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A Statistical Account of Bengal. 

PRESENTED BY THE 

SECRETARY OK STATE 

FOR INDIA 

By W. W. hunter, B.A., LL.D., 

DIRBCTOK-GSNBKAL OF STATISTICS TO THE COVBRNMBNT OP INDIA ; 

OMB, or THE COfNCIL OF THE ROYAL ASIATIC SOCIETY; HONORARY OR FOREIGN MEMBER OF THE 

ROYAL INSTITUTE OF NETHERLANDS INDIA AT THE HAGUE, OF THE INSTITUTO VASCO 

DA GAMA OF PORTUGUESE INDIA, OF THE DUTCH SOCIETY IN JAVA, AND OF 

THE ETHNOLOGICAL SOCIETY, LONDON ; HONORARY FELLOW OF 

THE CALCUTTA UNIVERSITY ; ORDINARY FELLOW OF 

THE ROYAL GBOGKAPHICAL SOCIETY, ETC. 



VOLUME XX. 

FISHERIES AND BOTANY OF BENGAL, 
BY SURGEON'MAfORS DAY, BUCHANAN-HAMILTON, KING, AND MR KURZ 

WITH 
GENERAL INDEX. 



TRUBNER & CO., LONDON, 1877. 



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PREFACE TO VOLUME XX. 



OF THE 



STATISTICAL ACCOUNT OF BENGAL. 



This Volume concludes the Statistical Account of Bengal. 
In sending forth a work which has occupied the last seven 
years of my life, I have a painful consciousness of its short- 
comings. The conditions under which it was executed render 
it silent on several points on which information might have 
fairly been expected, and leave much to be desired with regard 
to others. These conditions have been alluded to in the 
Preface to Volume I. The failures throughout a century of 
previous efforts, a single one of which cost the East India 
Company ^30,000, and left not a page of printed matter 
behind, had been accepted by the Government as a warning 
against elaboration of any sort. The state of public feeling 
induced by the Income Tax of 1869-70, precluded all inquiries 
which might re-awaken the suspicions of the natives with 
reference to fresh imposts, or prolong the popular sensitiveness 
and unrest. Historical disquisitions, or opinions on the social 
and economic conditions of the people, were deemed unsuit- 
able in a work which was to be revised by the Government, 
and to receive its official imprimatur. A general introductory 



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iv PREFACE, 

volume was, after being set up in type, withdrawn for this 
reason; and the unused materials extracted from the local 
records with a view to the District-history of Bengal, have 
been embodied in four printed volumes, which will appear 
hereafter as a separate work. The task assigned to me 
was to execute, under these conditions and in seven years, a 
Statistical Survey of Provinces containing a population more 
numerous than the inhabitants of England, Scotland, Ireland, 
Norway, Holland, Switzerland, and Italy put together. 
During the first three years, I collected, by means of letters 
and personal visits to the Districts, the local materials for my 
work. Except on special points, therefore, my statistics do 
not come further down than 1873: the year 1871 was the 
point of time at first prescribed. The fourth and fifth years 
were occupied in testing the information thus gathered, and in 
arranging it on a uniform system. The two remaining years 
have been devoted to reducing the materials to the shape in 
which they are now presented to the public. During fifteen 
months of this last period I have had the assistance of five 
junior members of the Civil Service in Bengal, and of two able 
coadjutors in England. To all these gentlemen, and to many 
others who have aided me as a labour of love during the long 
progress of the operations, I tender my sincere thanks. But 
for their kind help, the task could never have been completed 
within the period prescribed. 

Again, therefore, as in the Preface to my fir^t Volume, I 
beg that those who come after me will, in improving on my 
work, remember the conditions under which it has been done. 
It represents the first organised advance towards a better 
knowledge of the country. When I commenced the survey, 
no regular Census had been taken of India ; and the enumera- 
tion of 1872 disclosed that the official estimates had been 



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PREFACE, V 

wrong as regards Lower Bengal alone, by more than twenty- 
five millions of souls. No book existed to which either the 
public or the administrative body could refer for the most 
essential facts concerning the rural population. Districts 
lying within half-a-day's journey of the capital, and treated of 
at great amplitude in these Volumes, were spoken of in the 
Calcutta Review, with more truth than we can now believe 
possible, as "unexplored." Famines, agrarian agitations, 
tribal or sectarian movements, in short all the less common 
but inevitable incidents of Indian rule, were wont to take the 
Government by surprise. Even the past revenues of each 
District, and the gradual building up of its administrative juris- 
diction, were secrets which required much labour and patience 
to penetrate. The foregoing Volumes endeavour to reduce 
this element of the unknown, and to render the slowly acquired 
knowledge of the experienced few, the common property of 
the administrative body and the public. 



W. W. H. 
1877. 



Final Orders of the Government on the Statistical 
Account of Bengal, published by order of the Lieu- 
tenant-Governor ; Calcutta Gazette^ Dec. 20, 1876. 

EXTRACT. 

Para. 3. " Sir Richard Temple cannot but regard these re- 
sults with high satisfaction. Every volume of the statistical 
accounts has passed under his own personal supervision, and 
he is able therefore to testify to the quality of the work. The 
thanks of the Government of Bengal are emphatically due to 
you for the vigour and energy with which you have accom- 



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vi PREFACE. 

plished the collection of such diverse and varied information, 
and for the ability and literary skill which you have uniformly 
displayed in dealing with, sifting, analysing, and arranging 
materials supplied to you from so many quarters. 

Para. 4. " The Lieutenant-Governor's thanks are also 
accorded to the assistants who have laboured under your 
directions in compiling several of the accounts. The names 
of Mr J. S. Cotton, late Fellow and Lecturer of Queen's Col- 
lege, Oxford, Mr H. H. Risley, of the Bengal Service, and Mr 
C. A. Dollman, are especially mentioned in your letter. I am 
to request that you will communicate to each of these gentle- 
men an expression of the Lieutenant-Governor's thanks and 
approbation of their work. 

Para. 5. "It only remains that the Lieutenant-Governor 
should record his further acknowledgments to the district and 
sub-divisional officers under the Government of Bengal, who, 
with great personal trouble, have supplied, from their local 
knowledge and resources, the detailed information on which 
the whole of the statistical account of Bengal is necessarily 
based. The active co-operation of all officers in Bengal has, 
as you fully acknowledge, at all times been cordially extended 
to you in your inquiries. The Lieutenant-Governor congratu- 
lates you and your assistants, and the district officers of Ben- 
gal generally, on the successful completion of the statistical 
account of the Bengal Provinces." 



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TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

The Fish AND Fisheries OF Bengal, . . 1-120 
Introductory Note by Surgeon-Major F. Day, . 1-18 
Fisheries, &c., of Dindjpur, by Dr F. Buchanan- 
Hamilton, ..... 19-33 
Fisheries, &c., of Rangpur, by „ 35-53 
Fisheries, &c., of Purniah, by „ 54-67 
Fisheries, &c., of Bhigalpur, by „ 68-81 
Fisheries, &c., of Behar and Patnd, by „ 83-91 
Fisheries, &c., of Shahibdd, by „ 92, 93 
Fisheries, &c., of Gorakhpur, N.W.P., by „ 94-103 
Conclusion, by Dr F. Day, . . 104-120 

List of Plants found in Bengal and Assam, 

by Surgeon-Major G. King, . . 123-227 

General Index to Statistical Account of 

Bengal, . . . .231-425 



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For the scientific identification of plants, drugs, and animals in this 
as in the previous volumes, I am indebted to the various gentlemen 
mentioned throughout the work. In each case, my responsibility 
has been confined to obtaining the aid of the best knowledge on the 
subject which the Government departments could offer. Throughout 
I have had reason to be very grateful for the friendly spirit in which 
that aid has been given. 

During the progress of the work several rectifications of District 
boundaries have been introduced. Care has been taken to incor- 
porate such changes in passing the sheets through the press. But in 
all cases this has not been found possible. Thus, the arrangements 
mentioned as in progress, at p. 256 of Vol. V., for rectifying the 
Bdkarganj jurisdiction, have since been carried out, and the Midiri- 
pur Subdivision (with the exception of Gaumadf thdnd) has been 
transferred to Faridpur. I have exhibited this change in the map 

but not in the text 

W. W. H. 



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THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL, 

CONTRIBUTED BY 

SURGEON-MAJOR FRANCIS DAY, 

INSPBCTOR-GBNRRAL OF FISHERIES IN INDIA- 



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INTRODUCTORY NOTE, 

By Surgeon-Major Francis Day, Inspector-General op 
Fisheries in India. 

A FEW prefatory words seem necessary in order to explain how I 
obtained access to the MSS. of Dr Francis Buchanan,^ which have 
been so long withheld from the general reader. 

Dr Buchanan, subsequent to his employment in examining Mysore 
and Malabar, was engaged from 1807 to 1813 in making a minute 
investigation into the history past and present, as well as the natural 
resources in all its branches, of the various Districts then under the 
government of BengaL 

His exhaustive work fills twenty-one large volumes of MS., besides 
seven more of tables of statistics, all xof which have now been re- 
transferred from the India House to Hindustan, and are at present 
in the chaige of W. W. Hunter, Esq., LL.D., the Director-General 
of Statistics, who is engaged in utilising the materials they contain. 

Irrespective of the twenty-eight volumes alluded to, there are 
others in the chaige of the Asiatic Society of Bengal, but I shall 
only remark upon two, wherein are one hundred and forty-nine 
original coloured delineations offish, and forty-five copies.* These 
drawings were made for the purpose of illustrating the observations 
in the Statistical Accounts. 

Through the kindness of Dr King, of the Botanical Gardens in 

* Dr Fnuicis Buchanan subsequently assumed the surname of Hamilton. Cuvier 
however, suggested that although he signed himself by his new name in his 
" Fishes of the Ganges, '* he should be recognised amongst scientific writers as 
" Dr Hamilton Buchanan," as under the latter name he was best known amongst 
naturalists, In the notes in the following pages, he is termed '* Ham. Buch.'' 

> "On Hamilton Buchanan *s orginal drawings of fish, in the library of the 
Asiatic Society of Bengal, by Surgeon F. Day." — Proc, Asiatic Soc, of Bengal , 
i87i,p. 195. 



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2 THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL, 

Calcutta, I became possessed of copies of the correspondence which 
passed between Dr Buchanan and his successor on the former 
leaving India for Europe. 

Dr Hare, July 27th, 1816, in a communication to the chief 
secretary to government, observes : — " In a letter from the Right Hon. 
the Governor-General of the sth Januar>' 1815, His Excellency says : 
" By a letter from Dr Buchanan received here, it appears that he pro- 
poses to carry to Europe all the drawings of animals and plants 
collected by him during the tour which he was employed to make in 
this country. Dr Buchanan states that it is his object to request the 
Court of Directors to accept this collection as a present from him. 
Now, I apprehend that those drawings are already the property of 
the Hon. Court, the service for which Dr Buchanan was employed 
and paid having specifically been the furnishing government with a 
knowledge of the animal and vegetable productions of this country, 
delineations are essentially included in this service.' " . . . . The 
drawings were transmitted to government with the following letter, 
dated iSth February : — " I have been honoured with your letter of the 
31st ult, withdrawing the permission of the Hon. the Vice-President 
in Council for sending to the Hon. Court of Directors such drawings 
of natural productions as have been made at the public expense, 
and desiring me to deliver them to you, which I have accordingly 
done by the bearer. .... My abject in requesting that I 
might be permitted to present the drawings to the Court of Directors, 
did not originate in a view of claiming the merit of making a present 
to the Company oi its own property, but arose from a conviction that 
their being deposited in the collection at the India House, was the 
most probable n>eans of rendering them useful to science." 

Copies were made of these original drawings, consequently they 
" exist in triplicate, one copy being in the British Museum, where 
their free use is allowed."^ 

It is stated in the correspondence that Dr Buchanan sailed for 
Europe in 1 8 1 5 in the " Marchioness of Ely," taking with him " collec- 
tions of natural history,^ coins and Hindu manuscripts," which he 

* Dr Gunther, Zoological Record for 1869, p. 127. 

' Enquiries at the India House have not resulted in the discovery of any Zoo- 
logical specimens presented by Dr Buchanan to the Court of Directors of the East 
India Company. But in the " Catalogue of the Fishes of the British Museum," voL 
III., p. iv., the receipt is acknowledged of "a collection of fishes from Bengal, 
believed to contain many typical specimens of Buchanan Hamilton's work, pre- 



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INTRODUCTOR Y NOTE, 3 

presented to the Court of Directors of the East India Company. 
In 1822 he published the " Fishes of the Ganges," which contained 
numerous illustrations from the Indian drawings. 

In Chambers' " Lives of Scotchmen," it is remarked that Dr 
Buchanan, on his departure from India, was deprived by the Marquis 
of Hastings of all his extensive drawings and papers relating to every 
branch of natural history. ^ 

However, although Dr Buchanan evidently complained that some 
papers had been refused him, it has never appeared that such related 
to the fish and fisheries, as no such charge appears in his " Fishes of 
the Ganges." Whilst Mr Montgomery Martin,* who was permitted 
to publish a book from Dr Buchanan's MS., alludes so very casually 
to the Fish and Fisheries that it is useless alike to the pisciculturist 
and ichthyologist 

Fortunately when Dr W. W. Hunter was last in Europe, his 
attention was directed to these manuscripts,^ and he was permitted 
to bring them out to India for the purpose of utilising their contents. 
The whole of these books having been brought to Simla, I was 
shown them by Dr Hunter, and was requested by him to examine 
them for the purpose of ascertaining whether I could discover any 
allusion as to how the fresh water fisheries were worked at the com- 
mencement of the present century, as well as to how the MS. coloured 
figures of fish in Calcutta were referred to. 

To my surprise, I found not only detailed accounts of the fisheries 
and how they were worked, rented, and protected, but also detailed 
lists of the fish of the different Districts, with their native names, &c. 
Having obtained leave to make public the whole of the papers 
relating to the "Fish and Fisheries," my next question was, how 
could this be best accomplished without altering or curtailing a 
single word from the original descriptions. 

It appeared to me that the most useful plan would be to com- 
mence with a short account of the Fish and Fisheries * of the inland 

sented by G. R. Waterhouse, Esq." How these were obtained, and from 
whence they came, no information is given. The handwriting on the labels, in 
some at least, is very similar to that of the transcriber of Dr Buchanan's MS., and 
identical with that on the original drawings, which diifersi widely from that of Dr 
Buchanan himself, as shown in his personally kept "Journal." 

* M*Clelland, ** Transactions of the Asiatic Society of Bengal," vol. xix. 

« " Historical and Statistical Account of Eastern Bengal. " 

' Copies of some, at least, appear to be kept in the India Office library. 

^ See Report on the Freshwater Fish and Fisheries of India and Burmah» 1873. 



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4 THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL. 

Districts, many of which are the same as reported upon by Dr 
Buchanan. Secondly, to print verbatim the original manuscripts 
respecting the fish and fisheries as observed between 1807 and 181 3, 
to which I have added notes, mostly with reference to the name 
under which the same fish is to be looked for in the " Fishes of the 
Ganges." Lastly, I have given a short resumd of the innovations 
which have gradually crept in with respect to working these fisheries; — 
how, through want of supervision, the most deadly poaching practices 
are being freely carried on, to the impoverishment of these sources 
of food, and to the loss of the public in general, and the fishermen 
in particular. 



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THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL. 



In the following pages will be found Dr Buchatian's description of 
the condition and toodes of working the fresh-water fisheries in 
Bengal and contiguous Districts, between the years 1807 and 18 13. 
For the sake of comparison, soitie extracts have been added from 
reports made in 1870-71 of the present state of these same pieces 
of water and the fertility of their piscine inhabitants. 

Prior, however, to commencing these details, a brief description 
of the habits of the finny tribes which populate these fisheries may 
not be out of place. For whether the modes of preserving or using 
these pieces of water may have altered with time or not, the instincts 
of the indigenous fish must have continued unchanged. 

It seems therefore necessary to explain how it is that many sorts 
of tropical fishes can travel aCfoss land ; why they appear soon after 
the rains ; how plains, which, from being dry for months, become 
large lakes, and populated by fish ; and how some fish guard their 
ofispring until they are of sufficient size to capture prey for them- 
selves, and then drive thend away to do so, or should they refuse to 
go, destroy them. Irrespective of this, one niust observe that some 
fish are monogamous, others polygamous ; some niake nests for the 
reception of their eggs, others deposit them in the shallow water, in 
the sand, or amongst submerged grass or weeds. 

The fishes which frequent the fresh waters in India are divisible 
into two distinct classes: (i) the migratory ^ and (2) the non- 
migraiory^ amongst the latter of which must be classed those species 
which only travel short distances, for the purpose of depositing their 
eggs in some suitable locality, or in order to obtain a better or more 
palatable form of food. 

The migratory fish consist of two divisions : the marine, and the 



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6 THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL, 

strictly fresh-water ones. Marine fish enter firesh water either for 
predatory or breeding purposes. Thus the shad or Hilsa {Clupeo 
palasahy Cuv. and Val.), like the salmon in Europe, swarms up the 
larger rivers at the commencement of the S.W. monsoon, as it is 
only in fresh water that their eggs can be brought to maturity. If 
these rivers are not barred by weirs, they continue their ascent for 
some hundreds of miles, lay their eggs in suitable spots, and then 
return to the ocean as lean and poor in condition as a salmon out 
of season. 

But amongst many of the finest of the fresh water fishes, we 
see the same instinct exist The rivers of the plains to them, are 
what the ocean is to the shad, and they ascend up the mountain 
torrents, and turning into the side streams, deposit their ova, hav- 
ing done which, they drop down to the waters of the plains as they 
find the size of the mountain river begins to decrease. Returning 
downwards, it appears now to be the rule to throw weirs across every 
river, at each likely place, and thus to capture the descending fish. 
But the means employed for their destruction, will be alluded to 
further on. 

If the main rivers and streams, the highways of the migratory fish, 
are rendered so many places for the capture of those of every size, 
either ascending or descending, it might be erroneously concluded 
that no such destructive causes can affect the non-migratory fish. 
Here, however, it is necessary to observe, that although these latter 
fish are not destroyed in such large numbers in the weirs in the rivers, 
they have their own dangers to encounter. As the rains flood the 
country, they swarm into all side channels and minute streams, at 
which period their instinct teaches them to push on, and they do so 
in the most fearless manner. Then they can be easily knocked on 
the head with sticks, trapped as they are ascending, or should they 
have been so fortunate as to arrive at their breeding grounds, it is not 
difl[icult to place traps and fixed engines to take them and their 
young as they are endeavouring to return to the main streams or 
larger lakes. 

To enable fish to pass up miniature streams which are liable to 
suddenly dry up, or be cut oflf, certain means would appear to be 
requisite to allow these creatures to safely overcome such circum- 
stances. These we find they have been provided with, and such 
exist in the modes of respiration of some of these tropical genera. 
Consequently, before adverting to the subject of the sudden appear- 



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INTRODUCTION: RESPIRATION OF FISHES, 7 ' 

ance of fishes in Indian tanks after falls of rain» and their migra- 
tions during periods of floods, a few observations are necessary upon 
how they respire,* as some remarkable variations from the usual 
manner are observable, evidently to permit certain tropical species 
to resist causes which are not in existence in most extra-tropical 
regions. Three modes of respiration are perceptible : Jirst, the usual 
one of oxygen obtained, except under peculiar circimistances, from 
air in solution in the water, which is separated at the gills ; these 
may be termed for description, not definition, water-breathers ^ as the 
carps, Cyprininoe^ or some of the siluroids, as Macrones, and they 
can live, as a rule, without rising to the surface. If any of these 
fishes are placed in a globe of water at a moderate temperature, with 
a diaphragm of net precluding their reaching the surface, their 
breathing remains unaffected. If, on the contrary, a bandage is 
stitched around the gill-opening, precluding their employing their 
gills, they rapidly become suffocated. This result in another form 
is perceived to occur in India, either artificially or naturally. Thus, 
when the water in which they reside becomes suddenly changed from 
clear to very muddy, their gills become choked, respiration is impeded, 
and death results. Secondly^ some species which are, to a limited 
extent, " water-breathers," as already explained, are more essentially 
air-breathers^ having a compound respiration, consequently muddy 
water hardly affects them. Such fish never obtain oxygen for any 
length of time from the air in solution in the surrounding water, but 
inspire it direct from the atmosphere, no matter how cool and charged 
with air that water may be, and if unable to obtain it direct, they 
become simply poisoned by the circulation of carbon. Amongst 
these fish are the " climbing perch " (Anabas scandem), the Polya- 
canthus, Trichogaster and "walking fishes" {Ophiocephaii), all of 
which possess a cavity above the gills for the reception of air for 
respiratory purposes. 

The difference between the respiration of these two divisions of 
breathers is very apparent in an aquarium. Thus the Macrones 
carcio^ a " water-breather," keeps its gills constantly in motion ; but 
in the " walking fish " they are scarcely moved, at intervals it rises 
to the surface, opens its mouth, expels a bubble of gas, and having 
taken what it requires, descends. 

I instituted a considerable number of experiments (see Proc, 

* I omit the question of those species, as some of the loaches, which swallow 
air; or whether some genera do not absorb oxygen through the skin. 



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■ 8 THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL, 

Zoological Society of London, May 14th, 1868, p. 274) to investi- 
gate this question. Some live specimens of Ophiocephalus gachua 
were placed in a globe, which was filled two-thirds full of fresh water. 
A diaphragm of fine net was then stretched tightly across the inside 
of this globe, one inch below the surface of the water, thus effectually 
preventing them from ascending to the sur&ce to obtain a direct 
supply of atmospheric air ; death invariably ensued in a longer or 
shorter time, generally in accordance with whether they remained 
quiet or continued excited. A bandage stitched tightly around the 
gill openings, whilst it prevented their being used for respiratory 
purposes, did not appear to cause any inconvenience so long as they 
could inhale atmospheric air direct, and this although it was not 
removed for twenty-four hours. But it must not be considered that 
these fish are entirely prevented from decarbonising their blood if 
they are unable to obtain atmospheric air direct, as, although some 
died within the first forty minutes, others lived seven, and one seven- 
teen hours whilst below the diaphragm. In wet grass, at the end of 
three hours, those placed in it were found as lively as when first put 
there : one in a dry cloth lived for three hours and twenty-five 
minutes. 

In Burmah, the fishermefn appear to be practically acquainted with 
the fact of some fish, especially OphiocephcUidoi^ being air-breathers ; 
thus, after nearly all the water has been removed from the tank to 
be fished, leaving only about five feet of slimy mud, through which 
their bamboo net {gyan\ has been drawn, they are aware that many 
fine fish still remain. A large cloth or mat is spread over the mud, 
and left there two or three days, on removing which, the fish are 
seen stupefied and easily taken, their blood having become carbonised 
from a deficiency of oxygen, due to want of air for breathing. These 
fishes die when deprived of access to atmospheric air, not firom any 
deleterious properties in the water, but from being unable to de- 
carbonise their blood solely from the water, aerial respiration being 
indispensable. It seems that they can live out of water in moisture for 
lengthened periods, and for only a short and variable time in water, 
provided they are unable to obtain air direct : and that the cavity above 
the gills does not contain water, but has a moist secreting surface, in 
which the air is retained for the purposes of respiration, whilst it 
seems probable that the air, after having been employed for this 
purpose, is ejected through the mouth. 

Some of the venous blood appears in these fishes to be oxygenated 



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INTRODUCTION: BREA THING APPARA TUS OF FISHES 9 

at the gills, and the remainder in the superbranchial cavity by 
means of air ; but if they are kept under the water without being 
able to obtain direct access to it, this cavity, which is surrounded by 
bony tissue, becomes filled with water, which cannot be discharged 
owing to its almost non-contractile powers. Thus, there being no 
means of emptying it, and the contained water becoming carbonised, 
the whole of the respiration is thrown on the gills. This accounts 
for the reason that when an " air-breather " cannot reach the atmo- 
sphere, it lives longer in a quiescent state than in one of excitement, 
as there is not so much fuel being expended. This sluggishness, 
however, may be due to poisoned or carbonised blood. 

In some scaleless or siluroid fishes there exists an accessory breath- 
ing apparatus, thus the Clarias possesses a dendritic one on the convex 
side of the second, third and fourth branchiae, which has much the 
appearance of a bunch of red stick-coral ; this is received into a cavity 
posterior to that existing solely for the gills. In the scorpion fish 
{Saccohranchus) a long air-vessel of a pulmonic character (in addition 
to the air-vessel proper which is enclosed in bone) extends through- 
out the length of the muscles of the back, and anteriorly opens into 
the gill cavity. We see the same provision made for the eel-like 
Amphipnous. In short, this direct aerial mode of respiration is a 
wise provision to enable fish to migrate through moist grass and 
muddy channels, wherein '^ water breathing " could not be effected. 

A curious phenomenon in Indian fresh-waters, which indeed 
has never been satisfactorily explained, is the sudden appearance 
of healthy adult fish after a heavy fall of rain, in localities 
which for months previously had been dry. When pieces of water 
inhabited by fish yearly dry up, what becomes of them? On i8th 
January 1869, when examining this question, I was taken to a tank 
of perhaps an acre in extent, but which was then almost dry, having 
only about four inches of water in its centre, whilst its circumference 
was sufficiently exsiccated to walk upon. The soil was a thick and 
consistent bluish clay, from which, and not nearer than thirty paces 
to the water, five live fish were extracted from at least two feet 
below the surface of the mud. They consisted of two of the Ophio 
cephalus punctatus, and three of the Rhynchobddla acuUcUa. All were 
very lively, and not in the slightest degree torpid ; they were covered 
over with a thick adherent slime. Amongst the specimens of fish in 
the Calcutta Museum is one of Amphipnous cuchia^ which was dug 
up some feet below the surface of the mud, when sinking the founda- 



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lo THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL, 

tion for a bridge. If, when the water failed, fish invariably died, the 
tanks would be depopulated the succeeding year, unless a fresh sup- 
ply was obtained from some other source, whilst the distance from 
other pieces of water at which they reappear excludes, in many 
instances, the possibility of migration, which must always to a cer- 
tain extent be regulated by distance, time, and other local circum- 
stances. Some species, especially " compound breathers," are able 
to live in liquid mud, which they cannot employ for the purposes of 
aquatic respiration. The practical question arises, whether, when 
food and water fail, some fish do not aestivate until the return of a 
more favourable season ? Natives of India assert that they do thus 
become torpid in the mud. As the water in tanks becomes low, the 
fishes congregate together in holes and places in which some still 
remains, where they may be frequently seen in numbers, huddled 
together, with only suflftcient water to cover their dorsal fins. If 
disturbed, they dive down into the thick mud, so that a net is often 
found ineffectual to take them. The plan employed to capture them 
is for the fisherman to leave the net in the water, and to walk about 
in the surrounding thick mud ; in time they come to the surface to 
breathe, and fall an easy prey. As the water gradually evaporates, 
the fishes become more and more sluggish, and finally, there is every 
reason to believe that some at least bury themselves in the soft mud, 
and in a state of torpidity await the return of the yearly rains. 

In Ceylon, Mr Whiting, the chief officer of the western Province, 
informed Sir Emerson Tennent that he had accidentally been twice 
present when the villagers had been engaged in digging up fish. 
The ground was firm and hard, and '' as the men fiung up lumps of 
it with a spade, they fell to pieces, disclosing fish from nine to twelve 
inches long, which were full-grown and healthy, and jumped on the 
bank when exposed to light." Many other animals which possess a 
higher vitality than fish, aestivate during the hot months, as Batra- 
chians^ the Etnys^ the Lepidosiren annectens^ and some of the Croco- 
diles. Molluscs and land-snails are commonly found in this state 
during the hot and dry seasons. 

The subject of the migrations of fish during the periods of rain is 
of great practical importance, it being mostly effected for the pur- 
pose of breeding, ^but in some few instances is due to predatory 
fishes being in pursuit of their weaker neighbours. At the com- 
mencement of the rains fish become very excited and disturbed ; 
apparently unsatisfied with the localities they inhabit, they restlessly 



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INTRODUCTION: MIGRA TION OF FISHES. 1 1 

seek a change to other pieces of water. This may be owing to the 
same instinct which causes the migration of marine fish to the fresh- 
water, or the necessity of obtaining a suitable place in which to deposit 
their ova. It is generally at this season that some have.been observed 
travelling on land, and it has been imagined that places which are only 
occasionally covered by water become populated by fish after heavy 
showers of rain. The possession of the means necessary for loco- 
motion on land, combined with those for direct aerial respiration, 
frequently leads to the almost sudden appearance of fish in unex- 
pected places, and has given rise to numerous arguments and theories 
— amongst them, spontaneous generation, vivification of buried ova, 
migration, falling from the clouds, &c. 

Amongst persons testifying to having witnessed the migrations of 
fish is Mr Morris, government agent at Trincomali, who in 1857 
stated — " As the tanks dry up, the fish congregate in the little pools, 
till at last you find them by thousands in the moistest parts of the 
beds, rolling in the blue mud, which* is at that time about the consist- 
ence of thick gruel. As the moisture further evaporates, the surface 
fish are left uncovered, and they crawl away in search of fresh pools. 
In one place I saw hundreds diverging in every direction from the 
tank they had just abandoned to a distance of fifty or sixty yards, 
and still travelling onwards. In going this distance, however, they 
must have used muscular exertion sufiicient to have taken them half 
a mile on level ground, for at these places all the cattle and wild 
animals of the neighbourhood had lately come to drink, so that the 
sur£ice was everywhere indented with foot-marks, in addition to the 
cracks in the surrounding baked mud, into which the fish tumbled 
in their progress. In those holes which were deep, and the sides 
perpendicular, they remained to die, and were carried oflf by kites 
and crows. My impression is that this migration takes place at 
night or before sunrise, for it was only early in the morning that I 
have seen them progressing, and I found those I brought away with 
me in chatties appeared quiet by day, but managed to get out of the 
chatties at night Some escaped altogether, others were trodden on 
and killed." 

The Anabas scandens is able to travel short distances on land, 
and has been seen by many Europeans whilst thus engaged. This 
migrating propensity of some of the fresh-water fishes of the East 
was no secret to the ancient Greeks, who frequently commented 
upon it, and although the truth of their statements was impugned 

VOL. VII. B 



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12 THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL, 

by the Romans, the accuracy of their facts is above dispute. But 
the migrations of fishes during the rains is, perhaps, that which is of 
most consequence in fisheries. In fields irrigated from rivers or 
tanks, breeding-fish swarm up all water-courses for the purpose of 
depositing their ova, and should be protected as much as possible. 
As regards the marine fish which ascend rivers, as the hilsa or shad, 
the weirs which span rivers bar their upward ascent, and thus cut 
them off from their breeding-grounds. 

Closely allied, in fact inseparably connected with their migration, 
s the question of the breeding of fishes * in the fresh waters, which 
may be treated of in the following order: — ^non-migratory and 
migratory fish of the plains ; non-migratory and migratory ones oi 
the hills. Apparently, the migratory species produce the largest 
number of eggs, probably as a compensation for the increased 
chances of their destruction. Thus, in a migratory herring, the 
shad, Clupea palasah^ there were computed to be 1,023,645 eggs, 
and in a migratory barbel, 410,500 eggs, whilst carps in the hilly 
regions appear to have a larger proportion of ova than those in the 
plains. Amongst the non-migratory species, we likewise observe a 
difference : the monogamous not depositing so many as \^t polygamous 
as a general rule, which is probably due to two causes,— ^^rj/, in 
some localities the former seem to breed more frequently ; and 
secondly y they protect their offspring. Thus, a "monogamous" 
Ophiocephalus had only 4700 eggs, whilst a "polygamous" non- 
migratory carp, Cirrhina reba^ had 41,500, Amongst the shoals of 
hilsa which I have seen, more female fish were captured than 
males. 

Of the non-migratory hill fishes in the higher ranges, there are two 
situations in which they may breed : — the first is in water wholly or 
partially obtained from melted snows ; the second is in tributaries 
or affluents of the main streams, as already adverted to. It appears 
as if it were not merely the fact of elevation and difficulty of ascent 
which prevents more fish residing in the hill streams, but because 
some influence is exerted by the melted snow water, deleterious at 
least to the ova, if not to the fry. In the upper ranges of the 

* Whether fish, full of spawn, sestivate, and consequently are ready to deposit 
their ova as soon as the rains commence, is a question. Dr Buchanan, it will be 
observed, considered that the eggs themselves were deposited in the mud of tanks 
and hatched out at the next year's rains. Experiments of late years with ice 
have provei that the vivificatioa of ova may l)e retarded. 



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INTRODUCTION: MIGRA TION OF FISHES, 1 3 

Himilayas, personal enquiries lead me to believe that only the 
loaches, NemacheiluSy deposited and hatched their eggs in places 
where melted snow-water existed ; however, no climate appears too 
hot or too cold for them. The mountain barbels, Oreinus^ and all 
non-migraiory fish, breed in small or large streams off the main snow- 
replenished ones, or even in rivers which contain snow-water in the 
winter months, as in those around Simla, provided such is not present 
during the breeding season. The parent fishes appear to ascend these 
side streams with the first monsoon floods, and having deposited 
their ova, to return to the main river as the amount of water 
diminishes, or their retreat to the rivers of the plains would be cut 
off. The eggs not hatching in sufficient time for the young to pass 
down in any quantities to the rivers, the later fry become detained in 
these side streams until the next floods. Thus, when examining 
these places just prior to the burst of the S.-W. monsoon, thousands 
were seen in every small rivulet, whilst probably due to food being 
scarce, they seem to grow slowly. Consequently for the first year 
they remain very small, until the monsoon rains enable them to 
descend to the larger rivers, when with the floods large quantities of 
food are washed down. 

Of the migratory hill fishes, or those which ascend for breeding 
purposes, the various forms of large barbels, Barbtis, termed 
mah&sirs, fiimish good examples. These fish do not breed in the 
main snow-fed rivers, but do so in the side streams of the Sub- 
Himdlayan range. On the slopes of the Nflgiris I have observed 
the same occur, but with this difference, that they can deposit their 
ova in the main streams there, because they are small and not 
replenished by melted snows. The mahAsirs after breeding return 
to the main rivers, but the young are not generally sufficiently grown 
to descend to the plains. The foregoing appears to be the rule, 
to which, however, there are numerous exceptions; thus, if the 
mahdsirs are very large, they may have to deposit their ova in rivers 
near the base of the hills, owing to their being unable to ascend 
higher ; in these cases the young easily find their way into the main 
rivers of the plains. These fine fish having deposited their ova in 
the hill streams, and returned to the rivers of the plains, descend 
down their course in search of food, and if the upper portions of 
these rivers are not of much depth, their range is extended very 
far down; thus, I have seen numbers of mahdsir netted in the 
JamnA below Dehli, whilst returning up river towards their breeding- 



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14 THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL, 

grounds. A shoal of mahdsirs also descending rivers with weirs 
and irrigation canals, naturally turn into the latter, and having 
descended over one of the vertical falls, become unable to return to 
their breeding-grounds. 

: Of the non-migratory fishes of the plains^ the monogamous and 
ubiquitous walking - fishes, OPHiocEPHALiDiE, are perhaps best 
known. As a rule, these fish do not deposit such a number of ova 
as the migratory forms, but they appear to breed oftener. Some of 
them reside in tanks, others prefer rivers, where they live in deserted 
holes they find in the banks. The tank varieties delight in lying 
in the grassy edges, where the water is only sufficiently deep to 
cover them, so that they have no difficulty in respiring atmospheric 
air direct. In Mysore, Colonel Puckle observed that the " striated 
walking-fish " ( Ophiocephalus striattis) breeds twice a year, in June 
and December ; the male constructing a nest with his tail amongst 
the vegetation, and biting off the ends of the weeds that grow in the 
water. Here the ova are deposited, the male keeping guard, but 
should he be killed or captured, the vacant post is filled by his 
partner. When the fry are hatched out, they are defended by their 
parents with great courage. They may generally be perceived 
swimming just below the surface of the water a little above their 
progenitors. As they increase in size they are usually driven away 
by their parents, or are said to be even eaten by them if they do not 
disperse and search for subsistence for themselves. Some of the 
gobies, Gobius^ are probably monogamous, as they construct regular 
nests for the reception of their young. The polygamous non-migra- 
tory fishes of the plains are very numerous, but by " non-migratory " 
must be understood that they do not migrate long distances for 
breeding purposes. The smaller carps are innumerable in places, as 
are also the siluroid mdgurs, Clarias magur^ and the scorpion fishes, 
Saccobranchus fossilis. All these sorts during the rains pass up small 
water-courses or channels in order to deposit their eggs in irrigated 
fields, flooded plains, temporary formed tanks, or along the grassy 
sides of rivers. 

The minatory fresh water fishes of the plains, which do not 
apparently, as a rule, ascend to the rivers of the hills to breed 
during the freshes, are generally larger and stronger than the 
non-migratory. Amongst them there do not appear to be any 
of the spiny -rayed or Acanthopterygian order. Amongst the 
carps, Cyprinidce^ a considerable number are affected by the 



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INTRODUCTION: MIGRA TION OF FISHES. 1 5 

monsoons, and at periods of inundation migrate for the purpose of 
breeding. 

The migratory sea fishes^ as already remarked, are divisible into 
those which ascend rivers in order to find a locality suitable for 
depositing their eggs ; and the predatory sorts that also enter rivers, 
but solely to prey upon their weaker neighbours. Of those which 
ascend for breeding, is a Sctasna, the S, coitory some mullets, as 
Mugii corstilay and more especially the hilsa or shad, Ciupea paiasah, 
already remarked upon as ascending the larger Indian and Burmese 
rivers during monsoon months for the purpose of breeding. At 
these times there is too much water below such weirs as those span- 
ning the rivers in Madras or Orissa for this purpose, whilst, should 
they deposit their ova in shallows below them, they will be left high 
and dry as the floods subside, and their fertility be destroyed : the 
same destruction to their fertility would follow their being deposited 
in the deep and rapid parts of the rivers. More than one official 
has questioned the accuracy of this, and given the opinion of 
native fishermen that the ova is deposited in the river water, and 
whilst being carried out to sea becomes vivified ; therefore, weirs 
cannot injuriously <iffect the annual supply of the hilsa fishes in the 
rivers. The lower Kalerun (Coleroon) weir, which was built in 1836, 
spans the river about 15^; miles below the town of Combaconum ; 
its perpendicular height 8*3 feet, and its width at its base 8 feet. It 
possesses narrow under sluices, up which these fishes cannot ascend, 
whilst the rapidity of the current or other cause precludes them 
from passing over it Formerly the shad extended as high as 
Trichinnipalli in quantities, and were even taken miles above that 
town ; the fishing, according to the Collector, prior to the construc- 
tion of this weir, extended over 80 or 100 miles of the river, instead 
of its being concentrated, as it were, on a single spot. The fishing 
decreased until a breach occurred, when it almost ceased locally, 
owing to the fish being able to obtain access to their breeding- 
grounds, not being stopped by the weir, and they were taken 
even above Trichinnipalli. It decreased, doubtless, due to the fish 
being unable to breed ; the year after this breach, when it had been 
repaired, a great increase was observed in the fish, evidently due to 
one season's breeding. Depositing their eggs fruitlessly below these 
constructions, when between the sea and their spawning beds, and 
unable to pass them, extermination in such rivers will only be a 
question of time, should no remedial measures be adopted. This 
fish never breeds in tanks or canals. 



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1 6 THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL, 

As to the immature fry of fish, — ^where they are found, their 
means of subsistence, and opportunities of growth, are questions 
which it is very material to offer a few remarks upon. The fry of 
fishes are protected from their voracious parents in hill streams and 
rivers, by those localities being generally unequal to the supply of 
food for the mature or large fish, which migrate up these water-courses 
in order to deposit their ova : consequently, they drop down again 
into the rivers of the plains as the waters begin to subside, leaving 
the fiy to descend with the next year's rains. These fry, however, 
appear to likewise continue their descent in a very quiet and gradual 
manner, for when they have an opportunity of going down-stream, 
they avail themselves of it. In the Himalayas, numbers of these 
young fish descend into the kuls or canals for turning mills, where 
all are captured. Those which reach pools in these streams appear 
to often continue there throughout the dry months, unless destroyed, 
until the monsoon recommences. In the low country it is in irrigated 
or flooded localities that the fiy most abound, and generally with the 
monsoon rains every little stream and piece of water is resorted to 
by them to obtain food in. But by irrigated fields are not here 
included those irrigated by wells, but merely those in communication 
with running water and large tanks. In a large extent of irrigated 
country, the fields, which are divided off into embanked spaces in 
order to disseminate the water obtained from an irrigation canal, or 
embanked river or stream, the fry obtain an entrance along with 
the water which is kept at a depth which suits their puny size; 
whilst insect life abounds, excepting birds, they have few natural 
enemies but man to contend with. If irrigation is carried on by 
dipping water out of canals at some depth, and this does not run off 
again into any other water-course, the fry of course must perish as 
the water dries up. But if the water is conducted trom field to field, 
these localities should be excellent nurseries for young fish, but, as 
has been observed, they are now, as a rule, more useful in destruction 
than in propagation, as man is allowed to place traps at every outlet 
(and sometimes at inlets), and destroy all the young fish as they 
drop downwards towards the larger river. Fry also are found in 
abundance in sheltered spots at the edges of rivers and in shallow 
pieces of water, where there is no current to wash them away, and 
here an abundance of suitable food exists, but where, as will be 
shown, they do not escape the search of the fisherman and man's 
destructive greed. 



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INTRODUCTION: USE OF FISH AS FOOD, 17 

Before enquiring into whether a wasteful destruction of fish takes 
place in India, it will be as well to observe upon w?iat proportion of 
people in India and Burmah use fish asfood, or rather can do so without 
infringing caste prejudices. Amongst the various races inhabiting India 
and British Burmah, this article, as food, is held in different degrees 
of estimation, and in proportion to such must be its economic import- 
ance. In the Panjdb, comparatively but few of the inhabitants are 
prohibited by their religion from consuming fish, but there are many 
Hindus who reject it, as well as the rural population of some 
Districts. But of those residing in towns and in hilly ranges, it 
appears that, if the Br^mans are excepted, the consumption of fish 
is only limited by the paucity of the supply and the cost of the 
article. The price where fish is sold is stated, respecting the better 
sorts, to bear the same proportion to that of the best mutton, as 
the inferior does to that of inferior mutton, and varies from one-third 
that of mutton to an equal price with it. In Sind, fish is generally 
eaten by the population of the Province, whether Musalmdn or 
Hindu, except the Brdhmans. In the North Western Provinces, 
containing 30} millions of population, out of 20 returns re- 
ceived from native officials, 17 give more than half of the people 
as not forbidden by religious scruples to eat fish. In Oudh, the 
majority of the people appear to eat fish, which seems to be more of 
a necessity than a luxury, whilst a larger number would consume it 
were the supply equal to the demand. In the Bombay Presidency, 
the returns appear to show conclusively that the majority of the 
inhabitants of the inland Districts are consumers of fish when they 
can procure it In the Assigned Districts of Haidardbdd, fish, as 
food, is esteemed by a very large proportion of the residents. In 
Mysore and Curg, at least half the people are fish-eaters when they 
are able to obtain this species of food. In the Madras Presi 
dency great numbers are fish eaters, the largest exceptions being 
Brdhmans, goldsmiths, high-caste Sridras, the followers of Siva, 
Jains, &c. The Collector of South Canara gives the proportion of 
fish-eaters at 89 per cent. ; advancing southwards into Malabar, this 
proportion appears to decrease. In Tanjor and further towards 
Madras, exceptions to this strict carrying into effect 01 the rule of 
not consuming that which possessed animal life begins to be observed, 
but in many parts of the Presidency salt-fish appears to be preferred 
to the fresh, more especially by the lower castes. In Orissa, all but 
the Brdhmans and some religious fanatics seem to eat it, but not in 



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1 8 THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL. 

its salted state. In Bengal Proper, from 90 to 95 per cent, and in 
Assam and Chittagong, almost the entire population. In Burmah, 
the population, as Buddhists, profess a religious horror at taking the 
lives of the lower animals ; but being universally fond of a fish diet, 
they judiciously condemn the fishermen to eternal perdition, whilst 
they consume their fish in the form of nga-pee. Without entering 
more fully into this subject, it may be fairly advanced that fish is 
more suitable as a general food to the natives of the Indian Empire 
than the flesh of village sheep, pigs, and fowls, whilst the majority 
of the people eat it when they can procure it. 

Where no regulations exist as to the method in which fisheries 
should be worked, and should other circumstances be equal, that 
country or District which is most populated by man will be the most 
denuded of fish. Individuals would sooner live by fishing than by 
agriculture, as the trouble of capturing the finny tribes is less than 
tilling the soil, being simply catching without any idea of preserva- 
tion. Naturally, fish have been endowed with certain* means of 
increase, and protection, such as producing an enormous number of 
eggs or frequent breeding, or even by the action of periodic floods, 
when smaU-meshed nets cannot be used in rapid streams,* and by 
swamps covering a large extent of country, where shelter is afibrded 
by grass, rushes, &c, rendering vain man's attempt to depopulate. 
But, as inhabitants augment, watery wastes become drained and 
cultivated, predatory man increases hi^ methods of destruction, 
and then a decrease of food becomes apparent. As the price of 
food rises, so that of fish increases, and if the fish-eating population 
yearly becomes larger, increased exertions are used to capture fish to 
meet their demands : the size of the mesh is decreased, weirs are 
augmented, and everything taken, no matter how small, as fishermen 
never appear to consider from whence the next year's supply is to 
come, but only the easiest method to take at the present time all 
they are able. 

* This amount of protection does not extend to any great extent to the fiy of 
fishes, as they would be washed away by a rapid current, consequently they seek 
the shallows. 



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DINAJPVR DISTRICT-'MODE OF CATCHING FISH, 19 



FISHERIES OF DINAJPUR DISTRICT. 

Fish fomiing by far the greater part of the animal food that is 
consnmed in the District, the fisheries deserve particular notice. 
The demand being very considerable, and the supply being rather 
scanty, there is none exported, and salt is too expensive to admit of 
its being used in curing fish. The whole fish caught are therefore 
consumed in the country, and none are exported. During four 
months of the year, when the rivers are much swollen, fish is very 
scarce, for the animals have then such an extensive range, that they 
are not easily caught ; but, as the inundations subside, and when the 
fish are confined within narrow bounds, they are easily secured by 
various simple means which the natives employ, and a very large 
portion of those taken are secured when they may be said to be 
almost left sticking in the mud, by means that in most countries 
would be quite ineffectual. 

The most simple method, when a pond, ditch, or marsh has 
become nearly dry, and the fish of a large space have been collected 
into a small pool, is to divide it by dams of mud, and then, having 
throl^ the water from each successively, to catch the fish as they are 
left dry. This is usually practised by all the poor labourers, espe- 
cially in the ditches and pools near the rice fields, which are not let 
to fishermen by the landowners. 

It must be observed, that in about six weeks after the rainy season 
commences, every rice field, although quite dry and hard in spring, 
abounds with small fishes. They are certainly most numerous near 
rivers and marshes, from which they in general come; but I am 
inclined to think, as I observed in Mysore, that the eggs often con- 
tinue dry in the fields, and are hatched after they have been 
moistened by the rain. The natives account for their appearance 
in such places by supposing that they fall from heaven with the rain. 
The clerk (Muharrir) of the division Rdjdrdmpur, assured me, that 



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20 THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL. 

he had often seen them leaping among the grass as the shower fell. 
In fact, a person who is well disposed, can see anything ; like a very 
good Danish naturalist, who imagined that he saw a fish gravely 
walking up a tree, for he had been assured by the natives that such 
was the common practice. 

Where the water is deeper, and communicates with a large extent 
of low land, this method is improved by enclosing a square piece of 
shallow water, perhaps fifteen feet in diameter, with a mound of 
earth, and leaving an opening of about three feet wide in the side 
next the deepest water. The space within the dam is then filled 
with branches of trees, which attract the fish. After the branches 
have remained for some days, the opening is shut with a dam, the 
branches and water are thrown out, and the fish are secured. This 
also is chiefly practised by those who are not regular fishermen ; but 
when this plan is farther improved, it becomes one of the most 
effectual means of procuring fish that are employed in this District. 

In the old courses of rivers, called Bils, or in the courses of such 
as have little current, a large quantity of branches and twigs of trees 
are tied together and thrown into the water, so as to occupy a space 
of twenty or thirty feet square, fi-om the bottom to the surface. 
After they have remained from ten to thirty days, and the fish have 
entered into all parts, the branches are surrounded by a kind of 
screen called Bydnd, which is made of reeds (Ikiri) tied parallel to 
each other by means of twisted grass (Kese), and placed so close 
that the smallest fish cannot escape. These screens are about four 
feet wide, and of sufficient length to surround the whole heap of 
bushes. When this has been done, the bushes are thrown out, and 
the fish are secured by small bag nets (Chakoni), the moutfis oi 
which are fastened to hoops. 

The Bydnd or screen is sometimes used without having previously 
thrown in branches of trees. This is done in shallow water, where 
there are many weeds. A space is surrounded by the Bydnd, and 
all the fishermen go in with bag nets and secure the fish. 

This kind of fishing requires about seven men, who usually have 
two heaps of branches in the water for nine months in the year, or 
from about the middle of October until the middle of July, when 
the country becomes too much inundated. They draw one of these 
Bydnds once a week, and in the intervals of this labour, surround 
small spaces, as above mentioned, where no branches have been 
placed. 



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DINAJPUR DISTRICT'-MODE OF CATCHING FISH. 21 

These same fishermen employ a kind of trap called Ontd, which 
is made in the form of a truncated cone, four feet high> and from 
eighteen to twenty-four inches at the bottom. These traps are made 
of reeds, in the same manner as the screen, and the two edges are 
not ^tened together, but are bent in towards the cavity, so as 
gradually to approach each other. The fish can readily force its 
way into the cavity, 'but its efforts to come out are vain. The fish 
are directed to the opening by a screen placed on each of its sides, 
and, according to the situation of the fishery, these are disposed in 
two manners. 

The one is used during the dry season in shallow water-courses 
that are stagnant or have but little stream, and in such situations 
the screen extends the whole way across, and has traps at the 
distance of every twenty or thirty feet In the one at Akhdnagar, 
which was about 300 feet wide, a net was suspended over the 
screen, in order to prevent the fish from leaping over, for some of 
the carp kind leap with an agility equal almost to that of the salmon. 
This apparatus, called a Bdndh, procures a great many small fish, 
and is usually rented for a certain sum. 

The other situation chosen for this manner of fishing is much 
more common, as during the rainy season it is the only way in 
which these fishermen can procure employment. The screen is 
placed on the shelving side of a river, with one end to the shore, 
and the other as far into the water as possible, but it cannot be 
placed where there is a greater depth of water than four feet. 
Such a screen admits of one or two traps, according as the water 
deepens more or less suddenly, and one man manages two screens. 
The fish caught in this manner are much smaller than by the other 
method, but the quantity makes up for this defect These fishings 
with the Bydnd and Ontd are very productive, especially in the 
southern and western parts of the District, and require no 
boats. 

Still more simple traps are used. One called Polo and Tarpd 
is a basket with a hole in the bottom. In shallow water the fisher 
puts the mouth in the mud, and then passing his arm through the 
hole in the bottom, gropes for the fish which he may have secured. 
Another, called Jdkoyi, is a basket of an irregular three-sided form, 
open at one end, and has a bamboo shaft The fisher places the 
bottom flat on the mud, treads among the weeds before the open- 
ing, thus drives the fish into the trap, and then, suddenly raising the 



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22 THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL. 

handle, brings the opening above the surface. These two methods 
can only be practised in very muddy places covered with aquatic 
plants, and are commonly employed by labourers of the lowest rank 
to catch fish for their own use. 

The most simple net in this country is the Besdl, which is 
stretched between two bamboos that meet behind at an acute 
angle (about 75°), by which the fisherman holds. The net is of 
a triangular form, so as to apply to the bamboos, but is much 
bagged behind. The fisherman, walking up to the middle in the 
water, pushes the points of the bamboos along the bottom for a 
little way, and then raises them up to secure whatever fish may have 
come into his net The bamboos are from twelve to fifteen feet in 
length. 

The same form of net is enlarged so as to have bamboos nineteen 
cubits long, and is then used in a boat. A rower at each end 
manages the canoe, which is kept broadside on to the stream, and 
allowed to descend with it, and a third man lowers the points of the 
bamboos, which are fixed at right angles to the gunwale, and then 
occasionally raises them to secure the fish. This is one of the most 
common nets used by fishermen. Its mesh is small. The boat is 
16 or 17 cubits long by 2f wide, sharp at each end, and broadest 
abaft the middle. At the widest part of the boat two forked sticks 
project between three and four feet outwards and upwards from the 
gunwale, and a stick lashed between the forks serves as a lever, 
over which the bamboos of the net are raised and lowered. On the 
gunwale opposite to the net is a small outrigger, which serves as a 
balance. This kind of fishing may be carried on at all times, but 
the rainy season is the most favourable. Most of the fish caught 
in this manner are of the crustaceous kind. On die Mahinandd, 
a boat built of S41 will cost twenty rupees, and will last fifteen years, 
but it requires considerable repairs. The net is usually made of son, 
but sometimes of cotton, and, were it sold, would be worth ten 
rupees, but the fishermen usually make it themselves, and it costs 
only the materials. 

The same kind of net is still more enlarged, and is raised by a 
complicated machinery of bamboos. It is called a Chauri or Khord, 
and is fixed on the steep side of some river. A fiame of four strong 
bamboos supports the net, placed with its descending edge towards 
the mouth of the river, and also supports two sloping bamboos, 
on which a man walks, who has one end of a long rope round his 



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DIN AJ PUR DISTRICT— MODE OF CATCHING FISH. 23 

middle. The other end passes over a bamboo, for they have no 
pulley, and raises the net when the man walks down, and lowers it 
into the water when he walks up the sloping bamboos. The moving 
power is increased by a lever of bamboo, the heel of which rests 
on the bank, while the rope from the man's waist is fastened to the 
other end, and that again is connected with the bamboos of the 
net This is the most complicated machine that I have seen the 
natives employ, and seems to me very ill contrived. The net is 
quadrangular. Two comers are stretched to the bamboos, one of 
the other two comers is fixed to the bamboo lever, while the other 
is fijced to the end of a bamboo that projects over the river, which is 
fastened to where the lever and the two lateral bamboos join, and 
which is suspended by a rope from the frame, so that this comer 
should always be high. Ropes also pass from the bank to the two 
lateral bamboos, which prevents them from yielding to the stream, 
while a small bamboo from one of the lateral ones stretches out the 
lower edge of the net. Two men are employed at this net, one 
below, who is generally the proprietor, and who takes out the fish, 
the other walks backward and forward on the inclined bamboos, and 
is usually hired, getting 6-i6ths of the fish. These are generally 
small, and most are caught from about the middle of September 
until the middle of November, when the rivers are falling. 

Another kind of net, somewhat of a similar nature, would appear 
to be better fitted for such a large machine. It is called Chak or 
Jhiti, and is of a square form, a good deal bagged in the centre. 
Its angles are fastened to the ends of two bamboo bows that cross 
each other at right angles in the centre, which is suspended from 
the end of a bamboo lever, the other end of which rests against 
the bank, where the fisher sits. He lowers and raises his net by 
means of a rope that is ^stened to the far end of the lever. A large 
net of this kind, raised and lowered by a man on an inclined plane, 
with the assistance of a pulley, might be a good contrivance in 
muddy water. The Chak is used chiefly by poor fanners and 
labourers. 

The casting net is very much used. One from nine to eleven 
cubits in diameter, and called Bhomori and KhepU, is commonly, 
thrown from the shore or firom a boat. The mesh is small, and the 
sinkers are often merely earthen rings baked by the potters, but iron 
rings are also used for the purpose. If made of cotton, the net will 
last seven years ; if made of son it will last only four, and will cost 



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24 THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL, 

from eight to ten rupees. If the net is thrown from a boat, two men 
are required for this fishery, one to throw the net and another to 
manage the boat This latter and the boat are usually hired by the 
man who fishes with the net, and who allows the boatman 6-i6ths 
of the fish that are caught. The boat is only 13 or 14 cubits long 
and 2\ broad, and costs on the Mahinandi about 14 rupees. Small 
fish, especially of the crustaceous kind, are chiefly caught in this 
manner, which is only used in the dry season. 

A much larger kind, 38 cubits in diameter and called OthAr, is 
frequently employed, and is thrown by means of a long narrow boat, 
.which must be rather longer than the diameter of the net. This is 
gathered carefully into the boat, one edge being taken in first, and 
then one fold is placed above another. The boat is rowed into the 
stream, and by a rower at each end is placed broadside on. Two 
other men then throw over first one edge of the net, and as the boat 
drives, they throw gradually the remainder. The whole sinks to the 
bottom, and the boat is allowed to drive until the edges of the net 
have been dragged close to each other, when the net is drawn to the 
shore. Very large fish are caught in this manner. 

The natives use the seine, of several sizes, and different names. 

The Pahiljal of Ghordgh^t is a seine composed of several pieces, 
about II cubits wide by 12 cubits long, which belong to diflferent 
fisherman, six or seven of whom unite their stocks, and join their 
different pieces into one net The centre pieces are the widest, the 
mesh is small, the floats are gourds, and the weights are rings of 
potters' ware. It is thrown out in the usual manner from the stem 
of a boat, and requires six or eight men to draw it. The fish are 
divided equally, the owner of the boat taking half a share more than 
the others. 

At Pdtnftali, on the Atr4i, the large seine is called bed, and is 
made in one piece, 60 fathoms long and 10 or 11 cubits wide in the 
centre. It is floated by the spongy stems of the soli ( Aschynomene 
diffusa^ W.), and sunk partly by iron rings, and partly by those made 
of baked clay. The twine made of son would cost ten rupees ; but 
the plant is usually reared by the men, and spun by the women in 
intervals of labour, so that no estimate can be formed of its value. 
The boat is made of mangoe-wood, costs about three rupees, but 
lasts only two years. Six men are required; the proprietor 
of the net and boat takes 6-i6ths of the fish, the remainder is 
divided equally among the other five men ; so that a capital of 



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DINAJPUR DISTRICT—MODE OF CATCHING FISH, 2 

less than sixteen rupees is reckoned adequate to the labour of 
two men for the rainy season, at which time only this net is used 
in the river. At all seasons it is used in tanks. The largest fish 
are caught by it, such as Rohit or Rui, KAtal, and Chital. 

The Tdnd is a smaller seine of fine twine, about 90 cubits long 
and 3 cubits wide. It is floated by cuttings of a spongy reed 
called Ulu Kh^igr^ and sunk by rings of potters' ware. One 
man goes with the boat, and another holds the end that is lefl on 
shore. I should have supposed that the man in the boat had 
most trouble, but his situation is considered as preferable. This 
net seems well fitted for clear water, a shallow river, and sandy 
bottom. Two or three nets of this kind are sometimes joined 
into one. 

The Tune is a small drag net that is well fitted for fishing in 
shallow water among weeds. It is about 20 cubits long and 5^ 
cubits wide, and has neither floats nor sinkers. A row of sticks, 
about 2 feet long and 2 feet from each other, unite the two side 
ropes, so that the net bags behind. A man at each end goes into 
the water, until both are about 3 feet deep ; they then immerse the 
net, and drag it towards the shore with one end of the sticks touch- 
ing the ground. 

In the Mahinandd, which is frequented in the rainy season by the 
fish called Ilish, or hilsa, four other kinds of nets are used. They are 
called Khurkf, Sanguld, Konayu, and Ber ; but as I was there at an- 
other season, I had no opportunity of seeing them, and cannot describe 
them from the accounts of the natives. This fishery lasts from about 
the middle of June until the middle of October, and two very fine 
kinds of Cyprinus, the Rohit or Rui and Kdtal, are frequently caught 
in the same nets. 

Wherever the fishery is of such importance as to employ regular 
fishermen, the landlord exacts a revenue, which seems judicious and 
proper, because the proprietors are interested to improve the fishery, 
and to take care of the people employed ; for I am persuaded that a 
common property is in general neglected, and turns out of little or 
no advantage either to the public or to individuals. In this District 
the property in the fisheries (Jalkar) has in many places been 
separated from that of the adjacent land, which seems to me to be a 
great loss, as it is the proprietor of the neighbouring land alone that 
can take care either of the fish or fishermen. Yet probably some 
specious reason was held out for the separation, which, I am told, 



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26 THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL. 

was made when the Riji's estates were sold for arrears of revenue, 
and the sales were, of course, conducted by the Collector. I heard, 
however, no reason assigned for such a separation, and must con- 
fess that I know of nothing rational which can be alleged in its 
defence. Even the fish in ponds do not always belong to the 
proprietor of the banks, who, of course, will never take care to 
stock them, and who is the only person that can prevent poaching, 
so that probably not one-fourth of the fish is produced for use that 
might be by proper care. The same may be said of Bils or water- 
courses. 

The duties that are levied on the fishermen are in general mode- 
rate enough, and do not amount to a considerable sum. The 
largest proprietor of whom I heard (Balardm Joti) receives only 
2000 rupees a year, and I believe that part of this arises fi-om 
some duties which he levies on ferries. The proprietors generally 
let their fisheries from year to year, and the farmers (Ijdrddirs) 
sometimes employ fishermen to catch the fish, either for wages or 
for a share ; and sometimes levy so much money for each man or 
boat employed. Thus a water-course (Bil) in the Mdldah District 
pays to the proprietor 130 rupees a year. The farmer employs 
fourteen men to fish with the Bydni, and these give him one-half of 
the fish. They fish for nine months in the year, and each can make 
about four rupees a month, out of which, however, they have to 
deduct all expenses ; but these are inconsiderable, as they require 
no boat, and make the whole apparatus. The farmer therefore 
receives about 500 rupees, out of which is only to be deducted 
the rent, and the charge of watching to prevent imposition. Small 
traders come and purchase the fish, which they retail at different 
markets. 

These fishermen, when they fish with the trap (Onti), pay two 
rupees a head for the season of three months. Their profit is then 
still greater, and they have a remarkably good market in. the manu- 
facturing towns. Those who fish on the Mahdnandi pay twelve 
dnds a head yearly for the dry season, and the same sum, with four 
rupees for each boat that is wrought by five men, if they are 
employed in the Ilish fishery. In this case, the more wealthy men 
furnish the boats and nets, and take one half of the fish, while each 
man pays his share of the duty. The profits of those who fish with 
nets and boats, is more considerable than of those who use the 
screen and the traps. 



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DINAJPUR DISTRICT-FISHING POPULATION. 27 

Near Mildah, the traders who retail fish have some capital ; in 
other parts they are in general very poor, and the fish are often 
retailed by the wives of those who catch them. 

The rent in most other parts is lower, and the fishermen poorer 
than near Mdldah. At Ghordghdt, for instance, on a noble river, each 
fisherman pays five inds a-year, and fishes in whatever manner he 
pleases. His monthly gains are reckoned fi'om two or three rupees. 
On the Atreye (Atrti) at Pdtnitald each fisherman pays six inds a 
year j but then, except fi-om the chief men, ten hii& more are said 
to be exacted as presents, making the whole duty one rupee a head, 
and they may fish in whatever manner they please. At Fatirdm, 
each fisherman pa3rs one and a-half rupees a-year. Fishermen in 
general are not so poor as the common labourers who are employed 
in agriculture, and many of them live like formers who have two 
ploughs. The whole number in the District may be about 2,500 
houses. 

The [following table, showing the present population of the Dis- 
trict, and the total fishing population, &c., is taken firom the Census 
Report of 1872 :— 



District. 


'^t^r 


Total adult 
males. 


PercenUge 

of adult 

males to 

the whole 

popolatioii* 


Total 
fishing 
popula- 
tion. 


Number 

of 
Fishei> 
men. 


Number of Fish- 
mongers. 


Number 

of 

Net 

makers. 


Males. 


Females 


Total 


Dinajpur 


1,501,924 


482,736 


321 


31,206 


4164 


... 


III 


III 


18 



Varieties of Fish — 

I. TenpA^ Tetrodotty a bad small fish, reckoned impure by the 



Good fish, resembling eels 
in taste. 



Brihmans. 

2. V6m^ Macrognathe armd^ 

3. GongHy Macrognathe aguillonnd' 

4. Gdnger GongHy Macrognathe.* 

5. Bdliydj Gobie eleotre ? '^ a small but good fish. 

6. Khalishdy Trichopode,® a beautifiil small fish. 

1 TOrodonfluviaiUisy Ham. Buch. Fishes of Ganges, p. 6, pL 30, f. i. 
' Macrognathus armatuSy Lac^., Fishes of Ganges, p. a8. 
' Macrognathus acuUaius, Lacep., Fishes of Ganges, p. 29. 

* Macrognathus panctUus^ Ham. Buch. Fishes of Ganges, p. 30, pL 17, f. 7* 

* Cobiusgmris, Ham. Buch., Fishes of Ganges, p. 51, pi. 33) ^- I5- 

* Triehopodus colisa^ Ham. Buch. Fishes of Ganges, p. 117, pL 15, f. 40. 
VOL. VII. C 



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28 THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL. 

7. 6i?/i/,^ Opheocephale. "] Much used by the natives, 

g f Garayi 1 OoheoceDhale karawev^ U''^ ""^^ indiflferent eat- 

9. Cheng^ Opheocephale.^ J tremely tenacious of life, 

is often found wriggling from one pool to another, when there has 
been a heavy rain. It is one of the kinds which are supposed to fall 
from heaven with showers of rain. 

ID. Kai^ Lutjan grimpeur.^ This is a fish very much esteemed 
by the natives, and one of those supposed to fall from heaven. They 
also have a fable of its being able to climb a cocoa-nut tree. It is 
with the utmost astonishment that I perceive M. Lacep^e carried 
into this error by a foolish account, published in the Linnaean transac- 
tions. I should rather have classed this fish with the Holocentres, and 
M. Lacep^de has probably taken his account entirely from the before- 
mentioned source. This animal is remarkably tenacious of life, and 
I know can live a whole day without water. It is very well tasted, 
but full of bones, and is reckoned a restorative. 

1 1 . Chdnddy Centropome. ) These fish are very common, but 

12. Rdngd chdnda. Centropome.^ > are too small for being dressed 

13. Nam chdnddy Centropome.® ) ^^ ^^ European manner. 

14. Bhedi^ Holocentre. This fish has a strong resemblance to 
the Kai in its external appearance, tenacity of life, and dietetic 
qualities. 

15. Pangiydj Cobite.® A small fish little esteemed. 

16. Mdgury Macropteronote grenouiller,* an ugly fish, but very 
much esteemed by the natives, who consider it as very strengthening. 
I think it is far from being pleasant to the taste. 

» Ophiocephalus marulius^ Ham. Buch. Fishes of Ganges, p. 65, pi. 22, f. 19. 
' Ophiocephalus laia. Ham. Buch. Fbhes of Ganges, p. 63, pi 34, f. 18. 
' Ophiocephalus gachua^ Ham. Buch. Fishes of Ganges, p. 68, pi. 21, £. 21. 

* Coius cobcy'iuSf Ham. Buch. Fishes of Ganges, p. 98, pL 13, f. 33. Lieutenant 
Daldolf, who described this fish under the name of Perca scandens^ does not assert 
that it climbs "a cocoa-nut tree," but that he took one fix>m the deft of " a palm- 
ira tree," five feet above a tank, and the leaves of which commence from dose 
to the ground. The Tamils term it in places, according to Dr Jerdon, *' Panni- 
eyri," or " climbers of palmira trees. 

* Chanda ranga^ Ham. Buch. Fishes of Ganges, p. 113, pL 16, f. 38. 

* Chanda noma. Ham. Buch. Fishes of Ganges, p. 109, pL 39, f. 37. 

* C<nus nanduSf Ham. Buch. Fishes of Ganges, p. 96, pL 30, f. 32. 

^ CobiHs pangia. Ham. Buch. Fishes of Ganges, p. 355, MS. drawings No. 51. 

* Maaropunmotus magurt Ham. Buch. Fishes of Ganges, p. 146, pi. 26, f. 45. 



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DIN AJ PUR DISTRICTS-LIST OF FISHES, 29 

17. Kamdch singiy Silure [FossUe.^ A fish very much resembling 
the former in appearance and qualities. It is reckoned impure for 
Br^Ehmans, who eat the other readily. 

18. Pobd, Silure,* a small pretty fish, of an excellent flavour. 

I Baydli > Silure,' a large ugly fish, which often grows to six 
'^'1 KeydU ) feet in length. By the natives, it is thought good, 
but does not suit my taste. The Brdhmans consider it impure. 
20. Labhuya^ Silure. 



Large ugly fishes, but thought 
very good by most natives. 



2T. Gdgrd, Pimdode barbu ? 

22. Riidy Pimelode.* 

23. Ariy Pimelode.*^ 

24. Bdgh Arty Pimelode.® 

25. Gdgoty Pimelode, a small fish, with many bones. 

26. Vdchdy Pimelode,^ a fish about the size of a herring, and con- 
sidered as very good by the natives. 

27. BdnS'patarif Pimelode, a beautiful small fish, which, from its 
shining colours and shape, is, by the natives, compared to a bamboo 
leaf. 

28. Tengordy^ Pimelode, a small pretty fish that the natives think 
veiy good. 

29. KdnkUdy Esoce,^® an excellent small fish. 

30. Pdnchoky Esoce,^^ a very small fish. 

31. Ghoboly Muge,^* a fish about a foot long, which swims with 
its eyes above water. It is very good to eat. 

32. Telaty Clupee,^*^ a fish about the same size and value. 

33. Phaluyi}^ Myste, a fish about the same size and value. 



^ Silurus singioy Ham. Buch. Fishes of Ganges, p. 147, pL 37, f. 46. 
' SUuruspabda^ Ham. Buch. Fishes of Ganges, p. 150, pL 25, f.47. 
' Silurus boalisy Ham. Buch. Fishes of Ganges, p. 154, pi. 29, f. 49 

* Pimdodus rita^ Ham. Buch. Fishes of Ganges, p. 165, pL 24, f. 53. 

* Pimelodus arius. Ham. Buch. Fishes of Ganges, p. 17a 

' Pundadus bagarius, Ham. Buch. Fishes of Ganges, p. 186, pi. 7, f. 62. 
' Pimdodus vacka^ Ham. Buch. Fishes of Ganges, p. 196, pi. 19, f. 64. 
" Pimdodus anguis^ Ham. Buch. Fishes of Ganges, p. I So, pi. 29, £ 59. 

* Pimdodus carcioy Ham. Buch. Fishes of Ganges, p. 181, pL 3, f. 61, errone- 
ously termed P, tengara, 

^» Esoxeandloy Ham. Buch. Fishes of Ganges, p. 213, pL 27, f. 7a 
" Esox panchaxy Ham. Buch. Fishes of Ganges, p. 211, pL 3, f. 69. 
" Mugilcomdoy Ham. Buch. Fishes of Ganges, p. 221, pL 9, f. 97. 
" Clupea tdaroy Ham. Buch. Fishes of Ganges, p. 241, pL 2, f. 72. 
'♦ Mystus kaptrat^ Ham. Buch. Fishes of Ganges, p. 235. 



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30 THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL, 

34. Qhitaly Myste.^ This grows to a very large size, and is a rich, 
fine-tasted fish ; but the higher castes do not like it, because it feeds 
on dead animals. 

35. KaroH? Clupanodon, a small fish of little value. 

36. Chdo? Cyprin. This is one of a numerous tribe of Indian 
fishes, which resemble the Cyprin clupeoide. It is very common in 
every part of Bengal, but is of little value. 

37. Eiango,^ 



38. Sangpuyi,^ 

39. Doftgriko,^ 

40. Debofi? 

41. TitpunM^ 

42. Punthi,^ 



These are all small species of the Cyprin, 
which are very common, and much used by the 
natives, but are very poor eating. Some of them 
are very beautiful, especially Nos. 39 and 40; 
Nos. 41 and 42 are the best for eating. 

43. Saran-pufiihi^ Cyprin Bulatmai? A beautiful fish which grows 
to two feet in length. It is not much valued. 

44. KdlbasUj Cyprin,^® an ugly black fish strongly resembling, the 
Barbel. It grows often to a foot and a half in length, and sometimes 
to double that size. It is considered by the natives as a good fish, 
and is both light and well tasted ; but it has many small bones. 

45. Eohit, Cyprin.^^ Rut of the English in Bengal. This is 
one of the most beautiful of fresh-water fishes, being finely shaped, 
and elegantly adorned with green, purple, gold, and silver, constantly 
changing one into the other. It thrives well in ponds, but is best 
where found in running streams. The fish is much and deservedly 
valued, being light and well flavoured. It is only inferior to the fol- 
lowing in not being so rich. It grows to about three feet in length. 

46. Kdial^ Cyprin.^* When taken from rivers with a good stream. 



> Myshis chitala. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 236, Reproduced in "Illustra- 
tions of Indian Zoology." 

' ? Clupanodon chapra. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 248. 

• Cyprinus bacaila^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 265, pL 8, f. 76. 

• Cyprinus rasbora. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 329, pL 2, f. 9a 
» Cyprinus cotuh Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 339, pi. 39, 1. 93. 

• Cyprinus danricoy Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 325, pi. 16, f. 88. 
' Cyprinus devario. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 341, pi. 6, f. 94. 

' Cyprinus Htius^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 315, MS. drawing present 
in 1839. 

• Cyprinus puntioy Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 318. 

"° Cyprinus calbasu. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 297, pi. 2, f. 83. 
*^ Cyprinus rohiia^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 301, pi. 36, f. 85. 
»« Cyprinus catla^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 287, pL 13, f. 81. 



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Small jfishes of little value. 



DINAJPUR DISTRICT^UST OF FISHES. 31 

this is perhaps the best fresh water fish in the world. The body is 
white, light and firm, and the head and belly are remarkably fat 
without being luscious or heavy. It grows to a very large size, and 
weighs from 16 to 50 lb. Though only a clumsy made fish, it is 
remarkably active and strong, and frequently springs over the net 
with great violence. Its colours are not remarkable for beauty. 

47. Kuchiyd^ Unibranchaperture.^ An eel as good as the kind com- 
mon in Europe. The natives rejectitfrom its nearapproach to a serpent. 

Besides these, I observed many other fishes in the District, especi- 
ally the following: — 

48. Khaskhasiydy Muge,' a small fish. 

49. Dari? Cobite. A beautifiil small fish. 

50. Korkirtengord^^ Pimelode. 

51. Kavasi'tengpri^ Pimelode.^ 

52. Rdm-tengprd^ Pimelode.® 

53. Changrdrmdrd^ Pimdode.^ 

54. Uruyay Pimelode.® 

55. SUan^ Pimelode.^ A large ugly fish much used by the natives. 

56. Chakunddy Clupanodon.^^ A small fish of little use. 

57. Jlishy Clupanodon.^^ I have already mentioned the fishery of 
this species in the Mahinandd, which is almost the only river in this 
District which it frequents. This species is called Sable-fish by the 
English, and is the most important in Bengal It has a strong 
resemblance to that called la Feinte by Lacep^de, but has no teeth. 
During the floods it ascends in immense numbers to spawn in the 
Ganges and its larger branches for 500 miles from the sea, and 

* Umbranchapertura cuchia^ Ham. Bnch. Fish. Ganges, p. 16. 

* MugU cascasia. Ham. Buch. Fish Ganges, p. 217, MS. drawings, No. 68, 
Af. KaskaHya, 

' Cobiiis dariOi Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 354, pi 29, f. 95. 

* Pimdodus tengara^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 183, pi 23, f. 60, where it 
is erroneously marked P, batasiusy and is amongst the MS. drawings, No. 22, as 
Pimdodus kurki, 

A Pimdodus cavasiusy Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 203, pi 11, f. 67. 

• IHmdodus rama. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 176, pi 3, f. 55. 

' Pimdodus chandramara^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 162, MS. drawings, 
Na 13. 

• Pimdodus urua, Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 177, and MS. drawings. No. 
15, as P. urua. 

• Pimdodus sihndia. Ham. Buch. ^sh. Ganges,, p. 160, pi 7, f. 50. 
^^ Clupanodon chacunda^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 246. 

" Clupanodon ilishay Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 243. 



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32 THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL, 

retires as the rivers decrease. It is usually about a foot and a half 
long, and is a rich, highly flavoured fish. In taste it resembles some- 
what both the salmon and herring, to which last it has the strongest 
affinity. It is, however, rather heavy and difficult of digestion, and 
contains a vast number of small bones, so as to require much precau- 
tion in eating. These bones are destroyed, when it is cured with 
tamarinds, and the fish then becomes a very relishing morsel. 

58. Feyali} Cyprin, a small fish of little value. 

59. Kurso, Cyprin.^ This sometimes grows to a foot and a half 
in length, but is little valued. 

60. Hayalif Cyprin.* ) 

61. Tilo, Cyprin.4 i '^^^ '°^^ ^'^^' ^^ ""^^ ^^^"^• 

62. MrigcU^ Cyprin.^ A most beautifid fish like the Rohit, and 
almost as good, but it does not grow to quite so laige a size, being 
seldom found more than two feet in length. 

63. Kharkifi ) These are two beautifid fishes, somewhat between 

64. BhanganJ ] a carp and a mullet, as their lower jaw resembles 
that of the latter. They grow to about a foot in length, and are 
tolerably good to eat 

The crustaceous fishes are perhaps more valued by the natives of 
Bengal than the fish properly so-called, and are excellent seasoning 
to eat with a food so insipid as rice. In some parts, especially near the 
sea, they are of many dififerent kinds and sizes, firom that of a shrimp 
to those which are larger than lobsters. Those that are mostly used 
are of the oblong kind, and are called by the generic name, Chingri. 
In almost every ditch near the sea they are found in myriads, but in 
Dindjpur, except near the Mahdnandi and the lower part of the Kara- 
toyi, they are very scarce. In the Mahdnandi there are three kinds : — 

I- Jhingo^ a small prawn. 

2. Tenguyo^ a large prawn. 

3. MauhOf a crawfish, which is about fifteen inches in length, and 
as much in circumference. 

Crabs firequent the fresh waters of Bengal, and are distinguished 

^ Cyprinus barila^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 267, MS. drawings Na 134. 

' Cyprinus cursa, Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 290, MS. drawings No. 1 19. 

' Cyprinus hoalius^ Ham: Buch. Fish. Ganges, p> 336. 

* Cyprinus iila^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 274. 

" Cyprinus mrigala^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 279, pL 6, f. 79. 

' Mugii corsula^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 221, pi.* 19, f. 97. 

' Cyprinus danga^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 281, MS. drawings No. 103. 



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DIN A yPUR DISTRICTS-LIST OF FISHES. 33 

from the oblong kinds of crustaceous fishes by the generic term 
Elinkaid. They are reckoned much inferiqr to the long-shaped 
fishes of this kind, and are, indeed, considered impure by the higher 
ranks, who eagerly devour the others. In this District there are many 
crabs, but few of them grow to a size that would fit them for a 
European table. They are chiefly found in the parts near the Nagar 
Tdngan and Punarbhabi that in the^ rainy season are entirely inim- 
dated. When the inundation retires, these parts ipay be observed 
covered with little heaps of earth about a foot high and eight inches 
in diameter, and in the top of each is a perforation. Under these are 
the lurking places of the crabs, which retire there for the dry season, 
and live in pairs. According to the report of the natives, these animals, 
as the water subsides, dig perpendicular shafts about three inches in 
diameter and seven or eight cubits deep, and when at that depth they 
form a chamber about a foot in diameter, which contains water until 
the next inundation, and in which a male and female crab take up 
their residence. I attempted to dig several, but being too early in the 
season, the water always rose upon me before I reached the chamber. 



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RANGPUR DISTRICT'-CROCODILES. 35 



FISH AND FISHERIES OF RANGPUR 
DISTRICT. 

In the Brahmaputra^ as well as the Ganges, there are two kinds of 
crocodile, which at Godlpdrd are both called Kumir^ but each has 
a specific name. The Crocodilus Gangeticus'^ is called Gharidly and 
the other is called Banchd? This approaches so near in its form to 
the crocodile of the Nile, that for a long time I considered it as the 
same ; but its manners are very different from those attributed to the 
animal of Egypt ; and in the lower parts of Bengal we have what 
appears to me another species of crocodile called Hansa Kutniry the 
manners of which seem more conformable to the descriptions of the 
Nilotic quadruped 

The G^burte, who also kill both kinds of crocodile, inform me 
that they have killed the Bonch£ 15 feet in length, and one of this 
size is much heavier than a Ghariil of 18 feet long, which is the 
largest that they have seea In the water, the Bonchd attacks both 
men and cattle, but on shore he is shy and timid, and it requires 
great caution to be able to approach near him, as on the least noise 
he rushes to the water. The Bonchd usually frequents ponds and 
marshes, and it is only when these become entirely dry that he retires 
to a river. He lives in holes which he digs in the bank of the 
pond or river, and I knew a party of hunters who were a good deal 
surprised, if not alarmed, by digging out a crocodile when they ex- 
pected only a harmless jackal. In these holes they lay from twenty 
to thirty eggs between the loth of February and the loth of March, 
and the old ones take care of the young for a month, and give them 
fish to eat, after which they are able to provide for themselves. 

The Ghari^ is esteemed a much purer animal than the Bonchd, 
and never lives in stagnant waters nor in holes of the earth. It never 
attacks men or cattle, and lives entirely on fish. The female pro- 

^ GavkUis GangeticuSf Gmelin. 

* The two species of crocodile mentioned under the term " Bonchd " are the 
CroeodUus paiustriSf Less., or the common marsh crocodile, and the C. porosus, 
Schn., generally known as the " man eater.'' 



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36 THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL. 

duces eggs at the same season with the Bonchi. She digs a trench 
in the sand on the shore of the river, and there deposits ten or twelve 
eggs, which she covers with sand, and watches all day, but at night 
retires into the river, being remarkably shy and timid on shore. The 
young are hatched between the 13th of May and 13th of June, 
and for a month require the care of their mother. The eggs of the 
Ghariil are considered as a remedy for the smallpox in the human 
species, and for the disease in kine, which in the language of Bengal 
is called by the same name (Basanta). In Ava the eggs are com- 
monly sold in the markets for food, and in many parts of India the flesh 
of both kinds of crocodile is greedily devoured. I was indeed informed 
that the G^rdrs of this District did not hesitate to eat them ; but 
this they denied, probably thinking it disgraceful. When these fisher- 
men are able to steal upon either kind of crocodile, which requires 
great precaution, they strike him with a harpoon which has one iron 
prong about 3 inches in length, and which is barbed on one side. 
The plug of wood into which the iron is listened is connected with 
the shaft, which is veiy light bamboo, by a rope of about 12 feet 
long. In order to make this rope very strong, and at the same tune 
light, it is laid in a very curious manner. It consists of fifteen or 
sixteen threads veiy well twisted, and each containing three lays. 
The threads are veiy slightly twisted, and are kept together by knots 
tied at the distance of a span from each other. This cord is neatly 
rolled round the shaft. The G^rdr throws his harpoon with great 
certainty at from 15 to 20 yards' distance. On striking the crocodile 
the head comes out, the rope unrolls, and the animal rushing 
into the water, the shaft directs the Gdnrdr where to pursue. This 
he does in a &ist-rowing boat, and takes the first opportunity of 
striking with another harpoon, which has a strong iron, 5 inches 
long, and as thick as the little finger ; with this, which has a strong 
rope, he can drag the crocodile on shore. The omentum of both 
kinds of crocodile yields an oil which is used for the lamp. The 
omentum of a Bonchd does not give above 3 sers (of 60 S. W. 
= lb. 4Ttt), while that of the Ghariil gives from 10 to 15 sers (from 

lb. lST*iy to 23t\j). 

Notwithstanding the great number of rivers and lakes or 
marshes in this District, the people are but indifferently supplied 
with fish. 

Salt is by &r too expensive to be employed in preserving fish ; but, 
besides the method of preserving these animals by beating them with 
vegetable substances, which is practised in the rainy season, a great 



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RANGPUR DISTRICT^UST OF FISHES, 37 

quantity is preserved by merely drying them in the sun, which is 
practised in the dry season alone, and chiefly in the two eastern 
divisions, as the principal demand is from Bhutan and the Gdros. All 
along the great Tistd, however, some fish is dried in the spring for the 
supply of the rainy season. The Bijni Rijd, who holds lands of Bhutdn 
as well as of the Company, pays his tribute to the former power in 
dried fish, which he chiefly procures firom his estates that are subject 
to the Company ; but this supply is not sufficient for the demand of 
the Bhut^ market, and the Deb Bijd, who seems to have a mono- 
poly of all foreign commerce, sends agents, especially into the north- 
em half of the division of Dhubri, and makes large purchases. The 
fish dried on the left of the Brahmaputra are sent chiefly to the 
markets where the Gdros deal, and next to salt, is, perhaps, the most 
important article that is sold to these people. A small quantity of 
fish is also dried on the banks of the Brahmaputra, on the lower 
part of its course. Some of this is distributed through the western 
parts of the District ; but the greater part goes to Uie Gdros, who 
border on the District of Maimansinh. Fish prepared in this manner 
is called sukti, which merely signifies dry, as if this kind of fish were 
the only dry thing of any importance. To European taste and smell 
it is altogether insupportable, but the two nations that chiefly pur- 
chase» are fiu* firom being select in their eating, and all the people of 
the two eastern divisions like this fetid aliment 

Most of the fish cured in this manner, as I have before said, is 
caught in lakes, marshes, and old channels of rivers, but is sent to 
the sands of the Brahmaputra to be dried. The heads and guts of 
the fish are thrown away, but the fins and scales are allowed to 
remain. The fish, if small, is split in two, if large, it is divided into 
four slices. These are spread out to a sun that is intensely hot, on 
the extensive sands of the river where there are no insects, and where 
in the day everything is parched and withered by a dry heat. At 
night, the fish are secured in a shed from the dews, which are abund- 
ant at all seasons. At the beautiful lakes called Toborong, north 
fix>m Jogigophd, where this fishery is most extensive, and where fix>m 
twelve to fourteen hundred maunds may be annually dried, the fish 
are divided into four sorts. 

The following is a list of the principal varieties of fish found in 
Rangpur. 

I. The TmpA of Godlp^ and Dindjpur (No. i) katkaiiyd^ of 
^ TetrodonJluviaHlis^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 6, pi. 30, f. i. 



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38 THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL, 

Lakshmfpur, Pukhuriyd Patkd of Calcutta, is a species of Tetro- 
don. 

2. The DeokM ^ of Biruni, a species of Syngnathe, is a small fish 
which is of little or no use, but is remarkable for the -manner in 
which its eggs are hatched. The body is angular, and the belly is 
concave below, but with a high sharp ridge on each side. Two 
longitudinal rows of eggs are deposited between these ridges and 
adhere to the belly, much in the same manner as the eggs do under 
the tail of a lobster. It is stated by naturalists, that the belly of 
some species of this genus of fishes, actually splits open to make way 
for the young, but, if that really be the case, this kind diflfers very 
much fix)m the others. 

3. The Nader Vaim of Goilp^ TdrA vaim^ of Calcutta, and 
Gofigtioi PdtnftaM (Dindjpur list. No. 2) is the Macrognathe arm^ 
of Lacep^e. 

4. The Vaim of Goilpdrd and Calcutta, the Vdm^ of Pitnftali 
(No. 3, Dinijpur) is the Macrognathe aiguillonn^ of Lacep^e. 

5. The Gochi of Rangpur, the Gonger Gongtt of Pdtndtald (Dindj- 
piu; list, No. 4) and P&nhdl^ of Calcutta is another species of Macrog- 
nadie. 

6. The BdliyA of Rangpur, Pukhuriyd hdliyd^ of Calcutta, Bek 
hUiyd and Pdnimuthrd of GoilpM, is perhaps the Gobie eleotre of 
LacepAie. (See Dindjpur list, No. 5.) 

The following, six small fishes, witli very bright and beautifiil 
colours, all belong to one very natural genus, the Trichopode of 
Lacep^de. 

7. Khalishd^ everywhere (Dinijpur, No. 6). 

8. Beji khaltshd ^ of Goilp£i4. 

9. Buk sontaJt ^ and kalak of GodlpM. 

1 Syngfiathus deocata^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 14, and MS. drawings No. 
80, marked Sygnatkus deohUa^ 6 7-ioths inches in length. 
' Macrognathus armatus^ Fish. Ganges, p. 28, pi. 37, f. 6. 

* Macrognathus aculeatus^ Fish. Ganges, p. 29. 

* Macrognathus pancalus^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 30, pL 17, f. 7. 

^ Gobius guium. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 50, and MS. drawings Na 
74, 2^ inches in length. 

' Trichopodus colisa^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 117, pi. 15, f. 4a 

^ Trichopodus hejms Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 118, No. 36 MS. drawings 
marked T, bge is identical with T. colisay pi. 15, f. 40. 

> Trichopodus coira^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 119, MS. drawings No. 40, 
2 2-ioths inches long, marked T, cctrulacens. 



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RANGPUR DISTRICT— LIST OF FISHES. 39 

10. SdddkAa/isM^ of Go&Lpdxi. 

11. CAundkAaiisM^ of GoilpixL 

1 2. Zdl khalishd » of Go%ii4. 

We hav^ the following six species of another very natural genus 
the Opheocephale of Lacep^de. 

13. The CAswg-* of Godlpiri, Calcutta, and Pitnftali, and Gich- 
huya of Lakshmfpur. 

In the springs and clear mountain rivulets of H^br^hit and 
Mechpdrd is found a fish called by the same name,^ which is entirely 
of a bright orange colour, and in this alone differs from the common 
cheng, which is of a dirty green, variegated with black. The num- 
ber of rays in all the fins, the shape, tenacity of life, and all other 
circumstances are so exactly alike, that I am inclined to attribute the 
difference of colour to the different situation in which the animal has 
been placed, and that the bright orange glow is owing to its having 
lived in pure moimtain streams, instead of muddy rivers and ponds. 
The difference of water, I know, in several instances, produces great 
changes, although none so remarkable as this. The belly of the 
Tetrodon, No. i, in marshes covered with weeds, becomes entirely 
black, and the whole colour of the Trichopode, No. 9, is changed in 
the same manner by a similar situation. 

14. The Garui^ of every place, when large, at Calcutta, is called 
Laid, In some part of Dinijpur it is also called Bharayi (see list 
No. 8). 

15. The Moid of the Tamuls, the Soli of GoilpM the Saul ox SoP 
of Calcutta and Lakshmfpur and the Sola of Madras is the Opheoce- 



> Trkhopodus sota. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 120, and MS. drawings No. 
39, marked T,JuscuSy I 7-ioth inches long. 

* Trkhopodus cAuna, Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 121, and MS. drawings No. 
38, I 9-ioth inches long, marked 7*. vUtaius, 

3 Trichopodus /alius, Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 120, and MS. drawings No. 
37, marked T, ruber, 2 inches long. 

-* Ophiocephalus gachua. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p 68, pL 21, f. 21. 

A Ophiocephalus aurantiacus. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 69, pi. 23, f. 22. 
In the Ganjdm District, I obtained in 1868, a specimen of the climbing perch, 
Anadas scandens, of an orange colour, it appeared very healthy, and the fisher- 
men asserted such were not uncommon, and that their anomalous coloration was 
not dependant on the water they inhabited, nor on the state of their general 
health. 

* Ophiocephalus lata. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 63, pi. 34, f. 18. 

* Ophiocephalus wrahle. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 60, pi. 31, f. 17. 



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40 . THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL. 

phale wrahle of Lacep^e. This fish grows to about two feet in 
length, and inhabits both marshes and rivers, salt and fresh, and is 
reckoned very good to eat. 

1 6. The Chend ^ of Godlpdri is so nearly allied to the fonner, that 
I have some doubt of its being in reality of a different species, but it 
is considered as different by the natives, who say that it never grows 
to half the size, and it wants some spots on the fins by which the 
other is distinguished. It must be observed, that the different fishes 
of this genus are apt to vary considerably in the number of rays in 
their fins, which renders it difiicult to ascertain mere accidental 
varieties from kinds that are really different. 

17. The Gajdl of Godlpiri,* Pitnftald (Dinijpur, No. 7), and 
Lakshmfpur, and the Sol of Calcutta is another Ophiocephale. 

18. The Borkd^ of Godlpir^ is still another nearly related to the 
above ; but its colours and manners are very different It grows to 
about three feet in length, and is a very ugly lurid animal, although 
it has a variety of strong and bright colours. It is thought very 
good, but although much sought after, is rarely caught. The reason 
assigned for this is, that it lives either under rocks, or forms holes in 
the banks in which it constantly resides, and only puts out its head 
to procure food, so that it cannot be taken by a net It is said to be 
caught with a trap made of wide hollow bamboo, one end of which is 
placed against the mouth of the hole, and a bait of oil-cake is fixed 
to a spring some way up the bamboo. The fish enters to eat the oil- 
cake, and lets loose the spring, by which a valve shuts behind and 
prevents a retreat 

19. The Galpuri^ of Go^lpdrd, and Bhedi of Calcutta, is a small 
Labrus, found in tanks and ditches. 

20. The Sdgar Koyi^ of Goilpdrd, the Kai or Kuhaji of Calcutta 
(Dindjpur list, No. 10) is the Lutjan grimpeur of Lacepdde. 

21. The Bfudd^ of Godlpdrd and Dindjpur (List No. 14) is the 
Ndndas of Calcutta. If the former is a Lutjan, this also ought to be 
placed in the same family. Both, in my opinion, have the characters 

> Ophiocephalm chenoy Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 62, ? O. SUwartit^ 
Playfair. 
' Ophiocepkalus marulimy Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 65, pi. 22, f. 19. 
' Ophiocephalus barca^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 67, pi. 35, f. 2a 

* Labrus badisy Ham. Buch, Fish. Ganges, p. 70, pL 25, f. 23. 
^ Coius cobofius, Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 98, pL 13, f. 33. 

• Caius nanduSf Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 96, pi. 30, f. 32. 



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RANGPUR DISTRICT— LIST OF FISHES, 41 

of Holocentres, but I am doubtful concerning the propriety of this 
arrangement. 

Next follows a class of Bengali fishes, that contain many species which 
are eaten by the natives, but are too small for European cookery. The 
only one that I can trace in Lacep^e, is that called by him Centro- 
pome ambasse, which is not foimd in this part of Bengal. Although 
the whole appears to me to have the character of this genus Lutjan, I 
shall in deference to his arrangement, call them Centropomes. Those 
which I have observed in this District are five, as follows : — 

22. The Chdndd^ of Goilpird and Calcutta, the nam chdndd of 
Dinijpur, No. 13. 

23. The Bakul chdftdd^ of Go%M. 

24. The Phul chdndd^ of Godlpkrl 

25. Ta^ Bc^rd chdndd^ oi(^i\^ixL 

26. The Ldl chdndd ^ of GodlpM, the kdtchdndd of Calcutta. 

In this District I observed the following eight species of Cobitis, 
none of which are in much repute with the natives, and none are 
described by Lacep^de. • 

27. The Dari^ of Rangpur and Dinijpur, No. 49. 

28. The Gengto'^ of Godlp^i, a pretty fish like the former. 

29. The Pangiyd^ of Godlpdrd and Dindjpur, No. 15. 

30. The Bute'^ of Godlp^rd, the Gunte of Calcutta. 

3 1. The BoHd i® of Godlpirl 

32. The Tl^r/" of Godlpirl 

» Chanda nama^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 109, pi. 39, f. 37. 
' Chanda baculis. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 112, and MS. drawings No. 2, 
I & 2-loth inches long. Cmiropomus ? bahrul. 

» Chanda phula. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 1 11, and MS. drawings No. I, 

1 & 7-loth inches*iong. Centropomus phuichanda, 

* Chanda bogoda. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 1 1 1, and MS. Drawings No. 3, 

2 & 3-ioth inches long. Cmtropcmius bogoda. 

* C/ianda lala^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 114, pL 21. f. 39. 

* Cobitis dario^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 354, pi. 29, f. 95. 
' Cobitis geto. Ham. Buch. Fish, Ganges, p. 355, pi. 11, f. 96. 

» Cobitis pangia, Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 355, MS. drawings No. 51, as 
Cobitis pangya. 

* Cobitis guntm. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 353, and MS. drawings No. 58, 
as Cobitis gunte. 

1® Cobitis botia^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 350, and MS. drawings No. 50, as 
Cobitis botya, 

^1 Cobitis turioj Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 358, and MS. drawings No. 40, 
as Cobitis turi. 



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42 THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL. 

33. The BUturi^ of Goilpirl 

34. The Ghorgotd^ of Behar. This is the laigest and is often 
found six inches in length. 

I now proceed to a very numerous class of fishes, which by Linnaeus 
were included in one genus Silurus, but the number having increased 
beyond all expectation, this tribe has been subdivided by Lacep^de. 
At Godlpdr^ all these fishes are called Chingri, a name which, at 
Calcutta is applied to oblong crustaceous fishes. The following six 
belong to the Silure of Lacepede. 

35. Gharuyd^ of Calcutta, Lakshmfpur and GodlpM, the kochd 
of the Tist£ This is a very common fish, but is not eaten by the 
higher classes, because it is supposed to feed on excrement It 
grows to three feet in length, and although its colours are green and 
silver, has a very lurid ugly appearance. 

36. The Kochd^ of Godlpdrd is said to be a very different kind of 
the same family, and is reckoned remarkably good, but it is so rare, 
that I could procure none alive. It grows to a very large size. 

37. The Pdbdd or Pdbho^ of Godlpdri is a fish which grows to 
about a foot in length, and is a different species from the Pdbdd ^ of 
Calcutta, or Pobd of Dinijpur (No. 18), but is of a quality equally 
excellent 

38. The Kdni Pdbdd ^ of (Joilpird, is a smaller fish, nearly related 
to the above, and to the Pdbdd of Calcutta. Its size and quality is 
like the latter. 

39. The Bodli^ of every part of Bengal. In some parts of Dinij- 
pur (No. 19), it is, however, called Keydlu 

40. The Sit^'^ of Calcutta and Goilpird, the kamdch Angi of 
Dinijpur (No. 17) is the Silure fossile of Lacepdde. 

^ Cobitis diiturWf'Kun. Budu Fish. Ganges, p. 358, and MS. drawings No. 49, 
as CoHtis ifiUuri, 

* Cobiiis gongoia^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 351, and MS. drawings No. 55, 
as CoHtis ghorgota, 

' SUurusgarua^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 156, pL 21, f. 50. 

* This b perhaps the omitted first species of Callichrons from the " Fishes of the 
Ganges," 

' SUuruspabo^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 153, pi. 22, f. 48. 

< SUuruspabda^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 150, pL 25, f. 47. 

' Siluruscanio^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 151, and might be MS. drawmgs 
No. 5, marked Silurm katUpabda^ its pectoral spine is serrated and about 63 
anal, rays, 69 in the text 

* Silurus doaiiSf Ham* Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 154, pi. 29, f. 49. 

* Silurus singio, Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 147, pL 37, f. 46. 



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RANGPUR DISTRICT— UST OF FISHES. 43 

41. The Mdgur^ is everywhere known by this name (Dindjpur, 
No. 16), but at Goilpird it is also called Madgur, It is the- Ma c- 
ropteronote grenouiller of Lacepdde. 

42. The Kajoli^ of Godlpdrd, the Kayld of Calcutta is a Malap- 
terure. This has no electric qualities, like the species described by 
Lacep^de. It grows from 8 to 12 inches in length, is, for the tribe, 
rather a handsome fish, and by the natives is considered as good. 

The genus of Pimelode is exceedingly numerous, and in this 
District I have observed no less than nineteen distinct species, 
besides two that are doubtful. I begin with those called Tengrd.' 

The three following are longitudinally striped : — 

43. That commonly called Tmgrd^^ without any addition, is 
sometimes called Pukhariyd at Calcutta, and Mos^ at Godlp^ra. 
This is the Tengord of Dinijpur (No. 28.) It is reckoned good 
to eat. 

44. The Bish tmgrd ^ of Godlp^rd, the Korki iengord of Dindjpur 
(No. 50.) 

45. The Bdtdsi tmgrd^ of the Tisti, a fish still more like No. 43. 
The three following are transversely barred : — 

46. The Kengya'^ of Godlpdrd, the Rdm tengord of Dindjpur 
(No. 52.) 

47. The Kauya tengrd^ of the Dharld is a very ugly little fish, 
compared by the natives to a crow. 

48. The Kmyd tengrd of the Tisti is a fish nearly rdated to the 
former, but has fine bright colours. 

The two following have an uniform obscure colour : — 



* Macropieroftohts magur^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 146, pi. 26, f. 45. 

' Malapterurus coUa^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 158, and MS. drawings, 
No. 7, as Malapterure kamli. 

' It is much to be regretted that considerable confusion has occurred amongst 
these species, as published in the ** Fishes of the Ganges," but these papers of H. 
B. 's and the MS. drawings quite clear up all disputable points. 

* Pimdodus carcio. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 181, pi. 3, f. 61, erroneously 
termed P. iengara. 

* Pimdodus tengara. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 183, pi. 23, f. 60, where it 
is erroneously marked P. batasim is amongst the MS. drawings. No. 22, as 
Pimdodus kurki, 

^Pimdodus btiiasio Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 179, and MS. drawings. 
No. II, as Pintdodus batasi, 

^ Pintdodus ranui^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 176, pi. 3, f. 55. 
^ Pimdod'is cavia^ l£am. B ic'i. Fish. Gxngjs, p. 188. 
VOL. VI 1. D 



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44 THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL. 

49. The Pdthari tmgrd^ of Goilp^, the Kavasi tengoii of 
Dinijpur (No. si)> is the most common fish in several parts, such 
as Alfpur, and is 'there called simply Tengrd, although under that 
name also several of the other kinds are commonly sold 

50. The Gdgar of Goilpir^ the Gigrd tengrd of Calcutta, the 
G^ot of Din^jpur (No. 25.) 

Next follow five beautiful small fishes, more or less diaphanous, 
some of which also are occasionally called Tengdu 

51. The Changrdrmdrd^ of the Mahdnandi and Dindjpur, No. 53. 

52. The Rdm tengrd^ of Goilpdrl 

53. The Tengrd^ of Godlpdri. 

54. The BaradaJia * of Godlpird is the Vruya of Dinijpur, No. 54. 

55. The Doyd^ of Godlpiii, the Angi of Lakshmfpur, the B^Lns- 
patari of Dinijpur, No. 27. 

Next follow six large lurid Pimelodes, thought good by the natives. 

56. The Ritd^ of every place (Dinijpur, No. 22.) 

57. The Pdngds^ of Godlpdrl 

58. The Silon"^ of Go^pdri and Dinijpur (No. 55), the Silondid- 
vdchi of Calcutta. 

59. The Vdchd^^ of Goilpiri, Calcutta, and Dinijpur (No. 26), the 
Kingon of Lakshmfpur. 

60. The Ari^^ of every place (see Dinijpur, No. 23.) 

61. The Bdgh Ari^^ of every place (see Dinijpur, No. 24.) 
Somewhat akin to the two last are the three following fishes, 

although even the two first can with difficulty be considered as 
Pimelodes, and the last is still more remote from any tribe of fishes 
established by Lacep^de : — 



^ Pimdodm cavasms, Ham. Bach. Fish. Ganges, p. 203, pi. 11, f. 67. 
' Pifndodus chandramara^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 162, and MS. draw- 
ings, No. 13, as /*. changdramara, 

> Pinidodus rama^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 176, pi. 3, f. 55. 

* Pimdodtis tengana^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 176, pi. 39, f. 58. 

* Pimdodus urua^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 177, and MS. drawings, No. 
15, as Pimelodm urua. 

* Pimelodus anguis^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 180, pi. 29, f. 59. 
^ Pinidodus rUa, Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 165, pi. 24, f. 53. 

* Pifndodus pangast'us, Ham. Buch. Fbh. Ganges, p. 163, pi. 33, f. 52. 

* Pimdodus silondia^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 160, pL 7, f, 50. 
^^ Piffhdodus vacha, Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 196, pL 19, f. 64. 
" Pimelodm arius. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 170, 

" Pimdodus baganus^ Hara. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 186, pi. 7, f. 62. 



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kANGPVR DISTRICT— LIST OF FISHES. 45 

62. The Kkonta^ of the Mahinandd is a small and remarkably 
ugly fish. 

63. The Bhot mdgur^ of the Dharli, if possible, is still uglier. 
The people of Bhutan are said to be remarkably fond of it, from 
whence its name is derived. The people of Behar will not eat it. 

64. The Sisar^ of Behar is a very ugly fish, which is said to grow 
to seven or eight feet in length, and which few people will eat. The 
most remarkable thing about it is the tail, the upper ray of which 
is longer than the whole head and body. It is quite flexible, and 
tapers to a fine point. I have been able to learn nothing concern- 
ing the use of this strange appendage. 

65. Of all the horrid animals of this tribe the Chakd^ of this 
District is the most disagreeable to behold. It has the habit of 
the fishes called by Lacep^de Uranoscope and Cotte, that is, it 
conceals itself among the mud, from which, by its lurid appearance 
and a number of loose filamentous substances on its skin, it is 
scarcely distinguishable, and with an immense open mouth it is 
ready to seize any small prey that is passing along. In order that it 
may see what is approaching, the eyes are placed on the crown of 
the head In its artificial characters it comes nearer the Plotose of 
Lacep^de than any other tribe, but from such a different habit, it 
must be considered as belonging to a genus not yet arranged by 
naturalists. All persons turn away from it with loathing. 

66. The Ghariyd or Ghore^ of Go^lp^, the KinkiM of Calcutta 
and Dindjpur (No. 29) is an Esoce. 

I shall next mention two small fishes which seem to have some 
affinity to the Stolephore of Lacep^e, although in all points they do 
not coincide with his description. 

67. The Bdlitord^ of Godlpdrl This name signifies sand-digger, 
as the fish, in order to look for its food, is said to make little trenches 
in the sand. The same name, on a similar account, is given to a 



^ Pimdodus cantaf Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 191, and MS. drawings, No. 
I 7p as i'. cotUa, 

' Pimdodus botms^ Ham. Bach. Fish. Ganges, p. 192. 

3 Sisor rabdophorus^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 208, and MS. drawmgs, No. 
8, as HyposUnnus ? sisor. 

* Piaiystacus chaca. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 140, pL 28, f. 43. 

* Esox canala. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 213, pi. 27, f. 7a 

* Cyprinus bcditora^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 343, and MS. drawings No. 
44, as Stoiephorus halitora. 



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46 THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL. 

species of Cyprin (No. 122) to which also the creature now in ques- 
tion has a considerable resemblance. 

68. The Sukati^ of Godlpird is a fish evidently of the same genus 
with the Bdlitord, but still less resembles the character given of 
the Stolephore. 

Next I shall mention two species of the Muge. 

69. The Khaskhasiyd ^ of Goilpdrd is a small fish of little value. 

70. The Muj'P and IngU of Godlpird, the Khola of Dacca, the 
Khorsold of Calcutta, the Ghobol of Dindjpur, No. 3r. 

Next follow two species of Clupi about the size of small herrings, 
which here are reckoned good to eat, but they are very full of bones. 

71. The Phoingyd^ of Godlpdrd, the Gdngphensi of Calcutta, the 
Telar of Dindjpur, No. 32. 

72. The Phensd^ of Godlpird and Calcutta. 
Next follow three kinds of Myste. 

73. The Phaluyi or Phole^ of Godlpiri, Calcutta, Lakshmipur, 
and Dindjpur, No. 33. 

74. The Bara chitaP of Go^lpdrd, the Chital of Dindjpur, No. 34. 

75. The Chital of Goilpird has nearly the same qualities with 
the preceding. 

Next follow four species of Clupanodon. 

76. The Ilish^ of every part of Bengal, see Dinijpur list. No. 57. 
In this District this valuable fish is neither plentiful nor of good 

quality. The principal emigration, at spawning season, seems to 
follow the Padmd (Great Ganges R.), and Bhigirathf (Hiigli R.), 
with the intermediate rivers. Still, however, some ascend the 
Brahmaputra to Godlpdrd, and detach parties up the Tisti and 
DharM, but these in particular are small and poor. 

77. The Manmin^ of Goilpird, the ChdmrpH of Lakshmfpur, the 

^ Cyprinus sucatio^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 347, and MS. drawings, No. 
45, as Stolephorus sukati, 

"^ Mugil cascasia^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 217, and MS. drawings, No. 
68, three inches, long, as Mu^il kaskasiya. 

' Mt4gil €orsula^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 221, pi. 9, f. 97. 

* Clupea telara. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 241, pi. 2, f. 72. 

* Clupea phasa, Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 240. 

* Mysius kapirat. Ham. Buch. Fish Ganges, p. 235. 

' Mysttts ckUaloy Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 236, figure reproduced in the illus- 
trations of Indian Zoology. 

Clupanodon ilisha^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 243, probably not pi. 19, f. 73. 
» Clupatiodon manmina^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 247. 



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RAXGPUR DISTRICT-^LIST OF FISHES. 47 

Gdngkhayrd of Calcutta is a small fish, and like the two following, 
full of bones. 

78. The Khayrd^ of Godlpdrd and Calcutta, the Chdngpli of 
Lakshmfpur, the Karati of Dindjpur (No. 35). At Godlpdrd it is 
also known by this last name. 

79. The Morii or Mati^ of Goilpird. 

Next follow five fishes resembling the Cyprin couteau of Lacep^de 
and the Bendilisis, which I described in my account of Mysore, and 
which seem to be intermediate between the Clupea and the Cyprin. 
In fact, a common fish of Bengal, the Clupea Apalike of Lacep^de, 
serves to connect the two classes still nearer. The largest of the 
fishes that I am now to mention, does not exceed the size of a 
herring. Being very plentiful they are much used by all classes, but 
are not considered as remarkably good. 

80. The Ghord chdd^ of Goilpiri is the largest. 

81. The NariycUi cheld^ of Go%drd, the CheM of Calcutta and 
Dinijpur (No. 36). This is the most common. 

82. The PAu/cMd^ of Goilpixi. 

83. The Zayu bukd « of Godlpdrd. 

84. TheLayukuW^ ofGodlpdrl 

These two differ considerably fi"om the others. 

Next follow seven kinds of the same genus Cyprinus, which resemble 
the former in having very thin bodies with the lateral line running 
parallel to their lower edge; and in general also approach to the 
tribe Esoce in the position of the dorsal fin. They are all small 
fishes of little value. 

85. The Bhold^ of Goilpdri seems nearly related to the Vaudoise 
and Dobule of Lacepede. 

' Clupanadon cortiuSy Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 249. 

* Clupanodon tnotiusy Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 251, and MS. drawings, 
No. 88, as Clupanodon moti, 

' Cyprinus gora. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 263, and MS. drawings, No. 
146, C. gora. 

* Cyprinus bacaila. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 26$, pi. 8, f. 76. 

* Cyprinus phulo^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 262, MS. drawings. No. 130, 
as C, phul chda, 

* Cyprinus laubuca^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 260, MS. drawings. No. 
139, as C, laubuca. 

' Cyprinus atpar. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 259, and MS. drawings, No. 
142, as Cyprinus layukuli, 

* Cyprinus bolay Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 274, and MS. drawings, No. 131, 
as Cyprinus bkola. 



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48 THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL, 

86. The Buk rd/tfi^ of Goilpdrl At Bdrunf, both this and the 
following were called Boreli. 

87. The Bdlibhold 2 of Go^pird, the Boreli of B^nf on the Tistl 

88. The Barild^ of Goilpird, the Chedri of the Tisti, the Khaksi 
near the Mahdnandi, the Peyali of Dinijpur (No. 58). 

89. The JTAaksd* of the Mah^andi is in that vicinity considered 
as the male of the last, but it is a distinct species. 

90. The Cludrd^ of the Tisti and Dharli being also considered 
as the male of No. 88. It has a strong resemblance to the last, but 
is abundantly entitled tp be considered as a distinct species. 

91. The Chhepkd^ of Rangpur, the B^spdtd of Lakshmfpur, the 
Deborf of Dindjpur (No. 40). 

Then follow eight kinds of Cyprins, which, on account of the 
structure of their under-jaw, have an affinity to the tribe of Muge of 
Lacep^e. Owing to this circumstance, there is a considerable 
confusion in their native appellations, some of them being considered 
as belonging to the genus Muge, while others are considered as 
Cyprins, and some have compound names, referring to this double 
affinity. 

92. The Rdmchdndd^ of Rangpur, the Elangi of Dinijpur (No. 
37), and the Rasbard of Lakshmfpur, has a strong resemblance to 
the last seven fishes, and its jaws do not exactly resemble those of 
the tribe Muge, the under one only being pointed, and entering a 
notch in the upper. Its affinity, however, to the others, whose jaws 
are exactly formed like those of the Muge, is confirmed by the 
identity of the native names. 

93. The Elangd^ of Goilpdrd is called Bhingan at Calcutta, and 
at Patirdm in Dindjpur (No. 64), and Kuntd at Lakshmfpur. 



^ MS. drawings, No. 104, 3 inches long, it gives one much the idea of Cyprinus 
mttrar, p. 264, bat it is placed as a distinct species in the Pumiah list 

* Cyprinus bortUoy Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 336, and amongst the MS. 
drawings in Calcutta was one of this species as recorded by M'Clelland in 1839. 

* Cyprinus barila ei chedrio^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, pp. 267, 268, and MS. 
drawings. No. 134, as C barila, 

* Cyprinus cocsa^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 272, pi. 3, f. 77. 

* Cyprinus ckedra. Ham, Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 273, and MS. drawings. No. 
Ill, as C.chedra. 

* Cyprinus dtvario. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 341, pi. 6, f. 94. 
' Cyprinus rasbora^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 329, pi. 2, f. 90. 

» Cyprinus danga^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 281, MS. drawings. No. 103. 



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RANGPUR DISTRICT— LIST OF FISHES, 49 

94. The /auri ^ of Goitpiri, is a similar small fish, which near the 
Karatoyd, is called Bh^gan and kurd hiti, at Calcutta. 

95. The Bhdngan of Goilpdri in the marshes between Dfwdnganj 
and Ghordghit is called vdchd?^ which at Go^pdrd, Calcutta, &a, is a 
name given to a Pimelode (No. 55). At Calcutta the Cyprin of 
which I am now treating is called Bdt£ It is the most common fish 
in the southern parts of the District, and grows to two feet in 
length. Like the following it is very beautiful, being of a fine silver 
colour, striped longwise with black dots. 

96. The Akhrd^ of the Karatoyd, is called Kharki-bdtd at Cal- 
cutta, and simply Kharki in the central rivers of Dindjpur (No. 63). 
In Mysore it is called by its Camatic (Klamdta) name, Arizd, It is 
the Kindu of the Tamuls. 

97. The Lachhimd of Godlp^ is said to resemble the two former, 
but I omitted to procure it in time for examination. It is a very 
common fish. 

98. The Vogd-bhdngan^ of Godlpdri very nearly resembles the 
Akhrd in proportions, but its colours are v^ different. It is reckoned 
much better for eating. 

99. Nearly allied to the last, but shining with all the splendour of 
the Rohit, is one of the finest fishes of Bengal, everywhere called 
MrigcUJ* See Dindjpur, No. 62. 

I shall now mention twelve Cyprini which have nothing in their 
structure resembling other tribes, fine proportioned fishes, with bodies 
moderately compressed. 

100. The Rohit ^ of every part of Bengal (see Dindjpur, No. 45). 
loi. The Kurchhd'^ of Godlpdrd, by the people of Assam is called 

Ghmu It grows to about a foot and a-half in length, but is not 
thought good. It is a very beautiful fish, finely striped, with dotted 
lines. 

> Cyprinus hata^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 283, and MS. drawings, No. 
1 14, as Cyprinus curabaH hata. 

s Cyprinus cura. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 280, probably identical with 
C. bata. He observes that it is "so nearly allied to the Bata that I have only 
noted the circumstances in which it differs from the account before given.'' But 
in his Pumiah list he asserts it to be the C, reba, 

' Cyprinus acra. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 284. 

* Cyprinus hoga^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 286, pL 28, f. 80. 

* Cyprinus mrigala. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 279, pi. 6, f. 79. 

* Cyprinus rohita^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 301, pi. 36, f. 85. 

' Cyprinus cursa d gtmius^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, pp. 290-292, pi. 4, f. 82. 



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50 THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL. 

102. The Mahdsaul^ of the polished dialect of Bengal, called 
Putitor in the vulgar dialect of Godlpdrd, is the largest of the carp 
kind that we have, and is often found nine feet in length, and six 
feet is an usual size. The scales are exceedingly large, being like 
the hand, and at Dacca are often made into the cards with which 
people game. It is reckoned coarse food. 

103. The Tor^ of the Tistd does not grow above two feet in length, 
liut its scales are as large in proportion as those of the last mentioned 
fish, and its colours are more splendid, almost equal in beauty to 
those of the Rohit. 

104. The Angro^ of Godlpird, is also a beautiful fish, about the 
size of a herring. It is marked on each side by a fine broad blackish- 
purple line. 

105. The Morui^ of Godlpdrd scarcely differs from the former in 
anything but the colours ; while, on the contrary, the two following 
have almost^the same colours with the Morul, but differ very con- 
siderably in proportions. 

106. The Dhengro ^ of Goilpird, is a fish of four or five inches in 
length. 

107. The yaoydli^ of Godlpdrd is still smaller. 

108. The Kdlbasu'^ of Dinijpur (No. 44), both here and in most 
parts of Bengal, is called by the same name. At I^kshmfpur, it is 
also called Kdlkuni. 

109. The Kdtal^ of Dindjpur (No. 46), and of every other part of 
Bengal, is found here also, but in general is not of the best quality. 
This fish is never taken by a bait, for which the natives readily 
account by supposing that it eats by the nostrils, which are of the 
structure usual in carps. 



' Cyprinus puiitora, Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 303. 

• Cyprinustor^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 305. "This fish I found in the 
Mahinandi river, where it grows to three or four feet in length." MS. drawings. 
No. 121. 

' Cyprinus angra^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 331. MS. drawings, No. 
118. 

• Cyprinus maralay Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 331, pi. 22, f. 88. 

• Cyprinus dero. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 277, pi. 22, f. 78. 

• Cyprinus joalius. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 316, MS. figure, now missing, 
seen by M'Clelland. 

^ Cyprinus calbasu. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 297, pi. 2, f. 83. 

• Cyprinus catia^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 287, pi. 13, f. 81, 



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RANGPUR DISTRICT— LIST OF FISHES, 51 

no. The Darangi of the Tistd is, in some places, called Kuntd} 
It has a great affinity with the Curmuca ^ which is described in my 
account of Mysore, and with the following, being about the same size, 
and having nearly the same proportions and qualities. 

111. The Saran punthi^ of every part of Bengal, and of Dindj- 
pur (No. 43), is common in this District. 

Why the name Punthi has been given, in common, to the last fish 
and to the eight following, I cannot say, because it is a large fish 
with rather dull colours, and all the others are very small, and all 
more or less marked with fine spots, and shine with the most beautiflil 
glosses. The first five are in general of the colour of silver. The 
last three are more or less diaphanous, and are still more beautiful 
than the former. 

112. This is commonly called Punthi without any addition, and 
is the prototype of the others. It is the Saphari^ of the Sanskrit 
language. 

113. The Chold punthi^ of Godlp^, and Korabuti of Alfpur, 
where it is one of the most common fishes, but it is probable that 
several of the other kinds are often sold under the same name. 

114. The Teripunthi^ of Goilpdrd. 

115. The Tit-punthi'^ of Godlpird and Calcutta. At the two 
places, these small fishes diflfer in their colours a little, but scarcely 
so much as to render it necessary to consider them as two species. 

* Cyprinm chagunio^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 295, The original MS. 
drawing is missing, but a copy exists, No. 39, Vol. i., marked C. cfiagunio^ and 
Dr Giinthcr observes (Pro. Zool. Soc. 1872, p. 877), that on the paper, "a 
portion of the specific name has been cut off in binding the drawings. This name 
is Cy^nus Runt, a name which does not occur in Hamilton's Works, but which 
is evidently the same as JCunta, " 

« It is placed next to this species in the Fishes of the Ganges, p. 294, and it is 
stated, " this and the following species have a great resemblance to the Cyprinus 
nrrhosus of Bloch." The term "Kdnta," in reality signifying "a spine," or 
"thorn," with reference to the dorsal fin having a strong osseous ray or spine. 

• Cyprinui sarana^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 307. MS. drawings possessed 
a figure in 1839, according to Dr M*Clelland, so probably copies are still in exist- 
ence in Europe. 

* Cyprinus sophore^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 310, pi. 19, f. 86. 

» Cyprinus chda. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 312, MS. figure missing, re- 
produced M'Clelland, pi. 56, f. 3. 

• Cyprinus terio. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 313, MS. drawings. No. 97 as 
C Uripungti, 

' Cyprinus ticto^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 314, pi. 8, f. 87. 



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52 THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL. 

1 1 6. The Kdnchan-punthi'^ of Godlpdrl 

117. The Gdi-punthi^ of Godlpdrl 

118. The i%«A/«iy««M/» of Go^p4i£ 

119. The Kani-punthi*^ of Goilpdri. This little fish which is 
about one and a-half inch in length, exceeds all the others in 
beauty. Its back and tail are red and diaphanous, through which 
the peritoneum and intestines shine like silver, and on each side 
there are some large black shining spots. 

Allied to these three last in being diaphanous, are three other 
small fishes, which, however, want their splendid colours. 

120. The Ghugini^ of Goilpdrl 

121. The Mauyd, Mold ^ or Maurald of Godlpdrd, is known by the 
latter name at Calcutta, and by that of Kankochi at Lakshmfpur. 

122. The Ghild-chdndd^ of Godlpird, has, in fact, some afiinity to 
the fishes (No. 22-24) that are called by the common name Chindi ; 
but the position of the fins is quite different. It is mentioned in my 
account of Dinijpur (No. 38) under the name of Sangpuyi, but it is 
known in some parts of that District by the name of Koti\ at Laksh- 
mfpur it is called Bokri. 

The following Cyprini have bodies very little compressed, and 
resemble the Minnow or Veron of Lacepede. 

123. The Dorkind or Ddnikand^ of Go^pdrA is the Bara-Ddnt- 
kond of Calcutta, and very much resembles a Minnow, but is larger. 

124. The Sddd'bdlitard^ is about the size of the Minnow, but its 
colours are very different. It differs from the Bdlitord, No. 67, in 
wanting teeth. 

^ Cyprinus conchonws. Ham. Bnch. Fish. Ganges, p. 317, and MS. drawings. 
No. 96, as Cyprinus korikan. 

' Cyprimtsgdiust Ham. Buch, Fish. Ganges, p. 320^ and MS. drawings, No. 
I33i as CgdipunH. 

* Cyprinus phuiunio^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p^ 319^ MS. drawings, No. 
129. 

^ Cyprinus canms^ Ham. Bach. Fish. Ganges, p. 320, MS. drawings, No. 127, 
as C. kanipunti, 

* Cyprinus gujgunio, Ham. Bach. Fish. Ganges, p. 338, and MS. drawings^ 
No. Id, as C gugani. 

•• Cyprinus mola^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 334, pi. 38, C 92. 
' Cyprinus cotio^ Ham. Bach. Fish. Ganges, p. 339, pL 39, f. 93. 

* Cyprinus daniconiust Ham. Bach. Fish. Ganges, p. 327, pL 15, f. 89. 

* Cyprinus soda. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 344, MS. drawings. No. 
106. 



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RANGPUR DISTRICT- LIST OF FISHES. 



53 



125. The Zati^ of the Tisti is five or six inches long; but of a 
similar form. 

126. The Kuchiyd^ of Dinijpur (No. 47) is known here by the 
name of Kunche. It is a species of Unibranchaperture of Lacep^e. 

The following table, showing the present population of the district, 
and the total fishing population, &c., is taken from the census report 
of 1872 : — 



1 

I District. 


Total 
population. 


Male 
adults. 


Percentage 

of adult 

males to 

the whole 

p<^ulation. 


Total 
fishing 
popula- 
tion. 


Number 
of 
fisher- 
men. 


Number offish- 
mongers. 


Number 
of net- 
makers. 


i 


Males. 


Fe- 
males 


Total. 


Rangpiir 


2,149,972 


703,602 


327 


162,447 


5.332 


10^297 


639 


io»936 


7 



* Cyprinus laims. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 345, MS. drawnngs, No. 102, 
asC. /o/i 

• Unibranchapfrtura cuchia^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 16. 



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54 THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL. 



FISH AND FISHERIES OF PURNIAH 
DISTRICT. 

Notwithstanding the large rivers and numerous marshes of this 
District, the very great number of fishermen and the great demand 
for fish, the markets in the north-west parts are very indifferently and 
scantily supplied. The fishermen in these parts of the District have 
still less art than those towards the east ; and, as they man most of 
the boats employed in commerce, the number actually engaged in the 
fishery is but small, although, when not engaged as boatmen, they 
all fish. Towards the Ganges and Mahinandd, the supply is abundant. 

A very few fish are dried in order to be exported to the moun- 
taineers, by the same process as in Rangpur ; but among the people 
of the District, this sort of fish is not in request ; nor in most parts 
do they prepare the balls called Sidal, by pounding the fish with vege- 
tables. This, however, is done towards the North and East, where 
there are Kochs, for the art seems to have originated with the people 
of that tribe. The people are not, however, select in their choice, a 
great part of the fish used being in a state of the most disgusting 
corruption. That is particularly the case with what is used at the 
capital, most of which is brought from a distance. The difference of 
species makes very little alteration in the value, a seer of fish selling 
for nearly the same price, of whatever kinds or sizes the fish may be. 

With regard to the means used for catching fish, I have little to 
add to what I have said in the account of Din^jpur ; but that in 
general, the methods are more imperfect, and that the fishermen can 
take very little fish, except what is almost left dry. Those on the 
Mahinandd, however, are much more expert than most of the others ; 
but in my account of Dindjpur, I have said all that has been sug- 
gested on that subject. On the Ganges also, the fishermen seem to 
be expert ; but most of the fisheries on that river belong to the Dis- 
trict of Bhdgalpur. I must refer the reader to my account of that 
District, given in previous pages. The Kusf is not very abundant 
in fish, and the fishermen are the most obstinate people with 



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PURNIAH DISTRICT— MODE OF CATCHING FISH, 55 

whom it has ever been my misfortune to deal. In fact, the fisher- 
men make very high wages, when employed to man boats or bring 
down timber, and this enables them to be very idle when they are 
at home, so that the fishing is only a kind of amusement. On this 
great river they have no nets, but such as are thrown from the 
shoulder, or a miserable kind of bag net Most of the fish are taken 
as the river dries. up, by putting screens across the smaller channels, 
until the water leaves them dry. 

The farmers are very unskilful in catching fish, and chiefly pro- 
cure them in ditches by making little banks across and throwing out 
the water. The fishermen, so far as I saw, have none of the compli- 
cated machines used in Dindjpur and Rangpur, and a great many 
have neither nets nor boats, but in place of the former, use screens 
made of reeds, and never go to fish except in shallow water. There 
are none of the G^rdrs, or people who fish with the harpoon ; but 
some of the lower tribes of fishermen occasionally use a spear. Many 
of the natives fish with the rod for amusement. The rod and tackle 
are exceedingly coarse, and not at all fitted for showing dexterity in 
their use. The fisher never uses an artificial fly, nor does he drag 
his bait. It is suspended by a float, and he sits with the utmost 
patience, until a fish bites. He then drags out his prey by mere 
force, and, if it be small, makes it fly over his head, like our Euro- 
pean boys catching minnows. 

In most parts the right of fishing is annexed to the land, and is let 
to renters (Mustijfrs), who sometimes employ men to catch the fish 
for wages, or for a share, and sometimes re-let them to the actual 
fishermen, giving them either an exclusive right to the use of a 
certain extent, or a right of frequenting a certain extent along with 
others. The nominal value of the fisheries is a trifle, most of the 
landlords pretending to give them to their servants as a reward for 
their trouble ; but, as I have said, there is no knowing the amount of 
a Zamlndir's profit from the nominal rental. The leases of the 
fisheries are generally renewed annually, and at each renewal a 
Saldmf or homage is paid, and without knowing the amount of this, 
we learn nothing. A great many of the actual fishermen pretend to 
give one-half of all they take to the renter, but he is in general 
defrauded. By far the greatest fishing, that of the Ganges, belongs 
to a lady, who resides at Rijmahal in Bhigalpur and many fisher- 
men of this District are in her employ. 



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56 



THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL, 



The number of fishermen was estimated to me at about 7000 
, houses, and it was said that in each house there might, on an average, 
be two able-bodied men, giving 14,000 fishermen ; but, as I have 
said, many are boatmen, and only fish when they cannot procure a 
voyage, and several also catch ducks, or have other avocations that 
interfere with their catching fish. It is probable, however, that each 
man, on an average, may catch fish to the value of eighteen rupees a 
year. They probably give at least to the value of one-third of the 
fish to the agents of the landlords. Some fish is exported. A little 
of this is dried, and is sent to Bhutin or Nepdl, but by far the 
greater part is sent to Murshidibdd, without any care taken to 
preserve it, farther than by using a quick conveyance. The kinds 
sent are chiefly the Rohu (No. 105), Mrigal (No. 104), and Chital 
(No. 76). 

In the cold season some boats, of from 100 to 200 maunds burthen, 
are half filled with water, and great quantities of small fish are put 
into them, and sent living to Calcutta. The fish are so thick that 
they are just kept wet, but the water is frequently renewed. The 
kinds are the Singf (No. 38), Mauri (No. 37), and Obai (No. 20), 
all small fishes very tenacious of life, and in much request with the 
natives, as supposed to possess restorative powers. 

The wives of the fishermen sometimes retail the fruit of their 
husbands' toil, but in this District most of the fish are bought from 
the fishermen by wholesale, and retailed by people called Kunjrd and 
Fijdr^, who do not belong to fishing tribes. Those which are sent to 
Murshidibdd are bought by petty traders, who come from Bhag- 
wdngoli, and who have fast rowing boats. 

The fiishermen in general live very easily, those on the Mahdnandd 
by the laboiu* of their profession, and those in the other parts of the 
District by also acting as boatmen. 

The following table shows the fishing population in 1872, as 
returned by the census of that year. 

Census of 1872. 



Name of 
District. 


Total Popu- 
lation. 


Total 
adult 
males. 


Percentage of 
adult males 
to the entire 
population. 


Total 
fishing 


Number 

of 
fisher, 
men. 


Number of fish' 
mongers. 


Males. 


Females 


Total. 


Pumiah 


1,714,79s 


548,569 


32^ 


87,364 


8312 


477 


250 


727 



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PURNIAH DISTRICTS-LIST OF FISHES. 



57 



Estimate of how Families in Purniah and neighbouring districts are 
Fed. By Buchanan Hamilton, circ. A.D. i8io. 



FAMILIES 


Purniah. 
Population 
2,904,380. 


Shahabad. 
Population 
1,4x9, 520. 


Rangpur. 
Population 
!»,735.o«>^ 


Gorakhpur, 

northern part. 

Population 

i»989»3X4- 


That have as much fish as they please 

That have fish only on market days 

That have only what they can catch 

That reject fish, 

That have it daily in the cheap 
season only, and occasionally in 
the dear season, 


H 


From X20 to 
X50 times 
a-year. 
215 

39,175 

About 90 to 
X90 days 
a-year. 

41,518 


228,200 
178,500 
130,300 


From X90 to 

X50 times 

a-ycar. 

22,210 

From 30 to 
60 times. 
38,376 

107,736 

From 30 to 
90 times. 
108,777 



The population figures given above are those returned by Buchanan Hamilton. 

With r^ard to the species of fish that are found in this District, 
not a great deal of new matter has offered, and I shall confine myself 
chiefly to giving a list of those of the Kusf, by which means I shall be 
able to give the Hindi names, at least such as are used in the dialect 
of Mithili. When, therefore, no particular place is mentioned, it is 
to be understood that the fish is found in the Kusf near Ndthpur. 
For the synonymes, and other particulars, I shall merely refer by the 
initials of the name of the District, and by the numbers, to the 
account given of the fishes of Dindjpur and Rangpur. 

Varieties of Fish — 

1. Phckchd} R. I. 

2. KarthdwdUh Fhokchd.^ 

3. KMyd Phokchd^ are two small species of the Tdrodon, similar 
to the fish first mentioned. 

4. Rdjvdtn ^ is the eel common in Europe, the Mursena Anguilla 

' Tetrodon ftuviatUis^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 6, pL 30, f. i. 

* THrodon gtUaris, Ham: Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 10, with the name kantka- 
walih pkoksha. 

' Tdrodon cuicuHa, Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 8, pi. 18, f. 3, MS. drawings 
as T, kariya phoksa. 

* Murana anguilla. Fish. Ganges, p. 22. 



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58 THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL, 

of naturalists. It is found in marches near the Kusf, and as usual 
when found in dirty stagnant water, has very lurid colours, of various 
shades of green above, and of dirty yellow below. I am a good deal 
surprised at the fuss which Lacepede makes about this ugly animal, 
which has every appearance of a snake, and wants the beautiful 
colours with which most serpents glitter. The manners of the eel 
are as disgusting as its form. Whenever it can, it buries itself in 
putrid carcasses, or in the mud, in which it forms holes with great 
celerity. It is a very irritable animal, and, when angry, its head and 
neck swell, although not to such a degree as those of the hooded 
snake. All Hindus, except Brdhmans and Rdjputs, eat this fish, 
which is not very common, and does not here attain a very great size. 

5. The Susukd Kdnchai^ is a species of OphisuriSy and a much 
prettier eel than the one above mentioned. It is found in the 
Mahinandd, as well as near Calcutta. The Hindus on the banks 
of the former river eat it, but at the latter place it is rejected with 
disgust. Its name is derived from an imagination that it is bom in 
the ear of the porpoise. 

6. The Gdchchi^ (D. 4, R. S) of the Kusf at Bholdhdt is called 
Chhota Gochf. 

7. Vdm,^ D. 2, R. 4. 

8. The PdtdM (D. 3, R. 4) of the Kusf, at Bholahdt is named 
Pdtdl GocM.*^ 

9. Gulid,^ D. 5, R. 6. 

10. Kotrd^ R. 9. , 

11. Kdriyd Kotrd^ R. 7, D. 6. 

12. IMKotrd?^., 8. 

13. 14. Khesrd? R. 12. The same name is here given to the 
nth fish of the Rangpur list, a very distinct species. 



* Ophisurus hijala^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 20, pi. 5, f. 5. 

' MacrogtuUhus pancalus. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 30, pi. 17, f. 7. 
' Macrognatkus armatus^ Fish. Ganges, p. 28. 

* Macrognathus acideahis^ Fish. Ganges, p. 29. 

" Gobius giuris, Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 51, pi. 33, f. 15. 

* Trichopodus cotra^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 119, MS. drawings No. 40, 
as T, cccntlescens, 

' Trichopodtis colisa, Ham. Budi. Fish. Ganges, p. 117, pi. 15, f. 40. 
® Trichopodus bejeus^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 118. 
^ Trichopadus lalius, Hanu Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 120, MS. drawings No. 37, 
as T, ruber. 



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PURNIAH DISTRICT-^ LIST OF FISHES. 59 

IS- Chengd,^ R. 13. 
i6. Garai? R. 14, D. 8. 

17. Bhor^d^ R. 17, D. 7. 

18, 19. The Ddrhl^ includes two species, one is the 19th of the 
Rangpur list, the other nearly resembles it 

20. Kdh(Uf R. 20, D. 10. 

21. DhdRf R. 21, D. 14. 

22. Chdndd;^ R. 26. 

23. Suhi Chdndd,^ R. 22. 

24. 25. The Kesh'd chdndd^ in Bholihit is a name applied to 
both the 24th and. 25th fishes of the Rangpur list 

26. The Tdkd chdndd^^ of the same place is the 12th fish of the 
Dinijpur list 

27. V^hi,^^ R. 27, D. 49. 

28. Ldtd^ R. 30. 

29. IMki Ldtd}^ D. IS, R. 29. 

30. Kukurd^^ R. 34. 

31.* Chhotd Kukurd}^ a small fish very much resembling the one 
immediately preceding. 

32. Khdrikd}^ another smallfishnot differing greatlyfrom the two last 

33. A small fish, not differing much from the last, was brought to 
me by two names, Sdvdn Khdrkd ^^ and Fdthdr Chdtd.. 

^ Ophiocephalus gachuay Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. C8, pi. 21, f. 21. 

* Ophiocephaltu lata. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 63, pi. 34, f. 18. 

* Ophiocephalus marulius. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 65, pi. 22, f. 19. 

* Labrus badis^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Canges, p. 70, pi. 25, f. 23. 

* Caius cobojius^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 98, pi. 13, f. 33. 
« Coius nandusy Ham. Buch. Fish Ganges, p. 96, pi. 30, £ 32. 
7 Chanda lala^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 114, pL 21, f. 39. 

^ Chanda nama^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 109, pi. 39, £ 37. 

* Chanda phula and bogoda. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. ill, MS. drawings 
Nos. I and 3. 

^^ Chanda ranga. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 113. 

^ Cobitis dario. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 354, pi. 29, £ 95. 

i< Cobitis gunUa, Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 353, MS. drawings No. 58. 

" CobiHs pangia^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 355, MS. drawings No. 51. 

^^ Cobitis gongoiaj Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 351, MS. drawings No. 55. 

^ Cobitis cucura, Ham. Buch. Fish. Gai^^es, p. 352, MS. drawings Na 57, as 
C chota kukura* 

i< Cobitis coricoj Ham Buch. Fbh. Ganges, p. 359, MS. drawings No. 52, C. 
/khcrika, 

^ Cobitis savona, Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 357, MS. drawings No. 54, as 
Cobitis savonkhurika, 

VOL. VII. E 



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6o THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL. 

34, 35. The Bdfgdrd^ includes two species. 

36. Femd,^ R. 65. 

37. MangurA^ R. 41, D. 16. In the south part of the District it 
is caUed Maurf. 

38. Slngi^^ R- 40, D. 17. 

39. Boyd&f R. 39, D. 19. 

40. The 3Sth fish ^ of the Dindjpur list was brought to 
me by the fishermen on the Kus{ by two names, Bdchoyi and 
Sdsuyd. 

41. 42. Checkrd'^ D. No. 18. Under the same name is also 
included a kindred species, which grows to about a foot in length, 
and is one of the best fishes of the Kusf. 

43. CkhoiklChechrd^'Si.iZ. 

44. Ldlmukhd Chechrd^ R. 37. 

4$. The 42nd fish of the Rangpur list, in the Kusf is called 
Angckdduyd^^ and SdtarbM, at Bholdhit it was called Bdnspdtd^ 
or the bamboo-leaf, a name given by the Bengalis to several fish, 
that have a very small resemblance to each other, or to the object 
from which the name is derived. 

46. The Mdftgoi^^^ is a small very ugly Pimelode. 

47. Kdtldy^^ R. 59, D. 26. This must be cai'efiiUy distinguished 
firom the Kital of the Bengalis, at Calcutta, usually called Kitli, 
which is a species of Cyprin, very common in the Ganges and 
Mahdnandi, but scarcely ever found in the KusL 



^ CoHHs balgara^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 356, MS. drawings Na 56^ 
C halgara, 
' CaUiotnorus ckaca^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 133, pL 28, f. 43. 
^ MacropUrtmotus rnagur^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 146, pL 26, 

f. 45. 
« Silurus singio. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 147, pi. 37, f . 46. 
' Silurus doalis. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 154, pi. 29, f. 49. 

* Clupanodon chapra^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 248, the drawing missing 
in Calcutta is reproduced in the illustration of Indian Zoology. 

^ Silurus pabdat Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 150, pi. 35, f. 47. 
' Silufus canwj Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 151. 

* SUuruspabOt Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 153, pi. 22, f. 48. 

^" Malapterurus coUa^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 158, and MS. drawings 
No. 7, as Malopterure kaaali, 

^^ Pimdodus mangois^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 199, and MS. drawings 
No. 9, as P, manggoL 

^* Pimdodus vacAa, Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 196, pi. 19, t 64* 



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PURNIAH DISTRICT— UST OF FISHES. 6i 

48. The Chhoiki Vdchoy& of the Kusl, at Bholihit is called 
M&ivichd, and has a great resemblance in form to the last men- 
tioned fishy but it never grows to a large size, and is not so ugly, nor 
are its colours so lurid. 

49. Pdidsi? R. 55, D. 27. 

so. The Thunka Fdtdsfi (R. 51, D. 53) of the Kusf, at BhoUhit 
is called Khamdin. 

51. The Pdngsd^ of the Kusf was by all my people considered as 
the same with the Pdngds of Bengal (R. 57). Yet the only speci- 
men that I was able to procure had no abdominal fins. If this was 
not an accidental circumstance, the Pdngsi cannot be arranged with 
the Pimdodes, nor even among the same class of fishes, which shows 
the inconvenience of arbitrary systems, such as that used by Lacep^de. 

52. ArH/d^K. 60, D. 23. 

53. r^>W/r,« R. 61, D. 24. 

54. The Mmddd'^ of the Kusl on the Ganges and Mahinandd is 
called Gdgdr or Tel Gdgrd, and is the prototype of a large class of 
fishes. It is a small lurid Pimelode. 

55. Kosiyd Tydt^d? or TengSrd, R. 49, D. 51. 

56. Tydftgrd,^ or Tengdrd, or HM TengM, R. 43, D- 28. 

57. Bdihd}^ R. 44, D. 50. 

58. Ldrd Tengdrd}^^ R. 45. 

59. Mdhujdr,^ R. 53. 

60- TdchUd^^ is a small lurid Pimelode, which, like the following, 

1 Pimdodus murtus^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 195, and MS. drawings No. 14. 
' PimMUis anguis^ Ham. Bach. Fish. Ganges, p. 180^ pi. 29, f. 59. 

* Pimdodus chandramara^ Ham. Bttch. Fish. Ganges, p. 162, MS. drawings 
Na 13, as i'. changdramara^ 

* Pimdodus pangaHus^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 163, pL 33, fig. 52. 

* Pimdodus arius^ Ham. Bttch. Fish. Ganges, p. 17a 

* Pimdodus bagariust Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 186, pL 7, C 62, 

' Pimdodus matoda. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 203, pL I, L 72, in MS. 
drawings. No. 18, as P. telgagra and menoda. 

* Pimdodus cavasius^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 203, pL II, C 67. 

* Pimdodus cardo^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 181, pL 3, £ 61, erroneously 
termed P. teugara. 

1^ Pimdodus tengara^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 183, pL 23, C 60, erroneously 
mariced P, batasius, 

u Pimdodus balasio. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 179, MS. drawings No. 11 
zsP. deUasi, 

^ Pimdodus tmgana^ Ham. Buch. Fish Ganges, p. 176, pL 39, £ 58. 

" Pimdodus tdthitta^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 185, MS. drawings No. 
10, a P. nibriundus. 



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62 THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL. 

has the character of the Hypostomes of Lacep^de ; but I can see no 
sufficient grounds for separating these from the Pimelodes. 
6i. Nangrd ^ a small ugly fish. 

62. Pddnd? R. 46, D. 52. 

63. Nangrdy a small fish nearly related to the above. 

64. Guthalydngrdy R. 48. 

65. Chdmdr^ a small Pimelode. 

66. Hdrd^ an exceedingly ugly small Pimelode. 

67. Ndngdrdf^ R. 64. 

68. The small fish, number 30^ of the Dinijpur list, was brought 
to me from the Kusf by several names, Pithar Chllti also given to a 
fish already mentioned (No. 33), GingijW and Ghitponi. 

69. Dhongdf R. 66, D. 29. 

70. 71. The TUuyd^ of the Kusf includes two species, Nos. 67, 
and 68 of the Rangpur list 

72. Khard? R. 69. 

73. Hunddrd? R. 70, D. 31. At BhoUhdt it is called MtiriiiL 

74. The DhdnX}^ of Bholihdt is a very small species of Atherina, 
of which immense niunbers are found in the lower parts of the 
Mahinandi. 

75. GohdA}^ R. 73» D- 33- 

76. Bhufii^ R. 74, D. 34. 

77. The fishes of the Kusf difier in nothing more firom those of 
the rivers towards the east, than in containing few species that have 
an affinity to the herring. In fact no species that has teeth, is found 



^ Pimdodus nangra^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 193, pi. 11, £ 63. 
' Pimdodus rama^ Ham. Bach. Fish. Ganges, p. 176, pL 3, f. 35. 

* Pimdodus Mara, Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 198, MS. drawings No. 12. 

* Sisor rabdopharuSf Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. aoS, and MS. drawings 
Na 8, as ffypostomus ? sisor, 

* Esoxpanchaxy Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 211, pi. 3, £ 69. 

* Esox cancilOf Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 213, pi. 27, f. 7a 

' Cyprinus baliiora and sucatio. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, pp. 343, 347, and 
MS. drawings, Nos. 44. and 45. 
^ Mugil cascasia^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 217, MS. drawings No. 68: 

* MugU co^sutOj Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 221, pL 9, f. 97. 

^^ Atherina danim, Hamu Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 222, MS. drawings Na 91, 
A. dhani. 

^^ Mystus kapiraiy Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 235. 

" Mystus cAitala, Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 236, MS. drawings, i 
figure reproduced in illustration Indian Zoology. 



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PURNIAH DISTRICT-'UST OF FISHES. 63 

in this river, but in the Mah^nandd the kind called there Phinsd^ 
(R. 71), is very common. 

78. Of the fishes related to the herring, which have no teeth, 
Ciupamdotty the only one commonly foimd is a small fish nearly 
related to the 78th of the Rangpur list, and to the 3Sth of Dinijpur. 
In the Mahinandi it is called Bdrd-Khdyrd. 

79. The BKlsd^ (R. 76, D. 57) sometimes, but very rarely, straggles 
into the Kusf, and never ia. large shoals ; but it is very numerous in 
the Ganges and lower part of the Mahdnandi, into which it penetrates 
as &r as Krishnaganj. 

80. 81. In the last mentioned river, two species, the 77th and 78th 
of the Rangpur list, are called by the common name Kdrtifi 

82. In die Mahdnandd, the 79th fish of the same list is called 
Bdluydd^ 

83. There, also, I found a very singular small fish named Suvama 
Khdrikd^ which differs firom the above fishes, in having two fins 
under the tail, of which I have seen no other instance. 

84. Mdli,^ R. 83. 

85. The KdchJA^ is a small fish, a good deal resembling the last, 
which is found in the Mah^[nandi. It can be with difficulty con- 
sidered as a Cyprin, but is nearer that class of fishes than any other. 

86. The Kimgri is also a small fish that has only a distant resem- 
blance to the Cyprins. 

87. The 8oth fish of the Rangpur list on the Kusf is named BUrd^ 
on the Mahinandd, Dhar Chdd. 

88. GiOtd^ R. 122, D. 38. 

89. JI/i/>4/,WR.8i. 

> Clupea idara^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 241, pi. 3, f. 72. 

* Clupanodon Uisha^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 243, probably not pi. 19, 

f. 73- 

* Clupanodon manmina and cortms^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, pp. 247, 249. 

* Clupanodon motms^ Hanu Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 251, MS. drawings, No. 
88, C moiu 

* Corica soboma. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 253, and MS. drawings, No. 
87, as Clupanodon 9 subomo khorika, 

* Cyprmus Umbuca^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 260, MS. drawings. No. 139. 
' Cyprinus cachius. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 258, and MS. drawings, 

No. 145. 
' Cyprinus gcra^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 263, and MS. drawings No. 146. 

* Cyprinus coHo^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 339, pL 39, f. 93. 

^* Cyprinus bacaila^ Ham. Buch. Fish, Ganges, p. 265, pi. 8, f. 76. 



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64 THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL. 

90. PoiJd}^ R. 91. 

^s./dyfi is a small compressed Cyprin, with its back fin placed 
near die tail. 

92. The small fish (No. 86) of the Rangpur list, on the Kusf is 
called Son,^ on the Mahdnandi, Peheii, 

93. The Mdrur^ of the Kusf is one of the most delicate small 
fishes of the rivers in Bengal, and its taste and size have a consider- 
able resemblance to those of the Smelt It is a Cyprin. 

94. The fish of the Rangpur list (No. 104) on the Kusf is called 
Kdrsdf on the Mahinandi, Mochhnd. 

95. The Phdkrdfi is a small Cyprin, and like the two following, has 
dark bars transversing its sides. 

96. Pihuyd;} R. 88, D. 58. 

97. TUuyd,^ R. 89. 

98. TU^ is a small Cyprin, which, with the following, has its 
sides spotted somewhat like those of a trout. 

99. The Gohd^^ grows- to the size of a herring, and is a pretty good 
fish. 

100. The 93d fish of the Rangpur list on the Kusf, is called 
MUangd}^ and on the Mahinandd, Eleng, 

loi. The 9Sth fish of the Rangpur list, the E^d^^ of the banks of 
the Kusf, and the R^fkh^ of the Mahinand^. This fish seems to 
suffer considerable alterations in colour from the natiire of the water 
in which it lives. In marshes and small channels over-grown with 
weeds, its back is green with a gloss of gold, while in clear water, the 
whole is white and shines like silver. 

^ Cyprmus devario. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 341, pL 6, £ 94. 
' Cyprinus jaya^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 333, and MS. drawings 
No. 135. 

* MS. drawing No. 104. 

* Cyprinus morar^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 364, pi. 31, f. 75. 

* CyprUms angra^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 331, MS. drawings Na 118. 

* Cyprinus skacra^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 271, MS. drawings No. 137. 
' Cyprinus barUa and chedro^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, pp. 267, 268, and 

MS. drawings No. 134. 

* Cyprinus cocsa^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 272, pL 3, f. 77. 

* Cyprinus HUo^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 276, MS. drawings No. 125, 
C.tilei. 

** Cyprinus goAa, Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 275, MS. drawings No. 126. 
*^ Cyprinus elanga. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 281, MS. drawings No. 103. 
'' Cyprinus reba. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 280, MS. drawings No. 117 
C, bapgana. 



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PURNIAH DISTRICT-^LIST OF FISHES. 65 

103. Pdngtisiyd^ is a small fish^ nearly resembling the two follow- 
ing kinds, but does not grow larger than a Smelt 

103. Bhdngand,^ R. 98. 

104. mrkd,^ D. 62, R. 99. 

105. Rohu^^ D, 45, R. 100. 

106. The Ndnditfi of the lakes or marshes of Gaur, is a very fine 
laige well flavoured fish, like a Carp. I have seen it nowhere else in 
India. 

107. Bdsrdhdf R. 108, D. 44. 

108. The Kursff is a beautiful striped large Cyprin, very like that 
mentioned in the Rangpur list, loi, but its scales are much smaller. 
It is fiiU of small bones, and is poor eating. 

109. Under the name Sdhdrdy there was also brought to me another 
very fine large Cyprin, which name, however, was also given to the 
following. 

110. The 103d fish of the Rangpur list on the Kusf is called 
Turfyd or SdMrd,^ as I have just now mentioned. 

111. The Mdsd/^ of the Kusl is a very large fish, which many 
people think still better than the Rohu, and compare to the salmon. 
I cannot say that I could perceive any resemblance. It does not 
grow to such an immense size as the Mahisaul (R. 102) of the 
Brahmaputra, but has very large scales, and has a great affinity to 
that fish, and still more to the one last mentioned 

112. GdrMn,R. iio.^o 

113. The Khdngrhi of the Kusf is a fime large Cyprin, but the 
following is also called by this name. 

114. The I nth fish of the Rangpur list (D. 43) on the Kusf was 



^ Cyprinus pangusia. Ham. Bach. Fish. Ganges, p. 285, MS. drawings No. 
1 16, as C pangusiya, 
' Cyprinus boga^ Ham. Bach. Fish. Ganges, p. 286^ pi. 28, f. 80. 

* Cyprinus mrigala. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 279, pL 6, f. 79. 
« Cyprinus roAHa, Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 301, pi. 36, f. 85. 

* Cyprinus nandina^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 300, pL 8, f. 84, 

* Cyprinus ealbasu. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 297, pi. 2, f. 83. 
' Cyprinus cursa, Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 290. 

" Cyprinus tor^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 305, MS. drawings Na 

121. 

* Cyprinus masal^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 306, MS. drawings No. 
122. 

^ Cyprinus chagunio^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 295, MS. drawing (copy)^ 
▼oL u No. 39, C kunta. 



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66 THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL. 

by some called Ddrhi} but others again called it KhdngrM^ which, 
however, was probably a mistake. 

115. The Koswati^ strongly resembles the Pi&nthis, mentioned 
below, but has no spots. 

116. The 112th fish of the Rangpur list is here also commonly 
considered as the prototype of all the Piinthis, and is usually called 
by that name alone; but the specific appellation Dudhuyd^ is often 
prefixed. 

117. The name Kumrhi^ was often given to the 113th fish of the 
Rangpur list, which, however, from the redness of its fins, is often 
called Ldlkd Punthi. 

118. The name Chdngyt^ was given to a small fish of the same 
list (lis), ^^^ ^^ yam^ it was also called Kumri-Punthi, 

119. The name Khudi or Khudhi^ was also given to another 
similar fish (R. 116), but it was also occasionally called Chingy!. 

120. The same name Khudi^ without any addition, is also given to 
a small Cyprin, having one black spot on each side, and not being 
semidiaphanous like the Khiidis mentioned below. 

121. Chhotkd Khudi,^ K. 118. 

122. The 117th fish of the Rangpur list on the Kusf was some- 
times called Bh^y^ and sometimes Khudi, 

123. IMkdBhoti?'B^ 119. 

124. Mdrd^^ R. 120. 

125. The same name Afdrd^^ is also given to another small fish, 
R. 121. 

* Cyprinus sarana, Horn. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 307, MS. drawings mifaang 
in Calcutta. 

' CypHnus cosuaHsj Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 338, MS. drawings No. 132, 
as C, koswaiu 
' Cyprinus sophore^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 310, pL 19, f. 86. 

* Cyprinus cholcL^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 312, MS. figure reproduced 
M'CleUand, pL 56, f. 3. 

' Cyprinus HctOy Ham. Buch. FisK Ganges, p. 314, pL 8, C 87. 

* Cyprinus concAonius, Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 317, MS. drawings 
Na 96, as C. korikon. 

^ Cyprinus phutunio^ HauL Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 319, MS. drawings 
No. 129. 

* Cyprinus gdius^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 320^ MS. drawings Na 133, 
C gdi-pungH, 

* Cyprinus canius^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 320, MS. drawings Na 127, 
as C. ianipungtL 

>* Cyprinus guganiof Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 338^ MS. drawings. No. loi. 
^^ Cyprinus mola^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 334, pi 38, f. 92. 



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PURNIAH DISTRICT^UST OF FISHES. 67 

126. A small fish like a minnow (Cyprinus Phoxinus) on the Kusf 
is sometimes named the Dydngrd,^ and sometimes the Anjand. 
There are two other Dy^gr^ (No. 127 and 132), but the latter has 
no great resemblance to this or to the following. 

127. The Kostyd Dengrd,^ or Dydngrdy is another pretty little fish 
like a minnow, but has a long beard. In Dinijpur (39) it is named 
Dangrikd, at Calcutta it is named Dhini or D^ikond. 

128. Thi^/angjd^ of the Kusf very much resembles the last. 

129. The jRirhi Jongjd^ of the Kusf is one of the most beautiful 
little fishes that I have ever seen, being ornamented with fine longi- 
tudinal lines of purple and yellow. 

130. Kdrsd^ R. 104. 

131. The Pdugs^^ of the Kusf is a small fish nearly resembling 
105, 106, and 107 of the Rangpur list 

132. A good deal resembling these also is the third kind of 
Dydngrd^ mentioned above. It is also called Kanghdri, and is of 
little value. 

133. Desdrif IL 124; 

134. The Anhai^ of the'_Kusf is a species of Synbranche totally 
without fin, and as like a snake as possible. It is not, however, a 
very ugly eeL In the vicinity of Lakshmfpur it is called Kuchiyd, 
and is supposed by the natives to kill cattle by its bite ; but this is 
probably a mistake, as they also suppose that its bite is not fatal 
to man. It is not found more than two feet in length. 

> Cyprinus anjana. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 328, and MS. drawings 
No. 136, as Cyprinus dyangra anjana. 
' Cyprinus danrica. Ham. Bttch. Fish. Ganges, p, 325, pi. 16, f. 8S. 

* Cyprinus jogia^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 326, MS. drawings No. 141. 

* Cyprinus rerio^ Ham. Bach. Fish. Ganges, p. 323, and MS. drawings 
No. 144. 

* Cyprinus angra^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 331, MS. drawings No. iiS. 

* Cyprinus pausio^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 317, MS. figure reproduced 
M'Clelland Indian Cyprinidse, pi. 42, f. 4. 

' Cyprinus gohama^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 346, MS. drawings No. 107, 
as C. dyangra gohama, 

* Cyprinus sada^ HauL Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 344, MS. drawings Na 106. 

* Un^ranchapertura cucAia, Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 16. 



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68 THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL. 



FISH AND FISHERIES OF BHAGALPUR 
DISTRICT. 

Near the Ganges, and in the larger of its branches on the north 
side, tortoises are very numerous. They are caught by the common 
fishermen and are saleable ; but except among the lower tribes are 
in little request. Some are sent firom Rdjmahal to Murshidibid, 
and to the mountaineers. At Monghir there are reckoned seven 
kinds : — i, Singiyd, which is said to grow to between 5 and 6 feet 
in length. 2. Katdhi, which grows to about 2 feet in length. 
3. Dhongr grows to about a cubit in. length. 4. Stttlf is about 7 
or 8 inches long. 5. Bhitdhd is about the same size. 6. Sinddnyi 
is about 4 or 5 inches long. 7. H^rhi is about the same size. 

All these tortoises lay their eggs in the sand, digging a hole for 
the purpose, and covering them with sand. The season is from 
about the ist of March to the middle of April On other occasions, 
the whole continue always in the river, except the Kith^, which 
occasionally during the afternoon basks on the shore. They are 
supposed to feed chiefly on fish ; but they are also thought to eat 
shell fish, the reed called Kos^d, the roots of which are inundated^ 
and mud. Their eating the Kosili appears to me doubtful ; and 
what the natives mean by eating mud must have arisen from their 
having seen the animals searching among the mud for worms, snails, 
or such like animals. 

Lizards are not in request Crocodiles, both of the GhSriydl and 
Boch kinds, are numerous in the Ganges, and still more so in the 
Tiljugd. They are occasionally caught in the fishermen's nets, but 
are not intentionally molested, except on the north side of the 
Ganges, where the low tribe Mus^lh&r pursue them with spikes, and 
extract the oil. The Ghariydl, when caught, is eaten by the fisher- 
men, as well as the MusdUiir, but by no others. The Boch is 
rejected by all. Some invalids, whom it was attempted to settle on 



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- BHAGALPUR DISTRICT^FISH SUPPLY. 69 

the banks of the Tiljugi, assigned the number of crocodiles as a 
reason for having deserted their lands ; but I did not hear that in 
the whole District these animals had ever destroyed man or beast. 
I have, however, heard of the Boch having bitten people very 
severely. In one tank I heard of their being tamed to a certain 
d^ree. 

In the interior of the country south of the Ganges, fish are very 
scarce \ the rivers for a great part of the year are almost dry, and 
there are few marshes, ponds, or lakes. In the rainy season, how- 
ever, a few are generated, and are mostly caught by the farmers as 
the waters dry up. Near the Ganges, again, and especially near the 
Tiljugd Ghagri, on the north side of the great river, there is great 
abundance of fish ; but during the floods, owing to the want of skill 
in the fishermen, the supply is everywhere scanty ; and at Bhigalpur, 
owing probably to some defect in the police, the scarcity prevails in 
all seasons ; while at Monghir and Rijmahal, not more favourably 
situated, the supply during the dry season is uncommonly copious, 
and the quality tolerable. 

Some fish are dried and sent to the interior and to the adjacent 
hilly parts of the Blrbhiim District. Near the Ganges this kind of 
food is not in request, nor do the people there prepare the balls 
called Sidal, which I have formerly mentioned. A large proportion 
of the fish used is far advanced in putrescence before eaten. Rohii, 
Kitli, and Mrig^, being sent to Murshidibdd in considerable 
quantity, sell about one-fourth dearer than the other kinds. In the 
dry season these valuable species sell at Monghir for fi'om 2} to 3 
pice a ser of 84 S. W. (about 2 J pound), 64 pice bemg equsd to a 
rupee. 

There seems to be an uncommon alarm on the subject of the 
fisheries, so that I could procure no satisfactory account either of 
the number of men employed, of the nature of the tenures, of the 
means used, or even of the kinds caught. It was with great difficulty 
that I could induce two men to enter my service in order to bring 
me the different kinds, and they made so little exertion, and spoke 
so confusedly on the subject, that my list is exceedingly incomplete. 
The aversion shown by the owners and managers of the fisheries 
proceeds, I suspect, either from deficiencies of title or consciousness 
of firaud. 

A great many of the fishermen employed on the Ganges belong 
to the Pumiah District. When there, I was led to suppose that the 



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JO THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL. 

fishennen on that river were as expert as on the Mahdnandi, but 
here this is altogether denied, and it is alleged that there are very 
few indeed who can take fish in the stream of the great river, and 
these mostly strangers. It is said that even the stream of the 
Tiljugd or Ghigrf, in its most reduced state, is unfit for the fisher- 
men of this District, and that they are only successful in jhils or 
shallow lakes, and in what is called Kol and Ddmas — ^that is, 
branches of rivers, in which during the dry season the communica- 
tion with the stream is cut off at one, or at both ends. In the 
former case a net or screen stops the passage, and thus the fish are 
in a great measure caught as they are left dry, or, at least, when the 
assistance of a boat is not required in surrounding them with nets or 
screens (J^ghd). I am exceedingly doubtful concerning the re- 
ports which I heard on this subject, but an account of the nets used 
at Monghir will show that the fishermen are not so ignorant as 
they pretend. 

Some of the Banpar Gonrhfs at Monghir are said to strike large 
fish with the spear (Duktf), which is chiefly done in the floods. Some 
Keuts called Dubdri, or divers, are said to pursue fish under water 
with a spear, and I was gravely assured both at Surjyagarh and 
Monghir, that these men could continue under water a Hindf hour 
(twenty-four minutes); but two men that I tried at Monghir did 
not complete one minute, although one of them brought up a prawn. 
In some small rivers which have a supply firom the hills, as the 
waters fall in the cold season, I saw in use weirs somewhat like those 
employed in the small rivers of the eastern parts of the Rangpur 
District 

A great portion of the fisheries has been separated firom the pro- 
perty of the land by which they are surrounded ; and even where 
the landlord has the right to the fisheries situated within his estate, 
the tax on the two properties is kept distmct The greatest fishery, 
that at Rijmahal, mentioned in the account of Pumiah as belonging 
to a lady, now belongs to Government The owner having fallen 
into arrears, the estate was put up to sale, and no one offering, the 
Collector took it as usual. It has been since farmed to a Musal- 
mdn, who, it is said, pays only Rs. looi a-year, and who, it is pre- 
tended, loses by his baigain ; but how this should be the case, seems 
difficult to be understood. Some few privileged fishermen have a 
right to fish in certain places for a certain small sum (Rs. 3 or 4) 
annually ; but, if they go to any other place, as is usually the case, 



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BHAGALPUR DISTRICT— FISHING POPULATION. 71 

they give a share, and by &r the greater part of the fish is caught by 
those who give the renter or his agents half of all that they take, and 
the quantity taken in this fishexy must be exceedingly great. Another 
great fishery in the same vicinity, but farther down, is called Dihi- 
Mirzipur, and includes what is called the Gangipanth, or the fishery 
on the Ganges with all its creeks and branches. On the small 
Bhigirathf it extends from Jangfpur to Mohanganj, about nine 
kos ; and, on the great river, it extends firom Ridh^nagar to Kindrd 
Gobindpur, about fourteen kos. Five hundred families have leases in 
perpetuity to use this fishery, but most of them reside in Pumiah, 
Dinijpur, and Nitor, and they seem in some measure to be adscripti 
aqtdsy as it is alleged that, were they to remove even to Dacca, they 
would still continue liable for the rent For each ^unily, this varies 
from a-half to three rupees a-year, not according to its present 
strength, but according to its state, when the lease was granted. 
These people have the exclusive privilege of using the fishery of the 
Gangdpanth, wherever the stream runs, but this is chiefly used in the 
rainy season, and in the diy, the fish are mostly caught in the 
branches and creeks (Kol or Ddmas), that are stagnant, and the pri- 
vileged fishermen, if they fish there, must give one half of all they 
take to the renter of the fisheiy, and he may there employ as many 
other people as he pleases. The 500 privileged families have 400 
boats, and cannot well contain less than 1000 able-bodied men. The 
rent, according to some, is Rs. 900 ; according to others, Rs.i 100, and 
for the expense of collection (Saranjamf) the renter is allowed a 
deduction of Rs. 125. Similar customs exist on most of the other 
fisheries, and, as in Pumiah, the nominal profit arising to the owners 
from them is a mere trifle ; but, as these fisheries are here also in 
general farmed, there is no knowing their real value, even if we had 
access to see the books of the estate, for the renter either pa)rs a pre- 
miimi (Salimf ) for his lease, or receives it at a trifle as a reward for 
his services. 

The number of fishermen stated to belong to this District was 3800 
or 3900, but many of these are employed part of their time in gather- 
ing tamarisks for fuel, in harvest, and in working the boats which 
belong to the District ; but all the people employed in these are not 
natives ; and a great many people, even of those who have a right to 
fish for a fixed sum, are employed in the fisheries of this District, but 
reside in Pumiah, Dindjpur, Ndtor, and Miu^hidibid. The number 
actually employed may therefore be seven thousand ; and, allowing 



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72 



THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL. 



that each fishes eight months in the year, and catches five rupees worth 
of fish monthly, tiie total value will be 280,000 rupees, of which the 
owners of the fisheries may be able to secure a third part. No fish, 
so far as I heard, is sent to Calcutta. The sales are managed in 
Pumiah. 

The fishermen seem to live much as in that District It is said, 
that during the fishing season, they can clear firom two to six rupees 
a month, that is on an average four rupees, and the people, whom I 
employed merely to buy such fish as I wanted, complained of four 
rupees a month as being hard wages. 

Population and Proportion of Fishing Classes, according to the 
Census of 1872. 



Name of 
District 


Total popu- 
lation. 


Toul 
adult 
males. 


Percentage of 
adult males 

to the whole 
population. 


Total 
fi&hing 
popula- 
tion. 


Number 

of 
fishcr- 


Number of fish- 
mongers. 


Males. 


Females Total 


Bh^igalpur 


1,826,290 


565,131 


30-9 


118,606 


3051 


757 


82 


839 



Estimate as to how Families in the Bhagalpur District are Fed. 



FAMILIES 



ll 



Who have as much 
fish as they please, 

Who have fish daily 
in the cheap season, 
but only occasion- 
ally in the dear 
season. 

Who eat what they 
can catch, . . 

Who reject fish, . 



200A 



doo 



few 



» 



H 

few 



few 



n 



» 



few 



» 






If 

few 



few 



few 
few 



few 



ioo|a 



few 



H 



H 



^ few fowl 



The following is a list of the species which I procured ; and for 
each kind remarked upon in other Districts, I have made refer- 
ences by the initial and number to the lists given in the accounts of 
the Districts formerly surveyed. The names of the fishes found in 
this District, wherever not otherwise mentioned, are those used at 
Monghir. 

I begin with a list of those 1 found in or near the Atrii at 
Pdtnftall 



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BHAGALPUR DISTRICT-^UST OF FISHES. 73 

1. Sankchiy I was a good deal surprised to find, so high up a 
fresh water river as Monghir, a species of Raia, but I am told that 
this fish is not uncommon so high up even as Cawnpur. This 
species approaches nearer the Lymme described by Lacep^de than 
to any other mentioned by that author; but may readily be dis- 
tinguished by having a fin on the forepart of the under side of the 
tail. It does not grow to a large size ; at Monghir it is uncommon, 
but is thought very good. In Bengal it is called S^k^ch ; and its 
name in the Sanskrit language is said to be Sankii, but these names 
are probably generic. 

2. Phokchd^ of Monghir diifers from the species of Tetrodon called 
by that name at Ndthpur. It is, however, very probable that both 
may be called by the same name, as they have strong affinities. At 
Calcutta this is called the Gdng Pataki, fi:om its frequenting rivers, 
while the other is most commonly found in marshes, tanks, or 
ditches. The fish which I am now describing grows to about six 
inches in length, and when irritated does not swell near so much 
in proportion as the other kind.' 

3. Bdmach^ is an ugly animal even for an eel, and may perhaps 
be the Murene tachet^e of Lacepdde. Europeans who like eels 
think this very good, but it is not common. When full grown, it is 
said to be 2} cubits long, and i cubit in circumference, but I strongly 
suspect that the latter dimension is exaggerated. The one which I 
procured, 38 inches long, was only 6J inches round. It is a very dis- 
tinct species firom the Vamos of the lower parts of Bengal, although 
the names are undoubtedly the same. Eels are said in the Sanskrit 
language to be called S^hy& and Sailushbhuk, but the name is pro- 
bably generic. 

4. The Vdm^ (P. No. 7) is the species of Macrognathe called 
anguillon^ (armd?) by Lacep^de. In the Sanskrit language this 
fish is said to be called V^!, S^shm^iikh^ and B^y^prishth^- 
k^k^t^^. 

5. The Pdt Gainchi^ (P. No. 8) is another species of the same genus. 

6. The Bulld^ of Monghir at Ndthpur (P. No. 9) is caUed Guild, 

^ Rata sancur. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 2, MS. drawing, No. 65. 

* Tetrodon fluviaiilis (variety) Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 6, pi. 30, f. I. 

* Murana macu/ata, Dacep, Fishes of the Ganges, p. 23. 

* Macrognathus armatus, Lacep. Fish. Ganges, p. 28, pi. 37, f. 6. 

* Macrognathus acuteattiSy Ham. Buch. Fbh. Ganges, p. 29. 

* Godmsgiuris, Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 51, pi. 33, f. 15. 



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74 THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL. 

The names are undoubtedly the same, but whether my copyists have 
fallen ihto an error, or whether the fishennen have pronounced indis- 
tinctly, they being a people grossly ignorant, it is impossible to say. 

7. The Khisrd is the species of Trichopode called Sddi Khalishd 
at GodlpdrA (IL No. 10), and Kotri at Nithpur (P. No. 10). 

8. Garai is the Ophiocephalus punctatus of Block ^ (P. No. 16). 
In the Sanskrit language this fish is said to be called GSb::Slk^ 
GiLraghnf and S^iilarbhikl 

9. The Sauri^ is the Ophiocephale Wrahle of Lacep&le (R. No. 
15). In the Sanskrit language this fish is called SakiilL 

10. The Gdjdllf another species of the same genus, at Nithpur, 
was called Bhongrd (P. No. 17), and in the Sanskrit is said to be 
called Sdla. 

11. The Dhdlo^ is a Holocentre (P. No. 21), called Bhedi in 
many parts of Bengal. 

12. The Pdihri^ is also called Bholdy and is a species of Lutxan, 
which by the Europeans at Calcutta is often called a whiting, being 
a fish nearly of the same size and somewhat of the same taste with 
our European fish of that name, although it is inferior in quality, 
and, in the eye of the naturalist, has little or no affinity. I am 
inclined to think that it is the Lutian Chinois of Lacep^de. It is 
common in the mouths of the Ganges. At Lokipur, on the eastern 
of these, it is called the Bholi, and at Calcutta, on the western mouth, 
it is called Kit bhoUL It ascends the Ganges as high at least as 
Monghir, and is very conmion in the Ghigrf. 

13. Bholdf firom what I have above said, must be perceived to be 
a generic term, and the species which at Monghir is considered as 
the prototype at Calcutta, is called Pdmi Bhold, and by the English 
there is also called a whiting, but in the mouths of the Ganges this 
species often grows to the size of a cod. In this upper part of the 
river it is usually of the size of a whiting, and in every respect has a 
very strong affinity to the other Bholi, being also a species of 
Lutian. 

14. At Monghir the prototype of the next Gangetic Genus, 

^ Ophiocephalus laia^ Ham Bach. Fish. Ganges, p. 63, pL 34, f. 18. 
■ Ophiocephalus wrahle^ Fish. Ganges, p. 60, pi. 31, f. 17. 

* Ophiocephalus marulius, Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 65, pL 22, f. 19. 

* Labrus badisy Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 96, pi. 30, f. 32. 
^ Bala coitoTy Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 75, pi. 27, f. 24. 

* Bolapama, Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 79, pL 32, f. 26. 



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BHAGALPUR t) I STRICT— LI ST OF FISHES. 7$ 

Chdndd^ is considered to be the small species of Centropome, the 
25 th of the Pumiah and Rangpur lists. 

15. The Chhotd Chdndd^ is another species (D. No. 12, P. No. 26) 
of the same Gangetic genus. 

16. The Vdghi^ is a small Cobitis (P. No. 27). 

17. The Naktd^ is another (P. No. 32), which at Ndthpur is called 
Khdrikl 

18. The Rdmtengri^ is another (R. No. 33) called Bilturi at 
Go^p^. 

19. In the perennial sources amid the rocks of the Monghir Hills, 
is found another small Cobitis, which I have seen nowhere else, and 
for which the natives have invented no name. 

20. The Mdngri^ is the Macropteronotus batrachus Lacepdde (P. 
No. 37). In the Sanskrit language it is said to be called M&dgtir^ 

21. Singhi^ is the Silurus fossilis of Lacep^de (P. No. 38), and 
from the number of names it is said to have acquired in the sacred 
tongue, must have strongly attracted the notice of the Brdhmans. 
These names are Sringf, M^giir^f, Kiikii, Gom&tsydlf, Trlk^t^^ 
and Bfsh^LkdntiLki. 

22. Boydri^ another silurus (P. No. 39). This ugly fish has 
also acquired many Sanskrit names: — S^Lh^r^^shtr^ P^thini 
Mpy&btoili, UdiUMrgh^ and Mllhisirl 

23. Tdmbultyd pdptd^ or "pipt^like a betel leaf." Another silurus, 
the Pobho of GoilpM (R. No. 37). Although an excellent fish, 
it has only in the sacred tongue acquired one name, Mihis&ph^, and 
this is probably generic. 

24. The Fdptd^^ of this place is another excellent silurus, the 
Kinipdbdi of Godlp^ (R. No. 38). 

> Ckanda bogoda^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 111, MS. drawings, No. 3, as 
Cmiropomm bogoda, 

• Ckanda ranga, Ham. Bach. Fish. Ganges, p. 113. 

• CoHtis dario^ Ham. Buch, Fish. Ganges, p. 354, pi. 29, f. 95. 

• CobiAs carica^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 359, MS. drawings, No. $2, as 
CoHUs kharica. 

• Cobitit biiturio. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 358, MS. drawings, No. 49, as 
C.bUiuru 

• Macropteronotus magnr^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 146, pi. 26, f. 45. 
» Silurus singiot Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 147, pL 37, f. 46. 

• Siiurm boalis. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 154, pL 29, f. 49. 

• ^hmupabo^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 153, pi. 22, f. 48. 
I* Silurus canio^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 151. 

VOT- VIl. F 



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76 THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL. 

25. The Bdtausi^ is the Malapture which at Ndthpur is called 
Angchdcheyi (P. No. 45). 

26. The SUon^ is the species of Pimelode, almost everywhere 
known by the same name (R. No. 58, D. No. 55) ; but in the higher 
dialect of Bengal, it is called Sll^ndhi, and in the Sanskrit it is 
Silendhra and Sllindhl 

27. The Bdchoyd^ is another Pimelode, called VdchA in Bengal 
(R. No. S9), and Kdtld at Ndthpur (P. No. 47). 

28. The Pdidsi*^ is another Pimelode, at Go%drd called Baradaha 
(R. No. S4). 

29. The RUhd^ is another Pimelode, (R. No. 56). 

30. The Gdgrd Tertgrd^ is another, tjre Ariyd of N^thpur (P. 
No. 52). The name Gdgri Tengrd, in the lower parts of the 
Ganges, is given to a very different species of the same genus. 

31. The Ghorchdhdy^ is another very common Pimelode, the 
Vdghiir of Ndthpur (P. No. 53). This name is probably wrong, 
as it is likewise given to a kind of Cyprinus, which is so called 
in other places also, and is therefore in all probability the true 
Ghorchelhd. 

32. The Bdaundd^ is another Pimelode, the Men&dd of Ndthpur 
(P. No. 54). 

33. The Pdlwd Tengrd? is another Pimelode, the Pithari Tengrd 
of Go^lpird (R. No. 49). 

34. The BdjMy^ is another Pimelode, which at Nithpur is called 
Hdri Tengird (P. No. 56). 

35. The Gdfigti^^ is a small Pimelode, the M&htljar of Nithpur 
(P. No. 59), and Tengri of Godlpdrd (R. No. 53). 

^ Mala^erurus coila. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 158, and MS. drawings. 
No. 7, as Malopterure kayalu 

* Pimdodus sUondia^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 160, pi. 7, f. 50. 
' Pimdodus vacha^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 196, pi. 19, f. 64. 

* Pimdodus urua, Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 177, MS. drawings, No. 15, 
Punta. 

* Pimdodus rita, Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 165, pi. 24, f. 53, 

* Pimdodus arius, Ham. Buch. Fish Ganges, p. 17a 

. ^ Pimdodus bagarius^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 186, pi. 7, f. 62. 

* Pimdodus menoda^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 203, pL I, f. 72, MS. 
drawings, No. 18, as P. tdgagra and menoda. 

® Pimeiodus cavasius. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 203, pi. 11, f. 67. 
'<> Pimdodus carcio. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 181, pi. 3, f. 61, erroneously 
termed P, tengara. 
*' Pimdodus tengana^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 176, pi. 39, f, 58. 



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BHAGALPUR DISTRICT— LIST OF FISHES, 77 

36. The Bdifid^ is another Pimelode, the P^dnd of N^thpur 
(P. No. 62), and Kengya of Godlpird (R. No. 46). 

37. The Tinkdnioyd, ^ or three prickles, is still another Pimelode, 
or at least is nearer that genus than any other. It is the Hdri of 
Nathpur (P. No. 66). 

38. The Pemd^ is the ugly creature, which in the Rangpur District 
is caUed ChaH (R. No. 65). 

39. The Pdtli^ is the small fish (P. 70, R 68), which I have 
referred to the genus Stolephore. 

40. The Kauydl^ is a species of Esox, the Dhongd of Ndthpur 
(P. No. 69), and Chore of Godlp^rd (R. No. 66). 

41. The Andewdri^ is a species of Mugil, at Ndthpur named 
Hiind^d (P. No. 73), and at Godlpdr^ (R. N. 70), called Muji. 

42. The Kdnchdti ^ is a species of Myste, the Goh^tf of Ndthpur 
(P. No. 75), and Phole of Go%dr4 (R. No. 73). 

43. The Golhi^ is the Myste, which at Ndthpur is called Bhunl 
(P. No. 76), and at Godlpdril (R. No. 74) is. named Bara Chital. 
At Monghir when it grows very large it is called Moe. 

44. The Phdstyd^ is a species of Clupea, the Phinsd of the 
Mahinandi (P. No. 77), and Phoingyd of Godlpdrd (R. No. 71). 

45. The misd^^ of the Hindi dialect, or Ilish of the Bengalis, 
(P. No. 79, and R. No 76), ascends only in small quantities so far 
as Monghir, and there is very poor. In the S.E. comer of the 
District it is plentiful and tolerably good. In the Sanskrit language 
it is said to be called lUisha and M^tsy^rdj^. 

46. The Chdprd}'^ except in size and the difference of a few rays 
in the fins, is so like the above that I should be almost inclined to 

* Pinidodus rama^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 176, pi. 3, f, 55. 

' Pimdodus hara. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 198, MS. drawings. No. 12. 

* Platystacus chaca, Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 140, pi. 28, f. 43. 

* Cyprinus sucaiio. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 347, MS. drawings, No. 45, 
as Stdephorus sukatu 

* Esox cancUa^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 213, pi. 27, f. 70. 
« MugUcorsulay Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 221, pi. 9, f. 97. 

' Mystus kapirat. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 235. 

* Afystus chitula. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 236, figure reproduced in the 
illustrations of Indian Zoology. 

* Clupea tdara. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 241, pi. 2, f. 72. 

»• Clupanodon ilisha^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 243, probably not^ pi. 19, 

f. 73. 

1* Clupanodon chapra^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 24S, MS. drawings 

No. 89. 



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yS THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL. 

take it for the young Hilsd. It is a common fish, 6 or 8 inches long. 
I do not think that I have seen exactly the same fish anywhere else, 
although it comes very near the Manmin of Goilpdrd (D. No. 35). 

47. The SuMyd^ is another Clupanodon not very distinct fix>m 
the last mentioned, but smaller. It is the Khayri of Goilpiri 
(R. No. 78). 

48. The Kdhi^ is another kindred fish, the Mati of Godlpdri 
(R. No. 79). 

49. The small fish somewhat resembling the Cyprini which was 
called Giitti at Ndthpur (P. No. 88), and Ghili Chdndi at Godlpiri 
(R. No. 122), at Monghir was brought under two names, the PUhdri^ 
and Gorddy its real name is therefore uncertain. 

50. Chdptiy^ it must be observed, near Calcutta, is a name given 
to one of the genus Lutian, which by the English is called a whiting, 
but at Monghir it is the name of a small fish approaching to a 
Cyprinus, which at Godlpdrd is called Layukuli (R. No. 84). 

51. The Mdli^ at GoilpirtL was called Phulcheld (R No. 82). 

52. The Chdmdk Cfulhd is the Nariyali CheM of Goilpird 
(R. No. 81). 

53. The Ghorchdhd^ is another kindred ill-defined Cyprinus 
called GhordcheU at Godlpdri (R No. 80), which seems to be the 
same name, signifying horse cheli on account of its size, which is 
larger than that of the other Cheld. 

54. The KhuskP is a small Cyprinus, the Jiy^ of Nithpur 
(P. No. 91). 

55. The CMpiiyd^ is another very similar fish. The Bukrdngi 
of Godlpdrd (R. No. 86); the name Chipfiyi is, however, uncertain, 
for the same fish was brought also as the Piroiyl 

^ Clupanodon cortius^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 249. 

• Clupanodon viotius^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 251, MS. drawings, No. 
88, as C. moti, 

• Cyprinus cotio^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 339, pi. 39, f. 93. 

• Cyprinus at par ^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 259, and MS. drawings, No. 
142, as Cyprinus layukulu 

• Cyprinus phulo. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 262, and MS. drawings. 
No. 130, as C phul chda. 

• Cyprinus gora. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 263, and MS. drawings. 
No. 14^, as C, i;ora, 

' Cyprinus jaya. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 333, and MS. drawings 
No. 13s, as C.jaya. 

• MS. drawings. "No. 104, as Cyprinus bukranga. 



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BHAGALPUR DISTRICT— LIST OF FISHES, 79 

56. The Pdiharchdtd'^ of the Chdndan river in the mterior of the 
District, is the Chedr4 of the Tisti (R. No. 90). 

57. The Mdydri^ of the same river is nearly allied to the above, 
and is what in the Rangpur list (No. 89) is called Khaksi. 

58. Under the name Vdghrd^ the fishermen of Monghir brought 
two small fishes strongly resembling the last-mentioned Cyprinus. 
One I have seen nowhere else, nor do its qualities merit peculiar 
notice. 

59. The other VAghrd^ in the Rangpur list (No. 88) is called Barild. 

60. The Bdnghi Rewd ^ is a Cyprinus approaching to a Mugil, and 
is the Bhingan of the Rangpur list (No. 95). 

61. The Ardn^d^ is a similar fish — the Elangd of the Rangpur 
list (No. 93). The two names are evidently the same. The name 
in the Sanskrit is said to be Ering^ 

62. The Bhdngndthi'^ is a similar fish, the Yogi of Go^pdri 
(R. No. 98). 

63. The Chhahi^ of the arid rivers of the south is another similar 
fish, which at Nithpur is called Pdngtisiyi (P. No. 102). 

64. The first of these fishes allied to both the Cyprini and Mugils 
is here called MfrkP and Niyen; it is the Mirkd of Ndthpur 
(P. No. 104). 

65. The Kdlbdns ^^ is a proper Cyprinus, which has been mentioned 
in every District hitherto surveyed. It is the B^rdhd (No. 107.) of 
Pumiah, and the Kdlbasu of Bengal (R. No. 108). When 
caught in water that is pure and has a hard bottom, it assumes 
a different colour from what it has in dirty pools, many of the 

* Cyprinus chedra^ Ham. Buch, Fish. Ganges, p. 273, and MS. drawings, No. 
Ill, as C*. chedra. 

« Cyprinus cocsa. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 272, pi. 3, f. 77. 
■ Cyprinus vagra. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 269. 

* Cyprinus barila. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 267, MS. drawings, 
No. 134. 

* Cyprinus reba^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 280, and MS. drawings, 
No. 117, as C bangana, 

• Cyprinus danga^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 281, MS. drawings. No. 

103. 
' Cyprinus boga. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 286, pi. 28, f. 80. 

• Cyprinus pangusia^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 285, MS. drawings, 
No. 1 16, as C. pangusiya. 

• Cyprinus mrigala, Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 279, pi. 6, f. 79. 
*• Cyprinus calbasu^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 297, pi. 2, f. 83. 



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8o THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL. 

lateral scales being then of a coppery hue. In this case it is called 
Kiindhnd. 

66. The Rohu^ that most elegant of carps, called Rohit in Bengal 
(R. No. loo), is here, perhaps, the most common fish ; but being 
generally caught in dirty stagnant pools, it is seldom very good. 
Most excellent Rohtis are, however, sometimes procured from the 
river. No fish seems so much to have attracted the attention of the 
Brihmans, and in the Sanskrit language it is said to be called 
Rohita, Rakotd^r^, Raktimiikha, Riktikshi, Riktdpdksati, Krish- 
nip^ksh^ Krishna,prishth&, and Jhish&sreshta. 

67. The Kursd ^ of Monghir is the fish mentioned at Nithpur 
(P. No. 108) by the same name. 

68. The Kciild^ of the Hindi dialect is the Kital of Bengal 
(R. No. 109). What is most commonly procured and most 
abundant, is very indifferent, owing to the same cause which affects* 
the R6htt. 

69. The Dddhai^ is the fish called Ddrhf at Ndthpur (P. No. 114), 
and Saran punthi in Bengal (R. No. in). 

70. The Sdphari^ of the Sanskrit (P. 116) has, it is said, 
in that language, two other names, Proshthf and TiktSmitsyL In 
this District also it is considered as the prototype of an Indian 
genus of fish, included amongst the Cyprini of Zoologists. The 
vulgar name is everywhere radically the same, but on the smaller 
rivers of the south it is pronounced Ponthf, and at Monghir it is 
called Ponthiy£ 

71. The Tiktd SdpJidri^ of the sacred language, the Tit punthi of 
Rangpur (No. 115), and Chdngyi of Pumiah (No. 118), is at 
Monghir called the Sdmir Ponthf. 

72. The Dhemni' of Monghir is the Ghugini of Godlpdrd 
(R. No. 120). 

» Cyprinus rohita^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 301, pi. 36, f. 85. 
' Cyprinus cursa. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 290, and MS. drawings 
No. 124, as C cursa. 
2 Cyprinus catla^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 287, pi. 13, f. 81. 

* Cyprinus sarana. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 307, MS. drawing missing 
at Calcutta. 

* Cyprinus sophorcy Ham, Buch. Fishes of Ganges, p. 310, pi. 19, f. 86. 

* Cyprinus ticto. Ham. Buch. Fishes of Ganges, p. 314, pi. 8. f. 87. 

' Cyprinus guganio^ Ham. Buch. Fishes of Ganges, p. 338, and MS. Drawings 
No. 101, as C.gugani, 



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BHAGALPUR DISTRICT-^UST OF FISHES. 8i 

73. The Mdrdwd^ is the MM of Pumiah(No. 125), probably im- 
properly written, and the Mauyd of Rangpur (No. 121.) 

74. The Sdhdfi ^ is a small Cyprinus somewhat like a minnow, 
which is found in the small streams among rocks, south from 
Monghir, and at Ndthpur is named the Koslyi Dengrd (P. No. 127). 

75. The Ddngild^ is another small Cyprinus, found in the same 
places, and having its sides curiously reticulated with blue lines. I 
have seen it nowhere else. 

76. The Godiydri^ is another small Cyprinus found in the same 
places, which, together with the Desiri (P. No. 133), the Lati 
(R. No. 125), the Dydngri (P. No. 132), the Piiigsi (P. No. 131), 
and some others, has some affinity to the genus Cobitis, although 
they have very distinct scales, and it is by the want of these chiefly, 
in my opinion, that the genus Cobitis can be distinguished from that 
called Cyprinus. 

Oblong crustaceous fishes are in very great abundance through the 
whole course of the Ganges, and at Monghir those about the size 
of a prawn are remarkably well tasted. 

The small crabs mentioned in the accounts of the Districts formerly 
surveyed are common in the inundated lands. 

* Cyprinus mola^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 334, pi. 38, f. 92. 

* Cyprinus danrica. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 325, pi. 16, f. 88. 

3 Cyprinus dangiia^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 321, and MS. drawings 
No. 140, as C, dangila, 

* Cyprinus lamta. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 343, and MS. drawings 
No. 105, as Cyprinus godiyari. 



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BEHAR AND PATNA—YIELD FROM FISHERIES, 83 



FISH AND FISHERIES OF BEHAR AND 

PATNA. 

Except on the banks of the Ganges, fish, during the greater part 
of the year, are scarce, and mostly of a very poor quality. In the 
Son, indeed, the fish is better than in the Ganges, nor have I 
ever seen fresh water fish of a quality superior to several kinds of the 
carp, which are caught in that river ; but, whether from the fish being 
there scarce, or from want of sufficient skill in the fishermen, the 
supply from the Son is trifling. In the rainy season, indeed, this 
river swells so enormously and rushes with such violence that few 
fish, I believe, could by any means be caught ; and in the dry season 
the water is in general so shallow and clear that the simple and 
imperfect method used by the native fishermen are quite inadequate. 
The other rivers of the interior are mere torrents, and although a few 
fish ascend in the rainy season and are caught when the water sub- 
sides, the supply that they give is trifling. In some places, however, 
the fishermen, after the rivers have greatly subsided, form dams, 
which collect deep pools of water, into which all the remaining fish 
assemble, and are kept as a supply for spring. The reservoirs made 
for watering the fields, during four or five months in the year, give a 
considerable quantity of fish, but all the kinds are small, seldom 
exceeding three or four inches in length. In August every rice 
field swarms with such, and many of them, no doubt, make their 
way up the rivers, and from thence through the canals used in 
irrigation, and through the rills that fall from the fields; but 
these means seem to me inadequate to account for the number 
of fish that appear, and I have no doubt that the greater part 
is bred from eggs that remain dry in the soil until hatched by 
the heat and moisture of the rainy season. As the fields dry, a 
great many of these fish become a prey to the lower class of 
farmers, who catch for their own use ; but vast multitudes flock into 
the reservoirs, ditches being in general cut to give them a passage as 



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84 THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL, 

the waters retire. The reservoirs are let by the owners to professional 
fishermen, who, as the water dries up, catch the fish with very little 
trouble, and the supply continues pretty copious until February. The 
only supply after that, until September, is procured from a few tanks, 
reservoirs, and pools in rivers, mostly artificial, as just now mentioned, 
that retain water throughout the year ; but as such places are few in 
number, the supply is very scanty, and does not employ i-8th of the 
fishermen. In the Ganges the supply of fish is copious from the 
middle of October, until the rainy season has swollen the nver about 
the end of Jime. 

The fisheries in the pools and reaches of the rivers of the interior, 
in the reservoirs, and in ponds, are annexed to the lands by which 
they are surrounded, and are let for very trifling sums. The whole 
fisheries in the division of Sdhibganj, I was told, let for about 7000 
rupees a year to about 800 fishermen, but this is a very large propor- 
tion of the whole of the fisheries of the Behar District, which I am 
told may let at about 16,000 rupees a year. Some landlords, however, 
agree with people, who undertake to keep the reservoirs in repair 
for the fish. In the District of Patni city the fisheries may be let at 
between three and four thousand rupees a year. The main stream 
of the Ganges is free to all ; but fishermen, for the land which their 
huts occupy, always pay higher than any other class. Any fisher- 
man may, therefore, use the great river, but if he erects on the bank 
a shed, however wretched, he must pay rent, in the rate of which his 
gains as a fisherman are always considered. In creeks or channels 
of the river that, in the dry season, have no current (Kol, Ddb, 
Ddmas) the fish are the property of the owner of the bank, but the 
number and extent of such in these Districts are very trifling, and 
disputes about the property of the largest, in the immediate 
vicinity of Patni, have put a total stop to its being used, it 
not being the duty of any person to interfere. The supply in 
Patnd, however, from the middle of October to the middle of June, 
is copious, there being many fisheries on the north side of the 
Ganges. 

Very few of the fishermen live the whole year by this profession. 
During the rainy season, those near the Ganges act chiefly as boat- 
men, and fish about eight months. In the interior, during spring, 
some of them go to the forests to make catechu, and the remainder 
reap wheat and barley. In the early part of the rainy season, they 



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BEHAR AND PATNA— YIELD FROM FISHERIES. 85 

transplant and weed. They fish only, therefore, four or five months, 
and their operations are much interrupted by the rice harvest, in 
which, during the winter, by far the greater number are employed. 
Dining the time that they are employed in fishing, it is supposed that, 
besides pa3ring the rent of the fishery, which is high, each man, 
assisted by a woman to sell, can clear from three to fiwt rupees a 
month. Near the Ganges, it is supposed that there are 530 houses 
of fishermen, in which there will be about 1200 able-bodied men. 
These have not above 200 boats employed in fishing, exclusive of 
what are used for ferries. In the interior, there are about iioo 
houses, with more than double the number of able-bodied men. 
These have no boats, except such as are employed as ferries, and a 
very few in the Son. It must be observed that the number of people 
of fishing castes, is much greater than what I have here stated. I 
only here include such as are actually fishermen. 

Population and Proportion of Fishing Classes, according to the 
Census of 1872. 



Name of 
District. 


Total Popu- 
lation. 


Total male 
adults. 


Percentage 
of adult 
males to 
the total 

population. 


Total 
fishing 


Fisher- 


Fishmongers. 


J 


tion. 


Male.' Female. 


Total 


Patna 
GayA (for- 
mer Bchar?) 


1,559,638 
1,949,750 


491,394 
609,553 


315 

31 3 


23,752 
12,694 


452 
1070 


200 


233 
22 


433 
22 


10 



With respect to the kinds, I have little to offer, as no reasonable 
remuneration would induce the fishermen to bring me a complete set 
of the various sorts. In the most favourable season of the year, 1 
hired two men for two months to attend the fishermen, and to pur- 
chase every kind that was caught, and the result of their labour is 
given below : — 

Varieties of Fish — 

I. The Rdjd, called Sankchi^ at Monghir (Bhdgalpur, No. i) is 
known here by the same name, and sometimes its body is three 
feet in diameter. A considerable quantity of oil separates from it in 
boiling, and is used as a medicine. Great numbers are caught when 
the river begins to fall. 

* Rata safuur^ Ham. Buch. Fish, Ganges, p. 2, MS, drawings No. 65. 



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86 THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL, 

2. The PhuAyd PhokcM^ of Patni is the species of Tetrodon, 
which in Purniah (No. i) is called simply Phokchd. 

3. The Bard Phokchfi of Patnd, is the Phokchd of Monghir (B. 
No. 2.) 

4. The Eel, which, in the Pumiah list (No. 5) is called Sttsttki- 
ktochai, at Patni, DudMyd^ 

5. The Vdm^ of Patni is called by the same name at Monghir 
(B. No. 4). 

6. The Pdth^ of Patni is the Macrognathe aquillonde of La- 
cep&ie, and the same with the Pdt of Monghir (B. No. 5). The 
names are evidently the same ; I suppose the orthography here is 
the most correct. 

7. The Bhuftgfi^ is another species of the same genus, which is 
the same with the Gochi of Rangpur (No. 5.) 

8. The Gobius called here Giiild'' is the Biilli of Monghir 
(B. No. 6), which shows that the orthography given there was 
erroneous, as both at Patni and Nithpur the word commences 
with G. 

9. The large {Bard) Kheshrd^ of Patni is the species of Tricho- 
pode called Khalishd in Rangpur (No. 7), and is called laige, not on 
account of its size, but because it is considered as the prototype of a 
genus. 

10. The Ldikotrd^ is another Trichopode, which is called Ldlkha- 
lishi in Rangpur (No. 12). The name LAlkotrd in Pumiah (No. 12) 
is given to a very distinct species ^^ (R. 8), although both in their 
colour have a mixture of red, from whence the name is derived. 

11. The Sauri^^ of Patnd is called by the same name at Monghir 
(No. 9), and is the Ophiocephale Wrahle of LacepAie. 



* TetrwUm flmnatUis^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 6, pL 50, f. i. 
» ? Tetrodon ftuviatUis (variety), Ham. Buch. 

3 Ophisurus hijala. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 2a pi. 5, f. 5. 

* MacrognathMS amiatus^ Lacep. Fish. Ganges, p. 28, pL 37, f. 6. 

* Macrognathus aculeatus. Fish. Ganges, p. 29. 

' Miurognathtu pancalus^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 30, pi. 17, f. 7. 
V Gobius giuriSf HanL Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 51, pi. 33, f. 15. 

* Trichopodus colisa^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 117, pi. 15, f. 40. 

* Trichopodus lalius. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 120, MS. drawings No. 37, 
as T, ruber. 

^° Trichopodus befeus, Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 118. 
^^ Ophiocephaius wrahie^ Fish. Ganges, p. 60, pi. 31, f. 17. 



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BEHAR AND PA TNA—LIST OF FISlt£S. 87 

12. The Chatgd^ of Patni is another species of the same genus, 
and is everywhere known by the same name (P. No. 15). 

13. The Gdrai* of Patni is another species of the same genus, 
and is known by the same name at Monghir (B. 'No. 8). 

14. The I?Mlo ^ of Patn£ is known by the same name at Monghir 
(B. No. 11), and is a Holocentre. 

15. The Kdbai^ of Patni is the Lutjan grimpeur of Lacep^de, 
often already mentioned (P. No. 20, D. 10, R. 20). 

16. The Bhold^ of Monghir (B. No. 13) is found also at Patni, 
where it is called by the same name. 

17. The Chdndd^ of Patni differs from that of Monghir, and is 
the small fish called Bakul in Rangpur (No. 23). 

18. The 5«ri^ of Patnd is the small Centropome called Bagurd at 
Rangpur (No. 25). 

19. The small species of Cobitis called Angchdid^ at Patni is the 
same with the Rimtengrd of Monghir (B. No. 18). The latter name 
was probably a mistake, as the fish has no sort of afiinity to the others 
called Tengr£ 

20. The Vdghi^ is a Cobitis which derives its name from being 
striped like a tiger, and is called by the same name in Pumiah 
(No. 27), and Monghir (B. No. 16). 

21. The Ldtd^^ of Patn£ is the same Cobitis with that which at 
Rangpur is called Bute (No. 30). 

22. The Mdngri^^ of Monghir (B. No. 20) is known at Patni by 
the same name. 

23. The same is the case with the Singhl^^ of Monghir (B. No. 21). 

24. And with the Boydri^^ (B. No. 22). 

1 Ophiocephalm gachua^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 68, pi. 21, f. 21. 
' Ophiocepkalw lata^ Ham. Budi. Fish. Ganges, p. 63, pi. 34, f. 18. 
> Labrtts badis^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 96, pi. 30, f. 32. 
^ Coius cobofiust Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 98, pL 13, f. 33. 
' Bolapama, Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 79, pL 32, f. 26. 

* Ckanda baculis^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 112, MS. drawings No. 2, as 
Citiiropomus (?) bahrul. 

' Chanda bogoda^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. iii, MS. drawings Na 3, as 
Centropomus bogoda, 

* Cobitis bilturict Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 358, MS. drawings No. 49. 
' Cobitis darioj Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 354, pi. 29, f. 95. 

>^ Cobitis guntea^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 353, and MS. drawings No. 58. 
^^ Macropieronotus magur^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 146, pL 26, f. 45. 
^ Silurus siHgio^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 147, pL 37, f. 46. 
1* Silurus boalisy Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 154, pi. 29, f. 49. 



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88 THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL. 

25. And with the Paptd"^ (B. No. 24). 

26. And with the Tdmbrdtyd PAptd^ (B. No. 23). The two last 
are plentiful at Patnd, and are most excellent fishes. 

27. The Pimelodes called B^choyd at Monghir (B. No. 27), at 
Patnd is called Sugwdbdchoyd^ 

28. The Pimelode which at Patni is called Pdtdsi^^ differs very 
much from the fish soK^alled at Monghir, and is the Doy^ of 
Rangpur (No. 55). 

29. The Rithd ^ of Monghir (No. 29) and Patnd are the same. 

30. The Ar^ of Patnd is the Ari of Rangpur, No. 6o, 

31. The Susnd Pdlwd ^ of Patnd is the Pdthari TengriL of Rangpur, 
No. 49. 

32. The Chhotd Tetigrd^ of Patni is the Tengrd of Rangpur, 
No. 43. 

33. The Bdaundi^ of Patni is the Men&di of Pumiah, No. 54. 

34. The Kauydl^^ of Patnd, mentioned by the same name in the 
account of Bhdgalpur (No. 40) is a species of Esox. 

35. To the same genus belongs the Ndktd KauydP^ of Patnd, a 
small fish that hitherto I have had no occasion to mention, nor is it 
described in Lacepdde. It does not grow to so large a size as the 
Kauyai. 

36. The Angruydri^^ is the species of Muge called Ghobol in 
Din^jpur (No. 31), and is found in the Ganges, but is not common 
so high up as Patnd. 

37. The Thdrri^^ of Patni is a smaller species of Muge, which at 
Goilp^i is named ELhaskhasiyi, R. No. 69. 

» SUurus canto. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 1 5 1. 

* SUurus pabo, Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 153, pi. 22, f. 48. 

' Pimdodus vachoy Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 196, pL 16, f. 64. 

* Pinulodus anguis^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 180, pL 29, f. 59. 
» Pimdodus rita. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 165, pi. 24, f. 53. 

• Pimelodus ariusy Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 170. 

^ Pimdodus cavasius^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 203, pi. 1 1, f. 67. 
8 Pimdodus carcio^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 181, pL 3, f. 61, erroneously 
termed P. imgara, 

• Pimelodus menodoj Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 203, pi. i, f. 72, in MS. 
drawings, No. 18, as /*. tdgagra and tnetioda. 

^« Esox caftdla. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 213, pi. 27, f. 7a 

1^ Esox cctunctio. Ham. Buch. Fish, Ganges, p. 212. 

1* Mugil corsula, Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 221, pi. 9, f. 97. 

" Mugil cascasia, Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 217, MS. drawings, No. 68. 



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BEHAR AND PA TNA -LIST OF FISHES. 89 

38. The Myste, which at Monghir was called Kinch^ti (B. No. 
42), is at Patni known by the name of Kdnbhuniy 

39. The Moe^ of Patnd is the same with that of Monghir, B. No. 43. 

40. The same is the case with the Fhasiyd? B. No. 44. 

41. The same also is the case with the Hllsd * (B. No. 45). At 
Patni this fish is much more plentiful than at Monghir, but this must 
be owing to greater pains bestowed on the fishery. They are 
very small and poor, but in the rainy season are the only large fish 
that can be usually procured. 

42. The Clupanodon called Chipri at Monghir (B. No.- 46), is at 
Patnd known by the name of Khdyrd^ a name given in various parts 
of Bengal to several other species of the same genus. These species 
are indeed so nearly allied that the distinguishing them by different 
names in common discourse would be of little importance. 

43. The small fish that in former accounts I have referred with 
much doubt to the genus Cyprinus, and which at Monghir was 
called Pithirf and Gordd ^ (B. No. 49), at Patnd is known by the 
latter name. 

44- The small fish which at Monghir was called Chdpti (B. No. 50), 
at Patni was called CMpuyd^ which is probably the true orthography, 
the native writers being very careless in spelling, but at Monghir 
there is another fish called Chipttyi. 

45. The Mdlhi^ of Patnd is the Milf of Monghir (B. No. 51) 
evidently the same name. 

46. The Ghorchelhi of Monghir (B. No. 53), is at Patnd called 
Hctf^otd^ 

47. The CMpiiyi of Monghir (B. No. 55), at Patni is called 
Pildlohd}^ while, as above mentioned (No. 44), the CWpuyd of 

* Mystus kapiratf Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 235. 
« Mystus <hUala^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 236. 

• Clupea tdaray Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 241, pL 2, f. 72. 

< Clupanodon Uisha^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 243, probably not pL 19, 

f. 73- 

* Clupafwdon chapra. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 248, MS. drawings, No. 89. 

• Cyprinus coHo, Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 339, pi. 39, f. 93. 

» Cyprinus atpar^ Ham. Buch. Fish, Ganges, p. 259, MS. drawings, No. 142, 
as C, layukulL 

* Cyprinus phulo. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 262, MS. drawings, No. 130, 
as C. phul chda. 

• Cyprinus gora. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 263, MS. drawings, No. 146. 
>• MS. drawings, No. 104, as Cyprinus bukranga. 



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90 THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL. 

Patniis the Chiptf of Monghir. The two fishes, although both 
may be called Cyprini, have very little resemblance. 

48. The first Vighrtt of Monghir (B. No. 58), at Patni is named 
Loydy 

49. The Binghi rewa of Monghir (R Na 60), at Patni, is called 
merely Rewd,^ 

50. The BhdftgnatM^ of Monghir (B. No. 62), at Patni, is called 
Bhdngni. 

51. The Mtrkt or Ndyen^ of Monghir (B. No. 64), is at Patni 
called Mligd. In the Son this fish is most excellent 

52. The Kdlbdns^ of Monghir (B. No. 65), and Patni is the same 
fish. 

53. The same is the case with the Rohu ^ (B. No. 66), which, 
during the whole fair weather season is by far the most common fish 
in the markets of Patni. No pains being bestowed on its perfection 
or preservation, by far the greater part brought to market is young 
and small, in which state this fish is very poor eating, but very fine 
ones may be usually procured. Those from the Son are uncom- 
monly good. 

54. The Kdtld'^ of Monghir (B. No. 68), and of Patni is the same 
fish. It is not near so common as the Rohu. 

55. The Tor of the Rangpur list (No. 103), at Diddnagar on the 
Son was called Kajrd? and is one of the best fresh water fishes that 
I have tasted. It grows to fully as laige a size as the RohiL 

56. The Kurchhi of the Rangpur list (No. loi), at Patni is called 
Kursd? evidently the same name. 

57. The Didhai of Monghir (B. No. 69), is at Patni called Ddrki,^^ 
as is the case at Nithpur (P. No. 114). X consider Dirhf as the 

^ Cyprinus vagra^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 2691 

* Cyprinm reba^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 280, MS. drawings Na 117, 
as C dangana, 

* CypHnus boga^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 286, pL 28, f. 8a 

* Cyprinus mrigala^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 279, pL 6, f. 79. 

* Cyprinus ealbasu^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 297, pi. 2, f. 83. 

* Cyprinus rokita, Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 301, pL 36, t 85. 
' Cyprinus catla. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 287, pL 13, f. 81. 

" Cyprinus tor, Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 305, MS. drawings No. 121. 

* Cyprinus cursa et gonius^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, pp 290-292, pL 4« 
f. 82. 

^^ Cyprinus saranOf Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p 307, MS. drawing missing in 
Calcutta. 



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BEHAR AND PATNA'-UST OF FISHES. 



91 



real name in the Hindi dialect, and Dildhai as probably a careless 
orthography of the same word. 

58. The Ponthiyd^ of Monghir (B. No. 70) and Patnd is the 
same, and in the interior of Behar is by far the most common fish. 

59. The Mdrd ^ of Patnd is the same with the fish so called in 
the Pumiah list (No. 125), which confirms my opinion, that the 
name Miidwd given to it at Monghir (B. No. 73), is an improper 
orthography of the same name. 

60. The Jongji of the Puniiah list (No. 128), is at Patnd called 
DengrdyS a name which in different parts of the comitiy is given to 
several Cyprini. 

61. The third kind of Dy^grl, or the EonghSrf of the Pumiah 
list (No. 132), is at Patnd called Gohdmd.^ 

62. The eel called Anhai in the Pumiah list (No. 134), at Patnd 
is called Angdhai^ evidently the same name, but which orthography 
is right, I cannot take upon myself to say. 

Oblong cmstaceous fishes are abundant in the Ganges, and are of 
three sizes. One as large as a small lobster, is called Goird ; a second, 
like a prawn, called Jhlngd, is the best, and is the same as that 
mentioned in my account of Bhigalpur; the third and last, like 
a large shrimp, is called Echnd. 



Estimate of how Families in the Patna District and Zila Behar 

ARE FED. 



families 



t 



Have as mttdi fish as 

they please, . 
Daily have fish in the 

cheap season, but 

only occasionally in 

the dear. 
What fish they can 

catch, . 
Rqea fish, . 



100 



150 
if 

II 



H 



> Cyprmus sophore^ Ham. Bach. Fish. Ganges, p^ 310^ pi. 19, f. 86. 
' Cyprmus mola^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 334, pL 38, f. 92. 
' Cyprinus jogich Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 326, MS. drawings No. 141. 
* Cyprmus gphama^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 346^ MS. drawings, No. 
107, as C. Dyangra gohama. 
" Umbranchapertura cuchioy Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 16. 
VOL. Vll. G 



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92 THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL. 



FISH AND FISHERIES OF SHAHABAD 
DISTRICT. 

Except on the banks of the Ganges, where there is a good supply 
from the middle of October to the middle of Jime, fish are every- 
where very scarce, and, in general, of a very poor quality. The 
small channels between the Son and Ganges, near their junction, form 
the best fishery in the District, which gives a regular supply throughout 
the year. It belongs to one person, and has been separated from 
the property of the adjoining land. The fisheries in the main 
channel of the Ganges are free, but it is alleged that the Zamlndirs 
always take some fish without payment, whenever they can catch a 
boat; but this is not often. It would seem that this practice is 
pretty general on the Ganges; as from Patnd to Calcutta, it is 
seldom that a fisherman's boat will approach any person that he 
suspects has authority. This I have heard attributed to their having 
been plundered and beaten by Europeans ; but I can scarcely think 
that such is the case. The price of all the fish that an European 
wants, is so trifling an object, as to render it improbable that he should 
take any without payment In the parts of the channel of the Ganges, 
which in the dry season contain no current, and which are here 
called Bh^ar, the fisheries are private property annexed to the 
adjoining land, and are let. 

In the Son, there are a good many fish, and their quality is excellent, 
but, except during the floods, when it is impracticable to fish in such 
an immense torrent, the water is so clear, that the usual methods 
by which the natives take fish, have little success, and Sdhib Zidd 
Singh preserves the fisheries on his part of the river for his own 
sport The whole fisheries on the lower part of the Son, in the 
division of Arrah, are said to be let for Rs.io a year to one man ; but 
he is said to have procured the lease through the favour of the 
Europeans, and the same protects him from all attempts to raise the 



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SHAHABAD DISTRICT— FISH IN THE SON RIVER, 93 

rent Above this^ as I have said, Sdhib Zddd reserves the fish for his 
own sport When he fishes, he gives one-half of what is taken to 
the fishermen, and distributes the remainder among his friends and 
dependants. Higher up, the fishery in the stream of the Son is con- 
sidered firee ; but in the heats of spring, there are branches which 
lose the stream, and yet contain many fish in deep pools, and are 
called Chharan. It is there only that the fishermen are, in general, 
successfiil, and they pay rent 

The other rivers are mere torrents, and contain very few fish, 
except in the floods, when many small ones ascend from the Ganges, 
and are caught as the rivers dry up towards the end of the rainy 
season. Most of the reservoirs become dry in December, so that any 
fish which they contain, are of the small wretched kinds, such as are 
usual in rice fields, and are here called by the generic name, Sidhri 
analgous to the term Punti, or Punthi, that is used further east. 

The only supply, however, in most parts, is firom the two last 
sources, and from tanks ; but these are neither large nor numerous, 
and their fish, which are large, are usually preserved by the owners 
for their own use. The supply, from reservoirs and torrents, lasts 
only for about two months, commencing about the middle of October. 

As I made no fixed residence in any part of the District, I had no 
opportunity of collecting an assortment of the fishes ; but there can 
be no doubt, both firom what I saw and firom the similarity of situation, 
that they are nearly the same with those fouhd in the District of 
Patni. I shall not therefore enter into a detail of the species, and 
shall only observe that the fish which the English call the Trout of 
the Son, is a species of C3rprinus, and is the same with the Gohd of 
the Pumiah list (No. 99). In this District it is called Vagkra?- 

The fishing tribes live still less part of their time by this profession 
than those of Behar, being prevented by similar interruptions, and 
a greater scarcity of fish. Near the Ganges there are about iioo 
families, in which there may be 2000 able-bodied men, who have 
perhaps thirty boats employed in fishing. In the interior no boats 
are used for this purpose, and 400 families of actual fishers may 
contain 800 able-bodied men; but in most places the fish in 
reservoirs are caught by Musdhars, Chimirs and Dosadhs, who have 
no nets, and merely grope with a basket among the mud, as the 
water dries. The whole rent of the fisheries was said not to 
exceed Rs. 4000 a year. 

* Cyprinus gaha^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 275, MS. drawiiiigs, No. 126. 



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94 THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL. 



APPENDIX. 



FISH AND FISHERS OF THE GORAKHPUR 
DISTRICT, N.W. PROVINCES.^ 

Notwithstanding the great number of rivers and ponds, the supply of 
fish is neither abundant nor good. This is partly owing to the want 
of skill in the fishermen, who are able to catch very few in the laige 
or rapid rivers, where the fish is of a very good quality; and partly to 
the fish in the ponds and lakes being, in general, smaU and ill 
tasted. Even in the Bikhiri/i^7, the finest piece of stagnant water, 
the rui looses most of his splendid green gold and silver, and 
becomes of a dirty sable hue, and such fish are, in general, con- 
sidered not only as unpalatable, but as unwholesome. The crocodile 
also is very destructive, so that few fish of a large size are procurable ; 
the smaller ones do not seem to be worth this monster's pursuit The 
fisheries, of however little value they may be, are, however, private 
property, and many of them seem to have been given to the Rdjds 
free of rent, as a means of subsistence, when they were deprived of 
most of their lands, as being either unable or unwilling to pay the 
revenue that has been demanded. These chiefs are, however, so 
jealous of their incomes being known, that in many places they 
alleged that they took nothmg whatever, in others they acknowledged 
small presents given on every renewal of the lease, and in others, 
they admitted that the fishermen gave a share of what they caught ; 
but it was only in Barhdlganj that I could procure any account of 
what was actually paid for the rent of fisheries ; thirty ^imilies were 
there stated to pay 556 rupees. 
The fish are caught chiefly in the ponds, lakes, or small rivers as 
* The following pages refer to other parts of India rather than to Lower Bengal. 
They are given here by way of Appendix, for the sake of easy reference by those 
who desire to find the whole information on the subject of Indian Fisheries in a 
collected form. 



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GORAKHPUR DISTRICT, N.IV. PROVINCES. 95 

they become dry, and therefore are chiefly procured in the cold 
season. Many of them are caught with the basket or most simple 
kind of triangular net, stretched between two bamboos ; many are 
also caught by narrow, semi-circular canals, dug so as to form a con- 
nection between the upper and lower part of a small river, across 
which a dam has been thrown, so that, as the waters retire, the fish 
must descend by the canal, in which they are secured by a basket 
or bag-net This contrivance for catching fish is here called Bori- 
yiri. In B^khird jAil, which seems to be the largest body of water 
in which the natives attempt to fish, they use a long net, not above 
two feet wide. The mesh is pretty large, intended to admit and 
secure fish of from three to five pounds weight, for in this lake, few 
attain a greater size. One side of the net is held up by a row of dry 
reeds about two inches long, and as thick as a goose's quill. When 
the net is thrown into the water, the whole sinks slowly by the 
weight of the twine of which it is made, and it sinks in a vertical 
position, the reeds keeping the side on which they are from sinking 
so &st as the other. The net has a bamboo at each end, both to 
stretch it and to float the ends. It is let out slowly fi'om the end of 
a canoe paddling gently along, and four or five nets are usually let 
out at the same time, parallel to each other, and near the same place, 
so that the fish, being disturbed in all directions, may strike into the 
nets with the more force. When the nets have been thrown out, the 
canoes paddle back to the end first thrown into the water, one man 
in each making a noise by rattling a paddle on the gunwale. The 
nets are then pulled into the canoes, and if any fish has stuck in the 
meshes as it approaches the side of the canoe in drawing the net, 
it is secured by a bag-net fastened to a hoop and pole. This large 
net is called Chaundhi. When I examined the process, although all 
the boats on the lake were assembled, we had little success ; but 
there was a great tumult and noise, which probably scared away 
the fish. Circular casting nefs, of the kind common in India, are a 
good deal used. 

The fishermen of Nichldl use the Ijar bark to stupefy the fish. 
They make a strong infiision, and throw some of this on the smrface 
of a river or lake. All the fish that come to the surface during the 
first night afterwards, are killed, and collected in the morning. The 
operation may be repeated in fifteen days. Many other plants are 
used for the purpose, but the exact form of the processes I did not 
learn. 



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96 THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL. 

In the northern part of the District, a principal demand for the 
fish seems to be from the mountaineers, who purchase both what is 
dried in the sun {sidhli) and in the smoke {paklt). The fish thus 
dried are small, and being far from well cured, are more or less 
putrescent The people whom I saw purchasing, said that they 
were intended for the distant market of MdlibhiSm. 

According to the statements which I received, 395 canoes 
are employed in fishing, and there are 1625 families of fishermen, 
besides eighty men in one of the divisions where the estimate was 
given in this manner, and not according to families. It was stated 
that in 702 of these families, there were 1325 men, and at this rate, 
the whole number of men will be 3147. Some fish only for two 
months, and a very few the whole year round ; but according to the 
statements received for 1476 of the houses, the average rate of time 
for which the fishermen are supported by this employment, is foiu- 
months and ten days in the year. We cannot allow that each 
person makes less than Rs. 2 a month, including the tear and wear 
of nets and canoes. The fish caught, therefore, must sell to the 
retailers for Rs. 27,274, besides as much as will pay the rent. If 
we were to judge by what Barhilganj pays, this would amoimt to 
about Rs. 30,000 ; but the actual sum levied from the fishermen, pro- 
bably does not exceed the value of one-half of the fish taken, and 
as the rents of fisheries are usually farmed again and again, what 
actually reaches the pockets of the Rijis or other proprietors, is 
probably much less than Rs. 27,000. The fisheries in the main 
channel of the Ghaghrd and Gandaki are free, but very few can take 
fish in such extensive waters. 

Farmers of the low tribes catch fish in their own rice fields as the 
water dries up ; but entirely for their own use, and it is only such as 
fish for sale that pay any rent, although the farmers often give a 
share of what they take to their landlord. 

Most of the kinds of fish foimd in this District, I have already had 
occasion to mention, but the names used here dififer a good deal 
from those in Behar or Bengal. In the following list, therefore, I shall 
have little occasion to do more than to refer to my former account 
It is &r, I suspect, from complete, although for the last three weeks 
that I remained at Gorakhpur, hot a new kind was brought to me 
by the men whom I employed, but as usual they are a very perverse 
people. 



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GORAKHPUR DISTRICT, N.W. PROVINCES, 97 

1. The GuldS of this District is the species of Tetrodon, which in 
Rangpur (No. i) is called Tenpi. 

2. The Galphularfi is another Tetrodon, which in Pumiah is 
called Kiriyd-phokchl 

3. The Vdmdch is the species of Macrognathe called Vim in the 
account of Behar (No. 5). 

4. The Patayd is the species called Pdthi in Behar (No. 6). 

5. The Nakid is the kind called Bhungrf in Behar (No. 7). 

6. The Gobius called here Balld,^ is the GulM of Behar (No. 8), 
but in Bhigalpur the name is written Bulli, although in Pumiah as 
in Behar, the word commences with G. 

7. The Kotra^ is a species of Trichopode, which in Rangpur (No. 
10) is called Sddd-khalishi. 

8. Th^/old^ is another kind which in Rangpur (No. 12) is called 
Ldl-khalishi. 

9. The Garafl is the Ophiocephale, called by the same name in 
Behar (No. 13.) 

10. The Charangd^ is the kind called Chengi in aU the Districts 
hitherto surveyed, Behar (No. 12). 

1 1. The Charangchlf is the species, which in the account of 
Rangpur (No. 17) is called Gajdl. 

12. The DhebdrP is the Holocentre called Dhdlo in Behar 
(No. 14). 

13. The Samharc^^ is the Lutjan grimpeur of LacepAle, called 
Kabai in Behar (No. 15). 

14. The Small Centropome called CMndd in Rangpur (No. 22), 
is here called Gur^ and Chdndcktsla}^ 

1 TeirodonfluviaHlisy Ham. Buch. Fbh. Ganges, p. 6, pi. 30^ f. I. 

* Tetrodon aUcuHoy Ham. Bach. Fish. Ganges, p. 8, pL 18, f. 3. 

* GoHms gmris. Ham. Bach. Fish. Ganges, p. 51, pi. 33, f. 15. 

« Tricopodus sota. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 120, MS. drawings, No. 39, 
as TJuscus, 

* Trichapodus laUus, Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 120^ MS. drawings. No. 37, 
as T. ruber, 

* Ophiocephalus lata. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 63, pi. 34, f. 18. 

' Ophiocephalus gachua. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 68, pi. 21, f. 21. 

* Ophiocephalus marulius. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 65, pi. 22, f. 19. 

* Labms badis. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 96, pi. 30, f. 32. 
1* Coius cobojius. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 98, pi. 13, f. 33. 
^^ Chanda nama^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 109, pi. 39, f. 37. 



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98 THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL. 

15. The Gurda^hmdrd^ is another species which is the Sisr£ of 
Behar (No. 18). 

16. The ChmdrtP is a third species of Centropome, which in 
Dinijpur is called Kingi Chdndd. 

17. The Small Cobitis called Dari m Rangpur (No. 27) is here 
called Bdgdwa? 

18. Another species called Bute in Rangpur (No. 30) is here 
called Naktdf^ a name also given to a species of Macrognathe 
(No. 5). 

19. A third kind called Bilturi in Rangpur (No. 33) is here called 
Samunafi 

2a The Silurus called Pdpt^^ in Behar (No. 25) is here called 
Bulayd. 

21. The kindred fish called YL&dX pdbdd in Rangpur (No. 38) is 
here called Ghuguti, 

22. The Silurus called Boydrf in Behar (No. 24) is here called 
Barhariy a variation of the same name. 

23. The other called Singhi^ in Behar (No. 23) is here called 
Singij no uniformity being observed in the orthography of words. 

24. The Macropteronote called Mangrf in Behar (No. 22) is here 
called Afaguri? 

25. The Malapterure called Kajoli in Rangpur (No. 42) is here 
called Basanguti^^ 

26. The species of Pimelode considered here as the prototype of 
the Indian Genus Tengard^^ is that called Korki in Dinijpur 
(No. so). 

^ Chamia bogoda^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. iii| MS. drawings, No. 3, as 
Centropomus bogqda, 
' Chanda ranga^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 113. 

* CobiHs dario^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 354, pi. 29, t. 95. 

« Cobitis gtmiea^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 353, MS. drawings, No. 58, as 
C, gunte. 

■ Ci^itis biUurio, Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 358, MS. drawings, No. 49, as 
C. biUuri. 

* Si/urus canio, Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p.' 151. 

' Silurus hoalis^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 154, pL 29, f. 99. 

• Silurus singio^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 147, pi. 37, f. 46. 

• Macropteronotus magur. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 146, pi. 26, f, 45. 
^^ Malapterurus coila^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 158. 

" Pimdodus tengara^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 183, pi. 23, f. 60^ where it 
is emmeously marked P. batasius^ MS. drawings. No. 22, as P- kurki. 



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GORAKHPUR DISTRICT, N.W. PROVINCES. 99 

37. That in Dindjpur (No. 28) considered as the prototype of this 
genusy is here called Bajaha^ 

28. Tengnay^ considering the inaccurate manner in which the natives 
write, can scarcely be considered as a name different from Tengari, 
but the fish which was brought to me as the Tengrd, was the Pime- 
lode, called Uruya in Dindjpur (No 54). 

29. The Pimelode, called Pdtharf in Rangpur (No. 49) is here 
called Dhamasd.^ 

30. The Belaongdd^ of this District is also a Pimelode, and the 
name is no doubt the same with Belaundi of Behar (No. 33), but is 
here given to a species which differs very little from the Kengya of 
Rangpur (No. 46.) The differences are indeed so slight, that I con- 
sider them as varieties of the same species. 

31. The Tengaf^ of this District, a name scarcely different from 
Tengard, is the same with the Belaundi of Behar (No. 33). 

32. The Baikat^ is another Pimelode, called Silon in Dindjpur 
(No. 55.) In this District it is said never to exceed six inches in length. 

33. The Pdtharchatd^ a name given to several fish that have no 
affinity to each other, is here applied to the Pimelode which in 
Pumiah (No. 66) is caUed Hdri. 

34. The Ttkufi is a small species of Esox, which, in the vicinity of 
Calcutta, is called Panchak. It never exceeds two inches in length, 
and is very common in ditches. 

35. The species of Esox, called Kauyal in Behar (No. 34), is here 
called Kauya,® a name not essentially different 

36. The Sukaya^^ is a species of Mugil, which in Rangpur (No. 
69) is called Khaskhasiyl 

• Pimelodus carcio^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 181, pi. 3, f. 61, erroneously 
marked P, tengara. 

• Pimdodus uruoy Ham. Buch. Fkh. Ganges, p. 177, MS. drawings, No. 15. 

• Pemdodus cavasius^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 203, pi. 11, f. 67. 

• Pimdodus rama. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 176, pi. 3, f. 55. 

• Pimdodus menoda. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 203, pi. I, f. 72, and in MS. 
drawings, No. 18, as P. tdgagra and menoda, 

• Pimdodus silondia. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. i6o, pi. 7, f. 50. 

» Pimdodus hara^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 198, MS. Drawings, No. 12, 
as P, hara, 

• Esoxpanchaxy Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 211, pL 3, f. 69. 

• Esox cancUoy Ham. Buch: Fish. Ganges, p. 213, pi. 27, f. 7a 

" Mugil cascasia^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 217, MS. drawings, No. 68, 
as M. kaskasiya. 



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loo THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL, 

37. The-5'4^APis theMugil,whichinRangpur(No. 7o)is called MujL 

38. The Myste, which in Behar (No. 38) is called Kinbhunf, is 
here called Pitd.* 

39. ITie term Moe? used in Behar (No. 39) for the other Myste of 
India, is known here also, but the Niold is more common. 

40. The Somta^ is a species of Clupea, which in Dinijpur (No. 32) 
is called Telar. 

41. The Clupanodon, called Chaprd in Behar (No. 42), is here 
called PharchiJ" It is found, not only in the rivers, but in the marshes 
or lakes of this District. 

42. The Sahiyd is another small Clupanodon, called Karati in 
Dindjpur (No. 35). 

43. The Fatuki^ is the fish allied to the Genus Cyprinus, which in 
Behar is called Gordi (No. 43). 

44. The Layukuli of Rangpur (No. 84) is here called MalhiJ 

45. The Layubukd of Rangpur (No. 83) is here called Saphdnd? 

46. The Chhepki of Rangpur (No. 91) is here called yharaingi^ 

47. The Phulcheld of Rangpur (No. 82) is here called Chalawdy^ 

48. The Nariyali cheli of Rangpur (No 81) is here called 
Kangsdtdy^ 

49. The Ghord cheli of Rangpur (No. 80) is here called Cheriyd?^ 
These three fishes, which have such a strong resemblance to each 
other, that almost everywhere else they have a generic name, have 
here names totally distinct. 

^ MugU carsula^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 221, pi. 9, f. 97. 
' Mysius kapiraij Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 235. 

* Mystus chiiala^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 236, MS. drawing as Mystus 
chMt is iiow missing. 

« Clupea idara^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 241, pi. 2, f. 72. 

* Clupanodon chapra^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 248, MS. drawings, No. 
89, as C, chapra, 

* Cyptinus coUoy Ham. Buch. Fbh. Ganges, p. 339, pi. 39, f. 93. 

' Cyprinus aipar^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 259, MS. drawings, No. 142, 
as C, layukuli, 

^ Cyprinus laubucoy Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 260, MS. drawings, No. 
139, as C, laubuca* 

* Cyprinus devario. Ham. Buch. Fbh. Ganges, p. 341, pi. 6, f. 94. 

>^ Cyprinus phulOf Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 262, MS. drawings, Na 130, 
as C, phulchda, 

*^ Cyprinus bacaila^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 265, pi. 8, f. 76. 

** Cyprinus gora^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 263, MS. drawings, No. 146, 
as C, gora. 



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GORAKHPUR DISTRICT, N.W. PROVINCES. loi 

50. The Bukr^gf of Rangpur (No. 86), is here in some places 
called Tensij and in others, Piyaruya} 

51. The Elangi of Rangpur (No. 93) is here called Arangy^ 
evidently another form of the same name. 

52. The Bhingan of Rangpur (No. 95) is here called Bukti? 

53. The Vogd-bh^ngan of Rangpur (No. 98), in some parts here is 
called Bhagnd^ evidently the same name with Bhdngan, and in such 
parts it k considered as the prototype of this division of Cyprini, but 
in other parts it is called Nayahu 

54. The Mrigal of Bengal and Behar, Rangpur (No. 99), is here 
called Nainifi 

55. The Rohit of Rangpur (No. 100) here, as wherever else the 
Hindi language prevails, is called Rohufi 

56. The Kdlbasu of Rangpur (No. to8) is here called Kengya- 
chhari.^ 

57. The Ndndiffi of this District does not differ in any one point 
from the fish so called in Pumiah, except in having three rays less 
in the dorsal fin, and, although the number of these bones is gener- 
ally very little liable to variation, I can scarcely consider the fish of 
this District different from that of Pumiah. 

58. Very nearly allied to the above is another species of Cyprinus, 
which is here called the Ndnkdr and Bakahif nor have I seen it any- 
where except in the rivers of this District It never exceeds 3 or 4 
lb. in weight 

59. The Kurchhdof Rangpur (No. 101) is here called Kursi}^ and 
it must be observed that the names Kurchhi, Kurchi, and JCursi are 
aU the same, variously spelt and pronounced in different places, and 
applied with little or no discrimination to several fishes that have a 
very strong resemblance to each other. 

^ MS. drawings, Na 104, as Cyprinus bukrangU 

* Cyprinus eianga, Ham. Bnch. Fish. Ganges, p. 281, MS. drawings, No. 103, 
as C. elangu, 

* Cyprinus reba^ Ham. Bach. Fish. Ganges, p. 28a 

* Cyprinus boga^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 286, pi. 28, f. 8a 

* Cyprinus mrigala. Ham. Bnch. Fish. Ganges, p. 279, pL 6, f. 79. 

* Cyprinus rohiia. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 30Z, pL 36, f. 85. 
T Cyprinus caJbasu, Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 297, pi. 2, f. 83. 

* Cyprinus nandina^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 300^ pL 8, f. 84. 

* Cyprinus nancar. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 299. 

1* Cyprinus cursa and cursis^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, pp. 290^ 297. MS. 
drawings. No. 124. 



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I02 THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL. 

60. The Kital of Rangpur (No. 109) is here called Bhakurd?- 

61. The Darangi of RaDgpur (No. no) is here called Darai? a 
name perhaps not essentially different 

6?. The Saran-ptinthi of Rangpur (No. in) is here called 
Daraki^ a name also resembling the former, and the two fishes have 
indeed a strong resemblance. 

63. The Koswatf of the Pumiah list is here called Tlpui^ 

64. The Punthi of Rangpur (No. 112) is here called Pothiyd^ 
another orthography for the same name, and Sahari^ which is 
perhaps a coiruption of Saphari, the Sanskrit appellation. 

65. The Tit-punthi« of Rangpur (No. 115) is here called Chhota- 
pothiyd, 

66. The Phutuni-punthi of Rangpur (No. 118) is here called 
MakuP 

67. The Geli-punthi of Rangpur (No. 1 1 7) is here called Phardahi.^ 

68. The Klinchan-punthi of Rangpur (No. 116) is here called 
ChaiiL^ 

69. The Mauyd of Rangpur (No. 121) is here called Dhayai}^ 

70. The Anjind of the Pumiah list is here called JDtngrdi,^^ 
evidently the same name with Dengrd or Dyangr^ given in different 
places to this or other kindred species. 

71. The Dangrikd of the Dindjpur list, is here called Dangruyd}^ 
another form of the same word. 

72. The Dengrd of Patni (No. 60) is here called Dingrawa}^ 
another form of the same name. 

1 Cyprinm caila^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Gaiiges, p. 287, pL 13, t 8z. 
' Cyprmus chagumo. Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 295. 
' Cypfinus sarana^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 307. 

^ Cyprmus cosuaHs, Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 338, MS. drawings, Na 
132, as C. koswati. 

* Cyprinus sophorty Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 310, pL 19, f. 86. 

* Cyprinus HctOy Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 314, pL 8, i. 87. 

' Cyprinus phutunio^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 319, MS. drawings. 
No. 129. 

* Cyprinus gdius, Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 320, MS. drawings, Na 133. 
> Cyprinus cancAonius, Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 317, MS. drawings. No. 

96, as C korikon, 

^^ Cyprinus mola, Ham. Buch. Fiah. Ganges, p. 334, pi. 38, f. 92. 

" Cyprinus anjana^ Ham, Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 328, MS. drawings, No. 136, 
as C dyangra anjana. 

^ Cyprinus danrica, Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 325, pL 16, f. 8S. 

" CyptiM$4sjogia, Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 326, MS. drawings, No. 141. 



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GORAKHPUR DISTRICT, N,W. PROVINCES. 103 

73. The Suiiha^ of this District is a small fish, very much 
resembling the last, but wanting the coloured stripe on the sides. 

74. The Dhengro of Rangpur (No. 106) is here called Rawd.^ 

75. The Morul of Rangpur (No. 105) is here called ChhcM? 

76. The Angro of Rangpur (No. 104) is here called Masuyar.^ 

77. The Godiyiri of the Bhi^pur list is here called Lamtdfi 

78. The Gohamd of the Behar list (No. 61) is here called Gardfi 

79. The Mosayangr'^ of this District seems scarcely sufficiently 
distinct firom the Gard, although the fishermen declared them 
different species, but, being idle and careless, they wished to give a 
number of names to render their want of industry less con- 
spicuous. 

^ Cyprinus suHha, Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 327, MS. drawings, No. 143, 
C. suHha, 
■ Cyprinus dero^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 277, pL 22, f. 78. 

* Cyprinus morcUa^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 331, pi. 22, f. 88* 

* Cyprinus angra^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 331, MS. drawings, No. 118, 
as C- angra* 

' Cyprinus lamta^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 343, MS. drawings. No. 105. 
as C. gofUyari* 

' Cyprinus gohama^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 346, MS. drawings. No. 
107, as C dyangra gohama» 

' Cyprinus mosario^ Ham. Buch. Fish. Ganges, p. 346. 



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104 THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL. 



CONCLUSION. 

In the preceding pages, we have seen how the fisheries of the 
fresh waters of Bengal were worked half a century ago, and it now 
becomes necessary to investigate whether we are able to trace any 
novel modes of capture. As a rule, the native officials who have 
during the last few years reported on their present state, consider 
that the finny tribes have decreased, and that the markets are not 
supplied sufficiently to meet the demands of the people. 

An insufficiently supplied fish market may of course be due to 
two causes, either (i) that the fish are not being captured, or else 
(2) that they are not present in the waters in sufficient numbers. 
From Dr Buchanan's account, we may reasonably infer that the 
fisheries in those days were, as a rule, pretty well stocked, but that 
the fishermen's trade was carried on in such a primitive way, 
or he was subject to such an amount of rent, or other imposts, that 
the fishermen caste generally preferred engaging in boating and 
river traffic 

MODES OF FISHING. 

The various modes of fishing recorded by Dr Buchanan appear 
to be in existence still, with the exception of the " dip netsP These 
have not been mentioned as now used in the Ganges, and I have 
not personally observed them, except on the Brahmaputra, We are 
told that they were primitive contrivances, and at the present day I 
only know of them being employed in the rivers of the western coast, 
Assam, and in Burmah, or where the supply of fish has not yet been 
materially diminished owing to one of the three following causes : — 
(i) Being within tidal influence, (2) due to the British not having 
possessed the country long enough to permit the fisheries being 
ruined, or (3) owing to their being such a sparse population, either 
they are unable to make much havoc amongst the finny tribes, or no 
market exists to sell more than a very moderate amount of fish. 

The following modes now employed are either in excess of those 



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CONCLUSION-'MODES OF FISHING, 105 

mentioned fifty years since, or certain additions have been made. 
I give them as they are recorded in "The Fresh Water Fisheries 
Report," 1 under the heads of Oudh, N. W. Provinces, or Bengal : — 

OuDH. — ^Under the Faizibdd Commissioner " fishing is carried on 
in fivers from boats by casting and dragging nets, spears, lines, rods, 
and hooks ; in village ponds and jhils, in the months of Jaishtha and 
Baisdkh (April, May, and June), by hand, the water being first 
mudded by gangs of from 50 to 60 men. Large fish are sometimes 
kiQed by dubs. The Tdlukddr of Deogdon states that drains full of 
water are sometimes enclosed on both sides, and powders obtained 
from a poisonous wild fiiiit named " Bistend or Kuhir" thrown in. 
A channel is then cut to receive fresh-water in the enclosed drain, so 
as to save the fish from wholesale destruction. The large fish get 
disturbed (intoxicated or poisoned) and float, when people beat 
them on the head with clubs or catch them with their hands." But, 
he adds, the fish taken in this manner are not good to eat. In 
Unio and Saudi very small fishes are destroyed during the rains, and 
cultivators use them as manure ; in the latter place the fry are sold 
in quantities for little or nothing, the smallest mesh of the nets will 
not pass a grain of barley. 

N. W. Provinces. — In the Diin " breeding-fish are destroyed in 
great numbers, and small fry were, imtil lately, also largely captured. 
The breeding-fish are destroyed in the commencement of the rains 
in every conceivable manner ; they at that time run up small streams, 
and are there killed with sticks, caught in nets, in baskets, in 
temporary cruives, by hooks fastened in great numbers on to lines, 
and many other ways. Small fry are taken at the end of the rains 
in baskets placed in fields at the outlets for irrigation water ; in the 
cold weather small fry are caught in nets of all kinds having very 
small meshes. Streams are turned, the large fish taken out, and the 
small fry left to perish. Waters are poisoned by which fish of all 
sizes and kinds are destroyed." " Wasteful destruction of fish is 
carried on to a fearful extent ; the following are the chief modes : — 
from March to the beginning of the rains, streams are dammed and 
turned. In this District the mountain torrents, when they biu^t from 
the hills, have three or four different beds, all of which are full 
during the rains, but afterwards only one ; one year the stream is in 
one of these beds, another year in another, and so on. Th^ poachers 
choose a spot where the stream and an old bed are in close proxi- 

« Report on the Fresh Water Fisheries of India and Burmah, 1873. 



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J 



io6 THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL. 

mity ; both have good pools in them ; they fix nets right across the 
stream about a mile, or more, below this spot First, nets with 
large meshes, and then nets with smaller meshes. These nets are 
kept down to the bottom with heavy stones. When the nets are 
all ready they dam up the stream, and open a water-way into the old 
bed ; the force of the water soon cuts a deep way for itself, and then 
. the late bed of the stream is left dry, except in the deep holes ; all 
fish that try to escape down are stopped by the nets. The poachers 
then take away all the fish they want, and leave the rest to perish 
gradually as the pools dry up. I have sometimes seen small fiy 
l3dng dead, six and eight inches deep, in these holes. The poachers, 
in a day or two, do the same thing somewhere else lower down, and 
after a month or so, when the fish have become accustomed to the 
new bed, they commence at the top again, and return the stream 
into its late bed, catching all the fish in the new bed, &c." 

'' The mahisirs commence to run up about the end of March or 
beginning of April Like salmon and some other kinds of fish, they 
push their way up as high as they can get ; the consequence is, that 
in June and July, you will see ten and fifteen pound fish in little 
streams not more than a yard wide ; these are all heavy with spawn, 
and fall easy victims to poachers. In the hills in places where the 
streams run between narrow rocks, the natives fasten a series of 
strings with sharp strong barbed hooks every three inches ; a vast 
number of fish are destroyed in this way. The hill-men also fire- 
quently poison the rivers. In the plains, at the commencement of 
the rains, fish run up little streams and are easily caught. When 
the fish have run up and spawned, the young fiy are caught in 
myriads at the outlet for irrigation water, in ricefields and elsewhere." 
The Officiating Senior Assistant Commissioner of Kumion, Major 
Fisher, remarked that " both breeding-fish and veiy young ones are 
destroyed in this District to a very great extent, so much so that the 
absence of them as an article of diet in the Almord and Nainf Tdl 
markets, as compared with former years, is very noticeable, and it is 
a comparatively rare thing now to see good fish for breakfast, even at 
a European table. The destruction of fish and their absence now 
from some of our large rivers, such as the Saiju in the Eastern, and 
the Rimgangd in Western Kumdon, is equally noticeable. In parts 
of these rivers, where a good angler could take his six or eight fish 
a day, averaging from six to twelve pounds each, the same man 
would not now take two, although the angler of to-day has many 



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CONCLUSION^DESTRUCTION OF FISHES. 107 

devices in the way of artificial baits, which the sportsman of former 

days had not There are three or four ways of destroying young 

and large fish: — (i.) By a heavily leaded cast-net, the fishermen 
wading waist-deep into the stream to employ it (2.) By the use of 
a stout cord thrown right across a stream ; to one end is attached a 
short stick for a man to hold, whilst the other end of the cord is 
held slackly by a man on the opposite bank. Then two men 
generally stand on commanding rocks, overlooking some deep pool 
where the current is not rapid. The cord itself is armed with large 
iron hooks at intervals of two or three feet, being each of them about 
the size of one used in a patent weighing machine. The cord, thus 
armed, is kept about eighteen inches or two feet, sometimes deeper, 
below the surface of the stream. Some men now go down below 
the pool, and with bamboos or poles stir up the fish firom below, 
whilst, at the same time, the water firom this process becomes muddy. 
The half-blinded and frightened fish make for the deep water of the 
pool above, and as they pass over the cord, the man holding the 
stick jerks the cord with great skill and strength, and many a fine 
fish is hooked by the gills or the tail, or through the lower portion of 
the stomach : as to the Kimidon it is immaterial how, so long as the 
fish is landed. This process not only destroys large numbers of fish, 
but wounds and injures very many others which go away only to die. 
{3.) By placing at intervals firom three to four feet, on a weir used 
for irrigation purposes, conical-shaped baskets, the point of the cone 
being below, and the open mouth of the cone on a level with the 
weir. This device is chiefly successfiil at night. The baskets are 
generally placed in portions of the weir where the stream is strongest, 
and an unwary fish coming too close to the weir finds himself hurled 
into a basket firom which it is quite impossible to escape. It is need- 
less to point out how injurious this process of destruction is to the 
ascent of fish before the breeding season, and their descent when 
breeding is over ; practically, it requires a very clever fish to go up 
for breeding purposes, and return to the point started fi-om uninjured, 
for it has to cross and re-cross several of these weirs both on its 
journey up and down stream." 

The OflSciating Senior Assistant Commissioner Garhwdl, reported 
that almost all classes use fish as food when procurable. '* The 
wholesale destruction of fish and their fry commences in these hills. 
The rivers and streams here are the breeding-grounds of the 
mahisir, kdlons or kdU-banj, and other fish which ascend them in 

VOL. VII. H 



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io8 THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL. 

the rains to spawn. Not only are large fish destroyed on their 
upward and downward route, but the fry are caught wherever they 
are to be seen. Moreover, the rivers are so dammed up by weirs 
made on purpose to catch fish, that they cannot always ascend to 
their spawning-grounds, and fall an easy prey to the people, who are 
on the watch for them. There are several modes of catching fish ; 
the principal are netting ; by weirs with one exit, at which a wicker 
basket or trawl is fixed ; and by snagging, or, as it is called, the 
* raksha ; ' fishing with rod and line is rarely practised. Netting 
is carried on at all times of the year, but chiefly during floods, when 
the water is dirty, and the fish come to the edge to feed, or when the 
water is very low indeed. Weirs are erected as soon as the monsoon 
begins to cease, and they remain in existence till carried away by 
the first floods in the rains. They are placed usually at the tail of 
each pool, and there is almost always one at the junction of two 
rivers, thus entirely preventing fish running up till the weir is carried 
away by a flood. Snagging is, in my opinion, by far the most use- 
lessly destructive method. It is carried on as follows : — ^Two men, 
one on either bank of the stream, hold a long and strorig line 
between them. To this are attached several laige hooks, between 
each of which are fastened flat pieces of stick, so placed as to keep 
the hooks with the point upwards. The hooks are allowed to sink 
to the bottom, and when a fish, working his way up stream, comes 
over the hooks, the man on the higher bank jerks the line, and very 
firequently transfixes the fish. Of course, many fish must get away 
maimed ; but I have seen numbers, amongst them mahdsirs of 15 to 
20 pounds weight, caught in one pool in this manner. All villagers 
living along the larger rivers pursue this method during the cold 
season when the water is clear, and very few large fish can escape 
them. Were it not for the damage done by maiming fish, it would 
not be so objectionable, as what are caught are eaten ; but as it is, 
I think it a pernicious plan, and one which almost completely clears 
the fish out of the deep pools where they rest during the cold season." 
Some villages have purchased the r^ht to catch fish thus^ but they must 
be few. " That the number of fish is decreasing is well known and 
acknowledged, so much so, that the people living high up one of our 
rivers, an affluent of the Alaknandi, complained to me that owing to 
the number of weirs, they found that very few fish can find their way 
up as far as their villages. Being a fisherman myself, I too can testify 
that in some rivers where there used to be first-rate rod-fishing, it 



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CONCLUSION-^DESTRUCTION OF FISHES, 109 

has greatly deteriorated in the last few years, while the size of the 
fish has also decreased. The right of erecting weirs was not, I 
believe, carried on to the same extent in former days as now. They 
were not then so regularly or so generally made, and were not of the 
same impassable nature as those now erected. For I have seen some 
which none of the fish inhabiting these rivers could possibly pass. 
Besides, where a matter becomes one of public importance, as the 
preservation of fish is, surely the rights of private parties, especially 
when in the minority, ought to give way." 

The Magistrate of Gorakpur observed on the destruction and 
waste gf fish : — " It is sufficient to remark that the natives catch 
fish all the year round, at all times and in all places, without any 
regard to the spawning season and the mixture of the fiy, to show 
that great destruction must be committed. Their greediness also in 
sparing nothing, however small, which can contribute towards a meal, 
is an equally strong evidence of waste. It is even said that the 
mdids and ketUs dig the spawn of fish out of the banks of rivers, and 
after preparing it in a certain manner, either consume it themselves, 
or ofifer it for sale. Small auxiliary waters are the chief scene of this 
destruction, and the chief agent is a dam, called chilwdn^ which is 
stretched across a stream, and catches all the fish, however small, 
which may descend, while at the same time it entirely interrupts their 
ascent. I have inspected two of these dams constructed in the 
Rohan Nodi at Domingarh, and have carefully examined their con- 
struction and operation. The dam chilwdn resembles a screen 
made of common reed called sarpat; the reeds are so close together 
that the smallest fry can hardly get through, and the dam is further 
plastered at its foot with mud and strengthened with matting, chaidt^ 
so that no passage exists for anything. In mid-stream the screen 
opens into a long and narrow passage walled and floored with the 
same materials ; and this terminates in a basket, named katerd^^Yivck 
is a hamper made of reeds, into which a small orifice in the side 
gives admittance to fish beneath the surface of the water, whilst the 
lid remains above the surface, and is opened from time to time for 
the removal of the spoil. As the water hardly finds its way through 
the interstices of the screen, it rushes in a strong current along the 
passage, carrying the fish with it, and a fall firom the passage into 
the basket precludes all chance of escape. The months during which 
the greatest destruction of fry and small fish takes place are fi*om July 
to September." 



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no THE piSH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL. 

Mr Hobart reported of Bastf District : — " I remember the Kodnd 
used to overflow its banks yearly, and millions of fish used to come 
into the quiet waters of the lagoons lying near the stream. There 
was a system of staking the mouths of those lagoons, when the water 
fell in the river at the end of the rains, as the fish tried to get away. 
Except the very large fish, which leaped the artificial barrier (and it 
was more than four feet above the water), the rest of the fish were 
slaughtered in tens of thousands, and an incalculable waste occurred. 
Had the fish been gradually killed and sold, the plan has its advan- 
tages ; as it is, it requires restriction very badly. Again, in that 
same river, especially in the remote parts, there is a trap under every 
bridge that spans it, where fish are caught and slaughtered in 
numbers. I have never heard of poisoning being used as a means 
to capture fish there, but I remember seeing the stream poisoned 
naturally. At the end of the cold season some rain had fallen, and 
had washed the forest leaves into the water, which turned from this, 
or other cause, to a dull red colour. The fish sickened and died in 
thousands. On the up-stream side of each of the bridges and traps 
I have mentioned, you could see millions of fish eager to get down 
past the obstruction, and escape from the poisoned water. In a 
hundred yards or so, tlie river was a mass of living heads. The fish 
sickened and died in a day or two, and birds of prey came from all 
parts to devour them. I saw this myself, and heard that it was not 
of unfrequent occurrence, and that the dead fish were so numerous 
on these occasions that they were carted off as manure. This is 
certainly a crying evil and demands a remedy." 

The Collector of (Muthurd) Muttra reported : — " I have seen 
much of the Ganges and Jamni canals that run through Mirat, and 
I know that in both, quantities of fish are annually destroyed when 
the canals are allowed to run off. I have watched the first rush of 
water let in, and have been astonished at the shoals of fish brought 
down by it. One instance I recollect. I was at the Masuri fall on 
the Ganges canal in the Mirat District, when I saw hundreds of 
mahdsir come down j they were all carried over the fall, as they 
had been over a dozen higher up between that point and Hardwdr, 
not one of which could by any possibility have got back again up 
the canal. Such a constantly recurring drain on the supply of fish 
in the head-waters has naturally produced a great diminution in the 
numbers of the species of fish, and as it is the one most generally 
taken by the Europeans, the loss is more apparent. But I have 



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CONCLUSION^DESTRUCTION OF FISHES. 1 1 1 

little doubt that this injury to other descriptions of fish is equally 
great." 

Taking the Mahisir simply as a sample of the fish destroyed in 
these irrigation canals, what must every observer behold ? That they 
go down these large channels, but cannot return. It has been sug- 
gested that they might continue their descent, and thus find an exit 
at the lower end, but this they will not do. As the canal becomes 
shallower towards its termination, the falls are lower, the holes formed 
below them less deep, and there is not so much food, consequentiy 
they will not be found there. This is not a theoretical opinion, but 
deduced fi"om actual observation made when a canal was dried off. 
These canals are emptied at certain periods for repairs or other causes, 
and at this period many fish are left dry in the bed and are easily 
killed, but a large number retreat into the holes which exist and con- 
tain water. In some of these canals, a custom obtains to permit the 
employ^ to kill all they are able, in any manner they can ; in other 
places this is more or less prohibited ; whilst in some, the fisKing is 
let out, and every living fish destroyed, no matter how small ; and as 
none can ascend out of the canals, the destruction is enormous and 
sufficient to luin any fisheries. ** Dr Allen," of the 2nd Gorkhis, 
thus observed on these constructions : — " The fisheries are certainly 
decreasing as regards the number of fish, both in the Ganges and 
Jamnd rivers. The chief cause of this, I believe, to be the drain on 
them caused by the canals. Mahdsir, rohu, kdlbasu, &c., abound in 
all the canals both from the Jamnd and Ganges. The mahisir are 
very plentiful in the Jamni canal (Karndl branch, which runs down 
to Hinsf and Hissdr) and in the Ganges canal. When these canals 
silt up, or the water is cut off fi"om their head, for cleaning, repairing, 
or other purposes, hundreds of thousands of fish of all kinds and of 
all sizes are destroyed. When the water shallows sufficiently, men 
and boys go into it with sticks, and kill the fish in thousands, and this 
occurs every year. It must be very evident that so great a drain as 
this must decrease and injure the supply of fish in the main streams, 
as before the canals were cut, the whole of those now entering them 
remained in the Ganges and Jamn^ rivers and their tributary streams. 
The tributary streams may be netted and dammed, but such an amount 
of injury to the fishing from this cause would not happen in a series 
of years, as is produced in one year by the indiscriminate slaughter 
in the canals, when fish firom a maund in weight downwards are 
destroyed through a hundred or more miles of country." 



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112 



THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL. 



These canals thus form traps on a large scale wherein fish are 
destroyed wholesale whenever the water is cut off, and that this is not 
seldom, I adduce the following figures to prove. In the Eastern 
Jamnd canal the number of times and days it has been without a 
supply of water are as follows : — 

years ending Dec 31st, iS4a No. of times closed, 58 No. of days closed, 203 
1845 
1850 
1855 

i860 „ ,, 

186S 
1870 

If we now examine as to the comparative number of days on which 
the canals have been closed, we find the longest period firom 29th 
October 1845 to December 15th, 1845, or 47 days, and the shortest a 
single day, thus — 



53 


II 




356 


48 


II 




194 


47 


II 




26s 


36 


II 




267 


31 


II 




240 


14 


II 




2 16 



During the first 4 years 
II next 5 „ 


closures averaged 34 days each. 
64 „ 


II 5 II 
II 5 II 
II 5 II 
II 5 II 
II 5 II 


4 
54 
74 
8 

15 





The firequent closure of canals must be destructive to fish, unless 
they are able to retire into deep holes or contiguous tanks, where they 
may remain quiet until the canal is refilled ; but, of course, should 
the canal be left dry for very long periods, as over eight or ten days, 
the probabilities are, that the water will have become so foul that the 
fish will die. Out of 287 times this canal was closed between Janu- 
ary 1837, and December 1870, we find as follows regarding the times 
closures occurred, with reference to the number of days — 

From o to 10 days, 238 times. 
„ 10 to 20 „ 31 „ 
„ 20 to 30 „ 12 „ 
„ 30 to 40 „ 3 „ 
„ 40 to 50 „ 3 „ 

In the Ganges canal, slaughtering all the fish, whenever it was closed, 
was carried on when I was there, the numbers of times and the days 
wherein such occurred during the last fifteen years being as follows : — 



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CONCLUSION— IRRIGATION WEIRS. 113 

5 years ending December 31st, i86a Na of times closed, 3. Days 27 
5 >. „ 1865 „ „ 10 „ 156 

5 » » 1870 „ „ 7 i> 160 

Thus, in round numbers, this canal during the last five years has 
had six times more days without water than in the first five years 
under review; whilst the periods of time it has been kept dry have 
risen as follows : — 

1st 5 years — No. of days dry at each closure, 9 
2nd 5 „ „ „ „ 15 

3rd 5 »f u » n 23 

Irrigation weirs have been erected across various rivers in the 
Panjdb, North-Western Provinces, Bengal, and Madras, in order to 
deflect a certain amount of water into canals constructed for its 
reception and dissemination. These weirs are usually built in the 
form of stone walls spanning the entire breadth of rivers, and conse- 
quently form an obstruction, arresting the upward and downward 
passage of fish that are endeavouring to migrate, whilst, should it be 
sufficiently high, it entirely prevents their passing. . On the bed of 
the river in front of it, or on its down-stream face, there is generally 
a stone pavement termed " an apron," or this apron may be a gradual 
slope of rough or smooth stones extending from the summit of the 
walls to the bed of the river. Likewise on the up-stream face of 
these weir walls is a bandh of stones, of greater or lesser extent, slop- 
ing down to the bed of the river. 

These irrigation weirs are of different forms, but all arrest the pas- 
sage of fish, some temporarily, others entirely ; and, as a consequence, 
those migrating down-stream often pass into the irrigation canals. 
These weirs have openings of varying sizes, termed " under-sluices" 
constructed for the purpose of permitting the surplus water passing 
through the body of the weir, and on a level with the lowest bed of 
the river ; when rushing through with great velocity, it was expected 
large quantities of silt would be carried with it, keeping the general 
bed of the river washed out to its proper level. These under-sluices 
or complete gapsi through the weirs are of different widths, and may 
be classed under two divisions : ^rst, the long narrow ones in North- 
western Provinces, and the Panjdb ; and, secondly, the wide ones in 
use at Cattack, Midnapur, and on the Son River. These under 
sluices are kept closed, except when there is an excess of water, as 
during the monsoon months : those of the Madras or narrow pattern 
are from six to nine feet in width, and several yards in length ; they 



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1 14 THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL, 

close by means of boards pushed down vertically into large wooden 
grooves, and these boards can be elevated^ when it is desired to do 
so, by means of a capstan and windlass. As these narrow under- 
sluices are of many feet in length, there are generally two sets of 
grooves, one at each end, so that either can be made use o£ These 
narrow under-sluices carry such a rush of water through them, that 
no Indian fish can ascend up when they are open. 

Fish, which are attempting to pass weirs in the course of their 
ascent up rivers, are chiefly those who are in a breeding condition, 
and are trying to reach their natural spawning grounds. Thus, when 
near the sea, the shad or hilsd is the most valuable sort which 
becomes stopped by weirs without practicable passes, so they are 
unable to reach the only localities wherein their spawn or ova could 
come to maturity if deposited ; they consequently have to drop it 
in the water below these weirs, and here it cannot be fertilised, but 
inevitably perishes. The same occurs with some of the laige carps 
in the more northern rivers (as of the North-Westem Provinces and 
the Panjdb) that are weired not fsu* from the base of the Himdlayas, 
the hilly streams of which are the natural breeding-places for some, 
as the mahisir, &c. They descend over them before the cold months, 
when the rivers above contain too little water, or are unsuited for 
their residence ; and when attempting to return up-stream, find this 
stone wall an insuperable obstacle : thus their reproduction is like- 
wise prevented. 

Fish when heavy in roe are not so well able to jump any great 
heights as are some of thq younger or barren ones. Standing at the 
period of fi-eshes, on the bridge above one of the Madras weirs pos- 
sessing these narrow under-sluices, it is interesting to see the numbers 
offish, both laige and small, which leap up against their walls: some 
strike against the piers of the bridge, others fall into the cascade 
descending over its summit; but though I have passed hours 
watching them, I never saw one clear these obstacles, although I 
have seen thousands attempting it. The only rational reason that I 
can adduce for the jumping against the insurmountable weir walls 
whilst the narrow under-sluices are open is because they find such to 
be impassible. Could they ascend through these, why do they not ? 
When these fishes were netted, many, especially the large ones, were 
bruised and scaleless in places, evidently due to injuries caused 
during their fiantic but unavailing efforts to surmount the wall, or 
ascend through the open but narrow under-sluices. 



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CONCLUSION— IRRIGATION WEIRS, 115 

The wide under-sluices^ such as exist in the weirs at Cattack and 
Midnapur, are constructed on an entirely diflferent principle and 
pattern, forming free gaps of many yards in width, so that, when 
open, fish cannot have any difficulty in ascending through them. 

These weirs likewise, it is stated, may be topped by fish during 
heavy fioods» especially when the summit of their wall is several feet 
below the surfiace of the water. But they do not appear to do so, or 
why are the shad entirely stopped at the lower Kalerun one ? As 
they ascend along the river's bed they find a wall and ascend to sur- 
mount it, but as they rise the strong current must take them back- 
ward down-stream, and thus they never reach its summit, which the 
muddy condition of the water prevents their seeing, for it is only 
during fireshes that the wall is covered. 

Besides the foregoing there are irrigation canals which have a 
bearing upon the fisheries of a District, and these may be divided (i) 
into those simply constructed for purposes of irrigation, or {2) those 
which are made for both irrigation and navigation. These canals in 
some places, as the Rori one in Sind, are mere artificial streams, 
which, in some portions of their extent, exist in lieu of natural water- 
courses which have silted up. Here no great falls occur, and 
references to such are unnecessary. But irrigation canals, as a rule, 
are given oflf firom one or both sides of a river, which has a stone 
weir thrown across it for the purpose of backing up the water to a 
given height At the head of each of these canals are head sluices, 
where the amount of water entering can be regulated in accordance 
with local requirements, or entirely cut off if necessary. 

Irrigation weirs constructed simply for irrigaiion are those in which 
boat-traffic cannot be also carried on, due to one or more vertical 
falls existing, which are too great to permit such. These falls, which 
are sufficient to prevent traffic, are mostly sufficient to entirely 
obstruct fish which have once descended over them firom ever 
re-ascending. Such canals almost invariably have a high fall near 
their commencement, whilst below all overflows, and due to the 
action of descending water, are holes of a larger or smaller size in 
their bed, well adapted for feeding in, where large fish live and thrive 
so long as they are permitted The further the distance from the 
canal head, and as the amount and rapidity of the flow of water 
decreases, the falls are usually less and these holes are smaller ; still 
even there they are present, but are not so suitable for providing 
food for large fish. It will thus be seen that these canals form large 



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1 16 THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL. 

receptacles which may be turned into traps for all fish which once 
obtain an ingress, unless there are tanks connected with them into 
which they could retire when the water is cut off and they become 
dried, or else that the holes in their beds retain a sufficient supply 
during these periods, so that the fish may remain in safety until the 
water is re-admitted. For at certain times of the year it becomes 
necessary to drain off these canals to enable the engineer officers to 
ascertain what repairs are necessary, and unless the fish have a safe 
place to resort to they might be easily taken. But, unfortunately, in 
some canals it is, or has been, the custom to allow the employ^ to 
kill all the fish at this period, and thus a simple irrigation canal 
becomes a vast trap for destroying fish. 

In canals for both irrigation and navigation^ there are locks at 
every fall, that boats may be admitted and floated up to a higher 
level. At these locks I have observed that fish can obtain a passage 
up or down stream, so they will not be further alluded to. 

None of these canals contain gratings or other appliances at their 
commencement for preventing the ingress of fish, and I have wit- 
nessed how, when water is re-admitted into these canals, shoals of fish 
are carried over falls up which none can re-ascend, and below which 
they are unable to breed. Thus the water is cut off and the contained 
fish destroyed, the canal to be again replenished with a supply frpm 
the river, to be again and again exterminated several times during the 
year; and a surprise is expressed that the fisheries are deteriorating. 
The oflener the canals are closed, and the longer the periods at each 
closing, the greater is the mischief. But from either side of these 
main canals are given off side ones for the purposes of irrigation ; 
these, agam, have no grating to prevent fish ascending them ; they go 
up, but as they are mostly only filled every alternate week on either 
side, all that have gone up them invariably perish. In some Districts 
fixed traps are permitted in all these small water-courses. 

In Bengal. — ^The Commissioner of the Rijshdhf Division observes 
that—" Some salted and dried fish is imported to the Division, especially 
to Rangpur and Dinijpur, fi-om Dacca and Maimansinh. Except in 
Pabni, where there is a large trade in hilsd fish, there is no extensive 
fish trade to distant places in any Districts in the Division. The fish 
caught is almost wholly locally consumed, though it is not unfre- 
quently the case that, in the cold season, the fish is carried to distant 
hdts and markets for sale at some distance firom the rivers. The 
supply of fish has fallen off from what it was some twenty years ago. 



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CONCLUSION^DIMINUTION IN THE SUPPL Y OF FISH, 117 

This is attributed to the destruction of the fry and the young fish 
and to the silting up of small rivers and bits. The supply having 
fallen off, and the demand being great, owing to increase of popula- 
tion, its price has also, as a matter of course, nearly doubled what 
it was before." 

" There can be no doubt that the destruction of small fiy must be 
enormous, not only in rivers, but in every paddy-field in Bengal ; but 
I cannot say that I see my way to any feasible suggestions for the 
prevention of fish-catching in the rainy season all over Bengal." 

These fiy are sold for two purposes, (i) either alive for stocking 
tanks, or (2) dead as food. At the commencement of the century, it 
will have been observed, that although cultivators might capture 
some of these immature fish in their fields for their own consumption 
they had to pay a tax if they took any for sale. Now-a-days we do 
not hear that " vast multitudes flock into the reservoirs, ditches being 
in general cut to give them a passage as the waters retire," as Dr 
Buchanan observed used to be the case. 

In Assam. — The Deputy Commissioner of Darang observes — 
** There is good reason to suppose that the supply of fish is falling 
off. Fish has become of late years much dearer, the fisheries are 
falling in value, and many of the Dom fishermen are, in consequence, 
I believe, taking to agricultiu-al pursuits. With, perhaps, the excep- 
tion of some Mdrwdri merchants and some sepoys, fish would be con- 
sumed by all classes in this District could they get it, but, as it is, the 
supply by no means equals the demand. Fish is neither salted, dried, 
nor exported, but some is imported. Fish are neither put in tanks 
nor reared, but, on the contrary, all means are employed for their 
destruction and that of their spawn. Everything from a weir to a 
basket is used, and the meshes of nets are so small that no firy can 
escape. The fish never have rest, and must decrease in numbers. 
The only measure for conservation possible would be regulating the 
smallest size of the meshes permitted. The prevention of the des- 
truction of the fiy in the fields is a more serious consideration, as the 
people for years have procured daily meals from them, and to 
suddenly withdraw the privilege, even although it would be doubt- 
less much to their eventual advantage, might cause discontent and 
trouble." 

The Assistant Commissioner, Golighdt, observes — " Many of the 
river fish, some of which attain a large size, come annually up the 
smaller streams and deposit their spawn, and the young ones of these 



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1 18 THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL, 

are during the rains dispersed over the surface of the country 
in rice-fields, swamps, drains, and ditches. These endeavour 
subsequently to make their way to the large rivers, but the 
dangers that beset them on the road are numerous. In the 
shallow waters in the rice-fields, women and children may 
be seen in crowds fishing with baskets called jakai^ through 
the interstices of which a tadpole could not pass. Those that 
escape this danger, and, following the flow of the water, arrive at 
one of the innumerable dams separating the paddy fields, find 
their further progress barred by fimnel-shaped bamboo traps 
called khokd^ chdpd^ or ghani^ through which the water is made to 
pass, but whose outlets are so small that only the most minute fish 
can get through. Escaping to the smaller water-courses, their dangers 
seem to increase. The Assamese divide the channel into sections by 
erecting bdndhs, and firom one of these they proceed to bale out all 
the water, capturing every fish, large and small : they then dam up 
another portion and do likewise. The fish that finally arrive at the 
smaller rivers find their exit barred by weirs, which will let nothing 
pass ; and, not content with this, the Assamese will sometimes resort 
to poison, employing for this purpose the fruit of a tree called 
'Konibfh.'" 

Throughout the whole of the reports sent in, no such preserves of 
fish are recorded as those of Sihib Zddi Singh in the Son, half a 
century ago. Dr Buchanan evidently foresaw impending a diminu- 
tion of the supply of the fresh water fishes. He observed, " I am 
persuaded that a common property is, in general, neglected, and turns 
out of little or no advantage, either to the public or to individuals. 
In this District (Dindjpur) the property in the fisheries has, in many 
places, been separated from that of the adjacent land, which seems 
to me to be a great loss, as it is the proprietor of the neighbouring 
land alone that can take care, either of the fish or fishermen." He 
remarks that the Collector of Bhigalpiur was pursuing the same 
disastrous course, whilst in Gorakhpur, they were being given away 
to Rijds, firee of rent, as a means of subsistence. 

In those days, the fishermen evidently had not the same immuni- 
ties they have now. We hear that directly a fishing-boat was seen, 
it would be making away, as their occupants appear to have been 
generally plundered in the Ganges. The modes in which rents were 
paid, seem to have varied almost with each District. In some 



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CONCLUSION— DIMINUTION IN THE SUPPL V OF FISH. 1 19 

places, tanks were kept in repair by fishermen, in return for their 
being allowed the contained fish. Raising a hovel on the banks of 
the Ganges, necessitated the payment of a high rent, not ostensibly, 
but in reality, for the fishing in its vicinity. 

How are the markets supplied with fish at the present time, has 
been answered as follows : — " In the North- West Provinces^ suffici- 
ently in 13 ; insufficiently in 23 ; occasionally in 2 ; doubtful in 2. 
In Oudh^ three-fourths of the markets have a larger demand than 
supply. In Lower Bengaiy the returns show that the supply does not 
come up to the demand. We hear of fishermen being obliged to 
take to other occupation to earn a livelihood, and the reasons for this 
are apparently as follows : — 

Respecting the present state of the fresh water fisheries through- 
out India, excluding Lower Bengal, Assam, Sind and Burmah, the 
following reports were received. 

State of Indian Fresh-water Fisheries^ 187 1. 



Province. 


Increase. 


Stationary. 


Decrease. 


DonbtftiL 


Panjab, . . . 


13 


32 


33 




N.-W. Provinces, 




6 


10 


... 


Oudh, . . . 


.8 


10 


2 


I 


Bombay, . . 
Haidaiibid, . 






generally decreased, 
ditto. 


... 


Mysore, . . 


... 




in the majority. 


«. . 


Madras, . . 


6 


12 


46 





If the more destructive modes of taking fish, and the innovations 
now permitted are to be continued, what is to be expected except a 
continual decrease of the true fi-esh-water species, due to the 
incessant drain ? And when the next famine spreads its blighting 
influence over the Delta of the Ganges, where will be the indigenous 
fish which might aid in preserving the lives of some few of the 
miserable but thoughtless people ? Who will then be amongst the 
first to exclaim against the short-sightedness of their predecessors, 
who have allowed present greed to impoverish what should be a large 
reserve supply of food ? What will then be said of the philanthropy 
of permitting this waste of to-day, or the wisdom of unheeding what 
might be required for a future year's supply ? 

But it must not be imagined that, in Bengal alone^ the blighting 
influence of European non-regulation of fisheries is felt, for enquiries 
distinctly prove that it exists throughout the length and breadth of 



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120 THE FISH AND FISHERIES OF BENGAL. 

India. One example, from Madras, may here be quoted. The 
rents of the entire fresh-water fisheries in that Presidency have 
dwindled down to an average of Rs. 80,000 (£8000) per annum. 

Mr Nelson observes of the Madura District alone, " that the 
repair of tanks, or at all events the more important ones, seem to 
have been executed by Government, and to have been paid for out 
of the proceeds of the fishery of the tanks when drying up, and a 
letter, dated 17 13, states that the fishing of a single tank provided 
occasionally 2000 crowns, and that the sums so realised were invari- 
ably applied to the execution of repairs." 

The native officials of Madura (1872) report that "the local 
markets in large towns are not fully supplied with fish, and at certain 
seasons they are very scarce. During the season, the supply in many 
villages is sufficient, but more could always be sold in the larger 
towns." Eighty per cent, of the people would eat fish could they 
procure it 

The way in which the lower castes in this and the neighbouring 
District of Tinnevelly have now to supply themselves with animal 
food, is thus described in the Madras Mail (August 1873). Frogs 
are now used instead offish ! " All over the Districts of Madura and 
Tinnevelly, he says, the pariahs almost live on them, and thrive well. 
The frog most commonly in request is the green frog, called in the 
Tdmil language "pdtchei tavdlei.'* Next in demand is the large 
croaking solitary frog, called "peria tavilei;" and the " sori tavdlei," 
or spangled frog, is also eaten. The great delicacy, however, is the 
sand frog, or " manal tavdlei," and when these are procurable, the 
others are neglected. The frogs are generally cooked in the same 
way as fish, but the boys are content with simply disembowelling 
the frog, and roasting it for about five minutes before a fire." 

It is further suggested, one can hardly believe in earnest, that 
attention should now be turned to the fi"Ogs for an increase in the 
food supply. Thus a deficiency is admitted, but nothing is suggested 
to arrest the present ruinous way the fisheries are being worked, 
which might, with care and attention, be amply sufficient for all local 
requirements. The fi"Ogs might be left to the otters, and as food for 
fish, instead of compelling human beings to have recourse to them 
as a means of subsistance, at periods when no scarcity or famine 
exists in the District, except in respect to the fish supply. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



LIST OF THE PRINCIPAL PLANTS 



GROWING IN 



THE BENGAL PRESIDENCY AND ASSAM. 



Digitized by CjOOQ IC 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



RANUNCULACE^. 

I Clematis Cadmia, Bam, 

2 Nepalensis, Dc. 

3 montana, Ham. 

4 acutangula, I/f. and Th, 

5 smilacifolia, Wall. 

6 Gauriana, Roxb. 

7 puberula, Hf. and Th. 

8 apiculata, Hf. and Th. 

9 nutans, Royle. 

10 acuminata, Dc. 

H connata, Dc. 

12 Buchananiana, Dc, 

13 grewiaeflora, Dc. 

14 Naravelia Zeylanica, Dc. 

15 Anemone rupicola, Camb. 
16 vitifolia, Ham. 

17 Griffithii, Hf. and Th. 

18 obtusiloba, Don. 

19 rupestris, WalL 

20 trullifolia, Hf. and Th. 

21 -rivularis, Ham. 

22 demissa, Hf. and Th. 

23 ■ polyanthes, Don. 

24 elongata, Don. 

25 Thalictrum elegans, Wall. 

26 — - cultratum, WcUL 

27 — - Chelidonii, Dc. 
28 reniforme, Wall. 

29 — - virgatum, Hf and Th. 

30 rutsefolium, Hf and Th. 

vn. 



31 Thalictrum rostellatum, Hf 

and Th. 

32 alpinum, L. 

33 Punduanum,* Wall. 

34 saniculaeforme, Dc. 

35 Javanicum, Bl. 

36 foliolosum, Dc. 

37 minus, L. 

38 Callianthemum Cachemiria- 

num, Camb. 

39 Ranunculus Cymbalariae, 

Pursh. 

40 pulchellus, C. A. Mey. 

41 lobatus, ycLcq. 

42 hyperboreus, Rott. C. 

43 affinis, Br. 

44 nivalis, L. 

45 sceleratus, L. 

46 diffusus, Dc. 

47 laetus, Wall. 

48 Pensylvanicus, Z.. 

49 flaccidus, Hf and Th. 

50 Oxygraphis glacialis, Bunge. 

51 Caltha palustris, L. 

52 scaposa, Hf. and Th. 

53 Calathodes palmata, Hf and 

Th. 

54 TroUius pumilus, Don. 

55 CoptisTeeta, Wall. 

56 Isopynim adiantifolium, Hf 

andTh. 

57 Aquilegia vulgaris, Z. 



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124 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS, 



58 Delphinium coeruleum, ^acq. 

59 altissimum, Wall. 

60 viscosum, Hf, and Th. 

61 glaciale, Hf, and Th. 

62 Aconitum uncinnatum, Z. 

63 luridum, Hf, and Th, 

64 palmatum, Don, 

6s ferox, Wall, 

66 Napellus, L, 

67 Actaea spicata, L, 
(i^ Cimicifuga foetida, Z. 

DILLENIACEyE, 

69 Delima sarmentosa, Z. 

70 Tetracera Assa, Dc. 

71 Dillenia Indica, Z. 

72 aurea, Sm, 

73 pilosa, I^oxb. 

74 scabrella, Roxb. 

75 pentagyna, Roxb, 

MAGNOLIACEjE, 

76 Euptelea pleiosperma, Hf and 

Th. 

77 lUicium GrifBthii, Hf, and 

Th, 

78 Talauma Hodgsoni, Hf and 

Th, 

79 Rabaniana, Hf and Th, 

80 Magnolia Campbellii, Z^'C a«^ 

Th, 

81 globosa, Hf, and Th, 

82 Griffithii, Hf, and Th, 

83 sphenocarpa, Rooob, 

84 Manglietia insignis, Bl, 

85 Caveana, Hf and Th, 

86 Michelia Cathcartii, Hf and 

Th, 

87 Champaca, Z. 

88 excelsa, Bl, 



89 Michelia alongiunsa, Wall, 

po Kisopa, Ham, 

. 91 oblonga, Wall, 

92 Funduanai^ Hf, and Th. 

93 Schizandra grandifiora, Hf. 

and Th. 

94 elongata, Hf and Th. 

95 axillaris, Hf. and Th. 

96 Kadsura Roxburghiana, 

Am. 

A NONAGED. 

97 Uvaria Hamiltoni, Hf. and 

Th. 

98 bracteata, Roxb. 

99 macrophylla, Roxb. 

100 lurida, Hf, and Th, 

1 01 Artabotrys caudatus, Wall, 

102 suaveolens, BL 

103 Unona Dimalii, Wall, 

104 dumosa, Roxb. 

105 Desmos, Dun. 

J 06 discolor, VbL 

107 praecox, Hf and Th. 

108 longifiora, Roxb. 

109 Polyalthia longifolia, Bth, 

andHf 

simianim, Bth. andHf 
cerasoides, Bth. and 



no 

ITI 

112 
"3 



Hf 



- Jenkinsii, Bth, andHf 
' suberosa, Bth, and Hf 
114 argentea, Hf and Th, 

115 Oxymitra fomicata, Hf and 

Th, 

116 Goniothalamus sesquipeda. 

lis, Hf and Th. 

117 Simmonsii, Hf and Th, 

118 Mitrephora tomentosa, Hf 

and Th, 



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UST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



125 



119 Anona squamosa, L, 



120 


reticulata, Z. 


121 


Melodorum rubiginosum, 




Hf. and Th. 


122 


vemicosum, Hf. and 




Th, 


123 


bicolor, Bf. and Th. 


124 


Wallichii, Hf. and Th, 


"5 






Th, 


126 




127 


Miliusa macrocarpa, Hf, and 




Th. 


J28 


Roxburghiana, Iff, 




and Th, 


129 


velutina, Hf and Th. 


130 


Saccopetalum longifloruro, 



131 



Hf and Th, 
— tomentosum, Hf, and 



Th. 



132 Alphonsea ventricosa, Hf 

and Th. 
133 lutea, Hf and Th. 

MENISPERMA CEy£. 

134 Aspidocarya uvifera, Hf. and 

Th, 

135 Parabaena sagittata, Miers. 

136 Tinospora tomentosa, il//>rj. 

137 Malabarica, Miers. 

138 crispa, Miers. 

139 cordifolia, Miers. 

140 Anamirta Cocculus, Wa, 

141 Tiliacora racemosa, Coleb. 

142 Limacia cuspidata, Hf and 

Th, 

143 Cocculus villosus, Dc. 
144 mollis. Wall. 

145 Pericampylusincanus,^/<5rx. 

146 Stephania hemandifolia. 



147 Stephania elegans, Hf. and 

Th. 
148 rotunda, Lour. 

149 Cissampelos Pareira, Z. 

150 Cyclea peltata, Hf. and Th. 

151 Lophophyllum bicristatum. 

Griff. 

152 Pycnarrhena pleniflora, 

Miers. 

153 Haematocarpus Thomsoni, 

Miers. 

BERBERIDEjE. 

154 Decaisnea insignis, Hf and 

Th. 

155 Parvatia Brunoniana, Z>^n^. 

156 Hollboellia latifolia, Wall. 

157 Berberis Nepalensis, Spreng. 
158 umbellata, Wall. 

- aristata, Dc. 
' Asiatica, Roxd. 

- Wallichiana, Dc. 

- insignis, Hf. and Th. 
' angulosa, Wall. 

- macrosepala, Hf. 

- concinna, Hf 



IS9 
160 
i6i 
162 
163 
164 

i6S 

166 Podophyllum Emodi, Wall, 

NYMPH^ACE^. 

167 Brasenia peltata, Pursh. 

168 Nymphaea Lotus, Z. 

169 stellata, Willd, 

170 pygmaea, Ait, 

171 Euryale ferox, Salisb. 

172 Nelumbo nucifera, 

Gaertn. 

PAPAVERACE^. 

173 Papaver somniferum, Z. 

174 Argemone Mexicana, Z. 



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126 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



17s Meconopsis simplicifolia, 
nf, and Th, 

176 horridula, Hf, and Th, 

177 Nepalensis, Dc. 

178 Wallichii, Hook. 

179 Cathcartia villosa, Hf. 

FUMARIACE^, 

180 Hypecoumleptocarpum,Z5^ 

and Th. 

181 Dicentra torulosa, Hf, and 

Th. 

182 Roylei, Hf. and Th. 

183 thalictrifolia, Hf. and 

Th. 
184 Corydalis ophiocarpa, Hf. 

and Th. 

185 flaccida, Hf. and Th. 

186 leptocarpa, Hf and 

Th. 

187 Cachemiriana, Royle. 

188 polygalina, Hf and 



Th. 



juncea, Wall. 
■ ramosa, IVall. 



189 
190 

191 Sibirica, Fers. 

192 chaerophylla, Dc. 

CRUCIFERyE. 

193 Panya platycarpa, Hf and 

Th. 

194 Nasturtium palustre, Dc. 
195 Indicum, Dc. 

196 montanum, Wall. 

197 Barbarea data, Hf and Th. 

198 Arabis glandulosa, Kar. and 

Kir. 

199 Cardamine violacea, Wall. 
200 circaeoides, Hf and 

Th. 



201 Cardamine trifoliolata, Hj. 
and Th. 

202 hirsuta, L. 

203 impatiens, L. 

204 Griffithii, Hf. and Th. 

205 elegantula,-^. cind Th, 

206 macrophylla, Willd. 

207 Loxostemon pulchellus, Hf 

and Th. 

208 Draba alpina, L. 

209 elata, Hf. and Th. 

210 incana, L. 

211 lasiophylla, J?(?y/<r. 

212 Tibetica, Hf and Th. 

213 ellipsoidea, Hf andTh. 

214 gracillima, Hf. and Th. 

215 Cochlearia alyssoides, Dc. 
216 Himalaica, Hf and Th, 

217 scapiflora, Hf. and Th. 

218 Lepidostemon pendunculo- 

sus, Hf and Th. 

219 Sisymbrium moUissimum, C. 

A. Mey. 
- Himalaicum, Hf. and 



220 

221 

222 

223 
224 



Th. 



— Thalianum, Gay. and 
Monn. 
lasiocarpum, Hf and 



Th. 



axillare, Hf and Th. 
deltoideum, Hf. and 



Th. 



225 Eutrema Himalaicum, Hf. 

and Th. 

226 Erysimum deflexum, Hf. and 

Th. 

227 funiculosum, Hf and 

Th. 

228 pachycarpum, Hf and 

Th. 



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LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



127 



229 Erysimum longisiliquunijZJ^ 

and TL 

230 Braya rosea, Bunge. 

231 Brassica nigra, Koch, 

232 campestris, Z. 

233 iri\ocM\2j!\^,B/,andTh. 

234 quadrivalvis. Iff, and 

Th, 

235 juncea, Hf, and Th, 

236 oleracea, L, 

237 Capsella Bursa pastoris, 

Moench, 

238 Lepidium sativum, L, 

239 capitatum, Hf, and Th, 

240 Thlaspi arvense, L, 

241 alpestre, Z. 

242 cochlearioides, Hf. and 

Th, 

243 Senebiera didyma, Pers, 

244 Raphanus sativus, Z. 

CAPPARIDEyE, 

245 Cleome monophylla, Z. 
246 viscosa, Z. 

247 Chelidonii, L,f, 

248 Gynandropsis pentaphylla, 

Dc, 

249 Crataeva Roxburghii, Br. 

250 unilocularis. Ham, 

251 lophosperma, Kz, 

252 - — Nurvala, Ham, 

253 Capparis sepiaria, Z. 
254 pumila, Champ, 

255 Assamica, Z^*^ a^r/f Th, 

256 multiflora, Z^ atid Th, 

m ' horrida, L,f, 

258 olacifolia, Hf, and Th, 

259 ■ sabiaefolia, Hf, and 

Th, 

260 - — viminca, Hf and Th, 



261 Capparis tenera, Z^fl/ar. 

262 Roydsia snaveolens, Eoxb. 

VIOLA CE^, 

263 Viola biflora, Z. 

264 Patrinii, Dc, 

265 diffusa, Ging. 

266 Hookeri, T, Thorns, 

267 distans, IVaii. 

268 seqjens, Waii. 

269 Jonidium suffruticosum, 

Ging. 
2 'JO Alsodeia Roxburghii, Wall, 

271 Bengalensis, Wall, 

272 longiracemosa, Kz. 

BIXINE^, 

273 Cochlospermum Gossypium, 

Dc, 

274 Bixa Orellana, Z. 

275 Flacourtia inermis, Roxb, 

276 cataphracta, Roxb, 

277 Ramontchi, LHer, 

278 sepiaria, -^^Jt:^. 

279 Xylosma longifolium, Clos. 
280 controversum, Clos, 

281 Gynocardia odorata, R, Br, 

PITTOSPORE^, ' 

282 Pittosporum glabra turn, 

Lindl, 

283 humile, Hf, and Th, 

284 floribundum, W, A, 

POLYGALEAL, 

285 Polygala arillata. Ham, 

286 triphylla. Ham. 

287 crotalarioides, Ham, 

288 leptalea, Dc, 

289 persicariasfolia, Z?r. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



128 



UST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



290 Polygala erioptera, Dc. 

291 Chinensis, Z. 

292 Sibirica, Z. 

293 glomerata, Jjmr, 

294 Salomonia Cantoniensis, 

Jjmr, 
29s oblongifoHa, Dc. 

296 Securidaca inappendiculata, 

Hassk, 

297 Xanthophyllum flavescens, 

Roxb, 
2q8 virens, Roxb. 

CARYOPHYLLE^. 

299 Gypsophila cerastoides, 

Don, 

300 Saponaria Vaccaria, Z. 

301 Silene conoidea, Z. 

302 Stracheyi, Edg. 

303 Khasiana, Rohr, 

304 Cucubalus bacciferus, Z. 

305 Lychnis apetala, Z. 

306 nigrescens, Edg. 

307 Himalayensis, Et^. 

308 brachypetala, Hort. 

Berol. 

309 multicaulis, Wall. 

310 nutans, Bth. 

3 1 1 Cerastium vulgatum, Z. 

312 Stellaria crispata, Wall. 



313 
314 

315 
316 

317 
318 

319 

320 



paniculata, E^. 
media, Z. 
> Sikkimensis, Hf. 
bulbosa, Wulf. 
lanata, Hf. 
longissima, Wall. 



saxatilis, Ham. 

uliginosa, L. 

321 subumbellata, Edg. 

322 depaiiperata, Z^/^. 



323 Stellaria decumbens, Edg. 

324 Brachystemma calycinum, 

Don. 

325 Arenaria muscifonnis, Wall. 

326 polytrichoides, Edg. 

327 monticola, Edg. 

328 pulvinata, E€^. 

329 oreophila, Hf. 

330 orbiculata, Royle. 

231 ciliolata, Edg. 

332 glanduligera, Edg. 

333 melandryoides, Edg. 

334 Benthami, Edg. 

335 debilis, Hf 

336 Sagina procumbens, Z. 

337 Spergula arvensis, Z. 

338 pentandra, Z. 

339 Drymaria cordata, Willd. 

340 Polycarpon Loefflingiae, 

Bth, and Hf 

341 Polycarpaea corymbosa, 

Lamk. 

PORTULACACE^. 

342 Portulaca oleracea, Z. 

343 quadrifida, Z. 

344 tuberosa, Roxb. 

tamAriscine^. 

345 Tamari Gallica, Z. 

346 dioica, Rooib. 

347 ericoides, -^^///. 

348 Myricaria Gennanica, Desv. 

ELATINEyE. 

349 Bergia ammannioides, Roxb. 

350 verticillata, WUld. 

HYPERICINE^. 

351 Ascyrum filicaule, Dytf^, 



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LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



129 



352 Hypericum Griffithii, Hf, 

and Th. 

353 triflorum, Bl. 

354 patulum, Thbg, 

355 ItnmQZMle, Hf.andTh. 

356 reptans, fff. and Th, 

357 ■ 
358 



Sampsoni, Hance. 
• petiolulatum, Hf, and 



Th. 

— elodeoides, Chois. 
^^Nepalense, Chois, 

— monanthemum, 
and Th. 

— Japonicum, Thbg. 
Lalandii, Chois. 

— breviflorum, Wall. 



Hf. 



359 
360 

361 

362 

363 
364 

365 Cratoxylon neriifolium, Kz. 

GVTTIFER^. 

366 Garcinia cornea, L. 

367 Cowa, Roxb. 

368 Kydia, Roxh. 

369 lancesefolia, Roxb. 

370 pedunculata, Roxb. 

371 Morella, Desr. 

372 paniculata, Roxb. 

373 atroviridis, Griff. 

374 anomala, Platich. 

375 stipulata, T. And. 

376 Xanthochymus, Hf. 

^T] Calophyllum polyanthum, 

Wail. 

378 Kayea floribunda, Wall. 

379 Mesua ferrea, L. 

TERNSTRCEMIA CE^E. 

380 Temstroemia Japonica, Thbg. 

381 Adinandra Griffithii, Dyer. 

382 Cleyera ochnacea, Dc. 

383 grandiflora,ZJ^a;///77/. 



384 Eurya Japonica, Thbg. 

385 acuminata, Dc. 

386 trichocarpa, Korth. 

387 Actinidia callosa, Ldl. 

388 strigosa, Hf and Th. 

389 Saurauja Nepalensis, Dc. 

390 Griffithii, Dyer. 

391 Saurauja fasciculata, ]]'aiL 

392 Punduana, Wall 

393 Khasiana, Mig. 

394 cerea. Griff. 

395 Stachyurus Himalaicus, Hf. 

and Th. 

396 Schima Wallichii, Chois. 

397 Khasiana, Dyer. 

398 Pyrenaria barringtoniaefolia, 

Seem. 

399 Gordonia excelsa, Bl. 

400 Camellia Thea, Lk. 

401 caudata Wall. 

402 drupifera, Lour. 

403 lutescens. Dyer. 

DIPTEROCARPE^. 

404 Dipterocarpus turbinatus, 

Gaertn.f. 

405 pilosus, Roxb. 

406 tuberculatus, Roxb. 

407 scaber, Ham. 

408 alatus, Roxb. 

409 incanus, Roxb. 

410 Ancistrocladus Wallichii, 

Planch. 

411 Hopea scaphula, Roxb. 

412 Vatica lanceaefolia, Bl. 

413 Shorea robusta, Gaertn. f. 

414 Assamica, Dyer. 

MALVACE^. 

415 Althaea rosea, Cav. 



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^30 



LIST OF BJSNGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



416 Malva verticillata, Z. 

417 Malvastrum tricuspidatuniy 

A. Gray. 

418 spicatum, A. Gray, 

419 Sida humilis, Willd. 

420 Mysorensis, Willd. 

421 alba, Z. 

422 carpinifolia, Z. 

423 rhombifolia, Z. 

424 cordifolia, Z. 

425 Abutilon Indicum, Z. 

426 tomentosum, Willd. 

427 Urena lobata, Z. 

428 repanda, Roxb. 

429 Pavonia Zeylanica, Willd. 

430 Dicellostyles jujubifolia, 

Bth. 

43 1 Hibiscus Trionum, Z. 

432 Surattensis, Z. 

433 furcatus, Roxb. 

434 radiatus, Willd. 

435 micranthus, Z. 

436 Solandra, LHer. 

437 fragrans, Roxb. 

438 scandens, Roxb. 

439 macrophyllus, -/?^a:^. 

440 panduraeformis, Burnt. 

441 vitifolius, Z. 

442 cannabinus, Z. 

443 Sabdariffa, Z. 

444 ficulneus, Z. 

445 pungens, Roxb. 

446 Manihot, Z. 



447 
448 

449 
450 
451 
452 
453 



■ tetraphyllus, Roxb. 
Abelmoschus, Z. 

• esculentus, Z. 

• tiliaceus, Z. 
tricuspis, Banks. 
Rosa Sinensis, Z. 
Syriacus, Z. 



454 Thespesia Lampas, Dalz. 

and Gibs. 

455 populnea, Corr. 

456 Gossypium herbaceum, Z. 

457 Barbadense, Z. 

458 Kydia calycina, -^(7jc^. 
459 glabrescens, Mast. 

460 Bombax Malabaricum, J?c. 

461 Eriodendron pentandrum, 

Kz. 

STERCULIA CEjE. 

462 Sterculia urens, Roxb. 

463 foetida, Z. 

464 villosa, Roocb. 

465 Roxburghii, W*^. 

466 armata, Mast. 

467 coccinea, Roxb. 

468 mollis, Wall. 

469 parvifiora, Rooob. 

470 colorata, -^(7ji:^. 

471 alata, Roxb. 

472 Heritiera littoralis, Dry. 

473 minor, Roxb. 

474 macrophylla, Wall. 

475 acuminata, Jf^//. 

476 Reevesia Wallichii, Br. 

477 pubescens. Mast. 

478 Helicteres Isora, Z. 

479 plebeja, Kz. 

480 spicata, Colebr. 

481 Pterospermum acerifolium, 

- semisagittatum. Ham. 

- lanceaefolium, Roxb. 



482 • 

483 • 

484 Eriolaena Hookeriana, Ji^/A/. 

485 Candollei, Wall. 

486 quinquelocularis, 

Wight. 

487 Pentapetes phoenicea, Z. 



Digitized by 



Google 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS, 



131 



488 Melhania Hamiltoniana, 

Wall. 

489 Melochia corchorifolia, Z. 

490 Waltheria Americana, Z. 

491 Abroma augusta, Z. 

492 Guazuma tomentosa, Kth, 

493 Buettneria herbacea, Roxb. 

494 aspera, Colebr, 

495 pilosa, Roxb, 

TILIACE.iE, 

496 Brownlowia lanceolata, Bt/t. 

497 Grewia columnaris, Sm. 

498 - 

499 - 

500 - 

501 ■ 

502 ■ 

503 ■ 

504 - 

505 - 

506 - 

507 - 

508 - 



- excelsa, VhL 

- tiliaefolia, V/iL 

- Asiatica, Z. 

- polygama, Roxb, 

- sapida, Roxb, 

- sclerophylla, IVali, 

- pilosa, Lamk, 

- multiflora, yuss, 

- laevigata, Vhl, 

- hirsuta, Vhl, 

- microcos, Z. 

509 Triumfetta pilosa, Roth, 

510 rhomboidea, Jacq, 

511 rotundifolia, Lamk, 

512 annua, Z. 

513 Corchorus capsularis, Z. 

514 

515 

516 tridens, Z. 

517 acutangulus, Lamk. 

518 Echinocarpus Sigun, Bl, 

519 Assamicus, Bth, 

520 sterculiaceus, Bth, 

521 tomentosus, Bth, 

522 dasycarpus, Bth, 

523 Elaeocarpus Ganitrus, Roxb. 
524 serratus, Z. 



olitorius, Z. 
fascicularis, Lamk, 



525 Elaeocarpus iioribundus, Bl. 

526 robustus, Roxb, 

527 cuneatus, Wight, 

528 lanceaefolius, Roxb. 

529 Sikkimensis, Mast,. 

530 aristatus, Roxb, 

531 nigosus, Roxb, 

532 Monocera, Cav, 

533 acuminatus, Wall, 

534 prunifolius. Wall, 

535 Varunua, Ham, 

LINACEyE, 

536 Linum usitatissimum, L, 

537 Reinwardtia trigyna. Planch. 

538 tetragyna, Planch. 

539 Anisadenia saxatilis. Wall. 

540 pubescens, Griff, 

541 Erythroxylon Kunthianum, 

Kz, 

542 Ixonanthes Khasiana, Hf, 

MALPIGHIA CEyE, 

543 Hiptage Madablota, Gaertn, 

544 acuminata, Wall, 

545 Aspidopterys Roxburghiana, 

A, yuss, 

546 nutans, Hf. 

547 tomentosa, yuss, 

ZYGOPHYLLE^, 

548 Tribulus cistoides, Z. 

549 terrestris, Z. 

GERANIACEyE, 

550 Geranium refractum, Edg, 

andHf, 

551 collinum, il/]5, 

552 Grevilleanum, Wall, 

5S3 Nepalense, Sw, 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



132 



UST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



554 Geranium polyanthes, Edg. 

andHf. 

555 ocellatum, Camb. 

556 Oxalis comiculata, Z. 

557 Acetosella, Z. 

558 Griffithii, Edg. andHf. 

559 Biophytum sensitivum, Edg. 

560 Apodiscias, Turcz. 

561 Reinwardtii, Walp. 

562 Averrhoa carambola, L. 

563 Bilimbi, Z. 

564 Impatiens Chinensis, Z. 



593 Impatiens urticifolia, W. A. 



salicifolius, Z5^. ^;7// 2%. 
radicans, Bth. 
trilobata, CoUbr. 
flavida, Hf. and Th. 
Balsamina, Z. 
bella, Hf. and Th. 
latiflora, Hf. and Th, 
pulchra, Hf and Th. 



565- 
566 

567 
568 

569 

570 . 

571 ■ 

572 • 

573 fimbriata, Hook. 

574 acuminata, Bth. 

575 tripetala, Roxb. 

576 Thomsoni, Hf 

jyy sulcata, Wall. 

578 spirifer, Hf. and Th. 

579 serrata, Bth. 

580 scabrida, Dc. 

581 arguta, Hf. and Th. 

582 discolor, Dc. 

583 porrecta, Wall. 

584 racemulosa. Wall. 

585 Jurpia, Ham. 

586 puberula, Dc. 

587 bracteata, Colebr. 

588 laevigata, Wall. 

589 radiata, Hf. 

590 insignis, Dc. 

591 tingens, Edg. 

592 longipes, Hf. and Th. 



594 
595 
596 



leptoceras, Dc. 
laxiflora, Edg. 
tuberculata, Hf 



and 



Th. 



597 tropaeolifolia, Griff. 

598 Cathcartii, Hf 

599 cymbifera, Hf. 

600 Mishmiensis, Hf 

601 stenantha, Hf. 

602 racemosa, Dc. 

603 paludosa, Hf 

604 angustiflora, Hf 

605 depauperata, Hf. 

606 Hydrocera triflora, Wall. 

RUTACEyE. 

607 Boenninghausenia albiflora, 

Meisn. 

608 Evodia triphylla, Dc. 

609 fraxinifolia, Hf. 

610 meliaefolia, Bth. 

61 1 rutaecarpa,Z5^ and 2^h. 

612 Zanthoxylon acanthopo- 

dium, Dc. 

613 alatum, Roxb. 

614 Khasianum, Hf. 

615 Hamiltonianum, Wall. 

6i5 oxyphyllum, Edg. 

617 Budrunga, Dc. 

618 rayriacanthum, WcUl. 

619 ovalifolium, Wight. 

620 tomentellum, Hf. 

621 Tod'dalia floribunda, Wall. 

622 aculeata, Fers. 

623 Acronychia pedunculata, 

624 Skimmia Laureola, Iff. 

625 Glycosmis pentaphylla, Corr. 

626 cyanospemia, Spreng. 



Digitized by 



Google 



UST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



133 



627 Atalantia monophylla, Corr, 
628 caudata, Hf, 

629 Triphasia trifoliolata, Dc, 

630 Limonia acodissima, Z. 

631 Murraya exotica, Z. 

632 Koenigii, Spreng. 

633 Clausena pentaphylla, Dc. 
634 heptaphylla, Wight and 

Arm, 

635 excavata, Burnt, 

636 suffruticosa, Wt S^Arm, 

637 Wampi, Blanco, 

638 WiUdenowii, W. A. 

639 Micromelum pubescens, BL 
640 hirsutum, Oliv, 

641 Paramignya monophylla, 

Wight 

642 citrifolia, Oiiv, 

643 angulata, Kz, 

644 Luvunga scandens, Ham, 

645 Citrus decumana, Z. 

646 roedica, Z. 

647 aurantium, Z. 

648 nobilis, Loar, 

649 Hystrix, Dc. 

650 Feronia elephantum, Corr. 

651 -^gle Marmelos, CV?/r. 

SIMARUBE^, 

652 Ailanthus excelsa, ^(7jr^. 

653 Picrasma Javanica, Bl, 

654 quassioides, Benn. 

655 Nepalensis, Benn, 

656 Brucea Sumatrana, Roxb. 

657 mollis, Wall, 

658 Balanites Roxburghii,/Va«r^ 

OCHNACE^, 

659 Ochna squarrosa, Za:«^. 

660 pumila, Ham, 



BURSERACEAi, 

661 Boswellia thurifera, Colebr, 

662 Garuga pinnata, Roxb, 

663 Balsamodendfon Rox- 

burghii, Am. 

664 Bursera serrata, Wo?//. 

665 Canarium Bengalense, 

Roxb, 

MELIACEyE, 

666 Munronia Wallichii, Wight, 

667 Melia Azedarach, Z. 

668 composita, Willd. 

669 Azadirachta, ^«jj. 

670 Cipadessa baccifera, Bl, 

67 1 Dysoxylon procerum, Hiern, 
672 binectariferum, Hf, 

673 Hamiltonii, Hiern, 

674 Chisocheton paniculatum, 

Hiern, 

675 pallens, Hiern. 

676 Aglaia edulis, -^. G^riqy. 

677 Roxburghiana, W, A, 

678 Khasiana, Hiern, 

679 Wallichii, Hiern, 

680 perviridis, Hiern. 

681 Amoora Chittagonga, Miq, 

682 decandra, Hiern, 

683 Rohituka, /*^x^. 

684 cucuUata, Roxb. 

685 Walsura robusta, Roxb. 

686 tubulata, Hiern, 

687 Heynea trijuga, -4. yuss, 

688 Carapa obovata, y«Jj. 

689 Chickrassia tabularis, yuss. 

690 Cedrela Toona, Roxb, 

691 Soymida febrifuga, yuss, 

CHAILLETIA CE^. 

692 Chailletia gelonioides, Roxb. 



Digitized by 



Google 



134 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



OLACINEyE. 
693 Olax scandens, Roxb, 

694 acuminata, Wall. 

695 nana, Wall. 

696 imbricata, Roxb. 

697 Daphniphyllopsis capitata, 

Kz. 

698 Erythropalum scandens, 

JBl. 

699 vagum, Mast. 

700 Anacalosa ilicoides, Mast. 

701 Schoepfia fragrans, Wall. 

702 acuminata, Wall. 

703 Lepionunis sylvestris, Bl. 

704 Gomphandra axillaris, Wall. 

705 Stemonunis longifolius, 

Miers. 

706 Jodes Thomsoniana, Baill. 

707 Hookeriana, Baill. 

708 Miquelia Kleinii, Meisn. 

709 Natsiatum herpeticura, 

Ham. 

710 Cardiopteris lobata, Wall. 

ILICINE^. 

711 Ilex Griffithii, Hf. 
712 
713 



- thesefolia. Wall. 

■ godayam, Wall. 

714 venulosa, Wall. 

715 dipyrena. Wall. 

716 odorata, Ifam. 

717 ■ Sikkimensis, ICz. 

718 insignis, I/f. 

719 excelsa. Wall. 

720 embelioides, ZJ^ 

721 Thomsoni, -flj^ 

722 intricata. Iff. 

723 fragilis, B/i 

724 Daphnephyllum Himalai- 

ense, MnelL 



CELASTRINE^. 
725 Evonymus bullatus, Wall. 

726 echinatus. Wall. 

^2^ thesefolius. Wall. 

728 fimbriatus. Wall. 

729 Hamilton ianus, Wall. 

730 attenuatus, Wall. 

731 grandiflorus. Wall. 

732 glaber, -^e?Ji:^. 

733 nitidus, Bth. 

734 pendulus, Wall. 

735 frigidus, Wall. 

736 cinereus, Laws. 

737 vagans, JJ^j//. 

738 Microtropis discolor, Wall. 

739 Lophopetalum fimbriaturo, 

Wight. 

740 Celastrus acuminatus. Wall. 
741 Thomsoni, Kz. 

742 emarginatus, rF/7/d/. 

743 monospermus, Wall. 

744 rufus, Wall. 

745 • 

746 . 

747 
748 

749 • 

750 • 

751 - 

752 Kunimia robusta, Kz. 

753 Elaeodendron glaucum, 

Fers. 

754 Hippocratea lanceolata. 

Ham. 

755 Indica, Willd. 

756 arborea, Foxb. 

757 grandiflora. Wall. 

758 obtusifolia, Foxb. 

759 Salacia prinoides, Dc. 
760 Roxburghii, Wall. 



stylosus, Wall. 
venulosus. Wall. 
attenuatus. Wall. 
paniculatus, Willd. 
neglectus, Wall. 
salicifolius. Laws. 
rugulosus, I^ws. 



Digitized by 



Google 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS, 



135 



761 Salacia Jenkinsii, Kurz, 

762 floribunda, Wight 

rhAmnace^e, 

763 Ventilago calyculata, Ful 

764 Zizyphus Jujuba, Lam, 

76s 
766 
767 
768 
769 
770 

771 

772 

773 



— xylopyra, Willd, 
■ — glabra, Roxb, 

— funiculosa, Ham, 

— incurva, Roxb, 

— nigosa, Lamk, 

— oenoplia, Mill, 

— glabrata, Heyne, 

— vulgaris, Lamk, 

— apetala, Hf, 



774 Berchemia flavescens, 

Brongn, 

775 floribunda, Brongn, 

*ll(i lineata, Dc, 

*l*]*l Rhamnus Nepalensis, Wall, 

778 Hovenia dulcis, Tlibg, 

779 Sageretia hamosa, Brongn, 

780 Colubrina Asiatica, Brongn, 

781 Gouania Nepalensis, Wall, 

782 leptostachya, Brongn, 

783 Nepalensis, Wall, 

AMPELIDE^, 

784 Vitis bracteolata, WalL 

785 oxyphylla, Wall, 

786 tuberculata. Wall, 

787 muricata, Wall, 

788 lanceolaria, Roxb. 

789 campy locarpa, Kz, 

790 elongata. Wall, 

791 angustifolia, Roxb, 

792 pedata, Roxb, 

793 semilata, Roxb, 

794 capreolata, Don, 

795 tenuifolia, W, A, 



796 Vitis 

797 

798 

799 

800 - — 

801 

802 

803 

804 

805 

806 

807 

808 

809 

810 

811 

812 

813 

814 

815 

816 

817 

818 



819 

820 

821 

822 

823 

824 — - 

825 

826 

827 
828 
829 
830 
831 
832 
833 
834 
835 



Leea 



Japonica, Thbg, 
trifoliata, L, 
Teysmanni, Miq. 
auriculata, Roxb, 
repens, W, A, 
planicaulis, Hook, 
spectabilis, Kz, 
Linnaei, Kz, 
latifolia, Roxb, 
pentagona, Kz, 
discolor, Moq, 
quadrangularis. Wall, 
adnata, Roxb, 
tomentosa, Heyre, 
lanata, Roxb, 
barbata, Wall, 
Himalayana, Royle, 
Mukorossi, Gaertn, 
rubifolia, Wall. 
flexuosa, Thbg, 
neurosa, Kz, 
Assamica, Imws, 
Sikkimensis, Laws, 
nervosa, Imivs, 
montana, Lmws, 
glandulosa, Wall. 
angustifolia, Roxb, 
obtecta, Wall, 
Thomsoni, Jmws, 
obovata, La7vs, 
rumicisperma, Laws. 
macrophylla, Roxb. 
gigantea, Griff, 
sambucina, L, 
laeta, Wall, 
alata, Edg, 
crispa, L, 
aspera. Wall 
Sundaica, Miq, 
robusta, Roocb, 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



136 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS, 



836 Leea aquata, Z. 

837 parallela, Wall. 

838 trifoliata, Laws. 

SAPINDACEAE. 

839 Cardiospermum Halicaca- 

bum, Z. 

840 Erioglossum edule, BL 

841 Schmiedelia glabra, Roxb. 

842 -r serrata, Dc, 

843 villosa, Wight, 

844 aporetica, Wall, 

845 chartacea, Kurz, 

846 iEsculus Punduana, Wall, 

847 Cupania glabrata, Kz. 

848 Roxburghii, Wight, 

849 Sumatrana, Miq, 

850 Schleichera trijuga, Willd, 

851 Sapindus verticillatus, Roxb, 

852 Danura, Voigt, 

853 emarginatus, VbL 

854 detergens, Roxb, 

85s Nephelium Litchi, Z. 

856 Griffithianum, Kz, 

857 attenuaturn, Planch. 

858 rubrum, Walp. 

859 rimosum, Walp, 

860 longana, Zaw/^. 

86 1 Harpullia cupanioides, Roxb. 

862 Acer oblongum, Wall, 

863 . 

864 • 



laevigatum, Wall, 
Campbelli, Hf, and Th. 



865 pectinatum, Wall, 

866 caudatum, Wall. 

867 Thomsoni, Miq. 

868 niveum, Bl. 



869 Sikkimense, Miq. 

870 Hookeri, Miq. 

871 stachyophyllum,Zr/>r//. 

872 pictum, Thbg. 



.873 Dobinaea vulgaris, Ham, 
874 Turpinia pomifera, Wall. 
87s Nepalensis, Wall. 

SABIACE^. 
876 Sabia limonacea. Wall. 



lanceolata, CoUbr. 
leptandra, Hf. and Th. 
purpurea, Hf, and Th. 
parviflora. Wall. 
campanulata, Wall. 



877 . 
878 

879 . 

880 • 

881 • 

882 Meliosmasimplicifolia,i?^.v^. 

883 pinnata, Planch. 

884 WalUchii, Planch. 

885 dilleniifolia, Bl. 

ANACARDIACEjE. 

886 Rhus acuminata, Dc. 

887 semialata, Dc 

888 Mangifera Indica, Z. 

889 sylvatica, Roxb. 

890 Buchanania latifolia, Roxb, 

891 Tapiria hirsuta, Kz. 

892 Odina wodier, Roxb. 

893 Semecarpus acuminatus, 

Kz, 

894 Anacardium, Z. 

895 Drimycarpusracemosus,^M. 

andHf. 

896 Spondias pinnata, Kz. 

CONNARACEyE. 

897 Rourea santaloides, W, A, 

898 caudata, Planch. 

899 commutata, Planch. 

900 Connarus monocarpus, Z. 

MORINGACEjE. 

901 Moringa pterygosperma, 

Dc, 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS, 



137 



LEGUMINOSAi. 

902 Piptanthus Nepalensis, Don, 

903 Thermopsis barbata, Royle, 

904 Heylandia latebrosa, Dc. 

905 Crotalaria prostrata, Roxb, 

906 humifusa, Grah, 

907 acicularis, Ham, 

908 femiginea, Grah. 

909 hirsuta, Willd, 

910 alata, Roxh, 

911 retusa, Z. 

912 sericea, Retz, 

913 Assamica, Bth, 

914 verrucosa, Z. 

915 ramosissima, Roxh, 

916 juncea, Z. 

917 tetragona, Roxb. 

918 calycina, Schrank, 

919 sessiliflora, Z. 

920 occulta, Grah, 

921 Mysorensis, Bth, 

922 albida, Heyne, 

923 dubia, Grah, 

924 Hnifolia, Z. 

925 labumifolia, Z. 

926 medicaginea, Dc. 

927 luxuriana, Bth, 

928 striata, Dc. 

929 bracteata, -^^;c^. 

930 quinquefolia, Z. 

931 Priotropis cytisoides, W, A, 

932 Parochetus communis, ZTaw. 

933 Trigonella fcenum graecum, 

Z. 
934 comiculata, Z. 

935 Medicago lupulina, Z. 

936 Melilotus officinalis, Willd, 

937 albus, Desf, 

938 Trifolium pratense, Z. 

939 repens, Z. ^ 



940 Lotus Arabicus, Z. 

941 Psoralea corylifolia, Z. 

942 Cyamopsis psoralioides, Dc, 

943 Indigofera linifolia, Retz. 



' enneaphylla, Z. 

- viscosa, Lam. 
' trifoliolata, Z. 

- Trita, Z./ 

- tinctoria, Z. 

- coerulea, Roxb, 

• pulchella, Roxb, 

■ atropurpurea, Ifafn, 

■ arborea, Roxb, 
galegoides, Dc. 

■ hebepetala, Bth, 
' hirsuta, Z. 

■ stachyoides, Ldl 

■ bracteata, IVall 
heterantha, JVall 

' Dosua, Ifam, 

• leptostachya, Dc, 



944 
945 
946 

947 
948 

949 

950 

95' 

952 

953 

954 

955 • 

956 

957 

958 ■ 

959 
960 

961 Tephrosia Candida, Dc, 



962 

963 
964 

965 
966 

967 



■ macrophylla. Wall 

■ tinctoria, Rers. 
' villosa, Rers, 

■ amoena, E. Mey, 

■ diflfusa, W, A, 

• purpurea, Fers, 



968 Milletia racemosa, Bth, 

969 pachycarpa, Bth, 

970 caudata, Kz, 

97 1 cinerea, Bth, 

972 macrophylla, Bth, 

973 monticola, Kz, 

974 fruticosa, Bth, 

975 piscidia, Bth, 

976 pulchra, Kz. 

977 Sesbania iEgyptiaca, Fcrs, 

978 aculeata, Fers, 

979 paludosa, yc^. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



138 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAAf PIJiNTS, 



980 Sesbania grandiflora, Pers, 

981 procumbens, W. A, 

982 Caragana crassicaulis, RoyU, 

983 Gueldenstsedtia uniflora, 

Bth. 

984 Sikkimensis, Bih, 

985 Astragalus pycnorrhizus, 

Bih, 

986 rigidulus, Bth, 

987 Sikkimensis, Bth. 

988 lessertioides, Bth. 

989 floridus, Bth. 

990 Elhasianus, Bth. 

991 xiphocarpus, Bth. 

992 stipulatus, Don. 

993 leucocephalus, Grah. 

994 tenuicaulis, Bth. 

995 Hedysarum Sikkimense, 

Bth. 

996 iEschynomene Indica, Z. 

997 aspera, Z. 

998 Smithia sensitiva, Z. 

999 conferta, Sm. 

1000 ciliata, Royle. 

1 00 1 blanda, Wall. 

1002 grande, ^/^ 

1003 Arachis hypoggea, Z. 
T004 Zortiia diphylla, Pers. 

1005 Ougeinia dalbergioides, Bth. 

1006 Desmodium labumifoliuni, 

Bth. 

- Kulhaitense, C. B. 



1007 

1008 
1009 

lOIO 
lOII 
I0I2 
IOI3 
1014 



Clarke. 

oxyphyllum, Dc. 

confertum, Dc. 

cephalotes, Wall. 

triqiietrum, Dc. 

latifoliura, Dc. 

gangcticum, Burm. 

ormocarpoides, Dc. 



10 1 5 Desmodium difFusum, Dc. 

1016 recurvatum, Ham. 

1017 concinnum, 2?r. 

10 1 8 laxiflorum, Dc. 

1019 gyrans, Dc. 

1020 gyroides, Dc. 

102 1 polycarpum, Dc. 

1022 trichocaulon, Dc. 

1023 retroflexum, Dc. 

1024 Griffithianum, Bth. 

1025 amoenum, Wall. 

1026 podocarpum, Dc. 

T027 reniforme, Dc. 

1028 floribundum, Don. 

1029 dasylobum, Miq. 

1030 triflorum, Dc. 

1 03 1 paroifolium, Dc. 

1032 pulchellum, Bth. 

1033 Uraria lagopodioides, Dc. 

1034 alopecuroides, Wight. 

103s Lagopus, Dc. 

1036 hamosa, Wall. 

1037 picta, Desf. 

1038 crinita, Desf. 

1039 Lourea Vespertilionis, Desv. 

1040 Pycnospora hedysaroides, 

Bth. 

1 04 1 Alysicarpus vaginalis, Dc. 

1042 bupleurifolius, Dc. 

1043 monilifer, ^^. 

1044 quadrangularis, Edg. 

1045 longifolius, W. A. 

1046 Wallichii, Wall. 

1047 Lespedeza elegans, Camb. 

1048 juncea, Pers. 

1049 elliptica, ^M. 

1050 paniculata, Royle. 

105 1 eriocarpa, Bth. 

1052 Thomsoni, Bth. 

1053 Cicer arietinum, Z. 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



139 



1054 Vicia sativa, Z. 

1055 hirsuta, Z. 

1056 Lens esculentum, Moench. 

1057 Lathyrus sativus, Z. 

1058 Aphaca, Z. 

1059 Pisum sativum, Z. 

1060 Abrus precatorius, Z. 

1 06 1 pulchellus, Walh 

1062 Clitoria Teniatea,Z. 

1063 Mariana, Z. 

1064 Dumasia villosa, Dc. 

1065 leiocarpa, Bth. 

1066 cordifolia, Bth. 

1067 congesta, Dc, 

1068 Shuteria vestita, W. A, 

1069 Glycine Soya, S, and Z, 

1070 Teramnus labialis, Spreng. 

107 1 mollis, Bth. 

1072 flexilis, Bth. 

1073 Er3rthrina Indica, Lamk. 

1074 stricta, Jioxb. 

1075 tomentosa, Ham. 

1076 ovalifolia, Moxb, 

1077 sublobata, Eoxb. 

1078 arborescens, Eoxb, 

1079 Apios camea, Bth, 

1080 Mucuna pruriens, Dc. 

1 08 1 capitata, Dc. 

1082 macrocarpa, J^//. 

1083 atropurpurea, Dc, 

1084 imbricata, J^oxb, 

1085 monosperma, Roxb, 

1086 gigantea, Dc. 

1087 Butea frondosa, ^^jc^. 

1088 minor, Wall, 

T089 superba, Roxb. 

1090 paroiflora, Roxb. 

1 09 1 Mastersia Assamica, Bth. 

1092 Fueraria tuberosa, 2?r. 

1093 Thomsoni, Bth. 

VII. 



1094 Pueraria peduncularis, 

Grah. 

1095 Wallichii, Dc. 

1096 composita, Grah. 

1097 ferruginea, Kz. 

1098 phaseoloides, -5M. 

1099 subspicata, Bth. 

HOC Canavalia turgida, Grah. 

1 10 1 obtusifolia. Dc. 

1 102 virosa, W. A. 

1 103 ensiformis, Z7^. 

1 1 04 dolichoides, Kurz. 

1 105 tetragona, Kurz, 

1 106 lucens, Kz. 

1 107 grandis, Kurz. 

1 108 Phaseolus vulgaris, Z. 

1 1 09 lunatus, Z. 

mo aureus, Roxb. 

1 1 1 1 semierectus, Z. 

1 1 12 Truxillensis, Z^ j5. ^. 

1 1 13 trilobus, Z. 

1 1 14 sublobatus, Roxb. 

1115 aconitifolius, /acq. 

1 116 trinervius, Heyne. 

1 1 1 7 radiatus, Z. 

1 1 18 mungo, Z. 

1 1 19 Vigna vexillata, Bth. 
1 1 20 gangetica, Kz. 

1 121 pilosa, Kz. 

1122 calcarata, ^j?. 

1 1 23 lutea, -<4. G^roy. 

1 1 24 Sinensis, Savi. 

1125 Catjan, Bth. 

1 126 Pachyrrhizus angulatus, 

Rich. 

1 127 Psophocarpus tetragonolo- 

bus, Dc. 

1128 Dolichos Lablab, Z. 

XI 29 uniflorus, Za»i>J. 

1 130 cultratus, Thbg. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



I40 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



131 Cajanus Indicus, Spreng, 

132 Dunbaria conspersa, Bth. 

133 Atylosiascarab3eoides,^M. 
134 elongata, Bth. 

13 s platycarpa, Bth, 

136 mollis, Bth, 

137 calycina, Miq, 

138 Cylista scariosa, Ait 

139 Rhynchosia minima, Dc^ 
140 vestita, Bth, 

141 rufescens, Bth, 

142 suaveolens, Dc. 

143 Eriosaema Chinense, Vog, 

144 Flemingia congesta, Roxh. 



• semialata, Roxh, 

• prostata, Boxd. 

• nana, Roxb. 

• involucrata, Bth, 
■ stricta, Roxb, 

• latifolia, Bth. 
paniculata, Wall, 

• lineata, Roxb, 
' strobilifera, Alt. 
' chappar, Ifam, 

• bracteata, Roxb, 



145 
146 
147 
148 
149 
ISO 

152 

153 • 

154 • 

155 ■ 

156 Dalbergia rimosa, Roxb, 

157 latifolia, Roxb, 

158 Sissoo, Roxb, 

159 confertiflora, BlA, 

160 velutina, BlA, 

j6i tamarindifolia, Roxb, 

162 Assamica, BlA, 

163 lanceolaria, Z. 

164 volubilis, Roxb, 

165 stipulacea, Roxb, 

166 flexuosa, GraA, 

167 monosperma, Dalz, 

168 spinosa, Roxb, 

169 paniculata, Roxb, 

170 stenocarpa, J^urz, 



171 Rerocaipus Marsupium, 

Roxb, 

172 Derris scandens, Btk, 

173 • 

174 . 

175 • 
176 
177 . 
178 
179 
180 
181 . 
182 
183- 



• robusta, BlA. 
uliginosa, BtA, 
elegans, BlA, 

' femiginea, BtA, 
marginata, BlA, 

• discolor, BfA, 

• cuneifolia, BlA, 

■ polystachya, BtA, 
acuminata, BtA, 

' microptera, BtA. 
thyrsiflora, BtA, 



184 Pongamia glabra. Ft, 

185 Dalhousiea bracteata, ^^//. 

186 Ormosia acuminata, GraA. 

187 Sophora acuminata, BtA. 

188 Mezoneuron cucullatum, 

IV, A, 

189 enneaphyllum, JV, A, 

190 Caesalpinia Bonducella, 

Flem. 

191 Nuga, Ait, 

192 — tortuosa, Roxb, 

193 digyna, Roxb, 

194 sepiaria, Roxb, 

19s pulcherrima, Sw. 

196 Acrocarpus fraxinifolius, 

WigAt, 

197 Poinciana regia, Boj. 

198 Parkinsonia aculeata, L. 

199 Cassia Fistula, Z. 

200 nodosa. Ham. 

201 bicapsularis, JL 

202 occidentalis, L, 

203 Sophora, Z. 

204 hirsuta, Z. 

205 Tora, Z. 

206 multijuga, RicA. 



Digitized by 



Google 



UST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



141 



1207 Cassia Siamea, Lamk, 


1246 Acacia Suma, ZTax^. 


1208 Timorensis, Dc. 


1247 


femiginea, Dc. 


1209 alata, Z. 


1248 


rugata, Ham. 


1210 glauca, Lamk, 


1249 


concinna, Dc. 


1211 Absus, Z. 


1250 


oxyphylla, Grah. 


1 212 pumUa, Lamk. 


1251 


Intsia, Willd. 


1 2 13 mimosoides, Z. 


1252 


caesia, W. A. 


1 2 14 Bauhinia acuminata, Z. 


1253 


pennata, Willd, 


1 215 racemosa, Lamk, 


I2S4 


Aibizzia lucida, Bth. 


1 2 16 scandens, Roxb, 


"SS 


umbrosa, Bth. 


1 21 7 nervosa, ^M. 


1256 


Lebbeck, Bth. 


1218 purpurea, Z. 


"57 




1219 variegata, Z. 


1258 


procera, Bth. 


1220 Malabarica, Roxb. 


1259 


myriophylla, Bth. 


1 221 retusa, Roxb, 


1260 


amara, Boiv. 




1261 


stipulata, Boiv. 


1223 Vahlii, ^^. 


1262 Pithecolobium dulce, Blh. 




1263 


bigeminum, Mart. 


1225 rufescens, Bth. 


1264 


lobatum, Bth. 


1226 anguina, Roxb, 


1265 


angulatum, Bth. 


1227 Afzelia bijuga, A. Gray, 


1266 


montanum, Bth. 


1228 Tamarindus Indica, Z. 






1229 Saraca Indica, Z. 




ROSACEAE. 


1230 Cynometra bijuga, ^a«. 


1267 Prunus triflora, Roxb. 


1 23 1 Parkia biglobosa, Grah, 


1268 


Puddum, Roxb. 


1232 Brunonis, Grah. 


1269 


punctata. Wall. 


1233 Entada Pursha&ta, Dc. 


1270 


Jenkinsii, Wall. 


1234 Adenanthera pavonina, Z. 


1271 




1235 Neptunia oleracea, Zwr. 


1272 


Padus, Dc. 


1236 plena, Bth. 


1273 


integerrima, \^all. 


1237 Desmanthus virgatus, 


1274 


rufa. Wall 


mild. 


127s 


acuminata, Wall 


1238 Mimosa rubicaulis. Lam. 


1276 


femiginea, Wall, 


1 239 pudica, Z. 


1277 


Nepalensis, Ser, 


1240 Leucaena glauca, Bth. 


1278 


Persica, Z. 


1 241 Acacia Famesiana, ^/>(. 


1279 


Maddenia Himalaica, Ilf. 


1242 Arabica, Willd. 




and Th. 


1243 tomentosa, Willd. 


1280 


Pygeum lucidum, T, And. 


1244 Catechu, Willd. 


1281 • 


acuminatum, Colebr. 


1245 Sundra, Roxb. 


1282 - 


arboreum, Ldl. 

Digitized by VjOC 



142 



UST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



283 Prins'^pia utilis, Royie. 

284 Spiraea canescens, Don. 

285 callosa, TTibg. 

286 Anincus, Z. 

287 Neillia thyrsiflora, Don, 

288 rubiflora, Don, 

289 Rubus rugosus, Sm. 



' paniculatus, Sm, 
' pyrifoUus, Sm. 
acuminatus, Sm, 

• oxyphyllus, IVa/l 
' lineatus, J^iod/, 
' pentagonus, IVail. 
' calydnus, IVal/, 

• parvifolius, Z. 

■ Thomsoni, Fock. 

• nutans, Wall, 

• macilentus, Camd, 

■ biflorus, Ifam. 
' niveus, IVa//. 

■ flavus, Ifam, 
' rosaefolius, Z. 

■ lasiocarpus, Sm, 
' ferox, Wail. 
' Assamensis, Fock^, 

■ hibiscifolius, Fock^, 

• Hookeri, Focke. 



290 — 

291 — 

292 — 

293 — 

294 — 

295 — 

296 — 

297 ^ 

298 — 

299 — 

300 — 

301 — 

302 — 

303 — 

304 — 

305 — 

306 — 

307 — 

308 — 

309 — 
310 lucens, Focke. 

311 Fragaria Indica, -<4«//r. 

312 vesca, Z. 

313 Sikkimensis, J^urz, 

314 Potentilla fruticosa, Z. 

315 meifolia, Wall, 

316 microphylla, Don. 



317 
318 
3^9 
320 

321 
322 



• polyphylla, Wall. 

• fulgens, Wa//. 
leuconota, Wall. 

' peduncularis, Don, 
Kleiniana, W, A, 
argyrophylla, WaJL 



1323 Potentillamonanthes, W^//. 
1324 supina, Z. 

1325 procumbens, Z. 

1326 purpurea, Royle, 

1327 albifolia, Wall. 

1328 AgrimoniaEupatorium,Z- 

1329 Sanguisorba decandra. 

Wall. 

1330 Rosa involucrata, Roxb. 



1331 
1332 
1333 
1334 
1335 
1336 



semperflorens, Z. 
sempervirens, Z. 
Brunonis, IM. 
sericea, Ldl. 
centifolia, Z. 
Indica, Z. 

1337 Pyrus Indica, Wall. 

1338 baccata, Z. 

1339 Pashia, Ham, 

1340 granulosa, Bert. 

1 34 1 cuspidata, BertoL 

1342 Sorbus Sikkimensis, Wen- 

zig. 

1343 crenata, Don. 

1344 lanata, Don. 

1345 foliosa. Wall. 

1346 microphylla, Wenzig. 

1347 Photinia integrifolia, Ldl. 

1348 arguta. Wall. 

1349 Bengalensis, RooA. 

1350 Eriobotrya Japonica, Ldl. 
'35^ macrocaipa, Kurz. 

1352 Cotoneaster acuminata, 

Ldl. 

1353 nunmiularia, Fisch 

and Mey. 

1354 bacillaris, Wall. 

135s frigida, Wall. 

1356 microphylla, WaU. 

1357 Stranvaesia glaucescens^ 

Ldl. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



143 



SAXIFRAGES. 

1358 Saxifraga ligulata, Wall. 

1359 purpurascens,^.j«^ 

Th. 

1360 imbricata, Royle. 

1 36 1 hemisphaerica, Hf. 

and Th. 

1362 strigosa, Wall. 

^3^3 micrantha, Edg. 

1364 pallida, Wall. 

1365 flagellaris, IVilld. 

1366 pilifera, Hf. and Th. 

^367 Branonis, Wall. 

1368 brachypoda, Dan. 

1369 fimbriata, Wall. 

1370 hispidula, Don. 

137 1 palpebrata, Hf. and 

Th. 

137^ cordigera, Hf. and Th. 

^373 saginoides, Hf. and 

Th. 

1374 aristulata,J5J/:tf«//7%. 

'375 liychmtxSyHf.andTh. 

1376 nutans, Hf. and Th. 

1377 viscidula, Hf. andTh. 

1378 corymbosa, Hf. and 

Th. 

^379 diversifolia, Wall. 

1380 latiflora, Hf. and Th. 

1 38 1 umbellulata, Hf. and 

Th. 

1382 Jacquemontiana, 

Dene. 

1383 Stella aurea, Hf. and 

Th. 

1384 perpusilla, H^. and 

Th. 

1385 ChrysospleniumNepalense, 

Don. 

1386 altemifolium, L. 



387 Chrysosplenium camosum, 

Hf and Th. 
388 lanuginosum,Z^.ai«^ 

Th. 
389 Griffithii, Hf. andTh. 

390 Tiarella polyphylla, Don. 

391 Astilbe rivularis, Ham. 

392 rubra, J5J/: and Th. 

393 Hydrangea altissimai ^f^//. 

394 vestita, Wall. 

395 Khasyana, Hf. and 

Th. 

396 aspera, Don. 

397 stylosa, Hf. and Th. 

398 robusta, Hf. and Th. 

399 Dichroa febrifuga. Lour. 

400 Pileostegiavibumoides,.^. 

and Th. 

401 Polyosma Wallichii, Benn. 

402 Itea macrophylla, Wall. 

403 Chinensis, Hook and 

Arn. 

404 Farnassia foliosa, Hf. and 

Th. 

405 Wightiana, Wall. 

406 Mysorensis, Heyne. 

407 tenella, Hf. and Th. 

408 nubicola, Wall. 

409 affinis, Hf. and Th. 

410 pusilla, Wall. 

411 Philadelphus coronarius, L. 

412 Deutziacorymbosa,^r<7ze//z. 

413 staminea, R. Br. 

414 Ribes laciniatum, Hf. and 

Th. 

415 luridum, Hf. andTh. 

416 desmocarpum, Hf. 

and Th. 

417 — — glaciale. Wall. 

418 QrifS)!d\\\,Hf. andTh. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



144 



UST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS, 



CRASSULACEyE. 

1419 Crassula Indica, Dene. 

1420 Bryophyllum calycinum, 

Salish. 
143 1 Kalanchoe varians, Edg, 

1422 floribunda, W.A. 

1423 laciniata, Dc. 



1424 


Umbilicus spathulatus, Hf, 




and Th, 


1425 


Sedum crenulatum, Hf. and 




Hf, and Th. 


1426 




1427 


Himalense, Don. 


1428 


bupleuroides, Wall. 


1429 


elongatum, Wall. 


1430 






Th. 


1431 






Th. 


'432 


crassipes, Wall. 


1433 


trifidum, Wall. 


M34 


adenotrichum, Wall. 


I43S 


truHipetalum, Hf. and 




Th. 


1436 


multicaule, Wall. 


1437 


perpusillum, Hf. and 




Th. 


1438 


Triactina verticillata, Hf. 




and Th. 




DROSERACE^. 


1439 


Drosera Burmanni, Vhl. 


1440 


lunata, Ham. 


1 441 


AJdrovanda vesiculosa, Z. 



HAMAMELIDE^. 

1442 Corylopsis Himalayana, 

Griff. 

1443 Loropetalum Chinense, 

Oliv. 



1444 Bucklandia populifolia, R. 

Br. 

1445 Distylium Indicum, OUv. 

1446 Sycopsis Griffithiana, OUv. 

1447 Altingia excelsa, Noronh. 

HALORAGEyE. 

1448 Haloragis scaber, T7ibg. 

1449 micrantha, S.2L 

1450 Myriophyllum tetrandrum, 

Roxb. 

145 1 Indicum, Willd. 

1452 tuberculatum, Roxb. 

1453 verticillatum, L. 

1454 Callitriche stagnalis. Scop. 

RHIZOFHOREyE. 

1455 Rhizophora mucronata, 

Lamk. 

1456 conjugata, Z. 

1457 Ceriops Roxburghiana, 

Am. 

1458 Candolleana, Am. 

1459 Kandelia Rheedii, W.A. 

1460 Bruguiera gymnorhiza, 

Lamk. 

1 46 1 parviflora, W.A. 

1462 Carallia integerrinia, Dc 

1463 lancea&folia, Roxb, 

COMBRETACEjE. 

1464 Terminalia catappa, L. 

1465 Bellerica, Roxb. 

1466 Chebula, Roxib. 

1467 citrina, Roo^b. 

1468 Gangetica, Roxb. 

1469 bialata, Roxb. 

1470 glabra, Roxb. 

147' Arjuna, Roxb. 

1472 tomentosa, Roxb. 



Digitized by 



Google 



UST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



«4S 



1473 Terminalia crenata, J^oxb. 
1474 paniculata, W. A. 

1 475 myriocarpa, Heurck 

and MudL Arg, 

1476 Calycopteris floribunda, 

Nub, 

1477 Roxburghii, Kz, 

1478 Anogeissus latifolius, Wall. 

1479 acuminatus, Wall, 

1480 Lumnitzera racemosa, 

Willd. 

1 48 1 Combretum decandrum, 
Roxb. 

1482 squamosum, Roxb, 

1483 pilosum, Roxb, 

1484 Wallichii, £>c. 

1485 costatum, Roxb, 

1486 nanum, Roxb, 

1487 extensum, Roxb. 

1488 semiadnatum, Heurck 

and Muell. Arg. 

1489 Chinense, Roxb. 

1490 Quisqualis Indica, L. 

1 49 1 lUigera appendiculata, 

Bl. 

MYRTACEyE. 

1492 Fsidium guava, Z. 

1493 Nelitris paniculata, Ldl. 

1494 Eugenia claviflora, Roxb, 

1495 cuneata. Wall, 

1 496 cymosa, Lamk, 

1497 ramosissima, Wall, 

1498 tetragona, WaU. 

1499 Willdenowii, Dc. 

1500 caryophyllifolia, 

Roxb. 

1501 fasciculata. Wall. 

1502 obovata, ^^/Z. 

1503 Paneala, WalL 



1504 Eugenia lanceaefolia, Roxb. 

1505 cerasiflora, Kz, 

1 506 balsamea, Wall. 

1507 praecox, Roxb. 

1508 Jambolana, Z. 

1509 fruticosa, Roxb. 

15 10 Heyneana, Wall. 

1511 Malaccensis, Z. 

1 5 12 grandis, Wight. 

1513 Jambos, Z. 

1514 polypetala. Wall. 

1515 aquea, Dc. 

1516 bifaria, Wall. 

151 7 reticulata, Wight. 

1 5 18 formosa, W^//. 

1519 mangifolik, Wall, 

1520 inophylla, Dc. 

1 52 1 oblata, Wall. 

1522 Barringtonia acutangula, 

Gaertn, 
1523 racemosa, -^<?jf^. 

1524 Careya herbacea, Roxb. 

1525 sphaerica, Roxb. 

1526 arborea, Roxb. 

MELASTOMA CEyE. 

1527 Osbeckia brachystemon, 

Naud, 

1528 Chinensis, Z. 

1529 capitata, -^M. 

1530 stellata, Don. 

1531 crinita, Bth. 

1532 rostrata, Don. 

1533 nutans. Wall, 

1 5 34 Nepalensis, Z^^>^. 

1535 Melastoma Malabathricum, 

Z. 

1536 normale, Don. 

1537 Oxyspora paniculata, 2^^. 

1538 vagans, Wall, 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



146 



UST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



'539 Oxysporacemua,-^.6»7%. 

1 540 Blastus parvifolius, Trian, 

1541 Sonerila tenera, Royle, 

1542 amabilis, Kz. 

1543 squarrosa, Roxb. 

1544 arguta, R, Br. 

1545 maculata, Roxb. 

1546 emaculata, Roxb. 

1547 angustifolia, Roxb. 

1548 Sarcopyramis Nepalensis, 

Wall. 

1549 lanceolata, Wall. 

1550 Medinella rubicunda, Bl. 

1551 Himalayana, Hf. 

1552 pauciflora, Hf. 

1553 Memecylon edule, Roxb. 
^554 capitellatum, Roxb. 

LYTHRARIEjE. 

1555 Ammannia Indica, Spreng. 

1556 dentelloides, Kz. 

^557 pentandra, Roxb. 

1558 octandra, L. 

1559 glauca, Wall. 

1560 rotundifolia, Wight 

1561 yts\C2Xon2iy Roxb. 

1562 multiflora, Roxb. 

1563 auriculata, Willd. 

1564 pygmaea, Kz. 

1565 tenuis, Wight. 

1566 simpliciuscula, Ajf. 

1567 Woodfordia fruticosa, Kz. 

1568 Lawsonia alba, L. 

1569 Crypteronia paniculata, ^/. 

1570 glabra, Bl. 

1571 Lagerstroemia flos reginse, 

Retz. 

1572 villosa, Wall. 

1573 Indica, L. 

1 5 74 parviflora, i?<?;i:^. 



1575 Duabanga grandiflora, Kz. 

1576 Sonneratia apetala, Ham, 

1577 acida,Z./ 

ONAGRARIE^. 

1578 Epilobium montanum, Z. 
^579 roseum, Z. 

1580 tetragonum, Z, 

1581 Jussiaea repens, Z. 

1582 villosa, Lamk. 

1583 augustifolia, Lamk, 

1 584 Ludwigia parviflora, Roxb. 

1585 prostrata, ^e?jr^. 

1586 Circsea lutetiana, Z. 

1587 alpina, Z. 

1588 Trapa bispinosa, Roxb. 
'5^9 quadrispinosa, Roxb, 

SAMYDEM. 
1590 Casearia Vareca, Roxb. 
^59' tomentosa, -^<7a?^. 

1592 Canziala, Wall. 

1593 glomerata, Roxb. 

PASSIFLORE^. 

1 594 Passiflora foetida, Z. 

1595 Walkeri, Wight, 

1596 Nepalensis, WalL 

1597 Leschenaultii, Z?r. 

1598 minima, Z. 

1599 Modecca trilobata, Roocb, 
1600 extensa, Wall. 

1601 Carica papaya, Z. 

CUCURBITACE^. 

1602 Hodgsonia heteroclita, Zg^ 

1603 Trichosantheslobata,^^;jrA 
1604 cucumerina, Z. 

1605 — reniformis, Miq. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



U7 



1606 Trichosanthes pdmata, 

Eoxb. 

1607 dioica, Roxb. 

1608 cordata, Moxb. 

1609 ScotanthustubifloTus,iVai/^. 

1 6 10 Lagenaria vulgaris, Ser, 

161 1 Lufia qrlindrica, Roem. 

i6i2 acutangula, Roxb, 

16 13 amara, Roxb. 

1 6 14 graveolens, Roxb. 

16 1 5 echinata, Roxb. 

1616 Benincasa cerifera, Savi. 

16 1 7 Momordica charantia, Z. 

1618 Balsamina, L. 

16 19 dioica, Roxb. 

1620 renigera, Wail. 

162 1 mixta, Roxb. 

1622 Thladiantha dubia, Bunge. 

1623 Cucumis trigonus, Roxb. 

1624 Melo, L. 

1625 sativus, Z. 

1626 CitniUus vulgaris, Schrad. 

1627 Cephalandra Indica, iV^t^//. 

1628 Cucurbita moschata, Duch. 

1629 pepo, Dc. 

1630 maxima, Duch. 

1 63 1 Bryonia laciniosa, L. 

1632 scabrella. Am. 

1633 Zehneria umbellata, Thw. 
16^4 Hookeriana, Am. 

1635 Melothria Indica, Lour. 

1636 Herpetospermum pedun- 

culosum, Ser. 

1637 Gomphogyne cissiformis, 

Griff. 

1638 Actinostema digynum, 

Gnff. 

1639 Gyxiostema trigynum, 

Griff. 

1640 Alsomitra clavigera, ^j?. 



BEGONIACE^. 
1 64 1 Begonia Roxburghii, 2?r. 



1642 
1643 
1644 
1645 

1646 
1647 
1648 
1649 
1650 
1651 
1652 

1653 
1654 

1655 
1656 

1657 
1658 

1659 
1660 
1661 
1662 
1663 



Th. 



' polycarpa, Dc. 

• picta, Wall. 

■ Josephi, Dc. 

• gemmipara, Hf. and 

xanthina, Hook. 

■ barbata. Wall. 
rubro-venia, Hook. 
laciniata, Roxb. 

■ megaptera, Dc. 

■ Cathcarti, Bf. 

' Sikkimensis, Dc. 
' Thomsoni, Dc. 

• Griffithii, Dc. 

■ scutata. Wall. 

• Silhetensis, Dc. 

• amoena. Wall. 
' Rex, Futzeys. 

■ brevicaulis, Dc. 

■ pedunculosa, Wall. 

■ ovatifolia, Dc. 

■ Meisneri, Wall. 

• Nepalensis, Dc. 



CACTEjE. 

1664 Opuntia Dillenii, Haw. 

FICOIDEjE. 

1665 Sesuvium Fortulacastrum, 

Roxb. 

1666 Trianthema pentandra, L. 

1667 obcordatum, Roocb. 

1668 cristallina, Vhl. 

1669 MoUugo Spergula, L. 

1670 stricta, L. 

1671 glinus, -^/V^. 

1672 -^— pentaphylla, L. 

1673 cerviana, Ser. 



Digitized by 



Google 



148 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



UMBELLIFERjE. 

1674 Hydrocotyle Asiatica, Z. 

1675 Javanica, Thbg. 

1676 rotundifolia, Roxb, 

1677 Sanicula Europaea, Z. 

1678 Trachydium, Sp, 

1679 Bupleurum tenue, Ham, 

1 680 longicaule, Wall. 

1681 CandoUei, Wall. 

1682 marginatum, Wall. 

1683 Apium graveolens, L. 

1684 Petroselinum sativum, L. 

1685 Carum Roxburghianum, 

Bth. et Hf. 

1686 anethifolium, ^/>4.a«^f 

Hf. 

1687 copticum, jffM. e* ZJ^ 

1688 Pimpinella diversifoHa, Dc. 

1689 Chaerophyllum villosum, 

1690 Seseli Indicum, W. A. 

1 69 1 Fceniculum vulgare, Z. 

1692 Dasyloma Bengalense, Dc, 
i5q2 glaucum, Dc, 

1694 CEnanthe stolonifera, Roxb, 

1695 Ligusticum striatum, Z>r. 

1696 tenuifolium, ^^//. 

1697 Selinum Candollei, Bth, 

andHf, 

1698 Cortia Lindleyi, Dc. 

1699 Pleurospermum pumilum, 

Dc. 

dentatum, Wall. 
Brunonis, Dc. 
Govanianum, Dc. 
angelicoides, Dc. 

Sowa, Bth, 



1700 - 

1701 - 

1702 - 

1703 - 

1704 Peucedanum 

andHf. 
I yo5 ramosissimum, 



Bth. 



andHf. 



06 Pencedanum glaucum, Dc. 

07 Heracleum diversifolium, 

Wall, 

08 candicans, Wall. 

09 Brunonis, WcUl. 

10 Nepalense, Don. 

11 Birmanicum, Kz. 

12 Coriandrum sativum, Z. 

13 Daucus Carota, Z. 

14 Caucalis Anthriscus, Z. 

ARALIACEjE, 

15 Aralia Cachemirica, 2?^w^. 

16 armata, Seem. 

17 foliosa. Seem. 

18 Thomsoni, Seem. 

19 cissifolia, Griff. 

20 Pentapanax racemosu^i, 

2 1 subcordatum, .S^^/i. 

22 parasiticum, Seem. 

23 umbellatum, Seem. 

24 Leschenaultii, Seem. 

25 Panax pseudo - ginseng, 

Wall. 

26 Acanthopanax aculeata, 

Dene, 

27 sepium. Seem, 

28 Helwingia Himalaica, ZJ/C 

andTh. 

29 Heptapleurum Wallichian- 

um. Seem, 

30 venulosum, ^^r;//. 

31 capitatum, .S'^w. 

32 Agalma aesculifolium, Seem, 

33 rostratum, Seem. 

34 tomentosum, Seem, ' 

35 elatum, Seem. 

36 glaucum, 5^»!ff. 

37 Griffithii, Seefn, 



Digitized by 



Google 



UST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



149 



1738 Trevesia palmata, Vis. 


1769 


Lonicera quinquelocularis, 


1739 Heteropanax fragrans, 




Hardw. 


Seem. 


1770 


gracilis, Kurz. 


1740 Brassaiopsis palmata, Kz. 


1771 


decipiens, Hf. and 


1 741 Hainla, Seem. 




Th. 




1772 


alpigena, Z. 


1743 aculeata, Seem. 


1773 


Japonica, Thbg. 


1744 floribunda, Seem. 


1774 


glabrata. Wall. 


1745 confluens, Seem. 


1775 


Loureirii, Dc. 


1746 Macropanax oreophilum, 


1776 Leycesteria Formosa, Wall. 


Miq. 


1777 


Triosteum Himalayanum, 


1747 undulatum, &WW. 




Wall. 


1748 Hedera Helix, L. 


1778 


Viburnum cotinifolium. 


1749 Tupidanthus calyptratus, 




Don. 


Hf. and Th. 


1779 


corylifolium, Hf. and 

Th. 
involucratum, Wall. 


CORNACRyE. 


1780 


1750 Alangium decapetalum,Z^. 


1781 


cordifolium, Wall. 


1751 hexapetalum, Lam. 


1782 


foetidum. Wall. 


1752 Marlea begoniaefolia, ^^x^. 


1783 


lutescens, Bl. 


1753 barbata, R. Br. 


1784 


punctatum, Ham. 


1754 Comus macrophylla, Wall. 


1785 


odoratissimum, Ker. 


1755 oblonga, Wall. 


1786 


Simonsii, Hf. and Th. 


1756 fragifera, Bth. 


1787 


enibescens, Wail. 


1757 Aucuba Himalaica, Z5^ a«// 


1788 


nervosum, Don. 


Th. 


1789 


coriaceum, Bl. 


1758 Torricellia tiliaefolia, Dc. 


1790 


Sambucus Javanica, Reinw. 




1791 


adnata, Wall. 


CAPRIFOLIACEyE. 






1759 Lomcera hispida, Pall. 




RUBIACEjE. 


1760 ligustrina. Wall. 


1792 


Galium asperifolium, Wall. 


1761 tomentella, Hf. and 


1793 


acutum, Edg. 


Th. 


1794 


rotundifolium, Z. 


1762 sericea, Royle. 


I79S 


hirtiflonim, Wall. 


1763 angustifolia, Wall. 


1796 


triflorum, Z. 


1764 rupicola, Hf. and Th. 


1797 


aparine, Z. 


1765 spinosa, yacg. 


1798 Rubia cordifolia, Z. 


1766 Myrtillus, Hf.andTh. 


1799 


charaefolia, Wall. 


1767 parvifolia, Edg. 


1800 


Sikkimensis, Kutz. 


1768 obovaU, Royle. 


i8oi 


Geophila reniformis, Don. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



150 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



802 Hydrophylaxmaritiina,Z./. 

803 Spermacoce articularis, Z. 

804 hispida, Z. 

805 Serissa foetida, Comm. 

806 Leptodermis lanceolata, 

WalL 

807 Borreria lasiocarpa, Wall. 

808 Knoxia corymbosa, Willd. 

809 mollis, R. Br. 

810 compressa, Wall. 

811 brachycarpa, Roxb. 

812 Grumilea elongata, Wight. 

813 Psychotria fulva, Ham. 
814 viridiflora, Rwd. L. 

815 calophylla, Wall. 

816 Asiatica, Z. 

817 Chasalia sphserocarpa, 

Wall. 
818 curviflora, Thw. 

819 Ixora tomentosa, Roxb. 

820 Indica, Z. 

821 naucleiflora, WalL 

822 subcapitata, Wall. 

823 villosa, Roxb. 

824 cuneifolia, Roxb. 

825 acuminata, Roxb. 

826 subsessilis, Wall. 

827 oxyphylla, W^^/. 

828 barbata, Roxb. 

829 undulata, Roxb. 

830 parviflora, Vhl. 

831 coccinea, Z. 

832 Bandhuca, Z. 

833 Coflfea tetrandra, Roxh. 
[834 Bengalensis, Roxb. 

835 Saprosma temata, Ilf. 

836 Canthium didymum, 

Gaertn. 

837 parvifolium, J?^jc3. 

838 angustifolium, Roxb. 



1839 Damnacanthus Indicus, 
Gaertn. 

840 Psederia foetida, Z. 

841 tomentosa, BL 

842 Morinda citrifolia, Z. 

843 bracteata, Roxb. 

844 exserta, Roxb. 

845 angustifolia, Roxb. 

846 umbellata, Z. 

[847 tomentosa, Heyne. 

[848 Pentapyxis stipulata, ZJ'C 

849 glaucophylla, Hf. 

850 Polysolenia Wallichii, Hf. 

851 LasianthusWallichii, Wjfi*/. 

1852 stercorarius, Bl. 

[853 sylvestris, Bl. 

854 lucidus, Bl. 

:85s cyanocarpus, ^tf^. 

[856 Scyphiphora hydrophyl- 

acea, Gaertn. 
857 Vanqueria spinosa, Roxb. 

858 pubescens, Kz. 

859 Hamiltonia suaveolenSy 

Roxb. 
:86o Urophyllum streptopodium, 

861 Hedyotis hispida, Retz. 

" ' approximata, R. Br. 

anricularia, Z. 

lineata, Don.y non 

Roxb. 

costata, Kz.^ non R. 



.862 
863 
864 



86s - 

Br. 

:866 Wightiana, l^aU. 

867 scandens, Roxb. 

:868 racemosa, Lamk. 

869 biflora, R. Br. 

870 paniculata, Roxb. 

871 pumila, Z. 

872 Burmanniana, R. Br* 



Digitized by 



Google 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS, 



iSi 



1873 Hedyotis brachypoda, Dc. 191 1 



1874 spergulacea, £>c, 

1875 aspera, Heyne. 

1876 Heynei, R. Br. 

i8yy umbellata, Lam. 

1878 polycarpa, R. Br, 

1879 scandens, Roxb, 

1880 cephalophora, R, Br. 

1 88 1 microcephala, R. Br. 

1882 ingrata, Wall. 

1883 monocephala, Wall. 

1884 urophylla, Wall, 

1885 camosa, Wall. 

1886 calycina, Wall. 

1887 striulata, R. Br. 

1888 extensa, B. Rr. 

1889 stipulata, R. Br. 

1890 Diplospora singularis, 

Korth. 

1 89 1 Petunga Roxbuighii, Dr. 

1892 Hyptianthera stricta, W.A. 

1893 Polyura geminata, Hf. 

1894 Ophiorrhiza Mungos, Z. 
1^95 bracteolata, P. Br. 

1896 repens, Wall. 

1897 argentea, WW/. 

1898 gracilis, Kz. 

1899 subcapitata, Wall. 

1900 villosa, Roxb. 

1 90 1 Wendlandia tinctoria, Dc. 

1902 exserta, Z?r. 

1903 coriacea, Z>r. 

1904 bifaria, Wall. 

1905 Spiradiclis bifida, YJa. 

1906 c^espitosa, Bl. 

1907 Myrioneuron nutans, Jf^//. 

1908 Silvianthus bracteatus, Hf. 

1909 Carlemannia Griffithii, Bth. 

1910 congesta, Hf. and 

Th. 



Adenosacme Nepalensis, 
Wall. 

1 912 longifolia, Wall. 

1 9 13 Dentella repens, Forst. 

19 14 Nauclea sessilifolia, Roxb. 

1915 parvifolia, Roxb. 

1916 rotundifolia, Roxb. 

191 7 polycephala, WW/. 

19 18 cordifolia, Roxb. 

1 91 9 Sarcocephalus Cadamba, 

Kz. 

1920 Cephalanthus naucleoides, 

Dc. 

192 1 Uncaria sessilifolia, Roxb. 

1922 pilosa, -^^jc^, 

1923 Roxbuighii, Wall, 

1924 sessilifinctus, Roxb. 

1925 Hymenopogon parasiticus, 

WaU. 

1926 Hymenodictyon flaccidum, 

Vi^all, 

1927 excelsum, W^//. 

1928 thyrsiflorum, W^//. 

1929 Luculia Finceana, Hook* 

1930 gratissima, Wall. 

1931 Argostema verticillatum, 

Wall. 
^932 rostratum, W^//. 

1933 sarmentosum, WW/. 

1934 humile, Wall. 

193s Griffithia longiflora, Lamk. 

1936 Stylocoryne Webera, Roxb. 

1937 densiflora, W^//. 

1938 Brachytome Wallichii, Hf. 

1939 Randia uliginosa, Dc, 

1940 dumetorum, Lamk, 

1 94 1 glabra, R. Br. 

1942 longispina, Dc. 

1943 nutans Z^j»i>t. 

1944 Gardenia florida, L. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS, 



152 

1945 Gardenia costata, Roxb, 

1946 latifolia, Ait. 

1947 tetrasperma, Roxb. 

1948 campanulata, Roxb. 

1949 Posoqueria rigida, Wall. 

1950 Mussaenda frondosa, L. 

1951 glabra, VhL 

1952 corymbosa, Roxb. 

1953 pubescens, Ham, 

1 9 54 macrophylla, Wall. 

1955 incana, Wall. 

VALERIANEM. 

1956 Patrinia parviflora, S. Z. 

1957 Nardostachys jatamansi, 

Dc. 

i^^8 grandiflora, Dc. 

1959 Valeriana Wallichii, Dc. 
i960 officinalis, L. 

1 96 1 Hardwickii, Wall. 

1962 Triplostegia glandulifera, 

Wall. 

DIPSACE^. 

1963 Morina longifolia, Wall. 

1964 polyphylla. Wall. 

1965 nana. Wall. 

1966 betonicoides, Bth. 

1967 Dipsacus inermis. Wall. 

1968 asper, Wall. 

1969 Pterocephalus, sp. 

COMPOSITyE. 

1970 Ethulia conyzoides, Z. 

197 1 Vemonia anthelmintica, 

waid. 

1972 subsessilis, Dc. 

1973 attenuata, Dc, 

1974 saligna, Z?^. 

1975 diveigens, Bth. 



1976 Vemonia extensa, Dc. 



1977 
1978 
1979 
1980 
1981 
1982 
1983 

1984 
1985 
1986 
1987 . 



teres, Wall. 

aspera, Ham. 

bracteata, Wall. 

cinerea. Less. 

acuminata, Dc. 

arborea, Ham. 

talaumifolia, Hook. f. 

and Th. 

blandula,C.^. Clarke. 

scandens, Dc. 

vagans, Dc. 

Andersoni, C. B. 

Clarke. 

1988 Elephantopus scaber, L. 

1989 Adenostemma viscosum, 

Forst. 

1990 Ageratum conyzoides, L. 

1 99 1 Eupatorium odoratum, L. 

1992 longicaule, WcUl. 

1993 Simonsii, C. B. 

Clarke. 

1994 Birmannicum, Dc. 

1995 Punduanum, Wall. 

1996 Reevesii, Wall. 

1997 nodiflonim, Wall. 

1998 cannabinum, L. 

1999 Mikania scandens, WiUd. 

2000 Solidago virga-aurea, L. 

2001 Dichrocephala latifolia, Z^^. 

2002 Benthamii, C. B. 

Clarke. 

2003 chrysanthemifolia, 

Dc. 

2004 Cyathocline lyrata, Cass. 

2005 Grangea maderaspatana, 

Foir. 

2006 Myriactis Nepalensis, Less. 

2007 Wallichii, Less. 

2008 Gmelini, Dc 



Digitized by 



Google 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



<53 



2009 Rhynchospermum verticil- 


2038 


Blumea Wightiana, Dc. 


latum, Reitiw, 


2039 


lactucaefolia, Dc. 


2010 Brachycome (?) Assamica, 


2040 


lacera, Dc. 


C. B. Clarke, 


2041 


obovata, ? Dc, 


201 1 Callistephus Chinensis, 


2042 


runcinata, Dc, 


Nees. 


2043 


virens, Dc, 


2012 Aster Sikkimensis, Hook, 


2044 


subsimplex, Dc, 


/ et Th. 


2045 


fasciculata, Dc, 




2046 


hieracifolia, Dc, 


2014 Himalaicus, C. B, 


2047 


oxyodonta, Dc. 


Clarke, 


2048 


riparia, Dc. 


2015 tricephalus, C. B, 


2049 


procera, Dc. 


Clarke, 


2050 


Wallichii, C, B, 


2016 elegans, Hook, /. et 




Clarke, 


Th. 


2051 


squarrosa, WcUl. 


2017 diplostephoides, Bth. 


2052 


aromatica, Dc. 


2018 scabridus, Hook, f, et 


2053 


densiflora, Dc. 


Th. 


2054 


balsamifera, Dc, 


2019 Brachyactes Indica, C, B, 


2055 


flava, Dc. 


Clarke. 


2056 


alata, Dc, 


2020 Erigeron acre, L, 


2057 


intermedia, C, B, 


2021 hispidum, Dc, 




Clarke, 


2022 sub-lyratum, Roxb. 


2058 


pterodonta, Dc, 


2023 bellidioides, Bth, 


2059 


aurita, Dc, 


2024 multiradiatum, Bth, 


2060 Pluchea Indica, Less. 


2025 Microglossa volubilis, Dc, 


2061 


linearifolia, C, B, 


2026 Cabulica, Bth, 




Clarke. 


2027 Griffithii, C. B. 


2062 


Sphaeranthus microce- 


Clarke. 




phalus, Willd, 


2028 albescens, Bth, 


2063 


hirtus, Willd, 


2029 Conyza semi-pinnatifida, 


2064 Athroisma laciniatum, Dc, 


Wall. 


' 2065 


Antennaria muscoides, 


2030 veronicaefolia, WalL 




Hook,f, et Th. 


2031 viscidula, Wall. 


2066 


Leontopodium alpinum, 


2032 angustifolia, Ham. 




Cass. 


2033 absinthifolia, Dc. 


2067 Anaphalis Royleana, Dc, 


2034 Thespis divaricata, Dc, 


2068 


cinnamomea, Bth. 


2035 Blumea amplectens, Dc, 


2069 


triplinervis, Sims. 


2036 bifoliata, Dc, 


2070 


nubigena, Dc, 


2037 barbata, Z?^. 


2071 


mucronata, Dc, 

Digitized by VjOC 



154 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS, 



2072 Anaphalis contorta, Bih. 

2073 tenella, Dc, 

2074 chionantha, Dc. 

2075 subumbellata, C £. 

Clarke. 

2076 adnata, Dc. 

2077 araneosa, Dc. 

2078 Gnaphalium hypoleucum, 

£>c. 

2079 luteo-album, L. 

2080 Indicum, L. 

2081 crispatulum, Delile. 

2082 Csssulia axillaris, Roxh. 

2083 Inula vestita, Wall. 
2084 nervosa, Wall. 

2085 Simonsii, C. B. 

Clarke. 

2086 Hookeri, C. B. 

Clarke. 

2087 Kalipanica, C. B. 

Clarke. 

2088 Cappa, Dc. 

2089 eupatorioides, Dc. 

2090 rubricaulis, Bth. 

2091 Griffithii, C B. 

Clarke. 

2092 Vicoa Indica, Dc. 

2093 Pulicaria foliolosa, 2?^. 

2094 angustifolia, Dc. 

209s crispa, Bth. 

2096 Carpesium cemuum, L, 

2097 Lagascea mollis, Cav. 

2098 Adenocaulon Himalaicum, 

2099 Xanthium strumarium, L. 

2100 Siegesbeckia orientalis, Z. 

2 10 1 Enhydra Heloncha, Dc. 

2102 Eclipta alba, Hassk. 

2103 Blainvillea latifolia, Z>r. 

2104 Wedelia calendulacea, Z^Tx. 



2105 Wedelia scandens, Roy^. 

2106 biflora, Roxb. 

2107 Spilanthes Acmella, L. 

2108 Guizotia oleifera, Dc. 

2109 Bidens pilosa, Z. 

2110 decomposita, WcUL 

2 1 1 1 Glossogyne pinnatifida, Z>^. 

21 12 Chiysanthellum Indicum, 

Dc. 

2 1 13 Galinsoga parviflora, Cav. 

2 1 14 Tridax procumbens, Z. 

2 1 15 Tagetes patula, Z. 

2 1 16 erecta, Z. 

21 17 Achillea squarrosa, Alton. 

2 1 18 Chrysanthemum corona- 

rium, Z. 

21 19 Indicum, Z. 

2120 Atkinsoni, C. B. 

Clarke. 

2 12 1 Cotula anthemoides, Z. 

2122 hemisphaerica, Wall. 

2123 dichrocephaloides, 

C. B, Clarke. 

2124 Centipeda orbicularis, Z^wr. 

2125 minuta, Bth. 

2126 Tanacetum nubigenum. 

Wall. 

2127 Tibeticum, Hf. and 

Th. 

2128 gossypinum, Hf. atid 

Th. 

2129 Artemisia tricophora, Dc. 

2130 parviflora, Roxb. 

2 131 vulgaris, Z. 

2132 canifolia, Roxb. 

2133 biennis, ^7A/. 

2134 Campbellii, Hf. and 

Th. 

2135 Gynura angulosa. Wall. 

2136 Nepalensis, Dc. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



155 



2137 Gynura sinuata, WalL 

2138 auriculata, Dc, 

2139 Emilia sonchifolia, Dc, 

2140 scabra, Dc. 

2 141 prenanthoidea, Dc, 

2142 angustifolia, Dc, 

2143 Ligularia amicoides, Dc. 

2144 macrantha, Hf. and 

Th. 

2145 retusa, Dc. 

2146 racemosa, Dc. 

2147 Cremanthodium reniforme, 

Bih. 

2148 pinnatifidum, Bth. 

2149 palmatum, Bth. 

2150 Doronicum linifolium, Dc, 

215 1 Cacalia quinqueloba, Hf, 

and Th, 

2152 Setiecio araneosus, Dc, 
' Buimalia, Ham. 

- campylodes, Dc. 
-densiflorus, Wd//. 
• auriculatus, JValL 

- triligulatus/.^w. 

- acuminatus, Wd//. 



2153 
2154 
2155 
2156 

2157 
2158 

2159 

2160 - 

2161 - 

2162 - 

2163 - 

2164 - 

2165 - 

2166 - 

2167 - 

2168 - 

2169 - 

2170 - 

2171 - 

2172 - 
VIL 



n. 



Griffithii, Hf, and 

' pallens, IVali. 
' obtusatus, IVali. 
' graciliflonis, Dc, 

• spectabilis, Wall, 

■ diversifolius, Wall. 

• laciniosus, Wall, 

■ ramosus, Wall, 

• Wallichii, Dc. 

• alatus, Wall. 

■ tetranthus, Wall, 
' laciniosus, Wall, 

■ Amottianus, WtgAt 

• rufinervis, Dc, 



2173 Senecio Bhotanicus, C, B, 
Clarke. 

2174 vagans, Wall, 

2175 Simonsii, C.B. Clarke, 

2 1 76 alpinus, Z. 



— Rabani, C. B, Clarke, 

— pilosiusculus, C, B. 



Clarke. 
Mishmiensis, 



C, B, 



2177 
2178 

2179 

2180 
2181 

2182 
2183 

2184 Echinops echinatus, ^oocb. 

2185 Saussurea obvallata, Wall. 



Clarke, 

corymbosa, Dc. 

Thomsoni, C. 



B. 



Clarke, 

Yaklae, C. B. Clarke. 

Mortoni, C. B, Clarke. 



2186 
2187 
2188 
2189 
2190 
2191 
2192 
2193 
2194 

2195 
2196 



-caespitosa, Wall. 
•gossypina, Wall. 

• affinis, Spreng, 

• hypoleuca, Spreng. 

• pterocaulon, Dene, 
denticulata, Wall, 

■ candicans, Dc. 
' deltoidea, Dc. 

■ conica, C, B. Clarke, 
Kunthiana, Wall. 

■ Sughoonensis, C. B. 



Clarke. 

2197 subulata, C. B. Clarke. 

2198 Andersoni, C. B. 

Clarke, 

2199 eriostemon, Wall. 

2200 Hookeri, C.B. Clarke, 

2201 discolor, Dc, 

2202 Microlonchus divaricatus, 

Dc. 

2203 Tricholepis furcata, Dc. 

2204 Carthamus tinctorius, L. 

2205 Cnicus arvensis, Hoffm. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



156 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



2206 Cnicus eriophorus, Dc, 

2207 inolucratus, Dc, 

2208 Sinensis, Gardn, and 

Champ, 

2209 Nepalensis, Dc, 

2210 Leucomeris spectabilis, 

Don. 

22 1 1 Ainslisea pteropoda, Z^^. 

2212 aptera, Dc. 

2213 angustifolia, Hf. and 

TTi. 

2214 Gerbera ovalifolia, Dc. 

2215 lanuginosa, Bth. 

2216 nivea, Bth. 

2217 Bemiera Nepalensis, Dc. 

2218 Goniocaulon Indicum, Bth, 

2219 Cichorium Intybus, L. 

2220 Endivia, Willd. 

2221 Picris hieracioides, Z. 

2222 Sonchus asper, Fuchs. 

2223 arvensis, L. 

2224 Youngia lyrata, Cc^s. 

2225 fiiscipappa, Thw, 

2226 Prenanthes violsefolia, 

Dene. 

" glomerata, Dene, 

- grandiflora, JVa/i. 

- graciliflora, JVa/I, 

- Bninoniana, IVa//, 

- alata, B/, and Th, 

- scandens,Z5^^z«// Th. 

- Khasiana, C. B. 



2227 - 

2228 - 

2229 - 

2230 - 

2231 - 

2232 - 

2233 - 

Clarke. 

2234 Melanoseris hastata, Edg. 

2235 Lessertiana, Dc. 

2236 bracteata,Z5^d;«^ Th. 

2237 Lactuca obtusa, Bth, 

2238 longifolia, Dc. 

2239 brevirostris. Champ, 

2 240 gracilis, Dc, 



2241 Taraxacum Dens Leonis, 

Desv. 

2242 Ixeris polycephala, Cass. 

2243 fontinalis, Dc. 

2244 Crepis depressa, -^ and 

Th. 

2245 gracilis, Hf. and Th. 

2246 Hookeriana, C. B. 

Clarke. 

2247 Hieracium Silhetense, Dc. 

2248 Dubiaea hispida, Dc, 

2249 Mulgedium macranthum, 

Hf, and Th, 

2250 Microrhynchus glaber, 

Wight. 

2251 asplenifolius, Z^r. 

2252 sarmentosus, Dc. 

CAMPANULA CE^. 

2253 Cephalostigma panicula- 

turn, Dc. 

2254 hirsutum, Edg. 

2255 Campanumoea Javanica, 

Bl. 

2256 Codonopsis viridis, Wall. 

2257 . 

2258 . 

2259 . 



Th. 



2260 



2261 



affinis, Z5^ d;«^ Th. 
inflata, Z5^ a«// Tyi. 
Benthami, Hf. and 

subsimplex, Hf. and 



Th. 



- foetens, Hf. and Th, 

2262 Leptocodon gracilis, Hf 

andTh. 

2263 Cyclodon parviflorum, Hf, 

and Th, 

2264 Cyananthus lobatus, Wall, 

2265 linifolius, Wall. 

2266 incanus, Hf. and 77i. 

2267 inflatus, Hf. and Th. 



Digitized by 



Google 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS, 



^S7 



2268 VVahlenbergia agrestis, JDc. 


2295 


Vaccinium odontocerum, 


2269 Campanula sylvatica, Wall. 




Wight, 


2270 cana, JVa/I, 


2296 


acuminatum, Dc, 


2271 canescens, JVall. 


2297 


W\^\xi,HfandTh, 


2272 coloTSitsiy Wal/. 


2298 


auriculatum, Griff, 


2273 fulgens, IVa//. 


2299 


salignum, Hf, and Th, 


2274 modesU, Bf. and Tk. 


2300 


leucobotryum, Nutt, 


2275 Khasiana,^. a«^7}^. 


2301 


piliferum,Z5^ and Th, 


2276 Peracarpa caraosa, Hf, and 


2302 


glaucum, Hf and Th, 


Th. 


2303 


gaultheriaefolium, Hf 


2277 Piddingtoma nummularia, 




and Th, 


Lamk. 


2304 


serratum, Wight, 


2278 Isolobus Roxburghianus, 


2305 


rugosum, Hf and Th, 


Dc. 


2306 


obovatum, Wight, 


2279 Speirema mohtanum, Hf, 


2307 


serpens, Wight, 


and Th. 


2308 


nummularium, Hf, 


2280 Lobelia trigona, I^oxb. 




and Th, 


2281 affinis, Wall, 


2309 


Donianum, Wight, 


2282 Zeylanica, Z. 


2310 


emarginatum,Z5^ and 


2283 Griffithii, Hf, and Th. 




Th, 


2284 colorata, Wall, 


2311 


Dunalianum, Wight, 


2285 erecta, Hf, and Thl 


2312 


bracteatum, Thhg, 


2286 pyramidalis, Wall, 


2313 


Pemettya repens, Bl, 


2287 Wallichiana, Hf, and 


2314 


trichophylla, RoyU, 


Th, 


2315 


Gaultheria pyroloides, Hf, 


2288 rosea, Wall, 




and Th, 




2316 


Griffithiana, Wight, 


STYLIDIEyE, 


2317 


fragrantissima, Wall, 


2289 Stylidium Kunthii, Wall 


2318 


punctata, Bl, 


2290 roseum, -AT^. 


2319 


discolor, Nutt, 




2320 


Andromeda ovalifplia, 


GOODENOVIE^, 




Wall, 


2291 Scaevola Koenigii, Vhl, 


2321 


lanceolata, Wall. 




2322 


villosa, Wall, 


ERICINEJB., 


2323 


formosa, Don, 


2292 Vaccinium verticillatum, 


2324 


Cassiope fastigiata, Don, 


Wall. 


2325 


selaginoides, Hf, and 


2293 setigerum, Wall, 




Th, 


2294 variegatum, Hf, and 


2326 


Enkyanthus Himalaicus, 


Th, 




Hf and Th, 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



158 



UST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



2327 Rhododendron Falconeri, 

2328 argenteum, Hf. 

2329 Hodgsoniiy Hf. and 

Th, 

2330 Griffithii, Wight, 

2331 Thomson!, Hf, 

2332 Dalhousiae, Hf, 

«333 Edgeworthii, Hf 

2334 barbatum, Wall, 

233s Nuttalii, Boott. 

2336 ciliatum, Hf, 

2337 glaucum, Hf, 

2338 Kendrickii, Nutt. 

2339 pumilum, Hf 

2340 Batemanni, Hook, 

2341 campanulatum, Wall, 

2342 arboreum, Sm. 

2343 Smithii, Nutt, 

2344 niveum, Hf 

2345 fulgens, Hf 

2346 lanatum, Hf 

2347 Wightii, Hf 

2348 campylocarpum, Hf 

2349 Maddeni, Hf, 

2350 cinnabarinum, -^ 

2351 Roylei, ^. 

2352 camelliaeflorum, Hf, 

2353 pendulum, Hf 

2354 lepidotum, Wall, 

2355 vaccinioides, Hf 

2356 Shepherd!, Nutt, 

2357 \drgatum, Hf, 

2358 setosum, Don, 

2359 mvale, ZJ^ 

2360 anthopogon, Don, 

2361 formosum, Wall, 

2362 Diplarche multiflora, Hf, 

and Th, 

2363 ^yi6SL0xz,,Hf,andTh, 



' pctiolaris, Wall. 
reticulata, Wall, 
• pus!lla. Wall, 
- sapph!r!na, Hf, 



2364 D!apens!a H!malaica, Hf, 

and 7%. 

2365 Pyrola rotund!fol!a, L, 

2366 Monotropa un!flora, L, 

PL UMBAGINE^E. 

2367 ^gialitis annulata, R, Br. 

2368 Plumbago Zeylamca, Z. 

2369 rosea, Z. 

FRIMULACEyE, 

2370 Primula proUfera, Wall, 

2371 
2372 • 

2373 

2374 sapph!r!na, Hf, and 

Th. 

2375 m!nutiss!ma. Wall. 

2376 Sib!rica, ^acq, 

2377 TelemacWca, Klatt. 

2378 denticulata, Wall. 

2379 rotund!fol!a, Wall, 

2380 spathulata, T^^j'i^. 

2381 S!kkimensis, Hook, 

2382 glabra, Klatt, 

2383 uniflora, Klatt, 

2384 Androsace selago, Hf and 

Th, 

2385 Lehmann!, Wall, 

2386 Hookeriana, Klatt, 

2387 rotundifoha, Hardw, 

2388 camosula, .Dw^y. 

2389 Br}'Ocarpon Himala!cum, 

Hf and Th. 

2390 Conusae,^sp. 

2391 Lys!mach!a pyram!dalis, 

Wall, 

2392 multiflora, WcUl, 

2393 ramosa, WalL 

2394 evalvis, WaU, 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



159 



2395 Lysimachiajaponica, 7}%^. 

2396 prolifera, Klatt. 

2397 Anagallis arvensis, Z. 

2398 Micropyxis pumila, Duby, 

MYRSINE^. 

2399 Maesa ramentacea, WalL 

2400 nemoralis, Dc, 

2401 montana, Dc. 

2402 Indica, Dc, 

2403 macrophylla, Wall. 

2404 Samara undulata, Dc. 

2405 Embelia Ribes, Burnt. 

2406 - 

2407 - 

2408 - 

2409 - 

2410 - 

241 1 - 



- floribunda, WalL 

— villosa, WalL 

— robusta, Roxb. 

— parviflora, WalL 

- vestita, Roxb, 

- nutans, WalL 

2412 Myrsine capitellata, Wall, 

2413 semiserrata, WalL 

2414 Ardisia paniculata, Roxb. 



2415 
2416 
2417 
2418 
2419 
2420 
2421 
2422 
2423 
2424 

2425 
2426 



anceps, Wall, 
macrocapa, WalL 
floribunda, WalL 

■ membranacea, WalL 
neriifolia, Wall. 

• semilata, HCz. 

■ pendunculosa, WalL 

■ humilis, VAL 

' eugeniaefolia, WalL 

• oblonga, Dc. 

• odontophylla, Wa/L 
' involucrata, Kz, 



2427 Amblyanthus glandulosus, 

Dc. 

2428 Hymenandra Wallichii, Dc. 

2429 Antistrophe oxyantha, Dc. 

2430 ^giceras comiculata, 

Blanco. 



SAFOTACEyE, 

2431 Chrysophyllum Roxburghii, 

Don. 

2432 Sapota tomentosa, Dc. 

2433 armata, Dc. 

2434 Achras, MilL 

2435 Sideroxylon arboreum, 

Ham. 

2436 grandifolium, WalL 

2437 Bassia latifolia, Roxb. 

2438 villosa. Wail. 

2439 butyracea, Roxb, 

2440 Isonandra polyantha, WalL 

2441 Mimusops Elengi, L. 

2442 hexandra, Roxb. 

EBENACEyE. 

2443 Diospyros Tupru, If am, 

2444 melanoxylon, Roxb, 

2445 pilosula, WalL 

2446 stricta, Roxb. 

2447 variegata, Kz. 

2448 nigricans, Wall, 

2449 lanceaefolia, Roxb. 

2450 montana, Roxb. 

2451 Kaki, L.f. 

2452 chloroxylon, 7?<?;c^. 

2453 ramiflora, Roxb. 

2454 Embryopteris, Fers. 

245 s Toposia, Earn. 

2456 mollis. Griff. 

STYRACEyE. 

2457 Symplocos grandiflora, 

WalL 

2458 ferruginea, -^^je3. 

2459 oxyphylla, WalL 

2460 floribunda, WalL 

2461 pyrifolia, WalL 

2462 caudata, WalL 



Digitized by 



Google 



i6o 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS, 



2463 Symplocos 
Wall 



ramosissima, 



- crataegoides, Don, 

- lucida, Wall, 

- polycarpa, Wall, 

- polystachya, Wall, 

- spicata, I^oxd, 

- racemosa, J^oxd, 
2470 Styrax virgatum, Wall, 



2464 

2465 
2466 
2467 
2468 
2469 



2499 Nyctanthes arbor tristis, Z. 

2500 Schrebera Swietenia, I^oxd, 

2501 Fraxinus floribundus, Wall, 

2502 Ligustnim bracteolatum, 

Don, 

2503 Lindleyi, Wall, 

2504 robustum, Wall, 

2505 Nepalense, Wall. 

2506 Olea glandulifera, Wall, 



2471 • 


semilatum, J^oxd, 


2507 


dioica, Roxb, 






2508 


dentata, Wall. 




JASMINES, 


2509 


sabiaefolia, Wall, 


2472 , 


Jasminum Sambac, L, 


2510 


terniflora, Kz, 


2473 


rubescens, Ham, 


2511 


Chionanthus dichotoma, 


2474 ■ 


quinqueflorum,Zr^«^. 




Roxb. 


2475 ■ 


hirsutum, Willi, 


2512 


tenuiflora, Wall. 


2476 - 


pubescens, Willd, 


2513 


ramiflora, Roxb, 


2477 ■ 


undulatum, Willd, 


2514 


macrophylla, Wall. 


2478 


aristatum, Wall, 


2515 


Osmanthus fragrans, Lour. 


2479 


punctatum, Wall, 






2480 - 


arborescens, Roxb, 


SALVADORACE^, 


2481 


reticulatum, Wall, 


2516 


Azima tetracantha, Lamk. 


2482 


laurifolium, Roxb, 






2483 ■ 


calycinum, Wall 




APOCYNACEjE, 


2484 . 


anastomozans, Wall, 


2517 


Willughbeia edulis, Roxb. 


2485 . 


attenuatum, Roxb, 


2518 


Melodinus monogynus. 


2486 


glandulosum, Wall, 




Roxb. 


2487 • 


scandens, Vhl, 


2519 


Carissa diffusa, Roxb. 


2488 - 


auriculatum, Vhl, 


2520 


carandas, L. 


2489 


paniculatum, Roxb. 


2521 


Ophioxylon serpentinum, 


2490 . 


caudatum, Wall. 




L. 


2491 . 


dispermum, Wall. 


2522 


Thevetia neriifolia, yuss. 


2492 . 


trinerve, Roxb. 


2523 


Alyxia fasciculata. Wall. 


2493 • 


heterophyllum, Roxb. 


2524 


gracilis, Wall. 


2494 • 


revolutum, Sims. 


2525 


Hunteria corymbosa, Roxb. 


2495 


grandiflonim, Z. 


2526 


Calpicarpum Roxbuighii, 


2496 . 






Don. 


2497 • 


ovatum, Wall. 


2527 


Cerbera Odallum, Gaerln. 


2498 Chondrospermum smilaci- 


2528 


Tabemaemontana coro- 




folium, Wall. 


• 


naria, Z. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



i6i 



2529 Tabemaemontana cylindri- 

ca, Wall. 

2530 Vinca rosea, L. 

2531 parviflora, Roxb. 

2532 Plumeria acuminata, Dry. 

2533 alba, Dry. 

2534 Vallaris dichotoma, Wall. 

2535 Parsonsia spiralis, R. Br. 

2536 Beaumontia grandiflora, 

Wall. 

2537 Wrightia tomentosa, Roem. 

and yoh. 

2538 mollissima, Wall. 

2539 tinctoria, R. Br. 

2540 coccinea, Wall. 

2541 Holarrhena Codaga, Don. 

2542 antidysenterica. Wall. 

2543 Alstonia scholaris, R. Br. 

2544 Blaberopusneriifolius, Wight. 

2545 Nerium odorum, Sol. 

2546 Strophanthus caudatus, 

2547 Chonemorpha macrophylla, 

Don. 

2548 Rhynchospermum Walli- 

chii, Dc. 

2549 Aganosma cazyophyllata, 

Roxb. 

2550 cymosa, Don. 

2551 marginata, Don. 

2552 Ichnocarpus frutescens, R. 

Br. 

2553 latifolia, Wall. 

2 5 54 fragrans. Wall. 

2555 Ecdysanthera rosea. Hook. 

and Am. 

2556 brachiata, Dc. 

2557 micrantha, Z>r. 

2558 Pottsia Cantoniensis, Dc. 

2559 Anodendron paniculatum, 

Dc. 



ASCLEPIADEyE. 

2560 Cyrtolepis reticulata, Wal 

2561 Buchanani, -^(7^/. a«^ 

Schult. 

2562 elegans, ^f^/. 

2563 Goniostema acuminatum, 

Wight. 

2564 Toxocarpus crassifolius, W. 

A. 

2565 Himalensis, Falc. 

2566 laurifolius, Wight. 

2567 Ceropegia lucida, Jf^//. 



- longifolia, Wall. 
■ angustifolia, Wight. 

• lanceolata, Wight. 
•Wallichii, Wight. 

pubescens, Wall. 

• macrantha, Wight. 



2568 
2569 
2570 ' 
2571 
2572 ■ 

2573 

2574 Hoya linearis, Wall. 

2575 fusca, Wall. 

2576 Hookeriana, Wight. 

2577 parasitica. Wall. 

2578 lacuna, Wight. 

2579 Amottiana, Wight. 

2580 lanceolata. Wall. 

2581 Shepherdi, .^^>^. 

2582 viridiflora, R. Br. 

2583 pendula, W. A. 

2584 acuminata, Wall. 

2585 longifolia, Wall. 

2586 parviflora, Wight. 

2587 Pterostelma acuminata, 

Wight. 

2588 Marsdenia tinctoria, R. Br. 

2589 tenacissima, W. A. 

2590 lucida, Edg. 

2591 Cosmostigma racemosa, 

Wight. 

2592 Heterostema Wallichii, 

Wight. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



162 



UST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS, 



2593 Heterostema alata, Wight 

2594 Rheedii, Sp'g, 

2595 Peigularia pallida, W, A. 

2596 odoratissima, Sm, 

2597 Dischidia Bengalensis, 

Colebr. 

2598 Gongronema Nepalense, 

Bon. 

2599 Bidara tingens, 2?^;z^. 

2600 Gymnema sylvestre, I^. Br, 

2601 - 

2602 - 

2603 - 

2604 - 

2605 - 

2606 - 



- acuminatum, Wall. 

- lati folium, Wall. 

- Nepalense, Wall, 

- sagittatum. Wall 

- hirsutum, Wi^ht, 

- afiine, Dene, 

2607 Sarcolobus globosus, Wall, 

2608 carinatus, Wall. 

2609 Leptadenia reticulata, 

WA, 

2610 Tylophora camosa, Wall 

261 1 tenuissima, W. A. 

2612 pauciflora, W. A. 

2613 longifolia, Wight. 

2614 exilis, Colebr. 

2615 tenerrima, Wight. 

2616 asthmatica, W. A. 

2617 hirsuta, W. A. 

2618 Belostemma hirsutum, 

Wall. 

2619 Pentatropis microphylla, 

W.A. 

2620 Calotropis gigantea, R, Br. 

2621 Hamiltonii, Wight. 

2622 herbacea, Wight. 

2623 procera, R. Br. 

2624 Oxystelma esculentum, 

R.Br, 

2625 Raphistema pulchellum, 

Wall 



2626 Periploca calophylla, Falc, 

2627 Cynanchum corymbosum, 

Wight. 

2628 pauciflorum, R. Br. 

2629 Wallichii, Wight. 

2630 callialata. Ham, 

2631 Asclepias Curassavica, L. 

2632 Dsemia extensa, R, Br, 

2633 Pentasacme caudatum. 

Wall 

2634 Wallichii, Wight. 

2635 Hemodesmus Indicus, 

R.Br. 

2636 Streptocaulon calophyllum, 

Wight. 

2637 sylvestre, Wight. 

2638 extensum, Wight. 

2639 Finlaysonia obovata, Wall 

LOGANIACE^. 

2640 Mitreola paniculata, WaU. 

2641 pedicellata, R, Br. 

2642 Mitrasacme nudicaulis, 

Bth. 

2643 Gelsemium elegans, Bih. 

2644 Gardneria ovata, WaU. 

2645 angustifolia, Wall, 

2646 Fagraea obovata, Wall. 

2647 Khasiana, Br. 

2648 Strychnos axillaris, Colchr. 

2649 lucida, Pf^//. 

2650 potatorum, Z. 

2651 Nux vomica, L. 

GENTIANEjE. 

2652 Exacum tetragonum, Z. 

2653 teres, WaU, 

2654 pedunculatum, 

Griseb, 

2655 petiolarc, Griseb. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



163 



2656 Sebaea Khasiana, Clarke, 

2657 Erythrsea ramosissima, 

Fers, 

2658 Pladera pusilla, -^^jc^. 

2659 Canscora diffusa, Br. 

2660 decussata, Roem. and 

Schult. 

2661 andrographioides, 

Griff. 

2662 Slevogtia verticillata, Don, 

2663 Gentiana detonsa, Fries, 



• squarrosa, Leded, 

• pedicellata, IVa//. 

• capitata, Ham. 

• Andersoni, Clarke. 
■ decemfida, Ham. 

• marginata, Griseb. 

• nudicaulis, JCz. 

' depressa, Wall, 
' venusta, Wall. 
•tubiflora, Wall, 
' omata, Wall. 
nubigena, Edg. 



2664 

2665 ■ 

2666 

2667 

2668 

2669 

2670 

2671 

2672 ■ 

2673 

2674 

2675 . 

2676 Crawfurdia speciosa, Wall. 

2677 fasciculata, Wall. 

2678 luteo-viridis, Clarke. 

2679 puberula, Clarke. 

2680 Pleurogyne Carinthiaca, 

Griseb. 

2681 Ophelia cordata, Don. 

2682 purpurascens, Don. 

2683 paniculata, Don. 

2684 nervosa, Wall. 

2685 pulchella, Don. 

2686 angustifolia, Don. 

2687 macrosperma, Clarke. 

2688 chirayta, Griseb. 

2689 bimaculata, S. and Z. 

2690 Halenia elliptica, Don, 

2691 Swertia cuneata, Wall. 



2692 Swertia speciosa, Wall. 

2693 multicalis, Don. 

2694 limnanthemum cristatum, 

Griseb, 

2695 Indicum, Griseb. 

BIGNONIACEyE. 

2696 Payanelia multijuga. Wall. 

2697 Calosanthes Indica, Bl. 

2698 Millingtonia hortensis, Z./ 

2699 Nyctocalos Thomsoni, Hf. 

2700 Stereospermum chelon- 

ioides, Dc. 

2701 suaveolens, Dc, 

2702 Heterophragma Rox- 

burghii, Dc, 

2703 adenophylla, Seem. 

2704 Spathodea Rheedei, Wall. 

FEDALINE^, 

2705 Buddleia paniculata, Wall. 

2706 Neemda, Ham. 

2707 Asiatica, Lour. 

2708 macrostachya, Bth. 

2709 Colvillei, Hf. and Th. 

2710 Martynia proboscidea, 

Sprg. 

27 1 1 Pedalium murex, L. 

2712 Sesamum Indicum, Z. 

2713 Wightia gigantea, Wall. 

HYDROPHYLLA CEyE. 

2714 Hydrolea Zeylanica, VhU 

CONVOL VULA CE^. 

2715 Rivea tilisefolia, Chois. 

2716 omata, Chois. 

2717 Argyreia speciosa, Chois. 

2718 populifolia, Chois. 

2719 splendens, Sw. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1 64 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



2721 argentea, Chots. 

2722 capitata, Chois, 

2723 setosa, Chois, 

2724 Griffithii, Hf.afidTh. 

2725 Quamoclit coccinea, Chois. 

2726 vulgaris, Chois. 

2727 Batatas edulis, Chois. 

2728 — — paniculata, Chois. 

2729 Pharbitis nil, Chois. 

2730 Calonyction speciosum, 

Chois. 

2731 Lepistemon flavescens, Bl. 

2732 Wallichii, Chois. 

2733 Ipomoea reniformis, Chois. 

- reptans, L. 

- pes caprse, L. 

- tridentata, J^oth. 

- angustifolia,yJwy. 

- campanulata, Z. 

- Turpethum, 7?. Br. 

- vitifolia, Sw. 

- cymosa, J^oxd. 

- denticulata, Chois. 
• pes tigridis, Z. 

- pileata, Jioxd. 
' sessiliflora, Chois. 

- sepiaria, JCoen. 

- chryseidis, Ld/. 

- quinata, Br. 



2734 

2735 
2736 

2737 
2738 
2739 ■ 
2740 
2741 

2742 ■ 

2743 • 

2744 . 

2745 ■ 

2746 . 

2747 • 

2748 . 

2749 Convolvulus parviflorus, 

Vhl. 

2750 Aniseia uniflora, Chois. 

2751 Calistegia oleracea, IVall. 

2752 Shuteria bicolor, Chois. 

2753 Porana volubilis, Br. 

2754 racemosa, I^oxd. 

275s paniculata, I^oxd. 

2756 grand iflora, Wa//. 

2757 stenoloba, As. 



2758 Skinneria caespitosa, Chois. 

2759 Breweria Roxburghii, Chois. 

2760 Evolvulvulus alsinoides, Z. 

2761 Cuscuta Europaea, Z. 

2762 reflexa, J^oxd. 

2763 Erycibe paniculata, J^oxd. 

2764 laevigata, Wall. 

BORAGINE^. 

2765 Cordia polygama, Roxb. 

2766 Myxa, Z. 

2767 grandis, Roxb. 

2768 latifolia, Roxb. 

2769 Ehretia laevis, Roxb. 

2770 serrata, Roxb. 

2771 Wallichiana, Hf.atid 



Th. 



2772 



acuminata, Wall. 



2773 Rbabdia viminea, Dalz. 

2774 Toumefortia viridiflora, 

Wall. 

2775 He}Tieana, Wall. 

2776 Coldenia procumbens, Z. 

2777 Heliotropium supinum, L. 

2778 Coromandelianum, 

Lehm. 

2779 brevifolium, Wall. 

2780 Indiciun, Z. 

2781 Macaranga bicolor, Wall. 

2782 Emodi, Wall. 

2783 Bothriospennun diffusum, 

Roxb. 

2784 suboppositum, Hf. 

and Th. 

2785 Eritrichium microcarpum, 

Dc. 

2786 Echinospermum glochidia- 

tum, Dc. 

2787 Cynoglossum Wallichii, 

Don. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



165 



2788 Cynoglossum furcatum, 

IValL 

2789 micranthum, Dc, 

2790 canescens, Wail, 

2791 Trichodesma Zeylanicum, 

R. Br. 

2792 Indicum, I^. Br, 

SOLANEyE, 

2793 Lycopersicum esculeatum, 

Don, 

2794 Solanum tuberosum, Z. 



2795 
2796 
2797 
2798 

2799 
2800 
2801 
2802 

2803 
2804 
2805 
2806 
2807 
2808 
2809 
2810 



nigrum, Z. 

verbascifolium, L, 
' spirale, lioxb. 
• membranaceum, 



IVa//, 

dentatum, I^oxb, 

denticulatum, /V. 

macrodon, IVa//, 

lysimachioides, 

fVa//. 

ferox, Z. 

torvum, Z. 

trilobatum, I^oxd. 

Indicum, Z. 

Melongena, Z. 

- — sanctum, Z. 

involucratum, Bl 

xanthocarpum, 

Schrad, 

crassipetalum, Wall, 



2811 - 

2812 Capsicum frutescens, Z. 

2813 minimum, Z. 

2814 baccatiun, Z. 

2815 Nicandra physaloides, 

Gacrtn, 

2816 Physalis minima, Z. 

2817 angulata, L, 

2818 Peruviana, Z. 



2819 Physalis Alkekengi, Z. 

2820 Withania somnifera, Don, 

2821 Datura alba, N, E, 

2822 fastuosa, Z. 

2823 Wallichii, Dun, 

2824 Stramonium, Z. 

2825 Tatula, Z. 

2826 Scopolia lurida, Don, 

2827 humilis, Hf, and Th. 

2828 Nicotiana Tabacum, Z. 

2829 plumbaginifolia, Z. 

2830 nistica, Z. 

SCROPHULARINEyE. 

2831 Calceolaria glutinosa, Reg, 

2832 Celsia Coromandeliana, Z. 
2S33 Scrophularia pauciflora, 

Bth. 

2834 elatior. Wall, 

2835 urticaefolia. Wall, 

2836 Alectra Indica, Bth. 

2837 grandiflora, Kz, 

2838 aphylla, Kz, 

2839 Mimulus gracilis, R, Br, 

2840 Nepalensis, Wall, 

2841 Mazus surculosus, Don, 

2842 rugosus, Lour, 

2843 • dentatus, Wall, 

2844 Lindenbeigia grandiflora, 

Bth, 

2845 macrostachya, Bth, 

2846 polyantha, Royle, 

2847 urticaefolia, Z^^m. 

2848 Pterostigma capitatum, 

Bth, 

2849 Stemodia viscosa, Roxb, 

2850 Limnophila Menthastrum, 

Bth, 

2851 hypericifolia, Bth. 

2852 conferta, -5M. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



i66 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



2853 Limnophila micrantha, BtA. 

2854 diffusa, B^A. 

2855 hirsuta, -5M. 

2856 punctata, Bl 

2857 gratioloides, J^, Br, 

2858 sessiliflora, BI. 



2888 Scoparia dulcis, Z. 

2889 Microcarpsea muscosa, 

W.A. 

2890 Digitalis purpurea, Z. 

2891 Picrorrhiza Kurroa, J^oylt. 

2892 Veronica ciliata, jFiscA. 



2859 heterophylla, BfA. 


2893 


Anagallis, L, 


2860 racemosa, BtA, 


2894 


laxa, Bth, 


2861 polystachya, BtA. 


2895 


Maddeni, Edg. 


2862 Herpestis Hamiltoniana, 


2896 


cana, Wall, 


BtA. 


2897 


capitata, RoyU. 


2863 floribunda, Br, 


2898 


lanuginosa, Bth, 


2864 Monniera, JL B. K. 


2899 


Buchnera crudata. Ham, 


2865 Dopatrium junceum, Ham, 


2900 


hispida, Lamk. 


2866 Curangaamara,/«Afj. 


2901 


Striga hirsuta, Bth, 


2867 Torenia cordifolia, Roxb, 


2902 


euphrasioides, Bth, 


2868 edentula, Griff, 


2903 


Sopubia delphinifolia, Don, 


2869 diffusa, -ffM. 


2904 


stricta, Don, 


2870 parviflora, Bth, 


2905 


trifida, Don, 


2871 Vandellia Crustacea, Bth, 


2906 


Centranthera grandiflora. 


2872 multiflora, Bth, 




Don. 


2873 scabra, Bth, 


2907 


hispida, R. Br, 


2874 mollis, ^M. 


2908 


humifusa, Wall, 


2875 erecta, Bth. 


2909 


Pedicularis Hookeriana, 


2876 nummulariaefolia, 




Wall. 


Don, 


2910 


siphonantha, Wall, 


2877 pedunculata, Bth, 


2911 


tubiflora, Fisch. 


2878 angustifolia, Bth, 


2912 


furfuracea. Wall, 


2879 Ilysanthes hyssopioides, -5///. 


2913 


camosa. Wall. 


2880 • parviflora, Sprg, 


2914 


gracilis, Wall, 


2881 Bonnaya brachiata, Lk, 


2915 


brevifolia. Dene, 


and Ow, 


2916 


verticillata, L, 


2882 reptans, Bth, 


2917 


mollis, Wall, 


2883 veronicaefolia, Bth, 


2918 


megalantha, Don. 


2884 verbensefolia, Spreng, 


2919 


Lancea Tibetica, Hf, and 


2885 grandiflora, Bth. 




Th, 



2886 Glossostigma spathulatum, 

Am, 

2887 Hemiphragma heterophyl- 
• lum, Wall. 



LENTIBULARIEjE. 

2920 Utricularia stellaris, L. 

2921 flexuosa, Vhl. 



Digitized by 



Google 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



167 



2922 Utricularia diantha, Roem. 

and Schalt 

2923 reticulata, Sm, 

2924 — — bifida, Z. 

2925 Wallichiana, Wight 

2926 hirta, Klein. 

2927 rosea, Edg, 

2928 racemosa. Wall. 

2929 nivea, Vhl. 

2930 brachiata, Oliv. 

2931 orbiculata. Wall. 

2932 multicaulis, Oliv. 

2933 furcellata, Oliv. 

2934 Pinguicula alpina, Z. 

OROBANCHEjE. 

2935 Philipaea Indica, Don. 

2936 Boschniakia Himalaica, /^ 

2937 Christisonia subacaulis, 

Gardn. 

2938 i^ginetia Indica, Roxh. 
*939 pedunculata, Roxb. 

GESNERIACEjE. 

2940 i£schynanthus bracteata. 

Wall. 

2941 Peelii, Hf. and Th. 

2942 acuminata. Wall. 

2943 longiflora. Wall. 

2944 gracilis, Parish. 

2945 parasitica, ^^j:^. 

2746 ramosissima. Wall. 

2947 Lysionotus temifolius, 

Wall. 

2948 Dichrotrichum Griffithii, 

Clarke. 

2949 Didymocarpus Punduana, 

2950 Hookeri, Clarke. 



2951 Didymocarpus subalter- 

nans. Wall. 

2952 oblongus. Wall. 

2953 aromaticus, Wall. 

2954 Bivari, Clarke. 

2955 — — villosus, Wall. 

2956 aurantiacus, Clarke. 

2957 obtusus, Jf^//. 

2958 Andersoni, Clarke. 

2959 macrophyllus, Wall. 

2960 Mortoni, Clarke. 

2961 lanuginosus, Jf^//. 

2962 Chirita urticaefolia. 

Ham. 

2963 Hookeri, Clarke. 

2964 macrophylla, Wall. 

2965 Kurzii, Clarke. 

2966 glabra, J/i'i/. 

2967 polyneura, Miq. 

2968 bifolia, Don. 

2969 hamosa, R. Br. 

2970 speciosa, Kz. 

2971 primulacea, Clarke. 

2972 acuminata, -^. Br. 

2973 Baea flocculosa, Clarke. 

2974 Baeica fulva, Clarke. 

2975 Griffithii, Clarke. 

2976 capillaris, Clarke. 

2977 Rhynchoglossumobliquum, 

^/. 

2978 Stauranthera umbrosa, 

2979 Epithemia camosum, Bth. 

2980 Championia multiflora, 

Clarke. 

2981 Rhynchotichum ellipticum, 

Dc. 

2982 vestitum, i?^. 

2983 latifolium, Hf. and 

T7t. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



i68 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



ACANTHACE^. 


3017 : 


Strobilanthes Khasyanus, 


2984 Thunbergia grandiflora, 




T.And. 


Roxb. 


3018 


auriculatus, N E. 


2985 laiirifolia, Ldl, 


3019 


Sabinianus, N E. 


2986 lutea, T. And. 


3020 


Branonianus, N E. 


2987 — — coccinea, Wall 


3021 


maculatus, N. E. 


2988 fragrans, Roxb, 


3022 


acrocephalus, T. And. 


2989 Elythraria crenata, . P>^. 


3023 


pectinatus, T. And. 


2990 Nelsonia tomentosa, Willi, 


3024 


Simonsii, T. And. 


2991 Ebermaiera glauca, N. E. 


3025 


glabratus, N. E. 


2992 Staurogyne, N £. 


3026 


gracilis, T. And. 


2993 argentea, N E. 


3027 


glomeratus, T. And. 


2994 Simon&ii, T, And. 


3028 


capitatus, T. And. 




3029 


lamiifolius, T. And. 


2996 Adenosma triflora, N E. 


3030 • 


■ alatus, N E. 


2997 Griffithii, T. And. 


3031 


extensus, N. E. 


2998 uliginosa, R. Br. 


3032 • 


inflatus, T. And. 


2999 Hemiadelphis polyspenna, 


3033 


Wallichii, N E. 


N.E. 


3034 


urophyllus, N. E. 


3000 Hygrophila salicifolia, N. E. 


3035 


penstemonoides, T. 


3001 longifolia, Kz. 




And 


3002 Echinacanthus attenuatus, 


3036 


discolor, T. And. 


N.E. 


3037 • 


isophyllus, T. And. 


3003 parviflonis, T. And. 


3038 • 


anisophyllus, T. And. 


3004 Calophanes Nagchana, 


3039 ■ 


Thomsoni, T. And. 


Ham. 


3040 


divariactus, T. And. 


3005 depressa, T. And. 


3041 • 


Panichanga, T. And. 


3006 Ruellia prostrata, Foir. 


3042 


boerhaavioides, 7. 


3007 cemua, Roxb. 




And. 


3008 sufFniticosa, Roxb. 


3043 


rubescens, T. And. 


3009 Petalidium barlerioides, 


3044 • 


Helictus, T. And. 


N.E. 


3045 


secundus, T. And. 


3010 Phaylopsis parviflora, 


3046 


flaccidifolius, N. E. 


Willd 


3047 ■ 


Grifiithianus, T. And. 


30 1 1 Hemigraphis hirta, T. And. 


3048 


coloratus, T. And. 




3049 ■ 


crinitus, T. And. 


3013 Strobilanthes scaber, N. E. 


3050 


Mastersi, T. And. 


3014 decurrens, T. And. 


3051 • 


— ^ denticulatus, T. And. 


3015 fimbriatus, N. E. 


3052 • 


spicatiis, T. And.^ 


3016 polythrix, T. And. 


3053 • 


Digitized by CjOOQIC 



UST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS, 



169 



3054 iEchmanthera Wallichii, 

N.E, 

3055 Daedalacanthus tubiflorus, 

T.And, 

3056 splendens, T, And. 

3057 Grifiithii, T. And, 

3058 nervosus, T, And, 

3^59 scaber, T. And. 

3060 strictus, T. And. 

3061 purpurascens, T. And. 

3062 Barleria Prionitis, Z. 

3063 cristata, Z. 

3064 coerulea, Roxb. 

3065 Crossandra infundibulifor- 

mis, N. E. 

3066 Lepidagathis cristata, 

Willd 

3067 trinervis, N. E. 

3068 purpuricaulis, N. E. 

3069 incurva, Ham. 

3070 mucronata, N. E. 

3071 fasciculata, N. E. 

3072 Blepharis boerhaavisefoliay 

Pers. 

3073 Acanthus carduaceus,Gr(^ 

3074 leucostachyus, Wall. 

3075 ilicifolius, Z. 

3076 ebracteatus, Vhl. 

3077 volubilis, Wall. 

3078 Andrographis paniculata, 

N.E. 

3079 echioides, N. E. 

3080 Gymnostachyum androgra- 

phioides, T. And. 

3081 venustum, T. And. 

3082 Phlogacanthus thyrsiflorus, 

N.E. 

3083 curvifloras, N. E. 

3084 tubiflorus, N. E. 

3085 parvifloms, T. And. 



3086 Phlogacanthus guttatus, 

N.E. 
5087 vitellinus, T. And. 

3088 pubinervius, T. And. 

3089 Justicia Adhatoda, Z. 

3090 Atkinsoni, T. And. 

3091 Betonica, Z. 

3092 peploides, T. And. 

3093 procumbens, Z. 

- orbiculata, Wall. 
-diflfusa, Willd. 

- Gendarussa, Z. 

- Neesiana, Wall. 

- salicifolia, T. And. 

- quadrifaria, Wall. 
-vasculosa, Wall. 

- coUina, T. And. 

- virgata, Wall. 

- Grifiithii, T. And. 



3094 - 

3095 - 

3096 - 

3097 - 

3098 - 

3099 - 

3100 - 

3101 - 

3102 - 

3103 - 

3104 Rungia pectinata, N* E. 

3105 repens, N. E. 

3106 Punduana, N. E. 

3107 Khasiana, T. And. 

3108 Mastersi, T. And. 

3109 DiclipteraRoxburghii,iVI-E. 

31 10 micrantha, N. E. 

31 1 1 Peristrophe bicalyculata, 

N.E. 

3 1 1 2 speciosa, N. E. 

3 1 13 tinctoria, N. E. 

3114 montana, N E. 

31 15 acuminata, N E. 

31 16 lanceolaria, N. E. 

31 17 Hypoestes triflora, Rocm. 

and Schult. 

3 1 1 8 Rhinacanthus nasuta, N. E. 

3119 calcaratus, N. E. 

3120 Graptophyllum hortense, 

N.E. 

3 12 1 Ecbolium Linneanum, Kz. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



I70 



UST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS, 



3122 Eranthemum crenulatum, 3153 

Vhi. 

3123 palatiferum, N, E. 



3124 Codonacanthus pauciflonis, 

N.E. 

3125 Asy stasia Gangetica, T, 

And. 

3126 macrocarpa, N. E. 

3127 thyrsacanthus, T. 

And. 

3128 Neesiana, N.E. 

3129 atroviridis, T. And. 



VERBENACEjE. 

3130 Verbena officinalis, Z. 

3 13 1 Bonariensis, L. 

3132 Stachytarpheta Indica, ^/. 

3133 Lippia nodiflora, Rich. 

3134 Lantana alba, Mill. 

3135 trifoliata, Z. 

3136 mixta, Schau. 

3137 Sphenodesma Wallichiana, 

Schau. 

3138 Jackiana, Schau. 

3139 Congea tomentosa, Roxh. 

3140 Caryopteris Wallichiana, 

Schau. 

3 141 Tectona grandis, L. 

3142 Premna serratifolia, L. 

3143 scandens, Roxh. 

3144 racemosa. Wall. 

3145 intemipta. Wall. 

3146 longifolia, Roxb. 

3147 micrantha, Schau. 

3148 mucronata, -^^jc3. 

3149 barbata, Roxb. 

3150 Premna herbacea, L. 

315 1 Punduana, Wall. 

3153 Callicarpa tomentosa, 



3154 
3155 
3156 
3157 
3x58 
3159 
3160 

3161 
3162 
3163 
3164 
3165 
3166 
3167 
3168 
3169 
3170 
3^1 

3x72 

3173 
3174 

3175 
3176 

3177 
3178 

3179 
3180 

3181 
3182 



Callicarpa Wallichiana 

Walp. 

arborea, Roxb. 

Reevesii, Wall. 

cana, L. 

macrophylla, Vhl. 

rubella, Ldl. 

longifolia, Lamk. 

Clerodendron inerme, R. 

Br. 

nutans, WaU. 

serratum, L. 

bracteatum. Wall. 

fragrans, Z. 

infortunatum, Z. 

splendidum, Gnff. 

squamatum, Vhl. 

dentatum. Wall. 

Siphonanthus, R. Br. 

hastatum, WcUl. 

Colebrookeanum, 

Walp. 

gratum. Wall. 

Gmelina arborea, Z. 
Vitex trifolia, Z. 

Negundo, Z. 

pubescens, Vhl. 

canescens, Kz. 

heterophylla, Roxb. 

peduncularis. Wall. 

Holmskioldia sangumea, 

Retz. 
Avicennia tomentosa, ^^x^. 
officinalis, Z. 



PHRYMACEyE. 

3183 Phryma leptostachya, Z. 

SELAGINEyE. 

3184 Gymnandra spectabilis, JTjf. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



m 



LABIATjE, 

3185 Oqonum canum, Linn, 

3186 Basilicum, Z. 

3187 gratissimum, Z. 

3188 sanctum, Z. 

3189 Geniosporum strobilifenim, 

Wall. 

3190 Mesona Wallichiana, Bth. 

3 191 Acrocephalus capitatus, 

Bth, 

3192 Moschosma polystachya, 

Bth. 

3193 Orthosiphon rubicundus, 

Bth. 

3194 inoirvus, Bth. 

3 '95 staminens, Bth. 

3196 Plectranthus scrophularioi- 

des, Wall. 

3197 Gerardianus, Bth. 

3198 striatus, Bth. 

3199 hispidus, Bth. 

3200 repens, Wall. 

3201 coetsa, Don. 

3202 temifolius, Bth. 

3203 melissoides, Bth. 

3204 cordifolius, Bth. 

3205 Anisochilus camosus, Wall. 

3206 pallidus, Wall. 

3207 polystachyus, Bth. 

3208 Pogostemon plectranthoi- 

des, Desf. 

3209 parviflorus, Bth. 

3210 glaber, Bth. 

32 1 1 tuberculosus, Bth. 

3212 amarantoides, ^M. 

3213 elsholtzioides, Bth. 

3214 strigosus, Bth. 

3215 brachystachyus,^^jc^. 

3216 Dysophylla auricularia, Bl. 

3217 cruciata, Bth. 

VII. M 



3218 Dysophylla quadrifolia,^M. 

3219 linearis, Bth. 

3220 verticillata, Bth. 

3221 Colebrookia oppositifolia, 

Sm. 

3222 Elsholtzia flava, Bth. 

3223 polystachya, Bth. 

3224 blanda, Bth. 

3225 incisa, Bth. 

3226 pilosa, Bth. 

3227 densa, -5M. 

3228 pusilla, Bth. 

3229 strobilifera, B\h. 

3230 cristata, Willi. 

3231 Perilla ocymoides, L. 

3232 Ocimum vulgare, Z. 

3233 Calamintha umbrosa, Bth. 

3234 Melissa parviflora, Bth. 

3235 Hedeoma Nepalensis, Bth. 

3236 Meriandra Bengalensis, 

Bth. 

3237 Salvia glutinosa, Z. 

3238 campanulata, Wall. 

3239 saxicola, Wall. 

3240 plebeja, R. Br. 

3241 Nepeta ruderalis, Ham. 

3242 lamiopsis, Bth. 

3243 Anisomeles ovata, -^. Br. 

3244 Dracocephalum speciosum, 

3245 Brunella vulgaris, Z. 

3246 Scutellaria discolor, Colebr. 

3247 violacea, Bth. 

3248 rivularis, Wall. 

3249 repens, ZTax^. 

3250 Craniotome versicolor, ^/^. 

3251 Leonurus sibiricus, Z. 

3252 Colquhounia coccinea, 

Wall. 
3*53 vestita, Wall. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



172 



UST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



3254 Achyrospennum densiflor- 

um, Bl. 

3255 Stachys melissaefolia, Bth. 



3256 



oblongifolia, Bth, 



3257 Leucas lanata, Bth, 
2258 mollissima, H^alL 

3259 pilosa, Bth. 

3260 procumbeps, Desf. 

3261 ciliata, Bih. 

3262 diffusa, Bth. 

3263 aspera, Spreng. 

3264 cephalotes, Sprcftg. 

3265 linifolia, Spreng. 

3266 Leonods nepetaefolia, R. 

Br. 

3267 Phlomis breviflora, Bth. 

3268 macrophylla, Wall. 

3269 lamiifolia, Royle. 

3270 rugosa, Bth, 

3271 rotata, Bth. 

3272 Nothochaete hamosa, Bth. 

3273 Eriophyton Wallichianum, 

Bth. 

3274 Gomphostema oblongum, 

Wall. 

3275 lucidum, Bth. 

3276 parviflomm, ^M. 

3277 ovatum, Wall. 

3278 melissaefolium, Wall. 

3279 velutinum, Bth. 

3280 Mastersii, Bth. 

3281 pendunculatum, -5/>l. 

3282 Thomsoni, Bth. 

3283 Teucrium macrostachyum, 

3284 stoloniferum, ffam. 

3285 quadrifarium, Ham. 

3286 Ajuga lobata, Dc. 

3287 decumbens, Thbg. 

3288 raacrosperma, Wall. 



PHYTOLA CCA CEjE. 

3289 Coriaria Nq)alensis, Wall, 

3290 Pircuma Latbenia, Moq. 

PLANTAGINEyE. 

3291 Plantago major, L. 

CHENOPODEM. 

3292 Beta maritima, Z. 

3293 Chenopodium album, Z. 

3294 ambrosioides, Z. 

3295 Salicomia herbacea, Z. 

3296 Chenopodina maridma, 

Moq. 

3297 Suaeda fruticosa, Forsk. 

3298 nudiflora, Moq. 

3299 Basella rubra, Z. 

3300 alba, Z. 

AMARANTACEyE. 

3301 Deeringia baccata, .J/^. 

3302 Celosia cristata, Z. 

3303 argentea, Moq. 

3304 Chamissoa nodiflora, Moq. 

3305 Acroglochin chenopodio- 

ides, Schrad. 

3306 Amarantus caudatus, Z. 

3307 
3308 

3309 
3310 
3311 
3312 

3313 
3314 
3315 
3316 

3317 
3318 
3319 



paniculatus, Moq. 

Anardana, Ham. 

spinosus, Z. 

Gangeticus, Z. 

Mangostanus, Z. 

Blitum, Z. 

atropurpureus, Roxb. 

frumentaceus, Z. 

polyslachyus, Willi. 

viridis,Z. 

caudatus, Moq. 

oleraceus, Z. 

Mengea tenuifolia, Moq. 



Digitized by 



Google 



UST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



173 



3320 Psilotrichum trichotomum, 
BL 
Aerva Javanica, ^uss, 

scandens, Wall, 

monsoniae, Moq, 

lanata, yuss. 



3321 
3322 

3323 
3324 
3325 
3326 

3327 

3328 
3329 



Achyranthes bidentata, BL 

aspera, Z. 

porphyrostachya, 

Wall, 

scandens, Hf, and Th, 

Centrostachys aquatica, 

Wall. 

3330 Digera arvensis, Forsk. 

3331 Pupalia lappacea, £>c. 

3332 velutina, Moq. 

3333 Cyathula prostrata, Bl. 
3334 tomentosa, Moq. 

3335 capiUta, Moq. 

3336 Altemanthera nodiflora, 



R.Br. 



sessilis, R. Br. 



3351 Rheum nobile, Hf. 

3352 Oxyria reniformis, R. Br. 

3353 Polygonum Roxburghii, 

Meissn. 

3354 plebejum, R. Br. 

3355 hemiarioides, Del. 

3356 Dryandri, Spreng. 

3357 viscosum, Ham. 

3358 barbatum, L. 

3359 Donii, Meissn. 

3360 Posumbo, Ham. 

3361 fisiCcidMm^ Roxb. 

3362 Hydropiper, L. 

3363 mite, Schrank. 

3364 glabrum, Willi. 

3365 lanigerum, R. Br. 

3366 lapathifolium, Ait. 

3367 orientaJe, L. 

3368 tomentosum, Willi. 



3337 • 

3338 Gomphrena globosa, Z. 

NYCTAGINE^. 

3339 Mirabilis Jalappa, Z. 

3340 Boerhaavia diffusa, Z. 

3341 repanda, L. 

POLYGONACEyE. 

3342 Rumex Wallichii, Meissn. 

3343 Nepalensis, Spreng. 

3344 dentata, Camb. 

3345 acetosella, Z. 

3346 vesicarius, Z. ♦ 

3347 hastatus, Don. 

3348 Koeniga Islandica, Z. 

3349 Rheum Emodi, Wall. 
3350 acuminatum, Hf. and 

Th. 



paleaceum, Wall. 
' sphaerostach3rum, 



3369 ■ 

3370 ■ 

Meisn. 

3371 speciosum, Meisn. 

3372 amplexicaule, Don. 

3373 vacciniaefolium, 

Wall. 

3374 affine, Don. 

3375 Emodi, Meisn. 

2376 delicatulum, Meisn. 

3377 nummulariaefolium, 

Meisn. 

3378 filicaule, Wall. 

3379 perforatum, Meisn. 

3380 Nepalense, Meisn. 

3381 Wallichii, Meisn. 

3382 microcephalum, Don. 

3383 capitatum, Ham. 

3384 runcinatum. Ham. 

3385 sinuatum, Royle. 

3386 Chinense, Z. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



174 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



3387 Polygonum Hamiltonii, 
Meisn. 

3 388 perfoliatum, L. 

3389 horridum, Roxb, 

339^ pedunculare, WdlL 

339 ' strigosum, J?. Br, 

3392 pterocarpum, IValL 

3393 moUe, Wall, 

3394 polystachyum, Wall, 

3395 paniculatum, R, Br, 

3396 flaccidum, Roxb, 

3397 Fagopynim esculentum, 

Moench. 

3398 cymosum, Meisn, 

3399 Tataricum, Gaertn, 

LA URINES, 

3400 Cinnamomum Cassia, 

Bl, 

3401 obtusifolium, N. E, 

3402 pauciflorum, N, E, 

3403 Tamala, N, E, 

3404 impressinervium, 

Meisn, 

3405 caudatum, N, E, 

3406 glanduliferum, Meisn, 

3407 Phoebe lanceolata, N, E, 

3408 angustifolia, .A/5r/j«. 

3409 sericea, N, E, 

3410 glaucescens, N, E, 

341 1 paniculata, N, E, 

3412 pubescens, N, E, 

3413 attenuata, N. E, 

3414 parviflora, Meisn. 

3415 Machilus odoratissimus, 

N.E. 

3416 Beilschmiedia Roxburghi- 

ana, N, E, 

3417 fagifolia, N. E, 

3418 Assamica, Meisn. 



3419 Cryptocarya floribunda, 

3420 amygdalina, iV. -ff. 

3421 magnoliaefolia, T. 

And. 

3422 Endiandra firma, N, E. 

3423 Tetranthera laurifolia, 

3424 polyantha. Wall. 

3425 glauca, Wall. 

3426 Khasyana, Meisn. 

3427 chartacea, ^f^//. 

3428 laeta, Wall. 

3429 Sikkimensis, Meisn. 

3430 monopetala, Roxb. 

3431 amara, N. E. 

3432 Griffithii, Meisn. 

3433 lancifolia, -^^a:^. 

3434 Panamonja, Ham. 

3435 sericea, Wall. 

3436 Wightiana, N. E. 

3437 nitida, Meisn. 

3438 oblonga, Wall. 

3439 albicans, -^jp. 

3440 angustifolia, Jf^//. 

3441 Dodecadenia grandiflora, 

N.E. 

3442 Actinodaphne reticulata, 

Meisn. 

3443 angustifolia, N. E. 

3444 Hookeri, Meisn. 

3445 obovata, ZJ^ and Th. 

3446 Sikkimensis, Meisn. 

3447 Litsaea lanuginosa, iV. E. 
34^8 foliosa, iV. E. 

3449 striolata, -5/. 

3450 confertiflora, Meisn. 

3451 Daphnidium melastoma- 

ceum, N. E. 

- pulcherrimum, N. E. 



3452 



Digitized by 



Google 



UST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



^75 



3453 Daphnidium caudatum, 

WalL 

3454 bifarium, N, E, 

3455 elongatum, N. E. 

3456 Aperula Neesiana, B/. 

3457 Assamica, Masn, 

3458 polyantha, BI. 

3459 Lindera Bootanica, MeisN, 

3460 Griffithii, Meisn. 

3461 Sikkimensis, Mdsn, 

3462 Hookerii, Meisn. 

3463 heterophylla, Mdsn, 

3464 Polyadenia reticulata, A. -£. 

3465 Cassytha filiformis, Z. 

MYRISTICE^. 

3466 Myristica longifolia, WalL 

3467 erratica, Hf, and Th. 

3468 gibbosa, Hf. and Th, 

3469 corticosa, Hf. and Th. 

3470 glabra, Bi. 

PROTEACE^. 

3471 Helicia robusta, WalL 

3472 Cochinchinensis, 

Lour. 

THYMELAEACEjE. 

3473 Daphne papyracea, WalL 

3474 pendula, Sm. 

3475 Wallichii, Meisn. 

3476 longifolia, Meisn. 

3477 Aquilaria Agallocha, Roxb. 

3478 Gyrinops Walla, Gaertn. 

3479 Linostoma decandrum, 

WaU. 

3480 Edgeworthia Gardner!, 

Meisn. 

3481 Wickstroemia Indica, C. 

A. Mey. 



3482 Wickstroemia virgata, 

Meisn. 

3483 canescens, Meisn. 

3484 Stichoneuron membrana- 

ceum, Hf. and Th. 

LORANTHACEyE. 

3485 Loranthus odoratus, 

WalL 

3486 ligustrinus, WalL 

3487 Wallichianus, Schult. 

3488 pentapetalus, ^^jp^. 

3489 erythrostachys, 

- ampuUaceus, Roxb. 

- viridiflorus, WalL 

- oleoides, L>c. 

- globosus, Roxb. 

- pentandrus, Z. 

- farinosus, WalL 

- involucratus, Roxb. 

- obtectus, WalL 

- graciliflorus, WalL 

- cinnamomens, WalL 

- pulverulentus, WalL 

- cordifolius. Wall. 

- buddleioides, Desv. 

- vestitus, WalL 

- longiflorus, Desv. 

- bicolor, Roxb. 

- umbellatus, WalL 

- clavigerus, WalL 



3490 
3491 
3492 
3493 
3494 
3495 
3496 
3497 
3498 
3499 
3500 
3501 
3502 
3503 
3504 

3505 
3506 

3507 



3508 Viscum album, Z. 

3509 orientale, Wi/ld, 

3510 falcatum, WalL 

35 1 1 articulatum, -5«/;w. 

35 1 2 moniliforme, BL 

3513 elongatum, WalL 

3514 dichotomum, Don. 

3515 attenuatum, Dc- 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



176 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



ELAEAGNACEyE, 

3516 Elaeagnus latifolia, Z. 

3517 arborea, Roxb. 

3518 conferta, Roxb. 

3519 parvifolia, Wall. 

SANTALACE^E, 

3520 Pyrularia edulis, Dc. 

3521 Henslowia granulata, Hf. 

andTh. 

3522 heterandra, Hf, 

3523 Santalum album, Z. 

3524 Champereya Griffithii, 

Planch. 

CERATOPHYLLE^E. 

3525 Ceratophyllum demersum, 

Z. 

ARISTOLOCHIEyE. 

3526 Asarum Himalaicum, Iff, 

and Th, 

3527 Aristolochia Indica, Z. 

3528 acuminata, Lamk, 

3529 GriflSthii, Hf, and 

Th. 

3530 saccata, Wall. 

3531 platanifolia, Duch. 

NEPENTHACEJS. 

3532 Nepenthes Khasiana, Iff. 

EUFHORBIACEjE. 

3533 Actephila excelsa, Muell. 

Arg. 

3534 Agyneiabacciformis,J/i^^//. 

Arg. 

3535 Sauropus albicans, Miull. 

Arg 

3536 — — invitVi'wi'&yMuell.Arg. 



3537 Sauropus compressus, 

^«^//. Arg. 

3538 repandus, J/tttf//. 

Arg. 

3539 Antidesma Bunias, Spreng. 

3540 Menasu, J/«tf//. ^r^. 

3541 coriaceum, Tut. 

3542 refractum, Muell. 

Arg. 

3543 nigricans, Tul. 

3544 Ghaesembilla, 

Gaertn. 

3545 Roxburghii, Wall. 

3546 montanum, -5/. 

3547 diandnim, Sprg. 

3548 lanceolatum, TuL 

3549 Phyllanthus coccineus, 

Muell. Arg. 

- lanceolarius, Muell. 



3550 • 

3551 
3SS2 

3553 

3554 

3555 
3556 
3557 
3558 
3559 

3560 
3561 
3562 
3563 
3564 
3565 



Arg 



Arg. 

r 

Arg. 
Arg. 



leiostylus, Kz. 
multilocularis, Muell. 

r 

Thomsoni, MudL 

r 

Nepalensis, Muell. 

Daltoni, Muell. Arg. 
fagifolius, Muell. Arg. 
velutinus, Muell. Arg. 
bicolor, Muell. Arg. 
Andersoni, Muell. 



Arg. 



Afg. 



Hookeri, Muell. Arg, 
velutinus, Mudl. Arg. 

- urinaria, Z. 

> pendulus, Roxb. 

■ reticulatus, Potr. 
microcarpus, Muell 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



177 



3566 Phyllanthus baeobotryo- 
ides, MuelL Arg, 
— juniperinoides, MudL 



3567 

3568 

3569 

3570 

357' 
3572 
3573 
3574 

3575 

3576 
3577 



Arg. 
Maderaspatensis, 

MtulL Arg, 
Silheticus, MtulL 



Arg. 

] 

Arg. 



Arg. 

( 

Arg. 



Roeperianus, Muell. 

• parvifolius, Ham. 
simplex, J^e/z. 
Nizuri, L. 
Roxburghii, Mue/i. 

Sikkimensis, Mue//. 

r 

distichus, Z. 
Emblica, Z. 



3578 Securinega obovata, Muell. 

Arg. 

3579 grisea, Muell. Arg. 

3580 Breynia rhamnoides, -^<?^//. 

Arg. 

3581 Melanthesopsis fnidcosa, 

Muell. Arg. 

3582 patens, Muell. Arg. 

3583 Putranjiva Roxburghii, 

Wall. 

3584 Baccaurea propinqua, 

Muell. Arg. 

3585 Aporosa microstachya, 

Miull. Arg. 

3586 dioica, Muell. Arq. 

3587 Lindleyana, Baill. 

3588 Hymenocardia Wallichii, 

Tul. 

3589 Bischoffia Javanica, Bl. 

3590 Cyclostemon subsessile, 

Kz. 



3591 Cyclostemon Indicus, 

Muell. Arg. 

3592 eglandulosus, Kz. 

3593 Briedelia retusa, ^^. 
3594 montana, Willd. 

3595 Hamiltoniana, MuelL 

Arg. 

3596 tomentosa, BL 

3597 stipularis, Bl. 

3598 Cleistanthus chartaceus, 

MuelL Arg. 

- oblongifolius, MuelL 



3599 

Arg. 
3600 myrianthus, Kz. 

3601 Lebidieropsis orbicularis, 
MuelL Arg. 

3602 Croton oblongifolius, Roxh. 

3603 Jouflra, Roxb. 

3604 calldatus, Geis. 

3605 Tiglium, L. 

3606 chlorocalyx, Muell. 

3607 Aleurites Moluccana, 

Willd. 
3698 Crozophora plicata,y«xj. 

3609 Symphyllia Silhetana, 

BailL 

3610 Pluckenetia comiculata, 

Stn. 

36 1 1 Acalypha Indica, Z. 

3612 Claoxylon longipetiolatum, 

Kz. 

5613 longifolium, MuelL 

Arg. 

3614 Alchomea tilisefolia, 

MuelL Arg. 

3615 Cnesmone Javanica, BL 

3616 Tragia involucrata, Jacq. 

3617 Trewia nudiflora, Willd: 

3618 Mallotus Roxburghianus, 

MuelL Arg. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



178 



UST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



3619 Mallotus oreophilus, MutlL 

Arg, 
3620 tetracoccus, Kx. 

3621 Nepalensis, MuelL 

Arg. 

3622 paniculatus, MuelL 

3623 — — Philipinensis, MuelL 

Ar?. 

3624 repandus, MuelL Arg, 

3625 Cleidion Javanicus, BL 

3626 Macaranga denticulata, 

MuelL Arg. 

3627 Ricinus communis, Z. 

3628 Homonoya symphylliae- 

folia, Kz. 

3629 riparia, Lour. 

3630 Manihot utilissima, Fohl. 

3631 Jatropha ci#cas, L. 

3632 glandulifera, Roxb. 

3633 Trigonostemon Hookeri- 

anus, MuelL Arg. 

3634 Ostodes paniculata, BL 

3635 Codiaeum vari^atum, 

A. fuss. 

3636 Chsetocarpus castaneae- 

carpus, Thw. 

3637 Baliospermum calycinum, 

MuelL Arg. 

3638 montanum, MuelL 



Arg. 



3639 



micranthum, MuelL 



Arg. 
3640 Gelonium multiflorum, 

Juss. 
,^641 Sebastiania chamselea, 

MtulL Arg. 

3642 Excoecaria sebifera, MuelL 

Arg. 

3643 baccata, MuelL Arg. 



3644 Excoecaria insignis, MuelL 

Arg. 

3645 Indica, MueU. Arg. 

3646 acerifolia, Didr. 

3647 Agallocha, Z. 

3648 Euphorbia Indica, Lam. 

3649 pilulifera, L. 

3650 serpens, Kth. 

3651 thymifolia, ^i/rwf. 

3652 neriifolia, L. 

3653 Nivulia, Ham. 

3654 andquorum, L. 

3655 Tirucalli, L. 

3656 Himalayensis, 

Klotsch. 

3657 Khasiana, Boiss. 

3658 Sikkimensis, Boiss. 

3659 Stracheyi, Boiss. 

3660 longifolia, Don. 

3661 dracunculoides, Lam. 

3662 Pedilanthes tithymaloides, 

Poir. 

BUXACEjE. 

3663 Sarcococca pruniformis, 

LdL 

CUPULIFER^. 

3664 Quercus Griffithii, Hf. 

3665 serrata, 7>^f. 

3666 lanuginosa, Don. 

3667 fenestrata, Roxb. 

3668 turbinata, Roxb. 

3669 spicata, Sm. 

3670 lappacea, J?<?ji^. 

3671 acuminata, Roxb. 

3672 Thomsoniana, Dc' 

3673 pachyphylla, Kurz. 

3674 semiserrata, Roxb, 

3675 annulate, 5w. 



Digitized by 



Google 



UST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



179 



3676 Quercus lamellosa, Sm, 
3^77 paucilamellosa, Dc, 

3678 lanceaefolia, Roxb. 

3679 oxyodon, Miq. 

3680 xylocarpa, Kz. 

3681 squamata, Roxb. 

3682 Castanopsis Indica, A. Dc, 

3683 castanicarpa, Spach, 

3684 Hystrix, Dc. 

3685 tribuloides, Dc, 

3686 echinocarpa, Dc, 

MYRICACEjE, 

3687 Myrica integrifolia, Roxb, 

3688 sapida, Wall. 

BETULACEjE. 

3689 Betula Bhoipaltra, Wall 

3690 acuminata, Wall. 

3691 qrlindrostachya, Jf^//. 

3692 Alnus Nepalensis, Wall. 

CORYLACE^. 

3693 Carpinus viminea, Wall. 

3694 faginea, Ldl. 

3695 Corylus ferox, Wall. 

JUGLANDACE^E. 

3696 Juglans regia, Z. 

3697 Engelhardtia spicata, ^/. 

SALICINE^. 

3698 Salix tetrasperma, Roxb. 
36^9 elegans, Wall. 

3700 ■ viminalis, Z. 

3701 eriophylla, Andcrss. 

3702 longipes, Hf. and Th. 

3703 Lindleyana, Wall. 

3704 calyculata, Hf. and 

Th. 



3705 Salix secta, Hf, and Th. 

3706 oreophila, Hf. and 

Th. 

3707 Thomsoniana, An- 

derss. 

3708 grisea, Wall. 

3709 Smithiana, Willd. 

3710 longiflora, Wall. 

37 1 1 myrtiUacea, Anderss. 

3712 serpyllum, Anderss. 

3713 Populus ciliata, ^f^//. 

3714 microcarpa, Hf. and 

Th. 

VLMACEjE. 

3715 Ulmus integrifolia, Roxb. 

3716 •lancifolia, Roxb 

3717 Celtis tetrandra, ^^o:^. 



3718 

3719 
3720 

3721 
3722 
3723 

3724 



■ glabra Planch. 

cinnamomea, Ldl. 

serotina. Planch. 

Trema Amboinensis, Bl. 

orientalis, Bl. 

Girronniera subsequalis, 
Planch. 
subserrata, Kurz. 



URTICACE^. 

3725 Cannabis sativa, Z. 

3726 Urtica parviflora, Roxb. 

3727 Fleurya intemipta, Gaud. 

3728 Laportea terminalis, Wight. 

3729 crenulata, Gaud. 

3730 Girardinia heterophylla, 

Desv. 

3731 condensata, Wedd. 

3732 Pilea peploides, W. A. 

3733 smilacifolia, Wedd. 

3734 ' " anisophylla, Wedd. 

3735 insolens, Wedd. 



Digitized by 



Google 



i8o 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



3736 Pilea temifolia, Wedd. 



' approximata, Clarke. 

• oxyodon, IVedd. 

• trinervia, Wedd, 
■ Hookeriana, Wedd. 

• umbrosa, Wedd. 
•bracteosa, Wedd. 

• symmeria, Wedd. 

• thalictrifolia, Clarke. 

• hygrophila, Wedd. 



3737 
3738 

3739 
3740 

3741 
3742 
3743 
3744 

3745 

3746 Lecanthus Wightii, Wedd. 

3747 PellioniaGriffithiana, Wedd. 

3748 ambigua, Wedd. 

3749 Elatostemma ficoides, 

Wedd 

3750 sessile, Forst. 

375' platyphyllum, Wedd. 

3752 rupestre, Wedd. 

3753 integrifolium, Wedd. 

3754 Sikkimense, Clarke, 

3755 procridioides, Wedd. 

3756 Hookerianum, Wedd. 

3757 lineolatum, Wedd. 

3758 subincisum, Wedd. 

3759 dissectum, Wedd, 

3760 comutum, Wedd. 

3761 obtusum, Wedd. 

3762 papillosum, Wedd. 

3763 Stracheyanum, Wedd. 

3764 diversifolium, Wedd. 

3765 — : — pusillum, Clarke. 

3766 Khasianum, Clarke. 

3767 Procris laevigata, Bl. 

3768 Boehmeria Malabarica, 

Wall. 

3769 coraosa, Wedd. 

3770 niyt3i, JFfook. and Arn. 

3771 rugulosa, Wedd. 

3772 macrophylla, Don. 

3773 platyphylla, Don. 



3774 fioehmeria Hamiltoniana, 

Wedd 

3775 polystachya, Wedd. 

3776 Assamica, Clarke. 

3777 Chamaebainia squamigera, 

Wedd 

3778 Pouzolzia Indica, Gaud. 

3779 viminea, Wedd. 

3780 ovalis, Wedd. 

3781 Memorialis pentandra, 

Wedd. 

3782 Hyrtanandra hirta, Mtq. 

3783 Sarcochlamys pulcherrima. 

Gaud. 

3784 Oreocnide frutescens, Bl. 

3785 Villebninnea appendi- 

culata, Wedd. 

3786 Morocarpus velutinus, ^/. 

3787 leucophylla, Wedd. 

3788 Maoutia Puya, Wedd. 

3789 Distemon Indicum, Wedd. 

3790 Conocephalus Roxburghii, 

Tree. 

3791 suaveolens, ^/. 

3792 Artocarpus chaplasha, 

Roxb. 

3793 lacoocha, Roxb. 

3794 integrifolia, L. 

3795 Cudranus Javanicus, Tree. 

3796 fruticosus, 2>-^^. 

3797 Balanostreblus ilicifolius, 

Kurz. 

3798 Pseudostreblus Indica,-5«r. 

3799 Streblus asper, Lour. 

3800 Moms Indica, Z. 

3801 atropurpurea, Royle. 

3802 laevigata, Wall. 

3803 Ficus Bengalensis, L. 

3804 tomentosa, Roxb. 

3805 Mysurensis, ^^M. 



Digitized by 



Google 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS, 



i8i 



3806 Ficus annulata, BL 



3807 . 

3808 

3809 . 

3810 

3811 

3812 

3813 
3814 
381S 

3816 

3817 - 

3818 . 

3819 ' 

3820 . 

3821 • 

3822 . 

3823 • 

3824 ■ 

3825 ■ 
3826 

3827 

3828 

3829 

3830- 

3831 

3832 

3833 

3834 

383s 

3836 

3837 

3838 

3839 
3840 

3841 
3842 
3843 
3844 



Miq, 



• laccifera, jRoxd. 

■ Indica, Z. 

• obtusifolia, lioxk 
•ramea, Wal/. 

■ retusa, Z. 

■ elastica, Nois. 

- comosa, jRoxd, 

- benjamiDa, Z. 

- rhododendrifolia, 



3845 Ficus pyriformis, Jfooi and 
Am, 



' afiinis, Wa/l. 

Thomsoni, Mi{^. 

fratema, Mi^. 

Tjila, I^oxlf. 

infectoria, I^oxd. 
' monticola, Mi^. 

■ religiosa, Z. 

• Amottiana, Mi^, 

• Rumphii, Bi. 

■ nervosa, Heym. 

• callosa, Willi, 

- Fieldingii, Afi^. 

- gemella, Wall. 

• nemoralis, Wall. 
' clavata, Wall. 

• parasitica, I^an. 

■ Altimeraloo, I^oxd. 

- subulata, Bl. 

- uniglandulosa, Wall. 

- radicans, J^oxd. 

- caudata, Wall. 

- pisifera, Wall. 

- Silhetensis, Mi^. 
' scandens; J^oxd. 

- foveolata, Wall. 

- erecta, Thlg. 

' ramentacea, J^oxd. 
. Emodi, Wall. 

- diversifolia, Bl. 



3846 

3847 

3848 

3849 

3850 

3851 

3852 

3853 

3854 ■ 

3855 

3856 

3857 

3858 

3859 
3860 
3861 
3862 
3863 
3864 
3865 
3866 
3867 



• Millesii, Walp. 

• pyrrhocarpa, Kz. 

- lanceolata, Buck. 

. Roxburghii, Wall. 
' regia, Miq. 

- qrrtophylla, Mtg. 

- hispida, Z. / 

- dsemonum, jRoxd. 

• oligodon, Mi^. 

- fistulosa, Newdl. 

- cunia, Buck. 

- conglomerata, Roxb. 
-prostrata, Wall. 

- leucocarpa, Miq. 

- glomerata, Will. 

- Chittagonga, Miq. 

- subpyriformis, Miq. 
' scabrella, Roxb. 

- heterophylla, L.f. 

- asperior, Miq. 

- virgata, Roxd. 

- triloba, Ham. 



PODOSTEMMACEJB.. 

3868 Dicraea Wallichii, Tul 

3869 pterophylla, Wedd. 

3870 minor, Wedd. 

3871 Hydrobryum GriffithiijTtt/. 

3872 Podostemon acuminatus, 

Wedd. 

FIFE RACEME. 

3873 Houttuynia cordata, Tkbg. 

3874 Piper Griffithii, Dc. 
387s boehmeriaefolium, 

Wall. 

3876 Khasianum, Dc. 

3877 pedicellatum, Dc, 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



l82 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS, 



3878 Piper longum, Z. 

3879 sylvaticum, JRoxb. 

3880 aurantiacum, Wail. 

3881 Nepalense, Miq. 

3882 Betle, Z. 

3883 Hamatonii, Dc. 

3884 Sirium, Dc. 

3885 nigrum, Z. 

3886 attenuatum, Miq, 

3887 Zuccarinii, Dc. 

3888 Chavica sphaerostachya, 

Miq. 
3889 petiolata, Dc. 

3890 Thomsonii, Dc. 

3891 pcpuloides, Miq. 

3892 Peperomia reflejca,^. Dietr. 

3893 Heyneana, Miq. 

3894 Chloranthus officinalis, J?/. 

3895 inconspicuus, Sw. 

3896 brachystachySy Bi. 

GNETACEjE. 

3897 Ephedra fragilis, Dcsf. 

3898 Gneturajedule, Bl. 

3899 funiculare, J?/. 

3900 Gnemon, Z. 

BALANOPHORACEjE. 

3901 Rhapalocnemisfphalloides, 

3902 Balanophora dioica. Wall. 

3903 polyandra, Griff. 

3904 involucratay ZJ'C and 

Th. 

CYTINACEjE. 

3905 Sapria Himalayana, Griff. 

CYCADEjE. 

3906 CycasTpectinata, Griff. 



3907 Cyrus circinalis, Z. 

3908 Jenkinsii, Gri^. 

CASUARIN^. 

3909 Casuarina equisetifolia, 

Forst. 

CONIFERS. 

3910 Pinus Khasya, Royle. 

39" 
3912 

3913 
3914 

39^5 
3916 

3917 



longifolia, Roxb. 

excelsa, Don. 

Griffithii, Pari. 

Smithiana, Lamb. 

Webbiana, Wall 

Dumosa, Dan. 

Biota orientalisy Endl. 

3918 Cupressus funebris, Endl. 

3919 torulosa, Don. 

3920 Juniperus pseudosabina, 

Fisch and Mey. 

3921 recurva, Ham. 

3922 Chinensis, Z. 

3923 Taxus baccata, L. 

3924 Ceptalotaxus, Sp. 

3925 Podocarpus latifolia, WcUl. 

3926 neriifolia, Don. 

3927 bracteata, PL 

3928 macrophylla, Don. 

PALMjE. 

3929 Areca gracilis, Roxb. 

3930 triandra, Roxb. 

3931 Catechu, Z. 

3932 Wallichia nana, Mart. 

3933 caryotoides, Roxb. 

3934 disticha, T. And. 

3935 oblongifolia, Griff. 

3936 Arenga saccharifeia, Lab, 
2937 Caryota urens, Z. 

3938 sobolifera, WalL 



Digitized by 



Google 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS, 



183 



3939 Calamus erectus, Roxb. 

3940 schizospathus, Griff. 

3941 longisetus, Grif, 

3942 arborescenSy Griff, 

3943 acanthospathus, G^r^ 

3944 leptospadix, Griff, 

3945 latifolius, Roxb, 

3946 Mastersianus, Gri^, 

3947 Rotang, Roxb, 

3948 Guruba, Mart 

3949 floribundus, Griff, 

3950 — ■ — tenuis, Roxb, 

3951 macracanthus, T, 

And. 

3952 gracilis, Roxb, 

3953 fasciculatus, Roxb, 

3954 inermis, T, And, 

3955 flagellatus, GrigT, 

3956 montanus, T, And, 

3957 Jenkinsianus, Grif. 

3958 Plectocomia Himalayana, 

Gfiff. 

3959 Assamica, Grr^. 

3960 Borassus flabelliformis, Z. 

3961 Corypha umbraculifera, L, 

3962 Taliera, Roxb, 

3963 Livistona Jenkinsii, Grif, 

3964 Licuala peltata, ^^j:^. 

3965 Chamaerhops Khasyana, 

Grif, 

3966 Phoenix sylvestris, Roxb, 

3967 pahidosa, Roxb, 

3968 acaulis, Roxb, 

3969 nipicola, 7! And, 

3970 Cocos nucifera, Z. 

3971 Nipa fruticans, Wbrmb, 

PANDANE^E, 

3972 Pandanus odoratissimus, 

L.f. 



3973 Pandanus foetidus, Roxb, 

3974 furcatus, Roxb, 

3975 laevis, ^^:c^. 

TYPHACE^, 

3976 Spaiganium ramosum, Z. 

3977 Typha angustifolia, Z. 

3975 elephantina, Roxb, 

AROIDE^, 
3979 Arisaema echinatum, 

Schott, 
3980 nepenthoides, 5M^//. 

3981 enibescens. Mart, 

3982 Jacquemontii, Be, 

3983 utile, Hf, and Th, 

3984 Griffithii, Schott, 

3985 speciosum, Mart, 

3986 curvatum, Kth. 

3987 gracile, -^M. 

3988 Cryptocoryne ciliata, Fisch, 

3989 retrospiralis, Kth, 

3990 Sauromatum guttatum, 

SchoU, 

3991 Typhonium Roxbuighii, 

Schott. 

3992 flagelliforme, W^:*/. 

3993 Conophallus bublifer, 

Schott, 

3994 Pythonium Wallichianum, 

Schott, 

3995 Amorphophallus campanu- 

latus, Bl 

3996 Ariopsis peltata, Dalz, 

3997 Remusatia vivipara, Schott, 

3998 Gonatanthus sarmentosus, 

3999 Colocasia virosa, Kth. 

4000 antiquorum, Schott, 

4001 Indica, Schott. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



l84 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



4002 Colocasia commutata, 

Schott. 

4003 fornicata, .Sir-fe/^. 

4004 cucullata, Schott, 

4005 Aglaonema simplex, BL 
4006 Hookeriana, Schott. 

4007 Homalonema erubescens, 

Schott. 

4008 Scindapsus calophyllus, 
. Schott. 

4009 officinalis, Schott. 

4010 peepla, Sc?iott. 

401 1 glaucus, Schott. 

4012 pertusus, Schott. 

4013 Lasia heterophylla, Schott. 
4014 aculeata, Lour. 

4015 Pothos scandens, L. 

4016 Acorus Calamus, L. 

4017 Pistia stxatiotes, Z. 

LEMNACEjE. 

4018 Lemna trisulca, L. 

4019 paucicostata, Hegcltn. 

4020 polyrrhiza, L. 

4021 oligorhiza, Kz. 

4022 Wolffia arrhiza, Witnm. 

HYDROCHARIDE^. 

4023 Hydrilla verticillata, 

Casp. 
4024 dentata, Cc^p. 

4025 Nechamandra altemifolia, 

4026 Vallisneria spiralis, L. 

4027 Hydrotrophus echinosper- 

mus, Clarke. 

4028 Blyxa octandra, L. 

4029 Ottelia alismoides, Roch. 

4030 Hydrocharis cellulosa, 

Ham. 



NAJADEyE. 

4031 Ruppia maritima, L. 

4032 Potamogeton pectinatus, Z. 

4033 hybridus, Muh. 

4034 crispus, Z. 

4035 natans, Z. 

4036 Aponogeton monostachyus, 

Roxh. 
4037 crispus, Thbg. 

4038 Najas minor, Z. 

4039 Zannichellia palustris, Z. 

SCITAMINEjE. 

4040 Globba marantoides, J^^^jc^. 

4041 orixensis, Roxh. 

4042 racemosa, Sm. 

4043 Careyana, Roxh. 

4044 multiflora, Wall. 

4045 velutina, Jf^//. 

4046 expansa. Wall. 

4047 Andersoni, Clarke. 

4048 Zingiber Zerumbet, Rose. 

4049 capitatum, Roxh. 

4050 Cassumunar, J?^jc^. 

405 1 squarrosum, Roxh. 

4052 panduratum, Roxh. 

4053 officinale, Rose. 

4054 rubens, Roxh. 

4055 elatum, Roxh. 

4056 Curcuma Zerumbet, Z. 

4057 Zedoaria, Roocb. 

4058 leucorhiza, Roxh. 

4059 longa, Z. 

4060 caesia, Roxh. 

4061 ferruginea, -^<7:c3. 

4062 aeruginosa, Roxh. 

4063 rubescens, Roxh. 

4064 amada, Roxb. 

4065 Kaempferia Galanga, Z. 

4066 secunda, ^//. 



Digitized by 



Google 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



I8s 



4067 Kaempferia angustifolia, 

Roxb. 

4068 Roscoea elata, Sm. 

4069 spicata, Sm. 

4070 gracilis, Sm. 

4071 purpurea, Sm. 

4072 Amomum aculeatum, J?<7j:^. 

4073 linguiforme, Roxb. 

4074 sericeum, Rose. 

4075 aromaticum, Rose. 

4076 dealbatum, Roxb. 

4077 Hedychium coronarium, Z. 



4078 
4079 
4080 
4081 
4082 
4083 
4084 
4085 
4086 
4087 
4088 
4089 



flavum, Roxb. 
ellipticum, Hanee. 
angustifolium, Roxb. 
coccineum, Ham. 
elatum, R. Br. 
viridiflorum, Clarke. 
th)rrsiforme. Ham. 
spicatum, Sm. 
villosum, Wall. 
gracile, Roxb. 
densiflorum, Wall. 
Griffithianum, Wall. 
Gardnerianum, Wall. 



4090 - 

4091 Alpinia nutans, L. 

4092 AUughas, L. 

4093 Galanga, Roxb. 

4094 Hamiltoniana, Wall. 

4095 porrecta, Wall. 

4096 Monolophus linearis, Wall. 

4097 secundus, Wall. 

4098 Hitchenia glauca, Wall. 

4099 Costus speciosus, Sm. 

MARANTACEjE. 

4100 Maranta dichotoma, Wall. 

4101 Phrynium imbricatum, 

Roxb. 

4102 parviflorum, Roxb. 



4103 Phrynium macrostachyum. 

Wall. 
4104 capitatum, Wall. 

4105 Canna Indica, Z. 

MUSACEyE. 

4106 Ravenala Madagascarien- 

sis, Raf. 

4107 Musa sapientum, Z. 

4108 omata, Roxb. 

4109 rubra, Wall. 

41 10 dasycarpa, Kz. 

41 1 1 sanguinea, Z^C 

41 12 Sikkimensis, Kz. 

BROMELIACEjE. 

41 13 Ananassa sativa, Ldl. 

ORCHIDE.E. 

41 14 Pholidota imbricata, Ldl. 

41 15 rubra, Ldl. 

41 16 recurva, Ldl. 

41 1 7 articulata, Ldl. 

41 18 calceata, Rehb.f. 

41 19 convallariae, Rehb.f. 

4120 Otochilus alba, LM. 

4121 fusca, LjU. 

4122 porrecta, Ldl. 

4123 Tipularia Josephi, i?r^^./ 

4124 Epipactis latifolia, Sw. 

4125 intrusa, Ldl. 

4126 Cephalanthera ensifolia, 

Z. Rieh. 

4127 Listera pinetorum Z<//. 

4128 tenuis, LJL 

4129 micrantha, LJl. 

4130 Epipogium nutans, Ldl 

413 1 Anoectochilus lanceolatus, 

Ul. 

4132 luteus, Ldl. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1 86 



UST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



4133 Anoectochilus giandiflorus, 
LdL 

4134 brevilabris,*Z^/. 

413s crispus, LdL 

4136 Physurus hirsutus, LdL 

4137 Rhomboda [longifolia, Z^/. 

4138 Rhamphidia ovalifolia,Z^/. 

4139 rubens, LdL 

4140 Goody era secundiflora, 

Griff. 

4141 hispida, LdL 

4142 repens, R. Br. 

4143 recurva, LdL 

4144 procera, Hook. 

4145 Georchis cordata, Ldl. 

4146 vittata, Ldl. 

4147 Aetheria mollis, LdL 

4148 Dossinia marmorata, il/^r^. 
4149 lanceolata, LdL 

4150 Zeuxine sulcata, LdL 

4 15 1 membranacea, Z<//. 

4152 Tripleura, LdL 

4153 Monochilus nervosus, LdL 

4154 flavus, LdL 

4155 goodyeroides, LdL 

4156 galeatus, LdL 



4169 Dendrobium moschatum, 
WalL 

— fuscatum, LdL 

— Pseudaclinia, Ldl. 

— pulchellum, LdL 

— Pierardi, Roxb. 

— primulinum, LdL 



4170 
4171 

4172 . 

4173 ■ 
4174 

417s ■ 
4176 

4177 
4178 ■ 

4179 
4180 
4181 

4182 • 

4183 • 

4184 ■ 

4185 eiiaeflorum, Griff. 

4186 denudans, Don. 

4187 uniflorum, Griff. 

4188 heterocarpum, LdL 

4189 Falconeri, Hook. 

4190 Cleisostoma Mannii, 

Rchb.f. 

4 1 9 1 loratum, Rchh. f. 

4192 Phalaenopsis Mannii, 



- transparens, WalL 
amoenum, WalL 

' nobile, LdL 
Lindleyanum, Griff 

■ stupposum, LdL 

■ aqueum, LdL 
• spathaceum, LdL 

formosum, Roxb. 
longicomu, LdL 
porphyrochilum, LdL 



4157 


Cheirostylis flabellata, 


Rchb.f. 




WigkL 


4193 Cryptochilus sangumeus, 


4158 


pusilla, LdL 


WalL 


4159 


Griffithii, Ldl. 




4160 


Dendrobium pauciflorum, 


419s Acanthophippium Sylhe- 




Rchb.f. 


tense,|L//. 


4I6I 


anceps, Roxh. 


4196 gracile, Wall. 


4162 


cuspidatum,* WalL 


4197 Spathoglottis ixioides, LdL 


4163 


Macraei, Ldl. 


4198 pubescens, LdL 


4164 


Rabani, LdL 




4165 


densiflorum, Wall. 


4200 Arundina bambusifolia. 


4166 


Hookerianimi, Ldl. 


Ldl. 


4167 


chrysanthum, WalL 


4201 affinis, Griff 


4168 


ochreatum,^Z^/. 


4202 speciosa, BL 



Digitized by 



Google 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



187 



4203 Nephelaphyllum cordi- 

folium, Zdl. 

4204 Eulophia bracteosa, Zd/. 



graminea, Zd/. 
densiflora, Zd/. 
ramentacea, Zd/. 
hastata, Zd/. 
stenopetala, Zd/. 
virens, i?. Br. 



4205 - 

4206 - 

4207 - 

4208 - 

4209 - 

4210 - 

42 1 1 Oreorchis foliosa, Zd/. 

4212 Cymbiduim aloifolium, Sw. 



4213 
4214 

4215 
4216 
4217 
4218 
4219 
4220 
4221 
4222 
4223 
4224 

4225 
4226 

4227 



■ cyperifolium, IVa//. 
' cochleare, Zd/. 

• ebumeum, Zd/. 
affine, Griff. 
eleganSy Ld/. 
longifolium, Don. 
giganteum, Wa//. 
micromeson, Zd/. 

• chloranthum, Zd/. 
Sinense, JVi//d. 
erythraeum, Zd/. 
lancifolium, Ifook, 
Hookerianum,^^-^. / 
Mannii, Rchb.f. 



Cremastra Wallichiana,Z///. 

4228 Cyrtopera bicarinata, lAL 

4229 Candida, Ld/. 

4230 sanguinea, Ld/. 

4231 Duda, Rchh.f. 

4232 Mannii, Rchb.f. 

4233 Acampe papillosa, ZM. 
4334 cephalotes, Ldl. 

4235 dentata, Zd/.^ 

4236 Griffithii, Rchb.f. 

4237 Acrochaene punctata, Zd/. 

4238 Saccolabium guttatum, Zd/, 

4239 calceolare, Ld/. 

4240 obliquum, Ld/. 

4241 intermedium, Griff. 

VII. 1 



4242 Saccolabium acutifolium, 

Ld/. 

4243 micranthum, Ld/. 

4244 gemmatum, LJ/. 

4245 ampuDaceum, Ld/. 

4246 pallens, Cathc. 

4247 Wightianum, Ld/. 

4248 distichum, LJ/. 

4249 Podochilus cultratus, Ld/. 

4250 microphyllus, JLd/. 

4251 Camarotis purpurea, Ld/. 

4252 pallida, Ld/. 

4253 Stereochilus hirtus, Ld/. 

4254 Sarcanthus pallidus^ Ld/. 
425 s Cottonia Championi, Z///. 

4256 Uncifera obtusifolia, Ld/. 

4257 acuminata, Zdl. 

4258 Aerides cylindricum, Ld/. 

4259 taeniale, Ld/. 

4260 affine, Wa//. 

4261 odoratum, Lour. 

4262 difforme, Wa//. 

4263 Hystrix, Ld/. 

4264 Vanda undulata, Ld/. 

4265 Roxburghii, R. Br. 

4266 bicolor, Griff. 

4267 teres, Ld/. 

4268 Catcarthi, Ld/. 

4269 coerulea, Griff. 

4270 cristata, Zd/. 

4271 Griffithii, Zd/. 

4272 alpina, Ld/. 

4273 Stangeana, Rchh.f. 

42 74 Chiloschista usneoides, Ld/. 

4275 Aceras angustifolia, Ld/. 

4276 Satyrium Nepalense, Don. 

4277 ciliatum, Ld/. 

4278 Diplomeris pulchella. Den, 

4279 Pogonia carinata, Ld/. 

4280 plicata, LJ/. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1 88 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



4281 Pogoia Juliana, Wall. 

4282 Scottii, Rchb,f, 

4283 Eria microchilos, Dah, 

4284 pusilla, LdL 

4285 flava, LdL 

4286 pannea, LdL 

4287 carinata, Gihs, 

4288 scabrilinguis, LdL 

4289 vittata, LdL 

4290 discolor, LdL 

4291 stricta, LdL 

4292 suavis, LdL 

4293 . convallarioides, Ldl, 

4294 alba, LdL 

429s pubescens, Wight, 



4296 

4297 
4298 
4299 
4300 
4301 
4302 
4303 
4304 



• graminifolia, Ldl, 
' sphaerochila, LdL 

■ paniculata, LdL 

■ ferruginea, ZdL 

' pauciflora, JVigAf, 
' Khasiana, LdL 

• davicaulis, LdL 

- bambusifolia, LdL 

• angulata, I^M. / 



4305 CEceoclades flexuosa, LdL 

4306 pusilla, LdL 

4307 Phreatia elegans, LdL 

4308 Thelasis pygmaea, LdL 

4309 Oberonia iridifolia, LdL 
4310 
43" 
43" 

4313 
4314 

4315 
4316 

4317 
4318 

4319 
4320 



• Brunoniana, IV/g/iL 

■ Lindleyana, Wight. 

■ verticillata, Wight. 
' pyrulifera, Wight. 

' bicomis, LdL 
' demissa, Ul. 

■ Jenkinsiana, Griff. 

■ ensiformis, LdL 

' Sikkimensis, LdL 

• m3rriantha, Ldl. 
' Wightiana, LdL. 



4321 Oberonia angustifolia, Ldi. 

4322 caulescens, Ldl. 

4323 obcordata, Ldi. 

4324 trilobata. Griff. 

4325 acaulis, Grtff. 

4326 Microstylis Wallichii, LdL. 

4327 biaurita, LdL 

4328 biloba, LdL 

4329 Empusa paradoxa, Ldi. 

4330 Dienia congesta, LdL 

4331 muscifera, LdL 

4332 Liparis longipes, LdL 

4333 stachyurus, Rchb.f. 

4334 luteola, Ldl. 

4335 bituberculata, LAI. 

4336 Nepalensis, Ldl. 

4337 mannii, Rchb.f. 

433S vestita, Rchb. f. 

4339 Platystylis decurrens, Ldl. 

4340 Microstylis Wallichii, Ldl. 

4341 Coelogyne Gardneriana, 

LdL 

4342 ochracea, Ldl. 

4343 nirida, LdL 

4344 

4345 

4346 • 

4347 

4348 

4349 

4350 

4351 

4352 



- corrugata, Wight. 

- corymbosa, Ldl. 
brevifolia, LdL 

- ocellata, LdL 

- cristata, LdL 

- barbata, Griff. 

- data, LdL 

' prolifera, LdL 
■ flavida, Hf. 



4353 longipes, LdL 



4354 
4355 
4356 
4357 
4358 
4359 



• fuscescens, Ldl. 

• fimbriata, LdL 

■ fuliginosa, LdL 
' Hookeriana, LdL 
' diphylla, Ldl. 
' maculata, Ldl. 



Digitized by 



Google 



UST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS, 



189 



4360 Coelogyne humilis, LdL 

4361 praecox, LdL 

4362 lagenaria, Ldl. 

4363 Huettneriana, 

Rchb,f. 

4364 Mesoclastes brach3rstachys, 

LdL 

4365 Bolbophyllum hirtum, Ldl. 

4366 reptans, LdL 

4367 umbellatum, LdL 

4368 odoratissimum, LdL 

4^5^ Careyanum, Sprg, 

4370 caudatum, LdL 

4371 radiatum, LdL 

4372 Mannii, Rchb,f, 

4373 muscicolum, J?^iftA / 

4374 Trias ovata, LdL 
4375 oblonga, LdL 

4376 Phajus Wallichii, LdL 

4377 veratrifolius, LdL 

4378 albus, LdL 

4379 Cytheris cordifolia, LdL 

4380 Ania latifolia, Z///. 

4381 Apaturia senilis, LdL 

4382 Smithiana, LdL 

4383 Geodorum dilatatum, R, 

Br. 

4384 rariflorum, LdL 

4385 -T — candidum, WalL 

4386 Sunipia scariosa, Ldl, 

4387 Calanthe densiflora, Z^/. 



4388 

4389 
4390 
4391 
4392 
4393 
4394 
4395 
4396 



■ Masuca, Ldl, 
' clavata, LdL 

• uncata, LindL 
' gracilis, LdL 

' angusta, LdL 

• puberula, LdL 

- herbacea, LdL 

- brevicomu, LdL 

• chloroleuca, LdL 



4397 Calanthe fulgens, Ldl, 

4398 odora, Griff, 

4399 biloba, LdL 

4400 galeata, LdL 

4401 vaginata, LdL 

4402 alismaefolia, Ldl, 

4403 Griffithii, LdL 

4404 plantaginea, LdL 

4405 Sarcopodium afRiie, LdL 

4406 Griffithii, LdL 

4407 leopardinum, LdL 

4408 striatum, L^L 

4409 fuscescens, LdL 

4410 rotundatum, Ldl, 

44 1 1 amplum, LdL 

4412 uniflorum, LdL 

4413 Conchidium pusillum. 

Griff. 

4414 Jone cirrhata, Ul, 

4415 virens, LdL 

4416 fusco-purpurea, LdL 

4417 paleacea, Z^/. 

4418 Khasiana, ILdL 

4419 bicolor, LdL 

4420 . Candida, Ldl, 

4421 Limatodes gracilis, Z^/. 

4422 Mishmiensis, LdL 

4423 Luisia volucris, Ldl, 

4424 tenuifolia, BL 

4425 trichorrhiza, BL 

4426 brachystachys, -^7. 

4427 Panisea reflexa, Ldl, 

4428 uniflora, LdL 

4429 Gymnadenia spatulata, Z^/. 

4430 Chusua, LdL 

4431 Platanthera orchidis, LdL 

4432 clavigera, Ldl, 

4433 Susannge, LdL 

4434 Championi, Z^/. 

4435 Candida, LdL 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



igo 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS, 



4436 Platanthera tenuis, LdL 

4437 constricta, Wall. 

4438 Didymoplexis pallens. 

Griff. 

4439 Anthogonium gracile, 

Wall, 

4440 Cyrtosia Lindleyana, Hf, 

and Th. 

4441 Listera pinetorum, LdL 

4442 tenuis, LdL 

4443 Spiranthes plantaginea, 

LdL 

australis, R, Br. 



4445 Habenaria pectinata, Ldl, 

4446 marginata, LdL 

4447 graminea, LdL 

4448 rostrata, Ldl, 

4449 commelinifolia, Ldl. 

4450 tenuis, Griff, 

4451 Bonatea Bengalensis, G^/7^ 

4452 Peristylus goodyeroides, 

Ldl. 

4453 oxysepalus, LdL 

4454 Herminium congestum, 

Ldl. 

4455 grandiflorum, Ldl. 

4456 Josephi, Rchb.f. 

445 7 Tropidia curculigoides, Z<//. 

4458 Herpysma longicaulis, LdL 

4459 Cypripedium venustum, -5/. 

4460 insigne, Ldl. 

4461 Corymbis macrostachya,^/. 

4462 Dossinia marmorata, LAI. 

AFOSTASIACEjE. 

4463 Apostasia Wallichii, Ldl. 

B URMANNIA CE^. 

4464 Burmannia juncea, R, Br, 
44^3 distachya, Z. 



4466 Burmannia Nepalensis, 

WalL 

4467 coelestis, Don. 

TACCACEjE. 

4468 Tacca pinnatifida, Z. 

4469 laevis, -^^:r^. 

IRIDE^. 

4470 Iris sulcata, W^//. 

4471 decora, WalL 

4472 Nepalensis, WalL 

4473 Pardanthus Sinensis, Ker. 

AMARYLLIDE^. 

4474 Crinum toxicarium, Roxb. 

4475 — *" amabile, Roxb. 

4476 Asiaticum, Z. 

4477 defixum, ir<?r. 

4478 pratense, ZT^r^. 

4479 omatum. Herb. 

4480 Pancratium Zeylanicum, Z. 

4481 biflprum, Roxb. 

4482 triflorum, -^<7^^. 

4483 Molineria gracilis, Kz. 

4484 capitellata, Herb. 

4485 Hypoxis orchioides, Kz, 

4486 aurea, ILour. 

4487 Furcroya Cantula, Z?^w. 

DIOSCOREjE. 

4488 Dioscorea pulchella, ^^x^. 

4489 fasciculata, Roxb. 

4490 daemonum, Roxb. 

4491 crispata, Roxb, 

4492 glabra, Roxl), 

4493 anguina, ^<7jf^. 

4494 laurifolia, ^a//. 

4495 nummularia, Lam\, 

4496 pentaphylla, Z. 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



191 



4497 Dioscorea spinosa, Roxb, 
4498 hirsuta, Wall. 

4499 triphylla, Z. 

4500 sativa, Z. 

4501 bulbifera, Z. 

4502 globosa, Roxb, 

4503 alata, Z. 

4504 purpurea, Roxb. 

4505 rubella, Roxb, 

4506 aculeata, Z. 

LILIACEyE, 

4507 Iphigenia Indica, Kth, 

4508 Lloydia serotina, Rchb, 

4509 Fritillaria cirrhosa, Don, 

4510 Gardneriana, WalL 

45 1 1 Hookeri, Bak, 

4512 Lilium giganteum, Wall, 

4513 Gloriosa superba, Z. 

4514 Hemerocallis fulva, Z. 

4515 SansevieraZeylanica, [F/7A/. 

4516 Muscari Bootanense, Gr/J^ 

4517 Allium Wallichii, -^M. 



4518 - 

4519 - 

4520 - 

4521 - 

4522 - 

4523 - 
4424 - 

4525 - 

4526 - 

4527 Urginea Indica, Kth, 

4528 Asphodelus clavatus, Roxb. 

4529 fistulosus, Z. 

4530 Chlorophytum undulatum, 

Wall 

4531 Phalangium tuberosum, 

Roxb, . 

4532 Dianella ensifolia, Red, 



Porrum, Z. 
Cepa, Z. 
sativum, Z. 
ascalonicum, Z. 
Victorialis, Z. 
odorum, Z. 
Sikkimense, Bak, 
macranthum, Bak, 
exsertum, Bak, 



4533 Asparagus acerosus, Roxb, 

4534 racemosus, Willd, 

4535 filicinus, Ham, 

4536 subulatus, Steud, 

4537 curillus, Roocb, 

4538 officinalis, Z. 

4539 Nepalensis, Bak, 

4540 Dracaena angustifolia, 

Roxb, 

4541 ensifolia, Wall, 

4542 Griffithii, Reg. 

4543 elliptica, 7%^^. 

4544 atropurpurea, Roxb, 

4545 temiflora, Roxb, 

4546 spicata, Roxb, 

4547 Cordyline terminalis, Kth, 

4548 Polygonatum oppositi- 

folium, Royle, 

4549 punctatum, -^^j^/if. 

4550 Sibiricum, Red, 

4551 verticillatum, All, 

4552 brevistylum, Bak, 

4553 nervulosum, Bak, 

4554 Hookeri, -5«^. 

4555 Griffithii, Bak, 

4556 Cathcartii, Bak, 

4557 Theropogon pallidus, 

Maxim, 

4558 Clintonia alpina, Kth, 

4559 Tovaria oleracea, -5a>&. 

4560 purpurea, Bak, 

4561 oligophylla, Bak. 

4562 fusca, -5<7^. 

4563 Aspidistra lurida, Gawl, 

4564 Medora divaricata, Kth, 

4565 Tupistra squalida, Gaidl, 

4566 Campylandra aurantiaca, 

Bak, 

4567 Gonioscyphe eucomoides, 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



192 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



4568 Fluggea Wallichiana, 
Schult 

4569 intermedia, Schult 

4^70 dracaenoides, Bak. 

4571 Peliosanthes Teta, Andr. 

4572 macrophylla, Wail. 

4573 Smilax lanceifolia, Roxb, 



4574 



maculata, Roxb, 



4575 elegans, Woll. 



— macrophylla, Roxb. 

— Roxburghiana, Wall, 

— China, Z. 

— ovalifolia, Roxb, 

— ferox, Wall. 

— rigida, Wall. 

— oxyphylla, Wall. 

— prolifera, Roxb. 

— glabra, Roxb. 



4576 

4577 

4578 

4579 
4580 

4581 
4582 
4583 
4584 

4585 Stemona tuberosa, Lour. 

4586 Tofieldia Nepalensis, Wall. 

4587 Tricyrtis elegans. Wall. 

4588 Paris polyphylla, Sm. 

4589 Trillidium Govanianum, 

Kth. 

4590 Disporum Wallichii, Don. 

4591 Pitsutum, Don. 

3592 calcaratum, Don. 

4593 Hamiltonianum, Z>^«. 



PONTEDERACE^. 

4602 Monochoria vaginalis, iVx/. 

4603 plantaginea, Kth. 

4604 sagittata, Roxb. 

4605 hastata, Prsl. 

COMMEL YNACE^E. 

4606 Commelyna communis, 

Kth. 

4607 salicifolia, Kth. 

4608 appendiculata, C^r^. 



- Bengalensis, Kth. 
-Kurzii, Clarke. 

- Rajmehalensis, Clarke* 
■ obliqua, Don. 
' Sikkimensis, Clarke. 

- Simsoni, Clarke. 

- erecta, L. 



4609 
4610 
461 1 
4612 

4613 
4614 

4615 

4616 Aneilema scapiilorum, 

Wight. 

4617 lineolatum, Kth. 

4618 herbaceum, Kth^ 

4619 triquetrum, Wall. 

4620 nanum, Kth. 

4621 nudiflomm, Kth. 

4622 ensifolium, Wight. 

4623 vaginatum, Kth. 

4624 protensum, Wall. 



4594 Streptopus simplex, 2?^;*. 4625 Acclisia Indica, Wight. 



BUTOMACEjE. 

4595 Butomus lanceolatus, Roxb. 

ALISMACEyE. 

4596 Triglochin maritimum, L. 

4597 Alisma Plantago, L. 
4598 reniforme, Don. 

4599 Sagittaria cordifolia, Roxb. 

4600 sagittifolia, Z. 

4601 obtusifolia, Z. 



4626 subumbellata, Clarke. 

4627 Thomsoni, Clarke. 

4628 Floscopa paniculata, Lour. 

4629 Cyanotis axillaris, Kth. 

4630 cristata, Kth. 

4631 racemosa, Heyne. 

4632 barbata, Kth. 

4633 nodiflora, Kth. 

4634 nobilis, Hassk. 

4635 Streptolirion volubile, Edg. 

4636 Forrestia Hookeri, Hassk. 



Digitized by 



Google 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



193 



4637 Forrestia glabrata, Hassk. 

4638 Dichoespermum Blumei, 

Hassk, 

4639 repens, Wight 

4640 PoUia Aclisia, Clarke, 

4641 Flagellaria Indica, Z. 



4668 Eriocaulon achiton, Koem, 

4669 alpestre, Hf, and Th, 

4670 sexangulare, L, 

4671 gregatum, Koem, 

4672 truncatum, Ham, 

4673 oryzetorum, Mart, 

4674 trilobum, Ham. 





XYRIDACE^, 






4642 X}Tis pauciflora, Willd, 




CYPERACE^, 


4643 ■ 


Indica, L, 


4675 ^ 


Zlarex Thomsoni, Boott. 


4644 ■ 


Wallichii, Kth, 


4676 . 


nubigena, Don, 


4645 


schoenoides, Mart, 


4677 . 


foliosa, Don, 


4646 


robusta, Mart. 


4678. 


curvata, Boott. 






4679 - 


setigera, Don, 




JUNCACE^. 


4680 - 


spiculata, Boott. 


4647 


Luzula Forsteri, Dc. 


4681 ■ 


composita, Boott, 


4648 


campestris, L, 


4682 • 


nobilis, Boott, 


4649 Juncus glaucus, Ehrh, 


4683 . 




4650 


Leschenaultii, y. 


4684 • 


pulchra, Boott, 




Gay, 


4685 ■ 


insignis, Boott, 


4651 


castaneus, L. 


4686 . 


decora, Boott. 


4652 


bufonius, L, 


4687 


Daltoni, Boott. 


4653 


concinnus, Dene. 


4688 . 




4654 


effusus, L. 


4689 . 


munda, Boott. 


4655 


leucanthus, Don, 


4690 . 


fragilis, Boott. 


4656 


membranaceus, Royle. 


4691 


uncinioides, Boott. 


4657 


sphacelatus, Dene, 


4692 


notha, Kth. 


4658 


triglumis, Z. 


4693 • 


Jackiana, Boott. 


4659 




4694 


Moorcroftii, Fate. 


4660 


ochraceus, Buehenau, 


4695 ■ 


Wighriana, Ne. 


4661 


grisebachii,j5«^^^«dfi/. 


4696 . 


rara, Boott. 






4697 


capillacea, Boott. 




RESTIACEyE, 


4698 


fusiformis, NE. 


4662 


Eriocaulon Brownianum, 


4699 ' 


■ finitima, Boott. 




Mart. 


4700 


ligulata, NE. 


4663 


luzulaefolium, Mart. 


4701 ■ 


linearis, Boott. 


4664 


cristatum, Mart, 


4702 ■ 


speciosa, Kth. 


4665 


setaceum, L, 


4703 


radicalis, Boott. 


4666 


quinquangulare, L. 


4704 


parva, NE. 


4667 


xeranthemum, Mart. 


4705 


olivacea, Boott» 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



194 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



4706 Carex excurva, BootL 

4707 gracilis, R, Br. 

4708 teinogyna, Boott 

4709 teres, Boott, 

4710 phacota, Sprg, 

47 1 1 tumida, Boott, 

4712 laeta, Boott, 

47 '3 psychrophila, NE, 

4714 obscura, NE. 

4715 ustulata, Whlbg. 

4716 hsematostoma, NE. 

4717 cruenta, NE, 

4718 fuliginosa, Strbg. and 

Hoppe. 

4719 desponsa, Boott. 

4720 Myosurus, NE. 

4721 baccans, NE. 

4722 Bengalensis, Roxb. 

4723 — — condensata, NE. 

4724 Japonica, Thbg, 

4725 alopecuroides, Don, 

4726 fucata, Boott, 

4727 pruinosa, Boott. 

4728 setosa, Boott. 

4729 Nepalensis, Spreng, 

4730 Esenbeckii, -^//i. 

4731 caespititia, iV^. 

4732 cemua, Boott. 

4733 scitula, Boott. 

4734 longipes, Don. 

4735 remota, Z. 

4736 peduncularis, Wail, 

4737 pulchra, Boott. 

4738 atrata, L, 

4739 lachnosperma, Wall. 

4740 pellucida, T'wnr^r. 

4741 Doniana, Spreng. 

4742 instabilis, Boott. 

4743 gCQjdltnXaiy Boott. 

4744 ampuUacea, Whlbg. 



4745 Carex curvata, -5(7^//. 

4746 Lehmanni, Dry. 

4747 spiculata, Boott, 

4748 scitata, Boott. 

4749 — — diffusa, Boott. 



4750 longiaristata, j9<w//. 

4751 stramentitia, Boott. 

4752 vacua, Boott. 

4753 vesiculosa, Boott. 

4754 filicina, N. E, 

4755 cruciata, Boott, 

4756 Indica, Z. 

4757 Selena uliginosa, Hohen, 



' oryzoides, Prsl, 

■ pergracilis, NE. 

- corymbifera, Boeck. 

- ciliaris, NE, 
-tessellata, WtVld. 

lithosperma, Wt'lld, 

■ Steudeliana, M^, 

- Thomsoniana, Boek. 

- alta, Boeck, 
• elata, Tkw. 

■ Hookeriana, Boerk. 

- scrobiculata, NE, 
Isevis, Eetz. 



4758 
4759 
4760 
4761 
4762 

4763 • 
4764 

4765 
4766 
4767 
4768 

4769 

4770 ■ 

4771 Rhynchospora aurea, iV^. 

4772 Griffithii, Boeck. 

4773 Chinensis, NE. 

4774 Wallichiana, NE. 

4775 Hookeri, Boeck. 

4776 Elyna Royleana, NE. 

4777 laxa, NE, 

4778 schoenoides, C. A. 

May. 

- spicata, Schrad. 



4779 

4780 Diplacrum caricinum, R. 

Br. 

4781 Hypolytrum latifoliura, 

Rich. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS, 



195 



4782 lipocarpha argentea, R. 

Br. 

4783 sphacelata, Kth, 

4784 Pandanophyllum palustre, 

Hassk, 

4785 Anosporum cephalotes, 

NE. 

4786 Fuirena glomerata, Vhl. 

4787 ciliaris, Roxb, 

4788 pentagona, Wight 



4817 Fimbristylis Thomsoni, 

Boeck. 

4818 asperrima, Boeck, 

4819 subtetrastachya, 

Boeck. 

4820 Scirpus mucronatus, Z. 

4821 juncoides, -^^-^c^. 

4822 junciformis, -A^^. 

4823 maritimus, L, 

4824 affinis, Roth, 



4789 Baumea crassa, Thw, 


4825 


grossus, Roxb. 


4790 


Blysmus compressus, 


4826 


Chinensis, Munro. 




jPanz. 


4827 


Wichurai, Boeck. 


4791 


Fimbristylis falcata, Kth. 


4828 


Griffithii, Boeck. 


4792 


salbundia, NE. 


4829 


scaberrimus, Boeck. 


4793 


ovalis, NE. 


4830 


trialatus, Boeck. 


4794 


biumbellulata, Boeck. 


4831 


Heleocharis fistulosa, 


4795 


miliacea, Vhl. 




Schult. 


4796 


Griffithii, Boeck. 


4832 


plantaginea, NE. 


4797 


quinquangularis, 


4833 


capitata, R. Br. 




NE. 


4834 


gracilis, R. Br. 


4798 


globulosa, Vhl. 


4835 


palustris, R. Br. 


4799 


pallescens, NE. 


4836 


ovata, R. Br. 


4800 


dichotoma, Vhl. 


4837 


tetraquetra, NE. 


4801 


comata, NE. 


4838 ■ 


Thomsoni, Boeck. 


4802 


schoenoides, Vhl. 


4839 ■ 


ochrostachys. Stead. 


4803 


diphylla, Vhl. 


4840 . 


acutangula, NE. 


4804 


junciformis, Steud. 


4841 


spiralis, P. B. 


4805 


complanata, Lk. 


4842 Abildgaardia fusca, NE. 


4806 


oxylepis, Steud. 


4843 ■ 


monostachya, Vhl. 


4807 


acuminata, Vhl. 


4844 Chaetocyperus setaceus, 


4808 


cylindrocarpa, Kth. 




NE. 


4809 


podocarpa, NE. 


4845 Isolepis fluitans, NE. 


4810 


tenella, NE. 


4846 


setacea, R.Br. 


481 1 


nutans, Vhl. 


4847 ■ 


prolongata, NE. 


4812 


femiginea, NE. 


4848 


supina, R. Br. 


4813 


scabeirima, NE. 


4849 


squarrosa, Vhl. 


4814 


capillaris, R. and S. 


4850 - 


barbata, R. Br. 


4815 


Hookeriana, Boeck. • 


4851 


trifida, NE. 


4816 


- — filifolia, Boeck. 


4852 . 


dipsacea, R. and S. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



196 



UST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS, 



4853 
4854 

4855 
4856 

4857 
4858 

4859 
4860 
4861 

4862 

4863 
4864 
4865 
4866 
4867 
4868 
4869 
4870 
4871 
4872 

4873 
4874 

487s 
4876 

4877 
4878 

4879 
4880 
4881 
4882 
4883 
4884 
4885 
4886 
4887 
4888 
4889 
4890 



Isolepis densa, Wall. 

juncoides, Roxb. 

Micheliana, NE, 

Kyllingia monocephala, Z. 

brevifolia, Rotth, 

cylindrica, NE, 

. triceps, NE, 

Curtoisia cyperoides, NE. 
Eriophonim comosum, 

Wall 
microstachyum, 

Boeck, 
Cypenis pulvinatus, NE, 

vulgaris, Sieb, 

Nilagiricus, Hochst. 

Eragrostis, Vhl, 

— — sanguinolentus, VIil 

stramineus, NE. 

polystaehyus, VM. 

procerus, Roxb. 

angulatus, NE. 

mucronatus, Z. 

patuliflorus, Boeck. 

pygmaeus, VkL 

angustifolius, NE. 

castaneus, Willd. 

squarrosus, RotL 

aristatus, Roil. 

compressus, Z. 

Zollingeri, Steitd. 

moestus, Kth. 

Silhetensis, NE. 



4891 Cyperus Iria, Z. 



pallidus, Heyne. 

diffusus, Vhl. 

complanatus, Wight. 

apicalis, NE. 

niveus, Retz. 

cephalotes, Vhl. 

Haspan, Z. 

difformis, Z. 



4892 

4893 
4894 

4895 
4896 - 

4897 
4898 
4899 
4900 
4901 
4902 canescens, Vhl. 



• articulatus, L. 
corymbosus, Roil. 

- tegetiformis, Roxb. 

- Pangorei, Roxb. 

■ incurvatus, Roxb. 

■ pertenuis, Roxb. 

• rotundus, Z. 
pflosus, Vhl. 

■ venustus, R. Br. 

■ procerus, Roth 



4903 
4904 

4905 
4906 
4907 
4908 
4909 
4910 
491 1 
4912 

4913 
4914 

4915 
4916 

4917 
4918 

4919 
4920 
4921 
4922 



■ Wallichii, NE. 

• Neesii, J^lh. 

• digitatus, Roxb. 

■ elatus, Roxb. 

• verticillatus, Roxb. 

' alopecuroides, Roxb. 

• distans, Z. 
■dilutus, Vhl. 

• umbellatus, Bth. 

• pauper, Roxb. 

- fimbriatus, NE. 

■ paniceus, Lk. 

■ auricomus, Sieb. 
' exaltatus. Rets. 

■ radiatus, Schrad. 

- atratus, Steud. 

- intermedius, Stmd. 

• latispicatus, Boeck. 

- tenuicaulis, Boech. 
' Hookeri, Boeck. 



GRAMINEjE. 

4923 Leersia hexandra, Sxd, 

4924 Oryza sativa, Z. 

4925 coarctata, Roxb. 

4926 granulans, NE, 

4927 officinalis, Wcdl. 

4928 Hygrorhiza aristata, NE, 



Digitized by 



Google 



UST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



197 



4929 Zea Mays, Z. 

4930 Coix Lacryma, Z. 

4931 Koenigii, Sprg, 

4932 gigantea, Koen. 

4933 aquatiea, Roxb. 

4934 Chionachne barbata, Br, 

4935 Polytoca heteroclita, 

Munro. 

4936 Holcus mollis, Z. 

4937 Milium effusum, Z. 

4938 Garaotia Griffithii, Munro. 

4939 Paspalumscrobiculatum,Z. 

4940 brevifolium, Fliigge, 

4941 costatum, Hocks t 



4965 Setaria glauca, Z. 

4966 verticillata, -P. £. 

4967 Italica, -^M. 

4968 macrostachya, 

H,B,K. 

4969 intermedia, R, and S. 

4970 Panicum barbinode, Trtn, 

4971 prostratum, Lamk, 

4972 Helopus, yacq. 

4973 procumbens, NE, 

4974 Javanicum, i'l^/r. 

4975 fluitans, Roxb. 

49^6 brizoides, Z. 

4977 repens, Z. 



4942 


distichum, Z. 


4978 


psilopodium, Trin. 


4943 


vaginatum, Sw. 


4979 


paludosum, Eoxb. 


4944 


conjugatum, Jietz, 


4980 


uliginosum, Roxb. 


4945 


pedicellatum, NE. 


4981 


asperum, Wight. 


4946 


filiculmum, NE, 


4982 ■ 


Petiverii, Trin. 


4947 


Royleanum, NE. 


4983 


miliaceum, Z. 


4948 Digitaria sanguinale, Z. 


4984 


uncinnatum, Raddi, 


4949 


ciliare, Retz, 


4985 


filipes, NE. 


4950 


commutatum, NE. 


4986. 


plicatum, Lamk. 


495 1 


Coridochloa cimicina, 


4987 


auritum, Prsl, 




Stcud. 


4988 


trigonum, Retz. 


4952 


semialata, Steud. 


4989 


ovalifolium, Foir. 


4953 


Oplismenus Bumiamii, 


4990 


maximum, yacq. 




Eetz. 


4991 


nodosum, Ktk, 


4954 


sylvaticus, E. and S, 


4992 


incisum, Munro. 


4955 


compositum, Z. 


4993 


antidotale, Retz, 


4956 


Indicus, NE, 


4994 • 


longipes, WA, 


4957 


acuminatus, NE. 


4995 • 


montanum, Roxb, 


4958 


Ichnanthus pallens, 


4996 


miliare, Z. 




Munro. 


4997 ■ 


incomptum, Trin. 


4959 


Echinochloa cms galli, Z. 


4998 


radicans, Retz. 


4960 


colonum, Z. 


4999 


humile, NE. 


4961 


frumentacea, Eob. 


5000 


polystachyum, Prsl. 


4962 


hispidula, NE. 


5001 ■ 


villosum, Lamk. 


4963 


stagnina, Eoxb. 


5002 


vestitium, NE. 


4964 


glabresccns, Munro. 


5003 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



198 



UST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS, 



5004 Panicum zizanioides, 

H. B. K, 

5005 repens, L. 

5006 excurrens, Trtn. 

5007 Thysanolaena acarifera, 

NE. 

5008 Eriochloa punctata, Kih, 

5009 Hymenachne myurus, -P.^. 

5010 intemipta, Buse. 

501 1 Indica, Z. 

5012 angustata, Trin. 

5013 Isachne elegans, WA, 

5014 australis, ^. Br, 

5015 miliacea, Kth. 

5016 albens, Trin. 

5017 Or\S^ih\\, Munro. 

5018 geniculata, Wall, and 

Griff. 

5019 PeniciUaria spicata, Lamk, 

5020 Pennisetum cenchroides, 

Rich, 

5021 triflorum, NE, 

5022 Cenchrus echinatus, L, 

5023 Centotheca lappacea, Desv, 

5024 Berghausia polygonoides, 

Munro, 

5025 adscendeus, Munro, 



5039 Agrostis alba, Z. 

5040 ^^canina,Z. 

5041 Wightii, iV^Z:. 

5042 abnormis, -^««r(^. 

5043 nervosa, iV[^. 

5044 Hookeriana, Munro, 

5045 ^^verticillata, NE, 

5046 Muehlenbergia viridissima, 

NE, 

5047 Polypogon Monspeliensis, 

Z>^^f/ 
5048 littoralis, Z. 

5049 Nepalensis, Munro, 

5050 Perotis latifolia, -4/V. 

5051 Calamagrostis Nepalensis, 

NE, 

5052 Deyeuxia scabrescens, 

Munro, 

5053 ' elata, Munro, 

5054 Orthorhaphium Roylei, 

iv^z:. 

5055 Piptatherum holciforme, 

R, and Sch, 

5056 aequiglume, Munro, 

5057 Lasiagrostis Mongolica, 

Trin, 

5058 splendens, -^/"^ 



5026 


Anindinella Wallichii, Pers. 


5059 Aristida depressa, Retz, 


5027 


setosa, Trin, 


5060 capillacea, L, 


5028 


agrostoidea, Trin, 


5061 setacea, Retz, 


5029 


av^nacea, Munro. 


5062 Alopecurus geniculatus, Z. 


5030 


nervosa, NE, 


5063 Phleum alpinum, Z. 


5031 


Hookeri, Munro, 


5064 Arundo Roxburghii, Wight 


S032 


Khasyana, NE, 


5065 Madagascariensis, 


5033 


Nepalensis, Trin, 


Kth. 


5034 


miliacea, NE, 


5066 Bengalensis, Z. 


5035 


Sporobolus Indicus, R, Br, 


5067 Donax, Z. 


5036 


diander, Trin, 


5068 Phragmites Roxburghii, 


5037 


elongatus, R, Br, 


Kth. 


5038 


—— tenacissimus, Roxb, 


5069 Microchloa setacea, R. Br. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



199 



5070 Chloris barbata, Sw. 

5071 digitata, 5/«^^. 

5072 polystachya, Roxb, 

5073 Leptochloa Chinensis,-A^. 

5074 filifonnis, Ji. andSch. 

5075 Wightiana, Retz, 

5076 qmosuroides, Hochsf. 

5077 Eleusine Indica, 6^a^«. 

5078 coracana, Gaertn. 

5079 verticillata, ^^jc^. 

5080 Deschampsia caespitosa, 

P,B. 

5081 Trisetum virescens, NE. 

5082 aureum, Tm, 

5083 subspicatum, P, B. 

5084 flavescens, F, B, 

5085 Avena fatua, Z. 

5086 aspera, Munro. 

5087 pratensis, Z. 

5088 sativa, Z. 

5089 Dactyloctenium iEgyptia- 

cum, Fers. 

5090 Cynodon Dactylon, Rich, 

5091 gracile, iV]ff. 

5092 Aira caryophyllea, Z. 

5093 Dupontia nutans, Munro, 

5094 Attaxia, Sp, 

5095 Eriachne Chinenis, Zfew^. 

5096 Danthonia Kashmiriana, 

yauh, and Spach. 

5097 Poa annua, L. 

5098 alpina, L. 

5099 laxa, Haenke. 

5100 flexuosa, Whlbg, 

5 1 01 Nepalensis, Whlbg. 

J 102 Himalayana, NE. 

5103 Eragrostis pilosa, -P. -5. 

J 1 04 flexuosa, Roxb, 

5105 nigra, iV^JJ. 

5106 ^verticillata,^/'. -5. 



5107 Eragrostis tenella, NE. 

5108 nutans, .A^. 

5109 plumosa, Z^. 

5 1 10 viscosa, Trin, 

5 1 1 1 unioloides, NE. 

5112 Brownei, NE, 

5113 multiflora, NE. 

5114 procera, NE. 

5 1 1 5 qrlindrica, NE. 

51 16 poaeoides, F. B. 

5 1 1 7 diandra, Roxb. 

5 1 18 bifaria, WA. 

5119 nibens, Hochst. 

5120 Coelachne pulchella, R.Br. 

5 121 Glyceria aquatica, .Sw. 

5122 Lophatherum Lehmanni, 

NE. 

5123 Elythrophorus articulatus, 

F.B. 

5124 Tripogon bromoides, i?. 

and Sch. 

5125 filifonnis, NE. 

5 126 trifidus, Munro, 

5127 Festuca ovina, Z. 

5128 elastior, Z. 

5129 uniglumis, .&/. 

5130 duriuscula, Z. 

5 131 Brachypodium sylvaticum, 

F.B. 

5132 Bromus mollis, Z, 

5133 asper, Murr. 

5134 confinis, NE. 

5135 Arundinaria racemosa, 

Munro. 
5136 Griffithiana, Munro. 

5137 falcata, iV^. 

5138 Khasiana, Munro. 

5139 intermedia, Munro. 

5140 Hookeriana, Munro. 

5 141 callosa, Munro. 



Digitized by 



Google 



200 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



5142 Anindinaria hirsuta, il/««r(?. 


5176 


Haemarthria compressa, 


5143 microphylla, Munro. 




R.Br. 


5144 suberecta, Munro. 


5177 " 


Vossia procera, Wall, and 


5145 Falconeri, Kurz. 




Griff. 


5146 spathiflora, Trin, 


5178 Ophiurus corymbosus, 


5147 Phyllostachys hambusoi- 




Kth. 


des, S. and Z. 


5179 


Mnesithea laevis, Kth. 


5148 Bambusa nana, Roxb. 


5180 Rottboellia exaltata, Z. 


5149 Tulda, Roxb. 


5181 


glabra, Roxb. 


5150 nutans, Wall, 


5182 


Khasyana, Munro. 


5151 teres, Ham, 


S^^Z 


striata, NE, 


5152 pallida, Munro. 


5184 


Manisuris granulans, Sw. 


5153 Khasiana, Munro. 


5185 Schizachyrium brevifolius. 






NE, 


5155 amndinacea, jRetz. 


5186 


Hystrix, Kz. 


5156 spinosa, jRoxb. 


5187 Andropogon Gryllus, Z. 


5157 vulgaris, Wendl. 


5188 


Royleanus, NE. 


5158 Mastersii, Munro, 


5189 


acicularis, Retz, 


5159 auriculata, Kz, 


5190 


montanus, Roxb. 


5160 Gigantochloa nigro-ciliata, 


5191 


glaucopsis, Sieud. 


Munro. 


5192 


r villosulus, NE. 


5 161 Melocanna bambusoides, 


5193 


muricatum, Z. 


Trin. 


5194 


— - muticum, NE. 


5162 Cephalostachyum capita* 


5^95 


tropicum, Z. 


turn, Munro. 


S196 


Sorghum, L. 


5163 pallidum, Munro. 


5*97 


Halepensis, Z. 


5164 latifolium, Munro. 


S198 


Zeylanicus, Am, 


5165 Pseudostachyum polymor- 


S199 


involutus, Steud, 


phum, Munro. 


5200 


annulatus, Z. 


5166 Dendrocalamus strictus, 


5201 


scandens, Roxb. 


NE, 


5202 


polystachyus, Roxb, 


5167 sericeus, Munro, 


5203 


pseudo- Ischsemiun, 


5168 Hookeri, Munro. 




NE, 


5169 Hamiltonii, NE, 


5204 


pertusum, Z. 


5170 Hordeum distichum, Z. 


5205 


Hookeri, Munro, 


3 17 1 vulgare, F///. 


5206 


amplifolius, Steud. 


5172 Elymus Sibiricus, L, 


5207 


Schoenanthus, Z 


5173 Lolium temulentum, L, 


5208 


citriodorus, Dc. 


5174 Triticum vulgare, Vill, 


5209 


Nardus, Z. 


5175 longiaristatum, ^^wx. 


5210 


Khasyanus, Munro. 

Digitized by CjOOQIC 



UST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



20I 



52 1 1 Hologamium nervosum, 

NE, 

5212 Heteropogon contortus, Z. 

5213 Meoschium imbricatum 

Munro. 

5214 elegans, WA, 

5215 rugosum, Gaertn, 

5216 Spodiopogon angusdfolium, 

NE. 

5217 obliqui valve, NE. 

5?i8 Apocopis Royleanus, -A^J?. 
5219 Wightii, NE. 

5220 Batratherum moUe, NE. 
5221 lancifolius, Trin. 

5222 nudum, iV]£. 

5223 echinatum, NE. 

5224 plumbeum, NE. 

5225 Androscepia gigantea, 

5226 Anthistyria prostrata,^^^?^. 

5227 arundinacea, NE. 

5228 ciliata, Retz. 

5229 scandens, Eoxb. 

5230 Apluda aristata, Z. 
£231 mutica, Z. 

5232 geniculata, JRoxb. 

5233 Imperata arundinacea, 

Cyrill. 

5234 Saccharum spontaneum, Z* 
5235 fuscum, 

2236 procerum, JRoxb. 

^237 officinarum, Z. 

5238 Sara, Eoxb. 

5239 Narenga, Trin. 

5240 Pollinia Lehmanni, NE. 

5241 vagans, NE. 

5242 imberbis, NE. 

5243 ciliata, 7>7«. 

5244 nuda, NE. 

5245 Wallichiana, NE. 



5246 Pollinia micrantha, NE. 

5247 Erianthus velutinus,il/««r(^. 

5248 Japonicus, P. B. 

5249 tristachyus, Trin. 

5250 Pogonatherum crinitum, 

F.B. 

5251 nifo-barbatum, Wall. 

5252 Eulalia Nepalensis, 7>7>f. 

5253 Dimeria ornithopoda, 7>7«. 

5254 tenera, Trin. 

5255 fuscescens, Trin. 

5256 Zoysia pungens, WilU. 

EQUISETACEjE. 

5257 Equisetum debile, Rood>. 

5258 diffusum, Don. 

MARSILEACE^. 

5259 Marsilea erosa, Willd. 

5260 Salvinia natans, Z. 

5261 cucullata, Rooib. 

5262 Azolla pinnata, ^. Br. 

LYCOPODIACE^. 

5263 Selaginella semicordata, 

Spring. 

5264 chrysocaulon. Spring. 

5265 lenera, Spring. 

5266 imbricata, ^^jc^. 

5267 rupestris, iSi^n«^. 

5268 caulescens, Spring. 

^269 Belangeri, Spring. 

5270 laevigata, Spring. 

5271 monospora, Spring. 

5272 Wallichii, ^nVjig: 

5273 atroviride, Wall. 

5274 Lycopodium clavatum, Z. 

5275 subulifolium, Hook 

and Grev. 

5276 Hookeri, Wall. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



202 



UST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



5277 Lycopodium annotinum, Z. 

5278 complanatum, Z. 

5279 aloifolium, Wall, 

5280 comans, Hf, 

5281 cemuum, Z. 

5282 phlegmaria, Z. 

5283 serratum, T?ibg. 

5284 squarrosum, Forst 

5285 Psilotum triquetnim, Z. 

OFHIOGLOSSACE^. 

5286 Osmunda Claytoniana, Z. 

5287 cinnamomea, Z. 

5288 regalis, Z. 

5289 Lygodium dichotomum,«S'tt/. 

5290 scandens, Sw. 

5291 pinnatifidum, -ffa/^. 

5292 Japonicum, Sw, 

5293 Angiopteris evecta, Hoffin, 

5294 Kaulfussia SBSculifolia, Bl, 

5295 Helminthostachys Zeyla- 

nica, Hook, 

5296 Ophiogossium vulgatum, Z. 

5297 reticulatum, Bak, 

5298 Botrychium daucifolium, 

Wall, 

5299 Virginicum, Sw, 

FILICES, 

5300 Gleichenia longissima, Bl, 

5301 dichotoma, Jf^/7A/. 

5302 Cyathea spinulosa, Wall, 

5303 Hemitelia decipiens, Sett, 

5304 Alsophila Scottii, Bak, 

5305 Brunoniana, Wall, 

5306 glabra, Z^^i^. 

5307 latebrosa, Hook, 

5308 Andersoni, Sett, 

j^op ornata, Sett, 

5310 comosa, Hook, 



5311 Diacalpe aspidioides, ^/. 

5312 Onoclea orientalis, Bak, 

5313 Sphoeropteris barbata, 

Wall, 

5314 Woodsia lanosa, Hook, 

5315 Dicksonia Barometz, Z>&. 

5316 scabra, Wall, 

53 1 7 appendiculata, Wall, 

5318 Hymenophyllum exsertum, 

Wall, 

5319 microsorum, Bak, 

5320 polyanthos, ^2^/. 

5321 badium, Hook and 

Grev, 

5322 Javanicum, Bl, 

5323 Simonsianum, Hook, 

5324 flaccidum, Bak, 

5325 Trichomanes Filicula, 

Bory, 

- pyxidifenim, Z. 

- radicans, Sw, 

- auriculatum, Bl, 

- Javanicum, Bl, 

- nanum, Bosch, 



5326 ■ 

5327 ■ 

5328 ■ 

5329 • 

5330 ' 

5331 Davallia pedata, Sw, 



5332 

5333 

5334 

5335 

5336 

5337 

5338 

5339 

5340 

5341 

5342 

5343 

5344 

5345^ 

5346 



- membranulosa, Wall, 

- micans, Mett, 

- pteropus, Bedd. 

- immersa, Wall, 

- multidentata, Hook, 

- pulchra, I?on, 

- repens, £>£sv, 

- chaerophylla, Wall, 

- Griffithiana, Hook, 
-bullata, Wall, 

- Hookeriana, Wall, 
-villosa, Wall, 

- nodosa. Hook, 
-^elegans, Sw, 

- strigosa, Sw, 



Digitized by 



Google 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



203 



5347 Davallia platyphylla, L>on. 5385 

5348 hirta, J^aulf. 5386 

5349 speluncae, Bak, 5387 

5350 tenuifolia, Sw, 5388 

5351 divaricata, ^/. 5389 

5352 urophylla, Ifook. 5390 

5353 Cystopteris setosa, Bedd, 5391 

5354 Lindsaea cultrata, Sw. 5392 

5355 flabellulata, £>ry. 5393 

5356 lanceolata, Zad. 5394 

5357 pectinata, BI. 5395 

5358 Adiantum lunulatum, Z. 

5359 caudatum, Z. 5396 

5360 Capillus veneris, Z. 5397 

5361 pedatum, Z. 5398 

5362 flabellulatum, Z. 5399 

5363 Cheilanthes varians, TAw. 5400 

5364 Dalhousiana, Ifook. 5401 

5365 tenuifolia, Sw. 5402 

5366 rufa, £>on. 5403 

5367 argentea, Book. 5404 

5368 farinosa, JCau/f. 5405 

5369 Onychium auratum, 5406 

■ A7/. 5407 

537^ Japonicum, JCnze. 5408 

5371 Cryptogramme crispa, 5409 

^. Br, 5410 

5372 Pellaea pedata, Z. 54 11 

5373 Tamburii, Z^iw>^. 5412 

5374 Pteris longifolia, Z. 5413 

5375 Cretica, Z. 5414 

5376 semilata. L.f. 

5377 crenata, Sw. 5415 

5378 semipinnata, Z. 5416 

5379 quadriaurita, jRetz. 5417 

5380 excelsa, Gaud. 5418 

5381 pellucens, Ifook. 5419 

5382 aquilina, Z. 5420 

5383 biaurita, Z. 5421 

5384 Wallichiana, A^^. 5422 

VII. 



Pteris incisa, TAlfg. 

dactylina, Ifook. 

Griffithii, Hook. 

longipinnula, IValL 

tripartita, Sw. 

Lomaria Patersoni, Sprg. 

adnata, Bi. 

glauca, B/. 

pycnophylla, JCme. 

euphlebia, JTme. 

Ceratopteris thalictroides, 
Brong. 
Blechnum orientale, Z. 

melanopus, Hook. 

Woodwardia radicans, Sm. 
Asplenium Nidus, Z. 

ensiforme, Wall. 

stenophyllum, Bedd. 

Griffithianum, Hook. 

altemans, Wall. 

normale, Don. 

falcatum, Lamk. 

resectum, Sm. 

heterocarpum, Wall. 

planicaule, Wall. 

laciniatum, Don. 

nitidum, Sw. 

bulbiferum, Forst. 

tenuifolium, Don. 



rutasfolium, Knze. 

Hohenackerianum, 

Knze. 
thelypteroides, Mich. 

- macrocarpum, Bl. 

- nigripes, Bl. 

- Felix femina, Bemh. 

- longissimum, Bl. 

- oxyphyllum, Baker. 

- fimbriatum, Wall. 

- umbrosum,y! Sm. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



204 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



5423 Asplenium australe, Brack, 5456 

5424 

5425 ■ 

5426 

5427 
5428 

5429 
5430 
5431 
5432 
5433 



lanceum, Thbg, 

— Bantamense. Bak. 

sylvaticum, PrsL 

sorzogonense, Frsl. 

polypodioides, Mett 

Griffithii, Bak, 

dilatatum, Wall. 

heterophlebium, Mett 

esculentum, FrsL 

Finlaysonianum, 

Wall, 

Simonsiamim, Hook, 

subtriangulare, Hook, 

pinnatifido-pinnatum, 



Hook, 

tomentosum, Hook, 

Japonicum, Thbg, 



5434 
5435 
5436 

5437 

5438 

5439 Allantodia Brunoniana, 

Wall, 

5440 Actiniopteris radiata, 

Wall, 

5441 Didymochlaena lunulata, 

Desr, 

5442 Aspidium Lachanense, 

Hook, 

5443 auriculatum, Sw, 

5444 ilicifolium, Don, 

5445 Thomsoni, Hook, 

5446 aculeatum, Sw, 

5447 Prescottianum, Wall, 

5448 Sikkimense, Baker, 

5449 aristatum, Sw, 

5450 foeniculaceum, Hook, 

545 1 caducum, Wall, 

5452 falcatum, Sw, 

5453 Nephrodium cuspidatum, 

Bak, 

5454 hirtipes, Hook, 

5455 gracilescens, Hook, 



5457 
5458 
5459 
5460 

5461 
5462 

5463 
5464 
5465 
5466 

5467 
5468 

5469 
5470 
5471 
5472 
5473 
5474 
5475 
5476 
5477 
5473 

5479 
5480 

5481 
5482 

5483 
5484 
5485 
5486 

5487 
5488 

5489 
5490 
5491 
5492 
5493 
5494 



Nephrodium calcaratum, 
Hook, 

Ochthodes, Knze. 

prolixum, Bak, 

apicifloruin, Hook, 

syrmaticum, Bak. 

Filix mas, Rich. 

patentissima, Wall. 

flaccidum, Hook, 

Bninonianum, Hook, 

barbigenim, Hook. 

sparsum, Don. 

odoratum, Baker, 

recedens, Hook, 

membranifolium,/>-j/. 

splendens, Hook. 

pulvinuliferum, Bedd, 

intermedium, Bak, 

Boryanum, Bak. 

unitum, R, Br, 

pteroides, Baker, 

extensum, Hook, 

cucullatum, Baker, 

hirsutum, Sm. 

molle, Desv. 

crinipes, Hook, 

abruptum, Bl, 

truncatum, Frsl, 

Leuzeanum, Hook. 

vastum, Bak, ' 

irriguum, Bak, 

polymorphum. Baker. 

variolosum, Bak. 

decurrens, Bak. 



cicutarium, Bak, 

coadunatum, Bedd, 

giganteum, Bak, 

immersum, Hook. 

canum, Bak. 

platypus, Hook. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



LIST OF BENGAL AXD ASSAM PLAXTS, 



205 



5495 

5496 
5497 
5498 
5499 
5500 
5501 
5502 
5503 
5504 
5505 

5506 

5507 
5508 

5509 
5510 

5511 
5512 

5513 
5514 
5515 
5516 

5517 
5518 
5519 
5520 

5521 
5522 
5523 
5524 
5525 
5526 

5527 
5528 

5529 

5530 



Nephrodium glajidulosum, 

Sm, 

asperulum, Sett. 

sericeum, Sett. 

erythrorachis, Sett. 

Nephrolepis tuberosa,/yj/. 

exaltata, Schott. 

acuta, PrsL 

Oleandra neriiformis, Cav. 

VVallichii, Book. 

Cumingii, Sm. 

Polypodium auriculatum, 

irall. 

distans, Don. 

punctatum, Thbg. 

omatum, Wall. 

trichodes, Reinw. 

urophyllum, Wall. 

prolifenim, FrsL 

lineatum, Colebr. 

multilineatum, Wall. 

macrodon, 

Khasianum, Hook. 

trichomanoides, Swz. 

subfalcatum, Bl. 

subdigitatum, 

amoenum, Wall. 

lachnopus, Wall. 

microrhizon, Clarke. 

Hendersoni, Atk. 



subamoenum, Clarke. 

subauriculatum, BL 

adnascens, Sw. 

acrostichoides, Sw. 

Lingua, Sw. 

stigmosum, Sw. 

subfurfuraceum, 



Hook. 



nummulari?efoUum, 



Mett. 



5531 
5532 
5533 
5534 
5535 
5536 
5537 

5538 
5539 
5540 
5541 
5542 
5543 
5544 
5545 
5546 
5547 
5548 
5549 
5550 
5551 
5552 
5553 
5554 
5555 
5556 
5557 
5558 

5559 
5560 

5561 
5562 
5563 
5564 
5565 
5566 

5567 
5568 

5569 



Polypodium fissum, Bak. 

flocculosum, Don. 

rostratum, Hook. 

lineare, Thbg. 

superficiale, Bl. 

normale, Don. 

rhynchophyllum, 

Hook. 

Griffithianum, Hook. 

ovatum, Wall. 

membranaceum,/?^//. 

heterocarpum, Bak. 

irioides, Lam. 

hemionitideum. Wall. 

pteropus, Bl. 

Wallichii, R. Br. 

oxylobum, Wall. 

malacodon, Bak. 

Stewartii, Bedd. 

phymatodes, L. 

nigrescens, Bl. 

dilatatum, Wall 

ebenipes, Hook. 

longissimum, Bl. 

erythrocarpon, CAzr^^^. 

conjugatum, Sm. 

propinquum, Wall. 

quercifolium, L. 

juglandifolium, Don. 

Lehmanni, Mett. 

Himalayense, Hook. 

leiorhizon, Wall. 

erubescens, Wall. 

dareaeforme, Hook. 

Boothii, Hook. 

rivale, Mett. 

Gymnogramme totta, Bl. 

aurita, Hook. 

opaca, Spreng. 

Javanica, Bl. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



2o6 



LIST OF BENGAL AXD ASSAM PLANTS, 



5570 Gymnogramme microphylla, 

Hook. 

5571 lanceolata, Sw. 

5572 involuta, Don. 

5573 Hamiltoniana, Hook, 

5574 elliptica, Bak. 

5575 aspidioides, Hook, 

5576 Brainea insignis, Hook. 

5577 Meniscium triphyllum, Sw. 

5578 cuspidatum, BL 

5579 Antrophium coriaceum,^/. 

5580 plantagineum, Kaulf. 

5581 latifolium, ^/. 

5582 Vittaria elongata, Sw. 

5583 lineata, Sm. 

5584 Drymoglossum camosum, 

Hook. 
55^5 piloselloides, /Vr/. 

5586 Hcniionitis cordata, Roxb. 

5587 Qt[S^^\\ Hf. and Th. 

5588 Acrostichum conforme, 57^'. 
5589 
5590 
559' 

5592 
5593 
5594 
5595 
5596 
5597 
5598 
5599 
5600 



viscosum, Sw. 

scandens, y. Sm. 

appendiculatum, 

Willi. 

variabile, Hook. 

flagelliferum, Wall. 

virens, Wall. 

minus, Mett. 

axillare, Cav, 

tricuspe, Hook. 

aureum, L. 

spicatum, Z. 

Blumeanum, Hook. 



5601 Platycerium biforme, Bl. 

CHARACEyE. 

5602 Nitella flagelliformis, A. Br. 

5603 Roxburghii, A. Br. 

5604 oligospira, A. Br. 



5605 Chara corallina, Willd. 

5606 verticillata, Roxb. 

5607 furcata, Roxb. 

5608 involucrata, Roxb. 

5609 coronata, Ziz. 

5610 brachypus, A. Braun. 

561 1 foetida, A. Braun. 

5612 flaccida, A. Braun. 

5613 gymnopus, A. Braun. 

MUSCL 

5614 Andreaea rigida, Wils. 

5615 commutata, C. Muell. 

5616 Indica, Mitt. 

5617 densifolia, Mitt. 

5618 Pleuridium tenue, Mitt. 

5619 Garckea phascoides, C, 

Mudl. 

5620 Leptotrichum Khasianum 

Mitt. 

5621 pomifonne, Mitt. 

5622 tortile, Hampe. 

5623 divaricatum, Mitt. 

5624 Griffithii, Mitt. 

5625 amplexans, Mitt. 

5626 tortipes, Mitt. 

5627 laxissimum, Mitt. 

5628 capillaceum, Mitt. 

5629 inclinatum, Mitt. 

5630 setiferum, Mitt. 

5631 heteromallum, Mitt. 

5632 patulum, Mitt. 

5633 Himalayanum, Mitt. 

5634 Reinwardti, Mitt. 

5635 Wahlenbeigii, Mitt. 

5636 Ditrichum apophysatum, 

Hpe. 

5637 Trematodon Hookeri, C. 

Muell. 

5638 conformis, Mitt. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



LIST OF BEXGAL AXD ASSAM PLANTS. 



207 



5639 Trematodon sabulosus, G^r/j^ 

5640 megapophysatus, C, 

Muell. 

5641 Leucoloma Taylori, Mitt, 

5642 amoene-virens, Mitt, 

5643 Dicranum gymnostomum, 



Mitt, 



5644 • 
5645 

5646 ■ 

5647 ■ 

5648 ■ 

5649 
5650 
5651 latinerve, Mitt, 



Himalayanum, Mitt, 
' assimile, Hampe, 

lorifolium, Mitt, 

palustre, Brid, 
■ fragile, Hook, 

Beigeri, Bland, 

decipiens, Mitt, 



5652 
5653 
5654 
5655 
5656 
5657 
5658 
5659 
5660 
5661 
5662 

5663 
5664 
5665 
5666 

5667 

5668 
5669 

5670 

5671 
5672 



gracile, Mitt, 

pyriforme, Schult, 

Goughii, Mitt, 

ericoides, Griff, 

sordidum, Wils, 

nigrescens, Mitt, 

laetum, Mitt, 

ericetorum, Mitt, 

uncinatum, Harv, 

Dicticyon, Mitt, 

didymodon, Griff. 

csBspitosum, Mitt, 

asperulum. Mitt, 

attenuatum, Mitt, 

subreflexifolium, 

Muell, 

crispifolium, C, 



C, 



Muell, 

leptocaule, C, MuelL 

subreflexum, C, 



Muell, 



5673 Dicranella pseudosubulata, 

C, Muell, 

5674 toraentosula, C 

Muell, 

5675 aspenila, Hpe, 

5676 villicaulis, Hpe, 



5677 Pottia vernicosa, Hpe, 

5678 rufescens, C, Muell, 

5679 Gymnostomum Kurzii, 

Hpe, 

5680 purpurascens, Hpe, 

5681 Didymodon squarrosus, 

Hook, 

5682 gracilescens, Mitt, 

^683 laxifolius, Mitt, 

5684 dentatus, Mitt, 

5685 crenulatus, Mitt. 

5686 stenocarpus, Mitt, 

5687 HolomitriumGriffithianumy 

Mitt, 

5688 Indicura, Mitt, 

5689 crispulum, Mitt, 

5690 alpinum, Mitt, 

5691 Leucophanes glaucus, 

Mitt, 

5692 octoblepharoides, 

Brid, 

5693 Octoblepharum albidum, 

Hedw, 

5694 Splachnobiyum Indicum, 

Hpe, 

5695 Leucobryum Javense, 

Mitt 

5696 sanctum, Hampe, 

5697 aduncum, Doz. and 



integerrimum, C, 5698 



Muell, 

Dicranella. 5699 
aciculata, C, Muell, 5700 



Molk, 
Nilghiriense, C, 

Muell, 

Bowringii, Mitt. 

sanctum, Hpe. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



2o8 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS, 



5701 Schistomitrium Gardneria- 

num, Mitt, 

5702 Rhabdoweisia. 

5703 Tortula Drummondii, J/i'//. 

5704 anomala, Mitt. 

Sl^S longifolia, Mitt 

5706 cylindrica, Mitt, 

5707 stenophylla, Mitt, 

5708 Khasiana, Mitt. 

5709 flavescens, Hook, a fid 

Grev. 

5710 gregaria, Mitt, 

57 1 1 Indica, Hook. 

5712 angustifolia, Hook, 

and Grev, 

5713 cylindrotheca, Mitt, 

5714 Anoectangium clarum, 

Mitt. 

5715 Thomsoni, Mitt, 

5716 Hymenostylium xantho- 

carpum, Brid, 
^jjj aurantiacum, Mitt, 

5718 curvirostrum, Mitt, 

5719 vermicosum, Mitt, 

5720 inconspicuum, Grifi 

5721 Barbula rufescens, il///^. 

5722 vinealis, Brid, 

5723 obscura, Mitt, 

5724 constricta, Mitt, 

5725 hastata, Mitt. 

5726 recurvifolia, Mitt. 

5727 asperifolia, Mitt. 

5728 albicuspis, Mitt, 

5729 comosa, Doz, and 

Molk. 

5730 ovata, Mitt. 

5731 nigrescens, -^///. 

5732 confertifolia, Mitt. 

5733 subramosa, C. Muell. 



5735 Barbula Kurzii, C, Muell. 

5736 subramosa, C, Muell, 

5737 horridifolia, C. Muell, 

5738 ferruginea, Hampe, 

5739 marginatula, C, 

Muell 

5740 Trichostomum orientale, 

Willd, 

5741 Indicum, Schw, 

5742 thelinemon, C. MuelL 

5743 Symblepharis Hookeri, 

Wils. 

5744 Kurzii, Hampe. 

5745 Angstroemia acutifolia, 

Hpe, 
5746 subexigua, C. Muell. 

5747 Desmatodon latifolius, 

Brid 

5748 longirostris, Muell. 

5749 recurvus, Mitt. 

5750 Wallichii, Mitt, 

5751 Javanicus, il//V/. 

5752 spathulatus, J//V/. 

5753 Synlrichia princeps. Mitt. 

5754 Syrrhopodonheterophyllus, 

Mitt. 
5755 Gardneri, 5^Aa^. 

5756 Erpodium Mangifeiae, C. 

5757 Calymperes fasdculatum, 

Mitt. 

5758 tenerum, C. Muell. 

5759 Hyophila Kurziana, Hpe. 
5760 Hookeri, Hpe. 

5761 Harvey ana, Hpe. 

5762 Grimmia apocarpa, Zfefe'. 

5763 leucophloea, Cfw. 

5764 redunca. Mitt. 

5765 inflectens, Mitt. 



5734 Gangetica, C. Muell. 5766 macrotheca, Mitt. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS, 



209 



5767 Grimmia ovata, Web, and 
Mohr, 

— strictifolia, Mitt, 

— fuscescens, Mitt, 

— apophysata, Hpe, 



5768 

5769 
5770 
5771 

5772 



Guembelia commutata, 
Rhacomitrium subsecun- 

dum, Hook, 

lanuginosum, Mitt, 

canescens, Mitt, 

Himalayanum, Mitt, 

Khasianum, Mitt, 

Nepalense, Mitt, 

elongatum, Mitt, 

subheterostichum, C 

Muell, 
lorifolium, Hpe, 



5773 
5774 
5775 
5776 
5777 
5778 
5779 

5780 

5781 Glyphomitrium Tortula, 

Mitt, 

5782 Zy godon obtusifolius, Hook. 
5783 brevisetus, Wils, 

5784 stric'tus, Mitt, 

5785 Orthotrichum speciosum, 

NE, 
5786 Hookeri, Wils, 

5787 Ulota robusta, Mitt, 

5788 Macromitrium Perottetii, 

C, Muell, 



5789 
5790 
5791 
5792 
5793 
5794 



• Assamicum, Mitt, 
Nepalense, Schw, 

' Moorcroftii, Schwaeg, 

• densum, Mitt, 
sulcatum, Brid. 
goniorhynchum, 



Mitt, 

5795 Schlottheimia Grevilleana, 

Mitt, 

5796 Physcomitrium repandum, 

5797 pulchellum, Mitt, 

5798 cyathicarpum, Mitt, 



5799 Entosthodon Wallichii, 

Mitt, 

5800 Funaria hygrometrica. Dill, 

5801 leptopoda. Griff, 

5802 Nepalensis, C, Muell. 

5803 Voitia Hookeri, Mitt, 

5804 Tayloria Indica, Mitt, 

5805 subglabra, Mitt, 

5806 Splachnum urceolatum, 

Bryol, Eur, 

- mnioides, Hedw, 

- angustatum, L, 



5807 ■ 

5808 - 

5809 Meesia uliginosa, Hedw, 

5810 Oreas Martiana, Brid. 

581 1 Bartramia Halleriana, 

Hedw. 

- subulata, Br. and 



Schimp. 

leptodonta, Wils. 

subpellucida, Mitt. 

dicranacea, C. Muell. 

sublaevissima, C, 



5812 

5813 - 

5814 - 

5815 - 

5816 - 

Muell, 

5817 Kurziana, C, Muell, 

5818 Philonotis Griffithiana, 

Mitt, 

5819 glomerata, Mitt, 

5820 leptocarpa, Mitt, 

5821 subulosa, Mitt, 

5822 angusta. Mitt, 

5823 laxissima, Mitt. 

5824 Tumeriana, Mitt, 

5825 falcata. Mitt. 

5826 fontana, Brid. 

5827 lutea. Mitt. 

5828 speciosa, Mitt. 

5829 longicollis, Hampe, 

5830 Breutelia Indica, Mitt, 

5831 Webera elongata, Mitt, 

5832 polymorpha, Schimp, 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



2IO 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS, 



5833 Webera rigescens, Mitt 

5834 Himalayana, Mitt 

5835 flexuosa, Mitt, 

5836 delicatula, Mitt 

5837 cruda, Schw, 

5838 reflexula, Hpe, 

5839 flacca, Mitt, 

5840 Bryum filiforme, Mitt, 



' auratum, Mitt, 
• nitidum, Mitt, 
Weissiae, Mitt, 
Harveyanum, C, 



Muell, 

argenteum, L, 

coronatum, Schw, 

hemisphaericarpum, 



and 



5841 
5842 
5843 
5844 

5845 
5846 

5847 

5848 
5849 
5850 
5851 
5852 
5853 

5854 
5855 
5856 
5857 
5858 

5859 
5860 
5861 
5862 

5863 giganteum, Hook. 

^354 roseum, Schreb, 

5865 ramosum, Mitt, 

5866 laxelimbatum, Hpe, 

5867 melanostegium, C, 

Muell, 
5868 corragatum, Hpe, 



C, MuelL 

rubens, Mitt, 

fulvellum, Wils. 

erythrinum, Mitt, 

nitens, Hook, 

alpinum, L, 

cemuum, Br, 

Schimp, 

lacustre, Brid, 

caespititium, L, 

cellulare, Hook, 

splachnoides, Mitt 

flaccum. Wills, 

Nepalense, Mitt, 

paradoxum, Schw, 

recurvulum, Mitt 

medianuniy Mitt. 



5869 Ryum pseudo-alpinum, C, 

MuelL 
5870 ampullaceum, C, 

MuelL 

5871 brachyacron, C, 

MuelL 

5872 Hypnum laeviusculum, 

Mitt 

5873 pterygonioides, 



Mitt. 



5874 



decorum, Mitt 



5875 fulvum, Mitt 

5876 incompletum, Mitt, 

$877 Bonplandii, Mitt 

5878 longicuspidatum, 

Mitt. 

5879 — ' — cuspidifenim, Mitt, 

5880 Buchanani, Hook, 

5881 cameratum, Mitt, 

5882 procumbens, Mitt 

5883 Kamounense, Harv. 

5884 plumosum, Sw. 

5885 hians, Hedw, 



5886 - 

5887 - 

5888 - 

5889 - 

5890 - 

5891 planiusculum, Mitt. 

5892 herbaceum, Mitt. 

5893 sparsile, Mitt. 

^894 Tavoyense, Hook. 



' dumosum, Mitt, 
' scabrisetum, Schw, 
- nisciforme, Wils, 
vagans, Harv, 
semitortum, Mitt, 



5895 
5896 

5897 
5898 

5899 
5900 



Wightii, Mitt 
uncinatum, Hedw. 
• orbiculatum, Mitt. 
pseudostriatum, C. 



MuelL 
cycnopelma. C, 

MuelL 
applanatum, Hpe, 



Digitized by 



Google 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS, 



211 



5901 Hypnum corrugatulum, C 
MuelL 

5902 subalbicans, Hpe, 

5903 euroblastum, C 



5904 



MuelL 
xanthocladum, 



C. 



Muell. 

pycnothecium, 



MuelL 

ripicolum, C. MuelL 

submacrocarpum, C, 



MuelL 
stigmatophyllum, C, 

MuelL 

orbiculare, Hpe. 

Ballianum, C MuelL 

semiblastum, C, 



5905 

5906 
5907 

5908 

5909 
5910 
59" 

5912 

5913 
5914 

5915 
5916 

5917 

5918 

5919 

MuelL 

5920 Porotrichum Kurzianum, 

Hpe. 

5921 Meteorium plicatum, Mitt, 

5922 Wightii, Mitt, 

5923 acuminatum, Mitt, 

5924 Hookeri, Mitt, 

5925 nitidum, Mitt, 

5926 speciosum, Mitt, 

5927 divergens, Mitt, 



MuelL 
intodontiphyllum, C, 

MuelL 

subtenax, Hpe, 

inaequirameum, C, 

MuelL 

amblyacron, C, 

spiculosum, Hpe, 

longedecurrens, C, 



MuelL 
mastigophonim, C, 

MuelL 
brachythecioides, C, 



5928 Meteorium squarrosum, 

Mitt 

5929 phaeum, Mitt, 

5930 flammeum, Mitt, 

5931 solutum, Mitt, 

5932 cordatum, Mitt, 

5933 membranaceum, 

Mitt, 

5934 VVallichii, Mitt, 

5935 Hookeri, Mitt, 

5936 commutatum, Mitt, 

5937 aureura, Mitt, 

5938 spiculatum, Mitt, 

5939 lanosum, Mitt. 

5940 aureo-nitens, Mitt, 

5941 filamentosum, Mitt. 

5942 infuscatum, Mitt, 

5943 Stereodon juliformis, Mitt, 
5944 inflexus, Mitt, 

5945 decolor, Mitt, 

5946 pinetorum. Mitt, 

5947 flavescens, Mitt, 

5948 aureus, Mitt, 

5949 capillaceus. Mitt, 

5950 brevirostris, Mitt, 

5951 russulus, Mitt, 

5952 tenuirameus, Mitt, 

5953 renitens. Mitt, 

5954 speciosus, Mitt, 

5955 extentus, Mitt. 

595^ camurifolius, Mitt, 

5957 crista-castrensis, Mitt, 

5958 iraponens, Mitt, 

5959 — ^ — perspicuus, Mitt, 

5960 cupressiformis, Brid, 

5961 propinguus. Mitt, 

^^62 curvirostris, Mtit, 

5963 erythrocaulis, Mitt, 

5964 amblyostegus. Mitt, 

5965 nictans, Mitt, 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



212 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS, 



5966 

5967 
5968 

5969 
5970 
5971 
5972 
5973 
5974 
5975 
5976 
5977 

5978 
3979 
5980 

5981 
5982 

5983 
5984 

5985 
5986 

5987 
5988 

5989 
5990 
5991 
5992 
5993 
5994 
5995 
5996 
5997 
5998 

5999 
6000 
6001 
6002 
6003 



Stereodon lepidus, M/tt 

creperus, Mitt, 

celatus, Miff, 

Fabronia, MiU, 

ichnotocladus, Miff. 



compressifolius, Miff, 

cyperoides, Miff. 

rostellatus, Miff, 

cygnicollus, Miff, 

Nepalensis, Miff, 

stissophyllus, Miff, 

reticulatus, £>oz, and 

Molk, 
succosus, Miff, 



orthothecius, Miff, 

tristiculus, Miff, 

confertissimus, Miff. 

Harveyanus, Miff, 

humilis, Miff, 

brachypelma, C, 

Muell, 

rostratus, Miff, 

glauco-virens, Miff, 

paleaceus, Miff, 

neckeroideus, Miff, 



Donianus, Miff, 

denticulatus, Brid, 

nemoralis, Miff, 

albescens, Miff, 

Assamicus, Mitt, 

longitheca, Mitt, 

distichaceus, Miff, 

taxirameus, Miff, 

Ivoreanus, Miff, 

prsemoUis, Miff, 

acutirameus, Miff, 

angustifolius, Miff, 

plicatus, Miff, 

Isetus, Miff, 

Gardneri, Miff, 



rubicundus, Miff. 

caliginosusr, Miff, 

Schwaegricheni, Miff. 

Griffithii, Miff, 

curvatus, Miff, 

luridus, Miff, 

pulchellus, Miff, 

— comes, Miff, 

fulvonitens. Miff, 

nubigena, Miff, 

Schreberi, Miff, 

lancifoUus, Mitt, 

erinaceus, Miff, 

— asper. Mitt, 

— echinatus. Mitt, 
erraticus, Mitt. 

— planulus, Mitt, 

— orientalis, Miff, 



6023 surcularis. Mitt, 



6024 



lanytrichus, Mitt, 



6025 penicillatus. Mitt, 



psilunis. Mitt. 

■ pilosulus, Mitt, 
Himalayanus, Mitt, 

■ macrocarpus, Mitt, 
pseudostriatus, Mitt. 
tenuis, Mitt, 
Hookeri, Mitt, 

■ micans. Mitt, 
serrula. Mitt, 

' lychnites, Mitt, 
glaucocarpus, Mitt, 



6026 
6027 
6028 
6029 
6030 
6031 
6032 
6033 
6034 

6035 
6036 

6037 Entodon pallidisetus, 

Hampe, 

6038 Sauloma microcarpa, 

Hf, and Wils, 

6039 Lepidopilum purpuratum, 

Miff, 

6040 secundum, Mitt, 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



213 



6041 Lepidopilum flagellaceum, 

C. MuelL 

6042 Hookeria acutifolia, Hook. 

6043 Stereophyllum Indicum, 

Mitt. 
Neckera Hookerana, Mitt. 

- rectifolia, Mitt. 

- dentata, Griff. 

- glossophylla, Mitt. 

- flexuosa, Harv. 



— exserta, Hook. 

— crinita, Griff. 

— acutata, Mitt. 



6044 
6045 
6046 
6047 
6048 
6049 
6050 
6051 

6052 Himalayana, Mitt. 

6053 fimbriata, Harv. 

6054 fruticosa, Mitt. 

6055 
6056 

6057 
6058 
6059 
6060 
6061 
6062 
6063 
6064 
6065 
6066 
6067 
6068 



macrocarpa, -5/7.flr. 

subserrata, Hook. 

arcuans, Mitt. 

— • crenulata, Harv. 

alopecuroides, Mitt. 

ligulaefolia, Mitt. 

arbuscula, Hpe. 

longe-exserta, Hpe. 

subtenax, C, MuelL 

subbicolor, Hpe. 

apophysata, Hpe. 

himantophylla,/rw/^. 

craspedophylla, Hpe. 

Pilotrichum tumido- 
aureum, C. MuelL 

6069 Hedwigia ciliata, Ehrh. 

6070 Leucodon secundus, Mitt. 

607 1 Cryphaea sphaerocarpa, 

Mitt. 

6072 concavifolia, Mitt. 

6073 Cleisostoma ambigua, if//'//. 

6074 Anomodon viticulosus, 

Hook. 
5075 integerrimus, Mitt. 



6076 Anomodon planatus, Mitt. 

6077 tristis, CesatL 

6078 devolutus, Mitt. 

6079 fuscinervis, C. MuelL 

6080 Rhegmatodon declinatus, 

Brod. 

6081 polycarpus, Mitt. 

6082 orthostegius, Mont. 

6083 Trachypus bicolor, Schw. 

6084 blandus, Alitt. 

6085 Harveyi, MitL 

6086 fuscescens, Mitt. 

6087 Buchanani, Mitt. 

6088 declinatus, Mitt. 

6089 crispatulus, Mitt. 

6090 auriculatus, Mitt. 

6091 Leskea capillata, Mitt. 

6092 obscuriuscula, Mitt. 

^093 subulacea, Mitt. 

6094 stratosa, Mitt. 

6095 prionophylla, Mitt. 

0096 ramuligera, Mitt. 

6097 Wallichii, Mitt. 

6098 Hookeri, Mitt. 

6099 cymbifolia, Mitt. 

6100 trachypoda, Mitt. 

6101 glaucina, Mitt. 

6102 contortula, Mitt. 

6103 minuscula, Mitt. 

6104 sparsifolia, J//'//. 

6105 remotifolia, Hook. 

6106 haplohjonenium, 

Mitt. 

6107 Rozea pterogonioides, 

a MuelL 

6108 Calicostella papillata, Mitt. 

6109 Rhacopilum orthocarpum, 

Mitt. 

61 10 Conomitrium Bengalense, 

Hpe. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



214 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



6111 Fissidens nobilis, 6^/-/^ 



acutifolius, Mitt, 

anomalus, Mont, 

cristatus, Mitt. 

taxifolius, H^dw, 

sylvaticus, Griff, 

areolatus, Griff, 

obscurus, Mitt, 

involutus, Mitt, 

jungermannioides, 

Griff. 

elongatus, Mitt, 

diversifolius, Mitt, 

pulchellus, Mitt, 

crenulatus, Mitt, 

Ceylonensis, Doz. and 

Molk. 
6126 bryoides, Hedw. 

- longisetus, Griff. 

- Kurzii, C. Miull, 

- subpalmatus, C, 



6112 
6113 
6114 
6115 
6116 
6117 
6118 
6119 
6120 

6121 
6122 
6123 
6124 
6125 



6127 
6128 
6129 



Muell, 

6130 teraicola, C Muell, 

6131 Titalyanus, C, Muell. 



— auriculatus, C Muell, 

— pallidulus, Hpe. 

— corticula, Hpe, 

— polysetulus, C, Muell, 

— lancifolius, Hpe, 

— cincinatus, Hpe, 



6132 

6133 
6134 

613s 
6136 
6137 

6138 Rhizogonium spimforme, 

Br. 

6139 Mnium crispum, Mitt, 

6140 trichomitrium, Mitt, 

6 141 serratum, Brid, 

6142 lycopodioideSy Hook, 

6143 heterophyllum, Hook, 

6144 — 7- coriaceum, Griff, 

6145 dilatatum, Wils, 

6146 succulentum, Mitt, 



6147 Mnium rhynchophorum, 

Hook, 

6148 undulatum, Hedw, 

6149 medium, Bruch, and 

Schimp, 

- punctatum, Hedw, 

- subcrispum, C, Muell, 

- reflexifolium, C, 



Muell, 

reticulatum, C, Muell, 

tenerrimum, C. Muell, 

densirete, Hpe, 



6150 
6151 
6152 

6153 
6154 

6155 

6156 Mniadelphus, obovatus, 

Mitt, 

6157 heterophyllus, Mitt, 

6158 Griffithii, Mitt, 

6159 Daltonia apiculata, Mitt, 

6160 marginata, Griff". 

6 161 flexifolia, Mitt, 

6162 semitorta, Mitt, 

6163 subapiculata, Hampe. 

6164 Cyathophorum Adiantum, 

Mitt. 

6165 Hookerianum, Mitt, 

6166 Hypopterygium flavo-lim- 

batum, C, Mtull, 

6167 Diphyscium longifolium, 

Griff 

6168 involutum, Mitt, 

6169 Atrichum subserratum. 

Mitt, 

6170 flavisetum, Mitt, 

61 71 Oligotrichum semilamella- 

turn, Mitt, 

6172 Pogonatum Himalayanum, 

Mitt 

^173 microstomum, R, Br. 

6174 aloides, Brid, 

^'75 hexagonum, Mitt, 

6176 ^2X\j\\xmy HafV, 



Digitized by 



Google 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS, 



215 



6177 Pogonatum proliferum, 

Mitt 

6178 flexicaule, i)/"///. 

6179 seihinudum, Mitt 

6180 gymnophyllum, Mitt, 

6181 rufisetum, Mitt, 

6182 fuscatum, Mitt, 

6183 fastigiatum, Mitt, 

6184 Catharinea obtusula, C, 

Muell, 

6185 Pol3rtrichum perichaetiale, 

Mont 

6186 tortipes, Wils. 

6187 densifolium, Wils, 

6188 xanthopilum, Wils, 

6189 hirsutum, Hpe, 

6190 integerrimum, Hpe. 

6 1 9 1 striatum, Hpe, 

6192 Lyellia crispa, Hook, 

6193 Sphagnum cymbifolium, 

DHL 

6194 pseudo-cymbifolium, 

C Muell, 

6195 cuspidatum, -£>^r>%. 

6196 cuspidatulum, C 

- acutifoUum, Ehrh, 

- Gedeanum, Doz, and 



6197 
6198 

6199 

6200 
6201 
6202 
6203 
6204 
6205 



Molk, 
Junghuhnianum, Doz, 

and Molk, 

Khasianura, Mitt, 

fimbriatum, Wils, 

rufulum, C, Muell, 

Thomsoni, C, Muell. 

ovatum, Hpe, 

Hookeri, C. MuelL 



HEPATIC^. 
6206 Jungermannia atrata, Mitt 



6207 Jungermannia concinnata, 

Lightf, 

6208 rubida, Mitt 

6209 Hasskarliana, NE. 

6210 appressifolia, Mitt 

62 1 1 lanigera, Mitt, 

6212 marcescens, Mitt 

6213 purpurata, Mitt 

6214 sanguinolenta, Griff, 

6215 Assamica, Griff. 

6216 polyirhiza. Hook. 

6217 Ariadne, Tayl. 

6218 elongella, Tayl, 

6219 pluridentata, Mitt 

6220 setosa, Mitt 

6221 piligera, NE. 

6222 Doniana, Hook. 

6223 exsecta, Schm. 

6224 assimilis, Mitt 

6225 setigera, Ldbg. 

6226 hirtella, Weber. 

6227 setiformis, Ehrh. 

6228 Orcadensis, Hook. 

6229 ventricosa, Dicks, 

6230 bicuspidata, L. 

6231 connivens, Dicks. 

6232 albula, Mitt. 

^^ZZ divaricata, Eng, Bot 

6234 Plagiochila Nepalensis, 

Ldbg^ 

6235 fruticosa, Mitt, 

6236 flexuosa, Mitt, 

6237 orientalis, Tayl. 

6238 tenuis, Ldbg, 

6239 denticulata, Mitt 

6240 sciophila, NE. 

6241 Khasiana, Mitt. 

6242 Wightii, Ldbg, 

6243 firma, Mitt 

6244 trapezoidea, Ldbg. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



2l6 



LIST OF BENGAL AXD ASSAM PLANTS. 



6245 Plagiochila retusa, Mitt. 



6246 
6247 
6248 
6249 
6250 
6251 
6252 

6253 
6254 

6255 
6256 

6257 
6258 



Z. 



- ambigua, Mitt. 
integrifolia, Mitt. 
Brauniana, N£. 

• fimbriata, Mitt, 
' debilis, Mitt 

' deflexa, Milt. 

• elegans, Mitt. 

• uniformis, Mitt. 
subintegerrima, J\^E. 
secretifolia, Mitt. 
renitens, Lddg. 
semidecurrens, Z. and 



- phalangea, Tayl. 

6259 Leioscyphus Taylori, Mitt. 

6260 Lophocolea bidentata, NE. 

6261 flaccida, Mitt, 

6262 Chiloscyphtus argutus, N£. 

6263 coalilus, N£. 

6264 Sphagnoecetis communis, 

6265 Gymnanthe ciliata, Mitt. 

6266 Isostachys Indica, Mitt. 

6267 Scapania contorta, Mitt. 

6268 planifolia, N£. 

6269 femiginea, Z. and Z. 

6270 Ptilidium ciliare, NE. 

6271 trichophyllum, Mitt. 

6272 Sendtnera Woodsii, End/. 

6273 diclados, End/. 

6274 juniperina, /^E. 

6275 Trichocolea tomentella, 

J\rE. 

6276 Lepidozia flexuosa, Mitt. 
6277 

6278 ■ 

6279 ■ 
6280 
6281 • 



• ceratophylla, Mitt. 
setacea, Mitt. 
Wallichiana, Gottsche. 

• reptans, NE. 
brevifolia, Mitt. 



6282 Mastigobryum echinatum, 

Gottsche. 

6283 insequilatenim, Z. 

and L. 

6284 Wallichianum, NE. 

6285 umbricatum, Mitt. 

6286 deflexum, NE. 

6287 altemifolium, NE. 

6288 prgeruptum, NE. 

6289 tridens, NE. 

6290 falcatum, Ldbg. 

6291 appendiculatum, 

Mitt. 

6292 Himalayanum, Mitt. 

6293 oblongum, Mitt. 

6294 Calypogeia marginella, 

Mitt. 

6295 Trichomanis, Corda. 

6296 aeruginosa, Mitt. 

6297 lunata, Mitt. 

6298 Radula Javanica, Gottsche. 

6299 obscura, Mitt. 

6300 complanata, Dum. 

6301 Madotheca acutifolia, Z. 

and L. 

6302 ligulifera, Tayl. 

^Z^Z campylophylla, Z. and 

Z. 

6304 revoluta, Z. tf«^ Z. 

6305 ptychantha, Mitt. 

6306 plumosa, Mitt. 

6307 Bryopteris Trinitensis, Z. 

and L. 

6308 Ptychanthus striatus, N.E. 

6309 Lejeunia spathulistipa, 

6310 Wardiana, Mitt. 

631 1 repleta, Mitt. 

6312 Lindenbergii, 

Gottsche. 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS, 



217 



6313 Lejeunia subfusca, N. E, 

6314 adplanata, N. E, 

6315 turgida, N, E. 

6316 semirepanda, N. E, 

63 1 7 infuscata, Mitt 

6318 saccata, Mitt 

^319 Wightii, Z^/<^^. 

6320 Wallichiana, Lehm, 

6321 firma, Mitt. 

6322 obscura, Mitt. 

^323 subacuta, Mitt. 

6324 appendiculata, Mitt 

6325 - — aligera, Mitt 

6326 laevinscula, Mitt. 

6327 flexuosa, Mitt. 

6328 Nilgiriana, Gottsche. 

6329 Khasiana, Mitt. 

^2i2P angustifolia, Mitt. 

633 1 venusta, Lacost. 

6332 subopaca, Mitt. 

6333 Pulla, Mitt 

6334 producta, Mitt. 

6335 loDgifolia, Mitt. 

633^ diversifolia, Mitt. 

6337 Frullania Wallichiana,^!//*//. 

6338 squarrosa, N. E. 

^339 ericoides, N. E. 

6340 aeolotis, N. E. 

6341 aspenila, Mitt. 

6342 inflexa, Mitt. 

6343 breviuscula, Mitt. 

6344 rugosa, Mitt 

^345 physantha, Mitt. 

6346 Nepal ensis, L.and L. 

6347 apiculata, -^. iV! and 

B. 

6348 neurota, Tayl. 

^349 Hutchinsiae, iV[ E. 

6350 moniliata, -A^ E. 

635 1 evoluta, J//*//. 



6352 Calycularia crispula, Mitt 

6353 Steetzia ambigua, Mitt. 

6354 Pellia epiphylla, N. E. 

6355 Metgeria furcata, N. E. 

6356 Sarcomitrium multifidum, 

Mitt 

6357 . pingue, Mitt 

6358 Synhymenium aureo-nitens, 

6359 Targionia Michelii, Corda. 

6360 Plagiochasma cordatum, 

Z. and L. 

6361 appendiculatum, Z. 

/7;/^ Z. 

6362 Colsmannianum, Z. 

flr//^ Gottsche. 

6363 paradoxum, 6^r/^ 

6364 pedicellatum. Griff. 

6365 Marchantia polymorpha, Z. 

6366 nitida, Z. ^/^dT Z. 

6367 Nepalensis, L.and L, 

6368 linearis, Z. ^z^// Z. 

6369 Assamica, (7r/j^ 

6270 subintegra, Mitt. 

6371 Dumortiera hirsuta, N. E. 

6372 denudata, Mitt. 

^373 Nepalensis, N. E. 

6374 Fegatella conica, Corda. 

6375 Grimaldia dichotoma, 

Radd 

6376 barbifrons, ^^j^>^. 

6377 Fimbriaria Nepalensis, 

TayL 

6378 elegans, Spreng. 

^379 Wallichiana,Z.a«drZ. 

6380 Khasiana, J////. 

6381 viridis, Z. ^«// L. 

6382 leptophylla, il/b//. 

6383 Reboulia hemisphaerica, 

Radd. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



2l8 



UST OF BENGAL AXD ASSAM PLANTS. 



6384 Monosolenium tenerum, 
' Griff. I 

6385 Anthoceros glandulosus, 

Z. and L. 

6386 punctatus, Z. 

6387 Riccia discolor, Z. and Z. 

6388 cristallina, Z. 

6389 ciliata, Hoffm, 

6390 fluitans, Z. 

LICHENES, 

6391 Leptogium Menziesii, 

Motit, 

6392 Pyrgidium Bengalense, 

NyL 

6393 Acroscyphus sphaeropho- 

roides, Lev. 

6394 Baeomyces pachypus, NyL 

6395 icmadophyllus, Z. 

6396 Cladonia fimbriata, Hoffm. 

6397 degenerans, Flk. 

6398 turgida, Hoffm. 

6399 furcata, Hoffm. 

6400 deformis, Hoffm. 

6401 digitata, Hoffm. 

6402 rangiformis, Hoffm. 

6403 gracilis, Z^^^. 

6404 aggregata, Eschw. 

6405 notata, Krplh. 

6406 trachyna, ^M. 

6407 rangiferina, Z. 

6408 Stereocaulon ramulosum, 

6409 nesaeum, Nyl. 

6410 strictum, Nyl. 

641 1 coralloides, Fr. 

6412 paschale, Ach. 

6413 tomentosutn, Zr. 

6414 myriocarpoides, Nyl. 

64 1 5 arbuscula, Nyl. 



6416 Siphula ceratites, Fr. 

6417 Thamnolia vermicularis, 

Ach. 

6418 Usnea barbata, Fr. 



6419 
6420 
6421 

6422 
6423 



longissima, Ach. 
lacunosa, Willd. 
Vrieseana, Mont, and 



Bosch. 

trichoidea, Ach. 

ceratina, Ach. 



6424 Chlorea flexuosa, Nyl. 

6425 cladonioides, Nyl. 

6426 Alectoria sulcata, Lev. 

6427 bicolor, Nyl. 

6428 jubata, Ach. 

6429 sulcata, Nyl. 

6430 ochroleuca, Nyl. 

6431 virens, Tayl. 

6432 divaricata, Ach. 

6433 Ramalina calicaris, . 

6434 complanata, Ach. 

643 5 farinacea, Z. 

6436 angulosa, Laur. 

6437 Cetraria Islandica, Ach. 

6438 Stracheyi, Bab. 

6439 reticulata, Krplh. 

6440 Platysma melalomum, Nyl. 

6441 Stracheyi, Nyl. 

6442 leucostigmeum, Nyl 

6443 Fahlunense, Nyl. 

6444 evemiellum, -AJ/. 

6445 ambiguum, Nyl. 

6446 glaucum, Nyl. 

6447 Peltigera malacea, Fr. 

6448 canina, Hoffm. 

6449 rufescens, Hoffm. 

6450 platydactyla, ZT^^/w. 

6451 Solorina crocea, Ach. 

645 2 Simensis, Hochst. 

6453 Sticta retigera, Ach. 



Digitized by 



Google 



LIST OF BENGAL AXD ASSAM PLANTS. 



219 



6454 Sticta pulmonacea, Ach, 6490 

^ 6455 Parmelia hypotrypa, Nyi. 64^1 

6456 Kamtschadalis, ^^>4. 6492 

6457 perlata, Ach, 6493 

6458 perforata, Ach, 6494 

^459 olivetorum, Ach, 6495 

6460 latissima, Fee, 6496 

6461 tiliacea, Ach, 6497 

6462 Isevigata^ Ach. 6498 

6463 saxatilis, Ach. 6499 

A464 caperata, Ach. 6500 

6465 Borreri, TUm. 6501 

6466 olivacea, Ach. ^ 6502 

6467 physodes, Ach. 6503 

6468 pertusa, Schaer. 6504 

6469 firmula, Nyl. 6505 

6470 Physcia speciosa, Fr, 6506 

6471 leucomela, Z. 6507 

6472 picta, Sw. 6508 

6473 Pyxine Cocoes, Ach. 6509 

6474 Meissnerii, Tuckerm, 6510 

6475 Lecanora Domingensis, 65 11 

A^h. 6512 

6476 leprolyta, Nyl. 

6477 polyotera, iVv^- ^S^S 

6478 aurantiaca, Light/. 6514 

6479 Encephalarti, Krplh. 6515 

6480 intnisa, Nyl. 6516 

6481 colobina, Ach, 6517 

6482 subfusca, ^<r^ 6518 

6483 sarcopis, Whlbg. 6519 

6484 granifera, Ach. 6520 

6485 Pertusaha communis, Z^r. 6521 
^ 6486 leioplaca, Nyl. 6522 

6487 Thelostrema microspora, 6523 

Mdnt 

6488 Gyrostomum scyphuU- 6524 

ferum, Ach. 6525 

6489 Lecidea cameo-lutea, 6526 

Turn. 
VII. r 



Lecidea medialis, Tuckerm. 

propinquella, I^yl. 

spadicea, Tuckerm. 

patellarioides, Nyl. 

triphragmia, Nyl. 

premnea, Ach. 

lutea, Dicks. 

luteola, Nyl. 

aequalis, Nyl. 

diorista, Nyl. 

albo-atra, Nyl. 

plurilocularis, Nyl. 

Opegrapha herpetica, Ach. 

subvulgata, Nyl. 

Bonplandiae, Fee. 

Martii, Nyl. 

varia, Ach. 

vulgata, Ach. 

inaequalis, Fee. 

Platygrapha palidella, Nyl. 

glaucomoides, Nyl. 

stigmatica, Krplh. 

Stigmatidiura micrograph- 

um, Nyl. 

melastigma, Nyl. • 

Arthonia cinnabarina. 

subvelata, Nyl. 

subgyrosa, Nyl. 

chiodectoides, Nyl. 

Antillarum, Fee. 

impolitella, Nyl. 

abnormis, Ach. 

circumalbicans, Nyl. 

astroidea, Nyl 

Chiodecton heterotropum, 

Nyl. 
Graphis scripta, Ach. 

obtecta, Nyl. 

Fissurina leuconephela, 

Nyl. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



220 



LIST OF BENGAL AXD ASSAM PLANTS, 



6527 Glyphis cicatricosa, Ach. 

6528 Verrucaria nitida, SchraL 
6529 libricola. Fee, 

6530 tropica, Ach. 

6531 diluta, Fee, 

6532 mastoidella, NyL 

6533 albo-atra, Krplh, 

6534 majuscula, NyL 

6535 Thelopsis inordinata, NyL 

6536 Melanotheca Indica, NyL 

6537 Trypethelium Sprengelii, 



Ach, 



6538 



madreporiforme, 



Eschw, 

6539 subdiscretum, Nyi, 

6540 pallescens, Fee, 

6541 leucotrypum, NyL 

6542 Strigula complanata, /^^. 

6543 Lepraria flava, Ach, 

FUNGL 

6544 Agaricus regalis, Berk, 

6545 eriophonis, Berk, 

6546 Berkeley!, Hf, 

6547 excoriatus, Fr, 

6548 deliciolum, ^<?r>t. 

6549 horrens, Berk, 

6550 varus, Berk, 

6551 decupellus, Berk, 



6552 
6553 
6554 
6555 
6556 
6557 
6558 
6559 
6560 
6561 
6562 



• duplicatus, Berk, 

• multicolorus, Berk, 

■ omnituens, Berk, 
' adelphus, Berk, 

• cremoriceps, Berk, 
' incongruus, Berk. 

' napipes, I/f. 

• raphanipes, Berk. 

• stillaticius. Berk. 

■ undabundus, Berk, 

• triplicatus, I/f, 



6563 Agaricus papaveraceus, 

Berk. 

6564 podagrosus, Berk, 

6565 velutipes, CurL 

6566 ustipes, Berk, 

^567 rhodellus, Berk, 

6568 antitypus, Berk, 

6^69 camptopus, Berk. 

6570 Broomeianus, Berk, 

6571 myriadeus, Berk, 

6572 nubigenus, Berk. 

6573 aratus, Berk. 

6574 bicrenatus, /If, 

^575 nibiaetinctus, Berk. 

6576 xanthophyllus, Berk. 

- russulinus, Berk. 

- rufatus. Berk, 
' manipularis, Berk, 

- prasius. Berk. 

- rufopictus, Berk, 

• apalosclerus, Berk. 

• vemicarius, Berk. 

• anserinus, Berk, 
' eous, Berk, 
' ninguidus, Berk, 
■ palumbimis, Berk, 



6577 
6578 

6579 
6580 
6581 
6582 
6583 
6584 

6585 
6586 

6587 

6588 chrysoprasius, Berk, 

6589 
6590 

6591 
6592 

6593 
6594 

6595 
6596 

6597 
6598 

6599 
6600 
6601 



■ Goliathus, ^^. 

- cystopus, Berk. 
' Thwaitesii, I/f, 

• examinans, Berk, 

■ microsporus, Berk. 

• aurivellus, Batsch. 

• chrysimyces. Berk, 
' scrupeus, Berk. 

- tener, Schaeff. 
' exaltatus, Berk. 

- sylvaticus, Scfmeff, 
' aureo-fulvus, Berk, 

• sublateritius, Fries. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS, 



221 



6602 Agaricus fascicularis, Huds, 

6603 macrophalus, Berk. 

6604 velutinus, Fers. 

6605 hemisoodes, Berk, 

6606 atrichus, Berk. 

6607 castanophyllus, Berk. 

6608 condensus, Berk. 

6609 caespititius, Berk. 

6610 nassa, Berk. 

66 1 1 flavo-griseus, Berk. 

6612 petaloides, Bull. 

6613 Khasiensis, Berk. 

6614 fulviceps, Berkl. 

6615 stramineus, Berk. 

6616 calvescens, Berk. 

6617 discolor, -5^r^. 

6618 silvaticus, Fr. 

6619 campestris, L. 

6620 caesareus, Scop. 

6621 vaginatus, Bull. 

6622 fritillarius, Berk. 

6623 anax, Berk. 

6624 implanus, Berk. 

6625 laccatus, Scop. 

6626 maculatus, AUf. and 

Sch. 

6627 velutipes, Curt. 

6628 blandulus, Berk. 

5629 dryophilus, -5«//. 

6630 macer, Berk. 

6631 purus, Fers. 

56^2 galericulatus, Scop. 

6633 colligafus, Berk. 

56-^ discordis, -^^r^^. 

55^ g incommiscibilis, 

55^6 dentosus, Berk. 

6637 puberulus, Berk. 

6638 flavo-miniatus, Berk. 

6639 epipterygius, ^f^/. 



6640 Agaricus macrothelus,-5^r>^. 

6641 umbelliferus, Z. 

6642 ranunculinus, Berk. 

6643 radiatilis, Berk. 

6644 placentodes, Berk. 

6645 cuspidatus, Berk. 

6646 euthelus, Berk. 

6647 lazulinus, Fr. 

0648 phlegmaticus, -^^r^t. 

6649 flavidus, Schaeff. 

6650 micromegas, -5^r^. 

665 1 descendens, Berk. 

6652 vinolentus, j9^r>^/. 

6653 latipes, Berk. 

6654 semiglobatus, Batch. 

6655 papilionaceus, Bull. 

6656 montanus, Berkl. 

6657 longipes, ^«//. 

6658 salignus, Fers. 

6659 Cortinarius Emodensis, 

Berk. 
665o vinosus, Berk. 

6661 violaceus, Fries. 

6662 flammeus, -5^r^. 

6663 saniosus, Fr. 

6664 Hygrophorus miniatus, Fr. 

6665 Pomona, Berk. 

6666 fulvus, Berk. 

6667 Lactarius vellereus, /or. 

6668 deliciosus, /^r. 

6669 princeps. Berk. 

6670 inquinans, Berk. 

667 1 subdulcis, Fr. 

6672 stramineus, Berk. 

6673 Nepalensis, -5^r^. 

6674 Lecomtei, Fr. 

6675 Coprinus comatus, Fr. 

6676 Hookeri, Berk. 

6677 vellereus, Berk. 

6678 Pascillus chrysites, -5^r^. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



LIST OF BEXGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS, 



6679 Pascillus sulfureus, Berk, 

6680 pinguis, Hf, 

6681 Russula sanguinea, /r. 

6682 emetica, Fr, 

6683 furcata, Fr, 

6684 grossa, Berk, 

6685 cinnabarina, Hf, 

6686 lepida, ^r. 

6687 Cantharellus infundibulifor- 

mis, Fr, 

6688 Marasmius iridescens, 

Berk. 

6689 erythropus, Fr, 

6690 caperatus, Berk. 

6691 haematodes, Berk, 

6692 Hookeri, Berk, 

^^93 rotula, Fr, 

6694 Lentinus Lecomtei, Fr. 

^^95 Hookerianus, Berk, 

6696 coadunatus, Hf, 

6697 hepaticus, Berk, 

6698 subdulcis, Berk, 

6699 glabratus, Mont. 

6700 Panus monticola, Berk, 

6701 conchatus, Fr. 

6702 Schizophyllum commune, 

Fr, 

6703 Xerotus cantharelloides, 

Berk, 

6704 lobatus, -5^r^. 

6705 Lenzites repanda, Fr. 



6706 
6707 
6708 
6709 
6710 
6711 
6712 

6713 
6714 



• subferruginea, Berk, 

• Palisoti, Fr, 
acuta, Berk, 
imbricata, Fr, 
betulina, Fr. 

' pallida, Berk, 
nigulosa, Berk. 
applanata, Fr, 
ochrophylla, Berk, 



6715 Lenzites eximia, Berk and 

Curt, 

6716 Boletus Emodensis, Berk, 
6717 
6718 
6719 
6720 
6721 
6722 
6723 
6724 
6725 
6726 
6727 



ustalis, Berk. 

delphinusf, Hf, 

furfuraceus, Berk. 

squamatus, Berk, 

fragicolor, Berk. 

gigas, Berk, 

areolatus, Berk. 

scrobiculatus, Berk. 

flavipes, Berk, 

pusillus, Berk. 

vemicarius, Berk. 



6728 Strobilomyces polypyrani i s, 

Hf. 

6729 montosus, Berk, 

^730 nigricans, Berk, 

6731 Polyporus cremoricolor, 

Berk, 
6732 umbilicatus, Berk. 

6733 rufescens, Fr, 

6734 —^ — oblectans, Berk, 

6735 xanthopus, Fr. 

6736 maculatus, Berk, 

^IVl squamosus. Fries. 

6^28 platyponis, Berk, 

^739 sanguineus, Fr, 

6740 flabelliformis, Klotsch. 

6741 rubricus, Berk, 

6742 intybaceus, Fr, 

6743 sulfureus, Fr, 

6744 crispus, Fr, 

6745 ozonioides, Berk, 

6746 iridioides, Berk. 

6747 licnoides, Mont, 

6748 zonalis, Berk, 

6749 hirsutus, Fr, 

6750 versicolor, Fr, 

6751 Nilghiriensis, Mont. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



LIST OF BENGAL AXD ASSAM PLANTS, 



223 



6752 

6753 
6754 

6755 
6756 

6757 
6758 

6759 
6760 
6761 
6762 
6763 
6764 
6765 
6766 
6767 
6768 
6769 
6770 
6771 
6772 

6773 
6774 

6775 
6776 
6777 
6778 
6779 
6780 
6781 
6782 

6783 
6784 

6785 
6786 

6787 
6788 
6789 
790 



Polyponis elongatus, Berk, 

funalis, Fr, 

hypoplastus, Berk, 

picipes, Fr, 

lucidus, Fr, 

cinnabarinus, Fr, 

simulans, Berk, and 

Curr, 

nodipes, Berk, 

tabula&formis, Berk, 

obtectans, Berk, 

nigosus, NE. 

xanthopus, Fr, 

florideus, Berk, 

versiformis, Berk. 

pudens, Berk, 

vallatus, Berk, 

squanueformis, Berk, 

flammans, Berk, 

adustus, Fr, 

digitalis, Berk, 

vivax, Berk, 

Elatinus, Berk, 

meduUaris, Berk, 

australis, Fr, 



fomentarius, L, 

adamantinus, Berk, 

igniarius, Fr, 

senex, Ne, and Mont, 

endophaeus, Berk, 

marginatus, Fr, 

scopulosus, Berk, 

semitostuSy Berk, 

scniposus, Fr, 

xeranticus, Berk, 

flavidus, Berk, 

caperatuSy Berk, 

pictilis, Berk, 

Nepalensis, Berk, 

corium, Berk, 



6791 Polyponis gratus, Berk. 

6792 cereus, Berk, 

6793 Beharensis, Berk, 

6794 Campbelli, Berk, 

6795 Trametes lobata, Berk, 

6796 Hookeri, Berk, 

^797 crenulata, Berk, 

6 798 cingulata, Berk, 

6799 colliculosa, Berk, 

6800 tephroleuca, Berk, 

6801 occidentalis, Fr, 

6802 immutata, Berk, 

6803 ozonioides, Berk, 

6804 Daedalea sanguinea, 

Klotsch, 

6805 tenuis, Berk, 

6806 Emodensis, Berk, 

6807 Cyclomyces turbinatus, 

Berk, 

6808 Hexagonia Wightii, 

Klotsch, 

6809 polygramma, Mont, 

6810 tenuis, Fr, 

68 1 1 nitida, DR. and M, 

6812 Favolus multiplex, Lev, 

6813 tenenimus. Berk, 

6814 intestinalis. Berk, 

6815 setiporus. Berk, 

6816 Menilius lignosus, Berk, 

6817 Laschia subvelutina. Berk, 

6818 lamellosa, Berk, 

6819 tremellosa, Fries, 

6820 Fistulina hepatica, Fr, 

6821 Hydnum coralloides, Scop, 

6822 gilvum. Berk, 

6823 flabelliforme. Berk, 

6824 auriscalpium, L, 

6825 zonatum, Batsch, 

6826 vespertilio, Berk, 

6827 erinaceus, Bull, 



Digitized by 



Google 



224 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS, 



6828 Hydnum flabelliforme, 

Berk. 

6829 Hydnogloeum Kurzii, 

Curr, 

6830 Lachnocladium Hookerii, 

Berk, 

6831 Irpex zonatus, Berk, 

6832 fiavus, Klotsch, 

6833 Radulum spongiosum, 

Berk, 

6834 Thelephora palmata, Fr, 

^835 dentrica, Pers, 

6836 Clavaria botrytis, Pers, 
6S37 formosa, Pers, 

6838 striata, Pers. 

6839 miltina, Berk, 

6840 Phlebia reflexa, Berk, 

6841 Stereum rimosumy Berk, 

6842 purpureum, Fr, 

6843 hirsutum, Fr, 

6844 spadiceum, Fr, 

6845 bicolor, Fr, 

6846 Mougeotii, Fr, 

6847 ostrea, Fr, 

6848 elegans, Fr, 

6849 endocrocinum, -5!^;^. 

6850 lobatum, Fr, 

685 1 cacao, Berk, 

6852 scytale, Berk, 

6853 Corticium Lseve, Fr. 

6854 Calocera sphaerobasis, 

Berk. 

6855 Tremella ferruginea, 5w. 

6856 foliacea, Fr. 

6857 protensa, Berk. 

6858 Dictyophora speciosa, 

Kloisch. 
5859 phalloidea, Lev. 

6860 Clathrus cancellatus, Z. 

6861 Simblum sp. 



6862 Exida hispidula, Berk, 

6863 protracta, LefiK 

6864 bursseformis. Berk. 

6865 Geaster hygrometricus, P. 

6866 limbatus, Fr. 

6867 Bo vista sp. 

6868 Lycoperdon ccelatum, Fr, 

6869 sericellum, Berk. 

6870 gemmatum, Fr. 

6871 pyriforme, Schaeff, 

6872 microspermum, Berk, 

6873 pusillum, Batsch, 

6874 elongatum, -5^i. 

6^75 fucatum, LeiK 

6676 delicatum, Berk, 

6S'jj Emodense, Berk, 

6878 xanthospermum, 

Berk, 

6879 Trichocoma paradoxum, 

Jungh. 

6880 Scheroderma Geaster, Fr. 

6881 Bovita, Fr. 

6882 nitidum, Berk. 

6883 Mitremyces Junghuhnii, 

^//iif^/// and Mull. 

6884 viridis, Berk. 

6885 Diderma contextum, jRrrr. 

6886 Arcyria punicea, Pers. 

6887 Lycogala epidendnim, Fr. 

6888 Reticularia entoxantha, 

Berk. 

6889 Cyathus Hookeri, Berk. 

6890 Emodensis, -5^r^. 

6891 intermedius, Mont, 

6892 Aschersonia ox3rstoma, 

Berk. 

6893 Uredo Clematidis, Berk. 

6894 Coleosporium pingue, Lev. 

6895 Ravenelia Indica, ^^r^. 

6896 Ustilago carbo, Tul, 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



LIST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



225 



6897 Ustilago Emodensis, Berk, 

6898 hMX^,Berk, 

6899 vittata, Berk, 

6900 endotricha, Berk, 

6901 ocrearam, Berk. 

6902 Aecidium Thomsoni, 

Berk. 

6903 Puccinia ustalis, Berk. 

6904 insidiosa, Berk, 

6905 Stilbum lateritium, Berk, 

6906 Typhula fuscipes, Fr. 

6907 Cladosporium scopasforme. 

Berk, 

6908 Sclerographium aterrimum, 

Berk, 

6909 Geoglossum viride, Pers. 

6910 glabrum, Pers, 

691 1 Rhizina zonata, ^^r^. 

6912 Leotia lubrica, Pers. 

6913 Guepinia sp. 

6914 Peziza Darjeelensis, ^^'r^t. 
^9^5 macrotis, Berk, 

6916 aurantia, Pers, 

6917 geneospora, Berk. 

6918 clandestina, Bull, 



6919 
6920 
6921 
6922 
6923 
6924 



frustigena, -5«<//, 
turbinella, Berk, 
stilboidea, Berk, 
citrina, Pers, 
lutescens, Fr, 
seruginea. Berk, 



6925 Bulgaria inquinans, Fr, 

6926 Phytisma piceum, Berk, 

6927 Phacidium ceuthocarpn, 

Fr, 

6928 Asterina aspersa, Berk, 

6929 cincta, Berk, 

6930 scutellifera, Berk. 

6931 Cordyceps falcata, Berk, 
6932 racemosa. Berk, 



6933 Xylaria Hypoxylon, ^//r//. 

6934 piperiformis Berk, 

^935 fistuca, Berk, 

6936 tabacina, Kickx, 



compuncta, Jungh. 

digitata Ir, 

polymorpha, Pers. 

suborbiculare, Welw, 

and Curr, 

crenulatum, Berk, 

concentricum, Bolt. 



— vermicosum, •Sf^zc^///. 

— multiforme, Fr. 

— perforatum, Schwein, 



6937 
6938 
6939 
6,40 

6941 
6942 

6943 
6944 

6945 

6946 Hypocrea semiamplexa. 

Berk, 

6947 floccosa, Fr, 

6948 peltata, Berk, 

6949 grossa, Berk, 

6950 Dothidea vorax, Berk and 

Curt, 

6951 Hypopteris apiospora, 

Mont, 

6952 Bambusae, La*. 

6953 Sphaeria Cayemiensis, 

Fr, 

6954 constellatio, Berk. 

6955 Nepalensis, Berk. 

69^6 Yuccae gloriosae, 

Schxvein, 

6957 Graphiola Phoenicis, Pott. 

6958 Corynelia uberiformis, Fr. 

6959 Meliola sp. 

6960 Peronospora arborescens, 

Berk, (causing the poppy 
disease in India.) 

6961 Eurotium herbariorum, 

Lk, 

6962 Choanephora Cunningham- 

iana, Currey, 



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226 



LIST OF BENGAL A\D ASSAM PLANTS, 



ALG.iE, 

6963 Gloecapsa rupestris, Afarf, 

6964 Microcystis aeruginosa, 

6965 olivacea, JCg, 

6966 Leptothrix ochracea, A^. 

6967 subtilissima, Ji^g, 

6968 muralis, Ji^g, 

6969 mamillosa, Menegh, 

6970 Hypheothrix investiens, 

Mart, 

6971 subundulata, Mart 

6972 tenax, Mart 

6973 Spirulina oscillarioides, 
'' * Turp 

6974 Oscillaria interrupta, Mart, 

6975 Froelichii, Kg, 

6976 tenuis, Lyngb, 

^"911 Juliana, Men, 

6978 versicolor, Mart. 

6979 subfusca, Vauch, 

6980 Grateloupii, Bory, 

6981 Kurziana, Mart, 

6982 tenerriraa, Kg, 

69S3 amphibia, Ag, 

6984 brevis, Kg. 

6985 Cortiana, Men, 

6986 antliaria, Mart, 

6987 limosa, Ag, 

6988 Phormidium oryzetorum, 

Mart, 

6989 Lyngbyaceum, Kg, 

6990 Chthonoblastus salinus, 

Kg, 

6991 Lyngbya crispa, ^^;?. 
6qc)2 cincinnata, Kg, 

6993 cinerascens, Kg> 

6994 solitaris. Kg. 

6995 majuscula, Han\ 

6996 Lcibleinia Juliana, AV- 



6997 Hydrocoleum Kurzii, 

Mart, 

6998 heterotrichum, Kg, 

6999 violaceum, Mart, 

7000 Lenormandi, J/iir/. 

7001 Nostoc gregarium, Thur, 

7002 Hormosiphon coriaceus, 

Kg. 

7003 Anabaena mollis, A^. 

7004 Cylindrospermum spirale, 

Kg. 

7005 Rivularia Lens, Menegh, 

7006 Mastigonema granulatum, 

Mart, 

7007 caespitosum. Kg, 

7008 Scytonema aureum, J/tv/. 

7009 ■ 

7010 - 



Kg. 



granulatum, Mart, 
aerugineo-cinereum, 



701 1 tomentosum, Kg, 

7012 cinereum, il/Jr«. 

7013 palmarum, Mart, 

yoi4 chlorophaeum, Kg. 

7015 Vieillardia, iWtfr/. 

7016 Dictyonema fuscescens, 

Mart, 

7017 Fischera tenuis Mart, 

7018 Hormoceras flaccidum, 

Kg. 

7019 Palmellia bullosa, A!'^. 

7020 Protococcus cohaerens, A^^ 

7021 vulgaris, Kg, 

7022 Pediastrum Rotula^ Ehrh. 

7023 Vol vox sp. 

7024 Closterium sp. 

7025 Cosmarium sp. 

7026 Spirogyra adnata, Lk, 

7027 nitida, Lk, 

7028 elongata, Kg. 

7029 Heeriana, Xaeg. 



Digitized by 



Google 



UST OF BENGAL AND ASSAM PLANTS. 



227 



7030 Spirogyra subaequa, Kq, 

7031 decimina, Lk. 

7032 Zygnema insigne, Kg, 

7033 Zygogonium Bengalense, 

Mart 

7034 Sirogonium sticticum, Kg, 

7035 Mougeotia affinis, Kg, 

7036 Staurospermum coerules- 

cens, Kg- 

7037 Palmogloea Kurziana, 

Mart, 

7038 Vaucheria sp. 

7039 Enteromorpha intestinalis, 

L, 

7040 Gloetila protogenita, Kg, 

7041 concatenata, Kg, 

7042 AUogonium depressum, 

Mart, 

7043 Conferva bombycina, Ag, 

7044 antillarum, j^f. 

7045 Chaetomorpha chlorotica, 

7046 Rhizocloniuuii antillarum, 

7047 Kochianum, Kg, 

7048 Cladophora Tranque- 

bariensis, Roth, 

7049 Bengalensis, Mart, 

7050 Roettleri, Kg, 

7051 simpliciuscula. Kg, 

7052 CEdogonium scutatum^ Kg, 

7053 Ulothrix crassa, Kg, 
7054 pectinalis, Kg, 

7055 Chroolepus villosum, Kg. 

7056 Chaetophora Indica, Mart. 

7057 radians, Kg, 

7058 Caloglossa Leprieurii, Harv, 



7059 Bostrychia rivularis, Harv. 

7060 Catenella Opuntia, Grev. 

7061 Campsopagon Hookeri, 

7062 Polysiphonia nifo-lanosa, 

Harv. 

7063 angustissima, Kg. 

7064 polychroma, Mart, 

7065 Hypoglossum Bengalense, 

Mart. 

7066 Leprieurii, A^. 

7067 pygmaeum, if/izr/. 

7068 Encoelium vesicatum Kg. 

DIATOMACE^,^ * 

7069 Cyclotella striata, Grun. 

7070 Coscinodiscus subtilis, 

Ehrb, 

7071 radicatus, Ehrb, 

7072 lineatus, Ehrb, 

7073 Achnanthes subsessilis, 

7074 Synedra Ulna, Ehrb. 

7075 Nitzschia Kurziana, 

Rabenh. 

7076 dissipata, Kg, 

7077 obtusa, Sm, 

7078 Sigmatella, G^r^r^. 

7079 Navicula velox, Kg, 

7080 cryptocephala, Kg, 

7081 Calcuttensis, Grun, 

7082 Fenzlii, Grun, 

7083 sphaerophora, A^. 

7084 Pleurosigma Sinense, 

Pritch. 

7085 Hippocampus, Sm, 

7086 Kurzianum, Grun. 



VOL. VII. 



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GENERAL INDEX. 



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GENERAL INDEX. 



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GENERAL INDEX. 



Abddkdri hdolds and tdluks, S^ Tenures 
of land. 

Abbartak, pargand in Cuttack, xviii. 223. 

AbduUapur, pargand in NoakhdH, vi. 343. 

AbhaUaban^ a native medicine, ii. 336. 

Abhiipur, pargand in Monghyr, xv. 175, 
176. 

Abkdri opium. See Opium. 

Aboriginal population, 24 Pargands, i. 
50, 51; Sundarbans, i. 318, 319; 
Nadiya, ii. 46 ; Jessor, ii. 194 ; 
Midnapur, iii. 51 ; Huglf, iii. 
281, 284 ; Bardwdn, iv. 46, 55 ; 
Bankura, iv. 221, 229; Birbhiim, iv. 
326, 334; Dacca, v. 4^-44; Bakar- 
ganj, V. 188, 189, 193 J Faridpur, v. 
285 ; Maimansinh, v. 401, 402 ; Chit- 
tagong Hill Tracts, vi. 37, 39-66, 68 ; 
Chittagong, vi. 142, 143; Noakhili, 
vL 273, 274; Tipperah, vi. 374, 375 J 
Hill Tipperah, vi. 482-491; Maldah, 
vii. 40, 44, 47, 118; Rangpur, vii. 
211, 220, 221 ; Dindipur, vii. 373, 382; 
Rajsh4hi, viii. 36-38, 40 ; Bogrd, viii. 
165 ; Murshiddbad, ix. 43, 46-48; Pdbna, 
ix. 279, 282, 284, 285 ; Ddrjiling, x. 
44, 45, 47-80, appendix, 205-212 ; 
Jalpdiguri, X. 252, 253-256; Kuch 
Behar, x. 341, 342; Patnd, xi. 39, 
50-52 ; Saran, xi. 251-255 ; Gayd, xii. 
27, 34, 37, 38; Shdhdbdd, xiL 188- 
191, 197-201 ; Tirhut, xiii. 46-48 ; 
Champaran, xiiL 237, 245-247 ; Bhd- 
galpur,' xiv. 49, 52, 73-77; Santdl 
Pargands, xiv. 279, 280, 281, 284- 
319; Monghyr, xv. 50, 54; Pumiah, 
XV. 249 ; Hazdribdgh, xvi. 60, 61, 
63-74 ; Lohdrdagd, xvi. 251, 252, 254- 
299 ; Singbhum, xvii. 36-63 ; Tribu- 
tary States of Chutid Ndgpur, xvii. 161, 
162, 164 ; Mdnbhum, xvii. 273-275, 



278-288, 295, 296 ; Cuttack, xviii. 67, 
68, 77, 78 ; Balasor, xviii. 268, 277 ; 
Purl, xix. 31 ; Orissa Tributary Stales, 
xix. 208, 209, 218-255. 

Absentee and foreign landholders, 24 
Pargands, i. 163 ; Sundarbans, i. 344 ; 
Nadiya, ii. 93 ; lessor, ii. 278 ; Mid- 
napur, iii. 146 ; Hu£;li, iii. 368 ; Bard- 
wan, iv. 105 ; Banicurd, iv. 275 ; 
Birbhum, iv. 372 ; Dacca, v. 106 ; 
Bdkarganj, v. 214; Faridpur, v. 333; 
Maimansinh, v. 458 ; Chittagong Hill 
Tracts, vi. 83 ; Chittagong, vi. 185 ; 
Nodkhdlf, vi. 319 ; Tippeiah, vi. 416, 
417 ; Mddah, vii. 93 ; Rangpur, viL 
301, 302; Dindjpur, vii. 409; Rdjshdhi, 
viii. 81; Bogrd, viii. 277; Murshiddbdd, 
ix. 140, 141 ; Pdbnd, ix. 328 ; Ddxji- 
ling, X. 127; Jalpdiguri, x. 294; 
Kuch Behar, x. 396 ; Patnd, xi. 135 ; 
Gayd, xii. ill, 112; Shdhdbdd, xii. 
255 ; Tirhut, xiii. 121 ; Champdnm, 
xiii. 288 ; Santdl Pargands, xiv. ^51, 
352; Monghyr. XV. 135; Hazdrib^h, 
xvL 139; Lohdrdagd, xvi. 411 ; Sing- 
bhiim, xvii. 98, 90 ; Purl, xix. 31. 

Abu Rdi, the Khatri founder of the Bard- 
wdn family, iv. 48, 139. 

Abwdbs, or customary illegal cesses in the 
Sundarbans, i. 358 ; in Midnapur, iii. 
108- 1 13; in Dacca, v. 97, 127; in 
Chittagong, vi. 180-182 ; in Nodkhdlf, 
vi. 315, 316; mTipperah,vi. 411,412; 
in Bogrd, viii. 245-250 ; in Murshidd- 
bdd, ix. 71, 200; in Pdbnd, ix. ^18; 
in Kuch Behar, x. 428 ; in Patn^ xi. 
96, 127; in Gayd, xii. 70-72 ; in Tir- 
hut, xiii. 106, X07 ; in Bh^;alpur, xiv. 
158-160; in Monghyr, xv. 120-127; 
in Pumiah, xv. 388; in Hazdribdgh, 
xvi. 106, 107 ; in Lohdrdagd, xvi 368- 
370, 372| 380, 381 ; in Cuttack, xviii. 
121. 



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GENERAL INDEX. 



Achala Basanta, hill in Cuttack, Ruins 
on, xviii. 94. 

Achdrjyd Brahmans in the 24 Pai^nds, 
i. 57; in Nadiya, ii. 47; in Bard wan, 
iv. 66 ; in Binkurd, iv. 225, 245 ; in 
Birbhiim, iv. 330; in Bdkarganj, v. 
191 ; in Chittagong, vi. 145 ; in Tip- 
perah, vi. 380 ; in Maldah, vii. 44 ; in 
Rangpur, vii. 21 5, 230 ; in Patnd, xi. 
40 ; in Balasor, xviii. 272. 

Achipur, village with telegraph station, in 
the 24 Parganas, i. loi, 228 ; thdnd, 
i. 4O) 42, 171 ; incidence of income tax 
in, I 177, 178. 

Acquisition by the British of various Dis- 
tricts. See History. 

Act X. of 1859 (The Rent Law of Bengal), 
Operation of, in the 24 Pargands, i. 
157 ; in Nadiyd, ii. 82, 83 ; in Jessor, 
ii. 73 ; in Midnapur, iii. loS, 163 ; in 
Hugli, iii. 356, 357, 383; in Bardwdn, 
iv. 86, 147 ; in Bankura, iv. 266, 282 ; 



in Birbhiim, iv. 362, 371 ; in Dacca, v. 
93, loi ; in Bikarganj, v. 209 ; in 
Farfdpur, v. 318, 325; in Maimansinh, 
V. 450 ; in Chittagong, vi. 162, 179, 
216 ; in Noakhili, vi. 297, 298, 309, 
315. 332; in Tipperah, vi. 395, 414, 
432 ; in Maldah, vii. 89, iio; in Rang, 
pur, vii. 263, 280, 281, 282, 290, 323- 
324, 327 ; in Dinijpur, vii. 395, 403, 
404, 405, 422 ; in Rajshahi, viii. 
72 ; in Bogrd, viii. 247-248 ; in Mur- 
shidibdd, ix. 120, 130, 201 ; in 
Pdbni, ix. 317, 320, 321 ; in Patnd, 
xi. 117, 188, 189; in Saran, xi. 295, 
343, 344 ; in Gayd, xii. 105, 126, 127; 
in Shdhdbdd, xii. 240, 24i8 ; in Tir- 
hut, xiii. 169 ; in Champdran, xiii. 
282, 284, 298 ; in Bhdgalpur, xiv. 240 ; 
in the Santdl Parganas, xiv. 341, 342, 
345» 363; in Monghyr, xv. 117, 158; 
in Pumiah, xv. 340, 341. 397 ; in Ha- 
adribdgh, xvi. 106, 135, 136, 177; in 
Lohdrdagd, xvi. 397, 406, 470-473 ; in 
Singbhum, xvii. 117, 118; inMdnbhiim, 
xvii. 337, 338, 356 ; in Cuttack, xviii. 
109, 1 10 ; in Balasor, xviii. 294, 295. 

Act XXII, of i860, separating the Hill 
Tracts from the Regulation District of 
Chittagong, vi. 22, 124. 

Addi^ndf, village in Narsinhpur State, 
Onssa, xix. 304. 

Adampur village in Sdran, xi 257. 

Addpur thdndj Champdran, xiii. 234 ; 
fair at, xiii 255. 

Add-Rupiyd, pargand in Balasor, xviii. 
361. 

Adhiy adhidriy or hdrgd land tenures. See 
Tenures of land. 



Adi Malla, the first Hindu Rajd of Bish- 

nupur, iv. 233. 
Adinah Masjid in Panduah, viL 62. 
Adisur, Hindu King of Bengal, L 53; 

ii. 143, 217, 219; his dynasty, v. 

118 ; importation of Kanauj Brdhmans 

ty» V. 53. 

Administration of the 24 Pargands, i. 
183-241 ; of the Sundarbans, i. 346 ; 
of Nadiyd, ii. 111-139; of Jessor, iL 
306-328 ; of Midnapur, iii. 154-220 ; 
of Hugh', iii. 378-417 ; of Bardwdn, iv. 
143-176; ofBdnkurd, iv. 279-300; of 
Birbhiim, iv. 395-437 ; of Dacca, v. 
i29-i4i;of Bdkarganj, v. 217-246; of 
Faridpur, v. 341-357 ; of Maimansinh, 
V. 462, 479; of the Chittagong Hill 
Tracts, vi. loi, 102 ; of Tipperah, vi. 
461, 462 ; of Hill Tipperah, vi. 509- 
513; of Maldah, vii. 120; of Rangpur, 
vii. 157, 160; of Dindjpur, viL 356, 
434 ; of Rdjshdhf, vih. 19-21 ; of 
Bogrd, viii. 130-133 ; of Murshiddbdd, 
ix. 18-2 1 ; of Pdbnd, ix. 270; of Ddr- 
jfUng, X. 18, 19, 196, 197; of Jalpdiguri, 
X. 216-218 ; of Kuch Behar, x. 427- 
440 ; of Patnd, xi. 181-209; of Sdran, 
xi- 337-361 ; of Gayd, xii. 122-146; of 
Shdhdbad, xii. 271-287; of Tirhut, xiii. 
165-200; of Champdran, xiii. 297-313; 
of Bhdgalpur, xiv. 194-25 1; of the San- 
tdl Parganas, xiv. 361-378 ; of Mon- 
ghyr, XV. 155-187; of Pumiah, xv. 387- 
431 ; of Hazdribdgh, xvi. 18-22, 191, 
192; of Lohdrd^^d, xvi. 231, 232, 
482 ; of Singbhum, xviL 107-139 ; of 
the Tributary States of Chutia Ndgpur, 
xvii. 149-152; of Mdnbhiim, xvii. 353- 
370 ; of Cuttack, xviii. 177-234 ; of 
Baksor, xviii. 344-366 ; of Puri, xix. 
155-173; of the Orissa Tributary States, 
xix. 263, 264. 

Administrative Divisions {^^Subdivi- 
swns"), of the 24 Pargands, i. 22, 
222-225; of Nadiyd, ii. 130-139; of 
Jessor, ii. 317-328; of Midnapur, 
iii. 186-200; of Hiigli, iii. 41 1 -41 7; 
of Bardwdn, iv. 168-172 ; of Dacca, 
V. 138-141 ; of Bdkarganj, v. 238- 
246; of Faridpur, v. 353-357; of 
Maimansinh, v. 474-479 ; of the Chit- 
tagong Hill Tracts vi. loi, 102 ; of 
Chittagong, vi. 225 ; of Nodkhdli, vi 
342, 343; of Tipperah, vi. 441, 442; of 
Hill Tipperah, vi, 518, 519; of Mal- 
dah, vii. 126 ; of Rangpur, vii. 344, 
345 ; of Dindjpur, vii. 434 ; of Rdj- 
shdhi, viii. 116- 118; of Bocrd, viii. 
130-133, 302, 304; of Murshidlbdd, ix. 
230-232; of Pdbnd, ix. 365, 366; 



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GENERAL INDEX, 



233 



of DirjUing, x. 18, 19, 196, 197 ; of 
Jalpdignri, x. 216-218 ; of Kudi Be- 
har, X. 439, 440; of Patni, xL 35, 
204-206 ; of Saran, xi. 226, 354, 355 ; 
of GsLji, xii. 31, 141 - 143 ; of Shdha- 
bdd, xii. 284-286 ; of Tirhut, xiii. 34, 
178-180 ; of Champiran, xiii. 307, 
308 ; of Bhagalpur, xiv. 46, 237-239 ; 
of the Santal Parganis, xiv. 274, 277, 
375, 376 ; of Monghyr, xv. 174, 175 ; 
of Pumiah, xv. 414-416 ; of Haziri- 
ba|;h, xvi. 191, 192 ; of Lohirdaga, 
XVI. 4J82 ; of Singbhum, xvii. 135-139; 
of Manbhum, xvii. 366, 367 ; of Cut- 
tack, xviiL 220-223; of Balasor, xviil 
360, 361. 

Administrative Headquarters of the 24 
Parganas, i. 17, 18; of Nadiyi, ii. 18, 
58, 59 ; of Jessor, ii. 169, 201-203; of 
Midnapur, iii. 17, 18, 61 ; of Hiigli, 
iii. 251, 298-;^oi ; of Bardwan, iv. 17, 
58, 59 ; of BankurA, iv. 205, 229, 230 ; 
of Birbhum, iv. 312, 335 ; of Dacca, v. 
17, 18, 61, 62; of Bakarganj, v. 157, 
199, 200; of Faridpur, v. 255, 291, 
294; of Maimansinh, v. 383, 410, 
411; of the Chittagong Hill Tracts, 
vi. 22 ; of Chittagong, vi. 109 ; of 
Tipperah, vi. 356 ; of Maldah, vii. 
18 ; of Rangpur, vii. 225 ; of Din- 
ajpur, vii. 356; of Rajshahi, viiL 20, 
53, 54 ; of Bogrd, viii. 129, 186, 187 ; 
of Muishidibid, ix. 18, 230; of Pabnd, 
ix. 270, 280, 296; of Darjiling, x. 18, 
22, 24, 87-90 ; of Jalpdigurf, x. 216, 
261, 262; of Kuch Behar, x. 332, 359- 
360, 439 ; of Patnd, xL 18, 74 ; of 
Saran, xi. 258, 259, 354 ; of Gaya, xii. 
17, 18; Shahabad, xii. 204; of Tirhut, 
xiii. 18, 51, 52; of Champdran, xiii. 
219, 250 ; of Bhagalpur, xiv. 17, 80-84 ; 
of the Santal Pargands, xiv. 265 ; of 
Monghyr, xv. 18 ; of Pumiah, xv. 
256; of Hazaribagh, xvi. 17, 56, 85-87, 
191 ; of Lohardaga, xvi. 231, 320, 321; 
of Singbhum, xvii. 17, 70, 71; of Man- 
bhum, xviL 253; of Cuttack, xviii. 20; 
of Balasor, xviii. 248; of Puri, xix. 17. 

Administrative History of the 24 Par- 
gands, i. 183; of the Sundarbans, i. 
345» 346 ; of Nadiyd, ii. 142-165 ; of 
Jessor, ii. 306, 307 ; of Midnapur, iii. 
« 54- 1 57; of Hiiglf, iii. 378-380; of 
Bardwdn, iv. 18-21, 137-143; ofBdn- 
kurd, iv. 279-281 ; of Birbhum, iv. 312, 
316; of Dacca, v. 126-129; of the 
Chittagong Hill Tracts, vi. 88-95 J of 
Chittagong, vi. 212, 213; ofNodkhdlf, 
▼*• 329-331; of Tipperah, vi: 427, 428; 
of Hill Tipperah, vi. 461, 462; of Mal- 



dah, vii. 18, 19 ; of Rangpur, vii. 160, 
161; of Dindjpur, vii. 356-3^8; of Rdj- 
shdhi, viii. 20, 21 ; of Bogr^ viii. 130- 
133 ; of Murshiddbdd, ix. 250-232 ; of 
Pabnd, ix. 365, 366 ; of Darjiling, x. 
18, 19, 196, 197; of Jalpdigurf, x. 216- 
223 ; of Kuch Behar, x. 427-J.32 ; of 
Patnd, xi. 181 -183; of Sardn, xi. 
337, 338 ; of Gayd, xii. 122 ; of Shdh- 
dbad, xii. 271-274 ; of Tirhut, xiii. 
165, 166; of Champdran, xiii. 297, 
295; of Bhagalpur, xiv. 18-22 ; of Uie 
Santdl Parganas, xiv. 361, 362; of 
Monghyr, XV. 155-157; of Pumiah, xv. 
393-397 ; of Hazdribdgh, xvi. 18-22 ; 
of Lohdrdagd, xvi. 231 ; of Singbhum, 
xvii 107-115 ; of the Tributary States 
of Chutid Ndgpur, xvii. 149-152 ; of 
Mdnbhiim, xvii., 353; of Cuttack, xviii. 
200-202 ; of Balasor, xviii. 344 ; of 
Puri, xix. 155; of the Orissa Tributary 
States, xix. 263, 264. 

Advances to Cultivators, Midnapur, iii. 
83 ; Maimansinh, v. 444 ; Chittagong 
Hill Tracts, vi. 76, 78, 79, 87 ; Chitta- 
gong, vi. 207 ; MaldaJi, vii. 100, 104 ; 
Rangpur, vii. 306, 308, 309, 310; Din- 
djpur, vii. 398 ; Sdran, xi. 290, 335 ; 
Tirhut, xiii. 106 ; Santdl Pargands, xiv. 
361 ; Monghyr, xv. 106 ; Lohdrdagd, 
xvi. 355; Puri, xix. 96. 

Adwaitdnand, Disciple of Chaitanya, i. 
65, 73-; ii. 53. 

Adwantnagar, town in Shdhdbdd, xii. 202. 

Afghdns or Pathdns. Ste Muhammadans. , 

Afghdns, Fortified settlements of, in * 
Dacca v., 73 ; rebellion of, v. 67 ; de- 
feat of, V. 120. 

Agar ot sangchi ixte, in Rangpur, viL 192. 

Agarddri, village and market in the Sun- 
darbans, i. 229. 

Agarids or Aguris. See Castes. 

Agarpdrd municipality, 24 Pargands, i. 
77, 79, 107 ; church and orph^ refuge 
school, 206, 374. 

Agartald, capital of the State of Hill 
Tipperah, vi. 495-497, 5^7; school at, 
vi. 518; hospital, 521. 

Agartald, pargand in Hill Tipperah, vi. 
519. 

Agarwdlds or Mdrwdris, a trading caste 
in the 24 Pargands, i. 63 ; in Nadiyd, 
ii. 43, 47; in Jessor, ii. 195; in Midna- 
pur, iii. 40, 53; in Hugh, iii. 282, 287; 
in Bardwdn, iv. 44, 50; in Bdnkurd, iv. 
220, 225 ; in Birbhum, W7, 330 ; in 
Bdkarganj, v. 191; in Faridpur, v. 286; 
in Maimansinh, v. 400, 404 ; in Rang- 
pur, vii. 216; in Dindjpur, vii 377; 
in Bogrd, viii. 165, 173 ; in Murshida- 



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234 



GENERAL INDEX. 



bid, ix. 43, 49; in Darjiling, x. 45, 82; 
in Jalpdiguii, x. 253, 2J7; in Patni, xi. 
45; in Siran, xL 248; in Gayi, xii. 
I^ 193 ; in Shihibad, xii. 193 ; in 
Tirhut, xiii. 43 ; in Champdran, xiii. 
242 ; in Monghyr, xv. 57 ; in Pumiah, 
XV. 251 ; in Hazirib^h, xvi. 61, 76, 
77; in Lohdrdagd, xvi. 252, 303; in 
Singbhum, xvii. 38, 64 ; in Mdnbhum, 
xvii. 290 ; in Cuttack, xviii. 69, 73 ; in 
Puri, xix. 37 ; in the Orissa Tributary 
States, xix. 256. 

Age, Population classified according to, 
24 PaiganAs, i. 44, 45 ; Nadiya, ii. 38 ; 
Jessor, ii. 189 ; Midnapur, iii. 44 ; 
Hugli, iii. 273 ; Bardwdn, iv. 38 ; 
Bd^urd, iv. 213 ; Birbhiim, iv. 
.324, 325 ; Dacca, v. 34; Bakarganj, 
V. 182 ; Faridpur, v. 280 ; Maiman- 
sinh, v. 395 ; Chittagong Hill Tracts, 
vi. 36, 37 ; Chittagong, vi. 137, 138, 
151; Noakhdli, vi. 269, 270; Tip- 
perah, vi. 372, 373; Hill Tipperah, 
vi. 480; Maldah, vii. 37-39; Rang- 
pur, vii. 208-210; Dindjpur, vii. 370- 
373 ; RijshAhl, viii. 36 ; Bogra, 
viii. 159, 160 ; Murshiddbdd, ix. 
38-41 ; Pibnd, ix. 279-281 ; Ddr- 
jfling, X. 41, 43 ; JalpdiguH, x. 247- 
252 ; Kuch Behar, x. 340 ; Patnd, xi. 
36 ; Siran, xi. 242 ; Gayd, xii 30; 
Shihdbdd, xii. 181, 183; Tirhut, 
«ii. 35 ; Champdran, xiii. 235 ; Bhd- 
galpur, xiv. 47 ; Santal Parganas, 
xiv. 278-280; Monghyr, xv. [49; Pur- 
niah, xv. 245 ; Hazaribdgh,' xvi. 55- 
58: Lohdrdagd, xvi. 248-251 ; Sing- 
bhum, xvii. 33-35 ; Tributary States 
of Chutid Nd^ur, xvii. 153-156; Mdn- 
bhum, xvii. 270-272 ; Cuttack, xviii. 
64, 66 ; Balasor, xviii. 266, 267 ; Puri, 
xix. 2730; Orissa Tributary States, 
xix. 205-208. 

Agent, Political appointed to reside at 
the capital of Hill Tipperah, vi. 470. 

Aghani or winter rice. Sef Rice. 

Agmahdl, old name of Rdjmahdl, q. v,, 
voL xiv. 

A^rd, site of ancient remains in Jessor, 
li. 224. 

Agraddnfs, degraded Brdhmans. Stt 
Brdhmans. 

Agradwfp fair, Nadiyd, ii. 55, 104. 

Agrarian disputes and rent disturbances 
in Pdbnd, ix. 318-325. 

Agricultural castes. See Castes. 

Agricultural exhibition at Faridpur, v. 
292, 293. 

Agricultural day-labourers, in the 24 Par- 
gands, i. 154; in the Sundarbsois, i. 



338 ; in Nadiyd, ii. 71 ; in Jessor, iL 
258, 259 ; in Midnapur, iii. 84 ; in 
Huglf, iii. 347; in Bardwdn, iv. 76; in 
Bdnkurd, iv. 251 ; in Dacca, v. 95, 96; 
in Bdkarganj, v. 208 ; in Faridpur, v. 
324 ; in Maimansinh, v. 448 ; in the 
Chittagong Hill Tracts, vi. 76, 77 ; in 
Chittagong, vi. 154, 163; in Noikhdll, 
vi. 275 ; in Tipperah, vi. 396 ; in Hill 
Tipperah, vi. 504, 505 ; in Maldah, 
vii. 79 ; in Rangpur, vii. 266, 272 ; in 
Rdjshdhl, viii. 65, 68, 69 ; in Bogrd, 
viii. 204, 205 ; in Murshidabdd, ix. 97, 
no, 114, 115; in Pdbnd, ix. W, 309; 
in Ddriiling, x. 103 ; in Jalpdiguri, x. 
279, 280 ; in Kuch Behar, x. 385-387 ; 
in Patnd, xi. 1 19 ; in Saran, xi. 296 ; 
in Gaya, xii. 97 ; in Shdhdbdd, xii. 
243, 244, 246, 247; in Tirhut, xiii. 107; 
in Champdran, xiii. 279, 281, 282; in 
Bhdgalpur, xiv. 131; in the Santdl Par- 
ganas, xiv. 344, 345; in Monghyr, xv. 
108, 109; in Pumiah, xv. 310, 31 1; in 
Hazdribdgh, xvi. 111-115; in Lohdr- 
dagd, xvi. 361, 362 ; in Singbhum, 
xvii. 86, 98; in the Tributary States of 
Chutid Ndgpur, xvii. 210, 211 ; in 
Mdnbhum, xvii. 320; in Cuttack, xviii 
no, 117, 118; in Balasor, xviii 297, 
300; in Puri, xix. 97. 

Agricultural implements, 24 Pai^ands, i. 
150. 151; Sundarbans, i. 337, 338; Na- 
diyd, ii. 70; Jessor, ii 256 ; Midnapur, 
iii 84; Huglf, iii 343, 344; Bardwdn, 
iv. 74; Bdnkurd, iv. 249; Birbhiim, iv. 
363, 364; Dacca, v. 93; Bdkarganj, v. 
206; Faridpur, v. 319, 320; Maiman- 
sinh, V. 444 ; Chittagong HiU Tracts, 
vi. 75 ;. Chittagong, vi 162, 163 ; 
Nodkhdii, vi. 299 ; Tipperah, vi. 396; 
Hill Tipperah, vi 504 ; Maldah, vii. 
75, 76 ; Rangpur, vii 265, 266 ; Dindj- 
pur, vii. 396, 397 ; Rdjdidhi, viii 66 ; 
Bogrd, viii. 223, 224; Murshiddbdd, ix. 
109; Pdbnd, ix. 306, 307; Ddrjfling, 
X. 69, 100, loi; Jalpdigun, x. 277, 278; 
Kuch Behar, x. 385; Patnd, xi. 118, 
119; Sdran, xi 296; Gayd, xii 96; 
Shdhdbdd, xii. 240-243 ; Tirhut, xiii 
107; Champdran, xiii. 278, 279; Bhd- 
galpur, xiv. 130, 131; Santdl Par- 
gands, xiv. 342; Monghyr, xv. 108 ; 
rumiah, xv. 309, 310; Hazdribdgh, 
xvi. 108 ; Lohdrdagd, xvi 356, 357 ; 
Singbhum, xvii 47, 62, 84; Tributary 
States of Chutid Ndgpur, xvii. 210 ; 
Mdnbhum, xvii. 318 ; Cuttack, xviii. 
117; Balasor, xviii 295; Puri, xix. 97. 

Agriculture in the 24 Par^ands, i. 134- 
158; in the Sundarbans, i. 324-342; in 



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Nadiyi, ii. 64-83 ; in Jessor, ii. 241- 
356; in Midnapur, iii. 79-114; inHugli, 
iii. 329-358; in Bardw^, iv. 69-92; in 
Binkur^ iv. 245-270; in Birbhum, 
i^- 345-371; in Dacca, v. 82-102; in 
Bikaipuij, v. 202-211; in Faridpur, 
V. 296-330; in Maimansinh, v. 419- 
457; in the Chittagon^ Hill Tracts, vi. 
71 ; in Chittagong, vi. 159 ; in No4- 
khili, vi. 291-300; in Tipperah, vi. 
390-396; in Hill Tipperah, vL 500- 
504 ; in Maldah, vii. 70-90 ; in Rang- 
pur, vii. 234-292; in Dindjpur, vii. 
390-40S; in Rajshdhi, viii. 59-67; 
in Bogra, viii. 208-226; in Murshid- 
abid, ix. 99-107 ; in Pabna, ix., 301- 
310 ; in Ddrjiling, x. 69, 92-99; in Jal- 
paiguri, X. 271-280; in Kuch Behar, x. 
379-387; in Patnd, xi. 107- 1 1 7; in Siran, 
xi. 274-294 ; in Gaya, xii. 82-107 ; 
in Sfaihabdd, xiL 229-2 50; in Tirhut, 
xiii. 81-115; ^^ Champdran, xiii. 
260-284; in Bhdgalpur, xiv. 11 6- 130; 
in the Santdl Parganas, xiv. 333-346 ; 
in Monghyr, xv. 90-127 ; in Pumiah, 
XV. 281-341 ; in Hazaribdgh, xvi. 96- 
105 ; in Lohirdagd, xvi. 335-362 ; in 
Singbhiim, xvii. 79-83; in the Tributary 
States of Chutia Nagpur, xvii. 164, 
165, 176, 196, 197, 2<^-2io, 240, 241; 
in Mdnbhum, xvii. 309-317; in Cutlack, 
xviii. 99-117; in BsJasor, xviii. 289-292; 
in Puri, xix. 93-138; in the Orissa Tri- 
butary States, xix. 262, 263. See also, 
for details. Tillage. 

Aguris or Agartds. See Castes. 

Analyasthan, or Sin^heswarsthin, a re- 
ligious gathering in Tirhut, xiii. 62, 
162, 184. 

Ahilwdr, pargand in Tirhut, xiii. 180, 
181. 

Ahirs or Goalis. See Castes and Village 
Officials. 

Ahis, pargand in Tirhut, xiii. i8l. 

Ahi^^n, village in Tirhut, xiii. 62, 63. 

Ahiyds, pargand in Cuttack, xviii. 223. 

Ahmadpur, village and railway station in 
Birbhtim, iv. 343. 

Ahmad-Ulli, leader of the Wahdbis at 
the time of the Mutiny, xi. 64. 

Aichora, trading village in Dinijpur, vii. 
446. 

Aimd land tenures. See Tenures of 
land. 

Air, town in Shdhdbad, xii. 202. 

Ajai, river in Bardwan, iv. 17, 22, 23, 
93» 317 ; embankments, Bardwdn, iv. 
96. 

Ajai, river in Haziribagh, xvi. 38, 39. 

AjboTf pargand 'm Maldah, vii. 126, 127. 



Ajhor, pargand in Dinajpur, vii. 435. 
Ajndbad, village in Din^pur, vii. 444. 
Ajodhyd, trading village in Bardwin, 

iv. 65. 
Ajodhyi, pir in Singbhum, xvii 136. 
Alcann Dumd, village-union in Tirhut, 

xiii. 40. 
Akishganga, 'river of the sky,' a spring 

in Bha^lpur, xiv. 100. 
AkbardbTd, pargand in Maldah, vii. 127, 
Akbarbandar, market village in Rangpur, 

vii. 309. 
Akbamagar, chaklah in the Sundarbans, 

i. 358. 
Akbamagar, pargand in'Maldah, vii. 127. 
Akbamagar, vilk^e in Dinijpur, vii. 365. 
Akbamagar, Muluimmadan name of Raj- 

mahal town in the Santal Pargands, 

xiv. 270, 325-329, 352, 354, 363. 
Akbarpur, one of the original 24 Par- 
ganas, i. 20, 363. 
Akbarpur, pargand in Maldah, vii. 127. 
Akbarpur, pargand in Tirhut, xiii. 181. 
Akbarpur or Katra, village and thdftd in 

Tirhut, xiii. 34, 54, 55, 179. 
Akbarpur Rini, pargand in Monghyr, 

XV. 176. 
Akbarshahi or Sinrul, or Surul, pargand 

in Birbhiim, L 370. 
Akbarshdhi, pargand in Bfrbhum, iv. 421. 
Akbarshahi, /ar^ani in Maldah, viL 128. 
Akhdnagar, village in Dinijpur, viL 452. 
Akherganj, market village in Dinijpur, 

vii 449. 
Akhratald khdl, 24 Paigands, L 31, 32. 
Akrds, Vaishnav monasteries, in Dacca, 

V. 56, 57; in Maimansinh, v. 409, 417; 

in Rangpur, viu 224; in Murshidibdd, 

ix. 172. 
Akri village in Hugli, with mat manufac- 
ture, iii. 372. 
Aktidrpur, town in Shdhdbdd, xii. 202. 
Akyab, Emigration of boatmen from 

Nodkhdli to, vi. 257. 
Aldbakhshpur, mart in Patnd, xL 155, 

160. 
Aldi, one of the names of the Ghdghdt 

river, q. v. 
Aldipur, seat of pottery manufacture, Jes- 
sor, ii. 232, 284. 
Alamddngd, town and railway station, 

Nadiyd, ii. 33, 62, 104. 
Alamgir hill in Cuttack, Temple on, 

xviii. 90-92. 
Alamgimagar fort in Chittagong, stormed 

by Husdin Beg, vi. 112. 
Alamnagar, villi^ in Bhdgalpur, xiv. 92. 
Alampur, pargand in Nadiyi i. 367. 
Alampur, village and market, 24 Par* 

gands, i. 228, 



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Alangkhili river, ii. 265. 
Alantaras-hdty market in Chittagong, vi. 

198. 
Alapsinh, pargand in Maimansinh, v. 

4I4» 477. 
AMpuT, pargand in Tirhut, xiii. 181. 
Aliwarkhiwa, village and fair in Dinaj- 



pur, vii. 387, 411. 
Albert ~ " ~ 



English School in Chittagong 

town, vi. 220. 
Alexandra cAar Noikhili, vi. 252. 
AH VardiKhan, Nawib of Murshidabdd, 

ix. 180-185. 
Aliganj Sew^, town in Siran, xi. 257, 

261, 264, 356. 
Aligdon, pargand in Dindjpur, vii. 288, 

435. 

Aligarh fort, near Garden Reach, Cal- 
cutta, taken bv Lord Clive, i. loi. 

Alihit, pargand in Rangpur, vii. 253, 
288. 

Alihit, pargand in Dinijpur, vii. 435. 

Alinagar, former name of Naopara, vUlage 
in Jessor, ii. 206. 

Alinagar, pargand in Birbhum, iv. 421. 

Alinagar, pargand in NodkhiH, vi. 343. 

Alinagar, town in Maldah, vii. 128. 

Alipur Division, 24 Pargands, i. 22; sab- 
mvision, i. 22, 222. 

Alipur town, i. 18 ; headquarters of 24 
Fargands, residence of Lieutenant- 
Governor of Bengal, cantonments for 
native regiments, i. 15, 100 ; dispen- 
sary, i. 250; jail, i. 193-196. 

Alipur village and market, 24 Pargdnas, 
i. 229. 

Alipur, thdnd in Rangpur, vii. 328, 344, 

348, 350, 352. 

Alipur, market village in Dinajpur, vii. 
443. 

Alldhabad or Nodkhili, pargand in Noa- 
khili, vL 343. 

Alluvion and diluvion, in the 24 Parganiis, 
L 29, 30 ; in the Sundarbans, i. 299 ; 
in Nadiyd, ii. 181 ; in Jessor, ii. 181 ; 
in Midnapur, iii. 24, 26-29 ; in Hugli, 
iii. 255, 257 ; in Bardwan, iv. 24, 
25 ; in Bakargani, v. 167, 168 ; in Far- 
idpur, V. 263-268 ; in Maimansinh, v. 
309; in Chittagong, vi. 117, 132; in 
Noikhili, vi. 251, 252, 330; in Tippe- 
rah, vi. 362; in Maldah, vii. 24, 25, 27; 
in Rangpur, vii., 280; in Dinijpur, vii. 
360-362; in Rdjshihi, viiL 23 ; in Bo- 
gra, viiL 139, 141 -144; in Murshiddbdd, 
ix. 26-28; in Pdbnd, ix. 272, 294, 
295i 312; in Jalpdiguri, x. 232-235; in 
Kuch Behai-, x. 337; in Sdran, xL 233; 
in Shdhdbad, xii. 164 ; in Champdnin, 
xiii. 226 ; in the Santdl Paigands, xiv. 



269 ; in Singbhum, xvii. 22 ; in Mdn- 
bhiim, xviL 257; in Cuttack, xviii. 22; 
in Balasor, xviiL 250 ; in the Orissa 
Tributary States, xix. 201. 

Almshouse {Langar Khdnd) at Dacca, v. 
149. 

AUamghd or bddshdhi^ imperial rent-free 
grants of land. See Tenures of land. 

Alti, pargand in Cuttack, xviii. 223, 
224. 

Aman or winter rice crop, 24 Pargonds, i. 
I34» 135 ; Sundarbans, i. 324, 325 ; 
Nadi^ ii. 64; Jessor, ii. 241; Midna- 
pur, iii. 79; HiigU, iiL 329, 330; Bard- 
wdn, iv. 70 ; Bdnkurd, iv. 245, 246 ; 
Birbhum, iv. 345 ; Dacca, v. 83 ; Ba- 
karganj, v. 202, 203; Faridpur, v. 296, 
297; Maunansinh, v. 419, 420; Chitta- 
gong, vi. 159, 160, 185 ; Nodkhdli, vi. 
292, 295, 296; Tipperah, vi. 391, 416; 
Hill Tipperah, vL 502 ; Maldah, vii. 
70, 92, loi ; Rangpur, vii. 234, 235- 
238, 261 ; Dindjpur, viL 390, 409 ; 
Rajshdhi, viiL 59 ; Bogrd, viii. 148, 
149, 208, 20Q ; Murshiddbdd, ix. lOi, 
102, 136 ; Pabnd, ix. 301 ; Ddijiling, 
X- 92, 93 ; Jalpdiguri, x. 271, 272 ; 
Kuch Behar, x. 379, 380; Patnd, xi. 
109, no; Sdran, xi. 274, 275; Gayd, 
xii. 82, 83 ; Shdhdbdd, xii. 230, 231 ; 
Tirhut, xiii. 81; Champdran, xiiL 260, 
261 ; Santdl Pargands, xiv. 335 ; Mon- 

fhyr, XV. 91 ; Pumiah, xv. 283, 284 ; 
lazdribdgh, xvi. 339 ; Mdnbhum, xvii. 
311, 312; Cuttack, xviii. 99, 100; 
Piiri, 93, 94. 

Amdnat river, xvi. 38, 235, 236. 

Amdniganj-hdt, the chief silk mart in 
Maldah, viL 100. 

Amarthu, pargand in Monghyr, xv. 176. 

Ambar, fiscal division in the Santdl Par- 
gands, xiv. 376, 377. 

Ambdri, pargand in Dindjpur, viL 270^ 

435. 
Amblkdnagar pargand in Mdnbhum, xvii. 

367. 
Ambikdpur, Indigo factory at, xi. 286. 
Ambod mahal, in Satgdon (Sarkdr) HiigU, 

i. 362. 
Amdahar, pargand in Rangpur, viL 253, 

288 ; in Dindjpur, vii. 435. 
Amentacix, Species of, in Rangpur, vii. 

191. 
American Baptist Mission at Midnapur, 

iiL 60 ; for the Santdls, iiL 181 - 183 ; 

for Zandnds, iii. 184. 
Amgdchhi, pargand in Maldah, vii. 128. 
Amgdchhid, market village, 24 Pargands, 

L 236. 
Ami, village in Sdran, xi. 358. 



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GENERAL INDEX. 



237 



Amlns. See Village Officials. 
Amirdbid, parganA in Noakhdli, vl 298, 

343; 

Amirabid, pargand in Tipperah, vi. 442. 
Amirabad, township in Noakh^i, vi. 286. 
AnkixihkA^ pargand in Maldah, viL 128. 
Amiiganj, trading village in Rangpur, 

vii. 309. 
Amii^on thdnd in Nodkhilf, vi 239, 

269, 273, 285, 324, 330, 333, 342, 343. 
Amirpur, ene of the original 24 Parganas, 

i. 20, 225. 
Amiagdchhi, pargand in Rangpur, vii. 

290. 
Amnaur Hamdrdyan, village in Saran, 

xi. 258. 
Ampta village in Hugh', with boating 

community, iiL 305 ; and mat manu- 
facture, iii. 372. 
Axoxkhaid pargand in Noakhali, vi. 298. 
Amripiir pargand in Tipperah, vi. 442. 
Amravati, hill in Cuttack, Ruins on, 

xviii. 96. 
Amritd Bazar, or Magur£, village in 

Jessor, ii. 199, 205. 
Amrita Bdzar Patrika, newspaper, ii. 

1 1 1,, 305- 
Amtala, market village, 24 Pai^anis, i. 

236. 
Amur, a timber tree in the Sundarbans, 

i- 304* 305- 
Amura Bhauridri, village in Champaran, 

xiiL 250. 
Amur-Kasba, thdnd in Pumiah, xv. 243, 

244, 398, 415. 
Amusements of the people, in the 24 

ParganisjL 131-133; in Jessor, ii. 221; 

in Dacca, v. 81, 82 ; in Bakarganj, v. 

216; in the Chittagong Hill Tracts, vi. 

70, 71 ; in Murshid&ad, ix. 98 ; in 

Patni, xi. 107 ; in S4ran, xi. 273, 274; 

in Ga^d, xii. 78-81 ; in Shahabdd, xiL 

229; m Tirhut, xiii. 80, 81 ; in Cham- 

pdran, xiii. 259 ; in Bhdg^lpur, xiv. 

Ill, 112; in the Santal Pargands, xiv. 

314, 315 ; in Pumiah, xv. 279-281 ; 

in Singbhum, xviL 47 ; in Mdnbhum, 

xyii. 308, 309. 
Anabartak, pargand in Cuttack, xviii. 

224. 
Ananse, Species of, in Rangpur, vii. 185. 
Anand Sagar, tank in Dinajpur, vii. 438. 
Anandapur, village in Keunjhar State, 

Orissa, xix. 201, 202. 
Anandpur village in Midnapur, with silk 

manufacture, iii. 68. 
Anara, in Manbhum, Fair at, xvii. 298. 
Anchhd, pargand in Gayd, xiu 145. 
Anddl railway station, Bardwan, iv. 107. 
Andalgdon,/ar^a/f<iinDini.jpur, viL 435. 



AndaLrfpargaftd in Saran, xi. 355. 
Andar-khds, village in Siran, xi. 355. 
Andhiri, /ar^a^Jin Puri, xix. 172, 173. 
Andhdrmanil^ market village in the 24 

Parganas, i. 236. 
Andharmanik river, i. 299. 
Andhiri, site of fair in Midnapur, iii. 

152. 
Antrodh, pargand in Puri, xix. 130, 

172, 173. 

Andua, pargand in Rangpur, vii. 25^. 

Andul, Rija of, his estates in Hugh, UL 
382, 383. 

Angirbari peak, Smgbhum, xvii. 20. 

Angarid, trading village in Bdkarganj, 
V. 201. 

Angling in Hill Tipperah, vL 476, 480 ; 
in Maldah, vii. 30 ; in Rangpur, vii. 
174; in the Tributary States of Chutia 
Nagpur, xvii. 225. Ste also Fishing. 

Anglo-Vernacular schools. See Educa- 
tional Statistics. 

Angrazabad, or English Bazdr, chief town 
in Maldah, vii. 18, 48, 88, 95, loi, 
no; flooded in 1871, 91. 

Angul State, Orissa, xix. 205, 206, 210- 
217, 261, 264, 266-268, 325. 

Angul village, capital of Angul State, xix. 
268. 

Anhati, or Alhati, pargand in Hiiglf, i. 
368. 

Ankuri, pargand in Balasor, xviiL 361. 

Animals, Domestic, in the 24 Parganas, 
i. 149 ; in the Sundarbans, i. 337 ; in 
Nadiya, ii. 70 ; in Jessor, ii. 256 ; in 
Midnapur, iii. 83, 84 ; in HdgU, iii. 
34J ; in Bardwan, iv. 73, 74; in Bank- 
ura, iv, 248, 249; in Blrbhum, iv. 362, 
363; in Dacca, v. 93; in Bakarganj, v. 
169, 170; in Faridpur, v. 319; in Mai- 
mansinh, v. 443 ; in the Chittagong 
Hill Tracts, vi. 75; in Chittagong, 
vi. 162; in Nodkhdli, vi. 299; in 
Tipperah, vi. 396 ; in Hill Tippe- 
rah, vi. 503, 504 ; in Maldah, vii. 75 ; 
in Rangpur, vii. 264, 26$; in Dinaj- 
pur, vii. 395, 396 ; in Rajshahi, viii. 
65, 66 ; in Bogrd, viii. 222, 223 ; in 
Murshidibdd, ix. 108, 109 ; in Pdbni, 
ix. 306 ; in Ddijiling, x. 100 ; in JaU 
pdiguri, X. 277; in Kuch Behar, x. 385; 
m Tirhut, xiii. 107; in Champaran, xiii. 
278; in Bhdgalpur, xiv. 130; in the 
Santal Parganas, xiv. 342; in Monghyr, 
XV. 107, 108; in Pumiah, xv. 306-309; 
in Hazdribagh, xvl 107, 108 ; in Lo- 
hardagd, xvi. 356 ; in Singbhum, xvii. 
83, ^ ; in the Tributaiy States of 
Chutid Ndgpur, xvii. 175, 210 ; in 
Mdnbhum, xvii. 317, 318; in Cuttack, 



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GENERAL INDEX, 



xviii. iio; in Balasor, xviii. 295; in 
Purl, xix, 96, 97. 

Animals, Wild, of the 24 Parganis, i. 37, 
38 ; of the Sundarbans, i. 315, 316, 
331 ; of NadiyA, ii. 34 ; of Jessor, ii. 
1S4, 185 ; of Midnapur, iii. 39, 40 ; of 
Hufli, iii. 266; of Bardwin, iv. 29; of 
Bdmcurd, iv. 211, 212; of Birbhum, iv. 
322 ; of Dacca, v. 27-41 ; of Bakar- 
ganjj V. 177 ; of Faiidpur, v. 277 ; of 
Maimansinh, V. 391; of the Chittagong 
Hill Tracts, vi. 33, 34; of Chittagong, 
▼i- 133 ; of Noakhilf, vi. 258-266 ; of 
Tipperah, vi. 370 ; of Hill Tipperah, 
vi. 478-480; of Maldah, vii. 34, 35, 
129; of Rangpur, vii. 195-204; ofDin- 
ajpur, vii. 360-368, 441 ; of Rajshibi, 
viii. 31 ; of Bogra, viii. 151, 152 ; of 
Murshidibdd, ix. 34, 35 ; of Pabni, ix. 
277, 278 ; of Dirjfling, x. 39 ; of Tal- 
pdiguri, X. 245, 246 ; of Kuch Behar, 
X. 338; of Patn^ xi. 31; of Sdran, xi. 
237» 238 ; of Gaya, xii. 28 ; of Sh4h- 
dbid, xii. 179, 180; of Tirhut, xiii. 30, 
31 ; of Bhagalpur, xiv. 40-44 ; of the 
Santil Pargands, xiv. 273; of Monghyr, 
XV. 35-46; of Puxniah, xv. 236-240; of 
Hazaribdgh, xvi. 4it42; of Lohdrdaga, 
zvi. 246; of Singbhiim, xvii. 24-31; of 
the Tributary States of Chutid Nagpur, 
xvii. 168, 181, 191, 215, 230; of Mdn- 
bhuxn, xvii. 266-26iS; of Cuttack, xviii. 
59; of Balasor, xviii. 264; of Purl, xix. 
26, 27; of the Orissa Tributary States, 
xix. 203. 

Animals, Wild, Loss of life by, in the 24 
Pargands, i. 38 ; in the Sundarbans, i. 
315 ; in Nadiya, ii. 34 ; in Midnapur, 
iii. 39-41 ; in Hugli, iii. 266 ; in Bard- 
wdn, iv. 29 ; in Bdnkurd. iv. 212 ; in 
Birbhtim, iv. 322 ; in Bdkarganj, v. 
177; in Faridpur, v. 277; in Maiman- 
sinh, v. 392 ; in the Chittagong Hill 
Tracts, vi. 34; in Chittagong, vi. 133; 
in Nodkhdli, vi. 259, 266; in Tipperah, 
vi. 370 ; in Maldah, vii. 35 ; in Rang- 
pur, vii. 197, 202; in Dinajpur, vii. 
368: in Rdjshdhi, viii. 31 ; in Murshi- 
ddbdd, ix. 35 ; in Pdbnd, ix. 278 ; in 
Jalpdiguri, X. 246; in Patnd, xi. 31, 32; 
in Sdran, xi. 238 ; in Gayd, xii. 28 ; in 
Shdhdbdd, xii. 180; in Tirhut, xiii. 
30 ; in the Santdl Pargands, xiv. 273 ; 
in Monghyr, xv. 197, 298 ; in Hazdri- 
bdgh, xvi. 41; in Lohdrdagd, xvi. 246 ; 
in Singbhiim, xvii. 24; in the Tributary 
States of Chutid Ndgpur, xvii. 191 ; in 
Mdnbhum, xvii. 268; in Cuttack, xviii. 
59 ; in Puri, xix. 26 ; in Orissa Tribu- 
tary States, xU. 203. 



Anna Savings Banks, Proposal to estab- 
lish, in Rangpur. vii. 301. 

Ansular HI in Dinajpur, vii. 453. 

Antidesma, Species of, in R«^ur, viL 
192. 

Antimony in Hazdribdgh, xvi. 164. 

Antiquarian remains in the Sundarbans, 
i. 320, 321, 380, 381 ; in Nadiyd, ii. 
57, 58, 142; in Jessor, ii. 214, 22^ 
228 ; in Bardwdn, iv. 137 ; in Bdnkurd, 
iv. 237, 238 ; in Dacca, v. 72 ; in Nod- 
khdli, vi. 287, 288 ; in HUl Tipperah, 
vi. 497-409 ; in Maldah, vii. ^-64; in 
Murshiddbdd, ix. 87-93 J "^ Ddrjiling, x. 
32 ; in Jalpdiguri, x. 269 ; Kuch Behar, 
X. 335. 360-370; in Gayd, xiL 58-60 ; of 
Shahabad, xii. 209-217 ; in Tirhut, xiu. 
52, 55, 56, 58, 59, 70, 71, 189; in Cham- 
pdran, xiii. 252-255, 31 1 ; in Bhdgalpur, 
adv. 83, 86, 87, 91, 92, 95-ioS ; in the 
Santdl Pargands, xiv. 271, 272, 324- 
329 ; in Monghyr, xv. 62, 63, 70, 71 ; 
m Pumiah, xv. 267, 268 ; in Hazdri- 
bagh, xvi. 95, 96 ; in Lohdrddga, xvi. 
321-323; in Singbhiim, xvii. 7i-74» '87, 
188; in Sarguja State, xvii. 236-240; 
m Mdnbhum, xvii. 298-304; in Cuttack, 
xviii. 85-97, 179-187 ; in Pun, xix. 72- 
80. 

Anuttampur pargand in Sarkdr Mahmud- 
dbdd, 1., 372. 

Anwdrd, police-outpost in Chittagong, 
vi. 216. 

Anwarpur, fiscal division in the 24 Par- 
gands, i. 226, 363. 

Aoli, market villajpre in Dindjpur, vii. 452. 

Aonagar, village m Dindjpur, vii. 439. 

Aphaur, village in Sdran, xi. 257. 

Apild, pargand in Cuttack, xviiL 224. 

Apokrishta, or disgraced, Brdhmans. S^e 
Brdhmans. 

Arabic schools. See Educational Statistics. 

Arable Tract in Balasor, The, xviiL 249, 
250. 

Ardkan, formerly a province of Chitta- 
gong, vi. Ill, 212; Emigration of 
Maghs to Chittagong from, vi. 1 1 8, 
119; Capture of, by the English, in 
1824, vi. 135 ; Emigration from Chit- 
tagong to, vi. 143, 144; Portuguese 
Expedition against, in 1615, vi. 241, 
242. 

Ardkdnese, Depredations of, in the Sundar- 
bans, i. 382, 383 ; immigration of into 
the Sundarbans, i. 319, 320. 

Aralise, Species of, in Rangpur, vii. 182. 

Ardnagar, 'market village in Dindjpur, 
vii. A52. " 

Aranda, village in Sdran, xi. 353. 

Aranddtandila, village in Sdran, xi. 257. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



GENERAL INDEX, 



239 



Ararij, village in Champdran, xiiL 254, 
286 ; fair at^ xiii. 255. 

Aririyd Subdivision, Pumiah, zv. 244, 
380-^82, 413. 415. 

Adlriya, village and thdnd in Puxniah, 
XV. 243, 244, 266, 267, 398, 415. 

AreUddrSy commission agents for selling 
jute. See Jute. 

Ardabak village, with iron and brass 
work, 24 Pa^;an^, i. 170. 

Area of the 24 Parganis, i. 17 ; of the 
Sundarbans, i. 235 ; of Nadiya, ii. 17, 
69 ; of Jessor, ii. 169, 243 ; of Mid- 
napur, iii. 17; of Hugli, iii. 251 ; of 
Bard wan, iv. 17 ; of Bankuri, iv. 205 ; 
of Birbhum, iv. 311 ; of Dacca, v. 17, 
129 ; of B^rcanj, v. 157 5 of Farid- 
pur, V. 255 ; of Maimansinh, v. 383 ; 
of the Chittagong Hill Tracts, vi. 17, 
74 ; of Chittagong, vi. 109, 136, 161 ; 
of Noakhdli, ^. 268 ; of Tipperah, vi. 
356 ; of Hill Tipperah, vi. 459, 502 ; 
of Maldah, vii. 17, 18, 19, 38; of 
Rangpur, vii. 155 ; of Dinajpur, vii. 
355. 356, 371 ; of Rajshdhi, viii. 19, 
20; of Bogra, viii., 129, 159; of Mur- 
shidabid, ix. 17, 18, 39*40, 232-236; 
of Pibni, ix. 269, 280, 366-369; of 
Darjiling, x. 17, 18, 42; of Jalpdiguri, 
X. 215, 247-250; of Kuch Behar, x. 
331-332; of PatnA, xi. 17 ; of Saran, 
xi. 225, 241; of Gavd, xii. 17; of 
Shdhdbdd, xii. 157 ; ol Tirhut, xiii. 18, 
34 ; of Champaran, xiii. 219, 234 ; of 
Bhdgalpur, xiv. 17, 46 ; of the Santal 
Parganas, xiv. 265, 277 ; of Monghyr, 
XV. 18, 48 ; of Pumiah, xv. 219, 244 ; 
of Hazdribagh, xvi. 17, 56 ; of Lohdr- 
dagd, xvi., 231, 249, 353; of Sing- 
bhum, xvii. 17, 34 ; of the Tributary 
States of Chutid Ndgpur, xvii. 149, 
153 ; of Mdnbhum, xvii. 253 ; of Cut- 
tack, xviii. 19, 20, 65 ; of Balasor, xviii. 
247, 248, 265 ; of Pun, xix. 17 ; of the 
Orissa Tributary States, xix. 195. 

Area, Cultivated, out-tum of crops, &c., 
in the 24 Pargands, i. 148 ; in the 
Sundarbans, i. 335, 33^; Nadiyd, ii. 
69 ; in Jessor, iL 243 ; in Midnapur, 
iii. 82 ; in Hugli, iii. 240 ; in Bardwdc, 
iv. 72; in Bankurd, iv. 247; in Bir- 
bhum, iv. 346 ; in Dacca, v. 91 ; in 
Bdkarganj, v. 204 ; in Faridpur, v. 315; 
in Maimansinh, v. 44.2 ; in the Chitta- 
gong Hill Tracts, vi. 74, 75 ; in Chitta- 
gong, vi. 161, 162 ; in Nodkhdli, vi. 
295» 296 ; in Tipperah, vi. 393, 394 ; 
in Hill Tipperah, vi. 502 ; in Maldah, 
vii. 73» 74; in Rangpur, vii. 251-259; 
in Dindjpur, vii. 394, 395 ; in Rdji ' 



viii. 64-69; in Bogra, viii. 222, 226- 
228 ; in Murshiddl^d, ix. 105-107 ; in 
Pdbnd, ix. 305 ; in Ddrjiling, x. 97-99, 
103, 104 ; in Jalpdiguri, x. 224, 274- 
276, 280; in Kuch Behar, x. 383, 384; 
inPatnd, xi. 115, 116; in Sdran,xi. 292- 
294 ; in Gayd, xii. 94, 95 ; in Shdh- 
dbad, xii. 238-240 ; in Tirhut, xiiL 104, 
105; in Champdran, xiii. 271-277; 
in Bhdgalpur, xiv. 124-129; in the 
Santdl Pargands, xiv. 339-341 ; in Mon- 
ghyr, XV. 83, 84, 103-106 ; in Pumiah, 
XV. 293-303 ; in Hazdribagh, xvi. 105, 
192, 199 ; in Lohdrdagd, xvi. 353-355; 
in Singbhum, xvii. 81, 82; in the 
Tributary States of Chutid Ndgpur, 
xviL 209, 210; in Mdnbhum, xvii. 
316, 317 ; in Cuttack, xviii. 104-107 ; 
in Balasor, xviii. 291 ; in Purl, xix. 95. 

Areca nut trees in Jessor, ii. 248. 

Arfdbdd, mart in Patnd, xi. 160. 

Argirkid, police outpost in the Khand- 
mdls Onssa, xix., 264. 

Arhiddngd, village in Maldah, vii. 138. 

Ariddaha village and ihdnd, 24 Pargands, 
L 107, 179, 23a 

Aridl Khdn river, v. 160-162, 261. 

Armadi in the Sundarbans, Clearing at, 
i. 382. 

Armala, pargand in Balasor, xviii. 361. 

Armenian population. See Ethnical divi- 
sion of the people. 

Arpdngdsi river, l 18. 

Arrah {Sadr) Sub-division in Shdhdbdd, 
xii. 182, 247, 284, 285. 

Arrah, pargand in Shdhdbdd, xiL 286. 

Arrah, town and thdnd in Shdhdbdd, xii. 
157, 182, 203, 204, 257, 275, 285. 

Arrah canal, xii. 170, 171. 

Ax^ pargand in Sarkdr Sdtgdon, i. 363. 

Arsadpur, pargand in Rangpur, vii. 253. 

Arso, pargand in Balasor, xviii. 361. 

Articles of trade. See Commerce and 
Trade. 

Artisan castes. See Castes. 

Artisan school at Rangpur, vii. 342 ; in 
Kuch Behar, x. 398, A37. 

Arwal, pargand in Gaya, xii. i^ 

Arwal, town and thdnd in GaydTxil 23, 

3i» 57. 143. 

Asdmhudr system of indigo cultivation, 
Tirhut, xiii. 102, 103; Champdran, 
xiii. 268, 269. 

Asdni, village in Dindjpur, vii. 36^, 412. 

Asansol railway station, Bardwan, iv. 
107. 

Asantalid, //r in Singbhum, xvii. 136. 

Asdsunf, village and thdnd^ &*c.f 24 Par- 
gands, i. 118, 228. 

Asawdn, village in Sdran, xi. 257. 



Digitized by 



Google 



240 



GENERAL INDEX, 



Asclepiades, Species of, in Rangpur, vii. 

i8o. 
Asehni, village in Siran, xi. 258. 
Askta prahariy or watchers of crops. 

See Tenures of land. 
Asiatics, other than natives of India and 

Burmah. See Ethnical division of the 

people, 
Asjd, pargand in Pumiah, xv. 294, 332, 

417. 

Asoka, The Edicts of, xix. 77-80. 

Aspect, General physical, of the 24 Par- 
ganis, i. 22-24 ; of the Sundarbans, i. 
286-293 f of Nadiyd, iL 18; of Jessor, ii. 
170, 171 ; of Midnapur, iii. 22, 23 ; 
of Hugli, iii. 253, 254 ; of Bardwdn, 
iv. 21, 22 ; of Bdnicudi, iv. 207 ; of 
Bfrbhum, iv. 317; of Dacca, v. 18, 
19 ; of Bdkarganj, v. 158, 159 ; of 
Fandpur, v. 257-260 ; of Maimansinh, 
V. 384, 385 ; of the Chittagong Hill 
Tracts, vi. 22 ; of Chittagong, vi. 124 ; 
of No^hili, vi. 249, 250 ; of Tipperah, 
vi. 361 ; of Hill Tipperah, vi. 472, 
473 ; of Maldah, vii. 20 ; of Rangpur, 
vii. 161, 292 : of Dinijpur, vii. 358, 
363 ; of Rajshahi, viii. 21, 22 ; of Bogra, 
viii. 133, 135 ; of Murshidabdd, ix. 
21-23 ; of Pdbnd, ix. 271 ; of Dar- 
jiling, X. 19-23 ; of Jalpiigurf, x. 
223-225 ; of Kuch Behar, x. 333 ; 
of Patna, xi., 18; of Saran, xi. 226, 
227 ; of Gayd, xii. 18, 19 ; of Shah- 
abad, xii. 158, 159 ; of Tirhut, xiii. 18, 
19; of Cluunp4ran, xiii. 220, 221; of 
Bhdgalpur, xiv. 22-24 ; of the Santal 
Parganas, xiv. 266; of Monghyr, xv. 19, 
20; of Pumiah, xv. 225, 220; of Hazdri- 
bagh, xvi. 22-25 ; of Lohdrdagd, x\d. 
232-234; of Singbhiim, xvii. 18, 19 ; of 
the Tributary States of Chutia Nigpur, 
xvii. 152 ; of Manbhum, xvii. 254-256 ; 
of Cuttack, xviii. 20, 21 ; of Balasor, 
xviii. 248-250; of Pun, xix. 18; of the 
Orissa Tributary States, xix. 198, 199. 

Aspects, Medical, of the 24 Pargands, i. 
241-255 ; of Nadiyd, ii. 139 ; of Jessor, 
ii- 328, 329 ; of Midnapur, iii. 227-217; 
of Hugli, iii. 417-4405 of Bard win, 
iv. 177-201 ; of Binkuii, iv. 300-305 ; 
of Birbhum, iv. 438-455 ; of Dacca, v. 
141 -147 ; of Bakarganj, v. 246-248; of 
Faridpur, v. 357-362 ; of Maimansinh, 
V. 479 ; of the Chittagong Hill Tracts, 
vL 102-104; of Chittagong, \\. 226- 
233; of Nodkhdh', vi. 345-350; of 
Tipperah, vi. 447-454; of Hill Tip- 
perah, vi. 519-522; of Maldah, viL 
145 ; of Rwigpur, vii. 34 J ; of Dinij- 
pur, viu 456-458; of Rajshdhi, viii. 



121, 122; of Bogrd, viiL 306-313; 
of Murshidibad, ix. 239-244; of Pibna, 
«. 372-376; of Darjiling, x, 199, 
201 ; of Jalpiiguri, x. 321-326; of Kuch 
Behar, x. 441-444 ; of Patnd, xi. 209- 
213; of Sdran, xi. 361-363; of Cava, 
xii. 146-153 ; of Shdhdbad, xii. 287- 
291 ; of Tirhut, xiii. 200-208 ; of 
Champdran, xiii. 313-318; of Bhd- 
galpur, xiv. 220-223, 250-2^5 ; of the 
Santal Pargands, xiv. 378-385 ; of 
Monghyr, xv. 187-212 ; of Pumiah, 
XV. 431-444; of Hazdribagh, xvi. 199- 
206 ; of Lohdrdagd, xvi. 483-487 ; of 
Singbhum, xvii. 139-143; of Mdnbhum, 
xvii. 370-374 ; of Cuttack, xviii. 234- 
243 ; of Balasor, xviii. 366-372 ; of 
Puri, xix. 174-177. 

Assam, Emigration to, from the 24 Par- 
gsmdsji. 52; Western portion of, included 
with Bengal, i. 356; Emigrants from 
Midnapur to, iii. 52 ; Exp^ition into, 
by Husdin Shdh, vii. 315; Exports 
from Rangpur into, vii. 308. 

Assamese, Invasions of, and expeditions 
a^inst, V. 120, 121. 

Assid range of hills in Cuttack, xviii. 
22, 90. 

Assidgiri, hiU in Cuttack, xviii. 22. 

Association, The Chittagong, vi. 21 1, 212. 

Assumption of Government, by the Eng- 
lish. See History. 

Astichak embankment in Midnapur, iii. 
143. 

Astrang, pargand in Puri, xix. 130, 172, 

173. 

Asureswar, pargand in Cuttack, xviii. 224. 

Asurgarh fort in Pumiah, Ruins of, xv. 
267, 268. 

Asurdsf or Agarids. See Castes. 

Aswd, a hill in Hazdribagh, xvi. 26. 

Aswddid chaklah in NoakhdH, vi. 343. 

Aswamedha jajna or Horse Sacrifice of 
King Sagar, i. 28. 

Asylums, Lunatic, in the 24 Pargands, i. 
256-259 ; in Dacca, v. 148, 149 ; in 
Murshiddbdd, ix. 171, 249-251 ; in 
Patnd, xi. 220, 221. 

Atddighi, village in Dinajpur, vii. 453. 

Atdr-murd range and peak in Hill Tip- 
perah, vi. 474. 

Atasardi, or Isldmpur, mart in Patnd, 
xi. 83. 

Atasarai thand in Patnd, xi. 35, 206. 

Athais, pargand in Puri, xix. 130^ 172, 

173. 
Athdrabdnkd river, i. 25, 26, 32 ; iL 176, 

179. 
Athgarh State, Orissa, xix. 205, 206, 
210-217, 261, 268-270, 328. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



GENERAL INDEX, 



241 



Athjgarh village, capital of Athgarh State, 
zix. 27a 

Athmallik State, Orissa, xix. 206, 210- 
217, 261, 270-272, 325. 

Atia, subdivision, pargand^ and village 
in Maimansinh, v. 415, 475, 477. 

Atiabdri canal in Noakhali, vi. 254. 

Aiiihisdlds or alms-houses, Murshid^bad, 
ix- 171. 

Atkhantd, pargand in Cuttack, xviii. 
224. 

Atmospheric conditions inthe24Parganas, 
i. 242-245, 259-261 ; in Nadiy^, ii. 
139 ; in Jessor, it 329 ; in Bardwdn, 
iv. 177 ; in Bankur^ iv. 300; in Bir- 
bhdm, iv. 437, 438 ; in Dacca, v. 142 ; 
in Bikarganj, v. 246 ; in Faridpur, v. 
358 ; in Maimansinh, v. 479 ; in Chit- 
tagong, vi. 226 ; in Maldah, vii. 145 ; 
in RaM[pur, vii. 345, 346 ; in Dinijpur, 
vii. 456, 457 ; in Rijshihi, viii. 121, 
122 ; in Bogrd, viii. 305 ; in Murshibd- 
bdd, ix. 236-239; in Pdbnd, ix. 369- 
372 ; in Daijiling, x. 198 ; in Jalpdigurf, 
X. 320, 321 ; in Kuch Behar, x. 440-443; 
in Patnd, xi. 210, 211 ; in Sdran, xi. 
361, 362 ; in Gayd, xii. 146, 147 ; in 
Sbdhabdd, xii. 287; in Tirhut, xiii. 
200-202 ; in Champdran, xiii. 313, 314; 
in Bhdgalpur, xiv. 251 ; in the San- 
tal Pargands, xiv. 379, 380 ; in Mon- 
ghyr, XV. 187-190 ; in Pumiah, xv. 
431-434; in Hazdribagh, xvi. 199, 
201 ; in Lohdrdagd, xvi. 483, 484 ; in 
Singbhiim, xvii. 140; in Mdnbhiim, 
xvii. 370 ; in Cuttack, xviii. 234, 235 ; 
in Balasor, xviii. 366, 367 ; in Purl, 
xix; 173, 174. 

Atpakaris, See Village Officials. 

Atrdi river, vii. 359, 361, 362, 364 ; viii. 
23, 24, 135, 137. 

Atri, pargand in Gayd, xu. 144. 

Atri, village and thand in Gayd, xii. 31, 

55» 141. 
Aturid, market village in the 24 Pargands, 

i. 229. 
Atwdri, village and thdnd in Dindjpur, 

vii 365. 
Audumbar sarkdr^ in Bfrbhum, i. 359, 

360, 373. 
Aul Chdnd, founder of the Kartdbhajd 

sect, i. 74. 
Aul Kild, pargand in Cuttack, xviii. 

224. 
Auld, fir in Singbhiim, xvii. 136. 
Auldha, tappd in Champdran, xiii. 272, 

310. 
Aurangd river in Lohdrdagd, xvi. 236. 
Aurangdbddy subdivision in Gayd, xii. 

31, 62, 65, 142. 



Aurangdbdd, town and thand in Gayd, 
xii. 31, 63, 142. 

Aus or Autumn rice crop in the 24 Par- 
gands, i. 134; in the Sundarbans, i. 324; 
in Nadiyd, ii. 64 ; in Jessor, ii. 242 ; in 
Midnapur, iii. 79 ; in Htiglf, iii. 330 ; 
in Bardwdn, iv. 69 ; in Bdnkurd, 
iv. 245 ; in Birbhum, iv. 345 ; in 
Dacca, v. 83 ; in Bdkarganj, v. 203 ; 
in Faridpur, v. 296-298 ; in Maiman- 
sinh, V. 419 ; in Chitiagong, vi. 159, 
160, 185 ; in Nodkhdli, vi. 292, 296 ; 
in Tipperah, vi. 391, 416 ; in Hill 
Tipperah, vi. 502 ; in Rangpur, vii. 
234, 235, 237, 238, 261 ; in Dindjpur, 
vii. 390, 409 ; in Rdjshdhi, viiL 59 ; in 
Bogrd, viii. 208 ; in Murshiddbad, ix. 
34, loi, 136 ; in Pdbnd, ix. 301 ; in 
Ddrjfling, x. 92, 93 ; in Jalpdigurf, x. 
271, 272 ; in Kuch Behar, x. 379, 380 ; 
in Tirhut, xiii. 81 ; in Bhdgalpur, xiv. 
116 ; in the Santdl Pargands, xiv. 335 ; 
in Pumiah, xv. 282, 283 ; in Mdn- 
bhtim, xvii. 311 ; in Cuttack, xviii. 99; 
in Pun, xix. 93. 

Ausat madatmdshlBjii^ teoxaes. iisf Ten- 
ures of land. 

Ausgrdm, vilage and thand in Bardwdn, 
iv. 64. 

Azam Shdh proclaims his indepoidence 
in Sondrgdon, v. 1 19. 

Azam Sultan Muhammad, son of Aurang- 
zeb, and Governor of Dacca, v. 60, 
121. 

Azimdbdd, one of the original 24 Par- 
gands, i. 20, 226. 

Azimdbdd pargand in Patnd, xi. 206. 

Azimdbdd, native name of Patnd city, 
xi. 68. See also Patnd citv. 

Azimganj, a town in Murshiddbdd, ix. 84. 

Azim-us-Shdn, grandson of Aurangzeb, 
and Nizam of Bengal, v. 122. 

Azmatshdhi or Azmatpur pargand^ i. 
370. 



B 



Babanpur, pargand in Dindjpur, vii. 435. 

Bdbhan caste. See Castes. 

Babla or Dwarkd, river in Murshiddbdd, 

ix. 23. 25. 
Bdbndbdri, village in Bardwdn with river 

traffic, iv. 25. 
Babrd I., pargand in Tirhut, xiii. 181. 
Babrd II., pargand in Tirhut, xiii. 181, 

182. 
Babrd Turki, pargand in Tirhut, xiii. 182. 
Babuganj, village in Hugli, with river 

traffic, iii. 263. 



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242 



GENERAL INDEX, 



Babunpur, pargand in Rangpur, vii. i6i, 

253» 289. 
Babupur, pargand in NoikhdK, vi. 343. 
Biburd, town in Shdhibdd, xii. 202. 
Baburhdt, village in Dindjpur, vii. 383. 
Bada Bhusdri, pargand in Monghyr, xv. 

176. 
Bidalgachhi, thdnd and mart in Dindjpur, 

vii. 442, 451. 
Biularganj, village in Rangpur, vii. 309. 
Badaur, pargand in Pumiah, xv. 294, 295, 

332, 417, 418. 
BadaBhusirif/^r^if^ in Tirhut, xiii. 182. 
B^hpur, village-union in Tirhut, xiii. 49. 
Badkwdras, See Village Officials. 
Bador, pargand in Dinljpur, vii. 436. 
Badr&j Semar, thdnd in Tirhut, xiii. 34, 

179. 
Badnhit or Ghiisibdd, an ancient town 

in Murshiddbdd, ix. 91, 92. 
Badshdhi, or imperial rent-free grants of 

land. See Tenures of land. 
Badu Bdz^, village, and school, 24 Par- 

ganis, i. 206, 226. 
Badu Don^ river in No4khdli, vi. 251. 
Badurii, trading town on the Jamuni, i. 

34. 227. 
Badurid, market village in Dinijpur, vii. 

447. 
Badyu-ul-zamdn Khin, a Muhammadan 

R4j4 of Birbhum, iv. 387-390, 394. 
BagaM, village and thdnd in Champdran, 

xiii. 228, 234, 311. 
Bagand, town in Shahdbdd, xii. 203. 
Bdgat land tenures. See Tenures of land. 
Bagaurd, village in Sdran, xi. 258. 
Bagda, pargand in Mdnbhum, xvii. 367. 
Bdgdd, river in Hugli, iil 25. 
Bdgdebi khdl, Nadiyd, ii. 33. 
Bdgdi caste. See Castes. 
B&ghif pargand in the Sundarbans, i. 370. 
Bdghdhan, mart in Sdran, xi. 332. 
Baghchard, village in Dindjpur, vii. 455. 
B^hdala, town in Maldah, vii 126. 
Bdghddngd, an alluvial char or island in 

the Ganges river, ix. 28. 

2^hddn^ seat of pottery manufacture, 
essor, ii. 284. 
jhdhar, river in Moi^hyr, xv. 22. 
Bdgherhdt subdivision, ii. 319. 
Bdgherhdt town, with ruins connected 
with Khdn Jahdn, ii. 227-231 ; dispen- 
sary, ii. y>S, 341. 
Bdgher hhdl, 24 Parguids, i. 18, 24. 
Bdghichd, villa^ in Dindjpur, vii. 444. 
Bdghjdld muniapality, 24 Pargands, I 82. 
Bdghjdnd, village in Dindjpur, vii. 444, 

445. 
Bdghkhdli, river in the Chittagong Hill 
Tracts, vi. 27, 28. 



Bdghkdii, mart in Chittagong, vi. 198. 
Bdghmdrd, pargand, i. 226, 373. 
Bdghmdrd peak, xix. 200. 
Bdghmati river, xiii. 19, 23, 24, 130, 226. 
Bdghmati, embankment in Tirhut, xiii. 

116, 117. 
Bdghmati, khd/ in Monghyr. xv. 21. 
Bdghmundi, pargand in Mdnbhum, xvii. 

367. 
Bdglimundi, range of hills, Mdnbhum, 

xvii. 255, 256. 
Bdghndpdrd, village in Bardwdn, scene of 

a religious gathering, iv. 67. 
Bdgichdf or garden-land, Rent of. See 

Rent of land. 
Bdgmdrd, trading village in Tipperah, vi 

420. 
Bdgndn, village in Hugli, with pottery 

manufacture, iii, 373. 
Bagri, a Hindu division of Bengal, i 359, 

footnote, 371. 
Bagurd or Bogrd District. See Bogrd. 
Bagurd or Bogrd town, viii 129, 186, 187. 
Bdgutid, pargand, in Sarkdr Mahmudd- 

bdd, i. 372. 
Bagwdn, mahal, Sarkdr Sdtgdon, i. 363. 
Banddur river, i. 299. 
Bahddurganj, thdnd in Pumiah, xv. 243, 

244. 398, 415. 
Bahddurpur, pargand in Maldah, vii. 128. 
Bahddurpur, /ar^ami in Tirhut, xiii. 182. 
Bahdman Kumdr, village in Dindjpur, vii. 

436. 
Bahdman Kundd, pargand in Rangpur, 

vii. 161, 253, 289 ; in Dindjpur, vii. 436. 
Baharband, pargand in Rangpur, vii 253, 

263, 279, 284, 285, 302, 322-324. 
Baharhagarhd, thdnd in Singbhum, xvii. 

34, 71, 122. 
Bahds, tappd in Champdran, xiii. 272, 

274, 275, 310, 312. 
Bahauli Bonga festival, Singbhum, xvii. 

50, SI. 
Bahdwd railway station, Santal Paigands, 

xiv. 352. 
Bah Bonga festival, Singbhum, xvii 50. 
Baherd, village and thdnd in Tirhut, xiii 

34, 61, 62, 179. 
BaJimanbhiim mahal, Midnapur, i 371. 
Bahulia or Kdmdrgdrchhi k/idl, Hugll, iii. 

254. 
Bahurupd, pargand in Cuttack, xviii 224. 
Baiddn, village in Dindjpur, vii. 45a 
Baideswar, vSlage and police outpost in 

Bdnki State, Orissa, xix. 201, 204. 
Baidik Brdhmans. See Brdhmans. 
Baidyd caste, origin, sects, number, &c., 

in the 24 Pargands, i. 58 ; in the Sun- 
darbans, i 318 ; in Nadiyd, ii. 46, 47; 

in Jessor, ii. 195; in Midnapur, iii 53; 



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243 



in Ilitgli, iii. 286 ; in Bardwin, iv. 49; 
in Birbhiim, iv. 330 ; in Dacca, v. 47 ; 
in B&karganj, v. 190, 191; in Farldpur, 
V. 286; in Maimansinh, v. 401, 40^; in 
Chittagong, vi. 145 ; in Nodkhdli, vi. 
27s ; in Tipperah, vl 380; in Maldah, 
viL 44 ; in Rangpur, vii. 215 ; in Dinij- 
pur, vii. 377; in Rdjsh^, viii. 38, 43; 
in Bogri, viii. 165, 172, 173 ; in Mur- 
shiddbad, ix. 49; in Pdbna, ix. 286; in 
Diijiling, x. 81 ; in Jalpaiguri, x. 257 ; 
in Kuch Behar, x. 343 ; in Patni, xi. 
44; in Bhdgalpur, xiv. 63 ; in the San- 
tal Parganas, xiv. 319 ; in Monghyr, 
XV. 57 ; in Lohdrdagd, xvi. 302 ; in 
Singbhum, xvii. 64; in Manbhum, xvii. 
290 ; in Cuttack, xviii. 73 ; in Balasor, 
xviil 274; in Puri, xix, 37. 

Baidyabati mtinicipality, jute mart, &c., 
in Hugli, iii. 263, 303, 375; rope 
manufacture, iii. 375; khdl^ iii. 254; 
branch dispensary, iii. 440. 

Baidyanith, village in Shdhabdd, xii. 214. 

Baigds^ or village priests. See Castes 
and VilUge Officials, &c. 

Baidyottar land tenures. See Tenures of 
land. 

Biigundton, village in Dinijpur, vii. 415. 

Baigunkodar, pargand in Mdnbhum, 
xvii. 367. 

Baijndth railway station, Santdl Pargands, 
xiv. 352. 

Baikiri market village, 24 Pargands, i. 
229. 

Baikathpur, pargand in Patnd, xi. 206. 

Baikathpur, town in Patnd, xi. 66, 85, 
191. 

Baikunthpur,/ar^«/f in Tipperah, vi. 442. 

Baikunthpur, pargand in Rangpur, vii. 
160, 318, 321. 

Baikundipur, pargand in Nodkhdlf, vi. 

343- 
Bain, timber tree in the Sundarbans, i. 37, 

305' 
Bdinchi, village in Hiigli, and railway 

station, iii. 314 ; brass work, iiL 373. 
Bairdgis, a class of Vaishnav religious 

mendicants, in Rangpur, viL 229. 
Bairagitald, fair in Bardwan, iv. 67. 
BairiPerrij/ar^flii^in Rangpur, vii. 253. 
Bdishazdri, pargand in Maldah, vii. 84, 

128. 
Baishnabs. See Vaishnavs. 
Baitaghdti khdl, Jessor, ii. 180. 
Baitarani river, xvii. 22, 71; xviii. 22, 23, 

25. 36, 251, 252 ; xix. 200, 201. 
Baj-baj. See Budge-Budge. 
Bdjitnagar, pargand in Rangpur, vii. 286. 
Bdjitpur, formerly factory of muslin, now 

police station in Maimansinh, v. 459. 



Bdjitpur, pargand in Rangpur, vii. z6i, 
253, 286. 

Bdjitpur, pargand in Dindjpur, vii. 436. 

'Qiyn\ioXt pargand in Puri, xix. 172, 173. 

Bajrd Pukhdn, village in Dindjpur,"'vii. 
446. 

Bajras (budgerows). See Boats. 

BAkarganj District (VoL V.) — 

Geographical Situation, Area, Head- 
quarters, Boundaries, 157; Jurisdiction, 
158; General Aspect, 159; River sys- 
tem, 159-167; Tides in rivers, Bore, Allu- 
vion and Diluvion, 167; Changes in 
Rivers, Lakes, Marshes, &c., 168; 
Canals, 169; River Traffic, Fisheries, 
170; Marsh Reclamation, 171-174; 
Minerals, &c.. Jungle Products, 175; 
Fera Naturae, 177 ; Population, Esti- 
mates of, before 1872, Census of 1872, 
its Agencies and Results, 178-199; 
Population according to Sex and Age, 
182-184; According to Occupation,! 184- 
188 ; Ethnical Division of the People, 
188-190; Castes, 190-194; Religious 
Division of the People, 194-199 ; Towns 
and Principal Villages, 200, 201 ; 
Material Condition of the People, 202 ; 
Agriculture, 202-211; Rice Crops, 202, 
203 ; Area, Out-turn of Crops, &c., 
204; Condition of the Peasant^, Dom- 
estic Animals, 205 ; Agricultural Im 
plements. Wages and Prices, 206; 
Weights and Measures, 207; Day 
labourers, 208; Land Tenures, 209, 
365-3795 Rates of Rent, 210; Man- 
ure. Irrigation, Rotation of Crops, 
2JI ; Natural Calamities, 212; Com- 
pensating Influences and Famine 
Warnings, 213 ; Foreign and Absentee 
Landlords, Roads, &c., 214; Manu 
factures. Commerce, and Trade, 215 ; 
Capital and Interest, 216; News- 
papers, Income Tax, &c., 217; Revenue 
and Expenditure, 217-220; Land 
Settlement and History of five principal 
pargands, 221-226; Land Tax, 226; 
Mode of Collecting, 227 ; Land Law, 
Courts, &c., 228; Police Statistics, 
229; Criminal Cases, 230 ; Criminal 
Classes, 230-232 ; Jail Statistics, 233 ; 
Educational Statistics, 234-236 ; Postal 
Statistics, 237 ; Fiscal Divisions, 238- 
243; Sub-Divisional Administration, 
243-246; Qimate, Conservancy, &c, 
246; Diseases, Fairs, &c., 247; 
Native Practitioners and Charitable 
Dispensaries, 248; GeoI(^, 249-251 ; 
Special Report on Land Tenures, 365- 
379. 

Bdkarganj town, former head-quarters of 



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GENERAL INDEX, 



Bdkarganj District, now in ruins, v. 

IS7, 158. . 
Bdkeswar, river in Birbhdm, iv. 317 ; 

hot springs, iv. 322, 457. 
BakhrA, village, Tirhut, xiii. 52, 53. 
Bakhshis, See Village Officials. 
Bakhtiarpur, village and thdnd in Patni, 

xi. 35» 85, 205. 
Bakld, market village in the 24 Pargands, 

i. 229. 
Bakri, market village in the 24 Parganis, 

i. 236. 
Bakrd, river in Pumiah, xv. 227, 229. 
B4krdbad, pargand in Cuttack, xviii. 224. 
Bikrdbddif a variety of jute. Ste Jute. 
Bakrachandra, boor or lake, 24 Pargands, 

i. 240. 
Bakr 'Id, festival in Patni, xi. 60. 
Bakror, village in Gayd, xii. 55, 56. 
Bakshi, kk6l in Hugli, iii. 254, 256. 
Bakshish or Idkhiraj land tenures. See 

Tenures of land. 
Bakshnagar, pargand in Hill Tipperah, 

vi. 519. 
Bdkud Channel, False Point, xviii. 29. 
Bzkayk ffargand, L 364. 
Bakya nver, xiiL 225, 226. 
Bdl, pargand in Sdran, xi. 302, 355, 356. 
Bdlddhdng{, market village in Dindjpur, 

viL 449. 
Baldgach, pargand in Tirhut, xiii. 182. 
Bdldgarh, village in Hugli, with river 

traffic, iii. 263. 
Balaif timber tree in the Sundarbans, L 

Bdlakandf, village in Rangpur, vii. 305. 

Bdldm, See Rice. 

Bdldmmdrd, police outpost in Nodkhali, 

vi. 333- 

Baldn river, Tirhut, xiii. 20, 22, 25, 26, 
27. 

Balance of trade. See Commerce and 
Trade. 

Balance sheets of revenue and expendi- 
ture, of the 24 Parganis, i. 185-187 ; 
of the Sundarbans, i. 346 ; of Nadiya, 
ii. 1 11-115 ; of Jessor, ii. W; of Mid- 
napur, iii. 154-157; of Huglf, iii. ^78- 
381; of Bardwan, iv. 143, 144; of Bank- 
ura, iv. 279 ; of Birbhum, iv. 39S-400; 
of Dacca, v. 126-180 ; of BAkarganj, v. 
217-220; of Faridpur, v. 341-343 ; of 
Maimansinh, v. 462-464 ; of the Chit- 
tagong Hill Tracts, vi. 95-97; of 
Chittagong, vi. 212, 213 ; of Nodkhdli, 
vi. 33i» 332 ; of Tipperah, vi. 428-430 ; 
of Hill Tipperah, vi. 509-5^3; of Mai- 
dah, vii. 105, 106; of Rangpur, vii. 
325-327 ; of DinAjpur, vii. 4x5-421 ; 
of Rdjshdhi, viii. 92-99; of Bogrd, 



viii. 280-282 ; of Murshidibid, ix. 196- 
201 ; of Pdbnd, ix. 353-355 ; of Ddr- 
j fling, X. 178-182; of JalpAiguri, x. 301- 
304 ; of Kuch Behar, x. 432-435 ; of 
Patnd, xi. 18J-185 ; of Saran, xi. 338- 
342 ; of Gaya, xii. 122-126 ; of Shah- 
abad, xii. 271-275; of Tirhut, xiii. 166, 
167 ; of Champdran, xiii. 297-299 ; of 
Bhdgalpur, xiv. 194-200; ol the Santdl 
Pargands, xiv. 362, 363 ; of Mongh3rr, 
XV. 155/^57 ; of Pumiah, xv. 393-397; 
of Hazaribdgh, xvi. 173-177 ; of Lohdr- 
dagd, xvL 470-472; of Singbhum, xvii. 
115-117; of the Tributary States of 
Chutid Ndgpur, xvii. 152, 219, 220, 
243, 244; of Mdnbhum, xvii. 353-355; 
of Cuttack, xviiL 200-202 ; of Balasor, 
xviii. 344-346; of Purf, xix. 156; of the 
Orissa Tributary States, xix. 264. 
Balandd or Balindd, pargand^ i. 227, 

363. 
Balands, an aboriginal tribe in the 

Tributary States of Chutid Ndgpur, 

xvii. 216, 217. 
Balardmbhajas, Hindu sect in Nadiyd, ii. 

Balardm-prasdd, police outpost in Angul 
State, xix. 264. 

Bdldsan river, x. 27; xv. 227. 

Balasor District (Vol. XVIII.)— 
Geographical Situation, Area and 
Headquarters, 247, 248; Boundaries 
and Jurisdiction, 248 ; General Aspect 
of the District, 248-250 ; River System, 
250-252 ; Ports and Harbours, 252- 
263; Embankments, 263; Fisheries, 
263 ; Ferff" Natura, 264 : Population — 
Early Estimates, 264 ; The Census of 
1872, 264, 265 ; Classification accord- 
ing to Sex, Religion, and Age, 266, 
267 ; Infirms, 267 ; Ethnical Division 
of the People, 267-270; Emigration, 
270, 271 ; List of Hindu Castes, 271- 
277; Aboriginal Tribes, 277; Re- 
ligious Division of the People, 277- 
279 ; Division of the People into Town 
and Country, 279, 280 ; Balasor town, 
280-283; Minor Towns, 283, 284; 
Fairs, 284 ; Village Officials, 284-287 ; 
Material Condition of the People — 
Dress, Dwellings, Food, &c, 287-289; 
Agriculture — Rice Crops, 289-291 ; 
Other Crops, 291 ; Cultivated Area and 
Out-turn of Crops, 291, 292 ; Condi- 
tion of the Peasantry, 282-294 ; Tenant 
Rights, 294, 295 ; Domestic Animals, 
and Agricultuial Implements, 295 ; 
Wages and Prices, 295-299 ; Weights 
and Measures, 297; Day-Labourers, 
297-300; Waste Land, 300^ 301 ; Land 



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GENERAL INDEX. 



245 



Tenures, 301-320 ; Rates of Rent, 320- 
322 ; Manures, 322 ; Natural Calami- 
ties, Blights, Floods, and Droughts, 
322-326 ; Famine Warnings, 326-328 ; 
The Famine of 1866, 328-334 ; Roads, 
334-336; Manufactures, 336, 337; 
Trade, 337-344; Administrative His- 
tory, 344; Land Tax, 344, 346; 
Revenue and Expenditure, 344, 345 ; 
Civil and Criminal Courts, 346 ; Police 
and Tail Statistics, 346-352 ; Educa- 
tional Statistics, 352-359 ; Postal 
Statistics, 359; Administrative Divi- 
sions, 360, 361 ; List of Fiscal Divisions 
and Chief Villages in each, 361-366 ; 
Climate, Temperature, and Rainfall, 
366, 367; Diseases, 367-369; Dis- 
pensaries, 369, 370 ; Vital Statistics, 
370; Cattle Diseases, 370, 371 ; Indi- 
genous Drugs, 371, 372. 

Balasor port, xviii. 255-258; thdnd, 
xviii. 265, 360 ; town, description and 
histoiy of rise of, xviii. 279-283. 

Bilaur, town in Shihibdd, xii. 202. 

Balawii river, xiii. 223, 224. 

Balbhadrapur kild^ PnH, xix. 183. 

Balchari, island, Sundarbans, i. 294. 

Bildiib&ri, battle at, xv. 224, 225. 

Baleswar or HAringhita, river, i. 287, 
297, 298 ; v. 1 60, 164, 262 ; estuaiy, 
ii. 174, 232-235. 

Balgion, town in Shdh4bid, xii. 202. 

Balghdri pargandy Sundarbans, i. 368; 
market village in Dinajpur, vii. 447. 

Balhar, police outpost in Bh^igalpur, xiv. 
213. 

Bali, village in HCigli, and railway station, 
iii. 306 J fair, iii. 375. 

Bdli, khdl in Hugli, iii. 371 ; paper- 
works, iii. 372. 

Bili, municipality in Bardwin, iv. 62. 

Bailia, one of the original 24 Pargands 
(North and South), L 20, 227, 228, 336. 

Bdliigh4t4 canal, 24 Pargands, L 31. 

Bdli^hdti, seat of trade on the Circular 
Road Canal, 24 Pargands, i. 34. 

Bdliipal Mnd, Balasor, xviii. 265, 360. 

BAMdsingi par^nd, Sundarbans, i. 366. 

Bill diwdi^g;anj, trading village in Hugli, 

iii. 375. 

B41iganj, suburb of Calcutta, and rail- 
way station, i. loi, 170. 

B&lighai, trading village in Midnapur, 
iii. 152. 

Bilikothi /ar^ifj, Sundarbans, i. 371. 

Bdlis^f or Bdlishihi pargand, Sundar- 
bans, i. 371. 

Baliyi, pargand in Patni, xi. 207. 

Baliyd, pargand in Monghyr, xv. 176. 

Baliyd or £:gu Sar^ thdnd in Monghyr, 



XV. 48, 161, 174; dispensary, xv. 

209. 
Baliyi Sihibganj, mart in Bhigalpur» 

xiv., 190, 191. 
Bdljari, pir in Sinffbhdm, xvii. 139. 
Baikhand, pargatSi in Balasor, xviii. 361. 
Ballabhpur, suburb of Serampur, iii. 

306 ; car festival of Jagannith at, iii. 

322, 324, 375. 
B^lil Sen, Kinf of Bengal, i. §3, 59; v. 

54, 70, 118 ; tiis palace at Bikdunpur, 

v. 70 ; ruins of his palace in Gaur, vii. 

BalH bUy 24 Parganis, i. 3a 

Balrimpur, market village, 24 Parganitf, 
i. 220. 

Balrimpur, pargand and village in Mid- 
napur, iii. 104, 105, 191, 192. 

Balrampur fair, Jessor, ii. 337. 

Bahrimpur, thdnd in Purniah, xv. 243, 

244, 398» 415- 
Balthir, tappd in Champaran, xiiL 272, 

274, 310- 

Balud, village in Bhiigalpur, xiv. 94. 
Baludh, ta^ in Champiran, xiii. 272, 

275, JIG. 

Bdlubhar^ village in Dinijpnr, viL 442. 

Bilubisi, pargand in Cuttack, xviiL 224. 

Balughit, village in Midnapur, with river 
tnSfic, iii. 37. 

Bdlughit, village in Hiigli, with manu- 
facture of eunny cloth, iii. 372. 

Bdlughdt, village in Dinijpur, vii. 365, 
413. 452. 

Bdlupdri, market village in Dinijpnr, vii. 
452. 

Bilupur, town in Maldah, vii. 136. 

Baluti, village in Hl!igH, with branch of 
Sam4j, iii 293. 

Bam Marg or Kaulik, sect of Hindus in 
Patni, xL 56, 57. 

B4mandingi, pargand in Rangpur, vii. 

253- 
Bimanghdti State, Orissa, xix., 206, 2ZO- 

217, 261, 301-303. 
BdmangoU, market village in Maldah, 

fair at, vii. 68, 127. 
Baman Kili, pargand, Sundarbans, i. 

372. 
Bamboos, Varieties of, in the Chittagong 

Hill Tracts, vi. 32; in Ranepur, vii. 

192, 249, 307. Export of, from Tip- 

perah, vi. 423 ; from Hill Tipperali, 

vi. 508 ; cultivation of, in Knch Behar, 

3t. 383. 

Bimni, thdnd in No4kh4U, vi. 239, 269, 
273, 274, 277, 286, 294, 315, 324, 330^ 
333, 342 ; river in Noakhali, vi 25a 

Bamp4ti, town in Shdhibid, xii. 203. 

B&mtii/sr^aiiiin Hill Tipperah, vl 519. 
6 



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246 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Bind, a King who, according to the 

Furdnas, interfered with caste, i. 52. 
Banahir, pargand in Balasor, xviii. 361. 
Bdnar, river, v. 122. 
Banas, river, zii. 163 ; xvii. I So. 
Binchh^nagar, pargand in Noikhali, 

vi. 343- 
Bdnchh^bagar, township in Nodkhdli, vi. 

286. 
Banchis, pargand in Mdnbhum, xvii. 367. 
Banch^ pargand in Balasor, xviii. 362. 
Banchis, pargand in Purl, xix. 130^ 172, 

173. 
Banda, hill in Hazdrib^h, xvi. 29. 
Bandapird, trading village in Hugli, iii. 

375. 
Band4rban village, residence of Bohmong 

Rijd, in Chittagong Hill Tracts, vi. 22, 

27, 84, 203 ; Bttd(Uiist temple at, 41 ; 

school, 99, 100. 
Bandel, viUage in Huglf, with old Roman 

Catholic monastery, iiu 307. 
Bandhils, mat screens planted to deepen 

river channels, ii. 121 -131 ; ix. 27. 
Bandipur, village in HugH, with basket- 
work and mat-making, iii. 372, 373. 
Banga, a prehistoric immigrant to Eastern 

India, whence tradition derives the 

name Bengal, i. 53 ; a Hindu division 

of Bengal, i. 359, foot-note, 
Bangabdn, town in Maldah, vii. 143. 
Bangaduni, river and island, i. 294. 
Bangalas, a gipsy tribe. See Aboriginal 

population. 
Bang&li, river in Bogrd, viii. 135, 140, 

141. 
Bdn£[anga, channel or river in Rajshdhi, 

viii. 27. 
Bangion, pargand in Maldah, viL 129 ; 

mart in Tirhut, xiii. 125 ; village in 

Bhdgalpur, xiv. 46, 95, 213, 239. 
B&ngdra, river, i. 297. 
Bangis, a tribe of Toungthds, vi. 49. 
Bangld, market village, 24 Pargands, i. 

228. 
Bingsihirf, thdnd and village in Dinajpur, 

vii. 365, 423, 439, 457. 
Baninshahr, village in Dinajpur, vii. 

453. 
Baniyds, trading caste in Patna, xi. 45 ; 

in S4ran, xi. 248 ; in Shdhabad, xii. 

193 ; in Tirhut, xiii. 43 ; in Cham- 

pdnm, xiiL 243 ; in Bhd^pur, xiv. 

67 ; in Monghyr, xv. 57 ; m Pumiah, 

XV. 254; in Cuttack, xviii. 73. See 

also Castes. 
Banjar leases. See Tenures. 
Banjogi (Banjugi) tribe in the Chittagong 

Hill Tracts, vi. 57-59 ; in NodkhAlf 

vl 273, 



Binkd Subdivision, Bhdgalpur, xiv. 46^ 

127. 128, 153-155, 238. , 
Banka, town and thdnd^ Bhagalpur, xiv. 

46, 89-91, 213, 238. 
Bankd Canal, in Midnapur, iii. 36. 
Bankd nadi, stream in Bardwdn, iv. 

23. 
Bankana river, ii. 179. 
Bankar land tenures. See Tenures of 

land. 
Bankers, the Seths, in Murshiddbad, ix. 

252-265. 
Bankhandi, pargand in Mdnbhum, xvii. 

367. 

Banki State, Orissa, xuc. 205, 206, 210- 
217, 261, 264, 272, 273, 328. 

Bdnki village in Banki State, xix. 273. 

Banking Establishments in Chittagong, 
vi. 207 ; in Maldah, vii. 104 ; in Rang- 
pur, vii. 308 ; in Dindjpur, vii. 414 ; 
m Murshiddbad, ix. 170; in Pabnd, 
ix. 350 ; in Chhaprd, xi. 335 ; in 
Champdran, xiii. 296 ; in Bhdgalpur, 
xiv. 192; in Monghyr, xv. 154; in 
Pumiah, xv. 385. See also Institn- 
tions, &c. 

Bdnkipur, civil station and administrative 
headquarters of Patnd, xi. 74, 191 ; 
thdnd, xi. 35, 205 ; dispensary, xi. 
217, 219. 

Bdnkomundi peak, Orissa Tributary 
States, xix. 200. 

Banks of rivers, 24 Pargands, i. 29, 30 ; 
Sundarbans, i. 299 ; Nadi3rd, ii. 32 ; 
Jessor, ii. 171, 181 ; Midnapur, iii. 26 ; 
HiigH, iiL 253, 2^5, 257 ; Bardwdn, iv. 
24, 25 ; Bdnkur^ iv. 211 ; Dacca, v. 
20-22 ; Bdkturganj, v. 168 ; Faridpur, 
V. 268; Maimansinh, v. 385-387; 
Chittagong Hill Tracts, vi. 25 ; Chitta- 
gong, vi. 126, 127 ; Nodkhdli, vi. 251, 
253; Tipperah, vi. 362, 363; Hil! 
.Tipperah, vi. 475, 476 ; Maldah, vii, 
25 ; Rangpur, vii. 163, 164, 166, 167, 
l68; Dindipur, vii. 359, 360, 361, 
363 ; Rdjshdhi, viii. 22-25 1 Bogrd, 
viii. 135-144 ; Murshiddbdd, ix. 25-82; 
Pdbnd, ix. 272 ; Ddrjiling, x. 24-28 ; 
Jalpdiguri, X. 224, 235 ; Kuch Behar, 
X. 334 ; Patnd, xL 24 ; Sdran, xl 228, 
232, 233, 306, 309; Gayd, xii. 22; 
Shdhdbdd, xii. 164, 165 ; Tirhut, xiii. 
19, 22, 26 ; Champdran, xiii. 222, 224; 
Bhdgalpur, xiv. 30; Santdl Pargands, 
xiv. 269 ; Monghyr, xv. 22, 23 ; Haz- 
dribdgh, xvi. 40 ; Lohdrdagd, xvL 237 ; 
Singbhiim, xvii. 22 ; Mdnbhdm, xvii. 
257; Cuttack, xviii. 22; Balasor, xviii. 
251 ; Puri, xix. 19; Orissa Tributary 
States, xix. 201. 



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GENERAL INDEX, 



247 



Binksii, pir in Singbhiim, xvii. 139. 

Banhugli, market village, 24 Parganiis, 
i. 236. 

BAnkurA District (Vol. IV.) — 

Geographical Situation, Area, and 
Head^aarters, 205 ; Boundaries and 
Jurisdiction, 206, 207 ; General Aspect, 
207 ; Mountains and Hills, 207, 208 ; 
Rivers, 208-210; Lakes, &c., 210 ; 
Mineral Products, Jungles, &c., 211 ; 
Fera Natur(p, 211, 212; Population, 
Early Estimates of, 212; Census of 
1872, its Agencies and Results, 212- 
215 ; Popuktion according to Sex, 
213-215 ; according to Occupation, 
215-219; Ethnical Division of the 
People, 219-221 ; Immigration, 22 1 ; 
Castes, 221-228 ; Religious Division of 
the People, 228, 229 ; Division of the 
People into Town and Country, 229 ; 
Binkurd Town, 229, 230; Bishnupur 
Town, 230, 236-238 ; Family History 
of the Bishnupur Rdjds, 230-236; 
Smaller Towns, 238, 239; Village 
Officials and Notabilities, 239-245 ; 
Material Condition of the People, 245 ; 
Agriculture, 245-270 ; Rice, 245, 246 ; 
Other Cereds and Fibres, 246 ; Mis- 
cellaneous Crops and Description of 
Soil, 247 ; Area, Out-turn of Crops, 
247, 248 ; Condition of the Peasantry, 
248 ; Domestic Animals, 248, 249 ; 
Agricultural Implements, and Wages 
and Prices, 249; Weights and Measures, 
250; Labouring Classes and Spare 
I^d, 251 ; Land Tenures, 251-265 ; 
Rates of Rent, 265-268 ; Manures, Ir- 
rigation, and Rotation of Crops, 269 ; 
Natural Calamities, 270; The Famine, 
of 1866, 271-274; Famine Warning, 
274 ; Foreign and Absentee Propne- 
tors. Roads, 275 ; Manufactures, 276 ; 
Commerce and Trade, 277 ; Capital 
and Interest, 278 ; Imported Capi- 
tal, Institutions, 278; Income of tne 
District, Revenue and Expenditure, 
279 ; Balance-sheets of the Dbtrict, 
280, 281 ; Land Tax, &c., 279, 
282 ; Operation of the Rent Law, 
Number of Courts, &c., 282 ; Police 
Statistics, 282-284 ; Criminal Statistics, 
284-287 ; Criminal Classes, 287-290 ; 
Jail Statistics, 290-293 ; Educational 
Statistics, 293-299; Postal Statistics, 
299, 300; Medical Aspects of the 
District, 300-305 ; Climate, 300 ; Epi- 
demic Diseases, 301 ; Charitable Dis- 
pensary and Native Medical Practi- 
tioners, 302 ; Indigenous Vegetable 
Drugs, 303; Vital Statistics, 304, 305 ; 



Botanical Products, 301;, 306 ; Geology 

of the District, 306-308. 
BdnkuHL town, iv. 229, 230; famine of 

1866 at, iv. 271-274 ; commerce of, iv. 

277 : dispensary, iv. 302. 
Banmalipur village, 24 Paiganis, i. 228. 
Banmalipur, villi^e in Khandp4xi State, 

Orissa, xix. 300. 
Banpas, village in Bardwiin with brass- 
work manufacture, iv. 133. 
Bdnpur, thdnd in PuH, xix. 28, 183; 

kiid, xix. 183. 
Bansaj, a class of R&rhi Brihmans. See 

Brdhmans. 
Bdnsbirid or Binsbdti municipality in 

HugH, site of Hindu temple, and home 

of Sanskrit learning, iil. 30^ 304. 
Binsdihi. mahal^ ^a/^^r Jaleswar, i. 371. 
Bansdol Pattdpur, pargand in Maldah, 

vii. 129. 
Bdnsloi, river in Murshidibid, ix. 23, 25, 

33- 

Bdnsei&on, pargand in Maldah, vii. 130. 

B4nsKh41i, mart and police out-post in 
Chittagong, vi. 198, 216; embank- 
ment, vi. 131 ; canal, vi. 187. 

Bansidpiri, village in Nayig^h State^ 
Orissa, xix. 306. 

Bansis. See Rdjbansfs. 

Binsri, trading village on the MAdiri 
river, i. 33. 

Bansr^ coal mine at Riniganj, iv. 107. 

BdnstdU, market village, 24 Parganis, i. 

233. 
Bdnstild khdl, 24 Paxgan^, i. 24, 27, 32, 

233- 
Bdntara, pargand in Balasor, xviii. 362. 
Bdntara, pargand in Cuttack, xviii. 225. 
Bantarid, fir in Singbhiim, xviL 136. 
Bani^in, pargand in Tirhut, xiii. 182, 183. 
Banwdriganj, trading village in Bardwdn, 

iv. 134. 
Bdo rice crop. See Rice. 
Baodabdri, nuirket village in Dinijpur, 

vii. 455. 
Bdor, a bend of a river deserted by the 

stream, but full of water, ii. 181. 
Bdorid, township in Nodkhili, vi. 286. 
Baptist Missions in HugH, iii. 292, 293, 

302, 303, 376. See €Uso Missions. 
Bara, pargand in Sdran, xi. 302, 356. 
Bara, a mountain in Dijjilin|^, x. 23. 
Bara Dehi hill in Cuttack, Rums on, xviii. 

94- 
Bara deul^ the sanctuary at Jagannith, 

Orissa, xix. j8. 
Bara Kaligichhii river, i. 32. 
Bara Kheri, township in No^Udiili, vi. 

285. 
Bara Pheni, river, in Nodkhili, vl 25a 



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GENERAL INDEX, 



Bara Thikur, the ultimate successor to 

the RAjA, in Hill Tipperah, yi. 461. 
Baribir Hills, Ga^d, xiL 19, 58, 59. 
Badibdri, thdnd m Rangpur, vii. 175, 

328, 544. 
Barabhum, parganA in Miinbhum, xviL 

367- 
Baribhum, thdnd in Mdnbhum, xviL 271, 

366. 
Badibfl, pargand in Rangpur, vii 2^3. 
Bdr&chati, vUlage and tMnd in Gaya, xiL 

3i» 55» HI. 
Badldwdri, market village in Dinajpur, 

vii. 4SS- 
Badi^i, or Marang Bum, a hill in Ha- 

zinbi^h, xvi. 27, 236. 
Baraganj, or Pino, hiU in Chittagong, vL 

125. 
Baragdnwdn, pargand in Patni, xl 209. 
Baragion, pargand in Dindjpur, vii. 436, 

438. 
Baragion, villajze and thdnd in Saran, xL 

240, 241, 258, 293, 344; 358. 
Baragdon, village in Patna, xi. 82. 
Bardhils. See Village Officials. 
Baraiar Ddld, hill in Noikhalf, vi. 25a 
Bariil, pargand in Tirhut, xiii. 183. 
Barikamtd, thdnd in Tipperah, vi. 432, 

441. 
Barakhar, river, iv. 24 ; xvu 37 ; xvuu 

256, 2J7. 
Barakulia river, i 31, 32. 
Baral, river, vii. 362; viiL 23, 24; ix. 

271. 
Barambd State, Orissa, xix. 206, 210-217, 

261, 273-275. 
Barambd, chief village of the Barambd 

State, xix. 274. 
Bdrdn, pargand in Cuttack, xviii. 224. 
Baran aman, or long-stemmed rice. See 

Rice, long-stemmed. 
Barinagar (Varihanagar), formerly a 

Dutch factory, i. 106, 205 ; English 

school, I 230^ 374. 
Bardnii, market vUlage in Din&jpur, vii. 

Baian&i, river in Rijshihi, viii. 25, 28. 
Barani, Ml in Dinajpur, vii. 453. 
Bar&on, town in Shahibdd, xii. 203. 
Barapdngi river, i. 27, 295. 
Bdrdsat, Division and Joint Magistracy 

Subdivision, 24 Pargands, i. 22, 143, 

222. 
Bdrdsat town, 24 Pargands, i. 8i; schools, 

i. 206, 226 ; dispensary, i. 251. 
BardsC market village, 24 Pargands, L 

232. 
Bardsid river, ii. 177, 178. 
Barasimld market village, 24 Pargands, i. 

227. 



BarauH, thdnd in Sdran, xi. 230, 241, 243 

293. 344. 

Bdrbak Smh, pars^and in Birbhum, i. 
369 ; iv. 422. 

Barbakabdd sarhdr, i. 359. 

Barbakpur mahtU, Sarkdr Sdtgdon, L 364. 

Barbakpur, pargand in Dindjpur, viL 357, 
436. 

Bdrbighd, town in Mongh3rr, xv. 60^ 61. 

Bard&hdt, pargand in Tipperah, vi. 392, 
402, 442, 

Bdrdiydld, pargand in Cuttack, xviii. 224. 

BardwXn District (Vol IV.) — 

Geographical Situation, Area, and 
Headquarters, 17 ; Boundaries, 17, 18; 
Changes of Jurisidiction, and Brief His- 
torical Sketch, 18-21 ; General Aspect 
of the District, 21, 22 ; River System, 
22-25 ; Lines of Drainage and River 
Traffic, 25 ; Fisheries, 26-28 ; Land 
Reclamation, 28; Mineral Products 
and Fera Naturce^ 29 ; Early Esti- 
mates of the Population, 29-32 ; Cen- 
sus of 1872, its Agencies and Results, 
32-39; Comparative Density of the 
Population, 33-35 ; Population accord- 
ing to Sex and h^^ 38, 39 ; according 
to Occupation, 39-43; Etlmical Divi- 
sion of the People, 43-45 ; Immigra- 
tion and Emigration, 46 ; Hindu Castes, 
46 54 ; Kshattriyas and Khatris, 46-49 ; 
Muhammadan Sects, 54 ; Religious Di- 
vision of the People, 54, 55 ; Division 
of the People into Town and Country, 
55. 56 ; List of Towns, 57-65 ; Bard- 
wdn town, 58, 59 ; Kdlnd, 59^ 60 ; 
Rdniganj, 61 ; Kitwd, 62 ; Villaee 
Officials, 65-67 ; Fairs, 67 ; Material 
Condition of the People, 67, 68 ; Cloth- 
ing, Dwellings, Food, &c., 68, 69 ; 
Agriculture, 69-92 ; Rice, 69, 70 ; 
Other Cereals and Green Crops, 70; 
Oil-seeds, Miscellaneous Crops and 
Vegetables, 71 ; Fibres, Area and Out- 
turn of Crops, 72 ; Condition of the 
Cultivators, 73 ; Domestic Animals, 
73, 74 ; Agricultural Implements, 74 ; 
Wages and Prices, 74, 75 ; Weights 
and Measures, 75, 76; Agricultural 
Labourers and Spare Land, 76 ; Land 
Tenures, 76-85 ; Patnl tdluks, 78-83 ; 
Rales of Rent, 85-92 ; Manure, Irriga- 
tion, &c., 92 ; Naturail Calamities, 92- 
95 ; Floods, 92-95 ; Embankments, 
95, 96 ; Droughts, 96 ; Comoensating 
Influences, 96, 97 ; Famine Warnings, 
97 ; Famine of 1866, 98-105 ; Foreign 
and Absentee Proprietors, 105 ; Roa£, 
105, 106 ; Railways, 106, 107 ; Coal- 
mines of Rdniganj, their histoiy, mode 



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GENERAL INDEX. 



249 



of working, quality of the coal, esti- 
mate of the out-put, &c., 107-125 ; 
Iron-fields of Riniganj, descriptioii, 
quality of the ore, and estimate of the 
quantity, &i., 125-133 ; Building Stone, 
133 ; Manufactures, 133, 134 ; Com- 
merce and Trade, 134, 135 ; Capital 
and Interest, 135 ; Institutions, 136 ; 
Income of the District, 136 ; Adminis- 
trative History of the District, 137-143 ; 
Antiquities, 137 ; Early History, 137- 
139 ; History of the Bard win Family, 
'39-^43 ; Revenue and Expenditure, 
143, 144 ; Balance- Sheet of the Dis- 
trict, 145 ; Land Tax, 146 ; Rent Law, 
Courts, &c., 147 ; Police Statistics, 
H7-150 ; Criminal Cases, 150-153 ; 
Jail Statistics, 153-156 ; Educational 
Statistics, 156, 167 : Postal Statistics, 
166 168 ; Subdivisional Administra- 
tion, 168-172 ; Fiscal Divisions or par- 
gandsy 172-176 ; Medical Aspects of 
the District, 177 ; Endemic Malarious 
Fever, 177-192 ; Charitable Dispen- 
saries, 192-200 ; Native Medical Prac- 
titioners, 200 ; Cattle Diseases, 201. 

Bardwin town, its population, &c., iv. 
3^ 5^ 59 \ i^ commerce, iv. i^ ; 
Dispensary, iv. 193, 194, 199; 
railway station, iv. 106 ; famine of 
1866 at, iv. 98-100; thdndy density of 
population in, iv. 33, 34, 36. 

Bardwdn, Mahiriji of, his family history, 
iv. 48, 139-143 ; his charity during the 
famine of 1866, iv. 99, 100 ; his free 
school in Bard win town, iv. 136, 162 
his palace and mausoleum at Kilni 
iv. 60. 

Bdrendra BdLhmans. See Br&hmans. 

Bdrgdf or AdhiM^ land tenures. See 
Tenures of land. 

Bargdon, pargand in Cuttack, xviii. 225. 

Bargion, town in Shihdbid, xii. 202. 

Birh Subdivision, Patni, xL 35, 83-86, 
107, 108, 205. 

Birh, town and thdnd m Patni, xi. 25, 
35» 66, 83, 84, 191, 205 ; branch Dis- 
pensary at, xi. 217, 218, 219. 

Barhdis or village carpenters. See Village 
Officials, etc. 

Barhapur, village in Saran, xi. 258. 

Barhiit mart, Santil Parganis, xiv. 354. 

Barhampur or Berhampore in Murshidi- 
bdd, IX. 18, 74-80, 236. 

Barhampur or Berhampore in Murshidd- 
bid, College or High School, ix. 216- 
220. 

Barhampur, in Shahdbdd, fair, xii. 264, 
265. 

Barhampur, Tillage in Tirhut, xiii. 59. 



Barharim, village in Sdran, xi. 257. 
Barharwd, village in Champiran, xiiL 

309. 
Barhia Hit, village in Dindjpur, vii. 

443- 
Barhiyi, town in Mongh3rr, xv. 60, 61. 
Barhogi, village in Siran, xi. 233. 
Bari, pargand in Siran, xi. 302, 356. 
Baridhiti, one of the .original 24 Par- 

ganis, i. 20, 228. 363. 
Barijingarh, jfort in Pumiah, Riuns of, 

XV. 267. 
Barikindi pargand in Tipperah, vii. 442. 
Baripidi, village in Morbhanj State, 

Orissa, xix. 303. 
Baripdri, village in Rangpur, vii. 1 75. 
Barisakpali, fargand in Rangpur, vii. 

161, 253, 289. 
Barisdl, municipality, headquarters of 

Bakaiganj District, v. 200; river, v. 

160 ; the " Barisil guns," natural phe- 
nomenon, V. 175. 
Bariti bily 24 Parganis, L 3a 
Barjord, trading village in Binknri, iv. 

239- 

Barkal rapids in the Chittagong Hill 
Tracts, vi. 25, 93. 

Barkal Tai^ peak in the Chittagong HiU 
Tracts, vi. 25. 

Barkald, /f'r in Singbhiim, xvii. 136. 

Rarkop, nscal division in the Santdl Par- 
ganis, xiv. 377. 

Barkop hill, Santdl Pargands, xiv. 268. 

Barley, Cultivation of. See Cereal Crops. 

Barmi, mart in Pumiah, xv. 379. 

Bdrmiil pass, Orissa Tributary States, 
xix. 198. 

Bamdon Khds, town in Shdhdbdd, xiL 
202. 

Bamar, river in Hazdribdgh, xvii. 38. 

Barometrical pressures, in the 24 Par- 
gands, L 242-245, 259-261 ; in Nadiyd, 
il 139 ; in jfessor, ii. 329 ; in Bardwdn, 
iv. 177; in Bdnkurd, iv. 300; in Bi'r- 
bhdm, iv. 437, 438 ; in Dacca, v. 142 ; 
in Bdkarganj, v. 246; in Faddpur, v. 
358 ; in Maimansinh, v. 479 ; in Chit- 
tagong, vi. 226 ; in Maldah, vii. 145 ; 
in Kangpur, vii. 345, 346 ; in Dindjpur, 
vii. 456, 457 ; in Rdjshdhi, viii. 121, 
122 ; in Bogrd, viii. 305 ; in Murshidd- 
bdd, ix. 2^239; in Pdbnd, ix. 369- 
372 ; in Ddrjiling, x. 198 ; in Jalpdipuri, 
X. 320, 321 ; in Kuch Behar, x. 440- 
443 ; in Patna, xi. 210, 211 ; in Sdran, 
xi. 361, 362 ; in Gayd, xii. 146, 147 ; in 
Shdhdbdd, xii. 287; in Tirhut, xiii. 
200-202 ; in Champdran, xiii. 313, 
314; in Bhdgalpur, xiv. 251-; in the 
the Santdl Pargsinds, xiv. 379, 380 ; in 



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250 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Monghyr, xv. 187-190 ; in Pumiah, xv. 
431-434; in Hazirihttgh, xvi. 199, 
201 ; in Lohdrdagi, xvi. 483, 484 ; in 
Singbhiim, xvii. 140 ; in Manbhum, 
xvii. 370 ; in Cuttack, xviii. 234, 235 ; 
in Bdasor, xviii. 366, 367; in Puri, 
xix. 173, 174. 

BarpalU, pargand in Cnttack, xviii. 225. 

Barpiri, pargand in Minbhum, xvii. 

307. 

Barp{r, pir in Singbhiim, xvii. 136. 

Barrackpur Subdivision, 24 Pargands, i. 
224, 225 ; (native name Chinak), mu- 
nicipality, cantonment for European 
and native troops, scene of two muti- 
nies, i. 82-87 ; railway station, i. 166 ; 
education in, i. 213-220, 230. 

Barracks. See Cantonments, Military 
Depots, &a 

Banira indigo concern, Purniah, xv. 371. 

Barsaani, town in Shihdbid, xii. 202. 

Barsauni, village in Pumiah, xv. 412, 413. 

Barsof, village in Pumiah, xv. 26a 

Barsot, a hill in Haz^bdgh, xvi. 26. 

Bartli bil, 24 Parjg[an4s, i. 30. 

Bam village, with English school, 24 
Pargan^ L 204. 

Biro Gharia in Maldah, Silk filature at, 
vii. 142. 

BaruaSf or village headmen. See Village 
Officials. 

Bama Sarmi, d^aded Bdlhmans. See 
Brihmans. 

Biiui caste. See Castes. 

Bdruipur Subdivision, 24 Parganas, i. 224. 

Biruipur, town, 24 Parganas, i. 98, 99 ; 
cultivation of betel-leaf at, I 204; 
mission station, i. 237. 

Biml, iron fields in Bardwdn, description 
of, iv. 128, 132. 

B4run, village in Gayd, xiL 64. 

Biruni, bathing festival, ii. 223, 336, 337; 
iii. 323. 

Bdrum, fair in Hill Tipperah, vi. 509. 

Bamyi, river in Mongnyr, xv. 22. 

Baruy^ parmnd in Cuttack, xviiL 225. 

Barw^ thdnd in Birbhiim, Special agri- 
cultural statistics, classification of soils, 
mode of cultivation, rates of rent, value 
of produce, etc, iv. 347-362. 

Barya, village in Saran, xi. 353. 

Barvirpur Rudar, village union in Tirhut, 
xiil 49. 

Basddhpdti villa^ Tirhut, xiii. 52. 

Bas&iti, village m Pumiah, with school, 
XV. 413. 

Basantay cattle small -pox. See Cattle 
Diseases. 

Basantii, port of Jessor town, ii. 206 ; 
sugar market, ii. 296, 302. 



Basantpur, at confluence of Kalindf and 
Jamund rivers, seat of paddy trade, i. 32, 
34, 115. 116, 231, 30a 

Basantpur, thdnd in Saran, xL 233, 240, 
241, 247, 293, 344. 

Basantpur, village-union in Tirhut, xiii. 

49, 53- 
Basdtd, pargand in Rangpur, vii. 253. 
Basaur, village in S4ran, xi. 258. 
Bisdeopur, village in Tirhut, xiii. 57, 58. 
'^' ^ri, village in Tipperah, vi. 384. 



Basitang peak in the Chittagong Hill 
Tracts, vi. 24. 

Basket weaving, in the Sundarbans, i. 
314; in Murshidabad, ix. 154; in 
Pdbnd, ix. 333. 

Basnauli Gangar. See Mahardjganj. 

Basotrd, pargand in Tirhut, xiii. 183. 

Basri river mart, in the 24 Pargands, 
depot of timber trade, local l^;ena, rail- 
way station, i. 70, 34, 119, 237, 30a 

Basta, pargand in Balasor, xviii. 362. 

Basta thdndf Balasor, xviiL 265, 360. • 

Bdshif or homestead land. Rent of. See 
Rent of land. 

Basui village in Hugli, with branch of 
Brahma Samdj, iii. 293. 

Bdsudebpur, iAdnd, Balasbr, xviii. 265, 
361. 

Basundhari (BdsandiH), one of the ori- 
ginal 24 Parganas, i. 28, 365. 

Basurhdt Subdivision, 24 Pargapds, i. 223. 

Basurhit, municipality, 24 Parganas, i. 
8, 227 ; dispensary, i. 254. 

Basuri dispensary, Hugli, iii. 44a 

Bisurid, market villa^ in Dinajpur, viL 

437.,447. ^ 
Bataiya Dighi, market village in Dindj- 

pur, vii. 455. 
Batardah, village in Saran, xi. 357. 
Bdtdsun, pargand 'in Rangpur, vii. 253, 

302 ; in Dinajpur, viL 436. 
Batchii range and peak in Hill Tipperah, 

vi. 474. 
Bdthdnids, or cattle-herds, in NodkhaH, 

vi, 258, 274, 302, 303. See also 

Castes. 
Bdthud, village in Saran, xL 358. 
Bdtf river, xiv. 26, 27. 
Bdti Tang peak in the Chittagong Hill 

Tracts, vi. 24. 
Bati-main Tang peak, in the Chittagong 

Hill Tracts, vi. 24, 25. 
Batina, village in Dinajpur, vii. 452. 
Batsora, ta^d in Champaran, xiiL 277. 
Battlefield of Plassey, ii. 57, 58. 
Battles in Murshidabdd, ix. 93, 94* 180^ 

186, 187, 191, 259, 260. 
Bdtul, village in Dindjpur, vii. 454. 
Bduli Dun^ khdl^ 24 Paxganis, i. 232. 



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GENERAL INDEX. 



251 



Baulpttr, village in Dhenldnal State, 

Orissa, xix. 201. 
Bauds, Semi-Hinduized Aborigines. See 

Abori^nal Tribes. 
Bawdra indigo concern, Pumiah, xv. 371. 
Baxa, a military station in Jalpdiguri, x. 

225, 262 ; lime and building stone at, 

X. 239. 
Baxir, Subdivision in SMhdb&d, xii. 

182, 247, 285. 
Baxdr, town and thdnd in Shihibid, xii. 

182, 203, 204, 205, 257, 27s, 285. 
Baxdr canal, xii. 171, 172. 
Baxihdt, mart in Chittagong, vL 198, 

199. 
Bayi river, Tirhut, xiii. 19, 20^ 21, 22. 
Bayang, pargand in Balasor, xviii. 362. 
Bayrd, bil^ 24 Pargan^ i. 27, 30, 230 ; 

prain depot and rise mart, 24 Parganas, 

u 229. 
Bdzar Ibrahimpur, mahal in Birbhum, 

iv. 370. 
Btui-aftl-idluks, See Tenures of Land. 
Bazidpur, town in Maldah, vii. 136. 
Bazuna sarkdr^ i. 359. 
Bazur market village, 24 Pargands, i. 

227. 
Bebdjiis, a gipsy-like tribe of Muhamma- 

dans. See Castes. 
Bedango^ or Belddngi, village in Mur- 

shidabdd, ix. 62, 63, 83. 
Bediyds, a wandering caste. See Castes. 
Bedsari, village in Dindjpur, vii. 444. 
Begamdbdd, pargand in Maldah, vii. 130. 
Begamganj, thdnd in Nodkhdli, vi. 239, 

269, 273, 274, 277, 286, 294, 315, 324, 

330» 333» 342. 
Bcfi^unpur, weaving community of native 

Christians in Jessor, ii. 107. 
Begampur, village in Hugll, with cotton- 
weaving, iil 372. _ 
Begix Sarii Subdivision, Monghyr, xv. 

48. 83. M3» »72, 174, 175. 
Begu Sadii indigo concern, Monghyr, xv. 

139. 
Behali mission school, 24 Paigands, i. 

205. 
Behar Subdivision, Patni, xi. 35, 74-83, 

J08, 206. 
Behar, pargand in Patn4, xi. 206. 
Behar town and thdnd in Patnd, xi. 35, 

66, 74-77, 191, 206; dispensary, xi. 

218, 219. 
Behar, pargand in Monghyr, xv. 176. 
Behar opium agency. See Opium. 
Behar Scientific Society, The, in Muzaff- 

arpur, xiii 164. 
Beharinith hill in Bdnkudi, iv. 208. 
Behinnagar, pargand in Dindjpur, vii. 

437> 439-442. 



Befdn Adchd land tenures. Set Tenures 
of land. 

Beld, village and mart in Gayd, xii. 55. 

Bela Bard^on, village in Sdian, xi. 258. 

Beld Mochpakauni, village and thdnd in 
Tirhut, xiii. 34, 69, 180. 

Belamla, village in Bocrd, viii 197. 

Beldmli, village in Dindjpur, viL 445. 

Belauti, thdnd in Shdhdbdd, xii. 182, 275, 
285. 

Beldangd (Bedango), a village in Mnrshi- 
ddbdd, be. 62, 63, 83. 

Belgdchhi, pargand in the Sondarbans, L 
372. 

Belgdchhi, village in Pumiah, school at, 
XV. 412. 

Belgdon ^r^ani, Sundarbans, L 363. 

Belgharia railway station, 24 Paigands, i. 
166; school, i 206, 23a 

Belhari, village in Dindjpur, vii. 439. 

Belia, villafi[e in Dindjpur, vi!. 436. 

Bella Ndrdyanpur, village with iron- 
workings, formerly in Birbhiim, iv. 318, 
319^ transferred to Murshiddbdd, ix. 87. 

Belkd, trading village in Rangpur, vii. 

309. 
Belkuchi, municipality in Pdfand, ix. 275, 

291, 296. 
Belpddd, village in Daspalld State, Orissa, 

xix. 280. 
Belpukharid village, 24 Paigands, i. 233. 
Belsand thdnd^ Tirhut, xiii. 34, 179. 
Belsand Kaldn, village in Tirhut, xiiL 54. 
Belwd, tappd in Cl^mpdran, xiii. 272, 

276, 310. 
Bfi\yfiii pargand, Jessor, I 37a. 
Bendhar, /ar^/ift^f in Cuttack, xviii. 225. 
Bendres Opium Agency. .Siflf Opium. 
Bendkars. See Sabars. 
Bengd river, offshoot of the Nabagangd, 

it 172, 173. 
Bengal, Cession o^ to the British in 1765, 

vi. 427. 
Bengali, a name of the Ghdghdt river in 

Maldah, vii 9a 
Bengdaha or Sobndli river, i 24, 27, 32. 
Beni river, ii 178. 
Beni Rasalpur, village in Pumiah, xv. 

263. 
Benipdti Khajauli thdnd, Tirhut, xiii 34, 

i8a 
Benipur, village in Tirhut, xiii. 6a. 
Benugarh, fort in Pumiah, Ruins of, xv. 

267. 
Bepdripdrd, village of cotton weavers, 

Jessor, ii. 210. 
Bepdris, petty retail dealers. See Castes. 
Berdi, pargand in Tirhut, xiii 183. 
Berdmpur, village in Dindjpur, vii. 365, 

454- 



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GENERAL INDEX, 



Berautpar, village in Tirhut, xiiL 56. 

Berhampore. See Barhampur. 

Berol, village in Dindjpur, vii. 437. 

Be-Sh^u:^ sect of Muhammadans in Rang- 
pur, vii. 222, 227, 228. 

Betane^ viUage in Faridpur, with trade 
in nee and pulses, v. 292. 

Betel-leaf and nut cultivation, in the 24 
Parganis, i. 146 ; in the Sundarbans, 
i. 325 ; in Nadiyi, ii. 68 ; in Jessor, ii. 
246 ; in Midnapur, iii. 81 ; in Hu^li, 
iii. ^39 ; in Bard win, iv. 71 ; in Ban- 
kura, iv. 247 ; in Birbhdm, iv. 345 ; in 
Dacca, v. 89 ; in Bikarganj, v. 204 ; 
in Faridpur, v. 311, 312 ; in Maiman- 
sinh, V. 421 ; in Chittagong, vi. 159, 
179, 183, 184 ; in No&khili, vi. 291, 
292, 294, 295, 315, 316 ; in Tipnerah, 
vi. 39O1 392» 393» 413 ; in Maldah, vii. 
73; in Raii^ur, vii. 195, 248, 249, 
291 ; in Dinijpur, vii. 393; in Rdjshihi, 
viil 63 ; in Bogri, viii. 212 ; in Mur- 
shidibdd, ix. 100, 105 ; in Pdbnik, ix. 
302 ; in Dirjiling, x. 95 ; in Jalpiigurf, 
X. 274; in Kuch Behar, x. 394; in 
Patnii, xi. 46, 114 ; in Sdran, xi. 279 ; 
in Gayi, xii. 93 ; in Shihdbid, xii. 236; 
in Tirhut, xiii. 85. 86 ; in Hazirib^h, 
xvL 104 ; in Lofaarda^ xvi 241, 342 ; 
in Minbhtim; xvii. 314 ; in Cuttack, 
xviiL 104 ; in Balasor, xviii. 291 ; in 
Puri, xix. 95. 

Betgiri, trading viUage in Rangpur, viL 

309. 
Betni or Budhiti river, i. 27, 23a 
Betn^ village in Dinijpur, vii. 444. 
Betling Sib^ the highest peak in Hill Tip- 

penm, vi. 474. 
Bettii Subdivision, Champ4ran, xiii. 234, 

308. 
Bettii, town in Champ&ran, xiiu, 219, 

249, 251, 252 ; fair at, xiii. 255 ; dis- 
pensary, xiii. 317. 
Bettia Raj, History of the, xiii. 252. 
Beuti, villaee near Calcutta, L 23a 
Bhabdnigan^, khdl in No&khidi, vi. 250. 
Bhabiniganj) mart in Noikhili, vi. 283. 
Bhabanipur khM^ Jessor, ii. 177. 
Bhabeswar Rli, founder of the family of 

Jessor Rijib, iL 203. 
Bhabt^ tafpd in Champ&ran, xiii. 272, 

27s, 31a 
BhabuiL, Subdivision in Shih&b^, xii 

182, 248, 285, 286. 
BhabcdL, town and thdnd in Shihdbdd, 

xii. 182, 203, 208, 275, 286. 
Bhadai rice crop. See Rice Crops, &c. 
BhidaH, town in Shihib^, xii. 203. 
Bhadri or Harihar river, i. 299 \ ii. 174, 

i8a 



Bhadrakh Subdivision, Balasor, xviiL 265, 

279» 280, 360, 361. 
Bhadrakh, town and thdnd^ Balasor, xviii. 

265, 283, 284, 361. 
Bhadras or village elders. See Village 

Officials. 
Bhadreswar municipality in Hugli, iii. 

263,3041375- ^ . „ 

Bhadughar, village in Tipperah, vi. 384. 
Bhidurii-khiH, canal in Dinijpur, vii. 

364. 

Bhadwir, parganA in Tirhut, xiiL 183, 
184. 

Bhdg^ a sharing land tenure. ^^ Tenures 
of land. 

Bhagabatipur, village and thdnd in Bard- 
wan, iv. 64. 

BhAgalpur District— (Vol. XIV.) 
Geographical Situation, Area and 
Boundaries, 17, 18 ; Early History, 
18-21 ; Changes of Jurisdiction, 21, 22 ; 
General Aspect, 22-24 » River System, 
24-29 ; Changes in River Courses, 29, 
30; Boat- Routes and Boats, 31, 32 ; 
Irrigation, 32, 33 ; Lines of Drainage, 
33, 34 ; Forests and Forest Products, 
34-38 ; Geological Formation and 
Minerals, 38-40 ; Fera Natura^ 40-44 > 
Population — Early Estimates, 44, 45 ; 
Census of 1872 and its results, 45*47.; 
Classification according to Sex, Reli- 
gion, and Age, 47 ; Infirms, 47 ; Eth- 
nical Division of the People, 47-5* > 
Aboriginal and Hill Tribes, 52 ; Emi- 
gration and Immigratioii, 52, 53 ; 
Hindu Castes, 53-77 ; Religious Divi- 
sion of the People, 77, 78 ; Division 
into Town and Country, 78-80 ; Chief 
Towns, Places of Interest, Antiquities, 
etc, 80-105; Village Institutions, 105- 
109 ; Material Condition of the People 
— Dress, Dwellings, Food, Amuse- 
ments, etc., 109-116; Agriculture — 
Rice Crops and Cultivation, 116-118 ; 
Other Cereals, 11 8- 120; Green Crops 
and Vegetables, 120, 121 ; Fruit Trees, 
121-124 ; Area and Out-turn of Crops, 
124-129 ; Condition of the Peasantry, 
129, 130 ; Domestic Animals, 130 ; 
Agricultural Implements, 130, 131 ; 
Wages and Prices, 131, 132 ; Weights 
and Measures, 132-135 ; Land Tenures 
— Zaminddrl Estates, 135, 136 ; Mis- 
cellaneous Zaminddfi Tenures, 136^ 
137; Temporarily Settled Estates, 137, 
138; Government Estates, 138; Invalid 
jdgirSf 138, 139 ; Subordinate Under- 
Tenures, 139-142; Cultivating Tenures, 
142, 143 ; Rent-Free Tenures, 143, 
144; Service Tenures, Z44-146; List 



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GENERAL INDEX. 



253 



of Tenures, 147-149 ; Soils, 149- 151 ; 
Rates of Rent, 151-155 ; Modes of 
Assessing and Collecting Rent, 156- 
158 ; Abwdbs or Customaxy Cesses, 
158-160 ; Famines, 160-163 ; The 
Famine of 1866, 163-167; The Famine 
of 1874, 167-173 ; Embankments, 173- 
176; Means of Communication (Roads), 
176-179 ; Manufactures — Indigo, tasar 
silk, etc., 180, 181 ; Dyeing, 181-183; 
Commerce and Trade, 183- 191 ; Nep41 
Trade, 191 ; Capital and Interest, 191, 
192 ; Incomes and Income-Tax, 192 
194 ; Revenue and Expenditure, 194- 
197 ; Land Revenue, 198-200 ; Sub- 
division of Property, 200, 201 ; Early 
Currency, 201-204 ; Civil and Criminal 
Courts, 204; Rent -Suits, 204; Police 
Statistics, 204-209; Chaukiddri Re- 
form, 209-211 ; Criminal Statistics, 
211, 212 ; Distribution of Police, 212- 
214 ; Jail Statistics, 214-225 ; Educa- 
tional Statistics, 225-236 ; Postal Sta- 
tbtics, 236, 237 ; Administrative Divi- 
sions, 237-239 ; Fiscal Divisions {Par- 
gands\ 239-251 ; Climate, 251 ; En- 
demic and Epidemic Diseases, 251-255; 
Vaccination, 255, 256; Indigenous 
Drugs, 256-259 J Charitable Dispen- 
saries, 259-262. 

Bhigalpur ^r^«f,xiv. 152, IM, 239, 240. 

BhAgalpur town, xiv., 17, 80-84, 184-186, 
190, 191 ; thdnd, xiv. 46, 213, 237. 

"Bhigalpur HiU Rangers," The, xiv. 
305. 306. 

Bhagiwdn, taffd in Sargiiji State, Chutii 
Nagpur, xvii. 241. 

Bhagdangd, mart in Rangpur, vii. 167. 

Bhigipati, village in Siran, xi. 3^8. 

Bhagirath, traditional Prince of Oudh, 
L^end of, i. 28. 

Bhagirathi river, ii. 18 ; iv. 18, 22, 24, 
25. 93. 94; vii. 22, 24; ix. 18, 23. 24; 
efforts of Government to keep channel 
open, ii. 19-32. 

Bhdg'jot land tenures. See Tenures of 
land. 

Bhigni, village in Rangpur, vii. 305. 

Bhagrd land tenures. See Tenures of 
Umd. 

BhagwingoU, a town in Murshiddbid, ix. 
84,8c 

Bhagwanpur indigo concern, Monghyr, 
XV. 139. 

BhaiHj or brotherhood, a village institu- 
tion. See Panchdyat. 

Bhaila, timber tree of the Sundarbons, i. 

3<?S. 
Bhairab river, ofishoot of the Jalangi, ii. 
19. 



Bhainb river, ii. 173, 174, 180 ; ix. 23, 
24. 

Bhairab Bazdr or Ulakdndf, commercial 
martin Maimansinh, v. 416, 441, 461. 

Bhaidignii, village in Tirhut, xiii. 69, 
125. 

Bhil makal, Sarkdr Khalifatdb^, L 373. 

BhiU, pargand in Tirhut, xiii. 184. 

Bhalasun. See Sh^shaziiri. 

BhdXiwKt^ pargand in Gavd, xii. 144. 

Bhdlukd, nscal division m the 24 Par- 
ganas, i. 228, 363, 373. 

Bhalukadu, town in Maldah, vii. 127. 

Bhdm jalkar, lease of fishery over sub- 
merged land, i. 276. 

Bhandaris, or landlord's agents. See 
Village Officials. 

Bhandeswar, hill in Hazdrib^h, xvi 28, 

29. 
Bhdngy Manu&cture of, in Rdjshihi, 

viii. 55, 61, 63; in Bogr^ viii. 212; in 

Murshid&bdd, ix. 104, 105 ; in Pibni, 

ix. 302. See Ganj4. 
Bhingi, trading town in Faridpur, v. 291. 
Bhdngi-muri, peak in the Chittagong 

Hill Tracts, vL 24. 
Bhingar Kiti khdl, 24 Parganis, i. 31, 

33. 
Bh&ngarhit, trading villaj^ in the 24 

Parg^anis, i. 34, ill; fair, I 239. 
Bhangaon indigo concern, Pumiah, xv. 

370. 
Bhdoli system of rent-collecting in Bhi- 

galpur, xiv. 156, 157. 
Bh&osinh or Bh4usinh town, with river 

traffic, in Bardwdn, iv. 25, 64. 
Bhdra^ timber tree of the Sundarbans, i. 

305- 

Bharbharii, pir in Singbhiim, xvii. 136. 

Bhirgavi river, xix. 19, 20. 

Bharkanda, pargand in Birbhiim, iv. 423. 

Bhamipddl j^i^ Jessor, ii. 179. 

Bhars or Rijbhars, an aboriginal tribe. 
See Aboriginal Population. 

Bharwird, pargand in Tirhut, xiii. 184. 

BAdsdf "came floating," name of Midna- 
pur immigrants in Sundarbans, i. 51. 

Bhat, or banl caste, in the 24 Pargsui^ 
i. 59 ; in Nadiyi, ii. 47 ; in Jessor, ii. 
195; in Midnapur, iii. 53 ; m Hugli, 
iii. 286; in Bardwin, iv. ^o; in 
Binkuxi, iv. 225 ; in Birbhum, iv. 
330; in Maimansinh, v. 404; in 
Chittagong, vi. 145; in Rangpur, vii 
215 ; in Rijsh^hl, viii. 44; m Mur- 
shid4b4d, ix. 49, 50; in Patni, xi. 44 ; 
in ShihAb&d, xii. 192 ; in Tirhut, xiii. 
43 ; in Champ&ran, xiiL 240, 241 ; in 
the Santil Parganis, xiv. 319; in Mon- 
ghyr, XV. 57 ; in Hazirib^h, xvL 76 ; 



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GENERAL INDEX. 



in LohMagi, xvi. 303 ; in Singbhdm, 

xvii. 64; in the Tributary States of 

Chutid Niigpur, xviL 163 ; in Min- 

bhum, xvii. 290; in Cuttack, xviii. 73; 

in Balasor, xviii. 274 ; in Pud, xix. 37 ; 

in the Orissa Tributary States, xix. 255. 
Bhitg&on, market village in Dinajpur, 

vii. 452. 
Bhati, the tidal country of the Sundarbans, 

i. 380. 
Bhatial, a variety of jute, i^^ Jute. 
Bhdtottar^ rent-free grants of land for 

support of genealogists. See Tenures 

of Land. 
Bhatpiri, market village in Buran par- 

gand, i. 229; village in Havilishdhr 

pargand, i. 232. 
Bnatia, market village in Dinijpur, vii. 

452. 
Bhatsdli, pargand in Tirhut, xiii. 199. 
Bhattanirayan, chief of the five orifijinal 

Kanauj Brihmans, and founder of the 

family of the R4j^ of Nadiyd, iL 143 
Bhattia Gopdlpur, pargand in Maldah, 

vii. 130. 
Bhituria, village and tkdnd in Bardw&n, 

iv. 64. 
Bhaur, pargand in Tirhut, xiiL 184, 185. 
Bhaur, market village in Dinijpur, vii. 

452. 
'Bhsixxxk, pargand in Pumiah, xv. 295, 418. 
Bhdvd Chandra, Riji, viL 313; his 

famous judgments, vii. 313, 314. 
Bhawil or Nagarf, village in Dacca in- 
habited by Christians of Portuguese 

descent, v. 72. 
Bhaw&ni Pathak, a leader of tlakdits, 

Rangpur, vii. 158, 159. 
Bhawimganj, sub>division, Rangpur, viL 

345* 
Bhawdnigani, sub-divisional town and 

thdnd m Rangpur, viL 328, 332, 348, 

349 ; dispensary, viL 350, 352. 
Bhaw&nipur, village in the 24 Pargands, 

trade in firewood on Tolly s Canal, L 

34 ; school, i. 205 ; dispensary, L 250; 

lunatic a^lum for Europeans and 

Anglo-Indians, L 256. 
Bhawinipur Kiti khdl^ 24 Parganis, L 

3i» 32. 
Bhaw^ipur, village in Dindjpur, vii. 365, 

387, 446. 
Bhawirah, village and tkdnd in Tirhut, 

xiii. 34, 55» 180. 
Bhegdl, town in Maldah, vii. 127. 
BheliidiU, pargand in Mdnbhum, xviL 

367- 
Bhelordchaur, pargand in Balasor, xviiL 

362. 
Bhetiirl, thdnd in Chittagong, vi. 176. 



Bhikha Bandh, village in S4ran, xi. 258. 
Bhim Sinh*s IdtM m Tirhut, xiiL 52 ; in 

Champdran, xiiL 255, 311. 
Bhimbdndh, village in Monghyr, Hot 

springs at, xv. 77. 
Bhimnagar, frontier police post, Bhigal- 

pur, xiv. 213. 
Bhimpur, pargand in Patni, xi. 208, 209. 
Bhindf, village in Sdran, xL 358. 
Bhiri, pargand in Balasor, xviii. 362. 
Bhiti Sarkhandf, village in Tirhut, xiii. 

69. 
Bhitirbandf/ar^amf in Rangpur, viL 253, 

283, 302, 322. 
BhiU or bdstu, homestead land. Rent of. 

See Rent of Land. 
Bhogjdn, village in Dinajpur, vii. 441. 
Bhog-mandir^ the Hall of Oflferings, in 

the temple of Jagannith, xbc. 58. 
Bhogottar land tenures. See Tenures of 

land. 
Bhogrii, /ar^»i in Balasor, L 371; iiL 

18 ; xviiL 362. 
Bhogrii embankment, Balasor, xviii. 263, 

323, 324. 
Bhojpur, pargand in Sh4h4bad, xiL 286. 
Bhojpur, town in Shihibad, xii. 203. 
Bhojpur Jadid, town in Shihibid, xiu 

203. 
Bhojpur K4dim, town in Shah4b4d, xii. 

205. 
Bhola river, i. 299. 

Bholdchang, village in Tipperah, vL 43a 
Bholaganj, village in Dinajpur, vii. 451. 
BhoI4h4t, silk mart in Maldah, viL 101. 
Bholdkut, village in Tipperah, vi. 384. 
Bholiri river in Dindjpur, viL 361. 
Bholi river in Dinijpur, viL 362. 
Bhotmiri, trading village in Rangpur, viL 

309. 

Bhow^bhum, pargand^ Sundarbans, i. 
368. 

Bhuinhdr, or zamlnddri Brdhmans. See 
Brihmans. 

Bhuinhdra, pargand in Dindjpur, vii. 437. 

Bhuinkdri land-tenures. Sie Tenures of 
land. 

Bhuiyis Buddhist RAj^ of Bengal, 
founders of the P41 Dynasty, v. 1 18 ; 
ruins of their capital, v. 72, 73. 

Bhuiy&s, an aboriginal tribe in Nadiyi, 
ii. 43 ; in Midnapur, iii. 49 ; in HugH, 
iii. 282 ; in Bardwin, iv. 44 ; in 
Bdnkur^ iv. 219 ; in Birbhiim, iv. 327 ; 
in Maimansinh, v. 399 ; in Maldah, viL 
42 ; in Rangpur, vii. 212 ; in Rijshdhi, 
viii. 38 ; in Murshidabdd. ix. 43 ; in 
P&bna, ix. 282; in Dixjiling, x. 45; 
in Patni, xL 37; in Sdran, xL 244; 
in Shihibid, xii. 184 ; in Tirhut, xiiL 



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GENERAL INDEX, 



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47; in Choznpiran, xiii. 246; in Bhdgal- 
pur, xiv. 49 ; in the SantAl Parganis, 
xiv. 282; in Monghyr, xv. 52; in 
Pumiah, xv. 250; in Hazirib^h, xvi. 
61 ; in Xx)hardag4, xvi. 252 ; in Sing- 
bhiim, xvii. 67-69; in the Tributary 
States of Chutia Nigpur, xvii. 169-172, 
'92, 193, 232, 233 ; in MAnbhum, xvii. 
295 ; in Cuttack, xviiL 69 ; in Balasor, 
xviii. 269; in Puri, xix. 32; in the 
Orissa Tributary States, description 
of the, xix. 247-249 ; their settlements, 
xix. 249 ; tribal divisions, xix. 249, 
250; installation of a Riji by the, 
xix. 250, 251 ; physical traits of the, 
xix. 252 ; their religion, xix. 252, 253 ; 
domestic customs, dances, &c., xix. 
252-254. 

Bhului, pargand in Noakhili, vi 248, 
298, 322, 343. 

Bhului, military post of the Mughuls, in 
NodkhiH, vi. 287 ; battle at, in 1610, 
vi. 287, 288. 

Bhumij, an aboriginal tribe. See Abori- 
ginal population. 

Bhumij Kols, an aboriginal tribe. See 
Aboriginal Population. 

Bhundkhali, village in Dinijpur, vii. 437. 

Bhuranj4m4ri, village in Bjuigpur, vii. 

309. 
Bhurengi nodi in Tirhut, xiii. 23. 
Bhursut/or^M^, 24 ParganiU, i. 365. 
Bhusdri, pargand in Monghyr, xv. 176. 
Bhushnd chaklah in the 24 Paigan^ i. 

358. 
Bhusi, market village in Dindjpur, vii. 

365, 414, 449. 
Bhutdn, hill tract in Dirjding, x. 120-122. 
Bhutan Dwars, in Jalp^gur^ Acquisition 

of the, X. 218-223. 
Blali rice crop, in Cuttack, xviiL 99 ; in 

Puri, xix. 93. See also Aus. 
"Bix^VLXf pargand in Tirhut, xiii. 185, 
Bidrdbad, pargand in Nodkhdli, vi. 298. 
Bidri ware, manufacture of, in Pumiah, 

XV. 355-357. 
Bidyd^on, a small state -which formerly 

paid a tribute of elephants to the £. L 

Company, vii. 325. 
Bidyikut, village in Tipperah, vi. 383. 
Bidyananddti, in Jessor, seat of a branch 

of the Brdhma Samij, ii. 199. 
Bidyddhari river, i. 25, 32, 33. 
Biengonidy village in Khand{)4dL State, 

Orissa, xix. 300. 
Big Fenny river. See Bara Phenf. 
Bignonise, Species of, in Rangpur, vii. 

180. 
Bihirinith, hill in M4nbhi!im, xvii. 255. 
Bihii, pargand in Shdhdbad, xil 286. 



Bihid, railway station in Shahabdd, xii. 

257. 
Bihtd, town in Shihibid, xii. 203. 
Bihta, village in Patni, xi. 9a 
Bijdigang, river in Tipperah, vi. 363. 
Bijainagar, pargand in Dinijpur, viL 

437. 
Bijan, village in Dinajpar, vii. 453. 
Bijipur railway station, S^ntdl Pargands, 

xiv. 352. 
Bfjbani, village in Champdran, xiii. 250, 

.309. 
Bijnf} a small state which formerly paid a 

tribute of elephants to the £. I. Com- 
pany, vii. 325. 
Bikramiditya, celebrated Hindu king, 

who gave his name to Bikrampur, v. 

118. 
Bikrampur, pargand in Dacca, v. 14a 
Bikrampur, ancient capital of Hindu 

kings of Bengal, seat of Sanskrit learn- 
ing, V. 70, 71, 136. 
Bikrampur, pargand in Tipperah, vi. 

442. 
Bilaisari Tang, peak in Chittagong Hill 

Tracts, vL 24. 
Bilispur, tappd in Sargiija State, Chuti4 

Nagpur, xvii. 241. 
Bilonja, pargand in Gayd, xii. 146. 
Bils or swamps. See Lakes, Marshes, &c. 
Bindakhdri, market -village in Dinijpur, 

vii. 449. 
Bindaparab, festival in Minbhum, xvii. 

283. 
Bindaulid, town in Shdhdbdd, xii. 202. 
Bindhdra, pargand in Dindjpur, vii. 438. 
Bindol, market village in Dinajpur, viL 

441. 455. 

Binds, a tribe of Semi-Hinduized Abori- 
gines. .5>^ Aboriginal Population. 

Binidi river, Singbhum, xvii. 21. 

Binjpur, tappd in Sarguja State, Chuti4 
Ndgpur, xvii. 241. 

Binodpur, market village, Jessor, iu 216. 

Binyikuri* market village in Dinijpur, 
vii. 439. 

Bir Bandh, The, embankment, in Bhi- 
galpur, xiv. 102- 104. 

Bfr Chandra, present Rijd of Hill Tip- 
perah, vi. 469, 470, 471. 

Bir Sinh, the first Hindu Rijd of Bu*- 
bhum, iv. 384-386. 

BiRBHt^M District (Vol. IV.)— 

Geographical Situation, Area, and 
Headquarters, 311, 312; Boundaries, 
312 ; Constitution of the District and 
Early History, 312-316; General 
Aspect of the District and River 
System, 317 ; Iron-fields, 318-322 ; 
Hot Springs, 322; Fera Natura, Early 



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256 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Estimates of the Population, 322; 
Census of 1872, its Agencies and Re- 
sults, 323, 324; Popmation according 
to Sex and Age, 324-326; Infinn 
Population, 326 ; Ethnical Division of 
the People, 326329 ; Castes, 329333 ; 
Religious Division of the People, 333, 
334 ; Description of Sun, 335 ; Rdjna- 
^» 335. 336 ; Dubrijpur, 336, 337 ; 
Gauntid and the Story of Mr Frushard, 
337-341 ; Surul and the Residency of 
Mr Cheap, 341, 342 ; Village Officials, 
^3, 344; Material Condition of the 
People, 344; Agriculture, 345-371; 
Rice, 345, 346 J Area, Out-turn of 
Crops, &C., 346 ; Special Agricultural 
Statistics for Barwan Police Circle, 
Classification of Soils, Mode of Culti- 
vation, Rates of Rent, Value of Pro- 
duce, &C., 347-362; Condition of 
the Cultivators, 362 ; Domestic Ani- 
mals, 362, 363 ; Agricultural Imple- 
ments, 363, 364; Wages and Prices, 
364. 365; Land Tenures, 365-370; 
Rates of Rent, 370, 371 ; Manure, 
Irrigation, &c., 371 ; Natural Calami- 
ties, J71, 372; Foreign and Absentee 
LuuUords, 372 ; Roads and Railways, 
372, 374; Manufactures, 374-38o; Silk, 
374-378; Lac, 379; Commerce and 
Trade, 380; Capital and Interest, 381 ; 
Imported Capital, 381, 382 ; Income- 
Tax, 382; Native Chronicles of Blr- 
bhtim, 382-393 ; Muhammadan Princes 
of Birbhum, 393-395 ; Revenue and 
Expenditure, 395-400; Police Statis- 
tics, 401-403 ; Criminal Statistics, 404- 
406 ; Jail Statistics, 406-409 ; Eiduca- 
tional Statistics, 409-419 ; Postal Statis- 
tics, 419 ; List of PargEtnds or Fiscal 
Divisions, 419-437 ; Medical Aspects 
of the District, 437-455 > Climate, &c., 
437f 438 > Endemic Diseases, 438 ; 
Epidemics, 439 ; Epidemic Malarious 
Fever, 439*455 ; Native Medical Prac- 
titioners, 455 ; Geology, 45S-457' ^ 
aJsoix., 18-21. 

Bixbhum par^nd, i. 368. 

Birds of the 24 Parganis, i. 37 ; of the 
Sundarbans, i. 315, 316; of Nadiyi, ii. 
34 ; of Jessor, il 184, 185 ; of Midna- 
pur, ill. 40; of Hugll, iii. 266; of Bard- 
win, iv. 29 ; of Birbhum, iv. 322 ; of 
Dacca, v. 29, 30; of BAkaiganj, v. 177, 
178 ; of Faridpur, v. 277 ; of Maiman- 
sinh, V. 392 ; of the Chittaconjg Hill 
Tracts, VI. 34 ; of NoAkhdli, vi 259- 
265 ; of Hill Tipperah, vL 479 ; of 
Maldah, viL 34 ; ot Rangpur, vii. 199, 
aoo; of Dinijpur, vii. 364-367; of R^j- 



shdhi, viiL 31 ; of Bogri, viiL 152; of 
Murshiddbdd, ix. 35; of Pibni, ix. 277; 
of Dirjlling, x. 39 ; of Jalpiiguri, x. 
246; of Kuch Behar, x. 338; of Patni, 
xi. 31; of Siran, xi. 237; of Gayi, xii. 
28; of ShihdbAd, xii. 179, 180; of Tir- 
hut, xiii. 30 ; of Bhdgalpur, xiv. 44 ; 
of the Santal Parganas, xiv. 273; of 
Monghyr, xv. 37-44 ; of Pumiah, xv. 
238-240 ; of Hazirib&gh, xvi. 42 ; of 
Lohirdagi, xvi. 246 ; of Singbhdm, 
xvii. 26-29 ; of Cuttack, xviii. 59 ; of 
Balasor, xviii. 264; of Pun, xix. 26; of 
the Orissa Tributary Stotes, xix. 203. 

Bfr^ianj, village and i^nd in Dinijpur, 
vii. 365, 423, 448. 

Bfrgdon, village in Champ&ran, xiii. 250. 

Bf rhor, an aboriginal tribe. See Aborigi- 
nal Population. 

Birip&dii, maAa/, SarJkdr JsAtsvnLT, i. 371. 

Birkhul, seaside watering-place in Midna- 
pur, iii. 70, 194; embankment, iii. 142. 

Bfma^r or UlA, municipality, Nadiyi, 
ii. 62 ; fair and place ot pilgrimage, iL 
561 57f 58 ; dispensary, ii. 141. 

Birpur, village in Bhagalpur, xiv. 94. 

Birth of a child. Ceremonies and customs 
connected with, among the Chittagong 
Hill Tribes, vi. 46 ; in No4khilC vi 
279 ; in Rangpur, vii. 227; in the San- 
til Paigan^ xiv. 314; in Sinfbhum, 
xvii. 43, 44 ; among the Kandhs, xix. 
225 ; among the Bhmy&s, xix. 252. See 
also Ceremonies, &c. 

Birudi, village in Nayigarh State, Orissa* 
xix. 306. 

Bin!ip^ river in Cuttack, xviii. 23, 24, 25. 

Bisalkhand, pargoftd in Balasor, xviii. 
362. 

BishiUehar Hill, pargand in Hill Tip- 
perah, vi. 519. 

Bishilghar, thdnd in Hill Tipperah, vi. 

517. 
Bishanpur Narhan, village union in 

Tirhut, xiii. 49. 
Bishanpur Narhan Kh^ village in 

Tirhut, xiii. 67. 
Bfshkhili, river, L 299. 
Bisfanupur or Bishenpore, old name for 

Binkurd District, iv. 206 ; ix. la 
Bishnupur town. Description of, iv. 230^ 

236-238 ; its weaving manufactures, iv. 

276 ; its trade, iv. 277 ; famine of 

1866 in, iv. 271-274. 
Bishnupur Rijis, Family history of the, 

iv. 230 236. 
Bishnupur, village in Calcutta pargand^ 

i. 230. 
Bishnupur, village in Baridhiti pargand 

i. 225 ; dispensary, L 252. 



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257 



Bishnttpur, village in Monghyr, with 
school, XV. 172. 

Bishnupur KiU, pargand in Cuttack, 
xviii. 225. 

Bishnupura, village in Sardn, xi. 257. 

Bishu festival, cdebiated in the Chitta- 
gong Hill Tracts, vi. 45. 

Bisdunpur, village in Saigdji State, 
ChutidNifpur, xvii. 235, 236, 241, 242. 

Bisipdrd, thdnd in the Khandmils, Orissa, 
xix. 264. 

Bisrimpur, coal-field in Sargtiji State, 
Chutii N^ur, xvii. 225-228. 

Bfsrol, village in Dindjpur, vii. 447. 

Bisthaziri, pargand in Monghyr, xv. 176. 

Biswak, pargand in Patni, xi. TX/J, 

Bisw&nithpur, market village in Dinijpur, 
viL 452. 

BUdri or rice crop. See Aus. 

Bithari, market village in the 24 Paigands, 
i. 229. 

Black Pagoda or Sun Temple, The, at 
Kanirak, Cuttack, xviiL 186. 

Blights, in the 24 Parganis, i. 158; in the 
Sundarbans, i. 349 ; in Nadiyd, ii. 83 ; 
in Jessor, ii. 274 ; in Midnapur, iii. 114; 
in Huglf, iii. 358; in Bardwdn, iv. 92; 
in Dacca, v. 102; in Bdkarganj, v. 
112; in Faridpur, v. 330; in Maiman- 
sinh, V. 457 ; in Chittagong, vi. 184 ; 
in NoAkhilf, vi. 316, 317 ; in Tippe- 
rah, vi. 415, 416 ; in Hill Tipperah, 
vi. 507 ; in Maldah, vii. 90 ; in Kang- 
pur, vii. 292 ; in Dinijpur, vii. 408 ; 
m Rijshihi, viii. 79, 80; in Mur- 
shidibdd, ix. 131 ; in Pabni, ix. 
325, 326; in Ddrjflin^ x. 124, 125; 
in Jalpiiguri, x. 293 ; m Kuch Behar, 
X. 304; in Siran, xi. 305, 306; in 
G^yi, xii. 107 ; in Shdhib&d, xii. 250 ; 
in Tirhut, xiii. 115; in Champdran, 
xiii. 284 ; in Monghyr, xv. 127 ; in 
Pumiah, xv. 341, 342 ; in Lohdrda^ 
xvi. 408 ; in Mdnbhiim, xvii. 339 ; in 
Cuttack, xviii. 146, 147 ; in Balasor, 
xviii. 322, 323 ; in Puri, xix. 138. 

Blind, Number of, in the 24 Parganis, i. 
44 ; in Nadiyi, ii. 38 ; in Jessor, ii. 
189 ; in Midnapur, iii. 44 ; in Hiigli, 
iii. 276; in Bardwdn, iv. 39; in Bdnkurd, 
iv. 215 ; in Birbhiim, iv. 326 ; in 
Dacca, v. 34 ; in Bdkarganj, v. 184 ; 
in Faridpur, v. 282 ; in Maimansinh, 
V. J95: in Chittagong, vi. 138; in 
NoakhAli, vL 270; in Tipperah, vi 
373 ; in Maldah, viL 39 ; in Rangpur, 
vii. 210 ; in Dinijpur, viL 373 ; in 
Rijshihi, viiL 37 ; in Biogri, viii. 160 ; 
in Murshidibid, ix. 42 ; in Pibni, ix. 
281 ; in Diijilixig, x. 44; in Jalpiiguri, 



X. 252 ; in Patni, xi. 36 ; in Siran, xi. 
242; in Gayi, xii. 32; in Shihibid, xii. 
183 ; in Champiran, xiiL 235 ; in Bhi- 
galpur, xiv. 47 ; in the Santil Par- 
ganis, xiv. 280 ; in Monghyr, xv. 50 ; 
Pumiah, xv. 245 ; in Haziribigh, xvi. 
58 ; in Singbhum, xvii 35, 36 ; in 
Minbhibi, xvii 273 ; in Cuttack, xviiL 
67 ; in Balasor, xviii. 267 ; in Purf,^ 
xix. 30; in the Orissa Tributary States,' 
xix. 208. 

Blood revenge among the Kandhs, xix. 
221, 222. 

Boilkhili Canal in Chittagong, vi. 187. 

Boilmiri cloth market, Jessor, ii. 302. 

Boilmiri, trading town in Faridpur, t. 
291. 

Boating and fishing castes. See Castes. 

Boats, description of, in the 24 Pajganis, 
i. 33 ; in the Chittagong Hill Tracts, 
vi. 30» 3i» 38» 84, 256, 323 ; in Bogri, 
viiL 146 ; in Pibni, ix. 280^ 349 ; in 
Patni, xi. 28 ; in Siran, xL 235 ; in 
Tithut, xiiL 130, 131 ; in Bhigalpur, 
xiv. J I, 32 ; in Monghyr, xv. 23 ; in 
Haz&b^h, xvi. 40; in Lohirdagi, 
xvi. 237. 

Boat-racing in Jessor, ii. 221. 

Boat -routes between Calcutta and Eastern 
Districts, i. 32, 33, 300; in Bogri, 
viiL 145 ; in Bhi^dpur, xiv. 31. 

Bochubi, pargand in Tirhut, xiii. 185. 

Bod State, Orissa, xix. 205, 206, 210-217, 
261, 275-278. 

Bod village, capital of Bod State, xix. 

277. 

Bodi, village and thdnd in Rangpur, viL 
161, 318, 321. 

Bodh Gayi, or Buddh Gayi, formerly the 
residence of Sakya Sinha, xii. 53-55. 

Bodhbiri, village in Dinijpur, vii. 451. 

Bodhuri, village in Dinijpur, vii. 441. 

Bodos or Mechs, an aboriginal tribe. See 
Aboriginal Population. 

BogrA or BagurA District (VoL VIH.) 
Geographical Situation, Area, and 
Headquarters, 129 ; Boundaries and 
Jurisdiction, 129-133; General Aspect, 
133-^35 ; Rivers, 135-HI ; Lakes, 145; 
Jungles and Swamps, 145, 149, 150; 
Ferte Natura, 151, 152 ; Population, 
Early Estimate of, 153-156 ; Census of 
1872, its Agencies and Results, 153, 
156-158 ; Population according to Sex 
and Age, 159, 160; Popukition ac- 
cording to Occupation, 160, 161 ; 
Ethnioil Division of the People, 162- 
167 ; Castes, 166, 169-180 ; Immigra 
tion, 167-169; Religious Division of 
the People, 180-185 J Division of the 



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GENERAL INDEX. 



People into Town and Country, 185, 
186; Bogri or Bagadi Town, 129, 
186, 187 ; Sherpur, 187-192 ; Smaller 
Towns, 192-198 ; Village Officials and 
NotabUities, 198-203 ; Material Condi- 
tion of the People, 203-206; Rice, 
208, 209 ; Agriculture, 208-226 ; Other 
Cez^s and Fibres, 209-214 ; Miscel- 
laneous Crops, 210, 214, 215 ; Area, 
Out -turn of Crops, 148, 214, 221, 222 ; 
Domestic Animals, 222, 223 ; Agricul- 
tural Implements, Wages, and Prices, 
223, 224 ; Weights and Measures, 224, 
225 ; Spare Land, 222, 226, 228, 250; 
La^d Tenures, 228-244; Rates of Rent, 
244-247 ; Operation of the Rent Law, 
Number of Courts, 247, 248 ; Manures, 
Irrigation, and Rotation of Crops, 147, 
148, 250; Natural Calamities, 250, 
251 ; The Famines of 1866 and 1874, 
251-266 ; Roads, 266-269 ; Manufac- 
tures, 269-271 ; Commerce and Trade, 
271-277 ; Foreign and Absentee Pro- 
prietors, 277 ; Capital and Interest, 
277, 278 ; Imported Capital, 278 ; 
Institutions, 198, 279, 280; Income 
of the District, 278, 280-282 ; Revenue 
and Expenditure, 280-282 : Balance- 
sheets ot the District, 281, 282 ; Land 
Tax, &c., 280-282; Police Statistics, 
283-288; Criminal Statistics and 
Classes, 287, 288 ; Jail Statistics, 288 
291 ; Educational Statistics, 291-301 ; 
Postal Statistics, 301 ; Climate, 304- 
306 ; Medical Aspects of the Districts, 
306-313; Epidemic Diseases, 309-311, 
Charitable Dispensary and Native 
Medical Practitioners, 309, 315, 317 ; 
Indigenous Vegetable Drugs, 315. 
Bogri or BagurT town, viiL 129, 186, 

Bohmong Rij4, The, in the Chittagong 
Hill Tracts, vi. 35, 36, 37, 39, 54, 56, 
88, 1J2. 

Bojanhari, market village, 24 Pargan&s, 
i. 228. 

Bokiro coal-field, in HadLrib^h, xvi. 

Bolpur, village and railway station in 
Birbhum, iv. 343, 374. 

Bombay, Exports to. See Commerce. 

BoNAi Tributary State (Vol XVII.) 
Geographical Situation, Area, His- 
tory, &c., 165, 166; General Aspect, 
Hills and Rivers, 166, 167 ; Minerals, 
Forests, and Jungle Products, 167, 168; 
Fera Natura^ 168 ; Population, 168, 
169 ; Ethnological Classification, 169 ; 
The Bhuiy^ Sieir Manners, Customs, 
&c., 169-172; Other Tribes, 172-174; 



Residence of the R&J4, Villages, &c., 
174. 175 ; History of the R4j4, 175, 
176 ; Condition of the People, 176 ; 
Agriculture, Rice and other Crops, 176, 
177 ; Domestic Animals, Wages and 
Prices, and Police Statistics, 178, 179. 

Bonii Garh, the residence of the Rijd of 
Bonii, xvii. 174, 175. 

Bonigong, river in Tipperah, vi. 363. 

Bonjam^ a timber tree of the Sundarbans, 
i. 305. 

Bard or gi^, early rice crop in Haz4ri- 
b^h, xvL 99, 100 ; in Lohirdagd, xvi. 
338, 339. 

Boradah pargand, Sarkdr Mahmuddbdd, 
i. 372. 

Borddom, mart in the Chittagong Hill 
Tracts, vi. 203. 

Bordg4H, trading village in Rangpur, vii. 

309. 
Boragineae, Species of, in Rangpur, vii. 

179. 
Borahattd, village in Diniljpur, vii. 443. . 
Bordi, village in Hugli, with mat-making, 

iii. 372. 
Bordibari, village in Dinijpur, vii. 447. 
Borain, village m Mdnbhiim, Jain temples 

at, xvii. 299, 300. 
Boral, village, with English school, 24 

Parganis, i. 204. 
Bodir, village in Dinijpur, vii. 45A. 
Bore, or tidal wave on the Hugh river, 

i. 30, 299; on the Meghni, i. 298, 

299 ; V. 167 ; in Midnapur, iii. 26 ; in 

in Hugli, liL 256, 257 ; in Noakhilf, vi. 

253. 

Bor-muri peak in Hill Tipperah, vi. 474. 

Baro rice in Chittagong, vi. 159, 160 ; in 
Rdjshdhi, viii. 30, 59; Bogri^ viiL 
209 ; in Murshidibad, ix. 32, 34, 100 ; 
Pdbnd, ix. 301 ; in the Santil Paiganis, 
xiv. 335 ; in Pumiah, xv. 282. See 
also Rice. 

Borohit, village in Dinijpur, vii. 448. 

Bosher Hit, market village in Nodkhili, 
vi. 283. 

BosVhkXl khdl, Jessor, il 180. 

Botanical Gardens, Royal, near Howrah, 
iii. 294. 

Botanical Garden at Rungarun in Dir- 
jfling, X. 176-178. 

Botany of Bengal. List of plants found 
in Bengal and Assam, xx. 123-227. 

Boundaries of the 24 Parganis, i. 17, 18; 
of the Sundarbans, i. 285 ; of Nadiy^ 
ii. 18; of Jessor, ii. 1 70; of Midnapur, 
iiL 18 ; of Huglf, iii. 252 ; of Bard- 
wan, iv. 17, 18 ; of Bdnkurd, iv. 206 ; 
of Birbhum, iv. 312; of Dacca, v. 18; of 
Bdkarganj, v. 157 ; of Faddpur, v. 255 ; 



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GENERAL INDEX. 



259 



of Maimansinh, v. 383 ; of the Chit- 
tagong Hill Tracts, vi. 17 ; of Chitta- 
gong vi. no; of No^kkdlf, vi. 238; 
of Tipperah, vi. 356 ; of Hill Tippenih, 
vl 459, 460 ; of Maldah, vii. 17, 18, 
19; of Rangpur, vii. 156, 166; ofDi- 
nijpur, vii. 356; of Rdjshdhi, viii. 20; 
of Bogii, viii. 129 ; of Murshiddbid, 
ix. 18 ; of Pibnd, ix. 270 ; of Dirjil- 
ing, X. 18 ; of Jalpdigud, x. 216 ; of 
Kuch Behar, x. 332 ; of Patni, xi. 18; 
of Siran, xi. 225, 226 ; of Gayi, xii. 
18 ; of Shdhdbdd, xii. 158 ; of Tirhut, 
xiii. 18 ; of Champdran, xiii. 210, 220; 
of Bhdgalpur, xiv. 17, 18 ; of the San- 
t41 Pargands, xiv. 265 ; of Monghyr, 
XV. 18; of Purnlah, xv. 219, 220; of 
Hazdribdgh, xvi. 17, 18 ; of Lohdrdagd, 
xvi. 231, 232 ; of Singbhum, xvii. 18 ; 
of the Tributary States of Chutii Nag- 
pur, xvii. 149 ; of MAnbhum, xvii. 
253, 254; of Cuttack, xviii. 20; of 
Balasor, xviii. 248 ; of Furi, xix. 18 ; 
of the Orissa Tributary States, xix. 
159, 160. 

Boyaliyd, village in Maldah, vii. 131. 

Bozargomedpur, parMnd in Bdkarganj, 
Historical sketch of, v. 222, 223. 

Brdhmd Samaj, The, in the 24 Parganis, 
i. 76 ; in Nadiyi, ii. 52 ; in Jessor, 
ii. 197-199; in Midnapur, iii. ^8; in 
Huglf, iii. 291, 292; in Bardwan, iv. 
54; in Bdnkurd, iv. 228; in Dacca, 
V. 58, 117 ; in Bakarganj, v. 197 ; in 
Fandpur, v. 289 ; in Maimansinh, v. 
409, 410; in Chittagong, vi. 147, 
149, 150 ; in Noikhili, vi. 283 ; in 
Tipperah, vi. 381, 382 ; in Hill 
Tipperah, vi. 495; in Maldah, vii. 
47 ; in Rangpur, vii. 221, 224 ; in 
Dinijpur, vii. 382, 383 ; in Rijshdhl, 
viii. 51, 52 ; in Bogra, viii. 180, 181 ; in 
Murshidibdd, ix. 57, 59, 17 1; in Pdbnd, 
ix. 288 ; in Dirjfling, x. 85 ; in Jalpdi- 
guH, X. 260; in Kuch Behar, x. 359; in 
Patnd, xi. 64 ; in Sdran, xi. 256; in 
Gayd, xii. 39, 41 ; in Champdran, xiii. 
249 ; in Monghyr, xv. 59 ; m HazAri- 
bdgh ; xvi. 85 ; in Cuttack, xviii. 78, 
79 ; in Balasor, xviii. 278. 

Brdhmanb&rid Subdivision in Tipperah, 
vi. 386, 441, 442. 

Brdhmanbdrid, town in Tipperah, vi. 
363. 366, 382, 386, 387, 420, 432, 
442 ; lock-up, 435 ; dispensary, 453, 

BiJhmani river, xvi. 235 ; xvii. 166, 
167, 190; xviii. 22, 23, 25, 36; xix. 
200^ 201 ; estuaries, Cuttack, xviii. 33. 
35. 



Brdhmani river in Din&jpur, vii. 359, 

361, 362 ; canal, vii. 304. 
Brahmanpukur, marsh in Dindjpur, vii. 

Brahmans, Subdivisions, number, family 
names, etc., of, in the 24 Paiganis, 
i- 53-58 ; in Nadiyd, iu 46 ; in Jessor, 
ii. 194, 219-221 ; in Midnapur, iii. 
52 ; in HMi, iii. 293 ; in Bardwdn, 
iv. 46 ; in Bdnkurd, iv. 222 ; in Bir- 
bhum, iv. 329 ; in Dacca, v. 47, 52-55; 
in Bikarganj, v. 190 ; in Fandpur, v. 
286 ; in Mamiansinh, v. 402, 403 ; in 
Chittagong, vi. 145 ; in Noikhdli, vi. 
275 ; in Tipperah, vi. 379 ; in Hill Tip- 
persdi, vi. 494, 495 ; in Maldah, vii. 
44; in Rangpur, vii. 214, 215, 222, 227, 
220, 230; in Dinijpur, viL 377; in RAi- 
shahi, viii. 41 -43; in BogriL viii. 165, 188, 
191, 192 ; in Murshidabid, ix. 43, 48- 
50; in PAbnd, ix. 282, 286,314; in Dirjf- 
ling, X. 45, 53, 81; injalpfigurl, x. 253, 
256 ; in Kuch Behar, x. 341-343* 358 ; 
in PatnA, xi. 40-42, 55 ; in Sixan, xi. 
246 ; in GayA, xii 35-37 ; in ShAhA- 
bAd, xii. ipi ; in Tirhut , xiii. 41-43 ; 
in Champaran, xiii 236, 237, 240, 
241 ; in BhAgalpur, xiv. 54-61 ; in 
the Santdl Parganis, xiv. 282, 319 ; 
in Monghyr, xv. 55 ; in Pumiah, xv. 
254 ; in HazAribigh, xvi 75, 215 ; 
in LohArdagd, xvi 252, 300-303 ; in 
Singbhiim, xvii. 63 ; in the Tributary 
States of Chutii Nagpur,, xvii. 163, 
173; in MAnbhiim, xvii 290; in 
Cuttack, xviii 71 ; in Balasor, xviii. 
271, 272 ; in Puri, xix. 30, 34-36, 163 ; 
in the Orissa Tributary States, xix. 

255- 
Brahmapur, village in DinAjpur, vii 365, 

413- 

Brahmaputra river, v. 20, 386 ; vii 161, 
162, 163, 169, 292; viii 135, 138; ix. 
271, 272. 

Brdhmini river in Murshid&bAd, ix. 25. 

Brakmottar^ rent-free grants of land for 
support of BrAhmans, I 279, 280; in 
Jessor, il 265 ; BardwAn, iv. 77 ; in 
BdnkurA, iv. 264 ; in Birbhi!un, iv. 369; 
in NodkhAlf, vi. 313 ; in Maldah, vii. 
84, 85 ; in Rangpur, vii. 273, 278 ; m 
Dinijpur, vii 400, 404; in Rijshihi, 
viii 69, 70 ; in Bogri, viii. 241 ; in 
PdbnA, ix. 314; in Kuch Behar, x. 
391; in Tirhut, xiii no; in Singbhiim, 
xvii. 91. See also Tenures of land. 

Brihpur, town in Shihibid, xii 203. 

Brasswprk and brass-workers in Nadiyd, 
il loi ; in Jessor, il 207, 300 ; m Bard- 
win, iv. 133 ; in Rijshihi, viii 55, 56, 



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GENERAL INDEX. 



87 ; in Murshid^Md, ix. 154, 156, 163, 
164 ; in PAbnd, ix. 337, 338, 348, 351. 
See cUso Manufactures. 

Brijias, an aboriginal tribe. See Abori- 
ginal Population. 

Bnnddbonchak embankment in Midnapur, 
iii. 142. 

Britti, maintenance land, rent free. See 
Tenures of land. 

Brown's (Captain), scheme for the paci- 
fication of the Pahiriis (a.d. 1778), xiv. 

304. 
Brumchiri embankment in Chittagong, 

vi. 131. 
Buchanan-Hamilton's Account of the 

Fishes and Fisheries of Bengal, xx. 

5-I03- 

Bud-bud Sub-division, population, &c., 
iv- 34. 35. 37. 170. 171 ; the famine of 
1866 in, iv. loi ; branch dispensary, 
iv. 197. 

Buddh Gayd, formerly the residence of 
Sakya Sinha, xii. 53-J5. 

Buddhain hill, Gayi, xii. 19. 

Buddhists and Buddhism in the 24 Par- 
ganiis, i. 72, 76 ; in the Sundarbans, i. 
317, 319 ; in Dacca, v. 52; in Bakarganj, 
V. 198 ; in the Chittagong Hill Tracts, 
vi 40, 41, 45, 68, 102, 106 ; in Chitta- 
TOUF, VL 13;, 138, 139. 143, 147, 151 ; 
m Noikh&li, vi. 270, 277 ; in Maldah, 
vii 48 ; in Ran^ur, viL 210, 221, 234 ; 
in Dindjpur, vii. 370, 372, 382, 383; 
in Rdjshahi, viii. 36, ^2 ; in Murshida- 
b^, IX. 61 ; in DiijTling, x. 41, 46 ; 
in Jalpdiguri, x. 251 ; in Kuch Behar, 
X. 358 ; in Siran, xL 256 ; in BhAgal- 
pur, xiv. 77, 99 ; in Monp^hyr, xv. 49, 
59, 60 ; in Hazdribdgh, xvi. 84 ; in Cut- 
tack, xviii. 64, 66, 79, 179-183; in 
Puri, xix. 29, 40, 47. 

Buddhist antiquities. See Antiquarian 
Remains. 

Buddhist kings of Bengal, v. 1 18. 

BiSdhpur in Mdnbhiim, Ruins of Jain 
temples at, xvii. 301, 302. 

Budge-Budge, or Baj-Baj, fishing town 
in the 24 Pargands, L 35 ; site of fort 
captured by Lord Clive, i. loi, 228. 

Biidhdtd in the 24 Parganiiis, Fairs held at, 
i. 118, 228. 

Building leases. See Tenures of Land. 

Building stone in Bard win, iv. 133 ; in 
Binkuri, i v. 211 ; in MurshidabSd, ix. 
34 ; in Ddrjfling, x. 31, 157 ; Jalp4i- 
guri, X. 239. 

Bttkdd, village in Narsinhpur State, 
Orissa, xix. 305. 

Bulbulchoimy ' nightingales' eyes, ' pattern 
of siUc made in Maldah, vii. 95. 



Bunds, an aboriginal tribe in the 24 Par- 
ganAs, i. 71 ; in Sundarbans, i. 318, 
J19 ; in Nadiyi, ii. 49, 103 ; in Jessor, 
li. 196 ; in Midnapur, iii. 57 ; in Hugli, 
iii. 255, 291 ; in Bardwin, iv. 46 ; in 
Bdnkurd, iv. 228 ; in Birbhl!im, iv. 333 ; 
in Dacca, v. 43, 51 ; in Bikarganj, v. 
190. 193 ; in Faridpur, v. 285, 288 ; in 
Maimansinh, v. 407 ; in Murshiddbiid, 
ix. 47. See also Aboriginal Population. 

BundkMri, canal in Dinajpur, vii. 364. 

Buniyidganj, village in Gzyk, xii. 55. 

Burd Dharll, river in Rangpur, vii. 167. 

Burd Tistd, old channel of the Tistd, a,v, 

Burd Mantreswar, mouth of the HiSigli, i. 
28. 

Burdbalang river, xviii. 251 ; xix. 200^ 
201. 

Buran, fiscal division in the 24 Pargands, 
i. 229, 363. 

Burglary. See Criminal Statistics. 

Bur^ a hill in Lohirdagi, xvi. 237. 

Buri Gandak river, xiii. 130^ 223, 226. 

Burial ground of Mundas, at Chokahatu 
in Lohdrdaga, xvi. 488. 

BuHgangi river, an old branch of the 
Ganges, v. 20, 22 ; vii. 23. 

Burigangad, pargind in Pumiah, xv. 295, 

332, 333. 418, 419. 
Bungangi, river in Pumiah, xv. 227, 23a 
Burfswar river, i. 299. 
Burinadi river, in Midnapur, iii. 25. 
Burirhdt, trading village in Rangpur, vii. 

309. 
Burmah, Export of kingfishers' skins from 

Chittagong to, vi. 133, 190, 370^ 419. 
Burmese War, Cause of the first, vi. 1 18- 

120; conduct of, 120, 121. 
Buxar, Battle of, ix. 191. 



Cachar, Raids into, by Lushdis, vi. 20. 

Calamities, Natural, in the 24 Pargands, 
i. 158-163 ; in the Sundarbans, i. 342. 
344 ; in Nadiyd, ii. 83-93 ; in Jessor, ii, 
274-278 ; in Midnapur, iii. 1 14-133 ; in 
Hdglf, iii. 358-366 ; in Bardwdn, iv. 
92-105 ; in Bdnkurd, iv. 270-275 ; in 
Bfrbhiim, iv. 371, 372 ; in Dacca, v. 
102-104 ; in Bdkarganj, v. 212 ; in 
Faridpur, v. 330-332 ; in Maimansinh, 
V. 457; in the Chittagong Hill 
Tracts, vi. 82, 83 ; in Chittagong, vi. 
184, 185 ; in Nodkhdli, vi. 316-319 ; 
in Tipperah, vi. 415-417 ; in Hill Tip- 
perah, vi. 41 5-41 7; in Hill Tipperah, 
vL 507 ; in Maldah, vii. 90-93; in Kane- 
pur, vii. 292-302; in Dindjpur, vu. 



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General index. 



261 



408, 409 ; in Rdjshahi, viii. 78-80 ; in 
Bogra, viii. 250^ 21CI ; in Murshidabdd, 
ix. 26, 13 1 -141, 238,. 239 ; in Pibnd, ix. 
325-3271 370-372; in DArjiling, x. 124- 
127 ; in Jalpdiguri, x. 293 ; in Kuch 
Behar, x. 394-396 ; in Patn^ xi. 130, 
131 ; in Saran, xi. 305-307 ; in Gayi, 
xii. 107-111 ; in Shahibad, xii. 250- 
2^5 ; in Tirhut, xiii. 115-121 ; in Cham- 
paran, xiii. 284-288 ; in Bhdgalpur, xiv. 
160-173 ; in the Santal Parganas, xiv. 
346-351 ; in Monghyr, xv. 127-135 ; in 
Pumiah, xv. 34I-X4.9 ; in Hazdribiigh, 
xvi. 138; in Lohardagd, xvi. 408; in 
Singbhum, xvii. 95 ; in the Tributaiy 
States of Chutid Nagpur, xvii. 212 ; in 
Minbhdm, xviL 339, 340 ; in Cuttack, 
xviii. 146-173; in Balasor, xviii. 322- 
334 ; in Pud, xul 1 38- 15a See also 
Blights, Droughts, Famines, &c. 

Calcareous tufa in Ddijiling, x. 153-157 ; 
In Jalpiiguri, x. 239. See also Geo- 
logical. 

Calcuti'A, area, population, &c., i. 17, 
44* 77> 7^; acquisition of, by the 
Company, i. 18, 20; pargand of, 
i. 230; earliest mention of name, i. 

364. 

Calcutta, Exports from and imports into. 
See Commerce and Trade. 

Calcutta and South-Eastem Railway, L 
170, 171, 344. 

Cansds, water-courses, etc., in the 24 Par- 
ganis, i. 30-33 (tzaffic of Calcutta 
canals, i. 171 -174); Midnapur High 
Level Canal, its construction, prospects, 
&c, iii. 29-36^ 371; Rupniydran and 
Rasulpur Canal, iii. 36, 37 ; in Hugli, 
UL 262, 263, 371 ; in Bardwdn, iv. 
107 ; in Dacca, v. 23, 108 ; Bikarganj, 
T. 169, 170; in Chittafong, vi. 127, 
184, 187 ; in NoikhalC vi. 250, 251, 
253, 254, 318 ; in Tipperah, vl 365; in 
Rangpur, vii. 169, 304 ; in Dindjpur, 
vii. 361, 364, 365, 410 ; in Rijshahl, 
viii. 28, 82 ; in Bogrd, viii. 14J ; in 
Murshiddbdd, ix. 29, 148 ; in Pabni, 
«• 329* 330 ; in Patni, xi. 24, 25 ; in 
Gaya, xii. 22, 23 ; in ShiLhibid, xii. 
165-172 ; in Cuttack, xviii. 37-53. 

Cane, Sugar, in the 24 PargadU, i. I45t 
146 ; in Sundarbans, i. 325 ; in Nadi^ 
ii. 67 ; in Jessor, ii. 246, 249, 298 ; 
in Bandw^, iv. 171 ; in Binkurd, iv. 
247; in Birbhiim, iv. 345, 353, 354 ; in 
Rajshdhi, viii. 63 ; in Bogra, vfii. 21^- 
219 ; in Murshidabdd, ix. 100, 105 ; in 
Pibnd, ix. 302 I in Hadiribdgh, xvi. 
104, 171. See eUso SMSzxcAVkt, 

Canning, Port, town, and railway station) 



i. 25, 32 ; its history, i. 91-98, 170, 
294, 320. 

Cantonments, Military, in the 24 Par- 
ranis, i. 15, 82-87, 90, 91, 100 (also 
Calcutta) ; in Murshiddbid, ix. 75, 76 ; 
in Ddrjiling, x. 26, 89, 90, no; in 
Talpdigurf, x. 216, 225, 261, 262; in 

. Patni, xi. 87. 

Caoutchouc See India-rubber. 

Capital and Interest, in the 24 Paigands, i. 
173; in the Sundarbans, i. 345; in Na- 
diyd, ii. 150; in Jessor, ii. 304; in Mid- 
napur, iii. 153 ; in Hugli, iii. 376 ; in 
BaJrdwan, iv. 135 ; in Bdnkurd, iv. 
278; in Birbhum, iv. 381; in Dacca, v. 
115,. 116; in Bdkarganj, v. 216, 217; 
in Faridpur, v. 340 ; in Maimansinh, v. 
461, 462; in the Chittagong Hill Tracts, 
vi. 86, 87; in Chittagong, vi. 207, 2C^; 
in Nodkhdli, vi. 328, 329; in Tipperah, 
vi. 424, 425; in Hill Tipperah, vi. 509; 
in Maldah, vii. 104, 105 ; in' Rangpur, 
vii, 308-310; in Dindjpur, vii. 414; in 
Rijshdhi, viii. 88, 89 ; in Bogri, viii. 
277, 278; in Murshidabdd, ix. 169, 170; 
in Pibnd, ix. 350; m Diijfling, x. 164; 
JalpAiguri, X. 300, 301; in Kuch Behar, 
X. 401, 402 ; in Patn^ xi. 180 ; in 
Siran, xi. 335; in Gayi, xii. 119, 120; 
in ShAhibdd, xii. 269, 270 ; in Tirhut, 
xiii. 162-164; in Champaran, xiii. 296; 
in Bhigalpur, xiv. 191, 192; in the Santil 
Paiganis, xiv. 360, 361 ; in Monghyr, 
XV. 148, 154 ; in Pumiah, xv. 385 ; in 
Hazdribagh, xvi. 173 ; in LohirdagA, 
xvi., 421-423; in Singbhum, xvii. 106; 
in the Tributary States of Chutid Ndg- 
pur, xvii. 212, 213, 218, 219 ; in Mdn- 
ohiim, xvii. 352. 

Caprifolise, Species of, in Rangpur, vii. 
182. 

Car festival {Rath-JdtrS) at Jagannith, 
xix. 59-67, 175, 176. 

Card-playing in Pumiah, xv. 279-281 ; 
names of the cards, xv. 281. See also 
Amusements. 

Castes, List of, with numbers, pursuits, 
relative rank, &c., in the 24 Pargands, i. 
52-71; in the Sundarbans, i. 317; in Na- 
diya, ii. 146-150; in Jessor, ii. 194-196; 
in Midnapur, iii. 52-^8 ; in HugH, iii. 
284-291 ; in Bardwan, iv. 46- (4 ; in 
Bdnkurd, iv. 221-228 ; in Birbhum, iv. 
• 329-333; in Dacca, v. 46-5 1; in Bdkar- 
ganj, V. 190-194 ; in Faridpur, v. 286-^ 
288; in Maimansinh, v. 402-4£^; in the' 
Chittagong Hill Tracts, vi. 37, 38, 68; 
in Chittagong, vL I39-I4i» ^AS'^M i 
in Nodkhali, vi. 275-277; in Tipperah, 
vi. 379-381; in Hill Tipperah, vi. 494, 
c 



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262 



GENERAL INDEX. 



495 ; (amon^ the Hill Tribes, vi. 488) ; 
in Maldah, vii. 44-46 ; in Rangpur, vii. 
211-221; in Diniipur, vii. 376-382; in 
Rijshihi, viii. 39-48 ; in Bogrd, viii. 
166, 169, 180; in MurshidAbad, ix. 43- 
45, 48-56 ; in Pdbd^ ix. 282-284, 286- 
288 ; in D&rjiling, x. 45-46, 80-84 ; in 
Talpdiguri, X. 253, 254, 256-259 ; in 
Kuch Behar, x. 341-346 ; in Patna, xi. 
40-50; in Siran, xi. 246-255; in GayA, 
xii. 35-38; in Sh4h4bid, xii. 191 -197 ; 
in Tirhut, xiii. 41-46 ; in Champdran, 
xiii. 240-247; in Bhi^pur, xiv. 49-51, 
53-77; in the Santil ParganAs, xiv. 282- 
284, 319-321 ; in Monghyr, xv. 55-59 ; 
in Pumiah, xv. 254, 255 ; in Haz^- 
bdp^h, xvi. 60-62, 75-83; in Lohdrdaga, 
xvL 252, 253, 300-318 ; in Singbhiim, 
xvii. 63-69 ; in the Tributary States of 
ChutiA Nigpur, xvii. 156-164, 169-175, 
181-187, I92-I95> 203-207, 216, 217, 
230-235, 248, 249 ; in MAnbhum, xvii. 
278, 290-295 ; in Cuttack, xviii. 71-77; 
in Balasor, xviii. 271-277; in Pun, xix. 
34-40 ; in the Orissa Tributary States, 
xix. 255, 259. 
Cattle, in the 24 Pargan^ i. 1^9 ; in the 
Sundarbans, i. 337; in Nadiyi, il 70; in 

eisor, ii. 256; in Midnapur, iii. 83, 
; in HugH, iii. 313 ; in Bardwan, 
iv. 73, 74; in Binkuri, iv. 248; in B{r- 
bhum, iv. 362, 363; in Dacca, v. 93 ; 
in Bdkarganj, v. 205, 206; in Faridpur, 
T. 319 ; in Maimansinh, v. 443 ; in 
Chittagong, vi. 132 ; in No4khaii, vi 
258* 299^ 302, 303; in Tipperah, vi. 368, 
3691 390; in Hill Tipperah, vi. 478, 
504, 505 ; in Rangpur, vii. 264, 265, 
308 ; in DinAjpur, vii. 387, 395, 396, 
440; in Rdjshahi, viii. 66; in Bogrd, 
viii. 222, 223; in Murshiddbdd, ix. 108, 
109 ; in Pibni, ix. ^ ; in DdrjHing, 
X. 100 ; in Talpdigun, x. 277 ; in Kuch 
Behar, x. 385 ; in Patnd, xi. 118 ; in 
Sdran, xi. 295, 296 ; in Gay^ xii. 27 ; 
in Tirhut, xiii. 107 ; in Champdran, 
xiii. 278 ; in the Santid ParganiU, xiv. 
273, 342 ; in Monghyr, xv. 107, 108 ; 
in Pumiah, xv. 306-309; in Hazdribdgh, 
xvi. 107, 108 ; in Lohifdagi, xvi. 356 ; 
in Singbhum, xvii.. 47 ; in Cuttack, 
xviii. 59 ; in Balasor, xviii. 293. 
Cattle disease in the 24 Parganas, i. 244- 
247 ; in Nadiya, ii 139, 140 ; in Mid- 
napur, iii. 244 ; in BardwAn, iv. 201 ; 
in Dacca, v. ia6, 1^7 ; in Bakarganj, 
V. 247 ; in NoikhAll, vi. 347, 548 ; in 
Tipperah, vi. 450, 451 ; in Dm^jpur, 
vii 457, 458 ; in BogA, viii. 313, 314 ; 
in Murshiddbdd, ix. 251, 252 ; in Ddr- 



jiling, x. 200; in JalpiiguH, x. 323; 
in Kuch Behar, x. 444 ; in Siran, xi. 
363 ; in Gaya, xii. 149 ; in Cham- 
paran, xiii. 317, 318 ; in Monghyr, xv, 
212, 213 ; in Pumiah, xv. 440 ; in Lo- 
hdrdagl, xvi. 484, 485 ; in Singbhum, 
xvii. 143 ; in Cuttack, xviii. loS, 240 : 
in Balasor, xviii 370^ 371 ; in PuH, 
xix. 175. 

Caves in Ddrjfling, x. 32 ; in Gayi {S&t" 
ghar), xii 58, $9 ; in Shahdbdd {Gup- 
tesTvar)^ xii 216, 217; in the Santdl Par- 
ganis, xiv. 271, 272. See also Anti- 
quarian Remains. 

Cemetery of the Naw&bs of Murshidibdd, 
. ix. 72, 73. 

Census, Attempts to take, previous to 
1872. See Population. 

Census, Educauonal. See Educational 
Statistics. 

Census of 1872, its agencies and results 
in the 24 Parganis, i. 39-77; in Nadiyi, 
il 34-51; in Jessor, il 186-196; in 
Midnapur, ill 41-51 ; in Hu^li, iii 
267-2S4; in Howrah town, iii. 296, 
297 ; in Bardwin, iv. 32-45 ; in Ban- 
kur^ iv. 212-221 ; in Birbhiim, iv. 
323-330 ; in Dacca, v. 31-41 ; in BA- 
karganj, v. 178-188 ; in Faridpur, v. 
278-284; in Maimansinh, t. 392-401 ; in 
the Chittagong Hill Tracts, vi. 35-38; in 
Chittagong, vi. 133, 151, 152, 153, 183; 
in Nodkhali, vi. 267, 283 ; in Tippe- 
rah, vi. 371, 372 ; in Maldah, vii 36- 
do; in Rangpur, vii 205-210; in Din- 
ajpur, vii 368-384 ; in Rijshihi, viii 
20, 33-35 ; in Bogri, viii 156-158 ; in 
Murshidabdd, ix. i8» 36-42 ; in Pabni^ 
ix. 269, 278-280 ; in D^iling, x. 40- 
44; in Jalpiiguri, x, 246* 254; in 
Kuch Behar, x. 338-340; in Patni, 
w- 34» 35 ; in Siran, xi. 239-241 ; in 
Ga^ xii 29-32 ; in Shihdbdd, xii 
180-183; in Tirhut, xiii. 32-35; in 
Champdran, xiii. 232, 233 ; in Bhagal- 
pur, xiv. 4^-51; in the Santdl Parganas, 
xiv. 273-280 ; in Monghyr, xv. 47-50 ; 



in Pumiah, xv. 242-245 ; in Ha 
bdgh, xvi 17, 55 ; in Lohirdag^ xvi. 
247, 248; in Singbhum, xvii 31-33; 
in Minbhum, xvii. 269-273 ; in Cut- 
tack, xviii 60-67 ; in Balasor, xviii 
264-267 ; in Purl, xix. 27, 28 ; in the 
Orissa Tributary States, xU. 204, 208. 

Census of 1874, Darbhangah, xiii. 35-37. 

Central Asia and Thibet, Trade with. See 
Commerce. 

Cereal crops, in the 24 Parganis, 1 139; in 
the Sundarbans, i. 324-326; in Nadiya, 
ii. 64; in Jessor, il 241-243; in Midna- 



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GENERAL INDEX. 



2^3 



pur, iii. 80; in Hiiglf, iii. 331; in Bard 
wan, iv. 7o ; in Bankura, iv. 245, 246; 
in Birbhum, iv. 345 • in Dacca, v. 82, 
83; in B^karganj, v. 202-204; in Farid- 
pur, 296-306; in Maimansinh, v. 419- 
421; in the Chittagong Hill Tracts, vi. 
71 ; in Chittagong, vi. 159-161 ; in 
Ncdkhdli, vi. 291, 292 ; in Tipperah, 
vi. 390 ; in Maldah, vii. 72 ; in Rang- 
pur, vii. 234-240; in Dindjpur, vii. 
39Pi 391 ; in Rdjshahi, viii. 59, 60 ; 
in Bog^ viii. 209, 210 ; in Murshid- 
ibdd, ix. 104 ; in PAbnd, ix. 302 ; 
in Ddrjiling, x. 95 ; in JalpdiguH, 
X. 273 ; in Kuch Behar, x. 382 ; 
in Patni, xi. 109- 112; in Sdran, xi. 
274-276 ; in Gayi, xii. 82-86 ; in Shdh- 
ibid, xii. 230-234 ; in Tirhut, xiii. 
81-83 ; in Champaran, xiii. 260-262 ; 
in Bhigalpur, xiv. 1 16-120; in the San- 
tAl parganas, xiv. 335-337 ; in Mon- 
ghyr, XV. 90-93; in Pumiah, xv. 281- 
286; in Hazarib^h, xvi. loi, 102; 
in Lohirdag^ xvL 340 ; in Singbhiim, 
xvii. 79 ; in the Tributary States of 
Chutia Nagpur, xvii. 196, 208, 209, 
240 ; in M^ibhum, xviii. 309-313 ; in 
Cuttack, xviii. 99-103 ; in Balasor, 
xviii. 289-291; in Purl, xix. 93, 94; in 
the Orissa Tributary States, xix. 262, 
263. 

Ceremonies and customs of the Chittagong 
Hill Tribes, vi. 40, 41-43, 46-48, 52, 
53. S5» 56, 59. X05 ; in Noakhali, vi. 
279-282 ; in Rangpur, vii. 227-229 ; 
of the Mechs or BgkIos in Dirjiling, x. 
77-79 ; of the Kochs or Rdjbans& in 
Kuch Behar, x. 371-379 ; in Patni, xi. 
56 ; of the Pahi^Us, xiv. 297, 298 ; of 
the Santils, xiv. 314-319 ; xvi. 72 ; of 
the aboriginal tribes of the Orissa 
Tributary States, xix. 225-227, 239, 
240^ 247, 252, 253. See also Customs, 
Birth, Marriage, Funeral, &c. 

Cesses, Customary ill^^al, or abwdbs^ in 
the Sundarbans, i. 358 ; in Midnapur, 
iii. 108113; in Dacca, v. 97, 127; in 
Chittagong, vi. 180-182 ; in Nodkhdlf, 
▼i. 315, 316; in Tipperah, vi. 411, 412; 
in Bogra, viii. 248-250 ; in MurshidA- 
bdd, ix. 71, 200; in Pibni, ix. 318; 
in Kuch Behar, x. 428 ; in Patn£, xi. 
96, 127 ; in Gayd, xii. 70-72 ; in Tir- 
hut, xiii. 106, 107 ; in Bhigalpur, xiv. 
158-160; in Monghyr, xv. 120-127; in' 
Pumiah, xv. 388 ; in Hazdribdeh, xvi. 
106, 107 ; in Lohirdagi, xvi. 368, 369, 
37o» 372, 380, 381 ; in Cuttack, xviii. 
121. 

Ceylon, Exports to. See Commerce. 



Chabn bll in Dinijpur, vii. 442. 

Chaburiii, village in Dinajpur, vii. 444. 

Chagdah, trading village and railway sta- 
tion in Nadiya, ii. 32, 62, 104; bathing- 
place on the Huglf ii. 57. 

Chdgdah pdt^ Calcutta market name for 
Nadiya jute, ii. 102. 

Chiibdsi, chief town and administrative 
headquarters of Singbhum, xviL 17, 
70, 71, 145; dispensary, xvii. 145, 
146 ; jail, xvii. 124-127 ; school, xvii. 
127-130; fair, xvii. 144. 

Chaima river in Hill Tipperah, vi. 475. 

Chdinpur, village in Saran, xi. 258. 

Chdinpur, pargand in Shdhabad, xii. 286. 

Chainpur, town in Shdhibad, xiL 203, 
212-214. 

Chainpur, village in Bhib;alpur, xiv. 95. 

Chainpur, plr in Singbhum, xvii. 136. 

Chdinpur Bagaura, village in Siran, xi. 

355- 

Chaitakdndi, village in Tipperah, vi. 383. 

Chaital, mart in the 24 Parganis, i. 34,, 
227. 

Chaitanpur in Minbhum, Hot spring at, 
xvii. 260. 

Chaitanpur range of hills, Singbhum, 
xvii. 19. 

Chaitanya, founder of the Vaishnav sect, 
his doctrines and followers, in the 24 
Parganiis, i. 65-67, 72, 73, 107, 108 ; in 
Nadiyi, ii. 48, 52, 53, 56; in Jessor, ii. 
195, 232 ; in Midnapur, iii. 55 ; in 
Hugll, iii. 289; in Dacca, v. «-57; in 
Bikarganj, v. 192; in FaHdpur, v. 
287; in Maimansinh, v. 408, 409, 417; 
in Chittagong, vi. 146; in Rangpur, 
vii. 223, 224; in Dindjpur, vii. 379; 
in Rijshdhi, viii. 40, 45; in Bogrd, viii. 
167 ; in Murshidabid, ix. 45, 57, 58, 
172, 265; in Pdbni, ix. 284, 314; in 
Patnd, xi. 56 ; in Sdran, xi. 2$$ ; 
in Tirhut, xiii. 46; in Champdran, xiii. 
247; in Hazirib&gh, xvi. 62; in Lohir- 
dagi, xvi. 254; in Singbhi!im, xvii. 65; 
in Mdnbhiim, xvii. 292; in Cuttack, 
xviii. 74 ; in Balasor, xviii. 275 ; in 
Puri, xix. 38, 50-52. 

Chak Dilawari, pargand in Pumiah, xv, 

295» 333, 419. 
Chak Dori, market village m DinAjpur, 

vii. 443. 
Chak Gopal, village in Dinijpur, vii. 365, 

41*2. 

Chak Iniyatpur, village in Dindjpur, viu 

443- 
Chak Jaidebpur, village in Dindjpur, vii, 

439- 
Chak Kanchan, market village in Dinij- 

P Tf vii. 437. 



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264 



GENERAL INDEX, 



Chak Mani, pargand in Tirhut, xiii. 185, 

186. 
Chak Pirbatipur, market village in Dinaj- 

pur, vii. 437. 
Cnakai, pargand in Monghyr, xv. 176. 
Chakii, tk£td in Monghyr, xv. 48, 16 1, 

Chakalii, village in Pumiah, xv. 413. 

Chak-b4z4r-digh{, tank in Kumilla town, 
Tipperah, vi. 385. 

Chakdaha bil in Dinijpur, vii. 44.7. 

Chakddri, land reclamation tenures. See 
Tenures of Land. 

Chakdighi dispensary, in Bardwdn, iv. 
196, 197. 

Chakirid village and thand in Chittagong, 
vi. 136, 144, 153, 176, 216, 226. 

Chakla Dianapur, pargand in Maldah, 
vii. 131. 

Chakli ^ii^ pargand inTirhut, xiii. 186. 

Chaklahy a Muhammadan territorial divi- 
sion of the Mughul period, i. 355, 358. 

Chakmas, a hill-tribe in the Chittagong 
HUl Tracts, vl 35, 36, 37, 43-49, 88> 
90, 91, 102, 142 ; immigration of, into 
Hill Tipperah, vi. 492, 493. See also 
Aboriginal Population. 

Chakrabard village in Hugli, with weav- 
inc; community, iii. 372. 

Ch^Mrdn^ or service tenures, in Jessor, 
ii. 265; in Midnapur, iii. 97-100 ; in 



Hugli, iii. 353, 354; in BaidwAn, iv. 
" 85 ; in Blnl ' " \ , " 
Bfrbhum, iv. 368, 369; in Dacca, v. 



83-85 ; in Blnkura, iv. 263, 264 ; in 



99; in Bdkarganj, v. 377, 378; inChitta 
gong, vi. 179; in NodkldUi, vi. 313; in 
Maldah, vii. 82; in Dinijpur, vii. 404; in 
RijshiUil, viii. 70 ; in Bogri, viii. 244; 
in Murshidibdd, ix. I2I ; in Pdbn^ ix. 
314 ; in Kuch Behar, x. 392 ; in Bhd- 
galpur, xiv. 144-148; in Monghyr, xv. 
115; in Pumiah, xv. 330; in Hazdri- 
•bdgh, xvi. 121, 122 ; in Lohdrdagi, 
xvi. 370-374; in Singbhum, xvii. 91- 
93; in Manbhum, xvii. 333-335* in 
Cuttack, xviii. 138, 139 ; in Puri, xix. 
132, 133. See alsn Tenures of land. 

Ch&ti, mart in Chittagong, vi. 199. 

Chdkultor in Mdnbhum, Fair at, xvii. 



297,298. 
Iidli " ■ 



Chdla Masidhd, market village in Dindj- 

pur, vii. 448. 
Chaldmu, lake in Thibet, x. 24. 
CheUan HI or swamp in Rdjshdhi, viii. 22, 

25- 
Chalauni river, xiv. 28. 
Chalgdli, iappd in Sargiijd State, Chutid 

N&pur, xvii. 240, 241. 
Chalnapdti, village in Dindjpur, vii. 

365. 



Chaludri, market village in the 24 Par- 

gands, i. 236. 
Chdlun, pargand in Dindjpur, vii. 438. 
Chdlun, village in Dindjpur, vii. 454. 
Chdmdrs^ a caste of workers in leather, 

&c See Castes. 
Chamidmd, a mountain of Ddrjfling, x. 

20. 
Chdmpdhdtf, village and railway station 

in the 24 Pargands, i. 170. 
Champd-murd, peak in HUl Tipperah, vi. 

474. 
Champdnagar, village near Bhdgalpur» 

xiv. 82, 83. 
Champdndgarf, pargand in Sarkdr Madd- 

ran, L 368. 
ChampAran District (Vol. XHI.) — 
Geographical Situation, Area, and 

Boundaries, 219, 220; Jurisdictions, 

220; General Aspect of the District, 

220, '221 ; River System, 221-226; 

Alluvion and Diluvion, 226; Lakes, 

226, 227 ; Fisheries, 227 ; Irrigation, 

227, 228; Lines of Drainage, 228; 
Marsh Products, 228; Minerals, 228 
229 ; Soils, 229 ; Forest and Jungle 
Products, 229-231 ; Population — Early 
Estimates, 231; 232 ; Census of 1872, 
its agency and results, 232-234 ; Classi- 
fication according to Sex and Age, 
235; Infirmities, 235, 236; Ethnical 
Division of the People, 236-239 ; Im- 
migration and Emigration, 239, 240; 
List of Hindu Castes, 240-245 ; Abori- 
ginal Tribes, 245-247 ; Hindus not re- 
cognising Caste, 247-249; Religious 
Divisions of the People, 249 ; Towns 
and Places of Interest, 249-255 ; Fairs, 
255* 256; Village Officials, 256; 
Material Condition of the People — 
Dress, Dwellings, Food, Amusements, 
Conveyances, &c, 256-260; Agricul- 
ture — Rice Cultivation, 260^ 261 ; other 
Cereals, 261, 262; Oil Seeds, 262, 
263; Tobacco,' Cotton, and Sugar- 
cane, 263, 264 ; Sugar Manufacture, 
264, 265 ; Indigo CulUvation and Manu- 
facture, 266-269 ; Opium, 269-271 ; 
Cultivated Area and Out-turn of Crops 
in different tappds, 271-277; Condi- 
tion of the Cultivators, 277, 278 ; 
Agricultural Implements and Domestic 
Animals, 278, 279 ; Wages and Prices, 
279, 280 ; Weights and Measures, 280^ 
281 ; Lsuidless Day-Labourers, 281, 
282 ; Spare Land, 282 ; Tenants' 
Rights, 282 ; Land Tenures, 282, 283; 
Rates of Rent, 283, 284 ; Operation of 
the Rent Law of Bengal, 284 ; Manure 
and Irrigation, 284; Natural Calami- 



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GENERAL INDEX, 



265 



ties — Blight, Floods, and Droughts, 
284, 285 ; Famine of 1866, 285, 286 ; 
Famine of 1874, 286, 287 ; Famine 
Warnings, 287, 288; Foreign and 
Absentee Landholders, 288; Roads, 
288, 289; Manufactures, 289, 290; 
Commerce and Trade, 290; River 
Traffic, 290-294; Trade with Nep4l, 
294-2915 ; Capita] and Interest, 296; 
Income Tax, 296, 297 ; Revenue and 
Expenditure, 297, 298 ; Land Revenue, 
298 ; Civil and Criminal Courts, 298 ; 
Police and Jail Statistics, 298-304; 
Educational Statistics, 304-307 ; Postal 
Statistics, 307; Administrative Divi- 
sions, 307, 308 ; list of Fiscal Divi- 
sions {Pargands\ 308-3 13 ; Climate, 
Temperature, and Rainfall, 313, 314 ; 
Endemics and Epidemics, 314, 315 ; 
Vital Statistics, 315 ; Native Physicians, 
315, 316 ; Fairs as Causes of Disease, 
316; Indigenous Drugs, 316; Chari- 
table Dbpensaries, 316^ 317; Cattle 
Diseases, 317, 318. 

Champdtdl^ village in Dindjpur, vii. 
365, 412. 

ChAnaky native name of Barrackpur, q,v. 

Chanchil estates in Maldah under the 
Court of Wards, vii. 134, i^b. 

Chanchan Masidhi, market village in 
Dinijpur, vii. 448. 

Chinchrd, village near Jessor town, 
whence the R^is of Jessor derive their 
name, ii. 201, 202, 204. 

Cliandd khdlxm Monghyr, xv. 21. 

Chandabhandas, a salt-making tribe in 
the Sundarbans in ancient days, i. 379. 

Chanddl caste. See Castes. 

Chandan river, xiv. 29, 174-176, 241. 

ChAndan Bhuki, pargand in Monghyr, 
XV. 176. 

Chindan Katuriyi, pargand in Bhigal- 
pur, xiv. 154, 155, 240, 241. 

Chandanpur, mart in Chittagone, vi. 199. 

Chdndas, market village in Dinajpur, vii. 

443- 
Chandbdii, port in Balasor, xviii. 260- 

262. 
Chandamagar or Chundemagore, town 

belonging to the French, iii. 307, 375. 
Chdndganj, village in Dindjpur, vii. 365, 

412. 
Chandii, thdnd in Noikhdli, vi. 239, 



CMr^ 



Chandind rayatl land tenures. See 

Tenures of land. 
Chdndindth hill in Chittagong. See 

Chandrandth. 
Chdndisthdn, shrine in Monghyr, xv. 67. 
Ch&ndkhdli khdl^ 24 Pargands, i. 27. 



Chandkhali, market in the Sundarbans, 
description, i. 300, 301 ; principal seat 
of wood trade, i. 310; foundation of, 
i. 327, 3W; ii. 224-226, 302. 

Chdndkhall, river in Chittagong, vi. 129 ; 
canal, vi. 187. 

Chindlai, pargand in Maldah, vii. 131. 

Chandnd^ or homestead rayats. See 
Tenures of land. * 

Chdndni, tappd in Sarguji State, Chutli 
Nigpur, xvii. 241. 

Chdndnid, village in Bogrd, Tiii. 196, 197. 

Chandpur, village in North Hdthiigarh, 
pargandy i. 232 ; in Mudigdchhi, par- 
gand^ i. 238 ; in Bdlandd pargand, i. 
227; in BhaX\xVk pargand, 1. 118, 228. 

Chdndpur, seaside watering-place in Mid- 
napur, iii. 7a 

Chandpur, town in Tipperah, vi. 366, 
420. 

Chandpur, khdl in Tipperah, vi. 365. 

Chandpur, town in Maldah, vii. 142. . 

Chandra, family name of the Nadiyd 
Rajds, ii. 154-163. 

Chandnidwip, pargand in Bikarganj, 
historical sketch of, v. 224. 

Chandraguni. village, formerly administra- 
tive headquarters of the Chittagong 
Hill Tracts, vi. 22, 27, 84, 203. 

Chandrakoni, pargand transferred ffom 
Hi!iglf to Midnapur, iii. 22, 195. 

Chandrakond, municipality in Midnapur, 
site of a former factory of the Com- 
pany, now a trading village, iii. 61, 62, 
152, 362. 

Chandrandth, or Sitdkund, sacred hill 
and place of pilgrimage in Chittagong, 
vi. 124, 125, 232, 233, 379, 452; hot 
spring, 132; range, 125. 

Chandrandth, village in Chittagong, vi. 153. 

Chandris, See Village Officials. 

Chandtara, "moon and stars," a pattern 
of silk fabric made in Maldah, vii. 95. 

Chdndurid, trading villa^ and munici- 
pality in the 24 Paieanas, i. 35, 99. 

Chdndurid, village in Tipperah, vi. 420. 

Chdndwa, pargand in bhdgalpur, xiv. 

153,241. 
Chang Bhakar Tributary State 
(Vol. XVII.)— 

Geographical Situation, Boundaries, 
&c., 179; Physical Aspects, Hills and 
Rivers, 180, 181 ; Fene Natura, 181 ; 
Population, 181 ; Ethnological Divi- 
sion of the People, 181 ; the Muasis or 
Kunis, their Manners, Customs, Tradi- 
tions, &c., 182-187; History of the 
Rdjd, &c, 187 ; Excavations near 
Harchokd, 187, 188; Condition of the 
People, 188 ; Police Statistics, 188. 



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GENERAL INDEX. 



Chang^chi, mart in Jessor, vl 205, 293. 

Changes in jurisdiction in the 24 Par- 
ganis, i. 21, 22 ; in the Sundarbans, i. 
286 ; in Jessor, ii. 170, 306, 307 ; in 
Midnapur, iii. 21, 22 ; in Hugli, iii. 
^52) 253; in Bardwdn, iv. 21; in 
Bdnkura, iv. 206, 207 ; in Birbhum, iv. 
316, 317; in Dacca, v. 18; in Bakar- 
ganj, V. 158; in Fan'dpur, v. 256, 
257 ; in Maimansinh, v. 384 ; in the 
Chittagong Hill Tracts, vi. 21, 22, 88- 
95 ; in Chittagong, vi. 124; in No&k- 
hali, vi. 238, 239; in Tipperah, vi. 
356 ; in HiU Tipperah, vi. 460-462 ; in 
Maldah, vii. 19 ; in Rai^ur, vii. 160 ; 
in Dindjpur, vii. 356-358 ; in Rajshdhi, 
viii. 20, 21 ; in Bogi^ viii. 130133 ; 
in Murshidabdd, ix. 18-21 ; in Pabni, 
ix. 270; in Ddrjlling, x. 18, 19; in 
Jalpiiguri, x. 216-223 ; in Kuch Behar, 
X. 427-431 ; in Patnd, xi. 18 ; in Sdran, 
xi. 226; in Gay^ xii. 18; in Shdh- 
ibdd, xil 158; in Tirhut, xiii. 18; 
in Champdran, xiii. 220; in Bhigal- 
pur, xiv. 18-22; in the Santal Par- 
gands, xiv. 266; in Monghyr, xv. 18, 
19 ; in Pumiah, xv. 220 ; in Haziri- 
b^h, xvi. 22 ; in Lohdrdagd, xvi. 232 ; 
in Singbhtim, xvii. 18; in the Tribu- 
tary States of Chutli Nigpur, xvii. 
149-152; in Mdnbhum, xvii. 254; in 
Cuttack, xviii. 20; in Balasor, xviiL 
248, 344 ; in Purl, xbc. 155 ; in the 
Orissa Tributary. States, xix. 196- 
198. 

Changes in river courses in the 24 Par- 
p[anas, i. 29; in the Sundarbans, 
i. 299; in Nadiyd, ii. 19, 32; in 
Jessor, ii. 172-177; in Midnapur, iii. 
26-29 ; in Htigli, iii. 255, 257-261 ; in 
Bardwdn, iv. 24, 25 ; in Dacca, v. 21 ; 
in Bdkarganj, v. 168; in Faridpur, v. 
264-268 ; in Maimansinh, v. 385, 386 ; 
in Chittagong, vi. 126 ; in- Tipperah, 
vi. 362 ; in Hill Tipperah, vi. 475 ; in 
Maldah, vii. 25 ; in Rangpur, vii. 162, 
163, 164, 165, 166, 168, 169 ; in Din^- 
pur, vii. 363 ; in Rijshdhi, viii. 22-28 ; 
m BogHi, viii. 141 -145 ; in Murshida- 
bdd, ix. 24, 26-28; in Pabnd, ix. 294, 
295 ; in Ddrjfling, x. 27 ; in Jalpiiguri, 
X. 232-235 ; in Kuch Behar, x. 333- 
337; in Patni, xi. 22, 23, 24; in 
Sdian, xi. 227, 233 ; in Gayd, xii. 21, 
22 ; in Shdhdbdd, xii. 215 ; in Tirhut, 
xiii. 20 ; in Champaran, xiii. 222 ; in 
Bhdgalpur, xiv. 29, 30; in the Santil 
Paiganas, xiv. 269; in Monghyr, xv. 
22; in Pumiah, xv. 231-233; in 
Balasor, xviii. 254. 



ChangSy villages of aboriginals in 

Maimansinh, v. 401. 
Chanhu, tappd in SargiSji State, Chutii 

Nigpur, xvii. 241. 
Chinki, tappd in Champiran, xiii. 272, 

275. 310. 

Chantar bU in Tipperah, vi. 369. 

Chapai Gumishtapur, thdnd in Maldah, 
vii. ji, 71, 88, no, 144. 

Chapra, trading town in Nadiyi on the 
Jalanga, ii. 33, 62, 

Chdprdsi, khdl in Nodkhdli, vi. 250. 

Chapurd Hat, village market in Dinij- 
pur, vii. 435; 

Char Baradhali, township in Nodkhali, 
vi. 285. 

Char Buhetd, township in Nodkhdli, vi. 
286. 

Char Chindiye, township in No&khali, 
vi. 285. 

Char Darbesh, township in No&khali, vL 
285. 

Char Gdji, township in Nodkhdli, vi. 
285. 

Char Hdziri, township in Noikhdli, vi. 
285. 

Char Kdnkrd, township in Noikhdli, vi. 
285. 

Char Laksbmi, township in No&khdlit 
vi. 285. 

Char Mausd, township in Nodhilf, vi. 
286. 

Char Pirbati, township in Noikhili, vL 
285. 

Char Phakiri, township in Nodkhilf, vL 
285. 

Char Rdjrijeswar, township in Tipperah, 
vi. 383. 

Chardi, pir in Singbhum, xvii. 136. 

Chara Sultdnganj market village, 24 Par- 
ganis, i. 226. 

Chdrchikd, thdnd in BdnkI State, Orissa, 
xix.. 264. 

Chariel khdl, 24 Parganis, i. 31. 

Charitable dispensaries in the 24 Par- 
gands, i. 249-255 ; in Nadiyd, ii. 140- 
142 ; in Jessor, ii. 305, 340, 341 ; in 
Midnapur, iii. 246, 247 ; in Hugli, 
iii. 439, 440; in Bardwdn, iv. 192- 
200 ; in Bdnkurd, iv. 302 ; in Bir- 
bhum, iv. 455; in Dacca, v. 149- 
153 ; in Bdkarganj, v. 248^ 249 ; in 
Faridpur, v. 359 ; in Maimansinh, v. 
480, 481 ; in Chittagong, vi. 193, 233 ; 
in Nodkhdli, vi. 350 ; in TippCTah, vL 
453, 454; in Hill Tipperah, vL 521, 
522; in Maldah, vii. 105, 152; in 
Rangpur, vii. 349-352; in Dindjpur, 
vii. 458 ; in Rdjshdhi, viii. 99, 123- 
126 ; in Bogrd, viii. 315-317 ; in Mur- 



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GENERAL INDEX. 



267 



shidabid, ix. 171, 246-251 ; in Pdbnd, 
«• 374-376 ; in Ddrj fling, x. 200, 212; 
in Jalpaigud, x. 323, 324; in Kuch 
Behar, x. ^60, 441 ; in Patni, xi. 216- 
219; in Saran, xi. 366-368 ; in Gay^ 
xii. 152, 153; in Shihabdd, xii. 289- 
291; in Tirhut, xiii. 205-208; in Cham- 
paran, xiiL 316, 317; in BhAgalpur, 
xiv. 259-262 ; in the Santil Pargands, 
xiv. 382-385; in Monghyr, xv. 208- 
210 ; in Puzniah, xv. 444 ; in Haziri- 
b4gh, xvi. 204-206 ; in Lohirdagi, xvi. 
487 ; in Singbhum, xvii. 144, 145 ; in 
Manbhiixn, xvii. 373, 374 ; in Cuttack, 
xviii. 236-238 ; in Bialasor, xviii. 369, 
370; in Purl, xix. 176, 177; in the 
Orissa Tributary States, xix. 266. 

CharkAi, pargandm Dinijpur, vii. 438. 

CharkdnwAn, par^and in Gay^ xii. 145. 

Q\i9X^ixk parmnd in Tipperah, vi. 443. 

Charpdti in NoikhdliVFactory established 
by the East India Company at, vi. 
247, 288. 

Chani, village in Minbhum, Jain temples 
at, xvii. 299. 

Charri, village in Singbhum, with school, 
xvii. 127. 

Chars^ or alluvial islands. See Alluvion. 

Chds, thdnd in Manbhiim, xvii. 271, 366. 

Chdsd dhopdf a cultivating caste. See 
C^tes. 

Chasaudd land tenures. Se^ Tenures of 
land. 

Chatibinghi village, 24 Pargan^ i. 236. 

Chatisdf a cidtivatmg tenure, ilf^ Tenures 
of land. 

Chdtnd, village and thdnd in Binkurd, 
iv. 238, 239. 

Chatnagar Mulg&on, pargand in Dindj- 
pur, vii. 438. 

Chatra, town in Hazdribdgh, xvi. 85, 87, 
88, 170. . 

Chattagrim, name of Chittagong, vi. 
109. 

Chattdshpdthis or Tols, Sanskrit schools 
in Nadiy^ ii. 106-111; in Bardwin, iv. 
136. 

Chaub^ah, pargand in Sdran, xi. 302, 

356, 357. 
Clmubi or Mathurd Brdhmans. See Brdh- 

mans. 
Chaubiskud, pargand in Puri, xix. 130, 

172, 173. 
Chaudfiarisy or village head-men. See 

Village Officials. 
Chauki Hassan, village in Sditm, xi. 232. 
Chauklddri panchdyats. See Village 

Officials, &C. 
Chaukiddrsy or village watchmen, in the 

24 Pargandsy I 190; in Nadiyd, il 



117; injessor, ii. 309,310; in Midna- 
pur, iii. 97, 98, 164-160; in Hugli, iil 
385 ; in Biuxlwin, iv. 66, 149 ; in. 
Bankurd, iv. 242, 243, 284; in Birbhiim, 
iv. 344, 402, 403 ; in Dacca, v. 133, 
134; in Bdkarganj, v. 229; in Farfdpur, 
V. 345 ; in Maimansinh, v. 467 ; in 
Chittagong, vi. 133, 183, 216-218; 
in NoikhdH, vi, 289, 332, 334; in 
Tipperah, vi. 433, 434, 442 ; in Mal- 
dan, vii. 1 1 1 ; in Rangpur, vii. 230, 
232; in Dindjpur, vii. 424; in Rdj- 
shdhi, viii. loi; in Bogrd, viii. 202, 244, 
284-286 ; in Murshidabdd, ix. 203 ; in 



Pdbnd, ix. 314, 357 ; in Ddrjiling, x. 
183; in Jalpdlguri, x. 308, ^09; 
Patnd, xi. 97, 98, 190; in Sdran, xi. 



345, 346; in Gayd, xii. 69, 70, 128; 
in Shdhdbdd, xii. 276^ 277 ; in Tirhut, 
xiii. 170; in Champaran, xiii. 300, 301 ; 
in Bhi^lpur, xiv. 205-21 1 ; in the Santdl 
Pargands, xiv. 364, 365 ; in Monghyr, 
XV. 159, 160; in Pumiah, xv. 400; in 
Hazdribdgh, xvi. 90, 92, 120, 179 ; in 
Lohdrdaga, xvi. 327, 331, 474; in 
Singbhum, xvii. 76, 77, 119, 121 ; in 
Mdnbhum, xvii. 359; in Cuttack, xviii 
205; in Balasor, xviii. 347, 348; in 
Puri, xix. 158-160; in the Orissa Tribu- 
tary States, xix. 265. 

Chaukiddngd coal-mine at Rdniganj in 
Bardwdn, iv. 107, 109, III, 1 16, 124. . 

Ckaulmugrd or gartan oil. See Garjan. 

Chaumdhd pargand m Sarkdr Sulaimdnd* 
bdd, i. 366. 

Chaumahani mart in Nodkhdlf, vi. 283, 

Chaumukhd, village in Sdran, xi. 356. 

Chamuni, mart in Chittagong, vi. 198. 

Chaunsd, pargand in Shdhdbdd, xii. 286. 

Chaunsd, village and thdnd in Shdhdbdd, 
xii. 182, 215, 257, 275, 285. 

Chaunsd canal, xii. 171, 172. 

Chauphu peak in Hill Tipperah, vi. 474. 

Chaura, pargand in Dindjpur, vii. 438, 

Chaurdsf, fiscal division m the 24 Par* 
gands, i. 230. 

Chaurdsi, pargand in Mdnbhdm, xvii. 

367. 
Chaurdd Koldt, pargand in Cuttack, 

xviii. 225. 
Chausd Kismat, village in Dindjpur, vii. 

436. 
Cheap, Mr, an early commercial resident 
of the Company at Surul in Birbhdm, 

Chebu liiS, HiU Tract granted to> in 

Ddijiling, x. 112- 1 14. 
Chekndi, river in Pdbnd, ix. 276. 
Chelidmd, pargand in Mdnbhilim, ztIL 

367. 



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GENERAL INDEX. 



Chendwir, hill in HazAriMgh, xvi. 35. 
Chengd, river in Pumiah, xv. 227. 
Cheplngs, a sept of Nepalis in Daijfling; 

X. q8-6o. 
Cherand, pargand m Siran, xi. 302, 

_303, 357. 

Cherind, village in Saran, xi. 263, 357. 

Cheros or Cherus, an aboriginal tribe. 

See Aboriginal Population. 
ChetU village, with English school, 24 

Pargands, i. 205, 236. 
Chh^alndiyd ihdnd in Nodkhdlf, vi. 238^ 

342, 413, 414, 432, 434, 4+1. 
Chhagan Gobdi, village in Athgarh States 

Orissa, xix. 260^ 270. 
Chhii pargand in Bhigalpur, ziv. 152, 



I5i 241-244. 



Chhdild^ timber tree in the Sundarbans, 

i. w. 
Chhaldpdk, trading village in Rangpur, 

vii. 309. 
Chhanchii Mirganj, trading village in 

Rangpur, vii. 309. 
Chhdnuyd, pargand in Balasor, xviii. 362. 
Chhinuva port, Balasor, xviii. 255. 
Chhapra Subdivision, Sdran, xi. 241. 
Chhaprd, chief town of 3dran, xi. 225, 

228, 257, 258, 259, 264, 293, 306, 307, 

315. 325. 332, 345» 354, 359 J thdnd, 

xi. 344. 
Chhird, pargand in Manbhdm, xvii. 368. 
Chhdrat Kind!, township in Nodkhalf, 

vi. 285. 
Chhariddrst deputies of spiritual teachers 

of the Vaishnavs, t 73. 
Chhatri caste. See Kshattriyas. 
Chhatui, village in Champaran, xiii. 250. 
Chhedrd Kadalibdrf, /ar^awi in Cuttack, 

xviii. 225. 
Chhedrd Kjld, pargana in Cuttack, xviii. 

225. 
Chhiddipidi, police outpost in Angul 

State, Orissa, xix. 264, 268. 
Chhirixnati, river in Dinajpur, vii. 359, 

360, 361. 
Chholi, range of mountains, Dirjiling, 

. X. 20. 
Chhoti Bhd^rathf, a small branch of the 

Ganges, vii. 23. 
Chhota Durbln, a mountain in Darjfling, 

X. 24. 
Chhotd Sdgar Dighi in Gaur, vii 57. 
Chhoti Jdgulid. Village schools at, 24 

Pargands, i. 206. 
Chhofi, or ChuUd Nigpur. See Chutii 

. Ndgpur. 
ChhoS Paikdr, Village in Rangpur, vii. 

167. 
Chhotd. Tfetd, an old channel of the Tisti, 



Chhutipur, pargand in Sarkdr Sulaimini- 
bid, i. 366. 

Chigwdn and Dhun, tappd in Cbampiran, 
xiii. 272, 274, 312, 313. 

Chigwinbatsari, Uippd in Champaran, 
xiii. 272, 31a 

Child marriages among Vaidik Brihmans, 
i. 56. 

Child-birth, Ceremonies connected with. 
See Ceremonies. 

Children under 12, Number of, 24 Par- 
gands, i. 44, 45 ; Nadiyd, il 38 ; ^es- 
sor, ii. 189 ; Midnapur, iii. 44 ; Hugli, 
iii. 273 ; Bardwan, iv. 38, 39 ; Bdnkuri, 
iv. 213, 215 ; Birbhunoi, iv. 324, 326 ; 
Dacca, v. ^ ; Bdkarganj, v. 182 ; 
Faridpur, v. 280 ; Maimansinh, v. 395 ; 
Chittagong Hill Tracts, vL 36, 37; 
Chittagong, vi. 137, 138, 151 ; Nodk- 
hdli, vi 269, 270 ; Tipperah, vL 372, 
373 ; Hill Tipperah, vL 480 ; Maldah, 
viL 39 ; Rangpur, vii 2o8-2io ; Dindj- 
pur, vii. 370-373 ; Rdjshdhl, viii. 36 ; 
Bogrd, viil 159, 160; Murshiddbad, 
ix. 38-41 ; Pdbnd, ix. 279^281 ; Ddr- 
jfling, X. 41-43 ; Jalpdiguri, x. 248-252 ; 
Kuch Behar, x. 340; Patnd, xi. 36-; 
Sdran, xi. 242 ; Gayd, xii. 30 ; Shdhd- 
bdd, xil 181, 183; Tirhut, xiii 35; 
Champdran, xiii 235 ; Bhdgalpur, xiv. 
47; Santdl Pargands, xiv. 278-280; 
Monghyr, xv. 49 ; Pumiah, xv. 245 ; 
Hai&bdgh, xvi. 5558; Lohdrda^, 
xvl 248-250; Slngbhmn, xvil 33-35; 
TribuUry States of Chutid Ndgpur, 
xvil 153-156; Mdnbhiim, xvil 270- 
272 ; Cuttack, xviii 64, 66 ; Balasor, 
xviii 266, 267; Purl, xix. 27-30; 
Orissa Tributary States, xix. 205-208. 

Chilkd lake in Puri, xix. 20, 22-25, 28. 

Chilies, Cultivation of. See Tillage. 

Chilmdri, Mnd and village in Rang- 
pur, vii 164, 207, 309, 328, 348. 

China, export of kingfishers' skins to, from 
Chittagong, vi. 190. 

Chinese population. See Population. 

Chingri, river in the Chittagong HiU 
Tracts, vi. 25, 29. 

Chingrihdtd, fishing village, 24 Pargands, 

»• 35- 
Chinsurah, former Dutch settlement, now 

included in one municipality with 

Hi^li town, iii. 263, 301 ; public 

library, poor-fund, and printing-press^ 

iii 577. 
Chintdman, village and fAdnd in Dindjpur, 

vii 423, 443. 
Chirdgi land tenures. See Tenures of 

land. 
Chirirbandar, village in Dindjpur, vii 365. 



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269 



Chirn, plr in Sii&;bhum, xvii. 136. 

Chiralu, pargandy Sundarbans, i. 373. 

Chiti, river in Dinijpur, vii. 363. 

Chittagong District (Vol. VI.)— 
Ge(^[raphical Situation, Area, and 
Boundaries, 109, no;. Early History, 
1 16- 1 14; History under British rule, 
114-121 ; Mutiny of 1857,. 121-124; 
Jurisdiction and Physical Aspects, 124; 
Hills, 124, 125 ; River System, 125- 
127 ; Canals, &c., 127 ; Deaths by 
drowning, 127, 128 ; Ferries, 128^ 129; 
River traffic, 129; Fisheries and Fishes, 
129- 1 31 ; Embankments, 131, 132 ; 
Drainage lines. Marsh reclamation, &c, 
132; Minerals, 132, 133; FeneNatunt, 
133 5 Population—Census of 1872, its 
agencies and results, 133-136 ; Classi- 
fication according to sex, religion, and 
age, 137, 138 ; Ethnical Division of the 
People^ 1 38- 141 ; Hill Tribes and 
Races, 142, 143 ; Emigration and Im- 
migration, 143, 144 ; list of Castes, 
145-147; Religious Division of the 
people, 147-150; Chittagong town, 
I5p» 151 ; Cox's Bdz^r, 152, 153 ; 
Minor towns and villages, 153, 154; 
Places of historical mterest, 154; 
Material condition of the people, 154, 
155 ; Their character, 155, 150 ; Dress 
and ornaments, 157 ; Dwellings, furni- 
ture, and food, 158, 159 ; Agriculture 
— Principal crops, 159 ; Rice Cultiva- 
tion, 160^ 161 ; Cultivated Area, and 
out-turn of crops, 161, 162 ; Condition 
of the peasantry, 162 ; Domestic Ani- 
mals and agricultural implements, 162, 
163; Wages and Prices, 163; Weights 
and Measures, 163, 164 ; Landless day- 
labourers, and spare land, 164 ; Land 
tenures — Early Settlements, 164 ; Tar- 
afs, 166-169; Nodbdd T^uks, 169- 
174; the Jaynagar Estate, 174, 175 ; 
L&khirdj Estates, 175, 176 ; Freehold 
Estates, 176, 177 ; Intermediate Ten- 
ures, 178, 179; Rates of Rent, 179, 
180 ; Illqgal Cesses, 180-182 ; Kdnun- 
FOSy 182, 183 ; Matdbarst or village 
headmen, 183; Manure, irrigation, &c., 
183, 184 ; Natural Calamities, Famines, 
&c., 184, 185 ; Roads and Means of 
Communication, 185-187 ; Manufac- 
tures and Manufacturing classes, 187, 
188; Commerce and Trade, 188-190; 
Port Statistics, 191 -193; River Traffic, 
- 193-199 ; Cotton Cultivation in Hill 
Tracts, 199-203 ; Exports of Cotton 
from the Hill Tracts, 203; Tobacco 
cultivation in the Hill Tracts, 204-207 ; 
Capital and Interest, 207, 208; Tea 



Industry in Chittagong, 208-2 1 1 ; Local 
In^tutions, 21 1, 212 ; Incomes and 
Income-tax, 212 ; Revenue and Ex- 
penditure, 212 ; Balance-sheet for 1870- 
71, 213 ; Land-tax, 214 ; Customs 
Department, 215 ; Magisterial, Civil, 
and Revenue Courts, 215 ; Rent La^, 
216 ; Police Statistics, 216-218 ; Crim- 
inal Classes and Jail Statistics, 218, 219; 
Educational Statistics, 219-222 ; Postal 
and Telegraph Statistics, 223, 224; 
Administrative Divisions, 225, 226 ; 
Climate and Meteorological Statistics, 
226, 227 ; Earthquake in 1762, 227, 
228 ; Vital Statistics, 228, 229 ; En- 
demic and Epidemic Diseases, 229-231; 
Indigenous Medicines, 231, 232 ; Fairs 
and Religious Gatherings, 232, '233 ; 
Charitable Dispensary, 233. 
Chittagong Hill Tracts (Vol. VI.)— 
Geographical Situation, Area, and 
Boundaries, 17, 18 ; History — Raids 
by Hill Tribes, 18-20 ; Lushdi Expedi- 
tion, 20^ 21 ; Jurisdiction and Separa- ■ 
tion of the Hill Tracts frpm the Regula- 
tion District, 21, 22 ; General Aspects 
of the Country, 22-24 » Mountains, 24, 
25 ; Rivers, 25, 26 ; Lake, 26, 27 ; 
River Traffic, 27, 28; Fisheries and 
Marsh cultivation, 28 ; Lines of Drain- 
age, 28, 29 ; Minerals, 29 ; Forest Pro- 
duce, 29-33; -^^^-^ NaturcE, 33, 34; 
Population, estimated, in 1862, 34, 35; 
Census of 1872, 35, 36; Distribution 
of Population, 36 ; Classification ac- 
cording to sex, religion, and age, 36^ 
37 ; Ethnical Division, 37, 38 ; Hill 
Tribes, their ceremonies and customs — 
the Kyoungth^, 39-43 » the Chakmis, 
43'49 ; the Toungthis, 49-51 ; the 
Tippcrahs, 51-53 J the Kumls, 53-56 ; 
the Mros, 56, 57 ; the Khyengs, Ban- 
jogis, and Pifinkhos, 57-59 ; the Lushiis 
or Kukis, 59-65 ; the Shendus, 65, 66; 
Immigration and Emigration, 66-68 ; 
Religious Divisions of the People, 60 ; 
Places of Interest, 68, 69; Material con- 
dition of the People--<lress, dwellingSy 
food, &c., 69-71 ; Agriculture, Cereals, 
71 ; Green crops, fibres, -&c., 71, 72; 
Jdm method of Cultivation, 72-74 ; 
Cultivated Area, out-turn and value of 
crops, 74, 75 ; Condition of the Culti- 
vators, 75 ; Domestic Animals and 
Agricultural Implements, 75 ; Wages 
and t'rices, 75, 76 ; Weights and Mea- 
sures, 77 ; Landless day-labourers and 
Spare Land, 77; the Plough Cultivation 
movement, 78, 79 ; Plough cultivation 
settlements, 79, 80 ; Forest land settle- 



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270 



GENERAL INDEX. 



ments, 80, 8i ; Nodbdd^JcA other ten- 
ures, 81, 82 ; Rates of Rent, Manure, 
&&, 82 ; Natural Calamities, &c., 82, 
83 ; Roads, &c., 83 ; Manufactures, 
83 ; Trade and Commerce, 84-86 ; 
Capital and Interest, 86, 87 ; Tea In- 
dustry, 87, 88; Administrative History, 
88-95 ; Revenue and Expenditure, 95, 
96 ; Balance-sheet for 1866-67, 96 ; 
for 1870-71, 97; Land-tax and Courts, 
98 ; Police Statistics, 98, 99 ; Educa- 
tional Statistics, 99, 100; Postal and 
Telegraph Statistics, 100, loi ; Ad- 
ministrative Divisions, loi, 102 ; Cli- 
mate, temperature, and rainfall, 102- 
104 ; Vital Statistics, 104 ; Diseases 
and indigenous medicines, 104 ; Fairs 
and rel^ous gatherings, 104-106 ; 
Cotton and Tolmcco cultivation, &c., 

199-207. 

Chittagong Port, vi. 191 -193. 

Chittagong, Sarkdr of, i. 359. 

Chittagong or Islim&bid, chief town 
and administrative headquarters of the 
Chittagong I^istrict, vi. 109, 113, 114, 
IIS, 125, 129, 150, 151, 193, 198, 199, 
202, 216, 223, 224, 225, 246, 247. 

ChitiUa, fiscal division in the Santdl Par- 
ganis, xiv. 377. 

Chitalm^H fair in Jessor, ii. 302, 337. 

Chitdmanpur, town in Shdh&bdd, xii. 203. 

ChitartaU, river in Cuttack, xviii. 23, 24, 
36. 

Chitosi, town in Tipperah, vi. 366, 420. 

Chitdl river, ii. 172, 178, 179. 

Chitw^ embankment in Midnapur, iii. 
141, 142. 

Chitwd, pargand in Midnapur, i. 368; 
iii. 145. 

Chokahatu, village in Lohardi^^ with 
Munda burial-ground, xvi. 488. 

Choli Rijd, the Leper, xiv. 97, 98. 

Cholera in the 24 Pargands, i. 244; in 
Nadiyd, ii. 139; in Jessor, ii. 328, 
329 ; in Midnapur, iii. 227, 228 ; in 
Baldwin, iv. 192 ; in B&nkudi, iv. 
301 ; in Birbhum, iv. 439 ; in Dacca, 
v. 143 ; in Bikarganj, v. 247 ; in 
Faridpur, v. 359; in Maimansinh, v. 
479; in the Chittagong Hill Tracts, 
vi. 50^ 65, 103, 104; in Chittagong, 
vi. 230, 231 ; in NoikhAli, vi. 347 : 
in Tipperah, vi. 388, 450; in Hill 
Tippersdi, vi. 520 ; in Maldah, vii. 
129,. 146, I47i "49; in Rangpur, 
vii. 346, 347, 348, 349 ; in Dinijpur, 
vii. 456, 457 ; in lUjshihf, viii. 122 ; 
in Bogri, viii. 306, 308, 309 ; in Mur- 
shid&bdd, ix. 239, 24CS 242 ; in Pibnd, 
ix. 372-374 ; in DAijfling, x. 51, 200 ; 



in Jalpiiguri, x. 313, 322, 323 ; in Kuch 
Behar, x. 379, 441 ; in PatdL, xi. 211, 
212 ; in Siian, xi. 362 ; in Gayi, xii. 
147-149; in Shahibdd, xii. 288; in 
Tirhut, xiii. 201, 205 ; in Champiran, 
xiii. 314, 315 ; in Bhigalpur, xiv. 253 ; 
in the Sant41 Paiganas, xiv. 381, 382 ; 
in Monghyr, xv. 129, 130, 187,. 195- 
198 ; in Pumiah, xv. 261, 435-439 ; in 
Hazkribdgh, xvi. 201, 202; Lohir- 
dagi, xvi. 484 ; in Singbhum, xvii. 97, 

. 141-143 ; in Minbhum, xvii. 370, 371, 
372 ; in Cuttack, xviii. 235, 240 ; in 
Balasor, xviii. 368, 369, 370 ; in Puri, 
xix. 174-176. 

Chopli village in the Sundarbans, L ^289, 
290. 

Chord Ddkdtid^ sandbank, 24 Paxganis, 
i. 32- 

Chosikii, village in Dinijpur, vii. 453. 

Choidn Aman rice. See Rice. 

Christian Missions, &c., in the 24 Par- 
ganis, i. 99, 107, 119, 204-206, 208, 
209; in Nadiy4, ii. 52, 84, 89; in 
Jessor, iL 196, 197 ; in Midnapur, iii. 
60, 182, 184 ; in Hiiglf, iii. 293, 303, 

" 376, 398, 404; in Dacca, v. 60, 61, 
72 ; Bakargani, v. 198, 199 ; in 
Faridpur, v. 289 ; in Maimansinh, v. 
410 ; in Chittagong, vi. 148 ; in Mur- 
shidibdd, ix. 171 ; in S&ran, xL 256; 
in Gayi, xii. 39, 40; in Tirhut, xiii. 
46; in Champdran, xiii. 249, 311 ; in 
Bhdgalpur, xiv. 234; in the Santil 
Parganas, xiv. 322; in Monghyr, xv. 
60; in Lohdrdagi, xvi. 423-444; in 
Singbhum, xvii. 70^ 106, 107, 130;. 
in Manbhum, xviL 296; in Balasor, 
xviii. 278, 279, 353, 354, 357, 358; 
in Puri, xix. 40, 171. 

Christian Population of the 24 Parganis, 
i. 44, 71. 72, 75. 76; of NadiyA, li. 52; 
of Jessor, ii. 196, 197 ; of Midnapur, 
iii. 59, 60; of Hugli, iii. 292, 293; 
of Bardw&n, iv. 55 ; of Binkurd, iv. 
228, 229; of Birbhum, iv. 334; of 
Dacca, v. 60, 61 ; of Bdkarraij, v. 198, 
199 ; of Faridpur, v. 288, 289 ; of 
Maimansinh, v. 410; of the Chitta- 
gong Hill Tracts, vi. 36, 38 ; of Mal- 
dah, vii. 37, 47 ; of Rangpur, vii. 2o8- 
210, 221, 224 ; of Diniipur, vii. 370- 



373. 382, 383 ; of RAjshihl, viu. 36, 37, 

0^ 52; of Bogrd, viiL 167; of 
shidabid, ix. 45, 61 ; of Pabnd, ix. 



' Mur- 



40^ 52; of Bogrd, viiL 

shidabid, ix. 45, 61 ; < 

279, 281, 284, 288 ; of Dirjilmg, x. 

43, 46; of Jalpdiguri, x. 251-260; of 

Kuch Behar, x. 358 ; of Patni, xi. 36, 

54, 64, 65 ; of Saran, xi. 242, 256, 264, 

354; of Gayd, xii. 30^ 39, 40; of 



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GENERAL INDEX. 



27 1 



ShihiWd, xii. 181, 183, 201 ; of Tir- 
hut, xiiu 35, 37, 46, 48 ; of Cham- 
paran, xiii. 249 ; of Bhiigalpur, xiv. 47, 



V. 47» 
. 278, 



77 ; of the Santdl Paxganas, xiv, 
279» 321, 322 ; of Monghyr, xv. 49, w, 
60 ; of Purniah, xv. 245, 255; of Hazari- 
bdgh, xvi. 57, 62, 84, 85 ; of Lohir- 
dagi, xvL 248, 250, 251, 254, 319, 4*4- 
444; of Singbhum, xvu. 35, 69, 70, 
130 ; of M^bhum, xvii. 270, 296 ; of 
Cuttack, xviii. 64, 66, 80, 03 ; of 
Balasor, xviii. 266, 267, 277-279 ; of 
Puri, xix. 29, 30, 40; of the Orissa 
Tributary States, xix. 207, 260, 261. 

Chronicles. Native. See History. 

Chuiddnga sub-division, Nadiyi, iL 131 ; 
education in, ii. 128-130. 

Chudddngd dispensary, ii. 141. 

Chukdn^ or mukarrariy land tenures. See 
Tenures of land. 

Chundri caste, manufacturers of lime from 
shells. See Castes. 

Chuntd, market village in Tipperah, vL 
384, 420. 

Churdmain peak in Hill Tipperah, vi. 474. 

Churdman, mart in Dindjpur, vii. 359, 
365, 44P» 441. 450- 

Churdman port, Balasor, xviii. 258, 259. 

Chumi river, ii. 19. 

Chutid, village in Lohdrdagd, xvi. 321. 

ChutiA Nagpur, Tributary States 
OF (Vol. xvn.)— 

Geographical Situations, etc., 149; 
Boundaries, 149; Administrative His- 
tory, 149-152 ; Physical Features, 152 ; 
Population, Early Estimates, 152 ; 
Census of 1872, 152, 153 ; Classifica- 
tion according to Sex and Age, 153- 
156 ; Ethnical Division of the People, 
156-162; Hindu Castes, 163, 164; 
Religious Division of the People, 164 ; 
A^culture, 164, 165 ; Police Statistics, 
165; Bondi State, 165-179; Chdng 
Bhakdr State, 179-188; Gdiigpur State, 
1 89- 1 09; Jashpur State, 1 09-213; 
Kored State, 213-221 ; Sargtijd State, 
221-244 ; Uddipur State, 244-250. See 
also Bondi, Chdng, Bhakdr, Gangpur, 
Jashpur, Kored, Sargi^jd, and Udupur. 

Chutid Ndgpur Proper, Estate of, in 
Lohdida^ xvi. 362-389, 444-450. 

Chutid Ndgpur, ^Immigrants from, into 
the 24 Pargands, i. 51 ; into Midna- 
pur, iii. <i, 52 ; into Huglf, iii. 284 ; 
mto Maldah, vii. 41, 47. See also 
Emigration. 

Chutid Ndgpur Tenures Act, Lohdrdagd, 
xvi. 385-388. 

Cinchona cultivation in Ddijiling, x. 176- 
178. 



Circular Road Canal, Calcutta, i. 3a 

Cities, Ruined, in Kuch Behar, x. 335, 
360-370. 

Citrus, Species of, in Rangpur, viL 183. 

Classification of Opium. See Opiam. 

Clay figures, manuffutaMd «t Krishnagar. 
in NadiyaA, iL loi. 

Cleveland, Mr Ai^stus, Collector of 
Bhdgalpur, xiv. ^ 362 ; pacification 
of the Pahdrids by, xiv. 304-308. 

Climate of the 24 Pargands, i. 241, 242 ; of 
Nadiyd, ii. 129; of Jessor, ii. 328, 329; 
of Midnapur, iii. 227 ; of HiSgU, iii. 
417; of Bardwdn, iv. 177; ofBdnkurd, 
iv. 300 ; of Birbhiim, iv. 437, 438 ; of 
Dacca, v. 141 -143 ; of Bdkajganj, v. 
246 ; of Faridpur, v. 357, 358 ; of 
Maimansinh, v. 479 ; of the Chittagong 
Hill Tracts, vi. 102, 103 ; of Chitto- 
gong, vi. 226, 227 ; of Nodkhdll, vi. 
345 ; of Tipperah, vi. 386, 447, 448 ; of 
Hill Tipperah, vi. 519; of Maldah, 
viL 145, 146 ; of Rangpur, vii. 300^ 
345 ; of Dindjpur, viL 441, 456, 457 ; 
of Rdjshdhf, viiL 121, 122; of Bogrd, 
viii. 304-306 ; of Murshiddbdd, ix. 236* 
239 ; of Pdbnd, ix. 369-372 ; of Ddr- 
jtting, X. 177-199 5 of Jalpdiguri, x. 320^ 
321 ; of Kuch Behar, x. 440-443 ; dT 
Patnd, xi. 209, 210 ; of Sdran, xi. 361 ; 
of Gayd, xii. 146, 147 ; of Shdhdbdd, 
xii. 287 ; of Tirhu^ xiii. 200 ; of Cham- 
^ran, xiiL 313, 314; of Bhd£;alpur, 
xiv. 2U; of the Santdl Parganas, xiv. 
378-380 ; of Monghyr, xv. 187 ; of 
Pumiah, xv. 431, 432 ; of Hazdribdeh, 
xvi. 199-201; of Lohdrdagd, xvi. 4B3, 
of Singbht!im, 484 ; xvii. 139, 140 ; df 
Mdnbhiim, xvii. 370 ; of Cuttat^ xviiL 
234; of Balasor, xviiL 366. 

Clive, Lord, jagir and titles grtnted to, 
L 19, 20; assumption by the English of 
the ^f^a>i^r^ of Bengal, ix. 192. 

Cloth, European cotton. Trade in. See 
Commerce. 

Cloth, Manufacture of. See Cotton and 
Manufactures. 

Clothing of the people. See Dress. 

Coal in the Chittagong Hill Tracts, vi. 29; 
in Hill Tipperah, vi. 477 ; in Mur- 
shiddbdd, ix. 33, 163-165; in Pdbnd, 
«. 337» 338* 34S ; in DdrjQing, x. 31 ; 
129-140 ; in Jalpdiguri, x. 239 ; in 
Champdran, xiiL 228 ; in the Santdl 
Parrands, xiv. 266, 272, 352, 353 ; in 
the Tributary States of Chutid Ndgpur, 
xvii. 190, 225-228; in Mdnbhilim, xviL 
255» 259, 348-351- See also Minerals. 

Coal-fields of Rdniganj, in Bardwdn, 
iv. 29^ 107-125 ; general description ^ 



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GENERAL INDEX, 



the tract, with geology, iv. 107-112; 
modes of working, iv. ii2-ii6rout-put 
of coal, iv. 1 1 6- 1 19; quality of the coal, 
iv. 1 19- 1 22; history of the adventure, 
iv. 122-125 ; coal-fields in Hazirib^h, 
xvi. 141 -1 58, 171 ; in Loh^rdag^ xvi. 
413-415; in Tdlcher State, Orissa, xix. 
202. 

Coal-miners, Condition of the, at Rinfganj 
in Bardwdn, iv. 115. 

Cocoa-nuts, Cultivation and export of. 
See Commerce and Tillage. 

Cochin, Export of rice to. See Commerce. 

Colgung, pargand in Bhigalpur, xiv. 152, 
244-246. 

Colgong, town and thdnd^ BhAgalpur, 
xiv. 46, 85, 86, 213, 237. 

College, Baptist, at Serampur, iii. 398. 

College, Bi^op's, near Howrah, iii. 294. 

College, Dacca, v. 135-137.. 

College, Krishnagar, in Nadiy^ ii. 120. 

College, HtSigli, history, &c., of, iii. 392- 

395. 

College, Patni, xi. 201-204. 

Colleges in Murshiddb&d, ix. 67, 171, 
21 5-220. See also Educational Statistics. 

Colonelganj, mart in Patnii, xi. 155, 160, 
162. 

Colouring materials. See Dyes. 

Comillah or Kumilld, chief town of Tip- 
perah, vi. 356, 363, 364, 365, 378, 381, 
382. 385. 386, 396, 413, 417, 420, 432, 
433» 435» 441. 453. 454- 

Commerce and trade, in the 24 Parganas, 
i. 1 7 1- 1 73 ; in the Sundarbans, i. 344, 
345 ; in Nadiyd, ii. 104, 105 ; in 
Jessor, ii. 302-304 ; in Midnapur, iiL 
152 ; in Hugli, iii. . 375, 376 ; in 

. Bardw&n, iv. 114, 135 ; in B&nkur^ 
iv. 277; in Birbhum, iv. 380; in 
Dacca, v. 23, 24, 1 13-115 ; in. Bikar- 
ganj, V. 170, 215, 2i6 ; in Farld- 
pur, V. 269, 339, 340 ; in Maimansinh, 

. V. 388, 461 ; in the Chittagong Hill 
Tracts, vi. 84 ; in' Chittagong, vi. 188- 
190; in Noikhili, vi. 321-324^ in 
Tipperah, vi. 419-424; in Hill Tipperah, 
vi. 508, 509 ; in Maldah, vii. 100, 102; 
in Rangpur, vii. 307, 308 ; in Dinijpur, 
vii. 41 1, 414 ; in Rijshihi, viii. 88 ; 
in Bogi^ viii. 271-277 ; in Murshidi- 
bad, ix. 157-169 ; in Pdbni, ix. 334- 
352 ; in Ddrjiling, x. 158-164 ; in Jal- 
palguri, X. 297-300; in Kuch Behar, 
x. 398-401 ; in Patna, xi. 1^4-180 ; in 
Siran, xi. 323-334 ; in GayJ, xii. 117- 

. 119; in ShiLhAbid, xii. 257, 263-369; 
in Tirhut, xiii. 129-162; in Champftran, 
xiii. 290-296 ; in Bhigalpur, xiv. 183- 
191 ; in the Santdl Parganis, xiv. 354- 



361 ; in Monghyr, xv. 142-153 ; in 
Pumiah, xv. 371-385 ; in Haz&b^h, 
xvi. 87, 88, 170-172; in Loh&rdag^ 
xvi. ^2Qf 421 ; in Smgbhiim, xvii. 10^, 
106 ; in the Tributary States of Chutii 
Nigpur, xvii. 242 ; in Minbhum, xvii. 
352; in Cuttack (False Point, xviii. 
31, 32), xviii. 175, 176; in Balasor, 
xviii. 337, 344; in Purl, xix. 152-155. 
Commercial residency, Nadiy:^,. iL 95, 

159. 

Commercial residency at Dacca abolished, 
V. 124. 

Communal organisation of the Santils, in 
Hazdribdgh, xvi. 73, 74. 

Communication, Means of, in the 24 Par- 
gands, i. 164-170; in the Sundarbans, 
1. 344; in Nadiyi, ii. 93, 94; in Jessor, 
ii. 278-280; in Midnapur, iii. 146-149; 
in Hiigli, iii. 368-371; in Bard win, iv. 
165-107; in Binkuri, iv. 275, 276; in 
Birbhum, iv. 372-374; in Dacca, v. 
106-108; in Bdkaiganj, v. '214, 215; in 
Faridpur, v. 333, 334; in Maimansinh, 
v. 458, 459; in the Chittagong Hill 

' Tracts, vi. 83 ; m Chittagong, vi. i8j- 
187 ; in No4kh&li, vi. 319, 320 ; m 
Tipperah, vL 417, 418 ; in Hill Tip- 
perah, vi 507 ; in Maldah, vii. gx, 94; 
m Rangpur, vii. 302-304; in Dinijpur, 
vii, 409, 410; in Rijshihf, viii. 81, 82; 
in Bogrd, viii. 266-269; in Murshidabid, 
ix. 141-148; in P4bni, ix. 328-330; 
in Dirjiling, x. 42, 127, 128 ; in Jal- 
pdigurC X. 235, 236, 294-296 ; in Kuch 
Behar, x. 337, 396, 397 ; in Patni, xi. 
135-137; in Siran, xi. 316, 317; in 
Gayi, xii. 112, 113 ; in Shihibdd, xiL 
255-257 ; in Tirhut, xiii. 121-126 ; in 
Champiran, xiii. 288, 289 ; in Bhagal- 
pur, XIV. 176-179 ; in the Santil Par- 
ganas, xiv. 352 ; in Monghyr, xv. 135. 
137 ; in Pumiah, xv. 349-354 ; in 
Haziribigh xvi. 96, 139, 141 ; in 
Lohdrdaga, xvi. 41 1, 412; in Singbhum, 
xvii. 99 ; in Minbhum, xviL 347 ; in 
Cuttack, xviii. 173, 174, 336, 337 ; in 
Balasor, xviii. 334-336 ; in Purl, xix- 
Ijo; in the Orissa Tributary States, 
XIX. 263. See also Roads, Canals, and 
Railways. 

Communities living by river traffic. See 
River Traffic 

Company, East India, Acquisition of the 
24 Parganas by, i. 12; early history of, 
iii. 19-21, 300, 301 ; history of adminis- 
tration of Dacca under, v. 123-126, 
129 ; trade o^ in Bard win, iv. 20^ 21, 
64; in Birbhum, iv. 338-341 ; in Dacca, 
V. 68, 113; in Rijshihi, viii. 82; in 



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273 



Bogri, vUi. 269, 270 ; in Murshiddbdd, 
ix. 82, 8S, 93. See also Commerce and 
History. 

Companyganj, town in Noikh^i, vi. 366^ 
420 ; ferry at, vi. 363, 364. 

Comparative density of the population, 
in the 24 Paxgan4s, i. 39, 41, 44; in 
Nadiyi, iL 38; in Jessor, iL 189; in 
Midnapur, iii. 41-43 ; in H{igli, iii. 
269-275 ; in Bardwin, iv. 33, ^5 ; in 
Baiikura, iv. 213, 214; in Birbhum, iv. 
323; in Dacca, v. 33; in Bakarganj, v. 
182, 183 ; in Faridpiir, v. 279-281 ; in 
Maimansinh, v. 393, 394; in the Chit- 
tagong Hill Tracts, vi. 35 ; in Chitta- 
gong, vi. 133, 134, 136 ; in Nodkhali, 
vi. 268 ; in Tipperah, vt 372 ; in Mai- 
dah, vii. 37; in Rangpur, vii. 204, 207; 
in Dinijpur, vii. 37 1; in Ri.jshi.hf, viiL 
35 ; in Bogri, viii. 158, 159 ; in Mux- 
shidibid, ix. 38-^0; in Pibni, iz. 280, 
365, 366 ; in Dirjilinc, 35. -41-43 ; in 
Jalpdigurf, X. 247 ; in ICuch Behar, x. 
338. 339 ; in Patna, xi. ^t, 98, 99 ; in 
Slran, xi. 240; in Gayi, xii. 30, 31 ; 
in Shihibid, xii. 180, 181 ; in Tirhut, 
xiii* 3^» 76; in Champiran, xiii. 233, 
234 ; m Bhigalpur, xiv. 45-47 ; in the 
Santil Parganis, xiv. 276-278 ; in Mon- 
ghyr, XV. 49 ; in Pumiah, xv. 243 ; in 
Haziribigl^ xvi. 55, 56; in Lohirdagi, 
xvi. 248, 249 ; in Singbhiim, xvii. 33 ; 
in the Tributary States of Chutii Nijg- 
pur, xvii. 153; in Minbhi!im, xvii. 270; 
in Cuttack, xviii. 64, 65 ; in Balasor, 
xviii. 264, 265; in Purl, xix. 27, 28; in 
the Orissa Tributary States, xix. 204, 
206. 

Compensating influences in cases of floods 
and droughts, in the 24 Parganis, i. 
159 ; in the Sundarbans, i. 342, 343 ; 
in Nadiyi, ii. 85; in Jessor, ii. 277; in 
Midnapur, iii. 118, 119; in Hugli, ill 
361, 36^ ; in Bardwin, iv. 96, 97 ; in 
Binkuri, iv. 270; in Dacca, v. 104; in 
' Bdkarganj, v. 213; in Faridpur, v. 332; 
in Maimansinh, v. 457 ; m Maldah, 
vii. 92 ; in Rijshihi, viii. 80 ; in Mur- 
shidibid, ix. 26, 135 ; in Pibni, ix. 
326. See also Natural Calamities. 

Condition, of the peasantry in the 24 Par- 
ganis, i. 148, 149 ; in the Sundarbans, 
>. 336. 337; in Nadiyi, iL 69, 70; 
in Jessor, ii. 25 < ; in Midnapur, iii. 
83 ; in Hdgli, iii. 341, x^ ; m Bard- 
win, iv. 73 ; in Binkura, iv. 248 ; in 
Birbhum, iv. 362 ; in Dacca, v. 92, 
93 ; in Bikar^anj, v. 205 ; in Farid- 
pur, y. 317 ; m Maimansinh, v. 443 ; 
m the Chittagong Hill Tracts, vl 75 ; 



in Chittagong, vt. 162 ; in Noakhili, 
vi. 278, 279, 296, 297 ; in Tipperah, 
vi. 395» 396, 398 ; in HUl Tipperah, 
vi 502, 503 ; in Maldah, vii. 48, 68, 
69. 75. 79 ; in Rangpur, vii. 225, 226, 
227, 229, 242, 266 ; in Dinijpur, vii. 
388, 389* 396, 397, 408, 40Q, 457 ; in 
Rajshahi, viii. 65 ; in Bogra, viii. 203- 
206 ; in Murshidibad, ix. 97, 107, 108, 
119, 120; in Pibni, ix. 305, 306, 315 5 
in Diijiling, x. 99, 100 ; in Jalpiiguri, 
X. 276 ; in Kuch Behar, x. 384 ; in 
Patfai, xi. 117; in Siran, xi. 294, 295 ; 
in Gayi, xiL 95 ; in Shihilx&d, xii. 
240 ; in Tirhut, xiii. 106, 107 ; in 
Champiran, xiii. 277, 278 ; in Bhigal- 
pur, xiv. 129, 130 ; in the Santil Par- 
ganis, xiv. 341, 342 ; in Monghyr, xv. 
106, 107 ; in Pumiah, xv. 303-306 ; in 
Haziribigh, xvi. 92-95, loj, 106 ; in 
Lohirda^ xvi. 355, 356; in Singbhum, 
xvii. 82, 8^; in the Tributary States of 
Chutii N&>ur, xviL 178, 197, 210, 
241 ; in Minbhdm, xviL 317 ; in Cut- 
tack, xviii. 107-109 ; in Balasor, xviii. 
292-294; in Pud, xix. 96. 

Condition of the people. Material, in the 
24 Parganis, i. 127, 134; in the Sundar- 
bans, i. 321-324 ; in Nadiyi, ii. 62-64; 
injessor, ii. 240 ; in Midnapur, iii. 78^ 
79 ; in Hugll, iii. 328, 329 ; in Bard- 
ie, iv. 67-69 ; in Binkuri, iv. 245 ; 
in Birbhiim, iv. 344, 345 ; in Dacca, 
V' 74-79 ; in Bikarganj, v. 201, 202 ; in 
Faxfdpur, v. 295, 296 ; in Maimansinh, 
V. 418, 419; in the Chittagong Hill 
Tracts, vi. 69 ; in Chittagong, vl 154, 
155 ; in Ndikhili, vi. .289, 290 ; in 

. Tipperah, vi. 387, 388 ; in Hill Tip- 
perah, vi. 499, 500; in Maldah, vii; 
68, 99, 100 ; in Ran^ur, vii 225 ; in 
Dinijpur, vii. 388; m Rijshihi, viii. 
65 ; in Bogri, viiL 203-206 ; in Mur- 
shidibid, ix. 96-99, 107, 108, 154-156 ; 
in Pibni, ix. 299-301, 305, 306^ 333, 
3A4 ; in Diijiling, x. 90-92 ; in Tal- 
piigud, X. 270, 271; in Kuch Behar, 
X. 370-372; in Patni, xi. 98-100; in 
Siran, xi. 269, 270 ; in Gay^ xii. 73- 
82 ; in Shihibid, xiL 223-229 ; in 
Tirhut, xiii. 75-81; in Champiran, xiii. 
256-260; in Bhigalpur, xiv. 109-116; 
in the Santil Parganis, xiv. 330-332; in 
Monghyr, xv.' 8^^ ; in Pumiah, xv. 
273-2i8i; in Hazi^bigh, xvi. 92-95 ; 
in Lohirdagi, xvi. 334, 335, 416 ; in 
Singbhum, xvii. 60, 77-79 ; in the 
Tributary States of Chutii Nigpur, 
xvii. 176, 188 ; in Minbhiim, xvii. 
307-309 ; in Cuttack, xviii. 97-99 ; in 



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Balasor, xviii. 287-2S9 ; in Purf, xix. 
92, 93 ; in the Orissa Tributary States, 
xix. 262. 

Confiscation of all the English factories 
in Bengal, by order of Naw&b Shaisti 
Khin, vii. 4k 

Conservancy, sanitation, etc., in the 24 
Pargan^ i. 259 ; in Nadiyi, ii. 139, 
140 ; in Jessor, iL 338-340 ; in Midna- 
pur, iii. 239, 240 ; in Hugli, iiL 421 ; 
m Bard wan, iv. 178-180, 191; in Bir- 
bhum, iv. 446-449 ; in Dacca, v. 143 ; 
in BiJcaiganj, v. 246 ; in Faridpur, v. 
341, 360 ; in Maimansinh, v. 479 ; in 
Rijshahi, viii. 121, 122; in Bogri, 
viii. 306-313 ; in Murshid&bdd, ix. 243 ; 
in Pabna, ix. 369 ; in Patn^ xi. 221, 
222; in Sh4hil&d, xii. 289 ; in Tirhut, 
xiii. 203, 204 ; in the Santil Paigaiiis, 
xiv. 382 ; in Mongh3nr, xv. 210-212 ; 
in Hazirib^h, xvi. 201 ; in Lohirdagi, 
xvi. 486, 487 ; in Singbhum, xviL 145 ; 
in Minbhiim, xvii. 373 ; at Purl, and 
along the pilgrim high road, xix. 70-72. 

Conservancy of the Sundarban forests, i. 
304, 311, 312. 

Constabulary. See Police. 

Constitution of Hill Tipperah, Political, 
vi. 460-463. 

Cont^ or Kanthi Subdivision, Midnapur, 
iii. 43, 188. 

Conveyances used by the people in the 24 
Parganis, L 133, 134 ; in Patnd, xi. 
107 ; in Siran, xi. 274 ; in Gayi, xii. 
81, 82 ; in Champdran, xiii. 259, 260 : 
Iq Bhigalpur, xiv. 115, 116; in Ha- 
n&rib^h, xvi. 96 ; in M&nbhijm, xvii. 
'309. See also Condition of the people. 

Cooking, Processes of. See Condition of 
the People. 

Copper in Dirjfling, x.' 31, 142-152 ; in 
jaJpdiguH, X. 239 ; in Champiran, xiii. 
225 ; in the Santil Parganis, xiv. 272 ; 
in Hazirib^h, xvi. 160, 161, 172 ; in 
Lohardag^, xvi. 412. See also Minerals. 

Cossimbazar, or Kisimb&zir, in Itfur- 
shidibdd, ix. 87-90. 

Cossipur English sdiool in 24 Paiganib, 
i. 205. 

Cossye river. See KAs&i. 

Cost of living. See Condition of the 
People. 

Cotton doth, Trade in. See Commerce. 

Cotton, Cultivation of, in NadiyA, ii. 67 ; 
in Jessor, ii. 301-303 ; in Midnapur, 
iii. 81; in Hugli, iii. 334 ; in Bardwdn, 
iv. 72 ; in Binkurd, iv. 246 ; in Dacca, 
v. 84-86 ; in the Chittagong Hill Tracts, 
vi. 28, 71, 75, 74, 75, 83, 199-202 ; in 
Tipperah, vu 361; in Rangpur, vii. 



307 ; in Dinijpur, vii. 441; in Bogr^ 
viii. 219-221; in DiijiUng, x. 96 ; in 
Jalp^iguri, X. 273, 274 ; in Patd^ xi. 
. 1 14 ; in Siran, xi. 277 ; in Gay^ xii. 
87-89 ; in Shihibid, xii. 235 ; in Tir- 
hut, xiii. 83, 84 ; in Champaran, xiii. 
263 ; in the Santdl Parganis, xiv. 338 ; 
in Hazilribdgh, xvi. 105 ; in Lohir- 
dagA, xvi. 342, 343; in Singbhiim, 
xvii. 81; in Balasor, xviii. 291; in 
Puri, xix. 95. 

Cotton and cotton goods. Manufacture of, 
trade in, etc., Midnapur, iii. 153 ; 
BardwAn, iv. 64 ; Binkura, iv. 276 ; 
Birbhum, iv. 378 ; Chittagong Hill 
Tracts, vi. 28, 84, 85, 203 ; Chittagong, 
vi. 187, 203 ; Hill Tjpperah, vi. 508, 
511, 513; NodkhAli, vi. 247, 256, 288, 
321, 322, 327, 328 ; Tipperah, vi. 419, 
420; Murshidibad, ix. 88, 154, 156, 
163, 164; PAbni, ix. 332, 336-338, 
342, 348 ; Jalpdiguri, X. 299 ; Kuch 
Behar, x. 400; Patn^ xi. i<^6-i59, 
166, 171; Sdran, xi. 277, 278, 323, 
324, 331 ; Shah£b4d, xii. 260; Tirhut, 
xiii. 145 ; Hazdrib^h, xvL 172 ; 
Lohdrdag^ xvi. 416 ; Orissa Tributary 
States, xix. 262. See also Commerce 
and Manufactures. 

Courts, Number of civil and criminal, in 
the 24 Parganis, i. 189 ; in Nadiyi, ii. 
116; in Jessor, ii. 308; in Midnapur, 
iii 163 ; in Hugli, ill 384 ; in Bard- 
wan, iv. 147 ; in Bdnkuia, iv. 282 ; in 
Dacca, v. 124, 132 ; in Bikarganj, v. 
228 ; in Faridpur, v. 344 ; in Maiman- 
sinh, v. 465 ; in the Chittagong Hill 
Tracts, vi. 98 ; in Chittagong, vi. 215 ; 
in Nodkhdli, vi. 322 ; in Tipperah, vi. 
430, 432 ; in Hill Tipperah, vi. 513, 
514, 515; in Maldah, vii. no; in 
Rjuigpur, vii. 327, 328; in Dindjpur, 
vii. 422; in Rajshihi, viii. 119- 121; in 
Bogrd, viii. 302-304 ; in Murshidabdd, 
ix. 231, 232; in Pabna, ix. 355, ^56 5 
in Dirjiling, x. 182 ; in Jalpaiguri, x.- . 
216, 218 : m Kuch Behar, x. 427, 428, 
435 ; in Patnd, xi. 188 ; in Siran, xi. 
343 ; in Gayd, xii. 126 ; in Shihdbdd, 
xii. 275 ; in Tirhut, xiii. 169 ; in Cham- 
paran, xiii. 298 ; in Bhigalpur, xiv. 
204 ; in the Santdl Pargan£, xiv. 363 ; 
in Monghyr, xv. 158 ; in Pumiah, xv. 
397 ; in Hazdribagh, xvi. 192-107 ; 
in Lohdrdaga, xvi. 470 ; in Singbhum, 
xvii. 117 ; m Mdnbhiim, xvii. 354-356 ; 
in Cuttack, xviii. 203 ; in Balasor, 
xviii. 346 ; in Puri, xix. 157. 

Court of Wards, Estates under, in No4k- 
h£li, vi. 319 ; in Maldah, vii 134, 



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GENERAL INDEX. 



27S 



140; in Gdyd, xii. 104; in Tirhut, 

xiii. 1 11^ 112 ; in Singbhiim, xvii. 139. 
Cowcolly or Geonkhali, village in Midna- 

pur, with river traffic, iii. 37 ; light- 

nouse, iiL 249*^220. 
G>x's Bazdr Subdivision, Chittagong 

Hill Tracts, vi. loi, 134, 136, 225, 

226. 
Cox's Bizdr, town in Chittagong, vi. 136, 

143, 152, 153, 190, 216, 226 ; ruins of 

old fort at, vi. 154. 
Creation of the world, Account of the, 

fiven by the Pankhos, vi. 58 ; Ho tra- 
ition concerning, xvii. 41, 42. 

Criminal classes in the 24 Pargands, i. 192, 
193; in Nadiyd, ii. 117, 118; in Jessor, 
ii* 310, 311 ; in Bdnkurd, iv. 287-290 ; 
in Dacca, v. 134; in Bdkarganj, v. 230- 
232 ; in FaHdpur, v. 346 ; in Maiman- 
sinh, V. 468 ; in Chittagong, vi. 218 ; 
in Noikhiili, vi. 335 ; in Maldah, vii. 
n8; in Rangpur, vii. i6o, 217; in Din- 
^jpur, vii. 382, 424-427 ; in Murshid- 
abdd, ix. 207-210 ; in Dirjiling, x. 183- 
185; in Jalpaiguri, x. 309-312; in Kuch 
Behar, x. 438 ; in Patdl, xi. 193 ; in 
Saran, xL 147 ; in Gayd, xii. 130, 131 ; 
in ShihAbad, xii. 278 ; in Tirhut, xiii. 
172 ; in Hazdribdgh, xvi. 179-183 ; in 
Lohirdagd, xvi. 474-477 ; in Cuttack, 
xviii. 208, 209; in Balasor, xviii. 350. 
See also Castes. 

Criminal Statistics, General, 24 Pargan&s, 
i. 191-193; Nadiya, ii. 117, 118; Jes- 
sor, ii. 310 ; Midnapur, iii. 167, 168 ; 
Hiigll, iii. 386 ; Bardwdn, iv. 1^0-153; 
Bankurd, iv. 284-287; Birbhum, iv. 
404-406; Dacca, v. 134; Bikarganj, 
v. 230; Faridpur, v. 345; Maimansinh, 
v. 467 ; the Chittagong Hill Tracts, vi. 
48, 62, 99; Chittagong, vi. 218; Nod- 
khdlf, vi. 334, 335; Tipperah, vi. 434, 
435; Hill Tipperah, vi. 514, 515; Mal- 
dah, vii. 112, 113, 114; Rangpur, vii. 
32?-332 5 Dinijpur, vii. 424-427; Raj- 
shdhi, viii. 102-105 ; Bogra, viii. 287, 
288; Murshiddbdd, ix. 203-207; Pabn^ 
ix. ^58; Ddrjilmg, x. 183-185 ; Jalpdi- 
gurJ, X. 309-312 ; Kuch Behar, x. 438 ; 
Patnd, xi. 191-193 ; Sdran, xi. 346, 
347 ; Gayd, xii. 128-131 ; Shihdbdd, 
xii. 277, 278 ; Tirhut, xiii. 171, 172 ; 
in Champdran, xiii. 301, 302 ; Bhdgal- 
pur, xiv. 211, 212; Santdl Pargands, 
xiv. 365-368; Monghyr, xv. 161 - 163 ; 
Pumiah, xv. 400-402 ; Hazdribdgh, 
xvi." 179-183; Lohdrdagd, xvi. 474-477; 
Singbhiim, xvii. 123, 124; Tributary 
States of Chutid Ndgpur, xvii. 165, 179, 
213 ; Mdnbhum, xvii. 359, 360 ; Cut- 



tack, xviii. 205-209 ; Balasor, xviii.- 
348-350 ; Puri, xix. 160-163. 

Crops. See Agriculture, Cereal, Rice, 
Tillage, &c. 

Cultivated and cultivable area, out-turn 
of crops, &c., in the 24 Pargands, i. 
148 ; in the Sundarbans, i. 335, 336 ; 
in Nadiyd, ii. 69; in Jessor, iL 243; in 
Midnapur, iii. 82 ; in Hugli, iii. 240 ; 
in Banlwdn, iv. 72; in Bdnkurd, iv. 
247; in Birbhum, iv. 346; in Dacca, v. 
91; in Bdkar^j, v. 204; in Faridpur, 
v. 315; in Maimansinh, v. 442 ; in the 
Chittagong Hill Tracts, vi. 74, 75 ; in 
Chittagong, vi. 161, 162; in Nodkhdli, 
vi. 295, 2^; in Tipperah, vi. 393, 394; 
in Hill Tipperah, vi. 502 ; in Maldah, 
vii. 73, 74 ; in Rangpur, vii. 251-259 ; 
in Dindjpur, vii. 394, 395; in Rdjshahf, 
viii. 64-69 ; in Bogrd, viii. 222, 226* 
228; in Murshiddbdd, ixi 105-107 ; in 
Pdbnd, ix. 305 ; in Ddrjtiing, x. 97-99, 
103, 104 ; in Jalpdiguri, x. 224, 274- 
276, 280 ; in Kuch Behar, x. 383, 384; 
in Patnd, xi. 115, 1 16; in Sdran, xi. 292- 
294; in Gayd, xii. 94, 95 ; in Shdh- 
dbad, xii. 238-240; in Tirhut, xiii. 104, 
105 ; in Champdran, xiii. 271-277 ; 
in Bh^igalpur, xiv. 124-129; in the 
Santdl Pargands, xiv. 339-341 ; in Mon- 
ghyr, XV. 83, 84, 103-106; in Pumiah, 
XV. 293-303 ; in Hazdribdgh, xvi. 105, 
192, 199; in Lohdrdag^ xvi. 353-355 ; 
in Singbhdm, xvii. 81, 82; in the 
Tributary States of Chutid Ndgpur, 
xvii. 209, 210; in Mdnbhum, xvii. 316, 
317; in Cuttack, xviii. 104-107; in 
Baiasor, xviii. 291 ; in Purl, xix. 

95. 

Cultivating tenures, in Nadiyd, ii. 73; in 
Jessor, li. 265 ; in Midnapur, iii. 92, 
93; in HugH, iii. 350, 351; m Nodkhall, 
vi. 311, 312; in Tipperah, vi. 409; 
in Mald^ viii. 80; in Rdjshdhi, 
viii. 72 ; in Bogrd, viii. 236-239 ; in 
Hazdribdgh, xvi. 123-126 ; in Lohdr- 
dagd, xvi, 376-389 ; in Murshiddbdd, 
ix. 119-121 ; in Pdbnd, ix. 315; in 
Mdnbhdm, xvii. 332; in Cuttack, xviii. 
135-^37; in Balasor, xviii. 313-317; in 
Puri, xix. 125-128. See also Tenures 
of land. 

Cultivation. See Tillage. 

Cultivators, Advances to, Midnapur, iii. 
83 ; Maimansinh, v. 444 ; Chittagong 
Hill Tracts, vi. 76, 78, 79, 87 ; Chitta- 
gong, vi. 207 ; Maldah, vii. 100, 104 ; 
Rangpur, vii. 306, 308, 309, 310; Din- 
djpur, vii. 398 ; Sdran, xi. 290, 33^ ; 
Turhut, xiii. xo6; Santdl Pargands, xiv. 



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GENERAL INDEX, 



361 ; Monghyr, xv. 106 ; Lohdrdaga, 
xvi. 355 ; Puri, xix. 96. 
Cultivators, Condition of the, in the 24 
Parganis, i. 148, 149; in the Sun- 
darbans, i. 336, 337 ; in Nadiya, ii. 69, 
• 70 ; in Jessor, ii. 255 ; in Midnapur, iii. 
83 ; in Hugll, iii. 341, 342 ;'in Bard- 
win, iv. 73 ; in Bankui^ iv. 248 ; in 
Blrbhiim, iv. 367, 368 ; in Dacca, v. 
9^} 93 ; in Bikarganj, v. 205 ; in Faj^d- 
pur, V. 317 ; in Maimansinh, v. 443 ; 
in the Chittagong Hill Tracts, vi. 75 ; 
in Chittagong, vi. '162 ; in Noikhali, 
vi. 278, 279, 296, 297; in Tipperah, vi. 
395» 396, 398 ; in HiU Tipperah, vi. 
502, 503 ; in Maldah, vii. 48, 68, 69, 
75. 79 ; in Rangpur, vii. 225, 226, 227, 



in Murshidibid, ix. 97, 107, 108, 119, 
120 ; in Pabna, ix. 305, ^06 ; in Dir- 
jfling, X. 99, 100; in Jalpaiguri, x. 276; 
in Kuch Behar, x. 385 ; in Patni, xi. 
117 ; in Sarin, xi. 294, 295 ; in Gaya, 
xii. 95; in Shihdbdd, xii. 240; in Tir- 
hut, xiii. 106, 107; in Champaran, xiii. 
277, 278; in Bhigalpur, xiv. 129, 130;. 
in tiie Santil Parganis, xiv. 341, 342 ; 
in Mongh)rr, xv. 106, 107 ; in Pumiah, 
XV. 303-306; in Hazaribdgh, xvi, 92-95, 
105, 106; in Lohirdafi;4, xvi. 334, 335, 
35S» 356 ; in Singbhum, xvii. 82, 83 ; 
in the Tributary SUtes of Chutii Nag- 
pur, xvii. 178, 197, 210, 241 ; in M&n- 
bhum, 317; inCuttack, xviii. 107-109; 
in Balasor, xviii. 292-294; in Pun, xix. 
96. 

Cultivators' rights, holdings, &c., in the 
24 Parganis, i. 149; in the Sundarbans, 
i. 337; 'in Nadiyi, ii. 70; in Jessor, ii. 
2C6; in Midnapur, iii. 83; in Hugli, 
iii. 343; in Bardwin, iv. 73, 83; in 
Binkuxi, iv. 248, 260, 261 ; in Bfr- 

* bhum, iv. 362, 367 ; in Dacca, v. 91- 
93; in Bikarganj, v. 215; in Faiidpur, 
v. 317, 318; in Maimansinh, v. 443; in 
Chittagong, vi. 162, 178; in Noikhili, 
vi 297, 29iB, 302, 312; in Tipperah, 
vi. 395 ; in Maldah, vii 74, 75 ; in 
Rangpur, vii. 262, 263, 272, 273, 280, 
281, 290 ; m Dinijpur, vii. 395, 403, 
404 ; in Rijshihi, viii. 65, 72 ; in 
B<^ri, viii. 203, 230-239 ; in Murshid 
ibdd, be. 107, 108, 114, 119, 120; in 
Pibni, ix. 305, 306, 313, 315 ; in Dir- 
Hling, X. 99 ; in Jalpdiguri, x. 276 ; in 
iCudi Behar, x. 384, 390; in Patna, 
xi. 117 ; in Siran, xi. 295 ; in Gaya, 
xiL 105, 126, 127; in Shihibid, xii. 



2^0, 248; in Tirhut, xiii. 169; in Cham- 
paran, xiii. 282, 284, 298; in Haziri- 
bagh, xvi. 94, 123, 124; in Lohirdagi, 
xvi. 355* 379-384, 402, ,406. 

Culna, or Kilni, subdivision and town in 
Bard wan, iv. 59, 60, 135, 169, 17a 

Currency, Early, in Bhigalpur, xiv. 201 • 
204. 

Currumshaw Hills, Gayi, xii. 19. 

Customary cesses, or aMvdds, in the Sun- 
darbans, i. 358 ; in Midnapur, iii. 108- 
113; in Dacca, v. 97, 127 ; in Chitta- 
gong, vi. 180-182; in Noikhili, vi. 
315, 316; in Tipperah, vi. 411, 412; 
in Bogra, viii. 248-250 ; in Murshida- 
bdd, ix. 71, 200 ; in Pibnd, ix. 318 ; 
in Kuch Behar, x. 428 ; in Patna, xi. 
96, 127 ; in Gayi, xii. 70-72 ; in Tir- 
hut, xiii. 106, 107 ; in Bhigalpur, xiv. 
158-160; in Monghyr, xv. 120-127; 
in Pumiah, xv. 388; in Haziribigh, 
xvi. io6, 107 ; in LohArdaga, xvi. 368, 
369* 37Qi 372, 380. 381 ; in Cuttock, 
'xviii. 121. 

Customs and ceremonies of the Chittagong 
Hill Tribes, vi. 40, 41-43, 46-48, 52, 
53» 55» 56, 59» 105 ; o^ the people in 
Noikhili, vi. 279-282 ; in Rangpur, 
vii. 226-229 ; of the Mechs or Bodos 
in Ddrjllin^, x. 77-79; of the Kochs or 
RAjbansis m Kuch Behar, x. 371-379 ; 
of the people in Patna, xL 56 ; of the 
Pahiriis, xiv. 297, 298; of the Santils, • 
xiv. 314-319; xvi. 72; of the aboriginal 
tribes of the Orissa Tributary States, 
xix. 225-227, 239, 240^ 247, 252, 253. 
See a/so Customs, Birth, Marriage, 
Funeral, &c. 

Cutwa, or Kdtwi, subdivision and town 
in Bardwin, iv. 25, 62, 63, 67, 135, 
170, 194-196. 

CUTTACK (KaTAK) DISTRICT (Vol. 

xvni.)— 

Geographical Situation, Area, and 
Headquarters, 19, 20; Boundaries, 20; 
Jurisdiction, 20; General Aspect of the 
District, 20, 21 ; Hills, 21, 22 ; River 
System, 22-25; Estuaries and Harbours, 
25-27 ; False Point, 27-30 ; History of 
the Harbour, 30, 31; Its Trade, 31, 32; 
Its Future Capabilities and Iniprove- 
ments,32,33; TheBrAhmanl and Dhim- 



rA Estuaries, 33-35 ; Distribution and 
Control of the Water Supply, 35-37 ; 
The Orissa Canal System (High-Level, 



Kendripiri, Tdldandi, and Michh- 
gion Canals), 37-44 ; Irrigation Capa- 
bilities, 44-49 ; Financial Aspects, 49- 
^i; Embankments, 51-53; Utilization of 
Water Supply, 53 ; Fisheries, 53-58 ; 



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Lines of Drainage, 58; Jungle Pro- 
ducts and Pastures, 58, 59 ; Fera Na- 
tnra, 59; Population — Early Estimates, 
59, 60; Census of 1872, its Agency 
and Results, 60-64 ; Classification ac- 
cording to Sex, Religion, and Age, 64- 
67 ; Infinns, 67 ; Ethnical Division of 
the People, 67-71 ; List of Hindu 
Castes, 71-77 5 Aboriginal Tribes, 77, 
78 ; Religious Division of the People, 
78-80; Division of the People into 
Town and Country, 80-82; Cuttack 
(Katok) City, 82, 83 ; The Citadel of 
Cuttack, 83, 84; Jijpur, 84, 85 ; Siva- 
ite Temples and Sculptures, 85-89 ; 
Kendr^padl, 89, 90; Jagatsinhpur, 90; 
Antiquities of the Cuttack Hills, 90- 
97 ; Material Condition of the People 
— Dress, Dwellings, Food, &c., 97-99; 
Agriculture — Rice Cultivation and List 
of Crops, 99-102 ; Other Cereals, 102 ; 
Pulses and Fibres, 102, 103 ; Miscel- 
laneous Crops, 103, 104 ; Cultivated 
Area and Out-turn of Crops, 104- 107-; 
Condition of the Peasantry, 107-109 ; 
Rent Law, 109, no; Domestic Ani- 
mals, I ID; Wages and Prices, i le- 
nd; Agricultural Implements, I17 ; 
Weights and Measures, 117; Land- 
less Labouring Classes, 117, 118; 
J^nd Settlement, 1 18-122; Land Ten- 
ures — ^Tributary Estates or Kilajdis, 
122-125 ; zaminddrisy 125-131 ; Inter- 
mediate Estates paying Revenue through 
the tamifuidrs, 131; Resumed Revenue- 
free Tenures, 134, 135; Quit-rent Ten- 
ures, 135 ; Cultivating Tenures, 135- 
137; Religious and Charitable Tenures, 
137. 13S ; Service Tenures, 138, 139 ; 
Rates of Rent, 139-146; Manure, Irri- 
gation, and Rotation of Crops, 1462 
Natural Calamities — Blights, Floods, 
and Droughts, 146-148; Famine Warn- 
ings and Preventive Works, 148 ; The 
Famine of 1866, 148-173 ; Roads and 
other means of Communication, 173, 
174 ; Manufactures, 174, 175 ; Com- 
merce and Trade, 175-177 ; History of 
Orissa— Pre-historic Period, 177, 178 ; 
The Buddhists, 179-181 ; The Sivaite 
Dynasty, 183, 184 ; The Vishnuvite 
Dynasty, 184-188; The Muhammadan 
Conquest, 188-192; The MarhattA 
Rule, 192-196; The English Conquest, 
196-200; Revenue and Expenditure, 
200-202 ; Land Revenue, 202, 203 ; 
Civil and Criminal Courts, 203; Police 
and Tail Statistics, 203-212 ; Educa- 
tional Statistics, 212-220 ; Postal Sta- 
tistics, 220 ; Administrative Divisions, 



220-223; List o( pargaftds with Chief 
Villages in each, 223-234 ; Climate, 
Temperature, and Rainfall, 234, 235 ; 
Endemics and Epidemics, 235, 236 ; 
Charitable Dispensaries, 236-238; Cut- 
tack Lunatic Asylum, 238, 239 ; Vital 
Statistics, 239; Fairs, 239, 240; Cattle 
Disease, 240 ; Indigenous Drugs, 240- 

Cuttack (Katak) city, xviii. 20, 80, 82- 
84 ; dispensary, xviii. 236-238 ; High 
School, xviii. 215-218 ; lunatic asylum, 
xviii. 238, 230; iMdnd, xviii. 65, 203. . 

Cuttack HivilC ^rgand in Cuttack, 
xviii. 225. ' 

Cyclones, in the 24 Paiganis, i. 259-261; 
in the Sundarbans, L 289, 335, 341, 382; 
in Midnapur, iii. 220-227 » ^ Chitta- 
gong, vi. 184 ; in No4kh4Ii, vi. 253, 
317; inRangpur(i787-i788), vii. 297; 
in Murshiddbad, ix. 238,- 239; in Pibni, 
«• 370-372. 



Dabipur, town in Maldah, vii. 142. 

DabuTf timber tree in the Sundarbans, i. 
306. 

Dacca (DhAka) District (Vol. V.)— 
Gec^;raphical Situation, Area, and 
Headquarters, 17 ; Boundaries, Juris- 
diction, and Phjrsical Aspect, 18; 
Elevated Tracts, &c, 19; River 
System, 20-22 ; Lakes, Marshes, &c., 
22; River Traffic, 23; Fisheries, 24; 
Marsh Cultivation, 25 ; Lines of Drain- 
age, Minerals, Jungle Products, &&, 
26 ; Fera Natura^ 27-31 ; Estimates 
of Population previous to 1872, 31 ; 
Census of 1872, its Agencies and Re- 
sults, 31-41 ; Population according to 
Sex and Age, 34 ; according to Occu- 
pation, 35-38; Ethnical Division of 
the People, 38-46 ; Castes, 46-51 ; Re- 
ligious Division of the People, 52-61 ; 
Towns and Places of Historiod In- 
terest; 61-74; Material Condition of 
the People, 74-81 ; Agriculture, 82- 
102 ; Cereal Crops, 82, 83 ; Green 
Crops, 84; Cotton, 85; Jute, 86; 
Hemp and Rhea, 88; Miscellaneous 
Crops, 89, 90; Area, Out-turn of 
Crops, &C., 91, 92; Condition of the 
Cultivators, 92; Domestic Animals, 
Implements and Mode of Agriculture, 
93 J Wages and Prices, 94 ; Weights 
and Measures, 95 ; Day-Labourers and 
Spare Land, 96 ; Settlement and Land 

I Tenures, 97-100; Rates of Rent, loi ; 
d 



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278 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Manure, Irrigation, &c., 102; Blights 
and Floods, 103 ; Droughts and Com- 
pensating Influences, 104 ; Famine 
Warnings, 105 ; Foreign and Absentee 
Landlo]^s, lOS ; Roads and Means of 
Communication, 107; Mines, &c., 
108; Manufactures, 109- 113; Weav- 
ing, 109 ; Embroidery, 1 10 ; Gold and 
Silver Work, and Shell Work, iii ; 
Pottery and Condition of Manufactur- 
ing Classes, 112; Commerce and 
Trade, 1 1 3-1 15 ; Capital and Interest, 
115, 116; Institutions and Societies, 
News[>apers, &&, 117; Incomes and 
Income-Tax, 1 18 ; History of the Dis- 
trict, 1 1 8- 1 29; Revenue and Expendi- 
ture, 129-132 ; Land Law, Courts, &c., 
132 ; Police Statistics, 133 ; Criminal 
Clares, 134 ; Jail Statistics, 134, 135 ; 
Educational Statistics, 135-137; Postal 
Statistics, 138 ; Administrative Sub- 
Divisions, 138, 139; Fiscal Divisions, 
139-141 ; Climate, &c., 141-143; 
Diseases, &c., 143, 144; Indigenous 
Vegetable Drugs, 145, 146; Cattle 
Disease, 147 ; Fairs and Religious 
Gatherings, 148; Charitable Institu- 
tions and Dispensaries, 148-153. 

Dacca City (Vol. V.), — Situation and 
Origin of Name, Haui(^uarters of Dis- 
trict, 18, 19 ; First Enghsh Settlement, 
145; Christian Missions, 60, 61; Popu- 
lation and Municipal Income, 61, 62, 
70; Description and History, 65-68; 
Manufactures, 109-112; Trade, 114; 
Seat of Mughul Government, 120-122 ; 
French and Dutch Factories, 124; 
Sepoy Mutiny, 124-126 ; College, 135- 
137; Lunatic Asylum and Mitford 
Hospital^ 148, 149. 

Dachiir Kismat, market village in Dindj- 
pur, vii. 452. 

Vadan, system of indigo cultivation by 
rayats under contract m Nadiyd, ii. 96 ; 
in Jessor, ii. 251. 

D&dar, pargand in Gajri, xii. 145. 

D^id, fair in Bard win, iv. 134. 

Dagmiri, frontier police post in Bhagal- 
pur, xiv. 213. 

Dagni, //r in Singbhdm, xviL 139. 

DiM, nad( in S4ran. See Sundi. 

DainMt, town in Bardwdn with river 
traffic, iv. 25, 63 ; fair, iv. 67 ; manu- 
foctures, iv. 133 ; commerce, iv. 134. 

D6isudi land tenures. See Tenures of 
land. 

DdkdiH or gang* robbeiy in the 24 Par- 
viands, L I9i-I93;.in Nadiyd, ii. 118; 
m lessor, ii. 310, 311; in HugU, iii. 
386; in Bdnkurd, iv. 287-290; in Bir- 



bhum, iv. 404; in Dacca, v. 134; in 
Bakaiganj, v. 230; in Faridpur, v. 346; 
in Maimansinh, v. 468; in Nodkhali, vi. 
248, 330, 335 ; in Tipperah, vi. 379, 
43[4 ; in Maldah, vii. 113 ; in Ran^ur, 
vii. 158, 159, 160, 331 ; in Dindjpur, 
vii. 356, 425 ; in Rajshahf, viii. 100- 
103; in BogriL, viii. 130, 189, 190, 287, 
288 ; in Murshiddbdd, ix. 207-209 ; in 
Pdbnd, ix. 298 ; in Ddrjiling, x. 184 ; 
in JalpdiguH, x. 310; in Patnd, xi. 
191, 313 ; in Sdran, xi. 346 ; in Gayd* 
xii. 129; in Tirhu^ xiii. 48, 171 ; in 
Champdran, xiii. 301 ; in Bhdgalpur, 
xiv. 211, 212 ; in the Santdl Pat^ands, 
xiv. 365, 366 ; in Monghyr, xv. 102 ; in 
Pumiah, xv. 401, 402 ; in Hazdrib^h* 
xVi. 90, 120, 180-183; in Lohdrdagd, xvi. 
475, 476 ; in Singbhiim, xvii. 114, 123, 
124 ; in Mdnbhdm, xvii. 360; in Cut- 
tack, xviii. 206; in Balasor, xvii. 



Ddkditiy 



itiyd river, vi. 250, 362, 363. 

Dakantiyd Brdhmans See Brdhmans. 

Dakhih^, village in Dindjpur, viL 451. 

Dakhineswar, town in 24 Pargands, L 
34; powder magazine, i. 107, 206; 
temples, i. 230 ; schools, i. 374. 

Dakhndir, pargdnd in Gayd, xiL 143. 

Daklat Jaldpur, pargand in the Sundar- 
bans, i. 372. 

Ddk Pakhar, tank in Pumiah, xv. 267. 

Dakshin, village in Dindjpur, vii. 452. 

Dakshfn Shdhbdzpur, pargand in Nodk- 
hdli, vi. 343. 

Dakshin Shahbdzpur, island, v. 158; vi. 
239, 331 ; tidal wave at, v. 167 ; ex- 
portation of betel-nuts, v. 170; flood 
m 1822, V. 212; subdivision, v. 243, 
244 ; rates of rent, v. 210. 

Dakshin Shdhpur, pargand in Tipperah, 

vi. 443- 
Ddldng, xiame of one of the Lushdi tribes. 

6>^Lushais. 
Dalijord, pargand in Cuttack, xviii. 225. 
Ddlkaramchdy timber tree in the Sundar- 

bans, i. 306. 
Dalmd, range of hills in Mdnbhihn, xvii. 

255 ; peak, xviL 256, 285. 
Ddlmi, in Mdnbhum, Ruins at, xvii. 302- 

Ddlsinh-Sardi, village and thdnd in Tir- 
hut, xiii. 34, 66, 179. 

Dalthithd, market village in the 24 Par- 
gands, i. 227. 

Daltonganj, town in Lohdrdagd, xvi. 321, 
322 ; coal-field, xvi. 413-415. 

Ddman-i-koh, ITie, Government estate in 
the Santdl Pargands, xiv. 273, 274^ 
275» 277, 362. 



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GENERAL INDEX, 



279 



D&marpur, pargand in Cuttack, xviii. 

225. 
Damdahi, thdnd in Purniah, xv., 243, 

244, 39J8, 415. 
Damdama, village in Dinijpur, vii. 365, 

438, 439. 445. 
D&modar river, iii. 256-261 ; iv. 23, 24, 

208, 209; xvi. 35-37; xvii. 256, 257, 

258 ; floods, iv. 92-94 ; embankments, 

iv. 94-96. 
Dimodar, valley in Manbhum, xviL 255. 
DamdL, iir in Singbhiim, xvii. 139. 
Damurdt, festival in Singbhum, xvii. 50. 
Dandgodh^ village in Tipperah, vi. 420. 
Dances of the aboriginal tnbes in Haziri- 

b^h, xvi. 72, 73 ; in Loh&rdagi, xvi. 

281, 285-287 ; of the^avars, xix. 239, 

240 ; of the JuiLngs, xix. 244-246 ; of 

the Bhuiyis, xix. 253, 254. Sie also 

Amusements. 
D&ndia Kiti, khdl in the 24 Paigadis, 

i. 31- 
D&ndimdl, kild in Pud, xix. 183. 
Ddndr^ pargand in No4khil{, vi. 343. 
Dan|;si, pargand in Sdran, xi. 303, 357. 
Danish Settlement at Serampur, ill 302; 

Ancient, in Balasor, xvii. 283. 
Ddnk, river in Purniah, xv. 227, 23a 
Danki^ mountain, Diijiling, x. 20. 
Danra Sakhwird pargand^ Bhigalpur, 

xiv. 153, 247. 
D^tbhingd bil, 24 Pargands, i. 3a 
Danti^ fiscal division in the 24 Parganis, 

i. 231, 373, 
Ddntun, pargand and village in Midna- 

pur, with trade in mixed sUk and cotton 

cloth, iii 196. 
J>9Xi'9tiXf phrgand in Shihibdd, xii. 286. 
Ddo^ or axe, the various uses to which it 

is put by the hill-men, vi. 75. 
Diokobd, a local name for the Brdma- 

putra river, viii. 135. 
Dardi, village in Sdran, xi. 231. 
Dzikrif pargand in Mongh3rr, xv. 176. 
Dar&richaur, pargand in Balasor, xviiL 

362. 
Darauli village and tAdnd in Siran, xi. 

235. 241, 257, 263, 293, 328, 331, 344, 

356. 
Darauti, village in Shihib^, xii. 214. 
Darbakti mart in Chittagong, vi. 198. 
Darbhangah District, xiil 17, 105, 136, 

I37i 160, 161. 
Darbhangah subdivision, Tirhut, xiii. 

17, 34» 105, II4» 178, 179. 
Darbhangah town and fAdnd, xiiL 18, 

34. 49, 50. 59-61, 146. 1 56, 179 ; dis- 
pensary, xiiL 206. 
Darbhangah Rij, Hbtory of the, xiii. 

208-214. 



Darbangah State Railway, xilL 22, 121, 

122, 123. 
Dargiiiti river, xii. 166. 
Dariiganj, mart in Sinm, xi. 228, 235, 

Daridah^ village in DinAjpur, vii. 45a 

Dar-iMfndm, dar-ijdrd^ dar-patni, &*c,f 
land tenures. See Tenures of land. 

Daijibdju, iappd in Maimansinh, v. 356. 

DARjfLXNG District— (Vol X.) 

Geographical Situation, Area, and 
Boundaries, 17, 18 ; Jurisdiction and 
Histoiy, 18, 19; General Aspect and 
Configuration of the District, 19-23 ; 
Mountains, 23, 24 ; River System, 24- 
28 ; Lakes, 28, 29 ; Utilization of the 
Water Supply, 29 ; Fish and Fisheries, 
29, 30 ; Land Reclamation and Marsh 
Cultivation, 30; Lines of Drainage, 
30i 31 ; Minerals, 31, 32 ; Caverns, 
Natural Phenomena, Mineral Springs, 
etc., 32, 33 ; Forests and Vegetation ; 
33-38 ; Jungle Products, 38 ; Pasture 
Groimds, 39 ; Ffra Natures^ 39 ; Pop 
ulation. Early Estimates of, 40 ; Cen- 
sus of 1872 and its Results, 40-44 ; Po- 
pulation classified according to Sex» 
Religion, and Age, 41-44; Ethnical 
Division of the People, 44-47 ; Tribes 
and Races of People, 47-80; Hindu 
Castes, 80-84 ; Immigration and Emi- 
gration, 8^ 85 ; Religious Division of 
the People, 85-87; Division of the 
People into Town and Conntiy, 87-90; 
Ddrjiling Town and Station, 87-90; 
Material Condition of the People, 90- 
92 ; Dress, 90^ 91 ; Dwellings, 91 ; 
Food, 91, 92 ; Agriculture, 92-99 ; 
Rice Cultivation, 92-94 ; Preparations 
made from Rice, 94, 95 ; Other Cereal 
Crops, 95 ; Green Crops, 95, 96 ; 
Fibres, 96 ; Miscellaneous Crops, 96, 
97 ; Area, Out-turn of Croj^s, etc., 97- 

99 ; Condition of the Cultivators, 99^ 

100 ; Domestic Animab, 100 ; Agri- 
cultural Implements, 100^ loi ; Wages 
and Prices, loi, 102 ; Weights and 
Measures, 102, 103 ; Agricultural and 
Landless Day Labourers, 103 ; Spare 
Land, 103, IQ4 ; Land Tenures, 104- 
122 ; Rates of Rent, 122-124 ; Manure^ 
Irrigation, etc., 124 ; Natural Calami- 
ties, 124, 125 ; Famines and Famine 
Warnings, 125-127 ; Foreiga and Ab- 
sentee Proprietors, 127; Roads and 
Means of Communication, 127, 128 ; 
Mines and Quarries, 129-158 ; Coal, 
129-140 ; Iron, 140-142 ; Copper, 142- 
152 ; Lime and Limestone, 152-157 ; 
Building Stone, 157; Slate, 157; 



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aZo 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Clay, 157 ; Manufactures, 158 ; Trade 
and Commerce, 158 ; Trade with Thi- 
bet and Central Asia, 158-164; Ca- 
pital and Interest, 164 ; Imported 
Capital, 164-178; Tea Cultivation, 
164-176; Cinchona, 176; Botanical 
Garden at Rangarun, 176-178 ; News- 
papers, 178; Incomes and Income Tax, 
178 ; Revenue and Expenditure, 178- 
182 ; Balance Sheets of the District, 
180, 181 ; Judicial Statistics, 182 ; 
Police Statistics, 182-185 ; J^^ Statis- 
tics, 185-187; Educational Statistics, 
185-187 ; Postal Statistics, 195 ; Ad- 
ministi^tive Divisions, 196^ 197; Mete- 
orology, 197-199; Temperature, 197, 
198; Barometriod Pressures, 198; Rain- 
fall, 198, 199 ; Diseases, 199, 200 ; 
Cattle Diseases, 200; Charitable Dis- 
pensaries, 200^ 201 ; Geology, 201-203. 

Dazjiling town, headquarters of the Dis- 
trict, sanatarium, and military dep6t, x. 
18, 22, 24, 87-90. 

Darpan Kili, pargand in Cuttack, xviii. 
225, 226. 

Dasark Gangabir, pargand in Maldah, 
vii. 132. 

'Dim Brahma,* the story of the Divine 
Log, xix. 43-46. 

Darwani, thdnd and £Eur, Rangpur, vii. 
308, 328, 344, 349. 

Dasahard festival. See Fairs, &c. 

Dasmalang^ pargand in Balasor, xviii. 
362, 

Dasnagar, village in Dinijpur, vii. 450. 

Daspalli State, Orissa, xix. 206, 210- 
217, 261, 279-280. 

Daspall^ chief village of Daspalli State, 
xix. 280. 

Daspur village and Mnd^ Midnapur, iii. 
68, 195. 

Daspur, village in Morbhanj State, Orissa, 
xix. 303. 

Dalt^ original family name of the Ndrdl 
taminddrs, ii. 217. 

DattiLpukur nuurket village, 24 Parganis, 
i. 226. 

Datt's Biziror Biru, jute mart in Mai- 
mansinh, v. 417, 441. 

Didd Khdn, the last of the Afghan dy- 
nasty, vii 52. 

Diudk^di thdnd in Tipperah, vi. 432, 
434, 441 ; dispensary, vi. 4J3, 454. 

Diudnagar, town and thdnd in Gaya, 
xii. 23, 31, 42, 62, 63, 142. 

DidA^yxx pargand in Tipperah, vi. 443. 

Ddudpur, village in Rangpur, vii. 309 > in 
Dinajpur, vii. 453. 

Dauhiti, tappd in Champiran, xiil 272, 
276, 310. 



Daulat Khdn, municipality on island of 
Dakshln Shahbazpur, with river traffic 
and exportation of betel-nuts, v. 170^ 
201. 

Daulatdbdd or Daulatb&zdr, a large vil- 
lage and municipality in Murshid&bdd, 
ix. 82. 

Daulatganj village in S4ran, xi. 257. 

Daulatpur, tappd in Tipperah, vL 443. 

Daulatpur, village in Maldah, vii. 134, 
142. 

Daulatpur dispensary Jessor, ii. 305, 341. 

Daulatpur indigo concern, Mongh3rr, xv. 

139. 

Ddus river, xiv. 28, 29. 

DdwdU^ or Jau/idr, immigrant reapers in 
the SundarbansI i. 154, 333 ; ii. 193. 

Day's (Dr F.) Notes on Dr Hamilton 
Buchanan's Account of the Fishes and 
Fisheries of Bengal, xx. 1-4, 104- 12a 

Dayd river, xix. 19. 

Day-labourers, in the 24 Pargan&s, i. 15^; 
in the Sundarbaiis, i. J38 ; in Nadiya, 
ii. 7 ; in Jessor, ii. 258, 259 ; in Mid- 
napur, iii. 84 ; in Hiielf, iii. 347 ; in 
Bardwdn, iv. 76 ; in B^ikudi, iv. 251 ; 
in Dacca, v. 95, 96 ; in Bdkarganj, v. 
208 ; in Faridpur, v. 324 ; in Mai- 
mansinh, v. 448 ; in the Chittagong 
Hill Tracts, vi. 76, 77 ; in Chittagong, 
vi. 163 ; in NoakhAlf, vi. 275 ; in Tip- 
perah, vi. 396 ; in Hill Tipperah, vL 
505 ; in Maldah, viL 79 ; in Rangpur, 
vii. 266, 272 ; in Rajshdhj, viii. 68, 

. 69; in Bogra, viii. 204, 205; in Murshid- 
4b4d, ix. 97, 1 10^ 114, 115 ; in Pibnd, 
ix. 307, 309 ; in Dirjfling, x. 103 ; in 
Jalpdigurl, x. 279, 280; in iCuch Behar, 
X. 385-387; in Patn^ xi 119; in 
S4ran, xi 296 ; in Gay^ xii. 97 ; in 
Sh^dbdd, xii 243, 244, 246, 247 ; in 
Tirhut, xiii 107 ; in Champdran, xiii 
279, 281, 282 ; in Bhdgalpur, xiv. 131 ; 
in the Santdl Pargands, xiv. 344, 345 ; 
in Monghyr, xv. 108, 109; in Pur- 
niah, xv. 310, 311 ; in Hazdribdgh, 
xvi. 111-1x5 ; in Lohirdagd, xvi. 361, 
362 ; in Singbhtim, xvii. 86» 98 ; in 
the Tributary States of Chutid Ndgpur, 
xvii. 210, 211 ; in Minbhum, xvii. 320 ; 
in Cuttack, xviii 1 10^ 117, 118; in 
Balasor, xviii. 297, 300 ; in Puri, xix. 

97. 
Deaf and dumb. Number of, in the 24 
Parganis, i 44 ; in Nadiyd, ii 38 ; in 
Jessor, ii 189 ; in Midnapur, iii. 44 ; 
In Hugli, iii. 347 ; in Bardwin, iv. 
39 ; in Binkura, iv. 215 ; in Birbhiim, 
iv. 326 ; in Dacca, v. 34 ; in B&kar- 
ganj, V. 184 ; in FaHdpur, v. 282 ; in 



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GENERAL INDEX, 



281 



Maimansinh, v. 395 ; in Chittagong, 
vi. 138; in Noakhali, vi. 270; in 
Tipperah, vi. 373 ; in Maldah, vii. 
39 ; in Rangpur, vii. 210 ; in Dindj- 
pur, vii. 373 ; in Rajshihl, viii. 37,; 
m Bbgra, viii. 160; in Murshidibdd, ix. 
42 ; in Pabnd, ix. 281 ; in Darjiling, 
X. 44 ; in Jalpaiguri, x. 252 ; in Patnl, 
xi. 36 ; in Saran, xi. 242, 243 ; in 
Gaya, xii. 32 ; in Shdhibad, xii. 183 ; 
•in Tirhut, xiiL 35 ; in Champdran, 
xiii. 235 ; in Bhigalpur, xiv. 47 ; in the 
Santil Pargands, xiv. 280; in Monghyr, 
XV. 50 ; in Purniah, xv. 245 ; in Hazar- 
ibdgh, xvi. 58 ; in Singbhum, xvii. 
35 ; in Minbhdm, xvii. 273 ; in Cut- 
tack, xviiL 67 ; in Balasor, xviii. 267 ; 
in Puri, xix. 30 ; in the Orissa Tribu- 
tary States, xix. 208. 

Dedrd, village of cow-keepers, in the 24 
Pargands, i. 37. 

Death-rate. See Vital Statistics. 

Deaths by drowning' in the 24 Paigands, 
i* 35» 34 ; in the Sundarbans, i. 299 ; 
in Jessor, ii. 182 ; in Jdidnapur, iii. 38 ; 
in Bdnkurd, iv. 211'^.in Birbhum, iv. 
318 ; in Dacca, v. 23 ; in Bdkaiganj, 
V. 170; in Farfdpur, v. 269; in 
Maimansinh, v. 388 ; in the Chittagong 
Hill Tracts, vi. 26; in Chittagong, vi. 
127, 128; in Nodkhdli, vi. 256; in Tip- 
perah, vi. 366; in Maldah, vii. 27; m 
Kangpur, vii. 169; in Rdjshdhi, viii. 28; 
in Murshiddbdd, ix. 29 ; in Pdbnd, ix. 
273; in DdrjUins;, x. 29; in JalpdiguH, 
X. 236; in Patna, xi. 25; in Sdran, xi. 
234; in Gajrd, xii. 23; in Tirhut, xiii. 
28; in the Santdl Pareands. xiv. 270; 
in Monghyr, xv. 23; m Purniah, xv. 
233 ; in Lohdrdagd, xvL 237 ; in the 
Tributary States* of Chutid Ndgpur, 
xvii. 255 ; in Mdnbhum, xvii. 258. 

Deaths by wild beasts and snake bite, 
in the 24 Pargands, i. 38 ; in the 
Sundarbans, i. 315 ; in Nadiyd, ii. 34 ; 
in Midnapur, iii. 39, 41 ; in HugH, iii. 
266; in Bardwdn, iv. 29; in Bdnkurd, iv. 
212; in Birbhdm, iv. 322; in Bdkar- 
fanjj V. 177 ; in Faridpur, v. 277 ; in 
Maimansinh, v. 392; in the Chitta- 
gong Hill Tracts, vi. %\\ in Chittagong, 
vi. 133 ; in Nodkhdli, vi. 259, 265 ; m 
Tipperah, vi. 370; in Maldah, vii. 35; 
in Kangpur; vii. 197, 202; in Dindjpur, 
vii 368; in Rdjshdhi, viii. 31; in Mur- 
shiddbdd, ix. 35; in Pdbnd, ix. 278; in 
JalpdiguH, X. 246; in Patnd, xi. 31, 32; 
in Sdran, xi. 238; in Gayd, xii. 28; in 
Shdhdbdd, xii. 180; in Tirhut, xiii. 30; 
in the Santdl Pargands, xiv. 273 ; in 



Monghyr, xv. 197, 198; in Ha^ribdgh, 
xvi. 41 ; in Lohdrdagd, xvi. 246 ; in 
Singbhum, xvii. 24; in the Tributary 
States of Chutid Ndgpur, xvii. 191 ; in 
Mdnbhum, xvii. 268; in Cuttack, xviii. 
59 ; in PuH, xix. 26 ; in the Orissa 
Tributary States, xix. 203. 

Debhdtd, river town with trade in lime, 
24 Pargands, i. 34f 99» 237. 

Debi Chaudhrdni, a female dak&U in 
Rangpur, vii. 159. 

Debikot, pargand in Dindjpur, vii. 438. 

Debipur, town in Maldah, vii. 127. 

Debipur, market village, 24 Pargands, i. 
236. 

Debipur, market vill^e in Dindjpur, vii. 

452. 
Debpur, market village in Dindjpur, viL 

. 437. 

Debottary rent-free grants for idol worship, 
in the 24 Pargands, i. 279, 280; m 
lessor, ii. 265 ; in Bardwdn, iv. 77 ; in 
Bdnkurd, iv. 264; in Birbhum, iv. 369; 
in Nodkhdli, vi, 313 ; in Tipperah, vi. 
410; in Maldah, vii. 84, 85; in Rangpur, 
vii. 273, 278; in Dindjpur, vii. 400, 404; 
in Rdjshdhi, viii. 69, 70; in Bc^rd, viii. 
240, 241; in Pdbnd, ix. 314; m Kuch 
Behar, x. 391, 392; in Singbhdm, xviL 
91. See also Tenures of land. 

Decennial settlement. See Tenures of 
land. 

Dechu, a river in Ddrjiling, x. 28. 

Degraded Brdhmans. See Brdhmans. 

Deharpur, pargand in Maldah, vii. 132. 

Dehatta, pargand in Dindjpur, vii. 439. 

Dehri, village in Shdhdbdd, xii.' 208, 209. 

Deluti river, ii. 180. 

Delwarpur, pargand in Dindjpur, vii. 

439.. 

Demdgiri bdzdr in the Chittagong Hill 
Tracts, vi. 84; falls, vi. 25. 

Demerara, Emigrants to. See Emigra- 
tion. 

Dengue fever. See Diseases. 

Densitv of the population, in the 24 Par- 
p;an^ i. 39, 41, 44; in Nadiyd, ii. 38; 
in Jessor, ii. 189; in Midnapur, iii. ^i- 
43; in Hiigli, iii. 269-275; in Bardwdn, 
iv. 33, 35; i» Bdnkurd, iv. 213, 214; m 
Bfrbhdm, iv. 323 ; in Dacca, v. 33 ; 
in Bdkarganj, v. 182, 183; in Faridpur, 
V. 279-2B1 ; in Maimansinh, v. 393, 
394; in the Chittagonjg Hill Tracts, vi. 
35; in Chittagong, vi. 133, 134, 136; 
in Nodkhdli, .vi. 268; in Tipperah, vi. 
372; in Maldah, vii. 37; in Kangpur, 
vii. 204, 207; in Dinajpur, vii. 371; 
in Rdjshdhi, viii. 35; m Bogrd, viii. 
158^ 159; in Murshiddbdd, ix. 38-40; in 



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GENERAL INDEX. 



Pabni^ ix. 280^ ^65, ^66; in Darjfling, 
X. 41-43; in Jalpiigun, x. 247; in Kudi 
Behar, x. 338, 339; in Patn^ xi. 34, 
98, 99; in Siran, xi. 240; in Gayd, xii. 
30^ 31; in Shdhibdd, xii. 180, 181; in 
Tirhut, xiii. 35, 76 ; in Champ^ran, 
xiii. 233, 234; in BWigal^ur, xiv. 45- 
47; in the SantAl Parganas, xiv. 276- 
278; in Mongh3rr, xv. 49; in Pumiah, 
XV. 243; in Hazirib^h, xvi. 55, 56; 
in Lolilrda^ xvi. 248, 249; in Sing- 
bhilim, xvii. 33 ; in the Tributary 
States of Chutia N^ur, xvii. 153 ; in 
Minbhiim, xvii. 270 ; in Cuttack, xviii, 
64, 65; in Balasor, xviii. 264, 265; in 
Puri, xix. 27, 28; in the Orissa Tribu- 
tary States, xix. 204, 206. 

Deo, village in Oayi, xii. 63. 

Deo, river in Hill Tipperah, vi. 475. 

Deo, river, in LohArda^, xvi. 235. 

DeochA, village in Birbhum, with iron 
workings, iv. 318, 310. 

Deodhi, village in Gaya, xii. 62. 

Deogdon, pargand in Cuttack, xviii. 

2&. 

Deoghar sub-district, Santil Parganis, 

xiv. 274, 277, 375. 
Deoghar town and thdnd^ Santdl Par- 

ganas, xiv. 277, 322-325, 363. 
Deoghar coal-fields, Santal Pargan^ xiv. 

a&,'353, 354. 
Deokili, village in Tirhut, xiii. 68, 69. 
Deokot, ancient residence of Northern 

Governor of Bengal, i. 361, foot-note, 
Deord^ a variety of lute. .S)fl? Jute. 
Deord, pargand in Din4jpur, vii. 439. 
Deoraj, tappd in Champ&ran, xiii. 272, 

275, 310. 
Deoxu mdigo concern, Pumiah, xv. 371. 
Dependent tdluk9. See Tenures of land. 
Dep6ts, Military, in D4ij(ling, x. 89, 90, 

loi ; Jalpiiguri, x. 216^ 225, 261, 262. 

See also Cantonments. 
Desauli Bonga festival. See Magh parab* 
Deswdlf a variety of jute. See Jute. 
Deribisi, pargand in Cuttack, xviii. 226. 
Devatar-murf range and peak in Hill Tip- 
perah, vl 474. 
Devi, river in Cuttack, xviii. 23, 24, 36; 

estuary, xviii. 26, 27. 
Dewang, mart in Pumiah, xv. 379. 
Dewar, market village in Dinajpur, vii. 

Dh&dh&r, river in Hazdrib^h, xvi. 38. 
Dhiki (Dacca) District, City, &c (Vol. 

V.) ^^ Dacca. 
Dhiki Rimchandra, thdnd^ Champiran, 

xiii. 234, 309. 
Dhakayj. Khilan, town in Sh4hdb4d, xii. 

203. 



Dhakeswari, a goddess, eponym of Dacca, 

her shrine, v. 18. . 
DhalandA, lunatic asylum in the 24 Par- 

ganAs, i. 257-259. 
Dhalbhum, pargand in Singbhiim, xviu 

18, 32, 33. 34» 89.92, 121, 139; estote, 

xvii. 254. 
Dhaldighi, village and fair in Dinajpur, 

vii. 387, 388, 411. 
Dhaleswari river, v; 18, 20. 
Dhalkisor or Dwdrkeswar river, iv. 24, 

208, 209; embankments, iv. 95; xviL 



255, 257. 
Dhdmin 



min or Preti3r4 Brihmans. See 

BdLhmans. 
Dhdmnagar, pargand in Balasor, xviiu 

362. 
Dhamnagar, thdnd in Balasor, xviiL 265, 

361. 
Dhimnagar village, 24 Parganis, L 12a 
Dhdmri river, xvii. 23, 25, 251. 
Dhimr^ village in B(rbhi!un, with iron 

workings, iv. 318, 319. 
Dh&mr^ estuary and hatboor, in Cuttack, 

xviii. 33-35. 
DhamdL ports, Balasor, xviii. 259-262. 
Dhamrii, manufacturing village in Dacca, 
« near former fortified settlements of 

Afghans, V. 73. 
Dhamsiin, fiscal division in the Santil 

Parganis, xiv. 377. 
Dhimti, villa|[e in Tipperah, vi. 383. 
Dhandi nodi m Siran, xL 227, 232, 233. 
Dhinarji, river in Haziribdgh, xvi. 38. 
Dhanauti river, xiii. 225. 
Dhanauti, village in Siran, xi. 36a 
Dhangiin Pass, in Haziribdgh, xvi. 29. 
Dhangion, thdnd in Shihibid, xiL 182, 

275. 285. 
Dhangars, an aboriginal tribe in Chitta- 

gong, vi. 143, 209; in Dmijpur, 

vii. 382 ; living in towns in Mur- 

shidibdd, ix. 47 ; Pibnd, ix. 282, 284 ; 

in Shihibad, xii. 191 ; in Champ&ran, 

xiii. 245 ; in Bhi^pur, xiv. 49, 52 ; 

in the Santil Pargaxuis, xiv. 285 ; in 

the Tributary Sutes of Chutid Ndg- 

pur, xvii. 211 ; in Manbhum, xvii. 284, 

285. See also Aboriginal Population 

and Urdons. 
Dhangurhi Dhanipur, village in Siran, 

xi. 258. 
Dhanii-manii, police outpost in NoikhiH« 

vi. 239, 331. 
Dhinikoli, village in Maimansinh, v. 

413- 
Dhanjor, pargand in Dinijpur, viL 439- 

442. 
Dhinkiil, vilhige in Dinijpur, vii. 365, 
436. 



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GENERAL INDEX, 



283 



Dhansdrd, or Husainabdd Kh6l, 24 Par* 

gands, i. 31, 32. 
Dhdn-thikd land tenures. See Tenures of 

land. 
Dhanukiy village in Champiran, xiii. 309. 
Dhanwd Pass, in Hazdribagh, xvi. 29. 
Dhip, village in Rangpur, vii. 225. 
Dhapy floating patch of weed, used for 

fishing purposes, L 302. 
Dhdpd, river in Dinijpur, vii. 359-361. 
Dhapi. Set Salt-water Lake. 
Dhaphar, pargand^ in Bhdgalpur, xiv. 

155, 247. 
Dharara indigo concern, Pumiah, xv. 370, 

371- 
Dharaur, pargand in Tirhut, xiii. 186. 
, Dharld, Dhsdla, or Torshd, a river in 

Kuch Behar, x. 335, 336. 
Dharm Baksh Khdn, Raja, head of the 

Chakma tribe, vi. 92. 
Dharmandal, village in Tipperah, vL 384. 
Dharma P4l's city, an ancient ruined city 

in Kuch Behar, x. 360-362. 
Dharma Sdgar tank in Kumilla, vi. 385. 
Dharmsila, tkdnd in Cuttack, xviii. 65, 

203. 
Dharm Samai, The, in Muzaffarpur, xiii. 

164. 
Dharmapur, township in Noikhali, vi. 

284,285. 
Dharmpur, pargand in Pumiah, xv. 296, 

333-335» 420. 
Dhama, river in Dinajpur, vii. 362. 
Dharshd pargand in Sarkdr Sulaiman- 

AbAd, i. 366. 
Dharta, river in Rangpur, vii 1 61, 164, 

166, 292. 
Dhaus river, xiii. 228. 
Dheldlha, village in Champdran, xiii. 228. 
Dhenkdnal State, Orissa, xix. 205, 206, 

210-217, 261, 280-287, 328. 
Dhenkdnal village, the capital of Dhen- 

kdnal State, xix. 282-287. 
Dheyd, Dheyid, or Dhaniydn pargand 

in Sarkdr Sharifdbdd, i. 370. 
Dhimdis, an aboriginal race. See Abori- 
ginal Population. 
Dlurganj, village in Dindjpur, vii. 444. 
Dhobd, or washerman caste. See Castes. 
Dhobd, or Kdo river, xii. 165. 
Dhobi, village in Gayd, xii. 55. 
Dhodhan Bauigrd, pargand in Tirhut, xiii. 

186. 
Dhola, village in Gayd, xii. 62. 
Dholbdjd, vulage in Pumiah, xv. 267. 
Dholkerd Hl^ 24 Pargands, L 30. 
Dhol Samudra, large marsh or lake in 

Faridpur, v. 268, 361. 
Dhordm river, xiii 223. 
Dhukdrjdri, village in Dindjpur, vii. 437. 



DhuH, village in Tirhut, xiii. 66. 

Dhulidn, a town in Murshiddbad, with 
river traffic, ix. 85, 159-161, 167. 

Dhulidpur, fiscal division in the 24 Par- 
gands, i. 231, 364. 

Dhulihar, principal village in Dantii 
pargand^ i. 231. 

Dhulud market village, 24 Pargands, i. 

235- 
Dhulud, village in Sdran, xi. 258. 
Dhiiria, police outpost in Bhd^^pur, xiv. 

^}^' . 
Dhusan nver, xiv. 27, 28. 

Diamonds found in the Tributary States 
of Chutid Ndgpur, xvii. 190. 

Diamond Harl^ur subdivision, 24 Par- 
gands, i. 160, 161 ; famine of 1866 in, 
1. 223, 224 ; effect of cyclone of 1864 
in, i. 260. 

Diamond Harbour village, telegraph sta- 
tion, and old anchorage of K I. Com- 
pany's ships, 24 Pargands, i. 102, 237. 

Diamond Harbour Camd, i. 31. 

Diddrkot, village in Hindol State, Orissa, 
xix. 289. 

Digd khdl, 24 Pargands, i. 31. 

Digaldi, pargand in Nodkhdli, vl 344. 

Dighir, village in Dindjpur, vii. 444. 

Dighwdrd, village and tkdnd in Sdran, 

. xi. 240, 241, 258, 293, 31^, 344, 358. 

Dignagar, village in Bardwan, with lair, 
iv. 65, 67, 134. 

Digshan, village in Dindjpur, vii. 453. 

Digufdrsy watchmen dmrged with the 
care of villages, Rdniganj, iv. 66 ; 
Gayd, xii. 69, 70, 128; Hazdribdgh, 
xvi 90, 12a See also Police, Rural. 

Dihat Akbarshdhi, pargand in Maldah, 
viL 128. 

Dikl tenures. See Tenures of Land« 

Dihi Arakpur, pargand in Cuttack, xviiL 
226. 

Dilal Rdjd of Sandwip, a noted pirate, vi. 
240. 

Diluvion and Alluvion. See Alluvion. 

Dildwdpur, pargand in Tirhut, xiii. 186, 
187. 

Dildwdrpur, pargand in Pumiah, xv. 295, 
296, 333. 4I9» 420. 

Dimalj timber tree in the Sundarbans, i. 
306. 

Dimli, tkdnd in Rangpur, vii. 328, 344, 
349. 

Dimrd river, xiv. 27. 

DinAjpur District (Vol. VII.) 

Geographical Situation, Area, and 
Headquarters, 355, 356 : Boundaries, 
356 ; Changes of Jurisdiction, and Brief 
Historical Sketch, 356-358; General 
Aspect of the District, 358; River 



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284 



GENERAL INDEX. 



System, 359364; Canals, 364. 3^5 J 
River Traffic, 365 ; Fisheries, 365, 366; 
Forests and Jungle Products, 366 ; Fera 
Natura^ 366-388; Population — Early 
Attempts at Enumeration, 368 ; the 
Census of 1872, Method of taking the 
Census, 368-370 ; Classification of Pop- 
ulation according to Sex and Age, and 
Abstract of Population, Area, &c., of 
each thdnd, 370-373; Infirms, 373; 
Ethnical Division of the People, 373- 
* 376; Immigration and Emigration, 376; 
List of Castes, 376-382; Aboriginal 
Trib^ 382 ; Religious Division of the 
People, '382, 383 ; Distribution of 
People into Town and Country, 383, 
384; Dinajpur Town, 384; Village 
Officials, 384-386; Fairs and Reli- 
gious Gatherings, 386-388 ; Material 
Condition of the People — their Dwell- 
ings, Clothing and Food, 388-390; 
Agriculture — Cereal Crops, 390^ 391 ; 
Green Crops, 391 ; Fibres, 391 ; Sugar- 
cane, 391-393 ; Pdn and Tobacco, 
393, Miscellaneous Crops, 393, 394; 
Area and Out-turn of Crops, &c, 394, 
395; Domestic Animals, 395-396; Agri- 
cultural Implements, 396, 397 ; Wages 
and Prices, 397 ; Weights and Mea- 
sures, 397, 398 ; Landless Labouring 
Classes, 398 ; Land Tenures, 398-405, 
Rates of Rent, 405-407 ; Manure, 406- 
408 ; Irrigation, 468 ; Natural Cala- 
mities, 408 ; Famine Warnings, 409 ; 
Foreign and Absentee Proprietors, 409; 
Roads and Means of Communication, 
409, 410 ; Manufactures, 410, 41 1 ; 
Trade and Commerce — Rice Export, 
41 1-414 ; Other Exports, 414 ; Imports, 
414 ; Capital and Interest, 414, 415 ; 
Income of the District, 415 ; Revenue 
and Expenditure, 415 ; Balance Sheet of 
1787-88, 416; of 1820-21, 417; of 
1850-51, 418 ; of 1860-61, 419 ; of 
1870-71, 420, 421 ; Rent Cases, 422 ; 
Protection to Person and Property, 
422 ; Police Statistics, 422-427 ; Jail 
Statistics, 427-429 ; Educational Stat- 
istics, 429-433 ; Postal Statistics, 434 ; 
List of PargandSf 435-456 ; Climate, 
Temperature, Rainfall, &c, 456, 457 ; 
Diseases, 457, 458 ; Dindjpur Charit- 
able Dispensary, .458; Indigenous 
Drugs, 458-461. 

Dindjpur town and ihdtuL, vii. 356, 365, 
383f 3841 412, 423 ; jail. vii. 427-429 : 
dispensary, vii. 458. 

DindpUT subdivision, Patni, xi. 35, 86- 
90, 108, 116, 205, 206. 

Dinapur town and cantonment in Patna, 



xL 25, 66, 86, 87, 191 ; i^nd, 35, 206; 
dispensary, xi. 218, 219. 

Dinapur Nizimat, Patni, xL 66, 86, 
191. 

Dindrah, pargand in ShdhAb4d, xii. 286. 

Dinem4r-ddng^ ancient Danish settle- 
ment in Balasor, xvii. 283. 

Dingkarchd^ or sedition-tax, levied hj 
insurgents in Rangpur in 1783, viu 
158. 

Diseases, Endemic and Epidemic, in the 
24 Parganas, i. 244, 247 ; in Nadiy^ 
ii. 139; in Jessor, ii. 275, 329-^36; 
in Midnapur, iii. 227-244 ; in Hugli, iii. 
418-437; in Bardwin, iv. 177-192; 
in Bdnkurd, iv. 300, 301 ; in Birbhum, 
iv. 4?8-455 ; in Dacca, v. 95, 96 ; 
in Bakarganj, v. 208; in Faridpur, 
V- 358, 359; in Maimansinh, v. 479; 
in the Chittagong Hill Tracts, vi. 49, 
50, 65, 103, 104; in Chittagong, vi. 
229-231 ; in Nodkhili, vi. 346, 347 ; 
in Tipperah, vi. 449, 450; in Hill 
Tipperah, vi. 519, 520 ; in Maldah, viL 
146 ; in Ran^ur, vii. 345, 346-349 ; 
in Dinijpur, vii. 456-458 ; in Rijshihf, 
viii. 122, 123 ; in BogriL, viii. 306-31 i 
in Murshiddbdd, ix. 239-243 ; in Pibna, 
i^c. 372, 373 ; in DArjfling, x. 51, 199. 
200; in JalpiiguH, X. 321-323; inKuch 
]3ehar, x. 441-444; in Patni, xi. 211, 
212 ;• in Sdran, xi. 362, 363 ; in Gaydt 
xii. 147-149; in Shahdbdd, xii. 287, 
288; in Tirhut, xiii. 202, 203; in 
Champ&ran, xiii. 314, 315 ; in Bhdgal- 
pur, xiv. 220-223, 250-255 ; in the 
Santdl Parganas, xiv. 380^ 381 ; in 
Monghyr, xv. 188-197 ; in Pumiah, xv. 
432-439 ; in Haz&ribdgh, xvi. 201, 202; 
in Lohirdagi, xvL 4^ 485 ; in Sing- 
bhum, xvii. 140-143; in M&nbhum, 
xvii. 370, 371 ; in Cuttack, xviiL 23 J, 
236; in Balasor, xviii. 367-369; in 
Puri, xix. 174, 175. 

Diseases of Cattle. See Cattle Diseases. 

Diseases of Silkworms,' Birbhdm, iv. 376. 
See also Silk. 

Dispensaries, in the 24 Parganis, i. 249- 
255; in Nadiyd, ii. 140-142; in Jessor, 
ii- 3051 340» 341 ; in Midnapur, iii. 
246, 247; in Hugli, iu. 439, 440; 
in Bardwdn, iv. 187-190, 102-200; 
in Bdnkurd, iv. 302 ; in Birbhum, 
iv. 452-455 ; in Dacca, v. 149- 
153; in Bakarganj, v. 248, 249; in 
Faridpur, v. 359; in Maimansinh, v. 
480-451; in Chittagong, vi. 193, 233; 
in Noikhdli, vi. 350; m Tipperah, vi. 
453» 454; in Hill Tipperah, vl 521, 
522 ; in Maldah, vii. 105, 152 ; in 



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GENERAL INDEX, 



285 



Rangpur, vii. 349-35^; '^ t)ini.jpur, 
'vii. 458; in R^jshahi, viii. 90^ 123-126; 
in Bogra, viii. 315-317; in Murshidibdd, 
ix. 171, 2^6-251 ; in P^bna, ix. 374- 
376; in Darjiling, x. 20C\ 212; in Jal- 
piigurf, X. 323, 324; in Kuch Behar, x. 
360^ 441 ; in Patni, xi. 216-219 > ^^ 
Saran, xi. 366-368; in Gayd, xii. 152, 
153 ; in Shihibdd, xii. 289-291 ; in 
Tirhut, xiii. 205-2oi8; in Champdran, 
xiii. 316, 317; in Bhdgalpur, xiv. 2J9- 
262; in the Santdl Parganils, xiv. 382- 
385; in Mongh^, xv. 208-210; in Pur- 
niaJi, XV. 444; m Haz^b^h, xvi. 204- 
ao6; in Lohirdag^ xvi. 487; in Sing- 
bhiiin, xvii. 144-145 ; in Manbhum 
xvii. 373, 374; in Cuttack, xviii. 236, 
238 ; in Balasor, xviii. 369, 370 ; in 
Puri, xix. 176, 177 ; in the Orissa 
Tributary States, xix. 266. 

Distribution of population. See Popula- 
tion.- 

Disturbances, agrarian, in Pibni, ix. 318- 

325. , , 

Divination among the Pahdrias, xiv. 294. 
Division of Bengal under the Muhamma- 

dan kings and emperors, i. 355, 356. 
Division of the people into town and 

country. See Population and Towns, 

&C. 

Divisions, Administrative, ^^^v Adminis- 
trative. 

Divorces in Pdbnd, ix. 290^ 291. 

Divyabhiv Brihmans, vii 222. See also 
Brdhmans. 

Diwili festival. See Fairs, &c 

Diwdnganj, trading village in Bardwdn, 
iv. 134. 

Diwdnganj, thdnd in Rangpur, vii. 161, 
261. 

DhvdfU of Bengal, Grant to the East 
India Company, i. 18, 19^ 358; vi. 427; 
ix. 193, 194. 

Diwdni of Murshidibid, History of the, 

. ix. 172-195. 

Dogachhi. pargand in Maldah, vii. 133. 

Dogachhi, village in Dinajjpur, vii. 436. 

Dogr^ land tenures in Cuttack, xviii. 

I30» 131. 
Doisa, the site of a mined palace, in Lo- 

hdrdagd, xvi. 322. 
Dokr^ market village in Dindjpur, vii. 

452. 
DolihA, tappd in Champdran, xiii. 276. 
Dolijdrf peak in Tipperah, vi. 474. 
Dolgrim, fargand in Cuttack, xviii. 226. 
Dol Jdiri or ffoU festival. See Fairs, 

&c. 
DoUii, pargand in Tipperah, vi. 443. 
Dolomite in Ddrjiling, x. 152-157. 



Dolu river in Chittaffong, vi. 126, 127. 

Domiigarh, village m Sdran, xi. 228. 
Domanick Islands, i. 298. 
Domdrkhand, pargand in Puri, xix. 130^ 

172, 173. , . 

Domestic Animals, in the 24 Parganis, 1. 
149; in the Sundarban^ i. 337; in Na- 
diyd, ii. 70 ; in lessor, ii. 256 ; in Mid- 
napur, iii. 83, 84 ; in Hu^li, iii. 343 ; 
in Bardwdn, iv. 73, 74; m Binkuri, 
iv. 248, 249; in Birbhvm, iv. 362, 363; 
in Dacca, v. 93 ; in BAkarganj, v. 169, 
170 ;• in Faridpur, v. 319 ; in Maiman- 
sinh, V. 443 ; in the Chittagqng Hill 
Tracts, vi. 75 ; in Chittagong, vi. 162; 
in Noikhili, vi. 299 ; in Tipperah, vi. 
396 ; in Hill Tipperah, vi. 503, 504 ; 
in Maldah, vii. 7 j ; in Rangpur, viL 
264, 265 ; in Dinijpur, vii. 395, 396 ; 
in Rijshihi, viii. 65, 66; in Boj^jd, viii. 
222, 223 ; in Murshidibdd, ix. 108, 
109 ; in Pabni, ix. TOS ; in Diijiling, 
X. 100 ; in Jalpdiguri, x. 277 ; in Kuch 
Behar, x. 385 ; in Patnd, xi. 118; in 
Sdran, xi. 295, 296 ; in Gayd, xii. 95, 
96 ; in Shdhdbid, xii. 240 ; in Tirhut, 
xiii. 107 ; in Champdran, xiii. 278 ; in 
Bhdgalpur, xiv. 130 ; in the Santdl 
Parganas, xiv. 342 ; in Monghyr, xv. 
107, 108 ; in Pumiah, xv. 306-309 ; in 
Hazdribagh, xvi. 107, 108 ; in Lohdr- 
dagd, xvi. 356 ; in Singbhum, xvii. 83, 
84 ; in the Tributary States of Chutid 
Ndgpur, xvii. 178, 210; in Manbhum, 
xvii. 317, 318; in Cuttack, xviii. no; 
in Balasor, xviii 295 ; in Puri, xix. 96, 

97- 
Domohdnf, trading village in Bardwdn, 

iv. 134- 

Dompdrd Kild, pargand in Cuttack, xviii 
226. 

Dom caste. See Castes. 

Domarkondd,/0r^ff<i in Mdnbhum, xvii: 
368. 

Dordla, village in Dindjpur, vii. 443. 

Dorandd, militaiy cantonment in Lohdr- 
da^ xvi 321. 

Dorki, village in Uddipur State, Chutid 
Nagpur,. xvii 249. 

Dosddhs. See Castes. 

Dowdeswell Island, Cuttack, xviii. 27. 

Drainage, ^nes of, in the 24 Parganas, i 
36; m the Sundarbans i ^04; in 
lessor, ii. 170^ 171, 339; in Midnapur, 
iii 39, 229, 230; in Hu^H, iii. 265, 
266 ; in Bardwdn, iv. 25; m Dacca, v. 
26 ; in Bdkarganj, v. 172-174; in Farid- 
pur, V. 276; in Maimansinh, v. 390; 
m the Chittagong Hill Tracts, vi. 28, 
29; in Chittagong, vi. 132; in NodkhdlC 



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258; in Tipperah, vi. 368; in Hill 
Tipperah, vi. 377, 477; in Maldah, vii. 
31, 33; in Rangpur, vii. 161, 170, 175; 
in Din^jpur, vii. 358, 363; in Rdjshahi, 
viii. 30; in Bogra, viii. 149; in Mur- 
shidibid, ix. 27, 33; in Pdbnd, ix. 277; 
in D^ijiling, x. 30, 31; in Jalpdigurf, 
X- 238, 239; in Kuch Behar, x. 333, 
334* 338 ; in PatnA, xi. 18, 31 ; in 
Sdran, xi. 228, 229, 237; in Gayd, xiL 
2^; in ShAhdbid, xii. 168; in Tirhut, 
xiii. 29; in Champdran, xiii. 228; in 
Bh&galpur, xiv. 33, 34; in the Santil 
Parganas, xiv. 270; in Hazdribigh, 
xvL 35 ; inXohiupdagd, xvi. 238, 239 ; 
in Manbhum, xvii. 259; in Cuttack, 
xviii. 58. 

Draina^. See Conservancy. 

Dravidian or Tamulic races. See Ethnical 
Division of the Population. 

Dress of the people, in the 24 Parganis, i. 
128, 129 ; m the Sundarbans, i. 322 ; in 
Nadi^ ii. 62, 63 ; in Jessor, ii. 240 ; 
in Midnapur, ii^ 78; in HugH, iii. 328; 
in Bardw^ iv. 68; in Birbhum, iv. 
344; in Dacca, v. 74, 75; in Faridpur, 
v. 295 ; in Maimansinh, v. 418 ; in 
Chittagong, vi. 157, 187; in Noikhili, 
vi. 290; in the Chittagong Hill Tracts, 
vi. 41, 49, 50, SI, 55, 57, 62, 65, 69; 
in Tipperah, vi. 387, 388; in Hill 
Tipperah, vi. 489, 491, 499; in Mal- 
dah, vii. 68 ; in Rangpur, vii. 225 ; 
in Rdjshdhi, viiL 57 ; m Bogri, viii. 
206; in Murshidib^, ix. 97; in Pibni, 
ix. 299 ; in DArjfling, x. 71, 90, 91 j 
in Jalpiigurf, x. 270 ; in Kuch Behar, 
X. 370-372; in Patn^ xi. 100102, 
106; in Saran, xi. 271; in Gayd, 
xii. 75 ; in ShiUiib&d, xii. 225 ; in 
Tirhut, xiii. 77, 78 ; in Champiran, 
xiii. 257, 258; in Bhigalpur, xiv. 109, 
no; in the Santil Parganis xiv. 296, 
297i -317. 3*8, 33i» 332; in Monghyr, 
XV. 80, 81; in Pumiah, xv. 273-276; in 
Hazirib^h, xvi. 93 ; in Lohdr^ag^ 
xvi. 334 ; in Singbhiim, xvii. 4J, 78 ; 
in the Tributary States of Chutid Ndg- 
pur, xvii. 176 ; in Mdnbhum, xvii. 
307; in Cuttack, xviii. 98 ; in Balasor, 
xviii. 289 ; in the Orissa Tributary 
States, xix. 244-246, 262. 

Droughts in the 24 Pargands, i. 159 ; in 
the Sundarbans, i. 342 ; in Nadiyd, ii. 
86 ; in Jessor, ii. 276 ; in Midnapur, iii. 
114-116; in Hugli, iii 360, 361 ; in 
Baidwdn, iv. 96 ; in Bankurd, iv. 270 ; 
in Birbhiim, iv. 372 ; in Dacca, v. 104 ; 
in Faridpur, v. 33 1; in Muimansinh, 
V. 437 ; in Chittagong, vi. 184 ; in 



Nodkhdli, vi. 318 ; in Tipperah, vi. 
415 ; in Maldah, vii. 91, 92 ; in Rang- 
pur, vii. 293, 300 ; in Dindjpur, vii. ' 
408; in Rdjshdhi, viii. 79; in Bogrd, 
viii. 250, 251; in Murshiddbdd, ix. 135 ; 
in R&bnd, ix. 326 ; in Kuch Behar, x. 
394. 395; in Patnd, xi. 130, 131; in 
Sdran, xi. 310 ; in Gayd, xii. 107, 108 ; 
in Shdhdbdd, xii. 251; in Tirhut, xiii. 
115, 117, 118; in Champdran, xiii. 
256, 285 ; in Monghyr, xv. 127 ; in 
Lohdrda^ xvi. 408; in Singbhum, 
xvii. 95, 96 ; in Mdnbhum, xvii. 339, 
340 ; in Cuttack, xviii. 45, 147 ; in 
Balasor, 325, 326. 

Drowning, Deaths by, in the 24 Pargands, 
i* 33> 34 1 in the Sundarbans, i. 299 ; 
in Jessor, ii. 182 ; in Midnapur, iii. 38 ; 
in Bdnkurd, iv. 2x1 ; in Birbhum, iv. 
318 ; in Dacca, v. 23 ; in Bdkarganj, 
V. 170; in Faridpur, v. 269; m 
Maimansinh, v. 388 ; in the Chittagong; 
Hill Tracts, vi. 26 ; in Chittagong, vi. 
127, 128 ; in Nodkhdli, vi. 256; in Tip- 
perah, VI. 366 ; in Maldah, vii. 27 ; m 
Rangpur, vii. 169 ; in Rdjshdhi, viii. 28; 
in Murshiddbdd, ix. 29 ; in Pdbnd, ix. 
273 ; in Ddrjiling, x. 29 ; in Jalpdigurj, 
X. 236 ; in Patnd, xi. 25 ; in Sardn, xi. 
234 ; in Gayd, xii. 23 ; in Tirhut, xiii. 
28 ; in the Santdl Pargands, xiv. 270 ; 
in Monghyr, xv. 23 ; in Pumiah, xv. 
233 ; in Lohdrdaga, xvi. 237 ; in the 
Tributary States of Chutfi NM[pur, 
xvii. 255 ; in Mdnbhum, xvii. 258. 

Drugs, Indigenous, in the 24 Pargands, i. 
247-249; m Nadiyd, ii. 140; in Jessor, 
ii* 336; in Midnapur, iii. 246; in 
Hugu, iiL 438, ^39 ; in Bardwdn, iv. 
200, 201; in Bdnkurd, iv. 303; in 
Dacca, v. 144-146; in Bdkarganj, v. 
248; in Faridpur, v. 359, 360; in 
Mainmansinh, v. 479; in the Chittagong 
Hill Tracts, vi. 104 ; in Chittagong, 
vi. 231, 232; in Nodkhdli, vi. 348, 
349; m Tipperah, vi. 451, 452; in 
Hill Tipperah, vi. 520^ 521 ; in Mal- 
dah, vii. 150 ; in Dindjpur, vii. 366, 
458-461; in' Rdjshdhi, viii 12^; in 
Bogii, viii. 315; in Murshiddbdd, ix. 
34, 244-246 ; in Pdbnd, ix. 373, 374 ; 
in Ddrjiling, x. 38; in Jalpdiguri, x. 325, 
326 ; in Kuch Behar, x. 444 ; in Patnd, 
xi. 213-215 ; in Sdran, xi. 363, 366 ; in 
Gayd, xii 150-152 ; in Tirhut, xiii 
204, 205 ; in Champdran, xiii 316 ; 
in Bhdgalpur, xiv. 256-259; in Mon- 
ghyr, XV. 199-204; in Pumiah, xv. 
440-444; in Hazdribdgh, xvi. 51-53; 
in Lohdrdagd, xvi. 245, 349, 350; in 



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GENERAL INDEX. 



287 



the Tributary States of Chutid Nigpur, 

xvii. 191; in Cuttack, xviii. 240-243; in 

Balasor, xviiL 371, 372; in Purf, xix. 

177. 
Drung river in the Chittagong Hill Tracts, 

vi. 27. 
Drankeimess among the Kandhs, xix. 

232. 
Duba HI in Dinijpur, vii. 446. 
Dube Bhiiran, the Demon Brahman, 

Leeend of, xiv. 89-91. 
Dubiajpur, trading village and thdnd in 

Birbhum, iv. 336, 337, 457. 
Dudhkumir, river in Rangpur, vii. 164, 

167. 
Dadu Miy^ head of the sect of Fardizis, 

V. 195, 290, 291. 
Duduya, river in Jalpdiguri, x. 225, 233. 
Duho Suho, tappd in Champiran, xiii. 

272. 275» 310. 

DuUhazard, police outpost in Chittagong, 
vi. 216. 

DiilAi river in Hill Tipperah, vi. 475. 

Duldi dispensary, Tipperah, vi. 453, 454. 

Dulilganj, mart in Ptimiah, xv. 371, 379. 

Dulipur, town in Shdhdbdd, xii. 202. 

Dunmigarh, village in Sdran, xi. 359. 

Dumb and deaf. Number of. See Deaf. 

Dum-Dum, or Dam-damd subdivision in 
the 24 Parganis,' i. 225. 

Dum-Dum (Dam-dam4), village, canton- 
ment, i. 90, 91; railway station, i. 166; 
English school, i. 206, 214, 220; edu- 
cation in, 214, 230. 

DumkA mart, Santdl Pargands, xiv. 354. 

Dumrd Falls on the Gumti, vi. 475. 

Dumrion, town and thdnd in Shiihdbdd, 
xii. 182, 203, 257, 275, 285. 

DumH, village in Sdran, xi. 257, 258, 357. 

Dumrf ferry, Tirhut, xiii. 21. 

Dumrol, village in Dinijpur, vii. 45J. 

Dumurdah village in Hugli, formerly 
dreaded for its robbers, iii. 314. 

Dtin range of hills, Champdran, xiii. 221. 

Durbachati kkdl embankment in Midna- 
pur, iii. 140. 

Durbdshd, hiU in Haziribdgh, xvi. 29. 

Durdurii, site of remains of a strong fort 
in Dacca, v. 73, 74. 

Durgddahi, village in Dinijpur, vii. 451. 

Durgdpur, tapfd in Tipperah, vi. 443. 

Durgipur, village in Maimansinh, resi- 
dence of the M&hir&j4 of Susang, v. 
418. 

Durgdpur, villajg;e in Rangpur, vii. 305. 

Duigdpur, village in Dinijpur, vii. 441. 

Durgdpur Rdjds, The, in Bhdgalpur, xiv. 
249, 250. 

Durgdpur Ddudkdndi, pargand in Tippe- 
raJi, vi. 443. 



Dumri, town in Shdhdbdd, xii. 203. 
Dusdspurembankment, Midnapur, iii. 142. 
Dutch factories at Dacca taken possession 

of by the English, v. 67, 124. 
Dutch factories in Maldah, vii. 49; at 

Kdlkdpur in Murshiddbdd, ix. 91. 
Dutch settlement at Chinsurah, iii. 301, 

377 ; ancient, in Balasor, xvii. 283. 
D^khds, town in Shdhdbdd, xii. 202. 
Dwarbasini branch dispensary in Huglf, 

iii. 440. 
Dwarkd nadi, stream in Birbhilim, iv. 317. 
Dwarka or Babld, a river in Mur^d- 

dbdd, ix. 23, 25, 33. 
Dwdrkeswar river. See Dhalkisor. 
Dwellings of the people in the 24 Par- 

gands, L 129, 130; in the Sundarbans, i. 

322, 323 ; in Nadiyd, ii 62 ; in Jessor, 

ii. 240; in Midnapur, iii. 78; in Hugli, 

iii. 328, 329 ; in Bardwdn, iv. 68 ; in 

Birbhum, iv. 344; in the Chittagong 



Hill Tipperah, vi. 500; in Maldah, 
vii. 69 ; in Rangpur, viL 226 ; in Di- 
ndjpur, vii. 388 ; in Rdjshdhi, viii. 57 ; 
in ^ogrd, viii. 206; in Murshiddbdd, 
ix. 97-99 ; in Pdbnd, ix. 299, 300 ; in 
Ddrjiling, x. 70, 91; in JaJpdiguri, x. 
270; in Kuch Behar, x. 371; in Patnd, 
xi. 102-105 ; in Sdian, xi. 271, 272 ; 
in Gayd, xii. 75; in Shdhdbdd, xii. 
225, 226; in Tirhut, xiiL 77-79; in 
Champdran, xiii. 258; in Bhdgalpur, 
xiv. iio^ III; in the Santdl Pargands, 
xiv. 310, 311, 331, 332; in Monghyr, xv. 
81; in Pumiah, xv. 276-278; in Hazd- 
ribdgh, xvi. 93; in Lohdrdagd, xvi. 
334; in Singbhum, xvii. 6o» 78; in 
Mdnbhiim, xvii. 307, 308 ; in Cuttack, 
xviii. 98; in Balasor, xviii. 289; in 
PuH, xix. 92, 93; in the Orissa Tributary 
States, xix. 243. 
Dyes and dyeing in the ChittM|!(mg Hill 
Tracts, vi. 33 ; in Maldah, vii. ^ ; in 
Dindjpur, vii. 366 ; (and dye-woods) 
in Bogrd, viii. 149-15 1; in Sdran, xi. 
320-323; in Bhdgalpur, xiv. 181-183 ; 
in Monghyr, xv. 140-142; in Lohdr- 
dagd, xvi, 349b 35a 



E 

Eajbdlid, township in Nodkhdli, vi. 285. 
Early History. See History. 
Earthquakes in Dacca, v. 141, 142. 
Earthquake in Nodkhdli in 1762, vi« 227, 
228, 25a 



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288 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Eastern Bengal Railway, i. 166-170; ii. 
94; ▼. 334; vU. 412. 

East India Company, Acauisition of 24 
Parganis by, i. 12 ; Early Histoiy of, 
iii. 19-21, 300, 30X; trade of, in Dacca, 
V. 68, 113; history of Administration 
of Dacca under, v. 123-126, 129. See 
also History. 

East India Irrigation Company. See Ir- 
rigation. 

East India Railway, iii. 370, 371 ; iv.. 
106, 107, 373, 374 ; ix. 146-148 ; xi. 
137 ; xii. 257 J xiv. 352 ; xv. 136, 137; 
xvi. 141. 

Edicts of Asoka, The, xix. 77-8a 

Educational census. Su Educational 
Statistics. 

Educational Statistics in the 24 Pargan^ 
i. 199-221 ; in Nadi^ ii. 120-130; in 
Jessor, ii. 313-316; in Midnapur, iii. 
172-185; in Hu^li, iii. 392-409; in 
Howrah town, iii. 298 ; in Bardwin, 
iv. 156-166 ; in Bdnkuri, iv. 293-299 ; 
in Birbhiim, iv. 409-419; in Dacca, 
V. 135-137 ; in Bikarganj, v. 234-236 ; 
in Faridpur, v. 348-352 ; in Maiman- 
sinh, V. 471-473; in the Chittagong Hill 
Tracts, vi. 99, 100 ; in Chittagong, vi. 
219-222 ; in Nodkhdlf, vi. 337-341 ; in 
Tipperah, vi. 435, 437-439 ; in Hill 
Tinperah, vi. 518; m Maldah, vii. 
118-124 ; in Rangpur, vii. 335-342 ; in 
Dinijpur, vii. 429-433; in Rajahahi, viii. 
91, 92, io8-x 15; in Boeri, viii. 279, 291- 
301; in Murshiddb&d, ix. 171, 215-229 ; 
in Pdbni, ix. 360-364 ; in Diijiling, x. 
187-195; injalpiiguri, x. 313-319; in 
Kuch Behar, x. A37, 439; in Patnd, 
xi. 105-204 ; in Sarin, xi. i49-353 5 in 
Gaya, xiL 134-140 ; in Shahdb^, xii. 
280-283; in Tirhut, xiii. 175-177 ; in 
Champiran, xiii. 304-307 ; in Bhdgal- 
pur, xiv. 225-236 ; in the Santil Par- 
gan^s, xiv. 370-373 ; in Monghyr, xv. 
i65'i73 y in Pumiah, xv. 404-413 ; in 
HaziriMgh, xvi. 187-190; in Loh^r- 
dagi, xvi. 432-434. 438-440, 478-481 ; 
in Singbhdm, xvii. 127-133; in Min- 
bhum, xvii. 362-365 ; in Cuttack, xviii. 
2I2-220; in Balasor, xviii. 352-359; 
in Puri, xix. 165-171 ; in the Orissa 
Tributary States, xix. 265, 266. See 
also the different States. 

Eger^ headquarters of the Bengal Coal 
Company at Riniganj, in Bardwin, iv. 
107. 

Egra, site of £ur in Midnapur, iii. 
152. 

Ekamb^ market village in Pumiah, xv. 
371. 



Ekdil, village in Narsinhpur State, 

Orissa, xix. 304, 305. 
Ekil, pargand in Gayi, xii. 144. 
Eklikhi mosque in Panduah, vii. 62. 
Eklaspur, township in Nodkhili, vi. 286. 
Ekl^pur, town in Shdh^bid, xii. 203. 
Ekshora market village in the 24 Par- 

ganis, i. 234. 
Ekw&ri, town in Shahibad, xii. ao2. 
Elephants in the northern part of Mai- 

mansinh, v. 391, 392 ; (disease among, 

V. 147) ; in Rangpur, vii. 196, 197, 

264; in the Chittagong Hill Tracts, vi. 

*5» 26, 33, 63 ; in Chittagong vL 133; 

in Tipperah, vi. 359 ; in Hill Tipperah, 

vi. 466, 473, 474, 478, 479, 509, 512. 

513; in Tirhut, xiii. 30; in Bhigal- 

pur, xiv. 43 ; in Minbhdm, xvii. 266 ; 

m Morbhanj State, Orissa, xix. 303. 

See also Feng Natura. 
Elephant Cave, The, in Orissa, xviiL 179; 

XIX. 73. 
Elephants, Tribute of, paid to the E. I. 

Company, vii. 325. 
EUiotganj, village in Tipperah, vi. 42a 
Embankments in the 24 Parganiis, i. 23, 

36, 159^ 161 ; in the Sundarbans, i. 

288, 334, 342 ; in Nadiyi, iii. 36, 86 ; 

in Jessor, ii. 182, 193, 275 ; in Midna- 

{)ur, iii. 38, 133-146; in Hiigli, (on 
eft bank of Riipniriyan, iii. 256; on 
west bank of Damodar, iiL 257 ; for 
marsh reclamation, iii. 264, 266, 359^ 
360); in Bard win, iv, 28, 93, 95, 96 ; in 
Chittagong, vi. 131, 132 ; in No^h&li, 
vi. 254, 255; in Tipperah, vi. 364, 
365 ; in Maldah, vii. 31, 91 ; in Rang- 
pur, vii. 170, 293; in Dinijpur, viu 
366 ; in Bogxi, viii. 148, 191 ; in Mur- 
shidibid, ix. 25, 26, 29, 32, 133-135 ; 
in Dirjiling, x. 66; in Kuch Behsur, 
X. 394. 395 J in Siran, xi. 227, 230^ 
231, 233, 236, 306-310; in Tirhut, 
xiii. 51, 116, 117; in Champiran, xiii. 
285 ; in Bhigalpur, xiv. 26, 102-104, 
173-176 ; in the Santdl Parganis, xiv. 
345, 346 ; in HadlribAgh, xvi 157 ; in 
Lohirda^ xvi. 238, 409; in Min- 
bhdm, xvii. 259 ; in Cuttaql^ xviiL 35, 
51-53; m Balasor, xviii. 263, 323, 
324; in Puri, xix. 19; in the Orissa 
•Tributary States, xix. 202. 

Embroidery, Art of, practised at Dacca, 
chiefly oy the Mnsalmin women, v. 
no. III. 

Emigration and Immigration,inthe24 Par- 
gw^ i. 51, 52, in the Sundarbans, i. 51, 
318,320; in Nadiyi, ii. 45,46; in Midna- 
pur, iii. 52; in Hugli, iii. 284; in Bald- 
win, iv. 46 ; in Bankuri, iv. 221 ; in 



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GENERAL INDEX. 



28^ 



Birbhiim, iv. 326; in Dacca, v. 41-46; 
in Bikarganj, v. 188-190 ; inFandpur, 
V. 285, mb ; in Maimansinh, v. 401, 
402 ; in the Chittagong Hill Tracts, vi. 
51, 66-68; in Chittagong, vi. ii8» 119; 
135, 143, 144 ; in Nodkhilf, vi. 256, 
257, 274, 275 ; in Tippeiah, vi. 379 ; 
in Hill Tipperah, vi. 492, 493, 494 ; 
in Maldah, vii. 41 ; in Dindjpur, vii. 
376 ; in Rdjsh^i, viiL 40 ; in Bogri, 
viiL 167-169; in MurshidAbid, ix. 45, 
46; in Pibnd, ix. 285; in Diijiling, x. 
84, 85 ; in Kuch Behar, x. 340 ; in 
Patni, xi 39^ 40; in Sixan, xi. 268, 
269 ; in Gavi, xii. 34. 35 » in Shih- 
ib4d, xii. i86-i88 ; in Tirhut, xiii. 40, 
41 ; in Champdran, xiii. 239, 240 ; in 
Bhiigalpur, xiv. 52, 53 ; in the Santdl 
Paigan^ xiv. 273, 319, 362 ; in Mon- 
ghyr, XV. 54. 55 J in Pumiah, xv. 253, 
254 ; in Haslribigh, xvi 74; in Lohar- 
dag4, xvi. 299, 300 ; in Singbhiim, 
xviL 63; in the Tributary States of 
Cliutii N^ur, xvii. 153; in M4n- 
bhum, xvii. 288-290 ; in Bcdasor, xvUL 
270, 271. 

En&itpur (Iniyatpur), town in Maldah, 
vii. 136. 

Endemics and Epidemics. See Diseases. 

English Bdz^, or Angrazdbid, chief town 
in Maldah, vii. 18, 48, 88^ 95, loi, 
no; flooded in 1871, 91. 

English conquest of Orissa in 1803, xviiL 
i96-2oa 

English factories in Bengal See F^c- 
tones. 

English schools. See Educational Statis- 
tics. 

English, Early Settlements of the, in 
Biengal. See History. 

Enhancement of rent, m the 24 Paxganis, 
i. 157; in Nadiyi, ii. 82, 83; in Jessor, 
ii. 73 ; in Midnapur, iii. 108, 163 ; in 
Hiigli, iii. 35^, 357, 383; in Bard- 
wdn, iv. 86, 147 ; in B^kuri, iv. 
266, 282 ; in Blrbhdm, iv. 362, 371 ; 
in Dacca, v. 93, loi ; in Bakarcanj, 
v. 209; Faridpur, v. 318, 325; in Mai- 
mansinh, v. 456 ; in Chittagong, vi. 
162 ; in NoikhAli, vi. 297, 298, 309, 
315 ; in Tipoerah, vi. 395, 414 ; in 
Maldah, vii. 89, 1 10 ; in Rangpur, vii.* 
263, 280, 281, 282, 290 ; in Dinajpur, 
vii. 395. 403. 404 J in RAjshiihl, viii. 
72; in Bogii, viii. 247-248; in Murshid- 
ib4d, ix. 120^ 130, 201; in Pdbni, ix. 
317. 32P» 32" ; in PatnA, xi. 117 ; in 
Sinn, xi. 295 ; in Gayd, xiL 105, 
126, 127 ; in Shihdbid, xii. 240, 248 ; 
in Tirhut, xiii. 169; in ChampAian, 



282, 284, 298; in Bhigalpur, xiv. 240; 
in the Santil Paigan£, xiv. 341, 342, 
345. 363; in Mon^yr, xv. 117, 158; in 
Pumiah, xv. 340, 341, 397; in Haz4ri- 
bdgh, xvi. 106, 135, 136, 177 ; in 
LohArdagd, xvi. 397, 401, 406, 470- 
473; in Singbhtim, xvii. 117, 118; in 
Miabhum, xvii. 337, 338* 356; in Cut- 
tack, xviii. 109, 1 10 ; in Balasor, xviiL 

394. 295- 

Entalli, suburb of Calcutta, 24 Parganas, 
i. 205. 

Enumeration, Method of, in taking the 
Census. See Census of 1872. 

Epidemics. See Medical Aspects, Cho- 
lera, Diseases, Fever, &c. 

Era of the Hill Tipperah State, vi. 47a 

Eranch pargand^ and embankment in 
Midnapur, iii. 145, 198. 

Erannoboas, ancient name of the Son 
river, q. v. 

Estates, Number and Subdivision of, in 
the 24 Pax^ands, i. 187 ; in Nadiyi, 
ii. 115, no; in Jessor, ii. 26^ 263, 
308 ; in Midnapur, ill 157 ; in Hiigli, 
iii. 378, ^80; in Bardwdn, iv. 146, 
147; in Bankuri^ iv. 282; in Birbhiiuii, 
iv. 362, 371 ; in Dacca, v. 130 ; in 
Bdkarganj, v. 226; in Faridpur, v. 
343; in Maimansih, ▼. 465; in Chitta- 
gong Hill Tracts, vi. 98; in Chittagong, 
vi. 214; in NodkhiUi, vL 332 ; in Tip- 
perah, VL 429, 430 ; in Maldah, vii. 
106, 1 10 ; in Ranepur, vii. 252, 27^ 
326, 327 ; in Diiuypur, vii. 422 ; m 
RdjshAhi, viii. 97, 98, 118-121 ; in 
B<^tA, viii. 229-235, 302-304 ; in Mur- 
shiddbid, ix. 116, 117, 201, 232-236; 
in PAbnA, ix. 310, 312, 353, 355, 366- 
369 ; in Dirjiling, x. 182 ; in Jal- 
piiguri, X. 304-307 ; in Kuch Behar, 
X. 435; in Patni« xi. 187; in Sarin, xi. 
343 ; in Gay&, xii. 125, 126; in Shi- 
hibad, xii. 275 ; in Tirhut, xiii. 168 ; 
in Champ&ran, xiii. 298 ; in Bhigalpur, 
xiv. 200, 201 ; in Haziribdgh, xvL 
Ii8» 119^ 176; in Lohirdagd, xvi. 
362-38^ 392-403. 4". 470, 4«2; in 
Singbhum, xvii. 117; in Mipbhiim, 
xvii. 354 ; in Cuttack, xviii. 202, 203 ; 
in Balasor, xviii. 344, 346: in Puri, 
xix. 157. 
Estates paying revenue direct to Govern- 
ment 5>^ Tenures of land. 
Estates under the Court of Wards. See 

Court of Wards. 
Estates, Rent-free, in the 24 Pargands, i. 
278-281 ; in Dacca, v. 99 ; m Bikar- 
ganj, V, 368, 377-379 ; in Maimansinh, 
V. 453 ; in Maldah, vii. 83, 84 ; in 



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GENERAL INDEX, 



Rangpur, vii. 273, 275, 283 ; in Dinij- 
pur, vii. 404 ; in Riishihi, viii. 69-71 ; 
in Bogri, viii. 239-243; in Murshiddb&d, 
ix. i(% 121, 122; in P^bni, ix. 314- 
316. See also Tenures of land. 

Estates, Resumed. See Tenures of Land. 

Estuaries. See Rivers. 

Ethnical Division of the People, in the 
24 Pargan&s, i. 50; in the Sundarbans, 
i. 316-320; in Nadiyd, ii. 42; in Jessor, 
ii. 194 ; in Midnapur, iii. 52-58 ; in 
Hiigli, iii. 284-291 ; in Bard wan, iv. 
43-45 ; in Binkur^ iv. 219-221 ; in 
Birbhum, iv. 326-329 ; in Dacca, v. 
38-46 ; in Bdkarganj, v. 188-190 ; in 
Faridpur, v. 2^^-286 ; in Maiman- 
sinh, V. 398-401 ; in the Chittagong 
Hill Tracts, vi. 37, 38 ; in Chittagong, 
vi. 138- 141 ; in Noikhili, vi. 271- 
273; in Tipperah, vi. 374-37^; in 
HUl Tipperah, vi. 482 ; in Maldah, vii. 
40 ; in Kangpur, vii 21 1-22 x ; in Dinij- 
pur, vii. 373-376 ; in R^jshihi, viiL 
37; in Bo^i, viii. 162-167; in Murshi- 
dib&d, ix. 42-45 ; in Pibni, ix. 281- 
284 ; in Dizjiling, x. 44-47 ; in Jalpii- 
guri, X. 252-254; in Kuch Behar, x. 
340-342; in Patni, xi. 36-38; in Sdran, 
xi. 244-246 ; in Gayi, xiL 32-34 ; in 
Shihibid, xiL 183-186; in Tirhut, xiii. 
37-^9; in Champjran, xiii. 236-239; in 
Bhagalpur, xiv. 47-51 ; in the Santil 
Parganas, xiv. 280-284 ; in Monghyr, 
XV. 50-54. ; in Pumiah, xv. 249-252 ; in 
Hazkrib&gh, xvi. 59-62 ; in Lohuxlagi, 
xvL 251-256; in Singbhi!im, xvii. 36-39; 
in the Tributary States of Chutii Ndg- 
pur, xvii. 156-164, 169-175, 181-187, 
192-195, 203-207, 216, 217, 230-235, 
243, 244, 24^, 249; in Minbhi^m, xvii. 
273-288 ; in Cuttack, xviil 67-70 ; in 
Balasor, xviii. 267-270 ; in Pun, xix. 
30-34 ; in the Orissa Tributary States, 
xix. 208-217. 

£t Kadpur Kksimpur Machhudkhil, par- 
gafuiwi Tipperaii, vL 443. 

Euphorbise, Species of, in Rangpur, vii. 
188. 

Eurasians. See Ethnical Division of the 
People. 

Europeans. See Ethnical Division of the 
People. 

European troops, health of the, in Hazdri- 
bdgh, xvi. 202-204. 

Everest, mountain in the Nep^rhills, x. 
20. 

Excise revenue. See Expenditure and 
Revenue. 

Exhibition, agricultural, at Faridpur, ▼. 
292, 293. 



Expeditions against the Lushiis, vL 20^ 
21, 64, 470, 471. 

Expedition against the Rijd of Ardkin in 
1664-65, vi. 1 1 1- 1 14. 

Expedition into Assam by Husdin Shih, 
vii. 315. 

Expedition, military, against the Pahi- 
nis in 1772, xiv. 303, 304. 

Expenditure and Revenue, past and pre- 
sent, of the 24 Paiganis, i. 183-188 ; 
of the Sundarbans, i. 346 ; of Nadiyd, 
ii. 111-115 ; of Jessor, ii. 307 ; of Mid- 
napur, iii. 154-157 ; of Hiigli, iii. 378- 
381 ; of Bard win, iv. 144; ofBdnkura, 
iv. 279 ; of Birbhum, iv. 395, 396 ; of 
Dacca, v. 126-180; of Bdkarganj, v. 
217-220 ; of Faridpur, v. 341-343 ; of 
Maimansinh, v. 462-464 ; of the Chitta- 
gong Hill Tracts, vL 95-97 ; of Chitta- 
gong, vi. 2x2, 213; of Noikhdli, vi. 331, 
332; of Tipperah, vi. 428-430; of 
Maldah, vii. 105 ; of Rangpur, vii. 325, 
326 ; of Dindjpur, vii. 415-421 ; of 
Rijshdhi, viii. 92-99; of Bogrd, viii. 
280-282 ; of Murshidabdd, ix. 196-201 ; 
of Pibni, ix. 353-355 5 o^ DirjiUng, 
X. 178-182 ; of Jalpalgurl, x. 301-304 ; 
of Kuch Behar, x. 432-435 ; of Patni, 
xi. 183-185 ; of Sdran, xi. 338-342 ; 
of Gayi, xii. 122-126; of Sh&habdd, 
xii. 271-275 ; of Tirhut, xiii. 166, 167 ; 
of Champaran, xiii. 297-299 ; of Bhi- 
^pur, xiv. 194-200; of the Santdl 
Pargands, xiv. 362, 363 ; of Monghyr, 
XV. 1 55- 5157 ; of Pumiah, xv. 393-397 ; 
of Hazdribagh, xvi. 173-177 ; of Lo- 
hdrdagd, xvi. 470-472 ; of Singbhdm, 
xvii. 1x5-117 ; of the Tributary States 
of Chutii Nagpur, xvii. 152, 219, 220 ; 
of Minbhum, xvii. 353-355; of Cuttack, 
xviii. 200-202 ; of Balasor, xviii. 344- 
346 ; of Purl, xix. 156. 

Expenses of living. See Material Con- 
dition of the People. 

Exports and imports of the 24 Pargands, 
L 1 7 1- 173 ; of the Sundarbans, i. 344, 
345 ; of Nadiyd, ii. 104, 105 ; of Jessor, 
ii. 302-304; of Midnapur, iii. 152; of 
Hugh, iii. 375; of BardwAn, iv. 135; 
of BdnkurA, iv. 277 ; of Birbhum, iv. 
380; of Dacca, v. 113-115 ; of Bakar- 
ganj, V. 215, 216 ; of Faridpur, v. 269,' 
339» 340 ; of Maimansinh, v. 388, 461 ; 
of the Chittagong Hill Tracts, vL 
28, 84-86; of Chittagong, vi. 130^ 
133. 154, 155. 188-190, 194. 196- 
199, 207, 210, 215; of Nodkhili, 
vi. 256, 292, 294, 322, 325-327; of 
Tipperah, vi. 419, 421, 423, 424; of 
Hill Tipperah, vi. 508, 512, 513; of 



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GENERAL INDEX, 



291 



Maldah, vii. 94, 97, 98, 100- loj; of 
Rangpur, vii. 304, 305, 307, 308 ; of 
Din&jpur, vii. 405, 4x1-414, 441; of 
Rajshihi, viii. 88 ; of Bogr^ viii. 222, 
271 ; of Murshidibid, ix. 29, 30, 157- 
168 ; of Pabni, ix. 274, 275, 334, 336- 
339 ; of Ddrjiling, x. 158-164 ; of Jal- 
p^iguH, X. 237, 297, 299; of Kuch 
Behar, x. 337, 399; of PatnA, xi. 25, 
26, 156-158, 169-177; of Siran, xi. 
260. 323, 327, 328, 329, 331-334; of 
Gayi, xii. 11 7- 119; of Sh^Mbad, xii. 
263-266, 268, 269 ; of Tirhut, xiii. 129- 
162 ; of Champiran, xiii. 290-296 ; of 
Bhigalpur, xiv. 183- 191- ; of the Santil 
Paiganas, xiv. 354-361 ; of Monghyr, 
XV. 142-153; of Purniah, xv. 371-377; 
of Haz£rib4gh, xvi. 88-171 ; of Lohar- 
dagi^ xvi. 420 ; of Singbhum, xvii. 105, 
106; of False Point, xviii. 31, 32; of 
Cuttack, xviii. 175, 176; of Balasor, 
xviii. 337-340^ 342-344; of Puri, xix. 
153. 



X ii. 95. 
249-254, 298-301 ; in Bard win, iv. 
135-136 ; in Bankuri, iv. 278 ; in Bir- 
bhum, iv. 382 ; in Dacca, v. 106 ; in 
Farfdpur, v. 338, 341 ; in Maldah, vii. 
99; in Dinijpur, vii 439, 443, 445, 
455 ; in Rijshihi, viii. 87 ; in Mur- 
shidibid, x. 152, 153; in Pibna, ix. 293, 
33O1 331 ; in Saran, xi. 285, 286 ; in 
Tirhut, xiii. 22, 23, 24, 26, 52, 53, 54, 
57, 58, 61, 62, 66, 73, 74 ; in Cham- 
paran, xiii. 269 ; in Monghyr, xv. 138, 
139 ; in Purniah, xv. 360-370. 

Factories, Old English (East India 
Company), French, Dutch, ^h:., 
in the 24 Parganiis, i. 102, 107 ; 
in Midnapur, iiL 61, 62 ; in Hugli» iii. 
374; in Birbhum, iv. 341, 342; in 
Dacca, v. 45» 4^, 67, 68, 113, 122, 124; 
.in Maimansinh, v. 459, in Noikhilli, 
yi. 247, 288 ; in Maldah, vii. 48, 49 ; 
in Rijshdhi, viii. 82 ; in Bogri, viii. 
269 ; m Murshidibid, ix. 82, 88, 91 ; 
in Patnd, xL 71 ; in Balasor,, xviii. 281. 

Factories, Shellac, in Birbhum, iv. 379, 
382. 

Factories, Silk, in Midnapur, iii. 149, 
150; in Birbhum, iv. 381, 382; in R4j- 
sh4hi, viii. 87 ; in Bq^d^ viii. 269 ; in 
Murshidibdd, ix. ^^ 151, 152. 

Failure of crops* See Famines. 

Fairs and religious gatherings in thie 24 
Pargadis, I 75, 102, 105, iio^ iii, 



118, 119, 199, 228, 229, 235, 247 ; in 
NadiyA, ii. 55-57, 140 ; in Jessor, it 
336-338 ; in Midnapur, iii. 152 ; in 
HuglC iii. 244. 245, 375 ; in Bardwdn, 
iv. 67, 134 ; in Binkuri, iv. 277 ; in 
Birbhi!im, iv. 343 ; in Dacca, v. 1 14, 
148 ; in Bikarganj, v. ^i, 215, 247 ; 
in Faridpur, v. 292, 293, 340 ; in Mai- 
mansinh, V. 461, 479 ; in the Chitta- 
gong Hill Tracts, vi. 104, 105 ; in 
Chittagong, vi. 232, 233 ; in NoJkhilf, 
▼i. 323* 324; in Tipperah, vi. 420^ 
452 ; in HUl Tipperah, vL 509 ; in 
Maldah, vii. 67, loi, 149; inRangpur, 
vii. 308 ; in Din^jpur, vii. 386-388 ; 
in Rajshihi, viii. 56, 88, 123 ; in 
BogdL, viii. 312, 313; in Murshiddbid, 
ix. 94, 95. 157, 243; inPAbnA, ix. 334, 
374; in Ddrjiling, x. 76; in JalpAiguri, 
a. 269, 270^ 297 ; m Kuch Behar, x. 
398, 444 ; in Patni, xi. 59 ; in SAran, 
xi. 261, 262 ; in Gayd, xii. 149, 150; 
in Shdhibdd, xii. 264, 265 ; in Tirhut, 
xiii 42, 56, 59» 61-63, 67, 68, 69, 
71, 162, 184, 187, 193, 200; in 
Champdran, xiii. 253, 254, 316 ; in 
Bhigalpur, xiv. 97, 98, 105 ; in the 
Santil Parganis, xiv. 271, 381, 382 ;* 
in Monghvr, xv. 206, 208; in Purniah, 
XV. 260-262, 371 ; in Hazirib^h, xvi. 
28, 215 ; in LohirdagA, xvi. 323, 324 ; 
in Singbht!im, xvii. 70^ 71, 144 ; in 
MAnbham, xvii. 297, 298, 370^ 371 ; 
in Cuttack, xviii. 239, 240; in Balasor, 
xviii. 284; in Puri, xbc. 59-67, 175, 
176. 

Fairs as Causes of Disease. See Medical 
Aspects, &c 

Fakhardbdd, parganA in Tirhut, xiiL 
187. 

Fakir, market village in the Sundarbans^ 
L 227. 

Faklrdn rent-free grants of land. See 
Tenures of land. 

Fakirganj, thdnd in Rangpur, vii. 161. 

Fakirganj, market village in DinAjpur, 
viL 365, 413, 435, 443, 455. 

Fakirhit police outpost, sugar factory, 
and market in Jessor, ii. 231-302, 296. 

Fakfrkundf, old name of Rangpur, vii. 
156, 317. 318. 

Fallow land in NadiyA, ii. 82; in Jessor, 
ii. 274; in Midnapur, iii. 113; in 
Hi^H, iii. 358 ; in Dacca, v. 102 ; in 
Bakar^nj, v. 211 ; in Faridpur, v. 
330 ; m Maimansinh, v. 457 ; in Chit- 
tagong, vi. 184 ; in Tipperah, vi. 415 ; 
in Hill Tipperah, vi. 503 ; in Mal- 
dah, vii. 90 ; in Rangpur, vii. 245 ; 
in DinAjpur, viL 408; in RAjshihi, 



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GENERAL INDEX. 



viiL 64, 69, 78 ; in Bogri, yiii. 222, 
226, 228, 250; in Murshidibdd, ix. 
131, 176 ; in Pibni, ix. 315 ; in Dir- 
jiling^ X. 103, 104 ; in JalpaiguH, x. 
280; in Kuch Bchar, x. 383, 387, 394; 
in S&ran, xi. 305 ; in Tirhut, xiii. 115; 
in Haz^bagh, xvi. 135; in Lohirdaga, 
^' 353» 362 ; in Singbhtim, xvii. 94 ; 
in Balasor, xviii. 322. See also Rota- 
tion of Crops. 

False Point harbour, description of, xviii. 
27-30 ; history of, xviii. 30, 31 ; trade 
of, xviii. 31, 32 ; future capabilities of, 
xvui. 32, 33. 

Falti, in the 24 Parganis, site of old 
Dutch factory, i. 102, 239. 

Family history of the Maharii^ of Bard- 
wan, iv. 137-143; of the RijAsof Bish- 
nupur, iv. 230-237 ; of the Muhamma- 
dan R^j^ of Birbhum, iv. 393-395 ; of 
the Rijis of Rajshdhi, viii. 54, 55 ; of 
the Seths of Murshidibid, ix. 252-265; 
of the Rdji of Kuch Behar, x. 426; 
of the landholders of Haziribdgh, xvi. 
1 17-127, 206, 207; of the Rajis of 
Chutii Ndgpur, xvi. 444-447. 

Family tax in Hill Tipperah, vi. 509^ 

• 510. 

Famines in the 24 Parganils, L X59-j62 ; 
in Nadiy^ ii. 87, 88-93 > ^^ Jessor, ii. 
276, 277 ; in Midnapur, iii. 120-133 ; 
in Hugli, iii. 362-360 ; in Bardwin, iv. 
98-105; in Bankur^ iv. 271-274; m 
Dacca, v. 103 ; in Bdkareanj, v. 212 ; 
in Chittagon|^ vi. 163, 184; in No&- 
khiUi, vi. 318 ; in Hill Tipperah, vi. 
507 ; in Maldah, vii. 92 ; in Rangpur, 
vii. 293-298 ; in Dindjpur, vii. 409 ; in 
Rijshiuii, viii. 78, 79 ; in Bogd^ viii. 
251-266 ; in Murshidibdd, ix. 136-140; 
in Pdbni, ix. 326, 327 ; in Darjfling, 
X. 125 ; in Jalpiiguri, x. 293 ; in Kuch 
Behar, x. 395 ; in Patni, xi. 131-134 ; 
in Siran, xi. 310-31^ ; in Gayd, xii. 
108-111; in Shah^bid, xii. 251-254; 
in Tirhut, xiii. 11 8- 120; in Cham- 
piran, xiii. 285-287 ; in Bhigalpur, xiv. 
160-173; in the Santdl Parganis, xiv. 
303* 3«3. 2Ah 346-351 ; in Monghyr, 
XV. 127-134; in Pumiah, xv. 342, 343, 
346-349 ; in Hazirib^h, xvi. 138 ; in 
Lohudagd, xvi. 409 ; in Sin^^bhum, 
xvii. 95*^; in M^bhum, xvii. 340- 
346; in Orissa, xviiL 148-173* I94» 
328-334, xix. 142-150. 

Famines of 1769-70, 1777, 1788, 1866, 
and 1874. iWr j^amines, su£ra. 

Famine warnings in the 24 Parganis, i. 
162, 163 ; in the Sundarbans, L 343- 
344 ; in Nadiyi, iL 87, 88 ; in Jessor, 



ii. 277, 278; in Midnapnr, iii. 119, 
120 ; in Ht^lf, iii. 366, 376 ; in Bard- 
win, iv. 97, 98 ; in Bankur^ iv. 274 ; 
in BfrbhiSm, iv. 372 ; in Dacca, v. 105- 
106; in Bikarganj, v. 213; in Farid- 
pur, V. 332; in Maimansinh, v. 457, 
458; in Noikhdli, vL 318, 319; in 
Tipperah, vL 416 ; in Msddah, vii. 92, 
93 ; in Rangpur, vii. 208-301 ; in 
DiniUpur, vii. 409 ; in Rajshahi, viiL 
80, 81 ; in Murshiddbad, ix. 136; in 
Pabni, ix. 327, 328; in Darjfling; x. 
125-127; in Jalp4iguH, x. 293, 294; 
in Kuch Behar, x. 395, 396 ; in Patna, 
xi. 134, 135; in Siran, xi. 315; in 
Gayi, xii. ill ; in Shdhdb^, xii. 255 ; 
in Tirhut, xiii. 120, 121 ; in Cham- 
pdran, xiii. 287, 288 ; in the Santdl Par- 
gad^ xiv. 350^ 351 ; in Monghyr, xv. 
134. »35; in Pumiah, xv. 349; in 
Hazdrib&gh, xvi. 138, 139; in Lohir- 
dagi, xvi. ^09-411 ; in Singbhdm, xviL 
98 ; in M&nbhum, xvii. 346, 347 ; in 
Cuttack, xviii. 38, 148; in Bal&sor, 
xviii. 326-328. 

Farddhagar, headquarters of Pheni Sub- 
division, Noakhdli, vi. 342, 343. 

Farduisy a sect of Muhammadans, in the 
24 Parganis, i. 75, 113, 115 ; in the 
Sundarbans, i. 317 ; in Nadiyi, it 51 ; 
in Jessor, ii. 199, 200; in Bardvr&n, iv. 
54; in Dacca, v. 159; in B^arganj, v. 
195* 196 ; in Faridpur (originsQ home 
of the sect), v. 200; in Maimansinh, v. 
409; in Noikhil(, vi. 277, 278; in Tip- 
perah, vi. 383 ; in Maldah, vii 47 ; in 
Rangpur, vii. 222. See also Muham- 
madans. 

Farakhabad, pargand in Tipperah, vi. 

443- 
Farakhpur, pargand in Tirhut, xiii. 187. 
Fardsatghar, mahal \ii\Sarkdr Sitg&on, i. 

362. 
Fardsdinffd, French settlement in Mnr- 

shiddbad, ix. 91. 
Farisddng^ French settlement in Bala- 

sor, xviii. 283. 
Fardsganj, police outpost in No4khil(, vL 

333" 
FARmpuR District (Vol. V.) — 

Geographical Situation, Area, Head- 

Suarters, and Boundaries, 255 ; Juris- 
iction and Formation of District, 256; 
General Aspect of Countrv, 257-260; 
•River System, 260-263 ; AUuvion and 
Diluvion, 263; Changes in River Chan- 
nels, 264-268; Lakes, Marshes, &c, 
268; River Traffic, &c, 269; Fisheries, 
Fish, &C., 270-275 ; Marsh Reclama- 
tion, 275 ; Long-stemmed Rice, Lines 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



GENERAL INDEX. 



293 



of Drainage, Mineral Products, &c., 
276; FeriE Natures^ 277 ; Estimates of 
Population prior to 1872, 278 ; Census 
of 1872, its Agencies and Results, 279- 
285; Population according to Sex and 
Age, 280; according to Occupation, 282- 
254; Ethnical Division of the People, 
282-286; Castes, 286-288; Religious 
Division of the People, 288-291 ; Town 
Population, Municipalities, &c., 291- 
295; Material Condition of the People, 
295 ; Agriculture, 296-330 ; Rice, 296- 
305; Pulse Crops, 306; Oil-seeds, 
Fibres, Sugar-cane, 308; Date-Palm, 
Indigo, 309 ; Safflower, Tobacco, 310 ; 
Gdnj'd and Fdn, 311; Fruit Trees, 312- 
315 ; Area under Cultivation, Out-turn 
of Crops, &c., 315-317 ; Condition of 
the Peasantry, 317; Domestic Animals, 
318 ; Agricultural Implements, 319 ; 
Wages and Prices, 320-322 ; Weights 
and Measures, 322-324 ; Day-labourers 
and Spare Land, 324 ; Land Tenures, 
325; Rates of Rent, 325-329; Manure, Ir- 
rigation, 329, 330 ; Natural Calamities, 
330; Floods and Drought, 33 1; Famine 
Warnings, 332 ; Foreign and Absentee 
Landlords, 333; Roads, &c, 334; 
Manufactures, 334*339; Sugar, 334- 
338 ; Condition of the Manufacturing 
Clares, 339 ; Trade and Commerce, 
Capital and Interest, 340; Institutions, 
Incomes, and Income-tax, 341 ; Ad- 
ministration, 341-357 ; Revenue and 
Expenditure, 341-343 ; Land Revenue 
and Subdivision of Estates, 343, 344 ; 
Courts and Land Law, 344 ; Police 
Statistics, 345 ; Criminal Classes, 346 ; 
Jail Statistics, 347, 348 ; Educational 
Statistics, 348-352; Postal Statistics, 
353; Fiscal Divisions, 353-356; Sub- 
divisional Administration, 357 ; Cli- 
mate, Diseases, &c., 358; Mediod 
Charities, Native Practitioners, 359; 
Indigenous Drugs, 360 ; Conservancy, 
Sanitation, &c, 360-362. 

Faridpur town, Agricultural Exhibition 
at, V. 292, 293 ; municipal revenue, 
population, &c., v. 294. 

Farming tenures. See Tenures of land. 

Farrakhabid,/0r^ff<iinMaldah, vii. 133. 

Fasl^ jamd land tenures. See Tenures of 
land. 

Fathdbdd,./0r^if^ in Balasor, xviii. 362. 

Fdtaha Dawdz Dakum festival, Patnd, xL 
62. 

Fathidbdd and Jalilibdd, provinces under 
early Muhammadan rule, comprising 
the present districts of Dacca, Bdkar- 
ganj, and Faridpur, v. 119. 



Fathiigarh, village in Khandp&di State, 

Orissa, xix. 300. 
Fathijangpur, pargand in Rangpur, vii. 

253. 
Fathijangpur, pargand in Dinajpur, vu. 

442. 
Fathipur, market village in the 24 Par- 

ganis, L 227. 
Fathipur, mahal in Sarkdr Sitg&on, i. 

3^. 

Fathipur, pargand in Bfrbhum, iv. 424. 

Fathipur, pargand in Rangpur, vii. 253.^ 

Fathipur, market village in DidLjpur, vii. 
430, 452. 

Fathipur, thdnd in Sdran, xi. 358. 

Fathipur Singhi^ pargand in Pumiah, 
XV. 296, 335, 420, 421. ^^ „ „ 

Fatwd, town in Patnd, xi. 25, 66, 84, 85, 
191. 

Fatw^ thdnd in Patni, xi. 35, 205. 

Faujddrsy Muhammadan judicial and 
militaiy officers. See Village Officials. 

Faujddri gunidshtds or rent collectors. 
See Village Officials. 

Fee-simple lands. See Tenures of land. 

Females, Proportion of, in the population, 
in the 24 Parganis, i. 44, 45, 49» 5° \ 
in Nadiyi, ii. 38 ; in Jessor, ii. 189 ; 
in Midnapur, iii. 41, 44 ; in Huglf, iii. 
277 ; m Bardwdn, iv. 38, 39 ; in Bdn- 
kurd, iv. 213, 215 ; in Birbhibo, iv. 
324, 325 ; in Dacca, v. 34 ; in Bikar- 
ganj, V. 182 ; in Faridpur, v. 280 ; in 
Maimansinh, v. 394; in the Chittagong 
Hill Tracts, vi. 36, 37 ; in Chittagong, 
vi. 137, 138, 147, 148, 151 5 in NoA- 
khAll, vi. 269-271 ; in Tipperah, vi. 
372, 373; in Hill Tipperah, vi. 
480 ; in Maldah, vii. 37-39 ; in Rang- 
pur, vii. 208-210; in Dinijpur, viL 370- 
373 ; in Rijshihi, viii. 36 ; in Bogri, 
viii. 159, 160; in Murshidibid, ix. 38- 
41; in Pibn^ ix. 279-281; in Diijiling, 
X. 41-43 ; m JalpAiguri, x. 247-249 ; 
in Kuch Behar, x. 340 ; in Patni, xi. 
36 ; in Siran, xi. 240, 242, 243 ; in 
Gay^ xii. 30; in Shihibdd, xii. 181, 
183; in Tirhut, xiii. 35; in Champdran, 
xiii. 233, 235 ; in BhJgalpur, xiv. 47 ; 
in the SantAl Parganif, xiv. 278, 279 ; 
in Monghyr, xv. 49; in Pumiah, xv. 
245 ; in Hazdrib^h, xvi. 55-58 ; in 
Lohirdagd, xvi. 248-251; in Singbhiim, 
xvii. J5 ; in the Tributary States of 
Chutia Ndgpur, xvii. 153-156; inMAn- 
bhtim, xvii. 270-272; in Cuttack, xviii. 
64, 66 ; in Balasor, xviii. 266, 267 ; in 
Puri, xix. 27-30 ; in the Orissa Tribu- 
tary States, 205-208. 

Females, Occupations of, in the 24 Par- 
6 



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i94 



GENERAL INDEX. 



p;anis, I 44, 45 ; in Nadiyi, ii. 41, 42 ; 
in Jessor, ii. 191, 102 ; in Midnapur, 
iii. 47, 48 ; in Hugll, iii. 27^ 280 ; in 
Baldwin, iv. 42, 43 ; in Bankura, iv. 
218, 219 ; in Dacca, v. 37, 38 ; in 
Bakarganj, v. 187, 188 ; in FaHdpur, 
V. 284 ; in Maimansinh, v. 398 ; in 
Murshidabad, ix. 115 ; in Pabni, ix. 
289, 307, 331, 352; in Kuch Behar, x. 

387. 

Female education. Sa Educational Stat- 
istics. 

Fera Natura^ of the 24 Pargan^ i. 37, 
38 ; of the Sundarbans, i. 315, 316, 
331 ; of Nadiyd, ii. 34 ; of Jessor, ii. 
184, 185 ; of Midnapur, iii. 39, 40 ; of 
Hiiglf, iii. 266; of Bardwdn, iv. 29; of 
Bankur^ iv. 21 1, 212; of Birbhum, iv. 
322 ; of Dacca, v. 27-41 ; of Bakar- 
ganj, v. 177 ; of Faridpur, v. 277 ; of 
Maimansinh, v. 391 ; of the Chittagong 
Hill Tracts, vi. 33, 34 ; of Chittagong, 
vi. 133; of Noakhilf, vi. 258-266; 
of Tipperah, vi. 370; of Hill Tipperah, 
vi. 478-480; of Maldah, vii. 34, 35, 
129; of Rangpur, vii. 195-204; of Din- 
ijpur, vii. 3§5-368, 441 ; of Rijshahi, 
viii. 31 ; of Bogrd, viii. 151, 152 ; of 
Murshidabad, ix. 34, 35; of Hbnd, ix. 
277, 278 ; of Darjiling, x. 39 ; of Tal- 
pdiguri, X. 245, 246 ; of Kuch Behar, 
X* 338 ; of Patnd, xi. 31 ; of Saran, xi. 
237, 238 ; of Gayd, xii. 28 ; of Shdh- 
ibad, xii. 179, I50; of Tirhut, xiii. 30, 
31 ; of Bhdj^pur, xiv. 40-44; of the 
Santil Pai^anas, xiv. 273 ; of Mon- 
ghyr, XV. 35-46 ; of Pumiah, xv. 236- 
240 ; of Hazaribagh, xvi. 41, 42; of Lo- 
h^rdaga, xvi. 246 ; of Singbhiim, xvii. 
24-31 ; of the Tributary States of 
Chutii N^ur, xvii. 168, 181, 191, 
215, 230; of Mdnbhum, xvii. 266- 
268 ; of Cuttack, xviii. 59; of Balasor, 
xviii. 264 ; of Pud, xix. 26, 27 ; of 
the Orissa Tributary States, xix. 203. 

Ferries in Midnapur, iii. ia8 ; in Huglf, 
iii. 256, 370 ; m Bardwan, iv. 25 ; in 
Maimansinh, v. 387, 388 ; in Chitta- 
gong, vi. 128, 129; in Nodkhdli, vi. 
253» 254, 320 ; in Tipperah, vi. 363, 
364 ; in Maldah, vii. 24, 30^ 94 ; in 
Rangpur, vii. 169, W, 304 ; in Rij- 
shim, viii. 82; in Pabnd, ix. 272, 273, 
330 ; in Jalpaigurf, x. 235, 236 ; in 
Sdran, xi. 228, 263, 357, 359, 360; 
in Gayd, xii. 20^ 65 ; in Tirhut, xiii. 
21. 

Festivals, Religious Gatherings, &c., in 
the 24 Parganas, i. 75, 102, 105, no, 
III, 118, 119, 199, 228, 229, 235, 247; 



in NadiyA, ii. 55-57, 140; in Jessor, ii. 
336-338 ; in Midnapur, iii. 152 ; in 
Hiigll, iii. 244, 245, 375; in Bardwin, 
iv. 67, 134 ; in Bdnkuii, iv. 277 ; in 
Birbhiim, iv. 343; in Dacca, v. 114, 
148 ; in Bakarganj, v. 201, 215, 247 ; 
in Faridpur, v. 292, 293, 340 ; in Mai- 
mansinh, V. 461, 479; in the Chitta- 
gong Hill Tracts, vi. 104, 105 ; in 
Chittagong, vi. 232, 233; in NoikhAli, 



vii. 308; in Dindjpur, vii. 386-388; 
in Rijshihi, viii. 56, 88» 123; in 
Bogr^ viii. 312, 313; in Murshi&b&d, 
ix. 94, 95» 157, 243; in P4bn4, ij^ 334, 
374 ; in Ddrjiling, x. 76 ; in Jalpaigurl, 
X. 269, 270, 297 ; in Kuch Behar, x. 
398, 444 ; in Patna, xi. 57, ^9, 62 ; in 
Siran, xi. 261, 262 ; fn Gaya, xii. 149, 
150 ; in Shihdbad, xii. 264, 265 ; in 
Tirhut, xiii. 42, 56, 59, 61-63, 67, 68, 
69, 71, 162, 184, 187, 193, 200; in 
Champdran, xiii. 253, 254, 316; in 
Bhdgalpur, xiv. 97, 98, 105 ; in the 
Santdl Parganas, xiv. 271, 381, 382 ; 
in Monghyr, xv. 206, 208 ; in Pumiah, 
XV. 260-262, 371 ; in Haasiribdgh, xvL 
28, 215 ; in Lohdrdagd, xvi. 323, 324 ; 
in Singbhi!un, xvii. 70, 71, 144; in 
Manbhum, xvii. 297, 298, 370, 371; 
in Cuttack, xviii. 239, 240; in Balasor, 
xviii. 284; in Puri, xix. 59-67, 1 75, 
176. 
Fever, in th« 24 Pargands, i. 244 ; in 
Nadiyd, ii. 139; in Jessor, ii. 212, 
330» 335 ; in Midnapur, iii. 229-244 ; 
in Hugli, iiL 418-437 ; malarious epi- 
demic, in Bardwdn, its origin, nature, 
and progress, iv. 1 79-181 ; amount of 
sickness, iv. 181-184 ; mortality, iv. 
185-187 ; remedial measures, iv. 187- 
190; food relief, iv. 190-192; reports 
from the permanent dispensaries, iv. 
193-196 ; in Birbhum, history of the 
fever, iv. 439-441 ; type and character 
of the fever, and mortality, iv. 441- 
446; sanitary state of the district, iv. 
446-449; causes of the fever, iv. 449- 
451 ; relief measures, iv. 451-454 ; 
treatment of the fever, iv. 454, 455 ; 
in Dacca, v. 143 ; in Bdkai^;anj, v. 
247 ; in Faridpur, v. 358 ; in Mai- 
mansinh, v. 479, 480; in the Chit- 
tagong Hill Tracts, vi. lOd ; in Chit- 
tagong, vi. 229; in Noakhdli, vt 
347 ; in Tipperah, vi. 449, 450 ; in 
Maldah, vii. 146, 147; in Rangpur, vii. 
346 ; in Dindjpur, vii. 457 ; m Rdj- 



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GENERAL INDEX. 



a95 



shihf, viii. 122; in Bogrd, viii. 306, 

a; malarious epidemic, in Murshida- 
ix. 239-242 ; in PdbnA, ix. 372, 
373 ; in Ddrjiling, x. 199, 200 ; in Jal- 
paiguri, X. 321, 322 ; in Kuch Behar, 
X. 441 ; in Patna, xi. 212 ; in Shih- 
^bad, xii. 287 ; in Tirhut, xiii. 202 ; in 
Champdran, xiii. 314 ; in Bhagalpur, 
xiv. 251; in the Santil Parganis, xiv. 
380; in Monghyr, xv. 188; in Pumiah, 
XV. ^32 ; in Hazirib^h, xvi. 201 ; in 
Lohardagd, xvi. 484; in Singbhum, 
xvii. 140^ 141; inManbhum, xvii. 370; 
in Cuttack, xviii. 235; in Balasor, xviii. 
367, 368; in Puri, xix. 174. 

Fibres, Cultivation of, in the 24 Par- 
ganis, i. 143- 145; in NadiyA, ii. 64, 
67 ; in Jessor, ii. 254 ; in Midnapur, 
iii. 80; in Hiiglf, iii. 334; in Bard- 
win, iv. 72; in Binkuri, iv. 246; 
in Dacca, v. 84-88 ; in Bakarganj, v. 
204 ; in Faridpur, v. 308 ; in Maiman- 
sinh, v. 421-441 ; in the Chittagong 
Hill Tracts, vi. 71 ; in Chittagong, vi. 
159; in Tippjerah, vi. 390 ; in Maldah, 
yii. 72, 74 ; in Rangpur, vii. 2A2, 243 ; 
in Dindjpur, vii. 391; in Rijshihf, viii. 
60-6^; in Bogri, viii. 211-214; in Mur- 
shidabid, ix. 104, 105 ; in Pibnd, ix. 
302; in Dirjfling, x. 96 ; in Jalpiigurf, 
X. 273 ; in Kuch Behar, x. 382 ; in 
Patni, xi. 113, 114; in Saran, xi. 277- 
279 ; in Gayi, xii. 87 ; in Shdhibad, 
xii. 235 ; in the Santil Parganis, xiv. 
337; in Monghyr, xv. 102, 103; in Pur- 
niah, xv. 290-293 ; in Ha^iribigh, xvi. 
10^ ; in Lohirdagi, xvi. 342, 343 ; in 
Manbhiim, xvii. 314; in Cuttack, xviii, 
103; in Puri, xix. 94. 

Filatures, or silk-winding factories. See 
Factories, Silk. 

Filigree work of Cuttack, xviii. 83, 175. 

Fire-arms, Manufacture of, in Monghyr, 
XV. 1^7, 138. 

Firinghis, Dacca, v. 44, 45, 72 ; in Chit- 
tagong, vL 139, 147, 148, 149; in 
Noikhilf, vi. 245 ; in Hill Tipperah, 
VL 495. 

Firinghi Bizir, village and Portuguese 
settlement in Dacca, v. 45, 72; vi. if^. 

Firozibid, the court name of Panduah, 
q.v. 

Firozipur, a suburb of Gaur, vii. 58. 

Fiscal Divisions ox pargands^ List of, with 
area, number of estates, amount of land, 
revenue, 6^., in the 24 Parganis, 
i. 20, 225-241 ; in Nadiyi, ii. 132- 
138 ; in Jessor, ii. 320-328 ; in Mid- 
napur, iii. 189-220; in HugU, iii. 
413-417 ; in Bardwin, iv. 172-176 ; 



in Birbhum, iv. 4 1 9-437 ; in Dacca, v. 
1 39- 14 1 ; in Bakarganj, 222-226, 238- 
243; in Faridpur, v. 353-356; in 
Maimansinh, v. 477-479 ; in Noikhili, 
vi. 343-345 ; in Tipperah, vi. 442-447 ; 
in Hill Tipperah, vi. 519; in Maldah, 
vii. 126-145 ; in Rangpur, vii. 253, 254, 
256-259, 345 ; in Dinijpur, viL 435. 
456; in Rijshihf, viii. 1 18- 121 ; in 
Bogri, viii. 302-304 ; in Murshidibid, 
ix. 232-236; in Pibni, ix. 366-369; 
in JalpiiguH, x. 264-269 ; in Patna, xi. 
206,209 ; in Siran, xi. 3^5-361 ; in 
Gayi, xii. 143-146; in Shahibid, xii. 
286, 287 ; in Tirhut, xiii. 180-200; in 
Champiran, xiii. 308-313 ; in Bhigal- 
pur, XIV. 239-251 ; in the Santil Par- 
ganis, xiv. 376-378; in Monghyr, xv. 
175-187; in Pumiah, xv. 294-303,416- 
431 ; in Haziribigh, xvi. 192-199 ; 
in Lohirdagi, xvi. 483 ; in Singbhiim, 
xvii. 139; in Minbhum, xvii. 367-370; 
in Cuttack, xviii. 223-234; in Bala- 
sor, xviii. 361-366; in Purl, xix. 171- 

173- 
Fish, fisheries, and fishing castes and 
communities in the 24 Parganis, i. 35, 
37, 38; in the Sundarbans, i. 301- 
303, 316 ; in Nadiyi, ii. 33 ; in Jessor, 
ii. 182, 183, 185 ; in Midnapur, iii. 
37, 38 ; HiigH, iii. 264, 266 ; m Bard- 
win, iv. 26-28 ; in Binkuri, iv. 2x2 ; 
in Birbhiim, iv. 318, 337 ; in Dacca, 
v. 24, 25, 30 ; in Bikarganj, v. 170, 
171, 177 ; in Faridpur, v. 270-275 ; in 
Maimansinh, v. 389, 392; in Chitta- 
gong, vi. 129-131, 143, 146, 147; 
in Noikhili, vi. 257, 265, 266, 276, 
296; in Tipperah, vi. 366, 367, 
381 ; in Hill Tipperah, vi. 476, 
480, 494 ; in the Chittagong Hill 
Tracts, vi. 27, 28, 34; in Maldah, 
vii. 30, 31, 45; in Rangpur, vii. 
200, 201, 202-204, 218-220; in Din- 
ijpur, vii. 365, 366, 367, 381, 440; 
in Rijshihi, viii. 29; in Bogri, viii. 
146, 147, 152 ; in Murshidibid, ix. 30- 
32, 35, 120; in Pibni, ix. 275-277, 
311; in Dirjiling, x. 28-30, 39; in 
Jalpiiguri, X. 237, 238; in Kuch 
Behar, x. 337; in Patni, xi. 29-31, 49, 
50 ; in Saran, xL 235-237 ; in Gayi, 
xii. 23-25; in Shihibid, xii. 167, 197 ; 
in Tirhut, xiii. 28-30 ; in Champiran, 
xiii. 227, 245 ; in Bhigalpur, xiv. 73 ; 
in the Santil Parganis, xiv. 270, 321 ; 
in Monghyr, xv. 23, 29, 30, 58, 59, 82; 
in Pumi^, xv. 233, 255 ; in Haziri- 
bigh, xvi. 41 ; in Lohirdagi, xvi. 238: 
in the Tributary States of Chutii 



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296- 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Nigpur, xvii. 225 ; in Cuttack, xviii. 
53-58 ; in Balasor, xviii. 263, 264 ; in 
Pun, xix. 25, 26, 27, 39, 179; in the 
Orissa Tributary States, xix. 202. 
Fish and Fisheries of Ben^, Account of 
the, by Dr F. Buchanan Hamilton, 
with Introduction and Notes by Dr F. 
Day, XX. 1-120. 
Fishinf , Modes of, in Dacca, v. 24, 25, 30; 
in Blkargani, v. 238-243 ; in Faridpur, 
▼• 3S3» 356; ^^ Maimansinh, v. 477-4795 
in the Chittagong Hill Tracts, vi. 33 ; 
in Noakhili, vl 257 ; in Tipperah, vi. 
* 367 ; in Hill Tipperah, vi. 476, 4S0 ; in 
Maldah, vii. 30, 31 ; in Rangpur, vii. 
<7o-i75 ; >n Patni, xi. 30 ; in Gayi, xii. 
24; in Monghyr, xv. 29 ; in the Tribu- 
taiy States of Chutii N^ur, xvil 225; 
in Cuttack, xviiL 54, 55. See also 
Angling. 
Flax, Cultivation of. See Fibres. 
Floods in the 24 Pargan&s, i. 158 ; in the 
Sundarbans, I 342 ; in Nadiyi, ii. 83- 
86 ; in Jessor, iL 274, 275 ; in Midna- 
pur, iii. 1 1 6- 1 18; in Hogli, iii. 3^9, 
360 ; in Bardwdn, iv. 92-95 ; in Ban- 
kur^ iv. 209, 210; in Birbhum, iv. 
372 ; in Dacca, v. 103, 104 ; in Bakar- 
ganj, V. 212 ; in Faridpur, v. 331 ; in 
. Maimansinh, v. 457 ; in the Chitta- 
gong Hill Tracts, vL 83; in Chitta- 
gong, vi. 184; in No&kh^ vi. 317, 
318, 319 ; in Tipperah, vi. 364, 365, 
415 ; in Maldah, vu. 90, 91, 92, 94, 
126 ; in Rangpur, vii. 161, 165, 168, 
202, 292 ; in Dinijpur, vii. 442, 443 ; 
in Rijshdhl, viii. 79; in Bogr^ viii. 
251 ; in Murshidibid, ix. 26, 131-133 ; 
in Pibni, ix. 326 ; in Kuch Behar, x. 
394; in Patni, xi. 130 ; in Sdran, xi. 
226, 227, 230, 231, 252, 234, 237; in 
Gay^ xii. 107 ; in SmLhibid, xii. 250, 
251 ; in Tirhut, xiii. 28, 52, 60, 115, 
116; in Champ4ranf xiiL 221, 256, 
285; in Bhigalpur, xiv. 173*176; in 
Monghyr, xv. 127 ; in Pumiah, xv. 
341 ; in Lohirdaga, xvi. 408, 409 ; in 
M^bhiW, xvii. 257, 258 ; in Cuttack, 
xviii. 35, 5i-53» '47 J in Balasor, xviii. 
3*3* 324; in Puri, xix. 138-142; in 
the Orissa Tributary States, xix. 20a 
Flood and fjamine. Great, in 1787-88, in 

Rangpur, vii. 292, 293-298. 

Flora of Bengal. See Botany. 

Flute-playing among the Santdls, xiv. 314. 

Food of the people in the 24 Pargands, 

i. 128, 131 ; in the Sundarbans, i. 322- 

324 ; in Nadiyd, iL 63 ; in Jessor, ii. 

240; in Midnapur, iii. 79; in Hugli, 

iii 329 ; in Bardwin, iv. 68, 69 ; in 



Birbhum, iv. 344 ; in Dacca, v. 78-81 ; 
in Bakarganj, v. 202 ; in Faridpur, v. 
295» 296 ; in Maimansinh, v. 419 ; in 
the Chittagong Hill Tracts, vi. 70 5 in 
Chittagong, vi. 158, 159, 162; in 
No^Udiali, vL 279, 291 ; in Tipperah, 
vi. 377. 3«7. 388. 389; in Hill Tip- 
perah, vi. 479, 499, 500; in Maldah, 
vii. 69 ; in Rai^ur, vii. 226 ; in 
Dinijpur, vii. 380, 390; in Rijshihl, 
viiL 58 ; in Bogra, viii. 206, 207 ; in 
Mur^ddbdd, ix. 99; in Pabna, ix. 
300 ; in Dirjiling, x. 71, 72, 91, 92 ; 
in Jalpdiguri, x. 271 ; in Kuch Behar, 
X. 37 ^ 372; in Patni, xi. 106, 107; 
in Siran, xi. 272, 273 ; in Gay^ xii. 
75, 76 ; in Shahibid, xii. 227, 228 ; 
in Tirhut, xiii. 77, 79^ 80 ; in Cham- 
piran, xiii. 258, 2^9; in Bhi^lpur, 
xiv. Ill; in Monghyr, xv. 81-89: in 
Purniah, xv. 278^ 279 ; in Hazdribagh, 
xvi. 94 ; in Loh&rdagi, xvi. 335 ; in 
Singbhdm, xvii. 79; in Minbhdxn, 
xvii. 308; in Cuttack, xviii. 99; in 
Balasor, xviii. 289 ; in Puri, xix. 93 ; 
in the Orissa Tributary States, xix. 
243, 244, 262. 

Foreign and absentee landholders, in the 
24 Parganis, i. 163, 164; in the Sundar- 
bans, i. 344; in Nadiy^ ii. 93; in Jessor, 
ii. 278 ; in Midnapur, iii. 146 ; in 
Hugli, iii. 367, 368 ; in Bardwdn, iv. 
105 ; in Bdnkuii, iv. 275 ; in Birbhum, 
iv. 372 ; in Dacca, v. 106 ; in Bdkar- 
ganj, V. 214 ; in Faridpur, v. 333 ; in 
Maimansinh, v. 458; in the Chittagong 
Hill Tracts, vi. 83 ; in Chittagong, vi. 
185; in Nodkhdli, vi. 319; in Tip- 
perah, vi. 416, 417 ; in Maldah, vii. 
9^; in Rangpur, vii. 301; in Dindjpur, 
vii. 409; in Rdjshdhi, viii. 81 ; in Bogrd, 
viii. 277 ; in Mun^ddbdd, ix. 140^ 
141 ; in Pdbnd, ix. 328 ; in Dirjiling, 
X. 127 ; in Jalpdigurl, x. 294 ; in Kudi 
Behar, x. 396 ; in Patni, xi. 135 ; in 
Gayd, xii. iii, 112 ; inShdhibdd, xii. 
255 ; in Tirhut, xiii. 121 ; in Cham- 
pajran, xiii. 288; in the Sant&l Parganis, 
xiv. 35 1» 352 ; in Monghyr, xv. 13s ; 
in Hazdribagh, xvi. 139; in Lohar- 
dagd, xvi. All; in Singbhum, xvii. 98, 
99 ; in Purl, xix. 31. 

Forests or Jungles in the 24 Parrands, i. 
24; in the Sundarbans, i. 289; in Nadiyd, 
ii. 171; in 6ardwdn,iv. 29; in Bdnkurd, 
iv. 211 ; in Dacca, v. 19, 26, 27 ; in 
Bdkazganj, v. 175, 176 ; in Faridpur, 
v. 277 ; in Maimansinh, v. 390^ 391 ; 
in Chittagong vL 132; in Tipperah, 
vi. 368, 369; in Rangpur, vii. 175-192; 



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GENERAL INDEX, 



297 



in Dinijpur, vii. 366; in R&jsbihi, vili. 
30 ; in Bogrd, viii. 149, 150; in Mur- 
shiddbdd, ix. 34; in Pibnil, ix. 277; 
in Ddrifling, x. 33-38, 110-112 ; in Jal- 
piiguri, x. 239-245 ; in Bhdgalpur, xiv. 
34-38; in the Santal Parganas, xiv. 272; 
in Monghyr, xv. 31, 32 ; in Hazdribdgh, 
xvi. 44, 53, 171 ; in Lohirdagd, xvi. 
239-245 ; in Singbhum, xvii. 23 ; in 
the Tributary States of Chutla Nigpur, 
xvii. 167, id8, i80y 181, 190^ 191, 202, 
215, 229, 230; in Minbhiim, xvii. 260- 
264 ; in Pun, xix. 26. 

Forest or Jungle Products, in the 24 Par- 
g^Li^ ^* 3C 37 ; in the Sundarbans, i. 
304-315 ; in Jessor, ii. 184 ; in Midna- 
pur, iii. 39; m Hugli,iii. 266 ; in Bard- 
win, iv. 29; in Bdnkur^ iv. 2x1 ; in 
Birbhdm, iv. 377-379; in Dacca, v. 19, 
26, 27; in Bikarganj, v. 175, 176; 
in Faridpur, v. 277 ; in Maimansinh, 
V* 390> 391 ; in the Chittagong Hill 
Tracts, vi. 27, 29-33; in Chittagong, 
vi. 132 ; in Noikhalf, vi. 258 ; in Tip- 
perah, vi. 368, 369 ; in Hill Tipperah, 
vi. 511 ; in MaJdah, vii. 31, 33; in 
Rangpur, vii. 193-195 ; in DinAjpur, 
vii. 366; in RAjshahi, viii. 30; in Bogrd, 
viii. 149, 150 ; in Murshiddbdd, ix. 34, 
100; in Pibni, ix. 277; in Dirjiling, x. 
37, 38 ; in Jalpdiguri, x. 243-245 ; in 
Siran, xii 237 ; in Gayd, xii. 26, 27 ; 
in Shihibdd, xii. 172-176 ; in Cham- 
pimn, xiii. 229-231; inBhigalpur, xiv. 
34-40 ; in the Santil Parganis, xiv. 
272f 273; in Monghyr, xv. 31, 32 ; in 
Hazdribagh, xvi. 44, 47-53» >7i ; in 
Lohdrdaga, xvi. 239-245; inM^nbhum, 
xvii. 260-264; in Cuttack, xviii. 2X, 58; 
in Puri, xix. 26 ; in the Orissa Tribu- 
tary States, xix. 203. 

Forest-land settlements in the Chitta- 
gong Hill Tracts, vi. 80. 

Forts in the 24 Paxganis, i. loi, no, 
115, 118; in Jessor, ii. 208, 214; 
ruined, in Midnapur, iii. 20 ; in Hiigli, 
iii. 255, 299, 312 ; old, in Bardwdn, iv. 
137 ; ruins of, at Idrakpur, Dhimrdi, 
Durdurid, in Dacca, v. 72-74, 121 ; in 
Maimansinh, v. 417 ; old, in Tipperah, 
vi- 359* 3^ f in Champiran, xiii. 312 ; 
ruins of old, in Pumiah, xv. 267, 268 ; 
in Cuttack, xviii. 83, 84. 

Fort Baribati, the citadel of Cuttack city, 
xviii. 83, 84. 

Fort Sameswar, Champaran, xiii. |I2. 

Freehold Estates. Sa Tenures of land. 

French Factories in Dacca taken posses- 
sion of by the English, v. 67, 124; in 
Maldah, vii. 49. 



French Factory in Saidabad in Murshida« 
bad, ix. 91. 

French Settlement (Chandamaw), in 
HugU, iii. 307 ; in Balasor (Farash- 
dingi), xviii. 283. 

Frontier Line of Bengal, Tipperah, vi. 356. 

Frontier Police Force in the Chittagong 
Hill Tracts, vL loi, 102. 

Fruits and Fruit-trees of the 24 Pargands, 
i. 140-143; of Jessor, ii. 246, 249; of 
HiigU, iii. 337, 338 ; of Dacca, v. 80^ 
90; of Faridpur, v. 312-315 ; of Tip- 
perah, vi. 389 ; of Bogrd, viii. 211 ; of 
Murshiddbid, ix. 100; of Pdbnd, ix. 
303; of Ddrjfling, x. 37, 38; of Patni, xi. 
115 ; of Saran, xi. 273 ; of Gayd, xii. 
87 ; of Shahdbid, xii. 235 ; of Tirhut, 
xiii. 80; of Bhigalpur, xiv. 121 -124; 
of Monghyr, xv. 84, 99, 102 ; of Ha- 
zdribdgh, xvi 48-52,104; ofLohdrdagd, 
xvi. 241-245. 

Frushard, Mr, an early Silk "Adven- 
turer " in Bfrbhtini, iv. 338-34a 

Funeral Ceremonies of the Chittagong 
and Tipperah Hill Tribes, vi. 42, 43, 
48. 52, 53. 55. 57, 59, 61, 62, 66, 
279, 377, 383, 487, 488; in Rang- 
pur, vii. 229 ; in Kuch Behar, x. 377, 
378; among the Pahdrids, xiv. 298; 
among the Mai Pahdrids, xiv. 301 ; 
amon^ the Santils, xiv. 318, 319 ; in 
Singbhum, xvii. 53-57, 60, 61, 62; 
among the Kandhs, xix. 227 ; among 
the Savars, xix. 240 ; among the 
Juings, xix. 247. See also Ceremonies. 

Furniture of the People, in thc24Pargan4s, 
i. 130; in the Sundarbans, i. 322, 323; in 
Nadiyi, ii. 62, 63 ; in Jessor, ii. 240 ; 
in Midnapur, iii. 78, 79 ; in Hiigll, iii. 
328, 329 ; in Bardwii, iv. 68 ; in Dacca, 
V. 77, 78; in Faridpur, v. 295; in 
Maimansinh, v. 419; in the Chittagong 
Hill Tracts, vi. 70 ; in Chittagong, vi. 
158 ; in NoikMli, vi. 291 ; in Tip- 
perah, vi. 388 ; in Maldah, vii. 69 ; in 
Rangpur, vii. 226; in Dindjpur, vii. 
388; in Rdjshih^ viii. 57, 58; in 
Bogrd, viiL 207 ; in Murshiddbdd, ix. 
99 ; in PdbnA, ix. 300 ; in Ddrjfling, x. 
70; in JalpAigurC x. 270, 271; in 
Kuch Behar, x. 371 ; in Patnd, xi. 104, 
105 ; in Saran, xi. 272 ; in Shdhdbdd,. 
xii. 226, 227 ; in Tirhut, xiii. 79 • 
in Champdran, xiii. 2^8 ; in the Santdl 
Parganas, xiv. 332; in Monghyr, xv. 
81 ; in Hazdrib^h, xvi. 93, 94 ; in 
Lohdrdagd, xvi. 33A ; in Singbhiim, 
xvii. 78; in Mdnbhum, xvii. 308; in 
Cuttack, xviii, 98, 99 ; in Balasor, 
xviii. 289. 



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GENERAL INDEX, 



GibhuriL or Garbheswari river, viL 359, 

362. 
Gabhdlr, village in Sdran, xi. 360. 
Gachhidi, township in Noikhdli, vi. 286. 
Gadadhar river, x. 336. 
Gadeshar, pargand in Tirhut, xiii. 187. 
Gddis^ or estates, in Hazaribagh, xvi. 130- 

Gadkhali, market village in Jessor, ii. 

208. 
Gagla, trading village in Rangpur, vii. 

309. 
Gagnipur, or Gagneswar, pargand in 

Midnapur, i. 371. 
Gagrd, pargand in Pumiah, xv. 296, 297, 

336. 
Gahir&, embankment in Chittagong, vi. 

131- 
Gailibiri, village in Maldah, vii. 131. 
Gajboru peak. See Gangabiri. 
Gajghanta, trading village in Rangpur, 

vii. 309. 
Gajnibhipur, or Ghaznlpur, tnahal in 

Sarkdr Mahmudibad, i. 372. 
Gdjol, thdnd in Maldah, vii. 51, 87, no. 
Galchord, village in Dindjpur, vii. 439, 

441. , 

Galdighi, village in Dinajpur, vii. 439. 

GalgluLsia river, i. 24, 26, 27, 32. 

Game, Large. See Tigers, Elephants, 
Ferce Naturae, Hunting, &c. 

Game, Small, in the 24 Parganas, i. 37; 
in the Sundarbans, i. 315, 316; in Na- 
diya, ii. 34; in Jessor, ii. 184; in Mid- 
napur, iii. 40; in Hugli, iii. 266; in 
Bardwan, iv. 29; in Birbhum, iv. 322; 
in Dacca, v. 27-30; in Bakarganj, v. 
177; in Faridpur, v. 277, 278; in 
Maimansinh, v. 391, 392; in Rajshihi, 
viii. 31; in Bogra, viii. 152; in Mur- 
shiddbdd, ix. 35; in Pdbni, ix. 273, 
277; in Ddrjlling, x. 39; in Jalpdigun, 
X. 2a6 ; in Kuch Behar, x. 338 ; in 
Patna, xi. 31 ; in Sdran, xi. 237 ; in 
Gayd, xii. 28 ; in Shdhabad, xii. 179, 
180; in Tirhut, xiii. 30; in the Santal 
Pargands, xiv. 273 ; in Monghyr, xv. 
36-44; in Pumiah, xv. 236-240; in Ha- 
zdribagh, xvi. 41, 42; in Lohdrdaga, 
xvi. 246 ; in Singbhum, xvii. 24-31; in 
Manbhum, 266-268 ; in Cuttack, xviii. 
59; in Balasor, xviii. 264; in Puri, xix. 
26. 

Game Laws of the Pahdrids, Santdl Par- 
gands, xiv. 292. 

Games and Amusements of the people in 
the 24 Pargands, i. 131-133; in Jessor, 
ii. 22i; in Dacca, v. 81, 82; in Bdkar- 



gdnj, V. 216; in the Chittagoi^ Hill 
Tracts, vi. 70, 71; in Patnd, xi. 107; 
in Sardn, xi. 273, 274; in Gayd, xii. 78- 
81 ; in Shdhdbdd, xii. 229 ; in Tirhut, 
xiii. 80, 81 ; in Champdran, xiii. 259 ; 
in Bhdgalpur, xiv. 1 1 1, 112; in the San- 
tdl Parganas, xiv. 314, 315 ; in Pur- 
niah, xv. 279-281 ; in Singbhum, xvii. 
47; in Mdnbhum, xvii. 308, 309. See also 
Amusements, Card -playing. Dances, 
&c. 

Gamhdrid, pir in Singbhum, xvii. 139. 

Ganakottar land tenure. See Tenures of 
land. 

Gandak river, xi. 228 ; xiii. 19, 20, 21, 
221, 222 ; embankment, xL 227, 232, 
306; xiii. 116, 117, 285. 

Gandakf nodi in Sdran, xi. 227, 232. 

Ganddmdrd, village in Chittagong, vi. 
131, 144. 

Ganddmdrd dykes. The, in Chittagong, 
vi. 131. 

Gandar, river in Dindjpur, vii. 360. 

Gandauld, iappd in Champdran, xiii. 272, 

275» 310- 

Gandha Madan peak, xix. 199. 

Gandhabanik caste. See Castes. 

Gandhabhddoli, market village in the 24 
Pargands, i. 236. 

Gandito, pargand in Cuttack, xviii. 226. 

Ganesh Cave, The, in Puri,. xix. 76. 

Ganeswar, pargand in Balasor, xviii. 363. 

Gangd river. See Ganges. 

Gangdbdri or Gajboru, peak in Mdnbhtim, 
xvii. 256. 

Gangddharpur, market village in the 24 
Pargands, i. 233. 

Gangaialghdti, village and thdnd in Bdn- 
kurd, iv. 239. 

Gangd khdl, 24 Pargands, i. 34. 

Gangdkhdli khdl embankments, Midna- 
pur, iii. 140. 

Gangdmandal, pargand in Tipperah, vi. 

443- 
Ganedpdth Isldmpur, pargand in Mai- 

ddi, vii. 133. 
Gangdprasdd, village in Dindjpur, vii. 

443- 

Gangapur, village in Sdran, xi. 257. 

Gangdrdmpur, thdnd and village in Din- 
djpur, vii. 365, 423, 439. 

Ganges or Gangd river, i. 29; ii. 18; v. 18, 
21, 158, 160, 261, 264-268; vii. 18, 22, 
24, 91; viii. 22, 23; ix. 18, 20, 23, 24, 
270, 271 ; xi. 19-23, 227 ; xii. 163, 164; 
xiii. 19, 20, 130; xiv. 24, 25, 26^ 269; 
XV. 20, 226, 227, 341; legend about the 
origin of, i. 28, 29. 

Gangetic dynasty. The, in Orissa, xviiL 
187, 188. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



GENERAL INDEX. 



299 



Gangnagar, pargandm Rangpur, vii. 253. 

Gangni river. See Kalia. 

Gangnl Gang river, ii. 179, 

Gangpur Tributary State (Vol. 
XVII.)— 

Geographical Situation, Boundaries, 
History, etc., 189; Physical Aspects, 
Rivers, 189, 190; Minerals, Forest and 
Jungle Products, 190, 191; Ferce Na- 
tural 191; Population, 191, 192; Eth- 
nical Classification, 192; the Bhuiyds 
and other tribes, 192, 193; the Agariis 
or Agoris, 193-195; the Rija, his Re- 
sidence, History, etc., 195, 196; Agri- 
culture, 196, 197; Village Institutions, 
197, 198; Police Statistics, 198, 199. 

Gai^ri nodi in Siran, xi. 227, 233. 

Gangurii, village and thdnd in Bard win, 
iv. 64. 

Cdnjd or hemp cultivation in FaHdpur, 
v. 311; in Rajshdhi, viii. 55, 61-63; in 
Bogra, viii. 212; in Murshiddbad, ix. 
104, 105 ; in Pabnd, ix. 302. See also 
Fibres. 

Ganjair, village in Dindjpur, vii. 436. 

Gaurangdihi hills, in Bankurd, iv. 208. 

Gdmipoti fair, Nadiya, ii. 57. 

Gdnrar caste. iS^er Castes. 

Gansdm, a deity worshipped by the 
Mudsis and Gonds, Description of the 
invocation of, xvii. 183-185. 

Gdnthl land tenures. See Tenures of land. 

Ganutii, village in Birbhiim with silk 
filatures, founded by Mr Frushard, iv. 

337-341, 376, 377. 

Garai river, name for upper reaches of 
the Madhumati, ii. 175. 

Gardi bridge protective works, Nadiyd, 
i. 168. 

Garamchori hill in Mdskhdl island. Chit- 
tagong, vi. 125. 

Garany a timber tree of the Sundarbans, 
i. 306. 

Gardri, pargand in Pumiah, xv. 297, 
355, 336, 421. 

Garbheswarf, or Gabhurd, river in Di- 
ndjpur, vii. 359, 362. 

Garden, Botanical, near Howrah, iii. 
294 ; at Rangarun, in Ddrjiling, x. 
176-178 ; experimental opium seed, in 
Patnd, xi. 154. 

Garden Reach, suburb of Calcutta, de- 
scription of, and neighbourhood, i. 100, 
236; dispensary, i. 25 1; Church Mis- 
sion schools, i. 205. 

Gareris, a pastoral caste. See Castes. 

Gargdribd, town in Maldah, vii. 50^ 86, 
1 10 ; fair at, vii. 67. 

Garh, one of the original 24 Pargands, i. 
20, 232. 



Garh Chi\raA, pargand in Tirhut, xiii- i87» 
Garhdni, town in Shdhdbdd, xii. 202. 
Garhbeta subdivision in Midnapur, iii. 

43, i«8. 
Garhi, pargand in Pumiah, xv. 297, 336, 

421, 422. 
Garhpddd, pargand in Balasor, xviii. 

36^. 
Garia, mart for country produce on 

ToU/s Canal, i. 34, 102, 167, 235. 
Gatyan-oilt in the Chittagong Hill Tracts, 

vi. 28, 32, 82, 84, 85, 86; in Hill 

Tipperah, vi. 512, 513. See also Jungle 

Products. 
Garjanid police outpost in Chittagong, 

vi. 216. 
Garjdul, pargand in Tirhut, xiii. 188. 
Gdros, an aboriginal hill tribe. See 

Aboriginal Population. 
Garwd, trading village in Lohdrdagd, 

xvi. 322. 
Gataidchar Urid, township in Nbdkhdli, 

vi. 285. 
Gauhdti school in Midnapur, iii. 180. 
Gaupdrd village, Santdl Pargands, xiv. 

295. 
Gaur, pargand in Tirhut, xiii. 188. 
Gaur, The famous ruins of, in Maldah, viu 

23. 51-59. 

Gaur Brdhmans. See Brahmans and 
Castes. 

Gaurdngdih, thdnd in Mdnbhum, xviL 
271, 366. 

Gaurhand, pargand in Maldah, vii. 81, 
82, 85, 89, 90, 133. 

Gaurfpur, village in Dindjpur, vii. 451. 

Gaurlpurd town and thdnd in Tipperah, 
vi. 366^ 420, 432, 442. 

Gauma^ar, seat of a branch of the Brdhma 
Sam^, in lessor, ii. 198. 

Gautama, Worship of. See Buddhists, 
&c. 

GayA District (Vol. XII.)— 

Ge(^raphical Situation, Area, and 
Boundaries, 17, 18; Jurisdictions, 18; 
Physical Ajspects, 18, 19; Hills, 19; 
Rivers, 19-22 ; Canals, 22, 23 ; River 
Traffic, 23 ; Fisheries and Fishes, 23, 
25 ; Lines of Drainage, 25 ; Minexal 
Products, 25, 26; Forest and Jungle 
Products, 26, 27 ; Ferae Naturee^ 28 ; 
Population — Early Estimates, 28, 29 ; 
The Census of 1872, its Agency and 
Results, 29-31 ; Density, 30 ; Classifi- 
cation according to Sex, Religion, and 
Age, 30 ; Infirmities, 30, 32 ; Ethnical 
Division of the People, 32-34 ; Hill 
Tribes and Abori^^nes, 34; Immigra- 
tion and Emigration, 34, 35 ; List of 
Hindu Castes, 35-37; Muhammadan 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



300 



GENERAL INDEX, 



Classes, 37 ; Semi-Hinduized Aborigi- 
nals, 37, 38; Religious Divisions of 
the People, 39-41 ; Division of the 
People into Town and Country, 41, 
42; Towns — Gayi, 42-44; (Gay4 
Pilgrimages, 44-49; The Ga^wals, 
49i 50 5) Tikiri, 50-53 ; Other Towns, 
Places of Historical Interest, &c., <3- 
65; The Mutiny of 1857, 65-^9; 
Village Institutions and Officials, 69, 
70 ; Abwdbs or Customary Cesses, 70- 
72; Rural Serfs, 72, 73; Material 
Condition of the People — Dress, Dwel- 
lings, Food, Marriage Ceremonies, 
Games and Amusements, Musical In- 
struments, Conveyances, 73-82 ; Agri- 
culture — Rice Cultivation and Crops, 
82-84; Other Cereals, 84-86; Green 
Crops and Vegetables, 86, 87 ; Fruit- 
trees, 87 ; Fibres, 87 ; Cotton, 87-89 ; 
Oil-seeds, 89-91 ; Opium, 91, 92 ; 
Indigo, 92 ; Sugar-cane and Pdn^ 92, 
93 ; Chillies, 93, 94 ; Cultivated Area, 
Out-turn of Crops, &c., 94, 95 ; Con- 
dition of the Peasantry, 95 ; Domestic 
Animals, 95, 96; Agricultural Imple- 
ments, 96 ; Wages and Prices, 97, 98 ; 
Weights and Measures, 98-100; Spare 
Land, 100; Land Tenures — Inter- 
mediate Tenures, 100, loi ; Cultiva- 
tors' Holdings, loi, 102; Revenue- 
Free Tenures, 102, 103 ; Government 
Estates, 103, 104 ; Rates of Rent, 104, 
105 ; Rotation of Crops, 105 ; Manures 
and Irrigation, 105-107 ; Natural 
Calamities — Floods and Blights, 107 ; 
Droughts, 107, 108 ; The Famine of 
1866, 108-110; The Famine of 1873- 
74, no, III ; Famine Warnings, in ; 
Foreign and Absentee Landholders, 
III, 112; Roads, &c, 112, 113; 
Manufactures, 113-117; Commerce and 
Trade, 11 7- 120; Newspaper, 120; 
Income and Income-tax, 120, 121 ; 
Local Institutions, 121 ; Administrative 
History, 122; Revenue and Expendi- 
ture, 122-124; Land Revenue, 124- 
126 ; Civil and Criminal Courts, 126 ; 
Operation of the Rent-Law, 126, 127 ; 
Police and Jail Statistics, 127-134; 
Educational Statistics, 134-140; Postal 
Statistics, 140, 141 ; Administrative 
Divisions, 141 -143 ; List of Fiscal Di- 
visions (Par^ands), 143-146; Climate, 
Temperature, and Rainfall, 146, 147 ; 
Diseases, 147, 148 ; Cholera, 14^ 149 ; 
Cattle Diseases, 149 ; Fairs as Causes 
of Disease, 149, 150; Indigenous Drugs, 
150-152; Native Physicians, 152; 
Charitable Dispensaries, 152, 153. 



Gzyi pargand^ xii. 143. 
141. 



Gaya, town and thdnd^ xii. 17, 31, 42-50, 



Gaydwils, a dass of Brdhmans in Patna, 
xi. 40, 41 ; in Gayi, xii. 35-38, 49, 50. 

G2Lyhkxif pargand in Rangpur, vii. 302, 
322. 

Genealogical table showing the descent 
of the present Riji of Kuch Behar, x. 
426. 

General physical aspects of the 24 Par- 
gands, 1. 22-24 i of the Sundarbans, i. 
286-293 ; of Nadiyd, ii. 18 ; of Jessor, 
ii. 170, 171 ; of Midnapur, iii. 22, 23; 
of Hiigli, iii. 253, 254 ; of Bardwui, 
iv. 21, 22 ; of Bdnkur^ iv. 207 ; of 
Bfrbhum, iv. 317; of Dacca, v. 18, 
19; of Bakarganj, v. 158, 159; of 
Faridpur, v. 257-260 ; of Maimansinh, 
V. 384, 385 ; of the Chittagong Hill 
Tracts, vi. 22 ; of Chittagong, vi. 124 ; 
of Noikhdli, vi. 249, 250; of TippersJi, 
vi. 361 ; of Hill Tipperah, vi. 472, 473 ; 
of Maldah, vii. 20 ; of Rangpur, vii. 
161, 292 ; of Dinajpur, vii. 3158, 363 ; 
of Rdjsh^ viii. 21, 22 ; of Bogra, 
viii. 133, 13^; of Murshidabdd, ix. 
21-23; of Pabd^ ix. 271; of Dar- 
j fling, X. 19-23 ; of Jalpiigurf, x. 223- 
225 ; of Kuch Behar, x. 333 ; of Patna, 
xi. 18; of Sdran, xi. 226, 227; of 
Gayi, xii. 18, 19; of Sh^4b4d, xii. 
158, 159; of Tirhut, xiii. 18, 19; of 
Champdran, xiii. 220^ 221 ; of Bhdgal- 
pur, xiv. 22-24 ; of the Santil Parganis, 
xiv. 266; of Monghyr, xv. 19, 20; of 
Pumiah, xv. 225, 226 ; of Hazdrib^h, 
xvi. 22-25 9 of Lohdrdagd, xvi. 232- 
234; of Singbhum, xvii. 18, 19; of 
the Tributanr States of Chutid Ndgpur, 
xvii. 152 ; of Mdnbhum, xvii. 254-256 ; 
of Cuttack, xviii. 20, 21 ; of Balasor, 
xviii. 248-250 ; of Puri, xix. 18 ; of the 
Orissa Tributary States, xix. 198, 199. 

Genguti, river in Cuttack, xviii. 23, 24. 

Geoa^ timber tree in the Sundarbans, i. 

306. 

Geolc^cal formations of Bdnkurd, iv. 
306-308 ; of Birbhiim, iv. 455-457 ; of 
Bakarganj, v. 249-251 ; of the Chit- 
tagong Hill Tracts, vi. 24 ; of Chit- 
tagong, vi. 124, 125, 132; of Tip. 
perah, vi. 361 ; of Hill Tipperah, vi. 
473 ; of Murshiddbdd, ix. 22, 23, 34 ; 
of Pdbnd, ix. 271 ; of Ddrjiling, x. 201- 
204 ; of Jalpdiguri, x. 326, 327 ; of 
Gayd^ xii. 25, 26 ; of Shdhdbdd, xii 
158, 159, 162, 163, 176-178, 291-294; 
of Bhd^pur, xiv. 38-40 ; of the Santdl 
Pargaius, xiv. 266, 267; of Monghyr, xv. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



GENERAL INDEX, 



301 



20, 213-216 ; of Pumiah, xv. 225, 226 ; 
of Hazdrib^h, xvi. 24, 25 ; of Lohdr- 
dag^ xvi. 232-234 ; of Singbhum, xvii. 
19, 20; of the Tributary States of Chutii 
Nigpur, xvii. 1^2, 20Q, 225, 226^ 227, 
24^ 247 ; of Minbhiim^ xvii. 254-256, 
259» 260 ; of Orissa, xix. 315-328. 

Geonkhili. * See Cowcolly. 

Gennan mission in SAran, xi. 256^ 259; 
at Rdnchi in Lohirdagd, xvi. 434- 
440. See also Missions. 

Gh4jg[ar river, v. 161. 

Gh&ghit, river in Rangpur, vii. 166^ 168. 

Ghigri, pargand in Dindjpur, vii. 442. 

Ghigrd (Gogra), river in Din^jpur, vii. 
361 ; in Saran, xi. 228 ; traffic on, xi. 

Ghubnith Siva, Temple of the, at Sultdn- 

gani, in Bhigalpur, xiv. 86. 
Ghalias, a sept of Nep&lis in Ddrjiling, x. 

53. 

Ghiur Dewili, village in the 24 PargadLs, 
i. 121, 237. 

Ghisis, a semi-Hinduised aboriginal tribe 
in Hazdribdgh, xvi. 84 ; in Ix>hirdag^ 
xvi. 317, 3185 in the Orissa Tributary 
States, xix. 254, 255. See also Ab- 
original Population. 

Ghital, municipality and seat of commerce 
in Midnapur, iii. 152; embankment, 
iii. 141. 

Gh&tnagar, village in Dinijpur, vii. 450. 

Ghdtsilu, village in Singbhum, xviL 127. 

Ghdtwdl caste, origintuly guardians of 
hill passes in 24 Parg|an£, i. 59; in 
Bardwin, iv. 49, 66 ; in Bdnkur^ iv. 
222-225 ; in Birbhiim, iv. 327 ; in 
Chittagong, vi. 145 ; in Dinijpur, vii. 
377 ; in the Santdl Pargani^ xiv. 282, 
319. .S^ir o/r^ Castes. 

Ghd^vdli land tenures in Bardwdn, iv. 
77, 85 ; in Binkudi, iv. 254, 255 ; in 
Monghyr, xv. 115, 119 ; in Hazdribdgh, 
xvi. 129, 130; in Lohardagi, xvi. 373, 
374 ; in Singbhiim, xvii. 90. See also 
Tenures of land. 

Ghaydspur, pargand in Patni, xi. 207. 

Ghazilm&ri, bil in the 24 Pargand, i. 30. 

Gh^ikhili river, v. 20. 

Gh^ Miydn, marriage ceremonial in 
B(^;ri, viii. 183-185. 

Gherii^ Battles of, in Murshiddbdd, ix. 

93, ?4» 180, 191. 
Ghiasibdd or Badrihit, thdnd in Mur- 

shidabdd, ix. 91, 92. 
Ghias-ud-dfn II., Grave of, vii. 62. 
Ghipukur Kdti, khdl in 24 Pargands, i. 

3i» 3f 
Gholghat, early fortress of the Portuguese 
in Hugli, iii. 299. 



Ghodighit, chaklah and sarkdr, i. 358, 

359. 
GhorakhdH, k^ in Jessor, ii. 178. 
Ghorangi, hill in Hazaribdgh, xvi. 28. 
Ghordaur, tank in Tirhut, xiiL 61. 
Ghosd Bigh, e^AlaA in Noikhdli, vL 

344* 
Ghosewat, village in Tirhut, xiii. 54. 
Ghospird, seat of the origin of the Karta- 

bhaji sect in Nadiyd, u. 53-55. 
Ghughudingd, village in Din^pur, vii. 

365. 

Ghiigri river, xiv. 29. 

Ghusri, trading village near Howrah, 
with cotton mills, iii. 372, 375. 

GkuHn, a calcareous earth used for mak- 
ing lime in Murshiddbdd, ix. 34. 

Gidhaur, pargand in Monghyr, xv. 176, 

Gidhaur, town in Monghyr, xv. 71, 72. 

Gidwas, indigo concern in Pumiah, xv. 



3ilZbd] 



G\\&\^oA, pargand in Dindjpur, vii. 392, 
442. 

Giriyak, village in Patnd, xi. 82, 83. 

Girls' schools in the 24 Pargands, 202, 
203, 209, 219, 220 ; in Nadiyd, 122, 
123, 124, 125, 127; in Jessor, ii. 
315, 316; in Midnapur, iii. 183, 184; 
Hugli, iii. 405; in Bardwdn, iv. 165 ; in 
Bdnkurd, iv. 299 ; in Birbhum, iv. 416 ; 
in Dacca, v. 135, 137 ; in Bdkarganj, 
V. 235 ; in Faridpur, v. 351 ; in 
Chittagong, vi. 221, 222; m Nod- 
khdli, vi. 338, 339, 341 ; in Tipperah, 
vi. 438 ; in Maldah, vii. 124 ; in Rang- 
pur, vii. 336^ 337, 339 ; in Dindjpur, 
vii. 430, 431, 433; in Rdjshdhi, viii. 
114, 115; in Bogrd, viii. 292, 293, 
299, 300; in Murshiddbdd, ix. 171, 
222-225, 228 ; in Pdbnd, ix. 360, 362- 
364 ; in Ddrjfling, x. 191^ 195 ; in Jal- 
pdigurf, X. 314, 318; in Kuch Behar, 
X. 437i 439; in Patnd, xi. 199; in 
Bhdgalpur, xiv. 229, 233, 234 ; in the 
Santdl Pargands, xiv. 372, 373; in 
Monghyr, xv. 169; in Pumiah, xv. 
406-409, 411, 412 ; in Lohdrdagd, xvi. 
480 ; in Singbhum, xvii. 130, 132 ; in 
Mdnbhum, xvii. 364 ; in Cuttack, xviii. 
213, 214, 218, 219; in Balasor, xviii. 
353, 354» 356, 358, 359. See also 
Educational Statistics. 

God, pargand in Sdran, xi. 303, 357. 

Godld caste, in the 24 Pargands, i. 63 ; 
in Nadiyd, ii. 47 ; in Jessor, ii. 195 ; 
in Sardn, xi. 249; in Shdhdbdd, xii. 
194; in Tirhut, xiiL 44; in Cham- 
pdran, xiii. 236, 244; in Bhdgalpur, 
xiv. 68; in the Santdl Pargan^ xiv. 
283, 320; in Monghyr, xv. 57; in 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



302 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Pumiah, xv. 354.; in Lohirdagd, xvi. 
328 ; in Singbhum, xvii. 64, 65 ; in 
Mdnbhum, xvii. 292. See also Castes. 

Goaland^ town in Faridpor, at junction 
of Padmd and Jamuna rivers ; present 
terminus of the Eastern Bengal Rail- 
way, and starting-point of Assam steam- 
ers, i. 166-168 ; V. 261, 292, 334. 

Goalbari. See G^bdri. 

Goaldes peak, in Orissa, xix. 199. 

Goalpota canal, 24 Paigands, i. 32. 

Goiia, trading vUlage in Bardwdn, iv. 

Goin, local name of Krishnagar, q.v, 
Grobarddngi town, with river traffic, 

municipality, traditions of Krishna, i. 

34, 89, 115; English school, i. 207; 

dispensary, i. 254. 
Gopinithpur, village in Barambd State, 

Orissa, xix. 274. 
Gobindg^nj, ikand in Rangpur, vii. 328. 
Gobindganj, village in Dinajpur, vii. 443. 
Gobindganj, village and thand in Cham- 

pdran, xiij. 228, 234, 311. 
Gobindpur subdivision, Manbhum, xvii. 

27i» 366^ 367. 
Gobindpur, ihdnd in Mdnbhi!im, xvii. 

271, 366. 
Gobindpur, pargand in Tipperah, vi. 

443- 
Gobindpur, market village in Dinijpur, 

vii. 449. 
Gobindpur, mart in Gaya, xii. 62. 
Gobra village, in the Sundarbans, Old 

ruins near, i 327. 
Gobra Gdng, watercourse in the 24 Par- 

ganis, i. 31, 32. 
Goddd sub-District, Santil Parganas, 

xiv. 274, 277, 37J. 
Goddi thdnd^ Santil Pargands, xiv. 363. 
Godhud, village in Sardn, xi. 257. 
Godidpdrd, vUlage in Naydgarh State, 

Orissa, xix. 306. 
Godnd, native name of Revelganj, xi. 

259. 
Goghdt, village and railway station in 

Bardwdn, iv. 65. 
Gogrd river. See Ghagrd. 
GogH, thdnd in Monghyr, xv. 48, 160, 

161, 174. 
Goh, pargand in Gayd, xii. 145. 
Gohdn, market village in Dindjpur, vii. 

452. 
Gokama, canal in Tipperah, vi. 365. 
Gokiltd, pargand in Birbhdm, iv. 424. 
Gokulpur, market village in the 24 Par- 
ganas, i. 240. 
Gold^ The, in Patna city, xi. 69, 70. 
Goldiiddrs or brassfounders. See Castes. 
Gold found in the rivers of Midnapur, 



iii. 39, 149; in Champdran, xiii. 228, 
229; in Singbhum, xvii. 23; in the 
Tributary States of Chutid Ndgpur, 
xvii. 167, 190, 201, 202, 247 ; in Sfdn- 
bhum, xvii. 259 ; in the Orissa Tribu- 
tary Stat^ xix. 202, 203, 312. 

Gold and silver work in Dacca, v. iii; 
in Cuttack, xviii. 83, 175. See also 
Manufactures. 

Golund or Wazirpur Kdtd khdl^ 24 Par- 
gands, i. 31. 

Gomati. See Gumti. 

Gondi, town in Shdhdbdd, xii. 202. 

Gonds, an aboriginal tribe in Singbhtlm, 
xvii. 39; in the Tributary States of 
Chutid Ndgpur, xvii. 156-158, 172, 181, 
193, 216, 231, 232, 24S, 249; in Cut- 
tack, xviii. 77, 78; in Balasor, xviii. 
277; in the Orissa Tributary Sutes, 
xix. 241. See also Aboriginal Popula- 
tion. 

Gondwdrd, thdnd in Pumiah, xv. 244, 
398, 415 ; indigo concern, xv. 370. 

Goosery. See Ghusri. 

Gop, thdnd in Puri, xuc. 28. 

Gopdl Bhaltd, a follower of Chaitanya, 
and one of six orimnal gurus, i. 73. 

Gopdld, tappd in Champdran, xiii. 272, 

27s, 310- 
Gopdlganj sub-division, Sdran, xL 226, 

355. 
Gopdlganj, town in Faridpur, with trade 

in jute, &c, and manufacture of mats, 

V. 291. 
Gopdlganj, town in Sdran, xi. 232, 361. 
Gopdlganj, mart in Dindjpur, vii. 412. 
Gopdlnagar tappd in Tipperah, vi. 443. 
Gopdlpur, trading village in Jessor, iL 

302. 
Gopdlpur, village in Maldah, vii. 131. 
Gopdlpur, market village in Dindjpur, 

vii. 448. 
Gopdlpur, pargand in Tirhut, xiii. 188, 

18^. 
Gopalpur MiTzanagBLr pargand, NodkhdU, 

vi. 344. 
Gopdnadf River, iii. 24. 
Gopiballabhpur, site of fair in Midnapur 

in honour of Chaitanya, iii. 152. 
Gopindth, meld or fair in Nadiyd, ii. 55, 

56, 104. 
Gopindthpur, market village in Dindjpur, 

vii. 437. 
Gopindthpur, village in Tigarid State, 

Orissa, xix. 314, 
Gorabandi land tenures. See Tenures of 

land. 
Gordbdzdr, suburb of Barhampur in Mur- 

shiddbdd, ix. 76; vital statistics, ix. 

244, 



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GENERAL INDEX. 



303 



Gordchind Pir, Muhammadan Saint at 
Harai, in the 24 Pargands, i. 112, 113. 

Goiighi.t, pargand in Dinijpur, vii. 366, 
442. 

Gordghit, dty in Rangpur, vii. 324. 

Gordghit, chaklah in Rangpur, vii. 156, 
210, 516, 324, 325. 

Gordghat, village and thdnd in Dindjpur, 

vii. 363, 365,411,413.423. 
Gcrdits. See Village Officials. 
Gordmard, village in Rangpur, vii. 165, 

309- 

Gorkdti, or pasture-leases. .S55? Tenures 
of land. 

Gosdins or Goswdmis, religious precep- 
tors of the Vaishnavs, in the 24 Par- 
gands, i. 65, 67, 107, 108. See also 
Akrds dnd Vaishnavs. 

Gosdin Durgdpur Fair, Nadi3rd, ii. 56. 

Gosdinpur, market village, in the 24 Par- 
gands, i. 227. 

Government, Assumption of the, by the 
English. See History. 

Government estates {kkds mahdls) in the 
24 Pargands, i. 266^ 267 ; in Bankurd, 
iv. 253 ; in Bdkarganj, v, 368, 369 ; in 
Chittagong Hill Tracts, vL 36, 93, 
102 ; in Chittagong, vi. 214 ; in Nod- 
khdll, vi. 303, 304 ; in Tipperah, vi. 
397 ; in Murshiddbdd, ix. 31, 116; in 
Pdbnd, ix. 311, 312; in Ddrjiling, x. 
up, 112; in Gayd, xii. 103, 104; in 
Bhdgalpur, xiv. 138, 147 ; in Hazdri- 
bdgh, xvi. 119; in Lohdrdagd, xvi. 392- 
403, 411, 454-470, 482 ; in Mdnbhum, 
xvii. 325. See also Tenures. 

Government fisheries. See Fish, &c. 

Government grants for education. See 
Educational Statistics. 

Government high school, Balasor, xviii. 

355-357. ^ . ^ 

Govindganj, pargand m Rangpur, vn. 

161. 
Govindpur, part of the original town of 

Calcutta, 1. 20, 181. 
Gram, Cultivation of. See Agriculture. 
Grdm saranjaml pdiks^ old police force 

in Bardwdn, iv. 84, 85, 148, 149. 
Granaries, public, in Jessor, ii. 277. 
Grds or viliage headmen in Darjiling, x. 

72. 
Grass- land Settlements in Chittagong 

Hill Tracts, vi. 80, 81, 82. 
Great Gandak river, Tirhut, xiiL 19, 

130. 
Great Ranjit, river in Ddrjiling^ x. 25, 

26. 
Green crops, in the 24 Pargands, i. 139 ; 

in the Sundarbans, i. 331 ; in Nadiyd, 

ii. 64 j in Jessor, ii. 244 ; in Midna- 



pur, iiL 80 ; in HugH, iii. 312, 333 ; in 
Bardwdn, iv. 70^ 71 > in Bankurd, iv. 
246; in Birbhum, iv. 345; in Dacca, v. 
83, 84; in Bdkarganj, v. 204; in Farid- 
pur, V. 306-308; in Maimansinh, v. 420; 
m the Chittagong Hill Tracts, vi. 71; 
in Chittagong, vi. 159; in Nodkhdli, 
vi. 292, 293, 294 ; in Tipperah, 
vi. 390 ; in Maldah, vii. 72 ; in Rang- 
pur, vii. 240, 241 ; in Dindjpur, vii. 
391 ; in Rdjshdhi, viii. 60 ; in Bogrd, 
viii. 210; m Murshiddbdd, ix. 104, 
105 ; in Pdbnd, ix. 302 ; in Ddrjfling, 
X. 95, 96 ; in Talpdiguri, x. 273 ; m 
Kuch Behar, X.I382; in Patnd, xi. 112, 
113 ; in Sdran, xi. 276, 277 ; in Gayd, 
xii. 86 ; in Shdhdbdd, xii. 234 ; in 
Bhdgalpur, xiv. 120, 121 ; in the Santdl 
Pargands, xiv. 337; in Pumiah, xv. 
286, 287 ; in Hazdribdgh, xvi. 102 ; 
in Lohdrdagd, xvi. 341 ; in Singbhum, 
xvii. 79; in Mdnbhi!im, xvii. 313; in 
Cuttack, xviii. 103, 104; in Puri, xix. 

94,95. 
Gudsubd river, i. 295. 
Guicanae, Species of, in Rangpur, viL 

180. 
Gujarid, river in Rangpur, vii. 168. 
Gujjar caste. See Castes. 
GtUa jdnidj a cultivating tenure. See 

Tenures of land. 
Gularbagd, village in Sdran, xi. 359. 
Gulgulias, a gipsy tribe in Hazdribdgh, 

xvi. 81 ; in Lohdrdagd, xvi. 307, 3cS. 
Gulikedd, fir in Singbhiim, xvii. 136. 
Gultanganj, mart in Sdran, xi. 228, 235. 
Gulzdrbdgh, mart in Patnd, xi. 155, 160. 
Gum, range of mountains in Ddrjiling, x. 

24. 
Gumdnf, river^ viii. 24, 25; xiv. 268, 269. 
Gumdniganj, village in Dindjpur, vii. 

365- 

Gumdshtd, market village in Dindjpur, 
vii. 447. 

Gunidshtds, in Nadiyd, ii. 39 ; in Jessor, 
ii. 190 \ in Bardwdn, iv. 65 ; in Bdn- 
kurd, iv. 239-241 ; in Birbhi^im, iv. 
344; in Chittagong, vi. 182; in Maldah, 
vii. 66 ; in Rangpur, viL 231, 232 ; in 
Bogrd, viii. 200, 244 ; in Patnd, xi. 95, 
96; in Champdran, xiii. 256; in Bhdgal- 
pur, xiv. 106; in Monghyr, xv. 79. 
See also Village Officials. 

Gumdshtdpur, thdnd in Maldah, vii. 51, 
71, 88, up, 144. 

Gumld, fdr in Singbhum, xvii. 136. 

Gumti, river in Tipperah, vi. 362, 363, 

38^, ArlS; 
Gunanandi, pargand m Tipperah, vi. 

443. 



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304 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Gunjarpur, market village in the 24 Par- 

ganiis, i. 232. 
Gunny Trade. See Commerce. 
Gunny-bags, Manufacture of, in Pumiah, 
^^•.354,358. 



Guntii Khdll river, i. 27, 32. 
Gupteswar, Sacred cave of, in Shdhibdd, 

xii. 216, 217. 
Guptipdri, village in Hugli, seat of Sans- 
krit learning iii. 315. 
Gur, river in Rijshihi, viii. 24-28. 
Giir, or molasses. See Sugar, &c. 
Gui^ipdri, trading village in Rangpur, 

vii. 309. 
Gurkhas. See Ethnical Division of the 

People. 
GurkhA, village in S&ran, xi. 232. 
Guruk, village in Hugli, with cotton 

manufacture, iii. 372. 
Gurungs, a sept of Nep^is in Ddrjiling, 

X. 53, 55, 61. 
Guthni, village and police outpost in 

Siran, xi. 235, 257, 262, 263, 325, 

356, 357. 
Gimykjold or channel, in Rdjshahl, viii. 

27. 
Guttiferse, Species of, in Rangpur, vii. 

182. 
Guyii river, Manbhum, xvii. 257. 

H 

Habits of the people. See Ceremonies 
and Material Condition. 

H4brd, village and thdnd in Dindjpur, 
vii. 365, 423, 455- 

Hddipur, market village in the 24 Par- 
ganis, i. 227. 

Hadwi, hill in Hazdribdgh, xvi. 25. 

Haidtpur, in Maldah, vii. 28, 50, loi, 
I02,* 103, 127 ; effects of the great 
flood of 1 87 1 on, vii. 91. 

Haimantik or dman^ winter rice crop, in 
the 24 Parganis, i. 134, 135 ; in the 
Sundarbans, i. 324, 32J ; in Nadiya, ii. 
64; in Jessor, ii. 241; m Midnapur, iii. 
79 ; in Hugli, iii. 329, 330 ; in Bard- 
win, iv. 70; in Bankud^ iv. 245, 246 ; 
in Birbhimi, iv. 345 ; in Dacca, v. 83 ; 
in Bdkarganj, v. 202, 203; in Farid- 
pur, V. 296, 297 ; in Maimansinh, v. 
419. 420; in Chittagong, vi. 159, 
160, 185 ; in Nodkhil^ vi. 292, 
295, 296 ; in Tipperah, vi. 391, 
416 ; in Hill Tipperah, vi. 502 ; in 
Maldah, vii. 70, 92, loi ; in Rang- 
pur, vii. 234, 235-238, 261 ; in Din^- 
pur, vii. 390^ 409; in Rijshihi, viii. 
59 ; in Bogii, viii. 148, 149, 208, 209; 



in Murshidibid, be. loi, 102, 136; in 
Pabni, ix. 301 ; in Darjiling, x. 92, 
93; in Jalpiigud, x. 271, 272; in 
Kuch Bdiar, x. 370, 380; in Patni, 
xi. 109, no; in Saran, xi. 274, 275, 
in Gayd, xii. 82, 83 ; in Sh&hibid, xii. 
2^0, 231; in Tirhut, xiii. 81; in Cham- 
paran,'xiii. 260^ 261 ; in the Santil Par- 
ganas,*xiv. 335 ; in Monghyr, xv. 91 ; 
in Pumiah, xv. 283, 284 ; in Hazari- 
bagh, xvi. 339 ; in Manbhum, xvii. 
311, 312 ; in Cuttack, xviii. 99, 100; 
in Piiri, xix. 93, 94. 
Haiyus, a sept of Nepilis in Ddrjiling, x. 

Hajangs, an aboriginal hill tribe. See 

Aboriginal Population. 
Hajjam caste. See Castes. 
Hajiganj town and thdnd in Tipperah, 

vi. 366, 392, 420^ 432, 441. 
Hajipur, subdivision of Tirhut, xiii. 17, 



^ 105, 113, 178,280. 
lajipi 



Hajipur, pargand in Tirhut, xiii. 189. 

Hajipur, town and thdnd in Tirhut, xiii. 
34, 49, 50, 70-72, 130, 146-149, 180; 
dispensary, 207, 208; ferry, xiii. 21. 

Hijipur, township in Nodkhali, vi. 286. 

Hdjipur mahal in Sarkdr Satgdon, i. 364. 

Hdji Sharitulld, founder of the Fariizi 
sect of Muhammadans, v. 195, 290. 

Hajo, the founder of the Koch or Kuch 
Behdr dynasty, vii. 315. 

Hdkimst Muhammadan doctors in Patni, 
xi. 216. 

Halahir, river in Monghyr, xv. 22. 

Halakhaurd village. See Mallai. 

Haldd, river in Chittagong, vi. 126, 129. 

Hildahd, pargand in Sarkdr Mahmud- 
dbdd, i. 372. 

Haldi {halud) or turmeric cultivation in 
the 24 Parganis, i. 148 ; in Nadiyi, ii. 
68, 104 ; in Jessor, Ii. 249 ; in Hugli, 
iii. 339; in Bardwdn, iv. 71; in Dacca, 
V. 89; in Faridpur, v. 312; in Rijshahi, 
viii. 63 ; in Paon^ ix. 302 ; in Loh&r- 
diga, xvi. 342. See also Agriculture. 

Haldl, river, iii. 25 ; xvi. 39 ; embank- 
ment in Midnapur, iii. 145. 

Haldii kild, Purf, xix. 183. 

Halhalii, river in Bogrd, viii 136, 140. 

Hdl-hdsUd land tenures. See Tenures of 
land. 

Halingimiri in the Chittagong Hill 
Tracts, Teak-plantations at, vi. 30. 

Hallams, a hill-tribe. See Aboriginal 
Population. 

Hdlshdnds^ or village watchmen, in Bard- 
wdn, iv. 66 ; in Birbhum, iv. 344, 368. 
See also Village Officials. 

Hamidpur, pargand in Tirhut, xiiL 189. 



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y>5 



Hamilton's (Dr F. Buchanan), Account 

of the Fishes and Fisheries of Bengal, 

XX. 5-103. 
Hdnchd-katikhdl, river in Dinijpur, vii. 

361. 
Handapa village, capital of Athmallik 

State, Orissa, xix. 271. 
Hangaii, river in the 24 Par|[anas, i. 31. 
J/dtMwds, See Hunting Parties. 
Hinli river. See Matibhinga. 
Hansia Bangdlipur, par^andin Dindjpur, 

vii. 443. 
Hanskhalf, market village in Nadiyid, ii. 

62, IC4. 
Hdnskol or long-stemmed rice. See Rice, 

long-stemmed. 
Hanu, river in Jessor, ii. 177. 
Hdodi 3//, a considerable lake in the 

Madhupur jungle, Maimansinh, v. 388. 
Hdold or hdwMd land tenures. See 

Tenures of land. 
Haord, river in Hill Tipperah, vi. 475. 
Hdribdtf, river in Bogra, viii. 137, 138. 
Hdramii, township in NoikhAli, vi. 286. 
Harani, township in Nodkhdli, vi. 285. 
Hards^igar, river m Pabnd, ix. 271, 275. 
Haraul^ village in Tirhut, xiii. 72. 
YiBxkwki^ pargand in BhAgalpur, xiv. 155, 

247. 
Harbang, police outpost in Chittagong, 

vi. 216, 
Harbhined, river in Dinijpur, vii. 361. 
Habodl nver, xiiL 223, 224. 
Harbours of Chittagong, vi. 191 - 193 ; of 

Cuttack, xviii. 25, 33-35 ; of Balasor, 

xviii. 252-262 ; of Puri, xix. 21, 22. 
Harchoka, in Ching Bhakir State, Chutii 

N^igpur, Excavations near, xvii. 187, 

188. 
Harded chaur in Saran, xi. 234, 236. 
Harhd river, xiii. 223, 225, 
Hdri caste, swineherds and sweepers. 

See Castes. 
Hdrid Chiingd, river in the Sundarbans, i. 

295- 
Harib&ns, village in Siran, xi. 257. 
Harichandrapur, town in Maldah, vii. 127. 
Haricharanpur, market village in the 24 

Paigands, i. 232. 
Harihar or Bhadrd river, i. 299; il 174, 

180. 
Hariharganj, town in Shihdbid, xii. 203, 

258. 
Hariharpur, pargand in Cuttack, xviii. 

226. 
Hdringhdti, or MadhumatI, or Baleswar, 

or Barisid river, i. 287, 297, 298 ; ii. 

174, 232-235 5 V. 160, 164, 262. 
Haripur, market village in the 24 Par- 

gands, i. 227. 



Haripur Bejurd, pargand in Tipperah, vi. 

443- 
Haripur, tappd in Birbhiim, iv. 425. 
Harirdmpur, village in Dindjpur, vii. 439. 
Harish Chandra, Rajd, Chief of the Chak- 

mds, vi. 102, 142. 
Harishpur Kild, pargand in Cuttack, 

xviii. 226. 
Harispur, township in Nodkhdli, vi. 286. 
Harld, hill in Chittagong, vi. 125. 
Harldkf, ihdnd in Tirhut, xiii. 34, 180. 
Hamdgang. See Bidydhad river. 
Hamdtdnd, tappd in Champdran, xiii. 

272, 310. 
Harud, village in the 24 Pargands, L 1 1 1; 

fair in honour of Godl ChLid, i. 227. 
Hasanpurd, village in Sdran, xi. 257. 
Hdsdra, town in Dacca, v. 61, 63. 
Hasdo or Heshto river, xvii. 214. 
Hdsim Kdti, market village in the 24 Par- 

gands, i. 231. 
H&tar bU in Dindjpur, vii. 442. 
Hastings, Warren, in Murshiddbdd, ix. 

18, 71, 189, 190, 103. 5tffa/j<7 History. 
Hasiid, town in Gaya, xii. 42, 60, 61. 
Hatampur, town in Shdhdbdd, xii. 202. 
Hdtanad, pargand in Maldah, vii. 81, 82, 

84, 89, 134. 
Hatandd, pdrgand in Pumiah, xv. 297, 

298, 330, 422. 
Hatdshar, village in Dindjpur, vii. 450. 
Hdthdzdri village and thdnd in Chittagong, 

vi. 136, 153, 176^ 216, 225. 
Hathidgdrh (North and South) fiscal 

division in the 24 Paigands, i. 20, 21, 

29, 2J2. 
Hathikdndd, pargand in Hdgll, i. 364. 
Hdthpor tunnel, in Rdmgarh hill, Sar- 

euja State, Chutid Ndgpur, xvii. 238. 
Hdti, pargand in Tirhut, xiii. 190. 
Hdtf, villafi;e in Tirhut, xiii 62. 
Hdtid, thdnd in Nodkhdli, vi. 269, 273, 

285, 288, 324, 333, 342. 
Hdtid dver m Nodkhdli, vi. 250, 251, 

257. 
Hdtid island, Nodkhdli, vL 238, 239, 252, 

253» 330. 
Hdtimundd, pargand in Cuttack, xviii. 

226. 
Hatindd, pargand in Dindjpur, vii. 443. 
Hatwd estate and fEunily m Sdran, 1 ne, 

xi. 285, 286, 351, 368-371. 
Hatwd, village in Sardn, xi. 257, 360. 
Hausndchd, market village in the 24 Par- 

gands, i. 228. 
Haulongs, clan of Lushdis, Raid by, vL 

19, 20 ; number of, vi. 60. 

HdvUi Pumiah, pargand in Pumiah, zv. 
^298, 336, 337, 422, 423. 
Havi, pargand in Tirhut, xiii 190, I9I« 



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306 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Hivili Darbhangah, pargand in Tirhut, 

xiii. 190. 
Havilishahr or H^ishahr, pargand in 

Nadiyi and the 24 Pargani^ i. 20, 

233. 363. 
Hdvili Tari, pargand in Maldah, vii. 

135. 
Ildwald {kdold) land tenures. See Tenures 

of land. 
Hazar Tuki, pargand in Bhigalpur, xiv. 

I54» 247- 
Hazrat Panduah, proposed name of Pan- 

duah, vii. 59. 
Hazrdtpur, mart in Dindjpur, vii. 442, 

447. 

Ildzdri or military tenures in No^hili, 
vi. 247. 

HazAribAgh District (Vol. XVI.)— 
Geographical Situation, Area, and 
Headquarters, 17 ; Boundaries and 
Jurisdiction, 17-22 ; General Aspect, 
22-25; Hills, 25-35; Rivers, 35*40; 
River Traffic, 40 ; Fisheries, 41 ; Feree 
Naiura, 41, 42 ; Mineral Springs, 42- 
44 ; Forests, 44-47 ; Jun^e Products, 
47-53; Population, Early Estimates of, 
53 ; Census of 1872, its Agencies and 
Results, 17, 53-55; Density of the Popu- 
lation, 55 ; Population according to 
Sex and Age, 55-58; Abstract of the 
Population of each Subdivision and 
Police Circle, 56; Infirmities of the 
People, 58 ; Ethnical Division of the 
People, 59-62 ; Aboriginal Tribes and 
Hillmen, 63-74 ; Emigration and Im- 
migration, 74, 75 ; Castes, 75-83 ; Re- 
ligious Division of the People, 83-85 ; 
Division of the People into Town and 
Country, 85-88; HazAribagh Town, 85- 
87; IchikTown, 87; ChatrdTown, 87, 
88, 170; Smaller Townsand Villages, 88; 
Village Headmen and Officials, 88-91 ; 
Village Disputes, 91, 92; Material Con- 
dition of the People, 92-95 ; Pilgrim 
ages, 95, 96 ; Conve3rances, 96 ; Agri 
culture, 96-106 ; Rice, 97-101 ; Other 
Cereals and Green Crops, loi, 102 ; Oil 
Seeds and Fibres, 103 ; Vegetables, 
103, 104 ; Fruit-trees, 104 ; Miscel- 
laneous Crops, 104, 105; Area, Out- 
turn of Crops, 105 ; Condition of the 
Peasantry, io5,'io6; Cesses, or abwdbs^ 
106, 107; Domestic Animals, 107, 108; 
Agricultural Implements, Wages, and 
Prices, 108- no; Weights and Mea- 
sures, no, III ; Labouring Classes 
and Spare Lands, 111-117; Land 
Tenures, 117-135 ; Rotation of Crops, 
135; Operationof ActX. of 1859, 135, 
136 ; Manures, 136 ; Irrigation, 136- 



138; Natural Calamities, 138; Famines, 
138 ; Famine Warnings, 138, 139 ; 
Foreign and Absentee Proprietors, 1 39; 
Roads, 139, 140; Railways, 140; CoaJ, 
141-157 ; Iron, 158 ; Tin, 158-160 ; 
Copper, 160, 161 ; Mica, 161-164 : 
Antimony, 164 ; Tea Cultivation, 164- 
168; Silk Rearing, 168-170; Commerce 
and Manufactures, 170-172; Exports 
and Imports, 171, 172; Capital and 
Interest, 173 ; Income of the District, 
173 ; Revenue and Expenditure of the 
District, 173-177 ; Balance Sheets of 
the District, 174, 175; Protection to 
Person and Property, 177 ; Rent Law, 
177; Police Statistics, 177-184; Cri- 
minal Statistics, 179-183; Local Police^ 
183, 184 ; Jails and Jail Statistics, 184- 
187 ; Education and Educational Sta- 
tistics, 187-190; Postal Statistics, 190 ; 
Administrative Divisions, 191, 192 ; 
Fiscal Divisions, 192-199 ; Meteor- 
ology and Climate, 199, 200 ; Medical 
Aspects of the District, 199-206 ; Vital 
Statistics, 201 ; Diseases, 201, 202 ; 
Vaccination, 202 ; Health of the Euro- 
pean Troops, 202-204 ; Charitable Dis- 
pensaries, 204-206 ; History of the 
Landholders, 206, 207 ; History of the 
Jains, 207-227. 
Hazdribagh town, headquarters of Hizari- 

bigh district, xvi. 85-87. 
Haz&bandar, trading village in Rangpur, 

vii. 309. 
Headquarters, Administrative, of the 24 
Parganis, i. 17, 18 ; of Nadiyd, ii. 18, 
58, 59; of Jessor, ii. 169, 201-203; of 
Midnapur, iii. 17, 18, 61 ; ofHugli, 
iii. 251, 298-301 ; of Bardwdn, iv. 17, 
58, 59 ; of Bankurd, iv. 205, 229, 230; 
of Birbhtim, iv. 312, 335; of Dacca, v. 
17, 18, 61. 62 ; of Bdkarganj, v. 157, 
199, 200; of Faridpur, v. 255, 291, 
294; of Maimansinh, y. 383, 410, 41 1; 
of the Chittagong Hill Tracts, vi. 22; 
of Chittagong, vi. 109; of Tipperah, vi. 
356; of Hill Tipperah, vi. 518, 519; 
of Maldah, vii. I5 ; of Rangpur, vii. 
22 J ; of DinAjpur, vii. 356 ; of Rij- 
shahl, viii. no- 118; of BM[ri^ viii. 130, 
"33. 302, 304; of Murshidibdd, ix. 18- 
230; of PibnA, ix. 270, 280^ 296; of Ddr- 
jiling, X. 18, 22, 24, 87-90 ; of Jalpii- 
guri, X. 216, 261, 262; of Kuch Behar, 
X. 332, 359, 368, 439; of PatnA, xi. 18, 
74 ; of SAran, xi. 258, 259, 354 ; of 
Gayi, xii. 17, 18; of ShShiMd, xiL 
204 ; of Tirhut, xiii. 18, 51, 52 ; of 
Champdran, xiii. 219, 250 ; of Bhigal- 
pur, XIV. 17, 80-84 ; of the Santil Par- 



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GENERAL INDEX. 



3or 



ganis, xiv. 265; of Mocghyr, xv. 18; of 
Pumiah, xv. 256; of Had^ribigh, xvi. 1 7, 
56, 85-87, 191 ; of Loh^ag^ xvi. 
231, 320, 321 ; of Singbhum, xvii. 17, 
70, 71 ; of Mdnbhum, xvii.- 253 ; of 
Cuttack, xviii. 20; of Balasor, xviii. 
248; of Purf, xix. 17. 

Health. See Medical Aspects. 

Hemp, Cultivation of, in the 24 Parganis, 
i. 145 ; in Nadiyi, ii. 67 ; in Jessor, ii. 
2^5; in Midnapur, iii. 80; in HukH, 
iii. ^34 ; in Bardw^ iv. 72 ; in Ban- 
kurd, iv. 246 ; in Dacca, v. 87, 88 \ in 
Farfdpur, v. 308; inTipperah, vi. 390; 
in Rangpur, vii. 243; in Rdjshiihi, viii. 
55, 61-63; in Bogr^ viiu 212; in 
Murshidabad, ix. 104, 105, 154; in 
P4bni^ ix. 302. See also Fibres. 

Hemtdbid, thdnd in Dinajpur, vii. 423, 

447. 457. 

Henckell, Attempts made by Mr, to re- 
claim the Sundarbans, i. 327-331. ' 

Henckellganj, market village, foimded 
by Mr HenckeU on the north edge of 
the Sundarbans, i. 34, 233; iL 224, 
303 ; English school, i. 206. 

Mental^ timber tree in the Sundarbans, i. 
306. 

Hesatu, a hill in Hazdribdgh, xvi. 25. 

Heshto or Hasdo river, xvii, 214. 

Hesli, tarmnd in Mdnbhum, xvii 368. 

Hichmi, village in Dindjpur, vii. 445. 

Higher schools. See Educational 
Statistics. 

High-level canal, Cuttack, xviii. 39-41. 

Hijili, chaklahy i. 356, 358; historical 
account of, i. 385-389 ; now in Midna- 
pur, iii. 21 ; seat of salt manufacture, 
iii. 150-152; history and administration 
of, iii. 199, 200. 

Hijili Kasbd, /ar^if^ in Midnapur, iii. 
199 ; embankment, iii. 145. 

Hijrapur, pargand in Maldah, vii. 132, 

135. 
Hfli, mart in Dindjpur, vii. 413, 414, 

445- 
Hilki, fiscal division in the 24 Pargands, 

i. 233. 364. 
Hills of Midnapur, iii 23; of Bdnkurd, iv. 
207, 208 ; of Dacca, v. 19, 20; of Mai- 
mansinh, v. 385 ; of theChittagongHill 
Tracts, vi. 24, 25 ; of Chittagong, vi. 
124, 125; of Noakhdlf, vi. 250 ; of Tii>- 
perah,vi. 361, 362; of Hill Tipperah, vi. 
473» 474 ; of Maldah, vii. 27 ; of Mur- 
shiddbdd, ix. 23; of Pdbnd, ix. 271; of 
Ddijiling, x. 19-24; of Jalpdiguri, x. 
225 ; of Patnd, xl 18, 19 ; of Gayd, xil 
19; of Shdhdbdd, xil K9, 160; of 
Champdran, xiii. 221 ; of the Santdl 



Paigands, xiv. 267, 268 ; of Monghyr, 
XV. 20 ; of Hazdribdgh, xvi. 25-35 ; of 
Lohdrdagd, xvi. 233, 234, 236, 237 ; of 
Singbhum, xvii. 19-21; of the Tributary 
States of Chutid Nigpur, xvii. 167, 
200, 214, 224, 225 ; of Mdnbhdm, 
xvii. 256; of Cuttack, xviii 21, 22; 
of Purl, xix. 18 ; of the Orissa Tribu- 
tary States, xix. 198-200. 

Hill Passes in Shdhdbdd, xii. 160; in 
Champdran, xiil 221 ; in the Santdl 
Par^nds, xiv. 268. 

Hill Tipperah State (Vol VI.)— 
Geographical Situation, Area, and 
Boundaries, 459, 460; Political Con- 
stitution, 460-463; History, 463-470; 
The present Rdjd, 470-472; General 
Aspect of the Country, 472, 473 ; Hill 
System, 473, 474 ; River System, 474- 
476; Fisheries and Marshes, 476; 
Lines of Drainage and Minerals, 477 ; 
Jungle Produce, 477, 478; Fcraej 
Naturae, 478-480 ; Population — Failure 
of Census operations, 480, 481 ; Esti- 
mate of population, 481 ; Ethnical 
Division of the people, 482; Hill 
Tribes — Tippen^s, 482-488 ; Hallams, 

488, 489 ; Kukis, 489 ; Vocabulaiy of 
the Tipperah and Lushdi languages, 

489, 490 ; Manipurfs, 491 ; Religious 
Festivsds, 491, 492 ; Immigration and 
Emigration, 492-494; Castes, 494, 
495 ; Religious division of the people 
of the plains, 495 ; Agartald, the capi- 
tal of the State, 495-497 ; Kaildshar 
and Uddipur Villages, 497 ; Places of 
Historical Interest^Old Agartald, 497, 
498 ; Old Uddipur, 498, 499 ; Material 
Condition of the People-— Dress, Food, 
and Dwellings, 499, 500; Agriculture 
— Crops, 500; Rice cultivation, 500, 
501 ; ydm mode of Cultivation, 501, 
502; Area and Out-turn of Crops, 
502 ; Condition of the Peasantry, 502, 
503; Spare Land, 503; Domestic 
Animals, 503, 504; Agricultural Im- 
plements, Wages and Prices, Weights 
and Measures, 504; Landless Day- 
labourers, 504, 505; Land Tenures, 
505* 506; Rates of Rent, 506; Manure, 
506, 507; Natural Calamities, 507; 
Roads, 507; Commerce and Trade, 
508, 509; Capital and Interest, 509; 
Revenue Administration, 509-513 ; 
Courts of Justice, 513-515 ; the Rdjd's 
Military Force, 515-517; Police and 
Jail Statistics, 517, 518; Educational 
Statistics, 518; Administrative and 
Fiscal Divisions, 518, 519; Climate, 
Temperature, and Rainfall, 519 ; Dis- 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



3o8 



GENERAL INDEX. 



^<>s^> 5I9> 520; Indif^enous Drugs, 
<20, 521 ; Medical Chanties, 521, J22. 

Hill Tract granted to Chebu L4mi in 
Dirjiling, x. 11 2- 1 14. 

Hill Assembly, Mr Cleveland's, xiy. 306- 
308. 

Hill Tribes, 24 Parganis, i. 50, 51; 
Sundarbans, i. 318, 319; Nadiyd, ii. 
45» 4^ \ Jessor, ii. 194 ; Midnapur, iii. 
51, 52 ; Hdgll, iii. 281, 284 ; Bardwan, 
iv. 46; Binkuri, iv. 221, 229; Bfr- 
bhdm, iv. 334 ; Dacca, v. 41-44; Bikar- 
ganj, V. 190; Faridpur, v. 28$; Mai- 
mansinh, v. 401, 402 ; Chittagong Hill 
Tracts, vi. 39-66 ; Chittagong, vi. 142, 
143; NoAkhill, vi. 273, 274; Tip- 
perah, vL 376-370 ; Hill Tipperah, vi. 
482-492; Rdjshahi, viil 40; Bogri, 
viii. 165 ; Murshiddbid, ix. 4^ 46-48 ; 
Pdbni, ix. 279, 282, 284, 285 ; Dar- 
jfling, X. 44, 45, 47.80, 205-212 ; Jal- 
piiguH, X. 252-256 ; Hazdrib^h, xvi. 
60, 61, 63-74; Lohdrdagd, xvi. 251, 
252, 254-299; Singbhiim, xvii. 39-63 ; 
Tributary States of Chutid Ndgpur, 
xvii. passim ; Cuttack, xviii. 77, 78 ; 
Orissa Tributary States, xix. 208-255. 
See also Aboriginal Population. 

Hilsd mart and ihdnd in Patnd, xi. 35, 
83,206. 

Himdlayan races in Ddijiling, x., appen- 
dix, 205-212. 

Himsdgar, sacred pond of the Kartdbha- 
jds in Nadiyd, ii. 55. 

Hmdu population of the 24 Pargands, i. 
44, 71, 72 ; of the Sundarbans, i. 317 ; 
of Nadiyd, ii. 51 ; of Jessor, ii. 196 ; 
of Midnapur, iii. 44, 58 ; of Hugli, iii. 
273» 291 ; of Bardwan, iv. 38, S4 ; of 
Bdnkurd, iv. 213, 228 ; of Birbhum, iv. 
324, 325, 336; of Dacca, v. 34; of 
Bdkarganj, v. 182; of Faridpur, v. 
280 ; of Maimansinh, v. 394 ; of the 
Chittagong Hill Tracts, vi. 36, 37, 
68, 102 ; of Chittagong, vi. 130, ^137, 
138, 139, 147, I49» 151. 152. 218, 219- 
221 ; of Nodkhdli, vi. 269, 270, 277, 
280-282, 337, 338 ; of Tipperah, vi. 
373. 381, 386. 435» 438; of "Hill Tip- 
perah, vi. 482, 495, 518; of Maldah, vii. 
37, 47 ; of Rangpur, vii. 208-210, 221, 
222-224, 227, 229; of Dindjpur, vii 
366, 370-373, 382 ; of Rdjshihi, viii. 
36-38 ; 50-52 ; of B(^;rd, viii. 165-181 ; 



of JalpdiguH, x. 249, 251, 256-260; of 
Kuch Behar, x. 34i-346» 358; of 
Patnd, xi, 36, 54-59, 65 ; of Sdran, xi. 



241, 256, 264, 354; of Gayd, xii. 30, 
39 ; of Shdhdbdd, xii. 181, 201 ; of 
Tirhut, xiii. 35, 37, 48, 49 ; of Cham- 
pdran, xiii. 249 ; of Bhdgalpur, xiv. 47, 
77 ; of the Santdl Parganis, xiv. 278, 
279, 32Xf 322 ; of Monghyr, xv. 49, 
59; of Pumiah, xv. 245, 255; of 
Hazdribdgh, xvi. 57, 61, 62, 83; of 
Lohdrda^ xvi 24i8, 252-254, 318; 
of Singbhum, xvii. 33, 55, 69, 70 ; of 
the Tributary States of Chutid Ndgpur, 
xvii. 153, 155, 164, 169; of Mdnbhiim, 
xviL 270, 296 ; of Cuttack, xviii. 64, 
66, 78, 83 ; of Balasor, xviii. 266, 277, 
278 ; of Puri, xix. 27, 29, 30, 40 ; of 
the Orissa Tributary States, xix. 205, 
207, 259, 261. 

Hindol Sute, Orissa, xix. 206, 210-217, 
261, 287-289, 328. 

Hindol village, capital of Hindol State, 
xix. 288. 

Hingalbhdgd, river in Dindjpur, vii. 359. 

Hingir estate, in the Tributary States 
of Chutid Ndgpur, xvii. 190. 

Hingld nadiy stream in B{rbhi!an, iv. 317. 

Hinsf or Helencha river in the 24 Par- 
gands, i. 31, 32. 

Ifird Bonga festival, Singbhum, xvii. 50. 

Hiranyakaship, the Titan, L^end of, 
xiv. 100, loi. 

Himif pargand in Tirhut, xiii. 191. 

Histoncal interest, Places of. See Towns, 
&c. 

History, Early, of the 24 Pargands, i. 18- 
22 ; of the family of the Rdjds of 
Nadiyd, ii. 142-165 ; of Jessor, ii. 306; 
of Midnapur, iii. 19-22 ; of Hugli, iii. 
300, 301 ; of Bardwdn, iv. t8-2i ; of 
the Family of the Mdhdrdjd of Bardwdn, 
iv. 137-143 ; of the Rdjd of Bishnupur, 
Bdnkurd, iv. 230-237 ; of Birbhum, iv. 
312-316 ; of the Rajds of Birbhi^, iv. 
382-395; of Dacca, v. 45, 46, 122- 
126, 129; in Faridpur, v. 356, 257; 
of the Chittagong Hill Tracts, vi. 
18; of Chittagong, vi. 110-124; of 
Nodkhdli, vi. 239-248 ; of Tipperah, 
vi. 357-360; of Hill Tipperah, vi. 463- 
470 ; of Maldah, vii. 18 ; of Rangpur, 
vii. 156, 310-325 ; of Dindjpur, vii. 
356-358 ; of Rljshdhi, viii. 20, 21 ; of 
Bogrd, viii. 130-133; of the Rdjds of 
Rdishdhi, viii. 54, 5^ ; of Murshid- 
dbad, ix. 18-21 ; of P&nd, ix. 270; of 
the Diwdni and Nawdbs of Murshid- 
dbdd, ix. 172-195 ; of the Seths of Mur- 
shiddbdd, 252-265; of Ddrjiling, x. 
18, 19; of Jalpdiguri, x. 216-223; of 
Kuch Behar State, z. 402-426; of 
Patnd city, xi. 67-71 ; of Behar town, 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



GENERAL INDEX, 



309 



x>* 77f 7S ; of Bh^galpur, xiv. 18-21 ; 
of Pumiah, xv. 220-225; of Hazarib^h, 
xvi. 18-22; of the landholders of Hazlri- 
b^h, xvi. 1 17-127, 206, 207; of Chutii 
NagpuT Proper, Paldmau, and Lohdr- 
daga, xvi 444-478; of Orissa, xviii. 
177-260. 

History, Administrative, of the 24 Par- 
gan&s, i. 183 ; of the Sandarbans, i. 
34S» 346; of Nadiyi^ ii. 142-165 ; of 
Jessor, ii. 306, 307 ; of Midnapur, iii. 
154-157; of Hiigli, iii.' 378-380; of 
Bardwin, iv. 18-21, 137- 143 ; of Bin- 
kuri, iv. 279-281 ; of Blrbhum, iv. 312- 
316; of Dacca, v. 126-129; of the 
Chittagong HUl Tracts, vi. 88-95 • of 
Nodkhall, vi 329-331 ; of Tipperah, 
vL 427, 428 ; of Hill Tipperah, vi. 461, 
462 ; of Maldah, vii. 18, 19 ; of Rang- 
pur, vii. 160, 161 ; of Dinijpur, vii. 
356-35S; of Rijshiihi, viii. 20, 21 ; 
of Bogri, viii. 1 30- 133; of Murshid- 
dbid, IX. 230-232 ; of Pdbnd, ix. 365, 
366 ; of Dirjfling, x. 18, 19, 196, 197 ; 
of JalpAiguri, x. 216-223; of Kuch 
Behar, x. 427-432 ; of Patxiii, xi. 18 1- 
183; of Sdran, xi. 337, 338; of Gayd, 
xii. 122 ; of Shdhdbad, xii. 271-27J. ; of 
Tirhut, xiii. 165, 166 ; of Champaran, 
xiii. 297, 298 ; of Bhdgalpur, xiv. 18- 
22 ; of the Santil Parganis, xiv. 361, 
362; of Monghyr, xv. 155-157; of 
Pumiah, xv. 393-397 ; of Haziribdgh, 
xvi. 18-22; of Lohirdagd, xvi. 231 ; of 
Singbhdm, xvii. 107-11? ; ofthe Tribu- 
tary States of ChutidN^ur, xvii. 149- 
152 ; of Mdnbhiim, xvii. 353 ; of Cut- 
tack, xviii. 200-202; of Balasor, xviii. 
344 ; of Puri, xix. 155 ; of the Orissa 
Tributary States, xix. 263, 264. 

Hodipur, village in the Dhenkanal State, 
Onssa, xix. 282. 

Hogalberia fair in Nadiyd, ii. 57. 

Hold, festival in the Chittagong Hill 
Tracts, vi. 46. 

Holdings of the cultivators, Size of, in the 
24 Pargands, i. 148, 149; in the 
Sundarbans, i. 336, 337 ; in Nadiyd, 
ii. 64 ; in Jessor, ii. 255 ; in Midnapur, 
iii. 83; in Hugli, iii. 341, 342; in Bard- 
wdn, iv. 73 ; in Bdnkurd, iv. 248 ; in 
Birbhdm, iv. 362 ; in Dacca, v. 92 ; in 
Bdkar|;ani, v. 205 ; in Faridpur, v. 
317; in Maimansinh, v. 443; in the 
Chittagong Hill Tracts, vi. 75; in 
Chittagong, vi. 162 ; in Nodkhdu, vi. 
278, 279, 296, 297 ; in Tipperah, vi. 
395. 396, 398 ; in Hill Tipperah, vi. 
502, 503 ; in Maldah, vii. 48, 68, 69, 
75i 79 ; in Rangpur, vii 225, 226, 227, 



229, 242, 266 ; m Dindjpur, vii. 388, 
389, 396, 397» 408, 409, 457 ; in R^- 
shdhl, viii. 65 ; in Bogrd, viii. 201-206 ; 
in Murshiddbdd, ix. 97, 107, 10^ 119, 
120 ; in Pdbnd, ix. 305, ^06 ; in Ddr- 
jfling, X. 99, 100 ; in Jalpjigurf, x. 276; 
in Kuch Behar, x. 385 ; in Patnd, xi. 
117 ; in Saran, xi. 294, 295 ; in Ga)[d, 
xii 95 ; in Shdhdbdd, xii. 240 ; in Tir- 
hut, xiii. 106, 107 ; in Champdran, xiii. 
277, 278 ; in Bhdgalpur, xiv. 129, 130; 
in the Santdl Pargands, xiv. 341, 342 ; 
in Monghyr, xv. 106, 107 ; in Pumiah, 
XV. 303-30(5 ; in Hazdribdgh, xvi. 92-95, 
105, 106 ; in Lohdrdagd, xvi. 334, 335, 
355» 356 ; in Singbhum, xvii. 82, 83 ; 
in the Tributary States of Chutid Ndg- 
pur, xvii. 178, 197, 210, 241 ; in Mdn- 
bhiim, xvii. 3175 in Cuttack, xviii. 
107-109; in Balasor, xviii 282-294; 
in Puri-, xix. 96. 

Holi^ or Dol-jatrd^ festival in Patnd, xi. 
57, 58. 

Hollandais-sdhi, ancient Dutch settle- 
ment in Balasor, xviii 283. 

Homndbdd, pargand in Tipperah, vi. 

443.444. 

Horse-racing in Bdkarganj, v. 216. 

Hos or Larka Kols, in Singbhum, xvii. 
36* 37, 40' •S]?^ f^lso Kols. 

Hospitals. See Dispensaries. 

Hot springs in Bfrbhum, iv. 322; in 
Ddrjiling x. 32, 33; near Rdjgir in 
Patnd, xi. 80^ 81 ; in Monghyr, xv. 74- 
78, 206; in Hazdribdgh, xvi. 42-44; 
in Lohdrdagd, xvi. 239. 

Houses of the People in the 24 Pargands, 
i. 129, 130 ; in the Sundarbans, 1. 322, 
323 ; in Nadiyd, il 62, 63 ; in Jessor, 
ii. 240 ; in Midnapur, iii. 74 ; in Ht!iglf, 
iii 328, 329; in Bardwdn, iv, 68; in 
Birbhum, iv. 344; in Dacca, v. 65, 
^, 75, 76 ; in Bdkarganj, v. 202 ; in 
Faridpur, v. 295 ; in Maimansinh, v. 
419 ; m the Chittagong Hill Tracts, vi. 
54. 55, 63, 69, 70; in Chittagong, vi. 
158; in Nodkhdii, vi. 290, 291 ; in 
Tipperah, vi. 387, 388 ; in Hill Tip- 
perah, vi. 500 ; in Maldah, vii. 69 ; in 
Kangpur, vii. 226; in Dindjpur, vii. 
388 ; in Rdjshdhi, viii. 57 ; in Bogrd, 
viii 206; in Murshiddbdd, ix. 97-99; 
in Pdbnd, ix. 299, 300 ; in Ddrjiling, x. 
70^ 91 ; in Jalpdigurf, x. 270 ; in 
Kuch Behar, x. 371 ; in PaCnd, xi. 
102-105; in Sdran, xl 271, 272; in 
Gayd, xii. 75 ; in Shdhdbdd, xii. 225. 
226 ; in Tirhut, xiii. 77-79 ; in Cham- 
pdran, xiii. 258; in Bhdgalpur, xiv. 
1 10, III; in the Santdl Pargands, xiv, 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



310 



GENERAL INDEX. 



31O1 3"» 33l» 3325 in Monghyr, xv. 
81 ; in Pumiah, xv. 276-278 ; in 
Haziribdgh, xvi. 93 ; in LoMrdagi, 
xvi. 334 ; in Singbhiim, xvii. 60, 78 ; 
in M^nbhum, xvii. 307, 308; in Cut- 
tack, xviii. 98 ; in Balasor, xviii. 289 ; 
in Puri, xix. 92, 93; in the Orissa 
Tributary States, xix. 243. 

Houses, Number of, in the 24 Pargands, 
i. 42, 43 ; in Nadiyd, ii. 34, 35 ; in 
Jessor, ii. 186 ; in Midnapur, iii. 41 ; 
in Hugli, iii. 273; in Bardwin, iv. 
33 ; in Bdnkura, iv. 212 ; in Birbhum, 
iv. 523 ; in Dacca, v. 31-33 ; in Bdkar- 
ganj, V. 178, 183 ; in Fandpur, v. 278, 
281 ; in Maimansinh, v. 393 ; in the 
Chittagong Hill Tracts, vi. 35, 102; 
in Chittagong, vi. 133, 136; in Noik- 
hdll, vi. 268, 269; in Tipperah, vi. 
372 ; in Hill Tippprah, vi. 481 ; in 
Maldah, vii. 37 ; in Rangpur, vii. 206 ; 
in Dindjpur, vii. 370; m Rajshihi, 
viii. 35; in Bogrd, viii. 159; in Mur- 
shidibad, ix. 39, 40; in Pdbna, ix. 
279, 280; in Ddrjiling, x. 41, 42; in 
Jalpdigurf, x. 247, 248; in Kuch 
Behar, x. 339 ; in Patna, xi. 35 ; in 
S4ran, xi. 241 ; in Gayd, xii. 30, 31 ; 
in Shdhibdd, xii. 180; in Tirhu^ xiii. 
34, 3^ ; in Bhigalpur, xiv. 46 ; in the 
Santal Pargan£, xiv. 276, 277 ; in 
Monghyr, xv. 48 ; in Pumiah, xv. 244 ; 
in Hazaribagh, xvi. 56 ; in Lohirdagd, 
xvi. 249 ; in Singbhum, xvii. 33 ; in 
the Tributary States of Chutia N^ur, 
xvii. 153; in Manbhdm, xvii. 270; in 
Cuttack, xviii. 64, 65 ; in Balasor, 
xviii. 264, 265 ; in Puri, xix. 27, 28 ; 
in the Orissa Tributary States, xix. 
204. 

Howrah, sub-division and magistracy in 
Huglf, iii. 252, 275, 412 ; town and 
suburbs, history and description of, iii. 
294, 295 ; boundaries, iii. 295 ; census, 
iii. 296, 297 ; educational census, iii. 
298 ; hospital, iii. 440. 

Ht^GLf (or Hooghly) District, (Vol. 

ni.)- 

Geographical Situation, Area, Head- 

?uarters, &c., 251 ; Boundaries and 
urisdiction, 252; General Aspect, 
253; River System, 254-262; Lakes, 
Watercourses, and Canals, 262 ; River- 
side Towns and Utilisation of the 
WateV Supply, 263; Fisheries, &c., 
264 ; Marsh Reclamation, 265 ; Jungle 
Products, Embankments, and Fera 
NcUura^ 266; Census of 1872, its 
Agencies and Results, 267-284; Density 
of Population, 269-273; Population 



according to Sex and Age, 273 ; accord- 
ing to Occupation, 276-280 ; Ethnical 
Division of the People, 280-284 5 List of 
Castes, 284-291 ; Religious Division of 
the People, 291-293 ; Division of die 
People in Town and Country, 292; How- 
rah Town, 292-298 ; Hugft and Chin- 
surah, 298, 301 ; Other Municipalities, 
301-305 ; Smaller Towns and Places of 
Importance, 305-315 ; Village Institu- 
tions, 317-321 ; Fairs and Religious 
Gatherings, 322-328; Material Con- 
dition of the People, 328, 329 ; Agri- 
culture, 329-358 ; Rice Crop^ 329-331 5 
Other Cereals, 331 ; Pulses and Green 
Crops, 332; Oil-seeds, 333; Fibres, 
334; Vegetables, 334-337; Fniit Trees, 
337; Miscellaneous Crops, ^38, 339; 
Area, Out-turn of Crops, &c., 340; 
Condition of the Peasantry, 341, 342 ; 
Operation of the Land Law, and 
Domestic Animals, 343; Agricultural 
Implements and Wages, 344; Prices 
of Food Grains, 345; Weights and 
•Measures, 345, 346; Day-Labourers 
and Spare Land, 347 ; Land Tenures, 
348-353; Rates of Rent, 354-356; 
Manures and Irrigation, 357 ; Rotation 
of Crops and Blights, 358; Floods, 
359» 360 ; Droughts, 361 ; Famine of 
1866, 362-367 ; Foreign and Absentee 
Landlords, 367 ; Roads and Means of 
Communication, 368-370 ; Railroads, 
370; Canals, 371; Mines, Quarries, 
and Manufactures, 372 ; Condition of 
the Manufacturing Classes, 373; Ex- 
tinct Manufactures, 374; Trade and 
Commerce, 375 ; Capital and Interest, 
376; Institutions, Newspapers, and 
Printing Presses, 377 ; Incomes and 
Income-Tax, 377, 378 ; Administra- 
tion, 378-417 ; Revenue and Expendi- 
ture, 378-381; Land Revenue, 378- 
383; Land Law, 383; Courts, 384; 
Police Statistics, 384, 385 ; Criminal 
Cases, 386, 387; Jail Statistics, 392- 
409 ; Postal Statistics, 410 ; Sub-Divi- 
sional Administration, 411-413; List of 
Fiscal Divisions, with details, 413- 
417 ; Medical Topography, 417 ; the 
Epidemic of Malarious Fever, its 
Causes, and Nature, and Mortality, 418- 
437 ; Native Practitioners and their 
Drugs, 438, 439 ; Dispensaries, 440. 

Hugli river, i. 18, 24, 25, 29, 293 ; iii. 
18, 23, 24, 252, 254, 255, 258. 

Hiigli . town, forming one municipality 
with Chinsurah, founded by the Portu- 
guese, first settlement of the English in 
Lower Bengal, iii. 299-301; Imim- 



Digitized by 



Google 



GENERAL INDEX, 



3" 



bira, iii. 301 ; Hiigli Collie, iii. 392- 

^94 ; hospital, ill 440. 
Hugli or Burd Mantreswar estuary in 

the 24 Pargan^ i. 28. 
Hukumapur, tdluk in Birbhdm, iv. 425, 

426. 
Hikumi rent-free grants of land. See 

Tenures of land. 
Human sacrifice among the pCandhs, in 

Orissa, xix. 234-236; its suppression by 

the British, xix. 236-238. 
Humayun Jah, Naw4b of Murshidibdd, 

ix. 194. 
Hunting expeditions {hdnhwds) of the 

Santfls, xiv. 316, 317 ; of the Hos in 

Singbhiim, xvii. 26, 30, 31, 309. 
Hurpa bdn^ flood-wave on the rivers in 

Bankur^ iv. 209. 
Husdin Shdh, Afghdn king ( 1497- 1 521), 
. vii. 315. 
Husaindbid, khdi in the 24 Paigands, 

Husainabad, river mart, with paddy 

trade in the 24 Parganis, i. 34. 
Husdinpur, pargdna in Sarkdr Sulaimdn- 

dbdd i. 366. 
Husdinpur, market village in Dindjpur, 

vii. 443, 448. 
Husbandmen. See Cultivators, Tillage, 

&c. 
Husepur, village in Sdran, 'xi. 230, 358. 



Idrpur, market village in the 24 Pargands, 

i. 226. 
lb, river in Chutid Ndgpur, xvii. 190, 

200, 201. 
Ibrdhimpur, pargand in Tipperah, vi. 

444* 
Ibrdhimpur {tappd)^ pargand in Tipperah, 

vi. 444. 
Ibrdhimpur, town in Tipperah, v. 383. 
Ichd, pir in Singbhum, xvii. 139. 
Ichdk, town in Hazdribdgh, xvi. 85-87. 
Ichdkddd town, with sugar market, 

Jessor, ii. 212, 295. 
Ichhdmati river, Nadiyd, ii. 19. 
Ichhdmatf river, (i) tributaiy of the 

Jamund, i. 25, 26 ; (2) offshoot of the 

tamund, i. 35, 287, 299. 
Icnhdmdtf, river in the Chittagong Hill 

Tracts, vi. 27. 
Ichhdmati, river in Dindjpur, vii. 362. 
Ichhdmati, river in Pdbna, ix. 270, 271. 
Ichhdpukur, pargand in Birbhum, iv. 426. 
Ichhdpur khdl^ 24 Pargands, i. 32. 
Ichhdpur, village with English school, in 



the 24 Pargands, i. ao6, 233 ; powder 
factory and railway station, i. 1 10, 166. 

Iddlpur, pargand in Bdkarganj, Histori- 
cal sketch of, i. 224, 225. 

Idiots, Number of, in the 24 Pargands, i. 
44; in Nadiyd, ii. 38; in Jessor, ii. 
189; in Midnapur, iii. 44; in Hugli, 
iii. 276 ; in Banlwdn, iv. 39 ; in Bdn- 
kurd, iv. 215 ; in Birbhum, iv. 326; in 
Dacca, v. 34; in Bdkarganj, v. 184; 
in Faridpur, v. 280; in Maimansinh, 
V. ^95; in Chittagong, vi. 137; in 
Nodkhdll, vi. 270; in Tippeiah, vi. 
373 ; in Maldah, vii 39 ; in Rangpur, 
vii. 210; in Dindjpur, viL 373; in 
Rdjshdhi, viii. 37 ; in Bogrd, viii. 160 ; 
in Murshiddbdd, ix. 41, 42 ; in Pdbnd, 
ix. 281 ; in Ddrj fling, x. 44 ; in Jalpdi- 
guri, X. 252; in Patnd, xi. 36; in 
Sdran, xi. 242 ; in Gayd, xii. 30, 32 ; 
in Shdhdbdd, xii. 183; in Tirhut, xiii. 
35 ; in Cbampdran, xiii. 235 ; in Bhd- 
galpur, xiv. 47 ; in the Santdl Pargani^ 
xiv. 280; in Monghyr, xv. 50; in 
Pumiah, xv. 24^ ; in Hazdribdgh, xvi. 
58 ; in Mdnbhum, xvii. 273 ; in Cut- 
tack, xviii. 67 ; in Balasor, xviii. 267 ; 
in Puri, xix. 30 ; in the Orissa Tribu- 
tary States, xix. 208. 

Idrdkpur, pargand in Rangpur, vii. 253, 
287, 324, 325; 

Idrdkpur, site of ruins of a circular fort, 
Dacca, v. 72. 

IhHmdm land tenures. See Tenures of 
land. 

Jjdrds, or farming tenures in the 24 Par- 
gands, i. 155, 267, 271, 272; in Nadivd, 
ii. 72 ; in Jessor, ii. 264 ; in Bardwan, 
iv. 83; in Bdnkurd, iv. 259; in Birbhum, 
iv. 366, 367 ; in Chittagong. vi. 179 ; 
in Nodkhdll, vi. 312,313; in Tipperdi, 
vi. 401, 409, 410 ; in Maldah, vii. 80 ; 
in Rangpur, vii. 275, 270 ; in Dindjpur, 
vii. 401, 403 ; in Rdjshiuif, viii. 72 ; in 
Bogid, viii. 234-236 ; in Murshiddbdd, 
ix. 117, 118; in Pdbnd, ix. 313, 314; 
in Kuch Behar, x. 396 ; in Patn^ xi. 
125 ; in Bhd^pur, xiv. 141, 147 ; in 
Singbhum, xvii. 83, 90 ; in Mdnbhum, 
xvii. 325, 326,- 328. See also Tenures 
of land. 

Ijri river, Mdnbhum, xvii. 256, 257. 

Ikhtidrpur, one of the original 24 Par- 
gands, i. 20. 

Ilambdzdr, trading town in Birbhdm with 
lac factory, iv. 336, 377-379. 

Illegal cesses (customaiy) or aiwdbs, in 
the Sundarbans, i. 358 ; in Midnapur, 
iii. 108-113; in Dacca, v. 97, 127 ; in 
Chittagong, vi. 180-182; in Nodkhdll, 



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312 



GENERAL INDEX, 



vi. 315, 316; in Tipperah, vi. 41 1, 412 ; 
in 60m, viii. 248-250; in Murshid- 
£bdd, IX. 71, 200; in Pdbna, ix. 318; 
in Kuch Behar, x. 428 ; in Patni, xi. 
96, 127 ; in Gayd, xii. 70-72 ; in Tir- 
hut, xiii. 106, 107 ; in BhAgalpur, xiv. 
158-160; in Monghyr, xv. 120-127 > i^^ 
Pumiah, xv. 388 ; in Hazaribagh, xvi. 
106, 107 ; in Lohdrdaga, xvi. 368-370, 
372, 380, 381 ; in Cuttack, xviii. 121. 
Imidpur, mahal in Sarkdr Khalifatibid, 

i. 373- . 
Imddpur, /flr^mf in Monghyr, xv. 176. 
Imdmbira, or Muhammadan mosque, at 

HiigH, iii. 301 ; in Murshidibdd city, 

ix. e^, 68. 
Imdmganj, mart in Gay^, xii. 56. 
Immigration and Emigration in the 24Par- 

ganas, i. 5J, 52 ; in the Sundarbans, i. 

318, 320; in Nadiyid, ii. 45, 46; in 
Midnapur, iii. 352 ; in Hi^u, iii. 284 ; 
in Bardwan, iv. 46; in Bdnkurd, iv. 
221 ; in Birbhiim, iv. 326 ; in Dacca, 
v. 41-46; in Bikarganj, v. 188-190; 
in Faridpur, v. 285, 286 ; in Maiman- 
sinh, V. 401, 402; in the Chittagong 
Hill Tracts, vi. 51, 66-68 ; in Chitta- 
gong, vi. 118, 119, 135, 143. 144; in 
No&hdlf, vi. 256, 257, 274, 275; in 
Tipperah, vi. 379; in Hill Tipperah, 
vi. 492, 493, 494 ; in Maldah, vii. 41 ; 
in DinAjpur,' vii. 376 ; in RdjshAhl, viii. 
40; in Bogrd, viii. 167-169; in Mur- 
shidibdd, ix. 45, 46; in Pdbna, ix. 285; 
in Ddrjiling, x. 84, 85 ; in Kuch Behar, 
X. 340 ; in Patni, xi. x% 40 ; in Sdran, 
xi. 268, 269 ; in Qayt xii. 34, 35 5 »» 
Shdhibdd, xii. 168-188 ; in Tirhut, xiii. 
40, 41 ; in Champdran, xiii. 239, 240 ; 
in BhiLgalpur, xiv. 52, 53 ; in the San- 
tal Pargands, xiv. 273, 319, 362 ; in 
Monghyr, xv. 54, 55 ; in Pumiah, xv. 
253, 254; in Hazdribdgh, xvi. 74; 
in Lohirdaga, xvi. 299, 300; in Sing- 
bhum, xvii. 63 ; in the Tributary States 
of Chutii N&)ur, xvii. 153 ; in Man- 
bhiim, xvii. 288-290; in Cuttack, xviii. 
71 ; in Balasor, xviii. 270, 271. 

Implements of Agriculture in the 24 Par- 
- ganiis, i. 150, 151; in the Sundarbans, i. 
337» 338 ; in Nadiyd, ii. 70 ; in Jessor, 
ii. 2^6; in Midnapur, iii. 84; in 
Hiigli, iii. 343, 344; in Bardwdn, iv. 
74 ; in Bdnkuii, iv. 249 ; in Birbhiim, 
iv. 363, 364; in Dacca, v. 93; in 
Bdkarganj, v. 206; in Farfdpur, v. 

319, 320; m Maimansinh, v. 444; in 
the Chittagong Hill Tracts, vi. 75 ; in 
Chittagong, vi. 162, 163 ; in No4kh41i, 
vi. 299 ; in Tipperah, vi. 396 ; in Hill 



Tipperah, vL 504; in Maldah, vii. 
75, 76 ; in Rangpur, vii. 265, 266 ; in 
Dinajpur, vii. 396, 397 ; in lUjshihf, 
viii. 66 ; in Bogri, viii. 223, 224 ; in 
Murshiddbad, ix. 109; in P&bni, ix. 
306, 307 ; in Darjiling, x. 69, 100, loi ; 
in JalpaiguH, x. 277, 278; in Kuch 
Behar, x. 385 ; in Patni, xi. 118, 119 ; 
in Sdran, xi. 296 ; in Gayd, xii. 96 ; in 
Shihibdd, xii. 240-243 ; in Tirhut, xiii. 
107 ; in Champdran, xiii. 278, 279 ; 
in Bh^lpur, xiv. 130, 131 ; in the 
Santil Parganis, xiv. 342 ; in Monghyr, 
XV. 108 ; in Pumiah, xv. 309, 310 ; in 
Hazdrib^h, xvi. 108 ; in Lohardagd, 
xvi. 356, 357 ; in Singbhum, xviL 47, 
62, 84 ; in the Tributary States of 
Chutid Ndgpur, xvii. 210 ; in Man- 
bhum, xvii. 318; in Cuttack, xviii. 117; 
in Balasor, xviii. 295; in Puri, xix. 97. 

Imported Capital in Nadiyd, ii. 105 ; in 
Bardwdn, iv. 135, 136; in Bankurd, 
iv. 278 ; in Birbhiim, iv. 381, 382 ; in 
Dacca, v. 116; in Bdkarganj, v. 217 ; 
in Faridpur, v. 310, 341 ; in Rajshdhi, 
viii. 89 ; in Bogrd, viii. 278 ; in Mur- 
shiddbdd, ix. 170 ; in Pdbnd, ix. 350- 
352; in Ddrjiling, x. 164-178. See also 
Capital. 

Imports and Exports of the 24 Pargands, 
i. 171-173; of the Sundarbans, i. 345 ; 
of Nadiy^ iL 103 ; of Jessor," ii. 304 ; 
of Midnapur, iii. 152; of Hugli, iii. 
375 ; of Bardwdn, iv. 135 ; of Bdn- 
kurd, iv. 277 ; of Birbhiim, iv. 380 ; of 
the Chittagong Hill Tracts, vL 28, 84- 
86; of Chittagong, vi. 130, 188-190, 195- 
199, 207, 208, 210, 215; of Nodkhdli, vi. 
256, 322, 323, 326, 327; of Tipperah, vi. 
420, 422-424; of Hill Tippendi, vi. 508, 
509 ; of Maldah, vii loi, 102, 103 ; 
of Rangpur, vii. 264, 265, 307, 308 ; of 
Dindjpur, vii. 411, 414, 441 ; of Rdj- 
shdhi, viii. 88; of Bogid, viiL 222, 27 1; 
of Murshiddbdd, ix. 29, 30, 157-168 ; 
of Pdbnd, ix. 274, 275, 334, J36-339 ; 
of Ddrjiling, x. 158 ; of Jalpdiguri, x. 
237, 297, 299; of Kuch Behar, x. 399, 
400; of Patnd, xi. 25, 26, 156-169, 
172-177. 334; of Sdran, xi. 260, 323, 
324, 330, 331-334; of Gayd, xU. 117- 
119; of Shdhdbdd, xii. 263-265, 267- 
269; of Tirhut, xiii. 131-162; of Cham- 
pdran, xiiL 290-296; of Bhdgalpur, xiv. 
183-191 ; of the Santdl Pargands, xiv. 
354-360; of Monghyr, xv. 142-153; of 
Pumiah, xv. 371-380 ; of Hazdribdgh, 
xvi. 87, 88, 172; of Lohdrdagd, xvi. 
420 ; of Singbhum, xvii. 105, loiS ; of 
Cuttack (False Point, 31, 32), xviii. 175, 



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GENERAL INDEX. 



313 



176; of Balasor, xviii. 337-34>» 343» 
344; of Puri, xix. 154. 

Indmi land tenures. See Tenures of land. 

Indyatpur, town in Maldah, vii 136. 

Inayatpur, village in Dinijpur, vii. 443. 

Income and Income Tax m the 24 Par- 
gands, L 173-182; in Nadiyd, iL iii; in 
Midnapur, iii. 154; in HiigH, iii. 377; 
in Bard win, iv. 136, 137 ; in Bankudl, 
iv. 279; in Birbhiim, iv. 382; in 
Dacca, v. 118 ; in Bakarganj, v. 217 ; 
in Faridpur, v. 341 ; in Maimansinh, 
V. 462 : in Chittagong, vi. 212 ; in 
Noikhall, vi. 329; in Tipperah, vi. 
426; in MaldsSi, vii. 105; in Rang- 
pur, vii. 310 ; in Dinijpur, vii. 415 ; in 
RijsMhi, viii. 92 ; in 6og^ viii. 278, 
280-282; in Murshidibid, ix. 172, 196- 
201 ; in Pibni, ix. 353-355 ; in Ddijfl- 
ing, X. 178, 182;; in Jalp%uri, x. 301, 
304 ; in Kuch Behar, x. 432-435 ; in 
Patni, xi. 181 ; in Siran, xi. 337 ; in 
Gayi, xii. 120, 121 ; in Shdhdbdd, 
xii. 275; in Tirhut, xiii. 16?; in Cham- 
pdran, xiii. 296, 297; in Bhigalpur, xiv. 
192-194; in the Santil Parganas» xiv. 
361 ; in Monghyr, xv. 154, 155 ; in 
Pumiah, xv. 385-387 ; in Hazaribigh, 
xvL 173-177 ; in Lohdrdagi, xvi. 420, 
470-472 ; in Singbhum, xvii. 107. 

Indii, village in Saran, xi. 257. 

Indds, village and thdnd in Bardwiny iv. 

63- 

Independent tdluks. See Tenures of 
land. 

India-rubber in the Chittagong Hill 
Tracts, vi. 28, 32, 84, 85. 

Indian com. Cultivation and varieties o^ 
See Cereal Crops. 

Indigenous drugs, in the 24 Parganas, i. 
247-249; in Nadivd, ii. 140; in Jessor, 
ii- 336 ; in Midnapur, iii. 246 ; in 
HugS, iii 438, 439 ; in Bard win, iv. 
200, 201 ; in Bankurd, iv. 303 ; in 
Dacca, v. 144-146; in Bdkarganj, v. 
248; in Faridpur, v. 359, 360; in 
Maimansinh, v. 479; in the Chittagong 
Hill Tracts, vi. 104; in Chittagong, 
vi. 231, 232; in Nodkhdli, vi. 348, 
349; in Tipperah, vi. 451, 452; in 
Hill Tipperah, vi. 520, 521 ; in Mal- 
dah, vii. 150; in Dindjpur, vii. 366, 
458-461 ; in Rdjshdhi, viii 123 ; in 
Bogrd, viii. 315 ; in Murshiddbdd, ix. 
34, 244-246; in Pdbnd, ix. 373, 574; 
in Ddrjiling, x. 38 ; in Jalpdiguri, x. 
325; in Kuch Benar, x. 444; in Patnd, 
xi. 213-215; in Sdran, xi. 363, 366; in 
Gayd, xii. 1 50- 1 52; in Tirhut, xiii 
204, 205; in Champdran, xiii. 316; 



in Bhdgalpur, xiv. 256-259; in Mon- 
ghyr, XV. 199-204; in Pumiah, xv. 
440-444; in Hazaribdgh, xvi. 51-539 
in Lohdrdagd, xvi. 245, 349, 350 ; in 
the Tributary States of Chutid Ndgpur, 
xvii. 191; in Cuttack, xviil 240-243; in 
Balasor, xviil 371, 372 ; in Puri, xix. 
177. 

Indigenous schools. See Educational 
Statistics. 

Indigo, Cultivation and manufacture of, in 
the 24 Pargands, i. 147; in Nadiyd, ii. 67, 
95-101 ; in Jessor, il 298-300, 305 ; 
in Midnapur, iii. 81, 153, 203; in Htigli, 
iii- 338; in Bardwii, iv. 71 ; iv. 135, 
136 ; in Bdnkurd, iv. 247; in Birbhum, 
iv. 379; in Dacca, v. 89, 116; in 
Bdkarganj, v. 217; in Faridpur, v. 309, 
310^ 338, 341 ; in Maimansinh, v. 421, 
460; in Tipperah, vi. 425, 426; in Mal- 
dah, vii 73, 74, 76, 98, 99; in Ranj;- 

Eur, vii 195, 246, 247, 261, 307; -m 
>indjpur, vii. 440; in Rdjshdhi, viii 63, 
72, 87 : in ^grd, viii. 269 ; in Mur- 
shiddbdd, ix. 29, 100, 105, 152, 153, 
165, 164; in Pdbnd, ix. 302, 330, 337, 
335 ; in Patnd, xi. 1 14 ; in Sdran, xi. 
270, 282-287, 306 ; in Gayd, xii 92 ; 
in Shdhdbdd, xii. 237, 238 ; in Tir- 
hut, xiii 98-104, 138, 139, 163; in 
Champdran, xiii. 266-269, 290, 291 ; 
in Bhagalpur, xiv. 180; in the Santdl 
Parganis, xiv. 338, 354; in Monghyr, 
XV. 138, 139 ; in Purmah, xv. 293, 354, 

361-371- 

Indigo factories, in Nadiyd, il 95, 97, 
249-254, 298-501 ; in Bardwdn, iv. 
135-136; in Bdnkurd, iv. 278; in B(r- 
bhum, iv. 382 ; in Dacca, v. 106 ; m 
Faridpur, v. 336, 341 ; in Maldah, vii. 
99 ; m Dindjpur, vii. 439, 443. 445» 
456; in Rdjsndhi, viii. 87: in Mur- 
shiddbdd, ix. 53 ; in Pdbnd, be. 293, 
330, 331 ; in Sdran, xi. 285, 286 ; in 
Tirhut, xii. 22, 23, 24, 26, 52, 53, 54, 
57, 58, 61, 62, 66, 73, 74 ; in Cham- 
pdran, xii 269 ; in Bhdgalpur, xiv. 20; 
m Monghyr, xv. 138, 139 ; in Pumiah, 
XV. 360-371. 

Indradyumna, Legend of king xbc. 43-46. 

Indranagar, pargand in Hill Tipperah, vi. 

Indrdni, pargand in Bardwdn, i. 365. 

Industrial Statistics.. See Commerce, 
Manufactures, &c. 

Infirms, Number of, in the 24 Pargands, 
l 44 ; in Nadiyd, il 38 ; in Jessor, ii. 
189; in Midnapur, iii 44; m Hilieli, 
iii. 276 ; in Bi^wdn, iv. 39 ; in Bdn- 
kurd, iv. 215; in Birbhum, iv. 326; in 



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314 



GENERAL INDEX, 



Dacca, v. 34; in Bikarganj, v. 1S4; 
in Faridpur, v. 280; in Maimansinh, v. 
395; in Chittagong, vi. 137; in No4- 
khilf, vi. 270, 271 ; in Tipperah, vi. 
373; in Maldaii, vii. 39, 40 ; in Rang- 
pur, vii. 210; in Dinajpur, vii. 373; in 
R^jshdhi, viii. 37 ; in bogra, viii. 160 ; 
in Murshiddbdd, ix. 41 ; in Pdbni, ix. 
281; in Ddijiling, x. 44; in Talpdiguri, x. 
252; in Patni, xi. 36; in Saran, xi. 242, 
243; in Gayd, xii. 30, 32; in Shihdbdd, 
xii. 183 ; in Tirhut, xiii. 35 ; in Cham- 
piran, xiii. 235, 236; in Bhigalpur, xiv. 
47 ; in the Santiil Paiganiis, xiv. 280 ; 
in Monghyr, xv. 49, 50; in Pumiah, 
XV. 245 ; in Hazdribagh, xvi. 58 ; in 
Lohirdagi, xvi. 251 ; in Singbhtim, 
xvii. 35, 36; in Mdnbhdm, xviL 272, 
273; in Cuttack, xviii. 67 ; in Balasor, 
xviii. 267 ; in Puri, xix. 30 ; in the 
Orissa Tributaiy States, xix. 208. 
Insanes, Number of, in the 24 Paiganis, i. 
44; in Nadiyd, ii. 38; in Jessor, iL 189; 
in Midnapur, iii. 44; in Hdgli, iii. 276; 
in Bardw^, iv. 39; in Bankur^ iv. 
215; in BirbhAm, iv. 326; in Dacca, v. 
34; in Bdkarganj, v. 184; in Faridpur, 
v. 280 ; in Maimansinh, v. 395 ; in 
Chittagong, vi. 137; in NoAkhdli, vi. 
270, 271 ; in Tipperah, vi. 373 ; in 
Maldah, vii. 39; in Rangpur, viL 210; 
in Dinijpur, vii. 373; in Rdjshdhi, viii. 
^7; in Bogrd, viii. 160; in Murshid&b4d, 

IX. 41; in Pibn^ ix. 281; in Ddijfling, 

X. 44; in Jalpaiguii, x. 252; in Patna, 
xl 36; in S^ran, xi. 242; in Gayi, xii. 
30; in Shdhdbdd, xii. 183; in Tirhut, xiii. 
35 ; in Champiran, xiii. 23^ ; in Bhd- 
galpur, xiv. 47; in the Santal Pargands, 
xiv. 280; in Monghyr, xv. 49, 50; in 
Purniah, xv. 245; in Hazdril^h, xvi. 
58; in Loh4rdag4, xvi. 251; in Sing- 
bhtim, xviii. 35; in Mdnbhum, xyii. 
273; in Cuttack, xviii. 67; in Balasor, 
xviii. 267 ; in Puri, xix. 30 ; in the 
Orissa Tributaiy States, xix. 208. 

Institutions, Local Societies, &c., in 
Nadiyd, ii. 106-111 ; in Jessor, ii. 305 ; 
in Midnapur, iiL 153; in Hiigli„ iii. 376, 
377; in Bardw^, iv. 136 ; in Bdnkur^ 
iv. 278; in Dacca, v. 117; in Faridpur, 
V. 341; in Chittagong, vi. 211, 212; in 
Noakh&li, vi. 329; in Tipperah, vi. 
426; in Maldah, vii. 105; in Rangpur, 
vii. 310; in Rijshihi, viii. 89-92; in 
Bqgrd, viii. 198, 279, 280; in Mur- 
shiddbid, ix. 170-172; in Pdbnd, ix. 
352 ; in Jalpdiguri, x. ^01 ; in Kuch 
Behar, x. 360, 402 ; m Sdran, xi. 
335*337 5 >n Gayd, xii. 121 ; in Shdh- 



abdd, xii. 270, 271 ; in Tirhut, xiii. 
164. 

Institutions, Village. See Village Officials, 
&c. 

Insurrection in Rangpur in 1873, vii: 157, 
158. 

Insurrection of 1854, Santil, xiv. 310. 

Insurrections in Lohirdagd, xvL 450- 
454. 

Interest, Places of. See Towns, &c. 

Interest and Capital, in the 24 Paiganis, 
L 173 ; in the Sundarbans, i. 345 ; in 
Nadiyd, ii. 105; in JesSor, ii. 304, 305; 
in Midnapur, iii. 153; in Ht!i^lf, iii. 
376 ; in Bard win, iv. 135 ; in Bankura, 
iv. 278; in Bfrbhum, iv. 381; in Dacca, 
V. 115, 116; in Bikaiganj, v. 216, 
217 ; in Faridpur, v. 340 ; in Maiman- 
sinh, V. 461, 462; in the Chittagong 
Hill Tracts, vi. 86, 87 ; in Chittagong, 
vi. 207, 208; in Nodkhdli, vi. 32^ 
329; in Tipperah, vi. 424, 425; in 
Hill Tipperah, vi. 509 ; in Maldah, vii. 
104; in Rangpur, vii. 308-310; in 
Dindipur, vii. 414; in RajshJjif, viiL 
88, 89; in Bogra, viii. 277, 278; in 
Murshidibdd, ix. 169, 170; in Pibnd, 
ix. ^50; in Darjiling, x. 164; in Jalpdi- 
gur( X. 300^ 301 ; in Kuch Behar, x. 
401, 402; in Patnd, xi. 180; in Sdran, 
xi* 335; '^^ Gayd, xiL 119, 120; in 
Shdhabdd, xii 269, 270; in Tirhat, 
xiii. 162-164 ; in Champdran, xiii. 296; 
in Bhdgalpur, xiv. 191, 192; in the 
Santdl Pargands, xiv. 360^ 361 ; in 
Monghyr, xv. 148, 154; in Pumiah, 
XV. 385 ; in Hazdrib^fh, xvi. 173 ; in 
Lohards^ xvi. 421-423; in Singbhum, 
xvii. 106 ; in the Tributary States of 
Chutid Ndgpur, xvii. 212, 213, 218, 
219 ; in Mdnbhtim, xvii. 352. 

Intermediate land-tenures. See Tenures 
of land. 

Inundations. See Floods. 

Invalid >E£p/rj, land tenures in Bhdgalpur,* 
xiv. 138, 139, 147. 

Invasion of Tipperah by Lushdis in i860, 
vi. 19, 64. 

Invasions of Hill Tipperah by Musal- 
mdns, vi. 466. 

Invocation of Gansdm, Description of 
the, xvii. 183-185. 

Ipecacuanha cultivation in Ddijiling, x. 
176. 

Irdbatf, a river in Bogrd, viiL 137, 138. 

Iron in Midnapur, iii. 39, 149 ; in Bard- 
wdn, iv. 29, 125-133 ; in Bdnkurd, iv. 
21 1; in Bfrbht!uxi, iv. 318-322; in Dacca, 
V. 19, 26, 108 ; in Maimansinh, v. 390; 
in Tipperah, vi. 368, 418 ; in Munihid- 



Digitized by 



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GENERAL INDEX. 



315 



ibid, IX. 21, 33, 34, 87, 163, 164; in 
Pabni, ix. 337, 338, 348; inDirjiling, 
X. 31, 140-142; in Jalpiigurf, x. 239; 
in Gayd, xii. 25, 26; in Bhigalpur, 
xiv. 40, 241 ; in the Santil Ea^anas,. 
xiv. 272, 354; in Monghyr, xv. 137, 
138; in Haziribigh, xvi. 150, 158, 
171 ; in LohdrdagC xvL 412, 413; in 
Singbhum, xvii, 22, 23 ; in the Tribu- 
tary States of Chutid Nigpur, xvii. 

167, 201, 247 ; in Minbhdm, xvii. 259. 
Irregular cesses {almdbs) in the Sundar- 

bans, L 358 ; in-Midnapur, iii. 108-113 ; 
in Dacca, v. 97, 127 ; in Chittagong, 
yi. 180-182 ; in Nodkhili, vi. 315, 316 ; 
in Tipperah, vi. 411, 412; in Dinij- 
pur, vii. 4oq ; in Bogrd, viii. 248-250 ; 
in Murshidabdd, ix. 71, 200 ; in Pibna, 
ix. 318; in Kuch Behar, x. 428; in 
Patni, xi. 96, 127 ; in Gayi, xii. 70-72 ; 
in Tirhut, xiii. 106, 107 ; in Bhigal- 
pur, xiv. 158-160; in Monghyr, xv. 
120-127 ; in Purniah, xv. 388 ; in 
Hazaribijgh, xvi. 106, 107 ; in Lohir- 
dagi, xvi. 368-370, 372, 380, 381 ; in 
C attack, xviii. 121. 
Irrigation in the 24 Parganis, i. 35, 158 ; 
in the Sundarbans i., 301 ; in Nadiya, ii. 
33, 83 ; in Jessor, il 182, 274 ; in Mid- 
napur, from the Midnapur High Level 
Canal, iii. 29-36 ; from other sources, 
iii. 37, 114; in Hugli, iii. 26^, 2di, 
357 ; in Bardwin, iv. 92 ; in Bankura, 
iv. 269 ; in Birbhum, iv. 371 ; in Dacca, 
v. 23, 102; in Farfdpur, v. 330; in 
Maimansinh, v. 389, 457 ; in the Chit- 
tagong Hill Tracts, vi. 28 ; in Chitta- 
gong, vi. 184; in Tipperai, vi. 366, 
415 ; in Maldah, vii. 28, 90 ; in Rang- 
pur, vii. 161, 169, 291, 292 ; in Dinaj- 
pur, vii. 408 ; in Rijshahi, viii. 30 ; in 
Bogra, viiL 147, 148, 251 ; in Murshid- 
4b£i, ix. 130- 1 31 ; in Pdbni, ix. 325 ; 
in Diijiling, x. 124 ; in Jalpiiguri, x. 
236, 292; in Kudi Behar, x. 394; 
in Patni, xt. 28, 29, 118, 119, 129; 
in Siran, xi 231, 235, 30^ ; in Gayd, 
xii. 23, 105-107; in Shahibid, xii. 

168, 241-243, 249; 250; in Tirhut, xiii'. 
22, 27, 28, 86; in Champiran, xiii. 
227, 228, 284 ; in Bhigalpur, xiv. 26, 
32> 33; in the Santil Parganis, xiv. 
345, 346 ; in Monghyr, xv. 23-29 ; in 
Haziribigh, xvi. 136-138; in Lohdr- 
dagd, xvi. 408 ; in Singbhum, xvii. 22, 
95 ; in the TribuUry States of Chutid 
Ndgpur, xvii. 167, 196 ; in Mdnbhiim, 
xvii. 259, 339; in Cuttack, xviii. 37-53, 
146; in Purl, xix. 25, 137, 138; in the 
Orissa Tributary States, xix.. 202. 



Ishanpur, market village in Dinijpur, vii. 

437. • 
Islamdbid chaklah, i. 358. 
Islimabid, "Residence of the Faithful," 

name given to Chittagong town by 

Umed Khan, vi. 113. 
Islamdbid, pargand in Rongpur, vii. 

253, 285. 
Isldmpur or Atasarai, mart in Patni, xi. 

83. 

Islands, Pargand in Nodkhdlf, consisting 
of, vi. 344. 

Ismailpur pargand in Sarkdr Sulaimin- 
abdd, i. 365. 

IsiimrdrHaLDSi tenures in the 24 Pargands, 
i. 270, 271 ; in Nadiyd, ii. 72; in 
Bdnkurd, iv. 259; in Birbhdm, iv. 
366, 367; in Maldah, vii. 80; in 
Rangpur, vii. 275, 278 ; in Dindjpur, 
vii. 401, 402 ; in Bogrd, viii. 231 ; in 
Murshiddbdd, ix. 116; in Pdbnd, ix. 
314; in Purniah, xv. 318. 319; in Hazdri- 
bdgh, xvi. 123 ; in Lohardagd, xvi. 372. 
See also Tenures of land. 

Iswaripur village, old name Yasohara 
(Jessor), traditional seat of Rajd Pratd- 
pdditya, 24 Pargands, L 116- 118, 238, 
364. 

Iswarpdl, the present hereditary karid of 
the Kartabhajds, i. 74. 

Itdmdti, village in Na^igarh State, Orissa, 
xix. 306. 

Ivory carving in Murshiddbdd, ix. 153, 
154. 



J 

Jdbai, manufacturing village in Bardwdn, 

iv. 133. 
Jabar Almd, trading village in Bdkarganj, 

V. 201. 

{abdi, pargand in Tirhut, xiii. 191. 
adabpur, market in Jessor, ii. 294. 

yddtira, a Munddri dance, xvii. 50. 

Jafar Khdn, or Murshid Kuli Khdn, a 
Nawdb of Murshiddbdd, ix. 173-178 ; 
his assessment under Aurangzeb, i. 357. 

Jafar Ujidl, pargand in Tipperah, vi. 
44f 

Jafarabdd, or Lohaghar, pargand in Tip- 
perah, vi. 444. 

Jdiarganj, town in Tipperah, vi. 363, 

{366, 420. 
afarganj, village in Rangpur, vii. 305. 
afarpur, market village m die 24 Par- 
gands, i. 227. 
{agddal, village in Dindjpur, vii. 365. 
agaddnanda, township in NodkhdlL vi, 

2&S. 



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3i6 



GENERAL INDEX, 



Jamtnohan^ the Hall of Audience in the 
Temple of Jaganndth, xix. 58. 

JagannAth Temtle (Vol. XIX.)— 
Introduction, 40-43 ; Legendary Ori- 
gin of the Idol, 43-50 ; Vishnuvite Re- 
formation, Chaitanya, 50-52 ; Vishnu- 
vite Corruption, 52-54; Endowments 

. and Religious Offerings, 54-57 ; the 
Temple, 57-59 ; the Car Festival {Rath- 
jdtr£\^ 59-62; the Pilgrims, 62-67; 
Pilgrim Mortality, 67-70; Sanitary 
Measures, 70-72. Sie also Palm-l«u 
Records. 

{agannith town. See Pun. 
aganndthdighi tk&nd in Tipperah, vi. 

378, 413, 432, 434, 441. , 
Jagannithpur, village in Lohardaga, xvi. 

322. 
Jagannithpur, thdnd in Cuttack, xviii. 

65, 203. 
Jagar4b4d, tappd in Champ^uran, xiii. 272, 

276, 310. 
Jagat Seth,. the Banking House of, in 

Murshidibdd, ix. 252-265. 
Jdgitddl, village in the 24 Parganiis, 

Ruins of old fort at, i. 1 15. 
Jagatigarh, village in Bod State, Orissa, 

xix. 277. 
Jagatsinhpur sub-division of Cuttack,xviii. 

65, 81, 144, 145, 222, 223. 
Jagatsinhpur, town and th&nd in Cuttack, 

xviiL 65, 90, 203. 
Jagdispur, market village in the 24 Par- 

ganAs, i. 232. 

{agdispur, to^^n in Shah&bad, xii. 203. 
agdispur railway station, Santdl Par- 
fi;anas, xiv. 3^2. 

Jamrs^ or rent-free grants of land in the 24 
Paiganis, i. 279; in Jessor, ii. 227 ; in 
Midnapur, iii. 97-100; in Ihicca, 
granted to tiger-killers, v. 27 ; for 
defence against Maghs and Assamese, 
v. 120, 127 ; in Kuch Behar, x. 392 ; 
in Patni, xi. 127 ; in Monghyr, xv. 
115, 116, 119; in Pumiah, xv. 323; 
in Haz^b^h, xvi. 121, 122, 127, 197 ; 
in Loh4rdag&, xvi. 370-374; in Min- 
bhum, xvii. 333, 334; in Cuttack, xviii. 
134, 135; in Balasor, xviii. 317-320; 
in Puri, xix. 132-135. Seecdso Tenures 
of land. 

Jdgir granted to Lord Clive, i. 19, 20. 

yahdd, or sacred war. See Wahabis. 

Jah^ Khin, early reclaimer of the Sun 
darbans. Ruins connected with his name 
near Bigherhit, Jessor, ii. 228-2^1. 

Jahan4b4d, sub-diviaon of Bardwan, iv. 
171, 172. 

Jahan&b&d, municipality in Bardwin, iv. 
61, 62 ; dispensary, iv. 198. 



Jahandbad, sub-division of Gayi, xii. 31, 

56-60, 143. 
Jahindbdd, town and thdnd in Gayi, xii. 

31, 42, 56, 57, 143. 

{ahdndb4d, town in Sh^ihibad, xii. 203. 
ahdngird, parganA in Bhigalpur, xiv. 

Jahangiribid, pargand in Tirhut, xiii. 

• 191. 

Jahdngimagar, or Jahimgirdbid, name of 

Dacca City changed to, v. 67. 
Jah^gfmagar chaklahy which, under the 

Settlement of Tafar Khdn, included 

Bikarganj and the Sundarbans, i. 358 ; 

V. 221. 
Jahingirpur, pargand in Dinijpur, viL 

443. 
aharpur D&ura, khdl in Maldah, viL 72. 
iidia, pargand in Jessor, i. 372. 
'iiganj, village in Dinijpur, vii. 365, 

449. 

J4ikh41, stream in Bdnkur^ iv. 208. 

Jdikhili khdl, Jessor, ii. 180. 

Jail Manufactures in the 24 Pdrganis, i. 
197-199; in Nadiyd, iL 119-120; in 
Jessor, ii. 312, 313 ; in Midnapur, iiL 
170; in Hugll, iii. 390, 391 ; in Bard- 
win, iv. 15A, 15^; in Bankura, iv. 291, 
292; in Birbhum, iv. 407, 408; in 
Dacca, v. 135 ; in Bdkarganj, v. 233, 
2J4; in Faridpur, v. 347, 348; in 
Maimansinh, v. 470^ 471 ; in Chitta- 

?)ng, vi.' 219; in Nc^hali, vi. 373; in 
ipperah, vi. 435; in Maldah, vii. 116; 
in Rangpur, vii. 334; in Dinijpur, vii. 
428, 429; in R&jshihi, viii 107, 
108; in Bogrd, viii. 290, 291 ; in 
Murshidib^, ix. 210-215, in Pibna 
ix. 358-390; in D&rjfling, x. 185-187; in 
Jalpaiguri, x. 312, 313 ; in Kuch Behar, 
X. 438; in Patni, XL 195; in Siuan, 
xi. 349; in Gavi, xii. 134; in ShiUi- 
dbdd, xii. 279, 280; in Tirhut, xiii. 174, 
175 ; in Champdran, xiii. 303, 304 ; in 
Bhiigalpur, xiv. 224, 225 ; in the San- 
Xix Pargand, xiv. 369, 370 ; in Mon- 
ghyr, XV. 164, 165; in Pumiah, xv. 
403,404; inHaz^bi^h, xvi. 184-187; 
in Lohirdagi, xvi. 476-478 ; in Sing- 
bhiim, xvii. 126, 127; in M^bhdm, xvii. 
362; in Cuttack, xviii. 212 ; in Balasor, 
xviii. 352 ; in Puri, xix. 165. 
Jail Statistics, General, 24 Pargadb, l 
193-199; Nadiyd, ii. 1 18-120; Jessor, ii. 
311-313; Midnapur, iii. 168-172; Hugl(» 
»i- 387-391 ; BardwAn, iv. 153-156 ; 
B4nkur£, iv. 290-293; Birbhum, iv. 
406-409 ; Dacca, v. 134, 135 ; Bikar- 
ganj, V. 232-234; Faridpur, v. 346-348; 
Mamiansinh, v. 468-471 ; Chittagong, 



Digitized by 



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GENERAL INDEX. 



▼i. 218, 219 ; No4khilf, vi. 335-337 ; 
Tipperah, vi. 435, 436; Hill Tippcrah, 
vi. 517* 518; Maldah, vii. 115-118; 



Rangpur, vii. 332-33$ ; DinAjpur, viii. 
427-429 ; R£shahf, viii. 105-108 ; 
Bogi^, viii. 288-291; Murshiddbdd, ix. 
210-215 ; Pdbnd, ix. 358-360; Ddrjil- 
ing, X. 185-187; Jalpd^rf, x.312, 313; 
Kuch Behar, x. 438 ; Patni, xi. 193- 
195 ; Saran, xi. 347-349 ; Gava, xii. 
131-134; Shihibad, xii. 278-280; Tir- 
hut, xiil 172-175 ; Champaran, xiii. 
302-304 ; Bhdgalpur, xiv. 214-225 ; 
Santdl ParganAs, xiv. 368-370; Mon- 
ghyr, XV. 161 -165 ; Pumiah, xv. 401- 
404; Hazirib^h, xvi. 184-187; Lohir- 
dagi, xvi. 476-478; Singbhiim, xvii. 
124-127 ; M&nbhum, xvii. 360-362 ; 
Cuttack, xviii. 209-212; Balasor, xviiL 
350-352 ; Puri, xix. 163-165. 

{iinagar, village in Tirhut, xiii. 58, 59. 
iinagar, pargand in Mdnbhum, xvii. 



Jdinagar, trading village and municipality 
in the 24 Parganas, i. 34 ; Hindu 
temple, i. 88 ; English school, i. 
204, 228. 

Jains, a religious sect, in Maldah, vii. 48; 
in Rangpur, vii. 224 ; in Din^jpur, vii. 
382, 383 ; in Rijshahi, viii. 52 ; in 
Murshidabdd, ix. 58, 158, 159, 264, 
265 ; in Patnd, xi. 64 ; in Gay4, xii. 
39, 41 ; in Bhigal]>ur, xiv. 83, 87 ; in 
Monghyr, xv. 60 ; in Haz^b^h, xvi. 
84 ; their history, xvi. 207-209 ; philo- 
sophy, xvi. 209-212 ; religion, xvi. 
212-216 ; pilgrimages to Paiisnith 
Hill, xvi. 216-227 ; in Lohdrdagi, xvi. 
318 ; in Singbhdm, xvii. 40 ; m Cut- 
tack, xviii. 79. 

Jain temples, Ruins of, in Gaya, xii. 41 ; 
in M^bhdm, xvii. 298-302. See also 
Antiquarian Remains. 

Jaintgarh, village in Singbhum, xvii. 127. 

Jainti, river in Hazdribagh, xvi. 38, 39. 

Jiipur, village in Dinijpur, vii. 365, 439, 
451. 

Jaipur, pargand in Manbhum, xvii. 368. 

^^XoitLy pargand. in Manbhum, xvii. 368. 

Jiitpur, village in Sdran, xi. 258. 

Jijnagar, village in Tipperah, vi. 3J8. 

J£pur, sub-division ot Cuttack, xviii. 65, 
81, 145, 146, 222. 

Jijpur, pargand in Cuttack, xviii. 226, 

363- 
J4jpur, town and thdnd in Cuttack, xviii. 

65, 81,. 82, 84, 89, 203; dispensary, 

xviii 238. 
Jakhalpur, pargand in Tirhut, xiii. 191. 
J&khar, pargand in Tirhut, xiii. 191, 192. 



Jakhirpur, village in Dindjpur, vii. 443. 

Jal&libad and Fathiibdd, provinces under 
early Muhammadan rule, comprising 
the present districts of Dacca, Farid- 

Jpur, and B^arganj, v. 119. 
4I41pur, village in Siran, xi. 258. 
aldmut^ pargand in Midnapur, Histori- 
cal account of, iii. 200, 201 ; embank- 
ment, iii. 143. 
Jalangi river, ii. 19-32 ; ix. 18, 20, 23, 



allapahir 



hill cantonment in Darjiling, 



X. 26, no. 

{aldi, mart in Chittagong, vi. 198. 
aldhikii, thdnd in Rangpur, vii. 328, 

344» 349* 
JaldhAki river, x. 28, 225, 232, 335. 
Jaldi, police outpost in Chittagong, vi. 

216. 
Jaleswar sarkdr, i. 359, 370, 371. 
Jaleswar, pargand in Midnapur and 

Balasor, 1. 355, 371; iii. 18 ; xviii. 363. 
Jaleswar, town and thdnd in Balasor, iii. 

18 ; xviii. 265, 284, 360. 
Jilf, village and thdnd in Tirhut, xiii. 34^ 

69, 70, I25» i8o- 
J41L See Rice Crops. 
Jiliis, a fishing caste. See Castes. 
Jdli-khis, vil^ge union in Tirhut, xiii. 

49. 
Jaliyi Chandila, village in Maldah, vii. 

131. 

Jalkaddr, canal in Chittagong, vi. 187. 

Jalkar^ or fishing leases in the 24 Par- 
gand, i. 276 ; in Maldah, vii. 8^ ; in 
Murshidibdd, ix. 31, 120; in Pabni, 
ix. 275, 276, 311. .S"^ a/r(? Tenures of 
land. 

{alkar Bathin,yM in Maldah, vii. 140. 
alkar Kallak Suji,>M in Maldah, vii. 

131. 

Jalpdij a land tenure peculiar to Midna- 
pur, connected with manufacture of 
salt. iii. 88, 89. 

jALPAiGVRi District (Vol. X.)— 

Geographical Situation, Area, and 
Boundaries, 215, 216; Jurisdiction 
and Administrative Histoiv, 216-218 ; 
Elarly History and Acquisition of the 
Bhutiin Dwdrs, 218-223; General 
Aspects and Superficial Configuration 
of the District, 223, 224 ; Mountains, 
225; River System, 225-234; Char- 
acter of the Rivers, 234, 235 ; Fords 
and Ferries, 235, 236; River Traffic, 
236, 237; Utilisation of the Water 
Supply, 237 ; Fish and Fisheries, 237, 
239 ; Marsh Cultivation, 238 ; Lines 
of Drainage, 238, 239; Minerals, 239; 
Forests, 239-245; Pasture Grounds, 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



318 



GENERAL INDEX, 



Wild Vegetable Products, &c., 245; 
Ferte Natures^ 245, 246; Population, 
Early Estimates of, 246 ; Census of 
1872 and its Results, 246-249 ; Popu- 
lation according to Religion, Sex, and 
Age, 249-252; Infirmities of the 
People, 252 ; Ethnical Division of the 
Pepple, 252-254; Aboriginal Tribes, 
254-256; Hindu Castes, 256-259; 
Muhammadan Population, 259, 260; 
Religious Division of the People, 260 ; 
Distribution of the People into Town 
and Country, 260-262; Jalpdiguri 
Town, Headquarters, and Military 
Cantonments, 261, 262; Village Offi- 
cials, 262, 263; Description of the 
Pargands comprising the Regulation 
part of the District, 264-269; Re- 
ligious Gatherings, Fairs, &&, 269, 
270 ; Material Condition of the People, 
270, 271 ; Agriculture, 271-278 ; Rice 
Cultivation, 271-273 ; Other Crops, 
273, 274 ; Area, Out-turn of Crops, &c., 
274-276 ; Condition of the Cultivators, 
276, 277 ; Domestic Animals, 277 ; 
Agricultural Implements, 277, 278 ; 
Wages and Prices, 278, 279 ; Weights 
and Measures, 279; Landless Day- 
labourers, 279, 280 ; Spare Land, 280 ; 
Land Tenures, 280-286; Rates of 
Rent, 286-292; Manure, Irrigation, 
&C., 292; Natural Calamities, 293; 
Famines and Famine Warnings, 293, 
294; Foreign and Absentee Land- 
holders, 294; Roads, 294-296; Rail- 
way, 296 ; Manufactures,- 297 ; Com- 
merce and Trade, 297-300; River 
Trade Statistics, 29)8-300 ; Capital and 
Interest, 300, 301 ; Institutions, 301 ; 
Incomes and Income-Tax, 301 ; Re- 
venue and Expenditure, 301-304; 
Balance-Sheets of the District, 302; 
Land Tax, 303, 304; Principal 
Estates, 304-307; Police Statistics, 
307-312; Jail Statistics, 312, 313; 
Educational Statistics, 313-319 ; Postal 
Statistics, 319 ; Climate, Temperature, 
Rainfall, &c., 320, 321 ; Diseases, 321- 
323; Vital Statistics, 323; Chari- 
table Dispensaries, 325, 324; Native 
Medicines, 325 ; Drugs not Indigenous 
but Sold in the Biidrs, 323, 326; 
Universal Drugs, 326 ; Native Medical 
Practitioners, 326 ; Geol<^y, 326, 327. 

Jalp4iguri town, headquarters of the Dis- 
trict, X. 216, 261, 262. 

Jamds or Jots^ cultivating tenures in the 
24 Pargands, i. 155, 273-275; »n 
NadiyA, ii. 75 ; in Jessor, ii. 258 ; in 
Bardwdn, iv. 83 ; in B&nkurd, iv. 261- 



263; in Birbhiim, iv. 367, 368; in 
the Chittagong Hill Tracts, vi. 82 ; in 
Rdjshahf, viii. 71 ; in Bc^4, viii. 236- 
239; in Murshidabad, ix. 117, 118, 
120; in Pibnd, ix. 312, 313. See also 
Tenures of land. 

Jamaica, Emigrants to. See Emigration, 
im&ity^, an aboriginal tribe in Hill 
Tipperah, vi. 482, 483. 
JamiQganj Buzurg, village in Dinijpur, 

vii. 451. 
Jamilpur, trading village in Bardwdn, iv. 

«34- 

Jamilpur, sub-division of Maimansmh, 
V. 475. 

Jamdlpur, municipal town in Maiman- 
sinh, V. 411, 412. 

Jamdlpur, town in Monghyr, xv. 60, 61, 
72.74. . . 

jfamdwahy system of indigo cultivation m 
Sh&hibdd, xii. 237, 238. 

Jambu Channel, FaJse Point, xviii. 29. 

Jamdi, p{r in Singbhum, xvii. 136. 

James and Mary Sands (a corruption of 
jal mdri) in the HugU, between the 
mouths of the RupnarAyan and Deo- 
dar rivers, iii. 23, 24, 255 ; their origin 
and scheme for their removal, iii. 257- 
261. 

Jamhaulf, tappd in Champdran, xiii. 272, 

274, 313. 

Jamin, fiscal division in the Santal Par- 
ganis, xiv. 377. 

Jdmird, estuary in the 24 Pargands, i. 28, 

Jdmkd, river in Balasor, xviii. 251. 

Jamni river, xiii. 226. 

Jamni Pama Paer, fiscal division in the 
Santdl Pargands, xiv. 377. 

Jdmpui, peak in Hill Tipperah, vL 474. 

Jdmpui Kang, range in Hill Tipperah, 
vi. 474. 

Jdmtdrd, sub-division of the Santal Par- 
gands, xiv. 274, 277. 

Jdmtdrd, village and thdnd in the Santal 
Pargands, xiv. 277, 352, 363. 

Jamua river, xiii. 223. 

Jamui, sub-division of lyionghyr, xv. 48, 

83, 172, 175- 

Jamui, town and thdnd in Monghyr, xv. 
48, 60, 61, 69-71, 161, 175 ; dispen- 
sary, XV. 21 

Jamu-Kdndi or Kdndi, town in Mur- 
shiddbdd, ix. 80, 81. 

Jamund [several rivers of this name in 
Bengal], i. 25, 26, 32, 34, 287, 295, 
360, 374; iii. 310; v. 20, 385, 386; 
▼ii. 3S9» 362, 363* 364; viiL 24 ; ix. 
271, 272; XV. 227, 230; the local name 
for the Brahmaputra in Bogrd, viii. 135- 
138. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



GENERAL INDEX. 



319 



{amwirf, river in Tirhut, xiii. 22. 
anakpur village, the residence of the 
Raji of Chi^ Bhakir, xvii. 187. 
Janirddanpur, market village in the 24 
Paigands, i. 227. 

{anatabad, court name of Gaur, q,v. 
anaydbdd, pargand in Cuttack, xviii. 

226. 
Jangaldbddi leases, vi. 505. See also 

Tenures of land. 
Jdngalburl land tenures. See Tenures of 

land. 
Tangal Dawi, town in Shilhibid, xii. 202. 
jangalia, hill in Chittagong, vi. 125. 
Jangal-Tuti, fair in MaldaSi, vii. 67. 

{angaon, village in Dinijpur, vii. 452. 
angipur or Jahingirpur, a tradng town 
in Murshiddbdd, iz. 29, 81, 82, 159, 
160, 167. 

Sngipurl^ variety of jute. See Jute, 
onatibid sarkar, i. 359. 
Jdnt, an irrigating maddine. See Irriga- 
tion. 
Tarah, pargand in Gayd, xii. 145. 
Jar4il,/flr^«<f in'Tirhut, xiii. 192. 
Jarbar, market village in Dindjpur, vii. 

447. 
Jareyds, a sept of Nepdlis in Ddrjiling, x. 

55, 56. 
Jarhan rice crop. See Rice. 
J4ri-muri, peak in Hill Tipperah, vi. 

474. 

^r«/ wood in the Chittagong Hill Tracts, 
vi. 31. 

Tashpur Tributary State (Vol. 
XVII.)— 

Geographical Situation, Area, and 
Boundaries, 199; History, 199; General 
Aspect, Hills, and Rivers, 200, 201 ; 
Minerals, 201, 202 ; Forests and Jungle 
Products, 202 ; Population, 202, 203 ; 
Ethnolc^cal Classification, the Kor- 
wis and other tribes, 203-207 ; the 
Riji, his Residence, History, &c., 
207, 208; Agriculture, Rice, and 
other Crops, 208, 209; Cultivated 
Area, &c., 209, 210; Domestic Ani- 
mals and Agricultural Implements, 
'210; Wages and Prices, Weights and 
Measures, 210, 211; Land Tenures 
and Rates of Rent, 211, 212 ; Manure, 
212 ; Natural Calamities, 212 ; Capital 
and Interest, 212, 213 ; Judicial Statis- 
tics, 213. 

Jatripur village, with Vaishnav temple, 
Jessor, ii. 2^1. 

Jatr&pur, trading village in Rangpur, vii. 

309- 
JayanshW, pargand in Tipperah, vi* 356, 
446. 



Jay&pur, pargand in Balasor, xviii. 363. 
Jaykrishnapur, fair in Dinajpur, vii. 443. 
Jaynagar, estate in Chittagong, vL 174, 
175, 214. 

{aynagar, tappd in No^hili, vi. 344. 
aypur, pargand in Cuttack, xviii. 226, 

227. 
Tegna, village in Saran, xi. 231. 
JehuH, village in Champdran, xiii. 250. 
Jerddkhinah, name of portion of the 
Sundarbans on the rent-roll of Shdh 
Suja, i. 380. 
Jessdi, market village in Dinijpur, viL 

439. 455. 
Jessor District (Vol. II.) — 

Geographical Situation, Area, and 
Headquarters, 169; Boundaries, Juris- 
diction, and General Aspect, 170, 171; 
Rivers, 171-181; Lakes, Marshes, &c, 
181 ; Canals, 181 ; River Traffic and 
Fisheries, 182; Land Reclamation, 
183, 184; Swamp and Jungle Products, 
184; Fera Natiira and Fish, 184, 185; 
Population, Early estimates of, 185, 
186; Census of 1872, its Agencies and 
Results, 186-200; Population according 
to Sex and Age, 189; according to 
Occupation, 189-194; Ethnical Division 
of the People, 194; Castes, 194-196; Re- 
ligious Division of the People, 196-200; 
Towns and Important Places, 200-240; 
Jessor Town and the Rajis of Jessor, 
201-205; R^j^ of Naldangah, 288, 289; 
Muhammadpur, 212-216; Nirdl and its 
Zaminddrs, 216-218; Lakshmipdsd and 
its Kulin Brihmans, 219-221 ; Chind- 
khdli, and its weekly marts, 224-226 ; 
Bigherhit and Kh^ Jahdn'sTomb, 227- 
231 ; Morrellganj and the Haringhdtd 
River, 232-239 ; Material Condition of 
the People, 240, 241; Agriculture, 241- 
256; Rice Crops, 241-243 ; Extent of 
Cultivation and Out-turn of Crops, 
243-249 ; Indigo, 249-254 ; Jute, 254 ; 
Condition of the Cultivators, 255 ; 
Occupancy Rights, 255 ; Domestic 
Animals, 256 ; Agricultural Imple- 
ments, 256 ; Wages and Prices, 256, 
257; Weights and Measures, 257; Day- 
labourers, 257, 258; Spare Land, 258; 
Land Tenures, 258-266; Rates of Rent, 
266-273 ; Enhancement of Rent, 273 ; 
Manure, Irrigation, and Fallows, 273, 
274 ; Natural Calamities, 274-277 ; 
Blights, 274 ; Floods, 274, 275 ; 
Embankments, 275, 276; Droughts, 
Famines, and Famine Warnings, 276- 
278 ; Compensating Influences, 277 ; 
Foreign and Absentee Landowners, 
278; Roads and Means of Communica* 



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320 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Hon, 270-298; Indigo, 298-300; Ex- 
tinct Manufactures, 300, 301 ; Condi- 
tion of the Manufacturing Classes, 301, 
302 ; Commerce and Trade, 302-304 ; 
Capital and Interest, 304, 305 ; Insti- 
tutions and Societies, 305; Newspaper, 
305; Administration, 306-328; Changes 
of Jurisdiction, 306; Revenue and Ex- 
penditure, 307 ; Land Revenue, 308 ; 
Courts and Land Law, 308, 309; Police 
Statistics, 309, 310 ; Criminal Classes, 
310, 311; Tail Statistics, 3"-3i3; 
Educational Statistics, 313-316; Postal 
Statistics, 317; Subdivisional Adminis- 
tration, 317-320; Fiscal Divisions, 320- 
328 ; Medical Aspects and Climate, 
328-329; Diseases, 329-336; Native 
Practitioners, 336 ; Fairs and Religious 
Gatherings, 336-338 ; Conservancy, 
Sanitation, &c, 338-340; Charitable 
Dispensaries, 340, 341. 
Jessor or Rasulpur mahal, Sarkdr Khalif- 
atabAd, i. 373. 

Jessor, subdivision, ii. 317. 
essor town, locally known as Kasbd, or 
Yashohara, headquarters of Jessor Dis- 
trict, il 201-205 J Rajas of, i. 22 ; 
their history, ii. 203-205 ; dispensary, 

". 305. 341. 

Jessor chaklak^ i. 358. 

Jeth rayats, or village headmen, in S&ran, 
xi. 265; in Shihabdd, xii. 210, 220; in 
Tirhut, xiji. 75 ; in Champi-an, xiii. 
256 ; in Monghyr, xv. 80 ; m Pumiah, 
XV. 272, 273. See also Village Officials, 
&c. 

Jetmalpur, village in Dinijpur, vii. 439. 

Jewellery, Manufacture of. See Manufac- 
tures. 

Jhilakitf or Mahardjganj, municipality 
and market in Bikarganj, v. 170, 200 ; 
fair, V. 216. 

JhaleswaH, village in Dinajpur, vii. 443. 

JhUvii^ pargand in Minbhum, xvii. 368. 

Jhilidd, town in Minbhum, xvii. 297. 

Jhanidah, subdivision of Jessor, ii. 318. 

Jhanidah or Jandidaha, trading village in 
Jessor, ii. 209, 302, 339; dispensary, 
li. 305, 341. 

Jhanjharpur, village in Tirhut, xiii. 56, 

57. 
Jhankar, pargand in Cuttack, xviii. 227. 
Jhapartiil, pargand in Dinijpur, vii. 439- 

443. 
Jhapihapia river, 24 Pargands, i. 32, 
Jharahi nodi in Sdran, xi. 227, 2 



JhariA, pargand in Minbhum, xvii. 368. 
Jharid coal-field in Manbhum, xvii. 255, 
^259, 34S-350. 
Jhanpur village in Midnapur, with fair 

in honour of Siva, ilL 152. 
JhdmpSj mat screens pla(^ in rivers to 

form dams, Nadiyi, ii. 21. 
Jhau, timber tree m the Sundarbans, i. 



Jharbdri, market village in Din&jpur, vii. 

449; 

Jhargion pargand^ Midnapur, iii. 202; 
school, iii. 179. 



Jhauddngi village, with river traffic, 24 

Parganis, i. 35, 229. 
Jhaudii, pargand in Sarkdr Mahmud- 

dbdd, i. 372. 
Jhikii, river in Hazaribigh, xvi. 38. 
JhiliniH, tappd in Sargiija State, Chutid 

Nagpur, xvii. 241, 242. 
yhils. See Marshes. 
Jhim river, xiii. 20, 24. 
Jhindi river, v. 387. 
Jhingergich^ trading village in Jessor, 

ii. 205, 289, 294. 
JhorAs, a sept of Gonds, in the Tributary 

States of Chutii Nigpur, xviL 172, 

193. 
Jhulan jdird, annual 'fair at Kisoriganj, 

Maimansinh, v. 413, 461. 
Ji^gam, trading town in MurshidibAd, 

JiirAkh, pargand in Nadiyi, i. 372. 
Jib, a follower of Chaitanya, one of the 

six original ^«mr, 24 Pargands, i. 73. 
yil*an land tenure in Hazaribigh, xvL 

. 124, 125. 
Jiban Bazdr, mart in Dinijpur, vii. 413. 
JiAikdi tdluk land tenure. See Tenures 

of land. 
Jilinga, hill in Hazdribagh, xvi. 25, 26. 
Jlmach, village in Tirhut, Fair at, xiii. 

61. 
Jin, timber tree in the Sundarbans, i. 

307. 
Jithua, market village in the 24 Par- 
las, i. 235. 
Bhatera, pargand in Tippcrah, vi. 

444. 
Joar Rdmdebpur, pargand in Tipperah, 

vi. 444. 
Job Chamock, founder of Barrackpor. 

&c, i. 82. • 

{odh, pargand in Cuttack, xviii. 227. 
ogis, a weaving caste. See Castes. 
Jogidsan, land tenure, Maldah, vii. 84. 
Johilpur, market village in the 24 Par- 

ganas, i. 227. 
John de Silveyra, an early Portuguese 

buccaneer, v. 44. 
Jots, cultivating land tenures, Jessor, ii. 

259; in NoAkhilf, vi. 312; in Tip. 

pcrah, vi. 409 ; in Maldah, vii. 80 ; in 

Rangpur, vii. 275, 278, 279; in Dinij- 



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321 



pur, vii. 403, 404; in Rajshihi, viii. 
71; in Bogra, viii. 236-239; in Murshid- 
ibdd, ix. 117, 118, 120; in Pibnd, ix. 
309, 3"-3«3 ; in DAijiling, x. 117-120; 
in Jalpiiguri, x. 263, 282-284, 287, 
303» 304 ; in Kuch Behar, x. 333, 359, 
384, 388-390. See also Tenures of land. 
Jot pradhdni^ tenure, viii. 336. See also 
Tenures. 

bt Bdni, village in Dinijpur, vii. 454. 

ot Gharib, viUage in Maldah, vii. 137. 

bt Gopdli, village in Maldah, vii 137. 

bt Narsinh, village in Maldah, vii. '137. 

btddr, channel of the Devi estuary, Cut- 
tack, xviii. 25, 26. 
Jotipur, village in Keunjhar State, Orissa, 

xix. 260. 
Juincs, an aboriginal tribe in the Orissa 
Tributary States, description of, xix. 

241, 242; their habits and customs, xix. 

242, 243; dwellings, mode of cultiva- 
tion, and food, xix. 243, 244; weapons 
and dress, xix. 244; dances, xix. 244- 
246; physical characteristics, religion, 
and domestic ceremonies, xix. 246,. 247. 

Jubd, deserted fortress of, in Sargiij4 
State, ChutiA N^ur, xvii. 239. 

{ubdneswiH, river in Rangpur, vii. 168. 
ubarij, the heir-apparent in Hill Tip- 
perah, vi. 461. 
udicial Statistics. See Courts, &c. 
udum, village in DaspalU State, Orissa, 
xix. 280. 
Jugdid, pargand in Noikhilf, vi. 298, 

344* 

Jugdii in Nodkhali, East India Com- 
pany's factory at, vi. 247, 288. 

Jugi, market village in DinAjpur, vii. 455. 

Julindi, village in Daspalld State, Orissa, 
xix. 280. 

Jiim Book, Register of rights of head- 
men, &c.,in the Chittagong Hill Tracts, 
vi. 94, 95- 

Jiim cultivation, vi. 30, 32, 65, 72-74, 
82, 142, 273, 377, 501, 502. 

Tumid Maghs. See Khyoungthas. 

Jungles. See Forests, 
ungle products of the 24 Pargands, i. 36, 
17 ; of the Sundarbans, i. 304-315 ; of 
essor, ii. 184; of Midnapur, iii. 39; of 
iiigH, iii. 26iS; of BardwAn, iv. 29; of 
BAnkurA, iv. 21 1 ; of Blrbhum, iv. J77, 
379; of Dacca, v. 18; of BAkarganj, v. 
158; of Faridpur, v. 257; of Maiman- 
sinh, v. 390; of the Chittagong Hill 
Tracts, vi. 28, J2, 33; of Chittagong, vi. 
132; of NoikhaH, vi. 258; of Tipperah, 
vi. 368, 369 ; of Hill Tipperah, vi. 477, 
478; of Maldah, vii. 31, 33; of Rang- 
pur, vii. 193-195; of Dindjpur, vii. 366; 



I 



of Rijshihi, viii. 30; of Bc^^ri, viii. 
149, 150; of Murshidibdd, ix. 34; of 
Pdbni, ix. 277; of DAijiling, x. 37, 38; 
of JalpdiguH, X. 245; of Kudi Behar, x. 
383, 444-447; of Gayi, xii. 26, 27; of 
Shdhdbid, xii. 172-176; of Tirhut, xiii. 
29 ; of Champ&ran, xiii. 229-231 ; of 
Bhdgalpur, xiv. 34-38 ; of the Santdl 
Paiganas, xiv. 272, 273; of Monghyr, 
XV. 32-34; of Hazirib4:h, xvi. 47-53, 
171 ; of Lohdrdagd, xvi. 242-245 ; of 
Singbhum, xvii. 23, 24; of the Tributary 
States of Chutid Ndgpur, xvii. 167, 
168, 190, 191, 202, 229; of Mdnbhum, 
xvii. 264, 265 ; of Cuttack, xviii. 21, 
58; ofPuri, xix. 26; of the Orissa Tribu- 
tary States, xix. 203. 

Jurisdiction, History, changes of, &c, in 
the 24 Pargands, i. 21, 22; in the Sun- 
darbaixs, i. 286 ; in Nadiyd, ii. 18 ; in 
Jessor, ii. 170, 306, 307; in Midnapur, 
iii. 18-22 ; in HugH, iii. 252, 253 ; in 
Bardwdn, iv. 18-21 ; in Bdnkura, iv. 
206, 207; in Blrbhum, iv. ^16, 317; in 
Dacca, v. 18; in Bdkarganj, v. 158; in 
Faridpur, v. 257 ; in Maimansinh, v. 
283; m the Chittagong Hill Tracts, vi. 
21, 22; in Chittagong, vi. 124; in Noa- 
khili, vi. 238, 239; in Tipperah, vi. 356, 
357 ; in Hill Tipperah, vi. 460-470 ; 
in Maldah, vii. 18, 19; in Rangpur, 
vii. 156, 161 ^ in Dindjpur, vii. 356-358; 
in Rdjshdhi, viii. 20, 21; in Bogrd, viiL 
130-133; in Murshiddbdd, ix. 18-21 ; in 
Pdbnd, ix. 270; in Ddrjiling, x. 18, 19; 
in Jalpdiguri, x. 216-218 ; in Kuch 
Behar, x. 332; in Patnd, xi. 18; in 
Sdran, xi. 226 ; in Gayd, xii. 18 ; in 
Shdhdbdd, xii. 158; m Tirhut, xiii. 18; 
in Champdran, xiii. 220; in Bhagalpur, 
xiv. 18-22 ; in the Santdi Parganas, xiv. 
266 ; in Monghyr, xv. 18, 19 ; in 
Pumiah, xv. 220; in Hazdribdgh, xvi. 
22; in Lohdrdagd, xvi. 232; in Sing- 
bhi2im, xvii. 18; in the Tributary States 
of Chutid Nd^ur, xvii. 149-152; in 
Manbhum, xvii. 254; in Cuttack, xviii. 
20; in Balasor, xviii. 248, 344; in Pud, 
xix, 155; in the Orissa Tributary States, 
xix. 196-198. 

Jute in the 24 Pargands, cultivation, i. 143- 
145 ; in the Sundarbans, i. 325, 326 ; 
in Nadiyd, cultivation and trade, ii. 64- 
67; in Jessor, ii. 254; in Hi!igl{, cultiva- 
tion, iii. 334; in Dacca, cultivation 
and trade, v. 86, 87; in Bdkarganj, v. 
204; in Faridpur, v. 308, 338, 339; in 
Maimansinh, Jute Commissioners re- 
port, v. 421-441 ; varieties of plant, v. 
422 ; mode of cultivation, v. 423, 424; 



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GENERAL INDEX. 



steeping, v. 425 ; out-turn and prices, v. 
426 ; exhaustion of soil by crop, v. 427; 
alleged deterioration in quality, v. 428- 
431 ; extension of trade, v. 431-433 ; 
cultivation by means of advances, v. 
'434; buying and selling of fibre at rural 
marts, v. 435, 436; at Calcutta, v. 437; 
names for the productions of different 
places, v. 438, 439-; recent variations 
m price, v. 440 ; prospects of the trade, 
V. 441 ; in Nodkhili, cultivation, vi. 
292; import, vi. 256; price, vi. 300; 
in Tipperah, cultivation, vi. 390, 392, 
394, 413 ; export, vi. 392, 419, 423, 
244; price, vi. 392; in Maldah, cultiva- 
tion, vii. 72; import, vii. loi; in Rang- 
pur, cultivation, vii. 242, 260; out-turn, 
vii. 243, 261; paper made of, vii. 305; 
export vii. 307, 308; in Din^jpur, 
cultivation, vii. 391 ; leaves eaten as 
food, viL 389; export, 411, 414; in 
Rijsh^i, cultivation, viii. 60; in Bogri, 
viii. 212-214 ; in Murshid&bad, cultiva- 
tion and trade, ix. 104, 154, 157, 158,- 
162-164 ; in Pdbnd, 273-275, 293-296, 
302-305, 307, 309, 328, 331. 334, 335. 
337, 3381 340, 341, 343-346; in Ddrjil- 
ing, cultivation, x. 96 ; in Jalp4iguri, 
X. 273, 297, 29iS, 299, 300 ; in Kuch 
Behar, x. :J37, 382, 398, 399, 401 ; 
in Shihdbad, cultivation, xii. 235 ; 
in Tirhut, cultivation, xiii. 84, 85; in 
the Santil Paiganas, cultivation, xiv. 
337; in Pumiah, cultivation, xv. 290- 
293; markets, xv. 293, 379; export 
and import, xv. 377-379 ; in. Haziri- 
bieh, cultivation, xvi. 103; in Min- 
bhum, cultivation, xvii. 314; in Cuttack, 
cultivation, xviii. 103; in Puri, cultiva- 
tion, xix. 94. 

K 

Kabadak or Kapotiksha river, i. 18, 19, 

27, 171, 173, 181, 287, 299. 
Kibar Lake, the, in Mongh^, xv. 23, 83. 
Kibar, pargand in Gayi, xii. 144. 
Kibilpur, pargand in Rangpur, vii. 161, 

253- 
KabirdjSf or native medical practitioners^ 
their drugs, modes of treatment, &c., 
in Nadiya, ii. 139, 140; in Jessor, ii. 
190, 336; in Midnapur, iii. 245; in 
Hugli, iii. 438, 439 ; in Bardw^, iv. 
200, 201 ; in Bdnkuri, iv. 302 ; in Bfr- 
bhum, iv. 455 ; in Dacca, v. 144-146 ; 
in Bdkarganj, v. 284; in Faridpur, v. 
369* 360 ; in Maimansinh, v. 479 ; in 
Noiikhili, vi. 349, 350; in Maldah, 



vii. 150, 151; in Dinajpur, vii. 456, 

458 ; in R^syUii, viii. 123 ; in Bogra, 

viii. 309-315; in Murshidibid ix. 243; 

in Jalpdiguri, x. 325, 326 ; in Kuch 

Behar, x. 444; in Patni, xL 215, 216 ; 

in GtLjit xiL 152 ; in Tirhut, xiiL 204; 

in Champaran, xiii. 315, 316; in Mon- 

ghyr, XV. 198, 199 ; in Manbhum, xvii. 

371 ; in Balasor, xviii. 372. 
Kabkhand, pargand in Bbigalpur, xiv. 

248. 
Xt^urgah^ rent-free tenure. Sie Tenures 

of land. 
Kachang, pir in Singbhdm, xvii. 139. 
Kachnar, village in Siran, xi. 257. 
Kachui, market village in Jessor, founded 

by Mr Henckell, i. 320, 327 ; ii. 231. 
Kdlijori, pargand in Puri, xix. 130, 172. 
Kadam Rasiil mosque in Gaur, vii. 56. 
Kadamgichi, market village in the 24 

Parganis, i. 226. 
Kadamtalf river, name of part of the 

Khimati, i. 26. 
KAdba, pargand in Tipperah, vL 356. 
KAdbd in Nodkhidi, Ruins of fictoiy at, 

vi. 247, 288. 
K4db4, pargand in Pumiah, xv. 298, 299, 

337, 423, 424. 
Kadba, iAdnd in Pumiah, xv. 243, 244, 

398, 415. 

Kddbd Bediibdd, pargand in No^hili. 
vi. 344. 

Kidihiti, municipality, in the 24 Par- 
^nds, i. 89 ; English school, i. 206. 

Kadfra;anj, mart in Gayi, xii. 62. 

Kaeda, pargand in Balasor, xviii. 363. 

Kdgramuri, market village, in the 24 Par- 
ganas, i. 136. 

Kahalg&on. Sae Colgong. 

Kaibartta caste, their'origin, history, and 
sub-divisions, in the 24 Paiganis, i. 57, 
63> 64 ; in the Sundarbans, i. 317 ; in 
Nadiya, ii. 47, 48 ; in Jessor, ii. 195 ; 
in Midnapur, iii. 54, 67; in Hugli, iiL 
288; in Nodkhall, vi. 276; in Tipperah, 
vi. 380 ; in Maldah, vii. 45 ; in Rang- 
pur, vii. 216, 217; in Dinijpur, viL 
379 ; in Pumiah, xv. 254. See also ' 
Castes. 

Kaigrdm, mart in Chittagong, vi. 198. 

Kailapal, pargand in Minbhum, xvii. 
368. 

Kailis Ranjdn school in Rangpur, vii. 341. 

KaiUshar sub-division, Hill Tipperah, vL 
480, 495, 517. 518. 

Kailishar, pargand in Hill Tipperah, vi 
519. 

Kailashar, village in Hill Tipperah, vi. 
495, 497; school, vi. 518; dispensary, 
VL 521, 522. 



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GENERAL INDEX. 



323 



Kailrohri, village in Siran, xi. 257. 
KainU hAwdld land tenures. See Tenures 

of land. 
Kdimur Hills in ShiOiibid, xii. 158, 159, 

160, 176, 291, 293. 
Kaini, vUlage in Saran, xi. 257. 
Kainti, villiqgre in Athmallik State, Orissa, 

xix. 271. 
Kaitali, village in Tipperah, vi. 384. 
KaJTZfj^rmnd in Monghyr, xv. 177. 
Kaknd, village in Dindjpur, vii. 446. 
Kakraul, village in Tirhut, Fair at, xiii. 

59. 
Kaksi, village and Mnd in Bardwin, iv. 

65. 
Kakuldbiz, mart in Chittagong, vi. 199. 
Kala Kdsf, river in Pumiah, xv. 227, 

229. 
Kali Pdlf, village union in Tirhut, xiii. 49. 
Kalabigh, police outpost in the Khand- 

mals, Onssa, xix. 264. 
Kaldi, river in Dinijpur, vii. 360. 
Kalam B<mga festival, Singbhiim, xvii. 

Kaldmatiyd, pargand in Cuttack, xviii. 

227. 
KaU-nad(, a tributary of the Kirdtoya 

river in Dinijpur, vii. 363. 
Kalapinid, township in No4khil{, vi. 



Kaldpathar, police outpost in Bdnki State, 

Onssa, xix. 264. 
Kalarod, municipality in the 24 Pargands, 

i. 89 ; seat of river trade, i. 35, 230. 
Kaliroi Husainpur, fiscal division in the 

2± Pargands, i. 234, 364. 
Kali Durgdpur, market village in Dindj- 

pur, vii. 455. • 
Kalid, or Gangni river, ii. 179. 
Kdlid village in Jessor, with a settlement 

of Kdyasths, ii. 221 ; dispensary, ii. 

• Kdliachak, thdnd in Maldah, vii. 50, 86, 
90, no, 128; indigo concern at, vii. 



ij, thdnd in Dindjpur, vii. 365, 



42; 



Kdliaganj, tkdnd in Pumiah, xv. 243, 244, 
398. 4*5. 



398. 4*5. 
Kdlidneanj, village in Dindjpur, vn. 451. 
Kdlidghai river, tributary of the Haldf, 

in Midnapur, iii. 25. 
Kalidnpur Koari, pargand in Sdran, xi. 

Kfiidrchar, village in Tipperah, vi. 383. 
Kdlibhanj Island, Cuttack, xvi^i. 34. 
Kdlicharanpur, market village in the 

24 Pargands, i. 233. 
Kdliddh btl^ or marUi, in Dindjpur, vii. 

454- 



Kaligdchhd, village in Tipperah, vL 382, 



K^fgdc 



igdchhi river, 24 Pargands, i. 26. 
Kdliganp^d river, ii. 176, 177. 
Kdliganj, municipal union of villages with 

large bdssdr^ 24 Pargands, i. 34, 99, 

170, 227. 
Kdliganj, trading town in Nadiyd, ii. 32, 

62. 
Kdliganj, town in lessor, ii. 208, 295. 
KdHganj, village m Rangpur, vii. 164, 

^04, 309. 
Kdliganj, village in Dindjpur, vu. 365, 

412, 436, 444. 
Kdlighdt, site of great temple of Kdli in 

the 24 Pargands, i. loi. 
Kdlikund river, tributary of the Haldi, in 

Midnapur, iii. 25. 
Kdlinand, plr in Singbhum, xvii. 136. 
Kdlindi river, i. 26, 32, 287. 
Kdlindi Rdni, head of the Chakmd tribe, 

vi. 35» 36, 90. 
KdlindH, river in Maldah, vii. 22, 25. 
Kalingd municipality, 24 Paigands, i. 80, 

81. 
Kalingd, ancient name of Orissa, q,v, 
KalintardksM^ ** pigeons' eyes," a pattern 

of silk fabric made in Maldah, vii. 95. 
Kdlisankar, founder of family of Ndrdl 

tamlnddrs^ Jessor, ii. 217. 
Kalitas, a caste in the Tributary States of 

Chutia Ndgpur, xvii. 173, 174. 
Kdljdni river, x. 225, 233, 234, 336. 
Kalkald Kild, pargand in Cuttack, xviii. 

227. 
Kdlkdmdrd, village in Dindjpur, vii. 365, 

412. 
Kdlkdpur, site of old Dutch factory in 

Murshiddbdd, ix. 91. 
Kdlkdpur, thdnd in Singbhum, xvii. 34, . 

122. 
Kdlnd, orCulna sub-division, iv. 169,470. 
Kdlnd, or Culna, town in Bardi^n on 

the Bhdgirathf, with ferry, iv. 59, 60, 

135. 

Kdlpi, village and rice market in the 24 

Pargands, i. 226. 
Kalpurd, village in Sdran, xi. 357. 
Kaltdi indigo concern, Pumiah, xv. 371. 
Kalus, caste of oil-pressers. See Castes. 
Kalydndi in Nodkhdlf, Old factory of the 

E. I. Company at, vi. 288. 
Kalyan khdl^ 24 Pargands, i. 26. 
Kamalddhar, village in Daspalld State, 

Orissa, xix. 280. 
Kamaldkhand, mart in Bhdgalpur, xiv. 

191. 
Kamalpur, pargand in Hill Tipperah, 

vi. 519. 
Kamalpur, town in Maldah, vii. 127. 



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324 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Kdtndr caste. See Castes. 

Kdmirili Chaudhari*s hdt^ market in 



Chittagong, vi. 198. 
KamaFd£:h 



363. 



haur, pargand in Balasor, xviii. 



Kam^ganj, thdnd in Bhigalpur, xiv. 213. 
Kimdrjani, trading viiiage in Dinijpur, 

vii. 309, 348. 
Kamdtipur, city in Kuch Behar State, 

Ruins of, vii. 314 ; x. 362-370. 
Kambrd, pargand in Tirhut, xiii. 192. 
Kimdebpur, mart in the 24 Paiganis, i. 

226. 
IQmdiyd Hit, village mart in Dindjpur, 

vii. 435. 
Kamidsy or serfs, in Patni, xi. 123, 124 ; 

in Gaya, xii. 72, 73; in Hazaribagh, 

xvi. 111-115; in Lohirdagd, xvi. 362. 
Kdmis, a sept of Nepalfs in Darjiling^ x. 

Kamli river, Tirhut, xiii. 20, 25, 26, 27. 
Kamlabiri, /ar^ff^i in Maldah, vii. 135. 
Kdmripur (Tappd) pargand in Tipperah, 

vi. 444. 
Kimrup, Rangpur formerly part of, vii. 

156, 167, 310- 
Kamrupi Vaidiks, Brdhmans from Oudh, 

in Rangpur, vii. 214. 
Kamtaul, village in Tirhut, xiii. 62, 125. 
Kind, or Maureksha, or Mor river, iv. 

37 5 ix. 25. 

Kana nadi^ and Kansona khdl^ old chan- 
nels of the Damodar, iii. 361, 423, 429; 
iv. 23, 24. 

Kind nadiy or little Dhalkisor, tributary 
of the Ddmodar, in Bardwin, iv. 24. 

Kanaipur, manufacturing and trading 
village in Farfdpur, v. 292. 

Kanaka hill range in the Oris^ Tributary 
States, xix. 200. 

Kandrak Sun Temple, Ruins of the, in 
Orissa, xviii. 186 ; xix. 84-91. 

Kanauj Brdhmans, immigrants into the 
24 Pargands, i. 51, 56. See also Kan- 
vdkub3ra. 

Kanchanjangd mountain, x. 2a 

Kdnchanjhau mountain, x. 20. 

Kdnchanpur, pargand in Nodkhdli, vi. 
322, 344- 

Kdnchi, a river in Lohdrdagd, xvi. 235. 

Kanchikhand, pargand in Cuttack, xviii. 
227. 

Kdndirdpdrd railway station, 24 Pargands, 
L 166. 

Kandalia mahal, Sarkdr Sdtgdon, i. 364. 

Kandhs, an aboriginal tribe in the Tribu- 
tary States of Chutid Ndgpur, xvii. 
I72f 173, 193; in Cuttack, xviii. 69, 
77, 178; in Purf, xix. 31; in the 
Qrissa Tributary States, description 



of, xix. 209, 218, 219; their social 
organization, xix. 219-21 1; public law, 
xix. 221 ; private blood-revenge, xix. 
221, 222 ; origin and transfer of 
rights, xix. 222-224; character, cere- 
monies, and customs, xix. 224-232; 
religion, xix. 232-234 ; human sacri- 
fices, xix. 234-236 ; its suppression, 
xix. 236-238. 

Kdndi, or Jamu-Kand{, town in Murshidd- 
bdd, ix. 80, 81. 

ICdndis, See Village Officials. 

KandurH, village in Dindjpur, vii. 445. 

Kandwd in Champdran, Fair at, xiii. 256. 

Kdngsd river, v. 487. 

Kanndr river, xvi 236 ; xvii. 225, 227. 

Kanhauli, pargand in Tirhut, xiii. 192. 

Kanikd "KMi^ pargand in Cuttack, xviii. 
227. 

Kanjagold, village in Hindol State, 
Orissa, xix. 289. 

Kanjidld Bard, fiscal division in the Santal 
Pargands, xiv. 377. 

Kanjidld Chhotd, fiscal division in the 
Santdl Pargands, xiv. 377. 

Kankdi, river in Pumiah, xv. 227, 231. 

Kankdnagar, village in Dindjpur, vii. 

365. 
Kankary or nodular limestone in Mur- 

shiddbdd, ix. 21, 34; in Champdran, 

xiii. 228, 229; in Hazdribdgh, xvi. 

151 ; in Lohdrdagd, xvi. 412. See also 

Geological. 
Kdnkind, /ar^ff^i in Rangpur, vii. 246, 

253. 
Kdnkind, village in Rangpur, vii. 309, 



310, 317. 
Kankjol, pargand in Maldah, 



135- 



vii. 127, 



Kdnkjol, pargand in Dindjpur, vii. 444. 
Kdnkjol, fiscal division in the Santdl 

Pargands, xiv. 377. 
Kdnkjol, pargand in Pumiah, xv. 299, 



337, 424 
Kdnkrd, 



timber tree in the Sundarbans, 

i. 307. 
Kdnkrd, river in Dindjpur, vii. 359, 

362. 
Kanksidli (Coxcali) river, i. 26, 32. 
Kdnmdn, pargand in Puri, xix. 130, 172, 

173. 
Kdno, river in Singbhdm, xvii. 21. 
Kdnpjur, village in Narsinhpur State, 

Orissa, xix. 304. 
Kdnsdrisy caste of braziers, 24 Pargands, 

i. 63; Jessor, il 47, loi. See also 

Castes. 
Kdnsdt, village fair in Maldah, vii. 67, 

loi, 142. 
Kdnsbdns, river in Balasor, xviii 251. 



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GENERAL INDEX. 



325 



YjMiXk Barrachhi, village union in Tir- 

hut, xiiL 49. 
KanUi, village in Tirhut, xiii. 5^ 54. 
Kantiir, market village in Dinijpttr, vii. 

449* 
Kdntanagar, market village in Dindjpur, 

vii 365, 449. 
Kintitala Kiti, khdl in the 24 Pargands, 

i. 3i» 33- 
Kinthilpari villajge noted for Sanskrit 

learning, and fair in the 24 Parganis, i. 

Ill, 233. 
Kanthi. See ContaL 
Kanthio, village in Dhenkinal State, 

Orissa, xix. 282. 
Kantilo, town in Khandp^'State, Orissa, 

xix. 201, 262, 300. 
Kdntli, village in Dindjpur, vii. 365, 

454. 
K4ntnagar, pargand in Dinijpur, vii. 

444. 
Kdndngos, or 'village accountants. See 

Village Officials. 
Kanydkuby^ or Kanaujiyi Brahmans in 

Bhdgalpur, xiv. 54, 55. 
K4o river, xii. 165. 
Kdords, caste of swine-herds in the 

Sundarbans, i. 317 ; in Nadiyd, ii. 49 ; 

in Jessor, ii. 207. See also Castes. 
Kiorapukur, kkM in the 24 Farganis, L 

31. 
Kapdlis^ a cultivating caste in the 24 

Pargsm^ i- 69 ; in the Sundarbans, i. 

317. See also C9sXt&, 
Kapaigidi, range of hills in Singbhum, 

xviL 19, 20. 
K^pilmuni, Hindu sage, connected with 

mythical origin of the Ganges, i. 28. 
Kipilmuni, site of ancient ruins in Jessor, 

ii. 223. 224, 337. 
Kapirpur, village in Sarin, xL 257. 
Kiptii, river in the Chittagong Hill 

Tracts, vi. 25. 
Kai pujd, festival in Hill Tipperah, vi. 

492. 
Kiragoli, village in Pumiah, Fair at, xv. 

260-263, 371. 
Karii, piakdl in Midnapur, i. 371. 
Karii, river in Tirhut, xiii. 19, 24, 25. 
Kardiy timber tree in the Sundarbans, i. 

307. 
KariibiH, pargand in Rangpur, vii. 253. 
Kdriib^, pargand in Dinajpur, vii. 444. 
Kariibiri, chaklah, i. 358. 
Karambi village, near Calcutta, in the 

24 Pargands, i. 230. 
Karamnisi river, the accursed stream of 

the Hindus, xii. 164, 165. 
Karan^, a cultivating caste. See Castes. 
Karanji, village in DinAjpur, vii. 436. 



Karanpor^ coal-Beld in Haz^biigh, xvi. 

1^6-151. 
KAratoya, river, i. 25 ; vii. 161, 167, 359, 

363, 364; viii. 135-139; atL 271; x. 

225, 229.232. 
Karchdy an irregular cess. See Irregular 

Cesses. 
Kardti, pargand in Maldah, viL 136. 
Karddi, pargand in Tipperah, vi. 444. 
Kaigdon, pargand in Birbhum, i. 37a 
Karnarbdri, coal-field in Hazirib^h, xvi. 

141-146 ; xvil 351. 
KAri Sith, town in Shihdbid, xii. 202. 
Karimganj, Mzdr and jute mart in 

Maimansinh, v. 415, 441. 
Karimganji^ a variety of jute. See Jute. 
Karimpur, town in Nadiyi, with river 

traffic, iu 33. 
Karimul, pargand in Cuttack, xviii. 227. 
ICorindi, village in Hindol State, Orissa, 

xix. 288, 289. 
Kdrjisj village rent-collectors in Balasor, 

xviiL 287. 
Karkiri, river in Lohirdag^ xvL 235. 
Kdrkhdnds^ sugar refineries in Jessor, ii. 

206. 
JCarm, festival of aboriginal tribes in Lo- 

hirdagi, xvi. 290, 291. 
Kamigarh, hill in Bhigalpur, xiv. 83, 

84. 
Kamii, market village in Dindjpur, vii. 

447. 
Kamiphuli river, vi. 22, 23, 25, 27, 125, 

126, 129. 
Kiro or Kord, hill in Bdnkuri, iv. 207, 

Kixo river (North and South), xvii. 21, 
22. 

Karohi, mahalia Sarkdr JtXtsvnx^ i- 371* 

Karsand, town in Shihibdd, xii. 203. 

Karsaut, vilkge in Sdran, xi. 257. 

Karsiing, town in Ddrjiling, x. 87, I la 

Kart4bl^is, sect of Hindus, founded in 
NadivA by Rim Duldl, i. 73-75 ; ii. 
53-56. 

Kartikour Rijnagar Jalkar Mahal, par- 
gand in Tipperah, vi. 444. 

Karto river, or Old Tisti, vii 362. 

Kiru, river in Lohirdagd, xvi. 235. 

Kisii (Cossye), river, iii. 25 ; xvi. 39 ; 
xvii. 255, 257, 258 ; embankment, iii. 

145. 
Kasii, river in Monghyr, xv. 22. 
Kasiipur, pargand in Mdnbhum, xvii. 

Kisilang, river in the Chittagong Hill 

Tracts, vi. 25. 
Kisilang, village in the Chittagong Hill 

Tracts, vi. 27, 64, 84, 202, 203 ; fair 

at, vi. 105. 

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GENERAL INDEX, 



Kasandas, a sept of Nepilis, Dixjtiing, x. 

58. 59. 
Kasbi, local name of lessor town, ii. 169. 
Kasb4 mahaU Sarkdr Khalifatabid, i. 

373- 
Kasbi village, near Calcutta, in the 24 

Parganis, i. 230. 
Kasbd, trading village in Bardwin, with 

ferry, iv. 25, 64. 
Kasba, thdnd in Tipperah, vi. 378, 432, 

442. 
Kasbd, market village in Pumiah, xv. 

263, 371. 
Kasbd-Badinpur, village in Dinijpur, vii. 

446. 
Kasbi-Chauri, market village in Dinij- 
pur, vii. 438. 
Ksisbd-Khardaha, village in Dinajpur, 

vii. 446. 
Kasbi-Kismat, village in Dinijpur, vii. 

Kasiidingi, market village in the 24 

Parganas, i. 235. 
Kisiiaingi, market village in Dinijpur, 

vii. 437. 

Kasiirf, village in Midnapur, with silk 
manufacture and trade, iii. 68, 152. 

Kasiatu, hill in Haziribagh, xvi. 25. 

Kasidd^ embroidered cloth manufactured 
in Dacca, v. no. 

Kasiganj) river in Hill Tipperah, vi. 475. 

YMxysn^ pargand in Midnapur, i. 371. 

Kisijori, village, with community of mat- 
makers, in Midnapur, iii. 68, 149. 

Kisimiri, market village in the 24 Par- 
ganas, i. 227. 

Kasimbizar (Cossimbazar), decayed town 
in Murshidabad, ix. 87-90. 

Kasimnagar,/<jr^»<i in Matdah, vii. 136. 

Kasimpur, pargand in Dinajpur, vii. 444. 

Kasimpur, trading village in Dinajpur, 
vii. 365* 436. 

Kasimpur, /flr^«^ in Maldah, vii. 137. 

Kasimpur, silk mart in Maldah, vii. loi. 

Kasimpur, pargand in Pumiah, xv. 299, 
?oo, 337, 424. 

Kasinagar, market village in the 24 Par- 
ganas, i. 232. 

Kasfnath idluk in Sark&r Khalifatabad, i. 

Kasipur, market village in Dinajpur, vii. 

452. 
Kasipur, pargand in Tipperah, vi. 444. 
Kasipur, town in Manbhum, xvii. 297. 
Kasiswarpur, market village in tlie . 24 

Parganas, i. 231. 
Kasma, /a/^77«rfinTirhut, xiii. 192, 193. 
Kasmar, pargand in Saran, xi. 358. 
Kastua-khan, river in Dinajpur, vii. 362. 
Katabar{, village in Dinajpur, vii. 451. 



Katak. See Cuttack. 

Kitil, The, jungle tract in Maldah, vii. 

21, 22, 27, 33, 34. 
Kititiir, village in Dinijpur, vii. 454. 
Kate, pargand m Cuttack, xviii. 227. 
Kitghar, township in Noikhili, vi. 286. 
Kathalihit, village in Dinajpur, viL 454. 
Kathii, town in Shihibid, xii. 202. 
Kitiidf, jute mart in Maimansinh, v. 415, 

441. 
Kitipiri village in Jessor, with settlement 

of Kiyasths, ii. 227. 
Katiyi, pargand in Cuttack, xviii. 227. 
Katiyar,/ttr^ff«iin Pumiah, xv. 300, 337, 

424,425. 
Kitjuri, river in Cuttack, xviii. 23, 24, 

35. 
Katki river, ii. 172. 
Katni river, xiv. 28. 
Katriy or Akbarpur, village and ihdnd in 

Tirhut. xiii. 34, 54, 55, 179. 
Katras, pargand in Minbhum, xvii. 368. 
Katsihf, pargand in Balasor, xviii. 363. 
Katsil mahal, Sarkdr Satgion, i. 364. 
Katuibiri jold, or channel, in Rijshihf, 

viii. 27. 
Katuriyi, thdnd in Bhigalpur, xiv. 46, 

213, 238. 
Kitwi, or Cutwa, subdivision of Bard- 

win, iv. 170. 
Kitwi or Cutwa, town in Bardwin on 

the BhigiratW, with ferry, iv. 25, 62, 

63f 67, 135 ; dispensary, iv. 194-196. 
Kaulik, sect of Hindus, Patni, xi. 56, 57. 
Kaurs, a hill tribe in the Tributary States 

of Chutia Nigpur, xvii. 233, 234, 249. 
Kausaki, ancient name of the Kusi river, 

Kawikhol mart in Gaya, xiL 62. 

Kayi, river in Dinajpur, vii. 360. 

Ka3rigttlnj, village in Dinijpur, vii. 365. 

Kayami, pargand in Balasor, xviii. 363. 

Kayapat, manufacturing village in Midna- 
pur, iii. 67. 

Kayasthsj caste of writers, their origin, 
subdivisions, &c., in the 24 Parganis, i. 
59, 60; in Nadiya, ii. 47; in Jessor, ii. 
195, 221, 227 ; in Midnapur, iiu 53 ; 
in Hiigli, iii. 286 ; in Bardwin, iv. 49, j 

50 ; in Binkuri, iv. 225 ; in Birbhum, 
iv. 330 ; in Dacca, v. 47 ; in Bikar- 
ganj, v. 191 ; in Faridpur, v. 286; in 
Maimansinh, v. 404; in Chittagong, 
vi. 145 ; in Noikhili, vi. 275 ; in 
Tipperah, vi. 380 ; in Maldah, vii. 45; 
in Rangpur, vii. 215 ; in Dinijpur, vii. 
373 ; in Rijshihi, viii. 43 ; in Bogii, 
viii. 173; in Murshidabid, ix. 50; in 
Pabna, ix. 286; in Dirjiling, x. 81, 
82 ; in Jalpiiguri, x. 257 ; in Kuch 



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GENERAL INDEX. 



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Bchar, x. 343; in PatnA, xi. 44, 45, 
99 ; in Saran, xi. 247, 248 ; in Gaya, 
xii. 32; in Shdhdbid, xiL 19; in Tirhut, 
xiii. 44 ; in Champiran, xiii. 242 ; in 
Bhigalpur, xiv. 63, 64 ; in the Santil 
Parganas, xiv. 319; in Monghyr, xv. 
57 ; in Pumiah, xv. 254 ; in Haziri- 
bdgh, xvi. 76 ; in Lohdrda^ xvi. 302; 
in Singbhum, xvii. 64 ; in the Tribu- 
tary States of Chutii Nigpur, xvii. 
163 ; in Minbhiim, xvii. 290 ; in Cut- 
tack, xviii. 72, 73; in Balasor, xvi. 
273; in Purl, xix. 31, 37. 

Kizipdrd, village and fair in the 24 Par- 
eands, i. no, in. 

Kazirhdt, pargand in Rangpur, vii. 246, ' 
2S3» 270, 317. 

Kdzis^ or Muhammadan priests, vii. 228 ; 
viii. 202 ; XV. 273. 

Kedar, pargand in Midnapur, settlement 
of, iii. 102. 

Kedarkhand maAa/ in Midnapur, i. 371. 

Kel^, a vagrant caste. Set Castes. 

Kelo, river in Cuttack, xviii. 23, 24. 

Kaikdif ^rgand in Haidribagh, land ten- 
ures m, xvi. 133-135. 

Kendrdpird subdivision, Cuttack, xviii. 
65, 81, 144, 221, 222. 

Kendrdplrd, town and tAdnd, Cuttack, 
xviii. 65, 81, 82, 89, 90, 203. 

Kendrdpdii Canal, Cuttack, xviii. 29, 31, 
41-4J, 49. 

Kenduli, village in Birbhum, with annual 
fair, birthplace of Jaideva, iv. 343. 

JCenkti, timber tree in the Sundarbans, i. 
' 307. 

Keogram, village in Bardwin, with fair, 
iv. 67. 

Kiord, timber tree in the Sundarbans, i. 
307. 

Keruyilkhand, pargand in Cuttack, xviii. 
227, 228. 

Kerwa Kismat, township in Nodkhdli, vi. 
286. 

Kesabpur, town in Jessor, with trade in 
sugar and manufacture of pottery, ii. 
206, 289, 294. 

Kesariyd, thdnd in Champdran, xiii. 234, 

253, 3". 
Kesat, town in Shdhabdd, xii. 203. 
Kesndgarh ruins in Singbhum, xvii. 72. 
Ketri, village in Dinajpur, vii. 454. 
Keul river, xv. 20, 21, 22 ; xvi. 38. 
Keunjhar State, Orissa, xix. 205, 206, 

210-217, 261, 289-299, 324. 
Keunjhar village, capital of Keunjhar 

State, xix. 290. 
Khadah, tappd in Champaran, xiii. 272, 

276, 310. 
Khagaul, town in Patni, xi. 66, 90, 191. 



Khagorid. in the Chittagong Hill Tracts, 
Gurkha settlement at, vi. 67. 

Khairibdd river, v. 161 -165. 

Khairdi land tenures. See Tenures of 
land. 

Khajauli, village and thdnd in Tirhut, xiii. 
34, ^^y 56, 180. 

Khajra, village in Pumiah, School at, xv. 

413. 
Khdiurd, sugar market in Jessor, ii. 206, 

289, 295. 
Khajwi, village in Sdran, xi. 355. 
Y^2\kTh^ pargand in Dinijpur, vii. 439- 

442, 444. 
Khali&tibdd sarkdr^ i. 359, 373. 
Khalilibid. tappd in Tipperah, vi. 357. 
Khdliskhdli bit, 24 Partis, i. 30. 
Khalispur, fargand in Jessor, i. 372, 373. 
Khalsi^ timoer tree in the Sundarbans, i. 

307. 
Khdmdr^ system of indigo cultivation by 

hired labour, Jessor, ii. 251. 
Khdmdr Mahal, pargand in Rangpur, vii. 

161, 253, 289. 
Khambas, a sept of Nep&lis in D&rjiling, 

X- S3- 

Khin Jahin, early reclaimer of the Sun- 
darbans, i. 382. 

Khdndbdri land tenures, or building 
leases. See Teniures of land. 

Khand, pargand in Tirhut, xiii. 193. 

Khandiit, an (Jriyi military caste, in the 
24 Parganis, i. 59 ; in Cuttack, xviii. 
72 ; in Balasor, xviii. 273, 274 ; in 
Singbhiim, xvii. 63, 64. 

Khanddr, or Narayanpur, mahal in Mid- 
napur, i. 371. 

KhandauH, village in Bhdgalpur, xiv. 94. 

Khandgiri hill in Puri, Antiouarian re- 
mains on, xviii. 179, 180 ; xix. 72, 7j. 

Khandgosh, 'village and police station m 
Bardwdn, iv. 63. 

Kh^ndi, pargand in Cuttack, xviii. 228. 

Khandikar caste. See Castes. 

Khand-mdls State, Orissa, xix. 205, 206, 
210-217, 261, 278, 279. 

Khandpdrd State, Orissa, xix. 206, 210- 
217, 261, 299-301. 

Khandpdra village, capital of Khandpdri 
State, xix. 300. 

Khandtam, village in Champdran, xiii. 
250, 309. 

Khangor, pargand in Dinajpur, vii. 444, 
445. 

Khdnsimdganj, village in Dindjpur, vii. 

365. 
Khdnsdmanbandar, market village in 

Dinajpur, vii. 449. 
Khanwa nadi in Saran, xi. 230, 231. 
Khanwi, village in Tirhut, xiii. 69. 



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GENERAL INDEX, 



Kharagpor, /or^aici in Midnapur, i. 371* 

iii. 102-104. 
Khariil, pargand in Dinijpur, vii. 445, 

446. 
Khariil village in Dinijpur, vii. 445. 
Kharakdiha in Haziribegh, Land tenures 

in, xvi, 129-133. 
Kharakpur, pargand in Monghyr, History 

of, XV. 177-183. 
Kharakpur, thdna in Monghyr, xv. 48, 

160, 174; dispensary, xv. 209, 2ia 
Kharakpur irrigation works, Monghyr, 

XV. 24-29. 
Kharan, embankment in Midnapur, iii. 

144. 
Kharar mahal^ Sarkdr Sdtg&on, i. 364. 
Kharbd, thdnd in Maldah, vii. 51, 87, 

1 10. 
Kharchuni ferry in Tipperah, vi. 363, 

Khardah, village in the 24 Parganis, con- 
nected with traditions of the Vaishnav 
sect, place of pilgrimage, sgskd fair, i. 
107, 108; railway statipn, L 166; manu- 
factory of brushes^ i. 170J school, i. 
206, 230. 

Khardaha, pargand in Dinijpiir, vii. 446. 

Khardaha, village in Dinaipur, vii. 365. 

Kharg&on, parsand in Birbhumf iv. 428. 

Khargarii, khdl in Monghyx^ xv. 2%, 

Khargarii, mart in Monghyr, xiii. 124, 

KhiH, mission station i.^ t^e 24 Pargan&s, 

i. 106, 235. 
Khirl, or Kharii, river in Bardw^, iv. 

Kh£ri, river in Dinijpur, vii. 362. 
Khaiiis, an aboriginal hill triibe. See 

Aboriginal Population. 
Kharidd tenures, . xix. 1 20-; 23. 
Kkdrijd, or indep^dent tdluks i^ Nod- 

kh^i, vi. 305 ; in Cuttack^ xviii. 131 ; 

in Balasor, xviii. 309^ 310. See also 

Tenures of land. 
Kharijuri, one of the origiiiial 24 Parganas, 

i. 20. 
Kharkhii river, Singbhum, xvii. 21. 
Kharmitir railway station, Santil Par- 

ganis, xiv. 352. 
Kharriis, an .aborigixial tribe in Lohir- 

dagi, xvi. 262-265; in Mdnbhiim, xviL 

285-287, 307 ; in the Orissa Tributary 

States, xix. 247. See also Aboriginal 

Population. 
Kharsiwan, political estate in Singbhdm, 

xvii. 18, 32, 33, 34, 76, 92-94, 121, 

138. 
Kharsawin, pfr in Singbhdm, xviL 71, 

<39- 
Kharsua, river in Cuttack, xviii. 23, 25. 



Kharturi, village in Champiran, xiiu 250. 

Kharwirs, an aboriginal tribe in Shahi- 
bid, xil 189, 190 ; in Bhi^pur, xiv. 
49, 52; in Lohirdagd, xvi. 311-317. 
See also Aboriginal Population. 

Khds mahalSy estates under direct man- 
agement of Govenmient, in the 24 Par- 
ganas, i. 266, 230; in Binkuri, iv. 253; 
m the Chittagong Hill Tracts, vi. 36, 

39, 102 ; in Chittagong, vi. 214 ; in 
Noikhilf, vi. 30^, 304 ; in Tipperah, 
>^' 397 ; ii^ Pibna, ix. 312; in Bhdgal- 
pur, xiv. 138, 147; in Haziribigh, xvi. 
119 ; in Lohirdagi, xvi. 392-403, 411, 
454-470, 482 ; in Minbhum, xvii. 325. 
See al^o Tenures of land. 

Khds Taluk, pargand in Rangpur, vii. 

161, 2^3. 
Khis Taluk, pargand in Dinijpur, vii. 

366, 446. 
Khispar, embankment in Midnapur, iii. 

141. 
Khisi, a tributary of the Tinean, vii. 26. 
Khispel, pargand in Minbhum, xvii. 

Khispur, one of the original 24 Parganis, 
i. 20. 

Khiti, village in Dinijpur, vii. 454. 

Khitikhili watercourse, Dacca, v. 138. 

Khatasgi, pargand in Birbhum, i. 370; 
iv. 4S, 429. 

Khitri, nfiarket village, in the 24 Par- 
ganis, i. 227. 

Khatris. S^^ Kshattriyis. 

Khatsi, nodi in Sarin, xi. 227. 

Khayerbir;!, village in Dinajpur, vii. 365, 
443, 

Khayrdtit land tenures. %ee Tenures of 
land. 

Khayri, market village, in the 24 Par- 
ganis, i. 234. 

Khejdsj subordinate tax-collectors in the 
Chittagong Hill Tracts, vi. 89, 90. 

Kh^yyiri^ pargand in Balasor, xviii. 363. 

Khejurpuri, police outpost in the Khand- 
mils, Orissa, xix. 20^ 

Kherhi, pargand in Bhigalpur, xiv. 248. 

Kherhi, pargand in Monghyr, xv. 183. 

Khet IJU, pargand in Rangpur, vii. 253. 

Khet Lil, pargand in Din£pur, vii. 447. 

Khidarganj, town in Maldah, vii. 127. 

Khiongs^ or Buddhist houses of religion, 
&c., in the Chittagong Hill Tracts, vi. 

40, 41, 70, 99, 100; in Chittagong, 
vi. 158, 220. 

Khira, village in Monghyr, xv. 172. 
Khirang, in Balasor, Fair at, xviii. 284. 
Kkiretty a rent-free grant of land. See 

Tenures of land. 
Khimi, pargand in Birbhum, iv. 427, 428. 



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GENERAL INDEX, 



329 



Khirpd, village in HugH, with com- 
munity of cotton-weavers, iii. 372. 
Khizirpur, fargand in Tipperah, vi, 444. 
KhoU Khali creek, 24 Parganis, i. 25, 



31- 

Kholpetua river, i. 26, 27, 32, 299. 
Kholri, pargand in Pumiah, xv. 300, 

338; 425. 
Khoram, village in Siran, xi. 232. 
Kfufrofoshy land tenures. See Tenures of 

land. 
KhudiA river, Manbhum, xvii. 257. 
Khiidkhdsty land tenures. See Tenures of 

land. 
Khulni, market village in Jessor, i. 27, 

300, 314; ii. 222, 300, 305, J41. 
Khulsi, pargand in Dinijpur, vii. 447. 
Khundwdt land tenure in Haz^b&gh, 

xvi. 124. 
Khtint kiiti, land tenure in Singbhiim, 

xvii. 86. 
Khupi, pargand in Rane^ur, vii. 253. 
Khupi, pargand in Dini^pur, vii. 447. 
Khurd, market village in the 24 Paiganis, 

i. 227. 
Khurdha subdivision, Puri, xix. 28, 91, 

178-192. 
Khurdhi, khds mahdl in PuH, xix. 183. 
Khurdhi, pargand in PuH, xix. 130, 172, 

173. 
Khurdh^ thdnd in Puri, xix. 28, 183. 
Khurdhi rebellion of 1804, xix. 183-185; 

rebellion of 1 817- 18, xix. 185-192. 
Khursand, pargand in Tirhut, xiii. 193. 
Khursadli, villa^ in HugH, with cotton 



manufacture, lii. 372. 
* '. " in Hugl 
Khush B^h, or Gardoi of Happiness, 



Khusbdrii^ kkdl in HugH, iii. 254. 



old cemetery of the Nawibs of Mur- 

shidibid, ix. 72, 73. 
Khushbdsh Idkhirdj land tenures. See 

Tenures of land. 
KkiisM^ system of indigo cultivation, 

in Tirhut and Champ£an, xiii. 103, 

104, xiiL 268, 269. 
Khweymls. See Kumis. 
Khyengs, a tribe of Toungthis, vi. 49, 57. 
Khyoungthi tribes ('* Children of the 

Rivcr^'), vi. 19, 37, 39-43, 88, 142, 143, 

152, 218. 
Kkhing, village in Singbhum, Temples 

at, xviL 72, 73. 
Kidderpur, large market town on Tolly's 

Canai near Calcutta, called after Mr 

Kyd, site of Government and other 

docks, i. 31, 100, 236. 
Kild^ or Citadel of Gaur, The, vii 56. 
Kildy The, in Patni, xi. 155, 161. 
Kili-Ambo, pargand in Balasor, xviii. 

363. 



KiU Ambohdtit, pargand in Balasor, 

xviiL 363. 
Kila ManjaJpur, pargand in Balasor, xviii. 

363- 
Kili Patni, pargand in Balasor, xviii. 

363. 
Kila Talmundd, pargand in Balasor, xviii. 

364. 
KtldjdtSj or tributary estates, in Cuttack, 

xviii. 122-125. 
Kimiria, river in Cuttack, xviii. 23, 25. 
King-fishers' skins. Trade in, in Chitta- 

gong, vi. 133, 190; in Tipperah, vi. 

370, 419. 
Kiratis or Kichaks, a sept of Nepilis in 

DArjiling, x. 56, 57. 
Kir&ts, original legendary inhabitants of 

Bengal, i. 53. 
Kirpd^ timber tree in the Sundarbans, i. 

307. 
Kirtindsi river, v. 20, 21. 
Kishanpur, village in Maldah, vii. 139. 
Kishenganj, village and thdnd in BhJgal- 

pur, xiv. 46, 93, 213, 238. 
Kismat Ankuri, pargand in Balasor, 

xviii. 364. 
Kismat Gopinithpur, village in Maldah, 

vii. 131. 
^Kismat Katsai, pargand in Balasor, xviii. 

364. 
Kismat N4po, pargand in Balasor, xviii. 

364. 
Kismat Sarsani, market village in the 24 

Pargands, i. 236. 
Kismat Uddi, village in Dinijpur, vii. 454. 
Kisoriganj, subdivision of Maimansinh, 

V. 476. 
Kisoricanj, municipality and scene of £ur, 

in Maimansinh, v. 412, 413. 
Kisoriganj, trading village in Rangpur, 

vii. 309. 
KistkaH rayats, tenants at wilL See 

Tenures of land. 
Kit mahal in Sarkdr Madiran, i. 369. 
KoiH, pargand in Sarim, xi. 303. 
Ko^ or Koith, town in ShMb4d, xii. 

203. 
Kochjdl, HI in Din&jpur, vii. 4^ 
Kochs, semi-Hinduized abcmgines, in 

lessor, ii. 196; in Dacca, v. 42; in 

Tipperah, vL 378 $ in Maldah, vii 34, 

40, 46, 68 ; in Rangpur, viL 211, 219 ; 

in Dinijpur, vii. 379, 380; m D&rjiling, 

X. 80; m Jalpd^uri, x. 255, 256; m 

Kuch Behar, x. 346-358. See also 

Aboriginal Population. 
Kodhdr, pargand in Puri, xix. 130, 172, 

»73. 
Kodindi, pargand in Balasor, xviii. 228, 

364- 



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330 



GENERAL INDEX, 



Kocl river (North and South), xvi. 38, 

235, 236; xvii. 21, 22. 
Koelwir, railway station in Sh^hdbad, 

xii. 257. 
Koeris, a cultivating caste, branch of the 
Kaibarttis, in the 24 Parganis, i. 68 ; 

in Patn£, xi. 46; in Shahabad, xii. 195 ; 

in Tirhut, xiii. 44; in Champaran, 

xiii. 236, 243 ; in Monghyr, xv. 51, 

58 ; in Pumiah, xv. 254, 2^5 ; in 

Hazaribigh, xvi. 78; in Lohardaga, 

xvi. 305, 3o(S ; in Manbhum, xvii. 292, 

306. See aslo Castes. 
Koherd river, xiii. 225. 
Koind river, Singbhum^ xvii. 21, 22. 
Kokalhdt, a waterfall in Hazaribagh, 

xvi. 28. 
Kokuyikhand, parganA in Cuttack, xviii. 

228. 
Koldpdri, village in Tipperah, vi. 383. 
Kolarian races in Lohardaga, xvi. 254- 

256, 265. 
Koldsi indigo concern in Puraiah, xv. 

367-370. 
Koldingi, market village in Dinijpur, 

vii. 455. 
Kolhdn, The, Govemnent estate in Sing- 

bhdm, xvii. 18, 31, 33, 34, 75. 87-89, 

121, 135, 136.. 
Kols, an aboriginal tribe, 24 Pargands, i. 

51 ; Dindjpur^vii. 382 ; Patnd, xi. 30 ; 

Shdhdbdd, xii. 190 ; Santdl Pargands, 

xiv. 286, 287 ; Hazdribdgh, xvi. (S>, 65; 

Loharddgd, xvi. 251, 265-278, 325; 

Sin^bhiim, xvii. 19, 36, 37, 39-59, 77 ; 

subiugation of, xvii. 107-X15; Mdn- 

bhum, Tributary States of Chutid Ndg- 

pur, xvii. 156, 158, 162, 2 tf; Cuttack, 

xviii. 67, 78; Balasor, xviii. 277; Orissa 

TribuUry States, xix. 241. 
Kol insurrection of 1831, in Lohdrddgd, 

xvi. 45^54. 
Komdr, village in Dhenkdnal State, Orissa, 

xix. 282. 
Konch, viUa^^e in Gayd, xii. 55. 
Konnagar, village in Hugli, and railway 

station, iii. 306. 
Kopd, village iiv Sdran, xi. 2^7. 
Kopdi, or Ropa, or Sdl nddi, stream in 

Birbhiim, iv. 317. 
Kopilds, pesdc'in Orissa^ xbc. 199. 
Kopilds, village in Dhenkdnal State, xix. 

260 ; temples and £nrs at, xix. 199. 
Kord hill, in Bdnkurd, iv. 207, 307. 
Kord (Koherd) river, xik 167. 
Kordikald, plr in Singbhum, xvii. 139. 
Korea Tributary Statb.(VoL XVII.) 
Geographical Situation, Area, and 

Boundaries, 213; History,. a 13, 214; 

General Aspect, Hills, Rivers, and 



Forests, 214, 215 ; /war Natures^ 215 ; 
Population, 215, 216; Ethnological 
Classification, 216, 217 ; the Rajd's 
Residence, &c., 2x7, 218; Capital and 
Interest, 2x8, 219; Revenue and Police 
Statistics, 219-22X. 

Korfd land tenure, sub-lease under culti- 
vator, in the 24 Pargands, i. 155, 278; 
in Bankurd, iv. 262 ; Birbhum, iv. 368 ; 
in Rangpur, vii. 280, 281 ; in Bogrd, 
viii. 238. See also Tenures of land. 

Koron, town and thdnd^ in the Santdl 
Pargands, xiv. 277, 322, 363. 

Korwas, an aboriginal tribe in the Tribu- 
tary States of Chutid Ndgpur, xvii 
204-206, 234. 

Kosktd^ local name for jute in Maiman- 
sinh, V. 421. 

Koskird, village in the Santdl Pargands, 
xiv. 270, 271. 

Kot Rdhdng, pargand in Pun, xix. 130, 
172, 173. 

Kotdin, hill in Lohdrdagd, xvi. 237. 

Kotdlpur, village and thdnd in Bard- 
wdn, iv. 65. 

Kotdls, SeeKotw&ls. 

Kotchanpur, sugar mart in Jessor, ii. 210, 
280; 289, 293. 

Kotdes, pargand in Puri, xix. 130, 172, 

«73- 
Kotgarh, pir in Singbhum, xvii. 136. 
Kothid, village in Sdran, xi. 257. 
Kotnayi, river in Rangpur, vii. 167. 
Kotrang mumcipality in Hi!igU, with 

brick manufactures, &c., iii. 304. 
Kotsdri, tappd in Sargujd State, Chutid 

Ndspur, xviL 241. 
Kotwalf, tnahalvDi i'a^^&^r Sdtgdon, i. 362. 
Kotwdlf, pargand in Maldah, vii. 54, 137. 
Kotwdli, town in Maldah, vii. 137. 
Kotwdliodrd pargand in Bdkarganj, His- 
torical sketch of, i. 225, 226. 
Kotwdlsy or village police officers in Bard- 

wdn,.iv. 66; m - Birbhum, iv. 403 ; in 

Rangpur, vii. 233 ; in Murshiddbdd, ix. 

96, 121 ; in Lohdrdagd, xvi. 330, 331. 

See aba Village Officials, &a 
Koydkhdi river, xviii. 23, 24, 2C ; xix. 19. 
Kriimdfaar, trading village in Birbhum, iv. 

380. 
KriskdHs, or daylabourers. See Day- 

Labourers. 
Krishna Chandra^' Rdjd of Nadiyd, ii. 

154-161. 
Krishnadeopur, pargand in Nodkhdlf, vi. 

344. 
Krishnaganj sub-division in Pumiah, xv. 

244, 382, 383, 413. 415, 416. 
Krishna^;ani town, seat of commerce, &c, 

in Nadiya, ii. 33, 62, 104. 



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GENERAL INDEX. 



331 



Krishnaganj, town and thdnd in Purniah, 
XV. 243, 244, 265, 266, 371, 379, 398, 

415- 
Krishnagar College in Nadiya, ii. 120, 

121. 
Krishnagar, sub-division of Nadiyd, ii. 

131. 

Krishnagar or Krishnanagar, locally 
known as Godri, headquarters of 
Nadiya, municipality, seat of com- 
merce, and manufactory of clay 
figures, residence of Rajds of Nadiya, 
ii. 32, 58, loi, 104, 106; college, ii. 
120, 121 ; dispensary, ii. 141. 

Krishnai, pargand in Kangpur, vii. 253. 

Krishnanagar, village in Dinijpur, vii. 

450- 

Kshattriyd caste in the 24 Pargands, i. 
58 ; in Nadiyd, ii. 47 ^ in Jessor, ii. 
194; in Midnapur, iii. 52; in Hugli, 
iii. 285 ; in Bardwan, iv. 46-49 ; in 
BankuSri, iv. 222 ; in Birbhiim, iv. 329, 
330 ; in Dacca, v. 47 ; in Bikarganj, 
V. 190 ; in Farldpur, v. 286 ; in Mai- 
mansinh, v, 403 ; in Chittagong, vi. 
145; in Nodkhali, vi. 275; in Tip- 
perah, vi. 380 ; in Hill Tipperah, vi. 
495 ; in Maldah, vii. 45 ; , iii Rangpur, 
vii. 215 ; in Dindjpur, vii. 377, 379 ; 
in Rdjshahi, viii. 43 ; in Bogra, viii. 
171, 172 ; in Murshidabad, ix. 48 ; in 
Pibni, ix. 286 ; in D^rjiling, x. 81 ; 
in JalpdiguH, x. 256, 2^7 ; in Kuch 
Behar, x. 343 ; in Patni, xi. ^, 43 ; 
in Sdran, xi. 248; in ShA^bad, xii. 
191, 192 ; in Tirhut, xiii. 43 ; in Cham- 
paran, xiii. 240; in Bhigalpur, xiv. 
61, 62 ; in Monghyr, xv. 55, c6 ; in 
Hazaribagh, xvi. 76; in Lohardagd, 
xvi. 300-302 ; in Singbhiiixv, xyii. 63 ; 
in Mdnbhdm, xvii. 290; in Cuttack, 
xviii. 72 ; in Balasor, xviii. 272 ; in 
Puri, xix. 30, 36 ; in the Orissa Tribu- 
tary States, xix. 255. 

Kubazpur, pargand in SarHr SnlflimAn- 
ibdd, i. 367. 

KucH Behak State (Vol. X.)— 

Geographical Situation, Area, and 
Boundaries, 331, 332 ; Jurisdiction, 
332; General Aspect, 333; River 
System, 334-336; Change* in the 
River Courses, 337 ; River Traffic, 
337 ; Eera Naturae 338 ; Population 
according to Census of 1872, 338-340; 
Abstract of Area, Population, &c., of 
each Police Circle, 339; Population 
according to Sex and Age, 340 ; Ethni- 
cal Division of the People, 340-342 ; 
Aboriginal Tribes, 342 ; Hindu Castes, 
342-346; Description and History of 



the Kochs or Rajbansfs, 346-35^ J 
Religious Division of the People,- 358, 
359; Urban and Rural Population, 
359, 360 ; Description of the celebrated 
Ancient Cities of Dharma Pal and 
Kamatdpur. 360-370; Clothing, Dwell- 
ings, Food, &c., of the People, 37p- 
372 ; Ceremonies at Births and in 
Eariy Life of the Kochs, 372-374 5 
Marriage Ceremonies, 374-377 ; Fune- 
ral Ceremonies, 377, 378; Religious 
Worship, 378, 379 J Ajgriculture, 379- 
387.; Rice Cultivation, 379-382 ; Other 
Crops, &c., 382, 383 ; Area, Out-turn 
of Crops, &c., 383, 384; Condition of 
the Cultivating Classes, 384, 385; 
Domestic Animals, 385 ; Agricultural 
I»plements, 385 ; Wages and Prices, 
3S5, 386 ; Weights and Measures, 
387 ; Day-labourers, 387 ; Waste 
Lands, 387 ; Land Tenures, 388-392 ; 
Rates of Rent, 392-394; Manure, 
Irrigation, &c., 394; Natural Calami- 
ties, Floods, Droughts, &c,, 394, 395 ; 
Famines, 395 ; Famine Warnings, 395, 
396; Foreign and Absentee Proprie- 
tors« 396 1 Roads and Means of Com- 
munication, 396, 397 ; Manufactures, 
397, 398 ; Commerce and Trade, 398, 
399 ; River Trade Statistics, 399, 401 ; 
Exports itnd Imports, 399, 401 ; Capi- 
tal and Interest, 401, 402 ; Institu- 
tions, 402 ; History of Kuch Behar 
State, 402-426; Genealogical Table 
showing the Descent of the present 
R4ji of Kuch Behar, 426; Native 
Administration, 427-430 ; British 
Administration, 431-440 ; Revenue and 
Expenditure, 432 ; Financial Adminis- 
tration, 432-434; Balance Sheets of 
the State, 433.; Revenue Collections 
for the Six Years, 1869-70 to 1874-75, 
434; Land Revenue, 434, 435; Rent 
Suits, 435 ; Courts of Justice, 435 ; 
Police Statistics, 436, 437; Educa- 
tional Statistics, 437-439; Criminal 
and Jail Statistics, 438 ; Postal Statis- 
tics, 439, 440; Administrative Divi- 
sions, 439, 440 ; Climate, Meteorology, 
^c, 440-443; Medical History, 441- 
444; Native Medical Practitioners, 
444; Indigenous Drugs, 444; Faiis 
and Religious Gatherings, 444; Botany, 
444-447. 

Kuch Behar town, capital of the State, 
»• 332, 359, 360. 

Kuch Behar family. Rise of the present, 
vii. 3«5» 316. 

Kuch Behari, village in Dinijpur, vii. 
436. 



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332 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Kudra river, xii. i66. 
Kuhund4, pargand in Cuttack, xviii. 228. 
Kuhuni kUd in Puri, xix. 183. 
Kuiyi, river in Murshidibdd, ix. 25. 
Kujang Kili, pargand in Cuttack, xviii. 

228. 
Kuji Ghdt, lull-pass in^ Bh^lpur, xiv. 

250. 
Kukis. ^^Lushiis. 
Kukui, river in Bardw^, iv. 24. 
KukrihAti,. village in Midnapor, with 

river traffic, iii. 37. 
Kul^hdt, mart in Rangpuiv ^i. 167, 

KuldihA, plr in Singbfaum, xvii. 136. 
Kulgachi, ^i/ in the 24 P&rganiLs, i. 30 ; 

portly drained, i. 227. 
Kulhui, a hill in Hazdribigh,. xvi. 29. 
KuliA, fair in Nadiyi, 11.-57. 
Kulik, rivcp in Dmijpur, vii- 359$ 360, 

441. 
Kulin Brihmaiis,. tibeir origin,, sub-divi- 



221 ; in Dacca, v. 53-55 ; in Tipperah, 

vi. 380; in Puri, xix. 35. See also 

Bdi^ans. 
Kulti Bihiri,. fishing village on the Kulti 

Giiig in the 24* Paigan£, i. 35. 
Kulti Gdngr river in the 24 Parganis, i. 

33. 
Kumindi, a Hill in Lohirdag^.xvi. 237. 
Kumdrs, caste of potters. See Castes. 
Kum&r or Pingisi river, ii. 19, 172, 175, 

177 ; v. 161^ 262, 263. 
Kumiri, river in Minbhiim, xvii. 2^7. 
Kumar Bhawdniganj^. village in^Dinaj pur, 

vii. 451. 
Kumdr, khdl in Jessor, ii. 177. 
Kum4r Tntkp pargand,. Sarkdr Audum- 

bar, i. 373. 
Kum&rganj, village and' tkdnd in Dinij- 

pur, vii. 328, 344, 349, 365. 4", 412. 
Kum4ripur,./ar^M^ in Puralah, xv. 300, 

338, 425, 426. 
Kumirkhali, municipality in Nadiyd, ii. 

60. 
Kum&rkhAU,, trading village in> Faridpur, 

V. 291. 
Kum^dli fiscal division in the Sant41 

Parganiis, xiv. 377. 
KumiUA (Comillah), chief town of Tip- 
perah, vi. 356, 3^3, 364* 365, 378. 381, 

382, 385* 386, 396, 4«3. 4I7»420, 432, 

433> 435* 44i> 453> 454- 
Knmirii, village and thdnd in Chittagong, 

vi* 136, 153.216^.225. 
Kumis, a tnbe of Toungth^s, vi).49, 53- 

56,88. 



Kumribdd, town in the Santal Pai^;anas, 

xiv. 322, 354. 
Kumird^Lchaur, pargand in Balasor, xviii. 

364. 
Kund4, in Hazirib^h, LAnd tenures in, 

xvi. 126-129. 
Kund^it Karea, fiscal division in the 

Santdl Parganis, xiv. 377. 
Kund^it, tdwn in the Sant^ Parganas, 

xiv. 322. 
Kundi, pargand in Rangpur, vii. 156, 

253» 270, 324. 
Kundi, pargand in Balasor, xviii. 364. 
Kundirii, or Sobnalf river, i. 27, 32. 
Kunj Gor&gh&t, pargand in Rangpur, viL 

i6i, 253. 
Kunj Goraghit, pargand in Dinijpur, vii. 

447. 
Kunjabad^ village in Daspalla State, 

Orissa, xix. 280. 
KUnthiy svstem of indigo cultivation in 

Shihdbid, xii. 2^7, 238. 
Kunti or Nay^rfti, kMdl in HugU, iii. 

254, 261, 424. 
Kunur, river in Bardw&n, iv. 23. 
Kunwdrganj, village in Dinijpur, vii. 

405- 

Kunwarkdri, land tenure in Haziribigh, 
xvi. 12^. 

Kurii, pargand in Balasor, xviii. 364. 

Kurak^dr, hill in Gay4, xii. 19. 

Kural, village in Nayagarh State, Orissa, 
xix. 306. 

Kudmd, town in Shihdbdd, xii. 203. 

Kurgdchhi, market village in the 24 Par- 
ganis, i. 240. 

Kuriir, MJ in Din&jpnr, vii. 453. 

Kurigaxii, mart in Rangpur, vii. 167. 

Kurikhfi, tappd in Tipperah, vi. 356. 

Kuris, meld or fair in Maldah, vii. 67. 

Kurmfs, a caste of cultivators, 24 Par- 
gands, i. 64 ; Patni, xi. 46, 74 ; Gaya, 
xii. 37 ; Sh4h4b4d, xii. 195 ; Tirhut, 
xiii. 44, 4< ; Champiran, xiii. 236, 
243; Singbhtiun, xvii. 66; M4nbh6m, 
xvii. 292. See also Castes. 

Kumiyi, pargand in Cuttack, xviii. 228. 

Kursi, village in Rangpur, vii. 305. 

Kuruldingi, village m Dinijpur, vii. 

443- 
Kurulgichhi dispensary in Nadiyi, ii> 

141. 
Kunilo, pargand in Puri, xix. 130, 172, 

173. 
Kurus. See Muisis. 
Kusil, market village in the 24 Paiganis, 

i. 227. 
Kusaleswar, village in Keunjhar State, 

Orissa, xix. 260. 
Kusbhadri river, xix. 19, 20. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



GENERAL INDEX, 



333 



Kusdaha, pargand in the 24 Parganis, i. 

236, 367. ^ , 

Kiishtia, sub-division of Nadiyi, ii. 131. 
Kushtii, municipality in Nadiy^ ii. 59 ; 

seat of commerce, ii. 32, 104 ; railway 

station, ii. 94; dispensary and coolie 

hospital, ii. 141. 
Kushtid, village in Dinajpur, vii. 444. 
Kusi river, xiv. 29; xv. 227, 228, 231- 

233* 341. 
Kusiganj, bil in Dinajpur, vii. 445, 446. 
Kusmandal, pargand in Cuttack, xviii. 

228. 
Kuspili kild in Puri, xix. 183. 
Kutab Shih's monument in Gaur, vii. 60. 
Kutabdt^ island and lighthouse, Chitta- 

gong, vi. 144; embankment, vi. 131 ; 

outpost, vi. 176, 216. 
Kutabpur, town in Maldah, vii. 137. 
Kutabpur, village in Midnapur, with fair, 

iii. 152. 
Kutabpur, or Mahikanghat mahal^ in 

5<iriJr Jaleswar, i. 371. 
Kutabpur makal in Sarkdr Mahmiid4b4d, 

i. 372- 
Kutabsh^i, pargand in Cuttack, xviii. 

228. 
Kut4mii, market village in Dinijpur, vii. 

438. 

Kutii, village in Sdran, xi. 257. 

Kutir-bdzdr, trading village in Tipperah, 
vi. 420. 

Kutumbi, pargadn in Gay4,xii. 145. 

Kwdhi, river in Hill Tipperah, vi. 475. 

Kynsa Khyoung, name «ven by the hill- 
men to the Kamaphun river, q.v. 



Lab^nakhyi salt spring in Chittagong, vi. 

132, 133- 

Labbd, ihdnd in Purf, xix. 28. 

Labourers. See Cultivators. 

Labourers, Agricultural day, in the 24 
Parganis, i. 154; in the Sundarbans, i. 
338; in Nadi^, ii. 7; in Jessor, ii. 
258, 259 ; in HiSglf, iii. 147 ; in Bard- 
win, iv. 76 ; in B^kuri, iv. 251 ; in 
Dacca, v. 95, 96 ; in Bakaiganj, v. 208; 
in Faridpur, v. 324 ; in Maimansinh, 
V. 448 ; m the Chittagong Hill Tracts, 
vi. 76, 77 ; in Chittagong, vi. 163 ; in 
Noikhili, vi. 275; in Tipperah, vi. 
396; in Hill Tipperah, vi. 505; in 
Maldah, vii. 79 ; in Rangpur, vii. 266, 
272; in Rdjsh^i, viii. 68, 69; in 
Bogr&, viii. 204, 205 ; in Munhidibid, 
ix. 97, no, 114, 115; in^ Pdbnd, ix. 
307, 309 ; in Dirjfling, x- 103 ; in Jal- 



piiguH, x. 279, 280 ; in Kuch Behar, 
x. 385-387; in PatnA, xi. 119; in S4ran, 
xi. 29(3; in Gayi, xii. 97; in Shihibid, 
xii. 243, 244, 246, 247; in Tirhut, xiii. 
107 ; in Champiran, xiii. 279, 281, 
282 ; in Bhigalpur, xiv. 131 ; in the 
Sant&l Parganis, xiv. 344, 345 ; in 
Monghyr, xv. 108, 109; in Pumiab, xv. 
310, 311; in Haziribdgh, xvi. 111-115; 
in Lohiidagd, xvi. 361, 362; in Sing- 
bhdm, xvii. 86, 98; in the Tributary 
States of Chutid N^ur, xvii. 210, 21 1 ; 
in Minbhdm, xvii. 320; in Cuttack, 
xviii. no, 117, 118; in Balasor, xvii. 
297i 300 ; in Purif »x. 97. 

Labouring Castes. See Castes. 

Lac trade and manufacture in B&nkurd, 
iv. 276 ; in Birbhum, iv. 379 ; in Mur- 
shidibdd, ix. 34, 163, i6a ; in Pibni, 
«• 337, 338 ; in Haziribigh, xvi. 171 ; 
in Lohirdagi, xvi. 416-402. 

Lad4 hill, Singbhum, xvii. 20. 

Ladhurki, pargand in Minbhi!im, xvii. 
368. 

Ladni, tappd in Sargi!ija State, Chutiil 
Nigpur, xvii. 241. 

Ladu&{, pargand in Tirhut, xiii. 193. 

Lagwi hill, Sant4l Parganis, xiv. 267. 

Lah4ri village, capital of P£l Lahiri State, 
Orissa, xix. 309. 

Laheji, village in Siran, xi. 257. 

L^eri, or Nuri caste, makers of lac 
ornaments. See also Castes. 

Lalumd or Zar-i-peshgi land tenures. See 
Tenures of land. 

Lahrhi, village in Siran, xi. 257. 

Lakuhan rice crop in Haziribiigh, xvi. 
99, 100 ; in Lohdrdagi, xvi. 339. See 
also Rice. 

Ldichanpur port, Balasor, xviii. 258, 259. 

Lakes, Marshes, &c., in the 24 Pargand, 
i.-30; in the Sundarbans, i. 299; in 
Nadiyd, ii. 32 ; in Jessor, ii. 181 ; in 
Hugli, iii. 262 ; in Dacca, v. 22, 23 ; 
in Bikarganj, v. 168, 169; m Faridpur, 
V. 268, 269; in Maimansinh, v. 388; in 
the Chittaiong Hill Tracts, vi. 26, 28; 
in Nodkhfii, vi. 255, 256; in Tipperah, 
vi. 365, 366; in Hill Tipperah, vi. 476; 
in Maldah, vii. 27, 91, 129 ; in Ranc;- 
pur> vii. 161, 168, 169, 345 ; in Din^- 
pur, vii. J58. 361, 363, 364* 456, 457 ; 
m R^jshahi, viii. 25 ; in Bogrd, viii. 
145; in Murshidibid, ix. 28, 29; in 
PAbni, ix. 272, 273; in Ddrjfling, x. 
28, 29 ; in JalpAiguri, x. 235 ; in Kuch 
Behar, x. 337 ; in Sdran, xi. 233, 234 ; 
in Shdhib&d, xii. 168 ; in Tirhut, xiii. 
27 ; in Champdran, xiii. 226, 227 ; in 
Bhdgalpur, xiv. 30, 31 ; in the Santal 



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334 



GENERAL INDEX, 



Parganis, xiv. 270; in Monghyr, xv. 
23; in Pumiah, xv. 233, 234; in Lohar- 
dagi, xvi. 237 ; in Mdnbhum, xvii. 
258 ; in Cuttack, xviii. 58 ; in Balasor, 
xviii. 251 ; in PuH, xix. 19. 

Lak-handai river, Tirhut, xiii. 20, 23, 24. 

Lakhanpur, pargand in Monghyr^ xv. 
183. 

Lakhd4, pargand in Mdnbhiim, xvii. 368. 

Lakhipur, town in Maldah, vii. 144. 

Ldkkirdj\ or rent-free land tenures in the 
24 Pargands, i. 278-281 ; in Jessor, ii. 
264, 265 ; in Midnapur, iii. 04-100 ; in 
Bardw^, iv. 77, 79; in Bankuri, iv. 
253, 264, 265; in Bfrbhum, iv. 369, 
370; in Bikaiganj, v. 377-379; in 
Maimansinh, v. 453; in Chittagong, vi. 
I75-I77t 214; in Noikhalf, vi. 303, 
304, 306 ; in Tipperah, vi. 399, 400, 
403, 404, 410 ; m Maldah, vii. 83-85 ; 
in Rangpur, vii. 283 ; in Dinijpur, vii. 
404 ; in bogri, viii. 239, 240 ; in Mur- 
shidab&d, ix. 108, I2X, 122 ; in Pdbnd, 
ix. 314-316 ; in Kuch Behar, x. 391 ; 
in Patni, xi. 127, 186, 188 ; in Gay4, 
xii. 102, 103 ; in Bhdgalpur, xiv. 143, 
144, 147-149; in Monghyr, xv. 116; 
in Pumiah, xv. 328, 330 ; in Singbhum, 
xvii. 83, 89 ; in Minbhum, xvii. 332, 
333 ; in Cuttack, xviii. 134, 135 ; in 
Balasor, xviii. 310-313; in Purl, xix. 
111-114, 130-132, 135. 

Lakhmii river, v. 21, 22. 

Lakhnauti, former residence of the 
Muhammadan Governor of Lower 
Bengal, i. j/bij fa^t-note, 

Lakhpuri, tappd in Pumiah, xv. 300, 301, 
338, 426. 

Lakimiri peak in Chittagong, vi. 125. 

Lakrajit, pargand in Balasoi, xviii. 364. 

Likshim, thdnd in Tipperah, vi. 378, 432, ' 

441. 
Lakshanpur, pargand in Tippecah, vi. 

444. 
LAkshman Sen, last independent Hindu 

King of Bengal, his capital at Nadiy^, 

ii. 57, 152,219; V. 54. 
Lakshmi, township in Noakhali, vi. 286. 
Lakshmi Doni, river is Nodkhali, vi. 

251- 
Lakshmfdiri, market village iff the 24 

Parganis, L 229. 
Lakshmfdii, char in No^hdli, vi. 251. 
Lakshmiganj, mart in Chittagong, vi. 

198. 
Lakshmfkintpur, village with church and 

Christian schools, 24 ParganAs, i. 232. 
Lakshmipds^ sugar mart in Jessor, ii. 302; 

residence of a colony of pure Kulin 

Brdhmans, ii. 219-221. 



Lakshmipur, township and thdnd in Noa- 
khdli, vi. 239, 269, 273, 286, 294, 315, 
324, 33o» 333, 342, 344; East India 
Company's factory at, vi. 247, 288. 

Lakshmipur canal, Noakhali, vi. 254. 

IA\ Bakjr4 river, Tirhut, xiii. 23. 

L^ Bizar, thdnd in Dinajpur, vii. 451. 

Lai Beg{ river, xiii. 225. 

Lalbiri Jaglr Mai Mukhtipur, pargand in 
Dindjpur, vii. 447. 

Lalbirf Khalisa, pargand in Dinajpur, 
vii. 447. 

Lablegwa, police station in Saran, xi. 
360. 

Lalganj, town and thdnd in Tirhut, xiii. 

20, 34, 49, 50, 72, 73, 130, 146, 149- 
152, 180. 

Lilgarh, pir in Singbhum, xvii. 136. 

Lalm4i range of hills in Tipperah, vi. 
361, 362, 368, 404. 

Ldlpur, pargand in Tipperah, vi. 444. 

Lalpur, town in Tipperah, vi. 399, 42a 

Ldls^ Lushdi chiefs, xi. 6a 

LdmdSf or priests, in Diij fling, x. 64, 65. 

Land, cultivated and uncultivated, out- 
turn of crops, &c., in the 24 Pargand, 
i. 148; in the Sundarbans, i. 335, 336; 
in Nadiyd, ii. 69; in Jessor, ii. 243; in 
Midnapur, iii. 82 ; in Hugli, iii. 240 ; 
in Bardw&n, iv. 72; in Bdnkura, iv. 
247; in Birbhum, iv. 346; in Dacca, v. 
91; in Bakarganj, v. 204; in Faridpur, 
v. 315; in Maimansinh, v. 442; in the 
Chittagong Hill Tracts, vL 74, 75 ; in 
Chittagong, vi. 161, 162; in No4kh&li, 
vi. 295, 2^; in Tipperah, vi. 393, 394; 
in Hill Tipperah, vi. 502 ; in Maldah, 
vii. 73. 74; in Rangpur, vii. 2^1-2^9; 
in Dinijpur, vii. 394, ^95; in RijshAhi, 
viii. 64-69; in Bocpra, viii. 222, 226- 
228 ; in Muishidimld, ix. 105-107 ; in 
Pabni, ix. 305 ; in Diriiling, x. 97-99; 
103, 104 ; in Jalp4igun, x. 224, 274- 
276, 280; in Kuch Behar, x. 383, 384; 
in Patni, xi. 1 15, 1 16; in Siuan, xi. 292- 
294 ; in Gayi, xiL 94, 95 ; in Shih- 
&bid, xiL 238-240; in Tirhut, xiii. 104, 
105 ; in Champiran, xiii. 271-277 ; 
in Bhigalpur, xiv. 124-129; in the 
Santdl Parpanis, xiv. 339-341 ; in Mon- 
ghyr, XV. 83, 84, 103-106; in Pumiah, 
XV. 293-303 ; in HazAriba^, xvi. 105, 
1^2, 199 ; in LohArdagi, xvi 353-355 ; 
in Singbhum, xvii. 81, 82; in the 
Tributary States of ChutiA Nigpur, 
xvii. 209, 210; in Miuibhi!im, xviL 
316, 317 ; in Cuttack, xviii. 104-107, 
231, 232 ; in Balasor, xviii. 291 ; in 
Puri, xix. 95. 

Land Law (Act X. of 1859), Operation 



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GENERAL INDEX, 



335 



of, in the 24 Parganis, i. 149, 157, 
189 ; in the Sundarbans, i. 337 ; in 
Nadiyd, ii. 70, 82, 116; in Jessor, ii. 
255. 273. 309 ; in Midnapur, iii. 108, 
163; in HiigH, iii. 343. 356, 383; 
in Baldwin, iv. 86, 147 ; in Bankura, 
iv. 266, 282 ; in Birbhum, iv. 362, 
371 ; in Dacca, v. 132, 133 ; in 
Bdkarganj, v. 227, 228 ; in Faridpur, 
V. 344; in Maimansinh, v. 466; in 
Chittagong, vi. 162, 179, 216; in Nod- 
khali, vi. 297, 298, 309, 315, 332; in 
Tipperah, vi. 395, 414, 432; in 
Maldah, vii. 89, no; in Rangpur, 
263, 280. 281, 282, 290, 323, 324, 327; 
in Dindjpur, vii. 395, 403, 404, 405, 
422 ; in Rijshdhi, viii. 72 ; in Bogra, 
viii. 247, 248 ; in Murshiddbid, ix. 
120, 130, 201 ; in Pabni, ix. 3x7, 320, 
321; in Patnd, xL 117, 188, i&p; in 
S4ran, xi. 295, 343, 344 ; in Gajri, xii. 
105, 126, 127 ; in Shihabid, xii. 240, 
248 ; in Tirhut, xiii. 169 ; in Champ4- 
ran, 282, 284, 298 ; in Bhdgalpur, xiv. 
240; in the Santdl Paxgan£, xiv. 341, 
342, 345. 363; »n Monghyr, xv. 117, 
158; in Purniah, xv. 340, 341, 397; in 
Haziiribdgh, xvi. 106, 135, 136, 177; in 
LohArda^, xvi. 397, 406, 470-473 ; in 
Singbhum, xvii. 117, 118; in Min- 
bhiim, xviL 337, 338, 356 ; in Cuttack, 
xviii. 109, no; in Balasor, xviii. 294, 
295. 

Land measures in the 24 Pargands, i. 
153; in Jessor, ii. 256; in Bdnkurd, 
iv. 250, 251 ; in the Chittagong Hill 
Tracts, vi. 77 ; in Chittagong, vi. 164, 
200 ; in NdUchdli, vi. 300 ; in Maldah, 
vii. 78; in Rangpur, viL 269-271 ; in 
Dinajpur, vii. 39I8 ; in Rdjshdhi, viii. 
68 ; in Bogrd, viii. 225, 226 ; in Mur- 
hiddbdd, ix. 113- 1 14.; in Pdbna, ix.s 
309; in Diijfling, x. 102; in Jalpaiguri, 
X. 279 ; in Kuch Behar, x. 387 ; in 
Patnd, xi. 122, 123 ; in Sdran, xi. 279, 
299 ; in Gayd, xii. 99, 100 ; in Shah- 
dbdd, xii. 245 ; in Tirhut, xiii. 1 10 ; in 
Champdran, xiii. 281, 312; in Bhd- 
galpur, xiv. 134; in the Santdl Par- 
gands, xiv. 344; in Mongh3rr, xv. 112; 
m Purniah, xv. 314, 315, 331-340 ; in 
Hazdribdgh, xvi. 1 1 1 ; in Lohdrdaed, 
xvi. 359-361 ; in Singbhum, xviii. 185. 
86; in the Tributary .States of Chutia 
^(dgpur, xvii. J77, J96, 241 ; in Mdn- 
bhum, xvii. 320; in Cuttack, xviii. 
117, 140; in Pur{, xix. loi. 

Land Reclamation in the 24 Pargands, i. 
36 ; in the Sundarbans, i. 327-335 ; in 
Jessor, ii. 183, 184 ; in Midnapur, iii. 



38 ; in Hugli, iii. 264, 265 ; in Bard- 
wdn, iv. 28; in Dacca, v. 25; in 
Bdkarganj, v. 1 71-174; in Faridpur, v. 
275 ; in Maimansinh, v. 289, 390 ; in 
the Chittagong Hill Tracts, vi. 28 ; in 
Chittagong, vi. 132 ; in Tipperah, vi. 
368 ; in Maldah, vii. 31 ; in Rangpur, 
vii. 170; in Dinajpur, vii. 366, J90; in 
Rajshdhi, viii. 30; in B<^ra, viii. 
235; in Murshidabdd, ix. 32, 103; in 
Darjiling, x. 30; in Kuch Behar, x. 
338. See also Marsh Cultivation, &c. 

Land, Rent of. See Rent. 

Land Revenue of the 24 Pargands, i. 18, 
183, 188; of Calcutta in 1717, i. 20; 
of the Sundarbans, i. 346 ; of Nadiya, 
ii. 115, 116; of Jessor, ii. 308; of 
Midnapur, under the Mughuls, iii. 18 ; 
under the English, iii. 157-163 ; (mode 
of collection, iii. 159, 160; cost of 
collection, iii. 160-162 ; arrears, iii. 
162); of HugH, iii. 378, 383; ofBard- 
wdn, iv. 144-146 ; (under the Muham- 
madans, iv. 138, 139); of Bdnkurd, iv. 
279-282 ; of Birbhum, iv. 395-400 ; of 
Dacca, under the Mughuls, v. 126 ; 
under the English, v. 130-132 ; of 
Bdkaiganj, v. 226 ; (mode of collect- 
ing, V. 226, 227); of Faridpur, v. 343 ; 
of Maimansinh, v. 465; of the Chitta- 
gong Hill Tracts, vi. 98; of Chittagong, 
vi. 155, 156, 214; of Nodkhdll, vi. 332; 
of Tipperah, vi. 428-430, 431; of Hill 
Tipperah, vi. 509, 510; of Maldah, vii. 
106- 1 10 ; of Rangpur, vii. 255-257, 
326, 327; of Dindjpur, vii. 415-422; of 
Rdjshdhi, viii. 97-99; of Boigrd, viii. 
280-282; of Murshiddbdd, ix. 116, 176, 
179, 192, 195-201, 232-236 ; of Pdbnd, 
ix. 353-355. 366-369; of Ddijiling, 
X. 179-182; of Jalpdiguri, x. 302- 
304; of Kuch Behar; x. 431, 434, 
435 ; of Patnd, xi. i86-i88; of Sdran, 
xi. 342, 343 ; of Gayd, xii. 125, 126 ; 
of Shdhdbdd, xiL 275; of Tirhut, 
xiii. 168 ; of Champdran, xiii. 298 ; 
of Bhd^lpur, xiv. 198, 199; of the 
Santdl Parguids, xiv. 362 ; of Mon- 
ghyr, XV. 156, 158; of Purniah, xv. 
387-396; of Haidribdgh, xvi. 176, 177; 
•of Lohdrdagd, xvd. 470-^72 ; of Sing- 
bhum, xvii. 117; of Mdnbhiim, xvu. 
354 ; of Cuttadc, xviii. 202, 203 ; of 
Balasor, xviii. 344-346 ; of Purl, xix. 

157. 
Land Revenue of Lower Bengal, under 

Muhammadan rule, i. 3^6-358. 
Land, Spare or Waste, in the 24 Paraands, 

i. 154; in the Sundarbans, i. 338, 339; 

in Nadiyd, ii. 81; in Jessor, ii. 258; in 



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336 



GENERAL INDEX, 



Midnapur, iii. 85 ; in Huglf, iii. 347 ; 
in Bazxlwdn, iv. 76; in Binkura, iv. 
251 ; in Dacca, v. 64, 96 ; in Bikar- 
gani, V. 159, 208; in Faridpur, v. 324; in 
Maimansinh, v. 447; in tne Chittagong 
Hill Tracts, vi. 77 ; in Chittagong, vi. 
164, 210,211; inNodkhili, vi. 301, 302; 
in Tipperah, vi. 404; in Maldah, vii. 79; 
in Rangpur, vii. 273; in Rajshdhi, viii. 
64-69 ; in Bogdi, viii. 226-228; in Mur- 
shid4b4d, ix. 115; in P4bnd, ix. 310; in 
Daijiling, x. 103, 104 ; in Jalpdi^rf, x, 



280 ; in Kuch Behar, x. 383, 387 ; in 
Patn^ xi. 124, 125 ; in Sdran, xi. 299, 
300; in Gayi, xii. 100; in Shihibid, xii. 
in Tirhut, xiii. 1 10; in Champdran, 247; 
xiii. 282; in the Santil Pai^n^, xiv. 
345; in Haziriba^h, xvi. 115-117, I35; 
in Lohirdagi, xvi. 362; in Singbhiim, 
xvii. 86; in the Tributary States of 
Chutii Ndgpur, xvii. 196; in Manbhiim, 
xvii. 320, 321 ; in Baiasor, xviii. 300, 
301. 

Land Tenures in the 24 Pargan&s, i. 261- 
281 ; in NadiyA, ii, 70-74 ; in Jessor, 
ii. 259-266 ; in Midnapur, iii. 348-3 M; 
in Hugll, iii. 348-3S3 ; in Bardwan, 
iv. 77-?5*; in Blnkura,.iV. 252-265 ; in 
Birbhtim, iv. 366-370; in Dacca, v. 
97-99 ; in Bikarganj, v. 365-379 ; in 
Faridpur, v. 324, 325; in- Maimansinh, 
V. 450-453 ; in the Chittagong Hill 
Tracts, vi. 77-82; in Chittagong, vi. 
116, 117, r56» 164-17^; in NoAkhali, 
vi. 247, 301, 302-313; in Tipperah, vi. 
399-41 »; in Hill Tipperah, vi. 503, 
$p5f' 506 ; ill Maldah,' vii. 79;85 ; in 
Rangpur,- vii. 274-284 ; in Dinajpur, 
^l 398-404 ; in RdjshiW, viii. 69-72 ; 
in B^eri, viii. 229-243 ; in Murshid- 
ib&d, IX. 1 1 5-123; in Pdbnd, ix. 310- 
316; in Dirjfling, x»< 104-122; in Jal- 
piiguH, X. 280-286; in Kuch Behar, 
X. 388-392; in PatnA, xi. 125-127, 
186^188 ; in Saran, xi. 300, 301 ; 
in Gayi, xii. 100-104; in Shihabid, 
xii. 245,- 246 ; in Tirhut, xiii. iio- 
112; in Champiran, xiii. 282, 283; in 
Bhigalpur, xiv. 135-149 ; in Mon- 
ghyr, XV. 1 14- 119; in Pumiah, xv. 315- 
331 ; in Hazdrib^h, xvi. 117-13 J; in 
Loh&rdadi, xvi. 362-405; in Singbnum, 
xviL 83, 86-94 ; in the Tributary States 
of Chutii Ndgpur, xvii. 211, 212, 250; 
in M4&bhdm,.xvii. 321-336; in Cuttack, 
xviiL 122-139; iil*Balasor, xviii. 301- 
320 ; in- Purl, xix. 101-135. See' also, 
for details, Tenures of land. 

Land, Varieties of. See Soils. 

Land, Waste. Sse Land, Spare« 



Landed estates, Number, size, &c., of, in 
the 24 Paiganis, i. 188 ; in Nadiya, ii. 
115, 116; m Jessor, ii. yA\ in Mid- 
napur, iii. 157 ; in Hiigli, iii. 378, 380; 
in Bardwdn, iv. 146, 147 ; in Bdnkura, 
iv. 279, 282 ; in Birbhum, iv. 400 ; 
in Dacca, v. 130, 131 ; in Bikarganj, 
V. 226, 367 ; in Fa^dpur, v. 343 ; in 
Maimansinh, v. 465 ; in the Chitta- 
gong Hill Tracts, vi. 98 ; in Chitta- 
gong, VL 214 ; in Noikhiili, vi. 332 ; 
m Tipperah, vL 429, 430; in Maldah, 
vii. 106, 1 10 ; in Rangpur, viL 252, 
275» 326, 327 ; in Dinajpur, vii. 422 ; 
in Rajshdhf, viii. 97, 98, 118-121 ; in 
Boeri, viii. 229-233, 302-304 ; in Mur- 
shiaibid, ix. 116, 121-123, 201, 232- 
236 ; in PAbnd, ix. 310, 353-355» 366- 
369; in Ddijfling, x. 182; in Jalpdiguri, 
^* 303-307 ; in Kuch Behar, x. 435 ; in 
Patna, xi. 287 ; in Saran, xi. 343 ; in 
Gayi, xii. 126 ; in Shdhdbdd, xii. 275 ; 
in Tirhut, xiiL 168 ; in Champdran, xiii. 
298 ; in Bhdgalpur, xiv. 201 ; in Mon- 
ghyr, XV. 158 ; in Pumiah, xv. 392 ; in 
HazAribagh, xvi 117-127, 197 ; in 
Lohdrda^ xvi. 362-389, 411; in Sing- 
bhiim, xvii. 117 : in Minbhum, xvii. 
354 ; in Cuttack, xviii. 202, 203 ; in 
Balasor, xviii. 344, 346 ; in Puri, xix. 

157. 

Landholders. See Landed Estates. 

Landholders, Absentee and Foreign. See 
Absentee. 

Landless labouring classes, in the 24 Par- 
eanAs, i. 154 ; in Nadiya, ii. 71 , in 
Jessor, ii. 257, 258 ; in HugH, iii. 347 ; 
m Bardwib, iv. 76 ; in B^kuri, iv. 
251 ; in Dacca, v. 9^, 96 ; in B^kar- 
eanj, V. 208 ; in Fuidpur, v. 324 ; in 
Maimansinh, v. 448 ; in the Chitta- 
gong Hill Tracts, vi. 77; in Chittagong, 
vi. 164; in Noikh&li, vi. 301; in Tip- 
perah, vi. 399 ; in Hill Tipperah, vi. 
504, 505; in Maldah, vii. 78; in Rang- 
pur, vii. 272; in Din&jpur, vii. 308; in 
RijshAhi, viii. 68, 69 ; in Bogra, viii. 
204, 205; in Murshidibid, ix. 97, up, 
114, 115; in Pibni, ix. 307, 309; in 
Ddrjfling, x. 103; in JalpiiguH, x. 279, 
280; in Kuch Behar, x. 385-387; in 
Patnd, xi. 123, 124; in Smn, xi. 299; 
in» Sh^ibdd, xii. 246^ 247 ; in Chun- 
piran, xiii. 281, 282; in the Santil 
Parganis, xiv. 344, 345; in Monghyr, 
XV. 112-114; in Haz4nb4gh, xvi. iii- 
11^; in Lohirdag^ xvi. 361, 362; in 
Manbhdm, xvii. 320; in Cuttack, xviii. 
117, 118. 

Landslips in Dirjiling, x. 29. 



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GENERAL INDEX. 



337 



Langar KMnd (Almshouse) at Dacca, v. 

149. 

Languages spoken by the Hill Tribes, of 
Chittagong, Hill T ipperah, &c., vi. 43, 
45. 53» 55, 57, 93, 100, 142, 143, 274. 
^76, 488, 489, 490, 491 ; in Murshid- 
ab^, ix. 216; bv the Pahiriis, xiv. 
302; in Lohdrdaga, xvi. 254, 255 ; by 
aboriginal tribes in Singbhum, xvii. 36, 
37, 60, 61, 69; by the people of Sing- 
bhiim, xvii. 136, 138, 139. 

Lanktharii range in Hill Tipperah, vi. 

474- 
Lapso hill, Singbhum, xvii. 20. 
Larka Kols. See Hos and Kols. 
Lashkarpur, pargand in Maldah, vii. 132, 

137. 
Laterite found in Midnapur and quarried 

for building purposes, iii. 39, 149 ; in 

Bard wan, iv. 22; in BAnku^ iv. d.56. 
Ldthast irrigating machines, in Patna, xi. 

29. See also Irrigation. 
Laukihi, thdnd in Tirhut, xiii. 34, 180. 
Laukik, or worldly Bdihmans, in Cuttack, 

xviii. 71 ; in Balasor, xviii. 272 ; in 

Puri, xix. 34-36. 
Laurels in Rangpur, vii. 177, 
Lauriy^, thdnd m Champaran, xiii. 234, 

3". 
Lauriyd, Navandgarh or Mathy&, village 

in Champiran, xiii. 254, 255. 
Lawrence ^iar, Nodkhili, vi. 251. 
Layddd range of hills, Singbhum, xvii. 

19. 
I^eases of land. See Tenures. 
Legendary history. See History, Early. 
Leguminosse, Species of, in Rangpur, vii. 

186. 
Lehri, village in Tirhut, xiii. 61. 
Lembdi, pargand in Puri, xix. 130, 172, 

173. 

Leopards. See Ferae Natura. 

Lepch^, an aboriginal tribe, x. 47-53, 
61. 

Lepers, Number of, in the 24 Parganils, i. 
44; in Nadiyi, ii. 38; in lessor, ii. 189; 
in Midnapur, iii. 44; in Husrli, iii. 276; 
in Bardwin, iv. 39; in Bankurii, iv. 
215; in Birbhum, iv. 326; in- Dacca, v. 
34; in Bikaiganj, v. 184; in Faridpur, 
v. 282 ; in Maimansinh, v. 395 ; in 
Chittagong, vi. 138; in Noikhfii, vi. 
270; in Tipperah, vi. 373; in Maldah, 
vii. 39 ; m Rangpur, vii. ^10 ; in 
Din^jpur, vii. 37;^, 442; in Rdjshihi, 
viii. 37 ; in Bogra, viii. 160 ; in Mur- 
shidibdd, ix. 42; in P&bni, be. 281; in 
Ddriiline, x. 44; in Jalpdiguri, x. 252; 
in Fatna, xi. 36; in Saran, xi. 242; in 
Gay4, xii. 32 ; in Shahabad, xii. 183 ; 



in Tirhut, xiii. 3^; in Champaran, xiii. 
235, 236; in Bhi^pur, xiv. 47; in the 
Santdl Parganas, xiv. 280; in Monghyr, 
XV. 50, 191-195; in Pumiah, xv. 245, 
435. 436$ ^^ Hazaribdgh, xvi. 58; in 
Singbhiim, xvii. 36; in Manbhum, xvii. 
273; in Cuttack, xviii. 67; in Balasor, 
xviii. 267 ; in Puri, xix. 30 ; in the 
Orissa Tributary States, xix. 208. 

Libraries, Public, in Midnapur, iii. 153 ; 
in HugH, iii. 376, 377 ; m Nodkhdll, 
vi. 329; in Rangpur, vii. 310; in 
Rajshdhi, viii. 91 ; in Bogrd, viii. 279, 
280; in Pdbni, ix. 352; in Kuch 
Behar, x. 360, 439. See also Institu- 
tions, &c. 

Life, Loss of, by drowning, in the 24 
Pargands, i. 33, 34; in the Sundar- 
bans, i. 299 ; in Jessor, ii. 182 ; in 
Midnapur, iii. 38; in Bdnkurd, iv. 
211 ; in Birbhum, iv. 318; in Dacca, 
V. 23 ; in Bakarganj, v. 170 ; in Farid- 
pur, V. 269; in Maimansinh, v. 388; 
in the Chittagong Hill Tracts, vi. 26; in 
Chittagong, vi. 127, 128 ; in Noikhdli, 
vi. 256; in Tipperah, vi. 366; in 
Maldah, vii. 27 ; in Rangpur, vii. 169; 
in Rijshdhi, viii. 28 ; in Murshiddbdd, 
ix. 29 ; in Pdbn4, ix. 273 ; in Ddrjil- 
ing, X. 29; in Jalpdigun, x. 236; in 
Patnd, xi. 25 ; in S£an, xi. 234 ; in 
Gayd, xii. 23 ; in Tirhut, xiii. 28 ; in 
the Santal Parganas, xiv. 270; in 
Monghyr, xv. 23 ; in Pumiah, xv. 233 ; 
in Lohardagi, xvi. 237 ; in the Tribu- 
tary States of Chutia Ndgpur, xvii. 
255 ; in Mdnbhdm, xvii. 258. 

Life, Loss of, by wild beasts and snake 
bite, in the 24 Pargands, i. 38 ; in the 
Sundarbans, i. 315 ; in Nadiyi, ii. 34 ; 
in Midnapur, iii. 39, 41 ; in Hugli, iii. 
266 ; in Bardwdn, iv. 29 ; in Bdnkuri, 
iv. 212; in Birbhum, iv. 322; in Bdkar- 
ganj, V. 177 ; in Faridpur, v. 277 ; in 
Maimansinh, v. 392 ; in the Chittagong 
Hill Tracts, vi. 34 ; in Chittagong, vi. 
133; in Noakhdll, vi. 259, 266; inTip- 
pendi, vi. 370 ; in Maldah, vii. 35 ; m 
Rangpur, vii. 197, 202; in'DinSpur, 
vii. 308 ; in Rdjshihi, viii. 31 ; in Mur- 
shidabdd, ix. 35; in Pdbni, ix. 278; 
in Jalpdiguri, x. 246 ; in Patnd, xi. 31, 
32 ; in Siran, xi. 238 ; in Gayd, xii. 
28 ; in Shdhibad, xii. 180 ; in Tirhut, 
xiii. 30; in the Santal Parganis, xiv. 
273 ; in Monghyr, xv. 197, 298 ; in 
Hazdribdgh, xvi. 41 ; in Lohardagi, 
xvi. 246; in Singbhum, xvii. 24; in 
the Tributary States of ChutiA Ni 
xvii. 191 ; in Manbhum, xvii 



Wagpur, 
. 268 ; in 



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338 



GENERAL INDEX, 



Cuttack, xviii. 59 ; in Puri, xix. 26 ; in 
the Orissa Tributary States, xix. 203. 

LiUjan, a river in Hazaribdgh, xvi. 37. 

Limbus, a sept of Nep&lis, in Ddrjfiing, 
X. 53» 57, 58, 61. 

Limestone, in Midnapur, iii. 39 ; in 
HiigH, iii. 372 ; in Bardwdn, iv. 132, 
133 ; in Binkuri, iv. 211 ; in Bfrbhiim, 
iv. 318, 321 ; in Murshidabid, ix. 21, 
34, 163, 164 ; in Pdbn4, ix. 335, 337, 
338; in DdrjUing, x. 31, i«-i57 J 
in Jalpiiguri, x. 239; in Hazaribdgh, 
xvi. 150, 151 ; in Loh&rdagd, xvi. 412. 

lime Ash {CMt\ formed by burning 
shells, lessor, ii. 184. 

Lines of Drainage in the 24 Pargands, i. 
36; in the Sundarbans, i. 304; in 
Jessor, ii. 170, 171 ; in Midnapur, 
iii. 39, 229, 230; in HugH, iii. 265, 
266 ; in Bardwdn, iv. 25 ; in Dacca, 
V. 26; in Bdkarganj, v. 172-174; in 
Faridpur, v. 276; in Maimansinh, v. 
390; in the Chittagong Hill Tracts, 
vi. 28, 20 ; in Chittagong, vi. 132 ; in 
Nodkhdli, vi. 258; m Tipperah, vi. 
368 ; in Hill Tipperah, vi. 477 ; in 
Maldah, vii. 31, 33 ; in Rangpur, vii. 
161, 170, 175 ; in Dinajpur, vii. 358, 
363; in Rijsnihi, viii. ^o; in Bogri, 
viii. 149 ; in Mui^iddbad, ix. 27, 33 ; 
in Pabnd, ix. 277 ; in Ddrjiling, x. 30, 
31 ; in Jalpaiguri, x. 238, 239 ; in 
Kuch Behar, x. 333, 334, 338; in 
Patnd, xi. 18, 31 ; in Siran, xi. 228, 
229, 237 ; in Cniyi, xii. 25 ; in Shah- 
abdd, xii. 168 ; in Tirhut, xiii. 29 ; in 
Champdran, xiii. 228 ; in Bhagalpur, 
*iv. 33, 34; in the Santdl Pargands, 
xiv. 270 ; in Hazdribagh, xvi. 35 ; in 
Lohdrdagd, xvi. 238, 239; in Mdn- 
bhum, xvii. 259 ; in Cuttack, xvii. 58. 

Linseed, Cultivation of, in Rdjshdhi, viii. 
60 ; in Bogrd, viii. 210 ; in Murs^idd- 
bad, ix. 104. 163, 164 ; in Pdbnd, ix. 
302, 337, 338. Aflf a/so Oilseeds. 

Lion Dynasty, The, in Orissa, xviii. 187. 

Litigation in Chittagong, vi. 155, 156, 
171, 172; in Nolkhdlf, vi. 328; in 
Hill Tipperah, vi. 471 ; in Patnd, xi. 
99 ; among the Kandhs, xix. 224. Ste 
also Courts. 

Little Bdghmdti river, xiii. 19, 24. 

Little Balan river, xiii. 25, 26, 27. 

Little Gandak river, xiii. 19, 22, 222, 
223 ; XV. 20, 21, 22. 

Little Ranjh river, x. 26. 

Living, Cost of. See Material Condition 
of the People. 

Lochan Mandil, market village in Dinaj- 
p\ir, vii. 447. 



Locusts. See Blights. 

Lokd kaerd, timl^r tree of the Sundar- 
bans, i. 307, 308. 

LcAdrSf or village blacksmiths. .Sar 
Castes. 

Lohdgard, seat of sugar manufacture in 
Jessor, ii. 296. 

Lohdghar, or Jafardbdd, pargand in Tip- 
perah, vi. 444. 

LohArdagA District (Vol. XVI.) — 
Geographical Situation, Area, and 
Headquarters, 231 ; Boundaries and 
Jurisdiction, 231, 232; General Asi>ect, 
232-234 ; Rivers, 235-237 ; Lakes and 
Marshes, 237 ; River Traffic, 237, 238 ; 
Fisheries, 238; Lines of Drainage, 238, 
239; Hot-Springs, 239; Waterfalls, 
239; Forests, 239-242; Jungle Pro- 
ducts, 242-245 ; Pasturage Grounds, 
245, 246; Fera Naiurce^ 246 J Esti- 
mates of Population, 246, 247 ; Census 
of 1872, its Agencies and Results, 247, 
248 ; Population according to Sex and 
Age, 248-251 ; Abstract of the Popula- 
tion in each Subdivision, 249; Ethnical 
Division of the People, 251-254; 
Aboriginal Tribes, 254-299; Emigra- 
tion and Immigration, 299, 308; 
Castes, 300-318 ; Religious Division 
of the People, 3 1 8, 319 ; Divbion of 
the People into Town and Country, 
319-323; Rdnchf Town, 320, 321; 
Dorandd, 321 ; Chutid, 321 ; Dalton- 
ganj, 321 ; Garwd, 322 ; Lohdrdagd, 
322 ; Jaganndthpur, 322 ; Doisd, 322 ; 
Tilmi, 322, 323; Fairs, 323, 324; 
Village Officials, 324-332; Village 
Disputes and Ordeals, 332-334; Ma- 
terial Condition of the People, 334, 
335; Clothing, 334; Dwellings, 334; 
Furniture, 334; Food, 335; Cost of 
Living, 335; Agriculture, 335*362; 
Soils, 335 ; Classes of Land, 336-338 ; 
Rice Cultivation, 338-340; Prepara- 
tions made from Rice, 340; Cereal 
Crops, 340 ; Green Crops, 341 ; Oil- 
Seeds, 341 ; Miscellaneous Crops, 341, 
342 ; Cotton, 342, 343 ; Tobacco, 343- 
346; Silk, 346-349; Dyes and Tanning, 
349, 350 ; Opium, 350-352 ; Tea, 352, 
353; Area, Out-turn of Crops, 353- 
355 ; Condition of the Peasantry, 355, 
356 ; Domestic Animals, 356 ; Agri- 
cultural Implements, 356, 357; Wages, 
and Prices, 357, 358; Weights and Mea- 
sures, 358-361 ; Diw Labourers, 361, 
362 ; Spare Land, 362 ; Land Tenures, 
362-405 ; Rates of Rent, Operation of 
Act X., 406 ; Rotation of Crops, 406, 
407 ; Manure, 407, 408 ; Irrigation, 



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GENERAL INDEX, 



339 



408; Natural Calamities, 408; Em- 
bankments, 409; Famines, 409; Fa- 
mine Warnings, 409-41 1 ; Foreign and 
Absentee Landlords, 411 ; Roads, 411, 
412 ; Mines and Quarries, 412 ; Coal, 
413-415; Manufactures, 415-420; Lac 
Trade, 416-420; Income of the Dis- 
trict and Income Tax, 420 ; Commerce 
and Trade, 420, 421 ; Capital and In- 
terest, 421-425 ; Missions and Mission- 
ary Schools, 423-444 ; Legendary His- 
tory of Chuti4 Nagpur Proper, 444- 
447 ; Relations of the Raj4s of Chuti^ 
Nagpur Proper with the Muhamma- 
dans, 447-450 ; Acquisition of the Dis- 
trict by the British, 450-454; Elarly 
History of Palimau, 454-470; Revenue 
and Expenditure, 470-472 ; Land Tax, 
470-472 ; Protection to Person and 
Propaty, 470-474; Rent Law, 470- 
473; Police Statistics, 473, 474; 
Criminal Statistics, 474-476 ; Jail Sta- 
tistics, 476-478; Educational Statistics, 
478-481 ; Postal Statistics, 481 ; Ad- 
ministrative Divisions, 482 ; Fiscal 
Divisions, 483 ; Medical Aspects, 483- 
487 ; Climate, 483, 484 ; Temperature, 
484; Rainfall, 484; Diseases, 484; 
Cattle Diseases, 484, 485; Vaccination, 
485 ; Vital Statistics, 485, 486 ; Sani- 
tation, 486, 487 ; Charitable Dispen- 
saries, 487. 

Lohdrdaga town, xvi. 322. 

Lohdwar, a hill in Hazaribdgh, xvi. 29. 

Lok, river in Dindjpur, vii. 360. 

Lokanpur, pargatid in Bhagalpur, xiv. 
154, 248. 

Lokmdnpur, thdnd in Bhagalpur, xiv. 
213. 237. 

Loknith Nandi, the first taminddr in 
Rangpur District who obtained a per- 
manent settlement, vii. 322, 323. 

Long Island, Cuttack, xviii. 27. 

Long-stemmed Rice, in the 24 Pargan^, 
i. 36 ; in the Sundarbans, i. 303 ; in 
Nadiya, iL 33 ; in Jessor, ii. 184, 241, 
242 ; in Midnapur, iii. 38, 39 ; in 
HiigH, iii. 329, 330 ; in Dacca, v. 25 ; 
in Bakai^nj, v. 171 ; in Faridpur, v. 
276; in Maimansinh, v. 390; in the 
Chittagong Hill Tracts, vi. 28; in 
Chittagong, vi. 132 ; in Noakhali, vi. 
258 ; in Tippcrah, vi. 368 ; in Maldah, 
vii. 32 ; in Rangi^ur, vii. 170 ; in 
Rdjshahi, viii. 30 ; in Bogra, viii. 149, 
209 ; in Murshidabad, ix. 32, 33, 102 ; 
in Pabnd, ix. 277 ; In Kuch Hehar, x. 
379-381 ; in Saran, xi. 236, 237 ; in 
Shahabad, xii. 168 ; in Tirhut, xiii. 28, 
29, 81 ; in Champaran, xiii. 228 ; in 



Bhdgalpur, xiv. 117; in the Santal 
Parganas, xiv. 270, 335; in Cuttack, 
xviii. 58; in Balasor, xviL 263. See 
aiso Rice. 

Loran river, xiv. 28. 

Loss of life by drowning, wild beasts, and 
snake-bite. See Life, Loss of. 

Lota, pir in Singbhum, xvii. 136. 

Low castes. See Castes. 

Lowdn, pargand in Tirhut, xiii. 193. 

Lugu, a hill in Haziribdghj xvi. 26. 

Lunatic Asylums, 24 Pargands, i. 256- 
2^9; Dacca, v. 148, 149; Murshida- 
bid, ix. 171, 249-251 ; Patnd, xi. 220, 
221. 

Lunatics, Number of. See Insanes. 

Lundra, tappd in Sarguja State, Chutia 
Ndgpur, xvii. 241. 

Ludun Tang peak in the Chittagong Hill 
Tracts, vi. 24. 

Ldrik, the ballad of, xiv. 87-89. 

Lushdis, a tribe of Toungthas, Customs, 
&c., of, vi. 49, 59-65 ; expedition 
apainst, vi. 20, 21, 470 ; language of, 
VI. 489, 490 ; number of, vi. 35, 482 ; 
raids by, vi. 19, 360, 468, 469. 

Lyall, Tas., and Co., silk firm in Mur- 
shiddbdd, be. 151. 

M 

Mabdrikpur, village in Maldah, vii. 140. 
Mdchhgdon Canal, Cuttack, xviii. 43, 

44. 
Mdchhgdon, rice mart in Cuttack, xviii. 

26, 27. 
Mdchhgdon port in Puri, xix. 22. 
Madad-mash land tenures. See Tenures 

of land. 
Madahpurd subdivision, Bhdgalpur, xiv. 

46, 126, 152, 153, 238. 
Madahpurd, town and (hdnd in Bhdgalpur, 

xiv. 46, 87, 213, 238. 
Madaks or Mayrds^ caste of confectioners, 

i. 64. See also Castes. 
Madakhdli, embankment in Midnapur, 

iii. 144. 
Madanganj, a suburb of Ndrdinganj, in 

Dacca, v. 23, 69. 
Madanganj, village in Dindjpur, vii. 365, 

41 3» 452. 
Madanmdld, village in Dindjpur, vii. 

36J. 
Madaran sarkdr^ i. 359, 360, 367-369. 
Madaran Havili mahai^ Sarkdr Maddran, 

i. 368. 
Mddari river, i. 34. 
Maddripur, subdivision of Bdkarganj, v. 

210, 244. 



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340 



GENERAL INDEX, 



Madiripur, trading town in Bikarganj, 

V. 201. 

Mad£urf, tappd in Saiguji State, Chuti^ 

N^pur, xvii.241. 
Mddhabnagar, thdnd in Hill Tipperah, 

vi. 517. 
Mddhabpur, market village in Dinijpur, 

vii. 437. 
NUdhiil, village in Dinijpur, vii. 464. 
Midhalkdti, market village in the 24 Par- 

eanis, i. 229. 
Maidhav Sen, Hindu King of Bengal, 

i.379. 
Madhepur, village-union and thdnd in 

Tirhut, xiii. 34, 49, 57, 180. 
Madhuban, fiscal division in the Santil 

Pargands, xiv. 377. 
Madhubani subdivision, Tirhut, xiiL 17, 

34, 105, 114, 178, 179, 180. 
Madhubani, town in Tirhut, xiii. 55 ; 

dispensary, xiii. 206, 207. 
Madhubani thdnd^ Champaran, xiii. 234, 

250. 
Madhumati river, eastern boundary of 

lessor, ii. 174-177. See also Haring- 

hata. 
Madhupur Jungles, in Dacca and Mai- 

mansmh, v. 19, 26, 3S4. 
Madhupur railway station, Santal Par- 

ganis, xiv. 352. 
Madhupur IGm, pargand in Cuttack, 

xviii. 228. 
Madhwil, tappd in Champiran, xiii. 272, 

276, 310. 
Madhwipur, village in Tirhut, xiii, 69, 

125. 
Madndbati, pargand in Dinijpur, vii. 

447. 
Msidnupur, township in NoakhAli, vi. 

285. 
MaddL, village in Hugli, with basket 

manufacture, iii. 373. 
Madras, Traffic between Orissa and, xix. 

152-155- 

MadrasaSf or Muhammadan schools, in 
Nadiyi, ii. ill; in HiigM, iii. 292-295; 
in Bard win, iv. 136. See also Educa- 
tional Statistics. 

Madresh^r, market village in Dinajpur, 
vii. 448. 

M^ig&rs a sept of Nepilis in Ddrjiling, 

X. 54, 55» o«- 

Ma^ parab festival, Singbhum, xvii. 
48-50. 

Maghs, immigrants from the Ar&kdn 
coast, in the 24 Paiganis, i. 50; in the 
Sundarbans, i. 319, 320; depredations 
of, in the Sundarbans, i. 382, 383 ; in 
Midnapur, iii. 38 ; in Dacca during the 
Mughul rule, v. 67, 74, 120, 121, 188; 



settlement of, in Bakai^anj, v. 188- 
190 ; in Rangpur, vii. 248, 308. 
Maghia or Mugui, fair in Jessor, iL 504, 

337. 

Maghya Doms, a predatory tribe in Tir- 
hut, xiii. 172; in Champaran, xiv. 247- 
249. 

Magiri festival in the Chittagong Hill 
Tracts, vi. 45, 46. 

Maglispur, market village in Dinajpur, 
vii. 452. 

Magnolise, Species of, in Rangpur, viL 
185. 

Magri or N4riyantal4 khdl^ 24 Parganas, 

i. 31. 

Magrah, trading village and railway sta- 
tion in HuglC iii. 3x2. 

Magdihat, produce mart and mission 
station in the 24 Pargand, i. 1 19, 228. 

Magura, one of the original 24 Paiganas, 
i. 20, 236, 364. 

Miguri subdivision, Jessor, ii. 318. 

MagudL town and seat of mat-making, 
&c., in Jessor, iL 21 1, 212 ; dispensary. 



11. 305- 
fahdbar. 



Mahdbar, range of hills in Haz^bigh, 

xvi. 28. 
Mahdbar Jirimo, hiU in Haz&ribagh, xvL 

26. 
Mahibbatpur, pargand in Tipperah, vi. 

445. 
Mahadebnagar, market village in the 24 

Paiganis, i. 229. 
Mahidebpur, market village in Dinijpur, 

vu. 365, 437, 443. 
Mahair, pargand in Gayi, xii. 143. 
MahdjanSf or village grain-merchants and 

monev-lenders, in Bardwan, iv. 66 ; in 

Bogra, viii. 202; in Murshidibdd, ix. 

97, 170 ; in Pabna, ix. 294, 304. See 

cUso Village Offidails and Condition of 

the Cultivators. 
Mahajan's-hdt, village in Chittagong, vi. 

190, 198. 
Mahal, pargand in Minbhdm, xvii. 368. 
Mahil4t Kharakpur. See Kharakpur. 
Mahdlldddrs. .^vMitabars. 
MahalSf revenue divisions of Bengal under 

the Muhammadans, i. 365. 
Mahimuni temple in the Chittagong Hill 

Tracts, vi. 45, io6. 
Mahimuri river. See MdtimurL 
Mahin, river in the Tributary States of 

Chutia Nigpur, xvii. 225, 226. 
Mahinadi river, xviii. 22-25, 3J, 36, 178; 

xix. 200, 201; estuaries, xviii. 25, 27. 
Mah^madi, village in Barambd State, 

Orissa, xix. 274. 
Mahanagar, pargand in Dinajpur, vii, 

447. 



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GENERAL INDEX, 



341 



Mahinanda river, vii. 22, 24, 28, 31, 91, 
359. 441; viii. 22, 23; X. 25, 225, 229; 
XV. 227, 229-231. 

Mahdpatn Brihmans in Bhigalpur, xiv. 

59,60- 
Mahdidj&y market village in Dinijpur, 

vii. A55. 
Mahdrajganj, village and police outpost in 

SAran, xi. 261, 262, 355, 356. 
Mahddgganj, mart in Patna, xi. 155, 

160. 
Mahirijganj, village in Bakarganj, v. 

170, 200; fair at, v. 216. 
Mahdrijpur railway station, Santdl Par- 

gands, xiv. 352. 
Mahisa, pargand in Din^jpur, vii. 439- 

442, 447. 
Mahdsinhpur, pargand in Dinajpur, vii. 



sthim Garh, a Muhammadan shrine, 

in Bogid, viii. 192-196. 
MdhatOf a village official in Lohirdag^ 

xvi. 325-327. 
Mahdtrdn land tenures. See Tenures of 

land. 
Mahivinyaka peak, in Cuttack, xviii. 22 ; 

ruins on, xviii. 96, 97. 
Mahddipur Zili Pdendibe^ Joar Kh^jurii, 

pargand in Tipperah, vi. 444. 
Mahendia, khdl in Noikhdli, vi. 250. 
Mahendrapur indigo factory, Pumiah, 

XV. 370. 
Miher hill, Gayd, xii. 19. 
Mahesbathin, market village in Dinijpur, 

vii. 443- 
Mahesh, suburb of Serampur in HugU, 

scene of festivals in honour of Jagan- 

nith, iii. 306, 323. 
Maheshkhili canal in Chittagong, vi: 192. 
Maheshrekhd, subdivision of Hi!igli, iii. 

275, 412. 
Mahespur municipality, Nadiy^ ii. 62. 
Mahespur, village in Maldah, vii. 131. 
Mahessi, village in Bhdgalpur, xiv. 95. 
Maheswarkund fair, lessor, ii. 304, 337. 
Mahidri, market vUlage in HuglC iii* 

37?. 
Mahichiil, pargand in Tipperah, vi. 444. 
Mahiganj, town and thdna in Rangpur, 

vii. 156, 225, 308, 318, 328, 344, 349; 

dispensary, viL 350, 351. 
Mahim, pargand in Tirhut, xiii. 193, 194. 
Mahild Zila Turki, pargand in Tirhut, 

xiii. 194. 
Mahinagar, pargand in Maldah, vii. 138. 
Mahinagar, pargand in Pumiah, xv. 301, 

338, 339, 426. 
Mahind, pargand in Tirhut, xiii. 194. 
Mahipdl, village in Dinajpur, vii. 44)8. 
Mahipur, town in Maldah, vii. 130. 



Mahisil, village in Dinijpur, vii. 448. 

Mahishidal maAal, Sarkdr Madimi, i. 
369, now a pargand in Midnapur, His- 
torical account of, iii. 206 ; fair, iii. 152. 

Mahmud Taki's hdi in Chitta^mg, vi. 
198. 

Mahmddibdd sarkdr^ ancient division of 
Bengal, i. 359, 360, wa. 

Mahmudpur, market vulage in Dinijpur, 
vii. 452. 

Mahmudshdhf, pargand in Jessor, i. 372 ; 
U. 3Z1. 

Mahothi, village-union in Tirhut, xiii. 49. 

Mahri, tappd in Saxg^jd State, ChuHd 
Niepur, xviL 241. 

MdAnr fishing in HUl Tipperah, vi. 480. 

Mahui, village and thdnd m Tirhut, xiii. 

34, 73, 74- 
Mahud tree, its uses for food, in Haz&ri- 

bdgh, xvi. 48, 49, 94 ; in Lohiurdagi, 

xvi. 243, 244,410,411. 
MahdLsarhi range, SantiU Parganis, xiv. 

267. 
Mihuda, hill in Haziribigh, xvi. 26. 
M^udi, hill in Hazdrib^h, xvi. 26. 
M&hur, village in Dinijpur, vii. 454. 
Mahurig^n, river port in Balasor, xviii. 

261, 262. 
Mdicharpur, police outpost in Angul State, 

Orissa, xix. 264. 
Mdidinmal, one of the original 24 Par- 

ganAs, i. 20, 236, 237, 364. 
Maidapur, the old Civil Station of Mnr- 

shidab^, ix. 76. 
Miihditi or Maihdtf, fiscal division in the 

24 Parganas, i. 237, 364. 
Miijchar Matud, town^ip in Noikhilf, 

vi. 285. 
Mdilakcherral river in Hill Tipperah, vi. 

475- 
Maimansinh District (Vol. V.) — 
Geographical Situation, Area, Head- 
quarters, Boundaries, 383; General 
Aspect, 384; Mountains, &c., 385; 
Rivers, 3^5-387 ; Ferries, 387 ; Lakes, 
Marshes, &c., River Traffic, 388; Fish- 
eries and Marsh Cultivation, 389; Mine- 
rals and Jungle Products, 390; Fera 
Naiura, 391 ; Estimates of Population 
previous to 1872, 392; Census of 1872, 
Its Agencies and Results, 392-401 ; 
Population according to Sex and Age, 
394, 395; according to Occupation, 
395-398; Ethnical Division of the 
People, 398-401 ; Aboriginal Tribes, 
401 ; Castes, 402-408 ; Religious Divi- 
sion of the People, 408-410; Towns, 
Villages, &c., 410-418 ; Material Con- 
dition of the People, 418; Agriculture, 
419-457; Jute, Cultivation and Trade, 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



342 



GENERAL INDEX. 



421-441; Area, Out-tum of Crops, 
&c., 441-443 ; Size of Holdings, Do- 
mestic Animals, 443 ; Agricultural Im- 
plements, and Wages and Prices, 444 ; 
Weights and Mersures, 445-448; Day- 
labourers, 448; Tenures oi; Land, 448- 
453 ; Village Officials, 453 ; Rates of 
Rent, 453-456 ; Manure, Irrigation, 
&c., 456 ; Natural Calamities, 457 ; 
Foreign and Absentee Landlords, 
Roads, &c., 458; Manufactures, 459, 
460 ; Commerce and Trade, 461 ; In- 
comes and Income-tax, 462 ; Adminis- 
tration, 462-479; Revenue and Ex- 
penditure, 462-464; Land-tax, 465; 
Courts and Land-Law, 465, 466; Police 
Statistics, 466-468; Criminal Classes, 
468; Jail Statistics, 468-471; Edu- 
cational Statistics, 471-477; Fiscal 
Divisions, 477-479; Climate, Medical 
Aspects, Conservancy, &c., 479; Chari- 
table Dispensaries., 480, 481. 

Maimansinh sub-division, v. 474, 475. 

Maimansinh, or Nasfr&bid, town and 
municipality, with schools, dispensary, 
&c.,v. 411, 481. 

Maimunthpur, ^r^if^ in Rangpur, vii. 
161, 253, 288. 

Mainibid, village in Barambi State, 
Orissa, xix. 274. 

Mainichaura, pargand in Midnapur, iii. 
20, 207. 

Main&nagar, indigo factory in Pumiah, 
XV. 370. 

Mainipur fair in Bardwdn, iv. 67. 

Maintenance or khairdt land tenures. 
See Tenures of land. 

Maipird, river in Cuttack, xviii. 23, 25, 

33. 

Mait Bhdnia, township in Noakhdli, vi. 
286. 

Maithild Br&hmans in Bhigalpur, xiv. 
55> 56. See also Brdhmans. 

Maizanid{, pargand in Tipperah, vi. 444. 

Majhawa, pargand in Cnampdran, xiii. 
309* 310. 

Majhianwdn, thdnd in Gayd, xii. 142. 

Mdjir, village in Dinajpur, vii. 451. 

Majkurl land tenures. See Tenures of 
land. 

Mdjnamutti, pargand in Midnapur, His- 
torical account of, iii. 208, 209; em- 
bankment, iii. 142, 143. 

Majnu Shih, a noted dakdit in Rangpur, 
vii. 159. 

Majorganj or Malldi, village in Tirhut, 
xiii. 69, 125. 

Majudkhilf, khdl in Jessor, ii. 180. 

Makdir, pargand in Saran, xi. 303, 358, 
359. 



Makdra Sankrdnti, great festival at 

Tribeni in Hugli, iii. 322. 
Makarabpur, pargand in Tirhut, xiii. 194. 
Maker, village in Sdrao, xi. 258. 
Makir Khds, village in Sdran, xi. 359. 
Makld, manufacturing village in Hugli, 

iii. 373. 

Makrain, pargand in Maldah, vii. 138. 

Maksudpur, village in Dindjpur, viL 443. 

Maktabs^ or Muhammadan vOlape schools 
in Birbhum, iv. 418, 419; in Chitta- 
p;o&g, vi. 220; in Nodkhdlf, vi. 340: 
m Rangpur, vii. 342. See aUo Educa- 
tional Statistics. 

Mdls^ caste of snake-charmers, i. 70. 
See also Castes. 

Mdl gumdsktds or landowners' villa^^e 
bailiffs in Bardwdn, iv. 65 ; in Bankura, 
iv. 239, 240. ^ft'o/j^ Village Officials. 

Mai Pahdrids, a tribe of Pahdrias, q.v, 

Mdlds, caste of boatmen, i. 69. See also 
Castes. 

Mdlairs. See Pahdrias. 

Mdlanchd estuary, mouth of the Kabadak, 
i. 27, 28, 295. 

Mdlanchd. village, with trade in firewood 
on the Bidyddhdri, in the 24 Paigands, 

>. 34- 
Maldngd, thdnd in Rangpur, vii. 328, 

344. 

McUangiSt salt manufacturers, i. 289, 
388; ii. 301. 

Malarious Fever. See Diseases. 

Malaur, /6^i/ in Jessor, ii. 179. 

Maldyagiri pe^k, Orissa Tributary States, 
xix. 199, 309. 

Maldah District (Vol. VII.) — 

Geographical Situation, Area, and 
Headquarters, 17, 18 ; Boundaries, 18 ; 
Changes of Jurisdiction and brief His- 
torical Sketch, 18, 19 ; General Aspect 
of the District, 20-22 ; River System, 
22-27 ; Marshes, Artificial Water- 
courses, &c., 27 ; River Traffic, 27, 28 ; 
Utilisation of Water Supply, 28, 29 ; 
Fisheries and Fishing Communities, 
29* 30 ; Fishes and Modes of Fishing, 
30, 31 ; Embankments, 31 ; Marsn 
and Jungle Products, 31-34; Fertt 
Naturay 34-36; Population, Early 
Attempts at Enumeration, 36 ; Census 
of 1872, Classification according to 
Sex, Religion, and Age, 37-39 J 
Infirms, 39, 40; Ethnical Division oi 
the People, 40, 41 ; Emigration and 
Immigration, 41 ; Tabular Ethnical 
Classification, 42-44; List of Hindu 
Castes, 44-46 ; Reli^ous Division oi 
the People, 46-48 ; Division into Town 
and Countr}% 48 ; List of Towns and 



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GENERAL INDEX, 



343 



Places of Historical Importance, 48-65; 
English B^r, or Angrazibad, 48, 49 ; 
MaTdah, or Old Maldah Town, 49-51 ; 
Early History of Gaur, 51-53; De- 
scription of the Ruins, 53-59 ; History 
of Panduah, 59, 60 ; the Ruins, 60-64 ; 
T4nd^, 64, 65 ; Village Officials, 65- 
67 ; Fairs and Religious Gatherings, 
67, 68 ; Material Condition of tne 
People, 68, 69 ; Dwellings and Furni- 
ture, 69; Food, 69, 70; Agriculture, 
Rice, 70-72 ; Other Cereal Crops, 72 ; 
Green Crops, 72; Fibres and Mis- 
cellaneous Crops, 72, 73 ; Area and 
Out-turn of Crops, 73, 74 ; Position of 
the Cultivators, 74, 75; Domestic 
Animals, 75 ; Agricultural Imple- 
ments, 75, 76; Wages and Prices of 
Produce, 76, 77 ; Weights and Mea- 
sures, 78 ; Landless Labouring Classes, 
78, 79 ; Spare Land, 79 ; Land 
Tenures, 79-85 ; Rates of Rent, 85-89 ; 
Manure and Irrigation, 90; Fallows 
and Rotation of Crops, 90; Natural 
Calamities, Blights, 90; Floods and 
Droughts, 90-92 ; Compensating Influ- 
ences, 92 ; Famine of 1865-&, 92 ; 
Scarcity in 1873-74, 92 ; Famine Pro- 
spects, 92, 93 ; Foreign and Absentee 
Landlords, 93 ; Roads and Means of 
Communication, 93, 94; Manufacture 
of 6ilk and Silk Fabrics, 94-98 ; Manu- 
facture of Indigo, 98, 99 ; Indigo Con- 
cerns, 99; Condition of the Manu- 
facturing Classes, 99, loo ; Commerce 
and Trade, Exports and Imports, 100- 
102; River Trade Statistics, 102-104; 
Capital and Interest, 104, 105 ; In- 
comes and Income-Tax, 105 ; Revenue 
and Expenditure, 105, ig6; Land 
Revenue, 106; Gross Balance Sheet 
for 1832-33, 107; for 1850-51, 108; 
for 1870-71, 109; Rent Cases, no; 
Number of Courts, 1 10 ; Police Statis- 
tics, I10-I12; Criminal Cases, 112- 
115; Jail Statistics, 1 15- 1 18; Educa- 
tional Statistics, 1 18-124; Postal 
Statistics, 124, 125; List of Thdnds, 
126; Fiscal Divisions, or Pargands^ 
126-145; Medical Aspects and Meteoro- 
logy. »45» >46; Diseases, 146-150; 
Indigenous Drugs, 150; Native Prac- 
titioners, 150-152; Charitable Dis- 
pensaries, 152; Vital Statistics, 152. 
Maldah, or Old Maldah town, vii. 25, 
49,88, loi, 103, no, 117, 140, 148, 

149- 
Maldah, pargand in Mon^hyr, xv. 183. 
Maldah, pargtind in Patna, xi. 209. 
Maldehi clotns. See Silk. 



Maldawir, /ar^a»^f in Pumiah, xv. 301, 
339. 426, 427. 

Maldwir, pargand in Dindjpur, vii. 448. 

Males, Proportion of, in the population, 
in the 24 Parganas, i. 44, 45; in 
Nadiya, ii. 38; in Jessor, ii. 89; in 
Midnapur, iii. 44 ; in Hugl{, iii. 273 ; 
in Bard win, iv. 38; in Bdnkuri, iv. 
213 ; in B(rbhi!im, iv. 324 ; in Dacca, 
V. 34 ; in Bakarganj, v. 182 ; in Farid- 
pur, V. 280 ; in Maimansinh, v. 394 ; in 
the Chittagong Hill Tracts, vi. 36, 37 ; 
in Chittagong, vi. 137, 138, 147, 14^, 
151 ; in Noakhili, vi. 269-271 ; in 
Tipperah, vi. 372, 373 ; in Hill Tip- 
perah, vi. 480 ; in Maldah, vii. 37, 38 ; 
in Rangpur, vii. 208-210 ; in Dinijpur, 
vii. 370-373 ; in Rijshihf, viiL 36 ; in 
Bogra, viii. 159, 160; in Murshid&bdd, 
ix. 38-41 ; in Pibni, ix. 279-281 ; in 
Ddijiling, X. 41-43 ; in JalpAigurl, x. 
247-249; in Kuch Behar, x. 340; in 
Patni, xi. 36 ; in Siran, xi. 240, 242, 
243; in Gayi, xii. 30; in Shihibad, 
xii. 1 81 -1 83; in Tirhut, xiii. 35; in 
Champ&ran, xiii. 233-235 ; in Bhigal- 
pur, XIV. 47 ; in the Santdl Parganis, 
xiv. 278, 279 ; in Monghyr, xv. 49 ; in 
Pumiah, xv. 245 ; in Hazaribagh, xvi. 
55-58 ; in Lohirdagd, xvi. 248-251 ; in 
Singbhiim, xvii. 34, 35 ; in the Tribu- 
tary States of Chutii Nagpur, xvii. 153- 
156; in Minbhiim, xvii. 270-272; in 
Cuttack, xviii. 64-66 ; in-Balasor, xviii. 
266, 267 ; in Puri, xix. 27-30 ; in the 
Orissa Tributary States, xix. 205-208. 

Malhati, town in the Santil Pargands, 
xiv. 322. 

Mdlisy caste of gardeners in the 24 Par- 
ganis, i. 62 ; in Bardwdn, iv. 66 ; in 
Bankurd, iv. 214; in Birbhum, iv. 
344; in Rajshahi, viii. 38, 45; in 
Bogr4, viii. 166, 175 ; in Murshiddbad, 
U. 44, 50 ; in Pabna, ix. 283, 287. See 
also Castes. 

Maliddngd Hdt, village in Dinajpur, vii. 

443; 
Maligaon, pargand in Dinajpur, vii. 448. 
Mdlijol, canal in Dinajpur, vii. 364 ; 

marsli, vii. 361. 
Mdlik-ul-tujjar, title of salt monopolist 

under the Muhammadans, i. 389. 
Mdlikdnat system of land tenures in 

Patna, xi. 186, 188, 189. See also 

Tenures. 
Malikpur, pargand in Sarkdr Khalifat - 

dbad, i. 373. 
Malinagar, village in Tirhut, xiii. 63. 
Maljhatd mahal^ i. 371, 386. 
Maiki, pargand in Monghyr, xv; 183. 



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GENERAL INDEX, 



Mallalipur, village in Monghyr, School at, 
XV. 172. 

Mallai, or Majoi^;anj, or Halakhaurd, 
village in Tirhut, xiii. 69, 125. 

Malliipur, village in Dindjpur, vii. 451. 

Mallarpur, pargand in Birbhi^m, iv. 430. 

Mallikpur, village in DinAjpiir, vii. 445. 

Malnigopal, /ar^ffi in Bhig^pur, xiv. 
I5S» 248. 

Malnapahir in Mongh3nr, Hot springs at, 
XV. 77, 78. 

Malraceae, Species of, in Rangpur, vii. 
184, 185. 

M41ud, pargand in Pun, xix. 172, 173. 

Mamii, viDage in Monghyr, xv. 171, 
172. 

Mammalia. See Fera Natura, 

Man, marsh in Dinajpur, vii. 438. 

Man, river in Monghyr, xv. 20-22. 

Mdn^ bil in Dinijpur, vii. 454. 

Manis, fiscal division in the Santal Par- 
ganas, xiv. 378. 

Minis river, vii. 166, 168 ; viii. 135, 136, 
140. 

Manasi, goddess of snakes, special 
object of worship in Bakarganj, v. 
196. 

Manbizir, town in Manbhdm, xvii. 297. 

MAnbh(Jm District (Vol. XVII.)— 
Geographical Situation, Area, and 
Headquarters, 253; Boundaries and 
Jurisdiction, 253, 254; General Aspect, 
254-256 ; Hills, 256 ; Rivers, 256-258 ; 
River Traffic, 258, 259; Drainage, 
259; Minerals, 259, 260; Forests, 
260-264 ; Jungle Products, 264, 265 ; 
Pasture Grounds, 265, 266; Fera 
Natura^ 266-268; Population, Early 
Estimates, 268, 269 ; Census of 1872, 
its Agency and Results, 269, 270; 
Population according to Sex and Age, 
270-272; Infirms, 272, 273; Ethnical 
Division of the People, 273-277 ; 
Aboriginal Tribes, 278-288 ; Immigra- 
tion and Emigration, 288-290 ; Hindu 
Castes, 290-295 ; Semi-Hinduised 
Aborigines, 295, 296; Religous Divi- 
sions of the People, 296 ; Division of 
the People into Town and Country, 
296, 297; PuruHi, 297; Fairs, 297, 
298 ; Ruins of Jain Temples at Palmi 
and Budhpur, 298-302; Ruins at 
Dilmi, 302-304 ; Ruined Palace of the 
Pinchet Rijis, 304 ; Village Officials 
and Institutions, 305-307 ; Material 
Condition of the People, Clothing, 
Houses, Furniture, Food, Amusements, 
&c., 307-309; Agriculture, List of 
Crops, 309-310 ; Rice Cuhivation, 310- 
313 ; Pulses, Green Crops, and Oil- 



seeds, 313 ; Fibres, Tobacco, and 
Tasar Silk, 314, 315 ; Cultivated Area, 
Out-turn of Crops, &c., 316, 317; 
Condition of the Peasantry, 317; 
Domestic Animals, 317, 31S ; Agricul- 
tural Implements, 318 ; Wages and 
Prices, 318, 319; Weights and Mea- 
sures, 319, 320 ; Landless Day- 
Labourers, 320; Spare Land, 320, 
321 ; Land Tenures held direct from 
Government, 321-326; Tenures held 
by Middlemen, 326-331 ; Sub-tenures, 
33 1 ♦ 332; Cultivating and Rent-free 
Tenures^ 332, 333 ; Service Tenures, 
333-335; Maintenance Tenures, 335, 
336 ; Rates of Rent, 336, 337 ; Opera- 
tion of the Rent Law, 337, 338 ; Roto- 
tion of Crops, 338 ; Manure and Irriga- 
tion, 338, 339; Natural Calamities, 
339; the Famine of 1866, 340-346; 
Famine Warnings, 346, 347 ; Roads, 
347 ; Coal-mines, 347-351 ; Manufac- 
tures, 351, 352; Commerce, 352; 
Capital and Interest, 352; Adminis- 
trative History, 353; Revenue and 
Expenditure, 353, 354; Land Revenue, 
354; Balance-Sheet for 1870-71, 355; 
Civil and Criminal Courts, 354-356; 
Rent Suits, 356; Police Statistics, 
356-359 ; Criminal Statistics, 359, 360 ; 
Jail Statistics, 360-362; Educational 
Statistics, 362-365; Postal Statistics 
365 ; Administrative Divisions, 366, 
367 ; Fiscal Divisions, 367-370 ; 
Climate, Temperature, and Rainfall, 
370; Endemics and Epidemics, 370; 
Fairs as Causes of Disease, 370, 371 ; 
Native Doctors, 3*71 ; Vaccination, 
371, 372; Vital Statistics, 372, 373; 
General Conservancy, Town Sanito- 
tion, &c, 373; Charitable Dispen- 
saries, 373, 374, 

Minbhum/ar^a»<i, xviL 368. 

Mandals^ or village heads, in the 24 Par- 
p^anis, i. 124-127 ; m Bardw^ iv. 65 ; 
m Binkuri, iv. 241, 242; in Bfrbhdm, 
iv. 343, 344 \ in Maldah, vii. 65 ; in 
Dinijpur, vii. 369, 385, 386, 388; 
in Bogri, viii. 199, 200; in Mur^id- 
ibid, ix. QJ, 96, 121 ; in Pibna, ix. 
298 ; in Dirjiling, x. 72; in Bhigalpur, 
xiv. 108, 109; in Pumiah, xv. 272. 
See also Village Officials. 

Mandalghit mahal, Sarkdr Madinin, i. 

369. 
Mandan, tappd in Champiran, xiv. 272, 

277, 3«o- 

Mandargirf, a sacred mountain in Bhigal- 
pur, xiv. 95-102. 

Maner, pargand in Patni, xi. 207. 



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GENERAL INDEX. 



345 



Maner, town and thdnd in Patna, xi. 35, 

66, 90, 191, 206. 
Mangalbari, town in Maldah* vii. 140. 
Mangalbdri, village in Dindjpur, vii. 439, 

451, 455- 
Mangalkot, village and thdnd in Bard- 

wan, iv. 64. 
MangaHf an irregular cess, vii. 405. See 

also Abw&bs. 
Manganpur, town in Maldah, vii. 137. 
Mangarpur, tappd in Sarguji State, 

Chutia N^ur, xvii. 241. 
Mang&rs, a sept of Nepilis in Dirjiling, 

X. S3. 

Mdnghi Khis, police station in Siran, xi. 

359. 
Mangoes. 5^*^ Fruits. 
Manmiri, fiscal division in the Santil 

Paigands, xiv. 377. 
Manihirf, tkdnd in Pumiah, xv. 244, 398, 

415- 
Minikcharf, market village in the Chitta- 

gong Hill Tracts, vi. §4, 203 ; school, 

vi. 99, 100. 
Miniker, pargand in Dindjpur, vii. 439- 

442. 
Mdnikganj, sub-division of Dacca, v. 139. 
Mdnikgani, municipality in Dacca, with 

large bazdr, v. 61, 62, 69, 70 ; fair, v. 

114; dispensary, v. 153. 
Mdnikgodi kild. Pud, xix. 183. 
Miniktald, market village in the 24 Par- 

ganis, i. 235. 
Manikpatna, pargand in Puri, xix. 130, 

172, 173. 

Manipuns, frontier hill tribe, settled in 

Dacca, v. 41, 42; in Hill Tipperah, 

vi. ii9i. 
Manirsmfipur, fishing village on the Htigli, 

with school, 24 Parganis, i. 35, 206. 
Manirdmpur, market village in Jessor, ii. 

206, 295. 
Manis Crassicaudata, Habits of the, xvii. 

266-268. 
Mdnjhi, villa£;e in Sdran, xi. 257, 357. 
Manjhaul indigo factory, Monghyr, xv. 

138,139. 
Mdnjhi, pargand in Saran, xi. 303, 304, 



359. 
M&jhL 



njhi, town and thdnd in Siran, xi. 
228, 23s, 240, 241, 257, 293, 344. 

Manjhisy a boating caste. See Castes. 

Manjhis or village heads, in the Santdl 
Parganis, xiv. 329, 330. See also Vil- 
lage Officials. 

Mdnjhijots, or holdings of Santalf head- 
men, iv. 367. 

Manjhui, fiscal division in the Santil 
Pargands, xiv. 378. 

Manjia hill in Bankura, iv. 207. 



Mdnjikd^ a cultivating tenure, in Haza- 
ribdgh, xvi. 123, 124; in Lohardagd, 
xvi. 377, 378. See also Tenures of 
land. 

Mdnjurf, pargand in Balasor, xviii. 364. 

Mdnjurf, pargand in Cuttack, xviii. 228. 

MdnklSf divisional head-men in Sing- 
bhdm, xvii. 74-76, 87, 114, 118, 119, 
135 : in Mdnbhdm, xvii. 326. 

M&nkur, village and thdnd in Bardwdn, 
iv. 65 ; fair, iv. 67, 134. 

Manondi, pargand in Gayd, xii. 145. 

Manpur, one of the original 24 Parganis, 
i. 20, 21. 

Minpur, tappd in Champdran, xiii. 272, 

277. 
Manpur Chaudand, tappd in Champdran, 

xiii. 310. 
Manrdth, village in Sdran, xi. 353. 
Mdnsurgani. mart in Patnd, xi. 155, 160. 
MansurTAli Khdn, the present Nawdb of 

Murshiddbdd, ix. 195. 
Idnlir, vi" 

xix. 260. 



Mdnlir, village in Morbhanj State, Orissa, 



5. 

}hanj { 



Mantreswar, village and police station in 
Bardwdn, iv. 64. 

Manu, river in Hill Tipperah, vi. 475. 

Manufactures of the 24 Pargands, i. 170, 
171, 140-143, 145, 146; of Nadiyd, ii. 
94-104; of Jessor, ii. 280-301 ; ofMid- 
napur, iii. 149-152; of Hi!ig]i, iii. 372- 
375 ; of Bardwdn, iv. 133, 134 ; of 
Bdnkurd, iv. 276, 277 ; of Bfrbhiim, 
iv. 374. 380; of Dacca, v. 109-113; of 
Bdkarganj, v. 215 ; of Faridpur, v. 334- 
339 ; of Maimansinh, v. 459, 460 ; of 
the Chittagong Hill Tracts, vi. 83 ; of 
Chittagong, vi. 187, 188; of Nodkhdli, 
vi. 320, 321; of Tipperah, vi. 418, 419; 
of Maldah, vii. 94 ; of Rangpur, vii. 
304-306 ; of Dindjpur, vii. 410, 411 ; 
of Rdjshdhl, viii. 82-87 » o^ Bogid, viii. 
269-271 ; of Murshiddbdd, ix. 14JS-154; 
of Pdbnd, ix. 330-333 ; of Ddijfling, x. 
158; of Jalpaiguil, X. 297; of Kuch 
Behar, x, 397, 398 ; of Patnd, xi. 137- 
154; of Sdran, xi. 317-320 ; ofGayd, 
xii. 113-117; of Shdhdbdd, xii. 257- 
263; of Tirhut, xiii. 126-129; of Cham- 
pdran, xiii. 289, 290; of Bhdgalpur, 
xiv. 180, 181 ; of the Santdl Pargands, 
»v. 354 ; of Monghyr, xv. 137-139; of 
Pumiah, xv. 354-371 ; of Hazdrib&gh, 
xvi. 170; ofLiohdrdagd, xvi. 415-420; 
of Singbhdm, xvii. 105 ; of the Tribu- 
tary States of Chutia Ndgpur, xvii. 
242 ; of Mdnbhum, xvii. 351, 352 ; of 
Cuttack, xviii. 174, 175 ; of Balasor. 
xviii. 326, 327 ; of Puri, xix. 151, 152, 

ManufiEicturing Classes, Condition of the. 



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GENERAL INDEX, 



in the 24 Pargands, i. 171 ; in Nadiyd, 
ii. 102 ; in Jessor,- ii. 301, 302 ; in 
Midnapur, iii. 149, 150; in Hiigli, iii. 
373; iii Bankura, iv. 276; in Birbhum, 
iv. 380; -in Dacca, v. 112, 113; in 
Bdkarganj, v. 215 ; in Faridpur, v. 
339; in Malmansinh, v. 460; in Chitta- 
pong, vi. 188; in Maldah, vii. 99, 100; 
in Rangpur, vii. 306, 307; in Rdjshihi, 
viii. 87, 88 ; in Murshidabdd, ix. 154- 
156; in Pabna, ix. 333, 334; in Sing- 
bhum, xvii. 105; in Ddrjiling, x. 158; 
in Tirhut, xiii. 127 ; in Pumiah, xv. 

355, 357, 358. 

Manures -used in the 24 Parganas, i. 157, 
158; in Nadiyd, ii. 83; in Jessor, 
ii. 273; in Midnapur, iii. 113; in 
Hi^li, iii. 375 ; in Bardwan, iv. 92 ; 
in Binkuri, iv. 269 ; in Birbhum, iv. 
371 ; in Dacca, v. 102 ; in Bakarganj, 
V. 211 ; in Fandpur, v. 329; in Mai- 
mansinh, v. 456; in the Chittagong 
Hill Tracts, vi. 82 ; in Chittagong, vi. 
183, 184; in Noikhdli, vi. 291, 294, 
297, 316; in Tipperah, vi. 414, 415; 
in Hill Tipperah, vi. 506, 507 ; in 
Maldah, vii. 90; in Kangpur, vii. 
291, 292 ; in Dinajpui, vii. 405, 408 ; 
in R&j^^i, viii. 61, 78 ; in Murshid- 
dbid, ix. 130 ; in Pdbna, ix. 304* 325 ; 
in Ddijfling, x. 124 ; in Jalpaigun, x^ 
292 ; in Kuch Behar, x. 394 ; in Patnd, 
XL 128, 129; in S4ran, xi. 305; in 
Gay^ xii. 105; in Shihdbid, xii. 248, 
249; in Tirhut, xiii. 88, 100, 115; in 
Champdran, xiii. 284; in the Santil 
Pargands, xiv. 345; in Hazdrib^h, 
xvi. 136 ; in Lohirdagd, xvi. 407, 408; 
in Singbhum, xvii. 94, 95; in the 
Tributwy States of Chutii Ndgpur, 
xvii. 212; in Minbhum, xvii. 338, 
339; in Cuttack, xviii. 146; in Balasor, 
xviii. 322 ; in Purl, xix. 137. 

Maps, Old Portuguese and Dutch, and 
Rennel's, i. 373-379, 383-385- 

Madi nodi in Dindjpur, vii. 363. 

Mard Hiran, river in Pumiah, xv. 227. 

Mari Tang peak in the Chittagong Hill 
Tracts, vi. 25. 

Mara Tistd, old channel of the Tisti, q,v, 

Marang Buru, or Bardgii, hill in Hazdri- 
bdgh, xvi. 27, 236. 

Mdr£noko, hiU in Hazdribagh, xvi. 28. 

Afarchd, a marriage-tax levied by the 
zaminddrs of Rsmgpur, vii. 228, 290, 
291. 

Ma^rdm, a town in Murshiddbdd, ix. 83. 

Marhal, pargand in Sdran, xi. 304, 359. 

Marhattds, The^ in Midnapur, iii. 20, 21, 
48, 65 ; in Bard wan iv. 19, 62. 



Marhattd rule in Orissa, xviii. 192-196. 
Marjatd or Kdjd river, i. 297. 
Marichdkdndi, police outpost in Tipperah, 

vi. 432. 
Marichchap Gang, river in the 24 Par- 

gands, i. 27, 32. 
Marichpur, pargand in Purl, xix. 172, 

173. 

Markets. See Fairs, Commerce, &c 

Marmardi hill, Singbhum, xviL 20. 

Marra, pargand in Mdnbhiim, xvii. 368. 

Marriage ceremonies and customs in Dacca 
among the Kulin Brdhmans, v. 5^; 
among the Vaishnavs, v. 57; among the 
Chittagong Hill Tribes, vi. 41, 42,46,47, 
52, 55, 56, 57, 61, 66 ; in Chittagong. 
vi. 148, 149; in Nodkhdlf, vi. 279, 280- 
282; in Hill Tipperah, vi. 4S4-486; in 
Rangpur, vii. 227, 228; among the 
Muhammadans in Pdbnd, ix. 290, 291; 
in Kuch Behar, x. 356, 374-377; i" 
Patnd, xi. 45, 99, 100; in Sdran, xi. 
335-337 ; in Gayd, xii. 76-78 ; among 
the Pahdrids, xiv. 297, 298 ; among the 
Mai Pahdrids, xiv. 301 ; among the 
Santdls, xiv. 315, 316; in LohaMaga, 
xvi. 257, 258, 274, 27s, 283-285 ; in 
Singbhum, xvii« 44-46, 62; in the 
Tributary States of Chutid Ndgpur, xvii. 
171, 172, 185-187 ; in Mdnbhum, xvii. 
292-294 ; among the Kandhs, xix. 225- 
227 ; among the Savars, xix. 240 ; 
among the Judngs, xix. 247 ; among 
the Bhmyds, xix. 252, 253. 

Marriage, Cfrimes connected with, among 
the Muhammadans, Bdkaxganj, v. 232. 
See also Criminal Statistics. 

Mdrsdghdi, village in Cuttack, xviiL 31. 

Marshes, lakes, &c., in the 24 Parganas, 
i. 30; in the Sundarbans. i. 299; in 
Nadiyd, ii. 32 ; in Jessor, iL 181 ; in 
HugH, iii. 262; in Dacca, v. 22, 23; in 
Bdkarganj, v. 168, 169; in Faridpur, 
v. 268, 269 ; in Maimansinh, v. 3i88 ; 
in the Chittagong Hill Tracts, vi. 26, 
28; in Nodkhdli, vi. 255, 256; in Tip- 



perah, vi. 365, 366; in Hill Tipperah, 
vi. 476; in Maldah, vii. 27, 91, 129; in 
Rangpur, vii. 161, 168, 169, 345; in 
Dindjpur, vii. J58, 361, 363, 364, 456, 
457; in Rdjshdhi, viii. 22-25; "^ Bogrd, 
viii. 145 ; in Murshiddbdd, ix. 28, 29 ; 
in Pdbnd, ix. 273: in DdrjQing, x. 28, 
29 ; in Jalpdigurl, x. 235 ; in Kuch 
Behar, x. 337; in Sdran, xi. 233, 234; 
in Shdhdbdd, xii. 168; in Tirhut, xiii. 
27 ; in Champdran, xiii. 226, 227 ; in 
Bhdgalpur, xiv. 30, 31 ; in the Santdl 
Parganas, xiv. 270; in Mongfayr, xv. 
23; in Pumiah, xv. 233, 234; in 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



GENERAL INDEX. 



347 



Lohardaga, xvi. 237 ; in Mdnbhiim, 
xvii. 258; in Cuttack, xviii. 58; in 
Balasor, xviii. 251 ; in Puri, xix. 19. 

Marsh cultivation and reclamation in the 
24 Parganis, i. 36; in the Sundarbans, 
»• 303» 304; in Jessor, ii. 183; in 
Midnapur, iii. 38; in Huglf, iii. 264- 
266, 359, 360; in Dacca, v. 25; in 
Bakarganj, v. 171-174; in Faridpur, v. 
275 ; in Maimansinh, v. 389, 390 ; in 
the Chittagong Hill Tracts, vi. 28 ; in 
Chittagong, vi. 132; in Tipperah, vi. 
368 ; in Maldah, vii. 31 ; in Rangpur, 
vii. 170; in Dinijpur, vii. 366, 390; in 
R^shdhi, viii. 30 ; in Bogra, viii. 148 ; 
in Murshidabdd, ix. 32, 33 ; in Pabnd, 
ix. 277 ; in Ddrjiling, x. 30 ; in Jal- 
pdiguri, x. 238; in Kuch Behar, x. 
338 ; in Saran, xi. 338 ; in Tirhut, xiii. 
28, 29; in Champaran, xiii. 228; in 
the Santal Parganiis, xiv. 270; in 
Pumiah, xv. 233, 234. 

Marufganj, mart in Patna, xi. 25, 155, 
159. 

Marwa, tappd in Sarguja State, Chutia 
Ndgpur, xvii. 241. 

Marw4 KAIa, pargand in Tirhut, xiii. 194. 

Marwd Khuxd, pargand in Tirhut, xiii. 

194, 195- 
Miirwirfs, or up-countq^- traders, in the 

24 Parganis, i. 63; in Rangpur, vii. 

215, 216, 224, 304, 308; in Dinajpur, 

vii* 377 ; in Patnii, xi. 45, 161 ; in 

Saran, xi. 248, 324; in Tirhut, xiii. 43; 

in Champiran, xiii. 242 ; in Bhagal- 

pui, xiv. 65 ; in the Santil Paiganls, 

*iv. 319, 320 ; in Monghyr, xv. 57 ; 

in Miinbhum, xvii. 288,290; in Purl, xix. 

31, 37, See also Castes. 
Masdn river, xiii. 223, 225. 
Masdr, villa^ in Shahib£d, xii. 214, 215. 
Masat, fair m honour of Manik Pir, 24 

Pargani^ i. 102. 
Masaudah, pargand in Patni, xi. 207. 
Masaurhi, town and thdnd in Patna, xi. 

35, 74, 205. 
Mashrak, village and thdnd in Sdran, xi. 

233, 240^ 241, 247, 258. 293, 344, 358. 
Masidha, pargand in Dinajpur, vii. 448. 
Masidhd, village in Dinijpur, vii. 365. 
Masiidi^ a rent-free tenure, vii« 278. See 

also Tenures of land. 
Masjidkur, site of old mosque in Jessor, 

ii. 226. 
Masjidpur, pargand in Monghyr, xvl 183, 
M^khal island, Chittagong, vi. 125; 



ferry, vi. 128, 129. 
M4skh41,i 



, village and thdnd in Chittagong, 
vi. 136, 144, 153, 176, 216, 226. 
Masri, khdl in Jessor, ii. 177. 



Masrud, pargand in Puri, xix. 130, 172. 

"73. 
Massacre of Patna in 1763 A.D., xi. 71- 

Masti, pargand in Rangpur, vii. 253. 

MdtabarSf or village headmen, in Chitta- 
gong, vi. 133, 134, 156, 183; in Noa- 
khali, vi. 288, 289; in Tipperah, vi. 
385. See also Village Officials. 

Matabhanga or Hiull river in Nadiya, 
efforts of Government to keep the chan- 
nel open, ii. 19-32. 

Mataf river, xviii. 252. 

Matamuri river, vi. 22, 23, 26, 27, 28, 29. 

Matchii peak in Hill Tipperah, vi. 474. 

Material condition of the people, in the 
24Pargands, i. 127-131; mthe Sundar- 
bans, i. 321-324 ; in Nadivd, ii. 62, 63 ; 
in Jessor, ii. 240, 241 ; m Midnapur, 
iii. 78, 79 ; in Hugli, iii. 328, 329 ; in 
Bardw^, iv. 67-69; in Binkurd, iv. 
245 ; in Birbhiim, iv. 344, 345 ; in 
Dacca, v. 74-82; in Bdkarganj, v. 201, 
207 ; in Fandpur, v. 295, 296 ; in 
Maimansinh, v. 418, 419; in the Chitta- 
gong Hill Tracts, vi. 69; in Chittagong, 
vi. 154, 155; in NodkhaH, vi. 289, 290; 
in Tipperah, vi. 387, 388; in Hill Tip- 
perah, vi. 499, 500; in Maldah, vii. 
68, 99, 100 ; in Rangpur, vii. 225 ; in 
Rdjshdhi, viii. 65; in Bogrd, viii. 203- 
206; in Murshidfabdd, ix. 96-99, 154- 
156; in Pabnd, ix. 299-301,^-334; 
in Darjfling, x. 90-92; in Jalpaiguri, x. 
270, 271 ; m Kuch Behar, x. 370-372 ; 
in Patnd, xi. 98-100; in Sdran, xi. 269, 
270; in Gaya, xii. 73-82; in Shdhdbad, 
xii. 223-229; in Tirhut, xiii. 75-81; in 
Champaran, xiii. 256-260; in Bhigal- 
pur, xiv. 109- 1 16; in the Santdl.Far- 
gands, xiv. 330-332 ; in Monghyr, xv. 
80-90; in Pumiah, xv. 273-281; m Ha- 
zdribdgh, xvi. 92-9^ ; in LohdrdagA, 
xvi. 334, 335, 416; m Singbhiim, xvii. 
60, 77-79; in the Tributanr States of 
Chutid Ndgpur, xvii. 170, 188 ; in 
Mdnbhum, xvii. 307-309; in Cuttack, 
xviii. 97-99; in Balasor, xviii. 287-298; 
in Puiri, xix. 92, 93; in the Orissa 
Tributary States, xix. 262. 

Matha, /ar^»d in Mdnbhum, xvii. 368. 

Mathd Sdgar, tank in Dindjpur, vii. 438. 

Mdthdl tut, or mulberry land in Barwdn 
thdnd, Birbhum, iv. ^58. 

Mathurd or Chaubf Br&mans in Bhdgal- 
pur, xiv. 58, 59. See also Brdhmans. 

Mathurdpur, pargand in Dindjpur, vii. 
448. 

Mathurdpur, market village in the 24 
Pargands, i. 232. 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



348 



GENERAL INDEX, 



Matiari, parmnd in NadiyA, i. 364. 
Matiy&ri, thand in Pumiah, xv. 243, 244, 

398» 415- 

Matkadibad, pargand^ formerly in Cut- 
tack, xviii. 228 ; recently transferred to 
Balasor, xviii. 364. 

Matkadna^, pargand, formerly in Cut- 
tack, xviii. 228 ; recently transferred to 
Balasor, xviii. 364. 

Mdtkadpatnd, pargand in Puri, xix. 172, 

173- 
MatU or lUimatld, river and estuary, i. 

25, 28, 32, 294. 
MatU town. See Canning. 
Matlab, trading village in Tipperah, vi. 

420. 
Matrapur, indigo factory in Maldah, vii. 

99. 

Maukhili, market village in the 24 Par- 

ganis, i. 226. 
Maurek^ia, or Mor, or K4n& river, iv. 

317 ; ix. 25. 
Maureswar, village in Birbhum, with silk 

filatures, iv. 342, 343. 
Maureswar Dan (North), pargand in 

Birbht^m, iv. 430, 431. 
Maureswar Dan (South), pargand in 

Birbhum, iv. 431, 432. 
Maureswar Sabak, pargand in Birbhum, 

iv. 432, 433. 
Mauritius, Emigrants to. See Emigra- 
tion. 
Mauritius, Trade with. See Commerce. 
Maunisi^ or maurasiy land tenures. See 

Tenures of land. 
Mausoleums in Murshidab^d, ix. 72, 73. 
Mauzds or townships, in Nodkhali, vi. 

284-287; in Murshidibid, ix. 39, 40; 

in Pibn^ ix. 280 ; in Ddrjfling, x. 42 ; 

in Jalpdifi^uri, x. 248 ; in Kuch Behar, 

X* 339 > 11^ HazAribdgh, xvl 56; in 

Lohardag^, xvL 249. See also Towns. 

Villages, &c 
M£yd, stream in BardwAn, iv. 23. 
Mdvipur, site of powder magazine for 

shipping, 24 Pargand, i. loi, 228. 
Miyapur, village in HugU, with cotton 

manufacture, iiL 372. 
Maydd, one of the original 24 Pargands, 

i. 20, 21, 237. 
Maydd, market village in the 24 Par- 
gand, i. 232. 
Maynimatl, hill in Tipperah, vi. 361, 

404. 
Mayripati, village in Htiglf, iii. 374, 
Mauhchar^ ** riplets of the river," pattern 

of silk fabric made in Maldati, vii. 

95- 
Maziranti, market village in the 24 Par- 
gands, i. 227. 



Ma*kuri tdluks. See Tenures of land. 

Mazkurin mahal^ Sarkdr Sulaiminabad, 
i. 367. 

Mazarui-kiti. See Bir Bandh. 

Means of Communication in the 24 Par- 
ganas, i. 164-170; in the Sundarbans 
i. 344; in Nadiyd, U. 93, 94; in 
Jessor, ii. 278-280; in Midnapur, iii. 
146-149 ; in Htigli, iii. 368-371 ; in 
Bardwin, iv. 105-107 ; in Bdnkur^ iv. 
275, 276 ; in Birbhtim, iv. 372-374 ; in 
Dacca, v. 106-108; in Bakar^j, v. 
214, 215 ; in Faridpur, v. 333, 334; in 
Maimansinh, v. 458, 459 ; in the Chit- 
tagong Hill Tracts, vi. 83 ; in Chitta- 
gong, vi. 185-187 ; in NoAkhilf, vi. 
3i9f 320; in Tipperah, vi. 417, 418; 
in Hill Tipperah, vi. 507 ; in Maldah, 
vii. 93» 94 \ in Rangpur, vii. 302-304 ; 
in Din4jpur, vii. 409, 410 ; in Rdjshihi, 
viii. 81, 82 ; in Bogri, viii. 266-269 ; in 
Murshid4b4d, ix. 141 -148; in P4bd^ 
«• 328-330 ; in Ddijfling, x. 24, 127, 
128 ; in JalpAiguri, x. 235, 236, 294- 
^296; in Kuch Behar, x. 337, 396, 
397 ; in PatnA, xi^ 13^-137 ; in S£ran, 
lyA, 



289; in BhAgalpuf, xiv. 176-179; in 
the Sant&l Pargands, xiv. 352 ; in 
Monghyr, xv. 135-137 ; in Pumiah, 
«▼• 349-354; in HazAribdgh, xvi. 96, 
139, 141 ; in Lohirdagd, xvi. 411, 
412 ; in Singbhum, xvii. 99 ; in M&n- 
bhum, xvii. 347 ; in Cuttack, xviii. 
I73» 174, 336, 337 ; in Balasor, xviii. 
334-336; in Pun, xix. 150; in the Orissa 
Tributaiy States, xix. 263. See also 
Roads, Canals, and Railways. 
Measures and Weights in the 24 Par- 
gands, i. 152-154 ; in Nadiya, ii. 70, 
71 ; in Jessor, ii. 257 ; in Midnapur, 
iii. 84, 85 ; in Hiigli, iii. 345, 347 ; in 
Bardwin, iv. 75, 76 ; in Bankurd, iv. 
250; in Dacca, v. 205; in Bdkarganj, v. 
207, 208 ; in Faridpur, v. 322-324 ; in 
Maimansinh, v. 445-448 ; in the Chit- 
tagong Hill Tracts, vi. 77 ; in Chitta- 
gong, vi. 163, 164 ; in Noakhili, vi. 
300, 301 ; in Tipperah, vi. 398, 399 ; 
in Hill Tipperah, vi. 504; in Rij- 
shahi, viii. 67 ; in Bogr4, viii. 224, 
225; in Murshiddbdd, ix. 113, 114; 
in Pdbnd, ix. 309 ; in Ddrjiling, x. 
102, 103 ; in Jalpdiguri, x. 279 ; in 
Kuch Behar, x. 387; in Patnd, xi. 
122, 123 ; in Siran, xi. 298, 209; in 
Gayi, xii. 98-100; in Shih&b&d, xii. 
245; in Tirhut, xiii. 109, no; in 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



GENERAL INDEX, 



349 



Champdran, xiii. 280, 281 ; in Bhigal- 
pur, XIV. 132-135 ; in the Santdl Par- 
ganisy xiv. 344; in Monghyr, xv. 112 ; 
in Pumiah, xv. 313-31^; in Hazari- 
b^h, xvi. 1 10, III; m LoMrdagd, 
xvi. 358-361 ; in Singbhum, xvii. 85, 
86 ; in the Tributary States of Chutia 
Ndgpur, xvii. 211 ; in Manbhdm, xvii. 
319, 320; in Cuttack, xviii. 117; in 
Balasor, xviii. 297 ; in Puri, xix. loi. 

Mechanics. See Manulacturing Classes. 

Mechi river, x. 27, 227, 230. 

Mechs or Bodos, an aboriginal race in 
Rangpur, vii. 211 ; in Dd^jilin^, x. 66> 
80 ; in Jalpdiguri, x. 254, 255 ; in Kuch 
Behar, x. 342. See also Aboriginal. 

Medical Aspects and Topography of the 
24 Pargan^, i. 241-255 ; of Naidiyd, ii. 
139 ; of Jessor, ii. 328, 329 ; of Mid- 
napur, iii. 227-247 ; of Hi!igli, iii. 417- 
4do; of Bardwdn, iv. 177, 201; of 
Bankudi, iv. 300-305; of Birbhum, iv. 
438-455; of Dacca, V. 141 -147; of 
Bakarganj, v. 246-248; of Faddpur, 
V. 357-362; of Maimansinh, v. 479; 
of the Chittagong Hill Tracts, vi. 102- 
104 ; of Chittagong, vi. 226-233 ; of 
NoikhdH, vi. 345-350; of Tipperah, 
vi. 447-454 ; of Hill Tipperah, vi. 
519-522; of Maldah, vii. 145; of 
Rangpur, vii. 345 ; of Dinijpur, vii. 
456-458; of Rajshihf, viii. 121, 122; 
of Boe:rd, viii. 306-313 ; of Murshid- 
4bdd, IX. 2^9-244; of P4bn£, ix. 372- 
376 ; of Darjfling, x. 199-201 ; of Jal- 
pdigiiH, X. 321-326 ; of Kuch Behar, x. 
441-444; of Patn^ xi. 209-213; of 
Saran, xi. 361-563 ; of Gayd, xiL 146- 
153 ; of Shdhabad, xii. 287-291 ; of 
Tirhut, xiii. 200-208 ; of Champ&ran, 
xiii. 313-318 ; of Bhagalpur, xiv. 220- 
223, 250-21(5 ; of the Santal Parganas, 
xiv. 378-385; of Monghyr, xv. 187- 
212; of Pumiah, xv. 431-444; of 
Hazdribd^h, xvi. 199-206 ; of Lohdr- 
dagd, XVI. 483-487; of Singbhum, 
xvii. 139-143; of Mdnbhiim, xvii. 370- 
374; of Cuttack, xviiL 234-243; of 
Balasor, xviii. 36(5-372 ; of Puiri, xix. 
174-177. See also Cholera, Climate, 
Diseases, Dispensaries, Drugs, Tem- 
perature, Vital Statistics, &c. 

Medical Charities and Dispensaries, in 
the 24 Pargands, i. 249-255; in Nadiyi, 
ii. 140-142; in Jessor, iL 305, 340^ 
341 ; in Midnapur, iii. 246, 247 ; in 
Htjiglf, iii. 439, 440 ; in Bardwdn, iv. 
192-200; in Bdnkuid, iv. 302; in 
Birbhibn, iv. 455; in Dacca, v. 149- 
153; in Bdkarganj, v. 248, 249; in 



Faridpur, v. 359; in Maimansinh, v. 
480, 481 ; in Chittagong, vi. 193, 233 ; 
in Nodkhalf, vi. 350 ; in Tipperah, vi. 
453» 454; in Hill Tipperah, vi. 521, 
522; in Maldah, vii. 105, 152; in 
Rangpur, vii. 349-352; in Dinijpur, 
vii. 458; in Rdjsh^, viii. 90, 123- 
126; in Bogrd, viii. 315-317; in Mur- 
shidibdd, ix. 171, 246-251 ; in Pdbnd, 
ix. 374-376 ; in Diijfling, x. 200, 212 ; 
in Jalpaiguri, x. 323, 324; in Kuch 
Behar, x. 360, 441 ; in Patni, xi. 216- 
219 ; in Sdran, xi. 366-368 ; in Gayd, 
xii. 152, 153 ; in Shihabdd, xii. 289- 
291 ; in Tirhut, xiii. 205-208 ; in Cham- 
pdran, xiii. 316, 317 ; in Bhagalpur, 
xiv. 259-262 ; in the Santil Pargands, 
xiv. 382-385; in Monghyr, xv. 208- 
210; in Pumiah, xv. 444; in Haziri- 
bdgh, xvi. 204-206; in Lohdrddgd, xvi. 
487 ; in Singbhiim, xvii. 144, 145 ; 
in Minbhum, xvii. 373, 374 ; in Cut- 
tack, xviii. 236-328 ; in Balasor, xviii. 
369. 370; in Purf, xix. 176, 177; in 
the Orissa Tributary States, xix. 266. 

Medicines, Indigenous. .S^^ Drugs. 

Medicine, Temple School of, in Patnd, 
xi. 220. 

Me^hdsanf Peak in Morbhanj, Orissa, 
xix. 199, 303. 

Meghnd river and estuary, i. 298 ; v. 20, 
159, 160, 162, 387 ; vi. 250, 253, 257, 
362 ; " bore " on the, v. 167. 

Mehdr, pargand in Tipperah, vi. 444. 

Mekhdlis, a hill tribe in Tippexah, vi. 

378. 

Melas, See Fairs, &c. 

Melise, Species of, in Rangpur, vii. 184. 

Memdri, village and railway station in 
Bardwin, with silk manufactory, iv. 
106, 133. 

Mendikhdlf river, v. 21. 

Metayer Tenures. See Tenures of land. 

Meteorological Statistics of the 24 Par- 
ganiis, i. 242-245, 259-261 ; of Nadiya, 
ii. 139 ; of Jessor, ii. 329 ; of Midnapur, 
iii. 227; ofHugM, iii. 417; ofBardwdn, 
iv. 177 ; of BfnkurA, iv. 300; of Bfr- 
bhiim, iv. 437, 438 ; of Dacca, v. 142 ; 
of Bdkareanj, v. 246 ; of Faridpur, v. 
358 ; of Maimansinh, v. 479 ; of the 
Chittagong Hill Tracts, vi. 103 ; of 
Chittagong, vi. 226, 227 ; of Noakhdli, 
vi. 345» 346 ; of Tipperah, vi. 448 ; of 
Hill Tipperah, vi. 519; of Maldah, 
vii. 145 ; of Rangpur, vii. 345, 346 ; 
of Dindjpur, vii. 456, 457 ; of Rajshdhf, 
viii. 121, 122; of Bognd, viii. 305; 
of Murshiddbad, ix. 236-259; of 
Pdbnd, ix. 369-372; of Ddijfling, 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



350 



GENERAL INDEX, 



alpaiguri, x. 320, 
char, X. 440-443 J 



X. 197-199; of 
321 ; of Kuch 

of Patnd, xi. 2lo, 211 ; of Saran, xi. 
361, 362; of Gaya, xii. 146, 147; of 
Shahabid, xii. 287; of Tirhut, xiii. 
200-202 ; of Champaran, xiii. 313, 
314 ; of Bhagalpur, xiv. 251 ; of the 
Santdl Parganas, xiv. 379, 380; of 
Monghyr, xv. 187-190; of Pumiah, 
XV. 431-434 ; of Hazarib^h, xvi. 199 
201 ; of Lohardagi, xvi. ^3, 484 ; of 
Singbhum, xvii. 140; of Minbhum, 
xvii. 370 ; of Cuttack, xviii. 234, 235 ; 
of Balasor, xviii. 366, 367; of Puri, 
xix. 173, 174. See also dimsX^t Cyc- 
lones, Rainfall, Temperatttre, &c. 

Middi land tenures. See Tenures of 
land. 

Mica, in Haziribagh, xvi. 161 -164, 171. 

MiDNAPUR District (Vol. III.) — 

Geographical Situation, Area, Head- 
quarters, &C., 17 ; Boundaries, 18 ; 
Jurisdiction, 18-22 ; Physical Aspect, 
22, 23 ; River System, 23-26 ; Changes 
in the Course of the HugU, 26-29 ; 
Midnapur High Level Canal, 29-36; 
Tidal Canal, 36 ; Utilization of Water 
Supply and Fisheries, 37 ; Land Re- 
clamation, 38; Lines of Drainage, 
Mineral and Jungle Products, and 
FeriB Natura^ 39 ; Estimates of Popu- 
lation prior to 1872, 40; Census of 
1872, its Agencies and Results, 41-51 ; 
Population according to Sex and Age, 
41, 44; according to Occupation, 44- 
48 ; Ethnical Division of the People, 
48-51 ; Emigration, &c., 52 ; List of 
Castes, with details, 52-57 ; Religious 
Division of the People, 58-60; Division 
of the People into Town and Country, 
60, 61 ; Towns, &c., 61, 69 ; Sea- 
side Watering-places, 70 ; Vil^ge In- 
stitutions, 70-78; Material Condition 
of the People, 78, 79; Agriculture, 
79-114; Rice Crops, &c., 79-81; 
Green Crops, 80; Miscellaneous Crops, 
81 ; Area, Out-^tum of Crops, &c., 
82; Condition of the Peasantry, and 
Domestic Animals, 82 ; Agricultural 
Implements, Wages and Prices, Weights 
and Measures, &|. ; Waste Lands, 85 ; 
Land Tenures, 86-100; Settlements, 
&c., 100-105; Revenue Survev, 105- 
107 ; Rates of Rent, 107, 108 ; Ab- 
wdbs, or Customary Cesses, 108-113; 

. Manure, 113; Irrigation and Blights, 
114; Droughts, 1 14- 1 16; Floods, 116- 
118; Famine Prices and Famine 
Warnings, 1 19-120; Famine of 1866, 
120-133 ; Embankments, 133-146 ; 



Foreign and Absentee .Proprietors, 
146 ; Roads and Means of Communi- 
cation, 146-149 ; Minerals, 149 ; Manu- 
factures, 149, 150; Salt Manufacture, 
150-152; Trade and Commerce, 152; 
Capital and Interest and Institutions, 
153; Incomes and Income-Tax, 154; 
Revenue and Expenditure, 154-157; 
Land Revenue, 157 ; Land Settlement, 
1 5S; Mode of Collecting Land Revenue, 
159; Cost of Collection, 160, 161; 
Arrears of Land Revenue, 162 ; Land 
Law and Courts, 163; Police Statistics, 
163-167; Criminal Cases, 167 ; Jail 
Statistics, 168-172; Educational Su- 
tistics, 172-185 ; Postal Statistics, 158; 
Sub-divisional Administration, i86- 
189 ; Alphabetical List of Fiscal Divi- 
sions, or PargandSf with details, 189- 
220 ; Cyclone of 1864, 220-227 ; 
Climate, Medical Aspects, &c. 227; 
Epidemics and Small-Pox, 228 ; Epi- 
demic Malarious Fever, 229-244 ; 
Cattle Disease and Fairs, 244 ; Native 
Practitioners, 245; Indigenous Vege- 
table Drugs, 246 ; Dispensaries, 247. 

Midnapur /ar^ffii, Historical account of, 
and of the Riji, iii. 21a 

Midnapur, municipal town, iii. 61 ; brass 
and -copper manufactures, iii. 149; 
dispensary, iii. 247. 

Midnapur ^/o^z/, ^ar^r Jaleswar, L 371. 

Mihri, pargomd in Champaran, xiii. 308, 
309. 

Mihri, village in Champ&ran, xiii. 25a 

Mihrpui, municipality in Nadiyi, ii. 60 ; 
seat of brass manufacture, ii. loi ; 
dispensary, ii. 141. 

Mihrpur, subdivision of NadiyA, ii. 131. 

Mihsi, tappd in Champaran, xiii. 272, 
275. 

Mihtdr^ or s\('eeper caste, i. 71. See also 
Castes. 

Mikatdl festival in Hill Tippcrah, vi. 492. 

Military depdts, cantonments, &c., in 
the 24 Pargands, i. 25, 82-87, 90, 91, 
100; in MurshidAbdd, ix. 75, 76; in 
Ddrjfling, x. 26, 89, 90, 1 10 ; in Jalp&i- 
guri, X. 216, 225, 261, 262; at Dinipur, 
in Patna, xi. 87; sanitarium in Haziri- 
bdgh, xvi. 32-35. 

Military expedition against the Lushdis, 
vu 20, 21, 470; against the Pahiriis 
in 1772, xiv. 303, 304; against the 
Kols, xvii. 107- 1 14. 

Military force of the Rdja of Hill Tippe- 
rah, vi. 515-517 ; of the Rdji of Kuch 
Behar, x. 343-430. 

Millipur, village on the Bhdgirathi, with 
river traffic, in Bardwdn, iv. 25. 



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GENERAL INDEX. 



35' 



bdj 



Minabag mahaly Sarkdr Madaran, i. 369. 

Minakhln, trading village in the 24 Par- 
ganas, i. 34. 

Mines and Minerals in Midnapur, iii. 39, 
149 ; in Hugli, iii. 372 ; in Bard wan, 
iv. 29; in Bankura, iv. 211; in Bir- 
bhiim, iv. 318-322 ; in Dacca, v. 26, 
108;. in Bdkarganj, v. 175; in Maiman- 
sinh, V. 390; in the Chittagong Hill 
Tracts, vi. 29; in Chittagong, vi. 132, 
133; in Tipperah, vi. 368, 418; in Hill 
Tipperah, vi. 477 ; in Maldah, vii. 33 ; 
in Rangpur, vii. 17^ ; in Murshidabad, 
ix. 33, 34; in Daijfling, x. 31, 32, 129. 
1^8 ; in Jalpdiguri, x. 239 ; in PatnA, 
XI. 31; in Sdran, xi. 237, 334; in Gayi, 
xii. 25, 26; in Shihdbad, xii. 176-179 ; 
in Tirhut, xiii. 29; in Champdran, xiii. 
228, 229; in Bhagalpur, xiv. 38-40; 
in the Santal Parganas, xiv. 272, 3^2, 
3 ; in Monghyr, xv. 31 ; in Hazari- 
Lgh, xvi. 141-164; inLohardagd, xvi. 
412-415 ; in Singbhum, xvii. 22, 23, 
99-105 ; in the Tributary States of 
Chutid Ndgpur, xvii. 167, 100, 201, 
202, 225-228, 247 ; in Mdnbhum, xvii. 
259, 260, 347-351 ; in Cuttack, xviii. 
177 ; in the Orissa Tributary States, 
xix. 202, 203. See also Coal, Gold, 
Iron, &c. 

Mineral springs in DarjHing, x. 32, 33 ; 
in the Santdl Parganas, xiv. 272 ; in 
Hazdribdgh, xvi. 42-44; in Lohardagd, 
xvi. 239 ; in Sargujd State, Chutid 
Ndgpur, xvii. 228, 229. 

Mint at Calcutta, ix. 258, 259 ; at Mur- 
shiddbdd, ix. 174, 2^3, 256. 

Mir Jafar, Nawdb N^im of Bengal, i. 
18, 19 ; ix. 186-188, 191. 

Mir Jumld, Viceroy of Bengal, who trans- 
ferred the seat of Government to Dacca, 
v. 120, 121. 

Mir Kdsim, Nawdb of Murshiddbdd, ix. 
188-191. 

Mirchdiganj, mart in Patnd, xi. 155, 
161. 

Mfrganj, village in Sdran, xi. 358. 

M{rg;anj Harkhauli, village in Sdran, xi. 

257. 
Mirganjiy a variety of jute in Maimansinh, 

V. ^39. See also Jute. 
Mirkasardi village and thdnd in NodkhdH, 

vi. 136, 153. 176. 216, 225, 238, 342, 

343* 
Mirwd, village in Sdran, xi. 356. 
Mirzdnagar, former residence of Muham- 

madan Faujddr^ and seat of trade, 

in lessor, ii. 203, 303. 
Mirzipur, village in lessor, ii. 212. 
Mirzdpur, village in Dindjpur, vii. 454. 



Mirzdpur, village in Murshiddbdd, ix. 152. 
IS5» 242. 

Mirzapur, village in Saran, xi. 35S. 

Mirzdpur, village in Tirhut, xiii. 58. 

Missions, Christian, and missionary efforts 
in the 24 Pargands, i. 99, 107, 119, 
204-206, 208, 209; in Nadiyd, ii. 52, 84, 
89, 106; in lessor, ii. 196, 197; in Mid- 
napur, iii. 60, 181, 184 ; in Hugli, iii. 
293» 303» 376, 398, 404 ; in Dacca, v. 
60, 6lf 72 ; in Bdkarganj, v. 198, 199 ; 
in Faridpur, v. 289; in Maimansinh, 
v. 410; in Chittagong, vi. 148; in 
Murshiddbdd, ix. 171 ; in Sdran, 
xi. 256 ; in Gayd, xii. 39, 40 ; in Tir- 
hut, xiii. 46 ; in Champdran, xiii. 249, 
311 ; in Bhagalpur, xiv. 234; in the 
Santdl Pargands, xiv. 322 ; in Mon- 
ghyr, XV. 60 ; in Chutid Ndgpur, xvi. 
423-444; in Singbhum, xvii. 70, 106, 
107, 130 ; in Mdnbhum, xvii. 296 ; in 
Balasor, xviii. 278, 279, 353, 354, 357, 
358 ; in Puri, xix. 40, 171. 

Missionary Schools. See Educational 
Statistics. 

Mitford Hospital at Dacca, v. 149, 151. 

Mithild, a Province of Bengal towards the 
north and west under the Hindu kings, 
i« Z^% foot-note, 

Mithild, town in Shdhdbdd, xii. 203. 

Mitrapur, village in Nilgiri State, Orissa, 
xix. 260. 

Miydn. SeeTxXM Miydn. 

Mobrah Ghdzi, a mythical fakir in the 
Sundarbans, i. 119, 120. 

Model schools in Birbhum, iv. 411, 416 ; 
in Murshiddbdd, ix. 171, 228; in Pdbnd, 
ix. 362-364 ; in Ddrjiling, x. 191 ; in 
Jalpdi^H, X. 3 1 7. See also Educational 
Statistics. 

Modid Khandpatnd, village in Daspalld 
State, Orissa, xix. 28a 

Modind feir, Jessor, ii. 338. 

Mohdgdmd mart in the Santdl Pargands, 
xiv. 354. 

Mohdmd, village-union in Tirhut, xiii. 49. 

Mohani, river m Hazdribdgh, xvi. 37. 

Mohankhdlf embankment in Midnapur, 
iii. 141. 

Mohidrf, village in Huglf, with community 
of Pfr Ali Brdhmans, iii. 305. 

Mohnar, village and thdytd in Tirhut, xiiL 
34. 74, 180. 

Mokri, town in Shdhdbdd, xii. 203. 

Mong Rdjd, The, in the Chittagong Hill 
Tracts, vi. 35-38, 39, 88, 102. 

Monghyr (M^NofR) District (Vol. 
XV.)— 

Geographical Situation, Area, and 
Boundaries, 17, 18 ; Jurisdictions, 18, 



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352 



GENERAL INDEX, 



19 ; Physical Aspects, 19, 20 ; River 
System, 20-22 ; Deaths by Drowning, 
23; Lakes and Marshes, 23; Irrigation, 
23, 24 ; The Kharakpur Irrigation 
Works, 24-29 ; Fisheries, 29, 30 ; 
Minerals, 31 ; Forest Tracts, 31, 32 ; 
Jungle Products, 32-34 ; Pasture 
Grounds, 34, 35; Fera Natura^ 35-46; 
Population — Early Estimates, 46, 47 ; 
Census of 1872 — its Agency and Re- 
sults, 47-49; Classification according to 
Sex and Age, 49, 50 ; Ethnical Divi- 
sion, 50-54; Aboriginal and Hill Tribes, 
54 ; Emigration and Immi^^tion, 54, 
55 ; Hindu Castes, 55-59 ; Religious 
Division of the People, 59, 60 ; Divi- 
sion into Town and Country, 60, 6i; 
History of Monghyr (Mungir) Town, 
62-69 y Jamui, Gidhaur, and Jamilpur, 
69-74; Hot Springs in Sitdkund and 
Rishikund, &c., 74-78; Village Insti- 
tutions, 78-80 ; Material Condition of 
the People — Dress and Dwellings, 80, 
8i ; Food, 81-87 ; Processes of Cook- 
ing, 87-89; Musical Instruments, 89, 
90; Agriculture^Rice Cultivation, 90, 
91; Other Cereals, 91-93 ; Opium Cul- 
tivation, &c., 93-101 ; Fruit Trees, 99- 
102; Fibres, 102, 103; Cultivated 
Area, Out-turn of Crops, &c., 103-106; 
Condition of the Peasantry, 106, 107 ; 
Domestic Animals, 107, 108 ; Agricul- 
tural Implements, loiS ; Wages and 
Prices, 108-112; Weights and Meas- 
ures, 112; Landless Day-labourers, 
112-M4; Land Tenures, 114-119; Rates 
of Rent, 119, 120; ^^ii/ri^f or Custom- 
ary Cesses, 120-127 ; Natural Calami- 
ties — Droughts, Floods, and Blights, 
127; Famine of 1866, 127-130; Scarcity 
of 1874, 130-134; Famine Warnings, 
134, 135; Foreign and Absentee Land- 
lords, 135; Roads, 135-137; Railways, 
137; Manufactures — Firearms, Indigo, 
&c., 137-140; Colouring Materids, 
140-142 ; Commerce and Trade, 142- 
153; Capital and Interest, 148, 154; 
Incomes and Income-tax, 154, 155; 
Revenue and Expenditure, 155-157 ; 
Land Revenue, 150; Civil and Crimi- 
nal Courts, 158 ; Operation of the Rent 
Law, 158; Police and Jail Statistics, 158- 
165 ; Educational Statistics, 165-173 ; 
Postal Statistics, 173 ; Administra- 
tive Divisions, 174, 175 ; List of Par- 
gan&Sy 175-187; Climate, Temperature, 
and Rainfall, 187-190; Endemic and 
Epidemic Diseases, 188, 191 -197; Mor- 
tuary Statistics, 197, 198; Kdbirdjs, 
198, 199 ; Indigenous Drugs, 199-204 ; 



Vaccination, 204-207 ; Fairs, 206-208 ; 
Charitable Dispensaries, 208-210; Con- 
servancy and Sanitation, 210-2 12; Cattle 
Diseases, 212, 213; Geological Forma- 
tion, 213-215. 

Monghyr /«rpB»f, xv. 183, 184. 

Monghyr (Mungir) town and tkdn^^ xv. 
48, w>, 61, 160, 174 ; description and 
history of, xv. 62-69; banking estab- 
lishment in, XV. 154; dispensary, xv. 
208, 209. 

Monumental or sepulchral stones of the 
Mundas or Hos m SingUium, xvii. 73, 

74. 

Mor or Maureksha river, in Birbhum, iv. 
317 ; ix. 25 ; xiv. 269. 

Mora, river in Dindjpur, vii. 446. 

Morbhanj State, Orissa, xix. 205, 206, 
210-217, 261, 301-303. 

Morbhanj, Rajd of, and his estates in 
Midnapur, iii. 20, 21. 

Morhar, a river in Hazdrib^h, xvi. 37. 

Mori peak in the- Santil Parganas, xiv. 
267. 

Mori Khyoung river. See Matimuri. 

Mortality in Jessor, ii. 330, 331, 332; 
in Huglf, lii. 435-4 J7; in ^rdw^, 
iv. 185-187 ; in Bankurd, iv. 304, 
305 ; in Birbhum, iv. 442-445 ; in 
the Chittagong Hill Tracts, vi. 104 ; in 
Chittagong, vi. 228, 229 ; in Noikhili, 
vi. 337. 346; in Tipperah, vi. 448, 
449; in Maldah, vii. 152; in Bogrd, 
viii. 307-311; in Murshi&bdd, ix. 239- 
244 ; in Pabnd, ix. 372, 373 ; in Ddr- 
jiling, X. 199, 200; in Jalpiiguri, x. 
323; in Kuch Behar, x. 441; in Patni, 
xi. 212, 213; in Siran, xi. 368; in 
Shdhibdd, xii. 288, 289; in Tirhut, 
xiii. 173, 174, 205; in Champiran, xiii. 
315 ; in the Sant^ Parganas, xiv. 382; 
in Monghyr, xv. 197, 198 ; in Pumiah, 
XV. A39 ; in Hazdrib^h, xvi. 201 ; in 
Lohardagd, xvi. 485, 486 ; in Sing- 
bhum, xvii. 144, 145 ; in M4nbhum, 
xvii. 372, 373 ; in Cuttack, xviii. 239 ; 
in BaJasor, xviii. 370; in Pfiri, xix. 

177. 
Mortality from the Bardwap epidemic 

fever m Midnapur, iii. 244 ; in Huglii 

iii. 435-437; in Bardvrdn, iv. 185-187; 

in Birbhum, iv. 442, 443, 445. 
Mortgages. See Capital and Interest. 
Monellganj, port and town, founded on 

their Sundarbans property by Messrs 

Morrell and Lightfoot, i. 297, 300, 320, 

344 ; ii. 232, 239, 305, 338. 
Mosod, town in Shdhabad, xii. 203. 
Mosques, in Sandwip, vi. 240, 287 ; in 

Rajshdhi, viii. 56 ; in Bogra, viii. 187 ; 



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353 



in Murshidabad, ix. 66-68, 70, 177, 
179; in Pdbna, ix. 316. See also An- 
tiquarian Remains, Towns, &c. 

Mosque, The Golden, in Panduah, vii. 
61. 

Mosque, The Great Golden, in Gaur, vii. 

57. 

Mosque, The Lesser Golden, in Gaur, 
vii. 58. 

Motfhari, civil station and tkdnd in Cham- 
piran, xiii. 219, 234, 249, 250, 311; 
dispensary, 316, 317. 

Motijnamd waterfall, Santdl Parganas, 
xiv. 271. 

Mountains of Midnapur, iii. 23 ; of Bdn- 
kura, iv. 207, 208 ; of Dacca, v. 19, 
20; of Maimansinh, v. 385; of the 
Chittagong Hill Tracts, vi. 24, 25 ; of 
Chittagong, vi. 124, 125 ; of Noakh&lf, 
vi. 250; of Tipperah, vi. 361, 362 ; of 
Hill Tipperah, vi. 473, 474 ; of Mal- 
dah, vii. 27 ; of Murshiddbdd, ix. 23 ; 
of Pdbnd, ix. 271 ; of Ddrjfling, x. 
19-24 \ of Jalpdiguri, x. 225 ; of Patnd, 
xi. 18, 19 ; of Gayd, xii. 19 ; of Shah- 
abid, xii. 159,1160; of Champdran, 
xiii. 221 ; of the Santdl Parganis, xiv. 
267, 268 ; of Hazdribdgh, xvi. 25-35 ; 
of Lohardagd, xvi. 233, 234, 236, 237 ; 
of Singbhum, xvii. 19-21 ; of the 
. Tributary States of Chutid Ndgpur, 
xvii. 167, 200, 214, 224, 225 ; of Man- 
bhum, xvii. 256 ; of Cuttack, xviii. 21, 
22 ; of Purl, xix. 28 ; of the Orissa 
Tributary States, xix. 198-200. 

Mount Everest in the Nepal hills, x. 20. 

Mrdngd Pang peak in the Chittagong Hill 
Tracts, vi. 24. 

Mros, a tribe of Toungthds, vi. 49, 56, 

57. 
Mrungs, a tribe of Toungthds, vi. 49. 
Mudsis or Kurus, Manners, customs, and 

traditions of the, xvii. 182-187. 
Mubarak-ud-Dauld, Nawdb of Murshid- 

dbdd, ix. 193, 194. 
Mubdrakpur, mart in Sardn, xi. 332. 
Muchis, a low caste of leather dealers, i. 

70. See also Castes. 
Muchid, rice mart in Maldah, vii. 103. 
Muddfarganj, village in Tipperah, vi. 420. 
Mughul government of Midnapur and 

Hijili, lii. 18, 150, 151 ; of HugH, iii. 

299> 300; of Bardwdn, iv. 18, 19, 137- 

141; of Rangpur, vii. 314-318 ; of Raj- 

shdhi, viii. 49, 50; of Bogrd, viii. 162 ; 

of Pumiah, xv. 221-225 ; of Orissa, 

xviii. 188-192 ; of Eastern Bengal, v. 

1 18- 1 23. See also History. 
Mughul-bachhd, mart in Rangpur, vii. 

167. 



Mughulbhandi kild^ Purf, xix. 183. 

Mughul -hdt, mart in Rangpur, vii. 166. 

Muhammad Taghlak, first Musalmdn con- 
queror of Eastern Bengal, v. 119. 

Muhammad Tughral, Invasion of South - 
Eastern Bengal by, in 1279, vi. 239. 

Muhammadan population of the 24 Par- 
p;ands, i. 71, 72, 75; of the Sundarbans, 
1. 317, 318 ; of Nadiyd, ii. 38, 50, 51, 
143; of Jessor, ii. 194, 195. I99. 2oo» 
202, 213, 228) ; of Midnapur, iii. 44, 

58, 59; of Hiigli, iii. 273, 292; of 
Bardwdn, iv. 54; of Bdnkurd, iv. 228; 
of Birbhum, iv. 334; of Dacca, v. 34, 
58-60 ; of Bdkarganj, v. 182, 194-196 ; 
of Farfdpur, v. 280, 289-291 ; of 
Maimansinh, v. 394 ; of the Chit- 
tagong Hill Tracts, vi. 36, 37. 68, 83, 
102; of Chittagong, vi. 137, 138, 
143, 147-149, 151, 152, 218, 219-221 ; 
of Nodkhdli, vi. 269, 270, 277-282, 
319, 337, 338, 340; of Tipperah, vi. 
373, 374, 379, 381, 3^2, 3^3, 386, 417, 
435, 438 5 of Hill Tipperah, vi. 480, 
402, 495, 518; of Maldah, vii. 37; of 
Rangpur, vii. 208-210, 221, 222, 229, 
338, 341 ; of Dindjpur, vii. 366, 370- 
373, 382, 389, 432 ; of Rdjshdhi, viii. 
36, 37, 40, 48-50 ; of Bogid, viii. 167, 
181 ; of Murshiddbdd, ix. 38, 41, 45, 

59, 61 ; of Pdbnd, ix. 279-281, 284, 
288, 289 ; of Ddrjfling, x. 41-47 ; of 
JalpdiguH, x. 251, 254, 259, 260; of 
Kuch Behar, x. 340, 342, 358, 359; of 
Patnd, xi. 36, 52-54, 60, 65; of Sdran, 
xi. 240, 242, 255, 256, 257, 264, 315, 
316, 354; of Gavd, xiL 30, 37, 39, 40; 
of Shdhdbdd, xii. 181, 18^, 201, 202 ; 
of Tirhut, xiii. 35, 37, 46, 48, 49 ; of 
Champdran, xiii. 240 ; of BhdgpsLlpur, 
xiv. 47, 77, 78; of the Santdl Pargands, 
xiv. 278, 279, 321, 322 ; of Monghyr, 
XV. 49, 59 ; of Pumiah, xv. 245, 255 ; 
of Hazdribdgh, xvi. 57-62, 83, 84 ; of 
Lohardagd, xvi. 248, 250, 254, 3x8, 
319, 447-450; of Singbhum, xvii. 33, 
35, 69, 70 ; of the Tributary States 
of Chutid Ndgpur, xvii. 153, 155, 164, 
169 ; of Mdnbhum, xvii. 270, 29)3 ; of 
Cuttack, xviii. 64, 6^, 79, 80, 83; of 
Balasor, xviii. 266, 267, 277, 278 ; of 
Puri, xix. 29, 30, 40 ; of the Orissa 
Tributary States, xix. 207, 208, 259- 
261. 

Muhammadan ceremonies and customs, 

See Ceremonies. 
Muhammadan revenues in Murshiddbdd, 

ix. 176, 179, 192, 195. >96. 
Muhammadans, The, in Bengal. See 

Histor). 



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354 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Muhammadpur, pargand in Sarkdr Sulai- 

m&ndbad, i. 367. 
Muhainmadpur, village in Jessor, founded 

by Sitdrdm Rdi, Antiquities and ruins 

at, ii. 212-216. 
Muhammadpur, parganA in Tipperah, vi. 

445. 
Muhammadpur, village in Dinajpur, vii. 

365. 
Muhammadpur, town in Patni, xi. 66, 

84, 191. 
Muhammadpur, village in Saran, xi. 258, 

325. 332. 
Muharram festival in Dacca, Description 

of» V. 59; in Patni, xi. 6062. See also 

Festivals. 
Muhuri river in Tipperah, vi. 363. 
Mujndi river, in Jalpiiguri, x. 225, 233; 

in Kuch Behar, x. 335, 
A/uJkdddami land tenures inCuttack, xviii. 

I30» 13I1 132; in Balasor, xviii. 306, 

307; in Purl, xix. 114-116, 135. See 

also Tenures. 
Mukdddams or village heads in Monghyr, 

XV. 80; in Balasor, xviii. 286. See also 

Village Officials. 
Mukin^ town and tkdnd in Patn£, xi. 

35. 39, 66, 85, 86, 191, 20J. 
Mymensing. See Maimansinh. 
Alukarrdri land tenures in the 24 Par- 

ganas, i. 270, 271 ; in Nadi'ya, ii. 72 ; 

in JessoT, ii. 259; in Midnapur, iii. 

92 ; in HtigH, iii. 349 ; in Bardwan, iv. 

83 ; in Bankur^ iv. 258, 259, 260 ; in 

Birbhum, iv. 366, 367; in Maimansinh, 

V. 451 ; in Maldah, vii. 80; in Rang- 

pur, vii. 274, 275, 277, 278, 280, 281 ; 

in Dinajpur, vii. 401; in Rajshahl, viii. 

71 ; in Bogrd, viii. 236, 237; in Pabna, 

ix. 314 ; nn Kuch Behar, x. 391 ; in 

Patnd, xi. 125; in Saran, xi. 300, 301; 

in Gaya, xii. loo; in Bhagalpur, xiv. 

139, 140, 147; in Monghyr, xv. 116; 

in Pumiah, xv. 321, 322; in Hazari- 

bigh, xvi. 119, 123. 130-^32, 135; in 

Lonardaga, xvi. 372 ; in Manbhum, 

xvii. 329. See also Tenures of land. 
Mukhdam, Sh4h Jaldl, Monument of, in 

Panduah, vii. 60, 84. 
Mukhdam pur, village in Maldah, vii. 131. 
Mukhra, pargand in Balasor, xviii. 364. 
MukhtArpur, village in Dinajpur, vii. 443. 
Mukhyds or Mandals, village head-men. 

See Village Officials. 
Mukundpur, pargand in Manbhum, xvii. 

368. 
Mukundpur, market village in the 24 

Parganas, i. 231. 
Muldniddriy a land tenure in Jalp;iigiiri\ 

X. 285. 



Mulberry, Cultivation of, in Nadiya, ii. 
68; in Jessor, ii. 246; in Midnapur, iii. 
81; in Hugli, iii. 339; in Bardwan, iv. 
71 ; in Birbhum, iv. 357, 358; in Mal- 
dah, vii. 20, 68, 73, 74, 90, 96, 97 ; in 
Rangpur, vii. 249; in Rijshahi, viii. 
63, 83, 84; in Bogri, viii. 220; in 
MurshidiMd, ix. 83, 97, lOQ, 105, 152. 
See also Silk. 

MuldAchaur, pargand in Balasor, xviiu 

365,. 
Mulgaon, pargand in Balasor, xviii. 364, 

365. 

Mulghar, fiscal division in the 24 Par- 
ganas, i. 237, 367. 

Mulldki, a rent-free land tenure, Bir- 
bhum, iv. 370. 

Mundas or Kols, an aboriginal tribe, in 
Haiirib^h,- xvi. 60, 65; in Lohardagi, 
xvi. 251, 265-278, 325 ; in Singbhum, 
xvii.- 59, 288. See also Kols. 

Mundas^ village-heads, in Lohardaga, 
xvi. 325; in Singbhum, xvii. 74-76, 87, 
114, 118, 119; in Mdnbhum, xvii. 305. 
See also Village Officials. 

Mungir. See Monghyr. 

Municipal police, in the 24 ParganAs, i. 
190 ; i