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3 
ACTS AND RESOLVES 



GENERAL ASSEMBLY 



Ifaft ot Jl|iflk Sslnnb nnb Sj^tnnihntt ^Innlntions, 



MAY SESSION, 1861. 



Vina THE ROLL OF UEHBERS, PROCEEDINGS UF THE TWO HOUSES IN 
GRAND COUHITPEE, AND REPORTS ORDERED TO BE PDRUSHBD. 



Stale of Rliobe Island, &c. 

OFFICE OF 8ECBETARY OF STATE, NAY, IBSl. 



PROVIDENCE: 

SAYLES &. MILLER. PRINTERS. 

1861. 



5X5* The General Assembly convened at Newport in conformity to 
Art. 4, Sec. 3, of the Constitution, on the first Tuesday of May, (6th,) 
1851, and adjourned on Saturday, the 10th day of May following, to 
meet again in Newport, on the third Monday of June, 1851. 

L 2412 

DEC 4 193(r 



ACTS AND RESOLVES 



PAI8BD AT TBB 



MAY SESSION, 1851. 



As Act in amendment of an Act entitled " An Act 
enabling town councils to grant licenses, and for 
other purposes,'* and of the several acts in amend- 
ment thereof 

B is enacted hy the General Assembly nsfoOmos : 

The sixth section of the act to which this is in "Act ena. 
amendment, is hereby so far amended, as to extend the couDci£^° 
proTisions of said act over all the waters of Narragan- j^S^ 

flettBay. andforoth- 

■^ er parpos- 

____ es," fur- 

ther a- 

An Act to preserve the fisheries within the waters of 
the Narragansett Bay, and other navigable waters 

of this State. 

• 

B is enacted hy the General Assembly as follows ': 

Any person or persons, who shall, from and after the Penons 
passage of this act, throw or cause to be thrown, any fighoffaiin- 
parts of menhaden, or fish offal, into any of the waters J^^j® ^^^ 
of Narragansett Bay, or other navigable waters of this ^re of twa 
State, shall upon conviction, be subject to pay a fine upon ©on- 
not exceeding two himdred dollars for each offence ; "^^^^^^ 
to be recovered by indictment before any Court of 
competent jurisdiction to try the same. 



An Act to restore Thomas Wilson Dorr to his civil and 

poUtical rights. 

B is enacted hy the General Assembly as follows : 

That all civil and political disabilities growing out Thomas w 
of the sentence of the Supreme Court passed against ed "to* his 
Thomas W. Dorr, are hereby removed ; and the said ^uuSi* 
Thomas W. Dorr is hereby restored to his civil and n«hta. 



MAT, 1851. 

political rights, in as full a manner and with the same 
eflFect as if said sentence had not been passed. 



Resolution authorising the Secretary of State to have 
printed the joint rules and orders of the Senate and 
of the House ; the Joint and Standing Committees 
of each House, and to obtain and have bound ten 
copies of the Schedules and of the public laws pass- 
ed since the Digest of 1844. 

Secretary Resolved^ That the Secretary cause to be printed in 
to have book form for the use of the General Assembly, the 
KiM^nd**^ joint rules and orders of the two Houses ; the rules 
orders of and ordcrs of the Senate and of the House ; with a 

the two 

Houses and Ust of the Joiut Coumiittees and the Standing Com- 
sc^^Su?e8 mittees of each House, and that he also cause ten copies 
?aw8,^"^^^*^ of the Schedules and of the public laws passed since 

the Digest of 1844 to be obtained and bound for the 

use of this Assembly. 

Resolution for the payment of salaries of Governor 

and Lieutenant Governor. 

Salaries of Resolved. That the sum of foiu* himdred dollars be 
and Lieut, paid out of the General Treasury to his Excellency, 
Governor, jj^jj^y g Authouy, in full for his services as Governor 

of the State for the past year ; and that the sum of 
two hundred dollars be paid out of the General Treas- 
ury to the Honorable Thomas Whipple, in full for his 
services as Lieutenant Governor for the past year. 



Kesolution appropriating sixteen thousand dollars for 

new wings to State Prison. 

New wing Resolved^ That the Inspectors of the State Prison be 
Prison au- and they are hereby authorized to draw out of the 
bJiTi^? State Treasury from time to time, such sums of money 
as they may deem expedient for the pmrpose of ereclr 
ing a wing to the west side of the State Prison, pro- 
vided the whole amount so drawn shall not exceed the 
sum of sixteen thousand dollars. 



MAY, 1851. 5 

RESOLTmoN authorizing the Secretary to pay for and 
distribute the Eeports of the Supreme Court. 

Recked, That, when the reporter of the decisions secretary 
of the Supreme Court shall deposit with the Secretary J^f dwtrib- 
of State three hundred copies of part No. 3 of Vol. wteiuports 

T/»tT%iiTi-iTfc t c>\ in of Supremo 

1 of the Rhode Island Reports, the Secretary shall Court, 
be authorized to draw an order on the General Treas- 
urer in favor of said reporter, for an amount sufficient 
to pay for said Reports at their market price; and 
that he be directed to distribute said Reports as 
follows: to wit — one copy to each of the United 
States; one copy to each of the Town Clerks of this 
State ; one copy to each of the Justices of the Su- 
preme Court ; one copy to each of the Clerks of the 
Courts of this State, to be kept as appendages to their 
said offices, and one copy to each member of the Gen- 
eral Assembly. 



Kesolution appointing Committees to receive and 
transfer the books and papers in the offices of Sec- 
retary of State and Clerks of Courts to their suc- 
cessors. 

Rmked, That Olney Arnold be a Committee to re- ^nSd * 
ceive from the Clerk of the Supreme Comii and Clerk ^f^J^J 
of the Court of Common Pleas of Providence coimty, papers. 
the books, papers and every thing else appertaining 
to their respective offices, and deliver the same to the 
Clerks elected to the said respective offices at the pre- 
sent session, giving and taking the proper receipts for 
the same. 

Jiesolved, That Sylvester Robinson be a Committee to 
receive from the Clerk of the Court of Common Pleas 
for the county of Washington, the books, papers and 
every thing else appertaining to said office, and deliv- 
er the same to the Clerk elected to said office at the 
present session, giving aud taking the proper receipts 
for the same. 

Resolved, That George J. Adams be a committee to 
receive of the Clerks of the Supreme Court and of the 
Court of Common Pleas of Kent county, the books, 
papers and every thing else appertaining to their re- 
spective offices, and deliver the same to the Clerks 



MAY, 1851. 

elected to said respective offices at the present session, 
giving and taking the proper receipts for the same. 

Besolvedy That Benjamin Cottrell be a conmiittee to 
receive of the Clerk of the Supreme Court and the 
Clerk of the Court of Common Pleas for Newport coun- 
ty, the books, papers, and every thing else appertaining 
to their respective offices, and deliver the same to the 
Clerks elected to said respective offices at the present 
session, giving and receiving the proper receipts for 
the same. 

Resolved^ That Hezekiah C. Wardwell be a commit- 
tee to receive from the Clerk of the Supreme Court 
for Bristol county, the books, papers, and every thing 
else appertaining to the said office, and deliver the 
same to the Clerk elected to said office at the present 
session, giving and taking the proper receipts for the 
same. 

Besolvedy That Thomas Davis be a committee to re- 
ceive from the late Secretary of State, the books, par 
pers, and every thing else appertaining to said office, 
and deliver the same to the present incumbent of said 
office, giving and taking the proper receipts for the 
same. 



Ebsolution authorizing Justices of the Peace to make 
returns at the next June session. 

juBticea of Resolved^ That all Justices of the Peace who have 

to makfre^ uot made their returns to the General Treasurer, as 

*"™8- by law provided, are hereby authorized to make them 

on or before the second day of the next session, with 

like eflfect as if they had been made according to law. 



Resolution authorizing auctioneers to make returns on 
or before the first day of July next. 

fJJflSr' J^^olvedy That the Auctioneers of the several towns 

make re- '^^ho havo not made their returns according to law, be 

^"™'' authorized to make them on or before the first day of 

July next, with the same efiect as though the same 

had been made within the time prescribed by law. 



MAY, 1861. 7 

RfiSOLimoN appointing auditors of General Treasurer's 

Accounta 

Resoked, That Messrs. Henry Y. Cranston and ^^^^^^^"^ 
Thomas R Hunter of the House, and Nathan Porter, General 
of tie Senate, be a committee to audit the General Accounts'.' 
Treasurer's accounts; and also to receive from Ste- 
phen Cahoone, late General Treasurer, the books, pa- 
pers and every thing else appertaining to the General 
Treasurer's office, together with the money belonging 
to the State, and deliver the same to Edwin Wilbur, 
the present General Treasurer, giving and taking pro- 
per receipts therefor. 



Ak Act to incorporate the Bank of America. 

Whereas, Charles T. James, P. W. Gardiner, Adnah 
Sackett^ Sanauel James, Geo. B. Holmes, and others. 
Stockholders of the Bank of America, have, by their 
petition to the General Assembly, prayed for an act of 
incorporation : 

B is enacted hy the General Assembly as follows : 

Section 1. The Stockholders of said bank, their ?an^of 
successors and assigns, and such others as may become Providence 
stockholders, shall be, and are hereby made a body ^^^"p®™* 
corporate, by the name of the Bank of America ; and 
by that name are made capable in law to purchase, 
receive, retain and enjoy to them and their successors, 
lands, tenements, heriditaments, goods, chattels and 
eJSecte of whatsoever name or nature, and the same to 
sell, demise, or dispose o^ to sue and be sued, answer, 
and be answered unto, to defend and be defended 
against in all proper courts and in all other places ; 
to make and use a common seal, and the same to 
break, alter and renew at pleasure ; to ordain and ex- 
ecute such by-laws and regulations, as shall be con- 
venient for the government of the Corporation ; and 
generally do all things which to them it shall or may 
appertain to do. 

Sec. 2. The following shall be the constitution of 
said Bank : 

Article 1. The capital stock shall consist of one hun- 
dred thousand dollars in two thousand shares of fifty 



8 MAY, 1851. 

dollars each ; and said capital by a vote of said stock- 
holders at a meeting called for that purpose, may be 
increased to any sum not exceeding five hundred 
thousand dollars. 

Article 2. A general meeting of the stockholders 
shall be holden on the first Monday in July in every 
year, for the election of not less than five, nor more 
than nine directors, and to transact such other busi- 
ness as may legally come before a stockholders' meet- 
ing, and not less than eleven stockholders shall be 
necessary to form a quorum at all stockholders' meet 
ings. Each director shall hold in his own right, at 
least twenty shares in the capital stock, and shall con- 
tinue in office imtil the next annual election of oflBi- 
cers shall be made. The directors shall choose a pres- 
ident from their own body, and may supply any va- 
cancy in said office or in their own board, which may 
happen during the year. The president and directors 
may call special meetings of the stockholders. Every 
stockholders' meeting shall be notified in some Provi- 
dence newspaper,at least ten daysbefore it is tobe holden. 
Every stockholder shall be entitled at all meetings, in 
person or by proxy, to one vote for every share which 
such stockholder shall own ; Provided^ however , that but 
one vote for every ten shares shall be allowed to all 
stockholders holding over twenty ; and no stockhold- 
er shall be entitled to over forty votes in the same 
right. 

Article 3. The president and directors shall meet as 
often as they shall think proper. A majority of the 
directors elected shall constitute a quormn ; may di- 
rect the manner of doing business ; appoint and pay 
such officers as may be necessary ; emit bills of cred- 
it; make contracts, and dispose of the money and 
credit of the bank for the benefit of the stockholders; but 
they shall do nothing contrary to any regulations 
made by the stockholders. They shall from time to 
time, designate three of their number to inspect more 
immediately the business of the bank, who shall at 
least once in each month examine the accounts, and at 
the end of every three months cause them to be reg- 
idarly stated and the balances transferred. A divi- 
dend of the profits of the bank, if any, shall be made 
at least once in every year. The president and direc- 



MAY, 1851. 9 

tors, as such, shall receive no compensation or emolu- 
ment^ except by a vote of a stockholders' meeting. — 
If any president, director, or other officer shall com- 
mit any fraud or embezzlement on the moneys or oth- 
er property of the bank, he shall forfeit his shares in 
the stock to the use of the bank, and be liable to pros- 
ecution at law. 

Article 4. The stock shall be transferable at the 
bank only, by the stockholders or their agents, in the 
form prescribed by the president and directors. No 
person indebted to the bank, shall be allowed to sell or 
transfer his or her stock without the consent of the direc- 
tors ; and this whether indebted as principal, surety, 
or endorser, and whether the debt has become due or 
not The stock of each stockholder shall be liable and 
may be sold at auction by order of the president and 
directors, for the payment of any debt due from such 
stockholder to the bank or so much thereof as may be 
necessary on default of payment thereof when due ; 
bnt sixty days previous notice shall be given of such 
sale in some one of the newspapers printed in the city 
of Providence ; and the surplus of such proceeds over 
such debt and expenses, if any there be, shall be paid 
to such stockholder. 

Artiek 5. No director shall at any time be indebted 
to the bank in a sum exceeding the amount of his 
stock. 

Artick 6. The cashier, clerks, and other officers ap- 
pointed by the president and directors, shall severally 
give bonds to the satisfaction of the directors for the 
faithful performance of their trust. 

Artick 7. The capital stock of said bank shall be 
paid to the cashier or such other person as may be ap- 
pointed to receive the same, by installments, as fol- 
lows, viz : the sum of twenty dollars on each share, on 
or before the first Monday of July, A. D., 1851, and at 
or before the expiration of thirty days from the day 
of said first payment, the fiirther sum of ten dollars on 
each share, and thereafter the remainder of said stock 
flhall be paid in, in installments of ten dollars each, un- 
til the whole is paid ; said payments being made thir- 
ty days from each prior payment And in case any 
default ia the payment of any such installment, the 
t^hare on which it shall be due, with all installments 

2 



10 MAY, 1851. 

paid thereon shall be forfeited to the use and benefit 
of the bank. Said bank shall be located and estab- 
lished in the city of Providence. 

Sec. 3. The Governor shall appoint three commis- 
sioners to superintend the organization of said bank, 
who shall open a book or books.^ of subscription for 
the capital stock, giving notice of the time and place 
in at least two newspapers printed in this State. — 
The stock shall be apportioned, in proportion as near 
as may be, to the amount subscribed by each person 
who shall in their opinion have the ability to make a 
bona fide investment When the bo<dts are closed, 
the commissioners shall apportion the stock a» afore- 
said, and file a copy of the apportionment in the office 
of the Secretary of State. And the persons to whom 
the stock is apportioned shall then constitute the cor- 
poration created by this act, and shall meet at a 
time and place appointed by the commissioners to or- 
ganize and transact business. A majority of the com- 
missioners shall be competent to act They shall be 
sworn or affijmed to the faithful discharge of their du- 
ties. The compensation of said commissioners shall 
be paid by the bank. Said bank shall not ga into 
operation nor shall any bills be issued, until the first 
installment, herein before" provided, shall have been 
paid in in cash ; and the commissioners shall be fully 
satisfied of said fact, and that said payment is bona 
fide made, and shall sign a certificate to that efiect, 
which shall be filed in the office of the Secretary of 
State. The officers chosen at the meeting called by 
said commissioners for organization, or at any adjourn- 
ment thereof, shall hold thier offices until the next 
annual meeting, and until others are appointed in 
their stead. No person shall ever be allowed to hold 
at any one time, more than one-tenth of the shares of 
the capital stock of the bank. 

Sec 4. The stockholders of said corporation shall be 

personally and individually liable for all debts due 

"fi*om said bank, provided that the corporation be first 

sued and the corporate property first exhausted in the 

payment of the debts of the corporation. 

Sec. 6. A sum of money equal to one and one-halt 
per cent upon the aforesaid sum of one hundred 
thousand dollars, shall be by the said bank paid to the 



MAY, 1851. 11 

General Treasurer for the use of the State in the man- 
ner follo\nng, viz : one third part thereof on the first 
Monday of October, 1851 ; one third part thereof on 
the first Monday of December, 1851 ; and the remain- 
der on the first Monday of March, 1852. 

Sec, 6. In case the capital stock of said bank shall 
liereafler be increased, in pursuance of the provisions 
of tins act of incorporation, the said bank shall within 
ninety days of the time of such increase, pay to the 
General Treasurer for the use of the State, in manner 
by law provided, the sum of two per cent upon the 
additional amoimt of capital stock ; and the said banJc 
in all respects, as to the insertion of such increase fix)m 
time to time, in its annual report, and as to the col- 
lection of such sums or any part thereof mentioned in 
Ihis section, if default be made in payment, shall be 
subject to all the provisions and penalties provided in 
and by the act entitled ^ an act imposing a duty upon 
licensed persons and others, and bodies corporate/' 



An Act to incorporate the Merchants Insurance Com- 
pany, in Providence. 

M 18 enacted hy the General Assembfy asfoUaws : 

SficnoN 1. That Amasa Manton, William Foster, MerohantB 
Moses B. Lockwood, Samuel B. Wheaton, William c*!!!^^ 
Comstock, William Sprague, Hezekiah Anthony, Wil- dc^in- 
liam Viall, Asa Kerce, Boyal Chapin, Henry Lippitt, coipomted. 
Robert L. Lippitt, Joseph Manton, Charles L. Fisher, 
Truman Beckwith, Samuel Foster, Paris Hill, Joseph 
Carpenter, William J. Cross, Earl P. Mason, Seth Pad- 
elford, Charles T, James, Adnah Sackett, Duty Greene, 
Bobert Manton, Walter Manton, Henry A. Hidden, 
Jabez C. Knight, Byron Sprague, Orray Taft, Edward 
A. Green, WUliam H. Bowen, and James G. Anthony 
of said Company, together ;ith their succe^rs anS 
assigns, and such others as they may associate with 
them, be and they are hereby erected, created and or- 
dained a body politic and corporate, by the name and 
style of the Merchants Insurance Company in Providence ; 
and by that name shall have perpetual succession, and 
shall be able and capable in law to make insurance on 
vessels, and on freight and all property laden on board 



12 MAY, 1851. 

thereof ; upon houses and other buildings and the fur- 
niture and other goods therein, and upon all other le- 
gal subjects of insurance, except life insurance ; to ac- 
quire, purchase, hold, possess and enjoy lands, tene- 
ments, goods and chattels, and all other effects of every 
kind and nature, and the same at pleasure to sell, de- 
mise, lease and otherwise dispose of ; to have and to 
keep a common seal, and the same at all times to alter, 
destroy and renew; to ordain and pass such rules, 
regulations and by-laws for the government of said 
company and for conducting the business thereof, as 
may be judged expedient, provided the same are not 
repugnant to the laws of this State or of the United 
States, and generally to do and transact all matters 
and things fit and proper for bodies corporate to do, 
act and transact 

- Sbc. 2. Said company, by and in the corporate name 
of said company, shall have full power and authority 
to sue and be sued, to plead and be impleaded, to de- 
fend and be defended against, and to answer and be 
answered unto, in all courts of law and equity. 

Sbc. 3. Said company shall be and they hereby are 
authorized and empowered to hold annual meetings on 
the first Wednesday of June in each and every year, 
and at all such other times in each year as they may 
deem necessary ; at which said annual meeting, the 
said company shall elect not less than nine, nor more 
than fifteen directors, to hold their office for one year, 
and at the said meeting, and at all other legal meet- 
ings, said company may choose such other officers as 
they may judge necessary for conducting the business 
thereof, and in case of vacancies in the office of direc- 
tors as aforesaid, by death, resignation, or disqualifica- 
tion, the board of directors shall have power to fill the 
same \mtil the then next annual meeting. 

Sec. 4. No person shall be eligible to the office of 
director as aforesaid, unless at the time of his election 
he shall be a proprietor of at least twenty shares in 
said company, and shall be a resident of tiiis State ; 
and that no director shall hold said office longer than 
he shall continue a proprietor and resident as afore- 
said ; and the said directors for the time being shall 
have power to elect from their number a president ; 
to employ a secretary and other officers if necessary, 



MAY, 1851. 13 

and to allow said president^ secretary and officers a 
reasonable compensation for their respective services ; 
to agree upon all policies of insurance and the premi- 
ums and cause the same to be signed by the president 
in behalf of said company and countersigned by the 
secretaiT, who shall also sign and countersign respect- 
ively, all other written contracts and agreements made 
by said company ; to make all contracts to appropri- 
ate and improve the funds and property of said com- 
pany, and the same to dispose of in such manner as 
they deem most beneficial thereto, and generally to 
superintend and execute the affairs and business of 
said company, conformable to the rules, regulations 
aud provisions thereof; provided, nevertheless, that 
whenever the president diall be interested otherwise 
than as a stockholder in any policy of insurance or 
other contract or agreement made with said company, 
or diall be absent, the same shall be signed by two 
disinterested directors ; and no director shall vote or 
exercise any authority upon any question or in any 
case, in which he has an interest other than that of a 
stockholder as aforesaid. 

Sec. 5. The said directors shall cause to be kept 
a record of their proceedings, and from and after 
the first policy shall have been issued, shall quar- 
terly cause the accounts to be regularly stated, and 
once a year or oftener cause a dividend to be made of 
80 much of the profits of the company as they may 
judge advisable ; the said directors shall have power 
to pass by-laws and regulations touching the execu- 
tion of the business within their peculiar province, 
provided the same are not repugnant to law, and to 
the rules and regulations established by the stockholders ; 
provided, nevertheless, that in case of a diminution 
of the capital stock by losses, no dividend shall be made 
until a sum equal to such diminution arising from the 
profits, be added to the capital stock. 

Sec. 6. That if any director or other ofl&cer shall 
commit fraud or embezzlement upon the funds or pro- 
perty of said company, he shall forfeit all his shares 
and interest therein and be liable to further prosecu- 
tion by law. 

Sbc. 7. That if any porson or persons who now are 
or hereafter may be indebted to said company for 



14 MAY, 1851. 

shares therein, shall neglect to pay to said company any 
of his, her or their installments on or before the day 
whereon the same may become payable, he, she or 
they, so neglecting, as aforesaid, shall forfeit to said 
company, all his, her, or their shares and interest there- 
in, and also the monies which he, she, or they may 
have paid to said company, for shares as aforesaid; 
and shall moreover be liable to the payment of the 
remaining instaUments due on his, her, or their note or 
notes respectively ; provided, nevertheless, that in case 
of the death of any stockholder, a failure of pajrment 
of such stockholder's share or shares, shall not operate 
as a forfeiture of such share or shares, if payment 
thereof with interest shall be made within six months 
after such death as aforesaid. 

Sec. 8. That every stockholder shall, in person, or 
or by proxy, be entitled at all general meetings to as 
many votes as he or she holds shares, if the number 
does not exceed twenty ; and all shares over twenty, 
one vote on five shares, provided that no person shall 
have more than forty votes in his own right ; the stock 
or shares shall be transferable at the insurance office 
only and by such form as the president and directors 
shall prescribe from time to time, but no stockholder 
being indebted to the company either- as principal or 
endorser, individually or as copartner, whether the 
same has become due and payable or not, shall be al- 
lowed to sell or transfer his or her shares, without the 
consent of the president and directors for the time be- 
ing. And the stock of each stockholder is declared to 
be at all times pledged and liable for the payment of 
any debts due, or liability incurred to said office, other 
than original instalments ; and may be sold, or so many 
shares thereof as shall be necessary, by said president, 
directors and company, at public auction, for the sat- 
isfaction thereof; sixty days previous notice of such 
sale being given in one of the newspapers printed in 
Providence, and the surplus, if any, to be paid over to 
such stockholder. 

Sec. 9. The capital stock of said company shall not 
exceed the sum of five hundred thousand dollars, to be 
divided into shares of fifty dollars each ; that shares 
to the amount of one hundred and fifty thousand dol- 
lars shall be taken by the stockholders, and one fifth 



MAY, 1851. 15 

of the amount paid in before any policy shall be is- 
sued by said company ; and the remaining four-fifths 
shall be paid in when it may be deemed expedient by 
the board of directors ; and that the stockholders in 
said company, shall not be liable to any responsibility 
further than the amount of their respective shares and 
interest therein, for, or on account of any damage or 
loss sustained by said company, or for, or on account 
of any debts due thereon; provided, nevertheless, that 
the stock of said company shall not be increased be- 
yond the before named sum of one hundred and fifty 
thousand dollars, unless a majority of all the votes of 
the stockholders shall be given for the augmentation 
thereof and provided also, that no regulation shall be 
made to eflFect the rights acquired under subscriptions 
previous to angmentation. 

Sec 10. Tliat in case said company shall fail to elect 
their directors or any part thereof on the days re- 
spectively appointed by this charter for that purpose, 
the same may be nevertheless elected at any meeting 
of the stockholders thereafterwards to be holden. 

Sbc, 11. Process against said corporation may be 
served on the president or secretary or either of the 
directors thereof 

Skc. 12. Either of the persons named in the first 
section of this act may call the first meeting of the 
corporation for the purpose of organization and the 
election of officers, and the persons so elected shall 
hold their offices until the first annual meeting, first 
giving personal notice of the time and place thereof 
to the persons named in the first section of this act, 
and to the other petitioners for the same. 



An Act to incorporate the " People's Savings Bank, 

in Providence.'* 

B is enacted by the Gmiercd Aesenihly as follows : 

Section 1. That William Sprague, Orray Taft;, Mat-^Peopie'* 
tiiew Watson, Paris Hill, Joseph Carpenter, Asa Pierce, Bank m 
William Grosvenor, Resolved Waterman, Austin Gur- jn'S^ra? 
ney, Amos D. Smith, George W. Hallet, Earl P. Mason, «i." 
Samuel Foster, James T. Rhodes, James G. Anthony, 
Hezekiah Anthony, William Viall, Royal Chapin, Jo- 



16 MAY, 1851. 

seph Manton, Shubael Hutchins, Edward A Green, 
Truman Beckwith, Allen 0. Peck, John Larchar, Wal- 
ker Humphrey, Cyrus Taft, William Comstock, Peleg 
A. Rhodes, Seth Padelford, William J. Cross, George 
A. Burrough, Edward K Manton, Jabez C. Knight^ By- 
ron Sprague, Henry Lippitt, Edward Walcott, Wil- 
liam M. Bailey, Charles H. Mason, William H. Bowen, 
Amos N. Beckwith, Robert R. Stafford, James Y. Smith, 
Henry W. Lothrop, Robert Manton, William Foster, 
Robert W. Watson, Henry A. Hidden, Robert L. Lip- 
pitt, John H. Mason, John N. Mason, Vamima J. Bates, 
Daniel V. Day, John A. Taft, Ezra Bourne, Tully D. 
Bowen, Walter Paine, Jr., and Earl Carpenter, are 
hereby created and made a body corporate by the 
name, style and title of the People's Savings Banky m 
Providence^ and they and such others as shall be elect- 
ed members of said corporation, as in this act provided, 
shall be and remain a body corporate with perpetual 
succession. 

Sec. 2. Said corporation may have a common seal, 
which they may change and renew at pleasure, and by 
the name aforesaid, shall sue and may be sued, may 
defend and shall be holden to answer, and at any legal 
meeting thereof shall have full power and authority to 
make and establish such rules, regulations and by-laws 
for the government of said corporation and the man- 
agement of the affairs thereof, as they may deem nec- 
essary and expedient, provided the same are not re- 
pugnant to the laws of the United States, or of this 
State, and shall also have power and authority, at any 
legal meeting, to elect by ballot any other person or 
persons members of said corporation. 

Sec. 3. Said corporation shall hereafter meet in 
Providence, on the first Wednesday in October, annu- 
ally, and as much oftener as they may judge expedi- 
ent. Any seven members of said corporation, of whom 
two at least shall be directors, shall be a quorum. — 
And at the said annual meeting, said corporation shall 
have power to elect a President, three Vice Presidents, 
and twelve Directors, who, together, shall constitute a 
board of Trustees, together with such other officers as 
shall appear necessary, which officers shall continue in 
office one year, and until others are chosen in their 
room. 



MAY, 1851. 17 

Sbc- 4. Said corporation shall be capable of receiv- 
ing from any person or persons any deposit or deposits 
of naoney, and to use and improve the same for the 
purposes and according to the directions herein pro- 
vided Provided, however, that the amount of the 
whole sum received by said corporation and remain- 
ing under its management shall never exceed at any 
time the sum of one million dollars. 

Sec. 5. All deposits of money received by said cor- 
poration sliall be used and improved to the best ad- 
vantage, and the income or profits thereof, shall be by 
them applied and divided among the persons making 
the said deposits, their heirs, executors or administrar 
tors, in just proportion, with such reasonable deduc- 
tions as the management of the affairs of said corpora- 
tion may require ; and the principal of such deposits 
may be withdrawn at such times and in such manner 
as ^id corporation sliall direct. 

Sec. 6- All accounts on which no deposit or draft 
shall be made for twenty years in succession, shall be 
so fex closed that neither the sums deposited, nor the 
interest that shall have accrued thereon, shall be en- 
titled to any interest after the expiration of twenty 
years from the time of the last deposit or draft. 

And whereas the following regulations have been 
agreed upon for the management of the affairs of the 
said corporation, viz : 

First Object of this corporation, To enable all per- 
sons to invest such part of their earnings or property 
as they may choose in a manner which wUl afford 
them security and profit. 

Second. Management. — The affairs of siiid corpora- 
tion shall be managed by a president, three vice-presi- 
dents, and twelve directors, who together shall consti- 
tute the board of trustees as aforesaid. They shall 
have powder to elect a treasurer, secretary, and such 
other officers as they may deem expedient, and to fill 
all vacancies in their board which may happen during 
the year. They shall meet at least twice in every 
year, and as much oftener as they may deem neces- 
sary, and whenever meetings shall be required by the 
president or any two directors ; and it shall be the 
duty of the treasurer to notify such meetings, either 
by personal notice, or by advertisement in one of the 

3 



18 MAY, 1851. 

newspapers printed in Providence, and at all meetings 
of the board of trustees five members shall make a 
quormn. And it shall be the duty of the board of 
trustees to cause the monies deposited to be invested 
in some public stocks, in bank or other stock, or in 
private securities, at the discretion of a standing com- 
mittee of the board. The members of the board shall 
not receive any emolument for their services, nor shall 
any money be loaned to either of them. And any 
member of the board who shall be present when any 
loan to a member shall be made, and shall not at that 
time cause his protest to be entered in writing on the 
records of the proceedings of the board against the 
same, shall be considered and held liable for the 
amount of every such loan in his individual person 
and property. And the said members of the boaxd, 
(except as aforesaid) shall not be responsible for any 
losses which may happen from whatever cause, except 
their wilful corrupt misconduct, in which case those 
only who were present and guilty of such misconduct^ 
shall be responsible for the same. And the board of 
trustees, at any meeting at which seven at least of 
them shall be present, and after due notice of such in- 
tention at a previous meeting, may make such further 
rules, regulations and by-laws, or alteration of those 
already made, as they may deem necessary, provided 
that the same may be disallowed by said corporation 
at their next meeting. And all such rules, regulations 
and by-laws and alterations, shall be equally binding 
on all depositors as those by them subscribed, the same 
being first duly made known. 

Third. The Treasurer. — ^The treasurer before he en- 
ters on the duties of his office shall give bonds with 
sufficient surety or sureties to the corporation, to be 
determined by the board of trustees, for the faithful 
execution of the duties of his office. He may receive 
such reasonable compensation for his services as may 
be allowed by the board of trustees, but no monies 
shall be loaned to him ; he shall receive all deposits, 
enter the same in the books of the corporation, pay 
out all dividends which shall be declared, and render 
an account of the property and funds of the corporar 
tion to the board of Trustees or the corporation, when 
requested thereto by a vote. 



MAY, 1851. 19 

FourtL Deposits.! — ^All deposits shall be made at 
the office of the treasurer, in the city of Providence. — 
The smallest deposit shall be om dollar and the lowest 
sam whicii shall be put upon interest, shall be five dol' 
larSy and no fractional parts of a dollar shall be re- 
ceived An account shall be given in a book to each 
depositor by the treasurer, of the sum deposited, which 
sJiall be the evidence of the depositor's property in 
said corporation, who shall, on making the first depos- 
it^ subscribe and thereby signify his assent to the rules, 
r^ulations and by-laws of the corporation. Any de- 
positor at the time of making his deposit, may desig- 
nate the period for which he is desirous the same 
should remain, and the person for whose benefit the 
same is made, which shall be binding on him and his 
legal representatives — provided, however, that said 
deposit and its accruing dividends may be paid oflF ao- 
oording to the provisions hereinafter mentioned. Every 
person making a deposit personally, may withdraw 
the money deposited and the dividends that may have 
accrued thereon, notwithstanding the person at the 
time of withdrawing the same may be a married 
woman, and the receipt of such married woman shall 
be a sufficient discharge of said corporation for the 
sum so withdrawn. 

Fifth. Dividends. — ^At such times as the board of 
trustees shall determine, there shall be declared and 
paid on all sums of and above five doUars, which shall 
have been deposited, a dividend of such per centum 
per annum as the board shall determine, and a pro- 
portionate rate of interest shall be paid on any such 
sum which shall have been deposited tor the space of 
three months preceding. No interest shall be paid on 
any sums withdrawn for the period which may have 
elapsed since the last dividend — provided, that at the 
time of making any dividend, or within one month 
thereafter, the board of trustees may, at their pleasure, 
pay off the whole of any deposits due to any deposit- 
or whose aggregate sum shall amount to two hundred 
dollars, or such proportion thereof as they may think 
proper. 

Sixth. Mode of receiving dividends and of withdraw- 
hig deposits. — ^Dividends may be received either per- 
sonally, or by the order in writing of the depositors, or 



20 MAY, 1851. 

by letter of attorney. Deposits shall only be with- 
drawn by the depositor, or some person by him legal- 
ly authorized, but no person shall receive any part of 
his principal or dividends without producing the origi- 
nal book, that such payment may be entered thereon. 
No money shall be withdrawn except on the second 
Wednesdays in October, January, April and July, and 
one week's notice of the intention of withdrawing the 
same shall be given to the treasurer in writing. And 
no sum less than ten dollars of his capital shall be 
withdrawn by any depositor, unless the whole sum by 
him deposited shall be less than that amount. 

Seventh. Institution how dissolved. — The board of 
trustees by a vote of the major part of the whole num- 
ber, may at any time divide the whole property among 
the depositors in proportion to their respective inter- 
ests therein, upon giving three months' notice thereof 
and shall also have power to refuse to receive any de- 
posit at their pleasure. 

Sec. 7. The foregoing shall be the regulations for 
the government of said corporation, as part of this act. 



An Act to incorporate " the Bank of Commerce, in 

Providence." 

ofCom-"^ Section 1. The stockholders of said Bank, their 
merce in succcssors and assigns, and such others as may become 
dence/» in- Stockholders, shall be and are hereby made a body 
corporated. corporate by the name of The Bank of Commerce in 
Protideoice : . and by that name are made capable in 
law to purchase, receive, retain and enjoy, to ^them 
and their successors, lands, tenements, hereditamente, 
goods, chattels and ^effects of whatever name or nature, 
and the same to sell, demise or dispose of; to sue and 
be sued, answer and be answered unto, defend and be 
defended against, in all proper courts and in all other 
places ; to make and use a common seal, and the same 
to break, alter and renew at pleasure ; to ordain and 
execute such by-laws and regulations as shall be con- 
venient for the government of the corporation, not 
being contrary to law or the constitution of said Bank ; 
and, generally, to do all things which to them it shall 
or may appertain to do. 



MAY, 1851. 21 

Sec. 2. And the following shall be the Constitution 
of said Bank : 

Artiek 1. The capital stock shall consist of four 
hundred thousand dollars in eight thousand shares of 
fifty dollars each ; but the stockholders may augment 
said ftock at any special meeting or meetings, called 
for that purpose, a majority of all the votes being 
given therefor under such regulations as they shall 
think proper, to any amount not exceeding one mil- 
lion dollars. 

Artiek 2. A general meeting of the stockholders 
shall be holden on the first Monday of June in every 
year, for the election of not less than five, nor more 
than nine directors, and to transact such other busi- 
nea as may legally come before a stockholders' meet- 
mg. Eleven stockholders shall be necessary for a 
quonnn at all stockholders' meetings. Each director 
shall hold in his own right at least twenty shares in 
the capital stock, and shall continue in office one year, 
or untU the next annual election of directors shall have 
heen made. The directors shall choose a President 
from their own body, and may supply all vacancies in 
the oflBce of President or directors, which shall hap- 
pen during the year. The President and directors 
may call special meetings of the stockholdera Every 
stockholders' meeting shall be notified in one of the 
Providence newspapers at least ten days before it shall 
he holden. Every stockholder shall, in person, or by 
proxy, be entitled at all stockholders' meetings to one 
vote for every share which he or she may own in the 
stock, not exceeding twenty, and to one vote for every 
ten shares over twenty ; but no person or body cor- 
porate shall have more than forty votes, in his, their, 
or her own right. 

Article 3. Tlie President and directors shall meet as 
often as they shall think proper. A majority of the 
directors elected shall constitute a quorum ; may di- 
rect the manner of doing business ; appoint and pay 
^^ch officers as may be necessary ; emit bills of credit; 
make contracts, and dispose of the money and credit of 
the bank for the benefit of the stockholders ; but they 
shall do nothing contrary to the regulations made by 
the stockholders. They shall from time to time, desig- 
nate three of their number to inspect more immedi- 



22 MAY, 1851. 

ately the business of the bank, who shall at least once 
a month examine the accomits, and at the end of 
every three months cause them to be regularly stated 
and the balance transferred. A dividend of the pro- 
fits of the Bank (if 'any) shall be made at least once in 
every year. The President and directors shall, as 
such, receive no compensation, except by a vote of a 
stockholders' meeting. And if any President, director, 
or other officer shall commit any jEraud or embezzle- 
ment on the monies or other property of the Bank, he 
shall forfeit his shares in the Bank to the use and 
benefit of the Bank, and be liable to prosecution at 
law. 

The stock shall be transferable at the Bank only by 
the stockholders or their agents, in the form prescribed 
by the President and directors. No person indebted 
to the Bank shall be allowed to seU or transfer his or 
her stock without the consent of the directors, and this, 
whether indebted as principal, surety, or indoraer, 
either individually or as copartners, and whether the 
. debt has become due or not. The stock of each stock- 
holder shall be liable and may be sold at auction, by 
order of the President and directors, for the payment 
of any debts due from such stockholders to the bank, 
or so much thereof as may be necessary, in default of 
pajnnent thereof when due. But sixty days previous 
notice of such sale, shall be given in one of the Prov- 
idence newspapers, and the surplus of proceeds over 
such debt and expenses, if any there be, shall be paid 
to such stockholder. 

Article 5. The cashier, clerks, and other officers, ap- 
pointed by the President and directors, shall severally 
give bonds to the satisfaction of the directors for the 
faithful performance of their trust. 

Article 6. The capital stock of said bank shall be 
paid to the cashier, or such other person as may be 
appointed to receive the same, by installments as fol- 
lows, viz : the sum of twenty dollars on each shaxe 
shall be paid on the first Monday of Jidy next ; ten 
doUars on each share on the first Monday of Septem- 
ber next ; ten dollars on each share on the first Mon- 
day of November next ; and ten dollars on each share 
on the first Monday of January next ; and no stock- 
holder shall sell or dispose of his, her, or their stock, 



MAY, 1851. 23 

until the whole amount of the capital stock shall have 
been paid in, except stock belonging to deceased or 
insolvent persons. And in case any default be made 
in the payment of any such installment, the share on 
which it shall be due, with all installments paid there- 
on, shall be forfeited to the use and benefit of the 
bank 

Sec. S. The stockholders of said corporation shall 
be personally and individually liable for all debts due 
from said bank, provided, that the corporation be first 
saed, and the corporate property first exhausted in 
the payment of the debts of the corporation. 

Sec. 4. A sum of money equal to one and a half 
per cent upon the aforesaid sum of four hundred 
thousand dollars, shall be by the said bank paid to the 
CSeneral Treasurer for the use of the State, in the man- 
ner foflowing, viz : one third part thereof on the first 
Monday of November, 1851 ; one third part thereof 
on the first Monday of March, 1852 ; and the remain- 
der on the first Monday of July, 1852. 

Sec. 5. In case the capital stock of said bank shall 
hereafter be increased, in pursuance of the provisions 
of this act of incorporation, the said bank shall, with- 
in ninety days of the time of such increase, pay to 
the General Treasurer for the use of the State, the 
Bom of two per cent upon the additional amount of 
Hiid capital stock, at the time and in the manner by 
Iftw provided, and the said bank in all respects, as to 
the insertion of such increase, from time to .time, in 
its annual report, and as to the collection of such sums 
or any part thereof mentioned in this section, if de- 
&ult be made in payment, shall be subject to all the 
provifflons and penalties provided in and by the Act 
entitled ^An Act imposing a duty upon licensed persons and 
^^9j md bodies corporater 

SBa 6. The Grovemor shall appoint one or more, 
not to exceed three Commissioners, to superintend the 
<)iganization of said bank, who shall open a book or 
lK)ok8 of subscription for the capital stock, giving no- 
tice of the time and place in at least two newspapers 
printed in this State. The stock shall be apportioned, 
^ proportion as near as may be, to the amount sub- 
ttribed by each person who shall in their opinion have 
the ability to make a bona fide investment. 



24 MAY, 1851. 

When th$ books are closed, the Commissioners shall 
apportion the stock as aforesaid, and file a copy of the 
apportionment in the office of the Secretary of State. 
And the persons to whom the stock is apportioned, 
shall then constitute the corporation created by this 
act, and shall meet at a time and place appointed by 
the Commissioners, to organize and transact busi- 
nes& They shall be sworn or affirmed to the faith- 
ful discharge of their duties. 

The compensation of said Commissioners shall be 
paid by the bank, and shall not exceed the sum of fifty 
dollars each. Said bank shall not go into operation, 
nor shall any bills be issued, until the first installment 
herein before provided shall have been paid in in cash ; 
and the Commissioners shall be fully satisfied of said 
fact, and that said payment is bona fide made, and 
shall sign a certificate to that efiect, which shall be 
filed in the office of the Secretary of State. The offi- 
cers chosen at the meeting called by said Commission- 
ers for organization, or at any adjournment thereof 
shall hold their offices until the next annual meeting, 
and until others are appointed in their stead. No per- 
son shall ever be allowed to hold at any one time, 
more than one-tenth of the shares of the capital stock 
of the bank. 



An Act to Incorporate the Stockholders of ^ The Cit- 
izens' Bank." 

li 18 eimded ly the General Assemhb/ as foUoivs : 

Blnk,"^ Section 1. Eli Pond, John M. Daniels, John E. 
woonsock. Brown, J. Marble Dow, Seth L. Weld, Bethuel A. Slo- 
et,^coipo- ^^jj^ jyj^ Albert Jenckes, and their successors and as- 
signs, and such others as may become stockholders, 
shall be, and are hereby made a body corporate, by 
the name of The OUizejis Batik ; and by that name are 
made capable in law to piurchase, receive, retain and 
enjoy, to them and their successors, lands, tenements!, 
hereditaments, goods, chattels, and effects, of whatso- 
ever name or nature, and the same to sell, demise or 
dispose of; to sue and be sued, answer and be answer- 
ed unto, defend, and be defended against^ in all pro- 
per courts, and in all other places ; to make and use a 



MAY, 1851. 25 

common seal and the same to break, alter and renew, 
at pleasure ; to ordain and execute such by-jaws and 
regulations as shall be convenient for the government 
of the corporation ; and generally, to do all things 
which to them it shall or may appertain to do. 

Sec 2. The following shall be the Constitution of 
said bank : 

Arfic/e 1. The capital stock of said bank shall con- 
sist of twenty-five thousand dollars, in one thousand 
{diares of twenty-five dollars each ; and the said capi- 
tal, by a vote of said stockholders, a majority of the 
votes polled being given therefor, at a meeting or 
meetings specially called for that purpose, may be in- 
creased to one hundred and fifty thousand dollars, 

Arliele 2. A general meeting of the stockholders of 
aaid corporation shall be holden on the first Monday 
of July, in each and every year, for the election of not 
leas than five, or more than thirteen directors ; a ma- 
jority of the directors elected shall constitute a quo- 
rum, for the transaction of business ; and not less than 
nine stockholders shall be necessary to form a quorum 
at all stockholders' meetings. 

The directors shall, at said annual meeting, elect 
from their own number, a president ; and said presi- 
dent and directors shall hold their offices for one year, 
and until others are elected and qualified in their 
places. In case of the death or resignation of any of 
said directors or president, the remainder of them shall 
have power to fill such vacancy, to hold till the next 
annual election. 

The president and directors, or a majority of them, 
may call special meetings of the stockholders. Every 
special stockholders' meeting shall be notified in a pub- 
lic newspaper printed in Woonsocket, if such there be, 
and if none such, then in a public newspaper printed 
in the city of Providence, at least ten days before it 
Aall be holden. Each director shall hold in his own 
right, at least twenty shares of the capital stock of said 
corporation ; and every stockholder shall, in person or 
by proxy, be entitled to one vote for every serare not 
exceedmg twenty shares, and one vote for every five 
shares over twenty ; but shall in no case be entitled 
to more than forty votes in his or her own right 
ArHeie 3. The president and directors, or a majority 

4 



26 MAY, 1861. 

of them, (ahall meet as often as they think proper, and 
shall have the general supervision and management 
of the business and property of said corporation ; and 
shall appoint a cashier and such other officers as they 
shall deem necessary, and fix their compensation, and 
from time to time may remove the same ; may emit 
bills of credit, make all contracts, and dispose of the 
moneys and credit of said corporation, for the benefit 
of the stockholders thereof : provided^ they do nothing 
contrary to the rules and by-laws, made by said stock- 
holders. And any number of directors, not less than 
three, shall constitute a quorum for discount purposes. 
They shall, from time to time designate three of their 
number to inspect more particularly the busmes of 
the bank, who shall, at least once a month, examine 
the accounts, and at the end of three months, cause 
them to be regularly stated, and the balances traois- 
ferred. 

The president and directors shall, as such, receive no 
compensation or emolument, except by a vote of the 
stockholders' meeting ; and if any president, director, 
or other officer of said corporation, shall commit any 
fraud or embezzlement on the property of said bank, 
he shall forfeit his shares in the bank to the use and 
benefit of the bank, and be liable to prosecution at 
law. 

Article 4. The stock shall be transferable at the 
bank only, by the holders thereof or their attomeyfl^ 
in the form prescribed by the president and directoia 
No person indebted to the bank shall be allowed to 
sell, transfer, pledge, or in any way dispose of his or 
her stock without the consent of the directors ; and aD 
the stock of every stockholder shall at all times be lia- 
ble, and first pledged, to said corporation, for the pay- 
ment of all debts and liabilities of said stockholder, 
whether owing by him as principal, endorser, surety 
or otherwise, and whether due or not due, and may be 
sold by order of the president and directors, for the 
payment of any such debt to said corporation j notice 
of such intended sale, to be given not less than sixty 
days, in some public newspaper printed in Woonsock- 
et, if any, if not then in the city of Providence ; the 
surplus of such sale, if any, after the payment of all 
such (l^ts and liabilities to said corporation, and the 



MAY, 1851. 27 

expenses of such sale, to be paid over to such stock- 
holder. 

Ariiek ^ The cashier, clerks, and other officers ap- 
pointed by the president and directors, shall severally 
give bond to the satisfaction of the directors, for the 
fiuthihi performaxice of their trust. 

ArUck 6. The capital stock of said bank shall be 
paid to the cashier or such other person as may be ap- 
pointed to receive the same, by instaUments as follows, 
m : The sum of ten dollars on each share, on the first 
Monday of July, A. D., 1851. The sum of ten dollars 
on each share, on the first Monday of September, A. 
D., 1851, and the sum of five dollars on each share on 
the first Monday of December, A. D., 1851. And no 
stockholder shall sell or dispose of his, her, or their 
stock, until the whole amount of the capital stock shall 
have been paid in, except stock belonging to deceased 
or insolvent persons. And in case .any default be 
made in the payment of any such installment, the share 
on which it shall be due, with all installments paid 
thereon, shall be forfeited to the use and benefit of the 
bank. 

Sec. 3. The Governor shall appoint three Commis- 
sioners to superintend the organization of said bank, 
who shall open a book or books of subscription for the 
capital stock, giving notice of the time and place, in 
at least two newspapers printed in this State. 

The stock shall be apportioned, as near as may be, 
to the amount subscribed by each person, who shall, 
in their opinion, have the ability and disposition to 
make a bona fide investment. When the books are 
closed, the Commissioners shall apportion the stock as 
aforesaid, and file a copy of the apportionment in the 
office of the Secretary of State, and the persons to 
whom the stock is apportioned, shall then constitute 
the corporation created by this act, and shall meet at 
a time and place, appointed by the Commissioners, to 
organize and transact business. 

A majority of the Commissioners shall be compe- 
tent to act They shall be sworn or affirmed to the 
fitithful discharge of their duties. The compensation 
of said Commissioners shall be paid by the bank. — 
Said bank shall not go into operation, nor shall any 
Jl>i]ls ]ifi issued, until the first installment herein before 



28 MAY, 1851- 

provided, shall have been paid in, in cash, and the 
Commissioners shall be fully satisfied of said fact, and 
that the said payment is boL fide made, and shall sign 
a certificate to that efiect, which shall be filed in the 
office of the Secretary of State. The officers chosen 
at the meeting called by said Commissioners for 
organization, or at any adjournment thereoi^ shall hold 
their offices until the next annual meeting, and until 
others are appointed in their places. No person shall 
ever be allowed to hold at any one time, more than 
one*tenth of the shares of the capital stock of said 
bank. 

Sbc. 4. The said bank shall be located in Cumbe^ 
land, in the Village of Woonsocket, and in such build- 
ing as shall be directed by a majority of the votes 
polled at any stockholders' meeting. 

Sec. 6. The stockholders of said corporation shall 
be personally and individually liable for all debts due 
from said bank, provided that the corporation be first 
sued, and the corporate property first exhausted, in 
the payment of the debts of the corporation. 

Sec. 6. A sum of money equal to one and a half 
per cent, upon the aforesaid sum of twenty-five thou- 
sand dollars, shall be by said bank paid to the General 
Treasurer, for the use of the State, in the manner fol- 
lowing, viz : one third part thereof, on the first Mon- 
day of November, A. D., 1851. One third part thereof 
on the first Monday of March, A. D., 1852. And the 
remainder on the first Monday of July, A D., 1852. — 
And upon any addition to the capital stock of said 
bank, as herein provided, a sum of money equal to 
two per cent, on such additional stock, shall be paid 
by said bank to the General Treasurer for the use'of 
the State, as by law provided. 



An Act to incorporate the Stockholders of the ^ Rail 

Road Bank." 

R^^ Road Whereas, Edward Harris, Elisha Gaskill, George S. 

wwnflock. Wardwell, William Metcalf, Eli Pond, jr., Edward C. 

et,^coipo. Cranston, Lewis Metcalf, Jacob Morse, Samuel S. Foss^ 
and others, have by their petition to this General As- 
sembly, prayed for an act of incorporation, by the 
name and style of the Rail Road BarJc : 



MAY, 1851. 29 

B is enacted bjf the General Assembly asfoUotos : 

Section 1. The stockholders of said Bank, their 
successors and assigns, and such others as may be- 
come stockholders, shall be and are hereby made a 
body corporate, by the name of the Hail Road Banky 
and by that name are made capable in law to purchase, 
receive, retain and enjoy to them and their successors, 
landsy tenements, hereditaments, goods, chattels, and 
effects of whatsoever name and nature, and the same 
to sell, demise, or dispose of, to sue, and be sued, an- 
swer and be answered unto, defend and be defended 
against, in all proper courts, and in all other places ; to 
make and use a common seal, and the same to break, 
alter, and renew, at pleasure ; to ordain and execute 
such by-laws and regulations as shall be convenient 
for the government of the corporation, not being con- 
trary to law or the constitution of said bank ; and 
generaUy to do all things which to them it shall or 
may appertain to do. 

Sfic. 2. And the following shall be the constitution 
of said bank : 

Article 1. The capital stock shall consist of fifty 
thousand dollars, in one thousand shares of fifty dol- 
lars each, but the stockholders may augment said stock 
at any special meeting or meetings called for that pur- 
pose, a majority of all the votes being given therefor, 
under such regulations as they shall think proper, to 
any amount not exceeding three hundred thousand 
dollars. 

Article 2. A general meeting of the stockholders 
Bhall be holder on the first Monday of August in every 
year, for the election of not less than five, nor more 
than nine directors, and to transact such other busi- 
ness as may legaUy come before a stockholders' meet- 
mg. Eleven stockholders shall be necessary for a 
quorum at all stockholders' meetings. Each director 
shall hold in his own right at least twenty shares in 
the capital stock, and shall continue in office one year, 
or until the next annual election of directors shall 
have been made. The directors shall choose a Presi- 
dent firom their own body, and may supply all vacan- 
cies in the office of President or directors which shall 
happen during the year. The President and directors 
may call special meetings of the stockholders. Every 



so MAY, 1851. 

stockholders' meeting shall be notified in one of the 
newspapers printed in the county of Providence, at 
least ten days before it shall be holden. 

Every stockholder shall in person or by proxy be 
entitled at all stockholders' meeting to one vote for 
every share which he or she may own in the stock, not 
exceeding twenty, and to one vote for every ten 
shares over twenty, but no person or body corporate 
shall have more than forty votes, in his, their, or her 
own right. 

Article 3. The President and directors shall meet as 
often as they shall think proper. A majority of the 
directors elected shall constitute a quorum, — ^may di- 
rect the manner of doing business, appoint and pay 
such officers as may be necessary, emit bills of credit, 
make contracts, and dispose of the money and credit 
of the bank, for the benefit of the stockholders ; but 
they shall do nothing contrary to the regulations 
made by the stockholders. They shall from time to 
time, designate three of their number to inspect more 
immediately the business of the bank, who shall at 
least once a month examine the accounts, and at the 
end of every three months cause them to be regular- 
ly stated, and the balances transferred. A dividend 
of profits of the bank (if any) shall be made at least 
once in every year. The president and directors, as 
such, shall receive no compensation, except by vote of 
a stockholders' meeting. And if any president, direc- 
tor, or other officer, shall commit any fraud or embez- 
zlement on the moneys or other property of the bank, 
he shall forfeit his share in the bank, and be liable to 
a prosecution at law. 

Article 4. The stock shall be transferable at the 
bank only, by the stockholders or their agents, in the 
form prescribed by the president and directors. No 
person indebted to the bank shall be allowed to sell or 
transfer his or her stock without the consent of the 
directors, and this, whether indebted as principal, 
surety or endorser, and whether the debt has become 
due or not. The stock of each stockholder shall be 
liable and may be sold at auction, by order of the 
president and directors, for the payment of any debts 
due from such stockholders to the bank, or, so much 
thereof as may be necessary in default of payment 



MAY, 1851. 31 

thereof when due. But sixty days' notice of such sale 
diall be given in some public newspaper printed in 
the county of Providence, and the surplus of proceeds 
over 8acli debts and expenses, if any there be, shall 
be paid to such stockholder. 

AiHek 5. The cashier, clerks, and other officers, 
appointed by the president and directors, shall sever- 
afly give bond to the satisfaction of the directors, for 
ibe &ithfiil performance of their trust 

Article 6. The capital stock of said bank shall be paid 
to liie cashier or such other person as may be appointr 
ed to receive the same, by installments as follows, visf : 
The Sinn of twenty dollars on each share shall be paid 
on the first Monday of September next Ten dollars 
on eoch share on the first Monday of November next 
Ten dollars on each share on the first Monday of Jan- 
naiynext Ten dollars on each share on the first 
Afonday of March next. And no stockholder shall sell 
or dispose of his or her or their stock until the whole 
amount of the capital stock shall have been paid in, 
except stock belonging to deceased or insolvent per- 
sona And in case any default be made in the pay- 
ment of any such installment, the share on which it 
shall be due, with all installments paid thereon, shall 
he forfeited to the use and benefit of the bank. 
. Sk. 3. The Governor shall appoint three Commk. 
sioners to superintend the organization of said bank, 
who ehaU open a book or books of subscription for the 
capital stocky gi^g notice of the time and place, in 
at least two ikewspapers in this State. 

The stock shaU be apportioned, as near as may be, 
to the amount subscribed by each person, who diall, 
in their opinion, have the ability and disposition to 
Joake a bona fide investment When the books are 
cloaed, the Commissioners shall apportion the stock as 
aforesaid, and file a copy of the apportionment in the 
office of the Secretary of State, and the persons to 
wh(Hn the stock is aj^portioned, shall then constitute 
^ oorp(Mration created by this act, and shall meet at 
a thne and ^ace, appointed by the Commissioners, to 
oiganize and transact business. 

A majority of the Commissioners shall be eompetent 
to act They shall be sworn or affiniied,. to the faith- 
fill dittharge of tiieir dutiea The compensation of 



82 lilAY, 1851. 

said Commissioners shall be paid by the bank. Said 
bank shall not go into operation, nor shall any bills be 
issued, until the first installment herein before provid- 
ed, shall have been paid in, in cash, and the Commis- 
sioners shall be fully satisfied of said fact, and that the 
said payment is bona fide made, and shall sign a cer- 
tificate to that effect, which shall be filed in the oflBce 
of the Secretary of State. The officers chosen at the 
meeting caUed V «aid Commissioners for organization, 
or at any adjournment therof, shall hold their offices 
until the next annual meeting, and until others are 
appointed in their places. No one person shall at any 
one time, ever be allowed more than one-tenth of the 
shares of the capital stock of said bank. 

Sec. 4. The stockholders of said corporation shall 
be personally and individually liable for all debts due 
from said bank, provided that the corporation be first 
sued, and the corporate property first exhausted, in 
the pajonent of the debts of the corporation. 

Sec. 5. A sum of money equal to one and a half 
per cent, upon the aforesaid fifty thousand dollars^ 
shall be by the asid bank paid to the General Treas- 
urer, for the use of the State, in the manner following, 
viz : One third part thereof, on the first Monday of 
November, 1851. One third part thereof, on the first 
Monday of March, 1852. One third part thereof on 
the first Monday of July, 1852. 

Sec. 6. In case the capital stock of said bank shall 
hereafter be increased, in pursuance of the provisions 
of this act of incorporation, the said bank shall, within 
ninety days of the time of such increase, pay to the 
General Treasurer, for the use of the State, the sum of 
two per cent, upon the additional amount of said capi* 
tal stock, in the manner and in the time prescribed by 
law, and the said bank, in all respects, as to the inser- 
tion of such increase from time to time in its annual 
report, and as to the collection of such sums, or any 
part thereof mentioned in this section, if default be 
made in payment, shall be subject to aU the provisions 
and penalties, provided in and by the act entitled ^An 
Act impomg a duty upon licensed persona and others y and 
bodies corporate.^' 

Sec. 7. The said bank shall be located in the village 
of Woonsocket in Cumberland, in such building as 



MAY, 1851. 33 

shall be directed by a majority of votes at a stock- 
holders' meetiDg. 



An Act (o incorporate the Atlantic De Laiae Com- 
pany. 

JS is enacted hg the General ABsemblff as follows : Atlantic oe 

Section 1. Josiah Chapin, Charles T. James, Paris pany^^ncor-" 
Hill, Joseph Carpenter, and George W. Chapin, their p<^"'***- 
associates, successors, and assigns, are hereby constitu- 
ted and created a body corporate and politic, by the 
name of Atlantic De Laine Compang^ for manufacturing 
and other purposes, and by that name shall have per- 
petual succession, and are made able and capable in 
law to have, possess, purchase, receive, hold, enjoy 
and retain unto them, their successors and assigns, 
estates of every kind, real, personal or mixed, and the 
same to manage, let, lease, assign, grant, bargain, sell, 
lien, convey and dispose of at pleasure : to sue and be 
sued, plead and be impleaded, answer and be answered 
unto, defend and be defended against, in all courts of 
law and equity, and before all tribunals whatever ; to 
make, have and use a common seal, and the same to 
break, alter and renew at pleasure ; and shall also have 
power to make, establish and put in execution such by- 
laws and regulations, not contrary to law, as they may 
deem necessary or convenient for the government of 
said corporation, and the management of their property 
and concerns, and the duties, services, and employments 
of their officers and agents, and the same to change, 
alter or amend ; and generally to do and execute, all acts, 
matters, and things, which may be necessary to carry 
into effect, the powers and privileges herein granted. 

Sbc. 2. The capital stock of said corporation shall 
uot exceed Five Hundred Thousand Dollars, to be fixed 
in amount by vote of the Company, and to be divided 
iuto shares of one thousand dollars each. The shares 
in said capital stock are hereby declared to be per^ 
wnal estate, and shall be transferred, by bill of sale, 
which shall be recorded in the office of the Treasurer 
of the corporation, in such books as he shall provide 
for that purpose ; provided, however, that no stock- 
Holder, who may wish to dispose of his stock, shall 

5 



34 MAY, 1851. 

traDBfer, in manner aforesaid, any share or shares of the 
capital stock of said corporation without first giving the 
refusal of the same to the corporation, at the price for 
which he is willing to sell, and provided also, that the 
shares in said capital stock shall not be liable to assess- 
ment, after the capital stock, so fixed in amount, as afore- 
said, has been paid in, except in equal proportions, and 
by the consent of the stockholders, owning at least three- 
foiulihs of the shares of the capital stock of the corpo- 
ration. 

Sec. 3. There shall be an annual meeting of the 
stockholders, holden in Providence, on the first 
Wednesday of February, for the choice of a President, 
Treasurer, and Board of Directors, consisting of five, 
and such other officers as they may deem necessary 
or expedient, who shall severally hold their offices for 
one year, and until others shall be elected and quali- 
fied to act in their stead, unless sooner removed by 
death, or by a vote of the corporation. The Treas- 
urer, who shall reside in the county of Providence, 
shall, before entering upon the discharge of his duty 
as such, give bond with surety in such sum as the 
board of directors shall designate, for the faithful dis- 
charge of his duty as Treasurer, which bond shall be 
deposited with the President And if the corporation 
should fail to elect their officers on the day appointed 
for their annual election, it shall be lawful for them 
so to do, at any subsequent legal meeting, to be 
holden within one year, notice of the same to be giv- 
en in the same manner, as shall be prescribed for call- 
ing special meetings. 

Special meetings may be called at any time by the 
Treasurer, and in case of his absence, neglect, inabili- 
ty or refusal, by stockholders holding one-fifth of the 
shares of the capital stock, and shall be notified in the 
manner to be prescribed by the by-laws of the corpo- 
ration. All or any business of the corporation may 
be transacted, and act^d on, at any legal meeting 
thereof, and each stockholder, at all meetings of the 
corporation, shall in person, or by proxy, duly autho^ 
ized in writing, be entitled to one vote for each and 
every share, by him owned, not exceeding fifty shares^ 
and to one additional vote for every ten shares over 
and above said fifty shares, and the holders of one 



MAY, 1851. 35 

hundred shares, with the President, or Treasurer, shall 
constitute a quorum. 

Sk. 4. The stock or shares of each and every stock- 
holder shall be pledged and liable to the corporation 
for all debts and demands due and owing from such 
stockholder to said corporation, whether over due, or 
doe at a day fiiture, and whether the same shall arise 
fiom assessments or installments, or in any other man- 
ner ; and in case any stockholder shall refuse or neg- 
lect to pay such debt or demand to the treasurer 
thereof, within thirty days after the same shall become 
due and payable, then it shall be lawful for the treas- 
urer to sell, at public auction, the share or shares of 
each delinquent stockholder, or so many thereof, as 
may be necessary to satisfy the debt or demand, with 
all incidental expenses, first giving notice of the time 
and place of sale, with the sum due from such stock- 
holder, for which his stock shall be pledged or liable, 
at least twice a week for sixty days prior to the day 
of sale, in one of the newspapers printed in Provi- 
dence ; and such sale shall be a legal transfer of the 
fihare or shares so sold, and a certificate thereof, signed 
by the treasurer of said corporation, shall be issued to 
the purchaser or purchasers thereof, and shall be re- 
corded in the office of the treasurer, in the books of 
the company, provided for that purpose by him, and 
thereupon such purchaser or purchasers shall be con- 
mdered, to all intents and purposes, the proprietor of 
such share or shares ; and the balance of the money 
arising firom the sale of such share or shares, aft;er dis- 
charging the debt or demand, for which the same was 
pledged or liable, with the expenses, shall be paid to 
the delinquent proprietor or to his assigns ; and pro- 
vided, that if the proceeds of such sale be not suffic- 
ient to discharge such debt or demand, the corporar 
tion may have their action against the debtor for the 
balance due. 

Ssc. 5. Said corporation shall have a place of busi- 
ness in the city of Providence ; and in all proceedings 
in law or equity, in which said company shall be a 
party, the leaving an attested copy of the writ, sum- 
mons, or other process, with the treasurer of said cor- 
poration, or with some agent of said corporation, at 
place of business, shall be a sufficient service thereof 



36 MAY, 1851. 

Sec. 6. The validity of this charter shall not be im- 
paired by the omission of the stockholders to hold 
their annual meeting on the day herein before, in sec- 
tion third, appointed. 

Skc. 7. The above named George W. Chapin, is 
hereby authorized to call the first meeting of the 
stockholders, whenever he shall deem it expedient, for 
the election of officers, and organization under this 
charter, and for the transaction of any other business 
of the corporation, by giving notice of the time and 
place thereof, to the persons named in the first section 
of this act ; and the officers so elected, shall continue 
in office until the first annual meeting, as herein be- 
fore named, and until others are elected in their stead. 

Sec. 8. The liability of the members and officers of 
this corporation, for the debts of the company, shall 
be fixed and limited by, and the corporation, its mem- 
bers and officers, shall in all respects be subject to, the 
provisions of an Act, entitled " An act in relation to Man- 
vfaduring Corporations^' passed at the June session of 
the General Assembly, A. D., 1847. 



An Act to Incorporate " The New England Telegraph 
^ ^r Company." 

The New ^ -^ 

Teilaraph H ts cnocted hy the General Assembly asfoUmos : 
?^^^Z Section 1. Gardiner G. Hubbard, Daniel D. Broad- 
t^J- head and Henry B. Smith, their associates, successors 

and assigns, are hereby incorporated and made a body 
politic and corporate, with perpetual succession, by the 
name and style of The New England Telegraph Conir 
pony ; for the purpose of constructing lines of Tele- 
graph from the city of Providence to Boston and New 
York, and to connect the same with other lines of 
Telegraph in other States, to and from any other 
points in this State, as they may deem expedient for 
commercial purposes and for the transmission of intelli- 
gence. 

Sec 2. Said corporation are hereby authorized to 
purchase, lease, possess and enjoy real and personal 
estate for the purposes aforesaid, and the same to sell, 
demise and dispose of at their pleasure, to enter into 
and make all contracts in relation to the business and 



MAY, 1851. 37 

property aforesaid, and with full power to make, and 
from time to time to alter such rules and by-laws for 
the govemment of the affairs and property of said 
corporation ss they may deem fit : provided the same 
be not repugnant to the laws of this State nor the laws 
of the United States. And provided nothing herein 
contained shall authorize or empower said corporation 
to sell, dispose of, or in any manner discontinue any 
part or section of said line already established in this 
State, without consent of this General Assembly, un- 
less said corporation repay to those who subscribe to 
the capital stock of said corporation for the purpose of 
erecting said Telegraph on said section discontinued. 
Sbc. 3. Said corporation shall have full power to 
erect and maintain posts and fixtures in any of the 
highways of this State for the purpose of constructing 
and sostaining their wires, taking care in so doing, so 
to place them as least to obstruct the same— and have 
all powers requisite to carry this act of incorporation 
and the objects thereof into full effect 

Sec. 4. Any person who shall willfully and malic- 
iously cut, break, or otherwise injure the wires of said 
corporation, or who shall willfully and maliciously cut 
down or otherwise injiure or destroy any post or wires, 
or who shall otherwise injure or destroy any other 
property of said corporation used for the transmission 
of intelligence, shall be liable to be prosecuted before 
any Justice of the Peace in this State, and by indiclr 
ment in either the Supreme Court or Court of Com- 
mon Pleas, in any county, and on conviction, shall be 
sentenced to pay a fine not exceeding two hundred 
dollars, and to be imprisoned not exceeding six 
months, or both or either, at the discretion of such 
court 



Ax Act in amendment of an Act, entitled " An Act to 
Incorporate the Warwick Institution for Savings." 

^ w enacted hy the Getieral Assembly as follmvs : 

The sum which may be received by said corpora- ^oVjwrate 
tion, and remain under its management, may be JJf^,J^i"^;^. 
increased to, but shall not exceed, the sum of three tmion for 
Wdred thousand dollars. kmcndSi. 



38 MAY, 1851. 

An Act to Incorporate the ^Bank of the South 

County/' 

£ is enacted by the General Assemb^ as follows : 

Bank of SECTION 1. Elisha Watson, Stephen A. Wright, John 
oountv, Thompson, Samuel Eodman, and such others as may 
SwSpor^* be associated with them, their successors and assigns, 
*«d. shall and they are hereby declared to be a corpora- 
tion and body politic, by the name of the Bank of the 
South County ; and by that name shall be capable in 
law to purchase, receive, retain and enjoy to them 
and their successors, lands, tenements, hereditaments^ 
goods, chattels, and effects of whatsoever name or 
nature, and the same to sell, demise, or dispose o^ to 
sue, and be sued, answer and be answered unto, in 
all proper courts, and all other places ; to make and 
use a common seal, and the same to break, alter, or 
renew, at pleasure ; to make and execute such by- 
laws and regulations as may be necessary for the man- 
agement of said bank, not being contrary to their 
charter, or the laws of the land ; and generally to do 
all things which shall or may appertain to them to do. 
Sec 2. And it is further enacted, that the capital 
stock of said bank diall consist of one hundred tiiou- 
sand dollars, in two thousand shares of fifty dollars 
each ; but the stockholders may augment said stock 
at any special meeting called for that purpose, a mflr 
jority of all the votes being given for that purpose, to 
any amount not exceeding two hundred thousand dol- 
lars. 

Sec. 3. And it is further enacted, that the capital 
stock shall be paid to the cashier, or such other person 
as may be properly authorized to receive the same, by 
installments, as follows ; the sum of ten dollars on 
each share on the first Monday of June, 1851 ; and 
the sum of five dollars on each share every sixty days 
thereafter, until the whole is paid in. In case of fail- 
ure or want of punctuality in paying any of the in- 
stallments as aforesaid, the share or shares, to which 
such failure or want of punctuality may relate, shall 
be forfeited to and for the use of the bank, with all the 
payments which have been made, and all the profits 
which may be due thereon. 

Sec. 4. And it is further enacted, that every stock- 



MAY, 1851. 39 

holder, by himself or his duly appointed proxy, shall 
be entitled at all stockholders' meetings to as many 
votes as he or she may have shares, if the number 
does not exceed twenty, and to one vote for every 
five shares above that number ; prbvided, that no one 
shall be entitled in his own right or by proxy to more 
than fiAy votes ; a majority of the stock to constitute 
a quorum at all stockholders' meetings. And in case 
of minor children holding stock in said bank, their 
guardian may give all votes to which they are entitled, 
separate and distinct from the votes to which said 
guardian may be entitled in his own right or by proxy. 
There shall be an annual meeting of the stockholders 
ou the first Thursday of December, in every year, for 
tike dectioa of not less than five nor more than thir- 
teen directors ; to serve for one year, and until others 
may be chosen in their places, for the management of 
the a&irs of said bank. The President and directors, 
or the owner of one third of the stock, may call meet- 
ings of the stockholders whenever they may think 
proper, giving seven days' public notice of the time 
and place of such meetings. 

S£C. 5. And it is further enacted, that the directors 
shall choose firom their own body a president ; and 
any vacancy in the offices of president or directors, 
by death, resignation or otherwise, may be filled by 
the directors until another election shall be made by 
die stockholders. Each director shall be a stockholder 
in his own name, to the niunber of ten shares. The 
President and directors may meet as often as they 
think proper ; a majority of the directors elected shall 
constitute a quorum. They may appoint the necessa- 
ry officers ; direct the manner of doing business ; 
emit bills of credit ; make contracts and dispose of 
&e money and credit of the bank, for the benefit q£ 
the stockholders ; and declare dividends of the profits 
from time to time ; but shall do nothing contrary to 
any regulations made by the stockholders. 

Three directors may inspect and manage the bud- 
ness of the bank, under such regulations as may be 
established by the directors at their regular meetings; 
and they or one of them shaU, as often as once a week, 
examine into the state of the cash account, notes emitr 
tedy issued and received, and at the expiration of every 



40 MAY, 1851. 

three months, cause the account to be regularly bal- 
anced and the balances transferred. 

The President and directors, as such, shall receive 
no compensation, unless allowed them at a stock- 
holders' meeting. 

Sec. 6. And it is further enacted, that if the Presi- 
dent and directors, or any other officer of the bank, 
shall commit any fraud or embezzlement, touching the 
money, property or securities of said bank, he shall 
forfeit his stock in the bank, for the use and benefit 
of the same, and be liable to be prosecuted according 
to law. The cashier and other officers appointed by 
the directors, shall give bond to the satisfaction of the 
directors, for the faithful performance of their trust 

Sec. 7. And it is further enacted, that the stock of 
said bank shall be transferable at the bank only, and 
in the form and manner prescribed by the President 
and directors. No person indebted to the bank, shall 
be allowed to sell or transfer stock except by consent 
of the directors, and this whether indebted as principal 
or surety, and whether the debt or liability be due or 
not, nor until the whole of the capital stock has been 
paid in, except stock belonging to insolvent or deceasr 
ed persons. The stock of each stockholder shall be 
liable and may be sold at public auction, by order of 
the directors, public notice being given thereof sixty 
days previously in some newspaper printed in the city 
of Providence, for the payment of any debt or liability 
of any sort, incurred by such stockholder to the bank ; 
or so much thereof as shall be necessary to satisfy the 
same when due, and the surplus, if any, over such 
debts, liabilities and expenses, shall be returned to the 
stockholder. And the stockholders of said bank shall 
be personally and individually liable for all debts due 
from said bank ; provided the corporation be first sued 
and the corporation property first exhausted in pay- 
ment of the debts of said corporation. 

Sec. 8. And it is further enacted, that a sum of 
money equal to one and one-half per cent upon the 
aforesaid one hundred thousand dollars, be paid by 
said bank to the General Treasurer, to and for the use 
of the State, as follows : one-fourth part thereof on the 
first Monday of October, 1851, and the sum of three 
hundred and seventy-five dollars every ninety days 



MAY, 1861. 41 

thereafter until the whole is paid. And if the capital 
stock is increase J hereafter, in pursuance of the pro: 
visions of this act, the said bank shall pay to the Gen- 
eral Treasnrer, fur the use of the State, two per cent 
upon the additional amount of capital stock at the 
time and in the manner provided by law. And said 
increfl8C(l capital stock E^all be subject to each and 
all the liabilities and contingencies, mentioned in this 
and the preceding sections, and to all the provisions 
and penalties by law established. 

Sbc. (/. And it is further enacted that Elisha Wat- 
son be authorized to call the first meeting of said cor- 
poration, and appoint the time and place thereof, giv- 
ing seven days public notice thereof, and the directors 
then and there elected may continue in office until 
the next annual meeting. 

Sec. 10. Said bank shall be located in the village of 
Wakefield, in the town of South Kingstown. 

Sbc. 11. Elisha R Potter shall be the Commissioner 
to superintend the organization of said bank, who 
shall open a book or books of subscription for the capi- 
tal stock, giving notice of the time and place, in at 
least two newspapers in this State. The compensa- 
tion of said Commissioner shall not exceed three dol- 
lars per day and expenses. The stock shall be appor- 
tioned, as near as may be, to the amount subscribed 
by each person, who shall, in his opinion, have the 
ability and disposition to make a bona fide investment. 
When the books are closed the Commissioner shall 
apportion the stock as aforesaid, and file a copy of the 
apportionment in the office of the Secretary of State, 
and the persons to whom the stock is apportioned, 
Aall then constitute the corporation created by this 
wt, and shall meet at a time and place appointed by 
the Commissioner, to organize and transact business, 
The Commissioner shaU be competent to act He 
Aall be sworn or affirmed to the faithful performance 
of his dutiea The compensation of said Commissioner 
shall be paid by the baid:. Said bank shall not go into 
operation, nor shall any bills be issued, until the first 
JDrtallment, herein before provided, shall have been 
paid in, in cash, and the Commissioner shall be full^ 
satigfied of said fact, and that the said payment is 
bona fide made, and shall sign a certificate to that ^f- 

6 



42 MAY, 1851. 

feet, which shall be filed in the office of the Secretary 
of State. The officers chosen at the meeting called by 
said Commissioner for organization, or at any adjourn- 
ment thereof, shall hold their offices until the next 
annual meeting, and until others are appointed in 
their places. 



An Act to Incorporate the * Harrison Steam MOD 

Company." 

H M enacted by the General Assembly asfoUows : 
HMTtooo Section 1. William Viall, Albert Waterinan and 
Company Frederick Burgess, their associates, successors and a* 
tocoipora- gjgj^g^ gj,^ hereby constituted a body politic and corpo^ 

ate by the name of the Harrison Steam MiU Compamj ; 
for the manufacture of cotton and other goods, and 
by that name shall have perpetual succession, and 
power to pmrchase, hold and convey, real and personal 
estate to an amount not exceeding one hundred thou- 
sand dollars ; and generally all the powers and capac- 
ities usually incident to corporations. 

Sec. 2. The capital stock of said corporation shafl 
consist of thirty thousand dollars, m shares of one 
thousand dollars each, which may be increased by vote 
of said corporation to one hundred thousand dollars, 
at a special meeting of the stockholders called for that 
purpose. Said shares shall be personal estate, and 
shall be transferred in such manner as shall be pre- 
scribed by the by-laws of said corporation. 

Sec. 3. The stock and shares of every stockholder 
shall be pledged, and liable to the corporation for all 
debts and demands of whatever nature, due and 
owing from him to said corporation, and whether over- 
due or at a day future ; and in case the same shall re- 
main impaid for the space of ninety days after the 
same shall have become due and payable, the said 
corporation may sell the said shares, or any number 
thereof, at public auction, first giving six weeks' notice 
of said sale in some newspaper printed in Providence, 
and may transfer the same to the purchaser, and ap- 
ply the proceeds to the payment of said demands and 
mcidental expenses. 

Sec 4. There shall be an annual meeting of the 
stockholders in the city of Providence, on the fiwt 



MAY, 1851. 4S 

Monday of January in each year, for the choice of 
such officers and with such powers as they may deem 
expedient^ who shall hold their offices for one year, 
and until others are appointed in their stead. 

Special meetings of the corporation may be called 
at such times and in such manner as shall be prescrib- 
ed by the laws of said corporation ; {md at ail legal 
meetings every stockholder shall be entitled to one 
vote for every share of stock owned by him, and may 
vote in person or by proxy. 

Sec. 5. The validity of this act shall not be im- 
paired by the failure of said corporation to hold their 
annual meetings aforesaid, or either of them, but the 
bnsiness of such meeting may be transacted at any 
legal meeting of the corporation held thereafter. 

Sbc 6. William Viall shall call the first meeting of 
the corporation, by giving personal notice of the time 
and pkce thereof to the petitioners. 

Sbc. 7. The liability of the members and officers of 
this corporation for the debts of the company shall 
be fixed and governed by, and the corporation, its 
members and officers, shall in all respects be liable and 
subject to, the provisions of an act entitled an '^Act in 
relalion to manufacturing corporatiomj' passed at the June 
session, A. D., 1847. 



Aw Act in amendment of an act entitled ^ An Act to 
incorporate the Boston and Providence Bail Road 
and Transportation Company." 

It is enacted hy the General Assembly as foUows : Boston and 

Section 1.' The Boston and Providence Rail Road ^^^"^ 
and Transportation Company is hereby authorized to *°J[JJj^ 
subscribe for, purchase, pay for and hold, as an invest- company 
ment of a portion of its capital ^stock, not exceeding ?o take 
one thousand shares of the capital stock of the Prov- p^^ijence 
idence and Plainfield Rail Road Company. Sid^-" 



Pawtnzet 



Upon the petition of the Pawtuxet Turnpike Cor- lirnpike 
poration^ by Horatio Bassett, their Treasurer, praying SSnl^^Jiai 
for a repeal of so much of the act of January session, ^^JJ'^j/„. 
1841, as is inconsistent with the charter of said com- uanr, i84], 
pany, and that the present location of the toll gate on ^ui^i^a- 
said turnpike be le^zed : ^^" "^ •^"• 



gate. 



44 MAY, 1851. 

Voted and Resolved^ That the prayer of said petition 
be and the same is hereby granted, and so much of 
the act of 1841 as is inconsistent with the charter of 
said company is hereby repealed, and the toll gate of 
said company is hereby legalized in the present posi- 
tion : provided^ that no toll shall 1)0 received on said 
turnpike until the same shall be put in good repair; 
and provided said repairs shall be made on or before 
the fifteenth day of June next, and that Nathan Por^ 
ter be a committee with authority to declare when 
said turnpike is in suitable repair. 



to sell. 



an/wufe' Upon the petition of Asa Potter, of South Kings- 
authorfxed towu, and Mary Jane, his wife, representing that Mrs. 
Sarah Thurston of Hopkinton, in her will proved and 
recorded in said Hopkinton, devised to the said Asa, 
in trust for the use of said Mary Ann, the one half 
part of the Noyes Point farm, in Westerly, socalled, and 
subject to certain conditions for the benefit of Caro- 
line Thurston and her children, as more fully stated 
in said petition, and praying to be authorized to sell 
said property : 

Voted and Resolved^ That the said Asa and said 
Mary Ann be, and they are hereby authorized to sell 
said estate, subject however, to said conditions for the 
benefit of said Caroline and her chil<lren, and that a 
deed or deeds by them executed, shall vest in the 
purchaser or purchasers a full title thereto, subject to 
the charges aforesaid in said will made for the benefit 
of said Caroline and her children, which shall remain 
charged thereon in the hands of the purchaser or pin> 
chasers : provided, that said sale shall be made under 
the advice and direction of the Court of Probate of 
the town of South Kingstown, and that the petition- 
ers give bond with satirfactory security to said Court, 
to invest the proceeds of said sale in some productive 
property under the direction of said Court, in the 
name of said Mary Ann and for her benefit, and that 
said property, in the event of the decease of said Mary 
Ann, without disposing thereof, shall descend to the 
heirs of said Mary Ann, who may be of the blood of 
the devisor before named. 



MAT, 1851. 45 

Upon the petition of Anna H. Van Zandt of Middle- van*ZMidt 
town, a minor of the age of nineteen years, prajdng, authori»ed 
for certain reasons therein stated, that she may be an- ^ ' 
thorized to eeU and make a deed of her interest in cer^ 
tain real estate described in said petition : 

VM and Besolved, That the prjiyer of said petition 
be and the same is hereby granted, and the said Anna 
R Fan Zandt is hereby authorised and empowered to 
aell her interest or any part thereof in that certain es- 
tate in the town of Bristol on the comer of State and 
Hope streets, known as the homestead estate of the 
late Hersey Bradford, deceased — ^bounded Southerly 
on said State street — ^Westerly on said Hope street- 
Easterly on land late of Mark A. D'Wolf, deceased — 
and Hortiierly on land standing in the name of said 
Mark A. D' Wolf, trustee — ^and also her interest in a 
certan anall lot of land on Wood street, in said Bris- 
tol belonging to said Bra^lford at the time of his 
death, and called his Goree lot ; and to sign, seal, ac- 
knowledge and deliver to the purchaser or purchasers, 
a deed or deeds thereof, which deed or deeds so exe- 
cuted, shall be as effectual in law to pass to the pur- 
chaser or purchasers all the interest and title of the 
said Anna H. Van Zandt in said property, as if she 
were of full age : provided, Edward Van Zandt^ the 
fether and natural guardian of said Anna H., shall, pre- 
vious to said sale, give liond to said Anna H. Van 
Zandt, with surety satisfactory to the Court of Pro- 
bate of the town of Middletown, conditioned to account 
with and pay over to tlie said Anna H., the nett pro- 
ceeds of said sale or sales, upon her attaining the age 
of twenty-one years, or upon her marriage. And in 
case of the death of the said Anna H. before attaining 
the age of twenty-one years, then the said proceeds of 
said ^e or sales shall descend or be inherited in the 
RKme manner said real estate would descend in case 
the same had not been sold 



Upon the petition of John J. Watson, and wife Isa- john j. 
H now residing in Providence, representing that sey- ^[^5^^°^ 
^ years since the said John J. Watson conveyed his JJ*^^,"^®** 
life estate in a certain tract of land in South Kings- 
town, containing three hundred and fifty acres, more 



46 MAY, 1851. 

or less, bounded — ^Northerly by land of John Nichol 
Westerly by the highway — ^utherly by land now 
or late of Attmore Bobinson — ^and Easterly by Petta- 
quamscutt river, being a farm formerly belongmg to 
Walter Watson, Esq., and by him conveyed to his 
daughter, the said Isabel, and the fee of which is now 
vested in said Isabel — ^to Isaac P. Hazard and Bow- 
land G. Hazard in trust for the use of his said wife, in 
consideration of her releasing her dower in certain 
other real estate, as by reference to said deed of trust 
more fully appears, and pra3dng to be authorized to sell 
the same: 

Voted and Resolved^ That the said trustees be and 
they are hereby authorized to join with said John J. 
and Isabel Watson, in selling said estate, and that a 
deed executed by the said trustees in conformity here- 
to, shall vest in the purchaser or purchasers all the 
said life estate of the said John J. Watson discharged 
of said trust : provided^ however^ that said sale shall be 
made under the advice and direction of the Court of 
Probate of said South Kingstown, and that said trus- 
tees shall invest the proceeds in some productive prop- 
erty for the benefit of said Isabel, to be held by her 
in the same manner, the property hereby authorised 
to be sold was held, and the property so purchased 
shall descend in the same manner the property hereby 
authorised to be sold would have descended. 



E. J. An- Upon the petition of Elbert J. Anderson, praying 
?hJ?Sed*?o f^r permi&sion to alter the present line of the public 
alter line of road runniuff in front of his farm in the town of Porte- 

publicroad, , , ° 

mouth : 

Voted and Resolved, That the prayer of said petition 
be and the same is hereby granted ; and that the p^ 
titioner be, and he hereby is authorised and empow- 
ered to alter the line of said road, as prayed for in 
said petition : providedj that such alteration be made 
under the advice and direction of Messrs. Peleg Thurfr 
ton, Parker Lawton and John Manchester, all of said 
Portsmouth, who are hereby appointed a contonti^ 
for the purposes aforesaid. 



MAY, 1851. 47 

Upon the petition of Robert Wilson, Administrator Ad^SS!"' 
on the estate of Cyrel S. Carpenter, deceased, praying {?^M"' 
for leave to sell certain real estate : seii. 

Voted m»d Resolved, That the prayer of said petition 
be granted, and that the said Robert Wilson is hereby 
authorised in his said capacity to sell and convey by 
deed said real estate, at public or private sale, under 
the advice and direction of the Court of Probate of the 
town of North Providence ; p?vi*ided, that he first give 
bond to said Court of Probate with satisfactory sure- 
ty, conditioned to apply the proceeds of the sale of 
said property to the payment of the debts of said de- 
ceased, and to account to said Court for the proceeds 
of said sale, and to pay any balance thereof that may 
xenMun after the payment of the debts and expenses 
of administration of said estate, to the guardian of the 
minor children of said Cyrel S. Carpenter. 



Upon the petition of John 0. Mowry, and Abby Ann John 
Mowry, his wife, both of Smithfield, in the County of ^SSu^ 
Providence, praying for reasons therein stated, that 
William John Mowry, their infant son, who was bom 
to them before their marriage, may be legitimated : 

Voted cmd Resolved^ That the prayer of said petition 
be granted ; and that the said William John Mowry 
be legitimated as the lawfully bom son of the said 
John 0. Mowry and his wife the said Abby Ann Mow- 
ly, and that the aforenamed parties, reciprocally, shall 
be vested with all the rights, and subject to all the 
duties and obligations, including the rights of inherit>- 
ance of estates, real and personal, that they would 
bave had or been subject to, if the said William John 
Mowry had been the lawfully born child of the said 
John 0. Mowry and Abby Ain Mowry, in wedlock. 



Upon the petition of Francis Cassidy, praying for pmncia 
leasons therein stated that he may be liberated from ^^^ 
the Newport Coimty Jail : ubewted. 

Voted and Besolved, That the jailor in the County 
of Newport be and he is hereby directed and author- 
ised to discharge Francis Cassidy, confined under sen- 
tence for committing an assault and battery upon John 
King. 



48 



MAY, 1851. 



Upon the petition of George S. Morse, praying for 



Catharine 
Moree^con- 

^t, libera- the liberation of Catharine Morse, a convict confined 
in the State Prison : 

Voied a)id Resolved, That the prayer of said petition 
be granted, and the said Catharine Morse liberated, 
and the Warden of the State Prison is hereby directed 
to discharge her immediately. 



Margaret 
Donovan, 
convict, 
liberated. 



Catharine 
Jillaon, 
convict, 
liberated. 



William 
JefferB, 
convict, 
liberated. 



Upon the petition of Lyman Burlingame and others, 
praying for the liberation of Margaret Donovan, a con- 
vict in the Bristol County Jail : 

Voted and Rembed, That the prayer of said petition 
be granted; and the Sheriff of Bristol County directed 
to liberate her accordingly. 



Upon the petition of Lucinda Jillson of Warren, 
praying for reasons therein stated, that a fine and costs 
imposed upon her daughter Catharine Jillson, by 
judgment of a Justice of the Peace in said town, on 
the 11th day of April, 1851, may be remitted, and 
said Catharine discharged from imprisonment : 

Voted and Resolved, That the prayer of said petition 
be, and the same is hereby granted, and said fine and 
costs are hereby remitted, and the jailor of the Bristol 
Coimty Jail is hereby directed to discharge the said 
Catharine from imprisonment forthwith. 



Upon the petition of William Jeffers of Providence, 
in the county of Providence, praying, for reasons 
therein stated, that he may be discharged from said 
imprisonment : 

Voted and Resolved, That the prayer of said petition 
is hereby granted, and that said William Jeffers is 
hereby released from any ftirther imprisonment on ac- 
count of the matters in said petition specified. 



JoiJn Gim- XJPON the petition of John Gilligan of Smithfield, in 

totaiLepoor the couuty of Providence, now confined in the jail in 

^^^^ the city of Providence, on a judgment and execution 

in trover and conversion, in favor of EUery Slocumi tf 



MAY, 18&L 49 

said Smithfieldy pra3ang that he may be permitted to 
take the poor debtor^s oath on said execution. 

Voted and Resolved^ That the prayer of said petition 
be granted ; and that the said petitioner be allowed* 
to avail himaelf of the poor debtor's oath, in the 
same manner and with the same effect as in ordinary 
cases of debt, and the proper magistrates in the coun- 
ty oi Providence authorized to administer oaths on 
the application of poor debtors, under the act of this 
Stat^ entitled " An Act for the relief of poor persons mir 
prisomdfar deht^ and liie acts in addition to and in 
amendment thereof, are hereby empowered and author- 
ized, to administer said oath to the said petitioner, if 
they see fit, as in other cases of ordinary debt, any 
law to the contrary notwithstanding. 



Upon the petition of the New York, Providence and 
Boston Rail Boad Company, praying for an increase 
of capital stock : 

VUed and Resolvedy That the consideration of said New Yorir, 
petition be referred to the adjourned session of this and^BoM^ 
Gieneral Assembly ; and that the petitioners give cSlIipMy,** 
notice of the pendency thereof by publishing a copy fo' ^^^^?^ 
of this vote three weeks successively, next previous stock ; con- 
to said session, in the Providence Journal, and also in oXror^^^ 
some public newspaper publi^ed in the city of New ^^' 
York. 



no- 



Upon the petitaon of Bobin Gifford of Little Comp- 
too, praying, for certain reasons therein stated, that he 
may be authorized and empowered to appeal from a 
decree of the Court of Probate of the town of Little 
Ciompton, approving the will of Abigail Ldsh, late of 
little Compton, deceased : 

Voted and Resolved, That said petition be contiaued john Dyer 
to the next Session of the Greneral Assembly, and that JjJ^ ^oS 
tine said petitioner cause a copy of this resolution to j^^^^^f 
be served upon John Dyer, the person named as ex- continued 
ecutor in said will, within ten days after the rising of J",SotS?.^' 
the General Assembly at the present SessLon. 

7 



60 MAY, 1861. 

Upon the petition of Mary McGovem against Wil- 
liam J. Holden, for a new trial : 

aS^m^l ^^^^ ^^^ R^^olved, That said petition be continued 
Wiiuam J. to the next Session of tlie GenertJ Assembly; and that 

Holden, for •ji«« i i»» 

new trial; said petitioner caiuse the executor or auininistrator on 
with"orfer *^® goods and estate of the said Wilhara J. Holden, 
of notice, deceased, to be notified of the pendency of said peti- 
tion at least thirty days prior to the next Session of 
the General Assembly, by serving him with a certified 
copy of said petition. 



Upon' the petition of Lyinan'Hawes, praying for the 
passage of an act giving him a right to an appeal 
agreeably to the charter of the Providence and Wor- 
cester Railroad Corporation : 

riJ^*" for ^^'^^ ^^^ Resolved^ Tliat the said petition be conr 
right to ap- tinned to the next Session of the General Assembly, 
SSIloi ^?h and that the said petitioner lodge in the Secretary's 
^^^*^citol ^ffic® ^ bond to the said Providence and Worcester 
tion'to iB- Eailroad Company, with sufficient surety, in such sum 
as the Secretary may deem proper, to pay all lawfiil 
costs and damages which the said Providence and Wo^ 
cester Railroad Company shall sustain by means of 
preferring such petition, and shall at least ten days 
before such Session, serve the said Providence and 
Worcester Railroad Company with a copy of said pe- 
tition, and cite said company to appear and answer the 
same. 



iotowS!" Voted and Reaolvedy That the following sums be al- 
lowed and paid out of the General T&eaflury to the 
following named persons : 

John Holden - - . 40 92 

Spencer Mowry - . - . 4 50 

James Atkinson - - - 5 00 

Samuel Randall - - - 4 50 

ElishaR. Potter - - - 56 47 

Newport Artillery - - 129 39 

Thomas R. Hazard - - - 150 35 

Joseph Knowles ... 729 28 

Charles M. Hayden - - . 24 60 



MAT, 1851. 61 

A.Ji]k>n - - . 5 00 

Charles M. Hajden - • - 8 40 

Stephen Johnson - - 1 70 

Seth Peck . . • 1 60 

Charles AL Hajden - - 2 10 

Edward Clarke - - - 12 40 

E Potter & Co. - - - 5 54 

Jeremiah Hazard - - • 3 00 

Filliam Tibbets - - - 8 08 

Thomas Whipple - - - 12 75 

JohnHolden - - - 100 00 

Ci<y of Providence - - - 14 00 

Wflbnr T. Hunt ... 72 

SBmuel B. Perry - - - 8 70 

James HorsweU - - - 10 50 

Jeremiah S. Slocum - - - 1 80 

BnorSmith - - - 1 08 

£bidi and Coggeshall - - • 16 37 

Wingate Hayes - - - 5 00 

Gamaliel L. Dwight - - - 10 48 ' 

Samuel Dmm - - - 7 80 

Mary £. Beynolds - - - 44 

Jabez J. Potter - - - 26 00 

Henry Y. Cranston - - - 4 50 

EuasellClapp - - - 27 18 

Russell Clapp - - - 14 15 

EuasellClapp - - - 7 00 

J. F, Turner & Son - - - 6 48 

B. E Horton - - - 7 75 

Thomas Bateman - - - 2 92 

Henry Taggart - - - 165 99 

Jeremiah S. Sherman - - - 35 99 

Christopher Hawkins - - 57 87 

Fenner Kimball - - - 55 75 

CromweU T. Salisbiuy - - 31 81 

John S. Pearce - - - 103 40 

Thomas J. Hazard - - 10 00 

William H. Douglass - - - 3 02 

Nancy McLellan - - - 30 00 

Charles E Newell - - - 35 00 

Bennett J. Munroe - - 2 50 

Job Armstrong - - - 1 10 

Thomas Bateman - - 139 88 

Oladding & Brother - - 1 00 



52 



HAT, 1851. 




Job Armstrong - - - 
Ezra Hawkins 


6 30 
5 25 


Peleg Johnson - - . 


10 00 


Thomas Pearce 


43 50 


Henry Taggart - 
William Swan, Jr. 


5 00 
500 


James H. Douglass 


5 00 


James Lawton 


500 


WilUam C. Thurston 


9 96 


Wm. H. Douglass 


7 50 


Benjamin F. Thurston 

Wingate Hayes 

Thomas Durfee - - - 


2100 
21 00 
21 00 



2,261 17 

Voted and Resolved, That all bufimess pending befiwe 
this Assembly unfinished, be referred to tlie next Ses- 
sion ; and that this Assembly be, and the same is here- 
by adjourned to the third Monday of June next, then 
to convene at the State House in Newport 



The Report of the Governor, upon appropriations 
for the Insane, accepted and ordered to be placed cm 
file in the Secretary's Office. 



STATE OF RHODE ISLAND, &c. 



Secbetary of State'sIOkwc]^ \ 
May 28, 1861. ] 

I certify, that the acts, resolves, proceedings in 
grand committee, rolls, reports, and returns, pubUahed 
in this pamphlet, are true copies of the originals, de* 
posited in this office. 

ASA ^POTTER, 
Secretmy of State. 



APPENDIX. 



BOLL Of THE MEMBERS OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 

At the General Assembly of the State of Rhode 
Idand and Providence Plantations, begun and holden 
at Newport on the first Tuesday in May, (Cth,) in the 
year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and 
6&y one, and of Independence the seventy-fifth — 

peesent: 
Bis Excellency PHITJP ALT^EN, Governor. 
His Honor WILLLAM BEACH LAWRENCE, Lieut 

Governor. 

SENATORS FROM THE SEVERAL TOWNS. 



Newport, 

Providence, 

Portonoath, 

Warwick, 

Westerly, 

New Shoreham, 

North Kingstown, 

South Kingstown, 

East Greenwich* 

Jamestown, 

Smithfield, 

Scitnate, 

Glocester, 

CSiarlestown, 

West Greenwich, 

Coventry, 

Exeter, 

ffiddletown, 

Bristol, 

Everton, 

little Gomptcm, 

Warren, 

Cumberland, 

Kchmond, 

Cranston, 

Hopkinton, 

Johnston, 

North Providence, 

Barrington, 

Foster, 

BnrriUviUe, 



SETH W. MACY. 
ALBERT C. GREENE 
JOHN MANCHESTER 
JOHN BROWN FRANCIS. 
STEPHEN WILCOX. 
WILLIAM P. BALL. 
JOSEPH SPINK. 
HAZARD KNOWLES. 
NICHOLAS S. FRY. 
ANDREW F. POTTER 
GIDEON BRADFORD. 
PARDON ANGELL. 
THOMAS BARNES. 
JOSEPH H. CROSS. 
THOMAS T. HAZARD. 
CHRISTO'R A. WHITMAN. 
ISAAC GEEENE. 
NATHANIEL GREENE. 
BYRON DIMAN. 
WILLIAM C. CIL\PIN. 
NATHANIEL CHURCH. 
HAILE COLLINS. 
ARIEL BALLOU. 
JAMES G. SISSON. 
NATHAN PORTER. 
JOHN S. CHAMPLIN. 
ALFRED ANTHONY. 
CALEB V. WATERMAN. 
ALLEN BICKNELL. 
JONATHAN HILL, 2nd. 
LYMAN HAWKBS. 



TME SECRETARY. 
Bbtjamin F. Thubston, Esq., Clerk. 



1 



54 



MAT, 1851. 



-I 



t-ji ■!£ r 



BEPBESENTATIYES FROM THE SEVERAL TOWNS. 



Newport 
Henry T. Cranston, 
Joseph Anthony, 
Joseph B. Weaver, 
Benjamin Finch, 
Thomas R Hunter. 

Providence. 
Leonard Blodget, 
Stephen T. Ofiaey, 
WiUiam H. Potter, 
Henry Anthony, 
Allen C. Mathewson, 
James T. Rhodes, 
George S. Rathbone, 
Amos C. Barstow, 
Daniel R Carpenter, 
Samuel Currey, 
Thomas J. Stead, 

Christopher C. Potter. 

PortsmotUh. 
Borden Chace. 

Warwick. 
Pardon Spencer, 
Simon H. Green, 
William D. Brayton, 
Randall Holden. 

Westerly. 
Nathan F. Dixon. 

New Shoreham. 
Simeon Babcock. 

North Kingstown. 
James Eldred, 
Thomas G. Allen, jr. 

South Kingstown. 
George L. Hazard, 
Sylvester Robinson. 

East Greenwich. 
George J. Adama 

Jamestown. 

Benjamin CottrelL 

SmUhJield. 
Thomaa Buffiun, 
Daniel Pierce, 
John Fenner, 



Earl A. Wright, 
James Phetteplace, 
Israel B. Purinton. 

Scituate. 
William A. Roberts, 
Sheldon Fiske. 

Glocester. 
George H. Browne, 
Jonathan A. Tourtellot 

Charlestown. 

Joseph Gavitt. 

West Greenwich. 
Nathan Carr. 

Coventry. 

David S. Harris, 
Levi Johnson. 

JExeter. 
Daniel L. Money. 

Middletown. 

George J. Baylies. 

BristaL 
Benjamin Hall, 
Hezekiah C. WardweE 

Tiverton. 

WilUam P. Sheffield, 
Joseph Osbom, 

Nathaniel B. Durfee. 

Little Compton, 
Oliver C. BrowneH 

Warren. 
Alfred Bosworth, 
Thomas G. Turner. 

Cumberland. 

Fenner Brown, 

George L Dana, 

Olney Arnold, 

Mowry Taft. 

Richm^md, 

Daniel Kenyon. 

Cranston- 

Charles Goodwin, 

Ahnoran Harris. 

Hopkinton. 

Welcome Collina 



MAT, 1851. 55 

Jfknsion. Barringtcn* 

Granville S. Williams, Pardon Clarke. 
Alpheus F. Angell. Foster. 

North Providence. George E. Hopkins. 
Thomas Davis, DurriUviUe, 

Zdotes Wetherell, Elisha Mathewson, 

Edwin Harris, Silas A. Comstock. 

Josepi B. Stone. 

floD. Alfred Bosworth, of "Warren, Speaker. 

WDroAiE Hayes and Thomas Durfee, Esqs., Clerks. 



JOINT EXILES. 

1. There shall be a joint committee of both Houses 
on accounts and claims, to consist of five members of the 
House of Representatives and three Senators; whose 
i^tj it shaU be to consider aU such accounts and pe- 
titions in relation to claims and demands against the 
State as may be referred to them, and to report their 
opinioii theron, and such propositions relative thereto, 
as may seem to them expedient. 

2. There shaU be a joint committee of both Houses 
on sales of real estate, to consist of five members of 
4e House of Representatives and three Senators; 
whose duty it shall be to consider aU petitions in rela- 
tion to tlie sale of real estate, which may be referred 
to them, and to report their opinion thereon, and such 
propositions relative thereto as may seem to them 
expedient 

3. There shall be a joint committee of both Houses 
on convicts' petitions, to consist of five members of the 
House of Representatives and three Senators ; whose 
^^y it shall be to consider aU petitions of convicts 
rtatsoever, which may be referred to them, and to 
^rt their opinion thereon, and such propositions 
Native thereto as may seem to them expedient 

4. When a message shall be sent from the Senate to 
flie House of Representatives, it shaUbe announced at 
tte door of the House by the Sherifl^ and again, when 
flie messenger comes within the bar of the House, by 
file Speaker or presiding officer of the House, when all 
boainess shaU be suspended until the message shall be 
^ived and answered, if any answer be necessary, and 



56 MAT, 1861. 

the message shall be respectfully communicated to the 
chair by the person by whom it may be sent. 

5. The same ceremon}^ shall be observed when a 
message shall be sent by the Ilouse of Representatives 
to the Senate. 

6. All bills and resolutions finally passed by either 
House shall be communicated by message to the other 
House. 

7. Neither House shall entertain any petition the 
subject oi which is within the jurisdiction of any court 
in this State, imless it shall come up by appeal from 
such court as is or may be by law provided. 

8. There shall be a joint committee of both Houses 
upon Executive Communications, whose duty it shall 
be to consider all communications from Government^ 
and from other States^ and all such other matters as 
may be referred to them by either House, and to re- 
port their opinion thereon, and such propositions rela- 
tive thereto as may seem to them expedient. 



JOINT COMMITTEES. 

Resdvedy That Messrs. Barnes, Manchester and Sis- 
son of the Senate, with Messrs. Anthony, Turner, Car- 
penter, Dana and Durfee of the House, be and they 
are hereby appointed a joint committee on accounts 
and claims. 

Resolvedj That Messrs. Spink, Church and Angell, of 
the Senate, with Messrs. Stead, D. S. Harris, Brownell, 
Wardwell and Gavitt, of the House, be and they are 
hereby appointed a joint conmiittee on sales of real 
estate, 

Hesoivedy That Messrs. Ilawkes, Fry and J. Greene 
of the Senate, with Messrs. Blodget, S. H. Greene, Bai- 
ley, Wetherell and Comstock of the House, be and 
they are hereby appointed a joint committee on con- 
victs' petitions. 

JResolved, That his Honor William Beach Lawrence, 
and Messra A. C. Greene and Porter of the Senate, 
with Messrs. Barstow, Adams, Himter, Tourtellot and 
Dana of the House, be and they are hereby appointed 
a joint committee on executive communications. 



MAY, 1851. 57 

PEOCEEDINGS IN GRAND COMMITTEE. 

Tuesday, May 6, A. D. 1851. 

The two Houses of the General Assembly having 
convened in Grand Committee for the purpose of re- 
ceiving, counting, and declaring the votes for General 
Officers, given at the annual election on the first 
Wednesday in April, A. D., 1851, the votes were de- 
livered in, together with the lists of voters in the sev- 
eral towns, and referred to the following select com- 
mittee. 

Newport County — ^Messrs. Babcock, Sheffield, and 
A. F. Potter. 

PRonDENCB County — Messrs. Currey, Porter, Car- 
penter, Bradford, and Arnold. 

BwgTOL County — Messrs. Turner, Wardwell,and HalL 

Washikoton County — ^Messrs. Gavitt, Champlin, and 
SasoK 

Km County — ^Messrs. Adams, S. H. Greene, and 
CaiT, to which were added the Secretary, and ClerkiSt 
of the Senate and House. 

The Grand Committee adjourned until six o'clock, 
P.M. 

6 o'clock p. m., Tuesday, May 6. 

Agreeably to adjournment the Grand Conmiittee 
r^-afflembled, the Governor in the chair. 

Mr. Porter, of Cranston, from the Select Committee 
to count the votes for General Officers, presented the 
foBowing report, which was received, read and accept- 
ed, and ordered to be placed on file and published : 

The committee appointed to count the votes for 
General Officers, respectfully report : 

That the whole number of electors voting for Gov- 
ernor is 13,242, and that 6,622 votes are necessary to 
a choice. That 6,935 electors voted for Philip Allen, 
rf Providence ; 6,106 electors voted for Josiah Chapin, 
rf Providence ; 183 electors voted for Edward Harris, 
of Cumberland ; and 18 scattering. They further re- 
port that the said Philip Allen is elected by a majority 
of 628 votes over all others. 

That the whole number of electors voting for Lieu- 
tenant Governor is 13,243, and that 6,622 votes are 
necessary to a choice. That 6,787 electors voted for 
William Beach Lawrence, of Newport ; 6,258 electors 
^rted for Bowse Babcock, of Westerly; 196 electors 

8 



58 MAT, 1851. 

voted for Stephen Wilcox, of Westerly ; and 2 scatter- 
ing. They further report that the said William Beach 
Lawrence is elected by a majority of 331 votes over 
all others. 

That the whole number of electors voting for Secre- 
tary of State is 13,226, and that 6,614 votes are nec- 
essary to a choice. That 6,815 electors voted for Asa 
Potter, of South Kingstown ; 6,214 electors voted for 
Christopher E. Bobbins, of Providence ; 194 electors 
voted for George L. Clarke, of Providence ; and 3 scat- 
tering. They further report that the said Asa Potter 
is elected by a majority of 404 votes over all others. 

That the whole number of electors voting for Attor- 
ney General is 13,081, and that 6,541 votes are neces- 
sary to a choice. That 6,744 electors voted for Walter 
S. Burges, of Cranston ; 6,114 electors voted for Jo- 
seph M. Blake, of Bristol ; 191 electors voted for Thom- 
as Steere, of Smithfield ; and 32 scattering. They fur- 
ther report that the said Walter S. Burges is elected 
^ by a majority of 407 votes over all others. 

That the whole number of electors voting for Gen- 
eral Treasurer is 13,180, and that 6,591 votes are nec- 
essary to a choice. That 6,773 electors voted for Ed- 
win Wilbur, of Newport ; 6,196 electors voted for Sam- 
uel A. Parker, of Newport ; 193 electors voted for 
George H. Church, of North Kingstown ; and 18 scat- 
tering. They further report that the said Edwin Wil- 
bur is elected by a majority of 366 votes over all others. 
All of which is respectfully submitted by 

Nathan Porter, Ciwirrmiu 

The foregoing report having been read and accept 
ed, it was thereupon 

Resobedy That the following named persons be, and 
they are hereby declared elected for the year ensuing : 

PfflLip Allen, of Providence, Governor. 

WiLLLiM Beach Lawrence, of Newport, Lieutenant 
Governor. 

Asa Potter, of South Kingstown, Secretary of State. 

Walter S. Burges, of Cranston, Attorney General. 

Edwin Wilbur, of NcAvport, General Treasurer. 

The oath of office was then administered to the 
Governor and Lieutenant Governor by the Secretary 
of State ; and to the Secretary of State, Attorney Gen- 



MAY, 1851. 59 

eral and General Treasurer, by the Governor, and 
proclamation made accordingly. 

Ordered, That the votes for General Officers be de- 
livered to the Sheriff of the County of Newport, by 
him to be burned. 

The Grand Committee rose and the two Houses sep- 
arated. 

May 7, 3 o'clock, p. m. 
The two Houses having joined in Grand Committee 
for the election of officers, the following persons were 
severally elected : 

CLERKS OF THE SUPREME COURT. 

Newp(ni County/ — Joseph Joslin. 
Prmdenee Conrdy — ^Edwin Metcalf. 
y^Qi^mgton County — ^Postponed 
Briiol Chuntf/ — George H. Reynolds. 
Kent Cbttn/^— Silas A. Weaver. 

CLERKS OF THE COURT OP COADION PLEAS. 

Newport Cotuitt/ — George C. Shaw. * 

Providence Coui^y — ^Levi Salisbury. 
Wa;»lmgton County — ^Matthew Chappell. 
Bristol County — ^Massadore T. Bennett 
Kent County — Hazard Carder. 

SHERIFFS. 

Neu^port County — ^William J. Roberts. 
Providence County — ^Burrington Anthony. 
Washinyfon County — ^Weeden H. Berry. 
Bristol County — Nathan Bardin. 
Kent County — ^Alexander Allen. 

Agent of Providence and Pairiucket Turnpike — ^Abra- 
ham H. Adama 



Commissioners of Providence Washinyton Bridge — Joseph 
T. Sisson, Samuel S. Mallory, Allen G. Case. 

Rmlroad Commissioners — Olney Arnold, Horace Man- 
chester, Schuyler Fisher. 

Commissioners on Shell Fisheries — ^Henry B. Anthony, 
Thomas P. Carpenter, John Whipple. 

Cmmittee to Inspect Ferries — ^Hezekiah C. Wardwell, 
Stephen A. Wright, John H. Gardiner. 



60 



MAY, 1851. 



Inspector General of Be^ and Pork — ^Arnold Saun- 
ders. 

Inspector General of Lime — ^Enos Mowry. 

Injector General of Scythe Stones — Seth Spear. 

Brigade Impectory 2d Brigade — ^Edward C. Mauran. 

Brigade Quarter-Master^ 2d Brigade — ^Anthony B. A. 
Whiteker. 



PUBUC NOTARIES. 



Newport County. 
Christopher Grant Perry, Simeon Babcock, 



Peter Cook, 
Nathan Tompkins, 
Joseph Joslin, 
William G. Hammond, 
Elisha Atkins, 
Richard Shaw, 



Simon R Sands, 
Josiah S. Peckham, 
Ural Woodman, 
William G. Borden, 
Samuel Dunn, 
Benjamin Wilcox. 



Providence County, 

Sylvanus C. Newman, Benjamin N. Lapham, 



Josiah Perkins, 
John R Randolph, 
Dewitt C. Remington, 
Brown S. Woods, 
Smith Mowry, 
Asa Winsor, 
Ira Marvell, 
Richard Mowry, 
Emor Coe, 
Stafford Mann, 
William A, Bradley, 
Daniel Pearce, 
Israel Sayles, 
Alfred Allen, 
Arnold Wakefield, 
Simon Randall, 
Bailey E. Borden, 
Lewis B. Arnold, 
Olney Arnold, 
Jonah Titus, 
Horace S. Patterson, 
Sylvester Patterson, 



Alpheus P. Angell, 
Robert Wilson, 
William H. Mathewson, 
George Fry, 
Nathaniel Stone, 
Samuel Warner, 
Samuel Low, 
Abner Jillson, 
Clement Webster, 
Joseph Miller, 
Samuel Ashley, 
William H. Smith, 
Charles E. Newell, 
William E. Peck, 
Levi Salisbury, 
Edwin Metcalf, 
Thomas Steere, 
Charles H. Mason, 
Joseph A. Scott, 
Peleg W. Gardiner, Jr., 
Peter W. Ferris, 
William Fairbanks, 



MAY, 1851. 



61 



Joseph 6. Johnaoriy 
Nathan Porter, 
George E Browne, 
Gaius W. flubbard, 
Joeeph B. Smith, 
Thoim Irons, 
William D. S. Havens, 
Comehis Manchester, 
Lemuel Angell, 
William C. Barker. 



Jerome B. Anthony, 
Henry Potter, 
John H. Weeden, 
James F. Angell, 
David Rider, 
John Bayley, 
Joseph W. Miller, 
Lycurgus Sayles, 
Clark Dalrymple, 



Elidia Watson, 
Attmore Robinson, 
1? illiam N. Austin, 
William G. Slocum, 
Edward W. Hazard, 
Asa P. Gardner, 
Benjamin F. Robinson, 
John N. Taylor, 
Powell Heime, 
John D. Austin, 
Joseph H. Lewi^ 
Samuel B. Segar, 



Washington County. 



Edward M. Dunn, 
Edward W. Collins, 
Francis Chappell, 
George B. Nichols, 
Thomas Phillips, 
Cornelius Bradley, 
Stephen Wilcox, Jr., 
Thomas Perry, 
Benjamin Arnold, 
Raymond Chappell, Jr., 
Simeon F. Perry. 



George H. Reynolds, 
Massadore T. Bennett, 
Nathan Warren, 
William C. Vandoom, 
Bennet J. Munro, 
fleniy Wardwell, 



Bristol County. 

Peter Gladding, 
George L. Gardiner, 
Nathaniel P. Smith, 
Alfred Bosworth, 
Charles Randall. 



George Cook^ 
William G. Bowen, 
Joseph Winsor, 
Silas A Weaver, 



Kent County. 

Thomas Whitford, 
George Sprague, 
Henry A. Remington, 
Festus S. Thompson. 



JUSTICES OF THE PEACE. 

Newport. Providence. 

Joseph Joslin, William H. Smith, 

George C. Shaw, Samuel Ashley, 

Joseph A. Carr, Levi Salisbury, 

Biflha Atkina Peleg W. Gardiner, Jr., 



r 



62 



MAY, 1861. 



Charles H. Mamn, 
Joseph A. Scott, 
Peter W. Ferris, 
David Parmenter, 
John R Randolph, 
Edwin Metcalf, 
William E. Peck, 
Charles E. Newell, 
Clement Webster, 
Samuel Low, 
Samuel Warren, 
Benjamin Warner, 
Benjamin N. Lapham, 
Lycurgus Sayles, 
Ansel E Bradley, 
Benjamin N. Rose, 
Robert Knight, 
Henry L. Bowen, 
Stephen Martin, 
William F. Greene, 
Gamaliel L. Dwight, 
Charles Holden, Jr., 
Franklin Greene, 
Walter W. Updike, 
Samuel Currey, 
Jabez J. Potter, 
Walter Paine, Jr., 
Samuel W. Peckham, 
Israel G. Manchester, 
James C. Holden, 
Samuel Brown, 
Barzillai Cranston, 
Francis E. Hoppin, 
Abraham Payne, 
Benjamin T. Eames, 
William Knowles, 
Rollin Mathewson, 
Amasa S. Wescott, 
Wingate Hayes, 
James M. Clarke, 
Sylvester Hartshorn, 
Thomas A. Jenckes, 
Charles Hart, 
Weston A. Fisher, 



James Sheldon, 
Joseph S. Pitman, 
Willard Sayles, 
Thomas Diirfee, 
Philip C. Scott, 
Thomas C. Greene, 
Franklin J. Dickman, 
Daniel R. Clapp, 
Benjamin Cozzens, 
Charles W. Greene, 
Henry Adams, 
Samuil C. BW^t, 
Edward S. Martin, 
Thomas S. Anthony, 
George Rivers, 
John P. Jones, 
William Sandford, 
Augustus Hoppin, 
CaBsar A. Updike, 
William P. Greene, 
Nathaniel Searle, 
Henry Howard. 

Portsmouth. 

Albert G. Cook, 
Isaac S. Cory. 

Warwick, 
Christopher C. Spencer, 
Augustus G. MiUer, 
John Tiflfany, 
Oliver C. Arnold, 
William Carder, 
John Mowry, 
James S. Andros. 

Middletoum. 
Jonathan B. Northup. 

Tiverton, 
Asa Gray, 
William G. Borden, 
Benjamin Wilcox, 
Stephen Crandall, Jr., 
Samuel Wilcox. 

Little Compton, 
Pardon Almy, 
Nathaniel Tompkins. 



MAY, 1851. 63 

Cransion. John Wood, 

Sidney B. Smith, Jonathan Whaley, 

George Cady, Asa Hustin, 

William Fairbanks, George Vaughan, 

George P. Hazard, George Fairbanks, 

Daniel S. Congdon, Daniel D. Potter. 

Pardon Williams, East Greenwich. 

Joseph G. Johnson, Jeremiah S. Slocmn. 
A^athan Porter, Bristol, 

Lyman Barney. James Diman, 

Coventry. William PauU, 

Lawton Johnson, Hezekiah C. Wardwell. 
Seth B. Lewis, 



The Houses in Grand Committee received the votes 
lor Eepresentatives of the Thirty-Second Congress of 
the United States from all the towns, and appointed 
the following committee to count them : 

Messrs. Porter, A. F. Potter, J. Greene, Champlin, 
and Sisson of the Senate, with Messrs. Sheffield, Bab- 
cock, Carpenter, Currey, Tourtellot, Adams, S. H. 
Greene, Carr, Turner, Wardwell, and Hall, of the House. 

The Secretary and Clerks of Senate and House. 

The Grand Committee subsequently on the same 
day met and received the report of the committee ap- 
pointed to count the votes for Representatives to the 
Thirty-Second Congress of the United States. 

The committee appointed to count the votes for^^^j^^ 
Representatives to the Thirty-Second Congress of the to count 
United States, respectfully report : mJmbCTBof 

That the whole number of electors voting for Rep- ^^^s^®"- 
resentative, in the Eastern District, is 6,782, and that 
3,392 votes are necessary to a choice. That 505 elec- 
tors voted for George G. King, of Newport, for the 
Thirty-Second Congress, and that 2,958 electors voted 
for the said George G. King, for the Thirty-First Con- 
gress, making in all the number of 3,463 electors who 
voted for said George G. King. 

They further report that 3,239 electors voted for 
Welcome B. Sayles, of Providence ; and that 72 elec- 
tors voted for B&ram Cleaveland, of North Providence ; 
and 8 scattering. 



64 MAY, 1861. 

The committee further report that the whole num- 
ber of electors votmg in the Western District, is 6,073, 
and that 3,037 votes are necessary to a choice ; that 
3,524 electors voted for Benjamin B. Thurston, of Hop- 
kinton ; that 2,410 electors voted for Charles Jackson, 
of Scituate, for the Thirty-First Congress ; that 22 
electors voted for said Charles Jackson, for the 
Thirty-Second Congress ; making in all, the number of 
2,432 electors for said Charles Jackson ; and that 82 
electors voted for Lauriston Hall ; and 25 scattering. 
They further report that the said Benjamin B. Thurs- 
ton is elected, having a majority of the whole number 
of the legal votes. 

All of which is respectfully submitted by 

Nathan Porter, For the CommiUee. 

To the two Houses of the General Assembly, in Grand 

Committee assembled : 
^^^ The undersigned, a minority of the committee ap- 
pointed to count the votes for Eepresentatives from 
the Eastern District to the Thirty-Second Congress of 
the United States, respectfully beg leave to submit for 
the consideration of the Grand Committee, the follow- 
ing report, to wit : 

The whole number of electors voting were 6,782 ; 
that the number necessary to a choice is 3,392. That 
72 electors voted for Hiram Cleaveland, of North Prov- 
idence; that 3,239 electors voted for Welcome B. 
Sayles, of Providence ;• that 8 electors voted scatter- 
ing ; that 505 electors voted for George G. King, by 
the form of ballot hereto annexed, marked " A." ; and 
that 2,958 electors voted for said George G. King, by 
the form of ballot hereto annexed, marked " B. '* ; that 
in all 3,463 electors voted for the said George G. King. 
The undersigned further report that the said George 
G. King is duly elected by a majority of 144 votes 
over all others. Wherefore the committee recom- 
mend the passage of the accompanying resolution. 
William P. Sheffield, G. J. Adams, 

Thomas G. Turner, Samuel Curret, 

Daniel E. Carpenter, John G. Champlin, 

Benjamin Hall, Simon H. Greene. 

Which reports having been read and accepted, it 
was thereupon 



MAT, 1851. 66 

Reiohedj That George 6. King, of Newport^ be and 
he is hereby dedared to be duly elected Representa- 
tive to the Thirty-Second Congress for the Eaatem Dish 
trict of this State, he having received a majority of 
the whole number of votes necessary to a choice, cast 
for fiepresentative for that District at the election held 
on the first Wednesday of April, in the year 1861. — 
M 

Besobedj That Benjamin B. Thurston, of Hopkinton, 
be and he is hereby declared to be duly elected a BeiH 
lesentative fix)m the Western District of this Siate, m 
the Thirty-Second Congress of the United Statea 

Whig Ticket 

1851. 

Eastern District 

[State Arms.] 

For Sepresentative to the Thirty-Second Congress^ 

George G. Kino, 
of Neveport 

Whig Ticket 
1851. 
Eastern District 
[State Arm&J 
For Bepresentative to the Thurty-First Congress, 

George G. King, 
of Newport 

Orderedy That the proxy votes for Representatives 
rfhoth the Eastern and Western Districts be deposit- 
ed in the Secretary's OflBce. 

The Grand Conmiittee rose and the two Houses 

separated 



JUSTICES OF THE PEACE 

Eieeted hy the taums^ under the provisions of the ConstUtUion. 

ScUuate. Eleazer L. PhilEps, 

Jonah Titus, Robert Knight^ 

Charles A, Harris, George Sarle, 

Joh Angell, Joseph Potter, 

Samuel Wilbur, Jr^ Knight Wilbur, 

9 



66 



MAY, 1851. 



Arthur F. Randall, 
Nehemiali S. Fenner, 
Richard Olney, 
Geoi^ W. ColweE 

Providence. 

Henry Martin, 
K Dyer Vinton, 
Roger W. Potter, 
Edward S. Martin, 
Jesse K. Webster, 
James N. Holmes^ 
John & Eddy. 

North Providence, 
John H. Weeden, 
Lemuel Angell, 
John Tucker, 
Jesse S. Tourtellot, 
Thomas K. King, 
John Hoswell, 
Levi C. Eaton, 
Charles S. Bradley, 
Adams Park, 
Jerome B. Anthony, . 
Cornelius Manchester. 

East Greenwich. 
William Bodfish, 
William Bailey, 
William W. Shippee, 
Gilbert Tillinghast^ 
Isaac S. Whitford, 
Benjamin H. Reynolds, 
Thomas R Dawley, 
William R Tilley, 
Manly Bateman, 
Solomon Knowles^ 
Simeon Weaver, 

Robert C. Dawley. 
Bvrrillville. 

Daniel S, Mowry, 
Eddy Reach, 
Moses Taft, 
Whipple Wallingi 
Amasa Ballou, 
Charles S. Smith, 



Randall A. Smith. 
Johnston. 

Robert Wilson, 
William Smith, 
William W. Steere, 
William A. Pierce, 
Henry Fenner. 

Cranston. 

James S. Williams, 
William H. Hunt^ 
Mowry K. Aldrich, 
Robert Beatie, 
Henry F. Arnold, 
Simeon Lewis, 

John Read. 

Warwick. 
William Harrison, 
John J. Wood, 
John H. Kinyon, 
John Holden, 
John F. Carr, 
Cyrus Holden, 
Henry Hamilton, 
George A. Kinyon, 
Alfred Read, 
Charles W. Greene, 
Samuel L. Tillinghast, 
Ray G. Andrew, 
Joseph W. Potter, 
Dean Kimball, 
John Clapp, 
Charles D. Kinyon. 

Coventry. 
Benjamin H. Horton, 
Daniel R Whitman, 
Jeflfrey S. Lewis, 

James Warner/Jr., 
Giles M. Nichols, 
Oliver Lewis, 

Daniel R Weaver. 
SmUhfidd. 
Asa Winsor, 
John J. Carpenter, 
Samuel S. Mallery, 



MAY, 1861. 



67 



John Knight, 

Theophflns Crowell, 

Horace Trowbridge, 

Sabin Alien, 

EmorCo€^ 

Daniel Pearce, 

Seth Spear, 

Stephen Tucker, 

Daniel Mowry, 
Filliam & Lindsey, 
Hbridge G. Gilmore, 
Whipple B, Mowry, 
IraAbrveL 

Newpori. 
Benjamin B. Howland, 
Wiffiam Gilpin, 
Daniel C, Denham, 
Denjamin Mumford, 
William a Read. 
Olocester. 
£zra Hawkins, 
Benedict Aldrich, 
Gridley Bumham, 
Thomas Ironsy 
UonardR Williams, 
Anson Smith, 
Joeeph C. Medbury, 
Hiram Salisbury, 
Jeremiah Sheldon. 

Westerly. 

Daniel B. Irish, 
John a Cross, 
Jedediah W. Knight^ 
Nathan H. Langworthy, 
Eaoch B. Pendleton, 
William P. Arnold, 
John P. Hall, 
Nathan P, Dixon, 
George D. Cross, 
Joseph Potter, 
Edward W. Collins, 
Jiiah M. Knowles, 
Bradford Bliven, 
William H. StiUman, 



Joseph H. Lewis. 

South Kingstown. 
Benjamin Hull, 
Joseph P. Babeock, 
Wilkins Updike, 
EUsha R Potter, 
Powell Helme, 
Thomas P. WeUs, 
John G. Clarke, Jr., 
Thomas A. Haszard, 
George L. Hazard, 
John L. Brown, 
Matthew Chappell, 
Joseph D. Barber, 
Joseph C. Gardner, 
Stanley W. Webb, 
Nathaniel H. Knowles, 
Edmund Bagley, 

Hopkinton. 

Nathan K. Lewis, 
Jesse Brown, 
Christopher Brown, 
Isaac Cundall, 
LUlibridge Barber. 
Cumberland. 
Fenner Brown, 
George L. Dana, 
Nathaniel Dana, 
Welcome R Peck, 
Lewis B. Arnold, 
Bailey E. Borden, 
Sheffield Maxon, 
Abner JiUson. 

West Greenwich. 
Jesse Cottrell, 
Varnum Weaver, 
Nathan Carr, 
Benjamin R Hoxsie, 
Gideon B. Whitford, 
Jason P. Hazard, 
Ebenezer G. Church, 
Thurston Hall, 
Jonathan Nichols. 



GENERAL TREASURER'S REPORT, 

Frm October, 1850, fo J%, 1851. 

Sib— The annexed statement of the receipts and 
payments o{ the public money of the State of Rhode 
Islaod^ &C, ending April 1, 1851, is respectfully sub- 
mitted hy Your obedient servant, 

Stephen Cahoone, 

General Treasurer. 

To the Eon. Speaker of the 

House of Bepresentatwes. 



Dr. 

Balance due per October report - $11,607 71 
A-Salaries - - . 2,612 50 

B-Senators - - - 1,403 72 

C-Bepresentatives - - 3,066 80 

D— Paid Supreme Courts 4,543 42 

D-Court of Common Pleas 3^88 41 

7,831 83 

fi— Orders of the Governor - 57 33 

F— PubUc Schools - . . 1,652 36 

G— Support of Penitentiary - 5,000 00 

H— Accounts allowed by Gen. Assembly 11,898 17 
I— Repairs State House, Providence 4,150 03 

J— Appropriations for Public Schools - 660 92 

K— Active MiUtia - - 1,405 00 

J^Beporter of Deciaions Supreme Court 100 00 
M— Education dea^ dimib, &a - 700 00 

N— Insurrectionary claims - - 10 00 

Balance due the State, - 2,611 92 

54,768 29 

Cr. 

0— Beceived of peddlers and hawkers 2 500 

P— Banks for tax on capital stock 17,279 63 

Q— Banks for tax on increase stock - 75 00 

Br--Banks for bonus - - 500 00 

S^tate tax - - - 17,717 87 

T— Dividend and Lit on public deposits 8,140 13 

C— Dividend and Lit on school fimd stock 2,376 50 

^—Interest on deposited revenue - 148 82 



1 



70 



MAY, 1851. 

W — ^Town Councils 

X — ^Auctioneers 

T — ^Insurance companies not incorporated 

by the State 
Z — ^Insurance companies not incorporated 

by the State 
D — ^AvaHs of Supreme Court 593 89 

D— Avails of Court Com- Pleas, 250 96 



AA — Court of Magistrates 

BB — Court of Justice, Newport, 

CC — ^Tax on civil commissions 

DD — ^Providence and Pawtucket turnpike, 



A — Paid Salaries. 

Bichard W. Greene, Chief Justice 
Stephen Cahoone, General Treasurer 
George A. Brayton, Associate Justice 
Elisha R Potter, Com. of Public Schools 
William B. Staples, Associate Justice 
Christopher E. Bobbins, Secretary 
Bichard W. Greene, Chief Justice 
Stephen Cahoone, General Treasurer 
Levi Haile, Associate Justice 
Elisha R Potter, Com. of Public Schools 
William R Staples, Associate Justice 
Creorge A. Brayton, ^ ^ - 
Christopher E. Bobbins, Secretary 
Stephen Cahoone, General Treasurer 



B. — Paid Senators. 

Nathaniel Greene 
Nathaniel Church 
John Manchester 
Nathaniel Greene 
Andrew P. Potter 
Beth W. Macy 
Samuel Dun£ 
Christopher A. Whitman 
Nicholas "Fry 



483 48 
338 79 

1,890 72 

310 50 



844 85 

518 00 

100 00 

44 00 

1,500 00 

54,768 29 



225 00 
125 00 
137 50 
200 00 
137 50 
375 00 
225 00 
125 00 
275 00 
200 00 
137 50 
137 50 
187 50 
125 00 

2,612 60 

13 00 

13 00 

13 00 

6 85 

13 00 

12 20 

17 32 

528 

5 64 



MAY, 1851. 71 

John B. Francis • - 5 44 

Lyman Baraej - • - 5 96 

Casey B. Tyhr . • 10 92 

Ssnrael Potter '- ■ • 9 80 

Ephnim Winsor - - 8 68 

Dutykpham ■ • • 10 28 

Iliomas Boiluin - - 10 28 

Josab Westcott - • - 9 80 

&iiayler Fisher - - 6 92 

iiielBallou ■ - - 9 80 

Stephra Branch - - 7 40 

Filliam C. Chapin - - - 20 76 

MenBickneU • ■ 7 68 

Joseph W. Cross - - - 9 16 

BenJMnin J. T. Keynolds - - 7 88 

Jeraniah Chadsey - • - 6 28 

(leotge D. Cross - • 9 80 

Biaha R Potter - - - 7 40 

flaile Collins - - 9 00 

lloaias T. Hazard - - • 8 20 

8tq)hen Whipple - - 8 20 

Jwa L Champlin - - - 7 36 

J<^ Manchester - - 39 76 

Samuel Dunn - - - 14 00 

I E Cross - - 39 24 

Simuel Potter - - - 36 40 

Chiistopher A. Whitman - - 36 24 

Jeremiah G. Chadsey - - - 37 60 

Benjamin J. T. Reynolds - • 34 80 

John C. Champlin - - - 41 04 

George D. Gross - - 40 40 

Biaha R Potter - - - 30 08 

Josiah Wescott - - 36 40 

Nicholas S. Fry - - - 35 72 

BphraimWinsor - - 35 60 

John B. Francis - - • 31 12 

Thomas T. Hazard - - 38 80 

Samuel Dvinn - - - 29 08 

Nathaniel Greene - - 38 80 

Nathaniel Church - - - 39 60 

Seth M. Macy - - 30 80 

Schuyler Fisher - - - 38 32 

Stephen Whipple - - 31 80 

Stephen Branch - - - 84 00 



1 

72 MAT, 


1851. 




Ariel Ballon 


^ ^ 


35 56 


Allen Bicknell 


« 


- 34 28 


Andrew F. Potter 


f 


4120 


Dutee Lapham 




- 37 20 


Caaey B. Tyler 


- 


37 52 


Thomas Bnfinm 


• 


- 35 88 


William C. Chapin 


. 


38 20 


L^man Barney 


- 


- 33 28 


Haile Collins 


• 


34 76 


• 


1,403J2 


C. — Paid Representatives. 




Jonathan A. Tomtellot 


■• m 


1116 


Amos Fiske 


• 


- 12 36 


Henry Y. Cranston 


. 


12 88 


Christopher 6. Perry - 


- 


- 1188 


Benjamin Finch 


• 


12 88 


Benjamin Cottrell 


- 


- 13 00 


Joseph B. Weaver 


- 


1188 


Augustus Peckham 


. 


- 13 68 


Oliver C. Brownell 


• 


14 00 


Isaac Saunders 


. 


9 68 


Leonard Blodget 


- 


8 08 


Earl A. Wright 


• 


9 52 


Jonathan A, Tourtellot 


. 


10 48 


Samuel H. Hopkins 


. 


- 10 80 


Emor H. Smith 


•> m 


8 68 


George L. Dana 


- 


9 20 


Tilmerick Barnes 


. 


888 


Pardon Clarke 


• 


9 68 


Lyman Hawkes 


• 


1128 


Fenner Brown 


. 


- 10 48 


Emor Coe 


• • 


1112 


George H. Browne 


. 


9 80 


Nathan Porter 


• 


8 40 


Jabez Gorham 


m 


7 08 


Samuel Ames 


m aa 


8 08 


Olney Arnold 


. 


- 10 80 


Israel Sayles 


• 


9 36 


George S. Rathbone 


• 


6 08 


Samuel S. Mallory 


■ B 


9 36 


Joseph T. Sisson 


. 


812 


Zelotes Wetherell 


- 


8 72 



MAT, 1861. 



7S 



James G. Hidden 
^nbael Hutchins 
TuUy D. Bowen 
Heniy AnHtony 
Thomas 6. Fenner 
Josepii Potter 
Josepb Gavitt 
AbM & Kinjon 
James Eldred 
Simeon Babcock 
Pardon Spencer 
John G. Ellis 
Joseph Anthony 
WiDiam P. Sheffield 
EaWardwell 
Daniel G. Allen 
F.AHazard 
Wniiam Sheldon 
Bichard M. AndrewE 
John Holden 
Alfred Bosworth 
Thomas Davis 
William Collins 
Wilkins Updike 
Borden Chace 
Bobert Harris 
Benjamin Hall 
AmosFisk 
John Higffins 
Isaac Greene 
Joseph Potter 
Henry Y. Cranston 
Benjamin Finch 
Joseph Anthony 
Chrifltopher G. Pen 
Joseph B. Weaver 
W. P. Bateman 
Oliver C. BrowneU 
Augustus Peckham 
W. P. Sheffield 
Samuel Ames 
Jabez Gx>rham 
Joseph T. Sisson 
Tifaneiick Barnes 



8 08 
6 08 
8 08 

8 08 

9 68 

16 62 
1120 

8 36 

6 28 

19 04 

10 04 

8 40 

12 88 

10 28 

10 76 

6 48 

6 08 

8 08 

9 00 
6 12 
9 68 
6 24 
9 00 

8 66 

17 36 

9 84 
9 00 

23 16 

6 00 

10 80 

10 44 

36 80 
34 80 
38 80 
34 80 
38 80 
38 80 
38 60 
38 80 

37 20 
34 00 
34 00 
34 64 
34 80 



74 MAY, 1851 

George L. Dana - - - 3512 

Pardon Clarke - . 35 60 

Benjamin Hall - - - 31 92 

Joseph Potter - - 3g 72 

John Holden - - • 32 96 

Bichard M. Andrews - - 34 76 

Lyman Hawkes - - - 36 50 

Samuel MaUory - . 34 9g 

Penner Brown - - - 36 08 

Samuel H. Hopkms - - 37 04 

Pardon Spencer - - - 40 20 

James C. Hidden - - 34 Oq 

Leonard Blodget - - - 34 00 

George S. Ba&bone - - 34 00 

Earl A. Wright - - - 34 28 

Israel Sayles - - 33 % 

Edward H. Warner - - - 41 08 

TuUy D Bowen - . 33 00 

Henry Anthony - - - 34 00 

William Sheldon - - 34 00 

Alfred Bosworth - - - 35 76 

Daniel G. Allen - - 33 72 

Alpheus Blanchard - - - 34 96 

Benedict Lapham - . 9 6g 

Thomas G. Penner - - - 36 10 

Welcome Collins - - 39 40 

Isaac Greene - - - 40 24 

Emor Coe . - - 36 12 

W. A. Hazard - - - 34 00 

Thomas Davis - - 33 16 

Shubael Hutchins - - - 33 00 

H. C. Wardwell - . 41 72 

Benjamin Cottrell - - - 41 20 

Simeon Babcock - . 44 20 

Joseph Gavitt - - - 39 80 

John C. Ellis - - gg 00 

Wilkins Updike - - - 38 80 

Abial S. Kinyon - - 37 20 

Cyrus Harris - - - 31 72 

A. Harris . . 3576 

James Eldred - - - 86 20 

L Saunders - - 34 60 

0, Arnold - . - 32 72 

G. Higgins - . 33 26 



MAT, 1851. 



76 



RLapham 
Nathim Porter 
EooLor H. Smith 
R Harrb 
Geoige K Brown 
Zelotes WetheiiU 
E^EHaxard 
AmosFiske 
J. A. Tourtellot 
A. C. Mathewson 
Borden Chace 
R 6. Hazard 



D — Accounts albwed by (hurts since October 1850. 

Charles Spooner 
Thomas Bateman 
John Place 
Albert Cornell 
Thomas Bateman 
George C. Perry 
Christopher Budlong 
Jonathan Cooke 
Lebbius Gaskill 
George Fenno 
Christopher C. Dexter 
Isaac G. Weaver 
George W. Bston 
Jeremiah Sheldon 
John P. Nichols 
Bichard C. Young 
George B. Smith 
James M. White 
Sydney B. Smith 
OUver C. Williams 
Thomas S. Appleby 
L D. Bates 
Daniel T. Harris 
Wmiam H. Sweet 
Daniel PhiUips 
John Hill 
Daniel Sheldon 
Israel 6. M. Bates 

10 



- 35 64 


32 40 


- 34 60 


34 40 


- 36 64 


34 66 


- 10 80 


32 64 


- 36 24 


4108 


- 36 68 


47 44 


3,066 80 


)ber 1850. 


124 


13 68 


4 00 


244 


- 27 20 


3 00 


6 00 


2 96 


8 88 


712 


7 28 


7 92 


9 36 


8 56 


7 28 


6 32 


8 56 


8 72 


6 80 


116 


3 60 


3 88 


88 


3 00 


- 10 80 


4 60 


44 


4 16 



n 



MAY, 185t 




Abner Rogers 


- 3 62 


John Brown 


356 


Hannah Downing 


2 08 


Lewis Potter 


176 


Joseph W. Saunders 


176 


Bradford Bead 


164 


Horace A. Martin 


164 


Hugh N. Oifford 


500 


Richard Fenner 


100 


Joseph Sparks 


100 


Heiuy Felix 


100 


Henry Smith 


164 


Alexander G. Stevens - 


40 


Lyman Bosworth 


40 


Thomas Connaton 


40 


Charles A Brown 


40 


Edward T. Gladding - 


146 


Nelson Burdick 


2 48 


William H. Douglas 


5 40 


William H. Douglas 


8 70 


William H. Douglas 


- 18 90 


Isaac D. Champlm 


180 


George J. Sherman 


100 


Simeon Lewis 


23 88 


Humphrey Allen 


100 


George W. Crocker 


100 


Levi F. Ballou 


- 14 04 


John Allen 


504 


Leonidas Allen 


- 12 88 


John Tucker 


3 22 


Perry Arnold 


128 


William Bodfish, Clerk 


13 73 


Robert S. Scatle 


7 65 


Allen Durfee 


1134 


Allen Durfee 


- 1112 


W alter Sherman 


2 40 


Christopher T. White - 


3 92 


George F. Fowler 


2 00 


Thomas S. Stanhope 


200 


John M. Anthony 


224 


Creorge M. Taylor 


400 


Philip B. Chace 


2 80 


Daniel J. Weeden 


280 


Andrew C. Shaw 


3 60 



MAT, 185L 



77 



Isaac Borden 
Gardner Thomas 
WOlam B. Gray 
William B. Gmj 
William R Douglas 
Ja& C. Davenport 
Jolm R flammett 
Ben/amm N. Rose 
Lyman Mowry 
LeTiMowry 
Isaiah Perkms 
Guilford BnrrougliB 
Columbia Tingley 
John R Whipple 

Allen Taylor 

Itobert Reynolds 

Charles D. Greene 

Albert D. Vose 

Origin Steere 

Antoine L. Crout 

Orris Sarle 

Thomas Mereweiher 

William W. Spanlding - 

Thomas Wesson 

Leonard Blodget 

Allen J. Brown 

William R Babcock - 

Edward Thornton 

HemyBattey 

Hezekiah Wadsworth 

Joseph G. Snow 

Daniel Smith 

Charles & Smith 

William Matteson 

Lewis Curtis 

William C. Barker 

Thomas Breck 

Simeon C. Arnold 

Frederick Miller 

Walker Hmnphrey 

Tliomas Irons 

Edward D. Leach 

James R. Sheriden 

W. A. Mason 



3 36 


2 80 


80 


4 16 


864 


2 00 


2 00 


88 


2 16 


7 28 


3 00 


18 48 


30 20 


28 80 


28 00 


28 80 


23 00 


33 20 


29 00 


28 00 


32 40 


3 43 


25 20 


28 00 


28 00 


22 00 


27 00 


28 20 


28 00 


28 00 


27 00 


36 40 


36 40 


35 60 


28 80 


28 00 


3 00 


32 12 


100 


6 00 


3148 


7 00 


3 56 


8 80 



78 



BfAT, 1861. 



Samuel Staples 

William Wilson 

Jencks Mowrjr 

William N. Sherman 

Boud'win Hazard 

Stephen C. Fisk 

James C. Tucker 

Stephen Smith 

Amos P. Chapman 

Joshua C. Brown 

Janos Sherman 

Orlando Smith 

Charles Cross 

Horace H. Burdick 

Albert Spink 

Georee F. Shemum 

PaulM. Baden 

Silas Spink 

John B. Lawton 

Asa T. Reynolds 

John G. Perry 

Solomon Sprague 

Benjamin smith 

John Brown 

John A. Saunders 

Asa T. Hozie 

Simeon C. James 

Rhodes W. Perkins 

James PoUard 

Thornton Robinson 

Samuel Tucker 

George N. ChampUn 

Comeliiis Bradley 

Thomas Wilcox 

Jeremiah S. Sherman 

Joseph M. Blake, Attorney General 

Samuel W. Church 

Walter C. P. Barker 

John H. Chace 

Hezekiah Tiffony 

Darius Chase 

Samuel W. Church 

Marshal Waldron 

Thomas J. Usher 



132 
104 00 
2 52 
152 
192 
648 
708 
984 

1048 
680 
648 
300 
808 
8 72 
2 20 
164 
2 92 
2 20 
8 08 
8 08 
696 
760 
744 
536 
132 
244 
180 
244 
172 
132 
140 
108 
2 60 

28 93 
900 

23 00 
516 
140 
140 
164 
164 
116 
100 
100 



MAT, 1851. 



79 



George Wheatoi 

Lntixex Cole 

SBiam Drown 

William BinutQ 

Alfied Drown 

Daniel Groene 

John G. Clark, Jr. 
•EeiujTaggart 

WUSamSwBii 

WaHam C. Thurston 
Moses Norman 
James Lawton 
Cyras H. Gray 
Wiffiam T.Hall 
Benjamin Fish 
AbnerBead 
FiQiam G. Bowen 
M Strait 
IL T. Bennett^ Clerk 

Ditto 
Gecfl L Peckham 
Kwin Hambly 
been Evans 
Gamer Hambly 
Benjamin Hambly 
Biza Hambly 
Martin Gladding 
Samnel Brown 
A. Anthony 
G. E Whightman 
L E Endicott 
J.Andrews 
J.V.Snow 
E Fenner 
8.Chace 
E Fenner 
Charles Fenner 
J. £ Elliott^ 
W. E Pullen 
Benjamin Powley 
George C. Arnold 
WilHam Consett 
Samuel Woodcraft 
James Helme 



140 


132 


164 


100 


164 


144 


- 49 64 


3 00 


3 00 


6 00 


100 


3 00 


9 12 


9 12 


4 32 


14 24 


4 36 


2 20 


- 13 30 


37 84 


136 


4 32 


4 80 


4 80 


4 80 


4 80 


160 


27 00 


. 28 80 


88 


4 60 


2 92 


2 92 


4 60 


- 1012 


3 80 


3 92 


2 56 


2 62 


3 80 


2 92 


10 48 


5 92 


9 32 



80 



MAT, 1851. 



Benjamin Whipple 
David Davidson 
EUjah B. Craig 
A. E Mowiy 

F. A. Greene 
M. S. Daniels 
A. L. Crout 
J. B. Lisson 
A. Spooner 
J, J. Potter 
T. G. Stevens 
W. P. Dean 
D. E. Chafee 
Bussell Clapp 
J. L. Clark 
R P. Wilcox 

G. Wilcox 
J. Nokeay 
A. Carlton 

A. B. Saterlee 
T. W. Hart 
L. K Smith 
T. W. Hazard 
J. Medlerey 

J. J. D. Grafton 
K Egan 
H. Lindell 
O.Wood 
C. L. Fisher 
M.Egen 

B. Clark 

W. G. Merriwether 
Joseph Ince 
G. B. Goodhue 
K P. Church 
J. C. Potter 
L. Hemmenway 
H. M. Paine 
John Morris 
P. Case 
J. a Gould 
W. Wilbom 
W. Booth 
Eben Balcom 



- 6 36 


6 36 


- 1012 


1012 


. 6 36 


2 60 


. 16 84 


644 


. 700 


180 


. 644 


3 91 


- 32 32 


14 28 


. 2 92 


672 


- 6 72 


696 


- 212 


4 60 


. 816 


4 60 


. 3 36 


6 66 


. 388 


300 


. 4 68 


212 


■ 4 96 


300 


. 460 


612 


. 2 92 


2 66 


3 36 


20 76 


- 13 72 


67 25 


- 4 76 


26 92 


. 24 32 


3 60 


- 2 48 


120 



MAT, 1851. 81 

JiHone • - -120 

J. L Hazard - - 3 60 

J. lions - - - 88 

Joseph i. Scott - - 1 76 

Thomas EarkneflB - - - 44 

P. JohnsDn - - 80 

W.EPiillen - - - 100 

F.Sarrooghs - • 32 00 

& Hemmeaw&y - - - 12 13 

If. G. Merriwether - . 11 14 

T. W. Hart - - - 19 98 

& B. Arnold - - 16 60 

J. C. Potter - - . 33 99 

EM. Pierce - - 47 90 

J.J.Potter - - - 60 42 

Bnsaeliaapp • • 27 25 

J.E Gould - - -20 63 

Court of Magistrates - - 72 65 

RPeny - - - 1 92 

Joseph Champlin • - 2 72 

T. J. Champlin - - - 2 72 

JCEldred • - 2 80 

£. Champlin - - -104 

I Dorretj - - 1 36 

I Dorrety - - - 1 36 

Lydia Potter - - 1 68 

J-KPotter - - - 3 60 

RULane - - 136 

W.H Church - - -132 

William Manchester - - 6 16 

T.P.Lind8ey - - -108 

J J. Greene - - 1 32 

HeniySandford - - -100 

J.R Talbot - - 100 

R. a Paine - - -100 

JGayton - - 40 

Charies 0. Storrs - - - 40 

W. H. Pearce - - 1 16 

C. Kingman - - - 1 00 

W.E Church - - 132 

R&Paine - - -100 

J.B.Child8 • - 140 

W. P. Eddy - - - 1 40 

N. Gary - - 1 40 

11 



MAT, 1851. 

■Waldron 
D. Simmons 
Uen B. Mott 
rancis Peck 
imes Hoar 
ephen Easterbroofcs 
ichmond Holmes 
larles F. DWolf 
M. BUke, Attorney General 
J. Munro 
lac Manchester 
tnnet J. Miinro 
mea T. Munro 
ephen Johnson 
itthew HoppinB 
■en A Read 
imum J. Bates 
lorge Metcalf 
(rter B. Lewis 
larles H. Mason 
Ettuel Stokes 
idrew H Waterman 
niel C. Stone 
tiert Ohiey 

jxander S. Bennett - 
orge W. Lowell 
Ider WMpple 
lliam N. Place 
adiah B. King 
Qjamin G. Pabodie 
red Lapham 
cey B. Steere 
► Owen 

mcia H. Mann 
A Manchester 

eph M Blake, Attorney General 
aJy Taggarfc 
in Burrington 
lea Hoswell 
>. Cory 
les M Chace 
n Pitman 
n H Coggeshall 
sg Brownell 



MAT, 1851. 88 



Bennet Wilbor 

Thomas Piatt 

ThomaB B. Cory 

Albert Watson 

Augustus 6. Greene 

David &nith 

Pardon T. Smith 

Felix Peckham 

Peter Barker 

BobertRCarr 

Samuel Manchester 

Wm. H. Hazard 

Henry B. Underwood - 

James M. Clarke 

V. BL Douglas 

William Swan, Jr. 

James Lawton 

William C. Thurston 

William Sisson 

Charles K Hammett 

Joseph M. Blake^ Attorney General 

Augustus J. Millard 

David Parmenter 

Aaron Bathbone 

Julia K Bathbone 

James Billings 

James Sheldon 

Paris Williams 

Warren Wood 

Francis Wayland 

Samuel G. Bawson 

Israel Amesbury 

James Donovon 

Mma Tripp 

Joseph Higgins 

Caleb Peck 

Bichard G. Cientiffe - 

Abby G. Williams 

Kathan P. Lockling 

Charles R Sibley 

Charles P. Baker 

Willard HaskiH 

Thomas L. Clarke 

Ezra Carpenter 



9 92 


6 00 


2 00 


2 00 


6 00 


6 80 


6 00 


2 00 


2 24 


2 00 


6 72 


100 


2 40 


2 40 


22 20 


4 00 


4 00 


6 72 


8 00 


2118 


1100 


324 


88 


10 56 


3 40 


88 


176 


3 64 


2 12 


4 60 


2 92 


8 32 


300 


10 80 


7 28 


3 36 


3 64 


3 64 


3 36 


9 32 


6 64 


6 56 


2 92 


380 



84 MAY, 1861. 

Daniel Morse - - - 3 36 

Eber G. Mowry - - 3 00 

Michael Began - - • 3 00 

Horatio N. Pratt - - 4 04 

Henry M. Stetson - - - 7 00 

Samuel S. Pendecroas - - 7 00 

Henry 6. Pearce - - - 7 60 

Joshua Wilbur - - 5 24 

£L L. Manwaring - - - 3 64 

Aaron Harris - . 7 60 

Samuel GiflFord - - - 7 60 

Avery Allen - - 4 76 

Gladding & Proud - - - 1 67 

James Sherburne - - 20 

Jabez J. Potter - - - 31 00 

James Sheldon - - 76 

William G. Williams - - - 36 05 

Daniel Whiteman - - 49 26 

Horatio N. Pratt - - - 16 86 

Eoger W. Potter - - 162 33 

Joseph. M. Blake, Attorney Greneral - 264 50 

James Sheldon - - 31 00 

James Sherburne - - - 31 00 

Peleg Johnson - . 36 30 

Jonathan S. Kelly - - • 4 40 

Samuel K. Kelly - - 22 00 

Levi Lewis - - - 22 00 

John Battey - - 28 84 

Israel J. Bullock - - . 1 00 

Sterry Clarke - - 16 00 

Zephaniah Bandall - - . 14 92 

Daniel Pearce - - 16 44 

George Hunt - - - 25 96 

John Eaton - . 18 96 

James M.Patts - - - 26 68 

Jacob W. Hill . . . 29 80 

Elbridge G. Gilmore - - . 28 12 

Sylvester R Pearce - . 26 44 

Avery Pettis - - - 11 00 

Alfred Mason - . 22 00 

EddyKeach - . - 29 80 

^Francis C. Cummings - - 26 72 

Luke S. Salisbury - - - 25 96 

John W.Cole - . 26 72 



MAT, 186L 86 

Leonard Blodget - - - 19 00 

Pardon J. jabon - - 25 48 

Samuel D. Sloeum - - - 25 00 

Edwin Bmniutm - - 25 00 

Bnasell Greene • - • 25 00 

William&bin - - 12 00 

Oliver a Monlton - - - 12 00 

James Sherburne - - 96 

James Sheldon - - -96 

Dmel Wightman - - 28 00 

Jabez J. Potter - - -'^29 20 

Boger W.Potter - - 70 08 

James Sheldon - - - 27 08 

Joseph M. Blake, Attorney General - 224 60 

BobertDnnbar - - - 1 00 

Nathaniel Peck • - 1 64 

(Wles Spooner - - - 1 00 

ElTEennan - . 88 

John Henanslay - ' - - 3 00 

William D. Manchester - - 3 80 

William Tripp - - - 8 80 

Henry A. Lloyd - - 3 80 

C«rr Lawton - - - 2 92 

Henry Young - - 10 80 

SylTCBter Hartshorn - - - 31 60 

Ohver E. Tabor - - 26 00 

^fcn White - - - 80 04 

John P. Kjiowles - - 4 28 

Sylvester Hartshorn - - - 28 60 

Bwney Snell - - 1 24 

DavidGifford - - - 4 80 

John Mings - - 4 96 

BeazerWalden - - .44 

Nancy Brownell - - 44 

Jeflse Hoyt - - - 4 48 

John U.Watson . - - 7 60 

Joseph Boas - - - 1 60 

Henry Taggart - - 2 79 

JobnE Watson - - - 6 54 

^el Sherman - - 100 

John Rogers - - - 2 56 

Oliver Read - - 2 00 

VilliamGray - - - 2 00 

James Sherburne - - 14 20 



68 MAY, 1861. 

George W. Taylor - - - 6 00 

William Kaull - • 2 08 

Sylvester Hazard - . - 17 88 

David Sweet - - - 2 00 

Celinda Carpenter - - - 2 08 

Celinda Alexander - - 44 

Theophilus Crowell - - - 2 25 

Benjamin Holbrook - - 12 00 

Henry W. Parker - - - 1 40 

John Wilson - . . gO 

James 6. Harding - - - 1 60 

Bennet J. Munro - - 5 39 

Daniel C. Denham - - - 88 09 

Prudence Williams - - 4 40 

Charles Harris - - . 4 40 

Abner Read . . 15 16 

William G. Borden - - - 6 04 

Thomas Slocmn - - 1 60 

S. Howland - . - 2 48 

S. R Hazard - . 4 96 

T.Stacy, Jr. - - - 4 96 

S. R Hazard - • 5 11 

J. H. Watson - . - 4 96 

R Seatle - . 5 H 

R B. Lawton - - • - 6 00 

Edwin Wilbur - . 3 00 

Daniel Chace - - - 1 92 

Jeremiah Hazard - - 1 56 

Walter Paine, Clerk - - - 187 97 

Do. for stationery, - - 258 12 

W. S. Vose - - - 2 00 

Thomas J. Osbom - - 4 80 

Ruth 0. Westgate - - - 4 80 

Oliver Brownell « - 2 80 

Daniel L. Mowry - - • 2 72 

Daniel Brown - - 4 00 

Giles Manchester - . - 1 32 

Abiel T. Slocum - - 4 48 

Weaver Osbom - - - 7 40 

Gardner S. Anthony - - 7 40 

Thomas Wilbor - - - 7 88 

William Field - - 1 64 

Benjamin C. Slocum - - - 6 32 

OUver Hicks - . 7 40 



MAY, 1851. 87 

Joseph Faulkner - - - 6 20 

George W.CaiT - - 2 40 

Asa G017 - • - 2 80 

William N. 6. Helme - - 4 00 

Thomas Mner - • - 8 00 

Joseph Sisson - - 6 88 

SeanonsBailey - - • 7 88 

flenijI.King - - 7 40 

Samuel Sawyer - - - 7 88 

Peleg Eldred - - 6 84 

Joim^Pish - . - 7 40 

IVederic A. Stanhope - - 2 00 

James W. Eenyon - - - 2 00 

James HorsweU - - 1 00 

Bichard Swan - - - 2 00 

Thomas Stacy, Jr. - - 2 00 

fleazer J. Read - - - 1 00 

William Guild - ■ 4 00 

John MJngo - - - 1 88 

Job Snell - - 1 00 

Simon Snell - - - 1 00 

Daniel C. Denham - - 2 85 

Wanton R Hazard - - - 1 00 

R W.Potter - - 16 90 

B. Cozzens - - - 30 

J. Tucker - - 7 05 

Christopher Grarven - - - 1 20 

Maiy Garven - - 1 20 

William H. Jencks - - • 5 56 

Thoma« B. Rowland - - 3 80 

William T. TibbettB - - - 2 92 

SethW. Winch - - 5 56 

Franklin Pearce • - - 2 92 

Benjamin T. Beynolds - - 44 

Charles J. Hill - - - 6 36 

Albert Jencks - - 9 32 

Daniel Wightman - - - 3 00 

Bmily Cleaveland - - 2 20 

Charles A. Smith - - - 1 76 

George Ellifl - - 148 

Willard Ifetor - - - 2 12 

Catharine Larskey - - 96 

MaryCHnll - - - 2 20 

Thomafl Mann - ' 88 



88 MAT, 185L 

Ann T. Aldennan - - - 88 

H. H. Wightman - - 4 96 

David G. Shippee - - - 88 

Rosana Short - - 3 36 

William Streeter * - - 80 

S. Trowbridge - - 88 

R E. Jones - - - 1 32 

Willard Haskell - - 212 

Allen Haskell - - - 212 

P. Langdon - - 88 

Walter Paine - - .88 

Sayles A. Eeten - . 2 12 

Daniel H. Crapon - - - 2 40 

Eliza Feme - - 2 00 

Maiy Feme - - - 2 44 

Samuel A. Kelly - - 96 

Calvin S. Parke - . - 132 

Borden Albro - - 132 

Stephen Fammn - - - 5 04 

Alexander M'Dougal - - 60 

John Fuller - - - 4 60 

John Lynch - . 88 

Gilbert Wflbur - - - 2 08 

Margaret Hughes - - 7 60 

William B. Everett - - - 6 40 

Robert Pettet - . - 3 96 

Q. R Saunders - - - 2 56 

Lloyd S. Sutton - - 4 24 

Isaac Jacquays - - - 4 96 

Daniel Carr - - - 4 96 

Elisha Scott - - - 8 24 

Andrew J. Gardner - - 4 32 

N. W. Cozzens - - . 9 80 

Alfred Allen - - 4 96 

Bradbury C. Hill - . -4 32 

Cornelius E. Bourne - - 6 48 

Edwin Capron - - - 2 40 

Thomas Kenny - - 4 32 

Le Roy Brown - - - 4 96 

E.H.Sprague - - 2 08 

Caleb Carr - - - 2 08 

EUjaliHall - ^ 5 48 

Thomas W.Hart - - - 44 

W.H. Hudson - - 2 36 



M/LT, 1861. 89 

JohnRGodd ■ . - 5 40 

James Sheldon - . - 44 

Silas Henuneznraj - - -88 

W. 6. Herewether • ■ 6 28 

D. K (Mke - . . 6 48 

JabeiC. Potter • . 9 84 

BoaseD Cbpp - . • 6 60 

PelegJobmon - . 88 

leaader Bunnell - ■ - 2 56 

VSSam Belcher ■ . 2 72 

Alfred Voiter - - - 2 08 

Jo&A.Cliedel • - 5 40 

Ssmael Almy - . • 1 76 

Daniel T. Potter - - 76 

DeanEimbaU • - '8 24 

HemyM. Tucker - - 4 55 

Peleg Johnson • • • • 4 45 

W. E Hudson - - 12 64 

James Sherburne • - - 15 30 

D. K Chaffee ■ ■ 3 60 

R. W.Potter - - - 3 50 

S.Hemmenwaj - - 7 72 

ttltPearce - - - 5 24 

R Clapp - - 41 90 

J. S. Sheldon - - - 26 78 

W. 6. Merewether - . 6 48 

3o\m H. Gotild - - - 22 66 

Thomas W.Hart - - 2166 

Jabez J. Potter - - - 27 48 

Jabez C. Potter - - 54 32 

S.S.Mallery - - -130 

Conrt of Magistrates - ■ 114 75 

W.P.Morrell - - - 6 48 

Oliver Abbott - - 6 88 

JonahN. Colvin - - - 6 80 

W.B. Miller - - 6 08 

^a&taix Lockwood • - - 6 56 

Job Arnold - - 6 64 

John W. Manchester - • • 6 64 

Bridford C. Read - - 6 72 

Squire G. Wood - - -5 44 

Benjamin H. Hendricks - • 2 08 

Daniel Kemball - . - 4 16 

Benjamin Reynolds • - 6 96 

12 



90 MAT, 1861. 

Louis B. Place - - . 5 4g 

W. A, Grardner - - 2 08 

Henry J. WUbur . '- - 2 24 

Benjamin A. Eonnecome * - 2 40 

George C. Kenyon - - • 2 08 

Joseph Nichols - - 6 20 

Watson Matteson - - - 3 36 

John Parker - - 3 60 

Henry J. Capwell - - - 3 44 

Moses Budlong - - 2 24 

James R Remington - - - 2 24 

Alfred Read - . 748 

Clarke Greene - - - 6 20 

George C. Perry - . 6 00 

Henry A, Craff - . - 2 80 

Nelson Andrews - - 4 80 

Sheffield Waite - - - 4 80 

Lawton Greene - - 6 08 

Christopher R Whipple - - 2 64 

A. G. littlefield - . 4 08 

EbenSlocum - - - 2 08 

John Warner - - 3 68 

Peleg Matteson - - - 3 80 

Benjamin Reynolds - - 10 00 

Thomas Bateman - . - 25 83 

Thomas R Carder - - 9 00 

Isaac Whitford - - - 6 00 

David Howard - - 2 80 

Perry Arnold - - - 6 00 

George Gates - . 1 28 

John S. Pearce - • - 5 48 

Sterry Matteson - - 1 64 

John E French - - - 1 20 

Samuel Read - - 1 20 

James Horswell - - - 1 00 

W. Brownell - . 1 00 

MUtonHall - - -100 

W. Turner - - 1 00 

James C. Powell - - - 1 00 

W. Stevens - . 1 00 

Benjamin Easton - . - 1 00 

IfeekGiflTord - . 100 

John H. Stoddard - - -100 

W. P. Peckham - . 100 



MAT, 1861. W 

John D. WilliaiM - - -100 

W.C. Irish - - 100 

PelegCkie - - -100 

ErastasBowen - - 3 60 

AbnerPeckhMtt - - - 4 48 

John J. TTatson - - 6 20 

MwaiiGnj - - - 4 00 

SunaeJ Gould - - 4 48 

Aiier Lawton - - - 4 72 

lewisB. Rogers - - 4 56 

Daniel D. Dudley - - - 8 60 

George Popple, Jr. - - 4 00 

David Antliony - - - 1 80 

Stephen A. Ward - - 4 00 

Gardner LeUebridge - - - 4 00 

Thomaa Coggeshall - - 4 60 

Henry Hadley - - - 4 CO 

W.J.Peddiam - - 2 32 

Charles W. Howard - - - 3 92 

Abner Gifford - - ^ 92 

W. a Douglas - - - 2410 

W.tt Douglas - - 2130 

Henry Taggart - - - 5 00 

BobertSeatle - - 1^00 

William Thurston - - - 8 42 

James Lawton - " 6 00 

WiffiamSwan - - .5 00 

Isaiah Vickery - " 1 00 

J.Eflowland - - " ^ "S? 

PeterCook - - 2 24 

Peter Cook - - - 2 24 

W. A Wilson - - 94 

X A Hathaway - - " i ^2 

A Hazard - - » JJ 

Thomas little - - - 10 56 

J. T. Nichols - - ^36 

Joseph M. Blake - - ' ^ ?2 

George Potter - - » °? 

J.Pbce - - - 700 

XHart - - 2 08 

W.Whitford - ■ "55? 

J.Nichols - - 2 08 

D.Potter - - - ?5? 

J-CHanis - - 4 08 



aa MAY, 185L 

Paull^encer - - 4 32 

John Kinnicome • - - 6 40 

A,Kske . . 3 68 

11 Russell . . .44 

C.R Young . . 1518 

HL Trowbridge - - - 1 90 

L. J. Arnold . . 2 96 

E. Bennett . . .44 
Owen Stimcoe - - 44 
B. Evans - . .408 
G. M. Sheldon . . 1 32 
RWilbour - . - 708 
S.F. Burgess - . 88 
W. M. Young - . - 3 92 
H. M. Young . . 3 92 
A.Bartlett - - - 88 
N.Bond . . 88 

F. Mowry - . - 4 40 
Samuel Greene - - 4 96 
B. O. Annis » - -88 

G. M. Stanley ^ . . 4 32 
REvans - . -2 20 
J. M. Brown - . 1 32 

B. Wilcox - . - 2 70 
A. Payne - . 44 
W.B. Harvey - . - 88 
M. Kimball - . 3 92 
J. W. Paull - . .44 
0. Young . . 1 76 
A.Bartlett - . - 88 
Thomas Clarke - - 176 
a Booth . . - 132 
R Parker . - 96 
A. B. Copeland - - - 4 88 
F, L. Burgess - . 88 
A^Whitfoid . . -2 28 
N. Carr . . 2 92 

C. Copewell - . . S 08 
O.G.Pahner - - 212 
& Harris, Jr. - - - 212 
J). Wheelock . . 1 80 
M. Bateman - • - 1 16 
S. Nichols . . 2 28 
J.Gi^ene - . -3 72 



MAT, 186L 93 

W. A. Spencer - - 1 96 

Z. Parker - - - 1 80 

J. W. Carpenter - - 8 56 

L. Johnston <- <- - 4 62 

W. Spencer - - 1 16 

H. Bead - - - 2 76 

W. 6. JHiithewson - - 3 72 

EEiStone - - - 2 44 

T. ft Arnold - - 2 76 

A Weeks - - - 2 44 

i A Cole - - 2 60 

A Fan . . - 108 

iJ.Cady - . 196 

E Whitman - - - 1 96 

6.Potter - - 8 40 

6. B. Salisbury - - - 8 08 

J.ttWhitford - - 2 00 

E Walker - - - 1 52 

J.M.Place - - 2 88 

8. S. Bnrlingham - - - 4 96 

J.Myrick - - 152 

W. A Hubbaxd - - - 1 28 

P.Qarke - - 2 12 . 

J.lLEddy - - -140 

J.Pearce - - 1 80 

G.K.ViaU - - -2 44 

J.BLPeck - - 2 28 

R Rogers - - - 1 32 

J. 0. Waterman - - 1 80 

J. Pearce - - - 1 00 

J.M. Blake - - 2 00 

RWUcox - - - 2 20 

C. Congdon - - 1 80 

5. Sands - - - 2 92 
BIB. Wood . . 5 80 
Joeeph Taylor - . - 2 92 
William Aplin - - 8 00 

6. L Spencer - - - 5 24 
^Evans - - 8 88 
A. Caipenter - - - 2 20 
V.&Tingley . . 4 80 
S.Sweet - - -3 64 
8. Johnson - - 8 00 
I. Ibiicherter - - - 1 16 



94 MAT, 186L 

J. Manchester - - - 4 00 

J. C. Peckham - - 2 40 

T. HUl - - - 3 20 

D. G. Allen - - - 3 28 

J. S. Clark - - - 2 56 

H.M Wells - - - 3 28 

a N. Campbell - - - 3 92 

S. M Ferry - - 6 80 

W. Palmer - - - 5 64 

C. WUcox - - 3 92 

J. C. Greene - - - 2 88 

C. C. Greene - - 172 

C. P. LilUbridge - - - 6 36 

0. Sherman - - 6 80 

J. M LiUibridge - - - 6 36 

J. T. Hopkins - - 640 

T. PhiUips - - - 6 80 

R Gardner - - 1 40 

W. H. Robinson - - - 2 40 

£. Clarke - - 3 92 

0. Babcock - - - 4 24 

N. C. Peckham - - 2 08 

. S. Barber • - - 6 28 

J. A. Kenyon - - 3 04 

W. W. lallibridge - - - 7 52 

E.M.Bagas - . 6 28 

C. Comstock - - - 2 08 

T.G.Allen - - 744 

G. Hoxie - - - 3 44 

W. L. Richmond - - 3 20 

DutyJ. Hvdl - - - 3 60 

T.T. Hazard - - 2 80 

L. Crandall - - - 6 88 

H. P. Clarke - 52 

J. C. Pahner - - - 2 56 

J. M. Blake > - 15 00 

W. Bodfish - - - 32 90 

H. Carder - - 6 08 

A. Robinson - - . 2 40 

B. Smith - - - 180 
G. N. Butterworth - - - 212 

, N.Luther - - 180 

G.C. Hatch - - -164 

J. Woodman - - 1 96 



MAT, 186L 96 

James A. SmiOi - - - 2 28 

Charles Cole . . 1 64 

George A. fiuah - - - 1 00 

J.W.Baraej - - - 116 

A. H. Monro - • - 1 00 

C. Bowen ■ • 1 00 

IRaade - - -100 

J.EMyn . - 100 

ECfleath - - - 2 12 

I T. Monro - - 1 00 

RJ.Mimro - - -100 

W:r.Waldron - - 40 

MRfiirley - - -104 

J. 6. Anthony - - 1 76 

£ M. Gangland - - - ^ 88 

aO.Pennel - - ' 88 

D.Keach - - - 2 08 

George S. Baihbone - • 2 56 

KD.Baihbone - • -176 

J.R Pierce ... 44 

C. Brown - - 1 32 
F. G. Smith - - - 1 12 
CiLNewell - - 12 00 
Court of Ma^strates - - - 18 75 
W. A King - - 4 48 
H. Bos ■ - • 5 84 
J. Clark - - 4 88 

D. Coman - - - 4 96 
C. W.Hall - - 416 
J.B. Brown - - - 4 48 
B. E Hammond - - 5 60 
J.P.Weatcott - - - 5 20 
AWinaor - - - 4 88 
aSandaU - - - 4 80 
J. Young - - - 4 32 
B. Fessenden - - - 4 48 
P.PJiBaon - - - 4 16 
Court of Magistrates - • - 5 50 
J.Murray, 2d. - - - 8 40 
John Cornell - - - 1 16 
Job Card - - - 116 
T.B.Dawley - - -116 
ftCPerry - - - 2 00 
niomas Biiteman - - - 13 85 



96 MAT, 1861 

Joseph M. Blake, - - 4 00 

Greorge H. Peckham • - - 2 40 

Robert Rodman - . 6 12 

Isaac A. Chadsej - - - 6 76 

Nathan K Lei¥i£i - - 7 08 

Isaac Greene - - - 7 88 

Alfred B.Tift - - 3 24 

EliafiBurdick - - - 708 

John Wilcox - - 7 88 

George W. Holdredge - - 7 66 

J. B, Potter - - 756 

Henry J. Joslin - - - 6 92 

Clarke Crandall - - 7 56 

John B. Tift - - - 756 

John W. Sunderland - - 3 24 

Isaac £bll - - - 6 60 

George Hoxie - - 7 66 

Stanton W. Congdon - - - 6 60 

Albert Thayer - - 2 88 

EliaflTaft - - - 2 28 

W. C. Tucker - - 3 40 

Eliai9 M. Ballou - - - 2 28 

Daniel Hale - - 12 68 

Felix Coreen - - - 2 08 

W. S. Burges - - 176 

N.L.MiUer - - -88 

W. KThurber - . 132 

Henry Manchester - - - 6 00 

John C. Baker - . 4 40 

Whitman R Kenyon - - . 3 76 

Edward Barber - - 4 40 

Joseph Brightman - - - 708 

Silas James - - 3 76 

AbelFenner - - - 6 92 

Thomas M. Lewis - - 3 28 

Ezekiel James - - . 3 28 

Thomas J. Hazard - . 7 88 

Benjamin R Woodmancie - - 3 40 

Benjamin L. Lawton - - 6 60 

Jeremiah Thomas - - . 6 60 

Eliphalet Toung - . 2 60 

Stephen Reynolds *- - . 4 40 

Jabez Gorham - • 2 00 

Thomaa P. Baden - - - 7 24 



MAY, 1861 97 

J.IL Blake - - - 24 00 

Thomas Wilcox - - 93 90 

Jeremiah & Sherman - - - 16 76 

Joseph K Blake, Attorney General - 31 00 

James L Collins - - - 4 00 

Catherine McCartey - - 4,00 

E. — Paid orders of the Cfovemar. 

To Post Office, Providence - - 18 68 

Do. do. - - 17 61 

PrintiDg Govemor^s Proclamation - 2 00 

Freight box of books &om Mr. Yattemare 2 00 

Port Office, Providence - - 17 04 





57 33 


v.— Paid for Public Schook. 




Town Treasurer, South Kingstown 


- 964 48 


" * Bichmond 


350 84 


« « W. Greenwich 


- 337 04 




1,652 36 


G. — Paid for iupport of Penitentiary or State Prison. 


To Wardens and Inspectors 


- 500 00 


Ditto 


500 00 


Ditto 


- 500 00 


Ditto 


500 00 


Ditto 


- 1000 00 


Ditto 


500 00 


Ditto 


- 500 00 


Ditto 


500 00 


Ditto 


- 500 00 



6,000 00 

VL— Accounts allowed iff the General Assembly since Oct. 

1850. 

Jaaon W. Price - - 2 00 

L.B. Arnold - - -6 00 

George Bourne - - 40 

Charles A. Bourne - - - 40 

Lyman Bosworih - - 40 

tiiomas Cowton - - - 40 

Alexander G. Stevens - - 40 

13 



96 MAT,. 186L 

John W. Waldron - - - 40 

Warren Artillery - - 26 93 

Wm. H. Douglas - - - 15 50 

Charles D. Andrews - • 80 

Zenas L. Hammond - - - 20 53 

Henry Taggart - - 157 74 

James Horsewell - - - 11 83 

Robert B. Cranston - - 78 05 

Wm.H. Dou^ - - - 4 00 

P. P. Eemington - - 75 

Benjamin T. Eames - - - 21 00 

Isaac S. Whitford - - 3 00 

William Tibbetts - - - 4 00 

George H. Whitney • - 24 00 

Thomas G. Turner - - - 30 00 

Wingate Hayes - - 21 00 

Isaac Saunders - - - 12 00 

Horace Trowbridge - - 1 70 

ChriA Gauvin - - - 88 

Angeline Burgess - - 44 

Jobii Eagleston - - - 44 

Henry B.Wood - 44 

Sarah Taylor - -132 

Joseph Nokay - - 1 32 

Samuel S. Mallery - - - 5 30 

Stephen Branch - - 85 76 

Joseph E. Place - - - 3 80 

Charles M. Hayden - - 27 24 

Church & Metcalf - - - 3 75 

Silas Hemmenway - - 36 51 

Alfred Bosworth - - - 9135 

John H.Gould - - 6914 

Stephen T. Burgess ■ - - 1 32 

Perry Arnold - - 36 14 

John&Pearce - - - 194 92 

Charles Devens, Jr. - - 27 00 

J. V. Freemason - - - 17 71 

P. P. Bemington - - 60 

Ditto - - - 50 

Wm. H. Peterson - - 2 77 

Samuel Drury - - - 6 64 

Stephen Johnson - - 9 72 

Soger W. Potter - - - 3 12 

John N.Stone - - 44 



HAT, 1851. M 

Daniel R W&tennan - - 1 50 

James Dorretj - - - 48 

John Dorrety " - - 48 

JohnEdwards - - - 21 26 

Aaron flarrington - - 100 

Geoige Ranklin - - - 2 00 

MaryMes - - 52 

ftMPearce - - - 52 20 

George C. Peiiy - - 38 

'Dumas Duifee - - - 21 00 

Wm. H. S. Bayley - - 4 00 

John Place - - - 21 03 

Heniy Anthony - - 13 00 

Knowles & Anthony . - • 10 50 

George H. Browne - - 18 84 

Providence Gas Co. - - - 24 00 

Providence and Pawtucket Turnpike 53 53 

Goort of Ms^istrates ■ - . 193 30 

Daniel Tiffl - - 132 

WdlH. Douglas - - - 25 00 

CL R Haromett - - 6 61 

T. Coggeshall, Post Office - -1^65 

P. P. Remington - - 50 

Rowland Jackson - - - 80 

Charles O. Storrs - • 40 

Bennett J. Munro - - • 8 40 

John W. Waldron - - 40 

Eliza Lewis - . - 40 

Lafayette Vickery - - 2 00 

Bnrton Sweet - - - 2 00 

Pearce & D'Wolf - - 9 42 

Spencer Greene - - -52 

Wm.Jo8lin - - 40 

Ahner Jillson - - - 2 50 

J. S. Slocum - - 17 55 

& A Arnold - - - 50 00 

Angell Sweet - - 5 70 

Samuel Bandall • - -3 25 

Noyes W. Kenyon - - 6 92 

T. W. Hayward, Prov. County Jaa - 60O 00 

P. P. Remington - - 25 

Inspectors of State Prison • - 3000 00 

BepaiiB Kent Court House - -250 00 

Thomas Bateman - - 162 85 



100 MAT, 1851. 

Henry Taggart - . 246 98 

Wm. M. Cooke - - - 1 76 

J. M. Blake^ Attorney General - 6 OO 

John Hill . . - 4 48 

James Warner - - 13 70 

Gladding & Proud - - - 3 58 

W. H. S. Bayley - . 15 00 

L. L. Leonard « . - 2 26 

P. P. Remington - - 50 

Gh. Spencer - • -40 

Robert Shearman, printing - 15 00 

Samuel Dunn - - - 7 44 

Wm.Dunn . . 40 

Wm. Friend - . - 80 

Wm. L. Nichols - - 40 

George Freeborn - - - 3 00 

Wm. Brownell - . 17 06 

W. C. Cozzens & Co. - - - 36 61 

F. Lawton & Brothers - - 3 96 

William Lee - . 1 00 

Janus Weeden - - .40 

Henry Nason - - 40 

James Horswell <- . « 7 07 

Henry H. Young - . 40 

Charles Denham - - - 1 00 

Mas D. Bade * . 40 

Henry Thurston - - .80 

Robert Seatle - - 6 76 

John H. Watson - - -160 

Robert Seatle - - 9 70 

P. P. Remington - - .76 

Sylvester R Warren - - 9 70 

Robert B. Cranston - - - 50 92 

Joseph Babcock - - 80 

James Simmons . <- - - 80 

Edward Allen - - 100 

James Clarke - • - 1 00 

J. V. Turner & Son - . 3188 

Henry Taggart - - •2 34 

Wanton Carr - • 40 

Job Lawton - - .40 

Nathan Chaffee - - 40 

Gaton Anderson - - - 40 

William P. Peckham - • 17 00 



MAT, 1851. 101 

Daniel G. Denham - - - 9 60 

Sunuel&Dnuj - - 20 66 

Natiumiel Goggeshall - - • 36 61 

Joseph T. Barber - - 25 72 

Thomas 6. Turner - - - 16 75 

Eliaha & Potter - . - 58 74 

HoRM» K Fearce « • - 12 40 

James Koott - - - 32 25 

Joeepb Enowles - - • 94 00 

Sijles & Miller • - - 10 48 

JoimH. Gould - - -34 98 

James Sherbiime - - 42 68 

Jabez J. Potter - - - 91 12 

Charies Akeiman ... 218 59 

aomas W. Haxt - - 112 27 

William G. Merriwether - - 76 86 

JohnD. Pearce - - 170 01 

Charies B. Pearce - - - 9 75 

George W. Eddy - - 2 80 

Joseph H. Lewis - - - 6 00 

Edward Tifbny - - 44 

Bobert Hidden - • -44 

Uyton Hopkins - - 52 

Duiiel Mason - - - 44 

Beimet J. Munro • • 3 30 

Henry Gladding - - .40 

Bisa Levris . . 40 

John Gladding - - - 40 ' 

Inac Thomas - . 18 00 

Boger W. Potter - - - 38 00 

Henry Anthony - - 16 60 

Stephen Branch - - - 71 03 

Charles M. Hayden - - 87 25 

William Simons - - • 15 00 

Greene & Baain - - 67 41 

George D. Cross - - - 49 36 

Arnold L. Potter - - 26 00 

Thomas Durfee - - - 111 00 

Daniel R Whitmore - - 1 00 

Daniel Wightman - . . 125 50 

Benjamin T. Eames • - 108 00 

riHiam H. Hudson - . -94 33 

ISiomas Carder • 2 00 



102 MAT, 1851. 

J. W. Hajwood, for stock and toob for State 

Priflon and ProTidence County Jail 766 49 

Silas Deblois - - - 40 

William Pike - - 40 

Joseph Dewick ... - 40 

William Goflf - - 80 

Finch & Engs • . - 6 36 

Joseph L. Boas - • 40 

CL Underwood - - - 40 

MarjMichell . . 80 

Wm. Davis - - - 120 

H. Trowbridge - - 170 

Edward D. Jones - - - 80 

Abner Jillson - - 19 15 

Lucian J. Arnold - - • 41 10 

Providence Marine Corps - - 232 00 

Gladding & Proud - • - 25 48 

John Stanton - - 60 00 

Enowles & Anthony - - - 12 80 

Wingate Hayes - - 108 00 

W. Northup - - - 128 

Horatio N. Patt - - 33 02 

Alfred Bosworth - - - 62 75 

Sylvester Hartdbom - - 28 00 

BussellClapp - - - 167 76 

Asa Winsor - - 2 25 

John Harris - - - 12 72 

FrankKn G. Mowry - - 700 

Edward P. Hazard - - - 44 

James R Smith - - 3 96 
Lewis Dwight and Gridly F. Bryant - 300 00 

Peleg Johnson - - 41 83 

B.H.Horton - - - 14 32 

Wm. Simons - - 14 25 

JohnM'Lane - - .88 

Walter L. Potter - - 5 00 

W. Burroughs - - - 86 75 

Thomas Whitaker & Son - . 16 48 

John H. Davis - - - 9 98 

James Sheldon - - 93 25 

Thomas Wilcox - - - 36 80 

W.Pullen - - 2 50 

Joseph R Babcock - - - 1 87 

Joel Payne - - 6 60 



MAT. 1851. 103 

Hemy D. Martin - - - 10 50 

Louis B. Aniold - - 20 20 

H. M. Tucker - - • 19 35 

Maty Joimaon - - 68 

GeaCPeny - - - 40 92 

Pelegi.£dd7 - - 2 80 

Sylvester Bowers - - - 44 

W.EPvUen - - 4 00 

George Men - - - 88 

Cbarles £ Bobbins - - 25 00 

KancyMcLane - - - 30 00 

Wliam BoflB - - 38 

George B. Jastram - - - 4 50 

Leonard P. Phiney - - 3 32 

Mersnda Ejanball - - - 56 

Aaaph C. Luther - - 4 GO 

B. W.Potter - - - 51 37 

John Tucker - - 6 00 

John Place - - - 44 09 

John Branch - - 88 

Theodore Kimball - - - 56 

John Billings - - 1 28 

E&ihaScott - - -9 28 

Horatio G. Walker - - 44 

Daniel R Whitman - - - 21 00 

George H. Whiting - - 27 74 

Abiel T. Browning - - - 68 

Jeremiah P. Slocum - - 121 53 

J.EHowland - - - 31 25 

a & Tillinghast ■ - 9 35 

JohnPike - - - 6 75 

LewisTracy - - 26 00 

William Earl - . -5 85 

ThoaRKing - - 3 50 

Stephen Jolmson - - - 9 78 

Ja&Tyng - - 7 42 

WntFrench - - - 10 00 

A, C. Johnson - - 15 00 

Court of Magistrates - - -210 90 

A. C. Mathewson - - 15 00 

J. Tucker - - - 3 75 

James ^disbnry - - 1 68 

George Potter - - - 68 

George Robinson - - 45 30 



104 MAT, 1861. 

Tho. Swan - - - 1 04 

Samuel Bandall - . 2 60 

Lemuel Wyatt - - - 2 48 

Ch. E. Chaffee - . 1 00 

Jo. Knowles - - - 90 51 
Allen Manchester, for Wafihington Monument 200 00 

JohnEldred - . - 80 

T. Harrington - . 44 

N. Church - - - 88 

A. Hall . . 88 
L. Strait - . - 44 

B. C.Eead - . 44 
RR Potter - - - 88 
Wm. G.Smith - - 8 06 
D.W.Whipple - - - 44 
S. C. Waite - - 44 
RRPotter - - - 44 
L. Johnson - - 44 
H. Barker - - - 20 00 
George H.Ham - - 64 
B.Matteson - • - 44 
W. H. Eeynolds - - 60 
S. B. Gorton - - -44 
RSteere . - 44 
Joseph M. Blake - - - 32 00 
Gardner Smith - - 40 
Wm. G. Borden - - - 7 00 
J. A. Hathaway - - 16 90 
P. P. Remington - - - 50 
J.J.Potter . . 918 
Angell Sweet - - - 4 78 
Case, Tifl&ny & Co. - - 123 53 
Joseph Knowles - - - 234 33 

11,898 17 

L — Paid for Repaan of the Staie House, Providence. 

A. Tift . . - 48 00 

0. & Bead, for tin work - - 30 63 

William H. Crimw - . - 10 02 

James H. Butler, for ventilators . 135 61 

Oilman & Hunt, per order of Com. - 1000 00 

Ditto ditto - 160000 

W. E. Willard & Oo. • - 406 50 



MAY, 1851. 105 



K G. Mumford 

6. A. Howard 

Cuny & Potter 

ffiUimi G. WilUams 

Thomas Whitaker 

Proridence Steam and Gas Pipe Co. 

Homas Pearce 

Charles D. Colson 

L D. Anthony 

Pardon T. MiUer 



14 00 


186 40 


73 75 


290 45 


2100 


32196 


87 00 


2 21 


12 00 


10 50 



4150 03 



J. — i^cUe appropriaiion for the PvbUc Schools. 

To the town of South Kingstown - 385 79 

Ditto Richmond - - 140 32 

Ditto West Greenwich - - 134 81 



660 92 


■ 250 00 


172 50 


- 226 25 


198 75 


- 16125 


146 25 


• 250 00 



K. — Paid Active JMtHtta, 

To Marine Corps, Providence 

Newport Artillery 

Warren Artillery 

Kentish Guards 

Providence Artillery 

Bristol Artillery 

First Lt Infimtry, Providence 

1,405 00 

L — Paid Reporter of the Decimm Supreme Court. 
To Thomas Durfee, for salary - - 100 00 

M. — Paid for Education Deaf Dumb and BBid. 
To B. Diman, Commissioner, Hartford Asylum 700 00 

N. — Paid Insurrectionary Claims, 
To Joseph Gould - - - 10 00 

O. — Received of Hawkers and Peddlers. 

Biers Myers, of New York - - 200 00 

Samuel C. Kmdey, South Kingstown 100 00 

fiRBarr, do. - -100 00 

14 



106 MAY, 1851. 

George O. Gflbert, Providence - 100 00 

Wm. C. Woodman, do. - - 100 00 

Wm. C. Manchester, do. - - 100 00 

Peleg H. Congdon, do. - - 100 00 

Aaron French, do. - - 100 00 

William Toby, Boston - - - 100 00 

Michael and John Feely, do. - - 100 00 

Ebenezer Blanding, Providence - - 100 00' 

Hiram Averill, Massachusetts - 100 00 

George H. Barnes, North Providence - 100 00 

Henry Appleby, do. - 100 00 

Wm. Graves, Scituate - - 100 00 

James M. Viall, Providence - 100 00 

Edward and Ch. Shoren, Cumberland 100 00 

George W. Wells, N. Kingstown - 100 00 

Benjamin Lombard, Massachusetts - 100 00 

Peter Shanley, Providence - 100 00 

Nelson Hammond and Newton Clark, Conn. 100 00 
Darwin M.Cook andW. L. Darling, Cumberland, 100 00 

J. W. Shaver and A. M. Barr, Woonsocket, 100 00 

George Hawks and George Reynolds, Conn. 100 00 

2500 00 

P. — Received of Banks, for Tax on Capital Stock. 
Providence Banks - - 12,566 92 

Smithfield « - - - 370 38 

Bristol « - - 476 25 

Warwick « - - - 112 50 

Cumberland " - - 336 25 

Warren « - - - 412 60 

S. Kingstown" - - 226 00 

N.Kingstown" - - - 187 60 

N.Providence" - - 43919 

Westerly " - - - 37600 

Scituate " - - 60 00 

Cranston « - - - 37 60 

Exeter « - - - 31 99 

Tiverton " - - - 299 71 

Glocester « - - - 57 00 

Coventry « - - - 60 00 

Foster « - - - 90 00 

E. Greenwich" - - - 122 94 

Newport " ... 102000 

17,279 63 



MAY, 1851. 107 

Q-Seeewed of Bonis far Increase of CapUal. 

Landholders' Bank, South Kingstown - 75 00 

R — Recdved of Banks for Bonus. 

Coventry Bank, for 2d InstaUment - 250 00 
Hopkinton « 2d « - . 250 00 

600 00 

^—Received from the State Tax to provide for additional 

revenue, &€. 

little Compton - - - 187 25 

ffiddletown - - 156 18 

Hopkinton ... 140 54 

Portsmouth - - 223 73 

Newport . . . 1,182 18 

North Kingstown - - 302 10 

New Shoreham - - - 35 63 

Charlestown - - 68 64 

Bristol - ^ - 622 73 

South Kingstown - - 317 81 

Providence ... 8,079 75 

East Greenwich - - 184 11 

Westerly - - - 204 06 

Kchmond - - 151 95 

Warren - . - 370 80 

Kverton - - 423 46 

Cranston ... 442 04 

Barrington - - 69 83 

Coventry - - - 334 02 

North Providence - - 768 93 

Scituate - - - 394 44 

Cumberland - - 721 05 

West Greenwich - - - 95 76 

Smithfield - - 1,155 96 

Johnston - - - 216 60 

Poster - - 116 28 

Warwick - - - 770 58 



17,736 41 
Per centime refunded Town of Warren 18 54 

17,717 87 



108 MAY, 1861. 

T. — Beceived fw Dwidends and Interest on the PvbUe 

Depofitei. 
Globe Bank - - 2,285 50 

American do. - - - 896 00 

Arcade do. - - 105 00 

Bank North America, lor Jan. 1851, 1,281 00 

Arcade do. 62 50 

Interest on $58,402 60 at 6 per cent Prov. 2,920 13 
« 10,800 « Newport, 640 00 

« 1,200 « N. Prov. 60 00 



8,140 13 



U. — Recmedfor Dividend on School Fund. 

Globe Bank, Providence - 1,214 50 

Mechanics Bank, « - - 58100 

Mechanics « « - 58100 



2,376 50 

V. — Recmedfor Interest on Revenue. 

From Bank of North America, Providence, 

for the year ending Dec. 31st 148 82 

W. — Received of Town Councils for lAcenses, dte., ffratded 

by them. 

E W. Babcock, Town Treaa., Westerly 14 25 

Benj. B. Howland, « Newport 469 23 







483 48 


X. — Received of Aucticmeera. 




J. M. Eddy, of Glocester 


- 


- 4 71 


W. H. S. Bayley, Bristol 


- 


18 67 


W. S. DriscoU, Waxren 


- 


2 03 


M, R Grardner, Providence 


- 


100 26 


A. B. Dike, do. 


. 


- 16 89 


J. A. D. Joslin, do. 


«b 


36 46 


Stoddard & Staples, do. 


• 


- 64 72 


B. H. Wilbor & Co. 


- 


26 52 


J. W. Lowell do. 


- 


4 91 


John Harris do. 


. 


910 


William E. Coe, Cumberland 


. 


512 


S. B. Benedict, N. Providence 


- 


2 84 


J. Harris, Providence 


- 


9 10 



MAY, 1851. 




J. Hammoiid^ do. 


' 19 76 


Sylvester Hartahorn, do. 


2 91 


1 David Patt> do. 


81 


fiandaU Eddy 


10 


Jeremiah Olney, Burrillville 


256 


John Hazard, Jamestown 


6 97 


Warren B. Mowry 


4 56 


Owen Howard^ Foster 


89 


1 


338 79 



109 



ihi% State. 

Wingate Hayes, agent of the U. S. L. I. Ins. Co. 
of New York, for per centage on premiums 6 40 

James Y. Smith, agent of H. F. L Co. of Hart- 
ford, for licenses, - - . 350 00 

J. C. Peckham & Co. agents of Protection I. 
Co. of Rome, N. Y. for do. - 360 00 

Joseph Winsor, M. L. Ins. Co. Baltimore, on 
premiums, - - - - 6 03 

P. E Hoppin, N. L. F. L. So. London, on do. 39 69 

Mflton HaU, L. F. & Co. N. York - 12 27 

Wm. GuUd, M. L. I. Co. Hartford, on do. - 8 24 

D. W. Jenkins, M. L. L Co. on do. - 179 20 

J. C. Peckham & Co., F. I. Co. Hartford, license 350 00 
Do. do. M. M. I. Co. Buffalo, do. 350 00 

A. 0. Peck, M. L, I. Co. N. York, on premium 116 78 

Hezekiah Griswold, U. M. life Ins. Co. Bos- 
ton, license ... 
Do. do. do. do. premium 

H. P. Knight, N. Y. L. In& Co. do. 

A. B. Bradley, jEtna do. Conn. 

Wm.Bodfish, do. do. 

Benj. Stevens, Charter Oak L. Ins. Co. license 

L. Searl, L. Ins. Co. Boston, 

1890 72 

l-'-'Reeeived of Insurance Ccmpames Iho&rp^rated by the 

State. 

From Warren S. Greene, Sec. Washington 

In. Co., Providence - - 310 60 



600 


78 16 


18 96 


500 


600 


[se 600 


600 



110 



MAY, 1861. 



Entries 
Jury fees 
Other costs 
Fines 



D. — Received /ram Courts* 

8TJPBEME C0X7BT. 



COURT OF OOBiMON PLEAS. 



80 00 

75 00 

10219 

336 70 


593 89 

20 00 
85 00 
85 96 
60 00 



Entries 
Jury fees 
Other costs 
Fines 



250 96 

AA. — Received of Court of Magistrates, Providence. 

Charles Hart, for fines - - 518 00 

BB. — Received from the Court of Justices, Newport. 
Received of William Gilpin, Esq., Justice, 
forfeited recognizance of Mary Jane 
Downing - - - 100 00 

CC. — Received for Tax on Civil Commissions. 

WiUiam H. Douglas, Sheriff - 12 00 

Thomas WUcox do. - 32 00 



44 00 



DD. — Received of Providence and Pawtucket T\impike. 

Edward S. Wilkinson, agent - 500 00 

Do. do. - - 1,000 00 



1,500 00 

Stale of Rhode Island in account current vnth Stephen Co- 
hoone, General Treaaurer, from May^ 1850 to May^ 1861. 

Db. 
To Paid Salaries - - 5,187 60 

Senators - - - 2,038 41 

Representatives - - 4,408 88 

Orders of Supreme Court 9,141 30 
Orders of Court Com- 
mon Pleas 6,899 96 

16,041 26 

Orders of Govenor - - 367 15 



MAY, 1851. Ill 

Printing - - 27 50 
Support of Penitentiary - 7,500 00 
Orders of General Assembly 17,059 52 
Public Schools - - 25,000 15 
Appropriation for Public Schools 11,597 17 
Appropriation for Washington Mon- 
ument - - 40 00 
Teachers' Institute - 200 00 
Bepairs State House, Providence 4,150 03 
Active MiUtia - - 1,405 00 
Reporter of Decisions Sup. Court 100 00 
Education Dea^ Dumb, and Blind 700 00 
Insurrectionary Claims • 10 OO 
Balance due the State - 2,611 92 

98,444 49 

Cb. 
By Bahmce per May account, 1850 - 3,398 58 

Hawkers and Peddlers - 4,000 00 

Auctioneers - - - 1,157 93 

Banks for Tax on Capital Stock 34,558 59 

Banks for Tax on Increase Capital Stock 6,141 50 
Banks for Tax on Surplus Profits 252 53 

Banks for Tax Bonus - - 1,000 00 

State Tax - - 18,966 70 

Insurance Companies not incorporated 

by the State - - 4,177 75 

Insurance Companies incorporated by 

the State - - 1,210 50 

Dividend and Interest on Public Deposits 10,425 63 
Dividend on School Fund Stock - 3,591 00 
Interest on Deposites of Revenue 148 82 

Town Councils - - 1,569 79 

Avails of Supreme Court, 1,768 78 
Avails of Court Common Pleas 3,111 40 



4,880 18 

Justices of the Peace - 597 99 

Civil Conmussions - - 194 00 

Rent of Oyster Lots - 55 00 

Court of Justice, Newport - 100 00 

Court of Magistrates - 518 00 

Providence and Pawtucket Turnpike 1,500 00 

$ 98,444 49 



n 

abov' 
dred 
on ti 
eaad 
sum, 

M: 

that 

searc 

woul- 

error 

ditte 

inadv 

ofth- 

TheW 
Toth_ 



Tow* 
1305 

30 

25ft 

732 
Due:» 

Bala* 



Byti 



^ , ., -^"«*^ X, XOQX^ 



Ne. 



MAY, 1851. 113 

Permanent School Fund Stock. 
The following constitutes the permanent school fund 

stock, viz : 
332 shares of Mechanics Bank, Providence, 16,600 00 
694 shares of Glohe Bank, " 34,700 00 

61,300 00 



INDEX. 



Accounts allowed ... 

Ajdjoummeut, vote of - - 

Aiideison E. J., improyement in road - 
Atlantic DeLaine Company, incorporated - 
AoctioDeers to make returns - - ^ 

Audit General Treasurer's accounts 
Bulk of America, act incorporating - 
of Commerce, act incorporating 
of South County, act incorporating 
Citizens, act incorporating 
People's Savings, act incorporating 
Rail Road, act incorporating 
Boston & Providence Rail Road and Transportation 

Company, authorized to take stock 
Ckssidy Francis, for liberation 
Charter, Bank of America 
Bank of Commerce 
Bank of South County 
Citizens Bank 
People's Savings Bank 
Rail Road Bank 
Committee Grand, proceedings in 
Committee to audit General Treasurer's accounts 
Conunittees, Joint, appointed 
Committee to transfer books and papers Secretary's 

Office ... 

Conunittee to transfer books and paper General 

Treasurer's GfBce 
Committees to transfer books and papers Clerks' 

Offices - - - - 

Commmiication from Governor relative to appro- 
priation for Insane 
Donovan Margaret, convict liberated 
Dor Thomas W., restored to his civil and political 

rights ... 

Dyer John, for leave to appeal - 
Fisheries in riarragansett Bay, act to preserve - 
General Treasurer's semi-annual Report 
Gilligan John, liberty to take poor debtors' oath - 
Governor, report by, of expenditure of appropriation 

for indigent insane ordered on file 
Harrison Steam Mill Company, act incorporating 
Hawes Lyman, for right to appeal 
Jeffers William, convict liberated 
Jillson Catharine, convict liberated 
Joint Committees appointed 



50-62 

52 

46 

33 

6 

7 

7 

20 

38 

24 

15 

28 

43 
47 

7 
20 
38 
24 
15 
28 
57 

7 
56 

6 
7 



6-6 

52 

48 

3 

49 

3 

69-112 

48 

52 
42 
50 

48 
48 
66 



116 INDEX- 

Joint Rules and Orders of both Houses - • 55 
Justi<*.es of the Peace to make returns - - 6 
of the Peace elected by General Assem- 
bly - . - 61-63 
of the Peace elected by the Towns - 65-67 
King George G., declared elected Representative to 

Congress from Eastern District - - 65 

License Act amended - - - -3 

McGovem Mary, vs. Wm. J. Holden, for new trial 60 

Merchants Insurance Company, act incorporating - 11 

Morse Catharine, convict liberated - - 48 

Mowry John O. and wife, for legitimation of child - 47 
New York, Providence and Boston Rail Road Co. 

for increase of capital stock • - 49 

New England Telegraph Company, incorporated 36 

Officers General, resolution declaring the election of - 58 

elected - . . - 59-^ 

Pawtuxet Turnpike Corporation, clause in charter 

repealed . - . . 43 

Potter Asa and wife, authorized to sell - - 44 

Proceedings in Grand Committee - • 67 

Public Laws, copies of, to b3 bound - - 4 

Public Notaries - - • 60-61 

Rail Road Bank, act incorporating • - 28 

Report, semi-annual of General Treasurer • 69-112 
of committee to count votes for general ofl5.cer8 67-58 
of committee to count votes of Representatives 

to Congress - - - 63-64 
Governor, on appropriation for Insane, ordered 

on file - - - '52 

Resolution of adjournment - - 52 

Roll of members of Senate - • - 53 

Roll of members of House of Representatives - 54 

Rules and orders of the two Housas to be printed • 4 

Joint, of the two Houses - - 65 

Salaries of Governor and Lieutenant Governor • * 

Savings Bank, People's, act to incorporate - 15 

Schedules, copies of to be bound - - * 
Secretary, to pay for and distribute Reports of Supreme 

Court - - - ' Q^ 

South County Bank, incorporated - - ^ 

State Prison, appropriation to build wing • • * 
Telegraph Company, New England, act to incorporate 36 
Thurston Benjamin B., declared elected Representative 

to Congress, from Western District - ^ 

Town Councils to grant licenses^ act of, amended - ^ 

Treasurer's General, Report • - ^^"M? 

Van Zandt Anna H., authorized to sell - "or 

Warwick Institution for Savings, charter amended ^ 

Watson John J. and wife, authorised to sell - j^ 

Wilson Robert, administrator, authorised to sell ^' 



ACTS AND RESOLVES 

GENERAL ASSEMBLY 

Ifait of 9.^sAt Manb anti ^touibtntt j^lantationH, 

JUNE, A. D. 1851; 
BEING THE ASJODRNHENT OF THE HAT SESSION. 



WITH THB ROLL OF UEHBEKS, AND REPORTS ORDERED TO BE P1I8- 
LISHED. 



Autt it Hftakr 3aunt, m, 

OFFICE OF THE BECRETUtT OF STATE, JUHE, IBSL 



PROVIDENCE! 

PRINTED BT SATLBS * NILLER. 

1861. 



DTThe General Assembly convened at Newport, agreeably to adjoamment, 
on the third Monday of June, 1851, and adjourned on Saturday following, tha 
2l8t day of June. 



ACTS AND RESOLVES 



PASSED JUNfi, 1851, 



THE ADJOURNED MAT SESSION. 



As Act to legalize the election of School Committee- 
men. 

M is enacted hy the General Assemblg as follows . 

The election of any School Committee, or of any Election of 
member or members thereof, heretofore elected at any cCmmitiea 
Town meeting held in this State, or at any meeting {JJ^ *•«**" 
adjourned from the annual Town meeting for the 
election of Town officers, is hereby declared legal and 
valid. 



Ay Act in explanation and amendment of an Act 
entitled "An Act in relation to Manufacturing Cor- 
porations." 

It is enacted hy the General Assembly as follows : 

Section 1. If by the terms of any Act incorporatinir Act in «- 
a Manufacturing Company ; directors, managers or thl atcT.m^nd. 
like are not required to be chosen, and none are ^^[ ^|J" 
chosen, under and by virtue of the by-laws of the Cor- jJ}JJ{Jjrtn"* 
poration, the certificates required by the second, ninth Corpora- 
and eleventh sections of the act to which this is in ex- "^"■* 
planation and amendment, signed and sworn to by the 
officers required to be chosen by the charter or by- 
law^ shall have the same effect as if signed and sworn to 
hy the officer or officers, and a majority of the direc- 
tors required in said second, ninth and eleventh sec- 

tiOD3L 

Sbc. 2. Nothing in the eighth section of the act to 
which this is in explanation and amendment contained, 
shall be construed to prevent the application of this 
act or of the provisions of said eighth section thereof, 
to maDufacturing companies owning a manufacturing 



JUNE, 1851. 

establishment and obtaining a charter of incorporation, 
whether such charter was obtained before or after the 
passage of said act^ or shall be hereafter obtained. 



An Act in addition to an Act entitled ^An Act pro- 
viding for the relief, employment and removal of the 
Poor." 

M is enacted hy the General Assembly as follows : 

Section 1. Whenever any pauper in this State shall 
Actin addi- not be Suitably cared for, by the town in which said 
Act provid- pauper is chargeable, it shall and may be lawful for 
reSefi^'em* ^^7 pcrsou upou first issuing five days notice to any 
piovmcnt of the Commissioners or Overseers of the Poor of the 
ml of the * town, of the situation of such pauper, so to do, and a 
^^' continued neglect on the part of the town, to complain 
in writing to the Supreme Court in Term time, or to 
any one of the Justices thereof in vacation, setting forth 
as nearly as may be the nature of the grievance com- 
plained of; and said Court or Justice shall, upon first 
giving notice to the town of the pendency of such comr 
plain^ in their discretion, appoint a commission of not 
exceeding three persons, whose duty it shall be to visit 
the pauper or paupers who are the subject of the com- 
plaint, and upon hearing the allegations and evidence 
of the parties to report to said Court or Justice, as soon 
as may be, whether or not said paupers are suitably 
provided and cared for. Said Commissioners shall be 
allowed the like fees as are allowed to auditors and 
referees in other cases. 

Sec. 2. Whenever it shall be made to appear to the 
Court or Justice, by the Report of the Commissioners as 
aforesaid, that any pauper in this State is not suitably 
provided and cared for, said Court or Justice shall pass 
an order requiring the appropriate town authorities 
forthwith to provide suitable accommodations and care 
for such pauper, either in the poor house or in some 
private family, in the discretion of said Court or Jus- 
tice, at the expense of the town. 

Sec 3. Any town, refusing or neglecting, for the 
space of ten days, to comply with any order passed in 
•conformity to the second section of this act^ i^all be 



JUNE, 1861. 

luble to a fine of not exceeding fifty dollar^ to be 
recovered by indictment before any Court of competent 
jurisdiction, to and for the use of the State. 



Am Act to revise and amend the laws regulating 

Public Schools. 

JB is enacted hy the General Assemhhf as follows : 

SimoN 1. For the uniform and efficient administrar Acttow- 
tion of this act, and the supervision and improvement Ii^nd 
of such schools as may be supported in any manner out ^^*^ **'^* 
of the General Treasury, the Governor, by and with 
the advice and consent of the Senate, shall annually at 
the annual general election, appoint an officer to be 
called the Commissioner of Public Schools. In case of 
aickness, temporary absence or other disability, the 
Governor may appoint a person to act as Commissioner 
during such absence, sickness or disability. 

Sec. 2. The sum of thirty-five thousand dollars shall 
annually be paid out of the income of the school fund, 
deposit of surplus revenue, and other money in the 
General Treasury for the support of public schools in 
the several towns, upon the order of the Commissioner. 
He shall annually in May, apportion said sum among 
the several tovms in proportion to the number of chil- 
dren under the age of fifteen years, according to the 
then last U. States' census, and shall draw orders on 
the General Treasurer for their proportion in favor of 
all such towns as shall comply with the terms of this 
act on or before the first day of July annually. 

Sec. 3. The Commissioner shall visit as often and as far 
as practicable, every school district in the State, for the 
purpose of inspecting the schools, and difiusing as widely 
as possible by public addresses and personal communi* 
cations with school officers, teachers and parents, a 
knowledge of the defects and desirable improvements 
in the administration of the system and the govern- 
ment and instruction of the schools : and shall recom- 
mend the best text books, and secure as far as practica- 
ble, a uniformity in the schools of every town at least ; 
and shall assist in the establishment of and selection of 
l>ooks for Mbool librariea 



JUNE, 1851. 

Sec. 4. He shall prescribe, from time to time, suita- 
ble forms and regulations for carrying this act into 
effect, and for making all reports. He shall hear and 
decide all appeals and may remit all fines, penalties 
and forfeitures incurred by any town, district or person 
under this act. He may appoint County Inspectors to 
examine teachers and visit and report the state of the 
schools, whose office shall expire on the first Tuesday 
in May annuall}'^, unless sooner removed, and who shall 
not be entitled to any compensation from the State 
Treasury, and he shall annually at the January Term 
of the October Session, make a report to the General 
Assembly upon the state and condition of the schools 
and of education, with plans and suggestions for their 
improvement. 

TOWNS. 

Sec. 5. Towns may establish and maintain, (without 
forming districts,) a sufficient number of public schools 
of different grades, at convenient locations, under the 
entire management of the School Committee, or they 
may vote in a meeting notified for that purpose, to pro- 
vide school houses with the necessary fixtures and appen- 
dages, in all the di8tricts,(if there bedistricts)at the com- 
mon expense of the town. Provided^ that in the latter 
case, if any district shall provide at their own expense, a 
school-house approved by the School Committee, such 
district shall not be liable to be taxed by the town to 
furnish or repair school houses for the other districts. 
They may raise by tax all sums of money they may 
deem necessarj' for the support of public schools, or for 
establishing and maintaining a public school library; 
said library, when established, to be controlled and 
regulated from time to time by the School Committee 
of the town. 

Sec. 6. No town shall receive any part of the State ap- 
propriation, unless they shall raise by tax for the support 
of public schools, a sum equal to one-third of their pro- 
portion of the sum of twenty-five thousand dollars, 
apportioned to them from the State Treasury, which 
sum so raised shall be appropriated and paid by the 
town treasurer, as required by this act. And if any 
town shall refuse to raise or appropriate the sum hereby 
required, on or before the first of July in any year, 
their proportion of the public money shall be forfeit*!, 



JUNE, 1861. 

and the General Treasurer, on being officially informed 
tbereof bj the Commissioner of Public Schools, shall 
invest the amount in stocks, to be added to the Per- 
manent School Fund. 

Sec. 7. Any town may appoint or may authorize its 
School Committee to appoint a superintendent of the 
schools of the town, to perform, under the advice and 
direction of the Committee, such duties and exercise 
such powers as the Committee may assign him, and to 
receive such compensation out of the Treasury as the 
town may vote. 

Sec. 8. Each town shall, at its annual town meeting 
for choice of town officers, choose a School Committee, 
to consist of not less than three residents of said town, 
to serve without compensation, unless voted by the 
town out of the town treasury. 

SCHOOL COMMrrTEE. 

Sec. 9. The School Committee of each town shall 
have power, and it shall be their duty 

Sec 10. To choose a Chairman and Clerk, either of 
whom may sign any orders or official papers. 

Sec 11. To hold at least four stated meetings, viz: on 
thesecond Mondays of January, April, July and October 
m every year, and as much oftener as the state of the 
flchools requirea A majority of the niunber elected 
shall constitute a quorum, unless the committee consist 
of more than six, when four shall be a quorum, but 
any less nimiber may adjourn. 

Sec. 12. To form, alter and discontinue school dis- 
triets, and to settle their boundaries when undefined 
or disputed : Provided^ that no new district shall be 
formed with less than forty children between the ages 
of four and sixteen, unless with the approbation of the 
Commissioner of Public Schools; and further, that where 
a town is not now divided into districts, it shall not be 
done without the direction of the town. All existing 
districts shall continue until legally altered. 

Sec. 13. To locate all school houses, and not to aban- 
don or change the site of any without good cause. And 
in case the School Committee shall fix upon a location 
for a School house in any district, and the district shall 
have passed a vote to erect a School house, or where 
diere is no district organization and the Committee 
shall fix upon a location for a School house^ and the 



8 JUNE, 1851. 

proprietor of the land shall refuse to convey the Bame, 
or cannot agree with the district for the price thereof, 
the School Committee of their own motion, or upon 
application of the district, shall be authorized to ap- 
point three disinterested persons, who shall notify the 
parties and decide upon the valuation of the land, and 
upon the tender or payment of the sum so fixed upon 
to the proprietor, the title to the land so fixed upon by 
the School Committee, (not exceeding one-quarter of 
an acre,) shall vest in the district for the purpose of 
maintaining a School house and the necessary appen- 
dages thereon. Provided, however, that an appeal 
shall be allowed to the Court of Common Pleas in such 
cases, in the same manner and with the same efTect 9A 
is provided by law in case of laying out of highways. 

Sec. 14. To examine by themselves or by someone 
or more persons by them appointed, all applicants for 
the situation of teachers in the Public Schools of the 
town, and to annul the certificates of such as prove un- 
qualified or will not conform to the regulations of the 
Committee. 

Sec. 15. To visit by one or more of their number 
every Public School in town, at least twice during each 
term%nce within two week^ of its opening, and once 
within two weeks of its close, at which visits they shall 
examine the register and other matters touching the 
School house, library, studies, books, discipline, modes 
of teaching and improvement of the School& Or the 
Committee may employ some person of or not of their 
number to perform this duty, and to receive such com- 
pensation afi they may allow out of the money raised 
by the town, or as the town may allow out of the town 
treasury. 

Sec. 16. To make and cause to be put up in each 
School house, or furnished to each teacher, a general 
system of rules and regulations for the admission and 
attendance of pupils ; the classification, studies, books^ 
discipline and methods of instruction in the Public 
Schools. 

Sec. 17. To suspend during pleasure, or expel dm^ 
ing the School term, all pupils found guilty of incorri- 
gibly bad conduct, or violation of the school regula- 
tionsy and re-admit them on satisfactory evidence of 
amendmeni 



JUNE, 1851. 

Sec 18. To fill any vacancy in the Committee oc- 
casioned by death, declining or refusing to serve, 
resignation, removal from office or from the town, or 
otherwise. 

Sec. 19. Where a town is not divided into districts, 
or shall vote in a meeting duly notified for that pur- 
pose, to provide schools without reference to such 
division, the Committee shall manage and regulate said 
Schools and draw all orders for the payment of their 
expenses. 

Sec. 20. When the Public Schools are maintained 
by district organization, they shall apportion as early 
as practicable in each year among the districts, the 
money received from the State, one half equally, and 
the other hall^ according to the average daily attend- 
ance of the Schools of the preceding year. Said money 
received fironi the State shall be denominated **Teach- 
efs money," and shall be applied to the wages of 
teachers and to no other purpose whatever. They 
shall apportion the money received from the town, 
from the registry tax, from funds or other grants, either 
equally or in such proportion as the town may direct^ 
and for want of such direction, then in such manner as 
they deem best 

Sec. 21. They shall draw an order on the Town 
Treasurer in fiivor of such districts only as shall have 
made a return to them in manner and form prescribed 
by them or by the Commissioner of Public Schools, or as 
may be required by law, from which it shall appear 
that for the year ending on the first of May previous, 
one or more Public Schools have been kept for at least 
four months by a qualified teacher, in a School house 
approved by the Committee or Commissioner, and that 
the money designated "Teacher's money," received the 
year previous, has been applied to the wages of teachers 
and for no other purpose. Such orders may be made 
payable to the Trustees or their order, or to the district 
treasurer or teacher ; and if the treasurer receives the 
money, he shall pay it out to the order of the Trustees. 
Prmdedy however^ that the Committee shall not be 
obliged to give any order until they are satisfied the 
services have actually been performed for which the 
money is to be paid ; and Provided further, that at the 
end of the school year, any money appropriated to any 

2 



10 JUNE, 1851. 

disirict which shall be'forfeited, and the forfeiture not 
remitted,) or which shall remain unexpended, may be 
divided by the Committee among the districts the folr 
lowing year. 

Sbc. 22. They shall prepare and submit annually — 
first, a report to the'Commissioner of Public Schools, on 
or before the first day of July, in manner and form by 
him prescribed — secondly, a written or printed report 
to the town at the annual town meeting when the 
School Committee is chosen, setting forth their doings^ 
the state and condition of the Schools, and plans for 
their improvement, which report (unless printed) shall 
be read in open town meeting. And the Committee 
may reserve annually out of the public appropriation a 
sum not exceeding twenty dollars to defray the expense 
of printing their report 

TOWN TREASURER. 

Sbc. 23. The Town Treasurer shall receive the money 
due from the State Treasury, and shall keep a separate 
account of all money appropriated by the State or 
Town or otherwise for Public Schools, and shall pay 
the same to the order of the School Committee. He 
shall within one week afler the town meeting at which 
the Committee are elected, submit to them a statement 
of all monies in his hands belonging to Schools, apeci- 
fying the sources whence derived, and to what districts, 
if any^ belonging. 

TOWN CiERK. 

Sbc. 24. The Town Clerk shall record the bounda* 
rieo of school districts and all alterations thereof in a 
book to be kept for that purpose, and shall distribute 
such school documents and blanks as may be sent to 
hhn, to the persons for whom they are intended. 

DISTRICT MEETINGS. 

SwJ. 25. Notice of the time, place and object of h<dd« 
ingthe first meeting of a district for organization, or 
for a meeting to choose officers or transact other bust- 
nees^ in case there be no Trustees authorized to call a 
meettn^, shall be given by the School Committee of 
tlMi town, at any time they may deem proper. 

Sec. 2& Every school district when organised shall 
hold «D annual meeting in the month of April or May 
of each jear^ for choice of officers and transaction of 
a»3P otibier bustnesa relating to Schools. 



JUNE, 1851. 11 

Sbc. 27. The Trustees may call a special meeting 
for election or other business at any time, and shall 
call one to be held within seven days on the written 
request of any five qualified voters, stating the object 
for which they wish it called ; and if the Trustees 
neglect or refuse to call a special meeting when re- 
quested, the School Committee may call it and fix the 
time therefor. 

Sec. 28. District meetings shall be held at the School 
house, unless otherwise ordered by the district If 
there be no school house or place appointed by the 
district, the Trustees (or if there be no Trustees, the 
School Committee) shall determine the place, which 
shall always be within the district 

SEa 29. Notice of the time and place of every an- 
nual meeting, and of the time, place and object of 
every special meeting, shall be given for five days in- 
clusive before holding the same. 

Sbc. 30. The Trustees shall give notice of a district 
meeting, either by publishing the same in a newspaper 
published in the district, or by putting the notice on 
the district school house or on a sign post within the 
district, or if there be no newspaper, school house or 
sign post, then in such manner as the School Commit- 
tee may direct : Provided, however, that the district 
may from time to time prescribe the mode of notify- 
ing meetings, and the Trustees shall conform thereto. 
When the meeting is called by the School Committee, 
they shall direct when and how the notice is to be given. 
If in any case appealed to the Commissioner, he shall 
be satisfied that full and actual notice has been given 
and that no injustice will be done thereby, he may 
waive the compliance with the strict requirements of 
this section. 

Sec. 31. Every district meeeting may appoint a 
moderator and adjourn from time to time. 

Sec. 32. Every person residing in the district may 
vote in district meetings to the same extent and with 
the same restrictions as he would at the time be quali- 
fied to vote in town meeting : Provided, that no per- 
son shall vote upon any question of taxation of prop- 
erty or expending money raised thereby, unless he 
dudl have paid or be liable to pay a portion of the tax. 
And the clerk shall record the number and names of 



12 JUNE, 1851. 

the persons voiiug, and on which side of the question, 
at the request of any qualified voter. 

POWERS OF DISTRICTS. 

Sec. 33. Every school district shall be a body cor- 
porate, and shall be known by its number or other 
suitable or ordinary designation, and shall have power 

Sec. 34. To prosecute and defend in all actions, to 
purchase, receive, hold and convey any real or person- 
al property for school purposes, and to establish and 
maintain a School library. 

Sec 35. To build, purchase, hire and repair School 
houses, and supply the same with blackboards, maps, 
furniture and other necessary and useful appendages, 
and to insure the house and appendages against dam- 
age by fire : Provided^ that the erection and repairs of 
the School house be made according to the plans ap- 
proved by the School Committee or Commissioner of 
Public Schools. 

Sec 36. To raise money by tax on the ratable prop- 
erty of the district to support Schools, and to carry out 
the powers given them by this act : Providedy that the 
amount of the tax shall be approved by the School 
Committee of the town. All such taxes shall be col- 
lected by the district or town collector in the same 
manner as town taxes are collected. 

Sec 37. To elect a Clerk, either one or three Trus- 
tees as they may decide, a Treasurer and Collector, 
and to fill vacancies in either of said ofl&ces arising 
from death, declining or refusing to serve, resignation, 
removal from office or from the district, or otherwise, 
and if an election of any of said officers be not made 
a the time prescribed for the annual meeting, it may 
be done at any legally notified meeting afterward. — 
The Clerk, Collector and Treasurer shall have the 
same power and perform the same duties as the Clerk, 
Collector and Treasurer of a town. But the Clerk, 
Collector and Treasurer need not give bond unless 
required by the district, and any district may vote 
to place the collection of any district tax or rate bill 
in the hands of the collector of town taxes, who shall 
thereupon, without any new bond or engagement, be 
fully authorized to proceed and collect the same. 

Sec 38. If any School district shall neglect to o^ 
ganize, or if organized shall for any space of six months 



JUNE, 1851. IS 

neglect to establish a School and employ a teacher, 
the School Committee of the town may themselves or 
by an agent establish a School in the district School 
house or elsei^here, in their discretion, and employ a 
teacher. And any district may, with the consent of 
the Committee, devolve all the powers and duties re- 
lating to public Schools in the district on the Commit- 
tee. 

Trustees. 

Sfia 39. The Trustees of School districts are author- 
ized, and it shall be their duty 

Sbc. 40. To have the custody of the School house 
and other district property ; to employ one or more 
qualified teachers for every fifty scholars in average 
daily attendance, provide school rooms and fuel, to visit 
the schools twice at least during each term, and notify 
the Conmiittee or Superintendent of the time of open- 
ing and closing the school. 

Sec. 41. To see that the scholars are properly sup- 
plied with books, and in case they are not, and the pa- 
rents, guardians or masters have been notified thereof 
by the teacher, to provide the same at the expense of 
the district and add the same to the next rate bill of 
8uch person. 

Sec. 42. To make out the tax bill and rate bills for 
tuition against the persons liable to pay the same, and 
to deliver the same to the collector, with a warrant by 
them signed annexed thereto, requiring him to collect 
and pay over the same to the Treasurer of the district 

Sbc. 43. To make returns to the School Committee 
in manner and form prescribed by them or by the 
Commissioner of Public Schools, or as maybe required 
by law, and perform all other lawful acts required of 
them by the district, or necessary to carry into full ef- 
fect the powers and duties of districts. 

Sbc. 44. Trustees shall receive no compensation for 
services out of the money received from either the 
State or town appropriations, nor in any way unless 
raised by tax by the district. 

TAXES. 

Sec. 45. District taxes shall be levied on the ratable 
property of the district according to its value in the 
town assessment then last made, unless the district 
shall direct it to be levied upon the next town assess- 



14 JUNE, 1851. 

ment And no notice shall be required to be given by 
the Trusteea But whenever any real estate in the 
district is assessed in the town tax bill with real estate 
out of the district, so that there is no distinct or separate 
value upon it, or in case of any person removing into 
the district possessing personal property, or in case 
from death or sale of property a division and apportion* 
ment be necessary, or upon application of the party 
interested in case of investment of personal property 
in real estate, or in case of property omitted in the 
town valuation, the Trustees, if they cannot agree with 
the parties interested, shall call upon one or more of 
the town assessors not interested and not residing in 
the district, who shall assess the value of the estate so 
situated ; and the assessors shall give notice by putting 
np notices for ten days in three most public places in 
or near the district And after notice is given as afore- 
said, no person neglecting to appear before the assessor 
or assessors shall have any remedy for being over 
taxed. 

Sec. 46. K a district tax shall be voted, assessed, ap* 
proved of, and a contract legally entered into under it, 
or such contract be legally entered into without such 
vote, assessment or approval, and said district shall 
thereafter neglect or refuse to proceed and collect a 
tax, the Commissioner of Public Schools, after notice 
and hearing the parties, may appoint assessors to as- 
sess a tax, and issue a warrant to the Collector of the 
district, or to a collector by him appointed, authorizing 
and requiring him to proceed and collect said tax. 

Sec 47. Errors in assessing a tax may be corrected, 
or the tax re-assessed in such manner as may be di- 
rected or approved by the Commissioner of Public 
Schools. 

Sec. 48. When any person having paid a tax for 
building or repairing a School House in one district, 
shall by alteration of boundaries of districts become lia- 
ble to pay a tax in any other district, such abatement 
may be made therein, if such person cannot agree with 
the district, as the School Committee, or in case of a 
district composed from different towns, the School 
Commissioner, may under the circumstances deem jtut 
and proper. 



JUNE, 1851. 15 

APPOBXIONimVT OF PBOFBBTT, &C. 

Ssc. 49. When any two or more districts shall be 
consolidated into one, the new district shall own all the 
corporate property of the several districts ; and when 
a district is divided and a portion taken from it, the 
funds and property, or the income and proceeds there- 
of shall be divided among the several parts, in such 
manner as the School Committee of the town or towns 
to which the districts belong may determine : And 
when a part of one district is added to another district, 
or part of a district^ owning a School House or other 
property, such part shall pay to the district or part of 
a dtftrict to which it is added, if demanded, such sum as 
the School C!ommittee may determine. 

JOINT DISTRICTS. 

Sna 50. Any two or more adjoining primary school 
districts in the same or adjoining towns, may by a con- 
coneot vote, agree to establish a secondary or grammar 
school^ for the older and more advanced children of 
such districts. Such associating districts shall continue 
a school district for all the purposes of providing a 
school house^ fuel, furniture and apparatus, and for the 
election of a board of Trustees to consist of one mem* 
ber from each associating district, and for the la3dng of 
a tax for school pmposes, and fixing rates of tuition^ 
with all the rights and privileges of a school district, so 
far as the secondary school is concerned. The time 
and place for the meeting for organization of such 
secondary district may be fixed by the School Com- 
mittees, and any one or more of the associating districts 
may delegate to the Trustees of the secondary district 
the care and management of its primary school. The 
School Committee of the town or towns in which such 
secondary school shall be established, shall draw an 
order in favor of the Trustees of said school, to be paid 
out of the public money appropriated to each district 
ii^rested in said secondary school^ in proportion to the 
number of scholars from each. 

Sic 51. Any two or more adjoining School districts 
m the same town may, by concurrent vote, with the 
s^iqnrobation of the School Committee, unite together 
aad be consolidated into one district for the purpose of 
snpportmg Public Schools, and such consolidated di»* 
tricts shall have all the powers of a single district, but 



16 JUNE, 1851. 

shall be entitled to receive the same proportion of pub- 
lic money the districts would receive if not united. 
The mode of organizing such districts and calling the 
first meetings thereof, shall be regulated or prescribed 
by the School Committee. 

Sec. 52. Two or more contiguous districts or parts of 
districts in adjoining towns maybe formed into a joint 
school district, by the School Committee of such towns 
concurring therein, and all joint districts heretofore or 
hereafter formed may by them be altered or discon- 
tinued. The meetinjr for organization shall be called 
by notice signed by the School Committee of such 
towns, and set up in one or more places in each district 
or part of a district 8uch district shall have all the 
powers of a single school district and be regulated in 
the same manner, and shall be subject to the supervi- 
sion and management of the School Committee of the 
town in which the school is located. A whole district 
making a portion of such joint district shall be entitled 
to its portion of public money in the same manner as 
if it remained a single district, and when part of a dis- 
trict is taken to form a portion of such joint district, 
the School Committee shall a&sign to it its reasonable 
proportion. Where a joint district shall vote to build 
or repair a School house by tax, the amount of the tax 
and the plan and specifications of the building and re- 
pairs shall be approved by the School Committees of 
the several towns, or by the Commissioner of Public 
Schools. And in case of assessing a tax by a joint or 
secondary district, if the town assessments be made 
upon different principles, or the relative value be not 
the same, the relative value and proportion shall be 
ascertained by one or more persons to be appointed by 
the Commissionerof Public Schools, and the assessment 
shall be made accordingly. 

Sec 53. The School Committee of any town, or 
Trustees of any school district, may make arrange- 
ments with the School Committee of any adjacent town, 
or Trustees of any adjacent district, for the attendance 
of such children as will be better accommodated in the 
Public Schools of such adjacent town or district, and 
may pay such portion of the expense as may be jvsk 
And proper. 



JUNE, 1851. 17 

TBACHEB8. 

Sec. 54. No person shall be employed in any town 
to teach as principal or assistant in any School, sup- 
ported entirely or in part by the public money, unless 
he has a certificate of qualification, signed either by 
the School Committee of the town, or by some person 
or persons appointed by said Committee, which shall 
he valid within said town for one year, unless annulled, 
or by an Inspector of the county, which shall express 
a higher degree of attainment and be valid within the 
county for two years, and if countersigned by the Com- 
missioner of Public Schools within the State, for three 
years, unless annulled. 

Sbc. 55. Neither of the above authorities shall sign 
any certificate of qualification unless the person named 
in the same shall produce evidence of good moral char- 
acter, and be found on examination or by experience 
qualified to teach the English language, arithmetic, 
penmanship, and the rudiments of geography and his- 
tory, and to govern a school. 

Sbc. 56. The School Committee of any town may 
dismiss any teacher, by whomsoever examined, who 
shall refuse to conform to the regulations by them 
made, or for other just cause, and in such case shall 
give immediate notice to the Trustees of the district. 

Sbc. 57. Every teacher in any Public School shall 
keep a register of all the scholars attending said School, 
their ages, names of parents or guardians, the tune 
when each enters and leaves the School, the daily at- 
tendance, together with the days of the month on 
which the School is visited by any of the authorities 
named in this act, and shall prepare the district's re^ 
turn to the School Committee of the town, if requested 
to do so by the Trustee. 

teachers' institutes. 

Sbc. 58. There shall annually be paid out of the 
General Treasury to the order of the Commissioner of 
PubUc Schools, a sum not exceeding three hundred 
dollaiB, for defraying the expense of holding Teacher^s 
or Normal Institutes, and the Commissioner shall file 
in the General Treasurer's office an account of the 
disburaefldent of said sum. 

OP aAIB-BILUB FOR TUITION, &C. 

Sbc. 59. Any School district may fix or authorize 
3 



18 JUNE, 1851. 

its Trustees to fix a rate of ttdtion to be paid by the 
persons attending School, or by their parents^ employ- 
ers or guardians, towards the expense of fuel, books 
and other expenses, including estimated deficiences of 
payments over and above the money received from 
the town and state appropriations ; and where there 
is no district organization, the School Committee may 
fix the rate ; and the district, trustees or committee 
dbiall exempt therefrom all persons whom they con- 
^der imable to pay the same : Provided^ that the Trus- 
tees may prescribe and collect a rate in their discretion 
sufficient to keep the School for the four months re- 
quired by law without any vote of the district : And 
provided^ alsOy that the rate of tuition shall not exceed 
one dollar per scholar for any term of eleven weeks, 
except in towns or districts where different grades of 
schools are established, when the rate for the higher 
grades may be not exceeding two dollars per scholar 
for the same time : And provided, further, that the 
amount of the rate be approved by the School Com- 
mittee of the town. All such rate bills may be required 
to be paid in advance, or may be delivered to the town 
or district collector, and may be by them collected in 
the same manner as town taxes are collected. 

Sec. 60. No person shall be excluded jfrom any Pub- 
lic Schools in the district to which such person 
belongs, if the town is divided into districts, or if not 
so divided, from the nearest Public School, on account 
of being over fifteen years of age, nor except by force 
of some general regulation applicable to all persons 
under the same circumstances, and in no case on ac- 
count of the inability of himself, his parents, guardian 
or employer, to pay any rate bill, tax or assessment 
whatever. 

Sec 61. Any person committed to jail by the town 
or district collector, either for a tax or for a rate bill for 
tuition or assessments, shall be entitled to the benefit 
of "An Act for the relief of poor persons imprisoned 
for debt,'' in the same manner as if committed for 
town taxes. And any person assessed in any rate bill 
as aforesaid, may, before commitment, apply to any 
justice of the peace in the town for a citation to the 
Committee, Trustee or Trustees, to appear at a time 
and place named within said district^ and show cause 



JUNE, 1851. 19 

why he diould not be admitted to take the oath pre- 
scribed in said act : said citation shall be served by any 
officer or disinterested person three days before the 
time appointed, upon the chairman or clerk of the 
Committee, or Trustee, (or upon any one of them if 
more than one) and the applicant shall be heard before 
the justice signing the citation, and may by him be 
admitted to take the oath aforesaid ; and a certificate 
thereoi^ signed by him, shall be a full protection to the 
applicant against any further proceedings for collect- 
ing said rate. And the service of the citation afore- 
said shall suspend such proceedings for at least ten 
days, unless the case be sooner heard and disposed of 

ENGAGEMENTS. 

Sea 62. All School officers appointed under this act, 
(except the moderator of a district meeting) shall take 
an engagement to support the Constitution of the Uni- 
ted States^ the Constitution and Laws of this State, and 
fsdthfuUy to discharge the duties of their several offi- 
ces so long as they continue therein, before some judge^ 
senator, justice or warden, notary, town clerk, mem- 
ber of the town council, or chairman or clerk of the 
School Committee. The clerk of the district may take 
the engagement in open district meeting before the 
moderator, or any magistrate present, and the clerk's 
leeord that any district officer has been duly engaged, 
diall be prima facie evidence thereof And all dis* 
trict school officers may be engaged by the clerk of the 
district. If any school officer shall not take such en- 
gagement within a reasonable time he shall be liable 
to a penalty of one dollar, to be recovered on com- 
plaint before any justice of the peace, to the use of the 
state ; but all acts of such officers otherwise lawful 
diall be iralid fix>m the time of their election or ap- 
pointment. 

Sec. 63. All officers under the School Law shall, 
without a new engagement, hold their offices until the 
time of the next annual election or appointment for 
such office, and until other persons are appointed in 
their places. 

PENALTIES. 

Sec. 64. Any officer who shall make any false certi- 
ficate or appropriate any Public School money to any 
purpose not authorized by law, or who shall refuse, for 



20 JUNE, 1851- 

a reasonable charge, to give certified copies of any 
official paper, to account or deliver to his successor 
any accounts, papers, or money in his hands, or shall 
wilfully or knowingly refuse to perform any duty of 
his office, or violate any provisions of any acts existing 
or hereafter passed, regulating Public Schools, except 
where a particular penalty may be prescribed, may be 
indicted therefor, and on conviction fined not exceed- 
ing five hundred dollars or imprisoned not exceeding 
six months, and shall besides be liable to suit for 
damages by any person injured thereby. Any person 
refusing to account or to deliver over any accounts^ 
papers, or monies to his successor in office shall also 
be liable to a suit therefor to be brought by such suc- 
cessor. 

APPEALS AND LEGAL PROGEEDINQS. 

Sec. 65. Any person conceiving himself aggrieved 
in consequence of any decision or doings of any School 
Committee, District Meeting, Trustees, County Inspec- 
tor, or any other matter arising under this act, may 
appeal to the Commissioner of Public Schools, who is 
hereby authorized and required to examine and decide 
the same without cost to the parties ; and his decision 
shall be final : Provided, that the Commissioner may, 
and if requested on the hearing of either party shaU, 
lay a statement of the facts of the case before some one 
of the Judges of the Supreme Court, whose approval 
of such decision shall then be final. And the Commis- 
sioner may prescribe from time to time rules regulat- 
ingthe thne and manner of making such appeals, and to 
prevent their being made for trifling and frivolous 
pretences. And any persons havmg any matter of dis- 
pute between them arising under this act, may agree 
in writing to submit the same to the adjudication of 
said Commissioner, and his decision therein shall be 
final. 

Sec. 66. If no appeal be taken from a vote of a dis- 
trict relating to the ordering of a tax or rate bill, or 
firom the proceedings of the officers of the district in 
assessing the same, or if on appeal, such proceedings 
are confirmed, the same shall not again be questioned 
before any court of law or magistrate whatever : Frth 
ffidedy that this shall not be construed to dispense with 
legal notice of the meeting or with the votes or prt>- 



JUNE, 1851. 21 

ceedings being approved by the School Committee or 
Commiflsioner, whenever the same is required by law. 

Sic. 67. In any civil suit before any court against 
any school officer for any matter which might by this 
act have been heard and decided by the Commissioner 
of Public Schools^ no costs shall be taxed for the plain- 
tiff if the court are of opinion that such officer acted 
in good faith. 

1^. 68. Any inhabitant of a district or person lia- 
ble to pay taxes therein, may be allowed by any Court 
to answer a suit broughtagainst the district, on giving 
security for costs, in such manner as the Court may 
direct 

Sec. 69. The school house lot with the school house 
and appendages shall be exempt from attachment or 
sale on execution in any suit against the district. — 
When judgment has been or shall be recovered in any 
court of record against any school district, the court 
rendering judgment shall order a warrant to be issued 
(if no appeal be taken) to the assessors of taxes of the 
town (or in case of a joint district composed of parts 
of towns, then to one or more of the assessors of each 
town with or without designating them) in which such 
district is situated, requiring them to assess upon the 
ratable property in said district a tax sufficient to pay 
the debts or damages, costs, interest and a sum in the 
discretion of the court sufficient to defray the expenses 
of assessment and collection. Said assessors shall, with- 
out a new engagement, proceed to assess the same, giv*- 
mg notice as in case of other district taxes. Said war* 
rant shall also contain a direction to the collector of 
the town (or in case of a joint district, then to the col- 
lector of either town the court may direct) requiring 
him to coUect said tax ; and said warrant, with the 
assessment annexed thereto, shall be a sufficient au- 
thority for the collector, without a special engagement^ 
to proceed and collect the same with the same power 
as in case of a town tax ; and when collected, he shall 
pay over the same to the parties to whom it may be- 
long, and the surplus if any to the district And the 
court may require a bond of the collector at their dis- 
cretion. 

Sbc. 70. When auy writ, summons or other process 
<hall issue against any school district in any civil suit, 



22 JUNE, 1851. 

the same may be served on the treasurer or clerk, and 
if there are no such officers to be found, the officer 
charged with the same may post up a certified copy 
thereof on the door of the school-house, and if there 
is no school-house, then in some most public place in 
the district, and the same when proved to the satisfac- 
tion of the court, shall constitute a sufficient service 
thereof 

Sec. 71. Inhabitants of school districts, or persons 
paying taxes therein, shall be competent witnesses in 
aUcivU and criminal cases, notwithstanding such inter* 
est, if not otherwise disqualified. 

Sec. 72. The record of a clerk of a district, that a 
meeting has been duly or legally notified, shall be 
prima facie evidence that it has been notified as the 
law requires. The clerk shall procure at the expense 
of the district a suitable bound book for keeping the 
record therein. 

DEAF AND DUMB. 

Sec. 73. The sum of two thousand five hundred dol- 
lars, is hereby annually appropriated for the education 
of the indigent deaf mutes, indigent blind, and indi- 
gent idiots of this State. Said sum shall be paid out 
of the General Treasury to the order of the Commish 
sioner of Public Schools, who shall have full authority 
to determine which of said persons in this State shtdl 
be admitted to the benefit thereof, and the portion 
which each shall receive, and the institutions at which 
the beneficiaries of this State shall be educated : Pr(h 
videdy that no one person shall receive any portion 
thereof for more than five years, nor a greater sum in 
any one year than one hundred dollars. 

INDIAN SCHOOL. 

Sec. 74. The General Treasurer shall pay to the 
Treasurer of the town of Charlestown the sum of one 
hundred dollars annually, to be expended under the 
direction of some person or persons to be annually 
appointed by the Governor, in support of a School for 
the members of the Narragansett Tribe of Indians, 
and for the purchase of books aad other incidental ex- 
penses thereof; and an account of the expenditure of 
said money and of the condition of the School shall be 
transmitted to the Commissioner of Public Schools on 
or before the first Tuesday of May annually ; and in 



JUNE, 1861. 23 

the apportionment of the public money by the Com- 
misffloner and by the School Committee of Charles- 
town, the Narragansett Indians shall not be included. 
But no person shall be employed to keep said School, 
either as principal or assistant, unless he has received 
a certificate from the School Committee of Charles- 
town, or some competent authority, in the same man- 
ner as is required for other Public Schools. 

TOLDNTARY IKCORPORATIOXS FOE LIBRARIES, &C. 

Sec. 75. Whenever any persons to the number of 
three or more shall hereafler associate together for the 
purpose of procuring and maintaining a library, or pro- 
curing or supporting an academy or school, they shall 
upon complying with the following provisions become 
a body corporate for that purpose, by such name as they 
may designate, and subject to such regulations, condi- 
tions and constitution as they may have adopted. — 
And they may hold, control and convey real and per- 
sonal estate to an amount not exceeding five thousand 
dollars exclusive of their building and the lot on which 
it may stand, and of their books, maps, pictures and 
library furniture. 

Sec. 76. In case of any association of any number 
of members heretofore formed for the purpose of main- 
taining a library and not incorporated, any three of the 
members may call a meeting and appoint a time and 
place therefor, giving to all the known members resi- 
dent in this State five days notice thereof, to be served 
as an original summons is required to be served, by 
some sherifiT, deputy sheriff, constable or some disinter- 
ested person, who shall make oath thereto ; and at the 
meeting so held a majority of the persons present en- 
titled to vote, may organize said association as a cor- 
poration under tJus act. 

Sbc. 77- The library corporations formed under this 
act shall have the power to make assessments on shares 
and regulate by law the manner of selling them on fail- 
ure of payment ; and all transfers of the shares shall 
be recorded in the books of the corporation. 

Sbc. 78. All corporations organized under the seven- 
ty-fifth and seventy-sixth sections of this act may elect 
such officers and for such time as they deem proper, 
may regulate by by-laws the manner of calling annual 
^ other meetings, may require their officers to give 



24 JUNE, 1851. 

bonds^ deteimine the manner of voting and how many 
shall constitute a quorum, and generally may make all 
necessary by-laws not inconsistent with law or their 
constitution, and may prescribe suitable penalties for 
the violation of them, which if in money shall not ex- 
ceed twenty dollars, and may be collected by action 
of debt in the name of the corporation. All oflGicers 
shall continue in office until their successors are ap- 
pointed, and vacancies may be filled at any meeting or 
in such manner as the corporation may direct. If no 
mode is provided of calling annual or other meetings, 
the clerk or secretary shall call a meeting on the re- 
quest of any three members, by posting up a notice 
thereof five days in some public place upon the li- 
brary building, academy or school house, and a major- 
ity of votes, either in person or by proxy, shall con- 
stitute a quorum, unless otherwise provided by the 
corporation. 

Sec. 79. To entitle any association to the benefit of 
the foregoing provisions, the constitution or articles of 
association, and all alterations thereof, shall be record- 
ed in the books of land evidence of the town where the 
library, academy or school house is situated. Any 
such corporation shall not be dissolved by any reduc- 
tion of the number of its members. 

CONSTRUCTION AND REPEAL. 

Sec. 80. In the construction of this act the word 
town shall include the city of Providence only so far as 
to entitle said city to a distributive share of the public 
money upon making a report to the Commissioner in 
the same manner as the School Committees of other 
towns are required to do. The Public Schools in said 
city shall continue fus heretofore, to be governed ac- 
cording to such ordinances and regulations as the pro- 
per city authorities may from time to time adopt 

Sec. 81. All general acts and resolutions heretofore 
passed, relating to public schools, all acts relating to the 
education of the deaf, dumb, blind or idiots, and all 
acts authorizing particular towns and districts to build 
sdiool-houses and perform other duties now in this act 
provided for, excepting local acts and resolutions rela* 
ting to the Schools in Newport, and Provid^ice, are 
hweby repealed. But all parts of said acts which re- 
main in substance the same as before this reviaal, sht^ 



JUNE, 1861. 26 

be eonaidered as having remained in force from their 
first enactment ; and all rights vested in any persons 
by virtue of any act hereby repealed, shall remain un- 
impaired by this act ; and all matters commenced by 
virtue of any act hereby repealed, now depending and 
unfinished, may be prosecuted and pursued to final 
effictin the same manner as if this act had not been 
paased. And no new provision in this act shall affect 
any action or suit now pending, or judgment rendered 



An Act in amendment of an Act entitled ^An Act to 
regulate the election of Civil Officers." 

M is enacted iff the General AsBen/Afy ctefoUowa : 

Section 1. K Senators and Bepresentatives to the Act to ng- 
General Assembly be voted for by ballot, the names of el^on^of 
the candidates in any town voted for by any one elec- ^^^ ®*" 
tor shall be written or printed on one ticket, and in all amended. 
Buch cases where the voting is by ballot, and in the 
election of General Officers, Bepresentatives to Con- 
gress and Electors of President and Vice President of 
file United States, each voter shall, before depositing 
his vote in the ballot box, enclose his vote, which shall 
not be endorsed with the name of the voter, in a seal- 
ed envelope furnished as hereinafter provided. 

Ssc. 2. It shall be the duty of the Clerks of the 
towns and cities of the State to furnish and see that 
they are preserved in proper condition, a sufficient 
number of ballot boxes in each town and ward for the 
purpose of balloting, the expense of which, as also the 
expense of procuring from the Secretary of ftate the 
envelopes as hereinafter provided, shall be compensa- 
ted by their several towns and cities. 

Sec. 3. The said ballot boxes shall have a sufficient 
opening on the top to receive the ballots, and shall in 
open town meeting and before the balloting has been 
commenced be opened and exhibited to all present, af- 
ter which they shall be kept closed and locked, 
and shall not by the moderator or warden, or any 
other person whatever, be opened until the balloting^ 
be completed. 
Sia 4. The ballots for all officers when given at the 
4 



26 JUNE, 1851. 

same time of voting shaU be enclosed in ihe same en- 
velope. 

Sec. 5. The ballot box shall be in charge of the mod- 
erators and wardens only, and each voter shall at the 
time of voting announce to the moderator or warden 
his name^ who shall cause his name to be checked upon 
the voting hsts^ before he deposits his vote, and said 
voter shall also hold in his hand and deposit in said 
ballot box ihe envelope containing his ballot in such a 
manner that said moderator or warden can distinctly 
see that he deposits but one envelope, and it shall be 
the duty of the town, ward, and district clerks to 
check each voter's name as he deposits his baUoL 

Sec. 6. It shall be the duty of the Secretary of State 
to provide a sufficient quantity of self-sealing envel- 
opes of uniform appearance and of suitable size and 
quality, for the use of voters in the State, and on or be- 
fore the first day of November next, to notify each 
clerk of every town and city within the State liiat the 
same are ready for delivery, and it shall also be the du- 
ty of said Secretary to keep constantly on hand a su^ 
ficient quantity of said envelopes to supply all the vo- 
ters of the State at any time and at all elections that 
may take place, and famish the same to the clerks of 
the several towns and whenever they shall apply there- 
for. 

Sec. 7. It shall be the duty of the clerk of each 
town and city in this State, on receiving the notice 
aforesaid, forthwith to obtain from the Secretary o£ 
State, and thereafter to procure and keep on hand con- 
stantly a sufficient number of said envelopes, not at 
any time having less than six times the whole number 
of names on the list of voters of such town or city for 
the preceding year, subject to the order and direction 
of the town or city council as hereinafter provided. 

Sec. 8. It shall be the duty of the town coimcil of 
each town and of the common council of each city in 
this State, to appoint one of their number for each 
town, and where tiiere are more than one ward or dis^ 
trict in any town or city, one for each ward or dis- 
trict, to procure from the clerks of their several towns 
and cities, and provide at the polls on the day of elec- 
tion, a sufficient quantity of envelopes aforesaid, and to 
take diarge of the same and supply each voter on his 



JUNE, 1851. 27 

penonal applicatioii, and no other person^ with such a 
number as he needs for his own ballots during the 
pending election. 

Sec. 9. AH votes not enclosed in the envelopes pro- 
vided as aforesaid shall be void, and all moderators and 
wardens shall refuse to receive the same, and if any 
officer or other person shall in any way mark or dis- 
color any one of the envelopes deposited before the 
same is delivered to the voter, for the purpose of dis- 
tinguishing the same, shall on conviction thereof for- 
feit and pay to the treasurer of the State the sum of 
five hundred dollars, and any officer who shall neglect 
to comply with the requisitions of this act, shall on 
conviction thereof forfeit and pay as aforesaid a like 
8um of five hundred dollars, said simi in both cases to 
be recovered by indictment therefor. 

Sec. 10. After the voting in any town, city or 
ward, for the officers herein mentioned, or any of them 
shall be closed, the moderator and town clerk, or the 
warden and ward clerk, shall in open town or ward 
meeting count the number of envelopes, to ascertain 
the number of persons voting, and shall then proceed 
to open the envelopes and count the ballots. If any 
envelopes shall contain more than one vote for the 
same person for the same office, or votes for diflferent 
persons for the same office either on the same piece of 
paper or on different pieces of paper, all such votes 
shall be rejected and not counted, and every envelope 
found to contain only a blank shall not be counted. — 
When any envelope found in any ballot box bears any 
impression or device or color, designed to distinguish 
such envelope from others, deposited therein by the 
voters^ it shall be rejected with all its contents. 

Sec. 11. In the city of Providence and in other ci- 
ties and towns which are divided into districts, after 
the examination of the ballots, the wardens and ward 
clerks shall forthwith seal and transmit to the mayor 
and aldermen all the ballots given for State Senators and 
Repesentatives and for City Officers, with a certificate of 
their ntmiber, and for what officers they have been 
given, and town clerks where towns vote by districts, 
and the mayor and aldermen shall proceed to count 
ballots in tiie same manner as is prescribed in section 
eight for the counting of the votes by the moderator 
and clerks of town and ward meetings. 



28 JUNE, 1851. 

Sec. 12. The moderator and town clerks of the 
towns, and the wardens and ward clerks of the cities, 
shall after having counted the envelopes and ballots as 
in section eight, seal up and transmit the ballots, not in- 
cluding those excepted in the next preceding section, 
nor those given for State Senators and Representatives, 
with a certificate of the number of votes and for what 
persons, to the General Assembly at their next session, 
S^ the manner now prescribed bV law. 

Sec. 13. The use of envelopes shall not be required 
at any election prior to the first day of January in the 
year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and fifty 
two. 

Sec. 14. All acts and parts of acts inconsistent here- 
with are hereby repealed. 



An Act to legalize the election of School Committee- 
men. 

M is enacted ly the General AMembJy as follows : 
Election of The election of any School Committee or of any 
committee ^lember or members thereof, heretofore elected at any 
men legal- town meetings in this State, or at any meeting ad- 
journed from the annual town meeting, for the elec- 
tion of town officers, is hereby declared legal and 
valid. 



An Act in explanation and amendment of an Act en- 
titled " An Act in relation to Manufacturing Corpor- 
ations.'* 

J? is enacted by the General Assembly asfoUows : 

Actinreia- SECTION 1. If by the tcrms of any act incorporating 

MMufac- ^ manufiBMJturing Company, directors, managers, or the 

*M^|^^r- like, are not required to be chosen, and none are 

SpiaiSSd chosen tmder and by virtue of the by-laws of the Co^ 

JS?""*°^' poration, the certificates required by the second, 

ninth and eleventh sections of the act to which this is 

in explanation and amendment, signed and sworn to 

by the officers required to be chosen by the charter or 

by-laws, shall have the same efiect, as if signed and 

sworn to by the officer or officers and a majority of 



JUNE, 1851. «9 

the directors required in said second, ninth and elev- 
enth sections. 

Sbc. 2. Nothing in the eighth section of the Act to 
which this is in explanation and amendment contained, 
shall be construed to prevent the application of this 
actj or of the provisions of said eighth section thereof, 
to manu&ctnring companies owning a manufacturing 
establishment and obtaining a charter of incorpora- 
tion, whether such charter was obtained before or af- 
ter the passage of said act, or shall be hereafter ob- 
tained 



Ak Act in amendment of an Act entitled ^ An Act in 
amendment of an Act directing the times and 
places of holding the terms of the Supreme Court 
and the Courts of Common Pleas, contained in the 
digest of 1844." 

It is enacted hy the General Assembly as follows : 
Section 1. The term of the Court of Common Pleas, re- Timca of 
quired by the act to which this is in amendment, to be a>u?S ?n 
holden at East Greenwich, within and for the county jj^" 'J^ 
of Kent^ on the fourth Monday in August, shall here- ^,^^ 
after be holden at said East Greenwich on the third ^ 
Monday in August in each year, instead of being hol- 
den on the fourth Monday in August, as required by 
the act aforesaid. 

Sec. 2. The term of the Supreme Courts required by 
the act to which this is in amendment, to be holden at 
Newport, within and for the county of Newport, on 
the third Monday in August, shall hereafter be holden 
at said Newport on the fourth Monday in August in 
each year, instead of being holden on the third Monday 
in August, as required by the act to which this is in 
amendment. 

Sec. 3. All writs, actions, executions, sunmions, ap- 
peals and recognizances, and all other processes of ev- 
ery name, nature and description, returnable to or pend- 
ing in either of said Courts, shall be returnable to and 
pending in said Courts respectively at the terms 
thereof hereinbefore provided, in the same manner and 
with the same effect as they would have been at the 
terms of said Courts respectively as the same were es- 
tabhahed previous to the passage of this act 



30 JUNE, 1851. 

Resolution authorizmg his Excellency the Governor 
to appoint a Commissioner to ascertain and report 
the number of minors employed in manufacturing 
establishments. 

RfiiaUve to Resolved, that his Excellency the Governor, be au- 

minora em- . •• •■ii • k r^ •• a j • 

Dioyedin thonzed to appomt a Commissioner to ascertain as 

tuSffes- nearly as may be the number of persons employed in 

tabiiah- the manufactunnff establishments and corporations in 

this State under the ages of fifteen years, twelve years, 

and nine years respectively ; what are their hours of 

labor per day, the number of months thus devoted to 

labor per year; to what extent they are deprived of 

the benefits of our Public Schools ; and to Report to 

ProTiflo. this General Assembly as soon as may be : Provided, 

the expense does not exceed the sum of two hundred 

and fifty dollars. 



Ebsolution directing the President and Cashier of the 
Hamilton Bank to convey certain property to the 
Receiver of said Bank. 

HamUton*^ i?e«ofe^rf, That the Hamilton Bank of Scituate be here- 
Bank. by directed by their President, Jonah Titus, and their 
Cashier, Luther C. Warner, and imder their corporate 
seal, to make conveyance of such property to the Re- 
ceiver of said Bank as said Receiver shall deem neces- 
sary, to enable him to collect the assets of said Bank — 
such conveyance to be in trust for the uses and purpo- 
ses prescribed in the act appointing Receivers for said 
Bank. 



An Act establishing and regulating a Court of Justices 

in the town of Bristol. 

B is enacted hy the General Assenibbf as follows : 
Court of Section 1. There shall be a Court in the town of Bris- 
Ae'fo'^iJf tol caUed The Court of Justices of tfie Town of Bristol, to 
Brifltoi. consist of not more than five, nor less than three per- 
sons, to be annually chosen by the qualified electors of 
said town at the annual town meeting for the election 
of town officers, or at any adjournment of such meet- 
ing, from the justices of the peace, elected by said town, 



JUNE, 1851. 31 

or by tiie Gleneral Assembly. And no member of said 
Court shall act as counsel or attorney in any cause 
pending before the same. 

S»c. 2. The said Court shall have exclusively the 
same jurisdiction in all civil actions, and in all criminal 
cases and proceedings in said town, as is or may be giv- 
en by law to justices of the peace in other towns, and 
aD writs and civil and criminal processes issued by any 
justice of the peace in said town shall be returnable be- 
fore the said Court of Justices. 

Sec. 3. When said Court consists of but three mem- 
bers, two shall be necessary to constitute a quorum ; 
and when said Court shall consist of a greater number 
than three, three shall be necessary to constitute a 
quorum ; but any one member in the absence of the 
other members of said Court may adjourn from time 
to time. 

Sbc. 4. Said Court shall meet on Wednesday of each 
week, at nine o'clock A. M., at some public place in said 
town, and may meet at other times by adjournment, 
and shall annually elect one of their own number to 
act as clerk, who shaU keep a docket of all actions and 
complaints, and record the judgments and proceedings 
of said Court in a book to be kept for that purpose, as 
is now required by law of Justices of the Peace. 

Sbc. 5. All writs and processes issued by said Court, 
shall be signed by at least one of the Justices thereof; 
and appeals shall be had in all cases as is or may be 
provided by the general law. 

Sbc. 6. The Justices composing said Court shall hold 
iheii offices by the same tenure, and exercise the same 
powers, except as provided in this act, and be subject 
to the same duties and liabilities, as justices of the 
peace in other cases. 

Sec. 7. The Town Council of said town of Bristol may 
designate the Justices of the Peace of said town who 
may act as members of said Court until the next an- 
nual election of town officers. 



32 JUNE, 1851. 

As Act in amendment of the Act to incorporate the 
Stockholders of the BaUroad Bank. 

li is enacted ly the General Assernblxf asfoUowB : 

SS'^ A sum of money equal to one-and-a-half per 

Bank cent, upon the capital stock of said Bank, shall be by 

""'°^'^' the said Bank paid to the General Treasurer, for the 

use of the State, in manner following, viz : one-third 

part thereof on the first Monday of December, 1851 ; 

one-third part thereof on the first Monday of April, 

1852 ; one-third part thereof on the first Monday of 

August, 1852 ; — and the fifth section of the act to 

which this is in amendment is hereby repealed. 



An Act in amendment of an Act to incorporate the 
Stockholders of the Pascoag Bank, in the town of 
Burrillville. 

It is enacted ly the General Assembly as foUaws : 
Charter SECTION 1, The name of said Bank is hereby changed 
Bank^ ^ from that of the ^^ Pascoag Bank" in Burrillville to that 
of the Granite Bank^ of Pascoag, in Burrillville. 

Sbc. 2. The Corporation and Stockholders of said 
Granite Bank of Pascoag, shall be subject to aU the 
liabilities, duties and obligations, and shall be entitled 
to all the rights and privileges that they are or would 
be subject and entitled to, had not the name been 
changed as aforesaid. 



amended. 



An Act in amendment of an Act to incorporate the 

Bank of Commerce in Providence. 
h is enacted by the General Assembly as follows : 

Banfof °^ The sixth section of the act to incorporate "" The 
Commerce Bank of Commerce in Providence," is hereby so far 
amended as to allow the " Merchants Insurance Com- 
pany in Providence," to hold the shares of the capital 
stock of said Bank to an amount not exceeding, at 
any one time, at the par value thereof, the sum of One 
Hundred Thousand Dollars. 



JUNE, 1851. S3 

An Act to amend the Charter of the Woonsocket In* 

stitute for Saying& 

M is enacted hy the General Assenibh/ as foUows : 

The amount of Deposits which said Corporation are charter of 
hereby authorized to receive and retain under its man- JTinSSiSte 
agement at any one time, shall not exceed the sum of J^^/iSf* 
llree Hundred Thousand Dollars. 



An Act in amendment of an Act entitled " An Act to 
incorporate the Pawtucket Institution for Savings," 

J? is enacted hy the General Assembly as foUotvs : 

The sum which may be received by said Institution, Charter of 
and remain under its management, may be increased et^iMtuu-" 
to, but shall not exceed the sum of Five Hundred sa^«" 
Thousand Dollars. amended. 



An Act to incorporate the Rhode Island Homoeopathic 

Society. 

B is enacted by the General Assembly asfoUows : 

Section 1. A. H. Okie, Ira Barrows, Henry C. Pres- R. i. ho- 
ton, Peleg Clark, John J. DeWolf, and their associates, sSc?e^ty hf- 
successors and assigns, are hereby created a body pol- ^orporated. 
itic and corporate, by the name of " The Rhode Island 
Homoeopathic Society," for medical and scientific pur» 
poaes, and by that name shall have perpetual succes- 
sion^ and are made able and capable in law, to have, 
receive, possess, hold, enjoy and retain to them, their 
successors and assigns^ estates real and personal, to the 
value of ten thousand dollars ; and the same to man- 
age, let, grant, bargain, sell and dispose of at pleasure; 
to sue and be sued, plead and be impleaded, defend 
and be defended against, in all courts of law and 
equity, and before all tribunals whatever; to make 
and use a common seal, and the same to break, alter 
and renew at pleasure, and shall also have power to 
make and put in execution, such constitution, by-laws 
and regulations not contrary to law, as they may deem 
nec^asaxy for the interests of said association and th^ 

5 



84 JUNE, 1851. 

promotion of its objects ; and generally to do and exe- 
cute all actSy matters and things which may be neces- 
sary to carry into effect the powers and privileges 
herein granted. 

Sec. 2. There shall be an annual meeting of said As- 
sociation holden on the first Wednesday in May in 
each year, for the choice of a President, and such other 
officers as they may deem necessary, who shall hold 
their offices for one year, and until others are chosen 
and qualified to act in their stead, unless removed by 
the vote of the Association or otherwise. The number 
of officers and their powers and duties shall be deter- 
mined by their Constitution and By-Laws, and at any 
legal meeting of said Association they may elect such 
officers as may be judged necessary, and may fiU any 
vacancy that may happen in any of the offices created 
by the Association ; and if said Association from any 
cause should fail to hold their annual meeting on the 
day before mentioned in each and every year hereaf- 
ter, this act of incorporation shall not thereupon cease 
and determine, but the same shall nevertheless con- 
tinue and be in force, and the business of said annual 
meeting may be transacted at any legal meeting which 
shall be called for that purpose ; and legal meetings 
shall be at any time called in such manner as shall be 
prescribed by the by-laws of said Association, and at 
any such meeting officers may be elected, vacancies 
filled, and any and all other business of the Association 
transacted with the same effect as at annual meetings 
— and at all meetings of the Association, all matters 
shall be decided by a majority of the votes present. 

Sec. 3. The admission of members, the forms of pro- 
ceeding, the exercises of the Association, and the man- 
ner in which its objects are to be promoted, shall be 
regulated by its Constitution and By-Laws. 



An Act to Incorporate the Stockholders of the " Woon- 

socket Gas Company." 

jB is enacted hy the General Assembly cLsfoUows : 
WwMock- Section 1. That George S. Wardwell, Samuel Greene^ 
companyi Edward Harris^ Willis Cook, George C. Ballou, Ed- 
ii^eorpomt. ^^^ g Spraguc, WilUam Metcalf, Stephen N. Mason, 



JUNE, 1851. «6 

Oren A. Ballou, f3i Pond, Horatio Latham, and their 
associates, successors and assigns, are hereby made a 
body politic and corporate, by the name of the Wooih 
socid Gas Compainy^ for the purpose of making and 
selling Gas, to be used in lighting the mills, buildings 
and streets, in the village of Woonsocket and vicinity, 
or for other purposes, and by that name are made ca- 
pable in law to piu*chase, possess, have, hold, enjoy and 
retain to them, their successors and assigns, lands, ten- 
ements, hereditaments, goods, chattels and effects of 
whatsoever name or nature, and the same to sell, as* 
sign, or otherwise dispose of; to sue and be sued, plead 
and be impleaded, answer and be answered unto, be- 
fore any competent tribunal ; to make and use a com- 
mon seal, and the same to break, alter and renew, at 
pleasure ; to ordain such by-laws and regulations, not 
being contrary to law, as to them shall seem expe- 
dient for the government and management of said 
Company, and of the business and property thereof; 
and generally to do all things necessary and proper to 
carry into effect the powers and privileges herein 
granted. 

Sec. 2. Said Company shall have power and au- 
thority to open the ground in any part of the streets, 
lanes and highways in the towns of Smithfield and 
Cumberland, for the purpose of laying and repairing 
pipes for conducting said Gas, with the consent and 
under the direction in every respect of the Town 
Council of the town in which said pipes are to be laid 
or repaired. 

Sec. 3. The capital stock of said Company shall 
consist of twenty-five thousand dollars, in shares of one 
hundred dollars each ; but the stockholders may in- 
crease the said stock at any special meeting or meet- 
ings, called for that purpose, to any amount not ex- 
ceeding one hundred thousand dollars, under such reg- 
ulations and conditions, and according to law, as they 
may deem expedient, the holders of a majority of the 
capital stock voting for said increase. 

Sec. 4. After the organization of said Company 
as hereinafter mentioned, a meeting of the stockhold- 
ers shall be holden on the first Monday in September, 
in every year, for the election of nine directors, who 
shall choose a President from their own body, and for 



86 JUNE, 1851. 

the transaction of any other business of the Company. 
Said directors shall hold their offices until the next an- 
nual meeting, and until others are elected in their 
stead, unless sooner removed by the stockholders, at a 
meeting specially called for that purpose ; and may 
supply all vacancies in their Board, which may happen 
before the next annual meeting. Other meetings of the 
stockholders may at any time be called by the Presi- 
dent and Directors, or by the holders of one-third of 
the whole capital stock: Provided^ that every stock- 
holders' meeting shall be noticed in the newspaper 
published in the village of Woonsocket, at least ten 
days before the time appointed for the same. And in 
case the stockholders shall fail to elect said Directors 
at their annual meeting, they may elect them at any 
legal meeting of the stockholders thereafter. At all 
meetings of the stockholders, seven stockholders shall 
be necessary to form a quorum ; and every stockholder 
shall, in person or by proxy, be entitled to one vote 
for every share which he or she may hold, not exceed- 
ing twenty, and to an additional vote for every ten 
shares over twenty: Provided^ that no stockholder 
shall have more than forty votes in his or her own 
right 

Sec. 6. The President and Directors shall meet at 
such times a^ they shall deem proper, any five of them 
to constitute a quorum. They shall have the imme- 
diate government and direction of the business and 
affairs of the Company ; they shall appoint a Treasurer 
and such other officers as they may deem expedient, 
who shall give bond to the Company, with sureties, to 
the satisfaction of the Directors, for the faithful per- 
formance of their duties. The said President and Di- 
rectors shall have power to make contracts, to manage 
and dispose of the property and funds of the Com- 
pany, in such a manner as they shall deem for the in- 
terest of the stockholders ; they shall make such divi- 
dends of the profits, if any, at least once in every year, 
as to them shall appear proper ; and the said President 
and Directors shall, as such, receive no compensation, 
unless by the vote of a legal meeting of the stock- 
holdera 

Sec. 6. The capital stock shall be paid to the Presi- 
. dent and Directors, in such equal installments, and at 



JUNE, 1851. 37 

such times as they shall prescribe ; ten days' notice of 
said installment^ and of the times and places of pay- 
ing the same, shall be given in the paper aforesaid ; and 
sidd ci^ital stock shall not be liable to assessment, ex- 
cept for said installments, to the amount in all, of one 
hmidied dollars on each share. The said stock is here- 
by made personal property, and shall be transferable 
only at the office of the Company, in such form and 
manner as the President and Directors shall prescribe. 
And no stockholder shall, without the consent of the 
President and Directors, sell or transfer his or her 
stock, until the whole amount of his or her stock shall 
have been paid in, excepting stock belonging to de- 
ceased or insolvent persons ; and in case any default 
be made in the payment of any installment as afore- 
said, the share on which it shall be due, with all install- 
ments paid thereon, shall be forfeited to the Company, 
for the use and benefit of said Company. Nor shall 
any stockholder, indebted in any manner to the Com- 
pany, sell or transfer his or her stock, without consent 
as aforesaid ; but the same shall be liable for the pay- 
ment of such debt, and may for the payment of the 
same, be sold at auction, by order of the President and 
Directors, or so much thereof as shall be necessary for 
said pajrment ; sixty days previous notice of said sale 
being given in the newspaper aforesaid ; the surplus 
of the proceeds of said sale over such debt, and the 
expenses thereof, to be paid to such stockholder. 

Sec. 7. If any person or persons, shall willfully do, 
or cause to be done, any act or acts whatever, where- 
by the works of the said Company, or any pipe, con- 
duit, plug, cock, reservoir, or any engine, machine or 
structure, or any matter or thing appertaining to the 
same, shall be stopped, obstructed, impaired, weakened, 
injured or destroyed, the person or persons so oflFend- 
ing, shall forfeit and pay to the said Company, double 
the amount of the damage sustained by means of such 
offence or injury, to be recovered in an action of debt, 
to be brought in the name of said Company, in any 
Court of competent jurisdiction, together with costs 
of suit 

Sec. 8. In all proceedings at law or in equity, in 
which this Corporation shall be a party, the leaving of 
an attested copy of any process with the Treasurer, or 



38 JUNE, 1861. 

the person acting as such, or at his usual place of bu- 
siness, or residence, shall be deemed a sufficient ser- 
vice thereof. 

Sec. 9. Any three of the persons named in the first 
section of this Act, are hereby authorized to call the 
first meeting of the stockholders, whenever they shall 
deem it expedient, notice of the same being given as 
before mentioned, for the election of Directors, and or- 
ganization under this Charter, and for the transaction 
of any other business of the Corporation ; and the Di- 
rectors so elected, shall continue in office until the first 
annual meeting, and until others are elected in their 
stead. 

Sec. 10. The liability of the members and officers of 
this Corporation for the debts of the Company, shall 
be fixed and limited by, and the Corporation, its mem- 
bers and officers, shall in all respects be subject to, the 
Provisions of an Act entitled "an Act in relation to 
lanufacturing Corporations," passed at the June ses^ 
sion of the General Assembly, A. D. 1847. 



An Act to incorporate the "Union Butt Company." 

B is enacted hy the General Assemhh/ asfoUows : 
Ignioii^Butt Section 1. Joseph C. Miller, Welcome G. Comstock, 
incorporat- Richard W. Dexter, George L. Clarke, Lawrence Whit- 
^' lock, John P. Mumford, William J. Johnson, William 

Chase, Henry Bandall, Darius Eddy and James P. 
Murray, are hereby created a body corporate and poli- 
tic, by the name of the Union Butt Compam/j for Man- 
ufacturing Butt Hinges and other castings, and by that 
name are made able and capable in law, to have, pos- 
sess, receive, purchase, hold, enjoy, and retain to them, 
their successors and assigns, lands, tenements, and he- 
reditiments, goods, chattels, and effects, of every kind 
and name whatsoever ; and the same to grant, bar- 
gain, sell, assign, and dispose of; by that name to sue 
and be sued, plead and be impleaded, answer and be 
answered unto, defend and be defended against, in all 
Courts of Record, or in any other place or places, what- 
soever ; to make, have, and use a common seal, and 
the same to break, alter and renew at pleasure ; to o^ 



JUNE, 1851. 39 

dain, establish and put in execution such by-laws and 
regulations, (not being contrary to law,) as to them 
shall seem necessary and convenient for the govern- 
ment and regulation of said Company, and the busi- 
ness and property thereof, and generally, to do all acts, 
matters, and things, which may be necessary to carry 
into effect the powers and prii^eges herein granted. 

Sec. 2. The capital stock of said Company shall 
consist of Five Thousand Dollars, in shares of Fifty 
Dollars each, with the privilege of increasing the same 
to a sum not exceeding Twenty Thousand Dollars, by 
creating new shares for that purpose : Provided^ cdr 
woffSj that a majority of two-thirds of all the votes shall 
be necessary for making any increase of the Stock as 
aforesaid. 

Sec. 3. The shares in said capital stock are hereby 
declared to be personal property, and shall not be lia- 
ble to assessment, except for the payment of the in- 
staUments of the capital stock ; said assessments not to 
exceed, in all, the sum of fifty dollars on each share ; 
said shares shall be transferred in such form as 
the Company shall prescribe, and all transfers of Stock 
shall be recorded in Books to be provided by the Com- 
pany for that purpose. 

Sec. 4. Shares of every Stockholder shall be pledged 
and liable to the company for all debts and Uabili- 
ties arising or growing out of an original installment 
or otherwise ; and in case any Stockholder shall refuse 
or neglect to pay any such installments, debts or lia- 
bilities when demanded by the Agent of said Compa- 
ny, then it shall be lawful for the said Agent to adver- 
tise the share of such delinquent Stockholder or such 
part thereof as may be necessary to satisfy such de- 
mand, by giving at least ten days notice of such sale, 
in some public newspaper, published in the city of 
Providence, and the proceeds of such sale shall be ap- 
plied to the payment of the debt or debts, due to said 
Company, and the residue, if any remain, shall be paid 
to such delinquent Stockholder, his executors, adminis- 
trators or aligns. 

Sec 5. At all meetings of said Company, each Stock- 
holder in person or by proxy shall have one vote for 
every share owned by him not exceeding twenty, and 
one additional vote for every five shares beyond twenty. 



40 JUNE, 1851, 

Seo. 6. There shall be an annual meeting of the 
Stockholders, on the first Monday in February, for the 
appointment of such officers as the company may deem 
necessary and expedient, who shall hold their offices 
until others are elected in their stead, unless sooner re- 
moved by death or a vote of the company. In case 
the Company shall fail to elect their officers at the an- 
nualme/ting, itahaU be lawful for them to make such 
election at any legal meeting, duly called for that pur- 
pose. Other meetings of the Stockholders, may at 
any time be called by the Agent, or in case of his ab- 
sence, neglect, inability or refusal, by any five Stock- 
holders ; such meeting shall be notified in a manner 
to be prescribed by the by-laws of the Company. 

At all meetings of the Company, the owners of one- 
half of the capital stock shall constitute a quorum for 
the transaction of business ; but no dividend of profits 
shall be declared and made unless by the vote or con- 
sent of the owners of two-thirds of the capital stock. 

Sec. 7. In all proceedings in law or equity, in which 
the Company shall be a party, the leaving of an at- 
tested copy of any process with the Agent or the per- 
son acting as such, or at his usual place of business or 
abode, shall be deemed sufficient service thereof 

Sec. 8. John P. Mumford is hereby authorized to call 
the first meeting of the Company at any time within 
sixty days after the rising of this General Assembly, 
for the purpose of accepting the charter, electing of- 
ficers and organization under such charter, and for 
such other business as may be brought before said 
Company, and the officers so elected, shall hold their of- 
fices until the next annual election, and until others 
are elected in their stead. 

Seo. 9. The liabilities of the members and officers of 
this Company, for the debts of the Company, shall be 
fixed and limited by, and the Corporation, its members 
and officers, shall in all respects be subject to, the pro- 
visions of an Act entitled ^An Act in relation to Man* 
ufacturing Corporations," passed at the Jime session of 
the General A^mbly, A. D. 1847. 



JUNE, 186L 41 

As Act to incoporate the ^ipmuc Ledge Company." 

-B is enacted hy the General Assemhly as follotvs : 

Section 1. Job Harkness^ James G. Anthony, Henry Nipmnc 
B. Anthony, Lanriston Hall, Horace Foster and Ste- co^uif 
phen Mattison, their associates, successors and assigns, ^^7^' 
are hereby created a body corporate and politic by the 
name of the Nvpnmc Ledge Company^ for the purpose of 
working the Nipmuc Ledge in the towns of Scituate 
and Coventry, and for the transaction of such business 
as pertains thereto ; and by that name are made able 
and capable in law to have, possess, receive, purchase, 
hold, enjoy, and retain, to them, their successors and 
assigns, lands, tenements and hereditaments, goods, chat- 
tels, and effects, of every kind and nature whatsoever, 
and the same to grant, bargain, sell, assign, alien or 
otherwise dispose of; by that name to sue and be sued, 
plead, and be impleaded, answer and be answered, de- 
fend and be defended against, in all courts of record 
or in any other place or places whatsoever; to make, 
have and use a common seal, and the same to break, 
alter and renew at pleasure ; to ordain, estabUsh and 
put into execution such by-laws and regulations, not con- 
trary to law, as to them shall seem necessary and con- 
venient for the government and regulation of said 
Company, and the business and prosperity thereof; 
and generally to do and execute all matters and things 
which may be necessary to carry into effect the pow- 
ers and privileges herein granted, 

Sbc. 2. The capital stock of said Company shall 
oonsist of Ten Thousand Dollars, in shares of one hun- 
dred dollars each, with the privilege of increasing the 
same to a sum not exceeding Fifty Thousand Dollars, 
under such regulations and conditions, and according 
to law, as they may deem expedient : Provided^ that 
two-thirds of all the votes shall be necessary for mak- 
ing any increase of stock as aforesaid. The shares ia 
said capital stock shall be considered and taken as peiv 
sonal property, and shall be transferred by bill of sale 
to be recorded in the office of the Treasurer of the 
Corporation, in such books as he shall provide for that 
purpose ; and certificates thereof shall be issued by 
the Treasurer of said Corporation to the holder or 
holders thereof 



42 JUNE, 1851. 

8m. 3. The share or shares of every stockholder shall 
he he held pledged and liable to the Corporation for 
any original installments or for any debts due, or liar 
bilities which the Corporation shall hold against such 
stockholders arising or growing out of an original in- 
stallment, or otherwise ; and in case the same shall re- 
main unpaid for the space of ninety days after the same 
shall become due and payable, it diall be lawful for the 
Treasurer of said Company to advertise and sell at pub- 
lic auction the share or shares of such delinquent stock- 
holder, or such part thereof as shall be necessary to 
satisfy the demand and the expenses attending said 
sale, giving at least six weeks notice of the time and 
place of sale in one of the newspapers printed in the 
city of Providence, — ^the surplus of the proceeds of the 
sale over such debt, liabilities and expenses of said sale 
to be paid to such stockholder, and a transfer of such 
share or shares by the Treasurer shall be made to the 
purchaser or purchasers thereof in the manner herein- 
before provided. 

Sec. 4. There shall be an annual meeting of the 
stockholders on the second Monday in February in 
each and every year, for the choice of ofl&cers, who 
shall hold their offices for one year, or until others are 
elected in their stead, unless sooner removed by death 
or a vote of said Corporation. If the Corporation should 
fail to elect their officers on the day above named, 
then it shall be lawful for them so to do at any legal 
meeting to be holden within one year,notice of the same 
to be given in the same manner as prescribed for call- 
ing special meetings. Special meetings may be called 
by holders of twenty shares, which meetings shall be 
notified by the Treasurer of the Corporation at least 
three days before the appointed time ; notice thereof 
to be in writing and served by reading the same to 
each stockholder within this State, or by leaving a copy 
thereof at his last and usual place of abode,and said notice 
shall specify the substance of the business to be acted 
on at such special meeting. At all meetings of the 
Corporation all matters shall be decided by a majority 
of the stockholders then present, except as is other- 
wise provided in section second ; and any stockholder 
may be represented and vote by proxy, each share of 
the stock being entitled to one vote : Provided^ no 



JUNE, 1851. 43 

8to(^older ahall vote in his or her own right on more 
than one quarter of the shares of the capital stock. 

Sec. 5. Li all proceedings in law or in equity^ in which 
this Corporation shall be a party, the leaving an at- 
tested copy of any process with the Treasurer or pa^> 
son actiDg as such, or at his usual place of residence or 
buainesg, shall be deemed a sufficient service thereo£ 

Stc, 6. Any two of the persons named in the first 
section of this act are hereby authorized to call the first 
meeting of the stockholders, whenever they shall deem 
expedient, notice of the same being given as befi)re 
mentioned, for election of officers and organization m^ 
der this charter, and for the transaction of any other 
business of this Corporation ; and the officers so elected 
ahall continue in office until others are elected 
and qualified in their stead. The Treasurer for the 
time being shall at all times be an inhabitant and citi* 
zen of this State. 

Sec. 7. The liabilities of the members and officers of 
this Corporation, for the debts of the Company, shall 
be fixed and limited by the provisions of an Act enti- 
tied '^An Act in relation to Manufacturing Corpora* 
tions," passed at the June session of the General As- 
sembly, A. D. 1847. 



A5 Act to incorporate the ^Ocean Fire Engine Com- 
pany No. 7," in the city of Providence. 

Ic is enacted by the General Assembly as follows : 

Section 1. That Benjamin W. Ham, Bradford C Ocean fi» 
Shaw, Charles Willard, Augustus R Tallman, Edward T Nof^rf in- 
Ham, John T. WiUard, William Burke, Charles WU- ^^'p^'^- 
liams, Martin S. Budlong, George H. Cahoone, 0. P. 
Davis, Charles W. Field and others, their associates 
and successors, be, and they are hereby created a body 
corporate, with perpetual succession, under the name 
of the Ocean Fire Engine Compamf No. 7, and that they 
and their successors shall be and hereby are made ca- 
pable in law, by that name, to receive, hold, possess 
and enjoy, to them and their successors, real and per* 
Bonal estate, of what kind or nature soever, not e:sceed- 
ing in value the sum of two thousand dollars^ and the 



44 JUNE, 1851. 

same at pleasure to alien and dispose of; to have a 
conunon seal, and the same at pleasure to break, alter 
and renew, to sue and be sued, plead and be implead- 
ed, defend and be defended against, and to prosecute all 
suits to final judgment and execution ; to elect such 
officers as they may deem necessary, to prescribe times 
and places for meetings for such elections ; to estab- 
lish rules for the election of officers and members ; to 
ordain and execute such by-laws and ordinances as may 
be found expedient for the management of their af- 
fairs ; and in general to do and execute all matters 
which to them shall appertain to do, provided the 
same are not contrary to law. 

Sec. 2. The members of said Company shall have 
power and authority to inflict fines and penalties not to 
exceed two dollars for any one offence ; for the non- 
observance or violation of any by-law or regulation for 
the government of said Company, which they may le- 
gally ordain and establish. 

SsG. 3. The members of said Company, not to ex- 
ceed one hundred and twenty in number, at any one 
time, shall be, and the same are hereby exempted from 
all military duty and from serving as jurors, during the 
time that they shall be and continue members there- 
of 

Sec 4. This act of incorporation shall be forever sub- 
ject to all future acts of the General Assembly, wheth- 
er in amendment or repeal thereof, or in any wise af- 
fecting the same. 



An Act in addition to and amendment of an Act en- 
titled "An Act to incorporate the New York, Provi- 
dence and Boston Rail Road Company, and the acts 
in amendment thereto." 

3 is enacted hy the General Azsembly as foUotvs : 

mon to' Section 1. The New York,Providence and Boston M 
*nd amend- Road Company are hereby authorized to increase their 
Act incor- Capital stock beyond its present amount two hundred 
STnIV., *^d eighty thousand dollars,by the addition of two thou- 
p^Md^B. gaud and eighty shares, each share to be of the par 
Co. value of one hundred dollars. 



JUNE, 1851. 45 

Sk. 2. For the purpose of carrying into effect the 
proyifflons of this act, the Directors of said Company 
are hereby authorized and empowered to issue said two 
thousand and eighty shares of new stock, and the own- 
ers of the present stock of said Company may subscribe 
for said new stock in the proportion of four shares for 
every twenty five shares of old stock, by them held, 
they paying par value for such new stock in such man- 
ner as the Board of Directors of said Company shall di- 
rect at the time of subscribing, and also delivering up 
their certificates of old stock, and receiving in lieu of 
every twenty-five shares of old stock and four shares 
of new stock, a certificate of twenty-nine shares of pre- 
ferred stock. 

Sec. 3. No portion of said stock issued imder the pro- 
visions of this act, shall be issued at less than its par value ; 
the tune and manner of issuing it shall be determined 
by the Directors of said Company. 

Sec, 4. The said stock in the certificates issued there- 
for shall be called preferred stock ; and the Board of 
Directors are hereby authorized and empowered to de- 
clare and pay semi-annual dividends out of the nett 
earnings of said Company, not exceeding six per cent, 
per annum on said preferred stock, and no dividends 
shall hereafter be declared and paid upon any other 
stock of said Company, except as is provided in the fifth 
section of this act. 

Sec. 5. When after payment of the dividends upon 
said preferred stock, out of the nett earnings of said 
Company, there shall be a surplus remaining, there 
shall be paid out of said surplus semi-annual dividend 
not exceeding six per cent, per annum on all the old 
stock of said Company held by stockholders and re- 
maining unsurrendered ; and if there remain any surplus 
of said nett earnings after the payment of all the div- 
idends aforesaid, the same shall be equally divided 
among the stockholders upon all the stock of said Com- 
pany, new and old, share and share alike. 

Sec. 6. This act shall not lake effect until the same 
has been accepted by a vote of two-thirds in interest 
of the Stock. 



46 JUNE, 1851. 

An Act in relation to the Preebyterian Society in the 

Pettaquamscut Purchase. 

M is enacted by the General Assembly as foUows : 
Presbyte- The Presbyterian Society in the Pettaquamscut 
tMame^" Purchasc, incorporated October, A. D. 1820, shall here- 
"Col^*^ after be called and known by the name of the Oon- 
^tion«i„ gregaHonal Sodety in the Pettaquamscut Purchase, 
^ ^'^' and by that name shaU continue to possess and enjoy 
all the property, funds, and rights it now enjoys. Ev- 
ery oflficer of said society heretofore or hereafter legal- 
ly elected or appointed, shall hold his ofl&ce until some 
other person is elected or appointed in his place. 



An Act in amendment of an act incorporating the 

Willow Cemetery Company. 

M is enacted by the General Assembly as follows : 
Act incor- The 11th scctiou of the act incorporating the ^ Wil- 
S^rwXw low Cemetery Company" shall be so amended as to 
compaiSy extcud the time^within which the first meeting of 
amended, gaid Corporation shall be held, to thirty days from the 

rising of the General Assembly at its June session in 

1851. 



An Act in amendment of an act entitled " An Act to 
incorporate the Providence Boot and Shoe Manu- 
facturing Company." 

i? is enacted by the General Assembly asfoUows : 
Act incor- The eighth section of said Act is hereby so far 
KSlwIfnce amended as to authorize the first meeting of said Com- 
Ih^ Co. P^^y *^ ^® called at any time within sixty days from 
amended, and after the rising of the General Assembly at this 

session. 



An Act to incorporate " Washington Lodge No. 3, oi 
Free and Accepted Masons," in the town of Warren. 

B is enacted by the General Assembly as follows : 
Act incor- Section 1. Scth Pcck, Jamcs CoflHai, John Watson, 
tt^- Stephen Martin, William P. Eddy, WiUiam B. Snell, 
ton LoTge, Stephen Johnson, John F. Driscol, Nathan M. Whear 



JUNE, 1851. ^ 

ton, Paschal Allen, William Turner, Caleb Eddy, 
James Driscol, and such others as now are or may here- 
after be elected members of the Lodge and their suc- 
cessors, are hereby created a body, politic and corpo- 
rate, with perpetual succession, by the name of Wash- 
ingtm Ldge No, 3, of Free and Accepted Masons^ in 
the town of Warren ; and by that name shall be able 
and capable in law to sue and be sued ; plead and be 
impleaded ; to defend and be defended against in all 
courts, and before all proper judges and magistrates 
whomsoever ; to take, receive, possess, hold and re- 
tain to them, their successors and assigns, lands, tene- 
ments, goods, chatties, money, effects and property of 
whatever kind or nature, to an amount not exceeding 
twenty thousand dollars, whether obtained by gift^ 
grant, devise, bequej^t, purchase, voluntary subscrip- 
tion, contribution or otherwise, and the same to sell, 
grant, demise, convey and dispose of in such a manner 
as they may deem proper ; to make and have and use 
a common seal, and the same to break, alter and renew 
at pleasure ; and also at any of their meetings to enact 
or pass such rules and regulations and by-laws for the 
government of said Corporation or its officers, as they 
may think proper : Provided, the same shall not be 
repugnant to the laws of this State or of the United 
States. 

Sbc. 2. The said Corporation may elect at such times 
and in such manner and for such periods as may by 
their by-laws be prescribed, such officers as may be 
deemed necessary for the transaction of their business ; 
and any failure to elect officers at the time prescribed 
shall not be taken or considered a forfeiture of this act 
of incorporation ; and all officers chosen by said Corpo- 
ration shall hold their respective offices until others 
are chosen in their stead. 

Sec. 3. At all meetings of said Corporation for busi- 
ness, a &ir record of all its proceedings shall be made 
in a book kept by an officer chosen for that pm-pose, 
which book shall be at all times open to the inspection 
of any member of the Corporation. 

Sec. 4. The by-laws of the Corporation shall not be al- 
tered or amended, imless the amendment or alteration 
sbaU be proposed at a meeting previous to the one on 
which it shaQ be acted on, and not then unless by a 



48 JUNE, 1851. 

vote of two-thirds of the members present, after having 
been duly notified. 

Sec. 5. The first meeting of said Corporation shall 
be called by Seth Peck, at such time after the passage 
of this act, and at such place as shall be by him desig- 
nated. 



An Act in amendment of an Act dividing the town of 
Smithfield for the purpose of voting. 

M is enacted by the General Assemb^ asfoUows : 
iM fhl***" ^^® sixteenth section of the act to which this is in 
town of amendment, is hereby so far amended that the Town 
forihe pur- Couucil of Said towu of Smithficld may at any meeting 
^amend- thereof, uot morc than sixty days subsequent to their 
^ election, elect any of the officers which by the provi- 

sions of said act they are empowered to elect 



An Act in amendment of an Act for the better order- 
ing the Police of the town of Cumberland and a 
Bridewell to be erected therein. 

M 18 enacted hy the General Assembly as foUmvs : 

bSter^or-**^ SECTION 1. Any Justicc of the Peace in said town of 

dering the Cumberland, may at his discretion, impose a fine not 

the townof excccding five dollars, (to and for the use of said town,) 

Snd^^'a- together with costs of prosecution and conviction, upon 

mended, any pcrsou convicted before such Justice, if any of the 

offences set forth in the second section of the act of 

which this is an amendment, instead of sentencing such 

person to imprisonment as provided in the aforesaid 

Act, such person to stand committed until the fine and 

cost imposed be paid or until such person be legally 

discharged therefrom. 

Sec 2. Any constable in said town of Cumberland 
shall have power to arrest and take into custody 
(without a warrant) any person or persons whom they 
shall find within the limits of said town violating the 
laws of the State or the ordinances and regulations of 
the Town Coimcil for the government and regulation 
of the Police of the town. And it shall be their duty 
as soon as practicable after arrest of any such person 



JUNE, 1851. 49 

or persons, to bring him, her or tiiem before some 
Court having jurisdiction of the - offence, with which 
such person or persons are chargeable, for examination 
or trial 

Sec 3. So much of the sixth section of the Act 
to which this is on amendment as requires the com- 
plainant to give surety for costs, is hereby repealed. 



An Act in amendment of an Act entitled "An Act 
for the mending of Highways and Bridges." 

J? is enacted hy the General Assemhhj as follotvs : 
The seventh section of the Act to which this Act is in mending of 
amendment is so far amended that the several high- aJ^jJJHJL 
way surveyors in the town of Exeter, are hereby re- amended 
quired to make the returns required by said seventh 
section, to the assessors of taxes, on or before the first 
Monday of November next, after the assessment of 
said tax, instead of after the expiration of one year 
fix>m the assessment thereof, as provided by said sec- 
tion. 



Upon the petition of the "West Baptist Society of 
Providence," praying for a change of name : 

Voted and Resolved, That the prayer of said petition JJJf g^JJJ^ 
be granted, and that the name of said Society be and of Prpvi- 
is hereby changed to the "First Baptist Society in Olney- nam? 
ville," and that said society be and is hereby authorized "pSSbii^ 
to hold, receive, enjoy and transmit estates, and shall n^i^jj^?'' 
be entitled to all the privileges, and subject to all the 
liabilities that they would have been entitled and sub- 
ject to had their name not been changed. 



Voted and Resolvedy That no acts or proceedings of the Act to le- 
town of Newport, at their last annual town mee ting Shi*Jcterf 
for the choice of town officers, and for other purposes, Jj** ^^^ 
shall be deemed void and invalid, by reason of the p«rt. 
Moderator and Town Clerk elect having had the oath 
of office administered to them by the Moderator of the 
7 



50 JUNE, 1851. 

past year, a person not qualified by law to administer 
such oath ; but that the said engagements so adminis- 
tered and taken, shall have, to all intents and purposes, 
the same force and effect, as though the same had been 
administered by officers duly qualified by law fi)r that 
ProTiao. purpose : Provided^ however^ that this act shall not in 
any way affect any action or suit at law already com- 
menced and pending, which originated in the proceed- 
ings of the said town meeting. 



MMintld * Voted^ That all the petitions and memorials firom mem- 
to whom bers of the Narragansett Indian Tribe, now pending be- 
aiTilw peti- fore either House of the General Assembly, be referred 
memorial *^ * Committee, consisting of Messrs. Elisha R Potter, 
memb^ of ^^^P^ Gavitt and Benjamin B. Thurston, who shall 
the Narra- havc powcr to scud for pcrsous and papers and shall 
f^be.^^ examine into the subject matter of all the complaints 
referred to in said petitions or that may be brought 
before them, and report thereon to this General As- 
sembly. 



to*^c7re Resohed, That the Secretary of State be authorized 
RjBporte of and directed to procure three hundred copies of each 
Court. of the numbers of the Reports of the Supreme Court, 
published by the Reporter, Joseph K. Angell, and dis- 
tribute the same in the same manner as it was provi- 
ded the Reports of the present Reporter should be 
distributed by the resolution of the last session. 



An Act in amendment of an Act entitled " An Act 
regulating the confinement and discipline of the poor." 
It is enacted by the Oenercd Assembly cu follows : 

ktbiff^^ The Act to which this is in amendment, is hereby 

2J^jj»^ so far amended as to permit the confinement of Benjar 

difloipUno min Irish, an insane pauper, in the town of Ports- 

aniM^^' mouth, provided the same be done imder the direction 

of the Town Council of said town ; and that the said 

Irish shall not be confined for a longer period than 

thirty days at any one time. 



JUNE, 1861. 51 

Upon the petition of Bobin Giffi>rd, of little Comp- 
ton, praying for reamns therein stated, that he may be 
authorized and empowered to appeal from a decree 
of the Court of Probate, of the town of Little Comp- 
ton, approving of the last Will and Testament of Abi- 
gail Irish, late of said Little Compton, deceased : 

Voted and Hesolved, That the prayer of said petition be fo^*Sb^ 
granted, and that the said Robin Gifford be and he is «> appeal 
hereby authorized and empowered to appeal from said 
decree of said Court of Probate, with the like effect as 
if he had appealed therefrom within forty days from 
the rendition of the sidd decree by said Court of Pro- 
bate : Provided, Junoever, Ihat the said Eobin Gifford Proriio. 
shall give bond with surety satisfactory to the clerk of 
the Court of Probate for the town of Little Compton, 
in the sum of one hundred dollars, conditioned to pay 
to the executor of said Will of said Abigail Irish all 
costs which may accrue to him in the defending against 
said appeal, and the costs accruing to him in appear- 
ing before this General Assembly, in case such should 
be the final judgment of the Court, and shall also file 
his reasons of appeal in the office of the Clerk of the 
Supreme Court for the county of Newport, within 
thirty days after the rising of this General Assembly, 
at the present session, and shall enter his said appeal 
at the next August term of the Supreme Court, with- 
in and for said coimty. 



Upon the petition of Nehemiah Dodge, of Provi- 
dence, guardian of the persons and estate of Emily C, 
Johnson and Edward C. Johnson, minor children of 
Edward S- Johnson, late of Providence, deceased, pray- 
ing that an act may be passed authorizing the invest- 
ment of the proceeds of the sales of certain real estate, 
belonging to said minors, in other real estate, or in 
mortgages of real estate, or in bank or other safe 
stocks ! 

Voted and Resolved, That the prayer of said petition ^^^ 
be and the same is hereby granted — and the said Ne- gJJ™JJ 
hemiah Dodge, or his successor or successors in said ca- iveiu 
pacity, is and are hereby authorized under the advice 
and direction of the Mimicipal Court of the city of 
Piovidencey to invest any sum of money which is or 



52 JUNE, 1851. 

may be in his or their possession^ belonging to ihe said 
minors, either in real estate in this State or in mort* 
gages of real estate in this State, or in the capital stock 
of one or more of the incorporated Banks in this State ; 
and he and they are also authorized under the like ad- 
vice and direction, from time to time as occasion may 
require, to change the investment of said property, and 
reinvest in some one or more of the above named 
kinds of property. 
PioTiao. Provided^ Iiowevery That in case of the decease of the 
said minors, or of either of them intestate, the said pro- 
ceeds of the sale of their real estate, or the investment 
thereof, shall descend to their heirs at law in the same 
manner as the said real estate would have done 
had they continued to be the owners and died seized 
thereof 



Upon the petition of Thomas McCann, a native of 
Ireland, now resident in Newport, setting forth that 
on the 27th day of August, A. D. 1860, one Barney 
McGowan, an alien, purchased of Clark H. Burdick, 
a certain lot of land, situated in said Newport, bound- 
ed as follows : North on Holland street forty-two feet, 
East on land of Daniel McGowan seventy-two feet, 
South on land of William D. Deblois forty-two feet and 
West on land of George Burkinshaw seventy-two feet, 
which lot of land the said Barney McGowan after- 
wards, to wit, on the 9th day of June, 1851, conveyed 
by and to Thomas McCann, and praying that purchase 
of said land and the subsequent sale thereof by said 
McGowan may be confirmed by this Assembly, and 
that the said Thomas McCann may be authorized and 
empowered to hold, enjoy, transmit and convey said 
lot of land : 
Thomas Voted and Resolved, That the prayer of said petition 

authorSed bo and the same is hereby granted, that the purchase 
State? '^ ^^ ^^ aforedescribed lot of land by Barney McGowan 
and the subsequent sale thereof to Thomas McCann 
be and the same is hereby confirmed to be as good and 
valid as though said Barney McGowan had been a na- 
tive born citizen of this State, and that the said Tho- 
mas McCann be authorized and empowered to hold, 
enjoy, convey and devise or otherwise dispose of and 



JUNE, 1861. 53 

transmit the real estate above described in the same 
maimer and with the same effect, as if he were a native 
bom citizen of this State, and in case of his death, 
leaving a widow, she may in like manner be endowed 
thereof 

Prmded^ however ^ that nothing in this act be constru- ^"*^**'- 
ed as eonfering on the said Thomas McCann the pri- 
Tilege of a freeman of this State, until he shall be 
duly naturalized and made a citizen of the United 
States according to the laws thereof 



Upon the petition of Hugh Treanor, of Providence, 
a native of Ireland, praying for reasons therein stated, 
that he may be autiiorized to hold and transmit cer- 
tain real estate situate in said Providence : 

VUed and Jtesolvedy That the prayer of said petition ^'Jf*(S^ 
be, and the same is hereby granted, and the said Hugh orf^'o*' 
Treanor is hereby authorized to hold, enjoy, mortgage, hoWand 
convey and devise, or in any other way dispose of and rS?'e8iate. 
transmit a certain lot of land with the buildings and 
improvements thereon, situated on the Northerly side 
of Wickenden street in the city of Providence, and 
bounded and described as follows : — Southerly on said 
Wickenden street, on which, it measures sixteen feet, 
eight inches ; Easterly on land of the late Gilbert Sea- 
mans, on which it measures seventy feet ; Northerly 
on land of Capt John Haradon, on which it measures 
eighteen feet ; and Westerly on land of William Barnes, 
on which it measures seventy feet, being the same lot 
purchased by said Treanor of William Barnes ; — ^in the 
same manner and with the same effect as if he were a 
native bom citizen of this State ; and in case of the 
decease of said Hugh Treanor leaving a widow, that 
die may be endowed thereof. 



Upon the petition of Charles Holden, Jr., of Provi- 
dence, Administrator with the Will annexed, upon the 
estate of Robert Currie, late of said Providence, de- 
ceased, praying for certain reasons therein stated, that 
he may be authorized to sell all the right, title and in- 



54 JUNE, 1851. 

terest whereof the said Robert Currie died seised, in 
and to the following described lot of land, with the 
buildings and improvements thereon, to wit, a lot of 
land situate in said Providence, on the East side of 
North Main street, and bounded as follows: — ^beginning 
at the Southwest comer of said lot at a point on the 
East line of North Main street, thirty feet Southerly 
firom Short Alley [so called,] thence Northerly on the 
said East line of North Main street to Short Alley 
aforenamed, thence Easterly on the South line of Short 
Alley to Benefit street, thence Southerly on the West 
line of Benefit street, thirty feet, thence Westerly in 
a straight line to the centre of a well, one half of which 
is on said lot of land, thence in a straight Une to the 
first mentioned comer: 

chwiee Voted and Resolved, That the prayer thereof be and 

adminifitra- the samc is hereby granted, and the said Charles Hol- 
^ to^Jeij. d^^j Jr., is hereby authorized and empowered in his 
said capacity to sell either at public or private sale, un- 
der the advice and direction of the Municipal Court 
of the city of Providence, all the right, title and inte^ 
est which said Robert Currie had at the time of his 
death, in and to said real estate ; and a deed or deeds 
made and executed by him, the said Administrator, 
shall vest in the purchaser or purchasers thereof, as 
good and perfect title thereto, as if said Robert Currie 
were in full life, and should execute the same : Pro- 
^*"^^«*- tided, the said Charles Holden, Jr., shall first give bond 
with surety satisfactory to said Court, conditioned that 
so much of the proceeds of the sale of said land as shall 
remain after payment of the expenses of settlement of 
said estate, and of the debts due therefrom, and of the 
allowance made by said Court to the widow of said 
Robert Currie, shall be invested by said Administrator 
in bank stock under the direction of said Court, for the 
benefit of those persons to whom the estate of said 
Robert Currie belongs. 



Upon the petition of Charles C. Rhodes, Administra- 
tor on the estate of Mary T. Rhodes, late of North 
Providence, deceased, praying for leave to sell so much 



JUNE, 1851. 55 

of the Teal estate of said deceased as will pay the debts 
against the same : 

Voted and Resolredj That the prayer of said petition be Rh^^^ad- 
granted, and that the said Charles C. Rhodes is hereby jJJJSl'JJJ^^' 
antiiorized and empowered in his said capacity to sell to seu. 
80 much of said real estate as will pay the just debts of 
the said Mary T. Rhodes, with incidental charges, at 
pnrate or public sale, under the advice and direction 
of the Court of Probate of said North Providence, first 
had and obtained ; and that a deed or deeds thereof 
by him duly executed, shall vest in the purchaser or 
purchasers, their heirs and assigns, a good and valid 
title in fee simple : Pravidedy also, that he first give bond Proriso. 
to said Court of Probate, with satisfactory surety, con- 
ditioned to apply the proceeds of said sale of said pro- 
perty to the payment of the debts of said deceased, 
and to account to said Court for the proceeds of said 
sale. 



Upon the petition of George S. Wilcox, of Stonington, 
in the State of Connecticut, a prisoner in the State's jail 
in South Kingstown, in the County of Washington, on 
execution for debt at the suit of Edwin R Brown, of the 
State of Ohio, prajdng for reasons therein stated that 
he may be discharged from the commitment on said 
execution : 

Voted and Resolvedy That the prayer of said petition ^l^^ ^' 
be and the same is hereby granted, and that the sheriff stay of eze- 
of said County be hereby directed to discharge the said ^^ 
George S. Wilcox from jail, upon his giving bond to the 
plaintiff in said execution, with sureties to the satisfac- 
tion of said sheriff, to prefer a petition for a new trial 
in the action in which said execution was issued, at 
the next August term of the Supreme Court for the 
County of Washington, and to return to jail, within 
ten days after the rising of said Court, at any term 
thereof at which said petition shall be disposed of, if 
the same shall not be granted :' Provided^ the said Su- Provtao. 
preme Court shall have power and authority to issue 
execution on any judgment which may be hereafter 
rendered in favor of said Edwin R Brown against the 
said George S. Wilcox in said action, notwithstanding 
the granting of this petition. 



56 JUNE, 1851. 

Upon the petition of Peleg S. Tefil, of Westerly, 
praying for reasons therein stated that he may be 
authorized to release the right of dower of his wife 
Mary Tefft [now insane] in a certain tract of land situ- 
ated in said Westerly, containing about six acres, bound- 
ed South and East on the highway leading from Faw- 
catuck village to Hopkinton, and North and West by 
land of Nathan F. Dixon : 

Tefff E'ave Voted and Resolved^ That the prayer of said petition be 

to release and the Same is hereby granted, and the said Peleg S. 

MaryTem. Teflft be and he hereby is authorized and empowered 
to release and convey the right of dower and all the 
interest which his said wife Mary Tefil has in said de- 
scribed traet of land, and a deed or deeds by him exe- 
cuted shall be as good and effectual to release and 
transfer the interest of his said wife, as if the same 
were executed by her when of sound mind. 

Proviflo. Provided, The proceeds of the sale of said tract of 
land shall be again invested in real estate in said vil- 
lage of Pawcatuck, under the direction of the Court 
of Probate of the town of Westerly. 



j.H. ciegg Upon the petition of John H. Clegg, praying for cer- 
costa re- tain rcasons therein stated, for the remission of fine 
^^^^^' and costs paid by him : Voted, that the prayer there- 
of be granted in relation to the fine, and that the Gen- 
eral Treasurer be authorized and directed to pay to 
said John H. Clegg the sum of twenty-five dollars. 



Upon the petition of Mary Barrowscale, a convict, 

confined in jail in the county of Providence, praying 

for liberation : 

Maiy Bar- Voted and Resolved, That the prayer of said petition be 

Sn^ct^ii- fti^d the same is hereby granted, and the keeper of said 

bemted. jaij ig hereby directed to discharge her. accordingly 

forthwith. 



Upon the petition of Phoebe Capron, praying for 
reasons therein stated, that her son. Wanton W. Car 
pron be discharged from imprisonment, it is 



JUNE, 1851. 57 

Voted and Besolvedj That the prayer of said petition ca'^n"^' 
be and the same is hereby granted, so far as that the convicCub- 
said Wanton W. Capron be discharged from imprison- *^™^^' 
ment, and the Avarden of the State's prison is hereby 
directed to diBcharge said Capron forthwith. 



Upon the petition of Margaret Burrows, praying for 
remission of costs taxed against her minor son, Edwin 
Burrows, a convict confined in jail in the county of 
Newport, and for his liberation : 

Voted and Resolved, That the prayer of said petition fidwin 
be granted, and that said costs be remitted to said Ed- convtrglb- 
win Burrows, and that he be forthwith liberated from *"*®^ 
his confinement, and the keeper of said jail is hereby 
directed to discharge him forthwith accordingly. 



Upon the petition of John Patterson, of Johnston, 
setting forth that on the eighth day of May, 1850, he 
was convicted before William A. Pierce, of Johnston, a 
Justice of the Peace, of two violations of the license 
laws of this State, and sentenced to pay a fine of twen- 
ty dollars and costs on each, and praying that said fines 
and costs may be remitted, and that he may be re- 
leased from jail : 

Voted and Resolved, That the prayer of said petition ^^iSnTwi- 
be and the same is hereby granted, and that said fine vict, Ubem- 
and costs, so far as they accrue to the State, be and the 
same are hereby remitted to the said John Patterson, 
and the keeper of the Providence county jail is hereby 
directed to discharge the said John Patterson from im- 
prisonment forthwith, on payment of that portion of 
the fine due to the complainant. 



Upon the petition of Patrick and Mary Farrell, pray- 
ing for the liberation and discharge of James Parrell, 
convict No. 129 in the State's prison : 

Voted and Resolved, That the prayer of said petition ^msBFwt- 
be and the same is hereby granted, and the warden of wct, ubm- 
of said prison is hereby directed to discharge the said ^" 
James Farrell accordingly forthwith 
8 



1 



58 JUNE; 1851. 

Upon the petition of Ellen Conroy, a convict in 
the State's jail, in Providence County, praying for 
liberation : 
Ellen Con- Voted and Resolvedy That the prayer of said petition 
¥ict, ubera- be granted ; that the unexpired portion of the terra of 
*®^' imprisonment to which said Ellen was sentenced, to- 

gether with the costs of prosecution and conviction, 
be and the same are hereby remitted ; and the keeper 
of said jail is directed to discharge her accordingly 
forthwith. 



Upon the petition of Peter Cox, confined in the 

jail, in the City and County of Providence, praying 

for liberation : 
^^''▼icL^*' Fo^^rf and Besolvedy That the prayer of said petition 
liberated, be and the same is hereby granted, and the keeper of 

the jail in said County, is hereby directed to discharge 

Peter Cox forthwith. 



Upon the petition of Richard Montgomery, praying 
for reasons therein stated to be discharged from im- 
prisonment : 
R. MoHt- Voted and Resolved, That the prayer of said petition be 
gomery, and the same is hereby so far granted, that said Rich- 

convict. <« •/ o •' 

Uberated. ard Montgomery be discharged from imprisonment 
upon his paying all costs of prosecution and conviction, 
and the Jailor of Providence County jail, is hereby 
directed to discharge said Montgomery from imprison- 
ment forthwith, upon payment of said cost& 



Upon the petition of Amasa Yeaw, praying for the 

liberation of Charles Johnson, convict No. 135, in 

the State's prison : 
rfuiiiioyu. Voted and Resolved, That the prayer of said petition be 
convict, ' and the same is hereby granted, and the warden of 

the State's prison is hereby directed to discharge 

Charles Johnson forthwith. 



Charles 
Johnsoa, 



Upon the petition of the Pawtuxet Turnpike cor- 
poration by Horatio Baesett, their Treasurer, praying 



JUNE, 185L 59 

for a repeal of so much of the act of January Session, 
1841, as is inconsistent with the charter of said compa- 
ny, and that the present location of the toll gate on 
said turn-pike be legalized : 

Voted ondResolved. That the prayer of said petition be L«»tionaf 
and the same is hereby granted/and so much of the ^i'wC.f 
Act of 1841 as is inconsistent with the charter of said i^|3Sl!i 
company, is hereby repealed, and the toll gate of said 
company is hereby le^ized in its present position. 



Resolution — ^That Jesse Babcock be a committee to ^^^ "^ 
cause a bam to be erected on the State's jail lot, in bam and 
Kingston, Washington County, and a fence or bank vX San^ 
wall to be made around a portion of said lot, and that *^' 
he be authorized to draw on the General Treasurer for 
the expenses thereof, not exceeding two hundred and 
fifty dollars. 



RESOLunoN-That HezekiahC.Wardwellbeaeommittee JiJUf'S'^ 
to cause repairs to be made within the jail in the Coun- pair the jaii 
ty of Bristol, and on the fences, walls, and outbuildings county of 
thereof — and that said committee be authorized to '^'^"'^^" 
dra^v- on the General Treasurer for tlie amount of the 
expenses thereof: Provided^ the same do not exceed 
the sum of one hundred and fifty dollars. 



Resolution — That the Secretary cause a sufiBcient f^^^^^ 
number of copies of the School Act passed at this ses- school Act 
sion to be printed with suitable notes, forms, and in- "^"^ 
dex — and that the bill therefor, when approved by the 
Governor, be paid out of the General Treasury. 



Resolution — ^That the Supreme Court be and they cSSrt"**- 
are hereby authorized to continue Ann Sullivan at the thoHzed to 
Sutler Asylum where she now is, for so long a period Ann Sum- 
as they shall in their discretion deem proper for the S^j^j^] 
purpo0e6 of justice, at the expense of the State. 



60 JUNE, 1851. 

_ • 

^?^ for- Absolution — ^That his Excellency ike Governor be 
Dishing the and he is hereby authorized to draw on ihe General 
thesecreta- Treasurer for an amount not exceeding three hundred 
ry of State. (joUars, to defray the expenses of furnishing the OflBce 
of the Secretary of State, in the State House in Provi- 
dence, and for coUectmg and arranging the papers in 
said office. 



Upon the petition of Samuel B. Swan and others, 
praying for an act to incorporate the "Bhod^ Island 
Union Butt Company :" 

iw"n*eiS' ^^^^^ ^^^ Eesolvedy that the said petition be con- 
fer act of ' tinned to the next May Session of the General Assem- 
t?o^,'SJ^ bly, and that notice of the pendency thereof be given 
^erornl^ ^^7 publishing a copy of said petition, and of this vote, 
tice. in the Bristol Phenix, for three successive weeks next 

after the rising of the General Assembly at its present 

session. 



Upon the petition of the City Council of Providence 

praying for a revocation of the authority given by a 

resolution of the General Assembly to the Providence 

and Worcester Rail Road Company to Incomplete the 

location of their Rail Road in said city : 

city Conn- Voted mid Resolved^ that said petition be continued 

Tidence,"' to the next session of th£ General Assembly, and that 

S>n"f°?S- ^^ petitioners give notice of the pendency thereof by 

thorityjfiv. serving upon the President of said Rail Road Compar 

cntoWor- xi. i. j i? •- x«i« -^i • xi • . i^ 

cester Rail- uy au attested copy oi saia petition within thirty dajrs 
S'uidw^iih after the rising of this General Assembly, and that 
orferof no- g^id Rail Road Company is hereby enjoined not to lo- 
cate their Rail Road on any Public Land in said city 
until the rising of the said Assembly at its said next 
session. 



Upon the petition of John Graves, praying for rea- 
jhn sons therein stated, to have a case reinstated upon the 
liberty to dockct of the Supreme Court : 

wS^con- V^i^^ «^^ Resolved, That said petition be continued 
^"IJlrfn^ *^ ^^^ ^®^* session of the General Assembly, and that 
tice. in the mean time the petitioner give notice of the pen- 



JUNE, 1851. 61 

dency thereof by serving a copy of said petition and 
ibis Tote upon Nathan B. Sarle and George Sarle, at 
least thirty days before said next session^ and that he 
give bond aiccording to law. 



Upon the petition of George Fairbanks vs. Benoni 
Cahoone, for leave to appeal : 

Votedy That said petition be continued to the next SSis,^ for 
session of this General Assembly, and that in the mean leave t»ap- 
time the petitioner give notice to the respondent of the Snued^'th 
pendency thereof, by serving him with an attested ^uce?^ 
copy thereof ten days before said next session. 



Upon the petition of Lyman Hawes, praying for the 
passage of an act giving him a right of an appeal, 
agreeably to the law provided, from a certain decision 
of the commissioners appointed to assess the damages 
of the laying out over his land of the Providence and 
Worcester Railroad : 

Voted and Resohed^ That said petition be contin- ^,{^7^ 
ned to the next session of the General Assembly, and appeai,con- 
that the petitioner lodge in the Secretary's Office his orferorno- 
bond to the said Providence and Worcester Railroad *^*^- 
Company, in manner and form provided by statute in 
case of such appeals, and shall also ten days at least 
before such session serve the said Providence and Wor- 
cester Railroad Company with a copy of said petition, 
and cite said Company to appear and answer the 
same. 



Upon the petition of Mary McGovem vs. William 
J. Holden^ for new trial, the death of said Holden be- 
ing suggested : 

Foferf, That said petition be continued to the Octo- GoIJm for 
ber Session of this General Assembly, and that notice "^^jj^^^^^j 
be served on the Administrator of said Holden, at least wuh order 
three weeks before said session, by serving him with a °^ °°*^^*" 
certified copy of said petition. 



62 JUNE, 1851. 

Upon the petition of Arnold Weaver, praying, for 

reasons therein stated, that a report of commissionerfi 

appointed to make partition of a lot between him and 

Nicholas S. Fry may be set aside, and that a new trial 

be granted to said petitioner : 

atdou Voted and Revived. That said petition be continued 

new trial, to the next session of the General Assembly, and that 

with"^oMer ^^ petitioner cause a copy of said petition and this 

of nouce. yote to be served upon said Nicholas S. Fry, and upon 

Ebenezer Slocum, Thomas R Tilley, James S. Tilley 

and William R Tilley, at least thirty days before the 

next session of this Assembly, and that he give bond 

according to law. 

Upon the petition of Isaac Dennis, of Smithfield, 
praying for certain reasons therein stated, that he may 
be admitted to take the poor debtor's oath : 
laaac Den- Voted and Besolved^ That said petition be continued 
fotokepoor to the October Session of this General Assembly, and 
Mthl^'^con. *l^^t ^^^ petitioner cause notice of the pendency of 
tinued with gaid petition to be riven to the said Nathan C. Jenkes 

orderofno- *, . ., ..*? . . , . . . n 

tice. named m said petition, by serving nun with a copy oi 
said petition and this order, for at least thirty days 
before said next session of this General Assembly, and 
that all proceedings on the judgment described in 
said petition be and are hereby stayed until after the 
rising of this General Assembly at their said October 

ProviBo. Session : Provided^ that said Dennis shall not in the 
mean time make an assignment of his property. 



Upon the petition of Hartford B. Billings, for 
remission of jury fine : Voted, That said petition be 
continued, and that execution be stayed until the next 
October Session of this General Assembly. 



Accounts Voted and Resolved, That the following sums be al- 
auowed, iQ^ed and paid out of the General Treasury to the fol- 
lowing named persons : 

Horatio N. Patt - - . ^1316 

Cpurt of Magistrates - - 294 46 

Horatio N. Patt - - -1150 



JUNE, 185L . 




Henry Taggart 


20 80 


George L. Dana 


166 


Silas Battey 


140 


Michael Freeborn & Co. 


115 


John H. Weeden 


550 


Providence Reform School 


- 244 80 


Shubael HutchinH 


2 00 


Nathan Bardin 


280 


£sther Champlin 


68 


£^kAldrich 


2 00 


Amasa Breck 


8 75 


Charles Ackerman 


30O 


Earl P. Mason & Co. 


25 28 


Pierce, Salisbury & Co. 


161 86 


John Harris 


3 95 


Horatio N. Patt 


7 80 


Beniamin T. Eames 

9^ 


9 00 


Thomas Wilcox 


46 50 


Wflliam Brownell 


33 84 


Nathan Bardin 


5 06 


Edward lillibridge 


7 36 


Moses Sherman 


68 


Elizabeth Sherman 


68 


Oliver Sherman 


148 


Cato Gardner 


68 


Benjamin Gardner - 


68 


Edwin Reynolds 


68 


William Palmer 


2 88 


William Champlin 


68 


James P. Arnold 


68 


R B. Sherman 


112 


Benjamin Hall 


6 95 


Asa Jaqnes 


104 


Jeremit^ S. Sherman 


8 75 


John Harris 


2 54 


Charles Ackerman - 


5 00 


John S. Pearce 


160 


J(An Harris 


170 


Bennett J. Munro 


6 00 


Jabez C.Potter 


65 60 


J. V. Turner & Son 


7 73 


JohnH. Watson 


6 83 


Daniel C. Denham 


3 25 


Boberi Seatle 


7 85 



63 



64 JUNE, 1851. 

Daniel C. Denham 

Olney Arnold 

Henry Oman 

Mathew C. Card 

John S. Pearce 

Horace M, Pierce 

Benjamin Cottrell 

Seth W. Macy 

Joseph Knowles 

Joseph Knowles 

John Stanton 

Gorton Berry 

Sayles & Miller 

B. B. Thurston 

Nancy McLellan 

Patrick Manning 

Edward H. Tew 

Joseph Spicer 

Thomas Bateman 

Sayles & Miller 

William Bodfish 

Meeson & Pratt 

Thomas Bateman 

Benjamin Brown 

J. B. Eathbun 

John C. Card 

W. J. Roberts 

George Linden 

James Smith 

Albert Hewit 

James Lawton 

H. Y. Cranston and T. R Hunter 

Benjamin P. Thurston 

Wingate Hayes 

Thomas Durfee, 

Otis Wilbor 



2 50 


8 00 


7134 


2 40 


45 81 


12 70 


6 00 


17 25 


38 00 


117 50 


45 00 


4 24 


45 70 


4 48 


10 00 


175 


2 20 


4 48 


2100 


15 GO 


7 25 


8 00 


29 79 


6 00 


9 00 


600 


12 70 


900 


100 


6 00 


500 


48 00 


24 00 


24 00 


24 00 


100 



$1,618 46 



JUNE, 1851. «6 

Vcled <md Hesolvedy That all business pending before 
this General A^embly, unfinished, be referred to the 
next session ; that the Secretary of State cause the 
acts and orders passed at this session to be published 
^th a suitable index, and distributed according to law, 
and that this Assembly be and the same is hereby ad- 
jouned to meet at the time and place appointed by 
lair. 



The Reports of the Committee on Bribery, received 
and ordered to be placed on file in the Secretary's Of* 
fice. 



STATE OP RHODE ISLAND, &c. 



Secbetabt op State's Office, ) 
Jufy 10, 1851. J 

I certify that the acts, resolves, rolls and retur 
published in this pamphlet, are true copies of the c 
ginals, deposited in this offioe. 

ASA POTTER, 
Secretary cf State. 



9 



APPENDIX. 



BOLL OF THE MEMBERS OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 
At the General Assembly of the State of Rhode Island 
and Providence Plantations^ begun and holden by ad« 
jonniment at Newport, on the third Monday of June, 
(16th) in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hund- 
red and fifty-one, and of Independence the seventy-fiflh: 

PRESENT : 

His Excellency PHILIP ALLEN, Governor. 
His Honor WILLIAM BEACH LAWRENCE, Lieut 
Governor. 

SENATORS. 

SETH W. MACY. 
ALBERT C. GREENE. 
JOHN MANCHESTER 



Newport, 

Providence, 

Portsmouth, 

Warwick, 

Westerly, 

New Shoreham, 

North Kingstown, 

South Elingstown, 

East Greenwich, 

Jamestown, 

Smithfield, 

Scituate, 

Glocester, 

Charlestown, 

West Greenwich, 

Coventry, 

Exeter, 

Middletown, 

Bristol, 

Tiverton, 

little Compton, 

Warren, 

Cumberland, 

Richmond, 

Cranston, 

Hopkinton, 

Johnston, 

North Providence, 

Barrington, 

Foster, 

Burrillville, 



STEPHEN WILCOX. 
WILLIAM P. BALL. 
JOSEPH SPINK. 
HAZARD KNOWLES. 
NICHOLAS S. FRY. 
ANDREW F. POTTER 
GIDEON BRADFORD. 
PARDON ANGELL. 
THOMAS BARNES. 
JOSEPH H. CROSS. 
THOMAS T. HAZARD. 
CHRISTO'R A. WHITMAN. 
ISAAC GREENE. 
NATHANIEL GREENE. 

WILLLAM C. CHAPIN. 
NATHANIEL CHURCtt 
HAILE COLLINS, 
ARIEL BALLOU. 
JAMES G. SISSOK 

JOHN S. CHAMPLIN. 
ALFRED ANTHONY, 
CALEB V. WATERMAN, 
ALLEN BICKNELL, 
JONATHAN HILL, 2d. 
LYMAN HAWKES. 



THE SECRETARY. 
Benjamin F. Thurston, Esq., Clerk. 



68 



REPRESENTATIVES. 



Newport. 

Henry T. Cranston, 
Joseph Anthony, 
Joseph B. Weaver, 
Benjamm Finch, 
Thomas R Hunter. 

Promdence. 
Leonard Blodget, 
Stephen T. Olney, 
William H. Potter, 
Henry Anthony, 
Allen C. Mathewson, 
James T. Rhodes, 
George S. Rathbone, 
Amos C. Barstow, 
Daniel E. Carpenter, 
Samuel Currey, 
Thomas J. Stead, 

Christopher C. Potter. 

Portsmouth. 
Borden Chace. 

Warwick. 
Pardon Spencer, 
Simon H. Green, 
William D. Brayton, 
Bandall Holden. 

Westerly. 
Nathan F. Dixon. 

New Shoreham. 
Simeon Babcock. 

North Kingstown. 
James Eldred, 
Thomas G. Allen, Jr. 

South Kingstown. 

George L. Hazard, 
Sylvester Robinson. 

Etist Greenwich. 

George J. Adams. 

Jamestown. 

Benjamin Cottrell. 

Smithfidd. 
Thomas Bufium, 
Daniel Pierce, 
John Fenner, 



Earl A. Wright, 
James Phetteplace, 
Israel B. Purinton. 

SdtucUe. 
William A. Roberts, 
Sheldon Fiske. 

Glocester. 
George H. Browne, 
Jonathan A. Tourtellot 

Charlestown. 

Joseph Gavitt. 

West Greenwich. 

Nathan Can*. 

Coventry. 
David S. Harris, 

Levi Johnson. 

Exeter. 
Daniel L. Money. 

Middletofwn. 
George L Bailey. 

BristoL 

Hezekiah C. WardwelL 

Tiverton. 

William P. Sheffield, 
Joseph Osborne, 
Nathaniel B. Durfee. 

Little Compton. 

OUver C. Brownell. 

Wccrren. 

Alfred Bosworth, 

Thomas G. Turner. 

Cumberland. 

Fenner Brown, 

George L. Dana. 

Olney Arnold, 

Mowry Taft. 

Richmond. 

Daniel Kenyon. 

Cranston. 

Charles Goodwin, 

Almoran Harris. 

Hopkintcn. 

Welcome Collins. 



JUNi; 1851. 



69 



Mmston, 
Granyille S. Williams, 
Alpherus F. AngelL 

Ncrth Pratidenee. 
Thomas Davis, 
Zelotes Wetherell, 
Edwin Harris^ 
Joseph B. Stone. 



Barringim^ 
Pardon Clarke. 

Faster. 
George K Hopkins. 

BurriUvitte. 
Elisha Mathewson, 
Silas A. Comstock. 



Hon Alfred Bosworth, of Warren, Speaker. 
WiNGATE Hates and Thohas Durfse, Esqrs., Clerks. 



justice of the peace. 

Samuel B. Vernon, Providence— elected at the 
Maj Session^ and name not enrolled. 



justices of the peace 



Elected by the Towns, not 

North Kingstowru 
Francis Chappell, 
Isaac C. Champlin, 
Sylvester G. Sherman^ 
Benjamin T. Clarke, 
William F. Noy es, 
Daniel G. Allen, 

William N. Sherman. 

Tiverton. 
William G. Borden, 
Frederic A. Boomer, 
Clark Estes, 
William P. Bateman, 
Arnold Smith, 

David D. Gray. 

Charlestown. 
Samuel Stanton, 
Joseph H Griffin, 
Joseph E. Baggs. 

Richmond. 

Nathan Moore, 
Haszard Wilcox, 
Beynolds James, 
Job Hoxsie, 



appearing in the May Schedule. 

Nathan Kinyon, 
Moses B. James. 

Portsmouth. 
Borden Chace, 
George Manchester. 
Little Compton. 
Otis Wilbor, 
Alexander R. Brownell, 
Ephraim W. Brownell. 

Foster. 

William G. Stone, 
Eddy Walker, 
Richard Howard, 
George Walker, 

Ira Winsor. 

Exeter. 
Isaac Greene, 
Thomas Lewis, 
Waterman Franklin, 
Schuyler Fisher, 
James S. Moore. 

Warren. 
Alfred Bosworth, 
Samuel Randall, 



70 



JUNE, 1851. 



Joseph Child, 
Seth Peck. 

Barrington. 

Henry Smith. 

Middletown. 

George C. Coggeshall, 
Samuel Gould, 
George H. Peckham, 



John Gould, 

Henry E. Palmer. 

Bristol. 
William C. Van Doom, 
Bennet J. Munro, 
David Cole, 
Peter Gladding, 
George B. Munro. 



RETURNS OF OFHCERS OF INDEPENDENT AND REGIMENTAL 

OOMPANIES. 

The following retiums of oflScers elected by indepen- 
dent companies, were made to the Governor and Senate 
and approved: 

Christopher G. Perry, captain, 
George Burroughs, Ist lieutenant, 
Thomas B. Carr, 2d lieutenant, 
James Barton, ensign, 

Christopher Blanding, colonel, 
James N. Hopkins, lieut. colonel, 
Thomas Greene, major, 
John Viall, captain, 
Martin S. Budlong, lieutenant, 

Massadore T. Bennett, captain, 
Joseph C. Pearce, 1st lieutenant, 
Samuel Taylor, Jun., 2d lieutenant, 
James Coggeshall, ensign, 
Charles A. Creene, quartermaster, J 



Of the Artillery 

Company 

of the town of 

Newport 

Of the 
Providence Artil- 
lery. 



Of the Train of 
Artillery in the 
town of Bristol 



The following returns of officers elected by regimen- 
tal companies, were made to the Grovemor and Senate 
and approved : 

William Bodfish, colonel, • 
Stukely Underwood, lieut colonel, 
James Capron, major, 

William H. Potter, colonel, 
Albert S. Gallup, Ueut colonel, 
William Goddard, major, 
Nathaniel Fairbrother, captain, 
Boyal C. Taft, lieutenant^ 



Of the Kentish 
Guarda 



Of the Provi- 
dence Horse 
Guards. 



JUNE, 1851. 



71 



William W. Brown, colonel, 
John T. Pitman, lieut. colonel, 
Nathaniel W. Brown, major, 
Syhester R Knight, captain, 
Henry Richardson, lieutenant, 

Obey Arnold, colonel, 

Moees E. Holbrook, lieut. colonel, 

John Lynch, major, 

Filliam Lindsay, captain, 

finel P. Smith, Ueutenant, 

Joseph P. Balch, colonel, 
Charles T. Bobbins, Heut. colonel, 
George L. Andrews, niajor, 
William Sprague, 2d captaon. 
Dyer C. Potter, lieutenant, 

Samuel Pearce, colonel, 
William Carr, lieutenant colonel, 
John Frieze, major, 
George Williams, captain, 
William P. Freeborn, Ist lieutenant, 
Alfred Barton, Jr., 2d lieutenant, 



] 



Of First Light In- 

fantry Company 

Providence. 



Of the 

Woonsocket 

Guarda 



Of the Providence 

Marine Corps 

of Artillery. 



Of the Warren 
Artillery, 



INDEX. 



Acoounts allowed ... 62-Ci 

Adjoumment, vote of - - - 67 

Bank^ Hamilton resolution relating to - - 30 

Rail Road, charter of amended - - §^' 

Pascoag, charter of, amended : - - 3^ 

of Commerce, charter of, amended - - 32[ 

Arrowscale Mary, convict liberated - - 56 

Bam and wall appropriation for, on jail lot, Wash- c 

ingtou County - - - 69 

Boot and Shoe Co. Providence, act incorporating amended 46 

Burrows Edwin, convict liberated - - 57 

Bridges and Highways, act for the mending of,amended 49 

Oapron Wanton W., convict liberated - - 57 

City Council of Providence, for revocation of authority 

given to Worcester Rail Road - - 60 

• Civil Offic3rs, act to regulate the election of, amended 25-28 

Clegg J. H., fine and costs remitted - - 56 
Committee appointed to hear petitions and memorials 

from the Narragansett Tribe - - 50 
Congregational Society, name changed to, from Presby- 
terian, in the Pettaquamscut Purchase, 46 
Conroy Ellen, convict liberated - - 58 
Courts, times of sitting in Kent and Newport changed 29 
Court of Justices in town of Bristol - - 30 
Cox Peter, convict liberated - - 58 
Cumberland, act for the better ordering the Police of the 

Town of, amended - - - 48 

Dennis Isaac, for leave to take poor debtors' oath 62 

Dodge Nehemiah, guardian, liberty to invest - 61 

Election of civil officers, act to regulate amended 25-28 

Parrell James, convict liberated - - 57 

Fairbanks George, for leave to appeal - - 61 

Gas Company, Woonsocket, incorporated - - 34 

Gifford Robin, liberty to appeal - - 51 

Graves John, for liberty to reinstate action - - 60 

Hamilton Bank, resolution relative to - - 30 

Hawes Lyman, for leave to appeal - - 61 

Highways and Bridges, act for the mending of amended 49 

Holden Charles, Jr., administrator, authorized to sell - 64 

HoouBopathic Society of Rhode Island incorporated 33 

Jail, appropriation to repair in County of Bristol - 59 

Johnson Charles, convict liberated - - 58 

Justices Court in town of Bristol - - 30 

Justices of the Peace ... 69 
Hanufactoring Corporations, act in explanation and 

amendment of an act relating to , ^ 
McCann Thomas, authowei^ to hold real estate - 
McGovem Mary, for new trial . ^ - 



74 JUNE, 1851. 

Minors employed in manufecturing establishments, 

resolution regarding - - " kq 

Montgomery Richard, convict liberated - oo 

Newport, act to legalize certain acts of the town of - 4y 
New YorkjProvidence and Boston Rail Road Company, 

act incorporating amended - - 44 

Nipmuc Ledge Company incorporated - 41 

Ocean Fire Engine Company No. 7, incorporated - 43 

Office of Secretary of State, appropriation for furnishing 60 

Patterson John, convict liberated - - 57 

Pawtucket Institute for Savings, charter of amended 33 
Police in the town of Cumberland, act for the better 

ordering of - ". . . ' ^ 
Poor, act regulatmg the confinement and discipline of 

amended - - - 60 
Act in addition to an Act providing for relief, em- 
ployment and removal of - 4 
Presbyterian So. in Pettaquamscut Purchase, namechanged 46 
Providence Boot and Shoe Company, act incorporating 

amended . - - - 46 
Railroad, N. Y., P. & B., act incorporating amended 44 
Reports of Supreme Court, to be printed and distributed 60 
Resolution regarding Minors employed in Manufactur- 
ing establishments . - - 30 
Returns of Independent and Regimental Companies - 70-71 
Rhode Island HomoBopathic Society incorporated 33 
Rhodes Charles C, administrator, authorized to sell 55 
Rhode Island Union Butt Co. for act of incorporation - 60 
Roll of members of Senate - - 67 
of members of House of Representatives - 68 
School Committee-men legalized . - 3 
School law, act to revise and amend - - 6-25 
Secretary to procure and distribute Reports of Sup. Court 50 
to have School Act printed - 59 
Smithfield, act dividing the town of, amended - 48 
Supreme Court, authorized to continue Ann Sullivan in 

Butler Asylum - - - 69 

Tefil Peleg S., leave to release dower of Mary Tefft 66 

Times of sitting of Courts in Kent and Newport changed 29 

Toll-gate, location of on Pawtuxet turnpike, legalized - 69 

Town of Newport, act to legalize certain acts of 49 
Treanor Hugh, authorized to hold and transmit real 

estate - - - - 63 

Union Butt Company incorporated - - 38 

Washington Lodge No. 3, act incorporating - 46 

Weaver Arnold, for new trial . _ 62 
West Baptist Society, Providence, name changed to 

First Baptist, Ohieyville - - 49 

Willow Cemetery Company, act incorporating am^ided 46 

Wilcox George S., liberated and stay of exeeiition 66 

Woonsocket Gas Company, incorporated, - 34 

Institute for Savings, charter of amended 33 



ACTS AND RESOLVES 



GENERAL ASSEMBLY 



itDtt of JlliDk-SBlDnli nnb ^touibmtt |S!antationB, 



FASSBD AT TBB 



OCTOBER SESSION, 1851. 



fflTB THE ROLL OF MEMBERS, PROCEEDINQS OP THE TWO HOUSES IN 
GRAND COMMITTEE, AND REPORTS ORDERED TO BE PUBLISHED. 



SktaU at KtpolitsXiflanli, ^t. 

OFFICE OF aSCBSTARY OF STATE, NOVKHBEB, If «. 



PROVIDENCE: 

PRINTED by' SAVLE8 A MILLER., 

1851. 



B^The General Assembly convened at South-Kingstown, in con- 
formity to Art. 4, Sec. 3, of the Constitution, on the last Monday of 
October, (27th,) 1851, and adjourned on the Friday following, Octo- 
ber 31st, to meet again in Providence, on the first Monday of Janua* 
ry , 1852. 



ACTS AND RESOLVES, 



PASSED AT THE 



OCTOBER SESSION, 1851. 



An Act in amendment of an act entitled ^ an act in 

relation to the Supreme Court" 

JB is enacted by the General Assembly as follows : 

Section 1. It shall be the duty of the reporter of the Act in reia- 
decisions of the Supreme Court, to attend the Supreme ^^^ ^"' 
Court at their sittings in all the counties of the State, ^^gJJ,^ 
to make true reports of the decisions of said court, on 
all legal questions that shall be argued by counsel, and 
publish the same annually previous to the sitting of 
the Geneml Assembly at their October session. 

Sec. 2. Tbe salary of said reporter of the decisions 
of the Supreme Court, shall be five hundred dollars per 
annum, payable in four equal quarterly payments, the 
first payment to be made on the first day of January, 
A. D. 1852. 

Sec. 3. So much of the act of which this is in amend* 
ment, as is inconsistent herewith, is hereby repealed. 



Ak Act in addition to the several acts, enabling town 
councils to grant licenses for the retailing of strong 
liquors and for other purposes. 

Jl is enacted by the General Assembly as follows : 

Sectiom 1. The provisions of the act in relation to tion to raie 
the sale of cider in the towns of South Kingstown, Co- HopBS' *"* 
ventry and Westerly, passed at the January session, 
1861^ are hereby extended to the town of Hopkinton. 



tOB 



4 OCTOBER, 1851. 

An Act in repeal of the act, in amendment of an act 
entitled an act in amendment of an act entitled " an 
act for the relief of poor persons imprisoned for debt," 
passed at the January session of the General As- 
sembly, A. D. 1850. 

M is enacted by the General Assemblf/ as foUotvs : 
^^ Section 1. The act entitled an act in amendment of 

re i f of an act entitled an act in amendment of an act entitled 
•raiSapri-^^^^ act for the relief of poor persons imprisoned for 
Moed for debt," passcd at the January session of the General As- 
amended, sembly, A. D. 1850, is hereby repealed. 

Sec 2. The fifth section of the act in amendment of 

an. act entitled " an act for the relief of poor persons 

imprisoned for debt," passed at the January session, 

A. D. 1848, is hereby revived. 



An Act in amendment of an act entitled ^ an act to 
regulate the election of civil officers." 

It is enacted ly the General Assembly as follows : 

Acttoreg- Section 1. Hereafter the payment of the registry or 

5ection*'of ^tt^r taxes uccessary to the qualification of an elector, 

civil offi. may be made to the collecting officer before the third 

Amended, day preceding the annual election in April, or before 

any third day preceding the day of any other election, 

with the same effect to qualify an elector as if the tax 

had been paid on or before the last day of December 

in the calender year preceding, as is now required. 

Sec 2. Said " act to regulate the election of civil 
officers," is further amended, so that the registration of 
citizens, to be assessed with the registry tax, shaU be 
continued until the last day of December in each ca- 
lender year, or until the last day but one, when the 
last day shall be Sunday. The town or city clerk shall 
deliver to the assessors of taxes the list of registered 
persons on or before the second Monday of January 
next succeeding. The assessors shall then proceed as 
now directed by law, to assess the persons so present^ 
ed ; and the town or city clerk shall deliver a duly cer- 
tified copy of the registry and of the assessments, to 
the collector of taxes within five days after the said 
assessments shall have been made. 

Sec. S. The board of canvassers shall at their several 



OCTOBER, 1851. 

meetings add to the list of voters all persons otherwise 
qualified^ who since the preceding meeting have paid 
the taxes assessed against them necessary for a quali- 
fication ; and the canvassers shall hold their last meet- 
ing for revising the voting list within three days next 
preceding the day of voting, when they shall complete 
the lists of persons qualified. 

Sec. 4. The collector of taxes shall present to the 
canvassers, at each meeting, lists of those persons who 
have paid their taxes to said collectors, and have not 
been before presented ; and any collector neglecting 
or refusing to make such return to the board of can- 
vassers, shall be subjected to the penalty provided in 
the twelfth section of the " act to regulate the election 
of civil officers." 

Sbc. 5. So much of the act to which this is in amend- 
ment, and of any other act as is inconsistent herewith, 
is hereby repealed. 



Besolution directing Clerks of Courts to make return 
of the amount of fees received by the Judges of the 
Supreme Court, and Court of Common Pleas. 

Resolved^ That the clerks of the Supreme Court and ^JfJ^* ^^ 
Court of Common Pleas, in the several counties in this make re- 
State, be required to make return to the General As- rewiTed^by 
sembly at their next January session, of the amount of sup! court 
entries and other fees or perquisites, if any, received JJ^^i"'* 
by the judges of said courts, for the year preceding the 
first Tuesday in May, 1851. 



Resolution respecting the Hamilton Bank. 

Resolved^ That the commissioner of the Hamilton Commit 
Bank be, and he is hereby directed to give notice, that Hamilton 
the commission will close on the first day of June next, S?y" ^c^ 
and that all parties having bills of said bank, present 
the same before that date, or be precluded from any 
share or dividend of the property of said bank. 

And the commissioner is hereby authorized and em- 
powered to appropriate the funds of said bank to the 
payment of such bills as shall have been presented, on 
or previous to said time. 



6 OCTOBER, 1851. 

Resolution for opening a street in the city of Pro- 
vidence. 

street in JResolved^ That His Excellency the Governor, with 
the citv of the Inspectors of the State Prison, be authorized to 

Providence , •*■ • , , 

authorized join with the proprietors of land adjacent, in opening 
to be open- ^ g^p^g^ fj,Qjj^ Smith strcct, near the house of Thomas 

R. Holden, to the westerly side of the state prison lot, 
so as to intersect a street leading from the front or 
south side of the state prison, westerly — if in their judg- 
ment the interests of the State will be thereby pro- 
moted. 



Resqlution authorizing the Secretary of State to have 
the Reports of cases argued and decided in the Su- 
preme Court, bound, and repealing the appropria- 
tion to Mons. Vattemare. 

Secretanr JResolvcdy Ist, That the Secretary of State be direct- 
ports ol^ca- ed to procure the three hundred copies of Rhode-Island 
c'iwifnX* I^^ports purchased by the State, to be suitably bound, 
and that he be authorized and empowered to draw on 
the General Treasurer for the cost of the same : Pro- 
vided, the sum to be expended shall not exceed one 
hundred and twenty-five dollars. 
AppTopria- 2d. That the resolution authorizing an annual ap- 
Mona. Vat- propriation of two hundred dollars, for international 
^led.' '* exchanges to Mons. Vattemare, be, and is hereby re- 
pealed. 



Resolution authorizing the commissioners on Massachu- 
setts' and Rhode-Island boundary line, to make a re- 
port. 

Resolvedy That the commissioners for ascertaining and 
S2?ew on settling the line, between this State and the State of 
uSe'to*'^ Massachusetts, be requested to make, at the next ses- 
make w siou, a fuU and particular report of their doings in the 



port 



premises. 



OCTOBER, 1851. 7 

fi£BOLUTiON referring the account of the Phoenix Bank 
against the State, to the Supreme Court. 

Resolved, That the account of the Phoenix Bank, of 
Westerly, against the State, be referred to the Supreme phenbrB*k 
Court, with instructions to allow so much of said ac- sup7coiit 
count as they may deem proper, and to draw an order 
upon the General Treasurer for the amount allowed ; 
and said court may be permitted to examine the same 
in vacations, and the General Treasurer is hereby di- 
rected to pay said order, if drawn, out of the general 
treasury. 



Eesolution for building a fence around the State House 

grounds in Providence. 

Resolvedj That Allen C. Mathewson, Thos. J. Stead, Fence au- 
and Nathan Porter, be, and they are hereby appointed ^^^^ ^ 
a committee, to cause an iron fence to be built around V^^^^^^ 
the public grounds belonging to the State, in front grounds in 
and rear of the State House, in Providence, and to put ^'°^^**®°*^ 
said grounds in proper order ; and that said commit- 
tee be, and they are hereby authorized, from time to 
time, to draw upon the General Treasurer for such 
sum as shall be necessary for that purpose, provided 
that the whole amount of their drafts shall not exceed 
the sum of two thousand dollars. 



Besolittion for an appropriation for fixtures and cases, 
in the Clerks' oflBces in the State House, in Provi- 
dence. 

Besolvedy That the sum of five hundred dollars be ^ ^, 
appropriated for fitting up and furnishing the offices atlonfor 
of the clerk of the Court of Common Pleas, and pf the SStaP^ 
clerk of the Supreme Court, in the county of Provi- ^^^^^ 
dence, under the direction of His Excellency the Gov- 
ernor, and that he be authorized to draw for the same. 



Resolution in relation to the Committee on Indian Af- 

^^•"^- on Indian 

Affnlva 

Resohedy That the committee appointed by the Gen- ■uihoHx^ 
eral Assembly, at their last session, to examine into i^uy their 
the aflyrs of the Narragansett Indian tribe, be empow- '*^®™^* 



S OCTOBER, 1851. 

ered to settle finally all accounts and claims between 
individuals and said tribe, and that they be also au- 
thorized to agree with John Miller, as to the amount 
of damages due from said John Miller, annually, or in 
gross, for land of said tribe, or any individuals there- 
of, flowed by said John Miller, 



Eesolution authorizing the purchase of books for the 
use of the prisoners in the State Prison and Provi- 
dence County Jail. 

b^s'for Resolved, That the Board of Inspectors of the State 
PriM!!^«J Prison, be authorized to pimshase such books as they 
authorized, j^ay docm proper to select, not to exceed the expense 
of one hundred and fifty dollars, for the use of the State 
prison and the Providence county jail, and to draw on 
the General Treasurer for said sum of one hundred and 
fifty dollars for payment of the same. 



Resolution relative to deficiency of appropriation for 
stone for Washington Monument. 

Additional JResolvedy That the sum of thirty-five dollars and 
tion'for** twelve cents be, and the same is hereby appropriated, 
tonjf^u- *^ ^^^^ "P the deficit in the appropriation for a stone 
meot. for the Washington Monument, and that the chairman 

of that committee be authorized to draw for that 

amoimt. 



Resolution relative to repairs on North and South 
Court streets, in the city of Providence. 

5o,fft?^' Resolved, That the sum of two hundred and fifty dol- 

g"^" of d ^^^® ^^ hereby appropriated for the purpose of draining 

South and improving the avenues on the State House lot, in 

ProvWen"ce the city of Providcncc, on the north and south of the 

State House; and Henry G. Mumford and Allen C. 

Mathewson are hereby appointed a committee to cause 

the said improvements to be made, with authority to 

draw on the General Treasurer for the amount which 

shall be necessary to complete the same, provided the 

sum do not exceed the said sum of two hundred and 

fifty dollars. 



OCTOBER, 1851. » 

An Act establishing a harbor line on part of the east 

side of Providence River. 

II is enacted hji the General Aasembh/ aafolhws : Act««tob- 

Section 1. The harbor line of Providence river, on the [jahing hur. 
easterly side thereof, from Manton & Hallett's, wharf p^vidon^e 
southerly to the end of Fox Point, is hereby establish- '*^*^'* 
ed as follows, viz. : beginning at the southwest comer 
of Manton & Hallett's (late Carrington's) wharf wall, 
the said corner being marked A. on the plat hereunto 
annexed, and made part of this act, drawn by Gushing 
& Farnum, October 3d, 1851, and recorded in the city 
clerk's office in said Providence, thence three hundred 
and eighty-three feet and five inches to a point on Or- 
ray Taft's wharf, marked B. on said plat ; thence five 
hundred and eighty-four feet and eight inches, to a 
point on Jonathan Pike's wharf, marked D. on said 
plat ; thence eight hundred and ninety-six feet, to a 
point on Richard J. Arnold's wharf, marked K on said 
plat ; thence two hundred and eighty-four feet, to a 
point on A. D. & J. T. Smith's wharf, marked F. on 
said plat ; thence forty-one feet, to a point on the same 
wharf, marked G. on said plat ; thence one hundred 
and nine feet and six inches, to the southwest comer 
to said Smiths', or Fox Point wharf, marked H. on said 
plat The said harbor line as established by this act, 
being the red line on said plat, from poin>t A. 4o point 
H., as delineated thereon, reference being had to said 
plat, and to the various angies, bearings and distances 
trom established points thereon set forth, for the iden- 
tification of all the above mentioned points. 

Sec. 2. If any person shall erect or create any oib- 
straction in said harbor beyond said line now establish* 
ed, such person shall forfeit and pay the sum of not 
less than five hundred, nor more than three thousand 
dollars, to be recovered by indictment before the Su- 
preme Court, one half to and for the use of the city «f 
Providence, and one half to and for the use of the 
State ; and the board of aldermen of the city of Provi- 
dence shall be authorized, before or after conviction, 
to remove such obstruction at the expense of the per- 
BOB erecting or creating it 
2 



10 OCTOBER, 1851. 

An Act to incorporate the Savings Bank, to be located 

in Tiverton. 

AetiDcor- ^ ^ etiocted hy the General Assemhh/ asfoUmvs: 
w>rating Sbction 1. Oliver Chace, Jr., Cook Borden, Thomas 
Biiok!?iv- Borden, Clarke S. Manchester, their associates and suc- 
^^^' cessors, are hereby created a body politic, under the 
name and style of the Savings Bank, with perpetual 
succession. 

Sec. 2. Said corporation shall be capable of receiving 
from any person or persons disposed to obtain the ad- 
vantages of said institution, any deposit of money, and 
to use and improve the same for the purposes, and ac- 
cording to the directions herein made ; provided, how- 
ever, that the amount of the whole received by said 
corporation and under its management at any one time, 
shall not exceed four hundred thousand dollars. 

Sec. 3. All deposits of money received by the ^id 
Savings Bank, shall be by said corporation used and 
improved to the best advantage, and the income or 
profiit thereof shall be by them applied and divided 
among the persons making said deposits, or their legal 
representatives, in just proportion, with such reasona- 
ble deductions as the management of the affairs of said 
corporation may require ; and the principal of such 
deposits may be withdrawn at such times and in such 
manner as the said corporation shall direct and ap- 
point 

Sec. 4. Said corporation shall at their annual meet- 
ing in June, have power to elect by ballot, any other 
person or persons as members of said corporation. 

Sec. 5. Said corporation may have a common seal, 
and the same may break, alter and renew at pleasure, 
and shall at all times have power to sue and be liable 
to be sued, may plead and be impleaded against in 
all proper courts of law and equity whatsoever, and 
shall have all other powers incident to a corporation. 
Sec 6. Said corporation shall hereafter meet annu- 
ally, in the month of June, in the town of Tiverton, 
and shall elect a President, Secretary, Treasurer, and 
a board of not less than seven Trustees, and may hold 
such other meetings as they may think proper, and any 
seven members of said corporation shall be a quorum ; 
and all the officers of said corporation shall be sworn 



OCTOBER, 1851. 11 

to the faithftil discharge of the duties of their offices^ 
and continue in their offices until their successors shall 
be duly qualified. 

Sec. 7. The said corporation shall have power to 
make all necessary by-laws for the government of said 
corporation, and for the management of the business 
thereof; provided the same are not repugnant to the 
laws of this State. 

Sec 8. Any two of the persons named in the first 
section of this act^ may call the first meeting of said 
corporation at such time and place in Tiverton as they 
may specify, upon personal notice to the persons nam- 
ed in the first section of this act, and their associates^ 
or by leaving notice of such time and place at their 
last and usual place of abode. 



Upon the petition of the People's Bank, of North- TSSmrLr 
Providence, praying that the sum of two hundred and authori«ed 
fifty dollars, being the amount paid by them as per onleopie*! 
centage to the State on their stock, over and above the ^"^' 
amount required of other banks, may be remitted to 
them and allowed towards any payn^nts which may 
accrue, due to the State from said bank for tax or duty 
on the increase of their capital stock. 

Voted and resolved^ That the prayer of said petition 
be granted, and the General Treasurer is hereby au- 
thorized and required to allow and credit to said Peo- 
ple's Bank the sum of two hundred and fifty dollars to* 
wards the payment of any sums due or to become due 
from said bank, for tax on increase of the capital stock 
of said bank. 



Upon the petition of Samuel Boyd, of Johnston, in sammr 
the county of Providence, praying for certain reasons J^^'J^ 
therein stated, that he may be authorized to sell joint- •©JL 
Iv with Huldah Steere, a certain farm described in said 
petition. 

Voted and resolved^ That the prayer of said petition 
be granted, and that the said Samuel Boyd is hereby 
authorized and empowered to sell said farm at public 
or private sale, (provided said Huldah Steere do join in 



n OCTOBER, 1851. 

said sale,) and that a deed or deeds executed by said 
Samuel ISoy d and Huldah Steere, shall vest in the pur- 
chaser or purchasers thereof, a full title thereto ; pro- 
vided that said sale shall be made under the advice and 
direction of the court of probate of the town of John- 
ston, and that the petitioners give bond with satisfac- 
tory surety to said court, to apply the proceeds of said 
sale to the payment of the debts of said Silas Steere, 
with the expenses of settling his estate, and the surplus 
to be invested in such way and manner as said court 
of probate may direct 



Upon the petition of Edward T. Peckham, of Mid- 
Edwaiti T. dl^town, in the county of Newport, being a minor un- 
p«ckham, dcr the age of twenty-one years, praying for certain 
thorised to rcasons therein stated, that he may be authorized to 
5SdH*4c. make and execute all deeds and other instruments that 
may be necessary to perfect a division of the real es- 
tate hereinafter described, between said Edward and 
his brother William F. Peckham, and his sister Eliza- 
beth and her husband John G. Smith ; and also to sell 
and convey all said Edward's interest in and to the un- 
divided half of the lot of land hereinafter described, 
containing in the whole about twenty acres, to his said 
brother William ¥. Peckham, for the purpose of pay- 
ing his the said Edward's, one-third part of the dp.bts 
which William Peckham, the father of said Edward, 
owed at his decease. 

The first estate or tract of land, containing about 
twenty-five acres, situated in said Middletown, with a 
dwelling-house and other buildings thereon, is bound- 
ed easterly and southerly on the highway, westerly 
on land of said William Peckham, deceased, and north- 
erly partly on laud of Gideon Peckham, and partly on 
land of Abner Ward. 

The second tract containing about twenty-five acres, 
with a dwelling-house and other buildings thereon, 
bounded southerly and westerly on the highway, north- 
erly partly on land of Charles Peckham and partly on 
land of Gideon Peckham, and easterly on land of said 
heirs of William Peckham, deceased. 

The third tract, contains about eighteen acres, 



OCTOBER, 1851. Ig 

with a dwelling*bouse and other buildings thereon, 
bounded westerly «and northerly on the highway, east- 
erly partly on Easton'n Pond and partly on land of the 
heirs of said William Peck ham, deceased, and Resteam 
Peckham, and partly on land of the heirs of Nicholas 
Easton, deceased. 

The fourth tract contains about twenty-three acres, 
of which the said William Peckham, deceased, owned 
the undivided half, bounded northerly on land of Sam- 
uel Allen, and partly on land of the heirs of Nicholas 
Easton, deceased, westerly partly on said Easton's Pond 
and partly on land of the heirs of said William Peck- 
ham, deceased. 

The fifth lot contains about twenty-four acres, bound- 
ed westerly on the highway, northerly partly on land 
of John Barker and partly on land of Abner Ward ; 
easterly on land of the heirs of Stephen Barker, de- 
ceased, and southerly on land held by Joseph A. Bar- 
ker as trustee of Cyrus Barker. 

Voted andyesolved, That the prayer of said petition be 
granted, and that the said Edward T. Peckham be and 
he is hereby authorized, notwithstanding his minority, 
to make and execute all deeds and other necessary in< 
struments required, in order to make partition of the 
first, second, fourth and fifth lots above described ; and 
that he, the said Edward, is also hereby authorized to 
eell and convey his interest in the fourth lot before de- 
scribed, to his brother William F. Peckham, and also 
to make and execute all instruments that may be nec- 
essary to make a full settlement of the estate of said 
William Peckham, among said heirs, and in order to 
secure the widow of said William Peckham her dower, 
or compensation in lieu of dower, in all the real es- 
tate the said William Peckham died siezed. And all 
deeds or other instruments made and executed by said 
Edward T. Peckham to make partition of said four 
tracts of land, and to convey to said William F. Peck- 
ham, the interest of said Edward, in the other tract, 
containing twenty-three acres, and all instruments said 
Edward shall make and execute in order to secure the 
dower of his mother to her in such manner as she may 
desire, shall be as valid as if the said Edward T. Peck- 
ham was twenty-one years old. 



14 OCTOBER, 1861. 

Upon the petition of Jeremiah Whitehead, a native 
whiiShMd ^^ Ireland, now residing in the town of Newport, in this 
authorized State, praying for liberty to hold, convey and transmit 
tran»mit real estatc. 

real eatate. Yi^cd and resolcedy That the prayer of «aid petition 
be and is hereby granted ; and that the said Jeremiah 
be authoris&ed and empowered to hold a lot of land at- 
uated in the town of Cumberland, bounded and de- 
scribed as follows: beginning at the southeast comer at a 
white oak stump, which is the northwest comer of land 
formerly owned by J. Ansbury, now land of the heirs 
of James Carpenter, thence north about forty-five rods, 
bounded on land of the late Lucinda Wilkinson, to a 
stake and stones for a comer, near a cross ditch, thence 
by said ditch eighteen rods to another ditch leading 
south, thence by said ditch five rods to upland near a 
bunch of willow bushes, thence south of said upland 
about twelve rods to a stake and stones for a comer, 
which is in the line of land formerly belonging to Jes- 
se Smith ; thence easterly in said line ten' rods to the 
first mentioned bounds ; said lot of land being bog mea- 
dow, and contains about five acres, to hold, enjoy, con- 
vey and devise, or otherwise dispose of and transmit said 
real estate, in the same manner and with the same ef- 
fect as if he were a native bom citizen of this State. 



Zeiotes w Upou the petition of Zelotes W. Holden, of Provi- 
HoWcn. dence, guardian of Eliza G. Burrows, of said Providence, 
authorizod praying for the reasons therein stated, that he may be 
^ '®"' authorized to sell and convey a lot of land belonging 
to his said ward, situate on Spring street, in said Pro- 
vidence. 

Voted and resolved^ That the prayer of the said peti- 
tion be and the same is hereby granted, and that the 
said Zelotes W. Holden be hereby authorized to con- 
vey to John A. Smith, of Burrillville, who now holds a 
mortgage thereon, or to some one claiming under him, 
one undivided half of the lot of land on the east side 
of Spring street^ in Providence, measuring thirty-six 
feet thereon, and bounded northerly on land now or 
iormerly belonging to Benjamin Orswell, about fifty 
feet ; easterly on land now or formerly belonging to 



OCTOBER, 1851. 16 

Christopher Bublong, thirty-six feet ; and southerly on 
land belonging to the said Eliza G. Burrows and Jo- 
seph R Burrows, it being the same lot which Sarah 
Ann Burrows, Edward G. Burrows and Eliza G. Bur- 
rows were heretofore authorized to sell, by an act pass- 
ed by the General Assembly, at the October session 
thereol^ 1847 : provided, that said John A Smith shall 
accept the said conveyance in full satisfaction of his 
claim upon the estate of the said Eliza G. Burrows, and 
shall discharge the mortgage which he now holds there- 
on. 



Upon the petition of John Sawyer, of Glocester, an John 
alien, who has taken none of the necessary steps to be- amhoiii«] 
come a citizen of the United States, praying for leave ^^mu*^ 
to hold, convey, devise and transmit to his heirs, cer- «•* «•^•^• 
tain real estate, situate in said Glocester, containing 
about twelve acres in the tract, with a dwelling-house 
and out buildings thereon standing, bounded and de- 
scribed a« follows, viz. : beginning at the northwest 
comer of said lot in the south line of the road, being 
also the north comer of the lot belonging to the heirs 
of Mowry Smith, and running thence on the line of said 
Smith's lot, south twenty-four and a half degrees, east 
thirty-two and ten twenty-fifths rods, to a heap of 
stones in the comer of land belonging to the widow 
of William Page, thence north eighty-two degrees eaat 
thirty-eight rods in the line of said Page's land to a 
heap of stones, thence north seven degrees west fifty- 
two rods to a white in the line of said road ; 

thence by and with said road south fifty-nine degrees 
west, to said first bounds. 

Voted and reioJvedy That the prayer of said petition 
be granted ; and that the said John be and hereby is 
authorized to hold, devise, sell, convey and transmit to 
his heirs, said estate in as full and ample a manner as 
if he had been a native bom citizen of this State. 



Mallkfs 



Upon the petition of Matilda Congdon, one of the 
Narragansett tribe of Indians, congdoo. 

Voted and resolved^ That said Matilda Congdon be and to miu "^ 
she hereby is authorized and empowered to sell to any 



10 OCTOBER, 1851. 

member of the tribe the two lots of land as described 
in her said petition ; provided, that the same be done 
under the advice and with the approval of Joseph 
Gavitt, Esq., of Charlestown ; and provided also, that 
said land when sold, shall be subject to the usages of 
said tribe, regulating descent, &c. 



Sarah R. Upon the petition of Sarah R Hawkins, praying for 
amJToriMd ^^rtain reasons therein stated, that she may be author- 
to sdL ized to sell all the right, title and interest, which her 
three minor children, George M. Hawkins, Warren B. 
Hawkins and Almira H. Hawkins, have in and unto a 
-certain lot of land situate in the westerly part of the 
the city of Providence, on the northerly side of Foun- 
tain street, and bounded sQutherly on said street, on 
which it measures fifty feet, westerly on land of Ben- 
jamin B. Burgess, one hundred and twenty feet, north- 
erly on land of William E. Richmond, fifty feet, and 

easterly on land of Arnold, one hundred and 

twenty feet 

Voted and resolved, That the prayer thereof be and 
the same is hereby granted, and the said Sarah R Haw- 
kins is hereby authorized and empowered to sell said 
estate either at public or private sale for the purposes 
in said petition expressed, and to make, execute and 
deliver to the purchaser or purchasers thereof, good 
and sufficient deed or deeds of the same ; provided she 
the said Sarah shall first give bond satisfactory to the 
judge of the Municipal Court of the city of Providence, 
oonditioned to dispose of the proceeds of said sale un- 
der the direction of said court, for the benefit of said 
minor children. 



Elizabeth Upou the petition of Elizabeth Lee, a native of Ire- 
ixed tohow land, jiow residing in Burrillville, in this State, praying 
nnd con- ^^^ rcasous therein stated, that she may be authorized 
to hold and convey a certain lot of land, situate in said 
Burrillville, and bounded and described as follows : be- 
ginning at a stake and stones in the line formerly own- 
ed by Benjamin Smith, being the southeast comer 
bound, thence north thirty rods to a stake and stones^ 



OCTOBER, 1851. 17 

thence west thirty rods to a stake and stones, thence 
Houth thirty rods to a stake and stones, thence east to 
the first named bounds, containing six acres, more or 
less ; being the same lot conveyed to said Elizabeth, 
by John L. Barber, by his deed bearing date March 
13th, 1850 : 

Voied and resolvedy That the prayer of said petition 
be and the same is hereby granted ; and that the said 
Elizabeth Lee be authorized and empowered to hold^ 
enjoy, mortgage, convey and devise, or otherwise dish 
pose of and transmit said real estate, in the same man- 
ner and with the same effect as though she were a nar 
tive bom citizen of this State. 



Upon the petition of Hannah Thomas, of Charles- Hannah 
town, for liberty to convey real estate : Thomas, 

Resolvedy That Hannah Thomas, a member of the convey. 
Narragansett tribe of Indians, be authorized to set off 
and convey to Henry Hazard and Maria his wife, daugh- 
ter of said Hannah, one acre of land, or not exceeding 
that, to be Jield by said Henry and Maria for their lives 
and the life of the survivor, and after their decease to 
be held by the heirs of said Maria according to the 
nsages of said tribe ; provided, the same be done un- 
der the advice and with the approbation of Joseph 
Gavit, Esq. 



Upon the petition of Benjamin Thomas, of Charles- j.oavit an- 
town, praying that the commissioner on Indian Affairs Mii'latote* 
be authorized to sell certain real estate of Amey Nich- 2f/j"fy 
ols, deceased : 

Voted and resolved. That Joseph Gavit, of Charles- 
town, be and he is hereby authorized to sell so much 
of the estate of Amey Nichols, a member of the Narra- 
gansett tribe of Indians, deceased, as will pay her fur 
neral charges and expenses of her last sickness, to 
whomsoever due, and whether due by note or account, 
or for money advanced for said purposes, and to act as 
auctioneer at said sale, and to give a good and suffic- 
ient deed thereof; provided that said Gavit shall wait 
a reasonable time in his discretion, in order to give the 
heirs an opportunity to come forward and pay «aid 

sunusL 

3 



18 OCTOBER, 1851. 

rSii^co ^P^^ th^ memorial of the City Council of the city 

enjoined of Providence, praying for a revocation of the autho^ 

^IJ!^^ ity given by a resolution of the General Assembly to 

the Providence and Worcester Railroad Company to 

complete the location of their railroad in said city: 

Voted and resolved^ That said petition be further con- 
tinued to the next January session of the General As- 
sembly, and that in the mean while and until the rising 
of the General Assembly at their said next session, the 
said Railroad Company be and is hereby enjoined not 
to locate their said railroad on any public land in said 
city. 



M. '^'JJ!* Upon the petition of Martin Fitzpatrick, an alien, 
iied to praying for reasons therein stated, to be authorized 
JJJjJjJ^^ and empowered to have and maintain actions at law, 
andinaqui- or suits in cquity, for the recovery of certain premises 
situated in the city of Providence, and described as lot 
No. 10, on a plat of land of one Samuel Whelden, sur- 
veyed and platted July 7, 1845 : 

Voted and resolved^ That the prayer of said pet^ion 
be and the same is hereby granted, and the said Fita^ 
patrick be authorized and empowered to have and 
maintain any suit at law or in equity, for the recovery 
or defence of said premises as effectually as he might 
do if he were a citizen of this State. 



Upon the petition of Benoni Waterman, of Johnston, 
terman di»^ praying for reasons therein stated, that he may be dis- 
fromwjor c^ft^*g^d from his recognizance in the case of the State 
ni»»««- va Joseph H. Davis, on complaint of Lydia Waterman, 
for assault and battery, upon which recognizance an 
action of scire f 04:108 is now pending against said Wa- 
terman, in the Court of Common Pleas, within and for 
the county of Providence : 

Voted and resolved, That the prayer of said petition 
be granted, and that said Benoni Waterman be dis- 
charged from his said recognizance upon paying all 
eosts which have accrued on said writ of scire faciaa 



OCTOBER, 1851. / 19 

Upon the petition of Benjamin Wl Hawkins, of John- 5?J^^ J^- 
ston, praying for reasons therein stated, that he m'sy d]M!iMiB«i 
be discharged from a certain defaulted recognizance SSIS?*" 
against him : 

Voted and resolved, That the prayer of said petition 
be granted, and that said petitioner be discharged from 
said recognizance upon the payment of the costs of the 
original complaint against said petitioner, incurred be- 
fore Robert Wilson, Esq., the justice of the peace be- 
fore whom said complaint was made, and the costs of 
the writ of scire facias now pending before the Court 
of Common Pleas, in the county of Providence, against 
John M. Hart, surety for said petitioner in said recog- 
nizance. 



Upon the petition of John E, Lamed, praying for 
reasons therein stated, that further proceedings upon ^S!^ 
an indictment now pending before the Court of Com- SSSawHJ^ 
mon Pleas, against Thomas McFelie, may be stayed, JJ^^g** ^. 
and that the said Thomas McFelie may be discharged gdn^ rnxf- 
from his recognizance : . . . "^^ 

Voted and resolved, That the prayer of said petition be 
granted, and all further proceedings against the said 
Thomas McFelie in said coui*t, are hereby stayed, and 
he is hereby discharged, and released and acquitted 
from all costs and liabilities for or on account of the 
matter charged in the said indictment now pending 
against him, and that the Attorney General be, and be 
hereby is directed to enter a nolle prosequi of the in- 
dictment against the said Thomas McFelie, and to cause 
his recognizance to be discharged. 



Upon the petition of Silas E. Wood, of Cranston, pray- fciteYed*^ 
ing for reasons therein stated, that he may be relieved jjjjj' ^^» 
from the payment of a fine and costs for non-attendanoe ceecOno* 
as a juror at the last June term of the Court of Com- Hmy^d.' 
mon Pleas for the county of Providence: 

Voted and resolved, That the prayer of said petition 
be granted, and that the said Silas E. Wood be and he 
is hereby excused from the pa3nnent of said fine, and 
that the officer be authorized to return the prooess 



VS OCTOBER, 1861. 

against said Wood to said court unsatisfied, and that 
ihe said court be authorized to stay all further pro- 
ceedings against said Wood. 



BexreStor. Upou the petition of Charles Rex, of North-Provi- 
ed to his dence, he having been convicted of the crime of rob- 
pSv^gM. bery upon the highway, and sentenced to imprison- 
ment in the State prison, praying that he may be re- 
stored to all the rights and privileges of a citizen of 
this State : 

Voted and resolved, That the prayer of said petition be 
and the same is hereby granted ; and that the said Rex 
be restored to all the rights and privileges of a citizen 
of this State in as full and ample a manner as before 
said conviction. 



Jaeob Mor- Upou the petition of Jacob Morris, for reasons therc- 

nted. m stated, praymg tor remuneration: 

Voted and resolved. That the prayer of said petition be 
granted, and that the sum of fifty dollars be allowed 
and paid to said Morris out of the State treasury. 



sSl" Jibe. Upon the petition of Patrick Shea, a convict, confin- 
condiSonr ^^ ^^ Newport county jail, praying for remission of fine 
and costs, and that he be discharged from his confine- 
ment : 

Voted and resolved. That the prayer of said petition 
be so far granted as that the costs with that portion of 
the fine accruing to the State, be and are hereby remit- 
ted, and that the keeper of said Newport county jail 
be and he is hereby authorized and directed to release 
the said Patrick Shea from his said confinement upon 
payment of that portion of said fine due the complain- 
ant at whose suit he was prosecuted, and upon which 
he stands convicted. 



jwnette Upon the petition of Jeanette French, a convict^ in 
convictliib- tiie county jail in Providence, praying for remission of 
*^'*^' fine and costs, and liberation : 

Voted and reaohed. That the prayer of said petition 



OCTOBER, 1851. 21 

be granted ; that said fine and costs be remitted, and the 
keeper of said jail is hereby directed to discharge her 
forthwith. 



Upon th? petition of Joshua Bacon and others, pray- ^jl"*' 
ing for reasons therein stated, foi the liberation from ratJ. 
imprisonment of Michael Coffy, now confined in Provi- 
dence county jail : 

Voted and resolved. That the prayer of said petition be 
granted, and the jailer is hereby directed to discharge 
said Coffy forthwith. 



^ Upon the petition of John Glenright, confined in the j^^ ^^, 
jail in the county of Kent, praying for liberation and right liber. 
for remission of part of a iine and costs: 

Voted and resolved^ That the prayer of said petition be 
and the same is hereby granted, and the keeper of the 
jail in said county is hereby directed to discharge the 
said John Glenright forthwith, upon payment of that 
part of the fine belonging to Torris M. Evans, the com- 
plainant, and that so much of said fine as belongs to 
the State, and the costs, be and the same are hereby 
remitted. 



Upon the petition of Thomas Birch, praying for the lib- Richard 
eration of Richard Birch, convict No. 81, in the State vict, ubere- 
prison : **^' 

Voted and resolved, That the prayer of said petition be 
and the same is hereby granted ; and the Warden of 
the State prison is hereby directed to discharge Rich- 
ard Birch accordingly, forthwith. 



Upon the petition of Alexander McFarland, praying Alexander 
for the release of Alexander McFarland, Jr., a convict j^, conWc« 
in the State prison : ^^^"^^^^^ 

Voted and resolved^ That the prayer of said petition be 
and the same is hereby granted ; and the warden of 
the State prison is hereby directed to discharge said 
Alexander McFarland, Jr. accordingly^ forthwithl 



22 OCTOBER, 1851. 

James Fox Upon the petition of George W. Wightman, prajring 
convict, lib- fop ^^^Q liberation of James Fox, a convict in the State 

prison : 

Voted and resolved, That the prayer of said petition be 

and the same is hereby granted, and the warden of the 

State prison is hereby directed to discharge the said 

James Fox accordingly, forthwith. 



Upon the petition of Levi C. Dexter and Harriet W 

Ha^'i^* w -D^^*^^? ^is ^^f^> ®^^^ Solomon Young, all of Providence, 

Dexter ' in the county of Providence, praying that an act may 

a^op/chud ^^ passed authorizing the said Levi C. and Harriet W. 

to adopt as their own child, under the name of Emma 

Celestia Dexter, a daughter of Solomon Young, now 

known as Celestia Emma Young: 

Voted and resolved^ That the prayer of said petition be 
and the same is hereby granted ; that the said Levi C. 
and the said Harriet W. be and they are hereby author- 
ized to adopt the said Celestia Emma Young, as their 
own child ; that the said Celestia Emma shall hereaf- 
ter be called and known by the name of Emma Celes- 
tia Dexter, and that the said Levi C, and Harriet W», 
and Emma Celestia, shall reciprocally be vested with 
all the rights to which they would respectively be en- 
titled, and be subject to all the duties and obligations 
to which they would in like manner be subject, had 
the said Emma Celestia been born the lawful child of 
the said Levi C. and Harriet W. Dexter. 



T' n** d" k" Upon the petition of Freeborn Johnson, Jr. and Eliz- 
p/johneon abctli P. Johusou, his wifc, both of the city and county 
adopVchUd of Providcncc, in this State, praying for reasons there- 
in stated, that an act may be passed authorizing 
them to adopt William Freeborn Johnson as their own 
child : 

Voted and resolved, That the prayer of said petition be 
granted ; and that the said Freeborn Johnson, Jr. and 
Elizabeth P. Johnson, his wife, are hereby authorized 
to adopt the said William Freeborn Johnson as their 
own child, with all the rights, duties and liabilities of 
parents over said child ; and that the said William 
Freeborn Johnson is hereby declared capable in law 



OCTOBER, 1851. 23 

to claim and have protection and support from said 
Freeborn and Elizabeth P. Johnson, and to be capable 
in law to inherit from said Freeborn and Elizabeth P. 
Johnson, as fully and to all intents and purposes, as if 
he were the lawfully begotten son of said Freeborn 
Johnson, Jr. and his wife Elizabeth P. Johnson. 



Upon the petition of George Chase and his wife Al- Oeorpcand 
freda Chase, of North-Providence, for leave to adopt chiw* 
Ella Gertrude Cahoe : IS^Jpt chiw 

Voted and resolved^ That the prayer of said petition 
be and the same is hereby granted, and that the said 
George and Alfreda are hereby authorized and em- 
powered to adopt said Ella Gertrude as and for their 
own child, with all the rights, duties and liabilities of 
parents and child respectively ; and that said Ella Ger- 
trude shall hereafter be called and known by the name 
of Ella Gertrude Chase. 



name. 



An Act to change the name of Hope Engine Compa- 5^^^,^"' 
ny. Number 10, in the city of Providence. No. lo, ' 

II is enacted hy the General Assembl// asfolloios : dwngS^ 

Section 1. The name of said company is hereby 
changed from that of Hope Engine Company, Number 
Ten, to that of " Atlantic Engine Company, Number 
Ten." 

Sec 2- The members of said company shall be sub- 
ject to all the liabilities, duties and obligations, and 
shall be entitled to all the rights and privileges that 
they are, or would be subject and entitled to, had not 
the name been changed as aforesaid. 



Upon the petition of Ethan R Barr, praying for cer- 
tain reasons therein stated, that a license granted to r. r. Barr 
him to peddle, on the 31st day of October, A. D. 1850, S."' 
may be extended : 

Voted and resolved, That the prayer of said petition be 
granted, and that the provisions of said license be ex- 
tended for the term of three months from the 31st day 
of October, A. D. 1851, and that the said Barr be and 



1 



24 OCTOBER, 1851. 

is hereby authorized to peddle under said license for 
the term aforesaid, with the like effect as if the said 
license had not expired. 



him 'ro^*^ Upon the petition of J. C. Peckham & Co., pra3dng 

ceedingfl for extcnsiou of license, and for other relief : 

sSy^/ Voted and resolved^ That the same be continued to the 

next session of this General Assembly, and that in the . 

mean time any proceeding against the petitioners for 

any forfeiture or penalty by reason of non-compliance 

with the law, be stayed. 



Job Man. Upon the petition of Job Manchester and others, 

ch^^eret. praying for a repeal of the 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th and 

peai,&c. 13th sections of the act entitled "An act for the pre- 

ISJith Srdcr servation of oysters and other shell fish within this 

ofnotice. State:" 

Voied and resolved, That said petition be continued to 
the next January session of the General Assembly, and 
that the petitioners in the mean time cause notice of 
the pendency thereof to be given, by publishing a copy 
of this vote three successive weeks next preceding 
said January session, in one or more of the newspapers 
published in the city of Providence. 



^•MUchen Upon the petition of Daniel Mitchell et. al. in relar 
tiie to MiD- tion to the Mineral Spring Turnpike, in North-Provi- 
T™mpikef dence: 

^iihSner ^'^^^^ ^'*^ resolved, That said petition be continued to 
ofnotice. the ucxt scssiou of the General Assembly, and that no- 
tice of the pendency thereof be given, by publishing a 
copy of this vote in the Providence Journal and Morn- 
ing Post, for three successive weeks next after the ris- 
ing of this General Assembly. 



4'tak^^r Upon the petition of Augustus Rhodes, of Providence, 
debtor'8 praying for reasons therein stated, that he may be al- 
tuiuid with lowed to take the poor debtor's oath : 
onier af no- Yoted and resolved, That said petition be continued to 
the next session of the General Assembly, and that in 



OCTOBER, 1851. 26 

the mean time the petitioner give notice of the pen- 
dency thereof, by causing a certified copy of said peti- 
tion and this vote to be served upon the creditors upon 
whose suit said Rhodes is committed to jail, at least 
thirty days before the next session of the General As- 
sembly. 



Upon the petition of Stillman Welsh and others, fi ^^^ ^e 
praying for reasons therein stated, to be set off from ••t offfrom 
the town of Bristol and to be annexed to the town of BrKotcon- 
Warren. ^^Jl^. 

Voted and resolved^ That said petition be received and ^<^- 
referred to the next January session of this Assembly, 
and that in the mean time the petitioners give notice 
of the pendency of their petition, by publishing a copy 
of this vote in one of the newspapers published in the 
town of Bristol aforesaid, and also in one published in 
said town of Warren, for three weeks next after the 
rising of the General Assembly at the present session ; 
and shall also file copies of said petition and of this 
vote in the offices of the town clerks of said towns of 
Bristol and Warren, within ten days next after the ris- 
ing of the General Assembly of the present session. 



Resolution relative to a Report of a committee of the R«port af 
Senate, upon the affairs of the General Treasurer. of*SS?de^ 
The House of Representatives having learned inform- HoJ!J?or 
ally, that a committee appointed by the Honorable ^^^^ 
Senate, at the last June session, to make certain exam- 
inations in relation to the General Treasurer's office, 
have reported, among other things, that there has been 
misapplication of the fimds of the State to a very large 
amount, and this House not being aware of any mis. 
apphcation of the public money, therefore, 

jResolvedy That the Honorable Senate be respectfully 
requested to send said Report to the House, in order 
that the same may be read for the information of the 
members, previous to the printing of the same. 



26 OCTOBER, 1851. 

allowed!* Voted and resolved, That the following accounts be al- 
lowed and ordered to be paid out of the general treas- 
ury to the following named persons, viz. , 
William Holmes . . - 

James Sherburne 

George Welch . . . 

Nancy I. Bates - . - 

Solomon Kinyon . . - 

Josiah Bliss ... 

William Gilman ... 

Oliver C. Cook - 
Whipple M. FoUett 
William R. Mowry 
Arnold Teft 
Knowles & Anthony 

Gladding & Brother - - - 

Gladding & Brother 

Abner Jillson ... 

C. M. Hay den 

Weeden & Berry ... 

Charles M. Hayden 

George Durfee . . - 

Nancy McLellen 

Charles Akerman . - - 

Philip Martin ... 
John Harris ... 

Charles Oakes . . - 

George Hall . - - 

George Hall, Jr. - 

James McCabe ... 

Michael Corley - - . 

Fanny Smith ... 

Timothy Ferrill 

Coggeshall & Brastow . - - 

Thomas J. A. Gross 

Alanson Carter . . - 

Wardwell & Barstow 
John Place - - 

T.T. Hazard 

Joseph Gavit . - - 

Pardon Spencer 
Nicholas S. Fry 
Edward Lillibridge 
John P. Sherman, Jr. - 



5 65 


9 40 


44 


44 


44 


88 


88 


88 


52 


52 


52 


5 00 


31 57 


1 59 


13 75 


2 30 


93 72 


3 30 


13 00 


30 00 


56 49 


88 


88 


44 


88 


88 


88 


88 


88 


88 


4 74 


12 80 


2 82 


71 57 


94 92 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


4 78 


72 



OCTOBER, 1851. 




George P. Shennaii 


72 


Stanton Stedman 


60 


Thomas S. Cottrell 


60 


James H. Bliss 


72 


John P. Sherman 


72 


William H. Sherman - 


72 


Benjamin Bicknell 


72 


Benjamin Hull 


2 60 


Matthew Chappell 


9 46 


John Place 


7 00 


Row & Co. 


4 00 


James Sherburne 


1 00 


James Sherburne 


1 60 


Wflliam P. Dean 


12 00 


William P. Dean 


13 70 


Thomas J. A. GroB8 


3 60 


Gladding & Brother 


15 32 


William Simons 


2 75 


Emor Coe 


6 40 


Charles Randall 


. 18 17 


WiQiam Holmes, Jr. - 


7 34 


James H. Butler 


- 167 20 


Daniel E. Carpenter 


55 84 


Daniel E Carpenter - 


14 10 


Joshua B. Bathbun 


2 20 


George H. Whitney - 


16 50 


William Hunt - 


10 22 


Benjamin T. Grorton 


4 70 


ThomaR G. Turner 


12 29 


Elisha R Potter 


2 60 


Asa Hawkins . . . 


1 04 


John H Lonsdale 


. 239 60 


Z. J. Arnold . . . 


1 70 


Hiilip Arnold 


2 60 


Henry Y. Cranston 


4 50 


Frances Peck 


96 


Sally Miingo . - - 


80 


Oideon Sherman 


40 


Both G. DeWolf 


80 


William G. Borden - 


2 40 


L B. Arnold 


23 60 


Jabez C. Potter 


10 60 


City of Providence 


110 23 


A Payne 


5 Oft 



27 



28 OCTOBER, 1851. 

Robinson & Anthony - - 7 23 

Charles Akerman - - - 4 00 

Francis Marble - - - 1 90 

J. V. Turner & Son - - - 12 48 

Christopher B. Pierce - - 3 38 

Town of Warren - - - 71 32 

Jabez C. Potter - - 52 10 

Newport Artillery - - - 13 00 

George H. Whitney - - 27 59 

William H. PuUen - - - 17 00 

George Robinson - - 5 45 

John S. Pearce - - - 37 08 

Court of Magistrates - - 341 00 

Providence Reform School - - 270 91 

N. B.Hall & Co. - . 75 

H. S. Olney - - - 12 75 

Joseph Adams - . 1 50 

John A. Porter - - - 35 00 

William Sherman - - 80 

W. G. WiUiams - . - . 2 42 

Alfred Read - . - . 3 04 

William Harrison - - - 5 16 

John S. Pearce - - - 12 50 

John S. Pearce - - - 3 60 

Jonathan Day - - - 30 00 

John H. Gould - - - 7 00 

Jabez C. Potter - . 64 40 

William Earle - - . 7 45 

Matthew Chappell - - 9 71 

William P. Dean - - - 8 00 

Joshua B. Rathbun - - 21 10 

William A. Pierce - - - 6 09 

John H. Gould - - . 2 00 

William P. Dean - . - 3 10 

Henry Oman - - - 372 20 

S. Augustus Arnold - - - 100 00 

Mathewson Williams - . 40 

A. B. Copeland - - - 40 

Robert Seatle - - - g 40 

George C. Shaw - - - 9 26 

Sylvester R. Hazard . . 8 40 

Joseph B. Tompkins - - 40 

Charles Tennant, - - 40 

H. B. Underwood - - . 40 



OCTOBER 1851. 




Samuel Pearce 


80 


Maria Mitchell 


40 


Greoi^ Albro 


40 


Albert H. Hewitt 


80 


James Cummings 


40 


John H. Watson 


40 


Stephen S. Vars 


80 


Weeden H. Berry 


34 50 


Wingate Hayes 


21 00 


Thomas Durfee 


21 OO 


Benjamin F. Thurston 


21 OO 


Lewis Jj'oUett 


52 




$2,986 20 



29 



Voted and resolved That all business pending before 
this General Assembly unfinished, be referred to the 
next session ; that the Secretary cause the acts and or- Adjourned, 
ders passed at this session to be printed and distributed 
according to law ; and that this General Assembly be, 
and the same is hereby adjourned to the first Monday 
of January next, then to convene in the city of Provi- 
dence. 



State of rhode island, &c. 

Secretary of State's Office, ) 
December 4, 1851. 3 

I certify that the acts resolves, rolls and reports, pub- 
lished in this pamphlet, are true copies of the originals, 
deposited in this office. 

ASA POTTER, 
Secretary of State 



APPENDIX. 



ROLL OF THE MEMBERS OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 

At the General Assembly of the State of Rhode Island 
and Providence Plantations, begun and holden at South- 
Kingstown, on the last Monday of October, (27th) in 
the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and 
fifty-one, and of Independence the seventy-sixtk 

PRESENT : 

His Excellency PHILIP ALLEN, Governor. 
His Honor WILLIAM BEACH LAWRENCE, Lieut. 
Governor. 



Newport, 

Providence, 

Portsmouth, 

Warwick, 

Westerly, 

New Shoreham, 

North Kingstown, 

South Kingstown, 

East Greenwich, 

Jamestown, 

Smithfield, 

Scituate, 

Glocester, 

Charlestown, 

West Greenwich, 

Coventry, 

Exeter, 

Middletown, 

Bristol, 

Tiverton, 

Little Compton, 

Warren, 

Cumberland, 

Richmond, 

CraQston, 

Hopkinton, 

Johnston, 

North Providence, 

Barrington, 

Foster, 

Burrillville, 



SETH W. MACY. 
ALBERT C. GREENE. 
JOHN MANCHESTER 
JOHN BROWN FRANCIS. 
STEPHEN WILCOX. 
WILLLA.M P. BALL 
JOSEPH SPINK. 
HAZARD KNOWLES. 
NICHOLAS S. FRY. 
ANDREW P. POTTER 
GIDEON BRADFORD. 
PARDON ANGELL. 
THOMAS BARNES. 
JOSEPH H. CROSS. 
THOMAS T. HAZARD. 
CHRISTO'R A. WHITMAN. 
ISAAC GREENR 
NATHANIEL GREENK 

WILLLA.M C. CHAPIN. 
NATHANIEL CHURCH. 
HAILE COLLINS. 
ARIEL BALLOU. 
JAMES G. SISSON. 
NATHAN PORTER 
JOHN S. CHAMPLIN. 
ALFRED ANTHONY. 
CALEB V. WATERMAN. 
ALLEN BICKNELL, 
JONATHAN HILL, 2d. 
LYMAN HAWKES. 



THE SECRETARY. 
Benjamin F. Thukston, Esq., Clerk. 



32 



OCTOBEB, 1851. 



REPRESENTATIVES FROM THE SEVERAL TOWNS. 



Newport. 
Henry Y. Cranston, 
Joseph Anthony, 
Joseph B. Weaver, 
Benjamin Finch, 
Thomas R Hunter. 

Providence, 
Leonard Blodget, 
Stephen T. Olney, 
William H. Potter, 
Henry Anthony, 
Allen C. Mathewson, 
James T. Rhodes, 
George S. Rathbone, 
Amos C. Barstow, 
Daniel E. Carpenter, 
Samuel Currey, 
Thomas J. Stead, 

Christopher C. Potter. 

Ports7nouth. 
Borden Chace. 

Warwick. 
Pardon Spencer, 
Simon H. Green, 
William D. Brayton, 
Randall Holden. 

Westcrli/. 

Nathan F. Dixon. 

New Shoreham. 

Simeon Babcock. 

North Kingstown. 
James Eldred, 
Thomas G. Allen, Jr. 

tSouih Kitigstown. 

George L. Hazard, 
Sylvester Robinson. 

East Greenwidi. 

George J. Adams. 

Jamestown. 

Benjamin Cottrell. 

Sniithfield. 

Thomas Buffum, 
Daniel Pierce, 
John Fenner, 



Earl A. Wright, 
James Phetteplace, 
Israel B. Purinton. 

Sdtuate. 
William A. Roberts, 
Sheldon Fiske. 

Glocester. 

George H. Browne, 
Jonathan A. Tourtellot. 

Charlestown. 
Joseph Gavit. 

West Greenwich. 
Nathan Carr. 

Coventry. 
David S. Harris, 

Levi Johnson. 

Exeter. 
Daniel L. Money. 

Middletown. 

George 1 Bailies. 

Bristol. 
Benjamin Hall, 
HezekiahC. Wardwell. 

Tiverton. 

William P. Sheffield, 
Joseph Osborne, 
Nathaniel B. Durfee. 

Little Compton. 

Oliver C. Brownell. 

Warren. 
Alfred Bosworth, 
Thomas G. Turner. 

Cumberland. 
Fenner Brown, 
George L. Dana. 
Olney Arnold, 
Mowry Taft. 

Richmond. 

Daniel Kenyon. 

Cranston. 
Charles Goodwin. 
Almoran Harris. 

Hopkinton. 

Welcome Collins. 



OCTOBER, 1851. 



33 



Johnston, 

Granville S. Williams, 
Alpheus F. Angell. 

North Providence. 
Thomas Davis, 
Zelotes Wetherell, 
Edwin Harris, 



Barrington. 
Pardon Clarke. 

Foster. 

George K Hopkins. 

BurrillviUe, 
Elisha Matbewson, 
Silas A. Comstock. 



Jo^phB. Stone. 

Hon. Alfred Bosworth, of Warren, Speaker. 
Wesgate Hayes and Thomas Durpee, Esq'rs, Clerks. 



GENERAL TREASURER'S REPORT. 



Newport, October, 1851. 

Sir — The annexed statement of the receipts and pay- 
ments of the public money of the State of Rhode Island, 
ending October, 1851, is very respectfully submitted 
by Your obedient servant, 

EDWIN WILBUR, 

General Treasurer. 

To THE Hon. Speaker of the 

House op Representatives. 

Dr. 

A— Salaries .... $2,625 00 

B — Senators . . . 661 64 

C — ^Representatives . . . 1,583 04 

D— Orders of the Supreme Court $4,367 34 
Do. Court of Common Pleas 2,634 28 



7,001 62 

E— Orders of the Governor . . 1,043 24 

F— Printing ... 6 00 

H — Orders of the General Assembly 11,005 59 

I— PubUc Schools . . 24,127 51 

J — ^Appropriation for Public Schools 9,650 96 

Balance . 1,978 38 



$59,682 98 

Cr. 

Balance received of the late Treasurer, 

as per account May last, $2,611 92 
Amount received of the same 
as surplusage, 5,310 88 

7,922 80 

K— Hawkers and pedlars, . . 2,000 00 

L— Auctioneers, . . . 623 68 

M — Banks for tax on capital stock 18,450 53 

N — Banks for tax on increase of capital stock 12,705 25 



36 OCTOBER, 1861. 

— Banks for tax on surplus or reserved profits 275 35 
P— Banks for bonus - - . 2,147 50 

Q — Insurance companies not incorporated by 

this State, . . . 3,096 01 

R— Insiu-ance companies incorporated by this 

State, .... 1,150 00 

S — Avails of the Supreme Court, 728 24 
T— Avails of Court of Com. Pleas, 2,043 28 

2,771 52 

U — Justices of the peace, . . 650 44 

V— Town councils , . 981 86 

W — Dividend on the school fund . 1,795 50 

X — Dividends and interest on public deposits, 4,074 50 
Y— State tax, , . , 658 50 

Z. — Oyster lots, . . . . 65 00 

AA — Civil commissions . . 51 00 

BB — Providence and Pawtucket turnpike 222 31 

CC— Surplus, . . . .4122 



$59,682 98 

A — Paid Salaries. 

Richard W. Greene, Chief Justice, $225 00 

William R. Staples, Associate Justice, 137 50 

George A. Brayton, Associate Justice, 137 50 

Christopher E. Robbins, Secretary, 187 50 

Thomas Whipple, Lieutenant Governor, 200 00 

E. R Potter, Commissioner of Public Schools, 200 00 

Richard \\r. Greene, Chief Justice, 225 00 

Edwin Wilbur, General Treasurer, 125 00 

William R. Staples, Associate Justice, 137 50 

George A. Brayton, Associate Justice, 137 50 

E. R Potter, Commissioner of Public Schools, 200 00 

Asa Potter, Secretary, 187 50 

Henry B. Anthony, Governor, 400 00 

Edwin Wilbur, General Treasurer, 125 00 

$2,625 00 
B — Paid Senators. 

Byron Diman (2 orders) $40 88 

Pardon Angell . . . 12 04 

Thomas Barnes . . 11 40 

Ariel Ballou . . 12 52 

Jonathan Hill, 2d . . 1268 



OCTOBER, 1851. 



37 



Nathan Porter 
Haile Collins 
John B. Francis 
Christopher A. Whitman 
Nicholas S. Fry 
Nathaniel Church 
John Manchester 
Nathaniel Greene 
Andrew F. Potter 
William P. BaU 
Seth W. Macy 
Ljman Hawkes 
Ariel Ballon 
Jonathan Hill, 2d 
Caleb V. Waterman 
Pardon AngeU 
Gideon Bradford 
Albert C. Greene 
Joseph Spink . . 
Joseph H. Cross 
Joseph G. Sisson 
John S. Champlin 
Hazard Knowles 
Nicholas S. Fry 
Isaac Greene 
Thomas T. Hazard 
Allen S. Bicknell 
Haile Collins 
Albert C. Greene 
William C. Chapin 
Seth W. Macy 
John Manchester 
Nathaniel Greene 
Andrew F. Potter 
Nathaniel Church 
William P. Ball 
Lyman Hawkes . 
Caleb V. Waterman 
Gideon Bradford 
Thomas T. Hazard 
Joseph Spink 
Joseph G. Sisson 
Isaac Greene 
Joseph H. Cross 



10 12 


1140 


10 92 


1188 


11 52 


10 00 


6 80 


6 80 


7 04 


9 12 


6 00 


14 00 


13 52 


13 68 


1160 


13 04 


13 52 


10 80 


1108 


17 04 


14 60 


18 00 


18 00 


13 52 


16 88 


18 00 


1108 


1140 


9'80 


6 88 


5 00 


5 80 


5 80 


6 04 


9 00 


10 12 


13 OO 


10 60 


12 52 


17 00 


10 60 


14 60 


15 88 


16 04 



38 OGTOBEfe, 1851. 

Stephen Wilcox 17 00 

John S. Champlin . . 17 00 

Hazard Knowles . 17 00 

Allen Bicknell .1108 



$661 64 



C. — Paid Represerdaiives?^ 

William B. Spencer, (2 orders) . $30 04 

Welcome Collins . 16 20 

Thomas G. Allen, Jr. . 13 00 

Alpheus F. Angell . 1124 

Joseph Anthony . . . 5 00 

George G. Bailey . . 5 32 

Oliver C. BrowneU .9 00 

Simeon Babcock 10 12 

WiUiam D. Brayton .1140 

Alfred Bosworth 11 40 



Fenner Brown . . 11 8 

Thomas Buffum . 12(38 

Earl A. Wright . .1108 

Granville S. Williams . 10 92 

Mowry Taft . . 11 72 

William A. Roberts . ,1140 

James Phetteplace . . . ' 11 40 

Israel B. Purinton . 10 76 

Daniel Pearcc . . . 10 76 

Elisha Mathewson . 18 00 

Allen C. Mathewson • . 9 80 

George E. Hopkins . 12 68 

Edwin Harris . . .9 96 

Charles Goodwin . . 10 76 

John Fenner . . . 10 76 

George L. Dana . . 10 92 

Thomas Davis . . . 9 96 

Silas A. Comstock . . 13 00 

Borden Chace . . . 6 44 

Henry Y. Cranston . 5 00 

Benjamin Cottrell . . . 5 96 

Nathaniel B. Durfee . . 7 24 

Benjamin Finch . . 5 00 

Thomas R. Hunter . . 5 00 

Joseph Osborn . . . 7 24 

William P. Sheffield . 7 88 



OCTOBER, 1891. 



39 



Joseph B. Weaver 

Pardon Clarke 

Benjamin Hall 

Nathan F. Dixon 

Joseph Gavitt 

George L. Hazard 

Daniel Kenyon 

Daniel Mowry 

Sylvester Bobinson 

Nathan Carr 

Randall Holden 

Levi Johnson 

Pardon Spencer 

Geoi^ J. Adams 

Simon H. Greene 

David S. Harris 

Da^id S. Harris 

David S. Harris 

Edwin Harris 

Thomas G. Turner 
Hezekiah C. Wardwell 
Samuel Currey 
Amos C. Barstow 
Jonathan A. Tourtellot 
Stephen T. Olney 
Leonard Blodget 
James T. Rhodes 
Christopher C. Potter 
William H. Potter 
George S. Rathbone 
Thomas J. Stead 
Daniel E. Carpenter 
Joseph B. Stone 
Henry Anthony 
Zelotes Wetherell 
Sheldon Fiake 
George H. Browne 
Obey Arnold 
Zelotes Wetherell 
Geo^e S. Eathbone 
William H. Potter 
Leonard Blodget 
Tiionuts J. Stead 
Henry Anthony 



6 00 
1140 

7 88 

13 40 
16 20 
15 08 
15 40 

14 12 

15 72 
13 80 
1156 
13 48 
12 04 
12 04 
1148 

11 72 
2 80 

18 84 

10 96 

1140 

9 80 

9 80 

9 80 

12 04 
9 80 
9 80 
9 80 
9 80 
9 80 
9 80 
9 80 
9 80 

10 44 
9 80 
10 44 
1140 
12 36 
12 52 
1144 
10 80 
10 80 
10 80 
10 80 
10 80 



40 



OCTOBER, 1851. 




Daniel E. Carpenter 


10 80 


Thomas Harris 


10 96 


George H. Browne 


13 36 


Silas A. Comstock 


14 00 


Granville S. Williams 


1192 


Elisha Mathewsou 


14 00 


Levi Johnson 


14 48 


Alpheus h\ Angell 


12 40 


Thomas Buffum 


13 68 


George K Hopkins 


13 68 


Charles Goodwin 


1176 


Israel B. Purinton 


1176 


Daniel Pearce 


1176 


Mowry Tafl 


12 72 


Joseph B. Stone 


1144 


John Fenner 


1166 


George L. Dana 


1192 


Earl A. Wright 


12 08 


Sheldon Fiske 


12 40 


James Phetteplace 


12 40 


William A. Roberts 


12 40 


Fenner Brown 


12 88 


Jonathan A. Tourtellot 


13 36 


Olney Arnold 


13 52 


Henry Y. Cranston 


6 00 


Joseph Anthony 


6 00 


Thomas R Hunter 


6 00 


Benjamin Finch 


600 


Joseph B. Weaver 


6 00 


William P. Sheffield 


8 88 


Nathaniel B. Durfee 


824 


Simeon Babcock 


15 60 


Borden Chace 


6 44 


Oliver C. Brownell 


10 00 


Joseph Osborne 


7 24 


Benjamin Cottrell 


6 96 


George I. Bailey 


6 32 


Hezekiah C. Wardwell 


. . 11 76 


Alfred Bosworth 


12 40 


Thomas G. Turner 


12 40 


Pardon Clarke 


12 40 


William D. Brayton 


12 40 


Thomas G- Allen, Jr. 


13 84 


Simon H. Greene 


12 48 



OCTOBER^ 1851. 41 



Nathan Carr 
Pardon Spencer 
Nathan F, Dixon 
Sylvester Robinson 
Daniel Kenj^on 
Daniel L Money 
Welcome Collins 
George L. Hazard 
Joseph Gavitt 
Almoran Harris 
Alraoran Harris 
Samuel Currey 
Stephen T. Olney 
George J. Adams 
James Eld red 
James T. Rhodes 
Amos C. Barstow 



D. — Accounts allowed hy the CouHs. 

Henry Brownell 
M. T. Bennett, clerk's bill - 
George Pearce 

Clerk's bill, Common Pleas, Providence 
Clerk's bill. Common Pleas, Providence 
Horatio Relph . - - 

Gardner Luther 
Dexter Daniels 
Nicholas B. Gardner 

Enos Lapham - - - 

Willis Cook 
Ferdinand Potter 
Samuel W. Anthony 

Anson Smith . - - 

George W. Davis 
Isaiah T. Crooker 
Daniel B. Hawes 

Barzillai Cranston . - - 

Henry Baker . - - 

John Wardwell . . . 

Stephen G. Thxirber 
Horatio Hunt 
John J. Carpenter 
6 



14 64 


13 04 


16 20 


15 72 


16 40 


15 28 


17 20 


16 08 


17 20 


9 28 


9 28 


10 80 


10 80 


9 04 


10 20 


9 80 


10 80 


(1,583 04 


$100 


5 00 


148 


265 28 


290 42 


• 10 92 


10 00 


100 


7 00 


6 92 


2 28 


116 


lOO 


5 20 


8 00 


7 00 


7 00 


7 00 


6 00 


100 


4 00 


200 


6 00 



42 OCTOBER, 1851. 




George Olney 


- 


8 56 


Abraham H. Stillwell 


- 


4O0 


Henry Packard 


- 


7 00 


Joseph M. Blake, Attorney General 


140 00 


R. W. Greene 


am ■ 


3 80 


John Wynn 


•■ 


2 64 


Benjamin Hunt 


- 


7 40 


Patrick Boyle 


- 


7 32 


Stephen T. Burgess 


- 


7 36 


Oliver Wood 


• 


9 48 


George Miller 


- 


7 40 


Joseph Nokay 


- 


9 48 


Andrew D. S. Jillson 


- 


88 


Stiness Hopkins 


- 


4 88 


Frederick S. Burgess 




2 48 


Knowles & Anthony 


- 


183 


Sayles & Miller 


- 


4 00 


Walter Paine, Jr. 


• 


100 


A. Simons 


- 


183 


Peleg A. Shippee 


- 


10 40 


Ann Logan 


- 


300 


T. A. Jenckes 


. 


88 


George R. Marble 


- 


4 96 


A. A. Winch 


- 


132 


Edward D. Pcarce 


- 


2 08 


W. H. Censett 


- 


2 08 


Peleff Johnson 


» ■ 


3010 


Thomas Bateman 


- 


10 40 


Thomas R. Carder 


• ■ 


300 


Perry Arnold 


- 


3 00 


J. J. Tillino;hast, clerk's bills 


- 


68 78 


George D. Hazard 


• 


180 


James Sheldon 


• 


4 40 


Jesse Potter 


. 


3 76 


Gorton W. Arnold 


• 


8 08 


John T. Arnold 


• 


3 96 


James Murphy 


- 


4 48 


Samuel L. Hunt 


• 


4 48 


Daniel A. Hopkins 


- 


4 48 


John H. Watson 


. 


1711 


Charles C. Heath 


» 


7 24 


Sylvester R. Hazard 


- 


3 15 


Stephen Whitehome 


- 


240 


J. D'W. Perry • 


- 


116 



OCTOBER, 1851. 



48 



Clerk's bill Supreme Court, Washington 

A. Kimball . . - 

William Young 

Clerk's bill, Common Pleas, Washington 

Clerk's bill, Common Pleas, Newport 

William H. Read 

John Congdon 

William H. Knowles 

Samuel Moses 

Pardon Almy - - - 

Giles Lawson 

Samuel S. Peckham 

Solomon Braman 

John C. Braman 

William S. Richardson 

Peleg Almy, Jr. 
Thomas Hines 

Benjamin Wyatt 

Benajah Barker 

Nathaniel Tompkins 

George Potter 

John Rogers - - - 

George C. Carr 

John Cottrell 

Joseph C. Lawton 

John B. Gould 

George S. Ward 

Edward Westgate 

Jacob Mott 

Shubael Goff . . - 

Thomas Wilbur, 2d, 

Clarke Brownell 

Charles Manchester 

Henry B. Gardner 

James C. Stafford 

Charles F. Searle 

Henry P. Sumner 

Nathaniel Church 

James Brownell 

James Lawton 

William J. Koberts 

James Smith - - - 

Benjamin Brown 

Geoi^e Lyndon 



55 71 


5 28 


80 


39 67 


19 93 


116 


2 60 


2 28 


116 


4 20 


1 80 


1 96 


116 


108 


108 


140 


108 


1 64 


1 32 


4 20 


5 00 


2 12 


156 


108 


116 


124 


1 16 


2 04 


2 28 


2 60 


2 92 


2 92 


3 08 


3 40 


3 40 


3 72 


4 20 


5 00 


5 00 


2 00 


3 30 


100 


100 



2 00 



44 OCTOBER, 1851. 

John C. Card - - - 1 00 

Benjamin Davis - . - 1 00 

William A. Barber, stationery - - 13 46 

William Gilpin, 4 orders - 12 85 

John H. Watson 3 do. - - 4 04 

Hezekiah Wilbour 2 do. - 5 76 

Robert Thompson - - - 80 

Nathaniel Wyatt - - 2 72 

Edward Perry . . . 80 

John Read Sherman - . 2 80 

Joshua Champlin, 2d, - . 3 04 

Reuben Cook - - - 1 44 

Stephen D. Smith - - , 1 44 

Christopher Lippitt - - 21 20 

Clerk's bill. Supreme Court, Newport, Aug. 1849 14 29 

Do. do. do. March, 1850 30 69 

Do. do. do. Aug. 1850 55 44 

Do. do, do. March, 1851 5146 

Benjamin T. Melville - - 1 00 

Thomas Spooner - - • - 4 00 

Thomas Essex - (4 orders) 6 44 

Waity Essex - - 4 do. 5 44 

William H. Douglass - 2 do. 1 20 

Robert Seatle - - 3 do. 6 64 

Chester Keech - - - 1 76 

Ellen Bohanna - - - 2 00 

Elizabeth Miller . - 2 00 

Charles W. Underwood - - 80 

William D. Lake - . 1 76 

James Greason - - - 80 

James Shaw - - - 1 76 

John Chase - - - 1 76 

William H. Douglass - 6 orders 3 84 

Robert Seatle - 2 do. 60 

William Gilpin - 3 do. 10 25 

Clerk's bill, Sup. Court, Providence, stationery 120 91 

Do. do. do. fees, &c. 222 61 

Thomas Smith - . , - 12 60 

Noah B. Grossman - - 14 84 

John P. Smith - - - 17 00 

Ezra Knight - - - 23 04 

James Barnes - - - 27 00 

John R. Babcock - - 4 64 

George B. Thomas . . . 18 00 



OCTOBER, 1851. 



45 



W illiam X Waterman 


17 00 


Asa Bates 

• 


19 92 


Amasa Burlingaine 


3 92 


Ira Smith 


14 92 


George R. Marble 


27 00 


Horatio N. Read 


16 92 


William H. Pike 


9 04 


William Kerr 


9 48 


William RandaU 


9 16 


Otis Holmes 


9 04 


Amasa Irons 


9 40 


Cyrel Round 


10 76 


Samuel Whelden 


104 


John L. James 


2 08 


Lewis Follett 


10 60 


John M. Ray 


4 28 


David Burt 


904 


John T. Fiske 


4 28 


Georee S. Wardwell . 2 orders, 


4 80 


E. L. Peckham • . 


3 36 


Frank Mauran 


3 0O 


John H. btow 


4 16 


Isaiah J. Weaver . 2 orders 


1 76 


James Kelly 


3 84 


George E. Blake 


44 


Peter Managhan 


44 


John Handy 


88 


Nedabiah Angell 


12 00 


Thomas J. A. Gross 


12 00 


Russell Clapp 


12 00 


Daniel Gould 


2 35 


John D. Hathaway 


12 30 


W. S. Burges, Attorney General 


54 50 


Peleg Mathewson, Jr. 


6 40 


Samuel C. Cottrell 


5 12 


Joseph T. Nichols 


4 80 


Samuel Hoxie 


164 


William S, Browning , 


5 60 


Benjamin B. Sheldon 


2 48 


Hazard Burlingame 


2 96 


Stephen Wilcox 


7 84 


Horace Babcock 


7 84 


Slocum Hall 


5 76 


John L. Hunt 


5 28 



46 



OCTOBER, ISol. 



Ebenezer Brown 


. 544 


George P. Sherman 


2 64 


John Phillips 


. 2 80 


Benjamin Tucker 


5 60 


Daniel L. Briorrrs 


2 32 


Benjaiiiin F. Robinson 


4 80 


John C. Whitehome 


480 


James C. Baker 


6 40 


Pardon Lewis 


4 08 


John B. Eddy 


2 40 


William Ix)ng\vorthy 


3 28 


William P. Arnold 


3 84 


John H. Adams 


172 


Samuel Albro 


184 


AVilliam Champlin 


2 00 


Thomas P. Clarke 


2 08 


Reuben Cooke 


. 112 


Reuben Eaton 


184 


William Gavit 


185 


Arnold Hazard, Jr. 


184 


Charles W. Holland 


. 184 


Rowland Holland 


184 


John D. Hopkins , 


2 00 


Edward Lillibridge . 2 on 


lers 5 92 


James W. Northup 


2 96 


Jeremiah Rathbone 


184 


Amos P. Rodman 


172 


Philip Rose 


184 


Betsey Sherman 


216 


Moses Sherman 


216 


Rawson Sherman 


2 08 


Esek B. Smith 


184 


Ezekiel H. Sunderland 


216 


Joseph C. Wilmarth 


184 


John A. Whaley 


. 184 


Albert P. Woodmancie 


3 92 


Weeden H. Berry 


. 22 60 


W. A. Sherman 


2 00 


Jeremiah S. Slocum 


8 00 


Samuel B. Perry 


160 


W. S. Burges, Attorney General 


. 75 50 


Hezekiah Munro . 2 ord 


ers 3 36 


Jane Shepley 


160 


William Shepley 


300 



' OCTOBER, 1861. 




Robert Andrews 


• • 


1 60 


Patrick Looby 
William M. Spencer 


• • 


2 84 
164 


W illiam P. Salisbury 
John Place 


• • 


2 OS 
4 00 


W. S. Barges, Attorney 
Stephen P. Slocum 


General 

• • 


13 00 
100 


George B. Anthony 
Nathaniel Greene 


• • 


1 80 
180 


S. P. Slocnm 


3 orders 


160 


Joseph Nason, Jr. 
Michael Murphy 
Daniel C. Denhara 


• • 

• • 


176 
176 
1 76 


Edward H. Tew . 




1 76 


Robert Seatle 


• • 


60 


S. P. Slocum 


• 


100 


Benjamin Watson 


3 orders 


2 96 


Isaac Howland 




100 


John Chase 


• • 


80 


Rowse H. Cai^enter 
Nathan Moore 


• • 


2 32 
2 08 


Henry M. HoUey 

Clerk's bill, Common Pleas, Bristol 


144 
. 65 44 


William M. Darling 
William Gilpin 


• • 


2 32 

3 80 


Joseph K Bailey 
Arnold Braman 


• • 


108 
2 64 


Stephen D. Smith 
Matthiais Frederick 


• • 


136 
2 00 


John Parmenter 




44 


William B. Maxfield 


3 order 


s . 5 12 


John H. Gould 




176 


David Lawless 


2 orders 


2 20 


Asa Angell 
David McLeod 


• • 


44 
88 


Joseph L Bailey 
Asa G. Mathewson 


• • 


100 

44 


Thomas Hervey 
Charles Hart 


• • 


44 
176 


Eleaz^r Lundy 


2 ore 


iers 5 24 


Thomas Callahan 


• • 


2 48 


Bridgett Morris 
William H. Hudson 


2 orders 


88 
140 


George H. Holley 




144 



47 



48 



OCTOBER, 1851. 



John Morris 


• 


88 


Waity Ann Williams 


■ « 


176 


Horatio N. Williams 


2 orders 


132 


Jabaz C. Potter 


7 do. , 


8 08 


Philip A. Marks 


6 do. 


. 10 08 


John E. Elliott 


. 2do. . 


6 04 


Peleg Johnson 


• 


88 


Russell Clapp 


. 3 do. . 


312 


William H. Armmffton 


. 2 do. 


3 24 


Frank Morgan 




132 


Thomas W. Hart 


' 7 do. 


. 10 96 


Liberty Childs 




168 


James Sherburne 


' 4do. 


4 76 


Francis Williams 




44 


Benjamin T. A. Williams 


• 


176 


Burrington Anthony 




44 00 


Hezekiah Woodward 


• • 


12 00 


Court of Magistrates 


16 orders 


1 56 10 


James Sherburne 


6 do. 


. 16 17 


Thomas W. Hart 


3 do. 


6 85 


John Gould 


• 


100 


William G. Merriwether 


• 


62 


Russell Clapp 


19 orders 


1 19 59 


Peleg Johnson 


• 


48 


Jabez C. Potter 


. 6 orders 


I 1513 


William H. Hudson 


2 do. 


. 16 78 


Horace Trowbridge 


2 do. 


3 48 


John H. Gould 


8 do. 


. 19 97 


John Bussey 


• « 


12 00 


William Burrows 


• 


. 12 00 


Jabez J. Potter 


. 13 orders 14 24 


K G. McCormick 


fc 


88 


James McCarly 


5 do. 


644 


C. H. Munro 


3 do 


3 80 


H. Allen 


. 3 do. 


512 


L. B. Arnold 


3 do. 


. 7 40 


A. A. Winch 


• « 


2 48 


H. Freeman 


2 do 


4 60 


Sayles Irons 


• < 


96 


W. H. Helme 


2 do. 


2 20 


Henry W. Rivers 


6 do. 


600 


Whipple Sayles 


• 


. 18 72 


Richard C. Martin 


• 


. 1100 


George Sarle 


• 


16 84 



OCTOBER, 1851. 49 

William C. Barker - - 6 00 

Harvey G. Robinson - - 17 00 

Eaton W. Maxcy - - - 11 00 

Simon M. Rose - - - 12 28 

Benjamin Esten - - - 23 04 

William C. Phillips - - 22 76 

Luke Hazard - - - 20 OO 

Frank O.Ballou - - 6 56 

Benjamin Maker - - - 4 64 

Clarke Lawton - - 19 92 

Benjamin E. Jones, Jr. - - 18 64 

Joseph Arnold, Jr. - - 17 00 

Smith Mowry - - - 5 92 

Nathan Thornton, Jr. - - 2 00 

Albert Sayles - - - 13 72 

N.S. Short - - 2 orders 5 92 

James Mathewaon - - - 7 80 

Gideon Burgess - - 15 52 

Arnold Carpenter - - - 12 44 

Gladding O. Thompson - - 3 88 

Baxter S. Arnold - - - 14 04 

RufusBallou - - - 13 88 

EzekielRelph - - - 12 92 

OUver F. Dutcher - - 7 00 

aovisRKeech - - - 14 20 

T.R Tucker - - - 4 00 

John Gardner - - - 1 32 

Horace French - - 12 00 

Isaac C. Ballou - - - 3 88 

Aldis Harris - - - 13 08 

Abie! D. Blanding - - - 7 28 

John Bussey - - - 6 00 

Joseph Cobb - - - 11 80 

Benjamin M. Bourn - - 16 00 

William Osborne - - - 13 00 

Thomas J. Abbott - - 1 16 

Seriel E Sweet - - - 12 96 

OtisBoss - - - 17 88 . 

Albert M. Burgess - - - 1 08 

David B. Levally - - 16 44 

Samuel G. Allen - - - 1 96 

Robert Wilcox - - J 32 

William Burroughs - - - 45 00 

Charles E Newell - - 10 00 
7 



«0 



OOTOBEB, 1851. 



I%omas Pierce 
James Sherburne 
Jabez J. Potter 
William H. Pullen 
William G. Merriwether 
J. M. Potter 
Silas Hemmenway 
Thomas W. Hart 
William H, Hudson 
William G, Merriwether 
John H. Gould 
Roger W. Potter 
Burrinton Anthony 
Hezekiah Woodworth 
-John Bussey 
Nedebiah Angell 
Daniel Wightman 
James Sherburne 
Arnold L. Potter 
James Sheldon 
Peleg Johnson 
Sylvester Hartshorn 
■Court of Magistrates 
James Sherburne 
Jabez J. Potter 
J. C. Potter 
William A. Arnold 
Ann Brown 
Alex. Burke 
Samuel Bayley 
Stephen Barry 
James Caffrey 
Augustus Carlton 
Liberty Childs 
Levi Cobb 
D. K. Chaffee 
Bussell Clapp 
George McCabe 
Augustus Carlton 
Henry Booth 
A. C. Greene 
Thomas Dowling 
James A. Darling 
Albert Evans 



2 orders 



2 orders 

2 do. 

3 do. 

4 do. 
3 do. 



20ord«)ni 
9 do. - 
17 do. 

3 do. - 

4 do. 

3 do. - 

2 do. 

3 do. - 



2 orders 

3 do. . 

4 do. 

3 do. - 
2 do. 
2 do. - 

2 do. 

3 do. - 

3 do. 
3 do. 



14 50 
20 
100 
100 
100 
9 65 

7 60 
2120 

450 
22 65 

8 70 
83 97 
25 58 
1100 

1100 
12 00 

34 00 
33 00 
33 00 
33 00 
3^40 
49 50 
$9 70 

lUO 

21 44 

220 

9 48 
7 20 

2 66 

3 00 
168 

44 
176 

2 20 

3 84 
220 
184 
2^6 
176 
220 

I9i 
$49 
390 



OCTOBER^ 1861 


M. R Early 


Sdo. 


Henry Fenner, Jr. 


2 do. 


John H. Gould - 


. 


Thomas W. Hart 


lido 


S. Hartshorn 


• 


Luke Hazard 


3 do. 


P. S. T. Hewett - 


2 da 


a G. Hall 


2 do. 


Bridgett Hanly 


3 do. 


William Haskell 


3 do. 


William H. Hudson 


4 do. 


Patrick Hanly 


3 do. 


Silas Hemmenway 


2 do. 


Edward Harris 


2 do. 


John Ha.nly 


3 do. 


Pe^eg Johnson 


4 do. 


Peleg Johnson 


- 


Edwin Joslin 


- 


Andrew Jillson 


3 do. 


Hemy H. Lewis 


- 


Catherine Lookley 


5 do. 


William G. Meriweather 


10 do. 


Franklin B. Mowry 


- 


Samuel A. Metcalf 


3 do. 


John A McLane 


2 do. 


Thomas Pearce 


3 do. 


William RPullen 


6 do. 


William Prentice 


2 do. 


H. P. Pratt 


2 do. 


H. M. Pierce 


2 do. 


William Prentice 


2 do. 


Henry W Rivers 


4 do. 


James Rowley 


- 


James Rose 


4 do. 


C. Robinson 


3 do. 


George J. Slacb 


3 do. 


James Smith 


3 do. 


George W. Stanley 


m 


John Sarguson 


- 


TTraace H. Snow 


3 do. 


Anson Thurber 


4 do. 


Ellen Wyman 


3 do. 


Bhoda P. Wilooz 


Sda 


Bllfl^) Wesson 


- 



51 



412 
176 

4 76 

16 44 

3 46 

6 04 

3 68 
256 
2 64 

4 68 
8 76- 
2 64 
4 68 
176 

2 64 

3 39 
180 
12» 

4 60 
24S 

12 76 
972 
2 96 

5 04 
132- 

4 60 
10 76 

5 76- 
2 56 
4 84 

2 12< 

3 52 
16a 
788 

6 60 
3 80 
412 
184' 

88: 
220^ 

7 8» 
264 



52 OCTOBER^ 1851. 

. Frederick Wallace - 4 orders - 9 48 

Patrick Wynn ... 88 

Gideon Wilcox - 3 do. - 4 92 

Jane Wynn - 3 do. - 2 64 

Paris Thornton - - - 9 80 

William P. Olney - - 9 04 

Henry M. Field - - - 3 40 

Robert Stevens - . 3 08 

Samuel P. Potter - - - 4 28 

George W. Kennedy - - 4 76 

Jesse B. Champlin - - - 3 64 

George Hall - - - 3 16 

Tilmerick Barnes - - - 3 40 

Pardon J. Cummings - - 3 40 

Burrill Aldrich - . . - 4 44 

James O.Smith - . 4 20 

Gaines W. Hubbard - - - 7 40 

Henry A. Luther - - 3 24 

George W. Gooch - - - 4 32 

George R Marble - - 8 04 

Paris Simmons - - - 10 60 

William C. Barker - . 9 04 

Wheeler M. Blanding - - 9 04 

Pitts Sayles - - . 10 60 

Thomas N. Staples - - - 10 60 

Asahel Burlingame - - 9 96 

Benjamin Rasor • - - 9 96 

Amasa Smith - - - 9 60 

James Andrews - - - 10 60 

NoyesWade - - - 10 28 

Job Steere - - 10 28 

Ira B. Peck - . 10 28 

Sabin Ballard - - - 10 60 

John Brown - - 1 84 

Benjamin Cornelius - - - 2 56 

Elizabeth Price - 2 56 

PoUy Price - - - 1 52 

Richard Miegs - - • 1 04 

Cheses B. Sweet - . - 1 60 

Bennett J. Munro - - 4 36 

Michael Kelly - - - 5 00 

Joseph Read - - . 1 60 

Marmaduke Mason - - - 1 00 

Peter J. Bradford - . 1 00 



OCTOBER, 1851. 



53 



James P. Pierce 
David A. Waldron 
Joseph Haile 
Elisha Hathaway 
Philip Chase 
James £. Chase 
John E. Barney 
John Short 
Joseph G. West 
Nathaniel S. Greene 
Joseph Bean 
Stephen Martin 
Philip Drown 
William Haile 
Christopher P. Bowen 
Alfred R ComeU 
Simson Talbot 
Nathaniel Brown 
Heniy Smith 
John S. Pearce 
Nathan Bardin 
John S. Pearce 
James T. Munro 
Bennett J. Munro 
Isaac Manchester 
Edward LDUbridge 
Thomas Wilcox 
Jeremiah S. Slocum. 
William Warner 
John Edwards 
Spencer Greene 
James Barnes 
D. K. Chaffee 
Archibald Comstock 
Daniel Field 
John Tucker 
William Burrows 
John Bussey 
James D. WardweU 
Allen Wright 
Joseph Bowen 
Allen lindsey 
William B. Spooner 
John N. Miller 



4 orders 
3 do. 



1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
1 
2 



00 
OO 
96 
16 
80 
00 
80 
12 



244 



1 
3 
1 
2 
1 
2 
2 
2 
2 
3 
1 



00 
28 
64 
80 
64 
80 
64 
80 
24 
28 
10 
8 00 
2 00 
200 
200 

5 00 

7 70 
10 50 

175 

6 64 
1 12 
160 
176 

4 64 

8 60 

5 00 
12 00 



2 
2 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 



00 
00 
00 
00 
96 
00 
00 
00 



54 



OCTOBER, 1861. 



William L. Peckham 


• 


109 


Gilbert R Simmons 


• • 


200 


James Hazard 


• « 


200 


George Maxwell 


• • 


40 


Da.niel A. Pierce 


• • 


200 


Nathan Warren, Jr. 


• •' 


80 


Henry N. Greene 


• « 


160 


Benjamin M. Bosworth 


• • 


344 


Benjamin B. Waldron 


2 orders 


3 20 


_ ^y ^^^ _ _ 

James Duff 


• i 


288 


Mary I. Harding 


• • 


160 


James G Harding 


• 


3 60 


Bennett J. Munro 


3 orders- 


810 


Stephen Johnson 


2 do. 


14 22 


Nathan Bardin 


edoi 


&88 


Thomas T. A. Gross 


• ) 


1^ 


Roger W. Potter 


• • 


20 40 


Samuel Ladieu 


• 


132 


Clerk Supreme Court, Providence, 


9 30 


Benjamin S. Simmons 


• 


200> 


J. W. Hazard 


• • 


lift 


C. P, Barber 


• 


1. 16 


W illiam Gilpin 


• • 


m 


Abel Oaks 


• 


44 


William Bassett 


• •> 


84 


Amos FoUett 


• 


84 


Russell Brown 


• • 


84 


W alter R. Procter 


2 orders> 


88 


Joseph Hervey 


• •^ 


6 48 


Lewis Potter 


• 


S2' 


Willia.m H. Pullen 


• • 


44 


E. J. BickneU 


• 


88 


Henry A. Parker 


. 2 orders 


2 20 


Nathaniel Miller 


• t 


88- 


William H. Wilkinson 


• • 


3 36 


Ann Holmes 


• < 


256 


John Kelly 


• . • 


52 


Elizabeth Barry 


• 1 


1 68^ 


Stephen Barry 


• •' 


168 


Peter Lundy 


• 


168 


James Sheldon 


2 orders 


140 


William H. Barker 


• 


I40f 


Jidward Turner 


• • ' 


140 


William Belcher 


6 Olden 


6 6» 



OCTOBER, 1851. 



55 



iSamuel S. Malley 
Robert Wilson 
James Sheldon 
Jolm Harris 
Turpin Williams 
Henry Welsh 
James Sheldon 
C. £L A. Mathewson 
£. Lawrence 
Walter R Proctor 
John A. McLane 
Thomas A. T. Gross 
Ozias D. Willard 
William H. PuUen 
Allen Baker 
Silas Hemmenway 
Court of Magistrates 
John W. Smith 
Th(nnas Meriwether 
John Andrews 
Thomas P. Lamphere 
William S. Harris 
Jeremiah 0. Colvin 
Walter T. Manney 
(reorge W. Budlong 
Holden W. Potter 
Alfired James 
Joseph R Fry 
Albert Whitman 
Benjamin Austin 
Stephen A. Congdon 
Edward A. Weaver 
j^athaniel Fales 
Amos T. Gorham 
Daniel Munro 
Edward Anthony 
iStillman Welsh 
Benjamin Carpenter 
/Samuel Burdick 
George H. Card 
Jared Woodmansie 
Hazard Peckham 
Nicholas Austin 
WiUiun Palmer 



1 


k 


2 05 


^ 


180 


4 orders 


16 53 




2 80 


4 orders 


2 64 


2 do. 


4 16 


• 


96 


5 do. 


6 68 


2 do 


4 16 




104 


5 do. 


6 68 




88 


3 do. 


3 80 


5 do. 


6 68 


2 do. 


292 


3 do. 


2 36 




450 


a 


100 


k • 


199 


• 


160 




4 44 


• 


4 44 


1 • 


188 


• 


140 




164 


• 


2 44 




2 44 


• 


2 04 




148 


• 


2 20 


A 


108 




148 




• 


100 




• 


100 




• 


160 






116 




• 


2 28 




I 


280 




• 


8 62 






2 24 




• 


216 




1 


20O 




• 


166 




> 


120 



56 



OCTOBER, 1851. 



Sally A. Sweet , . 2 orders 

Lay ton Hopkins 

Ezbon S. Taylor 

Daniel Sherman 

William G. Kenyon 

Maxon Greene 

Sands C. Carr 

Hay S. Oakley, Jr. 

WUliam Palmer 

Nathan Newbviry 

George D. Cross 

Nichols Austin 

Rufus Sweet 

Clarke W. Lewis 

B. F. Crandall 

John T. Gardner 

Thomas Johnson 

Eason Barber 

George A. Stanton 

Joseph Hoxie 

Charles Clarke 

Robert W. Greene 

Jedediah Witter 

Christopher P. Lillibridge 

William Shippee 

Asa Stedman 

John W. Phillips 

Silas W. Terry 

Weeden H, Berry 

Jeremiah S. Slociun 

David Douglass 

Ceesar A. Updike 

Nathan R Lewis 

Samuel Sherman 

Clerk's bill, Supreme Court, Washington 

Henry Gardner 

Jonathan Freeborn 

Philip P. Bowen 

Thomas G. B. Mumford 

Edson v. Evans 

William G. Borden 

John Barker 

Asa Gray 

Allen Durfee 



2 orders 



304 

152 
4 28 
460 
4 60 

6 52 

7 64 
116 
164 
2 92 

2 92 
140 
180 
6 84 
6 84 

3 96 

6 52 

4 44 

7 48 
164 
156 
140 
196 
220 
540 

3 48 

4 60 
108 

29 00 
817 
100 
4 00 

30 

3 04 

30 04 
216 
126 
120 
116 
2 00 

2 40 

4 48 
184 

3 48 



OCTOBER, 1851. 


• 


George P. Anthony 




2 40 


George VV. Bamej 


■ 


2 08 


Fenner Brownell 




3 60 


William Bailey 




10 32 


William Barker 




1160 


Alonzo Borden 




13 20 


Jo^ph Brownell 




14 00 


William Cory 




13 20 


John G. Crandall 




. 13 52 


Ciarles J. Cornell 




10 32 


David Coggeshall 




10 80 


John S. Cottrell 




1112 


Peter Cha-se 




10 96 


Hemy H. Cook 




10 00 


Joseph W. Dockray 




10 80 


Nathaniel B. Durfee 




12 40 


Thomas D. Grinnell 




14 00 


Kobinson P. Gardner 




10 00 


Reuben F. Greene 




2 88 


John H. Gardner 




2 80 


Dennis H. Hunt 




4 00 


Edward Hull 




1160 


Nathaniel H. Lake 




3 44 


John C. Lawton 




10 96 


Edward McHugh 




2 08 


Eaaton Peabody 




14 00 


John S. Paine 




. 13 20 


Peleg Sanford 




4 00 


Christopher S. Southwick 




. 10 80 


John Tallman 




2 80 


WiUiam Tew Tilley 




10 00 


Peter B. Underwood 




2 16 


James E. Weeden 




10 16 


John G. VVUbour 




14 00 


John Wilbour 




10 00 


Robert WUson 




2 08 


Darias M. Wilcox 




10 00 


William Wilcox. 




5 88 


Gideon Wilcox 




. 13 20 


Charles Cotton 


3 orders 


2 16 


John 6. Sherman 


3 do. 


2 16 


James McKennon 


3 do. 


2 16 


Robert Seaile 


3 do. 


3 00 


William Read 

8 


2 do. 


176 



57 



58 



OCTOBER, 1851. 



Margaret Havy 

Michael Havy 

Nathan M. Chaffee 

Thomas H. Owen 

John H. Watson 

Oliver 0. Harra 

William J. Roberts 

John H. Watson 

Robert Seatle 

James Lawton 

Joshua B. Rathbun 

George Lyndon 

Albert Hewett 

John C. Card 

Clerk's bill, Supreme Court, 

William Gilpin 

George W. Stanhope 

Elizabeth Perry 

Bridget Mahoney 

William Sherman 

Susan A. Eldred 

John Eldred 

George M. Coit 

Thomas Dunmore 

Catherine Wardell 

Derrick Wardell 

Daniel C. Denham 

James Douglass 

Ann Wardell 

Almy Allen 

Benjamin Manchester 

Frederick A. Boomer 

Daniel C. Denham 

George W. Cross 

James Sheldon 

Roger W. Potter 

George W. Allen 

Russell Clapp 

Edward Clarke 

George S. Coy 

George D. Cross 

Gardner Richards 

Charles A Leonard 

Henry G. Ballou 



3 orders 

2 do. 

3 do. 
3 do. 
3 do. 
• 

2 do. 

3 do. 
3 do. 



Newport 



3 orders 
3 do. 
3 do. 
2 do. 



3 orders 
3 do. 
2 do. 
2 do. 

2 do! 
2 do. 



2 orders 

2 do. 

3 do. 

2 do. 



216 

176 

216 

216 

216 

88 

29 26 

5 05 

8 41 

12 00 

12 60 

14 00 

1100 

1100 

69 65 

3 47 

2 08 

3 00 
300 
3 00 
132 

44 
2 00 
100 
604 
604 
256 

2 20 
44 

5 60 

27 82 

150 

3 65 
26 26 
62 56 
73 99 

3 20 

38 24 

10 00 

5 98 

176 

3 60 
360 

4 56 



OCTOBKK, 1851. 




Paris L. Paine 


4 56 


Edward lillibridge 


172 


Jj'. F. Balkcom 


3 52 


WUliam C. Capron 


4 56* 


John Grain 


3 52 


Bobert Shennan 


3 52 


Otis Freeman 


3 52 


Joseph Fry 


5 64 


John P. Boberte 


2 08 


Alfred Fairbanks 


6 96 


Sterry B. Fenner 


5 96 


John G. Wood 


2 48 


Thomas Levally 


2 40 


Isaac G. Bowen 


5 72 


Levi Johnson 


6 52 


Jason Yaughan 


4 36 


Ezra D. Bates 


5 36 


Seth B. Lewis 


6 44 


Seth B. Levis 


172 


Baymond P. Goff 


7 24 


Daniel C. Wood 


8 20 


John Whipple 


5 28 


Gideon B. Card 


6 60 


Samuel Albro 


6 92 


Peleg W. Westcott 


5 48 


John D. Spink 


6 96 


Augustus G. Millard 


3 48 


Beriah Albro 


7 88 


Gflbert P. Salisbury 


7 24 


Henry J. CampbeU 


688 


Peleg Andrews 


7 20 


Joseph Carpenter 


2 40 


John H. Johnson 


2 08 


Elisha Harris 


2 64 


Henry Hamilton 


2 48 


Allison Franklin 


3 20 


George Fairbanks 


5 42 


John James 


3 40 


Nathan Carr 


6 16 


John Lillibridge 


3 36 


Christopher R Whipple 


5 28 


Ebenezer Slocum 


2 08 


Bobert Hazard 


3 60 


Bobert H. Lunderlin -. 


6 92 



69 



60 



OCTOBER, 1851. 



John James 

John Higgins 

Jeremiah S. Slociim 

George Perry 

Alexander Allen 

Isaac Brown 

Hazard H. Cooper 

Edward Kenyon 

Abel Paine 

George F. Williams 

Job Wilbonr 

Arnold Pratt 

Joseph C. Medbury 

Padden C. Hopkins 

George B. Hill 

Robert Aldrich 

Stacy W. Remington 

Henry Reynolds 

Richard C. Martin 

John F. Bagnall 

W. S. Burges, Attorney General 

Allen Tillinghast 

HoUisK. Jencks 

Augustus G. Millard 

George Vaughan 

William Matteson 

Ezra Spencer 

Peleg Matteson 

Albert A. Hall 

Henry A. Remington 

William G. Weaver 

David W. Hunt 

Joseph H. Arnold 

Jeremiah Foster 

Henry A. Cruff 

William D. Davis 

Edwin W. Potter 

Daniel L. Briggs 

John C. Harris 

Christopher Holden 

Alfred C. Matteson 

Ezra I. Cady 

Sheffield W. Havens 

Daniel Nason 





6 28 




516 




155 




1158 




. 23 90 




5 00 




4 20 




612 




8 20 




612 




580 




6 76 




6 92 




7 72 




6 96 


7 72 


5 48 




132 




5O0 


lers 


6 52 


■ 


2100 




8 20 




3 48 




3 48 




9 04 




8 40 




6 32 




8 88 




108 




4 12 




3 16 




3 16 




7 44 




6 48 




188 




6 96 




7 60 




6 48 




3 16 




148 




9 04 




3 96 




8 40 




6 96 



OCTOBER, 1851. 61 



Dean Kimball 

Jonathan Freeborn 

Samuel Greene 

Stephen A. Potter 

John Weaver - 2 orders 

PhUip Arnold 2 do. 

Alexander Allen 

W. S. Burges, Attorney General 

Daniel Hendrick 

Thomas Healy 

R W. Potter 

W. S. Burges, Attorney General 

Jeremiah Woodmansie 

Peter Gladding 

Joseph M. Gardner 

WiUiam H. Smith 

James M. Bowen 

Clarke L. Vaughan 

James Maxfield 

EUis Peck 

Thomas G. Munro 

Charles Wheaton 

William Richmond 

William Usher 

Bennett J. Munro 

Isaac Manchester 

John S. Pearce 

Levi Horton 

Shubael B. Cole 

Clerk's bill, Common Pleas, Kent 

Rescom Case - 2 orders 

Lucy Brown 

Lemuel Manchester 



R — Paid orders of the Govermr. 

Hamilton's Express 

Joseph Knowles 

Rowe & Co., advertising 

Butler Hospital, per act of General Assembly, 

February, 1850 
Bristol Train of Artillery 
H. S. Olney, labor in Secretary's office 



3 32 


6 16 


6 48 


2 80 


4 32 


2 88 


■ 40 76 


16 50 


96 


88 


100 


14100 


3 36 


80 


140 


164 


200 


2 54 


1 56 


164 


106 


2 90 


3 28 


2 54 


2 00 


5 00 


6 20 


100 


2 64 


33 09 


5 60 


88 


2 00 


$7,001 62 


|8 87 


2 00 


150 


. 638 64 


12 00 


19 94 



62 OCTOBER, 1851. 

Postage, &c. - - - 12 63 

C. E. Bobbins, per resolution June, 1851 30 00 

Asa Potter, freight, advertising, &c. - 4 25 
William Beach Lawrence, postage, porterage, 

and telegraphic despatches, - 20 00 
Asa Potter, warrants, stamps, &c - - 10 38 
Sayles & Miller, printing School Act, per reso- 
lution June, 1851 . - 283 03 



$1,043 24 
F. — Paid for Printing. 
Joseph Knowles, printing for public schools, $6 00 

H. — Accounts allowed hy the Gevyeral A&%emhTff. 

George T. Mellville 

William Eagleston 

Timothy Coggeshall ... 

Cranston & Norman 

William A. Barber . - • 

Charles E. Hammett 

Peter P. Bemington 

Mason Gorton 

Thomas Bateman - - . 

Patrick Williams 

Buth Taylor 

Charles Brackett 

William H. Bailey ... 

Bowland Cahoone 

Amos R Sweet ... 

Boswell Wilcox 

Alonzo Cahoone . . . 

Samuel B. Perry 

H. C. Wardwell 

Israel K. Potter 

Elisha Arnold ... 

Edmimd Walker 

George W. Babcock 

George Lamed 

John G. Sheffield 

Hervey Babcock 

Stephen C, Jack . . - 

Jesse Brown . . • 

Newport Artillery 



|O40 


120 


3 35 


1100 


50 


82 


25 


60 


160 


44 


88 


88 


3 75 


44 


44 


44 


44, 


3 60 


3 50 


6 30 


60 


200 


660 


200 


5 38 


80 


240 


128 


129 38 



OCTOBKK, 1851. 




Christopher Fitzpatrick 


80 


William H. Douglass 


3 02 


James Lawton 


5 00 


William Swan, Jr. 


5 00 


James H. Douglass 


6 00 


William H. Douglass 


7 60 


William C. Thurston 


9 96 


Thomas T. Hazard 


10 00 


Smith & Coggeshall 


- 16 37 


Thomas Durfee 


2100 


Benjamin F. Thurston 


- 2100 


Henry Taggart 


165 99 


Thomas R. Hazard, visiting insane 


150 35 


James Atkinson 


5 00 


James Horsewell 


. 10 50 


Sarah D. Mitchell 


44 


William Gilpin 


- 22 70 


William A. Sherman 


7 90 


Isuah Burdick 


4 39 


Joh Armstrong 


7 40 


Benjamin M. Bosworth 


56 


Fidelia Burlingame 


56 


Thomas Bateman 


2 92 


Do. do. 


6 80 


Do. do. 


3 44 


Do. do. 


139 88 


Bussell Clapp 


- 48 33 


Joseph M. Cross 


12 40 


Ge -rge H. Church, Jr. 


44 


Joseph W. Cooper 


44 


Emor Coe 


450 


•Stephen F. Carpenter 


52 


Benjamin Cornelius 


56 


Gamaliel L. Dwight 


10 48 


Beniamin T. Fames 


9 00 


JohnHolden 


100 00 


Charles M. Hayden 


- 35 10 


Wingate Hays 


21 00 


Do. do. 


5 00 


Amanda F. Hunter 


44 


Abner Jillson 


5 00 


Peleg Johnson 


10 00 


Stephen Johnson 


170 


Joseph Knowles 


729 28 



63 



G4 OCTOBER, 1851. 

Nancy McLellan - - - 30 00 
Do. do. - - - 10 OO 
Thomas Marble - - - 56 
Spencer Mowry - - 4 50 
Bennett J. Munro - - - 2 50 
Charles E. Newell - - 35 00 
JohnS.Pearce - - - 45 81 
Do. do. - - - 160 
Do. do. ... 103 40 
Thomas Pearce - - 43 50 
Jabez J. Potter - - - 26 00 
Elizabeth Price - - 56 
Elisha R Potter - - - 56 47 
Polly Price ... 56 
Charles Randall - - - 8 25 
Samuel Randall - - 4 50 
Joseph Knowles - - - 347 39 
Jeremiah S. Sherman - - 35 99 
William A. Sherman - - - 13 40 
R S. Strait ... 72 
Emor Smith - - -108 
Fidelia Steere . . - 56 
Phebe Steere - - - 56 
Alfred Updike ... 44 
Lurana Waldron - - - 40 
Thomas Whipple - - 12 75 
Lucy A. Whipple - . - 44 
John Wood - - - 162 
Gilmore & Hunt, repairs of Court House, Pro- 
vidence - - - 500 00 
Gilmore & Hunt, repairs of Court House, Pro- 
vidence - - - 3,012 00 
Inspectors of State Prison, their order for repairs 500 00 
Samuel B. Perry - - - 3 70 
SethW.Macy - - - 17 20 
Aaron Burrough - - - 40 
George PuUen - . - 40 
Robert Seatle - - - 7 85 
J. V. Turner & Son - - 7 73 
Benjamin F. Thurston - - 24 00 
OtisWilbour - - . - 100 
James Smith - - - 1 00 
G«orge Lyndon - - 9 00 
William Brownell - - - 33 84 



OCTOBER, 1851, 



65 



John C. Card 
William J. Roberts 
Henrv Oman 
Walter S. Surges 

Do. 
James Law ton 
Benjamin Brown 
Albert Hewitt 
James G. Sisson 
Joshua B. Bathbun 
J. V. Turner & Son 
John H. Watson 
John H. Clegg, remission of fine 
Mason & Pratt 
Sayles & Miller 
Timothy Coggeshall 
Daniel Smith 
Daniel Congdon, Jr. 
Willet Himes 
Benjamin Mumford 
H. Taggart 

Do. 
H. Y. Cranston and T. R. 
John Harris 

Do. 
Jeremiah S. Slocum 
John Stanton 
John Gardner 
Harrison G. Nichols 
Thomas Durfee 
Charles Randall 
Knowles & Anthony 
Pierce, Salisbury & Co. 
Joseph Knowles 

Do. 
Wingate Hayes 
Bennett J. Munro 
Olney Arnold 
Court of Magistrates 
William H. Mathewson 
Christopher Hawkins 
Horace M. Pearce 
Sayles & Miller 
Jabez C. Potter 
9 



Hunter 



6 00 

12 70 

71 34 

6 00 

600 

500 

6 00 

6 00 

88 

9 00 

6 48 

6 83 
25 00 

8 00 
20 00 

7 26 
44 
44 
44 

200 

5 00 
29 80 
48 00 

3 95 
170 

8 75 
45 00 

52 

100 

24 00 

18 34 

20 00 

16186 

117 50 

38 00 

24 00 

6 00 

8 00 
294 45 

9 32 
57 87 
12 70 

136 13 
65 60 



66 



OCTOBER, 1851. 




Feiuier Kimball 


. 55 75 


Sajles & Miller 


45 70 


Do. 


. 15 00 


Jeremiah S. Slocum 


180 


Abraham Walker 


2 00 


Thomas Bateman 


29 79 


Do. 


. 2100 


Providence Reform School 


244 80 


Esek Aldrich 


2 00 


Charles Akerman 


500 


Do. 


3 00 


Nathan Bardin 


280 


Do. 


5 06 


Horatio N. Pratt 


. 32 46 


John Harris 


2 54 


Daniel C. Denham 


250 


Do. 


3 25 


Stephen Hammett 


80 


George E. Vernon, administrator 


15 00 


Daniel C. Denham 


250 


Joseph K. Angell 


240 62 


Inspectors of State Prison, their order for 


repairs 5O0 00 


Thomas Durfee 


. 975 00 


Thomas Wilcox 


46 50 


Cromwell T. Salisbury 


. 3181 


George L. Dana 


166 


Spicer Greene 


68 


Thomas Carpenter 


52 


John Andrews 


52 


John W. Smith 


44 


Manning King 


44 


Benjamin Cottrell 


6 00 


Samuel Kent 


88 


John J. Banks 


80 


Robert Gardner 


44 


Hezekiah C. Wardwell, for repairs Court 


House, 


Bristol 


. 150 00 


Jeremiah Hazard 


300 


Mary Ann Sheldon 


80 


Peter P. Bemington 


3 00 


Timothy Coggeshall 


2 14 


Nicholas S. Fry, repairs Jail, Kent 


78 45 



Joseph D. Daly, repairs of State House, Pro- 
vidence . 220 00 



OCTOBER, 1851. 



67 



George M, Johnson^ repairs of State House, Pro- 
vidence 
J, Winsor 
Shubael Hutchins 
William Tibbetts 
R Potter & Co. 
Jeremiah Woodmansie 
Thomas R Dawley 
Savles & Miller 
William A. Barber 



5183 

50 

2 00 

8 08 

5 54 

56 

2 50 

108 20 

1125 









$11,005 59 






I. — Paid Public Sc/iools. 




City 


Treasurer, Providence 


$6,940 04 


Town Treasurer, Newport 


1,515 89 


u 


C6 


North Kingstown 


508 26 


a 


ii 


Little Compton 


254 91 


a 


U 


Tiverton 


930 31 


a 


u 


Scituate 


733 39 


u 


ii 


Smithfield 


1,970 85 


•< 


a 


North Providence 


1,326 79 


et 


u 


Johnston 


537 51 


u 


a 


Cumberland 


1,127 71 


u 


u 


Cranston 


797 11 


u 


a 


Hopkinton 


468 02 


i. 


u 


Exeter 


308 71 


u 


u 


Charlestown 


176 56 


u 


u 


South Kingstown 


686 90 


u 


u 


Coventry 


600 71 


u 


u 


East Greenwich 


389 16 


u 


a 


W arwick 


1,254 18 


u 


u 


Bristol 


772 04 


a 


u 


W arren 


416 65 


u 


a 


Portsmouth 


320 73 


u 


a 


Middletown 


135 29 


u 


u 


Barrington 


106 05 


u 


a 


Burrillville 


618 48 


a 


u 


Jamestown 


48 06 


tf 


a 


New Shoreham 


263 79 


tt 


u 


Glocester 


445 57 


it 


u 


Westerly 


473 78 



$24,127 51 



68 



OCTOBER, 1851. 
J. — State Appropriaiion for PvhUe Schools. 



City Treasurer, Providence 

Town " Newport 

" " North Kingstown 
" « Little Compton 
" Tiverton 


$2,776 01 
606 34 
203 30 
101 96 
372 13 


a 


a 


Scituate 


293 35 


u 


a 


Smithfield 


788 34 


u 


ii 


North Providence 


530 71 


u 


a 


Johnston 


215 00 


u 


iC 


Cumberland 


451 10 


li 


a 


Cranston 


318 85 


ti 




Hopkinton 
Exeter 


187 22 
123 49 


u 


a 


Charlestown 


70 62 




u 
a 


South Kingstown 
Coventry 
East Greenwich 


274 76 
240 29 
155 66 


a 


u 


Warwick 


50168 


C6 


ii 


Bristol 


308 82 


a 


a 


Warren 


166 66 


u 


u 


Portsmouth 


128 29 


u 


u 


Middletown 


54 12 


a 


ii 
a 


Barrington 
Burrillville 


42 40 
247 38 


u 


a 


Jamestown 


19 22 


a 


u 


New Shoreham 


105 52 


u 


.c 


Glocester 


178 23 


u 


u 


Westerly 


189 51 



$9,650 96 

*K. — Received for Pedlars' Licenses. 

Hervey Matteson, Providence . $100 00 

George Wade, Scituate 100 00 
Elisha Chapin and Edward Gee, Massachusetts 100 OO 

Willard S. Eddy, Glocester . . 100 00 

J. A. Wallace, Providence 100 OO 

Benjamin Moon, Providence . . 200 00 

H. S. Crane and A. S. Davis, Connecticut 100 00 



^16 of the above in the State. 
4 do. do. out of the State. 



OCTOBER, 1851. 



(VJ 



W. 8. Huntoon and H. Cahoon, Providence 

Beriah D. Crandall, Richmond 

Emery N. Bixby, Providence 

Lewis Furst and J. S. Brown, Massachusetts 

Joseph Fink, Providence 

Hervey E. Appleby, Scituate 

Thomas J. Martin, Scituate 

Enoch Stecre, Jr., Glocester 

Jacob and Joseph Straus, Westerly 

F. E. Hartshorn and H. Leonard, Massachusetts 

R K. and S. J. Hoxie, Richmond 

Dustin & Pearce, Providence 



L. — Received of Auclioneei'S, 

William Barker, Portsmouth 

James W. Anthony, South Kingstown 

George H. Reynolds, Bristol 

Samuel Pearce, North Kingstown 

S. A. DriscoU, Warren 

Joseph Osborne, Tiverton 

Weaver Osborne do. 

Benjamin York, Westerly 

W. N. Sherman, North Kingstown 

Charles N. Tilley, Newport 

Joshua B. Curtis, South Kingstown 

Lyman Barney, Cranston 

Daniel G. Aldrich, Providence 

Sylvester Hartshorn, do. 

A. G. Barton, do. 
M. R. Gardner, do. 

B. a Wilbour & Co. do. 
J. A. D. Joslin, do. 
A, B. Dike, do. 
Samuel A. Parker, Newport 
Milton Hall, do. 
John Harris, North Providence 
Henry Staples, Providence 
James Hammond, do. 
Henry M. Brown ell, Newport 
L. P. Ward, BurriUville 
Nathan Porter, Cranston 
E. W. Brownell, Little Compton 



100 00 


100 00 


JOOOO 


100 00 


100 00 


100 00 


100 00 


100 00 


100 00 


tts 100 OO 


100 00 


100 00 


$2,000 00 


$23 34 


10 23 


10 75 


9 21 


199 


1 79 


2 25 


10 49 


2 61 


2 77 


4 79 


6 01 


16 48 


13 


10 95 


33 51 


15 32 


133 16 


55 60 


24 26 


2 83 


13 89 


47 29 


49 55 


2 66 


5 80 


12 51 


1 88 



1 



70 



OCTOBER, I80I, 

Nathaniel Church, Little Compton 

Emor Coe, Smithfield 

J. S. Whitford, East Greenwich 

C. S. Siveetland, Johnston 

Sabin Allen, Smithfield 

John Peckham, Middle town 

Silas Moore, Providence 

Tillinghast Almy, do. 

John M. Eddy, Glocester 

Alfred Hixon, Cumberland 

Elisha A. Whitaker, Providence 

S. Gano Benedict, North Providence 

George B. Kinnicutt, Barrington 

RandaU P. Eddy, Smithfield 

Samuel Steere, Jr., Glocester 

Hiram L. Howard, North Providence. 

David Patt, Cumberland 

William E. Coe, do. 



Ci 



Providence Banks 


N. Providence 


a 


Tiverton 


a 


Scituate 


a 


Cumberland 


u 


Smithfield 


a 


Foster 


u 


Cranston 


u 


Glocester 


u 


W arwick 


u 


E. Greenwich 


a 


Coventry 
Exeter 


u 
u 


N. Kingstown 
S. Kingstown 
Westerly 
Bristol 


u 


Warren 


u 


Newport 


u 





92 




4 04 




7 97 




9 79 




3 75 




184 




159 




9 08 




70 




45 83 




87 




751 




450 


• 


43 




5 57 




318 




3 93 


. 


10 


$623 68 


'fapiial Slock. 


$13,457 99 


479 25 




299 71 




60 00 




337 50 




415 50 




90 00 




37 50 




57 00 




112 50 




122 94 




112 44 




32 00 




187 50 




300 00 




439 95 




476 25 




412 50 




1,020 00 



$18,450 53 



OCTOBER, 1851. 

N. — Jieceived of Batiks for tax on increase of Capiial Stock. 

Bank of North America, Providence 850 00 

American Bank « - - 1,477 00 

Blackstone Canal Bank « - 691 50 

Commercial « - - 21100 

Eagle « - 1,354 00 

Globe « - - 909 00 

Pawtoxet " - 262 00 

Phenix « - - 2,000 00 

Smithfield Lime Rock « • 756 00 

Weybosset « - - 855 00 

State " - 130 00 

New England Pacific, North Providence 13 00 

People's « - - 487 00 

Cumberland, Cmnberland - 39 00 

Globe, Smithfield - - 428 50 

North Providence, North Providence 33 00- 

Smithfield Union, Smithfield - - 173 00 

landholders, South Kingstown - 1000 00 

Wakefield « - - - 1,036 25 



$12,705 26 

0. — Received from Banks for tax on surplus or reserved 

Profits. 

Blackstone Canal Bank, Providence 
City « 

Mechanics & Manufacturers '^ - 
Pawtuxet " 

Phenix " - 

Providence " 

Roger Williams ** - 

New England Pacific, North Providence 
Franklin, Glocester 

Narragansett, North Kingstown 
Washington, Westerly 
Commercial, Bristol 
Hope, Warren 

275 35 



7 50 


14 97 


8 06 


6 00 


23 16 


152 08 


29 13 


07 


181 


1114 


8 41 


2 26 


10 77 



72 OCTOBER, 1851. 

P. — Received of Banks for Bonus. 

State Bank, Prov. 1st installment, 500 00 
Do. do. 2d do. 500 00 

Interest on the above - 22 50 

State Bank, Prov. 3d installment 500 00—1,522 50 
Hopkinton Bank, Westerly, 3d installment 250 GO 
Bank of the South County, South Kings- 
town, 1st installment - - 375 00 



|2,147 50 



Q. — Received of Imnirance Companies not imorporaied in 

this State 

Caleb Colvin, Agent Berkshire Mutual Health 

Association, Pittsfield, Mass. 5 00 

John H. Ormsbee, Agent JEtna Fire Insurance 

Company, Hartford, Conn. 350 00 

Gamaliel L. Dwight, Agent Merchants and 
Farmers Mutual Fire Insurance Compa- 
ny, Worcester, Mass. 

John Adams, Agent People's Mutual Fire In- 
surance Company, Worcester, Mass. 

Gamaliel L. Dwight, Agent Howard Fire In- 
surance Company, Lowell, Mass. 

A. B. Bradley, Agent ^Etna Life Insurance, 
Hartford, Conn. 

Hezekiah Griswold, Jr., Agent Union Mutual 
Life Insurance Company, Boston, Mass. 

D. W. Jenkins, Agent Connecticut Mutual Life 
Insurance Company, Hartford, Conn. 

Henry P. Knight, Agent New York Life In- 
surance Company, New York, 

Francis E. Hoppin, Agent National Loan Fund 
Life Assurance Society of London, 

James Y. Smith, Agent. Hartford Fire Insur- 
ance Company, Hartford, Conn. 

Benjamin Stevens, Agent Springfield Fire and 
Marine Insurance Co. Springfield, Mass. 

Wingate Hayes, Agent U. States Life Insur- 
ance Company, New York, 

Isaac Brown, Agent Protection Fire and Ma- 
rine Insurance Co. Hartford, Conn. 

Gamaliel L. Dwight, Agent State Mutual Life 
Assurance Company, Worcester, Mass. 



350 00 


350 00 


350 00 


15 85 


85 37 


210 76 


45 61 


46 28 


350 CO 


350 00 


23 69 


350 00 


197 00 



OCTOBER, 1851. f§ 

Cramaliel L Dwight, Agent Hope Mutual Life 

Insurance Company, Stamford, Conn. 11 45 

X Arthur Clarke and Daniel Martin, Agents 
Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Co. 
for a license, 5 OO 



3,096 01 



JiSecewed of Insurance Companies incorporated by iJdi 

State. 

5amuel Nightingale, Treasurer Manufacturers* 

Mutual Fire Insurance C\ Providence, 200 00 

Warren S. Greene, Secretary Washington In- 
surance Company, Providence, .300 00 

£ E. Manton, Secretary Rhode-Island Mutual 

Fire Insurance Company, Providence, 50 00 

ADen 0. Peck*, President American Insurance 

Company, Providence, 300 00 

George C. Arnold, Secretary Roger Williams 

Insurance Company, Providence, 300 00 





1,150 00 


D. — Supreme Court. 




Dr. 




Paid Attorney General 


167 00 


" Jurors ... 


1,637 60 


" Witnesses ... 


62129 


" Clerks 


733 88 


" OflScers ... 


325 94 


" Other costs, waiters, and incidental ex- 




penses, - - " - 


88163 



4,367 34 

S. — Supreme Court. 

Cr. 

By Entries - - - 60 00 

" Jury Fees - - 125 00 

" Other costs - - - 126 70 

" Tax on excess of Clerk's fees - 260 40 

" Fines - - - 156 14 



728 24 



10 



74 OCTOBER, 1851. 

D. — dmrt of Common Pleas. 

Dr. 

Paid Attorney General - - 300 50 
« Jurors - - - 76010 
« Witnesses - - - 353 09 
« Clerks - • - - 713 83 
« Officers - - - 240 37 
" Other costs, waiters, and incidental ex- 
penses, - - - 266 39 

$2,634 28 

T. — Oouri of Common Pleas. 

Cb. 

By Jury Fees - - - 170 00 

« Other costs - - - 1,092 28 

« Tax on excess of Clerk's Fees - • 400 00 

« Fines - - - 381 00 



$2,043 28 

U. — Received of Justices of the Peace. 

William A. Pearce, Johnston - - 34 OO 

Jonathan Nichols, West Greenwich - 10 00 

J. S. Whitford, East Greenmch - - lOOO 

Samuel Randall, Warren - - 28 00 

P. Gladding, Bristol - - - 11 58 

Asa Gray, Tiverton - - 1 00 

L. B. Arnold, Cumberland - - 18 OO 

George Lamed, North Kingstown - 60 00 

Thomas R. King, North Providence - 22 00 

William Earl, do. - 18 00 

John H. Weeden, do. - - 12 50 

Simon Lillibridge, Exeter - - 20 00 

Bennett J. Munro, Bristol - - 6 60 

Daniel S. Mowry, Burrillville - 01 

Amasa Ballou do. - - 10 00 

J. S. Slocum, East Greenwich - 1 00 

James Warren, Jr., Coventry - - 1 00 

George L. Dana, Cumberland - 2 00 

Schuyler Fisher, Exeter - - 39 80 

William G. Borden, Tiverton - 22 70 

James P. Babcock, South Kingstown - 10 00 

Benjamin H. Horton, Coventry - 10 00 



OCTOBER, 1851. 75 

TfilJiam Gilpin, Newport 

Ezra D. Hawkins, Glocester 
Benjamin Hull, South Kingstown 
Sylvester Sherman, North Kingstown 
Gridley Burnham, Glocester 
Nathan Moore, Richmond 
Matthew Chappell, South Kingstown 
Matthew C. Card, Richmond 
Abner Jillson, Cumberland 
Emor Coe, Smithfield 
Daniel C. Denham, Newport 
Alfred Reed, Warwick 
William P. Arnold, Westerly 

$650 44 

V. — Received of Town Councils, 

City of Providence - - 647 08 

Town of Glocester - - 20 37 

A- G. Greene,Clerk Municipal Court, Providence 18 00 

Town of Smithfield - - 61 28 

« Cumberland - - 40 00 

** North Providence - 21 75 

« Warren - - - 14 62 

« Bristol - - 12 00 

« Hopkinton - - 9 50 

"^ Foster . - - 2 00 

« Westerly - - - 2 00 

« South Kingstown - 5 00 

« Cranston - - - 128 27 



10 00 


20 25 


43 00 


100 


150 


40 00 


10 00 


10 00 


3 00 


50 00 


56 00 


50 00 


7 50 



$981 87 

W. — Received for Dividends on School Fund Stock. 
Globe Bank, dividend on 694 shares, 1,214 50 

Mechanics Bank, dividend on 332 shares, 581 00 



$1,795 50 



X. — Received for Dividends and Interest on Public Deponfes. 
Globe Bank, dividend on 1,306 shares 2,285 50 

American Bank, dividend on 256 shares 448 00 

Bank of North America, dividend on 732 do. 1,281 00 
Arcade Bank, dividend on 30 shares 60 00 

$4^74 50 



70 OCTOBER, I85I. ^^ 

Y. — Heeeivedfor 8tate Tax. 
Town Trewairer, Exeter - - laiO^'Iij 



u 



Burrillville - 267 36 



'S I 



« Glocester . - 208 09;'^ 

« Jamestown 62 10 

Less 5 per cent 3 10 — 59 00 



$658 54 

Z.-^Reedtedfor rent of Oyster Lc^. 

William Spencer, for rent - - 10' 0( 

G.Rice « - - 15 « 

JohnWilbour « - - 10 (X 

B. Smith '' - - 10 0( 

Cranston P. Peckham, do. - - 10 0( 

George R S. Saundens, do. - 10 0( 

II ml 

AA — Received for tax on Civil Commissions. 

Thomas Bateman, Kent - - 22 (M 

S. Johnson, Bristol - - 18 Oi 

William H. Douglass, Jfewport - 11 (H 

$51 Oi 

BB. — Received of Providence and PawtucJcet Turnpike 

Road, 

Edward Wilkinson, Agent - - $222 3J 

CC. — Received^for unclaimed balatiee resulting from sales d 
Executions deposited by Sheriffs and their Deputies. 

By balance in my hands, deposited by Jabez 

J. Potter, Deputy Sheriff, - $41 2) 



lom May, 1851, to October, 1851. 



^LEAS. 

k'8 



t 



Fines. 



Auction- 
eers. 



Dividends 

on School 

Fund 

Stocks. 



Interest on 
Public De- 
posits. 



AGGREGATE. 



Towns. 



Counties. 



^ 4k Jb ' ^^ 

and rheumatism ; convalescence is more rapid, and the 
prisoners more healthy and robust. Diarrhoea has been 
more prevalent and violent, than at any former period. 
It commenced in April — ^in which month there were 



78 OCTOBER, 1851. 

3 cases ; in May, 5 cases ; in Jnne, 6 cases ; in July, 40 
cases ; in August, 9 cases, and in September, 1 case. 

A Table, showing the diseases as they occurred each 
month, and the deaths; though it does not show all 
the milder forms of disease, for which medication 
has been necessary. 





-1 


lUt. 














, 


DISEASES. 


1'^ 

li 

o a 






1 
< 


t 
g 


t-3 




1 \ 


Diarrhoea, 


1 


1 


~l~ 






3 


6 


6 


42 


9 


1 


Dyspepsia, 


2 


1 


i 1 




1 




1 


1 










Rheumatism, 


1 


1 


1 




















Syphilis, second. 




2 










1 


1 










Cough, 




2 


2 1 




















Gastro Enteritis, 




1 




1 
















1 




Fevers, 








1 




1 


1 


2 


1 




6 






Tuberculous Peri- 




























tonitis, 










1 
















1 


Urethritis, 










1 


















Pneumonia, 












2 
















Dysentery, 














1 




1 


1 


2 






Nephritis, 












1 


1 













S. AUG. AENOLD, 
Phpician to the Rhode Island SicUe Prison. 
Providence, Oct 27, 1851. 



REPORT OF THE BOA!tD OF RAILROAD COM- 
MISSIONERS. 
To the Hon. the General Assembly of the State of 
Rhode Island, &c., at their October ses.sion, now hold- 
en by adjournment, at South Kingstown, A. D. 1851. 
The attention of the undersigned Railroad Comraia- 
sioners having been called to the investigation of the 
complaint of R. G. Hazard,James B. M. Potter and Otis 
H. Kelton & Co. again-^t the New York, Providence, 
Boston and Stonington Railroad Company, {the origin- 
al of which complaint, with the minutes of testimony 
thereoD, they herewith return,) respectfully 



OCTOBER, 1851. 79 

REPORT : 

That on the 9th of September last, the complainants 
filed charges against the Stonington Railroad Company 
as follows : 

Fint That the company charge more for the way 
business than they have a right to do. 

Second, That they make improper distinctions as to 
freight and passengers. (See paper A.) 

A hearing was had on the 23d of September, at which 
an order was taken upon complainants, to file specifi- 
cations of charges ; in compliance with which order, 
on the 27th of September, the complainants filed their 
particulars of charges, (see paper B.) and a hearing 
thereon was ordered. 

Oq the 7th of October, in pursuance of such order, 
at the city of Providence, due notice having been giv- 
en, the complainants (except Mr. Hazard,) and the re- 
spondents, by their proper officers and attorney, ap- 
peared before a majority of the Commissioners, and 
their several pleas, allegations and evidence was heard. 

To sustain the charge that the company exact more 
for their way than for their through business, (see spe- 
cifications 1, 2, 7, 8, 9 and 10,) the complainants rely 
upon the tariife of freight and passage published by the 
company. 

Some evidence was oflFered that horses had been car- 
ried for a Mr. Taylor at a less rate than the fare 
charged Mr. Kelton for a like service ; but it appear- 
ing that this was done under special contract, and at a 
rate which Mr. Kelton, or any other citizen could have 
secured the same amount of transportation, the com- 
missioners dismissed its further consideration. 

It is an admitted fact, that the company charge four- 
teen cents per 100 pounds first class freight,from Pro- 
vidence to Stonington, a distance of about fifty miles, 
whilst they charge seven cents for a like amount of 
fireight from Stonington to Westerly, a distance of five 
or six miles ; and the complainants contend that this 
difference in the rate per mile is a violation of that por- 
tion of their charter, which requires, ^ that their tolls 
shall be at such rates per mile." The company on their 
part, contend and show, that the simple transportation 
of freight is but a small portion of their labors and out- 
lays ; that the loading and unloading their cars is of 



so OCTOBER, 1851. 

great consideration in their expenditure ; that their 
way business does not sustain itself; that they employ 
way agents to attend to it, at great loss ; that the col- 
lection of way bills is attended with more trouble than 
at their principal termini, where regular agents are 
employed for each specific branch of duty ; that cars 
are unloaded at Providence or Stonington and reload- 
ed and returned again the same day, whilst at way sta- 
tions the cars are left to be imloaded, and then most 
frequently to be carried over the road to a different 
station, where freight may next require their use, thus 
not only requiring more cars to do the same amount 
of business, but consuming more time, at greater in- 
convenience than attends the through business. These 
considerations would most certainly enter into a con- 
tract between individuals, and the commissioners can i 
see no reason why a railroad corporation should not en- 
ter into the same rules of expenditures in fixing their 
rates. If, however, the law is different, then they are 
bound, reasonable or otherwise, to obey it. 

At the adoption of this charter, the commissioners have 
no evidence that any particular object was designed to 
be effected by the use of this particular phrase ; on the j 
contrary, they are shewn that it is was a mere transcript 
of other charters for a like purpose, granted at about the 
same period in other States — and the clause in question 
is to be found, as the commissioners are informed, in 
most Charters of other New England roads. This be- 
ing so, the practice in those states, under such charters, 
would become of much authority here ; and on exam- 
ination of some thirty different tariffs, we find them to j 
be made up upon the same rule with those of the Ston- 
ington road — this would go far to establish a construc- 
tion of the words of their charter. But a stronger au- 
thority with the commissioners is the acquiescence of 
this General Assembly in this rule of interpretation for 
more than sixteen years ; during which time the affairs 
of the company have been the subject of investigation 
time and time again before committees and commis- 
sioners, whose reports have been returned to this Gen- 
eral Assembly. Under all these circumstances, with 
the limited means and time which has been allowed 
the commissioners for their investigation, they do not 
feel authorized to recommend to this Legislature the 



OCTOBER, 1851. 81 

passage of any act which would tend to change this 
long settled course of action, without certainty of mak- 
ing matters any more certain or less liable to abuse or 
injurious effects upon the public interest. 

The charge of the improper use of the privilege of 
granting free tickets, the commissioners have examined 
518 well as their limited time would permit. As to that 
portion of this complaint, which is disconnected with 
the stage lines, and the charge of combination with 
rtage proprietors, the commissioners have relied prin- 
cipally upon the statements of officers of the road, and 
the return of the President, vmder oath, to the General 
Assembly. They have no evidence but that. That 
return is correct, with the exception of that part which 
relates to the Railroad Commissioners, who had not at 
the time of that report, and have not now a free pass 
over this road. In that list there are names, the pur- 
pose of whose favor thus conferred, it would be difficult 
to conjecture. Nor do the commissioners think they 
should be called upon to investigate such a matter, un- 
less the individual case of favor were connected with 
some design of wrong, and that design plainly averred. 
This right should be liberally used — and its numbers 
should not of itself, be used as an evidence of wrong 
design. It is a liberality, which can scarcely work in- 
jury of itself ; and this spirit is so seldom manifested by 
corporations, it should be encouraged when shown, in- 
stead of being made the cause of distrust. But the 
conmiissioners, further than its connection with the 
stage line, do not see any cause to warrant complaint. 
They are fully of the belief, that at this time, the Ston- 
ington company are less liberal than any other like 
company in New England ; even in some instances ex- 
hibiting a want of courtesey, unknown to any other 
railroad corporation in this country. 

As to so much of the charge as relates to specifics, 
that the company have exceeded their powers, by be- 
coming parties in rival stage route companies, carrying 
passengers of one stage a longer distance for a less 
price than those of another stage — and granting to the 
drivers of the favored line free passage over the road. 

It was proved and admitted before the commission- 
ers, that two rival stage routes existed diverging from 
Brand's Iron Works — the one to Kingston, and the 
11 






«2 OCTOBEB, 1851. 

other to Richmond Switch depots — that these two 
stages were started originally, the one at the sugges. 
tion of the company's agent, the other for the accom- 
modation of the district through which it runs. That 
hoth of these stage lines were got up without any de- 
sign of opposition ; that Mr Kelton was oflFered, as an 
inducement to put on his line, a discount of twenty centa 
for every through passenger he should bring to or ca^ 
ry from the road. That the agents of the railroad com- 
pany, when they were informed of the proceedings of 
the other stage, oflFered to make the same discount to 
them ; and it was agreed that the fare from Brand's 
Iron Works should be the same over both roads. That 
matters went on under this arrangement for some time, 
when Mr. Kelton reduced the fare — whether with or 
without the knowledge of the company, is somewhat 
uncertain. The other company then applied to the 
agent of the railroad company, for liberty to reduce 
their fare, which, after some little delay, was granted. 
The heat of opposition grew apace with these rival 
routes, until a second reduction was made by Mr. Kel- 
ton. Mr. Lamphere, on behalf of the other company, 
again applied for liberty to reduce, which was refused 
him by the agent of the road, with the declaration that 
both had violated their agreement with the road, and 
that they were no longer bound to make the deduction 
to them. Of the portion of the testimony relative to 
the knowledge of the companj^s agent, it was conflict- 
ing — and the agent being absent, the commissioners 
had no means to get more definite testimony upon it- 
it appears, however, that the deduction was taken from 
both parties for a time, but remained still the subject 
of solicitation from them. After a short interval, the 
President of the road agreed to allow a discount of sev- 
enteen cents up to a certain date, when he would de- 
cide what he would finally do in the matter. At the 
time agreed upon, it was again taken from both pa^ 
ties. They continued to run their several stages until 
the Richmond Switch line concluded to change their 
termini to Carolina Mills, and it was, at the solicitation 
of Mr. Lamphere, agreed, upon condition that he would 
run a mid-day line, that he should again be allowed 
the deduction — and the stage company erected a build- 
ing for the road at the depot But whether that was 



\ 



OCTOBER 1851. 83 

a part of the agreement, was not shown. This arrange- 
ment with Mr. Lamphere still continues, and as part of 
the agreement, an agent of the stage goes over the 
road Iree of charge, whilst Mr. Kelton's drivers are not 
allowed t6 pass over the road free. This imdoubtedly 
gives one Ime an advantage over the other. 

Numerous other facts were furnished the commis- 
sioners, but principally of a statistical character, and 
would not change the principle involved in this matter. 
The company charge to individual passengers to the 
same stations, the same price in every case, but on a 
final settlement they make a deduction in favor of the 
stage owners. And although the railroad company by 
80 doing, directly violate no law now existing, yet it 
might bear very had upon the interest of individuals, 
and indirectly effect that which, by law the company 
are prohibited from doing. It is for the interest of the 
railroad, and of great public benefit, that new routes 
should be opened, offering new aud increajied facilities 
for the transaction of the business of the State. To 
effect this, the railroad company was chartered, and 
the Legislature must have contemplated, as a natural 
result^ that it would interfere with old routes, and in- 
jure the business of individuals in many instances, and 
that travel, instead of pursuing the long routes, would 
be drawn in upon this channel from every side. And 
it undoubtedly was then expected that the road would 
foster and encourage the change by every means with- 
in its power. In faet, the Legislature did not restrict 
them in so doing. 

But whilst the legislature has left the company fi-ee 
to act in this respect, sensible of the immense power 
wielded by such a corporation, and that if improperly 
used, it would become dangerous to the rights of indi- 
viduals, the Legislature retained the supervisory pow- 
er, and delegated authority to a Board of Commission- 
ers vdth right to examine into all matters of contract 
or doings, at any and all times, and whether there be 
complaint or not, that thereby the agents of the company 
might be restrained from acts of oppression or injustice, 
and the complaints of every citizen be promptly en- 
quired into upon the spot where the injury occurs. — 
Thus guarded, the law has left the right. It now re- 
mains to be seen, if the facts here present a case of a 



84 OCTOBER, 1851. 

character warranting the interference of the General 
Assembly, or requiring general legislation. 

The commissioners, in coming to this consideration, 
desire to be understood as settling no opinion as to 
contracts between the parties, and would observe that 
the witnesses examined to establish their position, are 
not those, in some instances, who would be admitted 
as legal witnesses in a suit at law between the parties; 
and they have avoided in this matter and this stage of 
the controversy, many considerations, under the in- 
formation that the parties injured design to appeal to 
the legal tribunals o^ the State for redress. And the 
commissioners would avoid every thing which would 
tend to the prejudice of either party before the public. 
In the first contract or understanding, there was no 
design of running an opposition between these rival 
stage lines, the parties themselves did not even know 
at first that two lines were to be started. The compa- 
ny first agreed to make the allowance to Mr. Kelton 
as an inducement for him to invest his means in the 
undertaking, they not knowing that another line was 
to be put on, which fact alone would wholly negative 
the supposition of design of favoritism on the part of ^ 
the company. Mr. Kelton was their man, if either, 
and they would have been most likely to have favored 
him in any contest between the ])arties. But another 
conclusive evidence of the good faith of the company 
in this matter is, that when it became known that an- 
other company was formed, and they applied to be al- 
lowed an equal chance for success, the railroad compa- 
ny immediately granted the same opportunity or priv- \ 
lege to them ; and as a further barrier to ruinous com- 
petition between the parties, a fixed rate of fare was 
agreed to by all — and this left the public to choose be- 
tween the routes. The railroad company are interest- 
ed in keeping up both these lines, not in running them 
off. It is by such facilities as these that they are to 
look for the increase of way business. From all the 
testimony, this was undoubtedly the view taken of the 
matter by the company. They foresaw that these par- 
ties, if left to the passion generally engendered by this 
species of rivalry and opposition, would both be ruined, 
and both lines would be abandoned, to the injury of 
the road ; hence the reason why a price was first fixed 



OCTOBER, 1851. 85 

between them. There is some conflict of testimony as 
to the knowledge of Mr. Rutter, the agent of the com- 
pany, of the intention of Mr. Kelton to reduce the rate 
of fare the first time. But the commissioners cannot 
reconcile the conduct of Mr. Rutter and all the other 
parties, upon any other theory than that claimed to be 
true by Mr. Lamphere and the respondents — that there 
was an entire agreement between them ; and that the 
reduction was contrary to the agent's understanding of 
the agreement The commissioners believe that the 
parties acted in this particular, under a mutual mistake 
and misapprehension, and that this has led to the con- 
flict of statement in this particular — the manner of the 
transaction might well lead to this conclusion. If the 
parties fully understood the matter, it was singular 
that one party should seek for liberty to do that which 
he before had the right to do ; that it should be deem- 
ed necessary to notify Mr. Rutter of the change and 
request permission to the same thing the other party 
had already done. And what is more irreconcilable, 
that the now favored party should be denied by Mr. Rut- 
ter the privilege of doing the act he denied, until Mr.Kel- 
tou should be seen. And at the second reduction, when 
Mr. Rutter gave his reason for denying any further 
allowance to either of the parties — that they had both 
broken their agreement. Had it not been true, both 
parties would have protested at once, denying the fact. 
The commissioners leel that it would be unnecessary to 
pursue this argument further, as they can but feel ful- 
ly justified upon the present testimony, in the conclu- 
sion, that the Stonington Railroad Company, in this 
particular, at the outset, acted in good faith towards 
both these parties, and with a view to promote the pub- 
lic convenience. As to the present arrangement, the 
commissioners feel a delicacy in interfering with it. — 
It seems to have proceeded from considerations proper 
in themselves, and if it be in violation of any previous 
contract with Mr. Kelton, that is properly a matter for 
the investigation of a legal tribunal, and this new ar- 
rangement but enhances his damages. There is anoth- 
er difficulty in this matter — the railroad, by having the 
power to encourage new stage enterpise, aflFord new 
facilities to the public, and often in places where it 
could not otherwise be had. This is the case with the 



86 OOTOBEB^ 1861. 

present stage line to Carolina Mills, and the operation 
of such encouragement is for the public benefit as well 
as their own. But upon all these lines opposition is 
liable to be made, and shall the road then be obliged 
to leave the enterprise they have fostered and encour- 
ed This would be manifestly wrong, after an invest- 
ment of property had been made at their instigation, 
and 4^6 commissioners cannot see how a general law 
can be framed to meet all these difi&culties. Under 
these circumstances, they cannot reconmiend the Gen- 
eral Assembly to enact laws by way of experiment, 
abridging the general right of corporations to contract 
in cases of this kind. 

The commissioners do, however, believe that the sj^ 
tem of interference adopted by the agents of the com- 
pany in the matter now complained of, will prove ru- 
inous to the private interests of the parties concerned, 
jand in the end injurious to the interests of the road if 
persisted in. 

This arises from their position before the public — 
their great power and their intimate connection with 
the business interests of the State. They in fact a* 
fiume the privilege to adjudge between the parties of 
their private interests and to enforce that determinar 
tion — ^with the means placed at their disposal — and al- 
though this may be lawful, stilly such an act, coming 
from an individual, is viewed with great disfavor in our 
community — and will be sure to meet open hostility 
from the public, coming from a corporation. We think 
the agents of the road may have been led into error — 
perhaps by excess of feeling engendered by the con- 
duct of the parties themselvea The conunissioners^ 
however, view their present course as an abandonment 
of their first design — and in the end will tend to keep 
alive that spirit of opposition — ^and lead to that confu- 
sion, rivalry — and ruin of stage enterprise which in the 
beginning, it was the purpose of this company to pre- 
vent. The commissioners regret the occasion which 
calls for this examination, and that they should be 
obliged to disapprove of the course of the agents of 
any corporation of the State — but in this particular, 
ihey do feel called to express an opinion of the transao- 
tion^ trusting it will lead of itself to investigation if not 



i 



OCTOBEB, 1851. «7 

change — ^fiirther than this, they do not feel prepared 

under all the circumstances, at this time, to proceed. 

All which is respectfully submitted by 

H. A. MANCHESTER, 

OLNEY ARNOLD, 

SCHUYLER FISHERj 

Railroad Commissioners. 
, % 

CHARGES OF B. 6. HAZARD AND OTHERS. 

Paper A 

Kingston, Sept. 8, 1851. 
Grenilemen, — ^We wish to call your attention to sev- 
eral causes of complaint against the Stonington Rail- 
road, and request you to name a day in Providence, as 
soon as may be, to give us and others a hearing. No- 
tice to be given to the Company to appear. Please 
attend to this as soon as convenient, as we wish to 
bring the facts before the Legislature in October. 

One ground of complaint is that the Company charge 
more for the way business than they have a right to do ; 
another, that they make improper discriminations as to 
freight and passengers. 

Yours respectfully, 

J. B. M. POTTER, 

R G. HAZARD, 

OTIS H. KELTON & CO. 



SPECIFICATION OF COMPLAINT. 

Paper B. 

1. The Stonington Railroad Company make unjust 
and invidious distinctions as regards passengers over 
their road. 

2. They do not have uniform rates of &re for all 
passengers to the same places. 

3. They have exceeded their powers as a Railroad 
corporation, by becoming parties in rival stage routes^ 
carrying the passengers of one stage a longer distance 
for a less price than those of another. The exercise 
of this right, affects not only persons, but the value of 
property. They are aiding persons in running opposi- 
tion lines of stages against mail contractors, making it 
more difficult, for smaU places to enjoy mail facilities, 



88 OCTOBER, 1851. 

and more expensive for the government to make 
contracts. 

4. They aflFord the public fewer facilities than other 
railroads, to the injury of property on the line of the 
road ; their rates for passengers are high, and for freight 
excessive and variable. 

6. They claim that they can manage the road with- 
out any regard for the rights, or the interest of the 
people of Rhode-Island, and on this ground, violate 
contracts with impunity with individuals, relying upon 
their power and means of influence to escape damages. 

6. The power to bribe people with free tickets should 
be limited to the actual wants of the road, and the 
power to discount to stage proprietors should be used 
impartially. 

7. The Stonington Railroad Company charge more 
for the local, than through freight and travel. How 
much more, their tariff and statements including state- 
ment of proportion received by the through business 
by the Stonington Railroad Company, will show. 

8. On general principles every citizen has equal 
claims to the benefits to be conferred on the public by 
the company, as the equivalent and foundation of their 
exclusive grant 

9. But their charter requiring that their tolls should 
be at such "^ rates per mile," makes it obligatory on the 
Railroad Company, to do the local business at same 
rates as through, in proportion to the distance said 
Railroad Company may transport, and tliis was what 
the Company agreed to give for the monopoly of their 
route. 

10. The law appointing the commissioners, makes it 
their especial duty to ascertain if the company do not 
comply with this condition ; and if they do not, report 
to the Legislature. 

The company, after ample notice, still refuse to com- 
ply with this condition of their charter, and years of 
violation proves that the present law is not sujficient, 
and that some further legislative action is necessary to 
obtain justice for the citizens of the State. 



OCTOBER, 1851. 89 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON THE WASHINGTON 

MONUMENT. 

Your committee on the Washington Monument, beg 
leave to report, that they have performed their duty, 
in accordance with the resolution passed by the Gen- 
eral Assembly. The block is granite, from the town 
of Westerly; is four feet long, two feet high, and twen- 
ty inches deep. The design adopted by the majority 
of the committee, contains the name and arms of the 
State. On attempting to cut these in, it was found 
that the material would not bear siich delicate work, 
and it became necessary to choose another stone ; and 
it was only on the third trial, that the arms and inscrip- 
tion could be properly executed. A considerable delay 
has been occasioned by this circumstance, and some 
additional expense, exceeding the sum appropriated, 
by thirty-five dollars and twelve cents — the vouchers 
for which, with a letter from the Hon. Elisha Whittle- 
sey, agent for the Monument Association, acknowledg- 
ing the receipt of the Rhode-Island contribution, are 
herewith enclosed. 

NATHANIEL GREENE, 

For the Committee. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE INSPECTORS OP 

THE STATE PRISON. 

To the Honorable the General AsaembJjf of Rhode-Islandj at 
their October Session, A. D. 1851. 

The Board of Inspectors of the Rhode-Island State 
Prison and Providence County Jail, present their An- 
nual Report : 

The present Board came into office in June last. — 
At their organization, Francis Wayland was appointed 
chairman, and George L. Clarke, secretary. 

The regular monthly and several special meetings 
have been held during the year, and the prison has 
been visited weekly by some member of the Board. 

The officers employed in the prison and jail in the 
pay of the State, with their respective salaries per an- 
num, are the following : 

Francis B. Lee, Warden, salary - ^800 00 

Edward P. Hayward, Clerk, - - 500 00 

Edward P. Church, Under-keeper in Prison, 430 00 
12 



365 OO 


346 00 


430 00 


365 00 


37100 


250 OO 


$150 00 


208 00 



OCTOBER, 1851. 

William J. Booth, night watchman in do 

J. N. Standish, guard in do 

J. B. Ashcraft, under-keeper in Jail, 

Ira B. Wilson, night watchman in do 

H. A. Button, assistant in do - 

H. W. Patt, cook, (boarded by the State,) 

FEMALE DEPARTMENT. 
Mrs. M. G. Lee, principal matron, 
Miss H. S. Tracy, assistant do. 

The Warden's Reports of the expenses and income 
for the year, ending September 30th, are herewith pre- 
sented. From these reports it appears that the whole 
expense for the year commencing Oct. 1st, 1850, and 
ending Sept 30th, 1851, is $9851 27. The income for 
the same period is $2,761 41. Excess of expenditure 
above the income, is $7,089 86. 

From this sum is to be deducted the proceeds of 
stock sold in consequence of change of employment, 
amounting to $2,389 86 : leaving the balance which 
has been drawn from the State treasury $4,700 00. 

By the new arrangement with the city of Providence 
since the establishment of the Reform School, the State 
receives $400 less than formerly, for the use of the 
jail for city prisoners. By this amount, the income 
of the prison has been reduced for the past year. In 
consequence of the erection of the new wing, an addi- 
tional watchman has been employed ; this has also 
added to the expense. 

The year may for convenience be divided into two 
periods, the first commencing October 1st, 1850, and 
ending May 31st, 1851. The second commencing June 
1st, and ending September 30th, 1851. 
In the first period of eight months, the ex- 
pense was - - - $G,395 77 
The income was - - - 1,416 79 
In the second period of four months, the ex- 
pense was - . - 3,455 50 
The income was ... 1,342 62 
This comparison exhibits a decided gain in the in- 
come for the period in which the new arrangements in 
the prison have been in operation. 

If we compare the expenses and income of the prison 
with that of the county jail for the last four months^ 
we have the following results : 



OCTOBEB, 1851. W 

Expense of the county jail, - - $1,954 87 

Income, - . . . . 514 04 

Expense of the prison, - - 1,500 00 

Income, - - - . - 830 58 

From this, it will appear that the county jail is by 
far the most expensive portion of the establishment, 
and that it yields the smallest income. 

The reasons for this difference are that a considera- 
ble portion of the expense of the jail is incurred in 
the debtors department, and for persons awaiting trial, 
who are not subjected to labor. Besides this, a large 
part of the prisoners are committed for short periods. 
Their habits are generally dissolute, and before they 
can be accustomed to labor so as to render the State 
«any service, the terai of their confinement has expired. 
The State is thus subjected to great expense, while the 
criminal derives no benefit from the discipline of the 
prLson. 

If we compare the income of the State prison for the 
whole of the previous year, with its income for the last 
foiir months of the past year, the following result is 
exhibited. 

Income for the previous year. - - $709 56 

Income for the last four months, - - 830 58 

Income for the year, by contract, from April 1, 

1851, to April 1st, 1852, - - 2,500 00 

The increase of income per ann. is therefore 1,790 44 
The reason for the small amount of income for the 
first eight months of the year is found in the fact, that 
the change of employment in both the prison and jail, 
rendered nearly three months imavailable for labor. — 
This is a loss which could not well be avoided, but it 
seemed necessary in order to secure a greater good. 

The number of prisoners in the State prison for the 
year has been as follows : 
Number of convicts on the 1st of October 1850, 

was - - - - 37 

Committed during the year, - - 24 — 61 

Discharged by expiration of sentence, 5 

Discharged by General Assembly, 8 

Died, 1—14 

Leaving in Prison, September 30th, 1851, 47, all males. 
The average number in prison for the year has been 
43, being 33 per cent over the averaere of last year. 



92 OCTOBER, 1851. 

In the county jail the number of persons on the 1st 
day of October, 1850, confined by the State laws, was 
66 : — 223 have been committed during the year on 
sentence, and 214 in default of bail, and not sentenced, 
making the total number at the suit of the State, 503. 

The ages of those committed were as follows, viz. — 
Over 10 years old and under 20 years, 123 : — over 20 
and under 30 years, 204 : — over 30 and under 40 years, 
105 : — over 40 and under 50 years, 56 :— over 50 and 
under 60 years, 14 :— over 60 years, 1. Total 503. — 
Males, 452 ; females, 51. Whites, 473 ; colored, 30. 
Natives, 293 ; foreigners, 210. Average number for 
the year, 53. 

Of the 223 committed as above stated on sentence, 
192 were known to be or reported themselves as being 
intemperate in their habits. 

There have also been committed to the jail, as a 
House of Correction for the city of Providence, during 
the year, 177 persons, viz.: on sentence 116; in default 
of bail 61. Their ages were as follows: Over 10 years 
and under 20, 19 ; over 20 and under 30, 61 ; over 30 
and under 40, 56 ; over 40 and under 50, 25 ; over 50 
and under 60, 11 ; over 60, 5. Total 177. Males 133; 
females, 44. Whites, 170; colored, 7. Natives, 86; 
foreigners, 91. Temperate, 14; intemperate 163. — 
Average number under the city laws during the year, 
11. 

The number of commitments for debt have been 397; 
making, with the foregoing numbers committed under 
the State and City laws, a total of 1133 commitments 
to the Jail, during the year ending September 30th, 
1851. 

There were remaining on the 30th of September, at 
the suit of the State, 57 ; at the suit of the city, 11 ; 
for civil suits for damages, 2 ; for common debt, 2 ;— 
total 72. 

The changes which have been made in the arrange- 
ments for the prison and jail for the year, have been 
as follows ! 

At the commencement of the year, October 1st, 1850, 
the convicts in the prison were employed in shoe-mak- 
ing, and the prisoners in the jail, at cabinet making. 
The State purchased the stock and disposed of the pro- 
duct& By this arrangement, the State was liable to 



OCTOBER, 1851. 93 

loss from the fluctuations of the prices of the articles 
made, and from the disadvantages under which it came 
into the market for the sale of its goods. The result 
was that the income of the prison was small, the cost 
of oversight was great, and a heavy burden was imposed 
on the treasury of the State. The inspectors became 
convinced that a great gain could be secured by aban- 
doning the purchase of stock, and confining themselves 
to the mere sale of labor. In order to accomplish this 
result, they asked of the Assembly a grant of $4,000, 
for the enlargment of the work-shops. Their request 
was granted, and the buildings were erected within the 
estimate presented, and a small balance is now in the 
hands of the building committee. As soon as these 
arrangements were completed, the inspectors were en- 
abled to let out the labor of the convicts for $2,500, 
for the first year. This sum, as has been stated, is 
$1,790 44 more than their earnings amounted to, in 
the preceding year. The shoe-making business was 
closed in January last, and the cabinet work could not 
be commenced until April ; hence a loss of three months 
labor, as has been stated, was unavoidable, but we be- 
lieve, that, in the end, the State will be a gainer by 
the change. 

The same principle was applied to the labor of the 
prisoners in the county jail. They have for some time 
past been employed in making coarse cabinet work, 
which has yielded a fair income to the State ; but ow- 
ing to the large amount of capital which it was neces- 
sary to keep constantly invested in tools, and stock in 
the rough state, and in the process of manufactiure, and 
which was at all times in great danger of being destroy- 
ed by fire ; and also to the fact that the work-shops 
were not sufficiently commodious to carry on that 
business conveniently, and at the same time allow suf- 
ficient room for the labor of the State prison convicts, 
it was thought best to abandon the cabinet work, and 
adopt some labor better adapted to the accommoda- 
tions, and avoid the risk of loss to the State. The work 
of closing boots was selected in June last, and the pris- 
oners are now employed at that business ; a stipulated 
price per pair being paid for their labor. 

The Board have been able to effect an important 
change in the condition of the female department — 



94 OCTOBER, 1851. 

Previous to June last, the female prisoners were con- 
fined in two small rooms, without classification, and 
without any regular employment, and their condition 
could only tend to render their imprisonment a moral 
injury to themselves and the community. In June last 
it was determined to engage an assistant matron, under 
whose care they should be employed in regular labor. 
A room was provided for this purpose, and they are 
now all comfortably clad, and improving in habits of 
neatness and industry. Several of them are obliged to 
occupy the same room at night, but we hope that the 
enlargment of the prison will enable us to provide a 
separate cell for each convict. 

The present condition of the prison and jail may be 
summed up as follows : — Every prisoner, male and fe- 
male, under sentence, unless prevented by sickness, is 
now employed in labor of as profitable a kind as we 
are able to provide. The State prisoners labor at cabi- 
net work ; the prisoners in the jail labor at closing 
boots. The women are employed in sewing. The 
buildings are clean and comfortable as the crowded 
state of the cells will allow. The health of the prison- 
ers is generally good, and the number of cases of disci- 
pline is on the decline. 

The greatest evil under which we now labor, is the 
crowded condition of the prison and jail. In many cases 
it is necessary to confine two, or even more persons in 
a cell. 

During the coming winter, this evil will probably be 
increased. The Board would respectfully inquire wheth- 
er some of the county prisoners, those especially, who 
are unavailable for labor, might not be removed tem- 
porarily to some of the other jails in the State. 

The Assembly, at its June session, appropriated six- 
teen thousand dollars for the erection of an additional 
wing to the State prison. The board at once commenc- 
ed the work, with the expectation that it might be com- 
pleted by the 1st day of January, 1852. It was, how- 
ever, ascertained that it would be necessary to drive 
piles of unusual length under the whole foundation. — 
This has created so much delay, that only a part of the 
cells can be built before the beginning of winter. In 
June next it can probably be completed. It is intend- 
ed to be built in the most perfect manner, and it is 



OCTOBER, 1851. 96 

hoped that the State will not be at any expense, from 
the necessity of future alterations. 

Mr. T. W. Hayward resigned the office of Warden 
on the 1st of June last, and Mr. Francis B. Lee was ap- 
pomted to fill the vacancy. 

The religious instruction of the convicts in the State 
prison, has been conducted by the Rev. A. Woods, D. D., 
who has gratuitously attended divine service every 
Sunday morning. 

In the jail, the Rev. William Douglass, with the as- 
sistance of other clergymen in the city, has performed 
religious services on Sunday noons. He has, also, at 
other time, visited the prisoners for the sake of impart- 
ing to them religious instruction. All these services 
are gratuitous. 

After the labors of the day are completed, a consid- 
erable portion of time remains, in which the prisoners 
might derive advantage from the use of suitable books. 
The board respectfully solicit a grant of two hundred 
dollars for the purchase of a library for the use of the 
prison and jail. Visitors to the prison are now admit- 
ted without charge, on an order from an Inspector. — 
The board would advise that the Warden be authorized 
to admit visitors at his discretion, they holding no com- 
munication with the prisoners, on the payment of a 
fee, to be fixed by the Board of Inspectors, and that 
this fee be appropriated to the improvement of the li- 
brary. 

The board have thus, as far as they are able, pre- 
sented to the Honorable, the General Assembly, a full 
account of the condition and prospects of the prisons 
mider their charge. If there should be any points 
which they have omitted, on which the General Assem- 
bly desires additional or more minute information, it 
will give them pleasure to present it in their future re- 
ports. 
All which is respectfully submitted. 

F. WAYLAND, 

A. PECKHAM, 

A. SACKETT, i ^ , 

THOMAS DAVIS, f ^^^i^^^^^^^- 

AMASA MANTON, 

GEORGE L. CLARKE, 
Providence, Oct. 20, 1851. 



96 OCTOBER, 1851, 

WARDEN'S REPORT, 

For eight months, ending May 31st, 1851. 

To the Honorable General Assembly of the State of Rhode 
Island^ at their October SessioUy A. D. 1851. 

The undersigned respectfully presents the following 
account of receipts and expenditures of the Rhode le- 
land State prison and the Providence County Jail, for 
the eight months from October Ist, 1850, to May Slst, 
1851. His resignation of the office of Warden, was ac- 
cepted by the Inspectors, to take effect on the 5th day 
of June, A. D. 1851. 

Property on handy as per Inventory, October 1, 1850, under 

the following heads , viz. : 



Shoemaking 


$1,207 15 




Jail cabinet shop 


2,355 92 




Bedding and clothing 


657 52 




Fuel and lights 


455 56 




Books and stationery 


123 89 




Provisions and groceries 


154 53 




Furniture - - . 


513 54 




Miscellaneous 


- 249 95 




Cash ... 


205 13 




Due from city of Providence 


344 15 




Due from other sources 


708 68 


6,976 02 






Received by draft on General Treasurer, 


4,700 OO 


Amount of debts payable May 


31, 1851, 


556 58 




12,232 60 


Property on hand as per Inventory, May 31, 


, 1851. 


Shoemaking 


281 47 




Jail cabinet shop 


1,721 79 




Prison cabinet shop 


169 53 




Bedding and clothing 


753 49 




Fuel and lights 


27 13 




Books and stationery 


122 33 




Provisions and groceries 


168 17 




Furniture 


507 89 




Miscellaneous 


221 03 




Cash 


558 27 - 


» 



OCTOBER, 1861. 97 

Kitchen - - - 190 00 

Due from city of Providence 138 47 

Due from other sources - 904 99 

6,764 56 

Paid of last year's debts - - 1,489 06 

Balance being the expense for eight months, 
viz : from October 1, 1850 to May 31, 
1851, - - - 4,978 98 

12,232 60 

The receipts and expenditures have been as follows : 

Shoemaking Aeeount. 

Property on hand Oct 1, 1850, 1,207 15 
Amount since charged, 706 61 



Amount of credits, 1,723 34 

Property on hand. May 31, 1861, 281 47 



1,913 76 



2,004 81 

Income - - - - 91 05 

Jail Cabinet Shop. 

Property on hand, Oct 1, 1850, 2,355 92 
Amount since charged, 1,702 14 

4,058 06 

Amount of credits, 2,461 40 

Property on hand, May 31, 1861, 1,721 79 

4,183 19 

Income .... 126 18 

Prison Cabinet Shop. 
Property on hand Oct 1, 1850, 000 00 



Amount since charged, 249 09 

Amount of credits, 448 38 

Property on hand May 31, 1851, 169 53 



249 09 



617 91 



Income - -■ - • - 368 82 

BedHag and Clothing. 

Property on hand Oct 1, 1860, 667 62 
13 



«8 OCTOBER, 1851. 

Amount since charged, 413 18 



1,070 70 
Property on hand, May 31, 1851, 753 49 



Expense, - - - . 317 21 

Fuel and Lights. 

Property on hand Oct. 1, 1850, 455 56 
Amount since charged, 195 33 



Amount credited, 9 19 

Property on hand May 31, 1851, 27 13 



660 89 



36 32 



Expense, - - - - 614 57 

Books and Stationery, 

Property on hand Oct. 1, 1850, 123 89 
Amount since charged, 23 25 

147 14 

Property on hand May 31, 1851, 122 33 

Expense - - - - 24 81 

Provisions and Groceries. 

Property on hand Oct 1, 1850, 154 53 
Amount since charged, 2,289 02 



Amount credited, 145 70 

Property on hand May 31, 1851, 168 17 



2^443 55 



31S 87 



Expense - - - . 2,129 68 

Furniture, 

Property on hand Oct. 1, 1850, 513 54 

Amount since charged, 51 39 



Amount sold, 4 00 

Property on hand, May 31, 1851, 507 89 



564 9S 



611 89 



Expense, - - - - 53 04 



OCTOBER, 1851. 9» 



Miscellaneous. 

Propel ty on hand Oct. 1, 1850, 249 95 
Amount since charged, 269 10 



519 05 



Amount credited, 20 00 

Property on hand May 31, 1851, 221 03 



241 03 



Expense - - - - 278 02 

Repairs and Fixatures. 
Paid for repairs and fixtures, 180 81 

Recovering Prisoners. 
Paid for recovering one jail prisoner, 3 00 

Discharged Convicts. 

Paid to ten State prison convicts on be- 
ing discharged from prison, each, 4 00 — 40 00 
Paid for coffin and burial of No. 71, 8 00 



48 00 



Salaries and Labor. 
Amount paid and due for salaries, 2,654 09 

• Jail Rent. 

Received for jail rent, 48 16 

Jail Fees 

Received for jail fees and bonds, 203 61 

Jail Board, 

Received and due from city of Provi- 
dence for board, 423 1 9 

Received from United States, 7 50 

Received from creditors for board of 

debtors, 122 09 

Received from debtors, 22 38 

575 07 



Interest and Discount. 

Amount received for interest, 4 95 

Kitchen Account. 

Paid for alterations, fixtures and furn- 
iture in house and prison kitchens, 469 96 
Amount credited for fixtures &c. sold, 137 42 



100 



OCTOBER, 1861. 



Amount of fuhiiture inventoried May 

31,1851, 190 00 



327 42 



Expense . . . - 

Balance of expense and income as above 



142 54 



EXPENSE. 








Salaries and labor, 


2,654 09 






Provisions and groceries, 


2,129 68 






Fuel and lights, 


614 57 






Miscellaneous, 


278 02 






Bedding and clothing, 


317 21 






Repairs and fixtures, 


130 81 






Furniture, 


53 04 






Discharged convicts, 


48 00 






Books and Stationery, 


24 81 






Recovering prisoners, 


3 00 






Kitchen, 


142 54 










6,395 


77 






INCOME. 








Shoemaking, 


91 05 






Jail cabinet shop, 


- 125 13 






Prison cabinet shop, 


368 82 






Jail board. 


- 575 07 






Jail rent, 


48 16 






Jail fees, 


- 203 61 






Interest, . - - 


4 95 










1,416 


7Q 






• w 


Balance, being expense 




4,978 


98 



6,395 77 

The average number in the State prison and in the 
county jail during the eight months, has been as fol- 
lows: 

Convicts in the State prison, 
Persons in jail at the suit of the State, 

city of Providence 11 2« 



Dt5o43 



43^ 



U 



u 



Debtors boarding in jail, 



86 
^243" 



69 



144 
943 



Total, 



1 |0«SI 
1 1^243 



The statement of the comparative expense of the 
State prison and the county jail, has been prepared as 



OCTOBER, 1851. 101 

in former years, viz. : to divide the total expense in 
each account, according to the actual expense as far as 
practicable, and to apportion the remainder acaccord- 
ing to the number of prisoners in each department, 
which is nearly 43 in the prison, and 70 in the jail. 

The balance of expense for the eight months com- 
mencing Oct. 1, 1860, and ending May 31, 1851, is 
12,359 69 for thepris.n, and $2,619 29 for the jail, 
divided as follows : 

STATE PRISON. 

EXPENSE. 

Salaries and labor, actual, 723 44 

pro rata 501 35—1,224 79 

Provisions and groceries, pro rata 810 41 

Bedding and clothing, actual 173 85 

Fuel and lights, actual 150 51 

prorata 119 81 269 82 

^ooks and stationery, pro rata - - 9 44 

Furniture, actual - - - 15 10 

Miscellaneous, pro rata - - 105 80 

Discharged convicts, actual - - 48 00 

Repairs and fixtures - - - 113 06 

Kitchen, - - - - 54 24 



2,824 61 



INCOME. 

Shoemaking - - 91 05 

Prison cabinet shop - 368 82 

Interest ... 4 95 464 82 



Balance of expense - . - 2,359 69 

COUNTY JAIL. 

EXPENSE 

Salaries and labor, actual 613 15 

pro rata 816 15—1,429 30 

Provisions and groceries, pro rata 1,319 27 

Bedding and clothing, actual - 143 36 

Fuel and lights, actual, 150 52 

pro rata 194 23 344 75 

Books and stationery, pro rata - . - 15 37 

Furniture - - - - 37 94 

Miscellaneous, pro rata - - - 172 22 

Becovering prisoners - - 3 00 



102 OCTOBER, 1851. 

Repairs and fixtures - - - 17 75 

Kitchen - - - - 88 30 



3,571 26 

INCOME. 

Jail cabinet shop - 1 25 1 3 

Jail board - - - 575 07 

Jail rent - - 48 16 

Jail fees - - - 203 61 95197 



Balance of expense - - - 2,6 1 9 29 

The number of convicts in the State prison, on the 
30th of September, 1850, was 37, all males. 

Nineteen have been received during the eight months 
ending May 31st 1851, viz : 17 males and 2 females. 
The females were known as Nos. 132 and 133. Total 
number, 56. 

Five have been discharged, by expiration of sentence; 
five, (including the two females) by the General Assem- 
bly, and one has died ; leaving in prison, on the 3 1st of 
May, 1851, forty-five, all males. 

Convict No. 71, Joshua P. Scott, (who has since died,) 
was sentenced by the Supreme Court, at its September 
term, 1850, to an additional term of seven years' im- 
prisonment, for an assault on the Warden, on the third 
day of July, 1850. 

The accompanying schedule marked ^*A," gives the 
statement required by law, in relation to the prisoners 
confined in the State prison. 

T. W. HAYWAKD, Warden. 

Providence, May 31, 1851. 



The undersigned have examined the account of re- 
ceipts and expenditures for the State prison and Provi- 
dence county jail, for eight months ending May 3ist, 
1 85 1 , as within presented by the warden, T. W. Hay- 
ward, and have compared the same with the books and 
vouchers, and find them correctly stated. 

ABNER PECKHAM, ) Auditing 
GEORGE L. CLARKE, J OmnMee. 
Proaidence, Oct. 20th, 185 J. 



OCTOBER, 1851. 103 

WARDEN'S REPORT, 

For four months ending September 30th, 1851. 

Property on hand as per Inventory, taken May 31st, 
1851, under the following heads: viz. 

Shoemaking, 
Jail cabinet Shop, 
Prison cabinet shop. 
Bedding and clothing. 
Fuel and lights, - 
Books and stationery. 
Provisions and groceries. 
Furniture, 
Miscellaneous, 
Kitchen, (furniture,) - 
Cash, - - - 

Due from city of Providence, 
Due from other sources, 

Amount of debts payable Sept. 30, 1851, 

6,305 21 

Property on hand as per Inventory taken Sept. 30, 1851, 

as follows : 

Prison shoemaking, - 228 68 

Jail shoemaking, - - 84 17 

Jail cabinet shop, - - 561 85 

Prison cabinet shop, - - 171 53 

Bedding and clothing, - 698 75 

Fuel and lights, - - 15 65 

Books and stationery, - 117 00 

Provisions and groceries, - 70 95 

Furniture (including the amount of 

kitchen furniture and taken from 

kitchen account, - 721 42 

Miscellaneous, - - 213 81 

Cash, - - - 25 44 

Due on accounts, - - 728 50 

3,637 75 

Paid of debts contracted previous to 

May 31, 1851, 556 5» 



281 47 




1,721 79 




169 53 




753 49 




27 13 




122 33 




168 17 




507 89 




221 03 




190 00 




558 27 




138 47 




904 9^ 






5,764 56 
540 65 


1,1851, 



104 OCTOBER, 1851. 

Balance, being the expense for four 

months, ending, Sept. 30, 1851, 2,110 88 

6,305 21 

The receipts and expenditures have been as follows: 

Prison Cabinet Shop, 

Property on hand June 1, 1851, 169 53 
Amount charged, since that time, 9 00 



Amount of credits, 837 58 

Property on hand, Sept. 30, 1851, 171 53 



178 53 



1,009 11 



Income, - - - . 830 58 

Jail Cabinet Shop. 

Property on hand June 1st, 1721 79 

Amount charged since that time, 81 79 



Amount of credits, 1,212 05 

Property on hand Sept 30, 561 85 



1,803 58 



1,773 90 



Expense, - - - - 29 68 

Jail Shoemaking, 

Property on hand June 1st, 000 00 

Amount since purchased, 128 57 



Amount of credits, 1 79 50 

Property on hand Sept. 30, 84 17 



128 57 



263 67 



Income, 135 10 

Jail Sewing, 

Amount received and charged for sewing, 42 80 
" paid for wages and Assistant Matron 33 71 



Income, 9 09 

Bedding and Clothing. 

Property on hand June 1, 153 49 

Amount since purchased, 68 56—822 05 



OCTOBER, 1851. 105 

Property on hand, Sept. 30, 1851, 698 75 

Expense, - - - - 123 30 

Fuel and Idffhts. 

Property on hand June 1, 27 13 

Amount since purchased, 88 62 

115 75 

Property on hand Sepi 30, 16 65 

Expense, - - - - 100 10 

Books and Stationery. 

Property on hand June 1, 122 23 

Amount since purchased, 5 44 

127 77 

Property on hand Sept 30, 117 00 

Expense - - - - 10 77 

Furniture. 

Property on hand June 1st, 507 89 

Transfered from kitchen inventory 190 00 
Amount purchased since June 1st, 65 00 

762 89 

Property on hand, Sept 30, - - 721 42 

Expense, - - - - 41 47 

MiceUaneous. 

Property on hand June 1st, 221 03 

Amount since purchased, 115 33 

336 86 

Property on hand Sept 30, - - 213 81 

Expense . - - . 122 55 

Provisions and Groceries. 

Property on hand June 1, 168 17 

Amount since purchased, 1,330 29 



Amount of credits, 83 78 

Property on hand Sept 30, 70 95 



1,498 46 



154 73 



Expense . - - - 1,343 73 

14 



106 OCTOBER, 1851. 

Repairs and Fixtures. 
Paid for repairs and fixtures, 401 73 

Discharged Convicts. 

Paid to three discharged convicts, each, 4 00 — 12 GO 

Salaries and Labor. 

Amount paid and due for salaries, 1,270 17 

Jail Board. 

Received and due from city of Provi- 
dence for board, 1 57 70 

Received from creditors for board of 

debtors, 82 04 

Received from debtors, for board, 26 93 



266 67 

Jail Fees. 

Received for jail fees and bonds, 103 18 

Balance of expense and income as above : 

EXPENSE. 

Salaries and labor, - - 1,270 17 

Provisions and groceries, 1,343 73 

Repairs and fi:^tures, - - 401 73 

Bedding and clothing, - 123 30 

Miscellaneous,! - . - 122 55 

Fuel and lights, - - 100 10 

Furniture, - - - - 41 47 

Jail cabinet shop, - - 29 68 

Discharged convicts, - - 12 00 

Books and Stationery, 10 77 

3,455 50 

INCOME. 

Prison cabinet shop, - 830 58 

Jail Shoemaking, - - 135 10 

Jail board, - - 266 67 

Jail fees, - - - 103 18 

Jail sewing, - - 9 09 

1,344 62 

Balance, being expense for four months, 2,110 88 



^•^-p*^ 



3,455 50 
The average numbers in the State prison and coun- 
ty jail, during the four months, ending September 30, 
1851, have been as follows : 



OCTOBER, 1851. IW 



Convicts in the State prison, - - 42i^, 

Persons in jail at the suit of the State, 51}§J 
" " "" city of Providence 9ig 

Debtors boarding in jail, 5 "^ 



60 
^122 



Total average in jail, 66 



119 
133 



Total in both prison and jail, 1 09 



87 
1^ 



The division of the aggregate expense, between the 
State prison and county jail, has been made below, in 
the same manner as stated in the Warden's reports of 
previous years ; that is, every expense belonging inde- 
pendently to either one or the other department, has 
been charged accordingly ; and the remainder of ex- 
pense, which is common to both institutions, has been 
divided according to the proportionate number of pris- 
oners in each department. 

The balance of the expense for the four months end- 
ing as above, thus divided, is $670 05 for the prison, and 
$1,440 83 for the county jail, divided as follows : 

STATE PRISON. 

EXPENSE. 

Salaries and labor, actual, 334 72 

pro rata 212 08 546 80 

Provisions and groceries, pro rata, 522 56 

Repairs and fixtures, actual, 156 33 

pro rata, 79 34 235 69 

Bedding and clothing, actual 78 46 

pro rata, 57 79 03 

Miscellaneous, pro rata - - 47 66 

Fuel and lights, pro rata, - - 38 93 

Furniture, actual, - 8 42 

prorata, 5 35—13 77 

Discharged convicts, actual - - 12 00 

Books and stationery, pro rata, - - 4 19 

1,600 63 

INCOME. 

Prison cabinet shop, ... 830 58 

Balance of expense - - - 670 05 



108 OCTOBER, 1651. 

COUNTY JAIL. 

EXPENSE. 

Salaries and labor, actual 390 11 

pro rata 333 26 



723 37 
Provisions and groceries, pro rata 821 17 

Repairs and fixtures, actual 41 37 

pro rata 124 67 



166 04 



Bedding and clothing, actual 43 39 

pro rata 88 



44 27 



Miscellaneous, pro rata - - - 74 89 

Fuel and lights, pro rata - - 61 17 

Furniture, actual 19 30 

pro rata 8 40 

27 70 

Jail cabinet shop, actual - - 29 68 

Books and stationery, pro rata - - 6 58 



1,954 87 



INGOlfE. 



Jail shoemaking - - 136 10 

Jail board - - - 266 67 

JaQ fees - - - 103 18 

Jail sewing ... 9 09 514 04 

Balance of expense ... 1,440 83 
The number of convicts in the State prison, on the 
Ist day of June last, was 45, all male& Five have 
been received during the four months ending Septem- 
ber 30th ; three have been discharged by the General 
Assembly, leaving in prison, on the 30th ult, 47 con- 
victs, all males. 

F. B. LEE, Warden. 
PaovmENOEy Oct 18, 1851. 



OCTOBER, 1851. 109 

The undenigned have ezamined the account of re* 
ceipt8 and expenditures for the State prison and Provi* 
dence county jail, as presented in the foregoing report 
of the Warden, and have compared the same with the 
books and Touchers, and find them correctly stated. 

ABNER PECKHAM, ) AudOixig 
GEORGE L CLARKE, ) Cbmrmttee. 
PBovmxNCB, Oct 20th, 1851. 



OCTOBER, 1861. 



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112 OCTOBER, 1851. 



JAILER^S REPOET. 

To the General Assembfy of the State of Rhode-Island^ Ac 
at their October Seseioriy A D. 1851. 

Annexed is a list of the names of persons in the Coun- 
ty Jail in Providence^ at the suit of the State, on the 
&:st day of October^ 1850, and also the names of per- 
sons committed to said Jail fix>m said first day of Octo- 
ber to the Slst day of May, A. D., 1851 ; made in 
accordance with the provisions of an act concerning 
imprisonment in the County Jails, passed June 27th, 
1846. 



OCTOBER, 1851. 



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William Peterson 
Joseph Jacksoii 
Patrick Coyle 
Daniel Dugau 
Ellon Eiley 
John N. Willis 
Patrick McCusker 
DaTid Emerson 
Ann Sullivan 
William Hall 
John Wright 
Sarah Lane 3 ac'ts 
DaTid T. Cutting 
Baphael Jero 2 a'c. 
Humphry Callahan 
John Williams 
Bicharcl O'Brien 2 



OCTOBER, 1861. 

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OCTOBER, 1851. 131 

The number of persons in jail at suit of the State 
on the first day of October, 1850, was 66. There have 
been committed by State on sentence, during the eight 
months ending May 31st, 1851, 145; committed in 
default of bail, and not sentenced, 148; making the 
whole number at the suit of the State, 359. 

The ages of those committed, were as follows, viz. : 
over 10 years old and under 20, 98 ; over 20 and un- 
der 30 years, 141 ; over 30 and under 40 years, 66 ; 
over 40 and under 50 years, 44 ; over 50 and under 
60 years, 9 ; over 60 and under 70 years, 1 ; total, 359. 
Males, 322— females, 37. Whites, 335 ; colored, 44. 
Natives, 223 — foreigners, 136. Average number of 
persons in jail at suit of the State, for eight months, 
53iS- Of 145 committed on sentence, 119 reported 
themselves, or were known to be intemperate in their 
habits. 

Remaining in jail at the suit of the State, on the 31st 
day of May, 1851, 45 persons, viz: On sentence, 30; 
for trial at the September term of Supreme Court in 
Providence county, 7 ; for trial at August term of said 
court for Washington county, 1 ; for trial at the June 
term of the Court of Common Pleas, 7 ; for examinar 
tion at the Court of Magistrates in Providence, 2. — 
(Two of the foregoing were committed both on sen- 
tence and for trial.) 

There have also been committed to the Jail as a 
House of Correction for the city of Providence, 117 per- 
sons, viz. : Committed on sentence, 68 ; in default of 
bail, 49. Ages as follows : Over 10 and under 20 years, 
16 ; over 20 and under 30 years, 44 ; over 30 and un- 
der 40 years, 31 ; over 40 and under 50, 14 ; over 50 
and under 60 years, 8 ; over 60 and under 70 years, 4. 
Whites, 111 ; colored, 6 ; males, 87, females, 30. Na- 
tives, 65 ; foreigners, 52. Temperate in habits, 9 ; in- 
temperate, 108. Average number for 8 months, 11^. 

Commitments for debt in eight months ending as 
above, have been 256. Committed by the U. States, 7. 

Total number of commitments of all classes for said 
eight months ending as above, 739. 

Bemaining in jail on the 31st day of May, at the 
suit of the State, 45 ; at suit of the city, 4 ; debtors, 7. 
Total, 56. T. W. HAYWARD, JaUer. 

Providence, May 3l8t, 1851. 



132 OCTOBER, 1851. 



JAILER'S REPORT, 

ITo the Honorable General Assembly of the State of Rhode- 
Island &c.y at its October Session^ A D. 1851 : 

Annexed is a list of the names of persons in the 
Oounty Jail in Providence^ at the suit of the State, on 
the first day of June A. D. 1851, and also the names 
of persons committed to said Jail, during the four 
months ending September 30th, 185 1 : made in accor- 
dance with provisions of the fourth section of an Act 
concerning imprisonment in the County Jails, parsed 
June 27th, 1845. 



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INDEX. 



Accounts allowed, - - - . 

Act for the relief of poor persons imprisoned for debt, 

passed January 1848, revived, . - - 

Adjournment, - - . - 

Appropriation to Mons. Vattemare repealed. 

Ban E. R., license extended, - - - 

Birch Richard, convict, liberated, . . - 

Books, purchase of authorized, for the State prison and 

Providence County Jail, 
Boyd Samuel, authorized to sell, . - - 

Chase George and Alfreda, leave to adopt child. 
Cider sale of, ia the town of Hopkinton, regulated. 
Civil officers, act to regulate the election of, amended. 
Clerks offices. Providence, appropriation for 
Clerks of Courts, to make return of fees received by Courts, 
Coffy Michael, liberation, . - - - 

Commissioners, Hamilton Bank, to give notice. 
Commissioners on boundary line between Rhode-Island 

and Massachusetts, to make report, 
Congdon Matilda, authorized to sell 

Dexter Levi C. and Harriet W., leave to adopt child, 

Fitzpatrick Martin, authorized to maintain suits at law and 

inequity, - - - .* 

Fox James, convict liberated, - - - 

French Jeanette, convict, liberated - * 

General Treasurer's semi-annual report, 

Olenright John, liberated . - - 

Hamilton Bank, resolution respecting 

Harbor line of Providence river, act establishing 

Hawkins Sarah R., authorized to sell 

Hawkins Benjamin W., discharged from recognizance 

Holden Zelotes W., guardian, authorized to sell, 

Hope Engine Company, No. 10, leave to change name 

Indian afiairs, committee on, authorized to settle 

Johnson Freeborn Jr. and Elizabeth P., leave to adopt child 

Lee Elizabeth, authorized to hold and convey 

Manchester Job, et. a!, for repeal, &c. 
McFarland Alexander Jr., convict, liberated 
McFelie Thomas, discharged from recognizance 



26-29 

4 

29 

6 

23 
21 

8 
11 

• 

23 
3 
4 
7 
5 

21 
5 

6 

15 

22 



18 
22 
20 

36-76 
21 

6 

9 
16 
19 
14 
23 

7 

22 

16 

24 
21 
J9 



144 



INDEX. 

Mitchell Daniel et. al. relative to Mineral Spring Turnpike 24 

Morris Jacob, remunerated - - - 20 

Nichols Amey, estate of, authorized to be sold - 17 
North and South Court Streets, Providence, resolution to 

repair . . . . g 

Peckham J. C, proceedings against stayed - - 24 

Peckharo Edward T., authorized to execute deeds, &c. 12 

Peoples* Bank, tax remitted, - - - 11 
Phenix Bank, Westerly, account of, referred to Supreme 

Court .... 7 
Providence and Worcester Kail Road Company, enjoined 

not to locale - - - - 18 

Report to publish decisions of Supreme Court annually 3 

Report of Physician to State Prison . . 77 

Report of the Board of Rail Road Commissioners - 78-86 

Report of Committee on the Washington Monument 8& 

Report of the Inspectors of the State Prison, annual 89-95 
Report of Warden of State Prison - - 96-111 
Report of Jailer of Providence County - 112-142 

Reports of decisions of Supreme Court to be bound - 6 

Rex Charles, restored to his rights and privileges - 20 

Rhodes Augustus, for leave to take poor debtors' oath 24 

Roll of members of the Senate - - 31 

Roll of members of the House of Representatives - 32 

Savings Bank, Tiverton, act incorporating - 10 
Sawyer John, alien, authorized to hold and transmit real 

estate - - - - 15 

Shea Patrick, liberated upon condition - - 20 

State House grounds in Providence, authorized to be fenced 7 

Sti^et, in City of Providence, authorized to be opened 6 
Supreme Court, decisions of, to be reprinted and annually 

published, .... 3 

Thomas Hannah, leave to convey - - • . 17 

Vattemare M. Alexandre, appropriation to, repealed • 6 

Warden's report of the State Prison, annual - - 96 

Washington Monument, additional appropriation for 8 

Waterman Benoni, discharged from recognizance IS 

Welch Stillman, et. al, to be set off from town of Bristol 25 
Whitehead Jeremiah, authorized to hold and transmit real estate 14 

Wood Silas E., relieved from fine - - 19 



i 



ACTS AND RESOLVES 

at THB 

GENERAL ASSEMBLY 

OP THE 

Itott ot -Riiotit Sslnnb nnb ^rnnihntt ^lonfaiions, 

PASSED JANUAEY, 1852, 

SEIMQ THE ADJOURNMEMT OP THE ANNUAL OCTOBER SESSION. 1861. 

WITH THE EOLL OF MEMBERS, AKD KEPOBTS OEDEBED 
TO BE PnBLISHED. 



.SMtt o( Kliitie gutanlr, 4tL 

altici Ot d£CRETART OF STATE. MA R b H, 1 g9di 



P S r 1 D E N C E ; 
1>RINTBD BT SATLES & MILLEIl 

186 2. 



\ (l3l*l*he General Assembly cdttVened at t^roirldence, agreeably to 
adjournment, on the first Monday in January, 1852, and adjoufiied 
on Friday, XhH 80lh day bf F(Jbruary, fblloxlingi 



ACTS AND RESOLVES 

PASSED JANUARY SESSION, 1852, 

BEING THE ADJOUBNMENT FROM TBB 

ANNUAL OCTOBER SESSION, 1851. 



An Act enlarging the jurisdiction of special Courts of 
Common Pleas^ and amending proceedings therein. 

B is enacted ly the General Assembfy a% follows : ^ ^ p,^^ 

Section 1. Special Courts of Common Pleas, in ad- jurfiiiction 
dition to the powers now confided to said courts, shall * '** 
have cognizance concurrent with the ordinary Courts 
of Common Pleas, of all actions for possession of ten*^ 
ements or estates let, against tenants or persons who 
have broken the terms or conditions of the lease or 
agreement under which they hold, and against ten- 
ants or persons who hold or occupy tenements or es- 
tates by wrongful entry or detainer. 

Sec. 2. All special Court of Common Pleas' writs 
shall contain therein next after the day and year ap- 
pointed for the holding of the court, the words or no- 
tice following : — " and the answer or plea in this cause 
shall be filed four days prior to said day ;" and in case 
any such writ shall not contain said clause, the action 
thereby commenced may be answered by the defend- 
ant on the day appointed for the holding of the court. 
Sec 3. Anything contained in the act, entitled " An 
Act establishing Courts of Common Pleas," inconsistent 
herewith^ is hereby repealed. 



An Act legalizing certain holidays. 

Jl is enacted hy the General Assembly as follows : 

Section 1. The fourth day of July, or when that day oertain ho- 
fidls on the Sabbath, or first day of the week, the day Jj^JSJjJ.- 
following it — Christmas day — the first day of Janua- 



JANUARY, 1852. 

ry or New Year's daj — and such other days as the 
Governor or General Assembly of the State, or the 
President or Congress of the United States, may appoint, 
as days of Thanksgiving, or days of solemn fast, shall 
be holidays. 

Sec. 2. It shall be lawful to require payment of all 
notes, checks and bills of exchange due and payable 
on such holidays, to be made on the secular day next 
previous thereto — and that in default of such pay- 
ment the same may be protested, and that such pro- 
test shall be as valid as if made on the day on which 
such check, note or bill of exchange became due by its 
own terms. 



An Act in amendment of an act entitled " an Act to 
provide for a registration of births, marriages, and 
deaths." 

li is enacted by the General Assembly as follows : 
Act to pro- Section 1. The town clerks of the several towns, 
gfatrauo^ and the city clerk of the city of Providence, are here- 
ma^ges ^7 authorized and required to obtain, record and in- 
and deaths, dcx, as required by the forms prescribed by the third 
section of the act to which this is in amendment, all in- 
formation concerning births, marriages and deaths oc- 
curring amongst the inhabitants of their respective 
towns, and in said city, and annually to make duly cer- 
tified returns thereef to the Secretary of State, for each 
year, ending on the first day of June. 

Sec. 2. It shall be the duty of the Secretary of State 
to receive the returns made in pursuance of the pre- 
ceding section, and annually, with such assistance as 
shall be rendered by any authorized committee of the 
Khode Island Medical Society, to make and publish, not 
exceeding seven hundred copies, a general abstract 
thereof, in form as prescribed by the act to which this 
is in amendment. 

Sec 3. The blank forms required by the third sec- 
tion of the act to which this is in amendment, to be fur- 
nished as therein directed, shall hereafter be furnished 
by the Secretary of State to clergymen, physicians, un- 
dertakers, town and city clerks, and clerks of the Soci- 
ety of Friends. 



JANUARY, 1852. 

Sec. 4. The city and to\vii clerks shall receive for 
each record of a birth, marriage or death, made and re- 
turned as required by law, ten cents, to be paid to 
them out of the city and town treasuries, of their re- 
spective towns : provided, that the yearly compensation 
to any one town clerk who shall faithfully perform the 
duties prescribed by this act, and the act to which this 
is in amendment, shall not be less than five dollars. 

Sec. 5. If any clergyman, physician, undertaker, 
town or city clerk, or clerk of any meeting of the So- 
ciety of Friends, shall wilfully neglect or refuse to per- 
form any of the duties imposed or required by this act, 
or the act to which this is in amendment, he shall, at 
th« discretion of the court or justice trying the cause, 
on conviction thereof, be fined not exceeding twenty 
dollars, to be recovered by complaint and warrant, one 
half thereof to the use of the town or city in which the 
oflence shall occur, the other half to the person who 
shall prosecute for the same. 

Sec. 6. This act shall go into eflect from and after 
the first day of June next, and from and after that time 
all acts and parts of acts inconsistent herewith shall be 
deemed and taken to be lepealed. 



Act in re- 



An Act in relation to the Stonington Railroad. 

B. u enacted iy the Gfeneral Assembly asfoSouo^ : 

Section I . That from and after the first day of April, Stiii 'tolhe 
1852, the New York, Providence and Boston Raibx)ad lUiSr" 
Company shall transport all passengers coming to said 
raihoad at any point thereof, by any line or lines of 
fitages, on equal terms ; giving or making no discount 
or reduction in favor of any passengers coming by any 
such line ; or in case any discount or reduction is made 
by said company in favor of passengers so coming by 
^iiy stAge line, the same discount and reduction shall 
be made in favor of any passengers coming to said rail- 
road by any other line of stages at the same point, and 
similar reduction and discount shall be made in favor 
of passengers coming by any other lines of stages to 
ftny other point of said railroad to be transported over 
said road — and such discount or reduction from the 
usual fare on said railroad shall in all cases be as near^ 
1* 



6 JANUARY, 1852. 

ly as may be in proportion to the distance such par 
sengers so coming to or going from such railroad by 
stage lines at different points shall be transported by 
said railroad company, and said railroad company shall 
not directly or indirectly discriminate in any manner 
between passengers coming to or going from said road 
by any such stage lines at the same point, or at differ- 
ent points, except as herein provided. 

Sec. 2. In case said railroad company shall in any 
manner violate the provisions of this act, they shall be 
liable for all damages the party injured may sustain, 
and in case of recovery against them shall pay treble 
costs of suit to the party recovering them. 



An Act in addition to an act, entitled ^an Act regulat- 
ing the custody of Insane Paupers." 

. . II is enacted hy the General AsBemhly asfoUawa : 
t'l^^ The Governor is hereby authorized, at the end of 
PauperB. ^^^^j^ quarter of the year, to draw his order on the 
General Treasurer, in favor of the Butler Hospital, for 
such sum as he may find to be due to said hospital from 
the State, by virtue of the provisions of the act to which 
this is in addition. 



An Act providing for the appointment of Weighers, 
. . :. and for weighing Cotton. 

it is enacted ly the General Assembly as follows : 
Acipiovw. Section 1. The City Council of the city of Provi- 
Ippoint^* dence, shall, and the voters of the other towns in this 
w^cw State, may choose annually, a sufficient number of suit- 
and weigh- able pcrsous weighers of cotton, who shall be engaged 
ng cotton. fQ^jt]jf\j]iy ^Q discharge the duties of that office. 

Sec. 2. All cotton sold in this State (unless other- 
wise specially agreed,) shall be weighed by the weigh- 
ers so chosen. 

Sec. 3. Said weighers shall carefully and correctly 
weigh, and record in a book to be kept for that pur- 
pose, the weight of each bale of cotton, with the marks 
and numbers of the bales, and shall mark upon every 
bale in plain figures the weight of the same, and shall 



JANUARY, 1862. 

make a certificate of each lot of cotton, which certifi* 
cate shall specify the marks, numbers and weight of 
each bale ; this certificate or return, shall be given 
to the seller of the cotton, and the weigher shall be 
paid for weiging and marking the same, on the deliv- 
ery of the certificate, eight cents per bale ; and for ev- 
ery duplicate certificate of not exceeding one hundred 
baJes, fifty cents, and, fifty cents for every additional 
hundred bales. 



An Act in addition to an act entitled ''An act in amend- 
ment of an act entitled an act concerning crimes and 
punishments" 

B is enacted hy the General Assembly asfolhws : 

Section !• Whenever any accused person under the uon to act 
age of eighteen years shall be required by any court or crimcriSS 
justice in the county of Providence, to enter into recog- pJ'JJ} J* 
nizance for his appearance before any court, as provid- 
ed in the 142d section of the said '' act concerning 
crimes and punishments," and for not giving such re- 
c(^izance shall be liable to be committed to any jail 
iu this State, as provided in the 14Sd section of the 
said act, such persons may, at the discretion of such court 
or justice, be committed to the Providence Reform 
School, there to remain until the required recognizance 
be given, or he be otherwise discharged by order of 
law. 

Sec. 2. The warrant or mittimus for the commit- 
ment of any such accused person to said Reform School 
shall be, as nearly as the object of such commitment 
will admit, in the form prescribed in the second section 
of the act to which this is in addition, for the commit- 
ment of convicts ; and the trustees and keeper of said 
Heform School, shall have the same authority over any 
such accused person so committed to their custody, 
which they have by law over convicts in said Reform 
School, except that they shall not have authority to 
bind out or discharge such accused persons. 

Sec 3. The words "criminal ofiences" contained in 
the fourth section of the act to which this is in amend- 
nient, shall be construed, for the purposes of any com- 
mitment to said Providence Reform School, to embrace 



} 



8 JANUARY, 1852. 

offences against the ordinances of the city of Provi- 
dence. 

Sec. 4. The General Treasurer shall pay to the city 
of Providence the actual cost of supporting all persons 
mentioned in the first and second sections of this act, 
sent to said school, not computing in such costs, any 
salary or wages of any superintendent, keeper or in- 
structor employed therein ; this act to take efifect when- 
ever its terms shall be accepted by the city council of 
the city of Providence. 



An Act authorizing the Street Commissioner in the 
town of Newport, to lay flag stones on the parade 
in that town. 

li is enacted hy the General Assembly (18 follows : 
hSg^Btwrt The street commissioner of the town of Newport is 
sIodSw ^®^^^y authorized and empowered to cause to be laid 
lay flag a walk of flag stones across the east end of the parade 
ih«°^iide. in the town of Newport, in front ot the State House, 
Newport. ^^ conucct the side-walk on the north side of said pa- 
rade with the side-walk to be made by the town of 
Newport on the north side of Washington Square. And 
the sum of two hundred and fifty dollars is appropri* 
ated for that purpose. 



An Act in relation to Mutual Fire Insurance Com- 
panies. 

J? is enacted by the General Assembly as follows : 

Section 1. Every Mutual Fire Insurance Company 
Art in reia- incorporated by and doing business in this State, which 
twd Fi?i" has been transacting business for three years and up- 
o?m!Jli"i5L wards, shall annually on the first Monday of June, 
make return to the General Treasurer, setting forth 
the whole amount of cash premiums received during 
the previous year, and shall at the same time pay into 
the general treasury three per cent» of the amount so 
received : Provided^ no company shall be required to 
pay more than two hundred dollars in any one year. 
Sec. 2. Said returns shall be signed by the secreta- 
ry and treasurer of the company, or in case of their in- 



JANUARY, 1852. 9 

ability to act, by two of the directors, and sworn to be- 
fore some competent magistrate, whose certificate of 
engagement shall appear thereon. 

SEa 3. Every Mutual Fire Insurance Company which 
fiihall refuse or neglect to make return and payment, as 
provided in this act, shall forfeit for the use of the State, 
the sum of five hundred dollars, to be recovered by the 
General Treasurer in an action of debt 

Sec. 4. So much ot the tenth section of the act pass- 
ed at January session, 1849, entitled " an act to pro- 
vide additional revenue for the State," as applies to Mu- 
tual Fire Insurance Companies incorporated in this 
State, as is inconsistent herewith, is hereby repealed. 



Act ena- 



An Act enabling Town Councils to act as trustees for 
the purpose of holding burial lots. 

B is enacted hy the General Assembly as follows : 

Section 1. The town councils of the several towns wSgTown 
are hereby authorized to take and hold to them and hoiS'biriar 
their successors in office, all such lands as shall be con- ^^ 
veyed to them in trust for burial purposes, and in like 
manner to receive and hold all funds that shall be c6n- 
yeyed to them for the purpose of ornamenting or keep- 
ing in repair such burial lots, and to execute said 
trusts in accordance with the terms contained in the 
instruments of conveyance. 



Ak Act to repeal part of an act, entitled ^ an act to 
regulate the fishery in Pawcatuck River." 

•B is enacted by the General Assembly as follows : 

SEcnoN 1. The second and third sections of the act ubti^th?' 
to regulate the fishery in Pawcatuck river are hereby p^Stnck 
repeded ; provided the legislature of the State of Con- nver. 
necticut shall repeal so much of their act forming the 
compact, as requires the opening of the passage in the 
mill dams on the Connecticut side of said river. 



10 JANUARY, 1862. 

An Act in amendment of an act, entitled ^ an act di- 
recting the method of passing the acts of the Gene- 
ral Assembly, and for recording and distributing the 
same, and for distributing the laws of the United 
States." 

li IS enacted ly the General Az%embly asfoUowB : 

Act direct- SECTION 1. It shall be the duty of the Secretary of 

coAxng^ State, immediately after the proceedings of each ses- 

JSig^Sw*^ sion of the General Assembly are printed as required 

StoteiDdT ^^ ^^^> *^ cause at least six such printed copies there- 

thaUniicd of to be carefullv examined, certified, and sealed with 

the seal of the State ; and when so certified and sealed, 

he shall forever thereafter keep the same ^ his office as 

and for the record of the acts and proceedings of the 

General Assembly required by law ; and he shall from 

time to time cause the same to be bound in volumes for 

more convenient use. 

Seo. 2. Anything in the act to which this is in 
amendment inconsistent herewith, is hereby repealed. 



An Act in amendment of and in addition to an act, 
entitled ^an act establishing Courts of Common 
Pleas." 

B is enacted hy the General Assembly asfoUows : 

Act retet. Section 1. lu addition to the cases where Courts of 

Courts of Common Pleas may now grant new trials, such courts 

pSmI^" are hereby authorized and empowered to grant new 

trials in all cases where the parties have not now by 

law a right of appeal, and for such causes as new trials 

are granted by the Supreme Court, or at common law, 

the proceedings in such cases to be as near as may be 

like those in similar cases in the Supreme Court, and 

with the like effect. 



An Act in relation to poor persons imprisoned for torts. 

It is enacted hy the General Assemlly asfoUotvs : 
in^ to poor SECTION 1. Any pcrsou who now is, or who shall 
p^iron^^™' hereafter be imprisoned for want of bail, in any action 
for torts, on penal statutes, or in any action of trover, detinue, 



JANUARY, 1852. 11 

trespass, trespass and ejectment, or trespass quare clavr 
wnfregUj in which the title to the close was not in dis- 
pute between the parties, or upon surrender or com- 
mitment by bail in any such action, or on execution 
in any such actions, and who shall on oath complain to 
the keeper of the jail, where said person is so confined, 
that he hath no estate, real or personal, wherewith to 
support himself in prison or to pay prison charges, and 
whose complaint said keeper, on examination of said 
prisoner, shall believe to be true, shall be entitled forth- 
with to a citation under the hand and seal of said keep- 
er, to the plaintiff in said suit, if within this State, or if 
the plaintiff does not reside in this State, then to his 
agent or attorney of record, or if he have no agent or 
attorney of record, then to the person who endorsed 
plaintiff's writ as surety, setting forth that said prison- 
er hath made complaint as aforesaid, and that said 
prisoner will be discharged unless the sum of one dol- 
lar and fifty cents per week be within ten days from 
the time of the service of said citation, paid to the said 
keeper in advance for the board of said prisoner, reckon- 
ing said board from the expiration of said ten days af- 
ter said service, which payment in advance shall con- 
tinue to be made by said creditor during the time said 
prisoner shall be detained at his suit 

Sec. *Z. Said keeper upon issuing said citation shall 
at the expense of the State, cause service thereof to be 
made on said creditor if within this State, or if plain- 
tiff does not live within this State, then on his agent or 
attorney of record, or if he have no known agent or 
attorney of record, then on the person who endorsed 
plaintiff's writ as surety, by reading the same to him 
in his presence and hearing, or by leaving a true and 
attested copy thereof at his last and usual place of 
ahode, by the sheriff, his deputy, or either of the town 
sergeants or constables in the county in which such 
creditor, his agent, attorney, or surety shall reside, and 
in case of default made in payment of said prisoner's 
hoard as required in the preceding section, it shall be 
the duty of the keeper to discharge such prisoner from 
Jail, stating in his formal discharge on the jail book the 
reason thereof 

Sec. 3. The amount thus paid by the creditor for 
the board of the prisoner so imprisoned at his suit> 



I 



12 JANUARY, 1852. 

shal] be added to and form a part of the costs of com- 
mitment and detention, and as such costs shall be paid 
by the prisoner in the then existing or any future pro- 
ceedings livhich may be lawfully instituted against him, 
for the recovery of the debt and costs of said suit. 

Sec. 4. So much of the act for the relief of poor 
persons imprisoned for debt, contained in the Digest 
of the laws of this State, passed January, A. D. 1844, 
and of all subsequent acts of the General Assembly, as 
are inconsistent herewith, is hereby repealed. 

Sec. 5. This act shall go into e£fect immediately up' 
on the passage thereof. 



An Act in relation to the Seal of the State. 

jR is enacted hy the General Assembfy as/oBows : 
|e«uf the rjij^^ Govemor is hereby authorized to procure anew 

seal for the State, with the same devices substantially 
as tiie present one has engraved upon it, and the same 
when procured, shall be considered and used as the 
seal of the State. 



Act abol- 



An Act to abolish capital punishment, and to provide 
for the more effectual punishment of crime. 

a 18 enacted hy the General Assemhly asfoUows : 

Section 1. The punishment of death is hereby abd- 

ishing capi- ishcd. 

to^punish- gj^ 2. Any person convicted of any crime punisb 
able with death by the laws now in force in this State, 
shall be confined in the State prison, at labor, for the 
period of his or her natural life. 

Sic. 3. On the conviction of any person for a crime 
now punishable by law with death, he or she, shall 
thereupon with respect to all rights of property, to the 
bond of matrimony, and all civil rights and relations^ 
of whatever nature, be deemed to be dead in all res* 
pects, as if hi3 or her natural death had taken place at 
the time of such conviction. 

Sec. 4. Hereafter no person convicted of any crime 
now punishable with death, or other crime for which 
the punishment is now, by law imprisonment for a tenEi 



JANUAKY, 1852. IS 

of not less than five years, shall be pardoned or releas- 
ed from prison, except by a concurrent recorded vote 
of three-fourths of all the members elected to each 
house of the General Assembly, and approved by the 
Governor. And all challenges to jurors except for 
cause, in the trial of any criminal case, are hereby abol- 
ished. So much of any act as is inconsistent herewith- 
is repealed. 



An Act in amendment of an act, entitled ^^ an act re- 
lating to theatrical exhibitions and places of amuse- 
ment." 

M is enacted ly the General Assembly as follows : a i - 

Section 1. The act to which this is in amendment, totllhii)Z 
is hereby So far amended, that the town councils of the ?io^**{fcc. 
several towns be and they are hereby authorized in 
their discretion, to grant a licensfe to the owner of any 
hall, situate in such town, for the purpose of permitting 
shows and exhibitions in such hall, under such restric- 
tions and limitations as they shall think proper, which 
Ucense may be granted for one year or for any less 
term, and shall be revocable at the pleasure of said town 
council. 



An Act in addition to an act to incorporate the Butler 

Hospital for the Insane. 

// is enacted by the General Assembly as follows : 

Section 1. The board of trustees of the Butler Hos- t^^^fiiJiie^® 
pital for the Insane, may at any quarterly or other reg- ^^^P'^-**- 
ular meeting thereof, elect members to fill vacancies 
which may happen in the board, by death, resignation 
or otherwise : and the members so elected shall seve- 
rally hold their oflSces until the next annual meeting 
of the corporation, and until others are elected in their 
places. 

2 



14 JANUARY, 1852. 

An Act in addition to the act, in relation to the Butler 

Hospital for the Insane. 

M is enacted hy the General Assembbf asfoUmvs : 
Act relative SECTION 1. The party at whose request a person is 
Hosp/iaf. admitted into the Butler Hospital for the Insane, shall 
have the right of removing such person therefrom ; and 
also the parties, who by their own free act and accord, 
(and not by the operation of law,) have become respon- 
sible for the payment of the expenses of any patient, 
shall have the same right of removing such patient, if 
the terms of the obligation require the removal in or- 
der to avoid farther responsibility, but, such shall not 
extend beyond the two parties before described. Pro- 
videdy however^ that the superintendent of the hospital, 
on the application of any relative or friend, may with 
the approbation in writing of the visiting committee of 
the trustees, discharge any patient in the hospital, not 
committed by process- of law. 



An Act in relation to the duties of the keeper of the 
Jail for the county of Providence. 

^ , It is enacted hy the General Assembly asfoUows : 
to^dinhV^^ Section 1. Whenever any prisoner confined in the 
er of Pmvi^ State's jail, in the county of Providence, shall be order- 
dencejaii, ed to bc broiight before any court by writ of habeas 
corpus, it shall be the duty of the keeper of said jail, 
to produce such prisoner before the court issuing such 
wTit, and thereupon the custody of said jailor over 
such prisoner shall cease until such prisoner shall be 
again committed to said jail by order of such court be- 
fore whom such prisoner shall be brought. 



An Act to prevent shooting on the Islands of Prudence- 
Patience and Hope. 

B is enacted iy the General Assembly asfoUows : 
venilhZ'u Section 1. Hereafter any person who shall shoot any 
ingonthe g^n or othcr fire arms in any part of the Islands of 
Prudence, Prudcuce, Patieucc and Hope, without permission from 
and^Hopi. the owner or occupant of the land where such shoot- 



JANUARY, 1852. ]o 

ing shall take place, shall pay as a fine the sum of not 
exceeding twenty dollars, one half thereof to the use 
of the State, and one half thereof to the use of the com- 
plamant, and said fine may be recovered by complaint 
before any court of competent jurisdiction. 



As Act to revise and amend the several Acts in rela- 
tion to the election of Civil Officers. 

Bis enacted ly the General Asseviblf/ asfolhivs : 

Section 1. Th6 town councils of the several towns Act in rciar 
shall be boards of canvassers of voters in their respec- ejection of 
tive towns, as hereinafter provided : and the town civii offi- 
clerks of the several towns shall act as clerks of said 
boards, in their respective towns, and shall produce to 
their respective councils such returns, documents and 
records, as the councils may require for the perform- 
ance of their duties hereinafter set forth. 

Sec. 2. Every town clerk shall provide a suitable 
book for the registry of the names of all persons, who 
in order to vote, are required by the Constitution to 
be registered ; which book shall be kept in the office 
of the town clerk, for the purpose of such registry on- 
ly, and shall always be open to the inspection of any 
elector of such town ; and every town clerk in this 
State, is hereby required to register in said book the 
name of every male inhabitant of the town, who shall 
demand such registry, and who shall declare that he is 
qualified by birth, and is or will be within a year qual- 
ified by age and residence, to vote in such town, to- 
gether with the date of the registry; and shall also 
register therein the name of every such inhabitant de- 
manded to be registered by any elector of such town, 
who shall declare that such inhabitant is qualified by 
birth, and is or will be within a year qualified by age 
and residence, to vote therein ; in which case, besides 
the date of the registry, he shall also register op- 
posite the name of such inhabitant, the name of the 
elector demanding the same. Every town clerk who 
shall neglect to provide and keep such book, or who 
shall refuse at all suitable times, to permit such inspec- • 
tion of the san\e, or who shall refuse or neglect to reg- 
ister the name of any person, upon demand and de- 



16 JANUARY, 1852. 

claration as aforesaid, or shall register a name without 
a date, or with a false date, or shall fraudulently erase 
from the registry the name of any person duly regis- 
tered thereon, shall forfeit the sum of one hundred 
dollars for each and every such oflfence. 

Sec. 3. ' If any person claim a right to vote on ac- 
count of having done military duty, the proof thereof 
shall be a certificate from the commanding officer of 
any military company in this State in which he is en- 
rolled, that he has, within the year next preceding the 
time when he shall offer to vote, done duty therein, 
for at least one day, and been equipped according to 
law ; and every commanding officer, who shall wilfully 
refuse to grant such certificate to any person properly 
entitled to the same, or shall knowingly grant any 
such certificate to any person not entitled thereto, 
shall for each and every such offence, forfeit the sum of 
one hundred dollars. 

Sec 4. The commanding officer of each military 
company in this State, shall, on or before the fourth 
day preceding the annual election in April, or on or 
before the fourth day preceding the day of any other 
election, make return by him certified and sw^orn to 
before some judge, justice of the peace, or public no- 
tary, of all persons, arranging their names alphabetical- 
ly, belonging to such company, qualified to vote by 
military service as aforesaid, to the clerk's office of the 
several towns in which such persons reside, and every 
such commanding officer who shall wilfully neglect or 
refuse to make such returns, or shall knowingly make 
a false or imperfect return, shall forfeit not less than 
twenty-five, nor more than five hundred dbllara 

Sec. 5. The commanding officers of the several com- 
panies shall have full power, and it shall be their duty to 
require from all officers, and privates under their com- 
mand, all such returns and evidences, under oath, as 
may be necessary to enable them to comply with 
the provisions of the Constitution and of this act. And 
any such officer or private refusing to make such re- 
turns, or to give such evidence, when thereunto duly 
required, or wilfully making false returns, or giving 
false evidence, shall forfeit not less than twenty -five 
dollars, nor more than three hundred dollars. 

Sec 6. On or before the second Monday of Janua- 



JANUARY, 1852. 17 

ry in each year, the town clerk of every town shall de- 
liver to the assessors of taxes for their respective towns, 
a certified copy from the registry, of the names of all 
persons registered in the town, on or before the last 
day of December preceding, alphabetically arranged, 
placing opposite the name of every person thereon, 
the amount of his assessed property tax, for and with- 
in the said year ; and such assessors of taxes shall with- 
in five days thereafter, in every year, assess upon eve- 
ry person, whose name shall have been registered as 
aforesaid, as his registry tax, a tax of one dollar, or 
such sum as with his other taxes shall amount to one 
dollar, and return to the clerk's office of the town the 
said copy of the registry by them duly certified, with 
the registry tax assessed against each person placed 
against his name thereon, which copy so returned, it 
shall be the duty of the town clerk to put on file in 
his office. The town clerk shall, within five days after 
the assessments have been made in each year, deliver a 
duly certified copy of the registry, with the assessments 
aforesaid, to the collector of taxes for such town. Eve- 
ry town clerk neglecting or refusing to deliver such 
certified copy to the assessors as aforesaid, or wilfully 
delivering a false or imperfect copy, shall forfeit the 
sum of three hundred dollars ; and if any assessors of 
taxes shall wholly neglect or refuse to make such as- 
sessments, each and every such assessor so neglecting 
of refusing, shall forfeit the sum of one thousand dol- 
larsj and be liable to imprisonment for one year ; and 
if any assessors shall wilfully neglect or refuse to assess 
as aforesaid, any person registered as aforesaid, each 
and every assessor so neglecting or refusing, shall for- 
feit the sum of one hundred dollars for each and every 
person whom he or they shall so neglect or refuse to 
assess as aforesaid. 

Sec, 7. All registry and other taxes shall be paid 
to the collector of taxes or to the town clerk : Provide 
dj however, that in case of a school district or highway 
tax where by law the same may be paid in labor or 
money to a surveyor of highways or district collect- 
or, the receipt of such surveyor or district collector of 
snch payment, shall be sufficient evidence thereof, on 
settlement with the collector or town clerk. No per- 
son who claims a right to vote upon the payment of 

2* 



18 JANUARY, 1852. 

a tax or taxes assessed, for any other officer than May- 
or, Aldermen, or Common Councilmen of the city of 
Providence, or upon any other proposition than one to 
impose a tax, or for the expenditure of money in any 
town or city, shall by the boards of canvassers be ad- 
mitted to vote, unless upon the production ot a certifi- 
cate from the collector of taxes or town clerk of 
some town in this State, that before the fourth day 
preceding the annual election in April, or before 
the fourth day preceding the day of any other elec- 
tion, he has paid such tax assessed for, and within 
such year, at least to the amount of one dollar. If he 
claim a right to vote upon the payment of a registry 
tax, such payment shall be certified as aforesaid, by 
the officer of the town in which he resided at the time 
such tax was assessed, authorized to receive the same, 
and if his name has been registered for more than one 
year, two registry taxes for the two years next preced- 
ing the canvass having been assessed against him, and 
he claims a right to vote upon the payment of his reg- 
istry tax, the certificate of the officer of the town in 
which he resided at the time such tax was assessed, au- 
thorized to receive the same, shall be produced before 
the canvassers, that before the canvass, he has paid such 
registry tax for each of the two yearsnext preceding the 
time of voting ; or that one of the same, if the other 
has been paid, has been remitted by the town council 
of the town in which he resided at the time of the as- 
sessment of said tax, in conformity with article 2, sec- 
tion 3, of the Constitution. Provided^ however y that the 
payment of said registry tax for the first of said years, 
shall not be required in any case where the person so 
taxed would not have been entitled to vote in the town 
where he was so taxed, had the payment been made 
before the fourth day preceding the annual election of 
April in said first year. 

Sec. 8. No person claiming a right to vote upon 
the payment of a property tax, in the election of the 
City Council of the city of Providence, or of any mem- 
ber of the same, or upon any proposition to impose a 
tax, or for the expenditure of money in any town, 
shall in such case be admitted by the canvassers to vote, 
imless upon a certificate from the collector of taxes, or 
the town clerk of such town, that he has on or before 
the fourth day preceding the election, or before the 



JANUARY, 1852. 19 

time of voting on any proposition as aforesaid, paid a 
tax assessed for and within the year preceding, upon 
his property therein, valued at least at one hundred 
and thirty-four dollars. 

Sec. 9. Any collector of taxes, or other officer au- 
thorized to receive the taxes or give the certificates in 
either of the two preceding sections mentioned, who 
shall wilfully refuse to grant the certificate therein pre- 
scribed, to any person demanding the same and legally 
entitled thereto, or shall wilfully and fraudulently grant 
such certificate to any person not legally entitled there- 
to, shall forfeit the sum of one hundred dollars for each 
and every offence, and in all cases the return of said 
collector or towTi clerk, shall be deemed sufficient evi- 
dence of the payment of the said tax or taxes. 

Sec. 10. No person whose name is upon the regis- 
try of any town shall be deemed to be registered there- 
in who shall have died, or who for the space of one 
year, shall have ceased to reside in such town ; and it 
shall be the duty of the town council of each town, on 
the third Monday of June in each year, carefully to 
examine the registry of such town, in open meeting, 
and to purge the same, by placing against the names 
of all persons thereon who are dead, or who for the 
space of one year, shall have ceased to reside in such 
town, or w^hose name shall not have been put upon 
some list of voters in said town, duly certified, for some 
election of general or town officers, for the space of 
three years next preceding the meeting of the town 
council, the word " dead," " non-resident," or " unqual- 
ified," as the case may be, and to correct the registry, 
where the same person is registered more than once 
thereon ; and if the name of any person shall be wil- 
fully or Iraudulantly stricken from the registry as 
aforesaid, whose name should be retained thereon, ev- 
^ry member of the town council wilfully and fraudu- 
lently concurring in the same, shall forfeit the sum of 
one hundred dollars for every name so stricken off* as 
aforesaid. 

Sec. ] 1. It shall be the duty of the collector of 
taxes in each town to be and remain in the town clerk's 
office, and in the town of Newport, and city of Provi- 
dence, to be and remain at his own or at the town 
clerk's office, from and after the day of his receiving 



20 JANUARY, 1852. 

the copy of the registry, in the sixth section mentioned, 
for at least six hours in each day, to wit : from twelve 
to six o'clock in the afternoon, during the six days, ex- 
clusive of Sunday, next preceding the last four days 
before the day of the annual election for State Officers, 
and one day before the fourth day next preceding any 
other election ; or in case of absence, to appoint some 
one as his agent, there to remain as aforesaid, during 
the period aforesaid, to receive the registry tax : Pr> 
vidcd^ Imvever, that the certificate of such payment shall 
in case of payment to the agent, be under the hand of 
the collector, in order to avail as proof before the board 
of canvassers. If the collector shall die, resign, be un- 
able, or neglect, or refuse to do his duty herein before 
required, the town clerk of each town shall receive and 
certify the payment of the registry tax with the same 
effect that the collector might do. Any wilful neglect 
or refusal of duty on the part of the collector or town 
clerk, or agent under this section, shall be punished by 
a fine of not less than twenty-five nor more than one 
thousand doUara 

Sec. 12. Every town, ward, or district clerk, upon 
payment or tender of his legal fees, which shall be the 
same for the ward and district clerks as for the town 
clerks, shall furnish to any one demanding the same, a 
certified copy of any list of voters whose votes have 
been given in at any election. Every town clerk shall, 
upon like payment or tender, furnish to any person de- 
manding the same, a certified copy of any registration 
of voters, and shall also upon request of any pereon and 
tender of legal fees, and without any unreasonable de- 
lay, examine the records, and certify to the estate of 
any person, and shall furnish copies of any instrument 
or writing which may be on record, or in the files of 
his office. Every collector of taxes, or other officer 
authorized to receive the same, shall, upon like request 
and payment or tender, and without unreasonable de- 
lay, furnish to any elector, a certified list of those who 
have paid to him, State, town and registry taxes, and 
the amounts and times of such payments ; and shall 
grant certificates setting forth whether a certain person 
or persons, have or have not paid to him such taxes, 
and if paid, to what amount, and at what time ; and 
every town, ward, or district clerk, or collector of taxes 



JANUARY, 1852. 21 

who shall refuse or unreasonably delay to furnish such 
lists or certificates upon payment or tender as afore- 
said, shall for every such offence, forfeit not less than 
twenty-five dollars, nor more than two hundred dollars. 

Sec. 13. The collector of taxes, or other officer au- 
thorized to receive the same, shall present to the town 
councils at every meeting, for the purpose of canvass- 
ing, alphabetical lists of the names of all persons regis- 
tered on or before the last day of December next pre- 
ceding, in their respective towns, who shall have paid 
such officer their taxes, together with the amount of 
the payment by each, specifying whether the tax was 
an assessed tax, or a tax on his property valued at least 
at one hundred and thirty-four dollars, which have not 
been before presented. And any collector, or other 
officer authorized to receive taxes, neglecting or refus- 
ing to make such return to the town council, as afore- 
said, shall for every offence, forfeit not less than twen- 
ty-five dollars, nor more than two hundred dollars. 

Sec. 14. On or before the first Monday of March, 
in every year, the town clerks in the several towns 
shall furnish to the town councils of their respective 
towns a duly certified alphabetical list of all persons 
registered therein, on or before the last day of Decem- 
ber, next preceding, for the purpose of voting. And 
separately therefrom correct alphabetical lists of the 
names of all persons entitled to vote under article se- 
cond, section first, of the Constitution. And every town 
clerk, who shall wilfully neglect or refuse to deliver 
such lists as aft>resaid, within the time above limited, 
or who shall wilfully deliver false or imperfect lists, 
shall forfeit not less than five hundred, nor more than 
one thousand dollars, or be imprisoned not less than 
six months, either or both, at the discretion of the court 
who shall try the offender. 

Sec 15. The town councils of the several towns 
shall hold a meeting on the first Monday of March in 
every year, and shall make out correct alphabetical 
lists of all persons qualified, or who may by the pay- 
ment of the registry or other taxes, become qualified 
to vote generally, to wit : of all persons entitled to vote 
under article second, section first, of the Constitution, 
and of all persons who are or may be entitled by regis- 
try and payment of registry, and other taxes, or by 



22 JANUARY, 1852. 

the performance of military duty, to vote in their re- 
spective towns, distinguishing the persons registered, 
who are not entitled to vote under article second, sec- 
tion first, of the Constitution, and who had not paid 
their registry or other taxes, at the time of making 
said lists, from those who had paid their taxes, and se- 
parately from such lists, correct alphabetical lists of all 
persons entitled to vote upon any proposition to impose 
a tax or expend money in their respective towns, to 
wit : of all persons entitled to vote under article se- 
cond, section first, of the Constitution, and of every per- 
son who has paid taxes assessed within the year pre- 
ceding upon his property in any city or town, valued 
at least at one hundred and thirty -four dollars, or on 
whose property, valued as aforesaid, a tax has been as- 
sessed and not paid, distinguishing in the said list a^ 
hereinbefore provided, those who are not entitled to 
vote under article second, section first, of the Constitu- 
tion, and who have not paid the said tax. And on or 
before the 2d Monday in March, in each year, said 
councils shall cause said lists to be posted up in three 
or more public places in their respective towns, and one 
in the town clerk's office, which last list shall be open 
to the examination of any elector of the town, at aU 
reasonable hours : Provided^ lumever^ that separate lists 
of the voters in each ward of the city of Providence, 
shall be made out by the Mayor and Aldermen of the 
said city, and the lists for each ward shall be posted up 
in some public place in the ward, and in the office of the 
city clerk ; and also, that separate lists of the voters in 
each of the districts in any town which is or may be 
divided into voting districts, shall be made out by the 
town councils of such towns, and the lists for each dis- 
trict shall be posted up in one or more public places 
in each of the said districts, and in the town clerk's 
office. And any person who shall take down, destroy, 
or deface any list, by this section ordered to be posted 
up, shall forfeit the sum of one hundred dollars, or may 
be imprisoned three calender months. 

Sec. 1 6. On or before the third Monday of March 
in every year, the town councils of the several towns 
not divided into voting districts, shall be in session 
at tiome convenient place or places for a reasona- 
ablc time, in their respective towns, for the purpose 



JANUARY, 1862. 23 

of correcting such lists ; and the notice of the time or 
times, and place or places of holding said sessions shall 
be given by the town councils upon the lists posted up 
as aforesaid. Within two days after the corrections of 
the lists as aforesaid, such corrections shall be by the 
several town clerks entered upon such lists so posted, or 
other lists shall be corrected and posted in their places. 
The members of the town councils, and the town clerks 
of the several towns, shall be paid by their respective 
towns, one dollar each, for every day's attendance in 
the discharge of their duties under this act ; and the 
town clerks shall in addition, be paid legal fees for 
their recording and making out the several lists and 
returns in this act required. 

Sec. 17. On or before the third Monday of March, 
in each year, the town councils in the several towns, 
which are or may be divided into voting districs, shall 
be in session in some convenient place in each of said 
districts for a reasonable time, to correct said lists, and 
the notice of the time and place of holding such ses- 
sion, shall be given by the council, on the list posted 
up as aforesaid. 

Sec. 18. The board of canvassers shall, at their sev- 
eral meetings, correct the lists, and add to the list of 
voters all persons otherwise qualified, who, since the 
preceding meeting have paid taxes assessed against 
them necessary for a qualification, and all such others 
whose names may not be on the list of voters, who may 
be shown to be entitled to vote under article f^econd, 
section first of the Constitution, or by the performance 
of military duty; and the board of canvassers shall 
hold their last meeting within four days next preced- 
ing the day of voting, at any election, when they shall 
complete the lists of all persons qualified, which lists 
need not be posted up as aforesaid, but notice of the 
time and place of such session shall be given, for at 
lesist ten days previous thereto, by posting up notices 
thereof, in three or more public places in every town, 
and one in each ward in the city of Providence ; also, 
one in each voting district in any town, divided into 
districts, for the purpose of voting, and one in the town 
or city clerk's office ; in addition to such notice, by 
publication in one or more (newspapers published in 
such town, if any there be. And no name shall be 



24 JANUARY, 1862. 

stricken from the voting lists by any board of canvass- 
ers unless proof shall be presented to said canvassers 
that such name is the name of a person not qualified 
to vote, or who may not be qualfied according to the 
provisions of this act. The lists of voters so corrected, 
shall be by said town councils certified by their presid- 
ing officer, and on the same day delivered to the town 
clerks of their respective towns, to be delivered by 
said town clerics to the moderators of town meetings 
in their respective tow-ns. The town clerk of any town 
divided into districts for the purpose of voting, shall 
send to the moderator of each of said districts, a certi- 
fied copy of the list for his district, before the time fix- 
ed for opening the district meetings, for any election 
as aforesaid ; and the city clerk of the city of Provi- 
dence shall, from the list of voters so corrected, make 
out separate lists of the voters of each ward in said city, 
and send such lists, by him certified, to the clerks of 
the respective wards before the time fixed for the open- 
ing of the ward meetings. Any wilful neglect to hold 
the sessions, to post up the list^ or to deliver the same, 
as hereinbefore required, on the part of any town coun- 
cil or town clerk, shall be punished by a fine not ex- 
ceeding five hundred dollars, to be forfeited by every 
member of the town council, and by every town clerk 
so wilfully neglecting his duty as aforesaid. 

Sec. 19. The electors in each of the districts of towns 
divided, or which may be divided into districts, for the 
purpose of voting, qualified as aforesaid, shall on the 
first Wednesday of April, meet in their several districts, 
at a place to be designated by the town council, at 
nine o'clock in the forenoon, for the purpose of organ- 
izing and for the purpose of voting for such officers as 
are to be chosen by law on that day. The town clerk 
shall cause notice of the time, place and purpose of 
such meetings to be given, by issuing his warrant to 
the town sergeant or one of the constables of said town, 
requiring him to post up notifications thereof in two 
or more public places in each of said districts. Some 
member of the town council or other person to be de- 
signated by the town council, shall attend the meet- 
ing on that day in each of said districts and act as mod- 
erator until the meeting shall choose a moderator. 
The officers of said districts shall be a moderator, and 



JAMURAY, 1862. 25 

district clerk. They shall be chosen on the first Wednech 
day of April annually ; and shall be sworn for the faith* 
ful and impartial discharge of their several duties, ac- 
cording to law. The said moderators shall preside in 
all meetings of their districts until a new election ; and 
shall have the same authority to preserve order in said 
meetings as moderators of town meetings have ; and 
shall be subject to the same penalties for wilful violar 
tions or neglect of duty. Should the moderator not 
attend any meeting, the clerk shall preade until a 
moderator pro tempore shall be chosen. Should the 
clerk not attend any meeting, the moderator shall call 
for an election of clerk pro t^pore, and shall discharge 
the duties of clerk until such election, The clerk shall 
keep a record of the proceedings of the meetings in , 

their several districts, and afler a choice of officers in 
their several districts, shall in writing, duly certified, 
notify the town clerk thereof, and the meeting held on 
said first Wednesday in April shall fix upon the place 
of their future meetings ; and the district clerks shall 
severally give notice to the town clerk of the place so 
appointed Whenever any election for Bepresenta* 
tives to Congress, Electors of President and Vice Presi* 
dent. General Officers, Town Clerk, Town Council, 
Justices of the Peace, Town Treasurer, and for Senator 
and Representatives to the General Assembly, skaU be 
prescribed by law, it shall be the duty of the town 
clerk to cause notice to be given to the voters in each 
of the districts of the said towns divided into districts^ 
or which may hereafter be divided into districts^ as 
aforesaid, by issuing his warrant to the town sergeant, 
or one of the constables of the said town, directing him 
to poet up notifications of the time, place and purpose 
of such meetings, in two or more public places in each 
of said distiicts, at least seven days previous to the 
time appointed therefor. And the officer charged with 
the service of said warrant, shall return to the district 
clerks severally, a certificate of his doing^ upon said 
warrant in each district, previous to said meetii^. At 
the dose of each election, the moderator shall return 
to the town clerk the lists of those entitled to vote at 
8uch election, and the town clerk shall place the same 
on file in his office, to be kept there at least one year. 
Ssc. 20l If any town council of any town, shall, at 

3 



26 JAKUART, 1852. 

any setHsion hotden for the purpose of correcting the 
ligts of voters for the said town, as is hereinbdbre pro- 
vided^ wilfully and fraudulently place the name of any 
person upon the list of voters tor such town, who is not 
entitled to vote, or shall wilfully and fraudulently re* 
ject and cause to be erased from said lists the name of 
any person entitled to vote, every member of the said 
town councils so offending, who shall concur in said 
offence, shall forfeit not less than one hundred doUare^ 
nor more than five hundred dollars. 

Sbc. 21. If any town clerk shall at any time wilfully 
and firaudulently add a name to any list of voters, or 
erase any name therefrom, after the same has been 
corrected and certified as aforesaid, he shall forfeit the 
sum of one hundred dollars for each and every name 
so added or erased as aforesaid. 

Sec. 22. Any person who shall actually be sup- 
ported by any town at the time of the completion of 
the voting lists, shall be deemed and considered a pau- 
per, and the name of any such person shall be stricken 
horn the list of voters by the board of canvassers ; nor 
shall any person be permitted to vote who is excluded 
by the fourth and fifth sections of the second article of 
the Constitution* 

8sa 23. It ^all be the duty of the town clerk to 
record the votes of the members of said town coucik 
upon admitting or rejecting the name of any person 
from the list of voters, when he shall be requested 
tiiereto by any member of said council, or by any qual' 
ified elector of said town present at the time of can- 
vassing, a certified copy of which record shall be con- 
elusive evidence of the fiicts therein stated, and any 
wilfbl neglect upon the part of said clerk to make said 
record when requested as aforesaid, shall be punidbed 
by a fine not exceeding five hundred dollars. 

Sec. 24. Said town councils may, at their sessions, 
hoMen either for the purpose of revising the registry, 
or canvassing the votes as aforesaid, examine, under 
oath, the person whose right to vote is disputed, or any 
other person present, and may receive any other evi- 
dence offfeped, that they deem necessary, respecting the 
right of any person to have his name upon the registry, 
or to vote and to decide upon the same ; and any per- 
son refiudug to answer, or giving a false answer upon 



JANDABY, i««L ar 

such examination, shall forfeit a sum of not less than 
twenty-five dollars, nor more than three hundred dol* 
lars for such refustU, or for such &l8e answer flip given. 

Sfic 25. The town councils, in case they slmllhave 
entered on said lists the names of all persons returned 
to them hy said town clerks, shall not be held answeiy 
able for any omissions in said lists, nor for refusing to 
place in their list the names of any person omitted in 
the lists to them delivered as afo^resaid, unless at ope 
of theur said sessions they shall be furnished with suf* 
ficient evidence of such omission, and of the qualifiea* 
tions, as a voter, of the person omitted. 

Sec. 26. The moderator or warden of any town^ 
ward or district meeting, shall receive the votaa of all 
persons whose names are upon the lists of voters, 00 to 
him delivered and certified as afor^aid, and he shall 
reject the votes of all persons claiming to vote whose 
names are not on said lists : JPramded, however^ that if 
any voter whose name is upon any ward list in the 
city of Providence, or an any district list in any town, 
shall have removed to another ward or district^ after 
the making out the ward 01 district list^ or if the name 
of any voter shall have been placed upon the wrong 
ward or district list, every such voter aball be admilr 
ted to vote in the ward or district in which be resides, 
upon producing thex^ertificate of the town clerk, that 
hifl name is upon another ward or district list, duly pre* 
pared for the election at which he claims to vote, — p 
The certificate mentioned in this section, shall, with 
the votes, be returned by Ihe several ward and district 
clerks, to the officer or body by law provided to receive 
the votes. And if any ward or district clerk, shall re« 
fuse to give such certificate, to one entitled to and de* 
manding the same, or shall wilfully give a false one, 
he shall forfeit the sum of one hundred dollars fi)r ev« 
ery oflence. 

Sec. 27. If any person in any election shall fimid* 
ulently vote, not being qualified, or having voted in one 
town, or ward, or district, shall vote in another town, 
or ward, or district, he shall be fined one hundred 
dollars ; and no person after conviction of such oflfonoe 
shall ever after be permitted to exercise the privilege 
of voting for any civil or military officer. 

Sbc. 28. If any moderator, warden, or person whose 



i% JANUABY, 1862. 

duty it is to receive votes, shall fraudulently receive 
any unlawful vote, or shall fraudulently reject the vote 
of any voter, whose name is on the town, ward, or dis- 
trict lists, he shall forfeit the sum of one hundred dol- 
lars for every o£fence, and he ever after disqualified 
from votmg. 

Sxc. 29. In the election of General Officers, Repre- 
sentatives to Congress, and Electors of President and 
Vice President of the United States, and when the vote 
is taken by ballat in the election of Senators and Rep- 
msentatives to the General Assembly, the town meet- 
ings of the several towns, and the ward meetings in the 
4aity of Providence, shaU be kept open for voting during 
the whole time of voting for the day. Town and ward 
meetings for the election of General Officers, Senators 
and Representatives to the General Assembly, Repre- 
sentatives to Congress, and Electors of President and 
Vice President of the United States, shall be opened at 
ten o*clock, in the forenoon, on the day of election ; 
and all town meetings for such elections, except in case 
of the election of Senators and Representatives to the 
(General Assembly where the vote is not taken by bal- 
lol^ in any town having five hundred electors or up^ 
Ward, shall be kept open at least until five o'clock, in 
the afternoon, on said day ; and in all towns having less 
than five hundred electors, shall be kept open at least 
until three o'clock, in the afternoon, on said day ; and 
the ward meetings in the city of Providence, in all such 
elections, shall be kept open until eight o'clock in the 
evening, and no longer; and all district meetings hold- 
en for such elections, shall be opened at nine o'clock, 
in the forenoon, and be kept open at least until three 
o'clock in the afternoon. 

Sec. 80. If any person shall directly or indirectly 
give, or offer, or agree to give to any elector, or to any 
person for the benefit of any elector, any sum of money, 
or other valuable consideration, for the purpose of in- 
ducing such elector to give in or withhold his vote at 
any election in this State, or by way of reward for hav- 
ing voted or withheld his vote, or if he shall use any 
threats, or employ any means of intimidation for the 
purpose of influencing said elector to vote, or withhold 
his vote ; or if any person shall directly or indirectly 
accept or receive, or offer, or agree to accept or recme 



JAMUABT, 1862. 89 

any sum of money or other valuable consideralbioB m 
an inducement to give in or withhold hia vote» such 
person so offending, dball upon conviction there^ be 
fined the sum of five hundred dollars, or be impriioift* 
ed not exceeding three months, or both, at the discre- 
tion of the court ; and no person, after conviction of 
such offence, shall ever be permitted to exercise the 
privilege of voting for any civil or military officer. 

Sec 31. If Senators and Representatives to the Oei^ 
eral Assembly be voted for by ballot^ the names of the 
candidates for these offices in any town voted for by aoy 
one elector, shall be written or printed on one tioket> 
and in all such cases where the voting is by ballot, and 
in the election of General Officers, Representatives to 
Congress, and Electors of President and Vice President 
of the United States, each voter shall, (before deposii- 
ing his vote in the ballot box,) enclose his vote or voieB, 
which shall not have the name of the voter written 
thereon, unless in connection with an office for which he 
is voted for, in a sealed envelope furnished as hereinii£> 
ter provided* The names of the persons voted for as 
Govemer, Lieutenant Governor, Secretary of State^ At- 
torney General and General Treasurer, ^11 be placed 
upon one ticket or ballot, which shall be enclosed Ib a 
sealed envelope bearing no device except the arms of 
the State. The ballots for Senators and Representar 
tives to the General Assembly, shall be enclosed in a 
sealed envelope on which shall be printed the words 
^ For Senator and Representatives," in addition to the 
arms of the State. 

Sec. 32. It shall be the duty of the clerks of the 
towns and cities of this State to furnish and see that they 
are preserved in proper condition, a sufficient number 
of ballot boxes in each town, district and ward^ for the 
pnrpose of balloting, the expense of which, as also of 
procuring from the Secretary of State the envelopes as 
hereinafter provided, shall be paid by their several 
towns and cities. 

Ssa 33. The said ballot boxes shall have a suffio- 
ient opening on the top to receive the ballots^ and shall 
in open town meeting, and before the balloting has 
commenced, be opened and exhibited to all preseat^ 
after which they shall be kept closed and locked, and 
shall not by the moderator or warden, or any other 
3« 



30 ' JANUARY, 1862. 

person whatever, upon any pretext whatever, be open« 
>ed until the balloting be completed. 

Sbc. 84. The ballot box shall be in charge of the 
moderators and wardens only, and each voter »hall at 
the time of voting, announce to the moderator or war- 
den, his name, who shall pronounce the same aloud, 
and cause it to be checked upon the voting lists, be- 
fore he deposits his vote, and said voter shall also hold 
in his hand and deposit in said ballot box the envelope 
containing his ballot or ballots, in such a manner that 
uid moderator and warden can distinctly see that he de- 
.posit« but one envelope, of a kind, and it shall be the 
duty of the town, ward, and district clerks to dieck each 
Voter^s name as he deposits his ballots, m such a man- 
ner as that said clerk may be able to return to the Gen- 
eral Assembly a correct list of all persons voting for 
General Officers. 

Sec. 36. It shall be the duty of the Secretary of State 
to provide a sufficient quantity of self-sealing envelop«J 
of uniform appearance, and of suitable size and quali- 
ty, stamped as hereinbefore provided, for the nse of the 
voters in the State, and to notify each clerk of every 
town and city within the State, that the same are ready 
for delivery, in addition to those already distributed 
according to law, and it shall also be the duty of said 
Secretary to keep constantly on hand a sufficient quan- 
tity of said envelopes to supply all the voters of ihe 
State at any time and at all elections that may take 
place, and furnish the same to the clerks of the several 
towns, whenever they shall apply therefor. 

Sbc. 36. It shall be the duty of the cleric of each 
town and city in this State, on receiving the nctice 
aforesaid, forthwith to obtain from the Secretary of 
State, and thereafter to procure and keep on hand cotr- 
6tantly, a sufficient number of said envelopes, not at 
«oy time having less than six times as many envelo{)e9 
of each kind as the whole number of names on the list 
of voters of such town or city for the preceding ye»r, 
subject to the order and direction of the town or city 
council as hereinafter provided. 

Sw. 37 It shall be the duty of the town ccmncil of 
eadi town, and of the common council of each city in 
this State, to appoint two persons for each town, and 
irhere there is more than one ward or district in wy 



JANUARY, lg52. &1 

totvn or city, two for each ward or district, who shall 
make oath or affirmation to the faithful discharge of 
their duty, to procure from the clerks of their several 
towns and cities, and provide at the polls on the day 
of election, a sufficient quantity of envelopes aforesaid, 
and to take charge of the same and supply each voter 
on his personal application, and no other person, with 
such a number as he needs for his own ballots during 
the pending election. It shall be the duty of the town 
clerks of the several towns and cities to see that the 
envelopes aforesaid are provided, and are at the town 
and ward meetings at the opening of said meetings on 
all election days : And if the persons, or either of them, 
appointed by the town council of any town, or the com- 
mon councils of any city, shall not be present at the 
opening of any town, ward or district meeting, the 
moderator or warden shall appoint one or two persons, 
as the case may be, in the place or places of the person 
or persons absent, who shall make oath or affirmation 
before the moderator, or town, ward, or district clerk, 
that he will faithfully perform the duties assigned him : 
At the close of each town, ward and district meeting, eV' 
ery person so appointed, shall return all such envelopes 
as may remain in his possession, to the clerks of the 
town, ward, or districts, and the ward and district clerks 
shall forthwith deposit the same with the city and 
town clerks. 

Sec. 38. All votes not enclosed in the envelopes 
provided as aforesaid, shall be void, and all moderators 
and wardens eball refuse to receive the same ; and if 
any officer or other person shall in any way mark or 
discolor any one of the envelopes deposited, before the 
same shall be deposited in the ballot box, for the pur-* 
pose of distinguishing the same, he shall on conviction 
thereof forfeit and pay to the treasurer of the State, 
the sum of five hundred dollars, and any officer who 
diall neglect to comply with the requisitions of this 
act, diall on conviction thereof, forfeit and pay as afore- 
said, a like sum of five hundred dollars, said sum, in 
both cases to be recovered by an indictment there- 
for. 

Sbc. 39. After the voting in any town, city, ward, or 
district^ for the officers herein mentioned, or any of 
them, shall be closed, the moderator and town clerl^ 



3i JANUARY, 1862. 

or the warden and ward clerk, or th6 moderator and 
district clerk, shall, in open town, ward, or district 
meetings, count the number of envelopes to ascertain 
the number of persons voting, and shall then proceed 
to open the envelopes and count the ballots ; and the 
moderator shall announce the result, and the clerk of 
towns not divided into districts, shall give a certificate 
to the persons elected. If any envelopes shall con- 
tain more than one vote for the same person for 
the same office, or votes for different persons for 
the same office, either on the same piece of paper, or 
on different pieces of paper, all such votes shall be 
rejected and not counted, and every envelope found 
to contain only a blank shall not be coimted ; nor shaU 
any ticket be counted on which the name of the elec- 
tor is written, unless in connection with an office for 
which he is voted for, as hereinbefore provided. When 
any envelope found in any ballot box bears any im- 
pression, or device, or color, designed to distinguish 
such envelope from others of the same kind, deposited 
therein by the voters, it shall be rejected with all its 
contents. If in any case there shall be no election, the 
polls may be re-opened, and the like proceedings shall 
be had until an election takes place : Provided^ however^ 
that an adjournment, or adjournments of the election 
may be made to a time not exceeding seven days from 
the first meeting. 

Sec. 40. In the city of Providence and in other cities^ 
and in towns which are divided into districts for votings 
after the examination of the ballots, the wardens and 
clerks, and the moderators and district elerks,shall forth- 
with seal and deliver to the city clerk or town derk, 
nil the ballots other than those given for General Offi- 
cers, with a certificate of the number of ballots, and 
for what officers they have been ^ven ; and the May- 
or and Aldermen, or the Town Councils, as the case 
may be, shall proceed within two days to count the 
ballots, in the same manner as is prescribed in section 
thirty-nine for the counting of votes by the modera- 
tors and clerks of town and ward meetings^ and shall 
declare the result ; and if no election shall have been 
made of Senator and Representatives to the General 
Assembly, or of city or town officers, or of any one or 
more of them, upon the day appointed by law, for any 



JANUARY, 1852. 3S 

election, the Major and Aldermen, or Town Council, 
as the case may be, shall order a new election, to bo 
held not more than ten days from the day of the first 
election, and so on until the election shall be complet- 
ed. Certificates of election shall be furnished by the 
city or town clerks to the persons chosen. 

Sec. 41. The moderators and town clerks of the 
towns and districts, and the wardens and ward clerks of 
the cities, shall, after having counted the envelopes and 
ballots, as provided for in section thirty-nine, seal up 
in open meeting, the ballots* for General Officers, ana 
after certifying the same, deliver or send them to the 
Secretary of State, to be delivered by him to the 
Grand Committee of the General Assembly, and the 
said clerks shall keep correct lists or registers of all per* 
sons voting for General Officers, including therein those 
who may deposit blank ballots, and the envelopes re^ 
jected, and transmit a copy thereof to the General As* 
sembly on or before the first day of the May session, 
with the number of blank votes, and votes rejected. 

Sec. 42. Any town, or ward, or district clerk, who 
shall neglect to keep the registry, and any moderator, 
warden, or town, ward, or district clerk, who shall neg- 
lect to seal up and direct the votes, or to send the same 
with the lists, as hereinbefore or by the Constitution 
provided, and any town, ward, or district clerk, who 
shall knowingly keep a false or imperfect registry, and 
every moderator or warden, town, ward, or district 
clerk, who shall knowingly seal up, direct and send a 
part only of the votes, or with false and imperfect lists, 
shall be fined not less than one hundred dollars, nor 
more than three thousand dollars, or be imprisoned not 
more than three years, either or boUi, at the discretion 
of the court who shall try such offenders. 

Sec. 43. If any town clerk shall necessarily be ab- 
sent from his office between nine o'clock in the fore- 
noon and twelve o'clock at noon, or between two and 
five o'clock in the afternoon, of any day except Sun- 
day, within twenty days next preceding any meeting 
held for the annual election of State, or town officers,. 
Representatives to Congress, or Electors of President 
and Vice President of the United States, it shall be his 
duty to appoint a deputy clerk, according to the pro- 
visions of law in such case made, whose duty it shall be 



34 JANUARY, 1852. 

to attend the office during such absence, and perform 
all the duties thereof; and if any town or city clerk 
shall refuse or wilfully neglect to appoint a deputy as 
aforesaid, he shall forfeit the sum of one hundred dot 
lara 

Sec. 44. If any town clerk shall neglect or refuse 
to furnish any member of the Senate or House of Rep- 
resentatives electa with a proper certificate of his eleo* 
tion, as soon as may be after his election, he shall be 
fined not less than fifty dollars, nor more than five hun- 
dred dollars, or be imprisoned not exceeding six months^ 
either or both, at the discretion of the court trying such 
offender. 

Sec 45. If any person elected Senator or Represen- 
tative shall, at any time between his election and the 
expiration of his term, refuse to serve, and shall de- 
clare the same to the town clerk of the town for which 
he is elected, or shall die, resign, or remove out of said 
town, the town clerk shall forthwith issue his warrant 
for an election to fill such vacancy, unless a special 
election for that purpose shall be ordered by the House 
in which the vacancy happens ; and in case of the re- 
fusal or neglect of the town clerk to issue his warrant 
as aforesaid, he shall be subject to a fine of five hun- 
dred dollars for each offence. 

Sec. 46. Every officer chosen by the General As- 
sembly, and every military commissioned officer shall 
be commissioned by the Governor, and before he en- 
ters on the duties of his office, shall take an engage- 
ment before a Senator, Judge, Justice of the Peace, 
Public Notary, or Town Clerk, to support the Constitu- 
tion and laws of this State and the Constitution of the 
United States, and faithfully to discharge the duties of 
his office, which shall be certified upon his commission 
by the person administering the engagement 

Sec 47. All officers of annual appointment, except 
Justices of the Peace and Public Notaries, who shaU 
not be re-elected or continued in office, by the Gene- 
ral Assembly, at the annual general election, may con- 
tinue to officiate until their successors are qualified to 
act, and any officer of annual appointment, except Jus- 
tices of the Peace and Public Notaries, continued in 
office at said general election to a subsequent session 
of the General Assembly, may continue to officiate 



JANUAEY, 1852. 36 

after mich fiubsequent session^ until his niccesBor is qual- 
ified to act 

Sec. 48. All persons entitled to vote, shall be pro- 
tected from arrest in civil cases, on the days of election 
for the choice of city or town officers, and the election 
for State Officers, Representatives to Congress, or the 
Electors of President and Vice President of the United 
States ; and on the day preceding and the day follow- 
ing such election. 

Sisc. 49. All fines and forfeitures provided by this 
act shall be to and for the use of the State, and shall 
together with all other punishments herein prescribed^ 
be enforced by indictment in the Supreme Court, or 
Courts of Common Pleas : provided always, that all 
complaints for the same, shall be made within one year 
after such fines, forfeitures and punishments have been 
incurred, and not afterwards. 

Sec. 50. The Secretaiy of State shall at least t«n 
days previous to the day of election of General Offi- 
cers, Representatives to Congress, or Electors of Presi- 
dent and Vice Presdent of the United States, furnish 
each town or ward clerk with printed forms of returns, 
certificates and directions, together with any advice he 
may deem necessary to secure proper returns. 

Sec. 51. All acts and parts of acts inconsistent with 
this act are hereby repealed. 

Sbc. 52. This act shall go into efiect immediately. 



An Act explaining and in amendment of an act enti- 
tled " An Act to revise and amend the several Acts 
in relation to the election of Civil Officers." 

H is enacted hy the General Assembly as follows : 

Section 1. The seventeenth section of the act en- piainhiV«n 
titled " An Act to revise and amend the several acts in »^y ^ ^^'•■ 
relation to the election of Civil Officers,*' passed at the election of 
present session of the General Assembly, shall not be ^^*" ^ 
construed to require the Board of Aldermen of the city 
of Providence to hold meetings in each of the wards in 
said city. 

Sec 2. The Board of Aldermen of said citv of Pro- 
vidence may discharge all duties which are imposed on 
the Common Council by the act mentioned in the first 
section of this act. 



ocrs. 



36 JANUAEY, 18»2, 

An Act in amendment of an act entitled ^ An Act in 
relation to the election and duties of Town Offi* 
oers." 

Ji tf enacted hy the General AMemi^ as follows : 

Act in a. Sbction 1. Whenever a vote by ballot he demand* 

^l*?? "t ro- ^^ "^ *^^ election of any town officers^ or upon any 

iatiTet«ithe propositiou to imposo a tax or the expenditure of mo- 

•nd dudes ney^ or upon the question of withholding or granting 

ficCTsT"**^ of licenses in an^' town in this State, the elector voting 

shall present his ballot to the moderator or warden 

without his name being written on the back or face of 

his ballot. 

Sfic. 2. The ballot boxes shall be in charge of the 
moderator or warden only ; and the manner of deliv- 
ering or receiving the elector's ballots and the check- 
ing of the voting lists^ shall be the same as is required 
by the thirty -fourth section of " An Act to revise and 
amend the several acts in relation to the election <^ 
Civil Officers." Promdedy hawevery that the use of en- 
^ velopes shall not be required. 

Sec. 3. So much of any act as is inconsistent here- 
with, is hereby repealed. 



An Act in amendment of an act entitled ^ An Act for 
the preservation of Oysters and other Shell Fish, 
within this State." 

J? is enacted hy the Generai Assemify asfoHnffS : 
u^l^en^ Section 1. Whenever any suitable person or per- 
•hcli^fillh*^ sons, inhabitants of or domiciled within this State, shall 
make application to the Commissioners chosen by the 
General Assembly under the provisions of the act to 
which this is in amendment, for the lease of any piece 
of land covered by the waters of this State as a private 
or several oyster ground or oyster fishery, for the 
planting of oysters, said Commissioners shall, before 
granting or entering upon the consideration of such 
application, cause public notice to be given of the time 
and place for the hearing and consideration of the 
same ; which notice shall contain a description of the 
land so applied for, and shall be published at the ex* 
pense of the applicant, for at least two weeks previous 



JANUARY, 1852. 87 

to said hearing, in some public newspaper printed in 
the city of Providence ; and at such hearing, any per- 
son may appear and show cause why such application 
should not be granted ; — and said Commissioners may 
adjourn said hearing from time to time, and shall have 
power to issue process to compel the attendance of wit- 
nesses for either party, and to administer oaths ; and 
said Commissioners shall give notice to all parties who 
have appeared before them upon any application, of 
the time and place when their decision will be given, 
and such decision shall be final unless an appeal is 
claimed and prosecuted as hereinafter provided. 

Sec. 2. Said Commissioners shall not lease or re- 
new any lease of any piece of land covered by the 
public waters of this State, as a private or several oys- 
ter ground or oyster fishery, for the planting of oys- 
ters, which is or shall be at the time of the application 
for said lease a natural oyster bed. And any person 
aggrieved at the decision of the Commissioners upon 
any application for a private or several oyster ground / 

or oyster fishery, may appeal from said decision to the 
next term of the Court of Common Pleas to be holden 
within and for the county nearest to which said land 
so applied for lies : Providedy Jmoever^ that such appeal 
shall be claimed at the time such decision shall be 
made, and within five days thereafter be entered in 
the clerk's office of the court appealed to, together 
with the reasons thereof, and a copy of the proceed- 
ings before the Commissioners and a bond of the ap- 
pellant, with sufficient surety in the sum of fifty dol- 
lars payable to the clerk of the court appealed to, for 
the use of the State, conditioned to prosecute such ap- 
peal to final judgment and to pay such witnesses' fees 
and the costs of summons incurred by any party op- 
posing said appeal as the court shall award in case the 
decision of the Commissioners shall not be reversed, 
and said case shall be heard and tried in the same 
manner as other cases entered upon the docket of said 
court; and the judgment of said court shall be con- 
clusive upon the question whether said land shall or 
shall not be leased, and the Commissioners shall grant 
or refuse a lease accordingly. 

Sec. 3. Said Commissioners shall from time to timo, 
diligently inspect and ascertain whether or not the 



88 JANUARY, 1852. 

terms and restrictions of the leases^ in regard to tbe 
importing and planting of oysters, are kept and per- 
formed in a just and proper manner, and whether or 
not the rents are punctually paid j and in case said 
terms and restrictions are not kept and performed, or 
said rents not punctually paid, said Commissioners shall 
forthwith enter upon said land so leased, and terminate 
said lease. Said Commissioners, or either of them, 
may make complaint for violations of this act, or the 
act to which this is in amendment, without giving 
surety ior costs. Said Commissioners shall retain 
copies of all leases by them granted and the General 
Treasurer shall from time to time notify said Commis- 
sioners of any lessees who shall neglect or refuse 
to pay their rent within four weeks after tbe same 
shall fall due. 

Sec. 4. Said Commissioners shall stake out and de- 
fine or cause to be staked out and defined what are 
now the natural oyster beds and submit a report of the 
same to the next General Assembly at their May ses- 
sion, and if the General Assembly shall declare the 
same to be natural oyster beds they shall thereafter 
be considered as such, and whenever any new bed, or 
any new set of oysters shall be discovered within the 
public waters of this State, and brought to the know- 
ledge of said Commi&sioners, they shall forthwith pro- 
ceed to examine said new bed or new set, and, if after 
examination, they shall deem said oysters unsuitable 
for present use and market, they shall cause a suitable 
buoy to be moored and continued on said bed or set, 
until said oysters shall become suitable for present use 
and market, when they shall cause said buoy to be re- 
moved. Said Commissioners shall also cause public 
notice to be given in some newspaper published in the 
city of Providence, of the mooring of said buoy and 
the removal thereof, together with the purpose for 
which it is moored and removed, for one week next 
succeeding said mooring, and for one week next pre- 
ceding said removal. 

Sec 5. During the continuance of said buoy upon 
said bed or set, no person shall fish for or take any oys- 
ters or other shell fish from said bed or set ; and no 
person shall remove said buoy, except by order of 
j3aid Comjoaissioners, or injure or deface the same. 



JANUARY, 1852: $9 

Sec. 6. All persons taking oysters from any bed in 
the free and common oyster fisheries within the waters 
of this State, shall at the time of such taking, cull out 
and restore to said bed all small oysters, shells, stones 
and other substances valuable to said bed, retaining 
only such oysters as are fit for market and present use. 
No person shall take oysters either from a public or 
private oyster ground or bed, except between the hours 
of sunrise and sunset, on any day, and no person, not a 
citizen of this State, shall be allowed to fish for oysters 
or other shell fish, within the waters of this State, under 
the penalties provided for the violation of the provis- 
ions of this act. 

Sec, 7. No boat or vessel shall be used by more 
than two persons during each twenty-four hours, nor 
be used for taking more than three bushels of oysters 
to each of said persons during each twenty-four hours, 
as is provided in section third of the act to which this 
is in amendment. 

Sec 8. Every person convicted of violating any of 
the provisions of sections five or six, of this act, shall 
forfeit and pay the sum of twenty dollars for each and 
every offence ; to be recovered by complaint and war- 
rant before any court of competent jurisdiction, one 
half thereof to and for the use of the complainant, and 
the other half to and for the use of the State. And 
every boat or vessel used, or in any way employed in 
the taking of oysters or other shell fish, contrary to 
the provisions of either of said sections, shall, together 
with its tackle, apparel, furniture, and implements on 
board, be seized and forfeited ; said forfeiture to be re- 
covered in the same manner and to the same uses, and 
like proceedings therefor, in all respects to be had, as 
for the forfeiture in sections four and five, of the act to 
which this is in amendment. And any person convict- 
ed a second time of the violation of the provisions of 
this act, shall in addition to the penalties before men- 
tioned, be deprived of the privilege of fishing for oys- 
ters in the waters of Narragansett Bay, for the space of 
three years thereafter, under the penalty of thirty days 
imprisonment for each offence. 

Sec. 9. Nothing in the sixth section of this act con- 
tained shall be construed to prevent the said commis- 
aionerB from granting unto Luke S. Rice, George Rice^ 



40 JANUARY, 1852. 

John D. Wilbur, Lewis Wilcox, John Peterson, Lean- 
der Dunwell, Jeremiah Wilcox, Henry A. Sutton, Bow- 
en Sutton, Alvin S. Cozzens, James Cobb and Thomas 
B. Wall, the right and privilege of taking oysters, 
quahaugs, clams and other shell fish, within the waters 
and upon the shores of this State, for the term of ten 
years from the first day of March next, with the same 
rights and privileges and subject to the same condi- 
tions and restrictions as the inhabitants of this State. 
They the said Luke S. Rice, George Rice, John D. Wil- 
bur, Lewis Wilcox, John Peterson, Leander Dunwell, 
Jeremiah Wilcox, Henry A. Sutton, Bowen Sutton, 
Alvin S. Cozzens, James Cobb and Thomas B. Wall, each 
paying to the General Treasurer of the State, for said 
rights and privileges the sum of two dollars for each 
and every year they shall continue to enjoy the same. 

Sec 10. Nothing in this act shall be so construed 
as to afiect or invalidate any proceedings which may 
have been commenced for the violation of the act to 
which this is in amendment, or to affect the fishery in 
the pond on Block Island, or in Point Judith Pond in 
South Kingstown, or in any of the ponds lying in the 
towns of Charlestown or of Tiverton. 

Sec 1L All acts and parts of acts inconsistent here- 
with, aie hereby repealed. 



An Act in amendment of an Act to incorporate the 
Providence and Plainfield Railroad Company. 

Act in a. -B w enocted hy the General Assenibh/ as follows : 
^^mcinu^ Section 1. The union made by said corporation with 
^vetothe the Hartford, Providence and Fishkill Railroad Com- 
■nd Plain- pany, incorporated by the General Assembly of the 
fieidRaU- q^q^q q[ Connecticut, is hereby validated and confirm- 
ed ; said united corporation to bear the said name of 
the Hartford, Providence and Fishkill Railroad Com- 
pany, and to have, use, exercise and enjoy all powers^ 
authorities, privileges and immunities granted by the 
act incorporating the Providence and Plainfield Rail- 
road Company, and the acts in amendment of the same, 
and especially to have, use, exercise and enjoy for the 
purpose of constructing their railroad and the branches 



JANUARY, 18^i 41 

thereof, the right and privilege of laying out their 
road not exceeding six rods wide through the whole 
length, and for the purpose of cutting embankments^ 
and obtaining stone and gravel, and of making tracks 
to and from their depots and car-houses ; to take as 
much more land or real estate as may be necessary for 
the proper security, construction and use of said road: 
promdedj that all damages which may be occasioned to 
any person, company or corporation by taking of, or 
injury of any kind of taxed real estate or material for 
the use of said road, shall bo paid lor by said company 
in the manner provided in the said act incorporating 
the Providence and Plainfield Railroad Company, and 
the acts in amendment of the same : and provided fur* 
iheTy that nothing herein contained shall be construed 
to authorize the construction of said road in the city 
of Providence, in any way contrary to the provisions 
of the twenty-third section of the original charter. 



An Act authorizing the Town Council of North Provi 
dence, to establish sidewalks in said town. 

It is enacted by the General Assemb^ as follows : 

Section 1. The town council of said town are here- wngTowJ 
by authorized and empowered in their discretion to §?provi?' 
pass such ordinances in relation to the laying down **?l?V2d*^ 
and establishing sidewalks within the limits of the high- wauTa. 
ways in said town, as they may think proper, and impose 
such penalties for the violation of any such ordinances 
as they may think proper, not exceeding for any one 
offence, the sum of ten dollars. 



An Act authoriRing the Town Council of North Provi- 
dence and of Cranston to establish sidewalks in said 
towns. 

jS is enacted h^ the General Assembly asfoUows : 

Section 1. The town councils of said towns are here- j*P**tow'' 
by authorized and empowered in their discretion to coimcHso^ 
pass such ordinances in relation to the laying down ^s'nile^d 
and establishing sidewalks within the limits of the high- ?o^°biuh 
ways in said towns as they may think proper, and to sidewalks. 

4* 



ii JANUARY, 1862. 

impose such penalties for the violation of any such or- 
dinances as they may think proper, not exceeding for 
any one offence the sum of ten dollars : Provided, that 
the word " highways" as used in this act, shall not be 
construed to include or mean any turnpike or turn- 
pikes in either of said towna 



Actanthor- 



An Act authorizing the town of North Providence to 
establish Bridewells and for other purposes. 

It is enacted hy the General Assembly as foUows : 

Section 1. The town council of the town of North- 
town of N P^^^d^iice are hereby authorized to establish a bride- 
ProTidencc wcU or brfdewells within the limits of said town, in 
brfSweite. which shall be confined all persons who may be charg- 
ed with or convicted of offences against this act, as 
hereinafter provided. 

Sec. 2. The town council of said town are here- 
by authorized to appoint a keeper or keepers of such 
bridewell or bridewells, and such other officers there- 
of as they may deem expedient, at the time the same 
shall be first established by virtue of this act ; and af- 
terwards yearly at every annual election of town offi- 
cers of said town ; and the same to remove by a vote 
of a majority of the members of said council present at 
any regular meeting thereof ; which officers and keep- 
ers shall be duly sworn or affirmed to a faithful dis- 
charge of the duties of their respective offices. 

Sec 3. The town council of said town are hereby 
authorized from time to time to make and ordain all 
needful rules and regulations not repugnant to the 
Constitution and laws of this State, for the good gov- 
ernment of any bridewell or bridewells by tliem estab- 
lished pursuant to this act, and of the persons commit- 
ted thereto. 

Sec. 4. Any person who shall be found intoxicated 
or quarrelling, or revelling or wantonly making a false 
cry or alarm of fire, or otherwise behaving in a disor- 
derly or indecent manner, to the disturbance of the or- 
derly people of said town, in any public street, lane, 
public buUding, or other public place, wharf or com- 
mon in said town, or shall aid, incite, or encourage the 
same to be done, shall, on conviction thereof, be sen- 



JANUARY, 1852. 43 

tenced to pay a fine not exceeding five dollars, or to 
be imprisoned not exceeding ten days, in one of the 
bridewells of said town established pursuant to this act, 
at the discretion of the justice having cognizance of 
the offence, and to pay all costs of prosecution and con- 
viction, and in default of paying such fine and costs, to 
stand committed to such bridewell, until such sentence 
be performed in all its parts. Provided^ that such per- 
son shall not be kept in imprisonment for a longer pe- 
riod than ten days for any one default, except as pro* 
vided in the tenth section of this act. 

Sec. 6. When any person shall be found in the act- 
ual commission of any offence against this act, and there 
be reasonable cause to believe that such person may 
escape out of said town before he can be apprehended 
on warrant, it shall be lawful for any officer having au- 
thority to serve w^arrants in said town, without warrant 
to arrest and commit the person so offending to any bride- 
well in said town established pursuant to this act ; and 
it shall be the duty of the committing officer forthwith, 
unless such commitment be in the night time, and in 
such case as soon as may be on the morning next fol- 
lowing, to cause such person to be prosecuted for his 
offence as provided by this act : Provided, that any jus- 
tice of the peace in said town on such case being re- 
ported to him by the committing officer, may in his 
discretion discharge such person from his commitment, 
which discharge shall be in writing on the book of 
commitments, or by written order directed to the keep- 
er of the bridewell where such person shall be impris- 
oned. 

Sec. 6. Any bridewell in said town established pur- 
suant to this act shall be deemed a common jail, and 
the keeper thereof an officer, so far as to make appli- 
cable thereto the provisions of the Act entitled " An 
Act in relation to writs of habeas corpus"; and any 
person who shall be convicted of aiding or assisting, or 
of procuring to be aided or assisted, any prisoner con- 
fined therein to break or escape therefrom, shall be 
fined or imprisoned as for offences enumerated in the 
fourth section of this act ; and any prisoner who shall 
break or escape therefrom shall be liable, with or with- 
out warrant, to be recommitted thereto as of his former 
commitment. 



U JANUARY, 1852. 

Sec. 7. All proceedings for offences against this act, 
except as provided in the fifth section, shall be com- 
menced and prosecuted before some justice of the peace 
of said town, and shall be conformed as nearly as may 
be, except as provided in the next section, to pro- 
ceedings provided by law in other criminal cases with- 
in the jurisdiction of a justice of the peace to try and 
determine. 

Sec. 8. The town council of said town are hereby 
authorized, at any regular meeting thereof, to appoint 
one or more discreet persons, and the same at any such 
regular meeting to remove, to make complaint for of- 
fences against this act, in which cases the fines which 
may be recovered shall accrue to the town, and com- 
plainants so appointed shall not be required to recog- 
nize or give surety for costs. 

Sec. 9. All persons making complaint for offences 
against this act, not appointed thereto as is provided in 
the preceding section, shall proceed as prescribed in 
the 135th section of the Act entitled " An Act con- 
cerning crimes and punishments" and such complain- 
ants shall, on conviction of the respondent be entitled 
to one half part of the penalty recovered, and the other 
half thereof shall accrue to said town. 

Stc. 10. Any person who shall be aggrieved at any 
sentence of a justice of the peace pronounced against 
him for offences against this act, may appeal therefrom 
on like terms and conditions as are provided by law 
for appeal from a sentence of a justice of the peace in 
other criminal causes; and the Court to which such 
appeal shall be taken, shall have such cognizance of 
the cause, and of the appellant, as is provided for ap- 
pealed cases in other criminal causes, and if upon trial 
of the cause upon appeal, the respondent shall be con- 
victed, he shall be liable, if the Court shall so adjudge, 
to pay a fine not exceeding two dollars, or be impris- 
oned in one of such bridewells not exceeding twenty 
days, and to pay all costs of prosecution and convic- 
tion, and to be committed until such sentence be per- 
formed in all its parts : Provided, that such person shall 
not be kept in prison for a longer period than thirty 
days for any one defiiult. All recognizances given on 
any such appeal may upon forfeiture thereof, be 



JANUARY, 1852. 46 

prosecuted in the name of the State for the benefit of 
said town. 

Sec. 11. The town council of said town shall have 
authority, at any regular meeting thereof, to liberate 
any person imprisoned in any bridewell established 
pursuant to this act, and to remit all penalties incurr- 
ed under the same, whether of fines, imprisonments, 
costs, or forfeitures of recognizance. 

Sec 12. Every commitment in anv such bridewell 
established in said town, shall be entered in writing by 
the committing officer in a book to be provided by said 
town and kept at such bridewell, which commitment 
shall state the cause together with the hour of the day 
thereof. 

Sec. 1 3. No expense or costs of process, proceed- 
ing, trial or commitment, or for other matter or thing 
under this act, shall be chargeable to the State, except 
the necessary court and jury expenses in the trial of 
appeal causes. 

Sec. 14. Every complaint for any offence against 
this act shall be commenced within ten days after the 
commission thereof and not after. 



An Act giving additional powers to the Town Council 

of the town of Newport. 

JR is enacted hy tlie General Auemhly as follows : 

Section 1. The town council of the town of Newport Act giving 
are hereby authorized and empowered to enact and Jo^Jlre^ti 
establish such ordinances in relation to the running at qI^^^^ 
large of neat cattle and horses within the limits of said Newport, 
town, not repugnant to law, as they may deem just and 
proper. Proxidcd^ that no pen«alty for the violation of 
any such ordinance shall exceed the sum of ten dol- 
lars. 



An Act in relation to certain Acts and Resolutions 
heretofore passed by the General Assembly. 

JEL is enaded hj the General Assemhlfj asfolUnos : Act in reh- 

Section ]. The acts and resolutions of the General Ji^n ^l^T 

Assembly in this act specified, being acts and resolu- ^"jn/^^e"'^ 

tions which were in force when the Digest of Public fore passca. 



46 JANUARY, 1852, 

Laws published in 1 844, went into operation, and which 
are not contained in said Digest, and not " Public Stat- 
ute Laws" within the meaning and intent of the fifth 
section of the act in said Digest, entitled ** An act es- 
tablishing the Digest of Laws," as reported by the com- 
mittee appointed to revise the laws of this State, and 
amended by the General Assembl3% nor were they re- 
pealed or intended to be repealed by said section of 
said act. 

That is to say : — 

First, the following acts and resolutions which are 
contained in the Digest of 1822 : 

An act erecting a township in the Narragansett coun- 
try, to be called Westerly. 

An act incorporating the lands on Block Island into 
a township to be called New Shoreham. 

An act incorporating a certain tract of land in the 
Narragansett country into a township to be called 
Kingstown. 

An act incorporating East Greenwich into a town- 
ship. 

An act extending East Greenwich township to the 
State west line. 

An act incorporating the island of Conanicutt into a 
township to be called Jamestown. 

An act dividing the town of Kingstown into two 
towns by the names of North Kingstown and South 
Kingstown. 

An act incorporating the outlands of the town of 
Providence into three towms. 

An act dividing the town of Westerly into two towns 
to be known and distinguished by the names of West- 
erly and Charlestown. 

An act incorporating the west end of the town of 
East Greenwich into a township to be distinguished and 
known by the name of West Greenwich. 

An act incorporating the west end of the town of 
Warwick into a township to be distinguished and kno\ni 
by the name of Coventry. 

An act incorporating the west end of the town of 
North Kingstown into a township to be distinguished 
and known by the name of Exeter. 

An act incorporating the northeast part of the town 



JANUARY, 1852. 47 

of Newport into a township to be distinguished and 
known by the name of Middletown. 

An act incorporating the inhabitants of the lands 
lately taken into this fcitate by the settlement of the 
eastern boundaried into five townships 

An act incorporating the north part of the town of 
Charlestown, in the county of Washington, into a town- 
shipy to be distinguished and known by the name of 
Richmond. 

An act dividing the town of Providence and incor- 
porating the southern part thereof into a township to 
be distinguished by the name of Cranston. 

An act dividing the town of Westerly and thereof 
making two distinct townships, one to retain the name 
of Westerly and the other to be distinguished and 
known by the name of Hopkinton. 

An act dividing the town of Providence and incor- 
porating the westernmost part thereof into a township 
to be called Johnston. 

An act dividing: the town of Providence and incor- 
porating the northermost part thereof into a township 
to be called North Providence. 

An act incorporating the west part of tha town of 
Warren into a township to be distinguished and known 
by the name of Barrington. 

An act dividing the town of Scituate and incorpora- 
ting the west end thereof into a township to be distin- 
guished and known by the name of Foster. 

An act to divide the town of Glocester and to incor- 
porate the north part thereof into a to\vn by the name 
of Burrillville. 

An act providing in case office breaking out in the 
town of Newport, and for other purposes therein men- 
tioned. 

An act relating to the overseers of the poor and to 
the Asylum in the town of Newport 

An act to provide for the repairing of the streets and 
highways in the town of Newport. 

An act to prevent the pavements in Queen street in 
Newport from the State House to the east side of 
Thames street from being damaged by loxded carta 
and trucks. 

An act to enlarge and explain the powers of town 
meetings and town council of the town of Providence, 



48 JANUARY, 1852. 

An act providing in case of fire breaking out in the 
town of Providence. 

An act regulating the storage, safe keeping and trans- 
portation of gunpowder in the town of Providence. 

An act regulating side walks in the town of Provi- 
dence. 

An act authorizing the town council of the town of 
Providence to prevent the passing of carriages tlfrougli 
the streets adjacent to the houses of public woi^ship ia 
said town on Sundays during the time of Divine 
service. 

An act regulating the storing of lime in the town of 
Providence. 

An act relative to the harbor and public waters of 
the town of Providence. 

An act to incorporate the village of Pawtuxet for the 
purposes therein mentioned. 

An act for the better ordering of the police of the 
town of North Providence and ot the workhouse and 
bridewell to be established therein. 

An act to regulate the police of the town of Bristol. 

An act providing in case of fire breaking out in the 
towns of Bristol and Warren. 

Second, the following acts and resolutions passed 
since the publication of the Digest of 1822, and pub- 
lished from time to time with the public laws. 

An act declaring certain private streets and gang- 
ways in the town of Providence in the county of 
Providence, to be public highways. (Passed January, 
1822.) 

An act relating to the overseers of the poor and 
the Asylum in the town of Bristol. (Passed June, 
1823.) 

An act in addition to an act entitled an act concern- 
ing sidewalks in the town of Providence. (Passed Oct 
1823.) 

An act to regulate the police of the town of War- 
ren. (Passed Junf^, 1824.) 

An act in addition to an act entitled an act for incor- 
porating Pawtucket in North Providence into a district 
for the purposes therein mentioned. (Passed June, 
1825.) 

An act empowering the town of Newport to provide 
for educating the white children of said town who are 



JANUARY, 1852. 49 

not otherwise provided with the means of education. 
(Passed June, 1825.) 

An act in amendment of an act entitled " An act to 
enlarge and explain the powers of the town meetings 
and town council of the town of Providence." (Pass- 
ed October, 1825.) 

An act to repeal the first section of an act in addi- 
tion to an act entitled " An act incorporating Pawtuck- 
et in North Providence into a district for the purposes 
therein mentioned." (Passed October, 1825.) 

An act empowering fire companies in the town of 
Providence to inflict penalties. (Passed October, 1826.) 

An act in amendment of an act entitled an act to reg« 
ulate the police of the town of Warren. (Passed Jan- 
uary, 1827.) 

An act to confirm an act of the town of Newport 
for establishing a public school fund. (Passed May, 

1827.) 

An act in addition to the act entitled an act to en^ 
large and explain the powers of the town meetings and 
town council of the town of Providence. (Passed Jan- 
uary, 1828.) 

A xesolution relative to public schools in the town of 
Newport. (Passed June 28, 1828.) 

An act to prevent certain vessels lying at the head 
of Long wharf, in Newport (Passed May, 1829.) 

An act to prevent the sale of distilled spirits and oth* 
er liquors, as well as bread and fruit of every kind, 
within one mile of the Seventh Day Baptist meeting- 
houjse, in Hopkinton, on days of public worship. (Pass- 
ed June, 1829.) 

An act to authorize the town council of the town of 
Providence to appoint a harbor master. (Passed June^ 
1830.) 

An act in addition to an act to confirm an act of the 
town of Newport, for establishing a public school fund. 
(Passed June, 1830.) 

An act relating to the highways in the town of Little 
Compton. (Passed January, 1831.) 

An act regulating the piling of lumber and wood 
within certain limits in Providence. (Passed October, 
1831.) 

An act relating to the overseers of the poor and to 



50 JANUARY, 1852. 

the asylum in the town of Portsmouth. (Passed June, 
1832.) 

An act authorizing the city of Providence to elect 
an inspector of beef and pork for said city. (Passed 
June, 1833.) 

An act to authorize the city of Providence to estab- 
lish a house of correction and for other purposes (Pass- 
ed October, 1833.) 

An act in amendment of an act entitled an act to pre- 
vent erecting wooden buildings in certain parts of th« 
town of Providence. (Passed January, 1834.) 

An act to amend an act entitled an act to provide 
for the repairing of the streets and highways in the 
town of Newport. (Passed Jun^, 1834.) 

An act concerning firemen in the village of Olney- 
ville. (Passed October, 1834.) 

An act relating to the overseers of the poor and to 
the Asylum in the town of North Providence. (Pass- 
ed January, 1836.) 

An act relating to the fire engine companies in the 
town of Newport. (Passed January, 1836.) 

An act in amendment of an act to provide tor the re- 
pairing of the streets and highways in • the town of 
Newport. (Passed May, 1836.) 

An act in addition to an act entitled an act relative 
to the harbor and public waters of the town of Provi- 
dence. Passed January, 1837. 

An act to authorize the town of Westerly, to regu- 
late fisheries in Pawcatuck river. Passed June, 1837. 
An act relating to the overseers of the poor and to 
the asylum in the town of Smithfield. Passed October, 
1837. 

An act in amendment of an act entitled an act in ad- 
dition to an act incorporating Pawtucket in North Pro- 
vidence into a district for purposes therein mention- 
ed. Passed January, 1 838. 

An act relating to the overseers of the poor and to 
the asylum in the town of Cumberland. Passed Jan- 
uary, 1839. 

An act authorizing the town council of Newport to 
appoint an overseer of the poor in certain cases. Pass- 
ed January, 1839. 

An act establishing and regulating the court of jus- 
tice in the town of Newport Passed June, 1839. 



JANUARY, 1852. 61 

An act to enlarge and explain the powers of town 
meetings and town council of the town of Newport 
Passed June, 1839, 

An act in addition to the act establishing and regu* 
lating the court of justices in the town of Newport 
Passed January, 1840. 

An act in amendment of an act entitled an act in 
amendment of an act to provide for the repairing of 
the streets and highways in the town of Newport Pass- 
ed May, 1840. 

An act in amendment of an act entitled an act con- 
cerning sidewalks in the town of Providence. (Passed 
January, 1841.) 

An act in amendment of an act entitled an act di- 
viding the town of Providence and incorporating the 
northernmost part thereof into a township to be called 
North Providence. (Passed May, 1841.) 

An act in amendment of the act establishing and 
regulating the court of justices in the town of New- 
port and the acts in addition thereto. (Passed June, 
1841.) 

An act in addition to an act relative to the harbor 
and public waters of the town of Providence. (Passed 
October, 1841.) 

An act concerning firemen in the city of Providence. 
(Passed October, 1841.) 

An act to authorize the establishment of volunteer 
police companies in the city of Providence. (Passed 
April, 1842.) 

An act relating to the burying the dead in the town 
of Newport 

An act relating to the town councils and courts of 
probate of the towns of Cumberland and North Prov- 
idence. Passed June, 1841. 

Third. The following a<;ts and resolutions published 
in the Schedules of the proceedings of the General As- 
sembly, from 1842 to 1844 : 

An act relative to the public watch and town mar- 
shal of the town of Newport Passed October, 1842. 

An act concerning the establishing of highways 
in the city of Providence. Passed January, 1843. 

An act concerning ferry boats in the harbor of Prov* 
idence. Passed January, 1843. 

An act in amendment of an act to authorize the 



62 JANUARY, 1862. 

city of Providence to establish a house of correction 
and for other purposes. Passed October, 1843. 

An act concerning the erection of buildings in the 
city of Providence. Passed October, 1843. 

An act conferring additional powers upon wateb- 
men in the town of Newport Passed January, 1844. 

An act to authorize the use of the jail to the county 
of Providence by the city of Providence. Passed Jan- 
uary, 1844. 

An act in amendment of an act relating to the over- 
seers of the poor, and the asylum in the town of Ports- 
mouth. Passed January, 1844. 

An act in amendment of an act for incorporating 
Pawtucket in North Providence into a district, for the 
purposes therein mentioned and of the other acts in 
addition to or amendment of the same. Passed May, 
1844. 

Fourth. The following acts and resolutions, of 
which the first is in the Digest of 1822 — the last five 
in the Schedules of the proceedings of the General As- 
sembly from January, 1843 to January, 1844, and the 
others in the public laws published from time to time, 
fi:omthe Digest of 1822 to January, 1843. 

An act for filling up certain low grounds covered 
with stagnant water within the compact parts of the 
town of Providence. 

An act respecting slaughter houses in the tovm of 
Providence. Passed June, 1827. 

An act authorizing the freemen of the town of Wes- 
terly to pass such laws as they may deem expedient, 
for the building of school houses, not inconsistent with 
the general laws. Passed January, 1830. 

An act authorizing the town of East Greenwich to 
pass an act for the building and repairing of school 
houses in said town. Passed January, 1832. 

An act to provide for the manner of building school 
houses in the town of Cumberland. Passed October, 
1834. 

An act to provide for the manner of building and 
repairing school houses in the town of Hopkinton.— 
Passed June, 1829. 

An act in addition to and explanatory of an act en- 
titled an act to provide for the manner of building 



JANUARY, 1852, 63 

and repairing school houses in the town of Hopkin- 
ton. Passed June, 1835. 

An act to provide for the manner of building and 
repairing school houses in the town of Richmond. — 
Passed June, 1835. 

An act in amendment of an act entitled an act to 
provide for the manner of building and repairing school 
houses in the town of Richmond. Passed January, 
1836. 

An act to provide for the manner of building school 
houses in the town of Burrillville. Passed January, 
1836. 

An act relating to the building and repairing of a 
school house in school district No. 1, in North Provi- 
dence. Passed October, 1836. 

An act to provide for the manner of building and 
repairing school houses in the town of Charlestown. — 
Passed June, 1837. 

An act in addition to an act to provide for the man- 
ner of building school houses in the town of Richmond. 
Passed October, 1837. 

An act to provide for the location of school districts 
in the town of Smithfield, and for other purposes. — 
Passed January, 1838. 

An act to provide for the manner of building 
school houses in the town of Exeter. Passed Janu- 
ary, 1838. 

An act relating to the building and repairing a 
school house in school district No. 7, in North Provi- 
dence. Passed May, 1838. 

An act in addition to an act to provide for the man- 
ner of building school houses in the town of Cumber- 
land. Passed October, 1838. 

An act in amendment of an act to provide for the 
location of school districts in the town of Smithfield, 
and for other purposes. Passed October, 1838. 

A resolution relative to school district No. 4, in the 
town of Richmond, and school district No. 17, in 
the town of South Kingstown. Passed October, 1838. 

An act in amendment of an act entitled an act to 
provide for the manner of building school houses in the 
town of Exeter. Passed January, 1839. 

An act to provide for the manner of building school 
houses in the town of Glocester. 

5* 



64 JANUARY, 1862. 

An act to provide for the manner of building and 
repairing school houses in the town of Burrillville. — • 
Passed June, 1840. 

Resolution relative to school district No. 9, in North 
Kingstown. Passed June, 1840. 

Resolution relative to school district No. 15, in Scit- 
uate. Passed January, 1841. 

An act to provide for the manner of building and 
repairing school-houses in the several school districts 
in the town of South Kingstown. Passed January^ 
1841. 

An act to provide for the manner of building and 
repairing school-houses in the several school districts 
in the town of North Providence. Passed January, 
1841. 

An act in amendment of an act entitled an act to 
provide for the manner of building and repairing school 
houses in the several school districts in the town of 
North Providence. 

Resolution relative to school district No. 18, in Tiv- 
erton. Passed June, 1841. 

An act in amendment of an act to provide for the 
manner of building school houses in the town of Exe- 
ter. Passed October, 1841. 

Resolution relative to school district No. 6, in Cov- 
entry, Passed January, 1842. 

An act in amendment of an act entitled an act to 
provide for the manner of building and repairing school 
houses in the several school districts in the town of 
North Providence. Passed January, 1842. 

An act authorizing engine company. No. 3, in the 
town of Newport, to elect a larger number of members 
of said company. 

Resolution relative to school district No. 13, id John- 
ston. Passed April 2, 1842. 

Resolution relative to school district No. 20, in Tiv- 
erton. Passed January, 1843. 

Resolution relative to school district No. 3, in Tiver- 
ton. Passed January, 1843. 

An act to provide for the manner of building and re- 
pairing school houses in the town of Tiverton. Pass- 
ed June, 1 843. 

An act to provide for the manner of building and re- 



JANUARY, 1852. 55 

pairing a school house in the sixteenth school district 
in the town of Foster. Passed October, 1843. 

An act to provide for the manner of building and 
repairing a school house in school district No. 6, in the 
town of Johnston. Passed October, 18-43, 

Sec. 2. Each of the acts afore enumerated shall be 
so far deemed a public act, as that the same may be 
declared on and given in evidence without specially 
pleading the same. 



Whereas, Louis Kossuth, the elected Chief Magis- 
trate of the Hungarian nation, is now the invited guest 
of the United States : And tvhereas^ this General Assem- 
bly recognizes in him the undaunted champion, under 
the most adverse circumstances, of national freedom 
and political equality, as well as the eloquent apostle 
of those great doctrines of civil and religious liberty, 
on which the colonization of this State was founded, 
and the enlightened exponent of those municipal insti- 
tutions, on the full developement of which the perpe- 
tuity of our own Union depends : And whey-eaSy thi» Gen- 
eral Assembly feel assured that the people deeply sym- 
pathize in the disasters of Hungary, effected by the in- 
tervention of foreign despotism, and that they earnest- 
ly desire to evince their respect for the virtues and 
talents of the illustrious Magyar, and to manifest their 
lively interest in the ultimate triumph of his country : 

licsolvedy That this General Assembly do, in the r^oIu- 
name and on behalf of the people of Rhode Island and {{^'qJ,"''^'' 
Providence Plantations, invite Louis Kossuth to visit Kossuth to 
Providence, as the guest of the State, during their pre- i^hn^^^^^* 
Bent session. 

Sesolvedy That a committee of three members of the 
Senate and five members of the House ot Representa- 
tives, be appointed to make the necessary arrangements 
for the reception of Governor Kossuth. 

Hesolvcdy That His Excellency the Governor^ be re- 
quested to transmit a copy of the foregoing resolutions, 
duly authenticated under the seal of the State, to Gov- 
ernor Kowuth. 



66 JANUARY, 1852. 

EbsOLUTiON authorizing the Governor to draw upon the 
General Treasurer for the expenses of sending a mes- 
senger with invitation to Governor Kossuth to visit 
the State. 

8enffo"m- licsolved, That His Excellency the Governor, be, and 
Kossuth to ^® IS allowed to draw on the General Treasurer for the 
StotV^^* sum of one hundred and fifty dollars, to pay the ex- 
pense of sending an agent with the resolutions passed 
by this General Assembly, inviting Gov. Kossuth to 
visit this State. 



Resolution relating to the anticipated visit of Louis 

KoBSuth. 

Rehtinrr to Rcsolvcdj That in case Louis Kossuth should visit this 
i^suth.^^ State during the recess of the General Assembly, His 
Excellency the Governor, be, and he is hereby request- 
ed to receive him as the guest of the State, and that 
the committee of the two Houses heretofore appoint- 
ed for that purpose, make all necessary and proper ar- 
rangements to carry this resolution into effect 

Resolved^ That a sum not exceeding one thousand 
dollars be appropriated out of the moneys in the treas- 
ury not otherwise appropriated to carry the foregoing 
resolution into effect. 



Rbsolution relative to the disposition of ordnance and 
other military property of the State. 

o dnftnce Bcsolvcd^ That the quarter^master general under the 
ty sfires?" advice and consent of His Excellency the Governor, 
be and hereby is authorized to make sale of such ord- 
nance, small arms, military stores and equipments as 
may now be in tha arsenal, or that may hereafter be 
returned thereto which the wants of the service may 
not require, and which the interest of the State may 
be best answered by having sold, and that the pro- 
ceeds of such sale be paid into the General Treasury. 

Besolvedy That the quarter-master general, under the 
advice and with the consent of His Excellency, the 
Governor, be and he hereby is authorized to dispose 



JANUARY, 1852. 57 

at public or private sale, of all the interest that the 
State has in the several armories, at PatvUixd, at 
Greetwilley and at Wkkford. The quarter-master gene- 
ral is hereby empowered to execute such bills of sale 
or deeds as will vest in the purchaser or purchasers, 
all the right, title and interest that the State has in 
the same, and that the proceeds of the sales of these 
armories be paid into the General Treasury. 

Resolved^ That Messrs. Stead, Rathbone and Blodget 
of the House, and I. Greene and N. Greene of the 
Senate, be and they hereby are authorized to complete 
the agreement made by and between Messrs. Edward 
Carrington, Amasa Sprague and Samuel Ames, as a 
Committee in behalf of the State and the Providence 
marine corps of artillery, respecting the ownership and 
joint occupancy o\ the arsenal building, and that said 
Committee have full power to execute such deeds, 
leases or other conveyances as may be necessary to 
complete the arrangement, vesting in each party the 
rights and privileges provided for under the original 
agreement. 

And in order that the property may pass into the 
hands of the State free, the sum of six hundred dol- 
lars is hereby appropriated to procure a perfect title 
to said arsenal estate, subject only to the right to own 
and use that portion of the building by the Providence 
marine corps of artillery as stipulated in the original 
agreement, this sum of six hundred dollars to be paid 
by the General Treasurer on the order of said Com- 
mittee. 



Resolution relating to the publication of the Report of 

Commissioner of Schools. 

JResolved^ That the Secretary of State cause the report 
of the Commissioner of Public Schools to be printed in tion'of 
the Schedules, and he is hereby authorized and direct- com''^ 
ed to cause five hundred extra copies of said report to 
be printed for the use of said Commissioner. 



PuMica- 



mis- 
sioner's re- 
port. 



58 JANUARY, 1852. 

Kesolution relating to Committee on Indian Affidrs. 

Indian Af- Resolved, That the Committee on Indian AflFairs be 
continued for the purpose of settling the business which 
has been referred to them. 



Resolution allowing additional pay to newspapers. 

Allowing Resolved, That the sum of ten dollars be appropriat- 
additioaai ed and paid to each of the newspapers in this State, 
newspt- which published the laws of the State, during the year 
^^ 1851, as additional compensation for publishing the 
" Act to revise and amend the laws relating to Public 
Schools," passed at the June session, A. D. 1851. 



Resolution relating to the Advent Church in BristoL 

Church In ^^ ^^^ petition of certain citizens of Bristol, for per- 
BriBtoL mission to hold religious services in the court house : 
It is votedy That the two churches denominating them- 
selves ^ Second Adventers," both in the town of Bris- 
tol, shall have permission to worship in the eastern 
basemei^t of the court house, in said Bristol, each soci- 
ety to occupy the basement aforesaid aJtemoiiely^ one on 
one week, and the other the next, under direction of 
the sheriff of the county, who in his discretion, is here- 
by authorized to withhold said permission, if any reg- 
ulations he may prescribe are not complied with. 



Resolution relating to the printing and distributing the 

Election Law. 

Printing Resolved^ That the Secretary of State is hereby di- 
»nd *^^|J."^ rected to cause two hundred and fifty copies of the 
tion Laws, clcctiou law to bc printed in pamphlet form, and dis- 
tribute a suitable number of said copies to each of the 
several town and district clerks in this state as soon aa 
may be. 



Resolution relating to the Armory at East Greenwich. 

Armory, at 

wic?^^*'*" Voted and resolved, That all the right, title and inter- 
est of the State in the armory of the company of Kent- 



JANUARY, 1852. 59 

ish Guards, in East Greenwich, and the lot of land on 
which it stands, be and the same is hereby released and 
granted to the said company of Kentish Guards, abso- 
lutel}^ and without claim or demand against said com- 
pany. 



Resolution directing the Secretary of State to furnish 
each of the Election Districts in Smithfield, with the 
public acts of the General Assembly, since 1844. 

Besolved^ That the Secretary of State be directed to o/s?a?e^ 
funiish each of the clerks of the four election districts ^ijjjjb„,g° 
in the town of Smithfield, and each >vard clerk in the pubUc laws 
city of Providence, with the several publications of the 
public acts of the General Assembly, since January, 
1844. 



Resolution to improve the grounds, and to lay a flag 
walk around the State House, in Newport. 

Resolvedj That the sum of five hundred dollars be, the ground* 
and is hereby appropriated to improve the grounds Stote^ '^^ 
and to lay a flag walk around the State House in jJe{J,pi,\'J 
Newport, agreeably to the plan submitted by the 
street commissioner of said town; and the General 
Treasurer be, and is hereby directed to pay to the said 
commissioner any sum or sums (not exceeding five hun- 
dred dollars,) that may be required for the aforesaid 
purpose. 



Resolutions in relation to State Librar)-. 

Resolved^ That the Secretary of State under the ad- state Li- 
vice and direction of the Governor be authorized and ^^^' 
directed to procure a room adjoining the office of the 
Secretary of State on the East, in the State House in 
Providence, to be suitably fitted up for a State library 
room. 

Resolved^ That the Secretary of State be authorized 
and directed to procure to be bound such unbound 
books belonging to the State as are in his office, and 



60 JANUARY, 1852. 

that the Governor be authorized to audit the acconctfl 
of the said Secretary for monies expended under this 
and the preceding resolution, and to draw an order up- 
on the General Treasurer for the same. 

Besolvedy That the sum of two hundred dollars be 
appropriated for the current year and annually here- 
after, to be expended under the direction of the Gov- 
ernor and Secretary of State in the purchase of books 
for a State library. 



Eesolution authorizing the Secretary of State to 
procure copies of the Appendix to the Report of 
George Turner et al. on the registered State Debt. 

of^siar/au Ji^^olved, That the Secretary be authorized and di- 
ihorized to Tcctcd to causc thrcc hundred copies of the appendix 
pieB of*Xp^ to the report of George Turner, Amherst Everett and 
^"r^rt on *^- Kussell Bullock, on the registered State debt, made 
State dtbi. at the October session, A. D. 1849, to be printed for 
the use of the General Assembly. 



Resolution requesting our Senators and Representa- 
tives in Congress to procure the passage of an act 
abolishing Spirit Rations in the Navy of the United 
States. 

Ahoiisiig Jl^ereas^The Congress of the United States at its 

tfons in the latc scssiou passcd an act abolishing flogging as a pun- 

iK^'^^totis!* ishment in the United States Navy ; and a proposition 

having been made in the Senate of the United States 

at the present session, to repeal said act: And 

WhereaSy (in the opinion of this General Assembly) 
the use of intoxicating liquors in the Navy is the prin- 
cipal cause of the greater proportion of the offences 
committed therein, for which punishment is made ne- 
cessary ; and as the experiment of the abolition of 
flogging in the Navy cannot be entirely satisfactory 
so long as intoxicating liquors are furnished therein. 
Therefore 

Resolvedj That our Senators and Representatives be 
requested to use all proper means to continue the act 
•—abolishing flogging in the Navy— a law of the United 



JANUARY, 1852. 61 

States — and to procure in addition thereto an act 
abolishing ^ Spirit Eations" in all naval ships and navy 
yards in the United States. 

Resohedy That his Excellency the Governor, be re- 
quested to forward a copy of the above preamble and 
resolution to our Senators and Representatives in Con- 
gresa 



Resolution in relation to a Map of the State. 

Upon the proposition of H. F. Walling, to furnish 
the State six hundred copies of his proposed map oi^^^^^^^^ 
the State : 

Voted and resojvedy That when said Map be comple- 
ted it shall be examined by the Governor and the 
€ommi8sioner of Public Schools, and if found to be 
conformable to the p;roposition made by said Walling, 
the Governor shall be authorized to draw upon the 
General Treasurer for a sum not exceeding eighteen 
hundred dollars, for payment therefor upon the deliv- 
eiy of said six hundred copiea 

Besolvedy That a copy of said Map when completed, 
be furnished to each School District in the State, and 
that one copy be furnished to the Library of Congress, 
one to each State and Territory in the IJnion, and the 
remainder be placed in the Secretary's office, for fu- 
ture distribution. 



Upon the petition of the Mechanics and Manufactu- p^^^ ^^ 
rers Bank, praying for certain reasons therein stated, ^thareiia 
that they may have liberty to reduce the par value of &luiiufac- 
the shares of said Bank : ^ !S2l!?^ 

^ Voted and resolved, First, that the prayer of said pe- 
tition be and the same is hereby granted, and that ^e 
directors of the Mechanics and Manufacturers Bank 
shall have liberty to reduce the par value of the shares 
of the capital stock of said bank, from fifty (hilars per 
share io forty dollars per share^ and the par value of 
fiach share of the capital stock of said bank shall here- 
after be of the par value of forty dollars : but nothing 
herein contained shall affect or remove any personal 
^ud individual liability which the directors of said bank 



62 JANUARY, 1852. 

may be under to the stockholders or others^ or for any 
defalcation of the ofl&cers thereof, or otherwise. 

Second : Hereafter the shares of the capital stock of 
the said Mechanics and Manufacturers Bank, or anj 
increase of the capital stock of said bank, according to 
the terms and under the restrictions of the charter of 
said bank, shall be of the par value of forty dollars eacli; 
but nothing herein contained shall affect any tax that 
niay by law become due to the State, or any increa^ 
of the capital stock of said bank. 

Third : The second article of the charter of said 
bank is so far amended, that each director shall be a 
stockholder to the amount of twenty-five shares of the 
capital stock of said bank, at the par value of forty dol- 
lars per share, in his own name and right. 



An Act in amendment of ^^ An Act to incorporate the 

Bank of America." 



It is enacted ly the General Assembly as follows : 
porartDff Section 1. The second article of the second section 
Amwka, a^ of ^^ ^^t is hereby amended by adding thereto, as 
mended. foUows, to wit : Evcry stockholder shall be entitled at 
all meetings, in person or by proxy, to one vote for 
every share which such stockholder shall own, not ex- 
ceeding twenty, and to one vote for every ten shares 
over twenty ; but no stockholder shall be entitled to 
over forty votes in the same right. 

Sec. 2. So much of the aforesaid article second of 
section second, as is inconsistent herewith, is hereby 
stricken out and repealed. 



orahite Upou the petition of the Granite (formerly called the 
^ittS'*' Pascoag) Bank, at Pascoag, in Burrillville, praying for 
reasons therein stated, that the taxes due &om said 
bank to the State, be remitted : 

Voted and resolved^ That said petition be so far grant- 
ed, that said bank be and hereby is exonerated from 
its obligation to pay to the State any and aU iDstafr 
ments of the bank tax due from it to the State, either 
under its former or present name, at the October ses- 
sion of the General Assembly, A D. 1851. 



JANUARY, 1852. 63 

An Act for the limitation of certain actions against the 
Granite Bank, of Pascoag, in Burrillville, formerly 
called the Pascoag Bank, in Burrillville. 

B M enacted hy the General Assembli/ asfoUows : Limitation 

Section 1. All actions at law, of whatever form, for r^Jim?'" 
the recovery of any sum or sums due upon any bill or ^^]^ 
bills of said bank, issued under the name of the Pas- 
coag Bank, in Burrillville, and prior to the first day of 
January, A. D. 1843, shall be commenced and sued 
irithin four years from the fifteenth day of January, 
A D. 1852, and not after : Provided^ however, that said 
bank shall cause notice to be given in the Providence 
Daily Journal, and the Providence Daily Post, printed 
in the city of Providence, in this State, once a week 
for three months after the time aforesaid, by publish- 
ing therein a copy of this act, and upon failure so to do, 
the said act shall be inoperative and void. 



Upon the petition of the Wakefield Bank to have ^a^^ggy 
money paid by them for increase of Capital Stock re- Bank, to 
funded, and for other purposes : neJ^iSnnd- 

Resolved^ That the General Treasurer be and he is 
directed to pay to said bank the sum of two hundred 
and thirty dollars and fifty cents, being the amount 
overpaid by said bank for increase of capital stock. 



An Act to incorporate the Pawtucket Library Associ- 
ation. 

H is enacted hy the General Assemb^ asfoUowB : 

Sectign 1. Jesse S. Thornton, Nathaniel G. B. Dexter, L?b«?? aJ. 
Sylvanus Clapp, James S. Brown, Thomas K. King, fnci^rjlowt. 
John H. Willard, Cyrus Benson, jun., Joseph T. Sisson ed. 
and William Newell, together with each person who 
shall become a proprietor or stockholder in the same, 
their successors and assigns, be, and they hereby are 
constituted and made a body corporate and politic, in 
the town of North Providence, by the name of the Paw- 
tncket Library Association, with perpetual succession ; 
and by that name shall have power to have and use a 



64 JANUAET, 1852. 

common seal^ and the same to break, alter and renew 
at pleasure ; to prosecute and defend all suits in law 
or equity ; to have, hold, use and dispose of at their 
pleasure, goods, chattels, lands and tenements, to an 
amount not exceeding ten thousand dollars, exclusive 
of books, papers, furniture, and collections in science 
and the arts ; to make by-laws for the management of 
their concerns, and for the regulation of their library, 
and affix penalties to the breach thereof ; provided^ such 
by-laws be not repugnant to law : to elect all necessa- 
ry officers, and prescribe the tenure of their offices and 
their duties ; to hold meetings as often as occasion may 
require, seven proprietors or share-holders to be a quo- 
rum ; to impose taxes on the owners of shares in said 
corporation ; and generally to have all the privileges 
and powers incident to corporations instituted for libra- 
ry and scientific purposes. 

Sec. 2. The share of each corporator shall be lia- 
ble for all taxes assessed thereon, and may be sold for 
the pa3nnent thereoi^ under such terms, and in sudi 
manner as shall be prescribed in the by-laws. 

Sec 3. There shall annually be elected by ballot, a 
President, a Vice President^ a Secretary, a Treasurer, 
and not less than five nor more than nine Trustees, 
who shall together constitute a Board of Directors : 
Provided, a majority of said officers shall in all cases be 
citizens and inhabitants of this State ; and provided, 
also, that no failure to elect at the annual meeting, 
shall work a forfeiture of this act of incorporation. 

Sec. 4. Any individual who shall pay into the treas- 
ury five dollars, shall be a stockholder or proprietor, 
and entitled to one share of the joint stock of the cor- 
poration, which shall be transferable in such manner 
and form as the by-laws may prescribe. The shares in 
the corporation shall in no event be subject to a greatr 
er tax than one dollar on each, annually. The board 
of directors may admit quarterly or monthly subscri- 
bers to the privileges of the library, on such terms as 
may be prescribed by the corporation, at its annual 
meetings. 

Sec. 5. Each stockholder or proprietor shall be en- 
titled to one vote by himself, his attorney or proxy, 
for every share by him held ; provided^ no stockholder 
shall have more than ten votes j and shall be liable for 



JANUARY, 1852. 65 

all assessments voted by the corporation, provided the 
same do not exceed one dollar per annum on each 
share. 

Sec. 6. The by-laws of the corporation shall pre- 
scribe the time for holding the annual meetings, and 
how they shall be notified ; and the manner in which 
special meetings may be called and notified ; they shall 
aJso prescribe the duties of the officers elected by the 
corporation, and may generally provide all proper and 
needful regulations for the government of the Associ- 
ation, not repugnant to law, nor in conflict with this 
act of incorporation. 

Sec. 7. Jesse S. Tourtellot is authoized to call the 
first meeting of said corporation, by posting up thirty 
printed notices of the time and place in ten conspicu- 
ous places in each of the villages of Pawtucket, R. I., 
Pawtucket, Mass. and Central Falls, R. I., at least five 
days previous to the time appointed for said meeting. 



An Act to incorporate the Quidnic Baptist Society in 

Coventry. 

H is enacted hy the General Assemb^ as follows : 

Section 1. Jonathan Brayton, Pardon Spencer Samr ^'^^^^^^^'g 
uel Eldred, Oliver Howard and Elisha Andrew, togethr cicty "n ^ 
er with such other males of the age of twenty-one years, ^Z^mt- 
as now are or hereafter may be members of the Quid- ^* 
nic Baptist Church, in Coventry, are during their con- 
nection with said church, together with any other per- 
sons who shall own stock in any meeting-house which 
may be purchased, or erected for the use of said church, 
hereby constituted, and made a body politic and cor- 
porate, for the purpose of maintaining and promulgat- 
ing the Christian religion, according to the rites and 
ordinances now practiced by the churches in the War- 
ren Baptist Association, by the name of the Quidnic 
Baptist Society, and by that name shall be capable in 
law to sue and to be sued, plead and to be impleaded, de- 
fend and be defended against, in all courts and places, 
and before all proper judges and magistrates whomso- 
ever ; to take, receive, and hold, all money and other 
property, whether obtained by voluntary contribution^ 
gift, grant, or otherwise, all legacies and devises of real 

6^- 



66 JANUARY, 18^2. 

and personal estate ; to have, hold, possess, acquire, and 
retain lands, tenements and hereditaments, goods, chat- 
tels and property of every description, not exceeding 
in amount ten thousand dollars ; to lease, grant, con- 
vey, or dispose of all or any part of said property, at 
their pleasure ; to have and use a common seal, the 
same to change or renew at pleasure ; at any ot their 
meetings to enact and adopt such rules, regulations 
and by-laws for the government of said corporation, 
and for the management of the affairs thereof, as they 
may deem proper and necessary : Provided, the same 
be not repugnant to this act, the laws of this State or 
of the United States. 

Sec. 2. The aforesaid corporation are hereby au- 
thorized and empowered to elect at such times, and in 
such manner, and for such periods as the by-laws there- 
of shall prescribe, a President, Clerk, and Treasurer, 
and such other officers as shall be deemed necessary 
for transacting and managing the business of said co^ 
poration. 

Sec. 3. Five members of said society, legally con- 
vened at any of their meetings, being duly notified, of 
which number the President or Clerk shall always be 
one, shall constitute a quorum for the transaction of 
business ; and if at any time a quorum shall not be 
present, any one member may adjourn from time to 
time. 

Sec. 4. Any failure or omission of said corporation 
to elect said officers, shall in no way make void or in- 
validate this act of incorporation ; and all officers of 
said corporation shall have full power and authority to 
perform and fulfil the duties of their respective offices, 
until others shall be duly appointed in their stead. 

Sec. 5. Said house or place of worship occupied by 
said corporation, shall at all times be under the contn)! 
of the Quidnic Baptist Church, organized in Quidnic 
Village, Coventry, January, 1851, so far as to open and 
close doors at pleasure, to supply the pulpit ; and no 
person shall be pennitted to preach, lecture or exhibit 
therein, without the consent of said church, and if at 
any time there shall occur a division in said church, 
or said meeting house shall not be occupied by said 
church, or if said church shall hold to or inculcate sen- 
timents or views of doctrine not approved of by the 



JANUARY, 1852. 67 

Rhode Island Baptist State Convention, in either case 
the said convention shall have the control of said house 
and lot on which it stands, with all the powers hereto* 
fore belonging to said church. 

Sec. 6. The pews or slips in said house or place of 
worship, occupied by said corporation, may be rented 
by said church at public auction, from time to time, 
and the treasurer of said church, for the time being, 
shall be and is fully authorized to act and officiate as 
auctioneer, in renting pews or slips in said house. 

Sec. 7. At all meetings of said society for business, 
a fair record of its proceedings shall be made and en- 
tered in a book kept for that express purpose ; which 
book shall be at all times open to the inspection of any 
member of said society. 

Sec. 8. No alteration of the by-laws shall be made, 
unless the amendment or alteration proposed, be offer- 
ed at a previous meeting ; and not then unless by a 
vote of two-thirds of the members present, after having 
been dulv notified. 

Sec 9. Pardon Spencer shall be the first President, 
Jonathan Bray ton shall be the first Clerk, and Oliver 
Howard shall be the first Treasurer of said corporation, 
to continue in office until other persons shall be elect- 
ed by said corporation in their stead. 

Sec 10. This act of incorporation shall be forever 
subject to all future acts of this General Assembly, 
either in amendments or repeal thereof, or in anywise 
affecting the same. 



An Act in amendment of An Act entitled " An Act 
to incorporate certain persons hereafter mentioned 
by the name of the Methodist Society in the town 
of Providence, in the county of Providence and 
State aforesaid," and of An Act entitled " An Act to 
amend the Charter of the Methodist Society in the 
town of Providence, and to incorporate the Trus- 
tees thereof and changing the name of said Society 
to the " Trustees of Chestnut Street Methodist Epis- 
copal Church" in the city of Providence. chcstnufei 

It is enacted hy the General Assemhb/ asfoUoivs : sodeiy.^in 

Section 1. Hezekiah Anthony, Joseph West, James ftJPamend^, 
Lewis, James Snow, Job Andrews, Robert G. Cory,g^n^^^f 



68 JANUARY, 1852. 

Samuel James, William Spencer and William A. Ward- 
well, and their succe&sors, who shall be chosen as 
hereinafter directed, are hereby created a body cor- 
porate and politic, with perpetual succession, by the 
name of " The Trustees of Chestnut Street Methodist 
Episcopal Church," for the purpose of establishing and 
supporting the public worship of Almighty God, in the 
city of Providence, in any Church or place of worship 
that is now, or hereafter may be, owned or occupied 
by said Corporation, according to the rites and usages 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church, in the United 
States ; and by that name, shall be able and capable in 
law to sue and be sued, to plead and be impleaded, to 
defend and be defended against, in all courts and 
places, and before all proper judges and magistrates 
whomsoever ; to take, possess, have, hold, and retain 
all monies and other property, real or personal, unto 
them, their successors and assigns, whether obtained 
by voluntary subscription, donation, or otherwise; 
also, all Legacies, Devises, and Bequests of Real and 
Personal Estate : and to have, hold, possess, and ac- 
quire lands, tenements, and hereditaments, goods, chat- 
tels, and property of every description, not exceeding 
in amount the sum of one hundred thousand dollars. 
And all and singular the estate and property aforesaid, 
to lease, mortgage, sell, grant, convey, or dispose of in 
such manner as they shall judge expedient, at their 
will and pleasure ; to have and use a common seal, and 
the same to break, alter and renew at pleasure ; and 
at any of their meetings to'enact and pass such rules, 
regulations, and by-laws, for the government of said 
Corporation, and the management of their property 
and affairs, as they may think proper, and at any such 
meeting, alter, amend, or repeal the same : Provided, 
the same be not repugnant to this Act, the Laws of 
this State, or of the United States. 

Sec. 2. The number of Trustees, shall never be 
more than nine, nor less than five, and four shall con- 
stitute a quorum at any meeting for the transacting 
of business, and a less number may adjourn to a future 
meeting, 

Sfio. 3. The said Corporation shall hold an Annual 
Meeting, on the second Monday in March, in each 
and every year, and such other meetings as they may 



JANUARY, 1852. 69 

deem expedient, to be called and notified in such way 
and manner as they may prescribe. At their annual 
meeting they shall elect, from their ovm number, a 
President, Secretary, and Treasurer, and may elect 
such other officers as they may think necessary, who 
shall hold their respective offices one year, or until 
others are elected in their place ; provided, the failure 
to hold such annual meeting, or to elect all or any of 
their officers shall not in any way, impair or invalidate 
this Act, but said Corporation may elect their said of- 
ficers, and transact other business of said annual meet- 
isg, at any other meeting, called and notified in the 
manner prescribed by the Corporation, within one 
year firom the day appointed for the annual meet- 
ing. 

Sec. 4. Whenever there shall be a vacancy in said 
Board of Trustees, by any of their number ceasing to 
be a member of said Chestnut Street Church, or by 
death, resignation, or otherwise, said vacancy shall be 
filled according to the direction of the discipline of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church : Provided, no person shall 
be elected a Trustee, or hold that office, who is not the 
owner of a pew in said house. 

Sec. 5. The said Trustees and their successors, 
shall have the entire management and disposal of all 
the property and funds of the Corporation, which has 
been, or may be conveyed to them in trust : never- 
theless for the use and benefit of said Church, for the 
support and worship of God, according to the doctrine 
and discipline of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Sec. 6. The Treasurer shall keep a fair and accu- 
rate account of all the property and funds of the said 
Corporation, in a book kept for that purpose, and make 
a regular statement and report thereof, at the annual 
meetings of said Corporation, and at such other times 
as he may be required, by a vote of said Corporation, 
and his records shall at all times be open to the in- 
spection of the members thereof; and all obligations, 
deeds, and conveyances shall be executed by him. 

Sec. 7. The said Corporation, at any meeting, shall 
be, and hereby are, empowered to assess and levy 
upon the pews in any meeting house, owned or occu- 
pied by said Church, in a ratable proportion to the 
fixed valuation of such pews, and to collect, from the 



JANUARY, 1852. 

owner or owners thereof, all sums of money that said 
Corporation may vote to be necessary and requisite, 
for all repairs and insurance of said meeting house, 
and for the improvement of the lot on which it stands. 
And, on failure or neglect of the owners of said pews 
to pay such tax, the Corporation may sell, at public 
auction, such pew or pews, at any time, after giving 
thirty days notice to the owner or owners thereof, or 
leaving a notice at their last and usual place of abode; 
and after paying said taxes, and all legal charges, 
in consequence of such failure, the balance, if any, 
shall be paid to the owner or owners of such pew or 
pews. 

Sec. 8. So much of the original Act of Incorpora- 
tion and of any amendment thereof as is inconsistent 
with this Act, is hereby repealed. 



An Act to incorporate the Central Baptist Church and 

Society, in Tiverton. 

Ji IS enacted hy the General A^embly asfoUmvs : 
SpSt So- Section 1. Thomas Osbom, Clarke Estes, Joseph - 
cietyand Osbom, Asa Grey and Edward Westgate, together 
Tiverton, with such other males of the age of twenty-one years, 
^ncorporat- ^ ^^^ ^^ ^^ hereafter may be members of the Cen- 
tral Baptist Church and Society in Tiverton, are here- 
by created a body corporate and politic, for the pur- 
pose of maintaining and promulgating the Christian 
Eeligion according to the rights and ordinances now 
practised by the Churches in the Warren Baptist As- i 

sociation, by the name of the Central Baptist Church ' 

and Society, in Tiverton, and by that name shall be 
capable in law to sue and be sued, plead and be im- 
pleaded against in all courts and places ; to take, re- 
ceive, hold, possess, acquire and retain lands, tene- 
ments and hereditaments, goods, chatties and property 
of every description not exceeding in amount the sum 
of twenty thousand dollars ; to lease, grant, convey, 
or dispose of all or any part of said property, at their 
pleasure, to have and to use a common seal, the same 
to renew or change at pleasure; atany of their meet- 
ings to enact and adopt such rules, regulations and 
by-laws for the government of said Corporation, and 



JANUARY, 1852. 71 

for the management of the affiiirs thereof, as they may 
deem proper and necessary ; provided the same be not 
repugnant to this act, the laws of this State or of the 
United States. 

Sec. 2. The aforesaid Corporation are hereby au- 
thorized and empowered to elect at such times and in 
such manner and for such periods as the by-laws 
thereof shall prescribe, a President, Clerk and Trea- 
surer and such other oflScers as shall be deemed neces- 
sary for the transaction of business. 

Sec. 3. Five members of said society, legally con- 
vened at any of their meetings, being duly notified, of 
which number the President, Clerk, or Treasurer shall 
be one, shall constitute a quorum for the transaction 
of business ; and if at any time a quorum shall not be 
present, any less number may adjourn from time to 
time, until a quorum shall be present. 

Sec. 4. Any failure or omission of said corporation 
to elect said officers, shall in no way make void or in- 
validate this act of incorporation ; and all officers of 
said corporation shall have full power and authority to 
perform and fulfil the duties of their respective offices 
until others shall be duly appointed in their stead. 

Sec. 5. At all meetings of said society for business, 
a fair record of its proceedings shall be made and en- 
tered in a book kept for that purpose ; which book 
shall at all times be open to the inspection of any mem- 
ber of said society. 

Sec. 6. No alteration of the by-laws shall be made, 
unless the amendment or alteration proposed be offer- 
ed at a previous meeting ; and not then, unless by a 
vote of two-thirds of the members present, after hav- 
ing been duly notified. 

Sec 7. Joseph Osbom shall call the first meeting 
of said society, by posting up notices thereof, for three 
weeks before such meeting. 

Sec. 8. This act shall be subject to all future acts 
of this General Assembly. 



72 JANUARY, 1852. 

Upon the petition of the First Baptist Society in Olney 
ville, formerly West Baptist Society in Providence, 
praying for an amendment of their fundamental Ar* 
tides of Agreement heretofore granted : 

II is enacted by the General Assembly as follows : 
Firit Bap. SECTION 1. Thc foUowing axticlcs of agreement shall 
in o?ne*-^^ bc declared fundamental : 

vuie.fora. Article 1. As a majority of said society are of the 
J^c^hirtCT^ Baptist persuasion, their house of worship in which 
and articles j^j^^y jjq^ meet sliall bc a Baptist meeting-house. 

Art. 2. The society shall consist of such persons as 
are now legal members thereof, and such as shall here- 
after be admitted by a ballot of at least two-thirds of 
the members present at any regular meeting there- 
of, and they shall have power to expel members by a 
similar vote : Provided, that no member shall have a 
right to vote on any question involving an expenditure 
of money, except owners or lessees of pews. 

Art. 3. The society shall hold an annual meeting oo 
the first Wednesday in February in each and every 
year, and such other meetings as they may deem ex- 
pedient, and eleven members shall be necessary to form 
a quorum, one of whom shall be the secretary or treas- 
urer, but a less number may adjourn. 

Art 4. The society at their annual meeting shall 
elect from their own body a secretary and treasurer, 
and such other officers as they may deem necessary, 
who shall hold their respective offices one year, or un- 
til others are elected in their stead. 

Art. 5, It shall be the duty of the secretary to re- 
cord in a book kept for that purpose, all the pro- 
ceedings of the society, which book shall be at all 
times open to the inspection of members of the soci- 
ety. 

Art. 6. It shall be the duty of the treasurer to hold 
the funds of the society and apply the same in such 
manner and under such regulations as the society shall 
direct ; to keep a regular account of all moneys receiv- 
ed and expended, and to make a report of the finan- 
cial condition of the society at their annual meeting, 
or at such other meetings as they may require. 

Art. 7. The care of the house and its appurtenances 
shall be in a committee of five members, to be appoint- 
ed annually by said society, to be styled the commit- 



1 



JANUARY, 1852. 73 

tee of the house, who shall be authorized to make all 
necessary repairs on the buildings or other property . 
of the society ; provided, the expense of such repairs 
shall not exceed one hundred dollars in any one year. 

Art. 8. All applications for the use of the house for 
other purposes than religious worship, shall be made 
to the committee of the house, and a majority of those 
present at any notified meeting of said committee shall 
decide. 

Art 9. The society shall have power at any meet- 
ing legally notified, to cause the pews in said meeting- 
house to be appraised, and to lease said pews at public 
auction to the highest bidder above the fixed apprais- 
al, for choice, and to appropriate the proceeds of such 
leases and premiums to the maintenance of rehgious 
worship in said house ; and for repairs, insurance and 
other incidental expenses. 

Art. 10. All meetings of the society for business, 
shall be notified, when practicable, from the pulpit, at 
least eight days preceding such meeting, or by the 
secretary, on application of five members of the soci- 
ety. 

Ssc. 2. If said society shall at any time fail to hold 
any of their annual meetings, or to elect all or any of 
their officers thereat, such failure shall not impair their 
charter or this act, but they may elect their said offi- 
cers and transact their other business at any other 
meeting legally notified. 

Sec 3. Any thing in the fundamental articles of 
agreement ot said society heretofore enacted, or of 
their charter inconsistent herewith, is hereby repealed. 



Ak Act in amendment of an act entitled *' An act in 
addition to an act entitled an act to incorporate cer> 
tain persons by the name of the First Universalist 
Society in the town of Providence." 

It k enacted hy ike General Assembly dsfoUows : 

Section 1. The pewholders in the meeting house or ^JiSj*" 
church belonging to said society, who are members of S^JX *° 
said society, when convened by due notice, shall have for leaye ^ 
power to assess on the pews in said church, agreeably S^S^wa 
to the last valuation on the records of the society, a 



74 JANUARY, 1852. 

tax not exceeding three per cent, per annum; in addi- 
tion to the tax of five per cent, authorized by the act 
to which this is in addition, for the purpose of raising 
such sum or sums of money yearly, therefrom, as may 
be thought expedient for the support of the pastor of 
said society, the payment of city and State taxes, in- 
surance, and other incidental expenses, to which sdd 
society shall be subjected in maintaining, supporting 
and keeping up public religious worship regularly in 
said church. 

Sec. 2. Said society may have the same power of 
selling the pews for the payment of taxes assessed by 
virtue of this act, as provided for in the act to which 
this is in addition. 

Sec. 3. This act shall be in force from and after the 
passing thereof, on all the pews in said church beloDg- 
ing to individuals who have petitioned for this act, and 
on all other pews whenever the proprietors thereof 
shall assent to the same in writing to the treasurer of 
said society, or whenever said proprietors shall receive 
a transfer of a pew or pews subjecting the same to the 
operation of this act. 



An Act in amendment of ^ An act to incorporate the 
Glocester Evangelical Congregational Society." 

li is enacted by tlie General Assembh/ as follows : 
Actincor- Section 1. All persous inhabitant of this State, who 
SirG?oceB. have heretofore paid to the treasurer of said corporis 

l^uSicon- *^^^> f^^ ^'^ ^s^ ^^^ benefit thereof, the sum of twen- 
weg^tionai ty-fivc dollars, and all persons inhabitant of this State, 
amended, who shall hereafter pay the treasurer of said corpora- 
tion the sum of twenty-five dollars, or such sums as 
shall in addition to any sum they may have heretofore 
paid, make the sum of twenty-five dollars, for the ben- 
efit of said society, shall thereby become legal mem- 
bers of said corporation, entitled to all the rights and 
privileges, and subject to all the liabilities of members 
thereof: Provided, JioweveVy that no sum paid as and for 
rent of pews, shall be deemed or reckoned such a pay- 
ment as will constitute or create membership. 

Sec. 2. Every inhabitant of this State, who is or 
shall by the terms of said charter, or of this amend- 



JANUARY, 1851 75 

ment, become a member of said corporation, shall be 
entitled to one vote for every twenty-five dollars he 
has paid or shall pay as aforesaid to said corporation, 
or which he represents, by purchase, gift, or inheri- 
tance. 

Sec. 3. So much of the act of which this is in amend- 
ment, as is inconsistent herewith, is hereby repealed. 



Ay Act in amendment of an act entitled " An act to 
incorporate certain persons by the name of the Uni- 
tarian Congregational Church, in Newport" 

M is enacted hy the General Assembly asfoUows : Actincor- 

Section 1. Hereafter at the annual and every reg- porating 

ular meeting of said corporation, five members shall in^con^^-i 

constitute a quorum for the transaction of business. SJirch 
Sec 2. So much of said act as is inconsistent here- Newport, 

With, is hereby repealed. 



An Act in amendment of an act incorporating the "Uni- 
ted Congregational Society in the town of Barring- 
ton," parsed at the June session of the General As- 
sembly, A. D. 1797. 

J? w enacted hy the General Asseinhly as follows : 

Section 1. The annual meetings of said corporation Act incor- 
shall hereafter be holden on the first Monday in Janu- KiuldSon- 
ary ; and quarterly meetings shall be holden on the f *|j^^^°°"^ 
first Mondays in April, July, and October, in each Bamngton, 
year. ""''"^'^• 

Sec. 2. Said corporation at any legal meeting, pre- 
vious to which, reasonable notice of not less than five 
days shall be given from the desk, or by posting on or 
near the church, that such business will be acted on, 
shall be and hereby are empowered to assess and levy 
on the pews of any church which is or may hereafter 
be erected or purchased by said corporation for a place 
of worship, in a rateable proportion to the fixed valu- 
ation of such pews, all sums of money which they may 
vote to be necessary for the repairs and insurance of 
such house, and the other expenses of the church or 



76 JANUARY, 1852. 

corporation : Provided^ that the whole amount of taxes 
assessed upon such pews in any one year, exclusive of 
the amount assessed for repairs and insurance, shall not 
exceed six per cent, on the fixed valuation of the pews 
in said house : provided^ further^ that any person who 
may have purchased a pew in the house of worship 
now occupied by said society, may at his option, take 
his deed of such pew, subject to the provisions of this 
act, or decline to complete such purchase ; in which 
case, any amount which he may have paid towards the 
purchase of such pew, shall be returned to such pur- * 
chaser ; and in case of the failure of the owners, les- 
sees, or heirs of said pews, to pay said assessmenta. af- 
ter due notice from the treasurer of the corporation, 
and within ninety days thereafter, the said treasurer 
shall be and is hereby empowered to sell at public auc- 
tion, all the right, title and intesest of said owners, les- 
sees, or heirs in said pews ; and from the proceeds of 
the sale thereof, to deduct the amount of such assess- 
ment and charges accruing in consequence of such fail- 
ure, and the balance, if any, after deducting said 
amounts, shall be duly paid by said treasurer to said 
owners, lessees, or heirs, or their order. 

Sec. 3. No person shall be allowed to vote at any 
meeting of the corporation, upon any question of as- 
sessing or levying taxes upon the pews in said house or 
houses, unless he be an owner of a pew in such house, 
or being a part owner of a pew in said house, shall be 
authorized by the other owners to represent the said 
owners in such meeting ; and the owners of no pew in 
said house shall have more than one vote. 

Sec. 4. The officers chosen at any annual meeting 
of said corporation, shall hold their places until others 
are chosen in their stead. 



An Act in amendment of an act to incorporate the 
Second Universalist Society, in Providence. 

E is enacted hj the General Assemhh/ asfoUowB : 
ponitrng*2d SECTION 1. That the words "shares not exceeding 
isrsod^ty, one hundred dollars each," in section second, of said 
Tmend^r ^^^i ^^ strickcu out, and the words " pews in their meet- 
ing house," be inserted in place thereof: that after the 



Act incor 



JANUARY, 1852. 77 

words "the holders of which," in said section, the words 
*ora part of a pew, whenever the value of such part 
shall amount to one hundred dollars or more," shall be 
inserted. And that said act shall be further amended 
by striking out the words " stock, stockholder, share, 
shares," or " shareholders," wherever the same occur, 
and inserting the words " pew, pews, or pewholders," 
to conform to said amendment. That in the fifth 
section of said act, the word ^ five," shall be strick- 
en out, and " ten," inserted. That the sixth section 
of said act be amended by adding the words ^of 
worship," at the end thereof. And that the act in 
amendment of the fifth section of said act passed at 
the June session, A. D. 1848, be and the same is here^ 
by repealed. 

Sec. 2. Whenever any pewholder or pewholders 
desire to surrender the occupancy of the pew or pews 
by him, her, or them occupied, to the society, the same 
may be done by giving three months notice in writing, 
to the treasurer of said society; after the expiration of 
which time the owner shall be exempt from all assess- 
ments on said pew or pews for the support of a pastor, 
and the same may be occupied and used by the socie* 
ty, or by them let : Provided^ however^ any owner or 
owners of such pew or pews, may resume the occupan- 
cy of said pew or pews, and hold the same in the same 
manner, and under the same terms, and subject to the 
same liabilities as before said surrender, after three 
months' written notice to the treasurer of said society 
of the intention to do so. 



Protection 



An Act to incorporate Protection Fire Engine Com- 
pany No. 5, in Newport 

S is enacted hy the General Assembly asfoUows : 

Section 1. Henry Tlsdale, William Newton, Ira Fire In^ 
French, Frederick A. Pratt, William A. Vickory, fJ'Se^rt 
Henry H. Young and John Stoddard, and their asso- ^on>onit- 
ciates and successors are hereby created a body cor- 
porate with perpetual succession under the name of 
rrotection Fire Engine Company No. 5, in Newport ; 
and that they and their successors shall be and are 
hereby made capable in law by that name, to receive, 

7# 



78 JANUARY, 1852. 

possess and enjoy real and personal estate not exceed- 
ing five hundred dollars, and the same to aliene and 
dispose of ; to sue and be sued, plead and be impleaded, 
defend and be defended against, and prosecute all 
suits to final judgment and execution ; to prescribe 
times and places of meeting ; to elect such officers as 
they may deem necessary ; to establish rules for the 
election of officers and members ; to ordain, make and 
execute, by-laws and ordinances for the management 
of their afiairs ; to have a common seal and the same 
to break, alter and renew, and in general to do and 
execute all matters and things which to them may ap- 
pertain to do, provided the same are not contrary to 
law. 

Sec. 2. The members of said company shall have 
power and authority to inffict fines and penalties, not 
to exceed two dollars for any one oflence, for any neg- 
lect of duty, by any member, and for the non obser- 
vance or violation of any by-law or regulation of said 
company. 

Sbc. 3. The whole number of membera of said 
company shall at no time exceed seventy-five ; and 
they shall be exempted from military duty and from 
serving as jurors, and they shall enjoy all the privi- 
leges and immunities allowed by law to fire engine 
companies. 

Sec. 4. The members of said company shall have 
power and authority to dismiss or expel any member 
for gross misbehaviour and for continued and repeated 
neglect of any member to comply with the rules reg- 
ulating ordinances and by-laws adopted for the gov- 
ernment and regulation of said company : provided, 
however, that a vote of two-thirds of the whole num- 
ber of the members of said company shall be required 
to dismiss or expel any member, and after hearing of 
the charges preferred. 

Sec. 5. Whenever any person shall cease to be a 
member of said company otherwise than by death or 
removal from town, the presiding officer of said com- 
pany shall notify such fact to the Town Council of the 
town. 



JANUARY, 1852. 79 

Upon the petition of Ellis L. Blake, of Cumberland, ^jj;'?!^^,®; 
administrator of the estate of Welcome A. Whipple, J«ave to seii 
late of said Cumberland, deceased ; of Lydia C. Whip- ^ ^^ ^^' 
pie, widow ot said Welcome, and of Lyman Burlin- 
game, guardian of the person and estate of Harriet E. 
Whipple infant daughter and heir at law of said Wel- 
come, praying for reasons therein stated, they may be 
authorized and empowered to unite in a conveyance of 
the real estate of which the said Welcome died seized 
and possessed, and for other relief therein set forth for 
the better settlement of said estate: 

Voted and resolved^ That the prayer of said petition 
be, and the same is hereby granted ; and that the said 
administrator and guardian in their said capacities are 
authorized and empowered to agree with said widow 
upon the value of her dower in the real estate of her 
late husband, and also to make sale of all said real es- 
tate at public auction, and to make and execute in their 
respective capacities and jointly with said widow, a 
good and sufficient deed thereof to the purchaser there- 
of^ so as to vest in such purchaser all the estate which 
the said Welcome A. Whipple had at the time of his 
decease, and the said Harriet E. Whipple now has as 
heir at law in and to said estate ; and upon receipt of 
the purchase money therefor the said administrator 
and guardian are authorized to pay out of the same to 
the said Lydia C. Whipple such sum as may have been 
agreed upon as the value of her dower in said real es- 
tate as aforesaid, and shall be required to account for 
the residue of said proceeds in the same manner as 
they are now by law made liable to account for the 
same if said sale had been made by the authority of 
the Court of Probate. 

Provided^ That the said agreement for the value of 
such dower shall be submitted to and approved by the 
Court of Probate of said town of Cumberland, previous 
to any sale of any portion of said real estate under this 
act, and that the said administrator and said guardian 
first give bond to the Court of Probate to account for 
the proceeds of such sale in the same manner as if the 
sale had been authorized by said Court under the Stat- 
ute, and that such sale be had under the advice and 
direction of said Court ; and provided further, that the 
portion of the proceeds of said real estate which shall 



80 JANUARY, 1852. 

be received by said guardian as the property of hi« 
said ward^ shall vest ia said ward, and descend and be 
inherited in the same manner as said real estate if it 
had not been sold. 



1 



E. T. Peck- WherectSy The General Assembly at the October ses- 
deS/cott. ®^^^' 1851, passed a vote upon the petition of Edward 
Rrm«d. T. Pcckham, of Middletown, in the county of Newport, 
a minor, empowering him to make and execute a deed 
or deeds in partition of four lots of land described in 
said petition, and numbered 1> 2, 3 and 5 ; and also to 
make and execute a deed of sale to his brother Wil- 
liam F. Peckham, of all his said Edward's interest, in 
the undivided half of lot No. 4, when in fact it was in- 
tended by said vote to empower said Edward to divide 
and make partition of lots No. 1, 2, 3, and 4, and to 
empower him to sell and convey as aforesaid, his inter- 
est in the undivided half of lot No. 5, instead of 
No. 4: 

And whereasy said Edward has executed a deed or 
deeds of partition of said lots 1, 2, 3 and 4, and a deed 
of sale to his brother, William F. Peckham, of all his 
said Edward's interest in lot No. 5, in conformity to 
the family agreement between him and his said brother 
William and their sister Eliza Smith, in relation to the 
division and settlement of the estate left to them by 
their deceased father, which said deeds said Edward de- 
sires to have confirmed. Therefore, 

Voted and resolved^ That the said several deeds made 
and executed by said Edward in mnnner and for the 
purposes aforesaid, are and shall be taken and deemed 
to be as valid and effectual to all intents and purposes, 
as if said Edward T. Peckham h«ad been twenty-one 
years old at the time of the making and executing the 
same, and as if there had been no misdescription of 
said lots in the vote aforesaid passed at said October 
session, 1851 : provided, that the partition and sale 
aforesaid shall both be approved by the Court of Pro- 
bate of said Middletown. 



JANUARY, 1852. 81 

Upon the petition of Samuel Clarke, guardian of the p;,^dYon^' 
person and estate of Peleg Tallman, a minor, under the » ituorizcd 
age of twenty-one years, praying for divers reasons 
therein stated that he may be authorized and empow- 
ered to sell the interest of his said ward, being an es- 
tate in remainder expectant on the determination of a 
preceding estate for life, in and to two certain farms 
or tracts of land situated in Middletown in the county 
of Newport — the one called the ** Burden Wood farm" 
containing about ninety-eight acres and bounded north 
on land of Philip Anthony, east on land late of Giles 
Manchester, south on the Nj'^att farm, and west on the 
county road — the other of said farms called the " Sweet 
farm" containing about seventy-five acres, bounded 
north on land occupied by George Anthony, west on 
the " Bailey farm," east on land of John Bunker, and 
south on the main road, — and to give a good and suf- 
ficient title to the purchaser of the whole estate, on the 
sale of the interest of assignee of the tenant for life, of 
the estate iind interest of his said ward therein : 

Voted and resolvedy That the prayer of said petition 
be and the same is hereby granted, and that in the 
sale of the interest of the tenant for life in the said de- 
scribed premises, the said Samuel Clarke, guardian as 
aforesaid, be and he hereby is authorized and empow- 
ered to sell the interest and estate of his said ward 
therein, and the deed or deeds by him executed, shall 
vest in the purchaser or purchasers thereof a full and 
complete title of his said ward's estate and interest in 
said premises : provided, however, that said sale shall 
be made under the advice and direction of the Court 
of Probate of the town of Middletown ; and provided 
further, that out of the proceeds of the sale of the 
whole premises the interest of the said ward shall be 
apportioned by the said guardian under the advice and 
approval of the said Court of Probate, and the amount 
thereof be by him under the advice and direction of 
said Court securely invested in safe stock or other se- 
curities in the name of said ward, and in case of the 
decease of the said ward before attaining the age of 
twenty-one years, the said proceeds of the sale of his 
said estates and interest on the investment thereof, shall 
descend or be inherited in the same manner as the real 



82 JANUARY, 1852. 

estate would have descended had the same not been 
sold. 



p. A. & H. Upon the petition of Pardon A. Phillips and Helen 
authorized' M. PhiUips, wife of said Pardon, both of Scituate, pray- 
to sell. jjjg £qj, reasons therein stated that the said Helen M. 

Phillips may be authorized to join with her said hus- 
band, Pardon A. Phillips, in selling and conveying a 
certain part of a tract of land situate in the town of 
Johnston, containing about twenty-five acres, being 
undivided, which is owned in common with other 
owners of said tract of land and which descended to 
them in the division of the estate of Col. John Water- 
man, hite of Johnston, deceased : 

Voted and resolved^ That the prayer of said petition 
be granted, and that the said Helen M. Phillips be au- 
thorized and empowered to sell and dispose of all her 
right in said land, and that the deed or deeds given by 
her and her said husband, shall convey to the purcha- 
ser or purchasers as full and perfect a title as though 
the said Helen M. Phillips were now of the age of 
twenty-one years, and provided that said sale be made 
under the direction of the Court of Probate of the town 
of Scituate. 



c. Man. Upon the petition of Comfort Manchester, of Tiver- 
guaidian, tou, guardiau of the person and estate of Almira B., 
toSdL^'**^' George C. and William H. Manchester, minors, of the 
same Tiverton, praying, for certain reasons therein 
stated, that she, in her said capacity, may be authoriz- 
ed and empowered to sell and convey the interest of 
said minors in a certain parcel of real estate, situate in 
said Tiverton : 

Voted and resolved^ That the prayer of said petition 
be and is hereby granted ; and that the said Comfort 
in her said capacity of guardian, be and is hereby au- 
thorized and empowered to sell and convey all the right, 
title and interest of her said wards in and to a certain 
half acre of land situate on the east side of a highway 
leading from Tiverton Four Comers to Little Compton, 
bounded westerly by said highway, and northerly, east- 



JANUARY, 1852. 83 

erly and southerly on lands of the aforesaid wards as 
tenants in common with other heirs of the late Loring 
Manchester. 

Provided^ That said sale be made under the advice 
and direction of the Court of Probate of said Tiverton, 
and that she give bond with sufficient surety to the 
satisfaction of said court, to account to the said court 
or with said wards, when they shall arrive at full age, 
for the proceeds of such sale. 



Upon the petition of Edward Snow, of Providence, natura°^' 
natural guardian of his children, John E. Snow, g^wdian. 
Charles H. Snow, Anna E. Snow, Augustus F. Snow, \o\q\\!^ 
Caroline Snow, and Rowland H. Snow, representing 
that said minors, in common with their sister, Mary 
Alice, wife of Abner Cornell, of said city, are the own- 
ers of a fee of a tract of land of which said Edward is 
tenant by courtesy, situated in South Kingstown, con- 
taining fifty-five acres, more or less, and being a tract 
of land assigned to them in an action of partition by 
judgment of the Court of Common Pleas for Washing- 
ton county, at their November term, A. D. 1851, and 
which land was the property of Mary Ann Snow, late 
wife of said Edward, reference being had to the pa- 
pers in said action, for further description and account 
of the title thereto : 

Voted and resolved, That said Edward be and is 
hereby authorized to sell all the right of said minor 
children in said estate, and to give good and sufficient 
deed or deeds thereof to the purchasers, which shall 
convey all said minors' estate in the premises : provide 
ed^ that the sale be made under the direction of the 
Court of Probate of South Kingstown, and that the pe- 
titioner give bond to the Municipal Court of the city 
of Providence with surety, conditioned to invest the 
proceeds in stock or other productive property, for the 
benefit of said minors, and that the property or stock 
80 purchased, shall descend in the same manner the 
real estate aforesaid would have descended. 



84 JANUARY, 1852. 

bur^'adnl'r ^^P^^^ the petition of Martin S. Salisbury, of BurriU- 
for leave ' ville, administrator on the estate of Alfred Albee, late 
^^ ' of Burrillville, deceased, praying for reasons therein 
stated, that he may be authorized, in his said capacity, 
to make sale of his intestate's interest, being an un- 
divided half part thereof, in and to a certain facto- 
ry estate, situate in said Burrillville, with the water 
power and privilege and appurtenances thereto belong- 
ing, being the same factory estate w^hich was convey- 
ed to said Alfred Albee, by deed from Lyman Cope- 
land, bearing date the tw^enty-third day of April, A. D. 
1849, and recorded in book number 9. page 183, of 
the records of land evidence of said town of Burrill- 
ville, to which and to former deeds of same estate, re- 
ference is to be had for a more particular descrip- 
tion thereof; and also the undivided half part of the 
machiney in certain rooms therein, described as fol- 
lows, viz. : in basement of said factory, two nappers, 
two shears, one cloth winder, one flock grinder, one 
press-plate and papers, one stove, one flocking machine, 
and one brusher ; in the third story, seven carding ma- 
chines, two jacks, fourteen looms, one turning engine, 
one stove pipe, and tools ; in the attic story, one jack, 
one duster and one picker, at public or private sale, 
and altogether or separate : 

Voted and resolved^ That the prayer of said petition 
be and the same is hereby granted, and that the said 
Martin S. Salisbury, in his capacity of administrator as 
aforesaid be and he hereby is authorized and empow- 
ered to make sale of said intestate's interest at the time 
of his death in and to the factory estate and machin- 
ery above described either in a public or private man- 
ner and all together or separately, and upon sale 
thereof to make good and sufficient deeds and con- 
veyances to the purchaser or purchasers thereof, which 
shall vest all the title which said intestate at the time 
of his death had therein, and to receive the amount for 
which said property shall sell from the purchaser 
thereof, and to give valid receipts and acquittances 
therefor ; applying the sum or sums so received first 
to the payment of the claims proved before and allow- 
ed by the commissioners upon said estate represented 
insolvent, as debts against said intestate and his said 
estate, and paying over the balance, if any there be 



JANUARY, 1852. 85 

nfter the payment of said debts, to the guardians of the 
minor heirs of the said Albee, and making his settle- 
ment for the amount so received and paid out with 
the Court of Probate of said Burrillville, in the same 
manner as administrators are now by law required to 
make settlement of their accounts : Provided, said ad- 
ministrators shall before making the sale aforesaid give 
bonds, in such sum as said Court order, to said Court, 
conditioned to account for and pay over in manner 
iibove described the proceeds thereof; and also pro- 
vided, that said sale be made under the advice and di- 
rection of said court. 



Upon the petition of Mary R Potter and Elisha R ^f ^^1^' 
Potter, trustee, praying for leave to sell certain real Potter,tru»- 
estate held by him in trust: leoVeto 

Voted and resolved^ That the prayer of said petition ^^' 
be and the same is hereby granted, and the said Elisha 
R. Potter as such trustee is hereby fully empowered 
to sell at public or private sale a certain parcel of land 
situate in Point Judith, in South Kingstown, bounded 
westerly by the Point Judith pond, easterly by the sea, 
northerly by land of George C. Knowles, and southerly 
by land late of E. R. P. Kenyon, deceased, with full 
power to execute conveyances thereof in his name as 
such trustee, to persons who may purchase the same, 
80 as to vest in said purchasers an absolute title to the 
same. 

Provided^ hmvevery That the proceeds of said sales be 
held subject to the said trust and in the same manner 
afi Baid real estate is now held 



Upon the petition of John S. Cottrell, of Jamestown, J s Cottreu 
in the county of Newport, guardian of the property of KJSJ^ 
Ellen S. Cottrell, Henry D. Cottrell, and Charlotte Cot- ^°»^"- 
trell, minor children of Daniel S, Cottrell, late of Han- 
cock county, in the State of Mississippi, deceased, pray- 
ing for certain reasons therein stated, that leave .may 
be granted to sell certain real estate : 

Voted and resolved. That the prayer of said petition 
be and the same is hereby granted ; and the said John 

8 



86 JANUAEY, 1852. 

S. Cottrell, guardian as aforesaid, is hereby fully au- 
thorized and empowered to sell either at public or pri- 
vate sales, all the right, title and interest of the said 
Ellen S., Henry D. and Charlotte Cottrell, in and to 
each and all of the following described tracts or par- 
cels of land, namely : in and to the Fox Hill farm, so 
called, situated in said town of Jamestown, bounded 
southerly by land of John Wilbour, westerly and north- 
erly by the sea or salt water, easterly, partly on Eel 
Pond, and partly on the beach. 

Also, in and to a certain other tract of land, situ- 
ate on Dutch Island, bounded westerly by land of Wil- 
let Carpenter and Timothy C. Collins, northerly, east- 
erly and southerly by the sea or salt water. 

Also, in and to a certain other parcel of land situate 
in said JameMown, bounded southerly, partly on the 
highway, and partly on the beach ; easterly, partly on 
the highway, and partly on land of Oliver K.Armstrong; 
northerl}', partly on land of Oliver K. Armstrong, and 
partly on land of the late Joseph Green ; westerly on 
Eel Pond. 

Also, in and to a certain other parcel of land, called 
the Dumpling farm, in said Jamestown, bounded east, 
south and west by the sea or salt water, northerly by 
land of said John S. Cottrell, with power and authority 
on the part of said guardian, in his said capacity, to ex- 
ecute, seal and deliver deeds of the same to the pur- 
chaser or purchasers of the same, so as to vest in them 
respectively, all the right, title and interest of each and 
all said minors therein, and to receive the money the 
same shall be sold for, and after paying thereout all i 
the expenses of said sale, and incidental thereto, then ' 
to pay over the surplus thereof to Henry Dillard, of 
Hancock county, in said State of Mississippi, guardian 
of said minors in said last mentioned State : provided^ 
hmvever^ that all the same be done under the advice 
and direction of the Court of Probate of said town of 
Jamestown. 



T Hen Upou the petition of Thomas Henry, of the city and 

adminiJJr, couutv of Providencc, administrator on the estate of 
to wir* Sylvanus Henry, late of Scituate, in said county, de- 
ceased, praying for reasons therein stated, that he 



JANUARY, 1852. 87 

might be authorized and empowered in his capacity of 
administrator as aforesaid, to make sale of the real es- 
tate of said Sylvanus Henry, consisting ot a lot of land 
in said Scituate, of between fifty and sixty acres, with 
a dwelling house, two barns, and other buildings 
thereon, bounded south on a turnpike road, west on a 
cross road, northerly on land of James Battey and Jo- 
seph Sheldon, easterly on land of Fenner Angell. And 
one other lot in said Scituate, of about five acres, bound- 
ed southerly on the turnpike road, westerly and north- 
erly on land of James F Battey, and easterly on a 
cross road. And one other lot of about ten acres, 
bounded easterly on the said cross road and land of 
James F. Battey, northerly, westerly and southerly on 
said Battey's land,or however otherwise said lots may 
be bounded, or be reported to be bounded : 

Voted and resolved^ That the prayer of said petition 
be and the same is hereby granted ; and that the said 
Thomas Henry is hereby authorized and empowered to 
make sale of said lots at auction, first advertising the 
same as administrators are required by law to advertise 
the sale of real estate of persons dying intestate, and 
giving bond to the satisfaction of the Court of Probate 
of said Scituate, to pay one-sixth part of the proceeds 
of said sale to the widow of said Sylvanus Henry, up- 
on her releasing her dower in said premises, and to ap- 
propriate the residue of the payment of the expenses 
of settling said estate and the debts thereof, and to di- 
vide the remainder, if any, amongst the heirs at law of 
said Sylvanus Henry, according to law. 



Upon the petition of Thomas G. Turner, of Warren, "^ Henry, 
administrator on the estate of Jonathan Luther, late auihorizc<i 
of said Warren, deceased, praying for reasons therein *** **"' 
stated, that he may, in his said capacity, be authorized to 
sell so much of the real estate belonging to the estate of 
the deceased as may be necessary for the payment of 
debts, in his discretion, either at private or public sale : 

Vofed and resolved. That the prayer of said petition 
be granted, iind the said Thomas G. Turner is hereby 
authorized, in his capacity, to sell in his discretion, ei- 
ther at public or private sale, so much of the real es- 
tate of which the said Jonathan Luther died seized, as 



88 JANUARY, 1852. 

may be necessary for the payment of the debts of 
the said estate : Provided^ such sale be made under the 
advice and direction of the Court of Probate of the town 
of Warren. 



Upon the petition of George B. Hazard, of Newport, 
authorized in the county of Newport, praying for reasons therein 
ri^t of* stated that he may be authorized to release the right 
Hazard^ ^' ^^ dowcr of his wifc, Lydia Hazard, now and for se ve- 
* ' ral years past, insane, in a certain lot of land situated 
in New Town, so called, in said Newport, containing 
about a quarter of an acre, with a dwelling-house and 
other buildings thereon, bounded northeasterly on 
Spruce street, northwesterly on a drift-way, southwest- 
erly on land of Patrick Benson, and southeasterly on 
land of Edward Simmons : 

Voted and resolvedy That the prayer of said petition 
be and the same is hereby granted, and the said George 
B. Hazard be and he hereby is authorized and empow- 
ered to release and convey the right of dower and all 
the interest which his said wife, Lydia Hazard, has in 
said described lot of land and buildings thereon, to 
Abraham H. Tilley, whenever said Tilley shall convey 
to said George B. Hazard a clear title to about six 
acres and a quarter of land, with the buildings there- 
on, situated in the immediate neighborhood of said first 
described estate, as set forth and described in said pe- 
tition ; and a deed or deeds executed as aforesaid, by 
said George B. Hazard, shall be as good and effectual, to 
all intents and purposes, to release and transfer the in- 
terest of his wife, Lydia Hazard, in said first described 
estate, as if the same were executed by her when of 
sound mind : Provided^ that the exchange of said es- 
tates between said Hazard and Tillev, and the execu- 
tion of said deeds be approved by and made under the 
advice and direction of the Court of Probate of the 
town of Newport 



Lacy Ann Upou the petition of Lucy Ann Spink, of Provi- 
to idoir** dence, for leave to adopt Agnes Willard Spink : 
child. Voted and resolved. That the prayer of said petition be 

and the same is hereby granted ; and that the said Lucy 






JANUAEY, 1862. 89 

Ann Spink is hereby authorized and empowered to 
adopt the said Agnes Willard Spink as and for her own 
childy with all the rights, duties and liabilities of parent 
and child respectively. 



Upon the petition of Isaiah Bacon, of Harrington, i.BacoDJt 
and Eliza Ann Bacon his wife, praying for reasons jJ^^J^* 
therein stated that they may be authorized to adopt ciuid. 
Mary Abby Lockwood as their child : 

Voted and resolved^ That the prayer thereof be grant- 
ed ; and that the said Isaiah Bacon and Eliza Ann Ba- 
con are hereby authorized and empowered to adopt 
said Mary Abby Lockwood as and for their own child, 
with all the rights, duties and liabilities of parents and 
child respectively ; and the said Mary Abby Lockwood 
shall hereafter be called and known by the name of 
Mary Abby Brown. 



Upon the petition of John M. Wiggin and Caroline JMWi«gin 
KWiggin his wife, and Amanda A. E. Hale, all of rwveTtoa- 
Providence, in the State of Rhode Island, praying that ^^p* ^"^ 
an act may be passed authorizing the said John M. and 
Caroline E. Wiggin to adopt as their own child, Jean- 
nie Grace Jackson, by the name of Grace Ada Wiggin, 
daughter of Nathan W. Jackson and the said Amanda : 

Voted and resolved. That the prayer of said petition 
be and the same is hereby granted ; and that the said 
John M. and Caroline E. Wiggin be and they are here- 
by authorized to adopt the said Jeannie Grace Jack- 
son as their own child ; that the «aid Jeannie Grace 
Jackson shall hereafter be called and known by the 
name of Grace Ada Wiggin, and that the said John M. 
and Caroline E. and Grace Ada shall reciprocally be 
vested with all the rights to which they would respec- 
tively be entitled and be subject and liable to all the 
duties and obligations to which they would in like 
manner be subject, had the said Grace Ada been bom 
the lawful child of the said John M. and Caroline R 
Wiggin. 

8* 



90 JANUABT, 1852. 

p v.ciarke Upon the petition of Pittmond V. C]arke, of Rich- 
discharged mood, in the county of Washinirton, praying to be dis- 
nizance. charged from an execution on setre facta$ m favor of 
the State : 

Voted and resolved, That the prayer of said petition 
be and the same is hereby granted ; and said petitioner 
is hereby released and discharged from the judgment 
on which said execution issued and from 9XL liability 
on said execution. 



wHQfeene Upou the petition of William H. Greene, of Provi- 
JJj^^^ dence, praying for reasons therein stated, that he may 
Dixance. be discharged (torn a certain recognizance entered in* 
to by him with one Peter Conlon, for the appearance 
of the said Peter before the Supreme Court m Provi- 
dence oounty, at the term thereof holden on the fourA 
Monday of September, A. D. 1851, which has been de- 
jbulted: 

Voted and resoked, That the prayer of said petition 
be granted, on the payment of the sum of two hundred 
dollars by said petitioner into the hands of the clerk 
of the Supreme Court of said Providence county^ and 



s. Ban, Jr. Upon the petition of Samuel Ball, Jr., of New Shore* 
ftU^JJ*^. ham, praying for certain reasons therein stated, that 
ni»n<»- he may be discharged from a certain recognizance en- | 
tered into by him as principal, and Sylvanus D. Willis I 
as surety, before William P. Lewis, one of the wardens 
of the peace for the said New Shoreham on the twelfth 
day of November last past : 

Voted and resolved, That the prayer of said petition 
be so far granted as that the said Ball and the said 
Willis be discharged from all liability on said recog- 
nizance, upon the payment of four dollars and seventy* i 
two cents costs taxed by the said warden, at the first ! 
session of the court at which the said Ball appeared, 
and that the clerk of the Court of Common Pleas for 
the county of Newport be directed to cause all pro* 
ceedings on said recognizance to be stayed against the 
said Ball upon his filing with the said clerk evidence 
of compliance with the condition of this vote* 

i 



JANUARY, 1852. 91 

that on payment of said sum, said petitioner be and he 
is hereby discharged from all liability on account of 
said recognizance. 



Upon the petition of John A. Littlefield^ praying for J 'a. lhu*- 
reasons therein stated, that he may be discharged from ©hlf gtlT 
his liability on a recognizance as surety for one William ?^'^®*' 

. George : 
Voted and re^ohftd^ That the said John A. Littlefield 
be and he is hereby discharged from his said liability, 
and the clerk of the Court of Common Pleas for the 
county of Providence, is hereby authorized to enter a 
settlement of the judgment upon said recognizance 
against said Littlefield, rendered at the June term of 
said court, 1851 ; provided^ that said Littlefield pay to 
said clerk the amount of the fine against said George, 
and all costs that have accrued to the State upon said 
recognizance, and the scire facias thereon, and upon the 
complaint against said George, and the appeal thereon* 



Upon the petition of Antonio L. Crout, of the city ^ ^ crewi 
and county of Providence, praying for reasons therein discharged 
stated, for a discharge of a recognizance entered into tiiunceT^' 
by him as surety for Michael Kennedy, and returned 
to the Supreme Court for said county, at the March 
term thereof, in the year 1851, and upon which sdre 
faciM issued, and judgment was rendered against him 
at the September term of said court in the same year ; 

Voted and resolved, That the prayer of said petition be 
and the same hereby is granted j and that upon the 
payment of the sum of three hundred dollars to the 
clerk of said Supreme Court for said county of Provi- 
dence, at any time before the second day of the next 
March term of said court for said county, the said judg- 
ment, and any execution that has been or may be is« 
sued thereon, shall be fully discharged. 



Upon the petition of Benaiah Barney, praying for b. Bamer 
reasons therein stated, that a jury fine, being the sum J^^J^J?'"^ 
of twenty dollars^ levied against him for absenting him- fin«/ 



92 JANUARY, 1852. 

self from the March term of the Supreme Court in the 
county of Providence, in May, A. D. 1851, may be re- 
funded to him : 

Voted and resolved^ That the prayer of said petition be 
and the same is hereby granted ; and the Gene^l 
Treasurer is hereby directed to pay the said sum of 
twenty dollars to the said Barney. 



H. B. Bii. Upon the petition of Hartford B. Billings, for remis- 

nS?s on'of ' ®^^° ^^ J^^y ^°^ imposed upon him by the Supreme 
jury fine. Court, at Provideuce, March term, 1851 : 

Voted and 7'esolvedy That the prayer of said petition 

be granted : and that said fine be remitted on pajonent 

of all costs that have accrued thereon. 



L.T. B iiioQ Upon the petition of Levi T. Ballou and Charles Mi- 
ne?, forre!.' ^^^9 f^r remission of fine and costs, and for liberation : 
fillrind^^ ^^ ^^^ re^o/v^J, That the prayer of said petition be 
coitfl. and the same is hereby granted, and said fine and costs 
are hereby remitted ; and the keeper of the jail in the 
county of Providence, is directed forthwith to discharge 
said Levi T. Ballou and Charles Miner, from confine- 
ment. 



J. Francis, Upou the petition of John Francis, otherwise called 
dlkJ,fo/iS- John Updike, praying for a restoration to his civil 
storauon. gj^d political rights and privileges: 

V^d and resolved^ That the prayer of said petition 
be granted ; and that said John Francis be and he is 
hereby restored to all his civil and political rights and 
privileges, as fully and with the same efiect, as if the 
conviction and sentence set forth in said petition had 
never taken place. 



D A Brown Upou the pctitiou of David A. Brown, praying for 
retiored to rcstoratiou to civil and political rights and privileges : 
pomicd^ Voted and resolved, That the prayer of the same be 
tk^^ granted j and that the said David A* Brpwn be and 



JANUARY, 1852. 93 

he is hereby possessed of all the civil and political rights 
and privileges to which he would be entitled, had the 
conviction and sentence recited in said petition never 
. heen had against him. 



Upon the petition of Israel S. Smith praying for cer- 1. s.smiiu 
tain rejisons therein stated, that he may be restored tOhifc[vu^^ 
his civil rights : "s^ts 

Voted and resolved^ That the prayer of said petition 
be and the same is hereby granted ; and that the said 
Israel S. Smith be and he hereby is restored to all his 
civil rights as fully as if said conviction set forth in his 
petition had never been made. 



Upon the petition of Amos D. Moore praying for re a.d. Moore 
storation to his civil rights, for certain reasons therein M^dvu ^ 
stated : "«»*'» 

Voted and resolved, That the prayer of said petition be 
and the same is hereby granted ; and the said Amos 
D. Moore be and he herebv is restored to all his civil 
rights as fully as if said conviction set forth in his peti- 
tion had never been made. 



Upon the petition of Alice Laughery praying for a. Loughe- 
certain reasons therein stated that she may be libera- '^"^*^"^*®**" 
ted from her imprisonment in the State's jail in the 
county of Providence : 

Voted and resolved^ That the costs of the conviction 
of said petitioner and the State's portion of the fine 
she was sentenced to pay, be and the same are hereby 
remitted, and the keeper of said jail is hereby di- 
rected to liberate her from her imprisonment forth- 
with. 



Upon the petition of James Houston and others, t McWhor- 
praying for reasons therein stated, for the liberation of ^'^'^^^*^™*" 
Thomas McWhorter from imprisonment in the county 
jail in Providence : 

Voted and resolved. That the prayer of said petition 



94 JANUARY. 1852. 

be and the same hereby is granted, provided the 
amount of the execution upon which said McWhorter 
was committed, and the officer's fees for commitment 
be paid or discharged ; and that the keeper of said 
jail be and he hereby is directed to discharge said Mc- 
Whorter accordingly. 



R. Handy, Upou the petition of Ira B. Handy, praying for the 
Sbl^nitSi liberation of Richmond Handy, convict No. 69, in the 
State prison : 

Voted and resolvedy That the prayer of said petition be 
and the same is hereby granted ; and that the warden 
of the State prison is h-ereby directed to discharge said 
Richmond Handy on the expiration of six years from 
the date of his commitment. 



wMiddow Upon the petition of William Middow, of West 
liberated. Grecuwich, praying for reasons therein stated, that a 
fine and costs imposed upon him on the sixth day 
of October, 1851, be remitted and for liberation : 

Voted and resolved^ That the prayer of said petition 
be so far granted, that so much of said fine as accrues 
to the State and the said costs, be and the same are 
hereby remitted, and the keeper of the jail in the 
county of Kent, be and he is hereby directed to dis- 
charge the said Middow from jail upon payment of 
that portion of said fine belonging to the complainant 



E-Cum- Upon the petition of Margaret Barrett, praying for 
eraifd/^^' reasons therein stated, for the liberation of Ellen Cum- 
mings, a prisoner in the Providence county jail, and 
for remittance of fine and costs : 

Voted and resolved^ That said petition be and is here- 
by granted ; and that the fine and costs accruing to 
the State be remitted, and the jailer is hereby directed 
to discharge said Ellen Curamings from confinement 
forthwith. 



JANUARY, 1852. 95 

Upon the petition of John Saunders, a convict now e;,nvi?tf ^" 
confined in Newport county jail, praying for the re- ^berated. 
mission of fine and cost and for liberation : 

Voted and resolved. That the prayer of said petition be 
granted ; and that said fine and costs be and are hereby 
x*eniitted, and that the keeper of the Newport county 
jail be and is hereby directed forthwith to discharge 
the said Saunders from his said confinement : 



Upon the petition of Joseph Ralph, of Bristol, in the J. R«iph 
county of Bristol, blacksmith, now a prisoner for debt, ^^^^^^ ' 
in the State's jail in said county, upon execution in fa- 
vor of William M. Bly, praying for release : 

Voted and resolved, That the prayer of said petition 
be and the same is hereby granted, and the keeper of 
said jail is hereby directed to release and discharge the 
said Ralph from the said jail forthwith ; provided the 
said Ralph shall first make, execute and deliver to said 
jailer, a bond to said Bly, with surety or sureties satis- 
factory to said jailer in the penal sum of not less than 
twice the amount of said execution, conditioned that 
the said Ralph shall prefer his petition for the benefit 
of the insolvent acts of this State, to the Supreme 
Court at the next term thereof, within and for said 
county ; and in case said petition be not granted on 
the final hearing thereof, that the said Ralph will re- 
turn to said jail within ten days from such final hear- 
ing, and remain a true prisoner therein as upon his 
original commitment xmtil he be discharged therefrom 
by order of law. 



Upon the petition of Harrison G. Brown, a prisoner 
in the Providence county jail, praying for liberation m)?ratSr° 
and remission of costs : 

Voted and resolved, That the prayer of said petition 
be and is hereby so far granted, as to remit costs ; and 
the keeper of said jail is hereby directed to discharge 
said petitioner at the expiration of his term of impris- 
onment accordingly. 



96 JANUARY, 1852. 

comic?^'* Upon the petition of Catherine McGier, praying for 
liberated, the liberation of John McGier, a convict, now confined 
in the State prison : 

Voted and resoivedj That the prayer of said petition 
be and the same is hereby granted ; and that the war- 
den of the State prison be directed to discharge the 
said John McGier accordingly, forthwith. 



Wm. Holt, Upon the petition of citizens of Bristol county, pray- 
ribentted. i^g for rcasons therein stated, for the liberation of Wil- 
liam Holt, a convict in the State prison : 

Voted and resolved^ That the prayer of said petition be 
and is hereby granted j and that the warden of the 
State prison is hereby directed to discharge said Wil- 
liam Holt accordingly, forthwith. 



Upon the petition of Ellen O'Brien, praying for cer- 
li'be?lted!"* t^i^ reasons therein stated, that her son, John O'Brien, 
may be discharged from further imprisonment in the 
Providence county jail, and that the costs of his prose- 
cution and conviction may be remitted : 

Voted and resolvedy That the prayer thereof be and the 
same is hereby granted ; and the keeper of said jail ia 
hereby directed to discharge him accordingly. 



w.E.Tttus Upon the petition of William E. Titus, praying for 
liberated. j.gg^gQjjg therein stated, that he may be liberated from 

confinement in the Providence county jail, and the fine 
and costs awarded against him by the Court of Magis- 
trates of the city of Providence, on the seventeenth 
day of January, A. D. 1852, may be remitted : 

Voted and resolved^ That the prayer of the petition be 
and the same is hereby granted ; and that said fine 
and costs be remitted, and that the said William R 
Titus be forthwith liberated from his said confinement. 



M. Moran, Upou the petition of James Moran, praying for rea- 
SbCTat^ ^^^® therein stated, for the liberation of his son Ma- 
thew Moran, a convict in the State prison: 

Voted and resolved^ That the prayer of said petition 



JANUARY, 1852. 97 

be and the same is hereby so far granted as to liberate 
said Matthew Moran, at the expiration of one year from 
the date of his sentence, and the warden of the State 
prison is hereby directed to discharge him accordingly. 



Upon the petition of Richmond R King, a poor pris* s. r. King 
oner now confined in Providence county jail, in the u*>«*'«*- 
city of Proyidence, at the suit of Otis H. Eelton & 
Co.: 

Voted and resaivedy That the prayer of said petition 
be granted ; and the keeper of said Providence coun- 
ty jail be and is hereby directed to forthwith discharge 
the said Richmond R. King from his confinement : Pro- 
tndedy however^ that nothing herein contained shall be 
construed to invalidate or impair the claim of said Kel- 
ton & Co. against the goods and chattels of said King* 



Upon the petition of J. C, Peckham A Co., preying {[;^|^ 
that a certain sum of money may be refunded to them> ucenM ez- 
and for an extension of licenses granted to them : ^^^ 

Voted and resolved^ That the prayer of said petition be 
and the same is hei^eby granted ; and that the General 
Tieasurer be, and he is hereby authorized and direct* 
ed to pay to the order of J. C. Peckham & Co. the sum 
of three hundred and fifty dollars, and that the said X 
C. Peckham be and he is hereby authorized, as agent 
of the Merchants Mutual Fire Insurance Company of 
BaffiJo, and of the Protection Insurance Company of 
Rome, to close up the business of said companies ; and 
that the said J. C. Peckham be and he is hereby au* 
thorized to do business for the Connecticut Fire Insur- 
ance Company of Hartford, until the thirty-first day of 
December, A, D. 1852, under the license already grant- 
ed to him ; and that J. C. Peckham k Co. be and they 
are hereby discharged of and from any penalty or for^ 
feiture which they may have incurred as agents of the 
aforesaid insurance companies by reason of not having 
complied with the requirements of the law, 

8 



98 JANUARY, 1852. 

Mcc^S'S? Upon the petition of Benjamin Stevens, of Provi- 
tended, deuce, agent of the Springfield Fire and Marine Insur- 
ance Company, praying for reasons therein stated, that 
a portion of certain money paid by him into the State 
treasury as a license duty, may be refunded to him : 

Voted and resolved, That the prayer of said petition 
be so far granted, that the license issued to said 
Benjamin Stevens, as agent of the Springfield fire and 
Marine Insurance Company, by the General Treasurer, 
on the eighteenth day of August, A. D. 1851, be ex* 
tended to the seventeenth day of August, A. D. 1852, 
inclusive. 



J. p. caid, Upon the petition of Joshua P. Card, praying for rea- 
Snd3.^ sons therein stated, that certain moneys be refunded 
to him : 

Voted and resolved. That the prayer of said petition 
be granted ; and that the said Joshua P. Card have an 
order from the Secretary of State upon the General 
Treasurer for the sum of one hundred and ninety-five 
doUars and twenty-six cents. 



s. Hataid, Upon the petition of Stanton Hazard, of Coventryr 
im icHef. praying for reasons therein stated, that the Attorney 
General of this State be instructed to nol proa, three 
complaints against said Hazard, for a violation of a li^ 
cense law, or cider law, of said town, tried before Seth 
B. Lewis, Esq., of said place, on the twenty-third day of 
September, A. D. 1851, and by appeal from said Lew- 
is's decision, now pending before the Court of Common 
Pleas next to be holden within and for the county of 
Kent, on the second Monday of February, A. D, 
1852 : 

Voted and resolved, That the prayer of said petition 
be and the same is hereby granted ; and the Attorney 
General is hereby authorized in his discretion, to dis- 
continue said complaint upon such terms as he may 
deem proper. 



JANUARY, 1852. 99 

Upon the petition of Samuel W. Peckham, of the 2;J['^^ 
city of Providence, praying for certain reasons therein buned. 
set forth, to be reimbursed the amount by him ex- 
pended for counsel employed in the case, John A. Lit- 
tlefield vs. him : 

Voted and resolved^ That the prayer of said petition 
be granted ; and that the General Treasurer is hereby 
authorized and directed to pay to the said Samuel W. 
Peckham, the sum of fifty dollars, being the amount ex- 
pended by him as aforesaid. 



Upon the petition of Arnold Saunders, of Glocestcr, ASaundan 
praying for reasons therein stated, that he may take chimed. 
and be called and known by the name of Arnold Saun- 
ders Eddy : 

Voted and resolpedy That the prayer of said petition 
be and the same is hereby granted, and that the name 
of the said Arnold Saunders be changed to the name 
of Arnold Saunders Eddy, and that henceforth said pe- 
titioner be known and called by the name of Arnold 
Saunders Eddy, by which latter name he shall inherit^ 
take and convey any estate, and have, possess and en- 
joy all the righta, privileges and immunities, and be 
subject to all duties and liabilities, that he might have 
taken or conveyed, or that might have belonged to 
him, or that he would have been subject to, had not 
his name been changed 



Upon the petition of James Grammont Rawson, j. q. r^^. 
praying for a change of name : SSaSed!* 

Voted and resolved^ That the prayer of said petition 
be and the same is hereby granted ; and that the said 
James Grammont Rawson shall hereafter be known 
and called by the name of James Rawson Grammont, 
and by such name shall be entitled to all the rights, 
and liable to all the obligations and duties of any and 
every kind whatsoever, to which he might or would, 
under any circumstances, be entitled, or for which he 
might or would be liable, if said change of name had 
not been made. 



100 JANUARY, 1852- 

s. B B. Upon the petition of Sarah B. B. Wheeler, of Cot- 
naiM ^' entry, praying that her name may be changed to Sarah 
changed, fi. B. Hawkins : 

Voted and resolved, That the prayer of said petition 
be granted, and that the said Sarah B. B. Wheeler be, 
and she is hereby authorized and empowered to assume 
the name of Sarah B. B. Hawkins ; that all contracts 
and business made and performed in the name of Sa- 
rah B. B. Hawkins, shall be as valid and binding in law 
as they have heretofore been under the name of Sarah 
B. B. Wheeler ; and all contracts and business hereto- 
fore made and performed under the name of Sarah B. 
B. Wheeler, shall be and remain as binding as if the 
name of said petitioner had not been changed. 



An Act to authorize the Pawtuxet-street Christian So- 
ciety, in Providence, to change its name. 

Pawmxet H is enacted ly the General Assembly as follows : 

chpstian The Pawtuxet-street Christian Society, of Providence, 

^^^* is hereby authorized to take the name of the Broad* 

changed, street Christian Society. 



w H.Paine Upou the petition of William M. Paine, of Smithfield, 

diYorced. ^^ ^;^ State, praying for reasons therein stated, that he 

may be divored from his wife Catharine Paine, and 

that a subsequent marriage with Clarissa Collins may 

be legalized : 

Voted and resolved, That the prayer of the said petition ^ 
be and the same is hereby so far granted that the said 
William M. Paine be, and he is hereby divorced from 
his said wife Catharine. 



An Act to regulate the Fishery in Point Judith Ponds. 

B is enacted hy the General Assembly asfoBows : 
Actwgniat- Sbcmon 1. No pcrsou shall from the fifteenth day 
ing thefiah- of April to the fifteenth day of June, inclusive of both 
jttduh ^ those days, in every year, erect any weir, or set or 
^^^^ draw any seine or net, for the obstructing, catching or 



JANUARY, 1862. 101 

hauling of fish withia half a mile from Point Judith 
Ponds' breach, meaning the breach for the time being 
into the sea; or within said breach, or within any chan- 
nel leading to said ponds, or any branch thereof from 
the sea, or within a quarter of a mile from the en- 
trance of such channel into said ponds or branches 
thereof. 

Ssa 2. No person shall, from the fifteenth day of 
September to the fifteenth day of December, in every 
year, commencing and ending said time at the rising 
of the sun on both of said days, erect any weir, or set 
or draw any seine or net, for the obstructing, catching 
or hauling of fish, in any part of said pond which lies 
south of a line drawn from the north end of Beef Island 
to the north end of Thomas's Point on Great Island ; 
and from Thomas's Point along the west and south 
shore of Great Island to the cross-way leading to Sand 
Hill Cove, and thence along said cross-way to the 
marsh ; nor shall any seine or net be set during that 
period within half a mile of the breach for the time be- 
ing, on the outside next to the sea, or within any chan- 
nel leading to said Ponds from the sea ; nor shall any 
nets or seines be set or hauled during the same time, 
in the Potter Pond below the shell bar to the sea, fol- 
lowing the west shore from Meadow Point, south, to 
the marsh ; nor shall any standing net or seine be set 
within forty rods of the shell bar on the west side 
thereof 

Sec. 3. No stationary net or seine of any sort, shall 
be set at any sea.son of the year, within a quarter of a 
mile of a straight line drawn from Sandy Point to 
Spring Point, either above or below. 

Sbc. 4. No seine or net, of any sort, shall be used 
at any time within said ponds or any branches there- 
of, of over one hundred Mhoms in length ; nor any 
standing seine or mesh net of over twenty-five fath- 
oms in length, excepting from the first day of March 
to the fifteenth day of April. 

Sbc. 5. No person shall set a standing net or seine 
within forty rods of the place where a standing net or 
Beine is already set, excepting from the first day of 
March to the fifteenth day of April ; nor shall any per* 
son maintain any standing seine or net in the same 

9* 



102 JANUABY, 1862. 

place for more than forty-eight hours, if any other per- 
Bon desires to occupy the same place. 

Sec. 6. Every violation of this act shall be proceed- 
ed against by indictment, before the Court of Common 
Pleas ; and any person convicted of any such violation, 
shall be fined not less than twenty nor more than fifty 
dollars, and shall also forfeit the boat, seine, net, and 
other apparatus used in such violations ; one hsJf of 
said fine and forfeiture to and for the use of the per* 
son complaining, and the other half to and for the use 
of tlie State. 

Sec 7. All acts and parts of acts respecting the fish- 
ery in Point Judith Ponds, or that branch thereof call- 
ed Potter Pond, or in any other branch thereof, incon- 
Bistent ^ith this act, are hereby repealed. 



H is enacted by the General A^embfy asfoUows : 
Seal for SECTION. 1. The clerk of the Supreme Court for the 
Court"* county of Newport, is authorized to procure a suitable 
Newport seal for the said court, and a press for the use thereof; 
which seal and press shall be attached to the ojffice of 
the said clerk. 

Sec. 2. The necessary expense for procuring the 
said seal and press, shall be paid to the said clerk, un- 
der the order of His Excellency the Governor. 



County. 



Resolution directing the sheriff^ to procure an iron frame 
for the bell of the State House in Providence. 

Raaoiution Resolved^ by the General Assembly, that the sheriff 

frame for ^^ ^^ couuty of Piovidencc, be directed to procure, at 

*>«*^ the expense of the State, an iron frame for the bell of 

the State House, in Providence, and to have said bell 

hung and ready for use as soon as may be. 



Voted and resolved^ That the following sums be allow- 
ed and paid out of the General Treasury, to the fol- 
lowing named persons, viz. : 

Acc««. T. B. Mowry , . - »^^ 

•Mowed. Russell Clapp . . . 3 00 



\ 



i 



JANUAKY, 1862. 


Henry "W. Child 


1 70 


Horace Trowbridge 


170 


Silas Battey 


17 OO 


City of Providence, for Butler He 


>9pital 105 48 


Cleaveland & Brother 


41 09 


Henry Oman, for Newport jail 


246 58 


John D. Burdick 


600 


J, B. Turner & Son 


17 64 


William Sheldon 


6 00 


George Allen . « 


6 00 


Stephen C. Fisk 


15 00 


John Bussey 


24 00 


George Whaton 


37 50 


Pope & Cutter 


8 75 


Edward Lillibridgc 


3 00 


William Simons 


2 75 


Knowles & Anthony 


3 00 


Marcus B. Young 


8 00 


William H. Matherson 


2 70 


Asa Potter 


25 00 


Thomas R Dawley 


2 60 


William Spencer 


3 84 


B. B. Congdon 


3 84 


B. B. Congdon 


2 56 


Jonathan Card 


96 


John B. Sheldon 


2 56 


John S. Place 


5 50 


Philip Arnold 


18 24 


Benjamin Williams 


2 56 


N. F. Arnold 


2 56 


S. L. Tillinghaat 


20 60 


Henry Dyer 


44 


Mary Gibbons 


44 


S. A. Crane 


44 


John Nichols 


2 20 


S. S. Tillinghast 


2 60 


Timothy Coger 


40 


Luther Collamore 


40 


Allen Luther 


40 


Am SVinsor 


10 60 


iohn Graves 


5 10 


J. W. Smith 


83 75 


T. L. Hammond 


170 


Horace Trowbridge 


170 



103 



104 



JANUABT, 18S2. 



Job Armstrong, Jr. 
Russell Wheeler 
Hannah Thurber 
George W. Wheeler 
Horace Ti-owbridge 
Daniel Pearce 
Town of Cumberland 
John H. Gould 
John Nichols 
John H. Gould 
Bussell Clapp 
Gladding & Brother 
William Simons 
Thomas Whitaker & Son 
J. A. Uowland 
Stephen Gardner 
Gladding & Brother 
James Sheldon 
William A. Pierce 
James Sheldon 
Sayles & Miller 
William Holmes, Jr. 
D. F. Potter 
S. S. Tillmghast 
N. M. Briggs 
George A. Billings 
T. W. Hart 
John M. Shaw 
William H. Hudson 
C. M. Hayden 
£dward Lillibridge 
John Champlin 
Ellet L. Perkins 
David Tefil 
William A. Harvey 
George HoUey 
John Riley 
Charles Wilkinson 
Edward Harvey 
Thomas Sweet 
George C. Perry 
Horace Northup 
Benjamin Hull 
Edward Lillibridge 



586 

60 

60 

60 

290 

155 

17 50 

15 30 

15 20 

28 52 

700 

12 25 
300 

64 69 

3018 
100 

14 70 
100 
2 37 

38 30 
400 
880 
700 
614 

10 64 
7 70 

66 30 

25 69 

13 80 
730 
9 28 
208 
2 08 
2 08 
2 08 
2 08 

2 08 
128 
152 

96 
96 
96 

3 05 
44 50 



JANUARY, 1852. 



105 



James Sheldon 
Susan Block 
James Alger 
Jabez J. Potter 
Thomas W. Hart 
Thomas W- Hart 
WiUiam B. Cranston 
John H. Clegg 
Elizabeth Newcomb 
WiUiam Bichardson 
Christopher West 
Lydia West 
L J. Arnold 
Horace M. Pierce 
Abner Jillson 
Edward Lillibridge 
W. S. Barges 
Bobert Taylor 
Sloop Fly 
Thomas Milboum 
Bobert Wilson 
John Place 
John Edwards 
Gardiner Johnson 
John Mattison 
Vernon Weaver 
Wilbur Sweet 
Henry W. Gordon 
Jonathan Hill 
Thomas W. Hart 
Warren G. Slack 
John M. Shaw 
Jabez C. Potter . 
Harris H. Stone 
L J. Arnold 
Bates & Martin 
D. F. Potter 
WiUiam B. Cranston 
George W. Whitman 
Z.L Hammond 
WUliam Newcomb 
Providence Gas Company 
George Allen 
Levi Salisbury 



2 00 


40 


80 


2 15 


1 90 


2 00 


6 55 


40 


40 


40 


40 


40 


27 86 


5 10 


13 76 


2 10 


400 


40 


121 


40 


8 25 


56 98 


2 80 


200 


88 


175 


48 


• 28 


4 64 


9 45 


10 14 


46 80 


2 GO 


68 


8 90 


2 78 


6 00 


160 


70 94 


4 16 


40 


60 30 


3 00 


3125 



106 



JANUARY, 1852. 



Jabez C. Potter - 

William H. PuUen 

William C. Thurber 

John Graves 

Bridget Elwood 

Joseph Gavit 

Benjamin B. Thurston 

L. J. Arnold 

Harris J. Stephens 

John M. Shaw 

Freeman & Tyler 

Burrington Anthony 

William A Pierce 

Thomas Matteson 

Alanson Carter 

L. J. Arnold 

Charles M. Hayden 

William B. Cranston 

Joseph T. Sisson 

Court of Justices^ Newport 

L. J. Arnold 

Emor Coe 

Thomas W. Hart 

Thomas J. A Gross 

G. A Billings 

John H. Watson 

Daniel R. Weaver and others 

George A Billings 

Harris H. Stone 

Sayles & Miller 

B. H Horton 

Harris H. Stone 

N. Briggs 

Sylvester R Hazard 

Samuel Morrell 

William M. Mowry and wife 

Charles Davis 

R Seatle 

Thomas W. Hart 

A C. Luther 

George L. Dana 

William H. Hudson 

Charles M. Hayden 

Thomas Merriwether 



500 


8 00 


150 


5 21 


40 


14 50 


14 50 


46 00 


12 


1130 


3O00 


18 00 


624 


44 


8 40 


2150 


29 60 


29 50 


24 00 


6 09 


620 


8 40 


400 


16 00 


14 50 


514 


7 31 


52 80 


4 28 


416 25 


2 05 


36 


115 


10 51 


80 


80 


60 


50 


33 94 


1120 


2 50 


33 30 


7 30 


132 



JANUARY, 1852. 



107 



John M. Shaw 

Enowles & Anthony 

KnowleSy Anthony & Co. 

Alwin H. Shippee 

H. A Manchester 

John H. Gould 

A3el B. ColweU 

William Burrows 

SOas Hemenway 

John Manchester 

Gideon Bradford 

Seth W. Macy 

George Turner 

Mary E. Carpenter 

Alexander Allen 

S. W. Wheeler 

George Whiteman 

Holden Andrews 

James Sheldon 

Alexander Allen 

Samuel Darling 

John McConnell 

Ann McConnell 

Albert B. Truman 

John Rankins 

Mary Rankins 

Thomas Rankins 

John Tucker 

John H. Gould 

S. Hemenway 

William Winslow 

Thomas W. Hajrward 

Alfred Bosworth 

Court of Justices^ town of Newport 

J. G. Johnson 

Alfred Anthony 

John H. Gould 

Sayles & Miller 

Knowles & Anthony 

James R. Smith 

John Place 

Thomas Kenney 

M. Chappell 

George EL Whitney 



2 40 


3 00 


157 50 


3 70 


18 00 


2 82 


88 


12179 


3 90 


12 00 


203 25 


46 00 


123 00 


20 00 


70 


50 85 


2165 


72 


4 20 


7 40 


44 


48 


48 


44 


68 


68 


68 


2 00 


2 88 


48 


3 0O 


23 66 


8 0O 


7 81 


3 00 


27 50 


250 


85 80 


108 00 


144 


10 96 


88 


19 10 


3126 



108 



JANUARY, 1852. 



F. A. Holden, 

James S. Rhodes 

B. A. Newhall 

George C. Bowen 

Emor Shaw 

George C. Shaw 

William Holmes^ Jr. 

Thomas Merriwether 

William H. Pullen 

Jabez C. Potter 

Alanson Carter 

Jabez C. Potter • - 

Samuel Bandall 

Court of Magistrates 

Asa C. Luther 

Feleg T. Brightman 

John Famum, Jr. 

William H. Hudson 

John Weaver 

Israel R Potter 

James Sheldon 

Jabez J. Potter 

Charles K A. Mathewson 

Jonah Titus 

Thomas Whitaker & Son 

H. M. Pierce 

L. J. Arnold 

William Holmes, Jr. 

E. R Potter 

Thomas W. Hart 

Providence Reform School 

William Holmes, Jr. 

John Famum, Jr. 

William Holmes, Jr. 

B. Anthony 

James Sherburne 

W. E. MUlerd 

B. J. Munro 

William G. Borden 

Benjamin Manchester 

William Buidick 

T. W. Hart - 

Charles M. Hayden 

L. J. Arnold 



44 

44 

44 

44 

14 80 

3 20 

22 94 

300 

lis 

8 70 

3 64 
250 

78 65 
32 10 
300 
160 
820 
17 50 
900 

17 55 

1 80 
396 

4 25 
6 25 

2 10 
930 

45 00 

18 50 
160 

335 02 
8 58 

5 08 
25 50 
20 00 

800 

42 88 

880 

125 

5 40 

80 

2115 

28 60 

69 50 



JAIfUASLjf 1852. 



1D9 



Town of Bristol 

J. S. Pearce . . - 

B. McLaughlin 

L. Daily - . . . 

A. McKenney 

J. Cristy - • . 

William Coddington 
John Allen • . « 

£mor Coe « • . 

George Durfee . . . 

Harris H. Stone 
Ariel Ballon 
Jeremiah S. Sherman 
J. W. Wheelock 

joitn Cristy ... 

Benjamin Cummings 
L. A. Martin ... 

Mary Crowly 
G. M- Goodwin 
Allen J. Wright 
Nathaniel Green 
St. M. Tucker 
Charles W. Card 
Edward Gladding 
1N[ehemiah iJole 
John Norris 
JoJ^n S. Pierce 

Justices' Court for the town of Bristol 
Morris & Barnes 
'W^01iam A. Fierce, 
Justices' Court of the town of Bristol 
John S. Pierce 
Nathan Bardin 
Samuel S. Dmiy 
S. I^er 
Thomas R King 
John Hurley, 
tenner Bro^ 
John Wehb 
£, Slocum 
Anthony Donoyan 
Bradbuiy C. HiU 
Ambrose J. Horton 
Kimball, Jr. 

10 



326 

80 
80 
80 
40 
40 
1180 
10 50 

60 80 

350 

20 60 

^00 

120 

40 

40 

40 

S'20 

46 

80 

800 

2 70 
^0 
40 
^0 

k 

2qO 

26 6^ 

3 1^ 
14 40 
13^ 

|g 

120 
1^ 
lOO 
96 
20 
87 
92 
88 
60 
88 



2 
3 



110 



JANUAKT, 1852. 




James Finn 




. « 


88 


J. W. Stanley 


* 


• 

m m 


88 


Patrick Donovan 




• 


88 


J. J. Weaver 


. 


• 


88 


Isabella Lindsey 




- 


88 


S. K Reynolds 


- 


m m 


88 


George Rex 




- 


60 


Margaret Donovan 




- 


92 


Michael Donovan 




• 


88 


J. Congdon & Son 


. 


• 


75 


John S. Place 




• a 


130 


Peleg Brightman 


- 


• 


19 27 


John S. Place 




• 


140 


J. S. Pearce 


• 


• 


6 50 


J. S. Pearce 




• 


46 05 


John S. Place 


. 


• 


220 


Pierce, Salisbury & Co. 




10 00 


J. H. Griffln 


• 


m ^ 


156 


P. S. Brightman 




m m 


256 


J, Kenyon 


• 


- 


48 


R. Sisson 


• 


• 


52 


C. Holden 


• 


« «• 


48 


J. Gifford 


• 


m m 


48 


Charles Groodwin 


. 


• 


1192 


James Eames 


■ 


• 


450 


Jabez C. Potter 


• 


• 


3 00 


Jabez C. Potter 


m 


. 


100 


John Tucker 


m 


- 


2 25 


John J. Eelton 




• • 


SCO 


Greene & Brown 


m 


• 


255 56 


Providence Marine 


Artillery 


250 


John H. Gardner 


m 


- 


6 00 


H. a WardweU 




•' 


300 


B. F. Thurston 


m 


• • 


147 00 


Wingate Hayes 




- 


147 00 


Thomas Duifee 


- 


•• 


147 00 



|5,661 40 



B^^pott of ^^ Report of the Committee on the alterations and 
SiSS*"* improvements of the State House, in Ptovidenee, and 
ftofmrmtB the Report of the Committee appointed to audit the 
ho^Ipio accounts of said Committee : accepted and ordered on 
Tidence. fii^ j^ ^j^^ Secretary's office. 



JANUARY, 1852. Ill 

As H. Adams, agent, account with Providence and ah Adams 
Pawtucket Turnpike received, and ordered on file in KaMaw. 
Secretary's oflSce. tumpike. 



The Report of the committee to inspect the ferries, 5*PJ*J.fi. 
received February 20th, 1852, and ordered on file in ^^ tajp^T 
Secretary's office. *"^**' 



Reports of the clerks of the Supreme and Common c2£5fs 
Pleas Courts, received, and placed on file in Secretary's and c. p. ' 
office. ^^"'^ 



Resolution for improvements in North and South Court Additiwua 
streets, Providence, in accordance with report of SSnZrN. 
Committee : SafpSyT 

Resolved^ That the additional sum of two hundred dol* 
lars be and the same is hereby appropriated for the 
purpose of making certain improvements in the North 
and South Court streets, in the city of Providence, au- 
thorized and directed to be made in and by a resolu- 
tion of the General Assembly, passed at the October 
sesfflon, A. D. 1851, thereof, and that the Committee 
appointed at said October session, be authorized to 
draw on the General Treasurer therefor. 



The Directors^ return and the report of the Com' ntsni,^ 
missioners of the Providence and Worcester Railroad cSmn^L 
Company, accepted, and ordered on file in the Secre- J}^^^ 

tary's office. Railroad 



The report of Rhode Island Commissioners on the ^^^^ 
boundary line between Rhode Island and Massachu- bounkarr 
setts, ordered on file in Secretary's office. \HZUlmi 



Report of the Committee appointed by the General ^^^^l 
Assembly to examine into and settle certain accounts in^i<^«^ 
and difficulties between members of the Narragansett ^^^ 
Indian tribe, accepted, and ordered on file in Secreta- 
ry's office. 



112 JANtrAKT, 1852. 

Vot^d and resolved^ That all unfinished business be- 
jJl^J^ fore this General Assembly, be referred to the next 
session ; that the Secretary cause the acts and resolu* 
lions passed at this session to be published with a suit- 
able index, and distributed according to law ; and that 
tliis As^iKibly be and the same is hereby adjoumed to 
meet at the time and place appointed by law. 



STATE OF RHODE ISLAND, &c 

Sbcrei^akt Of State's Ofmcb, > 
March 28, 1852. J 

I certify, that the acts, resolyesj, rolls, aud reports, 
published in this paniphlet, are true copies oJT the orig- 
inal now oii file in this oMce. 

A. POTTER, 

Secretary/ of State. 



APPENDIX. 



ROLL OF THE MEMBERS OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 

At the General Assembly of the State of Rhode Island 
and Providence Plantations, begun and hold en by ad- 
journment, at Providence, on the first Monday of Jan- 
uary, (5th) in the year of our Lord one thousand ei^t 
hundred and fifty-two, and of Independence the seven- 
ty-sixth: 

prebbnt: 

His Excellency PHILIP ALLEN, Governor. 

His Honor WILLIAM BEACH LAWRENCE, Lieut. 
Governor. 

SENATORS : 



Newport, 

Providence, 

Portsmouth, 

Warwick, 

Westferly, 

New Shoreham, 

North Kingstown, 

South Kingstown, 

East Greenwich, 

Jamestown, 

Smithfield, 

Scituate, 

Glocester, 

Charlestown, 

West Greenwich, 

Coventry, 

Exeter, 

Middletown, 

Bristol, 

Tiverton, 

Little Compton, 

Warren, 

Cumberland, 

Richmond, 

Cranston, 

Hopkinton, 

Johnston, 

North Providence, 

Barrington, 

Foster, 

Burrillville, 

Bexjamin F. ThcbstOn, 



SETH W. MACY. 

ALBERT C. GREENE. 

JOHN MANCHESTER. 

JOHN BROWN FRANCIS. 

STEPHEN WILCOX. 

WILLIAM P. BALL. 

JOSEPH SPINK. 

HAZARD KNOWLES. 

NICHOLAS S. FRY. 

ANDREW F. POTTER. 

GIDEON BRADFORD. 

PARDON AN6ELL 

THOMAS BARNES. 

JOSEPH H CROSS. 

THOMAS T. HAZARD. 

CHRISTO'R A. WHITMAN. 

ISAAC GREENE 

NATHANIEL GREENE 
BYRON DIMAN, 
WILLIAM C. CHAPIN. 
NATHANIEL CHURCH. 
HAILE COLLINS. 
ARIEL BALLOU. 
JAMES G. SISSON. 
NATHAN PORTER 
JOHN S. CHAMPLIN. 
ALFRED ANTHONY. 
CALEB V. WATERMAN. 
ALLEN BICKNELL, 
JONATHAN HILL, 2d. 
LYMAN HAWKES. 

THE SECHETARY. 
Esq., Clerk. 



REPRESEirrATIVES PROM TAIS SEVERAL TOWNS. 



Newport, 
Henry Y. CranBton, 
Joseph Anthony, 
Joseph B. Weaver, 
Benjamin Finch, 

Thomas R Hunter. 

Providence, 
Leonard Blodget^ 

William H. Potter, 
Henry Anthony, 
Allen C. Mathewson^ 
James T. Rhodes, 
George S. Bathbone, 
Amos C. Barstow, 
Daniel K. Carpenter, 
Samuel Currey, 
Thomas J. Stead, 

Christopher C. Potter. 

Portsmouth, 
Borden Chace. 

Warwick. 
Pardon Spencer, 
Simon H. (xreene, 
William D. Brayton, 
Randall Holden. 

Westerly. 

Nathan F. Dixon. 

Netv Shoreham. 
Simeon Babcock.. 

North Kingstown. 

James Eldred, 
Thomas G. Allen, Jr. 

Simth Kifigstown. 

George L. Hazard, 
Sylvester Robinson. 

Etist Greenwich. 

George J. Adams. . 

Jamestown. 
Benjamin Cottrell. 

Smithfield. 

Thomas Buflum, 
Daniel Pierce, 
John Fenner, 



Earl A. Wright, 
«} ames Phetteplace, 
Israel B. Purinton. 

Scituate. 
William A Roberts, 
Sheldon Fiske. 

Olocester, 
George H. Browne, 
Jonathan A. Tourtellot 

Charlestoton. 
Joseph Gavit 

West Greetpwich. 
Nathan Carr. 

Coventry, 
David S. Harris^ 
Levi Johnson. 

Exeter, 
Daniel L Money. 

Middletown* 

George L Bailey. 

Bristol, 
Benjamin Hall, 
Hezekiah C. Ward well. 

Tiverton. 

WilHam P. Sheffield, 
Joseph Osborne, 
Nathaniel B. Durfoe. 

Little Oompton, 

Oliver C. Brownell. 

Warren. 
Alfred Bosworth, 
Thomas G. Turner. 

Oumberkntd, 
Fenner Brown, 
George L Dana. 
Olney Arnold, 
Mowry Taft. 

Ric/imand, 

Daniel Kenyon. 

Cranston. 
Charles Goodwin, 
Almoran Harris. 

Hopkinton* 
Welcome Collins. 



APPENDIX. 115 

Johnston. Barringtoru 

Granville S. Williams, Pardon Clarke. 
Alpheus F. Angell. Foster. 

North Providence. George R Hwkina 
Thomas Davis, Burrillville. 

Zelotes Wetherell, ^lisha Mathewson, 

Edwin Harris, Silas A. Comstock, 

Joseph B. Stone. 

Hon. Alfbed Bosworth, of Warren, Speaker. 
WiNGATE Hayes and Thomas Durfee, Esi^H Clerks. 



Report of the Committee to audit General Treasurer's 
accounts, and to transfer books, papers, &c. 

The committee appointed at the May session, to au- 
dit the accounts of Stephen Cahoone, late General 
Treasurer, for the year ending first day of May, 1851, 
and also to receive the books and papers pertaining to 
the office of General Treasurer, in the hands of said 
Cahoone, and the funds in the treasury, and deliver 
the same to Edwin Wilbur, his successor in office, re- 
spectfully Report : 

That they have attended to the duties of their ap- 
pointment, and after long and careful examination of 
the accounts of the General Treasurer, for the year 
commencing first of May, 1850, and ending May Ist, 
1851 ; and also the account from the 1st to the 13th 
of May, 1851, they found the same to be regularly and 
accurately stated and supported by proper vouchers, 
with the exception of an excess of ca^h, beyond the 
amount called for by the balance of the accounts, iis 
struck upon the books, which is more particularly re- 
ferred to in the close of this report. 

The committee also audited the accounts relative to 
the Touro Jewish Synagogue fund, and found the same 
to be correct, with the proper vouchers. They also 
examined the accounts of the Public Deposits, receiv- 
ed from the United States in 1837, and also the ac- 
count of the Permanent School fund, and found both 
to be correct in all respects. The committee further 
report that they have received from Stephen Cahoone, 
late General Treasurer, the books, papers and docu- 
ments appertaining to the office, and all funds and pro- 



116 APPENDIX. 

perty belonging to, or in charge of the State in his 
hands, as hereinafter stated, and delivered the same to 
his successor, Edwin Wilbur, agreeably to the resolu- 
tion of the (General Assembly : 

Schedule of the Cash property, &c., above referred 
to, viz. : 

3 bonds of the city of Providence, 

amounting to ;Sf58,402 60 

1 bond of the town of Newport, 10,800 00 

1 bond of the town of N. Providence, 1,200 00 

1306 shares in the Globe Bank, Providence, 66,308 19 

266 shares in the American Bank, Pro* 

vidence, 13,101 04 
732 shares in the Bank of North Amer- 
ica, Providence, 36,695 19 
30 shares in the Arcade Bank, Provi- 
dence, 1,534 25 
Balance in cash, 48 U8 
Due from the State, 194,245 88 

$382,335 2S 

Pennaneid School Ftmd. 

694 shares in Globe Bank, Providence. 
332 shares in Mechanics Bank, Providence. 

Touro Jetmh Si/nagoffiie Fund. 

30 shares in Manufacturers Bank, Providence. 

32 do. Merchants Bank, " 

3 do. Weybosset Bank, " 

10 do. Eoger Williams Bank, ^ 

24 do. Commercial Bank, " 

200 do. Blackstone Canal Bank, *^ 

21 do. Newport Bank, Newport 

18 do. Lime Rock Bank, Sn>ithfield. 
Unsettled balance in cash, $296 23 

Amount of cash received from S. Cahoone, late Gen- 
eral Treasurer, and paid over to Edwin Wilbur, Gene- 
ral Treasurer elect, viz. : 

The balance in the treasury on the first day 
of May, 1851, as appeals by the books ba- 
lanced to that day, $2,611 92 



APPENi:)IX. 117 

The excess beyond the above balance found 

in the treasury, 1st May, 1851, 5,310 88 

This amount received in the office 

after the 1st day of May, 1851, 

to the 13th of May, 1851, 4,446 74 

Deducting payments made during 

same period, viz, 2,326 38 

— 2,120 36 

Touro uniiivesied balance brought down, 295 23 

$10,338 39 

This amount, say ;|$fl0,338 39 was received, in the 
checks of the late General Treasurer, and the same 
were delivered to Edwin WDbur, General Treasurer, 
viz.: 
S. Cahoone, General Treasurer, check on 

Newport Bank, |118 78 

S. Cahoone, General Treasurer, check on 

Bank of North America, 176 45 

S. Cahoone, General Treasurer, check on 

Bank of North America, 6,326 16 

S. Cahoone, General Treasurer, check on 

Newport Bank, 3,717 00 

110,338 39 

Articles of Property leJmging to the State. 

The public Schedules} several volumes of State 
Laws, boimd and linbound ; nine chests, two trunks, 
and one case, containing papers filed, and blank forms ; 
one large table and carpet covering, and one screw 
press. 

The committee regret, that notwithstanding they 
liaye devoted twelve days to the examination and au- 
ditbg of the accounts^ they have been unable to detect 
the error, or errors, by which the cash in the treasury 
exceeds the balance, which the accounts themselves 
exhibii 

The committee have, however, detected several er- 
rors, which, taken together, slightly vary the excess of 
cash in the treasury, from the amount reported by the 
General Treasurer, at the May session. The commit- 
tee believe that this error must have originated in the 
^intentional omission to enter items of credit ; and 



118 APPENDIX. 

they entertain no doubt^ that a thorough examination 
of the books, which it was not in their power to make 
at this time and under their present appointment, will 
ultimately prove the error to have occurred in that 
way, or in some similar mistake, or omission. 

The committee deem it to be nothing more than an 
act of simple justice, to say, that notwithstanding the 
very advanced age of Mr. Cahoone, the late General 
Treasurer, and the severe indisposition he labored un- 
der for nearly the whole of the past year, the duties 
of the offloe L,e been weU iJ^ ^ wiftthe 
same stern and unwavering fidelity that characterized 
all his official conduct during the ten consecutive years 
he held the office. 

The committee consider it to be not altogether out 
of place for them now and here, to urge upon the Gren- 
eral Assembly the indispensable necessity there is for 
the creation of the office of Auditor of Accounts. — 
The great security the State would derive from the 
services of such an officer, not only against frauds, but 
against unintentional errors and mistakes of every 
kind, must be so obvious to every business man, as to 
render an argument in favor of establishing such an 
office altogether unnecessary. 

We have now presented a striking and impressive 
instance, directly in point If Stephen Cahoone, the 
late General Treasurer, had not been a man of tried 
and acknowledged integrity, he might have appropri- 
ated to his own use, the large amount of money found 
in the treasury over and above the cash balance his 
accounts exhibited, without the fact, in all probability 
ever coming to the knowedge of at least this General 
Assembly. 

The committee regret that the previous engage- 
ments of their colleague. Senator Porter, were such as 
to prevent his uniting with them in the discharge of 
the duties assigned to them by the resolution of the 
Assembly. 

H. Y CRANSTON, 
THOS. R. HUNTER 

Newport, 31st May, 1851. 

Received of Stephen Cahoone, late General Treas- 
urer, by the hands of the above named Committee, 



APPENDIX. 119 

Messrs. H. Y. Cranston and T. R Hunter, the books, 
papers, and other public property, and the checks of 
o. Cahoone, for ten thousand three hundred and thir^ 
tj-eight dollars and thirty-nine cents, as -within set 
forth and described, and have given him a receipt for 
the same- EDWIN WILBUR, 

General Treasurer. 
Newport, 31st May, 1851. 



< 



INDEX- 



Accounts allowed, .... 103-110 

Acts and resolotions heretofore passed, act in relation to, 45 

Advent Church in Bristol, resolution relating to, 68 
Additional appropriation for certain improvements in 

North and South Court streets, Providence, 111 
Adjournment, vote of, - - • - 112 
A. H. Adams, agent, account with Providence and Paw- 
tucket Turnpike, received, - - - 111 
Armory at East Greenwich, resolution relating to, .» .. 68 

Bacon I. and wife, leave to adopt child, - - 89 
Ballon L. T., and C. Miner, liberated, and fine and costs 

remitted, ----- 92 
Ball Samuel, Jr., discharged from recognizance, - 90 
Bank, Wakefield, to have money refunded, - 63 
Bank of America, act incorporating, amended, - 62 
Bank, Granite, taxes remitted, - - - 62 
Bank, Granite, limitation of actions against, - - 63 
Barney R, jury fine remitted, - - - 9L 
Births, marriages and deaths, act to provide for the reg- 
istration of, ..... 4 
Billings H. B., jury fine remitted, - - - 92 
Blake E. L., administrator, leave to sell real estate, 79 
Brown D. A., restored, .... 92 
Brown EL O., liberated^ .... 96 
Butler Hospital, act relative to, - - • 13 
Butler Hospital for flie Insane, act relative to, - 14 

Capital punishment, act abolishing, - - 12 
Card Joshua P., money refunded, - - - 98 
Central Baptist Church and Society, in Tiverton, incor- 
porated, - . - - - - 70 
Charter of Central Baptist, Tiverton, - - 70 
11 



122 INDXZ. 



1 



Charter of Chestnut St Methodist Society, Providence, 

amended, .... 67 

" Q^uidnic Baptist Society in Coventry, - 6S 
'' Second Universalist Society, in Providence, 

amended, - • - . 76 
'* Unitarian Congregational Church, Newport, 

amended, .... 75 
" United Congregational Church, Barrington, 

amended, .... 76 
'< Glocester Evangelical Congregational Socie^ 

ty, amended, .... 74 

'* First Baptist Society in Olnejrville, amended, 72 
" First Universalist Society in Providence, 

amended, - • - - 73 | 

'' Pawtucket Library Association, - - 63 

'' Protection Fire Engine Co. No. 6, Newport, 77 
Chestnut Street Methodist Society, Providence, charter 

amended, ..... 67 
Civil Officers, act in relation to the election of, - 16 
Civil Officers, act explaining, - « « 35 
Clarke Pittmond Y., discharged from recognizance, 90 
Conmiissioner, Street, Newport, to lay flag stones, 8 \ 
Courts of Common Pleas, act relating to, - - 10 
Crimes and punishments, act concerning, . . 7 
Commissioner's Report, resolution relating to the publi- 
cation of, ..... 67 
Committee on Indian AlSairs, resolution relating to, 68 
Cottrell J. S., guardian, authorized to sell, - - 85 
Crout Antonio L., discharged from recognizance, - 91 « 
Cummings Ellen, liberated, ... 94 

Directors return and report of Commissioners of Provi- 
dence and Worcester Railroad, accepted and order- 
ed on file, - . *. - - 111 

Election Law, printing and distribution of, - 68 

First Universalist Society in Providence, leave to in- 
crease tax, ..... 73 

First Baptist Society in Olneyville, charter and articles 

amended, ..... 72 

.Fishery in Pawcatuck River, act to regulate. - 9 



IRPSL 123 

Fishery in Point Judith Ponds, act regulating, - 100 

Francis John, restored, - - * - 92 

Gloeester Evangelical Congregational Society, act in- 
corporating, amended, - - • - 74 
Granite Bank, taxes remitted, - - - 62 
Granite Bank, limitation of actions against, - - 63 
Greene William H., discharged from recognizance, 90 

Handy R., convict, liberated, • - - 94 

Hazard G. B., authorized to release dower, - 88 

Hazard Stanton, for relief, - - - - 98 

Henry Thomas, administrator, authorized to sell, - 86 

Holidays, certain, legalized, ... 3 

Holt William, convict, liberated, - - - 96 

Insane paupers, act relating to, - <* - 6 

Invitation to Kossuth, - - - - 66 

King Richmond R., liberated, - - - 97 
Kossuth, Gov. L., resolution invitmg to visit Rhode- 
Island, ----- 55 
Kossuth, messenger to, - - • - 56 

Laws of the State and of the United States, act direct- 
ing the recording and distributing of, - - 10 
littlefield John A., discharged from recognizance, 91 
Laughery A., liberated, • - ^ - 93 

Manchester Comfort, guardian, authorized to sell, 82 

Map of the State, resolution relative to, - - 61 

McGier, J., convict, liberated, - - - 96 

McWhorter, T., liberated, - - - 93 

Messenger, with invitation to Gov. Kossuth, - 56 
Methodist Society, Chestnut street, Providence, charter 

amended, . - - . , 67 

Middow William, liberated, - - - 84 

Moore A. D., restored, - . - - - 93 

Moran M., convict, liberated, - - - 96 

Mutual Fire Insurance Companies, act in relation tOi 8 

Newspapers, resolution allowing additional pay to, 58 



124 naaoL 

North Providence, act anthorizing town council to es- 
tablish bridewells, .... 42 

O'Brien John, liberated, . • . . 

Ordnetnce and military stores, resolution relative to, 
Oysters and other Shell Fish, act for the preserva- 
tion of, • • • • • 

Pawtucket Library Association, incorporated, 
Pawtuxet Street Christian Society, name changed, 
Peckham Samuel W., expenses reimbursed, 
Peckham J. C. & Co., license extended, 
Peckham E. T., deeds confirmed, 
Phillips P. A. d& H. M., authorized to sell, 
Point Judith Ponds, act regulating the fishery in, 
Poor persons imprisoned for torts. 
Potter M. E. and E. R., trustee, authorized to sell, 
Protection Fire Engine Company, No. 5, Newport, in- 
corporated, • . • . • 
Providence county jail, duties of keeper, 
Providence and Plainfield Railroad, act relating to, 
Prudence, Patience and Hope, act to prevent shooting 
in the islands of, • . • • 

duidnic Baptist Society in Coventry, incorporated, 

Ralph Joseph, liberated, .... 

Rawson James G., name changed. 

Recording and distributing the laws of the State and of 

the U. States, act directing the, • . 10 

Registration of births, marriages and deaths, act to pro- 
vide for, . • . . . 4 

Resolution relating to visit of Gov. Kossuth, - 56 

Report of committee to inspect ferries, accepted and or- 
dered on file, . • • . .111 

Report of clerks of Supreme and Common Pleas Courts, 

recefved, .* . . . . .Ill 

Report of Conmfissioners on boundary between Rhode 

Island and Massachusets, accepted, • .111 

Report of committee on Indian Affairs, accepted, . HI 

Report of committee on improvements of State House, 

Providence, accepted, . . . .110 



96 


66 


36 


63 


100 


99 


97 


80 


82 
100 1 


10 ^ 


85 


77 


14 


40 ' 

1 


• 


65 


95 


99 



IHDIEZ. 125 

Report of Commissioner of Public Schools, (pamphlet, 
attached.) 

Salisbury M. S., administrator, leave to sell, . 84 
Saunders J., convict, liberated, ... 95 
Saunders Arnold, name changed, ... 99 
School Commissioner's Report, (pamphlet attached.) 
Seal for Supreme Court, Newport county, . . 102 
Seal of the State, act in relation to, . .12 
Second Universalist Society, Providence, act incorpo- 
rating, amended, . . • .' 76 
Secretary of State to furnish election districts in Smith- 
field, and ward clerks in Providence, with the pub- 
lic acts since 1844, .... 59 
Secretary of State authorized to procure copies of Ap- 
pendix to Report on State Debt, • . 60 
Smiih J. S., restored, .... 93 
Snow E., natural guardian, authorized to sell, . 83 
Special Courts of Common Pleas, jurisdiction of, en- 
larged, .••.•• 3 
Spink Lucy Ann, leave to adopt child, . . 88 
Spirit rations in the navy of the U. States, resolutions 

relative to the abolishing of, • . . 60 
State House, in Newport, appropriation to improve the 

grounds around, • • • . 59 
State Library, resolutions in relation to, . .59 

Stevens Benjamin, license extended, . • 98 

Stonington Railroad, act in relation to, . • 5 

Theatrical exhibitions, act relative to, • . 13 
Town Council of Newport, act giving additional pow- 
ers to, • • . • • • 45 
Town Councils of North Providence and Cranston, to 

establish sidewalks, .... 41 
Town Councils to hold burial lots, . . 9 
Town Officers, act in relation to the election and du- 
ties of, •.•••. 36 
Titus W. E., liberated, .... 96 
Turner Thomas G., administrator, authorized to sell, 87 

Unitarian Congregational Church, Newport, act incor- 
porating, amended, . • . .75 



126 iin>BZ. 

United Congregational Society, Barrington, act incorpo- 
rating, amended, • . . .76 

Universalist Society, Second, Providence, act incorpo- 
rating, amended, ..... 76 

Updike John, restored, .... 92 

Visit of Gov. Kossuth, appropriation for, . . 56 

Wakefield Bank, to have money refunded, . • 63 

Weighers and weighing cotton, act providing for, • 6 

Wheeler Sarah B. B., name changed, . . 100 

Wiggin J. M. and wife, leave to adopt child, 89 



( 



\ 



1 



APPENDIX. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

COMMISSIONER OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 



To^HE Honorable General Assembly: 

The subscriber herewith presents the abstracts of the returns 
of the Public Schools, for the year ending May, A. D. 1861. 

By these returns it appears that the number of children at- 
tending school was — 

Males ..... 14,133 

Females .... 12,521 

Total - . - 26,654 

The amount of money received and expended, wa»— 

Received from the State Treasury, $36,167 69 , 

Raised by towns, 65,488 69 

Raised by assessments on scholars, 10,076 39 

Received from the registry tax which is ) g^or ^o 

appropriated by law to schools, ) ' 

Unexpended of last year's money, 3,235 17 

Total, . . - $110,294 14 



Expended for support of schools, $94,471 96 

It further appears that there was expended for the erection 
and repairs of school houses during that year, $23,902 80. 

Of the thirty-one townships into which the State is divided, 
four, viz : Providence, Newport, Bristol and Warren, are not 



2 APPENDIX, 

divided into corporate districts, and in these the whole man- 
agement of the schools is under the care of the town's com- 
mittees, or superintendents. 

One town, viz : East Greenwich, is divided into districts, 
but the school houses were provided for all the districts at the 
expense of the town under the provision of law authorizing it. 

The remainder of the towns are divided into districts which 
by the law are authorized to organize themselves as corporate 
bodies, and nearly all of the districts have availed themselves 
of this right, and regulate their own affairs, subject to such 
rules and regulations as may be made by the town's commit- 
tees. 

It will also appear from the returns, that nearly all these 
districts have school houses belonging to the district as their . 
corporate property. Very few of the districts now depend up- 
on the old proprietors' school houses. In many cases they 
have been purchased by the district and repaired. The work 
of building and repairing is still going on, and every year adds 
to the number of good comfortable school houses in our coun- 
try districts. 

The whole number of teachers employed in the public 
schools for the year ending May, 1851, was — 

Males, ..... 256 

Females, - - - - 313 



Total, - - - 569 

It is gratifying to perceive from the returns, that the preju- 
dice which formerly existed against the employment of female 
teachers, seems to be dying away. The same result has been 
experienced in other States. In Massachusetts, the number of 
female teachers employed, increased from 3.591, in 1837, to 
4997 in 1845. If school officers and parents support the schools 
as they ought, female teachers would find no difficulty in gov- 
erning them.*. 



*NoTB — ^The following excellent remarks of Bishop Potter, on the advantages of 
employing female teachers, are from the " School and School Master." 

Preqitentt^umgeqf Teacher8.^-T[i\8 is a subiectof almost universal complaint.— 
The evil arose, at first, from the fact that schools were kept open but a part of each 
year; and more recently, it has resulted from the prevailing practice of hiring male 
teachers in winter, and females in summer. 

It is impoBsibie to overrate the evils of sach a course. The buaoess of cdocation 
is essentially progressive. It consists of a series of processes, the latter depend tog 
upon the earlier, and requiring, therefore, to be conducted, within certain limits, on 
the same principles, and by the same methods. But. in the present state of our 
schools hardly any two teachers have the same methods. No opportunity is afforded 
the one who succeeds to become acquainted with the state of the school, and with 
the methods of his predecessor, by actual observation. The one has gone, before the 
other arrives. He enters the school, a stranger to the children and to their pD.t»it^ 



APPENDIX. 



DEAF AND DUMB. 

The following are the names of the persons who have re- 
ceived the benefit of the appropriation from its commence- 
ment : 

Age when 

admitted. Entered. Left. 

Fanny Lamphear, Hopkiaton, 26, May, 1845, May, 1846. 

Abigail Slocum, Portsmouth, 25, May, 1845, May, 1847. 

Peleg Slocum, Portsmouih, 20. May, 1845, May, 1847. 

Mary E. Slocum, Portsmouth, 14, May, 1845, May, 1847. 

James Budlong, Warwick, 20, Aug. 1845. May, 1847. 

Charles H. Steers, Glocester, 15, May, 1846, May, 1850. 

Fhebe A. Winsor, Johnston, 8, May, 1846. 

John W. Davenport, Tiverton, 13, May, 1847. 

Samuel W. Thompson, Glocester, 11, May, 1847. 

Mary E. Tanner, Coventry, 10, May, 1847. 

Minerva Mowry, Smithfield, 13, May, 1848, May, 1851. 

Samuel G. Greene, Hopkinton, 11, July, 1849, Aug. 1851. 

George Gavit, Westerly, 10, May, 1850. 

The orders on the General Treasurer for their support have 
been — 

June 27,1846, 8479 17 

August 21, 1847, 600 GO 

June 30,1848, 450 00 

January 28, 1850, 933 33 

January 21, 1851, 700 00 

Decern. 21, 1851, 625 00 

Total, $3,787 60 



unaoqnalnted with (he relative prosperitv and aptitude of the different scholars, ig* 
Donint of the course which was pursued by former teachers, and with the prospect, 
probably, of retiring himself, attne end of three or four monttis. Is it not evident 
that the prog^ss of the school must be arrested, until he can learn his position 1 As 
each teacher is apt to be tenacious of his own system, is it not also evident that after 
having arrested the work which his predecessor began, he wiU in many cases, pro- 
ceed to ando it 7 Thus the children will often spend the whole period of his stay, 
in retracing their studies in a new book, or according to a new method. There will 
be movement, but no progress. 

The effect, on the teacher, must be equally bad. This practice makes him, in truth, 
little better than a vsgrant. He can have no fixed residence, since the period for 
which he engages is never over a ^ear and rarely over four months ; and even, in 
these cases. It is liable to be curtailed by the caprice of his employers or the arbitrary 
interference of the trustees. He of course cannot marry. He has little ambition to 
forma character; his employment occupies without improving him; and, in most 
cases, he either hastens to leave it, or becomes a contented but useless drone. Can 
we wonder that there are few good teachers under such a system. 

Is there any remedy for such an evil 7 We believe there is. The apologv for thia 
constant change is, that the district cannot support a good male teacher, throughout 
the year. They must either close the school during the summer or have it taught 
by a female. Then we say, let it be taught by a female throughout the year. ThQ 



4 APPENDIX. 

The beneficiaries of this State have been sent to the "Amer- 
ican Asylum at Hartford, for the Education and Instruction 
of the Deaf and Dumb." The time for admission of pupils is 
the third Wednesday of September, in every year. The 
charge is $100 per annum. In case of sickness, extra charges 
are made. Persons applying for admission, must be between 
the ages of eight and twenty-five years ; must be of good nat- 
ural intellect, capable of forming and joining letters with a 
pen legibly and correctly ; free from immorahties of conduct 
and from contagious disease. The charge for board includes 
washing, fuel, lights, stationery and tuition. No deductions 
are made for absence, except on account of sickness. 



sum which is now divided between the two teachers would pay a female handsomely 
fur the whole year, and thus supersede the necessity of cloanff the school at all, ex- 
cept for a vacation of three or four weeks. 

The advantages of the course would be various. Ist. It would give to the schol- 
ars the advantage of having the same instructress throughout one entire year at 
least ; and if she proved worthy of the chargOi she conld hardly iail during that time 
BO to cnUst the anections of the children, the good will of the parents ana the confi- 
dence of the trustees, as to be secure of a renewed engagement. Thus we should 
gradually return to the good old practice of permanent schools, under permanent in* 
structors. 

2d. It would be a cheap system. The best qualified female teachers in common 
schools, would be glad to accept what is now paid to men of the poorest capacity. 

3d. It would secure teachers of higher intellectual capacity and qualification. — 
Women have a native tact in the management of very young minds, which is rarely 
-possessed by men. The prospect also of permanent employment at a fair rate of 
compensation, would induce many young women of narrow means to prepare them - 
selves for teaching ; and it will hanlly be disputed that with limited opportunities as 
to time and money, they would make greater proficiency in knowledge and the art 
of teaching, than young men having onlv the same opportunities. It should be con- 
sidered also that the prcspect of profitable employment would awaken competition, 
and in this way higher qualifications would bo secured. 

4th. It would furnish a desirable resource and a useful as well as respectable mode 
xrf life to many females, who are cast upon the world without property. 

5th. It would conduce to the improvement of manners and morals in schools, 
isince females attach more Importance to these than men : and they have a peculiar 
power of awakening the sympathies cf children, and inspiring them with a desire to 
excel. 

6th. It would diminish the number of select schools, since many of these are 
taught by women, whose services would then be required in common schools; and 
these schools would also be less necessary, than at present, for very young children. 

But can you propose, seriously (some one will say,) that timid and delicate 
^omcn should retain charge, through the winter, of country schools, in which large 
and rude boys are congregated? 

This forms the only objection, which can be plausibly urged against this plan^ 
and it is one which deserves full and respectful consideration. I would remark in 
regard to it, 

Ist. That it is by no means so formidable as it might appear at first thought, [t 
is now admitted that in the government of schools, moral infiuence should Ix; aub- 
Btituted, as far as possible, in place of mere coercion, and that corporeal punishment 
should be reserved for young children, and be applied but very rarely even to them. 
It is admitted, too, that the teacher ought to aim, first of all, to cultivate the higher 
sentiments of our nature, to awaken self-respect, and to induce the child to become 
a law to himself. If this be true (and few will be disp^wd to question it,) then it 
must follow that women, are in most respects, pre* eminently qualified to administer 
such a discipline. Their very delicacy and helplessness give them a peculiar claim 
to deierence and respectAil consideration ; and this claim large boys, who are as* 



APPENDIX. 



THE BLIND. 



The following persons have received the benefit of our State^ 
appropriation for the blind : — 



William Hatch, Bristol, 

Oliver Caswell, Jamestown, 

Elizabeth Eddy, Warren, 

Charles Coddington, Newport, 

Maria Dunham, Newport, 

Marcia Thurber, Providence, 

Alexander Kenyon, S. Kingstown, October, 1847, 

William' Tallowficld, Providence, Novem. 1849, 

James H. Graham, Newport, May, 1850. 

Elizabeth Dennely, S. Kingstown, October, 1S51. 



Entered. 

January, 1845, 
January, 1845, 
January, 1845, 
March, 1846, 
March, 1846, 
June, 1846, 



Left. 



January, 1851. 
January, 1848. 



June, 1847. 
Novem. 1850. 



The payments 6n account have been — 

June 13, 1848, 

February 15, 1850, 
December 1, 1851, 



$1,100 00 

950 00 

1,500 00 



Total, $3,550 00 

The beneficiaries of this State have heretofore been sent to 
the Perkins Institution and Massachusetts Asylum for the 
Blind, at Boston. The charge at that Institution is $160 per 
amium, which covers board, washing, medicine, use of books, 
musical instruments, and all expenses except clothing and 
travelling expenses. Pupils must be under fifteen when ad- 



pirin^ to be men. can hardly fail to recognize. I need not add that they are honora- 
bly distinguishea from the other sex by warm aflfections, by greater faith in human 
nature, and in its capacity for good, and by disinterested and untiring zeal in behalf 
of objects that tliey love. Says the present chief magistrate of this State, (Gov. 
Seward of New lorlc,) "He it seems to me is a dull observer, who has not learned 
that It was the intention of the Creator to commit to them a higher and greater por- 
tion of responsibility in the education of youth of both sexes. They are the natural 
^ardians of the young. Their abstraction from the engrossing cares of life affords 
tnera leisure both to acquire and communicate knowledge. FYoro them the young 
more willingly receive it, because the severity of discipline is relieved with greater 
tenderness and affections, while their more quick apprehension, enduring patience, 
expansive benevolence, higher purity, more delicate taste, and elevated moral feel- 
ing, qualify them for excellence in all departments of learning, except, perhaps tha 
exact sciences. If this be true, how many a repulsive, bigoted, and indolent pro> 
fessor will, in the general improvement of education, be compelled to resign his claim 
to modest, assiduous and anectlonata woman. And how many conceited preten- 
ders, who may wield the rod in our common schools, without the knowledge of hu- 
man nature requisite for its discreet exercise, too indolent to improve, and too proud 
to discharge their responsible duties, will be driven to seek subsistence elsewhere," 
— Sdvoal and SchodimasUr, 

" A roan may keep a diilicult school by means of authority and physical force : a 
woman can do it only by dignity of character, affection, and such a superiority in 
attainment, as is too conspicuous to be questioned.— £r(;race Alann. 



r 



6 APPENDIX 

mitted, and of good character ; free from epilepsy or auy con* 
tagious disease ; and the friends of the applicant are required 
to answer certain queries respecting his age, and the cause and 
degree of his blindness, and to furnish an obligation that when 
discharged he shall be removed without expense to the Insti- 
tution. If possible, pupils should be taught the letters before 
going to the Institution. Books in raised letters for the blind, 
can be procured there, 

IDIOTS AND IMBECILES. 

The only person who has yet received the benefit of this 
appropriation, is James Lee, of Providence, The sum of $200 
has been paid to the Institution at Boston, for his support from 
October, 1850, to October, 1852, by an order on our Treasury, 
dated December 21, 1861. Two others have lately been 
placed upon the list^ but no payments yet made on their cu^- 
count. 

Appended to this report will be found the number of the In- 
sane, Idiots, Deaf and Dumb, and Blind, in every town, taken 
from the census. The number of these, however, as reported 
by Thomas R. Hazard, Esq., who, under authority of the 
Legislature, examined into the subject, is much greater, viz : 

Number of Insane in the State, 282 

Idiots, ' 136 

Blind, 60 

Deaf and Dumb, 64 

Of the insane and idiots, Mr. Hazard found one half in the 
condition of paupers, dependent upon the towns for support. — 
But it is believed that even Mr. Hazard's enumeration is not 
complete. Families are sometimes unwilling to have misfor- 
tunes like these exposed to the public. The census takers, 
perhaps, do not always enquire for them, and sometimes their 
enquiries may have been evaded. 

The thorough revision and codification of our School laws 
made the past year, it is believed will have a very favorable 
effect. The principal changes are such as are calculated to 
facilitate the collection of school taxes, and to remove doubts 
and ambiguities which had arisen relating to construction. — 
The ambiguity of some provisions, and the diflSculty of col- 
lecing a tax, were calculated to produce frequent lawsuits, 
and these often led to frequent quarrels in a district, resulting 
in great injury to the schools. It is believed, that under the 
new law, there will be less opportunity for these hereafter. — 



I 



APPENDIX. 7 

Otherwise the new law is principally a condensing and con-^ 
soiidation of the old ones. 

Although in revising our school laws, we have had the ben- 
efit of several years experience under our last law, and of 
the suggestions and criticisms of many friends of education in 
different parts of the State, and it was for two years before the 
Legislature, examined by committees and amended at various 
times by both houses, yet we are not to expect perfection in 
it. It seems almost impossible for human ingenuity to frame 
a law which shall be free from all ambiguity. The law is ne- 
cessarily a long one, resulting from the various circumstances 
of different sections of the State, for all of which it was neces- 
sary to provide; but the index accompanying it is believed to 
be very complete, so that any one may find any part ot it 
without difficulty. The law, in conformity to a resolution of 
the Legislature, was immediately published. It was accom- 
panied with very full notes and remarks on the duties of dif- 
ferent officers under it, and the proper manner of performing 
them, and with forms for transacting all ordinary school busi- 
ness. It is believed that these remarks and forms have been, 
and will continue to be, the means of preventing much litiga- 
tion. 

The provision in the law by which the Commissioner is 
authorized to hear appeals and decide disputed cases, has also 
tended materially to diminish the number of lawsuits. These 
cases of appeal have been quite nuiherous, and have been de- 
cided as the law reqmres, without cost to the parties. The 
members of the bar have rendered important service to the 
cause of education, by discouraging litigation in cases growing 
out of the school law. 

A revision of our general law for the assessing and collec- 
tion of taxes, would contribute much towards preventing of 
difficulties in school districts. 

Many of the towns have appointed superiutendents, or some 
one person to perform the duty of visiting the schools. This 
duty, if divided among a large committee, is seldom attended 
to : and even if not neglected, it cannot be so well done as by 
a single person. 

By a provision in our new law, school committees are au- 
thorized to cause their reports to be printed. It is desirable 
that the committee in every town should avail themselves of 
this right. A full statement of the expenditures of school 
moneys, an account of all the schools, with remarks upon the 
school houses, the teachers, their qualifications and mode of 
teaching, should be printed and placed in every dwelling house 
in the town. It would tend to keep up interest in the schoolss, 



8 APPENDIX. 

and to awaken interest in some quarters where they are now 
neglected* 

MEANS OP raPROVTNG THE SCHOOLS. 

It is interesting to look back upon the condition of our 
schools a few years ago, and consider what a great change has 
been wrought amongst us. A few years since, we were in a 
state of comparative indiflference to education — at least a large 
portion of the community was so. Now, we see everywhere 
the evidences of increasing interest. Nearly all our villages 
and the greater part of our country districts have been supplied 
with new and improved scliool houses. EflForts are generally 
made to secure better qualified teachers, and meetings of teach- 
ers and of parents are held to aid and encourage each other in 
this good work. 

But of all the means designed to promote the cause of sound 
education, there is none more important than the improvement 
of the teachers themselves. We may build fine school houses 
and collect the children together in them. If the teacher is 
not what he ought to be, all previous trouble and expense is 
thrown away. They will be as a body without a soul. On 
the other hand, we may have poor school houses and a poor 
and uneducated people ; send die good teacher among them, 
and his influence is soon felt. As is the teacher, so is the 
school. 

It is a serious truth, that there are many sections of our coun- 
try, and perhaps some districts in all parts of the State, where 
the great body of the people do not seem to know the differ- 
ence between a poor school and a good one. They have been 
so long taught by the dunces who have been sent among us 
from abroad, and who took a school because they could do 
nothing else, or came here to keep school because they could 
not get one where they were better known, that they have 
no idea of anything better than what they have been used 
to. 

Now what is wanted in such places ? First of all, there 
-canst be a feeling of deficiency, and a desire to improve. Then 
Ihey should not only choose a good school committee, but 
should let them understand that they are to be supported in 
making strict examinations, in rejecting the poor teachers — 
however many friends they may have — and in raising the 
standard of qualification. There are some powers belonging' 
to school committees, such as settling of district boundaries, 
location of school houses, &c., about the exercise of which, 
there may be an allowable difference of opinion : but, about 



APPENDIX 9 

this, the requiring of strict examinations, there should be but 
one opinion. Even when there is a well qualified committee, 
difficulty frequently arises from their endeavouring to accom- 
modate themselves to circumstances and the stale of popular 
feeling, from lowering the standaird to suit some particular 
district where the candidate proposes to keep. Of course, dis- 
cretion is always to be used, but it were as well, perhaps bet- 
ter, that some of our country districts should have been with- 
out schools for years, than be taught by such teachers as they 
have had — teachers who could only make stupidity more 
stupid. 

Teachers themselves for the credit of their profession, 
should mark and discoimtenance the dunces and quacks who 
dishonor it. 

The means of improving in the art of teaching have been 
so multiplied within a few years, that there is now but little 
excuse for committees or trustees in employing incompetent 
teachers, or, for the teachers themselves in not improving. — 
We have no Normal School it is true, but we have numerous 
High Schools and Academies. And then we have the Teachers' 
Institute, where for a week or more at a time, they may re- 
ceive instruction without money and without price, from the 
most able instructors of this and other States. The State 
pays for the instruction, the inhabitants of the villages gener- 
ously entertain them Our best teachers generally attend as 
many of these meetings as they can find time for. It is a 
pleasure as well as profit to them. Yet, although held in all 
parts of the State and almost brought to their very doors, 
there is a large number of teachers who never attend any. If 
they are poor teachers, they will probably remain so. Poor 
they may be m worldly goods ; they will probably remain so. 
Heaven helps those who help themselves. 

I shall devote a portion of this report to considering what 
teachers may do to improve themselves, and what they may 
do to improve the community around them. Some of the top- 
ics may be trite, yet it is a subject which needs and justifies 
repetition and on which too much cannot be said. 

The teacher should not think that he is doing his duty by 
merely spending the allotted time in the school room and 
hearing recitations in their prescribed order. To make a good 
teacher requires considerable energy of character, and he who 
has it not should endeavor to cultivate and acquire it. With- 
out it, he cannot succeed in teaching or in any other business. 
He should put his whole soul into his business, whatever it is 
for the time being. Whatever his hands find to do,iie should 
do it with all his might. By applying himself energetically 



10 APPENDIX, 

to any pursuit, even if it be a merely temporary one, he is cul- 
tivating habits and acquiring a force of character which will 
not only contribute to his happiness but to his success in all 
future pursuits. And by going through the routine of a school 
drowsily, and as if it was a mere task that he wishes to get 
rid of as speedily as possible, he is acquiring habits which will 
surely prevent success in future undertakings. 

A teacher should devote himself to his work heartily and 
with enthusiasm and energy, if he were to consider only his 
chances for pecuniary success in life. The greater part of our 
teachers are looking to some other employment a few years 
hence for a livelihood. They follow teaching a few years 
and then take up some other business or profession. For op- 
portunities of getting into business they have to depend most- 
ly on their previous reputation. And if a young man has 
been a teacher and has shown a listlessness and carelessness 
about his business, no desire to improve himself and no capac- 
ity to benefit his scholars, if he has been a poor teacher, it 
will be a very poor recommendation to those who might be 
willing to employ him in other business. He who from the 
causes I have mentioned, is unsuccessful as a teacher, will 
probably prove unsuccessful from the same causes in every 
thing else. 

One of the most distinguished men of Rhode Island in a 
discourse a few years ago observed, that " no teacher is fit to 
have a scholar unless he is able to make his mark upon him."* 
There is so much meaning condensed into this short sentence 
that it might serve as a text for a long discourse. 

A temptation which especially besets a good teacher — one 
who is desirous of improving, is the tendency to adopt some 
particular theory or mode of teaching, to the exclusion of all 
others — in other words, to have a hobby. Some degree of en- 
ergy and enthusiasm is absolutely necessary to constitute a 
good teacher, but the very possession of this enthusiasm with- 
out considerable discretion and judgment, will sometimes 
prove a stumbling block in the way of a teacher's usefulness. 
They have seen that there is a defect in some old mode of 
teaching — they have perhaps been in some school where some 
particular mode of teaching was practiced with good effect. 
It becomes a favorite with them, and without allowing for 
difference of circumstances, they adopt it at all times and pla- 
ces ; they make a hobby of it. 

This is particularly to be guarded against, and especially at 
the present day, when the public attention has been aroused 
to the subject of education and the community in consequence 

♦Dr. Waylaod. 



APPENDIX. 11 

swarms with theorists and took makers, who take advantage 
of the excitement for their own interest, and whose interest it 
is in too many cases, to rim down old modes and usages, siib- 
•tituting newer, but not better ones. 

A good teacher when he goes into a district which has been 
blessed with a good school, and where the people understand 
and appreciate its advantages, may find perhaps for awhile, 
little more to do than to continue on in the course already 
marked out. But even here, constant exertion is necessary. 
In the best districts, zeal for the interests of ediu^ation will oc- 
casionally decline. Human nature is so- constituted, that we 
seldom properly appreciate those advantages which we con- 
stantly enjoy. We must be occasionally deprived of them, or 
we must see the condition of others who do not enjoy them and 
be able to compare it with our own, in order to realize their 
Value. 

In a large portion of our districts, the good teacher finds that 
there is so much to be done, that it requires a great deal of 
discretion to know how to commence his work. By under- 
taking too much, he often defeats his purpose. But if he has 
the proper degree of zeal tempered with judgment, he can do 
a great deal. For those who desire to be useful in their day 
and generation, and who do not make the profession a mere 
matter of money, the opportunities of doing good will be con- 
stantly occuiring. The field of labor is vast, and it will al- 
ways remain open. For^each new generation the same work 
is to be done. 

Perhaps in a great many districts which have not been 
highly favored, the good teacher can best commence the work 
of reform by letting the people see the difference between a 
good teacher and a poor one. There are too many of our dis- 
tricts where the people have no knowledge of what a good 
teacher can do. They have got the notion that almost any 
body can teach small children, and that any blockhead is fit 
to teach A, B, C. Among all the errors on the subject of edu- 
cation, there is none more fatal. Now, here let the good teach- 
er show his capacity. He may have a poor house and but 
few scholars and many other discouragements to contend with. 
But let him show the people what a good teacher can do, and 
he will find them gradually beginning to sympathise with 
him. Our people are a shrewd, sensible people, and they on- 
ly want to be convinced that there is a real improvement, that 
there is something in it, (to use the common phrase,) and they 
will join in the movement and aid it along. Let a teacher 
once establish his influence in this way, by showing them that 
he is a good teacher, that he deserves their confidence, and ey- 
ery thing else is easy of accomplishment. 



12 APPENDIX. 

But the teacher can do very httle without the co-operation of 
the parents in his district. If from any cause they are opposed 
to the school, he can do nothing ; if they are merely indiffer- 
ent or careless, he can do but little, compared with what he 
can effect if he has their hearty co-operation and support. — 
And this certainly is an object worth some pains and labor on 
his part. 

When there was no school system, the whole responsibility 
of supporting a school was thrown upon the parents in a neigh- 
borhood. At the proper season they were obliged to consult, 
and meet, and negotiate about the teacher and the school, and 
the means of supporting them. True, the duty was often neg- 
lected. But parents in such cases felt that the responsibility 
was on them. 

Now we have a system established by law. The State 
comes in by its officers and provides a teacher and a school, 
and supplies in some cases a part, in some, all of the funds for 
its support. And a large portion of the people, finding a school 
provided without any trouble or effort of their own, contract 
the habit of looking upon it with indifference, as if it was 
something with which they had nothing to do, or rather, as if 
it were something they felt safe and justified in shifting the re- 
sponsibility of on to other people's shoulders, the trustees, 
committees, &c. 

But a teacher can do a great deal himself towards awaken- 
ing a proper spirit in the parents in his district. He should 
try to cultivate the acquaintance of all of them, consult with 
them about the studies, the characters, and interests of their 
children. . 

The old system of boarding around had at least this advan- 
tage, that it of necessity as it were, brought about an acquaint- 
ance between the teachers and parents. And to some teach- 
ers, who are modest and reserved, and unused to society, and 
have not the faculty of making acquaintances, this might be a 
real good. At all events, the teacher should avoid confining 
his intimacy to a few, whoever they may be, for every district 
has its family jealousies, its political quarrels, its religious or 
irreligious variances, jealousies of trade and jealousies arising 
from difference in property; and it will be most unfortunate 
for the school, if the teacher by favoring any one set incurs the 
displeasure of another. 

Sometimes, if one set of men get the power and hire a teach- 
er, it is a sufficient reason for the other party to find fault with 
him. The teacher cannot be too careful in such a case. It 
will require some knowledge of the world, of human passions, 
and weaknesses ; and if he has it not, he must learn it, how- 
ever hard and disagreeable the acquisition of it may be. 



APPENDIX. 13 

The teacher may then, by proper means, secure the influ- 
ence of the parents in his favor ; and if he does, he will find 
his task comparatively easy and his burden light. The disci- 
pline of the school, which to a young and inexperienced teach- 
er, is always the most trying part of his labors, depends great- 
ly upon the parents. If the parents listen to and encourage the 
complaints of the children, it makes hard work for the teach- 
er ; and the parents, or rather the children, are themselves the 
losers. For if a large portion of the teacher's time is taken up 
in keeping in order a set of unruly boys, that time is taken 
from their instruction, and the teacher's mind is wearied and 
fretted, and unfitted for the proper discharge of his duties. If, 
on the other hand, after taking pains to get a good teacher, in- 
stead of looking out for faults, they would let the children 
know that if they received one whipping at school they should 
receive another at home, the discipline of the school would be 
made easy. 

Upon this subject of co-operation of parents in supporting 
the school, too much cannot be said. It is a serious, solemn 
duty. We have been so mu9h eujcustomed in arguing in 
favor of a system of public instruction, to address ourselves to 
mere motives of interest, by holding out to parents that a good 
education would tend to the worldly advancement of their 
children, and that it would save the pockets of the people so 
many dollars and cents now paid for the conviction and pun- 
ishment of crime, that we have overlooked the question of 
duty. 

Samuch has been done. within a few years past towards 
establishing systems of education in all the States, and such 
is the disposition every where manifested to look to the State 
for the education of the child, that some of the best friends of 
education m the Union have considered the tendency a dan- 
gerous one. God has established the parental relation ; he 
has placed upon the parent the responsibility for the bringing 
up of the child in the way it should go : but they too easily 
fall in with the fashion of the day, which is to throw upon 
the State all care, all responsibility, not only for the secular 
education, but for the moral training of the child. But grant- 
ing that there is this tendency and this danger, it is one from 
which the old system or no-system was not free ; and we 
should meet and counteract it by the most strenuous and ever 
continuing efforts; the teacher in the school and the teacher 
in the pulpit, and the friends of education everywhere, should 
censtandy inculcate the duty of the parent to educate the 
child. 



14 APPENDIX. 



STUDIES AND OBJECT Of EDUCATION, 

A teacher can do a great deal with his scholars to make the 
school pleasant as well as profitable to them, and to excite in 
them a love for study and for acquiring information. Besides 
attending to the ordinary studies which are pursued in our 
schools, and which are absolutely necessary in any system of 
education, he can from time to time, and without interfering 
with regular studies, communicate to them much information 
which will be useful to them in after life. He may make them 
acquainted with, the modes of carrying on the business of the 
world, the different trades, the various modes of makipg notes, 
receipts, accounts, &c, d&c, so much of physiology as to enable 
them to guard against sudden wounds and accidents. 

Again, the children in our schools are educating not for 
themselves or for their parents only, but they are to sustain re- 
lations to society at large. They are, perhaps, some, or all of 
them, to be in the course of their lives, town officers, magis- 
trates, jurors, judges, ministerial officers of the law and per- 
haps, law makers. Yet no knowledge of this sort is conveyed 
to the children in most of our schools, although the existence 
and good government of our republic depends upon it But 
they are left to pick it up little by little as they go through 
life. Now, a teacher in a few occsional lessons may convey a 
great deal of informaation which will be of use to them after- 
wards. He might also inform them of the different classes of 
crimes and the punishments provided for them by law, and of 
the various legal rights pertaining to the various relations of 
life. In all this sort of knowledge so necessary in a free gov- 
ernment, children generally get no instruction in the schools. 
Yet how much better fitted to discharge their duties as citi- 
zens, and how many troubles and misfortunes might be avoid- 
ed, were thev better and earlier taught. Men may acquire a 
great deal of this knowledge as they rub along through life, at 
meetings, at courts, <fcc. But females are shut out from these 
opportunities. They arc generally.completely ignorant of their 
legal rights : and the consequences are often serious to their 
interest and happmess. 

I am no advocate for crowding a great variety of studies 
into a school, or attempting to teach too much But while in 
some schools, perhaps enough of this collateral information, 
as it may be called, is already given, there are others, as we 
all know, wh 3re nothing at all is done but to hear lessons re- 
cited by rote from the spelling book, the geography and gram- 
mar. 



APPENDIX. 15 

There is no doubt too that in a great many cases children 
are shut up in school ^t too early an age. Their intellectual 
training is begun and carried on in advance of and out of all 
proportion to the physical and the moral. Dr. Johnson once 
inquired what became of all the clever children. 

There is more of this hurrying of education with us than 
among other nations, and it results from the circumstances 
of the country and the character of our people. A man here 
has finished his education and begun the practice of some 
trade or profession at an age when in the old countries he 
would be just leaving school for college. He is thrown up- 
on the world early and upon his own energies for support, 
and this no doubt leads to or at least encourages the forcing 
system which we are so apt to pursue with the youth b{ 
America. 

In deciding upon the number of studies and the amount 
of information to be given, circumstances and tlie discretion 
of the teacher must govern. We can lay down no invaria- 
ble rules. But we may be guided in the exercise of this 
discretion by considering the object and design of educa- 
tion. 

What then is the aim. of education, or rather what should 
it be? What does the parent — not every parent — but the. 
wise and judicious parent wish his children to be ? We 
should consider what is his destination or object of life upon 
earth — what is to be his destiny for eternity. We may 
probably sum it up by saying that the object should be to 
make him a useful and respectable member of society and to 
cnlttvate such habits and give him such information as will 
make him as happy here as the conditions of a world of trial 
and probation allow, and happy in the life to come. With 
the Romans and the ancients generally, the idea of educa- 
tion was to make a citizen useful to the State, and every 
thing was made subservient to this. , Modern civilization un- 
der the influence of Christianity, teaches us to consider the 
happiness of the individual as well as the good of society 
and to extend our aim beyond the present world. 

in this view, or in any view in fact which we may take 
of the subject, strength of mind should be regarded as one of 
the great objects of education* While the communication 
of information is one object, wf should not forget that anoth- 
er and not less important — perhaps the most important, is to 
discipline the mind, to learn the scholar to think for himself, 
tohabitaate him to meet and overcome difficulties; and that 



16 APPENDIX. 

it is only the knowledge which is well digested and made 
his own that is of much use to him. We may smooth dowa 
the dijSBlculties of learning, explain every thing and commu- 
nicate a great deal of knowledge, but unless the child's mind 
is set to work and exercised in the process, the knowledge 
will be lost nearly as soon as acquired. And it will even be 
worse than useless, for the child will be acquiring habits of 
mind, which will unfit it for intellectual exertion after- 
wards. 

" The History of England," says Sir Walter Scott, speak- 
ing of the modern practice of attempting to render every 
thing easy and amusing to children, << is now reduced to a 
game at cards. * ♦ ♦ There wants ^but one step further 
a^d the creed and the ten commandments may be taught in 
the same way. * ♦ ♦ It may in the mean time be a subject 
of serious consideration, whether those who are accustomed 
only to acquire instruction through the medium of amuse- 
ment, may not be brought to reject that which approaches 
under the aspect of study, &;c." 

One of our objects, then, should be to produce mental 
power, and to teach them how to apply this power. The 
well educated man should be capable of concentrating all the 
powers of his mind upon any subject he undertakes, howev- 
•er difBcult. And to this end, for those who can afford the 
time and the expense, there is nothing to be compared with 
mathematics or the dead languages. I say the dead lan- 
guages, for the very objection to the modern languages, 
considered as a means of discipline, is that they can be ac- 
quired with very little labor. For those who cannot afford' 
the time or expense of these, the best substitutes must be 
adopted the nature of the case admits of. A good drilling 
in arithmetic (in this light) is invaluable. We should use 
the scholar to pursue hard studies, studies which are not 
pleasing in themselves, but which he is to look upon as a 
stepping stone, a necessary preliminary to understanding or 
excelling in other studies. The scholar who is habituated 
to meet and overcome difficulties, will find his future studies 
rendered pleasant £^ncl easy by it. 

Ofthetwo, ifl must go to either extreme, give me the 
young man who has by studies difficult but of no immediate 
utility, well disciplined his mind, increased his powers and 
acquired the faculty of directing them, in preference to one 
who comes from school or from college crammed with learn- 
ing upon the easy system. I could not hesitate as to my 



APPENDIX. 17 

Opinion which would most certainly succeed in life or which 
would make the most useful member of society. 

But it does not necessarily follow that we should go to 
the extreme of either system. Without interfering with the 
ordinary studies a teacher may relieve the tediousness of 
school hours by occasionally devoting a few moments to 
exercises of the sort I have mentioned, and in such a way 
as to make it a relaxation and a pleasant change from severer 
studies. 

I have spoken of some of the means by which a teacher 
may make himself useful to his school and to the communi- 
ty. The life of the faithful teacher is at best a laborious 
one. He needs for his own support a strong sense of duty 
to sustain him in his trials. He who without a sense of du- 
ty looks to interest alone and who merely thinks of getting 
a living for a year or two, until he can find more profitable 
business, will seldom succeed. He has no motive to im- 
prove. 



NORMAL SCHOOL. 

In considering the means of improving our teachers, we 
should not omit the subject of a Normal School. 

By a Normal School is generally understood a school or 
academy for the education of teachers with a special view to 
teaching ; and with provision in most of them for the gratui- 
tous instruction of such as intend to make a business of teach- 
ing. 

This name, (says Mr. Barnard,) was first used in Austria, 
and wfits applied to schools where young men received a 
practical education as teachers by being employed as assist- 
ants in the school, and at the same time received lectures on 
the principles and practice of teaching. The same name 
was applied in France and is used in England and this 
country to designate seminaries for the education of teach- 
ers, sometimes with and sometimes without a practical school 
attached to them. 

To the Austrian system it has been objected that its ten- 
dency is to perpetuate old errors, ancient modes of instruc- 
tion ; and to the teachers' seminaries as sometimes conducted 
it has been objected that the education given was of such a 
nature as to render the teacher discontented with his situa- 



18 APPENDIX. 

tioD and compensation, and unwilling to teach in the oidina" 
ry schools. 

A well qualified teacher, and one who intends to make a 
business of it, will be desirons of permanent employmeDt.— » 
This the greater part of our country districts, where schools 
are kept only a portion of the year, cannot give him. 

One of our greatest difficulties in regard to the subject of 
a Normal .School arises from the very freedom of our insti" 
tutions and the newness of our country. In Europe where 
society is permanently divided into various ranks and there 
is but little opportunity for a man to change the situation or 
mode of life to which he happens to be born, the teacher's 
profession is generally taken up as a business for life. He 
has little prospect or hopci of change. The governments 
can therefore e^ert tliemselves to improve the condition and 
qualifications of the teacher, and cao justly tax the people to 
do it because they know that the people will be repaid by 
the improved quality of the services he will render during 
his life. 

But in our country few undertake the business of teach" 
ing, as a business for life, and from the circumstances of our 
country, it must probably long remain so. All the avenues 
to wealth and distinction are here open to alL Wealth is 
the great means of social distinction. And while the tempta- 
tions to leave the teacher's profession are as great as they 
are, we shall constantly find young men of enterprise desert- 
ing it for more profitable occupations. 

The same difficulty has been ex))ericnced by the United 
States government at the West Point Academy, designed to 
educate officers for the army. Even the certainty of a per- 
manent and increasing salary for life, has not been sufficient 
to retain the graduates in the service, when the busihess of 
civil life was unusually prosperous and ofiered them induce^ 
ments for change. 

Mr. Barnard concludes his observations on the Normal 
Schools of Europe with these practical and common sense 
remarks, '' In conclusion, it may save some misapprehen* 
sion of his own views to remark, that with all these agencies 
for the education and improvement of teachers, the public 
schools of Europe with their institutions of government and 
society, do not turn out such practical and efficient men as 
our own common schools, acting in concert with our reli- 
gious, social and political institutions. A boy oducated in a 
district school of New England, taught for a few months in 






APPENDIX. 19 

tbd winter by a rough, half-edncated, but live teacher who 
is earning his way by his winter's work in the school-room 
t)Ut of the profession into something which will pay better ; 
«nd in summer by a young female just out of the oldest 
t^lass of the winter school and with no, other knowledge of 
teaching than what she may have gathered by observation 
of the diverse practices of some ten or twelve instructors 
^ho must have taught the school under the intermittent and 
itinerating system which prevails universally in the country 
districts of New England — a boy thus taught during his 
school life, but subjected at home and abroad to the stirring 
influences of a free press, of town and school district meet- 
ings, of constant intercourse with those who are mingling 
with the world and in the affairs of public life, and beyond 
-all these influences, subjected early to the wholesome disci- 
pline both moral and intellectual of taking care of himself 
^nd the affairs of the house and the farm, will have more ca- 
pacity for business and exhibit more intellectual activity and 
versatility than the best scholar who ever graduated from a 
Prussian school> but whose school life and especially the 
years which immediately follow, are subjected to the de- 
pressing and repressing influences of a despotic government 
and of a state of society in which every thing is fixed both 
4>y law and the iron rule of custom. But this superiority is 
Qot due to the school, but is gained in spite of the school. — 
Our aim should be to make the school better and to bring 
*all the influences of home and society, of religion and free in- 
stitutions, into perfect harmony with the best teachings of 
the best ten^herJ' 

There has been great diversity of opinion and practice in 
this country as to what should be taught in our Normal 
Schools. In some, direct instruction is given in all the 
branches taught in our common schools. But to this there 
are serious objections, and some of the considerations I have 
mentioned, apply with great force. Those entering a Nor- 
mal School should certainly be required to have studied all 
the branches they intend to teach, and then the time may be 
profitably spent in occasional reviews to refresh their know- 
ledge, and in direct instruction in the principles and various 
modes of teaching. The latter seems to be the proper pro- 
vince of the Normal School. 

The want of a Normal School among iis is at present par- 
tially supplied by the institution of the Normal Department 
in Brown University, an account of which by Professor Greene, 
is appended 4e this report. 



20 • APPENDIX. 

GRADES OP aUALIFICATIONS OF TEACHERS. 

The original design of the school laws was to establish 
three grades of teachers. School Committees were to give 
certificates of qualification which were to be valid only in 
their own towns. County Inspectors were to give certifi- 
cates which were intended to be of a higher grade and to be 
valid throughout the county. And finally, the hope was 
held out to the faithful and persevering, of receiving a cer- 
tificate endorsed by the Commissioner, which was to be va- . 
lid throughout the State. 

The intention of the law, however, has never been car- 
ried out. Few of the latter class of certicates have ever 
been given. And so much clashing and jealousy has arisen 
from County Inspectors giving certificates with which Com- 
mittees were dissatisfied, that the appointment of Inspectors 
was discontinued. 

Yet the object of the law is good, and should, if possible, 
be carried out. The teacher whose long service and high 
qualifications entitle him to it, should receive a certificate of 
those qualificatioes of a higher degree than is given to the 
less qualified and inexperienced. 

To effect this, and at the same time to protect the Com- 
missioner from the charge of favoritism and partiality — ^the 
suspicion of which would diminish the value of the certifi- t 
cate — the following plan might be adopted : — ^A board of ex- ^ 
amining teachers might be appointed, to meet at specified 
times, and all teachers with whose qualifications the Com- 
missioner was not personally acquainted, might be referred to 
this board for examination. The certificate would then not 
be liable to be given on imperfect mformation or partial re- 
commendations, and would be valuable to those who ob- 
tained it., 



LYCEUM LECTURES. 

The subject of lectures deserves attention as a part of a 
eystem of public education, and a meana of diffusing in- 
formation among the people. Where they can be support- 
ed, they afford a means of much valuable improvement.— 
But I apprehend that the manner in which they have gen- 
erally been managed amongst us, is not the one calculated to 
do the most good. Overlooking our home nutterial^ we send 



f I 



'APPENDIX. 21 

abroad for lecturers, and pay a high price for them ; we get 
in return a certain amount of general declamation on some 
subject, or on matters and things in general, with a full pro- 
]x>rtion of high-sounding phrases, but very little definite 
knowledge, and rery little that is fitted to make an impres- 
sion on our minds, and to excite thought in us. Now, almost 
every large village contains some men who have opportuni- 
ties for reading, or who by practice have become well ac- 
quainted with some particular branch of knowledge, or who 
have had opportunities of travelling and seeing the world. — 
If these men would digest the results of their reading and of 
their practical knowledge on the subjects familiar to them in- 
to lectures, and with an occasional interchange of lectures 
with other villages, it would be a profitable way of spending 
some of our winter evenings ; and the lecturers themselves 
would be well paid by the mental discipline and improve- 
ment to which the effort would conduce. As it is, we get 
our lecturers from abroad, we expect too much, we are often 
disappointed, and after a great deal of trouble and expense, 
we get tired and give up the system. An association of gen- 
tlemen for mutual improvement, conducted as I have sug- 
gested, and open to the public, might be managed without 
any expense. They would improve themselves and the ex- 
ercises might be made pleasant and useful to the whole com- 
mnnity. But if they have no time to write, or do not desire 
to appear before the public, evening meetings for reading 
and occasional discussion might be substituted. 



UNION DISTRICTS. 

I would again call attention, as I have done in a former re- 
port, to the formation of Union Districts. Many of our 
villages are so situated that they are divided not only be- 
tween different districts, but between different towns. In 
all of these cases it would be for the advantage of the peo- 
ple to unite the districts, by which they would be enabled to 
keep their schools for a longer time, to employ more and 
better teachers, and to divide the scholars according to age 
and proficiency. In several of our large villages, the dis- 
tricts have been consolidated and the schools graded. And 
there are many districts on streams which divide towns, 
which might be united with great benefit. 



22 APPENDIX 

By a provision in the present law, any two or more districts 
with the approbation of the school committee, may unite to- 
getber without losing their claim to that portion of the school 
money which is divided equally by districts. This was in- 
tended to encourage the union of districts, and it is to be hop- 
ed that it will have that efiect. 

There is no way in which more can be done for education ' 
in those neighborhoods which admit of it, than by the forma- 
tion of union districts. 



Note.— This subject of nniting schools for the purpose of improvemeDt and gn- 
dation is so important that we introduce here the followine^ suggestions of yarious 
authors, which we take from the vety able report of Hon. EniMs Roo% Snperin* 
tendent of Scfaoob of Wisconsin. ^ 

PfcAir Pboposbd Of Palm bb*s Paiza Emat. 

• 

" Let a female school be kept in every district, throughout the year, with the ex- 
ception of two short vacations ; the teachers being engaged not for any specific time^ 
but as long as both parties remndn suited. Let the studies^ in such schools, be con- 
fined to reading, writing, composition, (which of course includes orthography, and 
a certain extent of grammar, and the structure of sentences,) arithmetic and seo- 
graphy. Let these be considered as the primary schools, through which ^y^ry child 
must, of necessity pass, to prepare liimaelf for a difierent series* in a higher grade 
of schools, to be called central, or high schools. Of these, let there be one, or in 
large populous towns, two in each town. Generally these central schools would on- 
ly be kept during the winter; though some of the lareer villages might, perhaps, a^ 
ford them emplovment throughout the jrear. In sucn cases. addiUonat assistants 
would be wantea during the winter season, when the laiger children of the fiuroerSy 
&c., would generally attend. To prevent die younger children who live convenient 
to those central schools, from pressing in too so<»n, and at the same time, to avoid 
the Invldionsness of preliminary examination, it would be well to adopt as an unde- 
vlating rule, that no instructions should be eiven in the branches taught in the pri- 
mary schools, excepting in composition, which should be attended to on a more 
extended scale, one afternoon in the week. 

"The central schools should be considered as town schoola^ and of coarse should 
be partially supported by a proportion of the public funds from all the districts. It 
would not be proper, however, that these contributions should be in an equal ratio. 
They should bo adjusted on some principle favoring the districts, in proportion to 
their distances from the school house. It would scarcely be practicable to suggest 
a rule that would applv fairly, and in all cases ; but something like the following 
might probably be satisfactory in the greater number. Let such neighborhoods, 
(within certain limits,) as would agree to furnish the school house, or make the most 
liberal offer towards that item of expense, have the light of fixing the site, and also 
have the use of the building for puiposes not inconsistent with its character, when 
not occupied as a school. With respect to the other expenses, that part of the teach- 
ers* wages not paid by the public money, might be raised by an e(|ual tax on the 
scholars ; while in addition, the expense of iMaid might be defrayed by those living 
within one mile of the school house, and of the fuel by those witmn from one to two 
miles. The more distant families would thus be compensated for the Inconvenience 
of their remoteness, by their exemption from these expenses. Besides, as the chil- 
dren would not probably be prepared for the central school tilt about the age (tf 
twelve, the increased distance would then be a matter of but tiiffing moment. 

" Attached to the central school house, there should always be a long shed for the 
accommodation of the teams of distant families, who would probably make some ar- 
rangement to furnish such a convenience by turns ; while those who were unpro- 
vided, miffht pay a reasonable portion of their expense by their labor. The school 
house itself should be on a scale sufficiently large to admit of a few lodging rooms 
for those female pupils, whose health might be too delicate to go daily to their dis^ 
tant homes. Here, with a trifling inconvenience, and without any additional ex- 
pense, save the transport of thehr provisions, and a little nec^sary furniture from 



APPENDIX. 28 



ATTENDANCE ON THE SCHOOLS. 

The number of children, especially in our cities and villages, 
who receive no benefit from our public schools, is very great. 

In order to exhibit the extent of this evil, I have added to 
the abstract which accompanies this report a column giving 
the number of persons in each town over the age of four and 
under fifteen, as taken from the new census. This, of course, 
does not give exactly the number of those who should be re- 
ceiving education, as a considerable number of those over fif- 
teen should be in the schools, but it is the nearest approximation 
we can make of it. 



home, they might board ihemselves. But the boys should, ia all cases, return home ; 
as it is more important that they should be under the eye of their parents, as they 
haT^ generally, more or less evening and morning duties to perform. 

"The distance from the furthest comer of the town would probably, in no case, 
exceed four or five miles. Should there be any pupils to whom it might be incon- 
venient to furnish means of conveyance, daifyf it might easily be arranged, that they 
should have longer taskiL and attend the school for recitation only two or three 
times a week. And, if tneir leisure time was properly spent at home, it is highly 
probable, that improvement would be more rapid, under such an arrangement, Uuin 
where the school was attended more constantly. For it would certainly have the 
tendency, in most cases, to induce habits of patient perseverance, and confidence in 
one*8 own exertions, — ^habits of much more importance than the mere attainment of 
science. In all schools there is too much leaning on the teacher, tdo little patient 
research and self-dependence. 

'* As the languages and higher branches of mathematics should be taught in the 
central schoob, it would be necessary to have a gentleman of liberal education at its 
head ; bat probably, so great has been the improvement of female education within 
a few years, there would be little difficulty or procuring a sufficiency of well quali. 
fied assistants of that sex." 

PuLK Pboposkd bt Horacb Mamn. 

" It seems not unconnected with this subject to inquire, whether in many places 
out of OUT cities a plan may not be adopted to give greater efficiency to the means 
now devoted to common school education. The population of many towns is so sit- 
uated as conveniently to allow a gradation of the schools. For children under the 
age of eight or ten years, about a mile seems a proper limit, beyond which they 
sSonldnot be required to travel to school. On this supposition, one house, as cen- 
trallvrntuated as circumstances will permit, would accommodate the population up- 
on tne territory of four square miles, or, which is the •ame thing, two miles square. 
fiat a child above that age can go two miles to school, or even rather more without 
serious inconvenience. There are many persons whose experience attests, that they 
never enjoyed better health, or made greater progress, than when they went two 
miles and a half, or three rniles daily, to school. Supposing, however, the most 
remote scholars to live only at about the distance of two miles from the school, one 
house will then accommodate all the older children upon a territory of sixteen square 
miles, or four miles square. Under such an arrangement, while there were four 
schools in a territory of four miles square, i. e., sixteen square miles, for the younger 
chiidren, there would be one central school for the older. Suppose there is $G(nft0 
be divided amongst the inhabitants of this territory of sixteen square miles, or $160 
for each of the four districts. Suppose, farther, that the average wages fur the male 
teachers is $25, and for female $12 50 per month. I^ according to the present sys- 
tem, four male teachera are employed for the winter term, and four female for the 
summer, each of the summer and winter schools may be kept four munths. The 
money would then be exhausted ; i. e., four months summer at $12 50=$5U, and four 
months winter, at $26=$100; both=$150. But according to the plan suggested, 
the same money would pay for six months summer school instead of four, in each of 



24 APPENDDL 

With this, let any person compare the column which gives 
the whole number of scholars attending the schools. But even 
this will not show the magnitude of the evil. To know the 
full extent of it, we should make the comparison with the av- 
erage attendance, as a large number of those who attend are 
merely registered and attend but a very little while. 

The rate of non-attendance would appear to be highest in 
Newport, but very large in many other towns. 

That the rate bill system, or system of assessments on schol- 
ars in our country towns, has the eflfect of inducing many pa- 
rents to keep their children from school, there can be no doubt 
By law, the poor are exempted from assessment, but this is a 
privilege which very few will claim. Few are willing to have 
their children considered as charity scholars. This is a com- 
mendable pride. 



the four dietrictB* ftnd for a male teacher's school eight months, at 935 a moDthi 
instead of four at 925 a month, and would then leave 920 in the treasury. 

*< By this plan, the great superiority of female over male training for children under 
8, 10 or 12 years of age, would be secured; the larger scholars would be separated 
firom the smaller, and thus the ereat diversity of studies and of classes In the same 
school, which now crumbles the teacher's time into dust, would be avoided; the 
female schools would be lengthened one half ; and the length of male schools would 
be doubled, and for the increased compensation, a teacher of four fold qualifications 
could be employed. Undoubtedly, in many towns upon the Cape or among the moun- 
tains, the course of the roads and the face of the territory would present insuperable 
obstacles to the full reduction of this scheme to practice. But it is as unquestionable, 
that in msny others no physical impediments exist to its immediate adoption ; e^- 
daily if we consider the legal power of different towns to unite portions of their 
territory for the joint maintenance of schools. We have not yet brought the power 
of united action to bear with halfits force upon the end or the means of education. 
I think it will yet be found more emphatically true in this department of ha • 
man action, than in any other, that adding individual means multiplies social 
power." 

Plak Pboposxo bt Henbt Babnabd, Secsxtabt of the Board op Commis* 
szoKKBS OP Common Schools op CoNNBCTictrr. 

'^To" remedy in all or in part, the evils thus sunimarily presented, it is proposed 
that so far as practicable, the younger children with the primary studies, be as* 
signed to female teachers, and the older children and more advanced studies, to 
male teachers, and that both classes of teachers be well qualified for their appro- 
priate grade of schools. This, it is thought, can be done in one of the followi&g 
modes: 

" Ist By employing in every district numbering over fiftv children in school, 
two or more teachers, as is now done in more than eighty districts. There are 
several hundred districts which could adopt this course. 

** 3d. By the union of two or more adjoining districts, for the purpose of 
maintaining a union school for the older children of such associating districts, 
while the younger children of eaeh, are left in the district schools. There ii 
icarcelv a school society in the State, where at least one such union district can* 
BOtbetonned. 

"dd. By the establishment of a central school, where the circumstances 
of the society will admit of its being done, for the older children of all the dis- 
tricts. , 

*'By the establishment in each society, of one central school, or one or more 
■nion schools, for the older children, and more advanced stadies, the district 



J 



J 



APPENDIX. 25 

It is probable, too, that a considerable portion of the non- 
attendance in some places may be owing to religious or sec* 
tarian feeling. If such be the case, the objections should be 
enquired into ; and if any thing can be done to remove them, 
without impairing the efficiency of the schools, or without a 
surrender of any principles essential to the maintenance of a 
public school system, it should certainly be done. 



CHILDREN IN FACTORIES. 

Another, and probably the most considerable portion of the 
non-attendance in the schools, is the result of the employment 
of children in factories. The subject of the education of the 
children in these establishments, deserves the serious attention 
of the Legislature. 

The improvements of modern times have rendered the labor 
of children valuable to a degree that formerly could not have 
been anticipated. Hence the temptation to parents in destitute 



school will be relioTed of at least one-half the namber of classes and siodies, and 
the objections to the employment of female teachers in the winter, on account 
of their alleged inability to govera and instruct the older boys, will be re- 
moved. 

" As the compensation of female teachers is less than one-half that paid to 
males, every instance of the employment of a female teacher in place of a male 
teacher in the district school, will save one-half of the wages paid to the latter, 
which can be expended in increasing, partly the wages of the former, and partly 
the wages of the male teacher in the anion or central school. It will be found 
that the same amount of money now expended in three districts, on three female 
teachers in summer, and three male teachers in winter, will employ three female 
teachers for the whole length of the summer and winter school, and one male 
teacher for the winter, at an advance of one-third or one half of the average rate 
of wages paid to each. 

**Thi8 arrangement will thus lead to the more permanent employment of a 
larger number of female teachers, at an advanced compensation, thus holding 
oat an additional inducement to females of the right character and qnaliBcatioos, 
to teach in the district school. It will also reduce the demand for male teachers, 
except of the highest orders of qualifications, and increase the wages of those 
who are employed. In both ways it will diminish the expense, the loss of time, 
and other evils of a constant change of teachers in the same school, and give per- 
manence and character to the profession of teacher. 

** It will enable the teachers of the several schools to introduce studies, disci- 
pline and instruction appropriate to each. In the district primary school, the 
younger children need no longer be subjected to the discomforts and neglects 
which they now experience, or primary studies be crowded one side, to make 
room for the higher branches. In the union or central school, the scholars, com- 
ing as they would, from the primary school, well grounded in the fundamental 
branches, will be prepared to enter profitably upon studies which are now pursu- 
ed to advantage only in academies and other private schools of a similar grade. 
Thus, all that is now accomplished in the district school, will be better done, the 
course of study very much extended, and the advantages of a more thorough and 
complete education be more widely diffused." 



26 APPENDIX, 

circumstance is strong to take their children from the schools 
early, and put them in some establishment where they can aid 
them by their labor. But the necessitous are not the onl^ 
ones who do this. Many who have health and strength, and 
ability to support themselves and families by their own labor, 
yield to this temptation, to live upon the labor of their chil- 
dren, and support themselves in this way. 

Any person familiar with our schools must have noticed the 
small niunber of large scholars in all our ordinary schools. 
As soon as they are able to labor, they are taken from the 
school. 

By an act entitled " An act to provide for the better instruc- 
tion of children employed in manufacturing establishments," 
which was passed at January session, A. D. 1840, and re- 
mained in force several years, owners and superintendents of 
factories were prohibited from employing in their fectories 
children who had not attended some school for three months 
in the yean Similar laws are now in force in several States of 
our Union. 

It is to be hoped, that when the Legislature receives the re- 
port of Col. Sayles, who has been appointed by the Governor 
to collect the statistics upon this subject, it will receive their 
early attention. 

It is due to the manufacturers of this State to say, that with 
few exceptions, they have generously supported all measures 
for the improvement of our schools, and have often munifi- 
cently contributed to the building of houses and furnishing of 
libraries. 

The principal object of any law would be to exert an influ- 
ence upon the parents themselves. It is painful to consider 
that there are in this country, and at this age of the world, a 
class — and not a small class — of parents who calculate to live 
upon their children's earnings, and maintain themselves in 
idleness, and sometimes in dissipation, upon their wages. We 
denounce Southern slavery, while We have in our midst pa- 
rents who treat their own children as property, body and soul, 
and who sell their services, not for the good of the children, 
not to educate and support them, but to pamper to their own 
indolence and ease. 

While we admit as a general principle that the law ought 
but seldom to interfere between the parent and the child, and 
never unless there is some imperious necessity, it would seem 
that in cases such as we have described, it would be right to 
interfere, not by direct compulsion, but by an indirect appeal 
to interest, to prevent the child from being sacrificed to the pa- 
rent's selfishness. 



J 



APPENDIX. 2T 



MORAL EDUCATION. 

I will invite your attention for a short time to the subject 
of moral education. I do not propose to speak of its impor- 
tance, but to suggest a few thoughts relating to the connexion 
between education and the prevention of crime, and to consid- 
er what portions of morals may without objection be made sub- 
jects of instruction in schools. 

If all parents did their duty by their children, little would 
remain for the public teacher to perform in respect to morals, 
and he might devote his almost undivided time to their intellec- 
tual advancement. A large portion of parents, however, are 
prevented by poverty or business from giving it their atten- 
tion. 

A want of reverence for parental authority is supposed to 
be one of the characteristics of our country and of our times. — 
In former times the parent had the power of life and death 
over his child. In some countries, as long as the parent lived, 
the child was not free from his control. With the progress of 
civilization, the laws in all countries have become milder. — 
But in our country, partly probably from carrying to excess 
our notions of liberty and freedom from restraint, partly from 
the newness of the country and the unsettled, shifting habits 
natiiral to a new country — and partly from the facility with 
which any person can support himself and thus become inde- 
pendent of others — we have gone to the other extreme. The 
child, at an early age, throws off all control ; fortunate if he 
does not throw off all respect for the parent. But although 
much of this may be due to outward circumstances, we must, 
however, acknowledge that a great deal of it is owing to the 
fault of the parents themselves. 



RELATION OF EDUCATION TO PREVENTION OF 

CRIME.* 

The consideration of the connexion between education and 
the prevention of crime is most important, because the right to 
take the property of the people to educate the children of all, 
depends in a great measure upon our assuming that education 
tends to prevent crime and wretchedness, and therefore is jus- 
tified and required not for the individual, so much as by the 



* See a late number of one of the Q^uarterly ReviewB, and also, Essays by the 
Central Society : Essay by G. K. Porter, Esq. 



28 APPENDIX. 

good of society. We tax the public to educate a person, not 
because it promotes his personal advantage, but because we 
presume that we shall make a better citizen of him and so 
promote the good of the community. And the enquiry is in- 
teresting also, as shewing us what we may reasonably ex- 
pect from a system of education in reforming the morals of a 
people. • 

Some may perhaps express surprise that any one could im- 
agine that education would not have a tendency to lessen the 
amount of crime — yet intelligent men have done so — and when 
we examine the subject we jBind that statistics afford us very 
little aid in arriving at any certain conclusion. 

For instance, to show the caution with which we should 
reason from ordinary statistics, able writers have drawn ex- 
actly contrary conclusions from the returns of crimes in 
France. An intelligent and able man, Mr. Guery, shows as 
he thinks satisfactorily, that the amount of crime is greater in 
the best educated than in the most ignorant portions of France. 
But his conclusions are drawn from the returns of a single 
year. 

In 1813, the number of persons charged with offences 
against society in England and Wales, was 7,164 In 1836, 
20,984 ; nearly three times as many. And during this whole 
time, public and private benevolence had been actively en- 
gaged in schemes for educating and promoting the moral and 
intellectual improvement of their people. 

In 1849, 14,669 males^2,557 females— Total, 17,126 under 
17, were imprisoned for various periods for offences in Eng- 
land, and of these, 12,500 were convicted. The proportion of 
crime in the various districts present some curious facts — thus 
of the above, — (persons under 17.) 

In the Metropolitan counties the proportion is 1 to 694 
'• Manufacturing " « 1 to 1600 

" Maritime " " 1 to 1508 

" Agricultural « *■' 1 to 1917 

" Mining " « 1 to 2078 

It appears from a comparison of the French and English re- 
turns, that the number of persons punished for crime under 
17, or what may be called juvenile offenders, is nearly double 
in England what it is in France, in proportion to the popula- 
tion. And this has led to serious enquiry into the causes of it 
and presents some considerations which might be of practical 
use very near home, in our little State of Rhode Island. 

In England, the system of short imprisonment for small of- 
fences committed by boys, is adopted ; the same system we 
have followed here. In France, boys committing small crimes 
are considered as subjects for reformation, and are sentenced 



APPENDIX. 29 

10 be detained for various periods up to ten years, according to 
circumstances, and placed under proper discipline and instruc- 
tion. In the English system and in ours, the young offender 
is sentenced for a short time, he is shut up with old offenders 
and he comes out a hardened criminal, and the probability is, 
that the government is at the* expense during his life of con- 
victing and imprisoning him continually, unless he is led by 
passion to commit some great offence by which he forfeits his 
life or his liberty for life. 

The effect of the two systems upon the statistics is obvious. 
In the English system and in ours, the same yomig man is 
continually committing offences which of course swell the 
whole number of crimes committed ih the country and add to 
the expense of criminal justice. On the French system he of- 
fends but once. He is t}ien detained under training for a time 
sufficient to give a chance of reformation. The number of 
first offenders might be the same under each system. The 
number of offences could not be. 

As I saia before, these facts suggest considerations which 
may be applied at home. We have always followed the old 
English system of short imprisonments for small offences, and 
boys are treated as if they were as intelligent and as responsi- 
ble as older persons and are shut up with them in the same 
jail. Then an appeal is made to the humanity of the Legisla- 
ture and the boy is pardoned and the result generally is, that 
in about a year he is again before the Legislature for the same 
mercy. Any person familiar with our Legislative proceedings 
for a series of years, will recognize the truth of this. And 
while we pursue the system of committing them to the ordi- 
nary prisons and shutting them up to be schooled by old har- 
dened criminals, members of succeeding Legislatures will very 
naturally pursue the same system of pardons. 

But we may well be glad that a beginning has been made 
in the right direction. 

A few years since, the city of Providence took measures to 
establish a Reform School, under the authority of an act of 
the Legislature. Subsequently by an agreement between the 
State and city, the State has been authorised to send its young 
criminals to it. By acts passed January and October, 1860, 
any Justice of the Peace in the State when sentencing juvenile 
offenders, may in his discretion, sentence them to the Reform 
School. 

I take every opportunity to call attention to this, because 
the institution is new and has as yet few friends, and many of 
those who are opposed to all change, look coldly on it. Yet it 
seems to me that it needs only to be known to enlist the sym- 
pathy of all philanthropists. Institutions of the kind have suc« 
ceeded elsewhere. Why should they not here ? 



30 At^PENDEL 

The statistics of crime in relation to education are geneiall]^ 
defective, because they do not^how the amount or degree of 
education. It is obvious, that in taking an account of crimes 
committed by educated persons, we should make a distinction 
between those who have learned only to read and write with- 
out going any farther, which is the case with a large number 
of those who attend school^ and those who have received any 
education worthy of the name. Yet in the greater part of sta- 
tistical accounts, crimes committed by those who can merely 
read and write, and that perhaps very imperfectly, are charged 
to the account of education. Since 1828 the Frencli, and since 
1836 the English tables^ have classed tlie criminals as fol- 
lows : 

1. Those who can neither read nor write. 

2. Those who can readonly, or who can read and write 

imperfectly. 

3. Those who can read and write well. 

4. Those who have received instruction beyond that of a 

merely elementary school. 

The results of returns under these classes have been thus 
far highly satisfactory and encouraging For seven years 
ending with 1834, the convictions in France averaged ^838) 
of whom only 65, or one in 66, belonged to the educated—be^ 
ing one in about 500,000 of the population. In England, for 
1836, the number of persons accused of crime was 20,984; 
out of these, 191 were of the class who had received superior 
education. In Scotland^ out of 2,922, 55 belonged to this class c 

But these statements are almost too favorable to be relied ^ 
on. Perhaps we can account for it by supposing that many 
crimes committed by the educated, the intelligent and the 
shrewd, remain undetected ; and if detected, that their ingennif 
ty sometimes enables them to escape conviction. Besides the 
crimes punished by the courts, are crimes against property or 
person, generally accompanied with some degree of violence; 
crimes which educated persons would be less likely to com- 
mit ; while there are many violations of right by educated 
men, which a rigid morality would denounce as criminal, but 
which the law cannot punish because it cannot define them. 

So far as the statistics go to show that thera is less crime in 
the agricultural than there is in the manufacturing, seaport 
and city districts, they agree with what we should a priori ex* 
peel the result to be. In the countrv generally, there is a 
greater equality of condition ; less of that extreme distress 
which results from crowding together in cities ; more kindness 
and fellow feeling ; and many slight offences, especially if 
they are first offences, are passed over from charity or a hope 
of reformation. The man of bad character is known, marked 






APPENDIX 81 

and watched-^and there are not enough of them to herd to- 
gether and form a class and keep each other in countenance. 

On the other hand, the great cities (which Jeflerson said 
were great solfes upon the hody politic) draw together the dis- 
solute and idle from all quarters. It is there, too, that the 
wealth and enterprise of a country is concentrated, and where 
there is most wealth, of course will be the greatest mimber oi 
crimes against property. And in a city there can be none of 
that compassion for a neighbor which in the country would 
lead to overlooking a fault The smallest offence must be 

Eunished, without inquiring into the motives which led, or per- 
aps drove, the offender to commit it. 

There is one circumstance connected with the abundance of 
crime which commends itself to the attention of all friends of 
education — to all philanthropists. It is this : that in the large 
cities, the crimes are committed by a separate class. The low 
and degraded form a separate class, and almost a separate 
caste by themselves. Accessions are constantly making to 
their number, but the greater part of them are born and edu- 
cated to crime — they are hereditary criminals. Shut out of 
churches and schools, they live by preying upon society. Ot 
God they know but the name. Society they consider their en- 
emy and lawful plunder. The accounts of the ignorance, prac- 
tical Atheism and debasement of this class in some cities, are 
hard to be believed by those who are used only to the peace^ 
ful and orderly communities of New England. 

Although the most dreadful cases are probably in the large 
cities of the old world, yet our own cities present instances of 
the same sort, although here, from our youth as a nation, the 
evil may not be so confirmed and hard to combat. There 
seems to be an almost complete wall of separation between 
this class and what I may call the comfortable classes of so- 
ciety — ^the people of education, of middling property, and the 
wealthy. To associate with ignorance and vice is no pleasure 
to the educated and refined ; and then, again, the very great- 
ness of the evil and the fact of its long existence, are calculated 
to deter the timid from undertaking its removal. 

We may say that we are not responsible fox the existence 
of these evils. True we may not be directly. But if govern- 
ments and the comfortable classes had done their duty in years 
past, the evil could not have reached its present magnitude. 
if the evil is to be reformed, it must be through the influences 
of religion and of education. But how is religion to be brought 
home to them ? They are practically shut out of our churches, 
because they cannot cfme in upon an equality with others ; 
and no man, with any just pride or feeling of independence, 
will come in on any other terms. If church-going be an es- 



82 APPENDIX. 

sential part of Christianity, then, in some large cities, a man 
with a family cannot afford to be a Christian unless he is 
worth his tens of thousands of dollars, and in the same pro- 
portion in smaller places. The attention of our churches is 
already awakened to the necessity of a change of their sys- 
tem. This is shown by the erection of many free churches in 
our cities within a few years. And in what mode can wealth 
be more nobly employed than by devoting it to the religions 
instniction of the poor. 

We cannot doubt however, notwithstanding the gloomy de- 
tails of the criminal calendar, that there has been a gradual 
and marked change effected in modem civilized society in re- 
lation to crime — and a change for the better. The character 
of the crimes committed has changed. Formerly — in genera- 
tions past there was comparatively little security for person or 
property, except in the strong arm of the possessor. The of- , 
fences were of the more violent kind. Murders, robberies and 1 
duels, &c., were more frequent. Now, whatever may be true 
as to the total number of crimes, those of this violent sort have 
diminished. Even if it is only a substitution of fraud and 
craft for violence, it is certainly a change for the better and 
for the peace of society. 

The total number of crimes committed may not have dimin- 
ished, or may even have increased. If statistics should prove 
this, there are many reasons why the friends of humanity 
should not be discouraged. The population of all the civilized 
nations is fast increasing. Their wealth has increased wod- 
derf ully. To promote the acquisition of wealth, property must 
be secured by the most stringent enactments, and a lai^e class 
of the offences which makes such a figure in our criminal 
statistics, are of these modern offences against property. Leg- 
islatures in England and in this comitry almost every year 
make something a penal offence which was not so before.— 
This probably is the necessary result of the increase of wealth 
and civilization. Again, our credit system, while it has nearly 
superseded the old fashioned mode of robbery, yet presents in- 
numerable temptations to other sorts of crime, temptations 
which we should rather rejoice that so many withstand, than 
grieve that a few fall. 

Our modern police systems, too, are more perfect than those 
of former times. Fewer crimes escape detection in our large 
cities. All these combine to make the amount of crime appear 
to have increased of late years, while the fact may be very dif- 
ferent, if we take into account the increase of population, and 
consider also, that a great number of tike statute offences enu- 
merated as crimes, are not such as necessarily involve any 
great degree of moral turpitude. 



. _ APPENDIX. 38 

Without any lefeveiibe, however, to statistics^ it would seem 
as if we ought not to doubt as to the good effects of education 
in preventing misery and crime. 

Even supposing that no direct moral instruction whatever 
is conveyed, can there be any doubt but that a good trainiog 
of the intellect alone is favorable to morals? By pursuing a 
course of mere intellectual study by system, especially if it be 
pursued imder the restraints of a public school or college, the 
student acquires habits of self-denial, obedience to rule, regu- 
larity and order, which are invaluable. And a well disciplin- 
ed and Well stored intellect is a great security against crime in 
another view. The man of education has pleasiues and occu- 
pations for his leisure, which ignorance knows not of. He is 
thus protected from many of dxose vices into which the igno- 
rant an4 idle fall from the mere love of excitement We are 
so constituted as to need excitement of some sort, fie who 
knows the value of intellectual pleasures, will not be so apt to 
resort to low company, or intoxicating drkaksy for his amuse- 
ments. And it is probably to the diffusion of education, and to 
a thorough education, that we must look for the delivery <^ 
our community from the scourge of intemperance. 

Again, mere intellectual educati<m, doubtless, promotes good 
morals, at least negatively, by preventii^ poverty, the extreme 
of which is a fruitful source of crime. How many crimes are 
traceable to the temptations arising from poverty, mie ten- 
dency of education is to raise the man in the scale of being, 
to produce an ambition, and teach him ways of bettering his 
condition, to restrain improvidence and waste, to encourage 
forethought and prudence. So education improves the condi- 
tion of the poor and removes temptation. 

And although the present enormous accumulation of the 
wealth of civilized society, resulting iwm their superiority in 
knowledge, may in its first effect in the hands of the few, pro- 
duce an increase of crimes against property, yet we should 
consider that the benefits of this wealth are constantly diffus- 
ing, by furnishing cheap necessaries and comforts to me poor. 
Tne industrious laboring man of the present day, enjoys com- 
forts which were luxuries even to the rich men of former ages.< 
Thus wealth is slowly diffused andihe situation of the poorer 
class improved. 

The importance of providing recreation for the mind, of aa 
intellectual character, is not sumciently considered by us. As 
I said just now, we are so constituted that we need excitement, 
we need recreation. And if recreation of an innocent and in- 
tellectual kind is not famished, the people will resort to mere 
animal and baser gratifications. This is a law of nature, 
2 



34 AP^ftNDlX. 

whicb laWis made by ilnan, wiU in yaia aft^Upt to chatige ot 
cdnntefract. 

Hei^ce the importance of cultivating a habit of reading and 
supplying the means of gratifying a taste for reading. It was 
remarked by a foreigner that very few of odr large librariet 
are open to ^e public. In Europe the reverse is the practice. 
Hence too the importance of cultivating t!ie prai^liee of vocal 
and ittstruihental music, not merely for religious purposes, but 
for social iitaprovement. 

The only danger to be apprehended from moral instruction 
in our schools, arises froih the spirit of sectarianism. That it 
may be perverted to i^ctarianiszti is true. But as all sects 
agree in tne necessity of moral instruction, and as the attempt 
of any sect to teach its own creed^ would inevitably tend to 
bi'eak up any system of public educatiim, and to substitute in 
their stead sectarian or denominational schools which would 
leave a large portion of our country without any ed^ication at 
all, it is to be hoped that enough diarity and forbeajrance will 
be found among the diffisrent churches to avoid this evil. We 
should endeavor to give the youth a sound intellectual and 
moral training, to teach them how to think, not what to think. 
We should not suffer ourselves to be haunted with the fear 
that they will think differently from ourselves on some subject 
of reUgion or politics. Parental influence will always incline 
the child to the opinions of the parent without much direct 
teaching. If we are well grounded in bur opinions and believe . 
them well founded in argument, we should not be afraid of f 
our success. It is generally in proportion to our distrust of 
our opinions and to the weakness of the arguments on which 
we have adopted them that we are inclined to quarrel with 
those Ivho doubt or deny them. And it is only by a full ac- 
knowledgement of tlife right of private judgment in others, 
and cultivating in our own hearts a spirit of charity towards 
them, that we can avoid the dangers which surround this 
question. 

If moral instruction cannot be given without being made a 
means of prosely tism on sectarian or political questions, I would 
say at once that it should be excluded. 

Let us then consider for a few moments what portions of 
morals may with propriety be taught, snd the best manner of 
teaching them ; what should be taught, and how. 

A full classification of the subject would of course include 
many things which could not well be taught to the classes of 
smaller children, such as compose the great majority in our 
schools. They could not appreciate, and would not profit by 
systematic instruction. There are certain classes of duties, too, 
in which in orderly old settled communities — children gain in* 






J 



struction at ehUfeh and at home ; their duties ta Go^ Aidr 
parents, and the family relations, the duty of justice to others, of 
honesty as to property, and of yeracity. in orderly society there 
is a feeling c^ honor attached to the performance of some of these 
duties, and of meanness to their violation which is a great addi- 
tional motive to doing right 

But, without much system, important instruction may be 
given in regard to the nature of conscience, and its development 
aided. They may be warned against the various modes by 
which conscience may be blinded or misled. The illusions pro- 
duced by passion, interest, by looking to the end as justifying 
the means, may be rendered intelligible to all. But it may bd 
more difficult and require more maturity in the scholar to ud" 
derstand and properly to judge of the variety of opinions re- 
specting the moral nature of particular acts, produced by asso- 
ciation and the complexity of actions. These can only be 
understood after considerable acquaintance with the operations 
«nd laws of the human mitrd.. 

There are some classes of duties which it is very difficult to 
define, and which law therefore can very seldom punish, but 
-which are most essential to the happiness (^society, and should 
receive our constant attention both in the school and out of it — ^I 
mean, our duties to others in regard to their feelings, if I may so 
express it And it is in regard to this very class of duties, that 
the moral instruction of both young and old, in schools, colleges 
and at home, is probably most de&ient. How many men who 
would scorn to injure their neighbors property, will yet make 
sport of icguring their feelings. If they can excite a quarrel, 
prejudice one person against another ; if there are any subjects 
which they know to be peculiarly unpleasant, which the person 
addressed would like to have forgotten, anything calculated 
to produce a feeling of disgrace, or of physical or intellec* 
tual inferiority, or in any way to disturb his peace of mind, 
ihey perhaps take delight in suggesting it, in bringing it 
forward to public gaze, or if they do not absolutely take de* 
light in it and do it purposely, they are not sufficiently 
cautious in guarding against it. '^ A blow with a word strikes 
deeper than a blow with a sword." And when we reflecft 
iiow much of the happiness of life is made up of little 
things, how much it depends upon attention to the feelings 
•of others, we see the importance of attending to it in early 
education. 

A disposition to attend to the wants and feelings of others, 
and promote their happiness, united to a certain degree of 
knowledge of the conventional usages of society, constitutes 
what we call manners or politeness. Considered merely as re- 
gards the chUd's chances of success in life, it would be worthy 



S6 APPENDIX. 

of attention. But my object is to speak of it as a dnty.-** 
Even in the gravest concerns in life,, the manner is frequently 
as important as the matter of the deed. 
This same regard to the feelings of others of which I have 
' been speaking, will also lead us to be cautious how we do or 
say anything to affect their reputation. Of all the tittle-tattle 
and slander that is circulating in the world, the probability is, 
that a very small portion originates from malice or a direct 
design to mjure. A great deal of it originates from careless^ 
ness, from a desire to fall in with what we suppose to be the 

{prevailing humor of the company present ; but probably by 
ar the greater part, from vacancy of mind — from want of ac^ 
quaintance with other and more proper subjects of conversa- 
tion. Education and extension of information will supply us 
with other means of occupying our minds and maintaining 
conversation, but it is only a regard for the feelings of others 
which can entirely restrain this mischievous propensity. 

In regard to the manner of teaching morals to the very 
young, there can be but very httle difference of opinion. Be- 
fore they can understand a system, they must have the ele- 
mentary notions upon which a system is founded. The moral 
sentiment is first to be called out, trained, and developed. — 
And in doing this we should follow the course of nature. A 
moral lesson suggested by spme occasion in school life, will 
make a permanent impression upon a child and be remem-' 
bered and recalled whenever a siinilar occasion presents itself : 
while a moral lesson upon the same subject, but unconnectea 
with any present application, would be soon forgotten and 
would not be so likely to be recalled or suggest itself to the 
mind in case of need. Alcott's Record of a School and his 
* Conversations on the Gospels, may suggest to a teacher many 
good ideas as to the best method of conducting conversations 
or remarks on this subject ; and they have the advantage of 
being not imaginary but the record of real conversations which 
actually took place in his school. 

'< Moral instruction (says Wilm) ought to be less teaching 
than development ; and it ought to aim less at conveying to 
the pupils some propositions as coming from the master and 
as forming a science invented by the genius ot man, than at 
making them spring from the depths of his own conscious- 
ness." 

^< If ^says Sir James Macintosh) we were to devise a meth- 
od for mfusing morality into the tender minds of youth, we 
should certainly not attempt it by ai^uments and rules, by 
definition and demonstration. We should certainly endeavor 
to attain our object by insinuating morals in the disguise of 
history, poetry and eloc^uence } by heroic examples, by pathet* 



APPENDIX. 37 

ic incidents, by sentiments that either exalt and fortify or soft- 
en and melt the human heart. If philosophical mgenuity 
were to devise a plan of moral instruction, these I think would 
be its outlines." 

"As hierogl3rphics preceded letters, so parables are older 
than arguments. And even now, if any one wishes to pour 
new light into any human intellect, and to do so expediently 
and pleasantly, he must proceed in the same way and call in 
the assistance of parables." — Lord Bacon 

That these are the correct principles on which morals 
should be taught to the young, I suppose there can be very 
little doubt. To older scholars and classes, scientific treatises 
may be of advantage, but to mere children they would be in- 
comprehensible. The conscience must be cultivated as occa- 
sions arise and the moral feelings called out and' exercised up- 
on the various events in school and home life before they call 
make themselves or can tmderstand from others, the general- 
izations which make the moral code. Not that the teacher 
should wait for great occasions or displays of unusual passion 
or violence. The occasions will be constantly occurring. — 
Lessons upon characters and events in history are highly re- 
commended by Kant and Wilm ; and the influence of the se- 
lections in the reading books which are used in our schools, in 
forming the moral character of the pupils, can hardly be over- 
rated. But above all, let not the teacher forget the influence of 
his own example. 

With regard to the greater part of children, at least of those 
who do not see very bad examples at home, the teacher's 
greatest difficulty will probably be, not in teaching them what 
is right and what is wrong, but in persuading them to do 
right. And the difficulty is the same with older people.— 
Host of the duties of ordinary life are plain. We all know 
tolerably well what is right in any given case. In pronounc- 
ing an opinion on the conduct of others we seldom disagree* 
But how seldom do we ourselves do what we know to be rightt 
We need motives to do right, we need to have our disposition 
to do right strengthened and confirmed. We need to enlightv 
en conscience and give force to its decisions ; and some times 
perhaps must call in the ai<l of the sanctions of religion. 

We are too apt to appeal both with the old and young to 
motives of interest to induce them to do right. Honesty may 
be and no doubt is the best policy, and yet that may be a 
very mean motive for a man's being honest There is a strong 
temptation to use this motive with children because they can 
easily be made to understand it. But is there no fear that we 
may make too much of this and Jead them to undervalue 
other motives, so that other motives will have little influence 
over them 1 And will not the consequence be, that when they 



«8 APPENDIX. 

come to grow up and findy as they often will, tbat they caoool 
succeed in some favorite project honestly — that honesty does 
not always secure wealth, but is very often an obstacle to it,^ 
the foundation of their morality gives way, and they have not 
been accustomed to the control of better motives. 

It may be questionable whether it would not be better to do 
nothing at all, than to appeal as often as we do to impr^^r 
pnotives to encourage the young to what we deem a right 
course of action. It is a commcxi practice to pay children for 
|)eing good. And when they get to be children of a laiger 

Sowth^ we still appeal to the sune motives. We tell them 
at doing good or a correct course will insure success in life* 
We make too much of prosperity, success and wealtk. Econ- 
omy and correct conduct will, it is true, secure the means of 
living, but those generally best succeed in obtaining wealth 
9irho make the most sacrifices of time and of personal c<»nfoEt 
for it, and too often of honesty too. We should try to impress 
on them that true success, considered in relation to the great 
end of life, does not consist in making a ^ow or in making a 
noise in the world ; but that the approbation of conscience is 
better than all else. 

One of the ancient moralists has represented human life as 
a 4Bort of a market in which various c<»nmodities, health, wealth, 
literary distinction, military glory are exposed for sale, and ve 
can have whatever we choose if we pay the price for it 

Mrs. Barbauld has taken up this idea and most eloquently 
93(^nded and illustrated it in a passage which I will quote. 

*' We should consider this world as a great mart of comoaerce 
where fortune exposes to our view various commodities, riches, ease, 
tranquillity, fame, integrity, knowledge. Everything is marked at a 
9etded price. Our time, our labor, our ingenuity,are so much money 
which we are to lay out to the best advantage. 

'* Examine, compare, choose, reject ; but stand to your own judg^ 
ment ; and do not, like children, when you have purchased one thing, 
fepine that you do not possess another which you did not purchase. 
^ *' Such is the force of well-regulated industry, that a steady and 
vigorous exertion of our faculties, directed to one end, will geneiallv 
insure success. Would you for instance, be rich ? Do you think 
that single point worth the sacrificing everything eke to ? 

*< You may then be rich. Thousands have beonne so from the 
lowest beginnings, by toil and patience, d^igence, and attention to 
the minutest articleis of eacpense and profit. &it yoa must give up 
the pieasuies of leisure, of a vacant mmi, «f a free oiiBiispicioiB tea- 
per. If you preserve yoiur integrity, it must he a coaxse-^SNiB and 
vulgar honesty. Those )\\f^ and lofty notions of mosab which yo« 
brought with vou irom the schools, must be considemU^ lowesed, 
and nux with the baser aUoy ot a jealous and worldlyHDunded pro- 



APPENDOu 80 

nice embanaasmeats af a delicate aad ii^eiuuous spirit^ it is nejcessary 
for you to get rid of thcfn as fast as poa^ibla. ¥qu iniu^t shut your 
heart agaio^ the Muses, and content Xq feed ypur understanding with 
plain liousebold truths. In short, you must not attempit to eiwrg^ 
yowr idoas, or polish your taste or refine your sentiments ; but xnuat 
keep in one beaten tmck, without turning aside either to the rigbt 
haad or left ' But I cannot submit to dru(u^ry like this, I feel aboyp 
it.' 'Tis wall : be aboTe it then ; only d^ not repine that you arp 
not rich. 

" Is knowledge the pearl of price ? That too may be purchased 
— by steady application, and long solitary houre of study and reflec- 
tion. Bestow these, and you shall be wise. But (says the mao ^f 
letters) what a hardship it is that many an illiterate fellow, whp caA* 
not construe the motto of the arms on ivis coach, shall raise a iactWMs 
and make a figure, while I have little more than the common conven- 
iences of life. 

'* Et OH magna satis ! Was it in order to raise a fortune that 
YOU consumed the sprightly hours of youth in study and retirement ? 
Was it to be rich that you grew pale .over the midnight lamp, and dis- 
tilled the sweetness from the Greek and Boman spring ? 

" You have then mistaken your path, and ill employed your indus- 
try, ' What reward have 1 then for aH my labors V what reward ! 
A large comprehensive soul, well purged from vulgar fears, and per- 
turbations, and prejudices; able to comprehend and interpret the 
works of man^— of God : A rich flourishing, cultivated mind, preg- 
nant with inediaustible stores of entertainment and reflection. A 
perpetual spring of fresh ideas; and the conscious dignity ofaupe- 
rior intelligence. Good heaven! and what iseward cup you >ask 
besides?* 

*' But is it not some reproach upon the/economy of Providence that 
aoch a one, who is a mean dirty fellow should have amassed wealth 
enough to buy half a nation V Not in the least. He made himself 
a mean dirtv fellow for that very end. He has paid his health, his 
conscienae, his liberty for it : and will you envy him for his bargain ? 
Will you hang your bead and blush in his presence because he out- 
shines you in equipage and show ? Lift up younbrow with a noble 
confidence and say to yourself, I have not these things, it is true ; 
but it is because I have not sought, because I have not desired them ; 
it is because I possess something better. I have chosen my lot, I am 
content and satisfied. 

'* You are a modest man— you love quiet and independence, and 
have a delicacy and reserve in your temper, which renders it impos- 
sible for you to elbow your way in the w<»rld, and be &e herald of 
your own merits. Be content then with a modest retireHient, with 
the esteem of your intknate friends, with the piaises of a bkmcless 
heart, but sesign the splendid distinctions of <he world to those who 
can better scramble for them. 

" The man whose tender sensibility of conscience, and rtrict,rMifd 
to the mies of molality iikafce him seyupulpas and fea^d of oi^nd- 



40 APPENDIX. 

ing, 18 often heard to comi$lain of die diBadfantage he liea under in 
every path of honor and profit. Coald I hut get over some nice points 
and conform to the practice and opinion of &08e ahout me, I might 
stand as fair a chance as others for dignities and prefennent And 
why can you not? What hinders yon from discaniing this trouUe- 
some scrupulosity of yours, which stands so grievously in your way? 
If it be a small thing to enjoy a healthful mind, sound at the very 
core, that does not shrink from the keenest inspection ; inward free- 
dom from remorse and purturbation ; nnsullied whiteness and sim* 
plicity of manners ; a genuine integrity 

Pare in the last recesses of the mind ; 

if jrou think these advantages an inadequate recompense for whatyoa 
resign, dismiss your scrupks this instant, and be a slave-merchant, a 
porasite, or — ^what yon pfease." 

But while we make persevering efforts for the promotion of 
education, we ought not, on the other hand, to be di^ouraged 
if we do not see any sudden or immediate results from our la- 
bors. The leaven of Christianity has been working in the 
world for eighteen hundred years, and the world is not yet 
Christian. If we make up our minds — as I think we must, 
without regard to statistics — that education does promote ' the 
welfare of a people as well as the good of the individual, we 
shall be prepared not to be alarmed by any apparent results 
of statistics. Most of the communities of the civilized world 
may be said to be in a transition state from ignorance to 
knowledge ; and it is this fact, that their condition is a trans- 
ition one, which enables us to account satisfactorily for many 
things which the tables of crime exhibit to us. They have 
lost that sort of contentedness and negative happiness which 
results from brute ignorance in the mass and a strong govern- 
ment in the hands of the few, and they have not yet reached 
that state of intellectual and moral knowledge where each 
man is a law unto himself The elements of society are in 
conflict, and we*cannot expect peace ; but better, far better, is 
any condition — conflicts, wars, and rumors of wars — than the 
apparent peace of quiet and submissive ignorance. Individuals 
may suffer, humanity must gain. 

So in regard to the wonderful increase of wealth in the 
present age. The first effect of the increase of wealth, and 
while it is in the hands of the few, is to offer temptations to 
crime ; and we see, as a consequence, an increase of certain 
sorts of offences in wealthy communities. But may we not 
hope, that as wealth becomes diffused, as its beneficial efiiects 
are felt through all classes of society, as the luxuries of one 
age become the necessaries of life to the next, as the poor ob- 
tain comforts in one age which before only wealth could pur- 



APPENDIX. 41 

chase, the class of crimes arising from disparity of wealth 
will diminish. Poverty and distress we know to be fruitful 
sources of those offences which our laws denounce as crimes. 
As these disappear before the progress of education and wealth, 
we may hope for a better state of society. If the diffusion of 
wealth is a blessing, then we must bear with whatever is 
necessary to this diffusion. So the principle of competition ap- 
pears to be a necessary concomitant of the increase of wealth 
— ^yet it leads to a great amount of misery and crime. In this 
light, we should look upon these evils as temporary ones — as 
the undeniable consequences of our being in what I have 
called a transition state. 

These considerations serve to show us that while we should 
not indulge unreasonable expectations from moral education, 
we need not be without hope. We cannot expect, and perhaps 
ought not to, to remove all temptations from die way of youth. 
That virtue is of but little worth which has been brought up 
as a tender plant in the shade, and which is only virtue be- 
cause it has never been exposed. We should rather endeavor 
to cultivate a moral energy which may be acquainted with vice 
and misery, and yet not be contaminated by it. 

In conclusion, I would say, that we ought not to be disap- 
pointed if we do not see immediately from our system the re- 
sults which we may think we have a right to look for. It is 
unreasonable to expect that all our towns or all our districts 
should at once come up to the standard which we have fixed 
in our own minds as desirable and attainable. It is the policy 
of our laws, and the only policy consistent with the principles 
of a free government, to allow to towns and to districts the 
management of their own schools, subject to such general rules 
as the common good may require. Compulsion is against the 
spirit of our institutions and of our laws. We might by the ex- 
ercise of the central power of the State, force upon a town or 
district a school somewhat in advance of what the town or dis- 
trict would otherwise establish. But it will probably be foimd 
to be the wisest course in the end, to rely upon means of per- 
suasion, to endeavor to inlSuence the minds of the people by ar- 
gument and information, and we shall thus make a progress 
peaceful and sure, though slow. 

E. R. POTTER, 

Comm'r of Pub. Schools. 

Kingston, R. L, January, A. D. 1852. 



42 



AHPENDIX. 



Table No. 1, accompanying the Report of the Commissioner of 

Public Schools. 



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AFraiWIX. 



Table No. 2, accompanying the Report of the Commissioner 
of Public Schools. 





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APPENDIX. 



Table No. 8, accompanying the Report of ibe Commissioner 
of Public iSchools. 



APPENDIX No. 1. 



NORMAL DEPARTMENT IN BROWN UNIVERSITY. 

LETTER FROM PROF. GREENE. 

Pboyidenob, February 13, 1852. 
Hon. E. R. Potter: 

DxAR Sib : — You aak me to give you information respecting 
the organization, coursai of instruction, and present condition and 
prospects of the Normal Department of Brown tJntversity. In com- 
pliance with this request, permit me to premise that the enterprise 
is yet in its infancy, — the first class having been formed at the com- 
mencement of the present collegiate year. Hence little can be said 
of results* It promises well. All that could be reasonably hoped^ 
during so short a period, has been realized. The department is in« 
fended to fit teachers for the practical duties of the school room. 
The course of instruction, the drill exorcises, all tend towards this 
point. 

Two things are contemplated in the plan of organization. Of 
these that which is peculiar to the department is the professional 
training which the course in Didactics, is intended to give. 

The second is the litemry and scientific discipline which the va- 
rious courses afibrd to those who seek for situations in the higher 
grades of schools. Those who are candidates for degrees are, in the 
regular order of study, pursuing these courses. To such, the Nor- 
mal department is a kind of professional school, to fit them for their 
chosen occupation. But to those who come mainly to study Didac-^ 
tics, and yet wish to extend their literary and scientific researchesi 
without obtaining a degree, the collegiate courses afibrd peculiar ad- 
vantages. The student is placed at once in a literary atmosphere. 
He is in daily contact with scholars. He has access to a large and 



46 APPENDIX. 

valuable library. The principles of Chemistry and Natural PhilosD* 
phy are illustrated by an extensive and Well chosea apparatus. His^ 
tory, English literature^ fihe^oric, and English Composition, are all 
taught by able professors. And if he chooses to pursue one or more 
of the kBguageS) he has the privilege of doing it. AU these can be 
attended to in connection with Didactics^ 

But that the advantages of the department may be enjoyed still 
more widely, a second class^ of a more popular character, has beea 
organized. This class is attending a course of lectures and drill ex» 
ercises at the lecture room of the High School. It is opened for 
those teachers, male or female, who se^ for situationB in Granunat 
and Primary Schools, and who have already made sufficient progress 
in the elementary branches to fit them for their profession. The ex* 
ercises here are purely didactic. The principles of the art of teadi* 
ingare distinctly stated and illustrated before die dais ; and to ren* 
der the work more effective, the members thems^ltes are called out 
individually to give elementary le6Sdns,*--reganling die class for the 
time as their school. The skill and eflkiency with which these ex- 
ercises are conducted become, at once, a test of ability, aptness to 
teach) self possession, and power to command attention. This dasS) 
thus far, has been chiefiy composed of ladies, mosdy from Providence 
and the surrounding towns. It consists at present of upwards of 
sixty members. 

The course of instruction in both classes is, [itk its general spirit^ 
the same ; but in form it differs, to adapt it to the different degress ^ 
attainment of the two. All inttnicdons are given by lectures and 
practical exerci3es. The aim of these lectures and exercises is to 
reach the elementary steps in every branch taught in our schools 
which can be most easily and readSy comprehended by the child. 
It has also been our aim to determine not only what faculties of the 
child should be first addressed, but also the point of view from which 
instruction should be presented to Aem. 

'Every subject may be said to have an interior and an exterior 
point of view, from which it niay be examined. There is a vital 
element and an outward TnaniJestatiaPif which is only an unfolding 
' t»f die former. He only can be said to comprehend a subject who 
examines it from its spirit and intent. When approached from this 
interior point of view, a subject does not lose its identity Aoagh it 



smumd fl i^fiet^ of femia ; whereas, when viewed through some oo^ 
^Aid manifestation, it is asuaUy seen only throng a paiticnlar form 
•ttdd that but dimlf . #or example, the learner is told by the formal- 
ist in Arithmetic, that he must place units under units, tens under 
tens, hundreds under hundreds, d6c. Why he shoald do so, he cact* 
iM tell. H^ is not made t& feil the fitness of it, but obeys simply 
iheietter of the ratsi And in Addition, he rat»t begin at the right 
hand, and add up the firsi column, wriftiiig underneath the entire 
sum, if it do not exceed nine, but writing only the rigfat*hand figure 
and eatrymg Ae left to the next upper column, if the sum be greater 
than nme. To the learner thus taught, all these directions become 
in-wrought into the very idea of Addition, as though diey were vital 
to it. Ho supposes this the only mode of adding: and that any de« 
viation from it is a violation of asential priniciples. Now let the 
same learner become familiar with every feature of the Arabic sys- 
•tem of Nofiition m an ingenious invention^— let him see how it caUi 
with a few characters, represent all possible numbers-— let him see 
by contrasting it with o&er methods, as the Soman, for example, 
what unparalleled facilities it affords for carrying on arithmetical 
operations^^let him understand the fundamental principle that wholes 
are added t& wholes when we unite all their corresponding parts^— 
and he will at once see that it will make, essentially, no difierence 
whether we begin at the righi hand, or the left, or in th« middlie, or 
whether we add up er dmo% if so bo that aU the corresponding parts 
are united, and each figure has the place which its value demands. 
If, at length, it should be found by repeated experiments ^at it is 
more convenient to begin at the right hand, that <;07ies9tt9^cs will 
then be appreciated, but tppreciated as a convenience, and Hot as 
somethmg essential. Now when the learner looks at Addition from 
this point of view, he will set, whatever may be die mode of adding, 
that every method is pervaded by one and the same principle, viz* : 
that wholes, however large, art added to wholes when we unite their 
cormpon^ng parts, and that it is the crowning excellence of the 
Arabic method of Notation, that it represents all numbers in corra* 
spoading parts, as units, tens, &c., and that these parts, taken sepa- 
rately, are smaU numbers, and easily compr^ended. 

This interior view is capable of indefinite illustrations dmwn from 
Arithmetici Reading, Grammar, History, Geography, and in fact, all 



48 APPENDIX. 

die bmnches taught in our schools. It has been the chief aim of ovr 
course in Didactics, to open and unfold the methods by which the ?»• 
rious branches may be presented from this point o[ viewi to childreiu 
In no department has it been found neceesary to labor more assida- 
ously than in that of Reading. The elements of Beading, if taught 
at all, are too apt to be exhibited in the form of rules vrhich cannot 
be readily comprehended, much less exemplified by the pupil. The/ 
are usually either a dead letter, or are exemplified only by a serrile 
imitation of the teacher's voice. Now he who looks at a subject from 
this interior point, needs no rule, — ^the thought Bind feeling of the 
writer is his rule ; in other words, the rule is to give just suich an 
expression of the spirit and life of the subject as one would natunUy 
give to it himself) were he to embody it in his own words. 

Two things are needed to secure good reading. Foremost and 
chief, is a delicate appreciation of the sentiment to be expressed; asd 
then such a training of the vocal organs as will secure a forcible, clear, 
distinct, and musical utterance of that sentiment. 

He, therefore, who would teach Reading well, must dwell much 
upon the thought; lie must cultivate the "mind's eye" of the chiU, 
that he may see what the writer saw, feel what the writer felt, and 
then express these thoughts and feelings without restraint In so 
doing, the pupil, by his own voice, exemplifies the rules of good 
Beading, at first without knowing.it; at lengtht his own utterance 
furnishes him with the rules for stress, force, inflection, quantity, rate, 
pitch, emphasis, cadence, modulation, &c. ice. But all this most he 
under the guidance of an etperienced teacher, who can himself ap- 
preciate and exemplify all these qualities of good Beading, anddiaw 
the attention of the learner to what his ewn voice illustrates. Hence, 
the necessity of such Normal exercises as will prepare teachers to 
take up Beading firom the right point of view. The first error in 
teaching children to read, lies at the tery foundation. The first les- 
son is usually wrong. Instead of presenting a child at the outset with 
a letter, as a mere form for him to look at, and name, the teachef 
rixould give him an elementary sound and require him to utter it,-^ 
&en anodier, and so on. The letter should afterwards be given as a 
symbol of the sounds to be associated with it, at first as an aid U) his 
meinoryi and finally, as a permanent representation. In this waff 



APPENDIX. 4d 

the letter means something ; and in combining letters into syllables 
and words, their utility is readily appreciated. 

The next error lies in an ahnost total neglect of the thought y in the 
mechanical process which the pupil must go through in spelling out 
the words of his reading lesson. Hence that stiff, broken, school-boy 
style of reading which is sq disagreeable. It lacks soul — is wholly 
deroid of thought. To improve it, the unskilful teacher/ urges the 
child to *^ speak up loud," and '* read duster," thus involving him in 
two other errors,-— if possible, worse than the first, — and that, too, 
without correcting the first. The child's voice must, as soon as pos- 
sible, be placed under the supremacy of thought ; then will this me- 
chanical utterance yield to a life-like and graceful expression of the 
sentiment of the writer. Our exercises in the classes have aimed to 
exemplify this mode of teaching Reading. 

I have thus given you a few specimens of the mediods which have 
been adopted in our course in .Didactics. Suffice it to say, that aim- 
^lar methods are adopted in all the school bmnches. We have not 
been through with an entire course in any one ; this would be im- 
possible in the time allowed us. ^ But we have given specimens of 
what may be called elementary teaching in the various departments 
of each. It has been our aim to show liow this kind of teaching 
should be conducted, in a suitable number of examples, and leave to 
the members the work of applying it universally. We have"'aim0d 
to make them independent teachers, not leaning servilely . upon the 
text-book. Those who give a good elementary lesson ivithont a 
text-book, will be most likely to use that instrument to the best ad- 
vantage. Such is the course of instruction, so far as I can represent 
it in this short space. It should be added, that my connection with 
the Public Schools of Providence, enables me to give the members of 
the classes peculiar facilities for improvement. 

What cannot be seen in exercises conducted before the Noranl 
class, since the members are not children, but only supposed to be 
for the time, may be witnessed in reality in the different grades of 
oar Public Schools. To these schools, all the menibera of the chM 
hove free access. Here they can witness a practical exempUficatioii 
of the principles to which their attention has been called. 

Upwards of eighty persons have availed themselves of the opportu- 
nity which these exercises afibrd, since the opening of the Depart- 

4 



50 APPENDIX. 

ment last September. It will be seen from this brief sketch of the 
organization and condition of these classes, that a wider range for 
culture and mental improvement is here afforded than in any Normal 
School in the country. He who would with a liberal education pre- 
pare himself for teaching in Academies and High Schools, has here 
an opportunity for so doing. He, again, who would pursue a shorter 
yet thorough course, can accommodate himself to his wishes and cir- 
cumstances« And yet, again, he who wishes to combine the advan* 
tagos of tho Normal School and Teachers' Institute, may attend a 
course of lectures during the autumn and spring. 

Again, it will be seen that the exercises appropriately belonging to 
the Department are strictly didactic, not academic, the latter being 
furnished by the college courses. The question is not, hare you at- 
tended to such a branch ? but, how would you teach it to a beginner? 
How to one more advanced ? What means would you adopt to se- 
cure order and thrift in a school ? To inspire the pupil with entho. 
siasm ? To create a love for study ? To raise him to a perception 
of what is noble, and worthy of his aspiration ? And yet, it is obvi- 
ous that every branch taken from this point of view assumes a new 
and peculiar interest, which leads to a far better comprehension of 
the branch itself, than when learned merely as a school task. A 
task accomplished simply for the recitation room, is often only half 
learned ; it is committed to the memory, rather than the understand- 
ing. But when learned by one who feels himself responsible for an 
explanation of every idea it contains, it must be thoroughly learned. 
He must know not only the lesson itself, but its various relations to 
collateral subjects. He cannot slight it, and then expect to teach it 
successfully. Hence, although the student, on entering this depart- 
ment, is supposed already to JcTuno what he is now learning to teach ; 
yet he will find his knowledge of the various branches greatly ixa- 
proved from the new impulses under which they are reviewed. 

The tests to which candidates are usually subjected in examina- 
tions, make known only their literary qualifications. Little is learned 
of one's aptness to teach, power to interest and secure attention, abil- 
ity to control, fruitfulness in expedients, skill in adapting instruction 
to age and capacity of children, and force and impressiveness of illus- 
tration. But it is obvtous that these didactic exercises, in no incon- 
siderable degree, test the capacity of the candidate in all these.-' 



APPENDIX. 51 

Hence the advantage which school committees and supervisors may 
-derive from an acquaintance with the members of these classes, and 
the progress which they have made in all the characteristics of the 
*^ood teacher. 

It is equally obvious, that the Department will afford peculiar fa~- 
-cilities to those who aspire to good situations, and would be placed in 
a position to make them^ehes known. lam often applied to for 
^nitable persons to fill all classes of vacancies, from the High School 
down to the Common District School 

Hoping that this imperfect outline may in a measure answer your 
inquiries, 

I remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

SAMUEL S. GKEENE, 
Prof, of Didactics in Brown University. 



APPENDIX No. 11. 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 

LETTER FROM REV. R. M. STONE. 

Peoyidekce, Feb. II, 1852. 
Hon. Elisha R. Potter : — 

Dear Sir : — ^When I promised, at your request, to prepare an ar^ 
tide on Evening Schools for your Annual Keport, it was my inten- 
tion to have given to the subject the detailed consideration its impor^ 
tance demands. From the fulfilment of this intention I am preclu- 
ded by an unusual press of duties, and at this eleventh hour can on-^ 
'ly say a few words as an expression of my unabated interest in a 
' class of institutions that must, from necessity, fill -an important place 
in the educational movements of the day. 

In 1849 I prepared, at the instance of your predecessor, Hon- 
Henry Barnard, an account of Public Evening Schools in this couik 
try, embracing notices of all that were then known to be in operation. 
This account was published in his final report to the General As^ 
sembly. Since then, similar schools have been established in New 
Orleans, Newburyport, (Mass.,) Portsmouth, (N. H.,) Portland 
(Me.,) and several other places : all of which have fulfilled the ex- 
pectations of their friends. 

Eighteen years have passed away sin^e the first Public Evening 
Schools were opened in the United States, and the conviction of their 
utility has been gradually gaining strength in the public mind. The 
National Convention of the friends of education held in Philadelphia 
in 1849, and again in 1850, one of the most intelligent bodies that 
has been convoked in this country on any occasion, took up this sub. 
ject as one of commanding importance, and at the xecommendation 
of a committee who, by Prof. Hart, their chairman, made an interest- 
ing report on the subject, adopted the following resolution : 

*< Besolvid, That this Convention recommends to the earnest gob' 



APPENDIX. 63 

•sideration of the community in the several States, the propriety of 
establishing generally, free Evening Schools for adults and for young 
persons who are not in attendance upon the day schools.'^ 

From the report to which I have referred, I transcribe and enclose 
several paragraphs embracing statements worthy of profound consid- 
eration. 

These statements confirm the opinion I have long entertained, that 
something should be done to meet wants that are not met by our day 
schools. In every manufacturing village are to he found many chil- 
dren and youth like those described in these extracts. There is also 
another class, a large portion of them foreigners. They are ignorant* 
eften, of the simple rudiments of learning, and are precluded, by age* 
pride, or fake shame, from entering a primary class in our public day 
schools. They form, to an extent, a distinct order, and if educated 
at all, must be approached in a way that does not arouse either of 
these hostile feelings. It is easier to form an evening school of fifty 
boys fourteen or fifteen years of age, who cannot read and write, thaa 
to induce five of that number to attend a day schooL 

In a manufiicturing State, like Rhode Island » having so many oC 
this class amocig its population, these considerations bear with great 
force. Evening Schools should be established in every village for 
the benefit of its juvenile operatives, and of all odiers who need their 
advantages. It is not merely the dictate of philanthropy, but of en- 
lightened policy, to encourage in such the spirit of intellectual cul- 
tare, — never, indeed, losing sight of their moral and religious devel- 
epment. Intelligence is essential to the growth of the morals of the 
young, as it is to the improvement of their manners ; and to permit 
a generation to grow up among us without education sufficient to 
qualify them to transact ordinary business, or to give them correct 
ideas of our political institutions, is to violate a principle upon which 
their permanency rests. 

In conclusion, I have only time to add, that the efiiciency of Eve^ 
ning Schools may be greatly promoted by the appointment of an <>ut- 
door assistant for each school, whose duty it shall be to collect schol- 
ais, visit their homes to ascertain the cause of every absence, and to 
gain the co-operation of parents and employers in securing a regular 
attendance. Very sincerely your friend, 

EDWIN M. STONE, 



64 APPENDIX. 



EXTRACT FROM REPOBT ON EVENING SCHOOLS. 

BT PBOF. HABT, OF FHiLiJ)BLPH[A. 

While speaking of the large proportion of the population that now, 
in many states and cities, attend puhlic schools, we are apt to forge^ 
that not more than one-third of the whole ntimber attending school 
ever advance beyond the Primary. The High School and the Gram- 
mar Schools are, indeed, open to all ; but all, unfortunately, hove 
not the leisure to advance to those open doors. Idleness and va* 
grancy, no doubt, contribute to this result ; yet, for the most part, it 
is stem necessity, work — want of bread — that compels more than 
two-thirds of the children of the public schools, to complete their 
schooling in the Primary. Having barely learned to read and writei 
and perhaps knowing something of the first four rules of Arithmetic, 
they are taken by their parents to assist in the mill, the workshop or 
tiie factory, — or to become errand boys and news boys. Experience 
has shown that a large number of these boys, thus early withdrawn 
from school, would, at the age of ten to twelve, and even much later, 
be glad to avail themselves of any opportunity of pursuing their 
studies, that did not interfere with the daily pursuits by which their 
subsistence is procured. Wherever night schools have been opened 
a large number of such boys have been among the applicants for ad- 
mission. If there be any class of the community that more than 
others have a claim upon the public for special means of instruction, 
it is those who, through a grinding necessity, are unable to attend ao 
ordinary day school, even though it be entirely free. 

There is another important aspect of this case. The attention of 
those engaged in the cause of education has been occupied so exclu* 
iively with the instruction of the young, that we had weD nigh for- 
gotten the existence among us of an ignorant adidt population. The 
n«imber of illiterate adults will be yet further and largely increased by 
the constant tide of emigration from abroad. 

SoiTio, isolated and not uninteresting efforts have been made^ 
heretofore, to introduce the number of ignorant adults by the es- 
tablishment o( schools expressly for them. But it is not until very 
recently, that anything like a general effort^ in this direction, has been 
attempted. 



APPENDIX. 55 

Within the Jast two or three yean, in seTcral of our large cities, 
as New York, Cincinnati, Providence, and Philadelphia, evening 
schools have heen opened on a large scale, for the instruction, in parti 
of those heyond the proper age to attend the day schools. The special 
cause, which has led to this new impulse, has been the alarming in- 
crease, of late, of riotous and disorderly night assemhlages in the 
streets of our cities. In nearly every city, there exist, at present, 
Jarge gangs of disorderly young men, more or less organized, who 
nightly d isturh the puhlic peace. These young men, it has heen found 
in very many instances, were entirely unacquainted with the first rudi- 
ments of learning, unable to read and write, and thus shut out from 
the ordinary sources of improvement and of innocent recreation. It 
is believed that many of these persons are, in the first instance, drives 
into street-prowling and other disorderly practices, by a mere physi- 
cal impulse — the love of action — and by force of the social principle. 
The case has been stated with great clearness by the Hon. Judge 
Kelly, of Philadelphia, in an address delivered before the House of 
Refuge, in December, 1849. 

''From whom, and what, is Philadelphia now suffering most? — 
Not from the increasing frequency of the perpetration of crimes of 
the higher grades — these increase not in the ratio of the growth of 
our population ; — nor from organized gangs of skilled and hardened 
felons, for, inefficient as our multiplex police departments are, our 
borders are now, as they have ever been, comparatively free from 
these pests of cities. Hiot and tumult are the evils under which we 
^roan. The wayward and restless youths who congregate at the 
street corners, hang about hose and engine bouses, and throng the 
places of cheap and vulgar amusement in which the city abounds, 
are our terror at home and disgrace abroad. For these, if uncheck- 
ed we are all ready to predict a career of crime and punishment. — 
The project of establishing an armed police to hold them in subjec- 
tion, finds favor with many, and may yet be necessary. In Europe, 
such lads would constitute the strength of the government. Full of 
health and animal spirits, and pursuing novelty and adventure with 
the ardor of youth, they would be fascinated by the roving life of the 
soldier, and follow the recruiting sergeant. The standing armies of 
England, and the States of Europe, absorb enough of this class to 
overawe the remainder. Availing themselves of the impulses of 
youth, despotic government discipline those who, with us, would 
be the '* dangerous class,*' and rely upon them for the support of law 
and order ; and, if we fail to promote the peaceable and profitable 
action of these impulses, an armed police, the nucleus of a standing 
army, will be the consequence of our neglect Pardon me for draw- 



66 APPENDIX. 

iog an inustration from your own homes. Nothing essential to com- 
fort is wanting there. Your eztt*nsive lihraries add to the chamio 
of family intercourse. The chiselled marble and glowing canvass 
grace your waits. And, at your hid ding, music sends over yotir so- 
oial group her enlivening and purifying influence. Yet, despite these 
abundant means of domestic enjoyment, your arrowing children weary 
of home. You gladly gather their young friends around them m 
the evening party ; you welcome gratefully the card which invites 
them to an evening of merriment under the roof of a jndictovis 
friend : and you open to them the concert and the lecture room, and 
every other means of virtuous enjoyment oflered by society. The 
love of novelty is natural to your children. By providing amuse- 
ment^^, which are harmless, if not profitable for them, you hope to 
retain their confidence and love, and save them from the ailureinentB 
of folly and vice. Your conduct is prompted by your parentai in- 
stincts, and sanctioned by your experience. And it would be well 
Sot society to follow your example. The children of the poor and ig- 
norant differ not essentially from yours. Their appetite for pleasiue 
is as keen, they are not more sedate, nor has nature given them 
greater power of enduring trial or resisting temptation. 

Crime is not the inevitable consequence of ignorance, bot tkey 
have close and important relations. And I believe the day is not fieur 
distant, when the commonwealth will be constrained, not only to of- 
fer a generous elementary education to all her children, hut to treat 
the failure of a parant to secure its advantages to a child as a for- 
feiture of parental rights. I had occasion recently to request some 
information on this subject from the heads of our penal establish- 
ments, the Clerk of the Quarter Sessions of the County, and the gen- 
tlemen who have held the office of Prosecuting Attorney for Phila- 
delphia during the last five years. The replies were all concnrrent; 
and the information they furnished cannot fait to interest in this con- 
nection, though, it was obtained for another and different purpose. 
The statistics of the Penitentiary, and the convict department of the 
County Prison, show that less than two per cent, of the whole num- 
ber of convicts are thoroughly educated. Of one hundred and forty- 
nine prisoners received into the Eastern Penitentiary from this city 
and county, between January 1st, 1846, and December 17, 1849, 
twenty-eight had received a tolerable elementary education ; twenty- 
three could neither read nor write ; twenty-five could 'read a little ;'* 
and seventy-three could read and write imperfectly.* During the 
years 1847 and 1848, three hundred and thirty-five prisoners were 
received into the convict department of the County Prison, of whom 
one hundred and twenty-six could neither read nor write ; ninety 
coiild '*read a little ;" one hundred and sixteen could read and write 



*Tho8e marked in the above list as able to read and write are so registered upon 
their answers to quaetions at the time of their reception. It seldom amounts to 
more than being, able to read indifferently, and write very poorty; tiot one in hentt^ 
b^ingable to write a fair and connected letter. — NotejrQm Thomas Sbatiergood 
Warden, E, P. 



APPENDIX. 57 

imperfectly ;* and three were well educated. Of twenty-one persons 
under the conviction of riot in the County Prison, on the 1 9th of 
December, 1849, eight couid not read ; three coAjld read, but not 
write ; seven could read and write, but knew nothing of arithmetic ; 
and three could read, write and cipher. No one of them had a good 
elementary education. Of two hundred and thirty-seven boys over' 
thirteen years of age, received into the White Department of Refuge, 
between January 1st, 1847 and December 17th, 1849, forty-two 
ooald read well : one hundred and fifty three could '*read a little ;*' 
and forty-two could not read at all. The Clerk of the Se.'^sions says 
that a large majority of the persons held to bail in the court for riot, 
and other ofiences involving a breach of the peace, are ''destitute of 
edacation, being unable to write their names to the bail-bond." 
Messrs. Wharton, Webster, and Keed,whohave in turn prosecuted the 
pleas of the commonwealth in this county for five years, agreee that, 
with few exceptions, this class of offenders are *»almost utterly un- 
edu-^ated.*' Nor do these facts stand alone. No graduate of the 
Philadelphia High School is known to have been charged with the 
commission of a crime ; and, though I have made efforts to discover 
the fact, if it was so, 1 have not learned that a single person who has 
completed the excellent course of instruction given in our Grammar 
Schopis, hns ever been tried or arraigned in a criminal courtt 

Let me not be misunderstood, lam not maintaining that man is 
wholly the creature of circumstances ; or that instruction in reading 
wr ting, and arithmetic, in gramnar, geography, and mathematics, 
will purify his nature or defend him against all the assaults of folly 
and sin. What 1 mean to say is, that comprehension of and facility 
in, these branches of learning, elementary as they are, open to him 
▼ast fields of profit, pleasure, and advancement, from which his igno- 
rant brethren are excluded ; and that the fact that a boy has passed 
years in the Grammar School, proves that his childhood was not home- 
less; that he had friends to watch over him, to encourage and coun- 
sel him, to guard him from vicious associations, to stimulate his em- 
ulation, and gratify his appetite for refined and profitable pleasures. 
Did our parental and fraternal sympathies extend beyond our homes, 
we would oftener pity than condemn the turbulent youth of our 



*Of these not more than one-fourth can b<^ nnid to do more than write their names. 
— F^si Annual Report qf Vu Bocud of In$pedors. 

f For nearlf two years I was proBecuting attorney in this county, and from the 
period when I went into office down to the present moment, comprising an interval 
of f!veye:irs, I hove paid much attention to the working of the criminal system. 
Jkrom being, during the whole of this period, a Director of the Pullic Schools, mv 
comridemtion has nnturally been employed on the qurstion how far pulliccrinie fs 
affected by public education: ;ind Ht one time I comi»iled a tabulir statement of my 
observaiionfi on this particular point. I need now only give you the result, which is 
that, whether in prison waiting-trial, or in prison after trial, charged with riot or 
turbulence, I hnve never known a single pupil of the High School. 1 can go fur- 
ther, and say th»t, in h11 the cases in which rccogniznnces of hail were taken, and in 
which the defendant was produced for the purpose of writing his namr, and in all 
cases which by any test the educational position o' the de'^endant could be evolved, 
1 never knew, with but one exception, of a pupil of the pui)li<* schools, of a higher 
gttde Than the third diviflion, concerned.— iVo/«yro7/i Francis Wharton ^ Esq, 



68 APPENDIX. 

suburbs. Go with me to one of their homes ; not to that of the boy 
who never knew his parents, and has grown from infancy on the 
rough charities of the poor ; nor the son of the destitute widow, who, 
toiling wearily for food, clothes, and rent, reluctantly leaves her boy 
throughout the day to his own guidance, and the companionship af- 
forded by the alley in which they live ; nor the son of the inebriate, 
who labors by day only to purchase madness for the night. Such, 
though far from being exaggerated cashes, do not illustmte the point 
under consideration so well as the apprentices of our well -conditioned 
mechanics. Many of these are worthy farmers' sons. The father's 
well-tilled farm will support the family ; but is too small to be again 
divided. The son must, therefore, carve out his own fortune. He 
is now a well-grown boy, and, having enjoyed the example of his 
father's temperance and industry, the care and counsel of his fond 
mother, and such slender means of education as the wayside school 
afibrds, he turns his steps towards the city, as the field of widest and 
most varied enterprise. His object is the acquisition of a trade, by 
which he may gain an honest and independent livelihood. When 
his heart swells with recollections of home, he turns to the future and 
thinks of the happy time to come, when as a successful master work- 
man, his roof shall shelter, and his means maintain his aged parents. 
Finding employment, he enters on his apprenticeship. In his mas- 
ter be also finds a friend. Their contract, however, is a mere bar- 
gain, from which both parties expect advantage. The boy binds 
himself to give years of willing and obedient labor as the considere- 
tion for food, clothing, and instruction in the art and mystery of the 
calling of his choice. The master — a kind-hearted man, and good 
mechanic — is cheered in the hope of making something more than a 
bare living for the little family with which God has blessed him. 
His home is in a respectable neighborhood. Embellished by few 
luxuries, it is well supplied with the means of substantial comfort. 
The snug parlor, darkened at other times, is opened to the family on 
Sunday, or when a few friends visit the master's thrifty helpmate. 
In the rear of the parlor is the little dining-room, warmed by the 
kitchen stove, around which the family gathers in the evening for 
the gossip of the day and neighborhood. In the attic is the boy's 
clean and well-made bed. 'l*he little room, though well finished, is 
without grate or fireplace. To warm it through the long evenings | 
of the winter, when books or intercourse with young companions 
might engage him, would involve the master in the purchase of a 
stove, fuel, and lights ; a serious item of expenditure, which the cus- 
tom of the trade would not sanction, and the exigencies of the case 
do not require ; indeed, the boy does not expect it. He knows that 
ho enjoys more comforts than most of his class, and is grateful for 
them. He cannot, however, let his love of quiet and study be as 
keen as it may, confine himself in his cold chamber through the long 
winter evenings. True he is not donied — nay, he is sometimes 
welcomed — to a place in the "sitting room." He need not,, how- 
ever, attempt to read there ; nor can he join us equal participant m 
the conversations. Feeling restraint from the presence of the heads 



APPENDIX. 59 

of the family, he soon discovers that he too is a restraint on themr 
His acquaintances in the city are few, and remembering the oft re- 
peated admonitions of his mother against evil company, he is indis- 
posed to increase their number ; but he goes forth to escape the 
irksomeness of home. And where does he go ? To visit friends in 
the bosom of a virtuous and intelligent family ? Alas, he is a stran- 
ger ! He goes, however, where society in bis wisdom and goodness 
invites him — ^to the street comer, the hose or engine house, the beer 
shop or the bar-room — and if he go not speedily thence, to worse 
places — But I need not follbw him. Were he a son of yours, your 
fears would indicate the thousand dangers that surround him." 

The saipe point is presented with equal clearness and force in a 
pamphlet, understood to be from the pen of the Rt. Rev. Bishop Pot- 
ter, entitled " An Appeal to Philadelphians." 

" Idleness is evqr an abounding source of evil and misconduct. — 
What, then, may not be anticipated from the idleness of boys and 
young men congregated in large numbers in the streets — full of reck- 
less courage and lust of adventure — subject to manifold occasions of 
excitement — banded together, perhaps, by vows of fellowship and mu- 
tual support — unawed by a united and efficient police — often shel- 
tered by darkness — ^and fired, it may be, by the remembrance of 
wrongs still unavenged.- Yet it is to the street alone that many of 
these young men and boys can be expected to resort. After the eve- 
ning meal is finished, and until the hour for sleep arrives, the homes 
of many of them offer neither attraction nor restraint. If they have 
money, the cheap theatre, the bowling alley, the gaming house, the 
well warmed and well lighted tippling shqp holds out its lure, and 
through that lure, multitudes of unsuspecting youths are yearly 
drawn down to the gates of the Destroyer. Money, however, is that 
which most of them want. Hence, in many instances, petty thefts 
to enable them to encompass the means of indulgence — hence, more 
frequently, street gatherings for the younger, and meetings in the 
hose house or engine house, for the elder. Hence, the bands that we 
often pass at the corners of streets, and the throngs that gather 
round the avenues to each place of vulgar amusement. Hence, fire- 
arms are raised, and too often fires are even kindled, that hostile com- 
panies may be brought into conflict, and the opportunity for tumultu- 
ous excitement enjoyed. I'he aggregate result is seen in a spirit of 
wide-spread misrule among the young, which, by its outbreaks has 
often brought disgrace on the community, sacrificed many valuable 
lives, destroyed a vast amount of property, turned capital and enter- 
prise from the city to locations less exposed to outrages and tumults, 
subjected multitudes to extreme terror, and olten to danger, and 
which, at this moment, may well fill the heart of every reflecting cit- 
i2ea with anxious foreboding." 

According to the reasonings and suggestions of these admirable 



60 APPENDIX. 

addresses, the method of correcting the alarming social evil under con- 
sideration, is to find useful and attractive evening occupation for the 
persons here described. The method which, thus far, has been t^nutd 
most efficient for this purpose, is the opening of evening schools. It 
is proposed also, in connection with these schools, to institute readings 
rooms and libraries in the several suburban districts, where these ap- 
prentices chiefly reside. Such schools and reading-rooms with their 
accompaniments of popular lectures and books, their pleasant accom- 
modations and social aspect, can hardly fail to exert a counteracting* 
influence upon the present doi^iniiward tendencies of society. 

^* Experience proves," savs Bishop Potter, in the pamphlet just re- 
ferred to, "that a comfortable school-room, with instruction and su- 
pervision from intelligent, and conscientious persons, will, at once, 
draw large bodies of these lads and young men within their walls. — 
Experience demonstrates, too, that when once admitted, they become 
attached to their teachers, interested in their studies, and respectful 
to the authority of the school. 

" Experience shows yet further, that this amelioration in manner 
and deportment extends from the school-room to the street, the work- 
shop, and the home. Most gratifying facts have reached the Com- 
mittee in illustration of this kst remark, and they are precisely such 
facts as might have been anticipated. Awaken in the young feelings 
of kindness and gratitude — inspire a sense of self-respect and desire 
for knowledge and improvement — teach, experimentally, the pleasure 
and advantage of sustaining order and authority in a small communi- 
ty like the school, and we have then, a strong pledge for their good 
behavior at all times, and in all places." 

Again, he remarks in regard to very many of both sexes, and of 
diflferent ages, whose improvement cannot be provided for in Even- 
ing Public Schools : — 

" They are either too much occupied or too much advanced in 
knowledge. They need however a comfortable and respectable re- 
treat, where they can pass a quiet hour in reading good books, or in 
listening to instructive and entertaining lectures. Others, who are 
younger or less advanced in knowledge, would be willing — if oppor- 
tunity were given — to enter upon studies higher than those pursued 
in the Public Grammar Schools. For these last, rooms might be 
provided, in which, under teachers employed by themselves, or by oth- 
ers acting in their behalf, they could prosecute such branches as 
might best comport with their interests or taste.s. During one-half 
the year, also, Evening Schools are not likely to be kept ; and it is 
much to be desired, that at such times there should be other places 
of resort, where the tastes and habits developed in the school room, 
can be charished rather than discouraged." 



APPENDIX. 61 

It would he premature, perhaps, from the limited experience as yet 
recorded, to draw any very general or absolute inference in regard ta 
tbe final result of this agency. At the same time, the Committee 
feel authorized to say that, so far as they are apprised, nothing has 
yet occurred in the history of these eflforts that may be considered o[ 
an untoward character ; on the contrary, very many facta have come 
to their knowledge, of the most cheering sort. They believe the 
friends of education, generally, should be encouraged to go on, and 
give the pian a thorough and effectual trial. In the city of New 
York, where it has been tried more thoroughly than elsewhere, those 
conversant with the subject, speak in terms of the highest confidence 
to ita entire ultimate success^ 



APPMDIX No. IIL 



IGNORANCE AND VICE IN CITIES AND TOWNS. 

Extract fro1£ tIie Twenty-Seventh Annual Report of tsk 

American Sunday School Union. 

There never has been a time when the ills of society were more 
thoroughly searched out, or more glaringly exhibited than now. The 
institution of what are called the " Ragged Schools ** of London, and 
t)f the Industrial Schools of Aberdeen, Glasgow, &c., has probaWy 
had some share in opening to the light of day the hitherto dark 
mbodes of moral and social degradation in the more populous cities of 
Europe ; and however false may have been the theories or visionary 
the schemes of some reformers, but for them, much that we now 
know of the condition of large masses of our sufietring felloW- creatures 
would have remained unknown. 

When the Christian philanthropist attempts to analyse these ills, 
he soon detects the relation which each sustains to the other, and by 
which all may be traced to a common origin. In the application of 
his efforts^ however^ he must oftentimes select a point qaite remote 
from the seat of the disease, at which to commence the remedial pro* 
■cess. The ills which press most heavily on the mass of men, are 
those which affect chiefly their outward condition. The wtant of the 
comforts of life provoke many very bad passions ^ but tho want of 
the food necessary to sustain life itself, goads the sufferer to despeni^ 
tion. To the privation of wholesome food at proper intervals,— of 
clothing suitable to the varying seasons,*— of comfortable sleep,-'^f 
the decencies of domestic life,-— of steady and honest employment,— 
and of all intellectual and moral cultivation, may be ascribed most of 
the disease, the degtadation, the suffenng and the depraved habits 
E;id courses of those whose social condition excites so much sympathy 
in our day» 



APPENDIX. 68 

The first wants to be relieved are those which are first and most 
generally felt. The hungry must be supplied with food, the naked 
with clotlieSy^and the destitute and forsaken with a home and friends. 
To do this without encouraging or confirming idle and vicious habits^ 
but, on the contrary, inspiring self-respect and self-exertion, is one of 
the highest achievements of philanthropy. In the wise providence of 
God, the relief of these wants involves, to a great extent, the person- 
al efibrts of the more favored classes. Alms-houses, hospitals and 
asylums have their place, and a very important one» in the array of 
means; but they supply none of the sympathy, and but an inconsid- 
erable portion of the relief which sufi*ering humanity demands. — 
The endless variety of wants and woes, their wide difiusion, and their 
minute individuality, suggest the idea that the provisions of mercy 
• and sympathy, of which the more favored of our race are made the 
stewards, were, by this means, to be drawn out in corresponding va- 
riety, difiusiveness and individuality : — in other words, that every 
human being has something to contrive and to do for the good of 
some other human being. 

It is evidently no part of God's providential arrangements on this 
subject that a common fund should be established, to which the 
wealthy shall contribute, and from which the poor shall draw their 
supplies ; but each individual is constituted the Lord's almoner, and 
the nearer he comes to a personal knowledge of his beneficiary, and 
to a communion of thoughts and sympathies, the more effective is 
the charity, and the more permanent and happy its results to both 
parties. Perhaps, in the final vindication of the ways of God to man, 
it will appear that the darkest shades of human adversity were in- 
tended, in part, to set in a more distinct and vivid light the power 
and grace of human sympathy. 

It is a remarkable feature of the ministry of the Founder of our 
religion, that the dispensation of truth was closely interwoven with 
the dispensation of mercy, — the promulgation of the gospel with the 
alleviation of sufiering. Not only do '' the poor have the gospel 
preached to them," but " the blind receive their sight, the lame walk 
and the lepers are cleansed, the deaf hear and the dead are raised 
up." Beauty is given for ashes, and the garments of praise for the 
spirit of herviness. We are told that Jesus went about all the cities 
and villages of the Jews, not only teaching in their synagogues and 



64 APPENDIX. 

preachiog the gospel of the kingdoro, but ** healing every sickfiess 
and every disease among the people." When he gave his izmnediale 
disciples authority to preach the gospel, he connected with it a com- 
mand to *' heal the sick ;" and when those who had waited on his 
teaching were exhausted and hungry, he provided for their full sup- 
ply by an exertion of miraculous power. 

That these interpositions of his mercy were made the occrasion of 
the display of his miraculous power, and so evidences of his claim to 
faith and obedience, does not take at all from the force of the in- 
ference, — for he might have revealed the same divine poinrer in a 
thousand forms unconnected with human suffering. A similar trait 
appears in the ministry of the apostles ; and no one can read the 
annals of modern missionary labor without noting the increased &- 
cilities with which the gospel is introduced where it is preceded or 
accompanied by the relief of physical suffering. How far this 
happy union is preserved in modern arrangements for the promulga- 
tion of Christianity among ourselves is worthy of thoughtful coDnd- 
eration. 

It is very obvious that in order to connect religious inculcatioo of 
any. kind with ministrations to physical wants or griefs, we most find 
some avenue (hat will lead us to the family group, however litde 
resemblance such a group may bear to the true idea of that relation* 
We must make our way to the place, obscure and revolting as it may 
be, where the instincts, if not the afiections, of the parental and filial 
relation exist, and in which any permanent reform of the social state* 
as well as any efficient remedies for physical and social sufieriQg» 
must take their rise. It is no mercy to a youth to limit the hours of 
labor in the workshop and factory, if the time so rescued from the 
grasping hand of an avaricious employer is to be spent in the filthy 
and sickening garret or cellar, or in the haunts of the idle and 
vicious, or in the resorts of topers and vagabonds. We must improve 
his home before we can have much heart to turn the child towards 
it. And what shall we do first towards this desirable end ? A 
true economy will lead us, (1.) To apply the simplest and most ef- 
fective remedy. (2.) To do it as early as practicable, and (3.) To 
apply it to the mischief that lies nearest to us. Without disparag* 
ing other agencies that claim confidence in this behalf, we think the 
Sunday School has some peculiar claims to be regarded as the expo* 
nent of such an economy. 



APPENDIX. 65 

It will be conceded, we presume, that the attempt to inculcate re*, 
ligious truth upon adult minds that have been hitherto ignorant of id 
is, to a great extent, fruitless. The obstacles to its action on those 
who stand most in need of it are numerous. Among them are, 1. — 
the absence of habits of reflection and meditation. 2. The customs 
which govern the places of resort for pubiic worship and religious 
teaching. 3. The pressure of immediate and conscious wants. 4, 
False or vague views of the offices and requirements of religion. In 
confirmation of this opinion, we may cite a passage from a series 'df 
papers on the condition of large classes of the population of London 
which have excited more than ordinary interest. 

**• It is estimated that the number of costermongers or street sellen 
attending the London * green* aud fish markets, is about 30,000 men, 
women, and children. It is supposed that not three in one hundred 
of them were ever in the interior of a church or any place of worship, 
or knew what is meant by Christianity. Of all things, they hate 
tracts. They hate them, because the people leaving them never give 
them any thing, and, as they can't read tke tract, (not one in forty,) 
they're vexed to be bothered with it. And really, what is the use of 
giviog people reading before you've taught them to read ? They re- 
spect the city missionaries, because they read to them, and because 
they visit the sick, and sometimes give oranges and such like to them 
and the children. We have known a city missionary buy a shilling^ 
worth of oranges of a coster, and give them away to the sick and &e 
children, and that made him respected among them. If the costers 
had to profess themselves of some religion to-morrow, they would ail 
become Roman Catholics, every one of them. The priest, the sisters 
of charity, &c., always come to the sick, 6cc, They reckon that re- 
ligion's best that gives the most in charity." 

And is it impossible to teach them that the charity is best which 
brings with it the hopes and consolations of religion, secures to them 
permanent sources of prosperity, happiness and peace, frees the soul 
from the shackles of superstition and sensualism, and opens vp before 
it the way of eternal life ? Perhaps the experiment may fail wiih 
adults, but it will succeed to a great extent with the children ; and 
this presents the array of Infant schools, Sunday schools, and Indus* 
trial and Sagged schools in an interesting aspect. They confer the 
boon of education, and thus supply the means of self-support The 
Christian teachers go into a family as helpers, as suppliers of wants 
es counsellors, as friends in adversity, as sympathizers with woes 
whidh press most severely upon soul and body. 

5 



66 APPENDIX. 

It is among the children that we find the fewest ohstacles to the 
full play of good infiuences — and surely the motives to exert them 
are strong enough? If there is an object of real pity in the wide worid^ 
it is a little child making i(s way unguarded and uncounselled up in« 
to the busy haunts of men, with skin as fair and delicate as a palace- 
child, yet all begrimmed with dirt — affections susceptible of, the 
gentlest influences, yet all rudely stifled — a temper pliable, yet goad- 
ed into obstinacy and violence — a mind capable of exalted attain- 
ments assimilating it to its Creator, yet left to rust and perish in bru- 
tish ignorance. We have seen such children : they sometimes find 
place in our Infant and- Sunday schools, and when well cared for, 
they are among the most precious tokens of the redeeming virtue of 
such institutions. 

Dr. Bell thus describes the progress of one such, " But alas," be 
says, *' it is a history of a frightful class in the population of tiie 
towns, and half the inmates of the ragged schools of the old world." 

" The little creature has an expression that does not belong to in* 
fancy. It looks sad and careworn. If it survive, it early cree^ps oat 
into the street, there to begin a life that will probably end where it 
began. It learns to speak — but what is the language ? It sees and 
hears — but what does it see and hear? The reader knows. Sucli is 
its infantine education — an education that is unmixed, untinged even 
by the words of a good vocabulary. It does not know the meaoiog 
of Ue^ because it has never been taught the meaning of truth; nay. 
it has been taught to lie, and truth has been sedulously concealed 
from its mind. Anon, it is instructed in the art of pilfering, and in 
the hellish rhetoric of the wynds. When he is four or five years of 
age, he attracts the attention of the policeman, who ' marks him as 
his own ;* and he appears before the magistrate — an experienced 
thief — at the mature age of six years. How much this urchin knows! 
He knows all the obscene words, and all the oaths, simple and cooi' 
pound, which are the pith and nmrrow of the language in the wynds. 
He knows all the highways and byways — the outs and the ins— the 
nooks and the crannies of the city. He knows the value of things. 
He knows the most approved method of appropriating what belongs 
to another. He is acquainted with the ' wee pawn ' broker ; and he 
knows the dram-seller, for whose sake he is an outcast. We say 
that this boy as little deserves to be condemned for traversing the 
law, as the red-deer deserves to be slain for crossing the march upon 
the 8now*clad hill, descending into the valley, and satisfying his ap- 
petite on the turnips of an upland farmer." 

Having thus found access to a group of neglected children, our first 
object is to subject them to the simplest and most effective process to 



J 



APPENDIX. 67 

give a right direction to their hearts and minds. There can he hat 
one opinion, as to what this process is. Instruction in the sacred 
Scriptures must he the predominant element of it. If they do not 
know how to read, they must be taught ; and if they do, they must 
be persuaded to make a wise use of the attainment. If their secular 
time is absorbed in necessary labor, the more we must make of Sun- 
day. The whole array of moral means which the church and the 
friends of public virtue and good order can bring to bear on thei^i 
must be drawn into service. 

It is not an easy matter to persuade the father and mother, (and 
•tiU less easy to persuade one against the will of the other,) to attend 
a place of religious instruction ; but the children are glad of the opr 
portunity. A thousand motives influence them to which their pa- 
rents are strangers. The excitement of preparation, the change of 
scene, the association with numbers, the ceremony of being enrolled 
and classed, &c., nil have their place and weight. ' No deficiency or 
inferiority of apparel or personal consideration, no regard to the 
speech of the world, no taunts or jeers are sufficient to restrain them 
from embracing the opportunity. And it may be safe to say that in 
the absence of positive prohibition, or needless embarrassment inter- 
posed by parents, ninety-niiie in a hundred of all the children in the 
land, of proper age to attend Sunday school would desire to avail 
themselves of an offer to do so. So that if we assume that commor 
dious places of assembling Sunday schools were provided in all suit- 
able localities, and properly furnished with teachers and appurtenan- 
ces, there would be no difficulty in gathering together for Sunday 
school instruction ninety-nine hundredths' of the children and youth 
now living in the United States between the ages of six and sixteen 
years. 

The alternative presented to us at this stage, is to take them/ro»e 
home or to leave them untaught. There is no provision now made, 
nor does any provision seem practicable by which the proper influ- 
ence can be exerted upon hundreds of thousands of them at their 
dwellings. They must, therefore, be withdrawn for a little season, 
at stated times, in order that their hearts and minds and hands may 
be supplied, if possible, with something that Abey c$in take back with 



68 APPENDIX. 

them for the good of the household.*^ A right priDciple ia the h«itr 
a simple hymn in the memory, or & pleasant little hook in the handt 
may he as a light to shine in a dark place. Thus we gently and ef- 
fectually introduce the gospel, unmixed with human philosophy and 
* speculation, into the homes of the people ; and is not this subatan- 
tially the true remedy for social evils, introduced at the right tune 
and place, and operating upon the right class of persons ? 

We suhmit that it is only by thb minute subdivision of Christian 
energy and self-denial, which brings a single individual of somewbst 
elevated moral and intellectual character into personal cominunioD 
with another single individual of an inferior grade, that the general 
radical renovation of society can be brought about ; and when thii 
personal intimate communion can be made to bear on the mass of 



*In a former report, we mentioned an enterprise of much promise, undertaken In 
New York, and Icnown as the " Boys' Meeting.'' We make the following eztnct 
from the latest account wc hare seen of its success : 

After the lapse of more fhnn two years, the managers (of whom there are fpur, be- 
side the genilemen who officiate as speaker and chorisier,) feel that It may interest 
some to know, ihnt ihc meeting is still continued, and, as they think, with increse- 
inj[f usefulness. Whifc they do not claim for the plan any rare excellence, believing 
that the Sunday school would be a still better place of instruction for the chiklien 
and youth now under their care, they cannot but feel that they are engaged in an 
importont work. They are happy therefore, in being able to slate, that three »roi- 
lar meetings have been cstablisned in other parts of the city,— one of which isuadec 
the rare of a gentleman who is employed to derote his whole time to that pardc- 
ular field. 

In regard to the chikiren who attend this, the original Boys' Bfeeting, it may be 
said, that ihc greater portion of them bek>ng to the very class for whom it was io- 
stitutcd ; and, tboueh but a few of them are either ragged or filthy, ihey have not 
failed todeveiope phases of depravitv, and exhibit a want of religions instriictlon, 
sufficient to sadden the heart, and call for earnest efforts in their behalf. Some of tbe 
attendants are Sunday school scholars, who insist on coming, notwIthstandlDgthef 
have been asked to stay away. These aside, it has been clearljr demonstrated bcie, 
tiiat there is a verv large number of children and youth, all over the city, the off- 
spring of respectable parents, whose destitute condition demands the prayers, alaii. 
and labors ot the Christian community. It is n mistaken notion that our vicious 
children aro always clothed in rags. 

As to results, it may be remarked, that while the managers have not the happiness 
to record the conversion of any of those under their care, they hove been permitted 

■ to witneBs a marked and growing interest on the part of many, while the deport- 
ment of oil, during the past twenty months, has betn such as to secure almost per- 
fect order during tne exercises. Some boys have been regular attendants bom (be 

' very first day the meeting was opened. 

It is thought that the labors of the two individuals whose duty it is to visit tbs 
Deighboring docks and streets for the purpose of collecting hearera at the tooWj are 
of f8« ntial service. It is their custom to distribute papers, tracts, dtc, among 
young men and others who cannot be induced to attend the meeting, while they 
are otten permitted to say a word in season to some who never enter the sanc- 
tuary. 

Tljc whole omoimt of inoney expended since July, 1848, is a little less IhsnMre* 
hundred dollars. The principal itr ma of expenditure have been for reSi, furnisbiag 
the hall With matting, and for children's newspapers, tftc. dbc. 



J 



APPENDDL . 69 

childten a»d youth, aot otherwise simibrly infioenced, the adran* 
tage is inconceivably great 

If it is conceded — as we think it must be by the must superficial 
observer — that the weil-beiog of a community is greatly dependent 
on the moral and physical condition of what have been significantly 
•called the ** foundation classes," it cannot be a question of ^ubordi* 
nace consequence, what shall make their condition in both respects 
eligible ? For ourselves, we do not entertain a doubt that indifTer- 
once to the institutions and ordinances of religion — an habitual dis« 
regard of and dissatisfaction with the dealings of God *s providence — 
tmd (in a multitude of instances) a settled and shameless unbelief in 
the dispensations of his grace, if not in his existence, — lie at the hot* 
4om of the gravest of the social evils which are so rife in the cities of 
Europe, and are becoming too familiar among ourselves to excite 
surprise or alarm. In this view, nothing can be more preposterous 
iban to employ any remedy for them of which Christianity, in its 
purest and simplest principles, is not a predominant element. 

In the more elevated and prosperous classes of the community, in- 
fidelity may co*exist with an external regard to the proprieties and 
refinements of life. A thousand motives may be suggested for a con- 
cealment of such discreditable views. But it is far otherwise among 
those who are embarrassed by no such restraints, and who feel the 
power of no such motives. They speak out, to each other and to all 
the world, with an emphasis which should by right belong exclusive- 
ly to truth, and lay themselves open to every influence that will con- 
firm and strengthen them in their false position. 

We cannot present this painful view of the social condition of large 
dosses of people in our chief cities in more appropriate language than 
has been used in describing a like class in the English metropolis ; 
and it should always be remembered that what we lack in our native 
popular composition of the ingredients of ignomnce, selfishness, and 
an unblushing contempt for authority, human and divine, is likely to 
be oiore than made up to us in the influx of foreign stock. 

•' Very few of the working people of London," says a late writer, 
** give attention even to the outward ordinances of religion. There 
is scarcely a church or chapel in the metropolis that contains more 
than a mere sprinkling of them at Sabbath worship ; and although 



70 APPENDIX. 

the lowest and degraded classes are sunk in a carnal and stupid indif' 
ference, yet this cannot be said of the class above them. 

"What, then, are the opinions of these people respecting the doc- 
trines of Christianity ? Are they opposed to them, or favorable ?— 
Or are they in sentiment as in practice, resting in a cold, vagae 
neutmlitv? We know that the latter conclusion is a common, but 
sadly mistal^en one. Can it for a moment be reasonably supposed 
that, in these days of social and intellectual upheavings and univer- 
sal excitement, the land flooded with literary publications of the most 
arousing <:hai;acter, and of every form and tendency, with social ar- 
rangements so eminently productive of mental activity, inquiry and 
decision — can it be supposed that, under such a state of things, ^e 
immen^ working population of this country — shrewd, intelligent, 
and conclusive upon every other question — have no definite opinions 
whatever upon the subject of religious truth? .We may safely an* 
swer this question by referring to the nature of the most powerful 
influences that are at work in forming their opinions. They are not 
religums. For them the influences of the pqlpit are powerless, for 
they scarcely ever reach them ; and the Christiancharch has supplied 
no substitutionary means at all adequate to the work. She has 
trained and educated missionaries, and thus qualified them for for' 
eign labor, but to the missionaries and laborers among our heathen 
population at home, she gives no such training. She provides no 
Home Missionary Colleges where evangelists may be specially trained 
by men experimentally acquainted with their wants and circum- 
stances. And not only so, but there is scarcely any literature pro- 
vided of a suitable character. The mental appetite is quickened— 
it must be fed ; but the Christian church is not feeding it. We are 
ashamed to state it, bat the rarest publication we can find is a religi- 
ous tract or periodical suited to the mental characteristics of the irre- 
ligious poor I To the truth of this, every intelligent City Missionary 
or tract distributor will testify. Our monthly magazines would be 
less welcome, did they contain one long, dry religious essay, partly 
expressed in a language and style we could scarcely understandc— 
But such is generally the character of the monthly tracts written for 
the religious edification of the poor. Can we wonder, therefore, if 
they are seldom read ? or that an instrumentality so feeble and in- 
efficient in all its departments, should prove inoperative on our adult 
working population ? 

•* We believe, and we speak from experience, that the infidel Sun* 
day newspapers and kindred periodicals, are exerting^ a more power- 
ful influence upon the adult working population of London, than is 
being exerted upon the same doss of people by-all denominations of 
evangelical Christians put together. They find a welcome entrance, 
from cellar to garret, in ev^ lane and alley in the metropolis.— 
Their pages form the chief Sabbath reading of the poor, and are 
greedily perused, while the insipid tract is lying unopened upon (be 
shelf, ready for the polite " call" of the district visitor. Even witb 
the elder children, one of these newspapers is a favorite, and tbe on- 



APPENDIX. , 71 

]y one that some of our ragged emigrants have written to their pa* 
rents to send them. 

** Unlike the majority of modern Christians, each convert to infi- 
delity beymies a missionary. In the workshop or manufactory, their 
opinions are industriously promulgated, and the sacred truths of the 
gospel derided and denied. The effects of this we have seen even in 
the Ragged Schools : workshop hoys, coming with the determination 
of converting the whole class to their opinions — ^putting questions and 
uttering sophistical statements, which the teacher found some diffi- 
culty in refuting. 

" Among the conflicts which truth has yet to wage with the king- 
dom of darkness, and which every convulsive movement is hastening 
onward, we believe that the contest with infidelity will be neither 
the slightest nor the shortest.'^ 



APPENDIX Na IV. 



Smithfield, 



SCHOOL AND OTHER LIBRARIES. 

The following table exhibits the number of volumes in the 
School Libraries, as nearly as can be ascertained : 

No. Toll. 

North Ptowdence, Allendale, - - - 

Smith's Hill, 
No. 1, - 
No. 2, 

. Lonsdale, - - - ^900 

Slatersville, - - V50 

Globe, . . - "SSO 

Hamlet, - - "275 

Bernon, - - - •200 

- Manton Library at Cumberland Hill, 376 

- Manton Library at Pascoag, - 808 

- Chepachet, - - *750 

- Manton Library at Hemlock, - 1200 

- Abom Library at North Scituate, 450 
Smithville Seminary, - - 5(K) 

. No. 8, . - - '400 

- None. 
Old Library - - 100 
Methodist Seminary, - - 980 
Episcopal Parish Library, 100 
None. 

Washington Village, - 402 

Bowen'sHill, - - 40.9 

Old Warwick, - - 475 
Ladies' Library at Old Warwick, 250 

Phenix. • . - 720 

South Kingstown^ Kingston. 

D. Rodman's. 

Peacedale. 
North Kingstown, None. 



Cumberland, - 

Burrillville, - 

Glocester, - - 

Foster, - - - 

Scituate, - - 

Cranston, - -• 

Johnston, - - 
East Greenwich, 



West Greenwichj 
Coventry, - - 

Warwick, - -. 







APPENDIX, 


ts 

- Mo. Voto. 


Westerly, - - 


- 


Westerly, - - - 


2000 


Hopkinton, ) 
Richmond, ) 


- 


Brand's Iron Works. 


•800 


Richmond, 


• 


Carolina Mills, 




Exeter, - - 


. 


Fisherville, 


675 


Charlestown, - 


% 


One in three divisions, 


706 


Portsmouth, - 


. 


North End, 


425 


9 




South End, - 


650 


Middletowi), - 


^ 


~ X * 


•300 


Tivertoij, - - 


- 


Globe Factory, 


160 


Little Compton, 


- 


Two Libraries, - 


1108 


New Shoreham, 




.... 


•400 


Jamestown, - 


. 


.... 


•500 


Bristol, - - - 


. 


.... 


147 


Warren - - 


m 


Lyceum, 
Female Seminary. 


860 


Barrington, - 


- 


Barrington, 


550 


The following 


is 


believed to be the number of volumes in 


the College and other Libraiies. 




Providence, - 


• 


College, (bound volumes,) 


25,000 






College Societies, 


7000 






Friends' School, 


1500 






Atheneum, ... 


16,600 


Newport, - - 


- 


Redwood, founded 1747, 


•4000 






Mechanics', founded 1828, 


•iioo 






Hammond's, founded 1820, 


•8000 






Richardson's. 




Providence, - 


- 


Historical Society, 
State Library. 


•2500 


, 




Mechanics .... 


•3300 






Franklin, 


•800 



Those marked thus, * are estimates. 

In addition to the above, there are many parish libraries, of 
which we can obtain no account. And the number of volumes 
in the various Sunday School libraries, principally of juvenile 
books, is very large. 

There are still many places in the State, where village or 
school libraries should be established, as will be seen from an 
inspection of the foregoing table. 

These libraries have generally been formed upon the plan 
of loaning out the books for a small weekly charge to subscri- 
bers and non-subscribers alike. This is believed to be the wis- 
est arrangement. 

The friends of education should not be disappointed if the 



74 APPENDIX. 

books should not bo as much read a few years hence as now, 
while newly established. Still they should be maintained.— 
The youth who are growing up in our public schools, who feel 
a desire forjimprovement, should have the opportunities within 
their reach. And if even but one solitary scholar should have 
ambition or curiosity enough to lead him to use the librar\', 
slill it should be preserved.* 



*Those who wish to sne a full historical accoant of our large libraries should con- 
sult the account by Prof. Jewett in the Fourth Annuil Report of the Smithsonian 
Institution. Also see Journal of R. I. Institute, by Mr. Barnard, vol. 3, page 428.— 
We have endeavored to correct some inaccuracies in their statements as to 
numbers. 



« 



J 



APPENDIX No. V. 



OUTLINE OF THE SYSTEM OF EDUCATION IN RHODE ISLAND. 

The following outlioe is published as an answer to numerous en* 
quiries relating to our system. 

Population. — The population of the State is 147,549. Out of 
this, the city of Providence and the compact towns of Newport, Bris- 
tol and Warren^ contain 58,795. And when to this is added the 
population of Woonsocket, East Greenwich, Wickford, Pnwcatuck, 
Pawtucket, Pawtuxet, and the numerous manufacturing and other 
villages, it will be seen that by far the greater part of the population 
is iD cities and villages. 

The State is divided into five counties and thirty-one townships. 
In Providence, Newport, Bristol and Warren, the schools of the 
whole town are managed by Committees. The other twenty-seven 
townships are divided into schools districts, which are corporate 
bodies for school purposes. 

School Officers. — Every city and town chooses annually a 
School Committee of not less than three persons, and they may ap* 
point or authorise the committee to appoint a superintendent. The 
city of Providence and several of the towns employ superintendents. 

In the four towns named, the Committees have the whole man- 
agement of the schools. In other towns, they have the general su- 



76. APPENDIX. 

pervision, make regulations, define district boundaries, examine 
teachers, visit the schools, receive and make returns, and pay the 
bills by orders on the treasury. 

In tlie tvirenty-seven districted towns, each district chooses annual- 
ly one or three trustees, a clerk, treasurer, collector, &;c. The duty 
of the trustee is to employ the teacher, have the custody of the dis- 
trict property, to visit the school, &c. 

The supervision of the State is exercised by means of a Commis* 
sioner of Public Schools, annually appointed by the Governor and 
Senate, and to whom an appeal may be taken from all doings of 
committees, trustees, and other school officers. There is a Board of 
Education. The duties and powers of these school officers may be 
seen more particularly by referring to the several heads in the index 
to the School Law. 

County Inspectors may be appointed by the Commissioner, who 
are authorised to examine teachers and to give certificates, which are 
valid in all the towns in their county. They have no compensation. 

Compensation. — ^The Committees and Trustees, jzenerally, receive 
no compensation for services. Superintendents of towns are paid by 
the towns. The Commissioner's salary is paid from the State treas- 
ury. 

School Fhnd. — The State has a permanent fund invested in 
Bank Stock of $51,300. 

When the State received its pcrtion of the U. S. Surplus Bevc- 
nue, it was also invested, and the annual income appropriated to 
Schools. 

SappoRT OF Schools. — From the interest of the School Fund, 
the U. S. Surplus Revenue, and other sources, the State appropri- 
ates $25,000, and from the proceeds of a direct tax $10,000— mak- 
ing in all $35,000 annually. This is apportioned among the town- 
ships in proportion to the population under 15. But in order to re- 
ceive its portion, each town must raise at least one-third of its por- 
tion of the $25,000. Most of the towns raise a great deal more than 
the amount required. 



APPENDIX. 77 

In the twenty- seven districted towns the money is apportioned as 
follows : The money from the State is divided into two parts — one 
part Is divided equally among the districts, as corporations. The 
other part is divided af*cording to the average attendance in the dis- 
tricts the previous year. Tlie money raised hy the towns is divided 
hy such rules as the towns or committees prescribe, generally equal- 
ly. There is also a registry tax on voters, and the money received 
from this source is applied to support schools in the town where it 

is received. 

The school districts can also raise money by direct property tax 
to support schools, or can make an assessment on scholars who are 
able to pay. In the greater part of the districts the deficiency of the 
public money is supplied by assessments. 

Union Districts. — Ample provision is ^ade by the law for the 
gradation of schools, and to encourage country districts to unite for 
the sake of supporting a higher school. 

School Houses. — In the four towns named, and also in one other, 
school houses are erected by the whole town for all the districts. In 
the other towns, each district, as a corporate body, manages its own 
affairs, chooses of&cers, lays taxes to build and repair houses, support 
schools, &c. Locations and plans of houses, and the amount of 
taxes, must be approved by the committees of the towns. 

T£ACHRRs. — Committees can examine and give certificates for 
their towns, county Inspectors for their counties, and the Commis- 
sioner for the State. No teacher can be employed without a certifi- 
cate. 

Institutes. — Institutes are held at such places and times as the 
Commissioner decides. The expense is paid out of the State treas* 
ury. ' 

Length of Schools. — In the compact places and villages in which 
so very large a portion of our population is concentrated, they are 
continued through the year. Each district is required to keep a 
school fur four months, in order to receive its school money. The 



7« APPENDIX. 

country districts generally keep ft school from six to ei^t months, 
part in the winter and part in the summer. 

Academies and Colleges. — These receive no aid from the Sole. 
There are several academies and high schools, some of ivhich are io- 
corporated. Brown University, at Providence, is aa instituiion of 
long established reputation. 

Dbaf and Dumb, d&c. — The State makes provision for the suppoit 
and education of the indigent deaf and dumb, blind and idiots. The 
deaf and dumb have generally been sent to the Hartford Institution, 
and the blind and idiots to South Boston. Provision 19 also made 
by the State and towns for the support of the insane poor at the 
Butler Hospital for the Insane, at Providence. 

• 

I^BRARiEs. — Towns or districts may raise money by tax for a 
School Library. And individuals may incorporate themselves by a 
provision in the School Law for this purpose. Under this provision 
a large number of associations have been formed. See the appendix 
No. 4 to this report. 



ACTS AND RESOLVES 



BENEEAL ASSEMBLY 



itntt nf J^]}Bh Salnnli nni) |3ri)Ditinitt |$lnnfntiDn0, 



MAY SESSION, 1862. 



fflTH THE ROLL DP MEMBERS. PROCEEDINGS Oi' THE TWO HOUSES IS 
OSA-ND COMMITTEE. AND REPORTS ORDERED TO BE PBIN'TED. 



&tatr oC SSIjoue Volant, i^c. 

OFFtCB Ot 8ECRETA11V OF STaTS, MAV, iBil 



PROVIDE NCEi 

PRINTED BY 9AVLES & HILDEH. 

1862, 



S^r'The General Assembly catiVelied at Newport, in coflformityl 
Art. 4, Sec. 3, of ihd Constitutioiij on the first Tuesday in May, (Hi 
1852. and adjourncfd on Friday, the 7th day of May foUowiDg,* 
tneet again in Newport^ on the third Monday of June, 1852, 



ACTS AND RESOLVES 

PASSED AT THE 

MAY SESSION, 1852 



An Act for the suppression of Drinking Houses and 

Tippling Shops. 

M is enacted hy the General Assemhli/ a^ follows : 
B act for Section 1. No person shall be allowed, at any time, 
!J^J^ ^jf to manufacture or sell or suffered to be manufactured, 
^J?* d ^^ ^^ ^y ^^y person, any spirituous or intoxicating 
ippBii^° liquors, or any mixed liquors, a part of which is spir^ 
*^ uous or intoxicating, except as hereafter provided, 

Sec- 2. The town council of any town may, and the 
mayor and aldermen of any city shall, annually, on 
the Monday next following the annual election of town 
and city officers in any town or city, or as soon there- 
after as may be convenient, appoint some one or two 
suitable person or persons as the agent or agents of 
said town or city, to sell at some central or convenient 
place or places within said town or city, spirits, wines, 
or other intoxicating liquors, to be used for medicinal 
and mechanical purposes, only: and said agent or 
agents shall receive such compensation for his or their 
services, and shall in the sale of such liquors, conform 
to such rules and regulations, as the town council or 
mayor and aldermen, as aforesaid, shall prescribe. Any 
such agent, appointed as aforesaid, shall hold his situ- 
ation for one year, unless sooner removed by the board 
from which he received his appointment, as he may be 
at any time, at the pleasure of said board : and in case 
of a vacancy in said appointment by such removal, or 
otherwise, said board may appoint some other person 
to such agency for the remainder of the year, 

Sec* 3. Any such agent shall receive a certificate 
from the town council, or mayor and aldermen, by 
whom he has been appointed, authorizing him, as the 
agent of such town or city, to sell intoxicating liquors 



MAY, 1852. 

for medicinal and mechanical purposes only : but such 
certificate shall not be delivered to the person so ap- 
pointed, until he shall have executed and delivered to 
said board, a bond with good and sufficient sureties, in 
the sum of six hundred dollars^ in substance as fol- 
lows: 

Know all men, that we as principal, and 

as sureties, are holden and stand firmly bound to the 
inhabitants of the town of (or city of] (as the 
case may be,) in the sum of six hundred aoUars, to be 
paid them : to which payment, we bind ourselves, our 
heirs, executors and administrators, firmly by these 
presents. Sealed with our seals, and dated this day 
of A. D. The condition of this obligation is 

such, that whereas the above bounden has been 

duly appointed an agent for the town (or city) of 
to sell within and for and on account of said town (or 
city,) intoxicating liquors for medicinal and mechanical 
purposes, only, until the day of A. D. , un- 
less sooner removed from said agency. Now, if the 
said shall in all respects, conform to the provisions 
of the law, relating to the business for which he is ap- 
pointed, and to such rules and regulations, as now are, 
or shall be from time to time established by the board 
making the appointment, then this obligation shall be 
void ; otherwise it shall remain in full force. 

Sec. 4. If any person shall at any time, sell, or suf- 
fer to be sold by any person, any spirituous or intoxi- 
cating liquors, or any mixed liquors, a part of which 
is intoxicating, in violation of the provisions of this act, 
he shall forfeit and pay on the first conviction, the sum 
of twenty dollars : and on the second conviction, the 
sum of twenty dollars, and on the third and every sub- 
sequent conviction, he shall forfeit and pay the sum of 
twenty dollars, and shall be imprisoned not less than 
three months, nor more than six months. 

Sec 5. Any forfeiture or penalty arising under the 
fourth section of this act, may be recovered by com- 
plaint and warrant in the name of the State, before 
any justice of the peace, or any court exercising the 
jurisdiction of a justice of the peace, in the town or 
city where the offence was committed : one half of said 
forfeiture to and for the use of the complainant, and 
the other half thereof to and for the use of the State: 



MAY, 1852. 

And the prosecutor and complainant by waiving in ia- 
vor of the State his portion of the penalty, may be ad- 
mitted as a witness in the trial ; and no judgment ren- 
clered upon a subsequent complaint for the same of- 
fence, shall be a bar, or prevent j udgment upon the 
merits being rendered on any prior complaint, and the 
pendency of the former complaint may be pleaded in 
bar of the second complaint. 

Sec. 6. Any person convicted before a justice of 
the peace, or a court exercising the j urisdiction of a j us- 
tice of the peace, of a violation of any provision of the 
fourth section of this act, may appeal from the sentence 
of the justice or court, to the Court of Common Pleas, 
next to be holden in the same county, after ten days : 
but before the appeal shall be allowed, he shall be re- 
quired to give recognizance, in the sum of one hun- 
dred dollars, with good and sufficient sureties, in eve- 
ry case so appealed, conditioned, that he will file his 
reasons of appeal, together with a copy of the whole 
case in the court appealed to, on or before the second 
day of the term thereof, as aforesaid, that he will ap- 
pear before said court, and there pros?cute his appeal 
with effect, and abide and perform the order or sen- 
tence of said court, in said case, and pay all costs, fines 
and penalties, that may be awarded against him, upon 
a final disposition thereof, which recognizance such jus- 
tice or court shall forthwith certify to said Court of 
Common Pleas : and before his appeal shall be allow- 
ed, he shall also, in every case, give a bond with other 
good and sufficient sureties running to the town or 
city, where the offence was committed, in the sum of 
two hundred dollars, that he will not, during the pen- 
dency of such appeal, violate any of the provisions of 
this act ; and shall also, at the time of taking such ap- 
peal, pay to said justice or court, before which he shall 
have been convicted, all costs of his prosecution and 
conviction, to be taxed against him by such justice or 
court And no recognizance or bond shall be taken 
in cases arising under this section, except by the jus- 
tice or court before whom the trial was had : and if 
the recognizances and bonds mentioned in this section 
shall not be given within twenty-four hours after the 
judgment, the appeal shall not be allowed : the defend- 
ant in the mean time to stand committed. And in 

1* 



MAT, 1852. 

case the appellant shall be again convicted before the 
Court of Common Pleas, he shall pay double costs of 
the appellate court on his said appeal. 

Sec. 7. The town council of any town, and the may- 
or and aldermen of any city, whenever complaint sh^l 
be made to them that a breach of the conditions of 
the bond given by any person appointed under this 
act, has been committed, shall notify the person com- 
plained of, and if upon a hearing of the parties it shall 
appear that any breach has been committed, they shall 
revoke and make void his appointment : and whenev- 
er a breach of any bond given to the inhabitants oi 
any town or city, in pursuance of any of the proviaons 
of this act, shall be made known to the town council 
of any town, or mayor and aldermen of any city, or 
shall in any manner come to their knowledge, they or 
some of them shall, at the expense and for the use of 
said town or city, cause the bond to be put in suit^ in 
any court of competent jurisdiction. 

Sec. 8. No person shall be allowed to be a manu- 
facturer of any spirituous or intoxicating liquors, orto 
be a common seller thereof, without being duly ap- 
pointed as aforesaid, on pain of forfeiting on the first 
conviction, the sum of one hundred dollars and costs 
of prosecution and conviction, and in default 'of the 
payment thereof, the person so convicted shall be im- 
prisoned sixty days in the county jail of the same 
county in which the offence was committed ; and on 
the second conviction, the person so convicted shall 
forfeit and pay the sum of two hundred dollars and 
costs of prosecution and conviction, and in default of 
payment, shall be imprisoned four months in said 
county jail ; and on the third and every subsequent 
conviction, he shall forfeit and pay the sum of two 
hundred dollars and costs of prosecution and convic- 
tion, and shall be imprisoned four months in said 
county jail : said penalties to be recovered before any 
court of competent jurisdiction, by indictment in the 
county where incurred, one half of said forfeiture to 
and for the use of the town or city in which the of- 
fence shall have been committed, and the other half 
thereof to and for the use of the State, but nothing m 
this act contained, shall be construed to prohibit the 
manufacture of cider, or the sale thereof in quantities 



MAY, 1852. 

not less than five gallons, or the manufacture of alco- 
IloI for exportation or to be sold to or through, and 
only to or through the agents appointed under the 
second section of this act. 

Sec. 9. No person engaged in the unlawful traffic 
in intoxicating liquors, shall be competent to sit upon 
any jury, in any case arising under this act ; and when 
any juror shall be challenged for such cause, the court 
8hall enquire of the juror so challenged; and no an- 
swer which he shall make shall be used against him in 
any cause arising under this act ; but if he shall an- 
swer falsely, he shall be incapable of serving on any 
jury in this State ; but he may decline to answer, in 
which case, he shall not be allowed to sit as juror in 
the trial of any case arising under this act, during the 
term of the court for which he was drawn. 

Sec. 10. ^AU ca«es arising under this act, whether 
by action, complaint or indictment, which shall come 
before the Court of Common Pleas, or Supreme Court, 
shall take precedence of all other business, except 
those criminal cases, in which the parties are actually 
confined in jail, awaiting trial. 

Sec. 11. If any three persons, voters in the town 
or city where the complaint shall be made, shall, be- 
fore aAy justice of the peace, or court exercising the 
jurifidiction of a justice of the peace, in said town or 
city, make complaint under oath or affirmation, that 
they have reason to believe, and do believe that spir- 
ituous or intoxicating liquors are kept or deposited, 
and intended for sale, by any person not authorized to 
sell the same, in said city or town, under the provis- 
ions of this act, in any store, shop, warehouse or other 
building, vessel, craft or place, in said city or town, or 
upon any of the waters of Narragansett Bay, or any 
other public waters of this State, said justice or, court 
shall issue a warrant of search, directed to the sheriff, 
his deputy, or to either of the town sergeants or con- 
stables in the county in which said city or town is, 
who shall proceed to search the premises described in 
said warrant, and if any spirituous or intoxicating li^ 
quors are found therein, he shall seize the same, and 
convey them to some proper place of security, where 
he shall keep them until final action is had thereon ; 
but, no dwelling house, in which or in part of which, 



8 MAY, 1852. 

a shop is not kept, shall be searched, unlesB at least 
one of said complainants shall testify to some act of 
sale of intoxicating liquors therein, by the occupant 
thereof or by his consent or permission, within at least 
one month of the time of making said complaint ; and 
the owner or keeper of said liquors, seized as afore- 
said, if he shall be known to the officer seizing the 
same, shall be summoned to appear forthwith before 
the justice, or at the next regxilar session of the court 
upon whose warrant the liquors were siezed: and if he 
fails to appear, or unless he can show by satisfactory 
proof, that said liquors are of foreign production, that 
they have been imported under the laws of the Uni- 
ted Stales and in accordance therewith, that they are 
contained in the original packages in which they were 
imported, and in quantities not less than the laws of 
the United States, prescribe, they shall be adjudged 
forfeited, and shall be destroyed by authority of the 
written order to that eflFect, of said justice or court, 
and in his presence, or in the presence of some person 
appointed by said justice or court, to witness the de- 
struction thereof, and who shall join with the officer, 
by whom they shall have been destroyed, in attesting 
that fact upon the back of the order by authority of 
which it was done ; and the owner or keeper of such 
liquors shall pay a fine of twenty dollars, or stand com- 
mitted for thirty days in default of payment^ if in the 
opinion of such justice or court, said liquors shall have 
been kept so deposited for the purposes of sale, con- 
trary to the provisions of this act And if the owner 
or possessor of any liquors seized in pursuance of this 
section, shall set up the claim, that they have been 
regularly imported under the laws of the United 
States, and that they are contained in the original 
packages, the custom house certificate of importation 
and proof of marks on the casks or packages corres- 
ponding thereto, shall not be received as conclusive 
evidence, that the liquors contained in said packages 
are those actually imported therein. 

Sec. 12. K the owner, keeper or possessor, of M' 
uore, seized under the provisions of this act, shall be un- 
known to the officer seizing the same, said liquors 
shall not be condemned Jind destroyed until they shall 
have been advertised, with the number and descrip- 



J 



MAY, 1852. 

tion of the packages, as near as may be, for two weeks, 
by posting up a written description of the same in 
some public place, in order that, if such liquors are ac- 
tually the property of any city or town in the State, 
and were so at the time of the seizure, purchased for 
Bale by the aeent of said city or town, for medicinal 
and /ecM^ p«rp.«e, oJy. in pur^nce of the 
provisions of this act, they may not be destroyed ; but 
upon satisfactory proof of such ownership, within said 
two weeks, before the justice or court by whose au- 
thority said liquors were seized, said justice or court 
shall deliver to the agent of said city or town, an or- 
der to the officer having said liquors in custody, where- 
upon said officer shall deliver them to said agent, tak- 
ing his receipt therefor, on the back of said order, which 
shall be returned to said justice or court. 

Sec. 13. If any person claiming any liquors seized 
as aforesaid, shall appeal from the judgment or order 
of any justice or court, by whose authority the seizure 
was made, to the Court of Common Pleas, next to be 
holden in the same county after ten days, before his 
appeal shall be allowed, he shall be required to give 
recognizance in a sum not less than two hundred dol- 
lars, with good and sufficient sureties, conditioned, that 
he will file his reasons of appeal, together with a copy 
of the whole case in the court appealed to, on or be- 
fore the second day of the next term thereof, that he 
will appear before said court, and there prosecute his 
appeal with effect, and abide and perform the order or 
Bentence of said court in said case, and pay all fines 
and costs that may be awarded against him ; which re- 
cognizance such justice or court shall forthwith certify 
to said Court of Common Pleas ; and he shall also, at 
the time of taking such appeal, pay to said justice or 
court all costs that may have accrued upon such com- 
plaint and warrant, to be taxed against him by such 
justice or court ; and in the case of any such appeal, 
where the quantity of liquors so seized shall exceed 
five gallons, if the final decision shall be against the 
appellant, that such liquors were intended by him for 
sale, contrary to the provisions of this act, he shall 
be adjudged by the court a common seller of intoxi- 
cating liquors, and shall be subject to the penalties pro- 
vided in section eight of this act ; and said liquors 



10 MAY, 1852. 

shall be destroyed as provided in section eleven of this 
act, upon the order of the court, in which the case 
shall be finally disposed of, in such manner as said court 
shall direct ; but nothing in this act contained, shall 
be construed to prevent any chemist, artist, or manu- 
facturer, in whose art or trade they may be necessary, 
from keeping at his place of business, such reasonable 
and proper quantity of distilled liquors, as he may have 
occasion to use in his art or trade, but not for Kile. 

Sec. 14. It shall be the duty of any mayor, alder- 
man, city marshal, city or town sergeant, constable or 
police officer, of any city or town, if he shall have in- 
formation that any intoxicating liquors are kept or 
sold in any tent, shanty, hut or place of any kind for 
selling refreshments in any public place, on or near 
the ground of any cattle show, agricultural exhibition, 
military muster or public occasion of any kind, to 
search such suspected place, and if such officer shall find 
upon the premises any intoxicating liquors, he shall seize 
them and apprehend the keeper or keepers of such 
place, and take them with the liquors so found and 
seized forthwith or as soon as may be convenient, be- 
fore some justice of the peace, or court exercising the 
jurisdiction of a justice of the peace, of the town or 
city where found ; and thereupon such officer shall 
make a written complaint under oath, and subscribed 
by him, to such justice or court, and upon proof that 
said liquors are intoxicating, that they were found 
in the possession of the accused, in a tent, shanty or 
other place as aforesaid, he or they shall be sentenced 
to imprisonment in the county jail of the same coun- 
ty for thirty days, and the liquor so seized shall be 
destroyed, by order of said justice or court, as provid- 
ed in the eleventh section of this act ; and if any pe^ 
son apprehended under this section, and sentenced asr 
aforesaid, shall claim an appeal to the Court of Com- 
mon Pleas next to be holden in the same county after 
ten days, before his appeal shall be allowed, he shall 
pay all costs of his prosecution and conviction, and 
shall be required to give recognizance in the sum of 
one hundred dollars, with good and sufficient sureties, 
conditioned, that he will file his reasons of appeal, to- 
gether with a copy of the whole case in the court ap- 
pealed to, on or before the second day of the next term 



MAY, 1852. 11 

thereof that he will appear before said court and 
there prosecute his appeal with effect and abide and 
perform the order or sentence of said court in said 
case^ and pay all fines and costs, that may be awarded 
against him ; which recognizance such justice or court 
shall forthwith certify to said Court of Common Pleas. 
And if on such an appeal the verdict of a jury be 
against the appellant ; he shall in addition to the pen- 
alty imposed by said justice or court, pay a fine of 
twenty dollars. 

Sec. 15. In all cases of appeal under this act, in 
wliich the appellant shall fail to enter and prosecute 
his appeal in the appellate Court, according to law, 
said court, in addition to defaulting his recognizance, 
shall order all liquors seized upon the original com- 
plaint or complaint and warrant, and in the custody 
of the officer, to be destroyed forthwith, in such man- 
ner as said court shall direct ; and whenever a default 
shall be had of any recognizance arising imder this act, 
process shall be issued against the persons bound, re- 
turnable at the next term of said court. 

Sec. 16. It shall be the duty of the justice or court 
before whom a complaint and warrant is issued under 
the provisions of this act shall be tried, at the request 
of either party, to reduce to writing as the same is giv- 
en, the testimony of any witness in examination and 
'Cross examination, examined in behalf of the state, or 
of the defendants, and upon appeal to append the same 
signed by the witness and duly certified as evidence so 
given to the copy of the case as part thereof, and the 
Justice or court shall be allowed for reducing such 
testimony to writing the sum of thirty cents for the tes- 
timony of each witness thus reduced to writing, and 
upon appeal for returning the same to the appellate 
courts, the sum of ten cents upon each warrant, to be 
included and taxed in the bill of costa In case of the 
death, absence from the state, or avoidance of any wit- 
ness or witnesses whose testimony has been thus reduc- 
ed to writing, the said minutes of his or their said tes- 
timony shall be received as evidence for or against the 
appellant on the trial of the appeal, with like effect as 
depositions in civil causes. 

Sec. 17. The voters of any town or city in this 
state qualified to vote for general officers, shall at their 



12 



MAY, 1852. 



annual town or ward meetings held for the election of 
town or city oflScers, appoint one or more persons in 
each of their respective towns, and one in each ward 
of such city, whose duty it shall he to complain of and 
prosecute all persons guilty, or suspected of being guil- 
ty of any violation of any of the provisions of this act, 
and it shall be the duty of the town council of every 
town and the city council of the city of Providence, on 
the Monday next following the annual election of town 
or city officers, to designate some officer or officers of 
the town (or city) whose duty it shaU be diligently to 
inquire into all breaches of this act, and forthwith pro- 
secute for the same. 

Sec. 18. No person or persons, who shall make 
any complaint for the violation of any of the provis- 
ions of this act, except the provisions of the fourth sec- 
tion thereof, shall be required, at the time of making 
such complaint, to enter into recognizance, or in any 
way to become liable for the costs that may accrue 
thereon. Complainants appointed by the town or city 
where the offence is committed, and the complaint 
made, the city marshal, city sergeant, and city watch- 
men, of the city of Providence, the sheriffs and deputy 
sheriffs of the several counties, and the town sergeants 
and constables of any town or city, and such persons 
as shall waive in writing, on the complaint, at the time 
of making the same, in favor of the state, the com- 
plainant's portion of the penalty, shall not be required, 
upon making any complaint for the violation of any 
of the provisions of the fourth section of this act, to 
enter into recognizance or give surety. All other 
persons upon making any complaint* for a violation of 
any of the provisions of the fourth section of this act 
shall enter into recognizance with surety in manner 
and with like conditions, as is required by the 135tli 
section of the act entitled ^ an act concerning crimes 
and punishments." 

Sec 19. In any action, complaint and warrant, in- 
dictment, or other proceedings, against any person for 
a violation of any of the provisions of this act, it shall 
not be necessary to set forth the kind or quantity rf 
spirituous, intoxicating or mixed liquors^ or the time 
of the sale or manufacture thereof; but proof of tie 
Tiolation of any of the provisions of this act, the sub- 



MA.Y, 1852. 18 

Btance of which is briefly set forth therein, within the 
tinies mentioned therein, by the person complained of, 
shall be sufficient to convict such person : nor shall it 
be requisite in any such action, complaint and war- 
rant, indictment or other proceeding, to set forth a re- 
cord of a former conviction, or any allegation of any 
such conviction, but any such conviction may be prov- 
ed, in the same manner, and with the same eflFect, as 
if an allegation thereof had been made : and any de- 
fects in any such complaint and warrant, indictment, 
or other proceeding, either of form or substance, may 
be amended either by the justice, or court exercising 
the jurisdiction of a justice or other court before whom 
the action, complaint and warrant, indictment or oth- 
er proceeding is originally brought, or may be pend- 
ing on appeal. All cases of appeal under this act from 
the judgment or sentence of a justice of the peace, or 
court exercising the jurisdiction of a justice of the 
peace, to the court of common pleas, shall in the ap- 
pellate court, be conducted and argued by the attor- 
ney general in behalf of the state, with like compensa- 
tion as in case of indictments ; the said compensation in 
case of conviction of the appellant, to be taxed against 
him as a part of the costs of the proceeding in the ap- 
pellate court, and no costs in such cases shall be remit- 
ted or reduced. 

Sec. 20. Any justice of the peace within the town 
in which he resides, and any court exercising the ju- 
risdiction of a justice of the peace, within the town or 
city in which such court is established, shall have ju- 
risdiction and cognizance of all ofiences done or com- 
mitted, in the town or city in which the justice trying 
the cause shall reside, in violation of any of the pro- 
visions of the fourth, eleventh and fourteenth sections 
of this act^ with power to proceed to trial, render judg- 
ment, pass sentence, and award a warrant for execu- 
tion thereof And whenever a court, exercising the 
jurisdiction of a justice of the peace, is or shall be es- 
tablished in any town or city, such court shall have 
exclusively, in such town or city, the jurisdiction, cogni- 
zance and powers conferred by this act. And any vi- 
olation of any of the provisions of the eighth section 
of this act, upon any of the waters of Narragansett Bay, 
or other public waters of this State, may be prosecut- 
2 



14 MAT, 1852. 

ed, by indictment, in any county in this State ; and 
any violation of any other of the provisions of this act 
upon any of the waters of Narragansett Bay, or other 
publicwatersof this State, may be prosecuted by com- 
plaint and warrant, before any justice of the peace of 
any town, or any court exercising the jurisdiction of 
a justice of the peace, in any town or city in this State. 

Sec. 21. In addition to the fees now aUowed by law, 
the justice of the peace, or court exercising the juris- 
diction of a justice of the peace, shall be entitled to re- 
ceive, for taking any bond under this act, the sum of 
fifty cents ; for making any order for the destruction 
of any liquors seized under the provisions of this act, the 
sum of fifty cents ; and for his attendance at the destruc- 
tion of any such liquors so seized, the sum of fifty cent^ 
and the ofl&cer who shall make service of any warrant 
or process for the seizure of any liquors under the elev- 
enth or fourteenth sections of this act, shall be aUow- 
ed for the same the sum of one dollar ; for the remov- 
al of any liquors so seized, to a place of safety, all ex- 
penses by him incurred in the removal, care and cus- 
tody of said liquors, and for the destruction of any such 
liquors in pursuance of the order of the justice or conrty 
the sum of one dollar ; and the posting up the notices 
required by the twelfth section of this act, the sum of 
one dollar ; said fees to be included in the bill of costs 
and taxed by the justice or court against the defend- 
ant. 

Sec. 22. All payments or compensations for liquors 
sold in violation of law, whether in mony, labor or oth- 
er property, either real or personal, shall be held and 
considered to have been received in violation of laWy 
and without consideration, and against law, equity and 
good conscience, and all sales, transfers, and convey- 
ances, mortgages and liens, attachments, pledges and 
securities of every kind, which, either in whole or in 
part, shall have been for or on account of spirituous or 
intoxicating liquors, shall be utterly null and void, be- 
tween all parties having notice,either express or implied? 
that the consideration thereof was either in whole or in 

part,for or on account of spirituous or intoxicating liq- 
uors, and no rights of any kind shall be acquired thereby; 
and no action of any kind shall be maintained in any 
court in the State, for intoxicating or spirituous liq' 



MAT, 1852. 16 

uors sold in any other State or country whatever, nor 
shall any action of any kind be had or maintained in any 
court in the State for the recovery or possession of in- 
toxicating or spiritous liquors, or for the value thereof. 
Sec. 23. No action shall be maintained upon any 
claim or demand, whether it be note, account, bond, 
order, draft, acceptance, or other security or evidence 
-whatever, made, had, or given, for any spirituous or 
intoxicating liquors, or mixed liquors, a part of which 
is intoxicating, sold in violation of the provisions of this 
act : provided, however, that this section shall not ex- 
tend to negotiable paper in the hands of holders bona 
fide, and for a valuable consideration, without notice 
expressed or implied, of the illegality of the consider- 
ation. 

Sec. 24. If any payment or compensation for any 
such liquor hereafter sold, in violation of law, shall be 
received by the seller, his clerk or servant, agent or 
attorney, whether in money, labor or other property, 
real or personal, the amount so received, shall be held 
and considered to have been received in violation of 
law, and without consideration and held against law 
and equity and good conscience, and may be recovered 
hack, any time within six years from the receiving 
thereof, by the purchaser, his guardian, executors or 
administrators, or by any of his creditors ; such money 
in an action for money had and received, and such 
goods or other personal property in an action of tro- 
ver, and real estate in an action of ejectment, or such 
labor in a special action on the case, for the value 
thereof, in any court of competent jurisdiction ; and 
when such suit shall be commenced by a creditor, the 
purchaser may be a witness for theplaintiflf at the trial 
of the action, and such actions and causes of action 
shall not abate by reason of the decease of the plaintifF 
or defendant 

Sec. 25. All payments received as aforesaid, with- 
in the six years, may be embraced in one general 
count, which shall allege, that the money or other 
thing was received by the defendent, for liquor sold 
in violation of law, and amendments may be made to 
the YHit and declaration, as matter of right, and with- 
out terms, in any stage of the proceedings ; audit shall 
be no objection to the suit, that the payment was re- 



16 MAY, 1852, 

ceived for the joint use of the defendant, and snj 
other person, or persons, or that the defendant was m- 
der the age of twenty one years, or a married woman. 

Sec. 26. When the money or other thing shall have 
been received by any clerk, servant, agent or attorney, 
the action may be maintained against him, if he had 
knowledge or previous notice, that it was for liquor 
sold in violation of law. 

Sec. 27. The defendant shall not be allowed on the 
trial of any such action against him, under any of tiie 
provisions of this act, any claims or demands he may 
have against the plaintiff or person to whom the liquors 
were sold or furnished, either in set ofl^ payment or 
otherwise ; nor shall the action of any creditor be de- 
feated by any assignment of the claim by the purchas- 
er. 

Sec. 28. No discharge, release, receipt, settlement 
or admission, made by a purchaser, shall defeat or hin- 
der the suit, if it appear that the claim allowed to the 
purchaser by this act has not been actually paid in 
good faith, to its full value and amount ; and the giv- 
ing a negotiable note or other obligation, shall . not be 
deemed a payment. 

Sec. 29. Moneys which are by this act to be recov- 
ered back, may, when recovered by a guardian, execu- 
tor or administrator, be applied at the discretion of the 
guardian, executor or administrator, in whole or in 
part, to meet the debts of the purchaser, or to relieve hia 
wife or widow and children, or parents, in such propor- 
tions, as the guardian, executor or administrator may 
deem suitable ; and when recovered by a creditor, it 
shall be appropriated to the payment of his debt 
against the purchaser and his costs; and if any balance 
remains, it shall be paid to the purchaser, his guardian, 
executor or administrator, to be appropriated by them 
in the same manner as moneys recovered under thisact 
by them ; and if any guardian, executor or administra- 
tor, neglect to pay all said inoneys, he and his siueties 
shall be liable for the same on his official bond. 

Sec. 30. This act shall go into effect on the third 
^ Monday of July next, but nothing in this act contain- 
ed, shall be construed to affect any prosecutions com- 
menced or proceedings pending, or which may hereaf- 
ter be commenced, before this act shall go into effect 



MAY, 1852. 17 

for the violation of any ot the provisions of an act en- 
titled "An Act enabling Town Councils to grant licenses 
for retailing strong liquors and for other purposes," 
passed at the January session, A. D. 1844, or of any 
act or acts in amendment of or in addition to the same, 
but said prosecutions may be commenced, proceeded 
with, tried, determined, and sentence thereon passed 
and executed, in the same manner, and with the same 
effect, as if this act had not been passed. 

Sec. 31. All acts and parts of acts in any way in- 
consistent with the provisions of this act are hereby 
repealed, whenever this act shall go intD effect 



An Act in amendment of an act entitled ^ An Act in 
amendment of an Act enabling Town Councils to 
grant licenses for retailing strong liquors and for 
other purposes." 

M is enacted by the General Asse$nb^ as/oliaws : 

Section 1. All licenses for the retailing of ale, mendmont" 
wines and strong or malt liquors, hereafter granted un- cnaWiQg 
der the provisions of an Act entitled " An Act ena- Jw "cii« to 
bling town councils to grant licenses for retailing grant ji- 
strong liquor, and for other purposes," or under the """'*" 
provisions of any act in addition to, or in amendment 
of the same, shall continue and be in force, unless re- 
voked for cause as in said first named act is provided, 
until the third Monday of July next, and no longer. 

Sec. 2. So much of any act as is inconsistent here- 
with, is hereby repealed. 

Sec. 3. This act shall go into effect immediately 
upon the passage thereof. 



cenMfl. 



An Act in addition to an Act entitled " An Act to re- 
vise and amend the several acts in relation to the 
election of civil ofl&cers.'^ 

M 18 enacted hy the General Assemlly as foUmvs : 

Section L The Ward Meetings in the city of Provi- ^^iJ^X 
dence for the election of City Officers, shall be kept act* i^'e^*: 
open until eight o'clock, P. M., and no longer. o^e» ^ 

Sec. 2. This act shall go into effect immediately. 
2* 



18 MAY, 1852. 

An Act for the appointment of Keeper of the States 
Jail in the county of Providence. 

It is enacted hy the General Assembly as follows : 
An act ap- SECTION 1 . The Inspectors of the State Prigon are 
ffifer^f ro- hereby authorized to appoint a keeper of the State'^ 
Yidence. jg^^ jj^ ^j^^ couuty of Providence, with the same duties 
and liabilities that belong to the keepers of otherjaib 
in this State, Provided, hoioever, that the said appoint- 
ment shall not be made at an annual expense of more 
than two hundred and fifty dollars. 

Sec. 2. The said keeper, before entering upon tLe 
duties of his appointment, shall give a bond to the 
State with sureties satisfactory to said Inspectors, in 
the penal sum of ten thousand dollars, for the faithful 
performance thereof 

Sec. 3. From and after the receipt of such bond, 
the Warden of said Prison shall be exempt from all 
control over or connexion with the management and 
discipline of said jail, except that he shall continue tx) 
provide as heretofore for the support of the inmates 
thereof 

Sec 4. All acts inconsistent herewith are hereby 
repealed. 



An Act in amendment of an Act entitled " An Act io 
incorporate the Providence and Bristol Bailroad 
Company." 

It is enacted ly the General Assembly asfoUows : 
An act in a- The fourth scctiou of the Act to which this ifl m 
STn ^0^10 amendment is so far amended that the time limited by 
incoiporate said scctiou, withiu which the stock shall be subscnb- 
nnrBristol cd, the compauy organized and the location of the 
R. R. Co. jj^^^ g|^^ ^g therein prescribed, is hereby extended 

to the fifteenth day of July, A. D. 1853, and that said 
subscription, organization and location within said time 
shall be as effectual as if made and had within the 
time limited in the act to which this is in amend- 
ment 



MAY, 1852. 19 

An Act to amend an Act entitled "An Act estab- 
lishing and regulating a Court of Justices in the 
town of Bristol." 

II is enacted hj the General Assemhh/ as follows : court of 

The Town Council of the town of Bristol may de- g^?gj^f'' 
signate the Justices of the Peace of said town, who 
may act as members of said Court until the next an- 
nual election of town officers. 



Resolotion for the payment of the salaries of Govern- 
or and Lieutenant Governor. 

JResolvedy That the sum of four hundred dollars be q^Jj^/^'^J^^ 
paid out the general treasury to His Excellency Philip ^^ ^t, gov 
Allen, in full for his services as Governor of the State 
for the past year ; and that the sum of two hundred 
dollars be paid out of the general treasury to the Hon. 
William Beach Lawrence, in full for his services as 
Lieutenant Governor for the past year. 



Resolutions appointing Committees to receive and 
transfer the books and papers in the offices of the 
Clerks of Courts, to their successors. 

Eesolvedj That John T. Bush be a committee to re- committees 
ceive from Joseph Joslin, Esq., late clerk of the Su- *"„^^M*i^'of- 
preme Court for the county of Newport, the books and ^^^\^l^^ 
papers pertaining to the office of the clerk of said court, cou'"- 
and to cause the same to be removed to the custody 
of William Gilpin, Esq., the clerk elect of the said court, 
and to give to the said Joslin, upon receiving said 
books and papers and other appendages to said office, 
a proper receipt for the same ; and to take a receipt 
from said Gilpin for said books, papers and other ap- 
pendages to said office. 

Resolvedy That Joseph Anthony be a committee to 
receive from the late clerk of the Court of Common 
Pleas for the county of Newport, the books, papers, 
and every thing else appertaining to said office, and 
to transfer the same to the clerk elected by this Gen- 
eral Assembly at the present session, and to give and 
receive the proper receipts for the same. 



20 



MAY, 1852. 

Mesolvedy That C. C. Potter be a committee to receive 
from the late clerk of the Supreme Court for the comi- 
ty of Providence, the books, papers and every thing 
else appertaining to said office, and to deliver the same 
to the clerk elected at the present session of the Gen- 
eral Assembly, and to give and take the proper re- 
ceipts for the same. 

Resolved, That C. C. Potter be a committee to receive 
from the late clerk of the Common Pleas of the coun- 
ty of Providence, the books, papers and every thing 
else appertaining to said office, and to deliver the same 
to the clerk elected at the present session of the Gen- 
eral Assembly, and to give and take the proper re- 
ceipts for the same. 

Resolvedy That Nathaniel C. Peckham be a commit- 
tee to receive from the clerk of the Court of Common 
Pleas for the county of Washington, the books, papers 
and every thing else appertaining to said office, and 
deliver the same to the clerk elected to said office at 
the present session, giving and taking the proper re- 
ceipts for the same. 

Resolvedy That Robert AUyn be a committee to re- 
ceive from the late clerk of the Supreme Court for the 
county of Kent, the books papers and every thing eke 
appertaining to said office, and to transfer the same to 
the clerk elected at the present session of this General 
Assembly, and to give and receive the proper receipts 
for the same. 

Resolvedy That Robert Allyn be a committee to re- 
ceive from the late clerk of the Court of Common 
Pleas for the county of Kent, the books, papers and 
every thing else appertaining to the said office, and to 
deliver the same to the clerk elected by the General 
Assembly at the present session, and to give and re- 
ceive the proper receipts for the same. 



Resolution to appoint an Auditing Committee of the 
Accounts of the General Treasurer. 

Auditing Resolvedy That Gideon Bradford, on the part of the 
Cjmmittec Senate, and Henry Y. Cranston and Thomas R Hun- 
ter, on the part of the House of Representatives, be a 
Committee to audit the Accounts of the General Trea- 
surer. 



MAY, 1852. 21 

Resolution authorizing the Secretary of State to print 
in book form, for the use of the General Assembly, 
the Rules and Orders of each House, and the Joint 
Rules and Orders of both Houses, &c. 

Resolved, That the Secretary of State be, and he is tion,^ kSles 
hereby authorized to have printed in book form, one ^^^^H^' 
hundred and fifty copies of the Constitution of this 
State, the Rules, Orders, and Standing Committees of 
the two Houses, before the next session, for the use of 
the General Assembly. 



An Act in amendment of an act entitled " An Act to 
incorporate the What Cheer Mutuallnsurance Com- 
pany." 

M is enacted ly the General Assembly as follows : 

Section 1. Said Corporation shall be organized and Act to in- 
hereafter known by the name of the " Commercial wiTaT*^^ 
Mutual Insurance Company," and under that name Si!c^°' 
shall have the same powers and be subject to the same amended, 
liabilities as if said name had not been changed. 

Sec, 2. The capital stock of the Company shall 
be safely invested ; a semi-annual dividend from the 
income and profits of the company, of not less than 
three and one half per cent., shall be made to the 
stockholders provided that the same be earned, and 
provided also that in case of a diminution of the capi- 
tal stock by losses, that no dividend shall be made, un- 
til the capital has been made w'hole, with interest on 
the amount thereof at the rate of seven percent, per 
annum. 

Sec 3. Every person or firm effecting insurance 
with this company, and every stockholder, shall be en- 
titled to a credit on the books of the company of his 
or their proportion of said invested profits, sharing 
pro rata according to the amount of premium paid or 
the amount of stock held by him or them respectively ; 
and to a certificate thereof, such certificate to contain 
a proviso that the amount of profits named therein is 
liable for any future loss by said company, and shall 
state that the same is not transferable except by writ- 
ten assignment, entered on the books of the company; 
but no certificate shall be issued for fractional parts of 



22 MAT, 1852. 

a dollar, nor for any sum less than ten dollars, but 
dollars less than ten shall go to the credit of the I^ 
spectivo parties and may be transferred by assignment 
on the books of the company for consolidation, and 
certificates issue therefor ; such fractional parts of a 
dollar shall be passed to the contingent account of 
the company and applied to the expenses and othff 
charges of said company ; and when the profits of the 
business added to the capital stock of the company 
shall amount to the sum of three hundred thonsaad 
dollars, the excess of profits that may accrue thereaf- 
ter or a portion of them may be applied to the pay- 
ment or liquidation of said certificates of earned pro- 
fits ; the certificates issued for profits of the first years 
business being first discharged as far as may be prac- 
ticable and so on until the whole is paid. 

Sec. 4. Sections 8 and 10 of said act of incorpo- 
ration are hereby repealed. 



An Act to incorporate the Producers' Bank. 

It is enacted hy the General ABsemhly as follows : 
Producers* Seotion 1. Olucy Masou, Welcome Cook, George 
Fitter- W. Mowry, Jervis Cook, Whipple MetcaJf, Obey 
corpomted. Forlstall, Kuight Whipple, James A Aldrich, Phffip 
Mowry, Emory C. Arnold, William 0. Mason, and 
Jencks Harris, their successors and assigns, and suci 
others as may become stockholders, shall be, and ai« 
hereby made a body corporate, by the name of the 
Producers' Bank ; and by that name are made capa^ 
ble in law to purchase, receive, retain and enjoy to 
them and their successors, lands, tenements, heredita- 
ments, goods, chattels and eflFects of whatsoever name 
or nature, and the same to sell, demise, or dispose of; 
to sue and be sued, answer and be answered nnto, to 
defend and be defended against in all proper Courts 
and in all other places ; to make and use a cominon 
seal, and the same to break, alter and renew at ple»* 
ure ; to ordain and execute such by-laws and regula- 
tions, as shall be convenient for the ffovemment of ti^ 
Corporation ; and generally do all things wnicn w 
them it shall or may appertain to do. . 

Sec. 2. The following shall be the Constitution ot 
said Bank : 



MAY, 1852. 23 

Article 1. The Capital Stock of said Bank shall 
ionsist of fifty thousand dollars, in two thousand shares 
>f twenty-five dollars each ; and said capital, by a vote 
3f said stockholders, at a meeting called for that pur- 
pose, may be increased to any sum not exceeding two 
hundred thousand dollars. 

Art. 2. A general meeting of the stockholders 
shall be holden on the first Monday in October in 
every year, for the election of not less than seven, nor 
more than eleven Directors, and to transact such other 
business as may legally come before a stockholders* 
meeting. Not less than eleven stockholders shall be 
necessary to form a quorum at all stockholders' meet- 
ings, and a majority of the directors elected shall con- 
stitute a quorum, for the transaction of business. 

The directors shall, at said annual meeting, or as 
soon as may be thereafter, elect from their own num- 
ber, a President; and said President and directors 
shall hold their offices for one year, and until others 
are elected in their places. In case of the death or 
resignation of any of said directors or President, the 
remainder of them shall have power to fill such vacan- 
cy, to hold till the next annual election. 

The President and Directors, or a majority of them, 
may call special meetings of the stockholders. Every 
stockholders' meeting shall be notified in a public 
newspaper printed in Woonsocket, if such there be, but 
if none, then in a public newspaper printed in the city 
of Providence, at least t6n days before it shall be hol- 
den. Each Director shall hold in his own right, at 
least forty shares of the capital stock of said Corpora- 
tion ; and every stockholder shall, in person or by 
proxy, be entitled to one vote for every share not ex- 
ceeding forty shares, and one vote for every ten shares 
over forty, but shall in no case be entitled to more 
than forty votes in his or her own right. 

Art. 3. The President and Directors, or a majority 
of them, shall meet as often as they think proper, and 
shall have the general supervision and managemert 
of the business and property of the Corporation ,• and 
shall appoint a cashier and such other officers as they 
shall deem necessary, and fix their compensation, and 
from time to time remove the same, if they see fit so 
to do ; may emit bills of credit, make all contracts, and 



24 MAY, 1852. 

dispose of the moneys and credit of said Corporation, 
for the benefit of the stockholders thereof: Provided, 

4 

they do nothing contrary to the rules and by-lav? 
made by the stockholders. Any number of directors, 
not less than three, shall constitute a quorum for & 
count purposes. The directors shall, from time to time* 
designate three of their number, to inspect more par- 
ticularly, the business of the bank, who shall, at least 
once a month, examine the accounts, and at the end 
of every three months, cause them to be regularlr 
stated, and the balances transferred. A dividend of 
the profits of the bank, if any, shall be made at least 
once in every year. The President and Directors, as 
such, shall receive no compens