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Full text of "Athens College Bulletin"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/athenscollegebul19661967 



THENS COLLEGE 




- 



ATHENS, ALABAMA 



ACCREDITATION 

ATHENS COLLEGE is a member of: 

1. The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools 

2. The American Council on Education 

3. The University Senate of the Methodist Church 

4. The Association of American Colleges 

5. The Association of Alabama Colleges 

6. The Association of Church Related Colleges 

7. The American College Public Relations Association 

Athens College is approved by the Alabama State De- 
partment of Education for the training of both ele- 
mentary and secondary school teachers. 



Bulletin of 
ATHENS COLLEGE 

of 
Athens, Alabama 

Volume XXVIII Spring, 1966 Number 3 

Catalog And 

Announcements 

for 

1966- 1967 

# * # 
One Hundred Forty-Fifth Year 



Published by Athens College 

Entered as second class mail at Post Office, Athens, Alabama 

under the Act of August 24, 1912 



2 ATHENS COLLEGE 

CONTENTS 

Contents of the Bulletin is not to be regarded as an irrevocable contract. The 

Trustees, Administration and Faculty reserve the right to modify, revoke, or add 
to these provisions at any time. 

Page 

Academic Calendar 4 

General Information 6 

Student Life and Activities 8 

Admission Requirements 12 

College Program 14 

Night Division 16 

Academic Requirements and Regulations 17 

Financing an Education 22 

Scholarships 23 

Loans 24 

Fees and Expenses 25 

Division of Business Administration 28 

Division of Education 31 

Division of Humanities 38 

Division of Natural Sciences and Mathematics 49 

Division of Social Sciences 54 

Suggested Programs of Study Leading to the Bachelor Degree 60 

Special Curricula 71 

Board of Trustees 73 

Administration 74 

Faculty 74 

Index 82 






CALENDAR 



1966 



JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


S M T W T F 


S 


S 


M T W T F 


S 


S M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T F S 




1 




12 3 4 


5 




1 2 3 


4 


5 






1 X 


2 3 4 5 6 7 


8 


6 


7 8 9 10 11 


12 


6 7 


8 9 10 


11 


12 


3 


4 


5 6 7 8 9 


9 10 11 12 IS 14 


15 


13 


14 15 16 17 18 


19 


13 14 


15 16 17 


18 


19 


10 


11 


12 13 14 15 16 


16 17 18 19 20 21 


22 


20 


21 22 23 24 25 


26 


20 21 


22 23 24 


25 


26 


17 


18 


19 20 21 22 23 


23 24 25 26 27 28 


29 


27 


28 




27 28 


29 30 31 






24 


25 


26 27 28 29 SO 


SO 31 
























MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


S M T W T F 


S 


S 


M T W T F 


S 


S M 


T W T 


F 
1 


S 
2 


S 


M 


T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 6 


7 




1 2 3 


4 




1 


2 3 4 5 6 


8 9 10 11 12 13 


14 


5 


6 7 8 9 10 


11 


3 4 


5 6 7 


8 


9 


7 


8 


9 10 11 12 18 


15 16 17 18 19 20 


21 


12 


13 14 15 16 17 


18 


10 11 


12 13 14 


15 


16 


14 


15 


16 17 18 19 20 


22 23 24 25 26 27 


28 


19 


20 21 22 23 24 


25 


17 18 


19 20 21 


22 


23 


21 


22 


23 24 25 26 27 


29 30 31 




26 


27 28 29 30 




24 25 
31 


26 27 28 


29 


30 


28 


29 


30 31 


SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F 


S 


S 


M T W T F 


S 


S M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T F S 


1 2 


3 






1 




1 2 3 


4 


5 






1 2 3 


4 5 6 7 8 9 


10 


2 


3 4 5 6 7 


8 


6 7 


8 9 10 


11 


12 


4 


5 


6 7 8 9 10 


11 12 13 14 15 16 


17 


9 


10 11 12 13 14 


15 


13 14 


15 16 17 


18 


19 


11 


12 


13 14 15 16 17 


18 19 20 21 22 23 


24 


16 


17 18 19 20 21 


22 


20 21 


22 23 24 


25 


26 


18 


19 


20 21 22 23 24 


25 26 27 28 29 30 




23 
SO 


24 25 26 27 28 
31 


29 


27 28 


29 30 






25 


26 


27 28 29 30 SI 



1 967 



JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


S M T W T F 


S 

7 


S 


M T W T F 

1 2 3 


S 

4 


S 


M 


T W T F 


S 


S 


M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 6 






1 2 3 


4 




1 


8 9 10 11 12 13 


14 


5 


6 7 8 9 10 


11 


5 


6 


7 8 9 10 


11 


2 


3 4 5 6 7 8 


15 16 17 18 19 20 


21 


12 


13 14 15 16 17 


18 


12 


13 


14 15 16 17 


18 


9 


10 11 12 13 14 15 


22 23 24 25 26 27 


28 


19 


20 21 22 23 24 


25 


19 


20 


21 22 23 24 


25 


16 


17 18 19 20 21 22 


29 30 31 




26 


27 28 




26 


27 


28 29 30 31 




23 
30 


24 25 26 27 28 29 


MAY 


JUNE 




AUGUST 


S M T W T F 


S 
6 


S 


M T W T F 
1 2 


S 
3 


S 


M 


T W T F 


S 


S 


M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 








1 




12 3 4 5 


7 8 9 10 11 12 


13 


4 


5 6 7 8 9 


10 


2 


3 


4 5 6 7 


8 


6 


7 8 9 10 11 12 


14 15 16 17 18 19 


20 


11 


12 13 14 15 16 


17 


9 


10 


11 12 13 14 


15 


13 


14 15 16 17 18 19 


21 22 23 24 25 26 


27 


18 


19 20 21 22 23 


24 


16 


17 


18 19 20 21 


22 


20 


21 22 23 24 25 26 


28 29 30 31 




25 


26 27 28 29 30 
OCTOBER 




23 
30 


24 
31 


25 26 27 28 


29 


27 


28 29 30 31 


SEPTEMBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F 


S 
2 


S 
1 


M T W T F 
2 3 4 5 6 


S 

7 


S 


M 


T W T F 


S 


S 


M T W T F S 


1 






1 2 3 


4 




1 2 


3 4 5 6 7 8 


9 


8 


9 10 11 12 13 


14 


5 


6 


7 8 9 10 


11 


8 


4 5 6 7 8 9 


10 11 12 13 14 15 


16 


15 


16 17 18 19 20 


21 


12 


13 


14 15 16 17 


18 


10 


11 12 13 14 15 16 


17 18 19 20 21 22 


23 


22 


23 24 25 26 27 


28 


19 


20 


21 22 23 24 


25 


17 


18 19 20 21 22 23 


24 25 26 27 28 29 


30 


29 


30 31 




26 


27 


28 29 30 




24 

31 


25 26 27 28 29 30 







I 




FEBRUARY 

3 
5 

7 

MARCH 

31 

APRIL 
6-17 

18 

MAY 

17-20 

JUNE 

6-8 
10 
12 



ATHENS COLLEGE 

ATHENS COLLEGE CALENDAR 1966-1967 

WINTER TRIMESTER 1966 

Final grades due for Fall Trimester 
Registration for Winter Trimester 
Classes begin 

Mid-term grades due 



Easter Holidays begin 12:00 N. 
Classes Resume 



Pre-registration for Summer Trimester 

Final Examinations 
Final Grades due 
Commencement Exercises 



JUNE 

18 
20 

JULY 

25 

AUGUST 

16-19 
29-31 

SEPTEMBER 

3 



SUMMER TRIMESTER 1966* 



Registration for Summer Trimester 
Classes begin for Regular Trimester 



Mid-term grades due 



Pre-registration for Fall Trimester 1966-67 
Final Examinations 



Final Grades due for Summer Trimester 



SEPTEMBER 

30 

OCTOBER 
1 

3-5 

6 

7 

8 

10 
20 

NOVEMBER 

12 
22 

28 

DECEMBER 
2 
22 



FALL TRIMESTER 1966-67 
Faculty Workshop 



Registration for Fall Trimester 

Freshman orientation and registration (I 

vision) (6 P.M.-8:30 P.M. Night Division) 

Classes begin 

Last day to register 

Saturday classes follow Monday schedule 

Last day to add courses 

Last day to drop without penalty 



Saturday classes follow Monday schedule 
Thanksgiving Holidays begin 
Classes begin 



Mid-term grades due 
Christmas Holidays begin 



A.M.-3 P.M. Day Di- 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 



JANUARY 

2 

9-13 
21 

26-28 
31 



Classes resume 

Pre-registration for Winter Trimester 

Saturday Classes follow Tuesday Schedule 

Final Examinations 

Final grades due 



FEBRUARY 

6-8 

9 

10 
13 
20 

MARCH 

22-28 
29 



WINTER TRIMESTER 1967 

Registration Winter trimester (8 A.M.-3 P.M. Day Division 

(6 P.M.-8:30 P.M. Night Division) 

Classes begin. Last day to register without penalty 

Saturday classes follow Monday schedule 

Last day to add courses 

Last day to drop without penalty 



Easter Holidays 
Classes resume 



APRIL 

7 

MAY 

8-12 
29-31 

JUNE 

2 
4 



Mid-term grades due 



Pre-registration for Summer Trimester 
Final Examinations 



Final grades due 
Commencement 



"■Calendar for Special Summer Session 1966 will appear in Summer Bulletin. 



6 ATHENS COLLEGE 

LOCATION 

Alliens College is located in the City of Athens, Alabama, twenty miles west of 
the city of Huntsville, research center for America's space program. It lies 
midway between Nashville, Tennessee, and Birmingham, Alabama, in the foot- 
hills of the Cumberland Mountains. Athens is the seat of Limestone County and 
is served by the Louisville and Nashville Railroad, by modern buslines on Federal 
highways 31 and 72, and by three major airlines; United, Eastern, and Southern 
Airways. 

HISTORY OF ATHENS COLLEGE 

Athens College was founded in 1822, three years after the admission of Alabama 
into the Union. It is the oldest chartered institution of high learning in the state. 
At its beginning, the citizens of Athens purchased five acres of land, erected a 
building, and established the Athens Female Academy. Twenty years later, the 
people of Athens raised an endowment and expanded the academy into a four-year 
college. 

In January 1843, the legislature of the state granted a charter incorporating the 
college as the Athens Female Institute of the Tennessee Annual Conference of the 
Methodist Church. When the North Alabama Conference was organized in 1870, 
the property was transferred to it and has remained so affiliated until the present 
time. 

The institution became co-educational in 1931, and subsequently the name was 
changed to Athens College. Since 1822, however, the College has continued its 
program without interruption through epidemics, wars, and depressions. Notably 
did the college continue classes while Athens was under siege from the Federal 
troops during the War between The States. From the second floor windows of 
historic Founders Hall, the students were able to watch the Battle for Athens in 
progress. In spite of the siege, the College sustained no damage and student life 
continued unmolested. 

Athens College has had twenty-four presidents since its founding. Men and 
women of moral stature and wisdom have guided it from the beginning. Many of 
the College graduates have risen to become leaders in industry, business, education, 
and religion in this country and around the world. There is an understandable 
pride in its 143 year heritage and in its truly modern program of education that 
continues to prepare young men and women for leadership in many areas of en- 
deavor. 

ATHENS COLLEGE OBJECTIVES 

The objectives of Athens College are fivefold. First, it seeks to offer to worthy 
and qualified students a liberal arts or a pre-professional education under fully 
qualified teachers who believe in their disciplines and in the American culture. 
Second, it seeks to train men and women to assume an enlightened view of our 
society and to prepare them for professional, cultural, and spiritual leadership in 
their communities and in our nation. Third, it seeks to prepare students for the 
assumption of a profitable professional life with a terminal degree on baccalaureate 
level or for advanced study in professional or graduate schools. Fourth, it seeks 
to train under the most modern methods qualified teachers for elementary and 
secondary school teaching. Finally, it seeks to provide adults with opportunities 
for continuing education and to improve their status within their present profes- 
sional environment or within their communities at large. 

The College in its recruitment seeks to bring together teachers and students of 
differing social, economic, regional, and cultural backgrounds. Through the ming- 
ling of this heterogenous group, experience is broadened and horizons opened. 
Thus the student is in a varied environment in which he can grow and change and 
become prepared to take his place in a varied society with poise and assurance. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 7 

BUILDINGS OF THE COLLEGE 

FOUNDERS HALL— Started in 1842 and completed in 1844, this building is 
a majestic structure that has become the focal point and the visual trademark of 
the college. Its facade is graced by four magnificent Ionic columns which stu- 
dents have named Matthew, Mark, Luke and John. The main wing contains a 
reception parlor and a guest suite restored to its antebellum beauty. Three wings 
have been added to the building, and these provide space for classrooms, adminis- 
trative offices, library, and other functional areas. The Department of the Interior 
of the United States has listed Founders Hall in the Historic Survey of Buildings 
to be preserved. 

N. H. WATERS SCIENCE BUILDING— The N. W. Waters Science Building 
houses the science laboratories, and provides additional office and classroom space. 
The building is one of the most modernly equipped science buildings in the region. 

BROWN HALL — Built in 1909 as a memorial to Miss Sarah Frances Brown, 
this building with its Corinthian columns serves as a residence hall for students. 
Recently Brown Hall has been completely remodeled as a phase of the develop- 
ment program of the College. 

McCANDLESS HALL — Erected in 1912 by local citizens and the North Alabama 
Conference of the Methodist Church, this building is a memorial to a former 
director of music, Miss Kate Leslie McCandless. The building has a large audi- 
torium, equipped with a pipe organ and a stage, and seats approximately three 
hundred fifty. Studios and classrooms , are provided for the drama and music 
departments. 

McCAIN HALL — Occupied in the fall of 1962, this building is of contemporary 
colonial design. It houses 85 women students in twenty-five two-room suites. The 
suites consist of a study room and a bedroom with adjoining bath. A kitchenette, 
snack bar and facilities are also provided. 

SANDERS HALL — This three-story brick dormitory was built in 1924 as a 
memorial to W. T. Sanders, former president of the Board of Trustees. The dormi- 
tory accommodates eighty-six men, with each floor having three baths, showers and 
a small laundry room. An attractive parlor graces the first floor of the dormitory. 

HOUSTON HALL — This two-story dormitory for men is joined as a wing on 
the north of Founders Hall. It provides accommodations for twenty-five men. 

NAYLOR HALL — A small dormitory located just south of McCandless Hall, 
it provides dormitory and social living space for 30 students. Its spacious lower 
level houses The College Book Store. 

THE ATHENS COLLEGE LIBRARY— This two-story brick building, erected 
in 1946, adjoins Founders Hall. The book collection now totals about 40,000 
volumes, with annual additions averaging 3,000. Over 200 periodicals are received 
through purchase and gift subscriptions. The library also houses a large collection 
of phonograph records for use in music, speech, and drama courses. 

Efforts are made to make the library an integral part of the student's life. Books 
and periodicals in the open stacks are available to all students. Instruction is given 
to the freshman on the organization of the library, the use of reference books, the 
cards catalog, and the READER'S GUIDE TO PERIODICAL LITERATURE; 
and the best source materials in each area of study of the liberal arts program. 
Materials unavailable at Athens College may be borrowed from other libraries on 
the inter-library loan plan. 

During 1955-1956 definite steps were taken toward building a collection of items 
of local historical interest, including letters, manuscripts and other materials. 



8 ATHENS COLLEGE 

A valuable and extensive collection of scientific books and journals are found 
in the Science library. This special collection was donated from the private library 
of Dr. Emmett B. Carmichael of Birmingham. Materials are continually added to 
it, making it an up-to-date source of scientific and technological literature. 

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION CENTER— Completed in 1965, this 
building contains seating for more than 3,000 persons, as well as classrooms, offices, 
equipment rooms. It also contains an official competitive-sized swimming pool with 
spectator gallery. The college also has an athletic field and all-weather tennis courts 
adjacent to the center. The completion of the track and field sports area is pro- 
jected for 1966. 

COLLEGE DINING HALL — A spacious and modern dining facility for resi- 
dential students and guests was opened in 1965. It is operated full time by the 
Director of Food Services. 

COLLEGE BOOK STORE— Located in the lower level of Naylor Hall, the book 
store carries a full line of college textbooks, best seller and popular paperbacks, 
instructional and educational materials. It is the most complete book store in 
northern Alabama. It also carries clothing and other incidentals to service student 
needs. 

COLLEGE STUDENT CENTER— A center for student activities located adjacent 
to the College Dining Hall. The center offers recreational and social facilities for the 
students of the college. Its snack bar provides an attractive gathering place for resi- 
dential and commuter students. 

The college owns a number of faculty houses and apartments as well as other 
buildings used for storage and maintenance equipment and personnel. 

All buildings on the campus have undergone extensive renovations and are care- 
fully maintained. All residential and instructional buildings are air-conditioned to 
provide a comfortable living and instructional environment. 

Future planning includes the addition of more dormitories, a new library build- 
ing, and additional buildings for the physical and natural sciences. 

STUDENT LIFE 

All students activities other than the academic program are under the supervision 
of the Dean of Students. Student organizations must be authorized by and operate 
under the supervision of the faculty and administration. The Committee on Student 
Life, composed of students and faculty members, is designed to promote student 
welfare on campus. 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

The Student Government Association, authorized by the College administration, 
embraces the entire student body. Based upon democratic procedure, the association 
places responsibilities for enforcement of regulations and for safeguarding of 
standards upon the individual. The association encourages community cooperation 
and the development of good citizenship. 

CONDUCT OF STUDENTS 

Students, when they matriculate at Athens College, are expected to behave as 
responsible men and women at all times and in all places, to respect the rights and 
privileges of their instructors and fellow students, and to attend faithfully to their 
work. The College may at any time dismiss any student whose conduct is in its 
judgment detrimental to the welfare of the institution. 

Attendance at Athens College is a privilege and not a right. Any student deemed 
undesirable may be refused registration or may be requested to withdraw from the 
college at any time. Specific regulations governing student life are found in The 
"A" Book, the student handbook. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



FRATERNITY AND SORORITY LIFE 



In 1966, three national social sororities have been chartered on the Athens 
College campus: Zeta Tau Alpha, Phi Mu, and Sigma Kappa. Each sorority 
carries out its respective national principles in social congeniality, moral and 
mental standards, leadership development service, and outlet for creativity. 

At present, five fraternity local groups are operating and working toward charter- 
ing by national fraternities. These groups are a source of good fellowship, social 
outlet, athletic competition, and scholarship development. The college provides 
housing for these groups, but future plans are directed toward individual housing 
development. 

ATHLETIC PROGRAM 

Athens College participates in intercollegiate basketball, tennis, and golf com- 
petition. It is an active member of the NAIA and has in recent years fielded an 
outstanding basketball team. Enlargement of the intercollegiate program to include 
other sports is planned for the near future. 

INTRAMURAL AND RECREATION PROGRAM 

An intramural program for men and women is carried out by the Department 
of Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Athletics. Individual competition for 
men and women is available in campus-wide tournaments in such sports as tennis, 
golf, volley-ball, badminton, archery, swimming, and others. In late spring, Awards 
Day recognizes athletic excellence through presentation of awards and trophies, 
both individual and group. 

ORIENTATION WEEK 

New students arrive on campus a few days prior to registration. During this 
period students participate in social activities planned by upper-class students, be- 
come acquainted with college life, and meet roommates and faculty members. Each 
freshman is assigned to an orientation group leader who asissts whenever possible 
in helping the student to become acclimated to the new experiences and demands 
of college life. Later in the orientation period the student takes a series of tests 
designated to assist in guidance and placement. The student is then assigned a 
faculty adviser who aids him in planning his academic schedule, taking into con- 
sideration test data and his high school record. 

THE TESTING PROGRAM 

Upon entering the College, each student is given placement tests to determine his 
ability levels and background in specific areas of study, as provided by the College 
Entrance Examination Board. Students are also given Gradutae Record Examina- 
tions (GRE) at stated intervals throughout their college career. The GRE is pro- 
vided by the Educational Testing Service, Inc., of Princeton, New Jersey, to measure 
students' growth on a national level as they proceed through their curriculum of 
study. Special examinations for prospective graduate students are available on 
application submitted to the Office of the Dean. 

The student scoring within the upper ten percentile of any placement examina- 
tion is granted advanced standing in that course. He thus fulfills the required 
proficiencv level in the area and is permitted to by-pass the basic courses and move 
into advanced sections immediately. 

RELIGIOUS LIFE 

In keeping with the Methodist-related status of the College and pursuant to the 
tenets of Christian objectives in higher education of the Church-related college, 
Athens College has a regularly scheduled convocation service. Convocation services 
are held for the entire student body on a bi-weekly basis and all students are re- 
quired to attend. The program of the convocation is designed to be both religiously 
and intelectuallv stimulating. 



10 ATHENS COLLEGE 

At the College, a number of student Christian organizations offer membership 
to the Christian student who wishes to pursue his religious motivations into areas 
of service. These organizations have Christian ministers as consultants and advisers. 
Organizations of non-Christian religious groups is also encouraged. 

Students are urged to identify themselves with one or more of the groups organ- 
ized for the development of religious life at Athens College. The religious life of 
students is under the general supervision of the Student Christian Association, a 
body composed of representatives from the student body. 

STUDENT CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION— This association is the chief religious 
organization of the college. Weekly vesper services, morning watch, and the annual 
Religion in Life Week are sponsored by the Student Christian Association. 

MINISTERIAL ASSOCIATION — This is an organization composed of those stu- 
dents who are entering full-time Christian service. The constitution of the organiza- 
tion provides that those students who are Church School teachers and superin- 
tendents of Church Schools may become members. 

BAPTIST STUDENT UNION — This organization supports the work of religious 
activities on campus and works in cooperation with the area Baptist churches. 

PI TAU CHI — This is an honorary religious society which extends invitations to 
those students who merit recognition for participation in campus and off-campus 
religious activities. The Alpha Beta Chapter of Pi Tau Chi "taps" those students 
who qualify for membership during the spring of each academic year. 

M. S. M. — The Athens College M.S.M. (Methodist Student Movement) is an in- 
formal organization of students from all denominations meeting weekly. The M.S.M. 
attempts to aid the student in relating his academic life to his religious life. 

PUBLICATIONS 

THE ATHENIAN — The college newspaper is published by the student body. 
The official organ of the students of the college, the Athenian provides an oppor- 
tunity for students interested in journalism to develop in this field. 

THE COLUMNS— The yearbook, published annually by the students of the 
college, presents a pictorial review of the events of the year. 

"A" BOOK — The student handbook is published by the Student Government 
Association for the benefit of the new students. 

ALUMNI BULLETIN — This bulletin is published quarterly by the Alumni 
Association of Athens College. 

ATHENS COLLEGE BULLETIN— An official bulletin of the College is pub- 
lished annually; the January issue is the catalog number. This bulletin is sent free 
on request. 

MUSICAL ORGANIZATIONS 

ATHENS COLLEGE CHOIR — This is the major choral organization on campus. 
It performs a wide variety of choral literature from both the sacred and secular 
fields in concerts. The choir is open to all students. 

MEN'S CHORUS — This group offers men students opportunity to sing good 
music in an informal group and perforin in several recitals and concerts each year. 

ENSEMBLES — Opportunity is given on either an informal or a credit basis for 
participation in small musical ensembles, both instrumental and vocal. 

ATHENS COLLEGE BAND — The major instrumental music organization, the 
band plays at basketball games and participates in concerts each term sponsored by 
the music department. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 11 



DRAMA 



THE ATHENS COLLEGE PLAYERS— Dramatic activities on the campus are 
centered in The Athens College Players, a producing group open to all students 
interested in acting and stagecraft. The workshop plan offers an excellent dramatics 
laboratory. One-act plays, some student directed, are produced frequently. At least 
two major productions are presented, one in the fall trimester and one in the 
winter trimester. 

DELTA PSI OMEGA — Student members of the Athens College Players who meet 
the requirements of sustained activity in the college dramatics program may qualify 
for membership in Delta Psi Omega. The. Athens College Chapter maintains a 
strong membership in this largest of national dramatic fraternities. Membership is 
earned through acting or work in stagecraft. 

SIGMA TAU DELTA 

The Sigma Tau Delta English Fraternity was founded in 1924, and now has over 
80 chapters in the United States. It functions mainly as a writing club for English, 
Speech, and Journalism students and others who possess ability in creative writing. 
The fraternity publishes a quarterly literary magazine, The Rectangle, as an outlet 
for the writing done by the chapter members. The Athens College chapter, Kappa 
Zeta, was installed March 17, 1956. 

CHI BETA PHI 

The Alpha Kappa Chapter of the Chi Beta Phi, national honorary scientific fra- 
ternity, was organized on the Athens College campus in 1964. The fraternity pro- 
motes interest and scholarship in the natural sciences and mathematics. High 
scholarship in the sciences through the sophomore year is recognized by an invita- 
tion to become a member of the fraternity. An annual award is presented to the 
most outstanding member of the local chapter. 

LYCEUM SERIES 

The College provides a series of lectures, concerts, art exhibits, films, and other 
cultural events throughout the school year for students and the community. 

"A" CLUB 

Those who have won the coveted varsity "A" in recognition of their excellence in 
intercollegiate athletics are eligible for membership in this club. 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Athens College has an active Alumni Association, composed of men and women 
graduates and former students of the College. The Director of Alumni Affairs is 
located in Founders Hall. 

LIVING ARRANGEMENTS 

Living arrangements for men are provided on the campus. All students are re- 
quired to room in college houses and use the college food services provided, except- 
ing married students, students living at home with their parents, or students given 
special permission by the Dean of Students to live off campus. 

All women students who do not live at home will be required to live in on-campus 
dormitories. At the request of parents or guardians whose home is out of the city, 
permission for the female student to live with relatives in the vicinity of the college 
must be obtained from the Administrative Council and the Dean of Students. The 
College does not, however, assume responsibility for women students who live out- 
side the college residence halls. 

All inquiries concerning reservations, accommodations, and other particulars on 
student housing should be addressed to the Dean of Students. A student wishing 
to reserve a room should forward to the Dean of Students' Office a deposit of $27.50. 



12 ATHENS COLLEGE 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

All applications are considered individually and judgments are based on the stu- 
dents work in previous schools, recommendations, personal stability, and results of 
college entrance examinations. The college desires to admit only those graduates 
from secondary schools who have training, ability, and motivation to be successful 
in college-level studies. 

All applicants for admission to the freshman class are required to submit the fol- 
lowing credentials. (1) An application form for admission with an application fee 
of $15.00 which is non-refundable and cannot be applied to any other charges made 
by the college, (2) A complete transcript of high school or preparatory school work, 
(If transcript is submitted during applicants first semester of senior year, Athens 
College must be provided with a supplementary report of final grades and gradua- 
tion.) (3) two small photographs, (4) a medical report, (5) two letters of recom- 
mendation, (6) Scores from the American College Test (ACT) or Scholastic Aptitude 
Test (SAT) of College Entrance Examination Board. 

TRANSFER STUDENTS 

A student who wishes to transfer to Athens College from another college or uni- 
versity must apply to the Director of Admissions before the opening of the term 
and must provide the Director of Admissions with the following completed forms: 
(1) transcripts of all credits previously earned from each college or university 
attended, (2) two letters of recommendation, (3) physical or medical report, (4) two 
small photographs, and (5) application fee of $15.00, which is non-refundable and 
cannot be applied to any other charges made by the college. 

Athens College will admit a student only if he is in good academic standing and 
eligible to return to the college or university from which he is transferring. 

A student admitted from another college or university is required to earn an 
average of 1.0 (C) or better at Athens College and must accrue an over-all average 
of 1.0 (C) in all work before graduation is permitted. 

The student transferring to Athens College from a junior college may transfer a 
maximum of 60 semester hours (90 quarter hours) for credit. Other transfer stu- 
dents (from senior colleges and universities) may transfer in more than 60 semester 
hours (90 quarter hours) but will be admitted as unclassified students until the 
completion of the first trimester's work. 

The Director of Admissions will send an admissions card to each new applicant 
who has met the requirements for admission. A student who wishes to live in a 
college residence should notice that this card does not include a reservation for a 
room. Room reservations are made with the Dean of Students of the College 
through formal applications. 

TRANSIENT STUDENTS 

Applicants who wish to be admitted to Athens College as transient students must 
provide the Director of Admissions with a letter of permission from the Dean of 
the College or University in which he is currently enrolled, with an application 
form supplied by the Athens College Office of Admissions. 

NON-DEGREE STUDENT 

The non-degree program is open to adults, graduates of secondary schools, non- 
graduates of secondary schools not regularly accepted for admission to the under- 
graduate degree program of the College. Such students are enrolled as Unclassi- 
field Students. Records are kept of the work completed and credits are transferable 
to a degree program either at Athens College or to any college or university. Non- 
degree students wishing to enter a degree program at the College may not transfer 
more than 30 hours of the work taken as an Unclassified Student in the non-degree 
program. Details for admission and registration are available from the Director of 
Admissions, Athens College. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 13 

NIGHT DIVISION ADMISSION AND REGISTRATION REGULATIONS 

The Night Division student may secure forms for Admission from the Director 
of Admissions, Athens College, Athens, Alabama. These forms should be com- 
pleted and filed at least thirty (30) days prior to the beginning of the term in 
which the student wishes to enroll. Upon acceptance, information concerning regis- 
tration time and procedure will be sent to the student. Night Division Students are 
required to meet the same standards of admission at the Day Division students. 

OTHER INCOMING STUDENTS 

Mature students who do not meet the requirements for admission as regular 
students may be admitted as unclassified .students provided there is evidence of 
ability to pursue successfully the courses desired. Such students are required to 
take the General Educational Development (G.E.D.) test prior to admission. This 
test may be taken at the Testing Center, Athens College, at dates specified by the 
Center. Tests are normally given on the second and fourth Saturdays of each month 
throughout the year. 

Transfer into Lower or Upper Division may be requested after the successful 
completion of one trimester's work through application made to the Dean of the 
College. 

EARLY ADMISSIONS 

The student who has demonstrated capabilities to pursue college level work may 
enter into the College without having completed secondary or preparatory school 
work upon the completion of his junior year of high school or preparatory school. 
Such student will be required to accomplish the following: 

1. Completion of the American College Test (ACT) or the S.A.T. of the 
C.E.E.B. 

2. Completion of all standard forms for admission required of all students enter- 
ing the College for the first time. 

In addition, the student must provide a letter of recommendation from the prin- 
cipal of his secondary school or from the headmaster of his preparatory school, or 
guidance counsellor thereof, testifying to the student's ability to pursue college level 
courses. 

The student entering this program will be required to spend the first full year 
in residence carrying a minimum of 12 trimester hours each term before being al- 
lowed to transfer credit to another college or university. (Note: a full year is in- 
terpreted as 30 trimester hours.) 

ADVANCED STANDING PROGRAM 

The Advanced Standing Program of the College grants the superior student ad- 
vanced standing, should he qualify, in English, mathematics, and foreign languages. 
With advanced standing in any course(s), the student may by-pass the basic course(s), 
be given credit for having completed the basic course(s), and be permitted to enroll 
in advanced course(s) of the subject matter field. 

Advanced standing is determined by standard examinations, evaluation of aca- 
demic records, or personal interview or a combination of these three. 

CONDITIONAL READMISSION 

The following students are eligible to be granted conditional readmission: 

1. Students who show progress towards improving their cumulative grade point 
average (by making a 1.00 or better in the immediate prior trimester) are eligible 
for conditional readmission. 

2. Students who have fallen below a cumulative grade point average of 1.00 
(but who have not previously had trimester grade point averages below 1.00) are 
eligible. 



14 ATHENS COLLEGE 

REGISTRATION AND ENROLLMENT 

Registration is completed when the student has chosen his courses with approval 
by his adviser, secured the approval of the Dean, paid the required tuition and 
other fees and special charges. No student is admitted to classes until registration 
has been completed. 

All applications for Day and Night Divisions must be completed and in the 
Director of Admissions office by the dates give below. 

For Trimester Beginning Must Be Completed By 

June 18, 1965 June 11, 1965 

October 1, 1966 September 24, 1966 

February 6, 1967 January 30, 1967 

June 7, 1967 May 31, 1967 

THE COLLEGE PROGRAM 

• 

In keeping with the announced objectives of Athens College, a revised College 
program has developed. It will provide the opportunity for the student to move 
through his college career at a speed commensurate with his potential and demon- 
strated ability. Instruction in depth, one of the academic features of the program, 
affords the less capable student of additional instruction with trained tutors in 
individual conferences or in small group sessions. Thus the student is given addi- 
tional patient and intensified teaching to develop his capabilities. 

THE TRIMESTER SYSTEM 

During 1964-65, an intensive study of the academic system was completed and a 
determination was made to change the academic program to the trimester system. 
Since there is ample time for three equal semesters, or trimesters, of 15 weeks' 
duration in each college year, September 1965 will inaugurate the program on a 
continuing basis. The fall and winter trimesters are closely allied with the high 
school, preparatory school, and college semesters. The fall trimester begins in early 
October and ends in late January; the winter trimester begins in February and ends 
in early June; and the Summer trimester, equal in length to the others, begins in 
early June and ends in late September. 

For the summer trimester, the buildings, both academic and living, are air-con- 
ditioned, thus providing student and faculty a comfortable atmosphere in which to 
work and study. Vacation periods are provided in each trimester, including two 
weeks at Christmas, one week near Easter, and a period over the Labor Day holiday. 

The Trimester System makes it possible for the student to fulfill requirements 
for a degree and graduate in less than three years instead of the usual four, if he 
chooses to do so. The Trimester System also makes possible a reduced schedule of 
studies by which a student may take 10 hours work each term and still complete 
degree requirements in the four year period. In the Night Division, the student 
undertaking a full course of study will be able to complete his degree requirements 
in four years of study. 

Under the Trimester System at Athens, every core course is offered every trimester. 
Thus a student can enter in any of the terms and still be certain that the courses 
he needs will be offered during the trimester that he needs them. 

THE COLLEGE CURRICULUM 

A revision of the curriculum resulted in a reduction of the number of courses 
offered by the College. By eliminating courses of highly specialized nature or those 
of limited scope, the curriculum offers a truly sound basic education in all the 
disciplines in its program of studies. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 15 

Survey courses in all major areas of general knowledge cover the first four tri- 
mesters of the lower division. These courses cover a basic core commensurate 
with the objectives of a liberal arts education in the arts, the sciences, and in the 
social sciences. 

In the upper division, the student selects his major field of study from 
the various departments of the College. Major courses of study are available in 
Art, Biology, Business Administration, Chemistry, Economics, English, French, Ger- 
man, History, Mathematics, Music, Philosophy, Physics, Physical Education, Political 
Science, Psychology, Sociology, Spanish, and Religion. In the Department of Edu- 
cation, both Elementary and Secondary certification are available. 

Each trimester in the Upper Division, the student should take a minimum of 
two courses in the department of his major field and no more than three courses 
in one or more of the other departments. The student is thus provided five coursse 
each trimester for eight trimesters. With proper scheduling, the student will ex- 
perience no gaps in his educational background and will be fully prepared to enter 
into productive professional life or into further study at the graduate level. 

Students whose rate of progress is less accelerated or whose preparatory back- 
ground is deficient will be required to carry less than the standard load of courses 
and will also be assigned tutorial assistance, at no extra charge, to work with him 
until he reaches the standard proficiency level. 

In most of the basic courses, the student meets in class five times each week. 
Three of these sessions are lecture and two of them are discussion sections made up 
of small groups. Additional tutorial sessions are required of all students who are 
doing work below the "C" level until a proficiency level is reached. Further, indi- 
vidual faculty members are available to the student at any time for purposes of 
academic consultation and advice. 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

Students with fewer than 60 credit hours of college work are classified in the 
Lower Division of the College. Application for Upper Division of the College must 
be made in the Sophomore year. 

A 1.00 grade-point average is required for acceptance in the Upper Division. 

Not withstanding the above provisions, students may also be required to satisfy 
proficiency in English and Mathematics to enter the Upper Division. 

Students completing the Lower Division with a grade point below standard level 
may continue as an Unclassified Student. These students will be required to repeat 
previous course work to bring them to prescribed levels. 

Transfer students will be accepted as Lower Division students or as Unclassified 
students, measured by fewer or by more than sixty trimester hours of work. 

Transfer students who are listed as Unclassified may petition to take Upper 
Division work, but will only be eligible for admission to the Upper Division after 
completing one trimester's work in residence. 

The "in depth" academic program allows the student many more "contact" hours 
with academic personnel than is possible under the conventional college program. 
In addition, the program allows the opportunity for academic professionals to work 
directly with the individual student who gains by the individual attention. 

TRANSCRIPTS 

Transcripts are prepared for mailing only on the second and fourth Thursday 
of each month. Ten (10) days notice is required. Application for transcript is 
made to the Office of the Registar. First transcript is sent without charge; addi- 
tional copies cost $1.00 each. 



16 ATHENS COLLEGE 

THE NIGHT DIVISION 

The Night Division of the College is designed with a twofold objective: (1) to 
provide facilities and courses in upper level college work to the adult who is pro- 
fessionally employed and desires to complete degree requirements or improve or 
update his knowledge, or (2) to provide a degree program for those students of any 
age who must be gainfully employed but wish to acquire a college degree for per- 
sonal improvement. 

The Night Division offers the full range of courses in both Lower and Upper 
Divisions with the greater portion of the courses scheduled falling in the Upper 
Division. Day Division students, however, are permitted to enroll in Night Division 
courses and will receive the same credit as given in the Day Division. Night Divi- 
sion students are required to complete the final thirty (30) hours credit and one- 
fourth of the courses in their major toward the degree in attendance at Athens 
College. 

HOURS OF INSTRUCTION 

The Night Division classes are scheduled four nights each week in the following 
way: (1) All non-laboratory courses meet on Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday, and 
(2) All laboratory courses meet on Wednesday evening only. The hours of instruc- 
tions are as follows: 

6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. Monday, Tuesday and Thursday 

6:30 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. Wednesday 

The scheduled meeting times and frequency of meetings of 1-hour and 2-hour lec- 
ture and laboratory courses are arranged independent of the above hours of instruc- 
tion. The meeting times of these courses will be announced prior to the commence- 
ment of each term in the appropriate College bulletins. 

ORGANIZATION FOR INSTRUCTION 

The academic program of the College is administered through five divisions: 
Humanities, Business Administration, Social Sciences, Natural Science and Mathe- 
matics, and Education. Requirements for graduation and course offerings are listed 
under the appropriate division headings in the catalog. Faculty advisers are as- 
signed to students majoring in each division and consultation should be sched- 
uled for at least one meeting each term. 

The subject areas are arranged as follows: DIVISION OF BUSINESS ADMINIS- 
TRATION: Accounting, Business Administration, Economics, Secretarial Science. 

DIVISION OF EDUCATION: Elementary Education, Secondary Education, 
Health and Physical Education. 

DIVISION OF HUMANITIES: Art, English Language and Literature, Foreign 
Language, Humanities, Music, Philosophy, Religion, Speech and Drama. 

DIVISION OF NATURAL SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS: Biology, Chemistry, 
Engineering Graphics, Mathematics, Physics. 

DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES: History, Political Science, Psychology, 
Sociology. 

COURSE NUMBERING SYSTEM 

Courses numbered from 100-299 are ordinarily considered to be in the Lower 
Division; and those numbered 300-499 are considered to be in the Upper Division. 

Most courses are planned as independent units of study. However, some courses 
are sequential and indicate prerequisites in the catalog description of the course 
itself. Credit is allowed for the successful completion of one trimester's work in 
a sequential course. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 17 

FREQUENCY OF COURSE OFFERINGS 

Every course in the Lower Division will be, in so far as possible, offered each 
term. Courses in the Upper Division will be scheduled as often as necessary to 
accommodate the movement of students through the Upper Division. However, all 
courses in the Upper Division will be offered at least once each year or oftener upon 
special request. 

ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS 

The degree requirements at Athens College include 124 hours of course work, 
properly distributed, with a cumulative grade-point average of 1.00 on that course 
work, based on a 3.00 system. 

The college curriculum is divided into the Lower Division and the Upper Di- 
vision. The Lower Division requires a course of general "core" studies that is 
required of all students. This core comprises 62 of the 124 hours required. For 
students of exceptional ability, those majoring in the Division of Natural Sciences, 
and those majoring in certain other curricula, some deviation from the prescribed 
sequence is permitted. All students must, however, complete the sixty-hour "core" 
or its equivalent before graduation. 

Requirements for entering the Upper Division of the College are as follows: 

1. Completion of the Lower Division "core" or its prescribed equivalent with 
a cumulative grade point average of 1.00. 

2. Two trimesters in residence. 

3. Completion of the physical education requirement. 

MAJOR EDUCATIONAL FIELD 

LOWER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS 
HUMANITIES 15 hours 

Speech: 3 hours 

Each student is required to complete Speech 201 to fulfill this require- 
ment. 

Fine Arts: 6 hours 

A total of 6 hours is required in Fine Arts. This requirement is com- 
pleted by taking two of the following courses: Art 201 "Art Apprecia- 
tion," Music 201 "Music Appreciation," or Drama 201 "Drama Appre- 
ciation." 

Literature: 6 hours 

All students in the Lower Division must satisfactorily complete English 
211 and 212 or 215 and 216 to fulfill this requirement. 

COMMUNICATION SKILLS 15 hours 

English Completion: 6 hours 

Freshman composition is normally completed in the first two terms 
of the student's career by taking English 101-102. Students holding 
Advanced Standing in English are given credit for having completed 
this requirement. No remedial course in composition is offered. 

Foreign Language: 9 hours 

Each student is required to undertake study in one of the modern lan- 
guages offered in the curriculum: French, German, or Spanish. Advanced 
standing may be granted in the language requirement. Transfer credits 
in Latin or Greek may be applied toward this requirement upon approval 
of the Dean of the College. Students who have completed two years of 
a single language with passing grade at the secondary level may waive this 
requirement. 



18 ATHENS COLLEGE 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 12 hours 

History: 6 hours 

Each student fulfills this requirement by taking History 151-152, "History 
of Western Civilization. 

Political Science: 3 hours 
A three-hour course of study, I'olitican Science 251, "United States Gov- 
ernment" is required of all students in Lower Division. 

Economics, Psychology, Philosophy, or Sociology: 3 hours 

Each student is required to complete either Psychology 231, "General 
Psychology," Sociology 251, "Introduction to Sociology," or Economics 
222, "Principles of Economics." Pre-ministerial students should take 
Philosophy 201, "Introduction to Philosophy" to fulfill this requirement. 
Business majors should take Accounting 231, "Principles of Accounting" 
to fulfill this requirement. Majors in Elementary and Secondary Educa- 
tion are required to take Education 232, "Introduction to Education" 
to fulfill this requirement. 

SCIENCE 15 hours 

Biological Science: 6 hours 

Two three-hour courses, Biology 101-102 "General Biology," are re- 
quired in this area. The student majoring in any field of science will 
be required to take Biology 110-111 "Principles of Biology." 

Physical Science: 6 hours 

Each student will be required to take Chemistry 101 "Physical Science 
Chemistry," and Physics 101 "Physical Science Physics." The student 
majoring in any field of science or mathematics will be required to 
take Chemistry 112-113 "General Chemistry" and Physics 212-213 "General 
Physics" to fulfill this requirement. 

Mathematics: 3 hours 

This requirement is fulfilled by taking Mathematics 101 "College Mathe- 
matics." The student majoring in Mathematics will take Mathematics 
110 "College Algebra" to fulfill this requirement. The student deficient 
in Mathematics will be required to take Mathematics 101 if he intends 
to major in either Mathematics or Science. Such students, upon completion 
of Mathematics 101, will then be admitted to Mathematics 110. The 
student having advanced standing will be given credit for completion of 
this requirement. Business Administration majors will be required to 
take Accounting 232 to fulfill this requirement. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 4 hours 

Each student is required to complete four (4) hours of physical education 
(activities) courses during his tenure in the Lower Division. 

UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS 

Upon successful completion of the Lower Division requirements, the student 
is transferred to the Upper Division to the department of his elected major field 
for advisement and enrollment. Requirements for major field are determined 
by the department of his elected field of study. Course scheduling in the major 
and related courses is done at the department level. The student with the ad- 
vice and consent of his major field advisor should plan his course of study to 
fulfill the degree requirements. A program of his projected course of studies will 
be kept on file by department and by the Dean's office. Any deviation from 
the programmed course must be approved by the departmental advisor as well 
as by the Dean of the college. Each student must complete twelve trimester hours 
of Humanities and Religion as follows: Religion 220 and 221, (Old and New 



GENERAL INFORMATION 19 

THE ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

Testament) and Humanities 310 and 311. In addition, all students qualifying 
for a degree at Athens College must complete a minimum of thirty-six (36) tri- 
mester hours of 300 and 400 level courses. 

REPORT OF GRADES 

A report of grades is made periodically during the trimester. Students experi- 
encing dificulty in academics are met in conference with the faculty advisers and 
the Dean of the College to work out a program of study and tutorial assistance with 
the purpose of bringing the student's work up to standard. 

The scholastic record of each student is sent to his parents or guardian at mid- 
term and at the end of each trimester. Grades are reported as follows: 

"A" Excellent "D" Inferior 

"B" Above Average "F" Failure 

"C" Average "I" Incomplete 

Grades of "I" are changed to "F" if the work is not completed in the course 
within the first ten weeks in the following trimester in which the student is en- 
rolled. A student not enrolled in the college for a period of six (6) months follow- 
ing the date on which the "I" was received must remove the "I" during that period 
or the "'I" automatically becomes an "F". For the purposes of computation, "I" is 
always rated as "F". 

TRIMESTER HOURS AND GRADE POINTS 

All credits are counted in trimester hours.* A trimester hour usually refers to 
one class meeting one hour per week throughout the trimester. Two or three hours 
of classwork, discussion, or laboratory may be required to earn one trimester hour 
of credit. Each class presupposes two hours of preparation. 

For each trimester hour of credit in a subject, each letter grade earns the grade 
points as follows: 

"A" 3.0 points "D" 0.0 points 

"B" 2.0 points "F" 0.0 points 

"C" 1.0 points "I" 0.0 points 

If a student has received an "I" or an "F" and the work is repeated or made up, 
the appropriate grade points earned will be added to his record. In order to 
qualify for a degree, a student must complete his requirements with a cumulative 
grade-point average of 1.00. 

A student's scholastic average over any period is computed by dividing the total 
number of grade points by the total number of hours for which the student regis- 
tered. In repeated courses, the grade point may be computed only once. The 
standards of the College require that a student maintain a grade point average con- 
sistent with the grade point required for graduation upon completion of eight terms 
of academic work. 

Students entering in the Lower Division as probational students may be per- 
mitted two trimesters to gain satisfactory academic standing. All students in the 
Upper Division are permitted one trimester. Any student failing to attain ac- 
ceptable grade standing may be withdrawn from the college and denied permission 
to return for at least one trimester. 

•Trimester hours are equivalent to semester hours in schools on the semester system. 

RETENTION POLICY 

The standards of the College require that a student maintain a grade point 
average consistent with the grade point required for graduation after eight tri- 
mesters of academic work. Students who fail to maintain this minimum average 



20 ATHKNS COLLEGE 

of 1.00 are placed on scholastic probation and may be required to carry a reduced 
load of 12 trimester hours. 

Lower Division students who, at the end of the first trimester, have failed to 
achieve a 1.00 accumulative grade-point average are placed on probation and may 
be given up to two trimesters to attain satisfactory level. 

Upper Division students who failed to attain the 1.00 accumulative grade-point 
average are placed on academic probation and are given one trimester to attain 
satisfactory academic status. 

A TRANSFER student who is placed on probation upon entering the college 
must maintain a minimum average of 1.00 for all work done the entering trimester 
and must make consistent progress toward attaining satisfactory academic status. 

Any student failing to attain satisfactory academic standing at the end of the 
prescribed probationary period is withdrawn from the College and denied per- 
mission to return until the following summer trimester. A student must always 
petition for readmission and must attend the trimester for which he is admitted. 

A student readmitted may be limited to 12 hours work. If he is able to attain 
a 1.00 average for current work, he will be able to continue the following trimester. 
During the second trimester the student should attain the cumulative grade-point 
average of 1.00. If not, the student may be suspended from the College for aca- 
demic reasons. 

All students having failed to attain the standards of the college consistent with 
their requirements for graduation will be referred to the COMMITTEE ON 
STANDARDS for action. In all cases, the determination of the Committee is final. 

ARRANGEMENT OF SCHEDULE 

Each student is expected to arrange his course of study in consultation with his 
faculty adviser and the head of the division in which he plans to major. 
Prior to and during the pre-registration and the registration periods, faculty ad- 
visers are available for student consulation. The student is responsible for ar- 
ranging an appointment with his appropriate adviser at times other than the pre- 
registration and registration periods. 

Each student in the Lower Division of the College will be assigned a general ad- 
viser until such time as he elects a major field of study. Upon election of a major 
field, he will be assigned to a faculty adviser in that particular field. 

STUDENT COURSE LOAD 

Fifteen hours is considered a normal trimester load. A student in good standing 
may register for excess hours in accordance with the following restrictions. 

1. Any student attaining a 2.00 grade point in the preceding trimester and 
holding a minimum of a 1.75 overall may register for one three (3) hour course in 
addition to the normal trimester load. 

2. Any student attaining a 2.50 grade point in the preceding trimester and hold- 
ing a minimum of 2.00 overall may register for two three (3) hour courses in addi- 
tion to the normal trimester load. 

All petitions for excess credit load must be approved by the Dean of the College. 

Students not in good academic standing may be restricted to a load lighter than 
the normal fifteen hours. 

AUDITED COURSES 

Upon recommendation of his adviser, and with approval of the Dean of the 
College, a student may audit, without credit, a non-laboratory course. The student 
must attend class under the same obligation as the credit student although he is 
not required to stand scheduled examinations. Standard registration and fee pay- 
ment procedures apply. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 21 

CLASS ABSENCES 

Every class in the College curriculum is designed to present new material at each 
class meeting. The student absent from any session thereby misses part of the 
subject matter of the course. Viewed from this standpoint, there is no basis for dif- 
ferentiating between "excused" and "unexcused" absences. In order for the stu- 
dent to derive full benefit from the course of study, it is necessary that he do the 
work prescribed in each class session. 

It is therefore expected that every student will attend all scheduled classes, labora- 
tories, and discussion sessions promptly and regularly. Records of absences are 
kept by the Faculty and recorded with the office of the Dean. Penalties are assessed 
by the Faculty members by lowered grades for the course work or by recommenda- 
tion for dismissal from the course with an automatic grade of "F". 

ATTENDANCE AT CONVOCATION 

Students are provided with the privilege and are required to attend regular 
convocation programs held bi-weekly throughout the trimester. A student absent 
without being excused by the Dean of the College will be penalized one quality 
point for each absence in excess of one (1) per term. Convocations feature out- 
standing speakers in political, social, humanistic, and cultural areas, and make a 
constructive contribution to the general educational program of the College. 

DEGREES 

Each candidate for a Bachelor's Degree is required to complete a course con- 
sisting of a minimum of 124 trimester hours, properly distributed. 

A Bachelor of Arts degree is granted to a student who has majored in some area 
of the applied arts, humanities, or social sciences. 

A Bachelor of Science is granted to a student who has majored in one of the 
natural or physical sciences or mathematics, or in business administration. 

A Bachelor of Science in Education is granted to the student who has completed 
the prescribed course of instruction in either elementary or secondary education 
and has further qualified for teacher certification. 

APPLICATION FOR GRADUATION 

All students expecting to receive a degree from Athens College must apply for 
graduation at least 30 days prior to the beginning of their last term in residence. 
Specific date for filing the application will be announced in the college bulletin. 
Forms for the application are obtained from the Registrar of the College. 

THE DEAN'S LIST 

The Dean's List is announced each trimester and includes those students who are 
regular full-time students carrying at least 15 trimester hours of work. The List 
will carry those students who have attained a grade-point average of 2.50 or above 
for the work of the preceding term. The student having a grade-point average 
between 2.20 and 2.50 will be given Honorable Mention. 

DEGREES WITH DISTINCTION 

Three grades of honor are designated for the degrees granted. They are as 
follows: 

SUMMA CUM LAUDE is awarded to the student who has earned a grade-point 
average of 3.00 during his college career. 

MAGNA CUM LAUDE is awarded to the student who has earned a grade-point 
average of 2.75 during his college career, with no grade lower than 1.00. 

CUM LAUDE is awarded to the student who has earned a grade-point average 
of 2.50 during his college career, with no grade lower than 1.00. 



22 ATHENS COLLEGE 

FINANCING AN EDUCATION 

For the student who must finance his own education in whole or in part, Athens 
College has a number of sources of funds available such as workships, scholarships, 
grants, grants-in-aid, loans from the college and from public and private agencies. 
Many of these are not available to the entering freshman and inquiries for in- 
formation concerning the availability for these sources should be directed to the 
Business Manager of the College. 

THE TUITION PLAN 

Arrangements have been made with The Tuition Plan, Inc., New York City, 
to finance student education under the Budget Plan whenever financing is needed. 
The Tuition Plan is a convenient way to meet tuition and other academic fees 
out of regular earnings. These expenses may be set up on a one-year basis repay- 
able in eight monthly payments, on a two-year basis repayable in 30 consecutive 
monthly payments, or on a four-year basis repayable in 40 consecutive monthly 
payments. Life insurance is furnished on the two, three and four year plans. 

Further information regarding the Tuition Plan may be obtained by writing the 
Business Manager, Athens College. 

FUNDS FOR EDUCATION 

Arrangements have been made with Funds for Education, a subsidiary of House- 
hold Finance Corporation, whereby the students education may be financed on a 
monthly basis. These expenses may be set up on a one, two, three or four year 
basis. Life insurance is furnished with all of these plans. 

Further information regarding funds for education may be obtained by writing 
the Business Manager of Athens College. 

THE UNITED SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

The United Scholarship Fund has been established by the Board of Trustees 
of Athens College to provide financial resources for men and women who would 
not be otherwise able to attend college. The Fund, administered and regulated by 
the faculty, provides for scholarships and grants to students based upon need and 
merit as determined by information furnished on the Fund application form. The 
distribution of the Fund benefits the regional student as well as the student beyond 
the boundaries of the region. It is available to residential and to commuter stu- 
dents. 

In 1966 the distribution of more than $60,000 will be made to entering students. 
In subsequent years, the amount will increase and the Fund will grow. The grant of 
funds will be directly applied to tuition, fees, and other expenses normally in- 
curred by the matriculated student. 

The United Scholarship Fund is one of the most important means to offer edu- 
cation to a wider range of students who will one day develop into positions of 
leadership in our society. 

Information concerning the United Scholarship Fund may be obtained by writing 
to the Director of Admissions, Athens College, Athens, Alabama. 

GRANTS-IN-AID 

ATHLETIC: Athletic Grants-in-Aid are granted to those selected to play on the 
varsity team in intercollegiate athletic sports. The number and amount of grants 
shall be determined by the Athletic Committee and the Director of Athletics. 

MINISTERIAL: Ministerial Grants-in-Aid are available in the amount of $75.00 
per trimester for Methodist Ministers, their wives and children, providing the 
minister is the source of dependency for the wife and children, and providing the 
minister is pursuing the Pre-Ministerial Program. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 23 

TEACHERS: Teacher Grant-in-Aid in the amount of §50.00 is available to the 
children of teachers, providing the teacher has the sole dependency of the child. 

ATHENS COLLEGE FACULTY AND STAFF GRANTS: Policies for granting 
tuition credit for dependents of faculty, administration and staff employees (fees 
are not included): Full tuition credit is given to those dependents (wives, husbands 
or children) of full-time faculty members and administrative officers. This be- 
comes effective after one full academic year of employment. Full time staff em- 
ployees' dependents (wife, husband or children) are granted one-half tuition 
credit after one year of work at Athens College. Part time faculty members are 
granted a pro-rata tuition credit, according to hours taught with a maximum of one- 
third tuition credit. This becomes effective after one full year of employment. 

WORK GRANTS: The College seeks to employ students who need assistance in 
service jobs on campus. Such jobs consist of stenographic work in college offices, 
science laboratory assistants, service in dining room and kitchen, library work, and 
other campus work. Each job is under the supervision of either faculty or adminis- 
trative persons who also report the amount of time the student spends in produc- 
tive labor to the Dean. The uniform remuneration for each job is 65 cents per 
hour. Students on workships who perform unsatisfactory work on the assigned job, 
or who experience a drop in academic performance levels, will be, upon recommen- 
dation to the Dean, relieved of the workship and be required to pay full fees for 
the remainder of the term in which the student was relieved. 

THE NAMED SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM 

Wolverine Tube Division of Calumet and Hecla, Inc. Scholarship — The Wol- 
verine Tube Division of Calumet and Hecla, Inc., Decatur, Alabama, awards an- 
nually a $500 scholarship to a junior or senior who is chosen by the faculty of the 
College on the basis of his academic record, leadership, and moral character. 

Geneva A. Smith Scholarship — A fund of $5,000 was established by the late Mrs. 
Geneva A. Smith, the income from which provides a scholarship for a student of 
the Methodist faith residing in Franklin County, Alabama. The faculty of the 
College selects the student on the basis of need, leadership and moral character. 

Madison L. Marshall Scholarship — The Madison L. Marshall Scholarship was set 
up by the Kiwanis Club of Decatur, Alabama, in memory of the late Dr. Madison 
L. Marshall, who was a member of the Club, Professor of Chemistry at Athens 
College, and research chemist at The Chemstrand Corporation of Decatur. This 
is a scholarship of $600,000 to be awarded at the rate of $300.00 per year for two 
years to an ambitious student of good moral character majoring in the sciences 
and who is a native of Morgan, Lawrence or Limestone County. 

Chemstrand Scholarship — The Chemstrand Corporation of Decatur, Alabama, 
awards annually a $500.00 scholarship to a Junior or Senior who has chosen as his 
major interest the field of Chemistry. The candidate is chosen by the faculty on 
the basis of his scholastic record, leadership, and moral character. 

William A. Shelton Scholarship Fund— An investment donated by Mrs. Jessie B. 
Holloway, of Gadsden, Alabama, in memory of Dr. William A. Shelton, beloved 
Methodist Minister and College Professor. The revenue from this investment shall 
be given some worthy student each year to further his education at Athens College. 
The student must maintain an average grade of C, or above, in order to qualify for 
the scholarship. 

Josephine McCaleb Balch Scholarship — A fund of $1,000.00 has been established 
in memory of the late Josephine McCaleb Balch, class of 1913, the income from 
which provides a scholarship for a student. The faculty of the college selects the 
student on the basis of need, leadership, and moral character. 

National Methodist Scholarships — Each scholarship pays all tuition and fees. 
Awards are made according to terms established by the Division of Higher Educa- 
tion, Department of Educational Institutions of the Board of Education of the 
Methodist Church. 



24 AIM I . XS CO L L E C I . 

The Associates Capitol Corporation Education Fund — A scholarship of $250 a 
year has been established by the Associates Capitol Corporation with headquarters 
in Nashville, Tennessee, to be awarded annually to a student majoring in business 
administration. The award is to be made on the basis of grades, character, and 
leadership qualities. 

The Gorgas Scholarship Foundation, Inc. — Athens College has been approved 
as one of the Alabama colleges to award a four-year scholarship to the finalists in 
the Alabama Science Talent Search. 

The Sigma Kappa Scholarship — Established in 1966 by the Sigma Kappa Na- 
tional Social Sorority, this scholarship is available to any man or woman who 
meets the standards established by the Academic Council. The amount of 
scholarship is $500.00. 

LOANS 

Walter F. Rauschenberg Revolving Loan Fund — The Walter F. Rauschenberg 
Revolving Loan Fund of $1,000 was established in 1954 in memory of the late 
Walter F. Rauschenberg of Decatur, Alabama, by his wife, Mrs. Frances Rauschen- 
berg, and daughter, Miss Helen Rauschenberg, and daughter and son-in-law, Mr. 
and Mrs. Nichols Zelinka, to aid worthy students who will be selected for these 
loans on the basis of need, scholarship, and character. The amount that any one 
student may borrow from this fund is not to exceed $200.00 since it is the purpose 
of the donors to aid as many students as possible. 

The Eula Johnson Cooper and John T. Cooper Loan Fund — A fund of $500.00 
was established in 1958 by Mr. and Mrs. John T. Cooper, Hartselle, Alabama, as a 
loan fund to aid worthy students. The recipient of the loan will secure the loan 
and repay the money within a reasonable time after having completed work at 
Athens College. Selection of the recipient shall be determined by the Student Loan 
and Scholarship Committee. 

Phi Sigma Literary Society — The Phi Sigma Literary Society, a campus organi- 
zation which encourages scholarship, has established a loan found of $100 to aid 
worthy students in the continuance of their education. 

Saturday Culture Club — The Saturday Culture Club Loan Scholarship of $315.00 
is available for worthy students who have made a good record during their fresh- 
man and sophomore years and who hold promise of future leadership. This fund 
was established by the Saturday Culture Club of Decatur, Alabama, in 1951. 

Delta Kappa Gamma Scholarship Loan Fund — The Omicron Chapter of Delta 
Kappa Gamma has established a fund of $200.00 to be loaned to a girl from Lime- 
stone County who plans to enter the teaching profession. If no Limestone County 
girl requests a loan from this fund, any qualified out-of-the-county girl may borrow 
from the fund. 

General Joseph Wheeler Memorial Loan Scholarship — The General Joseph 
Wheeler Memorial Association has established a loan fund of $500.00 to be used 
by a worthy girl who meets the qualifications as outlined by the Scholarship Com- 
mittee. 

Optimist Club Revolving Loan Fund — The Huntsville Optimist Club has estab- 
lished a loan fund of $300 to be used by a worthy boy from Madison County or 
from an adjoining county. The student must meet qualifications outlined by the 
Scholarship Committee. 

ADDITIONAL LOAN FUNDS 

The Pickett and Hatcher Education Fund — The Picket and Hatcher Education 
Fund, 1708 Wynnton Road, Columbus, Georgia, makes loans available to students 
at low rates of interest. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 25 

The General Board of Education, The Methodist Church — The Methodist Board 
of Education, Nashville, Tennessee makes available loans for members of the 
Methodist Church who desire financial assistance in continuing their education. 

The Bess Rothmon Boon Loan Fund — Mrs. Bess Rothmon Boon of Los Angeles, 
California has contributed the sum of $1,000.00 which opens the United Student 
Aid Fund to Athens College. This amount of money is required in order that 
$25,000 be made available to eligible students. A description of this Loan Fund is 
given below. 

United Student Aid Fund, Inc. — Athens College participates in the United Stu- 
dent Aid Fund, Inc., whereby upperclass students may borrow funds at hometown 
and local banks for a nominal rate of interest. Application blanks may be obtained 
from the Business Manager or from local banks. In either case the College must 
approve the loan. 

LOCAL EMPLOYMENT 

Employment in the Athens, Decatur and Huntsville area exists in various plants 
and retail establishments. Students may check with the placement bureau to de- 
termine positions and jobs available. The Placement Bureau will make every effort 
to assist students to find part-time employment. 

The trimester system can make it possible for entirely self-supporting students 
to work and graduate in the normal four years by studying three trimesters each 
year at a reduced load level. 

FEES AND EXPENSES 

Athens College is a private institution which receives no support from taxes or 
public funds. Each student is charged a tuition fee which helps defray the total 
cost of his education, but the balance is made up through private gifts and from 
endowment funds income. 

Every dormitory student is required to make a deposit of $27.50 prior to July 
15th of each year. If no damages incur to the dormitory room, the deposit is re- 
fundable. This room deposit is refundable if a reservation for the first trimester is 
cancelled before August 15, or subsequent to the two week period immediately be- 
fore the opening of any trimester. A room will be reserved, but the specific room 
assigned will not be reported until the student arrives at the campus. The room 
deposit of $27.50 should be forwarded directly to the Dean of Students, Athens 
College. 





1st Trimester 


2nd Trimester 


3rd Trimester 


Tuition (12-16 hrs.) * 


$345.00 


$345.00 


$345.00 


General Fee** 


55.00 


55.00 


55.00 


Room 


150.00 


150.00 


150.00 


Board*** 


265.00 


265.00 


265.00 



* All costs listed above are effective September 1, 1966. 

Any load less than 12 trimester hours in the day program is based on a charge 
of $25.00 per hour. 

Day students taking nine hours or less will be charged fees in accordance 
with the night fee schedule in lieu of the $55.00 General Fee. 

** $1.50 assessed per trimester, levied by the student body, is charged as pay- 
ment toward the gym bleachers. This assessment will be removed as soon as 
the bleachers are paid in full. 

*** $15.90 State and local sales taxes not included. 

TERMS OF PAYMENT 

All dormitory students are required to pay to the Bursar of the College in accord- 
ance with the following schedule: 



26 ATHENSCOLLEGE 

SCHEDULE OF PAYMENT 1966-1967 

Fall Winter Summer 

$150.00* July 15 Nov. 15 March 15 

682.40 Sept. 1 Jan. 1 May 1 

*The $150.00 payment is credited to room rent and is not refundable. 

GENERAL FEES 

The General Fee covers various expenses in the College in connection with the 
individual student. The Student Activity Fee receives $20.00 of the General Fee. 
This sum is used to defray in part the cost of the weekly newspaper, the all-college 
dances, the year book, athletic contests. Student Government Association and various 
other all-college student activities. The Student Center receives $5.00 for its oper- 
ations. 

The College Counseling and Testing Program receives another $10.00 of the 
General Fee. This program consists of various tests that are administered to the 
students and personal counseling given each student concerning the results of these 
tests. 

Another $10.00 of this fund is used as a lab fee to help defray the cost of equip- 
ment and supplies used in all courses. 

The Student Health Program receives the remaining $10.00 and provides health 
and accident insurance for the full-time student for one trimester. 

BOARD 

The Board rate includes twenty meals per week at an average cost of less than 
85 cents per meal. All resident students arc required to room in College houses 
and use the College Food Service provided, excepting married students and stu- 
dents living at home with their parents. 

REFUNDS 

The College must engage its Faculty and assign resident home space in advance 
of each trimester, in accordance with the number of students who have indicated 
intent to enroll. When a student voluntarily withdraws from the college, that leaves 
a vacancy which cannot be filled. The following rules concerning refunds protect 
the College from losses when students withdraw. Exceptions will be made only 
under emergency conditions determined by the College. All refunds are figured 
from first day of registration. 

TUITION: A student who voluntarily withdraws from the college, will be held 
for tuition in accordance with the following schedule each trimester. Before the 
end of the fourth week, one-half tuition will be refunded. Thereafter no refund 
will be made. No fees are refundable. 

BOARD: Refunds for board are made in the following manner: 14 is retained 
for first two weeks, Y% is retained for first month. All is retained after first month. 

ROOM: No refund will be made for the trimester from room rental. 

SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES: The College reserves the right to exclude at any 
time, students whose conduct renders them undesirable members of the College 
community. In such cases, the tuition and fees due the College for that trimester 
are not refunded, and other charges are handled according to the schedule listed. 

SPECIAL AND INCIDENTAL FEES 

The following is a list of Special and Incidental Fees which arc not listed in the 
General Fees: 



COURSE OFFERINGS 27 

Application Fee (Non Refundable) $15.00 

Audit of course per trimester hour 12.50 

Practice Teaching 25.00 
Music (Piano, Pipe Organ, Voice, Violin, or 

Instrumental Music) two one-half hour lessons per week 80.00 

Music, same as above but for one-half hour lesson per week 50.00 

Pipe Organ (for practice) one-half hour per day 20.00 

Late Registration Fee 5.00 

Special Examination Fee 5. 00 

Change in Schedule or withdrawal 5.00 

Late Admission Fee 5.00 

Transcript of grades (after first request) 1.00 

Graduation Fee 18.50 

FEES AND EXPENSES — NIGHT DIVISION 

Tuition and fees for the Night Division are as follows: 

Tuition (per trimester hour) $20.00 

Registration 5.00 

Student Activity* 13.00 

Lab Fee 15.00 

Any load in excess of ten hours will carry a charge of $25.00 per hour. 

*An additional $1.50 is charged for the Gym Bleacher Fund. This charge will be 
dropped when the equipment bill is paid. 

All accounts for less than $80.00 must be paid in full at registration. Special per- 
mission may be obtained from the Business Manager for deferred payments for 
which an additional fee of $5.00 is charged. Any payment deferred will be on a 
50% registration payment, the remaining 50% in two equal installments of 25% 
each in 30 and 60 days from registration. 

All drop outs and dropped courses will be handled in accordance with the sched- 
ule outlined in the day division program. 






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28 A 1 H E N S COLL E G E 

DIVISION OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

The offerings in the Division of Business Administration are designed to give 
students who expect to enter business a broad business education in addition to the 
general cultural education afforded by the college. 

A student selecting an area of concentration in the Business Division is required 
to complete at least fifty trimester hours in the Division. Among the required 
courses are the basic courses laid down by the American Association of Collegiate 
Schools of Business for its members. Having taken these courses, a student will not 
lose credits in transferring to or from a recognized School of Business Administration. 

Business administration and secretarial students should take the Bachelor of 
Science degree. Business education students working for a teacher's certificate should 
take the Bachelor of Science in Education degree. 

ACCOUNTING (AC) 

Accounting 231-232. Accounting Principles. Basic principles plus practical applica- 
tion through the use of individual, partnership, and corporation practice sets. 

3 hours each 

Accounting 321-322. Intermediate Accounting. A further study of the application 
of Accounting Principles. This course gives particular reference to corporation 
accounting. Prerequisite: Accounting 232. 

3 hours each 

Accounting 331-332. Advanced Accounting. Problems in Cash and Receivables; in- 
complete data; inventories; investments; estates and trusts; receivership account- 
ing. Prerequisite: Accounting 232. 

3 hours each 

Accounting 342. Federal Tax Accounting. A study of the law and regulations per- 
taining to the more common forms of taxation at the present time, including 
social security legislation, withholding for income tax purposes. Emphasis is 
placed upon the practical problems involved in completing individual Federal 
Income Tax returns, including those concerned with single proprietorships, 
partnerships, corporations. Prerequistes: 6 hours of Accounting Principles. 

3 hours 

Accounting 351-352. Cost Accounting. The nature and uses of cost accounting; the 
job-lot cost plan and its application; process cost accounting; cost accounting 
with the use of cost standards and the use of cost accounting in formulation 
of the business policies of a company. Prerequisite: Accounting 322. 

3 hours each 

Accounting 441. Auditing. This course includes an extensive analysis of the work 
and responsibilities of an auditor; the purpose and kinds of audits; systems of 
internal check; auditors' reports; investigations and certificates. Prerequisite: 
12 hours Accounting. 

3 hours 

BUSINESS (BU) 

Business 305. Business Statistics. An introductory study of the nature and sources 
of business data and the principles which underlie the selection and classifica- 
tion of such data. Prerequisite: Upper Division. 

3 hours 

Business 311. Business Law. The bases and sources of our present day law; its 
divisions and fundamental principles. The general principles of the law of 
contracts, agency, employer and employee, negotiable instruments, with special 
attention to the law in Alabama. The Alabama Right-to-Work Law is also con- 
sidered. Statutes of limitations and exemptions are also included in the course. 
Prerequisite: Upper Division. 

3 hours 



COURSE OFFERINGS 29 

Business 312. Business Law. A further consideration of various branches and sub- 
jects of the law which may prove of benefit to the average business man. Among 
the subjects studied are wills, personal property, bailments, real property, mort- 
gages, leases, commmon carriers, sales of personal property, partnerships, corpo- 
rations, business torts and crimes, insurance, and a hasty consideration of the 
general Alabama law concerning marriage, divorce, alimony and the custody of 
children. Prerequisite: Upper Division. 

3 hours 

Business 313. Money and Banking. Study of the theory and principles of money, 
credit, and banking; the function and administration of banks; foreign ex- 
change; the clearing house, and the Federal Reserve System. Prerequisite: 
Economics 222, 223. 

3 hours 

Business 315. Business Finance. A study of the promotion, incorporation, and fi- 
nancing of modern business; consideration is given to the various types of stocks 
and bonds issued; attention is given to mergers, consolidations, holding com- 
panies, and other steps of business expansion. Prerequisites: Accounting 232 
and Economics 223. 

3 hours 

Business 316. Investments. General principles of investment. Industrial, railroad, 
public utility, federal, state, and municipal securities; real estate investment; 
mutual funds. Prerequisite: Business 315, or permission. 

3 hours 

Business 331. Marketing Principles. A study of the forces operating, institutions 
employed, and methods followed in the flow of goods and services from pro- 
duction to consumption. 

3 hours 

Business 332. Salesmanship Theory and Practice. The development of selling 
methods; buyer-seller relationship; qualities of effective salesmen; the salesman 
and his goods, his customers, and his firm. Prerequisite: Business 331, 
Psychology 231. 

3 hours 

Business 333. Advertising. A study of the principles of advertising; types of adver- 
tising media; testing advertising effectiveness; and analyzing problems of adver- 
tising encountered in business. Particular attention is given to the small ad- 
vertiser. Prerequisite: Business 331, Psychology 231. 

3 hours 

Business 341. Business English and Correspondence. A study of the parts of speech, 
punctuation, capitalization, syllabication, the use of the right word, and the 
construction of a sentence. Instruction is given in letter styles and types, the 
psychology of business writing, methods of communication, the actual writing 
of business letters. Prerequisite: English 102. 

3 hours 

Business 346. Industrial Management. A study of industrial organization and man- 
agement principles and practices. Prerequisite: Upper Division. 

3 hours 

Business 347. Office Management. A study of the problems involved in planning 
and directing the function of business and professional offices. 

3 hours 

Business 348. Personnel Management. A study of the methods and techniques of 
organized personnel work. Stress is laid upon scientific procedures and their 
integration into a complete program. Prerequisite: Psychology 231. 

3 hours 



30 ATHENS COLLEGE 

Business 349. Industrial Relation. Among the topics studied will be: the manage- 
ment function, executive behavior, employee behavior, incentives and restric- 
tions of output, labor unions and their structure, the problems of change. 
Prerequisite: Economics 222, 223. 

3 hours 

Business 355. General Insurance. A study of the fundamental principles and uses 
of various types of insurance: life, fire, marine, and other casualty coverages. 
Prerequisite: Upper Division. 

3 hours 

ECONOMICS (EC) 

Economics 222-223. Principles of Economics. Providing basic economic analysis; an 
orderly, objective way of thinking about economic problems to reach well- 
considered judgments on major public policy issues; intending to stimulate a 
continuing interest in real-world economics. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. 

3 hours eacli 

Economics 313. Money and Banking. Same as Business 313. 3 hours 

Economics 321. Economic History of the United States. A means of understanding 
the pattern in which economic principle is cast. A background for the study 
of economic thought, politics, and economic geography; an analysis of economic 
action in the United States. 

3 hours 

Economics 342. Comparative Economic Systems. Analyzing capitalist, socialist, com- 
munist, fascist, and cooperative economic systems; their institutions and the 
operation of economic principles within each. Prerequisite: Economics 222-223. 

3 hours 

Economics 349. Industrial Relations. Same as Business 349. 3 hours 

Economics 434. Public Finance. A study of the principles underlying the expendi- 
tures, revenues, and borrowing of government on federal, state, and local levels. 
Prerequisite: Economics 223. 

3 hours 

Economics 441. History of Economic Thought. A study of the development of 
economic doctrines from Mercantilism to present day theories. Prerequisite: 
Economics 222-223. 

3 hours 

TYPEWRITING (SS) 

Sec. Sci. 111. Basic Typewriting, Beginning course with emphasis on mastery of 
the keyboard, correct technique, and skill building. Instruction is given in the 
preparation of simple business letters, notes, memoranda, tabulations, rough 
drafts, manuscripts, and postal cards. 

2 hours 

Sec. Sci. 112. Intermediate Typewriting. Continuation of skill building and de- 
velopment of sustained typing ability. Instruction is given in business letter 
styles, advanced tabulation, rough drafts, manuscripts, word division, telegrams, 
postal cards, index cards, and interoffice memorandums. Prerequisite: Sec. Sci. 
Ill or the equivalent. 

2 hours 

Sec. Sci. 113. Advanced Typewriting. A continuation of Typewriting 112. Much 
stress is placed on the development of speed and accuracy, and the arrangement 
of material. Instruction is given in special business letter forms, advanced tabu- 
lation, legal documents, business forms, statistical and accounting reports, and 
stencil cutting. Prerequisite: Sec. Sci. 112 or the equivalent. 

2 hours 



COURSE OFFERINGS 31 

Sec. Sci. 301. Production Typewriting. Special attention is given to office typewrit- 
ing problems, and production rates and standards. Experience on electric type- 
writers. Prerequisite: Sec. Sci. 113 or the equivalent. 

2 hours 

SHORTHAND (SS) 

Sec. Sci. 211. Elementary Shorthand. Beginning course covering the theory of Gregg 
Shorthand. Development of fluency in reading and writing shorthand. Pre- 
requisite: Sec. sci. Ill or concurently enrolled in Sec. Sci. 111. 

3 hours 

Sec. Sci. 212. Intermediate Shorthand. Continuation of skill building with emphasis 
on developing speed in taking dictation. Considerable attention given to pre- 
transcription training. Introduction to transcription. Prerequisite: Sec. Sci. Ill 
and 211, or the equivalent. 

3 hours 

Sec. Sci. 311. Dictation and Transcription. Development of speed and accuracy in 
writing shorthand from dictation, and further development of ability to tran- 
scribe. Introduction of office-style dictation. Prerequisite: Sec. Sci. 212, or the 
equivalent. 

3 hours 

Sec. Sci. 312. Advanced Dictation and Transcription. Emphasis on speed building, 
production of mailable copy, office-style dictation, and mastery of specialized 
vocabularies. Prerequisite: Sec. Sci. 311 or the equivalent. 

3 hours 

Sec. Sci. 313. Office Dictation and Transcription. Much stress is placed on speed 
and accuracy in dictation and transcription. Further development in the pro- 
duction of mailable copy and office-style dictation. Practice in transcribing 
from machines. Prerequisite: Sec. Sci. 312 or the equivalent. 

3 hours 

Sec. Sci. 231. Secretarial Practice. Theory and practice in the operation of adding 
machines, rotary and key-driven calculators, electric typewriters, dictating, 
transcribing, and duplicating machines. An introduction to the nature of 
punched card data processing equipment, and electronic computers. Prerequi- 
site: Sec. Sci. Ill or the equivalent. 

3 hours 

Sec. Sci. 343. Filing and Indexing. Presentation of the fundamentals of indexing 
and filing. A study of the types of filing equipment, special filing systems, and 
practice in record keeping. 

3 hours 

DIVISION OF EDUCATION (ED) 

The Department of Education offers courses which meet the requirements of the 
State Department for teacher certification for the Professional B Elementary and 
the Professional B Secondary Teacher Certificates. The courses offered are also 
designed to give the student thorough training in a liberal arts education. 

If a student selects elementary education as his field, he must major in elementary 
education but does not need a minor. 

If a student chooses secondary education as his field, he must take 24 trimester 
hours of education as outlined in the catalog and in addition he must select a 
major and a minor in other fields. Generally he must earn 24 to 30 trimester hours 
in his major and 18 trimester hours in his minor. However, he should be familiar 
with the major requirements in the division in which he chooses to major, since 
they vary. 



32 ATHENS COLLEGE 

REGULATIONS FOR STUDENTS IN THE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

A student who plans to enter Education 472, Observation and Student Teaching 
in the Elementary School, or Education 482, Observation and Student Teaching in 
the Secondary School, must apply in writing at the beginning of his senior year to 
his education advisor. These courses are open only to seniors who have completed 
Methods and Materials courses in their special field. Therefore, it is wise for the 
student to take methods courses in the junior year or the first trimester of the 
senior year in order to have these courses before time to do student teaching. 

During the term when the student is student teaching, a maximum of 14 tri- 
mester hours may be taken. Of the 14 trimester hours, 8 trimester hours will be 
required for student teaching. In counting hours toward graduation, the individual 
should allow for only 14 trimester hours while student teaching. 

It is recommended that during the first two years, subjects required of all stu- 
dents be taken. Professional education courses are taken the last two years of 
college. Psychology 231, however, will be taken by all education majors as a part 
of their education requirement. 

(Note: Requirements given below for both Elementary and Sec- 
ondary Certification are pending approval of the State De- 
partment of Education at time of publication of this cat- 
alog. If approval is not determined, earlier requirements 
will prevail.) 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A STUDENT WHO DESIRES AN 
ALABAMA TEACHING CERTIFICATE 



B.S. in Education and Qualifications for Class B Elementary 
Professional Certificate 



Educational Courses 
Requirements: Minimum 36 Trimester Hours 

Course Trimester Hours 

Education 232. Introduction to Education 4 

Psychology 233. Educational Psychology 
Psychology 332. Child Growth and Development 
Education 330. Methods and Materials of teaching Health, 

Physical Education in the Elementary School 3 

Music 411. Materials and Methods of Elementary School Music 3 

Education 421. Materials and Methods of Teaching in the 

Elementary School 3 

Education 422. Materials and Methods of Teaching in the 

Elementary School 3 

Education 423. Curriculum Construction 3 

Education 461. Tests and Measurements 3 

Education 472- Observation, Seminar and Student Teaching in the 

Elementary School 8 



Total Required 33 



COURSE OFFERINGS 



33 



Other Requirements 
English 
Course 

English 101-102. English Composition 
English 215-216. American Literature 
Speech 201. Fundamentals of Speech 



Social Sciences 
Course 

History 151-152. History of Western Civilization 
Political Science 251. United States Government 
Sociology 251. Introduction to Sociology 
History 303. Alabama State History 
History 351. United States to 1876 

or 
History 352. United States 1876 to present 



Mathematics 
Course 

Mathematics 101. College Mathematics 



Psychology 



Course 

Psychology 231. General Psychology 



Natural Science 
Course 

Biology 101-102. General Biology 
Chemistry 101. Physical Science-Chemistry 
Physics 101. Physical Science-Physics 



Course 

Art 201. Art Appreciation 



Course 

Music 201. Music Appreciation 



Lower Division Requirement 



Art 



Music 



Physical Education 



Foreign Language 
Course 

Spanish 111-112, French 111-112, or German 111-112 

General Electives to complete 124 trimester hours. 



Trimester Hours 

6 
6 
3 



Total Required 15 



Trimester Hours 

6 



Total Required 18 



Trimester Hours 



Total Required 3 



Trimester Hours 



Total Required 3 



Trimester Hours 
6 

3 
3 



Total Required 12 



Trimester Hours 



Total Required 3 



Trimester Hours 



Total Required 3 
4 



Total Required 4 



Trimester Hours 

9 



Total Required 9 



34 



ATHENS COLLEGE 



Class B. Scondary Professional Certificate 
Educational Course Requirement: 24 Trimester Hours Minimum 



Course 

Education 232. Introduction to Education 
Psychology 233. Educational Psychology 

or 
Psychology 334. Adolescent Psychology 

Education 431. Materials and Methods of High School Teaching 
Education 432. Curriculum Construction 
Education 461. Tests and Measurements 

Education 482. Observation, Seminar and Student Teaching in the 
Secondary School 



Trimester Hours 

4 



Total Requirements 24 



Other Requirements 
English 



English 101-102. English Composition 

English 211-212 or 215-216 

Speech 201. Fundamentals of Speech 



Foreign Language 
Course 

Spanish 111-112, French 111-112, German 111-112 



Social Science 
Course 

History 151-152. History of Western Civilization 

History 351. United States to 1876 

Political Science 251. United States Government 



Natural Science 
Course 

Biology 101-102. General Biology 
Chemistry 101. Physical Science-Chemistry 
Physics 101. Physical Science-Physics 



Mathematics 
Course 

Mathematics 101. College Mathematics 



Course 

Psychology 231. General Psychology 



Psychology 



Total Required 15 





Trime 

Required 


ster Hours 

9 


Total 


9 




Trime 

Required 


ster Hours 
6 

3 
3 


Total 


12 




Trimester Hours 

6 
3 
3 



Total Required 12 



Trimester Hours 



Total Required 3 



Trimester Hours 



Total Required 3 



General electives to fill remainder of 124 trimester hours. All lower division re- 
quirements not listed above must be completed. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 35 

Additional Requirements 

One major area of studies and one minor area of studies are required of the 
student pursuing certification on a secondary level. The major and minor field 
may be selected from the following listing: 

Majors Offered 

Art, English, Foreign Language, Physics, Chemistry, Biology, Mathematics, Business 
Administration, History, Music, Religion, Philosophy, Social Studies, Sociology, 
Physical Education. 

Minors Offered 

Art, Biology, Business Administration, Chemistry, English, Health and Physical 
Education, History, Mathematics, Music, Physics, Political Science, Psychology, 
Sociology, Social Studies, Foreign Language. 



GENER\L EDUCATION 

Education 232. Introduction to Education. A general survey course designed for the 
student who expects to prepare for the teaching profession. Includes principles 
history and philosophy of education. Resuired of all education majors. Pre- 
requisite: Sophomore or higher standing. 

4 hours 

Education 423. Curriculum Construction. A course designed to assist teachers in the 
construction of a curriculum for an individual school, or for a given grade or 
group of grades in that school. Prerequisites: Education 232. 

3 hours 

Education 441. Administration and Supervision. This course is especially designed 
for those students who have a deep interest in administrative work, and who 
have shown special aptitude for this type of work. The topics to be considered 
are professional ethics; the responsibilities of administrative personnel to 
teaching personnel; the relationship of the administrative personnel and 
teachers to school and community; records and supervisory details. Prerequisite: 
Two years teaching experience and Junior standing. 

3 hours 

Education 461. Educational Tests and Measurements. A course concerned with the 
nature of measurement. Consideration is given to various types of aptitude, 
achievement, interest, and personality tests. Practical help is provided school 
administrators and teachers in instituting and carrying out a testing program 
in the schools. Prerequisites: Education 232 and Psychology 231. 

3 hours 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

Education 330. Methods and Materials of Teaching Health & Physical Education in 
the Elementary School. A study of source materials, planning and organizing 
instruction, selection of suitable activities, and preparation of teaching units. 

3 hours 

Education 421. Materials and Methods of Teaching in the Elementary School. A 

study of methods and materials used in the language arts and social studies 
in the elementary grades. Prerequisites: Education 232 and Psychology 231. 
Required of elementary teachers. 

3 hours 

Education 422. Materials and Methods of Teaching in the Elementary School. A 

study of methods and materials used in teaching science and arithmetic in 
the elementary school. Prerequisites: Education 232 and Psychology 231. 

3 hours 



36 ATHENSCOLLEGE 

Education 472. Observation Seminar and Student Teaching in the Elementary 
School. After a period of orientation, the student gains practical experience in 
teaching classes in the public schools under continual guidance of competent 
critic teachers in cooperation with the faculty director of teacher training. 
Materials and methods are utilized in lesson planning and teaching, and the 
participation in all activities is required of the student teacher. Includes 
Seminar. Prerequisites: Senior standing, Ed. 421, Ed. 422, and the completion 
of 18 hours of education and psychology certification requirements. Not 
applicable to secondary education. 

8 hours 

SECONDARY EDUCATION 

Education 340. Methods and Materials of Teaching Health & Physical Education 
in the Secondary School. Emphasis is placed on approved teaching techniques 
and a program of desirable activities. Lesson planning and unit construction 
are an important part of the course. 

3 hours 

Education 431. Materials and Methods of High School Teaching. A unified core 
course in the materials and methods of teaching in the secondary school. The 
first concern is with common fundamental principles and techniques, after 
which the work is differentiated according to major academic fields. Pre- 
requisites: Educ. 232 and Psychology 233 or 334. Must be taken before 
Educ. 482. 

3 hours 

Education 482. Observation, Seminar and Student Teaching in the Secondary 
School. After a period of orientation, the student gains practical experience 
in teaching classes in the public schools in his major or minor fields; the 
experience is under the continual guidance of competent critic teachers in 
cooperation with the faculty director of student teaching. Materials and 
methods are utilized in lesson planning and teaching, and participation in 
all activities of the school is required of the student teacher. Prerequisites: 
Senior standing, Ed 431 M. &: M. of High School Teaching, and completion 
of 15 hours certification requirements in Education. 

8 hours 

HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, RECREATION, AND ATHLETICS 

The Department of Health, Physical Education, Recreation, and Athletics seeks 
to achieve the following objectives: 

1. Encourage and teach students to form habits conducive to good health and 
physical fitness. 

2. Prepare students to become teachers and coaches in the areas of health, physi- 
cal education, recreation, and athletics. 

3. Promote and foster intercollegiate athletics and intramural sports. 

4. Provide leadership, materials, and facilities for activities related to the welfare 
of the students and the college. 

The department offers both a major and a minor in physical education. Twenty- 
four trimester hours of professional physical education courses must be satisfactorily 
completed to meet the requirements for the major. Eighteen trimester hours are 
required for the minor. 

Courses Which Satisfy the General College Physical Education Requirement 

of All Students 

Participation in physical education is required of students for four trimesters. 
Students may select from a number of sports and activities offered each trimester. 
Attention will be given to those students on restricted activity. Each student is 
required to purchase a regulation physical education uniform from the College 
Bookstore. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 37 

Both men and women may enroll in the same class when the course is marked 
(MW). When marked (M) (W) the activity is open to both men and women placed 
in separate sections. A mark of (M) indicates only men are enrolled while a mark 
of (W) indicates only women are enrolled. 

P.E. 101. Volleyball and Basketball (M) (W) 

P.E. 102. Softball and Track & Field (M) (W) 

P.E. 103. Touch Football and Soccer (M) 

P.E. 104. Field Hockey and Speedball (W) 

P.E. 200. Elementary Swimming (MW) 

P.E. 201. Advanced Swimming and Diving (MW) 

P.E. 202. Life Saving and Water Safety Instructor Course (MW). The American 

Red Cross Life Saving and Water Safety Instructor's Certificates are awarded 

upon completion of the course. 

P.E. 211. Tennis and Badminton (MW). 

P.E. 221. Archery and Bowling (MW) 

P.E. 231. Tumbling and Trampoline (MW) 

P.E. 241. Golf (MW) 

P.E. 251. Wrestling and Weight Training (M) 

P.E. 270. Modern Dance (MW) 

P.E. 271. Social Dance (MW) 

P.E. 272. Square and Folk Dance (MW) 

P.E. 280. Recreational Activities (MW) 

Courses Which Satisfy State Certification for Teaching and Coaching 

Through the professional program the college prepares students to teach and 
coach. Each physical education major or minor should confer with his advisor so 
arrangements can be made to meet certification requirements for a particular state 
where he wishes to teach and/or coach. 

P.E. 210. Personal and Community Health and Safety. Identification and solution 
of personal and community health and safety problems comprise the major 
objective of the course. 

3 hours 

P.E. 220, a, b, c. Standard, Advanced, and Instructors First Aid Course. American 
Red Cross Certificates awarded upon completion of the course. 

3 hours 

P.E. 230. Camp Counselors Training Course. Camp organization, finance, pro- 
gram, facilities and similar topics will be studies. Part of the course will con- 
sist of camping experience. 

2 hours 

P.E. 240. History and Principles of Health and Physical Education. A study of 
the historical background of health and physical education and a consideration 
of the basic principles and concepts upon which a sound program is founded. 

3 hours 

P.E. 300. Kinesiology. The analysis of human movement through the study of the 
action of muscles and bones. Efficiency in the development of physical educa- 
tion skills is emphasized with this knowledge. 

2 hours 

P.E. 301-302. Techniques of Coaching & Officiating Team & Individual Sports. 
Coaching methods and officiating techniques will be discussed and students 
will get practical experience in class and in assisting with the intramural sports 
program. Separate sections for men and women. 

3 hours each 



38 ATHENSCOLLEGE 

P.E. 350. Health and Safety Resources. Various health and safety agencies and 
organizations are investigated with attention to their services and materials 
available to teachers and students. Emphasis is placed on the use of these 
resources in personal, school, and community health problems. 

3 hours 

P.E. 400. School and Community Recreation. Planning a recreation program for 
the school and community. Personnel, organization, activities, facilities, and 
similar phases of an appropriate program are given consideration. 

3 hours 

P.E. 410. Organization, Administration and Supervision of Health and Physical 
Education. Various problems of organization, administration and supervision 
are identified and discussed. Such elements as types of activities, budget, care 
of equipment and maintenance of facilities form an important part of the 
course. 

3 hours 

P.E. 420. Adapted Physical Education. Modification of the program to meet indi- 
vidual needs. A study of principles and practices in the application of exercises 
and activities for specific conditions. 

2 hours 

P.E. 450. The School Health Program. Consideration is given to the organization 
of the total school health program involving health services, healthful school 
living, and health instruction. Content and materials suitable for a high school 
health course are stressed. 

3 hours 

DIVISION OF HUMANITIES 

The course offerings in the Division of Humanities cover the departmental fields 
of Art, English, Humanities, Modern Languages, Music, Philosophy and Religion, 
and Speech and Drama. Requirements for a major or minor in individuals fields 
of study are found in the introductory comments preceding the courses of study 
listed by departments. 

ART (AR) 

Students selecting art as a major must complete 48 hours of work in this area. 
Majors must meet the following requirements: Art 301, 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 310, 
311 and 407. In addition 15 hours of electives from the studio courses in art and 
6 hours from the lecture courses listed in art are required. 

Art 201. Art Appreciation. An introduction to art with a brief survey of major 
art styles as a background for the understanding of contemporary art. Various 
approaches to art are explored. Cannot be applied for an art major. No pre- 
requisite. 

3 hours 

Art 202. Painting and Drawing. (For the non-art major.) An introduction to the 
basic techniques of painting and drawing. No prerequisite. 

3 hours 

Art 301. Design I. An introduction to the fundamentals of design. No prerequi- 
site. 

3 hours 

Art 302. Drawing I. Emphasis is on the development of skills using a variety of 
media. No prerequisite. 

3 hours 



COURSE OFFERINGS 39 

Art 303. Survey of Art History I. A survey of the historical development of art 
from pre-historic times to the Renaissance. No prerequisite. 

3 hours 

Art 304. Painting I. An introduction to painting, learning the essentials of the 
media through problems of composition with still life and landscape. Pre- 
requisite: Art 301, Art 302, or permission. 

3 hours 

Art 305. Painting II. A continuation of Art 304, with further study of composition 
emphasizing the abstract approach. Prerequisite: Art 304. 

3 hours 

Art 306. Drawing II. A continuation of Art 302 with emphasis on additional 
media. Prerequisite: Art 302. 

3 hours 

Art 307. Commercial Art I. A study of design as related to commercial art tech- 
niques. Prerequisite: Art 301 or permission. 

3 hours 

Art 308. Sculpture. An introduction to three dimensional work, using a variety of 
media including clay, plaster, metal, and wood. Prerequisite: Art 301, or per- 
mission. 

3 hours 

Art 309. Art for Elementary Teachers. Designed to develop a sensitivity to the 
visual arts as a basis for the understanding of children's art. No prerequisite. 

3 hours 

Art 310. Design II. Advanced problems in design. Prerequisite: Art 301, or per- 
mission. 

3 hours 

Art 311. Survey of Art History II. A survey of the historical development of art 
from the Renaissance to the present. No prerequisite. 

3 hours 

Art 401. Painting III. Experimental techniques used and special problems as- 
signed. Prerequisite: Art 305. 

3 hours 

Art 402. Survey of American Art. A study of the historical development of Amer- 
ican art from the colonial period to the present. No prerequisite. 

3 hours 

Art 403. Commercial Art n. Advanced work with the student producing a port- 
folio of advertising designs. Prerequisite: Art 307. 

3 hours 

Art 404. A Survey of Modern Art. Special attention is given to the problems 
peculiar to the art of the 19th and 20th Centuries. No prerequisite. 

3 hours 

Art 405. Survey of Oriental Art. A survey of the development of Oriental Art. 
No prerequisite. 

3 hours 

Art 406. Figure Drawing. Emphasis of the human figure as subject for advanced 
drawing techniques. Prerequisite: Art 306. 

3 hours 

Art 407. Art Seminar. Required of all art majors during the senior year. 

3 hours 



40 ATHENSCOLLEGE 

Art 408. Graphics I. Development of techniques in various print media. Pre- 
requisite: Art 301, Art 302, or permission of instructor. 

3 hours 

Art 409. Graphics II. A continuation of Art 408. Prerequisite: Art 408, or per- 
mission of instructor. 

3 hours 
ENGLISH (EH) 

The student electing a major in English must complete 27 trimester hours of 
satisfactory work above Freshman Composition (English 101-102). The courses 
required of the English major are: English 211-212, 311, 312, 313, 424, and 452. 
Hours credit in Speech and Drama may not be applied toward the major. The 
student electing English as a minor field of concentration must complete 18 tri- 
mester hours of satisfactory work above Freshman Composition unless requirements 
of other divisions of instruction designate other credit requirements in the field. 
Minors must complete the following: English 211-212 (unless English 215-216 is 
specified), 311, 424, and 452. Credit in Speech and Drama may not be applied 
toward the minor. 

English 101-102. English Composition. The first trimester deals with the short 
essay with attention to content and grammar. The second trimester is devoted 
to longer pieces of essay writing with close study of rhetoric, logic, and funda- 
mentals of research. Prerequisite for all other English courses. 

3 hours each 

English 211-212. English Literature. A survey of English Literature, both poetry 
and prose, from its beginning to present time. The first trimester covers the 
literature to the 17th century; the second trimester continues the study from 
the 18th century to the present time. Emphasis is placed on interpretative 
study. 

3 hours each 

English 215-216. American Literature. A two-part survey course of American 
literature from the colonial period to the present time. The first trimester 
covers the colonial period to Oliver Wendell Holmes; the second trimester 
covers from Walt Whitman to the present. 

3 hours each 

English 301. Literature for Children. A course of study designed to meet the 
needs for prospective teachers of elementary grades. Also credited as Library 
Science 316. 

3 hours 

English 302. Modern Literature. Designed to acquaint the student with the major 
directions of poetry from 1890 to the present time. Course emphasizes the 
relationship of modern poetry, British and American, to contemporary criti- 
cism. 

3 hours 

English 304. Southern Literature. An analysis of the selected poetry, prose, and 
criticism of American writers from the South, from Byrd to Faulkner. 

3 hours 

English 311. Milton and the Seventeenth Century. A study of the major poetry 
and prose of Milton, Donne, and the metaphysical school with emphasis on 
changing religious, political, and literary ideas. 

3 hours 

English 312. Eighteenth Century Literature. An analysis of the principal authors 
in prose and poetry of the period from Pope to Blake. 

3 hours 

English 313, Romantic and Victorian Literature. A study of the poetry of Words- 
worth, Byron, Keats, Tennyson, Browning, and others and the prose of such 
writers as Lamb, Hazlitt, Carlyle, Newman, and others. 

3 hours 



COURSE OFFERINGS 41 

English 424-425. Shakespeare and Elizabethan Literature. A study of Shakespeare 
and his contemporaries with emphasis on the drama of Shakespeare to show 
the growth and development of his art. 

3 hours each 

English 452. Chaucer and Medieval Literature. A study of Chaucer's CANTER- 
BURY TALES and other works with introductory study of Middle English 
grammar and pronunciation. 

3 hours 

English 460. Individual Directed Studies in English. A course of individual di- 
rected study in specific areas of literature with in-depth reading and research. 
Course reserved for the superior student in English with permission of the 
Head Professor required. 

6 hours maximum 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

A major in any one of the foreign languages must include at least 20 trimester 
hours of course work more advanced than Course 111. A minor in any one of the 
languages must include at least 14 trimester hours of course work more advanced 
than Course 111. A student who presents high school credit in a foreign language 
as part of the requirements for entrance to Athens College may in no case receive 
college credit for Course 111 in that language. If he chooses to continue the same 
language in college, he will be assigned to the course for which he is prepared, the 
successful completion of which course will satisfy the language requirement for 
graduation from Athens College. 

FRENCH (FR) 

French 111. Elementary French. Basic vocabulary, pronunciation, essential gram- 
mar, and sentence structure. 

French 112. Intermediate French. A continuation of French 111, giving a broader 
vocabulary and more advanced grammar, including composition and reading 
of suitable texts. French 111 is prerequisite and both courses must be satis- 
factorily completed before credit is given. 

9 hours 

French 301-302. French Novel and Short Story. Selections of moderate difficulty 
from the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries. Prerequisite: French 
112 or equivalent. 

3 hours each 

French 311-312. Modern French Drama. Important dramatic works chosen from 
the writers of the last three centuries. 

3 hours each 

French 321-322. French Drama of the Seventh Century. Selected plays of Corneille, 
Racine and Moliere. 

3 hours 

French 413. French Phonetics and Diction. A detailed study of the pronuncia- 
tion of standard French. 

2 hours 

French 460. Advanced French. The content of the course will be suited to the 
need and interest of the students. 

2 or 3 hours 

GERMAN (GE) 

German 111. Elementary German. Course in basic vocabulary, pronunciation, 
essential grammar, and sentence structure. Oral and written exercises in 
translating German into English and English into German. 



42 ATHENSCOLLEGE 

German 112. Intermediate German. A continuation of German 111 with special 
attention to a broader vocabulary that would be useful for students working 
in the sciences. Prerequisite is German 111 and both courses must be satisfac- 
torily completed before credit is given. 

9 hours 

German 301-302. German Readings. 

3 hours each 

German 314. Scientific German. Readings in Chemistry, Physics, and Biology. 
Recommended for pre-medical students and science majors. Prerequisite: Ger- 
man 112 or equivalent. 

3 hours 

SPANISH (SP) 

Spanish 111. Elementary Spanish. Basic vocabulary, pronunciation, essential 
grammar, and sentence structure. 

Spanish 112. Intermediate Spanish. Continuation of Spanish 111 with a broader 
vocabulary, more advanced grammar and composition, and reading of suitable 
texts. Spanish 111 is prerequisite and both courses must be satisfactorily com- 
pleted before credit is given. 

9 hours 

Spanish 301, 302. Modern Spanish Novel. Selected works of the important writers 
of the last two centuries. Prerequisite: Spanish 112 or equivalent. 

3 hours each 

Spanish 311, 312. Modern Spanish Drama. Selected works of the important 
writers of the last one hundred years. Prerequisite: Spanish 112 or equivalent. 

3 hours each 

Spanish 321, 322. Spanish-American Literature. Selected works of the best Spanish- 
American writers. Prerequisite: Spanish 111, 112 or equivalent. 

3 hours each 

Spanish 341. Cervantes. Selections from Don Quixote. Prerequisite: Spanish 111, 
112. 

3 hours 

Spanish 460. Advanced Spanish. The content of the course will be suited to the 
need and interest of the students. 

2 or 3 hours 

HUMANITIES (HU) 

Humanities 310-311. Humanities. This course is required of all students in the 
Lower Division. The first half includes selections of the classics of Greece and 
Rome to include Homer, Plato, Thucydides, Sophocles, and Virgil. The second 
half includes selections of the Medieval and Renaissance period to include 
Dante, Mirandola, Erasmus, More, Boccacio, and others. 

3 hours each 

MUSIC DEPARTMENT (MU) 

The student may pursue the B.A. degree with a music major concentrating in 
Music Theory or Applied Music. A student may also major in music while pur- 
suing the B.S. in Ed. degree in either the B.A. or B.S. program. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR MUSIC MAJORS 

1. An audition will be required of all students entering as music majors in the 
B.A. and B.S. program. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 43 

2. Students must have the approval of the instructor before taking applied music. 

3. Two trimesters of a foreign language, French or German. 

4. All music majors will participate in the performing ensemble every trimester 
while enrolled whether or not they enroll for credit. 

5. Students concentrating in applied music will present a public senior recital and 
also appear in three other student recitals during his residence at Athens College. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MUSIC MINORS 

1. An audition will be required of all students entering as music minors in the 
B.A. and B.S. program. 

2. Music minors will be required to take the following courses: 

MU 111-112 Basic Theory I 

MU 221-222 Survey of Music Literature 

MU 331-332 Music History 

MU 181-282 Piano 

MU 141 Performing ensembles (4 trimesters) 

B.S. in Education — Music Major 

Trimester Hours 

MU 111-112, 211-212— Basic Theory I & II 12 

MU 311— Form & Analysis 3 

MU 211-222 — Survey of Music Literature 6 

MU 331-332— Music History 6 

MU 333 — 20th Century Music Literature 3 

MU 411 — Orchestration (Instrumental emphasis) 3 

MU 431 & 432— Choral Sc Instrumental Conducting & Lit. 6 

MU 441-442 — Woodwind & Brass (Instrumental emphasis) 6 

MU 451-452 — Music Methods — Elementary & Secondary 6 

MU 141— Performing Ensemble 8 

MU 181P-282P— Piano 4 

MU (electives) — Music Electives (to fulfill 60 hours) 6 



60 or over 

B.A. — Applied Music Concentration 

Trimester Hours 

MU 111-112, 211-212— Basic Theory I & II 12 

MU 311— Form Sc Analysis 3 

MU 221-222— Survey of Music Literature 6 

MU 331-332— Music History 6 

MU 321 or 422 — Piano or Voice Pedagogy (non instrument) 3 

MU 434 or 435 — Piano or Voice Literature (non instrument) 3 

MU 333 — 20th Century Music Literature 3 

MU 141 — Performing Ensemble 8 

MU 181-P to 282-P — Piano (non piano major) 4 

MU 181 to 482 — Applied Music (major instrument) 16 
MU (electives) — Music Electives (to fulfill 60 hours) 

60 or over 



44 ATHENSCOLLEGE 

B.A. — Music Theory Concentration 

Trimester Hours 

MU 111-112, 211-212— Basic Theory I & II 12 

MU 311— Form & Analysis 3 

MU 312— 18th Century Counterpoint 3 

MU 221-222 — Survey of Music Literature 6 

MU 331-332— Music History 6 

MU 333— 20th Century Music Literature 3 

MU 411 — Orchestration 3 

MU 141 — Performing Ensemble 8 

MU 181-P to 282-P— Piano 4 

MU (electives) — Music Electives (to fulfill 60 hours) 9 

MU 412 — Composition 3 



60 
THEORY 

Music 111-112, 211-212— Basic Music Theory I & H 

A study of musical elements including notation, harmony, part writing, ear- 
training, sight-singing and keyboard harmony. Required of music majors and 
minors. 

3 hours each 

Music 213 — Music Fundamentals 

An introduction to the rudiments of music through notations, the keyboard, 
and the use of the singing voice. Primarily for non-music majors. 

3 hours each 

Music 311 — Form & Analysis 

Principles of form and analysis. A study of style, emphasizing the basic ap- 
proach to phrase and cadence. Prerequisite: Music 212. 

3 hours each 

Music 312 — 18th Century Counterpoint 

A study of 18th century contrapuntal techniques, with emphasis on analysis 
and contrapuntal writing. Prerequisite: Music 212. 

3 hours each 

Music 411 — Orchestration 

Principles of orchestration and arranging for vocal and instrumental en- 
sembles. Prerequisite: Music 212. 

3 hours each 

Music 412 — Composition 

A seminar based on individual composition. Includes discussion on common 
problems to the composer. May be repeated for additional credit up to 12 
hours. Prerequisite: Music 311. 

2 hours each 

LITERATURE 

Music 201 — Music Appreciation 

A listening approach to the appreciation of music. The course is designed 
to acquaint the student with all types of music. For the non-music major. 

3 hours each 

Music 221-222 — Survey of Music Literature 

A listening approach to the study of musical form. The course is designed to 
acquaint the student with all styles of music. For music majors and minors. 

3 hours each 



COURSE OFFERINGS 45 

Music 231 — Music in the Church 

A discussion of the place of music in the worship service and the organization 
of a meaningful program of church music. 

2 hours each 

Music 232 — Hymnology 

A study and comparison of the modern hymnals of the church, emphasizing 
the historical development of the various types of hymnody. 

2 hours each 

Music 331-332— Music History 

A study of the musical styles from the Medieval era through the 20th century 
era. Prerequisite: Music 221-222, required of music majors and minors. 

3 hours each 

Music 333 — 20th Century Music Literature 

A study of the diverse elements which make up the complex music culture of 
the 20th century. Prerequisite: 221-222 or permission of the instructor. 

3 hours each 

Music 334 — 19th Century Music Literature 

A study of the style and literature during the 19th century. Prerequisite: 
Music 221-222 or permission of the instructor. 

3 hours each 

Music 431 — Choral Conducting and Literature 

Principles of conducting vocal ensembles. Includes a survey of literature, 
especially emphasizing suitable material for school choir. 

3 hours each 

Music 432 — Instrumental Conducting and Literature 

Principles of conducting instrumental ensembles. Includes a survey of litera- 
ture, especially emphasizing suitable material for school band. 

3 hours each 

Music 434 — Piano Literature 

A survey of piano literature pertinent to the pianist's repertoire. 

3 hours each 



Music 435 — Voice Literature 

A survey of voice literature pertinent to the singer's repertoire. 

EDUCATION 

Music 421 — Piano Pedagogy 

A study of piano methods for private teaching. 

Music 422 — Voice Pedagogy 

A study of vocal methods for private teaching. 

Music 441 — Woodwind Instrument Class 

An introduction to the basic playing of woodwind instruments. 

Music 442 — Brass Instrument Class 

An introduction to the basic playing of brass instruments. 



3 hours each 



2 hours 



2 hours 



3 hours 



3 hours 



Music 451 — Music Methods — Elementary 

Organization and development of the elementary school music program. For 
music majors and minors. 

3 hours 



46 ATHENS COLLEGE 

Music 452 — Music Methods — Secondary 

Organization and development of the secondary school music program. For 
music majors and minors. 

3 hours 

APPLIED MUSIC 

Music 181-IN — Private Instrumental Instruction (Wind, String, 8c Percussion) 

1 or 2 hours each 

Music 181-OR — Private Organ Instruction 

1 or 2 hours each 

Music 181-P — Private Piano Instruction 

1 or 2 hours each 

Music 181-V — Private Voice Instruction 

1 or 2 hours each 

PERFORMING ENSEMBLE 

Music 141-B — Athens Wind Ensemble 

This organization is open to all college students having experience in high 
school band work. Audition required. 

1 hour 

Music 141-C — Athens College Chorale 

This organization is open to all college students. Experience and training 
will be provided in the performance of choral literature, both secular and 
sacred. Audition required. 

1 hour 

Music 141-E — Chamber Ensemble (Instrumental or Vocal) 

Experience is offered in ensemble performing, plus sight-reading and ac- 
companying. Audition required. 

1 hour each 

Music 141-CO — Chamber Orchestra 

This organization is open to all college students having experience in high 
school orchestra work. Audition required. 

1 hour each 

Music 141-HO — Huntsville Symphony Orchestra 

The advanced student in the instrumental program will have the experience 
of playing in this civic organization. This organization is open to all college 
students having experience in high school orchestra work. Audition required. 

1 hour each 

Music 141-M — Athens College Men's Glee Club 

The glee club consists of faculty, staff, and students who enjoy experience 
and training in men's ensemble. Performances throughout year include TV 
and other guest appearances. Audition required. 

1 hour 

Music 401 — Opera Workshop 

The advanced student in voice will have the opportunity of singing in cham- 
ber opera, musicals, and full length opera. 

1 hour each 

RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY 

The student electing a major in Philosophy and Religion must satisfactorily 
complete twenty-seven trimester hours of course work. The student in the Pre- 
Ministerial Program must complete the following course requirements: 



COURSE OFFERINGS 47 

Religion: 220, 221, 304, 320, and 402; Philosophy: 201; Religious Education: 330; 
Music 231; English: 304; Speech: 201; Sociology: 251; Education: 232. 

The student in the Pre-Ministerial Program must also complete the general and 
specific requirements of his major field of study. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY & RELIGION 

Philosophy 201. Introduction to Philosophy. A presentation of the main problems 
underlying all philosophy and some of the historic solutions to these problems. 

3 hours 

Philosophy 302. Survey of Ethical Systems. A critical examination of the major 
systems of ethics devised by man and their relation to religion. 

3 hours 

Philosophy 322. Modern Philosophy. A survey of philosophical thought from 
Descartes to Walter Lippmann and Reinhold Neibuhr. 

3 hours 

Philosophy 325. Philosophy of Religion. A study of major religious concepts, 
the relation of religion to science and philosophy, and some of the types of 
religious philosophy. 

3 hours 

Religion 220. Old Testament. A survey of the history and religion of the Hebrews 
with a study of the personalities and writings of the prophets. 

3 hours 

Religion 221. New Testament. A survey of the origin and development of the 
Christian movement with emphasis on the teachings of Jesus and the journeys 
and letters to Paul. 

3 hours 

Religion 301. Major Religions of the World. A study of the principal religions 
of mankind in relation to Christianity. 

3 hours 

Religion 304. Christian Worship. The origin, nature and development of Christian 
worship, dealing with aims, aids, hindrances, methods, and materials. 

3 hours 

Religion 310. The Life of Jesus. A study of the life and teachings of Jesus based 
chiefly on the first three gospels. 

3 hours 

Religion 312. The Hebrew Prophets. A study of the personalities and messages 
of the Hebrew prophets. 

3 hours 

Religion 320. Ministerial Seminar. An introduction to the work of a Christian 
minister and church, dealing with some of the interests and problems of 
present-day pastors. 

3 hours 

Religion 330. Organization and Administration of Religious Education. The Com- 
mission an Education and the Workers' Conference of the local church; re- 
cruiting and training church school workers. 

3 hours 

Religion 340. The Director of Religious Education. An analysis of the responsibili- 
ties, relationships, and skills involved in the professional leadership of the edu- 
cational work of the local church. 

3 hours 



48 ATHENSCOLLEGE 

Religion 402. History of Christianity. A study of the most widespread of all re- 
ligious faiths with some of the greatest movements and leaders of Christianity. 

3 hours 

SPEECH AND DRAMA 

Speech 201. Fundamentals of Speech. An introductory course in oral communi- 
cation with emphasis on voice and speech improvement, reading aloud, public 
speaking, and group discussion. 

3 hours 

Drama 201. Drama Appreciation. A study of drama as art is partial fulfillment 
of the general requirements of the Lower Division. The course includes a study 
of the stage, the play, acting, and directing as related to the art form. Reading 
and criticism of well known plays. Study of great dramatists, actors, designers, 
and directors. 

3 hours 

Drama 321. The Art of Play Production. The problems of selecting and present- 
ing a play; casting, directing, acting, critical appreciation. For prospective 
teachers and community workers. 

3 hours 

Drama 322. Play Production. The combining of both music and drama depart- 
ments in the presentation of the opera and the Broadway musical variety pro- 
ductions. 

3 hours 

Drama 401. Special Studies in Theater Arts. A course designed for individual 
or small group study in all areas of the theater. Includes intensive study of 
acting and directing methods, and production methods. In individual directed 
study, up to 6 hours are permissible. 

3 hours 



LIBRARY SCIENCE (LS) 

The Department of Library Science offers a series of courses designed to aug- 
ment the teacher training program in the field of Library Science. All courses 
in Library Science can be credited as Education courses and will stand as electives 
in Education. Neither a major or minor is offered in Library Science. 

Library Science 310. School Library Administration. An introductory course in 
School Library administration to meet the needs of teacher-librarians in the 
elementary and secondary school. Includes administration, reader guidance, 
use of library, planning school libraries, and school and public library relation- 
ships. Also credited as Education 336, if so registered. 

3 hours 

Library Science 311. Library Materials: Cataloging I. Includes instruction in 
cataloging library materials, use of card catalog, book classification, Dewey 
Decimal and Library of Congress systems, and laboratory. Also credited as 
Education 337, if so registered. 

3 hours 

Library Science 312. Acquisition of Library Materials. Course emphasizes the 
selection of collections to meet varying needs through consideration of reader, 
library resources, forms of publication, and criteria for evaluation. Also 
credited as Education 338, if so registered. 

3 hours 



COURSE OFFERINGS 49 

Library Science 315. Introduction to Bibliography. A studv of the basic reference 
books and bibliographies most used to solve library search problems. Attention 
given to methods, organization, devices, forms of reference. Lab session 
required. Credited also as Education 339, if so registered. 

3 hours 

Library Science 316. Literature for Children. A course designed to meet the needs 

for prospective teachers of elementary grades. Also credited as English 301, 
if so registered. 

3 hours 



DIVISION OF NATURAL SCIENCES AND MATHEMATICS 

The course offerings of the Division of Natural Sciences and Mathematics are 
designed to give the student a broad basic education in Biologv, Chemistrv, Mathe- 
matics, and Physics with the degree of Bachelor of Science. The basic requirements 
of the major in each course of study are found at the beginning of each depart- 
mental listing of courses. Since science courses require an extended sequence, the 
major in this division should carefully check the Academic Requirements of the 
Lower Division in the science area. The student majoring in any field of science 
(other than Math.) may elect to take either 6 hours of Fine Arts or 6 hours of 
Humanities. It is imperative that the major in science meet with a division coun- 
selor just as soon as he makes his determination to major in the division. 



BIOLOGY (BI) 
Requirements for a Major. 

A minimum of 33 trimester hours in Biology. This must include Biology 
110, 111, 201, 202, 210, 211, 301, and 420. Also required are Mathematics 
through Math. 221; Physics 212 and 213; and Chemistry' 112, 113, 311, and 
322. It is highly recommended that a student minor in chemistrv. 

Biologv Minor. 

A minimum of six 4-hour courses in Biologv. 

Biologv - 101-102. General Biology. An introduction to the major principles and 
generalizations of biology. A survey of the plant and animal Kingdoms 
will be included along with an introductory study of the human organ- 
ism. This course is not to be used for credit by biologv* majors or minors. 
A non-laboratory course. Biol. 110 and 111 may not be taken for credit 
upon completion of these courses. 

3 hours each 

Biology 110-111. Principles of Biology. A study of the major biological principles 
basic to all forms of life. Background in historical aspects of biology and 
scientific philosophy. Considerable emphasis of modern aspects of cellular 
metabolism, concepts of genetics, reproduction and development, ecology, 
and taxonomy of organisms. Prerequisite to all other biology' courses. Biol. 
110 must precede Biologv' 111. Biol. 101 and 102 may not be taken for 
credit upon completion of these courses. 

4 hours each 



50 ATHENSCOLLEGE 

Biology 200. Elementary Human Anatomy and Physiology. A basic course in the 
structure and function of the human body. The essential contributions of 
the systems of the body comprise a major portion of the course. Termi- 
nology and fundamental concepts will be given attention. The course is 
open only to Physical Education majors and minors, and to American Cul- 
tural Arts majors. Prerequisite: Biology 102. 

3 hours 

Biology 201. Botany: Non-flowering Plants. A study of the Thallophytes and 
those Embryophytes which do not flower. Emphasis will be placed on 
classification, life cycles, reproductive processes, morphology, ecology, 
and physiology of representative forms. Economic factors will be stressed. 
Considerable attention will be given to the study of bacteria, especially 
their relationships to man. Prerequisite: Biol. 111. 

4 hours 

Biology 202. Botany: Flowering Plants. A study of the Angiosperms. Emphasis 
Avill be placed on the morphology, taxonomy, anatomy, ecology, and 
physiology of the flowering plants. Economic aspects will be considered 
where appropriate. Prerequisite: Bio. 111. 

4 hours 

Biology 210. Invertebrate Zoology. The biology of invertebrates. Emphasis will be 
placed on taxonomy, morphology, ecology, and physiology. Special atten- 
tion will be given to parasitic forms, microbial life, and insects. Some field 
work and entomological work will be included in lab. Prerequisite: Biol. 
111. 

4 hours 

Biology 211. Vertebrate Zoology. The taxonomy, ecology, physiology, and major 
characteristics of representatives of the major classes of vertebrates. A brief 
introduction of protochordates will be given. Prerequisite: Biol. 210. 

4 hours 

Biology 301. Genetics. An introduction to principles of heredity and variation. Some 
consideration of the chemical nature of the gene and modern aspects of 
genetics and eugenics. Drosophila studies will constitute most of the lab 
work. Prerequisite: Junior standing; 20 hours in biology; organic chemis- 
try; and college algebra. 

4 hours 

Biology 310. Morphogenesis of Vertebrates. An integrated study of vertebrate embry- 
ology and comparative anatomy. Representatives of several vertebrate 
classes will be studied. The study will proceed from germ cell maturation 
through organo genesis and development of the body systems. Prerequisites: 
Biol. 211 and preferably Biol. 301. 

4 hours 

Biology 410. Independent Study. Qualified students may select a problem which will 
be researched using carefully controlled laboratory methods. The problem 
may in some cases be primarily a library type project. The student will 
receive some direction from a professor and will meet with the professor 
once a week to discuss the progress of the project. A student may take one 
or two trimesters of independent work. In some cases a single problem 
may extend over two trimesters. The investigation must be carefully 
written up in a standard thesis form. Prerequisites: 24 hours in biology 
and consent of professor. 

1 - 4 hours 

Biology 420. Biology Seminar. A review of some major biological topics; discussion 
of the most recent developments in the field; use of bibliographic methods 
in finding information; participation in discussion and presentation of oral 
reports. Required of all biology majors during the senior year. 

1 hour 



COURSE OFFERINGS 51 

CHEMISTRY (CH) 

Chemistry major. Ten courses to include: Chemistry 112, 113, 222, 223, 311, 312, 
421, 422. Also required are Mathematics through 301, Physics 212, 213, and Biology 
110, 111. 

Chemistry minor: Six courses as follows: Chemistry 112, 113, 222, 223, 311, 312. 

Because of the sequential nature of chemistry courses, it is necessary that the 
student wishing to major in chemistry begin his chemistry and mathematics courses 
at the beginning of his freshman year. Included in this category are those students 
pursuing pre-medical, pre-dental and pre-pharmacy curricula. 

Chemistry 101. Physical Science: Chemistry. A non-laboratory course covering 
the principles of chemistry. This course is for non-science majors only and it 
does not serve as a prerequisite for any other course in the sciences. Three 
lecture periods. 

3 hours 

Chemistry 112-113. General Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis. The basic course 
in chemistry which includes a survey of principles and theories of chemistry, 
the nature of chemical change, the chemical bond and chemical properties 
of the elements. The second trimester laboratory involves semi-micro methods 
of qualitative analysis. Three lecture periods and one laboratory period. 
Prerequisite: Two units of high school algebra. 

4 hours each 

Chemistry 222-223. Quantitative Analysis. A study of the theory and practice of 
quantitative analysis. Laboratory work includes gravimetric, volumetric and 
modern instrumental methods. Two lecture periods and two laboratory periods. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 113. 

4 hours each 

Chemistry 311-312. Organic Chemistry. A basic study of aliphatic and aromatic 
compounds, their properties, preparation and reactions with emphasis on 
theory and mechanisms of reaction. Three lecture periods and one laboratory 
period. Prerequisite: Chemistry 113. 

4 hours each 

Chemistry 401. Industrial Chemical Calculations. A study of energy and material 
changes in the chemistry of industrial processes. This course is designed for 
students who plan to seek employment in chemical industries. Three lecture 
periods. Prerequisite: Chemistry 223. 

3 hours 

Chemistry 402. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. A course dealing with topics of 
theoretical inorganic chemistry including the periodic table, stereo-chemistry, 
coordination chemistry and wave mechanics. Three lecture periods. Pre- 
requisite: Chemistry 223, Physics 213 and Mathematics 301. 

3 hours 

Chemistry 412. Advanced Organic Chemistry. A study of some advanced topics 
and complex substances of organic chemistry. The laboratory consists of the 
identification of organic compounds by means of systematic analysis of their 
reactions and properties. Two lecture periods and two laboratory periods. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 312. 

4 hours 

Chemistry 413. Biochemistry. A study of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and other 
important biochemical compounds and their metabolic functions. Enzyme 
reaction mechanisms and biological oxidations are included. Three lecture 
periods. Prerequisite: Chemistry 312. 

3 hours 



52 ATHENSCOLLEGE 

Chemistry 421-422. Physical Chemistry. An application of the laws and prin- 
ciples of physics and mathematics to the study of phenomena and concepts 
such as chemical thermodynamics, equilibria, kinetics and molecular structure. 
Three lecture periods and one laboratory period. Prerequisite: Chemistry 223, 
Physics 213 and Mathematics 301. 

4 hours each 

Chemistry 471-472. Chemistry Seminar. Student presentations of written and oral 
reports of selected advanced topics. Prerequisite: Senior standing. 

1 hour each 

ENGINEERING GRAPHICS (EG) 

Engineering 212-213. Engineering Drawing and Descriptive Geometry. An intro- 
duction to the fundamental principles and applications of orthographic pro- 
jection and descriptive geometry in the making and interpretation of engineer- 
ing drawings. 

2 hours each 

Engineering 220. Graphical Analysis and Engineering Computation. A practical 
course in the use of the graph for problem solving, presentation and interpre- 
tation of statistical data. The slide rule is also used to solve complex prob- 
lems. Two hours lecture. Prerequisite: Mathematics 220. 

2 hours 



MATHEMATICS (MA) 

Mathematics major: Ten courses in Mathematics to include 110 (or equivalent), 
111, 220, 221, 301 and 421. Also required are Physics 212, 213; Chemistry 112, 113; 
and Biology 110, 111. 

Mathematics minor: Six courses in Mathematics as follows: Mathematics 110, 
111, 220, 221, 301 and 421. 

Because of the sequential nature of mathematics courses, it is necessary that the 
student wishing to major in Mathematics begin these courses in his freshman year. 
The student eligible for advanced standing in Mathematics must also complete ten 
courses in college level mathematics. 

Mathematics 101. College Mathematics. The objective of the course is to provide 
the students who do not plan to follow more advanced mathematics with the 
fundamental topics in college mathematics such as algebra, trigonometry, 
analytic geometry and calculus as well as modern mathematics. Credit will 
not be given for this course and Mathematics 110. 

3 hours 

Mathematics 110. College Algebra. Deals with equations involving quadratics, 
progressions, binomial theorem, determinants, partial fractions and topics in 
Theory of Equations. Prerequisite: Two units of high school algebra or 
equivalent. 

4 hours 

Mathematics 111. Trigonometry. Logarithms, Law of Logarithms and appli- 
cations. Plane trigonometry, trigonometric functions of an acute angle and 
applications, trigonometric functions of a general angle, trigonometric identities, 
addition formulas, double-angle formulas and half-angle formulas. Sum to 
product and product to sum formulas, trigonometric equations, oblique tri- 
angle, inverse trigonometric functions, radian measure. Prerequisite: Mathe- 
matics 110 or equivalent. 

4 hours 



COURSE OFFERINGS 53 

Mathematics 220-221. Calculus and Analytic Geometry. This sequence of courses 
includes analytic geometry, differential and integral calculus. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 111. 

4 hours each 

Mathematics 301. Intermediate Calculus, This course is a continuation of the 
series above (Mathematics 220-221). Prerequisite: Mathematics 220 and 221. 

4 hours 

Mathematics 310. Linear Algebra. Introduction to vectors and vector spaces, 
linear transformations and matrices, determinants, systems of linear equations 
and of applications. Prerequisite: Mathematics 301. 

3 hours 

Mathematics 320. Modern Algebra. Number systems, mathematical systems, group 
fundamental properties, introduction to rings, fields and ideals. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 111. 

3 hours 

Mathematics 403. College Geometry. Concepts of geometry as a logical system 
based upon postulates and undefined terms, introduction to the foundations of 
geometry and fundamental concepts of Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 301. 

3 hours 

Mathematics 421. Differential Equations. The fundamental types of elementary 
differential equations are studied with illustrative examples and exercises show- 
ing the usefulness and power of differential equations when applied to dif- 
ferent fields. Introduction to Laplace transform. Prerequisite: Mathematics 
301. 

3 hours 

Mathematics 422. Vector Analysis. An introduction to vector algebra, systems of 
vectors, differentiation and integration of vectors. Applications. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 301. 

3 hours 

Mathematics 424. Theory of Statistics. Considers measures of control tendency, 
measures of dispersion, comparison of distributions, correlation, probability, 
normal curves and sampling. Prerequisite: Mathematics 301. 

3 hours 

Mathematics 425. Solid Analytic Geometry. Deals with direction cosines and di- 
rection numbers, planes and lines, surfaces and curves, the general equation of 
the second degree, coordinate and point transformation, punctual and tangential 
coordinates, duality. Prerequisite: Mathematics 301. 

3 hours 

Mathematics 460-461. Advanced Calculus. Selected topics in vectors, functions of 
several variables, series, Fourier series, function of complex variables and partial 
differential equations. Prerequisite: Mathematics 301. 

3 hours each 

Mathematics 480-481. Mathematics Seminar. Offers independent studies in topics 
chosen in relation to programs either to extend investigation in fields already 
studied or to explore areas not covered by other advanced courses. 

1 hour each 

PHYSICS (PY) 

Physics major: Ten courses (3-or 4-hour) in Physics, eight courses (3-or 4-hour) 
in Mathematics to include Mathematics 301 and Mathematics 421, Chemistry 112 
and 113, Biology 110 and 111. 

Physics minor: Six courses in Physics plus sufficient Mathematics to meet all 
prerequisites. 



54 ATHENSCOLLEGE 

Because of the sequential nature of Physics and Mathematics, it is necessary that 
the student wishing to major in Physics begin his mathematics course in his fresh- 
man year and his physics courses in his sophomore year. 

Physics 101. Physical Science: Physics. A non-laboratory course covering the 
basic principles of physics. This course is for non-science majors only and it 
does not serve as a prerequisite for any other course in the sciences. Three 
lecture periods. No prerequisite. Credit will not be given for this course and 
for Physics 212-213. 

3 hours 

Physics 212-213. General Physics. The basic course in physics involving a study of 
mechanics, heat, sound, light, electricity and magnetism. Stress is placed upon 
the solution of problems. Three lecture periods and one laboratory period. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 110 and 111. 

4 hours each 

Physics 311. Electricity and Magnetism. A careful study of the laws of the d.c. 
and a.c. circuit is undertaken with the solution of many problems. Three lec- 
ture periods. Prerequisite: Physics 213 and Mathematics 221. 

3 hours 

Physics 313-314. Mechanics. A study of the laws and principles of statics, dy- 
namics, vectors, torques, conditions for equilibrium and moments of inertia. 
The solution of many problems is required. Three lecture periods. Pre- 
requisite: Physics 213 and Mathematics 221. 

3 hours each 

Physics 322. Optics. A course dealing with the theories and nature of light and 
its propagation. Three lecture periods. Prerequisite: Physics 213 and Mathe- 
matics 221. 

3 hours 

Physics 411. Heat and Thermodynamics. A study of thermometry, calorimetry, 
equations of state, heat transfer and the laws of thermodynamics. Three lec- 
ture periods. Prerequisite: Physics 213 and Mathematics 301. 

3 hours 

Physics 412. Modern Physics. A course in the electronic structure of the atom 
including the nature of matter, electromagnetic radiations, x-rays and crystal 
structure. Three lecture periods. Prerequisite: Physics 213 and Mathematics 
301. 

3 hours 

Physics 414. Nuclear Physics. The constitution of the atomic nucleus, isotopes, 
natural radioactivity, the laws of radioactive transformation, transmutation, 
nuclear reactions and nuclear structure. Three lecture periods. Prerequisite: 
Physics 213 and Mathematics 301. 

3 hours 

Physics 420. Problems in Theoretical Physics. Prerequisite: Physics 213 and 
Mathematics 421. 

3 hours 

DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES 

The Division of Social Sciences offers courses leading to the degrees of Bachelor 
of Arts and Bachelor of Science in Education, in the fields of History, Political 
Science, Psychology, and Sociology. In addition to the specific areas, the Division 
offers a major and a minor in interdepartmental studies under the title of Social 
Studies for the student majoring in Secondary Education.* The student will be re- 
quired to complete 30 trimester hours in the following courses: 

Economics 222-223 6 hours 

History: 151-152 351-352 12 hours 

Political Science: 251, 353 or 453 6 hours 

Sociology: 251 and 362 6 hours 



COURSE OFFERINGS 55 

The student majoring in Secondary Education may minor in Social Studies by 
completing 18 trimester hours chosen from two of the three following social studies 
with courses selected from these listed: 

History: 151-152, 351, 352 

Poltical Science: 251, 353, 453 
Sociology: 251, 253, 362 

♦Only students in teacher certification program may major or minor in social 
studies. 

HISTORY (HY) 

The student electing a major in History must complete 27 trimester hours of 
satisfactory work above History 151-152. The courses required of the History major 
are. History 310, 311, 312, 313, 321, 351, 352. Six hours for either Sociology or Po- 
litical Science may be applied to fulfill the requirements. These six hours may be 
selected from the following course offerings: Political Science 251, 353, 453. Sociology 
251, 311, 362. The student electing History as a minor must complete 18 trimester 
hours above History 151-152 and complete the following courses: History 251, 252, 
313, 321. The minor in History may select six trimester hours from the following 
courses: Political Science 251, 353, 453. Sociology 251, 253, 362. 

History 151-152. History of Western Civilization. A survey of civilization from 
ancient to modern times. 

3 hours each 

History 303. Alabama State History. The history of Alabama and its southern 
heritage. Emphasis is placed upon present day cultural and political problems 
and correctives. Required for elementary certification. 

3 hours 

History 310. Ancient World. A study of the ancient world from prehistoric 
times to the collapse of the Roman Empire. 

3 hours 

History 311. The Middle Ages and the Renaissance. An analysis of European 
history from the Germanic invasions through the Renaissance and the Refor- 
mation. 

3 hours 

History 312. Modern Europe. A study of European history from 1648 to the 
twentieth century. 

3 hours 

History 313. Contemporary Europe. The social, political, and economic develop- 
ment of Europe in the twentieth century. 

3 hours 

History 321. History of the English People. A survey of the political, economic, 
and social development of England and the Commonwealth countries. Recom- 
mended for pre-law students. 

3 hours 

History 323. Latin-American History. The development of the Central and South 
American states, and of the Caribbean area with emphasis on their backgrounds, 
problems and relationships to the United States. 

3 hours 

History 351. United States to 1865. A survey of United States history from the 
founding of the colonies to Reconstruction. 

3 hours 

History 352. United States 1865 to the Present. The political, economic, social 
and cultural history of the United States from Reconstruction to the present. 

3 hours 



ATHENS COLLEGE 

POl Ilk U SCIENCE PO) 

The student electing a minor in Political Science must complete IS trimester 
hours of course work to include the following: Political Science 251, 851, 858, and 
158. s ix hours of electees may he taken from the following: History 821, 851, 332: 
Sociology 251, 253, SIS, and $62. The department offers no major in Political 
Science. 

Political Science 251. United States Government. A study of the structure and 
the functioning of the system today . a study of pressure groups and with special 
emphasis upon the principles of democratic processes and constitutional be- 
havior. 

3 hours 

Political Science 351. Local Community Government. Consideration of local gov- 
ernment as it functions in the American community: town government organi- 
zation, public officials, public order, and community participation. 

8 hours 

Political Science 352. Political Parties. A course designed to set forth the two- 
partv svstem in the United States. Emphasis is placed upon party svstem and 
the functioning of the svstem today, a study of pressure groups and public 
opinion, and the role of individual citizens in political participation. 

3 hours 

Political Science 353. Comparative Government. A survey course in which a num- 
ber of governments from various sections of the world are studied. Among those 
studied are the governments of Great Britain, France. Germanv. Russia. Sweden. 
Norway, Switzerland. Japan and the Latin American countries. 

3 hours 

Political Science 451. Political and Social Movements. A study of social move- 
ments and their effect upon politics. 

3 hours 

Political Science 452. Western Political Heritage. A survey of Western ideas in- 
fluencing political behavior from ancient to present times. 

3 hours 

Political Science 453. International Relations. A studv of American participation 
in international affairs with special emphasis upon international controls. 

3 hours 

PSYCHOLOGY (PS) 

The student electing a major in Psychology must complete 26 trimester hours 
of satisfactorv work. The courses required of a major are as follows: Psvchologv 231, 
331. 332, 334, 345, 348, 352, 399 and 44S and one elective selected from the fol- 
lowing courses: Psvchologv 400, 401. or 402. 

A student who elects to minor in Psvchologv must complete 18 trimester hours 
as follows: Psychology 231, 331. 332. 334. 345, 352. The student majoring in Ele- 
mentary or Secondary Education may not major in Psvchologv. 

Psvchologv 231. General Psvchologv. A survey of the field of human psvchologv 
with emphasis upon the psychological problems in the fields of learning, think- 
ing, emotion, motivation, and the nature and development of personalitv. 

3 hours 

Psvchologv 233. Educational Psvchologv. A course including principles of learn- 
ing as they apply to the behavior of children in school. 

3 hours 



COURSE OFFERINGS 57 

Psychology 331. Social Psychology. The effects of the group upon individual and 
social psychology. A study of the biological antecedents of social behavior; 
leadership; attitudes, suggestions; institutions; and social conflict. Prerequisite: 
Psychology 231. 

3 hours 

Psychology 332. Child Growth and Development. A studv of the physical, mental, 

social, and emotional development of the child, methods of analyzing children's 
behavior, influences of school, home, and other environment on behavior. 

3 hours 

Psychology 334. Adolescent Psychology. This course is designed to give people 
who work with teen-agers a better understanding of human adjustments, en- 
vironment, intelligence, causes of delinquency", gangs, dispositions. Prerequisites: 
Psychology 231. 

3 hours 

Psychology 345. Psychology of Adjustment. A study of the mechanisms of adjust- 
ment in all areas of life. Prerequisite: Psychology 231. 

2 hours 

Psychology 348. Principles of Guidance. A study of the basic principles under- 
lying sound guidance practices and procedures. Prerequisite: Psychology 231. 

2 hours 

Psychology 349. Counseling Data. A study of the sources and kinds of data in 
counseling and how T to interpret the data. Prerequisite: Psychology 348. 

2 hours 

Psychology 352. Abnormal Psychology. A study of the origin or causes, types, and 
treatment of abnormal behavior in humans. Prerequisite: Psychology 231. 

3 hours 

Psychology 399. Statistics in Psychology. A studv of the minimum essentials in 
handling statistical data in psychology. Required of all majors in psychology. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 231, 352 and junior or senior standing. 

1 hour 

Psychology 400. Introduction to Experimental Psychology. An introductorv 
course in experimental methods and procedures in psychology. A laboratory 
and lecture course. Prerequisite: Psychology 231 

3 hours 

Psychology 401. Seminar in Psychotherapy. Historical backgrounds, origin and 
development of psychotherapy. 

2 hours 

Psychology 402. Seminar in Psychotherapy. A continuation of Psychology 401 
but concentrating upon the modern psychotherapies, their nature, and their 
relative effectiveness. 

2 hours 

Psychology 448. Techniques of Counseling. This course deals with methodology 
practices and procedures in and the Art of Counseling. Prerequisite: Psy- 
chology 352. 

2 hours 

Psychology 450. Field Counseling. This is an "interne" course. It involves actual 
counseling in the field under supervision. Prerequisite: Psychology 448. 

2 hours 



58 ATHENSCOLLEGE 

SOCIOLOGY (SO) 

The student electing a major in Sociology must complete 24 trimester hours of 
course work above Sociology 251. The courses required of the major are as follows: 
Sociology 252, 261, 311, 361, 362, and 461. Nine hours of elective courses in History 
or Political Science may be applied to the Sociology requirement. Such courses 
must be taken from the following: History 313, 351, and 352; Political Science 251, 
353, and 451. The student electing Sociology as a minor must complete 18 trimester 
hours above Sociology 251. He must complete the following: Sociology 261, 312, 
361, and 362. Six hours of electives for the minor may be chosen from the follow- 
ing: History 351, 352; Political Science 251, 451. 

Sociology 251. Introduction to Sociology. Scientific study of human society; basic 
concepts and principles of sociology in the study of groups, institutions, social 
processes, social control, and social change. (Prerequisite for all other courses 
in the department). 

3 hours 

Sociology 252. Rurban Sociology. Principles and procedures of community life; 
analysis of community structure, community power structure, community as a 
social system, merger of rural and urban social systems. 

3 hours 

Sociology 261. Marriage and the Family. Social psychology of dating, courtship, 
and family relations; evolution of the modern family; changes in family func- 
tions, structures, and roles. 

Sociology 311. Anthropology. Anthropological study of content and patterning 
of cultures; cultural processes; functional analysis, cultural themes and value 
orientations; basic relationships between culture and personality. 

3 hours 

Sociology 312. Minority Group Relations. Ethnic, racial, and cultural group con- 
tacts and conflicts; causes of prejudice, status and participation of minority 
groups in society. 

3 hours 

Sociology 313. Social Change and Collective Behavior. Processes of social change; 
conflict of norms; behavior of people in large collectivities, collective inter- 
stimulation and emotions; mass stimuli and mass response. 

3 hours 

Sociology 361. Contemporary Social Problems. The impact of social and economic 
change; the major lags leading to social problems, poverty, unemployment, 
dependency, disease, delinquency, mental deficiency, crime, old age, population 
problems, etc. A further study of how to analyze data in connection with 
such problems. Prerequisite: Sociology 251 or permission. 

3 hours 

Sociology 362. Institutions. Analysis of patterned relations; origins, development, 
and a variability of institutions; functional relationships between economic, 
political, educational, and religious institutions. 

3 hours 

Sociology 363. Social Work. Theory, philosophy, and objectives of social work; 
development of private and public social work agencies and organizations. 

3 hours 

Sociology 452. Criminology. An analysis of the social or casual processes by which 
individuals become criminals and delinquents; causative factors, techniques 
of control; accepted methods of treatment and correction; thoughts for future 
improvements of such. Prerequisite: Sociology 251 or permission. 

3 hours 



COURSE OFFERINGS 59 

Sociology 461. Sociological Theory. Development and characteristics of sociological 
theory as related to social structure and society; contributions of European and 
American sociologists to the development of social thought. 

3 hours 

Sociology 462. Independent Study and Research. Scientific research methods and 
techniques applied to the study of social phenomena; scope and purpose of 
social research; evaluation and interpretation of social data; practical applica- 
tion of research principles in an independent study project. 

1 hour 



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9 




60 



ATHENS COLLEGE 



CHEMISTRY MAJOR 



First Trimester 

Chem. 112 
Math 110 
Eng. 101 
Rel. 220 
Phys. Ed. 


Hours 

4 
4 
3 
3 

1 


Fifth Trimester 

Chem. 222 
Math 301 
Germ. Ill 
Pol. Sci. 251 
Hum. 310* 


Hours 

4 
4 
4.5 
3 
3 




15 


18.5 


Second Trimester 

Chem. 113 
Math 111 
Eng. 102 
Rel. 221 
Phys. Ed. 


4 
4 
3 
3 

1 


Sixth Trimester 

Chem. 223 
Math 421 
Germ. 112 
Psy. 231 
Hum. 311* 


4 
3 
4.5 
3 
3 




15 






19.5 


Third Trimester 

Chem. 311 
Math 220 
Phys. 212 
History 151 
Literature 
Phys. Ed. 


4 
4 
4 
3 
3 
1 


Seventh Trimester 

Chem. 421 
Adv. Chem. 
Biol. 110 
Speech 201 


4 

3-4 

4 

3 


18 




19 




Fourth Trimester 

Chem. 312 
Math 221 
Phys. 213 
History 152 
Literature 
Phys. Ed. 


4 
4 
4 
3 
3 
1 


Eighth Trimester 

Chem. 422 
Adv. Chem. 
Biol. 112 
Elect. 

*or Fine Arts 


4 

3-4 

4 

3 


15 




19 





BIOLOGY MAJOR REQUIREMENTS & OUTLINE OF COURSES & SEQUENCE 

BIOLOGY MAJOR 



First Trimester 


Hours 


Third Trimester 


Hours 


Eng. 101 


3 


Math. 110 


4 


Hist. 151 


3 


Biol. 201 


4 


Biol. 110 


4 


Eng. 211 


3 


Chem. 112 


4 


Ger. Ill 


4i/2 


Phys. Ed. 


1 


Phys. Ed. 


1 




15 


I6I/2 


Second Trimester 




Fourth Trimester 




Eng. 102 


3 


Math. Ill 


4 


Hist. 152 


3 


Biol. 210 


4 


Biol. Ill 


4 


Eng. 212 


3 


Chem. 113 


4 


Ger. 112 


41/2 


Phys. Ed. 


1 


Phys. Ed. 


1 



15 



16'/ 2 



COURSE OFFERINGS 



61 



Fifth Trimester 

Biol. 202 
Math. 220 
Chem. 311 
Fine Arts* 



Hours 


Seventh Trimester 


Hours 


4 


Biol. 301 


4 


4 


Physics 212 


4 


4 


Pol. Sci. 251 


3 


3 


Psy. 231 


3 



15 



15-17 



Sixth Trimester 
Biol. 211 
Math. 221 
Chem. 312 
Fine Arts* 



4 
4 
4 
3 




Eighth Trimester 
Biol. 420 
Physics 213 
Electives 


15 




Suggested 


Electives: 


Biol. 


310 




Biol. 


410 




Chem. 413 


Ger. 


314 





'May substitute Humanities 310 and 311 for the Fine Arts requirement. 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



1 

4 
10 



15 



First Trimester 


Hours 


Fourth Trimester 


Hours 


Eng. 101 


3 


Acct. 232 


3 


Hist. 151 


3 


Econ. 223 


3 


Biol. 101 


3 


Eng. 212 


3 


Fine Arts 


3 


Chem. 101 


3 


Speech 201 


3 


Foreign Language 112 


4i/ 2 


Phys. Ed. 


1 


Phys. Ed. 


1 




16 


171/2 


Second Trimester 








Eng. 102 
Hist. 152 


3 


Fifth Trimester 




3 


Bus. 311 


3 


Biol. 102 


3 


Bus. 331 


3 


Fine Arts 


3 


Psy. 231 


3 


Sec. Sci. Ill 


2 


Hum. 310 


3 


Phys. Ed. 


1 


Bus. Elec. 


3 




15 


15 


Third Trimester 








Acct. 231 


3 


Sixth Trimester 




Econ. 222 


3 


Bus. 312 


3 


Eng. 211 


3 


Bus. 341 


3 


Phys. 101 


3 


P. S. 251 


3 


Foreign Language 111 


41/2 


Hum. 311 


3 


Phys. Ed. 


1 


Bus. Elec. 


3 



17V 



15 



62 


ATHENS 


COLLEGE 




Seventh Trimester 


Hours 


Eighth Trimester 


Hours 


Bus. 305 


3 


Bus. 315 


3 


Bus. 313 


3 


Bus. 346 


3 


Rel. 220 


3 


Rel. 221 


3 


Bus. Elec. 


3 


Bus. Elec. 


3 


Elec. 


3 


Elec. 


3 



15 



A PROPOSED PLAN OF STUDY LEADING TO THE CLASS B PROFESSIONAL 

TEACHER'S CERTIFICATE IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

(Based upon proposed Certification Plan) 

Lower Division 

Eng. 101, 102 
Biol. 101, 102 
For. Lang. 
Hist. 151, 152 
Math. 101 
Phys. Ed. 



Hours 




Hours 


6 


Phys. Sci. 101, 102 


6 


6 


Art 201 


3 


9 


Music 201 


3 


6 


Pol. Sci. 251 


3 


3 


Psy. 231 


3 


2 


Educ. 232 


4 




Speech 201 


3 






33 


Eng. 215, 216 


6 




Phys. Ed. 


9 




33 


6 






3 


Materials and Methods 421, 


422 6 


3 


Curr. Const. 423 


3 


3 


Tests and Meas. 461 


3 


3 


His. 351 or 352 


3 


3 


Observation and Student 




3 


Teaching 472 


8 


6 


Electives 


7 



Upper Division 

Hum. 310, 311 
Music 411 
Psy. 332 or 433 
Art 309 
Educ. 330 
Soc. 251 
His. 303 
Rel. 220-221 

30 30 

A PROPOSED PLAN LEADING TO THE CLASS B PROFESSIONAL 
TEACHER'S CERTIFICATE IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 

(Based upon proposed certification plan) 

Lower Division 

Eng. 101, 102 

Biol. 101, 102 (Except for 
Physical Science Majors) 
Foreign Language 
Hist. 151, 152 
Math 101 
Phys. Ed. (Activities) 



Upper Division 

Rel. 220, 221 

Hist. 351 

Adolescent Psy. 334 and 

Educ. Psy. 233 
Subject Matter Major and 

Minor and Electives 



Hours 




Hours 


6 


Chem. 101, 102 or 112, 113 


6 




Fine Arts 





6 


Pol. 251 


3 


9 


Psy. 231 


3 


6 


Educ. 232 


4 


3 


Speech 201 


3 


2 


Hum. 310-311 


6 




Phys. Ed. (Activities) 


2 


32 












33 




Mat. and Meth. of 






High School Teaching 


3 


6 


Curr. Const. 423 


3 


3 


Tests and Measurements 461 
Observation Seminar and 


3 


3 


Student Teaching 
Subject Matter Major and 


8 


18 


Minor and Electives 


13 



30 



COURSE OFFERINGS 



63 



Additional Requirements 

One major area of studies and one minor area of studies are required of the 
student pursuing certification on a secondary level. The major and minor field 
may be selected from the following listing: 

Majors Offered 

English, Modern Language, Physics, Chemistry, Biology, Mathematics, Business 

Administration, History, Music, Social Studies, Sociology, Psychology, Physical 
Education. 

Minors Offered 

Art, Biology, Business Administration, Chemistry, English, Health and Physical 
Education, History, Mathematics, Music, Physics, Political Science, Psychology, 
Sociology, Social Studies, Modern Language, Speech. 



ENGLISH MAJOR 



First Trimester 


Hours 


Fifth Trimester 


Hours 


Eng. 101 


3 


Eng. 311 


3 


Hist. 151 


3 


Rel. 220 


3 


Biol. 101 


3 


Eng. Elective 


3 


For Lang. Ill 


41/2 


Elec. (minor) 


3 


Phys. Ed. 


1 


Elec. (minor) 


3 




141/2 


15 


Second Trimester 








Eng. 102 


3 


Sixth Trimester 




Hist. 152 


3 


Eng. 312 


3 


Biol. 102 


3 


Rel. 221 • 


3 


For. Lang. 112 


4V2 


Eng. Elective 


3 


Speech 201 


3 


Elec. (minor) 


3 


Phys. Ed. 


1 


Elec. (minor) 


3 




171/2 


15 


Third Trimester 








Eng. 211 (or 215) 


3 


Seventh Trimester 




Phys. 101 


3 


Hum. 310 


3 


Pol. Sci. 251 


3 


Eng. 424 


3 


Art 201 


3 


Eng. 313 


3 


Math. 101 


3 


Elec. (minor) 


3 


Phys. Ed. 


1 


Elec. (minor) 


3 




16 


15 


Fourth Trimester 








Eng. 212 (or 216) 


3 


Eighth Trimester 




Chem. 101 


3 


Hum. 311 


3 


Philo. 201 


3 


Eng. 452 


3 


Drama 201 


3 


Eng. Elective 


3 


Eng. Elec. 


3 


Elec. (minor) 


3 


Phys. Ed. 


1 


Elec. (minor) 


3 



16 



15 



64 



ATHENS COLLEGE 



HISTORY MAJOR 



First Trimester 

Eng. 101 
Hist. 151 
For. Lang. 1 1 1 
Chem. 101 
Math. 101 
Phys. Ed. 



Second Trimester 

Eng. 102 
Hist. 152 
For Lang. 112 
Phys. 101 
Speech 201 
Phvs. Ed. 



Third Trimester 

Eng. 211 
Hist. 351 
Biol. 101 
Fine Arts 
Pol. Sci. 251 
Phys. Ed. 



Eighth Trimester 

Hist. 313 and 12 hours electives. 



Hours 


Fourth Trimester 


3 


Eng. 212 


3 


Hist. 352 


4'/ 2 


Biol. 102 


3 

3 

1 


Fine Arts 


Soc. 251 


Phys. Ed. 


17'/ 2 






Fifth Trimester 




Hum. 310 


3 
3 
4i/ 2 


Rel. 220 


Hist. 310 


Hist. 321 


Pol. Sci. 353 or 453 


3 


Soc. 311 or 362 


3 




1 




171/2 


Sixth Trimester 

Hum. 311 




Rel. 221 




Hist. 311 


3 


Elec. 


3 




3 




3 


Seventh Trimester 


3 


Hist. 312 


1 


Elec. 



16 



Hours 

3 
3 



16 
3 



15 



15 



12 



15 



MAJORS IN DIVISION OF HUMANITIES 



First Trimester 


Hours 


Third Trimester 


Hours 


Eng. 101 


3 


Eng. 211 


3 


History 151 


3 


Phys. 101 


3 


Biol. 101 


3 


Lang. Ill 


4'/ 2 


Speech 201 


3 


Hum. 310 


3 


Fine Arts 201 


3 


Pol. Sci. 251 


3 


Phys. Ed. 


1 


Phys Ed. 


1 




16 


171/2 


Second Trimester 




Fourth Trimester 




Eng. 102 


3 


Eng. 212 


3 


Hist. 152 


3 


Lang. 112 


41/2 


Biol. 102 


3 


Hum. 311 


3 


Fine Arts 


3 


Music 201 


3 


Music 101 


3 


Econ. 222 


3 


Phys. Ed. 


1 


Phys. Ed. 


1 



16 



171/2 



COURSE OFFERINGS 



65 



Fifth Trimester 
Rel. 220 
Psy. 231 
Eng. 301 
Phil. 201 
Rel. (Elective) 



Sixth Trimester 
Rel. 221 
Eng. 304 
Phil. 302 
Music 234 
Rel. (Elective) 



Hours 


Seventh Trimester 


Hours 


3 


Art 404 


3 


3 


Eng. 424 


3 


3 


Phil. 322 


3 


3 


Lang. 


4i/2 


3 


Rel. (Elective) 


3 


15 


I6V2 




Eighth Trimester 




3 


Music Elec. 


3 


3 


Eng. 425 


3 


3 


Rel. (Elective) 


3 


3 


Lang. 


41/2 


3 


Drama 321 


3 



15 



I6I/2 



PRE LAW PROGRAM 



First Trimester 


Hours 


Fifth Trimester 


Hours 


Eng. 101 


3 


Hum. 310 


3 


Hist. 151 


3 


Rel. 220 


3 


For. Lang. Ill 


4i/ 2 


Speech 201 


3 


Chem. 101 


3 


Pol. Sci. 351 


3 


Math. 


3 


Hist. 351 


3 


Phys. Ed. 


1 














15 








171/2 






Second Trimester 








Eng. 102 


3 


Sixth Trimester 




Hist. 152 


3 


Hum. 311 


3 


For. Lang. 112 


41/2 


Rel. 221 


3 


Phys. 101 


3 


Pol. Sci. 352 


3 


Pol. Sci. 251 


3 


Hist. 352 


3 


Phys. Ed. 


1 


Elec. 


3 




171/2 


15 


Third Trimester 








Eng. 211 


3 


Seventh Trimester 




Biol. 101 


3 


Hist. 321 


3 


Fine Arts 


3 


Pol. Sci. 353 


3 


Acct. 231 


3 


Hist. 310 


3 


Econ. 222 


3 


Pol. Sci. 451 


3 


Phys. Ed. 


1 


Soc. 253 


3 




16 






15 


Fourth Trimester 








Eng. 212 


3 






Biol. 102 


3 


Eighth Trimester 




Fine Arts 


3 


Hist. 311 


3 


Acct. 232 


3 


Pol. Sci. 453 


3 


Econ. 223 


3 


Hist. 312 


3 


Phys. Ed. 


1 


Hist. 313 


3 



16 



12 



66 



ATHENS COLLEGE 



MATHEMATICS MAJOR 



First Trimester 
Math. 110 
Eng. 101 
Rel. 220 
Chem. 112 
Speech 201 
Phys. Ed. 



Second Trimester 

Math. Ill 
Eng. 102 
Rel. 221 
Chem. 112 
Pol. Sci. 251 
Phys. Ed. 



Third Trimester 

Math. 220 
Phys. 212 
Biol. 110 
Hist. 151 
Phys. Ed. 



Fourth Trimester 

Math. 221 
Phys. 213 
Biol. Ill 
Hist. 152 
Phys. Ed. 



Hours 


Fifth Trimester 


4 


Math. 301 


3 


Fine Arts 


3 


Germ. Ill 


4 


Hum. 310 


3 

1 


Elec. 


18 






Sixth Trimester 


4 


Math. 421 


3 


Fine Arts 


3 


Germ. 112 


4 


Psy. 231 


3 
1 


Hum. 311 


18 






Seventh Trimester 


4 
4 
4 
3 
1 


Adv. Math. 


Adv. Math. 


Lit. 


Elec. 


Elec. 


16 






Eighth Trimester 


4 


Adv. Math. 


4 


Adv. Math. 


4 


Lit. 


3 


Elec. 


1 


Elec. 



Hours 

3 

3 

41/2 
3 
3-4 

16-18 



3 
3 

41/2 



16'/ 2 



16 



3 
3-4 
3-4 

15-17 



3 

3 

3^4 

3-4 

15-17 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION MAJORS 



First Trimester 




Hours 


Third Trimester 




Hours 


Eng. 101 




3 


Eng. 211 or 215 




3 


Hist. 151 




3 


Physics 101 




3 


Biol. 101 




3 


Pol. Sci. 251 




3 


Psy. 231 




3 


Lang. 1 1 1 




41/2 


Phys. Ed. 220 




3 


Math. 101 




3 


Phys. Ed. (Requii 


ed) 


! 


Phys. Ed. (Requii 


red) 


1 




16 


171/2 


Second Trimester 






Fourth Trimester 






Eng. 102 




3 


Eng. 212 or 216 




3 


Hist. 152 




3 


Chem. 101 




3 


Biol. 102 




3 


Phil. 210 




3 


Soc. 251 




3 


Lang. 112 




41/0 


Speech 201 




3 


Phvs. Ed. 240 




3 


Phys. Ed. (Required) 


1 


Phys. Ed. (Required) 


1 



II, 



17 V4 



COURSE OFFERINGS 



67 



Fifth Trimester 


Hours 


Rel. 220 


3 


Educ. 232 


4 


Phys. Ed. 301 or 302 


3 


Phys. Ed. 300 


2 


Educ. 432 


3 




15 


Sixth Trimester 




Rel. 221 


3 


Psy. 334 


3 


Phys. Ed. 210 


3 


Educ. 340 


3 


Educ. 461 


3 



Seventh Trimester 


Hours 


Hum. 310 


3 


Phys. Ed. 400 
Phys. Ed. 410 
Phys. Ed. 450 
Phys. Ed. 420 


3 
3 
3 
2 



Eighth Trimester 

Hum. 311 
Educ. 482 
Educ. 431 



14 

3 

8 
3 



15 



14 



PHYSICS MAJOR 



First Trimester 

Math 110 
Eng. 101 
Rel. 220 
Hist. 151 
Chem. 112 
Phys. Ed. 



Second Trimester 

Math 111 
Eng. 102 
Rel. 221 
Hist. 152 
Chem. 113 
Phys. Ed. 



Third Trimester 

Phys. 212 
Math. 220 
Biol. 110 
Lit. 
Phys. Ed. 



Fourth Trimester 

Phys. 213 
Math. 221 
Biol. Ill 
Lit. 
Phys. Ed. 



Hours 


Fifth Trimester 


4 
3 
3 


Phys. 313 
Phys. 311 
Math. 301 


3 


Germ. Ill 


4 
1 


Hum. 310 


18 






Sixth Trimester 


4 


Phys. 314 


3 
3 


Phys. 322 
Math. 421 


3 


Germ. 112 


4 
1 


Hum. 311 


18 






Seventh Trimester 


4 
4 


Phys. 411 
Phys. 412 
Adv. Math. 


4 


Pol. Sci. 251 


3 
1 


Elec. 


16 




4 
4 
4 


Eighth Trimester 

Phys. 414 
Phys. 420 
Adv. Math. 


3 


Econ., Phil., Psy. or Soc. 


1 


Elec. 



Hours 

3 

3 

4 

4i/ 2 

3 

171/2 



3 
3 

41/2 
3 

16 1/2 



16 



15 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

15 



*Or Fine Arts. 



68 



ATHENS COLLEGE 



PSYCHOLOGY MAJOR 



First Trimester 


Hours 


Fifth Trimester 


Hours 


Eng. 101 


3 


Hum. 310 


3 


Hist. 151 


3 


Rel. 220 


3 


Lang. Ill 


4i/ 2 


Psy. 345 


3 


Chem. 101 


3 


Psy. 352 


3 


Math. 101 


3 

1 


Elec. 


3 


Phys. Ed. 




15 




171/2 




Second Trimester 








Eng. 102 


3 


Sixth Trimester 




Hist. 152 


3 


Hum. 311 


3 


Lang. 112 


41/2 


Rel. 221 


3 


Phys. 101 


3 


Psy. 331 


3 


Psy. 231 


3 


Psy. 348 


3 


Phys. Ed. 


1 


Elec. 


3 




171/2 


15 


Third Trimester 








Eng. 211 


3 






Pol. Sci. 251 


3 






Biol. 101 


3 


Seventh Trimester 




Fine Arts 


3 


Psy. 448 


3 


Psy. 332 


3 


Psy. 400 or 401 


3 


Phys. Ed. 


1 


Psy. 399 


1 






Elec. 


8 




16 






Fourth Trimester 


15 


Eng. 212 


3 






Speech 201 


3 






Biol. 102 
Fine Arts 


3 
3 


Eighth Trimester 




Psy. 334 


3 


Psy. 402 


3 


Phys. Ed. 


1 


Elec. 


9 



16 



12 



SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 
LEADING TO THE BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 



First Trimester 


Hours 


Third Trimester 


Hours 


Eng. 101 


3 


Sec. Sci. 113 


2 


Hist. 151 


3 


Sec. Sci. 311 


3 


Fine Arts 


3 


Acct. 231 


3 


Sec. Sci. Ill 


2 


Econ. 222 


3 


Sec. Sci. 211 


3 


Eng. 211 


3 


Phys. Ed. 


1 


Phys. Ed. 


1 




15 


15 


Second Trimester 








Eng. 102 


3 


Fourth Trimester 




Hist. 152 


3 


Sec. Sci. 312 


3 


Fine Arts 


3 


Acct. 232 


3 


Speech 201 


3 


Econ. 223 


3 


Sec. Sci. 112 


2 


Eng. 215 


3 


Sec. Sci. 212 


3 


P.S. 251 


3 


Phys. Ed. 


1 


Phys. Ed. 


1 



IS 



16 



COURSE OFFERINGS 



69 



Fifth Trimester 

Sec. Sci. 301 
Sec. Sci. 313 
Biol. 101 
Bus. 311 
Lang. Ill 



Sixth Trimester 

Sec. Sci. 343 
Bus. 312 
Biol. 102 
Lang. 112 
Psy. 231 



Hours 


Seventh Trimester 


2 


Bus. 341 


3 


Mgt. 347 or 348 


3 


Hum. 310 


3 


Chem. 101 


4V2 


Religion 220 


15V2 




3 


Eighth Trimester 

Sec. Sci. 231 


3 


Hum. 311 


3 

41/2 

3 


Phys. 101 
Religion 221 
Elective 



Hours 

3 



15 



16 1/2 



15 



SOCIOLOGY MAJOR 



First Trimester 


Hours 


Engl. 101 
Hist. 151 


3 
3 


Lang. Ill 
Chem. 101 


4V2 
3 


Math. 101 


3 


Phys. Ed. 


1 




171/2 


Second Trimester 




Engl. 102 
Hist. 152 


3 
3 


Lang. 112 
Phys. 101 
Soc. 251 


41/2 

3 

3 


Phys. Ed. 


1 




171/2 


Third Trimester 




Eng. 211 
Pol. Sci. 251 


3 
3 


Biol. 101 


3 


Fine Arts 


3 


Soc. 252 


3 


Phys. Ed. 


1 




16 


Fourth Trimester 




Eng. 212 
Speech 201 
Biol. 102 


3 
3 
3 


Fine Arts 


3 


Soc. 253 


3 


Phys. Ed. 


1 



Fifth Trimester 

Hum. 310 

Rel. 220 

Soc. 261 

Hist. 313 or 351 

Elec. 



Sixth Trimester 

Hum. 311 

Rel. 221 

Soc. 362 

Hist. 313 or 352 

Elec. 



Seventh Trimester 

Soc. 311 
Elec. 



Eighth Trimester 

Soc. 461 

Elec. 



Hours 

3 



15 



16 



15 



3 

12 

15 



3 
9 

12 



70 



ATHENS COLLEGE 



TWO-YEAR SECRETARIAL SCIENCE CERTIFICATE 



First Trimester 


Hours 


Third Trimester 


Eng. 101 


3 


Sec. Sci. 113 


Sec. Sci. Ill 


2 


Sec. Sci. 311 


Sec. Sci. 211 


3 


Acct. 231 


Biol. 101; Fine Arts; or 




Econ. 222 


Hist. 151 


3 


Bus. 341 


Psv. 231 


3 


Phys. Ed. 


Ph'ys. Ed. 


1 




Second Trimester 


15 
Hours 




Eng. 102 


3 




Sec. Sci. 112 


o 


Fourth Trimester 


Sec. Sci. 212 


3 


Sec. Sci. 301 


Sec. Sci. 343 


3 


Sec. Sci. 312 


Bus. 347; Bus. 348; Bus. 311; 




Sec. Sci. 231 


or Bus. 312 


3 


Acct. 232 


Electives 


3 


Econ. 223 


Phys. Ed. 


1 


Phys. Ed. 



Hours 

2 
3 
3 
3 
3 
1 

15 



Hours 

2 
3 
3 



is 



15 



SPECIAL PROGRAMS 



71 



SPECIAL CURRICULA 
AMERICAN CULTURAL ARTS 



American Cultural Arts is a unique concept of education for the woman student 
which provides through a varied curriculum a sound body of knowledge to prepare 
the modern woman to meet the religious, social, personal and cultural needs of the 
modern world. The curriculum is varied and sufficiently extensive, yet it allows 
the woman student enrolled in it to pursue a major course of study and fulfill its 
specific requirements. The Lower Division requirements are slightly altered from 
those of the general student; but still provide those courses necessary to fulfill the 
requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 



Lower Division Requirements 



Upper Division Requirements 





hours 


ho 


English Composition 


6 


General Insurance 


Humanities 


6 


Investments 


Appreciation Courses 


9 


Political Parties 


Art 




Child Growth and Development 


Drama 




Adolescent Psychology 


Music 




Physiology (Special) 


Religion 


6 


First Aid 


Social Sciences 


12 


Speech 


General Psychology 




Economics (Consumer) 


Intro, to Sociology 




Physical Education 


Intro, to Philosophy 




Literature 


Principles of Economics 




Electives in Major 


United States Government 


3 




History 


9 




Foreign Language 


9 





3 
3 
3 
3 
6 
3 
3 
3 
3 
6 
27 



PRE-PHARMACY PROGRAM 

All schools of pharmacy oprate on a five-year curriculum for entering freshman. 
This program makes it possible for a student to take one or two years of pre- 
pharmacy at Athens College, then transfer to a School- of Pharmacy and complete 
his training in four or three years. All pre-pharmacy students at Athens should 
consult the catalog of their chosen professional school and plan their courses ac- 
cordingly. The following pre-pharmacy curriculum is suggested by Athens College 
as one which will satisfy the various schools of pharmacy. 



First year (1-4 and 2-3 Programs) 

hours 

Principles of Biology 8 

General Chemistry and 

Qualitative Analysis 8 

Freshman English 6 

College Algebra 4 

Trigonometry 4 

American History 3 

Physical Education — 



Second year (2-3 Program) 

Botany 

General Physics 
Organic Chemistry or 

Quantitative Analysis 
English Literature 
Physical Education 



hours 



PRE-NURSING PROGRAM 

The student who completes the following prescribed course (two years or four 
trimesters) and then completes the regular program at an approved School of 
Nursing will be eligible to receive a Bachelor of Science degree from Athens College. 



First Year 


hours 


Second Year 


hours 


Arts Appreciation 


3 


Arts Appreciation 


3 


Principles of Biology 


8 


Humanities 


6 



72 



ATHENS COLLEGE 



First Year 


Hours 


Second Y'ear 


Hours 


General Chemistry 
English Composition 
Religion 


8 
6 
6 


Foreign Language 
Quantitative Analysis 
Sociology 
Comparative Anatomy 


9 
4 
3 
4 



PRE-DENTAL AND PRE-MEDICAL PROGRAM 

Medical Schools urge college students who plan to enter the medical field to 
get as wide a liberal arts education as possible. They believe that the medical prac- 
titioner needs a broad education as a part of his education and they usually require 
a college degree for entrance into medical schools. In view of the above, the liberal 
arts program at Athens College is well-suited to the pre-medical student and the 
pre-dental student. Both pre-professional students should consult the catalogs of 
their prospective professional schools to work out the program with their advisor 
and the Dean of the College. 

The program as given below does not arrange courses in any sequence or at any 
scheduled time. The courses in biology, chemistry, and mathematics are sequential 
in organization and must be started in the freshman year. The general require- 
ments of the Lower Division must be met except in cases where authorized sub- 
stitutions or extension are made. 





hours 




hours 


Principles of Biology 


8 


Physical Chemistry 


8 


Botany 


4 


College Algebra 


4 


Zoology 


4 


Trigonometry 


4 


Morphogenesis of Vertebrates 


Analytic Geometry and 




Genetics 


4 


Calculus 


8-12 


General Chemistry and 




Economics and/or 




Qualitative Analysis 


8 


Political Science 


6 


Quantitative Analysis 


8 


General Psychology 


3 


Organic Chemistry 


8 


General Physics 


8 




i 0^m 



iiiniiiiwito y 




74 ATHENSCOLLEGE 

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 

Frank N. Philpot, A.B., A.M., Ed. D President 

Guy Everett Snavely, A.B., Ph.D., LL.D., Litt.D., L.H.D., 

D.C.I In term President 

William R. Hauser, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Dean of the College 

Robert B. dejanes, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Dean of Students 

Bobby Ray Hicks, B.S Business Manager 

James H. Sandling, B.A Director of Admissions 

Edgar Darby Mason, B.S., B.D Chaplain 

Mary H. White Bursar 

Martha A. Porter Secretary to the President 

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS 

J. O. Belue, M.D College Physician 

Velma Nugent Head Resident — Sanders 

Etoile B. Pearce College Hostess 

Alma P. Puryear Assistant Registrar 

Epsie Horn Assistant to the Librarian 

Mildred McLain Staff Secretary 

James H. Harrison Superintendent of Maintenance 

Gladys B. Ward Assistant to the Librarian 

Anita Gregg Secretary — Admissions Office 

Sarah H. Leoper Assistant to the Librarian 

Elizabeth Elliot Secretary — Dean of Students 

FULL-TIME FACULTY 

ANNETTE C. ASKEW, B.A., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of English 
B.A., Woman's College of Georgia 
M.A.. Duke University 



DIRECTORIES 75 



JAMES D. BALLEW, B.S., M.A.L.Sc. 

Director of Libraries 

B.S., Athens College 

M.A., L.Sc, George Peabody College 

JAMES E. BATHURST, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of Psychology 
B.A., McPherson College 
M.A., Ph.D., State University of Iowa 

OBA E. BELCHER, B.S., M.Ed. 

Associate Professor of Physical Education 
B.S., Florence State College 
M.Ed., Auburn University 

WILLIAM D. BELL, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of History 

B.S., M.A., Mississippi State College 

Ph.D., Louisiana State University 

BARBARA BROOKS, A.B., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Secretarial Science 
A.B., University of Wichita 
M.A., University of Alabama 

RICHARD W. BRYAN, Ph.B., M.S., Ph.D. 

Professor of Business Administration 

Ph.B., Emory University 

M.S., Ph.D., New York University 

HALLIE CARSON, A.B., A.B.L. Sc., A.M.L. Sc. 
Catalog and Order Librarian 
A.B., Emory and Henry College 
A.B. in L. Sc, Emory University 
M.A. in L. Sc, University of Michigan 

ARMANDO CASTELLANOS, B.A., D.P.S., LL.D. 

Professor of Business Administration 

B.A., University of Havana 

LL.D., D.P.S., University of Havana 

MILDRED CAUDLE, B.A., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., Athens College 

M.A., George Peabody College 

RICHARD W. COUCH, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 

Professor of Biology 
B.S., Oklahoma State University 
M.S., University of Tennessee 
Ph.D., Auburn University 



76 ATHENS COLLEGE 

JAMES L. DAVIS, B.S., M.S. 

Associate Professor of Business Administration 
B.S., M.S., University of Alabama 
Additional Study, University of Alabama 

ROBERT B. DEJANES, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
Dean of Students 

B.A. George Washington University 
M.A. University of Tennessee 
Ph.D., University of Virginia 

BETTY Z. DOUTHIT, B.A., M.S. 

Instructor in Physical Education 
B.A., Alabama College 
M.S., Indiana University 

ELTON C. FITCH, B.B., B.D. 

Assistant Professor of Sociology 
B.B., Birmingham-Southern College 
D.D., Virginia Theological Seminary 

MARGARET E. FOLEY, A.B., M.A., Litt.D. 
Professor of Modern Languages 
A.B., Ohio Wesleyan University 
M.A., University of Illinois 
Litt.D., Alma-College 

AZALIA FRANCIS, B.A., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A., Athens College 

MA., George Peabody College 

SAM LEE GREENWOOD, A.B., Ph.D. 

Professor of Foreign La7iguages 
A.B., Winona College 
Ph.D., University of Chigaco 

WILLIAM HADSER, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 
Dean of The College 
A.B., Denison University 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

DENNIS JOHNSON, A.B., M.A. 
Instructor in Art 
B.A., Athens College 
M.A., University of Alabama 



DIRECTORIES 77 

JOY M. KIRCHNER, B.S., M.A., H.S.D. 

Professor of Education 

B.S., M.A., Texas Woman's University 

H.S.D., Indiana University 

PENNE J. LAUBENTHAL, B.A. 
Tutor In English 
B.A., Athens College 

E. DARBY MASON, B.S., M.S., B.D. 

Instructor in Physics and Chaplain 

B.S., University of Alabama 

M.S., B.D., Vanderbilt University 

Graduate work, Vanderbilt University School of Physics 

ACTON E. MIDDLEBROOKS, B.A., B.D., M.A., Ph.D. 

Professor of Religion and Philosophy 
B.A., Birmingham-Southern College 
B.D., Garrett Theological Seminary 
M.A., Ph.D. Northwestern University 

HARRY MOON, B.A., M.A., M.Music 

Associate Professor of Music 

B.A., Coe College 

M.A., Coe College 

M. Music, University of Michigan 

ANGELINE NAZARETIAN, B.S., M.A. 

Associate Professor of Physical Education 
B.S., Alabama College 
M.A., University of Alabama 

PAUL H. NEAL, B.A., M.A. 

Associate Professor of Speech 

B.A., Berea College 

M.A. Northwestern University 

LORAINE B. PABST, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. 

Professor of History 

B.S., Eastern Illinois State Teachers College 

M.A., Ph.D., University of Illinois 

LAFAYETTE PATTERSON, B.A., M.A., L.H.D. 

Assistant Professor of History 
B.A., Birmingham-Southern College 
M.A., Lee Stanford University 
L.H.D. , Birmingham-Southern College 



78 ATHENS COLLEGE 

HENRY GRADY RICHARDS, B.S., M.A. 

Instructor in History 

B.A., George Peabody College 

M.A., Columbia University 

DAVID L. ROSENAU, JR., B.A., J.D. 

Assistant Professor of Business and Social Science 
B.A., Yale University 
J.D., Stanford University 

BETTY MOSS SANDLIN, B.A. 

Instructor in Modern Languages 
B.A., Athens College 

LARRY A. SAUNDERS, B.A., M.A. 

Assistant Professor in English 
B.A., Memphis State University 
M.A., Memphis State University 

WILLIAM A. SHORT, B.S., Ph.D. 

Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Furman University 

M.S., University of South Carolina 

Ph.D., University of Alabama 

ANATOL V. SPAKOVSKY, Ph.D. 

Professor of Humanities 
Ph.D. University of Lyublyana 

MARGARET C. WALDRON, B.A. 

Tutor in History 
B.A., Athens College 

CHARLES C. WEST, A.B., B.D. 

Instructor in Religion and Philosophy 
A.B., Birmingham-Southern College 
B.D., Vanderbilt University 

JOSEPH M. YOUNG, B.S., M.A., Ed. D. 
Professor of Education 
B.S., Sam Houston State College 
M.A., Ed. D., University of Arizona 

PART-TIME FACULTY 

JANICE Z. ANDERSON, B.S., M.A. 

Instructor in Sociology 
B.S. Westminster College 
M.A., Ohio State University 

N. T. ANDERSON, B.S., M.S. 
Instructor in Physics 
B.S., M.S., University of Tennessee 



DIRECTORIES 79 



LYNWOOD BAILEY, B.S., M.S. 

Instructor in Mathematics 
B.S., M.S., Auburn University 

TERRY BAKER 

Instructor in Chemistry 
B.E., Vanclerbilt University 

BRYON T. BR\DLEY, B.S., of E., M.A. 

Instructor in Education 

B.A. of Educ, M.A., University of Alabama 

ROBERT L. BROAD, B.S., LL.B. 

Instructor in Law 

B.S., University of Alabama 

LL.B., University of Chicago 

MAX W. CAMP, B. Mus., M. Mus. 
Instructor in Music 
B. Mus., University of Alabama 
M. Mus., George Peabody College 

GEORGE W. CANNON, B.S. 

Instructor in Business 

B.S., Georgia Institute of Technology 

ROBERT S. DOHERTY, B.A., M.S. 
Instructor in Business 
B.A., M.S., Mississippi Southern University 

SAM. M. DOLLAR, A.B., M.A. 

Instructor in Education 
A.B., Piedmont College 
M.A., George Peabody College 

RUDOLF FESTA, M.S., Ph.D. 

Instructor in Mathematics 

M.S., Ph.D., University of Vienna 

EUGENIA P. FITCH, B.M.E., A.B., M.A. 

Instructor in Music 

B.M.E., Birmingham Conservatory of Music 
A.B., Birmingham-Southern College 
M.A., Columbia University 

SAMUEL K. GOANS, B.S.C., C.P.A. 

Instructor in Business 

B.S.C., Carson-Newman College 

HERBERT L. HUGHES, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 
Instructor in English 
A.B., Transylvania College 
M.A., Columbia University 
Ph.D., University of Virginia 



80 ATHENS COLLEGE 

OTIS KIRBY, A.B., B.D. 
Instructor in Religion 
A.B., Birmingham-Southern College 
B.D., Yale University 

THEODORE KROMIS, A.B., LL.B., C.P.A. 

Instructor in Business 

A.B., Birmingham-Southern College 

LL.B., Birmingham School of Law 

RALPH E. LEDBETTER, B.S. 

Laboratory Instructor in Physics, Chemistry 
B.S., Athens College 

BETTIE E. LEGG, B.S. 

Tutor 

B.S., Auburn 

JACK D. LOOSE, B.M.E., M.M.E. 

Instructor in Physics 

B.M.E., M.M.E., Cornell University 

ELBA W. MCLIN, B.S., B.A., MA. 

Instructor in English 

B.S., B.A., Kansas State University 

M.A., University of Alabama 

JAMES A. MERRITT, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. 

Instructor in Physics and Chemistry 
B.S., M.A., George Peabody College 
Ph.D., Vanderbilt University 

RALPH D. PRATER, B.S. 

Band Director 

B.S., University of Alabama 

GORDON S. RICKS, A.B., MA. 

Instructor in Social Science 

A.B., M.A., University of Mississippi 

KYLE C. RIGSBY, B.S., M.A., M.Ed. 

Instructor in Health 

B.S., Florence State College 

M.A., M.Ed., George Peabody College 

JEAN H. ROBERTS, B.S. 

Instructor in Secretarial Science 
B.S., Florence State College 

EWELL M. SCOTT, B.S., MA. 

Instructor in Music 

B.S., M.A., University of Alabama 



DIRECTORIES 81 

ELIZABETH J. SPENCER, B.S., M.A. 

Instructor in Secretarial Science 

B.S., Athens College 

M.A., George Peabody College 

FLORENCE M. STEWARD, A.B., A.M., Litt.D. 

Instructor in English 
A.B., University of Cincinnati 
A.M., Harvard University 
Litt.D., Alma College 

LLOYD STONE, A.B., M.A. 
Instructor in Mathematics 
A.B., Athens College 
M.A., George Peabody College 

KATHERINE W. THOMPSON, A.B. 

Instructor in Political Science 
A.B., University of Alabama 

WARREN J. TOMME, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 

Instructor in Mathematics 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas 

NATHAN E. WELCH, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 

Instructor in Mathematics 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas 

CARLTON D. WHITT, A.B., M.S. 

Instructor in Chemistry 

A.B., M.S., University of Alabama 

LEOVIS D. WHITT, B.A. 

Instructor in History 
B.A., Athens College 

WILBUR B. WRIGHT, B.S., M.S. 

Instructor in Biology 
B.S., Auburn University 
M.S., University of Georgia 



INDEX 



Page 

Absences 21 

Academic Regulations 19 

Accounting 28 

Admission Requirements 12 

Art 38 

Athletics 9, 36 

Biology 49 

Board 26 

Business Administration 28 

Change of Schedule 20 

Chemistry 51 

Classification, Student 15 

College Calendar 4 

Conduct, Student 8 

Convocation 21 

Curriculum, General 14 

Degrees with Distinction 21 

Degree Requirements 21 

Drama 10,48 

Economics 30 

Education Division 31 

English 40 

Expenses 25 

Faculty 74 

Fees 25 

Finance 22 

Foreign languages 41 

Fraternity Life 9 

French 41 

German 41 

Grading system 19 

Graduation requirements 20 

Grants-in-Aid 22 

Health Insurance 26 



Page 

Health, Physical Education 

Recreation and Athletics 36 

History 55 

Humanities Division 38 

Library 7 

Library Science 48 

Loans 24 

Mathematics 52 

Ministerial Scholarships 22 

Music 10, 43 

Natural Science Division 49 

Night Division 16 

Philosophy 46 

Physical Education 36 

Physics 53 

Political Science 56 

Programs, suggested 60 

Psychology 56 

Publications 10 

Purpose . . , 6 

Quality points 19 

Readmission 13 

Refunds 26 

Religion 46 

Religious Organizations 9, 10 

Scholarships 22, 23 

Social Science Division 54 

Sociology .- 58 

Sororities 9 

Spanish 42 

Speech 48 

Student Government 8 

Student Life 8 

Transcripts 15