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CRABBE LIBHARY 
EASTERN KENTUCKY 
UNIVERSITY ^JcKf 

pjCHMONO. KEN. 



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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/athletethe195455unse 



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/4? 

450 



KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE 

VOL. 17, Aug. 105U-l^ay lo55 
Out o^ Print: ^^ov., Tec. l^^^ii 




High School Athlete 



NEWPORT CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOL BASEBALL TEAM 
K. H. S. A. A. CHAMPION— 1954 



fi 




Left to Right) Front Row: Mgr. Blanchet, Burke, Scheider, Hehman, 
Meyers, Uebel, Pangallo, Weyer, Wood, McCarty. Second Row: Trainer 
Enzweiler, Lother, Brockman, Beiting, Staverman, Ass't Coach Neal Con- 
nor, Rev. John V. Hegenauer, Prin., Coach Jim Connor, Gish, Volpe^hein. 
Carr. 



' -i::i:l5 i 




LAFAYETTE HIGH SCHOOL TRACK TEAM— K.H.S.A.A. CHAMPION— 1954 



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(Left to Right) Front Row: Peel. Murphy, Dugan, .lones, Mcintosh, Deutsch, Walton Gorham, Fuller, 
Second Row: Coach Tony Salvato. Tomlin. Johnson, Eaves, Barger. Hundley, Plunkett. Polly, Shari>. 
Hogg. Shively, Norman. 



ST. XAVIER HIGH SCHOOL GOLF TEAM— K.H.S.A.A. CHAMPION— 1954 




(Left to Right) Lee Hasenour, Bobby Nichols, Tommy Musselman, Victor ReFalo. Bruce Refalo. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XVII— NO. 1 



AUGUST, 1954 



$1.00 Per Year 



Report of Audit 

Louisville. Ky., July 14, 1964 
Mr. Theodore A. Sanford, Secretary & Treasurer 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 
Henderson, Kentucky 
Dear Sir : 

Pursuant to instructions received, we have made an audit 
of the books and records of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL 
ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION for the period of one year be- 
ginning July 1. 1953. and ended June 30. 1954. In addition, we 
have prepared and attached hereto, statements of the Receipts 
and Disbursements, which, in our opinion, reflect the true 
financial condition of the Association as of June 30. 1954. 

The Cash Funds on Hand and U. S. Savings Bonds Ac- 
counts were found to be correct and verified by letter from 
your depositories. 

We found the records presented us for purpose of audit 
to be in agreement and in good condition. 

Respectfully submitted. 

JOHNSON-FOWLER & COMPANY 

By Huet L. .lohnson 

Certified Public Accountant. 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL 
ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

PERIOD FROM JULY 1, 1953 TO JUNE 30, 1954 
STATEMENT OF 
RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
RECEIPTS: 

Balance in Checking Account .luly 1, 1953 { 9,990.08 

Annual Dues - 456 "i $3.00 $ 1,368.00 

Officials' Dues - 1333 w $3.00 (301 

Football. 1032 Basketball) 3,999.00 

Reciprocity Officials - 37 ra $1.00 37.00 

Officials' Fines - 18 « 5.00 90.00 

School Fines - 19 iS $5.00 95.00 

Redeposits (Bad checks made good) 18.20 

Advertising in Magazine 800.00 

Subscriptions to Magazine - 5 m $1.00 5.00 

Sale of Rules Books 267.70 

Sale of matured Bonds 2,025.00 

Ticket Sales - Annual Meeting 102.50 

Interest Received from Gov't Bonds 2,477.50 

Interest Received from (Tnion Federal 

Loan Association 300.00 

Transferred from Savings Account No. 1 9,000.00 
Transferred from Savings Account No. 2 5,000.00 
Transferred from State Basketball Tourna- 
ment Account 78.576.56 

Refunds 104.79 

Receipts - State Baseball Tournament 411.50 $104,677.75 

$114,667.83 

DISBURSEMENTS: 

Board of Control Expense $ 4,087.50 

Commissioner's Salary 8,751.90 

Expense - Commissioner's Office 450.87 

Assistant Commissioner's Salary 6,104.10 

Travel Expense - Assistant Com. 772.80 

Clerical Help 4,919.12 

Postage 1,291.44 

Office Supplies 507.25 

Purchase of New Equipment 1,213.97 

Insurance on Office Equipment 45.81 

Office Rent 2,813.20 

Repairs on Equipment 140.36 

Utilities 178.82 

Telephone and Telegraph 769.82 

Investigations - Board of Control 90.36 

Fidelity Bonds 50.50 

Printing 1,932.97 

Appropriation to Kentucky Coaches Charity 

Association 500.00 

Purchase of National Federation 

Publications 1,549.60 

Delegates to National Federation Meetings 2.361.27 

National Federation Dues 121.90 

Girls Division— N.S.G.W.S. 200.00 

Rental on Films 621.33 

Audit 36.87 



Refund on Dues 3.00 

Bad Checks 27.30 

Service Charges - Bank 32.11 

Meals - Annual Banquet 1.457.50 

Federal Tax : 

Income Tax Withheld $ 3,495.10 

Social Security 419.98 3.913.08 

Transfer of Funds: 

To Savings Account 14,000.00 

To Protection Fund 9.000.00 23,000.00 

Magazine : 

Printing and Engraving 3.582.15 

Mailing 46.35 3,628.50 

Officials' Division : 

Honorariums and Expenses - 

Clinics 965.82 

Printing and Miscellaneous 

Expense 29.30 

School for Basketball 

Officials 756.43 

Expenses - Regional Basket- 
ball Clinics 145.49 

Officials' Emblems 498.28 2.395.32 

Swimming: 

Expenses - State Swimming 

Committee 103.60 

Trophies and Medals - 

State Meet 386.16 

Films 136.60 

Officials - State Meet 42.64 

Mileage and Local Entertain- 
ment (State Meet) 1,011.48 1.680.48 



Golf: 

Mileage and Local Entertain- 
ment (State Tournament)-- 570.60 

Trophies and Awards 448.57 

Miscellaneous Expenses 4.39 1.023.56 

Tennis; 

Mileage and Local Entertain- 
ment (State Tournament)-- 127.50 
Trophies and Balls 779.07 906.57 

Track : 

Regional Expense 80.50 

Trophies and Medals 1.777.60 

State Committee Expense 344.35 

Officials 405.00 

--Mileage and Local Entertain- 
ment (State Meet) 5.341.76 

Miscellaneous Expense - 

(State Meet) 86.20 

New Equipment 69.54 

Labor (State Meet) 67.00 S.371.95 

Baseball : 

Refunds on District Tourna- 
ment Deficits 1,949.93 

Trophies and Awards 1,126.03 

Refunds on Regional Tourna- 
ment Deficits 368.82 

Baseballs (State Tournament) — 147.30 

Transportation (State Tourna- 
ment)) 681.65 

Meals (State Tournament) 1,100.00 

Rental and Services - 

Parkway Field 479.75 

Ticket Sellers and Takers - 

(State Tournament) 30.00 

Lodging (State Tournament)-- 607.65 
Tournament Manager's Expense 

(State Tournament) 60.58 

Scorer (State Tournament) 25.00 

Umpires (State Tournament)- 148.50 

Expenses - Assistant Manager 

(State Tournament) - 41.00 

Films 425.50 7,191.71 



(Continued on Page Two) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1954 



AUGUST, 1954 VOL. XVII— NO. 1 

Published monthly, except June and .Tuly, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association. 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFOED 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Carlos Oakley (1951-55), Morganfield 

Vice-President Russell Williamson (1952-56), Inez 

Directors — .Tames L. Cobb (1951-55), Newport: Roy G. Eversole 
(1952-56), Hazard: W. B. Jones (1953-57), Somerset; Louis 
Litchfield (1953-57), Marion: Jack Dawson (1954-58), Middle- 
town; W. H. Crowdus (1954-58), Franklin. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 

^rorn the Commissionei s Cyjjice 

Attention, Principals! 

The State Office of the Kentucky High 
School Athletic Association is now located 
in its new quarters at Lexington. The move 
from Henderson was made early in July. The 
office is in the Exchange Building, situated 
at the corner of Upper and Church Streets. 
Correspondence should be sent to P. 0. Box 
1173, Lexington. 

Statements for the 1954-55 K.H.S.A.A. 
membership dues will be mailed soon to the 
principals of member schools registering last 
year. Principals should indicate the names 
of the coaches only in those sports which will 
be maintained during the forthcoming school 
year. 

Football Clinics 

The 1954 clinics for football officials will 
be conducted bv Dr. Lyman V. Ginger, mem- 
ber of the National Federation Football 
Committee. The dates and sites of the nine 
meetings are as follows: Aug. 19, Newport 
High School, 8:00 P.M. (E.S.T.) ; Aug. 20, 
Pineville High School, 8 :00 P.M. (E.S.T.) ; 
Aug. 21. Pikeville High School, 8:00 P.M. 
(E.S.T.); Aug. 22, Ashland Y.M.C.A., 2:00 
P.M. (E.S.T.) ; Aug 23, Kentucky Hotel, 
Louisville, 8:00 P.M. (C.D.T.) ; Aug. 24, Uni- 
versity High School, Lexington, 8:00 P.M. 
(C.D.T.) : Aug. 27, Bowhng Green High 
School, 8:00 P.M. (C.S.T.) ; Aug. 28, May- 
field High School, 8:00 P.M. (C.S.T.) : Aug. 
29, Barret M.T.H.S., Henderson, 2:00 P.M. 
(C.S.T.). 

National Federation Meeting 

K.H.S.A. President Carlos Oakley, Vice- 
President Russell Williamson, Directors 
James L. Cobb, Louis Litchfield, and Roy G. 
Eversole, and Assistant Commissioner J. B. 
Mansfield represented the Association at the 
Thirty-fifth Annual Meeting of the National 
Federation, held at the North Rim of the 
Grand Canyon, Arizona, on June 22-26. A 
report of the meeting will appear in the 
September issue of the ATHLETE. 



Registration of Officials 

Previously registered football and basket- 
ball officials have received their renewal ap- 
plication cards for the 1954-55 school year. 
Approximately eighty officials failed to file 
their 1953-54 reports on or before the dead- 
line set by the Board of Control for the sub- 
mitting of reports, and it was necessary to 
impose a fine on each official who thus failed 
to comply with Association rules. 
Protection Fund Credit 

The Board of Control in its April meeting 
(Continued on Page Four) 



REPORT OF AUDIT 

(Continued from Page One) 

First National Bank. Trustee, 

Annuity Trust Fund 2.000.00 $ 95,144.84 

Receipts $114,667.83 

Disbursements 95,144.84 

Cash Balance in Bank $ 19,522.99 

BANK RECONCILEMENT: 

Balance per Bank Statement 

June 30. 1954 $ 19,667.92 

Less Outstanding Checks : 

No. 480 $ 60.77 

No. 510 52.75 

No. 534 21.75 

No. 547 9.66 144.93 

True Bank Balance June 30, 1954 $ 19,522.99 

FUNDS ON HAND: 

Cash Balance - First National 

Bank of Henderson $19,522.99 

U. S. Savings Bonds 

(Value June 30, 1954) 93,261.00 

Savings Account - Union 
Federal Savings and Loan 
Association 10,000.00 

Savings Account No. 1 - First 

National Bank - Henderson 9,080.15 

Savings Account No. 2 - First 

National Bank - Henderson 9,251.74 

K.H.S.A.A. Protection Fund__ 82.10 

Total Funds on Hand, 

June 30, 1954 $141,197.98 

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
1954 STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 
RECEIPTS: 

Ticket Sales ?100,085.50 

Profit on Program 3,757.53 $103,843.03 

DISBURSEMENTS: 

Printing 584.31 

Trophies and Awards 606.72 

Postage 35.00 

Refunds on Tickets 47.00 

Public Liability Insurance 583.38 

Incidental Expenses - (16 teams) 4,800.00 

Transportation 1,255.09 

Taxi Service tor Teams 107.00 

Lodging 2,902.75 

Meals 4,673.59 

Coliseum Rental 3,073.60 

Organist 40.00 

Officials' Fees and Expenses 1,533.33 

Scorers and Timers 400.00 

Shot Chart Keepers and Statisticians— 200.00 

Ushers 75.00 

Ticket Sellers, Ticket Takers and Guards 1,997.00 

Public Address Announcers 135.00 

Telephone and Telegraph 10.63 

Films 194.85 

Towel Service 26.50 

Miscellaneous Expenses - Ticket Sales — 420.00 
Miscellaneous Expenses - Tournament 

Manager -101.50 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1954 



Page Three 



EASTERN AND ST. XAVIER WIN IN K.H.S.A.A. TENNIS TOURNAMENT 




(Left to Ri^ht) Jack Tarr. of the Eastern Hi^h School championship doubles team; Coach Emmett 
Goranflo, Eastern High School; Maxwell Brown, St. Xavier, singles champion; Bro. Bonaventure, St. 
Xavier coach; Jim Tarr. of the Eastern doubles team. 



Honorariums and Expenses - 

Assistant Tournament Managers- 
Service Charges - Bank 

Detective Service 



1.067.94 

11.13 

385.15 



Transfer of Funds — Amount transferred to 
K.H.S.A.A. as Tournament Profit 



$ 78.576.56 



RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
K. H. S. A. A. PROTECTION FUND 
JULY 1, 1953 TO JUNE .30, 1954 
RECEIPTS: 

Balance on Hand, .luly 1, 1953 $ 

Football Fees 3146 m $2.50___$ 7,865.00 
Fees for All Sports Except 

Football 6658 w $1.00 6,658.00 

Physical Education Fees - 

329 w 50c 164.50 



800.14 



Claims Paid: 

Football 

Basketball 

Baseball 

Track 

Wrestling 

Clerical Help 

Federal Tax : 

Income Tax Withheld _ 
Social Security 

Legal Services 

Service Charges - Bank 

Total Disbursements 



9,355.82 

5.253.83 

96.00 

145.00 

25.00 

909.27 

122.20 

15.60 

40.00 

4.32 



$ 16,426.04 



Total Funds on Hand 

BANK RECONCILEMENT: 

Balance per Bank Statement June 30, 1954 
Less Outstanding Checks: 

No. 



375.10 



14,687.50 
Less Credit Allowed Member 

Schools 8,077.50 $ 

Refunds 

Officials* Insurance Fees 

Football 6 la $2.50 15.00 

Basketball 43 (n $1.00 43.00 

Cash Transferred from 

K.H.S.A.A. Account 

Total Receipts 

Total Balance and Receipts 

DISBURSEMENTS: 

Postage $ 

Printing 

Refunds on Overpayments. 



6,610.00 
40.00 



9,000.00 



100.00 

282.00 

77.00 



15,708.00 
16,508.14 



Mii 



No 


274 


No 


363 


No 


531 


No 


600 


No 


638 


No 


675 


No 


676 


No 


677 


No 


678 


No 


680 _ 


No 


681 _ _ _ 


No 


682 __. 


No 


683 


No 


685 _- 


No, 


687 _ __ 



$ 5.00 

6.00 

10.00 

2.00 

5.00 

75.00 

12.00 

5.00 

50.00 

5.00 

22.00 

6.00 

15.00 

15.00 

40.00 

20.00 I 



293.00 



True Bank Balance June 30, 1954- 



82.10 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1954 



Kentucky High School Track Meet 

Lexington, Kentucky, May 14-15, 1954 

120 Yard Hurdles— 220 Yard Dash— High Jump— 

1. Ellis — Murray 1. Lynn — Henry Clay 1- Creasy — Barbourville 

2. Barger — Lafayette 2. Hillard — Ashland 1. Barger — Lafayette 

3. Houghland— Winchester 3. Draniis — Holmes 3. Slone — Catlettsburg 

4. Creasy — Barbourville 4. Williams — Elkhorn 4. Huffman — Newport 

5. Hammond — Bardstown 5. Cravens — Owensboro 5. Bierman — Highlands 

Time: 15.3 Time: 22.6 5. Hammond— Bardstown 

5. Wright — duPont Manual 

100 Yard Dash— Mile Relay— Height: 5' 8 3/4" 

1. Lynn— Henry Clay i. Lafayette TOT A I pniNT<5 

2. McGuire-Ashland 2. Ashland TOTAL POINTS, 

3. Woods— duPont Manual 3. pern Creek Lafayette 411/3 

4. Nolan— Hopkmsville 4. Shawnee AshlanH 21 

5. Dramis-Holmes 5. Danville „ ^, 7^ 

Time: 10.5 rr- oo.fi Henry Clay 18 

Time: 3:34.6 Danville 14 1/2 

■^"« «""- Shot Put- St. Xavier 113/7 

1. Plummer — Danville „ „ „., , Mnrr^nr in 

2. J. Oldendick-Bellevue 1. Russell-Tilghman .„^. ,"""", a,„ 

3. Herron— Providence 2. Gorman— St. Xavier duPont Manual 9 1/3 

4. Barnes Fulton 3. Langenbruner — Highlands Barbourville 9 

5. Whelan— St. Joseph 4. Shaw— Tilghman Tilghman 8 

Time: 4:38.5 ^^ ^"'^"'"T^^"^!- . 1 ,«. Winchester 6 

Distance: 47 6 1/8 ,„ 

880 Yard Relay— Elkhorn City 5 1/3 

1. duPont Manual Pole Vault — Eastern 5 

2. Henry Clay 1. Sharp— Lafayette Fulton 5 

3. Valley 1. Jenkins— Versailles Newport 5 

4. Ashland 1. Mulling- Elkhorn City HnlmAs 4 1/7 
S.Shawnee 4. Stanton-Holmes ' ^r I aM 

Time: 1:34.7 4. Herring— St. Joseph Versailles 4 1/3 

A,^ ^7 jr. u 4. Isgrigg— Fern Creek Highlands 4 1/3 

^ard Dash— 4 Roth— St. Xavier Millersburg Mili. Inst. 4 

1. Shively—Lafayette 4. Bailey— Hiseville Rellevne 4 

2. Dugan-Lafayette 4. Hendrix-Clay t ] , 

3. Durham— Eastern 4 Younsr— Clav ^^^^ * 

4. Gadberry— Danville ' * w»l„l,t. in' 4" Fern Creek 3 3/7 

5. Dixon-Ashland ""g^*^^- 1" ^ Atherton 3 

Time: 51.8 ui,^ug_ Catlettsburg 3 - 

180 Yard Hurdles— 1. Gorman— St. Xavier Valley 3 

1. Barger — Lafayette 2. Everett — Millersburg M. I. Shawnee - 3 

2. Ellis — Murray 3. Huffman — Newport d -j " " q 

3. Houghland— Winchester 4. Smith— Eastern Providence 6 

4. Creasy— Barbourville 5. Mullins— Elkhorn City Elkhorn 2 

5. Barksdale — Highlands * Distance: 140' 5 3/4" Hopkinsville 2 

Time: 20.0 ' Temple Hill 11/2 

^ J T. Broad Jump — St. Joseph 13/7 

880 Yard Run— j Barsjer— Lafavette Bardstown 1 1/3 

1. Henderson-Ashland ^ ^-Male "^ Erlanger Lloyd 1 

2. Plummer— Danville g Rig-bv—Atherton Owensboro 1 

3. Pigue-Fulton f Serry-Dan^lle Clay 6/7 

5: S:eb"riavie7 '■ Wiley-Temple Hill Hiseville 3/7 

Time: 2:01.3 Distance: 21' 2 3/4" * New Record 



FROM THE COMMISSIONER'S OFFICE 

(Continued from Page Two) 

voted a dividend credit out of State Basket- 
ball Tournament funds in the amount of 
$30.00 to each school insuring its athletes in 
the K.H.S.A.A. Protection Fund for 1954-55. 
This is the third year in which a dividend 
has been declared by the Board. 



School for Basketball Officials 

The sixth annual school for Basketball 
Officials will be held in Louisville on August 
15-16. In charge of the school will be Charlie 
Vettiner, veteran clinic director, whose serv- 
ices to the K.H.S.A.A. have been invaluable 
through the years. All registered basketball 
officials and others who might be interested 
are invited to attend the school, 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1954 



Page Five 



Twenty-Second Annual Kentucky High School Tennis 

Louisville Boat Oub — May 24, 25, 26, 1954 
SINGLES 
Brown - St. Xavier QUARTER-FINALS 

SEMI-FINALS 



Tournament 



Bye 



Brown 



Dash - Berea Found. 



Bye 



Dash 



Brown - 
6-0;6-2 



J. Baughman - Stanford 



Bye 



J. Baughman 



Williams - Atherton 

Bye 

Jack Tarr - Eastern 



iWilliams 



J. Baughman 
6-1:8-6 



Brown 
6-2;6-0 



Bye 


Jack Tarr 


Jack Tarr - 






6-l;6-l 


Hagberg - Bellevue 




Bye 


Hagberg 




Hunter — Barret 






Whalin - Mad.-Model 1 


Hunter - 6-l;ll-9 


Kinslow - 








6-4;6-3 


Hansen - Shawnee 






Kinslow - 6-l;6-l 





Jack Tarr 
6-0;6-0 



Kinslow - Glasgow | 
Jim Tarr - Eastern 



Travis - Glasgow 



Bye 



Travis 



Wood - Male 



Bye 



Wood 



Wood - 
6-3;9-ll;6-0 



Dixius - Bellevue 
Bye 

Brown - Barret 

Sternberg - Flaget 



Dixius 



Sternberg ■ 
1 7-5;2-6;6-2 



Dixius - 
2-6;6-0;6-0 



Wood - 6-0; 6-4 



FINALS 



Brown - 
6-2;6-8;6-3 



Bye 


1 Jim Tarr 


Jim Tarr - 
6-2; 6-0 




H. Baughman 




H. Baughman - Stanf d 


O'Bryan 
(Default) 






Jim Tarr - 


Bye 


O'Bryan 


6-0;6-l 


O'Bryan - St. Xavier 




Bye 


Rutledge 




Rutledge - Ashland 




Bye 





Jim Tarr 
6-3; 6-4 



SEEDED: 

1. Maxwell Brown 
St. Xavier 

2. Jim Tarr 

Eastern 

3. Jack Tarr 

Eastern 

4. Bobby Travis 
Glasgow 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1954 



TENNIS DOUBLES 
QUARTER-FINALS 



Eastern 


Eastern 


SEMI-FINALS 

Eastern - 6-0;6-0 






FINALS 


Bye 


Male 






Male 


Bellevue - 6-3;3-6;6-3 








Bye 


Bellevue 


Eastern - 6-0; 6-0 


Bellevue 








Bye 


Flaget (Default) 








Ashland 










Flag-et 







St. Xavier 


St. Xavier 


St. Xavier 


- 6-3; 6-1 








Bye 


Glasgow 








Glasgow 


Stanford - 


6-4;5-7;6-l 








Bye 


Stanford 


St. Xavier - 6-3;6-2 


Stanford 


SEEDED TEAMS: 




Bye 




1. Eastern - Jack Tan- 
James Tarr 


Garth 



Bye 



Garth 



2. St. Xavier - Max Brown 
and Thomas Fallon 




222 ; Belcher, 243 : Riley. 240 



L"«."xr • 



Bobby Nichols, St. Xavier H. S., 
Individual Golf Champion - 1954 



St. Xavier Golf Team 
Wins State Tournament 

The St. Xavier Hicrh School golf team won the 1964 State 
High School Golf Tournament when its members shot the low 
score of 919. Board of Control Director William E. Kingsolver 
managed the affair, which was held at Fort Knox on June 1-2. 
The Clark County High School team was runner-up, with a 
score of 945. and duPont Manual Higrh School was in third 
place with 959. 

The individual tournament champion was Bobby Nichols of 
St. Xavier, whose score was 211. .limmy Gilbert of Bowling 
Green was runner-up with 222. and .lim Berling of St. Henry 
was third with 226. 

A summary of the individual and team scores is as fol- 
lows : 

Bardstown : McCandless, 253 : Burba, 250 : Coomes, 303 
Miller. 298; Total — 1104. 

Bowling Green : Gilbert 
Hildreth, 266 : Total— 971. 

Clark County: M. Dudley. 227; L. Thornberry, 230: .T 
Thornberry, 238 : A. Dudley, 250 : Total — 945. 

Danville: Sheene, 245; Barker. 260; Hall, 278: Knight, 286 
Total— 1069. 

Eastern: Kemp, 250; Curry, 254; Semonin. 246; Logan, 266 
Total— 1006, 

Fern Creek; Vaughn, 23.'! : Bailey, 242; Burke, 258; Simmons, 
24;i ; Total— 981. 

Flaget: Demling, 237: Conliffe. 238: Schuster, 266: Kirk, 
266 : Total— 997. 

Franklin-Simpson : Gillespie, 241 ; .lackson, 263 : Arnold, 262 
Dillard, 285 ; Total— 1051. 

Hopkinsville : Wood. 238 ; Holt, 262 ; Rogers. 254 ; Lackey, 
278; Total— 1032. 

Kentucky Mill. Inst. : Bean, 265 ; Hudgins, 245 ; Stigger, 233 
Pedley, 263 ; Total— 986. 

Lafayette; Bringer, 230: Darnaby, 265; Bill Burgan, 241 
Bob Burgan, 254 : Total— 980. 

Manual : Tyree, 228 : Wiggins, 263 ; Hopewell, 244 ; Cody 
234: Total— 959. 

Middlesboro: Hoe. 243; Price, 267; Lovell, 285: Alford, 304 
Total— 1089. 

St. Henry: Berling, 226: Scheben, 260; Bilz, 266; Rouse, 266 
Total— 1008. 

St. Xavier: Nichols. 211; V. ReFalo, 236: Musselman, 233 
B. ReFalo, 239 ; Total — 919. 

Shawnee : Heick, 240 : Metzger, 238 ; Engelman, 284 ; Hesse, 
293 ; Total— 1055. 

Southern : Going, 260 ; Raizor, 268 ; Age, 259 ; Bu.'ihman, 281 
Total — 1058. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1954 



Page Seven 



Schools' Ratings on Basketball Officials 



The following ratings were received on basketball officials 
registered with the K.H.S.AA. during 1953-54. The numbers 
following each name represent respectively the number of Ex- 
cellent, Good, Fair, and Poor ratings given to the official, 

Abbott, Bravel, 0-1-0-0; Abernathy, Ernest W., 6-34-3-0; 
Abraham, Robert. Jr., 0-8-0-0 ; Adams, Ira R., 0-1-0-0 ; Adams, 
Roy, 6-9-0-0 ; Adkins, Raymond C, 17-21-2-0 ; Adkins, Sonny, 
0-2-7-2 ; Adkins, Tom M., 0-8-5-1 ; Aiken, Bill, 25-20-1-0 ; 
Alexander, Rex. E., 33-25-18-0 ; Alexander, William, 0-2-1-0 ; 
Alford, Glenn, 0-1-4-0 ; Alford, William C 1-1-0-1 ; Allen, John 
L., 4-9-4-3; Almond, Alvin. 1-0-0-0; Arnold, Kenneth L., 
4-15-2-4; Arnzen, Stanley, 2-6-1-0; Ashby, .lames R., 1-3-3-0; 
Ashley, Kenneth, 6-16-18-3 ; Augenstein, Keith, 1-2-1-3. 

Bailey, Arville, 0-19-0-1 ; Baird, Bill, 5-5-2-0 ; Baker, Charles 
J., 0-3-0-0; Baker, Dee C, 0-1-3-1; Baker, Edgar C, 1-11-0-1; 
Baker, James E., 27-25-1-1 ; Ball, Denver, 1-5-3-0 ; Ball, Robert 
L., 0-0-0-1 ; Ballard, Clark T., 3-11-3-0 ; Ballard, Jack H., 
8-7-6-1; Bandy, Jack R., 0-5-1-0; Barker, Walter D., 0-1-0-0; 
Barlow, James L.,2-3-0-0 : Barlow, Jay R., 17-5-1-0 ; Barnett, 
J. W., 7-22-6-1; Barrett, Jackie, 0-2-0-0; Barrett, Lloyd, 
1-2-2-0 ; Basham, Bailey, 7-23-9-4 ; Bates, Gardner, Jr., 
Beazley. James A., 1-0-1-1 ; Beattie, Mendell, 3-3-1-0 ; Begley, 
James P., 1-4-6-0; Beiersdorfer, Jim, 3-1-0-0; Bell, Harry Lee, 
0-6-2-0; Bell, Thomas P., 38-11-0-0; Bennett, Bert A., 0-14-6-2; 
Bennett, Gene. 0-3-0-0; Betz, Don, 3-15-0-1; Betz, Richard 1., 
33-49-7-3 ; Blackburn, Bill, 3-7-2-0 ; Blackburn, Clyde W., 9-13- 
6-0 ; Blackburn, Viley O.. 0-2-3-1 ; Blankenship. Zeb, 5-9-2-2 ; 
Blanton, Homer, 21-22-4-2 ; Blount, William B., 0-0-1-0 ; Blumer, 
Sherry, Jr., 5-5-4-0 ; Bobbera, Louis, 1-0-0-1 ; Boemker, Bob, 
0-8-2-1; Bolander, Albert J., 2-10-2-2; Bonner, William, 0-0-2-1; 
Bostic, Ralph, 17-26-3-0 ; Boswell, T. H., 1-2-0-0 ; Bowen, Gayle 
Blair, 0-2-2-1 ; Bowers, George, 1-0-1-0 ; Boyd, Thomas, 4-9-2-1 ; 
Bozarth, C. H., Jr., 6-2-2-6 ; Bradberry, Calvin, 2-0-2-0 ; Brana- 
man, William H. Jr., 2-2-0-0 ; Braun, Edgar F., 6-6-0-1 ; Braun, 
Robert, 7-27-1-4 ; Briehler, Joseph, 2-2-0-0 ; Bridges, Bennie 
Edward, 32-24-11-1; Briggs. Creson, 0-3-0-1; Briscoe, Hubert, 
1-0-0-0 ; Brittain, Ross Edward, 0-1-0-0 ; Brizendine, Vic, 39-41- 
10-6 ; Broderick, Carroll A., 70-7-3-1 : Brooks, Carroll C. 
23-15-3-0 ; Brooks, Charles D., 1-1-2-0 ; Brooks, James A., 
3-16-5-6-- Brotzge, Maurice, 0-4-5-0 ; Brown, B. B.. 4-16-5-0 ; 
Brown, Bryant, 9-40-7-2 ; Brown, Carlton, 3-7-1-0 ; Brown, 
Charlie, 0-4-0-0 ; Brown, James H., 2-0-0-0 ; Brown, James W., 
52-21-3-0; Brummett, Joseph, 1-8-1-0; Bruner, G. Bud, 3-1-1-0; 
Bryan, William B., 6-11-1-2; Bryant, Charles Wm.. 0-1-3-0; 
Bryant. Jack E., 2-8-2-0; Buchanan, Bobby M., 1-0-1-0; Buck, 
Alfred E., 4-6-1-0 ; Bunch, Richard, 0-1-4-3 ; Bunnell, Kenneth L., 
0-2-1-1 ; Burchett, Lanier, 5-6-4-1 ; Burke, Raymond, 28-37-3-1 ; 
Bush, Denver, 0-7-6-3 ; Bush, Herman, 7-3-1-2 ; Bush, Kenneth, 
0-2-1-1 ; Bush, Philip R., 0-8-2-1 ; Butler, Donald A., 2-16-8-1 ; 
Butte, Eugene, 0-5-1-1. 

Caddell, Howard A.. 16-13-9-0; Calhoun. Foster, 8-10-1-1; 
Campbell, George H., 1-4-1-0 ; Campbell, John E., Jr,. 15-22- 
2-0; Campbell, Robert W., 0-2-2-1; Cansler, Arthur A., 0-1-1-6; 
Capps, Jerry R., 0-8-6-1 ; Carlisle, John R., 4-13-16-0 ; Garner, 
C. Philip, 0-2-1-0 ; Carnes, Richard, 0-0-2-0 ; Carpenter, Bill, 
14-23-2-1 ; Carr, Walter W.. 0-0-1-0 ; Carroll, Conrad E., 0-4-1-0 ; 
Cartee, Ralph, Jr., 31-18-3-1; Carter, Harold, 0-1-0-0; Casebier, 
Jim, 0-1-3-1 ; Cassady, Charles W., 10-15-0-1 ; Cassady, Lloyd, 
1-1-0-1 ; Cassady, Richard. 26-29-8-1 ; Casteel. Ralph M.. 7-14- 
4-0 ; Castle. Lindle. 23-8-2-0 ; Cathey. Gene. 0-1-3-0 ; Champion. 
Paul. 0-7-1-0; Chappell. Joe. 39-24-3-3; Chattin. Charles, 6-5-3-0; 
Chattin, Ernest P., 23-13-1-0 : Chilton, Robert W., 0-0-4-1 ; Chinn, 
William, 0-6-2-0 ; Chumbler, W. W., 6-19-6-3 ; Clark, Charle.s 
Edmond, 12-26-8-2 ; Clark, James M., 0-0-1-0 ; Clark, Tom, 
0-6-1-0: Clay, Okey K., 2-7-2-0; Clift, Charlie, 2-0-0-0; Coe, 
Jimmy, 3-13-6-1; Coe, Haiold, 1-9-3-0; Cole, W. Frank, Jr., 
0-0-0-1 ; Coleman, Duke, 9-5-4-1 ; Coleman, Edward M., 3-16-6-0 
Colley, Larry, 0-4-1-1 ; Collins, Charles E., 0-0-2-0 ; Colonel, 
Charles, 2-2-0-0; Combs, -lames Glenn, 6-9-8-0; Combs, Travis, 
27-14-1-0 ; Combs, Walter, 26-36-4-1 ; Combs, William E., Jr., 
2-1-0-0 ; Conde, William F., 4-24-12-0 ; Conley, George D.. 7-6- 
0-0 ; Conley. Grover, 0-0-3-0 ; Conley. Tom W., 0-0-2-0 ; Connor, 
James R., 1-1-0-0; Coomer, Charles, Jr., 3-14-2-2: Cooper, 
Clyde, 0-2-0-1 ; Cooper, Hewlett, 1-5-2-1 ; Cooper, John W., 
19-11-11-5; Cooper, Warren, 32-8-1-0; Cooper, Willard O., 
0-8-3-0; Cornett, Robert M., 5-10-3-1 ;Cox, Glenn C, 0-2-1-0; Cox, 
Layton, 18-20-13-6 ; Cox, William J., 15-0-1-0 : Craig, John G., 
0-11-7-1; Craig, Randy, 1-16-9-6; Crawford, Fred T., 16-38-7-3; 
Creasey, Fred, 3-5-3-2 ; Creason, Coy. 3-1-0-2 : Crosthwaite, 
John S., Jr., 30-24-6-4: Crouch, Ronald, 4-9-8-4; Crowe, Emmett 
H.. 16-15-2-2 ; Crowell. Ray Jimmie, 0-1-0-1 ; Cubbage, Tom, 
6-20-6-2; Cullen, Linden R., 0-1-1-1; Cullivan, Jim, 1-11-8-3; 
Current, Ellis Ray, 0-1-0-0 ; Curry, Ellis. 0-1-1-0 ; Curtis, Robert 
3-5-1-0 ; Cuzzort, Donley, 0-6-0-0. 

Damico, Ernie, 0-5-1-0 ; Damron, William B., 12-6-3-1 ; 
Daniel, James O., 0-0-2-2 ; Davenport, Robert, 3-16-1-3 : David- 
son, George W., Jr., 0-6-2-1 : Davis, Donald, 3-2-0-0 ; Davis, 
Dwight R., Jr.. U-18-7-2 ; Davis, Ralph R., 24-10-0-0; Davis, 



Richard, 0-2-0-0 ; Davis, Thomas E., 0-1-0-0 ; Dawson, Ray R., 
1-3-3-1; Day, William J., 1-1-1-1; Day, William T., 0-4-0-0 
Deatherage, William L., 2-2-1-1 ; DeCoursey, Edgar, 2-14-1-0 
Delaney, William T., 0-3-1-0 ; DeMoisey, Fox, 16-12-2-2 ; De- 
Moisey, Frenchy, 15-6-2-1 ; DeMoisey, Truett R., 9-29-11-1 
Denton, J. W.. 7-4-1-1 ; Dexter, Sam, 8-22-0-1 ; Dieterle, Owen 
M„ 2-3-2-3 ; DiMuzio, Robert. 3-2-2-1 ; Dixon, William W., 
1-9-1-2; Donaldson, Frank, 2-10-0-0; Dotson, John B., 24-34-4-4; 
Downing, Dero, 84-22-2-2 ; Doyle, Donald, 0-3-1-0 ; Dromo, John, 
1-14-7-1 ; Dunn, Bobby Eugene, 4-7-1-1 ; Dunn, Sherley R., 
3-6-2-0 ; Durkin, Jack H.. 29-41-9-3. 

Eads, Walter, 3-5-1-3 ; Earle. Herschel, 0-2-0-0 ; Eaton, 
.Tames M., 2-19-5-0 : Eddings, Forrest, 0-14-13-1 ; Edelen, Ben R., 
47-30-6-1; Edcns, Ray D., 0-6-1-1; Edwards. Hubert, 0-4-0-1; 
Eggers, Rex, 0-6-4-1 ; Ellington, James E., 0-8-1-0 ; Ellis, Jack 
D., 1-0-0-0 ; Ellis, Thomas, 2-3-0-0 ; Ellspermann, George, 2-10- 
5-2 ; Elovitz, Carl, 2-2-1-1 ; Elrod, William Turner. 33-33-0-0 ; 
Engle, Orville, 9-6-3-6 ; Ernst, Ray C, 0-1-0-0 ; Evans, Julian I., 
0-0-1-0 ; Eversmeyer, Lysle K., 0-3-2-1 ; Ewing, C. M. "Hop", 
1-7-0-1. 

Fagues, Homer, 0-2-0-0; Fanning, Homer, 11-0-0-0; Far- 
ley, Thomas H., 6-9-10-1 ; Farris, Abe, 2-6-3-1 ; Farris, Harry 
H., 6-4-1-1 ; Faulconer, Leroy, 1-0-2-2 ; Feix, Jimmie, 18-37-3-1 ; 
Felts, Charles A., 0-1-1-0 ; Ferguson, Ford, 0-1-0-0 ; Ferrell, 
Doctor T., 33-41-1-0 ; Fey, Allen, 3-13-8-0 : Fields, Charles, 
2-6-1-0 ; Figg, Charles R., 7-16-6-1 : Firestine, Frank V.. 1-6-0-0 ; 
Fitchko, Bill, 30-5-0-0 : Flaugher, Allen, 0-10-5-3 : Flaugher, 
Gene, 0-6-3-4; Fleenor, Francis J., 2-16-7-1; Flynn. Robert D., 
13-20-7-0; Ford. Joe T., 0-9-4-1: Forsythe, Charles M., 2-20-2-0; 
Forsythe, Robert, 22-26-5-0; Foster, William R., 10-13-16-3; 
Fraley, Bill J., 2-6-3-3 : Fraley, James, 12-5-1-3 ; Franc, An- 
thony, 3-6-7-1 ; Franklin, Louis M., 0-8-3-6 ; Fritz, Sherman, 
0-19-6-2 ; Fugate, E. Hugh. 0-1-0-0 ; Fultz, Jack. 0-1-1-0. 

Gabbard. O. W., 1-6-2-1 : Gaither. Gene. 7-18-7-0 : Gaither, 
Jack, 5-23-6-0; Galiette. Joe, 0-0-0-1; Gant, W. G., Jr., 22-21- 
1-0; Gardner, Daniel H., 10-25-2-0; Gardner, Howard E., 
19-22-7-1; Gardner, Kessner, 2-19-9-3; Garland, Bob, 1-0-0-0; 
Gates, William A., Jr., 1-7-4-0; Gettler, John F., 0-11-3-0; 
Gibson. Romulus D., 5-8-1-2; Gillespie, Robert, 1-11-1-0; Gillespie, 
Robert C, 19-8-5-2 ; Giltner, Raymond E., 7-14-4-2 ; Gilvin, Allie 
F., 6-10-2-0; Ginger, W. L., Jr., 0-1-0-1: Gish, Delmas. 0-2-0-0; 
Godbey. Therman, 0-0-2-0 : Godbey. Truman. 0-3-1-0 : Godsey, 
Garland. 0-3-0-0 ; Goebel. Bill. Jr., 0-5-1-0 ; Goetz, Larry C., 
1-3-2-0 ; Coins, Bobby, 4-7-6-1 : Golden, Billy Joe, 16-18-5-1 ; 
Goley, James Edward. 0-6-2-1 : Gooch, Leonard, 0-3-8-6 ; Goodin, 
Charles L., 3-2-2-1; Goodman. Jack. 18-44-10-0: Goranflo, R. E., 
35-26-6-2 : Gordon, Gene, 1-13-12-1 ; Gorley, Cecil L., 2-5-0-0 ; 
Gover, Fenimore, 3-14-2-0; Green, Walter, 6-4-1-0; Greene, 
Tolbert E., 59-1-1; Greenslait. James W.. 1-1-1-0; Griese. War- 
ren. 0-2-0-0 ; Griffith. Barrel, 2-0-0-0 : Grisham, Jesse R., 
10-18-1-4 ; Grone. Freddy F., 0-0-2-0 ; Gumm, Kenneth E., 1-10- 
6-1; Gustafson, Al, Jr., 17-24-9-4: Guthrie, Harold L., 1-0-2-0; 
Gwin, Robert L., 0-0-1-2. 

Haas, Ralph, 0-0-1-0; Hadden, Newell P., Jr., 31-28-4-0; 
Hagan, Joseph E., 0-1-1-0: Hagerman, Thomas B., 0-18-5-2; 
Hale, Donald C, 7-12-0-0; Hale. Ed. 0-3-3-0; Haley, Dalton D., 
0-6-3-0; Haley, James, 0-0-1-1; Hall, Billy Joe, 1-1-0-0: Hall, 
Elvis, 23-7-0-0; Hall, Royal A.. Jr.. 0-4-1-0: Hammons. Abe L.. 
9-5-0-0 ; Hammons. William Earl. 0-0-1-0 : Hancock, Thomas E.. 
0-1-1-0; Harrell Leighton E. .Ir.. 0-!-".-l ; Harris. George F., 
1-3-4-0 ; Harris, William A., 3-16-9-0 : Hartley, William E., 
6-7-1-2; Hash, Ova, 1-5-4-6; Hatfield, Paul E.. 1-4-0-0; Hayden, 
Samuel J.. 2-3-1-0 ; Hayes. Charles R.. 6-19-0-0 ; Hayes, F. N., 
0-5-1-0: Haynes, John, 5-25-2-1; Head. Elmo C. 13-4-2-0; 
Heldman. Dr. John. 36-32-8-4 ; Henderson. Robert L.. 5-18-7-1 ; 
Hewling. Franklin C, 3-16-0-1: Hewling, Richard, 13-32-9-6; 
Hicks, Jimmie, 0-3-0-0 ; Hines. G. Cliff, 36-38-3-2 : Hinton, 
David, 1-0-0-0 : Hinton. Harold T.. 0-0-1-0 ; Hoagland. Charles 
R., Jr., 8-15-1-2 : Hobbs. Ralph E., 8-8-2-0 : Hodge. Fred A., 
2-4-0-0 ; Hodges, Holbert. 3-7-4-3 ; Hoffman. Garnett S., 
10-23-8-3 ; Hofstetter, Joe, 8-8-3-0 : Holbrook, William M., 
0-3-0-0; Holeman, D. Fletcher, 14-26-5-2; Holland, Franklin 
H., 0-3-4-0; Hollander, .lames A., 1-11-2-1; Holley. Uriah. 
Jr., 1-2-0-0 : Holzkneeht, George L., Jr., 0-5-1-1 ; Hook, 
Robert H., 1-4-0-0 ; Horning, Ralph, 12-13-1-0 ; Horton, 
John B., 7-11-10-4; Howard, Harry, Jr., 1-14-10-1; Hudson, Bob, 
4-6-0-0; Hudson. Douglas. 1-14-2-3: Hudson. J. D., 3-16-4-3; 
Huff, Carl R., Jr., 0-1-0-1 ; Hughes, Charles F., 57-32-0-1 ; 
Hunt, Joe S., Jr., 3-8-3-3 ; Huntsman, William L., Jr., 7-8-6-0 ; 
Hurd, Fred, 2-0-0-0 ; Hurst, David E.. 0-1-8-3 ; Hutt, Joseph D., 
Jr., 4-19-3-2; Hyland, F. D., 0-1-0-0, 

Irwin. Charles R.. 
Glennon R., 0-2-3-0. 



1-2-0-0 ; Isert, Louis, 0-2-0-2 ; Ison, 



Jackson. Gordon. 1-2-0-0; Jackson. J. Coleman, 24-20-6-4; 
Jeffrey. Robert Glin, 6-6-:i-2 : .lenkins, Joseph Kean, 3-2-0-0; 
Jerger, Carl B., 9-6-0-0 ; Jeter, John B., 4-16-7-1 ; Johnson, 
Ellis, 2-1-0-0 ; Johnson, Ed. 2-10-1-1 ; Johnson. James P., 9-15- 
6-0; Johnson, .F. T.. 1-0-1-0: Johnson, -lohn Luther, 0-1-0-0; 
Johnson, Ralph, 8-6-0-0 ; Johnson, Vernon Lee, 1-6-4-0 ; John- 



Page Eig-ht 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1954 



son, Walter "Budge", 9-4-3-0 : Jones, Boyer, 4-7-1-2 ; .Tones, 
Charles, 0-6-1-0; Jordan, Ken, 11-18-7-0. 

Keene, Marcum, 8-1-0-0 ; Keeton. Bill, 1-0-0-0 : Kelley, Jack 
W., 0-11-4-4: Kelley, James William. 0-6-0-0: Key, Calvin E., 
3-13-5-0 : Kidd, Eoy, 3-2-1-1 : Kiefer, Wilms, 12-16-7-1 ; King, 
James A., 7-30-7-0 : King. P. J.. 1-13-3-1 : King, Bob, 16-32-7-2 : 
King, Roy. 15-5-1-0 : Kinman, Joe T.. 28-32-3-0 : Kitchen. Leslie, 
2-13-1-1: Knifley, Ivan, 3-2-1-0: Knight, Bill. 20-33-9-3: Knight, 
Horace, 16-23-7-2 : Knight. L. D. 0-13-1-0 : Kohlmeyer. Robert, 
3-2-2-1 : Krekel, John W., 4-7-0-0 : Kremer. Joseph, 4-6-8-3. 

Lafser. Ray C, 0-5-7-1 : Lambert, Kenneth L., 4-1-1-0 : Lash- 
brook, Harry E., Jr., 0-1-2-0 : Lassiter. Eddie M.. 0-9-3-3 : 
Lawson. Sam. 1-0-0-0 : Layman. Frederick. Jr., 0-0-2-0 : Leath, 
Joseph M., 0-0-0-1 : Leathers, Ollie C Jr., 4-19-6-5 : Leech, 
Joseph C, 3-17-1-0 : Leet, Warren R., 32-22-6-0 : LaForge. Ronald 
M.. 0-4-6-0 : LeVan. T. F.. 6-7-13-2 : Lewis. Jack E.. 0-3-0-0 : 
Lindloff. Gilbert, 6-13-2-1 : Little. Calvert C. 11-12-7-1 : Little. 
J. B., 1-3-1-1 : Little, Ronnie. 0-3-4-1 : Little. Warren C. 0-1-6-1 : 
Littral. James W., 0-1-1-2 : Long. Russell. 0-0-4-1 : Long. Wil- 
liam Glenn. Jr., 0-2-2-2: Longenecker. David M., 26-19-2-0: 
Looney, Dick, 37-37-6-1 : Ludwig. Harry. 1-2-1-0 ; Lykins. 
Clayton G., 0-2-2-0 : Lynn. Charles C, 0-0-1-0 : Lyons. Harold 
M.. 1-9-0-0; Lyon. Manuel. 3-4-0-0; Lytle, William Price, 
0-14-3-0. 

McAninch. E. R.. 3-5-0-0 : McBride. W. Kenneth, 3-8-1-1 ; 
McClanahan, Charles, 0-1-0-0: McClellan, Leonard B., Jr., 
8-23-5-4 : McCollum. Robert G.. 2-4-6-0 : McCord. Anthony A., 
1-19-1-0 : McCord, Coleman, 1-3-3-1 : McCowan, Connell. 2-7-4-0 ; 
McCuiston, Pat M.. 0-4-5-0: McDonald. Harry E.. 2-15-0-0: Mc- 
Donald, Robert, 2-1-1-0 : McDowell. Glen D., 16-24-4-4 : McGhee. 
Laurence, 7-9-5-1 : McGlasson, Galen. 2-4-1-1 : McGuffey. Doyle 
E.. 0-2-0-0 : McGuffey. Harold, 44-18-10-1 : McHale, Edward, 
1-0-0-0: McKenzie, James C, 18-19-4-2; McKnight. Chester W., 
3-1-1-0; McLain, James H., 2-8-2-3; McLeod, Robert N. Jr., 
16-3-0-0 ; McMillan, James N.. 1-1-0-0 : McMurtrey, Joe, 0-1-1-0 ; 
McNabb, Edgar, 18-15-4-0: McNeil. Pat, 1-15-5-1; McPherson, 
Alton. 2-0-1-0 ; McPike, Ray S.. 2-7-2-6 : McQuilling, Gerald, 
0-1-1-0. 

Macon. Alan Leon. 2-12-4-2 : Macon. Max. 7-12-2-1 : Mahan. 
Boyd W., 2-19-6-0 : Mahan, Robert M., 2-10-4-0 ; Maines, George 
E., 2-15-5-0 : Major. Russell E.. 0-1-1-0 : Majors. Damon, 1-3-4-0 ; 
Malcolm. Donald C. 1-3-0-1 ; Mansfield. James T.. 4-2-1-0 ; 
Marshall, James A.. Jr.. 4-18-3-1 : Martin, Carl E., 1-5-0-0 ; 
Martin, T.. O., Jr., 2-10-7-4; Martin, William L., 0-2-1-0: Mason, 
James E., 14-26-10-5 ; Matarazzo, Salvatore, 2-1-3-0 ; May, 
Elijah B., Jr., 0-1-1-0: Mayes, Edward, 2-11-11-4; Mays, George, 
Jr., 0-10-4-1 ; Mays, Ralph, 16-15-2-2 : Mazza, Albert, 1-0-0-0 : 
Meade, Foster, 26-34-1-1 ; Meadows, Marvin Ray, 6-5-7-1 : Meeks, 
Jack. 9-12-10-0 ; Metcalf, Earl L., 29-51-3-0 ; Metcalf, Harold E.. 
3-6-2-3 ; Meyer. Clyde E.. 0-0-2-1 ; Milkovich. John, 0-0-1-0 ; 
Miller. Bob. 28-23-3-0: Miller. Jack. 11-2-1-3: Miller, Rex J.. 
7-19-2-1 ; Miller. Roy J.. 0-0-1-0 ; Miller. Roy L., 4-21-5-2 : 
Mills. Claude. 0-2-0-0 : Mills. Herman. 2-5-1-0 : Minor. William 
H., 1-2-1-1: Minton. Dewey D.. 0-1-0-0: Mitchell. Samuel W.. 
0-5-0-0 : Molen. James P.. 0-4-3-1 ; Moll. Francis B., 0-2-0-0 : 
Monahan, William G., 1-1-0-0 : Montgomery. W. G.. 9-9-2-2 : 
Moore. Eddie. 2-20-6-3 : Moore. James E.. 0-2-0-0 : Moore, Robert 
M., 0-6-1-0 : Moore. Robert N.. 0-2-0-0 ; Morano. Tony, 1-17-2-0 : 
Morehead. Merlin E., 0-2-1-0 ; Moreman. Lucian Y.. 27-19-1-1 ; 
Morgan. Lawrence E.. 0-5-2-0: Moricle, John, Jr.. 0-1-0-0; 
Moss. Bobby G.. 0-1-0-0 : Moss, Howard A., 3-8-9-0 : Moss. Julian. 
0-1-1-0 : Moss. Anderson Walter. 3-9-13-0 : Mouser. Henry D., 
Jr.. 0-4-10-0; Mudd. Edward, 10-15-4-0; Mulligan. J. T.. 2-4-2-0; 
Mullins. Charles N.. 0-4-0-0 ; Mullins, Noah W.. 4-9-5-4 ; Muss- 
man. Ralph, Jr.. 29-28-9-0 : Myers. Edward B.. 0-1-1-0 ; Myles, 
William C, 0-10-4-1. 

Naber. Robert Ed.. 10-13-2-0: Napier. Bill, 0-3-2-3: Nau. 
Bill, 8-12-7-2; Neal. Gene, 37-28-2-0: Nelson, Charles L.. 0-3-0-0; 
Neumann. Jerry, 0-4-0-0 ; Newboles, Vern B., 0-2-0-0 ; Newman, 
Bill. 0-1-1-0 ; Newman. Luther Garland, 21-8-0-1 ; Newsom, 
Marley. 23-23-8-5 ; Newsome, Forest, 10-13-3-1 ; Newton, C. S.. 
Jr.. 1-1-0-0 : Newton. Reason G.. 6-18-8-0 : Nimmo. Lomond, 
2-21-9-1 ; Noble. Charles B.. 15-20-10-3 : Noble. Leonard. 2-16- 
9-3 ; Noel. George E.. 0-0-2-0 : Nord, Ed, 25-40-3-3. 

O'Brien, Tim, 2-3-1-0 : Oldham, John, 19-4-0-0 ; Omer, Billy 
W.. 12-35-5-3 ; O'Nan. Eugene, 22-27-2-0 : O'Nan, Norman. 
0-8-0-0; Osborne, Bill, 11-15-1-0; Osborne, Homer L., 2-5-2-1; 
Osborne, Jack, 1-0-0-0 : Otten, Roger H., 20-24-6-2 : Owens, 
David Jack, 2-11-5-0: Owens, Lewis M., 2-12-8-4; Owens, R. 
L., Jr., 0-1-1-2. 

Padgett, R. K.. 2-20-8-1 ; Park. J. M.. 0-5-3-7 ; Parke. Paul 
G.. 1-9-2-1; Parker. Billie. 6-11-6-0; Parker. James P., 2-17-4-0; 
Parker, .John T., 0-6-1-0 : Parker, Vollie B., 1-3-1-1 : Parrish, 
Charles W., 1-3-1-1; Parson, Dewey A.. 0-0-3-0; Parsons. W. E. 
7-12-6-2 ; Paulin, Al, 0-7-1-1 : Pay, Robert L., 0-5-0-0 : Peay, 
Curtis E., 4-18-5-2 ; Penrod. Joe B.. 1-4-7-0 : Pergrem. Bernard, 
28-11-2-1 ; Perry. George B.. 20-15-7-0 ; Phelps. John B.. 0-3-8-1 ; 
Phelps. Rudy. 13-19-3-0; Picciano, John A., 0-2-1-0; Polk, John 
Collins, 0-8-0-0 ; Poppas, Nicholas, 49-24-12-0 ; Porter C. A., 
26-33-5-2 ; Porter, Roscoe, 1-4-1-0 ; Posey, Ralph W.. 0-0-0-1 ; 
Poulson. Jerry E.. Jr.. 5-12-3-0: Powell. Kenneth E.. 0-7-0-2; 
Powell, Logan G.. 12-26-7-3: Powers, Clayton E., 12-16-4-1; 



Preston. Robert L.. 2-18-0-1; Pritchett. Shirley. Jr.. 0-3-1-0; 
Pudlo, Walter, 0-14-14-3 ; Pursifull, Cleophus, 13-12-3-1. 

Radjunas. Stan, 16-15-1-3; Raisor, J. T... 6-16-6-1; Rakel, 
Roland G., 3-4-0-0 ; Rail. Eugene. 9-20-5-2 ; Randall, H. C, 
2-11-8-8 ; Randolph. C. D.. 19-3-1-1 : Rash. Lindell L., 0-0-0-1 ; 
Ratterman. Bernard W.. 13-19-1-0: Rawlings, Don R., 2-7-2-0: 
Rawlings, Harold, 1-1-1-0 : Ray. Robert R. 3-3-2-1 ; Reams, 
William E.. 6-7-2-0; Redden. James W., 1-0-0-0: Redman. Mal- 
vern G., 1-2-0-0 ; Reed, Edward, 1-9-5-2 ; Reed. Gordon. 0-18-3-3 ; 
Reinhart. Gene A.. 2-9-1-1 ; Reinhardt. Myron S.. 0-2-2-2 ; Rentz, 
Thomas W.. 19-32-11-3: Richardson. Joe M.. 15-40-4-4; Richard- 
son, Lewis H.. 4-23-5-1 ; Ricketts. Claude O.. 0-1-4-1 ; Riddle, 
George W.. 21-33-1-0 : Ries. Robert, 5-9-5-6 ; Rigney. Leo R., 
0-4-8-7 ; Ritter. Goebel, 2-1-0-0 ; Roach. Earl W., 0-0-1-1 ; Rob- 
erts. Earl C. 2-21-7-6 ; Robertson. Albert M., 1-8-1-3 : Robertson, 
Everett, L. 4-5-0-0 ; Robinson. Clarence. Jr.. 0-5-0-1 ; Robinson. 
John E., 5-5-3-2 ; Robinson. .John. -Ir.. 1-0-0-1 : Rocke. James 
M.. 16-24-6-1 ; Rogers. Earl. 4-7-1-1 : Rogers. Stanley. 0-0-1-0 ; 
Roller. Otis. 3-19-3-1 ; Rolph, Harold J.. 1-3-0-1 : Rose, Wallace 
C. 8-25-1-0: Rosenbaum. Robert L.. 6-11-7-7: Rothfuss, Richard, 
0-3-1-0 ; Rothschild, Charles, 6-6-5-3 : Rountree, Jack, 7-5-1-1 ; 
Rouse, Clyde L.. 11-21-7-0; Rozen. Morris, 3-11-2-2: Rubarts, 
Leland G.. 4-6-3-0: Russell. Allen Wells, 4-11-8-0; Russell. 
Eugene D., 2-5-3-0: Russell, Joe, 9-14-6-0. 

Sanders, Foster J.. 30-27-1-3 : Sanders. Milton. L., 19-57-5-1 ; 
Sang, Bob. 3-6-0-0 : Sankey. Lee R.. 2-4-3-1 : Schellhase. David, 
1-2-0-0 ; Schlich. Paul E.. 0-0-1-0 : Schu. Wilber, 9-17-3-1 ; 
Schuette, Frederick J.. 7-11-1-0: Schutz. John J., Jr., 0-5-1-0; 
Schwitz. Frank. 6-7-1-0 : Scott, W. L., 0-9-1-0 ; Seale. John D.. 
0-6-1-1 ; Seelye. Arthur L., 0-0-0-1 ; Settle. Evan E.. Jr.. 8-2-2-0 ; 
Settle, Roy G.. 40-18-2-0 : Sexton, William L., 5-7-6-2 : Shackel- 
ford. Buddy, 1-16-6-3 ; Shaw, Earl, 0-1-0-1 : Shaw. James T., 
3-2-3-1 ; Shaw. Lee Donald, 2-0-1-1 ; Sherrill, Lisle, 13-27-9-1 : 
Shively, Bernie, 11-6-0-1; Sifrig, Bernard J.. 0-1-3-2; Siler, 
Clarence M.. 3-4-0-0 ; Simmons. Earl Clifton. 0-0-2-2 : Simon, 
Charles. 0-4-5-0 : Simpson, Willis Brown, 0-1-0-0 ; Simpson, John 
C. 2-4-2-0 ; Singleton. Vesper, 3-19-7-0 : Sloan, Wallace, 6-21- 
4-1; Small, Rex. 0-1-2-0: Small, Wiliam, Jr.. 6-17-7-2; Smith, 
David M.. 0-1-0-0 : Smith, Edgar J., 7-19-8-1 ; Smith. Elza, 
0-0-4-0 : Smith. Eurie Hayes. 6-8-1-2 : Smith, Thomas F.. 2-2-0-0 ; 
Smith. W. J.. 0-3-4-0 : Snow. Charles H., 6-11-1-0 ; Sosh. Larue, 
44-12-1-0: Sosh, William N., 18-20-4-0: South, William F., 
3-27-12-8; Spaulding, Stanley H.. 1-4-0-0: Spurgeon. Kermit, 
1-2-1-0 ; Stanfill. Robert. 3-1-0-0 : Steenken. William R., 4-11- 
7-0: Steiger, AI. 3-331-0: Stephens, Clarence W.. 0-2-0-0; 
Stephens, Robert J.. 1-2-0-0 : Stephenson, Burkett H., 0-0-1-0 ; 
Stephenson. Harry S.. 42-18-8-0 : Stevens, Paul B., 7-17-6-2 ; 
Stone, Clifton, 2-3-0-0 ; Strange, William L., 1-2-2-0 ; Strong. 
Arnett. 9-9-1-0 ; Strong, David A., 1-8-3-1 ; Sturgill, Barkley J., 
0-6-2-1 ; Sullivan, Don, 0-0-2-0 ; Sullivan, Durwood, 2-15-10-1 ; 
Susott, Wilfred, 3-13-7-4. 

Taylor. Dennis H.. 1-13-8-0 ; Taylor, Ed, 9-23-8-0 ; Taylor, 
Kenneth W.. 19-16-5-0 : Taylor. Robert S.. 20-17-7-1 : Teague, 
Amos. 22-36-9-1 ; Temple, Dr. J. B., 2-20-12-6 : Thoma. M. L., 
26-29-8-1 : Thompson, Jack. 39-46-0-0 ; Thompson, Lawrence, 
0-1-0-0; Thompson, Ralph, 1-8-8-0: Thompson, Roy C. 0-2-3-1 
Threet. Hoyte B.. 2-6-1-0 : Thull, Nick B., 0-0-4-1 ; Thurrnan, A 
Earl. .3-12-8-7 ; Thurman. Robert N.. 6-7-0-0 : Tichenor, Billy, 
2-2-4-1 : Tichenor. Matthew. 0-3-3-0 : Tierney, Gordon P.. 0-0-1-0 
Tilford. Eugene, 0-0-1-0 ; Tilley. Huell M.. 3-15-4-0 ; Tincher, 
Robert. 29-19-12-0 : Tipton. Asa I.. 6-9-5-1 : Tobe. Larry, 1-6-4-0 
Tomblin. Donald A.. 0-0-2-1 : Tompkins. Chester B.. 0-1-0-0 
Topmiller, Ben, Jr., 0-5-3-0 : True, Charlie. 0-0-1-1 ; Tuck, Ochell. 
9-14-1-4; Tucker. Neal R., 0-1-0-0; Turner, A. J., 7-7-2-0; Tur- 
ner, Jack F., 5-16-2-0. 

Vance. Earl G.. 3-10-8-3 : Vandenberg. Ralph. 0-0-1-1 ; Van- 
Hoose. Jack D., 1-6-1-0: Varble. William, 17-20-2-0; Varner, Ray 
G., 0-5-0-0; Vest, James. 0-2-0-0; Vest. James T., 7-8-2-1. 

Waldon. Dot. 0-1-0-0 : Waldon, Tot, 16-14-7-0 : Walke, Glenn, 
0-19-1-0 ; Walker. Jack. 6-8-6-1 ; Walker. Julian R., 1-1-4-1 ; 
Walker, Paul R.. 2-9-3-0 : Wallace, James H.. 0-8-4-2 ; Waller, 
Bobbie Ed. 0-0-0-1 : Waller. Charles L.. 0-11-8-1 : Walsh. Robert 
M., 2-0-2-0 : Walton. Roy. 0-8-0-0 ; Wanchic, Nicholas, 1-4-2-0 ; 
Ward. Charles. 21-16-3-4 : Ward. Robert L.. 5-26-5-1 : Warf. 
Emerson. 0-16-3-0 : Watson. Ronald L.. 3-5-2-0 ; Webb. Leonard, 
W.. 9-21-3-2 : Webb. Oren H.. 4-6-1-1 ; Wedge. Donald R.. 0-4-0-0 : 
Weisbrodt. Paul E.. 4-25-3-0 : Welch, Bill, 2-2-1-1 ; Welch, Ralph 
W.. 1-6-2-0; Welch. Thomas P.. 1-1-2-0; Wellman. Earl. 0-4-1-0: 
Wells. Ed.. Jr., 0-2-0-0 : Wells. Milford. 31-36-3-3 : Whalen. Wil- 
liam C, 1-4-0-0 ; Whipple, Lloyd G., 9-4-1-1 : White, David, 
10-13-9-4 ; Wiederhold. Robert G.. 0-4-0-0 ; Wigginton Allen M., 
0-2-0-0: Wilder. Charles D.. 0-1-0-0; Wilhoite. John C, 0-0-1-0; 
Williams. Roger. 4-13-4-3 ; Williams. Tom M.. Jr., 6-6-4-1 ; 
Wilson. Burnell Z.. 2-4-0-0 : Wilson. James W.. 1-0-2-0 ; Wilson, 
Jerry C. 0-2-0-0 ; Wilson. Jerry D.. 0-2-0-0 : Wilson. John Pope, 
0-2-0-0; Winscher. Fred. 0-1-1-1; Winchester. Roy L., 15-12-3-3; 
Winfrey. Shelby. 67-22-13-6: Witschger, LeRoy J.. 2-0-4-0; 
Woford. Errest, 9-17-5-0 : Woods, Clyde, 1-0-2-0 : Workman, Bill. 
6-12-4-0; Wright, Billy Joe, 1-12-6-0; Wright, John A., 1-9-7-0; 
Wrightson, Arthur, 1-11-2-1 : Wurtz, Emil, 0-B-l-l. 

Yaggi, Bill. 1-5-1-0 ; Yessin, Rudy, 3-15-1-0 ; Young. Allen, 
0-3-1-1 ; Young, Roy, 0-6-9-2. 
Zachem, Vincent, 47-19-6-0. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1954 



Page Nine 



Kentucky High School Baseball Tournament 

Parkway Field, Louisville, Kentucky 
May 28-29, 1954 



Newport Catholic 


(3) 


Newport Catholic (9) 


Newport Catholic (6) 










Madisonville (0) 


Salem (4) 










St. Joseph (3) 


L'ville Male & Girls (0) 










Salem (5) 


L'ville Male & Girls (6) 


Newport Catholic - 
Champion 


L'ville Male & Gii 
Lafayette (0) 


Is (3) 




Wheelwi-ight (2) 




Jenkins (0) 






Wheelwright (2) 







Officials' Ratings on Sportsmanship of K. H. S. A. A 

Member Schools in Basketball, 1954-1955 



SCHOOL 



Adair County (Columbia) 

Adairville 

Ahrens Trade 

Albany-Clinton 

Allen County (Scottsville) 

Almo 

Alvaton 

Anderson (Lawrenceburg) 

Annville Institute 

Arlington 

Artemus 

Ashland 

Athens (Lexington) 

Auburn 

Augusta 

Austin Tracy (Lucas) 

Auxier 

Bagdad 

Bald Knob (R. 4, Frankfort) 

Ballard (Barlow) 

Barbourville 

Bardstown 

Bardwell 

Barrett (Henderson) 

Beaver Dam 

Beechwood (Ft. Mitchell) 

Belfry 

Bell County (East Pineville) 

Bellevue 

Benham 

Benton 

Berea 

Berea Foundation 

Betsy Layne 

Black Star (Alva) 

Blaine 

Bloomfield 

Bourbon County (Paris) 

Bowling Green 

Boyd County (R. 1, Cannonsburg) 

Bracken Co. ( Brooks viile) 

Bradfordsville 

Breathitt (Jackson) 

Breckinridge Co. (Hardinsburg) 

Breckinridge Training (Morehead). 

Bremen 

Brewers 

Bridgeport (Frankfort) 

Bristow 

Brodhead 

Brownsville 

Buckeye (Lancaster) 

Buckhorn 

Buffalo 

Burgin 













OTHER 




















COACH 






SCHOOL 




CROWD 






TEAM 












9FFICIALS 










1 




E 


G 


F 


P 


E 


G 


F 


P 


E 


G 


F 


P 


E 


G 


F 


51 


11 


1 


5 


59 


7 


1 




41 


23 


1 


9 


50 


14 


1 


21 


6 


1 


1 


21 


6 


1 




20 


9 






19 


9 


1 


38 


5 


2 




40 


4 


1 




31 


11 


3 




34 


9 


1 


38 


14 


5 


2 


40 


10 


2 




32 


11 


7 


2 


37 


11 


3 


48 


5 






48 


5 






41 


11 


1 




46 


7 




39 


2 


1 




42 








34 


6 


2 




36 


5 


2 


35 


4 


1 


1 


35 


7 






35 


6 




1 


36 


5 




26 


16 


2 




31 


9 


1 




27 


12 


3 




31 


10 




28 


3 


3 




22 


10 


1 




23 


6 


3 




25 


4 


2 


36 


3 






30 


8 




1 


25 


8 


4 


2 


33 


5 




19 


11 


5 




21 


11 


5 


1 


19 


12 


6 




17 


13 


7 


37 


4 


5 


3 


36 


11 






34 


4 


2 


9 


38 


6 


4 


38 


12 


1 




43 


6 


2 




33 


16 


2 




38 


9 


1 


29 


9 


1 


1 


30 


8 


1 




28 


11 






29 


10 




43 


10 


2 


1 


46 


9 






24 


25 


4 


1 


35 


17 


2 


43 


2 




1 


42 


4 






38 


7 


1 




38 


8 




16 


3 


1 




17 


3 






14 


5 


1 




14 


3 


3 


32 


14 


1 


1 


35 


12 




2 


29 


16 


3 




32 


16 




35 


11 


1 


3 


36 


10 




2 


31 


16 


3 


1 


31 


18 


2 


23 


5 


5 


5 


34 


3 




1 


21 


12 


5 




30 


7 


1 


26 


14 


1 


1 


27 


11 






25 


8 


10 




38 


3 


2 


41 


3 






42 


9 






36 


9 






36 


7 


1 


53 


2 


1 




53 


3 






49 


6 


1 




49 


8 




46 


2 






42 


5 






27 


17 


3 




34 


13 


1 


42 


10 


3 


1 


47 


6 


1 




40 


10 


6 




42 


9 


5 


41 


1 






411 








34 


7 






32 


9 




37 


5 


2 


2 


44 




2 




31 


11 


4 




34 


7 


2 


31 


11 


1 


2 


42 


3 






32 


9 


9 


2 


31 


10 


4 


35 


6 


1 


1 


35 


6 






32 


8 






28 


9 


?. 


30 


3 






32 


1 






31 


2 






31 


2 




26 


10 


3 




38 


2 






25 


11 


2 


1 


30 


9 




33 


16 


12 


2 


52 


10 






33 


20 


10 


1 


36 


17 


8 


21 


5 


4 


2 


25 


4 


1 


1 


22 


7 


2 


I 


20 


12 


1 


11 


5 


9 


5 


18 


7 


2 


3 


13 


11 


5 


1 


15 


15 




39 


1 


7 




47 








37 


7 


3 




42 


5 




29 


2 






26 


2 


1 




23 


6 


1 




21 


7 


1 


41 


8 






39 


5 






37 


7 


3 




35 


10 


2 


63 


10 






62 


9 






57 


11 


2 




60 


11 


2 


42 


4 


1 




42 


4 






36 


9 




1 


40 


6 




41 


7 


2 




37 


12 


1 




31 


14 


2 


3 


39 


8 


2 


51 


7 


5 




51 


7 


4 




41 


15 


4 


2 


46 


11 


3 


28 


5 


2 


9 


28 


5 


2 


3 


24 


8 


1 


2 


24 


10 


1 


53 


2 


1 




55 


1 






50 


6 






52 


4 




4U 


7 


2 


3 


45 


3 


1 




44 


7 


1 




45 


8 




38 


3 






34 


5 


1 




29 


11 






31 


8 




38 


9 


3 


1 


48 


3 






40 


9 


1 


) 


40 


11 




28 


8 


3 


2 


36 


1 


3 




30 


5 


4 


3 


32 


6 


4 


26 


11 


4 


3 


27 


11 


2 




25 


15 


2 




24 


15 


2 


33 


13 


3 


2 


40 


9 






29 


17 


2 


1 


28 


16 


5 


41 


10 


2 





47 


6 


1 




45 


8 


1 




45 


7 


2 


49 


10 






51 


5 


3 




43 


12 


3 


1 


42 


15 


2 


23 


11 


5 




28 


10 






25 


12 


1 




24 


12 


1 


34 


8 


2 


1 


38 


4 




2 


33 


6 


3 


1 


29 


7 


4 


23 


15 


7 


7 


45 


2 


1 




36 


7 


4 


I 


47 


3 




25 


6 


2 


3 


32 


4 


1 




27 


7 


3 




22 


9 


1 



JPage Ten 



THE KENTUCKY lilGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1^54 



SCHOOL 



Burlington 

Burnside 

Bush (Lida) 

Butler (Butler) 

Butler (Princeton) 

Butler County (Morgantown) 

Caldwell County (Princeton) 

Calhoun 

Calvert City 

Camargo (Mt. Sterling) 

Campbell County (Alexandria) 

Campbellsburg 

Campbells ville 

Camp Dick Robinson ( Lancaster) _ 

Caney ville 

Carlisle 

Carr Creek 

Carrollton 

Carter High 

Catlettsburg 

Caverna (Horse Cave) 

Cayce 

Center 

Centertown 

Central (Clinton) 

Central (Richmond) 

Central City 

Central Park (McHenry) 

Chandlers Chapel (Auburn ) 

Charleston (Dawson Springs) 

Clark County (Winchester) 

Clarkson 

Clay 

Clay County (Manchester) 

Clifty 

College High (Bowling Green) __. 

Corbin 

Cordia 

Corydon 

Covington Catholic 

Crab Orchard 

Crittenden Co. (Marion) 

Crofton 

Cromwell 

Cuba (R. 1, Mayfield) 

Cub Run 

Cumberland 

Cumberland Co. (Burkesville) 

Cunningham 

Cynthiana 

Dalton 

Danville 

Daviess Co. (Owensboro) 

Dawson High {Dawson Springs)-. 

Dayton 

Deming (Mt. Olivet) 

Dilee Combs (Jeff) 

Dixie Heights (Covington) 

Dixon 

Dorton 

Drakesboro 

Dundee 

Dunmor 

duPont Manual (Louisville) 

Earlington 

East Bernstadt 

Eastern ( Middletown) 

Edmonton 

Elizabethtown 

Elizabethtown Catholic 

Elkhorn (Frankfort) 

Elkhorn City 

Eminence 

Erie (Olive Hill) 

Estill Co. (Irvine) 

Eubank 

Evarts 

Ezel 

Falmouth 

Fancy Farm 

Farmington 

Feds Creek 

Ferguson 

Fern Creek 

Flaget (Louisville) 

Flaherty (Vine Grove) 

Flat Gap 

Fleming-Neon (Fleming) 

Fleming Co. (Flemingsburg) 

Florence 

Fordsville 

Forkland (Gravel Switch) i 

Fort Knox 

Frankfort 

Franklin-Simpson (Franklin) 



COACH 



E 


G 


F 


44 


2 


1 


46 


7 


2 


43 


9 


3 


37 


11 


1 


29 


2 




48 


6 




26 


15 


1 


40 


7 




3S 






40 


11 


3 


33 


7 


2 


64 


7 


1 


4S 


6 




27 


19 


2 


S3 


6 


1 


32 


6 


1 


34 


2 




32 


1 




55 


3 




37 


5 




50 


11 




48 


3 


1 


36 


20 


4 


23 


5 


1 


34 


1 


1 


20 


10 


3 


62 


4 


2 


24 


6 


1 


32 


5 


2 


43 


10 


3 


63 


7 




19 


19 


2 


66 


13 


2 


36 


5 


1 


34 


4 




36 






31 


8 




12 


5 


5 


39 


10 




20 


7 


2 


20 


14 


8 


33 


3 


3 


37 


6 


2 


33 


9 


2 


29 


9 


3 


43 


8 


1 


29 


3 


3 


44 


10 


6 


31 


8 


3 


39 


6 




26 


9 


4 


31 


15 


1 


45 


10 


3 


31 


4 


1 


46 


2 




41 


5 




64 


1 


2 


43 


6 




42 


15 


3 


38 


1 


1 


42 


7 


2 


33 


7 




32 


9 




54 


4 




52 


6 


1 


53 


7 


1 


38 


9 


1 


35 


24 


2 


37 


3 


2 


47 


1 




45 


10 


1 


32 


6 


1 


41 


7 


7 


30 


3 


1 


41 


10 


4 


44 


10 




36 


1 




29 


6 


3 


41 


4 




25 


8 


1 


33 


3 


1 


30 


2 


1 


38 


10 




33 


3 


2 


35 


16 


11 


40 


8 




19 


5 


1 


22 


4 


6 


80 


9 




47 


9 




39 


6 




27 


3 


1 


30 


3 


4 


24 


14 


7 


23 


12 


2 



OTHER 
SCHOOL 
3 
P 





OFFICIALS 


E 

43 
48 


G 

3 
7 


F 


47 
41 


8 
9 




24 


2 




48 


6 




33 


8 




44 


3 




37 


1 




31 


21 


3 


33 


7 




54 


6 


1 


45 


6 




32 


12 


2 


52 


6 


1 


33 


5 




33 




2 


34 






63 


5 




35 


6 




55 


5 


1 


50 


2 




46 


11 


4 


26 


4 




32 


3 


1 


25 


9 




64 


2 


1 


25 


5 


1 


34 


4 




50 


6 




66 


6 




36 


6 


1 


66 


11 




46 


2 




32 


4 


1 


34 


3 




32 


7 




22 


3 




43 


6 




25 


5 


1 


29 


11 


3 


38 


1 




35 


5 


1 


35 


8 


1 


33 


7 


1 


44 


4 


2 


35 






63 


6 


2 


36 


6 


1 


39 


4 


2 


34 


7 




41 


6 




48 


4 


2 


34 


3 




39 


2 




40 


4 




53 


3 


1 


44 


3 




46 


14 


1 


40 






47 


9 




24 


16 




31 


10 




51 


6 




48 


10 




50 


10 




40 


7 




51 


13 




40 


2 




48 


1 




50 


4 




36 


2 




61 


6 




30 


3 


1 


39 


11 


3 


46 


8 




36 


1 




27 


10 




38 


7 




32 


1 




34 


3 




32 


1 




44 


4 


2 


34 


5 




44 


14 


4 


44 


4 




21 


6 




32 


2 




68 


20 




47 


9 




38 


7 




28 


2 


1 


34 


3 




30 


10 


6 


26 


11 





CROWD 



E 

31 
44 
37 
19 
21 
42 
32 
36 
34 
20 
26 
45 
37 
26 
46 
32 
30 
33 
48 
27 
45 
39 
33 
26 
32 
18 
60 
17 
22 
42 
51 
29 
48 
42 
29 
31 
23 
18 
36 
14 
24 
36 
34 
28 
28 
41 
32 
42 
24 
38 
26 
33 
45 
31 
32 
34 
47 
31 
26 
30 
37 
20 
20 
41 
43 
40 
37 
37 
33 
43 
39 
25 
39 
29 
30 
41 
28 
27 
21 
19 
29 
21 
36 
27 
40 
36 
19 
25 
67 
26 
33 
26 
24 
22 
20 



11 
11 

1 
15 
16 

6 
15 
15 
14 

5| 
11 

9 

8 
17 
28 

9 
15 
20 
16 
15 
13 
17 
11 
19 

7 

6 
19 
10 
13 

5 
16 
10 

6 

7 
21 
11 

5 
10 
10 
10 
15 
12 

7 

8 
28 
24 
10 



E 


G 


F 


42 


3 


1 


49 


6 




40 


13 


1 


23 


25 


1 


23 


2 


1 


44 


9 


1 


28 


8 


5 


41 


6 




34 


3 




20 


20 


15 


30 


11 




47 


13 


1 


37 


13 


1 


29 


17 


2 


48 


11 




31 


6 


3 


30 


4 


2 


31 


3 




53 


5 




30 


7 


4 


47 


19 




47 


3 


2 


29 


23 


4 


22 


7 


2 


36 


1 




17 


16 


2 


58 


7 


2 


16 


9 


4 


22 


13 


2 


41 


14 


1 


53 


16 




30 


9 


3 


52 


8 


6 


47 


2 




31 


7 


1 


31 


6 




35 


4 




19 


2 


2 


36 


13 




16 


14 




24 


13 


4 


33 


3 


1 


36 


8 




31 


6 


4 


31 


6 


4 


43 


8 


1 


33 


2 




49 


10 


1 


27 


14 


1 


32 


14 




23 


13 


3 


33 


14 


1 


47 


10 


1 


34 


1 


2 


30 


14 




29 


13 


1 


49 


3 


4 


33 


13 


2 


44 


16 




32 


7 


1 


38 


13 


4 


21 


18 


1 


22 


17 


2 


43 


16 


1 


46 


11 


2 


45 


13 


3 


38 


10 


2 


35 


17 


7 


34 


8 




45 


4 




40 


13 


2 


30 


7 


1 


39 


15 


2 


29 


4 


1 


31 


18 


3 


45 


8 


1 


34 


1 


2 


23 


10 


6 


33 


14 




24 


8 


1 


34 


3 




21 


7 


4 


42 


10 


1 


28 


9 


2 


39 


17 


6 


34 


13 




21 


4 


1 


26 


7 


1 


64 


21 


3 


38 


15 


3 


36 


8 


1 


24 


7 


1 


25 


8 


1 


24 


14 


6 


21 


IB 


1 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1954 



Page Eleven 



SCHOOL 



Frederick Fraize (Cloverport) 

Fredericktown (R. 2, Springfield). 

Fredonia 

Frenchburg 

Fuleham (R. 1, Clinton) 

Fulton 

Gallatin Co. (Warsaw) 

Gamaliel 

Garrett 

Garth ( Georgetown) 

Glasgow 

Glendale 

Good Shepherd (Frankfort) 

Graham 

Grant Co. (Dry Ridge) 

Great Crossing (Georgetown) 

Greensburg 

Greenup 

Greenville 

Guthrie 

Haldeman 

Hall (Grays Knob) 

Hanson 

Hardin 

Harlan 

Harrison Co. (Cynthiana) 

Harrodsburg 

Hartford 

Hawesville 

Hazard 

Hazel 

Hazel Green Academy 

Hazel Green (East Bernstadt) 

Heath (West Paducahl 

Hebbardsville 

Hebron 

Hellier 

Henderson Settle (Frakes) 

Henry Central (New Castle) 

Henry Clay (Lexington) 

Hickman 

Highlands (Ft. Thomas) 

Hindman 

Hiseville 

Hitchins 

Hodgenville 

Holmes (Covington ) 

Holy Cross (Covington) 

Holy Family (Ashland) 

Holy Name (Henderson) 

Hopkinsville 

Horse Branch 

Howe Valley (Cecilia) 

Hughes Kirk (Beechmont) 

Huston ville 

Inez- 



Irvine 

Irvington 

Jackson 

Jenkins 

J. M. Atherton (Louisville) 

Junction City 

Kingdom Come (Linefork), 

Kingston (Berea) 

Kirksey 

Kirksville 

Knox Central (Barbourville) 

Knott County (Pippapass) 

Kyrock (Sweeden) 

Lacy Consolidated (R. 7. Hopkinsville) 

Lafayette (Lexington} 

Lancaster 

Laurel (Camp Dix) 

Leatherwood (Slemp) 

Lebanon 

Lebanon Junction 

Lee County (Beatty ville) _. 

Leitchfield Ind. 

Leslie Co. (Hyden) 

Lewisburg 

Lewisport 

Lexington Catholic 

Liberty 

Lily High 

Livermore 

Livingston Co. (Smithland 

Livingston 

Lloyd (Erlanger) 

London 

Lone Jack (Four Mile) 

Lone Oak (Paducah) 

Louisa 

Louisville Baptist 

Louisville Male & Girls 

Loyall 



E 

34 
9 
60 
15 
37 
27 
37 
35 
32 
37 
42 
28 
15 
58 
41 
41 
43 
73 
42 
34 
11 
34 
38 
30 
41 
36 
41 
65 
40 
38 
25 
28 
69 
35 
49 
42 
20 
22 
35 
32 
36 
34 
42 
28 
47 
39 
42 
16 
48 
43 
26 
27 
41 
51 
35 
58 
40 
42 
31 
14 
33 
38 
39 
39 
34 
14 
29 
6 
43 
32 
44 
32 
4 
25 
30 
28 
28 
47 
50 
43 
27 
44 
29 
40 
35 
32 
38 
31 
57 
32 
27 
30 
25 
47 
34 









OTHER 
















SCHOOL 




CROWD 








)FF1CIALS 






F 


P 


E 


G 


F 


P 


E 


G 


F 


1 




37 
11 


8 
2 




1 


25 

10 


14 
3 


5 




2 


50 


5 






49 


4 


1 


6 


4 


24 


12 


4 




20 


15 


5 


1 




35 


2 


1 




25 


12 


1 


2 


1 


27 


3 


1 




22 


6 


2 


1 


1 


36 


5 


1 


3 


21 


18 


3 


1 


2 


41 


8 


3 




32 


20 




3 


1 


33 


4 




1 


30 


8 


1 


2 




46 


2 






41 


6 




I 




39 


3 






34 


9 




3 




36 


7 






31 


12 


2 


2 


1 


21 


10 




1 


20 


11 


1 






57 


5 






47 


13 


1 




2 


44 


10 






25 


23 


5 


3 


2 


45 


11 






39 


16 


2 






43 


9 




1 


38 


14 




4 




67 


10 


3 




52 


20 


5 


2 




43 


4 






36 


10 


1 






41 


4 






32 


12 


1 






8 


7 






8 


7 








32 


1 




3 


28 


7 


1 


1 




34 


10 






29 


12 


3 


4 


6 


41 


3 




2 


25 


9 


6 


1 


1 


45 


1 






42 


3 




2 


1 


46 


9 






37 


16 


2 


1 




46 


2 






39 


5 


4 




1 


64 


6 


1 




52 


18 






2 


37 


8 




2 


28 


15 


2 




1 


39 


2 






33 


5 


1 


1 


3 


31 
28 


4 
3 






26 
25 


8 
6 


1 






67 


5 


1 


1 


53 


17 


5 


2 




35 


3 






30 


6 


2 


1 


2 


48 


7 


2 


2 


38 


16 


1 






46 


7 






25 


23 


5 


1 




21 


2 






17 


3 


2 


4 


1 


31 


1 


3 




22 


10 


3 


1 




39 


12 


1 




29 


18 


2 


1 




38 




1 




32 


6 


1 


2 




37 
34 
41 


4 
2 

1 


1 




31 
31 
40 


8 
5 

1 


1 


2 


3 


38 


7 




1 


30 


16 








46 


2 






36 


10 


1 


1 


1 


39 


6 


1 




33 


12 


1 






42 


4 






38 


7 


1 


1 




17 


8 






13 


13 




2 


1 


46 


6 


3 




36 


14 


4 


2 




42 


15 






31 


22 


3 


1 




28 


1 


3 




14 


11 


8 


4 


4 


29 


8 


3 




21 


11 


9 




1 


40 


6 






33 


13 


1 


3 


1 


54 


6 


1 




48 


10 


3 


3 




38 


11 






34 


14 


2 




1 


56 


1 


1 


2 


53 


7 








41 


1 






36 


5 


1 






43 


7 






32 


15 


3 




2 


34 


5 






30 


7 


1 


S 


1 


29 


3 






17 


12 


3 


1 


2 


37 


3 




1 


32 


10 




4 




46 


8 






35 


15 


3 


1 




41 


1 






38 


5 




4 


1 


40 


12 


3 


1 


30 


22 


4 


2 




42 


4 






24 


21 


2 


5 


11 


33 


12 






27 


12 


6 


2 


2 


32 
6 


5 






32 
5 


3 
1 


3 


1 


2 


34 


6 




8 


34 


17 


1 


3 




45 


1 






39 


6 






1 


45 


5 






41 


9 


2 


1 




33 


3 






32 


5 






1 


4 






1 


3 




1 


I 


1 


26 


3 




1 


24 


4 


1 


4 


1 


43 


13 






33 


21 


1 


4 


3 


45 


8 






29 


21 


3 


2 


3 


37 


7 




2 


31 


10 


2 


1 




46 


7 






38 


13 


1 






49 


5 






36 


6 


7 


1 




44 


6 






37 


11 


3 


1 


1 


33 


9 






25 


11 


3 


4 




44 


11 






31 


16 


9 


4 


5 


42 


S 






27 


14 


8 


7 


2 


53 


8 






43 


13 


4 


2 




35 


2 






32 


5 


2 


1 


2 


33 


4 






32 


4 


1 


2 




37 


7 






33 


11 




2 


1 


41 


6 






25 


15 


2 






60 


3 






46 


12 


2 


4 




33 


4 




2 


24 


13 


1 


3 


1 


29 


5 






28 


5 


1 


1 




34 


2 






25 


10 


1 


5 


3 


31 


5 


2 




26 


10 


2 


2 




54 


5 






48 


13 


1 


3 




40 








31 


4 


4 



I 



1 I 



1 

1 I 



E 

30 

11 

50 

18 

29 

27 

31 

37 

32 

I 42 

I 38 

I 35 

! 21 
54 
32 
45 
38 
65 
39 
34 
10 
35 
32 
28 



55 
39 
39 
31 
18 
34 
38 
39 
30 
31 
30 
33 
6 
38 
39 
41 
28 
3 
22 
29 
29 
4 I 31 



1 I 
1 I 



2 I 31 
1 I 28 
1 I 49 



I 



2 I 30 
1 28 
28 
25 
52 
1 36 



G 


F 


12 


3 


2 




5 




15 


5 


8 


1 


1 


2 


11 


3 


14 


1 


5 


1 


5 


] 


6 




7 


1 


11 




7 




20 


4 


11 


1 


12 


3 


14 


2 


8 


2 


12 




5 




2 


1 


11 


1 


12 


3 


1 




16 


2 


6 


1 


14 


3 


11 




3 




4 




3 


1 


8 


1 


3 




13 


2 


10 


1 


4 


3 


8 


5 


22 


1 


4 


3 


4 




5 




2 


3 


12 


1 


7 


1 


9 


1 


8 




8 


3 


16 


4 


20 


1 


8 


1 


8 


6 


12 


1 


16 


2 


16 


1 


5 




9 


1 


6 




in 


5 


8 




15 


1 


3 


1 


20 


6 


14 


2 


14 


2 


1 


3 


14 


1 


6 




9 


2 


5 




1 




6 


3 


24 


2 


20 


4 


10 


3 


11 


1 


9 


2 


8 


2 


11 


2 


16 


6 


16 


4 


8 


3 


2 


2 


6 


1 


15 




7 


10 


7 




4 


3 


7 




6 


2 


5 


6 


9 


1 


3 


1 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUCxUST, 1954 



SCHOOL 



Ludlow 

Lynch 

Lynn Camp (Corbin) 

Lynn Grove 

Lynnvale (White Mills) 

Lyon Co. (Kuttawa) 

McAfee 

McCreary Co. (Whitley City) 

McDowell 

McKee. 

McKell (South Shore) 

McKinney. 

Mackville. 

Madison-Model (Richmond) 

Madisonville, 

Maf^nolia 

Mapleton (Mt. Sterling) 

Marion 

Marrowbone 

Martin 

Masonic Home 

Mayfieid 

May's Lick 

Maysville 

Maytown (Langley) 

M. C. Napier Memorial (Darfork) 

Meade Co. (Brandenburg) 

Meade Memorial ( Williamsport) 

Melber 

Memorial ( Hardy ville) 

Memorial (Waynesburg) 

Middleburg 

Middlesboro 

Midway 

Milburn 

M. M. I. (Millersburg) 

Minerva 

Monticello 

Morehead 

Morgan 

Morgan Co. (West Liberty) 

Morganfield 

Mortons Gap 

Mt. Sterling 

Mt. Vernon 

Mt. Washington 

Muhlenberg (Powderly) 

Munfordville 

Murray 

Murray Training 

Nancy 

Nebo 

New Concord 

New Haven 

Newport 

Newport Catholic 

Niagara 

Nicholas Co. (Carlisle) 

Nicholasville 

North Middletown 

North Warren (Smiths Grove) 

Nortonville 

Oakdale 

Oil Springs 

Old Ky. Home (Bardstown) 

Oldham Co. (LaGrange) 

Olive Hill 

Olmstead 

Oneida 

Orangeburg (Maysville) 

Ormsby (Anchorage) 

Owen County (Owenton) 

Owensboro 

Owensboro Catholic 

Owensboro Technical 

Owingsville 

Owsley Co. (Boonville) 

Oxford (R. 2. Georgetown) 

Paint Lick 

Paints ville 

Paris 

Park City ^11 1_" 

Parksville 

Peaks Mill (R. 1. FrankfOTT)././..'' 

Pembroke 

Perryville 

Phelps '__'_'_ __"_" 

Pikeville I.I-.I.1_ 

Pikeville College Academy 

Pine Knot 

Pineville 

Pleasant View 

Pleasureville 

Poole 



COACH 



E 

27 
31 
28 
28 
54 
41 
35 
39 
32 
29 
8 
33 

42 
37 

43 

27 

25 

29 

33 

31 

28 

18 

22 

66 

32 

40 

47 I 
36 
19 
33 
34 
32 
40 
33 
33 I 
25 
22 
39 
36 
40 
37 
38 
46 
31 
60 I 
36 I 

48 I 
37 
26 
22 
45 
46 
25 
32 
45 
40 
33 



G 

10 
5 
9 
5 
3 

10 
6 
6 
4 

10 
5 
7 
4 
2 
2 
5 
7 
5 
15 
6 
13 
3 

7 

2 

2 

6 

5 

2 

5 

5 

6 
14 

7 
31 

4 

8 

2 
15 
11 

2 

6 

5 

5 

8 

7 
17 

9 



13 

4 

10 

8 

7 

11 

4 I 
7 



42 I 14 



31 I 
50 
32 
29 

2 
36 
45 
43 I 
37 I 
30 
32 
20 

5 
43 
50 
53 

32 I 
39 
26 

31 I 
46 I 
46 I 

27 I 

28 i 
26 I 
24 I 
34 I 

32 I 
37 I 
41 I 

13 I 
19 I 

29 I 

14 I 1 
49 
27 



10 
2 
9 
3 
2 
1 
5 
5 
9 
5 

7 
7 
6 

2 

7 
16 I 
10 
10 

7 

1 
12 
12 I 
12 

9 

4 I 



2 
2 
3 

1 I 

2 I 
2 I 
2 I 
1 



2 
2 
1 
1 

1 

3 I 



9 


3 1 


2 


1 


8 


1 


7 


2 


11 


1 


4 




13 


2 


7 




13 


4 



F I 

1 

2 

1 

4 

1 

5 

2 

1 

2 1 
1 



4 I 



E 

34 

35 

34 

34 

51 

48 

31 

40 

33 

36 

11 

34 

38 

36 

44 

31 

23 

25 

41 

36 

32 

20 

27 

66 

30 

4! 

48 

37 

22 

36 

35 

38 

47 

45 

33 

33 

25 

49 

34 

35 

39 

44 

45 

36 

60 

48 

56 

38 

27 

35 

44 

45 I 

32 

37 

50 

40 

32 

43 



OTHER 

SCHOOL 

OFFICIALS 



51 

36 

28 

3 

I 37 

I 41 

I 43 

I 37 

I 26 



16 
2 



I 32 
I 20 
I 6 
I 45 

46 
1 54 
I 34 
1 45 
I 39 
I 32 
I 43 I 
I 46 
I 35 
I 33 
I 24 
I 30 
I 39 
I 33 
I 40 

44 I 

36 

30 I 

36 

18 

50 

32 



G 

3 

3 

5 

2 

7 

13 

15 

4 

3 

14 

3 

7 

6 

4 

2 

9 

8 
10 

3 

8 

2 

5 

1 

2 

6 

4 

2 

3 

6 

4 

8 

2 
14 

5 

4 

6 
15 
6 
5 
2 
3 
5 
6 
8 
7 
9 



7 
10 
15 

3 

1 I 
12 I 

1 I 

2 I 

2 I 
1 I 
9 I 
6 
11 



CROWD 



26 
27 
26 
32 
39 
28 
22 
30 
14 
41 



E I 
28 
31 
28 
31 
43 
38 
24 
33 
25 
23 

6 
30 
37 
33 
38 
28 
21 
23 



29 
31 
12 
16 
49 
29 
31 
38 
26 
17 
30 
30 
37 
41 
28 
29 
27 
22 
38 
29 
26 
35 
38 
41 
31 

38 

35 

44 

33 

18 

20 

39 

37 

22 

30 

45 

32 

29 

37 

35 

46 

23 

26 
2 

33 

35 

42 

33 

18 

26 

18 
7 

35 

39 

41 

28 

32 



G 


1 F 


10 




2 


4 


9 


2 


5 


1 


13 




13 


11 


18 


4 


11 


1 


8 


3 


20 


7 


8 




10 




11 




7 


1 


4 


3 


7 


1 


12 




8 


3 



29 

5 

10 

3 

13 

17 

11 

8 

7 

7 

6 

24 

15 

17 

14 

8 

20 

9 

16 

10 

12 

13 

9 

10 

19 

7 

7 

11 

4 

1 

4 

14 

5 

12 

14 

5 

9 

6 

14 

10 

10 

10 

11 

22 I 15 

23 1 16 
37 
41 
27 
26 



13 

If, 
20 I 17 



6 

10 

14 

6 

8 

4 

10 

7 

13 

15 



23 I 14 



1 

I E 
28 
31 
29 
28 
44 
46 
34 
35 
28 
21 
4 
33 
38 
33 
40 
30 
26 
29 
33 
29 
32 
16 
19 
59 
25 
1 I 31 
42 
23 
16 
34 
32 



TEAM 



41 

34 

46 

32 

2 I 51 

I 32 

( 15 

I 22 

1 41 

1 I 35 

2 I 29 



45 
40 
29 
40 
37 
47 
25 
30 
2 
33 
37 
43 
41 
25 
24 
19 
2 
34 
39 
45 
31 
39 
22 
23 
43 
42 
25 
24 
19 
28 
34 
23 
35 
39 
28 
21 
32 
14 
42 
26 



4 
10 
9 
5 
7 
7 
8 
4 
34 
8 
14 
7 
13 
2 
14 
6 
9 
6 
8 
18 
17 
11 
13 
7 
13 
7 
16 
7 
6 
11 
2 
10 
18 
6 
6 
15 
1 
1 
4 
12 
5 
4 
8 
4 
11 
8 
14 
10 



13 
15 
15 
10 

1 
15 
19 
18 

6 

6 
13 

3 

6 

4 

2 

5 
12 
12 I 
12 I 



1 G 


1 F 


10 




2 


5 


7 


3 


6 


1 


11 


1 


11 


2 


13 




8 


1 


5 


3 


24 


4 


5 


2 


6 


1 


8 


1 


8 


1 


4 




5 




8 
5 





THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1954 



Page Thirteen 



SCHOOL 



Poplar Creek (Carpenter) 

Powell Co. (Stanton) 

Prestonsburg 

Prichard (Grayson) 

Providence 

Pulaski Co. (Somerset) 

Raceland 

Red Bird Settle (Beverly) 

Reidland (R. 4. Paducah) 

Richardsville 

Rineyville 

Riverside Christian Training 

Rockhold 

Rockport 

Rose Hill 

Russell 

Russell Co. (Jamestown) 

Russellville 

Sacramento 

Sadieville 

St. Agatha (Winchester) 

St. Agnes (Uniontown) 

St. Augustine ) Lebanon) 

St. Bernard iClementsvillel 

St. Charles (Lebanon) 

St. Catherine (New Haven) 

St. Francis (Loretta) 

St. Henry (Erlangeri 

St. Joseph Prep (Bardstown) 

St. Mary (Paducah) 

St. Patrick's (Maysville) 

St. Thomas (Ft. Thomas) 

St. Vincent 

St. Xavier (Louisville) 

Salem 

Sal visa 

Salyersville 

Sandy Hook 

Scottsville 

Sebree 

Sedalia 

Sharpe (Benton) 

Sharpsburg 

Shawnee (Louisville) 

Shelbyville 

Shepherdsville 

Shopville 

Silver Grove 

Simon Kenton (Independence) 

Simpson ville 

Sinking Fork (Hopkinsville) 

Slaughters 

Somerset 

Sonora 

South Christian (Herndon) 

Southern (Louisville) 

South Portsmouth 

Spottsville 

Springfield 

Stamping Ground 

Stanford 

Stearns 

Stinnett 

Stuart Robinson 

Sturgis 

Sunfish 

Symsonia 

Taylor Co. (Campbellsville) 

Taylors ville 

Tilghman (Paducah) 

Todd Co. (Elkton) 

Temple Hill (Glasgow) 

Tolleboro 

Tompkins ville 

Trenton 

Trigg Co. (Cadiz) 

Trimble (Bedford) 

Tyner 

Uniontown 

University High (Lexington) 

Utica 

Valley High (Valley Station) 

Vanceburg-Lewis Co. (Vanceburg). 

Van Lear 

Vine Grove 

Virgie 

Versailles 

Waco 

Waddy 

Wallins 

Walton-Verona (Walton) 

Warfield 

Warren Co. (Bowling Green) 

Wayland 



COACH 



I 



OTHER 
SCHOOL 



E 


G 


F 


9 


3 


6 


44 


6 


1 


20 


4 


4 


31 


1 




39 


3 




39 


7 


2 


40 


3 




18 


2 


3 


24 


5 




33 


6 


1 


65 


2 




4 






17 


6 




30 


6 




34 


6 




33 


3 




49 


14 




32 


8 




40 


13 




25 


7 




30 


6 


3 


22 


3 


2 


36 


6 


2 


15 


1 




34 


20 


2 


25 


6 




48 


7 


1 


35 


4 


1 


27 


8 


1 


31 


5 




18 


1 




19 


2 


2 


11 


10 


5 


42 


9 


4 


24 


10 




37 


6 




24 


4 


1 


35 






37 


7 


4 


46 


11 


3 


21 


9 


3 


32 


10 


4 


52 


5 




29 


6 


5 


28 


13 




34 


5 


6 


39 


6 




28 


10 


6 


43 


8 




33 


7 




29 


9 


3 


32 


10 


1 1 


35 


14 


1 


33 


10 


1 


20 


13 


7 


37 


6 


2 


44 


14 


1 


40 


8 


1 


39 


4 


2 


19 


11 


8 1 


30 


9 


1 1 


26 


7 


5 1 


21 


2 


1 


28 


7 


4 


36 


5 




22 


22 


5 


12 


4 


6 


24 


22 


4 


46 


11 


4 


21 


4 


2 


37 


3 


1 


27 


11 


2 1 


23 


6 




37 


8 




37 


7 


1 


32 


4 




39 


7 


3 


25 


5 




31 


2 




38 


12 


2 


47 


2 


2 


44 


10 




44 


5 




29 


2 


1 


42 


2 


6 


43 


1 




30 


4 




42 


5 


3 


34 


6 


1 


38 


1 




33 


12 


1 


22 


5 


1 


31 


12 


2 


26 


8 


1 



E 

9 
42 
31 
32 
37 
45 
41 
21 
26 
36 
61 

4 
18 
31 
33 
34 
61 
36 
53 
26 
35 
24 
39 
15 
41 
23 
47 
29 
29 
33 
17 
20 
21 
52 
27 
33 
28 
30 
46 
40 
31 
41 
45 
33 
33 



1 I 
1 1 
6 I 

1 I 



40 
30 
44 
31 
37 
32 
40 
35 
32 
38 
47 

2 I 33 
I 41 

1 I 25 
36 

4 34 

1 21 

2 I 37 
I 40 

4 37 
8 I 24 

3 I 35 
1 I 47 



1 I 



22 

40 

3 I 35 

I 27 

I 38 

I 33 

I 32 

40 

I 27 

I 28 

I 41 

1 I 48 

I 49 

I 43 

I 30 

1 I 46 

I 45 

I 31 

\ 43 

36 

39 

38 

23 

32 

35 



CROWD 



TEAM 



1 

3 I 

2 I 

3 1 



OFFICIALS 






G 


F 


P 


E 


6 


3 




8 


8 


1 




37 


3 






27 


2 






30 


5 


1 




30 


3 


2 




39 


4 






34 


1 


2 




21 


2 






24 


4 






33 


5 






50 
4 


5 






17 


6 






24 


10 






33 


4 






32 


6 






33 


3 






33 


6 






43 


6 






18 


6 




1 


29 


2 


1 




23 


4 


1 




35 
13 


15 






31 


7 






19 


9 






44 


10 


2 




19 


5 


1 


1 


21 


5 




1 


29 1 


2 






13 1 


3 


1 


1 


16 1 


7 


3 


3 


16 1 


6 


1 


1 


43 1 


7 






23 1 


10 






30 


3 






26 


6 






28 


4 






40 


9 


6 




36 


4 






26 


7 






30 


8 






46 


6 




1 


26 


12 






28 


4 




1 


34 


3 






38 


14 






21 


6 






31 


7 






32 


6 




1 


25 


11 






27 


9 




1 


30 


9 






29 


9 




3 


23 


7 






31 


13 






37 


13 






29 


5 






34 


14 






20 


4 






26 


7 






29 


2 




1 


21 


3 






29 


2 






36 


15 






27 


5 






19 


15 






24 


13 




1 


41 


6 






23 


2 






21 


5 






27 


5 






25 


6 






25 


7 




2 


33 


3 






29 


8 






30 


2 






21 


3 


2 




19 


11 






39 


4 






45 


5 






37 


6 






35 1 


3 






21 1 


2 


2 


1 


41 
35 


3 






26 


6 






38 


4 


1 




32 

37 


8 


1 




20 


4 


1 


3 


21 


6 


3 


6 


30 


3 






28 



11 I 

9 

5 
19 
10 
13 
14 
10 

4 

5 

2 
17 
12 

9 
17 
10 

6 

6 
15 
15 
13 
11 
11 

3 

9 

8 
19 

5 
14 

8 
12 
15 

7 

3 
20 
17 

6 
15 
13 
16 
19 
18 
12 
18 
15 
10 
13 
13 
10 

3 
12 

6 
20 

8 
21 
17 

5 
16 
11 

8 
16 
11 

4 
12 

8 
12 
12 

7 
17 
13 



F I 
4 



3 

2 

2 

3 

1 

6 I 

2 I 



p 


E 


G 


F 1 




8 


3 


6 




39 


9 


3 


2 


27 


2 


4 




27 


6 


1 




33 


7 


2 


1 


40 


9 


1 




35 


9 






21 


1 






22 


6 




1 


36 


4 






55 


14 






4 








17 


6 




1 


26 


6 


3 




31 


11 






33 


3 


1 


9 


62 


14 


1 




29 


8 


4 




43 


12 


3 




17 


13 


2 


1 


29 


9 


3 




25 


2 


1 




30 


7 


7 




14 


2 




3 


30 


21 


4 




23 


8 






43 


12 


1 


1 


29 


8 


3 




24 


7 


6 


5 


34 


2 


1 




15 


4 






16 


13 


4 




16 


13 


4 


1 


42 


13 


3 




26 


5 


3 


1 


31 


11 


1 




24 


5 


2 




32 


5 






40 


8 


3 




31 


8 


3 


2 


30 


2 


3 


2 


42 


6 




2 


45 


9 


3 




28 


9 


1 




29 


13 


1 


1 


33 


8 


3 




37 


8 




1 


22 


18 


3 




37 


11 


2 




32 


6 




1 


26 


13 


4 




30 


12 


1 




35 


19 


1 


1 


27 


16 




4 


36 


9 






33 


10 


2 




41 


15 


3 


1 


32 


11 


4 




39 


5 


1 




25 


4 






32 


6 


2 


2 


29 


8 


4 


1 


20 


3 






26 


12 


3 




35 


7 






23 


18 


11 




24 


6 






28 


15 


3 




35 


23 


2 




23 


4 


1 




35 


7 




1 


26 


15 


2 




26 


6 






28 


18 


1 




34 


10 


1 




26 


9 


1 


2 


33 


13 


2 




24 


6 






19 


6 


8 




37 


13 


2 




44 


4 


3 




40 


11 


2 




40 


9 






26 


5 


1 




38 


6 


4 




41 


3 


1 


1 


32 


2 






40 


9 






39 


2 




1 


37 


1 




1 


35 


11 


2 1 


2 


23 


2 


2 


2 


30 


16 






32 


6 





Page Fourteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1954 



SCHOOL 



Wayne Co. (Monticello) 

Western (Hickman) 

Western (Sinai) 

West Louisville 

West Point 

Wheelwright 

Whitesburg 

Williamsburg 

Williamstown 

Willisburg 

Wilmore 

Winchester 

Wingo 

Wolfe Co. (Campton) — 

Woodbine 

Wurtland 



E 

46 
31 
42 
23 
38 
47 
42 
19 
44 
41 
26 
32 
32 
37 
19 
42 



COACH 



OTHER 
SCHOOL 
OFFICIALS 



F 


P 


E 


G 


F 


1 


2 


53 


4 






1 


31 

42 


1 
4 


1 


2 


4 


29 


8 


4 


3 




38 

47 


7 


3 




3 


52 


1 




2 


3 


25 


10 




3 




44 


8 


2 


2 




44 


13 


1 


3 


1 


34 


4 


1 


4 


1 


43 


5 








27 


8 


1 


8 


2 


41 


9 


3 


3 


1 


19 


11 


3 


1 




44 


6 





CROWD 



E 


G 


F 


42 


12 


3 


24 


6 


3 


30 


12 


2 


24 


9 


8 


26 


11 


7 


41 


4 


2 


46 


4 


1 


21 


6 


5 


35 


14 


4 


40 


17 


1 


24 


12 


2 


40 


8 




27 


11 


4 


32 


15 


6 


16 


11 


5 


34 


12 


4 



E 


G 


F 


49 


3 


2 


28 


3 


2 


33 


12 




24 


9 


4 


25 


12 


5 


41 


4 


2 


48 


5 


1 


25 


5 


5 


36 


14 


4 


42 


14 


3 


27 


8 


4 


39 


9 




33 


9 


1 


37 


12 


5 


17 


13 


3 


32 


15 


3 



REPORT OF INSURANCE CLAIMS 

Three hundred twenty-three schools insured their athletes under the K.H.S.A.A. Protection Fund in 1953-54. In football 
3148 boys were insured, in all sports except football 6658, and in physical education 329. Seven hundred ten claims were sub- 
mitted, with six hundred seventy totaling $14,929.97. being paid. 
School Claimant Injury Amount Paid 

Ahrens Trade Maxie Campbell Injured finger (special) $ 74.50 

Almo Tackie Thorn Injured ankle — X-ray 7.00 

Alvaton Joe Tom Reagan Injured hand — X-ray 5.00 

Alvaton Roger Miller Injured knee — X-ray 10.00 

Anderson G. B. Hawkins Laceration — suture 5.00 

Anderson Walter W. Major. Jr Fractured rib 8.00 

Anderson Aubrey Etherington Fractured rib 10.00 

Annville Institute Herbert Cunagin Injured knee — X-ray 6.00 

Ashland Raymond Sparks Laceration^suture 5.00 

Ashland Jack Hillard Replacing knocked out filling 5.00 

Ashland David Klaiber Fractured metacarpal 10.00 

Ashland Jerry Henderson Broken tooth and X-ray 22.00 

Ashland Bill Hopkins Fractured ulna 25.00 

Ashland Charles McGuire Loss of tooth and broken tooth 45.00 

Ashland Ronnie Back Three fractured metatarsals 30.00 

Ashland Buddy Sexton Laceration — suture 5.00 

Athens -Bobby Baesler Injured ankle — X-ray 8.00 

Auburn Henry McCarley Injured elbow — X-ray 10.00 

Augusta Donald Edwards Fractured fibula 35.00 

Augusta James Fraysure Injured ankle — X-ray 6.00 

Austin Tracy Junior Spann Fractured femur 100.00 

Austin Tracy Roy Jones Injured elbow — X-ray 5.00 

Austin Tracy Paul White Injured back — X-ray 10.00 

Bagdad Bobby Wade Fractured humerus 48.00 

Bagdad Fred Ruble Loss of teeth 50.00 

Ballard Memorial Harold Farmer Injured arm — X-ray 10.00 

Barbourville Frank Disney Injured knee — X-ray 6.00 

Barbourville Frank Disney Injured hand — X-ray 5.00 

Barbourville Carl Engle Broken tooth 20.00 

Barbourville Arville Frazier Fractured metacarpals 25.00 

Bardstown John Will Graham Injured hip — X-ray 10.00 

Bardstown Norman Pash Broken nose 20.00 

Bardwell Paul Hoskins Injured ankle — X-ray 6.00 

Barret Rudy Bryant Injured wrist — X-ray 12.00 

Barret -Tack Matthews Injured neck — X-ray 10.00 

Barret Sammy Shelton Injured hand — X-ray 6.00 

Barret Frederick Schuette Laceration — suture 5.00 

Barret Donald Cobb Injured neck (special) 64.98 

Barret Bennie Logan Lacdration-suture 5.00 

Barret Cecil Logan Injured wrist — X-ray 10.00 

Barret Charles Watkins Loss of tooth 25.00 

Barret Rudy Bryant Fractured radius and ulna (special) 150.00 

Beechwood Ed Abbott Broken tooth — X-ray 22.00 

Beechwood William Schuize Injured foot — X-ray 5.00 

Beechwood William Schuize Chipped tooth 3.00 

Beechwood Alan Foster Injured knee — X-ray 5.00 

Beechwood Alan Foster Broken nose — X-ray 25.00 

Beechwood David Wade Injured ankle — X-ray 6.00 

Beechwood David Wade Laceration — suture 5.00 

Beechwood William Blasingame Broken teeth (special) 77.50 

Beechwood William Garrison Injured wrist — X-ray 5.00 

Beechwood Alan Foster Injured knee (special »_ 

Belfry Lawson King Injured ankl* 

Bell County Clinton Robbins Injured knee- 

Bellevue Clifford Swauger Laceration — suture 

Bellevue Cliff Swauger Injured knee — X-ray. 



90.00 

-X-ray 10.00 

-X-ray 12.00 

5.00 

5.00 

Bellevue Robert Bradford Injured head — X-ray 10.00 

Bellevue Robert Bradford Fractured scapula 35.00 

Bellevue Don Dixius Broken nose and injured shoulder — X-ray 45.00 

Bellevue Don Delaney Loss of tooth 20.00 

Bellevue Ken Watkins Broken tooth and X-ray 22.00 

Bellevue Ben Flora, Jr Fractured tibia 50.00 

Bellevue William Case Loss of tooth 20.00 

Bellevue Tom Jones Injured knee — X-ray '. 10.00 

Bellevue Cliff Swauger Injured knee (special) 82.50 

Benton Gene Clark Broken tooth — X-ray 24.00 

Bowling Green Pat Patterson Injured wrist — X-ray 6.00 

Bowling Green Billy Hildreth Injured leg — X-ray 6.00 

Bowling Green Dickie McCormack Fractured radius 40.00 

Bowling Green Jerry Polston Fractured metatarsal— *X- ray 25.00 

Bowling Green Fred Rich Fractured finger — X-ray 16.00 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLEiTE FOR AUGUST, 1954 Page Fifteen 

Bowling Green Bobby Armour Fractured carpal 20.00 

Bowling Green Joe Huddleston Broken nose and finger— X-ray 46.00 

Bowling Green David Mason 1 Injured arm— X-ray 6.00 

Bowling Green Jackie Jeannette Fractured fibula 50.00 

Bowling Green Arthur Gentry Fractured fibula 50.00 

Bracken County Gary Hicks Fractured radius and ulna 70.00 

Breckinridge Training Billy Kenney Loss of tooth 25.00 

Brewers Bobby Norsworthy Laceration— suture 6.00 

Brewers Eltis Prather Injured wrist— X-ray 5.00 

Brownsville Jimmie Skaggs Injured finger— X-ray_ 7.50 

Brownsville David Davis Fractured metacarpal— X-ray 23.00 

Buffalo Billy Joe Salsman Broken nose 18.00 

Burgin Paul Morford Injured wrist— X-ray 10.00 

Burgin James Baker. Jr Laceration— suture 5.00 

Burlington Charles Lustenberg Fractured radius 30.00 

Burlington Warren Ryle Fractured clavicle 25.00 

Bush Dennis Parman Injured ankle— X-ray 5.00 

Bush Ladel McFadden Fractured ulna 8.00 

gygh _ _ _Calvin Hensley Three chipped teeth — one broken tooth 14.00 

CamargJ Z.ZIZIIZIZZIZ._IIZIZII.I. Shirley McCoyIIZI_Z..ZZZ.__ZZZ..ZFractured fibula 50.00 

Campbell County Don Cline. Jr Loss of two teeth 40.00 

Campbell County Roy Gibson Injured elbow— X-ray 6.00 

Campbell County Ronnie Reder Laceration— suture 5.00 

Campbell County Don Cline. .Tr Laceration— suture 5.00 

Campbell County Don Cline. Jr Injured ribs— X-ray 10.00 

Campbell County Roger Bihl Fractured radius 40.00 

Campbell County Jay Teegarden Injured knee— X-ray 6.00 

Campbell County Dick Slocum Injured wrist— X-ray 6.00 

Carlisle Billy Clark Fractured ulna 10.50 

Carlisle Larry Cameron Injured elbow— X-ray 12.00 

Carrollton __ Ronnie Marlette Laceration— suture ^ 5.00 

Carter Rex English Injured shoulder 10.00 

Catlettsburg Robert Heaberlin Injured shoulder— X-ray 20.00 

Catlettsburg Charles Cantrell Injured ankle— X-ray 6.00 

Catlettsburg Eddie Fowler Injured finger (special) 86.50 

Catlettsburg John Spaulding Injured shoulder— X-ray 20.00 

Catlettsburg John Spaulding Broken nos<^X-ray 21.00 

Catlettsburg Norman Collingsworth Injured arm— X-ray 6.00 

Catlettsburg __ __Bill Kirk Broken nose— X-ray 21.00 

Catlettsburg _ __.Tames .Jordan Injured shoulder— X-ray 11.00 

Catlettsburg John Spaulding Injured leg— X-ray 6.00 

Catlettsburg __ Douglas Moore Dislocated ankle 17.00 

Catlettsburg Norman Collinsworth Injured arm (.special) 83.60 

Caverna __ _ Rex Bailey Fractured clavicle 35.00 

Caverna "Chester Adair Fractured carpal 10.00 

Caverna Rex Bailey Fractured clavicle 15.00 

Clark County _ _ Paul Soivey_ _ "_ _ Loss of teeth (special) 94.00 

Clark County _ ___ James Hall-- — - Fractured clavicle 35.00 

Clay Arnold McGrew Fractured radius 35.00 

Central __ .Terry Turner _ Injured hip— X-ray 20.00 

College — „Z"Hugh Hines Fractured rib 3.00 

College Frank Miller — _ „ Broken finger 4.00 

College Ronny Hilsmeier Injured foot— X-ray 6.00 

College -- _ _ Lamar Herrin __ Fractured tarsal 36.00 

College - _ Dan Browning--- — Injured hip — X-ray 20.00 

Corydon _ Charles Duncan-- - Injured tooth— X-ray 2.00 

Corydon _ __ .Charles Holcomb- - „ .Injured ankle— X-ray 10.00 

Corydon „Charles Duncan Loss of tooth 18.00 

Corydon _ Charles Duncan Loss of tooth (additional payment) 5.00 

Corydon ZZZ'Z'Z " 'Z"ZZZ Charles Holcomb-- ZZ— ~ "Dislocated shoulder 7.50 

Crab Orchard _ Tom Reynolds--- Injured ankle— X-ray 5.00 

Crab Orchard Ralph Hasty Injured thumb— X-ray 5.00 

Cromwell _ "_Houston Hudson - Dislocated ankle 7.00 

Cuba Jimmy Williams ... — Injured ankl^X-ray 6.00 

Cub Run _ Houston Jaggers Dislocated hip 11.00 

Cunningham _ _ Gene Allen Moss — „_ Injured ankle — X-ray 5.00 

Cynthiana __ William R. McKee _ Injured nose — X-ray 5.O0 

Cynthiana - - _ _ _ Gene Whitaker_- - Fractured metacarpal 15.00 

Cynthiana '""Z "Glendon Ravenscraft Injured hand— X-ray 6.00 

Cynthiana _ Virgil Lee Hatcher Injured knee — X-ray 6.00 

Cynthiana Z"'Thomas CIavton_- „ „ Injured ankle— X-ray 6.00 

Cynthiana _ Gene Whitaker--- Injured arm— X-ray 12.00 

Cynthiana ZZWilliam Wells Fractured carpal— X-ray 26.00 

Danville .Tack Farmer- - - - Loss of three teeth 50.00 

Danville ZZZ John Knight-Z-ZZ Z" ZZ Fractured rib — X-ray 18.00 

Danville ZZJohn Newlin ""_ Z Injured arm — X-ray 6.00 

Danville ZZZZZ"" "_Virgil Lanham--ZZZZZZZZZZ_Z-Z""Z"'^''^<^'"''^<' "*' — X-ray 18.00 

Danville ZZ-Z_ZZZ" Jim Rutigliano Z._Z.ZZZZZZZZ'"-i"''^'^ '"^■^'^ — X-ray 6.00 

Danville Z Tommy Kries _~ "Broken nose 5.00 

Danville ZZZ- - Sammy Reid Z Z Fractured knee cap 24.00 

Danville Z _""ZZDickie Brock "Z "ZZ" ZZ'"-!"''^'^ ankle — X-ray 5.00 

Danville Z Z-""_ Harold Harmon— Z """ZZ""Z- ""__Fractured tibia 31.00 

Danville ZZ-ZMack Johnson ZZZ.-I"-i"''^'^ ankle — X-ray 6.00 

Danville Z _.Tack Wallace ""Injured elbow — X-ray 6.00 

Danville "Z Tommy Kries Z- Z "Broken nose (special) Additional payment 78.15 

Danville Z "ZZCharles R. Seay "Z "Injured neck — X-ray 16.00 

Danville "" Billy Moore """""Fractured carpal 17.00 

Dayton ZZZ. ZZZ Basil Long ZZZZ-ZZZZZZ Z--'"J""'J ^"^e — X-ray 5.00 

Dayton _" David Kaiser Fractured ulna 40.00 

Dayton _ZHarry Schorry Fractured metacarpals — X-ray 31.00 

Dayton ZZZ_Z"_ Franklin Moore Z-Z ZZZ-ZLoss of tooth 22.00 

Dayton Z Robert Williams ^-'^Juf^"! hand — X-ray 6.00 

Dayton Z""ZJames Lowe Broken tooth 20.00 

Dayton ZZ_Joe Birkley Injured shoulder — X-ray 10.00 

Dayton ZZZZ ZZ Z Bernie Shields ZZZZZZZZZ ZZZZZ^roin injury — Operative case (special) 150.00 

Dixie Heights _ ZDave Browning Injured ankle — X-ray 5.00 

Dixie Heights Robert Scott Injured back— X-ray 5.00 

Dixie Heights Jack Gardiner Injured ankle — X-ray B.OO 

Dixie Heights Jack Gardiner Injured knee — X-ray B.OO 

Dixie Heights Z— David Skien Injured head — X-ray B.OO 



Page Sixteen THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1954 

Dixon Terry Villines Injured knee — X-ray 10.00 

Earlington Donald Smith Injured back — X-ray 10.00 

East Bernstadt Charles Rupered Injured ankle — X-ray 6.00 

East Bernstadt Denver Jones Fractured metatarsal 7.50 

Eastern Larry Wilson Fractured humerus (operative case) (special) 150.00 

Eastern Z Dick Voit Injured shoulder— X-ray 7.50 

Eastern Hugh Durham Injured shoulder — X-ray 20.00 

Eastern Jerry Colston Fractured finger — X-ray 16.00 

Eastern Stephen Isaacs Broken nose 15.00 

Eastern Fritz Russell Injured ankle and elbow — X-ray 12.50 

Eastern Paul Aspy Injured wrist— X-ray 6.00 

Eastern Paul Aspy Fractured metatarsal 20.00 

Eastern Richard Ewing Injured ankle — X-ray 5.00 

Eastern Dan Neubauer Injured wrist— X-ray 12.00 

Eastern Stephen Isaacs Injured leg — X-ray 12.00 

Eastern David Bay Injured ribs — X-ray 30.75 

Edmonton Kenneth Smith Injured nose — X-ray 5.00 

Edmonton Jimmy Romines Injured ankle — X-ray 5.00 

Edmonton Burnell Thompson Broker, tooth 15.00 

Edmonton Ted McMurtrey Broken tooth 10.00 

Elizabethtown G. C. Ray Injured head (special) 46.50 

Elkhorn Ray Scott Parris Fractured femur 21.00 

Elkhorn Larry Jones Dislocated shoulder 13.00 

Elkhorn Donald Graves Broken nose 5.00 

Elkhorn Ray Parris Injured knee — X-ray 6.00 

Elkhorn Donald Graves Two broken teeth (special) 52.00 

Erie Jerry Nolte Injured knee — X-ray 5.00 

Erie Glen David Rucker Fractured clavicle 35.00 

Ezel Bernard Murphy Injured ankle — X-ray 6.00 

Fern Creek David Denunzio Injured hand — X-ray 5.00 

Fern Creek Don Dyer Fractured radius 20.00 

Fern Creek George M. Stout Injured foot — X-ray 5.00 

Fern Creek David Racel Broken teeth 37.00 

Fern Creek Larry Johnson Injured elbow — X-ray 5.00 

Fern Creek George M. Stout Injured back — X-ray 15.00 

Fern Creek Larry Johnson Dislocated finger — X-ray 6.00 

Fern Creek David Denunzio Injured hip and arm — X-ray 20.00 

Fern Creek Don Dyer Injured chest — X-ray 15.00 

Flat Gap Zane Williams Loss of tooth — X-ray 27.00 

Flat Gap Phillip Eugene Murray Injured knee — X-ray, Two broken facings 18.50 

Fleming County Lucien Lee Royse Injured knee (special) 125.00 

Florence Donald Bonar Broken tooth — X-ray 22.00 

Florence Donald Gilbert Broken tooth 20.00 

Florence Frank Dixon Loss of tooth 25.00 

Franklin-Simpson Buddy Harris Injured shoulder — X-ray 10.00 

Franklin-Simpson Pat Freeman Injured wrist — X-ray 6.00 

Franklin-Simpson Donald Gore Injured back — X-ray 12.00 

Franklin-Simpson Donald Gore Fractured humerus 60.00 

Franklin-Simpson Charles Dillard Injured leg — X-ray 12.00 

Fredonia Donald Rogers Fractured radius and ulna 68.40 

Fredonia Major Brown, Jr Injured knee — X-ray, Laceration — suture 10.00 

Fredonia Donald Rogers Fractured radius and ulna 75.00 

Frenchburg Kenneth Lee Dislocated mandible (special) 15.00 

Frenchburg Wallace Williams Injured head — X-ray 5.00 

Fulton Haskell Nelson Fractured femur 35,00 

Fulton Donald McSpeight Injured back — X-ray 10.00 

Fulton Jeff Lester Injured ankle — X-ray 6.00 

Fulton Bobby Toon Injured knee — X-ray 6.00 

Fulton Don Wright Fractured metacarpal 32.00 

Fulton Bennie Sams Fractured tibia 35.00 

Fulton Bobby Dunn Fractured humerus 36.60 

Gallatin County Eddie Carlton Injured foot (special) 52.75 

Gamaliel Willard Hale Injured knee — X-ray 6.00 

Garth Dick Albright Injured knee — X-ray 10.00 

Garth Joseph B. Holman Injured ankle — X-ray 6.00 

Garth Dickie James Injured hand — X-ray 3.00 

Garth Duke Owens Injured foot — X-ray 5.00 

Glendale Donald Osborne Injured arm — X-ray 6.00 

Glendale Eugene Boyd Laceration — suture 5.00 

Glendale Paul Tharpe Laceration — suture 5.00 

Good Shepherd Overton Bryan .Injured hand — X-ray 5.00 

Graham Jerry Willis Laceration — suture 6.00 

Grant (bounty Jack Wilson Broken nose 8.00 

Grant County Richard Simpson Injured ankle — X-ray 6.00 

Grant County Richard Simpson Injured knee — X-ray 6.00 

Grant County Willie D. Lawrence Injured knee — X-ray 6.00 

Greensburg Donald W. McCubbin Fractured ulna 29.00 

Harlan Charles Berger Injured ankle — X-ray 6.00 

Harlan Howard Walls Injured elbow and shoulder — X-ray 15.00 

Harlan Ronald Ross Injured elbow and shoulder — X-ray 15.00 

Harlan David Short Injured back— X-ray 20.00 

Harrison County George P. Hehr, Jr Fractured patella 27.00 

Harrison County Donald Smith Injured elbow— X-ray 12.00 

Harrison County Gene Harp Injured knee — X-ray 12.00 

Harrodsburg Charlie Burton Injured ankle — X-ray 6.00 

Harrodsburg Clinton Woodard Loss of tooth 3.00 

Harrodsburg Charles Richard Butler Fractured metacarpal 18.00 

Harrodsburg Wallace Campbell Injured arm (special) 100.40 

Harrodsburg Charlie Burton Injured ankle — X-ray 5.00 

Harrodsburg Marshall Darnell Fractured radius 40.00 

Harrodsburg Lee Conley Fractured tibia 50.00 

Harrodsburg Lonnie Campbell Injured face — X-ray 6.00 

Hazard Joe Baker Injured hip — X-ray 10.00 

Hazard Roger Miniard Loss of tooth 20.00 

Hazard Bill Carson Injured foot — X-ray 5.00 

Hazel .Johnny White Injured wrist — X-ray 6.00 

Hazel Walter Byars Broken tooth— X-ray 21.00 

Hebbardsville Teddy Smith Injured ankle— X-ray 6.00 

Hebbardsville — , , Jimmy Pinkston Laceration — suture 3.00 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1954 Page Seventeen 

Hickman Darrell Vowell Injured ankle — X-ray 6.00 

Hickman Tames Holcombe Injured ankle — X-ray 6.00 

Hickman Terry Williams Injured knee — X-ray 10.00 

Highlands Douglas Harvey Injured back — X-ray 10.00 

Highlands Thomas L. Sadosky Fractured humerus and scapula 110.00 

Highlands Don Hussey Dislocated shoulder 10.00 

Highlands Gene Deslongchamp Dislocated knee 35.00 

Highlands Lynn Smith Dislocated knee 32.50 

Highlands Dave Langenbrunner Injured leg — X-ray 6.00 

Highlands Bill Boyle Fractured leg {special) 150.00 

Highlands Earl (Bob) Dickerson Injured ankle — X-ray 3.00 

Highlands Massey Pierce Injured knee (special) 150.00 

Highlands Paul Francis -Fractured mandible (special) 57.50 

Hiseville David L. Ballard Injured ankle — X-ray 6.00 

Hiseville Alan Herron Injured ankle — X-ray 5.00 

Hodgenville Murrell Smith Injured knee (special) 100.00 

Hopkinsville John Adams Broken tooth 5.00 

Hopkinsville Fred Belts Injured back (special) 100.00 

Hopkinsville O. T. Maddux Loss of tooth and X-ray 29.00 

Hopkinsville Ralph Anderson Broken tooth 8.00 

Horse Branch Tunior Raley Broken nose — X-ray 30.00 

Howevalley Kenneth Bush Dislocated elbow — X-ray 31.00 

Inez Billy Ray Cassady Injured ankle — X-ray 10.00 

Irvine Rhonda Flynn Injured knee — X-ray 10.00 

Irvine Robert Durbin Fractured wrist 20.00 

Irvine Owen Edwards Injured wrist — X-ray 10.00 

Irvine G. W. Quisenberry Loss of tooth 3.00 

Irvine Kenneth H. Covey Broken nose 20.00 

Irvine Owen Edwards Fractured finger — X-ray 20.00 

Irvine Melvin Smithers Broken nose 20.00 

Irvine Kenneth Covey Injured finger — X-ray. Laceration — suture 16.00 

Irvine Hade Durbin Fractured wrist and Laceration — suture 16.00 

Irvine Alton Flynn Loss of teeth — fractured jaw 67.00 

J. M. Atherton Rollins Burhans Injured chest — X-ray 12.50 

J. M. Atherton .Tohn Clancy Injured jaw — X-ray 10.00 

J. M. Atherton William Lussky Injured finger — X-ray 5.00 

J. M. Atherton William Young Injured hand— X-ray 5.00 

J. M. Atherton William Rudd Fractured metacarpal 10.00 

J. M. Atherton George W. Howard III Injured elbow— X-ray 5.00 

J. M. Atherton Neal McFerran Injured knee — X-ray 6.00 

J. M. Atherton Don Haverstock Injured knee — operative case (special) 90.50 

J. M. Atherton Bill Rudd Fractured metacarpal 7.50 

J. M. Atherton Richard Jelsma Loss of tooth — X-ray 26.00 

J. M. Atherton William Rudd Fractured metacarpal 15.00 

J. M. Atherton RoUin Burhans Injured neck— X-ray 10.00 

J. M. Atherton Roger Dalton Fractured clavicle 35.00 

Kentucky School for the Blind Robert Page Dislocated radius 25.00 

Kyrock Jackie Lee Webb Injured elbow — X-ray 5.00 

Lacy Ronnie Johnson Dislocated finger 10.00 

Lafayette Paul McCoy Broken nose — X-ray 25.00 

Lafayette Donald Plunkett Injured back^X-ray 15.00 

Lafayette Gerald Walton Dislocated knee 35.00 

Lafayette Eddie Ray Polly Injured knee (special) 150.00 

Lancaster Billy Joe May Injured head — X-ray 10.00 

Lee County ^ Bobby Thorpe, Jr Broken tooth .' 20.00 

Leslie County Archie Gene Caudill Broken tooth and laceration — suture 22.00 

Leslie County Archie Gene Caudill Injured ankle — X-ray 5.00 

Lewisport Leo Basham Injured back — X-ray 10.00 

Lewisport .Terry Frasure Fractured metacarpal — X-ray 21.00 

Lewisport Jerry Frasure Broken nose — X-ray 25.00 

Lexington Catholic Timothy Scully Laceration — suture 5.00 

Lexington Catholic Paul Frank Broken tooth 3.00 

Lexington Catholic Timothy Scully Laceration— suture 5.00 

Livermore Samuel Humphrey Fractured fibula 50.00 

Livermore Hubert Humphrey Injured knee — X-ray 10.00 

Livermore Kenneth Hutchins Laceration — suture 5.00 

Livermore Lester Humphrey Fractured rib 10.00 

Lloyd Ronnie Miller Two broken teeth 12.00 

Lloyd Gary Jump Chipped tooth — X-ray 5.00 

Lloyd George Ratcliff Injured finger — X-ray 5.00 

Lloyd Leo Perkins Injured chest — X-ray 10.00 

Lloyd Ronnie White Injured arm — X-ray 5.00 

Lloyd Leslie Lambert Injured arm — X-ray 10.00 

Lloyd Darrell Ferguson Injured hand — X-ray 5.00 

Lloyd David Stephens Fractured mandible 40.00 

London Lanny Hiller Four broken teeth 50.00 

London Hez Hensley Fractured vertebra process — X-ray 20.00 

London Bill Pennington Injured head — X-ray 20.00 

Louisa Kelly Patton Fractured metacarpal — X-ray 26.00 

Louisa Jack Fairchild Fractured clavicle 35.00 

Louisa .Timmy Johnstone Dental injury (special) 74.50 

Louisa Wallace Ewers Dental injury (special) 94.50 

Louisa Jody Adams Fractured fibula 50.00 

Louisa Kenneth Osborne Injured hand — X-ray 6.00 

Louisa Robert Collins Fractured radius 40.00 

Louisville Baptist John Jordan Injured knee (special) 150.00 

Louisville Baptist Donald E. Jarett Injured knee — X-ray 10.00 

Loyall Jerry Wilhoit Injured ankle — X-ray 5.00 

Loyall Bobby Goforth Fractured metacarpal— X-ray 32.00 

Loyall .Tackie McKendrick Fractured radius and ulna 75.00 

Lynn Camp Bobby Engle Fractured maxilla 40.00 

Lynn Grove Jimmy H. Ford Injured ankle — X-ray 6.00 

Lynnvale Boyce Duvall Injured knee — X-ray 5.00 

McCreary County Dean King Injured wrist^X-ray 2.00 

McCreary County Don Lindsay Injured ankle-— X-ray 2.00 

McKinney Larry Hensley Dislocated knee— X-ray 41.00 

Madison-Model Cecil Dunn Injured hip — X-ray 10.00 

Madisonville Edgar Price Injured ankle — X-ray __,__^,^_, , , 12.00 



Page Eighteen THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1954 

Madisonville John Donan Fractured radius and ulna 75.00 

Madisonville .John McClearn Injured ankle — X-ray 6.00 

Madisonville Robert Traylor Injured hand — X-ray 6.00 

Marion James W. Love Broken tooth — X-ray 22.00 

Mayfield Orby Arnold Broken nose (special) 49.75 

Maysville .Tames Collines Broken tooth 19.00 

Maysville Donald Combs Injured knee (special) 150.00 

Maysville Richard Breeze Injured back — X-ray 15.00 

Maytown Kenneth Collins Loss of teeth 50.00 

Middlesboro Joe Jenkins Injured knee — X-ray 6.00 

Middlesboro Larry Monhallon Loosened teeth — X-ray 4.00 

Middlesboro James Branscome Injured ankle — X-ray 6.00 

Middlesboro James Moody Taylor Injured ankle — X-ray 10.00 

Middlesboro Joe Jenkins Injured knee — X-ray 10.00 

Middlesboro Cecil England Loss of three teeth 50.00 

Middlesboro .Timmy O'Neal Injured nose — X-ray 7.50 

Middlesboro J. B. White Loss of two teeth 41.00 

Middlesboro Harry Chambers Fractured metatarsal — X-ray 35.00 

Middlesboro Billy Honeycutt Injured knee — X-ray 12.00 

Middlesboro .Tack Stanley Injured wrist — X-ray 7.50 

Middlesboro Bobby Meyers Injured knee (special) 102.75 

Middlesboro Douglas Campbell Injured hip — X-ray 10.00 

Middlesboro Noble Vaughn Injured foot — X-ray 6.00 

Middlesboro Bobby Barton Injured knee — X-ray 12.00 

Middlesboro Ren Bush Injured ear — X-ray 10.00 

Middlesboro Hugh Ed Howard Injured ankle — X-ray 6.00 

Middlesboro Herby Keffer Loss of teeth 50.00 

Middlesboro -Tack Stanley Injured knee — X-ray 12.00 

Middlesboro David Elliott Dislocated elbow — X-ray 31.00 

Middlesboro John Allen Taylor Injured rib — X-ray 10.00 

Middlesboro Tommy Lewis Injured knee — X-ray 12.00 

Middlesboro Paul Braden Loss of two teeth 50.00 

Middlesboro Cecil England Injured wrist — X-ray 6.00 

Middlesboro Paul Braden Broken nose 9.00 

Middlesboro Horace Mullins Broken nose — X-ray 27.50 

Milburn Gene Burgess Loss of two teeth 50.00 

Milburn Clayton Gilliam Hernia — operative case (special) 128.25 

Minerva Rodney Schiltz Injured knee — X-ray 5.00 

Minerva Donald Ray Merrill Loss of tooth 25.00 

Monticello Donald Morris Dislocated wrist 6.00 

Monticello Bobby Morris Loss of tooth 25.00 

Morgan County Bobby Lykins Dislocated elbow 10.00 

Morgan County J. D. Hill Fractured maxilla 22.00 

Morganfield Bobby Elliott Loss of tooth — X-ray 26.00 

Morganfield Jimmy Fisher Injured chest and foot — X-ray 16.00 

Morganfield Billy Ray Hughes Injured knee — operative case (special) 139.13 

Morganfield David Griggs Fractured tibia and injured hand 55.00 

Morganfield William Oakley Injured knee and nose — X-ray 12.00 

Morganfield Prentice Brisby Broken tooth 20.00 

Mt. Washington Tommy Cornell Chipped tooth— X-ray 5.00 

Muhlenberg Central Barnes Bratcher Laceration — suture 5.00 

Muhlenberg Central Kenneth Galyen Laceration — suture 5.O0 

Munfordville Harry C. Wilson Injured ankle — X-ray 6.00 

Murray Donnie McCord Injured nose — X-ray 6.00 

Murray Billy Wiggins Laceration— suture 5.00 

Murray Hal Houston Injured shoulder — X-ray 10.00 

Murray ._Don Overbey Fractured radius 40.00 

Murray Bobby Kik Dislocated knee cap 35.00 

Murray Holmes Ellis, Jr Broken nose — X-ray 26.00 

Murray Bobby Crawford Laceration — suture 6.00 

Murray R. c. Jones Injured nose — X-ray 5.00 

Murray Bobby Buchanan Fractured ulna : 40.00 

Murray Hal Houston Loss of tooth 27.00 

Murray Training Walter R. Jones, Jr Loss of tooth— X-ray 27.00 

New Concord Jimmy Allbritten Fractured vertebra process — X-ray 30.00 

New Concord Billy Joe Kingins Injured foot — X-ray 5.00 

New Haven Mack Judge Fractured finger 8.00 

Newport Robert Taylor Fractured ankle 16.00 

Newport Ronald Spenlau Injured foot — X-ray 5.00 

Newport Dale Poe Broken nose 10.00 

Newport Robert Hughes Fractured ulna 40.00 

Newport George Budig Injured knee — X-ray 5.00 

Newport Gene Stephens Injured head — X-ray 10.00 

Newport Howard Blaut Injured knee — X-ray 5.00 

Newport Ronnie Derrick Fractured tibia and fibula (special) 150.00 

Newport Kelly H. Flannery Injured chest — X-ray 10.00 

Newport Bruce Barkhau Fractured tibia 50.00 

Newport James Fangman Loss of tooth 5.00 

Newport Catholic .Terry C. Sutkamp Broken nose — X-ray 30.00 

Newport Catholic Joseph Michael Injured elbow — X-ray 5.00 

Niagara Robert Duncan Fractured finger — X-ray 15.00 

Nicholas County Ned -Tennings Laceration — suture 5.00 

Nicholas County William Earl Hubbard Injured leg — X-ray 10.00 

Nicholasville Robert Quinn Dislocated shoulder 16.00 

Nicholasville James Bailey Fractured metacarpal 26.00 

Nicholasville Alfred Shelley Injured jaw — X-ray 20.00 

Nicholasville Ronald Lane Dislocated shoulder 12.00 

Oil Springs Orville Conley Injured Foot — X-ray 10.00 

Oil Springs Paul Salyer Injured jaw — X-ray 10.00 

Oldham County .Tackle Carpenter Injured ankle — X-ray 5.00 

Oldham County Terry Ashbrook Two broken teeth 40.00 

Oldham County James W. Madden Injured ankle — X-ray 5.00 

Old Kentucky Home Billy Maddox Loss of two teeth 50.00 

Orangeburg George Galbreath Injured ankle — X-ray 6.00 

Orangeburg Forrest Jackson Broken nose — X-ray 40.00 

Owen County Glendel Dunavent Injured hand (special) -— 134.88 

Paintsville Edward Williams Fractured clavicle 35.00 

Paintsville Joe Kirk Injured elbow — X-ray 5.00 

Paintsville Roger Hammond Injured hand — X-ray 12.00 

Paintsville Phillip Estepp Fractured radius 35.00 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1954 Page Nineteen 

Paris Robert Ricci Dislocated knee 10.75 

Paris Tommy Fullington Injured back — X-ray 10.00 

Paris Charles Atkinson Injured shoulder — X-ray 13.00 

Paris Dan Walker Injured shoulder — X-ray 12.00 

Paris Ray Gant Injured wrist 7.00 

Park City Bill Shaw Fractured radius and ulna 131.93 

Park City Leroy Bailey Broken nose 20.00 

Pembroke Bobby Combs Fractured metatarsal 35.00 

Phelps Donnie Vaughn Injured arm — X-ray 6.00 

Pikeville Nelson Radwan Dislocated thumb — X-ray 16.00 

Pineville Boone Hoskins Ruptured spleen (special) 114.75 

Pineville Robert Culton Fractured tibia 50.00 

Pineville Marc Hoskins Fractured radius 25.00 

Pineville Chris Rego Fractured metacarpals 15.00 

Prestonsbure Franklin Caldwell Fractured metacarpal 30.00 

Prestonsbure Charles Salyers Injured ankle — X-ray 6.00 

Prestonsbure Clifford Goble Loss of two teeth 50.00 

Prestonsbure Bobby Crager Fractured femur (special) 150.00 

Prestonsbure Donald Gene Reatherford Laceration — suture 5.00 

Prichard Roy Fred Murphy Injured knee — X-ray 6.00 

Prichard Cecil .Tack Adams Injured wrist — X-ray 5.00 

Powell County Robert Atkinson Knee - Injured - surgery required 67.00 

Powell County Russell Bowen. Jr. Broken nose 20.00 

Pulaski County Virgil Diamond Injui-ed back — X-ray 10.00 

Pulaski County Marvin MuUins Laceration — suture 5.00 

Pulaski County .Tackie Vaught Laceration — suture 5.00 

Raceland Tames Huffman Loss of two teeth 50.00 

Reidland Ronnie Mohler Injured knee — X-ray 6.00 

Reidland Forrest Robinson Laceration — suture 5.00 

Richardsville L. A. Beals Injured ankle — X-ray 5.00 

Richardsville Landon Elkin Laceration — suture 5.00 

Rineyville Bobby Branger Injured knee — X-ray 20.00 

Rockhold Lawrence White Laceration — suture 5.00 

Rockport Bobby Drake Injured ankle — X-i-ay 5.00 

Rose Hill Kermit Ixigue Fractured femur 23.00 

Rose Hill Kermit Logue Fractured femur — Aditional payment 27.00 

Rose Hill Kermit Logue Fractured femur — Additional payment 12.00 

Russellville Jere Hopson Dislocated shoulder — X-ray 45.00 

Russellville William Earl Taylor Dislocated radius and X-ray 22.50 

Russellville John England Injured shoulder — X-ray 10.00 

Russellville Pat Kirkpatrick Dislocated shoulder 18.50 

Russellville Glenn Gilliam Injured head — X-ray 24.00 

Russellville David Hancock Broken nose (special) 133.45 

St. Charles Jerry Thompson Fractured clavicle 36.00 

St. Mary's Mike Sullivan Injured head— X-ray 31.20 

St. Vincent Eddie Clements Fractured thumb — X-ray 15.00 

St. Xavier David Whitehead Injured shoulder — X-ray 10.00 

St. Xavier William Goff Laceration — suture 5.00 

St. Xavier Charles Naber Laceration — suture 5.00 

St. Xavier Ronald Allgeier Injured arm — X-ray 6.00 

St. Xavier John F. Parker Injured head — X-ray 10.00 

St. Xavier John McGuire Injured back — X-ray 10.00 

St. Xavier John Wafford Fractured radius 40.00 

St. Xavier David McGinty Fractured finger — X-ray 16.00 

St. Xavier David Whitehead Fractured fibula 28.00 

St. Xavier Ed Walczak Injured chest — X-ray 10.00 

Sharpe Billy Lampley Injured shoulder — X-ray 10.00 

Sharpe Bobby McGregor Fractured finger 10.00 

Sharpe Charles Brindley Injured back — X-ray 7.50 

Sharpe Bobby G. Barrett Fractured toe — X-ray 20.00 

Sharpe David Earl Inglish Injured thumb — X-ray 5.00 

Shelbyville Joe Shea Injured knee — X-ray 6.00 

Shelbyville Sammy Dale West Injured knee — X-ray 5.00 

Shelbyville Russell Hickman Broken tooth 6.00 

Shelbyville Bobby Carter Injured elbow — X-ray 6.00 

Shelbyville Lewis Mathis, Jr tnjjred ankle — X-ray 6.00 

Shelbyville Herbie Kays Injured shoulder — X-ray 5.00 

Shepherdsville James Burden Laceration — suture. Fractured finger — X-ray 21.00 

Shepherdsville Arthur Miller Fractured ulna 40.00 

Shepherdsville Darrell Parrish Fractured humerus 60.00 

Silver Grove Frank Hilton Fractured clavicle 35.00 

Slaughters Billy Martin Loss of teeth 50.00 

Slaughters Duane Zachary Fractured radius 25.00 

Southern Darwin Dupin Broken nose 13.00 

Southern Kenneth Rennirt Loss of tooth 25.00 

Southern Charles Gray Injured foot — X-ray 6.00 

Springfield Bill Young Fractured tibia 41.00 

Springfield .John Young Injured finger — X-ray 6.00 

Stuart Robinson Hiram Whitaker Laceration — suture 4.00 

Stuart Robinson Floyd Mullins Laceration — suture 5.00 

Stuart Robinson Harold Mullis Laceration — suture 5.00 

Stuart Robinson Willie Haynes Injured leg — X-ray 6.00 

Stuart Robinson Edward Guerrero Loss of tooth — X-ray 27.00 

Stamping Ground Archie Burchfield Loss of tooth — X-ray 27.00 

Stamping Ground Neville Purvis Loss of tooth — X-ray 27.00 

Sturgis Billie Bob Sprague Fractured tibia and fibula 65.00 

Sturgis Dudley Hazel Injured back — X-ray 17.50 

Symsonia Bobby .Toe Cavanaugh Fractured metacarpal — X-ray 31.50 

Symsonia Charles McManus Laceration — suture 5.00 

Taylorsville George Brumley Laceration — suture 5.00 

Taylorsville Sherman Crenshaw Laceration — suture 5.00 

Temple Hill Richard Thomas Laceration — suture 5.00 

Tilghman Jerry Brewer Laceration — suture 5.00 

Tilghman Cletus Hardin Injured knee — X-ray 6.00 

Tilghman Bill Ferguson Injured ankle — X-ray 4.00 

Tilghman Eurie Smith Injured ankle — X-ray 4.00 

Tilghman Tim Russell Injured shoulder — X-ray 10.00 

Tilghman Bill Dyer Injured ankle — X-ray 4.00 

Tilghman Cecil Joe Moore Injured knee — X-ray 6.00 

Tilghman Charles Cole Injured ankle — X-ray 4.00 

Tilghman Eurie H. Smith Injured knee — X-ray 6.00 



Page Twenty THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1954 

Tilehraan __ Harold RigBS Injured knee— X-ray 6.00 

Tilghman Bill Dyer Injured chest— X-ray 10.00 

Tilghman Bill Ferguson Injured chest — X-ray 10.00 

Tilghman _ _ - Don Russell Broken to&th 20.00 

Tilghman -- .Terry Brewer Injured teeth — X-ray 8.00 

Tilghman _ Charles Cole Broken tooth 20.00 

Tilghman Carl Baker Loss of tooth— X-ray 27.00 

Todd County John B. Power Injured nose — X-ray B.OO 

Todd County Jesse Savage Dislocated wrist — X-ray BO.OO 

Todd County Allen Hampton Injured nose — X-ray 10.00 

Todd County C. H. Savage Laceration— suture 5.00 

Todd County Bobby Collins Dislocated elbow — X-ray 31.00 

Todd County Bobby Collins Injured shoulder — X-ray 5.00 

Tompkinsville Bobby Butler Fractured radius 20.00 

Tompkinsville Billy Turner Injured elbow — X-ray 10.00 

Tompkinsville Bobby Butler Fractured radius (Balance due) 6.00 

Tompkinsville Alton Ross, Jr. Injured knee — X-ray 10.00 

Trigg County Cleland White Injured head— X-ray 10.00 

Trigg County Curtis Joiner Dislocated thumb — X-ray 13.50 

Trigg County Cleland White Injured head (additional X-ray) 15.00 

Trigg County Chappel Allen Injured nose — X-ray 7.50 

Trigg County Earl Carr Injured head— X-ray 22.50 

Trimble County Graham Lee Abbott Injured hip — X-ray 15.00 

Trimble County .lames Stethen Fractured ribs — X-ray 24.00 

Trimble County Gayle Mattox Injured elbow — X-ray 5.00 

Trimble County Kenneth Burkhardt Injured ankle — X-ray 5.00 

Utica Russell Skinner Loss of one tooth 25.00 

Utica Gerald Rhodes Injured ankle — X-ray 5.00 

Utica Donald Young Injured ankle — X-ray 20.00 

Valley Kenneth Stanfield Injured hand — X-ray 4.00 

Valley Richard Sipes Injured elbow — X-ray 6.00 

Valley Robert Lamkin Injured finger— X-ray 6.00 

Valley Leo Martin Injured chest — X-ray 10.00 

Valley Kenneth Stanfield Injured head — X-ray 27.00 

Valley Richard Dimon Broken tooth 18.00 

Valley Roland Wallace Injured wrist — X-ray 6.00 

Valley Jerry Watkins Injured foot — X-ray 4.00 

Valley Bobby Turner Laceration — suture 5. GO 

Valley Tom Ackerman Injured wrist — X-ray 4.00 

Valley James Owens Injured head — X-ray 10.00 

Valley Richard Dimon Injured knee — X-ray 6.00 

Valley Kenneth Wonder Injured back — X-ray 10.00 

Valley Kenneth Stanfield Injured chest — X-ray 20.00 

Valley Rodney Priddy Fractured rib — X-ray 30.00 

Valley Billy Beanblossom Injured hand — X-ray 4.00 

Valley Tames Glover Injured finger — X-ray 6.00 

Valley James Beasley Injured finger — X-ray 6.00 

Valley Larry Keys Injured head — X-ray 10.00 

Valley Paul Bibelhauser Injured finger — X-ray 4.00 

Valley Larry Franklin Injured chest — X-ray 10.00 

Valley Kenneth Stanfield Injured hand — X-ray 4.00 

Valley Robert Blacketer Injured leg — X-ray 12.00 

Valley David Burton Fractured clavicle 35.00 

Valley Dale Baker Broken tooth 13.00 

Valley Bill Beanblossom Injured knee — X-ray 6.00 

Valley Roscoe Shain Injured foot — X-ray 4.00 

Valley Melvyn Vogel Broken nose — X-ray 35.00 

Valley .Tames Linzay Injured ankle — X-ray 6.00 

Valley Robert Gentry Fractured tibia 50.00 

Valley Roland Wallace Injured ankle — X-ray 6.00 

Valley Rodney Priddy Injured head — X-ray 15.00 

Valley Billy Beanblossom Injured knee — X-ray 12.00 

Valley Ralph Melton Injured thumb — X-ray 6.00 

Valley Frank Wallace Injured finger — X-ray 5.00 

Valley Fergie Scheynost Injured head — X-ray 10.00 

Valley Joe Dotson Injured ribs — X-ray 15.00 

Valley Albert Willis Injured finger — X-ray 9.00 

Valley Robert Young Injured shoulder (special) 150.00 

Valley Tommy Shelton Injured knee — X-ray 9.00 

Valley Tommy Houchin Injured finger — X-ray 12.00 

Valley Walt Cato Ruptured kidney (special) 76.53 

Valley Bobby DeSpain Injured chest— X-ray 12.00 

Valley .Terry Watkins Injured hand — X-ray 4.00 

Waddy Bobby M. Stevens Fractured tibia 50.00 

Wallins Arthur Hensley Injured knee — X-ray 6.00 

Wallins Charles Blanton Injured leg — X-ray 5.00 

Walton-Verona Russell Chipman Injured ankle — X-ray 6.00 

Walton-Verona Billy Smith Injured ankle — X-ray 12.00 

Walton- Verona Billy Smith Injured ankle — X-ray 6.00 

Warren County Don Compton Injured head — X-ray, Laceration — suture 20.00 

Warren County Dale Tucker Laceration — suture 5.00 

Warfield Landon Stepp Loss of teeth 40.00 

Warfield Clarence Williams Loss of teeth 40.00 

Warfield James Webb Injured shoulder 10.00 

Warfield Roy Jude Fractured radius (special) 53.75 

Western Bruce Springate Laceration — Suture 5.00 

Western Bobby Lane Laceration — Suture 5.00 

Western James L. Clack Loss of tooth 25.00 

West Louisville Bobby Payne Fractured fibula BO.OO 

West Point William Donald Allen Injured elbow — X-ray 7.50 

Winchester Horton Daniels Fractured tibia 18.00 

Winchester Darrell Butcher Fractured metacarpals 25.00 

Winchester Bill Layne Fractured fibula 21.40 

Winchester Horton Daniels Loss of two teeth 50.00 

Wheelwright Douglas Osborne Loss of tooth — X-ray 31.00 

Wingo Charles Saxon Loss of tooth 3.00 

Williamsburg Bob Bailey Fractured radius 40.00 

Williamstown Charles Hudson Laceration — suture 5.00 

Williamstown John Draper Injured knee (special) 150.00 

Williamstown Ronnie Hale Broken tooth 15.00 

Williamstown Donald Lee McWhorter Broken tooth 20.00 

Wilms Kiefer. Official Injured knee — X-ray 10.00 



B. S. HUNT 



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^ystopD^ 




PHONE 104 




W. S. "Bill" HUNT 

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HUNT^S ATHLETIC GOODS CO. 

MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 



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ALL-STAR GAME IN LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY 

We will have a display at the All-Star Game during the Coaching School 
at the University of Kentucky on August 13 and 14. 

We invite all of our many friends to drop by and see our display of foot- 
ball and basketball supplies which you are going to need during the coming 
season. 

On stock merchandise we can ship immediately, however, on special made 
merchandise you should be placing your order at the earliest possible 
moment so that you will not be disappointed from the standpoint of 
delivery. 

One of our fall and winter catalogs will be sent you this week so in case 
you do not get your copy write u.« and we will see that another catalog 
is sent you immediately. 

Don't forget to drop by the University of Kentucky Coliseum and see our 
display on August 13 and 14. 

Sincerely yours, 

HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO. 




W. S. HUNT 



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^vood Ave., Columbus, Ohio, \\\\\ cover the Big Sandy Valley; Bob 
Reis, 74 Pleasant Ridge Ave. South Fort Mitchell, Ky., will cover 
Northern, Central and Eastern Kentucky, and Charles (Chuck) 
Shuster, Horse Cave, Ky., will travel Western and Southern Kentucky. 

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Hiqh School Athlete , 

K. H. S. A. A. SCHOOL FOR BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Rex Alexander, R. 1; Vincent Zachem, R. 2; Larue 
Sosh, R. 3; Dero Downing, R. 5; Tom Williams, R. 6; Second Row: Benny Edelen, R. 7 
Elmo Head, R. 8; Edgar McNabb, R. 9; Bennie Bridges, R. 10; Harry Stephenson, R. 11 
Robert N. McLeod, R. 12; Back Row: Travis Combs, R. 13; Walter Combs, R. 14 
Charlie Vettiner, School Director; Dick Looney, R. 15; Ernie Chattin, R. 16 (Missing 
from Picture, Robert Forsythe, R. 4). 



ml; 




Valley players take part in demonstration game at Basketball School. Benny 
Bridges and Travis Combs are officiating. 




Sixteen regional officials and numerous visitors listen to Director Charlie Vettiner 
at the school for Basketball Officials. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



Vol. XVill— No. 2 



SEPTEMBER, 1954 



$1.00 Per Year 



National Federation Annual Meeting 



The thirty-fifth annual meeting of the 
National Federation of State High School 
Athletic Associations was held at North Rim, 
Arizona, on June 22-26, 1954. Thirty-nine 
State Association members or affiliated 
members were represented. Forty-six execu- 
tive officers or assistant executive officers, 
42 State Association board of control offic- 
ers, and 39 board of control members were 
in attendance. Total individual attendance 
was 401. 

Kentucky was represented at the meet- 
ing by K.H.S.A.A. President Carlos Oakley, 
Vice-President Russell Williamson, Directors 
James L. Cobb, Louis Litchfield and Roy G. 
Eversole, and Assistant Commissioner J. B. 
Mansfield. President Oakley was one of the 
presiding officers at a board of control ses- 
sion, held on Wednesday morning, June 23. 
One of the reports given at this meeting was 
made by Director Roy G. Eversole, who 
spoke on "Tournament Finances and Ex- 
periences." 

Speakers included many of the state ex- 
ecutive officers and board of control officers 
or members. In addition, excellent presenta- 
tions were made by Dr. Nicholas Nyaradi 
(Bradley University, Peoria, Illinois) ; Rich- 
ard Evans (Lecturer, writer, and nationally 
known radio M.C. for "The Spoken Work" 
over KSL at Temple Square) ; Dr. William 
Howell (University of Minnesota) ; Prof. C. 
E. Deaver (Arizona State College) ; Ernst 
Christensen (National Park Ranger) and 
George Manning (National Association of 
Secondary School Principals). 

Program and entertainment details were 
ably supervised by committees. Their work 
was coordinated by the General Planning 
Committee, made up of H. H. Rose (Chair- 
man), 0. D. Ballard, D. F. Stone, and P. C. 
Stevens. 

The Registration Committee, made up of 
C. C. Thompson (Chairman), P. M. Bethers, 
Mrs. E. F. (ilrider, Mrs. H. W. Jennings, Mrs. 
William Leiter and John W Stone, served 
as a clearing house for all activities. 
Mesdames Grider, Jennings and Leiter were 
unusually efficient in serving as a combina- 
tion business office, traveler's aid, informa- 



tion desk, collection agency and trouble- 
shooting committee. Their patience, courtesy 
and efficiency were outstanding. 

Because of the nature of the accommoda- 
tions and their isolation from centers of 
population, this meeting involved much pre- 
liminary planning and detailed work. All 
reservations, assignments to class of cabin 
and collection of all fees for Lodge accommo- 
dations and related items had to be made 
through the Federation office. Prizes, sup- 
plies for distribution in the sessions, carnival 
items and other entertainment features, en- 
rollment material and nearly everything else 
connected with the meeting had to be shipped 
two thousand miles and relayed from Cedar 
City by special arrangement with the Utah 
Parks System. The staff in the Federation 
office and in the offices of the Utah and 
Arizona State Associations supervised these 
details with a negligible number of omis- 
sions or miscalculations. 

Presentations or progress reports included 
the following topics : Non-Athletic Activities, 
Bringing Eligibility Rules Up-to-Date, Re- 
evaluation of Athletic Policies, Association 
Finances, Health Factors in Athletics, Re- 
cent Court Cases and Legislation, State 
Association Building Projects, Expanding the 
Public Relations Program, Television — 
Threat or Challenge, Track and Field Com- 
mittee Report, The Bowling Program, the 
Health Program, Evolution of a Rules Pro- 
gram, Survey of Bonding and Insurance Pro- 
gram, Junior and Summer Championships, 
State Association Publications, Basketball 
Developments, the Baseball Program, Foot- 
ball Meetings Brought Up-to-Date, Tangible 
Results from Football Activity, Further Per- 
fecting the Football Manual, and a Brush-up 
on Rules Presentation. 

The National Council voted unanimously 
to accept the application for affiliation by 
the Alaska High School Activities Associa- 
tion. It was recommended that the Federa- 
tion Executive Committee authorize a tele- 
vision committee to continue surveys and 
studies of this important activity and to 
represent the Federation in any negotiations 

(Continued on Page Ten) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1954 



SEPTEMBER, 1954 



VOL. XVn— NO. 2 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association. 

Office of Publication. Lexingi;on, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Carlos Oakley (1951-55). Morganfield 

Vice-President Russell Williamson (1952-56), Inez 

Directors — James L. Cobb (1951-55). Newport: Roy G. Eversole 
(1952-56). Hazard; W. B. Jones (1953-57). Somerset: Louis 
Litchfield (1953-57), Marion: Jack Dawson (1964-58), Middle- 
town; W. H. Crowdus (1954-58), Franklin. 

Subscription Rates {1.00 Per Year 



Jrom the Ci 



omtncssionei s 



Basketball Clinics 



O0i 



ice 



Charlie Vettiner, who has conductecJ K.H. 
S.A.A. basketball clinics for many years, will 
be in charge of the 1954-55 rules meetings. 
All registered basketball officials and those 
planning to register for the coming season 
are reminded that clinic attendance is re- 
quired. 

School administrators are urged to make 
it possible for their coaches and athletic 
directors to attend the forthcoming series of 
state and regional clinics. Although the 
meetings are held primarily for the training 
of officials, much more can be accomplished 
in securing uniformity of officiating and 
improving the relationship between officials 
and coaches if both groups attend the clinics 
and receive the same interpretations of the 
rules. The Commissioner and the Board of 
Control believe that every basketball coach 
in Kentucky should attend as many clinics 
and similar meetings as possible during the 
forthcoming season. 

The dates and sites of the meetings which 
will be conducted by Mr. Vettiner are as fol- 
lows: 

October 3, Louisville Y. M. C. A., 2:00 
P. M. (CST) 

October 10, Newport High School, 2:00 
P. M. (EST) 

October 10, University High School, 7:30 
P. M. (CST) 

October 11, Morehead College, 2:00 P. M. 
(CST) 

October 11, Ashland Y. M. C. A., 7:30 
P. M. (EST) 

October 12, Hazard High School, 2:00 
P. M. (CST) 

October 12, Pikeville High School, 7:30 
P. M. (EST) 

October 13, Harlan High School, 2:00 
P. M. (EST) 



October 13, Somerset High School, 7:30 
P. M. (CST) 

October 17, Owensboro High School, 2:00 
P. M. (CST) 

October 17, Bowling Green High School, 
7:30 P. M. (CST) 

October 18, Mavfield High School, 2:00 
P. M. (CST) 

October 18, Madisonville High School, 
7:30 P. M. (CST) 

October 19, Barret (Henderson), 7:30 
P. M. (CST) 

Use of Registered Officials 

The attention of principals and coaches of 
K.H.S.A.A. member schools is called to the 
lists of registered football and basketball 
officials which appear in this issue of the 
ATHLETE. The use of registered officials 
is required under the provisions of Associa- 
tion By-law 22, which savs : "Member schools 
shall use registered officials in all football 
and basketball games. Failure to complv with 
this regulation makes the home school liable 
for suspension." School men should study the 
current lists, to determine whether or not 
all officials with whom contracts have been 
signed have registered this fall. Supplemen- 
tary lists of officials will apoear in subse- 
quent issues of the Magazine. If there is any 
question about resristration. the official 
should be asked to present his card. 

Delegate Assembly 

Article IV., Section 2-b, of the K.H.S.A.A. 
Constitution, provides that members to the 
Delegate Assemblv at the annual meeting 
shall be elected by the nrincinals of each 
basketball district on ballots distributed by 
the Commissioner before October 1 and I'e- 
turned on or before November 15. Delegates 
serve for a period of one year, besrinning 
January 1 immediately following their elec- 
tion. 

Football Examinations 

Part II of the Natinnnl Federqtion Football 
Examination for Officials will be given in 
Kentuckv on Mondav, October 4. An official 
who has been resristered for at least one year 
prior to the current season is eligible to take 
the examination and work for a hieher rat- 
ing. Officials who hold the "Approved" 
rating in football are required to make a 
minimum nercentas-e errade of 80 in order to 
maintain the rating from vear to year. Of- 
ficials who hold the "Certified" ratine keet) 
this rating by attendino- one or more foot- 
ball clinics each year. Elio-ible officials who 
wish to take the test should write to the 
State Office. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1954 Page Three 

Early Season Football Questions 



Editor's Note: These rulings do not set aside or modify any 
rule. They are interpretations on some of the early season 
situations which have been presented. 

1. Play: Have any errors or omissions been dis- 
covered in the 1954 football publications? 

Ruling: In the RULE BOOK, in article 3-3-3, a 
reference to fair catch interference has inadvertent- 
ly been held over from last year and in article 6-4-1 
the definition of what is a legal fair catch signal 
has been inadvertently omitted. A quarter is never 
extended because of fair catch interference or any 
other foul by the offensive team. The signal for a 
fair catch is the same as for the past several years, 
i.e., the open hand held at arm's length above the 
head and waved sidewise. 

Also, in the CASE BOOK, Play 148 is not cor- 
rectly worded. Part (a) is meant to be a punt which 
comes to rest in the kicker's end zone and part (b) 
a backward pass by A which comes to rest in B's 
end zone. Play 16 gives the correct statement. 

2. Play: Team A takes position with center Al 
over the ball and with his hand on it. The team 
then shifts so that Al removes his hand from the 
ball and participates in the shift. Ball is then 
snapped by A2 who has moved over the ball. 

Ruling: This constitutes two shifts and a full sec- 
ond is required after each. Also, the removal of the 
hand from the ball might be in the nature of a 
false start if the Official believes it may have been 
such as to throw B off balance. 

3. Play: After time-out for a measurement, when 
does the clock start? 

Ruling: When the ball is snapped. In any situa- 
tion in v/hich advantage might be gained by the 
requesting team, the Referee should refuse a re- 
quest for measurement unless the line-to-gain is 
so close that the Referee is in doubt. 

4. Play: During a legal forward pass which ends 
behind the line, Bl while on A's side of the line, 
uses his hands on A2. Is this pass interference? 

Ruliung: No. It may be legal use of hands by the 
Defense if he is attempting to get at the ball. If it 
is holding or is not sn attempt to get at the ball, 
it is illegal use of hands. The distance penalty is 
the same as for pass interference, i.e., 15 yards but 
it is not loss of down. 

5. Play: Just before the snap, B has only 10 play- 
ers on the field. Before the ball is snapped, Bll runs 
on the field. He is in a position to tackle the run- 
ner and does so. 

Ruling: If this were a player of Team A, the 
Official would usually consider it as using a sub- 
stitution to deceive B. 7-2-4 applies to Team A. If the 
outlined act by B is an infraction it would be be- 
cause it is done intentionally, and is unsportsman- 
like conduct. Unless such act is repeated or is done 
in such a way as to make it clear that the entry of 
the substitute is purposely delayed, the Official 
should not regard it as illegal. 

6. Play: On a try for point, all players of B 
wave their hands in the air to disconcert kicker Al. 

Ruling: If this is done before the snap, it could 
be called unsportsmanlike conduct. Usually the 
effectiveness of such an act is immediately after 
the ball has been snapped and it is doubtful whether 
any Official would call it unsportsmanlike conduct 
in that case. 

7. Play: Al, who has been disqualified, erroneous- 
ly reenters. He throws a forward pass which is 
complete for a touchdown. 

Ruling: If the infraction is discovered before 



the beginning of the succeeding down, the infraction 
is penalized. Since it occurred at the beginning of 
the down in which the touchdown was scored, the 
score is nullified because of enforcement of the 
penalty. If the infraction is not discovered until 
after the succeeding down has started, (with the 
snap) the touchdown is not nullified but the pen- 
alty should be enforced as part of the dov^oi during 
which discovery is made. 

8. Play: While a kick is in flight, Al or Bl holds. 
What is the spot of enforcement and is the down 
replayed ? 

Ruling: By Federation Code, administration is 
comparatively simple. Regardless of the kind of 
kick, it is merely a foul during a loose ball and the 
basic enforcement spot is at the previous spot. After 
the penalty, the down is replayed. 

Comment: By Collegiate Code, enforcement de- 
pends on whether it is a scrimmage-kick or a 
free-kick. For the latter, penalty is at spot of foul 
and the down is not replayed since ball is put in 
play by a snap instead of a free-kick. 

9. Play: Legal forward pass goes beyond line 
where Bl intercepts. B2 was off-side. While B2 is 
advancing, there is clipping by Al. Are these off- 
setting fouls and is this fair to B? 

Ruling: These are offsetting fouls. As far as 
equity is concerned, there is a difference of opinion. 

10. Play: During the entire game up to the last 
few minutes, Team A has been operating from the 
T offense. In the last few minutes, they are inside 
B's 10. They take position for the T offense but 
then shift into another formation, after which the 
ball is snapped. Is this legal or illegal? 

Ruling: Merely using an additional shift is not 
an illegal act. The only way it might be a violation 
of the rules is to make it a false start which is 
used for the purpose of drawing the opponent off- 
side. The defensive team is expected to be on the 
alert for an additional shift at any time during the 
game. In the circumstances which are outlined, it 
is expected that Team A will be cautious about the 
way they move into the second shift. If it is done 
with a quick charging motion such as that which 
is usually used at the time the ball is snapped, it 
should usually be called a false start. If, however, 
the team "slides" out of the first position and moves 
into the new position, there is nothing in the rules 
to prevent their doing so. Obviously, some judgment 
on the part of the Official is involved but these 
comments concerning the method of making the 
second shift may be of some help in reaching de- 
cision on these borderline cases. 

11. Play: 1st and 10 on B's 12. Team A scores a 
touchdown. In the statistics, should the team be 
credited with a 1st down as well as with a touch- 
down? 

Ruling: It is doubtful whether there is any na- 
tion-wide system for recording football data. How- 
ever, most groups would not credit the team with 
a 1st down if they score a touchdown. 

12. Play: With only a few seconds remaining in 
the first half, there is a kick-off. To consume the 
few remaining seconds, Kl intentionally makes a 
short free-kick. Time expires before the down ends, 
Since there is no provision in the rules for allowing 
R to extend the quarter, is this an inequitable situa- 
tion which should be corrected? 

Ruling: Probably no more inequitable than several 
other similar situations. If the time was that short, 

(Continued on Page Ten) 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1954 



The Flying Dutchman 

It is "King" Tater Combs now. Bow low 
as he offers you premium insurance at bar- 
gain prices because you are in the presence 
of the official crowned "KING" at the Sixth 
Annual School for Basketball Officials 
sponsored by the K.H.S.A.A. in Louisville 
15 and 16. 

"Tater" is the chap everybody likes and 
likes to kid — and brethern, he can take it. 
He was crowned with an umbrella hat which 
will be the talk of "Them thar mountings." 
The "KING" was selected because he pos- 
sesses the following qualities: (1) Muscular 
physique which includes a roll of "lard" 
around his mid-section, (2) Speed (not on 
the floor) at getting to the dinner table, 
(3) Ability to recognize humor in Tom Wil- 
liams' jokes. 

No foolin', besides learning plenty about 
the art of basketball officiating the Officials, 
their wives and spectators attending the 
School for Officials had a lot of fun. Two 
floor shows, supplied by the Jefferson Coun- 
ty Recreation Entertainers, had the audience 
in "stitches". It was Ernie Chattin's wife 
who said, "These kids should show all over 
Kentucky so other counties can see how 
much supervised recreation means to young 
people." 

Ashland's Ernie and Mrs. Chattin left for 
a Florida vacation as soon as the school was 
completed. Both felt an urgent need of 
Florida's restful paradise after the wedding 
of their daughter recently to Eastern's 
Basketball Star, "High-scoring Mulcahy." 

Here's lead pipe cinch — The Dutchman can 
never forget the wonderful treatment ac- 
corded him by the sixteen officials and Com- 
missioner Ted Sanford. Ted's assistant, Joe 
Billy Mansfield, had to forego the school to 
go to Minnesota with Carlos Oakley to make 
life miserable for the fish there. 

"Jolly John" Heldman, popular president 
of the Falls Cities Officials Association, 
opened the fiesta by sounding the keynote 
that Kentucky's schoolboy officiating is the 
nation's "Tops", because of the outstanding 
training program of the K.H.S.A.A. John 
was followed by the Commissioner and things 
went into high gear. 

This Dutch boy just has to give the "Sa- 
lute of the Month" to handsome Vic Brizen- 
dine who volunteered his services and took 
couuntless details off this feeble frame. It was 
this personable fellow who got us a full 
page spread of pictures in the Louisville 
Times, gave away Lucky Strike cigarettes 
and Roi-Tan cigars by the wholesale lot, and 



who handled gym arrangements and other 
necessary chores, which helped make the 
School the best ever held. 

Cooperation was the key to every success. 
It was Coach "Red" Garrison of Valley sup- 
plying the teams for demonstration pur- 
poses, Ben Edelen drilling the Officials in 
proper signalling, and Vince Zachem and 
Bob Forsythe setting up proper floor proce- 
dure. By all means Mrs. Frances Radford, 
secretary to the Dean, must draw her share 
of attention for giving up her entire Sunday 
to arrange the meeting room and handle 
attendance records. 

Officials attended from Indiana, Ohio, 
West Virginia and Kentucky. The chap from 
Columbus was greatly impressed. Bernie 
Shively, University of Kentucky's astute ath- 
letic director, was high in his praise of the 
sessions while Dean Eagle, Sports Editor of 
the Louisville Times, commented that the 
program is a great stimulus for better of- 
ficiating. 

You should have been at the gift session 
when each official received a laugh-provok- 
ing gift from the teacher. The first explos- 
ion came when Bowling Green's Dero Down- 
ing opened his package, then came another 
big laugh as Shelbyville's Elmo Head saw his 
gift. Still other laughs came as Lexington's 
Harry Stephenson, Fort Mitchell's Ed Mc- 
Nabb and Pikeville's Dick Looney got their 
"Apple" from the teacher. The fellows honor- 
ed the Dean with a gift certificate, which 
left the usually loquacious Dutchman speech- 
less. 

Did you read the column Dean Eagle wrote 
in the Louisville Times praising Dr. Bob 
McLeod of Somerset for his interest in kids 
and their games in his briar-jumping town? 
Bob deserves anything good you say about 
him because he has dedicated his life to un- 
fortunate youngsters. It is safe to say that 
the officials in our school represent the 
"Cream of the Crop." 

Take it direct from the Dutchman that 
Rex Alexander, Murray's new college coach, 
is one of the finest gentlemen of the blue- 
grass state. We would rather have this fel- 
low's respect and friendship than a million 
bucks — and we are poor people. Not only 
does he contribute much by his philosophy, 
but his influence makes everybody leave feel- 
ing that it was good to have been there and 
to have associated with him. 

Larue Sosh, Uniontown; Bennie Bridges, 
North Middletown; and Walter Combs of 
Hazard were outstanding in their contribu- 
tions. It is small wonder that such wonder- 
ful spirit exists in Kentucky from the moun- 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1954 



Page Five 



tains to the Pennyrile with these three serv- 
ing as "Ambassadors of Good Will." 

If you really want to sit in on something 
different and enjoyable, get an 0. K. from 
Ted to be a spectator at next year's sessions. 
Kentucky may be a laggard in many ways 
but it takes the lead in the training of its 
schoolboy officials. The Dutchman will be 
looking for you at his regular clinics in 
October. 



ijxegistered football CJfficials 
of She J{. Si. S. Jl.Ji.--l954 

(List Compiled September 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it 
is the home phone unless otherwise designated. If two numbers 
are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Adams. Roy, 302 Brunswick Rd.. Louisville, BE 6367 
Adkins, Raymond C 1526 Beverly Blvd., Ashland, North 6740 
Allmon, Raymond T., 415 Walton Lane, Madison, Tenn., Nash- 
ville 2-5939, Amqui School 
Anderson, E. W., .Tr., 902 7th St.. Mayfield, 1927 
Ashworth, Fred G.. 3430 Piedmont Rd., Huntington, W. Va. 
Ballard. Clark. 8806 Plainfie'd Rd., Cincinnati. Ohio, SY 5540, 

Ma 2000 
Barlow, Bob, 209 Rucker Ave., Georgetown, 1090 S 
Bauer, Richard E., 1019 E. Iowa. Evansville, Ind., 4-2458, 5-3397 
Bell, Thomas P., 404 Ctizens Bank, Lexington, 2-2958, 2-1477 
Bennett, Howard, 955 So. Sixth. Mayfield, 1661-W. 1420 
Betz, Dick, 250 Albany Rd.. Lexington, 4-7394, 3-2880, Ext. 322 
Blanton. Homer, Box 312. Catlettsburg. Grand 370. 404 
Bloebaum, Albert. 418 Pedretti Rd.. Cincinnati. Ohio. GR 1762. 

WA 2787 
Bostick, Lord M., ,Ir., 419 W. 12th St., Bowling Green. 3319, 5650 
Bowling, Harry, Hodgenvil'e, 27502, 24 
Brichler, .Joseph A.. 5737 Kiefer Ct., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

Ki 6049, Pa 1984 
Briggs, ,Tames P., 2526 Harrison, Paducah, 2-1235, 5-6311, Ext. 

8158 
Brizendine. Vic. 520 E. Oak St.. Louisville. MA 0579W, CL 4866 
Brown, George W. 725 So. 36th St., Louisville. AR 8373, 

JA 1361, Ext. 460. 
Burch, Ossie, 116 Hamlin, Corbin, 323W 
Byrd, Harry G,, 7331 N. Timberlane Dr., Madeia, Ohio, Locust 

8745, Locust 8745 
Caiman, Edwin C, Jr.. Route 3. Box 218, Sturgis. 3944, 3546 
Canter, .John. 2319 Glenmary Ave.. Apt. F 3, Louisville, Hi 

3364J, Wa 8862 
Carlson, David A., 2916 Washington, Paducah, 5-7943 
Carroll, Thomas J., 1917 Deerwood, Louisville, HI 1564W, 

Fr 3585 
Carter, Richard C, Bov 296, Winchester, Winchester 1258, 

Lexington 2-2220, Ext. 3222 
Carter. William W., Tompkinsville 

Chaney, Joseph G.. Box 103. Honse Cave. 186B, 69 
Chattin. Ernest P., 2147 Central. Ashland 
Coleman, James T.. 2416'1. St. Ann Ct., Owensboro 
Collier. J. Hamlet. Jr.. 120 E. Ninth. Paris, 185W, 401R 
Combs, Travis, Box 107. Harlan 

Cook, E. C. 208 Highland Ave., Georgetown, 438 
Cover. Harry E., 2701 Madison Rd., Cincinnati, Ohio, Ea 2369. 

Me 4660 
Cox. Layton. 269 HiDsboro. Lexington 
Creasey. Fred. 204 W. Washington. Sebree. 2172 
Crosthwaite, .lohn S.. .Ir., Ky. Utilities Co.. Harlan. 2075, 57 
Crotty. Tom, 322 Wyoming St., Cincinnati, Ohio 
Crum, Edward E„ 4034 Valley View Dr., Louisville. AT 0483 
Dallman, James W., 12 Center St.. Jeffersonville, Ind., 3-7255, 

3-7255 
Davis, Clyde E., 2531 E. Euclid Ave., Ashland. N2302, 785 
Deaver, John W., 2323 Ralph, Louisville 
Delaney, Mike, 8030 Constance, Chicago, 111., BA 1-3948, 

ST 3-7126 
Dexter, Sam, 846 Hilltop Rd.. Danville, 2017, 2017 
Diehl, Cleo, 4423 Elm, Hammond, Ind.. Sheff 9793W. 2060. 

East Chicago, Ind. 
Dimitroff, James M.. 4526 Swallow Road, Louisville, Okolona 

9-6693, Ft. Knox 6169 
OiMuzio. Robert, 4047 Runnymede, Cincinnati, Ohio, Kirby 

2220, Wabash 1180 
Dolan, Richard S., 5111 Emeral Dr.. Louisville, OK 9-7239, 

Jeffersonville 3-6611, Ext. 206 
Dreyer, Jack. 3306 Lookout Dr., Cincinnati, Ohio, EA-3009, 

GA 3323 
Durkin, Jack H.. 240 Hillsboro, LexinEton, 4-4396, 4-17IT 
Elaer. Don. 764 Folk, Gary, Ind. 



Engle, Orville. 208 Tennessee, Pineville, 479 

Ernst, Ray C, 3574 Larkspur Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, EA 6758, 

EA 6768 
Farmer, John, Box 47, London, 290-R, 290-R 
Faust, John F. (Jack), 2427 Concord Dr., Louisville, CA 2043, 

CA 3651 
Fey, Allen, 611 E. 9th St.. Newport. He 7699, Ki 1800, Ext. 

1313 
Fitchko. Bill. Norton, Va., 653, 554 
Fletcher. John L., 122-1 Gaffey, Ft. Knox, RT 3-2742, Ft. Knox 

7109 
Florence, Robert H., 242 Glenwood Dr., Paducah, 5-7910, 

5-6311, Ext, 8759 
Forbes, John W., Jr., 208 Granvil Dr.. Buechel. Ch 6025. Cy 2731 
Forsythe. Robert, Browder, Drakesboro 2583, Greenville 309 
Fortney. Robert L., 2614 Colin, Louisville, MA 9083R 
Freihaut, Herman P., 2601 N. Heidelbach, Evansville, Ind., 

2-1774 
Gant, W. G., Jr.. 810 Kentucky Ave.. Corbin, 1102W 
Garrity, E. F., 105 Bradford St., Charleston, W. Va. 
Geiser. Carl H.. Jr., 2404 Emil Ave.. Louisville, Ca 3023, 

Cy 6521 
Gettler, John F.. 314 Sheridan Dr.. Lexington, 2-8846, 4-9895 
Gish, Delmas, 207 W. Fourth. Central City, 518W, 9 
Greene, Omar Paul, Box 58, By Pro, 2673, 2573 
Gruneisen, Sam J., 1101 Samuel St.. Louisville, Ma. 3276M, 

Wa 6961 
Hadden, Newell P., Jr.. 121 Lackawanna Rd., Lexington, 

3-5332. 2-7866 
Haffey, Stan, 1243 Garden Circle, Cincinnati, Ohio, PO 2884, 

PR 8931 
Hagan, Joseph E.. 3000 Sherbrooke Rd., Louisville, CH 1326. 

WA 4327 
Hagerman. Bart, 716 Magnolia Ave., Bowling Green. 7865. 3212 
Hale, Charlie, Box 1026, Grundy, Virginia 
Hall, Royal A., Jr., 3809 Park Ave.. Covington. He 0716 
Hambrick. Walter, Bank. P.keviUe, 1456 J, 289 
Handy, Ralph W.. 1620 Longfield. Louisville. Wa 2211, Em 

6-6383 
Hanes, Edward C, 204 Sunset, Elizabethtown, 3495 
Harris, Gene, 111 Riverside. Russell, 0241 
Hartley, William E., 1121 Marshall, Evansville, Ind., 7-0631, 

7-0631 
Heinold, John R.. 3642 Wilshire, Cincinnati, Ohio, EA 9263, 

MA 1901 
Hellard, George D., Jr.. 572 Longview Dr.. Lexington, 3-0871. 

3-0484 
Hoagland, Charles R., Jr., 102 E. Leesway Dr., Lexington, 

2-9704, 2-5494 
Hofstetter, Joe, 1423 Fourth Ave.. Williamson, W. Va. 
Hogan, John E., 807 Schmidt Building, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

ME 2550, DU 6480 
Holbrook, William M., 2421 Forest, Ashland 
Holeman, D. Fletcher, 329 Poplar St., Dawson Springs, 2302, 

4241 
Holland, Tom .T., Grundy, Virginia 
Howerton, Jack, Jr.. 416 Lotis Way. Louisville, Taylor 7490, 

Wabash 6002 
Isaac, John K., 917 Carte St., Charleston, W. Va. 
.fanning. 'Robert L., 3 Charmaine Circle, So. Ft. Mitchell, 

ED 3538, KI 2142 
Jeter, John B., 271 Clay Ave.. Lexington. 3-3441, 4-9895 
Johnson, Ellis T., Morehead 

Kathman, Bernie, 48 Beech, Edgewood, Di 8207, Ma 7541 
Kemper, Russell H., 5405 Phillorett Dr.. Cincinnati, Ohio 
Kyle, Leslie G., Jr., 25 Chalfonte Place. Fort Thomas. Hi 8601. 

Co 5620. 
Lancaster, Morris B.. 106 Penmoken Pk.. Lexington. 2-6592, 

4-8331 or 4-3644 
Lawson, Carl E., Corbin, 1327. 136 

Lawson, Sam, 215 Tenth St., Norton, Virginia, 356W. 564 
Lenahan, Thomas F.. 1655-A Indiana Ave., Louisville, MA 

8844W, JA 9912 
Levicki, A. P., ,1. I. Burton High School, Norton. Va. 
Lindloff, Gilbert E., 6004 So. Third, Louisville, FR 0225, 

RA 5781 
Linker, Joe, 2354 Tyler Lane, Louisville. Ch 4292, Wa 8064 
Long, Leo. J., 1106 Battery Lane, Nashville, Tenn., 8-1300, 

7-0420 
Longenecker, D. M., 3910 Olympic, Louisville, TA 9071, 

BE 3401-2 
Ludwig, Harry F., Lou. Country Day School, Louisville. BE 

53S0, BE 3452 
McCoIlum, Robert G., 406 Holliday Rd., Lexington, 2-3710 
McCorkle, Wade E.. 119 So. Main, Harlan, 283, 1527 
McCowan, Connell, Route 1, Box 251, Corbin, 1037R, 284 
MoGhee, Laurence, 2111 S. Alta, Danville, Danville 2057, 

Lancaster 338 
McKown. C. H., Wayne, W. Va. 

McMillan, James N., 305 Riverside Dr., Russell, 0-367, Ash- 
land 370 
McNabb, Edgar, 137 Pleasant Ridge. So. Ft. Mitchell. ED 3113. 

ED 1220 
McTigue. Joe, 647 Eastlawn, Louisville, AR 6120, MA 2774 
Makepeace, William H., -Ir., 1321 Michigan, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

East 4042 
Malcolm, Donald C. Route 1, Kenova, W. Va., 34097 HTG, 

21778 HTG 
Martin, William J., 624 Bakewell, Covington, JU 2549 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1954 



Mason, Fred D., Box 325, Manchester, 3373 

Matarazzo, Salvatore, 320 N. Mulberry, Elizabethtown, B689, 

Ft. Knox 2-2260 
May, E. B., Jr., Box 185, Prestonsburg, 3453 
Mayhew, Happy, Barbourville, 619L 

Mercke, Frank R., 417 Lotis Way, Louisville. TA 8460, WA 4206 
Milliken John S., Jr., 1217 Cardinal Dr., Louisville, Ma 6990, 

Ja 3181 
Mitchell, Emmett, Route 2. Todds Ed., Lexington, 2-3788 
Mitchell, Vyron "W., 901 Walnut, Fulton, 1648, 30 
Moellering, Louis H., 6508 Crest Ridge Court, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

Me 3694, Mu 3510 
Moore, William A., 2930 Riedling Dr., Louisville, TA €734, 

JA 7434 
Mordica. William A., 800 Edgewood Ave., Ashland, Park 2833 
Murrell, Claude H., 312 Jefferson Ave.. Charleston, W. Va. 
Mussman, Ralph, Jr., 502 Monroe St., Newport, JU 4562, 

CO 1300 
Muntan, Peter J., 125 Woodmore Road, Louisville, Atwood 8236, 

Calhoun 7621 
Nau, Bill, Barbourville, 203 
Neal Gene, 549 Washington, New Richmond, Ohio, NR 3641, 

NR 7571 
Nimmo, Lo, 207 Price Rd., Milford. Ohio, TE 3170, EA 1484 
Noland. Douglas, 707 E. Main, Stanford. 2609, 2619 
Noland, James H., Jr.. Perry Rd., Route 1, Lyndon. BE 3996, 
Nunn, Winston C, 407 Cleveland St., Glasgow, 2317, 2128 
Omer, Billy W., Route 5, Madisonville. 851-W 
O'Nan, Norman, Route 3, Henderson, 7-5067 
O'Neal, Bud, 2010 Bonnycastle, Louisville, HI 2447J, CA 6494 
Parker, M. L., 202 Cardinal Lane, Paducah. 5-6204, 2-3501 
Pearce, Horace L., 5324 Halsey Court, Louisville, At 4133, Ar 

2481 
Perdue, Paul, 523 Broad, Murray, 1018J, 298 
Perry, Alfred L.. 321 Meadow Lane, Elizabethtown, 3735, Ft. 

Knox 2-0143 or 4147 
Potter, Sam, Box 804, Lynch, 2673 

Potter, W. H., Jr., 2019 Forrest Ave., Ashland, HI 327 
Powell, Logan G., 252 B. McCracken Dr.. Lexington. 2-9794 
Radjunas, Stan, 1644 Elliott Ave., Ashland, Grand 772-W 
Ratterman. Bernard W.. Sr., 1222 So. 41st, Louisville, Cy 6085, 

Wa 1241, Ext. 6274 
Reed, Gordon, 1603 N. Ft. Thomas Ave., Ft. Thomas, HI 4946, 

DU 4507 
Reinhart, Gene, 649 E. Tennessee St., Evansville, Ind., 2-5913, 

2-0892 
Richlin. Maurice, 2505 Talbott, Louisville, CH 55252, JA 7164 
Riggins, Jason, IJ2 W. Fifth Ave., Williamson, W. Va. 
Rose, Andy, Div. of Rec, Louisville, TA 0832, MA 9060 
Rudolph, Fred, Jr., 1020 Parkway Dr., Louisville, MA 6081M, 

MA 5900, E.xt. 10 
Russell, Joe, 608 W. Seventh St., Russellville, 398, 398 
Sabato, Al, 4121 Foest Ave., Norwood, Ohio, ME 6771, ME 6771 
Sallee, W. E.. 107 Cochran, Lexington, 4-0305, 2-4628 
Sauter, Harold S., 1227 Crown Ave., Louisville, Highland 

5612J, Atwood 3381, Ext. 144 
Saylor, Deward, Box 407, Wallins Creek, Wallins 3 (Bus. No.) 
Schuhmann, Joseph R., Altawood Ct., Anchorage, 21-6088, 

WA-7341 
Schultz, Edward J., 6910 Gloria Dr., Cincinnati, Ohio 
Schutz, John J., Jr., 4117 River Park Dr., Louisville, Cypress 

8917, Magnolia 2774 
Scott, W. L., 1816 McDonald Rd., Lexington, 2-3316, 4-3662 
Shaw, John H., 219 E. Lee, Mayfield. 1435 
Showalter, John, Georgetown, 662 
Smith, Edgar J., Farmview Ave., Route 5, Buechel, CH 1286. 

MA 7530 
Smith, Walter K., 728 So. 38th. Louisville. Ra 0586, CL 8381 
Smith, William J., 106 Franklin, Lawrenceburg, 3248 
Sossamon, James W., 702 Lone Oak Rd., Paducah, 2-2740 
Sperry, George A., 319 Chandler, Evansville, Ind., 3-4269, 

(Bus. No.) 
Steinbicker, Paul F., 1503 Bedford Road, Charleston, W. Va., 

6-0140, 5-121 
Stephens, Robert J., Box 529, Montgomery, W. Va., 9-3391 
Stevens, Paul B., Dawson Springs, 2120, 5911 
Straight, Roy L., 1701 Jackson Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Streicher, Abe, 2120 Douglass, Louisville, Hi 7399, Am 9372 
Taylor, Jack G., 2619 Sheridan Dr., Norwood, Ohio, ME 6347, 

PO 4100, Line 2021 
Temple. Dr. J. B., Guthrie Bldg., Paducah, 2-2147, 2-1422 
Thompson, A. W., 215 W. Adair, Louisville, FR 6976, EM 6-3350 
Thompson, Jack, 2347 Saratoga, Louisville, HI 4183J 
Thompson, Jack F., Jr., 1310 Rammers, Louisville, MA 0924W, 

JA 5311 
Thompson, Paul, 2624 Blackburn Ave., Ashland, G 3365, 1642 
Thurman. J. W., Manchester, 2313, 3737 
Treas, Joe W., 607 Green St., Fulton, 1056, 41 
Tunstill, Jesse, 379 Stratford Dr., Lexington 
Vandenberg, Ralph H., 3126 S. Farmcrest, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

Me 9072, Ki 1800, Line 846 
Vankirk, Alvia S., 209 Johnson Rr., London, 2, 2 
Varner, Ray G., 626 Emerson Dr., Lexington, 2-5432, 3-4224 

Station 210 
Vennari, Paul, Box 13, Beckley, W. Va. 
Vinson, William J., Box 245, Wayne, W. Va. 
Walker, Paul R., Leech Court, Glasgow, 3013 
Watson, John T,, 1808 16th St., Huntington, W. Va., B398, 9162 



Weber, Edward H., 3707 St. Germaine, Louisville, TA 4298, 

HI 6613 
Weddle, Bob, Pikeville, 1243, 200 
Wedge, Donald R., 1316 Spring St., Portsmouth, Ohio, 4-7661, 

6100-3442 
Welch, Bill, 3601 Warsaw, Cincinnati, Ohio, Grandview 8090, 

Wabash 9722 
Welch, Tom, 3560 Beldare Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, AV 8094, 

GA 5700, Line 371 
Wellman, Earl, 504 13th Ave., Huntington, W. Va., 2-0479, 

2-0311 
Wells, Milford, Prestonsburg, 2116, 2629 

Wigginton, A. M., Sr., 1037 Cecil Ave., Louisville, Ar 7881 
Wilson, Jerry C, 1735 Glendale, Evansville. Ind.. 2-4573. B-8112 
Wilson. John P., 903 S. Shelby St.. Louisville, WA 4591, 

WA 4591 
Zimmerman, James C, 323 14th., Henderson, 3066, 4963 



£Registe>ieJ basketball Officials 

of ike J{. M S. Ji. Jl.-- 1954-1955 
(List Compiled September 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Adams, Roy, 302 Brunswick Dd., Louisville, BE 6367 

Adkins, Raymond C, 1526 Beverly Blvd., Ashland, North 6740 

Akers, Ted L., Box 126, Allen. 2541 (Bus. No.) 

Alexander. William, 215 Fourth, Fulton, 716W, 8461 

Allen, Stanley M., Hawesville, 3401 

Arnold, Kenneth L., Route 2, Fern Creek, 3-4446, 3267 

Arnzen, Stanley, 33 Ohio Ave., Newport 

Bailey, George, Hindman 

Bailey, Kerney, Box 202, Hazel 

Baird, Bill, First Street, Harlan, 632, 532 

Baker, Dee C, Lackey, Wayland 3864 

Baker, Edgar C, 1205 Ashland. Louisville. FR 4106 

Ballard. Clark, 8806 Plainfield Ed., Cincinnati, Ohio, Sy 6540, 

Ma 2000 
Bandy, Jack R., Box 8, Harlan, 1386J 
Barker, Donald, 111 Mill, Campbellsville, 3603 
Barker, Walter D., Eoute 5, Portsmouth, Ohio, W. Ports.-2770, 

Waverly-6100, Ext. 3682 
Barrett, Lloyd, Box 389, Jackson, 21 
Barrett, William S., 241 Georgia Ave., Clarksville. Tenn.. 

5036, 6628 
Beiersdorfer, Jim, 5517 Surrey Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, HU 7194, 

HU 6744 
Bell, Thomas P., 404 Citizens Bank, Lexington, 2-2968. 2-1477 
Bennett, Bert A., 14 Doris Drive, Covington, JU 2121, HE 6990 
Bennett, Gene, Box 218. Wheelersburg. Ohio, Scioto 970L 
Betz, Dick, 250 Albany Rd., Lexington, 4-7394, 3-2880, Ext. 322 
Betz. Don, Route 2. Ripley, Ohio, 35963 
Binder, Keith, London, 861L 

Blackburn, Viley O., Richardson Dr., Somerset, 1113, 993 
Blankenship, Zeb. Virgie, 12 (Bus. No.) 
Blanton. Homer. Box 312. Catlettsburg. Grand 370. 404 
Bolander, Albert J.. 523 N. 26th. Louisville, AR 9061. AR 2046 
Boyles, Clarence A., Jr., 2511 Clearbrook Dr., Louisville, 

CH 0209, JA 8062 
Boyles, Jerry F., 3013 Walters St., Ashland, N 2262, 1860, 

Ext. 427 
Branson, John H., Robards, 77-2612 

Braun, Edgar P., 134 N. Fifth, Cannelton, Ind., 782R, 782W 
Braun, Robert, 146 Center, Erlanger. GO 8194. DI 8476 
Brewer. Eandell L.. Route 4. London 
Brichler. Joseph A.. 6737 Kiefer Ct., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

Ki 6049, Pa 1984 
Brittain, Ross E., 217 Geenwood Rd., Middlesboro 
Brizendine, Vic, 520 E. Oak St., Louisville, MA 0579W, CL 4866 
Brooks, Carroll C, 139 Southland Blvd., Apt. 4, Louisville 
Brown, Carlton, 411 O'Hara Dr., Danville, 1569J, 68 
Brown, Charlie, Box 31, Centre College, Danville 
Brown, James H., Route 1, Nabb, Ind., New Washington 

4140, Ja. 5381 
Brown, James W., 124 Lancaster Ave., Richmond, 1658, 

Waco 4071 
Brown, Tommy, Olmstead 

Bruner, G. Bud, 7149 Dundee Ct.. Cincinnati. Ohio. JA 6859 
Bryan. William B., Box 34. North Middletown, 2003 
Bryant, Jack E.. 135 Morris Rd., Lookout Heights. Coving- 
ton. ED 2819, AU 1400, Line 277 
Buck, Alfred E., 2179 Morgan, Evansville, Ind., 64736, Cedar 

Hall School 
Burke, David L., 224 Cumberland Ave., Louisville, EM 6-6948 
Burke, Raymond. 411 Sixth St.. Pikeville. 971J. 38 or 39 
Bush. Denver. Tilford. 1847 (Bus No.) 
Byrd, Harry G., 7331 N. Timberland Dr., Madeira, Ohio, 

Locust 8745, Locust 8745 
Campbell, George H., 116 Winchester, Middlesboro, 856, 122 
Campbell, William C, 2359 Frankfort, Louisville, TAylor 3526, 

CAlhoun 7621. Ext. 225 
Canter, John, 2319 Glenmary Ave., Apt. F 3, IiOuisville, 

Hi 3364J, Wa 8862 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1954 



Page Seven 



Carnes, Richard, 305 Light. New Richmond, Ohio, 4151, 257 

Cartee. Ralph, Jr., Olive Hill, 3811, 3581 

Cartwright. William G.. Jr., 218 Scott. Metropolis, 111. 7813. 2122 

Cassady, Richard. 608 Nutwood. Bowling Green. 3506, 9078 

Casteel, Ralph M., East Bernstadt. 1421. 1413 

Chaney. Joseph G., Box 103. Horse Cave, 186B, 69 

Chappell, Joe, 202 Gibson Rd., Louisville, TA 9070, CY 1061 

Chattin, Ernest P.. 2147 Central. Ashland 

Chilton, William R., Albany. 45R. 36L 

Clark, Tom, 430 Spalding Ave., Lebanon. 29B 

Coe. Jimmy. Burkesville 

Collins, Charles E., Route 2, Glasgow 

Combs, Travis, Box 107, Harlan 

Combs, Walter H., 409 Oakhurst, Hazard. Grand 183. Main 3300 

Coniey, George D., 456 Blackburn Ave.. Ashland, Oak 2344 

Connor, James R., 204 East Seventh St.. Newport. HE 8292, 

JU 2800 
Coomer, Charles, Jr.. Norfleet Dr.. Somerset, 1322W 
Cooper, John W., Box 332. Danville. 2090J, 9102 
Cornn, Harold, 420 N. Broadway. Lexington 
Cosby. H. P.. Tompkinsville, 8902 ^Bus. No.) 
Cox, Charles G., Route 3. Morganfield, 160-M 
Cox, Layton, 269 Hillsboro, Lexington 
Cox, Ralph, Box 555, Benham 
Cox, William J., Oak St., Pineville, 573M, 371 
Craig. John G.. Rochester. 63 

Crawford, Fred T., 709 Nutwood. Bowling Green. 6441. 9052 
Creasey, Fred. 204 W. Washington. Sebree, 2172 
Crosthwaite, John S., Jr.. Ky. Utilities Co., Harlan, 2075. 57 
Crowe, Emmett H., 1223 Bates Court. Louisville. HI €132, 

JA 4241 
Crutcher, Joseph L., Vine Grove. Flaherty, 2-7241 (Bus. No.) 
Cubbage. Tom. Leitchfield. 80, 67-3 
Cummins, Albert, 4807 Ash Ave.. Cincinnati, Ohio. JE 0258. 

PO 4100, Ext. 317 
Dallmann, James W., 12 Center St., Jeffersonville, Ind., 

3-7255, 3-7255 
Damico, Ernie, 1758 E. McMillan St., Cincinnati, Ohio, WO 8058, 

CH 5820, Ext. 386 
Daniel, James O., 1319 State, Bowling Green, 9006. 9006 
Davenport. William T.. 315 Village Dr.. Elizabethtown. 6451, 

2160 
Davis, Donald, 39 Harrison, Bellevue. JU 9813. CO 6990 
Davis, Dwight R.. Jr., 3878-D Fincastle Rd., Louisville, 

MA 3331M, WA 7531, Ext. 201 
Davis. Ralph E., Main St., Vanceburg, 49. Ill 
DeMoisey, Fox, 227 Highland Ave., Fort Thomas, Hi 0795 
Dexter, Sam, 846 Hilltop Rd.. Danville, 2017, 2017 
Dial, Jack W., 3913 Brandon Rd.. Huntington. W, Va. 
Dimitroff, James M.. 4526 Swallow Rd., Louisville, Okolona 

9-5693, Ft. Knox 6169 
Di Muzio. Robert, 4047 Runnymede, Cincinnati, Ohio, Kirby 

2220, Wabash 1180 
Dixon, William, 2909 Wak St., Evansville, Ind., 6-1212, 6-7244 
Dromo. John, 1844 Deer Park. Louisville. HI 1444W, CA 7002 
Drye, James E.. 607 Franklin. Clarksville. Tenn.. 3-1066. 5620 
Durkin, Jack H., 240 Hillsboro. Lexington, 4-4396, 4-1717 
Eads, Walter. Monticello. 170B, 19 
Earle, Herschel, Berry. 941WI - Cyn. 
Edelen, Ben R., 2903 Yorkshire. Louisville, CH 3518. JA 1361, 

Ext. 244 
Edwards, Hubert, Columbia. 4592, 3261 
Ellington, James E., 2222 Linden Ave., Southgate. HI 6084. 

JU 7946 
Ellis, Jack D., 426 Second St.. Morehead, 381, 46 
Elovitz, Carl, 349 S. Broadway Park, Lexington, 2-4601, Ver- 
sailles 720 
EIrod, W. T., 332 Sumpter. Bowling Green, 6110, 4334 
Estes, A. D., Hawesville, 4491 
Eversmeyer, Lysle K. 1720 Valley Rd., Clarksville, Tenn., 

7002, 2973 
Fagues, Homer, Combs, 1833 (Bus. No.) 
Ferguson, Ford, College St., Paintsville. 274. 274 
Ferrcll, Doc, N. Lake Dr.. Prestonsburg, 6182. 5153 
Fields, Joe D., Route 1, Gilbertsville 
Florence, Robert H.. 242 Glenwood Dr.. Paducah. 5-7910. 

5-6311. Ext. 8759 
Flynn, Robert D., 110 Halls Lane, Lexington. 4-7924, 4-6373 
Forsythe, Robert, Browder, Drakesboro 2583. Greenville 309 
Franklin, Clifford, 10152 Zig Zag Rd., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

TW 3567. TW 3567 
Frazer, Thomas Roe, 212 E. Belleville, Marion. 20 
Fugate, E. Hugh, Price. Wheelwright 2422, 2351 
Fultz. Jack, Box 636. Olive Hill 

Gardner, Daniel H., 104 S. Adams. Henderson. 7-1297 
Gardner, Howard E., 307 Popular Dr., Elizabethtown, 4451, 

Fort Knox 2-8137 
Gates, William A., Jr.. 125 Travois Rd.. Louisville, Belmont 

2310, Jackson 8121 
Gettler, John F., 314 Sheridan Dr.. Lexington, 2-8846. 4-9896 
Gibson, Romulus D., Box 212. Campbellsville, 2630 
Gillenwater, Powell B.. Centre College, Danville. 1607 R 
Gish, Delmas. 207 W. Fourth. Central City. 518 W. 9 
Goetz, Larry C, 6786 LeConte, Cincinnati, Ohio, Be 9281 (Bus. 

No.) 
Coins, Bobby, E. Second. Corbin, 1642 J, 295 
Golden, Billy Joe, 568 Main St., Lynch 

Goley, James, 10 Utz Dr., Florence. Axtel 5447 (Bus. No.) 
Gooch, Leonard, Waynesburg, Eubank 2731 



Gourley, Harold E., 1700 N. Alvord Blvd.. Evansville, Ind. 

Grace, Charles K. 344K- Catalpa, Pineville, 793, 76 

Greene, Omar P., Box 58. By Pro. 2573. 2573 

Griese. Warren J., 362 Craig Ave., Evansville, Ind. 

Grisham, Jesse, 1625 Roosevelt, Henderson, 7-1035, Evansville 

3-6461 
Grissom, William H., Norris Court, Glasgow, 2877, 3666 
Grone, Freddy F., 1126 Win Ave.. Ashland, 1089, 1660 
Gustafson, Alford. 240 Francis BIdg.. Louisville, CH 6151, 

Jackson 2058 
Haas, Ralph, 612 Vine St.. Ironton. Ohio. 2497 
Hagan, Joseph E., 3000 Sherbrooke Rd., Louisville, CH 1325, 

WA 4327 or 432S 
Hagerman, Bart. 715 Magnolia Ave.. Bowling Green, 7865, 3212 
Haley. Dalton D., 230 W. College St., Mayfield, 943W 
Hall. Billy Joe. Morehead, 327 R 

Hall, Royal A., Jr., 3809 Park Ave., Covington. HE 0716 
Hammons, William Earl, 68 Fitch Ave., Winchester, 2126W, 

1184 
Hanberry, H. Carrol, 1609 Frederica St., Owensboro, 3-1759 
Hancock, Thomas E.. Route 1. Fulton. 1222-R-2 
Hardin. Ben W., Marrowbone. 6830 (Bus. No.) 
Hardin, Jack H., 3924 Gartin Ave., Ashland, Park 2112, 

6161 Htg. 
Harris, Wallace R.. 3219 Hillcrest Terrace, Evansville, Ind., 

4-3116, 3-1151, Ext. 243 
Hartley. William E., 1121 Marshall, Evansville. Ind.. 7-0631, 

7-0631 
Head. Elmo C, 113 Alton Rd.. Shelbyville. 1273 W. 142 
Heldman. John. Jr., 140 Seneca Trail. Louisville, FN 2181, 

CA 2531 
Henderson, Robert L., Route 3. Mayfield 
Hewling, Richard, 211 Linden. Newport 
Hines. Maurice D., Olmstead, 4595 
Hoagland. Charles R.. Jr.. 102 E. Leesway Dr., Lexington, 

2-9704. 2-6494 
Hodge, Fred A., 1063 Waggoner Ave.. Evansville. Ind.. 3-3231, 

2-1111 
Hodges. Holbert, 616 N. Hill St.. London 
Hoffman. Garnet, 916 Ash St., Louisville 
Hofstetter, Joe. 1423 Fourth Ave.. Williamson. W. Va. 
Holbrook, William M.. 2421 Forest. Ashland 
Holeman. D. Fletcher, 329 Poplar St.. Dawson Springs, 2302, 

4241 
Holland, Franklin H., 1607 Cabel Dr., Bowling Green, 6029 
Hollowell, James R., 1441 So. Fourth St., Apt. 8. Louisville 
Holzknecht, George L.. 206 North 39th St.. Louisville 
Hood. Clayton, 307 W. Kentucky. Franklin 
Howard. Harry. 401 N. Main. London, 3I4J, 231Y 
Howard. Jimmy D.. 204 E. Depot. Marion 
Hudson, Douglas, Worthville 
Hudson, Oscar, Sassafras, 683 (Bus. , No.) 
Hulse. Robert K.. Jr.. Kuttawa. 2201 
Hunley. Neil P.. West Liberty, 78F2. 163 
Hurd. Fred. Clinton 
Hurst. David E.. Box 688. Jenkins. 355. Fleming Neon High 

School 
Hutt. Joseph D., Jr., 608 Wallace, Louisville 
Hyland. Frank D., Box 156. South Webster, Ohio, Porter 2211, 

Waverly 5-100, Ext. 317 
Jenkins, Joseph K., 210 Moringside Dr., Elizabethtown 
Jeter, John B., 271 Clay Ave.. Lexington, 3-3441, 4-9895 
Johnson, Ellis T.. Morehead 
Johnson. J. T.. Route 1. Pryorsburg 
.Johnson, James P.. Big Hill 
Johnson, Ralph, Hitchins 

Johnson, Vernon L.. 307 Holt. Mt. Sterling 
Johnson. Walter, Hitchins 
Jones, Carson G., 709 N. Main, Evansville. Ind.. 2-3069, 3-1151, 

Ext. 427 
Jones, Charles "Junior". 2834 Yorkshire Blvd., Louisville 
Jordan, Ken, 104 W. Orchard Rd.. Fort Mitchell 
Joseph, Michael, 2706 First Ave., Huntington. W. Va. 
Keene. Marcum. Feds Creek 
Key. Calvin E.. Hazel. 31, 25 
Kidd, Roy. 224 Vet Village. Richmond. Athletic Dept. of 

Eastern State College (Bus. No.) 
Kieter, Wilms, 425 Dixon, Henderson, 4204, 3772 
King, James A., 720 So. 43rd. Louisville. CY 3690. JA 8351 
Kinman. Joe T.. Roselawn Dr.. Williamstown. 4-8631 
Knight, Bill, 725 N. 36th St.. Paducah. 3-2775, 3-1957 
Kohlmeyer. Robert, 1760 N. Alvord, Evansville, Ind., 7-0500, 

2-4161 
Kremer. Joseph A., 3753A Fincastle, Louisville, Ma 6036W, 

Wa. 7747 or Ja 9583 
Leech, Joseph C, 104 Leech Court. Glasgow. 3939. 3245 
Leet, Warren R., 432 Queensway Dr.. Lexington. 2-0060, 2-0939 
Lenox. Robert W.. Berry. Cyn. 929-R4 
LeVan, Thomas F.. Burna. 4601 
Lewis, .Tack E., Route 4. Plainview Dr.. Evansville, Ind., 

96-93111 
Lindloff, Gilbert E., 6004 So. Third, Louisville. FR 0225. 

RA 5781 
Little. J. B., Jackson. 112W. 112J 
Little, Ronnie, Pomeroyton. 1714 (Bus. No.) 
Little, Warren C, Pomeroyton, 1714 (Bus. No.) 
Long. William G., Jr., 209 Idlewylde Dr., Louisville, BE 8731, 

MA 9060 
Longenecker, D. M., 3910 Olympic, Louisville, TA 9071, BE 3401 



k 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1954 



Looney, Dick, 313 Scott Ave., Pikeville, 813 

LudwiB, Harry F., Lou. Counti-y Day School, Louisville, 

BE 5380, BE 34.52 
Lykins, Clayton G., Vaneeburg 

Lytle, William P., Hopkinsville, Tu 5-8903, Tu 5-36.54 
McAllister, John T., 2322 Stratford, Cincinnati. Ohio, Pa 4198, 

Ch 8100, Ext. 207 
McClellan, Leonard B., .Jr., 2512 Goldsmith Lane, Louisville 
McClanahan, Charles, 222 Front, New Richmond. Ohio, 4121, 

264 
McCollum, Robert G., 406 Holliday Rd., Lexington, 2-3710 
McCowan, Connell, Route 1, Box 251, Corbin, 1037R, 284 
McCuiston, Pat M., Hopkinsville, 4ii Pembroke, TU 69096 
McGlasson, Galen, Route 1, Burlington. Hebron 3342 
McGuftey, Harold B., 1109 Nutwood, Bowling Green, 50M, 

Smiths Grove 77 
McLeod, Robert N., Ja., Bourne Ave., Somerset, 571, 545 
McMillan, James N., 305 Riverside Dr., Russell, 0-367, Ashland 

370 
McNabb, Edgar, 137 Pleasant Ridge, So. Ft. Mitchell, ED 3113, 

ED 1220 
McPike, Ray S., Jr., 309 Theatre Bldg, Louisville, HI 639W, 

WA 2832 
Macon, Alan L., 1637 Sale Ave., Louisville, AT 3495, JA 1361, 

Line 473 ^. , , ^^^^ 

Mahan, Robert M.. 114 W. Water St., Mayfield, 86, J 
Majors, Damon, Caneyville, 49, 3102 
Malcolm, Donald C, Route 1, Kenova, W. Va., 3409 1 HTG, 

21778 HTG .„ .^ , ,,,„ 

Marshall, Clyde, 4214 S. Third, Louisville. Em 6-7248 
Martin, Bobby, Route 2. Beaver Dam, 4595 
Martin, Carl E., Box 102, Pineville, 496M, 263 
Martin, Theodore O., Jr., Route 9, Highland Pkwy., Frankfort, 

46970, 42281 .„ , ^ „ ,„,„ 

Martin, William L., 816 N. Governor, Evansville, Ind., 2-4258, 

5-3151, Ext. 20 
Mason, James E., 121 South Second. Mayfield, 1210M 
Matarazzo, Salvatore, 320 N. Mulberry, Elizabethtown, o689. 

Fort Knox 22260 
Mav E. B., Jr., Box 185, Prestonsburg, 3453 
Mayes, Edward. 838 CrosshUl Ed., Danville, 986R, 1008 
Meade, Foster "Sid", Box 63, South Portsmouth, 7-6291 (Bus. 

Meeks, Jack, 211 Ky. Ave., Corbin. 378J, 2178 
Metcalf, Earl L.. 3441 Lovelaceville Kd.. Paducah 2-13o.l 
Metcalf, Harold E., 3933 Tulane St., Louisville. At 5574, Ra oifcl 
Milkovich, John, 2000 Kenilwoi-th Ct., Apt 1 Louisville 
Miller, Bob 630 Berry Ave., Bellevue. Co 5655. Ax bKii 
Miller. Jack T., Black St.. Barbourville 417 
Miller. Rex J.. 704 23rd St.. Ashland, Oak 2b09, 225d 
Miller, Roy, Belton, Central City 440 (Bus. No.j 
Mills, Claude, Inez , . 

Mills, Herman, Lovely, Kermit, W. Virginia 2551 
Mitchell, Emmett, Route 2, Todds Rd., Lexington, 2-3 1 88 
Moll, Francis B.. 820 Mulberry, Mt Vernon, Ind., 119-118, 
Moore, Thomas C. Jr.. 220 Sterrett. Covington, Ax 8997, Pa 7646 
Moreman, Lucian Y., Valley Station, Pleasure Ridge 21-,S41 
Moss Bobby G., LaCenter „ ,, ti 

Mueller, Frank J., 132 A, Gaffey Heights, Fort Knox, Eose 

Terrace 3-3519, Fort Knox 2-6244 
Mussman, Ralph, Jr., 602 Monroe St., Newport, Ju 4562 Co 1300 
Myers, Edward Botts, 626 Columbia Ave., Glasgow, 2878, 287K 
Nau, Bill. Barbourville, 203 . , , ^u- -.ca, i^-x 

Neal Gene, 549 Washington, New Richmond, Ohio, .ilj41, ibii 
Neal, Marion, 1638 12th St., Portsmouth, Ohio, 5-0256, 3-2631 
Neumann, Jerry, 2154 Selim Ave., Cincinnati, Oh.o, WA 49, o 
Newsom. Marley. 109 Division St., Pikeville. o9M 
Newsome. Forest, Wheelwright, 2784, 2142 
Nie Allen F., 304 W. i:ilh St., Newport, Ax 6847 
Nimmo, Lo, 207 Price Rd., Miiford. Ohio. TE 3170, EA 1484 
Noble, Charles B., Court, .lackson, 53W, 9109 
Noble, Leonard, Jackson, 334, 5 

Noel, Roy D. Brook, Burgin 4292 .,„.,„ 

O'Bryan, Robert H., 1736 Harvard Dr.. Louisville, HI (jJo.i-K 
Oldham, John, Bowling Green, 9553, 4334 
Omer, Billy. R. R. 5. Madisonville, 861-W 
Osborne, Bill, 410 E. Main, Vine Grove, 095 
Owens, Lewis M.. Heskamp, Columbia, 4675, 4111 or 3131 
Padgett, R. K.. 117 Griffin Ave., Somerset, 470W, 12 
Park, J. M., 924 Yarbro Lane, Paducah, 5-6567, 5-5292 
Paulin, Al, 538 Franklin, Tell City, Ind., 435-R, 435-R 
Pergrem. Bernard, 2815 Hackworth. Ashland 
Phelps, Rudy, Box 533, Russell, Grand 172 
Picciano, John. 3799 Gatewood. Cincinnati. Ohio, Tw 2474, 

Je 4548 
Poppas, Nickolas, Box 127, Blue Diamond, 1829 (Bus. No.J 
Posey. Ralph W.. 101 Veterans Village, Bowling Green, 3167 
Postlewaite, George D., 1629 Court Manor, Owensboro 
Powell, Logan G., 252-B McCracken Dr., Lexington, 2-9794 
Price, James E., Pricetown. Liberty Ext. 2588 
Radjunas, Stan. 1644 Elliott Ave.. Ashland. Grand 772-W 
Rakel. Roland G.. Donegal Dr., Cincinnati, Ohio. Sy 1662, 

Po 3210 
Rail, Eugene, 124 W. Todd. Frankfort, 4-2355, 4-4408 
Randall, H. C, Box 227, Columbia, 4661, 4711 
Ranson, Robert M., St. Joseph, W. Louisville 2526, Slaughters 

2742 
Ratterman, Bernard W., Sr.. 1222 S. 41st St., Louisville. 

Cy 6085, Wa 1241, Ext. 6274 



Rawling.s Don R., 840 Hoyd, Danville, 926, 708 

Redman. Malvern G.. 1226 Main St.. Mt. Vernon. Ind.. 1065. 

90-W 
Reed, Charles R., 147 Walnut St., Versailles, 605-Y 
Reed, Gordon, 1603 N. Ft. Thomas Ave., Ft. Thomas, HI 4946, 

DU 4607 
Seinhart, Gene, 649 E. Tennessee St., Evansville. Ind., 2-6913, 

2-0892 
Reynolds, Howard M., 407 Holt, Mt. Sterling, 1068. 9134 
Rice, Homer, Highlands Hig,i School, Fort Thomas 
Rice, James F., 506 Morehead. Central City, 2n5, 574 
Richlin, Maurice, 2605 Talbott, Louisville, CH 5252, J A 7164 
Ries, Robert R.. 2454 Grinstead Dr.. Louisville, Hi 2625-R, 

Wa 7561, Ext. 420 
Riggins, Jason. IV2 W. 5th Ave.. Williamson, W. Va. 
Ritter. Goebel, Baker Av3.. Hazard, 836, 365 
Roberts, Earl C, Science Hill, 19. 19 

Robinson. Eugene. Cynthiana St.. Williamstown, 4-8782 
Rogers, Stanley J., 18 Victory Ave., Winchester, 958-R 
Roller, Otis, 3712 Nanz, Louisville, BE 6356, WA 1121, Ext. 302 
Rothfuss, Richard. 470 Foote Ave.. Bellevue. He 1422. Co 2980 
Rountree, Jack, Pleasant View, Williamsburg 5708 (Bus. No.) 
Rouse, Clyde L., 630 Erianger Rd.. Erlanger 
Eubarts, Leland G., Dunnville, 2784 (Bus. No.) 
Russell, Allen W., 1503 Main, Murray, 1205-W 
Russell, Joe, 608 W. 7th St., Russellville, 398, 398 
Sallee, Charles M.. R. R. No. 2, Rockport, Ind., Hatfield 

18-F-21, Evansville 31179 
Sandefur, Rudy, St. Joseph, W. L. 2629 
Sanders. Foster J.. Box 90, Route 4, Louisville, Okolona 

9-3720, Lou. Cy. 1061 
Saylor, Deward, Box No. 407, Wallins Creek. Wallins 3. 

(Bus. No.) 
Scheben. William J., Erlanger. Dixie 5054, Dixie 5832 
Schlich, Paul E., 1712 Deerwood, Louisville, Hi 5504R, Hi 2131 
Schwitz, Frank, 21 Mary. Evansville, Ind. 
Scott. W. L. (Bill). 1816 McDonald Road. Lexington. 23316. 

43662 
Settle. Evan E., 102 Alton Rd.. Shelbyville. 561-W 
Settle. Roy G., 1000 E. 20th St., Owensboro, 3-2136, 3-3575 
Shackelford, Buddy, 1313 Olive, Murray, 1143. 1143 
Shanahan. John Hugh. Jr., 600 Gibson Ave., Lexington, 2-9193 
Shaver, Roy A., Bremen, 30-2, 20-2 

Sherrill, Lisle R., 312 Cherrylon, Bowling Green, 6218, 4334 
Short, Buford A., Beattyville, 112-W, 95 
Showalter, John, Georgetown. 662 

Sifrig, Bernard J., R. R. 1. Tell City, Ind., 487-J-4 
Siler, Clarence M., Front St., Williamsburg, 6188, 3411 
Small, Rex, Whitesville. 4032 
Smith, Edgar J., Farmview Ave., Rt. 5, Buechel, Ch 1286, 

Ma 7530 
Smith, Elza, Beauty 
Smith, Thomas F., Biggs 
Smith. Wilbur Gaylord, Raceland. Oak 954 
Sosh. O. L. (LaRue), Uniontown, 1, 123 
Spaulding, Stan, 1318 Spring St.. Portsmouth, Ohio, Waverly 

0-6100, Ext. 2887 (Bus. No.J 
Spurgeon, Kermit, Henryville, Ind., 3271 

Stahl, L. Richard. 109 N. Bayly. Louisville, TA 8840, Cy 5631 
Stephens, Robert J.. Box 529, Montgomery, W. Va., 9-3391 
Stevens, Paul B., Dawson Springs, 2120, 5911 
Stewart, Herbert T., Oak St., Lothair 

Straight, Roy L., 1701 Jackson Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Strange, William L., 305 Sycamore St., Elizabethtown 
Strong. Arnett. Jordan, Hazard 
Strong, David A., 1413 Maple Ave., Owensboro 
Sullivan, Don C, 623 Riverside Dr., Prestonsburg, 2144, 5291 
Surface, William E., Rt. 8. 636 A Lees Lane, Louisville 
Taylor. Ed. 435 N. 41st, Louisville, RA 0126, RA 0126 
Taylor, Robert S., 2231 Hawthorne, Louisville, CH 3423, CH 6521 
Teague. Amos. 332 McLeod. Madisonville. 1346W 
Temple, Dr. .1. B., Guthrie Bldg., Paducah, 2-2147, 2-1422 
Thompson, Jack, 2357 Saratoga. Louisville, Hi 41835 
Thomp.son, Paul, 2624 Blackburn Ave., Ashland, G 3365, 1642 
ThuU. Nick B., 207 Inverness, Louisville, FR 4978, WA 6687, 

Ext. 6 
Tichenor, Billy. Route 3. Hartford, 224-LLS 
Tichenor, Matthew D., Centertown, 1212 
Tilford, Eugene, Box 381, Leitchfield. 6104. 122 
Tobe. Larry, 14 S. Sherry Lane, Bellevue, AX 8419, PA 6160 
Tompkins, Chester B., 1916 S. Kentucky Ave., Evansville, Ind., 

4-6776. 2-0020 
Toon. Joseph E.. Fancy Farm. Fancy Farm Exchange 
Tuck, Lillard Ochell, 124 Lexington Ave., Glasgow, 3331, 2723 
Tunstill, Jesse, 379 Stratford Dr., Lexington 
Ulsas. Charles F.. 601 Rosewood Dr.. Evansville, Ind., 3-6988, 

6-6521 
Vandenberg, Ralph H., 3126 S. Farmcrest, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

ME 9072. KI 1800, Line 846 
VanHoose, Jack D., Box 789, Paintsville, 669, 601 
Varble, William, 1705 Cypress. Louisville. RA 6712 
Varner, Ray G.. 626 Emerson Dr.. Lexington. 2-6432, 3-4224. 

Station 210 
Vettiner, Charlie, 205 Esplanade Dr., Louisville 
Wagoner, Donald F. c/o YMCA, 15 Pike St., Covington, 

He. 9486, Newport City Health Dept. 
Walton, Roy, Morehead St. College, Box 602, Morehead 
Walker, Lawrence I., Special Services, T. A. C., Fort Knox, 

4213 (Bus. No.) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1954 



Page Nine 



Walker, Paul R.. Leech Court, Glasgow, 301S 

Webb Leonard W., 474 S. Main, Russellville. 230 

Wedge, Donald R., 1316 Spring, Portsmouth, Ohio, 4-7661, 

6100-3442 
Welch, Bill, 3601 Warsaw, Cincinnati, Ohio, Grandview 8090, 

Wabash 9722 
Welch Ralph W., 2108 Greenwood Ave., Louisville, SP-ing-42495 
Welch', Tom. 3560 Beldare Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, AV 8094, 

GA 5700, Line 371 
Wellman. Earl, 504 13th Ave., Huntington, W. Va., 2-0479, 

2-0311 
Wells, Ed, Jr., Main St., Millersburg, 2522 
Wells, Milford, Prestonsburg, 2116, 2629 

Wesche, .James A., 427 Queensway, Lexington. 4-4413, 4-4413 
White, David, 209 Sharon Dr., Bowling Green, 9870, 5624 
Widerschein, Morton W.. 3519 Taylorsville Rd., Louisville. 

Ch-9010, Am-2583-84 
Wigginton, A. M., Sr., 1037 Cecil Ave., Louisville, Ar 7881 
Wilham, Earl. Beaumont Ave.. Harrodsburg, 913-J 
Williams, Roger L., Box 224, Ravenna, 363-R, 271 
Williams, Tom M.. Jr., 116 E. Broadway, Bardstown 
Willoughby, James T.. 919 Lorine Lane, Paducah, 3-4067 
Wilson, Jerry C, 1735 Glendale, Evansville, Ind.. 2-4573, 5-8112 
Winfrey, Shelby, Holly, Berea, 805, 850 
Witschger, LeRoy J., 1412 Antoinette, Cincinnati, Ohio, Beech- 

mont 6859. MU. 5900, Line 242 
Woford, Ernest. 222 S. 4th, Danville, 1275-W 
Wright, Billy J., Salt Lick 
Wright. John A., Salt Lick. 4637 
Zachem, Vincent, Echo Lane. Madisonville. 2730. 963 



School For Officials 

The sixth annual School for Basketball 
Officials was held on August 15-16 at the 
Watterson Hotel and the St. Xavier High 
School gymnasium, Louisville. Charlie Vet- 
tiner, veteran clinic director, was in charge 
of the school. 

The sixteen officials and the regions 
which they represented were: Rex Alexan- 
der, Region 1; Vincent Zachem, Region 2; 
LaRue Sosh, Region 3 ; Bob Forsythe, Region 
4; Dero Downing, Region 5; Tom Williams, 
Region 6; Benny Edelen, Region 7; Elmo 
Head, Region 8; Edgar McNabb, Region 9; 
Bennie Bridges, Region 10; Harry Stephen- 
son, Region 11; Robert McLeod, Region 12; 
Travis Combs, Region 13; Walter Combs, 
Region 14 ; Dick Looney, Region 15 ; and 
Ernie Chattin, Region 16. 

Through the cooperation of Coach Gar- 
land Garrison, members of the Valley High 
School basketball team were used in the 
demonstration game. Vic Brizendine of the 
Falls' Cities Basketball Officials Association 
was in charge of arrangements for the four 
sessions. The Jefferson County Recreation 
Entertainers appeared twice before the 
group of officials and visitors, and were en- 
joyed thoroughly. 

The first session of the School, which was 
held on the afternoon of August 15, was 
given over to Rules Study and Interpreta- 
tion. The second session, which followed din- 
ner, had as its principal topic "How to Teach 
Officials Coming to your Sixteen Regional 
Schools." On the morning of August 16, a 
demonstration game was played at the St. 
Xavier gymnasium, with all of the sixteen 
regional representatives having an oppor- 
tunity to work for a short period of time. 
In the Monday afternoon session, play situa- 



tions of the morning game were analyzed, 
and play set-ups were discussed for the 
purpose of uniform interpretation. 

The School was well attended, with visit- 
ors from the Louisville area, other parts of 
Kentucky, and neighboring states being 
present. 

The services of the sixteen regional representatives will be 
available to member schools of the Kentucky High School Ath- 
letic Association throughout the forthcoming basketball season. 
These men will conduct schools, clinics, demonstration games 
and assembly programs at the requests of school administrators 
and coaches. They will also assist new officials in becoming 
registered. It is hoped that school men will take advantage of 
this Association service, which has for its purpose uniformity 
in officiating and the teaching of the rules of the game to all 
those who can profit by such instruction. 

Memorandum Concerning Polio 

The National Foundation for Infantile 
Paralysis has issued recently a memorandum 
to high school coaches in the nation con- 
cerning polio prevention. The following 
facts concerning polio, given by the National 
Foundation, are very timely: 

Polio makes its appearance in a few ath- 
letic teams each Fall. Here is ui>-to-the- 
minute information on polio prevention 
through Gamma Globulin, vaccine, and hy- 
gienic precautions. 

Developments in the use of Gamma Glob- 
ulin are of special interest to coaches. As 
you know, it is derived from human blood 
serum and when used under appropriate 
conditions confers passive protection against 
paralytic poliomyelitis for about five weeks. 
This year, it is available in greater supply 
for use in time of epidemic. It is recommend- 
ed for the inoculation of groups larger than 
the family, such as camps, schools and 
neighborhoods. The method of using Gam- 
ma Globulin will be entirely at the discre- 
tion of each State Public Health Officer. If 
a case of polio appears in your team, com- 
municate immediately with your team phy- 
sician and have him get in touch with your 
local or State Health Officer. 

Over 600,000 school children participated 
this Spring in extensive field trials of a polio 
vaccine. Scientists have high hopes that this 
vaccine will prove effective but the results 
of the tests will not be known until mid- 
Winter. No vaccine is available for use out- 
side these special studies. 

Precautions against contracting the dis- 
ease are still important: 

1. Wash hands thoroughly before eating 
and after using the toilet. 

2. Persons having symptoms which may 
indicate polio should be put to bed promptly 
and a doctor should be called. These symp- 
toms are: headache, fever, sore-throat, up- 
set stomach, stiff neck or back. 

3. Avoid chilling. It seems to lower resist- 
ance to the virus. 

4. Avoid extreme or unnecessary fatigue. 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1954 



Scientific study has revealed that heavy ex- 
ertion in the early stages of the disease has 
resulted in more severe and extensive paraly- 
sis. 

The National Foundation is deeply appre- 
ciative of the help which coaches all over 
the country have given in the fight against 
polio. 



NATIONAL FEDERATION MEETING 

(Continued from Page One) 

which involve all of the states or a group of 
states. Exploratory surveys and studies by 
a non-athletic committee were approved. The 
treasurer's report was approved with com- 
mendation to Treasurer and Executive Com- 
mittee for their method of handling the 
Federation funds. Election of Executive 
Committee members for Sections 2, 4, and 6 
was held. For Section 2, Herman F. Keller 
(Bosse High School, Evansville, Indiana) 
was elected for a term of three years. Prior 
to the election, President C. A. Semler had 
announced that he would not consider re- 
election because of his decision to reduce the 
number of his activities in various state and 
national groups. For Section 4, Fred L. Bles- 
ter (Glenbard Township High School, Glen 
Ellyn, Illinois) was elected for a term of 
three years. For Section 6, L. T. Havig (Sup- 
erintendent of Schools, Williston, North Da- 
kota) was elected for a term of three years. 

At a meeting of the Executive Commit- 
tee, held on June 26, S. F. Burke, Executive 
Secretary-Treasurer of the Georgia High 
School Association, was nominated and elect- 
ed President by unanimous vote. C. A. Sem- 
lar, retiring President, who was presiding, 
turned the Chair over to Mr. Burke with ap- 
propriate comment and congratulations. 
Since Mr. Burke's elevation to the presidency 
left the position of Vice-President open, he 
called for nominations for this office. Paul 
C. Stevens was nominated and unanimously 
elected (Note: Both men received appro- 
priate recognition when they returned home 
after the meeting. A delegation of schoolmen 
and state officials met the Georgia delega- 
ion at the Georgia-Alabama state line and 
escorted them to Thomaston, where the 
Chamber of Commerce and other civic or- 
ganizations honored the new President with 
an impressive ceremony on the courthouse 
skuare. In commenting on the occasion. 
President Burke summed up the situation by 
the statement, "The whole thing makes a 
person feel rather humble.") . 

A sincere expression of appreciation was 
extended to Frank Douma and C. C. Thomp- 



son, who, because of a rotation policy in their 
respective sections, had ended their terms 
of office as Executive Committee members. 
Appropriate service medals were presented. 
The Committee also confirmed the many 
statements of appreciation which had been 
expressed throughout the meeting for the 
fine services which had been rendered by 
C. A. Semler during his ten years as Presi- 
dent of the Federation and presiding officer 
at all of the meeting sessions during that 
period. 



EARLY SEASON FOOTBALL QUESTIONS 

(Continued from Page Three) 

i.e., while the ball was going 7 yards and being 
declared dead. Team K could get the same result by 
kicking off down the field and out-of-bounds. There 
are several ways in which K could kill the remain- 
ing few seconds. They could kick the ball just enough 
to avoid being a short kick and then hold every op- 
ponent in sight. If it is a glaring case of intent to 
delay, the Official always has authority to order 
the clock to remain stopped to avoid this circum- 
vention of the rules. 

13. Play: How does the 1954 edition of the Foot- 
ball Official's Manual differ from previous editions ? 

Ruling: Except for improvements in clarity and 
a few corrections of inadvertent minor errors in 
statement, the only significant modification is in 
the signalling of a touchdown. Last year, Officials 
other than the Referee, delayed their signals. This 
year, any Official who sees the ball go over, signals 
it immediately. 

14. Play: Are there any changes in the types of 
signal used by Football Officials ? 

Ruling: No. The signals are the same as for 
1953. There was some sentiment for having only 
one signal for illegal use of hands by either Offense 
or Defense since each now carries a 15-yard penalty. 
This will be studied for possible action for 1955. 

15. Play: Where and when will the 1955 meeting 
of the National Federation Football Committee be 
held? 

Ruling: At New Orleans, Louisiana, between 
January 6 and 9, 1955. 

16. Comment: In Play 4 on page 4 of the CASE 
BOOK, the occurrence is on the last (instead of 1st) 
play of the half. 

17. Play: When may the snapper move his foot? 
Ruling: He has the same rights as any other 

player and may move after the snap motion has 
started. Since he is the only player who knows the 
exact time this motion will be started, he may have 
a tendency to move his foot or body before the 
hand motion. This item is in article 7 of Rule 7-2 
instead of in 7-1-3 to give the Official ample author- 
ity to penalize movement which anticipates the 
snap. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1954 



Page Eleven 



The Kentucky High School Coaches Charity Association 
Annual All-Star Football and Basketball Games 



I. ALL-STAR RULES APPLYING TO BOTH FOOTBALL 
AND BASKETBALL GAMES 

A. THE GAME 

1. The Association shall sponsor all-star football and basket- 
ball games to be played between squads representing West 
Kentucky and East Kentucky at Lexington each August. 

2. These games shall be played on a date approximately two 
weeks prior to Labor Day. The exact date, each year, shall be 
determined by the Executive Committee and the University 
of Kentucky Athletic Association. 

3. The Basketball &ame shall be played at 6:00 P. M. Cen- 
tral Standard Time, and the football game shall be played at 
8:30 Central Standard Time. 

B. PURPOSE OF THE GAME 

1. The purpose of the games is to raise funds with which to 
help schools and parents pay medical expenses of players who 
were severely injured while playing or practicing with their 
high school squad. This help shall be reserved for cases that 
require long expensive medical treatment. 

2. The Executive Committee may. at its discretion, assist 
with the funeral expenses in cases where an athlete is killed 
while playing or practicing any sport. 

3. The Committee may assist any member coach who has 
been injured or is sick and has been off his job without pay 
for a long period. 

4. Coaches are expected to report all needy cases to the 
Secretary, but the Executive Committee shall be the sole judge 
of merits of each case. They shall set the amount to be paid 
and shall decide the length of time such assistance shall con- 
tinue. 

C. FUNDS 

1. A checking account shall be established and all bills shall 
be paid by check. 

2. All expenses of promotion shall be paid each year before 
any fund may be distributed. 

3. A savings account shall be established and all profits on 
the games shall go to this fund until it becomes large enough 
to pay the expenses of promoting the games for one year. 
This fund ($7,500.00) shall remain on interest but so that it 
may be withdrawn when the Associat!on may need all or part 
of it to pay for any loss that might come because of bad 
weather. 

4. After the expenses have been paid each year and the full 
amount of reserve has been set aside, a third account shall be 
established. This shall be the Charity Fund. The amount on 
deposit in this account as of March 1st of each year shall be 
the determining factor in deciding how much money may be 
expended in the coming fiscal year. 

5. Not more than 50^;^ of the amount on hand in the Charity 
Fund on March 1st may be expended in any fiscal year until 
the fund has a balance of $25,000.00 after all payments have 
been made for that year. 

6. After that amount has accumulated the committee may 
spend the interest on the S25.000.00 plus all money accumulat- 
ed above that figure. 

7. In case an expendable balance is left over, it shall be 
added to the amount available for expenditure the following 
year. 

D. PLAYERS' ELIGIBILITY 

1. Any player to be eligible for these games shall have played 
high school football or basketball during the past season and 
he shall have received a high school diploma before the start 
of practice for the games. 

2. If he is elected to play in both the football and basketball 
games, he must decide which game he will play in. He may not 
play in both. 

E. COACHES* ELIGIBILITY 

1. Only member head coaches of Kentucky high schools who 
cast a ballot for the selection of players may serve as a coach 
of either game. 

2. Any man who has served as HEAD coach of an All-Star 
team shall be ineligible to serve again until five years have 
elapsed. 

F. VOTERS* ELIGIBILITY 

1. Member head coaches only may vote for players and 
coaches. A nonmember coach may send his dues with his 
nominations or ballot and become eligible. 

2. Members must vote for players and coaches from their 
own side of the State. 

G. DUTIES OF ALL-STAR HEAD COACHES 

1. The coach shall receive from the manaerer the final list 
of his players. He shall get in touch with these players. He 
shall be responsible for the players getting to Lexington on 
time and for all tactics employed by his players. 

2. In case less than a full squad of players reports at Lex- 
ington, the head coach and the manager shall select a player 
or players to bring his squad up to full strength. After a 
player has reported for practice, he may not be replaced re- 
gardless of what happens to him. 



3. Coaches shall be responsible for all discipline of their 
squad members from Sunday meeting prior to the game until 
they leave Sunday after the game. 

4. Coaches shall cooperate with each other in deciding th§ 
place of practice, maximum length of practice periods and 
other technical points relative to practice and the game. 

5. Coaches shall cooperate with the manager at all times in 
the promotion of the games. 

6. The Executive Committee is empowered to relieve a coach 
from his job at All-Star games for failure to carry out his 
duties in connection with the coaching of an All-Star team. 

H. CHECKING-IN TIME AT LEXINGTON 

1. Players and coaches shall report at the Coliseum at 
1 :30 P. M. Central Standard Time, Sunday prior to the games. 

2. They shall check out not later than Sunday morning after 
the games. 

L EXPENSES FOR INDIVIDUALS 

1. Before game night, the secretary shall refund each in- 
dividual as follows: Four cents per mile from the player's 
home to Lexington will be allowed for transportation. Necessary 
meals and lodging will be also paid, both going and coming. 

2. Lodging and meals will be furnished in Lexington start- 
ing Sunday night before the games and ending Sunday morn- 
ing after the games. 

3. Coaches and players shall be furnished the same lodging, 
meals, transportation, awards, and entertainment. 

J. UNIFORMS 

1. AH players and coaches shall furnish their own game 
and practice uniforms except game jerseys and game pants. 
They will be furnished by the University of Kentucky Athletics 
Association. 

K. AWARDS 

1. Some suitable award shall be given each player and 
coach. 

2. The Executive Committee shall decide what to give and 
how much it is to cost. The details shall be arranged by the 
manager. 

L. SPECIAL PASSES 

1. Necessary passes shall be issued by the manager to the 
working press, radio, and television workers and special Uni- 
versity personnel. 

M. TICKETS 

1. All admission tickets shall cost $1.25 each. 

2. Reserved seats for the All-Star basketball game will be 
composed of the box seats on the West side of the Coliseum 
and may be secured from the manager, in Lexington, during 
the week of the games. 

3. There will not be any seats reserved for the AU-Star foot- 
ball games. 

4. Members will be admitted to All-Star games upon presenta- 
tion of membership cards at the game. 

II. ALL-STAR RULES APPLYING ONLY TO FOOTBALL 

A. DIVISION OF STATE 

1. United States Highway 27 completely across the state 
shall be the basic dividing line. 

2. In order to balance the power evenly, certain schools have 
been placed as the Committee wished. Male and Girls. Flaget, 
Southern, Lafayette, and all Kenton County schools have been 
placed in the West. Manual, St. Xavier, Shawnee, Henry Clay 
and all schools of Campbell County have been placed in the 
East. 

3. AH other schools along the 27 Highway have been placed 
so that they provide about equal strength for each side. Thus, 
Lancaster, Somerset, and Cynthiana have been placed in the 
East, Paris, Nicholasville, and Stanford have been placed in 
the West. 

4. All other schools are obviously on their side because of 
their positions on the map. 

5. SIX-MAN TEAMS 

a. Six-man football teams have been divided so that each 
side has approximately equal numbers and strength. 

b. Austin-Tracy, Caverna. Hiseville, Park City. Shepherds- 
ville, and Temple Hill have been placed in the West. 

c. Burgin, Lebanon Junction, Perryville. Ormsby Village, 
Munfordville, Walton-Verona, have been placed in the East. 

B. PLAYER BENCH AND JERSEY 

1. Players of the East squad shall wear blue jerseys and 
occupy the bench on the north side of the field each year. 

2. "The players of the West squad shall wear white jerseys and 
occupy the bench on the South (press box) side of the field. 

C. SQUADS 

1. Each squad shall be composed of a maximum of twenty- 
eight players. There shall be five ends, five tackles, five 
guards, three centers, and ten backs. 

2. Not more than two players from any school may play on 
a squad under any circumstances. 

D. METHOD OF PICKING PLAYERS 

1. On or before November 15, the manager shall mail a 
letter to each head football coach and ask him to nominate 
a maximum of two players from his own squad. (Coaches should 



Pa^e Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1954 



not nominate a boy unless he is good enough to play in this 
game. He should nominate the boy for a position that he 
plays best and has played most of the season.) If the coach 
nominates more than two players, the manager shall mark 
off all names from that school except the top two. 

2- The coach shall send his nominations to the manager 
not later than December 1. 

3. Not later than December 10 the manager shall send each 
head coach the following forms : 

a. A list of all nominees and their schools, also positions. 

b. A list of schools for each side and their head coaches, 
with former head coaches who are ineligible so indicated. 

c. A ballot so ruled that the voter may vote for two full 
teams and two coaches. 

^ 4. Coaches should vote for two full teams from the nominee 
list only. Votes for unlisted players will not be counted. 
Votes for players not listed correctly according to position shall 
not be counted. Coaches shall list on the ballot all players in 
order of their preference. In tabulating the manager shall 
allow points as follows: four points for first position, three 
points for second position, two points for third position, and 
one point for fourth position. 

5 Coaches shall return their ballots to the manager not 
later than .January 10. 

6. The manager shall tabulate the votes and call a meeting 
of the Executive Committee and the newly elected head coaches 
not later than the week end nearest January 25. 

7. The manager shall submit a list of all the nominees with 
a summation of their votes. 

8. From that list the committee shall name four ends, four 
tackles, four guards, two centers, and eight backs. These boys 
must be the players with the most points for the-r nosHion. 
In case of a tie vote the head coach (if present) sba'I decMe 
the man he wants. If he is not present the committee shall pick 
the players. 

9. The head coach shall pick three players from his s'de of 
the State for his squad. They may be any eligible plaver, 
nominated or not. However no more than two men from one 
school may play. 

10. A committee of three, selected by the president, shall 
pick three players for each squad. They may nick any eligible 
player from their respective sides of the State. However the 
committee shall observe the two-man rule also. 

E. SELECTION OF COACHES 

1. Member coaches may vote for two men for head coach 
of their respective squads. They shall list these men in order 
of their preference. First man shall receive two points and 
the second man shall receive one point. 

2. Member coaches may vote only for coaches from their 
respective section of the State. 

i.^;, V^^ /^^^ '^'**^ *^^ '"°^* points in his half of the State 
shall be declared the head coach. He shall be paid §200.00 

4 The man wnh the second most points on each side shall 
be declared the first assistant coach. He shall be paM $100.00 

5. In case of tie points the executive committee shall break 
the tie by tossing a coin. 

6. Each head coach shall be allowed to pick a second assistant 
coach He shall be paid $100.00. This second assistant must be 
a head coHch from some school in the Al!-Star head coach's half 
ot the State. He may come from any school in that half of 
the State. 

f '^* "^i ^ u^^-.^ ?°^^^ ^^''^ *° appoint his second Assistant be- 
fore March 1. he shall lose this privilege and the manager 

coach ^^ ""^^ °" *^^ "^* ^^ ^^^'^"^ assistant 

ni. RULES THAT APPLY ONLY TO BASKETBALL 

A. DIVISION OF STATE 

1. Basketball regions 1 through 8 shall constitute the West 
^. Kegions 9 through 16 shall constitute the East 

B. SQUADS 

la'e^s^*^^ s^^ad shall be composed of a maximum of twelve 

2. Not more than two players from any school shall play on 
a squad under any circumstance. 

C. METHOD OF PICKING PLAYERS 

I, If ?1 "'" u^^u'■^ ^^K''"^»-y 20. the manager shall mail a 
ballot to each basketball coach and request him to vote for 
two men in his region. He shall list these men in order of 
his preference. Number one shall receive two points, number 
two shall receive one point. 

2 Coaches shall return their ballots not later than Monday 
following the State Tournament. Ballots delivered on Tuesday 
will not be coantcd. 

3 The manager shall call a meeting of the Executive Com- 
rr. ^ ""1 Friday morning during the State Tournament. 
Coaches of teams m the tournament shall be invited 

4. I he manager shall present to the committee a list of 
players from each region with a summation of the votes 
=o^; IJ^ P^^y?»* ^v'tj the highest number of points shall repre- 
^ « u „ '■^^'""u " ^^ '^ "°* eligible or available, the next 
man shall be chosen. Ties shall be broken by the toss of a 

6. Eight men for each squad (one from each region) shall 
be selected in this manner. 

ihl' J*f ^""^l '''''''''^ ^^^^^ P^^^ *^'^** players from his side of 
»^nv tl^" 7 ""^ ™^^ ^^ ^"y eligible player, except that no 
more than two men shall come from one school. 



8. A committee of three selected by the president shall pick 
two players for each squad. They may pick any eligible player 
from their respective sides of the state except that only two 
players may come from one school. 

D. SELECTION OF COACHES 

1. The head coach of the West squad shall be the coach 
from regions 1 through 8 whose team advanced the fartherest 
in the State Tournament which precedes the game. He shall be 
paid S200.00. 

2. The West assistant coach shall be the next highest ranked 
coach from regions 1 through 8 in the State Tournament. 
He shall be paid $100.00 

3. The head coach of the East squad shall be the coach from 
regions 9 through 16 whore team advanced the fartherest in 
the State Tourunament. He shall be paid $200.00. 

4. The assistant coach of the East squad shall be the next 
highest ranking coach in the State Tournament from regions 
9 through 16. He shall be paid $100.00 

5. In case of ties, the manager shall decide the coaches by 
the toss of a coin. 

6. If a former head coach of the All-Stars or another man 
who is ineligible to coach that year, advances in the State 
Tournament until he would be picked, the committee would 
select the next high ranking man or men to fill the coaching 
positions. 

IV. DUTIES OF ALL-STAR MANAGERS 

A. DUTIES OF ALL-STAR MANAGERS APPLICABLE TO 
BOTH GAMES. He shall: 

1. Prepare, mail, and collect all details concerning the selec- 
tion of squad members for all teams. 

2. Contact all nominees and selected players and secure the 
following data: 

a. Their agreement to play in the game. 

b. Their parents' permission for them to play. 

c. Their school principal's permission for them to represent 
their school. 

d. Their coach's permission to play and agreement to furnish 
a uniform. 

e. A picture for publicity papers. 

f. Three copies of publicity data (one each for office, pro- 
grams, and head coach). 

3. Strictly observe all deadlines. 

4. Make arrangements with the University for their full 
cooperation. 

5. Collect and issue all publicity data. 

6. Have mats prepared of all players and see that proper 
pictures appear in home-town papers of the players. 

7. Have complete charge of sale and nroduction of the pro- 
grams. He shall pay all bills. One-half of the net receipts shall 
be given to the game fund and he shall retain the balance as 
part of his salary. 

8. Purchase reserved seat tickets for the basketball game. 

9. Have complete charge of ticket sales. 

10. Secure insurance on players of all squads. 

11. Carry out the wish of the Executive Committee in regard 
to awards for the players and coaches, and have the presenta- 
tion in Lexington for the awards, at the first meeting. 

12. Present the treasurer with statements or receipts for 
all exoenses which are to be paid by the treasurer. 

13. Prepare travel expense forms and have them filled in 
by the coaches and players before Friday (the treasurer will 
make these payments in cash Friday noon ) . 

14. Have the authority to attend to any details of the game 
not covered i n the rules. 

B. DUTIES OF MANAGER CONCERNING FOOTBALL 
ONLY. He shall: 

1. Before November 15, each year, prepare a form and send 
it to all head coaches of football in Kentucky requesting them 
to nominate two players for the All-Star Game. 

2. Between December 1 and December 10 make a list of all 
nominees for each half of the state showing their position and 
school ; prepare a list of all football schools in each half of the 
state and list their head coaches, indicating former All-Star 
head coaches not now eligible. Send the three forms to all head 
football coaches. 

3. Between .January 10 and January 20 tabulate all votes. 

4. On the Saturday nearest January 25 call a meeting of the 
Executive Committee and the newly elected head coaches. 

5. Submit a list of players and coaches and a summation of 
their votes to the Executive Committee. 

6 On March 1 name a second assistant coach for each squad 
if the head coach has not exercised his privilege to name him. 
He shall be the next available man on the list. 

C. MANAGER'S DUTIES APPLYING ONLY TO BASKET- 
BALL 

1. Ballots: 

a. On or before February 20 the Manager shall mail a ballot 
to each head basketball coach requesting him to vote for two 
players from their own region. 

b. He -shall collect all ballots not later than Monday 
following the Regional Tournament and shall tabulate all 
votes. 

c. He shall call a meeting of the Executive Committee Friday 
morning of the State Tournament. 



so^^ 



^"^ to ^^"^ 



IN STOCK FOR AT ONCE DELIVERY 



OFFICIAL FOOTBALLS 

MacGreg-or No. M5G - solid color $14.45 

Spalding No. J5V - solid color 14.45 

MaeGregor No. M5G2 with white stripes 14.95 

Spalding No. J5V with white stripes 14.95 

MaeGregor No. F7G 11.50 

PLASTIC HELMETS 

No. E604, Suspension type $14.95 

No. E624, Absorblo rubber padded 12.95 

No. E644, Absorblo rubber padded 9.95 

No. E654, for Jr. High, a real value 6.95 

SHOULDER PADS 

No. H721 Outside Cantilever $14.45 

No. H723 Flat Pad 12.45 

No. H724 Outside Cantilever 12.45 

No. H726 Cantilever Pad 10.95 

FOOTBALL SHOES 

No. A609 Kangaroo Upper $16.95 

No. A612 Kangaroo Low Cut 16.45 

No. A615 Heaw Duty Sole 14.95 

No. A618 Soft Toe - a real value 13.95 

No. A625 Sportan Leather Upper 9.95 

HIP AND KIDNEY PADS 

No. C605E Girdle type pad $ 9.95 

No. C610 Absorblo type 8.95 

No. C615 Absorblo type 7.45 

No. C63 Absorblo type 5.95 

PRACTICE JERSEYS 

No. UKH Heavy Wgt. solid white $ 3.00 

No. UKH Med. Wgt. solid white 2.50 

No. UKL Light "Wgt. solid white 2.00 

(All above with double elbows and 
double shoulders). 

PRACTICE PANTS 

No. HIOOO practice pants of 9 oz. duck, 
all-around web belt with knee pads. 
Made in regular, long or extra long 
lengths, per pair $ 4.95 



No. SFM Marietta Face Mast (full type) $6.95 

No. SHM Marietta Face Mask (half type) 5.95 

No. GFM Guardsman Face Mask 6.65 

No. TPI Adams Plastic Bar Mask 5.25 

No. S640 Eyeglass & Face Guard, rubber 

covered 5.40 

No. S645 Jaw and Face Guard, rubber 

eovei-ed 4.95 

No. E750 Military type chin strap $ .75 

No. HCS White rubber padded chin strap 1.25 
No. S635 Colorite - all colors for 

helmets, pint 1.35 

40 inch Round Pant or Pad Laces, pair .06 
57 inch Heavy Black or White Laces, pr. .12 

Football Posters, large and very nice, ea $ .10 

No. S486 Voit Teeth Protector 2.00 

No. S487 Double White Rubber Protector 1.45 
Featherbite Teeth Protector 4.25 

UK Game Cleats, Aluminum (set 14)--$1.00 

UK Practice Cleats, Aluminum " " 1.00 

UK Game Cleats, Rubber " " .60 

UK Practice Cleats, Rubber " " .60 

UK Mud Cleats, Rubber " " .60 

No. RW - Ratchet Wrench for aluminum 

cleats 2.25 

Dri-Flo Marking Set with Ink $3.50 

No. FRI Foam Rubber & Fabric Inner- 
soles, pair .25 

UKP - White Web 1" belt, parachute 

buckle .50 

No. C692 Formed Absorblo Knee Pads, pr. 1.50 
No. C692C Same as C692, only drill 

covered, pair 2.25 

No. C-650 reg. Thigh guards, best grade, 
pair $1.65 

No. C646 reg. thigh guards, Absorblo 
lined, pair 2.65 

No. HIO Supporter, 3" waistband with 

mesh pouch, all sizes .75 

No. 525 Sweat socks, pair .40 

No. 612 Sweat socks, elastic top, pair .60 

No. H900 Wool Sweat socks with 3" 

colored top, pair .75 



We are prepared to give very good service on game jerseys and game pants. Call us or write 
us immediately. Our stock is very complete, so check over your adhesive tape, first-aid sup- 
plies, injury pads, foam rubber, dry or wet Stag line white for marking football fields; 
and remember this does not burn or injure the players; sideline coats, official's clothing, 
knee braces, duffle bags, megaphones, cheerleader sweaters, cheerleader emblems, pump with 
gauge, sideline markers, goal flags, linemen's chains, wet or dry field markers, tackling dum- 
mies, blocking dummies, first-aid kits, ankle wraps, etc. 



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OHicial Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 

OCTOBER - 1954 





Kids having fun in the Vine Grove prof'ram 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL XVII— NO. 3 



OCTOBER, 1954 



$1.00 Per Year 



Community Recreation at Vine Grove 

By Coach Chet Redmon 



The organization and operation of a recreation 
program in a consolidated school district is a tre- 
mendous challenge. The people of the Vine Grove 
school district have accepted this challenge and 
are providing' for their community a recreation 
program adapted to their needs and desires. 

The growth of this program has been observed 
with great interest and appreciation. From a meager 
beginning in 1949, the status has changed to a 
larg'e opeiation for this area, involving a budget 
of some thiitv-five hundred dollars for the summer 
of 1954. 

How did the program beuin? How is it financed? 
How is it supeivised ? What activities are pro- 
vided ? How is the time for the activities decided 
f>nd what activities are likely to be most desirable? 
How does the school and community benefit from 
the program ? What are the olans for the future ? 
In an effort to analyze the Vine Grove program or 
any community-type program, these and many 
other questions are presented for solution. 

As background for the beginning of any commun- 
ity planning, such an enterprise must look at factors 
such as the distribution of the population, the 
economic and social status of the community and 
its people, and other related items. Some things 
are common to most areas while others are pe- 
culiar to a particular community. 

The Vine Grove school district, one of six dis- 
tricts in the Hardin County School System, is ap- 
proximately ten miles wide and twenty-five miles 
long, pi-esenting a total area of two-hundred fifty 
square miles. Fortunately, for the success of the 
Vine Grove program, the people of this area are 
not distributed evenly throughout this vast district, 
but are congregated primarily in three or four 
smaller communities within the larger community. 
This has been a very important factor in schedul- 
ing most activities at night when the greatest num- 
ber of people could be served. 

Still another factor has been very instrumental 
in the planning of the Vine Grove program. The 
proximity of this Hardin County community to the 
Fort Knox Military Reservation is responsible for 
a rather unusual social and economic situation. 
The large number of military personnel in the area 
has brought a cosmopolitan population to the com- 
munity. People from many places, not only in the 
United States but from foreign countries as well, 
many of them accustomed to recreation opportun- 
ities, have contril)uted much to the Vine Grove pro- 
gram mainly throu.gh their participation. Many 
civilians in the area are employed on the resei-va- 
tion and not a small number of them supplement 
theii- income with part-time farming. The balance 
of the people in the community are farmers, small 
business owners, or employees of these businesses. 



These points have been mentioned to illustrate the 
idea of characteristics common to communities and 
those peculiar to a particular area. 

Many scoffeis at the idea of recreation for rural 
areas advance the id.^a that farmers and their fam- 
ilies do not readilv accept or engage in recreation 
activities. Observation at Vine Grove has not proved 
this to be true. The many developments in recent 
vears of new agricultural equipment and methods 
have given farm families more leisure time than 
they have ever before en'ove'l. They make good 
use of this leisure at Vine Grove, and it hardly 
seems logical to presume that farmers in other 
areas are any different. If Vine Grove has achieved 
any measure of success whatsoever in its program, 
it has been because every effort has been made 
to gear the program to the time available and to 
the preferred activities of the people. 

Much of the credit for the creation and develop- 
ment of the Vine Grove proi^'ram must be aiven to 
the principal of Vine Grove School. James T. Alton. 
Mr. Alton, early in his administration at Vine 
Grove, felt the need for a summer pro.gram based 
on pi'oviding wholesome activity as a snoplement 
to the community school nrogram. Unlike school 
districts in other areas of the country. Vine Grove 
could not petition a fiscal court or other govern- 
ment institutions for financial assistance in or- 
ganizing- a recreation program. Kentucky, of course, 
had a commission i-ecentlv for aiding in such or- 
ganization but it was abolished at the end of a 
recent governor's term in office. Mr. Alton, a man 
of determination and unusual foresight, was ex- 
tremely helpful w^en he was instrumental in locat- 
ing a National Youth Administration nroject in 
Vine Grove. When the NYA was disbanded in the 
early 1940's, Vine Grove wa« P'iven an ooportunity 
to purchase the permanent buildines and much of 
the equipment left behind. Mr. Alton and others 
in the community led the neonle of the community 
to acquire this project, and the oresent Vine Grove 
Community Park is built around the former NYA 
project. Approximately eight thousand dollars have 
been spent in grading and drainage around this area 
in providing for a level play field. 

Probably the foremost building in the old NYA 
project is the one now designated as the Vine 
Grove Community Recreation Building. A former 
shop building, this structure is 125' x 75', eighteen 
feet of the width having been added in 1951 at a 
cost of two thousand dollars. Radiant type heating 
was installed in the building in 1952 at a cost of 
moie than three thousand dollars, and in the Spring 
of 1954 a hardwood floor covering seventy-five per 
cent of the building's vast area was laid at a cost 
of three thousand dollars. Not only does this build- 

(Continued on Page Eleven) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1954 



OCTOBER, 1954 VOL. XVII— NO. 3 

Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association. 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Carlos Oakley (1951-55), Morganfield 

Vice-President Russell Williamson (1952-56), Inez 

Directors — James L. Cobb (1951-55), Newport; Roy G. Eversole 
(1952-56), Hazard: W. B. Jones (1953-57), Somerset; Louis 
Litchfield (1953-57), Marion; Jack Dawson (1964-58), Middle- 
town; W. H. Crowdus (1954-58), Franklin. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 

Jrom the Commissione'i s C/ffice 

The Cross Country Championship 

The second official State Hiarh School 
Cross Country Chamoionship will be held at 
the University of Kentucky over the two 
mile Picadome Golf Course on Saturday 
morning, November' 13, at 11:00. The meet 
is sanctioned by the K.H.S.A.A., and the 
Association will furnish trophies for the 
winning team and runner-up and individual 
medals for the first ten places. 

The Spiked Shoe Society at the University 
will stage the event, as it has done in recent 
years. All K.H.S.A.A. member schools are 
invited to compete. Their teams may be com- 
posed of any number of competitors, but only 
the first five runners (as designated before 
the race) will count on the team score. 

Some seventy-five boys took part in the 
1953 Cross Country, which was won by the 
Breckinridge Countv Hi.srh School. The team 
representing Valley High School placed sec- 
ond, and the Fern Creek High School team 
was third. The individual champion was Joe 
Oldendick of Bellevue High School, whose 
time was 13 :44. Scheler of Valley was second 
with the time of 13 :48, and Ball of Breckin- 
ridge County was third with 14 :05 

Principals planning on entering teams in 
the 1954 Cross Country should send their 
entries to Dr. Don Cash Seaton, Alumni 
Gym, University of Kentucky, Lexington, on 
or before November 6. Teams will dress in 
the Coliseum. Team members and their 
coaches will be guests of the University for 
the Memphis State game at 2:00 P. M. 
New Football Film 

Prints of the new film, BETTER FOOT- 
BALL, have been rented by the K.H.S.A.A. 
and have been placed on loan with the De- 
partment of Extension at the University of 
Kentucky. The film was produced by' the 
Official Sports Film Service, under the sanc- 
tion and recommendation of the National 
Federation, and was made possible by two 



good friends of school athletics. General 
Mills and Wilson Sporting Goods Company. 
BETTER FOOTBALL includues game sit- 
uations and their relation to the rules. Movie 
and TV actor Bill Frawley is the coach of a 
team which learns "the hard way" why 
knowledge of the rules is important. The 
film is instructional for coaches, officials 
and players, and has enough entertainment 
value for school assemblies and service clubs. 
In the film are play situations, some in slow 
motion, some animated, illustrating football 
rules. There are nlays involving sideline, end- 
line, goal line and scrimmage line ; illegal par- 
ticipation ; eligible pass receivers ; relation of 
force to safety and touchback ; action during 
snap; rights and limitations during pass; 
protection for p-^sser, kicker and place kick 
holder; legal and illegal use of hands; dis- 
tinction between muff and fumble ; and pen- 
alty enforcement. The film is cleared for 
television. 



Clinics for Cheerleaders 

The State Y.M.C.A. of Kentucky is con- 
ducting four Youth Davs and Cheerleaders 
Clinics this fall. On 0("tober 2 the second 
annual meeting was held at Western Ken- 
tucky State College, on October 9 the third 
annual meeting at Kentucky State College. 
The University of Kentucky will be the 
scene of the fourth annual clinic for the 
Central Kentucky area on October 30. and 
the second annual meeting will be held at 
Morehead State College on November 13. 

The University of Kentucky program will 
have a panel for cheerleaders on "Building 
Better Sportsmanship in High School Ath- 
letics." On the panel will be U.K. Football 
Coach Blanton Collier, State Superintendent 
Wendell Butler, Commissioner Ted Sanford, 
Capt. Billy Evans of the University basket- 
ball team, and a well known game official. 
Two groups of cheerleaders will demonstrate 
good and bad cheers, under the direction of 
Mrs. Stella Gilb. There will also be a special 
program for majorettes. The high school 
cheerleaders will .join college cheerleaders in 
leading cheers before the Kentucky-Villa- 
nova football game, and the majorettes will 
also perform on the field. 

Mr. A. D. Litchfield, Secretary of the State 
Y.M.C.A. is sending out a special letter to 
high school principals about these events. 
This fine program of the state organization 
has the full approval of the K.H.S.A.A., and 
it is hoped that high school principals will 
make it possible for their cheerleaders and 
sponsors to attend one of the meetings. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1954 



Page Three 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED FOOTBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled October 1) 

If one telephone number is g:iven for an official listed, it is 
tlie home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are g:iven, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Applegate, William L., 112 S. Fourth, Bardstown, 4592, 4256 

Bach. Stanley, Route 2, Lexington, 4-8319. 4-4609 

Baker. Charles .T., 2547 Harrison, Paducah, 3-3043, 5-6311. 

Ext. 8532 
Ball, Al, 306 Monroe St., Charleston, W. Va. 
Banko, Gus, 2016 E. Michigan St.. Evansville, Ind., 6-6819 
Barlow. Billy B., Route 5, Paris. 1969 R 

Barlow, James L.. 282 S. Ashland. Lexington, 2-5858 (Bus. No.) 
Bowman, Earl G.. 511 Park Ave., Lexington, 3-0977 
Broderick, Carroll A., 1760 Normal Dr., Bowling Green, 8594. 

8212 
Brotzge, Maurice J., 3800 W. Broadway, Louisville, AR 2506, 

AR 2506 
Campbell. .Tohn .T.. Country Club Courts. Fulton, 1773, 14 
Clark, Buford, Barbourville, 707L. 707L 
Craig, Randy, 446 Elm St.. Ludlow, CO 2766, GA 4460 
Daniel, Ernie, Jr., 2317 Bath Ave., Ashland, Park 2027, 2130 
Davis. Charlie. Benham 

Derrington, Robert, Evansville, Ind.. 2-4171 (Bus No.) 
Edelen, Ben R., 2903 Yorkshire, Louisville, CH 3518, JA 1361, 

Ext. 244 
Ellis, Thomas B. 123 W. 33rd, Covington, HE 6990 
Elovitz. Carl. 349 South Broadway Park. Lexington. 2-4601, 

Versailles 720 
Ewing, C. M.. 7409 U. S. 42, Florence, 1995, Main 4680, Cin- 
cinnati 
Fisher, W. B., 1634 Kenton, Bowling Green, 2-2287, 7302 
Foreman. Earl V.. .Ir., 411 Marshall Ave., Apt. 4-B, Clarksville, 

Ind., Jeffersonville 3-3963, WH 1241, Ext. 6220 
Gillespie, Robert C, Box 486, Pikeville. 1418 
Gorham, Robert J.. 726 Melrose. Lexington, 2-6610 
Gosiger. Paul E., 3036 Linview, Cincinnati. Ohio, EA 1753 
Grace, Charles K., 344"/. Catalpa. Pineville, 793, 76 
Gi'een, Walter. Kentucky Ave., Pineville 
Greenlee, O. C. (Dougl. Huntington High School. Huntington. 

W. Va. 
Greenslait. James W., Brown St., Raceland, 1260, Ext. 456 

(Bus. No.) 
Grissom, William H., Norris Court, Glasgow, 2877, 3666 
Harmon, Charles W., Williamsburg 
Heldman, John, Jr., 140 Seneca Trail. Louisville, FU 2181, 

CA 2531 
Herbert, Eddie, 219 W. 49th Ave.. Gary. Ind.. 4-6098. 6-6193 
Hewling, Richard, 211 Linden, Newport 
Himmler. Robert H.. 621 Van Voast, Bellevue, JU 3779, 

WO 9200 or CO 8375 
Hoferer. Louis R., 420 McClelland. Cincinnati. Ohio 
Hollowell. James R.. 1441 South Fourth, Apt. 8. Louisville 
Jacobs, Edwin A.. 320 Queensway Dr.. Lexington, 2-6784. 2-5784 
Jarboe. Clem E., 1631 "A" Division St., Evansville, Ind., 

3-4324, 3-4435 
Johnson, Bernard M., 2046 Clays Mill Rd.. Lexington, 4-7722, 

2-2200, Ext. 2324 
Johnston. J. M., Jr., 400 Queensway Dr.. Lexington, 3-3979, 

2-1640 
Keller, Herman, 2105 Mulberry, Evansville. Ind. 
Kempf. Joseph. 120 Sherrin Ave.. Louisville, BEL 1430 JA 4391 
Kiefer. Wilms. 425 Dixon, Henderson, 4204 3772 
Kraesig. Raymond, 927 Ardmore Dr.. Louisville, MA 2623M, 

CA 7621 
McNeish, James S., 204 Mankin Ave., Beckley, W. Va. 
Meeks. Jack, 211 Kentucky Ave.. Corbin. 378J. 2178 
Mitchell, Albert R.. 105 Brown Ave.. Lexington, 4-8921, 2-5383 
Morton, Ward D., 30F Rose Terrace, Fort Knox, 3360 (Bus No.) 
Moss, Howard A.. Route 4. Paducah. 3-1072. 3-1234 
Mudd, Edward, 400 N. 42nd St., Louisville, AR 6888 
Nord, Ed., 1734 S. 23rd St.. Louisville 
Osborne, Ted, Box 806, Lexington, 4-6270 
Parsley, Clyde E.. Route 2. Providence, 2624, 2400 
Patrick, Charles C. Route 2. Lexington, 3-4516, 3-4616 
Perkins, Billy, Route 1, Georgetown. 464 W 
Pinson, Eugene, 341, Ashland, Oak 2521, 422 
Poore, William E., Winchester St.. Middlesboro. 1368J 
Pudlo. Walter, 1016 Magnolia, Bowling Green. 6312, 3874 
Reddington, James T., 2539 Ridgewood, Box 13. Louisville. 

CA 7964. CY 4421. Ext. 243 
Reece. Fred. 149 Elm, Versailles, 33, Bourbon Vocational, 

Paris, Ky. 
Riddle, Maurice G., Route 6, Lexington, Avon 2238 (Bus. No.) 
Robertson, Everett L., 341 Etna St., Russell, Oak 368 
Rocke, James M., Route 4, Cynthiana, 1384, Frankfort 42231, 

Ext, 261 
Rogers, John B., 840 12th Ave.. Huntington, W. Va. 



Rolph. Harold J.. 915 S. 7th St,, Ironton, Ohio, 2059 R, 1390 
Ro.'^e. Alfred William. 5713 Washington Ave., Evansville, Ind., 

6-0,slr2, 2-0282 
Ross, Hill E., Uth St.. William.sburg, 6259. 4391 
Rupert, Joe, 2618 Forest. Ashland, Oak 2652, 160 
Russell, Charles. Box 627, Lynch 

Rutledge. Edward B., 814 Alton Rd., Danville, 874, 708 
Sacra, Gresham, 920 Darley Dr., Lexington, 2-6036 
Schellhase, David. 1630 Wedeking, Evansville, Ind., 5-9790 
Schmitt, Karl F.. 201 Southern Trust Bldg., Louisville, 

RA 0131, JA 8269 
Schuette, Frederick, Route 3, Henderson, 7-5917 
Sheets, James W.. 870 Cheryl Lane, Lexington, 2-6636, 4-8322 
Sloan, Wallace, 419 Oread Rd.. Louisville, BE 1126, TA 2564 
Sortet, Wilbur, 1582 Washington Blvd., Huntington, W. Va. 
Sparks. Harry M., 210 Woodland. Murray, 1193 J, 740. E.xt. 10 
Steere. David. W. Main St., Danville, 666 W 
Stephenson. Harry S., 2210 Circle Dr., Lexington 
Stevens, William D., 418 Broadway, Irvine, 410 
Stone, Clifton, Route 3, Oak Hill Rd., Evansville, Ind., 6-0973, 

5-3311 
Susott, Wilfred, 2837 Pennsylvania St., Evansville, Ind.. 4-1102, 

2-1162 
Taylor, Dennis, 811 Olive, Murray 
Thompson. Ralph, 5599 Surrey, Cincinnati, Ohio, MO 7196, 

WA 0047 
Tucker, William R., 230 S. Highland St.. Winchester, 941 W 
Wanchic, Nicholas, 311 Pepper Dr., Lexington, 3-1838 
Warf, Emerson, 2630 Jackson, Ashland. H 3476, 1037 
Watson. Jack G., 1322 N. Elm. Henderson, 3186, 9889 
Welch, Troy Lee, 103 Cherry St., Middlesboro, 851 W. 6 
Wilson, Jack R.. 3009 Moore St., Ashland, G 2463 
Witt, Fred, Whitesburg, 2661 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled October 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Adams, John W., .Ir., 119 James St., Elizabethtown 
Alford. William C, Thatcher Ave., Alexandria, Thatcher 9631 

8221 
Allen, Jack, 302 So. Fifth St., Bardstown, 4061, 3282 
Allen, Nelson R.. Route SO. Box 42, Hueysville, Wayland 4464 
Almond, Alvin, 644 14th St., Alvaton, 4850 
Ashley, Kenneth, Eubank, 2604 
Bailey, Arville. Flat Gap 
Baker. James E.. Livingston 

Ballard. Shirley L., Route 3, Winchester, 1933 W, 668 
Barlow, James L., 282 S. Ashland. Lexington, 2-6868 (Bus. No.) 
Barnett. J. W.. 201 College. Somerset, 741 R., 224 
Bartlett, Howard, Box 692, Hazard 
Basham, Bailey. Leitchfield. 9603, 25 

Begley. James P.. Blue Diamond. Hazard 1829 (Bus. No.) 
Bigelow. Ralph. Route 1. Mayslick, SO 3-2396. LO 4-4204 
Black, Clarence, West Liberty, 105, Salyersville 402 
Blackburn, Clyde W.. Sue Bennett College, London, 241 X 
Bonner, William, Vanceburg, 143, 46 
Bradshaw, Bill. High Street, Burgin, 4381 
Bridges, Bennie E.. North Middletown, 4392 
Brooks. Charles D., Gilbertsville 
Brotzge, Maurice J., 3800 W. Broadway, Louisville, AR 2506, 

AR 2506 
Brown, B. B.. Box 204, Slaughters, 2072 

Brown, Bryant. 18D Harry Smith Apts., Owensboro, 4-1273 
Brown, Sam F., Arlington, 156 
Brummett, Joseph W., 318 E. Lexington Ave., Danville, 1324 W, 

1900 
Bunch, George, Box , Salyersville, 91 W 
Bunch, Richard. Blue Diamond 

Burchett, Lanier. Heskamp St., Columbia, 4674, 4111 
Butcher, Douglas, Barrett, W. Va. 
Butcher. Paul, West Van Lear 
Butler, Donald A.. 1909 South Griffith Ave., Owensboro, 3-3176. 

3-2401, Ext. 279 
Calhoun. Foster C Jackson. 313 
Carpenter. Bill. 121 S. Sunrise Dr.. Box 12, Bowling Green, 

6167, 6167 
Caudill, James, College St.. Hazard, Park 738, Main 364 
Chattin, Charles, 2325 Harrod St., Ashland, 2020 (Bus. No.) 
Chinn. William. Centertown 
Chumbler, W. W., Lowes. 15 (Bus No.) 

Ciolek, Robert W.. Asst. Officer, T.A.C.. Ft. Knox, 2268, 24256 
Coffey. Kenneth B.. 55 Prospect, Berea. 237, 880 
Colonel, Charles. New Richmond. Ohio, NR 298, NR 7611 
Combs, James G., 280 E. Third. London. 278 R 
Combs, Raymond C, 101 Sawyer St., Somerset, 1544 L, 1051 W 
Connor, Neal, 1006 Saratoga, Newport. CO 6242, JU 2800 
Cooksey, Adrian, Olaton 
Cooper, Warren, Hindman 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1954 



Craie Randy, 44« Elm St., Ludlow. CO 2765. GA 4M0 
0™;,%. Ronald B.. 104 South 12th St.. Murray. 274 M 
Cullivan. .Tim, College Station. Murray. IbbBW. ^41 bxt. lo 
Current. Ellis Ray. 670 Spnngrldge. Lexington. 2-0.W2. .1-41.1.0 
Curry. Ellis. Bypro . 

Dawahare. Frank. .Jr.. Second St.. Plkevllle 
Dav. William .James. West Liberty, (i (Bus. No ) 
DeMoisey. John. 114 Chambers, Georgetown, 1252 J, 42281 
DeVary. Blackie. 217 Hickman. Winchester. »02 W 
Deskins. Henry C, 803 Press Ave.. Lexington 
Doehring D E.. 267 So. Kentucky Ave., Madisonville, 1908 M 
Dodson. Kenneth. 416 So. 10th St.. Mayfield 447 M _ 
Dotson .John B.. 2630 Martin Lane, Paducah, 3-4321. o-o4»8 
Doyle, Donald. 203 Chandler. Campbellsville. 190 X, 355 
Duncan, Earl S.. Anchorage No. 2. Box 109, Anchorage, 274 M 2, 

TA 0177 
Dunn, Lynn. Arlington, 151 R. 42 
Eaton. .lames M., 214 Carolyn. Greenville 
Edens, Ray D., Sanders. Ghent. Kentucky-65-6. Chent, Ken- 

Elkin, Benjamin J., 311 Cassidy Ave., Lexington, 2-9761, 3-4636 
Elliott, Humphrey. HQ. SQ. Sec. 6400 Air Depot Wing. APO 

323, c/o P. M., San Francisco. Cal. 
Ewing. C. M., 7409 U. S. 42. Florence. 1995, Cincinnati Main 

4680 
Fanning. Homer, 213 S. Highland St.. Winchester. 925 .T, 

2-2220, Ext. 2223 
Farris. Abe. Leitchfield. 4705 

Fisher. W. B. 1534 Kenton, Bowling Green. 2-2287, 7302 
Fleenor, Francis J.. 225 Cherry St., Bowling Green. 6472 
Forsythe. Charles M.. Belton, 2173. 169 
Fritts. James W.. 307 E. High. Mt. Sterling, 930 J, Lexington 

Signal Depot 
Fritz, Sherman, Route 2. Richmond. 1325 J. Westinghouse 1595 
Gaither. Gene, West Third, Beaver Dam, 3365, 3365 
Gaither, Jack, W. Third St.. Beaver Dam. 3365, 3365 
Gary. Robert R.. Rosine. 7019 

Gates. Thomas F.. Route 6. Hopkinsville. 6-2837. 6-1238 
Gillespie. Robert C. Box 485, Pikeville, 1418 
Giltner. Ray. 1219 Audubon Dd.. Park Hills. Covington 
Ginger.' W. L., Jr., 208 Rosemont. Providence, 2181, 2401 
Gray. Raymond, Island. 2161 
Grimes. Orbin. Jr.. Salem, 27M2 
Hadden. Newell P.. Jr., 121 Lackawanna Bd., Lexington. 

3-5332, 2-7866 
Haley. James, 113 Moss, Earlington, 5214, 5214 
Hancock. Bob N., 4105 Stoneview Dr., Louisville. TA 9889 
Hancock, Morris W., Route 1, Fulton. 1222-R-2 
Harmon. Charles W., Williamsburg 
Harrell, Bill D., School Place. Berea. 446 R. 195 
Harrell Leighton E.. Jr.. Office of the Chaplain. 3rd Bn.. 
10th Inf.. Regt. 5th Inf. Div.. APO 112. c/o P.M., 
New York, New York 
Harris, George F., Salem. 546 Marion. 75-M Salem 
Harris. William A.. 311 N. Third. Richmond 
Hayden. Samuel J., Fancy Farm. St. Jerome High School 

(Bus. No.) 
Haynes. John. 416 Clay, Henderson, 7-5137 
Heldman. John, Jr., 140 Seneca Trail, Louisville, FU 2181. 

CA 2531 
Henry. Maxwell. Frenchburg. 2103. 2203 

Hines. G. Cliff, 1113 Covington Ave., Bowling Green, 4810 
Hoferer. Louis R.. 420 McClelland. Cincinnati. Ohio 
Hollander. James A.. 733 11th St., Tell City, Ind. 
HoIIey, Uriah. Jr.. Jeffersonville. 97W3 
Hoover. Ermon. Jr.. 1662 Cook Ave.. Evansville. Ind., 6-8295. 

5-3311. Ext. 69 
Hudson, J. D., Caneyville 
Jarboe, Clem E.. 1631 "A" Division St.. Evansville, Ind., 

3-4324, 3-4435 
Jenkins. James. Route 1, Bowling Green. 6954 
Jones. Boyer. 407 Taylor Blvd.. Campbellsville 
Jones, George Wills, 216 Christ Rd., Evansville, Ind., 2-3348, 
Keeton, Bill. 308 Frankin St., Louisa 

5-2661, Ext. 232 
Kitchen. Chris, 339 Aylesford Place, Lexington, 4-8190 
Knox, Billey R., Hazel High School (Bus. No. I 
Lally. Michael J., Jr., 40 Wherry Apts.. Fort Campbell, Clarks- 

ville, Tenn. Ed 3989, Fort Campbell 7295 
Lamastus. Jimmy. 720 N. Third. Central City. 362. 310 
Lambert, Kenneth, 2221 Bayard Park Dr.. Evansville. Ind. 
Leach. Aaron, McHenry 

Lenderman, Bob, 245 Vet Village. Richmond, 1141 R 
Little, James G.. Hellier. 3 

Luckey, Robert E., 447 Bridge St., Cynthiana. 317 W, 121 
Lyons, Harold M., Webster Ave.. Cynthiana. 332 R, 99 
McAninch. E. R.. Liberty, 3241. 4501 
McCord. Coleman. 1727 Courtney. Lexington 
McDonald. Robert. Route 2, Springfield, Bardstown 3548 
McKenzie, Jim, 24 Riverview, Ashland, Russell, Kentucky-Grand 

731, Ashland 961 
Mackenzie, James, Camden St.. Jenkins, 952, 243 
McNeil, Pat, 411 Sylvan Terrace, Hopkinsville, 5-3680, High 
School 



Mazza, Albert. 285 A. Street. Ceredo. W. Va. 

Miller, Roy J., 544 Whitcomb, Clarksville, Ind.. A1 4140. 

(Bus No.) , ,, 

Monahan. William G.. 402 Uelleville, Marion. 188 J. 21 
Moore. .James E.. Lily 

Moss. Howaril A., Route 4, Paducah. 3-1072, 3-1234 
Moss, .lulian (Moose I. 104 Hill Ct.. Lancaster. 383 .1. 27 
Mudd Edward, 400 N. 42nd St.. Louisville, AR 6888 
Mulligan, J. T., 421 Center, Erlanger, DI 5628, MA 6171 
Mullins. Arthur. Elkhorn City. 4151. 3401 
Mullins. Eugene. Box 145, Garrett. 3783 
Mullins, Noah. Jr., 148 Stout Ave.. Versailles. 777R. Frank- 

' fort 4-2221 
Naber, Robert E.. 1057 Lawton Rd., Park Hills. Covington, 

JU 8836. CO 0847 
Newnam, Luther G., Beattyville, 109. 91 
Newton. C. S. Jr.. Asbury College, Wilmore 
Noel. Paul W., Midway, 46S1, 4841 
O'Brien, Jim. Box 96. Golconda. 111., 140-R2, 85 
Oney. Leo T.. Jr.. 603 Perry. Greenup. 162 

Parke. Paul G. 414 N. .)ackson, Oakland City. Ind.. 66 B, 38 
Parker, James P.. 355 Columbus Ave.. Lone Oak 
Parsley, Clyde E., Route 2, Providence. 2524. 2400 
Patrick, Don. 704 E. 17th St.. Covington. AX 1941, MA 4300, 

Line 75 
Petit, Herb. 353 Mockingbird Dr.. Lexington. 4-8865 
Porter. C. A.. 1202 Center St.. Bowling Green, 8315 
Preston. Charles V.. Route 4. Lucasville, Ohio. LU 3667, 34771 
Preston. Robert L.. 1309 Center. Bowling Green. 8859. 5425 
Prop. Walter V.. Ill South Ashland. Lexington. 2-4190 
Puck'ett. Calvin. Jr.. Box 232, Greensburg, 206 JI. 196 JI 
Pudlo. Walter. 1015 Magnolia. Bowling Green. 6312. 3874 
Rainey. Jimmy. 167 E. Washington. Winchester. 2441. 518 
Randolph. Donald. 228 No. Main, Monticello, 122W 
Rawlings, Harold, Route 2., Bethel, Ohio, 4312 
Reams, Harry K., 1019 Oak Hill Dr., Lexington. 4-4708, 

3-3335. No. 6 
Reams, William E., Cumberland. 4 R 
Reeser. Gene. Box 553. West Point. 3525 

Richardson. Joe M.. Greenville, Drakesboro 3307. Greenville 48 
Ricketts. Claude O., 6620 Strawberry Lane. Louisville. FR 1624 

MA 5140 
Rison. Johnny B., Box 148. Irvine. Ill (Bus. No.) 
Rocke. James M.. Route 4. Cynthiana. 1384. Frankfort 42231, 

Ext. 251 
Rolph. Harold J.. 915 S. 7th St., Ironton. Ohio. 2059 R, 1390 
Rosenbaum, Robert L., 117 Fairlawn Rd.. Louisville. TA 2833. 

JA 8191 
Ross. Bill E.. 11th, Williamsburg, 6259, 4391 
Roth. Kenneth, Box 95, Hatfield. Ind. 
Rozen. Morris, 216 Madison Ave.. Richmond 

Sanders, Mel, 1727 Broadway, Paducah. 55360. 56311. Ext. 8551 
Sexton. William L., 423 3rd Ave., Dayton. HE 5941, MA 4321, 

Line 40 
Shaw, Earl, Crab Orchard. 2251, 2427 (Bryantsville) 
Shaw. James T.. Brookside Ave.. Campbellsville. 104 X. 4000 
Shuck. Freddie L.. 1626 Rosewood Ave., Louisville HI 3208 M, 

CY 5531 
Shuck, Thomas G.. 455 Sheridan, Lexington, 2-4635 
Simpson, Jack, 224 E. 22nd St., Owensboro, 3-4280 
Singleton, Vesper. Anco 

Sloan. Wallace. 419 Oread Rd., Louisville. BE 1126. TA 2554 
Small. Bill. 1846 Mary Catherine Dr.. Louisville. AT 8364, 

HI 4900 
Smith, David W.. 2726 Montanna. Louisville. EM 6-5929. 

HI 5861 
Stanfill. Donald H., Box 120, Pleasant View 
Stanfill, Robert. Louisa. 90R 

Steely. Stanley E.. South Uth St., Williamsburg. 3641 
Steenkin. William R., 1636 Highland. Covington. ED 3789. 

CO 3710 
Stephenson. Harry. 2210 Circle Dr.. Lexington, 4-9620. 2-4789 
Strong, Thomas K., Jackson, 53 J. 160 
Sturgill. Barkley J.. N. Lake Drive. Prestonsburg 
Susott. Wilfred, 2837 Pennsylvania St.. Evansville. Ind., 4-1102, 

2-1162 
Taylor, Dennis, 811 Olive. Murray 
Thoma. M. L.. 103 Holly. Berea. 520, 95 
Thompson. Byron, Hill St., London, 291 J. 291 J 
Thompson. Ralph. 5599 Surrey. Cincinnati. Ohio. MO 7196. 

WA 0047 
Thurman. A. E.. 3025 S. Allen. Owensboro. 3-9583. Stanley 

976-2151 
Tilley. H. M.. Box 132. LaCenter 

Topmiller, Ben. Jr.. Browder. Drakesboro 3552, Drakesboro 2531 
Troutman. Doyle. Lynch Hotel. Lynch. 2421 
True, Charlie C, 246 Vet Village, Richmond 
Urlage, Richard C. 333 E. 16th St., Covington 
Vance, Earl G.. 537 W. Main, Glasgow, 3083, 5205 
Walke. Glenn R.. 42 Main. Paintsville. 91 W, 2680 
Walker, Raymond, 1213 S. Ninth Ext., Mayfield. 1143, 2263 
Wallace. James H.. Baskett, 75759 
Wanchic. Nicholas, 311 Pepper Dr.. Lexington. 3-1838 

(Continued on Page Ten) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1954 



Page Five 



Member Schools of the K.H.S.A.A. 



The following schools are members of the Kentucky High 
School Athletic Association for the year ending June 30, 1955. 
Principals of member schools should check this list carefully 
to see if the names of schools with which they have scheduled 
games are included. This list was compiled and sent to the 
printer on October 1. A supplementary list of member schools 
joining in October will appear in the November issue of the 
magazine. 



Adair County 

(Columbia) 
Albany-Clinton Co. 
Allen County 

(Scottsville) 
Almo 
Alvaton 
Anderson 

(LawrencebufK) 
Annville Institute 
Ashland 
Athens 

(Lexington) 
Atherton 

(Louisville) 
Auburn 
Austin Tracy 

(Lucas) 
Auxier 
Bald Knob 

(R. 4, Frankfort) 
Ballard Memorial 

(R. 1, Barlow) 
Barbourville 
Bardstown 
Barret 

(Henderson) 
Beaver Dam 
Beechwood 

(Ft. Mitchell) 
Bell County 

(Pineville) 
Bellevue 
Benham 
Benton 
Berea 

Berea Foundation 
Betsy Layne 
Black Star 

(Alva) 
Blaine 
Boone County 

(Florence) 
Bourbon Co. Voc. 

(Paris) 
Bowling' Green 
Boyd County 

(Ashland) 
Bracken County 

(Brooksville) 
Breathitt 

(Jackson) 
Breckinridge County 

(Hardinsburg) 
Breckinridge Trg. 

(Morehead) 
Brewers 
Bridgeport 

(R. 2, Frankfort) 
Bristow 
Brodhead 
Brownsville 



Buckeye 

(R. 3, Lancaster) 
Buckhorn 
Buffalo 
Burgin 
Bush 

(Lida) 
Butler 
Butler County 

(Morgantown) 
Caldwell County 

(Princeton) 
Camargo 

(Mt. Sterling) 
Campbell County 

(Alexandria) 
Calhoun 
Camp Dick Robinson 

(R. 5, Lancaster) 
Campbellsburg- 
Campbellsville 
Carlisle 
Carr Creek 
Carrollton 
Catlettsburg 
Caverna 

(Horse Cave) 
Cayce 
Centertown 
Central 

(Richmond) 
Central 

(Clinton) 
Central City 
Central Park 

(McHenry) 
Chandlers 

(R. 2, Auburn) 
Clark County 

(Winchester) 
Clay County 

(Manchester) 
Cliffy Consolidated 
College 

(Bowling Green) 
Combs Memorial 

(Jeff) 
Corbin 
Cordia 

Crab Orchard 
Crittenden County 

(Marion) 
Crofton 
Cuba 

(R. 1, Mayfield) 
Cumberland 
Cumberland County 

(Burkesville) 
Cunningham 
Cynthiana 
Dalton 
Danville 



Daviess County 

(Owensboro) 
Dawson 

(Dawson Springs) 
Dayton 
Deming 

(Mt. Olivet) 
Dixie Heights 

(Covington) 
Dixon 
Dorton 
Drakesboro 
Dunmor 
Dundee 
duPont Manual 

(Louisville) 
Earlington 
East Bernstadt 
Eastern 

(Middletown) 
Edmonton 
Elizabethtown 
Elizabethtown Catholic 
Elkhorn 

(Frankfort) 
Elkhorn City 
Eminence 
Erie 

(Olive Hill) 
Estill County 

(Irvine) 
Eubank 
Evarts 
Ezel 

Falmouth 
Fancy Farm 
Farmington 
Feds Creek 
Ferguson 
Fern Creek 
Flaget 

OLouisville) 
Flaherty 

(Vine Grove) 
Flat Gap 
Fleming County 

(Flemingsburg) 
Fleming-Neon 

(Fleming) 
Fordsville 
Forkland 

(Gravel Switch) 
Fort Knox 
Frankfort 
Franklin-Simpson 

( Franklin ) 
Frederick-Fraize 

(Cloverport) 
Fredericktown 

(R. 2, Springfield) 
Fredonia 
Frenchburg 
Fulton 
Gallatin County 

(Warsaw) 
Gamaliel 
Garrett 
Garth 

(Georgetown) 



Glendale 
Graham 
Grant County 

(Dry Ridge) 
Great Crossing 

(R. 3, Georgetown) 
Greensburg 
Greenup Independent 
Greenville 
Guthrie 
Haldeman 
Hall 

(Grays Knob) 
Hai'rison County 

(Cynthiana) 
Hazel Green 

(East Bern.stadt) 
Hanson 
Hardin 
Harlan 
Harrodsburg 
Hartford 
Hawesville 
Hazard 

Hazel Green Acad. 
Hazel 
Heath 

(R. 1, West Paducah) 
Hellier 

Henderson County 
Henderson Settlement 

(Frakes) 
Henry Central 

(New Castle) 
Henry Clay 

(Lexington) 
Hickman 
Highlands 

(Fort Thomas) 
Hindman 
Hiseville 
Hodgenville 
Holmes 

(Covington) 
Holy Cross 

(Covington) 
Holy Name 

(Henderson) 
Holy Trinity 

(Louisville) 
Hopkinsville 
Horse Branch 
Howevallev 

(Cecilia) 
Hughes-Kirk 

(Beechmont) 
Hustonville 
Inez 
Irvine 
Irvington 
Jackson 
Jenkins 
Johns Creek 

(R. 1, Pikeville) 
Ky. Mill. Inst. 

(Lyndon) 
Ky. Sch. for the Blind 

(Louisville) 
Kingdom Come 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1954 



(Linefork) 
Kingston 

(R. 1, Borea) 
Kirksey 
Kii'ksville 
Knott County 

(Pippapass) 
Knox Central 

(Barbourville) 

Lacy 

(R. 7, Hopkinsville) 

Lafayette 

(Lexington) 
Lancaster 
Leatiierwood 

(Slemp) 
Lebanon 

Lebanon Junction 
Lee County 

(Beattyville) 
Leitchfield 

Leslie County 

(Hyden) 
Lexington Catholic 
Liberty 
Livermore 
Livingston 
Livingston County 

(Smithland) 
Lloyd Memorial 

(Erlanger) 
London 
Lone Jack 

(Four Mile) 
Louisa 

Louisville Male & Girls 
Lowes 
Loyall 
Ludlow 
Lynch 
Lynn Grove 
Lynnvale 

(White Mills) 
McAfee 
McKee 
McKell 

(South Shore) 
McKinney 
Mackville 
Madison-Model 

(Richmond) 
Madisonville 
Magnolia 
Marion 
Marrowbone 
Martin 
Mayfield 
Maytown 
May's Lick 

(Langley) 
M. C. Napier 

(Darfork) 



Meade County 

(Brandenburg) 

Memorial 

( Hardy ville) 
Memorial 

(Waynesburg) 
Middleburg 
Middlesboro 
Midway 
Milburn 

Millersburg Mili. Inst. 
Montgomery County 

(Mt. Sterling) 
Monticello 
Morehead 
Morgan County 

(West Liberty) 
Morganfield 
Morton's Gap 
Mt. Sterling 
Mt. Vernon 
Mt. Washington 
Muhlenberg Central 

(Powderly) 
Munfordville 
Murray 
Nebo 

New Concord 
Newport 

Newport Catholic 
Nicholas County 

(Carlisle) 
Nicholasville 
North Middletown 
Noith Warren 

(Smiths Grove) 
Nortonville 
Oakdale Voc. 
Oil Springs 
Old Kentucky Home 

(Bardstown) 
Oldham County 

(LaGrange) 
Olive Hill 
Olmstead 
Orangeburg 

(Maysville) 
Ormsby Village 

(Anchorage) 
Owen County 

(Owenton) 
Owensboro 
Owensboro Catholic 
Owensboro Technical 
Owingsville 
Owsley County 

(Booneville) 
Oxford 

(R. 2, Georgetown) 
Paint Lick 
Paintsville 
Paris 

Park City 
Parksville 
Pembroke 
Perryville 
Phelps 



Pikevillo 
Pine Knot 
Pincville 
Pleasant View 
Pleasureville 
Poplar Creek 
(Carpenter) 

Powell County 

(Stanton) 
Prestonsburg 
Prichard 

(Grayson) 
Providence 
Pulaski County 

(Somerset) 
Raceland 
Red Bird Settlement 

(Beverly) 
Richardsville 
Rineyville 
Riverside Institute 

(Lost Creek) 
Rockhold 
Rockport 
Rose Hill 
Russell 
Russell County 

(Russell Springs) 

Russellville 

Sacramento Consolidated 

Sadieville 

St. Agatha 

(Winchester) 

St. Agnes 

(Uniontown) 

St. Augustine 
(Lebanon) 

St. Bernard 

(Clementsville) 
St. Catherine 

(New Haven) 
St. Francis 

(Loretto) 
St. John 

(Paducah) 

St. Joseph 

(Bardstown) 
St. Mary 

(Alexandria) 
St. Mary's Academy 

(Paducah) 
St. Patrick 

(Maysville) 
St. Xavier 

(Louisville) 
Salem 
Salyersville 
Scottsville 
Sebree 
Sedalia 
Shawnee 

(Louisville) 
Shelbyville 
Shepherdsville 
Shopville 
Silver Grove 
Simon Kenton 

(Independence) 



Simpsonvillo 
Sinking Fork 

(R. 5, Hopkinsville) 
Somerset 
Sonora 
South Christian 

(Herndon) 
South Portsmouth 
Southern 

(R. 4, Louisville) 
Springfield 
Stamping Ground 
Stanford 
Stearns 
Stuart Robinson 

(Blackey) 
Sturgis 
Symsonia 
Taylor County 

(Campbellsville) 

Taylorsville 

Temple Hill 

(R. 4, Glasgow) 

Tilghman 

(Paducah) 

Todd County 

(Elkton) 
Tompkinsville 
Trenton 
Trigg County 

(Cadiz) 
Tyner 
Utica 
Valley 

(Valley Station) 

Van Lear 

Versailles 

Vine Grove 

Virgie 

Waco 

Waddy 

Wallins 

Walton-Verona 

(Walton) 
Warfield 
Warren County 

(Bowling Green) 

Wayne County 

(Monticello) 
West Point 
Western 

(R. 3, Hickman) 

Western 
(Sinai) 

Wheelwright 
Whitesburg 
Williamsburg 
Williamstown 
Wilmore 
Winchester 
Wingo 

Wolfe County 
(Campton) 
Woodbine 
Wurtland 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1954 



Page Seven 



The Flying Dutchman 

We're packing now for that thirteenth 
basketball clinic trip over Kentucky. It's an 
annual thrill to get ready for the meetings 
with all of you fellows again. 

Your Dutch friend can't help reminiscing 
a bit as he considers the first tour in 1942 
when it was necessary to start out with in- 
sufficient gasoline ration coupons. It seems 
funny now as we ]-ecall that in that year we 
were towed three different times for a total 
of more than two hundred miles, and that on 
one occasion the old Chevrolet was driven 
into a huge moving van for a free lift from 
Cincinnati to Aberdeen, Ohio. 

Commissioner "Ted" never expected to see 
the Dutchman wind up that historic first 
year by showing up on time for the final 
clinic at Henderson. It was then that the 
Commissioner became so elated as the 
"Chevy" pulled up in front of Henderson's 
Barret High School that he proclaimed the 
Dutchman "Dean of Officials" for complet- 
ing this trip. 

Now in 1954 we start out in deluxe fash- 
ion with plenty of gasoline available, eager 
anticipation of fun ahead, and a dogged 
determination to locate some of those fine 
mountain-grown country hams to bring back. 
It seems harder to locate those hams than 
it was to get across the State in 1942 with- 
out gasoline. 

Bring news items and information on 
game guys, people who should be recognized 
as Corn Cob Pipe winners, and communities 
which should receive citations for promoting 
good public relations in their areas to the 
clinics. 

We remind everybody that the Flying 
Dutchman has three aims in writing his copy 
for the Athlete each month : (No. 1) The pro- 
motion of sportsmanship between Kentucky 
Communities, (No. 2) recognition and en- 
couragement of young men who are over- 
coming physical handicaps to enjoy sports 
like other young people, (No. 3) recognition 
of people by the Corn Cob Pipe of Honor 
Award for performing services just to help 
others. 

In connection with the promotion of good 
sportsmanship between communities, we 
commend Mr. George D. Wheeler, associate 
state secretary of the Y.M.C.A., for his ac- 
tivities in setting up four Cheerleaders 
Clinics, at Bowling Green on October 2, at 
Kentucky State College on October 9, at 
University of Kentucky on October .30, and 
at Morehead College on November 13. Cheer- 
leaders many times control the actions of 
over-enthusiastic crowds at athletic contests. 



On occasions all of us have noticed situations 
which might have reflected badly on the 
sportsmanship of Kentucky had not the 
Cheerleaders held up their hands to quiet 
rabid crowds. 

Besides the Flyinor Dutchman the Bowling 
Green Clinic Panel will be composed of Forest 
Able, a guard of Western's basketball team ; 
Carlos Oakley, president of the K.H.S.A.A. 
Board of Control; H. B. Gray, principal of 
Bowling Green High School ; Bob Forsythe, 
Superintendent of Muhlenberg County 
Schools ; and A. D. Litchfield, state secretary 
of the Y.M.C.A. Hundreds of Cheerleaders 
will be reached at the clinics and much is 
bound to come from such meetings. 

Now concerning the second aim of the Fly- 
ing Dutchman in the recognition of game 
guys, we pause to salute Coach Junie Jones 
of Louisville's Atherton High School for the 
interest he has taken in James "Cap" Cau- 
dill. "Cap" Caudill is the first Game Guy to 
be recognized this season, and is truly an 
example for other young men suffering from 
physical handicaps to pattern after. Let's 
look over the accomplishments of this fighter 
whose right arm is deformed, and is only 
three quarters its full length. He has played 
football, winning his J. V. letter. He pitched 
a no-hitter in baseball while winning four 
games and losing none, won his varsity foot- 
ball letter in 1953 as a halfback and his base- 
ball letter the same year as a pitcher, and in 
1954 he played on the varsity baseball team. 
Besides all of these athletic accomplishments 
he is a "terrific student." 

A Flying Dutchman Lion Heart lapel but- 
ton has been sent to Jimmie, in recognition 
of his victories, and he is being placed on the 
list of voung men to be considered for the 
Game Guy Plaque of 1954-55. 

About that third aim of recognizing 
people doing things unselfishly for the sheer 
joy of making others happy, the salute of 
this month must go to Dunnville's Leland 
Rubards. Travel Kentucky and you'll fail to 
find anybody more interested in basketball 
officiating and helping young officials over 
the humps. For his unselfish efforts over the 
years and for his civic contributions to his 
community a "Little Stinker" is now on its 
way to Dunnville. Incidentally this chap, Ru- 
bards, is one of the best corn growers of the 
commonwealth — try some of his roasting 
ears. 

No foolin', we are looking forward to driv- 
ing those beautiful Kentucky Mountains with 
all of the colorful autumn hues as we head 
out on another historic clinic excursion. 
Don't forget those mountain hams, Tater 
and Dick! 



Page Eig-ht THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1954 

Early Season Football Questions — Installment 2 



Editor's Note; These rulings do not set aside or modify any 
rule. They are interpretations on some of the early season 
situations which have been presented. 

18. Play: After Al scores a touchdown, A2 com- 
mits a personal foul. During the try-for-point, Bl 
is offside and : (a) the try is successful; or (b) 
the try is not successful. Are these treated as a 
double foul ? 

Ruling: Yes for (a). No for (b). 

19. Play: On 3rd down, a fumble by Al is re- 
covered by Bl after which he throws a backward 
pass which is intercepted by A2. A2 attempts a 
backward pass which goes forward and is incom- 
plete. What is the number of the next down and how 
many yards-to-gain ? 

Ruling: 1st down for A with 10 to gain (see 
5-2-4a). The line-to-gain is not established until 
after the 5-yard penalty is enforced. This is the 
only type of illegal forward pass which does not 
involve a loss of down penalty. 

20. Play: Does the new rule which requires each 
A player to momentarily take a position within 15 
yards of the snap prohibit spread plays ? 

Ruling: No. Any player may move into an area 
within about 15 yards of the snap and then take 
any legal position. Under the ordinary circumstances, 
participation in the huddle satisfies this require- 
ment. From the usual huddle, players may move 
to spread positions. If they do not participate in 
the huddle, each player must move into the area 
as outlined but he may then move to a spread 
position. 

21. Play: On anticipated try for field goal, Al 
has his knee on the ground when he receives the 
snap. When he attempts to place the ball, he fumbles. 
Who may recover and advance ? 

Ruling: If Al had possession with a knee on 
the ground and there was no kick, the ball became 
retroactively dead at the time of possession. It is 
A's ball at that spot. See parenthetic statement at 
end of item (a) of 4-2-2. 

Comment: Of course if Al muffed the snap with- 
out having had possession, then the ball is alive 
and any player may recover and advance as for 
any backward pass. 

22. Play: A team has tradtiionally used a jersey 
with a navy blue background and 1,2 inch white 
stripes about 2 inches apart over the entire sleeve. 
Is this in conflict with rule l-5-3f? 

Ruling: Since such jersey was designed before 
the use of the striped ball, it would not seem that 
there was any intention of simulating ball color 
and design. Also, the background color and arrange- 
ment of stripes are such that it is doubtful whether 
an arm would look like a ball. Under the circum- 
stances, the jersey should not be ruled illegal. The 
effect should be carefully studied by neutrals who 
will report at the end of the season to guide the 
proper rules group in possible action toward more 
specific standards as to color and design. 

23. Play: Is it permissible to lengthen the inter- 
mission between halves ? 

Ruling: Every possible effort should be made to 
hold this intermission to the presci'ibed 18 minutes. 
The Federation Code provides 3 extra minutes be- 
yond the customary 15 minutes. This is enough. 
Even the intricate movements of some of the col- 
lege and professional bands are kept within the 15 
minutes. No high school group should use more. If 
necessary, some of the activites can be performed 
before the game. School officials and game of- 



ficials are urged to get the second half started in 
accordance wuti the prescribed schedule. 

24. Play: Are lace and moutn protectors legal? 
Ruling: The smooch plastic-type face guara or 

the type of rubber guard wnien is worn in the 
mouth is legal ana reasonable use of these is urged 
by the National i^ ootball Committee. For the pro- 
tector which is worn in the mouth, good sanitation 
pi'actices should be followed and the items should 
be kept clean and disinfected when not in use. 
The wire cage-type face guard may not be 
legally used unless all parts are covered with soft 
rubber. When so covered, they may be used to pro- 
tect an actual injury but not unless such injury is 
present. 

25. Play: Who is responsible for maintaining order 
among spectators at a game ? 

Ruling; While the visiting school is expected to 
provide reasonable control over its own group, the 
greater responsibility lies with the home manage- 
ment. It is essential that adequate protection against 
any roughness or unsportsmaniiKe demonstration 
be proviaed in the form of a police detail or similar 
agency. 

26. Play: Who is responsible for injuries which 
are caused by defective football shoe cleats ? 

Ruling: The officials are authorized to stop the 
game for correction of defective equipment but the 
greater responsibility lies with the wearer of the 
shoe and with his coach and team manager. If 
players walk on concrete or other hard surface 
to reach the game or the dressing room, the cleats 
may develop nicks or burrs with cutting edges. 
The player, coach and manager should carefully 
examine all cleats before the start of any perioa. 

27. Play: If a team shifts more than once, must 
they pause for a full second after each shift? 

Ruling: As far as the shift rule is concerned, the 
one second is required only after the last shift. 
However, certain situations may result in a false 
start when successive rapid shifts are made. The 
penalty for false start is the same os for the illegal 
shift, i.e., loss of 5. 

28. Play: Team A moves to position and center 
Al has his hands on the ball. He then removes his 
hands from the ball: (a) to shift to another posi- 
tion so that A2 may snap the ball; or (b) to go 
back into the huddle to check signals. Is this an in- 
fraction ? 

Ruling: The rules state that no player other than 
the snapper may touch the ball (7-1-1). If the rule 
is followed literally, it is an infraction in (a). In 
(b) it is not an infraction unless the time limit is 
exceeded. 



Physical Fitness Tests 
Mr. Daniel J. Ferris, Secretary-Treasurer 
of the Amateur Athletic Union of the United 
States, has advised the State Office that 
Physical Fitness and Proficiency Tests are 
available to interested high school adminis- 
trators at no cost. In a letter, addressed to 
state high school executive officers, Mr. Fer- 
ris says: 

"Prompted by an enthusiastic response on 
the part of high school physical education 
teachers to administer our A.A.U. Physical 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1954 



Page Nine 



F'itnos.s and Proficiejicy Tests, we are of the 
opinion that many administrators in your 
State High School Athletic Association 
would be similarly interested. These tests 
were adopted in 1943, and have been increas- 
ing in interest each year. . . . We are aware 
that the primary function of your associa- 
tion is to conduct a program of inter-.scholas- 
tic competitive athletics, yet there are many 
students, both boys and girls, who might have 
a desire to earn A.A.U. Physical Fitness cer- 
tificates by meeting our carefully prepared 
standards. . . . We would appreciate your 
consideration of this program on a state-wide 
basis and, if it meets with your approval, 
would be grateful for the inclusion in one of 
your periodical bulletins of a notice to the ef- 
fect that the test sheets are available without 
cost to all interested high schools. Prompt 
attention will be given all inquiries directed 
to our office at Suite 3904, Woolworth Build- 
ing, 233 Broadway, New York 7, New York." 
Athletic Director Honored 

The Bellevue High School Faculty enter- 
tained with a surprise dinner Tuesday, May 
25, honoring John E. Schaar, teacher and 
athletic director of Bellevue High School, 
who is completing his thirtieth year as a 
member of that faculty. 

Mr. Schaar, who came to Bellevue High 
as a teacher and coach, in September of 
1924, graduated from State Normal School, 
Whitewater Falls, Wisconsin. He became the 
first regularly employed coach of football 
and basketball, and started Bellevue High 
on a long climb to a recognized spot, near the 
top in Kentucky High School athletics. 

Mr. Schaar also took over the coaching of 
the baseball team in about 1927, and intro- 
duced and became coach of the high school 
track team around 1930. His team and his 
ability are best characterized by the .state- 
ment in the 1927 yearbook, published by the 
students. They were: "Without the splendid 
character and ability of our coach, Bellevue 
High School would have fallen far below 
par. We hope he stays with us a long time." 

Coach Schaar carried the entire coaching 
load in all four major sports until about 
1932, when the school faculty was enlarged, 
and he reliquished his duties as head coach 
to take over the office of athletic director, 
which he still holds, along with his present 
position as Assistant Principal. Schaar con- 
tinued to assist with the active coaching, and 
directs one of the largest sports programs 
of any Northern Kentucky school. 

In Schaar's long association with athletics 
in northern Kentucky, the finest tribute 
comes from the other school men who have 



coached again.st his .squads, worked with him, 
and come to know and recognize his abilities. 

He has served the Kentucky High School 
Athletic Association as timer in the State 
Basketball Tournament for a great number 
of years. He has also been the director of the 
regional track meets, and conference track 
meets. He assists with the State Track Meet 
each year. 

Locally Mr. Schaar has been honored each 
year, since the start of the Little Six Con- 
ference in 1940:, with the position as secre- 
tary, and at present he is secretary of the 
Northern Kentucky Conference. He assigns 
officials for all the Conference schools in 
both football and basketball. 

In commemoration of this fine contribu- 
tion to the youth of Bellevue and to the 
school, the faculty presented Mr. Schaar with 
a trophy, suitably engraved, consisting of a 
figure of a coach kneeling, with a represen- 
tative of each of the four major sports, with 
which he was associated as a head coach dur- 
ing his coaching career. 

The surprise dinner was attended by mem- 
bers of the faculty and their wives and 
guests, members of the Board of Education, 
Superintendent C. S. Dale and guests. 

— B. F. 
Good Idea 

At the close of the 1953 football season, a 
K.H.S.A.A. registered official, in a letter to 
the Commissioner, made a suggestion which 
has some merit. He thinks that the home 
team should have an adult available to assist 
the yardage line carriers, and that this per- 
son could carry the downs marker. Many 
schools are probably already using adults 
for this important position. High school stu- 
dents or young graduates still in their teens 
are many times quite excitable and in some 
instances extremely partisan. There are ex- 
ceptions to all rules, of course, but an adult 
under ordinary conditions would do this par- 
ticular job better than a youngster. 

Basketball Scouting Techniques 

While attending the University of Ken- 
tucky as a graduate student, William L. 
Kruse wrote a paper as a class project on 
basketball scouting as conducted by the Uni- 
versity of Kentucky. The material in the pa- 
per is very interesting. Persons desiring 
copies of Mr. Kruse's study may write to 
Professor Maurice A. Clay, Department of 
Physical Education, University of Kentucky. 
A subsequent issue of the Athlete will car- 
ry an abstract of a thesis written by Mr. 
Kruse on the subject, "The Status of Health 
and Physical Education in the Secondary 
Schools of Kentucky (1953-1954)." 



Pag-e Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1954 



A Kentucky Official, No Doubt! 

By Gordon Moore, C-J Sports Writer 

The Basketball Official is often accused of many 
things, and with the current cage season just around 
the corner, he will be subject to many more. To the 
unheralded workers we dedicate the following: 

If he's brand new at officiating, he lacks 
experience. 

If he's been officiating all his life, he's in 
a rut. 

If he knows the rules, he's studied all his 
life. 

If he's never read the rule book, he's con- 
sulted an oculist. 

If he changes shirts between games, he's 
trying to be a fashion plate. 

If he thinks about the boos and cheers, 
he's a bum. 

If he seldom admits a mistake, he's arro- 
gant. 

If he ever admits a mistake, he ought to 
go back to digging ditches. 

If he plants an occasional gesture in his 
action, he's a comedian. 

If he never condescends to the rule book, 
he's duty dull. 

If he goes to clinics with regularity, he's 
a hypocrite. 

If he shies at lectures, he's a heathen. 

If he hands out plenty of information, he 
has no standards. 

If he hands out several decisions, he's a 
joker. 

If he uses signals, he's unoriginal. 

If he gets along without signals, he's a 
mumbler. 

If he sticks to his specialty, he's got a one- 
track mind. 

If he turns to the crowd, he's a show-off. 

If he can't identify blocking and charging, 
he isn't human. 

If he listens to the roars of the crowds, 
he's illiterate. 

If he works at another job, he's greedy. 

If he does nothing else, he's a sucker. 

If he's young, he needs more seasoning. 

If he's old, he's seen better days. 



If he gets his name in the newspaper, he's 
publicity mad. 

If he never appears in public prints, he's 
so much deadwood. 

If he's on good terms with the coaches, 
he's a sycophant. 

If he doesn't overflow the mails to the 
principal, HE DOESN'T GET ANY GAMES. 



K.H.S.A.A. Films 



During the school year 1953-54, the As- 
sociation made three films of its state events, 
which are now on loan with the Department 
of University Extension, University of Ken- 
tucky. These films are as follows: 

NEWPORT vs. INEZ (finals) 

This is the final game of the 1954 State 
Basketball Tournament, in which Inez de- 
feated Newport by the score of 63-55 The 
sparkling play of Newport's Redmon, and 
Inez's Cassady and Triplett, is the highlight 
of the film. The three players were selected 
as members of the All-State team. 

1954 STATE TRACK MEET 

Some of the qualifying heats and all of the 
final events are shown in this film. The 
winner of each field event was filmed in 
action. Each race is shown in its entirety 
from one angle, and the finish shown again 
from the second angle. Lafayette won the 
title for the second consecutive year. 

1954 STATE BASEBALL TOURNAMENT 
This film shows the first inning of each 
game played in the tournament at Parkway 
Field, Louisville. Several innings of the final 
game between Newport Catholic and Louis- 
ville Male, won by Newport Catholic, 6-0, 
are shown. The pictures of daytime play 
are in color. 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(Continued from Page Four) 

Ward. Robert L., 842 Mill St.. Henderson, 9992, 2759 
Warf. Emerson. 2630 .Tackson. Ashland, 4-3476, 1037 
Weisbrodt. Paul E.. 35" Stratford Dr., Lexington, 4-6665, 4-6665 
Whalen, William C. 558 W. Second St., Maysville, 244 L, 779 
Willett, Arthur G., 244 Van Voast, Bellevue, AX 1388 
Wilson, Burnell iZekel, 348 Lafayette. Lexington, 2-6940, 4-4060 
Wittenburg, Howard. 1723 Oakland, Portsmouth, Ohio. 5-3211, 

2-1561 
Workman Bill, 2806 Central Ave., Ashland, HI 1124 W. 1860 
Wurtz, Emil. 18 E. Fourth St.. Cincinnati, Ohio, GR 0526, 

DU 1232 
Yaggi, Bill. 731 11th St.. Tell City. Ind., 803 R, 455 
Zachary, Alvin L., FPHA 318-4 West State St., West Lafayette, 

Indiana 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1954 



Page Eleven 



COMMUNITY RECREATION 

(Continued from Page One) 

ing provide much in tlie way of recreation, it Vias 
been a very welcome supplement to the facilities of 
the school in times of inclement weather when out- 
door facilities could not be used satisfactorily. 

In the foregoing introduction the facts and fig- 
ures related have been a foundation for the pro- 
gram which is now in existence. Anyone reading 
this article with the idea of planning a recreation 
program for his community would no doubt be 
concerned vdth financing such a program. This 
is an annual problem at Vine Grove. The question 
stated simply is this: How does a community with 
no designated funds for the purpose secure the 
money essential to the operation and maintenance 
of a recreation program ? Vine Grove has utilized 
many plans. Although the facilities acquired on the 
departure of the National Youth Administration 
have been wonderfully helpful, it should be pointed 
out here that since they were not constructed for 
recreational purposes, much expense has been in- 
curred to make them available for such use. Here 
the people of the community must be commended 
for their many contributions of labor and materials, 
without which much construction might never have 
been accomplished. For example, one man and his 
sons contributed both the materials and labor in 
roofing the extension on the Recreation building. 
Many other such contributions are too numerous 
to mention. 

For the purpose of converting present facilities 
and the addition of others considered necessary, the 
people of Vine Grove annually combine their efforts 
in presenting a gigantic fund-raising program on 
and around November 11. This program is called 
a Turkey Shoot, though it has in the past included 
everything from magicians to wrestling, as well as 
the annual trapshooting and still-target shooting 
for turkeys. During the three years past this pro- 
gram has earned for recreational improvements a 
sum annually in excess of two thousand dollars. All 
proceeds from this program are designated for 
construction and improvement of permanent facil- 
ities. The school, Vine Grove's Womans Club, Home- 
makers Club, Lions Club. American Legion Post, 
and Parent-Teacher Association, plus many inter- 
ested individuals, give untiringly and unselfishly 
each year of their time and efforts to make this 
program the success it has been thus far. Too much 
praise cannot be given these folks for their belief 
in the worthiness of such an endeavor. 

The matter of securing funds is not finished with 
the Turkey Shoot. Money must be provided each 
year for the operating expense of the summer pro- 
gram. To determine ways and means of securing 
such funds, a committee of recreation-minded pa- 
trons is called together each Spring to discuss this 
and other plans for the program. In May of 1954 
approximately twenty-five people met with the 
school principal and the recreation director for this 
purpose. Out of this meeting came a proposal which 
was adopted for this year. Merchants were solicited 
for contributions which netted more than seven 
hundred dollars including sponsors for four Little 
League baseball teams. A full-page advertisement 
was run in a county newspaper, featuring the 
names of the contributors and the schedule of the 
summer's activities. This page was also duplicated 
on poster cards of equivalent size and placed in 




the business establishments of contributors. Here 
we might add that on several occasions groups of 
men have signed notes to borrow money for the 
purpose of finishing tome project or of beginning 
something considered urgent to the progiam. At 
times the amount borrowed has often been as much 
as four thousand dollars. 

Probably the most significant outcome of the 
1954 meeting was the selection of committee chair- 
men for securing volunteer assistance for the opera- 
tion of various activities each night the program 
is in operation. Such tasks as selling tickets at 
the skating rink, selling items at the concession 
stands, coaching Little League baseball teams, um- 
piring, and many other .jobs are all handled by 
volunteers. Some recreation authoi-ities contend 
that a program based on volunteer workers is not 
sound. "The Vine Grove program may be unusual in 
this respect for it has prospered and continued to 
grow with volunteers doing a lion's share of the 
work. Most of the workers are mothers and dads 
of youngsters who are participating in many phases 
of the program. This community WANTS re- 
creation. 

Supervision of the summer program at Vine 
Grove has experienced a series of changes. The 
Parent-Teacher Association and Vine Grove School 
jointly supervised the program during 1951 and 
1952. Prior to that time the school had supervised 
the program, and at present the school supervises 
the program in coniunction with the Vine Grove 
Community Recreation Committee. Much credit 
must be given the PTA for its contributions. Dur- 
1951 and 1952 this group sold advertising in a 
booklet which contained the summer schedule as 
well. In 1951 this booklet alone lealized twelve 
hundred dollars toward the operation of the pro- 
gram. 

For the purpose of centralizing both responsi- 
bility and the various records that must be kept, 
the supervision is now the responsibility of the 
school, with the director employed by the school. 
The director is the only full-time paid employee of 
the program. 

The program at Vine Grove includes some type 
of activity every da.v in the week with the exception 
of Saturday. Sunday afternoons the amateur base- 
ball team participates in a league along with other 
towns in the area. Uniforms, league franchise, um- 
pires, equipment, and other expenses of this team 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1954 



are all borne by the recreation program. 

Little League baseball is played on Monday 
nig-hts with four teams organized for the 1954 
season. Business places snonsor the teams, volun- 
teers coach them. The lighted field where these 
boys play also is used for the Tuesday and Thurs- 
day night Community Softball League and was 
built at a cost of twenty-six hundred dollars. The 
people of Vine Grove are indebted to the K"ntncVv 
Utilities Company for the consult'ition of their 
engineers and the assistance they rendered in the 
layout of the entire lighting program of the park. 

The new hardwood floor has been used each 
Tuesday and Friday night for skating. An admis- 
sion fee has been charged for skating, but nlans 
are now in the making for the elimination of this 
charge in the future. Children twelve and under 
have enjoyed this pj ivilege each Wednesday morn- 
ing for several summers. This will go along with 
a recreation principle of raising all the necessary 
funds for the desired program and then presenting 
that program to the community. 

Sale of soft drinks, ice cream, popcorn, and 
candy help to defray much of the exnense of opera- 
tion. Concession stands are avpilnble in the Re- 
creation building- and also in a buildinfi- built near 
the center of the Park for that purpose.. 

During- 1954 girls in the communitv have had 
Friday night for Softball and vollevball play. The 
physical education proeram in the high school has 
done much to encourage the girls and to nrovide 
them with the skills necessary for enjoyment of 
these sports. 

In 1953 an area was lighted at a cost of twenty- 
two hundred dollars, providing- an outdoor basket- 
ball court, a tennis court, and the volleyball court. 
The tennis court has vet to be completed and future 
plans call for surfacing- the entire area. 

Swings, seesaws, climbing apparatus and picnic 
tables have been installed in a shaded area of the 
park at a cost of twelve hundred dollars. The tables 
are of concrete construction making- maintenance 
relatively easy and inexpensive. This is importaiit 
to remember since the program is considerably 
larger than at its beginning- in 1949. yet the paid 
help has not been increased at all. Construction of 
facilities have always been considered with respect 
to ease of maintenance. 

Two semi-automatic traps have been installed in 
the Park for trap shooting. These traps are used 
much in the Fall of each year, especially around 
Turkey Shoot time. Various organizations sponsor 
shoots at different times and these facilities are 
made available to them. 

The Hardin County Fiscal Court, the State Board 
of Health, and the Hardin County Board of Edu- 
cation have been very coooerative in rendering in- 
valuable assistance to the Vine Grove program, and 
this article could not be complete without acknow- 
ledging their aid. Neither would it be fair to con- 
clude without mentioning- the Vine Grove Lions 
Club which annually assumes a "Lion's" share of 
the task of providing Vine Grove with a recreation 
program of which it may be justly proud. Many 
times this organization has stepped into a difficult 
spot and produci-d the necessary funds oi- effort 
for some project. 

What does the future hold foi- comnuuiily re- 
creation in Vine Grove? Has everything been done 
that can be done? Not at all! Plans are made for a 
long time ahead involving the addition of an am- 





^^ ^^^^^^^|Bh 


^^r ^^Bf9p^^^ 


""*' ' rK^HI^^^^ 







phitheatre, the improvement of the Recreation 
Building- to house club rooms, a library, a game 
room, and a kitchen for the preparation of dinners, 
plus a banquet room for such gatherings. A 
swimming- pool is and has been on the minds of 
leaders and people of the area for some time. Vine 
Grove's people hold no fear for the cost of its con- 
struction. They have done too much to let that 
stand in their way. 

Lest anyone might think that the program has 
not met opposition in some of its efforts, this ar- 
ticle would hasten to inform that on occasions 
there have been conflicts over what should be done 
next, but never has there been a reluctance on 
the part of the people to do something! 

Leaders in various fields of this community were 
questioned regarding- the values they had observed 
rendered by the recreation program to the com- 
munity. When questioned about this, James T. 
Alton, Principal of Vine Grove School, replied: 
"The retaining- power of the program has been 
a very great asset to the school. It has been our 
observation that because of the varied program 
offered the youngsters thev are very reluctant to 
drop out of school, and I believe school records will 
justify that statement. In addition, delinquency has 
been reduced to a minimum, with those few delin- 
quents being- boys and girls who in the majority 
have not been regular participants in the recreation 
program." 

Mr. A. J. Emerine, Cashier of a local bank added, 
"No dollar and cents value can be placed on this 
program. It has virtually eliniinated delinquency in 
this area, and no other activity of the community 
entertains such a wide range of ages as does our 
recreation program." 

The Hardin County School Superintendent, Mr. G. 
C. Burkhead, was questioned and his reply was, 
"The program at Vine Grove seeking to provide 
recreational opportunity foi- the neople of that area 
has been an invaluable aid to the school program. 
This is manifest in records of the school available 
to everyone." 

The foregoing account and subsequent endorse- 
ments have been prepared in the hope that othei-s 
might take courage and find some assistance in 
providing iccreation for youngsters and older folks 
as well in other areas of our state. If even one 
community is aided by this work, the effort will 
have been justified. 



V — ^^ 



In Stock For Immediate Delivery 



I) (I 



DeLUXE FAIR PLAY - FD60 

Basketball Scoreboards $322.00 

FIGURGRAM FAIR PLAY - FFIS 
Basketball Scoreboards $422.00 

Converse Basketball Shoes - All-Star 



Either Black or White Uppers, 
all sizes 



.$6.95 



Fan-shaped Steel Backboards 

Complete with goals and nets 

E. R. Moore Girls' Gym Suits 

We carry in stock several colors, several 

latest catalog or 



styles and sizes. Write for 
samples. 



Coach Rupp Gym Pants for Boys 

Several colors and all sizes from 24 thru 44. 
We also can supply the sleeveless shirt or T 
shirt in white or various colors. 

Officials Clothing 

We carry the most complete line in the 
entire South. Write us for price list. 

Cramer's First-aid Supplies 

Our stock is very complete. Check up and 
let us have your order. 



% 



Last-Bilt Basketballs 

We have the MacGregor Goldsmith No. 
XIOL, Spalding No. 100, O'Shea BM at $19.85 
No. H 200 molded basketball endorsed and 
used by Coach Adolph Rupp at the Univer- 
sity of Kentucky. Approved ball for confer- 
ence games in the SEC, a!so this ball was 
one of the balls used during Kentucky High 
School Basketball Tournament. Price $19.85 

Colored Top Sweat Socks 

These surely add color to your team. Made 
by Wigwam. 50% wool. All colors carried 
in stock. Pair 75c 

Dodge Trophies 

The most complete line in the South. All 
figures, all designs, all prices. Write for 
our special trophy catalog. 

Award Sweaters 

We feature the O'Shea line. Now is the time 
to purchase your football and basketball 
award sweaters or jackets. We can supply 
anything you want. Would you like to see 
our salesman without obligation or should 
we mail you samples by return mail ? 



I) (I 



Our stock is very complete on football shoes, shoulder pads, hip pads, 
helmets, practice pants, practice jerseys, footballs, adhesive tape, athletic 
supporters, etc. 

Ten days delivery on special H:ame pants and game jerseys made in your 
school colors, and lettered, striped, etc. to your specifications. If interested, 
phone us immediately. 

1) (I 



HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO. 

PHONE 104 MAYFTELD. KY. 

"The Largest Independent Exclusive Athletic House in the South" 




SutcliffeTIas The 

SWEATERS! 




CLASS AND HONOR SWEATERS 

in Stock for Immediate Delivery 
With Lettering Service, 10-Day Delivery 




ORDER 
NOW 



ORDER FOOTBALL 
HONOR SWEATERS 

NOW SO THEY'LL 
BE READY FOR YOUR 
PLAYERS THE MOMENT 
THE SEASON IS OVER. 




V-NECK SWEATERS 
No. 1030— A Sand Knitting Mills sweater of 100% 
wool in heavy baby shalcer weave. Stock colors — Blacic, 
White, Royal, Scarlet, Purple, Kelly, Old Gold, 

Cardinal; each ___ __ _ $12.45 

No. 58V — Made by Imperial Knitting Mills. Very 
popular throughout the U. S. and a remarkable value. 
100% wool. Stock colors— White, Black, Old Gold, 
Royal, Scarlet, Purple, Maroon, Kelly, Light Gold, 
Burnt Orange: each $9.15 



— BUTWIN JACKETS — 
Reversible Honor Jackets 

Write us for our catalog with 

Special School Prices 



COAT SWEATERS 

No. 1020 — A Sand product of heavy baby shaker weave. 
100% pure wool yarn. Demanded by schools who want 
the best. Stock colors— Black, White, Royal, Scarlet, 
Purple, Cardinal, Kelly, Old Gold; each $13.65 

No. 58J — An Imperial product, and favored by many 
schools. Coat style with 2 pockets; lOOyo wool. 
Knitted in the popular baby shaker weave. Stock colors 
—White, Kelly, Royal, Black, Old Gold, Purple, Maroon; 
each . , $10.95 



No. 2620J — A Sand Knittinn Mills Heavy Jersey Weave. 
Button Front Coat Sweater — 100% pure wool and one 
of our most popular honor garments. Stock colors — 
Royal, Kelly, Scarlet, Black, Old Gold, White, Maroon 
Purple; each . _ _ $10.65 

LETTERING: 6" chenille letters, each $1.15; 8" letters $1.70; chenille bars 40c each; 
chenille chevrons, 45c: name plates, 15c each. Delivery of woven service stripes 
in sleeves cost 35c additional per sweater and requires three weeks for delivery. 

All prices quoted ore wholesale school prices —not retail prices. 




XX 




^ .,^ KENTUCKY 



High Schooi Ath fete 

Trimble County's State Championship Cross Country Team 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Stethen, Oak, Bray. Pyles. -Second Row: Bryan, Coach Hutchinson, Brown. 

The team representing the Trimble County High School of Bedford won the K.H.S.A.A. Crosss 
Country Run, held in Lexington on November 13. The same group was first in the high school 
division of the Shamrock Cross Country Run (A.A.U.), held in Louisville on November 25. 



Official Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 

JANUARY - 1955 






¥n 




PERRYVILLE HIGH SCHOOL— CO-CHAMPION BLUEGRASS SIX-MAN CONFERENCE 



■y^'>> '^ ' 



«li 



jy^ 






\4 



\^ lin' 



tt'lLli'UliWfi"""' 



/*%; 



(Left to Kight) Front Kow : Ray Bonta, Roy Bonta, C. Reynolds. Roney, H. Bonta, Garrison, D. Reynolds. 
Second Row: Jones, Smith, Gibson, Webb, Shewmaker, Middleton. H. Chambers, Mgr. Wright. Third Row: Coach 
Gentry, Adkius, G. Hundley. C. Hundley, V. Chambers, King, Coach Peden. 

WILMORE HIGH SCHOOL — CO-CHAMPION BLUEGRASS SIX-MAN CONFERENCE 




31 f.- (X^i .f, 13. T 
t^' 4.3' 1,. 24*2'' £i • 






( LcfL lu liitiiil t I' I 'Pill Kuw ; Mgr. T. Garrett, D. Conn, li. McGohon, T. Shewinakui . L>. Cunigran, Mgr. J. Shearer. 
Sucoiiil liovv : 1>. Sclitjiircr, Creucli, G. Cuuisaii. -Third Kow: Guy. J. Gurrett, Powers, Hunter. Tourth Row: Lowery. 
Kuuatacr, Tommy Shewniuker. Fifth Row: B. Conn, Crousc. McL'ce. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XVII— No. 6 



JANUARY, 1955 



$1.00 Per Year 



Commissioner s Message 



One of the most significant milestones in 
the history of the Kentucky High School 
Athletic Association was passed on Decem- 
ber 18, when the Board of Control authorized 
its Building Committee to complete the pur- 
chase of a lot in Lexington and to proceed 
with the planning and erection of an office 
building for the Association. The Board 
authorized the Commissioner to sign a con- 
tract with the architects who have been 
selected to draw the nlans for the new build- 
ing, and urged the Building Committee to 
make every effort to make the new building 
a reality just as soon as possible. 

The building will be erected on a lot locat- 
ed on the west side of Rose Street between 
South Limestone Street and Washington 
Avenue. Plans and specifications are now 
being prepared by the architects, and it is 
hoped that bids can be let and construction 
started at some time during the month of 
March. The construction work is scheduled 
to be completed on or before Julv 1. The 
building will be modern in design, with a 
one floor plan including a full basement. It 
will be approximately 42' by 55'. It will not 
be pretentious, and is planned to utilize all 
of the space on the main floor. The base- 
ment will include storage rooms and other 
space which might be needed for future ex- 
pansion. 

Kentucky thus joins the ranks of several 
other states whose athletic associations own 
their own buildines. The Building Commit- 
tee has four members. Thev are Chairman 
James L. Cobb, Director W. B. Jones, Direct- 
or Jack Dawson, and Commissioner Ted 
Sanford. 

The K.H.S.A.A. Protection Fund continues 
to render a fine service to the member 
schools of the Association. More than eight 
thousand dollars in claims have been paid 
out since July 1. However, one hundred 
twenty-eight member schools have not in- 
sured their athletes with the Protection Fund 
during the current year, taking advantage 
of the thirty dollars credit voted by the 
Board of Control for 1954-55. This credit 



insures thirty players free of charge in all 
sports except football. Examination cards 
and summary sheets have been mailed to 
all member schools, but the insurance is not 
considered to be in effect until the summary 
sheets, listing the players to be insured, are 
mailed to the State Office. Many schools, 
of course, carry other types of insurance, 
and several of the larger schools possibly 
have their own medical staffs. It is hoped 
that all K.H.S.A.A. members are seeing to 
it that their athletes have some type of in- 
surance protection against injuries. 

At this point in the 1954-55 basketball 
season, it appears that the conduct of team 
supporters is improving. Credit for this must 
be given to the school administrators and 
coaches who are making every effort to im- 
prove the sportsmanship of their student 
and adult supporters. It became the un- 
pleasant duty of the Commissioner not long 
ago to suspend a member school from the 
Association for violation of K.H.S.A.A. By- 
Law 17, Practice of Sportsmanship. It was 
held that the school had not given proper 
protection to official representatives of a 
visiting school from a troublesome fan. An 
officer of the law had been present during 
the early part of the game, but had left the 
gymnasium for a short period of time. Had 
the peace officer been present when the 
trouble occurred it is probable that the 
trouble maker would have been ejected from 
the gymnasium promptly, and that no fur- 
ther trouble would have developed. Many 
of our school administrators are running a 
great risk in not seeing to it that peace of- 
ficers are present at all of their home con- 
tests. The Board of Control and the Com- 
missioner believe that one of the first im- 
plied duties of the home principal under the 
provisions of By-Law 17 is to have adequate 
police protection during games and im- 
mediately following. Arrests should be made 
and warrants sworn out promptly if the 
activities of the trouble makers justify this 
procedure. 

(Continued on Page Ten) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1955 



JANUARY, 1955 VOL. XVII— No. 6 

Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association. 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Carlos Oakley (1951-55), Morganfield 

Vice-President Russell Williamson (1952-56), Inez 

Directors — James L. Cobb (1951-55), Newport; Roy G. Eversole 
(1952-56 ) , Hazard ; W. B. Jones ( 1953-57) . Somerset ; Louis 
Litchfield (1953-57), Marion; Jack Dawson (1954-58). Middle- 
town; W. H. Crowdus (1954-58), Franklin. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 



Jrom the Commissioned s Cjffi 



ice 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1. 1954 Football Participation List 

2. School's Report on Football Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Football) 



"Approved" and "Certified Officials" 

One hundred seventeen basketball officials have 
qualified for the "Certified" rating- this year, and 
seventy-six have received the "Approved" rating. 
The latter rating does not cairy forward from year 
to year, but must be earned each year. After an 
official has received the "Certified" rating, he 
keeps this rating by clinic attendance. Only officials 
leceiving these higher i-atings are eligible to work 
in the regional tournaments. Only "Certified" of- 
ficials, who are residents of Kentucky, are eligible 
to work in the State Tournament. 

Basketball officials who qualified for advanced 
ratings during the current season are as follows: 
Certified Officials 

Raymond C. Adkins, Rex Alexander, James E. 
Baker, Jack H. Ballard, J. W. Barnett, Bailey Bash- 
am, Thomas P. Bell, Bert Bennett, Richard I. Betz, 
Bennie E. Bridges, Vic Brizendine, James Brown, 
Raymond Burke, George H. Campbell, Ralph M. 
Casteel, W. W. Chumbler, Charles Edward Clark, 
0. K. Clay, Travis Combs, Walter Combs, George 
Conley, John Wellington Cooper, John S. Crosth- 
waite, Jr., Tom Cubbage, Dwight R. Davis, Jr., Dero 
Downing, John Dromo, Jack Durkin, Forrest Edd- 
ings, Ben R. Edelen, William Turner Elrod, Doc 
Ferrell, Allen Fey, Bill Fitchko. Robert Forsythe, 
Howard E. Gardner, Delmas Gish, Leonard Gooch, 
R. E. Goranflo, Al Gustafson, Jr., John Heldman, Jr. 
Franklin C. Hewling, Richard Hewling, G. Cliff 
Hines, Fred A. Hodge, Holbert Hodges, Ganiet S. 
Hoffman, Joe Hofstetter, D. Fletcher Holeman, Clay- 
ton Hood, J. D. Hudson, Charles R. Ii-win, Kenneth 
P. Jordan, Bob King, P. J. King, Roy King, Joe T. 
Kinman, Bill Knight, Horace Knight, Warren R. 
Leet, Gilbert E. Lindloff, David M. Longenecker, 
Dick Looney, E. R. McAninch, L. B. McClellan, Jr., 
Anthony A. McCord, Pat H. McCuiston, Glen D. Mc- 
Dowell, Harold McGuffey, Robert N. McLeod, Edgar 
McNabb, Alan Leon Macon, Boyd W. Mahan, James 
E. Mason, Ralph Mays, Foster Meade, Bob Miller, 
Rex J. Miller, Ed Mudd, Ralph Mussman, William 
E. Nau, Gene Neal, Ed Nord, Tim O'Brien, Billy W. 
Omer, Bernard Pergrem, C. A. Porter. Cleophus 
Pursifull, Stan Radjunas, Bernard W. Ratterman, 
James F. Rice, Earl C. Roberts, James M. Rocke, 
Otis Roller, Clyde L. Rouse, Leland G. Rubarts, Mel 



Sanders, Evan E. Settle, Jr., Roy G. Settle, Stanley 
E. Shaw, Wallace Sloan, Edgar J. Smith, LaRue 
Sosh, Wilfred Susott, Ed Taylor, Robert S. Taylor, 
Amos Teague, Jack Thompson, William Varble, 
Charlie Vettiner. Leonard W. Webb, Ralph W. 
Welch, Milford Wells, Lloyd G. Whipple, Tom M. 
Williams, Jr., Shelby Winfrey, Ernest Woford, 
Vincent Zachem. 

Approved Officials 
Kenneth Ashley, Arville Bailey, Edgar C. Baker, 
James P. Begley, Clyde W. Blackburn, C. H. Bo- 
zaith, Jr., Bob Braun, Bryant Brown, Dave Burke, 
Joe Chappell, Jimmy Coe, Kenneth B. Coffey, Layton 
Cox, Randy Craig, Fred T. Crawford. Emmett H. 
Crowe, Al Cummins, Ellis Curry, Don Davis, Fox 
DeMoisey, Truett DeMoisey, James M. Eaton, Bob 
Foster, E. Hugh Fugate, Romulus Gibson, Eugene 
Gordon, Warren J. Griese, Jess Grisham, Royall A. 
Hall, Jr., Charles R. Hayes; George L. Holzknecht, 
Harry Howard, Douglas Hudson, Joe Hutt, Jr., 
Wilms Kiefer, J. A. King, Joseph A. Kremer, Ray S. 
McPike, George Maines, Davis Martin, Edward 
Mayes, Earl Metcalf, Lucian Y. Moreman, Reason 
G. Newton, Norman O'Nan, Lewis M. Owens, R. K. 
Padgett, Rudy Phelps, Logan G. Powell, H. C. Ran- 
dall, Malvern Redman, Gordon Reed, Joe M. Richard- 
son, C. O. Ricketts, Bill Roberts, Richard Rothfuss, 
Morris Rozen, Foster J. Sanders, W. L. Scott, Lisle 
R. Sherrill. Bill Small, Robert Stanfill, William R. 
Steenken, Harry Stephenson, Ralph Thompson, A. E. 
Thurman, Bob Tincher, Asa L Tipton, Jack D. Van- 
Hoose, Don Wedge, Paul E. Weisbrodt, James A. 
Wesche, David White, Jerry C. Wilson, Roy L. Win- 
chester, Emil Wurtz. 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled January 1) 
If one telephone number is given for an official listed it is 
the home phone number unless othewise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Baker, Charles .T., 2547 Harrison, Paducah, 3-3043, 5-6311, 

Ext. 8532 
Barrett, Jackie, Route 6, Benton 
Bohanan, -Tames. Camargo 
Bone, Billy Mac, 58 Robin Road, Hopkinsville, Tu ti-1424, 

Tu 6-2433 
Bowling, Floyd. L. M. U.. Harrogate, Tenn., 3656. 4461 
Bowman, Earl G., 611 Park, Lexington, 3-0977, 2-8955 
Browning, William H,, Lebanon, 6413 
Brumback, Buford, Main St., P. O. Box 134, Williamstown, 

4-5822, 4-8461 
Burch, Ossie, 116 Hamlin, Corbin, 323 W 
Burchett, Denny, P. O. Box 85, Pembroke, 4316, 126 
Butcher, Granville, Paintsville, 399 

Caldwell, Gerald G., Charlotte Hts., Williamstown, 4-5872. 4-8461 
Carrithers, Bill, Men's Hall, Morehead, 9107 
Carter. Leslie, Route 3, Tompkinsville 

Cloyd, William H., 106 Clyde St., Lexington, 2-7927, 2-4789 
Copley, Clyde, Warfield, 4762 (Bus. No.) 
Coulter. William M.. 2002 N. Fifth Ave., Evansville, Ind, 
Denton, Charles, 1427 Clay, Henderson, 4020, 3195 
Durham, Sam, Sixth Street, Liyermore, 2411 
Eagle, Carl, c/o Bell High School, Pineville 
Ensslin, Charles, 716 N. Main St., Barbourville, 185 
Everett, Harold, 601 Concord Blvd., Evansville, Ind., 3-5033 
Hodge, Ken, 711 Locust, Owensboro, 3-4438 
Hoffer, William E., 16 West 19th St., Covington, Ju 2445 
Jenkins, Neel, 244 Padgett St., Morganfield, 503 W 
-lohnson. Moses, Route 1, Utica 

Jonas, Arnold, Hq. Sec. 3400 A S U, Fort Campbell, 7580, 300 
King, Allen V., 424 N. Brady, Morganfield, 532 W, 2 or 3 
King, Ray, M. S. C, P. O. Box 79, Morehead, 9107 
King, Roy, Box 143, Cumberland, 214 L 
Lefevers, Jasper N., Jr., Cardinal 
Levicki, A. P.. J. I. Burton H. S., Norton, Va. 
Longshore, Richard D., 906 Taylor, Bellevue, Co 8921 
Lowe, Robert G., 3009 Prichard St., Ashland 
McPherson, Alton, 8 Hughes Ave., Winchester, 1927 
Marcum, Harold A., 1378 Trinity Pk. Dr., Louisville, At 9775 
Mason, Kenneth H., 624 So. 8th St., Mayfield, 2068 
Massengale, Wendell H., Route 3, Monticello, 6310 

(Continued on Page Fifteen) 



THE 


KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE 


FOR JANUARY, 1955 


Page Three 


1954-55 MEMBERSHIP IN THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 








REGION 1 






School 


Address 




Principal 


Basketball Coach 


U. 1 


Arlington 


Arlington 




0. J. Mitchell 


0. J. Mitchell 




Bardwell 


Bardwell 




R. L. Petrie 


Tom M. Adkins 




Cayce 


Cayce 




Edmund Clark 


Edmund Clark 




Central 


Clinton 




James H. Phillips 


James H. Phillips 




Cunningham 


Cunningham 




0. J. Allen 


0. J. Allen 




Fulg-ham 


R. 1, Clinton 




Rilev Denington 


R. L. Thurston 




Fulton 


Fulton 




K. M. Winston 


Uel Killebrew 




Hickman 


Hickman 




Carlos H. Lannom 


Carlos H. Lannom 




Milbum 


Milburn 




Henry O'Daniel 


Carl Scoggins 




Western 


Hickman 




E. L. Clark 


E. L. Clark 


D. 2 


Ballard Memorial 


R. 1, Barlow 




Richard Winebarger 


Willard Carroll 




Heath 


R. 1, West Paducah 


A. L. Roberts 


W. E. Carter 




Lone Oak 


Paducah 




John Robinson 


Don Stephenson 




Reidland 


R. 8, Paducah 




Lyndle Barnes, Sr. 


Henry L. Paul 




St. John 


R. 5, Paducah 




Sr. Mary Ansbert 






St. Mary's 


Paducah 




Sr. Alma Clare 


Gene Kenny 




Tilghman 


Paducah 




Walter C. Jetton 


Otis Dinning 


D. 3 


Cuba 


R. 1, Mayfield 




Joe McPherson 


Joe McPherson 




Fancy Farm 


Fancy Farm 




Sr. Rose Angeline 


Samuel Hayden 




Farming-ton 


Farming-ton 




Conrad E. Carroll 


Conrad E. Carroll 




Lowes 


Lowes 




W. W. Chumbler 


Vernon Gates 




Mayfield 


Mayfield 




Paul Craig 


Jack Story 




Sedalia 


Sedalia 




McCoy Tarry 


McCoy Tarry 




Symsonia 


Symsonia 




Cecil Reid 


Joe Ford 




Wing-o 


Wing-o 




Howard V. Reid 


Charlie Lamploy 


1). 4 


Almo 


Almo 




William B. Miller 


William B. Miller 




Benton 


Benton 


(Supt.) Joe P. Duke 


Billy J. Farris 




Brewers 


Brewers 




Reed Conder 


Reed Conder 




Hardin 


Hardin 




C. B. Hendon 


C. B. Hendon 




Hazel 


Hazel 




C. M. Scarbrough 


Billy R. Knox 




Kirksey 


Kirksey 




M. B. Rogers 


Rex Watson 




Lynn Grove 


Lynn Grove 




Raymond L. Story 


Bob Eaker 




Murray 


MuiTay 




W. B. Moser 


Preston Holland 




Murray Training- 


Murray 




Roy S. Steinbrook 


Garrett Beshear 




New Concord 


New Concord 




Ed"ward T. Curd 


Gene Cathey 




No. Marshall 


Calvert City 




Robert Goheen 


L. G. Tubbs 








REGION 2 




D. 5 


Crittenden County 


Marion 




Louis Litchfield 


Ercel Little 




Livingston County 


Smithland 




W. A. Threlkeld 


Frank Wright 




Marion 


Marion 




Thomas A. Parrish 


Dennis Mefford 




Salem 


Salem 




Willis W. Southern 


George Whitecotton 


U. 6 


Caldwell County 


Princeton 




Guy G. Nichols 


Fred Clayton-Hoyt Threet 




Fredonia 


Fredonia 




Bradley Cox 


Bradley Cox 




Lyon County 


Kuttawa 




Russell R. Below 


Jason White 




Trigg County 


Cadiz 




John Minton 


James Solomon 


D. 7 


Charleston 


R. 1, Dawson Sp 


'ings 


Lewis Good 


George Wooton 




Dalton 


Dalton 




Thornton Dever 


Edwin Martin 




Dawson 


Dawson Springs 




B. U. Sisk 


Aubrey M. Inglis 




Earlington 


Earlington 




James W. Lai-mouth 


James W. Larmouth 




Hanson 


Hanson 




Ina D. Moore 


Elmer Brooks 




Madisonville 


Madisonville 




Vincent Zachem 


Charles Parrish 




Morton's Gap 


Morton's Gap 




G. A. Brown 


Morton Hamblin 




Nebo 


Nebo 




Auvergne Carneal 


Jewell Logan 




Nortonville 


Nortonville 




Ruby C. Harralson 


Orlando Wyman 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1955 



School 

D. 8 Clifty 
Crofton 
Guthrie 
Hopkinsville 
Lacy 

Pembroke 
Sinking: Fork 
South Christian 
Todd County 
Trenton 



Address 

Clifty 

Crofton 

Guthrie 

Hopkinsville 

R. 7, Hopkinsville 

Pembroke 

R. 5, Hopkinsville 

Herndon 

Elkton 

Trenton 



Principal 

O. P. Hurt 
Gene G. Wilson 
Henry C. Malone 
Charles J. Petrie 
Omer Gosnell 
Mrs. L. W. Allen 
T. W. Stewart 
Clovis W. Wallis 
Basil 0. Smith 
Raymond Bottom 



Basketball Coach 

J. G. Young 

Bob Chaney 

Richard G. Covington 

Bill Brannock 

Bill Kern 

Denny Burchett 

J. W. Jones 

Charles R. Ii-win 

Basil 0. Smith 

Raymond Bottom 









REGION 3 




D. 


9 Clay 


Clay 


Irene Powell 


Kenneth Middleton 




Dixon 


Dixon 


P. D. Fancher 


Dudley Brandenburg 




Providence 


Providence 


Wendell Johnson 


G. C. Sherrell 




Sebree 


Sebree 


Mrs. Fred Poore 


Hugh E. Sellers 




Slaug'hters 


Slaughters 


F. F. McDowell 


Dorman Dunville 


D. 


10 Barret 


Henderson 


W. W. White 


T. L. Plain 




Henderson County 


Henderson 


Lewis N. Johnson 


Charles Wilder 




Holy Name 


Henderson 


Sr. Albert Mary 


James K. Lindenberg 




Morganfield 


Morganfield 


Thomas Brantley 


Charles Straub 




St. Agnes 


Uniontown 


Rev. R. G. Hill 


Rev. J. M. Mills 




St. Vincent 


St. Vincent 


Sr. Ramunda 


Carolisle Towery 




Sturgis 


Sturgis 


H'Earl Evans 


H. D. Holt, Jr. 




Uniontown 


Uniontown 


(Supt.) Otis Harkins 


Bert T. Rountree 


D. 


11 Calhoun 


Calhoun 


James B. McEuen 


Delbert Settle 




Livermore 


Livermore 


A. G. Crume 


Lee Robertson 




Sacramento 


Sacramento 


Paul Phillips 


Charles Summers 


D. 


12 Daviess County 


Owensboro 


W. B. Sydnor 


W. B. Sydnor 




Owensboro 


Owensboro 


J. W. Snyder 


Lawrence McGinnis 




Owensboro Catholic 


Owensboro 


Sr. Mary Auxilium 


Harold Mischel 




Owensboro Tech. 


Owensboro 


C. F. Criley 


John C. Simpson 




Utica 


Utica 


J. T. Sandefur 
REGION 4 


W. P. Wheeler 


D. 


13 Breckinridge Co. 


Hardinsburg 


R. F. Peters 


Charles Linsmith 




Flaherty 


Vine Grove 


M. E. Swain 


M. E. Swain 




Frederick-Fraise 


Cloverport 


Hilbert R. Taylor 


Joseph Baker 




Hawesville 


Hawesville 


Cecil Foreman 


Charles Quisenberry 




Ii-vington 


Irvington 


Edwin J. Mayes 


A. C. Thomas 




Lewisport 


Lewisport 


Shelby R. Mason 


Edgar R. Payne 




Meade County 


Brandenburg- 


Mrs. C. P. Miller 


D. T. Starks 


D. 


14 Brownsville 


Brownsville 


Estil Griffis 


Louis Durbin 




Butler County 


Morgantown 


W. Foyest West 


William 0. Warren, Jr 




Caneyville 


Caneyville 


Ramon Majors 


William P. Tully 




Clarkson 


Clarkson 


Howard P. Lindsey 


Bowman Davenport 




Kyrock 


Sweeden 


W. L. Wood 


Oren H. Webb 




Leitchfield 


Leitchfield 


0. A. Adams 


John H. Taylor 




Sunfish 


Sunfish 


Bernard Bolton 


Bernard Bolton 


D. 


15 Beaver Dam 


Beaver Dam 


Shelby C. Forsythe 


Ed Hickey 




Centertown 


Centertown 


J. Neil Embry 


Bill Leach 




Central Park 


McHenry 


D. B. Lutz 


Gene Gaither 




Dundee 


Dundee 


C. A. Croley 


€. A. Croley 




Fordsville 


Fordsville 


M. S. Greer 


Bobby Parks 




Hartford 


Hartford 


Charles S. Combs 


Charles S. Combs 




Horse Branch 


Horse Branch 


W. 0. Wan-en 


Tom Boswell 




Eockport 


Rockport 


J. W. Park 


J. W. Park 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1955 



Page Five 



I). 



School 
16 Bremen 

Central City 

Drakesboro 

Dunmor 

Graham 

Greenville 



Address 

Bremen 

Central City 

Drakesboro 

Dunmor 

Graham 

Greenville 



I 



Hug-hes-Kirkpatrick Beechmont 
Muhlenberg- Central Powderly 



D. 17 Alvaton 

Bowling Green 

Bristow 

College 

Franklin-Simpson 

North Warren 

Richardsville 

Warren County 



I 



D. 18 Adairville 
Auburn 

Chandlers Chapel 
Leviasburg 
Olmstead 
Russellville 

D. 19 Allen County 
Austin Tracy 
Glasgow 
Hiseville 
Park City 
Scottsville 
Temple Hill 

D. 20 Albany-Clinton Co. 
Center 
Cumberland 
Edmonton 
Gamaliel 
Mari-owbone 
Tompkinsville 



Alvaton 
Bowling Green 
Bristow 
Bowling Green 
Franklin 
Smiths Grove 
Richardsville 
Bowling Green 

Adairville 

Auburn 

R. 2, Auburn 

Lewisburg 

Olmstead 

Russellville 

Scottsville 

Lucas 

Glasgow 

Hiseville 

Park City 

Scottsville 

R. 4, Glasgow 

Albany 

Center 

Burkesville 

Edmonton 

Gamaliel 

MaiTowbone 

Tompkinsville 



Principal 

Hugh A. Noffsinger 
Delmas Gish 
Ovid Arnold 
Charles Eades 
Troy E. Spear 
John R. Owens 
Lyle C. Baugh 
Sherman Gish 



REGION 5 



Jacob Stagner 
H. B. Gray 
R. E. Hendrick 
C. H. Jaggers 
J. W. Dunn 
Everett Witt 
G. E. Rather 
C. H. Harris 

0. W. Lovan 
H. M. Watkins 
Morris Shelton 
G. L. Summers 
W. N. Alexander 
Harold Hunter 

T. C. Simmons 
A. T. McCoy 
Edwin R. Jones 
Lenis Reece 
W. L. Gardner 
Bradford Mutchler 
David Montgomery 

L. H. Robinson 
M. A. Fancher 
Waymon Huddleston 
Samuel L. Smith 
Edwin Steen 
Ralph Clark 
Randall Grider 



Basketball Coach 

Porbis Jordan 
Delmas Gish 
Wesley Coffman 
Charles Eades 
Wayne Ewing 
Robert L. Todd, Jr. 
Ben Topmiller, Jr. 
Tom Neathamer 



Alvin Almond 
Clarence Musgrave 
Jesse Kimbrough 
John Oldham 
Jimmy Ownby 
Wendell Duncan 
Clyde Smith 
Eddie Diddle, Jr. 

John Sweatt 
William Cate 
R. B. Porter 
James Grimes 
Earle Shelton 
B. H. Weaver 

Jim Bazzell 
Jim Rush 

James W. Bravard 
Geoi-ge A. Sadler 
Lloyd Sharpe 
Carl Garmon 
Wayne McKibbin 

William A. Kidd 
Ralph 0. Davis 
Lewis Williams 
Ralph Reece 
Edward Agers 
Cortez Butler 
John C. Marrs 



D. 21 Adair County 
Campbellsville 
Greensburg 
Lebanon 
St. Augustine 
St. Charles 
St. Francis 
Taylor County 

D. 22 Buffalo 
Cavema 
Cub Run 
Hodgenville 
Magnolia 
Memorial 
Munfordville 



D. 23 Elizabethtown 

Elizabethtown Cath. 
Fort Knox 

PGlendale 
Howevalley 
Lynnvale 
Rineyville 
Sonora 
Vine Grove 
A West Point 



Columbia 

Campbellsville 

Greensburg- 

Lebanon 

Lebanon 

R. 2, Lebanon 

Loretto 

Campbellsville 

Buffalo 

Horse Cave 

Cub Run 

Hodgenville 

Magnolia 

Hardyville 

Munfordville 

Elizabethtown 
Elizabethtown 
Fort Knox 
Glendale 
Cecilia 
White Mills 
Rineyville 
Sonoi-a 
Vine Grove 
West Point 



RECxION 6 

Albert L. Berry 
Thomas F. Hamilton 
Eugene E. Tate 
Charles F. Martin 
Sr. Nerinx Marie 
Sr. M. Romuald 
Sr. Charles Asa 
J. G. McAnelly 

Edwin R. Harvey 
(Supt.) Ralph C. Dorsey' 
T. Y. Tabor 
Everett G. Sanders 
W. B. Borden 
Lynn D. Thompson 
H. D. Puckett 

Paul E. Kerrick 
Sr. Doloretta Marie 
Herschel J. Roberts 
Damon Ray 
Lonard L. Lindsey 
Paul Ford Davis 
H. L. Perkins 
Dellard Moor 
James T. Alton 
Lloyd G. Lee 



John Burr 
Paul Coop 
Claude Sharpe 
Ted Cook 

Rev. F. M. Hannifin 
John Marshall 
Nick Smith 
Donald Barker 

Merle Nickell 
Ralph C. Dorsey 
James Edwards 
Irby Hummer 
Little C. Hale 
Denval Barriger 
Wilbur Smith 

Leon Kingsolver 
Edward C. Hanes 
John Hackett 
Edwin A. Goodman 
Thomas H. Bi-yant 
Bill Tabb 
W. H. Taylor 
H. W. Wilson 
Chet Redmon 
Charles Rawlings 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1955 



School 

D. 24 Bardstowi 
Bloomfield 
Fredericktown 
Lebanon Junction 
Mackville 
Mt. Washington 
Old Ky. Home 
St. Catherine 
St. Joseph 
Shepherdsville 
Springfield 
Willisliurg 



Address 

Bardstown (Supt.) 

Bloomfield 

R. 2, Springfield 

Lebanon Junction 

Mackville 

Mt. Washins-ton 

Bardstown 

New Haven 

BardstovsTi 

Shepherdsville 

Spring-field (Supt.) 

Willi.sburg 



Principal 

H. T. Cooper 
Ralph M. Alexander 
Sr. M. Raphael 
Thomas S. Jeffries 
Howard Moore 
C. L. Francis 
T. 0. Thompson 
Sr. Margaret Louise 
Bro. Nilus, CFX 
Edwin E. Rodgers 
Bennett R. Lewis 
L. A. Wash 



Basketball Coach 

Garnis Martin 
Ernest Ruby 
George R. Cecil 
Glenn B. Smith 
Fredie Lake 
L. W. Mullins 
J. H. Harvey 
Rev. L. A. Hardesty 
John Stoll 
Arthur L. Moody 
Charles Kolasa 
J. P. I;ong 



REGION 7 



D. 2H Ahrens Trade Louisville 

Baptist Louisville 

duPont Manual Louisville 

Flaget Louisville 

J. M. Atherton Louisville 

L'ville Male & Girls Louisville 



St. Xavier 
Shawnee 

D. 26 Eastern 

Fern Creek 

Holy Trinity 

Kentucky Mili. Inst. 

Ky. Sch. for Blind 

Southern 

Valley 



Louisville 
Louisville 

Middletown 

Fern Creek 

Louisville 

Lyndon 

Louisville 

Louisville 

Valley Station 



Alfred H. Meyer 
B. T. Kimbrough 
Arthur J. Ries 
Bro. Mark, CFX 
Emma J. Woerner 
W. S. Milbuni 
Bro. Thomas More 
Robert B. Clem 

Jack Dawson 

W. K. Niman 

Rev. A. W. Steinhauser 

N. C. Hodgin 

L. P. Howser 

T. T. Knight 

0. M. Lassiter 



C. W. Learned 
Jack Thorpe 
James R. Riffey 
Jim Huter 
Ralph H. Mills 
J. W. Ellison 
Gene Rhodes 
Jerome Keiffner 

Roy Adams 
Collis Stumbo 
Charles Quire 
W. T. Simp.son 

Lloyd Redman 
Garland Garrison 



REGION 8 



P. .30 Bagdad 

Shelbyville 
Simpsonville 
Taylorsville 
Waddy 

D. 31 Campbellsburg 
Eminence 
Henry Central 
Oldham County 
Ormsby Village 
Pleasureville 

n. .32 Carrollton 

Gallatin County 
Owen County 
Trimble County 



Bagdad 

Shelbyville 
Simpsonville 
Taylorsville 
Waddy 

Campbellsburg 

Eminence 

New Castle 

LaGrange 

Anchorage 

Pleasureville 

Carrollton 
Warsaw 
Owenton 
Bedford 



Vernon E. Shown 
Elmo C. Head 
Bruce Sweeney 
B. L. Sizemore 
W. R. Martin 

G. H. England 
Robert Pay 
D. W. Quails 
Roy H. Dorsey 
Anna B. Moss 
Clyde Davidson 

Palmore Lyles 
John M. Potter 
Cyi'us E. Greene 
D. P. Parsley 



Gayle Taft 
Evan E. Settle 
Troy Adams 
E. C. Brown 
Kenneth Gordon 

John Bailey 
Robert Pay 
Earl Henderson 
Robert B. Hehl 
Fred McDaniel 
Delbert Butts 

Ivan Knifley 
Milan Perpisch 
Paul Marshall 
D. R. Hutchinson 



REGION 9 



D. .33 Boone County 
Lloyd 
St. Henry 
Simon Kenton 
Walton-Verona 

D. 34 Beechwood 

Covington Cath. 

Dixie Heights 

Holmes 

Holy Cross 

LaSallette Acad. 

Ludlow 

Villa Madonna 



Florence 

Erlanger 

Erlanger 

Independence 

Walton 

Ft. Mitchell 

Covington 

Covington 

Covington 

Covington 

Covington 

Ludlow 

Covington 



Chester Goodridge 
James Tichenor 
Sr. M. Clarita, OSB 
R. C. Hinsdale 
James S. Smith 

Thelma W. Jones 
John S. Feldmeier 
W. N. Shropshire 
H. T. Mitchell 
Sr. M. Judith, OSB 
Sr. Linus Mary 
Joseph T. Conforti 
Sr. Aileen, OSB 



Rice Mountjoy 
Paul Champion 
Rev. Paul Ciangetti 
William Faulkner 
Dyke Vest 

John Cassady 
Robert Naber 
William Shannon 
Tom Ellis 
Theo. A. Keller 
Carol Guliani 
Harold Williams 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1955 



Page Seven 



School 
D. 35 Campbell County 
Highlands 
Newport 
St. Mary 
St. Thomas 



Address 

Alexandria 
Ft. Thomas 
Newport 
Alexandria 
Ft. Thoma.s 



Principal 

F. I. Satterlee 

Alton D. Rudolph 

James L. Cobb 

Sr. Mary Honora, SND 

Sr. Mary Barbara 



Basketball Coach 

Norman Irvin 
Howard G. Law 

Stanley Arnzen 
Rev. Carl Schaffer 
Donald Nie 



I 



D. 36 Bellevue 
Dayton 

Newport Cath. 
Silver Grove 



Bellevue 

Dayton 
Newport 
Silver Grove 



George H. Wright 
Edward J. Davis 
Rev. John Hegenauer 
(Supt.) Tom L. Gabbard 



Ben Flora 
Clarence Caple 
James Connor 
Tom L. Gabbard 



REGION 10 



37 Cynthiana 
Garth 

Great Crossing- 
Harrison County 
Oxford 
Sadieville 
Stamping Ground 



Cynthiana 

Georgetown 

R. 3, Georgetown 

Cynthiana 

Georgetown 

Sadieville 

Stamping Ground 



Kelley B. Stanfield 
Flem M. Justice 
Tony Raisor 
Joe H. Anderson 
G. W. Cassity 
W. C. Stevens 
Miss Allie Dragoo 



Carl Genito 
Tom Green 
Robert Barlow 
Kenton Campbell 
Marion Crowe 
Melvin Conway 
James McLaughlin 



D. 38 Augusta 

Bracken County 

Butler 

Deming 

Falmouth 

Grant County 

Morgan 

Williamstown 



Augusta 

Brooksville 

Butler 

Mt. Olivet 

Falmouth 

Dry Ridge 

Morgan 

Williamstown 



Alice K. Field 
Jarvis Parsley 
Franklin Webster 
T. Ross Moore 
(Supt.) L. H. Lutes 
Robert Ison 
Richard Gulick 
M. J. Belew 



Easton F. Meyers 
Jarvis Parsley 
Eddie Morgan 
Herman 0. Hale 
Cecil Hellard 
Eugene Robinson 
Richard Gulick 
Delbert Walden 



I 



D. 39 Fleming County 
May's Lick 
Maysville 
Minerva 
Orangeburg 
St. Patrick 
Tollesboro 



Flemingsburg 

May's Lick 

Maysville 

Minerva 

R. 3, Maysville 

Maysville 

Tollesboro 



D. 40 Bourbon Co. Voc. 
Carlisle 

Millersburg Mili. In. 
Nicholas County 
North Middletown 
Paris 



Paris 

Carlisle 

Millersburg 

Carlisle 

North Middletown 

Paris 



L. J. Cooper 
Harold Holbrook 
E. D. Jones 
R. H. Ruber 
Charles Browning 
Sr. M. Monica 
Eugene Fox 



Joe E. Sabel 
Nancy E. Talbert 
Major J. W. Rees 
Willard Sandidge 
John T. Gentry 
Donald H. Fair 



G. B. Ison 
Rudolph Szturma 
E. D. Jones 
Rufus Carter 
Julian Cunningham 
Don B. Grove 
William Ryan 

Fred Reece 
Louie Walters 
Capt. Robert Johnson 
Charles W. Finnell 
Ben E. Bridges 
Ralph Patterson 



REGION 11 



D. 41 Bald Knob 
Bridgeport 
Elkhom 
Frankfort 
Good Shepherd 
Peaks Mill 



R. 4, Frankfort 

R. 2, Frankfort 

Frankfort 

Frankfort 

Frankfort 

R. 1, Frankfort 



W. Roy Bondurant 
A. F. Kazee 
Ronald R. Conley 
F. D. Wilkinson 
Sr. Mary Fredrick 
Howard Cohom 



Ray Butler 
J. L. Cardwell 
Claud M. Logan 
Homer Bickers 
Charles Furr 
Eddie Ward 



D. 42 Anderson 
Burgin 
Harrodsburg 
McAfee 
Midway 
Rose Hill 
Salvisa 
Versailles 
Western 



Lawrenceburg 

Burgin 

Harrodsburg 

McAfee 

Midway 

Rose Hill 

Salvisa 

Versailles 

Sinai 



V. E. Whitaker 
(Supt.) D. R. Riggins 
A. F. Young 
M. W. Rowe 
(Supt.) Frisby Smith 
Webb Young 
Bruce Champion 
Frank V. Firestine 
Robeit B. Turner 



Don Miller 
Don Bradshaw 
Aggie Sale 
Amos Black 
Ed Allin 
Webb Young- 
Charles Reeves 
Call Mahan 
Manford Singleton 



Pag-e Eight 


THE KENT 


^UCKY HUGH SCHOOL ATHLEl 


^E FOR JANUARY, 1955 


School 


Address 


Principal 


Basketball Coach 


D. 43 Athens 


R. 5, Lexington 


R. L. Grider 


Bob Abney 


Henry Clay 


Lexington 


C. T. Sharpton 


Elmer T. Gilb 


Lafayette 


Lexington 


H. L. Davis 


Ralph Carlisle 


Lexington Cath. 


Lexington 


Rev. Leo Kampsen 


Nick Wanchic 


Nicholasville 


Nicholasville 


Rawdy Whittaker 


Elmer Stephenson 


University 


Lexington 


Morris Cierley 


Edward Shemelya 


Wilmore 


Wilmore 


Dan R. Glass 


Bill Maxwell 


D. 44 Berea 


Berea 


Mrs. Morris Todd 


Bill D. Harrell 


Berea Foundation 


Berea 


Roy N. Walters 


Robert Jones 


Central 


Richmond 


James B. Moore 


Hugh L. Davis 


Estill County 


Irvine 


Thaddeus Worrell 


Rodney Brewer 


Irvine 


Irvine 


Joe Ota- 


Joe Ohr 


Kingston 


R. 1, Berea 


Walter W. Moores 


Ronald N. Finley 


Kirksville 


Kirksville 


C. A. McCray 


William N. Hendren 


Madison-Model 


Richmond 


Kenneth Caufield 


Bobbie Williams 


Waco 


Waco 


James Brown 
REGION 12 


Edwin Parsons 


D. 45 Buckeye 


R. 3, Lancaster 


Gladys S. Bruner 


Henry F. Pryse 


Cp. Dick Robinson 


Lancaster 


W. R. Tudor 


Earl Shaw 


Danville 


Danville 


Don R. Rawlings 


Ken Snowden 


Forkland 


Gravel Switch 


Garland Purdom 


Garland Purdom 


Junction City 


Juction City 


Earl Cocanougher 


Garius Ball 


Lancaster 


Lancaster 


Stanley Marsee 


Leslie C. Dyehouse 


Paint Lick 


Paint Lick 


Mrs. Fay Little 


Harold L. Kittrell 


Parksville 


Parksville 


Harlan Kriener 


Joe Wesley 


Perryville 


Perryville 


R. C. Campbell 


Harian C. Peden 


D. 46 Brodhead 


Brodhead 


D. A. Robbins 


Joe Harper 


Crab Orchard 


Crab Orchard 


C. W. Bryant 


Douglas Hines 


Hustonville 


Hustonville 


Cecil Purdom 


Earl Land 


Liberty 


Liberty 


Garland Creech 


Don Bales 


Livingston 


Livingston 


James E. Baker 


William Lethgo 


McKinney 


McKinney 


M. C. Montgomery 


Lloyd Gooch 


Memorial 


Waynesburg 


Lester M. Mullins 


Doyle McGuffy 


Middleburg 


Middleburg 


Odes Bastin 


Truman Godbey 


Mt. Vernon 


Mt. Vernon 


William Landrum 


Jack L. Laswell 


St. Bernard 


Clements villa 


Sr. Carmelita Mattingly 


Rev. Thomas E. Buren 


Stanford 


Stanford 


J. T. Embry 


Denzil Ramsey 


D. 47 Burnside 


Burnside 


Miss Bethel Burdine 


Leonard Sears 


Eubank 


Eubank 


J. B. Albright 


Glen Bryant 


Ferguson 


Ferguson 


Sanford Hurt 


William A. Kelley 


McCreary County 


Whitley City 


Dewey Ball 


J. C. Bell 


Monticello 


Monticello 


Robert E. Woosley 


Leon Ford 


Nancy 


Nancy 


Herbert T. Higgins 


Lindsey Molen 


Pine Knot 


Pine Knot 


Mrs. C. D. Harmon 


George A. Cordell 


Pulaski County 


Somerset 


Edward B. Webb 


Raymond C. Combs 


Russell County 


Russell Springs 


L. A. Johnston 


Charles Mrazovich 


Shopville 


Shopville 


Dewey Bolton 


Roy Holt 


Somerset 


Somerset 


W. B. Jones 


W. M. Clark 


Steams 


Stearns 


(Supt.) C. W. Hume 


Jack W. Murphy 


Wayne County 


Monticello 


Arthur J. Lloyd 


Lloyd Hudnall 


D. 48 Bush 


Lida 


C. Frank Bentley 


Claude McKnight 


East Bemstadt 


East Bernstadt 


Elise Morgan 


Richard Morgan 


Hazel Green 


R. 1, East Bernstadt Clark E. Chesnut 


Clark E. Chesnut 


Lily 


Lily 


R. S. Baldwin 


Harold Storm 


London 


London 


Harry Howard 
REGION 13 


Gilbert Samples 


D. 49 Annville 


Annville 


Zilda R. Heusinkveld 


Jerry Hacker 


Clay County 


Manchester 


Robert Campbell 


J. W. Thurman 


McKee 


McKee 


W. L. Anderson 


Charles Norris 


Oneida 


Oneida 


John A. Wells 


David C. Jackson 


Tyner 


Tyner 


James W. Wilson 


R. B. Mon-is 



THE KENTUCKY HIGF 


I SCHOOL ATH 


LETE FOR JANUARY, 1955 


Page Nine 


School 


Addres.s 


Principal 


Basketball Coach 


1). 50 Barbourville 


Barbourville 


Edward E. Brunk 


Herb D. Tye 


Corbin 


Corbin 


H. A. Howard 


Harry J. Taylor 


Knox Central 


Barbourville 


Clinton B. Hammons 


Charles Black, Jr. 


Lynn Camp 


Corbin 


P. M. Broughton 


Z. R. Howard 


Pleasant View 


Pleasant View 


Clive Smith 


George E. Moses 


Poplar Creek 


Carpenter 


Charles M. Lawson 


Edward Teague 


Rockhold 


Rockhold 


Dan L. Cobb 


Tip E. Cobb 


Williamsburg- 


Williamsburg 


(Supt.) Jack Miller 


H. B. Steely 


Woodbine 


Woodbine 


Raymond Wells 


Warren Peace 


D. 51 Bell County 


Pineville 


James A. Pursifull 


Willie Hendrickson 


Henderson Settle. 


Frakes 


Thomas Winkler 


Wayland Jones 


Lone Jack 


Four Mile 


Maurice Tribell 


G. B. Hendrickson 


Middlesboro 


Middlesboro 


Clyde T. Lassiter 


Shelvie Fuson 


Pineville 


Pineville 


Effie Arnett 


Orville Engle 


Red Bird Settle. 


Beverly 


W. H. Kesselring 


Roy E. Garland 


D. 52 Benham 


Benham 


James H. Powell 


Charles Davis 


Black Star 


Alva 


W. R. Miracle 


D. C. Taylor 


Cumberland 


Cumberland 


Talmage Huff 


Roy King 


Evarts 


Evai-ts 


Leonard F. Woolum 


Charles Bentley 


Hall 


Grays Knob 


Mildred Rowland 


Joe Campbell 


Harlan 


Harlan 


Roy G. Teague 


Joe Gilly 


Loyall 


Loyall 


Charles R. Steele 


Needham Saylor 


Lynch 


Lynch 


Sam Potter 


Doyle Troutman 


Walllns 


Wallins 


John H. Howard 
REGION 14 


James L. Howard 


D. 53 Fleming-Neon 


Fleming 


Jason Holbrook 


Henry E. Wright 


Jenkins 


Jenkins 


Homer C. Davis 


Tom Price 


Kingdom Come Set. 


Linefork 


William W. Watts 


Ira R. Adams 


Stuart Robinson 


Blackey 


J. M. Burkioh 


Benton Back 


Whitesburg 


Whitesburg 


Kendall Boggs 


Ray Pigman 


D. 54 Buckhorn 


Buckhorn 


Edwin Keen 


Fred Johnson 


Dilce Combs Mem. 


Jeff 


Robert Holliday 


Warren H. Cooper 


Hazard 


Hazard 


H. M. Wesley 


Goebel Ritter 


Leatherwood 


Slemp 


Bingham Brashear 


Nick Poppas 


Leslie County 


Hyden 


Quentin Keen 


Ray Howard 


M. C. Napier 


Darfork 


Walter Martin, Jr. 


Howard Bartlett 


Stinnett Settle. 


Stinnett 


Raleigh L. Couch 


Bruce Begley 


D. 55 Breathitt County 


Jackson 


Millard Tolliver 


Farris Woods 


Carr Creek 


Carr Creek 


Morton Combs 


Morton Combs 


Cordia 


Cordia 


Alice H. Slone 


George W. Cornett 


Hindman 


Hindman 


Claude Frady 


Pearl Combs 


Jackson 


Jackson 


Orleff Knarr 


J. B. Goff 


Knott County 


Pippapass 


Lovell Ison 


Roy Reynolds 


Oakdale Voc. 


Oakdale 


Keith Ivers 


Lowell Noble 


Riverside Inst. 


Lost Creek 


Miss Ada Drushal 


D. Stoddard 


D. 56 Hazel Green Aca. 


Hazel Green 


Mrs. H. A. Stovall 


Pryce Tutt 


Lee County 


Beattyville 


T. L. Ai-terberry 


H. K. Hampton 


Owsley County 


Booneville 


W. 0. Gabbard 


Fred Callahan 


Powell County 


Stanton 


Kenneth Kuhnert 


Bill Orme 


Wolfe County 


Campton 


Ora Watts 
REGION 15 


A. M. Richie 


D. 57 Belfry 


Belfry 


D. E. Elswick 


Zeb Blankenship 


Dorton 


Dorton 


Charles E. Spears 


Monroe Hall 


Elkhorn City 


Elkhom City 


James V. Powell 


Arthur Mullins 


Feds Creek 


Feds Creek 


W. F. Doane 


W. S. Risner 


Hellier 


Hellier 


William M. Justice 


Arthur B. Castle 


Johns Creek 


R. 1, Pikeville 


Charles R. Elswick 


D. F. Burchett 


Phelps 


Phelps 


Tilden Deskins 


George Bailey 


Pikeville 


Pikeville 


Bernard N. Mims 


John W. Trivette 


Virgie 


Virgie 


Fred W. Cox 


Johnny Benedict 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1955 



School 

n. 58 Auxier 

Betsy Layiie 

Garrett 

McDowell 

Martin 

Maytown 

Prestonsburs' 

Wayland 

Wheelwright 

D. 59 Blaine 

Flat Gap 

Inez 

Louisa 

Meade Memorial 

Paintsville 

Van Lear 

Warfield 

I). 60 Ezel 

Morg'an County 
Oil Spi-ing's 
Salyersville 
Sandy Hook 



Address Principal 

Auxier Boone Hall 

Betsy Layne D. W. Howard 

Garrett Charles Clark 

McDowell George L. Moore 

Martin James W. Salisbury 

Lang-ley Edwin Stewart 
Prestonsburg (Supt.) Chalmer H. Frazier 

Wayland Lawrence B. Price 

Wheelwright Wayne Ratliff 

Blaine Paul Gambill 

Flat Gap Basil Mullins 

Inez Russell Williamson 

Louisa L. H. McHargue 

Williamsport Russell Boyd 

Paintsville Oran C. Teater 

Van Lear Hysell Burchett 

Warfield Oran Hinkle 

Ezel Miss Larue Millen 

West Liberty Lloyd E. Patterson 

Oil Springs Willis H. Conley 

Salyersville Creed Arnett 

Sandy Hook Roy Lewis 



Basketball Coach 

Jack P. Wells 
Tommie Boyd 
John Campbell, Jr. 
Estill Hall 
Denzil Halbert 
Ray Heinisch 
William Damron 
John D. Campbell 
Adrian Hall 

Andy Wbeeler 
Francis Stapleton 
Claude Mills 
John Thompson 
Paul Butcher 
Jim Wheeler 
Billy L. Conley 
Clyde Copley 

J. S. Trimble 
Glendon Stanley 
Herman Bolin 
Leonard Marshall 
Tom Adkins 



REGION 16 



D. 61 Camargo 

Clark County 

Frenchburg 

Montgomery Co. 

Mt. Sterling 

St. Agatha Acad. 

Winchester 

T). 62 Breckinridge Trg. 
Haldeman 
Morehead 
Owingsville 
Sharpsburg 

n. 63 Carter 
Erie 
Hitchins 
Laurel 
Olive Hill 
Prichard 
Vburg-Lewis Co. 

I). 64 Ashland 

Boyd County 

Catlettsburg 

Greenup 

Holy Family 

McKell 

Raceland 

Russell 

South Portsmouth 

Wurtland 



Mt. Sterling 

Winchester 

Frenchburg 

Mt. Sterling 

Mt. Sterling 

Winchester 

Winchester 

Morehead 

Haldeman 

Morehead 

Owingsville 

Sharpsburg 

Carter 
Olive Hill 
Hitchins 
Camp Dix 
Olive Hill 
Grayson 
Vanceburg 

Ashland 

R. 1, Ashland 

Catlettsburg (Supt.) 

Greenup 

Ashland 

South Shore 

Raceland 

Russell 

South Portsmouth (Supt.) 

Wurtland 



Walter H. Power 
Harvey G. Bush 
Geraldine Galloway 
E. G. Jones 
Dawson Orman 
Sr. Caroline Mary 
Nelson Jones 

Monroe Wicker 
Clifford Cassady 
Calvin Hunt 
Harding' Lowry 
Julian Cunningham 

Everett T. Phillips 
Rothel B. Mason 
Harold H. King 
William A. Carver 
Hayden Parker 
Max E. Calhoun 
Teddy Applegate 

H. L. Ellis 
Thelma W. Allie 
Carl Hicks 
Fred Maynard 
Sr. M. Herbert, CDP 
Eunice Harper 
L. T. Dickenson 
Fred Johnson 
Foster Meade 
Eugene Sammons 



Roy Hutcherson 
Maurice Jackson 
Robert W. Randall 
E. W. Clark 
James McAfee 
Karl Cheuvront 
"Eck" Branham 

John Allen 
Clifford Cassady 
Tilford Gevedon 
Len Stiner 
Julian Cunningham 

Glen Spai'ks 
William C. Priestley 
John R. Hartig 
William A. Carver 
Andrew J. Fultz 
Billy Vanderpool 
Charles Harris 

Robert Lavoy 
Delmis Donta 
Charles Snyder 
Oscar F. Bush 
Rev. Ed. S. Haney 
Jack Burgess 
Cecil Shryock 
Fred Johnson 
Foster Meade 
Everett Vanover 



COMMISSIONER'S MESSAGE 

(Continued from Page One) 

We are glad to report that our principals 
are using the athletic transfer blank more 
each year, with the result that rulings can 
be made on transfer cases more promptly. 
A first team player who transfers during 



the season is ineligible to represent any 
other school for the remainder of the season 
in that sport, even though his parents move 
to the new school district. The Commissioner 
has the authority to waive this penalty "in 
any case where there is evident injustice," 
and information given on the transfer blank 
is of great value when this decision is made. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1955 



LIBPARV 
EASTERN KENTUCKY 

RICHMOND, KCNTU CKY 



little thing's we do have a definite bearing- on our 
success or failure as an official. I have known of 
a iew officials who chance taking a drink before a 
game. Think of the possible consequences! I know 
of an umpire who forgot a cig-arette was in his 
mouth when he went to the field to place the ball 
for the opening kickoff. I know an excellent official 
who can no longer work in a certain town because 
of his failure to control his emotinal vocabulary. 
I also know officials who are cocky, arrogant, and 
self-centered, who often wonder why they have dif- 
ficulties filling theii schedule. These unethical 
personal characteristics can be conti'olled, if the 
official wills to do so. 

Ethics After the Completion of the Game 

Many problems can be avoided, if the official 
conducts himself properly at the completion of the 
ball game. I believe a few of the problems can be 
solved by the following ethical procedures: 

1. Take the point of least resistance to the 
dressing room. You probably will have indiscreet 
remarks directed to you. Some of them are hard 
to take. Keep your legs moving and your mouth 
closed and you will reach your destination. 

2. If the coach comes to the dressing room fol- 
lowing the game, maintain your complacency. Meet 
the problem with courteous and direct answers. 
Don't argue. 

3. If you are critical of the way your co- 
officials worked the game, now is the time, and the 
only time, to offer constructive criticism. Please 
avoid making derogatory comments to others as a 
way of self protection, or condemnation when that 
official's back is turned. Be direct. 

4. You must maintaiii your conduct as a gentle- 
man from portal to port a;. Some officials who so 
thoroughly dehydrate themselves during the game 
are unable to pass the first absorption joint. If you 
must hydrate, at least wait until you are out of 
town. Respect is often lost when you are seen fre- 
quenting those places. You may return to that town 
to officiate again and, even though one glass of 
beverage was hardly a sin, there may be that 
"trouble maker" who will give you a hard time 
and sway the opinion of others. 

5. You are, for sure, going to avoid discussion 
of offensive, defensive play patterns, etc., with 
coaches who are yet scheduled to play the team for 
whom you have officiated. Perhaps the best answer 
to this problem is, "I was too busy doing my job 
and am unable to give you a fair answer." This is 
a true statement, if you are concentrating on your 
duties as an official. 

Conclusion 

In conclusion, I would like to reemphasize that 
general ethics supercede officiating ethics and that 
everything an official does on or off the field af- 
fects his status. Officiating ethics begin upon certi- 
fication as an official and can only end when you 
are no longer associated with the game. You are 
labeled an official and every unethical act expressed 
by you has a definite effect on the general public's 
reaction toward all officials. 

I would like to present a creed taken from the 
National Federation of State High School Athletic 
Association's publication, "So Now You Are an Of- 
ficial." I am sure it summarizes very well what I 
have just attempted to say. 

A Creed for Athletic Officials 

Believing that mine is an important part in the 
nationwide school athletic program, I pledge myself 
to act in accordance with these principles: 



1. To know fully the i-ules and accepted of- 
ficiating procedures for each sport in which I sei've 
as arbiter. 

2. To build my game schedule through accepted 
worth, potential possibilities and inherent character, 
rather than through transitory acquaintance, or 
ti-ading of favors or attempted pressures. 

3. To honor every contract, even though this 
may occasionally result in financial loss, or loss of 
opportunity to work for a larger school or one in- 
volving less travel. 

4. To keep myself physically and mentally fit. 

5. To be systematic, prompt and business like in 
all my dealings with those I serve. 

6. To wear the accepted official's attire and to 
maintain a neat and creditable appearance. 

7. To act in such a way as to be a worthy 
example to those under my supervision. 

8. To remember that my responsibility also 
extends to my fellow officials and that I must work 
as a member of a team. 

9. To make my decisions promptly but without 
snap judgment, firmly but without arrogance, fair- 
ly but without officiousness, and to base them on 
the rules regardless of the type of school, the close- 
ness of the score, or the opinions of partisan 
spectators. 

10. To keep in mind that my first charge is the 
safety and general welfare of those under my 
supervision. 



Southeastern Conference Bulletin 

Commissioner Bernie Moore of the South- 
eastern Conference wrote recently to the 
State Office of the K.H.S.A.A., enclosing a 
bulletin which explained the Southeastern 
Conference scholarship and pointed out vio- 
lations of the scholarship which affect an 
athlete's eligibility. Mr. Moore stated that 
his only purpose in asking that the bulletin 
be called to the attention of prospective ath- 
letes who may be going to college is to as- 
sist them and to keen them from doing any- 
thing or acceptinff anything which might 
cause their ineligibility in the Southeastern 
Conference. The bulletin follows : 

Attention — Hisrh School Seniors 

It is the desire of the Commissioner's Of- 
fice to acquaint you with the Southeastern 
Conference scholarshio rules. 

Any high school athlete who may be of- 
fered a scholarship by a Southeastern Con- 
ference institution should know that the 
scholarship cannot exceed actual and neces- 
sar.v college expenses, which are tuition, fees, 
books, room, board, laundry and dry clean- 
ing. Application for scholarship cannot be 
signed by applicant or parent prior to De- 
cember 7. 

The following are violations of South- 
eastern Conference rules which affect an 
athlete's eligibility: 

1. Any financial aid to an athlete from 
any source other than the institution, his 
parents or guardian. 



Page Fourteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1955 



2. Any financial aid or promise of aid to 
any member of his family. 

3. Promise of financial aid beyond his nor- 
man period of eligibility. 

4. Summer or vacation employment for 
which a higher scale of pay is received by 
an athlete than is received by other em- 
ployees doing the same type of work. 

5. Award of money, gifts or promise of 
gifts equivalent to money, or lavish enter- 
tainment by anyone, including alumni or 
friends of the institution. (Example: clothes, 
television sets, radios, automobile, summer 
vacation, Bowl Game trips.) 

6. Transportation to and from school by 
the institution. 

7. Tryouts which include any demonstra- 
tion of athletic ability. 

Bernie Moore, Commissioner, 
Southeastern Conference. 



North Central Kentucky Six-Man Conference 



Conference Standings 

Won Lost Tied Dickinson 

Rating; 

Barren River Six-Man Conference 

Caverna 5 

Austin-Tracy 3 1 

Hiseville 3 2 

Park City 1 4 

Temple Hill n 5 

Bluegrass Six-Man Conference 

Wilmore 4 U 22.511 

Perryyille 4 22.50 

Berea 3 1 20.00 

Shepherdsville 2 2 17.00 

Burgin 4 10.00 

Central Kentucky Conference 



Nicholasville 


S 





1 


28.50 


Danville 


5 








26.00 


Madison 


3 


2 


2 


20.42 


Harrodsburg: 


5 


2 





20.00 


Garth 


6 


2 


1 


19.72 


Shelbyville 


5 


1 


1 


19.64 


Lancaster 


4 


2 


1 


18.93 


Cynthiana 


4 


2 


2 


18.75 


Mt. Sterling 


4 


3 


1 


18.44 


Anderson 


4 


4 





16.25 


Versailles 


4 


6 





16.00 


Irvine 


3 


3 


1 


15.71 


Carlisle 


2 


4 





13.33 


Frankfort 


2 


7 





12.22 


MMI 


1 


4 





12.00 


Paris 


1 


G 





11.43 


Stanford 


1 


6 





11.43 


Winchester 





i) 





10.00 


Henry Clay 


:i 


1 


U No 


Rating 


Somerset 





1 


No 


Rating 


Cumberland 


Valley 


Conference 




Cumberland 


ti 


u 





23.33 


Harlan 


6 


1 





20.83 


Evarts 


6 


2 





18.33 


Black Star 


2 


2 


1 


15.00 


Lynch 


3 


3 





16.00 


Loyall 


2 


3 


1 


14.16 


Benham 


3 


6 





13.75 


Wallins 


2 


6 


(1 


12.50 


Hall 


(1 


S 


II 


10.00 


Eastern Kenluck 


y Mountain 


Conference 


Prestonsbur.t; 


i; 





u 




Whitesburg 


.5 


1 







Hazard 


4 


1 







Paintsville 


5 


2 







Pikeville 


3 


3 







Belfry 


2 


3 







■lenkins 


1 


4 


1 




Fleming 





(i 







Elkhorn City 





G 


1 





Eminence 
Ormsby Village 
Oldham Count>- 



Northeastern Kentucky Conference 



Catlettsbui.e: 

Russell 

Raceland 

Morgan County 

Louisa 

Wurtland 



McKell 1 5 

Northern Kentucky Athletic Conference 

Holmes 

Dixie Heights 

Highlands 

Lloyd 

BellevuL 

Newport 

Campbell County 

Dayton 

Beechwood 

Ludlow 

South Central 



1 8 11 

Kentucky Conference 



Glasgow 

Lebanon 

Springrfiold 

St. Charles 

Elizabethtowii 

Bards town 

St. Joseph 

Ft. Knox 

Old Kentucky Home 

Tompkinsville 

Southeastern 

Pinevilie 5 1 2(), 

Middlesboro 5 2 24 

Coibin 4 2 1 23, 

Harbourville 4 3 U 21, 

Lynn Camp 3 :^ 1 li) 

Bell County 3 3 19, 

Williamsburg 2 5 It 17. 

Knox Central U 7 14. 

Western Kentucky Athletic Conference 



U 4 10 

Kentucky Conference 



Mayfield 

Owensboro 

Sturgis 

Russellville 

Bcwlinjr Green 

Madisonville 

Henderson 

Murray 

Hopkinsville 

Owensboro Catholic 

Princeton 

Trigg County 

Morganfield 

Marion 

Franklin-Simpson 

Fulton 

Providence 



All-Conference Teams 

Barren River Conference 

Ends : Bennett, Caverna ; Poison, Hiseville ; Steenbergen, 
Austin-Tracy ; Cravens, Austin-Tracy. 

Centers : Norris, Temple Hill ; Campbell, Caverna. 

Backs : Hestand. Caverna ; Siddens, Hiseville ; Russell, 
Austin-Tracy ; Harper, Caverna ; Strader, Hiseville ; Slaughter, 
Park City : Cox, Aus*.in-Tracy. 

Bluegrass Six-Man Conference 

Ends: Hundley, Perryville : Shewmaker, Wilmore. 
Centers : Chambers, Perryville ; Stine, Burgin. 
Backs: Cunnigan, Wilmore; Prewitt, Berea; Sadler, 
Shepherdsville : Tate. Shepherdsville. 

Cumberland Valley Conference 

Ends : Vanmeter, Cumberland ; R. Asher, Evarts. 
Tackles : T. J. Asher, Wallins : Hammons, Evarts. 
Guards : Scott, Cumberland ; Smith, Wallins. 
Center: Johnson, Evarts. 

Backs : Gallagher, Cumberland ; Cain, Cumberland ; Jaco, 
Benham : Toby, Evarts. 

Eastern Kentucky Mountain Conference 

Ends : Dixon, Prestonsburg ; Franklin, Paintsville. 
Tackles: Puckett, Prestonsburg ; Cyrus, Paintsville, 
Guards : Wells, Prestonsburg ; Caudill, Whitesburg. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1955 



Page Fifteen 



Attention, All Women Teachers Of Physical Education 

Girls' Sports Associations 

At long: last there is to be an organization in Kentucky 
whose purpose is to promote wholesome sports and recreation 
programs for all the girls of Junior and Senior High Schools 
of the state. A group of interested teachers and students has 
met together a number of times for the last two years, develop- 
ing purposes, standards and a plan for organization. A constitu- 
tion has been written and the whole plan has now been en- 
dorsed by the State Department of Education, by the Kentucky 
Association for Health, Physical Education and Recreation, and 
the Kentucky High School Athletic Association. 

The newly formed organization for girls is to be called the 
Kentucky Federation of High Schools Girls' Sports Associations. 
Its main purpose has been stated to "provide opportunities for 
sharing ideas on leadership and standards for establishing 
wholesome sports and recreational activities." It does not in- 
clude the promotion of interscholastic competition for girls. 

A handbook of instructions for organizing a local Girls' 
Sports Association is being prepared and will be sent to any 
teacher or interested group who requests it. Membership dues 
of $2 per year will be charged each group desiring to become a 
member of the Federation. Requests for membership blanks 
for information should be addressed to Mr. E. B. Whalen, 
Department of Education, Frankfort, Kentucky. 

Sports programs for all girls in secondary schools should 
be encouraged and promoted and should be those which con- 
tribute to total fitness, to enjoyable use of leisure time, and 
to the development of the most desirable and attractive physical, 
mental and emotional qualities of young womanhood. A major 
objective in the sports programs should be the participation of 
many through the offering of a variety of activities. Getting all 
high school girls off the side lines and into active participa- 
tion through intramural competition will be one of the out- 
comes of a well organized Federation of Girls' Sports Associa- 
tions. General principles for setting up these programs have 
been agreed upon by the National Section for Girls and 
Womens Sports. They are listed below. 

1. A medical examination should be given .... prior to 
participating in the sports programs. 

2. A healthful, safe, and sanitary environment should be 
provided for activities. 

3. Every girl should have the opportunity to participate 
in a variety of activities including both individual and team 
sports. 

4. Competition should be equitable between girls of approx- 
imately the same ability . . . maturity . . . skill. 

5. Sport seasons should be limited . . . maximum number of 
practices and games carefully weighed. 

6. Games should be played according to girls' rules . . , 
with qualified officials. 

7. Intramural competition should be stressed and extra- 
mural competition . . . an outgrowth. 

8. Extramural competition should be limited to a small 
geographic area . . . separate from boys' contests when possible 
and should include informal social events after the games. 

9. Program leadership should be of the highest calibre . . . 
preferably by women wherever possible. 

The Constitution and By-Laws of the new orgranization 
follow : 



Center : Reatherford, Prestonsburg. 

Backs: Hughes. Prestonsburg; Goble, Prestonsburg: Fields. 
Whitesburg ; Gilliam, Pikeville. 

Northeastern Kentucky Conference 

Ends: Craig, Raceland : B. Rose, Wurtland. 
Tackles : Brown, McKell ; Walters, Catlettsburg. 
Guards : P. Rose, Raceland ; Robinson, McKell. 
Center : Scott, Catlettsburg. 

Backs: Harris. Russell; Conley, Russell; Miller, Wurtland; 
Sloan. Catlettsburg. 

Northern Kentucky Athletic Conference 

Ends: Carr, Dixie Heights: Reinhardt. Campbell Co. 

Tackles: Kappas, Dixie Heights; J. Turner of Newport 
and .1. Bradford of Bellevue (tie). 

Guards: Broering. Bellvue; Leistner and Woods of Holmes 
and Hart of Highlands (three-way tie). 

Center : Ross, Dixie Heights. 

Backs: Browning of Dixie Heights, White of Holmes and 
Mendell of Bellevue (three-way tie); Fry, Dixie Heights; Etler. 
Lloyd ; Albershart, Highlands. 

South Central Kentucky Conference 

Ends: McGill, Springfield: Hibbs of St. Joseph and Jewell 
of Glasgow (tie). . 

Tackles : Lloyd. Elizabethtown : Hundley, Tompkinsville. 

Guards : Pyle. Bardstown : Crepps, O.K.H.S. 

Center: Yast. St. Charles. 

Backs : Petterson. St. Charles ; Mattingly, Lebanon ; Travis, 
Glasgow. 

Southeastern Kentucky Conference 

Ends: Webb, Pineville : Hart, Corbin. 
Tackles : D. Roper, Pineville : Bargo, Knox Central. 
Guards : F. Roper. Pineville ; Cobb, Corbin. 
Center : Stone, Pineville. 

Backs: Burgess. Barbourville : Howard, Pineville; Taylor, 
Lynn Camp : Stanfield. Williamsburg. 

Western Kentucky Athletic Conference 

Offensive Team 

Ends : Alexander, Murray : Holt, Sturgis. 
Tackles : Watts. Mayfield, Plain, Owensboro. 
Guards : Mason. Bowling Green ; B. Lewis, Mayfield. 
Center : Taylor, Russellville. 

Backs : Smith, Owensboro ; Cravens, Owensboro : Curry, 
Providence : Morris, Owensboro. 

Defensive Team 

Ends : Rogers, Madisonville : Kirkendol, Owensboro. 
Tackles : S. Lewis. Sturgis : Boldrick, Owensboro Catholic 
Guards : Law, Franklin-Simpson : Stokes, Mayfield. 
Backs : Wyatt, Paducah : Shaw, Murray : Riley, Bowling 
Green : Franklin, Madisonville ; Barlow, Mayfield. 



BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(Continued from Page Two) 

Mattingly. Jimmy, K. A. House, Georgetown, 735 

Mays. Ralph J., Barbourville, 710 R 

Meacham, Jack R.. Jr., Route 2, Pembroke, 2024 

Meyer, James E., 1751 B Marshall, Evansville, Ind., 6-0228 

Miracle, Edward, Stadium, Richmond, 915 

Newman, Buddy, 1320 Clay, Henderson, 7-9402, 2500 

O'Daniel, Jeff, Route 2, Lebanon, 7112 

Osborne, Nick, Wallins Creek, 1100 (Bus. No.) 

Pursifull, Cleophus, Loyall, 1110 

Randolph, C, D.. Box 493, Harlan, 1939 

Rapier, Burl. 4518 Louisville Ave.. Louisville, At S273 

Redmon, Jack R., 21st St., Middlesboro, 122 (Bus. No.) 

Richards, James S., P. O. Box 94, Columbia, 3135 

Riggs, William T., 28 Congress Dr., Morganfield, 590, 9168 

Russell, Dewey, Tompkinsville, 4602, 53 

Schellhase, David, 1630 Wedeking, Evansville, Ind., 5-9790 

Schubert. Don, 107 N. Walker. Marion, 748, Marion H. S. 

Speier. John F., 3816 Miami Ave., Louisville, Cy 6736 

Stanley, Glendon, West Liberty, SH 3-4155 

Stapleton, Roy, 817 Illchester. Middlesboro 

Stidham. Thomas E., 569 Chipman, Lexington 

Stone, Clifton, Route 3, Oak Hill Er., Evansville, Ind., 

6-0973, 5-3311 
Wehrmann, Louis, Sports Office, Fort Campbell, 7295 (Bus. No.) 
Wellman, Bill, 711 23rd St., Ashland, Grand 1091, 3798 
Willett, Irvin H., 815 Burns Ave., Wyoming, Ohio, P. O. 3716, 

P. O. 4100. Ext. 1916 
Yeary, William H., Jr., 1721 Liberty Rd., Lexington, 2-6945, 

2-6603 



CONSTITUTION 

ARTICLE I 
NAME 

Kentucky Federation of High School Girls' Sports Associa- 
tions. 

ARTICLE II 
PURPOSE 

Since many girls in high schools are interested in a more 
extensive program of Physical Education than is now provided 
in the regular Physical Education classes, this Federation is 
organized to provide opportunities for the development of leader- 
ship and to set standards for establishing sports and recreation 
programs and to promote such activities for the high school 
girls of Kentucky. 

ARTICLE III 

STANDARDS 

The accepted standards for this Federation shall be the 
standards of the National Section for Girls and Womens Sports 
as listed in Standards in Sports for Girls and Women. 1953. 
These standards shall serve as a guide to action, as a basis for 
program planning. 



Page Sixteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1955 



ARTICLE IV 
MEMBERSHIP 

Membership shall be open to junior and senior high school 
girls. The three types of membership are: (1) active. (2) pro- 
visional, and (3) associate. 

Section 1. Active— Active membership is granted schools 
who apply for membership using the Federation application 
blank, adopt the Constitution of the Federation, secure the 
approval of the Federation's Executive Council through the 
acceptance of a local Constitution which is drafted in conform- 
ity with the suggestions of the Council, and pay the annual dues 
to the State Treasurer. 

Section 2. Provisional— Provisional membership is granted 
to those schools that wish to receive literature, but are not 
fulfilling the requirements for active membership. Such mem- 
bership cannot be continued longer than two years, except by 
permission of the Executive Council. Provisional membership 
dues are the same as those for active membership. 

Section 3. Associate — For individuals interested in the 
activities and desiring material from the Federation. (Dues less 
than other two types.) 

ARTICLE V 
MEETINGS 

Section 1. A meeting of the delegates of member schools 
of the Federation shall be held twice a year, in the spring and 
in the fall. The business at the spring meeting shall include 
the election of officers and any other official Federation busi- 
ness. The time and place for these meetings shall be announced 
by the Executive Council. 

Section 2. Each association, active or provisional, shall be 
entitled to two representatives, one faculty and one student. 
Each delegation is entitled to one vote. 

Section 3. Any other meeting may be called by a majority 
vote of the Executive Council or shall be called upon petition 
of twenty members acting through their official representatives. 

Section 4. Thirty days before any meeting, the Secretary 
shall notify all members of the exact time and place of the 
meeting. 

Section 5. Meetings of the Executive Council may be called 
by the President. 

ARTICLE VI 
QUORUM 

Section 1. The official delegates present at the meetings 
shall constitute a quorum for the transaction of business. 

Section 2. A two-thirds vote of all members replying shall 
be necessary for the transaction of business by correspondence. 

Section 3. Two-thirds of the members of the Executive Coun- 
cil shall constitute a quorum. 

ARTICLE VII 
OFFICERS AND EXECUTIVE COUNCIL 

The officers of the Federation shall be elected from faculty 
representatives and shall consist of a President. Vice-President, 
a Secretary, and a Treasurer. These officers with the im- 
mediate past President, President-elect, and two members-at- 
large from each district, shall be known as the Executive 
Council. The members-at-large shall be two representatives 
from each district, one faculty and one student. 

ARTICLE VIII 
ELECTION OF OFFICERS 

Section 1. The officers and members-at-iarge of the Fed- 
eration shall be elected at the spring meeting and they will 
serve for two years. 

Section 2. The President shall appoint a Nominating Com- 
mittee which shall propose names of suitable candidates for 
various offices. Additional candidates may be nominated upon 
petition of five members. Candidates may also be nominated 
from the floor. 

Section 3. A vacancy in the presidency shall be filled by 
the vice-president. The executive council shall fill all other 
vacancies by appointment to complete the unexpired term. 

ARTICLE IX 
DUTIES OF OFFICERS 

Section 1. It shall be the duty of the President to preside 
at all meetings of the Federation, to answer letters on general 
information, to appoint such committees as deemed necessary 
for the conduct of the activities of the Federation, 

Section 2. The Vice-President shall, in case of the resigna- 
tion, absence, or disability of the President, assume all the 
duties of the President. 

Section 3. The Secretary shall keep a record of all meet- 
ings of the Federation and the Executive Council, conduct all 
correspondence of the Federation not otherwise provided for, 
and return decisions on technical questions to local associa- 
tions. 

Section 4. The Treasurer, who must be bonded, shall take 
care of all funds, keeping an accurate account of all receipts 
and expenses and paying out funds only upon order of the 
President, submit the books unce a year to an auditing com- 
mittee appointed by the President, receive dues for memberships, 
and take care of anything pertaining to membership. 

Section 5. The Executive Council shall determine all neces- 
sary expenditures of money. 



ARTICLE X 

AMENDMENTS 

Section 1 . Amendments to this constitution may be pro- 
posed by the official representative of any member school. Such 
proposed amendments must be submitted to the President at 
least thirty days before the meeting and copies thereof sent by 
the President to the various members at least ten days before 
the meeting. 

Section 2. Proposed amendments to the constitution may 
be voted upon at the regular meetings or by mail and must 
receive two-thirds majority of those voting for adoption. 

Section 3. Amendments to the by-laws may be made at 
any Executive Council meeting. 

BY-LAWS OF THE CONSTITUTION 

ARTICLE I 
DUES 

Section 1. Each local association shall pay $2.00 annually. 
Section 2. The annual dues are payable before November 1. 
Section 3. The fiscal year shall coincide with the aca- 
demic year. 

ARTICLE 11 
COMMITTEES 

The President may appoint from the members of the Fed- 
eration the standing and special committees with the approval 
of the Executive Council. 

ARTICLE III 
PROGRAM 

Section 1. Within the school each local association conducts 
its own activity program. All rules and standards in regard 
to girls' sports shall be in accordance with the National Sec- 
tion for Girls and Womens Sports. The program of activities 
may be selected from one or more of the following: 

1. Organized Activities — Organized activities are those con- 
ducted after school, during the noon hour or before Bchool 
under the supervision of the girl's Physical Education teacher 
or other qualified school personnel. The following are sug- 
gested organized activities : 

It Aerial Dart. 2) Archery, 3) Badminton, 4) Basketball, 
51 Bowling. 61 Captain Ball. 7) Dancing, 81 Deck Tennis, 
9) Golf. 10) Hiking. 11) Hockey, 12) Horseshoes, 13) Kick 
Ball, 14) Life Saving and Water Safety, 15 1 Riflery. 16) 
Self-testing, 171 Shuffleboard, 18) Skiing. 19) Soccer, 20) Soft- 
ball, 21) Swimming. 22 1 Tennis Type Games, 23) Track and 
Field, 24) Tumbling. 25) Volleyball. 

2. Unorganized Activities— Unorganized activities are acti- 
vities which are done by the individual, alone or in groups, 
outside of school and not under the direct supervision of an in- 
structor. The following are suggested unorganized activities : 

II Archery, 2\ Badminton. 3) Bicycling. 4) Bowling, 

5) Dancing, 6 1 Golf, 71 Hiking. 8) Hobby Groups, 9) Horseback 
Riding, 10) Horseshoe Pitching, lit Life Saving and Water 
Safety. 12) Shuffleboard, 13) Skating (ice or roller), 14) 
Skiing, 15) Softball, 16) Swimming, 17) Tennis Type Games, 
18) Walking. 

3. Special Activities — Special activities are those events 
concerned with the educational, recreational, and social aspects 
of the group that are in keeping with the purpose of the as- 
sociation. Participation in these activities may include non- 
members of the local association. Parents and members of the 
entire student body may be invited to take part in such special 
events as : 

1 ) Banquets and Suppers, 2 ) Camping Trips, 3) Circuses 
or Carnivals, 4) Co-recreational Sports, 5) Dance Activities, 

6) Dance Recitals, 7) Discussion Groups, 8) Hobby Groups, 
9) Hosteling, 10) Movies. 11 ) Picnics and Buddy Picnics, 12) 
Play Days, 13) Pleasure Trips, 14) Seasonal Parties, 15) 
Sports Days. 16) Square Dances. 17) Talks or Speeches, 18) 
Water Pageants. 

4. Officials Group — Membership shall consist of those de- 
siring to improve officiating techniques, to interpret rules, to 
encourage good sportsmanship and to become a more competent 
leader. Officiating skills shall conform to those set forth by 
the Kentucky Officials Rating Board as defined by the Womens 
National Officials' Rating Committee. 



Protection Fund News 

Three hundred fourteen member schools 
of the K.H.S.A.A. had insured their athletes 
with the Protection Fund at the time this 
issue of the magazine went to press. Three 
hundred eighty-one claims, totaling $8,- 
372.80, have been paid since July 1. 



ATTENTION . . . BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT DIRECTORS 

The trophies shown on this page are the type selected by the KHSAA Board of Control for 
the Official District trophies and Regional trophies for all the KHSAA Tournaments in the 
1955 season. All trophies have genuine walnut wood bases and all figures and cuts are in a 
beautiful sunray gold finish. 

NOTE: The prices below include the application and supplying of the official KHSAA seal and 
necessary engraving. 

Let us have your order early so you will not be disappointed from the standpoint of delivery. 





Kejjional 
First Place 

No. Rl 

Height 25" 

Price 

$26.20 



District 
First Place 

No. Dl 

Height 21" 

Price 

$19.15 



\l 



H 



Regional 
Runnerup 

No. R2 

Height 20" 

Price 

$19.60 



^ 



District 
Runnerup 

No. D2 

Height 15" 

Price 

$16.10 



No. Rl 



No. R2 



No. Dl 



No. D2 



Official Basketball: We can supply for your district and regional tournament as well as for 
your games the MacGregor Lastbilt No. XIOL or the Spalding Lastbilt No. 100 or the Coach 
JRupp No. H200 ball for $19.85 each and remember ALL OF THESE BALLS WILL BE USED 
IN THE 1955 STATE KHSAA TOURNAMENT, and furthermore, these three balls have been 
used in the past state tournaments. 

ADMISSION TICKETS: These come two thousand to a roll printed with admission price and 
numbered on each end. Available in several colors and several prices from 10c througrh $1.25. 
Also blank or ADMIT ONE tickets together with Pass-Out Tickets. Per roll of two thousand 
only $1.25. 

FAIR PLAY ELECTRIC BASKETBALL SCOREBOARDS 

We have in stock the No. FD-60 for $350.00. We have in stock the Figurgrani No. Fl-SS at 
$445.00 each, complete with controls and ten feet of cable. Extra cable 30c per foot. Both 
boards carry a twelve months guarantee and we have a service man in the territory. Buy 
Fair Play and buy the best. 

BASKETBALL ACCESSORIES: 

We have in stock the official No-Whip nets, scorebooks, Cramer's first aid supplies, metal 
and bakelite whistles, stopwatches, Eastman Kodak timers, umpire horns, basketball posters, 
bath towels, shoe laces in various colors, colored top wool sweat socks, individual carry-all 
uniform bags in colors, All-Star Shoes in black and white in all sizes from 3 thru 17. 

HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO. 

PHONE 104 MAYFIELD, KY. 

"The Largest Independent Exclusive Athletic House in the South" 



Official Tournament '^ 
Trophies 




-25" Tall-$26.20 



D2-15" Tall-$16.10 



-193/4" Tall-$19.60 01-201/2" Tall-$19.15 

HERE THEY ARE 

These are the official ones selected by the K.H.S.A.A. BoarcJ of Control for all District and Regional Kentucky 
Tournaments. Each must have the Official K.H.S.A.A. seal as illustrated above. They are in our stock for 
immediate delivery. The prices below include the follovtring engraving: on Regional; "Winner (or Runner-up) 
X X Regional 1955"; on District Trophies; "Winner (or Runner-up) x x District 1955." 



INDIVIDUAL 
TROPHIES 

Trophies for individual 
awards for sportsmanship, 
foul shooting and 2nd team 
awards, and charm balls for 
individual players. 



WRITE FOR OUR 
COMPLETE TROPHY CATALOG 




OFFICIAL 
TOURNAMENT BALL 

No. RSS — This Rowlings Official Ball 
is used by the big percentage of all 
K.H.S.A.A. member schools. It was 
the ball demanded by mosf of the 
teams in previous State Tournaments 
and of course will be the favorite 
demanded ball for the 1955 Tourna- 
ments School Price $19.85 




:-.r^S^&)S. -^.L\ 'JX'^'iisnmssrzE 



UTCLIFFE CO.! 

LOUISVILLE 1, KENTUCKY ^ 







High School AfMefe 

Boone County High School Gymnasium 




Sfes-.»*«^ 



Kentucky school boards are constructing- fine new gymnasiums all 
over the state. The Boone County High School gymnasium, shown above, 
will be the site of the forthcoming Ninth Regional Basketball Tournament. 



OfficiaiBlrganofthe KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 



) FEBRUARY 



1955 




• • 

• • 


^he iSpo^tsman s C^eed 


The Player 


1. 


He lives clean and plays hard. He plays for the love of 




the game. 


2. 


He wins without boasting, he loses without excuses, and 




he never quits. 


3. 


He respects officials and accepts their decisions without 




question. 


4. 


He never forgets that he represents his school. 


The Coach — 


1. 


He inspires in his boys a love for the game and the desire 




to win. 


2. 


He teadies them that it is better to lose fairly tban to 




win unfairly. 


3. 


He leads players and spectators to respect officials by 




setting them a good example. 


4. 


He is the type of man he wants his boys to be. 


The Official 


1. 


He knows the rules. 


2. 


He is fair and firm in all decisions. He calls them as 




he sees them. 


3. 


He treats players and coaches courteously and demands 




the same treatment for himself. 


4. 


He knows the game is for the boys, and lets them have 




the spotlight. 


The Spectator — 


1. 


He never boos a player or official. 


2. 


He appreciates a good play, no matter who makes it. 


3. 


He knows the school gets the blame or the praise for his 




conduct. 


4. 


He recognizes the need for more sportsmen and fewer 


- 


"sports." 



7726 Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XVII— NO. 7 



FEBRUARY, 1955 



$1.00 Per Year 



Report on the National Federation Winter Meeting 



Editor's note: The material given below com- 
bines reports on the recent National Federation 
meeting, made by Secretary Joe Ohr of the Ken- 
tucky High School Coaches Association and Execu- 
tive Secretary H. V. Porter of the National Federa- 
tion. 

The Kentucky High School Athletic Assoc- 
iation and the Kentucky High School Coaches 
Association were represented at the Na- 
tional Federation meeting, held in New Or- 
leans, Louisiana, on January 5-7, by Assist- 
ant Commissioner J. B. Mansfield ; Dr. Lyman 
V. Ginger, Football Committee member; 
Principal Joe Ohr of the Irvine High School, 
Secretary of the Kentucky Coaches Associa- 
tion ; and Athletic Director Edgar McNabb 
of the Beechwood High School, President of 
the Kentucky Coaches Association. 

The three day meeting, which included 
sessions for state executive officers and for 
members of the National Federation Foot- 
ball Committee, was held in the St. Charles 
Hotel. S. F. Burke, National Federation 
President, was general chairman. Delegates 
from forty-two states were in attendance. 

The National Federation Executive Com- 
mittee met Wednesday morning and after- 
noon, January 5, and there was a session 
on "Non-Athletic Activity" Wednesday eve- 
ning. Thursday and Friday were given over 
to meetings of the Football Committee. On 
Thursday evening the delegates were enter- 
tained at a dinner given with the compli- 
ments of the Louisiana Athletic Association 
and the New Orleans Recreation Department. 

The state executive officers met on Fri- 
day evening and Saturday morning, with 
such items on the agenda as Report of the 
Non-Athletic Committee, The Basketball 
Program, Court or Legislative Activity, The 
Baseball Program, A Public Relations Proj- 
ect, and Bringing Statistical Data Up-to- 
Date. 

During the first session of the Football 
Committee meeting, a complete report on 
the Chicago meeting, held in December, 
was made by Secretary Lyle Quinn of Iowa 
and Assistant Secretary Kermit Anderson 
of Minnesota. Particular emphasis was given 
to that part of the Chicago meeting which 



dealt with equipment and safety factors. 
Several proposals submitted by the Safety 
Committee were adopted later and will be- 
come effective in 1956 and 1957. 

The Game Administration Committee, 
headed by Secretary J. C. Harper of Ala- 
bama, reclassified or introduced new signals 
for some twelve rules infractions. The whole 
purpose for the reclassification of signals 
is simplicity, with the idea that the signals 
can be better understood by coaches, players, 
and spectators. 

The 1955 rules will show the modifications 
with the ma.ior changes in signals affecting 
foul signal Nos. 2 and 3 and the elimination 
of signal No. 10 as the present signals are 
known. Probably the most significant modi- 
fication passed by the Committee was that 
of an ineligible receiver being down the field 
on a pass situation. The penalty was in- 
creased from a five yard loss to a fifteen 
yard loss. 

Several important changes in the rules 
were voted in the Assembly, and among the 
changes were: 

1. The snapper (center) should have the 
same right as his teammates to move his 
foot as soon as the snap motion has started. 
The vote registered by coaches and athletic 
directors favoring this rule was 4741 to 566. 

2. All white stripes on jerseys below the 
elbow are illegal. This rule becomes effec- 
tive in 1958. 

3. Rubber-covered wire cage face guards 
are given the same standing as smooth plas- 
tic face guards. 

4. The nylon cleat with metal tip was made 
legal. A report made by the Michigan dele- 
gates emphasized the fact that with use the 
cleat became more safe. 

5. A maximum limit on the length of a 
cleat was adopted to become effective in 
1956. The cleat, to be legal, can not be more 
than 7 8 of an inch in length. 

Executive Secretary H. V. Porter sum- 
marized for members of the Football Com- 
mittee the more important rule modifica- 
tions. Mr. Porter's summary follows : 

(Continued on Page Seven) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1955 



FEBRUARY, 1955 VOL. XVII— NO. 7 

Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association. 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Carlos Oakley (1951-55), Morganfield 

Vice-President Russell Williamson (1952-56) , Inez 

Directors — James L. Cobb (1951-55), Newport; Roy G. Eversole 
(1952-56). Hazard: W. B. Jones (1953-57), Somerset; Louis 
Litchfield (1953-57), Marion; Jack Dawson (1954-58), Middle- 
town; W. H. Crowdus (1954-58). Franklin. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 

^rom the Commissione>i s C/fflce 

Allotment of State Tournament Tickets 

Followers of teams winning the regional 
basketball tournaments will have an oppor- 
tunity to purchase State Tournament tickets 
from their school principals under a ticket 
allotment plan similar to the one which has 
been in effect for the past several years. 
Approximately 1700 sets of tickets, calling 
for seats in the end and corner sections of 
the Coliseum, will be saved for the supporters 
of the regional winners. These tickets will be 
allotted to the schools involved on the basis 
of their enrollments, and the allotments will 
be made only to the schools with teams com- 
peting in any narticular session. Princinals 
of these schools will be advised concerning 
their allotments early in the week of the 
State Tournament. 

1955 District Tournament Sites 

(1) Fulton, (2^ Lone Oak. (31 Lowes. (4") 
Murray Training- C5') Marion, (d) Caldwell 
Countv, (7) MadisonviUe. CXI Honkinsville, 
(9) Providence. HO) Holy Name. (U) Sac- 
ramento, (12) Owensbovn, CI. 3) Flahertv, 
(14) Butler Countv. (W) Hartford. (16) 
Central Citv. (17) BnwHnsr Green, (18) Rus- 
sellville, (19) Pai-k Citv. (20) Marrowbone, 
(21) Campbellsville. <'22) Memorial, (23) 
Ft. Knox, (24) Old Kentuckv Home, (25) 
Atherton, (26) Fern Cre^k. (30) Shelbvville, 
(31) Oldham Countv. (32) Gallatin Countv, 
(33) Boone Countv. (34) Covington Catholic, 
(35) Newnort. (36) Newnort Catholic, (37) 
Garth, (38) Grant County. (39) Maysville, 
(40) Bourbon Countv Vocational. (41) 
Bridgenort. (42) Harrodsburg. (43) LTniver- 
sity, (44) Central. (45) Junction City, (46) 
Liberty, (47) Somerset, (48) London, (49) 
McKee, (50) Woodbine, (51) Bell County, 
(52) Loyall. (53) Whitesburg, (54) Hazard, 
(55) Breathitt Countv, (56) Lee Countv (57) 
Belfry, (58) Garrett. (59) Van Lear, (60) 
Morgan County, (61) Clark County, (62) 
Morehead, (63) Vanceburg, (64) McKell. 



By-Law 21 

School administrators and coaches should 
check their schedules carefully and see to 
it that their teams are not playing more than 
the number of basketball games allowed un- 
der the provisions of K.H.S.A.A. By-Law 21. 
In only one countv, conference or invitational 
tournament may the games played by a team 
representing a member school count as only 
one game. If a team plays in more than one 
of these tournaments, the one in which the 
most games are played may be counted as 
the one game mentioned in the By-Law. 
News About Swimming 

The 1955 State High School Swimming 
Meet is scheduled to be held in Lexington 
on Saturday, April 2. Although the State 
Swimming Committee and the Board of Con- 
trol have not completed the preparation of 
swimming regulations for the state affair, 
it is safe to assume that these regulations 
will be essentially the same as those in ef- 
fect last year. 

Class A schools will include those high 
schools with an enrollment of 750 or more 
(grades 9-12), Class B will include those 
schools with an enrollment between 300 and 
750, and Class C will be schools with an en- 
rollment of less than 300. Any school may 
enter a class above its classification, and any 
school entering a team in the meet for the 
first time may enter the class below its 
classification. 

The method of entering teams in the meet 
will be the same as in past years, with the 
State Office supnlying entry blanks to the 
schools whose princioals have indicated that 
they will enter teams in the meet. The As- 
sociation will probablv make the same allow- 
ance to particioants for transportation, 
lodging and meals, as is given State Track 
Meet participants, this allowance applying to 
not more than two participants in each 
event. Expenses of the swimming coach will 
be paid if the school has as many as four 
entries in the State Meet. 

Board Election 

The terms of Board of Control members 
for Sections 2 and 5 expire on June 30. Four 
men have been nominated for membership on 
the Board by nrincipals of Section 2. They 
are Principal Charles S. Combs of the Hart- 
ford His-h School, Supt. Robert P. Forsythe 
of the Muhlenberg County Schools, Principal 
Edwin J. Mayes of the Irvington High School, 
and Supt. George T. Taylor of the Central 
City Schools. In Section 5, two men have 
been nominated. They are Supt. Kenneth G. 
Gillaspie of the Georgetown Schools, and 
Principal George H. Wright of the Bellevue 



EASTERN 

STATE GOLL£Gc 
RICHMOND. KEHTUCK-^ 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1955 



Page Three 







''^^ 






0^k,iii> 



U- - 




»mmm» 



iliiil!! 




The Lone Oak gymnasium was erected at a cost of approximately $300,000. 



High School. Principals in the sections in- 
volved will be mailed ballots prior to Febru- 
ary 15. These ballots should be returned on 
or before March 1. 

"Approved" and "Certified" Officials 
Since the list of "Approved" and "Certi- 
fied" officials appeared in the January issue 
of the magazine, one additional official has 
quahfied for the "Approved" rating and 
three for the "Certified". They are: Ap- 
proved — Robert K. Hulse, Jr.; Certified — 
Ralph E. Hobbs, Damon Majors and George 
W. Riddle. 

Correction 

Through an error, the name of R. C. John- 
son, a Springfield High School football play- 
er, was omitted from the South Central All- 
Conference Team, which appeared in the 
January issue of the Athlete. Johnson, a 
back, was an unanimous selection. 
Protection Fund News 

Three hundred twenty-two member schools 
of the K.H.S.A.A. had insured their athletes 
with the Protection Fund at the time this 
issue of the magazine went to press. Five 
hundred three claims, totaling $10,820.09, 
have been paid since July 1. 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled February 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed it is 
the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Ashbrook, William Elliott, 158 Eastover. Lexington, 2-8360 

Ashby, Carl Cooper. 1013 W. 12th., Owensboro, 3-9991 

Bohanon, J. B., 2226 Madison, Paducah, 28149, 21662 

Black, Charles D., High St., Barbourville, 193, 439 

Brown, Paul D., 262 Kalmia, Lexington, 3-1428 

Brugh, Walter J., P. O. Box 624, Paintsville, 855. 97 

Carr, Herman, Gatliff 

Chandler, .Tames, 134 Main, Paintsville, 374, 97 

Damron, William B., Rock Hill High School, Pedro, Ohio 

Deaton, Carl, P. O. Box 38, Morehead 

Draughn, Bartram. Hindman 

Farmer, .John Clay, Shakertown Rd., Danville, 531-W, 5R1-W 

Foster, Joseph W., 1015 Bryan Ave., Lexington, 4-8068, 3-3335 

Goodin, Charles L., 632 Mt. View Ave., Pineville, ED 7-2365 

Gosnell, Chai-les, Gatliff 

Hardy, Alvin, Route 3, Vine Grove, 04W2 

Hayes, Douglass .Tennings, YNSN, Navy No. 128, U. S. Naval 

Supply Center, 0/0 FPO, San Francisco, California 
Hodges, Robert P., Route 6, Box 175, London, 891W 
Hooper, Marion, 359 S. 4th, Danville, 1527-R, 1985 
Johnson, Ed, Box 185, Kentucky Wesleyan College, Owensboro 
Jones, Donald, Bengal, 4820, 163G 

Kuster, William F., 174 Franklin St., Tell City, Ind., 352R1, IS 
Littlepage, Pryce B.. 431 Sugg St., Madisonville, 505-W, 2389 
Looney, Charles. 708 Parkway Dr., Louisville 
McCartt, Dock Shirley, 208 Oak, Somerset, 62-W, 158 
Preece, James A., Bo.x 492. Inez 
Ryan, William, 1637 Burdette Ct., Owensboro 
Sayre, Dave, Box 365, Hurricane, W. Va. 

Scullen, Maj. A. R., 7618 Mt. Vernon, Ft. Knox. 6998, 6712 
Taylor, James M., Jr., 307 21st, Middlesboro, 605 
Threet, Hoyte B., 827' i W. Main St., Princeton 
Wallin, Malcolm (Buddy), 102 Delmont Dr., Lexington, 4-1457 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY. 1955 



Synopsis of Major Activities of The 1954 National 



NAME 



Excel Good Fair Poor 



NAME 



Excel Good Fair Poor 



Allmon, Raymond T.- 
Anderson, E. W., Jr. — 
Applegate, William L. — 

Ashworth, Fred G. 

Bach, Stanley 

Baker, Charles Joe 

Ball, AI 

Ballard, Clark 

Banko, Gus 

Barlow, Billy B. 

Barlow, Bob 

Barlow, James L. 

Bauer, Richard E. 

Bell, Thomas P. 

Bennett, Howard 

Betz, Dick 

Black, Charles D. 

Blanton, Homer 

Bloebaum, Albert 

Boemker, Bob 

Bostick, Lord M., Jr._- 

Bowling', Harry 

Bowman, Earl G. 

Briggs, James P. 

Brizendine, Vic 

Broderick, Carroll A. __ 

Brotzge, Maurice J 

Burch, Ossie 

Byrd, Harry G. 

Caiman, Edwin C, Jr._ 

Campbell, John J. 

Carlson, David A. 

Carroll, Thomas J. 

Carter, Richard C. 

Carter, William W. _ — 

Chaney, Joseph G 

Chattin, Ernest P. 

Clark, Buford 

Coleman, James T. 

Collier, J. Hamlet, Jr. 

Combs, Travis 

Cook, E. C. 

Cover, Harry E. 

Cox, Layton 

Craig, Randy 

Creasey, Fi-ed 

Crosthwaite, J. S., Jr.. 

Crotty, Tom 

Crum, Edward E. 

Cullen, Herbert M. ___ 
Dallmann, James W. ._ 

Daniel, Ernie, Jr. 

Davis, Charlie 

Davis, Clyde E. 

Deaver, John W. 

Delaney, Mike 

Derrington, Robert 

DeVault, Don 

Dexter, Sam 

Diehl, Cleo 

DiMuzio, Robert 

Dolan, Richard S. 

Dreyer, Jack 

Durkin, Jack H. 

Edelen, Ben R. 

Ellis, Thomas B. 

Elovitz, Carl 

Elser, Don 



4 


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Engle, Orville 

Ernst, Ray C. 

Farmer, John 

1 Faust, John F. 

Fey, Allen 

Figg, Charles R. 

Fisher, W. B. 

Fitchko, Bill 

Fletcher, John L. 

Florence, Robert H. ._ 

Forbes, John W., Jr.,__ 

1 Foreman, Earl V., Jr. 

1 Forsythe, Robert 

Fortney, Robert L. 

1 Freihaut, Herman P 

Gant, W. G., Jr. 

Garrity, E. F. 

1 Gettler, John F. 

Gillespie, Robert C. .- 

Gish, Delmas 

Gorham, Robert J. 

Gosiger, Paul E. | 

Grace, Charles K. 

Green, Walter ' 

Greenlee, 0. C. (Doug) i 

Grissom, William H | 

1 Gruneisen, Sam J. I 

Hadden, Newell P., Jr.. I 

Haffey, Stan I 

1 Hagan, Joseph E. 

Hagerman, Bart 

3 Hale, Charlie 

Hambrick, Walter 

Hanes, Edward C. 

Harris, Gene 

2 Hartley, William E. ._ 
Heinold, John R. 

Heldman, John, Jr. 

1 Hellard, George D., Jr. 

Herbert, Eddie 

1 Hewling, Richard 

Himmler, Robert H. __ 

Hougland, Charles R., Jr 

Hoferer, Louis R. 

Hogan, John E 

Holbrook, William M.__ 

Holeman, D. Fletcher 

Holland, Tom J 

Hollowell, James R 

Howerton, Jack, Jr 

3 Hunter, Charles 

1 Isaac, John K. 

Jacobs, Edwin A. 

Janning, Robert L. 

Jeter, John B. 

Johnson, Bernard M. _. 

Johnson, Ellis T. 

Johnston, J. M., Jr. __ 

3 Jones, Robert E. 

Keller, Herman 

Kempf, Joseph 

Kemper, Russell H. __ 

Kiefer, Wilms 

1 King, Roy 

Kraesig, Raymond 

Lancaster, Harry C. __ 

1 Lancaster, Morris B.__ 
1 Lawson, Carl E. 



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THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1955 



Page Five 



NAME 



Excel Good Fair Poor 



NAME 



Excel Good Fair Poor 



Lawson, Sam | 

Lenahan, Thomas F. __| 

Levicki, A. P. 

Lindloff, Gilbert E. ___i 

Linker, Joe j 

Long, Leo J. I 

Longenecker, D. M. 

Ludwig, Harry F. [ 

MeCollum, Robert G. __[ 

McCorkle, Wade E. | 

McCowan, Connell | 

McGhee, Laurence 

McKown, C. H. | 

McMillan, James N. __ 

McNabb, Edgar | 

McNeish, James S. i 

McTigue, Joe 

Makepeace, Wm. H., Jr. 

Malcolm, Donald C I 

Martin, William J j 

Matarazzo, Salvatore __| 

Mayhew, Happy j 

Mercke, Frank" R. ! 

Milliken, John S., Jr._-i 

Mitchell, Albert R. j 

Mitchell, Emmett j 

Mitchell, Vyron W. j 

Moellering, Louis H 

Mordica, William A. .-1 

Moss, Howard A. 

Muntan, Peter J. 

Mussman, Ralph, Jr. __] 

Nau, Bill 

Neal, Gene 

Ninimo, Lo 1 

Noland, Douglas i 

Noland, James H., Jr 

Nord, Ed 1 

Nunn, Winston C. 

Omer, Billy W. 

O'Nan, Norman 

O'Neal, Bud 

Osborne, Ted i 

Parker. M. L. i 

Patrick, Charles C. __- 

Pearce, Horace L. 

Perdue, Paul I 

Perkins, Billy 

Perry, Alfred L. | 

Pinson, Eugene I 

Poore, William E. I 

Potter, Sam I 

Powell, Logan G. 

Priode, Len 

Pudlo, Walter 

Radjunas, Stan 

Ratterman, 

Bernard W., Sr. ___ 
Reddington, James T. 

Reece, Fred 

Reed, Gordon (Moe) 

Reinhart, Gene 

Richlin, Maurice 

Riddle, Maurice G. __. 
Robertson, Everett L. 

Rocke, James M. 

Rogers, John B. 

Rolph, Harold J. 

Rose, Alfred W. 

Rose, Andy 

Ross, Bill E. 



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Rudolph, Fred, Jr. _.. 

Rupert, Joe 

Russell, Charles B. 

Russell, Joe 

Rutledge, Edward B.__ 

Sabato, Al 

Sacra, Gresham 

Sallee, W. E. 

Sauter, Harold S. 

Saylor, Deward 

Schuhmann, Joseph R._ 

Schmitt, Karl F. 

Schuette, Frederick 

Schultz, Edward (Jake) 

Schutz, John J., Jr 

Scott, W. L. (Bill) 

Shaw, John H. 

Shaw, Stanley E. 

Sheets, James W. 

Showalter, John 

Sinclair, George H 

Sloan, Wallace 

Smith, Edgar J. 

Smith, Walter K. 

Smith, William E. 

Smith, William J. 

Sortet, Wilbur 

Sossamon, James W. __ 

Sparks, Harry M. 

Sperry, George A. 

Steere, David 

Stephenson, Harry S 

Stevens, Paul B. 

Stevens, William D. __ 

Stone, Clifton 

Streicher, Abe 

Taylor, Dennis (Tubby) 

Temple, J. B. 

Thompson, A. W. 

(Tommy) 

Thompson, Jack | 

Thompson, Jack F., Jr. I 

Thompson, Paul I 

Thompson, Ralph j 

Thurman, J. W. ! 

Thurman, Robert N. _^| 

Todoran, Roman 

Tieas, Joe W. 

Tucker, William R. _._ 

Tunstill, Jesse 

Vankirk, Alvia S. 

Varner. Ray G. 

Vennari, Paul 

Vinson, William J. 

Walker, Paul R. 

Wanchic, Nicholas 

Warf, Emerson 

Watson, John T 

Weber, Edward H. 

Weddle, Bob 

Wedge, Donald R. 

Welch, Bill 

Welch, Tom 

Welch, Troy L. 

Wellman, Earl 

Wiggington, A. M., Sr. 

Wilson, Jack R. 

Wilson, John P. 

Winfrey, Shelby 

Zimmerman, James C._ 



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Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY mOH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1955 



The Flying Dutchman 

History is being written in the realm of 
school boy sportsmanship when a basket- 
ball player on the crucial decision of a game 
can take an official's decision "on the chin" 
and admit that he committed a foul which 
decides a most important tournament con- 
test. 

To Hugh Durham of Eastern High School 
of Middletown, goes The Flying Dutchman's 
salute of the month. With the controversial 
charging-blocking situation involved, Official 
Ben Edelen called charging on Hugh in the 
closing seconds of the Eastern-Manual Game 
in the Louisville Invitational Tournament, 
and Hugh took it "on the chin" hke a true 
Kentucky Sportsman. A truly fierce com- 
petitor and a kid who plays every sport to 
win, Hugh Durham turned to Ben Edelen 
as his Manual opponent scored the foul point 
and said, "It was a close decision, but you 
were right." In that instant Hugh Durham 
became one of Kentucky's school boy immor- 
tals in the realm of sportsmanlike competi- 
tion. 

Marvin Gay, Louisville Times Sports Writ- 
er, paid Hugh the greatest compliment which 
could be paid a young athlete as he featured 
Hugh in his "Gay's Say." Marvin, who is 
constantly working for keen, competitive, 
sportsmanlike play in athletics, told the 
Dutchman that he felt that Durham's ex- 
ample is one which will make for improve- 
ment of athletic competition everywhere. 
We heartily agree. 

Such action by a young athlete reflects 
credit not only en himself, but on his school, 
home and all those associated with him. It 
is rare indeed that a school boy is ever rec- 
ognized with the Corn Cob Pipe of Honor 
Award for unselfish service to others, but 
Durham becomes one of the Cob Pipe Win- 
ners for the month of January because he 
passed up the opportunity to claim selfishly 
that he had been blocked, and showed ath- 
letes everywhere that a real sportsman 
knows how to take it as well as dish it out. 

Those little Corn Cob Pipes of Honor mean 
a lot to the recipients as is evidenced by this 
quotation from Herman F. Keller, a member 
of the Board of Control of the National Fed- 
eration of State High School Athletic As- 
sociations and a teacher in the Evansville, 
Indiana, school system : "It was indeed a 
very pleasant surprise recently when through 
the mail I received the Cob Pipe of Honor 
and its accompanying certificate. I had read 
about Cob Pipe Recipients in the Kentucky 



High School Athlete but little did I realize 
that I would ever become a member of The 
Flying Dutchman's Honor Roll. . . . Thank 
you very, very much for your very distinct 
honor conferred upon me and I only hope 
that I in some small way am worthy of it." 

Another quote from Wilfred Susott, Presi- 
dent of the Southern Indiana Officials As- 
sociation, says, "I can see the results of your 
efforts in The Flying Dutchman Column as 
I officiate for the schools in Kentucky. The 
courtesy extended to the officials is a direct 
reflection of the efforts in your column. It 
was indeed a pleasant surprise to receive 
your Corn Cob Pipe of Honor. I shall cer- 
tainly display The Flying Dutchman Award" 

Countless Kentuckians certainly deserve 
the Corn Cob Pipe of Recognition but the 
Dutchman always waits for a recommenda- 
tion from another Kentuckian before con- 
ferring the Honor. One of the coaches who 
should have had one of the little stinkers 
years ago is Freddie Lake, of Mackville. In 
all The Dutchman's experience, he has never 
met a gentleman of higher caliber and one 
whose life is more exemplary than Freddie's. 

It remained, however, for officials Otis 
Roller and Jim King to call for a Corn Cob 
Pipe of Honor to be sent Freddie Lake, whom 
they classify as "one of the greatest." Start 
smokin', Freddie, because it's on its way to 
you now. 

Hundreds of letters, cards and telephone 
calls have come to The Flying Dutchman 
from all parts of the United States com- 
menting on the article "Basketball In Ken- 
tucky" which is currently appearing in 
SPORTS REVIEW on the news stands. No 
doubt exists that Kentucky's school boy 
basketball was placed squarely in front of 
the nation through this article. People from 
everywhere expressed amazement at all of 
the stimulating activities injected into Ken- 
tucky's high school basketball through the 
K.H.S.A.A. promotions. 

Incidentally, one of the most appreciated 
compliments on the SPORTS REVIEW ar- 
ticle came from Vine Grove's Loy Ingram. 
Loy, who is one of the most popular chaps 
in that section of Kentucky, is presently re- 
cuperating from a heart attack. A fellow has 
to get sick before he really finds out how 
manj' friends he has made because of un- 
selfish activities all through his lifetime. 
This has happened to Loy, who has always 
been a friend of kids and has always been 
willing to go out of his way to do something 
unselfishly for somebody else. In recog- 
nition, Loy Ingram becomes a Corn Cob Pipe 
of Honor winner along with Coach Freddie 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1955 



Page Seven 



Lake and Hugh Durham for the month of 
January. 
I Basketball officials in Kentucky are cer- 
tainly versatile. This could never have been 
made more evident than when Don Hill, 
sportscaster, suffered laryngitis during the 
professional basketball game played this 
month in the Armory and called on person- 
able John Dromo to take over the radio mike 
for him. 

As the Dutchman listened to the broadcast 
of the game, he would have gambled that 
the voice was that of official John Dromo, 
but because he knew that Dromo was a 
"Whistler" and not a sportscaster and be- 
cause the running account was so close to 
perfection, he could not be certain until a 
time out when it was announced that Dromo 
was pinchhitting for Don. We were further 
amazed later to learn that Dromo had never 
attempted a broadcast of a basketball game 
before. Personally, we would suggest that 
he go into this business professionally and 
become a millionaire faster by so doing than 
he would by officiating. 

Remember to help that physically handi- 
capped youngster to engage in sports nor- 
mally like other young athletes. Further re- 
member to write The Flying Dutchman tell- 
ing about the Game Guy you are sponsoring 
so that he may be honored with the Dutch- 
man's Lionheart Lapel Button and his name 
placed in the "hopper" for consideration for 
the Game Guy Plaque which is presented at 
the Annual K.H.S.A.A. Banquet to the 
youngster overcoming the greatest physical 
handicap to engage in Kentucky's high school 
sports. 



NATIONAL FEDERATION MEETING 

(Continued from Page One) 

CHECK-UP ON 1954 CODE: 20,000 football ques- 
tionnaires were distributed and approximately 5,800 
were returned and tabulated. The returns indicate a 
high degree of satisfaction with the changes which 
were authorized for the season of 1954. The rules 
which provided that a stopped clock should be 
started with the snap or a free-kick unless the 
Referee orders otherwise for abuse and the rule 
which eliminates nearly all possibility for a "hide- 
out" play were approved by more than 10 to 1. The 
simplification of the rule concerning a foul by B 
during the last timed down of a period and the 
increasing of the penalty for defensive holding were 
approved by about the same proportion. The rule 
which permits a team to use a properly constructed 
rubber-covered football when that team puts the 
ball in play was approved by a vote of about 2 to 1. 
Comments on the questionnaire concerning- use of 
the rubber-covered football indicate that whatever 
objection has been voiced is based on lack of proper 
mechanics for making a change in balls when one 



team chooses to use the leather-covered ball and 
the other prefers the rubber-covered ball. 

Reports from Rhode Island and other scattered 
areas where transition to the Federation Code was 
delayed until the 1954 season indicate a high de- 
gree of satisfaction with use of the Code. The sim- 
plification and orderly arrangement, as outlined 
in the recently released folder entitled "Football 
Symposium," was commented upon as being one of 
the reasons for the satisfaction which has been ex- 
pressed by coaches and officials in making the 
transition. These simplified procedures have had 
a good effect on the game as administered by all 
groups and the advantages have more than bal- 
anced any slight inconvenience which may have 
come from adjusting to a new code. 

COMMITTEE REPORTS: During the 1954 season, 
data concerning various phases of the game were 
collected. These were included in reports made by 
each of the standing committees. A summary of 
all statistics was available for use by Committee 
members in their deliberations. 

AUTHORIZED RULES REVISIONS 
Page 4: A note will be inserted under the field 
diagram to provide for flags with elastic standards 
at the ends of the field to assist in marking the 
inbounds lines when conditions are such as to ob- 
literate the inbounds marks. Also, it will be stated 
that if both benches are on the same side of the 
field, they should extend from each 45-yardline to 
each 20-yardline. 

1-5-1: The last sentence of this article will be 
revised to urge further use of some type of mouth 
or face protector and to make it permissible for 
any player to use a properly constructed face mask, 
including a rubber-covered cage-type mask provided 
it extends only a reasonable distance in front of 
the face. A survey of equipment revealed that 
many schools use the cage-type mask for the pro- 
tection of spectacles and for protection against 
inadvertent blows which might injure the nose or 
mouth. Sentiment expressed in connection with 
the survey indicates that many types of mask are 
evolving and that it would not be wise to outlaw 
any of the widely used types until such time as it 
might be proved by statistical data that any one type 
is less safe than another. In the meantime, the cur- 
rent interpretation that it is illegal to deliberately 
grasp or twist a face mask for the purpose of 
worrying or twisting the head of the wearer is in 
effect. The equipment and safety committees were 
instructed to continue their studies and to attempt 
to develop a standard which might be applied to 
determine which type of protector should be en- 
couraged and which should be considered illegal. 
These committees will continue to work with equip- 
ment manufacturers in the attempt to develop this 
type of equipment. 

1-5-3-d: The last sentence of this item will be 
revised to permit the use of a properly constructed 
metal-tipped cleat. Also, a note wil be added to 
specify that, beginning with the 1956 season, a cleat 
longer than 7/8 inch will be prohibited. In the 
rules supplement or elsewhere in the published ma- 
terial, schools will be urged to make wider use of 
practice cleats which are not longer than 3/4 inch 
and have an end diameter of 1/2 inch and of the 
cleats from 1/2 inch to 3/4 inch in length which 
have no metal posts but which are molded in the 
shoe sole, and some of which may be re-soled at 
small expense. The proper committees were in- 
structed to attempt to develop standards for the 



Pag-e Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1955 



proper type of metal alloy which will not chip or 
develop scratching surfaces. 

2-3-2: A definition of what constitutes a valid 
fair catch signal will be inserted. The statement 
will be similar to that which appeared in the 1953 
rules book and which was inadvertently omitted in 
the 1954 edition. 

3-3-1: This article will be revised to provide for 
notifying the coaches as well as the captains that 
approximately 4 minutes of the half remain. Unless 
time is already out, the Referee will order the clock 
stopped for the notification. If a field clock is being 
used as the official timepiece, no notification will 
be required. By general rule, the clock will then be 
started with the snap or freekick. 

3-3-3: To correct an inadvertent "holdover" state- 
ment, the exception for fair catch interference will 
be omitted. 

6-2-4: The last sentence will be revised to make 
it clear that first touching of a kick by K is 
ignored if R then touches the kick and thereafter 
commits a foul. This revision does not change 
present practices except for one rare occurrence. 
That is the case where K might choose to decline 
the penalty for the foul by R. Under present 
rule, the first touching by K would be ignored if 
the foul occurs after R has had possession. The 
revised rule will make this apply if the penalty is 
declined, even though the foul occurs after touch- 
ing (muffing) by R but with no possession. 

6-4-2: The words "beyond the line" will be in- 
serted at the end of the second line. The purpose 
is to make it clear that the statement applies only 
when the touching by K is beyond the scrimmage 
line or the free-kick line. Any touching behind 
K's line is ignored as far as the fair catch rule 
is concerned but it may cause the free-kick to be 
short. 

6-4-5: The penalty will be simplified by stating 
that R may choose an awarded fair catch at spot 
of the interference. With this revision, the last 
part of the present wording becomes unnecessary 
because the declining of a penalty permits a team 
to ignore the foul and to take advantage of action 
during a down. Hence R might take the 15-yard 
penalty or decline it and they might choose to take 
an awarded fair catch or to keep the ball at point 
where it became dead in their possession. The 
purpose of the change in wording is simplification. 
There is no change in procedure. 

7-2-4: The last sentence will be slightly reworded 
by substituting "be" for "take a position." If Al 
runs through the 15-yard area, it is not necessary 
that he stop. 

7-2-7: The wording will be revised to omit the 
statement about a snapper moving his feet during 
the snap. This will permit the snapper to move 
his foot at the time the ball motion starts. His 
foot rights are the same as those of any player of A. 
7-5-4: and P.R. 4 under 8-5-2: The last sentence 
of Art. 4 will be reworded to make it clear that 
"enforcement" includes either accepting or declin- 
ing the penalty. The new wording will specify that 
even if the penalty is declined, the ball belongs to 
the nassing team at spot of the illegal pass. If 
the foul (the illegal pass) is by A and occurs dur- 
ing 4th down, a new series may then be awarded 
Team B if the ball is behind the line-to-gain and 
is not a safety. If B intercepts an illeg'al pass, 
they may choose to retain possession and have the 
foul ignored. 

8-3-4: The Editorial Committee was authorized to 



revise the last sentence if it appears necessary 
to cover the possible double or multiple fouls which 
mig-ht be involved. Actually, the last sentence of 
Rule 2-22 probably gives sufficient coverage. 

8-5-1: At the end of the 4th line, "either of" will 
be inserted. 

8-5-2-c: In last line "the penalty" will be sub- 
stituted for "it." 

Play 4 under 8-5-2 will be omitted or the ruling 
will be revised to state that it is a safety regard- 
less of whether the penalty is accepted or declined. 

9-3-c: This will be expanded to include batting 
or batting at a loose ball other than a forward pass. 

9-6-1: A report on an experiment by a conference 
in New York indicates that the group favors a 
modification which permits the quarterback to con- 
fer with his coach whenever the clock is stopped. 
The Committee did not feel that action on this mat- 
ter at the present time would be desirable but they 
they authorized the New York authorities to con- 
tinue the experiment if the conference members de- 
sire to do so. 

10-2-1 and 2: These articles wiil be revised to 
indicate that the dividing line in determining 
whether these fouls constitute a double or multiple 
foul is the beginning, rather than the ending of 
enforcement. If there is a foul by A during the 
down and there is a foul by B after it has been 
determined whether the penalty for the first foul 
will be accepted or declined, the second foul will 
not make this situation a double foul. Instead, pen- 
alty for the 1st foul will be accepted or declined, 
after which penalty for the second foul will be 
accepted or declined. The Editorial Committee was 
authorized to use some discretion after careful 
study of the problems which might be encountered 
in changing this dividing line. 

An attempt will be made to outline the proper 
procedure in certain borderline cases where it is 
difficult to determine when a penalty has been ac- 
cepted or declined. In certain situations, the Ref- 
eree is instructed to consider the penalty as hav- 
ing been automatically accepted or declined if an 
advantage to the offended team is obvious. It will 
be necessary to specifv whether, in such circum- 
stances, the acceptance or declination occurs as 
soon as ball becomes dead. Several plays in the 
Case Book will cover some of the doubtful situations 
if the revision is attempted and there is no way to 
fix a definite time when the decision as to accept- 
ance has been made. 

10-2-3: This article will be revised for better cov- 
erage and to make it clear that this includes fouls 
connected with the try-for-point but does not include 
fouls connected with the free-kick. It will also be ex- 
amined in the light of the possible revision of 10-2. 
GENERAL: Interpretations for several listed 
situations were authorized. Some of these confii-m 
interpretations which were used during the past 
season and some of them are slightly revised. 

1. In determining whether a second shift is a 
false start, the Official may regard it as a sus- 
picious circumstance if the snapper suddenly re- 
moves his hand from the ball to participate in a 
shift or if the linemen have taken their normal 
charging position with a hand on the ground and 
then make a sudden chang-e in this position as a 
part of the shift. In contrast, if linemen are not 
down in their charging position but merely have 
hands on the knees when starting the second shift, 
the benefit of any doubt should be given to Team A. 

2. If a player of A is not in legal position on 



I 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1955 



Page Nine 






^ jiH»j?% ^ „ - ; 



Park City has a new gymnasium seating 2000. 



the line and is not at least one yard behind the line 
when he starts in motion backward, it is not neces- 
sary that he be 5 yards behind the line at the time 
of the snap if he is the man in motion. Under ordi- 
nary circumstances, this will be the quarterback 
but it also applies to a flanker who may be near 
the line but not on the line prior to the snap but 
is at least a yard behind the line at the time of 
the snap. 

3. If, during a scrimmage-kick, a fair catch signal 
is given by a player who is a considerable distance 
away from where the kick conies down. Officials 
are authorized to assume that players of K would 
not have a reasonable opportunity to knew that a 
signal had been given. Hence, if a runner is tackled 
after the ball has become dead, it is not subject to 
penalty. In such matters, the procedure should be 
the same for any case in which there is activity if 
the ball has become dead. Penalty is enfoi-ced only 
in case the player had reasonable opportunity to 
know that the ball had become dead. 

4. If two players have hand or hands on the 
ball, each is to be regarded as a runner and either 
may be tackled. Any advance which is made while 
the ball is in possession of more than one player 
is to be considered a legal advance, provided there 
is no hand-off while the player who last takes the 
ball is in advance of the player from whom he 
receives it in a situation where forward handling 
is prohibited. 

5. If a snapper moves a foot at about the time 
of the snap, the Official is authorized to penalize 
if there is a suspicion that the foot is being moved 
before the snap motion starts. The snapper has 
the same foot rights as those of any teammate. 
However, it is somewhat easier for the snapper to 
make a false start by moving a foot slightly before 
the ball motion is started. If there is such move- 
ment, the Official should not hesitate to rule that 
it is a false start. 

6. If players make a practice of slapping or 
jerking or twisting a face protector, it is a sus- 
picious act. Slapping is clearly a foul. Jerking or 
twisting is an infraction of 9-2-2-c and if such act 
appears to be for the purpose of irritating the 
opponent or merely because it offers a good hand 
hold for loosening the helmet. 

FOOTBALL OFFICIATING PROCEDURES: Af- 



ter careful study of certain items related to of- 
ficiating mechanics, the Game Administration Com- 
mittee recommended a number of procedures which 
involve signals. The following procedures were 
authorized. 

For intentional grounding. Signal 12 will be used. 
For false start, illegal acts by the snapper, illegal 
snap, illegal position at snap, having fewer than 7 
players on A's line at the snap and for flying block 
or tackle. Signal 2 will be used. The designation 
for Signal 2 will be "for illegal position or proced- 
ure." For an illegal shift. Signal 3 (illegal motion) 
executed with both hands will be used. For charg- 
ing into a fair catcher. Signal 5 (personal foul) 
will be used. The same signal will be used for 
striking, kicking, or kneeing.. For roughing the 
kicker. Signal 8 will be used. For holding or 
illegal use of hand or arm by either team. 
Signal 11 will be used. The defensive holding sig- 
nal (10) which was used in past years will be dis- 
continued. A new signal will be used in place of 
Signal 10. It is the placing of the finger tips of each 
hand on each shoulder. This will be used for il- 
legally kicking, batting, kicking at or batting at a 
loose ball. That tvpe of forward pass interference 
which is caused by an ineligible receiver being down- 
field too soon will be designated by Signal 15. 

Signal 18 will be used to indicate interlocked in- 
terference as well as for crawling, pushing or help- 
ing the runner. When a touchback occurs, the dead 
ball signal will be followed by waving the raised 
hand from side to side. 

Present Signal 6 which has been used for rough- 
ness and piling on will be discontinued. This is one 
of the personal fouls and the personal foul signal 
will be used. 

FOOTBALL CASE BOOK: Several slight revis- 
ions in play rulings as used in the Football Case 
Book were authorized. Most of these are for cor- 
recting typographical errors or for making the 
statement more complete. Plays which are affected 
include the following: 4; 9; 11; Items about Rule 10 
on page 8; Question 2 of page 9; 125; 148; 209A; 
and Question 1 on page 63. 

MINOR EDITORIAL CHANGES were referred 
to the Editorial Committee with authority to act. 
Also, several specific items were assigned to the 
proper standing committee for further study and 
possible inclusion on next year's questionnaire. 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1955 




The 13th Regional Tournament will be held in Clay County's new gym. 



Basketball Films 

The basketball films listed below are in the Film Library 
of the University of Kentucky Department of Extension. The 
code letters "e, j, s, c. a" refer to elementary, junior high, 
senior high, college, and adult audiences who may enjoy the 
particular film listed. The rental prices shown do not apply 
to schools which use one of the special subscription service 
plans, offered by the Bureau of Audio-Visual Material. 

BALL HANDLING IN BASKETBALL, j-s-c, 1 reel, 
$1.50 
Teaches fundamentals of basketball handling in- 
cluding- stances, grip, control, adjustment before 
shooting, catching the ball, and other points. Pre- 
sents game shots, using special photographic tech- 
niques to illustrate principles. 

BASKETBALL FUNDAMENTALS— INDIVIDUAL 
TECHNIQUES, j-s, 11/2 reels, $2.50 
Branch McCracken, Indiana University basketball 
coach, uses his team to demonstrate the fundamen- 
tals of basketball. Slow-motion photography is 
used to break the various court techniques down 
into easily grasped essentials. 

BASKETBALL KENTUCKY STYLE, .j-s-c-a, 2 
reels, $2.50 (in state), $5.00 (out of state) 
This is the revised edition of the film "Basketball 
By Rupp" prepared under the personal direction of 
Mr. Rupp especially for coaching use. 



CHAMPIONSHIP BASKETBALL— TEAM TECH- 
NIQUES, j-s, 1 reel, $1.50 
Man-to-man defense is shown, with the means 
best used under varying conditions. 



CLARK COUNTY VS. DUPONT MANUAL (SEMI- 
FINALS), e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels, silent, $.75 
One of the 1952 State Basketball Tournament 
games. Manual won 54-53, on a goal by Moffett 
in the last two seconds of the game. 

CUBA VS. DUPONT MANUAL, (FINALS), 
e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, silent, $.75 
This is the final game of the 1952 State Basket- 
ball Tournament, in which the Cuba Cubs defeated 
Manual Crimsons by the score of 58-52. 

CUBA VS. HINDMAN (SEMI-FINALS), e-j-s-c-a, 
3 reels, silent, $.75 
This film is on one of the semi-final games of 
the 1952 State Basketball Tournament. Cuba won 
54-52 in a double overtime. 

DEFENSIVE FOOTWORK IN BASKETBALL, 
j-s-c, 1 reel, $1.50 
Striding with an opponent, checking, maneuvering 
him out of position and other basic skills are illus- 
trated, using special photography to demonstrate 
points. Rebounding, pivoting, and correlated arm 
action are taught also. 

KING BASKETBALL, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, $.75 

The official rules for the 1953-54 season are in- 
terpreted in this film. In addition, play situations 
are demonstrated by members of the Shawnee Mis- 
sion basketball team, finalists in the Kansas State 
High School Tournament. Particular skills are 
shown by Robin Freeman, jump shot artist, who 
averag'ed thirty points a game for Hughes High 
School, Cincinnati; Wade Holbrook, a 7 foot 3/4 
inch giant from the Portland, Oregon, State High 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1955 



Page Eleven 



School champions; and Chuck Darling, All- American 
center from the University of Iowa. 

MODERN BASKETBALL, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, $.50 

This film presents two hig-h school teams playing 
basketball, illustrating the techniques of the game. 
It presents various infractions of the rules and how 
to avoid them. 

NEWPORT VS. INEZ (1954) K.H.S. BASKETBALL 
TOURNAMENT FINALS, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, 
silent, $.75 
This is the final game of the 1954 State Basketball 
Tournament, in which Inez defeated Newport by 
the score of 63-55. The sparkling play of Newport's 
Redmon, and Inez's Cassady and Triplett, is the 
highlight of the film. The three players were select- 
ed as members of the All-State Team. 

PADUCAH TILGHMAN VS. LEXINGTON LA- 
FAYETTE (1953) K.H.S. BASKETBALL TOUR- 
NAMENT FINALS, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, silent, $.75 
This is the final game of the 1953 State Basket- 
ball Tournament in which Lafayette High of Lex- 
ington, Kentucky defeated Paducah Tilghman of 
Paducah, Kentucky, by the score of 84-53. This 
film shows the superior play of two very excellent 
teams. 

RUPP'S FUNDAMENTALS OF BASKETBALL, 
j-s-c-a, 3 reels, $.50 
Coach Rupp's University of Kentucky Wildcats 
(1949-50) demonstrate ten different plays in such 
a clear manner that it is easy to follow and learn 
each play. 

SHOOTING IN BASKETBALL, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 
Concentrating on the set shot, this film pictures 
the action of the throw, stance, aim, trajectory, and 
fingertip control. Special attention is given total 
body coordination, especially inward rotation of the 
hand and arm making the throw. 



Athletics and the Atomic Age 

It takes years to build body strena-th and 
coordination, and generations to build a na- 
tion. The fused atoms from the H-bomb can 
destroy both in a split second. This could 
lead to a fatahstic philosophy of "What's the 
use?" But it took a virile, non-fatalistic na- 
tion to develop the know-how and the x-bil- 
lion cash to get on speaking terms with this 
eon-old secret. No group of washed-out sed- 
entarians could have done it. 

Nature's laws do not change. Man's abil- 
ity to understand them and adapt himself is 
the stuff on which progress is based. That 
muscles develop through use and coordina- 
tion comes from practice, is as true today as 
it was when an atombusting cataclysm pro- 
jected the swirls which came together in 
human form. Desirable human relationships 
spring from matching strength, speed and 
wit with other individuals and with other 



forces. The individual grows through striv- 
ing mightily in a common cause under stress 
of competition. To date, no one has been able 
to find a suitable substitute for this stimulus. 
The schools are the channel through which 
the flood of living energy flows. As the units 
tumble through, they are bombarded with 
the neutronic cosmic forces which cause 
latent talent and pent up energy to explode 
or fuse into the skills and abilities which give 
purpose and importance to the process of 
living. One important source of this atomic 
phenomenon is the activity centered around 
training of the human physical mechanism. 
Atomic power is a physical thing just as 
muscular power and endurance are physical. 
Mental processes merely unlock the shackles. 
To neglect the importance of the physical is 
to fail to appreciate basic natui'al law. 
Strength, health, endurance and coordina- 
tion are basic attributes worth striving for. 
They seldom reach maximum development 
without direction. That direction is one es- 
sential job of the school. 

It takes courage and ingenuity to gear the 
school physical fitness activity to enable the 
human mechanism to keep pace with the 
needs of the new era in which supersonic 
speed is a fait accompli and the terrible and 
wonderful power in the atom is being un- 
locked. 

The nation's welfare depends on the abil- 
ity of the schools to reach every student 
through this important activity. They must 
not fail. — A National Federation Editorial. 



DON'T WAIT 



When I quit this mortal shore, 
And mosey 'round the earth no more, 
Don't weep, don't sigh, don't sob, 
I may have struck a better job. 

Don't go and buy a large bouquet. 
For which you'll find it hard to pay. 

Don't mope around and feel all blue, 
I may be better off than you. 
Don't tell the folks I was a saint, 
Or any old thing that I ain't. 

If you have jam like that to spread, 
Please hand it out before I'm dead. 

If you have roses, bless your soul, 
Just pin one in my button-hole, 
While I'm alive and well, today, 
Don't wait until I've gone away. 

— Anonymous 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1955 



Girls Sports Association News 

Last month the organization of a state 
association for girls sports was announced. 
It is hoped that many of you have been con- 
sidering how you can get a G.S.A. started in 
your school. The constitution which will be 
used to govern the state association was pub- 
lished, and you have all had a chance to read 
it through. It is planned to hold the election 
of officers at the annual meeting during 
K.E.A. Only representatives of member as- 
sociations will be allowed to hold office. Your 
dues should be sent in as soon as possible in 
order that you may get started on your local 
school plans. In order to help local schools 
get started, suggestions are made here for 
your help. Also there is a membership blank 
for your use. This blank should be returned 
to Dr. Martha G. Carr, Department of Physi- 
cal Education, University of Kentucky, who 
is acting as temporary chairman until the 
election of officers can be held. 

Getting the G.S.A. Started 

The organization of a Girls Snorts Associa- 
tion is started best by talking with the girls 
in the school. Follow this by a discussion 
with the Dean of Girls, the Guidance Coun- 
selor, and then the Principal. Stress in each 
meeting the values, types of proo-ram and 
what other schools ai-e doing in G.S.A. Some 
of the values you mav want to stress could 
be: Social development, leisure time activi- 
ties, improvement of skills, promotion of 
leadership, physical fitness, teaching carry- 
over activities, co-recreation encouraged, 
health and safety, participation of large 
groups, wholesome attitudes established, 
and fun for all. 

With the permission of the principal, or- 
ganize a Girls' School Athletic Council con- 
sisting of the following members : Principal, 
Dean of Girls, Guidance Counselor, two in- 
terested teachers, men's coach, school cus- 
todian, school Business Manager, and a stu- 
dent representative. 

Present these problems to the council: 



Time available for the club, use of the gym- 
nasium, and facilities and equipment. 

These meetings are necessary to set up 
a G.S.A.: 

1. A meeting of all girls of the school call- 
ed by the Dean of Girls, the Principal or you, 
if you have the authority. Have a speaker 
from another school or the state association 
to explain her G.S.A. If this is not possible, 
you, the teacher, should do this. Present the 
report of the Girl's School Athletic Council. 
Nominate tentative officers from the girls. 

2. Hold another meeting of all the girls in 
the school. Explain that membership is open 
to all girls. Tell about your tentative plans for 
activities and program. Discuss awards (this 
is not necessary). Have an election of offic- 
ers. Appoint a constitution committee. 

3. A meeting of interested girls only. Adopt 
the constitution. Appoint student snort man- 
agers. Appoint any committees called for in 
the constitution. 

Now you are ready to start making plans 
for the year's program. Next month several 
ideas for program will be given, but until then 
you might consider the following points in 
setting up your sports calendar: 1) Facilities 
in the community as well as in your school, 

2) Needs and interests of the student body, 

3) Equipment on hand, 4) Time which can be 
allotted to program, 5) Indoor and outdoor 
activities, 6) Organized and unorganized ac- 
tivities, 7) Selecting activities from both 
team and individual sports, 8) Competitive 
and non-competitive sports, 9) Co-educa- 
tional activities, 10) Play days, 11) Award 
banquets. 

Competition can be carried on through 
color teams, home room teams, class teams, 
or any group of interested girls. Have some 
activities "just for fun" without competition, 
such as hikes, picnics and parties. 

Next month there wil be information con- 
cerning activities and point systems. Now 
tear off the membershin blank below or pre- 
pare a form similar to it and mail it as soon 
as possible. 



APPLICATION FOR MEMBERSHIP 

In Kentucky Federation of High School Girls Sports Associations 

No. girls enrollei- 



Name of School 
Address 



Enclosed- 



Faculty Adviser 

Membership dues $2.00 

Please check the following: 

We have a Girls Sports Association in our school. 

We Plan to organize an association . 



-Will send- 



We would like help in organizing an association- 



Return to: Dr. Martha G. Carr, Department of Physical Education, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Ky. 



„,CHMOH0. KENTUCKY 



ATTENTION . . . BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT DIRECTORS 

The trophies shown on this page are the type selected by the KHSAA Board of Control for 
the Official District trophies and Regional trophies for all the KHSAA Tournaments in the 
1955 season. All trophies have genuine walnut wood bases and all figures and cuts are in a 
beautiful sunray gold finish. 

NOTE: The prices below include the application and supplying of the official KHSAA seal and 
necessary engraving. 

Let us have your order early so you will not be disappointed from the standpoint of delivery. 



Regional 
First Place 

No. Rl 

Height 25" 

Price 

$26.20 



H 



Regional 
Runnerup 

No. R2 

Height 20" 

Price 

$19.60 




District 
First Place 

No. Dl 

Height 21" 

Price 

$19.15 



n 



District 
Runnerup 

No. D2 

Height 15" 

Price 

$16.10 



No. Rl 



No. R2 



No. Dl 



No. D2 



Official Basketball: We can supply for your district and regional tournament as well as for 
your games the MacGregor Lastbilt No. XIOL or the Spalding Lastbilt No. 100 or the Coach 
Rupp No. H200 ball for $19.85 each and remember ALL OF THESE BALLS WILL BE USED 
IN THE 1955 STATE KHSAA TOURNAMENT, and furthermore, these three balls have been 
used in the past state tournaments. 

ADMISSION TICKETS: These come two thousand to a roll printed with admission price and 
numbered on each end. Available in several colors and several prices from 10c through $1.25. 
Also blank or ADMIT ONE tickets together with Pass-Out Tickets. Per roll of two thousand 
only $1.25. 

FAIR PLAY ELECTRIC BASKETBALL SCOREBOARDS 

We have in stock the No. FD-60 for $350.00. We have in stock the Figurgram No. Fl-SS at 
$445.00 each, complete with controls and ten feet of cable. Extra cable 30c per foot. Both 
boards carry a twelve months guarantee and we have a service man in the territory. Buy 
Fair Play and buy the best. 

BASKETBALL ACCESSORIES: 

We have in stock the official No-Whip nets, scorebooks, Cramer's first aid supplies, metal 
and bakelite whistles, stopwatches, Eastman Kodak timers, umpire horns, basketball posters, 
bath towels, shoe laces in various colors, colored top wool sweat socks, individual carry-all 
unifoi-m bags in colors, All-Star Shoes in black and white in all sizes from 3 thru 17. 

HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO. 

PHONE 104 MAYFIELD, KY. 

"The Largest Independent Exclusive Athletic House in the South" 



r 




WHILE IN LEXINGTON 

FOR THE 

Slate Basketball Tournament 

VfSff our Sample Rooms 
461 and 462 Phoenix Hotel 

Wur special Sample Rooms at the Phoenix 
Hotel are the happy meeting place and head- 
quarters for players, coaches, fans, celebrities, 

store, school and factory representatives. Make it ^<1 t. 

your headquarters, too. 

'ur traveling Kentucky school representatives. 
Bob Reis, Harry Blackburn and Chuck Shuster wil 
be on hand. As will John Head, Sales Manager from 
our Louisville office. 

See our complefe showing 
of 1955 nationally advertised 
football and basketball equip- 
ment, honor sweaters and 
award jackets. 




XX 



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High khooi Athlete 



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Official Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 

MARCH - 1955 




School Athletics Then and Now 



By J. B. Edmonson (deceased) 



National Press note: The late J. B. Edmonson, an 
influential leader in North Central and National 
Educational Association activities until his death 
in 1953, was President of the Michigan High School 
Athletic Association in 1911-12 and was active in 
development of that association over a long period. 
His article "Then and Now" was used in the Na- 
tional Federation Press in 1945. A few months be- 
fore his death Mr. Edmonson asked for and ap- 
proved suggestions for a revision to bring the ar- 
ticle up-to-date. The revision was too late to be 
used by him. 

THEN (1910) — Athletic participation was 
grudgingly tolerated. 

NOW (1953) — Such participation is 
strongly encouraged for all. 

THEN — Physical ed was nil except for 
those in competitive sports. 

NOW — Physical ed for all is generally 
given and frequently required. 

THEN — Football and baseball were the 
major sports with slight interest in basket- 
ball and track. 

NOW — Varied programs and many sports. 

THEN — Little emphasis on good sports- 
manship, and rowdyism was fairly common. 

NOW — Pupils and fans are instructed in 
sportsmanship, and rowdyism is not com- 
mon. 

THEN — Few schools had gymnasiums or 
playgrounds. 

NOW — Schools have gyms and play- 
grounds. 

THEN — Financing of school athletics was 
the responsibility of the team or of an out- 
side group. 

NOW — Athletics and physical ed support- 
ed by general funds or student funds. 

THEN — Local sports groups and former 
athletes had a control over many teams. 

NOW — Athletics are a part of a school's 
program. 

THEN — Athletic coach was a local athlete 
who was frequently not a member of the 
school staff. 

NOW — Physical ed and athletic coaches 
must hold teachers' certificates. 

THEN — Eligibility standards were poorly 
enforced. Alumni and former students often 
used on teams. 

NOW — Rules are clearly defined and 
strictly enforced. 

THEN — Game officials were often chosen 
with an eye for their interest in a home 
town victory. 

NOW — Officials must go through a com- 



prehensive training course sponsored by the 
State Associations. 

THEN — School assumed no responsibility 
for injury of players. 

NOW — Schools, through cooperative in- 
surance, protect players. 

THEN — Recruiting of high school athletes 
by colleges was common and high school 
teams were scheduled. 

NOW — Colleges cannot use high school 
students and high school team cannot play 
college team. 

THEN — Schools assumed little responsi- 
bility for health examinations and health 
instruction. 

NOW — Health objective generally rec- 
ognized. Physical examination now pre- 
requisite for eligibility. 

THEN — Schools were subjected to very 
little discipline except as locally administered. 

NOW — The State Athletic Association has 
large measure of disciplinary control. 

THEN — Schools might play an unlimited 
number of basketball or football games 
throughout the year. 

NOW — Number of games and also sports 
seasons are limited by State Association 
rules. 

THEN — Post-season games and cross- 
country trips were sponsored. 

NOW — Post-season games are prohibited 
and distant trips are regulated. 

THEN — Out-of-season practice was com- 
mon. 

NOW — Out-of-season practice is prohibit- 
ed or limited. 

THEN — Men nearly 21 competed against 
boys of normal high school age. 

NOW — Age limits are lower — usually 18 
plus or 19. 

THEN — Playing equipment and rules 
were designed by college or Athletic Union 
men for adult participants. 

NOW^ — Equipment and rules are now 
adapted to high school competitors. 

THEN — Mythical national championships 
were promoted. 

NOW — No national championship can be 
sanctioned. 

THEN — Athletics were largely for the 
boys. 

NOW — Fitness programs and sports are 
for both boys and girls. 



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The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 






VOL. XVUI— NO. 8 



MARCH, 1955 



$1.00 Per Year 



A Basketball Frankenstein 



Editor's Note: This article was in the 1949 National 
Federation Press. The suggested time limit on con- 
tinuous control (25 seconds for both back and front 
court) was considered radical and it received little 
support. In 1955, use of a time limit by the Pro- 
fessional Basketball League has made it one of the 
most talked about possibilities for an improved 
game. 

IN CURRENT BASKETBALL, "freezing" 
or "keep-away" tactics could become a Frank- 
enstein. Under certain conditions, the team 
in the lead attempts a "keep-away" type of 
play and if they are good ball handlers, the 
defensive team is made to look foolish in 
their futile chasing of the ball. In despera- 
tion, all contact precautions are dispensed 
with and there is a succession of fouls. 

YEARS AGO, the team in the lead at- 
tempted to keep control of the ball just as 
they do today. However, it was more difficult 
to retain control because more contact was 
permitted and it was common practice for 
the Official to give the benefit of the doubt 
to the defensive player when he was actually 
trying to get his hands on the ball. A player 
in control could be guarded so closely that 
it was difficult for him to accurately pass or 
dribble. The Defense had a reasonable chance 
to secure a held ball or to bat the ball out 
of control. Because of this, the keep-away 
tactics were always mixed with an attempt 
to make a quick break for the basket and it 
was good strategy for a team to risk a try- 
for-goal whenever it had a reasonable oppor- 
tunity. 

Through the years, the amount of per- 
missible contact has steadily decreased. Evi- 
dence of this is in the higher scores and in 
the greater number of contact fouls per 
game. The number of such called fouls has 
doubled in the past ten years even though 
players make more effort to avoid contact. 
As a result of this lack of contact, and be- 
cause of constantly increased efficiency in 
ball handling (which may be partly attribut- 
ed to the smaller-sized ball and to a more 
accurately constructed ball), it is practically 
impossible for the Defense to prevent a rea- 
sonably good opponent from retaining con- 



trol of the ball for as long as they desire to 
do so. Consequently, when the team in the 
lead begins to play keep-away ball, the De- 
fense has a feeling of helplessness and they 
can be made to look foolish in their futile 
attempts to get their hands on the ball. 
There is nothing left for them to do but to 
throw caution to the wind and attempt to 
crowd the player in control. Any player 
would be severely criticized if he did not 
do this and there is no alternative for a 
coach but to instruct his players to risk foul- 
ing. Even the most rabid fan believes in giv- 
ing the underdog his chance. Hence, a game 
which has been thoroughly enjoyable up to 
a point, becomes an anti-climax with no 
rapid scoring action. The thrills which were 
once common in the last few minutes of a 
close game have been replaced with - ■^ ag- 
gravating let-down in watching an exhibi- 
tion of tantalization and frustration. 

ATTEMPTED CURES: The attempted 
cures seek to prevent the fouling by making 
the penalty more severe, i.e., so costly that 
the Defense cannot afford to foul. Actually, 
when the penalty is unduly severe, it is an 
invitation for the team in the lead to play 
more keep-away ball in an attempt to draw a 
foul. Consequently, where they would once 
have taken a chance in attempting a field 
goal to increase their lead, this becomes poor 
strategy which leads to severe criticism if 
the shooter is not successful. As far as the 
Defense is concerned, they do not have any 
choice but to commit a foul regardless of 
how severe the penalty for a foul may be. 
If they do not commit a foul, they have lost 
the game anyway and they look less fool- 
ish if they crowd an opponent. 

BASIC QUESTIONS. The problem narrows 
down to one question. Is it more desirable to 
have the keep-away type of play with its in- 
evitable resultant fouling, or is it desirable 
to force a team to keep attempting to score ? 
When all the related facts are analyzed and 
boiled down to essentials, this is the question 
which must be answered by basketball lead- 
( Continued on Page Five) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH 1955 



MARCH, 1955 VOL. XVH— NO. 8 

Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

Hie:h School Athletic Association. 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexincrton, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Carlos Oakley (1951-66), Morganfield 

Vice-President Russell Williamson (1952-56), Inez 

Directors — James L. Cobb (1951-55), Newport; Roy G. Eversole 
(1952-56), Hazard: W. B. Jones (1953-57), Somerset; Louis 
Litchfield (1963-67), Marion; Jack Dawson (1954-68), Middle- 
town; W. H. Crowdus (1954-68), Franklin. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 



ANNUAL MEETING SPEAKER 



Jrom the Commisslone'i s (z)ffi 



ice 



REPORTS NOW DUE 

1. 1954-55 Basketball Participation List 

2. School's Report on Basketball Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Basket- 

ball) 



Spring Meets 

Tentative dates have been set for the var- 
ious spring meets anci tournaments in base- 
ball, golf, track and tennis. The dates are as 
follows : 

May 4-6 or May 9-11, District Baseball 
Tournaments. 

May 13, Regional Track Meets 
May 16, Regional Tennis Tournaments 
May 20-21, State Track Meet 
May 23-24, State Tennis Tournament 
May 25, Regional Golf Tournaments 
May 26-27, Regional Baseball Tourna- 
ments 

May 31-June 1, State Golf Tournament 
June 10-11, State Baseball Tournament 

1955 Regional Tournament Sites 
(1) Murray State College, (2) Madisonville 
High School, (3) Owensboro Sportscenter, 
(4) Muhlenberg Central High School, (5) 
Bowling Green High School, (6) Campbells- 
ville High School. (7) Louisville Armory, 
(8) Oldham County High School, (9) Boone 
County High School, (10) Harrison County 
High School, (11) U. K. Coliseum, (12) Som- 
erset High School, (13) Clay County High 
School, (14) Hazard High School, (15) 
Paintsville High School, (16) Clark County 
High School. 

Attention, Baseball Coaches! 

Your attention is called to the fact that 
the State High School Baseball Tournament 
is scheduled to be played at Parkway Field, 
Louisville, on Friday and Saturday, June 
10-11. This represents a change from the 
dates of June 2-3, shown on your calendar. 




L. V. Phillips 

Commissioner L. V. Phillips of the Indiana 
High School Athletic Association will be 
the principal speaker at the annual dinner 
meeting of the K.H.S.A.A., scheduled to be 
held in the Crystal Ballroom of the Brown 
Hotel, Louisville, at 6:00 P. M., April 15. 
The subject of Mr. Phillips' talk will be "Cur- 
rent Problems in High School Athletics." 

In responding to an inquiry concerning his 
educational activities, Mr. Phillips listed his 
"pedigree in very brief form" as follows: 

a. A.B. — Indiana University; M. A. — Col- 
umbia University. 

b. Principal and basketball coach at sev- 
eral small Indiana high schools. 

c. Refereed basketball before H. V. Porter 
was born and started making bonus rules, 
etc. 

d. Principal of high schools at Rochester, 
Linton and Vincennes, Indiana. 

e. Former President of the Indiana State 
Teachers' Association. 

f. Served on both the Board of Directors 
and the Executive Committee of the Na- 
tional Education Association. 

g. Member of the Indianapolis Press Club, 
Kiwanis Club, and makes small contribu- 
tions to the Methodist Church. 

h. Served a total of seven years on the 
IHSAA Athletic Council and Board of Con- 
trol. Have been drawing a salary as Com- 
missioner since January 1, 1945. 

Mr. Phillips is one of the outstanding ath- 
letic association executive secretaries in the 
United States. He is an excellent speaker, 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH 1955 



Page Three 



with a fine sense of humor. Kentucky school 
men will be looking forward to hearing some 
of his Indiana philosophy. 

News About Swimming 
Regulations concerning the forthcoming 
State High School Swimming Meet, scheduled 
to be held in Lexington on Saturday, April 2, 
have been sent to schools whose principals 
have indicated that they will enter teams in 
the meet. Other principals who have not re- 
ceived these regulations and entry blanks 
should write to the State Office for this ma- 
terial if they are interested. 

The various classes will have the follow- 
ing events: 

50 Yard Freestyle (Classes A, B, C) 
50 Yard Breaststroke (Classes B, C) 
100 Yard Breaststroke (Class A) 
200 Yard Freestyle (Class A) 
50 Yard Backstroke (Classes B, C) 
100 Yard Backstroke (Class A) 
100 Yard Freestyle (Class A) 
75 Yard Individual Medley (Class B) 
150 Yard Individual Medley (Class A) 
150 Yard Medley Relay (Classes A, B, C) 
200 Yard Freestyle Relay (Classes A.B.C) 
Fancy Diving (Classes A, B, C) 
A school is limited to two entries in each 
event and only one team in each relay. In- 
dividual contestants are limited to two swim- 
ming events including relays, but may enter 
Fancy Diving as a third event. If a competi- 
tor enters two individual events and fails to 
qualify for the finals, he may not be an add- 
ed entrant on a relay team. 

Trophies will be awarded the winning 
school and the runner-up in each class, and 
medals will be presented to the winners of 
the first three places in each event. The 
Association will make the same allowance to 
participants for transportation, lodging, and 
meals as is given State Track Meet particip- 
ants, this allowance applying to not more 
than two participants in each event. Expenses 
of the swimming coach will be paid if the 
school has as many as four entries in the 
State Meet. 

Certified Official 
Since the last issue of the ATHLETE 
went to press, Carroll A. Broderick, Bowling 
Green, has qualified as a "Certified" of- 
ficial. 

Protection Fund News 
Three hundred twenty-two member schools 
of the K.H.S.A.A. had insured their athletes 
with the Protection Fund at the time this 
issue of the magazine went to press. Five 
hundred fifty-six claims, totaling $11,842.09, 
have been paid since July 1, 1954. 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled March 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Adams, Charles C, 201 Clements Ave., Somerset, 1049-R, 589 
Bentley, Roy E., P. O. Box 63, Millstone, 42-Jenkins (Bus. No.) 
Broderick, Carroll A., 1760 Normal Dr., Bowling Green, 

8594 8212 
Fields, Ellis M., Box 191, Matewan, W. Va. 
Hall, C. E., Jr., P. O. Box 744, Russell 
Hoffman, Jack J.,c/o General Delivery, Fort Knox, Officers 

Trailer Court, Lot 224 
Jarvis, Lindle F., 172 S. Main St., Versailles, 663 
Jones, Jimmie R., Williamsburg, 6208 
Lentz, Charles E., 72 N. Belleview Place, Indianapolis, Ind., 

Me-88095, Me-B54H 
Moorefield, Jack, 1662 N. Lime, Lexington, 2-0119 
Mullins, Bcnnie F., Williamsburg, 6208 
Mullins, Bobby E., Paintsville, 432, 645 
Noel, James L., P. O. Box 223, Nortonville, 3234 
Parsons, W. E., Berea. 462, Waco 4071 
Tye, Charles H., 362 Transylvania Park, Lexington, 2-3349 



Films in U. K. Library 

The films listed below are in the Film Library of the Depart- 
ment of Extension, University of Kentucky. The rental prices 
shown do not apply to schools which use one of the special 
subscription service plans, offered by the Bureau of Audio- 
Visual Materials. 

Baseball Films 

Baseball Today, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, $.50 

This is a film covering generally all aspects of 
baseball as a professional sport. This sponsored film 
shows scenes of major league games and various 
personalities in the sport as they perform in various 
games. The film is not designed to teach different 
phases of the sport, but rather to create general 
interest. 

Batting Fundamentals, j-s, 1 reel, $1.50 

This film shows basic skills which must be master- 
ed before one becomes an accomplished hitter. Bat 
selection, stance, grip, stride, swing and follow 
through are clearly demonstrated by professional 
players. 

The Batting Stars of Baseball, s-c-a, 3 reels, $1.00 

Who are the big names among batters and what 
makes them good? Watch the featured hitters as 
shown in this film, learn the secrets of their styles 
and forms, and try it yourself. For clubs as well 
as classes. 

Catching in Baseball, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

The basic skills in baseball catching are presented 
in this film. How to catch a high rapid ball, a batted 
ball, thi'own ball, and a ground ball are shown. 
Stance, footwork, and body balance are described. 
Slow motion and close-up photography are used to 
enable the viewer to follow each step or movement 
in each of the basic skills. 

Democracy of Baseball, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $.75 

The purpose of this film is for further develop- 
ment of young basebal players in our modern democ- 
racy and illustrates this through sports and sports 
competition. This film includes a brief history of 
baseball along with a cavalcade of past and present 
stars. 

Double-Play Kings of Baseball, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $.50 
This film presents an analysis of the double play 
in baseball. Different players from several major 
leagues are shown in action. Fielding, tagging, and 
throwing are illustrated and explained. 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH 1955 



Hitting In Baseball, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Slow motion and close-up photography are used 
to follow accurately and graphically the basic funda- 
mentals of hitting in baseball. Coordination of feet, 
legs, hips, shoulders, ai-ms, and head is explained. 
How to select a bat, how to hold it, and correct 
batting positions are shown. 

Infield Play at First and Third, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, 
$.50 

The fundamentals and finer points of infield play 
at first and third bases are illustrated by big league 
players. Fielding, stance, throwing, tagging, run- 
ners, etc., are pictured, often in slow motion. 

Inside Baseball, j-s, 3 reels, $1.00 

Fundamentals of baseball, including pitching, bat- 
ting, fielding, and base-running, are demonstiated. 

Modern Baseball, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, color, $.75 

This film deals mainly with the rules of the game. 
It presents various infractions of the rules and the 
results of errors made in the game. 

1952 Kentucky High School A. A. Baseball Tourna- 
ment, j-s-c-a, 4 reels, silent, $.75 

This film has some shots of each of the eight 
regional winners competing in the Tournament. All 
of the final game, duPont Manual vs. St. Joseph 
Prep., is shown. A part of the film is in color. 

1953 Kentucky High School A. A. Baseball Tourna- 
ment, j-s-c-a, 4 reels, silent, b & w, color, $.75 

This film has some shots from each of the games 
played in the tournament. A large part of the final 
game, St. Joseph vs. Jenkins, is presented. The 
daytime games were filmed in color. 

1954 Kentucky High School A. A. Baseball Tourna- 
ment, j-s-c-a, 4 reels, silent, b & w, color, $.75 

A part of each game played in the first round is 
shown. Several innings of the final game, with New- 
port Catholic defeating Louisville Male and Girls 
6-0, are included in the picture. Daytime action was 
filmed in color. 

Play Ball, America, j-s-a, 3 reels, $1.00 

This film takes up defensive baseball. Illustrated 
under pitching are overhand, sidearm, and underhand 
deliveries; fast curve, slow, knuckle and screwball 
pitches; positions on the rubber and ways of catch- 
ing a man off base. Infielding, tagging, double 
plays and catching pegs to the bases are illustrated. 
Catching a fly and throwing in are demonstrated 
in outfielding. The film turns to an analysis of 
offensive baseball. Purposes of the hit and run play 
are explained. Base running is taken up. 

Play Ball, Son, j-s, iy2 reels, $2.50 

Joe Cronin introduces this film, showing a group 
of fourteen-year-old boys who are experts in base- 
ball. Correct methods of hitting, catching, and throw- 
ing are demonstrated in natural and slow motion. 
Based on book by Bert V. Dunne. 

Throwing In Baseball, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Slow motion, close-up, and stop photography are 
used in presenting the basic fundamentals of throw- 
ing in baseball. Instructions are given for the over- 
head, three-quarters side, side, and underhand 
throws. Coordination of foot and arm motion is 
stressed, as well as coordination of the body as a 
whole. 



Touching All Bases, j-s-a, 4 reels, $1.00 

This film is intended to teach youngsters baseball 
by showing various American League stars playing 
their positions. It is also intended to give fans as 
a whole a better understanding and knowledge of 
the national pastime. This film shows Father Flana- 
gan and his Boys Town Team, the Hall of Fame 
ceremonies in Cooperstown, New York, and scenes 
from night baseball games. 

The Umpire in Baseball, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $.50 

Summarizes importance of the umpire to the base- 
ball game. Explanation of the duties of umpire and 
also qualifications for job, showing where they re- 
ceive their training. 

Winning Baseball, j-s-a, 3 reels, $.75 

The "cut-off" play, how the pitcher catches a 
man off base, and how to call for a catch of a fly 
ball are explained. Art of base coaching is depicted. 
Ways of keeping in condition throughout the season • 
and of caring for equipment are shown. Players of 
the National League show their style of pitching, 
batting and fielding. Umpires' techniques are demon- 
strated. The picture concludes with scenes from the 
final game of the 1940 World Series. 

World Sei-ies of 1954, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, $.75 

The picture shows the 1951 World Series which 
celebrated the 75th anniversary of the National 
and the 50th anniversary of the American League. 
The two teams playing were the New York Giants 
of the National League and the New York Yankees 
of the American, \vith the Yankees winning. 

World Series of 1952, e-j-s-c-a. 3 reels, $.75 

The two teams playing were the Brooklyn Dodgers 
of the National League and the New York Yankees 
of the American. The Yankees won the champion- 
ship and were again the world's champions after a 
long and exciting series. 

World Series of 1953, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels, $.75 

This is the fiftieth anniversary of World Series 
games between the American and the National 
Leagues. The two teams participating were the 
Brooklyn Dodgers of the National League and the 
New York Yankees of the American League. The 
Yankees retained the championship by winning the 
first, second, third and sixth games of the series. 

World Series of 1054, e-i-s-c-a, 3 reels, $.75 

A picture of the series in which the New York 
Giants defeated the Cleveland Indians in four 
straight games. The Indians had set a record for 
the number of games won during a season in win- 
ning the American League Pennant. 

Track Films 

The Broad Jump, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Controlled speed — timing and coordination — de- 
velopment of legs and torso — mobility of pelvis and 
bins — one, two, three style — foot roll — single and 
triple air stride — soft versus hard take off — arm 
position. 

Discus, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Princinle of centrifugal force — muscle develop- 
ment of side arm throw — grips — finger roll — heel 
of thumb pressure — finger exercises — clockwise spin 
— hip snap — reverse and non-reverse styles. 

Distance Races, s-c, 1 reel, $1.50 

Races from 1,000 to 10,000 meters and steeple- 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH 1955 



Page Five 



chase are demonstrated. Style of distance runner is 
contrasted with that of dash men. Differences in 
typical physiques are shown. Slow motion photog- 
raphy is used to analyze movements. 

Distances, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Style — developing stamina — calisthenics — avoiding 
shin stilint — controlled tension — forward knee reflex 
— straight line running — automatic stride. 

The High Jump, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Belly roll or straddle and improved Western style 
— body lean and reverse — approach — body tension — 
coordination of arm and leg action. 

The Hurdles, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Basic hurdling styles — rear hip and leg action — 
rhythmic running — hurdling calisthenics — body bal- 
ance — correct clearance — circular stepover action — 
adapting styles of n'^vsiques. 

Jumps and Pole Vault, s-c, 1 reel, $1.50 

Demonstrations from actual competition are 
shown for running high-jump; running broad-jump; 
hop, step and jump; and pole vault. Slow motion 
photography is used for detailed study of form. 

1952 Kentucky High School A. A. Track Meet, 
j-s-c-a, 4 reels, silent, $.75 

Highlights of the Kentucky High School Athletic 
Association State Track Meet, won by Louisville 
Male High School, are shown. The film includes 
some of the field events, the finals of the dashes, 
and the finish of the runs. 

1954 Kentucky High School Track Meet, j-s-c-a, 4 
reels, silent, $.75 

Portions of the state meet are presented in this 
film. Several of the Qualifying events are shown 
with the finals of all the track and field events. 
Lafayette High School won the title with 41 1/3 
points, Ashland was second and Henry Clay third. 

Middle Distances, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Sprinting techniques — ball of foot running — auto- 
matic stride — pendulum and bicycle stride — exercises 
— counter balanced "' " action — push drive — jockey- 
ing for position. 

Pole Vault, i-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Basic vaulting principles — importance of exercises 
— running action — grip — selecting the pole — take- 
off — Western and Eastern style — slotting — novice 
training. 

The Relays, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Passing — visual pass — blind pass — right and left 
exchange — merging of runners' speed — baton grips 
— relay starts, undei-hand action — cup style — over- 
hand sprint pass — fb- scoop — practice and team 
work. 

Shot Put, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Fitting style to physiques — tension control — 
one, two, three rhythm — evercises — finger and hand 
grip — finger and wrist snap — foot positions — pro- 
gressive tension and effort — explosive hip snap. 

The Sprints, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $2.50 

Fundamentals of 100 yard and 200 yard dash — 
impact style and natural stretch stride — syncroniz- 
ing leg and arm action — conditioning exercises — 
starting techniques — slow motion of muscular utili- 
zation and coordination. 



A BASKETBALL FRANKENSTEIN 

(Continued from Page One) 

ers. It is impossible to encourage keep-away 
ball and not have the rough scramble. There 
are those who contend that the keep-away 
type of play is a desirable part of the game, 
since it involves good ball handling. Also, 
there are those who contend that if a team 
is in the lead they ought to be permitted to 
protect this lead by any means they may 
choose. In contrast, there are those who con- 
tend that even a mediocre team can, with 
present prohibitions against contact, retain 
control of the ball without any special skill 
in the fine points of ball handling. And 
there are those who believe that the game 
would be better off if it retained the thrills 
which once came from the rapid change of 
possession and the rapid scoring action 
which once accompanied close games and 
continued up to the time of the final gun. 

If basketball leaders believe that it would 
be more desirable to discourage the keep- 
away type of game and that any sporting 
team ought to be willing to trade shots if the 
score is that close, there seems to be only 
one way to insure this, i.e., to limit the 
amount of time a team may retain continuous 
control. If this were done, control in the 
front court would be handled in practically 
the same way as control in the back court. 
For the back court, the rule is seldom in- 
voked because players know that they must 
advance the ball to the front court within 
the given time and they immediately devise 
a style of play which will get the ball there 
without any violation having been com- 
mitted. It is reasonable to assume that if 
they knew they must try for goal within the 
stated time limit (possibly 15 seconds in the 
front court), they would adopt a style of 
play which would get them in a reasonably 
good position for a try-for-goal. Failing in 
this, they could settle for a held ball which 
would break control. Under such circum- 
stances, the former thrills which were once 
packed into the last few minutes might be 
returned to replace the chaos which now 
mars many games. 

CONCLUSION: The basic question must 
be answered one way or another before fur- 
ther rules action is attempted. Unless this 
decision of basic philosophy is made, rules 
action will merely result in floundering. The 
National Committee will find itself in a situ- 
ation with everyone demanding that some- 
thing be done but with no unanimity of 
opinion as to what can or should be done. 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH 1955 



The Flying Dutchman 

All roads now lead to Lexington and the 
1955 Kentucky High School Basketball tour- 
nament. Kentucky's regional champions, 
known as the "Sweet Sixteen", will be ar- 
riving by bus, train and other first class 
transportation with all expenses paid. This 
is a gigantic stride of progress from the way 
it used to be. 

Talking to Roy H. Whalin the other day 
about the wonderful set-up the present day 
quintettes have in the mode of travel and 
accommodation caused the former Coach of 
Marrowbone High School, now associated 
with Spencerian Commercial School of Louis- 
ville, to draw a sharp contrast. 

Roy related that back in 1927 his Marrow- 
bone team survived trials and tribulations to 
get to the State Tournament, which should 
cause the present crop of sixteen regional 
champions to start counting their blessings. 

To start with, such sturdy country boys 
as Sam Alexander, now director of finance 
for the Jefferson County Board of Educa- 
tion, had only a dirt court to practice and 
play their games on, only nobody would play 
them in the mud so all games were played 
away from home and each required two to 
three days for the round trip since Marrow- 
bone then was isolated with mud roads in 
all directions. 

For the district tournament the team 
journeyed to Columbia in a farm truck. The 
following week was the regional meet in 
Louisville and the team left Marrowbone in 
a wagon drawn by six mules. Upon reaching 
Glasgow the squad transferred to a farm 
truck which took those rugged basketeers to 
Horse Cave. 

Don't rush the Dutchman now, "Dear 
Readers", as there is a lot more to come be- 
cause, wonder of wonders, the kids went 
modern in the land of W. B. Owen, Ralph 
Dorsey and Joe Billy Mansfield to catch a 
train to Louisville. Marrowbone couldn't go 
home after winning the Class B regional af- 
fair because it had rained again and no traf- 
fic was going in or out of their town so they 
stayed over in the big city for a week await- 
ing the 1927 Kentucky High School Tourna- 
ment in Lexington. 

Remember the song which came out dur- 
ing the first world war, "How You Gonna 
Keep Em Down On The Farm After They've 
Seen Paree?" Sam Alexander's daddy hadn't 
heard it so he let Sam come but Marrowbone's 
"Hot Shot", Mitch Thurman, who stood 6'5" 



and was one of the high scorers, refused to 
make the trip to the Louisville regional be- 
cause his pappy thought it would be "too 
much city" for him — so the team had five 
regulars and two subs to operate with. 

Don't go away, Dutchman fans, because 
there's more to this transportation problem 
yet. After losing in the quarter finals of the 
State Tournament, the team got as far as 
Burnside by train on the return trip but 
there had to board a packet steamboat for 
Burkesville, where they were met by par- 
ents and friends from home. 

Boy — Oh — Boy — Have you ever heard 
anything like this ? Calling all coaches ! If 
any of your "Mighty Mites' start complain- 
ing going, coming or during your sojourn 
at this 1955 State Meet, just read them this 
month's Flying Dutchman. If that doesn't 
silence them, then their only hope is to join 
the army now where travel, food and enter- 
tainment in "luxurious" surroundings will 
bring the contentment their little hearts de- 
sire. 

Kentucky is noted for its fast horses, 
beautiful girls, rugged competitive kids and 
courageous officials, and the most courag- 
eous of them all just have to doff their hats 
right now to Somerset's Dr. Bob McLeod who 
calls ball games for the fun and recreation 
he gets from it. 

Dr. Bob, on a game-winning goal try In 
the last second knew the ball was in the air 
when the Timer's signal sounded and im- 
mediately ruled it so, even though it was 
against the home team in a "Blood and 
Thunder" game. By not throwing the re- 
sponsibility of the decision on the Timer, as 
is done too often, he won the respect of 
thousands and the Dutchman's "Salute of 
the Month." 

Small wonder that Kentucky's school boy 
officiating is pointed to as outstanding in the 
nation when its officials not only know the 
rules and how to enforce them but also have 
the "Raw Guts" to call the tough ones when 
the chips are down. 

Here's another Game Guy and he is none 
other than Coach Paul Coop's son, Dickie. 
Campbellsville Coach Coop, who is one of the 
finest men Kentucky ever bred, can be down- 
right proud of Dickie, who was sent the Lion- 
heart Lapel Award for overcoming Polio to 
set an example for other physically-handi- 
capped youngsters to pattern from. Dickie 
makes the twelth athlete and fighter Ken- 
tuckians have told the Dutchman about this 

(Continued on Page Ten) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH 1955 



Page Seven 



Football Officials' Ratings on Sportsmanship of K. H. S. A. A 

Member Schools — 1954 



SCHOOL 



Anderson (Lawrenceburg) 

Ashland 

Austin Tracy (Lucas) 

Barbourviile 

Bards town 

Barret (Henderson) 

Beechwood (Ft. Mitchell) 

Belfry 

Bell County (Pineville) 

Bellevue 

Benham 

Berea 

Black Star (Alva) 

Boone County (Florence) 

Bowling Green 

Burgin 

Caldwell County (Princeton) 

Campbell County (Alexandria) _ 

Carlisle 

Catlettsburg 

Caverna (Horse Cave) 

Corbin 

Cumberland 

Cynthiana 

Danville 

Daviess County (Owensboro) 

Dayton 

Dixie Heights (Covington) 

duPont Manual (Louisville) 

Eastern (Middletown) 

Elizabethtown 

Elkhorn (Frankfort) 

Elkhorn City 

Eminence 

Evarts 

Fern Creek 

Flaget (Louisville) 

Fleming-Neon (Fleming) 

Fort Knox 

Frankfort 

Franklin-Simpson (Franklin) 

Fulton 

Garth (Georgetown) 

Glasgow 

Hall (Grays Knob) 

Harlan 

Harrodsburg 

Hazard 

Henry Clay (Lexington) 

Highlands (Ft. Thomas) 

Hiseville 

Holmes (Covington) 

Holy Trinity (Louisville) 

Hopkinsville 

Irvine 

Jenkins 

J. M. Atherton (Louisville) 

K. M. I. (Lyndon) 

Knox Central (Barbourviile) 

Lafayette (Lexington) 

Lancaster 

Lebanon 

Lloyd (Erlanger) 

Louisa 

Louisville Male & Girls 

Loyall 

Ludlow 

Lynch 

Lynn Camp (Corbin) 

McKell (South Shorel 

Madison-Model (Richmond) 

Madisonville 

Marion 

Mayfield 

Middlesboro 

M. M. I. (Millersburg) 

Morgan County (West Liberty)- 

Morganfield 

Mt. Sterling 

Murray 

Newport 

Newport Catholic 

Nicholasville 

Oldham County (LaGrange) 

Old Ky. Home (Bardstown) 

Ormsby Village (Anchorage) 



COACH 



21 
32 
5 
18 
21 
27 
21 
19 
23 
18 
26 
a 
17 
26 
33 
8 
22 
28 
14 
31 
6 
29 
24 
22 
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10 
32 
31 
41 
40 
25 
20 
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38 
32 
23 

22 
9 
19 
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17 

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31 

21 

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26 

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13 

37 

22 

25 

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33 

19 

32 

14 

12 

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16 

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19 

29 

27 

20 

14 

26 

25 

21 

28 

21 

28 

22 

31 

29 

26 

30 

15 

22 
9 

20 
7 



5 


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24 
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9 
23 
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42 
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OTHER 

SCHOOL 

OFFICIALS 

a I 

4 



19 


1 




37 


2 


2 


16 


5 


1 


20 


4 


1 


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5 




24 


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4 




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28 


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23 






14 


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26 


4 




28 






27 


B 




24 


1 




27 






22 


1 




32 


3 




27 


3 


2 


23 


5 




32 


4 




17 


3 




24 


3 




9 






19 


1 


1 


6 


1 


1 





CROWD 






TEAM 




15 


9 


1 1 


3 


21 


7 


1 


1 


43 


6 


1 




29 


4 


1 




4 


3 






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22 


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16 


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20 


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23 


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2b 


11 


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27 


11 


1 




26 








29 


2 






9 


2 






9 


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20 


2 


1 




18 


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23 


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3 






32 


6 






27 


10 


1 




V 


2 






7 


2 






16 


11 


2 




14 


12 


3 




28 


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26 


8 






12 


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10 


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29 


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5 


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7 


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29 


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25 


4 






25 


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17 


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17 


7 






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28 


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10 


2 






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26 


9 






25 


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23 


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1 


1 


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37 


13 






36 


12 


2 




38 


9 


2 




40 


9 






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7 


1 




25 


4 


1 


1 


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5 






17 


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3 




18 


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16 


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11 








11 








25 


1 


2 


1 


25 


3 






33 


6 






34 


5 


1 




29 


10 


1 




33 


5 


2 




22 


2 


1 




23 


1 


1 




23 


1 






22 


2 






16 


8 


1 


3 


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11 




(\ 


19 


4 






19 


4 






8 


3 






fi 


2 


2 


1 


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3 


1 


1 


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2 




1 


15 


4 






15 


4 






22 




1 




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6 




1 


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29 








23 


5 


2 




24 


6 






17 


4 






19 


2 






25 


4 






25 


3 


1 




24 


8 






25 


7 






7 


2 


1 




10 








31 


6 






31 


5 


1 




9 


2 


1 




11 


1 






:;b 


5 


1 




36 


5 






20 


6 






21 


5 






21 


6 






21 


6 






46 


6 


2 




42 


9 


3 




34 








33 


2 






19 


1 






20 








36 


5 


2 




37 


1 


4 




12 


6 


2 


2 


15 


7 






21 


3 


1 




21 


4 


1 




29 


8 


1 




35 


3 






16 


4 


5 




16 


6 


3 




25 


13 


3 


3 


35 


8 


1 




18 


2 






17 


2 


1 




2V 


6 


1 




28 


4 


3 




24 


4 


2 




21 


3 


5 


1 


22 


1 






20 


3 






10 


13 


3 




8 


9 


2 


2 


24 


4 




1 


18 


6 






19 


9 


1 1 


1 1 


17 


12 




1 




6 


2 


1 


17 


14 






27 


6 






25 


8 






"4 


1 






21 


3 




1 


26 1 


1 




1 1 


24 


4 






17 1 


5 


1 




15 


7 


1 




27 1 


8 


1 




31 


4 






25 


B 1 


1 


1 1 


25 


6 1 


1 




21 


7 






19 


9 






26 


10 






28 


6 


2 




15 


5 






17 


3 






21 


6 






22 


5 






9 








9 








IS 


2 


2 1 




18 


3 


1 




6 1 


2 


1 




4 


3 


1 





Pag-e Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH 1955 



SCHOOL 

Owensboro 

Owensboro Catholic 

Paintsville 

Paris 

Park City 

Perry ville 

Pikeville 

Pineville 

Prestonsburg 

Providence 

Raceland 

Russell 

Russell ville 

St. Charles ( Lebanon) __ 
St. Joseph (Bardstown). 
St. Xavier (Louisville) — 

Shawnee ( Louisville) 

Shelbyville 

Shepherdsville 

Somerset 

Southern ( Louisville) 

Springfield 

Stanford 

Stuart Robinson 

Sturgis 

Tilghman (Paducah) 

Temple Hill ( Glasgow) __ 

Tompkinsville 

Trigg County (Cadiz) ___ 
Valley (Valley Station).. 

Versailles 

Wallins 

Whitesburg 

Williamsburg 

Wilmore 

Winchester 

Wurtland 













OTHER 




















COACH 




SCHOOL 
OFFICIALS 




CROWD 




TEAM 


28 


7 




1 


32 


3 




1 


28 


7 


1 


1 


26 


8 




23 


1 




1 


23 


1 






- 23 


1 






24 






29 

17 


2 
6 






30 
21 


1 
2 






19 

17 


11 
3 


1 


3 


16 
17 


14 
5 


1 
1 


5 


3 






4 


3 






4 


4 






5 


2 


1 


13 
26 
16 
30 
20 
15 


1 
1 
1 
5 

1 


1 


1 


13 
27 
16 
34 
20 
15 


1 
1 
1 
2 
4 
1 






12 
23 
15 
25 
21 
13 


2 
4 
2 
10 
3 
3 


1 


1 


12 
23 
10 
30 
20 
12 


1 
4 
2 
6 
4 
4 


1 
1 
1 


20 


3 


1 




23 


1 






17 


7 






18 


6 




33 








30 


1 






27 


4 






25 


5 


1 


26 


2 


1 




27 


1 






27 




1 


1 


25 


2 


2 


28 


5 






31 


2 






27 


6 






26 


6 


1 


39 


6 


3 




39 


8 






38 


10 






40 


7 


1 


43 


4 






43 


4 






38 


8 


2 




33 


13 


2 


23 

9 

24 

31 


5 

6 
2 


1 
1 


1 


26 

9 i 
29 
33 


3 
I 






23 

9 

25 

26 


4 

3 
6 


2 
3 

9 




21 

9 
28 
30 


8 

2 

4 


2 


22 
21 
19 
30 


3 

1 
4 


1 




24 
21 
20 
30 


1 
4 




1 


20 
18 
20 
30 


4 
3 

4 


1 


1 


20 
18 
19 
28 


5 
3 
2 
4 


1 
2 


34 

6 

22 

20 


4 
4 
4 
9 


1 

1 
1 




37 

7 

23 

19 


2 
2 
5 

9 






35 

5 

20 

17 


4 

5 

8 

10 






33 

5 

22 

14 


6 

5 

5 

10 


1 
4 


29 
22 
25 
30 


2 
10 

4 


5 


1 


28 
26 
26 
32 


3 
11 

1 






27 
29 
26 
26 


4 
11 

5 


2 


1 


21 
19 
25 
23 


10 

20 

1 

3 


2 


22 


1 






23 








23 








22 


1 




11 
19 


2 


1 


3 


10 
21 


1 
3 






10 

19 


1 
5 


1 




10 
16 


1 

4 


3 


13 


1 


2 


1 


13 


4 






10 


6 


1 




11 


5 


1 



Early Season Baseball Questions — Installment 1 



Editor's Note: These rulings do not set aside or 
modify any rule. They are interpretations on some 
of the early season situations which have been 
presented. 

1. Play: Have any errors or omissions 
been discovered in the 1955 baseball publi- 
cations ? 

Ruling-: In the RULES BOOK, a note un- 
der the balk penalty on page 24 states that 
the Professional rule is slightly different 
from the Federation rule. That statement 
was correct at the time the note was printed 
but since that time, the Professional balk 
rule has been changed so that it is now the 
same as the Federation rule. 

In the BASEBALL CASE BOOK, the term 
"retouching" is used in Play 57. The correct 
word is "replacement." Also, in Play 143, 
omit the last sentence. 

2. Play: Is use of a head protector for 
each batter mandatory? 

Ruling: In a few areas, it is mandatory 
by order of the conference or the State As- 
sociation. As far as the rules are concerned, 
use of such a protector is recommended in 
1-1-5. 

3. Play : A line drive to right field comes 
down on the foul line and then bounces into 
fair territory or foul territory. Is this a fair 
hit? 

Ruling : Yes. The line is a part of fair ter- 



ritory in accordance with last sentence of 
1-2-1 and 2-7-1- (c). 

4. Play : On a pitch-out, catcher has one 
or both feet several feet to the side of home 
plate. 

Ruling : In a Professional game, this would 
be considered a balk. By the Federation Code, 
it is a legal act in accordance with last sen- 
tence of 2-3-2. 

5. Play : A ball has all of the qualifications 
listed in 1-3-4 except that some cord other 
than yarn is used in the construction. 

Ruling: Since top grade baseballs are con- 
structed of yarn, it is assumed that no manu- 
facturer will use any other type cord until 
such time as some newly developed satisfac- 
tory substitute might be approved. 

6. Play: With Rl on 2nd and R2 on 1st, B3 
attempts a bunt which rises high in the air 
and comes down near 2nd. Should Umpire 
announce infield fly? 

Ruling: No. An attempted bunt cannot 
become an infield fly. 

7. Play: A runner advances from 1st to 
2nd. He reaches 2nd safely but overslides 
after which he is tagged out. Is this ruled 
the same as if he had been put out before 
he touched 2nd? 

Ruling : In one respect, it is ruled the same, 
i.e., the runner is not credited with a stolen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH 1955 



Page Nine 



base nor with an extra base hit. In other re- 
spects, it is ruled the same as if he were run 
down on his way to 3rd. If it was a force 
play, the force ended as soon as the runner 
safely touched 2nd and the putting out of 
the runner is not considered a force-out. Con- 
sequently, any run scored before such out 
will count. 

8. Play: Is penalty for an illegal pitch the 
same as for an illegal balk? 

Ruling: It is provided there is a runner. 

9. Play: May a balk result in a ball being 
called ? 

Ruling: If penalty for the balk is enforced, 
it never results in a ball being called but if 
it is a situation such that the penalty for 
the balk is automatically declined, it might 
result in a ball being called. This could hap- 
pen in the case where, with Rl on 1st, pitcher 
makes a quick return-pitch and it is a 4th 
ball. In this case, each runner advances one 
base and the batter is awarded 1st base 
so that the balk penalty is automatically de- 
clined. 

10. Play: How strict should the Umpire 
be concerning delay by the pitcher? 

Ruling : More attention will be given to en- 
forcement of this rule than in past seasons. 
The 20-second time limit may be used as a 
guide but the Umpire should not hesitate 
to award a ball to the batter in any case 
where the pitcher unnecessarily consumes 
time. 

11. Play: It is the turn of B5 to bat but 
B6 erroneously steps in the box and receives 
one ball and or one strike. The error is then 
discovered. 

Ruling: B5 is declared out immediately. 
B6 should then start his turn at bat with 
no balls or strikes. B7 should follow. 

12. Play: It is the turn of B3 to bat but 
B4 erroneously bats and reaches 1st safely. 
B3 then bats but the irregularity is not dis- 
covered immediately. B4 steals 2nd and goes 
to 3rd on an overthrow. B3 then hits a single 
to drive B4 home. The irregularities are then 
discovered. 

Ruling: B5 (who should have followed 
B4) is declared out. B3 (the wrong batter) is 
removed from base and B4 is sent back to 
3rd. It is now the turn of B6 to bat. 

13. Play: It is the turn of Bl to bat but 
B5 erroneously bats and gets on base. The 
error is not discovered until B2, B3 and B4 
have batter so that it is now the turn of B5 
to bat but he is on base. 

Ruling: B5 is declared out as a batter but 
he is allowed to remain on base and it is 
now the turn of B6 to bat. 



14. Play: With Rl on 1st, B2 hits to right 
field. An overthrow at first: (a) goes into 
the stands; or (b) strikes the enclosing wall 
and rebounds to the catcher. In going to 3rd, 
Rl misses 2nd base and ball is thrown there 
for an appeal. 

Ruling: In (a), the missed ball is ignored 
since ball became dead and 3rd base is award- 
ed. In (b), Rl is out, since ball did not be- 
come dead. 

15. Play: On an attempted pitch-out, B3 
steps out of his box in: (a) striking at and 
missing the pitch; or (b) hitting a single. 

Ruling: In (a), there is no penalty unless 
subsequent action should be ruled interfer- 
ence with the catcher's throw. In (b), B3 
is out immediately and ball becomes dead 
as soon as ball is hit. 

16. Play : Does ball become dead when 
struck by a fielder's cap or glove which is 
thrown at the ball? 

Ruling: Ball does not become dead im- 
mediately except in a case where the thrown 
cap or glove prevents a batted fair ball from 
going over the fence in flight. In all other 
cases, ball remains alive until no further ad- 
vance by any runner is being attempted. Um- 
pire than decides whether each advance is 
as great as the penalty award for the infrac- 
tion. In an unusual case, this could result in 
one I'unner advancing farther than the 
awarded base and another advancing less 
than the awarded distance. The latter is en- 
titled to the awarded base. The other retains 
the base he reached safely. 

17. Play : In determining how many bases 
shall be awarded for an overthrow, when is 
a pitcher considered to be in pitching posi- 
tion on his plate and when is he to be regard- 
ed the same as any other infielder? 

Ruling: Opinions are somewhat different 
in this connection. However, it is assumed 
that standing on the pitcher's plate is signi- 
ficant only in those situations in which it 
would be natural for a pitcher to consider 
delivering to the batter. As an illustration, if 
a catcher's throw is muffed by F4 and is re- 
covered by the pitcher and if this recovery 
should happen to be while the pitcher is 
touching his plate and he then overthrows 
home in an attempt to retire a runner, the 
pitcher should be regarded the same as any 
other infielder and the award would be two 
bases. 

18. Play: Is it always illegal for a retired 
runner to be in a position which hinders a 
fielder? 

Ruling: While a retired runner is not per- 
mitted to intentionally interfere with a field- 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH 1955 



er, there are circumstances in which the re- 
tired runner's team should not be penalized. 
His right to a position on the field is some- 
what dependent on whether he has had a 
reasonable opportunity to know that he has 
been put out. As an illustration, Rl might 
be on 1st when B2 hits a high fly which 
comes down near the plate. It is natural for 
B2 to run to 1st base even though the fly 
may be caught before he reaches there. If, 
in the meantime, there should be a throw 
to 1st after the fly is caught and if the throw 
strikes B2 while he is in legal territory, he 
should not be penalized for interference. In 
these cases, the Umpire has some discretion- 
ary authority. 

19. Play: May two runners be called out 
for one infraction? 

Ruling: Yes, provided an infraction such 
as interference by a batter or runner pre- 
vents a double play. 

20. Play: With Rl on 3rd, B2 strikes and 
misses a pitch as Rl advances, (a) the pitch 
is caught by the catcher and B2 holds his 
position in his box while Rl slides in ; or (b) 
the pitch is muffed by the catcher and rolls 
toward 3rd, where it is recovered by the cat- 
cher who throws toward the pitcher at home 
but the thrown ball strikes B2 who continues 
to hold his position in his box toward 3rd. 

Ruling: In (a), B2 should not be penalized 
for interference. In (b), it is interference if 
B2 had a reasonable opportunity to step away 
from congested area. 

21. Play : With Rl on 2nd, B2 attempts to 
bunt on 3rd strike. The bunt is a foul fly 
which is caught by the catcher. Does ball 
become dead when 3rd strike is bunted foul 
or may Rl be thrown out if caught off 2nd? 

Ruling: Ball remains alive. Rl may be 
thrown out. 

22. Play: How many types of appeal play 
are there? 

Ruling: Several years ago there were a 
number of types. One type was batting out 
of turn. For this act, neither the Umpire 
nor the Scorer had authority to call attention 
to the infraction. Under the new rule con- 
cerning this, it is no longer an appeal play. 
At present, there are only two types of ap- 
peal plays, i.e., failure of a runner to touch 
a base in advancing or returning and failure 
of a runner to retouch his base after a field- 
er has touched a batted ball which is then 
caught. 

23. Play: Pitcher hits a 2-base hit but 
fails to touch 1st. When coacher signals to 



him, pitcher requests time-out with the in- 
tention of going back to 1st while the ball is 
dead. 

Ruling : Umpire should refuse to grant the 
request until the fielding team has had ample 
time to make an appeal. If request is granted, 
runner cannot return to an untouched base 
during dead ball. If the fielding team 
does not notice the infraction, runner may 
remain on 2nd. If they do notice the infrac- 
tion and ball has become dead, ball should 
be returned to the pitcher on his plate and 
then thrown to 1st for the appeal. 

24. Play: When two bases are awarded for 
an overthrow which goes into a stand, where 
is the starting point? 

Ruling: If the throw is by an outfielder 
or is by an infielder whose throw is not the 
first throw after a pitch, the starting point 
for the award is the base which was occupied 
by the runner at the time the ball left the 
thrower's hand. In any other case, the start- 
ing point is the base which was occupied by 
the runner at the time of the pitch. 

25. Play. With Rl advancing from 2nd to- 
ward 3rd, there is a wild pitch or a pitch 
which is muffed by the catcher. Rl advances 
to home base. Is he entitled to such base? 

Ruling: It depends on whether the ball 
went into the stand or otherwise became 
dead. If it did, Rl is entitled to only one 
base, i.e., 3rd base. 

26. Play: Bl touches a pitch with his bat. 
Ball then goes, (a) to the catcher's mitt 
after which it strikes his chest protector 
and rebounds into his glove; or (b) direct to 
catcher's mask or protector and rebounds 
into his glove. 

Ruling: In (a), it is a foul tip and proce- 
dure is the same as for any strike which is 
caught. In (b), it is not a catch but is the 
same as an uncaught foul. 



THE FLYING DUTCHMAN 

(Continued from Page Six) 

year. Our thanks go to U. of L.'s Harold Pike 
for telling us about Dickie Coop. 

When the State Tournament is over the 
deadline is at hand for getting in your recom- 
mendations for the Game Guy of 1955 who 
will receive the Flying Dutchman plaque at 
our annual K.H.S.A.A. dinner in April. 
Right now the Dutchman is getting ready for 
a circuit of high school commencement 
speeches and that trip "DeLuxe Style" to 
Lexington. See you there! 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH 1955 



Page Eleven 



Kentucky Federation of High School Girls Sports Associations 

By Martha G. Carr 



We promised in last month's issue of the 
High School Athlete to discuss with you the 
program for girls athletics which should be 
started after you have gotten your Girls 
Sports Association organized in your own 
school. 

When the G.S.A. program is being planned, 
it is necessary to take into consideration 
the required and elective physical education 
programs, the time and facilities available 
and the community facilities. These factors 
vary so much that no one program can be 
suggested which is ideal for all situations. 
Generally speaking, the program should be 
varied and interesting and should offer op- 
portunities for participation to the physical- 
ly handicapped and those of limited ability 
as well as to those skilled in sports and ath- 
letic activities. In planning the program, pro- 
vision should be made for business and social 
meetings, the activity program and for spec- 
ial events. 

Business Meetings 
Regular business meetings should be sche- 
duled with definite programs planned for 
them. In some large schools where the acti- 
vity program is conducted exclusively 
through the physical education classes, the 
G.S.A. may meet twice a month for business 
and social reasons. In small schools where 
there is no activity program other than that 
conducted by the G.S.A., meetings may be 
held weekly with a minimum amount of time 
used for business. 

Since most associations do not have 
enough real business to take up the full 
time, a speaker, movies, recreational games 
or similar programs can be planned. If the 
officers or board of control will meet before 
the general meeting and decide on the busi- 
ness which needs to be brought up for dis- 
cussion, the meeting will progress more 
smoothly and more will be accomplished 
than if no previous organization has taken 
place. Try to bring up only the most import- 
ant things and give time for discussion by 
the entire group. 

The Activity Program 
The activities which usually make up a 
G.S.A. program include team sports, tests, 
rhythmic activities, self-testing activities, 
games of low organization, individual and 
recreational sports, outing activities and 
health education. A varied program should 
be offered ; it is a mistake to concentrate on 



one or two team sports such as basketball 
and Softball to the exclusion of all others. 

Class periods, before and after-school per- 
iods, noon hours and time outside of school 
should all be considered when programs are 
being planned. Class periods usually should 
be used for instruction in various sports ac- 
tivities and noon and after-school hours used 
for competition in these sports learned in 
regular classes in physical education. 

Teams may be organized through color 
teams, home room teams, class teams and 
groups of interested girls. Next month we 
will try to help you with types of tourna- 
ments that can be used in small and large 
schools. The boys' coach in the school can 
be of help to you in planning these if you are 
not sure how to do it. 

Coeducational Activities 

Many of the G.S.A. activities may be car- 
ried on by girls and boys playing together. 
This may be done through an informal type 
of activity when the facilities of the gym- 
nasium must be shared by both boys and 
girls. Or classes can be organized for instruc- 
tion in these activities which are interesting 
to both ; such as folk dancing, social dancing, 
table tennis, badminton, outings and many 
others. Team comnetition may even be sche- 
duled having an even number of boys and 
girls on each team. Volleyball is an excellent 
game for this purpose. 

Here is a suggested list of activities for 
you to try : Ariel darts. Archery. Badminton, 
Basketball, Bowling, Checkers. Deck Tennis, 
Golf, Hockey, Horseshoes. Kickball. Tennis, 
Table Tennis, Shuffleboard. Soccer. Softball, 
Swimming, Track and Field, Volleyball, 
Hikes, Picnics, Parties, Dances, Camping, 
Bike rides, Hayrides, Skating, Co-recreation 
parties. Cook outs. 

Spring Meeting at K.E.A. 

There will be a spring get-together of all 
women teachers who are interested in the 
G.S.A. on Thursdav morning, April 14, dur- 
ing the week of K.E.A. The meeting will be 
held at 10:00 A. M. in the Kentucky Hotel in 
Louisville. It is hoped that we will have a 
large group of you to help us get this or- 
ganization under way. Do be sure to come, 
even though you have not as yet gotten your 
local association going. We will elect officers 
for the State Federation at this time and 
will try to give you all the help possible in 
a meeting of this kind. Then plan to stay 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH 1955 



on for the luncheon meeting of the Kentucky 
Association for Health, Physical Education 
and Recreation. We will have the national 
president of our association as speaker at 
this luncheon, so it should be a worthwhile 
day for all of us. Hope to see you there. 



A Softened Outlook 

as in 

Athletic Journal. May, 1954, and the 

Washington High School Athletic Association, 

May, 1954, Bulletin. 

Someone once said : "On the timber line 
of the mountain, where the storms beat in 
full fury, we find the sturdiest trees, the 
hearty veterans of ten thousand blasts. In 
the hothouse is produced the puny plant that 
fades in a day. Adversity is hard to bear, 
but it tries the soul and sti'engthens it." 

A short time ago we received a letter 
from a prominent New England coach who 
bemoaned the fact that the youth of today 
were spending their idle time riding around 
in automobiles instead of coming out for 
athletics. 

We wonder if the shortened work week and 
numerous labor-saving devices have not sof- 
tened us as a people? We wonder further- 
more if this leisure attitude has not been 
passed on to our children ? 

The extremely high percentage of physical 
rejects in the recent draft statistics is, we 
feel, due in large measure to this mental at- 
titude which classes physical exertion in the 
same category as work. 

A clear illustration of our general soften- 
ed outlook on life is to be found in one of 
the_ recommendations of the Educational 
Policies Commission. In their report on 
"School Athletics" they said: "More adequate 
health and safety protection is accomplished 
by avoiding play during inclement weather." 

Mr. H. V. Porter summed up our thinking 
on the matter when he said : "There are cer- 
tain to be a few rugged individuals who will 
wonder whether our effete society has reach- 
ed the state where bad weather is a legiti- 
mate excuse for failing to report for work 
or to keep an appointment or for a doctor 
to avoid making a call or a pilot to leave the 
helm." 

We are showing a tendency to develop a 
breed of hothouse plants that will not be able 
to endure the cold of Attn or the drenching 
rains of Guadalcanal. Our future survival 
may well depend upon a hardy citizenry as 
well as on adequate atomic bomb defenses. 
— Reprint from Connecticut Interscholastic 
Athletic Conference Bulletin. 



Hit That Line 

By Hollis C. Franklin 

(To the boys who play on Kentucky High 
School football teams) 



Some other fellow on the team 
May be playin' way "off-side"; 
The breaks may be against you, 
And the passes wild and wide; 
Your team may be playin' rotten, 
The referee not so fine, 
But get in there! Hurry up! 
And hit that line! 



The man you're facin' in the game 

May be husky, and rough ; 

The field may be slick and muddy, 

And the luck you've had be tough, 

But the game isn't over 

Till the whistle tells the time. 

So get down to it ! Get 'em low ! 

And hit that line! 

As you play the game called "Life," 
You'll find conditions 'bout the same. 
There's always trouble bobbin' up, 
As you try to play the game. 
But just get down and fight 'em, 
It will pay you every time. 
To snap into it, get your man, 
And hit that line. 



Often luck will be against you. 
And the whole works goin' wrong. 
And there'll be no one on the side-line 
To cheer you with a song; 
But keep your shoe-strings fastened. 
And the signals in your mind. 
Quit your beefin'! Watch the play! 
And hit that line! 



The head-lineman's watching. 
He's got his eye upon the ball ; 
The time-keeper'll give you warning. 
You play the game, that's all; 
But that's what you're there for. 
So it's no use to whine. 
It's up to you to play the game, 
So hit that line! 



Editor's Note: Hollis C. Franklin, Marion banker 
and member of the Murray State College Board of 
Regents, is a man of many talents. He is an out- 
standing church layman and worker with young 
people. It goes without saying that he is an ardent 
lover of sports. 



B. S. HUNT 



A*" 



>^ 



o-^ 



^[f ^YSTOJ g^ 




W. S. "Bill" HUNT 



PHONE 104 



HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO. 

MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 



\ 



% 



^- 



KHSAA STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 

During the 1955 Kentucky High School Basketball Tournament make our 
sample room No. 363 at the Phoenix Hotel in Lexington, Kentucky, your 
headquarters. Let Hunt's Room be a meeting place for you and your 
friends along with the players, fans, coaches and salesmen. 

Our representatives, Bill Hunt and Roy Boyd, together with two or three 
factory representatives, will be on hand to extend a warm welcome alonig 
with a little Southern Hospitality. 

There will be a complete display of spring and summer merchandise as 
well as advance 1955 samples of football and basketball equipment. 

We will also have a complete line of O'Shea award sweaters, Butwin 
jackets, award blankets and miniature basketball charms and trophies. 

CHENILLE LETTERS 

We have the finest chenille letter and emblem on the market. See the new 
three dimension chenille letter. Why not give your letter-man the very 
best in chenille letters? 

Our spring and summer catalog was sent you a few weeks ago. If you 
have failed to receive your copy write and we will gladly send you another. 

If you want our advance pamphlet on football for 1955 let us hear from 
you. 

Sincerely yours, 

HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO. 




SALES MANAGER 



WSH/bjm 




THE LARGEST INDEPENDENT EXCLUSIVE ATHLETIC HOUSE IN THE SOUTH 





Sutcliffe always has them^on time! 

BASEBALL UNIFORMS 

m STOCK FOR 




IMMEDIATE 
DELIVERY 

(Wholesale School Prices) 

2 PIECE SUITS — SHIRTS & PANTS 

$750 $975 $1200 $1575 

Swatches of Fabric in Each Price 
Range Sent Promptly Upon Request 

We have in stock several grades in 
Caps, Belts and Stockings. These are 
shown in our NEW 1955 Athletic Cata- 
log which you should have. 

Write us for copy with wholesale prices 
if you do not have one. 



K« Ea A* When in Louisville be sure to visit Sutcliffe's Display quarters 
at Room 812, Kentucky Hotel, April 13-14-15. See, inspect and order 
your athletic goods equipment for Summer, tor next Fall and next year. 

^^••^ STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT iririririr 

Lexington March 16-17-18-19 

See SUTCLIFFE REPRESENTATIVES 

Rooms 461-462 PHOENIX HOTEL 



Reach American League Baseballs, each $2.40 
Wilson American Ass'n Baseballs, each $2.40 



Spalding National League Baseballs, each $2.40 
Sutcliffe Official League Baseballs, each $1.90 

LOUISVILLE SLUGGER BATS 

No. 125— Natural White Ash, each $2.90 No. 110— White Ash, each $2.10 

Plenty of lower price Bats also in Stock for At Once Delivery- 
Write to Sutcliffe foi iUx..H.x,iv ii.uaiialed, (itonn^iive cataiosuc niid listing 
of wholesale school prices on baseball^ sof t ball, track, tennis and golf. 

UTCLIFFE CO. 

LOUISVILLE 1, KENTUCKY 




XX 




High School Afhlefe] 



Hazard High School Basketball Team 
K. H. S. A. A. Champion - - 1955 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Mgr. Dale Creech, Robert Igo, Don Chapman, 
Arnold Feltner, Herman Watts, Mgr. Robert Fugate. Second Row: Athletic Dir. 
James Caudill, Prin. H. M. Wesley, Gary Gabbard, Walter Ward, Johnny Cox, 
James Stidham, Sammy Burklow, David Copeland, Coach Goebel Ritter. 



District Tournament Games Won 

Hazard 78 - 57 Combs Mem. 

Hazard 47 - 22 Leatherwood 

Hazard 94 - 72 Napier 



Regional Tournament Games Won 

Hazard 66 - 62 Carr Creek 

Hazard 73 - 66 Hindman 

Hazard 87 - 64 Powell Co. 



Official Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 

APRIL - 1955 



I fc— 




Mark up Two Points for the Champions! 




— Lexington Herald-Leader Photo 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



Vol. XVII— No. 9 



APRIL, 1955 



$1.00 Per Year 



THE 1955 ANNUAL MEETING 



The business meeting of the Kentucky 
High School Athletic Association will be held 
on Friday, April 15, at 2 :00 P. M. The place 
will be the South Room at the Brown Hotel, 
Louisville. The dinner meeting will be held 
in the Crystal Ballroom of the Brown Hotel, 
the hour being 6:00 P. M. 

The principal speaker at the dinner meet- 
ing will be Commissioner L. V. Phillips of 
the Indiana High School Athletic Associa- 
tion. The subject of Mr. Phillips' talk will 
be "Current Problems in High School Ath- 
letics." The presentation of the Game Guy 
Award will be made during the meeting, and 
the program will also include entertainment 
features. 

As provided in Article IX, Section 1, of the 
K. H. S. A. A. Constitution, the following 
changes in the By-Laws and Tournament 
Rules, to be acted upon by the Delegate As- 
sembly, are hereby submitted to all members 
of the K.H.S.A.A. for their information: 
PROPOSAL I 

Twenty-one school administrators of the 
Central Kentucky Association of School Ad- 
ministrators propose that the second sen- 
tence of By-Law 21 be amended to read as 
follows: "A school maintaining a football 
team shall not play more than twenty 
basketball games during the season, and a 
school which does not maintain a football 
team shall not play more than twenty-six 
games." (This amendment shall not be put 
into effect until the school year 1956-57 for 
those schools whose principals have already 
signed contracts for 1955-56 basketball 
games in excess of the number permitted 
under the amendment.) 

PROPOSAL II 

Supt. Joe P. Duke (Benton) proposes that 
the first line of Tournament Rule XV be 
amended to read as follows: "The Board of 
Control is authorized to select, standardize, 
and purchase." 

PROPOSAL HI 

Coach George A. Sadler (Hiseville) pro- 
poses that Tournament Rule V be amended 
to provide that regional tournament officials 



shall be selected by the Commissioner. 
PROPOSAL IV 

Prin. W. Harold Kesselring (Red Bird Set- 
tlement School) proposes that the By-Laws 
be amended to provide that a "B" team 
player shall not be eligible to play on an 
"A" team during the same evening or session. 
PROPOSAL V 

Prin. H. D. Puckett (Munfordville) and 
Coach W. W. Smith (Munfordville) propose 
that By-Law 4 be amended to read as fol- 
lows: "A contestant becomes ineligible at 
the end of the semester during which he 
reaches his twentieth birthday." 
PROPOSAL VI 

Prin. C. A. McCray (Kirksville) proposes 
that "twelve" be substituted for "ten" in 
Tournament Rule XI. 

PROPOSAL VII 

Prin. Riley Denington (Fulgham) and 
Coach R. L. Thurston (Fulgham) propose 
that the following be added to By-Law 5, 
Section 3 : "A bona fide student shall be one 
as defined and interpreted by the Kentucky 
State Board of Education in its accrediting 
standards, and should not be the subject 
for any interpretation other than that given 
by the Department of Education." 



New Organization 

The first meeting of the newly formed or- 
ganization of Sponsors of Cheerleaders, Pep 
Clubs and Baton Twirlers will be held during 
K.E.A., on Thursday, April 14, at 10:00 
A. M., in the Chapel of the Warren Memorial 
Presbyterian Church, Fourth and Broadway, 
Louisville. For further information, write to 
Mrs. Stella S. Gilb. University High School, 
Lexington, Kentucky. 

The newly formed organization awarded a 
cup during the State Basketball Tournament 
to the group of cheerleaders which came the 
nearest to meeting certain requirements. 
The cup was won by the cheerleaders of the 
Berea High School. The girls were Frances 
Andrews, Pat Porter, Patsy Marcum, Jean 
Wilson and Imagene Combs. The cheerlead- 
( Continued on Page Ten) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1955 



APRIL, 1955 VOL. XVII— NO. 9 

Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association. 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Carlos Oakley (1951-B5), Morganfield 

Vice-President Russell Williamson (1952-56), Inez 

Directors — James L. Cobb (1951-65), Newport; Roy G. Eversole 
(1962-56), Hazard: W. B. Jones (1953-57), Somerset; Louis 
Litchfield (1953-67), Marion: Jack Dawson (1954-58), Middle- 
town; W. H. Crowdus (1954-58), Franklin. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 

Jrom the Commlssione'i s Cjfflce 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1. 1954-55 Basketball Participation List 
(Eligibility) 

2. School's Report on Basketball Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools - Basketball 



Regional Track Meets 

The Board of Control has established twelve track 
regions for 1955. The scheduled date for the reg-ional 
meets is May 13. Only first and second place winners 
in the regions will qualify for the State Meet. Sites 
of the meets are: Murray, Henderson, Bowling 
Green, Danville, Louisville (Bellarmine College), 
Louisville (Shawnee), Bellevue, Newport, Lexing- 
ton, Barbourville, Elkhoi'n City and Ashland. 

The assignment of schools by Regions is as fol- 
lows: 

Murray Region — Ballard Memorial, Caldwell 
County, Fulton, Graham, Hopkinsville, Murray, 
Tilghman, Trigg County. 

Henderson Region — Barret, Breckinridge County, 
Clay, Crittenden County, Daviess County, Hender- 
son County, Madisonville, Marion, Morganfield, 
Owensboro, Providence, Sturgis, Uniontown. 

Bowling Green Region — Albany, Austin Tracy, 
Bowling Green, Center, College, Edmonton, Eliza- 
bethtown, Franklin-Simpson, Glasgow, Greensburg, 
Hiseville, Park City, Russellville, Temple Hill, Tomp- 
kinsville, Vine Grove, West Point. 

Danville Region — Bardstown, Berea, Berea Foun- 
dation, Camp Dick Robinson, Danville, Junction 
City, Monticello, Old Kentucky Home, Perryviille, 
St. Joseph, Springfield, Stanford, Wayne County. 

Bellarmine Region — Carrollton, Eastern, Emin- 
ence, Fern Creek, K.M.I., Ky. School for the Blind, 
Oldham County, Ormsby Village, Pleasureville, 
Simpsonville, Southern, Trimble County, Valley. 

Louisville Region — duPont Manual, Flaget, J. M. 
Atherton, Louisville Male, St. Xavier, Shawnee. 

Bellevue Region — Bellevue, Dayton, Dixie Heights, 
Holmes, Lloyd, Ludlow, Silver Grove, Simon Kenton. 

Nevi^port Region — Beechwood, Boone County, 
Campbell County, Grant County, Highlands, New- 
port, Walton- Verona. 

Lexington Region — Bourbon County Vocational, 
Bridgeport, Camargo, Central, Elkhorn, Frankfort, 
Garth, Harrodsburg, Henry Clay, Lafayette, Lex- 
ington Catholic, Madison Model, M.M.I. , Nicholas- 
ville, Oxford, Peaks Mill, University, Versailles, 
Winchester. 

Barbourville Region — Bell County, Barbourville, 



Benham, Corbin, Eubank, Harlan, Hazel Green H.S., 
Henderson Settlement, Knox Central, London, Mid- 
dlesboro, Pineville, Somerset, Williamsburg, Wood- 
bine. 

Elkhorn City Region — Belfry, Elkhorn City, Ezel, 
Fleming-Neon, Hazard, Jenkins, Martin, M, C. 
Napier, Paintsville, Pikeville, Phelps, Prestonsburg, 
Stuart Robinson, Wayland, Whitesburg, Wolfe 
County. 

Ashland Region — Ashland, Boyd County, Catletts- 
burg, Erie, Fleming County, May's Lick, Morgan 
County, Orangeburg, Prichard, Russell. 
Golf Tournaments 

Six regional tournaments have been set up in 
golf. These tournaments will be held on May 25 
at Madisonville, Bowling Green, Louisville, Dixie 
Heights, Lexington and Middlesboro. The State 
Golf Tournament will be held at Fort Knox on May 
31 - June 1. The assig-nment of schools by regions 
is as follows: 

Madisonville Region — Barret, Fulton, Greenville, 
Hopkinsville, Madisonville, Owensboro. 

Bowling Green Region — Bardstown, Bowling 
Green, Elizabethtown, Elizabethtown Catholic, Fort 
Knox, Franklin-Simpson. Glasgow, Russellville, St. 
Augustine, St. Joseph, Scottsville. 

Louisville Region — Ahrens, duPont Manual, East- 
em, Fern Creek, Flaget, J. M. Atherton, K.M.I., 
Louisville Male, St. Xavier, Shawnee, Shelbyville, 
Southern, Valley. 

Dixie Heights Region — Beechwood, Covington 
Catholic, Dixie Heights, Holmes, Holy Cross, Lloyd, 
Newport, Newport Catholic, St. Henry, St. Thomas. 

Lexington Region — Ashland, Berea, Danville, 
Henry Clay, Lafayette, Paintsville, Prestonsburg, 
University. 

Middlesboro Region — Cumberland, Hazard, Mid- 
dlesboro. 

Tennis Tournaments 

On May 16 four regional tennis tournaments will 
be held. The sites are Bowling Green, Louisville, Lex- 
ington and Bellevue. The State Tennis Touimament 
will be held in Louisville on May 23-24. The assigrn- 
ment of schools by regions is as follows: 

Bowling Green Region — Bardstown, Barret, Bowl- 
ing Green, Caverna, Central Park, College, Eliza- 
bethtown, Glasgow, St. Joseph. 

Louisville Region — Eastern, Flaget, J. M. Ather- 
ton, K.M.I., Louisville Male, St. Xavier, Shawnee, 
Valley. 

Lexington Region — Ashland, Berea Foundation, 
Erie, Garth, Hazard, Hazel Green H.S., Junction 
City, Oxford, Stanford, University. 

Bellevue Region — Augusta, Bellevue, Boone Coun- 
ty, Covington Catholic, Grant County, Holmes, St. 
Henry, Silver Grove. 

Baseball Tournaments 

The district baseball tournaments are scheduled 
to be held on May 4 - 6 or May 9-11. The dates 
should be set by the district tournament managers, 
and should represent the thinking of the majority 
of principals or coaches in the district involved. The 
regional tournaments will be held on May 26-27, 
and the State Baseball Tournament is scheduled to 
be played at Parkway Field, Louisville, on June 
10-11. The assignment of schools to the various 
districts and regions is as follows: 
MURRAY REGION 

South Christian District — Guthrie, Hopkinsville, 
Lacy, Sinking Fork, South Christian. 

Murray District — Benton, Murray, MuiTay Train- 
ing, Reidland, St. John, St. Mary. 

(Continued on Page Four) 



V, 



^^^-.r'^A. 



''^. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1955 






'^.^. 



NEW BOARD MEMBER 



Page Threg^. ~«-^^ 




Kenneth G. Gillaspie 

Supt. Kenneth G. Gillaspie of Georgetown 
defeated Prin. George H. Wright of Bellevue 
in balloting for Board of Control membership, 
which ended March 1. Mr. Gillaspie's four 
year term \vill begin on July 1, 1955. He will 
represent Section 5. 

Mr. Gillaspie was born in Montgomery 
County, Kentucky, on December 21, 1905. 
He is a graduate of Mt. Sterling High 
School. He received his A.B. degree from 
Georgetown College, his M.A. degree from 
Columbia University, and he has done addi- 
tional post-graduate work at Western Ken- 
tucky State College, George Peabody Col- 
lege, and the University of Kentucky. 

In 1928 Mr. Gillaspie married Miss Martha 
Jane Thompson of Frankfort, who died in 
1936. In 1940 he married Mrs. Mary Will- 
oughby Scott of Georgetown. He has two 
step-daughters and four step-grandchildren. 

The new sectional representative played 
basketball and football at Georgetown Col- 
lege. He was assistant coach at the Morgan- 
field High School for four years. During his 
eleven year tenure at Morganfield, he was 
principal for three years and superintendent 
for the last eight. He went to the Garth 
High School, Georgetown, in 1939 as prin- 
cipal, and has been superintendent at George- 
town since 1952. 

Mr. Gillaspie is Past President of the 
C.K.E.A., the Kentucky Association of Sec- 
ondary School Principals, the Western Ken- 
tucky Athletic Conference, the Georgetown 



College Alumni Association, the Morganfield 
Kiwanis Club, and the Georgetown Rotary 
Club. He is Past Vice-President of the Blue 
Grass School Executives Club and the 
C.K.E.A. He is Past Chairman of the Dea- 
cons of the Georgetown Baptist Church. He 
is currently Chairman of the Georgetown 
Rotary Charity Horse Show and is President 
of the Central Kentucky Athletic Conference. 
For several years he was on the summer 
faculties at Western and Georgetown col- 
leges. At the present time Mr. Gillaspie 
holds membership in the following: C.K.E.A., 
K.E.A., N.E.A., American Association of 
Secondary School Principals, Kentucky As- 
sociation of Elementary School Principals, Pi 
Kappa Alpha, Pi Kappa Delta, Phi Delta 
Kappa, Kappa Delta Pi, Georgetown Baptist 
Church, Masonic Order, and the Georgetown 
Rotary Club. 



TO REPRESENT SECTION 




Robert P. Forsythe 

Supt. Robert P. Forsythe of the Muhlen- 
berg County Schools will represent Section 
2 on the Board of Control for a four year per- 
iod, beginning July 1, 1955. In recent ballot- 
ing Mr. Forsythe defeated Supt. George T. 
Taylor of Central City, Prin. Charles S. 
Combs of Hartford and Prin. Edwin J. Mayes 
of Irvington. 

Mr. Forsythe was born on August 20, 
1917 at Belton, Muhlenberg County, Ken- 
tucky, being the eldest of three sons of Mr. 
and Mrs. P. A. Forsythe. He attended rural 



Page Pour 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1955 



school in Muhlenberg County and graduated 
from the Hughes-Kirkpatrick High School, 
Beechmont, in 1935. He received his B.S. de- 
gree from Western Kentucky State College 
in 1940, and his M.A. degree from the same 
institution in 1953. 

The new Board member taught three years 
in the rural schools of Muhlenberg County. 
He taught and coached basketball one year 
in Daviess County schools. He entered the 
Army in 1942 as a private, and was discharg- 
ed in 1946 as a captain. He taught in the 
Central City Independent School system for 
six years. He was elected Superintendent of 
the Muhlenberg County School system in 
1953, which position he still holds. 

In 1942 Mr. Forsythe married Miss Clara 
M. Westerfield. He has two sons, Preston, 
age eight, and Noel, age five. He is a mem- 
ber of K.E.A., N.E.A., Lions, Kiwanis, Amer- 
ican Legion, Masonic Lodge, and the Baptist 
Church. He has been a "Certified" K.H.S.A.A. 
official for eight years, and has worked in 
numerous state tournaments. Mr. Forsythe 
also works many O.V.C. and S.E.C. games 
each season. 



FROM THE COMMISSIONERS OFFICE 

(Continued from Page Two) 

Mayfield District — Ballard Memorial, Bardwell, 
Central, Cuba, Farmington, Heath, Mayfield, Se- 
dalia. 

Salem District — Caldwell County, Crittenden 
County, Livingston County, Lyon County, Marion, 
Salem. 

MADISONVILLE REGION 

Henderson District — ^Barret, Henderson County, 
St. Vincent, Sebree, Uniontown. 

Irvington District — Breckinridge County, Fred- 
erick Fraize, Irvington. 

Hartford District — Butler County, Centertown, 
Central Park, Hartford, Horse Branch. 

Owensboro District — Daviess County, Owensboro, 
Owensboro Catholic. 

Madisonville District — Calhoun, Clay, Earlington, 
Livermore, Madisonville, Sacramento, Slaughters. 

Central City District — ^Bremen, Central City, 
Drakesboro, Dunmor, Graham, Greenville, Hughes- 
Kirk, Muhlenberg Central, Roekport. 

BOWLING GREEN REGION 
Bowling Green District — Alvaton, Bowling 
Green, Bristow, College, Franklin-Simpson, Richards- 
ville, Warren County. 

Russellville District — Adairville, Auburn, Lewis- 
burg, Russellville. 

Tompkinsville Disti-ict — Albany, Austin Tracy, 
Glasgow, Scottsville, Tompkinsville. 

Caverna District — Caverna, Center, Cub Run, 
Edmonton, Hiseville, Hodgenville, Park City. 

Brownsville District — Brownsville, Clarkson, Ky- 
roek, Sunfish. 

Campbellsville District — Adair County, Camp- 
bellsville, Greensburg, Lebanon, St. Augustine, St. 
Charles, St. Francis, Taylor County. 



St. Joseph District — Bardstown, Bloomfield, 
Fredericktown, Lebanon Junction, Mackville, Mount 
Washington, Old Kentucky Home, St. Joseph, 
Shepherdsville, Springfield, Taylorsville. 

Vine Grove District — Elizabethtown, Elizabeth- 
town Catholic, Fort Knox, Glendale, Howevalley, 
Lynnvale, Rineyville, Sonora, Vine Grove, West 
Point. 

LOUISVILLE REGION 

Louisville District — Atherton, Flaget, Male, Man- 
ual, St. Xavier, Shawnee. 

Fern Creek District — Eastern, Fern Creek, K.M.I. , 
Southern, Valley. 

NEWPORT REGION 

Boone County District — Boone County, Grant 
County, Morgan, St. Henry, Simon Kenton, Walton- 
Verona. 

Beechwood District — ^Beechwood, Covington Cath- 
olic, Dixie Heights, Holmes, Holy Cross, Lloyd, Lud- 
low. 

Newport District — Bellevue, Dayton, Highlands, 
Newport, Newport Catholic, St. Mary, St. Thomas, 
Silver Grove. 

Maysville District — Bracken County, May's Lick, 
Maysville, Orangeburg, Tollesboro, Vanceburg- 
Lewis County. 

VERSAILLES REGION 

Frankfort District — Anderson, Elkhorn, Frank- 
fort, Garth, Great Crossing, Oxford, Versailles. 

Paris District — Bouibon County, Cynthiana, Har- 
rison County, M.M.I., Nicholas County, Paris. 

Buckeye District — Buckeye, Camp Dick Robinson, 
Crab Orchard, Danville, Harrodsburg, Kirksville, 
Lancaster, Paint Lick, Stanford. 

Eminence District — Carrollton, Eminence, Galla- 
tin County, Ormsbby Village, Pleasureville, Trimble 
County. 

Lexington District — Athens, Henry Clay, Lafay- 
ette, Nicholasville. 

Richmond District — Berea, Central, Estil County, 
Irvine, Kingston, Lee County, Madison-Model, Waco. 

Shelbyville District — ^Bagdad, Oldham County, 
Shelbyville, Simpsonville. 

HARLAN REGION 

Somerset District — Bush, Corbin, Eubank, Hazel 
Green, London, McKinney, Memorial, Somerset. 

Harlan District — Benham, Black Star, Cumber- 
land, Evarts, Hall, Harlan, Henderson Settlement, 
Loyall, Lynch, Wallins. 

Elkhorn City Districts-Belfry, Elkhorn City, 
Fleming-Neon, Phelps, Pikeville, Virgie. 

Hazard District — Carr Creek, Clay County, Combs 
Memorial, Hazard, Jenkins, Leslie County, M. C. 
Napier, Whitesburg, Wolfe County. 

GRAYSON REGIOlSi 

Ashland District — Ashland, Boyd County, Catletts- 
burg, Erie, Holy Family, Louisa, McKell, Raceland, 
Russell, South Portsmouth, Wurtland. 

Mt. Sterling District — Camargo, Clark County, 
Montgomery County, Mt. Sterling, Owingsville, 
Powell County, Sharpsburg, Winchester. 

Breckinridge Training District — Breckinridge 
Training, Fleming County, Hitchins, Morehead, 
Olive Hill, Prichard. 

Wheelwright District — Auxier, Martin, Prestons- 
burg, Wayland, Wheelwright. 

Paintsville District — Inez, Meade Memorial, Mor- 
gan County, Paintsville, Salyersville. 



i 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1955 



Page Five 



Adair County — Runner-Up 
1955 State Basketball Tournament 




(Left to Right) Coach John Burr, Lewis Pendleton, Terry Randall, Haskin Rowe, George 
Cheatham, Ralph Shearer, Mackie Baker, Rayburn Daugherty, Ralph McQueary, Billy Conover, 
Roger Pickett. 



Henderson Barret — Third Place Winner 
1955 State Basketball Tournament 




(Left to Right) Dave Eakins, Pascal Benson, Billy Brown, Richard Yates, Donald Gish, Byron 
Pinson, Fred Schuette, Sammy Shelton, Tommy Childress, Bill Ruff. 



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Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1955 



The Flying Dutchman 

It is James "Cap" Caudill of Atherton Hig-h 
School who joins the Parade of Game Guys and is the 
winner of the Game Guy Plaque of 1955. "Cap" Cau- 
dill and Coach Junie Jones of Atherton, who took 
such an interest in the physically handicapped young- 
ster, can be justly proud of this honor which was 
nationally recognized in Sports Review as one of the 
finest achievements which can come to a Kentucky 
high school athlete. 

Take a look at the achievements of this fig-hting 
lad whose right arm is only three-quarters its normal 
length and is so poorly developed that the same con- 
dition would have discouraged many young men of 
less courage. Couple this with the fact that "Cap" is 
only 5/ 8" tall, weighing only 140 pounds, and you 
will readily agree that the annual Flying Dutchman 
Award has to go to him for setting an example 
which inspires other young men, despondent because 
of handicaps, to keep carrying on the fight. 

Here's the picture. In 1951-52 he played J. V. foot- 
ball, winning his letter and playing in every game. In 
1952-53 he played baseball, pitching a no-hitter for 
the V.F.W. Post 3636 and having a record of four 
games won and none lost. The same year he played 
varsity football as a halfback and pitched on the 
Atherton High School baseball team. In 1953 he 
again had a perfect year as a pitcher, losing no 
games, and was given a try-out with the Little 
Colonels. Then in 1953-54 he turned to basketball and 
captained the Audubon Methodist Church basketball 
team which won the championship of Louisville. 

The Dutchman doffs his hat to the Game Guy of 
1955, Atherton's "Cap" Caudill, who showed the 
world that fight and determination plus a little en- 
couragement from interested adults can make happy 
kids of handicapped boys who in turn render sei-vice 
by the inspiring example they set. 

Now for some Kentucky sportsmanship which 
places Kentucky's high school athletic program on a 
sound foundation and causes it to be praised far and 
wide. Abou Ben Adhem certificates have gone to 
Jarvis Parsley and His Bracken County crew, and 
Maurice Jackson's Clark County gang on recom- 
mendation of Gene Neal who had to work the 
Brooksville-Clark County game alone when Bob 
Miller was unable to get there because of icy roads. 
Both Maurice and Jarvis took time to explain to 
their boys that Gene would have to work alone and 
to give him due consideration. According to Gene 
there has never been any sportsmanship anywhere 
to top the performance turned in by both Clark 
County and the Bracken County kids that night. 

LaRue Sosh calls for an Abou Ben Adhem award 
to be sent to Louie Litchfield for outstanding sports- 
manlike conduct in the Livingston County-Critten- 
den County game when his decision was the factor 
which caused Crittenden County to lose a "Blood and 
Thunder" game. It was Louis who was the first on 
the floor to tell LaRue that he had worked one of 
the best games he had ever seen, and that his kids 
and people could lose close ones on an official's de- 
cisions, without pushing the blame for defeat on the 
arbiter. You just can't top guys like Louie Litchfield, 
anyway. 

Referee John Heldnian wants recognition of the 
outstanding conduct of Simpsonville's Kenny Tingle 
who impressed him grreatly throughout every close 




State Basketball Tournament Trophies 
and Awards 



game he played in. Said John, "This kid knows how 
to take adverse decisions and be a man." So you 
Dutchman fans can see that in Kentucky it is not 
only sportsmanlike coaches and superintendents, but 
hundreds of tough boy competitors as well. 

Bowling Green's Barkus Gray is in the sportsman- 
ship life-light. In fact, Barkus has been there ever 
since the Dutchman worked the first game of his 
officiating career for him at Brownsville in 1928 
when this great guy was coaching at Woodbuni 
Brethren. This Dutchman will never forg-et that 
night, nor two great fellows. Coach Gray of Wood- 
burn and Coach DeMunbrun of Brownsville. 

Back to Barkus, though, we want to tell you that 
he has won an Abou Ben Adhem for his Bowling 
Green school on the recommendation of referees 
Ralph Hobbs and Roy Settle. These two whistlers 
called H. B. Gray "tops." Ralph and Roy, working 
the district and regional tournaments at Bowling 
Green, never wanted for cokes, towels, soap, enter- 
tainment or anything. Barkus simply stamped him- 
self as "Mr. Public Relations of Kentucky." 

Let's close on a wonderful tribute to Kentucky's 
officiating by Dean Eagle, Sports Editor of the 
Louisville Times, who said this to the Dutchman: 
"After watching officiating at the N. I. T. in New 
York and in surrounding areas, I am convinced that 
Kentucky's high schools have the best officiating 
I have observed." Brethren, Dean can say that again 
because, by overwhelming opinion, the officiating 
he saw at this year's state tournament substantiated 
his remark. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1955 



Page Nine 



Newport — Fourth Place Winner 
1955 State Basketball Tournament 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Mgr. Marvin Wander, Allen Youtsey, Henry Green, Ralph 
Chapman, Ronnie Derrick, Jerry Morris, Roger Quinn, John Little, Mgr. Don McDaniel. Second 
Row: Phil Hamilton, Don Dietrich, Ronnie Pigg, Ronnie Bridewell, Irvin Deaton, George Foy, 
Bill Morton. Third Row: Ass't Coach Ed Burton, Ed Huffman, Paul Bergman, Prin. James 
L. Cobb, John Turner, Marilon Reams, Coach Stan Arnzen. 



TABULATION OF VOTES ON HIGHEST RATED OFFICIALS - 1955 STATE TOURNAMENT 

Listed below are the tabulations of votes on the twelve officials who received the 
highest ratings by coaches of the sixteen teams v/hich participated in the recent State High 
School Basketball Tournament. Each coach voted on six Certified officials in the order of 
his preference, the official whose name was listed first by the coach receiving six points, 
the second official five points, etc. This is the method which has been used for many years 
by the Board of Control and the Commissioner in selecting State Tournament officials. 
The schools given below are not listed in order by regions nor are they listed in the order 
of the tournament bracket. 



Official 

Bob Forsythe 

Vincent Zachem. 

Ben Edelen 

George Conley __ 
Ralph Mussman- 

Dero Downing 

Travis Combs 

Eichard Betz 

Doc Ferrell 

D. Longenecker_ 

Dick Looney 

Shelby Winfrey _ 



ABCDE FGH I J KLMNOP TOTAL 



6 5 6 14 
5 4 4 5 2 5 

3 6 3 

3 5 4 2 

6 5 
2 6 

4 6 2 
1 3 1 



1 4 



4 
3 



6 6 



6 
2 
5 



4 
6 



6 
5 
3 



42 
33 
26 
26 
21 
19 
18 
18 
16 
16 
12 
10 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1955 



Just Before the Battle Mother! 




— Lexington Herald-Leader Photo 



NEW ORGANIZATION 

(Continued from Page One) 

ing group from Henderson Barret was run- 
ner-up, and the Mayfield cheerleaders re- 
ceived honorable mention. 

The cheerleaders were judged on the fol- 
lowing: 1) Appearance — neatness and good 
grooming, 2) Ability to execute the yells, 
3) Ability and effort displayed in control 
over own rooters, 4) Appropriateness of the 
choice of yells, 5) Conduct while in uniform, 
6) Pep and enthusiasm displayed during the 
cheers, and 7) Sportsmanship toward oppon- 
ents and officials. 

Style of cheerleading was not taken into 
consideration in the judging. Six of the 
cheerleading groups were not eligible for the 
award because the Association had not re- 
ceived confirmation that the cheerleaders 
were being chaperoned during their stay at 
the tournament by an individual appointed 
and approved by the school authorities. 




President Oakley and Berea Cheerleaders 

Many favorable comments concerning the 
award were heard from individuals and from 
press and radio. It is the hope of the As- 
sociation that this award will be an incentive 
for better cheerleading and better sports- 
manship throughout the state. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1955 



Page Eleven 



At This Point, Everybody's Happy 




-Lexington Herald-Leader Photo 



Kentucky Federation of High School Girls Sports Association 

By Martha G. Carr 



We have good news to report this month. Mem- 
berships are beginning to come in now for our new 
association which promises to be one of the best 
steps forward for physical education in this state. 
The G. S. A. at College High, Western Training 
School, with Miss Betty Langley as Adviser, should 
have the gold star for sending in its school member- 
ship first. Other early registrations have been re- 
ceived from Bowling Green High, Walton- Verona 
High, Lafayette Senior High, Lexington, Bellevue 
High and Lloyd High of Erlanger. Welcome to the 
Federation and congratulations on your early start. 

For those of you who are in the process of or- 
ganizing your Girls Sports Association, you may 
need a little help in writing a constitution. Here 
are a few suggestions along that line. First, write 
out the purposes of your association. They might 
be stated somewhat like these: 

1. Development of leadership 

2. Participation in physical and social recreation 

3. Improvement of skill 

4. Provision of an intramural program 

5. Provision for co-recreational activities 

Next things to consider will be: 

1. The name of your organization (It can be 
named anything which means the same as our 
state association) 

2. Membership requirements 

3. Financing 

a. preferably by school funds 

b. by approved money raising activitieis 

c. by dues (if this does not keep some girls 
from belonging) 

4. Meetings. What is the purpose of meetings ? 
When will they be held? 

5. Officers and executive council 



6. Election of officers 

7. Duties of officers 

8. Point systems and awards 

9. Amendments 
10. By-laws 

Be sure to start with a simple constitution, the 
simpler the better. Add things as they come up 
rather than trying to have a complicated plan that 
you can't carry out. Everything should be on a trial 
basis for the first year. Awards and point systems 
for awards should not be developed right at first. 
You may not need them to get participation from 
your girls. If not, you will find you have avoided 
a lot of problems and bookeeping. Try to plan 
things that lots of girls can enter into rather than 
trying for just one or two teams. 

Teams and Tournaments: If you can get a few 
teams set up this spring in any activity which they 
already know, you can start a small tournament and 
get lots of interest which should carry over to your 
program next fall. Here are a few pointers about 
teams and tournaments: 

A. The organization of teams and the type of tour- 
nament selected for participation will depend on the 
interests of the girls, facilities, the size of the 
group, time available, and the activity. 

B. The teams should be so organized that they are 
of equal ability and should provide equal competi- 
tion for all teams. The teams may be organized in 
various ways: 

1. A student-faculty committee may make the 
selection. 

2. A student committee may make the selec- 
tion, subject to the approval of the adviser. 

3. Captains or sports managers may make the 
selections. 

4. Class teams may be used. 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1955 



1955 State Tournament Basketball Statistics 

Average Score : For Winners : 62 ; For Losers : 57. Total for both : 119. per game 

Average No. Personal Fouls (fouls by A plus fouls by B) : 31.5 per game 

Average No. Technical Fouls (fouls by A plus fouls by B) .18 per game 

Total No. Free Throw Attempts (per. and T. for all Games) 865. Successful 65.7% 

Total No. Players Disqualified for Flagrant Fouls per tour. 

Average No. Times per game a player committed 5 Personals: — 1.62 per game 

Averaee No. charged time-outs (total for both teams): 5.70 per game 

DATA COLLECTED BY FIRST STATISTICIAN 

Average No. (a) Personal fouls made by players while on Offense: 3 per game 

Average No. (b) Cases of traveling (include illegal dribble) : 6.6 per game 

Average No. (c) Times 2 throws were awarded because foul occurred 

during unsuccessful try: 6.8 per game 

AverageNo. (d) Times a bonus foul occurred : 19.8 per game 

% of times 1st throw in (d) was successful: 60.7% 

% of alt. throws which were successful: 58. % 

AverageNo. (e) Field goals (both teams) : 43.5 per game 

% scored without ball touching backboard: 58.6% 

Average No. (f) Over-all time from first toss to final gun: 1 hr. and 10 minutes 

DATA COLLECTED BY SECOND STATISTICIAN 

AverageNo. (a) Jump Ball situations (include center jumps) : 10 per game 

(1) Times above jumps followed held ball: .50 per game 

(2) Times jump rules were violated: .13 per game 

Average No. (b) Throw-ins from end of court (Do not include 

throw-in after any goal): 9.5 per game 

Average No. (c) Throw-ins from side of court (Do not include after 

Technical Foul) : 9.5 per game 

Average No. (d) Violations of 3-second lane rule: .44 per game 

For Last Three Minutes : 

(1) No. Field Goals: 2.6 per game 

(2) No. Chare-ed time-outs: 5.6 pergame 

(3) No. Held Balls: 1 pergame 

(4) No. Pers. fouls aeainst a thrower: 1.6 pergame 

(5) No. Pers. fouls other than against a thrower: 2.2 pergame 

(6) Average time consumed by last 3 min. of clock time: 
7 minutes 10 sees, per game. 



C. Care should be taken that team membership 
varies for the different sports. 

D. Tournaments should be planned so that the 
g-ames are scheduled for maximum participation bv 
all. 

1. If time and facilities are adeauate, the round 
robin tournament is the most effective. 

2. If time and facilities are limited, a ladder 
tournament or a sinele or double elimination tour- 
nament may be used. 

E. Some consideration should be sriven to the or- 
ganization of non-competitive activities. 

F. Activities should be conducted according to 
the standards and rules of the National Section for 
Girls and Women's Sports. All rule books may be 
obtained from the above mentioned organization by 
writing- to their office at 1201 Sixteenth Street, 
N. W., Washing-ton, D. C. 

Have You Tried This Game? 

BATTLE BALL 

Number of Players: 30 or less. 

Playing- Space: 20 by 20 feet at least. 



Equipment: Balls of volleyball type. One net or 
rone. 

Method of Play: Divide group into two teams. 
Gi^'p tbp players at least seven balls. The balls are 
to be thrown over the six foot net or rope. At the 
end of the neriod, three to five minutes, the side 
wins which has the smaller number of balls in its 
possession. Fun and activity increase in proportion 
to the number of balls in play. 

This is a good warm-up game. You may want to 
make some "home rules' of your own. If you have 
a good game that works in your school, send it 
into me and we will print it. 

Don't Forget! 

We hope to see you at the first state meeting of 
the Girls Spor*ts Associations — Kentucky Hotel, 
April 14, 9:45 a.m., Louisville. Then plan to stay 
for the luncheon meeting of the Kentucky Associa- 
tion for Health, Physical Education and Recreation. 
Luncheon tickets may be obtained by writing to 
Mr. E. B. Whalin, Department of Education, Frank- 
fort, Kentucky. 



B. S. HUNT 



4^e 



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PHONE 104 




HUNT^S ATHLETIC GOODS CO. 

MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 



W. S. "Bill" HUNT 



Oc. 



% 



> 



VISIT OUR DISPLAY ROOM DURING K.E.A. 

We extend a hearty welcome to you and your friends to make Room 512 
at the Kentucky Hotel your headquarters during the K.E.A. in Louisville, 
Ky. from April 13 to April 16. 

We will have a complete showing of baseball, softball. track, tennis and 
other spring sports. We will also have our new football and basketball 
samples for the coming 1955 and 1956 season; also a complete line of 
award jackets, sweaters, blankets, trophies, etc. 

The K.H.S.A.A. Tennis Tournaments for 1955 will again use the McGregor 
Tennis Ball, both regional and state. 

The K.H.S.A.A. State Baseball Tournament will use the famous McGregor 
No. 97 Ball for 1955 — same as in previous years. 

Do you have one of our Spring and Summer 1955 Catalogs, and one of 
our advance Fall and Winter Catalogs for 1955-56? If not write us and 
another copy will be gladly sent. 

We enjoyed seeing our many friends during the State Basketball Tourna- 
ment in Lexington. To our many old and new customers, "Many Thanks" 
for the nice orders placed with us for at once and future delivery. Rest 
assured that these will receive our usual prompt and personal attention. 

Visit us during the K.E.A. Have a sandwich and a coke "on the house." 

We are going to have a complete line of PHYS ED supplies both for Ladies 
and Men. Come and discuss your problems and needs with us. We are 
agents for the E. R. Moore and Broderich Gym Suits, Shorts, pinnies, etc. 
for Girls. 

Sincerely yours, 

HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO. 




SALES MANAGER 



WSH/bjm 




THE LARGEST INDEPENDENT EXCLUSIVE ATHLETIC HOUSE IN THE SOUTH 




SpetiolilU in 

Athletic 

Equipment 



N 

N. 

^"c.3:!;:t>'.,,;, ■■■"°"'::"'-.„, ■■■■■■ 

'^ I?" ,"' c/„>, ^ ' Oa//. , ■ ■ • . . ■ ' net 



8.65 

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■ / 2.90 

■ / 2.4S 
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* 1.90 
* /.80 




"UTCLIFFE Cp. 

LOUISVILLE 1, KENTUCK/Y 



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XX 



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Hiqh School AthMe 



ST. XAVIER HIGH SCHOOL SWIMMING TEAM 
KENTUCKY CLASS "A" CHAMPIONS-1955 




i 



(Left to Right) Front Row: John Hubbuch, Martin O'Toole, Gerald Varga, Douglas 
Riehl, Edward Schmidt, Joseph Roehrig. Second Row: Thomas Hagan, Victor DiOrio, 
Donald Gregg, Kenneth Remmers, Richard Whitty, Terry Sullivan. Third Row: Mgr. 
John George; Capt. John Remmers; Bro. Niles, C.F.X., Coach. 



Omcial Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 

MAY - 1955 




U. K. Coaching Clinic 

One of the most outstanding lineups of 
lecturers to be presented by any school in 
the country will be on hand to conduct dis- 
cussions at the University of Kentucky's an- 
nual free coaching school for high school 
mentors of the state, to be held in Lexington 
August 10-13, U. K. Athletic Director B. A. 
Shively has announced. 




-»~ ~^1f.'. 




COACH BLANTON COLLIER 
Kentucky 

Besides the University's own nationally- 
recognized football-basketball team of Blan- 
ton Collier and Adolph Rupp, and their staff 
assistants, the school lecture staff will in- 
clude Bud Wilkinson of Oklahoma and Forest 
Evashevski of Iowa, in football ; Dr. Ernst 
Jokl, director of the U. K. Rehabilitation 
Center and former consulting physician to 
the Olympic Games committee, who will 
speak on physical conditioning; and Coach 
Charles Werner of Penn State in track. 




COACH BUD WILKINSON 
Oklahoma 

The annual Kentucky High School All- 
Star Games in basketball and football, held 
in conjunction with the U. K. coaching school, 
will be staged Saturday evening, August 13, 
President Edgar McNabb of the Kentucky 
High School Coaches Association announced. 
Profits from the games are eai-marked for 



a fund to insure high school athletes of the 
state against permanent injury. The basket- 
ball game will be played in Memorial Coli- 
seum at 7:00 P. M., while the football con- 
test will follow on Stoll Field at approximate- 
ly 8 :30 P. M. 




\ 

COACH ADOLPH RUPP 
Kentucky 

A television party is being planned for 
Friday evening to watch the college All- 
Stars-Pro Champion football game telecast 
from Chicago. 




COACH FOREST EVASHEVSKI 
Iowa 

Following up on a trend initiated last year, 
the University said the coaching school will 
open a day early for the benefit of track 
coaches and others interested. The first 
afternoon lecture is slated on the subject of 
field events, with a demonstration to follow, 
and a Thursday morning session is carded on 
track events. Wednesday evening will be 
given over to a talk by Dr. Jokl keyed to 
fundamental problems of physical condition- 
ing for athletics. 

The major portion of the school again will 
be devoted to football and basketball and 
will open as usual with grid discussions 
Thursday afternoon. Cage lectures are due 
to start Friday morning and it is planned 

(Continued on Page Ten) 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XVII— NO. 10 



MAY, 1955 



$1.00 Per Year 



MINUTES OF THE ANNUAL MEETING 



The thirty-eighth annual meeting of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 
was held at the Brown Hotel, Louisville, on 
Friday afternoon, April 15, 1955. 

President Carlos Oakley called the meet- 
ing to order at 2 :00 and asked Commissioner 
Theo. A. Sanford to call the roll of delegates. 
Fifty-seven regularly elected delegates or 
alternates answered the roll call. The follow- 
ing delegates were seated in the absence of 
the delegates or alternates from their re- 
spective districts : 0. J. Allen, D. 1 ; James 
A. Fursifull, D. 51 ; James H. Powell, D. 52. 
The motion to seat the delegates was made 
by John Potter, seconded by Joe Duke, and 
carried unanimously. 

President Oakley then presented to the 
assembly Supt. Robert P. Forsythe and Supt. 
Kenneth G. Gillaspie, elected recently to 
membership on the Board of Control for a 
four-year period to represent Sections 2 and 
5 respectively. 

C. A. McCray moved, seconded by 0. J. 
Allen, that the minutes of the 1954 annual 
meeting of the Association, which had been 
sent previously to all member schools, be ap- 
proved without being read. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

Commissioner Sanford then gave a report 
on the activities of the Association during 
the 1954-55 school year. Lyndle Barnes 
moved, seconded by Gene Wilson, that the 
report of the Commissioner be accepted. The 
motion was carried unanimously. 

President Oakley stated that consideration 
of the proposals was the next order of busi- 
ness. 

John Heber moved, seconded by Joe Cau- 
dill, that Proposal I, providing for the reduc- 
tion in the number of basketball games which 
may be played in any season by a team repre- 
senting a member school, be adopted. The 
motion was lost. 

Gene Wilson moved, seconded by Joe Mc- 
Pherson. that Proposal H, authorizing the 
Board of Control to select, standardize, and 
purchase district and regional basketball 
tournament trophies, be adopted. The motion 
was carried. 



John Potter moved, seconded by J. I. Tiche- 
nor, that Proposal HI, providing that reg- 
ional basketball tournament officials shall be 
selected by the Commissioner, be adopted. 
The motion was lost. 

Lawrence McGinnis moved, seconded by 
Bruce Sweeney, that Proposal IV, providing 
that a "B" team player shall not be eligible to 
play on an "A" team during the same evening 
or session, be tabled. The motion was 
carried. 

Jason White moved, seconded by 0. J. Al- 
len, that Proposal V, providing that a con- 
testant shall become ineligible at the end of 
the semester during which he reaches his 
twentieth birthday, be tabled. The motion 
was carried unanimously. 

John Potter moved, seconded by H. T. 
Cooper, that Proposal VI, providing that 
"twelve" be substituted for "ten" in tourna- 
ment Rule XI, be tabled. The motion was 
carried. 

Bowman Davenport moved, seconded by 
Irby Hummer, that Proposal VII, providing 
that "a bona fide student shall be one as de- 
fined and interpreted by the Kentucky State 
Board of Education in its accrediting stand- 
ards," be tabled. The motion was carried. 

After some announcements concerning 
spring sports had been made by Commis- 
sioner Sanford, President Oakley declared 
the business meeting adjourned. 

The dinner meeting of the Association 
was held in the Crystal Ballroom of the 
Brown Hotel at 6:00 P. M., with approxi- 
mately three hundred delegates and other 
school officials present. President Oakley 
presented new Board members Robert P. 
Forsythe and Kenneth G. Gillaspie. He in- 
troduced Dr. Ray 0. Duncan, Dean of the 
School of Physical Education and Athletics, 
West Virginia University, who was a guest 
of the Association at the dinner; and Presi- 
dent Edgar McNabb of the Kentucky High 
School Coaches Charity Association, who in- 
troduced other Association officers present. 
Director Jack Dawson announced that James 
"Cap" Caudill of the Atherton High School 
(Continued on Page Seven) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1955 



MAY, 1955 VOL. XVII— NO. 10 

Published monthly, except June and -Tuly, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association. 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President - Carlos Oakley (1951-55), Morganfield 

Vice-President Russell Williamson (1952-56), Inez 

Directors — .Tames L. Cobb (1951-55). Newport; Roy G. Eversole 
(1952-56), Hazard: W. B. Jones (1953-67). Somerset: Louis 
Litchfield (1953-57), Marion: Jack Dawson (1954-58), Middle- 
town: W. H. Crowdus (1954-58), Franklin. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 

Jtrom the Commissioned s CJffice 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1. 1954-55 Basketball Participation List 
(Eligibility) 

2. School's Report on Basketball Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools — Basket- 
ball 



Fines for Late Reports 

Approximately one hundred member 
schools had not filed their reports on basket- 
ball officials and their basketball participa- 
tion (eligibility) lists for the 1954-55 season 
when this issue of the ATHLETE went to 
press. A few less than four hundred basket- 
ball officials have not filed their reports on 
member schools. The Board of Control has 
established a fine of $5.00 for both schools 
and officials delinquent with their reports. 
A deadline of June 1 has been set for the 
filing of all reports required under Associa- 
tion rules. This deadline is extended to June 
15 for those schools which have terms of 
more than nine months. 

State Track Committee 

The forthcoming State High School Track 
Meet, which will be held in Lexington on 
May 20-21, will be managed by Athletic 
Director John Heber of the Henry Clay High 
School, Lexington, Chairman of the State 
Track Committee. Other members of the 
committee are: Preston Holland, Murray; 
W. W. White, Henderson ; Turner Elrod, 
Bowling Green ; Joe Brummett, Danville ; Ed- 
die Weber, Louisville ; Joe Curtsinger, Louis- 
ville; John Schaar, Bellevue; Bob Miller, 
Newport; Charles Black, Barbourville ; Ar- 
thur Mullins, Elkhorn City ; and Ernie Chat- 
tin, Ashland. These men will assist Mr. 
Heber in conducting the State Meet. 
Tennis Tournaments 

Four regional tournaments will be held in 
tennis. They will be managed by the follow- 
ing men : Coach Ted Hornback, Western Ken- 
tucky State College, Bowling Green; Coach 



Emmett Goranflo, Eastern High School, Mid- 
dletown ; Coach Leon Porter, University High 
School, Lexington; and Coach Roger Klein, 
Bellevue High School. 

Principals who have indicated previously 
that their schools will have tennis teams this 
spring have been mailed entry blanks by the 
regional managers. The tentative date for 
the regional tournaments is May 16. 

The State Tennis Tournament will be held 
in Louisville on May 23-24, and will be man- 
aged by Coach Emmett Goranflo. 
Golf Tournaments 

There will be seven regional golf tourna- 
ments this spring instead of the usual six. 
They will be managed by the following men : 
Coach Bailey Gore, Madisonville High School ; 
Prin. H. B. Gray, Bowling Green High 
School; Coach Ed Binford, Ahrens Trade 
High School, Louisville ; Coach Charles Crum, 
Dixie Heights High School, South Fort Mit- 
chell; Coach Ralph Carlisle, Lafayette High 
School, Lexington ; Prin. Clyde Lassiter, 
Middlesboro High School ; and Prin. Oran 
Teater, Paintsville High School. 

The date for the tournaments is May 25. 
However, this date may be changed by some 
of the managers if conditions require it. 
Principals who have not received their en- 
try blanks should write to their respective 
managers for these forms. 

The State Golf Tournament will be held at 
Fort Knox on May 31-June 1, and will be 
managed by Supt. Herschel Roberts. 



1954-55 Annual Report 

Four hundred forty-two schools joined 
the Association during 1954-55. This is thir- 
teen less than were enrolled in 1953-54. One 
hundred ten schools had eleven-man football 
teams, and thirteen played six-man football. 
This represents an increase of three in the 
number of schools having eleven-man teams, 
and a decrease of three six-man teams since 
1953-54. 

Financial reports filed by the sixteen reg- 
ional basketball tournament managers show 
total receipts of $90,549.81. This represents 
an approximate increase of $10,000.00 over 
1954 receipts. Receipts in the sixty-one dis- 
trict basketball tournaments amounted to 
$149,200.74, a small decrease from the 1954 
figure. Receipts from ticket sales at the State 
Basketball Tournament, exclusive of refunds, 
were $103,389.75. Additional receipts from 
television and from the tournament program 
will bring total tournament receipts to an 
amount in excess of $107,000.00. Profit to 

(Continued on Page Eleven) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1955 



Page Three 



1955 Kentucky State High School Swimming Meet 

April 2, 1955 University of Kentucky Coliseum, Lexington, Kentucky 

University High School Swimming Team 
Kentucky Class '3" Champions— 1955 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Ernest Clarke, Stuart Lowenthall, Skipper Adams, 
Vertrees Hollingsworth, Bill Taylor. Second Row: John Howard Williams, Charles 
Huber, Boo Weinman, Mitchell Gail, William Wenneker. 



CLASS "A" 

Results 

St. Xavier 81 

Lafayette 62 

Atherton 37 

Flaget 19 

duPont Manual 19 

Fern Creek 14 

]. 50 Yard Freestyle — 

Heat No. 1: Walker, Atherton (:28.0); 
Thompson, Lafayette (:29.0); Karem, 
Flag-et (:29.3); Solomon, Atherton (:30.2); 
Peters, Manual (:33.7); Schuler, Manual 
(:37.4). 



Heat No. 2: Bobrow, Fern Creek (:25.7); 
Gregg, St. Xavier (:27.5); Honican, Lafay- 
ette (:28.0); Obst, Flaget (28.5); Hubbuch, 
St. Xavier (:28.7). 
Finals 



1. Bobrow, Fern Creek. 

2. Gregg, St. Xavier 

3. Honican, Lafayette 

4. Walker, Atherton . . - 

5. Hubbuch, St. Xavier_ 

6. Obst, Flaget 

100 Yard Breaststroke — 



25.5 
27.0 
27.7 
28.1 
28.0 
28.8 



Heat No. 1: Buschmeyer, Flaget (1:19.9); 

Wieeks, Atherton (1:22.9); Dein, Atherton 

(1:27.7). 

Heat No. 2: O'TooIe, St. Xavier (1:04.2); 

Portmann, Lafayette (1:17.5); Roehrig, St. 

Xavier (1:19.8); Cooke, Lafayette (1:21.0). 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1955 



Finals 

1. O'Toole, St. Xavier 1:04.8 

2. Portman, Lafayette 1:15.5 

3. Cooke, Lafayette 1:18.1 

4. Roehrig-, St. Xavier 1:19.2 

5. Buschmeyer, Flaget 1:21.0 

6. Wiecks, Atherton 1:22.5 

O'Toole set a new state record in this event with his time 
of I :04.2. This mark breaks the record time of I :06.6, set by 
Don Miller, Louisville Male, in 1951. 

3. 200 Yard Freestyle — 

Heat No. 1: Draper, Atherton (2:33.2); 
Remmers, St. Xavier (2:37.4); Bridges, 
Atherton, (2:43.0); Maggard, Lafayette 
(2:46.5). 

Heat No. 2: Will, Manual (2:26.6); Letch- 
worth, Lafayette (2:26.9); DiOrio, St. 
Xavier (2:31.8); Boone, Flaget (2:43.7). 
Finals 

1. Will, Manual 2:21.2 

2. Letchworth, Lafayette 2:30.1 

3. DiOrio, St. Xavier 2:33.7 

4. Draper, Atherton 2:35.2 

5. Remmers, St. Xavier 2:39.2 

6. Bridges, Atherton 2:43.0 

4. 100 Yard Backstroke- 

Heat No. 1: Grubbs, Atherton (1:15.6); 
Schmidt, St. Xavier (1:21.5); Ahl, Flaget 
(1:26.5); Roberts, Lafayette (1:25.2). 
Heat No. 2: Remmers (1:10.3); Musselman, 
Atherton (1:11.8); Thompson, Lafayette, 
(1:12.1). 

Finals 

1. Remmers, St. Xavier 1:07.6 

2. Musselman, Atherton 1:09.2 

3. Thompson, Lafayette 1:10.6 

4. Grubbs, Atherton 1:16.4 

5. Schmidt, St. Xavier 1:19.4 

6. Ahl, Flaget 1:27.4 

Remmers set a new state record in this event, breaking that 
set by Phil Peyton, Louisville Male, In 1951, with a mark of 
I :07.8. 

5. 100 Yard Freestyle — 

Heat No. 1: Varga, St. Xavier (1:04.7); 
Fraser, Lafavette (1:06.2); Lips, Atherton 
(1:06.7); Gordinier, Atherton (1:14.3); 



1. 
2. 
3. 
4. 
5 
ft 
Far 



Blakeman, Manual (1:22.4) 

( ). 

Heat No. 2: Bobrow, Fern Creek (:57.6); 
O'Toole, St. Xavier (:59.6); Honican, Lafay- 
ette (1:02.6); Struck, 
Reid, Flaget (1:13.3). 
Finals 

Bobrow, Fern Creek :58.2 

O'Toole, St. Xavier :59.1 



Craig, Manual 



Flaget (1:07.9); 



Honican, Lafayette 1:02.2 

Fraser, Lafayette 1:04.7 

- —■ - — 1:06.2 
1:06.5 



3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
150 
B 
L 
(: 
E 
E 
Javier (1:59.6). 

Finals 

1. Remmers, St. Xavier 

2. Will, Manual 

3. Thompson, Lafayette 

4. DiOrio, St. Xavier 

5. Cooke, Lafayette 

6. Walker, Atherton 

150 Yard Medley Relay — 

Finals 

1. St. Xavier, Whitty, Roerhig, 
Riehl) 

2. Atherton (Musselman, Dein, 
Young) 

3. Lafayette (Honican, Portmann, 
Thompson) 

4. Flaget (Ahl, Buschmeyer, Boone) 

5. Manual (Charmoli, English, 
Schuler) 



97.95 
84.55 
63.00 
56.20 
42.60 
35.50 
130.8 

ooke, 
erton 

58.5); 
io, St. 



1:46.0 
1:46.7 
1.51.0 
1:56.9 
2:05.5 
2:05.7 



1:32.9 

1.33.2 

1:35.1 
1:45.2 

2:11.2 



TEAM SCORING 



TEAM 





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Lafayette 

Atherton 

Flaget 

duPont Manual 
Pern Creek 



7 


10 


6 


9 


7 


10 


4 


9 


5 


4 


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6 


3 


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4 


8 


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10 
6 
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5 




7 
9 
5 
3 




10 
14 
8 
6 
4 




81 
62 
37 
19 
19 
14 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1955 



Page Five 



9. 200 Yard Freestyle Relay — 

Finals 
1. Lafayette (Eraser, Appley, 

Honican, Letchworth) 1:51.1 

1^. St. Xavier (Gregg, Whitty, 

Hagan, Hubbuch) 1:53. (i 

3. Atherton (Solomon, Jelsma, 

Wiecks, Walker) 1:54.0 

4. Flaget (Reid, Obst, Struck, 

Karem) 1:59.0 

5. Manual (Biakenian, Bierbaum, 

Hemmer, Brown) ,-- 2:09.3 

CLASS "B" 

Results 

University 51 

Madison-Model 47 

Newport 32 

Berea Foundation 31 

Eastern i- 10 

Holmes 9 

1. 50 Yard Freestyle — 

Heat No. 1; Litkenhous, Eastern (:29.4); 
Derrick. Newport, (:30.2); Hollingsworth, 
University (:SI.5); Utz, Newpoit (:33.2); 
Strunk, Beara Foundation (:34.6). 
Heat No. 2: Hatch. Madison-Model (:27.3); 
Johnson, Holmes (:28.0); Adams, Univer- 
sity (:28.5); Rose, Berea Foundation 
(:28.6); Gibbs, Madison-Model (:31.6). 



2. 



50 



1. Hatch, Madison-Model :27.3 

2. Adams, University :28.3 

3. Rose, Berea Foundation :28.2 

4. Johnson, Holmes :28.4 

5. Litkenhous, Eastern :29.0 

6. Derrick, Newport .30.0 

Yard Breaststroke — • 

Heat No. 1: Hagan, Eastern (:34.7); Routh, 
Berea Foundation (:44.5); Ebert, New- 
port (:49.4); Hoskins, Berea Foundation 
(.50.1). 



3. 



50 



Heat No. 2: Porter, Madison-Model (:32.7); 
Weinman, University (:38.5); Wander, 
Newport (:38,4). 

Finals 
Porter, Madison-Model :3" 1 

Hagan, Eastern :3G.t 

Weinman, University :3^.1 

Wander, Newport :?" ''. 

Ebert, Newport :47.7 

Bill Routh, Berea Foundation 

(disqualified) 44.7 

Yard Backstroke — 

Heat No. 1: Huber, University (:34.7); 
Litkenhous, Eastern (:37.6); Hardesty, 
Newport (:.38.0); Peper, Newport (:40.9); 
Parsons, Berea Foundation (:41.6). 
Heat No. 2; Hatch, Madison-Model (:33.2): 
Johnson, Holmes (:33.6); Wenneker, Uni- 
versity (:34.9); Noss, Berea Foundation 
(:35.7); Saufley. Madison-Model (:38.6). 

Finals 

Hatch, Madison-Model .32.4 

33.7 



2. Johnson, Holmes 

3. Huber, University 

4. Wenneker, University _ 

5. Noss, Berea Foundation 

6. Litkenhous, Eastern 



34.7 
35.6 
36.3 
37.0 



4. Fancy Diving — 

Finals 

1. Adams, University 79.25 

2. Routh, Berea Foundation 64.7 

3. Derrick, Newport 58.4 

4. Roberts, Berea Foundation 55.8 

5. Weinman, University 50.6 

fi. Johnson, Holmes 48.0 

7. Wander, Newport 45.3 

8. Blue, Madison-Model 31.4 

."). 75 Yard Individual Medley — 

Heat No. 1: Sensel, Newport (:55.8); 
Stephenson, Berea Foundation (:59.8); 
Hagan, Eastern (:59.7); Gibbs, Madison- 
Model (1:02.9); Kew, Newport (1:03.6). 
Heat No. 2: Rose, Berea Foundation (:55.8); 
Hughes, Madison-Model (:57.3); Huber, 



TEAM SCORING 















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TEAM 


50 Yard 
Freestyle 


50 Yard 
Breaststrok 


A! 
la PQ 


Fancy 
Diving 


75 Yd. Ind 
Medley 


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7 


9 


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51 


Madison-Model 


7 


7 


7 





4 


12 


10 


47 




1 
4 


5 




2 


4 
8 


7 
G 


7 
5 


8 
6 


32 




31 


Eastern 


2 


5 


1 





2 








10 




3 





5 


1 











9 







Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1955 



University (:57.6); Taylor, University 
( :55.1) — disqualified. 
Finals 



1. Sensel, Newport 

2. Rose, Berea Foundation 

3. Hug-hes, Madison-Model 

4. Huber, University 

5. Hagan, Eastern 

6. Stephenson, Berea Foundation__- 
150 Yard Medley Relay — 

1. Madison-Model (Hatch, Porter, 
Blue) 

2. University (Wenneker, Weinman, 
Hollingsworth) 

3. Nevv^port (Pabst, Wander, 
Den-ick) 

4. Berea Foundation (Noss, 
Stephenson, Strunk) 

200 Yard Freestyle Relay— 

1. University (Taylor, Clarke, 
Lowenthal, Adams) 

2. Madison-Model (Hatch, Hughes, 
Saufley, Blue) 

3. Newport (Sensel, NeCamp, 
Kreutzer, Stanfield) 

4. Berea Foundation (Fiske, Baker, 
Pennington, Hoskins) 



54.2 
55.5 
56.6 
58.4 
58.0 
00.1 



1:34.5 
1:35.2 
1:46.2 
1:47.8 

1:58.0 
1:58.5 
2:12.7 
2:19.1 



CLASS "C" 
Results 

Bellevue 49 

Lexington Catholic 40 

Bardstown 35 

Beechwood 29 

St. Joseph Prep 9 

Danville 3 

1. 50 Yard Freestyle — 

Heat No. 1: Hammond, Bardstown (:29.3); 
Minor, Danville (:31.8); Hess, St. Jocsph 
(:33.1); Snidep, Bardstown (:33.4); D. 
Hill, Danville (:34.4); Danville (:34.4); 
Whelan, St. Joseph (:35.5). 
Heat No. 2: Meyer, Lexington Catholic 
(:28.0); Tully, Bellevue (:28.7); Banret, 
Lexington Catholic (:28.9); Giles, Bellevue 
(:30.8); B. Hill, Beechwood (:31.3); Vander- 



mark, Beechwood (:32.4). 
Meyer set a new record in this heat, breaking the old maric 
of :28.6 set by Skipper Adams, University High, in 1954. 



Finals 

1. Meyer, Lexington Catholic 

2. Tully, Bellevue 

3. Ban-ett, Lexington Catholic -_. 

4. Hammond, Bardstown 

5. Giles, Bellevue 

6. B. Hill, Beechwood 

50 Yard Breaststroke — 

Heat No. 1: Burba, Bardstown 



28.2 
28.6 
29.0 
29.3 
31.5 
32.0 



(:39.5); 



Salas, St. Joseph (:45.2); Brooks, Bards- 
town (:46.6); Hutchings, St. Joseph (:55:5); 
Dykes, Danville (46.9) — disqualified; Sel- 
lers, Danville (:67.9) — disqualified. 
Heat No. 2: Meyer, Lexington Catholic 
(:35.2); Bailer, Beechwood (:36.5); Grant, 
Lexing-ton Catholic (:46.3); Cavana, Belle- 
vue (:48.8); Lamping, Bellevue (:49.3). 
Meyer set a new record in this heat^ breaking his own mark 
of :36.2, set in 1954. i 



1. 
2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 



Finals 

Meyer, Lexington Catholic 

Bailer, Beechwood 

Burba, Bardstown 

Salas, St. Joseph 

Grant, Lexington Catholic 
Brooks, Bardstown 



36.1 
36.8 
36.9 
44.1 
44.8 
46.0 



3. 



50 Yard Backstroke — ■ 

Heat No. 1: Hammond, Bardstown (:35.8); 
Wright, Danvile (:43.2); Guthrie, Bards- 
town (:45.8); Martin, St. Joseph (:48.8); 
Nolan, St. Joseph (:40.1) — disqualified. 
Heat No. 2: Tully, Bellevue (:36.2); Men- 
dell, Bellevue (:36.8); Elo, Beechwood 
(:37.2); Haney, Lexington Catholic (:41.3); 
Lee, Beechwood (:45.8); Stallard, Lexing- 
ton Catholic (:49.9). 

Finals 

1. Hammond, Bardstown :35.5 

2. Mendell, Bellevue :36.5 

3. Tully, Bellevue 37.0 

4. Elo, Beechwood :38.9 

5. Haney, Lexington Catholic :41.3 

6. Wright, Danville :45.0 



TEAM SCORING 













>> 


1 
0) 








o 






sS 






TEAM 


0) 
O '- 




-a P 
o °s 




;2s 


CM M 




Bellevue 


7 





9 


12 


7 


14 


29 


Lexington Catholic 


11 


9 


2 


3 


5 


10 


9 


Bardstown 


3 


5 


7 


3 


9 


8 


3 


Beechwood 


1 


5 


3 


4 


12 


4 


49 


St. Joseph Prep 





3 











6 


40 


Danville 








1 








2 


35 



THE KENTUCKY HI' 




(Left to 
Row: Coach 
picture: Bob 

Fancy Diving — 

Finals 

1. Cavana, Bellevue 70.8 

2. Tully, Bellevue 63.8 

3. Foster, Beechwood 55.2 

4.__Pyle, Bardstown 53.7 

5. O'Kelley, Lexington Catholic 47.7 

6. Barrett, Lexington Catholic 44.8 

7. Rhodes, Bardstown 40.5 

8. Bailer, Beeohwood 39.0 

9. Minor, Danville 25.8 

150 Yard Medley Relay— 

1. Beechwood, (Elo, Bailer, Hill)-- 1:45.1 

2. Bardstown (Guthrie, Burba, 
Higdon) 1:55.6 

3. Bellevue (Bradford, Lamping, 
Veatch) 2:01.3 

4. Lexington Catholic (Haney, 

Grant, Fister) 

St. Joseph (Fobiano, Romweber, 
Duncan) — disqualified 2:21.2 

200 Yard Freestyle Relay— 

1. Bellevue (Giles, Wuilluimier, 
Bradford, Mendell) 2:03.2 

2. Lexington Catholic (Johnson, 



4. 



O'Kelley, Wade, Barrett) 2:09.9 

Bardstowii (Snider, Higdon, 

Pyle, Brooks) 2:10.9 

St. Joseph (Hess, Nolan, 

Wlielan, Page) 2:14.0 

Beechwood (Deters, Foster, Hill, 

Vandermark) 2:19.4 

Danville (Boone, McGiee, Col- 
cough, Huff) 2:23.4 



MINUTES OF THE ANNUAL MEETING 

(Continued from Page One) 

had won the Game Guy Plaque of 1955, and 
he presented the award to the father, Larry 
Caudill, in the boy's absence. Commissioner 
L. V. Phillips of the Indiana High School 
Athletic Association gave the address of the 
evening. Mr. Phillips spoke on the subject, 
"Current Problems in High School Athletics." 
His talk was informative and interesting, 
and it was enjoyed by all present. 



TE FOR MAY, 1955 



1 ne next meeuiii^ ui uiie jiiacuuhvc v^vh»»iiih/lcc wcv» 
scheduled for Friday, 10:00 A. M., March 18, in the 
office of Athletic Director B. A. Shively, University 
of Kentucky. 

The meeting- adjourned at 12:30 P. M. 

Executive Board Meeting 

Held in Lexington, March 18, 1955 

As provided in the Constitution, the Executive 
Committee of the Kentucky High School Coaches 
Charity Association met on Friday morning during- 
the State Basketball Tournament, March 18, 1955, 
in the squad room of the University of Kentucky. 

Members of the executive committee present 
were: President, Edgar McNabb; Vice-President, 
Tom Green; Secretary-Treasurer, Joe Ohr; Sgt.-at- 
Arms, Estill Branham; and Manager of All-Star 
g-ames, 1955, Bob Miller. 

The purpose of the meeting was to make final 
selections and to check all data relative to football 
squad members of the East and West teams. Coach 
Roy King of the East and Coach Ed Rutledge of 
the West reported that necessary an-angements had 
been completed, with the exception of meeting with 
members of the Univei'sity of Kentucky coaching 
staff for their recommendations. This meeting was 



e tournament was over, 
meeting that two speak- 
program of the general 
igh School Coaches Char- 
le, April 14, 1955. Mr. 
h of the Western Ken- 
■■^r. Blanton Collier, foot- 
y of Kentucky. 
ast-West All-Star games 
)5. 
11:40 A. M. 

!ss Meeting 
April 14, 1955 

ing of the K.H.S.C.C.A. 

r Hotel, Louisville, on 
1955. 
to order at 7:40 with 

iresiding. 

le minutes of the meet- 

mittee, and they stood 

gular Business Meeting 
)1 Coaches Charity As- 
1 the Kentucky High 
)n "Athlete", it was 
lan) and seconded by 
ding of the minutes be 
1 carried. 

nized Theo. Sanford, 
y High School Athletic 
vely, Athletic Director 
ky. 
inked the coaches for 

expanding the spring 
e schools were fielding 

any other time in the 

e savings account, the 
ecking account of the 
es Charity Association 
Frankfort) moved and 
1 the motion that the 
'd. The motion carried, 
nade by the Secretary, 
^54-55 the total mem- 
bership was 689, with about 80 of this number pay- 
ing their own dues. This number is not absolutely 
correct, as four or five memberships are duplica- 
tions, caused by individuals paying their dues after 
the district has paid them, or because of the loss of 
membership cards. 

The membership total for the previous year, 
1953-1954, was 686. For the cui-rent year, 1955- 
1956, as of April 8, 1955, the membership was 622, 
with 613 of the members having their dues paid by 
their respective districts. 

Three districts did not avail themselves of the 
membership service provided by the Commissioner's 
Office. They were: Fifth, Thirty-first and Thirty- 
sixth. However, individual coaches are being regis- 
tered from these districts. 

It was announced that the coaches for the All-Star 
basketball teams, the East and the West, were to 
be: Goebel Ritter (Hazard), head coach of the East, 
his assistant, Stan Arnzen (Newport). T. L. Plain 
(Henderson) was announced as the head mentor of 
the West squad, while Gene Rhodes (St. Xavier) 
was to assist. 

Secretary Ohr was instructed by the vote of 
(Continued on Page Twelve) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1955 



Page Nine 



The Flying Dutchman 




There never has been a Game Guy Plaque 
winner who has received a greater ovation 
than James "Cap" Caudill did when he walk- 
ed up to the speakers' table to receive his 
award at the K.H.S.A.A. dinner during 
K.E.A. 

Every man present stood up in tribute to 
a kid who overcame a tough physical handi- 
cap to participate in athletics like other 
youngsters with all of their facilities. Pres- 
ent to see "Cap" honored were Larry Caudill, 
his dad and a Louisville Times sports writer, 
and his brother, Charlie, who is connected 
with Eastern Airlir,es. 

Probably a unique example was set by 
"Cap" since he is one of the two Game Guy 
champions who has gone on to college to con- 
tinue his participation in sports. Oral Miller, 
a previous winner, continued his wrestling 
career in college despite his blindness, while 
"Cap" is currently playing baseball with 
Centre College. 

"Cap" was delayed getting to the dinner 
because he was in Florida with the Centre 
nine. He forsook bus transportation back 
with the team to grab a plane and be on hand 
for his big night. Jack Dawson, a member of 
the Board of Control, did a masterful job 
in the presentation of the Fying Dutchman 
Award to this fighting lad. 

Kentucky's Game Guys are becoming the 
talk of athletic circles of the nation and cer- 
tainly have become one of the Common- 
wealth's finest traditions in high school 
sports. The Dutchman salutes "Cap" Caudill 
and all those young fighting athletes who re- 
fuse to let handicaps get them down. 

Indiana's Commissioner of Athletics, L. 
V. Phillips, won the hearts of Kentucky's 
school men, coaches and officials with a 
down-to-earth, common sense talk which 
has to go down in the history of these an- 



nual dinners as not only one of the best but 
one of the most timely and worthwhile. 

Commissioner Phillips' philosophy of the 
administration of athletics is sound as a 
dollar. It is easy to understand, after listen- 
ing to some of the problems he discussed, 
why the life of a commissioner of high school 
athletics can never be a "bed of roses." The 
administration of high school athletics in 
anybody's state calls for courage few possess. 
Take it from the Dutchman that the three 
commissioners he has met are terrific ex- 
amples for all athletics administrators to 
pattern from. My reference is to Lyle Quinn, 
of Iowa, L. V. Phillips of Indiana and our 
own Ted Sanford. 

In 1942 the Flying Dutchman started his 
travels over Kentucky conducting clinics for 
officials. Each year he has learned much 
from the chaps he is supposed to teach, and 
each year it has been a little more fun as 
other states extended invitations for him 
to conduct clinics and have the opportunities 
to meet more swell people. During these 
thirteen years the Dutchman has worked in 
ten states with officials in clinics but this 
vear of 1955 holds for him the greatest thrill 
of all. 

On September 24 your Dutch reporter 
will head for Indianapolis to conduct the an- 
nual basketball clinic for Indiana high school 
officials at the Lincoln Hotel. Indiana brings 
in representative officials from all of the 
associations of the state for the all-day ses- 
sion and they, in turn, go back to their areas 
to teach as they were taught. 

For years this clinic has been superbly 
done by the renowned H. V. Porter, but this 
time he asked Commissioner Phillips and 
his assistant, Bob Hinshaw, to "pass the 
torch" on to another interpreter, and those 
gentlemen pitched it south across the Ohio 
River. 

You Kentuckians, who have never been to 
one of those all-day Indiana sessions, just 
cannot know what enjoyable occasions they 
are. The finest fellows you will ever meet 
anywhere blow whistles in the Hoosier state. 
So you see that it is small wonder that we 
look forward with a lot of pleasant anticipa- 
tion to the Indiana high school clinic this 
fall. 

This is the Dutchman's last column until 
October. It is always a lot of fun to write it 
but it is even more fun to get the letters 
which come in or to see a crippled kid smile 
as he receives an award or to see the pride 
on a man's face when he receives a Corn 
Cob Pipe of Honor for just being a good guy 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1955 



to somebody else. Gotta pack now to catch 
an Eastern Airliner for Cuba to get things 
ready for the Youth Ambassador of Good 
Will Flight in June. Watch those kids write 
teenage history and read about it in LOOK 
magazine. 



More State Tournament Statistics 

1954-55 BASKETBALL DATA ON POINT 
VALUE OF PENALTY AND POSSESSION 

Part A — About bonus and double free throw 
penalties 

1. In first 29 minutes: (a) Average num- 
ber bonus penalty fouls: 13.62 per game, (b) 
Average point fraction scored from a bonus 
penalty: 1.5 per game, (c) Average number 
of fouls (1st 29 mins.) against a thrower: 
21.5 per game. 

2. In last 3 minutes: (a) Average number 
personal fouls other than those against a 
thrower: 2.25 per game (b) Average points 
scored on the 2 F. throws in (a) : 1.62 per 
game, (c) Average number of fouls (last 
3 mins.) against a thrower; 1.2 per game. 

3. General: (a) Time from 1st whistle to 
final gun: 1 hr. and 10 mins. per game, (b) 
Time consumed by last three minutes of 
clocktime: 7 mins. 10 sees, per game. 

Part B — About Value of Possession (separate 
record for each team) 

Average recorded for only those games in 
which the score in the last quarter is close 
enough to encourage "keep-away" and reck- 
less play by the team behind. 

A possession unit begins when the team 
gets control and it continues until the oppon- 
ent secures control. It extends through a try, 
rebound attempts, free throws by that team 
or any subsequent action up to the time the 
opponent secures control such as by intercep- 
tion or securing a rebound or control after a 
violation or successful goal. In a single pos- 
session unit, a team might score a field goal, 
be fouled and score 2 or more points on free 
throws, intercept a throw-in and score again. 

1. In first 29 minutes: (a) Average No. 
possession units: 54.5 per team per game, 
(b) Number possession units in which the 
team scored: 2 points, 24.1; only 1 point, 
1.9; 3 or more points, 1.1; points, 27.4. 

2. In last 3 minutes: (a) Average No. 
possession units : 6.3 per team per game, (b) 
Number possession units in which the team 
scored: 2 points, 2.2; only 1 point, 1.1; 3 or 
more points, .3; points, 3.1. 



U. K. COACHING CLINIC 

(Continued from Inside Front Cover) 

to continue last year's highly acceptable 
plan of holding special football, basketball 
and track conferences throughout each day 
for interested coaches. The conferences al- 
low the individual coaches to discuss special 
problems with the school lecturers at times 
when they are not talking on the regular 
clinic programs. 

More than 150 high school and small col- 
lege coaches attended the U. K. coaching 
school last year, and an even greater attend- 
ance is expected this year to hear some of 
the nation's most successful coaches give 
tips on coaching techniques and discuss the 
fine points of each game. Kentucky Athletic 
Director Shively, who serves as director of 
the coaching school, said copies of the com- 
plete schedule for the school will be sent to 
coaches throughout the state early in May. 
Registration for the school may be made by 
writing now to Shively in care of the Uni- 
versity of Kentucky Athletic Association, 
Lexington. 

Coach Wilkinson, who will be making his 
second appearance on the U. K. clinic pro- 
gram in five years, is one of the country's 
leading advocates of the Split T offense, 
and he holds a lifetime coaching record of 
nearly ninety per cent against rugged com- 
petition. Under the big Minnesotan's leader- 
ship, Oklahoma in the past seven years has 
attained virtually every honor in college 
football. The team holds the modern national 
record of thirty-one consecutive victories, 
and it had the best record in the country in 
'54, with ten wins against no defeats to 
finish third in the final polls. 

Iowa's Evashevski joins a long list of 
notable coaches who have lectured at the 
U. K. clinic. He provides something new in 
a discussion of his variations of the multiple 
offense. He is remembered at Michigan, 
where he captained the 1940 team, as the 
blocking scourge of the Big Ten. In 1941, 
he entered the coaching profession at Hamil- 
ton College, and he later served at Pittsburg, 
Syracuse, Michigan State and Washington 
State before tackling the Iowa job in 1952. 
It was as an assistant to Coach Biggie Munn 
at Syracuse, and Michigan State that he 
first became interested in the multiple of- 
fense which he has since modified with his 
own ideas. Evashevski also is recognized as 
an outstanding defensive tutor. 

Kentucky's contingent of Collier and Rupp 
again will share the spotlight with the visit- 
ing lecturers. Football chief Collier, a former 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1955 



Page Eleven 



Kentucky high school coach and one-time 
participant in the clinic, is in his second year 
with the Wildcats after a successful debut 
last season that gained him "Coach of the 
Year" honors in the Southeastern Confer- 
ence. The ex-Cleveland Browns' aide plans 
to tailor his discussions to the fundamental 
needs of high-school-level coaching as re- 
quested by the coaches association. Motion 
pictures also will be utilized to illustrate 
methods used in actual practice and under 
game conditions. 

Coach Rupp's talks will be centered around 
an explanation of the basic ingredients of 
teaching his particular brand of fast-break 
offense and other tactics used so success- 
fully during his amazing 25-year regime at 
the University. 

Assisted by Coach Harry Lancaster, Rupp 
will bring out time-proven suggestions re- 
garding all phases of the game, from scout- 
ing to individual defensive assignment. He 
is expected also to cover the new rules 
changes. 



FROM THE COMMISSIONER'S OFFICE 

(Continued from Page Two) 

the Association on the tournament should be 
approximately $80,000.00. A few tournament 
bills are still being received by the State 
Office, with the result that it is necessary to 
give an estimate of tournament profits at 
this time. A complete record of all receipts 
and disbursements will appear in a subse- 
quent issue of the Association magazine. 

One thousand eighty-nine basketball of- 
ficials and 323 football officials registered 
with the Association in 1954-55. Nine foot- 
ball rules clinics were held under the direc- 
tion of Dr. Lyman V. Ginger, and twenty- 
four football officials took the National Fed- 
eration football examination for the higher 
ratings. The basketball clinics were conduct- 
ed by Charlie Vettiner, as was the School for 
Basketball Officials. Mr. Vettiner held four- 
teen clinics. Additional meetings and clinics 
were held by the regional representatives 
who continued to render a fine service to the 
officials and schools in their respective areas. 
One hundred thirty-three officials took the 
basketball examination, with twenty-six 
being added to the "certified" list and seven- 



ty-seven receiving the "approved" rating. 

Three hundred twenty-three schools in- 
sured their athletes under the K.H.S.A.A. 
Protection Fund this year. Three thousand, 
four hundred ninety-six boys were insured 
in football; 6,711 in all sports except foot- 
ball ; and 193 in Physical Education. Six 
hundred thirty-nine claims, amounting to 
$13,724.89, have been paid to date. This 
figure is approximately $1,300.00 more than 
the amount reported a year ago for a com- 
parable period of time. The Board of Con- 
trol for 1954-55 gave each member school 
insuring its athletes in the Protection Fund 
a credit of $30.00. To date this free insurance 
has cost the Association $9,000.00, this 
amount having been transferred from the 
General Fund to the Protection Fund. 

Two schools have been suspended from 
the Association this year, and one placed on 
probation. One suspension came as a result 
of the violation of K.H.S.A.A. By-Law 17, 
Practice of Sportsmanship; the other for 
violation of By-Law 5, Section 1, Maximum 
Number of Semesters. The school placed on 
probation was judged guilty of having violat- 
ed By-Law 17. 

Interest in spring sports continues to in- 
crease. Eighteen schools sent entries to the 
Swimming Meet, which was held in Lexing- 
ton on April 2 under the supervision of the 
State Swimming Committee. The increasing 
of the number of track regions from eight 
to twelve a year ago has been one of the 
factors in causing more schools to sponsor 
track. The largest number of baseball teams 
in Association history will go to the forty 
district tournaments this spring. There are 
more tennis and golf teams each year. 

1954-55 has been a good year for the 
K.H.S.A.A. Last July the State Office was 
moved to Lexington, a more central location. 
A new office building, modern in every detail, 
is now under construction. It is anticipated 
that this building will be completed within 
the next three or four months. The State 
Basketball Tournament set a new record in 
attendance and receipts, and the finances of 
the Association continue to remain in excel- 
lent condition because of the tournament 
profits. 

If the program of the K.H.S.A.A. has been 
an expanding one, it has been because our 
school men have been most helpful when 
called upon to assist in directing certain As- 
sociation projects and activities. Suggestions 
for the improvement of the Association are 
always welcomed by the members of the 
Board of Control and by the Commissioner. 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1955 



G. S. A. News 

By Martha G. Carr 

The Kentucky Federation of High School 
Girls Sports Associations held its first of- 
ficial election of officers on Thursday, April 
14, in the Kentucky Hotel, at Louisville. The 
officers chosen by member associations were: 
President, Miss Betty Langley, College 
High, Bowling Green; Vice-President. Mrs. 
Dew Drop Rowlett, Murray High School ; 
Secretary, Miss Lo.yce Meadows, Bellevue 
High School ; and Treasurer, Miss Robye 
Anderson, Bowling Green High School. With 
these very capable and enthusiastic officers, 
your organization should progress very 
rapidly. 

Plans for future statewide programs 
were discussed. The possibilities of district 
Play Days and summer camps for all G.S.A. 
members received enthusiastic support from 
all those present. The state constitution calls 
for two members-at-large from each district 
to serve on the Executive Council. These rep- 
resentatives, one faculty and one student, 
will be appointed for the first year as new 
members come in from all eleven districts. 
There is still time for your school to get an 
association organized before the close of 
school, ready to start off in the fall. Any 
future correspondence should be addressed 
to Miss Betty Langley, College High, Bowl- 
ing Green. 

The Kentucky organization of the National 
Section for Girls and Women's Sports, a sec- 
tion of the American Association for Health, 
Physical Education and Recreation, elected 
its state representatives for the coming year 
on April 14. Miss Elsie Sawver of Ea-tern 
Junior High School. Louisville, was chosen 
as State Representative to succeed Miss Doro- 
thy Taylor. She will have Miss Pe2;gy Stana- 
lind of the Universitv of Louisville to assist 
her as Chairman of the Women Officials 
Rating Board. This organization can give 
the G.S.A. lots of assistance through Sports 
Clinics and its many other services. 



K.H.S.C.C.A. MEETINGS 

(Continued from Page Eight) 

members present to vote in the affirmative on 
Proposal Six and to vote negative on all other 
proposals brought before the Delegate Assembly 
of the Kentucky High School Athletic Association, 
which was to meet at 2:00 P. M. at the Brown Hotel 
on April 15, 1955. 

McRight proposed that all coaches be required 
to attend the football and basketball officials' clinics. 
Tarry (Sedalia) moved and Bryant (Howe Valley) 



seconded that the above proposal be rejected. The 
latter motion carried. 

Crowe (Oxford) moved that the Kentucky High 
School Coaches Charity Association go on record 
as recommending that all coaches attend an of- 
ficials' clinic. The motion was seconded by Morgan 
(Butler) and was passed. 

Martin (Bardstown) inquired about claims on in- 
jured athletes and President McNabb explained the 
procedure as outlined in the Constitution and By- 
Laws of the K.H.S.C.C.A. 

Miller (Newport), manager of the 1955 All-Star 
g'ames, asked that members send him suggestions 
for the improvement of the games. 

Claiborne (Daviess County), asked that a study 
be made on the possibility of high school baseball 
being played during the summer and that the State 
Baseball Tournament be played in August rather 
than in June. 

The above question was answered by Commis- 
sioner Sanford, who said that the Association favors 
the plan, but since schools do not employ coaches 
for the summer, little could be done. 

Martin requested that a study be made for the 
declaring of a State Champion in football. After 
some discussion it was agreed for a three-man com- 
mittee to conduct this study and submit its findings 
to the next regular meeting. 

Branham (Winchester) introduced Coach Ed 
Diddle, basketball coach of the Western Kentucky 
State College "Hilltoppers". Coach Diddle told 
stories illustrating the improvement of basketball 
and officiating. His talk was interesting and 
humorous. He stressed the need for the improve- 
ment of home conduct at basketball games. 

Flora (Bellevue) introduced Blanton Collier, foot- 
ball coach of the University of Kentucky. Coach 
Collier announced the staff which was to appear at 
the Coaching School during the week of the All-Star 
games, and in a short informal talk praised the 
coaches of Kentucky for the excellent work being 
done despite handicaps of age and finances. He 
emphasized that the University of Kentucky is try- 
ing to imorove football and basketball in Kentucky. 

The following were elected: Edgar McNabb of 
Beechwood, President; Charles Combs of Hartford, 
Vice-President; Joe Ohr of Irvine, Secretary-Treas- 
urer; and Estill Branham of Winchester, Sergeant- 
at-Arms. The officers will take office March 1, 1956, 
and will leave office March 1, 1957. 

There being no further business, the meetting 
adjourned. 

Joe Ohr, Secretary, K.H.S.C.C.A. 



THE VALUABLE MAN 

Some fellows stay right in the rut. 

While others hit the throng. 

All men may be born equal, but 

They don't stay that way long. 

There's many a man with gallant air 

Goes galloping to the fray; 

But the valuable man is the man who's 

there 
When the smoke has cleared away. 
Some "don't get nothing" out of life 
But when their whines begin 
We often can remind them that 
They "don't put nothing" in. 

— Lexington Rotary Club Bulletin. 



MANY THANKS TO YOU 



We appreciate very much all of our many friends who made our room their 
headquarters during the State Basketball Tournament. It was nice to see 
all of you and we hope to see you again soon. 

Thanks for the nice orders and please rest assured that we will give each 
and everyone our prompt and personal attention. 

We were wondering, have you failed to place your order for award sweaters, 
chenille letters and other awards? We can give you very prompt service 
and would like to hear from you by long distance telephone requesting a 
salesman or requesting samples. 

The track and field meets as well as the tennis tournaments and the golf 
tournaments will soon be at hand. Could we take care of your order on any 
supplies for any of these events? 

BASEBALL AND SOFTBALL 

We have uniforms in stock ready for immediate delivery. Also Louisville 
Slugger Bats, MacGregor No. 97 baseballs, gloves, shoes and everything 
you need. 

Our spring and summer catalog has been sent you, however, another copy 
will be gladly mailed upon request. 

TROPHIES 

We are trophy headquarters and can take care of your requirements not 
only on trophies but also on medals, award certificates, ribbons and we do 
expert engraving and can make shipment the same day it is received. 

COME TO SEE US DURING YOUR SUMMER VACATION 



HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO. 

PHONE 104 

MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 

THE LARGEST INDEPENDENT EXCLUSIVE ATHLETIC HOUSE IN THE SOUTH" 



ORDER YOUR FALL ATHLETIC 
EQUIPMENT NOW 

HAVE A HAPPIER VACATION 

Soon the summer vacation period will be in full swing all 
over Kentucky. We hope your vacation will be pleasant, 
refreshing and relaxing. 

One thing that can add to your pleasure is to eliminate 
all worry about fall athletic equipment before you close up 
shop. Check over your football and basketball equipment 
now. Order what you need. Then that worry will be off your 
mind and you'll be ready for action when school opens in the 
fall. We'll be glad to be of service. Let us hear from you. 

A PERSONAL NOTE 

We want to thank you, our friends the Superintendents, 
Principals and Coaches, for the many orders you have placed 
with us during the past school year. We appreciate it. We have 
enjoyed the pleasant association. We shall do everything pos- 
sible to deserve your continued confidence. 




THE 

UTCLIFFE 



COMPANY 
INC. 



225 South Fourth Street 
LOUISVILLE 1, KENTUCKY 

P.S. If you need personal summer vocation equipment, drop us a line. 

P.P.S. It was good to have been able to renew acquaintances with so 

many of you at the State Basketball Tournament and the K.E.A. 



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