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Full text of "Athlete, The"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/athletethe195556unse 






L, 



High School Athlete 



du PONT MANUAL HIGH SCHOOL BASEBALL TEAM 
K. H. S. A. A. CHAMPIONS-1955 



. J^'"^ 




iri\ i 



I'? 



(Left to Right) Front Row: Johnson, Bradbury, Capt. Dawson, 
Catinna, Bamett, Mnrta. Second Row: Holton, Miller, Peterson, Bryan, 
Vassie, Coach Kimmel. Third Row: Mgr. Bland, Auter, Volk, Rankin, Nuss, 
Mgr. Oyler, 



i J 



Official Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 

AUGUST - 1955 




New President and Vice-President Elected 




Russell Williamson 



Roy G. Eversole 



Principal Russell Williamson of the Inez 
High School, Board of Control member 
representing Section 8, was elected Presi- 
dent of the Board and of the Kentucky 
High School Athletic Association at the 
summer meeting of the Association, held on 
July 29-30. Mr. Williamson's present term 
on the Board ends on June 30, 1956. He 
previously represented his area during the 
1943-46 period. 

The new Vice-President of the Associa- 
tion is Superintendent Roy G. Eversole of 
Hazard. Mr. Eversole's present term on 
the Board also ends on June 30, 1956. He 
is now in the last year of his second four- 
year term. 

The new President graduated from More- 
head State College with an A.B. degree, 
and he has done graduate work at the Uni- 
versity of Kentucky. He has spent all of 
the thirty years of his teaching, coaching, 
and administrative experience at Inez. He 
has been principal of the Inez High School 
for the past twenty-seven years. He coached 
his 1941 basketball team to the champion- 
ship of the K.H.S.A.A., and the team repre- 
senting his school was also crowned champ- 
ion in 1954. 



Mr. Williamson married Miss Nolda 
Cassady of Inez. They have three children: 
Jimmie, twenty-one, now attending Louis- 
ville Medical School ; Bobby, seventeen, en- 
rolled at Georgetown College ; and Mary Jo, 
fifteen, a sophomore at Inez High School. 
Mr. Williamson is a member of the Baptist 
Church. He also holds membership in the 
Masonic, Elks, and Lions fraternal and civic 
organizations. At the present time he is 
president of the Inez Deposit Bank. 

Superintendent Eversole, a graduate of 
Hazard High School, received his A.B. and 
M.A. degrees from the University of Ken- 
tucky. His coaching, teaching, and adminis- 
trative assignments have been as follows: 
Coach, Combs High School, 1929-31; prin- 
cipal, Jackson High School, 1931-34; prin- 
cipal, Broadway Elementary School, Hazard, 
1934-42; coach, Hazard High School, 1942- 
44; principal, Hazard High School, 1943-47; 
superintendent. Hazard City Schools, 1947 
to present. 

The new Vice-President was formerly 
president of the Hazard Lions Club. He is 
a Deacon of the First Baptist Church of 
Hazard, where he teaches the Men's Bible 
Class. He was named 1953 Man of the Year 
for Hazard and Perry County. He was vice- 
president of the Kentucky Association of 
School Administrators in 1953-54, and is a 
member of the Kentucky Commission for 
Elementary Schools. 

Mr. Eversole's wife is the former Miss 
Hazel Irene Robinson of Combs, Kentucky. 
They have three children: Reta Irene Ever- 
sole Fletcher, twenty-one, of Toledo, Ohio; 
Amy Colleen, sixteen, a student at the Haz- 
ard High School ; and Mary Carole, six, who 
attends the Broadway Elementary School 
at Hazard. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XVIII— NO. 1 



AUGUST, 1955 



.00 Per Year 



Report of Audit 

Louisville, Ky.. July 22, 1955 
Mr. Theodore A. Sanford, Secretary & Treasurer 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 
Lexington. Kentucky 
Dear Sir: 

Pursuant to instructions received, we have made an audit 
of the books and records of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL 
ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION for the period of one year be- 
ginning July 1, 1954, and ending June 30, 1955. In addition, 
we have prepared and attached hereto, statements of the 
Receipts and Disbursements, which, in our opinion, reflect the 
true financial condition of the Association as of June 30, 1955. 
The Cash Funds on Hand and U. S. Savings Bonds Accounts 
were found to be correct and verified by letter from your 
depositories. 

We find the records presented to us for the purpose of 
audit to be in agreement and in good condition. 
Respectfully submitted, 
JOHNSON-FOWLER & COMPANY 
by Huet L. Johnson 
Certified Public Accountant 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL 
ATHLETIC ACCOCIATION 

PERIOD FROM JULY 1, 1954 TO JUNE 30, 1955 
STATEMENT OF 
RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
RECEIPTS: 

Transfer of Account (Henderson 5 19,522.99 

Annual Dues - 442 @ $3.00 $ 1,326.00 

Officials' Dues — 

Football - 299 (S $3.00 897.00 

Basketball - 1076 @ $3.00 3,228.00 

Reciprocity Officials — 

Football - 24 M $1.00 24.00 

Basketball - 13 (S $1.00 13.00 

Officials' Fines - 10 iS $5.00 50.00 

School Fines - 7 (S $5.00 35.00 

Redeposits (Bad checks made good) 12.00 

Advertising in Magazine 800.00 

Subscriptions to Magazine - 1 (g $1.00___ 1.00 

Sale of Rules Books 178.35 

Sale of Equipment 250.00 

Sale of Bonds 17,736.00 

Ticket Sales - Annual Meeting 97.50 

Interest Received from Government Bonds 2,227.50 
Interest Received from Union Federal 

Loan Association 300.00 

Closed Savings Accounts (Henderson) ___ 18,396.02 

Short-term Loan 5,000.00 

Transferred from State Basketball 

Tournament Account 82,298.39 

Refunds 466.61 

Receipts - State Baseball Tournament ___ 375.50 133,691.87 



DISBURSEMENTS: 

Board of Control Expense $ 5,240.63 

Commissioner's Salary (Base Sal., $10,500) 8,418.24 

Expense - Commissioner's Office 351.65 

Ass't Commissioner's Salary 

(Base Sal., $7,000) 6,057.46 

Travel Expense - Assistant Commissioner 373.33 

Clerical Help 4,078.46 

Janitor Service 125.00 

Postage 1,645.22 

Office Supplies 431.41 

Purchase of New Equipment 47.70 

Insurance on Office Equipment 89.10 

Repairs on Equipment 347.10 

Office Rent 4,674.20 

Moving Office Equipment 566.67 

Purchase of Lot - Office Building 18,160.00 

Payment of Short-Term Loan 5,006.67 

New Office Building 24,977.17 



153,214.8 



Utilities 137.07 

Telephone and Telegraph 803.14 

Fidelity Bonds 42.50 

Printing 2,721.94 

Appropriation to Kentucky Coaches 

Charity Ass'n. 500.00 

Purchase of National Federation 

Publications 1,715.36 

Delegates to National Federation 

Meetings 3,730.74 

National Federation Dues 120.60 

Girls Division— N.S.G.W.S. 500.00 

Rental on Films 306.00 

Audit 38.45 

Bad Checks 21.00 

Meals - Annual Banquet 1,168.75 

Speaker - Annual Banquet 75.00 

Taxes: 

Federal Income Tax Withheld__$2,951.10 

Social Security 577.04 

City Income Tax Withheld 224.25 

State Income Tax Withheld___ 407.01 4,159.40 



Transfer of Funds: 

To Protection Fund 

Magazine : 

Printing and Engraving 2,915.31 

Mailing 75.00 

Officials' Division : 

Honorariums and Expenses - 

Clinics 870.67 

Printing and Miscellaneous 

Expense 29.95 

School for Basketball 

Officials 847.28 

Expenses - Regional Basketball 

Clinics 191.50 

Officials' Emblems 237.06 

Swimming: 

Expenses - State Swimming 

Committee 59.50 

Trophies and Medals 

(State Meet) 381.20 

Films 100.00 

Officials (State Meet) 98.90 

Mileage and Local Entertain- 
ment (State Meet) 1,026.59 

Golf: 

Mileage and Local Eentertain- 

Ment (State Tournament) __ 770.62 

Trophies and Awards 550.80 

Miscellaneous Expenses 2.50 



1,323.92 



Tennis : 

Mileage and Local Entertain- 
ment (State Tournament) 124.44 

Trophies and Balls 858.06 

Miscellaneous Expenses 22.60 

Refund on Expenses - 

National Tournament -150.00 1,155.10 

Track : 

Regional Expense 160.50 

Trophies and Medals 1,718.06 

State Committee Expense 434.12 

Officials 385.00 

Mileage and Local Entertain- 
ment (State Meet) 5,057.41 

Miscellaneous Expenses 

(State Meet) 77.00 

New Equipment 88.00 

Labor (State Meet) 20.00 

Films 262.40 

State Clinic 201.50 8,403.90 

(Continued on Page Two) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1955 



AUGUST, 1955 



VOL. XVIII— NO. 1 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association. 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington. Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Russell Williamson (1952-56), Inez 

Vice-President Roy G. Eversole (1952-56). Hazard 

Directors — W. B. Jones (1953-571 Somerset; Louis Litchfield 
1953-571, Marion: W. H. Crowdus (1954-68), Franklin; Jack 
Dawson (1954-58). Middletown ; Robert P. Forsythe (1955-59) 
Browder; K. G. Gillaspie (1955-59), Georgetown. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 

^rom the Commlsslonei s Office 

Football Clinics 

The 1955 clinics for football officials will be 
conducted by Dr. Lyman V. Ginger member of the 
National Federation Football Committee. The dates 
and sites of the nine meetings are as follows: 
August 22, University High School Lexington, 8:00 
P. M. (CDT); August 23, Newport High School, 
8:00 P. M. (EST); August 24 Ashland Y. M. C. A., 
8:00 P. M. (EST); August 25, Pikeville High School, 
8:00 P. M. (EST); August 26, Pineville High School, 
8:00 P. M. (EST); August 29, Kentucky Hotel, 
Louisville 8:00 P. M. (CDT); August 30, Bowling 
Green High School, 8:00 P. M. (CST); August 31, 
Mayfield High School, 8:00 P. M. (CST); Septem- 
ber 1, Henderson High School, 8:00 P. M. (CDT). 

Registration of Officials 

Previously registered football and basketball of- 
ficials have received their renewel application cards 
for the 1955-56 school year. Approximately seventy 
officials failed to file their 1954-55 reports on or be- 
fore the deadline set by the Board of Control for 
the submitting of reports, and it was necessary to 
impose a fine on each official who thus failed to 
comply with Association rules. It is an Association 
requirement that each registered official attend a 
clinic in the sport in which he is registered. Six- 
teen football officials and thirty-five basketball of- 
ficials were suspended in 1954-55 for failure to 
attend clinics. Unless an official plans to attend 
one or more clinics during the season and to file 
his report on member schools promptly at the end 
of the season, he should not apply for registration 
in the Officials' Division of the Association. 

National Federation Meeting 

K. H. S. A. A. President Carlos Oakley; Vice-Presi- 
dent Russell Williamson; Directors James L. Cobb, 
Roy G. Eversole, W. B. Jones, Louis Litchfield and 
Jack Dawson; Commissioner Theo. A. Sanford and 
Assistant Commissioner J. B. Mansfield represented 
the Association at the Thirty-Sixth Annual Meeting 
of the National Federation held at York Harbor, 
Maine, on June 26-30. A report of the meet- 
ing will appear in the September issue of the 
ATHLETE. 

Protection Fund Credit 

The Board of Control in its April meeting voted 
a dividend credit out of State Basketball Tourna- 
ment funds in the amount of $30.00 to each school 
insuring its athletes in the K. H. S. A. A. Protection 
Fund for 1955-56. This is the fourth year in which 
a dividend has been declared by the Board. 



REPORT OF AUDIT 

(Continued from Page One) 

Baseball : 

Refunds on District Tournament 

Deficits 2.517.59 

Trophies and Awards 959.61 

Refund on Regional Tournament 

Deficits 399.60 

Baseballs (State Tournament),. 87.70 

Transportation (State Tourna- 
ment G62.20 

Meals (State Tournament) 1,240.00 

Rental and Services - 

Parkway Field 342.75 

Ticket Sellers and Takers 

State Tournament) 25.00 

Lodging (State Tournament)-- 675.45 

Scorer (State Tournament) 25.00 

Umpires (State Tournament)— 174.80 

Expense - Assistant Manager 

(State Tournament) 53.20 



Filn 



st National Bank. Trustee, 
Annuity Trust Fund 



2.000.00 $135,976.74 



Receipts $153,214.86 

Disbursements 135.976.74 



BANK RECONCILEMENT: 



Bala 



per Bank Statement, 
30. 1955 



Less Outstanding Checks; 

No. 497 $116.00 

No. 511 62.70 

No. 523 123.10 

No. 552 57.30 

No. 554 16.41 

No. 577 56.50 

No. 578 102.03 



True Bank Balance Ju 



30, 1955 $ 17,238.12 



FUNDS ON HAND: 

Ca.sh Balance - First National 

Bank & Trust Company. _$ 17,238.12 
U. S. Savings Bonds (Value 

June 30, 1955) 75,470.50 

Savings Account - Union 

Federal Savings & Loan 

Association 10.000.00 

K.H.S.A. Protection Fund 413.12 



Total Funds on Hand, 

June 30, 1955 $103,121.74 

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
1955 STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 
RECEIPTS: 

Ticket Sales $103,453.75 

Profit on Program 3,685.11 

WLEX-TV 1,000.00 $108,138.86 



DISBURSEMENTS: 



Printing 



Awards 



Troph 
Postage 

Refunds on Tickets 

Public Liability Insurance 

Incidental Expenses - (16 Teams) 

Transilartation 

Taxi Service for Teams 

Lodging 2,916.00 

Meals 4,821.92 

Coliseum Rental 3,000.00 



632.14 

595.70 

65.00 

20.00 

602.76 

4,800.00 

1,196.75 

102.75 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1955 



Page Three 



Organist 50.00 

Officials' Fees and Expenses 1.576.40 

Scorers and Timers 400.00 

Sliot Cliart Keepers and Statisticians-- 200.00 

Ushers 100.00 

Ticket Sellers, Ticket Takers and Guards 2,189.00 

Public Address Announcers 150.00 

Telephone and Telegraph 66.13 

Films 198.00 

Towels and Towel Service 87.75 

Chamber of Commerce Ticket Sales 348.00 

Graves-Cox Ticket Sales 266.00 

Miscellaneous Expenses - Tournament 

Manager 31.50 

Honorariums and Expenses - Assistant 

Tournament Managers 966.67 

Bad Checks 44.00 

Detective Service 384.00 

Audit 30.00 



RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
K. H. S. A. A. PROTECTION FUND 
JULY 1, 1954 TO JUNE 30, 1955 
RECEIPTS: 

Transfer of Account 

(Henderson) $ 

Football Fees - 3521 (oi $2.50_$ 8,802.50 
Fees for All Sports Except 

Football - 6819 (q: §1.00 6,819.00 

Physical Edacation Fees - 

96.50 







S 7,202.00 
68.40 

58.50 

12.000.00 




Less Credit Allowed 


15,718.00 
_ 8,516.00 




Refunds - - _ 


22.50 
36.00 




Officials' Insurance Fees 

Football - 9 (if $2.50 

Basketball - 36 @ S1.00___ 




Cash Transferred from 

K.H.S.A.A. Account 






Total Receipts 




19,328.90 
$19,411.00 



DISBURSEMENTS: 

Postage $ 100.00 

Printing 238.50 

Refunds on Overpayments 13.00 

Claims Paid: 

Football 11,120.29 

Basketball 5,067.63 

Baseball 542.00 

Track 24.50 

Clerical Help 1,493.69 

Taxes : 

Federal Income Tax Withheld 302.36 

Social Security 70.00 

State Income Tax Withheld.. 8.41 

iCIty Income Tax Withheld.. 17.50 

Total Disbursements 

Cash Balance in Bank 

BANK RECONCILEMENT: 

Balance per Bank Statement, June 30, 1955 

Less Outstanding Checks ; 

No. 608 $ 6.00 

No. 674 35.00 

No. 740 40.00 

No. 747 10.00 

No. 749 5.00 

No. 762 26.00 

No. 766 6.00 

No. 767 40.00 

No. 769 5.00 

No. 772 12.00 

No. 774 9.00 

No. 776 5.00 

No. 778 14.80 

No. 779 124.05 

No. 780 4.50 

No. 781 69.00 

No. 782 2.28 

True Balance, June 30, 1955 



Eastern's Championship Golf Team 




(Left to Right) Tabb. Kemp, Watts, Curry. 

Eastern Golf Team 
Wins State Tournament 

The Eastern High School golf team won the 1955 State 
High School Golf Tournament with the low score of 951. The 
tournament was held at Ft. Knox on May 31-.Tune 1, and was 
managed by Supt. Herschel Eoberts. The Bowling Green High 
School team was runner-up with a score of 962, and St. Xavier 
was third with 969. 

George Stigger of K. M. I. was individual champion, with 
a score of 224, and Jimmy Gilbert of Bowling Green High 
School was runner-up with 230. Dave Vaughn of Fern Creek, 
Dave Watts of Eastern, and John Codey of dePont Manual 
tied for third place with scores of 235. 

Bobby Carrico of Ft. Knox was first in the putting contest, 
with Frank Floden of Holy Trinity second, and Terry Jones 
of Bowling Green third. Doyle Lovell of Middlesboro won the 
approaching contest, Terry Jones of Bowling Green was second, 
and Daniel Wiggins of duPont Manual was third. In the driv- 
ing contest Jim Berling of St. Henry was first with 286 yards, 
2iv. feet. John Haner of K. M. I. was second 



thi: 



■ith 270. 



folio 



(Easte 



Codey 



277 yards, and Ben Darnaby of Lafayette 

A summary of the individual scores 

224— Stigger (K. M. I.) 

230— Gilbert (Bowling Green) 

235 — Vaughn (Fern Creek), Watts 
(duPont Manual) 

236 — Kemp (Easti 

237— Marsch (J. 
ReFalo (St. Xavier) 

288— Curry (Eastern) 

239 — Carrico (Ft. Knox) 

240 — M. Conliffe (Flaget 

241 — Lally (St. Xavier) 

242— Pedley (K. M. I.), 
Xavier) 

243— Don Wood (Hopkinsville). N. Belcher (Bowling Green) 

244 — Floden (Male), Riley (Bowling Green) 

245 — G. Belcher (Bowling Green), Frantz (Ahrens), Ulrich 

M. Atherton) 

246— Owens (Shawnee) 

247— J. Conliffe (Flaget) 

248 — Sheene (Danville), Fannin, Ken Simpson (J. M, Ather- 
ton), Scheben (St. Henry) 

ier), Schuster (Flaget), Livesay 



), Young (Madison-Model) 
Atherton), Brinegar (Lafayette) 



, Berling (St. Henry) 
Tabb (Eastern), Schneider (St. 



(J. 



Hill (Male), Haner (K. M. L), 



al). 



ek) 



249— Brown (St, 
(Lafayette) 

250 — Ramsey (Male) 
R. Burgan (Lafayette) 

251— Wiggins (duPont M 
Logan (Eastern) 

252— Kennedy (Fe: 

253— Schnurr (St. 
(Prestonsburg), Harmi 

256 — Durham (St. 
Groves (Fern Creek) 

266— Hill 

267 — Darnaby (Lafayette), Knight (Danville) 

258— Holt (Hopkinsville) 

(Continued on Page Eight 



Lackey 
n (Danville) 
Augustine), Black 



urgan (Lafayette), 



(Hopkinsville), Cook 
, (duPont Manual), 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1955 



Kentucky High School Track Meet 

Lexington, Kentucky, May 20-21, 1955 
ASHLAND HIGH SCHOOL TRACK TEAM— K. H. S. A. A. CHAMPION— 1955 




(Left 
AUister. IJ. Patrick. .Sink. Twina 
Patrick, McPeek, Walter Jones, Fultz, Wesley J 



120 Yard Hurdles— 

1. Jones — Tilghman 

2. Boots — Eastern 

3. Hogg — Lafayette 

4. Haycraft — Eastern 

5. Patrick — Ashland 

Time: 15.7 
100 Yard Dash— 

1. Hills— Ashland 

2. Goins — Madisonville 

3. Hemmer — duPont Manual 

4. Lowen — Atherton 

5. Lawler — St. Joseph 

Time: 10.2 
Mile Run — 

1. Plummer — Danville 

2. Whelan— St. Joseph 

3. B. Dallas— Fulton 

4. Wood — Highlands 

5. Richter — Highlands 

*Time: 4:34.9 
880 Yard Relay— 

1. Valley 

2. Ashland 

3. duPont Manual 

4. Highlands 

5. Tilghman 

Time: 1:33.1 
440 Yard Dash — 

1. Lowen — Atherton 

2. Shively — Lafayette 

3. Rutledge — Ashland 

4. Thompson — Valley 

5. Gum — Henry Clay 

Time: 52.5 
180 Yard Hurdles— 

1. Hopper — Lafayette 

2. Hogg — Lafayette 

3. Vogel— Valley 

4. Boots — Eastern 

5. Oursler — duPont Manual 

Time: 20.7 



22.2 



880 Yard Run— 

1. Plummer — Danville 

2. Pique — Fulton 

3. Durham — Eastern 

4. Whitely — Shawnee 

5. Hall— Highlands 

Time: 2:02.4 
220 Yard Dash 

1. Hills— Ashland 

2. Goins — Madsonville 

3. Sheltoin— Valley 

4. Lowen — Atherton 

5. Lawler — St. Joseph 

Time: 
Mile Relay — 

1. Ashland 

2. Eastern 

3. Highlands 

4. Tilghman 

5. Valley 

*Time: 3:32.4 
Shot Put^- 

1. Shaw — Tilghman 

2. Everett— M. M. I. 

3. Rhodes — ^Tilghman 

4. Cambron — Plaget 

5. Lewis — Holmes 

Distance: 50' 4 1/4" 
Pole Vault— 

1. Roth— St. Xavier 

1. White — Holmes 

3. Ruff — Henderson Barret 

3. Lewis — Shawnee 

5. God'bey — duPont Manual 

5. James — Somerset 

5. Merritt— M. M.I. 

5. McKnight— Tilghman 

Height: 10' 8" 
Discus — 

1. Everett— M. M. I. 

2. McClearn — ^Madisonville 

3. Blocker— St. Xavier 



4. iRhudy— St. Xavier 

5. White — Holmes 

■'Distance: 149' 11" 
Broad Jump — 

1. Huskisson — Berea Found. 

2. Kuhn — Male 

3. Coone — Barbourville 

4. Brewer — Tilghman 

5. Smith— M.M.I. 

Distnace: 21' 9 1/4" 

High Jump — 

1. Murphy — Lafayette 
1. Schuette — Henderson Barret 
1. Armes — duPont Manual 
1. Huskisson — Berea Found. 
1. Norman — Stuart Robinson 

* New Record 

TOTAL POINTS 
Ashland 26 

Tilghman 20 1/4 

Lafayette 20 1/5 

Eastern _. 15 

Valley 15 

Danville 12 

Madisonville 12 

M. M. L 111/4 

duPont Manual 10 9/20 

Atherton 10 

St. Xavier 10 

Berea Foundation 9 1/5 

Highlands 9 

Fulton 7 

Holmes 7 

St. Joseph 6 

Henderson Barret 5 7/10 

Shawnee 4 1/2 

Male 4 

Stuart Robinson 3 1/5 

Barbourville 3 

Flaget 2 

Henry Clay 1 

Somerset 1/4 



THE KENTUCKY HI'GH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1955 



Page Five 



Twenty-Third Annual Kentucky High School Tennis Tournament 

Shawnee Park, Louisville — May 23-24. 1955 
SINGLES 
Brown - St. Xavier QUARTER-FINALS 

SEMI-FINALS 





Brown 


Brown - 


Bye 


Williams 




6-0; 6-0 


Williams - Atherton 


Walts - 
6-3; 6-0 




Bye 


H. Baughman 


H. Baughman- Stanforc 




Bye 


Walts 


Walts - Flaget 









Whalin - Mad.-Model 



Brown - Barret 



B. Adams-University 



B. Adams 
(Default) 



Washington-Owensboro 



Bye 

Hagberg - Bellevue 

Bye 

Jack Tarr - Eastern 

Bye 

Riggs - K. M. I. 



Bye 



Riggs 



Feige - Flaget 



Bye 



Feige 



Feige - 
6-1; 6^0 



Skipper Adams - Univ skipper Adams 



Bye 



English - 
(Default) 



Lewis - Garth 



English - Atherton 



English - 6-0; 6-2 



Wilson - Owensboro J- Baughman 

\ (Default) 

J. Baughman-Stanford | 

Dixius - Bellevue 



Dixius 



J. Baughman- 
6-3; 6-3 



Bye 



Hunter — Barret 



Bye 



Hunter 



Jim Tarr - Eastern 



Jim Tarr 



Bye 



Jim Tarr - 
(Default) 



Brown - 
6-2; 3-6; 6-0 





B. Adams - 
(Default) 


Washington 


Jack Tarr - 
6-4; 6-0 


Hagberg 


• 


Jack Tarr 





Jack Tarr - 
6-0; 6-0 



Feige - 
7-5; 6-4 



Jim Tarr 
6-3; 6-2 



FINALS 



Blown - 
3-6; 6-3; 6-1 



Jim Tarr 

6-1; fi-2 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1955 



St. Xavier 



TENNIS DOUBLES 
QUARTER-FINALS 

SEMI-FINALS 



Bye 



St. Xavier 



Henderson Barret 



St. Xavier (Default) 



Bye 



Georgetown 



Stanford 



Owensboro 



Henderson Barret 




Stanford 


Stanford (Default) 




Owensboro 





FINALS 



St. Xavier - 6-2; 6-3 



Bye 



University 



Bye 



Flaget 



University 



Flaget 



Flaget- 6-3; 6-1 



Bye 



Eastern - 6-0; 7-5 



Eastern - 6-2; 7-5 



Eastern 



Schools' Ratings on Basketball Officials 



The following ratiners were received on basketball officials 
regristered with the K.H.S.A.A. during 1954-55. The numbers 
following each name reoresent resoectively the number of 
Excellent, Good, Fair, and Poor ratines given to the official. 

Abernathy, Ernest. Jr.. 0-13-1-1: Adams, Roy 0-1-3-0: Ad- 
kins, Raymond C, 8-12-4-1 : Akers. Ted L.. 5-0-1-1 : Alexander, 
.Tack M.. 0-0-0-2 : Alexander. Re\ E.. 4-1-1-0 : Alexander. Wil- 
liam. 2-1-0-0: Alford, William C. 0-4-2-0: Allen, Jack, 2-15-0-0: 
Allen, Stanley M.. 0-3-0-0: Allison. Roy. 4-2-2-0: Almond. Alvin, 
3-6-0-0 : Anderson, Elmer D.. 0-8-1-0 : Arnold, Kenneth L.. 
4-4-3-0: Arnzen, Stanley, n-5-0-0 : Ashby. Carl C. 0-1-0-0: 
Ashley, Kenneth, 4-9-12-2: Atkinson, Charles D.. 0-4-2-2: Austin, 
Bruce. 6-12-3-1. 

Bailey, Arville. 3-7-0-0 : Bailey. George. 0-1-0-0. Bailey. 
Kerney. 3-1-2-0 : Baird, Bill. 4-5-2-0 : Bnker. Charles J. 0-1-1-0 : 
Baker. Dee C. 0-4-0-3 : Baker. Edear C. 0-5-2-0 : Baker. .Tames 
E., 16-22-3-0 : Baker, Samuel, 1-3-1-0 : Ball. Denver, 2-7-2-0 : 
Ballard. Clark. 0-4-0-0: Ballard. Jack H.. 11-8-1-0: Ballard. 
Shirley L.. 2-3-2-0: Barker. Harold. 0-4-1-0 : Barker. Walter D.. 
1-1-3-0: Barlow. James L.. 1-0-0-0: Barnett. J. W.. 6-23-5-1: 
Barrett. Jackie. 0-1-0-0: Rarrett. Lloyd. 1-11-2-0: Bartlett. 
Howard, 2-1-0-0: Bartley, Robert E.. 0-1-0-0: Barton, Walter, 
0-3-2-1 : Basham, Bailey, 1-5-1-1 : Begley, James P., 5-26-0-1 : 
Bell, Harry Lee, 3-8-1-2 : Bell. Thomas P.. 17-9-0-0 : Bennett. 
Bert A.. 0-4-6-0 ; Bennett, Gene, 1-0-0-0 : Betz, Dick, 20-28-3-3 : 
Betz, Don, 2-5-2-0 : Bigelow. Raloh, 3-2-1-0 : Binder, Keith. 
2-3-6-0 : Black, Charles D.. 3-5-0-0 : Black, Clarence, 3-5-1-0 : 
Black, Clarence. 3-5-1-0 : Blackburn. Bill. 7-3-3-1 : Blackburn, 
Clyde W., 3-10-3-0 : Blackburn, Viley O.. 0-0-1-0 : Blankenship. 
Zeb, 2-1-0-0: Blanton, Homer. 13-17-0-2: Blumer. Sherry. 
3-15-1-0 ; Boemker. Bob. 3-3-0-1 : Bohanan. James 3-0-2-1 : 
Bolander. Albert J.. 1-1-0-1: Bolin Herman. 0-6-2-0: Bonner. 
William. 0-1-0-0 : Bowen, Gayle B.. 3-8-1-0 : Bowling. Floyd 
"Jack", 0-1-0-0 : Bowman, Earl G., 1-0-0-0 : Boyd, Thomas, 
1-3-2-1 ; Boyles, Jerry F.. 0-8-2-0 : Bozarth, C. H.. Jr.. 1-2-4-1 : 
Bradshaw, Bill. 0-0-3-0; Brashears. Bobby F.. 0-1-2-0: Brantley. 
Alfred C, 3-20-3-3 : Braun. Edgar F. "Bud", 2-3-1-0 : Braun, 
Bobert, 10-9-1-2 : Breeding. Bruce C. 0-2-1-0 : Brewer. Randell 
L., 0-2-3-0 : Brichler, Joseph A., 0-1-0-0 : Bridges, Bennie E., 
12-5-0-0 : Brizendine. Vic. 8-45-4-0 : Broderick, Carroll A., 
33-10-3-0 : Brooks. Carroll C. 0-4-0-0 : Brooks. Charles D.. 
0-3-0-0 : Brooks, James A.. 5-8-5-2 : Brooks. Jerry M.. 0-4-1-0 ; 
Brotzge. Maurice .T.. 0-2-0-0: Brown, B. B., 0-7-3-0: Brown, 
Bryant, 2-27-7-1 ; Brown, Carlton. 3-18-3-0 : Brown, Charlie, 



, James H.. 4-2-0-0: 
nmv. 0-2-0-0 : Brown- 
Joseph W.. 2-13-4-1 : 
Clyde, 0-3-2-0 : Bryant. 



0-1-1-0 : Brown, Doyle. 0-1-0-0 : Brov 
Brown, James W.. 12-7-4-2 : Brown. 1 
ing. William H., 0-2-0-0 : Brummett 
Bryant. William B., 2-5-1-1 : Bryant, 
Koy P.. 0-5-0-1 : Buck. Alfred E., 5-5-3-0 : Buis. Nathaniel A.. 
5-19-2-3 : Bunch, George, 0-4-1-0 : Bunch, Richard, 0-7-1-2 ; 
Bunnell, Kenneth L.. 0-2-1-0 : Bunning. James P.. 0-4-1-0 : 
Burchett. Lanier. 4-7-2-0 : Burke. David L., 0-6-1-0 : Burke. 
Raymond. 8-12-5-4 ; Bush, Denver, 0-8-0-0 : Butcher, Paul, 
0-4-0-0 : Butler, Donald A., 0-6-5-1 : Butte, Eugene, 1-1-3-0. 
Calderone. Joseph J., 0-0-0-1: Calhoun Foster C. 6-15-6-0; 
Campbell, John E.. Jr.. 22-8-3-0: Campbell. John D.. 3-4-1-0; 
npbell. William C. 0-3-0-0: Carnes. Richard. 0-0-1-0; Car- 



penter. Bill. 3-21-1-1 ; 
.3-6-1-0 : Cartee, Ralph. , 
Cartwright. William G.. Jr., 
Cash. Randall E., 0-3-1-0 : 
Cassady, Richard, 14-29-2-0 : 
Vernon R.. 1-2-1-0 : Cathey, 



Herman. 0-1-0-0 : Carrithers. Bill, 

27-9-1-0: Carter, Leslie, 3-1-0-0: 

, 0-0-1-0 : Case, David A., 1-8-0-6 ; 

Cassady, Charles W., 0-16-1-0; 

Casteel, Ralph M.. 1-8-3-2 : Gates, 
S.. 3-2-0-1 : Caudill. .Tames, 
0-5-0-1: Champion, Paul, 0-2-1-0; Chaney, Joseph G., 8-9-2-0; 
Chappell, Joe, 14-11-2-1: Chattin, Charles, 5-9-0-2: Chattin, 
Ernest P.. 17-10-0-0: Chesnut. Ray. 0-2-0-0: Chilton, William 
R.. 1-0-1-0: Chinn, William, 0-2-0-2: Chumbler, W. W., 1-15-6-0: 
Ciolek. Robert W.. 1-2-2-2 : Clark. Charles E.. 17-23-2-1 : Clark, 
Tom. 5-2-0-2 ; Clay, O. K.. 0-1-0-0 : Coe. Harold. 0-1-1-0 : Coffey, 
Kenneth B., 7-12-2-1 : CoHey, Larry. 0-0-1-0 : Collins. Elmer F.. 
0-0-2-2 : Colonel. Charles, 3-2-0-0 : Combs, James G., 5-18-3-0 : 
Raymond C, 1-4-1-0: Combs, Travis. 8-0-3-0: Combs. Walter H.. 
8-18-3-0: Conley. George D.. 17-1-0-0; Conley. Grover. 1-0-0-0: 
Connor, James R.. 2-2-1-0: Connor. Neal. 2-4-1-0: Coomer, 
Charles, Jr., 0-3-2-0 : Cooper, John W.. 5-8-0-0 ; Cooper. War- 
ren. 17-9-0-0 : Coulter. William M.. 0-3-1-1 : Cowley. Hays L., 
Jr.. 0-0-1-1; Cox, Layton, 24-27-4-1: Cox, William J.. 3-11-0-0: 
Craig, John G.. 1-5-2-2 ; Craig. Randy, 0-5-4-0 : Crawford, Fred 
T.. 10-12-5-0 : Creasey. Fred, 0-4-1-0 ; Crosthwaite, John S.. Jr., 
12-4-1-3 : Crouch. Ronald B.. 3-4-1-1 : 
4-9-0-4 : Crowell. Jimmie R.. 0-4-0-0 : 
0-1-0-0 : Cubbage. Tom. 1-5-1-2 : Culliva 
mins. Albert. 3-6-7-1 : Current. 
Donley, 0-2-2-2. 

Damico. Ernie. 0-18-3-1: Damron. William B.. 2-1-0-0: Daniel. 
James O., 0-2-2-1 : Davenport. Robert B., 2-8-4-0 ; Davenport, 
William T., 0-2-0-0 : Davis. Donald, 3-10-2-0 ; Davis, Dwight R., 
Jr., 1-12-1-0; Davis, Ralph E.. 6-7-1-0: Davis, Richard, 0-1-0-0; 



Emmett H.. 
utcher. Joseph L., 
an. Jim. 4-7-3-2; Cum- 
Ray, 0-0-0-1 : Cuzzort, 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1955 



Page Seven 



Kentucky High School Baseball Tournament 

Parkway Field, Louisville, Kentucky 
June 10-11, 1955 



Newport (5) 




1 
Hall (6) 1 


Salem (4) 


Madison-Model 


(1) 1 


Ashland (2) 


1 
Central City (8) | 


Greensburg (1) 


duPont Manual 


(8) 1 



Hall (4) 



Salem (3) 



Central City (4) 



duPont Manual (10) 



Hall (3) 



duPont Manual (13) 



duPont Manual - Champidn 



De Coursey, Edgar Jr., 8-20-4-0 ; DeMoisey, Fox, 5-21-3-1 ; De- 
Moisey, J. Frenchy, 1-0-0-0 ; DeMoisey. Truett R., 4-30-2-1 ; 
Deskins, Tilden, 3-2-1-0 : DeVary, Blackie, 0-1-0-0 ; Dexter, Sam, 
2-27-6-1 : Diddle, Eddie A., Jr., 6-11-1-0 ; DiMuzio, Robert, 
0-2-0-0 : Dixon, William, 1-0-0-0 ; Dobson, Kenneth, 1-0-0-0 ; 
Doehring,' D. E., 0-12-0-0 : Dotson, John B., 19-11-1-0 ; Downing, 
Dero, 54-14-1-0; Drake, Richard, 0-6-1-0; Dromo, John, 13-8-0-0; 
Qrye, James E., 0-2-1-0 ; Dubrock, Donald M., 0-1-0-2 ; Duncan, 
Earl S., 0-16-5-0 ; Dunn, Lynn, 0-3-1-2 ; Durbin, Louis E., 
1-0-0-0 : Durkin, Jack H., 15-32-3-0. 

Eads, Walter, 3-6-1-0 ; Eagle, Carl, 8-12-1-2 ; Earle, Herschel, 
2-6-1-0 ; Eaton, James M., 4-8-2-4 ; Eddings, Forrest, 1-13-1-6 ; 
Edelen, Ben R., 35-30-8-1 ; Edens, Ray D., 0-9-0-0 ; Edwards, 
Hubert, 0-0-1-0 : Ellington, James E., 2-7-2-0 : Ellis, Jack D., 
1-2-0-0 ; EUspermann, George, 1-2-1-0 ; Elovitz, Carl, 0-9-0-1 ; 
Elrod, W. T., 14-10-3-3 ; Estes, A. D., 0-3-0-0 ; Everette, George, 
0-1-0-0; Eversmeyer, Lysle K., 0-1-2-0; Ewen, Jack, 2-2-2-0; 
Ewing, C. M. "Hop", 0-19-4-0. 

Fagues, Homer, 0-9-1-0 ; Fanning, Homer, 11-10-3-1 ; Farley, 
James F., 1-2-0-0 ; Farmer, John, 0-7-2-3 ; Farmer, John Clay 
"Jack", 0-1-0-0 ; Farris, Abe, 0-1-0-1 ; Faulconer, Leroy P., 
0-2-2-0; Ferrell, Doc, 16-24-0-0; Fey, Allen, 1-14-2-1; Fields, 
Joe Daryl, 1-10-6-0 ; Figg, Charles R., 1-13-1-1 ; Finley, Ronald 
N., 1-0-0-0 ; Fish, Earle G., 0-2-1-0 ; Fish, William R., 0-1-0-0 ; 
Fisher, W. B., 8-20-1-0 ; Fitchko, Bill, 25-3-2-1 ; Fleenor, Francis 
J., 4-13-9-1 ; Flynn, Robert D., 27-18-3-2 ; Forsythe, Robert, 
21-13-0-0; Foster, Joseph W., 0-1-0-0; Foster, William R., 
6-14-6-2 : Fraley, James, 1-14-5-1 ; Franklin, Jim, 1-4-1-0 ; 
Fritts, James W., 2-0-0-0 ; Fritz, Sherman, 9-15-1-0 ; Fugate, E. 
Hugh, 1-17-7-2. 

Gaither, Gene, 1-17-3-1 ; Gaither, Jack, 0-20-6-1 ; Gant, W. G., 
Jr., 0-4-0-1 ; Gardner, Daniel H., 7-24-3-2 ; Gardner, Howard E., 
6-23-5-4 ; Garrett, Nevil M., 0-1-0-0 ; Gary, Robert R., 0-0-0-1 ; 
Gates, Thomas F., 0-2-3-0 ; Gates, William A., Jr., 4-9-1-1 ; 
Gentry, David R., 0-1-1-0 ; Gettler, John F., 2-17-1-1 ; Gibson, 
Romulus D., 0-6-0-1 ; Gillenwater, Powell B., 0-6-0-0 ; Gillaspie, 
Robert, 6-3-2-0; Gillespie, Robert C, 6-23-4-2; Gilvin, Allie F., 
2-2-0-0 ; Gish, Delmas, 0-2-0-0 ; Goebel, Bill, Jr., 0-2-1-0 ; Goetz, 
Larry C, 3-2-0-0 ; Coins, Bobby, 0-12-1-1 ; Golden, Billy Joe, 
13-19-2-0 ; Goley, James, 0-0-2-1 ; Goodin, Charles L., 0-2-0-0 ; 
Goranflo, R. E., 13-20-8-1 ; Gordon, Gene, 0-2-5-1 ; Gosnell, Char- 
les, 0-1-0-0; Grace, Charles K., 1-1-3-4; Grace, H. E., Jr., 
1-3-4-7 ; Gray, Raymond, 3-6-5-0 ; Green, Tolbert E., 2-11-3-0 ; 
Green, Walter, 9-9-2-0 ; Greene, Omar P., 0-1-0-0 ; Greenslait, 
James W., 0-2-0-0; Griffin, W. B., 1-6-3-2; Griffith, Daryel, 
1-0-0-0, Grisham, Jesse, 3-16-4-0 ; Grissom, William H., 1-12-2-1 ; 
Guskert, Elmer B., Jr., 0-1-1-1 ; Gustafson, Alford "Gus". 
31-22-8-4. 

Hackworth, Harvey, 0-4-3-0 ; Hadden, Newell P., Jr., 22-32-8-6 ; 
Hagan, Joseph E., 18-29-2-1 ; Hagerman, Bart, 0-6-4-1 ; Hale, 
Don C, 10-16-7-0 ; Haley, Dalton D., 13-9-6-0 ; Haley, James, 
0-2-1-0; Hall, Billy Joe, 1-7-5-0; Hall, Royal A., Jr., 0-2-2-4; 
Hambrick, Walter, 3-5-0-0 ; Hammond, William, 1-0-0-0 ; 
Hammons, Abe L., 24-12-6-1 ; Hammons, Norman, 4-8-1-0 ; 
Hammons, William E., 6-4-0-0 ; Hanberry, H. Carroll, 0-0-0-1 ; 
Hancock, Morris W., 0-0-4-1 ; Hancock, Thomas E., 1-7-0-3 ; 
Haney, Paul E., 4-8-4-1 ; Hardin, Ben W., 0-9-1-0 ; Hardin, Jack 
H., 0-4-0-0 ; Harmon, Charles W., 0-6-0-0 ; Harrell, Bill D., 
6-3-0-0 ; Harris, George F., 10-6-2-1 ; Harris, Wallace R., 
1-3-1-0; Harris, William A., 2-1-0-0; Hartley, William E., 
1-0-X-O; Hash, Ova, 0-1-0-0; Uayden, Samuel J., 2-1-0-0; Hayes, 



St. Xavier Best in Tennis 




(Left to Right) Brother Bonaventure, St. Xavier tennis 
coach; Maxwell Brown, St. Xavier, state singles champion 
and member of the doubles championship team ; Thomas Fallon, 
St. Xavier, of the doubles team, 

Charles R., 8-34-3-0; Haynes, John, 3-19-7-2; Head, Elmo C, 
1-4-0-0 ; Heldman, John, Jr., 25-28-7-1 ; Henderson, Robert L., 
9-22-3-1 ; Henry, Maxwell, 0-2-0-0 ; Hewitt, Raymond T., 
4-9-1-1 ; Hewling, Franklin C, 3-5-1-0 ; Hewling, Richard, 
11-33-12-1; Hicks, Jimmie A., 0-2-0-0; Hill, Earl F., 0-6-2-0; 
Hines, G. Cliff, 21-51-5-1 ; Hines, Maurice D., 0-6-3-1 ; Hinton, 
David, 1-10-5-1 ; Hoagland, Charles R., Jr., 3-6-0-0 ; Hobbs, 
Ralph E., 35-18-3-1 ; Hodge, Fred A.. 6-5-0-0 ; Hodges. Holbert, 
25-12-1-1 ; Hoffman, Jack J., O-O-l-O ; Hoffman, Garnet 
9-23-7-1 ; Hofstetter, Joe, 0-3-0-0 ; Holbrook, William M., 
0-7-0-0 ; Holeman, D. Fletcher. 17-17-0-0 ; Holland. Franklin 
H., 0-2-1-3 ; Hollander, .Tames A., 0-5-1-0 ; Holley, Uriah, Jr.. 
0-3-2-1 : Hollowell, James R., 0-1-1-0 ; Holzknecht. George L., 
0-3-0-0; Horning, Ralph, 2-6-1-0; Horton. John B., 7-13-6-2; 
House, Bobby J., 0-0-1-0 ; House. James A., 0-3-0-3 ; Howard, 
Carl, 3-1-0-0 ; Howard, Harry, 3-11-2-0 ; Howard, Jimmy D., 
3-1-0-0; Hudson, Douglas, 1-11-1-2; Hudson, J. D.. 0-4-1-0; Hud- 
son. Oscar. 0-1-0-0 ; Hughes, Charles F., 3-0-0-0 ; Hulse. Robert 
K. Jr.. 3-7-0-1 ; Hume. Charles E., 0-1-1-1 ; Hunley, Neil P.. 
2-4-2-0; Hunter, Charles, 1-4-0-0; Hurd, Fred, 7-16-6-4; Hurst, 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1955 



David E.. 1-4-3-1 ; Hutt, Joseph D., Jr., 4-23-3-1 ; Hyatt, Robert 
L., 0-8-4-0. 

Irwin, Charles R., 6-5-1-0. 

Jackson, J. Coleman, 16-30-1-0: Jenkins, James, 11-9-1-3; 
Jenkins, Joseph K., 1-12-5-0 : Jerger, Carl B., 1-2-0-0 : Jeter. 
John B., 0-10-3-5 : Johnson, Ed, 0-3-1-2 : Johnson, Ellis T., 
5-15-1-0 : Johnson, J. T., 2-0-0-0 : Johnson, James P., 4-7-1-0 : 
Johnson, Moses, 1-3-1-0 : Johnson. Vernon Lee, 0-0-1-0 ; Johnson, 
Ralph, 0-0-1-0 : Johnson, Walter, 24-8-2-0 : Jones, Boyer, 4-12-0-1 ; 
Jones, Carson G.. 4-12-3-6: Jones, Charles, 0-6-0-0: Jones, 
Donald, 0-0-1-0 : Jones, George W., 1-2-0-0 : Jones, Jimmie R., 
0-2-0-0 : Jones. Robert E., 7-4-1-0 ; Jordan, Ken, 4-16-2-0. 

Keene, Marcum, 3-0-0-0 ; Keeton, Bill, 1-2-0-0 : Kereiakes, 
Spero. 1-5-4-1: Key, Calvin E., 3-6-0-0: Kidd, Roy. 2-10-3-1: 
Kiefer, Wilms, 3-10-6-1 : Kimmel, George H., 0-5-2-0 : King, 
Allen v., 0-1-0-0 : King, Bob, 25-32-4-0 : King, James A., 
14-28-2-1 : King, Price J., 0-6-5-2 ; King, Ray, 1-1-0-0 ; King, 
Roy, 9-4-1-0 : Kinman, Joe T., 26-31-0-0 : Kitchen, Chris, 
0-1-0-0 : Kitchen, Leslie, 3-4-1-1 : Knifley, Ivan, 0-1-0-0 : Knight. 
Bill, 29-23-3-5 : Knight, Horace, 14-24-2-0 : Kohlmeyer, Robert 
0-6-0-1 ; Krekel, John W., 11-6-0-0 : Kremer, Joseph A.. 
2-12-5-1. 

Lamastus, .Timmy, 0-1-2-0 : Lambert, Kenneth, 0-2-1-0 : Lash- 
brook, Harry E.. Jr., 1-4-1-0 : Lawson, Sam. 1-0-0-0 : Leach, 
Aaron. 0-1-2-0 : Leathers. OIlie C. Jr., 2-6-6-0 : Leech, Joseph C 
3-17-5-2 : Leet, Warren R., 21-21-5-0 : Lenahan, Thomas F., 0-5-2-0 ; 
Lenderman, Bob, 2-3-4-0 ; LeVan, Thomas F.. 0-21-4-0 : Lile, 
William, 0-1-0-0 : Lindloff, Gilbert E., 3-8-3-0 : Little, Calvert 

C. 6-11-3-0: Little, J. B., 1-16-7-5: Little, James Glen, 0-5-0-0; 
Little, Ronnie , 1-2-0-1 : Littlepage, Pryce B., 0-2-2-0 ; Littral, 
James W., 0-1-0-0; Long, William G., Jr., 4-8-5-2; Longenecker, 

D. M., 33-16-8-1 ; Longshore, Richard D., 0-1-0-0 : Looney, 
Charles, 4-6-2-1 ; Looney, Dick, 8-21-3-3 ; Lowe, Robert G., 
0-2-0-0 ; Lucas, Gene T., 17-4-0-0 ; Ludwig, Harry F.. 0-3-0-0 : 
Lykins, Clayton G., 1-0-0-0 ; Lyons, Harold M., 0-6-0-0 ; Lytle, 
William P., 5-13-1-1. 

McAninch. E. R., 6-4-5-2: McBride, William K., 4-12-2-4: 
McClaskey, Booker. 1-2-0-0 ; McClellan, Leonard B., Jr., 13-27- 
12-4; McCollum, Robert G.. 0-1-0-0; Mcord. Anthony, A,, 
3-14-0-0; McCord, Coleman, 0-7-1-6; McCowan, Connell, 0-12-6-0: 
McCuiston, Pat M., 0-7-1-1 : McDonald. Robert, 1-9-0-1 : Mc- 
Dowell, Glen D., 19-13-3-0 ; McGhee, Laurence, 0-0-1-0 : Mc- 
Glasson, Galen, 0-6-0-2; McGuffey, Harold B., 26-12-2-0; 
McKenzie. Jim, 8-11-4-0; McLeod, Robert N., Jr., 10-3-2-0; 
McNeil, Pat, 5-20-3-0; McPherson, Alton, 6-5-2-1; McPike, 
Ray S. Jr., 1-7-2-0. 

Mackenzie, .Tames. 9-2-0-0; Macon, Alan L., 2-11-2-2; Macon, 
Max, 8-10-0-1 : Mahan. Boyd W., 1-12-3-1 ; Mahan, Robert M., 
21-12-8-0 ; Maines, George, 3-30-2-1 ; Majors, Damon, 1-4-1-0 : 
Martin, Carl E., 1-9-4-5 : Martin, Theodore O., Jr., 1-3-0-0 ; 
Mason, James E., 22-17-2-1 ; Mastin, Gerald L., 1-0-0-0 ; 
Matarazzo, Salvatore, 0-6-6-1 ; Mattingly, Jimmy, 0-1-0-0 : May, 

E. B., Jr., 1-12-9-0; Mayes, Edward, 0-8-9-2; Mays, Ralph J., 
10-14-3-1: Mazza, Albert, 2-0-0-0; Meade, Foster, 8-5-3-0: 
Meadows, Marvin R., 0-8-4-0 ; Meeks, Jack, 3-9-8-1 ; Metcalf, 
Earl L., 32-16-11-4; Metcalf, Harold E., 2-4-0-0; Meyer, Clyde 
E., 0-3-1-0 : Milkovich, John, 0-1-0-0 ; Miller, Bob, 26-23-3-2 ; 
Miller, Jack T., 0-5-0-0 : Miller, Rex J., 5-8-2-4 ; Miller, Roy, 
2-18-10-2; Miller, Roy J., 0-4-0-0; Mills, Herman, 1-12-0-0; 
Miracle, Edward, 0-1-1-0 ; Molen, James P„ 0-5-1-0 ; Moll, 
Francis B., 0-1-0-0 ; Monahan, William G., 0-3-1-0 : Moody, 
Adrian, 0-3-2-0 ; Moore, James E., 0-1-6-1 ; Moore, Robert M., 
4-9-1-0; Moreman, Lucian Y., 16-25-2-3; Moricle, John, Jr., 
0-4-0-0; Moss, Howard A., 5-14-6-0; Moss, Julian, 0-5-1-1; 
Mouser, H. D., Jr., 0-5-0-1; Mudd, Edward, 16-21-4-4; Mueller, 
Frank J., 0-3-0-0 ; Mulligan, J. T., 2-8-1-2 ; Mullins, Eugene, 
0-9-2-3 ; Mullins, Noah, Jr., 0-2-1-0 ; Mussman, Ralph, Jr., 
31-35-6-0 ; Myers, Edward B., 1-1-0-1. 

Naber, Robert E., 1-14-2-1 : Nau, Bill, 4-13-9-2 ; Neal, Gene, 
17-30-4-1 ; Neal, Marion, 0-3-2-0 : Neumann, Jerry, 0-0-1-0 ; 
Newboles, Vern B.. 0-1-0-0 ; Newcomb, Bobby, 0-1-1-0 : Newnam, 
Luther G., 5-2-0-0 ; Newsom, Marley, 17-17-9-2 ; Newsome, 
Forest, 1-13-7-0; Newton, Reason G., 5-8-1-0; Nie, Allen F., 
0-10-1-0 ; Nimmo, Lo, 2-9-2-0 ; Noble, Charles B., 8-25-15-6 ; 
Noble. Leonard, 4-21-9-4; Noel, Paul W., 1-4-3-0; Noel, Roy D., 
0-0-1-0 ; Nord, Ed, 16-26-2-1. 

O'Daniel, Jeff, 0-1-1-0 ; Odlivak, Nick, 1-4-2-2 ; Oldham, 
John, 20-9-1-0; Omer, Billy W„ 16-33-2-2; O'Nan, David F., 
6-9-3-2; O'Nan, Eugene, 15-27-7-0; O'Nan, Norman, 10-17-1-3; 
Orris, J. A., 0-3-2-5 : Osborne, Bill, 11-17-3-3 ; Osborne, Homer 
L., 2-7-1-1 ; Osborne, Nick, 1-4-2-0 ; Owens, Lewis M., 0-4-6-2. 

Padgett, R. K., 1-17-6-3 : Page, Forrest, 1-1-0-0 ; Park, J, M., 
0-10-5-5 ; Parke, Paul G., 0-2-0-0 ; Parker, Billie E., 16-12-4-0 ; 
Parker, James P., 6-11-4-1 : Parsley, Clyde E., 0-2-u-O ; Parsons, 
W. E., 2-6-0-0: Paulin, Al, 0-5-2-0; Peay, Curtis E., 6-18-5-3; 
Pergrem, Bernard, 34-24-5-3 : Perry, James E., 0-0-1-1 ; Phelps, 
John B., 1-6-5-1 ; Phelps, Rudy, 13-16-8-2 ; Polk, John C, 2-7-1-1 ; 
Poppas, Nickolas; 3-12-2-0; Porter, C. A., 13-45-7-2; Posey, 
Ralph, 0-2-3-0; Powell, Logan G., 9-16-3-2; Powers, Clayton 
E., 12-12-5-0 ; Preece, James A., 2-17-0-0 ; Preston, Charles V., 
0-1-0-0; Preston, Robert L., 1-16-3-1; Price, James E., 1-18-4-1; 
Price, Jimmy H., 0-1-0-1 ; Prop, Walter V„ 1-3-4-1 ; Pudlo, 
Walter, 0-5-1-0; PursifuU, Cleophua, 16-7-0-0. 



K.M.I.'s Stigger Wins 



jb 




m 


\ 


^m, ^ 


mUlk 


\ 


^« 



t. 



(Left to Right) Col. Lee S. Read, official scorer; George 
Stigger, III, individual state golf champion, K.M.I. ; parents, 
George Stigger, Jr., and Mrs. Stigger. 

EASTERN GOLF TEAM 

(Continued from Page Three) 

260— Butler 

261— Craft (K. M. I.), Hall (Paintsville) 

— Carlton (Lebanon), Holstein (Ft. Knox) 

—White (Fulton), Lencke (duPont Manual), Solinger 

Atherton) 

—Patrick (duPont Manual) 

— Heim (St. Joseph) Barker (Danville) 

—Singer (Male). Fondren (Ft. Knox) 

—Green (St. Augustine), Kirk (Flaget), Rudeen (Ft. 

Hall (Paintsville;, Williford (Middlesboro), McDade 
) 

-Van Hoose (Paintsville), Rouse (St. Henry), Faught 

r) 

-Drury (Hopkinsville), Binford (Fulton) 

-Harrison (Cumberland), Floden (Holy Trinity) 

-Bailey (Fern Creek) 

-Bushart (Fulton), Froelicher (St. Henry) 

-Thomas (Henderson Barret), Moore (Fulton) 

-Alford (Middlesboro) 

-Royster (Henderson Barret) 

-York (Glasgow) 



262 
263 
(J. M. 
264 
265- 
266- 
267 



Radjunas, Stan, 7-15-6-2; Hainey, Jimmy, 0-1-0-0; Raiser, 
J. T., 6-22-2-0; Rail, Eugene, 9-21-7-5; Randall, H. C, 0-3-9-4; 
Randolph, C. D., 45-11-4-1 ; Randolph, Donald, 5-8-4-0 ; Ranson, 
Robert M., 0-0-2-1 ; Ratterman, Bernard W., Sr., 16-11-1-2 ; 
Rawlings, Don R., 4-9-3-2 ; Rawlings, Harold, 0-1-2-0 : Ray, 
Robert R., 0-3-2-0 ; Redman, Malvern G., 1-0-0-0 ; Reed, Charles 
R., 4-2-0-1 ; Beed, Gordon, 7-9-4-1 ; Reeser, Gene, 0-0-1-1 ; Reeves, 
Kenneth H., 2-8-0-1 ; Reinhart, Gene, 4-2-0-1 ; Reinhardt, Myron, 
0-1-6-0 ; Rentz, Thomas W., 9-23-3-0 ; Rice, Homer, 1-1-0-0 ; 
Richardson, Joe M., 25-25-5-1 ; Richeson, King, 2-7-2-0 ; Ricketts, 
Claude, 7-17-4-4; Riddle, George W„ 0-1-0-0; Ries, Robert R., 
7-9-4-0 ; Riggs, William T., 0-2-0-0 ; Ring, William H., 0-2-0-0 ; 
Rison, Johnny B., 0-0-2-0 ; Ritter, Goebel, 4-8-0-0 ; Roach, Earl 
W., 0-7-8-0; Roberts, Bill, 0-0-1-0: Roberts, Earl C. 7-22-6-0; 
Robertson, Albert M., 3-6-4-1 ; Robertson, Everett L., 3-13-0-1 ; 
Robinson, Clarence, Jr., 1-4-0-0 ; Rocke, James M., 28-21-3-3 ; 
Rodgers, David G.. 0-4-0-2 ; Rogers, Earl, 1-1-0-0 : Roller, Otis, 
11-29-13-0; Rolph, Harold .!., 5-1-0-0; Rose, Wallace C, 17-33- 
4-1 ; Rosenbaum, Robert L., 1-6-4-1 ; Ross, Bill E., 2-4-7-6 : 
Rothfuss, Richard, 0-1-0-0; Rountree, Jack, 0-17-2-0: Roun- 
tree, John T., 2-3-1-0 ; Rouse, Clyde L., 18-28-9-2 ; Rozen, 
Morris, 14-16-3-1 ; Rubarts, Leland G., 4-5-4-0 ; Russell, Allen 
W., 10-21-4-1; Russell, Eugene D., 3-5-1-0; Russell, Joe, 
14-28-2-1. 

Sabato, Al, 1-2-2-0 ; Sallee, Charles M., 0-2-0-0 ; Sandefur, 
Rudy, 0-0-0-1 ; Sanders, Foster J., 8-19-4-1 ; Sanders, Mel, 
34-31-12-5; Sang, Bob, 6-9-2-3; Saylor, Deward, 7-3-3-0; Sayre, 
Dave, 0-2-0-0 ; Schellhase, David, 3-0-2-0 ; Schlich, Paul E., 
1-2-2-0; Schu, Wilbur L., 7-28-1-1; Schubert, Don, 0-6-1-0; 
Schutz, Eugene R.. 0-0-1-0; Schweers, Edward H.. 0-1-1-2; 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1955 



Page Nine 



Schwitz, Frank, 8-7-0-0; Schwitz, Joe, 0-0-3-0; Scott, W. L., 
0-7-4-5 ; Seale, John D., 0-3-3-1 : Seelye, Arthur L., 0-3-1-0 ; 
Settle, Evan E., 1-0-0-0: Settle, Roy G.. 35-24-2-2; Sexton, Wil- 
liam L., 7-16-6-1 ; Shackelford, Buddy, 3-16-4-3 : Shaw, Earl, 
1-1-0-0 ; Sheffer, Joseph, 0-1-0-0 ; Sherrill, Lisle R., 10-36-10-1 ; 
Shively, Bernie, 3-5-1-0 ; Showalter, John, 3-1-0-1 : Shuck, 
Freddie L., 0-1-0-0 ; Shuck, Steve, 3-4-1-2 : Shuck, Thomas 
G., 0-2-5-3 ; Sifrig, Bernard J., 0-3-0-0 ; Sile 
6-9-2-0 ; Simpson, Jack, 0-0-2-0 : Simpson, Thomas E 
Sloan, Wallace, 7-26-8-1 : Small, Bill, 14-15-3-1 : Smith, 
0-0-4-3 ; Smith, David W., 8-8-7-1 : Smith, Edgar J., 
Smith, Elza, 0-3-0-0 ; Smith, Eurie Hayes, 6-12-4-0 ; Solomon, 
Jim, 0-2-0-0 ; Sosh, O. L., 38-13-1-0 : Sosh. William N., 19-18-3-4 ; 
South, William F., 0-23-7-2 : Spaulding, Stan, 6-6-1-0 ; Spencer, 
Billy C., 0-1-2-0 ; Spiceland, S. E., 1-4-5-2 ; Spurgeon, Kermit, 
3-2-1-0; Stamper, Robert L., 0-3-1-0; Stanfill, Donald H., 
1-1-1-0 ; Stanfill, Robert, 2-6-0-0 ; Stanley, Glendon, 0-1-0-0 
Steely, Stanley E., 4-11-3-3 ; Steenkin, William R., 2-20-4-1 ; 
Stephenson, Harry, 30-18-4-4 ; Stevens, Paul B., 
Stewart. Herbert T., 0-1-0-0 ; Stone, Clifton, 3-1-2-0 
Frederick, 1-6-1-1 ; Strange, William L., 0-8-8-0 
Arnett, 6-12-5-1 ; Strong, David A., 0-2-0-1 ; Sturgill, Barkley J 
3-15-0-0 ; Sullivan, Don S., 0-5-1-0 ; Sullivan, Durwood, 7-20-5-1 ; 
Surface, William E., 2-10-2-2; Susott, Wilfred, 1-0-1-0; Swartz, 
Dan S., 0-1-1-3. 

Taylor, Dennis, 5-10-5-1 ; Taylor. Ed, 17-23-4-2 ; Taylor. Hal, 
6-1-3-1 ; Taylor, Kenneth W., 2-8-2-1 ; Taylor, Robert S., 
7-26-8-1 : Teague, Amos. 37-27-5-0 ; Temple, J. B.. 5-20-12-7 : 
Templeton. Pressly, 0-0-2-1 : Thoma, M. L. 22-29-9-2 ; Thomas. 
William G., 0-8-3-0 : Thompson, Byron, 0-1-0-0 ; Thompson, Jack, 
46-46-4-3 ; Thompson, Paul, 0-2-0-0 ; Thompson, Ralph, 4-13-2-0 ; 
Threet, Hoyte B., 3-1-0-1 ; Thull. Nick B., 1-4-8-1 ; Thurman, 
A. E.. 1-9-3-0 : Thurman, Harold W., 0-1-0-0 ; Thurman, Robert 
N., 3-15-2-0 ; Tichenor, Billy, 0-5-1-0 ; Tichenor, Matthew D., 
0-6-0-0 ; Tilley, H. M.. 6-20-5-1 ; Tincher, Robert, 21-16-7-2 ; 



0-1-0-1 ; 
Cecil E., 
4-18-3-0 ; 



9-16-3-0 ; 
Strange, 
Strong, 



Tipton, Asa I.. 8-16-8-1 ; Tobe, Larry, 3-12-4-3 ; Todd. Obbie. 
0-4-0-0 ; Tompkins, Chester B., 0-2-0-0 ; Topmiller, Ben, Jr., 
3-6-0-0 ; Tower, Don. 7-12-2-4 ; Trimble, W. R., 0-6-4-6 : Trivette, 
John W., 7-5-3-0 ; Troutman, Doyle, 1-0-0-0 ; True, Charlie C, 
1-11-1-1 : Tuck, Lillard O.. 1-26-7-0 ; Turner, A. J., 10-18-7-1. 

Urlage, Richard C, 0-7-0-0. 

Vance, Earl G., 1-14-7-1; VanHoose, Jack D., 4-4-1-0; Varble. 
William, 15-32-6-4; Varner, Ray G., 6-12-4-7. 

Wade, Bill, 0-9-7-1 ; Wagoner, Donald F., 0-0-1-1 ; Waldon, 
Tot, 8-16-2-0; Walke, Glenn R., 2-18-0-0; Walker, Lawrence 
I.. 3-8-9-3 ; Walker, Paul R., 8-6-0-1 ; Walker, Raymond, 2-0-4-0 ; 
Wallace, James H., 0-1-0-0 ; Wallace, W. C, 3-3-0-1 ; Waller, 
Charles L., 0-8-0-1 ; Walton, Roy, 6-9-0-0 ; Wanchic, Nicholas, 
8-5-0-0 ; Ward, Bobby G., 0-7-1-0 ; Ward, Milton L., 1-0-4-3 ; 
Ward, Robert L., 3-12-4-2 ; Warf, Emerson, 5-8-3-1 : Watts, 
Paul, 0-3-4-0 ; Webb, Leonard W., 11-15-7-1 ; Webb, Oren H., 
1-4-0-0 ; Wedge, Donald R., 3-4-1-1 ; Weisbrodt, Paul E., 
8-25-7-0 ; Welborn, Curtis, 0-2-1-0 ; Welch, Bill, 0-3-0-0 ; Welch, 
Ralph W.. 8-14-9-5 ; Welch, Tom, 1-6-0-0 ; Wellman, Bill, 
2-2-0-1 ; Wellman, Earl, 0-1-0-0 ; Wells, Ed. Jr., 2-3-1-0 ; Wells, 
Milford, 15-9-2-1 ; Westerfield, Glenn, 3-0-0-0 ; Whalen, Wil- 
liam C, 0-7-4-1 ; Whipple, Lloyd G., 3-0-1-0 ; White, David, 
2-12-2-3 ; Wiederhold, Robert G., 0-6-2-1 ; Wigginton, A. M., Sr., 
O-I-O-O ; Wilhoite. John C. 0-3-0-0 ; Willet, Irvin H., 0-1-0-0 ; 
Williams, James H., 0-3-4-0 ; Williams. Roger L., 1-20-3-1 ; 
Williams, Tom M.. Jr., 15-14-1-0 : Willoughby, James T., 
0-3-1-2 ; Wilson, Burnell, 4-8-4-1 ; Wilson, Jack R., 1-3-1-0 ; 
Winchester, Roy L., 23-24-3-1 ; Winfrey, Shelby, 43-33-9-7 ; 
Winscher, Fred, 0-1-4-1 ; Witschger, Leroy J., 0-1-0-0 ; Woford, 
Ernest, 10-22-4-4 ; Woods. Gene, 0-0-1-0 ; Workman, Bill, 2-7-2-1 ; 
Wright, Billy J., 5-8-8-4; Wright, John A., 3-4-11-0; Wright, 
John G., 0-1-0-1 ; Wurtz, Emil, 3-5-1-0. 

Yaggi, Bill, 1-5-0-0 ; Yessin, Rudy, 5-7-1-0 ; Young, Allan, 
0-1-0-0 ; Young, Roy, 0-7-2-1. 

Zachem, Vincent, 39-11-3-0. 



Officials' Ratings on Sportsmanship of K. H. S. A. A. 

Member Schools in Basketball, 1955-1956 



Adair County (Columbia 

Adairville 

Ahrens Trade 

Albany Ind. -Clinton Co. (Albany) _ 

Allen Co. (Scottsville) 

Almo 

Alvaton 

Anderson (Lawrenceburg) 

Annville Institute 

Arlington 

Ashland 

Athens (Lexington) 

Atherton (Louisville) 

Auburn 

Augusta 

Austin Tracy (Lucas) 

Auxier 

Bagdad 

Bald Knob (Frankfort) 

Ballard Memorial (Barlow) 

Baptist (Louisville) 

Barbourville 

Bardstown 

Bardwell 

Barret (Henderson) 

Beaver Dam 

Beeehwood (Ft. Mitchell) 

Belfry 

Bell County (Pineville) 

Bellevue 

Benham 

Benton 

Berea 

Berea Foundation 

Betsy Layne 

Black Star (Alva) 

Blaine 

Bloomfield 

Boone Co. (Florence) 

Bourbon Co. (Paris) 

Bowling Green 

Boyd County (Cannonsburg) 

Bracken Co. (Brooksville) 

Breathitt Co. (Jackson) 

Breckinridge Co. (Hardinsburg) — 













OTHER 


















COACH 


SCHOOL 


CROWD 




TEAM 






OFFICIALS 












E 


t; 


F 


1" 


E 


U 


F 


f 


E 


G 


F 


P 


E 


G 


F 1 


69 

24 


12 
4 


2 

8 


6 


62 
33 


12 
4 


1 
2 




53 
20 


12 
13 


1 
6 


1 


52 
26 


12 
8 


3 
3 


35 


6 






41 


6 






30 


10 


1 




32 


9 




43 


17 


1 


1 


48 


12 


1 




38 


12 


8 




39 


14 


6 


49 
35 
37 


7 
3 

1 


1 

1 




46 
37 
33 


10 
4 
5 


1 




49 
S3 
32 


7 
6 
6 


1 

1 


2 


50 
36 
34 


6 

7 
4 


2 
1 


33 


8 


1 




35 


3 


1 


X 


31 


6 


4 


1 


35 


4 




29 


1 






29 


1 






29 


1 






28 


2 




40 


5 


1 




44 


1 


1 




28 


16 


2 




31 


7 


3 


35 


6 


7 


2 


42 


1 






37 


6 


6 




40 


4 


3 


29 


4 






40 


2 






38 


2 


2 


1 


40 


3 


1 


33 
30 


10 
6 


3 

1 


1 


38 
33 


5 
3 


2 


1 


40 
30 


6 

7 


1 




38 
35 


7 
2 


2 


38 
43 


3 
2 


2 
1 




41 
38 


2 
7 


1 




31 
33 


12 
11 


2 




36 
33 


6 
11 


1 
1 


20 


4 


2 




22 


4 






20 


4 


1 


1 


16 


8 


3 


30 
31 
20 
26 


5 
8 

7 


1 
3 

1 
8 


1 

4 


32 
33 
20 
31 


3 

7 

10 


1 
2 
2 


1 


28 
24 
14 
31 


6 
16 

5 
12 


3 
2 

1 


1 

1 


28 
30 
19 
26 


8 
12 

2 
10 


1 
3 


24 


4 






25 


3 






22 


4 


1 




23 


5 




44 
49 


14 
4 


2 
2 




54 
49 


6 

4 


1 




37 

42 


20 

8 


2 
3 


1 
1 


41 
47 


16 
6 


3 
2 


43 
44 


2 
10 


1 


1 
1 


38 

41 


6 
12 


2 




34 
38 


8 
11 


2 
6 


1 
1 


38 
40 


7 
10 


5 


47 
31 
26 
27 
31 


2 
3 
8 
8 

1 


1 

1 
2 


2 


47 
32 
31 
36 
31 


2 
2 
3 
2 

1 


1 


1 


43 
26 
22 
30 
30 


6 
7 
10 
5 
1 


1 
2 


1 

1 
1 


45 
29 
23 
28 
31 


4 
4 
10 
7 
1 


1 
1 
2 


23 
30 


2 
3 


1 




24 
33 


1 

1 






22 
26 


3 

7 


1 




24 
27 


1 

7 




21 


1 






22 








19 


1 


2 




18 


1 


2 


23 


7 


3 


2 


22 


8 


1 




17 


10 


4 




21 


5 


5 


36 


4 


1 




39 


2 






31 


5 


4 


1 


35 


5 


1 


29 


2 






25 


2 






17 


12 


1 




17 


13 




35 
28 
63 


5 
4 

• 


1 


1 


37 
32 
63 


4 
1 
6 


1 




28 
23 
53 


11 
10 
10 


1 
1 




30 
30 
62 


9 
3 
8 


1 


37 


6 




1 


37 


6 




1 


34 


6 


3 


1 


36 


7 


1 


36 


2 


1 


1 


30 


9 






20 


16 


2 


1 


26 


12 


2 


55 


4 






54 


3 


1 




43 


16 




1 


63 


5 




47 
52 


8 

1 


1 

1 


3 

1 


52 
62 


6 
3 






48 
48 


11 
6 




2 


49 
49 


11 
3 


3 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1955 



Breckinridge Trg. (Morehead ) - 



Bridg:eport( Frankfort). 
Bristow 

Brodhead 



Buckeye (Lancaster) 

Buckhorn 

Buffalo 

Burgin 



Bush (Lida) 

Butler (Butler) 

Butler Co. (Morgantown) 

Caldwell Co. (Princeton) 

Calhoun 

Camargo (Mt. Sterling) 

Campbell County (Alexandria) 

Campbellsburg 

Campbellsville 

Camp Dick Robinson (Lancaster)- 

Caneyville 

Carlisle 



Carrollton 

Carter 

Catlettsburg 

Caverna (Horse Cave) 

Cayce 

Center 

Centertown 

Central (Clinton) 

Central (Richmond) 

Central City 

Central Park (McHenry) 

Chandlers Chapel ( Auburn) __ 
Charleston (Dawson Springs). 

Clark Co. (Winchester) 

Clarkson 

Clay- 



Clay Co. (Manchester) 

Clifty 

College iBowling Green) 

Corbin 

Cordia 

Covington Catholic 

Crab Orchard 

Crittenden Co. (Marion) 

Crofton 

Cuba (Mayfield) 

Cub Run 

Cumberland 

Cumberland Co. (Burkesville). 

Cunningham 

Cynthiana 

Dalton 



Da 



■ille 



rensboro)-. 
Springs)- 



Daviess Co. (Ov 
Dawson (Dawson 

Dayton 

Deming (Mt. Olivet) 

Dilce Combs Mem. (Jeff|__ 
Dixie Heights (Covington). 



Dunmor 

duPont Manual (Louisville) _ 

Earlington 

East Bernstadt 

Eastern (Middletown) 

Edmonton 

Elizabethtown 

Elizabethtown Catholic 

Elkhorn (Frankfort) 

Elkhorn City 

Eminence 

Erie (Olive Hill) 

Estill Co. (Irvine) 

Eubank 

Evarts _ 

Ezel 

Falmouth 

Fancy Farm 

Farmington 

Feds Creek 

Ferguson Ind. 

Fern Creek 



OTHER 
SCHOOL 
OFFICIALS 



G 


F 


P 


E 


G 


6 






32 


4 


4 


5 


4 


49 


4 


3 




1 


20 


3 


3 


2 


1 


30 


2 


4 


3 


1 


36 


2 


5 


2 


2 


46 


4 


11 


2 


1 


32 


9 


4 


2 




26 


2 


6 


1 


1 


34 


5 


2 






28 


3 


6 






28 


3 


3 


1 




48 


1 


6 






41 


4 


7 


2 




27 


5 


8 


1 


1 


62 


7 


5 






23 


5 


3 


1 




36 


5 


11 


3 


1 


49 


6 


2 


4 


2 


48 


1 


5 






44 


3 


6 






39 


7 


11 


5 


2 


35 


7 


2 






50 


4 


S 


1 


1 


36 


4 


4 






38 


1 


5 


2 


1 


38 


1 


2 




1 


34 


1 


3 

1 


1 
1 


2 


42 

44 


5 
2 


4 


1 


1 


37 


3 


8 


1 




34 


9 


6 


1 


1 


30 


3 


4 






34 


4 


4 


2 




17 


3 


3 


3 




64 


2 


6 




1 


22 


7 


5 


2 


1 


33 


3 


3 


1 




44 


2 


1 6 






51 


8 


6 


3 


4 


25 


4 


6 




1 


57 


1 


4 
1 


2 


1 


31 
30 
35 


2 

4 


5 


1 




38 




4 


2 




25 


2 


10 


1 




26 


5 


4 






28 


2 


9 


3 




27 


8 


9 


3 


1 


34 


7 


10 


3 


1 


30 


7 


4 






31 


9 


3 


3 


2 


36 


2 



48 


6 


32 


5 


41 


3 


42 


1 


40 


2 


42 


3 


40 


5 


27 


2 


40 


2 


31 


9 


27 


4 


60 


4 


53 


10 


52 


6 


30 


3 


37 


12 


39 


7 


42 


5 


49 


7 


31 


4 


43 


6 


34 


3 


38 


5 


48 


4 


34 




28 


3 


50 


5 


30 


6 


31 


2 


34 


6 


34 


4 


39 


5 



1 


36 


12 




33 






21 


7 


1 


24 


6 




33 


4 



1 



1 60 


5 


1 


29 


4 




40 


4 




38 


2 




39 


2 




44 


1 




38 


8 




26 


3 




43 


2 


1 


32 


8 


2 


24 


7 




61 


4 




54 


11 




55 


3 




29 


2 




43 


7 


2 


37 


6 




40 


3 




64 


4 




36 


2 




48 


3 




35 


2 




40 


4 




49 


4 


1 


36 






29 


1 




50 


6 




32 


8 




32 


1 




29 


6 


4 


35 


5 


1 


39 


7 





G 


F 


P 


E 


G 


F 


4 


2 




30 


4 


2 


5 


6 


1 


46 


10 


2 


6 






18 


4 


1 


6 


2 




26 


8 


1 


5 


1 


2 


30 


9 


2 


6 


2 


1 


42 


9 




13 


11 


1 


31 


17 


1 


8 






20 


8 


1 


6 




1 


34 


6 




4 






28 


3 




7 


7 


2 


19 


9 


4 


10 






41 


8 




9 


1 




36 


9 




12 


4 


3 


20 


11 


3 


12 


4 




44 


11 


4 


7 


1 


1 


20 


8 




9 






35 


6 


1 


12 


2 


1 


48 


5 


4 


5 


1 




44 


6 




5 






42 


6 




8 


1 




36 


8 


3 


11 


2 


1 


32 


8 


3 


7 


2 


2 


44 


9 


1 


5 






34 


4 


2 


5 




1 


34 


6 




5 


4 


2 


36 


3 


1 


5 


2 




33 


3 


1 


12 


1 


1 


33 


13 




7 


2 




48 


3 




6 




2 


35 


4 


3 


8 


2 




35 


8 


2 


7 


2 




30 


2 


3 


5 






37 


1 




5 




1 


17 


4 




7 






67 


5 




12 


8 


1 


19 


6 


5 


13 




1 


27 


5 


4 


8 






38 


8 




21 


2 




39 


18 


4 


7 


1 




22 


6 


2 


2 


3 




50 


8 


1 


4 


1 




32 


2 




15 




1 


20 


14 




2 






34 


3 




4 


1 


1 


34 


4 




7 


1 


1 


21 


3 


2 


12 






21 


10 




7 


3 




26 


4 


1 


9 


2 


2 


24 


11 


2 


9 


2 


1 


37 


4 


2 


9 


3 




26 


9 


3 


9 






31 


10 




3 


2 


4 


34 


2 


2 


14 


5 


1 


33 


14 


1 


16 


2 




29 


13 


2 


6 


1 




18 


10 




7 




1 


23 


6 


1 


5 


1 




32 


6 




6 






50 


4 


2 


12 






24 


14 




6 






40 


3 


1 


9 


1 




36 


6 




3 


3 


1 


38 


1 


2 


7 






40 


6 




10 


5 


2 


33 


10 


2 


5 


2 




26 


3 


2 


3 


1 


4 


43 


3 


1 


8 


4 


4 


26 


9 


7 


8 




1 


24 


6 


1 


1 


1 


2 


53 




2 


6 


2 


2 


54 


10 


1 


5 


3 




49 


6 


1 


2 


1 




30 


2 




16 




1 


36 


12 


4 


8 


1 




39 


7 


1 


3 


1 


1 


36 


4 




11 


2 


1 


46 


11 


2 


7 


1 




33 


4 


1 


6 


2 




43 


7 


1 


5 






39 


2 


1 


7 






36 


7 




8 


2 




46 


8 


1 


3 


2 


1 


33 


1 


1 


2 






28 


3 




12 






45 


10 




11 


2 


1 


28 


10 




8 






31 


2 




8 


2 


3 


26 


8 


3 


10 


1 




30 


10 




Jl 


2 




38 


7 


2 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1955 



Page Eleven 



Flaget (Louisville) 

Flaherty (Vine Grove) 

Flat Gap 

Fleming Co. (Flemingsburg) _ 

Fleming-Neon (Fleming) 

Fordsville 

Forkland (Gravel Switch) 

Fort Knox 

Frankfort 

Franklin-Simpson (Franklin) _ 
Frederick Fraize (Cloverport)_ 

Fredericktown (Springfield) 

Fredonia 

Frenchburg 

Fulgham (Clinton) 

Fulton 

Gallatin Co. (Warsaw) 

Gamaliel 

Garrett 

Garth (Georgetown) 



Glendale 

Good Shepherd (Frankfort) 

Graham 

Grant Co. (Dry Ridge) 

Great Crossing (Georgetown) 

Greensburg 

Greenup 

Greenville 

Guthrie 

Haldeman 

Hall (Grays Knob) 

Hanson 

Hardin 

Harlan 

Harrison Co. (Cynthiana) 

Harrodsburg 

Hartford 

Hawesville 

Hazard 

Hazel Green Academy 

Hazel Green (East Bernstadt).. 

Heath (West Paducah) 

Hellier 

Henderson Co 

Henderson Settle. (Frakes) 

Henry Central (New Castle) 

Henry Clay (Lexington) 

Hickman 

Highlands (Ft. Thomas) 

Hindman 

Hiseville 

Hitchins 

Hodgenville 

Holmes (Covington) 

Holy Cross (Covington) 

Holy Family (Ashland) 

Holy Name (Henderson) 

Holy Trinity (Louisville) 

Hopkins ville 

Horse Branch 

Howevalley (Cecilia) 

Hughes Kirk (Beechmont) 

Hustonville 

Inez 

Irvine 

Irvington 

Jackson 

Jenkins 

Johns Creek (Pikeville) 

Junction City 

K. M. I. (Lyndon) 

Kingdom Come (Linefork) 

Kingston (Berea) 

Kirksey 

Kirks ville 

Knott County (Pippapass) 

Knox Central (Barbourville) 

Kyrock (Sweeden) 

Lacy Consol. (Hopkinsville) 

Lafayette (Lexington) 

Lancaster 

Laurel (Camp Dix) 

Leatherwood (Slemp) 

Lebanon 

Lebanon Junction 

Lee County (Beattyville) 

Leitchfield Ind. 

Leslie Co. (Hyden) ., 









1 




OTHER 










1 








COACH 1 SCHOOL 


CROWD 1 




TEAM 






OFFICIALS 






1 








E 


c 


F 


P 


E 


G 


F 


P 


E 


G 


F 


P 


E 


G 


F 


36 


8 


1 


1 


41 


5 






33 


S 


1 




37 


9 




43 


2 


1 




43 


3 






45 


6 






48 


3 




28 


9 


3 




31 


6 


1 




29 


9 






31 


6 




56 


8 






52 


15 






50 


17 


1 


1 


54 


15 




•n 


6 


3 


1 


27 


6 






19 


12 


1 


1 


28 


3 


1 


43 


7 






44 


6 


1 




40 


11 






43 


7 


1 


30 


1 


1 




29 




3 




26 


3 


2 


1 


26 


4 


2 


33 


8 


3 




31 


7 






30 


8 






30 


6 


2 


26 


5 






18 


3 






14 


6 


1 




14 


6 


1 


2K 


2 


2 


1 


32 


2 






25 


6 






23 


8 


1 


38 


6 




1 


41 


3 


1 




31 


12 


2 




35 


7 


3 


23 


4 






20 


7 






18 


9 






IS 


9 




53 


10 


1 


2 


57 


8 






47 


15 


3 




44 


20 


1 


14 


8 


2 


1 


20 


3 


2 




15 


7 


5 




19 


6 




35 


3 


1 




36 


5 






25 


12 


3 




33 


6 


1 


27 


1 




3 


27 


1 




3 


25 


2 


1 


3 


24 


2 


2 


39 


2 




2 


38 


3 


2 




26 


15 


3 




29 


13 




33 


12 


4 




37 


12 






27 


14 


7 


1 


31 


12 


6 


34 


12 






42 


5 






33 


11 


1 


1 


37 


9 




32 


2 






32 


2 






30 


3 


1 




30 


4 




40 


1 


1 




36 


3 






37 


3 


2 




36 


4 


2 


25 


4 


3 


4 


32 


4 






31 


5 






34 


2 


1 


14 


17 


1 




23 


9 






16 


15 


1 


1 


16 


15 


1 


44 


2 


1 




42 


3 






38 


9 






40 


6 




42 


11 




4 


53 


4 






38 


13 


4 


2 


47 


16 




40 


8 


4 


1 


44 


6 




2 


41 


8 


3 




42 


10 




37 


4 




2 


35 


7 






34 


8 


1 




36 


6 


1 


49 


5 






51 


2 






49 


4 




1 


55 


3 


1 


37 


4 


1 




34 


6 




2 


28 


11 


2 


1 


30 


7 


3 


36 


4 






39 








32 


7 






35 


5 




16 


2 






17 


1 






15 


2 






16 


2 




35 


3 


2 




37 


2 






38 


2 






38 


2 




35 


2 


4 




38 


2 






35 


3 


3 




37 


2 


2 


32 


3 


9 


1 


44 








34 


7 


4 




36 


6 




42 


4 


1 




47 








42 


3 


1 


1 


46 


1 




40 


10 


2 


4 


52 


2 






39 


14 




8 


44 


12 




36 


1 






38 


1 






37 


2 






37 


1 




37 


5 


2 


2 


41 


6 




1 


32 


14 


2 




32 


14 


2 


40 


2 


1 


1 


41 


1 






39 


6 






36 


6 


1 


40 


3 


2 




45 


1 




1 


38 


1 


3 


2 


39 


6 




23 


11 






27 


6 






16 


10 


3 


5 


16 


12 


4 


23 


2 






26 








24 


1 






22 


3 




65 


5 


2 




65 


5 


2 




62 


5 


5 




63 


8 


1 


35 


5 




1 


32 


8 




1 


33 


8 






32 


8 


1 


22 


3 


1 




21 


6 






22 


3 


1 




19 


4 


3 


39 


5 






41 


2 




1 


38 


4 


2 


1 


39 


4 




21 


4 


6 




25 


2 


1 




25 


3 


2 




21 


3 


6 


27 


7 






28 


6 






14 


12 


5 


3 


17 


14 


1 


33 


3 


2 




36 








30 


4 


2 




30 


6 


1 


42 








41 


1 






28 


12 


2 


1 


35 


5 


2 


33 


2 






34 


2 






27 


7 


2 




28 


8 




31 


1 






31 








29 


2 




1 


24 


3 


2 


28 


9 


1 




31 


6 






30 


7 


1 




27 


9 


2 


47 


1 






47 


1 






42 


2 






46 


2 




41 


5 


1 


1 


39 


5 






38 


7 


1 


1 


42 


6 


1 


43 








42 


1 






37 


5 


1 




38 


4 


1 


14 


8 






15 


7 






10 


11 


1 




11 


9 


2 


43 


4 




1 


43 


3 




1 


35 


6 


3 


4 


37 


7 


2 


45 


11 


1 




47 


12 






37 


18 


2 




45 


10 


2 


15 


1 






10 


1 






10 


1 






9 


2 




311 


4 


3 


1 


29 


2 


3 




25 


9 


2 


3 


30 


6 


2 


25 


13 


1 


10 


31 


12 


3 


1 


27 


13 


6 


3 


29 


12 


5 


38 


7 


3 




40 


6 


2 




38 


9 


1 




37 


7 


3 


42 


7 


1 




43 


7 






41 


7 


1 


1 


40 


8 


1 


35 


7 


3 


1 


39 


7 






36 


9 


1 




40 


7 




35 






1 


32 


1 


1 




32 


2 






30 


1 




38 


2 




1 


39 


1 






38 


1 


1 




37 


3 




49 


9 






54 


5 






49 


10 






61 


8 




30 


12 


3 


1 


38 


6 


1 


1 


25 


14 


3 


4 


30 


13 


2 


21 


2 






22 


1 






21 


1 


1 




21 


1 


1 


19 


2 


1 




19 


3 






18 


3 


1 




19 


2 


1 


35 
1 


5 


1 


1 


35 
1 


6 


2 




32 
1 


6 


3 


1 


36 

1 


5 


1 


26 


4 






29 


1 






26 


6 






25 


6 




31 


10 


2 


4 


47 


2 


2 




41 


7 


2 


2 


41 


9 


1 


20 


6 






21 


3 




2 


18 


7 


1 




21 


4 


1 


32 


5 






33 


2 






43 


8 


1 




44 


6 


2 


9 


2 






9 


2 






6 


5 






5 


6 




23 


2 


1 




24 


2 






20 


4 


2 




23 


3 




43 


9 


1 


2 


51 


6 


1 




47 


8 


6 




49 


11 




28 


4 


2 




30 


3 






29 


7 


2 




30 


7 


1 


51 


2 




1 


48 


5 






46 


7 


1 




43 


7 


3 


32 


5 






37 


1 






33 


5 






32 


4 


2 


7 








7 








7 








6 


2 




27 


10 






29 


7 






26 


IC 




1 


24 


6 


6 


31 


7 


6 


6 


44 


6 






39 


9 


2 




46 


8 


1 


21 


4 






21 


3 






16 


9 






16 


10 




28 


16 


6 




36 


11 


1 




30 


17 


1 




30 


17 


1 


60 


14 


1 


2 


60 


17 






49 


14 


6 


3 


48 


18 


1 


a 


•i 






38 


i 






36 


e 


1 




8S 


7 


1 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1955 



Lewisburg 

Lewisport 

Lexington Catholic- 
Liberty 

Lily 

Li 



Livingston Co. (Smithland ) _. 

Livingston 

Lloyd (Erlanger) 

London 

Lone Jack (Four Mile) 

Lone Oak (Padueah) 

Louisa 

Louisville Male 

Lowes 

Loyall 

Ludlow 

Lynch 

Lynn Camp (Corbin) 

Lynn Grove 

Lynnvale (White Mills) 

Lyon Co- (Kuttawa) 

McAfee 

McCreary Co. (Whitley City) 

McDowell 

McKee 

McKell (South Shore) 

McKinney 

Mackville 

Madison-Model (Richmond) 

Madisonville 

Magnolia 

Marion 

Marrowbone 

Martin 

Mayfield 

Ma 



Lick- 



Mays ville , 

May town (Langley) 

M. C. Napier (Darfork) 

Meade Co. (Brandenburg) 

Meade Mem. ( Williamsport)- 

Memorial I Hardy ville) 

Memorial ( Waynesburg) 

Middleburg 

Middlesboro 

Midway 

Milburn 

M. M. I. (Millersburgj 

Minerva 



(Mt. Sterling)- 



Mo 



Morgan 

Morgan Co. (West Liberty) 

Morganfield 

Morton's Gap 

Mt. Sterling 

Mt. Vernon 

Mt. Washington 

Muhlenberg Central (Powderly). 

Munfordville 

Murray 

Murray Training 

Nancy 

Nebo 

New Concord 

Newport 

Newport Catholic 

Nicholas Co. (Carlisle) 

Ntcholasville 

North Marshall Co 

North Middletown 

North Warren (Smiths Grove I.- 
Norton ville 

Oakdale 

Oil Springs 

Oldham Co. (LaGrange) 

Old Ky. Home (Bardstown) 

Olive Hill 

Olmstead 

Oneida 

Orangeburg (Maysville) 

Ormsby Village (Anchorage) 

Owen Co. (Owenton) 

Owensboro 

Owensboro Catholic 

Owensboro Technical 

O wings ville 



33 


4 


3(1 


9 


30 


1 


S3 


1 


42 


4 


26 


7 


35 


4 


31 


1 


2K 


5 


21 


2 


33 


9 


4(1 


3 


31 


2 


45 


8 


28 


5 


33 


11 


34 


8 


32 


3 


30 


3 



30 I 2 I 









OTHER 








SCHOOL 






OFFICIALS 


F 

1 
1 


P 


E 

38 
20 
46 


G 

6 
3 

4 


F 


2 
1 


4 


39 
44 
27 


4 
4 
1 




1 


4 

1 


38 
35 
37 


7 
2 


3 




2 


63 


4 


1 


2 


2 


34 


5 


1 


4 


3 


31 


6 


1 


2 


5 


29 
43 


6 
4 




4 


5 


21 
36 
25 
36 


4 
3 
2 


4 


3 


1 


34 
29 
51 


7 
2 
3 


1 


2 


3 


49 


3 


2 


2 


2 


32 


3 




3 
1 


2 


37 
31 
30 


5 

1 
4 


2 


2 




20 
39 


4 
3 


1 






36 


5 


2 




1 


31 


1 




2 




47 
28 


6 
4 




2 


2 


34 


8 


2 


3 


2 


34 


12 




1 


2 


35 

27 


2 
6 




4 

1 


3 


22 
46 
35 
29 
35 
29 


6 
2 

1 
1 
3 

1 


1 


1 


2 


31 
33 
32 

27 


2 
5 




4 
1 


2 

1 


37 
24 
32 


16 
3 
3 


4 
1 


3 


6 
1 


13 
19 


7 
3 


3 


4 
1 

I 


2 


28 
22 
26 
36 


4 
6 
4 
4 




3 


1 


30 
25 


6 

7 


2 


4 

1 


2 


23 
51 
29 


1 
2 
5 




2 


1 
1 


38 
37 
31 


3 
6 
6 




3 
1 
1 


1 
1 


23 
29 
38 


4 
6 
6 




2 
1 

1 




27 
34 
43 


7 
5 
6 


1 


3 
1 


2 


39 
35 
31 
54 


6 

3 
1 


1 


2 


3 


24 


8 


1 


3 

1 


2 

1 


32 
14 
35 
34 


3 

3 
1 


3 


3 




46 
25 
41 


1 
2 




2 


1 


43 
30 
26 
60 
55 


2 
2 
2 
6 
2 


1 




1 


61 


3 


2 






41 


3 




1 


1 


30 


4 1 





4 




6 




5 




9 




4 


1 


5 




12 


2 


12 


5 


3 


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1 


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1 


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1 


1 


2 


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1 


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3 


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2 


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2 


4 


6 


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1 


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2 


7 


2 


3 




4 




4 




3 




2 




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2 


6 




;7 


7 


7 


4 


4 


2 


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3 


5 


2 


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6 


5 


2 


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2 


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1 


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3 


4 


3 


6 


4 


2 


1 


fi 


1 





3 


4 


1 


7 


4 


11 


3 


7 


3 


!) 


3 


9 


1 


7 




1 


2 





2 


3 


1 


K 


6 


6 


6 


8 


1 


5 


1 


4 




6 


1 


9 


1 


5 




2 




6 


2 


2 


2 


8 




3 




2 


1 



E 


G 


37 


8 


19 


3 


40 


8 


37 


9 


38 


10 


23 


3 


39 


9 


27 


6 


31 


5 


52 


14 


29 


9 


29 


5 


29 


6 


41 


4 


16 


12 


36 


4 


23 


4 


29 


2 


31 


9 


25 


6 


52 


3 


39 


7 


26 


10 


29 


10 


28 


2 


23 


9 


20 


4 


27 


11 


34 


9 


37 


15 


23 


10 


28 


9 


35 


12 


29 


6 


24 


8 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1955 



Page Thirteen 



Owsley Co. (Booneville) 

Oxford (Georgetown) 

Paint Lick 

Paintsville 

Paris 

Park City 

Parksville 

Peaks Mill (Frankfort) 

Pembroke 

Perry ville 

Phelps 

Pikeville 

Pine Knot 

Pineville 

Pleasant View 

Pleasureville 

Poplar Creek (Carpenter) 

Powell Co.( Stanton) 

Prestonsburg 

Prichard (Grayson) 

Providenco 

Pulaski Co. (Somerset) 

Raceland 

Bed Bird Settle. (Beverly) 

Reidland (Paducah) 

Richardsville 

Riney ville 

Riverside Inst. Lost Creek 

Rockhold 

Rockport 

Rose Hill 

Russell 

Russell Co. (Russell Springs) „ 

Russellville 

Sacramento 

Sadieville 

St. Agatha (Winchester) 

St. Agnes ( Uniontown ) 

St. Augustine ( Lebanon ) 

St. Catherine (New Haven) „-- 

St. Charles (Lebanon) 

St. Francis (Loretto) 

St. Henry (Erlanger) 

St. .Joseph Prep (Bardstown). 

St. Mary (Alexandria) 

St. Mary's (Paducah) 

St. Patrick (Maysville) 

St. Thomas (Ft. Thomas) 

St. Vincent (Morganfield) 

St. Xavier (Louisville) 

Salem 



Salyers ville 

Sandy Hook 

Scottsville 

Sebree 

Sedalia 

Sharpsburg 

Shawnee (Louisville) 

Shelbyville . 

Shepherdsville 

Shopville 

Silver Grove 

Simon Kenton (Independence) _ 

Simpsonville 

Sinking Fok (Hopkinsville)___ 

Slaughters 

Somerset 

Sonera 

South Christian (Herndon) 

Southern (Louisville) 

South Portsmouth 

Springfield 

Stamping Ground 

Stanford 

Stearns 

Stinnett 

Stuart Robinson 

Sturgis 

Sunfish 

Symsonia 

Taylor Co. (Campbellsville) 

Taylorsville 

Temple Hill (Glasgow) 

Tilghman (Paducah) 

Todd Co. (Elkton) 

Tollesboro 

Tompkinsville 

Trenton 







1 




OTHER 


OACI 


1 SCHOOL 






OFFICIALS 


1 G 


F 


P 


E 


G 


F 


10 


4 




33 


6 


1 


6 


1 




2S 


6 


1 


7 


2 


1 


37 
48 


7 




6 






36 


3 




4 






30 


5 




4 






21 


6 


2 


3 


1 




23 


4 


1 


8 




1 


34 


3 




6 


1 


1 


21 


11 




4 


1 




25 


5 




2 


1 


2 


28 


1 


1 


* 


1 




20 


4 


1 


2 


1 




27 


2 




15 


1 


1 


29 


7 


1 


9 




2 


45 


5 




3 


3 




14 


3 


2 


5 




2 


35 


' 6 


1 


4 




2 


30 


3 




s 






38 


2 




6 






48 


1 




3 


1 




32 


2 




4 

1 


4 


1 
1 


40 
32 


3 

1 


1 1 


2 


2 




25 


4 




2 


2 




33 


4 


1 


2 




3 


83 


3 


1 


3 






14 


2 




11 


2 




27 


9 


3 


7 




1 


23 


11 


1 


5 


2 


2 


37 


8 


1 


6 


3 




35 


4 




4 


1 


2 


49 


3 




2 


1 




21 


2 




4 


1 


1 


47 


6 




8 

1 




1 


25 
21 


11 
2 


1 


2 




1 


24 


2 




6 




1 


36 


8 




8 


1 




26 


11 




6 


1 




26 


7 




11 






42 


7 




3 


1 




33 


6 


1 


3 


3 


1 


30 


6 




13 




1 


30 


10 




8 


4 


4 


7 
20 


10 


2 


7 






19 


10 


1 


11 


10 


6 


19 


15 


2 


7 


3 




40 


6 


3 


12 


5 


2 


37 


8 


1 


9 






41 


7 




3 


2 


1 


32 


5 




1 






34 


2 


1 


7 


1 


2 


40 


6 




4 




1 


30 


8 


1 


7 


1 




21 


9 




7 






45 


5 




9 


1 




38 


6 




3 


3 




36 


1 




5 


1 


1 


33 


8 




2 






33 


1 


1 


11 






28 


9 




3 


1 




45 


2 




10 


3 




33 


13 




2 




1 


29 


1 




2 


1 




38 


7 




7 


3 


2 


55 


5 




8 


1 




38 


7 




12 


1 


4 


38 


8 


1 


9 






32 


7 




7 


5 


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47 


12 


2 


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32 


7 




7 


1 


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8 




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1 


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39 


2 


2 


5 


1 


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30 


2 


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2 






17 


3 






4 




31 


2 




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1 


1 

1 


1 


29 
19 


7 
4 


2 

1 


11 


1 


1 


29 


6 




9 


4 


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38 


8 




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1 




28 


6 


1 


3 


1 




28 


4 




4 


1 




31 


8 




5 






24 


7 




13 






34 


n 




9 


2 


1 


39 


7 





G 


F 


P 


£ 


G 


F 1 


7 


4 


1 


31 


9 




11 


2 


1 


26 


8 


2 


13 
3 


2 




36 
45 


8 
3 




7 


2 


1 


35 


2 


1 


9 






27 


8 




12 


1 




21 


7 


1 


4 


1 




23 


4 


1 


7 


1 




31 


6 


3 


16 


2 




19 


11 


2 


7 


1 




18 


11 


1 


5 


1 




25 


4 


I 


7 


6 




11 


8 


6 


5 


2 


1 


17 


9 


2 


15 


6 


1 


18 


14 


4 


7 


1 


2 


41 


7 


2 


3 


2 


1 


10 


6 


3 


8 


2 


2 


24 


16 


2 


4 




2 


27 


2 


3 


4 






37 


3 




3 






44 


6 




5 






31 


3 


1 


5 


2 




40 


3 




1 






27 


2 




4 






25 


4 




7 






30 


7 




5 




3 


81 


6 




2 






14 


2 




11 




3 


19 


17 




14 




1 


21 


11 


3 1 


13 






33 


11 




8 






33 


4 




4 




2 


48 


4 




5 






20 


1 




9 






45 


7 




14 


2 




21 


14 




4 






19 


4 




2 






25 


2 




8 


2 


1 


35 


8 




14 






26 


11 




10 






32 


6 




14 






39 


11 




IS 






31 


8 




8 






29 


6 




11 






23 


16 




13 




1 


3 


13 




3 






17 


2 




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15 


14 




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18 


11 




9 




1 


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5 




11 






36 


12 




13 






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11 




8 




1 


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8 




4 




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4 




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7 




5 




1 


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7 




11 






20 


9 




9 






42 


7 




9 




1 


32 


10 




2 






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2 


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10 




5 






32 


2 




17 






22 


15 




14 




2 


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8 




14 






35 


12 




9 




1 


19 


9 


2 


e 






32 


10 




10 




2 


50 


10 




9 






37 


8 


2 


8 






43 


5 




10 






28 


12 




15 






43 


14 


1 


10 






30 


10 




7 






30 


9 




6 




1 


39 


5 




5 




2 


21 


6 


5 


4 






16 


2 


2 


6 




2 


27 


3 


1 


6 






36 


5 




9 




1 


23 


7 


6 


5 






19 


4 


1 


13 




2 


18 


11 


5 


11 




1 


37 


9 


2 


10 






23 


9 


2 


4 






28 


4 




12 




1 


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11 




9 






23 


9 




14 


6 




27 


10 


6 


16 


2 


1 


34 


11 


2 



Page Fourteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1955 



Trigg Co. (Cadizi 

Trimble Co. (Bedford) 

Tyner 

Uniontown 

University (Lexington) 

Utica 

Valley (Valley Station) 

Vanceburg- Lewis Co. (Vanceburg) 

Van Lear 

Versailles 

Vine Grove 

Virgie 

Waco 

Waddy 

Wallins 

Walton-Verona (Walton) 

Warfield 

Warren Co. (Bowling Green) 

Wayland 

Wayne Co. (Monticello) 

Western (Hickman) 

Western (Sinai) 

West Point 

Wheelwright 

Whitesburg 

Williamsburg 

Williamstown 

Willisburg 

Wilmore 

Winchester 

Wingo 

Wolfe Co. (Campton) 

Woodbine 

Wurtland 









1 




OTHER 










1 








COACH SCHOOL 


CROWD 


TEAM 


OFFICIALS 




, 






E 


G 


F 


P 1 E G 


F ' P 


E 


G 


F 


P 


E 


G 


F 


35 


3 






34 


4 






32 


5 


1 




31 


6 




33 


n 


2 


3 


41 


6 




2 


33 


8 


5 


3 


37 


9 


1 


29 


2 






29 


2 






27 


1 


3 




26 


5 




32 


19 






32 


7 


2 




28 


6 


6 


1 


27 


9 


4 


30 


7 


1 


2 


34 


B 






29 


8 


2 




20 


12 


4 


47 


1 






46 


2 






46 


2 






43 


5 




35 


8 






34 


7 


2 




24 


15 


2 


1 


31 


8 


3 


35 


5 






35 


5 






35 


6 






35 


6 




29 


4 


1 




28 


4 






23 


9 


1 




25 


6 


1 


34 


3 






34 


3 






34 


3 






35 


2 




41 


3 


2 


1 


39 


4 


2 


1 


35 


5 


2 


3 


38 


5 


1 


51 


4 






52 


1 






46 


5 


1 




43 


7 


1 


40 


6 


3 


7 


51 


4 






42 


8 


2 




53 


9 


1 


33 


12 


2 




43 


4 






38 


7 


2 




34 


11 


2 


34 








33 




1 




33 




1 




34 






31 


15 






34 


11 


1 




28 


17 


1 




32 


10 


3 


19 


3 






21 


1 






17 


5 






19 


3 




30 


2 


3 


1 


■ 31 


3 


1 




28 


5 


2 




30 


4 


1 


28 


4 






30 


2 






27 


5 






27 


5 




36 


16 


2 


2 


46 


9 


1 


1 


39 


12 


1 


4 


41 


15 




24 








19 


5 






14 


10 


2 


1 


23 


6 




40 


5 






40 


10 






37 


10 




1 


39 


5 


1 


41 


a 






33 


8 






25 


15 


1 




30 


11 


1 


43 


s 






46 


2 






35 


12 


1 




38 


6 


2 


32 


1 


1 


1 


33 


2 






28 


1 


1 


5 


31 


3 




18 


7 






19 


5 


1 




14 


10 


1 




19 


6 


1 


38 


4 


1 




37 


6 






30 


10 


1 


2 


28 


12 


2 


34 


13 


1 




49 


7 






43 


12 


2 




42 


15 


1 


25 


4 




3 


26 


2 


3 


1 


20 


6 


5 


1 


23 


2 


2 


22 


2 


1 


1 


23 


3 






20 


6 


5 


1 


23 


2 


2 


24 


2 






19 


7 






17 


7 


2 




20 


5 




37 


6 




1 


41 


3 






33 


6 


5 




34 


10 




31 


9 


3 




35 


7 


2 




32 


7 


5 




33 


9 


3 


45 


3 


2 




48 


3 






43 


6 


2 




44 


7 





REPORT OF INSURANCE CLAIMS 



Three hundred twenty-three schools insured their athletes under the K.H.S.A.A. Protection Fund in 1954-55. In football 
3521 boys were insured, in all sports except football 6819, and in physical education 193. Seven hundred eighty-one claims 
were submitted, with seven hundred fifty-two totaling $16,754.42. being paid. 



t Injury Amount Paid 

nauer X-ray (ankle) $ 12.00 

Reeves X-ray (anklel 6.00 

-Dwain McClard Dislocated shoulder 35.00 

6.00 

20.00 

10.00 

10.00 

5.00 

20.00 

10.00 



Aln 
Aln 

Almo Thomas Reeves X-ray (anklel 

Alvaton Robert Donoho Fractured ulna 

Alvaton Robert Donoho X-ray (hip) 

Alvaton Danny Turner X-ray (back) 

Alvaton Tom Reagan X-ray (elbow) 

Ashland Ronnie Perry Broken nose. X-ray 

Ashland Herbert Thompson X-ray (kneel 

Ashland Bill Hopkins Dislocated shoulder. X-ray 45.00 

Ashland Larry Highley Fractured vertebra (special) 94.55 

Ashland lohn Koskinen Loss of teeth 50.00 

Ashland Bill Sutphin Broken nose. X-ray 38.00 

Ashland Lamar Patrick Dislocated thumb. X-ray 27.01' 

Auburn James Pendleton X-ray (head) 10.00 

Austin Tracy James Reed Wheat X-ray (leg) 6.00 

Austin Tracy Kenneth Sanders Head injury (special) 32.00 

Barbourville Walter Ray Jones X-ray (chest) 7.50 

Bardstown Bobby Brooks X-ray (hand) 6.00 

Bardstown Donald Pyle X-ray (ankle) 9.00 

Bardstown Robert W. Brooks X-ray (chest) 10.00 

Bardstown Billy Snider X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Barret Donald Adkins Dislocated knee 34.00 

Barret James McMahon Dislocated elbow 31.00 

Barret Gerald Duncan Knee injury, requiring surgery 41.00 

Barret Ronnie McClure Laceration — suture 5.00 

Barret Charles Watkins Fractured pelvis 18.00 

Barret Charles Watkins Fractured metacarpal, X-ray 32.00 

Barret Pascal Benson Broken tooth. X-ray 22.00 

Barret Bill Harralson Loss of tooth 25.00 

Barret Charles Watkins Broken tooth 20.00 

Barret Harry Tate Fractured clavicle (special) 83.50 

Barret James Willett Broken rib 8.00 

Barret Charles Parker Fractured tibia 50.00 

Barret David Wilson Laceration — suture, chipped tooth 8.00 

Barret Jim Lambert Knee injury (special) 110.00 

Beechwood Alex Wilson Broken tooth 20.00 



Beechwood Dick Hutchcraft Fractured tibia 

Beechwood Jerry Lowry X-ray (head) 

Beechwood Tom Richardson Loss of teeth 

Bell County Dale Hurst Laceration — suture 

Bell County Charles Cheek X-ray (shoulder) 

Bell County Carlo Miracle X-ray (wrist) 

Bell County Mitchell Cox Dislocated shoulder. X-ray 

Bell County Leiter Mer«dith Broken nose 



BO.OO 
5.00 

BO.OO 
5.00 
7.60 
B.OO 

35.00 

20.00 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1955 Page Fifteen 

Bell County Clinton Rolbins Arm injury (special) 150.00 

Bellevue Bill Harmon Loss of tooth 26.00 

Bellevue Tim Wuillenmier Broken teeth 40.00 

Bellevue Charles Blersch Fractured radius 25.00 

Bellevue Clifford Swauger Knee injury (spec-all 150.00 

Bellevue Vades Norman X-ray (head I 10.00 

Bellevue Ronnie Mendell X-ray (chesti 5.00 

Bellevue Ronnie Mendell Fractured finger. X-ray 16.00 

Bellevue Bob Pope X-ray (wristl 6.00 

Bellevue .Tim Hall Abdomen injury (Special) 40.00 

Bellevue Kenneth Watkins Loss of tooth 15.00 

Benton Jerry Meyer Broken nose 3.00 

Benton Tommy Morgan X-ray (anklel 6.00 

Berea -Toe Azbill Broken finger 10.00 

Berea .Tohn Earl Stivers Fractured finger, X-ray 16.00 

Berea David Singleton X-ray (finger) 5.00 

Berea Delbert Prewitt X-ray (finger) 4.00 

Berea David Singleton X-ray (knee) 6.00 

Berea Dorse LeMaster X-ray (finger) 5.00 

Berea Delbert Prewitt Kidney injury (special) 150.00 

Bowling Green Richard Hardcastle Fractured tibia 50.00 

Bowling Green Hal Kitchens Laceration — suture 5.00 

Bowling Green Danny Jenkins Loss of teeth 50.00 

Bowling Green Jim Sparks Broken tooth 11.00 

Bracken County Clarence Teegarden Dislocated shoulder 25.00 

Bridgeport Jimmie Carroll Lewis Fractured radius and ulna 75.00 

Bristow Melvin Jones Replacing knocked out filling 3.00 

Bristow Melvin Jones X-ray (spine) 10.00 

Brodhead Larry Harris Broken tooth 1.50 

Brodhead Donald Thompson Laceration — suture 3.00 

Brodhead Byron Owens X-ray (spine) 10.00 

Buckeye J. W. Tyree Laceration — suture 5.00 

Burgin Gerald Goodlett Loss of tooth 25.00 

Burgin Eddie W. Wilham X-ray (chest) 6.00 

Burgin Billy Waggoner Broken tooth. X-ray 22.00 

Burgin Paul Morford Fractured carpal. X-ray 26.00 

Burgin Eugene Robinson Loss of tooth. X-ray 27.00 

Bush Calvin Hensley Chipped tooth 3.00 

Bush Ronald Napier X-ray (hip) 10.00 

Bush Eugene Minton X-ray (ankle) 5.00 

Bush Calvin Hensley Fractured metatarsa's 35.00 

Bush Ralph Rush X-ray (ankle) 10.00 

Butler County Allan Shields X-ray (ankle) 5.00 

Butler County Ralph Romans Broken nose 6.00 

Calhoun Lynn Young Fractured femur 100.00 

Calhoun Eddie Galloway X-ray (hand) 7.00 

Calhoun Billy Dent X-ray (foot) 6.00 

Camargo Wendell Frazier Loss of tooth, chipped tooth, laceration — suture 29.00 

Camargo Perry Amburgey Loss of teeth 50.00 

Campbell County Lloyd Schalck Fractured fingers. X-ray 25.00 

Campbell County George Spreher X-ray (kneel 12.00 

Campbell County Ronny Reder Laceration — suture 5.00 

Caneyville Ronnie Rinnert Laceration — suture 5.00 

Carlisle Billy Berry X-ray (spine) 10.00 

CarroUton Ronnie Marlette Laceration — suture 5.00 

Catlettsburg Paul Clevenger X-ray (teeth) 2.00 

Catlettsburg Arthur Craft X-ray (finger) 5.00 

Catlettsburg Wray Chaffin Fractured mandible 40.00 

Catlettsburg Paul Sloan Fractured finger, X-ray 15.00 

Catlettsburg Dan Mollett ..Fractured tibia 35.20 

Catlettsburg .Toe Griffin _ X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Catlettsburg Hubert Sloan X-ray (knee) — 6.00 

Catlettsburg Tom Stewart X-ray (arm) 6.00 

Catlettsburg Dan Mollett .Fractured tibia (add't'onal payment) 14.80 

Caverna WMIiam Proffitt Dislocated wrist 26.00 

Caverna Bill Ross Dislocated shoulder 35.00 

Cayce David McKimmons Fractured radius and ulna 47.00 

Center Ray Pennington Lung injury (snociall 45.20 

Central (Clinton) Rudv Waggoner _ Broken nose. X-ray 30.00 

Central (Richmond) William House Chipped teeth 4.00 

Central (Richmond) Harold Kirby Fractured tarsal 31.00 

Central Park Herschel E. White X-ray (ankle) 5.00 

Central Park Randell Embry Fractured radius 40.00 

Chandlers Chapel Morris Ashby ^X-ray (head) 10.00 

Clark County .Timmy Allen Fractured metacarpal. X-ray 38.00 

Clay Danny Clark Dislocated finger. X-ray 20.00 

Clifty Dorris Powell X-ray (leg) 12.00 

Clifty Billy McGhee X-ray (knee) 6.00 

Clinton County .Toe Landrum .Fractured ulna 29.00 

Clinton County Sidney Scott I___I.X-ray (ankle) 10.00 

College Tohn Garnett Laceration— suture 5.00 

College Terry Owens X-ray (teeth) 2.00 

Corbin Smith Henson Fractured tibia and fbula 90.00 

Corbin David Miller Fractured radius and ulna 50.00 

Corbin Sammy Sturgill Fractured tibia 15.00 

Covington Catholic Fred Terry X-ray (ankle) 10.00 

Crab Orchard Donald Martin 'X-ray (finger) 6.00 

Crab Orchard Harry Middleton __ X-ray (knee) 6.00 

Crab Orchard Ronnie Taylor X-ray (leg) 6.00 

Crab Orchard Bert McGohn Fractured tibia 50.00 

Cub Run Huston Jaggers Laceration — suture 5.00 

Cynthiana Lloyd Smith II_ I"X-ray (finger) B.OO 

Cynthiana Glenn Anderson X-ray (finger) 5.00 

Cynthiana Glendon Ravenscraft X-ray (ankle) B.OO 



Page Sixteen THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1955 

Cynthiana James Sausberger Fractured radius 40.00 

Cynthiana Clay Adams X-ray Ifinger) 6.00 

Cynthiana John Tubbs Broken tooth 20.00 

Cynthiana Wayne Hill Dislocated shoulder 35.00 

Cynthiana James Swinford Loss of teeth 69.00 

Cynthiana Ronald Richie X-ray (shoulder) 5.00 

Cynthiana Ronald Richie Fractured clavicle 35.00 

Cynthiana Otis Tussey Fractured finger. X-ray 16.00 

Cynthiana William McKee X-ray (spine) 18.00 

Cynthiana Glenn Fields Fractured metacarpal. X-ray 31.00 

Danville E. G. Plummer X-ray (elbow) 6.00 

Danville Perry Moore Laceration — suture, X-ray (head) 13.00 

Danville Timmy Poynter Fractured fibula 48.55 

Danville Tommy Slieene Broken nose 20.00 

Danville Roger Collins Fractured scapula ;20.00 

Dawson Donald Inglis Fractured clavicle 9.50 

Dayton Ollie Wilhers Laceration — suture 5.00 

Dayton Bob Frederick Loss of tooth 25.00 

Dayton Neil Thompson Broken teeth 50.00 

duPont Manual Jack Grim X-ray (knee) 6.00 

duPont Manual Sam Patrick X-ray (knee) 6.00 

duPont Manual Truman Strausburg _ X-ray (hand) 5.63 

duPont Manual Toe E. Brown X-ray (head) 20.00 

duPont Manual Don Gambrall Fractured humerus 75.00 

duPont Manual Joe E. Brown X-ray (pelvis) 18.76 

duPont Manual Thomas Oursler X-ray (spine) 10.00 

duPont Manual Don Meyer X-ray (spine) 10.00 

duPont Manual Tames Goff __ X-ray (spine) 10.00 

duPont Manual Evarts English X-ray (neck and shoulder) 10.00 

duPont Manual Harold Bates X-ray (spine) 10.00 

duPont Manual Mike Hemmer X-ray (spine) 10.00 

duPont Manual Don Robbins Broken tooth 9.00 

Eastern Edward Shackleford Finger injury (special) 45.63 

Eastern Stephen Hager Knee injury (special) 102.00 

Eastern Tames Bate __ X-ray (knee) 5.00 

Eastern James Ralph Judd X-ray (knee) 6.00 

Eastern Stephen Isaacs __ _ X-ray (shoulder) 10.00 

Eastern Barney Long I "„III.IlFractured clavicle 35.00 

Edmonton Kenneth Smith __ __Knee injury (special) 150.00 

Elizabethtown R^y Vencill Jr X-ray (ankle) 10.00 

Elizabethtown Norman HoIIan __ ___ "X-ray (head) 10.00 

Elizabethtown Ronny Myers _ X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Elizabethtown John Loyd _ _ _" IX-ray (spine) 10.00 

Elizabethtown Bobby .Tenkins X-ray (chest) 10.00 

Elizabethtown Norman Hollan I__ _Nose injury (special) 100.45 

Elizabethtown James M. Best, Jr. _ _ "_' X-ray (shoulder) 10.00 

Elizabethtown 3jl]y 1,c,-„is Laceration — suture 5.00 

Elizabethtown Sonny Hawkins~_ __II II__ Fractured tarsal 9.50 

Elizabethtown Gerald Nottingham __ __Kidney injury (special) 160.00 

Elizabethtown David Cundiff I"""".."!! _X-ray (knee) 6.00 

Elizabethtown jerry Holman ___ Laceration— Suture 5.00 

Elkhorn Lawrence Duval' 11" I"Fractured metacarpal 20.00 

i-lkhorn Lawrence Duvall Fractured fibula 60.00 

Eminence j^rry McKay _ ~~ I'l "X-ray (ankle) . 6.00 

Jl-mmence Jackie Purvis Fractured radius -and ulna 40.00 

Eminence Tackie Purvis I " Fractured radius and ulna (additional payment) 9.50 

Eminence jorry McRay "II I'l X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Eminence Ca^l Collins I "_X-ray (chest) 7.50 

Erie jgy Uhler __ __ Loss of teeth 50.00 

Estill County Kenny Embry __"___I"__ "X-ray (elbow) 10.00 

5^f' Bobbv Pieratt I " _III"III__Laceration— Suture 6.00 

Fa mouth Kenneth Tucker ""_ __"I"I"IBi-oken finger 10.00 

Falmouth Pan] Brown Fractured pelvis 30.00 

Fancy Farm Oene Hobbs I I" "rX-ray (finger) 3.00 

I-ancy Farm __ T?i]iy Dalton _II "III "Laceration— Suture 5.00 

Ferguson Eugene Meeks""II _ ""X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Ferguson Max Lay _ _"_ II_IX-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Fern Creek _ David Race! __ ""II__ X-ray (head) 10.00 

Fern Creek David Pitts _ II 11" "IX-ray (ankle) 5.00 

Fern Creek Don Dyer ___ "II_ II"" "" _X-ray (wrist) 6.00 

Fern Creek James E Ki"nma"n .//' _I X-ray (head) 6.00 

Fern Creek Ted Kendrick ""II_I IX-ray (elbow) 6.00 

Fern Creek Arthur D. Racel _ _ I X-ray (wrist) 6.00 

Fern Creek Bobby Groves _I X-ray (hip) 10.00 

rern Creek _ John Miller ___ Finger injury (special) 40.00 

Fern Creek ."Tames V Mahon "Jr III. "Broken nose. X-ray 30.00 

Fern Creek _ ..iBilly Day ... ...I.I" ...I"""X-ray (shoulder) 16.00 

Fern Creek Johnny Gen"t"r"y" X-ray (spine) 10.00 

Fern Creek Gregory Dean """""I IX-ray (rib) 10.00 

fern Creek Henry Graves ."I" I" Dislocated shoulder 35.00 

Fern Creek _ " Arthur D R»cel .I."""II.I.II.IIVertebra injury (special) 34.60 

Fern Creek I.Ioseph G. Mills "".. "X-ray (finger) B.OO 

F at Gap Gilbert Taylor . ." ""I . ""X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

f eming-Neon ..Tames Abies .. I" .1.. X-ray (knee) 6.00 

Florence Larry Yelton I .rill Knee injury (special) 160.00 

Fredericktown Colbert Smith " . I Broken rib 2.00 

Fu gham Bennie L. Hawks X-ray (rib and ankle) 13.50 

f ulton y^g jje^ _ Laceration— suture. X-ray (head) 10.00 

Fu ton Gerald Bushart""I..IIII.."I "Fractured finger. X-ray 16.00 

r u ton jjon Hogan . . .... .Laceration— suture 5.00 

fulton .Timmy Oliver . . . ... Fractured radius 40.00 

Fulton Billy Hatler . " 11"""" IIII" "X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

tu ton John McAlister . . Broken nose. X-ray 27.60 

Fulton Mclvin Merryman Fractured fibula 50.00 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1955 Page Seventeen 

Gallatin County Joe Reffett X-ray (head) 32.50 

Garrett Douglas Chaffins X-ray (ankle) 10.00 

Garth Herbert Mulligan Fractured fibula 6-00 

Glendale J. W. Miller Fractured tibia 21.50 

Glendale J. W. Miller Head injury (special) 113.05 

Graham Johnny Roark X-ray (foot) 5.00 

Grant County Richard Longbons X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Grant County Kenneth Franks X-ray (leg) 6.00 

Greensburg Delbert Lobb X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Greenville Bobby Webb Fractured fibula 35.50 

Hanson Mike Wilson X-ray (wrist) 6.00 

Hanson Richard Wells X-ray (wrist) 6.00 

Hanson Tackle Jewel X-ray (hand) 6.00 

Hardin Jerry Inman X-ray (hand) 6.00 

Hardin Bobby Miller Laceration — suture 3.50 

Hardin Eddie York Broken rib. X-ray 12.80 

Hardin .Terry Inman Laceration — suture 5.00 

Harlan Vernon Denny X-ray (knee) 6.00 

Harlan Don Adkisson X-ray (arm) 5.00- 

Harlan Dan Beasley T="ractured radius 40.00 

Harlan Tommy Cornett X-ray, (knee, nose), laceration — suture 23.50 

Harlan Sonny Shepherd X-ray (hand) 5.00 

Harlan Shelby Seale X-ray (hand) 5.00 

Harlan Frankie Morrow X-ray (knee) 6.00 

Harlan Perry Walls X-ray (head) 7.50 

Harlan Jackie Jones X-ray (foot) 5.00 

Harlan Howard Walls X-ray (knee) 6.00 

Harlan Jimmy Gross T^ractured fibula 48.00 

Harlan Robert Owens X-ray (head) 7.50 

Harlan Kenneth Farmer X-ray (knee) 6.00 

Harlan Don Adkinson X-ray (leg) 6.00 

Harlan Charley Stephenson X-ray (arm) 5.00 

Harrison County Kenneth Whitson Laceration — suture 5.00 

Harrison County Jimmy England Laceration — suture 5.00 

Harrison County Willard Fryman X-ray (spine) 20.00 

Harrison County Ralph Wiglesworth Laceration — suture 5.00 

Harrison County Ernest Smith Laceration — suture 5.00 

Harrodsburg Gene Curtsinger Fractured clavicle 26.00 

Harrodsburg James Robert Lykins X-ray (toe) — _ 5.00 

Harrodsburg Charlie Burton X-ray (finger) 6.00 

Harrodsburg Don Bishop X-ray (leg) 6.00 

Hazard Dale Creech Fractured fibula. X-ray 32.50 

Hazard Leon Hollon Fractured radius 40.00 

Hazard Robert Igo Head injury (special) 150.00 

Hazard Gary Gabbard Broken nose, laceration — suture 13.50 

Hazel Green Alvin Binder Dislocated finger. X-ray, laceration — suture 21.00 

Hazel Green Gordon Bay McWhorter I__X-ray (head) 10.00 

Henderson Settlement Alvin Jones Laceration — suture. X-ray (head) 12.50 

Henderson Settlement Eugene Shackleford __ X-ray (finger) 5.00 

Henderson Settlement .Tohn M. Tolliver __. X-ray (ankle) 5.00 

Henderson Settlement Billy Walker X-ray (ankel) 5.00 

Hickman James Holcombe X-ray (foot) 6.00 

Hickman Rayburn Garrison X-ray (leg and ankle) 12.00 

Hickman Tames Holcombe X-ray (ankle) 5.00 

Hickman Charles Hammock .Laceration — suture 5.00 

Highlands Don Borches X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Highlands Tony Foellger ___ Dislocated hip 21.00 

Highlands William Stephens .Dislocated shoulder 35.00 

Highlands .Jeff Pence Broken tooth 7.00 

.Tohn L. Siddens X-ray (shoulder) 10.00 

Kenneth Grider X-ray (chest) 5.00 

Wesley Strader Fractured metatarsals. X-ray 40.00 

Junior Shaw Fractured carpal 20.00 

Bobbie Atwell Fractured metatarsal. X-ray 30.00 

Hodgenville Donald Bennett I___IIlDislocated knee 24.00 

Holy Cross Richard Gutman Laceration — suture 6.00 

Holy Name Donald Wurth X-ray (foot) 6.00 

Hopkinsville William Fuller Broken finger 6.00 

Hopkinsville Ralph Anderson Nose injury (special) 63.18 

Howevalley Glenn Nichols Loss of tooth 25.00 

Howevalley Eugene Jaggers _ Hernia— operative (special) 116.20 

Howevalley Buddy Pirtle Foot injury (special) 51.00 

Hustonville Earl Curtis Fractured mandible 40.00 

Irvine Harold King _ _ _X-ray (ankle) 10.00 

Irvine William Neikirk X-ray (knee) 10.00 

Irvine Paul Johnson _ .Laceration — suture 3.00 

Irvine Herbert Wiseman X-ray (ribs) 10.00 

Irvine William Griffin Replacing knocked out filling 3.00 

Irvine Paul .Tohnson Replacing knocked out filling 3.00 

Irvine .Toe Yeager Broken tooth 5.00 

Irvine Kenneth Covey __ X-ray (hip) 5.00 

Jenkins Ronald Irwin X-ray (ribs) 10.00 

Jenkins Roger Blevins _X-ray (knee) 6.00 

Jenkins Larry Horner X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Jenkins Charles Elkins _ Loss of tooth. X-ray 27.00 

J. M. Atherton Raymond Tichenor _ _ X-ray (knee) 7.50 

J. M. Atherton Don Taylor X-ray (shoulder) 10.00 

J- M. Atherton Witty Howard .X-ray (foot) 5.00 

J. M. Atherton Richard Young X-ray (hip) 10.00 

J. M. Atherton Arthur Cuscaden Broken teeth 50.00 

J. M. Atherton Pat Maloney Fractured radius 40.00 

J. M. Atherton David Burhans X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

J. M. Atherton .Tohn Taylor Dislocated shoulder. X-ray 15.00 

J. M. Atherton John Inman Broken nose. X-ray 15.00 



H 

Hisev: 



Page Eighteen THE KENTUCKY HJiGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1955 

Junction City Leland Lockhart Fractured fibula 50.00 

Kingdom Come Shermon Ison X-ray (wrist) 5.00 

Kirksey Don E. Paschall X-ray (hand) 6.00 

Kirksey Gerald Stone X-ray (spine) 5.00 

Kirksey Edgar Doores X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Kirksey Bobby Hugh Wilson X-ray (knee) 5.00 

Knox Central Harry Martin Laceration — suture 5.00 

Kno.x Central Bruce Hensley X-ray (arm) 6.00 

Knox Central Kenneth Lay X-ray (shoulder) 7.50 

Lacy Ronnie Johnson Broken nose 5.00 

Lafayette Dean Benton X-ray (ankle) 5.00 

Lafayette Gerald Walton X-ray (knee) 10.00 

Lafayette Donnie Bates Broken thumb, X-ray 22.00 

Lafayette Eddie Sellier X-ray (arm) 10.00 

Lafayette .Tames Hogg X-ray (nose) 15.00 

Lafayette Jim Fugette Laceration — suture 5.00 

Lafayette Bobby Joe Peele Laceration — suture 5.00 

Lafayette Bobby Gillis X-ray (foot) 12.00 

Lafayette Kenneth Eaves Fractured clavicle 5.00 

Lafayette James H. Fugette X-ray (shoulder) 10.00 

Lafayette Kenneth Eaves Fractured clavicle (additional payment) 10.00 

Lafayette James Hogg X-ray (knee) 12.00 

Lafayette Harry Dugan X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Lafayette Ranny Blount Fractured carpal, X-ray 32.00 

Lafayette .Ronnie Hacker X-ray (head) 25.00 

Lancaster Bobby Bourne Ruptured kidney 50.00 

Lancaster Hugh McCulley X-ray (finger) 5.00 

Lancaster Raymond Spivey Knee injury (special) 96.78 

Lebanon Danny Collier X-ray (ribs) 15.00 

Lebanon Billy D. Mattingly Loss of tooth 25.00 

Lebanon Junction Carlos Miller Dislocated knee 35.00 

Lebanon Junction Charles Doan Dislocated knee 35.00 

Lee County Russell Stamper Laceration — suture 5.00 

Lee County Clay Moore Laceration — suture 5.00 

Leitchfield Hugh Mac Haycraft X-ray (ankle) 12.00 

Leitchfield Chester McClure X-ray (ankle) 5.00 

Lexington Catholic Lynn Luallen Laceration — suture 5.00 

Lexington Catholic Eugene Thompson Arm injury (special) 66.00 

Lexington Catholic Ronnie Watson Loss of tooth 25.00 

Lexington Catholic John Meyer X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Livermore Lester Humphrey Loss of tooth 4.00 

Lloyd Ronnie Miller Broken teeth 28.00 

Lloyd Ray Faris Broken nose. X-ray 30.00 

Lloyd Ronnie Miller Loss of tooth, X-ray 31.00 

Lloyd Philip Taliaferro X-ray (spine) 15.00 

Lloyd Edward McCall Laceration — suture 5.00 

Lloyd Jack Burgan X-ray (spine) 5.00 

Lloyd Robert Reed X-ray (ribs) 6.00 

Lloyd Jack Gravitt Arm injury (special) 36.00 

Lloyd Jack Burgan X-ray (wrist) 7.50 

London Jack Demarcus Fractured fibula 40.00 

London Richard Moore Fractured mandible 40.00 

London Lanny Hiller X-ray (spine) 10.00 

Louisa Bob Collins ._ Replacing knocked out filling 5.00 

Louisa David Shortridge Fractured fibula and tibia 60.00 

Louisa Luke Varney Dental injury (special) 57.00 

Louisa _ I_ ""Bob Crabtree X-ray (knee) 10.00 

Louisa Cecil Thompson X-ray (leg) 10.00 

Louisa Bob Collins X-ray (knee) 6.00 

Louisa Jody Adams Fractured tibia 20.00 

Louisa _Bob Bartram Dental injury (special) 63.00 

Louisa __ Kelly Patton Dental injury (spec'al) 55.00 

Louisa __ __ Marvin Rose Loss of teeth 50.00 

Loyall """.."iDon White X-ray (shoulder and arms) 17.50 

Loyall Morton Boggs X-ray (hand) 6.00 

Loyall __ _ Luther Shoemaker Fractured metacarpal. X-ray 30.00 

Loyall Van Blanton Fractured tibia 60.00 

Loyall __ "William Criscillis Fractured ulna 40.00 

Loyall ___""Morris Hall X-ray (shoulder) 10.00 

Ludlow Maurice Bill Bising X-ray (spine) 5.00 

Ludlow Robert Meece Lacerations — sutures 10.00 

Ludlow James Remley X-ray (shoulder) 5.00 

Ludlow Larry Price X-ray (teeth) 4.00 

Lynch Jackie Thomas Broken nose 20.00 

Lynch Johnnie Ray Haley Loss of tooth 2.00 

Lynch William Wells Broken rib. X-ray 30.00 

Lynn Camp Connie Jump X-ray (head) 12.50 

Lynn Camp Jack Taylor Fractured skull 100.00 

Lynnvale __ Donald Johnson X-ray (shoulder) 7.50 

McAfee _ Marvin Ashford Broken nose 4.00 

McAfee George D. Phill'pps X-ray (leg) 12.00 

McKell __ ___ Emmitt Salisbury Fractured clavicle 35.00 

McKell Robert Armour Fractured clavicle 35.00 

McKell Richard Fletcher Dislocated ankle. X-ray 42.75 

McKell ___ ___ Robert Robinson X-ray (head) 15.00 

Mackville Gerald Shewmaker X-ray (ankle) 15.00 

Mackville Paul Carey Fractured fibula. X-ray 17.00 

Madison-Model _ __ Johnny Greene Loss of tooth, broken tooth 40.00 

Madison-Model Fred Crump X-ray (knee) 20.00 

Madison-Model __ ...Cecil Dunn X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Maysville Donald W Combs Knee injury (special) 160.00 

Memorial (Hardyville) Hugh R. Edwards Fractured metatarsal 16.00 

Memorial (Waynesburg) George Eldridge Fractured metatarsal 60.00 

Middleburg Lonnie Mullins Fractured radius ^ 36.00 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1955 Page Nineteen 

Middlesboro Paris Bowlett X-ray (nose) 6.00 

Middlesboro Paul Thompson Broken teeth 3.00 

Middlesboro Charles Kelly Fractured carpal 10.50 

Middlesboro Hugh Ed Howard X-ray (ribs) 10.00 

Middlesboro Cecil England X-ray (shoulder) 7.50 

Middlesboro Larry Lyon X-ray (hand) 5.00 

Middlesboro John Allen Taylor Laceration — suture 6.00 

Middlesboro John Allen Taylor Fractured metacarpal. X-ray 25.00 

Middlesboro Larry Monhollen Dislocated shoulder 10.50 

Middlesboro Bernard Beach X-ray (head) 8.00 

Middlesboro Bobby Meyers X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Middlesboro Larry Blondell X-ray (chest) 7.60 

Middlesboro Ronnie Milligan X-ray (rib) 7.50 

Middlesboro Bill Honeycutt Loss of tooth 25.00 

Middlesboro Bernard Beach X-ray (head) 5.00 

Middlesboro Gene Redmon X-ray (hip) 7.50 

Middlesboro Tommy Stapleton X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Midway Michael Rice Laceration — suture 5.00 

Midway Joe Sames Shoulder injury (special) 86.68 

Milburn Buddy Gorham X-ray (foot) 6.00 

Milburn Buddy Gorham X-ray (foot) (additional payment) 6.00 

Monticello Fred Frye Laceration — suture 5.00 

Monticello __ _Bobby Morris Fractured carpal 10.00 

Monticello Bill Barrier Fractured clavicle 36.00 

Morgan County Glen Lykins Loss of teeth 50.00 

Morgan County Randolph Potter X-ray (shoulder) 10.00 

Morganfield Dorris Detraz Broken nose 20.00 

Morganfield _ _ _Tom Conway X-ray (elbow) 5.00 

Morganfield "1 '"'.Phillip Collins X-ray (ribs) 10.00 

Morganfield Billy Ray Hughes X-ray (head) 30.00 

Morganfield Ed Langley X-ray (leg) 6.00 

Morganfield Bobby Nay Fractured clavicle 35.00 

Morganfield Bobby Elliott Arm injury (special) 130.13 

Morganfield Edward Langley Loss of tooth. X-ray 27.00 

Mt. Sterling I"_ ' ""Roger Drake X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Mt. Sterling Buddy Messer Fractured maxilla 40.00 

Muhlenberg Central Wayne Brown Head injury (special) 150.00 

Muhlenberg Central Barnes Bratcher Laceration — suture 5.00 

Muhlenberg Central Elbert Holman Laceration — suture 5.00 

Munfordville John Emery Martin Broken nose. X-ray 30.00 

Murray Don Overby Ruptured kidney 48.73 

Murray Bobby Mix Crawford Laceration — suture 5.00 

Murray IIIlRobert Kik X-ray (knee) 6.00 

Murray Joe Farmer Orr Fractured metacarpal. X-ray 26.00 

Murray Z'_~_ "I_^Edward Carroll X-ray (elbow) 6.00 

Murray _ Bill Wyatt Fractured fibula. X-ray (elbow) 66.00 

Murray ..Bill Wyatt Broken tooth. X-ray 22.00 

New Concord Gene Bailey Broken tooth 20.00 

New Concord Bobby McCuiston Replacing knocked out filling 5.00 

New Concord Billy Buchanan Laceration — suture 5.00 

New Concord Gene Ba'ley X-ray (finger) 6.00 

Newport Russell Weier Fractured vertebra 40.00 

Newport Dale Landell Dislocated elbow 23.50 

Newport Ronnie Rauss Broken tooth 8.00 

Newport Dale Landell Laceration — suture 5.00 

Newport Jon Swobland Loss of tooth 25.00 

Newport Eugene Volter Dislocated elbow. X-ray 35.00 

Newport IIII.IZI.I.Dale Poe Fractured skull 100.00 

Newport Phillip Hamilton X-ray (head) 10.00 

Newport Jack Turner Fractured fibula 60.00 

Newport J™ Wood X-ray (head) 10.00 

Newport Dennis Holzschuh ._ X-ray (nose) 10.00 

Newport Larry Harden X-ray (hand) 6.00 

Newport Dan Azbill X-ray (ankle) 10.00 

Newport Paul Bergman Laceration — suture 5.00 

Newport Jerry Combs Fractured tibia 25.00 

Newport Catholic Charles Frederick Broken teeth 40.00 

Newport Catholic Kenneth Brown X-ray (side) 10.00 

Newport Catholic Kenneth Niehaus Loss of tooth 25.00 

Newport Catholic Stanley Belting Loss of tooth. X-ray 27.00 

Newport Catholic Paul Carr X-ray (teeth) 4.00 

Newport Catholic Robert Velton X-ray (foot) 9.00 

Newport Catholic Ronald Cooney Fractured metatarsal 37.00 

Newport Catholic Robert Terlau Fractured maxilla. X-ray (wrist) 31.00 

Newport Catholic Frank Pangallo Laceration — suture 5.00 

Newport Catholic Paul Carr X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Nicholas County Merrill Mitchell Fractured fibula 14.50 

Nicholas County Jimmy Joe Downing X-ray (ankle) 12.00 

Nicholasville Gerald Abshear X-ray (spine and ribs) 6.00 

Nicholasville Harold House X-ray (wrist) 6.00 

Nicholasville Mac Vanderpool X-ray (head) 8.00 

Nicholasville Billy Kennoy X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Nicholasville Russell Rhineheimer Foot injury (special) 109.25 

North Warren Wayne Wingfield Laceration — suture 6.00 

Oldham County Timmy Horine X-ray (ankle) 5.00 

Oldham County Jimmy Marcum X-ray (spine) 5.00 

Oldham County Dave Walling X-ray (head) 10.00 

Oldham County Walter McHargue Fractured patella 40.00 

Old Kentucky Home Kenneth Horned Loss of teeth 50.00 

Old Kentucky Home Norman Green X-ray (knee) 10.00 

Old Kentucky Home Harold Robinson Fractured clavicle 36.00 

Old Kentucky Home Lee Thomas Stansbury X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Orangeburg Freddie Kabler X-ray (hip) 10.00 

Oxford Ted Holland Vertebra process, X-ray 20.00 



Page Twenty THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1955 

Paintsville Homer Hale, Jr. Loss of tooth 25.00 

Paintsville Franklin Kennard Fractured toe. X-ray 25.00 

Park City Franklin Slaughter Knee injury (special) 109.25 

Pembroke William Bond Loss of teeth 39.00 

Perryville David Reynolds Broken rib. X-ray 13.00 

Perryville Godbey Hundley, Jr. Dislocated shoulder 20.00 

Perryville David Reynolds X-ray (headi 15.00 

Perryville Henry F. Bonta Broken teeth 40.00 

Perryville David Reynolds Broken tooth 15.00 

Perryville Carlos L. Reynolds X-ray (spine) 20.00 

Perryville J. M. Webb X-ray (ankle) 5.00 

Perryville John Mason Fractured tarsal. X-ray 35.00 

Perryville Bobby Carroll Dislocated finger, X-ray 5.00 

Perryville Walter Sanderson X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Perryville Douglas Bingham Fractured metacarpal _. 20.00 

Perryville Billy Cummins Loss of tooth, chipped tooth 28.00 

Powell County Raymond White Dislocated knee 35.00 

Prestonsburg Clifford Goble X-ray (foot) 6.00 

Prestonsburg Chester Shephard X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Prestonsburg Donald Puckett X-ray (knee) 6.00 

Prestonsburg Kendall Alexander X-ray (shoulder) 10.00 

Prestonsburg Joe P. Tackett Fractured metatarsal. X-ray 30.00 

Prestonsburg Don Harrington Kidney injury (special) 38.75 

Prestonsburg James B. Crager Loss of teeth 50.00 

Prestonsburg Edward Ousley Broken tooth. X-ray 26.00 

Prestonsburg Wayne Dixon Loss of tooth. X-ray 29.00 

Prestonsburg Chester Shepherd Laceration — suture 5.00 

Prestonsburg Charles Salyers Loss of teeth 50.00 

Raceland Charles Cox Loss of tooth 25.00 

Raceland Tom Sims X-ray (elbow) 6.00 

Raceland Darryle Toney Fractured mandible 40.00 

Raceland Tames Stout Fractured tibia and fibula (special) 124.05 

Rineyville Bobby Branger X-ray (foot and knee) 7.50 

Rineyville Donnie Lewis X-ray (spine) 16.00 

Rineyville Donald Wolfe X-ray (hip) 7.50 

Rineyville Raymond W. Nail Chipped teeth 4.00 

Rockhold Marcus Rains X-ray (hip) 10.00 

Rockhold Roy Hill Dislocated hip 14.00 

Russell County Roger Roy Broken teeth 17.00 

Russellville Glenn Gilliam Fractured clavicle 35.00 

Russellville Rayburn Atkinson Dislocated elbow. X-ray 43.00 

Russellville William Earl Taylor Dislocated shoulder 32.36 

St. Agatha Richard Nunan Fractured carpal 20.00 

St. Charles Edward Hardesty Fractured radius 40.00 

St. Charles Joseph Buckman Fractured ulna 40.00 

St. Charles Donald Wheatley X-ray (knee) 6.00 

St. Charles Hugh Mattingly X-ray (wrist) 6.00 

St. Charles Joe Abell X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

St. Charles __ _L Thomas Buckman X-ray (ankle and knee) 12.00 

St. Charles Vernon Yates Fractured metacarpal. X-ray (ankle and hand) 26.00 

St. Charles Hugh Mattingly Fractured carpal. X-ray (additional payment) 30.00 

St. Vincent Tommy Wedding X-ray (head) 22.60 

St. Vincent Charles Mills X-ray (toe) 6.00 

Shelbyville Timmy Long Fractured clavicle 36.00 

Shelbyville Earl Ray Smith Broken finger 10.00 

Shelbyville William Clements X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Shelbyville Sherman Greer Fractured radius 20.00 

Shelbyville William Clements Chipped tooth. X-ray 4.00 

Shelbyville William Clements X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Shelbyville Jake Smith X-ary (ankle) 6.00 

Shelbyville Bobby Shelton Laceration— suture 5.00 

Shelbyville Sherman Greer Dislocated shoulder 2.00 

Shelbyville William Clements Broken tooth. X-ray 22.00 

Shelbyville Earl Ray Smith Finger injury (special) (additional payment) 130.50 

Shelbyville """"""I'Mac Weaver X-ray (shoulder) 7.50 

Shelbyville __ Jesse Frazier X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Sheprerdsville Harold Lee Sipes Leg injury (special) 73.68 

Silver Grove Buddy Goodwin Fractured pelvis 100.00 

Silver Grove T. J. Goodwin X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Somerset Jack Fish Fractured finger 10.00 

Somerset Ronnie Rice Dislocated finger _ 10.00 

Somerset Harry Collins Knee injury (special) 150.00 

Somerset Edward Adams Fractured femur _ 100.00 

Somerset Kenneth Beasley Fractured radius and plna 25.90 

Somerset _Roy Pike Loss of tooth 25.00 

South Christian Mike Adams Broken thumb. X-ray _ 15.00 

South Christian James Robertson X-ray (back) 15.00 

South Christian ___ _ Mike Adams Fractured radius and ulna 62.95 

South Christian _ .Richard Hancock J-ray (finger) 6.00 

South Christian ..._Mike Adams ^-ray (ankle) 6.00 

South Christian ....Bobby Cunningham E''"','''"?'^ "'^"dible 40.C0 

Southern . _ Robert Gatton Dislocated shoulder 36.00 

Southern """y'T'charles Day X-ray (wrist) 6.00 

Southern __ _ Kenneth Rennirt Broken nose. X-ray 27.60 

Southern ._ _ '_'"_ "Stanley Hardin Fractured fibula 50,00 

Southern _ ___ _""___lMarvin Curry Elbow injury (special) 60.93 

Southern __ __ '__'_'_' "Carol Howell Dislocated elbow 26.00 

Southern Morris Longacre . Fractured radius 40.00 

Southern William Lanham X-ray (knee) 7.60 

South Portsmouth Robert Sanders Fractured metacarpal. X-ray 24.00 

South Portsmouth Newell Golden Laceration — suture 6.00 

(Continued in September issue of the ATHLETE) 



U. of K. Coaching Clinic 



You probably visited our display at the Coliseum during the University of 
Kentucky Coaching Clinic in Lexington,, Kentucky on August 11, 12 and 
13, 1955. 

We will be able to take care of your football order in a most satisfactorj' 
manner, as our stock is more complete than ever. 

On special-made merchandise we feeel confident that we can have the 
merchandise in your possession in due time for your requirements. 
Any shipments made during the month of August will carry October 1, 
1955 dating. 

On your incidental supplies check up on the following: 

Football tees, table pumps, electric inflators, shoulder 
pad laces, pant laces, shoe laces, plastic face guards, 
rubber teeth guards or protectors, helmet paint for 
leather or plastic helmets, all kinds of chin straps, 
aluminum cleats, rubber cleats, dry stag line white for 
marking football fields, blocking dummies, line markers, 
linesmen's chains, goal line markers, sideline markers, 
football goal posts, sideline capes. Fair Play football 
scoreboards. Fair Play basketball scoreboards, portable 
bleachers, dry or wet lime markers. Whirlpool Baths, 
Vibra Whirl Baths by Cramer, football posters, first-aid 
kits, Cramer's first-aid supplies, a complete line of prac- 
tice jerseys, sweat socks, athletic supporters, Grid foot- 
ball scorebooks, surgical scissors. 

We will be looking forward to seeing you at various times throughout the 
year, so drop by to see our displays. 



HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO. 

PHONE 104 

MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 

"THE LARGEST INDEPENDENT EXCLUSIVE ATHLETIC HOUSE IN THE SOUTH" 



SUTCUffE IS REAPy 

with complete football, basketball 
and athletic equipmet^t for the fall season 



PLACE ORDERS NOW! 

Now we can give you immediate delivery. No Delays! No Waiting! 
Stock merchandise can be shipped on the very day your order is 
received. 

QUALITY BRANDS 

Our stocks this year are the same top 
quality for which Sutcliflfe is now well 
known — nationally-distributed, nation- 
ally-advertised, preferred-quality brands. 

SUTCLIFFE SERVICE 

Write us about your needs — we'll give one day service. For extra-quick 
service or information — pick up your phone and ask for Al Seekamp 
or J. W. Head in our main Louisville office— CLay 0283. For "on-the- 
ground-service", Sutcliffe's school representatives will contact you dur- 
ing the year as usual — Harry Blackburn, 1340 Linwood Ave., Colum- 
bus, Ohio, will cover the Big Sandy Valley; Bob Reis, 74 Pleasant Ridge 
Ave., South Fort Mitchell, Ky., will cover Northern, Central and Eastern 
Kentucky, and Charles (Chuck) Shuster, Horse Cave, Ky., will travel 
Western and Southern Kentucky. 




W\ 



OFFICIAL BASKETBALLS 



No. RSS Rawlings official 

College Ball $19.85 

No. RS3 Rawlings official 

High School Ball $14.95 

No. PLIO Spalding official 

College Ball .' $19.85 

No. 125 Spalding official 

High School Ball $14.95 

No. XB20 Voit official Rubber Ball $14.85 

OFFICIAL FOOTBA! 

No. J5V-T Spalding All Tan. $14.45 

No. (R5) Rawlings All Tan $14.45 

No. FlOlO Wilson All Tan $14.45 



BALLS FOR NIGHT GAMES 



No. J5V-T2 Spalding Tan with 
white bands 



No. R5-S Rawlings Tan with 
white bands 



No. F10I2 Wilson Tan with 
white bands 



PRACTICE FOOTBALLS 

No. A4 All Tan $ 9.45 



SUTCLIFFE'S SCHOOL CATALOG 

If you have not received our Fall 1955 cat- 
alog by Sept. 5, drop us a card and we will 
send one promptly. 




THE SUTCLIFFE CO, 

INCORPORATED 

225 SO. FOURTH ST., LOUISVILLE, KY. 




* Migh School Athlete 



K. H. S. A. A. SCHOOL FOR BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Rex Alexander, R. 1; Amos Teague, R. 2; Larue Sosh, 
R. 3; Ben Topmiller, R. 4; Dero Downing, R. 5; Second Row: Tom WilUams, R. 6; Ben 
Edelen, R. 7; Elmo Head, R. 8; Bob Miller, R. 9; Bennie Bridges, R. 10; Harry Stephen- 
son, R. 11; Back Row: Bob McLeod, R. 12; John Crosthwaite, R. 13; Walter Combs, 
R. 14; Charlie Vettiner, School Director; Dick Looney, R. 15; Ernie Chattin, R. 16. 




Official Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 



SEPTEMBER 



1955 





Tom WUIiams tells a new one during the Basketball School. (Left to Right) Seated: Larue Sosh, 
Williams, Elmo Head. Standing: Ben Edelen, Harry Stephenson. Walter Combs. 




Basketball School Director Charlie Vettiner gives some of the fine points to new regional representa- 
tives. (Left to Right) Ben Topmiller, Amos Teague, Veittiner, Bob Miller, John Crosthwaite. 



7726 Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



Vol. XVIII— No. 2 



SEPTEMBER, 1955 



$1.00 Per Year 



National Federation Annual Meeting 



The thirty-sixth annual meeting of the 
National Federation of State High School 
Athletic Associations was held at York Har- 
bor, Maine, on June 26-29, 1955. Forty-four 
State Associations and two Canadian Affil- 
iated Associations were represented. Fifty- 
one State Executive Officers or Assistant 
Executive Officers, forty-seven State As- 
sociation Board of Control officers and sixty- 
one Board of Control members were in at- 
tendance. The total individual attendance 
was 438. This represents a new high record 
of number of states represented and total 
attendance. 

Kentucky was represented at the meeting 
by K.H.S.A.A. President Carlos Oakley; 
Vice-President Russell Williamson ; Directors 
James L. Cobb, Roy G. Eversole, W. B. 
Jones, Louis Litchfield, and Jack Dawson; 
Commissioner Theo. A. Sanford ; and Assist- 
ant Commissioner J. B. Mansfield. At their 
respective sessions for Executive Officers 
and Board of Control members. Commission- 
er Sanford and Director Cobb gave reports 
on "State Association Owned Buildings." 

The meeting was made the occasion for 
announcements concerning several Executive 
Officers. William W. Russell is the Secretary- 
elect of the California Interscholastic Feder- 
ation, succeeding A. B. Ingham, who has an- 
nounced his retirement as of July 1, 1955. 
Lawrence B. Graves is the Executive Secre- 
tary of the South Carolina High School 
League, succeeding E. W. Stokes, who re- 
signed from that position to accept a posi- 
tion with a school supply firm in that area. 
R. S. Locke, principal of the hieh school at 
Barrington, is Chairman of the Rhode Island 
Secondary School Principals' Association, 
succeeding Charles H. Abbott, who has re- 
tired from active school administration work. 
H. A. Swaffield, formerly president of the 
Connecticut Interscholastic Athletic Con- 
ference, Inc., is the executive consultant who 
is serving on a part-time basis on the Connec- 
ticut Board of Control. James F. Miller, who 
at various times has served on the Missouri 
State High School Activities Association 



Board of Control, will begin his duties as 
Assistant Secretary of the Missouri State 
High School Activities Association on July 1. 
He will assist Secretary T. L. Noel in Associa- 
tion work, especially in connection with the 
rules training program and related activities. 

An impressive initiation ceremony was 
conducted. Secretary J. J. Devitt (Maine), 
Secretary J. Robert Eddy (New Hampshire) , 
Secretary J. K. Fagans (California Inter- 
scholastic Federation Southern Section) and 
Secretary-Elect C. C. Thompson (Nebraska) 
came through with flying colors and none 
the worse for wear. 

Speakers and others who had an active 
part in the program included many of the 
State Executive Officers and Board of Con- 
trol officers or members. In addition, ex- 
cellent presentations were made by Dr. 
Clarence P. Houston, Vice-President of Tufts 
College, Medford, Massachusetts, and newly 
elected President of the National Collegiate 
Athletic Association; by Dr. Parmer Evdng, 
city Superintendent of Schools in Buffalo, 
New Fork; and by Dr. Clair Turner of the 
National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis. 

Program and entertainment details were 
ably supervised by committees. Their work 
was coordinated by the General Planning 
Committee, made up of W. R. Fugitt, Chair- 
man, Joseph Devitt, J. Robert Eddy and F. 
H. Pierce. All members of the executive 
staffs and boards of control of the three 
states which served as direct hosts (Maine, 
New Hampshire and Massachusetts) and of 
the other states in the host section (Con- 
necticut, Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, 
New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Ver- 
mont and West Virginia) gave valuable as- 
sistance. These states made up a fund of 
more than $400.00 to provide special features 
for the entertainment of the group. 

An impressive memorial ceremony for 
those who have passed away since the last 
annual meeting was ably conducted by Ex- 
ecutive Committee member H. F. Keller. A 
delightful welcoming pageant was produced 

(Continued on Page Three) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1955 



SEPTEMBER, 1955 VOL. XVIII— NO. 2 

Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association. 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Russell Williamson (1962-B6), Inez 

Vice-President Roy G. Eversole (1952-56). Hazard 

Directors — W. B. .Tones (1953-57) Somerset; Louis Litchfield 
1953-57), Marion; W. H. Crowdus (1954-58), Franklin; Jack 
Dawson (1954-58), Middletown ; Robert P. Forsythe (1955-59) 
Browder; K. G. Gillaspie (1955-69), Georgetown. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 

Jtrom the Commlssione'i s Cjfflce 

New Office Building 
Work on the new home of the Kentucky 
Hig-h School Athletic Associaton. located at 
763 Rose Street, Lexington, is nearing com- 
pletion. Unless some unforeseen delay devel- 
ops, the K.H.S.A.A. staff will move to the 
new building early in October. Present 
plans call for an "open house" at the K.H.S. 
A.A. Building on Saturday afternoon, Oct. 22. 



Basketball Tournament Trophies 

The 1955 Delegate Assemblv amended 
Tournament Rule XV to provide that the 
Board of Control be authorized to select, 
standardize, and purchase trophies for all 
district and regional ba.sketball tournaments, 
the cost of the trophies to be borne by the 
respective districts and rea-ions. On the pres- 
ent Trophv Committee of the Board are 
Chairman W. B. Jones. Director Jack Daw- 
son, Director K. G. Gillasnie, and Commis- 
sioner Theo. A. Sanford. Specifications are 
now being written for the trophies, and bids 
will be taken bv the committee during the 
next few weeks. Firms interested in sub- 
mitting bids on the tournament trophies 
should write to the Commissioner for infor- 
mation. 



Basketball Clinics 

Charlie Vettiner, veteran K.H.S.A.A. 
basketball clinic director, will be in charge 
of the 1955-56 rules meetings. Under Associa- 
tion rules clinic attendance is required of all 
repristered officials. 

Coaches and athletic directors are urged 
to attend the fortbcominff series of state and 
regional clinics. Although the meetings are 
held primarilv for the training of officials, 
the relationship between officials and coaches 
should be improved if both groups attend 
the clinics and receive the same interpreta- 



tions of the rules. 

The dates and sites of the meetings which 
will be conducted by Mr. Vettiner are as 
follows : 

October 2, Louisville Y.M.C.A., 2:00 P. M. 
(CST) 

October 9, Newport High School, 2:00 
P. M. (EST) 

October 9, Ashland Y.M.C.A., 7:30 P. M. 
(EST) 

October 10, Morehead College, 2:00 P. M. 
(CST) 

October 10, Pikeville High School. 7:30 
P. M. (EST) 

October 11, Hazard High School, 2:00 
P. M. (CST) 

October 11, Bell Countv High School, 
7:30 P. M. (EST) 

October 12, Somerset High School, 2:00 
P. M. (CST) 

October 12, University High School, 7:30 
P. M. (CST) 

October 16, Daviess County High School, 
2:00 P. M. (CST) 

October 16, Henderson High School, 7:30 
P. M. (CST) 

October 17, Madisonville High School, 2:00 
P. M. (CST) 

October 17, Mavfield High School, 7:30 
P. M. (CST) 

October 18, Bowling Green High School, 
2:00 P. M. (CST) 

Use of Registered Officials 
K.H.S.A.A. By-Law 25 says: "Member 
schools shall use registered officials in all 
football and basketball games. Failure to 
comply with this regulation makes the home 
school liable for suspension." The attention 
of principals and coaches is called to the lists 
of registered football and basketball officials 
which appear in this issue of the ATHLETE. 
School men should study the current lists to 
determine whether or not all officials with 
whom contracts have been signed have regis- 
tered this fall. Supplementary lists of of- 
ficials will appear in subsequent issues of 
the magazine. If there is any Question about 
registration, the official should be asked to 
present his card. 

School for Officials 

The seventh annual School for Basketball 
Officials was held on August 14-15 at the 
Phoenix Hotel and the Lafayette High 
School gymnasium, Lexington. The School 
was directed by Charlie Vettiner. 

The sixteen officials and the regions which 
they represented were: Rex Alexander, 
Region 1 ; Amos Teague, Region 2 ; Larue 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1955 



Page Three 



Sosh, Region 3; Ben Topmiller, Jr., Region 
4; Dero Downing, Region 5; Tom Williams, 
Jr., Region 6; Ben Edelen, Region 7; Elmo 
Head, Region 8 ; Bob Miller, Region 9 ; Bennie 
Bridges, Region lOi; Harry Stephenson, Reg- 
ion 11; Robert McLeod, Region 12; John 
Crosthwaite, Region 13; Walter Combs, 
Region 14 ; Dick Looney, Region 15 ; and 
Ernie Chattin, Region 16. 

Through the cooperation of Coach Ralph 
Carlisle, members of the Lafayette High 
School basketball team were used in the 
demonstration game. 

In the first session of the School, held 
on the afternoon of August 14, the subject 
for discussion was "New Rules Study and 
Rules in General." In the evening session, 
the subject was "How to Teach Officials 
Coming to Your Regional Schools." On the 
morning of August 15, a demonstration game 
was played at the Lafayette High School 
gj^mnasium, with each of the sixteen regional 
representatives having an opportunity to 
work for a short period of time. In the Mon- 
day afternoon session, play situations of the 
morning game were analyzed. 

The services of the sixteen regional representa- 
tives will be available to member schools of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association through- 
out the forthcoming basketball season. These men 
will conduct schools, clinics, demonstration games 
and assembly programs at the requests of school 
administrators and coaches. They will also assist 
new officials in becoming registered. It is hoped that 
school men will take advantage of this Association 
service, which has for its purpose uniformity in 
officiating and the teaching of the rules of the game 
to all those who can profit by such instruction. 

Football Examinations 

Part II of the National Federation Football 
Examination for Officials will be given in 
Kentucky on Monday, October 3. An official 
who has been registered for at least one year 
prior to the current season is eligible to take 
the examination and work for a higher ra- 
ting. Officials who hold the "Approved" 
rating in football are required to make a 
minimum percentage grade of 80 in order to 
maintain the rating from year to year. Of- 
ficials who hold the "Certefied" rating keep 
this rating by attending one or more foot- 
ball clinics each year. Eligible officials who 
wish to take the test should write to the 
State Office. 

Delegate Assembly 

Article IV, Section 2-b, of the K.H.S.A.A. 
Constitution, provides that members to the 
Delegate Assembly at the annual meeting 



shall be elected by the principals of each 
basketball district on ballots distributed by 
the Commissioner before October 1 and re- 
turned on or before November 15. Delegates 
serve for a period of one year, beginning 
January 1 immediately following their elec- 
tion. 



NATIONAL FEDERATION ANNUAL MEETING 

(Continued from Page One) 
by the young people of the group under the 
efficient supervision of a committee which 
included Mrs. J. R. Eddy, Chairman, C. E. 
Bride, Charles Cole, Mrs. L. W. Grimes, Ed- 
ward Sillari and Peggy Smith. Mr. and Mrs. 
J. C. Harper (Alabama) made an outstanding 
contribution to the direction of this home 
talent event. 

An exhibit of State Association printed 
forms and publications was arranged by the 
Exhibit Committee, At one of the sessions, 
Chairman E. V. Mortenson (Utah) called 
attention to some of the values which might 
be derived from inspecting items in this ex- 
hibit. 

Brief summary of action of the National 
Council: The National Council approved and 
adopted the recommendations of the Execu- 
tive Committee with reference to the Na- 
tional Collegiate Athletic Association action 
concerning all-star contests. The treasurer's 
report was approved. Amendments to Sec- 
tions 3 and 6 of Article IV of the National 
Federation Constitution had been proposed 
and these were unanimously adopted. An 
election for Sections 3 and 7 resulted in the 
reelection of S. F. Burke (Georgia) to rep- 
resent Section 3 for another period of three 
years on the Federation Executive Commit- 
tee and the election of Homer Williams 
(Idaho) to represent Section 7 on the Execu- 
tive Committee for a period of three years. 

Presentations or progress reports included 
the following topics: State Association 
Owned Buildings, Expanding Contacts with 
Member Schools, Track and Field Pro- 
cedures, Television Developments, Legisla- 
tive Action and Court Cases, Association Re- 
tirement plans. Expanding the State As- 
sociation Services, The Financing of the 
State High School Associations, State As- 
sociation Publicity, Promotions — Good, Bad 
and Neutral; State Department Interests, A 
Survey of Handbook Policies and Data, The 
Football Hall of Fame, Canadian Activity, 
Non-Athletic Activities, Tangible Football 
Results, Devices for Maintaining Interest in 
(Continued on Page Ten) 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1955 



The Flying Dutchman 

A lot of things happened in the "School 
for Basketball Officials" on August 14 and 
15, which you will want to know about. 

Probably the most enthusiastic discussions 
which have ever come up took place in this 
year's school at Lexington. Our new regional 
representatives, Ben Topmiller, Amos 
Teague, Bob Miller and John Crosthwaite, 
added a lot to the value of the school by their 
suggestions and assistance. 

All officials and coaches over Kentucky 
will now be advised that every rule in the 
book will be enforced in every section of 
Kentucky, especially the one dealing with 
coaching from the sideline and verbal abuse 
directed toward the officials. It is now man- 
datory for every Kentucky official to first 
warn a coach who is guilty of sideline 
coaching, and then call a technical foul upon 
repetition of such action. It is also manda- 
tory for all officials to call technical fouls 
on coaches for unsportsmanlike conduct of 
any kind, and immediately notify the Com- 
missioner's office in writing that a technical 
foul was called on a certain coach and what 
it was for. 

There were several questions revolving 
about the new rules which will require of- 
ficial interpretation from H. V. Porter. At 
this writing, Mr. Porter is out of his office 
and such interpretation will not be available 
until the next issue of the ATHLETE. 

When the Dutchman makes his circuit 
of Kentucky in October conducting the an- 
nual basketball clinics, he will carry with 
him a new film on basketball officiating done 
in color, which should go far toward enlight- 
ening our officials on proper officiating 
techniques. In the afternoon clinics, which 
are scheduled for 2:00 p.m., it will be neces- 
sary to sart one-half hour early, showing 
the picture at 1:30 p.m. 

Out of this year's School for Basketball 
Officials has come this memorandum for 
the Kentucky officials: The sixteen regional 
official representatives have direct jurisdic- 
tion over everything which happens in the 
way of officiating in their respective areas. 
In the schools which they will conduct, the 
word which is passed on must be respected 
and followed. Each representative is directly 
responsible to the Association Office for see- 
ing that all rules and regulations are kept. 

The first Com Cob Pipes of our new season 
are on their way to Johnny Edelen and John 
Saltzman of Bardstown, Kentucky. These 
two gentlemen have gotten squarely behind 



the Game Guy project and through their ef- 
forts much work is being accomplished in 
encouraging physically handicapped young 
men to overcome those handicaps and have 
fun like other young people. It was through 
their efforts that Joe Wycoff was recognized 
and finally selected as Game Guy of 1954. 

MEMORIAL SERVICE 

Presented by Leonard T. Havig (North Dakota) 

at the York Harbor National Federation Meeting 

on June 26, 1955 

It is ordained that all must die, for in the 
words of the Bible's first letter of Peter, "All 
flesh is as grass, and all the glory of man 
as the flower of grass. The grass withers, 
and the flower thereof falls away." 

The lapse of a year reveals that several of 
our associates of the National Federation and 
of our State Associations have forever laid 
down their earthly burdens. 

As a token of our appreciation for their 
efforts in the Federation and for the esteem 
in which they were held in their state or- 
ganizations, it is entirely fitting that we 
share a few words of final tribute. 

Each of these faithful servants gave un- 
selfishly of his time for the benefit of youth 
in order that their lives might be made more 
enjoyable and at the same time be streng- 
thened for the game of life. It was not fi- 
nancial rewards which motivated their ef- 
forts but rather it was a desire to serve their 
fellow men. The lessons they taught and the 
leadership they exerted are an encourage- 
ment to us who carry on to look forward to 
new horizons of activity. Working together 
in a common cause has made us all brothers 
and their deeds have become a part of our 
lives. They brought esteem and strength to 
the organizations with which they were as- 
sociated. I call the roll of our departed com- 
panions. 

H. R. ADAMS (Hyrum, Utah) was a mem- 
ber of the National Federation Executive 
Committee from 1938 to 1944 and a respected 
member of the Utah High School Association. 
He passed away at his home on March 2. 

MR. AND MRS. FRED BROUGHER (Dan- 
ville, Illinois) attended Federation annual 
meetings each year since 1950 and made 
many friends in the group. They lost their 
lives in a crash of their privately-owned air- 
plane near Mt. Vernon, Illinois, on February 
27. 

C. J. GLUDT (Killdeer, North Dakota) was 
a prominent member of the North Dakota 
Board of Control. He was a school adminis- 
trator for twenty years and was the first 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1955 



Page Five 



President of the Administrator's Association 
of North Dakota. He passed away on March 
28. 

WILLIAM E. KINGSOLVER (Ft. Knox, 
Kentucky) has attended a number of Na- 
tional Federation meetings. He was a promi- 
nent member of the Board of Control of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association. 
He lost his life when he accidentally fell into 
an abandoned well on the Ft. Knox firing 
range on November 7. 

W. E. PARSONS (Roanoke, Virginia) was 
a member of the Board of Control of the 
Virginia State High School League for many 
years. He had the distinction of having been 
present and active at thirty consecutive an- 
nual meetings of the Virginia League. He 
passed away on March 31. 

For each of our departed associates we 
can apply individually these words of Grant- 
land Rice : 

I do not know what I shall find on out beyond 

the final fight, 

I do not know what I shall meet beyond the 

last barrage of night ; 

Nor do I care — but this I know — if I but 

serve within the fold 

And play the game — I'll be prepared for all 

the endless years may hold. 

On by the skyline, faint and vague, in that 

Far Country all must know, 

No laurel crown of fame may wait beyond 

the sunset glow; 

But life has given me the chance to train and 

serve within the fold, 

To meet the test — and be prepared for all 

the endless years may hold. 

Life gave them the chance, they served, 
they met the test and they were prepared 
for the endless years. Their memory is a 
benediction. 



Ticket Survey 

Coach Bob Miller of the Newport High 
School made recently a survey of football 
ticket prices in various parts of the state. 
He found a difference between student and 
adult prices in most of the school districts 
which reported to him. 

Seven schools reported a student price of 
$1.00 for each of their home games. These 
were Bowling Green, Mayfield, Middlesboro, 
Owensboro, Owensboro Catholic, Paducah 
and Pineville. Charges of 50c were made by 
Bardstown, Catlettsburg, Danville, Harlan 
and Harlan County schools, Henderson, 
Marion, Madisonville, Morganfield, Mt. Sterl- 
ing, Murray, Old Kentucky Home, Pikeville 



and area schools, Prestonsburg, Providence, 
Sturgis, and Winchester. Henry Clay and 
Somerset charge students 35c for each of 
their home games, Lafayette has a price of 
40c, Corbin charges 60 and the student ad- 
mission price at most Northern Kentucky 
games is 75c. Ashland charges both students 
and adults $1.25. 

All of the other schools mentioned have 
an adult price of $1.00 except Bardstown, 
Henderson, Henry Clay, Madisonville, Mar- 
ion, Morganfield, Mt. Sterling, Old Kentucky 
Home, Providence, Somerset, Sturgis, and 
most Northern Kentucky schools. These 
have an adult price of 75c. 

Although Bowling Green, Mayfield, Owens- 
boro, Owensboro Catholic and Paducah 
charge students $1.00 at the gate, tickets 
bought by students in advance cost only 50c. 
Bardstown, most Northern Kentucky schools, 
Ashland and Catlettsburg have advance 
prices to students of 35c, 35c 40c, and 40c, 
respectively. Several schools have season or 
student activity tickets which range in price 
from $2.40 to $6.50. 



Registered Football Officials 

of The K. H. S. A. A.-1955 

(List Compiled September 1) 



If one telepho 
the home phone 

given, the first 



Adkii 



Anders 



given for an official listed, it is 
otherwise designated. If two numbers 
nber is that of the home phone. 

Adams, Roy, 302 Brunswick Road, Louisville, Be 6367, Anchor- 
age 912 

Raymond C, 1626 Beverly Blvd., Ashland, Oak 2742, 

1260, Ext. 377 
, Raymond T., 415 Walton Lane, Madison, Tenn., 

Nashville 2-5939 
Dn, E. W., Jr., S52 Paris Road, Mayfield, 1927, 71 
Bach, Stanley, Route 2, Lexington, 4-8319, 2-0959 
Baker, Charles .T,. 2547 Harrison, Paducah, 3-3043, 6-6311, 

Ext. 204 
Ball, Al, 306 Monroe Street, Charleston, W. Va. 
Barlow, Bill B., Bourbon Parkway, Paris, 1969-R 
Barlow, Bob, Highland Ave., Georgetown, 894 
Barlow, .Tames L., 282 South Ashland, Lexington, 4-9287, 

2-6868 
Barrett, .James F., 3019 Wallace Road, Huntington, W. Va. 
Beiersdorfer, Jim, 6517 Surrey Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

HU 1-7194 
Bell, Thomas P., 404 Citizens Bank Bldg., Lexington, 2-2958, 

2-1477 
Bennett, Howard, 965 South 6th, Mayfield, 1661-W, 1420 
Betz, Dick, 250 Albany Road, Lexington, 4-7394. 3-2880 
Black, Charles D., High Street, Barbourville, 193, 439 
Blanton, Homer, Box 312, Catlettsburg, 404 (Bus. No.) 
Bloebaum, Albert, 418 Pedretti, Cincinnati 38, Ohio, GR 11762 
Boemker, Bob, Huntington Ave., Covington, He 1-5332, Pa 1-2700 
Bohanon, J. B., 2226 Madison, Paducah, 28149, 21662 
Bostick, Lord M., Jr., 419 W. 12th, Bowling Green, Vi-33319, 

Vi-26660 
Bowling, Harry, Hodgenville, 27602, 24 

Bowman, Earl G., "Dick," 611 Park, Lexington. 5-0473, 2-3343 
Briggs, J. P., 2526 Harrison, Paducah, 2-1235, 5-6424 
Brizendine, Vic, 2711 Lakeside Dr., Louisville 5, Ch 6843, 

Cl 4866 
Brotzge, Maurice J., 3800 W. Broadway, Louisville, Ar 2506, 

Ar 2606 
Brown, George W., 1502 Oleanda Ct. No. 2, Louisville, At 9894, 

Ja 1361, Ext. 462 
Brown, James H., Route 1, Nabb, Ind., New Washington 4140, 

Louisville Ja 6380 
Burch, Ossie, 116 Hamlin, Corbin, 2228 
Byrd, Harry G., Jr., 7331 North Timberlane Drive, Madeira, 

Ohio, Locust 1-8745 Cincinnati, Dunbar 1-5379 
Caiman, Edwin C, Jr., Box 218, Sturgis, 3900, 3545 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1955 



Campbell, John Jr., Country Club Courts, Fulton, 1773, 14 
Campbell, William C, 2359 Frankfort Ave., Louisville 6, 

Tw 3-3526, Ca 7621, Ext. 225 
Canter, John, 2315 Glenmary Ave., Apt. F-3, Iiouiaville, 

Hi 3364-J, Wa 8862 
Carlson, David A., 2916 Washington, Paducah, 5-7943 
Carroll, Thomas J., 1917 Deerwood, Louisville, Hi 1B64-W, 

Fr 3585 
Chaney, Joseph G., Box 103, Horse Cave, St 6-6341, St. 6-6181 
Chattin, Ernie, 2147 Central, Ashland, 1088. 148 or 370 
Clagg, Harry G., 1336 13th Street, Huntington, W. Va. 
Coleman, James T., 2416^. St. Ann Court, Owensboro, 4-1386 
Collier, "J" Hamlet, Jr., 120 E. 9th St., Paris, 1858 W, 401 K 
Colonel, Charles, New Richmond, Ohio, Nr 298, Nr 7611 
Combs, Travis, 415 Park Ave., Piqua, Ohio 
Coulter, William M.. 2002 N. Bth Ave., Evansville, Ind., 3-7510 
Cox, Layton, 269 Hillsboro Ave., Lexington, 2-0570, 4-3977 
Craig, Randy, 446 Elm, Ludlow. Ci 1-2765, Ga 1-4460 
Crosthwaite, John S., Jr., Box 689, Harlan, 2075, 67 
Crum, Edward E., 4034 Valley View Dr., Louisville, At 0483 
Dallmann, James W., 12 Center St., Jeffersonville, Ind., 3-7255 
Damico, Ernie. 1758 E. McMillan, Cincinnati, Ohio. Wo 8058, 

Ch 1-5820 
Daniel, Ernie, Jr., 2317 Bath Ave., Ashland, Park 2027, 2130 
Davis, Charlie, Benham 

Davis, Clyde E., 2531 E. Euclid, Ashland, Ni 2302, 785 
Deaver, John W.. 2323 Ralph, Louisville 16, Gl 8-6651, Ar 7239 
DeMuth, Paul E., 1509 Oleanda Ct., Louisville, Em 6-4354, 

Wa 6719 
Derrington, Robert, Route 9, New Harmony Road, Evansville, 

Ind., 24171, Sta. 245 (Bus. No.) 
Dexter, Sam, 846 Hilltop Road, Danville, 2017, 2017 
DiMuzio, Robert, 6422 Golfway Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

Ki 1-2220, Wa 1-1180 
Dolan, Richard S., 611 Emerald, Louisville, Ok 97239, Jeffer- 
sonville, Ind. 3641, Ext. 204 
Dreyer, Jack, 3305 Lookout Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio, Ea 1-3009, 

Ga 1-3323 
Dunbar, Russell C, 1010 11th Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Durkin, Jack H., 240 Hillsboro, Le.xington, 4-4346, 4-1717 
Edelen, Ben R., 3309 Wellingmoor, Louisville, Ch 3618, Jal361, 

Ext. 319 
Elovitz, Carl, 1920 Spring Grove Ave., Lexington, 6-1222, 

Versailles 720 
Engle, Orville, 208 Tenn. Ave., Pineville, 7-2916 
Ernst, Ray C, 3574 Larkspur Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, East 

1-6768, Dunbar 2200, Ext. 478 
Ewing, C. M. (Hop), 7409 U. S. 42, Florence, At 1-33147, 

Un 1-4100 
Farmer. John H., Box 47, London, 290 R, 290 E 
Faust, John F., 2427 Concord Dr., Louisville, Ca 2043, Ja 3428 
Fitchko, Bill, Norton, Va., 466W, 654 
Fletcher, John L., 122-1 Gaffey Hts., Fort Knox, Rt 3-2742, 

Fort Knox 4127 
Florence, Robert H., 242 Glenwood Drive, Paducah, 6-7910, 

5-6311. Ext. 576 
Forbes, John W., Jr., 208 Granvil Drive, Louisville 18, Ch 6025, 

Cy 2731 
Foreman, Earl V., Jr., Maple Court, Route 3, Jeffersonville, 

Ind.. Louisville, Wa 1241, Ext. 6220, (Bus. No.) 
Forsythe, Robert, Browder, Drakesboro 2583, Greenville 309 
Fortney, Robert L., 2805 Breckenridge Lane, Louisville 

Ch 1079, Ja 3231, Ext. 474 
Freihaut, Herman P., 2601 Heidelbach, Evansville, Ind., 21774 
Funkhouser, Roy A., Building 432 "A", Fort Campbell, 3257, 

2804 
Gammon, William H. 3028 Bath, Ashland 
Geiser, Carl H., Jr., 1093 Keller Ave., Louisville, At 8191, Cy 

6521, Ext. 23 
Gettler, John F., 314 Sheridan Dr., Lexington, 2-8845. 4-9895 
Gish, Delmas, 204 W. 3rd St., Central City, 518 W, 9 
Gorham, Robert J., 626 Emerson Drive, Lexington 2-6610, 4-1717 
Grace, Charles K., 344>2 Tennessee Ave., Pineville, Ed 7-3331, 

Ed 7-2392 
Grady, Clarence O., 430 No. Main, Marion, 95, 60 or 51 
Greene, Omar Paul, Box 156, Waynesville, Ohio, 82-2291, 

(Bus. No.) 
Greenslait, James W., Brown St., Raceland 
Gruneisen, Sam, 1101 Samuel St., Louisville, Ma 3276 M, 

Wa 6951 
Hadden, Newell P., Jr., 121 Lackawanna Road, Lexington, 

3-5332, 2-7866 
Haffey, Stan. 1243 Garden Circle, Wyoming IB, Ohio, Ki 

1-6600, Po 1-2884 
Hagan, Joseph E., 3000 Sherbrooke Road, Louisville, Ch 1325, 

Wa 4327, Ext. 28 
Hagerman, Bart, 715 Magnolia Ave., Bowling Green, Victor 

2-7865, Victor 2-2481 
Hale, Charles, Box 1026, Grundy, Va. 

Hanes. Edward C 204 Sunset Road, Elizabethtown, 3495 
Harmon, Charles W., 840 Walnut, Williamsburg 
Harris, Gene, 201 Riverside Dr., Russell, Russell 822, Ashland 

1260, Ext. 253 
Hartley, William E. "Ox", 1121 Marshall Ave., Evansville, Ind., 

7-0631, 7-0631 



Heinold, John R., 3642 Wilshire Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, East 

1-9263, Main 1-1901 
Heldman, John, Jr., 140 Seneca Trail, Louisville, Fr 2181, 

Ca 2531 
Hewling, Richard, 211 Linden, Newport, Ax 1-2299, Me 10010 
Hill, Lewis H., 515 High St, Russell, Park. 762 W, 54 or 671 
Himmler, Robert, 521 Van Voast, Bellevue, Ju 1-3779, Wo 1-9200 
Hoferer, Louis R., 420 McClelland, Cincinnati 17. Ohio. Ca 

1-3022, Wa 1-9841 
Hofstetter, Joe, 1423 W. 4th Ave.. Williamson, W. Va. 
Hogan, John E., 200 Schmidt Building, Cincinnati 2, Ohio, 

Tw 1-4269, Du 1-6480 
Holbrook, William M., 2421 Forest, Ashland, Oak 707, 3100 
Holeman, D. Fletcher, 329 Poplar St., Dawson Springs. 2302 

4241 
Holland, Tom J., c/o Virginia Mountaineer, Grundy, Va. 
Howerton, Jack, Jr., 416 Lotis Way, Louisville, Taylor 7490. 

Wabash 6002 
Huff, Carl R., Jr., 1017 W. Delaware St., Evansville 10, Ind., 

2-7234 
Hyland, John L., 612 Second St., Fulton, 1185 
Isaac, John K., 917 Carte St., Charleston, W. Va. 
Jacobs, Edwin A., 320 Queensway, Lexington, 2-5784 
Janning, Robert L., 3 Charmaine Circle, So. Fort Mitchell. 

Ed 1-3538, Ki 1-2142 
Jarboe, Clem, 1318 Ridgeway Court, Evansville, Ind., 7-2625, 

3-4436 
Jeter. John B., 1702 Versailles Road, Lexington, 6-0562, 4-9895 
Johnson, Bernard, 2046 Clays Mill Road, Lexington, 4-7722, 

22200, Ext. 2324 
Johnson, James M., Box 367, Jenkins, 64-J 
Jones, George W., 6207 Pine Drive, Huntington, W. Va. 
Kathman, Bernard, 48 Beech Drive, Edgewood, Covington, 

Di 1-8207, Ma 1-7541 
Kemper, Russ, 5405 Phillorett, Cincinnati, Ohio, Mo 1-6022, 

Ma 1-4380 
Kyle, Leslie G., Jr., 25 Chalfonte Place, Fort Thomas, Hi 1-8601 

Ki 1-2622 
Lancaster, Morris B., 106 Penmoken Park, Lexington, 2-6592, 

4-8331 
Lawson, Carl E., Harlan 

Lawson, Sam, 816 Ridge Ave., Norton, Va. 
Lenahan, Thomas F., 1655 A Indiana Ave., Louisville, Gl 

84490, Ja 9912 
Levicki, A. P. c/o Norton City School Board, Norton, Va. 
Lindloff, Gilbert E., 6004 So. 3rd, Louisville, Fr 0225, Sp 4-5781 
Linker, Joe D., 2354 Tyler Lane. Louisville, Ch 4292, Wa 8054 
Long, James S., Rural Route, Bedford, Georgetown 566- J 
Long, Leo J., 1106 Battery Lane, Nashville, Tenn., 8-1300. 

7-0420 
Longenecker, David Merlin, 3910 Olmpic, Louisville, Ta 9071. 

Be 3401, Ext. 301-2 
Ludwig, Harry F., Louisville Country Day School, Louisville 7, 

Be 6380, Be 3452 
McClaskey, Booker, Jr., Boston, Fort Knox 4916 (Bus. No.) 
McCollum, Robert G., 406 Holliday Road, Lexington, 2-3710, 

2-2220 
McCorkle, Wade E., Box 502, Harlan, 283, 1527 
McCowan, Connell, Route 1, Box 251, Corbin. 1037-R 
McGhee, Laurence, 210 S. Alta, Danville, 2057, Lancaster 380 
McKown, C. H., 127 Roanoke Circle, Wayne, W. Va. 
McMillan, J. N., 305 Riverside Dr., Russell, Russell 0-367, 

Ashland 370 
McTigue, Joe, 647 Eastlawn, Louisville, Ar 6120, Ma 2774 
Makepeace, William H., Jr., 2346 East Hill, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

East 4042, East 4042 
Malcolm, Donald C, Route 1, Kenova, W. Va. 
Martin, Bill Jr. 163 Clay St., Erlanger, Ju 1-2649 
Matarazzo, Salvatore, 320 N. Mulberry, Elizabethtown, 5689, 

Fort Knox 5256 
Mayhew, Happy, Barbourville, 619 L 
May, Elijah B., Jr., Box 185, Prestonsburg, 3453, 7661 
Mercke, Frank R., 417 Lotis Way. Louisville 7. Taylor 8400, 

Wabash 4206 
Meeks, Jack, 407 5th St., Corbin, 415, 2178 
Milliken, John S., Jr., 1217 Cardinal Dr., Louisville, Ma 6990, 

Ja 3181 
Mitchell, Emmett, Route 2 Harrodsburg Road, Lexington, 

2-5230, 4-4255 
Mitchell, Vyron W., 901 Walnut, Fulton 
Moellering, Louis H., 6287 Lilbur Lane, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

Be 18701, Mu 13510 
Mordica, William, 800 Edgewood Ave., Ashland, Park 2833 
Morton, Ward D., 7482-B 10th Tank Bn. St., Fort Knox, 

3350 (Bus. No.) 
Mudd. Edward, 400 N. 42nd St., Louisville, Ar 6888 
Muntan, Peter J., 125 Woodmore, Louisville 14, At 8236, 

Ca 7621 
Mussman, Ralph, 602 Monroe St., Newport, Ju 1-4562, Co 1-1300 
Nau, Bill, Barbourville, 203, 317 
Neal, Gene, 649 Washington, New Richmond, Ohio, Nr 3641, 

Nr 7571 
Nimmo, Lo, 207 Price Road, Milford, Ohio, Te 1-3170, Ea 1-1484 
Noland, Douglas. 707 E. Main, Stanford, 2609, 2619 
Noland, James H., Jr., Route 2, Box 17, Lyndon, Be 3996, 

Ju 4-4S79 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1955 



Page Seven 



Nord, Ed, 1734 So. 23rd, Louisville, Sp 4-1958, Be 3401, Ext. 233 
Nunn, Winston C, 407 Cleveland, Glasgow, 2317, 2128 
Omer, Billy W., Route 5, Madisonville, 851-W 
O'Nan, Norman, Route 3, Henderson, 7-9912, 7-345B 
O'Neal, Bud, 4205 Berkshire Ave., Louisville, Ch 9051, Ca 6494 
Osborne, Theodore G., Box 806, Lexington, 45270, 45270 
Parker, M. L., 202 Cardinal Lane, Paducah, 5-6204, 2-3501 
Parsley, Clyde E., Route 2, Providence, 2524, 2400 
Patrick, Charles C, Route 2, Lexington, 4-4516, 4-4516 
Pearce, Horace L., 5324 Halsey Court, Louisville 14, at 4133, 

Ar 2481 
Perdue, Paul, 523 Broad, Murray, 1018 J, 298 
Perry, Alfred L., 321 Meadow Lane, Elizabethtown, 3735, Fort 

Knox 2149 
Poore, William E., Winchester Ave., Middlesboro, 1358 J 
Potter, Sam, Lynch 

Powell, Logan, 1031 Oak Hill Dr., Lexington, 2-9794 
Radjunas, Stan, 1644 Elliott Ave., Ashland, Grand 772 
Eatterman, Bernard W., Sr., 1222 So. 41st St., Louisville, 

Cy 6086, Wa 1241, Ext. 6274 
Reddington, James T., 2539 Ridgewood, Louisville, Ca 7964, 

Cy 4421, Ext. 255 
Eeece, Fred, 149 Elm, Versailles, 33 
Reed, Gordon, 1603 N. Fort Thomas Ave., Fort Thomas, 

Hi 14946, Du 14507 
Reinhart, Gene, 4813 Sweetzer Ave., Evansville, Ind., 6-0568, 

2-0892 
Renfro, John E., Pikeville College, Pikeville, 1456 E, 289 
Riddle, Maurice G., Route 1, Georgetown, 661-M-2, Avon 2223 
Riggins. J. M., 11/, W. 5th Ave., Williamson, W. Va. 
Rocke, James M., Pike St., Cynthiana, 1384, Midway 2261 
Rolph, Harold J., 915 S. 7th, Ironton, Ohio, 2059 R, 1390 
Ross, Bill, 11th St., Williamsburg, 6259, 4391 
Rudolph, Fred, Jr., 1020 Parkway Dr., Louisville, Ma 2588 R, 

Ma 5900 
Russell, Charles B., Jr., Box 627, Lynch 
Russell, Joe, Box 11, Russellville, 398, 398 
Rutledge, Ede, 814 Alton Road, Danville, 874, 2576 J 
Sabato, Al, 4121 Forest Ave., Norwood 12, Ohio, Me 1-6771, 

Pa 1-1052 
Sacra, Gresham, 920 Darley Dr., Lexington, 2-6036, 2-2220, 

E.xt. 3217 
Sallee, W. E., 107 Cochran Road, Lexington, 4-0305, 2-4628 
Sauter, Harold S., 1227 Crown Ave., Louisville, Hi 6512J, 

At 3381, Ext. 259 
Saylor, Ben H., Box 383, Corbin 

Saylor, Deward B., Box 407, Wallins Creek, Wallins 3 (Bus. No.) 
Scharfenberger, Irvin T., 7267 Jethve Lane, Madeira, Ohio, 

Lo 1-6278, Ch 1-5430 
Schmitt, K. F., 636 S. 40th, Louisville, Sp 2-0131, Ja 8269-0 
Schuette, Frederick, Route 3, Henderson, 7-5917 
Schuhmann. Joseph R., Altawood, Anchorage, 21-6088, Wa 7341 
Schultz, Edward "Jake", 6910 Gloria Dr., Cincinnati 24, Ohio 
Schutz, Eugene R., 1322 St. Clair Dr., Middletown, 218-1045-J 
Schutz, John J., Jr., 2353 Winston Ave., Louisville 
Scott, Bill. 1816 McDonald, Lexington, 2-3316, 4-3662 
Scullen, Allan R., 7618 Mt. Vernon, Fort Knox, 6998, 5712 
Selvy, Curt, Steele, Corbin, 1333 
Shaw, John H., 219 E. Lee, Mayfield, 1435 
Shaw, Stanley E., 4469 W. 8th St., Cincinnati, Ohio, Ge 1-1100. 

Wa 1-5300 
Sheets, James W., 1101 Bryan Ave., Lexington, 4-2931, 3-4660 
Showalter, John, 116 Military, Georgetown, 662 
Sloan, Wallace, 419 Oread Road, Louisville, Belmont 1126, 

Taylor 2554 
Sparks, Harry M., 210 Woodland, Murray, 1193 J, 740, E.xt. 10 
Smith, Edgar J., 3904 Fai-mview, Louisville 18, Ch 1286, Ma 7530 
Smith, Walter K., 728 So. 38th, Louisville, Sp 2-0586, Ci 8381 
Sortet, Wilber, 1528 Washington Blvd., Huntington, W. Va. 
Sperry, George A., 319 Chandler Ave., Evansville, Ind., 4-6481, 

Ext. 317 (Bus. No.) 
Steere, David, W. Main St., Danville, 556 W 
Stephenson, Burkitt H., 331 Taylor Dr., Lexington 
Stephenson, Harry S., 2210 Circle Drive, Lexington, 4-9620, 

2-4789 
Stevens, Paul B., Dawson Springs, 2120, 5911 
Stevens, William D., 418 Culpepper, Lexington 
Streicher, Abe, 2120 Douglass Blvd., Louisville, Hi 7399, Am 

Temple, J. B., Goodman Bldg, Paducah, 2-2147, 2-1422 
Thompson, A. W. "Tommy", Route 4, Box 680, Louisville 13, 

Fern Creek 3790, Hi 6682 
Thompson, Jack, 2347 Saratoga Dr., Louisville, Hi 4183 J 
Thompson, Jack F., Jr., 1310 Rammers, Louisville, Ma 0924W, 

Ja 6311 
Thompson, Paul, 2624 Blackburn Ave., Ashland, G 3365 
Thompson, Ralph, 6699 Surrey, Cincinnati, Ohio, Mo 1-7196, 

Wa 1-0047 
Thurman, J. W., Manchester, 2313, 2811 

Thurman, Robert, c/o Lighthouse Lake, Louisville, Ch 9372 
Timmering, George E., 1741 Boiling, Louisville, Ar 0309, 

Wa 6710 
Todoran, Roman, Jenkins, 243 (Bus. No.) 
Treas, Joe W., 609 Green, Fulton, 1066, 41 
Tucker, William R., 230 S. Highland, Winchester, 941 W, 

Lexington 2-2222 
Vandenberg, Ralph, 3126 S. Farmcrest, Cincinnati 13, Ohio, 



Me 9072, Ki 1800, Line 846 
Vankirk, Alvia S., 401 Center St., Corbin 1546, 146 
Varner, Ray ., 626 Emerson, Lexington, 2-5432 
Vinson, William J., Box 246, Wayne, W. Va. 
Wanchic, Nicholas, 311 Pepper Dr., Lexington, 31838, 32880, 

Ext. 323 
Watson, Jack G., 4A Centreville, Danville, 624 J 
Watson, John T., 1808 16th St., Huntington, W. Va. 
Weber, Edward H., 3707 St. Germaine, Louisville, Ta 4298, 

Hi 6613 
Weddle, Bob, Pikeville 

Welch, Bill, 3601 Warsaw, Cincinnati, Ohio, Gr 18090, Pa 18578 
Welch, Troy L., 103 Cherry St., Middlesboro, 851 W, 6 
Welch, Tom, 3560 Beldare Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, Av 1-8094, 

Ga 1-5700, Ext 383 
Wellman, Earl. 604 13th Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 20479, 37111 
Wells, Milford, Prestonsburg, 6101, 2629 
Wigginton, Al, Sr., 1037 Cecil, Louisville, Au 7881 
Williams, James H., 210V, Poplar, Russell, N-863, Ashland 961 
Williams, Reid V., Box 27, Tompkinsville 
Wilson, Jack R., 3009 Moore St., Ashland, Grand 2463, 60 
Wilson, Jerry C, 1735 Glendale, Evansville, Ind., 2-4573, 

6-8112 
Wilson, John Pope, 903 So. Shelby St., Louisville, Wa 4591, 

Ja 2058 
Winfrey, Shelby, Holly St., Berea, 805, 850 
Witt, Fred, Whitesburg, 2661 
Womack, William H., 1512 Oak, Henderson, 9780, 2735 

Owen B., 1146 S. Lynnebrook Drive, Cincinnati 24, 

Ohio, Mu 1-2680, Ki 1-2142 



Registered Basketball Officials 

of The K. H. S. A. A.— 1955-1956 

(List Compiled September 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone unless otherwise designated. If two numbers 
are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Abney, Bob, Route 6, Lexington, 6-1777, 4-5193 

Adams, Charles C, 201 Clements, Somerset, 1049 R, 589 

Adams, Charles W., 507 W. Main, Princeton, 2460 

Adams, Roy, 302 Brunswick Road, Louisville 7, Be 6367, 

Anchorage 912 
Adkins, Raymond C, 1526 Beverly Blvd., Ashland, Oak 2742, 

1260, Ext. 377 
Alexander, William F., 215 4th St., Fulton, 716 W 
Alford, William, Thatcher Ave., Alexandria, My 7-2462, 

My 7-8221 
Allen, Jack R., 302 S. 5th St., Bardstown, 4061, 3282 
Allen, Nelson E., Dental Clinic, No. 128, Pearl Harbor, T.H., 

San Francisco, California 
Allen, Stanley M., Hawesville, 3401 

Arnold, Kenneth L., Route 2, Box 658, Fern Creek, 3-4445, 3267 
Arnzen. Stanley, 33 Ohio Ave., Newport, Ju 16262, Ax 16827 
Ashbrook, William E., 158 Eastover, Lexington, 2-8360 
Ashby, Carl Cooper, 1013 W. 12th St., Owensboro, 3-9991 
Atkinson, Charles D., 758 W. Noel, Madisonville, 1658 M. 963 
Austin, Bruce E., Beaver Dam, 4667, 4424 
Bailey, Arville, Flat Gap 
Bailey, Kerney, Hazel, 107 
Baker, James E., 2425 Main St., Westwood Station, Ashland, 

Park 4163, 3406 
Baldwin, Ronald E., Box 478, Hopkinsville, Tu 6-1964, Tu 6-2555 
Barker, Walter D., Route 5, Portsmouth, Ohio, Wp 2770, 3-3541 
Barlow, Bill B., Bourbon Parkway, Paris, 1969 R 
Bartley, Robert E., Hellier 

Beiersdorfer, Jim, 5617 Surrey Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, Hu 1-7194 
Belcher, Elster E., Bridge and Pine Ave., Elkhorn City, 334 

(Bus. No.) 
Bell, Thomas P., 404 Citizens Bank Bldg., Lexington, 2-2958, 

2-1477 
Bennett, Bert A., 14 Doris Dr., Covington, Ju 1-2121, He 1-6990 
Bentley, Eoy E., Millstone, Jenkins 42 (Bus. No.) 
Betz, Dick, 250 Albany Road, Lexington, 4-7394, 3-2880 
Bigelow, Ralph, Route 1, Mayslick, So 3-2395, Lo 4-4204 
Binder, Keith, Route 2, London, 861 L, 861 L 
Black, Clarence, West Liberty. Sh 3-4262, Sh 3-3405 
Blankenship, Zeb, Belfry 

Blanton, Homer, Box 312, Catlettsburg, 404 (Bus. No.) 
Boemker, Bob, Huntington Ave., Covington, He 1-5332, Pa 1-2700 
Bolander, Albert J., 415 N. 26th St., Louisville, Ar 2046, Ar 

9051 
Bonner, William, P. O. Box 426, Vanceburg, 143, 46 
Boyles, Jerry F., 3200 Park St., Ashland 
Bradberry, Calvin, Baxter, 2073 E 
Brady, James W., Route 3, Carlisle, 2712 

Brashears, Bobby F., College Station, Box 175, Murray, 745, 745 
Brittain, Eoss Edward, 510 Avondale Ave., Middlesboro, 866 

(Bus. No.) 
Brooks, Jerry M., 103 N. Maple, Wilmore, 2564 
Brotzge, Maurice J., 3800 W. Broadway, Louisville, Ar 2506, 

Ar 2506 
Browning, William Henry. Eoute 2, Lebanon, 6413 
Brown, Bryant, 18 D, Harry Smith Apartments, Owensboro, 

4-1273 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1955 



Brown, Carlton, 411 O'Hara Dr., Danville, 1569 .J, S8 

Brown, Doyle. Route 3, Winchester 

Brown, James H., Route 1, Nabb, Ind., New Washington 1140, 

Louisville Ja 5381 
Brugh, Walter J., Paintsville 355, 97 
Bryan, William B., Box 34, North Middletown, 2003 
Buck, Al, 2179 Morgan, Evansville, Ind.. 64736, 25801 
Burchett. Lanier, Appen Ave., Columbia, 2654, 4111 
Burke, David L, 224 Cumberland Ave.. Louisville, Em 6-6948 
Burke, Raymond, 411 Si.xth, Pikeville, 971 J, 38 or 39 
Bush, Denver, Tilford. Hazard 1847 (Bus. No.) 
Butcher, Granville, Paintsville, 399 (Bus. No.) 
Byrd, Harry G., Jr., 7331 North Timberlane Drive, Madeira, 

Ohio, Locust 1-8745, Cincinnati, Dunbar 15379 
Campbell, William C, 2359 Frankfort Ave., Louisville 6, 

Tw 3-3526, Ca. 7621, Ext. 225 
Canter, John. 2315 Glenmary Ave., Apt. F-3, Louisville, 

Hi 3364 J, Wa 8862 
Carnes. Richard, 305 Light St., New Richmond, Ohio, 4151. 257 
Cassady, Richard, 508 Nutwood Ave.. Bowling Green, V13-3506, 

V13-9078 
Casteel, Ralph M., East Bernstadt, 1421, 1413 
Chandler, James, 134 Main, Paintsville. 374, 96 
Chaney, Joseph G., Box 103, Horse Cave. St 6-6341, St 6-6181 
Chattin, Ernie, 2147 Centual. Ashland, 1088, 148 or 370 
Chesnut, Ray, Harlan, 1286, 888 
Chumbler, W. W., Lowes 

Clark, Charles E., 301 So. 16th St., Mayfield, 2598 J 
Clark, Tom, 430 Spalding Ave., Lebanon, 298 
Coe. Jimmy, Burkesville, 11211, 91 
Coffey, Kenneth B., Prospect, Berea 237, 880 
Colonel, Charles, New Richmond, Ohio. Nr 298, Nr 7611 
Combs, James Glenn, 280 East 3rd, London, 278 R 
Combs, Raymond, 101 Sawyer, Somerset, 1544 L, Burnside 65 
Combs, Travis, 415 Park Ave., Piqua, Ohio 

Combs, Walter H., 409 Oakhurst, Hazard. Grand 183, Main 3300 
Conley, George, 456 Blackburn Ave., Ashland, Oak 2344 
Connor. James R.. 1939 Alexandria Pike. Highland Heights, 

Ju 18987, Ju 12800 
Cooper, John Wellington, P. O. Box 332, Danville, 2090 J. 9102 
Cooper, Warren, Hindman 

Coulter, William M., 2002 N. 5th Ave., Evansville, Ind., 3-7510 
Cox, Layton. 269 Hillsboro Ave., Lexington, 2-0570, 4-3977 
Craig, John G., Rochester 
Crawford, Fred T., 709 Nutwood, Bowling Green, Vi 3-6441, 

Vi 3-9051 
Crosthwaite, John S.. Jr., Box 589, Harlan, 2075, 57 
Crutcher, Joseph L, Vine Grove, Fort Knox 2254 (Bus. No.) 
Cubbage, Tom, Leitchfield, 80 
Cummins, Albert B.. 4807 Ash St., Cincinnati 12, Ohio, Je 

10258, Po 4100, Ext. 1197 
Curry, Ellis, By Pro 
Curtis, Robert L., 7773 Army Unit, APO 189, New York, 

New York, N/A 
Dallmann, James W.. 12 Center St., Jeffersonville, Ind., 3-7255 
Damico, Ernie, 1758 E. McMillan, Cincinnati, Ohio, Wo 8058, 

Ch 1-5820 
Davis, Dwight R., Jr., 3516 Hycliffe Ave., Louisville 7, 

Be 7302, Wa 7531, Ext. 201 
Davis, Ralph E., Vanceburg, 250. Ill 
Dawahare. S. F., Jr., Pikeville. 524 M, 941 

DeBoor, Matthew J., 248 S. Ashland, Lexington, 3-0156, 3-0235 
DeMoisey, Fox, 227 Highland Ave., Fort Thomas, Hi 1-0795, 

Hi 1-0795 
DeMoisey, Truett R., Box 7, Walton, 1423 
Denton, Charles, 1427 Clay, Henderson, 4020, 3195 
Deskins, Henry. 156 Leader Ave.. Lexington, 4-2789, 3-4477 
DeVary, Blackie, 217 Hickman, Winchester, 302 W 
Dexter, Sam, 846 Hilltop Road, Danville, 2017, 2017 
Dial, Jack W., 1230 26th St., Huntington, W. Va. 
Diddle, Eddie A., Jr., 1629 State St., Bowling Green, Vi 3-6030, 

Vi 3-4334, Ext. Training School 
DiMuzio, Robert, 6422 Golfway Dr., Cincinnati, Ohio, Ki 1-2220, 

Wa 1-1180 
Dobson, Kenneth, 416'/. So. 10th, Mayfield. 1193, 47 
Drake, Richard R.. 54 Sterling, Fort Thomas, Hi 1-4235 
Dromo. John. 1844 Deer Park, Louisville, Hi 1444, Ca 7002 
Dubrock, Donald M.. Route 1, Arlington, 4 (Bus. No.) 
Dunn, Lynn, Arlington, 381 R 

Durkin, Jack H., 240 Hillsboro, Lexington, 4-4346, 4-1717 
Eads. Walter, Monticello. 170 B. 19 
Earle, Herschel G., Route 1, Berry, 941-Wi-Cyn. 
Eaton, James Marvin, 214 Carolyn. Greenville, 624 J 
Edelen, Ben R., 3309 Wellingmoor, Louisville, Ch 3518, Ja 1361, 

Ext. 319 
Ellington, James E.. 18 Division, Erlanger. Di 1-6058, Ju 1-7946 
Ellspermann, George, 1305 Ruston, Evansville. Ind., 6-6693. 

4-7741 
Elovitz, Carl, 1920 Spring Grove Ave., Lexington, 5-1222, 

Versailles 720 
Elrod. Turner. 332 Sumpter, Bowling Green, 2-5110 
Engle, Orville, 208 Tenn. Ave., Pineville. 7-2916 
Estes. A. D.. Hawesville, 4491 
Ewing, C. M. (Hop), 7409 U. S. 42, Florence, At 1-33147, 

Un 1-4100 
Ewen. Jack S., Stanton, 2606 



Fagues, Homer, Combs, Grand 838, 1833 

Ferrell, Doctor T., Owensboro High School. Owensboro, 4-1969 

Fields, Charles H., 538 E. 4th, Newport, Ju 1-8864 

Flynn, Bobby, 110 Halls Lane, Lexington, 4-7924, 4-6373 

Forsythe, Charles M., Belton, 2173 

Forsythe, Robert, Browder, Drakesboro 2583, Greenville 309 

Foster, Joseph W., 1019 Bryan Ave., Lexington, 4-8058, 3-3335 

Franklin, Clifford, 10152 Zig Zag Road, Cincinnati 36, Ohio, 

Tw 1-3567, Be 1-8800 
Frazer, Thomas Roe, 212 East Belleville, Marion, 20 
Fritz, Sherman, Richmond, 1344-R4, 1595 
Fugate, E. Hugh, P. O. Box 19, Price, Prestonsburg 2649 

(Bus. No.) 
Fugate, Johnnie, P. O. Box 334, Hindman, 1202 
Gardner, Daniel H.. 104 So. Adams, Henderson. 7-1297 
Garrett, Nevil M., 32 Jackson, Berea, 301 (Bus. No.) 
Gary, Robert R., Rosine 

Gates, Thomas F., Route 6, Hopkinsville. 6-2837 
Gates. William A.. Jr., 125 Travois Road, Louisville, Belmont 

2310, Jackson 8121 
Gettler, John F., 314 Sheridan Dr., Lexington, 2-8845, 4-9895 
Gish, Delmas, 204 W. 3rd St., Central City, 518 W, 9 
Goetz, Larry C, 6786 LeConte, Cincinnati 30, Ohio, Beech- 

mont 1-9281 
Golden, Billy Joe, 568 Main, Lynch 

Goley, James E., 10 Utz Dr., Florence, Ax 1-5447 (Bus. No.) 
Gooch, Leonard, Waynesburg, Eubank 2731 

Goodin, Charles L., 632 Mt. View Ave., Pineville, Ed 7-2365 
Gourley, Harold E., 1700 N. Alvord Blvd., Evansville, Ind., 

Gr 6-6191, 4-0629 
Grace, Charles K., 344V. Tennessee Ave., Pineville, Ed 7-3331, 

Ed 7-2392 
Greene, Omar Paul, Box 156, Waynesville, Ohio, 82-2291 (Bus. 

No.) 
Greene, Tolbert E., Ill Linden Ave., Frankfort, 3-0922, Lex- 
ington 2-8353 
Grimes, Mike, 433 Fox St., Elsmere, Erlanger, Di 1-6724, 

Ma 1-5083 
Grone, Freddy F., 1125 Win Ave., Ashland, P-3735 W, 4066 
Hadden, Newell P., Jr., 121 Lackawanna Road. Lexington. 

3-5332, 2-7866 
Hagan, Joseph E., 3000 Sherbrooke Road, Louisville, Ch 1326, 

Wa 4327, Ext. 28 
Hale. Don C. 45 Center St., Berea, 341 R 
Haley, Dalton D., 230 W. College. Mayfield, 943 W 
Hall, Billy Joe, 120 Bridge, Morehead, 327 R 
Hall. Bob, Box 444, Cumberland, 74 J, 52 J 
Hall, C. E.. Jr., Raceland, Oak 502, 777 
Hall, Elvis, McHenry 

Hammons, Norman, Route 4, Hopkinsville, 5-5914, 5-5914 
Hancock, Morris W., Route 1, Fulton, 1222-R-2 
Hancock, Thomas E., Route 1, Fulton, 1222-R-2 
Hardin. Ben W. Marrowbone, 6830 (Bus. No.) 
Hardin, Jack H., 3924 Gartin Ave., Ashland, Park 2112, 

Huntington, W. Va.. Ga 5-5151 
Hardy. Freddie, Box 325, Burnside. 6 R (Bus. No.) 
Harmon, Charles W., 840 Walnut, Williamsburg 
Harris, Thomas P., Jr., Route 1, Allensville, 2791, Elkton 2111 
Harris, Wallace R., 3219 Hillcrest, Evansville, Ind., 4-3116, 

4-7741, Ext. 243 
Hartley, William E. "Ox", 1121 Marshall Ave., Evansville, Ind.. 

7-0031, 7-0631 
Hayden, Samuel J., Fancy Farm, St. Jerome School (Bus. No.) 
Hayes, Charles R., 401 E. 21st, Owensboro, Mu 3-0114, 

Mu 3-3548 
Haynes, John, 416 Clay, Henderson. 7-5137 
Heldman, John, Jr., 140 Seneca Trail, Louisville, Fr 2181, 

Ca 2531 
Hewling, Richard, 211 Linden, Newport, Ax 1-2299, Me 10010 
Hodge, Fred A., 1063 Waggoner Ave., Evansville, Ind., 3-3231. 

2-1111 
Hoferer, Louis R.. 420 McClelland. Cincinnati, 17, Ohio, 

Ca 1-3022, Wa 1-9841 
Hoffman, Garnett S., 916 Ash St., Louisville, Ma 3702 W 
Hofstetter, Joe, 1423 W. 4th Ave., Williamson, W. Va. 
Holbrook. William M.. 2421 Forest, Ashland, Oak 707, 3100 
Hollander, James A., 733 11th St., Tell City, Ind., 179, 966 
Hollowell. James R., 122 S. Ingram, Henderson, 7-9502 
Holzknecht, George L., 206 North 39th St., Louisville, Cy 3705, 

Em 6-5911 
Hood. Clayton. 307 W. Kentucky, Franklin, 362 W. 177 
Hornsby, John W., 420 Harahan, Paducah, 2-1762. 6-6311, 

Ext. 284 
Horton, John B.. Shearer Apts, Monticello, 130 G, 130 G 
Howard, Carl F., 323 Woodland Ave., Murray. 1035 R 
Howard, Harry, Jr., 401 N. Main, London, 314 J, 231 X 
Howard, Jimmy D., Salem 
Hudson, Douglas, Worthville, Carr. 694-R2 
Huff. Carl R., Jr., 1017 W. Delaware St., Evansville 10, Ind., 

2-7234 
Hunley, Neil P., West Liberty, Sh 3-3131, Sh 3-4195 
Hurd, Fred, Clinton, 6440, 2381 
Hurst, David E.. Box 688, Jenkins, Neon 3601 
Hutt, Joseph D., Jr., 608 Wallace, Louisville, Ta 5060, Ja 3546 
Hyland, F. D., Box 166, South Webster, Ohio, Porter 2211. 

Waverly 5-100: £xt. 2168 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1955 



Page Nine 



Hyland, John L., 512 Second St., Fulton, 1185 

Jeter, John B., 1702 Versailles Road, Lexington, 5-0562, 4-9895 

Johnson, James M., Box 367, Jenkins, 64 J 

Johnson, Walter, Hitchins 

Johnson, William B., Route 7, Hopkinsville 

Jones, Carson G., 709 N. Main, Evansville, Ind., 2-3069, 4-7741, 

Ext. 210 
Jones, Charles Junior, 2834 Yorkshire Blvd., Louisville, Ch 1293, 

Ja 3969 
Jones, Elmon, E. Bernstadt, 17X 
Jones, George W., 216 Christ Road, Evansville, Ind., 2-3348, 

5-2661, Ext. 240 
Jordan, Ken, 104 W. Orchard Road, Fort Mitchell, Edison 

1-2747, Garfield 1-3100 
Keene, Marcum, Feds Creek 
Kereiakes, Spero G., 516 Nutwood, Bowling Green, Vi 36498, 

Vi 25575 
Kimmel, George H., Tutt St., Columbia, 5322 
King, Allen V., 424 N. Brady, Morganfield, 532 W, 2 or 3 
King, James A.. 720 So. 43rd, Louisville, Cy 3690, 212-36668 
King, Raymond, Box 79 M.S.C., Morehead, 9104 
Kinman, Joe T., Roselawn Dr., Williamstown, 4-8631 
Knight, Bill, 762 N. 36th, Paducah, 3-2776, 3-1967 
Kenkins, James D., Route 1, Bowling Green, Vi 2-5964 
Kohlmeyer, Robert L., 1760 N. Alvord, Evansville, Ind., 

70500, 24161 
Kremer, Joseph A., 3727 Glenmeade Road, Louisville 18, Ch 

3991, Wa 7747 and Ja 9583 
Lashbrook, H. E., Jr., 1603 Daviess St., Owensboro, 3-2431 

(Bus. No.) 
Leach, Aaron, McHenry, 4906 
Leech, Joseph C, 104 Leech Court, Glasgow, Olive 1-3939, 

Olive 1-3246 
Leet, Warren R., 432 Queensway Dr., Lexington, 2-0060, 

2-0939 
LeFevers, Jasper N., Jr., Cardinal 
Lenox, Robert W., Berry, 941-R2 
Lewis, Jack E., Route 4 Plainview Drive, Evansville, Ind., 

96-93111 
Lindloff, Gilbert E., 6004 So. 3rd, Louisville, Fr 0225, Sp 4-5781 
Little, Calvert C, N. Main, London, 365, 13 
Little James G., Heillier 

Littlepage, Pryce, 431 Sugg, Madisonville, 3364 
Long, William G., Jr., 209 Idlewylde Dr., Louisville, Be 8731, 

Ma 9060 
Longenecker, David Merlin, 3910 Olympic, Louisville, Ta 9071, 

Be 3401, Ext. 301-2 
Longshore, Richard D., 906 Taylor, Bellevue, Co 18921 
Looney, Dick, Eiverview Dr., Pikeville, 813, 813 
Lucas, Gene T., 412 Clayton Ave., Georgetown, 1371, 1215 
Ludwig, Harry F., Louisville Country Day School, Louisville 7, 

Be 6380, Be 3462 
Lunsford, James F., 121 Chesnut St., Berea, 334 
Lykins, Clayton G., Vanceburg 
McAninch, E. R., Liberty, 3241, 4501 
McClanahan, Charles, 600 Washington, New Richmond, Ohio, 

7181, 264 
McClaskey, Booker, Jr., Boston, Fort Knox 4916 (Bus. No.) 
McClellan, Leonard B., Jr., 2612 Goldsmith Lane, Louisville, 

Ch 2599, CI 4_866, Ext. 3B 
McCollum, Robert G., 406 Holliday Road, Lexington, 2-3710, 

2-2220 
McCord, Anthony A., 1636 Courtney Ave., Lexington, 3-3814, 

2-2260, Ext. 272 
McCowan, Connell, Route 1, Box 261, Corbin, 1038 R 
McGuffey, Harold B., 1109 Nutwood, Bowling Green, V 35090, 

Smiths Grove 77 
McLeod, Robert N., Jr., Bourne Ave,, Somerset, 571, 646 
McMurtry, Joe, Tompkinsville, 3403 
McPike, Ray S., Jr., 309 Theatre Bldg., Louisville 2, Hi 6398 W, 

Wa 2832 
Macon, Alan Leon, 1769 Wilart Dr., Louisville, Ar 7906, 

Ja 1361, Line 473 
Mahan, Robert, 114 W. Water, Mayfield, 867 J 
Mason, James E., 121 South 2nd, Mayfield, 1210 M 
Matarazzo, Salvatore, 320 N. Mulberry, Elizabethtown, 5689, 

Fort Knox 6255 
May, Elijah B., Jr., Box 185, Prestonsburg, 3453, 7661 
Meacham. Jack R., Pembroke, 2014, 2014 

Meade, Foster "Sid," Box 63, So. Portsmouth, 7-6291 (Bus. No.) 
Metcalf, Earl L., 3441 Lovelaceville Road, Paducah, 2-1369 
Miller, Jack Tye, Black Street, Barbourville, 417, 440 
Miller, Roy J., 644 Whitcomb Ave., Clarksville, Ind., 212- 

36335. At 4140 
Mills, Claude, Box 68, Inez, 2631, 4872 
Mitchell, Emmett, Route 2, Harrodsburg Road, Lexington, 

2-6230, 4-4265 
Moll, Francis, 820 Mulberry, Mt. Vernon, Ind., Po 32870. 

Po 34426 
Moreman, Lucian Y., Valley Station, 21-7841, Em 61901 
Morgan, James H., 806 N. Main, Somerset 
Mouser, Henry D., Princeton Road, Madisonville, 327 M, 1298 

or 1299 
Mudd, Edward, 400 N. 42nd Street, Louisville, Ar 6888 
MuUins, Arthur, 620 3rd Street, Elkhorn City, 4161, 3401 
MuUins, Bobby E., Paintsville, 432, 646 
Mulline, Eusene, Garrett 



Mussman, Ralph, 502 Monroe Street, Newport, Ju 1-4562, 

Co 1-1300 
Napier, Bill, Court St., Prestonsburg, 2663 
Neal, Gene, 549 Washington, New Richmond, Ohio, Nr 3641, 

Nr 7671 
Neal, Marion, 1638 12th Street, Portsmouth, Ohio. 5-0256. 

2-6821 
Newman, Buddy, 1431 Clay, Henderson, 7-9402, 2500 
Newsom, Marley, 109 Division St., Pikevville, 49 M 
Nimmo, Lo, 207 Price Road, Milford, Ohio, Te 1-3170, Ea 1-1484 
Nixon, James W.. Route 7. Hopkinsville, Tu 6-2641 
Noble. Charles B., Jackson, 53 W, 9109 
Noble, Leonard, Jackson, 334, 299 
Noel, Paul, Midway. 4681. 4841 
Noel, Roy D., Burgin, 4292 
Norris, Charles E., McKee, 7-3232, 7-3301 
O'Bryan, Robert H., 1736 Harvard Drive, Louisville, Hi 6933 R, 

CI 4866 
G'Daniel, Jeff, Route 1, Lebanon, 7112 
Omer, Billy W., Route 6, Madisonville. 851 W 
Oney. Leo T.. Jr.. 6922 Rad. Sq. Mobile. APO 76. San Fran- 
cisco. Calif. 
Page, Forrest C, Evansville College, Evansville, Ind., 70088, 

67211 
Park, J. M., 924 Yarbro Lane, Paducah, 5-6567, 6-5292 
Paulin. Al, 538 Franklin, Tell City. Ind.. 435 R 
Perry. James E.. Route 1. Paducah. 3674-0, 56886 
Phelps, Rudy, Box 533, Russell, G 172 
Poe, Thomas E. Route 6, Benton, 6453, 6453 
Powers, Hazel A., Route 1, Stanley, West Louisville 2016, 

Sorgho 2433 
Price, Jimmy H., 215 Highland, Georgetown, 4-3644 (Bus. No.) 
Prop, Walter V.. 417 Lafayette Ave., Lexington, 2-4190 
Pruden, Jim, 102 E. 22nd Street, Owensboro, 3-8675. 3-4555 
Radjunas, Stan. 1644 Elliott Ave., Ashland, Grand 772 
Rainey, Jimmy, 20 Euclid, Winchester, 292 M. 658 
Rakel. Roland G., 8512 Donegal, Cincinnati, Ohio, Sy 1-1662, 

Po 1-3210 
Randall, H. C, Hi Street, Columbia. 4661, 4711 
Randolph, Donald M., 1523 Aletha Dr., Louisville, Okolona 

9-5976 
Ranson, Robert M., St. Joseph, West Louisville 2626. Slaughters 

2742 
Rapier, Burl, 4618 Louisville Ave., Louisville, At 8273 
Ratterman, Bernard W., Sr., 1222 So. 41st Street, Ixiuisville, 

Cy 6085, Wa 1241, Ext. 6274 
Reams, Harry K., 1019 Oakhill Drive, Lexington, 4-4708, 3-3335, 

No. 6 
Redman, Malvern G., 206 Edson, Mt. Vernon, Ind., P. O. 

3-3328. P. O. 3-2637 
Reed, Charles B., 147 Walnut Street, Versailles, 606 Y 
Reed, Gordon, 1603 N. Fort Thomas Ave., Fort Thomas, Hi 

14946, Du 14507 
Reinhart, Gene, 4813 Sweetzer Ave., Evansville, Ind., 6-0668, 

2-0892 
Renfro, John E., Pikeville College, Pikevville, 1456 R, 289 
Reynolds, Howard M.. 407 Holt Ave., Mt. Sterling, 1058 
Rice, Homer, Highlands High School, Fort Thomas, Hiland 

1-2501, Hiland 1-1303 
Rice, James F., Central City, 206 574 
Richards, James S., Box 94, Columbia, 3136 
Richardson, Joe M., Greenville, 1077 W. 48 
Richeson, King, 790 Allendale Drive, Lexington, 4-6306, 

2-4585 
Riggs. William T., 28 Congress, Morganfield, 690, 9168 
Ring, William H., Route 3, Maysville, Logan 4-5892, Logan 

4-3929 
Rison, Johnny B., 112 Stevens Ave., Irvine, 111 (Bus. No.) 
Roberts, Clayton, 122 Garrett, Lexington, 2-1402 
Roberts, Earl C, Science Hill, 19 A, 19 
Robson. Boynton A.. 2966 N. Wallace Ave.. Indianapolis, Ind., 

Li 74800, Me 54491 
Rodgers. David G.. 299 3rd St.. Williamsburg. 3471, 3901 
Rogers, Stanley J., 18 Victory Ave., Winchester, 958 R 
Roller, Otis, 3712 Nanz, Louisville. Be 6356, Wa 1121, E.xt. 302 
Rolph, Harold J., 915 S. 7th, Ironton, Ohio, 2059 R, 1390 
Rosenbaum, Robert, 117 Fairlawn Road. Louisville, Ta 2833, 

Ja 8191 
Ross, Bill, 11th St., Williamsburg, 6266, 4391 
Roth, Kenneth, Hatfield, Ind., 73 R 
Rouse, Clyde L., 630 Erlanger Road, Erlanger. Di 1-6943, 

Ju 1-5601 
Rubarts, Leland G., Dunnville, Liberty 2784 (Bus. No.) 
Russell, Allen W., Box 81, Murray. 439 W 
Russell, Dewey, Box 407, Tompkinsville 
Russell, Eugene D., 1106 Gallia Street, Portsmouth, Ohio, 

74342, 26641 
Russell, Joe, Box 11, Russellville, 398, 398 
Sabato, Al. 4121 Forest Ave.. Norwood 12. Ohio, Me 1-6771, 

Pa 1-1052 
St. Clair, Robert L., Jr., 436 No. 29th St., Louisville, Sp 4-2911, 

Fr 0277 
Salchli, Stanley W.. 106 Aspen Ave., Frankfort, 4-8420 
Sallee, Charles, 606 S. E. Riverside, Evansville, Ind., 31179 

(Bus. No.) 
Sanders, Mel, 8910 Sunset, Paducah, 23660, 66311, Ext. 68S 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1955 



Sandefur, Rudv, St. Joseph, Wl 2529 

Saylor, Deward B., Box 407, Wallins Creek, Wallins 3 (Bus. 

No.) 
Schaifenberger, Irvin T., 7267 Jethve Lane, Madeira, Ohio, 

Lo 1-6378, Ch 1-5430 
Scheben, W. J., Erianger, Dixie 5832 (Bus. No.) 
Schlich, Paul, 1712 Deerwood Ave., Louisville, Hi 4928, Hi 4928 
Schutz, Eugene R., 1322 St. Clair Dr., Middletown, 218-1045 J 
Sehwitz, Joe, 1350 Covert Ave., Evansville, Ind., 72664 
Scott, Bill, 1816 McDonald, Lexington, 2-3316, 4-3662 
Scully, Thomas L., Jr., 327 N. 44th Street, Louisville, Sp 

6-8620, Fr 0277 
Settle, Boy G., 1000 E. 20th St., Owensboro, 3-2136, 3-3575 
Sharp, Claude, 400 Henry St., Greensburg, Campbellsville 4000 

(Bus. No.) 
Sheffer, Joseph W. 203 E. Lyon St., Morganfield, 560 W, 232 
Short, Buford A., Beattyville, 112 W, 95 
Showalter, John, 116 Military, Georgetown, 662 
Shuck, Steve, 135 Louisiana Ave., Lexington, 2-3206 
Sifrig, Bernard J., Route 1, Tell City, Ind., 487-J-4 
Siler, Clarence M., 8th St. and Cumberland Ave., Williamsburg, 

6188, 3411 
Simpson, Fred, 900 Carter Ave., Ashland, Park 274 
Sloan, Wallace, 419 Oread Rd., Louisville, Belmont 1126, Taylor 

2554 
Smith, David W. 4511 Bishop Lane, Louisville, Hi 1745 R, 

Hi 5861 
Smith. Edgar J., 3904 Farmview, Louisville 18, Ch 1286, 

Ma 7530 
Smith, Elza, Box 247, Beauty 
Smith, Wilbur G., Raceland, Oak 954 
Snider, Louis G., P. O. Box 647, Valley Station, Pleasure 

Ridge 76128, Ch 7611, Ext. 644 
Sosh, LaRue, Uniontown, 1, 123 

Sparks, Keith E. Jr., 1923 Avery Court, Louisville 8, Ca 8245 
Spencer, Billy C, Route 2, Lawrenceburg, 2645 
Spiceland, S. E.. 306 So. 13th St., Murray, 852 
Spurgeon, Kermit, Henryville, Ind., 3271, 3322 
Stahr, David C, 1240 W. Broadway, Mayfield 
Stantill, Robert, Louisa, 246 J (Bus. No.) 

Steenken, William R., 1636 Highland, Covington, Co 1-3710. 
Steere, David, W. Main St., Danville, 566 W 
Stephens, Robert J., Box 529, Montgomery, W. Va. 
Stephenson, Harry S., 2210 Circle Dr., Lexington, 4-9620, 

2-4789 
Stewart, Herbert T., Oak St. Lothair, Oak 320 
Strong, David A., 1413 Maple Ave., Owensboro, 41355, 39624 
Sturgill, Barkley, J., Prestonsburg, 3641, 3641 
Sullivan, Don C, 623 Riverside Dr., Prestonsburg, 2144, 6291 
Surface, William E., 353 Lexington Ave., Lexington, 2-7483, 

U. K. Ext. 2241 
Taylor, Ed, 435 No. 41st. Louisville 12, Spring 2-0126 
Taylor, Robert S., 2231 Hawthorne, Louisville, Ch 3423, Ca 6521 
Teague, Amos, 332 McLeod, Madisonville, 1441 R 
Temple, J. B., Goodman Bldg., Paducah, 2-2147, 2-1422 
Thompson. Jack, 2347 Saratoga Dr., Louisville, Hi 4182 J 
Thompson, Paul, 2624 Blackburn Ave., Ashland, G 3365 
Thompson, Ralph, 5699 Surrey, Cincinnati, Ohio, Mo 1-7196, 

Wa 1-0047 
Thurman, Harold W., Livermore 
Tichenor, Matthew, Centertown, 1212 

Tobe, Larry, 14 So. Sherry Lane, Bellevue, Ax 1-8419, Pa 1-6160 
Tompkins, Chester B., P. O. Box 13, Slaughters, 2141 
Topmiller, Ben, Jr., Browder, Drakesboro 3562 
Troutman, Doyle C, 316 Cumberland Ave., Harlan, 147, 522 
Tuck, Lillard C, 124 Lexington Dr., Glasgow, 3331, 2723 
Ulsas. Charles F. 501 Rosewood Dr., Evansville, Ind., 6-6621, 

3-4324 
Vandenberg, Ralph, 3126 S. Farmcrest, Cincinnati 13, Ohio, 

Me 9072, Ki 1800, Line 846 
Varner, Ray G., 626 Emerson, Lexington, 2-5432 
Vettiner, Charles J., 205 E. Esplanade, Louisville 
Walke, Glenn R., 91 First St., Paintsville, 91, 2680 
Walter, Lafayette, 55th St., Ashland 

Ward, Bobby G., Box 676, Southern Baptist Seminary, Louis- 
ville 6 
Ward, Milton, McWhorter Court, Richmond, 613 
Weddington, Herbert, 131'/. Holly St.. Pineville 
Welch, Bill, 3601 Warsaw, Cincinnati, Ohio, Gr 18090, Pa 18578 
Welch, Ralph W., 2108 Greenwood Ave., Louisville, Sp-ing 

4-2495 
Welch. Tom, 3560 Beldare Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, Av 1-8094, 

Ga 1-5700, Ext. 383 
Wellman, Earl, 504 13th Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 20479, 37111 
Wells. Milford, Prestonsburg, 6101, 2629 

Wesche, .lames A., 427 Queensway, Lexington, 4-4413, 4-4413 
Westerfield, Glenn, 536 Stanley. Evansville, Ind., 39670 
White, David B., 209 Sharon Dr., Bowling Green, Vi 3-9870, 

Vi 2-5624 
Wickline, Dan, Marshall College, Huntington, W. Va., Ja 51460, 

28362 
Widerschein, Morton. 2931 Bon Air, Louisville, Ch 9010, Be 3491 
Wigginton, Al., Sr., 1037 Cecil, Louisville. Ai 7881 
Wilham. Earl. Beaumont Ave.. Harrodsburg, 913 J 
Willett. Arthur G., Box 143. Morehead State College, 77 9104 
Williams, James H., 210V4 Poplar, Russell, N-863, Ashland 961 



Williams, Reid V., Box 27, Tompkinsville 

Williams, Roger, 306 Eighth, Ravenna, 349 J, 271 

Williams, Tom M., 116 E. Broadway, Bardstown 

Wilson, Jack R., 3009 Moore St., Ashland, Grand 2463, 60 

Wilson, Jerry C, 1735 Glendale, Evansville, Ind., 2-4573, 6-8112 

Winfrey, Shelby, Holly St., Berea, 805, 850 

Witschger, DeKoy J., 1412 Antoinette, Cincinnati, Ohio, Be 

1-5859, Mu 1-6900, Ext. 242 
Woods, Gene, College Station, Murray 
Wright, Billy Joe, Salt Lick, 3927 
Wright, John A., Salt Lick, 4637 
Wurtz, Emil, 18 E. 4th St., Cincinnati, Ohio, Gr 1-0526, Du 

1-1232 
Yeary, William H., Jr., 1607 Carolyn Dr., Lexington, 2-6945, 

2-6945 
Yessin, Rudy, McClure Bldg., Frankfort, 46656 (Bus. No.) 



NATIONAL FEDER-\TION ANNUAL MEETING 

(Continued from Page Three) 
the Football Meetings, Football Rules 
Changes for 1955, Football Official's Manual, 
Athletic Benefit Plans and Injury Question- 
naire, Experiments with Safety Equipment, 
Basketball Meeting Devices, Recent Tourna- 
ment Developments, The National Basketball 
Committee and Experimental Work, Basket- 
ball Official's Manual, The New Picture 
"Better Basketball," The Baseball Rules 
Training Program, and Relationship with 
Baseball Clubs. 



State Association Owned Buildings 

Editor's Note: This report, based on a survey made by the 
K.H.S.A.A., was made by Commissioner Theo. A. Sanford and 
Director James L. Cobb at their respective sessions for Execu- 
tive Officers and Board of Control members during the York 
Harbor meeting of the National Federation. 

Forty-seven completed questionnaires concerning 
State Association owned buildings were returned by 
National Federation members to the offices of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association. A study 
of these questionnaires brings out interesting facts. 

Seven Associations now own their own buildings 
or are in the process of building construction. These 
are California, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Kansas, Ken- 
tucky and Pennsylvania. The Florida and Kentucky 
buildings are under construction. 

Thirty-three State Secretaries indicated that their 
Associations had not considered seriously the possi- 
bility of purchasing or constructing their own build- 
ings. Thi'ee said that building construction had been 
considered seriously and two indicated that discus- 
sions had been held concerning the matter. Reasons 
given by this group for preventing the purchase 
of buildings to date were finances, present cheap 
rent, present location preferable, and inability to 
find suitable location to date. 

Thirty-two Executive Secretaries stated that there 
was little possibility of their Associations purchas- 
ing or constructing headquarters office buildings at 
any time within the near future. Sixteen indicated 
that they were presently housed in quarters owned 
by the state, a teachers' group, or a similar organi- 
zation. Fifteen of this group said that the arrange- 
ments were satisfactory. Two qualified this by add- 
ing "so far", and two others said that they were 
in crowded quarters. 

Eleven Associations pay no rent for their offices. 
The highest rent paid is $6,800.00 per year (Illinois). 
The number of persons employed in the state office 
ranges from one part-time worker to thirteen (Iowa). 

Following are a few other facts gleaned from the 
survey: 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1955 Page Eleven 

CALIFORNIA: Purchased and remodeled a build- ment surplus accumulated over a period of ten or 

ing in 1954. The original cost of the building and lot twelve years. 

was $42,500.00, the present value $45,000.00. The KENTUCKY: Presently constructing a modern 

building was purchased on the basis of a loan from brick and stone building at a cost of $85,000.00. 

the Protection Fund surplus. A part of the building Building is being financed by money taken from the 

is rented, with the Association receiving a net of Association surplus. Approximately 4,600 square 

approximately $3,800.00 per year. feeet are available for office space and storage. The 

FLORIDA: The Association is now housed in a building is one story, with a full basement, and has 
remodeled residence, with a new building being con- expansion possibihties. The buildmg has adequate 
structed. This building, brick on concrete blocks, will office space, work space, kitchen facilities, a con- 
be valude at $45,000.00 when completed. It will be ference room, and parking space, 
financed by the sale of the old building ($10,000.00), IOWA: Purchased a two story brick bank build- 
a loan of $15,000.00, with the balance being taken in§: m 1944 at a cost of $30,000.00. The present value 
out of the surplus. This will eventually be a two of the building and lot is $175,000.00. Surplus 
story building, but only one story is being completed money was used for the purchase of the building, 
at the present time. Approximately 13,500 square feet are available for 

GEORGIA: Erected a modem brick one story office space and storage, and the building has space 

building in 1953. The cost of the building and lot for rent by other groups. 

was $10,000.00, its present value $25,000.00. The PENNSYLVANIA: Purchased a brick building in 

building was financed by cash from reseve funds 1948 at a cost of $35,000.00. Building was remodeled 

being used. Two thousand square feet are available to fit Association needs and to supply additional 

for office space, this being ample for Association rental space. The present value of the building and 

needs except for once a twice a year when a large lot is $70,000.00. Approximately 3,500 square feet 

meeting room is needed. are available for office space and storage. The in- 

KANSAS: Constructed a modern two story build- come from rentals is $545.00 per month, this in- 
ing in 1953, the total floor space being approximate- eluding a small rental which the Association pays, 
ly 4,800 square feet. This includes ample office The building is operated by Trustees of Real Estate, 
space, parking space, work space, kitchen facilities, who are authorized by the P.I.A.A. Constitution and 
and a meeting room for the Legislative Council. By-laws, which vests the title in the President, Vice- 
Building and lot are valued at $80,000.00, money for President, Treasurer, and Executive Director, and 
construction being taken from a basketball tourna- their successors, as Trustees. 

REPORT OF INSURANCE CLAIMS 

(Continued from August issue of The Kentucky High School Athlete) 

School Claimant Injury Amount Paid 

Springfield John Scott X-ray (knee) 6.0U 

Springfield Colin Lewis X-ray (finger) 6.00 

Springfield Tommy Dowling Fractured femur 100.00 

Springfield Frank Wall Simms X-ray (leg) 12.00 

Springfield .Timmie Johnson X-ray (ankle) 10.00 

Stanford Edward Brown Dislocated finger. X-ray 16.00 

Stanford James Baxter Broken teeth 15.00 

Stanford Paul Napier X-ray (head) 6.00 

Stanford Ted Gilbert X-ray (knee) 10.00 

Stuart Robinson Delmus Ison X-ray (foot) 6.00 

Stuart Robinson Oscar Isaacs Fractured finger. X-ray 16.00 

Stuart Robinson Willie Haynes Dislocated shoulder 35.00 

Stuart Robinson .Tesse Back ^Fractured radius 40.00 

Stuart Robinson Edwardo Guerrero Laceration — suture 5.00 

Taylor County Lowell Beck Loss of tooth. X-ray 34.00 

Taylorsville Louis Roberts Laceration — suture 5.00 

Taylorsville Donald Smith X-ray (wrist) 6.00 

Taylorsville Ray W. Armstrong X-ray (knee) 12.00 

Taylorsville David Houghlin Fractured metacarpal. X-ray 9.00 

Taylorsville Herbert A. Curtsinger X-ray (arm) 6.00 

Temple Hill James S. Jones X-ray (head) 10.00 

Tilghman .Terry Lax X-ray (foot) 6.00 

Tilghman Jerry Brewer X-ray (chest) 10.00 

rilghman Sherman Mayne Laceration — suture 5.00 

Tilghman Jon Petway Broken tooth 20.00 

Tilghman J. Everette Fike X-ray (foot) 6.00 

Tilghman Gary Jenkins X-ray (pelvis) 5.00 

Tilghman Bill Trevarthen Laceration — suture 5.00 

Tilghman Tommy Nelson X-ray (chest) 10.00 

Tilghman Charles Cole X-ray (knee) 6.00 

Tilghman Bill Trevarthen Laceration — suture 5.00 

Tilghman Frank Miller Fractured fibula 50.00 

Tilghman Glenn Shaw X-ray (pelvis) 10.00 

Todd County Bobby Adams Dislocated ankle, X-ray 37.00 

Tompkinsville Teddy Butler Laceration — suture 5.00 

Tompkinsville Terrell McPherson Fractured clavicle 35.00 

Tompkinsville Jon McCIendon Fractured humerus (special) 160.00 

Tompkinsville .Tack Carter Fractured metatarsals 35.00 

Tompkinsville James Chapman Kidney injury (special) 150.00 

Trenton Leslie Simmons X-ray (knee) 6.00 

Trigg County Bruce Thomas Chipped teeth 6.00 

Trigg County Howard Adams Broken tooth 20.00 

Trigg County Wallace E. Calhoun X-ray (ribs) 10.00 

Trigg County Benjamin Moore Fractured finger, X-ray 16.00 

Trigg County William C. Redick X-ray (spine) 10.00 

Trigg County Bob White X-ray (ankle) 10.00 

Trigg County Billy Finley X-ray (hand) 5.00 

Trigg County John Randolph Broken nose. X-ray 9.50 

Trigg County Jackie Alexander X-ray (hand) B.OO 



Page Twelve THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1955 

Tyner Earl Boggs Laceration — suture 5.00 

Uniontown Henry W. Whittaker Loss of teeth 5.00 

University Wick Russell X-ray (foot! 12.00 

University Sam C. Ward Laceration — suture 5.00 

University Howard Taylor X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Utica Donald Young X-ray (shoulder) 10.00 

Valley Billy Beanblossom X-ray (head) 17.50 

Valley Harold Craig Broken nose. X-ray 30.00 

Valley Larry Franklin Fractured metacarpal, X-ray 31.00 

Valley Tom Houchin X-ray (leg) 6.00 

Valley Norman Mackin Fractured metacarpal, X-ray 30.00 

Valley Melvin Vogel X-ray (chest) 10.00 

Valley Frank Wallace Fractured toe. X-ray, X-ray (chest) 31.00 

Valley William Carter Laceration — suture 5.00 

Valley Frank Wallace X-ray (chest) 10.00 

Valley Norman Mackin X-ray (elbow) 6.00 

Valley Norman Mackin X-ray (hand) 6.00 

Valley Billv Beanblossom X-ray (knee) 6.00 

Valley Paul Bibelhauser X-ray (arm). X-ray (shoulder) 16.00 

Valley Rodney Roberts X-ray (pelvis) 10.00 

Valley Rodney Priddv X-ray (shoulder) 20.00 

Valley Roscoe Shain X-ray (shoulder) 10.00 

Valley William Carter Fractured femur 100.00 

Valley Joseph Dotson X-ray (chest) 10.00 

Valley Clarence Miles X-ray (knee, leg, and ankle) IS.OO 

Valley Billy Baker X-ray (pelvis) 10.00 

Valley Gene Stone Fractured finger. X-ray, (hand). X-ray (chest) 26.00 

Valley Donald Lacefield X-ray (knee) 6.00 

Valley Larry Franklin Head injury (special) 54.76 

Valley Carl Cooper Fractured metacarpals. X-ray (hand and head) 41.00 

Valley Billy Seward _II Broken rib. X-ray 20.00 

Valley Timmy Smith Broken rib. X-ray (rib and finger) 26.00 

Valley Tommy Houchin X-ray (elbow) 6.00 

Valley Albert Willis X-ray (wrist and hand) 12.00 

Valley Albert Willis Fractured finger. X-ray (hand) 22.00 

Valley Tommy Houchin X-ray (arm) 3.00 

Valley Rodney Friddy X-ray (skull and hand), fractured metacarpal 36.00 

Valley Joseph Dotson ^Broken teeth 40.00 

Valley Norman Mackin X-ray (knee) 6.00 

Valley Stewart Bratcher Fractured metacarpal. X-ray 13.00 

Valley Jimmy Mitchell X-ray (finger) 6.00 

Valley Willie Carter X-ray (knee and leg) 12.00 

Valley Frank Wallace Dental filling. X-ray 11.00 

Versailles James Lear Broken teeth. X-ray 50.00 

Versailles Paul Smith Loss of teeth 50.00 

Versailles Sidney Cruise" I I X-ray (elbow) 6.00 

Versailles Doug Matthews Loss of teeth 50.00 

Walton-Verona Alfred Brown , Broken nose 20.00 

Warfield jay Dingess X-ray (knee) 6.00 

Warfield Leroy Collier X-ray (toe) 6.00 

Warfield James Webb Loss of teeth 40.00 

Warfield Clyde -Tarrel Loss of teeth 40.00 

Warren County Kenneth Sparks" X-ray (elbow) 5.00 

Warren County Walter Cassady Loss of teeth 50.00 

Warren County Willard Hanes Laceration — suture 5.00 

Warren County Willard Hanes X-ray (ankle) 5.00 

Warren County Gorden McLaughlin Laceration — suture 5.00 

Warren County Jim Graham Laceration — suture 5.00 

Warren County Vernon Canary Laceration — suture 5.00 

Warren County B, C Wimpee Dislocated knee 15.00 

Wayne County Tack Eller Dislocated elbow 17.00 

Wayne County Gerald Blevins Loss of teeth 50.00 

Wayne County Richard Cooper X-ray (leg) 5.00 

Wayne County Don Bates X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Western Billy Abernathy X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Western Frank Parker, .Tr. Broken finger. X-ray 20.00 

Western Billy Abernathy Fractured tibia 50.00 

Western James Leiand ClacV X-ray (fingers) 6.00 

Western William Bruce Springate Laceration — suture 5.00 

Wheelwright Monroe .Tones Loss of teeth 50.00 

Whitesburg Anthony Webb Broken nose. X-ray 13.00 

Whitesburg Elmer Ray Webb Fractured finger. X-ray 16.00 

Whitesburg Lloyd Hodge X-ray (wrist) 6.00 

Whitesburg Donald Lee Polly X-ray (foot) 6.00 

Whitesburg Arnold Enfusse Leg injury (special) 18.50 

Whitesburg Cecil Barnes Pelvic injury (special) 35.50 

Williamsburg Charles Stanfield IZ-ZIZI-X-ray (wrist) 6.00 

Williamsburg Ray Bryant Broken tooth : 5.00 

Williamsburg _ _Doyle Brown Broken tooth 8.00 

Williamsburg .Joe Rains I "IZIIII.-Broken teeth 22.00 

Williamsburg Dickie Ramey Fractured tibia and fibula 90.00 

Williamsburg Bobby Ashby Knee injury (special) 147.38 

Wiliiamstown Lorin Mullins X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Williamstown John Draper X-ray (ankle) 5.00 

Wilmore Treffert Shewmaker'IIZI X-ray (knee) 6.00 

Winchester David King Fractured clavicle. X-ray 35.00 

Winchester Eddie Phelps Fractured metacarpal. X-ray 26.00 

Winchester Jackie Neal Laceration — suture 5.00 

Winchester Paul Rainey Replacing filling. X-ray 7.00 

Winchester Prewitt VanMeter Replacing knocked out filling 5.00 

Winchester Charles Epperson Replacing knocked out filling 3.00 

Winchester Prewitt VanMeter X-ray (spine) 10.00 

Winchester Charles Parido Replacing knocked out filling 3.00 

Winchester Paul Rainey Knee injury (special) 150.00 

Winchester David Comett Loss of tooth. X-ray 26.00 

Wurtland Harold Gillum Fractured metacarpal 20.00 



N^ 



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MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 



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We fully guarantee each and every item we sell. 

Our fall catalog has been mailed to you. If you have failed to receive it 
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We can take care of your order on football posters, dry stag line white and 
admission tickets; and remember, if you would like to see our salesman 
for either football or basketball supplies, call us 104 collect. 

Roy Boyd, Jim Mitchell or Bill Hunt are always in our store ready to assist 
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If you want the best quality and the best service contact HUNT'S. 



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Official Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL A THLETIC ASSN. 
OCTOBER - 1955 



• • 


^he iSpo^tsmans C^eed 


The Player 


1. 


He lives clean and plays hard. He plays tor the love of 




the game. 


2. 


He wins without boasting, he loses without excuses, and 




he never quits. 


3. 


He respects officials and accepts their decisions without 




question. 


4. 


He never forgets that he represents his school. 


The Coach — 


1. 


He inspires in his boys a love for the game and the desire 




to win. 


2. 


He teac'hes them that it is better to lose fairly tban to 




win unfairly. 


3. 


He leads players and spectators to respect officials by 




setting them a good example. 


4. 


He is the type of man he wants his boys to be. 


The Official 


1. 


He knows the rules. 


2. 


He is fair and firm in all decisions. He calls them as 




he sees them. 


3. 


He treats players and coaches courteously and demands 




the same treatment for himself. 


4. 


He knows the game is for the boys, and lets them liavc 




the spotlight. 


The Spectator — 


1. 


He never boos a player or official. 


2. 


He appreciates a good play, no matter who makes it. 


3. 


He knows the school gets the blame or the praise for his 




conduct. 


4. 


He recognizes the need for more sportsmen and fewer 




"sports." 



7726 Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XVIII— NO. 3 



OCTOBER, 1955 



1.00 Per Year 



Early Season Football Questions 



Editor's Note: These rulings do not set aside or 
modify any rule. They are interpretations on some 
of the early season situations which have been 
presented. 

1. Play: What is the relation of a foul to first 
touching of a kick by K? 

Ruling: A few fundamentals make this relation- 
ship clear. (1) First touching of a kick by K is not a 
foul but is similar to any other legal act. (2) Any 
foul at any time during the down causes the first 
touching of a kick by K to be ignored provided the 
penalty for the foul is accepted. (3) Any foul by 
R which occurs after R has touched the kick causes 
the first touching of the kick by K to be ignored 
even when penalty for the foul is declined. This 
item 3 is the only circumstance in which the re- 
lationship of first touching to a foul is slightly dif- 
ferent from that of other legal acts. 

2. Play: Scrimmage-kick by Kl comes down on R's 
20 where it is first touched by K2, after which it is 
muffed by K3 on R's 25, and finally recovered by 
K4 on R's 15. Is there more than one spot of "first 
touching" ? 

Ruling: There are three spots of first touching. 
In the case cited, R would choose to take the ball 
on their 25. 

3. Play: Have any errors or omissions been dis- 
covered in the 1955 ruleh publications? 

Ruling: The following corrections should be made. 
IN THE RULES BOOK: In the last sentence of 
1-5-1, "of" should be changed to "or." Also, in the 
6th line of 10-5-2. "opponent's" should be inserted 
after "their." 

4. Play: Is the rule which specifies that a foul 
by B during a try is penalized on the kick-off an 
exception to the fundamental that the penalty for 
any single foul may be declined? 

Ruling. No. Such penalty may be declined. How- 
ever, the advantage of acceptance is so obvious that 
the Referee does not ask the Captain to choose. If 
the Captain should desire to decline, he must take 
the initiative. Note that the last sentence of 8-3-4 
now uses the word "measurement" instead of the 
former "enforced." If there is any measurement, it 
is from the succeeding spot, i.e., from spot where 
the kick-off would have been made if there had been 
no foul. 

5. Play: What is the difference between the terms 
"enforced", "administered", "inflicted", "assessed" 
and "measured", as applied to penalties? 

Ruling: At one time, these different terms were 
used in an attempt to avoid confusion as to whether 
the statement applied to an accepted penalty or to 
a declined penalty or to both. Under the current 
code, any penalty for a single foul may be accepted 
or declined and the only penalties are loss of dis- 
tance. Under these circumstances, there should be 
no difficulty regarding any statement about penal- 
ties. In general, since all penalties are loss of dis- 



tance, the term "measurement" seems to be the most 
descriptive. 

6. Play: Forward pass infractions once included 
"loss of down" with the penalty statement. It now 
refers to the fact that "the down counts." What is 
the reason for the change in method of treatment? 

Ruling: The use of the term "loss of down" was 
never accurate although there was some excuse for 
the statement in the years when a forward pass 
incompletion was considered a foul. In those days, 
the foul for incompletion had a penalty of "loss of 
down." At present, an incompletion is not a foul. 
The down counts the same as it counts for any other 
completed play. If there is a down in which there is 
a forward pass infraction, the down counts, regard- 
less of whether the penalty for the infraction is 
accepted or declined. Procedure is covered in Rule 
5 which outlines all of the situations in which the 
number of the down is affected. The counting of the 
dovm is not a part of the penalty since the down 
also counts in many cases where there is no penalty. 
All coverage for situations which involve the num- 
ber of the down are now covered in Rule 5 and there 
is no good purpose served by reference to it in the 
section which covers foi-ward pass infractions. For 
convenience, it has been thought desirable to retain 
a statement about the matter in the foi-ward pass 
section. This may be useful during the transition 
period but is not actually needed since the entire 
matter is now covered in Rule 5. 

7. Play: During 4th down, there is a legal forward 
pass by Al. A2 illegally interferes with Bl beyond 
the line. The pass is batted backward and is caught 
by A3 behind the line. Does the down count? 

Ruling. The down counts regardless of whether 
the penalty for interference is accepted or declined. 
If declined, a new series is awarded B at spot where 
ball becomes dead. If accepted, a new series is 
awarded B 15 yards behind the previous spot. 

8. Play: 4th on the 50. A legal forward pass by Al 
is intercepted by Bl and advanced to A's 40 where 
fumble by Bl is recovered by A2. In an attempted 
advance, A2 throws an illegal foi-ward pass from 
his 40 and this illegal forward pass touches the 
ground. What is the number of the next down ? 

Ruling: Since the foul occurred after a change of 
team possession, a new series is awarded, regard- 
less of whether the penalty for the foul is accepted 
or declined. If declined, it is 1st and 10 for A from 
his 40. If accepted, it is 1st and 10 for A on their 
35. 

9. Play: Legal fonvard pass by Al is intercepted 
by Bl. In attempting to advance Bl throws illegal 
pass which strikes the ground. What is the distance 
to be gained after the loss of 5 yards is assessed? 

Ruling: It is 1st and 10 for B. 

10. Play: 2nd and 10 on the 50. Al advances to 
B's 30 where he throws an illegal forward pass 

(Continued on Page Ten) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1955 



OCTOBER, 1955 VOL XVIII— NO. 3 

Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association. 

Office of Publication. Lexington. Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexin^on, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Russell Williamson (1952-66), Inez 

Vice-President Roy G. Eversole (1952-56). Hazard 

Directors— W. B. Jones (1953-57) Somerset; Louis Litchfield 
1953-57), Marion: W. H. Crowdus (1954-58). Franklin: Jack 
Dawson (1954-58), Middletown : Robert P. Forsythe (1955-59) 
Browder: K. G. Gillaspie (1955-59), Georgetown. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 

^rom the Commissionel s C/ffice 

"Open House" at New Building 

By the time this issue of the magazine 
comes from the printers, the K.H.S.A.A. 
staff will be move(S to the new office build- 
ing, located at 763 Rose Street, Lexington. 
There will be an "open house" at the build- 
ing on Saturday afternoon, October 22, be- 
tween the hours of 1 :30 and 4 :00, All school 
administrators, coaches, officials, press-ra- 
dio-television repi-esentatives, and others in- 
terested in the program of the K,H S.A.A. 
are invited to inspect the new home of the 
Association during the time mentioned. 
There will be no formal dedication. School 
men and others who do not find it possible 
to be in Lexington on the date mentioned will 
be most welcome at the K.H.S.A.A. Building 
at any time, of course. 

The Cross Country Championship 

The third official State High School Cross 
Country Chamr'ionshiD will be held at the 
University of Kentucky over the two mile 
Picadome Golf Course on Saturday morning, 
November 12, at 11 :00. The meet is sanction- 
ed bv the K.H.S.A.A.. and the Association 
will furnish trophies for the winning team 
and runner-up and individual medals for the 
fir.st ten places. 

All K.H.S.A.A. member schools are invited 
to compete in the event, which will he staged 
bv the Spiked Shoe Society of the University. 
This organization has sponsored the champ- 
ionship in recent years. The teams may be 
composed of a maximum number of seven 
competitors, but only the first five runners 
will count on the team .score. It will not be 
necessary to designate the five-man team be- 
fore the race. No school will qualify for the 
team chamoionship which enters fewer than 
five competitors in the event. A school en- 
tering only one boy may qualify for the in- 
dividual championship. 

One hundred sixteen boys took part in 
the 19.54 Cross Country, which was won by 



the Trimble County High School. The Valley 
High School team placed second, and St. 
Joseph Prep School was third. The individual 
champion last year was Press Whelan of St. 
Joe. Scheler of Vallev was second, and Ball 
of Breckinridge County was third. 

Principals planning on entering teams in 
the 1955 Cross Country should send their en- 
tries to Dr. Don Cash Seaton, Alumni Gym- 
nasium, University of Kentucky. Lexington, 
Kentucky, on or before November 5. Entry 
blanks will be mailed to all member schools. 
Team members and their coaches will be 
guests of the University for the Memphis 
State game at 2 :00 P. M. 



Clinics for Cheerleaders 

The State Y.M.C.A. of Kentucky continues 
to render a fine service to the youth of the 
state in conducting clinics for cheerleaders. 

The first clinic was held October 1 on the 
campus of Morehead State College. Miss 
Henrietta Avent, physical education director, 
was in charge of the clinic, which had as its 
theme "How to lead yells and how to prac- 
tice good sportsmanshiD in cheerleading." 

Western Kentucky State College is plan- 
ning a clinic for October 22. Miss Betty 
Langley of College High, Bowling Green, 
should be written for further information. 

A state-wide clinic for both cheerleaders 
and baton twirlers will be held November 12 
on the University of Kentucky campus. Lead- 
ing sports announcers and writers will form 
a panel which will have as its theme "Sports- 
manship." Fans will be entertained at half- 
time of the University-Memphis State game 
by cheerleaders, baton twirlers and high 
school bands. 

K.A.P.O.S. 

The Kentucky Association of Pep Or.e^ani- 
zation Sponsors will have a luncheon meeting 
at 12 :00 in the University School cafeteria 
on November 12. Those having special prob- 
lems which they would like to have discussed 
at the meeting should advise Mrs. Stella S. 
Gilb, College of Education, University of 
Kentucky, accordingly. Dues to the K.A.P.O. 
S., which is in its infancy, should be sent to 
Miss Phyllis Kloecker, Treasurer, at the Uni- 
versity School in Lexington. The amount is 
$1.00.' 

Falls Cities Clinics 

Secretai-y-Treasurer Robert L. Rosenbaum 
of the Falls Cities Basketball Officials As- 
sociation sends information to the effect 
that his association has scheduled eight rules 
clinics in regions in which his group supplies 
most of the officials. Approval of these meet- 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1955 



Page Three 



ings has been secured from the K.H.S.A.A. 
office. Clinics were held at the Oldham Coun- 
ty High School, Campbellsville High School, 
and Anderson High School on October 4, 
October 6, and October 11 respectively. Other 
meetings have been scheduled as follows: 



Elizabethtown H. 
Shelbyville H. S.,, 
Frankfort H. S., 
Bardstown H. S., 
Fern Creek H. S. 



S., October 18 
October 18 
November 17 
November 17 
November 22 
Mr. Rosenbaum states that all clinics will 
start at 8 :00 P. M. The clinics will be directed 
by Claude Ricketts, rules interpreter for the 
Falls Cities group. 

Corrections 
FOOTBALL RULES BOOK 

Rule 1-5-1 : In the 7th line, change "of" to 
"or." 

Rule 10-5-2: In the 6th line, insert "op- 
ponents" after "their." This is the only cor- 
rection needed if it is assumed that the ante- 
cedent of "their" in the last clause is the 
team which committed the foul. 

FOOTBALL CASE BOOK 

Play 247: In the 2nd line, substitute 
"reaching" for "reading." 

Play 303-A: The 2nd foul, as outlined, is 
not part of a double foul since penalty for the 
offside was automatically accepted or declin- 
ed as soon as ball became dead. 

Play 427: Ruling is correct as printed if 
it is assumed that the situation is not com- 
plicated by a score which results in automatic 
acceptance or declination of the offside pen- 
alty. 

FOOTBALL MEETING FOLDER 

Correct answer to item (d) of question 3 
is "no." For a foul during a loose ball, spot 
of enforcement is the previous spot. 

FOOTBALL PLAYER HANDBOOK 

Ruling for 2nd play on Page 14 is correct, 
provided touching by ineligible A2 was in or 
behind the neutral zone. 

In first line of question 6 on Page 36, it is 
assumed that the antecedent of "it" is the 
"muff." On this assumption, the key is cor- 
rect. 

Key on Page 52: Answer to question 16 
on Page 9 is inadvertently omitted. Correct 
answer is "yes." 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED FOOTBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled October 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Adams, Mark, 28 Whirla Way, Route 1. Lyndon, Be 864S. CI 1624 
Baird, D. M., 313 Main St., P. O. Box 188, Fulton, 1560, 100 
Boyles, Jerry F., 3200 Park St., Ashland, O 3343W, 18fiO, 

Ext 229 
Brichler, Joe A., 5737 Kiefer Court, Cincinnati. Ohio, Ki l-r,049. 

Pa 1-1984 
Broderick, Carroll, 1760 Normal Dr., BowlinE Green, 3-8,594, 

3-8212 
Carter, Darrell, Tompkinsville, 4602, 53 
Carter, Gene S., P. O. Box 20, Brookport, Illinois. 2661 
Coleman, L. J. "Duke", Jr., 230 Koster, Lexington, 5-1400 
Creasey. Fred, Sebree, 2172 
Fey, Allen, 123 Garden Way, Fort Thomas, Hi 1-6288, Ki 1-1800, 

Line 1265 
Figg, Charles Raymond, 108 East Second, Frankfort, 4-2146, 

3-0565 
Fisher, W. B., 1722 Beechview Court, Louisville 16, Em 6-6488 
Garrity, E. F., 105 Bradford St., Charleston, W. Va. 
Gillespie, Robert C. Box 485, Pikeville, 1418, 1114 
Gosiger, Paul E., 3036 Linview, Cincinnati, Ohio, Ea 1753, 

Ch 1654 
Grace, H. E., Jr., P. O. Box 232, Middlesboro, 413 J 
Grissom, William H., 106 Norris Court, Glasgow, 2877. 5122 
Hawkins, Robert W., Echo Lane, Madisonville, 2722, 210 
Hellard, George D., Jr., 572 Longview, Lexington, 3-0871, 3-0484 
Hicks, W. Edmund, Route 1, Box 213, Valley Station. Pr 72727, 

Pr 7431 
Hoagland, Charles R., Jr., 212 Hillsboro, Lexington, 2-9704, 

2-5494 
Hunter, Charles, Evarts, 791, 77 
Johnson, Fred, Russell, Park 661 

Jones, Robert E., 24 Center. Berea. 301 (Bus. No.) 
Keller, Herman, 2105 Mulberry, Evansville, Ind. 
Kempf, Joseph L., 227 Virginia Ave.. Lyndon, Bel 1430, Ja 4391 
Kraesig. Raymond. 927 Ardmore Dr., Louisville 
Longshore, Richard D., 906 Taylor, Bellevue, Co. 18921 
Lucas. Gene T., 412 Clayton, Georgetown, 1371, 1215 
McCord, Anthony, 1636 Courtney Ave., Lexington, 3-3814 
Manning. Louis, P. O. Box 142, Lynch, 2124, 2171 
Moss, Howard A., P. O. Box 142, Paducah. 3-1072, 3-1234 
Parker, Monroe, 10th St., Norton, Va., 7, 554 
Perkins. Bill R.. Route 1. Georgetown, 464 W 
Pinson, Eugene, 341 Ringo, Ashland, Oak 2521, 422 
Pursifull, Cleophus, Loyall, 1110, Alva No. 2 
P.entz, Thomas W., 107 Swigert, Lexington, 4-1091, 3-2880 
Robertson, Everett, 341 Etna, Russell 
Sinclair, George H., 5120 Lammers Lane, Louisville, Okolona 

9-7925. Ca 7621, Line 204 
Taylor, Jack G., 2619 Sheridan Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

El 1-5366, El 1-5366 
Troutman, Doyle C, 316 Cumberland Ave., Harlan, 147, 522 
Tucker, William A., 509% Oak St., Corbin, 536, 465 
Walker, Paul R., Leech Court, Glasgow, 1-3013, 1-3811 
Wedge, Donald R., 3 Palmer Street, Athens, Ohio 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled October 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Adams, Ira R., Kermit High School, Kermit, W. V. 
Alexander, Jack M., 1510 Werner Ave., Owensboro, MU 4-1823, 

MU 3-1585 
Alexander, Rex E., College Station, Murray, 1292 W, 740, Ext, 15 
Almond, Alvin, 644 14th St., Bowling Green 
Armstrong, Fred W., Route 2, LaCenter 
Ashley, Kenneth, Eubank, 2604 
Bailey, George, Phelps 
Baker, E. C, Jr., Crab Orchard 
Ballard, Clark, 8806 Plainfield Road, Cincinnati 36, Ohio, 

Sy 1-5540, Du 1-2000 
Barker, Bob R., 1306 Center St.. Catlettsburg, N 388 W 
Barnes, Judson, P. O. Box 127, Cawood, 1974 J 
Barnett, J. W., 201 College, Somerset, 741 R, 224 
Barrett, Lloyd, Box 389, Jackson. 21 
Barton, Walter, Corbin, 648 M, 9144 
Basham, Willard, Jr., Leitchfield 

Begley, James P., Blue Diamond, 1829 (Bus. No.) 
Blackburn, Clyde W., Sue Bennett College, London, 241 X 
Blount, William B., 340 S. Broadway, Lexington, 3-2277, 4-8487 
Bowling, Floyd "Jack", L.M.U., Harrogate. Tennessee, 3656, 

4461 
Bowman, Earl G. "Dick", 611 Park, Lexington, 5-0473, 2-3343 
Bradshaw, Bill, Burgin, 4062 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1955 



Brichler, Joe A.. 5737 Kiefer Court. Cincinnati. Ohio. Ki 1-6(149. 

Pa. 1-1984 
Bridges, Bennie E.. North Middletown. 4392 

Brizendine. Vic, 2711 Lal<eside Dr., Louisville 5, Oh 6843. CI 4866 
Brock, James J.. P. O. Box 95. Cawood, 1968 R 
Brooks. Carroll C, 2905 Bowman Ave.. Louisville. Ch 6786 
Brooks, Charles D.. 215 S. 12th, Murray, 220 
Brown, James W., 124 Lancaster Ave., Richmond, 1558. 

Waco 4071 
Brumback, Buford. Box 134. Williamstown, 4-5822, 4-8461 
Brummett, Joseph W.. 318 E. Lexington, Danville, 1324 W, 

1900, Ext. 26 
Bryant, Jack E.. 135 Morris Road. Lookout Heights, Covineton. 

Ed 1-2819. Du 1-1400. Ext. 220. 
Bryant, Roy P., Cumberland Ave., WilliamsbirrK, 6634 
Butcher. Paul. West Van Lear. 967 M4, 1181 J3 
Butler, Donald A.. 2505 Iroquois Drive. Owensboro MU 3-3175, 

MU 3-2401, Ext. 279 
Calhoun, Foster C, Jackson, 313. Hindman 2410 
Campbell, George H.. 116 Winchester. Middlesboro. 856. 122 
Carpenter, Bill. Box 12. Bowling Green, Vi 21253, Vi 21253 
Carter. Gene S.. P. O. Box 20. Brookport. Illinois. 2661 
Cartwright. James F.. P. O. Box 154. Olive Hill 
Case. David A.. Lees Jr. College, Jackson. 199 J. 90 
Chattin, Charles. 2326 Harrod St.. Ashland, Ea 45385, Ea 46464 
Chilton. William R.. Albany. 45 R, 114 W 
Ciolek, Robert W.. 503 M. P. Co.. 3rd Armored Division. Fort 

Knox. 4498. 4847 
Coleman, L. J.. Jr.. 230 Koster. Lexington. 5-1400 
Coleman. Pat. 316 S. 13th. Murray, 1882 W 
Connor Neal. 322 Division. Bellevue. Ju 1-1369 
Cornn. Harold. 420 N. Broadway. Lexington, 4-2812, 2-0265 
Coppage. Donald L.. Taylor Mill Road. Route 1. Independence. 

Fleetwood 7-5572. Fleetwood 7-3071 
Creasey. Fred. Sebree. 2172 

CuUivan. Jim. College Station. Murray, 1668 W, 740, Ext. 15 
Cummings. Dale A.. 303 Forrestdale. Fulton, 908 
Curtis, James E.. Rockport. Beaver Dam 4424 
Davis, Donald. 39 Harrison. Bellevue. Ju 1-9813. Co-1-6990 
Davis. Richard. 5903 Harding Ave.. Portsmouth. Ohio, 

Scioto 284 L 
Dorroh. Glenn U.. Jr.. 328 Transylvania Park, Lexington, 4-2234 
Dotson, John B.. 2630 Martin Lane. Paducah. 3-7287, 5-5488 
Draughn, Bartram, Hindman. 6903 

Edens, Ray D.. Sanders. Ghent 65 - 6. Ghent 65-2 
Elkin, Benjamin J.. 153 St. James Drive, Lexington. 5-0000, 
Ellis, Jack D.. Bays Ave.. Morehead. 381, 46 

3-4636 
Elliott, Humphrey T.. Liberty 

Ensslin. Charles W.. 716 N. Main St.. Barbourville, 185 
Farley, James F.. 508 Grant St., Danville, 2495 
Farris, Abe.. Leitchfield, 30 

Fields, Joe D.. Route 1. Gilbertsville, 2674. Paducah 2-4311 
Figg. Charles R.. 108 East Second. Frankfort, 4-2146, 3-0565 
Fish, Earle G.. 30 Center. Berea 

Fisher, W. B.. 1722 Beechview Court, Louisville 16, Em 6-6488 
Franc, Anthony E.. Wingo High School, Wingo 
Fryman, Bobby G.. High St.. Carlisle. 328 W. 101 
Gardner. Howard E.. 307 Foplar Dr., Elizabethtown. 4451. Fort 

Knox 28137 
Gillespie. Robert C. Box 485, Pikeville, 1418, 1114 
Gillaspie, Robert H., 1931 E. 19th, Owen.sboro, MU 4-3502 
Goebel, Bill. Jr.. Prestonsburg. 7032 
Gray. Raymond. Island, Hu 6-2151 
Griese. Warren J.. 362 Craig Ave., Evansville, Ind., 2-0339, 

3-4012 
Griffin. William R.. 635 S. Frederick. Evansville. Inrt., 6-1931, 

4-7741 
Griffith, Daryel. Biggs 

Grisham. .lesse. 1525 Roosevelt. Henderson, 7-1035 
Grissom, William H.. 106 Norris Court. Glasgow, 2877, 5122 
Gustafson. Alford "Gus". 240 Francis Bldg.. Louisville. Ch 6161. 

Jackson 2068 
Hall. Royal A.. Jr.. 3823 Park, Covington, Ax 1-2300 
Hansel, Earl D.. Crummies 

Hardy. Alvin. Campbellsville College. Campbellsville 
Barrel!. Bill D.. Berea High School. Berea 
Hatfield. Paul E., 1102 Madison, Evansville. Indiana. 6-6621, 

5-2471 
Hayes, Douglass J., YN3 Staff, ComHawSeaFron, Navy 128, 

c/o Fleet Post Office, San Francisco. Calif. 
Henderson, Robert, Mayfield, Dulbin 
Henry, Maxwell, Frenchburg, 2103, 2203 
Hewitt, Raymond T.. 2541 Monroe, Paducah, 2-3027. .5-6311, 

Ext. 475 
Hewling. Franklin C, 1125 Orchard. Newport. Co 1-7380, 

Ga 1-3700 
Hines, G. Cliff. 113 Covington Ave.. Bowling Green VI34810 
Hiten, John W.. 362 Aylesford, Lexington, 4-8672, 2-2626 
Hoagland, Charles R.. Jr., 212 Hillsboro, Lexington. 2-9704, 

2-6494 
Hodges, Holbert, 516 N. Hill St., London, 208 L, 676 
Hodges, Mendell, P. O. Box 169. London, 841 L 
Hoffman, Jack J. c/o General Delivery, Fort Knox, 4102 
Hudson, J. D., Caneyville 
HudBon. Oacnr, 708 Highland Ave., Hazard 



Hulse, Robert K., Jr.. 1629 Farn 
Jackson. G. G.. 517 St. .loseph 

Ch 1-9900, Ext. 364 
Jenkins. Kean, 210 Morningside. Elizabethtown, 4087 
Johnson, Fred, Russell, Park 661 
Johnson, James P.. Big Hill 

Jones. Boyer. 407 Taylor Blvd.. Campbellsville. 348 W 
Jones, Robert E.. 24 Center, Berea, 301 (Bus. No. I 
Keeton, Bill, Louisa, Me 8-4346, Me 8-4346 
Key. Calvin. Hazel, 31. 25 
King, P. J., 307 Coast Guard Lane. Owensboro. MU 3-2401, 

(Bus. No.) 
King. Bob. 119 So. 39th St.. Louisville, Cy 4660. Ar 0872 
Lamastus. Jimmy. 720 North 3rd St.. Central City. 362. 310 
Ledford, James, Jr.. Box 144, Crab Orchard 
LeVan. Thomas F.. Box 823, Benton. 7676. Paducah. 3-5386 
Lewis. Robert L.. 205 Fuller St.. Mayfield. 2029 W 
Little. .1. B., Broadway, .lackson, 112 W, 112 J 
Long, Russell, Albany 

Luckey, Robert E.. 447 Bridge St.. Cynthiana, 317 W, 121 
Lytle. William P.. 927 E. 13th St.. Hopkinsville. Tu 5-8903. 

Tu 5-9622 

loute 1. Burlington, Hebron 3342, Hebron 



McGlas: 



3342 
lie, Jan 



C, 24 Riverview, Ashland, Grand 731 
1511 Chestnut St.. Bowling Green, Victo 



McLane. Hardin 

3-4320 

Macon. Max, 3001 Tremont, Louisville. Ch 5744 
Mahan. Boyd W., 2212 Sterrett. Covington. He 13746. Lo 18686 
Major. Cecil P., 223 Amy, Louisville. Cy 7601 
Martin, Bobby E.. Route 2. Beaver Dam. 4595 
Mason. Gene. Route 5. Mayfield 

Metcalf, Harold E.. 500 Montana. Louisville 8. Ca 4510 
Meyer. Clyde E., N. Ninth. Tell City, Ind., 968 J 
Milts, Herman. Lovely 

Miller. Rex .1., 704 23rd St.. Ashland. Oak 2609. 2255 
Miller. Roy. Belton. Drakesboro 3994, Central City 440 
Moody, Adrian, 411 Legion Blvd.. Owensboro 
Moore, James E.. Route 1, Box 14, Lily, London 844 L 
Moss, Howard A., P. O. Box 142. Paducah, 3-1072, 3-1234 
Mueller, Frank J., 516 Springdale Dr.. Elizabethtown, Fort 

Knox 2434 (Bus. No. I 
Myers. Edward B.. 626 Columbia. Glasgow. 01 1-2878 
Neumann, Jerry, 2154 Selim Ave.. Cincinnati. Ohio, Wa 4975 
Newman. Bill. 1614 6th. Portsmouth, Ohio. 5-6503 
Newnam, Luther G., Beattyville. 109, 91 
Newsome, Forest, Wheelwright, 2784 
Newton, Reason G., Lebanon Junction, 146 
Nie, Allen F., 304 W. 13th, Newport. Ax 1-6847 
Nielsen. Stanley, 242 Chenoweth, Louisville 
Noel, James L.. Nortonville, 3234 

Osborne. Bill, Box 594, Vine Grove, 095, Elizabethtown 9042 
Pack, Ervin B., P. O. Box 258. Baxter. 133 
Padgett, R. K.. 117 Griffin Ave.. Somerset. 470 W, 12 
Parker. .1. P., 356 Columbus, Lone Oak 
Patrick, Ralph, Salyersville, F19-4661 
Pergrem. Nard, 2815 Hackworth, Ashland, High 2887. 1260, 

Ext. 390 
Pewitt. Charles. Ill Beechwood Ave., Frankfort. 4-4426. 4-2281. 

Ext. 419 
Phelps. John B.. N. Main St.. London. 317 (Bus. No.) 
Poppas. Nickolas. Box 215. Blue Diamond. 1829 
Powell, Logan. 1031 Oakhill Dr.. Lexington, 3-9794 
Powers, Clayton E.. 501 Wolford. Pikeville. 1232 J, 823 
Price. James E., Pricetown, Liberty 2588 

Puckett, Calvin, Jr., Box 232, Greensburg. 205 J 1, 196 J 1 
Pursifull, Cleophus, Loyall, 1110, Alva No. 2 
Rash, Lindell L., P. O. Box 303. Mortons Gap, 4242 
Rawlings. Harold. Route 1. Bethel. Ohio, Rockwell 3-2645, 

New Richmond 3651 
Ray, Robert R.. Cave City, PR 3-7614 
Reeves, Kenneth H.. 132 E. Gray St.. Louisville. Wa 6201. 

St. Anthoney Hospital 
Rentz, Thomas W., 107 Swigert. Lexington, 4-1091, 3-2880 
Ricketts, Claude "O", 6620 Strawberry Lane, Louisville, Fr 1624, 

Ma 6140. Ext. 220 
Ries, Robert R.. 2454 Grinstead Dr., Louisville, Hi 2625 R, 

Wa 7551 
Riggins, J. M.. IV2 W. 5th Ave.. Williamson. W. Va. 
Roach. Earl W., Farmington 
Hountree. .lack. Route 2. Williamsburg 

Rountree, John T., 1068 Laurel Ave., Bowling Green, VI2-5646 
Rozen, Morris, Richmond. 1188 R. 2038 

Schwitz, Frank, 21 Mary St.. Evansville, Ind., 5-6605, 2-3671 
Small. William W., 1846 Mary Catherine Drive. Louisville, 

At 8366. Hi 4900 
Stamper, Robert L.,Morehead, 610 W. 194 or 195 
Stahl L. Richard, 109 No. Bayly Ave.. Louisville. Ta 8840. 

Cy 6631 
Stephens. Clarence W.. 943 Bryan, Lexington, 4-1224, 3-2817 
Strange, William L.. 305 Sycamore St.. Elizabethtown 
Strong. Arnett, 426 Cedar, Hazard, North 389, 3300 
Susott, Wilfred, 2837 Pennsylvania, Evansville, Ind., 4-U02, 

2-1662 
Threet, Hoyte B., 827 Vi W. Main. Princeton. 2640 

(Continued on Page Eight ) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1955 



Page Five 



Member Schools of the K. H. S.A.A. 



The following schoo's ar 
School Athletic Association f 
Principals of member schools 



of the Kentuckv High 
r ending June 30. 1956. 
■ck this list carefully to 
:h they have scheduled 



Eames are included. This 


list was compiled and sent to tt 


printer on October I. A su 


pplementary list of member schoo 


joining in October will ippear in tlie November issue of tj 


maerazine. 




Ahiens Trade 


Bridgeport 


(Louisville) 


(Frankfort) 


Allen County 


Bristow 


(Scottsville) 


Brodhead 


Almo 


Buckeye 


Alvaton 


(Lancaster) 


Anderson 


Fuffalo 


( La wrencd burs') 


Burgin 


Annville Institute 


Burnside 


Arlington 


Bush 


Ashland 


(Lida) 


Athens 


Butler 


(Lexington) 


1 utler County 


Atherton 


(Morgantown) 


(Louisville) 


Caldwell County 


Auburn 


(Princeton) 


Augusta 


Calhoun 


Austin Tracy 


Camargo 


(Lucas) 


(R. 2, Mt. Sterling) 


Auxier 


Campbal! County 


Bagdad 


(Alexandria) 


Ballard Memorial 


Campbellsburg 


(Barlow) 


Campbellsville 


Bald Knob 


Camp Dick Robinson 


(R. 4, Frankfort) 


(R. 5, Lancaster) 


Barbourville 


Caneyville 


Bardstown 


Carlisle 


Bardwell 


Carr Creek 


Beaver Dam 


Carrollton 


Beechwood 


Catlettsburg 


(So. Ft. Mitchell) 


Caverna 


Belfry 


(Horse Cave) 


Bell County 


Cayce 


(Pineville) 


Centertown 


Bellevue 


Central 


Benham 


(Clinton) 


Benton 


Central 


Berea 


(Richmond) 


Berea Foundation 


Central City 


Betsy Layne 


Chandl"'- Chapel 


black Star 


(A burn) 


(Alva) 


Clark County 


Blaine 


(Winchester) 


Bloomfield 


Clay 


Bourbon Co. Voc. 


Clay County 


(Paris) 


(Manchester) 


Boone County 


Clifty 


(Florence) 


Clinton County 


Bowling Green 


(Albany) 


Boyd County 


College 


(Ashland) 


(Bowling Green) 


Bracken County 


Corbin 


( Brooks ville) 


Cordia 


Breathitt 


Crab Orchard 


(Jackson) 


Crittenden County 


Breckinridge County 


(Marion) 


(H,;rdinsburg) 


Crofton 


Breckiniidge Training 


Cub Run 


(Morehead) 


Cuba 


Bremen 


(R. 1, Mayfield) 


Brewers 


Cumberland 


(Bent(m) 


Cunningham 



Cynthiana 
Dalton 
Danville 
Daviess County 

(Owensboro) 
Dayton 
Deming 

(Mt. Olivet) 
Dilce Combs Memorial 

(Jeff) 
Dixie Heights 

(So. Fort Mitchell) 
Dixon 
Dorton 
Drakesboro 
Dundee 
Dunmor 
duPont Manual 

(Louisville) 
Earlington 
Eastern 

(Middletown) 
E imonton 
Elizabeth town 
Elizabethtown Catholic 
Elkhorn 

(Frankfort) 
Elkhorn City 
Eminence 
Erie 

(Olive Hill) 
Estill County 

(Irvine) 
Evarts 
Ezel 

Falmouth 
Fancy Farm 
Farming-ton 
Ferguson 
Fern Creek 
Flaget 

(Louisville) 
Flaherty 

(Vine Grove) 
Flat Gap 
Fleming County 

(Flemingsburg) 
Fleming-Neon 

(Neon) 
Forkland 

(Gravel Switch) 
Fort Knox 
Frankfort 
Franklin-Simpson 

(Franklin) 
Frederick Fraize 

(Cloverport) 
Frenchburg 
Fordsville 
Fulgham 

(Clinton) 
Fulton 
Gallatin County 

(Warsaw) 
Gamaliel 
Garrett 
Garth 

(Georgetown) 



Glasg-ow 
Glendale 
Grant County 

(Dry Ridge) 
Greensbui'g 
Greenup 
Greenville 
Guthrie 
Haldeman 
Hall 

(Giays Knob) 
Hanson 
Hardin 
Harlan 
Harrison County 

(Cynthiana) 
Harrodsburg 
Hartford 
Hawesville 
Hazard 
Hazel 

Hazel Green Academy 
Heath 

(R. 1, Paducah) 
Hellier 
Henderson 
Henderson County 

(Henderson) 
Henry Central 

(New Castle) 
Henry Clay 

(Lexington) 
Hickman 
Highlands 

(Ft. Thomas) 
Hindman 
Hiseville 
Hodgenville 
Holmes 

(Covington) 
Holy Cross 

(Covington) 
Holy Name 

(Henderson) 
Holy Trinity 

'Louisville) 
Hopkinsville 
Horse Branch 
Howevallev 

(Cecilia) 
Hughes-Kirk 

(Beechmont) 
Hustonville 
Inez 
Irvine 
Irvington 
Jackson 
Jenkins 
Johns Ceek 

(Pike ville) 
Junction City 
Ky. Mili. Inst. 

(Lyndon) 
Ky. Sch. for the Bind 

(Louisville) 
Kingdom Come 

(Linefork) 
Kii'ksey 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1955 



Knox Central 

(Barboui-villet 
Knott County 

(Pippapass) 
Lacy 

(Hopkinsville) 
Lafayette 

(Lexington) 
Lancaster 
Leatherwood 

(Slemp) 
Lebanon 

Lebanon Junction 
Lee County 

(Beattyville) 
Leitchfield 
Lewisburg 
Lexington Catholic 
Liberty 
Lily 

Livermore 
Livingston 
Livingston County 

(Smithland) 
Lloyd Memorial 

(Erlanger) 
Louisa 

Louisville Male & Girls 
Loyall 
Ludlow 
Lynch 
Lynn Camp 

(Corbin) 
Lynn Grove 
Lynnvale 

(White Mills) 
Lyon County 

(Kuttawa) 
McDowell 
McKee 
McKinney 
Mackville 
Madison-Model 

(Richmond) 
Madisonville 
Magnolia 
Marion 
Martin 
Marrowbone 
Mayfield 
Maysville 
May's Lick 
Meade County 

(Brandenburg) 
Meade Memorial 

(Williamsport) 
Memorial 

(Hardyville) 
Mercer County 

(Harrodsburg) 
Middlesboro 
Midway 
Milburn 

Millersburg Mill. Inst. 
Minerva 
Montgomery County 

(Mt. Sterling) 
Monticello 



Morehead 
Morgan 
Morgan County 

(West Liberty) 
Morganfield 
Mt. Sterling 
Mt. Vernon 
Mt. Washington 
Muhlenberg Central 

(Powderly) 
Murray 

Murray Training 
M. C. Napier 

(Hazard) 
Nancy 
Nebo 

New Concord 
Newport 

Newport Catholic 
Nicholas County 

(Carlisle) 
Nicholasville 
North Marshall County 

(Calvert City) 
North Middletown 
North Wan-en 

(Smiths Grove) 
Oakdale Voc. 
Oil Springs 
Oldham County 

(La Grange) 
Old Kentucky Home 

(Bardstown) 
Olive Hill 
Olmstead 
Ormsby Village 

(Anchorage) 
Orangeburg 

(R. 3, Maysville) 
Owen County 

(Owenton) 
Owensboro 
Owensboro Catholic 
Owensboro Technical 
Owingsville 
Owsley County 

(Booneville) 
Paducah Tilghman 
Paint Lick 
Paintsville 
Paris 
Park City 
Parksville 
Peaks Mill 

(R. 1, Frankfort) 
Pembroke 
Perryville 
Phelps 
Pikeville 
Pine Knot 
Pineville 
Pleasureville 
Powell County 

(Stanton) 
Prichard 

(Grayson) 
Providence 



Pulaski County 

(Somerset) 
Raceland 
Red Bird 

(Beverly) 
Reidland 

(R. 8, Paducah) 
Richardsville 
Rineyville 
Rockhold 
Riverside Inst. 

(Lost Creek) 
Russell 
Russell County 

(Russell Springs) 
Russellville 
Sacramento 
St. Agatha 

(Winchester) 
St. Agnes 

(Uniontown) 
St. Augustine 

(Lebanon) 
St. Bernard 

(Clementsville) 
St. Catherine 

(New Haven) 
St. Charles 

(Lebanon) 
St. Francis 

(Loretto) 
St. Henry 

(Erlanger) 
St. Joseph Prep 

(Bardstown) 
St. Mary 

(Alexandria) 
St. Patrick's 

(Maysville) 
St. Thomas 

(Ft. Thomas) 
St. Vincent 
St. Xavier 

(Louisville) 
Salem 
Salyersville 
Scottsville 
Scott County 

(Georgetown) 
Sebree 
Sedalia 
Sharpshurg 
Shawnee 

(Louisville) 
Shelbyville 
Shepherdsville 
Shopville 
Silver Grove 
Simon Kenton 

(Independence) 
Simpsonville 
Sinking Fork 

(R. 5, Hopkinsville) 
Slaughters 
Somerset 
Sonora 
Southern 

(Louisville) 



South Portsmouth 

Springfield 

Stanford 

Stinnett Settlement 

(Stinnett) 
Stuart Robinson-Highland 

(Blackey) 
Sturgis 
Suda East Butler 

(Shively) 
Sunfish 
Symsonia 
Taylor County 

(Campbellsville) 
Taylorsville 
Temple Hill 

(Glasgow) 
Todd County 

(Elkton) 
ToUesboro 
Tompkinsville 
Trenton 
Trigg County 

(Cadiz) " 
Trimble County 

(Bedford)" 
Tyner 
University 

(Lexing-ton) 
Utica 
Valley 

(Valley Station) 
Vanceburg-Lewis County 

(Vanceburg) 
Versailles 
Villa Madonna 

(Covington) 
Vine Grove 
Virgie 
Waddy 
Wallins 
Walton-Verona 

(Walton) 
Warren County 

(Bowling Green) 
Warfield 
Wayne County 

(Monticello) 
Western 

(Hickman) 
Western 

(Sinai) 
West Point 
Wheelwright 
Whitesburg 
Williamsburg 
Williamstown 
Willisburg 
Wilmore 
Winchester 
Wingo 
Wolfe County 

(Campton) 
Woodbine 
Wurtland 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1955 



Page Seven 



The Flying Dutchman 

With the October basketball clinics in the 
offing, a special effort must be exerted in 
all parts of Kentucky to get all of our coaches 
to attend. It is lamentable that in past years 
only a few coaches have taken part with the 
officials in studying and understanding the 
rules in the state-wide clinics. 

If our coaches attend this season's ses- 
sions, it is a safe assumption that there will 
be fewer differerxes of opinion and a closer 
unity between the men who must make the 
decisions and those who teach the boys. 
While the Dutchman will try in the follow- 
ing paragraphs to explain the new rule 
written to prevent stalling by the dribbler, 
we all know that various questions will arise 
which can only be answered effectively in 
the clinics themselves. 

That new rule states that "Held ball may 
occur when a closely guarded dribbler con- 
trols the ball in the front court in an 
OBVIOUS attempt to consume time or to 
tantalize an opponent." Because we had a lot 
of trouble with this rule in our School for 
Officials in August, the Dutchman made a 
trip to Chicago to get it thoroughly ironed 
out with H. V. Porter, "Mr. Interpreter for 
the Nation," and here's the "dope." 

The only area in which a dribbler may 
have a 5-second held ball called on him, if 
he cannot elude a close guard, is between the 
mid-court dividing line and an imaginary line 
drawn through the nearest point of the foul 
circle in his team's front court. 

This area is not considered to be a reason- 
able scoring area so the 5-second count is on 
until the dribbler can place enough distance 
between him and his guard that the official 
no longer considers him to be closely guard- 
ed. Then, when he is again under close 
guard, a new 5-second count begins. 

In his team's front court in the area from 
the imaginary line through the point men- 
tioned on the foul circle to the end line a 
dribbler is never to have the 5-second count 
put on him unless he uses boundary lines to 
force his opponent to go out of bounds to 
reach the bouncing ball. 

After this lengthy written discourse on 
this one "toughie" you can see why our 
coaches just must join our officials in this 
season's clinic to get straight on this inter- 
pretation. 

Now let's look at some other interpreta- 
tions which you won't find in either your 
rule or case book but which are now official 
after my meeting with H. V. Porter: 



1. PLAY: Al shoots at mid-court, travels, 
and the ball goes in the basket. Is the ball 
]uit in play at mid-court by Team R or out- 
of-bounds under the basket? 

RULING : Point nearest the traveling. 

2. PLAY: Al, out-of-tounds behind his 
backboard, hits the back of board on throw- 
in. The ball rebounds to him and he gets it 
in play legally before five seconds are up. 
Is this 0. K.? 

RULING: Legal. 

3. PLAY: Same situation except ball was 
thrown out-of-bounds across the court with- 
out touching another player. 

RULING : Same as above except that this 
would nearly always consume 5 seconds. 

4. PLAY: On jump ball between Al and 
Bl, A2 is in the cylinder simultaneously with 
the tapping of the ball. Is this a violation? 

RULING : No. To be a violation, the entry 
must be "before" the tap. 

5. PLAY: Al stalls for four seconds by 
dribbling. He then brings his dribble to an 
end and feints a pass toward scoring area 
but does not pass. Does the five second count 
continue or does the attempt to pass stop 
the count? 

RULING : The five second count continues. 

6. PLAY: On jump ball, A2 is in the cylin- 
der too soon. Players do not hear the whistle 
and play continues with the timer erroneous- 
ly starting the clock. Should the officials 
order the clock to be set back? 

RULING : Under ordinary circumstances, 
the lesser of several evils is to assume that 
no correction can be made. However, in 
certain cases where, with only a few seconds 
remaining the error is especially significant, 
the referee would have authority to arbi- 
trarily state that a given number of seconds 
remain to be played. This would be done 
only in extreme cases where it is obvious 
that the outcome of the game may be deter- 
mined by the error. 

7. PLAY: Define close guarding of a 
player. 

RULING : A guard must be in a customary 
guarding stance and within reaching dis- 
tance of his opponent. It must be remem- 
bered that a guard may be within reaching 
distance even though his hands during his 
adopted stance would not reach his oppon- 
ent until he lunged forward to g:in advant- 
age of his full stretch. Officials will give the 
guard full advantage of his stretch in meet- 
ing the requirement of reaching distance. 

8. PLAY: Al and Bl get into a fight 
during a live ball or during a dead ball. 
How many foul shots are awarded? 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1955 



RULING : If dui'ing a live ball the players 
are disqualified and their substitutes shoot 
one foul shot each ; but if during a dead ball 
their substitutes get two foul shots each 
since flagrant technical fouls draw two free 
throws under the new rules. 

Now we leave rules, to remind everybody 
of the three purposes of the Flying Dutch- 
man activities: (1) To recognize an indivi- 
dual rendering unselfish service to others 
with the Corn Cob Pipe or Honor award, 
which has something new added this year 
in that the tiny pipe adorns the neck of a 
beautiful Kentucky Thoroughbred ; (2) to 
recognize physically handicapped athletes 
who show determination by their participa- 
tion in sports; (3) to salute communities go- 
ing out of their way to promote good sports- 
manship and good neighbor practices by the 
presentation of the Abou Ben Adhem certi- 
ficate. 

Mail your recommendations to the Flying 
Dutchman, Armory Building, Louisville 2, 
Kentucky. 

And now for the Corn Cob Pipe of Honor 
winner for October. The "little stinker" is 
on its way to Buss Kirchdorfer of Shively 
who has been named MR. RECREATION OF 
KENTUCKY FOR 1955 for his outstanding 
service to young people through his volun- 
teer work in setting up youth centers, parks, 
trips, and teams ; and for his invaluable as- 
sistance, which helped make the Youth Am- 
bassador of Good Will Flight to Cuba this 
summer possible. 

You'll be surprised how much real pleasure 
you'll get yourself from seeing people or 
communities you recommend for recognition 
receive the honor. It will be more fun when 
you see how much even small recognition 
means to them. 



MU 3-n5R3. 



-1641 



BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(Continued from Page Foui-) 

Thurman, Armon E., 8025 S. Allen, Owensboro. 

976-2151 
Tichenor, Billy. Route 3, Hartford. 224 - LLS 
Tipton, Asa I., 828 Hillwood, Frankfort, 4-6606, 
Tucker, William A., 5091/0 Oak St., Corbin. 636, 465 

Urlage,' Richard C.'. 333 E. Uith', Covington, Co. 1-0068, Gr 1-8120 

Waggoner. Philip, Wingo 

Walker, Paul R., Leech Court, Glasgow, 1-3013, 1-3X11 

Warren, Bill, Morgantown, LA 63062 (Bus. No.) 

Wedge, Donald R., 3 Palmer Street, Athens, Ohio 

, Charles H., Route 1, St. .Joseph, 988-2472, 4-3221 
n, Curtis, 218 E. Franklin, Evansville, Ind., 3-3483 
, William C, 558 W. 2nd St., Maysville, Lo 4-3942 
IS. Harold K., 1415 Jefferson, Reading 15. Ohio, Va 1061B, 

Pa 16110, Line 68 
Willoughby, .Tames T., 2207 Kentucky Ave., Paducah, 3-4067, 

2-4311, Ext. 283 
Winchester, Roy L., Box 164, Route 10, Louisville IR, Fern 

Creek 3-4202, Fern Creek 3267 
Woford, Ernest. 222 S. 4th, Danville, 1275 W, 708 
Womack, William H„ 1512 Oak, Henderson, 9780. 2735 
Wood, James W., 827 E, 19th St., Owensboro. MU 4-1789, 

MU 3-2401, Ext. 388 
Wnrknuin, Bill, 280(i Central Ave., Ashhind, EA»t 4-2885, EAet 

4.mi 



War 
Welbo 
Whale 
Willia: 



Here and There 

MORE OR LESS PERSONAL : The many 
friends of Secretary LaFayette Golden (Flor- 
ida) regret that illness took him out of the 
office for several weeks during August. 
Everyone connected with the Federation 
hopes that the heart condition will soon be 
corrected. 

Stephen Epler, originator of 6-man foot- 
ball, has been made President of Reedley 
College at Reedley, California. 

A new baseball motion picture to be titled 
"Better Baseball" has been authorized. The 
scenes will be set up in Florida during April 
and the new picture will be available for the 
school year 1956-57. Full cooperation has 
been promised by Professional Baseball of- 
ficers and by College Baseball authorities. 
The picture will probably be made in the vic- 
inity of St. Petersburg and some of the 
scenes will show widely known Professional 
players. The major portion of the demonstra- 
tions will be by high school players. 

SAFETY DEVICES: The emphasis which 
has been given to the need for wider use of 
some type of mouth or face protector has 
resulted in a great increase in number of 
players which will be equipped with such 
device during the 1955 season. Several facts 
have been revealed by recent studies. More 
than half of all listed injuries in football 
have been to the mouth or face. Many of 
these have been broken or cracked teeth. 
Dental reports indicate that for each listed 
tooth injury, there are probably several 
other tooth injuries which are not revealed 
unless the mouth is X-rayed. These delayed 
discovery injuries may be chipped enamel or 
a tooth crack which is revealed at a later 
date. It is obvious that some type of mouth 
protector is desirable. The most commonly 
used type of protector is a face mask. Such 
mask will protect the teeth from a frontal 
blow but it is not claimed that it will protect 
them when there is a blow on the chin or 
the top of the head. To give protection 
against such blows, some type of elastic ma- 
terial must be used between the upper and 
lower teeth. There are three commonly used 
types of mouth protector. One type fits over 
the upper teeth through use of a type of 
dental wax which insures a proper fit. The 
second is a hinged rubber tooth guard which 
fits over both the upper and lower teeth. 
The hinge in the back of the mouth is de- 
signed to keep the device in proper position. 
A third type is held between the front teeth 
and extends over the lips. This type is usually 
fastened to the chin strap so that it can be 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1955 



Page Nine 



removed during the period between downs. 

Opinions differ as to which is least un- 
comfortable in the mouth and as to which 
is most effective in giving full protection. 
The type of mouth guard which is fitted 
through use of dental wax has been in use 
long enough to provide some interesting 
data. Last season, one manufacturer of this 
type of guard issued an insurance policy 
with each guard. This policy guaranteed to 
pay the dental bill for any injury which 
might occur while the boy is wearing the 
guard. For the 20,000 players who were 
equipped in this manner, there was only one 
claim for injury and the circumstances con- 
cerning this were such as to leave some 
question as to whether the guard was ac- 
tually in place at the time of the injury. 

Progress continues to be made toward the 
adequate padding of braces and shoulder pro- 
tectors. Several manufacturers have, through 
their research departments, produced a type 
of soft material which appears to be durable 
and which has the quality of spreading the 
effects of a shock. In some cases shoulder 
pads and thigh pads are now covered with a 
thick layer of such material so that it cush- 
ions the shock for the wearer and also for 
the player who is blocked or tackled. 

Progress has also been made in connection 
with the development of shoe cleats which 
are less dangerous than those used in the 
past. The developments include considerable 
progress in the making of a type of cleat 
which does not develop cutting edges and 
also a type which can be molded into the sole 
of the shoe. Hundreds of pairs of such shoes 
will be used during the current season and 
data secured from their use should give valu- 
able information as to whether there are 
real advantages in use of such cleats which 
have no metal posts and, consequently, have 
no tendency to chip or crack in such a way 
as to expose sharp metal spikes. 

A survey which was made at the end of 
last season by the Ohio Athletic Association 
reveals that of the 24,000 players included 
in the survey, 2500 wore some type of face 
protector. Among the Ohio coaches who were 
included in the survey, 106 favored making 
the wearing of such protectors mandatory 
and 355 did not favor mandatory use. 

BASKETBALL INTEREST: The United 
States has more reasonably good school 
basketball courts than any other country in 
the world. However, some of the other coun- 
tries have individual courts which surpass 
any in the United States. A recent basket- 
ball tournament was held in Rio deJaneiro in 



a stadium which seats 35,000 and which has 
a type of roof suspension which eliminates 
obstructing posts. For this and related tour- 
naments, a capacity crowd observed the 
games. 

OLYMPIC DAY: The United States Con- 
gress has designated the third week in Octo- 
ber as "Olympic Week" and Saturday, Octo- 
ber 22, as "Olympic Day." Because of an 
established policy of opposition to the use 
of high school teams in charity or fund rais- 
ing games, it is not recommended that pro- 
ceeds from school games be used for any 
purpose other than for helping to finance 
the school athetic program. However, this 
policy does not deter schools from arranging 
for collection of voluntary contributions for 
the Olympics or for any other good cause. 
Such collections may be sent to any state 
chairman of the Olympic Committee. In case 
of doubt, contact may be made with Execu- 
tive Director J. Lyman Bingham at the 
Biltmore Hotel in New York City. 

Regardless of viewpoints concerning the 
relative merits of Olympic values and of 
different methods of financing Olympic ac- 
tivities, those trained in athletic procedures 
are confident that the program is currently 
in excellent hands. The roster of officers in- 
cludes many of the most highly respected 
men in the world of sports. 

THE BASKETBALL SIGNAL ILLUS- 
TRATIONS as used on the back cover of the 
Basketball Case Book were made by Mal- 
colm Hancock of Great Falls, Montana. His 
friends will recall that his artistic talent 
became apparent during his stay in the hos- 
pital following his accident in Wisconsin. 
Malcolm's recovery has been as rapid as 
could be expected after such a serious fall 
but he is still under a doctor's care and uses 
special equipment in moving about. He is 
completing his high school course and is ex- 
ercising his artistic talent in a ceramics 
project and in illustrative work for the high 
school yearbook and the Great Falls news- 
paper. 

FOOTBALL HALL OF FAME : The New 
Jersey State Association is cooperating in 
the Football Hall of Fame project to the ex- 
tent of suggesting to member schools that 
they arrange for receiving voluntary dona- 
tions at one of their football games. 

CANADA: New Brunswick has recently 
adopted a limitation on length of season for 
each of the major sports. Member schools 
are expected to refrain from scheduling any 
game before or after the listed season limits, 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1955 



FOOTBALL QUESTIONS 

(Continued from Page One) 

which is s'l'ounded. Does the down fount if B accepts 
01' declines the penalty? 

Ruling: In either case, the down counts but the 
counting of the down has no significance since a 
new series is awarded as soon as acceptance or de- 
clination of the penalty leaves the ball in A's 
possession in advance of the linc-to-gain. 

11. Play: Would there be advantage in removing 
the provision that the down counts when penalty for 
a forward pass infraction is accepted ? 

Ruling: A good case might be made for such 
removal. At one time, the forward pass was gov- 
erned by a set of rules which were quite different 
from those which apply to other situations. Under 
the current method of handling the matter, all 
general penalty rules apply to the forward pass. 
It is possible that provisions concerning the num- 
ber of down could also be made to apply to forward 
pass infractions without creating- inequitable situa- 
tions. The matter deserves further study. 

12. Play: During try-for-point, Bl is offside and 
Al is charged with illegal piling on after ball becomes 
dead and the kick is successful. Does the point count 
and what is the procedure ? 

Ruling: The point counts. A foul by B during a 
try-for-point is always accepted since the loss of 
distance is measured on the next kick-off when- 
ever the try is successful. The foul by A, therefore, 
occurred after the automatic acceptance. Both dis- 
tances are enforced but in actual practice the 
Referee will subtract the lesser distance from the 
greater and measure the difference. 

13. Play: Has the change in the double and 
multiple foul rules introduced a new situation in 
which a Referee might find it necessary to step off 
a penalty in one direction and then step off another 
penalty in the other direction ? 

Ruling: There has always been the possibility of 
such a situation. Fortunately, the occasion seldom 
arises. The change in the double and multiple foul 
rule slightly increases the chance for such an oc- 
currence. In practically all cases, the Official will 
merely subtract one distance from the other. 

14. Play: Does the "short free-kick" differ from 
other fouls connected with a kick ? 

Ruling: There is no difference in administration 
unless it is in the fact that the act of kicking the ball 
erratically is considered the foul and it cannot be de- 
termined whether the act is a foul until the down has 
ended. This is significant only in the infrequent case 
where a free-kick by Kl bounces backward and be- 
comes dead behind the free-kick line when recovered 
by K2. Since the erratic kick is considered the foul, 
spot of the foul is the same as spot of the kick, 
rather than where the kick is recovered by K2. 

15. Play: Is a snapper permitted to move a foot 
backward at the same time he snaps the ball ? 

Ruling: The rights of the snapper in this connec- 
tion are the same as for any other player of A. 
Any player may move as soon as the ball is moved 
to start the snap. In past years, there were additional 
restrictions on the snapper. This was based on the 
belief that the force applied to the ball should come 
entirely from the hand movement rather than from 
the movement of the body. In the current game, it 
is not practical to require the snapper to keep his 
body stationary after the opponent has started his 
change. 

16. Play: Center takes one step backward as he 



snaps ball and hands off to a back. Is this legal 
under the new wording of Rule 7-2-7 ? 

Ruling: If the snap is between the feet and the 
motion is a quick "swipe" this can be a legal mo- 
tion. If the snap is outside the feet and with a turn 
of the body, it is doubtful whether the snap can 
be considered a quick "swipe" and since it is "bor- 
derline", it is recommended that it be prohibited 
until such time as controlled experimentation might 
prove that it can do no harm. 

17. Play: What changes in officiating signals 
have been authorized? 

Ruling: The illustrations on page 81 of the Foot- 
ball Rules Book show all authorized signals. A 
complete list of penalties on page 61 indicates the 
number of the signal which should be used for any 
infraction. The new illustrations are primarily for 
better classification of the signals and to give com- 
plete coverage as to which signals should be used 
for certain infractions which were not illustrated in 
past years. About the only significant difference 
from last year is in the use of one sig'nal for any 
type of illegal holding or illegal use of hand or arm. 
Since the Official always points to the team which 
is charged with the holding and since the distance 
penalty is now the same for either offensive or de- 
fensive holding, it is desirable to use one signal, 
rather than one for offensive holding and one for 
defensive holding. The chopping of the wrist of the 
left hand with the open right hand is the signal 
which should be used for these acts. 

The signal plate has a few numbers missing. 
The reason for this is that the numbers for the 
different penalties are kept the same as those used 
in the Collegiate Code. Because the Federation Code 
has no foul which results in loss of ball and because 
there is no "free ball", some of the signals used 
for the Collegiate Code are not necessary in admin- 
istering the Federation Code. 

18. Play: What is the significance of the changed 
wording in Section 1 of Rule 10 concerning en- 
foi'cement of penalty ? 

Ruling: In past years, coverage for the procedure 
in the administering of penalties has never been 
adequate. There was no authority for the Official 
to assume that a penalty is automatically declined 
or accepted, even in the most obvious cases. Also, 
there was no adequate coverage to indicate the sig- 
nificance of cei-tain types of declination. It was im- 
plied that when a penalty is declined, procedure is 
the same as if the foul had not occurred. This im- 
plication was not entirely accurate. An illustration 
is the illegal forward pass. Even when the distance 
penalty is declined, the procedure is not the same 
as if the illegal pass had not been thrown. The new 
wording is intended to be in harmony with pro- 
cedures in the current game. 

19. Play: Dui-ing a try-for-point, Bl is offside and 
the try is: (a) successful; or (b) not successful. In 
either case, B2 commits an unsportsmanlike foul 
after the try has ended. Do the fouls by Bl and B2 
constitute a multiple foul so that A has a choice? 

Ruling: It is not a multiple foul in either (a) or 
(b). In (a), the penalties of loss of 5 and loss of 
15 are added and enforced on the succeeding kick- 
off. In (b), penalty for the offside by Bl is measur- 
ed, after which the try is attempted again. The 15- 
yard penalty for the foul by B2 is then enforced on 
the succeeding kick-off. 

20. Play: Have any changes in the field markings 
been authorized? 

Ruling: The new diagram on page 4 suggests 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1955 



Page Eleven 



markers at each end of each inbounds line. The pur- 
pose is to aid the Official in case the hash marks 
are erased by snow or mud. Also, an engineer has 
suggested that it would aid those who follow a 
game by television if the hash marks were to ap- 
pear only on that side of each yardline which is 
away from the 50 yardline and toward the nearer 
goal line. 

21. Play: Under second paragraph of 5-3-2, how 
is ball placed when a new series in awarded: (a) 
after a touchback; or (b) after a 4th down forward 
pass is incomplete ? 

Ruling: No specific coverage is given. In (a), 
the ball should be placed with its foremost point 
on the 20 so that the line-to-gain is the 30. In (b), 
when possession changes, the ball remains in the 
same position as at the start of the down. The fore- 
most point of the ball becomes the rear point when 
the direction' of the offense is changed. 

22. Play: 3rd on the 50. Runner Al advances to 
B's 30 where he throws an illegal fonvard pass. 
The illegal pass is muffed toward the 50 where it 
is caught by A2. A2 is downed on his 40. If B de- 
clines the penalty for the illegal foi-ward pass, may 
they choose to have it 4th down for A on their 40 ? 

Ruling: No. Since the down did not end with the 
ball in possession of B, it would be A's ball at spot 
of the illegal pass if B declines the 5-yard penalty. 

Comment: A good case could be made for giving 
B the choice of having the ball put in play at the 
spot where it becomes dead. However, an exception 
would have to be made for an illegal forward pass 
which is incomplete. In such case, the ball might 
become dead through striking the ground at some 
distance from the spot of the illegal pass. The situa- 
tion outlined in this play is such a i-emote possibility 
that it has not been thought desirable to provide 
the more complicated coverage. As far as equity is 
concerned, present coverage is in harmony with the 
tendency to permit a team to retain distance which 
has been legally gained before the throwing of the 
illegal pass. 

23. Play. Doesn't the first sentence of 10-5-2 "an 
illegal forward pass from the end zone is a safety" 
conflict with Play 4 of 8-5-2? The ruling states 
"Safety whether penalty is accepted or declined." 
Can this be declined? 

Ruling: The penalty can be declined but it is still 
a safety because the play leaves the ball behind 
the goal line. The fii-st sentence of 10-5-2 covers 
only the case when penalty is accepted. 8-5-2c 
covers when declined. 

24. Play: Does fair catch interference cease after 
Rl touches or bobbles the kick but does not com- 
plete catch? 

Ruling: Yes. However, a fair catch may still be 
made. 

25. Play: Doesn't the ruling in Case Book No. 143 
(b) "... point where it crossed plane of sideline" 
conflict with 2-19-2 "... ball touches anything 
which is on or outside a sideline or endline" ? 

Ruling: There is no conflict. Ball becomes dead 
when it touches but it is put in play where it 
crossed sideline. A kick might touch 20 yards away 
from where it crossed plane. 

26. Play: 3rd on A's 10. Al receives the snap 
near his goal line, advcnces to his 5 and throws an 
illegal foi-ward pass which is caught by A2. A2 
moves backward and is downed in his end zone. 
May B decline the penalty for the illegal foi-ward 
pass and choose a safety? 

Ruling: No. Since the down did not end with ball 



in possession of B, the ball is returned to spot of 
the illegal pass if the 5-yard penalty is declined. 

Comment: See Play 22 above for comment con- 
cerning present coverage. 

27. Play: May a school use colored streamers on 
the goal post or the crossbar? 

Ruling: The rules do not mention this. It is fairly 
common practice for schools to use colored crepe 
paper or bunting on the goal posts. Quite often these 
are in the colors of the two contesting schools. Use 
of such material on the crossbar might disconcert 
a kicker and it is recommended that it be kept free 
from any decorations, either painted or through 
wrapping. 

28. Play: On a dive play, quarter-back Al hands 
the ball foi^ward to a half-back who is near the line 
of scrimmage when the hand-off occurs. Is this 
illegal forward handing? Also, if there is a fumble, 
may the ball be advanced by any player or is it 
an illegal forward pass ? 

Ruling: If the hand-off is actually made, the 
Official must determine whether the exchange was 
made behind the line of scrimmage or in advance of 
it. In most cases, it will probably be behind the 
line. If so, such hand-off is legal. If there should 
be a fumble, it is ruled the same as for any fumble. 
It is assumed that the dropping of the ball is 
accidental. Consequently, it could not be considered 
a forward pass. 

29. Play: The Cleveland Browns and other teams 
often split their line after the quarter-back has 
started his count. Is this legal ? Also, if there is a 
variation in the counting rhythm in situations of 
this kind to permit the splitting of the line for 
better blocking positions, should this be ruled a 
false start? 

Ruling: There is nothing illegal about linemen 
changing their postions provided all players come 
to a complete stop for at least one second after they 
make the change and provided the movement to a 
new position is not a quick start which simulates 
action at the snap. There is no good reason why 
this move cannot be accomplished by a somewhat 
leisurely pulling out of the first position unless the 
primary purpose in making the move is to cause 
the Defense to think that the ball is going to be 
snapped. The changing of the rhythm for the count 
is not, in itself, illeg-al. There may be a legitimate 
reason for changing the rhythm. However, if it is 
coupled with some quick charging motion by a 
player of A, it is a suspicious circumstance which 
will justify having the Official call it a false start. 
If the linemen plan to move into a new position, 
they ought to make a special effort to make the 
initial movement such that it does not resemble the 
quick charging motion which accompanies the 
actual snap. 

It must be admitted that some judgment is 
necessary on the part of the Official. His judgment 
will be based on the type of movement with which 
the change in position is made. 

30. Play: Since there has been a change in the 
rules concerning the ignoring of first touching of a 
kick when there is a foul by R after the kick has 
been touched, could the last clause of Rule 10-5-2 
be eliminated? 

Ruling: From a practical standpoint, it could 
probably be eliminated. However, if it were elimi- 
nated, there would be no answer to the question 
as to what the result would be if A should accept 
the penalty in a case where B commits holding or 
some similar foul while Al is running for a touch- 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1955 



down. While there is no practical reason why A 
would desire to accept such a penalty, the rules 
give him the right to accept it. If the last clause 
of 10-5-2 were removed, thei-e would be nothing to 
indicate the procedure if he did. Retention of the 
clause, if justified at all, is on the basis of desire 
to have complete coverage for cases which should 
not happen, but might. 

31. Play: Over the past several years, there has 
been a progressive movement in the direction of 
ignoring first touching of a kick if R commits a 
foul. Are there possibilities for further movement in 
this direction ? 

Ruling: The first step in this direction was taken 
several years ago when it was decided to ignore 
the first touching if there is a foul by R after R 
has had possession of the kick. The second step 
was to advance the dividing line to the time the 
kick is touched by R. If there should be further 
movement in this direction, the next step would be 
to ignore first touching in any case where R com- 
mits a foul after the first touching by K. A more 
extreme step would be to provide that if R com- 
mits a foul any time during or just prior to the 
down, any first touching will be ignored. Both of 
these provisions may receive some considei'ation by 
the National Football Committee. The game ad- 
ministration committee will study the possible ad- 
vantages and disadvantages of each of these sug- 
gested steps. 

32. Play: 2nd and 5 on B's 1-yardline. Bl is off- 
side. After enforcement of the 1/2-yard penalty, is 
a new series awarded to A ? 

Ruling. No. If this were in the field of play, the 
penalty of 5 yards would carry the ball to the line- 
to-gain, but in the case cited, the goal line is the 
line-to-gain and the penalty does not carry the ball 
to that point. 

33. Play: In the following formations, which 
players are eligible to receive a forward hand-off 
without turning? 

(a) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 
0x000 

(b) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 
0x00000 

(c) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 
x 

Ruling: In (a) 1 and 7. In (b) and (c) only 7 
may receive a forward hand-off without turning. 
Any other lineman may receive such hand-off by 
properly turning and being one yard back. 

34. Play: Federation Rule 10-1 recognizes the 
right of the Referee to consider a penalty as being 
automatically accepted or declined in certain ob- 
vious situations. Does this mean that a Captain can- 
not accept or decline in these situations? 

Ruling: A Captain may always accept or decline 
a penalty but in certain situations he must take 
the initiative if his desires are different from those 
anticipated by the Referee. At one time, it was 
considered good officiating practice by the Referee 
to call the Captains together in all cases even though 
the advantage of accepting or declining might be 
obvious. This seems to be a waste of time, especially 
since the adoption of the 3 and 1 system of penalty 
enforcement eliminates nearly all cases where it is 
necessary for a team to decline a penalty. The fol- 
lowing is an illustration: Runner Al advances 10 
.yards to the 50 and Bl holds during the run. Since 
A retains the distance gained and is awarded an 
additional 15 yards for the foul, it would be an 



absurdity to ask the offended Captain whether he 
desires to accept the penalty. Currently, it is com- 
mon practice for the Referee to omit the time con- 
suming procedure of calling the Captains together 
in a situation of this kind. 

35. Play: Al receives snap in his end zone and 
throws an illegal forward pass. What happens if 
Bl intercepts and declines ? Also, is this in conflict 
with the last clause of 8-5-2-c? 

Ruling: There is no conflict. The key to the last 
clause of 8-5-2-c is "to leave him in possession at 
spot of illegal pass." The only illegal foi-ward pass 
which could do this would be an incomplete illegal 
pass, i.e., one which is intentionally thrown to the 
ground. In that case, it would be impossible for B 
to intercept. The only other possibility of an illegal 
forward pass from the passer's end zone is an illegal 
forward pass after there have been two changes of 
team possession. In this infrequent case, B might 
intercept and score a touchdown. Such a situation is 
not included in the last clause of 8-5-2-c because, 
by Rule 7-5-4, the ball is not returned to the spot 
of the illegal pass if B chooses to keep it where it 
becomes dead in their possession. 

36. Play: Right end Al goes to a position near the 
line of scrimmage but he intentionally faces the 
wrong direction so he is not "on the line." Just be- 
fore the snap, he starts in motion backward and is 
1 or 2 yards behind the line at the snap. Is this an 
illegal position? 

Ruling: Not if the current rule is interpreted 
literally. Since Al was not "on the line", his move- 
ment to a new position is not a shift. Also, he is 
not required to be 5 yards behind the line when the 
snap is made. Sentiment concerning whether this 
should be prohibited differs. Some contend that 
when Al is clearly not on the line, this is sufficient 
warning to the Defense that he may become the 
man in motion. If his position is such that there 
might be some doubt as to whether he is actually 
"on the line," he must gamble on the Official not 
noticing that he has deliberately avoided being on 
the line. Under these circumstances, the possible 
advantage to Al may be more imagined than real. 
Others are of the opinion that the rule should be 
interpreted so that any player who takes a position 
within reasonable distance of the line of scrimmage 
should be considered "on the line" as far as ad- 
ministration of the shift and man in motion rules 
are concerned. 

Comment: Further study of the two viewpoints 
is urged. If restriction is attempted, it will be nec- 
essary to set up guides as for the meaning of "near 
the line." Reports should be made to the State Of- 
fice so that they may be relayed to the National 
Federation Football Committee. 

37. Play: When and where will matters pertain- 
ing to safety equipment and to the rules for the 
1956 season be considered ? 

Ruling: A meeting with equipment manufactuiers 
is scheduled for Chicago on Monday, December 19. 
Representatives of the Safety and Equipment Com- 
mittees of the National Federation Football Com- 
mittee will be present. The rules for 1956 will be 
made at the meeting of the Federation Football 
Committee to be held in Nashville, Tennessee on 
Thursday and Friday, January 5 and (!, 1956. Foot- 
ball questionnaires will be distributed during Nov- 
ember to provide opportunity for everyone to in- 
dicate sentiment and to make suggestions. 



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Coach Rupp Gym Pants for Boys 

Several colors and all sizes from 24 thru 
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Officials Clothing 

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We feature the O'Shea line. Now is the 
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NEW HOME OF THE K. H. S. A. A. 




On October 22 an "open house" was held in the new K.H.S.A.A. build- 
ing-, located at 763 Rose Street, Lexington, to which school administrators, 
coaches, officials, and press-radio-television representatives were invited. 




Oiiicial Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 
NOVEMBER - 1955 



Interior Views of the K. H. S. A. A. Building 




Upper left, general office; upper right, Commissioner's office; lower left, Board 
of Control meeting room; lower right, lobby. 

New Building Represents Dream Come True 



The new K. H. S. A. A. Building which was in- 
spected by school men, officials, and the public on 
October 22 represents a dream come true for Board 
of Conti-ol members and the Association staff. 
Over a long- period of time, while the annual re- 
ceipts of the Association were considerably in 
excess of the annual disbursements, the funds were 
allowed to accumulate, it being thought that the 
reserve would finally be enough to pay for building 
one of the finest association headquarters buildings 
in America. The Board of Control has done just 
that. 

Members of tTie Building Committee, who were 
charged by the Board of Control with the responsi- 
bility of planning the building and supervising its 
construction, were Chairman James L. Cobb (for- 
mer Director whose term on the Board expired on 
June 30, 195.5). Director W. B. Jones, Director Jack 
Dawson, and Commissioner Theo. A. Sanford. The 
full membershin of the Board decided upon the 
stvle of the buildinir, anprovod the final plans and 
snecifications, and let the contract with the builder. 
Other school men who wei-e on the Board when 
the deci.sion to construct the building was made 
were Carlos Oakley (former President, whose term 
ex-oired on Ju"e 30. 1955). Russell Williamson (for- 
i"e>- Vice-President, now President of the K. H. S. 
A. A.), Roy G. Eversole (former Director, currently 



Vice-President of the Association), Director Louis 
Litchfield, and Director W. H. Crowdus. 

Mr. Cobb gave his final report as chairman of 
the Building Committee at a Board of Control 
meeting- held on the morning of October 22. The 
Board of Conti'ol accepted the report and discharged 
the committee after commending its members for 
their work. Mr. Cobb reported that the new head- 
quaters building- had been constructed at a cost of 
$72,000.00. The Board had paid $18,000.00 for the 
lot on which the building is located. Approximately 
$4,000.00 had been spent for new equipment after 
deducting for some of the old equipment which 
was traded in. 

The building is one story and of modern design. 
It has a full basement. On the main floor are the 
Board of Control meeting room, a foyer or lobby, 
a general office, offices for the Commissioner and 
Assistant Commissioner, and a workroom. There 
are five rooms in the basement, including a small 
kitchen and the boiler room. One of the larger 
rooms is finished. The other rooms will be used 
mostly for storage. The building has a hot water 
heating system and air conditioning. 

All school men, officials, and other interested 
persons, who have not found it possible to inspect 
the new building as yet, are urged to pay a visit 
to the Association headquarters at the first oppor- 
tunity. 



7726 Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



Vol. XVIII— No. 4 



NOVEMBER, 1955 



$1.00 Per Year 



Early Season Basketball Questions — Installment 1 

Editor's Note: These rulings do not set aside or modify any covercd in the curreiit basketball pubHca- 

of the early season j . o 

tions : 

Ruling: BASKETBALL CASE BOOK: In 
second line of Play 381 "but" should be sub- 
stituted for "out." BASKETBALL MEET- 
ING FOLDER: In Play 1 on page 5, omit 
last sentence of ruling. See Play 330 in the 
Case Book for correct procedure. In Play 18 
on Page 9, reverse Al and Bl in second line. 
In Key on page 11, change second answer to 
Question 7 from "yes" to "no." In the for- 
mulae on point values on page 12, omit 
"plus .48" in third item and change total 
point value for a 2-throw foul to .72. 

4. Play: During dead ball, Al and Bl flag- 
rantly foul each other. Is this a double foul? 
How many free throws are awarded? How 
is ball put in play after the last throw? 

Ruling : It takes two personal fouls to make 
a double foul. Since the outlined fouls oc- 
cur during dead ball, they are technical. It 
is not a double foul t)ut a false double foul. 
Each foul carries its own penalty, i.e., two 
free throws for each. After the last throw, 
the ball is put in play by center jump. 

5. Play: If two free throws are awarded 
for a technical foul, is player always dis- 
qualified ? 

Ruling : Yes. The only time two free throws 
are awarded for a technical foul is when 
the foul is flagrant. If a foul is flagrant, 
player must be disqualified in accordance 
with second paragraph of penalty under 
10-6. 

Comment: Whether the Official considers 
a foul as being flagrant is dependent on sever- 
ity and related circumstances. An act such 
as slugging is always flagrant. Use of abus- 
ive language is also flagrant. An act such 
as intentionally pushing an opponent might 
be considered flagrant or it might not, de- 
pending on severity and conditions. In the 
case of a personal foul in which a player in- 
tentionally pushes an opponent, two free 
throws are always awarded because of the 
intentional feature but the player might not 

(Continued on Page Nine) 



1. Play: What aids may be given the Of- 
ficial in administering the 5-second held ball 
limitation ? 

Ruling: The second and third paragraphs 
of the comments on held ball on page 30 of 
the Rules Book and Plays 225 and 230 in the 
Case Book should be used as a guide. For 
practical administration the following speci- 
fic statements might be helpful. 

a. If a player in control is closely guarded 
in the front court in the floor area within 
about 15 feet of the center division line, he is 
expected to pass the ball or dribble out of 
this area within 5 seconds. 

b. If he is successful in getting out of this 
general area, the count is off since it is as- 
sumed that in such circumstances he has 
eluded his guard or that the opponent has 
retreated into a type of zone defense. If he 
then dribbles back into the restricted 1 5-foot 
area, a new 5-second count may begin. 

c. Dribbling alon'g the sideline is no dif- 
ferent from dribbling farther in the court 
unless the dribbler is penned in a corner or 
in such a way that the opponent cannot reach 
the ball without going out of bounds. In 
such a situation the 5-second time limit ap- 
plies. 

Comment : This time limit has been adopt- 
ed in the hope that the threat will be suffi- 
cient to eliminate any necessity for enforce- 
ment. Most coaches and players will realize 
that it is a poor gamble for a team to de- 
pend on one player to "run out the clock." 
If, despite the rule, a dribbler attempts this, 
it gives the defense a slightly better chance 
to get action without the necessity of com- 
mitting a foul. 

2. Play: With respect to the roughly out- 
lined areas which apply to the 5-second time 
limit on dribbling in the front court, is it 
safe to assume that they also apply to a play- 
er who is holding the ball instead of drib- 
bling? 

Ruling: Yes. 

3. Play: What irregularities have been dis- 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1955 



NOVEMBER, 1955 VOL. XVIII— NO. 4 

Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association. 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Russell Williamson (1962-66), Inez 

Vice-President Roy G. Eversole (1952-66), Hazard 

Directors— W. B. Jones (1953-67) Somerset; Louis Litchfield 
1963-57), Marion: W. H. Crowdus (1954-58), Franklin: Jack 
Dawson (1954-58), Middletown : Robert P. Forsythe (1955-69) 
Browder: K. G. Gillaspie (1956-59), Georgetown. 

Subscription Rates, $1.00 Per Year 

Jirotn the Cominissione>i s Dfflce 



REPORTS NOW DUE 

1. 1955 Football Participation List 

2. School's Report on Football Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Football) 



State Tournament Reservations 

The 1956 State High School Basketball 
Tournament will be held in Lexington on 
March 14-17. On October 24 each principal 
of a K.H.S.A.A. member school a.\iA all city 
and county superintendents were mailed an- 
nouncements concerning reservations for 
lodging during tournament time. In this 
announcement it was stated that the period 
of November 1-15 has been designated as the 
First Priority Period in the matter of mak- 
ing reservations for rooms. 

A Housing Committee, set up by the 
Lexington Chamber of Commerce, will as- 
sist with lodging reservations, giving first 
consideration to school representatives who 
live in distant parts of the state and to those 
whose reservations begin on Wednesday 
night, March 14. Requests for lodging reser- 
vations should be addressed to: Lexington 
Chamber of Commerce, Tournament Reser- 
vations, 152 East High Street, Lexington, 
Kentucky. 

The second Priority Period will be from 
November 15 to December 1, and will apply 
to others who plan to attend the tournament. 
School officials should advise their patrons 
concerning this period through articles in 
their local or county newspapers. 

National Federation Basketball Test 

Part II of the National Federation basket- 
ball examination will be given all over Ken- 
tucky on Monday, December 5, to officials 
who wish to work for the "approved" and 
"certified" ratings. Officials registered with 
the K.H.S.A.A. for the first time this year, 
and who have not been registered previously 



in any other state associations, are not elig- 
ible to take the test. Those interested should 
advise the State Office immediately in order 
that necessary arrangements can be made 
with the school administrators who will 
supervise the taking of the exam. Officials 
living in Kentucky need not suggest the 
name of an examiner, since it is probable 
that one examiner for each county will be 
named. The "approved" rating does not 
carry forward from year to year, but must 
be earned each year. After an official has 
received the "certified" rating, he keeps this 
rating by attending clinics without having 
to continue to take the exam each year. 
Approved and Certified Officials 

Nineteen football officials have qualified 
for the "Certified" rating this fall, and 
seven for the "Approved" rating. These of- 
ficials are: 

Certified Officials — Jim Barlow, Thomas 
P. Bell, Howard Bennett, Richard Betz, 
Travis Combs, Layton Cox, John S. Crosth- 
waite, Jr., Jack H. Durkin, Gene Harris, 
Fletcher Holeman, Bernard Johnson, Ray- 
mond Kraesig, Carl Lawson, Bob McCollum, 
Bill Nau, K. F. Schmitt, Joseph R. Schuh- 
mann, John H. Shaw, Edward H. Weber. 

Approved Officials — George W. Brown, 
Edwin C. Caiman, Jr., John B. Jeter, James 
M. Johnson, Douglas Noland, A. L. Perry, 
Bill Scott. 

Protection Fund News 

Two hundred ten member schools of the 
K.H.S.A.A. had insured their athletes with 
the Protection Fund at the time this issue 
of the magazine went to press. One hundred 
thirty-two claims, totaling $2,562.09, have 
been paid since July 1. 

Employment Bureaus 

Sixteen employment bureaus for officials, 
one in each basketball region, have been es- 
tablished. Each registered official should file 
at once with the bureau head of each region 
his schedule of games and a list of dates on 
which the officials will be available to call 
games. The names of the bureau heads, with 
their business and residence phone numbers, 
are as follows: 

Region 1. Rex Alexander, Murray State 
College, Murray; Business No. 740, Ext. 15; 
Res. No. 1292 W. 

Region 2. Amos Teague, 332 McLeod, Mad- 
isonville; Res. No. 1441 R. 

Region 3. Roy Settle, 1000 E. 20th St., 
Owensboro; Business No. MU 3-3575; Res. 
No. MU 3-2136. 

Region 4. Bob Forsythe, Browder; Busi- 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1955 



Page Three 



ness No. Greenville 309 ; Res. No. Drakesboro 
2583. 

Region 5. Dero Downing, Smallhouse Road, 
Bowling Green ; Business No. 4334 ; Res. No. 
5368. 

Region 6. Tom Williams, 116 E. Broadway, 
Bardstown; Res. No. 3079. 

Region 7. Dave Longenecker, 3910 Olympic, 
Louisville; Business No. Be 3401; Res. No. 
Ta 9071. 

Robert L. Rosenbaum, 117 Fairlawn Road, 
Louisville; Business No. Ja 8191; Res. No. 
Ta 2833. 

Region 8. Elmo Head, Shelbyville; Busi- 
ness No. 142 ; Res. No. 1273 W. 

Region 9. John Schaar, Bellevue; Business 
No. Co 1-2980; Res. No. Co 5069. 

Region 10. Earle Jones, Maysville; Busi- 
ness No. Lo 4-3856 ; Res. No. Lo 4-3393. 

Region 11. Harry Stephenson, 2210 Circle 
Dr., Lexington; Business No. 2-4789; Res. 
No. 4-9620. 

Region 12. Robert McLeod, Somerset; 
Business No. 545; Res. No. 571. 

Region 13. John S. Crosthwaite, Jr., Har- 
lan ; Business No. 57 ; Res. No. 2075. 

Region 14. Walter Combs, Hazard; Busi- 
ness No. 3300; Res. No. Grand 183. 

Region 15. Dick Looney, Pikeville; Res. 
No. 813. 

Region 16. Ernie Chattin, Y. M. C. A., 
Ashland; Business No. 370; Res. No. 1088. 

SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 

MEMBER SCHOOLS OF THE K.H.S.A.A. 

Adair County Kyrock 

(Columbia) Sweeden 

Adairville Leslie County 
Brownsville (Hyden) 

Buckhorn London 

Carter Lowes 

Center McCreary County 
Central Park (Whitley City) 

(McHenry) McKell 
Charleston (South Shore) 

(Dawson Springs) Magoffin Baptist 
Clarkson (Mountain Valley) 

Covington Catholic Maytown 
Dawson (Langley) 

(Dawson Springs) Middleburg 

Eubank Munfordville 

Feds Creek Oneida Institute 

Floyd County Poplar Creek 

(Prestonsburg) (Carpenter) 

Fredericktown Rockport 

(R. 2, Springfield) St. John 
Fredonia (R 5, Paducah) 

Good Shepherd Sandy Hook 

(Frankfort) South Christian 
Hazel Green (Herndon) 

(East Bernstadt) South Hopkins 
Henderson Settlement (Nortonville) 

(Prakes) Stearns 

Hitchins Uniontown 

Holy Family Van Lear 

(Ashland) Wayland 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED FOOTBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled November 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone unless otherwise designated. If two numbers 
are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Bartels, John T., 423 3rd, Dayton, Ju 14260, He 19088 

Corea, Frank, Box 452, Williamson, W. Va. 

Gentile, A. R. "Tony", 306 E. 3rd St.. Williamson, W. Va. 

Hamilton, G. J. "Ben", Williamson, W. Va. 

McDade, C. F. "Mickey", 918 6th Ave., St. Albans, W. Va. 

Rogers, J. B., 840 12th Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 

Spaulding, Stan, Route 2, Lake White Road, Waverly, Ohio 

Sweeney, James P., 3320 Trinity Road, Louisville, Ta 0401 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled November 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone unless otherwise designated. If two numbers 
are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Acuff, Charles E., 200 Southland, Louisville, Em 61077, CI 0271 
Akins, Charlie, White Mills. Cecilia 6662 (Bus. No.) 
Anderson, Elmer D., Director of Pupil Personnel, Morgan 

County Schools, West Liberty 
Arnold, Marvin R., 226 Jagoe St., Madisonville, 2329 
Augen.stein, Keith, 3212 Placid Place, Owensboro, Mu 30381, 

Mu 32401, Ext. 261 
Baker, Dee C, Lackey, Wayland 3864 
Ball, R. L., Box 577, Owensboro, Mu 32431 (Bus. No.) 
Bandy, Jack, Box 8, Harlan, 1386 J 

Bankemper, Thomas F., 723 Robert St., Newport, Ju 17347 
Bennett, Gene, Box 218, Wheelersburg, Ohio, Scioto 970 L 
Black. Ralph Amos, College St., Harrodsburg, 501, 711 
Blackburn, Viley O., 114 Richardson Dr., Somerset, 1113, 

993 or 162 
Boling, J. L., 1016% E. 4th, Owensboro 
Bolin, Herman, Oil Springs 

Bone. Billy M., 3817 Craig, Louisville, Fr 5993 
Booth, Leonard, College Heights Station, P. O. Box 191, 

Bowling Green 
Bowling, Roy, Route 1, Box 3, London 
Boyd, Thomas, Betsy Layne 

Brewer, Eandell L., Route 4, Box 282, London 
Briscoe, Hubert, Route 3, Shelbyville, 1484, 263 
Brooks, James A., Box 120, Betsy Layne, Pikeville 1465 

(Bus. No.) 
Bruce, W. D., Route 3, Central City, 633 M, 93 
Buchanan, Bobby M., Route 6, Paducah 
Buckles, Harold H., White Mills, Cecilia 6662 (Bus. No.) 
Buis, Nathaniel, Libei-ty. PAll, 2951 
Bunnell, Kenneth L., Munfordville 
Caldwell. James, 411 E. 8th, Newport, Ju 15957 
Campbell, John D., Garrett, 5903, 6241 
Carr, Scott B., 412 15th St., Bowling Green, Vi 39107 
Cassady, Charles W., 1127 Kentucky, Bowling Green, Vi 39538 
Cates, Vernon R., Lowes. Lowes Exchange (Bus. No.) 
Chadwell, Lester, Loyall, 1075, 35 
Chandler, Tommy, Route 3, Dixon 

Clark, Gordon, Route 4, P. O. Box 334, Frankfort. 30773 
Cole, Lynn M., 329 So. 4th St., Paducah, 35144 
Conley, Tom W., Route 23, Paintsville, 642 
Conn, Hershel, Dana 
Cook, Harold D., Livermore 
Coppage, Eugene, Route 1, Walton, Fleetwood 77424, Fleetwood 

73071 
Cotton, Larry J., 805 Walnut St., Dawson Springs, 5842 
Cox, C. Glenn, 326 S. Morgan, Morganfield, 160, 56 or 57 
Craft, James T., 134 N. Main, Madisonville, 2179, 548 
Creason, Coy, Morning Dr., Route 2, Benton, 7561, Calvert 

2600, Ext. 20 
Crowe, Emmett H., 7420 Joseph St., Cincinnati 31, Ohio 
Current, Ellis R., 670 Springridge Dr., Lexington, 20382, 34660 
Davenport, William T., 315 Village Dr., Elizabethtown, B451, 

2160 or 3139 
DeCoursey, Edgar, Wayland, 3274, 2601 

Decker, William K., Centre College, Danville, 9109, 1900, Ext. 26 
Devers, Marvin G., Box 193, Midway, 4741 
Doehring, D. R., 131 South Harrig, Madisonville, BID J, 1298 
Driskell, Earl, Jr., 1002 Cecil Ave.. Louisville, Ar 6774, Ca 7621 
Downing, Dero, Smallhouse Rd., Bowling Green, 6368, 8571 
Doyle, Donald, 203 Chandler, Campbellsville. 190 J, 355 
Dunaway, Paul R., Middlesboro, 1471, 2200 
Duncan, Earl S., 247 Taylorsville Road, Jeffersontown, Ta 0177 

(Bus. No.) 
Dunn, Sherley Ray, 2123 Madison, Paducah, 32914, 21314 
Fades, Jimmy, South Carrollton 
Eddings, Forrest, 418 Kinkead, Paducah, 28697 
Edwards, Hubert, Columbia, 4592, 4531 
Evans, ,Tame3 W., Auxier 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1955 



Everett, Harold E., fiOl Concord. Evansville, Indiana, 35033, 

Faber, William F., P. O. Hox 183. Smithland, 86 W, Mayfield 

1004 
Fanning, Homer, 213 S. Highland St., Winchester, 925 J, 

Lexington 22220. Ext. 2223 
Farmer, John C, "Jack", ii37 Shakertown Road, Danville. 

531 W, 2192 
Farmer, John H.. Box 47, London. 290 R 
Flynn, Reynolds. Route 3, Paris 

Ford. Douglas. 102 E. Front St.. Glasgow, Olive 15761 
Foster, William R., Science Hill 

Fyffe. Paul O., Box 645, Morehead State College, Morehead 
Gaither, Gene, 400 South Lafayette, Beaver Dam, 3365. 3366 
Garrett. Edison. P. O. Box 631, Whitesburg, 2168, 2749 
Gatliff, Grover W., 1318 29th St., Ashland, East 40197, East 

42114 
Gentry, David R., Route 3, Eubank 

Gever, Roger D., Seebolt Dr., Route 10, Box No. 330 B., Louis- 
ville 18 
Gilbert, Lawrence, 600 Nutwood, Bowling Green, Vi 34768, 

Vi 39779 
Haekel, John C, Jr., 846 Linwood Ave.. Louisville. Mag 2257 M 
Hagerman. Bart, 716 Magnolia Ave., Bowling Green, Vi 27865, 

Vi 22481 
Haley, James, 113 Moss Ave., Earlington, 5214, 5214 
Hannum, Harry, 3192 W. Tower Ave., Cincinnati 38, Ohio 
Hatfield, Gene Edwin, 202 Tavlor St.. Fulton, 1274, Mayfield 

2137 
Hill, Earl F.. 132 Holly .St.. Pineville 
Hill. Jimmie. Gausdale 

Hillyard. David, Route 2. Henderson, 76147, 3688 
Hohbs, Charles V.. 2121 Main St., We.stwood. Ashland, Ea 49150, 

Russell 808 
Hodge, Ken, Box K2, College Station, Murray, 34438 
Hoffer, William E., 15 W. 19th St., Covington, Ju 2445 
Holbrook, Harold, Grayson 

Holland, Robert Pat, 1621 Poplar St., Kenova, W. Va. 
Hood, Hovle D.. Box 174. Route 2, West Paducah 
Hoskins, Charles, 2922 Finn, Louisville 
Hughes, Charles F., Wayland 
Irwin, Charles R., Herndon 

James. Edward U.. P. 0. Box 244, Water Valley 
James, William A., 1036 Seelbach, Louisville, Em 61533 
Jarvis, Lindle F., 172 Main. Versailles, 663 
Johnson. Lonny R.. Scott Ave., Pikeville. 663, 40 
Johnston, Edward F... 300 College Ave., Paducah, 20216 
Jones, Donald, Campbellsville, 4820, 169 
Judy, Russell M., P. O. Box 207. Millersburg 
.Tury, William Robert. Route 1, New Haven, 3004 
Kemp, Bobby. 403 North 16th, Murray. 1418 W 
Kennev. Joe, 131 Main, Flemingsburg, 2041, 6441 
Kidd, William A., P. O. Box 1631, Albany, 25 L, 31 
Koenigsmark. Ted. 1105 W. Main St., Murray, 442 W 
Krekel. John W., 129 S. Shawnee Terrace, Louisville, Sp 4-5476, 

Ja 8261 
Langston, Marvin C, 216 No. 16th. Paducah, 24007, Calvert 2600 
Lavoy. Bob, 1529 29th St., Ashland, Ba 46685, Ea 46641 
Lentz, Charles, 72 N. Belleview, Indianapolis, Ind., Me 88095, 

Me 55416 
Linville, Shelby E., Box 101, Vanceburg, 225 
Lyons, Harold M.. Webster Ave., Cynthiana. 332 B. 99 
McAllister. Jack, 2322 Stratford, Cincinnati, Ohio, Pa 14198, 

Ma 11517 
McBride, W. Kenneth. 157 St. William Dr., Lexington, 4-8287, 

3-3335, Station No. 1 
McDade, C. F. "Mickey". 918 6th Ave., St. Albans, W. Va. 
McDonald, Robert, Route 2, Springfield, Moresville 2561, 

Bardstown 3548 
McDowell, Glenn D.. 604 6th, Pikeville, 252 
McLaughlin, Theodore F., 1143 Vine St., Newport, Ju 6712, 

Ch 4268 
McNeil, Patrick, 325 Race, Madisonville, 3460, 2402 
Maines, George, 44 Clover, Erlanger. Di 17460, Co 18120 
Marble, L. R., P. O. Box 5057. Monticello, 124 R, 70 B 
Martin, Howard I.. College Station, Murray 
Mayes, Edward, 838 Crossbill Road, Danville, 986 R, 1008 
Mazza, Albert "Babe", 285 A Street, Ceredo, W. Va. 
Meeks. Jack, 407 5th Street, Corbin, 416, 2178 
Meyer, H. "Bud". 846 Delehanty Ct., Cincinnati, Ohio, Dunbar 

15411. Grandview 13730 
Million, Warren T.. 359 S. 4th St.. Danville, 1973, 482 
Miller. Dencel, 1660 Normal Drive, Bowling Green 
Miller, Ferrel, College Heights, Bowling Green 
Molen, James P.. 102 Richardson Drive, Somerset, 894 L. 880 
Monahan. William G., 402 Belleville, Marion. 188 J, 21 
Morgan. Charles A.. Route 3. Clinton, Clinton 3533 
Morris, Rodney A., Route 4, Bowling Green. 5764 (Bus. No.) 
Moore, Edward C, Jr.. Main Street, West Point 
Moss, Bobby G., 2721 Adams St.. Paducah 
Moss. Julian "Moose". 106 Dickerson Ct.. Lancaster, 29, 27 
Mulligan. J. T.. 421 Center, Erlanger. Di 15628. Ki 17349 
Mullins. Thomas W.. Route 3. Mayfield 

Murphy, Leo T., 222 McCready. Louisville, Ta 2277. Wa 8284 
Myers. Julian. Route 2, Kevil, Paducah 56744 (Bus. No.) 



Newman, Earl B.. East McDowell 

Newton, C. M., 363 N. Broadway, Apt. 1, Lexington, 26669, 

24789 
Nord, Ed, 1734 So. 23rd, Louisville, Sp 41958, Be 3401, Ext. 233 
O'Brien, Tim, Box 96, Golconda, III., 140 R 2, 85 
Oldham, John, 2216 Dorothy Ave., Louisville, Hi 6153 M, 

Ta 3636 
O'Nan, Eugene, Route 3. Henderson. 79077 
O'Nan, Norman. Route 3. Henderson. 79912, 73465 
Osborne, Nick, Star Route, Wallins Creek, 1100 (Bus. No.) 
Owen. Arthur P., 1161 S. Kentucky Ave., Evansville. Ind.. 

Ha 28618. Ha 25801 
Palmore. Ralph L.. 631 Cleveland Ave., Glasgow, OL 1-5690, 

OL 1-3714 
Patton, Harold L.. Auxier, 4812, 4381 
Penrod, Joe B., 1115 W. 3rd. Owensboro 
Phillips, Jim, 1007 Clay, Paducah. 24226, 31771 
Pinchback, Ronald, Georgetown College, Georgetown 
Porter, C. A.. 1202 Center, Bowling Green, Vi 38316 
Powers, Jerry O.. 2701 Allen St., Owensboro, Mu 32420, Mu 36446 
Pyle, George E., Crofton, 6 R, Tu 53485 
Rains, Richard, Kenvir 

Rakel, Leroy L., 168 North Bend Road. Cincinnati 16, Ohio 
Ratliff, Albert H., Denniston 

Reagan, Johnny L., Box 188, College Station, Murray, 379 J, 740 
Reinhardt, Myron S., 1443 N. Fort Thomas Ave., Fort Thomas. 

Hiland 13730, Myrtle 78081 
Reynolds, W. J., Jr.. (Bill I. Martin. 3020 
Richard.son. Lewis H., Lewisburg, 70 J 
Ritter, Goebei, 119 Baker Ave.. Hazard, 835, 355 
Roberts, Bob, 215 Southport, Lexington, 26495 
Robinson, Donald C, Route 4. Box 182, London, 142 L, 231 X 
Rogers, Bob G., 162 N. Arcadia, Lexington, 32841, 26191 
Rogers, Earl, Evarts, 53, 77 

Rose, Wallace C. 623 Southridge, Lexington, 27255, 20515 
Rothfuss, Richard, 37 Gregory Lane. Fort Thomas, Co 12980 
Salisbury, William .1., Box 672, M.S.C., Morehead, 9107 
Samples, Gilbert, 306 East 3rd, London, 221 J, 231 X 
Sang, Bob, 4312 Gartin, Ashland, Ea 44184 
Schmidt, Chester A., P. O. Box 518. Middlesboro, 2208, 2200 
Schu, Wilbur L.. 106 W. Main, Georgetown, 1297, 1297 
Seelye, Arthur L., Box 82, College Station. Murray 
Selbee. W. A., Ashland, 40319. 48181 
Settle, Evan, Shelbyville, 561-W, 142 
Sexton, William L., 324 4th Ave.. Dayton, He 15941, Ma 14321, 

Line 40 
Shaw, Stanley E., 4460 W. 8th St., Cincinnati 5, Ohio, Gr 11100, 

Wa 15300 
Sheets, James W., 1101 Bryan Ave.. Lexington, 42931, 34660 
Shuck. Thomas G., 455 Sheridan. Lexington, 24635 
Simpson, Jack, 325 Orchard St., Owensboro, 34280 
Simp.son, Thomas E.. Route 2, Lawrenceburg, 2889 
Small, Rex, 300 E. 27th, Owensboro, 42845. 43129 
Smith, Eurie H., 3730 Taylorsville Road, Louisville, Ch 0374, 

Fc 3267 
Smith, John K., 120 Bridge, P. O. Box 456, Morehead, 327 R 
Spaulding, Stan, Route 2, Lake White Road. Waverly. Ohio 
Spencer, Edward, 315 Vet Village, Richmond 
Spencer, Irvin E., 1811 Dubourg Ave., Louisville 16, Cy 6281 
Stewart, Charles W., 425 Main Street. Ceredo. W. Va. 
Stamper. Paul, Box 367, West Liberty, Sh. 3-3275, Sh. 3-4576 
Strange. Frederick, LaCenter. 36-1 (Bus. No.) 
Sullivan. Durwood, Route 1, Arlington, Milburn 475 
Taylor, Hal, 320 North 32nd. Louisville 12. Arlington 4859. 

Anchorage 913 
Thoma, M. L., 103 Holly. Berea. 520. 95 

Thomas. William G.. 411 Hall, Dawson Springs, 2369, 2591 
Thompson, Roy C. Box 461. Somerset, 4214. 98 
Thweatt, Barney G., 1616 Monroe, Paducah 
Tilley, H. M.. Box 132, LaCenter 
Tincher, Robert. 1600 Chestnut, Bowling Green, Vi 33380, 

Vi 22424 
Tucker, Morris E.. Route 7, Hopkinsville, 62950, 61236 
Turner, A. J., Langley, Martin 3202, Martin 3241 
Vance. Earl G.. 637 West Main. Glasgow, 3083, 6206 
Vandergriff. Gene, Thomas Jefferson Place, Apt. 89, Paducah. 

65752, 22768 
Van Zant, Jim G.. 602 Prichard St., Williamson. W. Va. 
Varble. William E., 1706 Cypress, Louisville. Sp 66712 
Vaughn. Melvin, Route 5. London 
Vaught. Donald Ray, Science Hill, 263, 1176 
Walling, Blaine R.. Jr., 3509 Pennway, Louisville. Cy 6374 
Ward, Robert L., 842 Mill St.. Henderson. 9992. 2759 
Watts, Paul, Route 2, Lawrenceburg, 3705 

Webb, Leonard W., 3240th Support Sqdn. Command, Air Prov- 
ing Ground Command. Eglin Air Force Base. Florida 
Webb, Oren, Sweeden 
Webb. Walter E., Sweeden, Ly 72347 

Weber, Walter. 338 Anderson Ferry Road. Delhi Hills 38. Ohio 
Weisbrodt, Paul. 350 Stratford Dr.. Lexington, 46666 
Wetterer. A. L.. Jr.. 2905 Miles Road, Louisville. Ch 9809, 

Ch 7511. Ext. 406 
Wiederhold Robert G.. 216 Richmond, Lancaster. 180, 244 
Wilder. Charles D., 452 A Michigan Court, Evansville, Ind., 

72303, Henderson, Ky. 9551 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1955 



Page Five 



Willet, Irvin H., 815 Burns Ave., Wyoming. Ohio, Po 13716, 

Po 14100, Ext. 1916 
Winstead, Melvin Lee, 828 Triplett, Owensboro 
Witt, Fred, Whitesburg, 266 I 

Wright, John G., Kentucky Village, Greendale, 44728 
Yates, William D.. Route 2, Fulton, 1580-B, 9176 
Young, Coleman L., 340 Vet Village, Kichmond 
Young, Roy, Elkton, 52434, 52235 



The 1955-1956 Basketball Rules 

Comment by the Editorial Committee of tlie 
National Basketball Committee 

FROM THE COACHING STANDPOINT, 
there are three changes which are signifi- 
cant, i.e., the elimination of the 2-throw pen- 
alty for a foul in the last three minutes, the 
expanding of the 5-second held ball rule to 
include the dribble under outlined circum- 
stances, and the widening of the free throw 
lane for college and A.A.U. courts. Most of 
the other changes are in the nature of code 
organization improvements or of simplifying 
procedures in administering the game. In 
common with all change from traditional pro- 
cedures, these have ramifications which are 
certain to raise questions whenever rules 
matters are discussed. The following com- 
ments are an attempt to anticipate .such prob- 
lems and to outline the proper solution. 

JUMP BALL • 
The provision for delayed whistle for a 
jump ball violation has been abolished. A 
jump ball violation now kills the ball at the 
instant it is committed or if the ball is already 
dead, the violation causes it to remain dead. 

(a) On a jump ball, non-jumper Bl is in 
the restraining circle too soon but the ball 
is tapped. Ruling: B's violation caused the 
ball to remain dead. Award the ball to Team 
A at out of bounds point nearest the viola- 
tion. 

(b) Jumper Bl is not in legal jumping 
position, or he taps the ball before it reaches 
its highest point. Ruling: Same as in (a), 
except that B's tap on the way up may have 
been due to a bad toss, in which case the ball 
should be tossed again. 

(c) Jump violation occurs on jump ball in 
Team A's free throw circle. The uall is tapped 
into A's basket. Ruling: No goal because the 
violation caused the ball to remain dead; 
ball awarded to offended team at the out of 
bounds point nearest the violation. On a 
regulation court, this would be at the end 
line. 

AWARD OF BALL AFTER VIOLATION 
The penalty following Rule 9, Section 9, 
formerly contained an exception which speci- 
fied that the ball must be put in play on the 



sideline when the ball went in the basket 
after violations listed in Sections 2 to 9. This 
exception has been deleted and the ball is 
awarded out of bounds at the nearest point. 
For instance, if A runs with the ball, then 
throws the ball into the basket, no goal is 
scored and the ball goes to B at the out of 
bounds point nearest the violation. In so.ae 
cases, the nearest point will be at the end. 
The ball must be thrown in at the indicated 
point and the thrower-in does not have the 
right to pass the ball to another out of bounds 
player, or to move along the line, as after a 



The foregoing does not affect free throw 
violations covered in 9-1. For these, the ball 
is awarded out of bounds on the sidehne as 
in the past. 

STARTING THE CLOCK 
For a jump ball, the clock is started when 
the ball is legally tapped. This change con- 
serves a few seconds of playing time in the 
course of a game and might be important 
in close games in which a second or two may 
be vital. Officials should check timers prior 
to each game to make sure that they under- 
stand this new provision. 

There may be a jump ball violation just 
prior to the tap or an illegal tap. If the clock 
is started in the belief that play has begun 
legally, the official should signal time-out. If 
an out of bounds penalty is imposed, the clock 
should be restarted on the throw-in when the 
ball touches a player in the court. If, instead 
of a throw-in, the officials order a re-jump, 
the clock should be started when the ball is 
legally tapped. 

FLAGRANT TECHNICAL FOULS 
A flagrant technical foul now calls for the 
awarding of two free throws, plus disqualifi- 
cation. 

Al and Bl flagrantly foul each other dur- 
ing dead ball. The fouls are technical because 
they occur during dead ball. Two free throws 
are awarded to each team and the offenders 
are disqualified. Any player of the respective 
teams may attempt the free throws. This is 
not a double foul situation because by defini- 
tion, the term double foul applies only to 
personal fouls, that is, personal contact while 
the ball is alive. 

PUTTING THE BALL IN PLAY AT START 
OF GAME AND PERIODS 
Rule 6, Section 2, states that the ball shall 
be put in play at the beginning of each 
quarter (or half) and each extra period by 
a center jump between two opponents. Un- 

(Continued on Page Eight) 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1955 



The Flying Dutchman 

The annual basketball clinics continue to 
bring out more interesting- facts each year. 
There is always something new happening. 
After The Dutchman completed his 1900- 
mile circuit of Kentucky this year for his 
fourteenth annual session of clinics, he feels 
that it may now correctly be assumed that 
everything has happened in the way on con- 
ducting the rules meetings that can happen. 

Over the years, clinics have been held in 
gymnasiums where basketball practice was 
going on simultaneously with the rules ses- 
sion, carpenters were at work in another 
place sawing and hammering, and shop 
classes were in operation with buzz saws go- 
ing, but it remained for "Moose" Zachem to 
come up with the "gem of them all" when, 
in the midst of an explanation of stalling by 
the dribbler, the personable chap cut in on 
the school's loud speaker system to announce, 
"There will be a meeting of the Rainbow 
Girls tonight and all of you are invited." 
The school men over Kentucky are to be 
highly complimented for the cooperation 
which they have all given to make the clinics 
more successful each year. They have all 
been superb. 

The Game Guy project, which was started 
in 1949, got a "shot in the arm" this year 
when Bob Kirchdorfer, who was the first 
winner of the Game Guy Plaque in that 
year, accompanied The Dutchman on his 
sashay through Northern and Eastern Ken- 
tucky. Bob, who is paralyzed from his hips 
down with polio, won the hearts of every- 
body as he spoke to them, asking that they 
interest themselves in young men with phys- 
ical handicaps and recommend them for The 
Flying Dutchman Award. 

It was Joe Gilly, Harlan's popular coach 
of all sports, who made the first nomination 
for the Game Guy Award of 1956 when he 
recommended that a Lionheart Lapel But- 
ton be sent to one of his star athletes, Tony 
Halbumt. Tony had the misfortune of los- 
ing some of the fingers of one hand in an 
accident this summer, but he refuses to be 
beaten by his handicap. Everybody is cheer- 
ing the courageous youngster who is cur- 
rently playing football and is expected to 
reach new heights on the hardwood this 
winter. Tony's Lionheart Lapel Button will 
be presented to him in an appropriate cere- 
mony in the mountain city. Let's follow Bob 
Kirchdorfer's suggestion that you find out 
who these game guys are, where they live 
and notify The Flying Dutchman, Armory 





i 


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Building, Louisville, Kentucky, so that each 
may receive his lapel button award and be 
eligible for the Game Guy Plaque, which will 
be presented at the annual K.H.S.A.A. dinner 
during K.E.A. 

Be sure to take a look at the picture of 
the race horse with the Corn Cob Pipe around 
its neck which is the attractive paper weight 
which will be sent to people rendering un- 
selfish service to others. Already these Ken- 
tucky Thoroughbreds have gone to Charlie 
Forsythe, Commissioner, and Dave Arnold, 
Assistant Commissioner, of the Michigan 
High School Athletic Association ; L. V. 
Phillips, Commissioner, and Bob Hinshaw, 
Assistant Commissioner, of the Indiana 
High School Athletic Association. Three 
more are on their way this month to Ernie 
Chattin, of Ashland, who has devoted years 
of his life to unselfish service to young 
people ; Stanley Arnzen, who has gone far 
beyond the call of duty to make things 
pleasant in the annual basketball clinics at 
Newport; and to James A. Pursifull, Prin- 
cipal of Bell County High School, who set an 
outstanding example of developing friendly 
relations between communities at this year's 
basketball session at Bell County High 
School. 

Jimmy Pursifull did something which the 
officials and coaches proclaimed "tops." He 
had sandwiches of all kinds, cakes, coffee, 
and soft drinks on hand as a compliment 
from Bell County to everybody in attend- 
ance. The manner in which everybody took 
part in this social occasion was ample evi- 
dence of their appreciation of his unselfish 
service. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1955 



Page Seven 



We picked up a lot of information as we 
drove through the mountains and valleys of 
Kentucky. Elvis Hall, veteran official who 
roams the area surrounding Owensboro, 
Hartford and Henderson, will shortly pack 
his bag for a trip to Venezuela, where he will 
umpire in the winter baseball league. Glen 
McDowell, for many years an outstanding 
official in the mountain area surrounding 
Pikeville, is back in the coaching business 
at John's Creek High School. Bob McLeod, 
the popular young Somerset pediatrician, did 
double duty at Somerset as he supervised the 
basketball clinic and a Polio Clinic for chil- 
dren at the same time. 

Dr. Bob McLeod is one of Kentucky's most 
efficient and unusual officials. He officiates 
strictly because he loves the game of basket- 
ball and wants to keep contact with the young 
men who play it. Every youngster on the 
street calls a friendly greeting, "Hello, Doc- 
tor Bob!" as he passes. At the clinic the 
football players were having a field day 
kidding him about a stiff knee caused by an 
operation on some tendons. The more they 
kid Bob, the better he likes it and they like 
him. A most unusual fellow! 

All officials should adopt Bob's happy 
philosophy that officiating is a hobby. While 
it is true that it may at times be a profitable 
one, the men who get the most from the ac- 
tivity are those who do it to remain young 
with the boys who play. While all of us feel 
that officials must be properly compensated 
for their time and effort, everybody, includ- 
ing the officials, must realize that the great- 
est returns come from serving the boys, 
rather than from cashing the checks. While 
we were in Mayfield, the news broke that 
Kelly Thompson, long associated with West- 
ern Kentucky State College, had been named 
the President of the Hilltop institution. 
The news was enthusiastically received be- 
cause Kelly richly deserves the post and a 
nicer iguy could not have been selected for 
the high honor. Kelly has always been a 
friend of high school athletics and has never 
missed a night clinic in the forteen years 
The Dutchman has been making the rounds. 
He has our best wishes. 

One thing was obvious over the state, that 
being there is either a shortage of officials 
in an area or there is an over abundance. 
New officials must be encouraged and de- 
veloped. Possibly the best example of the 
right attitude to be instilled in young offi- 
cials was manifested by Billy Riggs, of Mor- 
ganfield, who set forth to properly train 
(Continued on Page Twelve) 



New Basketball Film 




The K.H.S.A.A. has rented several prints 
of the new basketball film, BETTER 
BASKETBALL, and has placed these on 
loan with the Department of Extension, 
University of Kentucky. The film was shown 
at the basketball clinics, recently conducted 
by Charlie Vettiner, and received much fav- 
orable comment. 

The film is produced under the sanction 
of the National Federation of State High 
School Athletic Associations and in coopera- 
tion with the National Basketball Commit- 
tee and the National Association of Basket- 
ball Coaches. 

The production is made possible by two 
good friends of school athletics : General 
Mills, Inc., Wheaties "Breakfast of Champ- 
ions"; and Wilson Sporting Goods Co., 
World's Largest Manufacturer of Sports 
Equipment. 

The film demonstrates original rules and 
current rules. It portrays good officiating 
procedure, continuing motion, time limits, 
responsibility during screens and dribbles, 
basket interference with animation, floor and 
free throw violations, player and team con- 
trol, substitution procedure, colorful action 
by skilled high school and university players, 
crowd scenes, and humor in costumes and 
action of by-gone days. 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1955 



Current Swimming Rules 

Editorial Note : For a number of years, the 
swimming rules have remained almost the 
same from year to year. For the 1955-56 
season, a rule which has been widely dis- 
cussed for several years has been changed. 
Director C. E. Foi'sythe (Michigan), who is 
the National Federation representative on 
the Swimming Rules Committe, has sum- 
marized the rules action authorized at the 
last meeting of the National Committee. 
Questions concerning details may be direct- 
ed to Mr. Forsythe. 

SWIMMING RULES FOR 1955-56 
By Director C. E. Forsythe (Michigan) 

At the 1955 meeting of the National 
Swimming Rules Committee, there were sev- 
eral significant actions. Decisions were in- 
fluenced by recommendations or surveys 
made by the Interscholastic Swimming 
Coaches' Association or by a member of 
members of the National Committee. In the 
case of action which involves high school 
swimming, all State Offices were contacted 
prior to the meeting so that sentiment con- 
cerning the proposed change was available. 
The following action may be of general in- 
terest. 

ELIMINATION OF HAND TOUCH IN 
FREESTYLE EVENTS— There was consid- 
erable discussion of the modification of this 
Rule which would eliminate the hand touch 
in freestyle events. It had been proposed at 
several meetings but had not been adopted 
by the Committee. This year it was decided 
that a poll should be conducted among the 
members of the Interscholastic Swimming 
Coaches' Association to determine whether 
there was sufficient sentiment to warrant 
the change in this Rule for interscholastic 
swimming. Such a poll was conducted and 
there were 73 affirmative votes and 25 in the 
negative. As a result of this expression of 
opinion. Chairman Royer of the N.C.A.A. 
Swimming Committee again contacted mem- 
bers of the Committee itself on the proposed 
change and the vote was 6 favoring the 
elimination of the hand touch, 1 abstention, 
and 3 opposed to the change. As a result of 
the majority opinion of the members of the 
Committee, the Chairman has declared that 
the hand touch is to be eliminated from inter- 
scholastic swimming freestyle events be- 
ginning with the 1955-56 season. 

BREASTSTROKE (Rule X)— The Com- 
mittee approved the retention of the present 
100 yard butterfly breaststroke for inter- 
scholastic swimming. 



INDIVIDUAL MEDLEY— The interschol- 
astic individual medley shall be 150 yards 
with the first leg butterfly or breaststroke 
to be used interchangeably or any combina- 
tion thereof; the second leg is to be back- 
stroke; and the last leg, any stroke other 
than butterfly, breaststroke or backstroke. 

MEDLEY RELAY— The interscholastic 
medley relay race is to become a 200 yard 
four-stroke relay. Four swimmers on each 
team — with each to swim one-fourth of the 
distance continuously; first: backstroke; sec- 
ond: breaststroke as prescribed in Rule 9, 
Section 1, Page 139, of the 1955 Guide ; third : 
optional-butterfly or butterfly breaststroke; 
fourth : a stroke other than backstroke, but- 
terfly, butterfly breaststroke, or breast- 

SCo'rING IN MEDLEY RELAY— The 
scoring in the interscholastic medley relay 
at dual meets is to be the same as for the 
freestyle relay composed of four men (7-0). 
Championships - six finalists: 14, 10, 8, 6, 4, 
2 ; five finalists : 12, 8, 6, 4, 2 ; four f malists : 
10, 6, 4, 2. 

FALSE START ELIMINATION— Provis- 
ions of Rule V, Section 4, Page 136 of the 
1955 Guide, do not apply to interscholastic 
dual meets. 



THE 1955-1956 BASKETBALL RULES 

(Continued from Page Five) 
der the new provision whereby the ball be- 
comes alive and the clock starts when the 
ball is legally tapped, instead of when the 
ball leaves the official's hands on the toss, 
there is more possibility for a violation be- 
fore the ball becomes alive and greater pos- 
sibility for starting a period with a throw-in. 
Illustration: At the start of a period. Jump- 
er Bl taps the ball before it reaches its higii- 
est point. It not a legal tap and therefore 
the ball is awarded to an opponent for a 
throw-in and the clock starts when the 
throw-in touches a player in the court. The 
ball remains dead when the violation occurs. 
The same procedure follows other violations 
that occur before the ball is legally tapped. 
If, because of a slow whistle, the clock is 
started, it should be stopped and re-started 
when the throw-in is touched. 

The foregoing applies only to violations. 
If a technical foul occurs before the ball is 
legally tapped, it is treated as though it were 
a foul during intermission. The free throw 
is attempted after which it is a jump ball at 
center. 

HELD BALL 

Changes in the definition of Held Ball 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1955 



Page Nine 



(4-10) provide that it is a held ball after 5 
seconds if a player in his front court, in an 
obvious attempt to consume time and while 
closely guarded, controls the ball without a 
reasonable effort to pass or shoot. Formerly 
the word "holds" was used but now it ap- 
plies to a player who is holding or dribbling 
the ball. The definition is amplified in the 
COMMENTS ON THE RULES under the 
caption HELD BALL. If the comments are 
studied, there should be no difficulty in ad- 
ministering the change. The fact that this 
additional restriction has been placed on 
player control of the ball will probably dis- 
courage this type of control. The risk of los- 
ing the ball will deter players from using 
such tactics, just as infractions of the three- 
seconds and ten-seconds rules seldom occur. 
The change gives the trailing team a slight- 
ly better chance to combat a "freeze." 



EARLY SEASON BASKETBALL QUESTIONS 

(Continued from Page One) 
be disqualified. However, if it is a situation 
in which a player intentionally pushes an 
opponent in the back when he is driving in 
for a try, it is usually considered a flagrant 
act and the player is disqualified. 

6. Play: Why was the double free throw 
for a foul in the last three minutes elimi- 
nated? 

Ruling: This was a compromise between 
those who have contended that the old pen- 
alty of one free throw for each common 
foul is severe enough and those who have 
contended that the penalty for a foul must 
be so severe that a player cannot afford to 
gamble on committing a foul. The bonus 
penalty is about 50 7o more severe than the 
1-throw penalty. The double-throw penalty 
as used last year during the last three min- 
utes is about 400% more severe than the 
1-throw penalty. It was almost 300% more 
severe than the bonus penalty. Developments 
during the season will determine whether 
the bonus penalty is severe enough to cause 
players to use every reasonable means to 
avoid committing a foul. 

7. Play: Rule 6-2 states that each period 
begins with a jump ball. Does this mean that 
if there is a violation of the jump rules prior 
to the first jump, you ignore the violation? 

Ruling: No. The new definition of the 
meaning of "a rule" (4-16A) makes it clear 
that any rules statement is made on the as- 
sumption that it is not complicated by a foul 
or a violation unless so stated or implied. 
The statement in 6-2 is, therefore, correct. 



But if a foul or violation occurs, the specific 
rule concerning such foul or violation is to 
be used. In the case of a jump ball violation, 
the violation penalty should be enforced and 
the period will then start with the throw-in. 
If a technical foul precedes the jump ball, 
the specific rule 8-5 is the one which is fol- 
lowed. This rule makes an exception for a 
foul which precedes a jump ball, it might be 
claimed that there is lack of consistency in 
handling the violation and the foul. The 
Rules Committee will probably consider this 
matter at the next meeting. It is possible 
that the exception in 8-5 should be eliminat- 
ed. This would be a step in the direction of 
avoiding exceptions wherever possible. The 
occurrence is so rare that it would not make 
much difference in actual practice. 

8. Play: Can basket interference ever oc- 
cur at a player's own basket? 

Ruling: No. Basket interference is a tech- 
nical term which includes those acts which 
are covered in Rule 9-10 ad 11. Illegal touch- 
ing of a free throw when it is in flight to- 
ward the basket or when it is on the ring 
are free throw violations with the usual free 
throw violation penalty. They are not in- 
cluded in the acts as outlined in Sections 10 
and 11. 

9. Play: Is it possible to commit a "goal 
tending" violation during a free throw? 

Ruling: Not if the technical meaning of 
"goal tending" is used. "Goal tending" ap- 
plies to the acts outlined in Rule 9-11. They 
do not apply to a free throw. 

10. Play: If a court is marked to show 
both the narrow and the wide free throw 
lanes, is it legal to use different colors for 
these markings? 

Ruling: Yes. The rules do not specify any 
color for floor markings. There may be some 
advantage in having different colors if both 
types of lane are marked. 

11. Play: If the 12-foot wide lane is being 
used, may players step into the lane as soon 
as the ball leaves the free thrower's hand ? 

Ruling: No. The Professional League has 
a modified rule of this type but in all other 
groups, it is necessary for players to avoid 
touching the floor in the lane before the ball 
has touched the basket or backboard. 

12. Play: Is the front face and each edge 
of a backboard treated the same as the floor 
inbounds ? 

Ruling: In most respects, it is the same. 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1955 



It differs in two ways, (a) If a player throws 
the ball to the floor and touches it again, 
it is a dribble but if he throws it against his 
own backboard, it is not a dribble, (b) If a 
try for field goal or free throw touches the 
floor, the try is ended but if it touches the 
face or edge of the backboard, the try is not 
ended. 

13. Play: On jump ball between Al and Bl, 
A2 is in the cylinder simultaneously with the 
tapping of the ball. Is this a violation? 

Ruling: No. To be a violation, the entry 
must be "before" the tap. 

14. Play: On jump ball, A2 is in the 
cylinder too soon. Players do not hear the 
whistle and play continues with the timer 
erroneously starting the clock and allowing 
it to run. Should the Officials order the clock 
set back? 

Ruling: Usually the lesser of several evils 
is to assume that no correction can be made. 
However, in certain cases where, with only 
a few seconds remaining, the error is es- 
pecially significant, the Official has author- 
ity to arbitrarily state that a given number 
of seconds remain to be played. He will do 
this only in extreme cases where it is ob- 
vious that the outcome of the game may be 
determined by the error. 

15. Play: What experimental projects are 
being sponsored? 

Ruling: Several large high school groups 
are experimenting with the wide free throw 
lane. Data is being collected concerning 
basketball nets so that the most advantag- 
eous net length and distance from the ring 
to the nearest knotted loops can be deter- 
mined. Because of the potential danger in 
the lower part of the rectangular backboard, 
a study is being made to determine whether 
the lower part of such backboard should be 
eliminated. Various types of time limit on 
control in the front court are being tried. 
A further expansion of the 5-second limit 
on a dribble in the front court is being ob- 
served. This would apply the 5-second limit 
to any situation which appears to involve an 
attempt to consume time and regardless of 
where it occurs in the front court. 

16. Play: Is a properly constructed rubber- 
covered basketball legal ? Also, what is the 
meaning of "properly constructed"? 

Ruling: For the current season, a rubber- 
covered basketball can be used only when 
both teams agree to its use. Beginning with 
the season of 1956-57, such ball will have the 
same standing as a leather-covered basket- 



ball as far as high school and Y.M.C.A. are 
concerned. To avoid the difficulties which 
might come from attempts to use a poorly 
constructed beach ball, the high school or- 
ganization conducts a testing and approval 
plan so that only those balls which have the 
proper reaction are included in the term 
"properly constructed." A list of the trade 
names and numbers of such balls may be 
secured from the National Federation or the 
State High School Association office. 

17. Play: Are the scenes and rulings in 
the new film "Better Basketball" approved? 

Ruling: Yes. This film was supervised by 
representatives of the National Federation, 
the National Basketball Committee and the 
National Basketball Coaches' Association. 
All rulings are in accordance with the of- 
ficial rules. 

18. Play: Since a jump ball does not start 
until the ball is legally tapped, do violations 
such as being in the cylinder too soon occur 
during dead ball (before the jump) or dur- 
ing live ball (during or after the jump) ? 

Ruling: They occur during dead ball and 
prior to the jump. The use of the term "dur- 
ing the jump" as used in 9-6 must be inter- 
preted to mean "during activity connected 
with the jump ball." This also has a bearing 
on violations which occur just prior to the 
starting of a period. In previous years, the 
violation occurred after the ball became alive 
and the period had started. Now they occur 
before the live ball and this raises questions 
about whether a period may start with a 
throw-in. See Play 7 above for comment. 

*~19. Play: If Al and Bl flagrantly foul 
each other during dead ball so that 2 throws 
are awarded for each foul and the players 
disqualified, who may throw the free throws ? 

Ruling: Any other player or entering sub- 
stitute. There might be a different free 
thrower for each throw. The last throw is 
followed by jump ball at center as after any 
false double foul. Official will ordinarily take 
ball to the free throw line nearest spot of the 
foul for the first pair of throws. 

20. Play: If the above false double foul 
occurs just prior to the starting of a 2nd 
extra period, is the extra period played? 

Ruling: If one team scores 2 points on the 
free throws and the other team does not, it 
results in a team scoring 2 points "after the 
first extra period has ended" (5-7) and the 
game is ended. Otherwise, the 2nd extra 
period is played. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1955 



Page Eleven 



Here and There 

MORE OR LESS PERSONAL : C. W. Whit- 
ten celebrated his 84th birthday last Aug- 
ust at his home at 121 Kingston Street, 
South, in St. Petersburg, Florida. 

P. F. Neverman, formerly Secretary of the 
Wisconsin Interscholastic Athletic Associa- 
tion, is enjoying his retirement at his home 
in Marinette, Wisconsin. He maintains his 
usual interest in all matters pertaining to 
school athletic activities. 

Secretary LaFayette Golden (Florida) is 
back on the job for a short time each week, 
after having been confined to a hospital with 
a heart ailment. Headquarters are now in 
the newly constructed office building which 
is owned by the Florida Association. 

Mitchel (Mitch) Ferguson, who served as 
President of the Florida Association for a 
number of years, is now connected with the 
State Department of Public Instruction with 
headquarters at Tallahassee. 

Principal John Sexton of Northeast High 
School in St. Petersburg, Florida, will as- 
sist with the filming of the new baseball pic- 
ture. He helped supervise the picture "Foot- 
ball-by-the-Code" which was made in St. 
Petersburg several years ago.. 

PUBLICATION DEVELOPMENTS: The 
North Dakota Association is the latest to 
make the transition to a monthly printed 
magazine. The first "Activities Bulletin" was 
issued in September. It is attractively print- 
ed in a 2-color cover and a 3-column make-up. 
The first issue was 8 printed pages in a size 
of 81/2 by 11. 

The West Virginia "Interscholastic" made 
its appearance in September. It replaces the 
West Virginia "Athlete." The new publica- 
tion is attractively made up with a 2-column 
make-up and 20 printed pages. One way in 
which this magazine differs from most of the 
other State Association publications is in the 
fact that the make-up for page 1 is such as 
to be a substitute for a cover. The masthead 
is attractive and incorporates a new artistic 
design for the State Association seal. 

BASEBALL ACTIVITY: The National 
Federation Baseball Committee met in Chi- 
cago on October 17 and 18. The rules for the 
season of 1956 were made up and plans were 
made for baseball activity to be conducted 
during the year. These activities include the 
making of a new baseball film under the di- 
rection of the Official Sports Film Service. 
A. A. Schabinjger and William Runyon will 
jointly direct the film. Mr. Runyon will be- 
come associated with the Official Sports Film 



Service, beginning January 1. The filming 
will be done in the vicinity of St. Petersburg, 
Florida during the latter part of April. The 
film will be ready for preview in time for 
the annual Federation meeting in June. 
The Joint Baseball Committee program 
(Continued on Page Twelve) 



Girls' and Women's Sports News 

by Betty Langley 

Dot Harkins acted as Secretary in the ab- 
sence of Loyce Meadows at our sectional 
meeting of the Fall Conference of the K.A.H. 
P.E.R., held at Kenlake Hotel on October 
7-9. Plans were made for a student-sponsor 
meeting of all G.S.A.'s in the state, to be held 
in the Western College gym, Bowling Green, 
November 5. 

By the time this issue of the ATHLETE 
comes from the press, the Bowling Green 
meeting will have been held. It was hoped 
that a large representation from throughout 
the state would be present in order that dis- 
trict representatives could be appointed. 
Each of the eleven districts of the state has 
one faculty and one student representative. 
If invitations failed to reach any Girls Sports 
Associations, those interested in receiving 
more information concerning the state or- 
ganization should send cards of inquiry to 
Betty Langley, College High School, Bowling 
Green. 

At the present time we have fourteen paid 
members in our newly formed Kentucky 
Federation of High School Girls Sports As- 
sociations. Following is a list of sponsors 
and member schools: 

Miss Betty Langley (President), College 
High School, Bowling Green; Miss Loyce 
Meadows (Secretary), Highlands High 
School, Ft. Thomas ; Miss Robye Anderson 
(Treasurer), Bowling Green High School; 
Mrs. Howard F. Harkins, Greenville High 
School; Mrs. Dew DroD Rowlett, Murray 
High School; Miss Dorothy Honaker, Lafay- 
ette High School, Lexington ; Miss Charlotte 
McGire, Lloyd High School, Erlanger; Belle- 
vue High School ; Mr. James T. Vest, Walton- 
Verona High School, Walton; Mrs. George 
Sadler, Hiseville High School ; Mrs. Emilie 
Gregg, Atherton High School, Louisville ; 
Miss Hazel Kinslow, Male and Girls High 
School, Louisville ; Mr. Charles Irwin, South 
Christian High School, Herndon; Miss Jean 
S. Jewell, Daviess County High School, 
Owensboro. 

Membership dues are $2.00 per year. Dues 
should be sent to Miss Robye Anderson, 
Treasurer, at the Bowling Green High School. 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1955 



HERE AND THERE 

(Continued from Page Eleven) 
similar to that which has been in effect for 
the past several years has been outlined 
and will be followed provided it is approved 
by the Professional Baseball organization. 
Professional Baseball has subsidized this 
program to encourage giving baseball atten- 
tion similar to that which has been accorded 
football and basketball. 

The new baseball pul:lications will be 
printed during December and early January 
in time for use at meetings which precede 
the opening of the baseball season. 

JANUARY MEETINGS: Several import- 
ant meetings are being held at Nashville, 
Tennessee during the period from January 
4 to January 7. The National Federation 
Executive Committee will meet Wednesday 
morning and afternoon, January 4. State 
Executives who are interested in non-athletic 
activities will have a conference on Wednes- 
day night, January 4. The National Federa- 
tion Football Committee will meet Thursday 
morning and afternoon and Friday morning 
and afternoon, January 5 and 6. The State 
Executive Officers will meet on Friday night 
and Saturday morning, January 6 and 7. The 
Program Committee for the non-athletic ac- 
tivities is made up of M. F. Sprunger 
(Illinois), Chairman; A. Oden Hawes (Ore- 
gon); and J. F. Jiacoletti (Wyoming). The 
Program Committee for the Executive Of- 
ficers Session is made up of Secretary Fos- 
ter Bridges (Tennessee) ; Commissioner T. 
A. Sanford (Kentucky) ; and the National 
Federation Executive Secretary. 

FOOTBALL ACTIVITY: Several import- 
ant safety projects are being sponsored. 
One of these includes a detailed study of dif- 
ferent types of mouthguards and face pro- 
tectors. Data are being collected concerning 
the advantages and disadvantages of each 
type of protector. Another study involves a 
survev of all serious injuries. In past years, 
data have been collected to determine the 
exact cause of those injuries which resulted 
in death. The new survey has been expanded 
to include an injury which involves a long 
period of medical care. Through this survey, 
it will be possible to determine the exact 
type of play during which the injury occurs 
and possible related causes. 

All of the above data will be made avail- 
able for an equipment conference which is 
being held in (Chicago on Monday, December 
19. At this conference, representatives from 
manufacturers of athletic equipment will be 
in attendance. The Federation will be repre- 



sented by the chairmen of those committees 
which are directly interested in safety fac- 
tors and by others from nearby State As- 
sociations. The conference is designed to 
provide full information as to recent activi- 
ties to make the game safer and to permit 
the adoption of minimum standards for items 
such as face protectors, shoe cleats and other 
apparatus. Following the equipment confer- 
ence, full report will be made at the meeting 
of the National Federation Football Com- 
mittee at Nashville. Tennessee on January 5. 



THE FLYING DUTCHMAN 

(Continued from Page Seven) 
himself by spending two days in August in 
the School for Officials in Lexington, and 
then showed up for the training clinics at 
both Owensboro and Henderson Young of- 
ficials wanting to break into officiating 
would do well to follow Billy's example, get 
as much training as possible, and officiate 
at every opportunity, whether for pay or 
experience. 

More than 2500 officials, coaches, players 
and spectators jammed into the fourteen 
sessions which were held. To this group at 
Hazard we should add twenty-five young 
ladies who lead the cheers in the mountain 
area. Their presence was gratifyinq: because 
cheerleaders can do much toward developing 
and maintaining the proper attitude of 
sportsmanship among the spectators. Every- 
body in attendance was in accord in »cclaim- 
in? the motion picture film on officiating, 
which was shown, to be one of the finest ad- 
ditions ever made to the annual rules ses- 
sions. 

As we conclude this month's column, let us 
add a reminder to send your nominations for 
the Game Guy Award, Com Cob Pine Award 
and Abou Ben Adhem Award to The Flying 
Dutchman immediately when you locate in- 
dividuals or communities whom you think 
qualify for the honor. 



Mack Hughes can photograph any event at 

your school. 
Motion pictures taken and developed within hours. 
Let Mack Hughes take a movie of your basketball 

games for aid in coaching and good will. 
24-hoiir service on developing your own movies 

if you use Blue Base or duPont film. 



Write for prices and details. 

MACK HUGHES 

Photographer 

.50.3 E. High Ph. 26470 Lexington 

Also complete photo supplies 



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Why not let us have your order for basketballs 
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Corbin Football Team-Kentucky's Best Says Litkenbous 
Southeastern Kentucky Conference Champion 



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H B irii ii nil f 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Lanham, Ellison, R. Wilder, Bill Howard, Riley, Bird, 
Queary, Bob Howard. Second Row: McGowan, D. Chandler, Bailey, Steely, Green, 
V. Wilder, Wyatt, Hoskins. Third Row: Miller, Meadors, Poynter, Alsip, Turner, 
Boone, McBurney, M. Chandler. Fourth Row: Mgr. B. Hodge, Bible, Sealf, M. Howard, 
Williams, Jones, Garrison, Bunch, Phillips, Mgr. E. Hodge. 



Corbin 25— Bell County 6 
Corbin 33 — Henry Clay 
Corbin 39 — Pineville 
Corbin 7 — Manual 
Corbin 46 — Middlesboro 
Corbin 76 — Barbourville 



Corbin 45 — Somerset 6 
Corbin 34— Danville 20 
Corbin 61 — Williamsburg 6 
Corbin 56 — Knox Central 
Corbin 27 — Newport 21 



Oiiicial Organ ol the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN, 

DECEMBER - 1955 



tp 



CATLETTSBURG— NORTHEASTERN KENTUCKY CONFERENCE CH^MP'ON 




(Left to Eight) Front Row: Bice, McKcnzie, Sloan, Alley, Hemmele, Co-Capt. Mulletle (i.-Capt. Spaulding, 
Ross. Johnson, Conley. Chaffin, Hedrick, Coach Snyder. Second Row: McWain. Wellman, P Rice. Vaughn, May, 
Nunley, Brown, T. Stewart. Craft, Jordan, Ray, Wynne, Home. Strait. Third Row. Ciider, Biewer. Robinson, 
Flint, Stewart. Bernard. Branham, Davis. Clark, J. Rice, Howell. Burke. Earl, Elliott, Griffith. 



DIXIE HEIGHTS— NORTHERN KENTUCKY CONFERENCE CHAMPION 




((Left to Right) Front Row: Ass't. Coaches Phillips, Perkins. Walsh, McKcnney. Second Row 
Beach, Walker, Ross, Fletcher, Bolton, Heckman, Regan, Fry. E. Isaacs, Centers. Third Row : Scott. Murphy, 
Huber, Weaver. Eveleth. Ziegler, Pack, Martin, Eger, Rube, McKibben, Kappas, Vieth, Riechert, Dopp, Head Coach 
Shannon. Fourth Row: Farris. Shearer, Connors. Collins. Steele, Stickrod, Shulz, B. Steele, Reckner. 



HARRODSBURG— CENTRAL KENTUCKY CONFERENCE CHAMPION 




^ % t^- 



if t * %i * I. \ . I j 







(Lcfi I,, IJii/hti ]-,-,,,,t 
Second Row: Mgr. Coodpast 
Row ; Ass't. Coach Leedy. 
Freeman, Coach Rose. 



w: l.vkiiis, li Hi,sli,,|,, |{;ai„l,.ll. Cintsiiii.'.-i Hili '1 Mntin (., iipbell, D. Bishop, 
U. Martin, Howell, Brown, Parks. Claunch, I Ma. tin. Motley, Wampler. Third 
'ans. Co-Capt. Isham, Burton, Stratton, Co-Capt. Allison, Hood, Sherrow, Darnell. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XVIII— No. 5 



DECEMBER, 1955 



.00 Per Year 



Early Season Basketball Questions — Installment 2 

24. Play: A 6 foot 10 inch player stands in the 
outer half of his free throw circle or in that vicinity 
and holds the ball above his head so that no oppon- 
ent can reach it without committing' a foul. It is a 
situation where it is to his advantage to consume 
time. Does the 5-second held ball rule apply? 

Ruling: The Note under Rule 4-10 states that 
the 5-second time limit "normally" does not apply 
to such area. In the outlined situation, any Official 
would be justified in regarding it as an "abnormal" 
situation and he has authority to apply the 5-second 
time limit. 

25. Play: On a last free throw which is missed 
or on a try for field goal which is missed, A2 gets 
the rebound in his front court. He then dribbles to 
his back court. Is this legal ? 

Ruling: No. 

26. Play: On throw-in by Al from outside his 
back court, the pass is near the center division line 
when A2 leaps from his front court, catches the ball 
and alights in his back court. Is this a violation? 

Ruling: Yes. Since the position of A2 while in 
flight is the same as it was when he last touched 
the floor, A2 is in the front court when he first 
touches the ball. This is in accordance with Rule 
4-13. When he then alights in the back court, the 
ball is in the back court and it has been caused to 
go there by A2 who was in control as soon as he 
caught the ball. 

Comment: A similar situation might occur 
when A2 is in his front court when he taps the 
throw-in and it goes into the back coui-t. However, 
in this latter situation, the legality of the play de- 
pends on whether A2 was in control when he tapped 
the ball. Ordinarily, in the case of the ball being 
tapped, the Official leans toward calling it an un- 
controlled tap, i.e., an attempt to get the ball in a 
position where control can be secured. If there is no 
control, the outlined action is not a violation. 

27. Play: Wliile ball is rolling on the floor, Al 
requests time-out and the Official inadvertently 
grants it. What is the penalty? 

Ruling: No penalty is prescribed since this is an 
error by the Official. The time-out should be 
charged to the requesting team and the full one 
minute should be allowed. Several years ago this 
resulted in a triple penalty, i.e., a technical foul as 
well as a charged time-out and cancellation of the 
rest period which usually follows the granting of 
a time-out. It was felt that such a penalty was not 
justified. Responsibility is now placed on the Official 
to avoid granting a time-out unless there is player 
control, i.e., unless a player of the requesting team 
is either holding or dribbling the ball. 

28. Play: Al travels and ball is awarded out 
of bounds to Bl. At the time, 3 seconds remain to 
be played. On the throw-in, B2 gets the ball and 
scores. The Timer failed to start the clock. Should 
the score count ? 

(Continued on Page Ten) 



Editor's Note: These rulings do not set aside or modify any 
rule. They are interpretations on some of the early season 
situations which have been presented. 

21. Play: During jump between Al and Bl, 
Al jumps through the plane of the circle dividing 
line and into Bl. Contact is made: (a) on the way 
up; or (b) as jumpers come down after the tap. 

Ruling: Under current rule, ball does not become 
alive until it has been legally tapped. Hence, if con- 
tact is made while jumpers are rising as in (a), 
it occurs during dead ball. If the contact is con- 
sidered illegal, it is a technical foul. In most cases 
of this kind, the contact will be because of an at- 
tempt to gain an advantage through unbalancing- the 
opponent. If so, a technical foul should be called. 
In (b), it is a foul during live ball and results in a 
bonus penalty. 

Comment: The modified rule which specifies 
that the ball does not become alive until it is legally 
tapped, has resulted in a number of related changes. 
It is possible that there would be fewer irregular 
situations if the rule were changed to specify that 
the ball becomes alive when it leaves the Official's 
hand on a toss, even though the clock does not start 
until it has been legally tapped. This matter will be 
studied for possible action at the next meeting of 
the Rules Committee. 

22. Play: On jump ball between Al and Bl, 
ball is legally tapped: (a) by Al; or (b) simultan- 
eously by both jumpers. In either case, it goes direct- 
ly out of bounds. Are these legal taps ? And when 
does the clock start? 

Ruling: In either case, it is a legal tap and the 
clock starts with the tap. In (a), it continues to run 
during the throw-in unless the clock is stopped be- 
cause it rolls into the crowd and causes delay. In 
(b), it stops as soon as ball is out of bounds be- 
cause it results in another jump ball. 

23. Play: During jump between Al and Bl in 
A's free throw circle, Bl illegally jumps into Al 
while he is in the act of tapping the ball. The tapped 
ball: (a) goes in the basket, or (b) misses the 
basket. Does the foul kill the ball ? How many free 
throws are awarded ? 

Ruling: Since the act of batting the ball to- 
ward the basket is included as a part of "continuing 
motion" as outlined in the Note under 10-7, the foul 
does not kill the ball. Since the foul occurs before 
the tap, it is a dead ball foul and, therefore, tech- 
nical. One free throw is awarded. 

Comment: If this foul were personal, some un- 
usual problems would be created. If the tapped ball 
fell in the basket, the goal would count unless it is 
ruled that it is a "controlled bat" and, therefore, a 
try for field goal. If it is so ruled, Al has violated 
the jumping rule because of having "caught" the 
tossed ball. If it is not a controlled bat and, hence, 
is not a try for goal, it is not a foul against a 
thrower. The bonus penalty would be assessed even 
though a goal has been scored. 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1955 



DECEMBER, 1955 VOL. XVUI— NO. 5 

Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association. 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Russell Williamson (1952-56), Inez 

Vice-President Roy G. Eversole (1952-56), Hazard 

Directors — W. B. Jones (1953-67) Somerset; Louis Litchfield 
1953-57), Marion; W. H. Crowdus (1954-58), Franklin; Jack 
Dawson (1954-58), Middletown ; Robert P. Forsythe (1955-59) 
Browder; K. G. Gillaspie (1955-59), Georgetown. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 



Jrom the Ci 



ommissionei s 



Offi 



ice 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1. 1955 Football Participation List 

2. School's Report on Football Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Football) 



State Tournament Information 

The 1956 State High School Basketball Tourna- 
ment will be held in the University of Kentucky 
Coliseum, Lexington, on March 14-17. The first ses- 
sion is scheduled for Wednesday night. Three ses- 
sions will be held on Thursday, two on Friday, and 
two on Saturday. 

At some time In the month of January the 
Commissioner will send K.H.S.A.A. member schools 
forms which may be used in requesting passes to 
the tournament. 

Complete sets of tickets are priced at $8.00 (end 
seats), $10.00 (side seats — stadium type), $12.00 
(side seats, stadium type and chair back), and $16.00 
(box seats near the floor). The general sale of 
tickets (not school orders) will be conducted by 
State Tournament Ticket Sales, P. 0. Box 1173, 
Lexington. These orders should not be placed before 
January 1. The amount of 35c should be added to 
each remittance to pay for postage and insurance 
charges. Orders mailed prior to January 1 will re- 
ceive a lower priority than those mailed on that 
date. 

Delegate Assembly Members 

Members to the Delegate Assembly at the 
forthcoming 1956 annual meeting of the Associa- 
tion were elected by the principals of K.H.S.A.A. 
member schools on ballots returned to the State 
Office before November 15. There were several ties 
in the voting for delegate and alternate. These ties 
were broken recently hj the Board of Control, the 
delegates or alternates involved being determined 
by lot. The names of the district representatives are 
as follows: 

Delegates 

(1) James H. Phillips, (2) A. L. Roberts, (3) 
Conrad Carroll, (4) Joe P. Duke, (5) Frank Wright, 
(6) James Solomon. (7) Aubrey M. Inglis, (8) O. 
P. Hurt, (9) J. D. Rayburn, (10) Thomas Brantley, 
(11) Paul Phillips, (12) W. B. Svdnor, Jr., (13) 
M. E. Swain, (14) W. O. Warren, Jr., (15) Charles 
Combs, (16) Ben Topmiller. Jr., (17) Buddy Cate, 
(18) B. H. Weaver, (19) James E. Bazzel'l, (20) 
John C. Marrs, (21) Ted Cook, (22) Wilbur Smith, 
(23) Herschel Roberts, (24) H. T. Cooper, (25) 



Brother Mark, C.F.X., (26) T. T. Knight, (30) W. 
R. Martin, (31) Roy H. Dorsey, (32) Cyrus E. 
Greene, (33) R. C. Hmsdale, (34) Edgar McNabb, 
(35) Alton D. Rudolph, (36) Kenneth Kuhnert, (37) 
Tony Raisor, (38) W. H. Hanson, (39) Earle D. 
Jones, (40) Willard Sandidge, (41) Alan Parr, (42) 
V. E. Whitaker, (43) John Heber, (44) James B. 
Moore, (45) Harold Murphy, (46) Denzil J. Ramsey, 
(47) Dewev Ball, (48) Gilbert Samples, (49) David 
C. Jackson, (50) R. H. Playforth, (51) Clyde T. 
Lassiter, (52) Earl Bradford, (53) Heni-y Ed Wright, 
(54) Warren Cooper, (55) Millard Tolliver, (56) 
W. C. Stevens, (57) Arthur Mullins, (58) Ray Hein- 
isch, (59) Oran C. Teater, (60) Creed Arnett, (61) 
E. G. Jones, (62) Burl Kincaid, (63) Max E. Cal- 
houn, (64) Charles C. Snyder. 
Alternates 
(1) E. L. Clark, (2) Ralph McRight, (3) Howard 
V. Reid, (4) William B. Miller, (5) Denzil Mefford, 
(6) Fred Clayton, (7) Jewel Logan, (8) Bill Bran- 
nock, (9) James Lynch, (10) W. W. White, (11) 
Hugh Noff singer, (12) George Claiborne, (13) 
Edwin J. Mayes, (14) Bowman Davenport, (15) 
Bill Leach, (16) Roy Withrow, (17) Andrew Renick, 
(18) Dencil Miller, (19) T. C. Simmons, (20) Cortez 
Butler, (21) Eugene E. Tate, (22) James Edwards, 
(23) Dellard Moor, (24) E. E. Rodgers, (25) Brother 
Dominic, C.F.X., (26) John W. Trapp, (30) Harding 
Lowry, (31) Robert L. Pay, (32) Palmore Lyles, 
(33) Chester Goodridge, (34) Tom Ellis, (35) F. I. 
Satterlee, (36) Rev. John V. Hegenauer, (37) Joe 
H. Anderson, (38) Jarvis Parsley, (39) Glennon B. 
Ison, (40) Joe E. Sabel, (41) Eddie Ward, (42) 
Carl Mahan, (43) Bill Maxwell, (44) Roy N. Walters, 
(45) Stanley Marsee, (46) Clyde Linville, (47) John 
M. Wilson, (48) Clark E. Chesnut, (49) Ed Mills, 
(50) Charles Black, Jr., (51) James Pursifull, (52) 
Charles A. Davis, (53) Benton Back, (54) Ray 
Howard, (55) Morton Combs, (56) Bill Orme, (57) 
Monroe Hall, (58) Adrian Hall, (56) Claude Mills, 
(60) Herman Bolin, (61) E. W. Clark, (62) John 
Allen, (63) Andrew J. Fultz, (64) Bob LaVoy. 



State Y.M.C.A. Youth Day 

The Fifth Annual Youth Day and Cheerleaders' 
Clinic on Sportsmanship, under the auspices of the 
Kentucky State Y.M.C.A., was held on Saturday, 
November 12, at the University of Kentucky. More 
than three thousand high school students attended. 
Three concurrent meetings were held, beginning at 
10:00 A. M. Cheerleaders met in Alumni Gymnas- 
ium, majorettes in Guignol Theatre, and all other 
students in the Coliseum. 

The purpose of the Youth Day was to en- 
courage high school students to go to college, and to 
give them an idea of what the University of Ken- 
tucky offers students. An excellent program had 
been prepared, which included the University brass 
choir, troupers, short addresses, demonstration by 
the varsity basketball team, a short concert by the 
Men's Glee Club, and a dramatic skit. Walter Hall, 
Warren Lutz, and Don Wilson were in charge of 
the session for majorettes. 

The purpose of the clinic for cheerleaders was 
to build greater sportsmanship in high school ath- 
letics. A. D. Litchfield, State Secretary of the 
Y.M.C.A. of Kentucky, presided. Members of his 
panel were: Bemie A. Shively, Director of Athletics, 
University of Kentucky; Ed Ashford, Sports Editor, 
Lexington Herald; Johnny Carrico, Assistant Sports 
Editor, Louisville Courier- Journal; Claude Sullivan, 
Sports Announcer, Radio Station WVLK; George 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1955 



Page Three 



Walsh, Sports Announcer, Radio Station WHAS; 
and "Cookie" Grawemeyer, Captain of the Univer- 
sity of Kentucky basketball team. 

Following the panel, Mrs. Stella Gilb of the 
U. K. staff led a demonstration of good and bad 
cheering. She was assisted by cheerleaders of the 
University, Lexington Catholic, Henry Clay, and 
Lafayette high schools. SuKy and the University 
cheerleaders worked vwth the high school cheer- 
leaders for a program to be given later on the 
football field. 

Cheerleaders and majorettes attended the 
Memphis State-Kentucky football game in their 
school uniforms and appeared on the field im- 
mediately preceding the game for a program in 
which the majorettes, accompanied by the Henry 
Clay and Lafayette bands, gave a demonstration 
of twirling. The cheerleaders joined the University 
cheerleaders in giving a yell for the two teams. 

This was the third of three such programs 
held under the auspices of the Kentucky State 
Y.M.C.A. this year. On October 22, more than 325 
cheerleaders from 52 high schools participated in a 
clinic at Western Kentucky State College. On Nov- 
ember 5, 300 attended the Youth Day and Cheer- 
leaders' Clinic at Kentucky State College. 

SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED FOOTBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled December 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone unless otherwise designated. If two numbers 
are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Bates, Pervis M., Athletic Officer, 3rd Armored Division, 

Fort Knox, 2723, 2723 
Lloyd, Julius C, Athletic N.C.O., 3rd Armored Division, 

Fort Knox, 2723, 2723 
McNabb, Edgar, 137 Pleasant Ridge, So. Fort Mitchell, 

Ed 3113, Ed 1220 
Rice, Thomas A., Special Service, 3rd Armored Division, Fort 

Kno.x, 2723, 2723 
Shemelya, Ed, 449 S. Ashland, Lexington, 32011 
Snider, Louis G., No. 14 Grafton Hall Road, Route 6, Valley 

Station, 76128, Cherokee 7511, Ext. 644 
Wing, Howard R., Jr. 3001 Frazier, Covington, Ju 1-8707 
Zumar, John M., SSO, 3rd Armored Division, Fort Knox, 

2723, 2723 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled December 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone unless otherwise designated. If two numbers 
are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Abell, James A., Burna 

Andrews, Earl, Asbury College, Wilmore, 9141, 9141 

Baesler, Robert A.. Route 7, Lexington, 46173 

Baird, Bill, Box 493, First Street, Harlan, 9152, 9162 

Baker, Roger K., Crab Orchard 

Baker, Samuel, Stanton, 2255 

Ball, Denver, Ashland High School, Ashland 

Ballard, Jack H., Box 271, Barbourville, 371-L 

Barker, Donald, 209 Bibb, Campbellsville, 173 W, 156 

Barlow, James L., 282 So. Ashland, Lexington, 4-9287, 2-5868 

Basham, James L., Jr., 511 Lee Rd., Elizabethtown, 5286 (Bus. 

No.) 
Bates, Pervis M., Athletic Officer, 3rd Armored Division, 

Fort Knox, 2723, 2723 
Baumeyer, William A., 1640 A John St., Evansville, Indiana, 

Ha 25898 
Beasley, Maurice, P. O. Box 221, Caneyville, 30 (Bus. No.) 
Blackburn, Bill, Box 267, Barbourville, 187, 169 
Blumer, Sherry, 376 Park Ave., Lexington, 3-0312 
Brantley, Alfred C. Box 253, Madisonville, 1880, 1880 
Butts, Delbert L., Bethlehem, Pleasureville 2716 
Carpenter, Leonard F., P. O. Box 217, Salyersville 
Carr, William R., 501 Military St., Georgetown 
Case, Martin A., Asbury Seminary, Wilmore, 2084, 9131 
Caudill, Gary A., Cline St., Pikeville, 811 
Clark, Owen B., Route 3, Georgetown, 955-M 
Collier, Jack W., SSO, 3rd Armored Division, Fort Knox, 3264, 



Combs, Roy B., 132 E. Gray, Louisville, Wa 6201 



Compton, Marvin L., 1266 Kentucky St., Bowling Green, 3-8186 

Conley, Billy Lee, Box 205, Van Lear, 697-W, 397 R-2 

Coomer, Charles, Jr., Box 476, Somerset, 1322-W 

Cox, Ralph, Box 655, Benham 

Cunningham, Julian, Butler High School, Butler 

Dami-on, O. P., c/o Conn Motel, P. O. Box 665, Piketon, Ohio, 

9481, 3610 
Damron, William B., Valley High School, Lucasville, Ohio 
Denney, Billy L., 2600 Nolte St., Ashland 
Deskins, Tilden, Phelps 

Dexter, Glenn E., Route 6, Paducah, 31872 
Dixon, Sam, Appalachia High School, Appalachia, Virginia 
Downing. Thomas E., Gamaliel, 7-2341 (Bus. No.) 
Elliott, Carroll Lee, P. O. Box 41, Hodgenville, 2302, 262 
Farciuharson, Bill, P. O. Box 301, Matewan, W. Va. 
Fey, Allen, 123 Garden Way, Fort Thomas, Hi 1-6288, Ki 1-1800, 

Ext. 1265 
Fitchko, Bill, Norton, Virginia 

Forrest Billy Joe, 401 W. State Line, Fulton, 1019-J 
Fraley, James. 417 Main St., Mt. Sterling 
Fraley, William L., 242 A McCracken Drive, Lexington, 

33847, 33847 
Fultz, .Tack, Olive Hill, 3661, 4591 
Gamble, Gerald, 108 Highland Ave., Earlington, 5435 
Gibson, Romulus, Box 212, Campbellsville, 2630, 2530 
Goranflo, B. E., 133 Bonner Ave., Louisville 7, Anch 912 
Grace, H. E., Jr., Middlesboro, 413-J, 177-J 
Graehler. Albert J., 820 Hazel St., Louisville, Cypress 1539, 

Amherst 2514 
Green, Walter, 113 Laurel, Pineville 
Greenslait, James, Brown St., Raceland 
Gritton, Robert Andrew, 794 W. Office, Harrodsburg 
GuiHoil, Bobby Austin, Route 7, Lexington, 45443 
Hackworth, Harvey, Route 3, Owensboro 
Hall, Mallam, McHenry, 4668 

Hamby, Larry B., P. O. Box 41, Nortonville, 3364 
Hammonds, Brooks, Lovelaceville 

Hampton, Darrel C, c/o Butler County High School, Morgan- 
town, Logansport Exchange, La 63062 
Harris, James L., 401 Locust, Providence, 2736, 2474 
Harris, Jerry Lee, Route 1, Rockhold, Corbin 1064 J-I 
Head, Elmo C, 113 Alton Road, Shelbyville, 1273-W, 142 
Herndon, Alton E.. Route 5, Paducah, 22818 
Himes, Harold, Asbury Seminary, Wilmore 
Hinton. David, 237 West Main, Greenville, 1163 E 
Hobbs, Ralph E., 259 Riverside Drive, Owensboro, MU 33473, 

MU 36445 
Hogg, Bill. 1291 Glider St.. Bowmanfield Apts., Louisville, 

Glendale 84822, Anch. 910 
Hoover, Ermon, Jr., 1662 Koch Ave., Evansville, Indiana, 

Gr 68295, Ha 63311, Ext. 69 
Howard, Joe M., 713 Oaks Road, Paducah, 31969, 56311, Ext. 204 
Howard, Oscar D., 635 Mt. View Ave., Pineville 
Howard, Ray, Hyden, 12 F 3 

Hubbard, Frank L., P. O. Box 246, Fort Gay, W. Va. 
Hubbard. George F., P. O. Box 246, Fort Gay, W. Va. 
Hubbard, Joel M., Morehead State College, P. O. Box 481, 

Morehead 
Hummer, Irby, 110 College Heights, Hodgenville, 2003, 2003 
Hunter, Charles, Evarts, 791 

Hyatt, Robert L., 1291 Airway Court, Louisville 6 
Joiner, William, 403 N. 16th St., Murray, 1481-W 
Kastner, Alfred .!., 6797 Kennedy Ave., Cincinnati 13, Ohio, 

El 12426, P & G Co., Ivory Dale 
Kok, George W., Route 5. Janna Drive, Valley Station, 

79330, Gl 47511, Ext. 532 
Lambert, Kenneth L., 2221 Bayard Park Drive, Evansville, 

Indiana, 6-6146, 6-5262 
Lawson, Sam, 816 Ridge Ave., Norton, Virginia 
Layman, D. Fred, S.P.O. Box 23, Wilmore, 9131 
Leathers, Ollie, 6 Tanner Drive, Frankfort, 44116, 48030 
Lequire, Harold M., P. O. Box 507, Harlan, 1123 
Levicki, A. P.. c/o Norton City School Board, Norton, Va. 
Littral, James W., 460 Locust, Lexington, 30354, 33335, Station 1 
Llewellyn, Charles S., 110 Spring, Wilmore, 9161 
Lloyd, Julius C, Athletic N.C.O., 3rd Armored Division, 

Fort Knox, 2723, 2723 
Logsdon, David L., 1160 Lincoln, Louisville, Me 73192, Ar 3921 
Long, James H., 606 N. Main, Deshoge, Missouri, 809M 
Luckett, Gale, Route 5, Madison, Indiana, 73851, 4238 
Lusby, George, 508 Clayton, Georgetown, 1334 
McBride, Donald R., 848 Bennett Ave., Lexington, 46610 (Bus. 

No.) 
McCuiston. Pat M., Pembroke, Gr 54232, Tu 56301 
McNabb, Edgar, 137 Pleasant Ridge, So. Fort Mitchell, Ed 

3113, Ed 1220 
Mattingly, Jimmy, 2400 Fleet, Louisville, Ma 1018 
Mayes, John T., 684 Longview, Lexington, 20269 
Menshouse, Glen, 432 Bellefonte Road, Ashland 
Miller, Bob, 630 Berry Ave., Bellevue, Co 16656, Co 12860 
Miller, Lonnie, Wakefield, Ohio, Piketon 3510 (Bus. No.) 
Miracle. Edward, Jenkins High School, Jenkins 
Mitchell, John Hampton, Route 2, Frankfort, 31962 
Monroe, E. W. 412 West Poplar, Elizabethtown, 3588, 2406 
Moore, Ed., Morehead State College, Box 83, Morehead 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1955 



SPRINGFIELD— SOUTH CENTRAL KENTUCKY CONFERENCE CHAMPION 




O f^ ^ n. 



->m^ 














'■*C.vJ 



(Left to Right I Front Row: Mgr. Barber, Hinton, McCabe. Wheatley, Kimberlin, Milburn, Goatley, Mgr. 
Tapp. Second Row: Dowling. Mudd. Pardee, Coach Kolasa, Pope, Johnston, Reynolds. Young. Third Row: 
Pinkston, Wohner, Lewis, Mattingly, McGill, Thompson, Haydon, Robertson, Scott. Not in picture : Moore, Honor- 
ary Capt. Elder (deceased). 



Moore, Robert, 214 Logan, Frankfort, 30717, 42281, Ext. 450 

Mullins, Noah, Jr., 148 Stout Ave., Versailles, 777 R 

Nau. Bill, Barbourville, 203, 317 

Niemeier, Pelsor, 108 N. Main. Lawrenceburg, 2162 

Niswonger. Charles W., P. O. Box 214, Nebo, 26S1, Madison- 

ville 2460 
Oglesby. Durwood, Nortonville 

Osborne, Homer L., 3323 Schneiter Ave., Louisville, Em 61992 
Osborne, James C Star Route, Harlan, 2237 
Parker, Billie E., Box 731. Pineville. Edgewood 73293 
Partridge, Donald E.. 1621 N. Willow Road, Evansville, 

Indiana. 41.566. .58181 
Patrick, Charles C. P.oute 2, Lexington. 44516. 44516 
Patterson. Norman H.. P. O. Box 76. Sonora, 1912 
Ping. Harold. Asbury College, P. O. Box 494, Wilmore, 9191 
Pittard. Fred W., 1022 Elmsdale Road, Paducah, 36680 
Pogue. Gene, Beechmont 

Polk, John C, 650 Lindell Ave., Louisville, Sp 2-0303 
Preece. Boyce C, P. O. Box 674, Kermit, W. Va. 
Rail. Eugene. 124 W. Todd St., Frankfort, 42355, 44408 
Ratchford, Charles R.. Jr.. 516 No. 33rd St., Louisville, 

Sp 20108 
Rav, Damon, Glendale, 3802, 2300 
Raymond, Dannie Neil, McHenry, 3344 (Bus. No,) 
Redden. James W.. Midway. 4134 
Rice. Thomas A.. Special Service, 3rd Armored Division, Fort 

Knox, 2723, 2723 
Eocke, James M., Pike St., Cynthiana, 1384, Midway High 

School 
Rose Harold S.. Morehead State College, P. O. Box 691, 

Morehead 
Schnebelt. Carl R.. Hanover, Indiana, 95523, 94561 
Shelton, Robert, 515 Pelhan St.. Maysville, Lo 44700 
Smith, Charles D., 529 E. Main St.. Georgetown, 261, 261 
Smith, Darrell Carlton, 2090 Edgeworth Drive, Lexington, 

43166, 22776 
Smith, E. H., Ill, 3730 Taylorsville Road, Louisville 
Sosh, Nelson, Uniontown, 123, 1 

South, William F., 180 Versailles Road, Frankfort, 46566, 48473 
Stokes, James W.. 105 Highland Ave., Earlington, 2791 
Stone, Clifton, Route 3, Oak Hill Road, Evansville, Indiana, 

Gr 6-0973, Ha 53311 
Sullivan, Dan L., 239 Berry, Bellevue 
Swartz, Dan, Vet Village, Morehead 
Taylor, Dennis "Tubby", 710 W. Main St., Murray 
Thomas, Philip W., 403 N. 16th, Murray, 1418-W 
Trivette, John W., Pikeville 
Turner. Bruce, 1114 Pleasant St,, Paris, 603 W. 9060 



Tuttle, Charles. 431 Meadow Park, Lexington, 30640 

Van Sant, William E.. 101 Holaday Lane, So. Fort Mitchell, 

Di 1-6087, He 1-2986 
Van Winkle, Stephen N.. .Ir.. 643 Emerson Drive. Lexington, 

21094 
Wade. Bill. 412 Harrahan Blvd.. Paducah, 31373, 57191 
Wallace, W. C, 637 Delray. Owensboro, Mu 42117, Mu 41416 
Waller, Charles L., Elkton 
Wanchic, Nicholas, 311 Pepper Drive, Lexington, 31838. 

32880, Ext. 323 
Ward. Tommy, Marsee Drive, Harlan, 1930-W 
Warren, Joe, College Station. Murray, 1078 R 
Weekley, Ronald R., SSO, 3rd Armored Division, Fort Knox, 

2723, 2723 
Wellman, Bill, 711 23rd St., Ashland, Grand 1091 
Whipple, Lloyd G.. 216 S. Frederick, Evansville, Indiana, 

Gr 66809, Ha 43311, Ext. 338 
Williams, Lewis P., Burkesville. 4003, 91 

Wilson, Burnell. 348 Lafayette Ave., Lexington, 26940, 44060 
Wilson, Herman, Helton 
Wilson. Kenneth, Helton 
Wilson, Louis O., Versailles Road. Route 2, Lexington, 44913, 

41717 
Wing Howard R., Jr., 3001 Frazier, Covington, Ju 1-8707 
Wise, Jack, Stamping Ground, 4159 

Wortham, Robert W., Cecilia, 5261, Elizabethtown 2228 
Yessin, Humzey, 211 Tahoma Road. Lexington, 21434, Frank- 
fort City Clerk's Office 
Zachary, Alvin L., 2908 Pairie Lane, Lafayette, Indiana, 

27-6774 
Zumar, John M., SSO, 3rd Armored Division, Fort Knox, 

2723, 2723 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
MEMBER SCHOOLS OF THE K.H.S.A.A. 



Graham 
Lewisport 
Lone Jack 

(Four 
Lone Oak 

(Paducah) 



Mile) 



Memorial 

(Waynesburg) 
Pine Mountain 
Pleasant View 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1955 



Page Five 



BEREA— BLUEGRASS SIX-MAN CONFERENCE CHAMPION 




I Left to B ght I Fi out Ri 
Second Row: Johnson. Col 
D Sinpleton, Lemaster. Eadi 
Witt. 



Mgr Whitlock. Davidson, 
, Saylor, Mn-acle, .T. Stivei-.s. 
Williamson. Coach Harrell, 



Hubble. Oliver. Swope. Lake, Mgr. 
Third Row: Supt. Singleton, Azbill, Walke 
airman Stivers. Not in picture; Jennings 



Dr. M. E. Ligon Honored 

On October 28 the Taylor Education Building- at 
the University of Kentucky was the scene of a pro- 
gram honoring Dr. M. E. Ligon, Professor Emeritus 
of the University. Dr. Harold Adams of the U. K. 
College of Education, Chairman of the Kentucky 
Committee of the Southern Association of Colleges 
and Secondary Schools, presented a portrait of Dr. 
Ligon to the College of Education. The portrait was 
accepted by Dean Frank G. Dickey. 

After opening remarks by Dr. Adams, the In- 
vocation was given by Bart N. Peak, Secretary of 
the University of Kentucky Y.M.C.A. Tributes to 
Dr. Ligon were paid by Director Ezra L. Gillis, 
Bureau of Source Materials for Higher E..ucation, 
University of Kentucky; Commissioner Theo. A. 
Sanford of the K.H.S.A.A.; and Mr. W. F. Coslow, 
Assistant Superintendent of the Louisville City 
Schools, speaking for Principal W. S. Milburn of the 
Louisville Male and Girls High School, President 
of the Southern Association of Colleges and Second- 
ary Schools. The program ended with Dr. Ligon's 
response to Dean Dickey s acceptance of the por- 
trait. 

Because of the important part which Dr. Ligon 
played in the organization of the Kentucky High 
School Athletic Association, the remarks made by 
Commissioner Sanford at the dedicatory program 
are given below. 

Mose Ligon, Educator 

"The man whom we are honoring today, Dr. 
M. E. Ligon, has made a great contribution to high 
school athletics in Kentucky. In fact, few, if any, 
have made greater contributions. 

"After teaching in the Philippines during the 



1905-1908 period, being prinicpal of the Paducah 
Franklin Elementary School from 1908 to 1910, and 
teaching science in the Owensboro High School from 
1910 to 1913, Prof. Ligon came to Lexington in 
August of 1913 as principal of the Lexin.a:ton High 
School. 

"Up to this time high school athletics had not 
been organized in Kentucky, either on a state or 
area basis. There were no eligibility I'ules, and most 
of the competition was on an unequal basis. Prof. 
Ligon had trained and coached good teams of the 
Philippines in baseball, track, and swimming. He 
now came in direct contact with high school ath- 
letics when he became principal of the Lexington 
High School. Football, basketball, baseball, and track 
had been introduced in the larger high schools, but 
no organization had been established to enforce 
uniform rules of eligibility and play. 

"In the spring of 1914 Prof. Ligon invited 
Central Kentucky administrators to a conference 
in his office in Lexington to consider the problem 
of high school athletics. Every school which was 
invited responded. The conference revealed that the 
problems were the same in all of the schools, and 
were difficult to deal with because there was no 
organization to which appeals for help might be 
made. The Central Kentucky High School Athletic 
Association was organized, and Prof. Ligon was 
elected its first president. By-laws, rules of eligibil- 
ity, and rules of the game were adopted. The by- 
laws provided that the president and vice-president 
were to interpret the rules and sit in judgment on 
all cases of eligibility. The by-laws and rules were 
printed and sent to all the schools. The press gave 
the organization good publicity. The superintendents 
and principals enforced the rules well and only a few 
difficult problems were referred to the president 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1955 



OLDHAM COUNTY— NO. CENTRAL KENTUCKY SIX-MAN CONFERENCE CHAMPION 







~r~4 



-.,i 



(Left to Bight; Front Row: Darland, Co-Capt. Cox, Co-Capt. Walling, Morris. K. Brooks. Hayden, Vaughn, 
Powell, Thompson. Second Row: Mgr. Ingram, Stoess. P. Brooks, Rohde, Martin, Leet, Madden, Stanley, Head, 
Coach BeU. 



and vice-president. Representatives of the schools 
met in the spring of 1915, and amended and added 
to the rules. The association worked well during 
1914-1915, 1915-1916, and 1916-1917. 

"In 1916 requests for the rules of the Central 
Kentucky organization became frequent and there 
was talk of a similar organization in Western Ken- 
tucky. Prof. Ligon discouraged this organization 
and suggested a meeting of the representatives of 
the high schools in April of 1917 during the annual 
meeting of the Kentucky Education Association. The 
suggestion was accepted, the meeting was held and 
the Kentucky High School Athletic Association was 
organized. Prof. Ligon was elected president. The 
Central Kentucky Association became a part of the 
Kentucky Association, and its rules and regulations 
were used during 1917-1918. President Ligon served 
the Association with distinction for nine years, 
1917-1926. He has served sixteen years on the ath- 
letic board of the University of Kentucky, six years 
under Dr. Frank L. McVey and ten years under 
Dr. Herman L. Donovan. His experience in the field 
of high school athletics has been valuable in assist- 
ing in the solution of the athletic problems of the 
University. 

"The object of the Kentucky High School 
Athletic Association remains the same as it was 
when it was formulated by Prof. Ligon and his 
friends in 1917. It is stated as follows in the K.H.S. 
A. A. Constitution. 'Its object shall be the develop- 
ment, regulation, and purification of the athletic 
activities in this state.' 

"The Association has come a long way. Many 
services to member schools have been added. How- 
ever, President Ligon in those early days was per- 
forming many of the duties that have not changed 
through the years. The eligibility of players must 
still be checked, rules and regulations of the As- 
sociation must be interpreted, penalties must be 
imposed. 

"All honor to the man who pioneered in the 
organization of high school athletics in this state! 
All honor to the man whom all of us, who know him, 
Jove and respect! All honor to Mose Ligon, educator! 



Girls' and Womens' Sports News 

By Betty Langley 

In our November article the Kentucky Federa- 
tion of High School Girls Sports Associations mem- 
bership list was given, and now we are happy to add 
another new member, Fern Creek High School, Mary 
Rose Cave, sponsor. 

At the November 5th meeting in Bowling Green, 
it was voted that certificates of membership be de- 
signed and awarded to those schools belonging to 
our association. Another project for the year is the 
organization and distribution of a G.S.A. Handbook. 
All student representatives expressed a strong de- 
sire for more "Play Days" sponsored by various high 
schools throughout the state. Let's give it a try, 
sponsors! 

Each school has now received a copy of our 
State G.S.A. constitution. We would like for you to 
read this carefully and decide on the type of mem- 
bership certificate you wish to receive. It would be 
nice for all of us to try for the Active Membership. 
If you would like the Active Membership, please 
send a copy of your local constitution and a state- 
ment of your club's adoption of our state associa- 
tion constitution to Loyce Meadows, Secretary, K.F. 
H.S.G.S.A., Highlands High School, Ft. Thomas. Any 
suggestions you have to offer will be appreciated. 
Just send them to any of our four officers. 

All those who attended the Girls Basketball 
Clinic December 3 at Bowling Green High School 
enjoyed it very much, and have a better understand- 
ing of the girls' rules and the new changes. Our 
thanks go to Miss Laura Evans, Southern Illinois 
University, and the co-sponsors. The National Sec- 
tion for Girls' and Women's Sports and the Ken- 
tucky Officials Rating Board. Also our appreciation 
goes to Miss Anderson and her students for their 
hospitality and use of their facilities. 

In our next article we hope to have the names 
of our district representatives listed. Your coopera- 
tion in acceptance of these positions will be appre- 
ciated. 

Greenville G.S.A., we hope your annual Christ- 
mas dance will be a big success. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1955 



Page Seven 



PIKEVILLE— EASTERN KENTUCKY MOUNTAIN CONFERENCE CHAMPION 




1 54 35 JM 90|*p 

f ' . f t '"■' 



j5^^,i^6_ Ml' 



'jcm k "0. n ^M as &" Ml f?^ — 

E^~te^ f*'' m « rat ^§f-.*'i^.^* 




(Left to Bight I I>ont Rc.w: E. Justice, Butcher, Ratliff, Billy Elkins, Charles, Hicks, Leslie, Stone. Second 
E&w: Picklesimer, Coleman, Weddle, L. Phillips, Musck, Clark, Duty, Elliott. Third Row: Wait, Bowling, H 
L. .Justice, Williamson, Yarus, D. Smith, D. Phillips, Green. Fourth Row : Looney, Roberts, Baker, Penny, 
Johnson. Miller, Hall, Paine, Bubby Elkins. Fifth Row: Coach Powers, Hutchinson, Woods, Bailey, Scott, H. 
Smith, Ass't. Coach Mack. 

CAVERNA— BARREN RIVER SIX-MAN CONFERENCE CHAMPION 



M^ 






w^ 



A I 



(Left to Right) Front Row: Mtrrs. Bailey, Evans, Ellzey. Second Row: Hestand, Bybee, Harper, Stinson, 

Hogan, Profitt. Third Row: McGavic, M. Hatcher, Bastow, McGee, J. Lindsey. McLellan, Campbell, Gentry. 

Fourth Row: G. Hatcher, Ross, Lyon, Goodhue, Walters, D. Lindsey, Duncan, Wood. Fifth Row: Coach Chaney, 
Ass't. Coach Turner, Ass't Coach Reynolds. Not in picture: Atwell, Frasier, Esters, Pritchard. 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1955 



The Flying Dutchman 

It is Christmas Time in Kentucky, a time when 
we all wonder what presents will bring the most 
happiness to others. Coaches, principals, officials and 
community leaders — here's a tip for the Yule season 
which will solve your problem as to the finest gift 
which can be given to bring lasting happiness and 
at the same time make this Christmas your most 
enjoyable. 

Somewhere in your community is a kid who 
had an accident early in life which has left a 
physical or mental scar. There's another who took 
a hard jolt when polio left him handicapped. There 
are still others who have felt the sting of misfor- 
tune as diseases and mishaps of many natures, and 
falsely feel that they are no longer a part of things 
and cannot engage in sports like their friends. These 
kids are unhappy. They need not be because you can 
do something about creating new and happier 
philosophies of life for them. 

You may bankrupt yourselves buying material 
Christmas gifts for such youngsters if you want to, 
but you'll not bring them the happiness you would 
like to in this manner. The Good Samaritan did not 
sit down and write a check when he wanted to be 
of service, but rather gave of himself. What our 
physically-handicapped kids will most appreciate for 
Christmas are men willing to give of themselves by 
taking an interest in them. 

Whether a Kentucky school boy is physically whole 
or handicapped, he wants to be a part of his school's 
athletic program in some way. He can be a part if 
you'll give him a part of you. He can go on to be- 
come a happy future citizen and possibly a great 
leader, but he can never accomplish this if we fail 
to sell him on the idea that one defeat does not 
constitute a lifetime, and that he is useful and 
needed. 

Since 1949 when the Game Guy program be- 
came a part of the over-all Kentucky High School 
Athletic Association picture, scores of unhappy 
kids have not only found joy in living which they 
thought was gone forever, but many have gone on 
to fight their ways to high positions in everyday 
life. What greater victory can come to a coach 
than to score foi the "Man Upstairs" by helping 
one of these unfortunate kids find himself. 

It pays off. Take that from the Dutchman. 
Study carefully the picture in this column of Bobby 
Kirchdorfer dictating to his secretary, Lou Leedy, in 
his athletic commissioner's office of the Jefferson 
County Playground and Recreation Board. In this 
picture you'll see a happy young man, paralyzed 
from his waist down with polio since he was three 
years old, doing a superb job of directing all ath- 
letics in the Jefferson County Recreation Program. 

Ten years ago his teachers worried about Bob's 
future. Today he not only out-earns most of them, 
but he shows them bow to set up and run their 
athletic programs. They lean on this young man 
now, the kid who won the first Game Guy Award 
in 1949. You fellows in Eastern Kentucky "went 
over-board" for him as he accompanied the Plying 
Dutchman on that part of his clinic trip, making 
a plea to you to give other kids the same break he 
got. 

How did Bob get his break? His grade school 
principal, Mrs. Leona Guttermuth of Mill Creek 
School, got him interested in the wheelbarrow race 
in a track meet. Bob ran on his hands as a buddy, 
Boyd Carter, pushed him. He won that race. When 




Bobby Kirchdorfer and Secretary 

the realization dawned on this "fighting kid" that 
he could be a part of the athletic program, he took 
a new lease on life. He went on to Valley High 
School where Dick Van Hoose, who is now Superin- 
tendent of Schools in Jefferson County, was prin- 
cipal. Dick got Bobby interested in managing the 
football, baseball and basketball teams. 

All of this interest was giving- this kid increased 
confidence. One day he announced that he was 
going to make athletics his life's work and so he 
started to study all phases of athletics. He pitched 
on Softball teams, sitting down in the pitcher's box 
as he threw. He became an inspiration to other 
physically-handicapped boys, with the result that 
they started getting in on the fun. Thus it developed 
that the interest of a couple of school leaders in 
one lad was the best Christmas present which could 
have been given. 

So the Game Guy idea spread over Kentucky 
to reach scores of boys and girls. Hundreds more 
still must be reached through your efforts. It will 
cost you two cents to send a card to the Plying 
Dutchman, Armory Building, Louisville 2, Ken- 
tucky, to tell him about your Game Guy and to re- 
quest that a Lionheart Lapel award be sent him. 
Your dividend will be impossible to measure as you 
give some kid this lasting Christmas present. 

A Corn Cob Pipe of Honor, tied around the 
neck of a Kentucky thoroughbred, is on its way to 
Glen McDowell of John's Creek School, and Lion- 
heart awards are on their way to Bill Harmon How- 
ard and Earl Pinson. Glen rendered unselfish serv- 
ice by helping these Game Guys. He has made these 
youngsters co-managers of his John's Creek basket- 
ball team. 

Bill has a deformed right hand and leg, but he 
excels in skating and plays basketball, while Earl 
is whipping polio which caused one leg to be shorter 
than the other. Not only does he hunt, fish and 
swim, but he is also chief observer for the Ground 
Observer Corps in his area. Both boys are juniors. 

Before wishing you all "A Merry Chinstmas" 
here are a few personal short shots you'll be inter- 
ested in: "Tater" Combs has left his mountain abode 
in Harlan to take up residence at 1701 Deer Lane in 
Louisville; Walter Combs has moved from Hazard 
to Ashland; Dero Downing, assisted by Eddie 
Diddle, "Cow Boy" Almond and Jim Jenkins, put 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1955 



Page Nine 



on an outstanding clinic at Bowling Green; and 
praise has come from official "Hop" Ewing for 
good neighbor pi-actices being carried on at Walton- 
Verona High SchooL 

Don't forget to remember our GAME GUYS. 



Guest Editorials 

Building Character 

The athletic coach whose nucleus for the 
new season consists of a guard with two left 
feet, a muscle bound center and two half- 
backs whose mutual interest in life is chas- 
ing the same girl, will sometimes smile sadly 
and say, "This year I'm building character." 
Of course, most of such remarks are on the 
facetious side — an admission that the opposi- 
tion will probably fatten up their season's 
average at his expense. Yet, in the "win or 
else" circuit, the impression is often given 
that character building is an adjunct of the 
athletic program only when the more im- 
portant matter of winning games is less than 
a remote possibility ; or that the development 
of character is forgotten during a winning 
season. 

The development of desirable traits of 
character is not inherent in athletics. The 
stress of competition between rival schools 
and communities would in itself tend to bring 
out only the worst in the competitors. With- 
out proper supervision and control, without 
the development of good character traits, 
physical competition between rival groups 
would soon be governed by the law of claw 
and fang. If you're a doubting Thomas, read 
accounts of the early Gaelic and British 
football battles which lasted all day and 
where fatalities were a part of the box score. 
The fierce, but controlled, competition, the 
jet-propelled, but clean, charge, the shatter- 
ing, but legal, tackle are things that don't 
just happen. Somewhere along the way, 
someone has taught a boy that it is possible 
to send an adversary crashing to the ground 
under a set of rules and traditions which do 
not permit teeth marks, brass knucks, zip 
guns and groin kicking. Somebody is con- 
stantly developing patterns of character un- 
der which the "policemen" who supervise 
the combat are armed with whistles instead 
of night sticks and where gaining yards is 
more important than gouging eyes. 

Think on these things the next time you 
watch a football game, and you should have 
a feeling of gratitude to those who, win or 
lose, embrace every opportunity to build 
character. If character is built only during 
the lean years, some ex-champions will have 



missed training that is a lot more important 
than blocking punts or breaking up pass 
patterns. A coach must realize that, win or 
lose, many of his kids will not pass his way 
again. — Illinois Interscholastic. 

From Those on the Firing Line 

President Eisenhower didn't ask for our 
views about encouraging greater participa- 
tion in sports by American youth, if he had, 
we could tell quite a bit. We don't know 
what suggestions were made by the 32 sports 
luminaries, "the greatest array of U. S. 
sports stars ever gathered in one place." 
Whatever they were, this "meeting at the 
summit" might have some good effect if it 
directs attention to the constantly growing 
needs in facilities and manpower for the 
building of physical fitness. 

We could use more adequate facilities, 
more manpower and a rededication to the 
belief that the democratic ideal is consist- 
ent with the slogan "a sport for everyone 
and everyone in a sport." We reaffirm our 
faith in the importance of amateur sports 
which stimulate equitable competition and 
good sportsmanship and in the principle that 
high school sports are at their best when 
conducted by the proper school authorities 
who will keep them articulated with the total 
school program and in harmony with proven 
educational standards. If anyone can devise 
ways of increasing opportunity for partici- 
pation through expansion of established 
machinery, we know we can count on a fine 
response from high school students. 

In progress toward an adequate fitness 
program, our schools have something tang- 
ible to show for their efforts. Last year's re- 
ports show that 31 different interscholastic 
sports were sponsored. Participation in at 
least 17 of these sports showed an increase 
over the previous year. 57% of our schools 
had competition in 8 or more sports, an ap- 
preciable increase over any previous year. 
In at least 3 sections of the state, more than 
three-fourths of the schools sponsored 8 or 
more sports. 170 high schools now offer 
training in 12 or more sports. 

All of the recent talk about a broadened 
sports program is interesting. Those who 
are on the firing line are always looking for 
more effective ways of doing an important 
job. It is understandable why they are 
somewhat gun-shy of loud noises astern un- 
less they are confident that the barrage is 
being laid down by experienced and trusted 
marksmen. — Secretary John K. Archer (New 
York). 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1955 



The 1955 Cross Country 

The St. Joseph Prep School won the third official 
K.H.S.A.A. Cross Country Run, which was held in 
Lexington on November 12. First place was won by 
Press Whelan of St. Joe, who was also first place 
winner in 1954. Whelan's time was 11:05.3. The 
team was coached by Brother Berard. 

The Trimble County High School team, coached 
by D. R. Hutchinson, Jr., won second place. Mr. 
Hutchinson had won the event in 1953 with his 
Breckinridge County team and in 1954 with his 
Trimble County team. The Flat Gap High School 
runners, coached by Francis Stapleton, placed third. 

The Run was held on the Picadome Golf Course, 
and was managed by the Spiked Shoe Society of 
the University of Kentucky. Charles Tye is presi- 
dent of the organization. The course was laid off 
for a distance of something more than two miles. 

One hundred forty-one boys took part in the 
Cross Country. The order in which the first fifty 
of these finished is given below, including the times 
of the first twenty-five. 

l_Whelan, St. Joseph (11:05.3); 2— Thompson, 
Valley (11:13); 3— Pyles, Trimble Co. (11:14); 4— 
Shipp, St. Joseph (11:18); 5— Adkins, Virgie 
(11:19); 6— Jackson, Trimble Co. (11:24); 7— 
Clements, St. Joseph (11:32); 8— McCoy, Johns 
Creek (11:34); 9— Burchett, Flat Gap (11:35); 10— 
Cantrell, Flat Gap (11:36); 11— Osborne, Flat Gap 
(11:37); 12— Snawder, Fern Creek (11:38); 13— 
Meehan, St. Joseph (11:39); 14 — Shrote, Male 
(11:44); 15— McDowell, Trimble Co. (11:45); 16— 
Johnston, Southern (11:51); 17 — Baker, Montgomery 
Co. (11:52); 18— Wathen, St. Joseph (11:53); 19— 
Andrew, Trimble Co. (11:55); 20— Mahurin, Male 
(11:56); 21— Zipperlien, Valley (11:57); 22— Joslin, 
Trimble Co. (11:58); 23— Wine, Holy Trinity 
(11:59); 24— Gum, Henry Clay (12:02); 25— Swan, 
Fern Creek (12:02); 26— Cissell, St. Joseph; 27— 
Groce, Southern; 28 — Wilder, Henderson Settlement; 
29 — Partin, Henderson Settlement; 30 — Johnson, 
Madisonville; 31 — Bray, Trimble Co.; 32 — Lawrence, 
Trigg Co.; 33 — Damron, Johns Creek; 34 — Fields, 
Virgie; 85 — ^Ballinger, Livingston; 36 — Thacker, 
Berea Foundation; 37 — Collins, Madisonville; 38 — 
Blair, Berea Foundation; 39 — Groves, Fern Creek; 
40— Steedley, Southern; 41— Clark, Valley; 42— 
Wilson, Southern; 43 — Halderman, Simon Kenton; 
44 — Rountree, Fern Creek; 45 — Robert Jenkins, 
Berea Foundation; 16 — Funk, Valley; 47 — Sandlin, 
Berea Foundation; 48— Sheffield, Male; 49— Hester, 
Valley; 50— Saylor, Red Bird. 



Suggestions 

A K.H.S.A.A. registered official said in a 
letter written not long ago to the Commis- 
sioner: "I believe that all schools should use 
contracts to hire their officials. 1 have signed 
only one contract since I first started of- 
ficiating. The coaches have been very unfair 
in some instances in kicking officials out of 
games, and also there is a habit of some of- 
ficials cancelling small games to take big 
games. This should be corrected." 



The principal of a member school said in 
a letter written to the State Office last 
spring: "We are increasingly aware during 
the past two or three years that many of- 
ficials are negligent in the matter of arriv- 
ing on time. We hear complaints, too, that 
many referees allow warm-up periods be- 
tween games to drag out to unreasonable 
length." 

These are justifiable complaints, and there 
is no reason for the problems mentioned not 
being solved by the persons involved, namely, 
school administrators and registered of- 
ficials. 



BASKETBALL QUESTIONS 

(Continued from Page One) 
Ruling: There is nothing in the indicated cir- 
cumstances to prevent the score from counting. The 
fact that the clock is not running does not prevent 
the scoring of points. In the outlined situation, it 
seems apparent that there would be some difference 
of opinion as to whether the 3 seconds had expired 
before the ball was in flight for the try. In question- 
able circumstances of this kind, the Referee would 
have no reason for failure to count the basket. 
Comment: Modification of the outlined circum- 
stances might result in a different situation. If 
there should be mechanical failure of the official 
timepiece or if there was a dispute between the two 
Timers so that it is quite obvious that prejudice had 
a bearing on the situation or that the time taken 
to score the field goal was very clearly in excess of 
the remaining time to be played, the Official has 
some discretionary authority. However-, in such 
cases, a good Official would, in the outlined cir- 
cumstances, be alerted to a possible irregularity of 
this kind and would make preparations for it. 

29. Play: On the 1st free throw by Al of a 
bonus penalty, ball is tapped by tall A2: (a) while it 
is on the basket ring; or (b) while it is bouncing 
above the basket. In either case, the tapped ball 
goes through the basket. Does goal count and is a 
bonus free throw awarded? 

Ruling: In (a), the tapping of the ball by A2 is a 
violation which immediately causes the ball to be- 
come dead. Also, touching by A2 ends the free throw 
so that it cannot be successful. Hence, no point is 
scored and no bonus free throw is permitted. In 
(b), the act by A2 is legal. His touching of the ball 
ends the free throw but does not cause the ball to 
become dead. A field goal is credited to A2. Since 
the free throw is not successful, no bonus free throw 
is awarded. 

30. Play: What should be the procedure if two 
violations or a violation and a foul occur simultan- 
eously? 

Ruling: An experienced Official will not see 
two of these occurring at exactly the same time, 
unless it is one of those rare combinations where 
the acts must be treated as having happened simul- 
taneously. Here are illustrations. CASE I: Running 
by Al and a foul by Bl occur at nearly the same 
time. An experienced Official will always see one 
of them as having occurred first. If the i-unning 
occurs first, any subsequent common foul is ig- 
nored because it occurred after ball became dead. 
If the foul occurs first, that kills the ball and there 
is no such thing as running during a dead ball. The 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1955 



Page Eleven 



procedure in cases of this kind is the same as that 
which is followed in Case II. CASE II: Al throws 
for goal at about the time his foot touches the 
sideline. The Official will never rule that the ball 
leaving the hand and the foot touching the sideline 
are simultaneous. He will see one as having occurred 
before the other and that determines whether the 
goal counts. There are many other similar situations 
where the Official would be in a difficult situation 
and without rules coverage if he were to declare 
that certain acts are simultaneous. In contrast, there 
are a few situations where there are double viola- 
tions which cannot be avoided. CASE III: During a 
free throw by Al, Bl and A2 are both in the lane 
too soon. If these two violations are simultaneous, 
there is rules coverage and the ball is next put in 
play by a jump at the free throw line. Even if the 
acts are not simultaneous, the net result may be 
the same as if they were simultaneous. If the vio- 
lation by Bl occurs first, this does not kill the ball 
immediately. When A2 then enters, the ball is still 
alive and the free thi-ow has not ended. Consequently, 
it is a violation by each team and is administered 
the same as if the two acts were simultaneous. 
CASE IV: During jump ball, non-jumpers A2 and 
B2 are in the restraining cylinder before the tap. 
While it is possible for these two acts to occur 
simultaneously, one usually precedes the other. 
When the first violation occurs, it causes the ball 
to remain dead. No advantage can then be gained 
by the second player's entry. The first act is penaliz- 
ed as a violation. 

31. Play: Thrower-in Al is outside the end line. 
He throws the ball: (a) against the back of the 
backboard, receives the rebound while he is still out 
of bounds and then makes the throw-in; or (b) 
he throws the ball across a corner of the court and 
out of bounds at the side without the ball having 
been in the court. He then receives the ball back 
and makes the throw-in. 

Ruling: The ball has not become alive in eithe*. 
of these cases. About the only specific regulation 
which would be violated is that concerning the 5- 
second time limit. In practically all cases, the act 
would consume more than the 5 seconds and, in 
case of doubt, the Official would usually rule it a 
violation of the time limit rule. Unless it is such a 
violation, the act should probably be treated the 
same as if the thrower-in were to bounce the ball 
on the floor out of bounds a time or two before 
picking it up and making the throw-in. There is 
nothing in the rules to prevent such bouncing, al- 
though the rules do prohibit him from throwing the 
ball to the floor out of bounds so that it bounces 
into the court. In this case, the throw-in has not 
gone directly into the court. 

32. Play: Al throws ball at B's basket, (a) 
While he is in the act of throwing, there is a foul 
by Bl and the ball goes in the basket; or (b) Vv^hile 
ban is in flight toward the basket, time for a period 
expires; or (c) while ball is rolling on the ring, it is 
tapped by A2, after which it falls in or out. 

Ruling: Since an attempt at the wrong basket 
is not a "try for goal" as defined in Rule 4-20 
the continuing motion rule does not apply and the 
exception to the dead ball rule for a ball in flight 
does not apply. But the touching of the ball on the 
ring as outlined in 9-10 applies to any situation, re- 
gardless of whether it is a try for goal. In all three 
situations, ball becomes dead immediately. The goal 
does not count in any of the three situations. How- 
ever, in (c), it is a violation (basket interference) 



and the penalty for this particular violation is the 
awarding of 2 points. If the penalty under 4-10 
and 11 were followed literally, the 2 points would 
be awarded to "the thrower." Obviously, it is not 
the intent to count 2 points for the thrower when 
the infraction has prevented the possible scoring of 2 
points for the opponent. If any points are awarded, 
they should be awarded to the team at whose basket 
the infraction occurred. Until adequate coverage is 
provided, it is fortunate that this combination of 
circumstances will rarely, if ever, occur and that 
the Official will, in any doubtful case, not see the 
violation. 

33. Play: Al receives a pass. He throws the 
ball against the Official or against the leg or back 
of Bl, then catches the ball and dribbles. Is this 
legal ? 

Ruling: If the ball is thrown against the Of- 
ficial, the player has always completed a dribble 
(air dribble) when he catches the ball. He may not 
dribble again. The same thing applies if he throws 
the ball against B except that if the pass is long 
enoug'h or the circumstances are such that Al 
has lost control when he passes the ball, his first 
dribble ends with loss of control. Since the ball 
has touched an opponent while out of his control, 
he is permitted to dribble again. From this, it will 
be obvious that the Official must exercise some 
judgment. In many cases, Al will pass the ball with 
the intention of having it go to a teammate. If 
such a pass is touched by B, it is common practice 
to assume that player control was lost and that 
when Al again secures control, he has a right to 
dribble in accordance with Rule 9-5c. Also see Play 
425. 

There is a Good Reason — or is There? 

NOTE: Somewhat similar questions were dis- 
tributed last year. Six resulted in rules improve- 
ments. This new set provides food for thought. 

ABOUT THE DRIBBLE: 

1. Why should touching the ball with both 
hands simultaneously end a dribble? 

2. Why should pivot foot rights be different 
in starting a dribble? 

ABOUT FOULS: 

3. Why is a bat (which is not a try) considered 
continuing motion? 

ABOUT JUMP BALL: 

4. Why shouldn't ball become alive when ball 
leaves Official's hand on the toss? 

ABOUT BASKET INTERFERENCE: 

5. Why shouldn't basket interference be made 
a technical foul ? 

6. If Al throws at B's basket and A2 taps it 
while it is on the ring, is penalty correct in stating 
that 2 points are awarded "the thrower"? 

ABOUT THE THROWJN: 

7. Why shouldn't ball become alive when a 
throw-in touches a player even if in the meantime 
it has gone through the basket for no score? 

GENERAL: 

8. Why isn't the commonly used term "false 
double foul" to indicate a pair of fouls which is not 
a double foul, recognized in the rules ? 

9. Should properly reacting rubber-covered 
basketballs have official standing? 

10. Why should i throw-in after a goal be dif- 
ferent from other throw-ins ? 

11. Why shouldn't the broken line arc in the 
free throw lane be one inch in width and with only 
a few segments to indicate the circle? 

12. Are the lower 6 or 8 inches and sharp 
corners of the large backboard necessary? 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1955 



To All Coaches From KAPOS 

One of the g-oals of the Kentucky Association 
of Pep Organizations sponsors is to encourage 
school administi'ators to appoint an approved fac- 
ulty member to sponsor the cheerleading and baton 
twirling- groups. 

A well qualified chaperone for all off-campus 
trips should be a MUST for all schools. At times 
the role of chaperone can be a difficult as well as 
an expensive one. No chaperone should be em- 
barrassed by having to pay her own expenses on 
these trips. 

In order to alleviate some of this expense, the 
KAPOS organization obtained permission from the 
Kentucky Principals' Association to have all KAPOS 
membership cards honored when the sponsor is in 
the act of chaperoning the visiting team. 

The purpose of this article is to notify all 
coaches of this new ruling and to ask their co- 
operation in notifying all ticket sellers and ticket 
takers of the rule. Our organization would deplore 
any abuse of this generous offer, and sincerely hopes 
that no sponsor will try to have others admitted 
on her membership card. 

May we take this opportunity to thank the prin- 
cipals and coaches for their cooperation in this 
matter, and to ask you to encourage your sponsor 
to join the KAPOS organization. We need your help 
in improving standards of conduct, caliber of cheers, 
etc., so JOIN NOW! Send your $1.00 to Miss Phyllis 
Kloecker, College of Education, University of Ken- 
tucky, and she will promptly send you your KAPOS 
membership card. 



Here and There . . . 

FOOTBALL AND BASKETBALL STA- 
TISTICS: The collecting of accurate data in 
football and basketball has permitted a 
scientific approach to problems connected 
with the games. Football statistics have 
played a vital role in determining manv of 
the actions of the National Federation Foot- 
ball Committee. In some cases, data have 
warranted positive action which has improv- 
ed the game. In other cases, data have pre- 
vented proposed action which might have 
had a bad effect on the game. Ill lustrations 
include the following. At one time, senti- 
ment was about 50-50 as to whether all 
plastic helmets should be prohibited. On one 
occasion, a tentative vote outlawed such 
equipment. A further study of available 
data indicated that there was no evidence 
that helmets with a plastic construction 
were any more dangerous than those con- 
structed of fiber covered with leather. In 
the meantime, it became apparent that a 
heavy helmet and one which does not per- 
mit proper ventilation results in fatigue 
which is, in itself, a safety hazard. During 
the past several years, more than three- 
fourths of all helmet shells are of plastic 



construction. Some have web suspension, 
some have rubber padding and others have 
both for maximum protection. If the foot- 
ball rules had outlawed such construction, 
progress would have been prevented. 

In basketball, many of the recent develop- 
ments in the game have come from a study 
of data secured by reliable statisticians who 
have collected statistics during state-spon- 
sored games and meets. 

State Associations differ in the extent to 
which machinery is set up for the collec- 
tion of such statistics. At a recent meeting 
of the Tennessee Board of Control, it was 
voted to employ a game statistician for the 
1956 tournaments. In some states this work 
is done in return for a front row seat at the 
tournament. 



Correction 

BASKETBALL CASE BOOK 



Play 254, item (b) might be affected by 
the new rule which awards two throws for 
a flagrant technical foul. In second line of 
play 381, substitute "but" for "out." 

BASKETBALL MEETING FOLDER 

In second line of play 18 on page 9, re- 
verse Bl and Al. In key at bottom of page 
11, the second answer in question 7 should 
be "no" instead of "yes." In formulae table 
on page 12, the figures in the second and 
third lines should be ignored. The total value 
of the bonus penalty should be .67 and for 
the 2-throw penalty it is .72. 



BOWLING : The Junior Bowling Congress, 
under sponsorship of Secretary Milton Ray- 
mer, has adopted the rule which was dis- 
cussed at the annual meeting of the Federa- 
tion. This regulation of the Junior Bowling 
Congress is in harmony with policies of most 
State High School Associations. It provides 
that if a junior bowler accepts money prizes 
or similar prizes as a reward for his bowling 
ability, he becomes ineligible to participate 
in the Junior Bowling program. One purpose 
of the regulation is to reduce the number of 
cases where the high school eligibility might 
be affected through the acceptance of an 
award. Secretary Raymer and his executive 
body deserve commendation for this pro- 
gressive step. 



BASKETBALL FOR 1955-1956 

The Basketball Season is Just Around the Corner 

Why not let us have your order for basketballs 
which have been and which will be used in the 
1956 KHSAA State Tournament? 

No. H200 Coach Rupp Basketball $19.85 

No. XIOL Mac Gregor Lastbilt BasketbalL_$19.85 

No. 100 Spalding Lastbilt Basketball $19.85 

Check your Converse All-Star Shoes. The No. 9160 with 
black uppers at $6.95 and the No. 9162 All-Star with 
white uppers at $6.95. We have in stock all sizes from 
3 thru 17. 

We also have the Converse "Coach" black No. 9240 or the 
white No. 9241 at $5.45. If you want a cheaper shoe we 
recommend the Converse "Sport King" in all sizes to 
wholesale at $4.25. 

AWARD SWEATERS AND JACKETS 

You will be needing real soon award jackets, 
award sweaters as well as chenille letters, em- 
blems, name-plates, etc. Our representative, Mr. 
Roy Boyd would enjoy calling to see you with a 
complete line of samples and without obligation. 
Let us hear from you. 

TROPHY HEADQUARTERS 

We have a very complete line of trophies in stock, do our 
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catalog. 

FAIR PLAY FIGURGRAM 
SCOREBOARDS 

NO. FFIS— The single face Fig- 
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complete with ten feet of cable. 
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NO. FD60 — A new deluxe board with 
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minute clock. Twelve months' guarantee. 
Ten feet of cable. (Time out clock extra). 
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,UTCLIFFE'S^::dBASKETBALL 

Equipmei^t 



TOURNAMENT BALLS 

No. RSS Kawlings "Seam Sealed" 
Ply-Fused Basketball was one of the 
official balls in the 1955 State Tour- 
nament and will be an official ball for 
the 1956 Tourney at Lexington. 

EACH $19.85 

No> 100. The famous Spalding 
"Last Bilt" fully molded ball. Official 
ball for any tournament and will be 
one of the official balls sanctioned for 
the 1955 State Tourney at Lexington. 

EACH $19.85 

BASKETBALL GOALS 




No. 260. Schutt "Rigid Build" are 
tops for all college and high school 
use — nothing better. Complete with 
nets— Pair $10.25. 

No. 5. Pla)ground and Backyard 
Practice Goals— Full official size and 
heav)' weight— complete with nets- 
Pair $4.25 

No. BN 1 20. Extra Heavy Tourna- 
ment Nets— Pair $3.45. 




OUTDOOR or 
PLAYGROUND BALLS 

No. CB 2. The popular Voit Rubber 
Co. official top grade rubber covered 
ball for outdoor use. Not affected 
by cinders, gravel, cement or wet 
weather. For outdoors will outwear 
two or more of even the top grade 
leather balls. EACH $11.35 

No. L B 9. Another rubber cov- 
ered Basketball made by the Voit 
Rubber Co., but the inside carcass is 
not quite so durable as the No. CB 2 
above. EACH $6.25 

CONVERSE BASKETBALL SHOES 

Nothing finer and their "All-Star" 
shoes are demanded by most of the 
top ranking College and Professional 
teams. 

NO. 9160. Converse "All Star" 
Black Duck Uppers,. .PAIR $6.95 
NO. 9162. Converse "All Star" 
White Duck Uppers.. .PAIR $6.95 
NO. 9360 Converse "Lucky Boy" 

Black Duck Uppers PAIR $4.95 

NO. 9361- Converse "Lucky Boy" 
White Duck Uppers PAIR $4.95 

MISCELLANEOUS 

No. 610. "W'K"am" Brand Basketball Sox — 
white wool with cotton reinforcement. PAIR 60c. 
No. 637. White Wool Sox with Colored Tops. 
Scarlet, Kelly, Royal, Lt. Gold, Purple, Maroon. 

PAIR 80c. 

No. 9. Official Basketball Score Book— Spiral 
wire binding — 25 games. EACH 65c. 
No. 166. Individual Suit Bag — 16 inch length — 
made of heavy leatherette material. EACH $2.10 

TROPHIES 

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to 



INCORPORATED 



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f 




High Schoa/ Athlete 

St. Joe's State Championship Cross Country Team 




(Left to Right) Whelan, Individual Champion; Shipp; Clements; Meehan; Wathen. 

The team representing the St. Joseph Prep School of Bardstown won the K.H.S. 
A. A. Cross Country Run, held in Lexington on November 12. The same group won 
first place in the Fern Creek Invitational on November 3, and the BeUarmine Cross 
Country Run on November 18. The team was also first in the high school division 
of the Shamrock Cross Country Run (A.A.U.), held in Louisville on November 24. 
Press Whelan was individual champion in the K.H.S.A.A., Fern Creek, and BeUar- 
mine runs, and he was first in the high school division of the Shamrock Cross Coun- 
try. 




Omcial Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 
JANUARY - 1956 




HENDERSON HIGH SCHOOL— WESTERN KY. ATHLETIC CONFERENCE CHAMPION 



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(Left to Rlghtl Pront Row Mills. Herzog, Stone, D .Sheff< i Maishall T t.lo\ei WiKon Toone Siiond Row: 
Mrjant. Woikins, Smith, Gibson, Duncan. Benbon, Book, Ruff Thud Row Hatle\ Bauon Hall. Watkins. Cave. 
Haiialson. Shelton, B Glovei fourth Row: McClure, K Sheffti Tate. Wilbon, McMahon, Rojater, Lambert. 



HARLAN HIGH SCHOOL — CUMBERLAND VALLEY CONFERENCE CHAMPION 




(Left to Rightl front Row: J. Asher. Brown. Webb. Shepherd. Adkibson. Owens. Parsons. Beasley, Stephenson. 
Edwards, .Tohnson. Second Row: Hyatt, J. Gross. B. Roark, Reeves, Bob Asher, T. Cawood, tee, A. Cawood, 
Cornett. Ledford. Third Row: P. Walls. Halburnt. Anderson. Bud Asher, Wright. Napier. Williams. Greynolds. 
Howard, RichHldsi.n. I.. Roark. G. Gross. Fourth Row: Havnes. H. Walls. Marks, Blanton, J. Pollite. Myers, G. 
I'ollitv, Miller. G. Cawood. Bugger. Tinsley, Farmer, Scriitirs. lirih Row: Ward, Price. Tweed, Dye, Angel, 
Welch, Christian, Martin, Scalf, Maden. Baird. C<Mch Troutmaii. Couch Gilly. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XVIII— No. 6 



JANUARY, 1956 



$1.00 Per Year 



Guest Editorials 

Let's Leave Our Boxing Gloves At Home 

Play ball! That's the cry heard around 
Kentucky this week. The same cry is heard 
here in Rockcastle as the three county schools 
open their basketball season. 

All three county teams appear set, says our 
sport writer, Lyle Underwood, to give each 
other and the rest of the district a "run for 
its money." And on hand will probably be 
more spectators than at any time in recent 
years. All will be Dulling for their favorite 
team. That's fine. But behind that support is 
a danger — especially this year. 

Let's look at that danger and its conse- 
quences. It's the fourth quarter. Two minutes 
left to play. One point separates the two 
teams. The pep clubs are "whoopin' it up." 
Nerves are taut. Although the moment won't 
matter so much tomorrow, right now it mat- 
ters a great deal. 

Suddenly, one of the fans sees an incident 
on the playing floor that is inevitable in the 
rouffh and tumble game. He seizes on it and 
screams a none too comolimentary phrase. 
Someone wants to defend the honor of the 
school and the battle is on. 

Another situation would see two opposing 
players lose their wits and resort to their 
fists. 

Regardless of the situation, the next day 
brine-s the bitter news and the crying towel. 
Ted Sanford. Commissioner of the Kentucky 
Hisrh School Athletic Association, has sus- 
pended the teams from furt,her competition. 

Suspension can happen. When it comes, it's 
not easy to take. Ask the team that's had 
one. All the team and school can do is try to 
live it down. Sometimes they never do. 

We are told basketball is getting to be big 
and serious business. Mr. Sanford and Ken- 
tuckv officials have been trvinoc to tie the 
wildcat they have had by the tail. Indications 
are, they'll stand for no foolishness this year. 
They intend to control plavers and spectators, 
and if unable to do so in some scattered in- 
stances, then the school and town will have 
to bear the financial and sportsmanship loss. 
They're ready to "lower the boom." 

In this season, like all seasons, both sjjec- 



tators and players must be ready to bear part 
of the responsibility for loss of prestige and 
recognition. The school must always be held 
responsible whether it is or not. 

It all boils down to this : A player who can- 
not control his temper does not deserve to 
play. No team unable to abide by the decis- 
ion of a referee (right or wrong) deserves to 
compete. No school which cannot teach its 
players sportsmanship and good conduct 
along with basketball deserves to floor a 
team. No fan unable to take the losses with 
the wins deserves a team to support. 

When the going gets roughest this year 
and the winning point doesn't come, refrain 
from punching the guy in front of you in the 
nose, or swatting the lady with your purse. 
Remember this paraphrase of a line on love 
from a poem by Alfred Lord Tennyson: 'Tis 
better to have plaved and lost, than never to 
have played at all.' 

— Editorial in the Mt. Vernon Signal 



Key Man More Ways Than One 
By Burns Bennett, Montgomery Advertiser 

Editor's Note; This article should probably have appeared 
early in the fall since it refers mostly to football. However, 
there is a messagre in it for every coach. 

You're the high school football coach. This 
is your time of the year. All over America 
thousands of young men are busy these days 
collecting new crops of callouses, building 
better blisters, and mangling with the 
muscles. 

Maybe you don't realize how important you 
are. You're buildinp- impressions that will 
last forever. A million kids are watching 
your every move — modeling themselves after 
their coach. 

You take a lot of kidding. One of the stock 
stories for the Monday Morning Quarter- 
backers and Touchdowners concerns the 
high school coach in the little town. His 
season had been somewhat less than terrific. 
The only way he could have lost more games 
would have been to schedule more. 

The practice field was across the highway 
from the school, building in this suburban 
area. Each afternoon the young gentlemen 
with biceps and bruises would dress in the 
school basement and cross the road to the 
practice grid. 

(Continued on Page Fifteen) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1956 



JANUARY, 1956 VOL XVIII— No. 6 

Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association. 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3. 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Russell Williamson (19B2-B6), Inez 

Vice-President Roy G. Eversole (1952-B6), Hazard 

Directors — W. B. Jones (1953-67) Somerset: Louis Litchfield 
1953-57). Marion: W. H. Crowdus (1954-58), Franklin; Jack 
Dawson (1954-58), Middlctown : Robert P. Forsythe (19BB-B9) 
Browder: K. G. Gillaspie (1955-69), Georgetown. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 



Jrom the Ci 



omtnissionei s 



Off, 



ice 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1. 1955 Football Participation List 

2. School's Report on Football Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Football) 



"Approved" and "Certified" Officials 

One hundred twenty-nine basketball officials 
have qualified for the "Certified" rating this year, 
and fifty-three have received the "Approved" rating. 
The latter rating does not carry foi-ward from year 
to year, but must be earned each year. After an 
official has received the "Certified" rating, he keeps 
this rating by clinic attendance. Only officials re- 
ceiving these higher ratings are eligible to work in 
the regional tournaments. Only "Certified" officials, 
who are residents of Kentucky, are eligible to work 
in the State Tournament. 

Basketball officials who qualified for advanced 
ratings during the current season are as follows: 
Certified Officials 
Raymond C. Adkins. Rex Alexander, James E. 
Baker, Jack H. Ballard, J. W. Barnett. Thomas P. 
Bell, Bert Bennett, Richard I. Betz, Clyde W. Black- 
bum, Bennie Bridges, Vic Brizendine, Carroll A. 
Broderick. Bryant Brown, James W. Brown, Ray- 
mond Burke, George H. Camobell, Ralnh M. Casteel. 
W. W. Chumbler, Charies E. Clark, Travis Combs, 
Walter Combs, Georee Conley, John Wellington 
Coooer, Layton Cox. John S. Crosthwaite, Jr., Tom 
Cubbage, Al Cummins, Don Davis, Dwight R. Davis, 
Jr., Dero Downing, Jack Durkin, James M. Eaton, 
Forrest Eddings, Ben R. Edelen. William Turner 
Elrod, Doc Fen-ell. Allen Fey. Bill Fitchko, Robert 
Forsvthe, Howard E. Gardner, Delmas Gish, Leonard 
Gooch, R. E. Goranflo. Al Gustafson, Jr., John Held- 
man. Jr., Franklin C. Hewling, Richard Hewling, G. 
Cliff Mines, Ralph E. Hobbs, Fred A. Hodge, Holbert 
Hodges. Garnet S. Hoffman. Joe Hofstetter, Clayton 
Hood, Harry Howard, J. D. Hudson, Charles R. 
Ii-win, Kenneth P. Jordan, Bob King, Jim King, 
P. J. King, Joe T. Kinman, Bill Knight. Warren R. 
Leet, Gilbert E. Lindloff, David M. Longenecker, 
Dick Looney, E. R. McAninch, L. B. MccClellan, 
G'en D. McDowell, Harold McGuffev. Robert N. 
McLeod, Alan Leon Macon, Boyd W. Mahan, James 
E. Mason, Ralph Mays, Foster Meade, Earl L. Met- 
calf. Bob Miller, Rex J. Miller. Lucian Moreman, 
Ed Mudd, Ralph Mussman, William E. Nau, Gene 
Neal, Ed Nord, Tim O'Brien, Billy W. Omer, R. K. 
Padgett. Bernard Pergrem, Ralph (Rudy) Phelps, 
C. A. Porter, Cleophus Pursiful. Stan Radjunas, 
Bernard W. Ratterman, James F. Rice, Joe M. 



Richardson, C. 0. Ricketts, George W. Riddle, Earl 
C. Roberts, James M. Rocke, Otis Roller, Clyde L. 
Rouse, Leland G. Rubarts, Mel Sanders, Evan E. 
Settle, Jr., Roy G. Settle, Stanley Shaw, Wallace 
Sloan, Bill Small, Edgar J. Smith, LaRue Sosh, 
William R. Steenken, Harrv S. Stephenson, Wilfred 
Susott, Ed Taylor, Robert S. Taylor, Amos Teague, 
Jack Thompson, William Varble, Charlie Vettiner, 
Paul Weisbrodt, Ralph W. Welch, Milford Wells, 
Lloyd G. Whipple, Tom M. Williams, Jr., Roy L. Win- 
chester, Shelby Winfrey, Ernest Woford. 
Approved Officials 
Alvin Almond, Kenneth Ashley, Arville Bailey, 
Bill Baird, James P. Begley, David A. Case, Joseph 
G. Chaney, Fred T. Crawford, Ellis Curry, Earl S. 
Duncan, Joe D. Fields, Earle G. Fish, Bob Flynn, 
William R. Foster, E. Hugh Fugate, Bill Gates, Jim 
Goley, Charles L. Goodwin, Jesse R. Grisham, 
Charles R. Hayes, John Haynes, Carl Howard, 
Douglas Hudson, Joe Hutt, Jr., James Jenkins, 
Kean Jenkins, Thomas LeVan, Bill Long, Ray S. 
McPike, Jr., George Maines, Roy Miller, Frank J. 
Mueller, Reason G. Newton, Gene O'Nan, Norman 
O'Nan, Billie E. Parker, Logan Powell, Charles R. 
Reed, Gordon Reed, Tommy Rentz, William T. Riggs, 
Allen W. Russell, Deward Saylor, Paul E. Schlich, 
W. L. Scott, Steve Shuck, Robert Stanfill, William 
L. Strange, J. B. Temple, Asa I. Tipton, Larry Tobe, 
David B. White, Emil Wurtz, Humzey Yessin. 



Protection Fund News 

Three hundred four member schools of the 
K.H.S.A.A. had insured their athletes with the Pro- 
tection Fund at the time this issue of the magazine 
went to press. Four hundred forty claims, totaling 
$8,987.53, have been paid since July 1. 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED FOOTBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled January 1) 

Butler, John A., 803 Carlyle Place, Nashville, Tennessee, 
42-0226 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled January 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed it 
is the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Back. Adrian G., Jr., Hodgenville, 245, 90 

Ballard. Shirley. 2A Gay, Winchester, 1933W, 668 

Barrett. Jack. 1419 So. 6th, Paducah 

Black, Charles D., 223 S. Main St., Barbourville, 193, 439 

Broderick, Carroll, 1760 Normal Dr., Bowling Green, 3-8594, 

Browning. Dennis R., Lucllen, 7-R 

Burman, Jack, 1144 Covedale, Cincinnati, Ohio, Wa 1-3174, 

Ch. 1-3400 
Campbell, John E., Jr., Garrett. 3813 
Carter, Bill, Box 76, Southern Baptist Seminary, Louisville, 

Tw 7-2336 
Clay, O. K., 114 Riverside Dr., Williamson, W. Va. 
Copley. Clyde, Warfield, 4762 (Bus. No.) 
Craig, Randy, 446 Elm St., Ludlow 
Cravens, Earl F., 532 Main St., Tell City, Ind. 
Creech, Harvey, Kings Creek 

Davenport. Robert B., Shakertown Road. Burgin, 5204 
Duerson, W. Robert. Lancaster, 401, 9110 
Evans, Carl L., 2332 Moore St., Ashland, Ea 4-4068 
Fraley, Bill, 732 5th, Henderson, 4708 
Fulkerson. Raymond. 9212 Cornflower Road, Valley Station, 

Pleasure Ridge 7-2065, Cy 1061 
Gaither, Jack, 400 Lafayette. Beaver Dam, 3365, 3365 
Garrett, Clifford D., Jr.. 803 S.E. 2nd St., Evansville. Ind.. 

Ha 3-7283, Gr 6-6521 
Goodin, Shirley Glenn, Four Mile, Ed 7-2031 
Hardin, William B., P. O. Box 6, Inez, 2971, 4621 
Hartman, John W., Jr., 629 Stewart St., Elizabethtown, 4587 
Haury, John R., 3817 Parker Ave., Louisville 12, Ar 3816 
Hill, James E.. 200 9th St., Norton, Va. 
Holeman. Bill, Manchester, 2223 



(Continued on Page Ten) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1956 



Page Three 



1955-56 MEMBERSHIP IN THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 







REGION 1 




School 


Address 


Principal 


Basketball Coach 


D. 1 Arlington 


Arlington 


0. J. Mitchell 


Jimmy Voight 


Bardwell 


Bardwell 


R. L. Petrie 


L. G. Tubbs 


Cayce 


Cayce 


Edmund Clark 


Frank Rice 


Central 


Clinton 


James H. Phillips 


James H. Phillips 


Cunning-ham 


Cunningham 


0. J. Allen 


J. R. Despain 


Fulgham 


R. 1, Clinton 


E. L. Clark 


Ralph Bugg 


Fulton 


Fulton 


K. M. Winston 


Uel Killebrew 


Hickman 


Hickman 


Robert Summers 


Robert Summers 


Milbum 


Milburn 


Henry O'Daniel 


Henry Johnson 


Western 


Hickman 


T. H. Likens 


Bobby McCord 


D. 2 Ballard Memorial 


R. 1, Barlow 


Richard Winebarger 


Willard Carroll 


Heath 


R. 1, West Paducah A. L. Roberts 


W. E. Carter 


Lone Oak 


Paducah 


John Robinson 


Don Stephenson 


Paducah Tilghman 


Paducah 


Walter C. Jetton 


Otis Dinning 


Reidland 


R. 8, Paducah 


Lyndle Barnes, Sr. 


Henry L. Paul 


St. John 


R. 5, Paducah 


Sr. Marie Therese 




St. Mary's 


Paducah 


Sr. Alma Clare 


Robert L. Highdon 


D 3. Cuba 


R. 1, Mayfield 


Joe McPherson 


Joe McPherson 


Fancy Farm 


Fancy Farm 


Sr. Rose Angeline 


Samuel Hayden 


Farmington 


Farmington 


Conrad E. Carroll 


Charles Floyd 


Lowes 


Lowes 


W. W. Chumbler 


Vernon Gates 


Mayfield 


Mayfield 


Robert F4ser 


Jack Story 


Sedalia 


Sedalia 


McCoy Tarry 


Roy Warmath 


Symsonia 


Symsonia 


Cecil Reid 


Joe Ford 


Wingo 


Wingo 


Howard V. Reid 


Tony Franks 


D. 4 Almo 


Almo 


William B. Miller 


William B. Miller 


Benton 


Benton 


(Supt.) Joe P. Duke 


Billy J. Farris 


Brewers 


Brewers 


Reed Conder 


Reed Conder 


Hardin 


Hardin 


C. B. Hendon 


C. B. Hendon 


Hazel 


Hazel 


Guy Lovins 


Guy Lovins 


Kirksey 


Kirksey 


M. B. Rogers 


Rex Watson 


Lynn Grove 


Lynn Grove 


Raymond L. Story 


John Cannon 


Murray 


Murray 


W. B. Moser 


Preston Holland 


Murray Training 


Murray 


Roy S. Steinbrook 


Garrett Beshear 


New Concord 


New Concord 


Edward T. Curd 


Bobby Hargis 


No. Marshall 


Calvert City 


Robert Goheen 
REGION 2 


Charlie Lampley 


D. 5 Crittenden County 


Marion 


Louis Litchfield 


Ercel Little 


Livingston County 


Smithland 


K. T. Hardin 


Frank Wright 


Marion 


Marion 


Thomas A. Parrish 


Denzil Mefford 


Salem 


Salem 


L. E. Dunning 


Dan Larue 


D. 6 Caldwell County 


Princeton 


Guy G. Nichols 


Hoyt Threst 


Fredonia 


Fredonia 


B. L. Sizemore 


Mervil Phelps 


Lyon County 


Kuttawa 


Russell R. Below 


Jason White 


Trigg County 


Cadiz 


John Minton 


James Solomon 


D. 7 Charleston 


R. 1, Dawson Springs Lewis Good 


Jewel Logan 


Dalton 


Dalton 


A. 0. Richards 


Edwin Martin 


Dawson 


Dawson Springs 


B. U. Sisk 


Aubrey M. Inglis 


Earlington 


Earlington 


James W. Larmouth 


James W. Larmouth 


Hanson 


Hanson 


Ina D. Moore 


James White 


Madisonville 


Madisonville 


Vincent Zaehem 


Charles Parrish 


Nebo 


Nebo 


A. C. Cameal 


George Wooton 


South Hopkins 


Nortonville 


Charles Jenkins 


Orlando Wyman 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1956 



School 

Clifty 

Crofton 

Guthrie 

Hopkinsville 

Lacy 

Pembroke 

Sinking Fork 

South Christian 

Todd County 

Trenton 



Address 

Clifty 

Crofton 

Guthrie 

Hopkinsville 

R. 7, Hopkinsville 

Pembroke 

R. 5, Hopkinsville 

Herndon 

Elkton 



Trenton 



Principal 

0. P. Hurt 
Gene G. Wilson 
Henry C. Malone 
Charles J. Petrie 
Omer Gosnell 
Mrs. L. W. Allen 
T. W. Stewart 
Clovis W. Wallis 
A. R. Rochelle 



(Supt.) Gene Fusco 



Basketball Coach 

Edward Hickey, Jr. 
Gene Wilson 
Jim Daley 
Bill Brannock 
Glenn Henderson 
W. Larry Trimble 
T. W. Stewart 
Charles R. Irwin 
Wesley Coffman 
Jim Young, Jr. 



REGION 3 



D. 


9 


Clay 


Clay 






Dixon 


Dixon 






Providence 


Providence 






Sebree 


Sebree 






Slaughters 


Slaughters 


D. 


10 


Henderson 


Henderson 






Henderson County 


Henderson 






Holy Name 


Henderson 






Morganfield 


Morganfield 






St. Agnes 


Uniontown 






St. Vincent 


St. Vincent 






Sturgis 


Sturgis 






Uniontown 


Uniontown 


D. 


11 


Bremen 


Bremen 






Calhoun 


Calhoun 






Livermore 


Livermore 






Sacramento 


Sacramento 


D. 


12 


Daviess County 


Owensboro 






Owensboro 


Owensboro 






Owensboro Cath. 


Owensboro 






Owensboro Tech. 


Owensboro 






Utica 


Utica 



Mrs. Irene Powell 
P. D. Fancher 
Wendell Johnson 
Mrs. Fred Poore 
F. F. McDowell 

W. W. White 
Lewis N. Johnson 
Sr. Albert Mary 
Thomas Brantley 
Rev. R. G. Hill 
Sr. Frances Ann 
H'Earl Evans 
Verlie Koltinsky 

Hugh Noffsinger 
A. G. Crume 
J. Lee Robertson 
Paul Phillips 

J. T. Sandefur 
J. W. Snyder 
Sr. Joseph Mary 
C. F. Criley 
H. K. Hamblen 



Kenneth Middleton 

G. C. Sherrell 
Hugh E. Sellers 
F. F. McDowell 

T. L. Plain 

John H. Branson 

James K. Lindenberg 

Charles Straub 

Wilbur Clark 

Rev. William E. Allard 

H. D. Holt, Jr. 

Bert T. Rountree 

Forbis Jordan 
Delbert Settle 
J. Lee Robertson 
Charles Summers 

W. B. Sydnor, Jr. 
Lawrence McGinnis 
Harold Misehel 
John C. Simpson 
W. P. Wheeler 



REGION 4 



D. 13 Breckinridge Co. 
Flaherty 
Frederick-Fraize 
Hawesville 
Ii-vington 
Lewisport 
Meade County 



Hardinsburg 

Vine Grove 

Cloverport 

Hawesville 

Irvington 

Lewisport 

Brandenburg 



R. F. Peters 
M. E. Swain 
Hilbert R. Taylor 
Cecil Foreman 
Edwin J. Mayes 
Shelby R. Mason 
Mrs. C. P. Miller 



Dewey Parson 
M. E. Swain 
Howard Owens 
Charles Quisenberry 
A. C. Thomas 
Edgar R. Payne 
Willis Simpson 



D. 14 Brownsville 

Butler County 

Caneyville 

Clarkson 

Kyrock 

Leitchfield 

Sunfish 



Brownsville 

Morgantown 

Caneyville 

Clarkson 

Sweeden 

Leitchfield 

Sunfish 



Estil Griffis 
W. Foyest West 
Ramon Majors 
Howard P. Lindsey 
R. E. Hendrick 
O. A. Adams 
Mills Lowe 



Louis Durbin 

William 0. Warren, Jr. 

Victor Harned 

Bowman Davenport 

Oren H. Webb 

John H. Taylor 

Mills Lowe 



D. 15 Beaver Dam 
Centertown 
Central Park 
Dundee 
Fordsville 
Hartford 
Horse Branch 
Rockport 



Beaver Dam 

Centertovni 

McHenry 

Dundee 

F'ordsville 

Hartford 

Horse Branch 

Rockport 



Shelby C. Forsythe 
J. Neil Embry 
L. H. Anthony 
Bruce Austin 
M. S. Greer 
Charles S. Combs 
W. O. Warren 
J. W. Park 



Thural West 
Bill Leach 
Douglas Ashby 
Bruce Austin 
Bobby Park 
Charles S. Combs 
Tom Boswell 
J. W. Park 



p 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1956 



Page Five 



School 

D. 16 Central City 
Drakesboro 
Dunmor 
Graham 
Greenville 



Address 

Central City 

Drakesboro 

Dunmor 

Graham 

Greenville 



Hughes-Kirkpatrick Beechmont 
Muhlenberg- Central Powderly 



Principal 

Delmas Gish 
Ovid Arnold 
Charles Eades 
Troy E. Spear 
John R. Owens 
Lyle C. Baugh 
Sherman Gish 



Basketball Coach 

Delmas Gish 
Tom Neathamer 
Charles Eades 
Bobby Chaney 
Ben Topmiller, Jr. 
Roy Withrow 
William Stokes 



D. 17 Alva ton 

Bowling Green 

Bristow 

College 

Franklin-Simpson 

North Warren 

Richardsville 

Warren County 

D. 18 Adairville 
Auburn 

Chandlers Chapel 
Lewisburg 
Olmstead 
Russellville 



D. 



19 Allen County 
Austin Tracy 
Glasgow 
Hiseville 
Park City 
Scottsville 
Temple Hill 

D. 20 Center 

Clinton Co. 

Cumberland 

Edmonton 

Gamaliel 

Marrowbone 

Tompkinsville 



Alvaton 
Bowling Green 
Bristow 
Bowling Green 
Franklin 
Smiths Grove 
Richardsville 
Bowling Green 

Adairville 

Auburn 

R. 2, Auburn 

Lewisburg 

Olmstead 

Russellville 

Scottsville 

Lucas 

Glasgow 

Hiseville 

Park City 

Scottsville 

R. 4, Glasgow 

Center 

Albany 

Burkesville 

Edmonton 

Gamaliel 

Marrowbone 

Tompkinsville 



REGION 5 

Jacob Stagner 
H. B. Gray 
Jeff Stagner 
C. H. Jaggers 
J. W. Dunn 
Basil 0. Smith 
G. E. Rather 
C. H. Harris 

0. W. Lovan 
H. M. Watkins 
Morris Shelton 
G. L. Summers 
W. N. Alexander 
Harold Hunter 

T. C. Simmons 
A. T. McCoy 
Edwin R. Jones 
Lenis Reece 
W. L. Gardner 
(Supt.) Bradford Mutchler 
David Montgomery 

Glenn Scott 
L. H. Robinson 
W. B. Ray 
Samuel L. Smith 
Edwin Steen 
Ralph Clark 
Randall Grider 



Alvin Almond 
Clarence Musgrave 
Jesse Kimbrough 
Eddie Diddle, Jr. 
Jimmy Ownby 
Andrew Renick 
Clyde Smith 
Buddy Gate 

John Sweatt 
Dencel Miller 
R. B. Porter 
James Grimes 
Earle Shelton 
B. H. Weaver 

Jim Bazzell 
Jim Rush 
Bill Huntsman 
George A. Sadler 
Lloyd Sharpe 
Carl Garmon 
Robert Pardue 

Glenn Scott 
William A. Kidd 
L. P. Williams 
Ralph Reece 
Edward Agers ' 
Cortez Butler 
John C. Marrs 



D. 21 Adair County 
Campbellsville 
Greensburg 
Lebanon 

St. Augustine 
St. Charles 
St. Francis 
Taylor County 

D. 22 Buffalo 
Cavema 
Cub Run 
Hodgenville 
Magnolia 
Memorial 
Munfordville 

D. 23 Elizabethtown 

Elizabethtown Cath. 

Fort Knox 

Glendale 

Howevalley 

Lynnvale 

Rineyville 

Sonora 

Vine Grove 

West Point 



Columbia 

Campbellsville 

Greensburg 

Lebanon 

Lebanon 

R. 2, Lebanon 

Loretto 

Campbellsville 

Buffalo 

Horse Cave 

Cub Run 

Hodgenville 

Magnolia 

Hardyville 

Munfordville 

Elizabethtown 
Elizabethtown 
Fort Knox 
Glendale 
Cecilia 
White Mills 
Rineyville 
Sonora 
Vine Grove 
West Point 



REGION 6 

Joe B. Janes 
Thomas F. Hamilton 
Eugene E. Tate 
Charles F. Martin 
Sr. Nerinx Marie 
Sr. Mary Andrew 
Sr. Charles Asa 
J. G. McAnelly 

Edvnn R. Harvey 
Joe Chaney 
T. Y. Tabor 
Everett G. Sanders 
W. B. Borden 
Lynn D. Thompson 
H. D. Puckett 

Paul E. Kerrick 
Sr. Doloretta Marie 
Carl Williams 
Damon Ray 
Lonard L. Lindsey 
Paul Ford Davis 
H. L. Perkins 
Dellard Moor 
James T. Alton 
(Supt.) Charles Rawlings 



John Burr 
Paul Coop 
Jim Dupree 
Ted Cook 
James Hargadon 
John Marshall 
Sam B. Thomas 
Donald Barker 

Monty Singleton 
Ralph C. Dorsey 
James Edwards 
Cortland Cox 
Little C. Hale 
Denvil Barriger 
Wilbur Smith 

Leon Kingsolver 
Edward C. Hanes 
John Hackett 
Edwin A. Goodman 
Thomas H. Bryant 
Bill Tabb 
C. R. Perkins 
H. A. Wilson 
Chet Redmon 
Charles Rawlings 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1956 



School 

D. 24 Bardstown 
Bloomfield 
Fredericktown 
Lebanon Junction 
Maclcville 
Mt. Washington 
Old Ky. Home 
St. Catherine 
St. Joseph 
Shepherds ville 
Springfield 
Willisburg 



Address 

Bardstown 

Bloomfield 

R. 2, Springfield 

Lebanon Junction 

Mackville 

Mt. Washington 

Bardstown 

New Haven 

Bardstown 

Shepherdsville 

Springfield 

Willisburg 



Principal 

(Supt.) H. T. Cooper 

T. T. Etheredge 
Sr. M. Raphael 
Thomas S. Jeffries 
Howard Moore 
C. L. Francis 
T. O. Thompson 
Sr. Leora 
Bro. Nilus, C.P.X. 
Edwin E. Rodgers 

(Supt.) Bennett R. Lewis 
L. A. Wash 



Basketball Coach 

Garnis Martin 
Ernest Ruby 
John Huber, Jr. 
Glenn B. Smith 
Freddie Lake 
L. W. MuUins 
J. H.| Harvey 
Rev. L. A. Hardesty 
John Stoll 
Arthur L. Moody 
Charles Kolasa 
J. P. Long 



REGION 7 



D. 25 Ahrens Trade 
Atherton 
duPont Manual 
Flaget 



Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 



L'ville Male & Girls Louisville 
St. Xavier Louisville 

Shawnee Louisville 



Alfred H. Meyer 
Russell Garth 
Arthur J. Ries 
Bro. Mark, C.F.X. 
W. S. Milbum 
Bro. Thomas More 
Robert B. Clem 



C. W. Learned 
Ralph H. Mills 
James R. Riffey 
Eugene Kenny 
J. W. Ellison 
Gene Rhodes 
Jerome Keiffner 



D. 26 Eastern Middletown 

Fern Creek Fern Creek 

Holy Trinity Louisville 

Kentucky Mill. Inst. Lyndon 

Ky. Sch. for Blind Louisville 

Southern Louisville 

Suda E. Butler Shively 

Valley "\^alley Station 



John W. Trapp 

W. K. Niman 

Rev. A. W. Steinhauser 

N. C. Hodgin 

L. P. Howser 

T. T. Knight 

Herb Hatfield 

0. M. Lassiter 



Roy Adams 
F. Wallheiser 
Charles Quire 
W. T. Simpson 

Clarence Smith 
Lucian Moreman 
Garland GaiTison 



REGION 8 



D. 30 Bagdad 

Shelbyville 
Simpsonville 
Taylorsville 
Waddy 

D. 31 Campbellsburg 
Eminence 
Henry Central 
Oldham County 
Ormsby Village 
Pleasureville 

D. 32 Carrollton 

Gallatin County 
Owen County 
Trimble County 



Shelbyville 
Simpsonville 
Taylorsville 
Waddy 

Campbellsburg 

Eminence 

New Castle 

LaGrange 

.\nchorage 

Pleasureville 

Carrollton 
Warsaw 
Owen ton 
Bedford 



Harding Lowry 
Elmo C. Head 
Bruce Sweeney 
W. A. Threlkeld 
W. R. Martin 

G. H. England 
Robert Pay 
D. W. Quails 
Roy H. Dorsey 
Anna B. Moss 
Clyde Davidson 

Palmore Lyles 
John M. Potter 
Cyrus E. Greene 
Eugene Robinson 



Gayle Taft 
Evan E. Settle 
Joe Gill 
E. C. Brown 
Kenneth Gordon 

John Bailey 
Robert Pay 
Lee Payton 
Robert B. Hehl 
Fred McDaniel 
Kenneth McCarty 

Ivan Knifley 
Charles Sutherland 
Paul Marshall 
D. R. Hutchinson, Jr. 



REGION 9 



D. 33 Boone County 
Lloyd 
St. Henry 
Simon Kenton 
Walton-Verona 

D. 34 Beechwood 

Covington Cath. 

Dixie Heights 

Holmes 

Holy Cross 

Ludlow 

Villa Madonna 



Florence 

Erlanger 

Erlanger 

Independence 

Walton 

So. Fort Mitchell 

Covington 

Covington 

Covington 

Covington 

Ludlow 

Covington 



Chester Goodridge 
James Tichenor 
Sr. M. Clarita, O.S.B. 
R. C. Hinsdale 
James S. Smith 

Thelma W. Jones 
John S. Feldmeier 
W. N. Shropshire 
H. T. Mitchell 
Sr. M. Judith, O.S.B. 
Charles 0. Dawson 
Sr. Aileen, O.S.B, 



Rice Mountjoy 
Paul Champion 
Donald Nie 
William Faulkner 
Dyke Vest 

Harold Williams 
Robert Naber 
Louis Phillips 
Tom Ellis 
Edward Toner 
Heulyn Bishop 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1956 



Page Seven 



School 

D. 35 Campbell County 
Higrhlands 
Newport 
St. Mary 
St. Thomas 



Address 

Alexandria 
Fort Thomas 
Newport 
Alexandria 
Fort Thomas 



Principal 

F. I. Satterlee 

Alton D. Rudolph 

James L. Cobb 

Sr. Mary Honora, S.N.D. 

Sr. Mary Barbara 



Basketball Coach 

Norman Ii-vin 
Owen Hauck 
Stanley Arnzen 
Rev. Carl Schaffer 
Jack Stutler 



D. 36 Bellevue 
Dayton 

Newport Cath. 
Silver Grove 



Bellevue Ben Flora Joe Kohler 

Dayton Kenneth Kuhnert George Houston 

Newport Rev. John Hegenauer James Connor 

Silver Grove (Supt.) Tom L. Gabbard Tom L. Gabbard 



REGION 10 



D. 37 Cynthiana 
Garth 

Harrison County 
Scott Co. 



Cynthiana 
Georgetown 
Cynthiana 
Georgetown 



Kelley B. Stanfield 
James McEuen 
Joe H. Anderson 
Tony Raisor 



James Cinnamon 
Tom Green 
Kenton Campbell 
Robert Barlow 



D. 38 Augusta 

Bracken County 

Butler 

Deming 

Falmouth 

Grant County 

Morgan 

Williamstown 



Augusta 

Brooksville 

Butler 

Mt. Olivet 

Falmouth 

Dry Ridge 

Morgan 

Williamstown 



Alice K. Field 
Jarvis Parsley 
Franklin Webster 
T. Ross Moore 
(Supt.) L. H. Lutes 
Fred Bunger 
Richard Gulick 
M. J. Belew 



Easton F. Meyer 
Jarvis Parsley 
Julian Cunningham 
Herman O. Hale 
Cecil Hellard 
Delbert Walden 
Richard Gulick 
Charles M. Reeves 



D. 39 Fleming County 
May's Lick 
Maysville 
Minerva 
Orangeburg 
St. Patrick's 
Tollesboro 



Flemingsburg 

May's Lick 

Maysville 

Minerva 

R. 3, Maysville 

Maysville 

Tollesboro 



L. J. Cooper 
Herschel Owens 
E. D. Jones 
Curtis McNece 
Charles Browning 
Sr. M. Monica 
Eugene Fox 



G. B. Ison 
Chai'les Dixon 
Woodrow Crum 
Curtis McNece 
Gayle Bowen 
Rev. Eugene Wagner 
William Ryan 



40 Bourbon Co. Voc. Paris Joe E. Sabel 

Carlisle Carlisle Nancy E. Talbert 

Millersburg M. Inst. Millersburg W. A. Buckner 

Nicholas County Carlisle Willard Sandidge 

North Middletowii North Middletown John T. Gentry 

Paris Paris Alonzo Combs 



Fred Reece 
Ed Wells 
Darrell Jones 
Charles W. Finnell 
Ben E. Bridges 
Howard Downing 



REGION 11 



D. 41 Bald Knob 
Bridgeport 
Elkhorn 
Frankfort 
Good Shepherd 
Peaks Mill 

D. 42 Anderson 
Burgin 
Harrodsburg 
Mercer County 
Midvvay 
Versailles 
Western 

D. 43 Athens 

Henry Clay 

Lafayette 

Lexington Cath. 

Nicholasville 

University 

Wilmore 



R. 4, Frankfort 

R. 2, Frankfort 

Frankfort 

Frankfort 

Frankfort 

R. 1, Frankfort 

Lawrenceburg 

Burgin 

Harrodsburg 

Hirrodsbrug 

Midway 

Versailles 

Sinai 

R. 5, Lexington 

Lexington 

Lexington 

Lexington 

Nicholasville 

Lexington 

Wilmore 



W. Roy Bondurant 
A. F. Kazee 
Ronald R. Conley 
F. D. Wilkinson 
Sr. Mary Fredrick 
Howard Cohom 

V. E. Whitaker 
(Supt.) D. R. Riggins 
A. F. Young 
Albert L. Berry 
Hubert Jaco 
Clyde Orr 
Robert B. Turner 

R. L. Grider 
C. T. Sharpton 
H. L. Davis 
Rev. Leo Kampsen 
Rawdy Whittaker 
Morris Cierley 
Dan R. Glass 



Ray Butler 
J. L. Cardwell 
Claud M. Logan 
Homer Bickers 
Charles Furr 
Eddie Ward 

Jim Boyd 
Don Bradshaw 
Aggie Sale 
Henry Pryse 
Ed Allin 
Carl Mahan 
Bobby Disponett 

Pob Abney 
Elmer T. GUb 
Ralph Carlisle 
Nick Wanchic 
Elmer Stephenson 
Edward Shemelya 
Bill Maxwell 



Page Eight 


THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1956 


School 


Address 


Principal 


Basketball Coach 


D. 44 Berea 


Berea 


Mrs. Mon-is Todd 


Bill D. Harrell 


Bei-ea Foundation 


Berea 


Roy N. Walters 


Robert Jones 


Central 


Richmond 


James B. Mooi-e 


Russell Roberts 


Estill County- 


Ii-vine 


Luther Patrick 


Rodney Brewer 


Irvine 


Ii-vine 


Joe Ohr 


Joe Ohr 


Madison-Model 


Richmond 


Kenneth Caufield 

REGION 12 


Guy Strong 


D. 45 Buckeye 


R. 3, Lancaster 


Mrs. Gladys S. Bruner 


Harold Murphy 


Cp. Dick Robinson 


Lancaster 


W. R. Tudor 


Earl Shaw 


Danville 


Danville 


Don R. Rawlings 


Ken Snowden 


Forkland 


Gravel Switch 


Garland Purdom 


Garland Purdom 


Junction City 


Junction City 


Earl Cocanougher 


Garis Ball 


Lancaster 


Lancaster 


Stanley Marsee 


Leslie C. Dyehouse 


Paint Lick 


Paint Lick 


Mrs. Fay Little 


Harold L. Kittrell 


Parks ville 


Parksville 


Harlan Kriener 


Joe Wesley 


Perryville 


Perryville 


M. W. Rowe 


Harlan C. Peden 


D. 46 Brodhead 


Broadhead 


D. A. Robbins 


Joe Harper 


Crab Orchard 


Crab Orchard 


C. W. Bryant 


Douglas Hines 


Hustonville 


Hustonville 


Cecil Purdom 


Jack Johnson 


Liberty 


Liberty 


Garland Creech 


Earl Land, Jr. 


Livingston 


Livingston 


Charles Parsons 


Preston Parrott 


McKinney 


McKinney 


M. C. Montgomery 


Lloyd Gooch 


Memorial 


Waynesburg 


Lester M. Mullins 


Doyle McGuffey 


Middleburg 


Middleburg 


Nathaniel Buis 


Truman Godbey 


Mt. Vernon 


Mt. Vernon 


William Landrum 


Jack L. Laswell 


St. Bernard 


Clementsville 


Sr. Carmelita Mattingly 


Rev. Thomas Buren 


Stanford 


Stanford 


Denzil Ramsey 


Denzil Ramsey 


D. 47 Bumside 


Burnside 


Raymond Combs 


Leonard Sears 


Eubank 


Eubank 


J. B. Albright 


Glen Bryant 


Ferguson 


Ferguson 


Olen Kerns 


Ray Stines 


McCreary County 


Whitley City 


Dewey Ball 


J. C. Bell 


Monticello 


Monticello 


Robert Woosley 


Charles R. Harris 


Nancy 


Nancy 


Herbert T. Higgins 


Lindsey Molen 


Pine Knot 


Pine Knot 


Mrs. C. D. Harmon 


Howard Jones 


Pulaski Co. 


Somerset 


Edward B. Webb 


Collas Simpson 


Russell Co. 


Russell Springs 


L. A. Johnston 


Charles Mrazovich 


Shopville 


Shopville 


Miss Bethel Burdine 


Roy Holt 


Somerset 


Somerset 


W. B. Jones 


T. S. Glass 


Steams 


Stearns 


(Supt.) C. W. Hume 


Jack W. Murphy 


Wayne Co. 


Monticello 


Arthur J. Lloyd 


Lloyd Hudnall 


D. 48 Bush 


Lida 


C. Frank Bentley 


Claude McKnight 


Hazel Green 


R. 1, East Bernstadt Clark E. Chestnut 


Clark E. Chestnut 


Lily 


Lily 


R. S. Baldwin 


Harold Storm 


London 


London 


Harry Howard, Jr. 
REGION 13 


Gilbert Samples 


D. 49 Annville 


Annville 


Zilda R. Heusinkveld 


Jerry Hacker 


Clay County 


Manchester 


Robert Campbell 


J. W. Thurman 


McKee 


McKee 


W. L. Anderson 


Bruce Norris 


Oneida 


Oneida 


John A. Wells 


David C. Jackson 


Tyner 


Tyner 


James W. Wilson 


Jack Powell 


D. 50 Barbourville 


Barbourville 


R. H. Playforth 


Herb D. Tye 


Corbin 


Corbin 


H. A. Howard 


Hari-y J. Taylor 


Knox Central 


Barbourville 


Clinton B. Hammons 


Charles Black, Jr. 


Lynn Camp 


Corbin 


P. M. Broughton 


Z. R. Howard 


Pleasant View 


Pleasant View 


Rev. Clive Smith 


George E. Moses 


Poplar Creek 


Carpenter 


Charles M. Lawson 


Tony McKiddy 


Rockhold 


Rockhold 


Dan L. Cobb 


Paul Mauney 


Williamsburg 


Williamsburg 


H. B. Steely 


J. B. Mountjoy 


Woodbine 


Woodbine 


Raymond Wells 


Warren Peace 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH 


[ SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1956 


Page Nine 


School 


Address 


Principal 


Basketball Coach 


D. 51 Bell County 


Pineville 


James A. Pursifull 


Willie Hendriekson 


Henderson Settle. 


Frakes 


Thomas Winkler 


A. H. York 


Lone Jack 


Four Mile 


Robert Hendriekson 


G. B. Hendriekson 


Middlesboro 


Middlesboro 


Clyde T. Lassiter 


Shelvie Fuson 


Pineville 


Pineville 


Effie Arnett 


Orville Engle 


Red Bird 


Beverly 


Perle Estridge 


Roy E. Garland 


D. 52 Benham 


Benham 


James H. Powell 


Charles Davis 


Black Star 


Alva 


W. R. Miracle 


D. C. Taylor 


Cumberland 


Cumberland 


Talmage Huff 


Earl Bradford 


Evarts 


Evarts 


Leonard F. Woolum 


Charlie Hunter 


Hall 


Grays Knob 


Mildred Rowland 


Joe Campbell 


Harlan 


Harlan 


Roy G. Teague 


Joe Gilly 


Loyall 


Loyall 


Charles R. Steele 


Needham Saylor 


Lynch 


Lynch 


Sam Potter 


James Summers 


Pine Mountain 


Pine Mountain 


Gerna Campbell 


William E. Collins 


Wallins 


Wallins 


John H. Howard 
REGION 14 


James L. Howard 


D. 53 Fleming-Neon 


Neon 


Jason Holbrook 


Preston Armstrong 


Jenkins 


Jenkins 


Homer C. Davis 


Henry Wright 


Kingdom Come 


Linefork 


William W. Watts 


Jack Fugate 


Stuart Robinson 


Blackey 


J. M. Burkich 


Benton Back 


Whitesburg 


Whitesburg 


Kendall Boggs 


Ernest Trosper 


D. 54 Buckhorn 


Buckhorn 


Marshall Colwell 


Fred Johnson 


Dilce Combs Mem. 


Jeff 


Homer Jones 


Warren H. Cooper 


Hazard 


Hazard 


H. M. Wesley 


Goebel Ritter 


Leatherwood 


Slemp 


Bingham Brashear 


Dwight Fields 


Leslie County 


Hyden 


Roscoe Turner 


Ray Howard 


M. C. Napier 


Hazard 


Walter Martin, Jr. 


Grant Combs 


Stinnett Settle. 


Stinnett 


Raleigh L. Couch 


Kenneth Wilson 


D. 55 Breathitt County 


Jackson 


Millard Tolliver 


Fairce Woods 


Carr Creek 


Carr Creek 


Morton Combs 


Morton Combs 


Cordia 


Cordia 


Alice H. Slone 


George W. Cornett 


Hindman 


Hindman 


Claude Frady 


Pearl Combs 


Jackson 


Jackson 


Orlaff Knarr 


J. B. Goff 


Knott County 


Pippapass 


Lovell Ison 


Elis R. Reynolds 


Magoffin Baptist 


Mountain Valley 


Miss Anna Starkey 


Jessie Smith 


Oakdale Voc. 


Oakdale 


Willard Trepus 


Lowell Noble 


Riverside Inst. 


Lost Creek 


Miss Ada Drushal 


Gordon Drushal 


D. 56 Hazel Green Aca. 


Hazel Green 


Mrs. G. E. Breece 


B. E. O'Donnell 


Lee County 


Beattyville 


T. L. Arterberry 


H. K. Hampton 


Owsley County 


Booneville 


W. 0. Gabbard 


Fred Callahan 


Powell County 


Stanton 


W. C. Stevens 


Bill Orme 


Wolfe County 


Campton 


Ora Watts 
REGION 15 


A. M. Richie 


D. 57 Belfry 


Belfry 


D. E. Elswick 


Zeb Blankenship 


Dorton 


Dorton 


Charles E. Spears 


Monroe Hall 


Elkhorn City 


Elkhorn City 


James V. Powell 


Arthur Mullins 


Feds Creek 


Feds Creek 


W. F. Doane 


W. S. Risner 


Hellier 


Hellier 


William M. Justice 


Homer Owens 


John's Creek 


R. 2, Pikeville 


Charles R. Elswick 


Glen McDowell 


Phelps 


Phelps 


Tilden Deskins 


George Bailey 


Pikeville 


Pikeville 


Bernard N. Mims 


John W. Trivette 


Virgie 


Virgie 


Fred W. Cox 


T. T. Colley 


D. 58 Auxier 


Auxier 


John Wells 


Jack F. Wells 


Betsy Layne 


Betsy Layne 


D. W. Howard 


Tommie Boyd 


Floyd County 


Prestonsburg 


Ottis Spurlock 


William Goebel, Jr. 


Garrett 


Garrett 


Charles Clark 


John Campbell, Jr. 


McDowell 


McDowell 


George L. Moore 


Estill Hall 


Martin 


Martin 


James W. Salisbury 


Denzil Halbert 


Maytown 


Langley 


Edwin Stewart 


Ray Heinisch 


Wayland 


Wayland 


Lawrence B. Price 


John D. Campbell 


Wheelwright 


Wheelwright 


Boone Hall 


Adrian Hall 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1956 



School 



Address 



Principal 



Basketball Coach 



D. 59 Blaine 

Flat Gap 

Inez 

Louisa 

Meade Memorial 

Paintsville 

Van Lear 

Warfield 



Blaine 
Flat Gap 
Inez 
Louisa 

Williamsport 
Paintsville 
Van Lear 
Warfield 



Paul Gambill 
Basil Mullins 
Russell Williamson 
L. H. McHargue 
Russell Boyd 
Oran C. Teater 
Hysell Burchett 
Oran Hinkle 



Andy Wheeler 
Francis Stapleton 
Claude Mills 
John Thompson 
Paul Butcher 
Jim Wheeler 
Billy L. Conley 
Clyde Copley 



D. 



60 Ezel 

Morgan County 
Oil Springs 
Salyersville 
Sandy Hook 



Ezel 

West Liberty 

Oil Springs 

Salyersville 

Sandy Hook 



Ottis Murphy 
Llovd E. Patterson 
Willis H. Conley 
Creed Arnett 
Roy Lewis 



Glen Helton 
Merle Nickell 
Herman Bolin 
Leonard Marshall 
Tom Adkins 



REGION 16 



I). 61 Camargo 

Clark County 

Frenchburg 

Montgomery Co. 

Mt. Sterling 

St. Agatha Acad. 

Winchester 



Mt. Sterling 

Winchester 

Frenchburg 

Mt. Sterling 

Mt. Sterling 

Winchester 

Winchester 



Walter H. Power 
Joseph Conforti 
Geraldine Galloway 
E. G. Jones 
Dawson Orman 
Sr. Caroline Mary 
Nelson Jones 



Luther Risner 
Letcher Norton 
Robert W. Randall 
E. W. Clark 
James McAfee 
Rev. John Danz 
"Eck" Branham 



D. 62 Breckinridge Trg. 
Haldeman 
Morehead 
Owingsville 
Sharpsburg 



Morehead 

Haldeman 

Morehead 

Owingsville 

Sharpsburg 



Monroe Wicker 
Clifford Cassady 
Calvin Hunt 
Edsel Karrick 
Julian Cunningham 



John Allen 
Clifford Cassady 
Tilford Gevedon 
Les Stiner 
Julian Cunningham 



D. 63 Carter Carter 

Erie Olive Hill 

Hitchins Hitchins 

Olive Hill Olive Hill 

Prichard Grayson 

V'burg-Lewis Co. Vanceburg 



Thomas E. Phillips 
James Ivev 
Harold H.'King 
Hayden Parker 
Max E. Calhoun 
Teddy Applegate 



Glenn Sparks 
William C. Priestley 
John R. Hartig 
Andrew J. Fultz 
Walter Willis 
Shelby Linville 



D. 64 Ashland 

Boyd County 

Catlettsburg 

Greenup 

Holy Family 

McKell 

Raceland 

Russell 



Ashland 

R. 1, Ashland 

Catlettsburg 

Greenup 

Ashland 

South Shore 

Raceland 

Russell 



South Portsmouth South Portsmouth 



Wurtland 



Wurtland 



H. L. Ellis 
Webb Young 

(Supt.) Floyd Hall 

Agnes Miller 
Sr. M. Herbert 
Carroll Caudill 
L. T. Dickenson 
Frank Firestine 

(Supt.) Foster Meade 

Eugene Sammons 



Robert Lavoy 
Delmis Donta 
Charles Snyder 
H. R. Bowling 
Rev. Edward Haney 
Bennett Webb 
Jack Carson 
Marvin Meredith 
Chester Bruce 
Everett Vanover 



BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(Continued from Page Two) 



Hooks 



Floyd. 112!|i;. Allen St., Owensboro 

O. Bo.x 183. Russell Springs, 12003 



Huter, .lames J.. 3505 Vermont. Louisville. Cypress 3891 
Jackson, J. O.. 1659 B Division, Evansville 14, Ind., Ha 40370 
.Tamerson, Wilbur R., Vets Village, Box No. 355, Morehead, 

14 (Bus. No.) 
Jenkins, Neel, 244 Padgett St., Morganfield, 503 W 
Jerger, Carl B., 1601 E. Sycamore. Evansville, Ind., Ha 45842, 

Ha 53311 
King, .lohn J.. Jr., 1758 Dixdale, Louisville 10, Arlington 3732, 

Melrose 48311 
Kitchen, Leslie, 1701 Lindy Lane, Lexington. 30396, 51575 
Krebs, Francis, 514 No. 34th St., Louisville, Ar 0626, Jp 4-1361, 

Ext. 473 
Law, Ray L., 809 Broadway, Bowling Green, 38850, 27939 
Lee, Lonnie W., Keavy 
Lile, William A., Crofton, 3630 

Lott, Jack D., 4525 Fox Run Road, Louisville, Be 5976 
McQuilling, Gerald, 2011 S. Lombard, Evansville, Ind., Gr 

66941, Ha 53311 
Massengili, Thomas H., 606 Winchester. Middlesboro, 1910, 

37-581 
Mayo, Henry L., Jr., 681 College, Paintsville, 866, 768 
Mays, Ralph J.. Barbourville, 710 R 
Miles, Joseph D., 22nd & Main, Louisville, New Albany, Ind., 

41639, Louisville Cy 1061 

((Del, Kobert Alan, Bouts 3, Winchester, 7e6-M-2, 28a-J 



Peay, Curtis E., 118 N. Sunrise Dr., Bowling Green 
Perry. George. Route 4, Box 280, Frankfort, 4-4829 
John A., 3799 Gatewood, Cincinnati 
Tu 1-2474, Je 1-4548 



P. O. Box 113, Morehead, 731 J, 



492, In 



Price, Dwight L., 157 Cherokee Park, Lexington, 3-2416 

Redmon, Jack Ray, 21st St., Middlesboro, 605, 104 

Riddle, George W.. Maceo. Ensor 2482 

Rose. Lee Hyden, 209 E. Maxwell, Lexington, 2-4668 

Rush. Ralph. Lida, London 

Schellhase. David G., 1630 Wedeking, Evansville, Ind.. Ha 5-9790 

Schmidt, Robert, Alexandria Pike, Alexandria, Myrtle 7-6398 

Selvy, Curt, Steele, Corbin, 1333 

Shaw, Earl, 109 Hillcourt, Lancaster, 524, Bryantsville 2201 

Shrewsbury, Richard, 148 Shawnee Place, Lexington, 6-0669 

Thurman, Robert, c/o Lighthouse Lake, Louisville, Gl 8-9372 

Smith, Clifford E., 407 13th. Ashland, East 46191, East 4-6111 

Tindall. Gene D.. Route 1, Shelbyville, 910-W3, 450 

Todd, Lonnie H., Route 2. Madisonville, 897-R, 271 

Trussell, Arthur, P. O. Box 242. Williamsburg, 6612 

Tye, Charles H.. Jr.. 362 Transylvania Park, Lexington, 2-3349 

Vanhooser, James, 422 E. Bellville. Marion, 466, 466 

Vice, Cliff, Jr., East Main, Carlisle, 464 W, 3 

Walton, Boy, 212 Reed Lane, Lexington, 48189, 42331 

Webb, Lester, P. O. Box 608. Morehead 

Welch, John H.. P. O. Box 606, Neon. 2771, 4703 

Williams, Donald D„ Route 2, Waltersville 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1956 



Page Eleven 



The Flying Dutchman 




Got a letter in the mail saying, "Dutchman, 
how about letting us know through your 
column in the Athlete how your various pro- 
jects function and what they are?" This re- 
minded us of something Talt Stone said a 
few years ago when the Dutchman was con- 
sidering dropping an activity because he 
doubted it was doing as much good as he 
had hoped for. 

Said Talt, "Just because you don't hear 
from people, don't get the idea that a pro- 
gram is not clicking. You got to keep 'plug- 
ging away.' Make a list some time of your 
projects and get somebody to evaluate it, 
and you'll get all the encouragement any- 
body will ever need." Talt was so right in his 
thinking. 

Four communications this month answer 
the request for information on the activities 
of the Flying Dutchman which are purely 
philanthropic endeavors. One was from a 
cheerful crippled kid, another came from a 
proud school principal whose school had just 
been recognized with an Abou Ben Adhem 
award, a third was a happy long distance 
telephone call from a chap who had received 
a Corn Cob Pipe of Honor citation for un- 
selfish service, while the fourth came from 
a service man away down south in Florida, 
who said, "Keep writing the column." 

When a physically-handicapped kid says, 
"My award did something for me," and a 
school principal tells you that his entire 
community felt honored because his school 
had been recognized for good neighbor prac- 
tices, and another chap spends a couple of 
bucks on a telephone call because he got a 
"lift" from receiving a cob pipe, then you 
know Talt had something when he said. "You 
have got to make a list some time and eval- 
uate." 

There is a new Flying Dutchman project 



in the "hopper" for the New Year of 1956, 
The Youth Ambassadors of Friendship To 
Mexico. 

All of the Flying Dutchman readers re- 
member the first such breath-taking venture 
which took place in June of 1955, when 
eighty-five teen-age boys and girls from the 
Commonwealth of Kentucky astonished the 
world by flying to Cuba for the purpose of 
developing future friendships which might 
cause the world to be a friendlier place in a 
few years because kids from one country 
made friendships with those of another by 
personally visiting and getting to know and 
like them. 

You will recall how the Government of 
Cuba reciprocated by sending a plane load of 
their own youngsters to Kentucky to keep 
that spirit of future friendships between na- 
tions alive. Those Kentucky kids raised by 
their own efforts and through the sponsor- 
ships of adults willnig to invest in them more 
than $22,000 to finance this Friendship 
Flight. Winners of the Corn Cob Pipes of 
Honor became "Buck Sponsors" and helped 
by their sponsorships to the extent of $350. 
The avalanche of encouragement received 
by the Dutchman from all of you was heart- 
warming. 

Take a look at some of the reactions which 
were occasioned by the first Youth Ambas- 
sador of Friendship Flight to Cuba: LOOK 
Magazine, "Kentucky kids conquer Cuba;" 
Courier-Journal, "The ways of diplomacy are 
reported in some circles to be rather rugged. 
But the way the eighty-five Youth Ambas- 
sadors handled their first experience in in- 
ternational relations made it look like a 
breeze ;" Vice-President Richard Nixon, 
"Congratulations on a job well-done. You 
have made an important contribution to in- 
ternational goodwill and understanding;" 
Miami Beach Sun, "Those Kentucky kids 
proved that their State is equally famous 
for its courteous youngsters as it is for its 
blue grass and derby races ;" U. S. Embassy, 
Havana, Cuba, "Kentucky's Youth Ambas- 
sadors made a host of friends for the United 
States on their recent visit to Cuba;" Presi- 
dent Fulgencio Batista of Cuba, "You are an 
outstanding group. By your individual and 
collective initiative you have earned the 
privilege of sponsoring a great cause." 

Without the influence and help of friends 
of The Flying Dutchman it is a certainty that 
there could never have been that first Youth 
Ambassador of Good Will project. It was the 
moral and financial support given by Ken- 
tucky's athletic leaders, school men and of- 
ficials, and even those Dutchman readers 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1956 



beyond the boundaries of Kentucky which in- 
spired this youth movement and caused the 
eyes of the nation to focus on Kentucky. 
When our State Department, our Vice-Presi- 
dent, senators, congressmen and countless 
Kentuckians urged the Dutchman to organ- 
ize a second Youth Ambassador of Friend- 
ship Flight to Mexico in 1956, his first 
thought was to present it to Flying Dutch- 
man readers and if he had their support he'd 
be willing to make the gigantic effort again. 

Address a letter to The Flying Dutchman, 
Armory Building, Louisville, Ky., giving him 
your reaction to the proposed Youth Am- 
bassador of Friendship Flight to Mexico, 
letting him know if he has your backing in 
flying kids talented in athletics and other 
fields to another country to build friendships 
for the future. 

Watched George Conley and Tommy Bell 
team together in officiating a basketball 
game between Western and Alabama, and 
could not help but think that the training 
program of the K.H.S.A.A. was paying big 
dividends even outside the high school circles. 
There were several occasions when situa- 
tions arose where each had to cover for the 
other and did so with perfection. It was a real 
pleasure to watch those two make a tough 
job look easy. 

Presently, the K.H.S.A.A. training pro- 
gram is going on in all of the sixteen regions 
of the state, and good reports are coming in 
from the regional clinic directors who are 
doing the jobs out in the field. 

Harlan's Johnny Crosthwaite has already 
conducted four training sessions, and here 
are his results : 55 took his training at Man- 
chester, 80 attended at Barbourville, 40 were 
at his clinic at Pineville, while 150 crowded 
into the hall at Harlan. Johnny has two more 
planned at Benham and Loyall and will cover 
all the high schools in the 52nd district dur- 
ing the season. Remember that there are 
fifteen other such clinic directors besides 
Johnny teaching our officials in the other 
regions. Give your K.H.S.A.A. credit for a 
terrific training program for officials. 

HAPPY NEW YEAR ! 



Girls' State Basketball Clinic 

On Saturday, December 3, 1955. a Ba.sket- 
ball Clinic was held at Bowling Green High 
School, Bowling Green, Kentucky. The clinic 
was conducted by Dr. Lura Evans of South- 
ern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois. 
Approximately one hundred and ten attend- 
ed, representing seven high schools and three 
colleges. 

With some fifty girls participating, special 




Officers of K.A.P.O.S., the Kentucky Associa- 
tion of Pep Organization Sponsors, are, reading 
from left to right: Miss Phyllis Kloecker, Treasurer 
(University School); Mrs. Grace Fragstein, Presi- 
dent (Lafayette); Mrs. Stella S. Gilb, Executive- 
Secretary (University of Kentucky); Mrs. Jane 
McCoy, Vice-President (Shelbyville). 



attention was given to some of the basic 
skills in basketball. These included running, 
evading, jumping, using limited dribble and 
combining the dribble with a running screen. 
Following the skills sessions, Miss Evans 
gave an interpretation of the rules as estab- 
lished by the National Section for Girls' and 
Women's Sports. Some essential rules were 
discussed and demonstrated along with an 
explanation of the new N.S.G.W.S. rule 
changes. 

The techniques of officiating were demon- 
strated by Miss Peggy Stanaland, University 
of Louisville, and Miss Dottie Taylor, East- 
ern High School, Middletown, Kentucky. 
Many of the teachers and some of the stu- 
dents did some practice officiating. This 
concluded a most successful day of basket- 
ball for girls in the Southwestern part of 
the state. 

The state was indeed fortunate in having 
the capable leadership of Dr. Lura Evans. 
She has long been a leader in the promotion 
of N.S.G.W.S. standards and has made num- 
erous contributions to girls' basketball. 

Ratings in basketball officiating will be 
be given in several areas in the state this 
year. Definite plans have been made for these 
ratings in Bowling Green, Morehead, Lex- 
ington and Louisville. For additional infor- 
mation concerning basketball ratings con- 
tact Miss Peggy Stanaland, Kentucky Of- 
ficial Rating Board Chairman, University of 
Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1956 



Page Thirteen 








Scenes at the fifth annual Youth Day and Cheerleaders' Clinic, held at the University of 
Kentucky, Lexington, on Saturday, November 12, 1955, under the auspices of the Kentucky 
State Y.M.C.A. 



Page Fourteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1956 



Conference Standings 

Won Lost Tied Dickinson 
Eating 

Barren River Six-Man Conference 

Caverna 5 

Hiseville 4 1 

Austin Tracy 2 3 

Park City 1 4 

Temple Hill 5 

> Bluegrass Six-Man Conference 

Berea 6 

Perryville 5 2 

Wilmore 3 3 

Shepherdsville 1 3 

Burgin 7 

Central Kentucky Conference 

Harrodsburg 6 1 25.00 

Shelbyville (i 1 24.50 

Anderson 6 2 22.00 

Frankfort 6 3 21.00 

Nicholasville 7 10 21.00 

Madison 5 3 21.00 

Cynthiana 7 2 20.00 

Irvine 4 3 1 17.50 

Lancaster 3 5 13.75 

Garth 3 6 13.33 

Versailles 2 7 1 13.00 

Stanford 2 5 12.86 

Mt. Sterling 2 6 12.50 

M. M. I. 14 12.00 

Carlisle 1 4 12.00 

Paris 16 11.43 

Winchester 8 10.00 

Danville 3 1 No Rating 

Henry Clay 3 1 No Ratine 

Somerset 1 No Rating 

Cumberland Valley Conference 

Harlan 7 

Hall 6 1 2 

Loyail 4 2 

Black Star 3 2 1 

Evarts 5 3 

Benham 3 3 2 

Wallins 1 6 1 

Cumberland 1 6 

Lynch 17 

Eastern Kentucky Mountain Conference 

Pikeville 7 

Whitesburg 4 2 

Fleming 4 2 

Prestonsburg 4 3 

Hazard 3 3 

Paintsville 3 4 

Belfry 2 4 
Elkhorn City 



Southeastern Kentucky Conference 



Jenki] 











North Central Kentucky Six-Man Conference 



Or 



Northeastern Kentucky Athletic Conference 

Catlettsburg 5 

Russell 3 2 

Raceland 3 2 

Louisa 1 3 

Wurtland 1 3 

McKell 1 3 

Northern Kentucky Athletic Conference 

Dixie Heights 8 26.00 

Newport 5 10 22.50 

Holmes 4 2 20.00 

Bellevuc 5 3 1 17.22 

Highlands 4 5 15.55 

Dayton 3 5 1 14.44 

Lloyd 4 5 14.44 

Campbell County 3 4 14.28 

Boone County 3 2 13.00 

Ludlow 1 8 11.11 

Beechwood 5 10.00 

South Central Kentucky Conference 

Springfield 6 30.00 

Elizabethtown 6 2 24.00 

St. Joseph 4 2 22.60 

St. Charles 5 2 1 20.62 

Bardstown 2 2 1 18.60 

Glasgow 3 2 II 18.00 

Fort Knox 2 4 13.33 

Tompkinsville 1 4 12.00 

Old Ky. Home 1 6 11.43 

Lebanon 6 10.00 



Corbin 
Pineville 
Williamsburg 
Knox Central 
Bell County 
Lynn Camp 
Middlesboro 
Barbourville 



30.0 
19.7 
18.6 
17.9 
16.7 
16.7 
IB.O 
12.1 



Western Kentuckv Athletic Conference 



lie 



Henderson 

Franklin-Sii 

Sturgis 

Morganfield 

Calloway C^ 

Mayfield 

Hopkins\ 

Owensbo 

Russellville 

Bowling Green 

Murray 

Madisonville 

Marion 

Trigg County 

Owensboro Catholii 

Daviess County 



24.25 
19.64 
19.50 
19.44 
19.25 
19.00 
15.00 
15.00 
16.00 
14.44 
14.44 
13.33 
13.33 
12.50 
11.66 
11.26 
11.26 
10.00 



All-Conference Teams 

Barren River Conference 

Ends: Poison. Hiseville ; Siddens, Hiseville; Shipley, Aus- 
tin-Tracy : Lindsey, Caverna. 

Center: Campbell, Caverna. 

Backs : Harper, Caverna : Hestand, Caverna : Powell, Austin- 
Tracy : .Tanes. Park City : Bunch, Hiseville : Cox, Austin-Tracy ; 
.Tones. Temple Hill. 

Bluegrass Six-Man Conference 

Linemen : Singleton, Berea : Reynolds, Perryville ; Walker, 
Berea ; Adkins, Perryville. 

Backs : LeMaster, Berea : Saddler, Shepherdsville ; William- 
son, Berea : Lowe, Burgin. 

Cumberland Valley Conference 

Ends : Kirk, Benham ; Webb of Harlan and Rose of Black 
Star (tie). 

Tackles : Cornett, Loyail : Goforth, Loyail. 

Guards: Adkisson, Harlan; McKeehan, Hall. 

Centers: Cole of Benham and Owens of Harlan (tie). 

Backs : Parson, Harlan ; Toby of Evarts and Hensley of 
Hall (tie) : Walls of Harlan and Warfield of Black Star (tie). 

Eastern Kentucky Mountain Conference 

Ends: Bartlev. Elkhorn City: E. .Justice, Pikeville. 
Tackles: Siner, Hazard: Scott, Pikeville. 
Guards: Hutchinson. Pikeville: Long. Whitesburg. 
Center: Swiney. Elkhorn City. 

Backs : Hughes. Prestonsburg : H. L. Justice. Pikeville : 
Conley, Paintsville. Meade, Whitesburg. 

Northeastern Kentucky Athletic Conference 

Ends: Morton, McKell: Mollett, Catlettsburg. 
Tackles: Gorrell, Russell: Grubb, Wurtland. 
Guards: Rose, Raceland: Thompson, Louisa. 
Center : Patton. Louisa. 

Backs: Jones. Raceland: Barber, Wurtland: Griffeth, 
Catlettsburg : Jordon, Wurtland. 

Northern Kentucky Athletic Conference 

Ends ; Pigg of Newport, Lewis of Holmes and McKibben 
of Dixie Heights (three-way tie). 

Tackles : Holzschuh, Newport ; Landell of Newport and 
Walker of Dixie Heights (tie). 

Guards: Dixius, Bellevue : Fletcher, Dixie Heights. 

Center: Ross. Dixie Heights. 

Halfbacks : Mendell, Bellevue ; Moore of Dayton and Albera- 
hart of Highlands (tie). 

Fullback: White. Holmes. 

South Central Kentucky Conference 

Ends: McGill, Springfield; Brooks, Bardstown; Oswald, 
Fort Knox. 

Tackles: Boone. St. Joe: Smith, Tompkinsville: L. Mattine- 
ly. St. Charles : Coffman, Elizabethtown. 

Guards: Breden, Old Ky. Home; Thompson, Springfield; 
Higdon, Bardstown. 

Center: Yates, St. Charles. 

Backs : Corbett. St. Charles ; Best, Elizabethtown ; Pardee, 
Springfield: Herman, St. Joe; Robinson, Bardstown; Barnes, 
Old Ky. Home: H. Mattingly. St. Charles. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1956 



Page Fifteen 



Southeastern Kentucky Conference 

Ends : Chandler, Corbin : Turner of Corbin and Cheek of 
Bell County (tie). 

Tackles: Miracle, Bell County; Scalf. Corbin. 

Guards: Patrick, Williamsburg-; Steely, Corbin. 

Center: Hensley, Knox Central. 

Backs: Bird, Corbin; Wilder, Corbin: Denny, Pineville ; 
Stanfield of Williamsburg: and Jackson of Lynn Camp (tie). 

^ Western Kentucky Athletic Conference 

Offensive Team 

Ends : Hovius, Bowling' Green : Fisher, Owensboro Catholic. 

Tackles : Berry, Sturgis ; Whitley, Franklin-Simpson. 

Guards : Hammonds, Caldwell County ; Newton, Bowling 
Green. 

Center ; Benson, Henderson. 

Backs : Rodgers, Madisonville ; Richards, Franklin-Simpson ; 
Morris, Mayfield : Kelly, Caldwell County. 

Defensive Team 

Ends : Potts, Sturgis : Gentry, Franklin-Simpson. 
Tackles : Hina, Sturgis ; Perry. Franklin-Simpson. 
Guards : Cesser, Owensboro Catholic ; McMahan, Hender- 

Backs : Watkins. Henderson : Brown, Russellville : Mayes, 
Sturgis ; Green, Franklin-Simpson ; Jennette, Bowling Green. 



GUEST EDITORIALS 

(Continued from Pag-e One) 

Thoug-htfully, the city h^d provided warn- 
ing signs for motorists who were want to 
come whizzinor hell for leather down this 
narticular artery. It said: "Drive carefully. 
Don't injure our Dlayers!" Below this some- 
one had carefully written in with chalk: 
"Wait for the coach !" 

But of course, this is just a joke. You are 
probably the most influential man in your 
community in the vouthful set these days. 
You can afford to do no wrong because all 
eyes are upon you. You set the examples. 

This same instructor in punts and nasses 
set public speech classes in our school back 
10 years. Since time immemorial instructors 
have been trying to impress upon budding 
William Jenninp-s Brvans that they should 
allow the hands to swing freely and naturally 
when addressing an audience. This coach al- 
ways kept his hands in his pocket when 
speaking to a grour), or making a pep meet- 
ing talk. Furthermore, he'd jingle coins in his 
pocket while delivering his priceless 
forensics. 

To this day when I get uo before a crowd 
I frequently keep mv h^nds in mv pocket and 
finger loose chan"-e. I don't think I was anv 
more impressionable than the average kid. 
Never underestim-^te vour influence, Coach. 

You've got an important job. You get hold 
of most of these youngsters just as thev've 
reached the awkward age — the awkward age 
is that embarrassing oeriod when the average 
youth discovers that he knows more than his 
father. He's setting aside the cocoon of youth 
for the robes of manhood. So Coach it's your 
job to impress unon the prospective star that 
athletic heroes have been coming and going 
for a long time. 

People forget quick. You are to emphasize 




": ' f- 



Daymen Day 
IN MEMORIAM 

Daymon Day died Sunday morning, Novem- 
ber 6, at his home in Bedford, Kentucky. He 
had been employed by the Trimble County 
Board of Education at the beginning of the 
current school year, and was Principal of 
Trimble County High School. 

Mr. Day was a native of Hart County. He 
attended College High in Bowling Green, and 
graduated from Western State College. Since 
college, he had served in the capacities of 
teacher and attendance officer in Hart Coun- 
ty, and as coach and principal at Sonora, 
Upton, Memorial High and Corinth. He had 
been affiliated with school work for the past 
eighteen years. 

Mr. Day was a member of the Baptist 
Church, Lions Club and Masonic Lodge. His 
sudden death, due to a heart attack, was a 
great shock to his family and multitude of 
friends. 

— C.A.H. 

that athletic fame dies as quickly as a tropic- 
al flower — and stays dead just as long. 
There's nothing as pathetic as the man who 
tries to spend the rest of his life living in 
the reflected glow of a greateness that's gone. 

Tell him, Coach, that the fellows who jump 
up and yell their heads off when he tears 
around end for 20-yards today, will have a 
hard time remembering his name five years 
from now. (Let me see, who WAS the cap- 
tain on my senior team?) 

Your most important job. Coach, is to let 
him know about the touchdowns in the real 
game of life. Football is a good teacher. You 



Page Sixteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1956 



can stress that teamwork and cooperation and 
living clean and giving his best pays off. But 
there's more to life than that. Much more. 

So, Coach, you, like Caesar's wife, must be 
above suspicion. You've got to show the way. 
As you go, so goes the squad — for a mighty 
long time. 

— Alabama Bulletin. 



"MEAN TO— Don't Get No Cotton Picked" 

Many years ago a sage old black philoso- 
pher spoke a truth that has been handed 
down over the years and has become a folk 
saying, "Mean to — don't get no cotton 
picked !" 

Probably there is not a principal or coach 
anywhere who does not at times resolve to 
take definite action to improve the sports- 
manship at the athletic contests in which 
his teams oarticioate. It may be that the 
attitude of the players is not just what it 
should be; or the nroblem mav be with stu- 
dent or adult spectators. Whatever the prob- 
lem, it is usually a difficult one — so difficult 
in manv cases that the principal or coach 
nuts off the task of attacking it, and soon 
the season is so far gone that he succumbs 
to the idea that it is too late to start anything 
this season. And he salves his conscience by 
promising himself that he will do it for sure 
nevt year. 

The hardest thine about a difficult task 
is to start it. Great thincrs ffrow from small 
beeinnings. "Mean to — don't get no cotton 
picked !" 

— Tennessee Bulletin. 



Sportsmanship 

The teaching of reasonable and fair human be- 
havior is a continuing process. The stresses which 
center around the loyalties and group prestige as- 
sociated with athletic contests are a proving ground 
on which each individual is tested. Because the 
school group and the circumstances snri-ounding the 
contests are constantly changing, the job of develop- 
ing right attitudes never ends. 

It is a perpetual challenge to the school and ath- 
letic administrator. Because any g'iven group has a 
small percentage of individuals who lack inhibitions 
and who have little apnreciation of social obliga- 
tions, the disappointments are many but compensat- 
ing rewards are in the satisfaction which comes 
from directing energies into desirable channels. 

The athletic program has many values. Far 
from the least of these is the providing of oppor- 
tunity for an army of non-pai-ticipants to ex- 
perience the satisfaction which conies from working 
in a common cause without the excesses which un- 
inhibited behavior would produce. Setting up the 
machinery for utilizing this opportunity is a job 
worthy of the best efforts of the entire school staff. 
— National Federation Press. 




The Referee 

(Lament of a Disqualified Player) 

The Referee runs up and down 

And tears his thinning hair. 
He yells and blows his whistle with 

A John L. Lewis air. 
He glowers when I take a step 

Or brush against my guard 
And if I chance to hack a man 

He throws the book — and hard. 

The Referee's a flighty bird ; 

He has an eagle eye. 
I can't get any foul past him 

No matter how I try. 
But if my guard hangs on my neck 

Or smacks my ears down flat, 
The Referee ain't lookin', or 

He's blind as any bat. 

The Referee's a hard boiled egg, 

A domineering guy. 
And if I try to sass him back 

I kiss the game good-bye. 
I take his bum decrees and smile, 

Don't say what Pd like to say. 
But the son-of-a-gun is psychic. 

He throws me out for just 

Lookin' that way! 

— H. V.'s Athletic Anthology. 



Basketball Tournament Directors! 



The Board of Control will contract for all district and regional first 
place and second place KHSAA basketball trophies for the 1956 tourna- 
ments, and any tournament director who is interested in a third place, 
fourth place, sportsmanship award or best all around player as well as 
gold filled or sterling silver basketball charms or individual awards, we 
can take care of your order in the proper way complete with the necessary 
engraving. 

TOUKNAMENT BASKETBALLS: The MacGregor No. XlOL Lastbilt ball will again 
be one of the official balls used in the 1956 tournament, so let us have your order 
at $19.85 each. 

ADMISSION TICKETS: Available in several colors and nearly all prices from ten 
cents thi-u $1.25 including ADMIT ONE and PASS OUT. Stock tickets per roll of 
2,000 only $1.25. 

Tickets imprinted DISTRICT OF SEASON 1956 which are different from the stock 
tickets are $1.50 per roll of 2,000. 

SPECIAL IMPRINTED TICKETS: Send us a blueprint of your gym, and we can 
supply the reserved seat or special imprinted tickets on very short notice at factory 
prices. 

NURRE RECTANGULAR BACKBOARDS AT $350.00 PER PAIR: Goals and nets 
are extra. 

FAIR PLAY ELECTRIC BASKETBALL SCOREBOARDS: The No. FD60 is $350.00. 
The No. FISS Figurgrani is $445.00, complete with controls and cable. In stock for 
immediate delivery. 

BASKETBALL ACCESSORIES: No-Whip nets, scorebooks, Cramers first-aid supplies, 
bath towels, whistles, stop watches, Eastman Kodak timers, umpire's horns, basket- 
ball posters, powdered rosin, shoe laces in colors, white wool sweat socks or with 
3 inch colored top, individual carry-all bags, etc 

CONVERSE BASKETBALL SHOES: The famous All-Star for men No. 9160 black or 
the No. 9162 white, in all sizes from 5 thru 17 at $6.95 per pair. We have several pairs 
of irregulars of the above of the above shoes at $5.95 per pair. 

BASKETBALL UNIFORMS AND WARMUP JACKETS: We can give you two weeks 
delivery complete with lettering and numerals. All colors and trim to your specifica- 
tions. Several grades and colors carried in stock for immediate delivery. 

HUNT'S AWARD SWEATERS AND JACKETS: Our representative will gladly call 
to see you with samples of sweaters. Hunt's or O'Shea as well as Butwin or Hunt's 
jackets complete with the finest chenille lettering available. 

CATALOG GLADLY SENT UPON REQUEST 

LET US HELP YOU HAVE A SUCCESSFUL TOURNAMENT 



HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO. 

PHONE 104 MAYFIELD, KY. 

"The Largest Independent Exclusive Athletic House in the South" 








OFFICIAL'S 
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Colored top sweat socks 

Athletic supports — 

Bosketball goals 
and nets 



IS alv/ays ready \v/ffi 
complete basketball and 
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* SCOREMASTER SCOREBOARDS 
^ CONVERSE BASKETBALL SHOES 

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^ CRAMER'S FIRST AID AND 

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We have our own lettering dept. for fast delivery 
on Chenille letters and any style emblems 







OFFICIAL 


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INDIVIDUAL 
TROPHIES 

Trophies for Individual awards 
for sportsmanship, foul shoot- 
ing, and second team awards 
and charm bofls for individual 
players. Write for our com- 
plete trophy catalog. 




UTCLIFFE CO. 

LOUISVILLE 1, KENTUCKY 




J'M 



High School AthMe 

NEW SCHOOL PLANT AT ELIZABETHTOWN 





The Elizabethtown High School and the Morningside Elementary School have been erected 
at an approximate cost of $750,000.00. The gymnasium will seat 2,500. 



Official Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 
FEBRUARY - 1956 



New Russell E. Bridges Physical Education Bldg., Ft. Thomas 




c 



Dedicatory exercises, honoring Mr. Bridges, were held in the Highlands High School gymnasium on January 15. 




The basement recreation room is used for student activities during the day and by the teen-age canteen and other 
groups on weekends and for special evening programs. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XVTII— NO. 7 



FEBRUARY, 1956 



1.00 Per Year 



Report on the National Federation Winter Meeting 



The Kentucky High School Athletic Associa- 
tion and the Kentucky Hig-h School Coaches Charity 
Association were represented at the National Fed- 
eration meeting, held in Nashville, Tennessee, on 
January 4-7, by Commissioner Theo. A. Sanford; 
Dr. Lyman V. Ginger. Football Committee mem- 
ber; Supt. Robert P. Forsythe, Board of Control 
member; Prin. Joe Ohr of the Irvine High School, 
Secretary of the Kentucky Coaches Charity Asso- 
ciation; and Athletic Director Edgar McNabb of 
the Beechwod High School, President of the coaches 
organization. 

The three day meeting, which included sessions 
for state executive officers and for members of 
the National Federation Football Committee, was 
held in the Andrew Jackson Hotel. Delegates from 
forty states were in attendance. 

Mr. H. V. Porter, Executive Secretary of the 
National Federation, summarized for members of 
the Football Committee the more important rule 
modifications which received the approval of that 
committee at the meeting. Mr. Porter's summary 
follows: 

CHECK-UP ON 1955 CODE: 20,000 football 
questionaires were distributed and approximately 
5500 were returned and tabluated. The complete 
minutes contain a summary of the vote on each 
of the listed items and a tabulation of the comments 
which were made on the back of the questionnaire. 
The returns indicate a high degree of satisfaction 
with the changes which were made for last season. 
The_ last seasons revisions which had to do with 
setting a maximum length for shoe cleats and with 
the use of white stripes on the sleeve of a jersey 
were approved by more than 30 to 1. Beginning 
with the season of 1956, no shoe cleat longer than 
% inch may be used. Beginning with the season 
of 1957, no white stripe on the jersey below the 
elbow may be used. Questionnaire item 3 which 
gave expanded coverage for certain infrequent ille- 
gal forward pass situations was approved by a 
vote of more than 4 to 1. A minority felt that one 
or two inequities remain. A majority seem to be- 
lieve that these few claimed inequities are more 
than offset by improvements in related situations, 
^tem 4 which gives the snapper the same foot rights 
as any other lineman was approved by a vote of 
more than 30 to 1. Items 5 and 6 were approved 
bv more than 9 to 1. The dissenting minority was 
doubtful as to one or two features of the revision 
which increases the number of possible cases where 
two fouls related to the same down do not result 
in_ a double or multiple foul. Since each foul is ad- 
ministered as an independent infraction, there is a 
slight possibility of having a measurement in one 
direction immediately followed by a measurement 
in the opposite direction. Action by the Commit- 
tee eliminates some of these for 1956. The present 
set of signals as used by Officials is approved by 
more than 6 to 1. The dissenting minority is of 
the opinion that there should be two separate sig- 



nals for offensive and defensive holding or that the 
clasping of the wrist should be used instead of 
the current signal of hacking the wrist. 

During the course of the meeting, slight modifi- 
cations were adopted to take care of most of the 
objection to item 3 (procedure when penalty for 
an illegal forward pass is declined) and items 5 and 
6 (relationship of automatic acceptance or declina- 
tion of a penalty to a double or multiple foul). 

THE SIMPLIFICATION AND ORDERLY AR- 
RANGEMENT of the rules as in the Federation 
Code are, according to report, becoming more wide- 
ly understood and appreciated. 

COMMITTEE REPORTS: Reports from the 
various standing committees provided a wealth 
of material upon which to base action of the rules 
committee. Complete copy of reports from the 
Safety, Equipment, Statistical, Game Administra- 
tion and Research committees is included in the 
complete minutes. 

AUTHORIZED RULES REVISIONS 

Page 4: A slight change in the small field 
diagram will make it clear that the field should be 
marked by 5-yard intervals. It will also be stated 
that where possible, hash marks at 1-yard intervals 
should be placed at each inbounds line. 

1-3-1: This article will be revised to give rub- 
ber or composition-covered footballs which have 
been approved as meeting proper reaction and dura- 
bility standards the same status as that of a 
leather-covered ball. It will also be provided that 
if the two competing teams cannot agree on whether 
a leather-covered ball or a ball with another type 
cover shall be used, each team may designate at 
the beginning of a half which type ball will be used 
when that team snaps or free kicks. 

1-4-1 and 3-4-2: In each of these articles, an 
added statement will make it clear that any player 
may request a time-out provided the coach of that 
team has authorized such action. Otherwise, only 
Captain may request time-out. 

1-5-1: A revision of the last sentence will fur- 
ther emphasize the desirability of equipping each 
player with a flexible mouth guard and/or a face 
protector. Supplementary material will state that 
the proper committees are attemping to set mini- 
mum standards which must be met by any such de- 
vice if it is to be approved. If and when such 
standards are drawn up, the committee vsrill con- 
sider making the wearing of approved equipment 
mandatory for the season of 1957. 

1-5-3-d: The last sentence will be deleted 
and the second sentence will be expanded to make 
it clear that no cleat longer than % inch may be 
used. The note will state that certain soft material 
cleats as tested by a durometer will be approved 
for specified experimental use. Such cleats may 
have a thickness at the free end of less than the 
prescribed % inch or % inch provided that the 
thickness shall not be less than % inch. 
(Continued on Page Ten) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1956 



FEBRUARY, 1956 VOL. XVIII— NO. 7 

Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association. 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Russell Williamson (1952-66), Inez 

Vice-President Roy G. Eversole (1952-56), Hazard 

Directors — W. B. Jones (1953-67) Somerset: Louis Litchfield 
1953-57), Marion; W. H. Crowdus (1964-68), Franklin: .Tack 
Dawson (1954-58), Middletown : Robert P. Forsythe (1965-69) 
Browder: K. G. Gillaspie (1955-59), Georgetown. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 

Jrom the Commissioned s Office 

1956 District Tournament Sites 

(1) Central, (2) Reidland, (3) SecJalia, 
(4) Murray Training (5) Livingston County, 
(6) Lyon County, (7) Madisonville, (8) Hop- 
kinsville, (9) Providence, (10) Henderson 
City, (11) Sacramento, (12) Owensboro, (13) 
Hawesville, (14) Caneyville, (15) Hartford, 
(16) Muhlenberg Central, (17) Bowling 
Green, (18) Russellville, (19) Park City, 
(20) Marrowbone, (21) Campbellsville, (22) 
Memorial, (23) Elizabeth town, (24) Old Ken- 
tucky Home, (25) Flaget, (26) Fem Creek, 
(30) Shelbyville, (31) Oldham County, (32) 
Carrollton, (33) Boone County, (34) Coving- 
ton Catholic, (35) Highlands, (36) Newport 
Catholic, (37) Harrison County, (38) Brack- 
en County, (39) Maysville (40) Paris, (41) 
Bridgeport, (42) Versailles, (43) University, 
(44) Central, (45) Junction City, (46) Stan- 
ford, (47) Somerset, (48) Hazel Green, (49) 
Oneida, (50) Wilhamsburg, (51) Bell County, 
(52) Lynch, (53) Kingdom Come, (54) Haz- 
ard, (55) Hindman, (56) Wolfe Countv, (57) 
Pikeville, (58) McDowell, (59) Warfield, 
(60) Sandy Hook, (61) Clark County, (62) 
Breckinridge Training, (63) Hitchins, (64) 
Holy Family. 

News About Swimming 

The 1956 State High School Swimming 
Meet was scheduled originally to be held in 
Lexington on Saturday, March 31. It appears 
now that the meet will be held on April 7. 

Although the State Swimming Committee 
and the Board of Control have not completed 
the preparation of swimming regulations for 
the state affair, it is safe to assume that 
these regulations will be essentially the same 
as those in effect last year. 

Class A schools will include those high 
schools with an enrollment of 750 or more 
(grades 9-12), Class B will include those 
schools with an enrollment between 300 



and 750, and Class C will be schools with an 
enrollment of less than 300. Any school may 
enter a class above its classification, and any 
school entering a team in the meet for the 
first time may enter the class below its 
classification. 

The method of entering teams in the meet 
will be the same as in past years, with the 
State Office supplying entry blanks to the 
schools whose principals have indicated that 
they will enter teams in the meet. The As- 
sociation will probably make the same allow- 
ance to participants for transportation, lodg- 
ing and meals, as is given State Track Meet 
participants, this allowance applying to not 
more than two participants in each event. 
Expenses for the swimming coach will be 
paid if the school has as many as four en- 
tries in the State Meet. 

Allotment of State Tournament Tickets 

Followers of teams winning the regional 
basketball tournaments will have an oppor- 
tunity to purchase State Tournament tickets 
from their school principals under a ticket 
allotment plan similar to the one which has 
been in effect for the past several years. 
Approximately 1700 sets of tickets, calling 
for seats in the end and corner sections of 
the Coliseum, will be saved for the supporters 
of the regional winners. These tickets will 
be allotted to the schools involved on the 
basis of their enrollments, and the allot- 
ments will be made only to the schools with 
teams competing in any particular session. 
Principals of these schools wil be advised 
concerning their allotments early in the week 
of the State Tournament. 

By-Law 21 

School administrators and coaches should 
check their schedules carefully and see to it 
that their teams are not playing more than 
the number of basketball games allowed un- 
der the provisions of K.H.S.A.A. By-Law 21. 
In only one county, conference or invitational 
tournament may the games played by a team 
representing a member school count as only 
one game. If a team plays in more than one 
of these tournaments, the one in which the 
mo.st games are played may be counted as 
the one game mentioned in the By-Law. 
Protection Fund News 

Three hundred nine member schools of the 
K.H.S.A.A. had insured their athletes with 
the Protection Fund at the time this issue 
of the magazine went to press. Five hundred 
forty-two claims, totaling $11,833.71, have 
been paid since July 1. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1956 



Page Three 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled February 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone unless otherwise designated. If two numbers are 
given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Babbs, Don, Route 1, Box 58. Henshaw, Sturgis 2520 

Bloss, Howard, Marion 

Chaput, Louis E., 410 College Street, Elizabethtown, 3069, 4125 

Cornelius, H. R., Jr., 429 W. 15th Street, Hopkinsville, 5-3507, 

5-5232 
Cox. William .T., Oak Street, Pineville, 573 M, 371 
Fields. Ellis, Box 191, Matewan, W. Va. 
Finley, Sam, Kentucky Central Hotel, Campbellsville 
Hardy, Henry C. 4845 Peachtree, Louisville, CY-4185, Wa-7371, 

Ext. 294 
Hawkins, Charles C, 360 Maple Ave., Hodgenville, 20011, 4313 
Hensley, Calvin, Lida 

Johnson. Vernon Lee, 307 Holt Ave., Mount Sterling 
McCulIy, Ray, Route 2, Sebree, Di.xon 3831 
May, Harold M.. Box 97, Danville, 737, 1400 
Nally, Charles Leo, Route 1, Loretto, 34W 
Pursiful, Darrell, Box 59, Four Mile. Ed. 7-2983 
Straight, Roy, 1701 Jackson Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Stutler, John P., 1621 Cumberland, Covington, Ed 12631, — 

Ed 12631 
Teer, Forrest D., S. Main, Marion, 773 
Wheatley, Donald, Route 2, Lebanon, 2413 
Withers, Frank, 213 Willow Street, Providence, 2422 
Wray, Darrel, Box 545, Water Valley 



"Certified" Officials 

Since the list of "Certified" officials ap- 
peared in the January issue of the magazine, 
three additional officials have qualified for 
the "Certified" rating. They are: Anthony A. 
McCord, Pat McCuiston, Edgar McNabb and 
Leonard W. Webb. 



Correction 

CORRECTION FOR 1956 TRACK RULES 
BOOK: First paragraph on page 21, substi- 
tute: THE JUDGES of the pole vault shall 
determine the be.ginning height of the bar 
and successive elevations. The order of com- 
petition and number of trials shall be as 
provided in rule 9-1. 



Dr. Ginger Honored 

Near the close of the meeting of the Na- 
tional Federation Football Rules Committee, 
held recently in Nashville, Tennessee, Execu- 
tive Secretary Sam Burke of the Georgia 
High School Association, chairman of the 
committee mentioned, presented for the na- 
tional organization several citations for out- 
standing services in the field of athletics. 
Among these citations was one for Dean 
Lyman V. Ginger of the University of Ken- 
tucky staff, who has been a member of the 
committee for several years. The citation 
was in recognition of the contributions made 
by Dr. Ginger to the national organization. 



Board Election 

The terms of Board of Control members 
for Sections 7 and 8 expire on June 30. Two 
men have been nominated for membership 



on the Board by principals of Section 8. They 
are Principal Russell Williamson of the Inez 
High School, currently President of the 
K.H.S.A.A. ; and Principal Edwin V. Stewart 
of the Maytown High School. In Section 7, 
only one man received the necessary number 
of nominations for Board of Control member- 
ship, required under the provisions of Article 
IV, Section 2a, of the Association constitu- 
tion. He is Assistant Superintendent Cecil A. 
Thornton of the Harlan County Schools. 
Principals in Section 8 have been mailed 
ballots. These ballots should be returned to 
the State Office on or before March 1. 



School Milk Program 



The State Office has received recently 
from Mr. C. E. Bevins, Supervisor, Special 
School Milk Program, Department of Edu- 
cation, Frankfort, a letter outlining the pro- 
gram in Kentucky for 1955-56. Excerpts 
from Mr. Bevins' letter follow : 

"As you probably know, the Special School 
Milk Program makes it possible for boys and 
girls in school today to enjoy milk at a cost 
below the usual retail price. Congress ap- 
propriates the money, the State Department 
of Education in Kentucky approves schools 
for participation and certifies claims for 
reimbursement from the schools. We pay a 
maximum reimbursement of 4c of the cost 
of each half pint of milk the students drink. 

"Tournament time for basketball will soon 
be upon us. I was just thinking as to how 
nice it would be if each host school conduct- 
ing the tournament would provide cold re- 
freshing milk for each team after each game. 
The claim for reimbursement can be sub- 
mitted through the lunch program and the 
cost of the milk over the reimbursement 
could be written as tournament expense. I 
know you'll agree that we'd be doing the 
boys a big favor, and who deserves to share 
in tournament receipts more than the boys 
who are participating. 

"Spring football practice is still another 
time when an abundant supply of milk should 
be made available to the boys. I'll bet that 
after a hard scrimmage, some TACKLES 
could drink lots of milk. There are no re- 
strictions on the size of serving — half pints, 
pints, quarts may be used. All these coaches 
have to do is to provide the milk and report 
the amount to the lunch room." 

School administrators and coaches inter- 
ested in the milk program, who are not 
thoroughly familiar with the plan, should 
write to Mr. Bevins for more particulars. 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1956 



Schools' Ratings of Football Officials for 1955 



NAME 



ExceL Good Fair Poor NAME 



Excel. Good Fair Poor 



Adams, Mark 

Allmon, Raymond T.,_. 
Anderson, E. W., Jr._- 

Bach, Stanley 

Baker, Charles J. 

Ball, Al 

Barlow, Bill B. 

Barlow, Bob 

Barlow, James L 

Beiersdorfer, Jim 

Bell, Thomas P. 



9 
1 

5 
4 
1 
9 

Bennett, Howard j 16 

Betz, Dick 13 

Black, Charles D. j 3 

Blanton, Homer j 7 

Bloebaum, Albert | 1 

Boemker, Bob | 1 

Bostick, Lord M., Jr... 3 

Bowling, Harry 

Bowman, Earl G. (Dick) 3 

Boyles, Jerry F. 

Briggs, J. P. 

Brizendine, Vic 

Broderick, Carroll 10 

Brotzge, Maurice J. | 5 

Brown, George W. | 3 

Brown, James H. 

Burch, Ossie 6 

Byrd, Harry G., Jr. __ 2 

Caiman, Edwin C, Jr._ 8 

Campbell, John J. | 5 

Canter, John I 2 

Carlson, David A. j 3 

Cari'oll, Thomas J. | 5 

Carter, Darrell | 4 

Chattin, Ernie i 4 

Clagg, Harry G. 1 

Coleman, L. J., Jr 1 

Coleman, James T. 3 

Collier, "J" Hamlet -_ 2 

Combs, Travis 5 

Coulter, William M. _-- 3 

Cox, Layton 9 

Craig, Randy 

Creasey, Fred 9 

Crosthwaite, John S., Jr. 29 

Crum, Edward E. 4 

Daniel, Ernie, Jr. 3 

Davis, Charlie 14 

Davis, Clyde E. 6 

Deaver, John W. 9 

Derrington, Robert | 4 

Dexter, Sam j 4 

Dolan, Richard S. 

Dreyer, Jack 

Durkin, Jack H. 12 

Edelen, Ben R. 8 

Elovitz, Carl 2 

Ernst, Ray C. 3 

Ewing, C. M. (Hop) __ 

Faust, John F. | 

Fey, Allen I 3 

Figg, Charles R. I 4 

Fisher, W. B. | 

Fitchko, Bill I 29 

Fletcher, John L. | 3 



1 2 





2 





3 





2 





7 











7 


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13 


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8 





2 





2 





6 


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3 


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1 "' 


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5 





10 


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2 1 


2 


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5 





2 


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3 


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1 





6 


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6 


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5 


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8 


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9 


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11 





18 


1 


6 


2 


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1 


6 


3 


8 


1 


3 


2 


9 


2 


2 





3 





2 


1 


2 






Florence, Robert H. __j 

Forbes, John | 

Foreman, Earl V., Jr. | 

Forsythe, Robert ] 

Fortney, Robert L. j 

Freihaut, Herman P. _| 
Gammon, William H. __j 

Geiser, Carl H., Jr | 

Gettler, John F. [ 

Gillespie, Robert C. | 

Gish, Delmas | 

Gorham, Robert J. j 

Gosiger, Paul E. | 

Grace, Charles K. i 

Grace, H. E., Jr. | 

Grady, Clarence 0. __| 
Greenslait, James W. -_| 

Grissom, William H. | 

Gruneisen, Sam | 

Hadden, Newell P., Jr.__j 

Haffey, Stan j 

Hagan, Joseph E. | 

Hagerman, Bart | 

Hanes, Edward C. j 

Harris, Gene 1 

Hartley, William E.( Ox) I 

Heinold, John R. | 

Heldman, John, Jr. j 

Hellard, George Dr., Jr.| 

Hewling, Richard | 

Himmler, Robei't I 

Hoagland, Charles R., Jr.] 

Hoferer, Louis R. j 

Hogan, John E. ] 

Holbrook, William M. _| 
Holeman, D. Fletcher-_| 

Holland, Tom J. | 

Howerton, Jack, Jr. __| 

Hunter, Charles 

Hyland, John L. 

Isaac, John K. 

Jacobs, Edwin A. __. 
Janning, Robert L. _. 

Jarboe, Clem 

Jeter, John B. 

Johnson, Bernard __. 
Johnson, James M. -. 

Jones, Robert E. 

Kathman, Bernard | 

Keller, Herman | 

Kemper, Russ | 

Kempf, Joseph L. i 

King, Allen | 

Kraesig, Raymond 

Kyle, Leslie G., Jr. j 

Lancaster, Moms B. _ 

Lawson, Carl E. 

Lawson, Sam 

Levicki, A. P. 

Lindloff, Gilbert E.-_ 

Linker, Joe D. 

Long, James S. | 

Long, Leo J. 

Longenecker, David M. 

Lucas, Gene T. 

Ludwig, Harry F. 



8 


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13 


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z 


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: 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1956 



Page Five 



NAME 

McCollum, Robert G. __ 

McCord, Anthony 

McCorkle, Wade E. 

McCowan, Connell 

McDade, C. F. (Mickey) 

McGhee, Laurence 

McKown, C. H. 

McMillan, J. N. 

McNabb, Edgar 

McTigue, Joe 

Makepeace, Wm. H. Jr. 

Malcolm, Donald C. 

Manning, Louis 

Martin, Bill J. 

Matarazzo, Salvatore __ 

Mayhew, Happy 

Meeks, Jack 

Mercke, Frank R. 

Milliken, John S., Jr.__ 

Mitchell, Emmett 

Mitchell, Vyron W. 

Mordica, William 

Moss, Howard A. 

Mudd, Edward 

Muntan, Peter J. 

Mussman, Ralph 

Nau, Bill 

Neal, Gene 

Nimmo, Lo 

Noland, Douglas 

Nord, Ed 

Nunn, Winston C. 

Omer, Billy W. 

O'Nan, Norman 

O'Neal, Bud 

Osborne, Theodore G. _ 

Parker, M. L. 

Pai'ker, Monroe 

Parsley, Clyde E. 

Patrick, Charles C. _-_ 

Pearce, Horace Lee 

Perdue, Paul 

Perry, Alfred L. 

Pinson, Eugene 

Poore, William E. 

Potter, Sam 

Powell, Logan 

Pursifull, Cleophus 

Radjunas, Stan 

Ratterman, B. W., Sr._ 

Reece, Fred 

Reed, Gordon 

Reinhart, Gene 

Renfro, John E. 

Rentz, Thomas W. 

Riddle, Maurice G. 

Robertson, Everett 

Rocke, James M. 

Rogers, J. B. 

Rolph, Harold J. 

Ross, Bill 

Rudolph, Fred, Jr. 

Russell, Joe 

Rutledge, Ede 

Russell, Charles B., Jr._ 
Sabato, Al 



Excel. 


Good 


Fair 


Poor 


1 9 


11 


4 


1 


i 1 


2 


1 




1 











1 "1 


12 





2 


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8 


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1 3 


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1 2 


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1 1 











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13 


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10 


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8 


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2 


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3 


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7 


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13 


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1 


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14 


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7 


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1 





4 


7 








7 


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9 


7 








1 


6 








8 


8 


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11 


9 








1 


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4 


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6 


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3 











7 


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14 


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14 








2 





2 





7 


1 





1 


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4 


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3 


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4 


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1 


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6 


6 


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4 








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1 














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2 


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1 


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14 


6 


2 





3 


1 








9 


5 


1 








4 


1 






NAME 

Sacra, Gresham 

Bailee, W. E. 

Sauter, Harold S. 

Saylor, Ben H. 

Say lor, Deward B. 

Schmitt, K. F. 

Schuette, Frederick __ 
Schuhmann, Joseph R. _ 
Schultz, Edward (Jake) 

Schutz, Eugene R. 

Schutz, John J., Jr 

Scott, Bill 

Selvy, Curt 

Shaw, John H. 

Shaw, Stanley E. 

Sheets, James W. 

Shemelya, Ed 

Showalter, John 

Sinclair, George H. 

Sloan, Wallace 

Smith, Edgar J. 

Smith, Walter K. 

Sortet, Wilber 

Spaulding, Stan 

Sparks, Harry M. 

Sperry, George A. 

Steere, David 

Stephenson, Burkitt H. 

Stephenson, Harry S. i 

Stevens, Paul B. i 

Stevens, William D. 

Streicher, Abe 

Taylor, Jack G. 

Temple, J. B. j 

Thompson, A. W. 

Thompson, Jack | 

Thompson, Jack F., Jr.! 

Thompson, Paul l 

Thompson, Ralph [ 

Thurman, J. W. 

Thurman, Robert j 

Todoran, Roman i 

Treas, Joe W. 

Troutman, Doyle C. 

Tucker, William A. — i 

Tucker, William R. ; 

Vankirk, Alvia S. | 

Varner, Ray G. 

Vinson, William J. | 

Walker, Paul R. ' 

Wanchic, Nicholas 

Watson, Jack G. ] 

Watson, John T. 

Weber, Edward H. 1 

Weddle, Bob | 

Wedge, Donald R. 

Welch, Bill \ 

Welch, Tom 

Wellman, Earl 

Wigginton, Al, Sr. __._] 
Williams, Reid V. __ 

Wilson, Jack R. 

Wilson, John Pope _ 

Winfrey, Shelby 

Womack, William H. 
Wrassman, Owen B. 



ExceL Good Fair Poor 



7 


i 


5 


1 


9 


! 


2 


3 


5 


1 


1 





7 


1 


1 4 





7 


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3 





3 





1 


3 1 


7 


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2 


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Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1956 



The Flying Dutchman 




Let's check up on the new rule changes 
which we talked about in our October clinics 
to see what kind of a record the National 
Basketball Rules Committee made for itself 
for the season of 1955-56. From just about 
every corner of the Commonwealth comes 
praise for the over-all job these distinguished 
gentlemen did in making basketball a better 
game this season. 

With the exception of some "bugs" in the 
rule making the ball become alive on a jump 
when tapped rather than when leaving the 
official's hands, we definitely have a better 
game this season and seem well on the way 
toward the solution of the greatest "head- 
ache" ever to confront the rules makers, 
namely, keeping basketball from taking on 
an entirely new look in the last few minutes ; 
and we all have to admit that in close games 
in past years, the last few minutes presented 
an entirely different type of play than is 
seen up to that final stage of the contest. 

The Dutchman served two years as a 
member of the National Basketball Commit- 
tee and knows how the membership of this 
group becomes the target for criticism when 
a "bug" appears in a rule although there was 
no way of knowing that it would be there 
until the new rule was tested in season play. 
So it follows that there should also be com- 
mendation when a good job is done. If it is 
our job to criticize, then it is also our duty 
to praise. The Dutchman salutes the Rules 
Committee. 

That five-second rule, which we were all 
afraid of as we studied the rules in our Oc- 
tober clinics and which we prophesied would 
do little good, has pleasantly surprised us 
all because it has caused the boys to keep 
right on playing ball through the entire con- 
test. The rules makers certainly get an 
orchid for this one. 



Many communications from high school 
coaches ask the Dutchman to do what he can 
to get the foul lanes in high school play 
widened to twelve feet like the colleges. So 
the boys like the widened lanes, which means 
another score for the Rules Committee. 
Thus, it appears that after this year's meet- 
ing of the rules makers, we may have arrived 
at the time we have all been waiting for 
when the rules have caught up with the game 
and they can be left alone for awhile. 

The Dutchman has had one of his busiest 
years in passing out interpretations as un- 
usual plays have been developing all over the 
state. Situations which have never come up 
before and are not covered in the case book 
have brought a lot of interesting rulings to 
light. 

"Ole Ben" Edelen, the state tournament 
official, was tearing his hair after returning 
from working a game up in Wisconsin. It 
seemis that a home spectator had a whistle 
and each time a visiting player would drive 
for the basket, he would "sound off," thus 
stopping play and ruining an opportunity for 
a score. "Ole Ben" said: "I let him score the 
first time, although every other player 
stopped to see what was wrong. The next 
time, I stopped play before the drive ended 
in a score and did what I could to get the 
situation remedied." Now Ben wanted the 
official ruling. He was right either way he 
called it. The best procedure after the first 
whistle blowing by the spectator was to see 
that the game manager located the fan with 
the whistle before continuing the game. Al- 
ways be slow to forfeit a game under such 
conditions because you can never be sure 
that the offender is connected with the team 
being penalized. 

Shelby Winfrey, of Berea, came up with a 
good one. With only seconds left in the game, 
Team A scored on a foul shot. The scorer's 
horn sounded for a substitution and was not 
heard until a Team B player had taken a 
pass on the throw-in after the foul shot and 
knocked the bottom out of the basket for a 
field goal. The timer had never started the 
clock, so the question was whether to count 
the field goal or not. The ruling is that the 
goal has to count. The fact that the clock had 
not started means nothing. Also, the sounding 
of the scorer's horn for a substitution only 
stops play when the official beckons the sub- 
stitute into the game. In the case presented, 
the officials did not hear the scorer's horn 
and did not beckon to the substitute which 
means play continues. 

From the mountains to the Pennyrile, Ken- 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1956 



Page Seven 



tucky's sportsmanship is being praised by 
the "Men With The Whistles." Comment 
from such sources constitutes "Praise from 
Caesar." Deward Saylor and Joe Golden told 
the Dutchman that sportsmanship at the 
Wallins Invitational Tournament was not 
only of the highest calibre, but that it was 
also characteristic of the mountains, while 
"Jolly Amos" Teague and "Wild Bill" Omer 
praised Western Kentucky school officials 
and fans in the same manner. 

Dewey and Joe called for an Abou Ben 
Adhem Award for Wallins High School at 
the same time "Jolly" Amos and "Wild Bill" 
were asking that the same honor be bestowed 
on Henderson City and Owensboro Senior 
High schools for outstanding courtesies ex- 
tended officials working the games. 

It was the actions of "Big Jim" Golden of 
Wallins which won the award for his school 
while the practices of that new Henderson 
City High School could well write a new 
chapter in good neighbor practices. Arriving 
at Henderson to officiate the game with 
Owensboro Senior High, Amos and Bill found 
that the city police had reserved a parking 
space for them. Then they were met by a 
hospitality committee at the door and es- 
corted to their dressing room; At half-time 
there were cold drinks brought them as well 
as towels and chewing gum. After a double 
overtime, ball game players, coaches and 
fans were courteous and friendly beyond the 
fondest expectations. In the words of these 
officials, "Such treatment of officials goes 
a long way toward meriting for Kentucky its 
recognition as the 'Sportsmanship Capitol 
of the Nation'." 

Dale K. Hayes and H. Vaughn Phelps, of 
the University of Nebraska, were the recip- 
ients of The Flying Dutchman's Corn Cob 
Pipe of Honor Award for unselfish serv- 
ice in December. Now, from that Great State 
of Nebraska comes this word from those gen- 
tlemen: "All praise to the Kentucky High 
School Athletic Association for those Corn 
Cob Pipe Awards. Those race horses with the 
pipes around their necks will adorn our desks 
as a symbol to all individuals who try to be 
of service to others." 

All of this leads up to the fact that E. 
Kelly Thompson, brand new president of 
Western Kentucky State College, receives 
the Dutchman's Corn Cob Pipe salute for 
the month of January. Friends of the youth- 
ful prexy have presented a list a "mile long" 
of Kentuckians now holding college degrees 
who would never have been able to get them 
had it not been for the personal interest 



President Kelly took in them by finding jobs 
to keep them in school and by lending en- 
couragement in countless ways to keep them 
striving toward their goals in spite of dis- 
couragements. The award could not go to a 
more deserving chap. 

As your Dutch friend signs off, his 
thoughts once again are of Kentucky's Game 
Guys. The month of February offers the last 
opportunity to nominate your selections for 
the Game Guy Plaque to be presented to the 
kid overcoming the greatest physical handi- 
cap to engage in sports for the current high 
school athletic year. Let's remember them. 
They are worth helping. 

Cheerleaders, Are Your Manners Showing? 

By Mrs. Stella S. Gilb 

If your manners are "slipping" but not 
actually showing, better anchor them before 
you, too, are guilty of bad manners. From 
the many letters being received on the sub- 
ject of "courtesy among cheerleaders," we 
are inclined to believe the problem is one 
deserving some discussion. Whether your 
cheerleaders are or are not guilty of violat- 
ing any of the courtesies mentioned below, 
now is the time to take inventory. 

The following are some of the complaints 
that have been registered with the KAPOS 
organization : 

1. Many visiting cheerleaders are abusing 
the privilege of being guests by dashing on 
the floor in order to give the first yell. 
(After the first few times of allowing the 
visitors the courtesy of giving the first yell, 
it should be an alternating situation.) 

2. Visiting cheerleaders are choosing such 
long, drawn-out yells to give during a short 
time-out period that it leaves no time for 
the host cheerleaders to give a yell. 

3. Host cheerleaders are being negligent 
in greeting the visiting cheerleaders and 
providing adequate facilities for the checking 
of personal belongings and proper seating 
space. 

4. Cheerleaders are trying to drown out 
opponents by yelling at the same time. 

5. Coaches and officials are complaining 
over the delay of the game caused by cheer- 
leaders who begin a formation yell in the 
middle of the floor just as the time-out is 
over. 

If you are guilty of the violations listed 
above, then your manners are showing! 
Cheerleaders Are Being Recognized 

There is more talk, more favorable pub- 
licity, and more recognition being given to 
the cheerleaders now than ever before. This 
is good, and as it should be, as their job is 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1956 



not an easy one. Their practice hours are 
long and strenuous. However, they should 
keep in mind that the fans come primarily 
to see the team perform. They are the "big 
show", the cheerleadei's are only the 
"barkers". 

As with everything, there is a time and 
place for cheering. It is up to the cheerleader 
to develop a sensitivity as to when that time 
arrives. Many sponsors feel that unless 
cheerleaders learn to adhere to the rules of 
propriety and respect for the rights of 
others, they are in danger of losing the inter- 
est and cooperation of both coaches and fans. 

The following is offered in the hope that, 
in learning to spell "courtesy", cheerleaders 
will learn also to exhibit it. 

C— is for COURTESY, which for the host 
school should imply 

a welcome cheer, one that says Hello, 
Welcome, Hi! 

— is for ONE, meaning one group on 
the floor at a time; 

you had your turn, now it is mine. 

U — is for UNITY, all cheerleaders doing 
the same; 

be ready, alert, don't delay the game. 

R — is for RUSH, hurry to get on the 
floor ; 

there is but time for one yell, no more. 

T— is for TIME-OUT, the referee has the 
ball; 

give a yell, be quick, don't stall. 

E — is to ERR on the choice of your yell; 
if long and complicated it will delay the 
timer's bell. 

S — is for SHARING every other time to 
give a cheer; 

adhere to this rule or else you will be 
unpopular, I fear. 

Y — is to say YES, a pledge I will gladly 
make 

ever COURTEOUS to be, even though the 
championship may be at stake! 

Note: Mrs. Stella S. Gilb, of the University of Kentucky 
faculty, is Executive Secretary of KAPOS (Kentucky Associa- 
tion of Pep Organization Sponsors). This organizatioin sug- 
gests that sponsors write whenever they encounter problems 
in their work, or when they feel that they have had successful 
experiences, so that these problems and experiences may be 
uied in helping others. 



Co-Physical Education 

By Martha G. Carr 

As we all know, the objectives of education 
are always undergoing change. Much depends 
upon the mood and customs of the commun- 
ity and of the nation as a whole as to what 
particular objective or value will be high- 
lighted at any particular time. We have come 
a long way from the time that "learning to 
read the Bible" was the sole objective of edu- 
cation. Our educational objectives have be- 
come highly diversified and have come to 
include much of the training that was 
thought to be the realm of the family group. 

In recent years more attention has been 
turned to the social objectives. We have 
come to realize that human relationships are 
an essential part of living and that success 
depends so very much upon the ability to 
get along well with other people. The 
Columbia University curriculum study points 
out that life holds a number of "persistent 
situations" which must be met by our boys 
and girls as they occur in each age level. 
Boys and girls together as part of the per- 
sistent-situations-frame is definitely a per- 
sistent situation in human relationships. 

Good human relationships do not just 
happen. They can be taught in a number of 
ways. We can help boys and girls to meet 
this persistent situation tnrough well 
planned physical education experiences. 
These situations should occur all through 
their school life if they are to be well ad- 
justed for man and woman relationships as 
they reach adulthood. There should be no 
interruption in tiiis process at any age. The 
degree of relationship may vary with the age 
levels but there should be no absolute separa- 
tion at any age. Sex roles are said to be 
imposed upon children by adults. Little girls 
are told to act like ladies and little boys are 
expected to act like their fathers. Children 
are not ready to become classified at such 
early ages. Sex cleavages can occur and are 
even encouraged by some methods used in 
elementary schools. This makes the return 
to the acceptance of the sexes at adolescence 
very difficult. We are all familiar with the 
problems brought on by this "new found" 
interest in each other. Why should it be a 
newly found interest? Interest now in co- 
physical education or joint participation by 
boys and girls represents a natural result 
of the increased importance given to social 
adjustment and recreational objectives of 
physical education. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1956 



Page Nine 



Some principles of methods to be followed 
in co-physical education might be listed as 
follows : 

1. Programs must provide continuity in 
heterosexual experiences from elementary 
through secondary. 

2. Only activities which are completely 
suitable for mixed participation should be 
included in the program. 

3. Occasional games for recreation such 
as Softball, volleyball, and basketball where 
rules can be adapted to offset the superiority 
of one group can be included. For example, in 
volleyball, spiking and blocking are difficult 
for girls, so in mixed teams a row of girls 
should be facing a row of girls on the op- 
posite team. Teams should always play mixed 
and never boys against girls. In individual 
Sports girls can quite often achieve the same 
level of skill as boys and can therefore play 
as opponents in these games. 

4. i^egin co-physical education (if it has 
not been introduced earlier) in extra class 
offerings which are not required. 

5. Introduce activities as electives for 
credit such as folk dance, ballroom, dance, 
tennis, golf, etc. 

6. Introduce a unit in mixed participation 
in one required course such as 9th graae 
physical education. 

Concluding statement: Let's teach toler- 
ance and understanding of the strengths and 
weakness of each sex. Let's not encourage 
antagonism and sex cleavage. Hemember 
that the major portion of life's activities 
are done in mixed groups. Let's help to pre- 
pare our boys and girls for this kind of liv- 
ing. 

Mote: Dr. Martha G. Carr is Director o£ the Women's Division 
of the Physical Education Department, University of Kentuctcy. 



How to Sit the Bench 

By Lee Kennedy, Sophomore, Newark High School 

In choosing a subject for this essay I re- 
call what was said in our English handbook 
about choosing a subject which you are well 
versed on. Therefore, I have chosen this one, 
for during the past two years I have spent 
approximately eighty-five hours sitting the 
bench while my luckier and more talented 
chums have been giving their all for the dear 
old alma mater. 

Well, so much for the preliminaries. Now 
let me expand a little on the actual art. To be 
able to sit the bench properly you must have 
the following qualifications: you must have 
practically no talent, and if you do, you must 
be careful to keep it dormant or you might 
have the awful experience of having the 



coach put you in; you must have highly de- 
veloped hind quarters for in this art that is 
the part of you that takes the wear and tear 
(plus the numerous splinters) ; last, but not 
least, you must have a highly trained voice 
for it's the duty of the bench to aid the cheer- 
leaders in spurring the team on to gi'eater 
heights. If, after carefully examining your- 
self, you find that you possess these qualifi- 
cations, you have a good chance of becoming 
at least an average benchwarmer. 

I shall now elaborate on how to go about 
assuring a permanent place on the bench. 
First, you must constantly be on guard 
against showing any improvement during 
practice, for if you do, the coach will surely 
try to develop you into something resembling 
a ball player (this is what all benchwarmers 
have nightmares about) ; next, it will aid 
your cause immensely if you can by some 
means disgust the coach or arouse his ill will 
against you. At this time I will disclose some 
of the trade secrets for accomplishing this 
not too difficult feat. As these ai'e of highly 
secretive nature I will leave it to your discre- 
tion not to betray them to any outsider. One 
very successful method is to let the coach 
catch you breaking training rules. This will 
either get you kicked off the team or you will 
most assuredly sit the bench for quite a 
period of time. If, for some reason this fails, 
another good one is never to pay attention to 
what the coach is saying. The last, and one 
of the most effective, is that of playing dumb, 
that is, wearing a look of complete ignorance 
on your face which belies the fact that you 
have an ounce of brains. 

One must not get the idea that a bench- 
warmer's life is not an enjoyable one, for 
there comes a time during the half-time per- 
iod or the pre-game warm-ups when the boys 
of the bench are allowed to exhibit their 
meager talents. This is done mainly to assure 
the public that they have some reason for 
wearing the school uniforms, and are not just 
charity cases. 

This, plus the excellent food which they so 
joyously consume at the expense of the ath- 
letic department, and the fact that just being 
on the team tends to impress the opposite 
sex makes life most enjoyable for the bench- 
warmer. All in all I can think of just one 
thing more enjoyable than sitting the bench, 
and that is not sitting the bench. 

— Ohio Athlete. 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1956 



NATIONAL FEDERATION MEETING 

(Continued from Page One) 

1-5-4: This article will be slightly revised to 
provide for a Referee's time-out in certain cases 
where defective (as well as "illegal") equipment 
may be discovered. The related modification of the 
rule governing starting of the clock will prevent 
most abuses which might otherwise develop through 
use of a purposely bi'oken shoe-string or similar 
piece of equipment. 

2-15-1 and 2-16: Slight editorial revisions will 
make it clear that the scrimmage lines are approxi- 
mately eleven inches apart even though the ball 
may be tilted to a perpendicular position. 

" 2-15-2: Last paragraph will be editorially re- 
vised to make it clear that this applies to the posi- 
tion of the feet at the time of the snap but not 
after the snap. 

2-20-3: An editorial revision will state that 
the determination of whether a pass is forward or 
backward will depend on the initial direction in 
eases where the direction of the pass might be 
changed because of contact with a player or the 
ground or because of the wind. 

3-5-1: This article will be revised to provide 
that a stopped clock will be started with the snap 
or free-kick as for last season except that after a 
time-out charged to the Referee (as for correction 
of defective equipment or a measurement or for 
similar reason), the clock shall be started when 
the ball is ready-for-play. It is understood that 
the elastic authority for starting or stopping the 
clock when there is an infraction of 3-6-3 may af- 
fect this as well as any other timing situation. 

5-1-2-c and 5-2-5-a: No actual revision of 
these two items was authorized but the Editorial 
Committee was given authority to sanction an 
interpretation for an infrequent and unorthodox 
situation which does not properly fit into the rules 
organization. This deals with a case where a 
scrimmage-kick might be touched beyond the line 
of scrimmage by R, then rebound behind the line 
to be recovered by K after which he advances the 
ball by another kick or by a run which is followed 
by an illegal forward pass or by a forward pass 
which becomes incomplete. It is contended that in 
the case of a forward pass which becomes incom- 
plete, Rule 7-5-1 specifies that the down shall be 
counted while Rule 5-1-2-c specifies that the next 
down is 1st. Other irregularities may arise in con- 
nection with an illegal forward pass or with a sec- 
ond punt. There are several possibilities, i.e., to 
consider all action after R first touches a kick be- 
yond the line as being the same as if it were after 
team possession had changed; or to entirely dis- 
regard such touching by R in any case where the 
kick is then recovered behind the line; or to as- 
sume that a new series is established immediately 
when there is such touching by R. Until such time 
as an agreement can be reached as to which is the 
most desirable procedure, an arbitrary ruling for 
the given situation will be made in some of the 
supplementary material but no change will be made 
in the rules statement. 

5-3-2: The first sentence of the second para- 
graph will be revised to provide adequate coverage 
for the placing of the ball when team possession 
changes after a touchback and when there is an 
incomplete forward pass or an illegal forwai'd pass 
during 4th down. 

6-4-5: This article about what constitutes in- 
terference with a fair catch will be slightly revised 
to make it fair catch interference whenever K 
touches a kick in flight beyond the line, regardless 



of whether any player of R is within running dis- 
tance of the place where the kick comes down. It 
would be a very rare occurrence when no player 
of R would be within running distance and the re- 
vision takes away any necessity for judgment on 
the par-t of the Official. 

7-1-1: A slight editorial revision will make it 
clear that the snapper as well as any other player 
is prohibited from moving into or across the neu- 
tral zone to touch an opponent or interfere with 
him. This does not involve any change from past 
procedure but is entirely for clarification. 

7-2-5: The second sentence will be revised to 
make the provision about being 5 yards behind the 
line apply to any A player who starts from within 
a yard of the scrimmage line even though he mig-ht 
not be legally "on the line" because he is faced 
in the wrong direction or for similar reason. Un- 
der the present ruling, it has been claimed that a 
player might circumvent the rule by standing with- 
in a foot of the line of scrimmage but in such a 
way that he is not legally on the line. 

7-3-2: This article will be revised for clarifica- 
tion only. It will state that any player including the 
snapper or players adjacent to him, may legally 
receive a forward handed ball provided such player 
makes a complete turn and is at least a yard behind 
the line at the time he receives the handed ball. 

7-5-4: The last sentence wil be revised to in- 
corporate one minor difference from the current 
rule. This will cover the case where an illegal for- 
ward pass is caught and the down ends with the 
ball in possession of the passing team. Under 
such circumstances, the offended team may decline 
the distance penalty and have the ball put in play 
at the spot where it became dead rather than to 
have it returned to spot of the illegal pass. Illus- 
tration: The snap is from the 50. Al advances to 
B's 40 where he throws an illegal forward pass 
which is caught by A2 who, in an attempt to re- 
verse his field, is finally downed on his 45. Since 
the down does not end with ball in possession of 
B, if B declines the penalty, the old rule provided 
that the ball would be taken to the spot of the ille- 
gal pass. Under the revised rule for 1956, B will 
have the right to decline the penalty and have the 
ball put in play on A's 45 where it became dead in 
4's posession. 

9-4-3: The first sentence will be editorially 
revised to make it clear that the right of R to inten- 
';ionally bat a low scrimmage-kick in flight applies 
Dnly to an attempt by iR to block such kick. The 
"evision is designed to avoid inequity in a rare case 
?uch as the following. Scrimmage-kick by Kl is 
low and strikes a player in the neutral zone and 
then bounds in the air in such a way that R2 bats 
it forward with his fist so that it goes 20 yards 
downfield. Under the rule as presently written, 
this would have to be considered a legal act. Under 
the revised rule such action will be illegal batting 
of a kick. 

9-6-1-a: After a thorough discussion of the 
unsatisfactory condition concerning coaching from 
the sidelines, the Committee authorized two ap- 
proaches to the problem. The states of New York 
and Maine where the modified rule has proven to be 
popular will have approval if further use of the 
experimental rule is desired. The modified rule 
permits one_ player to confer with the coach at the 
sideline during any charged time-out. A majority 
of the Committee did not favor adoption of the 
modification even though there was a heavy favor- 
able vote on the questionnaire. It was voted that 
as long as the present rule is in effect, it should 



I 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1956 



Page Eleven 



be more rigidly enforced. In an attempt to call at- 
tention to the need for eliminating' undesirable 
coaching activity by anyone in the coaching- box, a 
note will be inserted to instruct Officials to penalize 
for any act such as throwing out a kicking tee, 
gesturing in a passing motion, swinging a foot as 
for a kick or any other gestures or comments di- 
rected to the quarterback or any player. 

9-6-2-c: This will be editorially revised to 
make it clear that a coach can not serve as the 
one attendant who may enter the field when there 
is no injury. In the case of an injury, it will be 
provided that the coach and any other needed at- 
tendants may enter through permission of the 
Referee. 

10-1: The second sentence of this section will 
be revised to reduce the amount of judgment in 
determining when the advantage of accepting or 
declining a penalty is obvious enough to eliminate 
some of the explanations to the Captains. After 
any foul, the Referee will signal the Captains that 
a foul has occun-ed. Whether he calls the Cap- 
tains into a conference for explaining the various 
effects of the foul will be determined as follows. 
If a foul is followed by a touchdown, it is assumed 
that the acceptance or decliniation of the penalty 
will be automatic and it is not necessary to call 
the Captains in. The same thing applies to a foul 
during a try-for-point. In any other case, even 
though the advantage or disadvantage to the of- 
fended team may be obvious, the Referee will call 
the Captains together. For certain fouls, such as 
most dead ball fouls, the explanation will con- 
sist of a statement of the procedure which is ob- 
viously to the advantage of the offended team. 
In any case where there is doubt as. to the advan- 
tage, a full explanation of the possibilities will be 
made. 

The primary effect of this revision is to in- 
crease the number of cases where a second foul 
will be considered a part of a double or multiple 
foul. Under the revised rule, if the second foul 
occurs before the explanation to the Captains has 
been completed, it will be paired \vith a foul during 
the preceding down to make a double foul. If it oc- 
curs after the explanation has been completed, 
each penalty will be administered independently. 
The revised rule will not affect a foul which is fol- 
lowed by a touchdown or a foul during a try-for- 
point. These will be administered the same as for 
last season. 

10-5-2: The last sentence will be revised to 
incorporate an inadvertent omission of last year. 
There will be no change from last year as far as 
actual administration is concerned. Discussion 
brought out the question as to whether part of this 
statement has outlived its usefulness. It no longer 
would be necessary to cover the infrequent case 
where a distance penalty starts from the goal line 
and is measured into the end zone except for the 
academic question as to what would happen in cer- 
tain cases where a team might desire to accept 
such penalty, even though there would be no advan- 
tage in such acceptance. Illustration: Runner Al 
advances for a touchdown. During the run, Bl 
holds. _ It is doubtful whether there is any situation 
in which A would desire to accept the penalty, since 
they can retain the touchdown through declination. 
However, the rules give any team the right to 
decline any single penalty. The last sentence of 
10-5-2 makes this a touchdown even though the 
distance measurement is accepted. 

GENERAL: Interpretations for several listed 
situations were authorized. Most of these confirm 



interpretations which were used during the past 
season. 

1. If players persist in grabbing at the face 
protector of an opponent so that the hand and neck 
can be twisted, it is to be considered a suspicious 
act. n certain situations connected with line play 
or with the tackling of a runner, there may be no 
other place for the tackier or player trying to get 
through to the ball to make his tackle or quick pull 
effective. The Official will be liberal under such 
circumstances. But if players persist in grabbing 
at the face protector, when it is possible for them 
to avoid deliberate grabbing of such protector, the 
Official is instructed to penalize for unsportsman- 
like conduct. This is on the assumption that since 
the wearing of such protective equipment is urged, 
there should be no activity designed to discourage 
the use of this safety device. 

2. The Research and Equipment Committees 
were instructed to make an intensive study of pos- 
sibilities in connection with reducing the amount 
of hard fiber and plastics in helmets, shoulder pads 
and other pads and that they make every effort 
to encourage further development of equipment 
which will fully utilize the advantages of shock- 
absorbing materials which are not so prone to in- 
jure the opponent. 

Similar research is urged in connection with 
the setting of standards for material used in shoe 
cleats. This applies especially to various types of 
metal cleat. 

3. If a player reports a broken chin strap or 
an untied shoe lace or some similar defective equip- 
ment in a situation in which it is to the obvious 
advantage of his team to get the clock stopped, 
the Official is instructed to start the clock as soon 
as there has been reasonable opportunity to make 
correction. Under Rule .3-5-1, as revised for 1956, 
the clock will, under the outlined circumstances, 
start when the ball is ready-for-play but the Offi- 
cial has authority to start it even earlier in cases 
where there is doubt as to whether defective equip- 
ment has been used to gain an advantage. 

4. To avoid situations in which the ball is 
hidden so effectively that some of the officials are 
deceived, all officials will be urged to follow the 
procedure which will be outlined in the new edition 
of the Football Official's Manual. This will caution 
officials against killing the ball on suspicion and it 
will also urge that no official other than the Referee 
use his whistle except in those cases where the Ref- 
eree is not in a position to be certain that the ball 
has become dead. 

5. The Official's Manual Committee was auth- 
orized to encourage further experimentation with 
devices which simplify the procedure when a meas- 
urement for a 1st down is to be made. 

6. Since there is some question about the plac- 
ing of the white stripe on the ball in such a way 
that it will have the least contact with the fingers, 
auhorization was given to approve outlined experi- 
mentation by listed groups. 

7. A discussion of the question of whether 25 
seconds is the correct maximum time for snapping 
the ball led to authorization of experimentation by 
any interested group with a time limit of 20 
seconds. 

FOOTBALL OFFICIATING PROCEDURES: 
A new edition of the Football Official's Manual will 
be ready for use during 1956. Several minor re- 
visions, as outlined by the Game Administration 
Committee will be incorporated in the new edition. 
All signals will be retained as for last year and the 
proper illustrative plate, which was prepared too 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1956 



late for inclusion in the old edition of the Manual, 
will be used. 

FOOTBALL CASE BOOK: Several slight re- 
visions in early inilings as used in the Football 
Case Book were authorized. Most of these are for 
correcting' typographical errors or for making the 
statement more complete. Plays to cover all of the 
rules revisions will be included. 



Films 



The basketball films listed below are in the Film 
Library of the LTniversity of Kentucky Department 
of Extension. The code letters "e, j, s, c, a" refer 
to elementary, junior high, senior high, college and 
adult audiences who may enjoy the particular film 
listed. The rental prices shown do not apply to 
schools which use one of the special subscription 
service plans, offered by the Bureau of Audio-Visual 
Material. 

BALL HANDLING IN BASKETBALL, j-s-c, 1 reel, 
$1.50 
Teaches fundamentals of basketball handling in- 
cluding stance, grip, control, adjustment before 
shooting, catching the ball, and other points. Pre- 
sents game shots, using special photographic tech- 
niques to illustrate principles. 

BASKETBALL FUNDAMENTALS— INDIVIDUAL 
TECHNIQUES, j-s-c-a, I'/i reels, $2.50 
Branch McCracken, Indiana University basketball 
coach, uses his team to demonstrate the fundamen- 
tals of basketball. Slow-motion photography is 
used to break the various court techniques down 
into easily grasped essentials. 

BASKETBALL KENTUCKY STYLE, j-s-c-a, 2 
reels, $2.50 (in state), $5.00 (out of state) 
This is the revised edition of the film "Basketball 
By Rupp" prepared under the personal direction of 
Mr. Rupp especially for coaching use. 

BETTER BASKETBALL, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, color, $.75 
This film is produced by the Official Sports Film 
Sei-vice under the sanction of the National Federa- 
tion of State High School Athletic Associations. It 
demonstrates current rules and good officiating 
procedure, with colorful action by skilled players. 

CHAMPIONSHIP BASKETBALI^TEAM TECH- 
NIQUES, j-s, 1 reel, $1.50 
Man-to-man defense is shown, with the means 
best used under varying conditions. 

CLARK COUNTY VS. DUPONT MANUAL (SEMI- 
FINALS) e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, silent, $.75 
One of the 1952 State Basketball Tournament 
games. Manual won 54-53, on a goal by Moffett in 
the last two seconds of the game. 

CUBA VS. DUPONT MANUAL, (FINALS), 
e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, silent, $.75 
This is the final game of the 1952 State Basket- 
ball Tournament, in which the Cuba Cubs defeated 
Manual Crimsons by the score of 58-52. 

CUBA VS. HINDMAN (SEMI-FINALS) e-j-s-c-a, 
3 reels, silent, $.75 
This film is on one of the semi-final games of 



the 1952 State Basketball Tournament. Cuba won 
54-52 in a double overtime. 

DEFENSIVE FOOTWORK IN BASKETBALL, 

j-s-c, 1 reel, $1.50 
Striding- with an opponent, checking, maneuvering 
him out of position and other basic skills are illus- 
trated, using special photography to demonstrate 
points. Rebounding, pivoting, and correlated arm 
action are taught also. 

HAZARD VS. ADAIR COUNTY (1955) K.H.S. 

STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 

FINALS, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, silent, $.75 

This is an excellent film of the game in which 

Hazard defeated Adah' County by the score of 74-66 

for the championship. Johnny Cox bore the brunt 

of the attack by the ehamnions while all-state play- 

prs, Ralnh Shearer and Terry Randall, were best 

for Adair County. The presentation of all awards 

and trophies for the tournament is shown also. 

KING BASKETBALL, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, $.75 

The official rules for the 1953-54 season are in- 
terpreted in this film. In addition, play situations 
are demonstrated by members of the Shawnee Mis- 
sion basketball team, finalists in the Kansas State 
High School Tournament. Particular skills are 
shown by Robin Freeman, jump shot artist, who 
averaged thirty points a game for Hughes High 
School. Cincinnati; Wade Holbrook, a 7 foot 3/4 
inch giant from the Portland, Oregon, State High 
School champions; and Chuck Darling, All- Ameri- 
can center from the University of Iowa. 

MODERN BASKETBALL, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, $.75 _ 

This film presents two high school teams playing 
basketball, illustrating the techniques of the game. 
It presents various infractions of the rules and how 
to avoid them. 

NEWPORT VS. INEZ (1954) K.H.S. BASKETBALL 
TOURNAMENT FINALS, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, 
silent, $.75 
This is the final game of the 1954 State Basketball 
Tournament, in which Inez defeated Newport by 
the score of 63-55. The sparkling nlav of Newport's 
Redmon, and Inez's Cassady and Triplett, is the 
highlight of the film. The three players were select- 
ed as members of the All-State Team. 

PADUCAH TILGHMAN VS. LEXINGTON LA- 
FAYETTE (1953) K.H.S. BASKETBALL 
TOURNAMENT FINALS, e-j-s-c-a-, 3 reels, 
silent, $.75 
This is the final game of the 1953 State Basket- 
ball Tournament in which Lafayette High of Lex- 
ington. Kentucky defeated Paducah Tilghman of 
Paducah, Kentucky, by the score of 84-53. This 
film shows the superior play of two very excellent 
teams. 

RUPP'S FUNDAMENTALS OF BASKETBALL, 

j-s-c-a, 1 reel, silent, $1.25 
Coach Rupp's University of Kentucky Wildcats 
(1949-50) demonstrate ten different plays in such 
a clear manner that it is easy to follow and learn 
each play. 

SHOOTING IN BASKETBALL, j-s-c, 1 reel, $1.50 
Concenti-ating on the set shot, this film pictures 
the action of the throw, stance, aim, trajectory, and 
fingertip control. Special attention is given total 
body coordination, especially inward rotation of the 
hand and arm making the throw. 



S. HUNT 



vTSaystopIj^ 




PHONE 104 



W. S. "Bill" HUNT 



^ 



HUNT^S ATHLETIC GOODS CO. 

MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 





KHSAA Basketball Tournaments For 1956 



The KHSAA Board of Control gave us a contract to 
supply all of the official KHSAA Regional and Dis- 
trict Basketball Trophies both first place and second 
place for the various 1956 tournaments complete 
with the KHSAA seal and engraving. 

These beautiful trophies will be made by Dodge, Inc., 
and will be shipped by us about February 12, so if 
you are a tournament director we would like to 
supply your third place and fourth place trophy or 
a Sportsmanship plaque or trophy complete with 
proper engraving. 

Naturally, if you need any gold filled or sterling 
silver basketballs for the winners, runners-up or 
individual awards we can supply with proper 
engraving. 



MACGREGOR LASTBILT BASKETBALL NO. XIOL: 

For years and years the No. XIOL basketball has been used 
in the KHSAA State Basketball Tournament. It has been 
and is today the FAVORITE among the coaches and players, 
and for this reason the No. XIOL is being used in the 
KHSAA State Tournament for 1956. 



ATTENTION — DISTRICT BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT DIRECTORS 

Why not let us supply your basketballs, nets, scorebooks, Cramer first-aid supplies, whistles, stop- 
watches, horns, basketball posters, powdered rosin, bath towels, shoe laces, colored top socks, 
basketball shoes, Nurre rectangular glass backboards at $350.00 per pair. Fair Play electric basket- 
ball boards at $350.00 or $445.00, and other items which we carry in stock for immediate delivery? 

ADMISSION TICKETS: These are supplied in all prices, all colors from 10c thru $1.25 and 
numbered. Per roll of 2,000 tickets, $1.25. We also have ADMIT ONE or PASS-OUT tickets, 
per roll of 2,000 only $1.25. 

Visit Room 363 at the Phoenix Hotel during the State Basketball Tournament. See our new 1956 
samples of spring and summer as well as football and basketball supplies for the coming 1956 
season. 

Hunt's Athletic Goods Co. 
"Wp ShipThb DaV Vou BuV" 




0. 



WHILE IN LEXINGTON 

FOR THE 

Stale Basketball Tournament 

Visit our Sample Rooms 
461 and 462 Phoenix Hotel 



'ur special Sample Rooms at the Phoenix 
Hotel are the happy meeting place and head- 
quarters for players, coaches, fans, celebrities, 
store, school and factory representatives. Make it 
your headquarters, too. 

Wur traveling Kentucky school representatives, 
Bob Reis, Harry Blackburn and Chuck Shuster will 
be on hand. As vi^ill John Head, Sales Manager from 
our Louisville office. 

See our complete showing of 1956 nationally adver- 
tised football and basketball equipment, honor sweaters and 
award jackets. 



^ 



SEE THE NEW 100% 
HELANCA S-T-R-E-T-C-H 
NYLON FOOTBALL PANTS 
AND JERSEYS 




WRITE FOR 
SPRING CATALOG 

If you have not received 
your copy of the new 
1956 Sutcliffe Catalog, 
featuring Baseball, 
Track, Softball, Tennis, 
and other athletic equip- 
ment, advise us at once 
by letter or post card. 



HniiF>r«i%i0j 



225-227 So. 4th St., Louisville, Ky. 




Hiqh School Athlete 

NEW SCHOOL BUILDINGS AT PADUCAH AND HENDERSON 





The top picture shows the new Paducah Tilghman High School. The gymnasium 
at the left and the auditorium at the right. Below is an airplane view of the Henderson 
(City) High School. The gymnasium is at the rear of the central entrance, and 
the auditorium is at the right. 



OHicial Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 

MARCH - 1956 



Uiri 




These are interior views of the Henderson and I'aducah j^j mnasiums. 
The Henderson gym is pictured above. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XVIII— NO. 8 



MARCH, 1956 



$1.00 Per Year 



BASKETBALL— CURRENT AND FUTURE 



FOR THE FIRST TIME IN SEVERAL 
SEASONS, there is no pronounced opposi- 
tion to the penalty rules. Either the bonus 
penalty wears well or a fatalistic attitude 
has developed. Probably it has taken a 
couple of years for players and coaches to 
fully realize that under such penalty, the 
odds are in favor of the team that avoids 
excessive fouling. The scores may be higher 
than might be desirable and the number of 
fouls is still too great, but the game con- 
tinues to be thrilling, skills in throwing field 
goals continue to increase and the team 
which is behind in the score retains a reason- 
able chance to win up to the last few seconds 
unless the teams are very unevenly matched. 
These factors partially account for the con- 
tinued great interest in the game. 

AS THE SEASON DRAWS TO A CLOSE, 
it is in order to consider possible ways in 
which the code and the game can be further 
perfected without any radical change in fun- 
damentals. Items which could be studied with 
profit include the following. Should the 12- 
foot wide free throw lane which is now pre- 
scribed for college and A.A.U. courts be ex- 
tended to include high school and Y.M.C.A. 
courts? If the wider free throw lane should 
be adopted for universal use, what con- 
stitutes the most pleasing and efficient 
type of marking? During a jump ball, should 
the ball become alive when it leaves the Of- 
ficial's hand for the toss (rather than when 
it is legallv tapped) ? Should further restric- 
tions be placed on action above basket ring 
level at a player's own basket? 

COURT MARKINGS have always varied 
in accordance with decorative taste. A cer- 
tain amount of variation is probably desir- 
able. On some courts, the center circle is 
embellished with the trademark of the 
school. In some cases, that part of the free 
throw lane which is restricted by the 3-sec- 
ond rule is stained in a solid color. If the wide 
free throw lane should be adopted for high 
school courts, there should be some uniform- 
ity in the method of marking this part of 
the court. At the present time, the free throw 



line is the only line on the court which is one 
inch in width. Since this line is one of the 
boundaries for the area limited by the 3- 
second rule, a good case could be made for 
making this 2 inches in width, the same as 
for the other lane lines. Regardless of what 
is done with the free throw line, the appear- 
ance of the floor will differ with different 
methods of marking the broken semi-circle 
which lies between the parallel lane lines. 
Because of the personal taste of the artist 
who drew the present illustration for the 
rules book, this broken semi-circle is shown 
as having many segments. Since only one 
Durpose is served bv this broken semi-circle, 
i.e., to act as a restraining line during a 
jumn ball, there is no good reason why it 
should not be inconspiciuously marked. Most 
gymnasium instructors prefer a evmnasium 
with a minimum number of markings. It is 
pi'obable that a marking with not more than 
six segments would give a more nleasing ef- 
fect as seen from the bleachers. Color of the 
circles should also be considered. If the lane 
lines are black, it miffht be best to show the 
entire circle in red or only the broken semi- 
circle in red. These matters should be given 
careful consideration before the rules for 
next season are authorized. 

ACTION IN THE VTCINITY OF THE 
THROWER'S BASKET: In the college game, 
nearlv everv team has at least one nlaver 
who can handle the ball above the basket 
ring level. Because of this, there are a 
number of so-called "cheap tap-ins." Some 
of these follow a free throw. As a partial 
curb on free throw tap-ins. one or more con- 
ferences are experimenting with a modified 
rule which gives both the H and V alleys 
to defensive plavers. This probably reduces 
the number of "tap-ins" but it also reduces 
the severity of the penalty for a common 
personal foul. This could ut)set the balance 
which now makes it unprofitable to commit 
a foul and thus bring back a greater number 
of intentional or careless fouls. 

The second factor concerning activity 
(Continued on Page Eleven) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1956 



MARCH, 1956 VOL. XVni— N0.8 

Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association. 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered ail second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Russell Williamson (1962-56), Inez 

Vice-President Roy G. Eversole (1952-56), Hazard 

Directors — W. B. Jones (1953-67) Somerset: Louis Litchfield 
1953-57), Marion; W. H. Crowdus (1954-58), Franklin: Jack 
Dawson (1964-58), Middletown : Robert P. Forsythe (1955-59) 
Browder: K. G. Gillaspie (1965-59). Georgetown. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 

^rom the Commissionet s Cjjjice 



REPORTS NOW DUE 

1. 1955-56 Basketball Participation List 

2. School's Report on Basketball Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Basket- 
ball) 



Spring Meets 

Tentative dates have been set for the var- 
ious spring meets and tournaments in base- 
ball, golf, track and tennis. The dates are as 
follows : 

May 7-9, District Baseball Tournaments 

May 11, Regional Track Meets 

May 14, Regional Tennis Tournaments 

May 18-19, State Track Meet 

May 21 22. State Tennis Tournament 

May 23, Regional Golf Tournaments 

May 24-25, Regional Baseball Tournaments 

May 28-29, State Golf Tournament 

June 1-2, State Baseball Tournament 

1956 Regional Tournament Sites 
(1) Murray College, (2) Hopkinsville High 
School, (3) Henderson City High School, 
(4) Butler County High School, (5) Bowling 
Green High School, (6) Elizabethtown High 
School, (7) Louisville, (8) Owen County 
High School, (9) Boone County High School, 
(10) Harrison County High School, (11) 
U. K. Coliseum, (12) Somerset High School, 
(13) Bell County High School, (14) Hazard 
High School, (15) Pikeville High School, 
(16) Ashland. 

Attention, Baseball Coaches 
Your attention is called to the fact that 
the State High School Baseball Tournament 
is scheduled to be played at Parkway Field, 
Louisville, on Friday and Saturday, June 
1-2. This represents a change from the dates 
of June 7-8, shown on your calendar. 
News About Swimming 
Regulations concerning the forthcoming 



State High School Swimming Meet, scheduled 
to be held in Lexington on Saturday, April 
7, have been sent to schools whose principals 
have indicated that they will enter teams in 
the meet. Other principals who have not re- 
ceived these regulations and entry blanks 
should write to the State Office for this ma- 
terial if they are interested. 

The various classes will have the following 
events : 

50 Yard Freestyle (Classes A. B. C) 

50 Yard Breaststroke (Classes B, C) 

100 Yard Breaststroke (Class A) 

200 Yard Breaststroke (Class A) 

50 Yard Backstroke (Classes B, C) 

100 Yard Backstroke (Class A) 

100 Yard Freestyle (Class A) 

75 Yard Individual Medley (Class B) 

150 Yard Individual Medley (Class A) 

150 Yard Medley Relay (Classes B, C) 

200 Yard Medlev Relay (Class A) 

200 Yard Freestyle Relay (Classes A. B, C) 

Fancy Diving (Classes A, B, C) 

A school is limited to four entries in Class 
A and B events and two entries in Class C 
events. It shall have only one team in each 
relay. Individual contestants are limited to 
two swimming events including relays, but 
may enter Fancy Diving as a third event. 
If a competitor enters two individual events 
and fails to qualify for the finals, he may 
not be an added entrant on a relay team. 

Trophies will be awarded the winning 
school and the runner-up in each class, and 
medals will be presented to the winners of 
the first three places in each event. The 
Association will make the same allowance to 
participants for transportation, lodging, and 
meals as is given State Track Meet partici- 
pants, this allowance applying to not more 
than two participants in each event. Ex- 
penses of the swimming coach will be paid 
if the school has as many as four entries 
in the State Meet. 



Certified Official 

Since the last issue of the ATHLETE went 
to press, 0. K. Clay, Williamson, West Vir- 
ginia, has qualified as a "Certified" official. 



Protection Fund News 

Three hundred eleven member schools of 
the K.H.S.A.A. had insured their athletes 
with the Protection Fund at the time this 
issue of the magazine went to press. Six 
hundred nine claims, totaling $13,673.26, 
have been paid since July 1. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1956 



Page Three 



ANNUAL MEETING SPEAKER 




mission ; and as chairman and trustee of the 
Educational Testing Service. Dr. Hill is a 
member of Phi Delta Kappa and Kappa Delta 
Pi. He has received the honorary degree of 
Doctor of Laws from five colleges and uni- 
versities, including the University of Ken- 
tucky, and in 1954 he received the honorary 
degree of Doctor of Humane Letters from 
Columbia University. He is a member of the 
Committee for the White House Conference 
on Education. 

Personal — Was first president of United 
Givers Fund of Nashville ; is a member of the 
Rotary Club, Belle Meade County Club, 
Round Table, and other similar organiza- 
tions. Dr. Hill is a native of Statesville, North 
Carolina. 



Dr. Henry H. Hill 

Dr. Henry H. Hill, President of George 
Peabody College for Teachers, Nashville, 
Tennessee, will be the principal speaker at 
the annual dinner meeting of the K.H.S.A.A., 
scheduled to be held in the Crystal Ballroom 
of the Brown Hotel, Louisville, at 6:00 P. M., 
April 13. The subject of Dr. Hill's talk will 
be "Athletics and Education : Rivals or Part- 
ners?" 

In responding to an inquiry concerning his 
educational activities, Dr. Hill gave the fol- 
low information: 

Degrees — Attended Davidson College; re- 
ceived A.B. and M.A. degrees from the Uni- 
versity of Virginia, and the Ph.D. degree 
from Teachers College, Columbia University. 

Professional service — Has served in a pro- 
fessional capacity for a year or more in Vir- 
ginia, Tennessee, Arkansas, Missouri, Ken- 
tucky, and Pennsylvania; served as superin- 
tendent of schools at Lexington, Kentucky, 
for ten years, as professor of school admin- 
istration and as a dean of the University of 
Kentucky; has been president of Peabody 
College since 194.5. 

Special interests — Has written for pro- 
fessional periodicals, and for various state 
educational journals ; has had occasional ar- 
ticles in other magazines, including one in 
The Atlantic Monthly; and has also written 
brochures, pamphlets, and reports in the 
field of Education. 

Professional honors — Has served as presi- 
dent of the Southern Association of Colleges 
and Secondary Schools, and of the American 
Association of School Administrators; as 
chairman of the Educational Policies Com- 



Films 



The films listed below are in the Film Library of the Depart- 
ment of Extension, University of Kentucky. The rental prices 
shown do not apply to schools which use one of the special 
subscription service plans, offered by the Bureau of Audio- 
Visual Materials. 

Baseball Films 
Baseball Today, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, $.75 

This is the annual edition of a film covering generally all 
aspects of baseball as a professional sport. This sponsored film 
shows scenes of major league games and various personalities 
in the sport as they perform in various games. The film is not 
designed to teach different phases of the sport, but rather to 
create general interest. Useful for all ages except primary. 

Batting Fundamentals, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

This film shows basic skills which must be mastered before 
one becomes an accomplished hitter. Bat selection, stance, grip, 
stride, swing and follow through are clearly demonstrated by 
professional players. 

The Batting Stars of Baseball, s-c-a. 3 reels. $1.00 

Who are the big names among batters and what makes 
them good? Watch the featured hitters as shown in this film, 
learn the secrets of their styles and forms, and try it yourself. 
For clubs as well 



Catching in Baseball, e-j-s-c-a. 1 reel, $1.50 

The basic skills in baseball catching are presented in this 
film. How to catch a high rapid ball, a batted ball, a thrown 
ball, and a ground ball are shown. Stance, footwork, and body 
balance are described. Slow motion and close-up photography 
are used to enable the viewer to follow each step or movement 
in each of the basic skills. 

Democracy of Baseball, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $.75 

The purpose of this film is for further development of 
young baseball players in our modern democracy and illustrates 
this through sports and sports competition. This film includes 
a brief history of baseball along with a cavalcade of past 
and present stars. 

Double-Play Kings of Baseball, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $.75 

This film presents an analysis of the double play in base- 
ball. Different players from several major leagues are shown 
in action. Fielding, tagging, and throwing are illustrated and 
explained. 

Hitting In Baseball, e-j-s-c-a. 1 reel, $1.50 

Slow motion and close-up photography are used to follow 
accurately and graphically the basic fundamentals of hitting 
in baseball. Coordination of feet, legs, hips, shoulders, arms, 
and head is explained. How to select a bat, how to hold it, 
and correct batting positions are shown. 

Infield Play at First and Third, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels. $.75 

The fundamentals and finer points of infield play at first 
and third bases are illustrated by big league players. Fielding, 
stance, throwing, tagging runners, etc., are pictured, often 
In slow motion. 

Inside Baseball, j-s, 3 reels, $1.00 

Fundamentals of baseball, including pitching. Iiatling. 
fielding, and base-running, are demonstrated. 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1956 



Modern Baseball, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, color, $.75 

This film deals mainly with the rules of the game. It 
presents various infractions of the rules and the results of 
errors made in the game. 

1952 Kentucky High School A. A. Baseball Tournament, 
j-s-c-a, 4 reels, silent, $.75 

This film has some shots of each of the eight regional 
winners competing in the Tournament. All of the final game, 
duPont Manual vs. St. Joseph Prep, is shown. A part of the 
film is in color. 

1953 Kentucky High School A. A. Baseball Tournament, 
j-s-c-a, 4 reels, silent, b & W, color, $.75 

This film has some shots from each of the games played 
in the tournament. A large part of the final game, St. J oseph 
vs. Jenkins, is presented. The daytime games were filmed in 
color. 

1954 Kentucky High School A. A. Baseball Tournament, 
j-s-c-a, 4 reels, silent, b & w, color, $.75 

A part of each game played in the first round is shown. 
Several innings of the final game, with Newport Catholic 
defeating Louisville Male and Girls 6-0, are included in the 
picture. Daytime action was filmed in color. 

1955 Kentucky High School A. A. Baseball Tournament, 
j-s-c-a, 4 reels, silent, color, $.75 

This film has some shots from each of the games played 
in the tournament. duPont Manual defeated Hall High School 
for the championship by a score of 13-3. All the final game 
is shown in color. 

Play Ball, America, j-s-a, 3 reels, $1.00 

This film takes up defensive baseball. Illustrated under 
pitching are overhand, sidearm, and underhand deliveries ; 
fast curve, slow, knuckle and screwball pitches ; positions on 
the rubber and ways of catching a man off base. Infielding. 
tagging, double plays and catching pegs to the bases are 
illustrated. Catching a fly and throwing in are demonstrated 
in outfielding. The film turns to an analysis of offensive 
baseball. Purposes of the hit and run play are explained. Base 
running is taken up. 

Play Ball, Son, j-s, IV^ reels, $2.50 

Joe Cronin introduces this film, showing a group of 
fourteen -year-old boys who are experts in baseball. Correct 
methods of hitting, catching, and throwing are demonstrated 
in natural and slow motion. Based on book by Bert V, Dunne. 

Throwing In Baseball, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 
Slow motion, close-up, and stop photography are used in 
presenting the basic fundamentals of throwing in baseball. 
Instructions are given for the overhead, three-quarters side, 
side, and underhand throws. Coordination of foot and arm 
motion is stressed, as well as coordination of the body as a 
whole. 

Touching All Bases, j-s-a, 4 reels, $1.00 

This film is intended to teach youngsters baseball by show- 
ing various American League stars playing their positions. It 
is also intended to give fans as a whole a better understanding 
and knowledge of the national pastime. This film shows Father 
Flanagan and his Boys Town Team, the Hall of Fame ceremon- 
ies in Cooperstown, New York, and scenes from night baseball 
games. 

The Umpire in Baseball, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $.75 

Summarizes importance of the umpire to the baseball game. 
Explanation of the duties of umpire and also qualifications for 
job, showing where they receive their training. 

Winning Baseball, j-s-a, 3 reels. $.75 

The "cut-off" play, how the pitcher catches a man off 
base and how to call for a catch of a fly ball are explained. 
Art of base coaching is depicted. Ways of keeping in condition 
throughout the season and of caring for equipment are shown. 
Players of the National League show their style of pitching, 
batting and fielding. Umpires' techniques are demonstrated. 
The picture concludes with scenes from the final game of the 
1940 World Series. 

World Series of 1951, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, $.75 

The picture shows the 1951 World Series which celebrated 
the 75th anniversary of the National and the 50th anniversary 
of the American League. The two teams playing were the New 
York Giants of the National League and the New York Yankees 
of the American, with the Yankees winning. 

World Series of 1952. e-j-s-c-a. 3 reels, $.75 

The two teams playing were the Brooklyn Dodgers of the 
National League and the New York Yankees of the American. 
The Yankees won the championship and were again the world's 
champions after a long and exciting Beries. 



World Series of 1953, e-j-s-c-a. 3 reels, $.75 

This is the fiftieth anniversary of world Series games be- 
tween the American and the National Leagues. The two teams 
participating were the Brooklyn Dodgers of the National 
League and the New York Yankees of the American League. 
The Yankees retained the championship by winning the first, 
second, third and sixth games of the series. 

World Series of 1954, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, $.75 

A picture of the series in which the New York Giants defeat- 
ed the Cleveland Indi^,ns in four straight games. The Indians 
had set a record for the number of games won during a 
season in winning the American League Pennant. 

Swimming Films 

Aquatic Artistry, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

The film presents a diving exhibition by Harold Smith, an 
Olympic champion. Slow motion photography brings out clearly 
various points in Smith's techniques. 

Beginning Swimming, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Through scenes photographed both above and beneath the 
surface of the water, basic techniques of swimming for be- 
ginners are demonstrated. Land and water drills involving 
kicking, breathing, floating, paddling, and stroking and pulling 
with the arm are practiced separately, then coordinated as the 
swimmer learns the American crawl. The back float, back 
stroke, and breast stroke are also illustrated and explained. 

Breast Stroke, Side Stroke, and Underwater Swimming, 
e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

This film presents the conventional breast stroke, timing 
the strokes, and the kick. 

Crawl Stroke, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

The basic principles of the stroke are presented in this 
film. The arm stroke, the kick, and breathing are demonstrated. 
This film also includes slow motion shots under water. 

Diving Fundamentals, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

After a brief history of the sport of diving, the following 
points are explained and demonstrated : The hurdle jump, de- 
termining the correct distance, proper arm action, correct way 
of landing on the feet, proper takeoff and lift, correct entry 
into the water. The backward dive is also taught, including 
lift, ai'ching the body, and entry into the water. The motion 
is stopped at various points to enable detailed study of form. 

1951 Kentucky High School A. A. Swimming Meet, e-j-s-c-a, 
IV2 reels, silent, $.75 

This is a film showing some of the qualifying heats and 
finals of all the events in the 1951 State Swimming Meet. The 
individual divers are included. St. Xavier High School won the 
title for the fifth consecutive year. 

1952 Kentucky High School A. A. Swimming Meet, e-j-s-c-a, 4 
reels, silent, $.75 

This is a film showing some of the qualifying heats and the 
finals of all the events in the 1952 State Swimming Meet. The 
individual divers are included. St. Xaxier High School won the 
title for the sixth consecutive year. 

1953 Kentucky High School A. A. Swimming Meet, j-s-c-a, 2 
reels, silent, $.75 

This film shows the finals of all events in the 1953 State 
Swimming Meet. The individual divers are included. St. Xaxier 
was the winner in Class A, Berea Foundation in Class B, and 
Newport in Class C. 

1955 Kentucky High School A. A. Swimming Meet, j-s-c-a, 4 
reels, silent, $.75 

Highlights of the meet and championship heats are shown 
in the film. St. Xavier of Louisville won the Class A title for 
the ninth consecutive year. University High of Lexington won 
the Class B and Bellevue the Class C. 

Tennis Films 

Advanced Tennis, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

While working with a tennis pupil. Bill Bill Tilden narrates 
and demonstrates, showing advanced techniques of tennis. 

Tennis Rhythm, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Bobby Riggs is shown winning national tennis champion- 
ship of Forest Hills. Later, at his tennis school in Chicago, he 
demonstrates how to make various shots correctly — the grip, 
service, forehand drive, backhand, etc., using regular speed and 
slow motion. 

Track Films 

The Broad Jump, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Controlled speed — timing and coordination— development of 
legs and torso — mobility of pelvis and hips, one, two, three 
style — foot roll — single and triple air stride — soft versus hard 
take off — arm position. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1956 



Page Five 



Discus, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Principle of centrifugal force — ^muscle development for 
side arm throw^grips — finger roll — heel of thumb pressure — 
finger exercises — clockwise spin — hip snap — reverse and non- 
reverse styles. 

Distance Races, s-c, 1 reel, $1.50 

Races from 1,000 to 10,000 meters and steeplechase are 
demonstrated. Style of distance runner is contrasted with that 
of dash man. Differences in typical physiques are shown. Slow 
motion photography is used to analyze movements. 

Distances, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Style — developing stamina — calisthenics — avoiding shin 
splint — controlled tension^forward knee reflex — straight line 
running — automatic stride. 

The High Jump, j-s-c-a, 1 reel. $1.50 

Belly roll or straddle and improved Western style — body 
lean and reverse — approach— body tension — coordination of 
arm and leg action. 

The Hurdles, j-s-c-a. 1 reel, $1.50 

Basic hurdling styles — rear hip and leg action — rhythmic 
running — hurdling calisthenics — body balance — correct clear- 
ance — circular stepover action — adapting styles of physiques. 

The Javelin, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Four stage catapult throw — preliminary run — concluding 
stride — -throwing stance— throwing and reverse — alternative hand 
and finger grips — facing positions — balance of stomach and 
back muscle tension— throwing angle— body and leg coordina- 
tion drills — flexibility exercises. 

Jumps and Pole Vault, s-e, 1 reel. $1.50 

Demonstrations from actual competition are shown for 
running high-jump; running broad-jump; hop, step and jump; 
and pole vault. Slow motion photography is used for detailed 
study of form. 

1952 Kentucky High School A. A. Track Meet, j-s-c-a. 4 reels, 
silent, $.75 

Highlights of the Kentucky High School Athletic Associa- 
tion State Track Meet, won by Louisville Male High School, 
are shown. The film includes some of the field events, the finals 
of the dashes, and the finish of the runs. 

1954 Kentucky High School A. A. Track Meet, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, 
silent, $.75 

Portions of the state meet are presented in this film. Several 
of the qualifying events are shown with the finals of all the 
track and field events. Lafayette High School won the title 
with 41 1/3 points, Ashland was second and Henry Clay third. 



Meet, 



4 reels. 



1955 Kentucky High School A. A. 
silent, $.75 

The finals of all the track and field events are shown as 
Ashland High School won the meet with 26 points. Tilghman 
High School of Paducah was second with 20 1/4 points. New 
records were set in the Mile Run, Mile Relay, and Discus. 

Middle Distances, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Sprinting techniques — ball of foot running — automatic stride 
— pendulum and bicycle stride — exercise— counter balanced arm 
action — push drive — jockeying for position. 

Pole Vault, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Basic vaulting principles — importance of exercises — running 
action — grip — selecting the pole — take-off — Western and Eastern 
style — slotting — novice training. 

The Belays, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Passing — visual pass — blind pass — right and left exchange 
— merging of runners' speed — baton grips — relay starts, under- 
hand action — cup style — overhand sprint pass — fly scoop — 
practice and team work. 

Shot Put, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Fitting style to physiques — tension control — one, two, three 
rhythm — exercises — finger and hand grip — finger and wrist 
snap — foot positions — progressive tension and effort — explosive 
hip snap. 

The Sprints, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $2.50 

Fundamentals of 100 yard and 200 yard dash — impact 
style and natural stretch stride — syncronizing leg and arm action 
— conditioning exercises — starting techniques — slow motion of 
muBcular utilization and coordination. 




The Flying Dutchman 



Three state tournament officials made 
news this month. "Handsome Ralph" Muss- 
man, Newport's progressive recreation direc- 
tor, has been elected president of the Ken- 
tucky Recreation Society to succeed Frank- 
fort's Charlie Figg, while Ben Edelen was 
selected to serve as an official for a pic- 
torial Courier-Journal magazine story, co- 
starring with Northern Kentucky's Bob Mil- 
ler and depicting the woes and thrills of 
officiating basketball games. 

Since we have started off talking about 
officials, let's study some rules which may 
cause controversies in the tournaments un- 
less we have the "dope" in advance. 

Al Gustafson asks, "What constitutes per- 
sistency by a defensive player in kicking the 
ball, inasmuch as a technical foul is involved 
when repeated kicking takes place?" The 
ruling: The first time a defensive player in- 
tentionally kicks the ball, it is a violation 
and the ball is awarded out of bounds to his 
opponents ; the second time he kicks the ball, 
it is a violation and the player is warned that 
the next occasion will result in a technical 
foul ; the third time he kicks the ball, a tech- 
nical foul is called. 

Jack Thompson asks for a ruling on this 
play : In a sudden death overtime period, A-1 
jumps and shoots, coming down on his de- 
fensive player B-1 and fouling him. The ball 
then goes in the basket scoring the two 
points necessary to win the game after the 
first overtime period. Inasmuch as B-1 has 
a foul shot and a possible bonus shot due him. 
Jack wants to know if the game is over. The 
ruling: B-1 gets his foul shot and if he 
makes it, gets another one, and if he scores 
on both, the game continues until one of the 
teams has scored at least one more point. 
If, however, B-1 missed his bonus free throw, 
the game would be over. 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1956 



Now let's talk about the five-second rule 
as it pertains to the dribbler: The rule is in 
effect when the dribbler is obviously stalling 
in the area between the outer edge of his 
foul circle and the mid-court dividing line, 
provided that a defensive man has him under 
close guard for five seconds. Close guard is 
defined as reaching distance. If the dribbler, 
after being guarded for less than five sec- 
onds, is able to break far enough away from 
his guard to be outside of reaching distance, 
the count stops and a new count starts when 
he is again under close guard. In the event 
that he is guarded by A-1, breaks away from 
A-1 and is immediately picked up by A-2, the 
count would not stop but would be continu- 
ous. Remember that the rule pertaining to 
stalling by the dribbler is never in effect in 
that area between the outer edge of his foul 
circle and the end line in his team's front 
court. 

While we are talking about rules, the Fed- 
eral Internal Revenue officials have asked 
The Flying Dutchman to advise all officials 
that if they have an income from officiating 
in excess of $100 on or before April 15, 1956, 
they are required to file an estimated tax 
return for the year of 1956. While this in- 
formation will not be especially delightful to 
the officials, it will save much difficulty with 
the tax officials later on. 

Cob Pipe Awards have gone out during the 
month of February to Bellevue's Ben Flora, 
Owensboro's Charlie Hayes and H. E. Lash- 
brook. Ben merited The Flying Dutchman's 
Honor Award for his countless years of serv- 
ice in developing fine character in the young 
men of Northern Kentucky. Charlie Hayes 
and "Speedy" Lashbrook were sent cobs 
after Sam Barker, Director of the Mile of 
Dimes in the Owensboro-Daviess County 
Campaign, praised them highly for rendering 
their expert officiating services free of 
charge in a polio basketball game aimed at 
raising funds to eliminate this dread disease 
forever. 

Let's talk some more about awards, be- 
cause Earl Roberts, of Science Hill, has 
called for an Abou Ben Adhem Award to be 
sent to Harrodsburg High School for out- 
standing courtesy extended to basketball of- 
ficials working games in that town. Earl 
was especially high in his praise of Coach 
Aggie Sale, and to that The Dutchman says 
"Amen." With such men as Aggie and Bill 
Ed Leedy handling young athletes in Har- 
rodsburg, those citizens will always be able 
to be proud of the sportsmanship for which 
their town is noted. 



The Game Guy Program in Kentucky has 
been paying big dividends during this year. 
The Dutchman's salute goes to his friend, E. 
C. Jones, Principal of Montgomery County 
High School, for the interest he has taken 
in this month's Lionheart Award winner, 
Edward Earl Ginter. According to Jonesy, 
Edward Earl qualifies as an outstanding can- 
didate for the Game Guy Plaque of 1956. 
Due to an accident at the age of 5, Edward 
Earl has lost the use of his right arm. The 
fingers of his right hand will open when the 
wrist is turned so that he is able to type at 
the rate of 30 words a minute, but when the 
wrist is straightened, his fingers will not 
open. This does not stop this fighting young- 
ster from being an outstannding basketball 
player. Against Fleming County High he 
ripped the net for 13 points, and ranks third 
among Mt. Sterling's Eagles in defensive 
work in games played this year, besides aver- 
aginng 8 points per game. And all this with 
the use of only one arm. For such determina- 
tion and will power Edward Ginter has 
evened up the odds which life stacked against 
him and is the recipient of the Lionheart 
Lapel Button Award for February. 

You officials, whose legs are not moving 
as fast this year as last, may take it from 
The Dutchman that you are getting old. This 
becomes evident as Walter Combs, "The Old 
Hazard Flash," writes that his son Jimmy is 
playing ball in Ashland on a team which 
boasts also the son of Stan Radjunas as a 
member. Old Father Time is pickin' Walter's 
and Stan's pockets. 

Every now and then in the countless let- 
ters which come to The Flying Dutchman 
each month, we find a note of humor which 
we like to pass on to you. The one which gave 
your Dutch Reporter a chuckle this month 
came from Clyde Cantrell of Collista, Ken- 
tucky. Clyde said he'd like to be straightened 
out on who makes the rules for the game of 
basketball. It sems that somebody had told 
him that the Governor of Kentucky made 
them. We told Clyde that this was one thing 
nobody could blame on "Happy." It's a safe 
bet that if the Governor of Kentucky had to 
write the basketball rules, there would be 
few seeking the candidacy for that office. 
You couldn't stay in politics and take the 
beating the rules committee takes each year. 

Let's give Franklin's "Johnie" Crowdus a 
salute for an outstanding achievement. Short- 
ly "Johnie", who serves a member of the 
Board of Control, will receive his Ph.D in 
the field of Recreation. As far as The Dutch- 
(Continiied on Page Eleven) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1956 



Page Seven 



Football Officials' Ratings on Sportsmanship of K, H. S. A. A. 
Member Schools~1955 



SCHOOL 

Anderson (Lawrenceburg) 

Ashland 

Atherton 

Austin Tracy (Lucas) 

Barbour ville 

Bardstown 

Beeehwood (Fort Mitchell) 

Belfry 

Bell County (Pineville) 

Bellevue 

Benham 

Berea 

Black Star (Alva) 

Boone County (Florence) 

Bowling Green 

Caldwell County (Princeton) 

Campbell County (Alexandria) 

Carlisle 

Catlettsburg 

Caverna 

Corbin 

Cumberland 

Cynthiana 

Danville 

Daviess County (Owensboro) 

Dayton 

Dixie Heights (Covington) 

duPont Manual (Louisville) 

Eastern (Middletown) 

Elizabethtown 

Elkhorn (Frankfort) 

Elkhorn City 

Eminence 

Evarts 

Fern Creek 

Flaget 

Fleming- Neon 

Floyd County 

Fort Knox 

Frankfort 

Franklin-Simpson (Franklin) 

Fulton 

Garth (Georgetown) 

Glasgow 

Hall (Grays Knob) 

Harlan 

Harrodsburg 

Hazard 

Henderson 

Henderson County 

Henry Clay (Lexington) 

Highlands (Fort Thomas) 

Hiseville 

Holmes (Covington) 

Holy Trinity (Louisville) 

Hopkinsville 

Irvine 

Jenkins 

Ky. Mili. Inst. (Lyndon) 

Knox Central (Barbourville) 

Lafayette 

Lancaster 

Lebanon 

Lloyd (Erianger) 

Louisa 

Louisville Male 

Loyall 

Ludlow 

Lynch 

Lynn Camp (Corbin) 

McKell (South Shore) 

Madison-Model (Richmond) 

Madisonville 

Marion 

Mayfield 

Middlesboro 

Millersfaurg Mili. Inst 

Morganfield 

Mt. Sterling 

Murray 

Newport 

Newport Catholic 

Nicholas ville 

Oldham County (LaGrange) 

Old Kentucky Home (Bardstown). 

Ormsby Village (Anchorage) 

fiwensboro 





COACH 


21 


3 




32 


4 




SI 


4 


') 


K 


1 




18 


4 


1 


24 


2 


1 


23 


6 




18 


2 


2 


17 


5 


1 


24 


11 




2(; 






8 


5 




15 


2 


1 


23 


6 


1 


35 


4 




B 


3 




22 


6 


1 


20 


4 


1 


7 


4 




19 


1 




8 


4 




22 


6 




19 


2 


9 


28 


1 




27 


9 




25 


8 


1 1 


28 


9 




28 


4 




40 




2 


35 


7 


1 


26 


3 


1 


21 


3 




15 




2 


12 


1 




26 






36 


2 




25 


9 





23 


7 




12 


7 


5 


18 


2 




20 


4 




30 


2 




16 


2 


3 


17 


6 


1 


24 


1 




23 




1 


28 




4 


24 






24 


4 




27 


9 




15 


4 


2 


20 


1 




32 


6 




4 


2 


1 


30 


5 


1 


30 


2 




29 


5 




24 




2 


19 


3 


3 


35 


1 




16 


6 




31 


2 




18 


4 




14 


5 


1 


26 


9 




10 


5 


1 


48 


a 




18 


3 


1 


31 


6 




24 






14 


6 




8 


4 




22 


1 




25 


5 


1 


19 


11 


2 


19 


11 




18 






19 






30 






9 




3 


37 






24 


5 


3 


21 


] 


1 


17 


3 




12 






20 






9 






26 




2 





OTHER 








TEAM 




SCHOOL 




CROWD 








OFFICIALS 












20 


4 






IS 


6 






20 


4 




31 


2 






27 


8 






24 






35 


2 






33 


3 


1 




33 


4 




7 


2 






r-, 




1 




5 


2 


1 


19 


4 






17 


6 






16 


7 




24 


2 


1 




21 


3 


2 




22 






20 


6 






19 


7 






19 


8 




19 


2 


1 


1 


14 


6 




3 


14 






16 


7 






11 


10 


2 


1 


12 


7 


5 


29 


6 






21 


13 


1 




23 


11 


2 


24 








24 


3 






24 


2 




9 


4 






9 


4 






9 


3 


1 


18 


2 




2 


15 


3 


1 


1 


18 


3 


1 


24 


6 






22 


8 






20 


9 




38 


3 






35 


6 






29 


5 


4 


6 


a 






6 


3 






6 


3 


1 


26 


3 






22 


8 






23 


3 


3 


18 


7 






13 


12 






15 


10 




8 


1 


1 




11 








10 


I 




17 


3 






16 


4 






18 


2 




10 


2 






6 


6 






11 


1 




24 


4 






19 


6 




3 


19 


7 


1 


27 


1 






25 


2 






24 


5 


1 


27 
24 


1 
5 






23 
24 


5 






25 
26 


3 
3 




25 
27 


9 
9 






25 
16 


9 
19 






25 
26 


1^ 


1 


25 


5 






25 


8 


1 




28 


6 




39 


1 






37 


3 


1 




43 


4 




40 
29 


4 


1 




36 
28 


5 
3 






36 

28 


7 
2 


1 


21 


3 


1 




20 


4 


1 




18 


6 


1 


14 


2 


1 




11 


5 




1 


10 


6 


1 


12 


1 






12 


1 






11 






26 








24 






2 


24 


1 




38 


1 






29 


7 


2 




29 


8 




28 


8 


2 




25 


11 


1 


1 


29 


7 


9 


26 


5 






23 


7 


1 




24 


7 




18 


7 


3 


1 


11 


10 


3 


5 


13 


7 


4 


19 
22 
29 


1 
3 




1 


17 
14 
29 


4 
7 
2 


1 


2 


21 
15 
27 


6 
5 




20 


1 




1 


20 


2 


1 




20 




3 


20 


4 


1 




17 


6 


1 


1 


16 


7 


1 


23 
24 
28 


2 
2 






20 
23 
27 


4 
1 


1 
2 


^ 


22 
23 
26 


3 
1 
1 


4 


23 


2 






16 


8 


1 




24 


1 




24 


4 






22 


6 






21 


6 


1 


27 


9 






19 


16 






22 


10 


2 


18 


3 


1 




15 


5 


1 




16 


4 


1 


20 


2 






19 


3 






19 


3 




32 


6 






21 


17 






20 


16 


1 


6 


1 






4 


3 






2 


4 


1 


29 
29 


7 
3 






24 
28 


12 
3 


1 




23 
27 


12 
5 




32 


3 






28 


4 






29 


6 




24 


1 


1 




22 


3 


1 




24 




2 


24 


2 






19 


5 




2 


21 


4 


1 


38 








32 


2 


2 




32 


4 




16 


6 






13 


7 




2 


13 


9 




30 


2 






28 


4 






26 


6 


1 


20 








18 


2 


1 


1 


20 


2 




20 
25 


5 
9 






14 
23 


7 
12 


1 


2 


16 
23 


4 
12 


3 


1] 


5 






10 


6 


1 




9 


4 


4 


50 


1 






42 


7 


1 




40 


9 


2 


22 








18 




2 




IS 


1 


1 


30 


6 






26 


11 


1 




25 


10 


1 


25 


1 






23 


1 


1 




23 


2 


1 


15 


6 






17 


2 


1 


1 


17 


2 


1 


11 


1 






7 


5 






6 


6 




23 


1 






19 


4 






19 


4 




25 


6 






20 


5 


5 


2 


24 


7 


2 


27 


5 




2 


23 


7 


4 




20 


10 


2 


27 


6 






23 


9 


1 




21 


10 


1 


20 


3 






16 


5 


1 


1 


15 


4 




19 


3 






16 


6 






17 


5 




25 


6 






23 


7 


1 


2 


24 


7 


1 


16 


2 




1 


16 


2 


1 




12 


3 


3 


37 


1 






36 


2 






32 


3 


3 1 


28 


4 






26 


5 


2 




22 


6 


2 


22 








20 


2 






20 


3 




17 


4 






15 


5 


1 




16 


5 




12 
21 


2 






12 
20 


4 






12 
22 


„ 




10 








9 


1 






10 






28 


S 


I 




23 


9 


2 




25 


9 





Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1956 



SCHOOL 

Owensboro Catholic 

Paducah Tilghman 

Paintsville 

Park City 

Perryville 

Pikeville 

Pineville 

Providence 

Raceland 

Russell 

Russellville 

St. Charles (R. 2, Lebanon). 

St. Joseph (Bardstown) 

St. Xavier (Louisville) 

Shawnee (Louisville) 

Shelbyville 

Shephardsville 



Southern (Louisville) 

Springfield 

Stanford 

Sturgis 

Suda E. Butler (Shively) 

Temple Hill (R. 4. Glasgow). 

Tompkinsville 

Trigg County (Cadiz) 

Valley (Valley Station) 

Versailles 

Wallins 

Whitesburg 

Williamsburg 

Wilmore 

Winchester 

Wurtland 







18 






23 






24 






11 






9 


1 


1 


14 
29 
17 


1 




19 

17 




2 


8 


^ 




34 
24 


a 


1 


21 


1 


9 


26 
45 
20 
5 


2 




27 
30 
25 


1 


1 


9 
31 
3 

6 

17 


1 




26 
30 


1 


2 
1 


17 
27 
23 
19 


1 




4 


1 


1 


22 




1 


11 



OTHER 


















SCHOOL 




CROWD 




TEAM 


OFFICIALS 












3 






14 


7 






17 


2 


2 


8 






18 


11 


1 




17 


12 


1 


3 






17 


10 






20 


6 


1 


6 






13 


4 






11 


6 




3 






9 


2 


1 




7 


3 


2 


2 






12 


3 


1 




9 


6 


1 


4 






21 


12 






21 


8 


4 


3 






16 


3 


1 




12 


6 


2 


8 






19 


7 




1 


18 


8 


1 


3 






10 


9 


1 




16 


4 




1 






3 


6 




1 


5 


2 


2 


3 






31 


6 






31 


2 


3 


2 






22 


3 


1 




21 


4 




1 


2 




22 


4 


1 




21 


4 


2 


10 


2 




21 
40 


13 
5 


4 


1 


26 
36 


11 
8 


1 


3 






18 


5 






20 


3 




3 






5 


3 






6 


2 


1 


2 






26 


3 


3 




23 


7 




1 






30 


2 






30 


2 




1 






22 


1 


1 


2 


23 


2 


1 


X 






15 


2 






12 


5 




3 






27 
2 


5 
1 


2 




29 
2 


5 

1 




1 






6 


1 






6 


2 




2 






11 


« 




3 


16 


3 




4 




22 


7 






19 


7 


3 


4 




30 


4 






27 


6 




3 


1 


17 


4 






15 


6 










27 








27 






6 






18 


10 




1 


21 


7 


1 


6 




1 


16 


8 


2 


1 


15 


8 


3 


1 


1 




4 


1 


1 




6 




1 


2 






22 


2 






21 


2 


1 


3 






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10 


4 





Early Season Baseball Questions 

Editor's Note: These rulings do not set aside or 
modify any rule. They are interpretations on some 
of the eaily season situations which have been pre- 
sented. 

1. Play: How does the National Federation 
Baseball Code differ from the Professional Code? 

Ruling-: The primary difference is in organiza- 
tion, arrangement and wording. The Federation 
Code follows a pattern which is similar to the codes 
for football and basketball. This has advantages in 
making them more teachable and easier to learn, 
especially for anyone who is somewhat familiar 
with codes for one or more of the other major sports. 

2. Play: In playing procedures, what are the 
differences between the National Federation Code 
and the Professional Code ? 

Ruling: There are only a few significant dif- 
ferences. They are as follows: (1) All money and 
suspension fines are omitted from the Federation 
Code. (2) The high school game is seven innings 
unless the teams or the league agree to play nine. 

(3) Unless the two teams or the league authorities 
agree otherwise, the coacher's box at 1st and 3rd 
may be occupied only by someone eligible to play. 

(4) Catcher is not compelled to remain in his box 
until the pitch leaves pitcher's hand. (5) Batting 
out of order is not an appeal play in the Federa- 
tion Code. Use of an Official Scorer is encouraged 
and he or anyone else may call attention to any 
irregularity in the batting order. To eliminate some 
of the complications, the administration of this 
infrequent foul is slightly different from that pre- 
scribed by the Professional Code. (6) If ball becomes 
dead and runner is awarded a base in advance of 
one he inadvertently misses, the missed base is ig- 
nored. An illustration is: A home run is hit over 
the fence so ball becomes dead. If runner circles the 
bases but happens to miss one, no appeal can be 
made. 

Any other minor differences have little signi- 
ficance except to simplify procedures for learning 
the rules. 



3. Play: What is the responsibility of the Um- 
pire if a batter steps in the batter's box without 
wearing a head protector? 

Ruling: Unless the conference or State Associa- 
tion has authorized the Umpire to enforce a penalty, 
he will allow the game to proceed if no head pro- 
tector is available. If a head protector is available, 
he will order the batter to use it. Failure to comply 
may result in disqualification of the player in ac- 
cordance with Rule 10-2-2-e. 

4. Play: After three or four innings of a high 
school game have been played, the home manager 
informs the visitors that the game will be nine 
innings in length. 

Ruling: Unless the visitors agree to nine inn- 
ings. Umpire should declare the game ended after 
seven innings unless the game ends in a tie. If it 
ends in a tie, the usual procedure for extra inning 
games shall be followed. 

5. Play: Is administration of penalty for a bat- 
ter interfering with the catcher the same as for a 
runner interfering with a batted ball or with a 
fielder? 

Ruling: There is a slight difference between 
interference at home base and interference else- 
where. The difference is in the time the ball becomes 
dead. If a batter interferes with a catcher's attempt 
to put out a runner at home, the ball becomes 
dead immediately. The runner is declared out unless 
there are already two out, in which case, the batter 
becomes the third out. In contrast, if the batter 
interferes with a catcher's throw to a base, there is 
a delayed dead ball, i.e., play continues until the 
outcome of the throw is determined. If the throw 
is in time to put out the runner, the interference by 
the batter is automatically declined. But if the 
throw is not in time to put out the runner, then the 
penalty is automatically accepted and the ball is 
retroactively dead as of the time of the interference. 
In such case, the batter is out and the runner re- 
turns to the base he occupied at the time ball be- 
came dead. 

6. Play: May penalty for the following infrac- 
tions be ignored if all runners, including the batter- 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1956 



Page Nine 



runner, advance a minimum of one base? (a) Balli; 

(b) catcher interferes with batter, (c) pitcher 
throws an illegal quick pitch; (d) runner illegally 
kicks a batted ball. 

Ruling: Penalty is ignored in (a), (b) and (c). 
It is not ignored in (d). 

7. Play: It is sometimes stated that two play- 
ers cannot be declared out for one infraction. Is 
this correct? 

Ruling: When an infraction prevents a double 
play which involves the batter-runner, two runners 
may be called out because of the infraction which 
prevented the double play. In certain cases, it might 
be obvious that an infraction has prevented a double 
play which does not involve the batter-runner. Un- 
der such circumstances, only one player is called out 
because of the infraction. This is on the assumption 
that practically all such cases will involve some 
doubt as to whether the second I'unner would have 
been put out, while it is easier to determine whether 
the batter-runner would have been put out except 
for the infraction. 

8. Play: B3 bunts, (a) If this is on third strike, 
is it illegal? (b) If the batted ball goes high in 
the air and comes down over the infield, is it an 
infield fly if 1st and 2nd are occupied? (c) May the 
bunt be a foul or a foul tip ? 

Ruling: (a) No. In case it should be a foul 
ball, it would not be a bunt but only an attempt to 
bunt. The attempt causes batter to be out. (b) and 

(c) No. 

9. Play: Rl is trapped between 1st and 2nd 
but he escapes being put out and reaches 2nd safely. 
Is this recorded as an error or a stolen base? 

Ruling: Rl is credited with a stolen base. 

10. Play: Rl is on 3rd. Pitcher Fl stretches for 
set delivery. Before he has brought the ball down 
to the stop position, Rl breaks for home. Fl throws 
to catcher. Is this an illegal pitch or a throw to a 
base? If batter chooses to strike at the ball, he 
he committed an infraction. 

Ruling: It depends on whether F moved his 
pivot foot by stepping backward off his plate. If 
he did, it is a throw to a base and Bl may not inter- 
fere by striking at such throw. If Fl did not step 
off his plate before the throw, Bl has no way of 
knowing whether it is an illegal pitch or a throw 
to a base. Umpire would be justified in regarding 
it as an illegal pitch and, since there is a runner, 
administration is the same as for a balk. 

11 Play: Following an overthrow at 2nd, ninner 
Al is advancing from 3rd when batter B4 illegally 
interferes with the throw to the catcher. Is B4 or 
Rl declared out? 

Ruling: If two are already out, B4 is the third 
out. If two are not already out, Rl is declared out. 

Comment: At one time, there was some question 
as to whether this procedure is followed since this 
is neither a steal nor a squeeze play. Under current 
rules, the same procedure is followed, regardless of 
the type of play. 

12. Play. Bl steps foi-ward in front of his box 
to meet a pitch or he steps out of his box toward 
home plate to reach for a wide pitch. What is the 
penalty ? 

Ruling: If he does not hit the pitch, there is no 
penalty unless it should be interference with the 
catcher's throw. If he does hit the pitch fair or foul, 
Bl is out. 

13. Play: If a pitcher is touching his plate when 
he overthrows a base, does this always result in 
the awarding of one base instead of two ? 

Ruling: It does provided the pitcher is touch- 
ing his plate in a normal pitching situation. If the 



pitcher has fielded a batted ball or has fielded a 
throw and happens to be in contact vdth his plate 
when he overthrows a base, he is then regarded as 
an infielder. In these cases, the pitcher is touching 
his plate but he is not in his pitching position. 

14. Play: With Rl on 2nd, it is the time of B5 
to bat but B6 erroneously bats and hits a 2-bagger. 
The irregularity is discovered: (a) before a sub- 
sequent pitch; or (b) after a subsequent pitch. 

Ruling: In (a), the proper batter, R5, is declared 
out. Rl is ordered back to 2nd and it is now the turn 
of B6 to bat again. In (b), no adjustment can be 
made. If B7 has properly followed B6, B5 has lost 
his turn at bat. 

15. Play: Is batting out of turn an appeal 
play? 

Ruling: No. The Scorer is expected to help 
prevent such an irregularity. Also, the Umpire, if 
he should happen to discover it, is expected to call 
attention to it and, if possible, prevent the wrong 
batter from receiving a pitch. 

16. Play: With Rl on 2nd, pitcher Fl delivers 
an illegal spit ball. Is this a balk or an illegal pitch? 

Ruling: Technically, it is neither since it is not 
directly covered under 6-1 nor under 6-2-4. If Umpire 
discovers the infraction before the pitch is delivered, 
he should declare the ball dead immediately and no 
runner may advance. If he does not discover the 
infraction until after delivery, he will administer it 
the same as if it were a balk. In either case, Fl 
is disqualified. 

17. Play: With no runner on base, PI delivers 
an illegal spit ball to Bl who: (a) does not hit the 
pitch and it passes throug-h the strike zone; or (b) 
liits a fly bal which is caught. 

Ruling: Such a pitch is not included as an 
illegal patch as outlined in 6-1. For practical pur- 
poses, it is best to treat such a pitch as an illegal 
pitch except that Fl is disqualified. If this procedui'e 
is followed, a ball would be awarded in either (a) 
or (b). 

18. Play: With the ball alive, Rl and R2 are 
both on 2nd base. Which runner may be tagged out 
while standing on the base? 

Ruling: If a force play is involved, only the 
advance runner may be tagged out. Otherwise, only 
the succeeding runner may be tagged out. 

19. Play: Since a high school game is seven 
innings in length, how many innings are necessary 
for a regulation game when it is called because of 
weather ? 

Ruling: The same as for a nine inning game, 
i.e., at least four and one-half innings. 

20. Play: From 2nd base, Rl attempts to steal 
3rd as Fl starts his delivery. The pitch is over the 
catcher's head for a wild pitch. Which base is 
awarded Rl? 

Ruling: If the wild pitch does not go into the 
bleachers to become dead, no bases are awarded. 
If the pitch does become dead, only one base is 
awarded. Hence, if Rl should advance home, he 
would be sent back to 3rd. 

21. Play: Is it always illegal for a ininner to 
leave the 3-foot baseline in his advance ? 

Ruling: No. It is quite common for a runner to 
make a wide swing in rounding a base. This is illegal 
only when it is an attempt to avoid being tagged or 
to interfere with a fielder or for pui-poses of de- 
ception. 

22. Play: With one out and Rl on 3rd, B3 has 2 
strikes. On the next pitch, he strikes at and misses 
the ball which then touches him. Does ball become 
dead immediately? Who is declared out? 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1956 



Ruling: The ball becomes dead immediately. 
B3 is out. 

23. Play: After pitcher Fl has taken his 
stretch and stop, the ball strikes the pitcher's body 
and falls to the ground. 

Ruling: If there is no runner, this is not an in- 
fraction. If there is a runner, it is a balk. 

24. Play: Is it a catch when a fielder traps the 
hall against his body or under his arm ? 

Ruling: No. However, this may become a catch 
as soon as the fielder gets the ball securely in his 
hand after having trapped it. 



Early Season Track Questions 

Editor's Note: These rulings do not set aside or 
modify any rule. They are interpretations on some 
of the early season situations which have been pre- 
sented. 

1. Situation: Are any corrections needed for 
the 1956 Federation edition of the Track and Field 
Rules Book? 

Ruling: The first paragraph on page 21 is in- 
advertently held over from last year. It conflicts 
with the new procedure which permits competitors 
in the high jump and pole vault to pass one to 
three of their opportunities at a given height. Cor- 
rect procedure is at the bottom of page 18. Also, the 
cross country data on page 90 are for the year 1954 
instead of for 1953. 

2. Situation: What is the penalty for knocking 
over a hurdle? Will a record be accepted if one 
or more of the hurdles is knocked over? 

Ruling: Assuming that the hurdler makes an 
actual attempt to go over the hurdle and does not 
drag a leg outside the hurdle, there is no penalty. 
Experience has shown that no advantage can be 
gained from knocking down a hurdle. Records may 
be accepted even though not all of the hurdles are 
standing at the end of the race, provided the hurdles 
meet the overturning- specifications. If they do not, 
no record will be accepted even though the perform- 
ance counts in points. 

3. Situation: What was the purpose in lower- 
ing the overturning specifications for the high 
hurdle ? 

Ruling: If the 8-pound overturning force which 
is specified for the low hurdles were to be applied 
to the high hurdles, it would require an expensive 
set of shifting weights to make the same hurdle 
suitable for use in both races. Tests indicate that 
a hurdler cannot gain an advantage by knocking 
over a high hurdle with an overturning force of 6 
pounds. Hence, there is no good reason why 8 
pounds should be required. 

4. Situation: With the pole vault bar at 12 feet, 
Al passes all of his turns because of competing in 
other events or for other reason. After all of the 
competitors have failed, Al requests permission to 
ti-y at this height. 

Ruling: Unless Al happens to be the last in 
the list of all competitors, his request should not be 
granted. The bar should be raised, after which Al 
is entitled to his remaining turns. 

5. Situation: Why is it required that the bar 
be raised in the above situation ? 

Ruling: To prevent a competitor from passing 
all of his turns at a given height in order to wait 
until after all of his competitors have finished at 
that height. In the case cited, Al had three oppor- 
tunities and he did not choose to use any one of 
them. He can compete only in his regular turn and 
his third turn was passed. When the bar is raised, 



he is competing in his regular turn since all other 
competitors were eliminated at the lower height. 

6. Situation: In the first line on page 19 of 
the Track Rules Book, there is a reference to "his 
third opportunity." Is this correct or should the 
reference be to "his second opportunity"? 

Ruling: The statement is correct as printed. In 
the case cited, the competitor had his first oppor- 
tunity at 6 feet. He passed his second and this makes 
a succeeding opportunity the third. 

7. Situation: What is the purpose of the slight 
change in wording which permits a shot putter or 
discus thrower to touch the inside of the ring pro- 
vided the does not step on top of it? 

Ruling': In past years the I'ules concerning this 
were indefinite and they were not the same for 
the two events. If a chalk mark is used for the ring, 
it is expected that the competitor will stay inside 
the chalk mark. However, the inside edge of such 
mark often becomes i-agged. It is not intended that 
a competitor be unduly handicapped because of such 
ragged edge. In the case of a raised metal ring, it 
is quite common for a competitor to rest the side 
of his foot ag'ainst the inner edge of the ring in 
order to be sure of getting maximum distance for 
his approach. The current wording permits him to 
do this. 

8. Situation: What developments in equipment 
are being considered? 

Ruling: Many improvements in equipment 
have been made during the past few years. One of 
these is in the perfection of a satisfactoi-y light- 
weight metal vaulting pole. The best of these has 
a strength equal to that of a bamboo pole and it is 
claimed that such poles have a springing quality 
which is of some assistance to the vaulter. 

Experiments vdth the standard high school dis- 
cus is being promoted. The small discus which was 
adopted several years ago for high school meets 
has increased the popularity of this event. The use 
of the lighter discus permits better control and 
feels more comfortable in the hand of a competitor 
of high school age. Some track coaches have ex- 
pressed the opinion that the smaller discus would 
be even more satisfactory if it were slightly thinner 
at the edge where the fingertips grip the instru- 
ment. Experimental implements of the same weight 
as at present but with a slightly thinner edge for 
gripping pui-poses are being tried during the spring- 
meets. 



NATIONAL INTERSCHOLASTIC RECORDS 
ESTABLISHED IN 1955 

POLE VAULT (14' 2")— James A. Brewer, 
Phoenix, Arizona 

HIGH JUMP (6' 9%")— Charles Dumas, Conip- 
ton, California 

MILE RUN (4 min. 19.5 sec.)— Tom Skutka, 
Rockaway, New Jersey 

4-MAN 880 RELAY (1 min. 27.2 sec.)— Thomas 
Jefferson High School, Los Angeles, California 
(Phillips, White, Brice and Walter) 

220 YARD DASH (20.7 sec— Ties former 
record) — Eddie Southern, Dallas, Texas 

180 YARD LOW HURDLES (18.5 sec.)— Char- 
les E. Tidwell, Independence, Kansas 

440 YARD DASH (47.2 sec.)— Eddie Southern, 
Dallas, Texas 

ONE MILE RELAY (3 min. 17.9 sec).— Robert 
E. Lee High School, Baytown, Texas (Smajstila, 
Robins, Davis and Wilson) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1956 



Page Eleven 



K.E.A. Program 
K.A.H.P.E.R. 

Thursday, April 12, Louisville, Kentucky 

9:00-10:00 A. M. 

Division of Physical Education — Minnie 
Maude Macauley, Vice President; Kentucky 
Hotel — Mirror Room 

Pannel Discussion — "Relating School and 
Community through Physical Education" 

Division of Health Education — Charles 
Acuff, Vice President; Kentucky Hotel — 
Room B 

Panel Discussion — "Health, a School and 
Community Responsibility" 

Division of Recreation — James P. Ross, 
Vice President; Kentucky Hotel — Room C 

Panel Discussion — "Relating the School 
and Community Through Recreation" 
9:30-11:30 A. M. 

N.S.G.W.S.— Elsie Sawyer, State Chair- 
man; Y.W.C.A. Gymnasium 

Demonstration and Discussion — "Posture 
and Body Mechanics in the Physical Educa- 
tion Curriculum" 
12:00-2:00 P. M. 

Luncheon for all members ; Kentucky Hotel 
— Terrace Room 

Reports of Divisions, Election of Officers, 
Honor Awards 

Program — Dancers from Kentucky State 
College — Miss Esther Brown; Dancers from 
University of Kentucky — Miss Joanna 
Gewertz 

Reservations for the luncheon should be 
sent to Dr. Sue Hall, Department of Physical 
Education, University of Louisville ; price of 
luncheon will be $2.00. Reservations should 
reach Dr. Hall not later than April 9. 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled March 1) 

If one telephone nnmber is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 
Barry. Harold L., Route 1, Elizabethtown. 2226 (Bus. No.) 
Duncan. Hickman E., 624 Skyview Dr., Nashville, Tenn., 

An-32556 
Espie, Sidney, 1614 Algonquin Parkway, Louisville, ME 7-2703, 

WA 1121, Ext. 292 
Morris, Buddy G., 2177 Winchester Ave., Ashland 
Schmalfuss, Werner, 3021 Scioto, Cincinnati, Ohio, CA 1-0027 
Watson, Everett, 1319 Cypress, Louisville, AR 7627, WA 1121, 

Ext. 292 



BASKETBALL— 

(Continued from Page One) 
near a player's own basket is related to the 
"dunk shot" whereby a tall player rises so 
that his hand is above the basket and he 
can't miss because he stuffs the ball down 
through the ring. This could be prevented if 



it seemed desirable to do so by expanding 
the present restrictions which now apply to 
the defensive player so that it will also in- 
clude a player at his own basket. Under such 
rule no player of either team would be per- 
mitted to touch the ball while it is on the 
ring or while the hand in contact with the 
ball is in the cylinder above the ring. If a 
moi'e drastic rule were desired, this could be 
expanded to prohibit touching the ball while 
the ball is touching the ring or cylinder. 
This would make all "dunk shots" illegal. 

THE ANNUAL BASKETBALL QUES- 
TIONNAIRE is now being distributed. It 
gives opportunity for everyone to express 
his opinion concerning these and other re- 
lated problems which will be placed before 
the National Basketball Committee when it 
meets in Chicago on March 24 and 25. 

— National Federation Press. 



THE FLYING DUTCHMAN 

(Continued from Page Six) 
man can find out, "Johnie" will be the only 
native bom Doctor of Recreation in Ken- 
tucky. Back in 1930 Gene Flippin pi'ophesied 
that this fighting little guy, who cavorted 
as center on the Hilltoppers' football team, 
would leave his footprints in the sands of 
time. 

There is no doubt that one friend is worth 
more than can ever be measured by financial 
return. Last month, The Dutchman mailed 
two thousand letters to the readers of The 
Flying Dutchman column explaining the 
Youth Ambassadors of Friendship Flight 
planned to Old Mexico in 1956 and asked 
their support. It was heartwarming that 
301 readers contributed $357 to purchase 
"Buck Sponsorships" to help make this world 
friendship project possible. 

Erlanger's Paul Champion presented the 
project to his Citizenship Class and each 
student kicked in a dime and raised $3.45 to 
show what they thought about the develop- 
ment of future world peace through our 
young people of today. Paul came up with a 
good idea because the project does have a 
merit when presented to classes who are in- 
terested in what they may do toward making 
the world a better place in which to live. 

The Dutchman just can't help feeling 
warm inside toward the countless friends 
who said, "We're behind you." That's the 
reason we're looking forward to the State 
Tournament when we'll be able to once again 
renew friendships which are worth much 
more than money in the bank. 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1956 



A Philosophy of Athletics 

The following philosophy of athletics was pre- 
pared by the Monessen (Pennsylvania) School Dis- 
trict. Dr. Michael Duda is superintendent of schools. 
K. Fife Sterett is principal of the high school and 
Frank McKoskev serves as athletic director. 



WE BELIEVE THAT 

1. Athletics are an integral part of our secon- 
dary school program. Our hi.srh school sports are 
administered by secondary school authorities and 
all instruction is provided by competent, qualified, 
and properly certified teachers so that desirable, 
definite educational aims may be achieved. Parti- 
cipation contributes to happiness, physical skill, 
emotional maturity, social competence, and moral 
values. 

2. Cooperation and competition are both import- 
ant component parts of American Life. Athletic 
participation can help teach the values of coopera- 
tion as well as the spirit of competition. 

3. Athletics are for the benefit of all youth. A 
sport for every student and every student in a spoit 
in a well-balanced intramui-al and interseholastic 
program vdth emphasis on safe and healthful stand- 
ards of competition. 

4. Athletics are to be administered under rules 
which provide for eauitable competition, sportsman- 
ship, fail play, health, and safety. 

5. The aim of athletics is the development of 
desirable character traits for useful and satisfying 
democratic living. 

6. The objectives of coaching- are to provide 
the best type of training for our athletics since 
sports play an important part in our American way 
of Life, to instill a spirit of playing the game for 
the sake of the game and not for rewards other 
than that of winning a letter, and to protect our 
youth from exploitations by outside interests. 

7. The desire to learn all phases of the sport 
and to develop one's ability to the fullest extent 
should be stimulated. 

8. Each coach should recognize his responsibil- 
ities in developing sportsmanship in the youth under 
his guidance. Sportsmanship requires that one gives 
as well as takes. Sportsmanship is reallv the Golden 
Rule applied to the fields of combat. We should al- 
ways treat our visitors, both players and snectators, 
as we would like to be treated when we visit them. 
Sportsmanship is the quality that makes one desire 
to play the game fair and hard, determined to win 
without breaking the rule, without discourtesy to 
an opponent.. It is the spirit that wins without using 
victory as a means to humiliate a worthy opponent, 
the spirit that loses without resorting to alibis, to 
discount an opponent victory. 

9. The best discipline is that which enables the 
athlete to develop the ability to govern himself and 
to respect the coach. 

10. Conduct out of school leflects the training 
not only of the home and the school but also the 
church and community. If the athlete's good conduct 
in all these agencies is a self-imposed discipline, it 
will carry over into all other community situations. 



11. There will be a carry-over from a good 
participant to a good spectator. 

12. School morale is important. Intramurals are 
fine and essential, but interseholastic competition 
is needed to give a school life. Hig-h morale depends 
upon the hamionious relationship between all groups 
and agencies that affect the athlete, student, and 
teacher. 

13. The learning- process takes place most ef- 
fectively in attractive physical surroundings in 
which the athlete has a feeling of pride and shared 
ownership and in an atmosphere where there are 
mutual respect and understanding between the coach 
and athlete and between athlete and athlete. 

14. A good public relations program should be 
built. Our athletic pi'ogram is a major school acti- 
vity of interest to participants and spectators alike. 
In its ramifications it gives rise to considerable 
comment in the local and surrounding communities. 
When properly conducted, it is a source of good vrill 
to those exposed to its many facets. 

15. Since communitv and school benefit mu- 
tually from a well conducted program, the com- 
munity should be recognized and kept fully informed 
of the finances and program of the school. 

16. Since the success of democracy depends 
upon democratic action, athletics must foster basic 
democratic principles, not through verbiage but by 
actually living it. Every opportunity possible should 
be provided for the development of the American 
way of Life. 

17. Athletics suggest health and happiness. It 
arouses school and community pride and also arouses 
school and community spirit. A student should be 
proud of the nlace in which he lives so that his school 
will be proud of him. 

18. Athletics develop a more sturdy, a more 
self-reliant, and a more responsible student. 

19. Ethics in school sports are very impoi-tant. 
Our ethics gi-ow out of our thinking and are re- 
flected in our attitude and conduct. 

20. The hip-hest type of behavior should be 
developed, esneciallv resnect for individual rights 
and for law and order. Coaches, teachers, and par- 
ents must work together in this grave task of pre- 
parina- the pthlete to be a good citizen of God, com- 
munitv, and country. Tf the athlete is thoroughly 
inq-vained in the nraetice of obedience for the com- 
mon a-ood, he will have a firm foundation in fun- 
dpnipntal law and order. He ^-ill acquire stabilitv 
of chai-acter that will last him through life. With 
obedience will come piudence to distinguish between 
what is valuable and what is useless. In the practice 
of obedience he will recognize the existence of a 
higher authoritv than his own will. He will learn to 
respect the rights of others. 

21. Because of increased leisure time, it becomes 
incumbent upon each community to pro-vide as 
much adult recreation as is of interest to the people 
of the community. 

22. No expense within reason should be spared 
to give our youth the best of equipment and a wide 
variety of activities to meet his needs and interests. 
Money spent for spoi-ts is money invested in the 
futuie of our community and our country. 

—THE PA'THLETE 



W. S. HUNT 



-\^" 



yf g^YSTOg ^ 





PHONE 104 



HUNT^S ATHLETIC GOODS CO. 

MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 



C. A. BYRN, JR. 
Q 



'"4 



> 




KHSAA State Basketball Tournament 

During your stay in Lexington for the 1956 KHSAA State 
Basketball Tournament we extend you a very cordial 
invitation to make our Sample Rooms 363 and 365 your 
headquarters. 

For years and years coaches, fans, players, celebrities and 
friends have made our room their headquarters. 

Visit us and the factory representatives who will be 
available to assist you with your athletic requirements. 
A complete display of spring and summer merchandise as 
well as 1956 lines of football and basketball equipment, 
including honor sweaters, award jackets, chenille letters and 
trophies. 

Our salesmen, Rov J. Boyd, Jim Mitchell, C. A. Byrn, Jr., 
and Bill Hunt will be present to welcome you. 

Our spring and summer catalog was mailed some time 
aero. If you have not received your copy write us and we 
will send you another one by return mail. 

We have already shipped all of the district and regional 
first place and second place official KHSAA trophies 
complete with the seal and prorier engraving, as well as 
several MacGregor XIOL basketballs which will be used 
in various district and regional tournaments. 

Why not get the feel of the XIOL in case you are not using 
it, for it will again be used in the State Tournament for 
1956. 



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Write us tor copy il" you do not have 
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K* E* A» When in Louisville be sure to visit Sutcliffe's Display quarters 
at Room 812, Kentucky Hotel, April 11-12-13. See, inspect and order 
your athletic goods equipment for Summer, tor next Fall and next year. 

• ••** STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT ••*** 
Lexington March 14-15-16-17 

See SUTCLIFFE REPRESENTATIVES 

Rooms 461-462 PHOENIX HOTEL 



Reach American Leaj^iie Baseballs, each $2.25 Spalding National League Baseballs, each $2.25 

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L LOUISVILLE 1, KENTUCKY 




High khoof Af Mete 



CARR CREEK HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL TEAM 
K. H. S. A. A. CHAMPION - - 1956 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Estill Adams, Jim Calhoun, Mgr. Donald Hylton, 
Mgr. Donald Combs, Ed Richardson, Ray Stamper. Second Row: Coach Morton 
Combs, Team Mascot Glen Combs, E. A. Couch, Warren Amburgey, Bobby Shep- 
herd, Marcus Combs, Freddy Maggard, John Mullins, Asst. Coach Willard (Sprout) 
Johnson. 

District Tournament Games Won Regional Tournament Games Won 

Carr Creek 97 - 49 Riverside Carr Creek 93 - 69 Hindman 

Carr Creek 73 - 49 Jackson Carr Creek 59 - 34 Hazard 

Carr Creek 85 - 67 Hindman Carr Creek 76 - 46 Whitesburg 




OHicial Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 

APRIL - 1956 



In Memoriam 

Dr. Moses Edward Ligon, professor emer- 
itus of education at the University of Ken- 
tuclty and first president of the Kentucky 
High School Athletic Association, died on 
March 27, 1956, after a short illness. He 
was 78. 

Born in Owen County on April 15, 1877, 
Prof. Ligon attended Owen County rural 
schools and Owenton Academy, and was 
graduated from Georgetown College in 1905. 
He received a M.A. degree from the Univer- 
sity of Chicago in 1921 and an honorary 
Doctor of Laws degree from Georgetown 
College in 1935. 

From 1905 to 1908, Prof. Ligon taught in 
the schools of the Philippine Islands, and 
traveled in China, Japan, East Indies, Ceylon, 
Egypt, Palestine and several European coun- 
tries. Upon returning to Kentucky in 1908 he 
was employed as principal of the Franklin 
Elementary School in Paducah. Later he 
taught at Owensboro. He came to Lexington 
as principal of the Lexington High School 
in 1913. It was during this time that he 
and other high school principals organized 
the K.H.S.A.A., of which he served as presi- 
dent from 1916 to 1926. In 1919 Prof. Ligon 
went to Henderson as superintendent of 
schools, resigning two years later to become 
principal of Ashland High School He came 
to the University of Kentucky in 1924 as pro- 
fessor of secondary education, principal of 
University High School and director of the 
teacher placement bureau of the College of 
Education. In 1930, he relinquished the uni- 
versity school post to become chairman of 
the Kentucky committee of the Southern 
Association of Colleges and Secondary 
Schools. He was president of the Southern 
Association in 1942. He was president of the 
Kentucky Education Association in 1925-26, 
and he served on the athletic board of the 
University of Kentucky for sixteen years. 
He assumed a change of work and emeritus 
status on July 1, 1947. 

Prof. Ligon was the author of scores of 
articles, reports and newspaper accounts. In 
1942, the U. K. Bureau of School Service 
published his "History of Public Education 
in Kentucky." 

From 1938 to 1955, Dr. Ligon served as a 
trustee of Georgetown College. He held mem- 
bership in the National Education Associa- 




Moses E. Ligon 

tion, National Association of Secondary 
School Principals, National Society for the 
Study of Education, National Society of 
College Teachers of Education, Phi Delta 
Kappa, Kappa Delta Pi, National Institution- 
al Teachers Placement Association and the 
Lexington Country Club. He was a past 
president of the Blue Grass Executives Club. 

Prof. Ligon was honored in 1955 at a pro- 
gram sponsored by the Kentucky commit- 
tee of the Southern Association. The cere- 
mony, held at the U. K. Taylor Education 
Building, was a feature of the University's 
32nd Annual Education Conference. A por- 
trait of Prof. Ligon was presented to the 
College of Education by the Southern As- 
sociation. 

The veteran educator devoted much time 
to church and civic activities. He frequently 
served as an election officer here and had 
been a member of the Lexington Board of 
Education since 1948. He was member of 
the Calvary Baptist Church, where he 
served as a deacon and was both teacher and 
dean of the Men's Baraca Class. He was a 
member of the Rotary Club, and was presi- 
dent of the club in 1938-39. 

Survivors of Prof. Ligon are his wife, a 
son, two daughters, three brothers, a sister, 
and three grandchildren. The deepest sym- 
pathy of all K.H.S.A.A. member school rep- 
resentatives is extended to these members 
of the family. 

— F.P. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



Vol: XVIII— No. 9 



APRIL, 1956 



1.00 Per Year 



7956 ANNUAL MEETING 



The business meeting of the Kentucky High 
School Athletic Association will be held on Friday, 
April 13, at 2:30 P. M. The place will be the South 
Room at the Brown Hotel, Louisville. The dinner 
meeting will be held in the Crystal Ballroom of the 
Brown Hotel, the hour being 6:00 P. M. 

The principal speaker at the dinner meeting 
will be Dr. Henry H. Hill, President of George 
Peabody College for Teachers, Nashville, Tennessee. 
The subject of Dr. Hill's talk will be "Athletics and 
Education: Rivals or Partners?" The presentation 
of the Game Guy Award will be made during the 
meeting, and the program will also include enter- 
tainment features. 

As provided in Article IX, Section 1, of the 
K.H.S.A.A. Constitution, the following changes in 
the By-Laws and Tournament Rules, to be acted 
upon by the Delegate Assembly, are hereby sub- 
mitted to all members of the K.H.S.A.A. for their 
information: 

PROPOSAL I 

The State Track Committee and the Board of 
Control propose that the following paragraph be 
added to Track Rule VII: "The K.H.S.A.A. will sup- 
ply the shot and discus for the Regional Track Meet 
and for the State Track Meet, and only these may 
be used." 

PROPOSAL II 

The State Track Committee and the Board of 
Control propose that the title of Track Rule IX 
be amended to read "Number of Contestants;" 
that the first sentence of this rule be amended to 
read, "In any regional meet a school shall be per- 
mitted," etc.; and that the second sentence of this 
rule be amended to read, "In any meet a contestant 
may compete," etc. 

PROPOSAL III 

The State Track Committee and the Board of 
Control propose that the last paragraph of Track 
Rule XII be amended to read, "Any contestant in the 
State Meet must participate and finish in the event 
or events which qualified him for the State Meet 
or disqualify himself from the relays." 

PROPOSAL IV 
Ath. Dir. Arthur Mullins (Elkhorn City) pro- 
poses that the second sentence of the first para- 
graph of Tournament Rule VI-A-3 be amended to 
read as follows: "In no case shall this amount ex- 
ceed fifty dollars." 

PROPOSAL V 
The Central Kentucky Superintendents' Associa- 
tion proposes that By-Law 21 be amended to pro- 
vide that the number of basketball games played 
by a member school be limited to 26 for schools 
not maintaining a football team, and to 20 for 
schools maintaining a football team, the amendment 
not to go into effect until July 1, 1957. 



PROPOSAL VI 

The Central Kentucky Superintendents' As- 
sociation proposes that the By-Laws be amended to 
provide that no regular season basketball game 
played by a member school start later than 8:00 P.M. 
PROPOSAL VII 

The Central Kentucky Superintendents' As- 
sociation and Prin. James B. Moore (Madison Cen- 
tral) propose that Tournament Rule XI be amended 
to provide that each team be limited to twelve 
players for tournament games. 

PROPOSAL VIII 

The North Central Kentucky Athletic Confer- 
ence proposes that the Tournament Rules be amend- 
ed to provide that the Board of Control of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association select 
all regional basketball tournament officials. 
PROPOSAL IX 

Prin. Bernard Mims (Pikeville) proposes that 
the first sentence of paragTaph one of Tournament 
Rule V-A be amended to read as follows: "The 
Board of Control shall have authority to establish 
uniform procedures in the selection of officials 
for the district and regional tournaments, except 
that no official shall be permitted to officiate in 
the regional tournament in the region in which he 
is a permanent resident or has been a permanent 
resident during the current school year." 
PROPOSAL X 

Supt. Leonard C. Taylor (Mt. Sterling) proposes 
that Tournament Rule V-B be amended to read as 
follows: "Only K.H.S.A.A. approved or certified 
officials shall be used in the regional tournaments, 
and they shall be appointed by the Commissioner." 
PROPOSAL XI 

Supt. Leonard C. Taylor proposes that Tour- 
nament Rule V-B be amended to read as follows: 
"Only K.H.S.A.A. certified officials shall be used 
in the State Tournament. These shall be residents 
of Kentucky, and shall be appointed by the Com- 
missioner." 

PROPOSAL XII 

Prin. Oran C. Teater (Paintsville) proposes that 
the first sentence of paragraph one of Tournament 
Rule V-A be amended to read as follows: "The Board 
of Control shall have authority to establish uniform 
procedures in the selection of officials for district 
toui-naments, and shall appoint officials for all reg- 
ional tournaments." 

PROPOSAL XIII 

Prin. R. F. Peters (Hardinsburg) proposes that 
Tournament Rule II be amended to provide that: 1) 
the state shall be divided into eight tournament 
regions of eight districts each, 2) eight district 
winners will be permitted to advance to regional 
tournaments, 3) eight regional winners will be per- 
mitted to advance to the state tournament, 4) the 
(Continued on Page Eleven) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1956 



APRIL, 1956 VOL. XVIII— NO. 9 

Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association. 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky, 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor... THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Russell Williamson (1952-66), Inez 

Vice-President Roy G. Eversole (1952-56), Hazard 

Directors — W. B. .Tones (1953-67) Somerset: Louis Litchfield 
1963-67), Marion: W. H. Crowdus (1964-68), Franklin: Jack 
Dawson (1964-58), Middletown : Robert P. Forsythe (1965-69) 
Browder; K. G. Gillaspie (1965-69), Georgetown. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 



Jrom the Ci 



ommissionei s 



Offi 



ice 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1. 1955-56 Basketball Participation List 
(Eligibility) 

2. School's Report on Basketball Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools - Basketball 



Regional Track Meets 

The Board of Control has established twelve 
track reaions for 1956. The scheduled date for the 
regional meets is May 11. Only first and second 
place winners in the regions will Qualify for the 
State Meet. Sites of the meets are: Murray, Hender- 
son, Bowling- Green, Danville, Louisville (Bellarmine 
College), Louisville (Shawnee), Bellevue, Newport, 
Lexington, Barbourville, Elkhom City and Ashland. 

The assignment of schools by regions is as 
follows : 

Murray Region — Ballard Memorial, Caldwell 
County, Fulton, Hopkinsville, Murray, Murray 
Training, Padueah Tilghman, Trigg County. 

Henderson Region — Breckinridge County, Da- 
viess County, Henderson, Henderson County, Madi- 
sonville, Owensboro, Owensboro Technical, Provid- 
ence, Sturgis. 

Bowling Green Region — Austin-Tracy, Bowling 
Green, Central Park, Clinton County, College, Eliza- 
bethtown, Franklin-Simpson, Glasgow, Greensburg, 
Hiseville, Meade County, Park City, Temple Hill, 
Tompkinsville, Vine Grove, Warren County. 

Danville Region — Bardstown, Berea, Berea 
Foundation, Danville, Eubank, Harrodsburg, Junc- 
tion City, Monticello, Old Kentucky Home, Peny- 
ville, Russell County, St. Joseph, Springfield, Stan- 
ford, Wayne County. 

Bellarmine Region — Eastern, Eminence, Pern 
Creek, Holy Name, K. M. I., Ky. School for Blind, 
Oldham County, Pleasureville, Southern, Suda E. 
Butler, Taylor County Trimble County, Valley, 
Waddy. 

Louisville Region — duPont Manual, Flaget, J. 
M. Atherton, Louisville Male, St. Xavier, Shawnee. 

Bellevue Region — Bellevue, Dixie Heights, 
Holmes, Lloyd, Simon-Kenton. 

Newport Region — Boone County, Campbell 
County, Grant County, Highlands, Newport. 

Lexington Region — Bourbon County, Bridge- 
port, Camargo, Central, Elkhorn, Garth, Henry 
Clay, Lafayette, Lexington Catholic, Madison-Model, 
M. M. I., Nicholasville, North Middletown, Univer- 
sity, Versailles, Winchester. 



Barbourville Region — Bell County, Benham, 
Corbin, Harlan, Hazel Green, Knox Central, 
Middlesboro, Pineville, Red Bird, Somerset, Wood- 
bine. 

Elkhorn City Region— Belfry, Elkhorn City, 
Fleming-Neon, Hazard, Jenkins, M. C. Napier, 
Paintsville, Pikeville, Stuart Robinsn, Wayland, 
Whitesburg, Wolfe County. 

Ashland Region — Ashland, Catlettsburg, Ei'ie, 
Russell. 

Tennis Tournaments 

On May 14 four regional tennis tournaments 
will be held. The sites are Bowling Green, Louisville, 
Lexington and Bellevue. The State Tennis Tourna- 
ment will be held in Louisville on May 21-22. The 
assignment of schools by regions is as follows: 

Bowling Green Region — ^Bardstown, Bowling 
Green, Caverna, College, Glasgow, Henderson, Hop- 
kinsville, St. Joseph. 

Louisville Region — Eastern, Fern Creek, Flaget, 
Holy Trinity, K. M. I., Louisville Male, Shawnee, 
St. Xavier, Southern, Suda E. Butler, Valley. 

Lexington Region — Ashland, Berea Foundation, 
Erie, Garth, Hazel Green, University. 

Bellevue Region — Augusta, Bellevue, Grant 
County, Holmes, St. Henry, Silver Grove, Villa 
Madonna. 

Golf Tournaments 

Seven regional tournaments have been set up 
in golf. These tournaments will be held on May 23 
at Madisonville, Bowling Green, Louisville, Dixie 
Heights, Lexington, Middlesboro (tentative), Paints- 
ville. The State Golf Tournament will be held at 
Poi-t Knox on May 28-29. The assig-nment of schools 
by regions is as follows: 

Madisonville Region — Fulton, Henderson, Hop- 
kinsville, Madisonville. 

Bowling Green Region — Bardstown, Bowling 
Green, College, Fort Knox, Franklin-Simpson, Glas- 
gow, St. Aug-ustine, St. Joseph, Scottsville. 

Louisville Region — Ahrens, duPont Manual, 
Eastern, Fern Creek, Flaget, Holy Trinity, J. M. 
Atherton, K. M. I., Louisville Male, St. Xavier, 
Shawnee, Shelbyville, Southei-n, Suda E. Butler, 
Valley. 

Dixie Heights Region — Beechwood, Covington 
Catholic, Dixie Heights, Highlands, Holmes, Holy 
Cross, Lloyd, Newport, St. Heniy, St. Thomas. 

Lexington Region — Danville, Lafayette, Mays- 
ville. University. 

Middlesboro Region (tentative) — Hazard, 
Middlesboro, Somerset. 

Paintsville Region — Ashland, Martin, Paints- 
ville, Wheelwright. 

Ba.seball Tournaments 

The district baseball tournaments are scheduled 
to be held on May 7-9. The dates should be set by 
the district tournament managers, and should rep- 
resent the thinking of the majority of principals or 
coaches in the district involved. The regional tour- 
naments will be held on May 24-25, and the State 
Baseball Tournament is scheduled to be played at 
Parkway Field, Louisville, on June 1-2. The assign- 
ment of schools to the various districts and regions 
is as follows: 

MURRAY REGION 

South Christian District — Crofton, Hopkinsville, 
Lacy, Sinking Fork, South Christian, Trigg County. 

Mun-ay District — Benton, Farmington, Murray, 
Murray Training, North Marshall. 

Heath District — Arlington, Ballard Memorial, 
Heath, St. John, St. Mary. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1956 



Page Three 



WILLIAMSON REPEATS 




Russell Williamson 

Principal Russell Williamson of the Inez 
High School will represent Section 8 on the 
Board of Control for a four year period, be- 
ginning July 1, 1956. This will be his second 
consecutive term of Board membership. He 
previously represented his area during the 
1943-46 period. In balloting which ended 
March 1, Mr. Williamson, who is currently 
serving as President of the Association, de- 
feated Prin. Edwin V. Stewart of the May- 
town High School. 

President Williamson, a graduate of More- 
head State College, has spent all of the 
thirty-one years of his teaching, coaching, 
and administrative experience at Inez. He 
has been principal of the Inez High School 
for the past twenty-eight years. He coached 
his 1941 basketball team to the state champ- 
ionship, and the 1954 team representing his 
school also attained the crown. 

Mr. Williamson is married to the former 
Nolda Cassady of Inez. They have three chil- 
dren: Jimmie, Bobby and Mary Jo. 

The newly re-elected Boai'd member also 
holds membership in the Masonic, Elks, and 
Lions fraternal and civic organizations. He 
is a member of the Baptist church, and is 
currently president of the Inez Deposit Bank. 



Mayfield District — ^Central, Cuba, Hickman, 
Mayfield, Sedalia, Symsonia. 

Salem District — Caldwell County, Predonia, 
Livingston County, Lyon County, Marion, Salem. 
MADLSONVILLE REGION 

Henderson District — Henderson, Henderson 
County, Holy Name, Sebree, Uniontown. 

Irvington District — Breckinridge County, Fred- 
erick Fraize, Irvington, Lewisport. 

Hartford District — Beaver Dam, Butler County, 
Centertown, Central Park, Dundee, Hartford, Horse 
Branch, Rockport. 

Owensboro Disti'ict — Daviess County, Owens- 
boro, Owensboro Technical, Utica. 

Madisonville District — Calhoun, Dawson, Earl- 
ington, Livermore, Madisonville, Providence, Sacra- 
mento, South Hopkins. 

Central City District — Bremen, Centi-al City, 



STATE TRACK MEET SCHEDULE 
Lexington, Kentucky, May 18-19 
FRIDAY 

2:30P.M.— 120 Yard High Hurdles (heats), 3 
to qualify for Semi-finals; Shot Put and Broad 
Jump, Preliminaries and Finals. 

2:50 P.M. — 100 Yard Dash (heats), 2 to qualify 
for Finals. 

3:05 P.M.— 120 Yard High Hurdles (Semi- 
finals), 3 to qualify for Finals. 

3:20 P. M.— 880 Yard Relay (heats), 3 to qualify 
for Finals; Discus, Preliminaries and Finals. 

3:50 P. M.— 440 Yard Dash (heats), 2 to qualify 
for Finals. 

4:15 P.M.— 180 Yard Low Hurdles (heats) 3 to 
qualify for Semi-finals. 

4:45 P.M.— 220 Yard Dash (heats), 2 to qualify 
for Finals. 

5:00 P.M.— 180 Yard Low Hurdles (Semi- 
finals), 3 to qualify for Finals. 

5:15 P.M.— 880 Yard Relay (Semi-finals), 3 to 
qualify for Finals. 

5:30 P.M.— Mile Relay (heats), 2 to qualify for 
Finals. 
SATURDAY 

1:00 P.M.— High Jump and Pole Vault 

2:00 P.M.— 120 Yard High Hurdles 

2:15 P. M.— 100 Yard Dash 

2:30 P.M.— Mile Run 

2:45 P.M.— 880 Yard Relay 

3:00 P.M.— 440 Yard Dash 

3:15 P.M.— 180 Yard Low Hurdles 

3:30 P.M.— 880 Yard Run 

3:45 P.M.— 220 Yard Dash 

4:00 P.M.— Mile Relay 

Drakesboro, Dunmor, Graham, Greenville, Hughes- 
Kirk, Muhlenbei'g Central. 

BOWLING GREEN 

Bowling Green District — Alvaton, Bowling 
Green, Bristow, College, Franklin-Simpson, North 
Warren, Richardsville, Warren County. 

Russellville District — Adairvill'e, Auburn, 
Guthrie, Lewisburg, Russellville, Todd County, Tren- 
ton. 

Tompkinsville District — Austin-Tracy, Clinton 
County, Glasgow, Scottsville, Tompkinsville. 

Caverna District — Caverna, Cub Run, Edmon- 
ton, Hiseville, Hodgenville, Memorial, Park City. 

Brownsville District — Brownsville, Clarkson, 
Kyrock, Sunfish. 

Campbellsville District — Adair County, Camp- 
bellsville, Greensburg, Lebanon, St. Augustine, St. 
Charles, St. Francis, Taylor County. 

St. Joseph District — ^Bardstown, Bloomfield, 
Fredericktown, Lebanon Junction, Mt. Washington, 
Old Kentucky Home, St. Joseph, Shepherdsville, 
Springfield, Willisburg. 

Vine Grove District — Elizabethtown, Elizabeth- 
town Catholic, Fort Knox, Glendale, Howevalley, 
Lynnvale, Rineyville, Vine Grove, West Point. 
LOUISVILLE REGION 

Louisville District — Atherton, Plaget, Male, 
Manual, St. Xavier, Shawnee. 

Holy Trinity District — Eastern, Fern Creek, 
Holy Trinity, K. M. I., Southern, Suda E. Butler, 
Valley. 

NEWPORT REGION 

Boone County District — ^Boone County, Grant 
County, Lloyd, Morgan, St. Henry, Simon Kenton, 
Walton-Verona. 

Beechwood District — Beechwood, Covington 
(Continued on Page Four) 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1956 



NEW BOARD MEMBER 




Cecil A. Thornton 

Assistant Superintendent Cecil A. Thorn- 
ton of Harlan was unopposed in the ballot- 
ing for Board of Control membership, which 
ended March 1. Mr. Thornton's four year 
term will begin on July 1, 1956. He will rep- 
resent Section 7. 

After graduating from the Newport 
(Tennessee) High School, Mr. Thornton 
continued his studies at Tennessee Wesleyan 
and Union colleges. He received the M.A. 
degree in Educational Administration from 
the University of Kentucky. 

Mr. Thornton is married to the former 
Gertrude Cawood. Their only child, Fred Lee, 
is thirteen years of age. 

The new sectional representative lettered 
in football and basketball for four years in 
high school, and in football, basketball and 
tennis for the four years of his college career. 
He worked for many years as a football and 
basketball official, and held the "approved" 
and "certified" ratings in the latter sport 
for several years. He taught science and 
physical education and served as assistant 
coach for three years at Evarts High School. 
His educational experience also includes serv- 
ice as assistant high school principal, pupil 
personnel director, and supervisor. He is cur- 
rently Assistant Superintendent of Harlan 
County Schools. 

Mr. Thornton is an active member of the 
Harlan Methodist Church, where he served 
for five years as chairman of the Board of 
Stewards. He is now chairman of the Mem- 
bership and Evangelistic Committee of that 
church, and teaches a Sunday School class. 
He has for many years participated in Boy 
Scout work, and has served for over ten 



years on the Harlan County 4-H Club Coun- 
cil. He is a member of the Harlan Lions Club 
and the Harlan County Association of So- 
cial Agencies. His professional affiliations 
include membership in the National Educa- 
tion Association, Kentucky Education As- 
sociation, Upper Cumberland Education As- 
sociation, Harlan County Education Associa- 
tion, American Association of School Admin- 
istrators, and the Association for Childhood 
Education International. Mr. Thornton is 
also a member of Kappa Delta Pi, national 
educational honor society. 



BASEBALL TOURNAMENTS 

(Continued from Page Three) 
Catholic, Dixie Heights, Holmes, Holy Cross, Ludlow. 

Newport District — Bellevue, Campbell County, 
Dayton, Highlands, Newport, Newport Catholic, St. 
Mary, St. Thomas, Silver Grove. 

Maysville District — Bracken County, Butler, 
Falmouth, Maysville, Tollesboro. 

VERSAILLES REGION 

Harrodsburg District — Buckeye, Camp Dick 
Robinson, Danville, Harrodsburg, Lancaster, Mercer. 

Frankfort District — Anderson, Bridgeport, Elk- 
horn, Frankfort, Garth, Good Shepherd, Great Cx'oss- 
ing, Scott County, Versailles. 

Millersburg District — ^Bourbon County, Cyn- 
thiana, Harrison County, M. M. 1., Nicholas County, 
North Middletown, Paris. 

Carrollton District — Carrollton, Eminence, Gal- 
latin County, Henry Central, Pleasureville, Trimble 
County. 

Lexington District — Athens, Henry Clay, La- 
fayette, Midway, Nicholasville. 

Richmond District — ^Berea, Central, Estill Coun- 
ty, Irvine, Lee County, Madison-Model. 

Shelbyville District — 'Bagdad, Oldham County, 
Shelbyville, Simpsonville, Taylorsville. 

Stanford District — Crab Orchard, Memorial, 
McKinney, Middleburg, Mt. Vernon, Paint Lick, 
Stanford. 

HARLAN REGION 

Somerset District — Corbin, Hazel Green, Liber- 
ty, Lily, London, McKinney, Memorial, Middlebui-g, 
Mt. Vernon, Russell County, Somerset, Wayne 
County. 

Harlan District — Benham, Black Star, Cumber- 
land, Evarts, Harlan, Loyall, Middlesboro. 

Elkhorn City District^Belfry, Elkhorn City, 
Johns Creek, Phelps, Pikeville. 

Hazard District — Annville, Buckhorn, Carr 

Creek, Combs Memorial, Fleming-Neon, Hazard, 

Jenkins, Leatherwood, Leslie County, Magoffin 

Baptist, M. C. Napier, Whitesburg, Wolfe County. 

GRAYSON REGION 

Ashland District — Ashland, Boyd County, Cat- 
lettsburg, Erie, McKell, Russell, So. Portsmouth. 

Mt. Sterling District — Camargo, Montgomei-y 
County, Mt. Sterling, Owingsville, Sharpsburg, Win- 
chester. 

Breckinridge Tiraining District — Breckinridge 
Training, Fleming County, Hitchins, Morehead, 
Olive Hill, Prichard. 

Wheelwright District — Auxier, Martin, Floyd 
County, Wheelwright. 

Paintsville District — ^Meade Memorial, Morgan 
County, Oil Springs, Paintsville, Van Lear. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1956 



Page Five 



Henderson — Runner-Up 
1956 State Basketball Tournament 




a ^j^ %fi JL_ R C, _2 C 



- - ^-^ 3 J^ 




r*Si 



(Left to Right) Bill Ruff, Petie Bryant, Byron Hall, Ronnie Sheffer, Sammy 
Shelton, Richard Yates, Byron Pinson, Bill Harralson, Frederick Schuette, Pascal 
Benson, Dale Brown, David. Eakins. 



Wayland — Third Place Winner 
1956 State Basketball Tournament 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Mgr. S. Hall, Curtis Slone, Billy Ray Fultz, Bobby 
Bentley, Jackie Thornberry, Jackie Greathouse, Coach John Campbell. Second Row: 
Principal L. B. Price, Elmond Hall, Melvin Robinson, Kelly Coleman, James V. Hall, 
Billy Ray Combs, Mgr. J. Collins. 



CO 
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Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1956 



The Flying Dutchman 

Tournaments may come and tournaments 
may go, but it is doubtful if any other state 
in the country will ever produce a better or 
more exciting state tournament than the one 
Kentucky witnessed this year at Lexington. 

It was Winchester's "Eck" Branham who 
remarked that there was less "booing" in 
this tournament than any he had attended, 
and "Eck" sees them all. Certainly, the 
sportsmanship of the coaches and players 
was beyond reproach, all of which continues 
to merit for Kentucky its reputation as the 
"Sportsmanship Capitol of the Nation". 

The Kentucky High School Athletic As- 
sociation can be justly proud of the job 
turned in by its executives in crowd engineer- 
ing. The manner in which everybody was 
kept moving and the way in which the Boy 
Scouts handled the seating was as efficient 
as any job ever done in Madison Square 
Garden. The officiating was again of the 
highest calibre. 

This is, without a doubt, Kentucky's most 
colorful show and one which affords the best 
opportunity for all Kentuckians to mingle, 
have friendly conversations and meetings in 
hotel lobbies and at the games. The holiday 
spirit which prevails is wholesome and the 
cooperation of the spectators splendid. Ken- 
tucky's State Tournament is just the most 
enjoyable place to be during the ides of 
March. 

Top this if you can! Coach Andy Jack 
Fultz, of Olive Hill, lost in a heart-breaking 
overtime in the State Tourney to Coach Jim 
Bazzell, of Allen County. Do you know what 
they did after that game? Andy Jack and 
Jim lunched together downtown — Brethren, 
you can't beat that kind of sportsmanship 
anywhere! 

There has to be a wonderful spirit of fel- 
lowship in Kentucky's high school athletic 
program when a basketball official will name 
a new baby for an assistant commissioner. 
Arbiter Omer, of Madisonville, has named his 
spanking new boy "Joe Billy" after debonair 
J. B. Mansfield, of the K.H.S.A.A. If the 
baby has an appetite like big Joe Billy, 
Whistler Omer had Letter up his officiating 
fee. 

The next big athletic event is scheduled 
for April 13 when all of Kentucky's athletic 
enthusiasts gather at the Brown Hotel dur- 
ing K.E.A. for the annual banquet. This is 
the occasion when the "Game Guy of 1956" 
will be honored by receiving the Flying 
Dutchman Trophy for being the athlete who 



has overcome the greatest physical handi- 
cap to engage in sports. 

This year, that honor goes to Edward Earl 
Ginter, Montgomery County High School, 
Mt. Sterling, Kentucky. Edward Earl is a 
unanimous selection for this year's honor 
from among fifteen nominations from all 
over Kentucky. Eddie, who lives a "whoop 
and a holler" from the Montgomery County 
High School at Mt. Sterling, is 17 years old, 
an above average student and popular with 
the teachers and student body. He is a coun- 
try boy who has not let his physical handicap 
of losing the use of his right arm keep him 
from being an outstanding basketball player 
or from milking the cows, pitching hay or 
doing anything else on a farm or the basket- 
ball court that anybody else can do. So it is 
that Edward Earl Ginter joins the parade of 
Kentucky's Game Guys who annually set 
outstanding examples for other young men 
to pattern from. Meet this fighting young- 
ster at the K.E.A. Athletic Dinner, 

The interest that Kentucky's school men 
and athletic leaders are taking in encourag- 
ing physically handicapped boys to live 
normal lives and play normally as do their 
physically whole friends is gratifying. Dur- 
ing March, Bill Ring, of Maysville, recom- 
mended Don Ryan and J. T. Whaley, of St. 
Patrick's, for the Lionheart Lapel Button 
Award for their courage in carrying on in 
the field of sports although temporarily set 
back by physical handicaps suffered in an 
unfortunate accident. 

It is the sincere desire to help other people 
and to render unselfish service which has 
caused Kentucky's school boy athletic pro- 
gram to reach the high level it now enjoys. 
When so many people are interested in the 
achievements of others and are anxious to 
gain recognition for them, it is easy to see 
why so much is accomplished. 

A letter from Al Gustafson praises Vine 
Grove's Chet Redmon, an outstanding leader 
in Kentucky's high school athletics, for the 
practice Chet has initiated in saying a prayer 
with his boys prior to his games in their 
dressing rooms. Such practices mean a lot 
to high school sports and the future develop- 
ment of fine men through athletics. Vine 
Grove gets another well deserved orchid be- 
cause the parents of the boys do something 
fine by feeding all the players, coaches and 
officials in the cafeteria after every home 
game. 

Elizabethtown Catholic High School cheer- 
leaders also come in for special acclaim for 
the good neighbor practices which they fol- 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1956 Page Nine 

1956 State Tournament Basketball Statistics 

Average Score: For Winners: 66.9; For Losers: 59.3. Total for both: 126.2 per game 

Average No. Personal Fouls (fouls by A plus fouls by B) : 33.1 per game 

Average No. Technical Fouls (fouls by A plus fouls by B) : .18 per game 

Total No. Free Throw Attempts (per. and T. for all Games) 880. Successful 67.0 % 

Total No. Players Disquahfied for Flagrant Fouls per tour. 

Average No. Times per game a player committed 5 Personals: 1.56 per game 

Average No. charged time-outs (total for both teams) : 6 per game 

DATA COLLECTED BY FIRST STATISTICIAN 

Average No. (a) Personal fouls made by players while on Offense: 3.2 per game 

Average No. (b) Cases of traveling (include illegal dribble) : 5.6 per game 

Average No. (c) Times 2 throws were awarded because foul occurred 

during unsuccessful try: 6 per game 

Average No. (d) Times a bonus foul occurred : 23.1 per game 

Vo of times 1st throw in (d) was successful: 68.8% 

% of 2nd throws which were successful: 68.1% 

Average No. (e) Field goals (both teams) : 43.5 per game 

% scored without ball touching backboard: 64.1% 

Average No. (f) Over-all time from first toss to final gun: 1 hr. and 15 minutes 

DATA COLLECTED BY SECOND STATISTICIAN 

Average No. (a) Jump ball situations (include center jumps) : 10 per game 

(1) Times above jumps followed held ball: .87 per game 

(2) Times jump ball rules were violated: .31 per game 

Average No. (b) Throw-ins from end of court (Do not include throw-in 

after any goal) : 9.6 per game 

Average No. (c) Throw-ins from side of court (Do not include after 

Technical Foul) : , 8.8 per game 

Average No. (d) Violations of 3-second lane rule: .56 per game 

Average No. (e) Free Throw violations: .31 per game 

For Last Three Minutes : 

(1) No. Field Goals: 4.1 per game 

(2) No. Charged Time-outs: 1.18 per game 

(3) No. Held Balls: .12 per game 

(4) No. Pers. fouls against a thrower: .44 per game 

(5) No. Pers. fouls other than against a thrower: 4.37 per game 

(6) Average time consumed by last 3 min. of clock time : 

8 minutes 45 sees, per game. 



low by preparing a lunch of sandwiches, 
oranges and apples after each game for 
teams and officials. Certainly, Vine Grove 
and Elizabethtown Catholic High Schools 
richly merit the award of the Abou Ben 
Adhem Certificates. 

And now, from Bill Knight, "The Duke 
of Paducah", comes this comment: "I am 
taking this opportunity to acknowledge the 
courtesy extended to me as a basketball of- 
ficial by Bardwell High School down in the 
First District. I have never witnessed great- 
er sportsmanship by a coach, team, school 
officials and spectators anywhere. I feel 
that much of this fine sportsmanship can 
be credited to Coach L. G. Tubbs, who is a 
shining example. To this fine coach I ask 
that a Cob Pipe of Honor be awarded and 
an Abou Ben Adhem Award to his school 



and community." Bill may be sure that Coach 
Tubbs now has a Corn Cob Pipe to puff on 
and that the sportsmanship award now 
adorns the wall of the Bardwell High School. 

Unquestionably, this year's season of 
basketball in high school circles of the Com- 
monwealth has been great because school 
men, coaches, spectators and cheerleaders 
all cooperated to make it that way. There is 
a lot of satisfaction in just the association 
with the kind of leaders Kentucky offers to 
its young people. 

With Bill Hunt and Dr. James Fuller lead- 
ing the way, Mayfield is getting ready to 
start a big year-round recreation program 
in that progressive Western Kentucky city. 
The Dutchman has a trip to make there in 
April to help get that recreation program 
started and another to Mount Washington 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1956 



Bell County — Fourth Place Winner 
1956 State Basketball Tournament 




(Left to Right) John Brock, David Brock, Teddy Turpen, Jack Johnson, Bob 
Long-, Claude Cheek, Murph Shisher, Present Saylor, Johnnie Mayes. 



in May for a commencement address — so we 
are on the move again. 

Here's some news for communities of 
Kentucky who have been wanting to start 
programs of recreation, but lack the knowl- 
edge necessary to launch such programs. A 
new textbook, written by The Flying Dutch- 
man, will be off the press by June and avail- 
able to any schools or communities interest- 
ed in public programs of recreation. 

Entitled A New Horizon of Recreation, it 

represents a guide which may be followed by 
inexperienced directors just starting in the 
recreational field. It offers additional serv- 
ice to community planners of recreation who 
will take the lead in bringing many new 
public programs of recreation to America 
during the next two decades. This is a grass 
roots study. Recorded are the results of 
twelve years of actual experience in the or- 
ganization and administration of county- 
wide recreation tailored to fit the needs of 
the communities. 

The procedure is democratic. The ideas are 
new and challenging. New conceptions of 
recreational responsibilities appear, with the 



Shelby ville Cheerleaders Best 

Cheerleaders representing the Shelbyville 
High School were first place winners in the 
second annual competition for the Cheer- 
leaders' Cup, awarded by K.A.P.O.S. Runner- 
up honors went to Lafayette High School, 
with Honorable Mention to Bell County High 
School. The presentation of the cup was made 
by K.H.S.A.A. President Russell Williamson 
during the award ceremony following the 
final game of the 1956 State Basketball 
Tournament. 

The cheerleaders were judged on the basis 
of a seven-point rating scale, which included 
appearance, ability, conduct while in uni- 
form, and sportsmanship toward opponents 
and officials. 



importance being attached to working with 
small groups as well as large masses. It is 
The Dutchman's hope that this volume will 
speed up the development of the many rec- 
reation programs needed over Kentucky and 
will render real service to Kentuckians. 
Drop by to see The Dutchman at his Armory 
offices during K.E.A. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1956 



Page Eleven 



1955-56 BASKETBALL DATA ON POINT 
VALUE OF PENALTY AND POSSESSION 

Part A — About bonus penalties 

1. In first 29 minutes: (a) Average num- 
ber bonus penalty fouls : 23.6 per game, (b) 
Average number of fouls (1st 29 mins.) 
against a thrower: 7.2 per game. 

2. In last 3 minutes : (a) Average number 
bonus penalty fouls : 3.56 per game, (b) 
Average number of fouls (last 3 mins.) 
against a thrower: .56 per game. 

3. For all bonus penalties : (a) Average 
point fraction scored on one penalty (zero 
if 1st throw is missed - 2 if both are success- 
ful) : 1.5 per game, (b) For all attempts 
what per cent were successful: 66.59'. For 
1st throws, what per cent were successful: 
67.8 ^'. For 2nd throws, what per cent were 
successful: 60.3 "^r . 

4. General: (a) Time from 1st whistle to 
final gun: 1 hr. and 15 min. per game, (b) 
Time consumed by last 3 minutes of clock- 
time: 8 mins. 45 sees, per game. 

Part B — About value of possession (separate 
record for each team) 

Average recorded for only those games in 
which the score in the last quarter is close 
enough to encourage "keep-away" and reck- 
less play by the team behind. 

A possession unit begins when the team 
gets control and it continues until the op- 
ponent secures control. It extends through 
a try, rebound attempts, free throws by that 
team or any subsequent action up to the 
time the opponent secures control such as 
by interception or securing a rebound or 
control after a violation or successful goal. 
In a single possession unit, a team might 
score a field goal, be fouled and score 2 or 
more points on free throws, intercept a 
throw-in and score again. 

1. In first 29 minutes: (a) Average No. 
possession units: 61.5 per team per game, 
(b) Number possession units in which the 
team scored: 2 points, 30.0; only 1 point, 
3.62 ; 3 or more points, 1.1 ; points, 27.4. 

2. In last 3 minutes : (a) Average No. pos- 
session units: 6.8 per team per game, (b) 
Number possession units in which the team 
scored: 2 points, 3.1; only 1 point, 1.2; 3 or 
more points, .44 ; points, 2.6. 

Note: Last year, possession had a value of between 
.8 and .85 of a point. The net worth of a bonus 
penalty was approximately one-half a point. 



PROPOSALS 

(Continued from Page One) 
Commissioner and Board of Control shall be auth- 
orized to make all necessary changes in the word- 
ings of By-Laws and Tournament Rules to make 



New Baseball Films 

Prints of two new films, WORLD SER- 
IES OF 1955 and CATCHING STARS OF 
BASEBALL, have been rented by the 
K.H.S.A.A. and have been placed on loan 
with the Department of Extension at the 
University of Kentucky. 

The film, WORLD SERIES OF 1955, de- 
picts the highlights of the seven games be- 
tween the Brooklyn Dodgers and the New 
York Yankees. The Dodgers won the series 
four games to three after the Yankees had 
won the first two games. Most of the action, 
hitting and scoring play, is shown in the 
four-reel film, with some shots in slow mo- 
tion. 

CATCHING STARS OF BASEBALL 
shows some of the great catchers of the 
game demonstrating the proper techniques 
of receiving, throwing, fielding and signall- 
ing. The illustrators are Bill Dickey, Yogi 
Ben-a, Al Campanella, and Sherman Lollar. 
The picture is entertaining to all baseball 
fans, but is especially designed as a coach- 
ing film for catchers. 

said rales conform with aforementioned changes. 
PROPOSAL XIV 

Prin. Homer Jones (Dilce Combs) proposes that 
Tournament Rule III-C be amended to read as 
follows: "The regional tournament sites shall be 
determined by the participating- schools." 
PROPOSAL XV 

Prin. Cecil Reid of Symsonia, and ten admin- 
istrators and coaches (Carroll, Chumbler, H. Reid, 
MePherson, Hayden, Dorsey, Ellis, Winebarger, 
Rayburn, Litchfield), propose that By-Law 6, Sec. 1, 
be amended to read as follows: "Any student who 
has represented a secondary school in a first team 
game in any spoi-t, shall be ineligible to represent 
any other school, without a corresponding change 
of his parents' address, and the approval of a 
majority of the member schools of the district to 
which they move." 

PROPOSAL XVI 

Prin. Cecil Reid, et al., propose that By-Law 8, 
Sec. 1, be amended to read as follows: "Any person 
who is a first team player on one secondary school 
team shall be ineligible to represent any other 
secondary school for the remainder of the season 
in that sport, even though his parents move to the 
school district in which the school to which he 
transfers is located. The season begins with the 
day when the squad is first called out for practice, 
and ends with the last g-ame. The pi-ovisions of the 
first sentence of this section may be waived by 
the Commissioner in any case where there is evident 
injustice, provided he has the approval of the 
majority of the schools of the district to which 
the move is made." 

PROPOSAL XVII 

Prin. Cecil Reid, et al., propose that By-Law 
10 be amended to read as follows: "The use of undue 
influence by any person connected or not connected 
with a member school to secure or to retain a stu- 



I^age Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1956 



TABULATION OF VOTES ON HIGHEST RATED OFFICIALS - 1956 STATE TOURNAMENT 



Listed below are the tabulations of vo 
highest ratings by coaches of the sixteen tea 
School Basketball Tournament. Each coach 
his preference, the official whose name was li 
the second official five points, etc. This is the 
by the Board of Control and the Commissioner 
schools given below are not listed in order by 
tournament bracket. 



tes on the twelve officials who received the 
ms which participated in the recent State High 
voted on six Certified officials in the order of 
sted first by the coach receiving six points, 
method which has been used for many years 
in selecting State Tournament officials. The 
regions nor are thev listed in the order of the 



Official 

George Conley 

Dero Downing 

Milford Wells. __ 

Richard Betz 

Travis Combs 

Roy Winchester- 
Jack Thompson.. 
Shelby Winfrey. 
Ralph Mussman.. 
John Crosthwaite 

Bob Forsythe 

Ben Edelen 



ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOP TOTAL 



5 


5 
3 


4 


5 


4 


2 


2 

6 


6 




6 

5 


6 


6 


3 


4 


6 


5 
4 


38 
26 
23 


9 


6 








1 








4 






6 


2 






21 


1 






2 




6 










1 


5 




6 






21 


3 












3 


5 


6 










3 






20 


4 


1 


1 
6 


3 
6 

4 


6 


4 






4 




5 
3 


2 
3 

4 


2 

4 

5 




3 




19 
18 
17 
16 


6 




3 




1 
2 


.5 






5 




4 












16 
10 



dent or his parents shall cause the student to be 
ineligible for one year; and the offending- school 
shall be suspended for not less than one year. In 
interpreting' this rule the Commissioner shall be 
sole judg-e as to what constitutes undue influence, 
except that in the case of any school which allows 
a player, who is not eligible at that school, to parti- 
cipate in practice sessions, organized or unorganized 
during the school term or after, it shall be ruled 
that undue influence has been used." 
PROPOSAL XVIII 

Prin. Walter H. Power (Camargo) proposes 
that Tournament Rule XII-C be amended to read 
as follows: "Each member school of the Associa- 
tion, upon application by the principal, shall re- 
ceive four passes to the State Tournament. These 
passes may be used by the principal, coach, or any 
other member of the faculty, or by the wife of the 
principal or coach. Each superintendent shall also 
receive two passes upon application to the tourna- 
ment manager." 

PROPOSAL XIX 

Prin. Walter H. Power proposes that Tourna- 
ment Rule XII-B be amended to read as follows: 
"Each member school of the Association shall re- 
ceive four passes to the regional tournament and 
each superintendent of a pai-ticipating school dis- 
trict shall receive two passes to the regional tour- 
nament." 

PROPOSAL XX 

Prin. Bernard Mims proposes that a committee 
be appointed to determine a classification of foot- 
ball schools and a method of declaring a champion 
in each class; that this committee shall consi.st of 
the Commissioner of the K.H.S.A.A., the President 
of the K.H.S.A.A., and seven coaches; and that, 
upon approval by the Board of Control, this com- 
mittee report shall become effective for the 1956-57 
football season. 

PROPOSAL XXI 

Prin. Dawson Orman (Mt. Sterling) proposes 
that the By-Laws be amended to provide that the 



date limit of selecting opposing teams for Kentucky 
hiah school bowl games shall be October 31 (alter- 
nate choice October 21). 

PROPOSAL XXII 

Prin. Charles S. Combs (Hartford) proposes 
that the By-Laws be amended to provide that bands 
will play during basketball games only at the fol- 
lowing- times: before games, between quarters, be- 
tween halves, and between games. 
PROPOSALXXIII 

Prin. Charles S. Combs proposes that the By- 
LaAvs be amended to provide that a basketball of- 
ficial may not officiate in a game between school 
teams if either school is located in a town of which 
the official is or has been a resident, or if the of- 
ficial attended or graduated from either school. 
PROPOSAL XXIV 

Prin. Charles S. Combs proposes that the Tour- 
nament Rules be amended to provide that the reg- 
ional tournaments be held on a neutral floor, pre- 
ferably that of the weakest team if the teams have 
gymnasiums of proportionate size, or in the gym- 
nasium which has a distinct advantage in seating 
capacity. 

PROPOSAL XXV 

Prin. Charles S. Combs proposes that the Tour- 
nament Rules be amended to provide that an of- 
ficial must be rated among the top three in reg- 
ional tournament selections in order to aualify for 
selection as a St<)te Tournament official. 
PROPOSAL XXVI 

Prin. Charles S. Combs proposes that the By- 
Laws be amended to provide that the files or other 
material concerning schools or people involved in 
protests or hearings shall be open to any schools or 
individuals requesting said information. 
PROPOSAL XVII 

Prin. Charles S. Combs proposes that the Tour- 
nament Rules be amended to provide that the 
trophies and awai-ds for the district, regional, and 
state tournaments be furnished by the Kentucky 
High School Athletic Association. 



W. S. HUNT 



^o- 



t.^ 



l^r SYSTOg ^ 



PHONE 104 

HUNT^S ATHLETIC GOODS CO. 

MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 



C. A. BYRN, JR. 



a. 



Many thanks to our many friends and customers who made our room their 
headquarters while in Lexington during the 1956 State High School 
Basketball Tournament. 

It was nice to have you and we appreciate the nice business that you placed 
with our salesmen for the present spring and summer season as well as 
the coming fall and winter season of football and basketball. 

BASEBALL UNIFORMS 

We have several grades of two-piece uniforms consisting of shirts and 
pants in stock ready for immediate delivery. Several colors and with any 
color or style trim. 

One of our basball folders with swatches will be sent upon request. 

We have in stock several grades in stockings, caps, belts and training shirts. 
You will find these listed in our new spring and summer 1956 catalog, a 
copy of which was sent you some time ago. However, if you need another 
copy let us hear from you at once. 

We have a complete stock of Reach American League baseballs, Spalding 
No. 1 National League baseballs as well as the MacGregor No. 97 baseball. 

We have the famous Louisville Slugger baseball bats as well as Hanna bats 
in all models, lengths and weights. 

K.E.A. NEWS 

During K.E.A. be sure to make Hunt's Room No. 512 at the Kentucky 
Hotel in Louisville your headquarters from April 11 through April 13. 
Our salesmen, Roy J. Boyd and Bill Hunt, will be present to welcome you. 




Hunt's Athletic Goods Co. 




THE LARGEST INDEPENDENT EXCLUSIVE ATHLETIC HOUSE IN THE SOUTH 






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Hiqh School AthMe 



ST. XAVIER HIGH SCHOOL SWIMMING TEAM 
KENTUCKY CLASS "A" CHAMPIONS-1956 




(Left to Right) Front Row : Mgr. Daugherty, Schmidt, Parsons, Hutti, Gettelfinger, 
Second Row: Roehrig, O'Toole, McMahon, Capt. DiOrio, Matthews, Riehl. Third Row: 
Mgr. Doheny, Capt. Whitty, Remmers, Hubbuch, Hagan, Bro. Howard - Coach. 

OHicial Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN, 

MAY - 1956 



U. K. Coaching Clinic 





Bobby Dodd 



Duffy Daugherty 



Some of the most widely known and most successful coaches 
in collegiate sports today will make up the instructional staff 
offering free tips of the trade to Kentucky high school coaches 
during the annual University of Kentucky Coaching Clinic 
scheduled in Lexington August 8-11. 

Due to be on hand as guest lecturers to give their pro- 
fessional opinions at the free U. K. clinic, which is expand- 
ing in attendance and national reputation each year, are 
successful football bowl coaches from Michigan State and 
Georgia Tech as well as Illinois' outstanding basketball mentor 
and the University of Louisville's veteran baseball tutor. The 
University of Kentucky will add, for good measure, its own 
highly-respected coaches of football, basketball and track. Also 
on the program will be two chief aides from Georgia Tech, 
along with Wildcat assistants in football and basketball. 

Rounding out the working vacation for a probable record 
number of high school coaches of the state will be the attrac- 





Blanton Collier 



Adolph Rupp 



tion of the fifth annual Kentucky High School All-Star Games 
in basketball and football. The two star-studded tilts between 
selected East- West squads are carded for the University's 
Memorial Coliseum and Stoll Field stadium at 7:00 and 8:30 
p.m. (Daylight Time) Saturday, Aug. 11. These games are open 
to the public at a small admission charge. 

Lending a bowl atmosphere and special authoritativeness 
to the discussions in football will be Bobby Dodd and Duffy 
Daugherty, both of whom guided their grid teams to bowl 
victories last New Year's Day, Dodd's Georgia Tech crew 
topping Pittsburg in the Sugar Bowl and Daugherty's Spartans 
from Michigan State edging by Southern California in a Rose 
Bowl date. Kentucky's own Blanton Collier, whose opinions are 
based on twenty-six years in the high school-professional-college 
coaching field, will add a wealth of much sought after basic 
knowledge to the grid lecturers. 

From the three grid masters, the visiting high school coaches 
wil be able to glean a condensed but informative report on 
three very different brands of successful football. 

Michigan State's Daugherty, who directed his 
tan outfit to a brilliant season capped by a 
victory and his own selection as "Coach of the 
added a new, Irish flavoring to the "multiple 
ture explained so effectively by his predeci 



lecond Spar- 
Rose Bowl 
Year," has 
offense" mix- 
Biggie Munn, 



at the 1953 Kentucky clinic. The personable Daugherty hasn't 
taken anything away from the effectiveness of the system and 
actually has added a few refinements of his own to the newest 
offensive trend in college football. The "multiple offense" 
pattern is a strange, often confusing, and effective mixture of 
straight or regular T, winged T, and single wing formations, 
each run with an unbalanced line. Defensing the T and single 



wing also will be a subject for discussion by Daugherty. 

The amazing Mr. Dodd, now in his 12th season at the 
Tech football helm and able to point with pride to an un- 
paralleled record of five successive major bowl victories, prac- 
tices the "razzle-dazzle" variation of T-formation football. 
His Yellow Jackets, who tackle Kentucky's Wildcats on Stoll 
Field in a nationally televised season opener Sept. 22, are 
taught to be a quick-striking, fast, T-outfit with primary 
emphasis on the running game, but with enough passing to 
keep the defense opened up. They run most plays from the 
regular T and the big ground gainers are quick pitchouts and 
variations from the famed "belly series." 

To assist in projecting a mental picture of the Dodd sys- 
tem, aides Frank Broyles and Ray Graves also will be on hand. 
The former is backfield coach in charge of offense and will 
explain the runs and passes off the belly series. Graves is in 
charge of line operations at Tech and will give tips on vary- 
ing defenses. 

Departing from his role of interested listener who figures 
he never can learn enough football. Kentucky's Collier has two 
lectures scheduled, one on pass defense and a later explanation 
of the Kentucky offensive system. The quiet-mannered native 
Kentuckian, who took over the helm of his alma mater two 





Harry Combes 



Harry Lancaster 



years ago after 16 seasons as a high school coach and eight 
years as backfield chief of the professional world champion 
Cleveland Browns, teaches a system based on the Split T with 
emphasis on fundamentals. 

Aiding in the explanations of the Kentucky offense will he 
backfield coach Ermal Allen and offensive line coach Bill 
Arnsparger, 

ill feature tips from two gentle- 
10 can boast the unique 
ing directed a losing team. During nine 
Harry Combes has guided his teams to 
nly 44 defeats for a .788 winning per- 
centage. Kentucky's Adolph Rupp counters with a 26-year 
reputation that has stamped him without challenge as the 
most successful college basketball mentor in America today — 
winner of 539 and loser of 91 for a remarkable winning 
average of .855. Combes has produced three Big 10 champions 
and each of these squads placed third in NCAA Tournament 



Basketball 
men of the coaching professi( 
distinction of ne- 
'ith the 

victories against 





Don Seaton 



John Heldman, Jr. 



as a host of other national tou 
to recount. The Fighting Illini of C( 
to win the Western Conference title 
on an 18-4 mark, but ranked along 
the top 10 teams of the nation 



honors too 
bes failed by an eyelash 
d NCAA bid this season 
'ith Kentucky as one of 



nd Co 
and defens' 



'ill be interested listeners to 
explanations since they will 



(Continued on Page Nine) 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL XVIII— NO. 10 



MAY, 1956 



$1.00 Per Year 



MINUTES OF THE ANNUAL MEETING 



The thirty-ninth annual meeting of the Ken- 
tucky Hig-h School Athletic Association was held at 
the Brown Hotel, Louisville, on Friday afternoon, 
April 13, 1956. 

P*resident Russell Williamson called the meet- 
ing to order at 2:30, and asked Commissioner Theo. 
A. Sanford to call the roll of delegates. Fifty-four 
regularly elected delegates or alternates answered 
the roll call. The following delegates were seated in 
the absence of the delegates or alternates from their 
respective districts: T. L. Plain, D. 10; Charles 
Fades, D. 16; J. L. Cardwell, D. 41; J. H. Powell, 
D. 52; and Wayne Ratliff, D. 58. 

Earle D. Jones moved, seconded by Oran C. 
Teater, that the minutes of the 1955 annual meeting 
of the Association, which had been sent previously 
to all member schools, be approved without being 
read. The motion was carried unanimously. 

Commissioner Sanford then gave a report on 
the activities of the Association during the 1955- 
56 school year. T. T. Knight moved, seconded by 
Hersohel Roberts, that the report of the Commis- 
sioner be accepted. The motion was carried unan- 
imously. 

President Williamson stated that consideration 
of the proposals was the next order of business. 

John Heber moved, seconded by Henry T. Cooper, 
that Proposal I, providing that the K.H.S.A.A. 
supply the shot and discus for the regional and 
state track meets, be adopted. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

Edgar McNabb moved, seconded by Millard 
Tolliver, that Proposal II, clarifying and amending 
certain sentences of Track Rule IX, be adopted. The 
motion was carried unanimously. 

A. L. Roberts moved, seconded by Arthur Mul- 
lins, that Proposal III, providing that Ttack Rule 
XII be amended to require that any contestant in 
the State Track Meet must participate and finish 
in the events which qualified him for the state meet 
or disqualify himself from the relays, be adopted. 
The motion was carried unanimously. 

Conrad Carroll offered an amendment to Pro- 
posal IV, to read as follows: "The expenses of the 
district representatives to the annual meeting shall 
be paid from the gross receipts of the State Tour- 
nament, only to those representatives who are pres- 
ent at the annual meeting, and the expenses shall 
be paid at the end of the meeting. The amount 
shall be $50.00 for each district representative." T. 
T. Knight moved, seconded by Oran C. Teater, that 
the amendment be tabled. The motion was carried. 
W. B. Sydnor moved, seconded by Arthur Mullins, 
that Proposal IV, increasing the maximum amount 
to be paid the district representatives to the annual 
meeting from twenty-five to fifty dollars, be accept- 
ed. The motion was carried. 

Millard Tolliver moved, seconded by Arthur 
Mullins, that Proposal V, providing that the num- 
ber of basketball games played during a season by 



a team representing a member school be decreased 
in number, be tabled. The motion was carried. 

John Heber moved, seconded by James B. Moore, 
that Proposal VI, providing that no regular basket- 
ball game played by a member school start later 
than 8:00 P. M., be amended to include: "on nights 
preceding school days." The amendment failed to 
carry. Kenneth Kuhnert moved, seconded by Alton 
D. Rudolph, that Proposal XI be tabled. The motion 
was carried. 

Joe P. Duke moved, seconded by Aubrey M. 
Inglis, that Proposal VII, providing that Tourna- 
ment Rule XI be amended to increase the player 
limit for basketball tournament games from 10 to 12, 
be tabled. The motion was lost. James B. Moore 
moved, seconded by R. C. Hinsdale, that Proposal 
VII be adopted. The motion was carried. 

W. B. Sydnor moved, seconded by M. E. Swain, 
that Proposal VIII, providing that the Board of 
Control select all regional basketball officials, be 
tabled. The motion was carried. 

Clyde Lassiter moved, seconded by A. L. Roberts, 
that Proposal IX, providing that the Board of Con- 
trol set up certain residence qualifications for reg- 
ional basketball tournament officials, be tabled. The 
motion was carried. 

Paul Phillips moved, seconded by Clyde Lassiter, 
that Proposal X, providing that the Commissioner 
shall appoint regional basketball tournament of- 
ficials, be tabled. The motion was carried. 

James E. Bazzell moved, seconded by Owen P. 
Hurt, that Proposal XI, providing that the Com- 
missioner shall appoint state basketball tourna- 
ment officials, be tabled. The motion was carried. 

Clyde Lassiter moved, seconded by R. C. Hins- 
dale, that Proposal XII, providing that the Board 
of Control shall have authority to establish uniform 
procedures in the selection of district tournament 
officials, and shall appoint officials for all regional 
tournaments, be tabled. The motion was carried. 

M. E. Swain moved, seconded by Millard Tolli- 
ver, that Proposal XIII, providing that the state be 
divided into eight basketball tournament regions in- 
stead of sixteen, be tabled. The motion was carried. 

Clyde Lassiter moved, seconded by J. H. Powell, 
that Proposal XIV, providing that the regional 
basketball tournament sites shall be determined by 
the participating schools, be tabled. The motion was 
carried. 

Clyde Lassiter moved, seconded by Millard 
Tolliver, that Proposal XV, providing for certain 
changes in By-Law 6, Section 1, be tabled. The 
motion was carried. 

Conrad Carroll moved, seconded by A. L. Rob- 
erts, that Proposal XVI, providing for certain 
changes in By-Law 8, Section 1, be adopted. The 
motion was lost. 

Clyde Lassiter moved, seconded by Buddy Gate, 
that Proposal XVII, providing for certain changes 
(Continued on Page Ten) 



Page IVo 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY 195G 



MAY, 1956 VOL. XVIII— NO. 10 

Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association. 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Russell Williamson (1952-56), Inez 

Vice-President Roy G. Eversole (1952-56), Hazard 

Directors — W. B. Jones (1953-67) Somerset : Louis Litchfield 
1963-67), Marion; W. H. Crowdus (1954-68), Franklin: Jack 
Dawson (1964-68), Middletown ; Robert P. Forsythe (1966-69) 
Browder; K. G. Gillaspie (1955-59), Georgetown. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 



^rom the Commisslone'i s yJffl 



ice 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1955-56 Basketball Participation List 

(Eligibility) 

School's Report on Basketball Officials 

Official's Report on Schools — Basketball 



Fines for Late Reports 

More than one hundred member schools had not 
filed their reports on basketball officials and their 
basketball participation (eligibility) lists for the 
1955-56 season when this issue of the ATHLETE 
went to press. Approximately four hundred basket- 
ball officials have not filed their reports on member 
schools. The Board of Control has established a fine 
of $5.00 for both schools and officials delinquent 
with their reports. A deadline of June 1 has been 
set for the filing of all reports required under As- 
sociation i-ules. This deadline is extended to June 
15 for those schools which have terms of more than 
nine months. 

State Track Committee 

The forthcoming State High School Track Meet, 
which will be held in Lexington on May 18-19, will 
be managed by Athletic Director John Heber of the 
Henry Clay High School, Lexington, Chairman of 
the State Track Committee. Other members of the 
committee are: Preston Holland, Murray; W. W. 
White, Henderson; Turner Elrod, Bowling Green; 
Joe Brummett, Danville, Eddie Weber, Louisville; 
Joe Curtsinger, Louisville; John Schaar, Bellevue; 
Bob Miller, Newport; Charles Black, Barbourville; 
Arthur Mullins, Elkhom City; and Ernie Chattin, 
Ashland. These men will assist Mr. Heber in con- 
ducting the State Meet. 

Tennis Tournaments 

Four regional tournaments will be held in tennis. 
They will be manag-ed by the following men:Coach 
Ted Homback, Western Kentucky State College, 
Bowling Green; Coach Emmett (3oranflo, Eastern 
High School, Middletown; Coach Ed Shemelya, Uni- 
versity High School, Lexington; and Coach Roger 
Klein, Bellevue High School. 

Principals who have indicated previously that 
their schools will have tennis teams this spring- 
have been mailed entry blanks by the regional man- 
agers. The tentative date for the regional tourna- 
ments is May 14. 

The State Tennis Tournament will be held in 
Louisville on May 21-22, and will be managed by 
Coach Emmett Goranflo. 



Golf Tournaments 

There will be seven regional golf tournaments 
this spring. They will be managed by the follovvang 
men: Prin. Vincent Zachem, Madisonville Hig-h 
School; Prin. H. B. Gray, Bowling Green High 
School; Brother Ed Joseph, St. Xavier High School, 
Louisville; Coach Charles Crum, Dixie Heights 
High School, South Fort Mitchell; Coach Ed Shemel- 
ya, University High School, Lexington; Prin. Clyde 
Lassiter, Middlesboro High School; and Prin. Oran 
Teater, Paintsville Hig-h School. 

The date for the tournaments is May 23. How- 
ever, this date may be chang-ed by some of the 
managers if conditions require it. Principals who 
have not received their entry blanks should write 
to their respective managers for these forms. 

The State Golf Tournament will be held at 
Fort Knox on May 28-29, and will be managed by 
Supt. Herschel Roberts. 

Basketball Court Changes 

The National Basketball Rules Committee has 
made mandatory the use of the twelve-foot-wide 
free throw lane for high schools at the beginning 
of the 1957-58 season, with the provision that a 
state may make the change for 1956-57 on a state- 
wide basis. K.H.S.A.A. member schools will not 
change to the wide lane until 1957-58, the time 
specified by the Rules Committee. 

The Rules Committee has made it mandatory 
that for 1956-57 the H and V designations be re- 
moved and the width of the free throw lines be in- 
creased to two inches. 

Correction 

Attention is called to an error in the State 
Track Meet schedule, which was printed in the 
April issue of the ATHLETE. The 880 Yard Relay 
heats, scheduled to be held at 3:20 P. M. on Friday, 
May 18, are qualifying heats for the Semi-Finals, 
and not for the Finals. 



1955-56 Annual Report 

Four hundred thirty-three schools joined the 
Association during 1955-56. One hundred ten schools 
had eleven-man football teams, and thirteen played 
six-man football. These numbers are the same as 
for 1954-55. 

Financial reports filed by the sixteen regional 
basketball tournament managers show total re- 
ceipts of $101,002.80. This represents an approxi- 
mate increase of $10,500.00 over 1955 receipts. Re- 
ceipts in fifty-eight of the sixty-one district basket- 
ball touranments amounted to $146,867.21, indicat- 
ing that the total figure for all sixty-one district 
will exceed, by a small amount, the 1955 figure. 
Receipts from tickets sales at the State Basketball 
Tournament, exclusive of refunds, will exceed 
$108,000.00. Additional receipts from television and 
from the tournament program will bring total tour- 
nament receipts to a figure in e.xcess of $113,000.00. 
Profit to the Association on the tournament should 
be approximately $88,000.00. A few tournament bills 
are still being received by the State Office, with 
the result that it is necessary to give an estimate 
of tournament profits at this time. A com/plete 
record of all receipts and disbursements will appear 
in a subsequent issue of the Association magazine. 

One thousand one hundred twenty-five basket- 
ball officials and 302 football officials registered 
with the Association in 1955-56. Nine football rules 
clinics were held under the direction of Dr. Lyman 

(Continued on Page Eleven) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY 1956 



Page Three 



1956 Kentucky State High School Swimming Meet 

April 7, 1956, University of Kentucky Coliseum, Lexington, Kentucky 



Berea Foundation School Swimming Team 
Kentucky Class "B^' Champions ^ 1956 



^^#'^(i:cr50fwis:«.^^'?-,*'^' 




V^T^^v^V-^ 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Hile, Fiske, Stephenson, 
Strunk, Griffith. Second Row: Reesor, Sanborne, Wehrle, 
Lowe, Abney. 



CLASS "A" 

Results 

St. Xavier 101 

Lafayette 74 

Atherton 40 

duPont Manual 14 

Eastern 1 

1. 50 Yard Freestyle 

Heat No. 1 : Cooke, Lafayette ( :26.4) ; 
Hagan, St. Xavier ( :27.6) ; Young, Ather- 
ton (:27.6); Belker, Atherton (:28.2); 
Mathews, St. Xavier ( :29.2) ; Bierbaum, 
duPont Manual ( :31.2). 
Heat No. 2 : Hubbuch, St. Xavier ( :26.6) ; 
Lowry, Lafayette ( :27.6) ; Solomon, Ath- 
erton f :27.6) : Thompson, Lafayette 
( :28.2) : Honican, Lafayette (:29.7) ; Clark- 
son, duPont Manual ( :31.5). 
Finals 

1. Hubbuch, St. Xavier :26.1 

2. Cooke, Lafayette :26.4 

.3. Hagan, St. Xavier :2S.9 

4. Lowry, Lafayette :27.5 

5. Solomon, Atherton :28.0 

(i. Young, Atherton :28.0 

2. 100 Yard Breaststroke — 

Heat No. 1 ; Portmann, Lafayette 
(1:11.7): Parsons, St. Xavier (1:12.8); 
Weber, Atherton (1 :20.1) ; Eshbaugh, Ath- 
erton (1:33.9). 

Heat No. 2: O'TooIe, St. Xavier (1:03.1); 
Roehrig, St. Xavier (1:14.3): Essene, 
Lafayette (1 :20.4) ; Swann, duPont Man- 
ual (1:36.5); Lowry, Lafayette (1:40.6). 

Finals 
1. O'Toole, St. Xavier 1:02.2 



2. Portmann, Lafayettd 1:12.5 

3. Parsons, St. Xavier 1:12.7 

4. Roehrig, St. Xavier 1:13.4 

5. Essene, Lafayette 1:19.4 

6. Weber, Atherton 1:20.8 

O'Toole set a new state record In this 
event with his time of 1:02.2, breaking 
the record time of 1:04.2 which he set 
in 1955. 

3. 200 Yard Freestyle — 

Heat No. 1: MeMahon, St. Xavier 
(2:24.0); DiOrio, St. Xavier (2:25.3); 
Gettlefinger, St. Xavier (2:33.6); Litken- 
haus. Eastern (2 :35.0) ; Kessler, Lafayette 
(2:46.1). 

Heat No. 2 : Freeman, Lafayette (2 :23.4) ; 
Dillard, Lafayette (2 :23.9) ; Lips, Ather- 
ton (2 :37.8) ; Maggard, Lafayette (2 :40.2) ; 
Foster, Atherton (2:47.2). 

Finals 

1. McMahon, St. Xavier 2:17.9 

2. Freeman, Lafayette 2:21.0 

3. DiOrio, St. Xavier 2:21.8 

4. Dillard, Lafayette 2:24.0 

6. Gettlefinger, St. Xavier 2:33.0 

6. Litkenhaus, Eastern 2:34,5 

4. 100 Yard Backstroke- 
Heat No. 1: Schmidt, St. Xavier 

(1:12.1): Roberts, Lafayette (1:14.5); 
Hill, Lafayette (1 :15.4) ; Langston, Lafay- 
ette (1:18.6). 

Heat No. 2 : Musselman, Atherton (1 :10.9) ; 
Remmers, St. Xavier (1:12.9); Whitty, St. 
Xavier (1:17.4). 

Finals 

1. Musselman, Atherton 1:08.0 

2. Schmidt, St. Xavier 1:09.8 



Remmers, St. Xavier 1:12.7 

Roberts, Lafayette 1 :15.0 

Hill, Lafayette 1 :17.5 

Whitty, St. Xavier 1:18.0 

100 Yard Freestyle- 
Heat No. 1 : Fraser, Lafayette 
(1:02.3); Freeman, Lafayette (1:05.1); 
Stamatis, Lafayette (1:07.2) Hammonds, 
Lafayette (1 :08.6) : Mathews, St. Xavier 
(1:11.3); Brown, duPont Manual (1:20.0). 
Heat No. 2: O'Toole. St. Xavier (1:01.2); 
Riehl, St. Xavier (1:02.2); Young, Ather- 
ton (1:02.4); Gettlefinger, St. Xavier 
(1:05.6); Litkenhaus, Eastern (1:05.9); 
Berg, Atherton (1:08.7). 

Finals 

1. O'Toole. St. Xavier :58.2 

2. Fraser, Lafayette 1:00.9 

3. Riehl, St. Xavier 1:01.6 

4. Young, Atherton 1:02.3 

5. Freeman, Lafayette 1:03.5 

6. Gettlefinger, St. Xavier 1:06.1 

6. Fancy Diving — 

Finals 

1. Weber, Atherton 249.35 

2. Whitty, St. Xavier 187.30 

3. Wigglesworth, Lafayette 185.35 

4. Appley, Lafayette 166.95 

5. Berry, duPont Manual 140.30 

6. Wood, Lafayette 123.60 

7. Hutti, St. Xavier 110.20 

8. Allen, Lafayette 109.50 

9. Sehell, Atherton 102.30 

7. 150 Yard Individual Medley — 

Heat No. 1 : DiOrio, St. Xavier 
(1:52.7); Roberts, Lafayette (1:53.8); 
Honican. Lafayette (2 :06.8) ; Kessler, La- 
fayette (2 :24.4) 

Heat No. 2: Schmidt. St. Xavier (1:52.4); 
Musselman, Atherton (1 :57.8) ; Hill, La- 
fayette (2:07.2). 

Finals 

1. Schmidt, St. Xavier 1:49.5 

2. DiOrio, St. Xavier 1:49.6 

3. Roberts, Lafayette 1:54.4 

4. Musselman, Atherton 1:57.5 

5. Honican, Lafayette 2:06.9 

6. Hill, Lafayette 2:07.0 

8. 200 Yard Medley Relay- 

Finals 

1. St. Xavier (Remmers, Parsons, 
Roehrig, Hubbuch) 2:01.5 

2. Lafayette (Durbin, Essene, 
Portmann, Thompson) 2:04.2 

3. Atherton (Weber, Eshbaugh, 
Foster, Lips) 2:15.4 

4. duPont Manual (Clarkson, 

Swan, Berry, Brown) - - 

St. Xavier team set a record for 
this new event with the time of 2:01.5. 

9. 200 Yard Freestyle Relay — 

Finals 

1. Lafayette (Cooke, Fraser, 

Dillard, Lowery) 1:46.6 

2. St. Xavier (Hagan, McMahon, 
Whitty, Riehl) 1:47.6 

3. Atherton (Belker, Young, 
Solomon, B. Young) 1:50.7 

4. duPont Manual (McKinley, 
Bierbaum, Peet, Berry) 2:02.2 

CLASS "B" 
Results 

Berea Foundation 49 

University 48 

Newport 28 

Ashland 24 

K.MJI. 24 

Danville 8 

Lexin^on Catholic 5 

1. 50 Yard Freestyle — 

Heat No. 1: Poore, Ashland (:28.7); 
Strunk, Berea Foundation ( :29.8) ; Peper, 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY 1956 



TEAM SCORING— Class "A" 

















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11 


14 


13 


10 


12 


5 


12 


14 


10 


101 


Lafayette 


8 


7 


8 


5 


7 


8 


7 


10 


14 


74 


Atherton 


3 


1 





7 


3 


7 


3 


8 


8 


40 


duPont Manual — 

















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6 


6 


14 










1 




















1 







Newport ( :31.4) ; Cole, University ( :32.0) ; 
Ball, Ashland (:33.6); Vaughn, Ashland 
^:37.8). 

Heat No. 2: Minor, Danville (:30.1): 
Haney, Lexington Catholic ( :31.8) ; 
Wehrle, Berea Foundation {, :32.6) ; Col- 
cough, Danville ( :33.0j ; Ratliff, Newport 
i:38.1). 

Heat No. 3: Clark, University (:28.2); 
Fiske, Berea Foundation C:29.7); Morris, 
Ashland ( :30.0 1 ; Wade, Lexington Cath- 
olic (:30.4); Brock, University (-.36.7). 
Heat No. 4: Chenault, K.M.I. ( :25.7) ; 
O'Kelley. Lexington Catholic ( :33.1) ; Pol- 
lard, University (:33.3); Hill, Danville 
t, :33.6j ; Hoskins, Berea Foundation 
( :34.3). 

Semi-Final Heat No. 1 : Poore, Ashland 
1:28.1); Clark. University 1:28.4); Minor, 
Danville ( :29.6) ; Morris, Ashland (. :31.9) ; 
Wehrle, Berea Foundation ( :32.BJ ; 
O'Kelley, Lexington Catholic (:34.0). 
Semi-Final Heat No. 2: Chenault, K.M.I. 
( :26.0) ; Fiske. Berea Foundation ( :29.6) ; 
Strunk. Berea Foundation ( :30.1) ; Peper, 
Newport (:31.1): Haney, Lexington Cath- 
olic (:32.5); Pollard, University (:34.6). 
Finals 

1. Chenault, K.M.L :2G.3 

2. Poore, Ashland :28.1 

3. Clark. University :28.2 

4. Strunk. Berea Foundation :29.9 

5. Fiske, Berea Foundation :30.3 

G. Minor, Danville :31.1 

2. 50 Yard Breaststroke — 

Heat No. 1 : Weinman, University 
(:38.1); Wright, Berea Foundation 
( :39.5) ; Ebert. Newport ( :42.B) ; Vaughn. 
Ashland ( :48.9) — disqualified. 
Heat No. 2: Nickell, Ashland ( :40.2) ; 
Lowe, Berea Foundation (:53.4); Hunt, 
Ashland ( :44.0) — disqualified. 
Heat No. 3: Stephenson, Berea Foundation 
(:36.5): Gail. University ( :38.8) : San- 
borne. Berea Foundation ( :49.0) ; Patter- 
son, Lexington Catholic ( :55.7) 
Ashland ( :5U.O) — disqualified. 
Finals 

1. Stephenson. Berea Foundation 

2. Weinman, University 

3. Gail, University 

4. Wright, Berea Foundation 

.5. LiOwe, Berea Foundation 

6. Nickell, Ashland disqualified 

3. 50 Yard Backstroke — 

Heat No. 1: Wander. Newport (:37.2) ; 
Keen. Newport ( :38.0) : Hoffmeyer, Dan- 
ville ( ;46.7) ; Hill. Danville ( :48.6) ; Stein, 
Ashland ( :58.9J — Klisqualified. 
Heat No. 2: Wright. Danville (:39.1): 
Hile, Berea Foundation ( :41.5) ; Spencer, 



Lexington Catholic ( :42.6) ; Minor, Dan- 
ville (:43.4). 

Heat No. 3 : Abney. Berea Foundation 
3) ; Griffith, Berea Foundation 
1) ; Haney. Lexington Catholic 
(:40.5): Sledge, Ashland ( :41.6) ; Kunkle, 
.Ashland — disqualified. 

Heat No. 4: Wenneker. University ( :33.6) : 
Crawford. K.M.I. ( :36.2) ; Baker. Berea 
Foundation ( :45.4) ; Reeves, University 
( :50.5) : Price, Ashland (:56.B). 
Semi-Final Heat No. 1 : Abney, Berea 
Foundation ( :34.9) ; Crawford, K.M.I. 
(:36.7|; Griffith. Berea Foundation 
( :37.6) ; Wright, Danville ( :39.7) ; Spen- 
cer. Lexington Catholic ( :42.0) ; Baker, 
Berea Foundation (:46.6). 
Semi-Final Heat No. 2: Wenneker, Uni- 
versity ( :33.6) ; Wander. Newport ( :37.6) ; 
Keen. Newport ( :39.2) ; Hile, Berea Foun- 
dation ( :41.8) ; Haney. Lexington Catholic 
( :42.0) : Hoffmeyer. Danville (:43.7). 
Finals 

1. Abney, Berea Foundation 

2. Wenneker, University 

3. Crawford, K.M.I. 

4. Griffith, Berea Foundation 

5. Keen, Newport 

6. Wander, Newport 

4. Fancy Diving — 

Finals 
1. Weinman, University :62.9 

1. Wander, Newport :62.9 

2. Neal, Newport :59.4 

3. Minor. Danville :59.2 

4. Whittenberg. K.M.I. :58.8 

5. Mullins. Lexington Catholic 

6. O'Kelley. Lexington Catholic... 

7. Wherle. Berea Foundation 

8. Fiske, Berea Foundation 

9. Cole. University 

10. Griffith. Lexington Catholic 



34.6 
34.8 
36.0 



Fosson, 



:66.6 
:53.0 
:B2.0 
:B0.4 
:48.B 
:46.6 
University :44.4 

12. Hile. Berea Foundation :39.6 

13. Kouns. Ashland :38.4 

14. Gibson. Lexington Catholic :34.7 

15. Kunkle. Ashland :34.2 

16. Fosson. Ashland :31.6 

17. Stein, Ashland :29.0 

5. 75 Yard Individual Medley- 
Heat No. 1 : Wright, Danville (1 :02.3) ; 

Gail. University (1:02.0); Kouns, Ashland 
(1:09.31; Hile. Berea Foundation (1:13.6). 
Heat No. 2 : Chenault. K.M.I. ( :50.5) ; 
Taylor. University ( :66.0) ; Ray Griffith, 
Berea Foundation (1:01.5); Reesor, Berea 
Foundation (1:01.6); Wright, Berea Foun- 
dation (1:03.4). 

Heat No. 3 : Crawford, K.M.I. ( :55.8) ; 
Sensel, Newport (1:06.4); Minor, Danville 
(1:23.51; Nunley, Ashland — disqualified; 
Dixon, Ashland-Alisqualified. 



Finals 

1. Chenault, K.M.I. :49.S 

2. Taylor, University :B5.3 

3. Crawford, K.M.I. :B6.4 

4. Griffith, Berea Foundation 1 :02.3 

5. Wright, Danville 1 :02.7 

6. Reesor, Berea Foundation 1.02.7 

6. 150 Yard Medley Relay — 

Finals 

1. Berea Foundation (Abney, 
Stephenson, Strunk) 1:39.3 

2. University (Wenneker, Wein- 
man, Combs) 1:42.B 

3. Newport (Wander, Ebert, 
Kreutzer) 1 :48.B 

4. Ashland (Nunley, Kunkle, 

Sledge 2:05.7 

7. 200 Yard Freestyle Relay- 

Finals 

1. Ashland (Nickell, Ball, 

Morris, Poore) 2 :01.B 

2. University (Cole, Taylor, 

Combs, Clarke) 2:04.2 

3. Newport (Kreutzer, Peper, 

Sensel, Stanfield) 2.04.3 

4. Berea Foundation (Hoskins, 

Reesor, Wehrle, Fiske) 2 :06.G 

5. Lexington Catholic (Patterson, 
Sallee, O'Kelley, Wade) 2:23.1 

6. Danville (Minor, Dykes, 

Massey, Colcough) 2:40.0 

CLASS "C" 
Results 

Highlands 50 

Beechwood 37 

Bellevue 33 

St. Joseph 24 

Trinity 9 

Ft. Knox 7 

Bardstown 6 

Wilmore 3 

1. 50 Yard Freestyle — 

Heat No. 1: Giles, Bellevue (:28.2): 
Rhodes. Bardstown ( :29.2) ; Bowlin, Wil- 
more ( :29.8) ; Brooks, Bardstown (:29.7). 
Heat No. 2: Wadsworth, Highlands 
(:27.8): Gavigan. St. .loseph ( :28.6) ; 
Veenenam. Trinity ( :29.0) ; Leurck. Belle- 
vue (:34.3I: Turner. Wilmore (:35.7). 
Heat No. 3 : Stegeman. Highlands 
(:2B.O): Karoblis. St. .Toseph ( :28.2) : 
Vandermark. Beechwood ( :29.4) ; Michaels, 
Beechwood ( :29.3) ; Brian, Trinity 
(:29.7). 

Finals 

1. Stegeman. Highlands 

2. Wadsworth, Highlands 

3. Giles. Bellevue 

4. Gavigan, St. Joseph 



2B.4 
;27.8 
27.9 
29.0 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY 1956 



Page Five 



Highlands High School Swimming Team 
Kentucky Class "C" Champions ^ 1956 

r^ ^^ n f% n f% '-^ 



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(Left to Right) Front Hon : (daih Law, J. McAtee, Bootes, 
Grt)es, Albtrshart, Kisker. Second Row: D. McAtee, Glass, 
Howard, Bryson, Stegeman, Wadsworth, Beineke. 



5. Karoblis, St. Joseph :29.2 

G. Rhodes, Bardstown i29.3 

S+egeman set a new state record in this 
event with his time of :25.4. This mark 
breaks the record time ot :28.0, set by 
John Meyer of Lexington Catholic in 
1955. 

2. 50 Yard Breaststroke — 

Heat No. 1 : Bootes, Highlands 
(:37.5); Bevis, Bellevue ( :42.0) : Downie, 
St. Joseph (:42.9); George, Trinity 
(:42.9). 
Heat No. 2: Bailer. Beechwood ( :33.5) ; 



Bowlin, Wilmore ( :40.6) ; Beineke, High- 
lands ( :47.1 1 : Schildt, Trinity ( :49.0) ; 
Turner, Wilmore (:60.4). 
Heat No. 3: Mendell, Bellevue (:37.1): 
Sweeney, St. Joseph ( :40.5) ; Goldman, 
Ft. Knox ( :40.6) ; Ballard, Bardstown 
( :39.6)— disqualified. 

Finals 

1. Bailer, Beechwood 

2. Mendell, Bellevue 

3. Bootes, Highlands 

4. Bowlin, Wilmore 

5. Sweeney, St. Joseph 

6. Bevis, Bellevue :40.5 



Bailer set a new state record in this 
event with his time of :33.5. The previous 
record time was :35.2, set by John 
Meyer of Lexington Catholic in 1955. 

3. 30 Yard Backstroke — 

Heat No. 1: Goes, Highlands (:35.9I: 
Mendell, Bellevue ( :38.8) ; Wuilleumier. 
Bellevue ( :50.3). 

Heat No. 2: Veeneman, Trinity (:36.3l: 
Albershart, Highlands < :38.4) ; Mooney. 
St. Joseph (:38.7). 

Heat No. 3: Gramzow. Ft. Knox ( :33.6) ; 
EIo, Beechwood ( :36.0) : Lee, Beechwood 
1:41.21: Hammond, Bardstown ( :41.6) ; 
Kute. Trinity ( :43.1) ; White, St. Joseph 
( :45.1). 

Gramzow set a new record in this heat, 
breaking the old mark of :35.4 set by 
Don Ehleben, Winchester, in 1953. 

Finals 

1. Gramzow. Ft. Knox 

2. Elo, Beechwood 

3. Goes, Highlands 

4. Veeneman, Trinity 

5. Mendell, Bellevue 

6. Albershart. Highlands 

4. Fancy Diving — 

Finals 

1. Cavana, Bellevue 80.10 

2. Bailer, Beechwood 71.50 

3. Stegeman, Highlands 68.45 

4. Giles, Bellevue 64.80 

5. McAtee, Highlands 63.40 

6. McGuire. Trinity 60.20 

7. Bowlin, Wilmore 57.50 

8. Bootes, Highlands 53.10 

9. Rhodes, Bardstown 43.10 

10. Page. St. Joseph 39.90 

11. Shook, Beechwood 36.00 

12. Barnhorst, St. Joseph 35.60 



150 Yard Medley Relay — 
Beechwood (Elo, Bailer, 

VanDermark) 1 

Highlands (Goes, Bootes, 

Bryson) 1 

St. .Joseph (Mooney, Sweeney, 

Levy) 1 

Bellevue (Wuilleumier, Bevis, 

Parker) 1 

Trinity (Kute, George, 

Hollenback) 1 

Bardstown (Guthrie, Ballard, 
Goff) 2 



37.9 
39.0 
49.4 
52.2 
55.5 
06.0 



TEAM SCORING— Class "B" 















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6 
4 


12 
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7 


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2 
3 

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4 


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Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY 1956 



TEAM 


SCORING— Class "C" 




















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Bellevue 


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St. Joseph 


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The Beechwood team set a new state 
record in this event with the time of 
1:37.9, brealflng the old record time of 
1:40.2, set by Newport in 1953. 
6. 200 Yard Freestyle Relay — 
I. Highlands (Albershart, Wads- 
worth. Howard, Stegeman) 1:49.4 



St. Joseph (Conlon. Gavigan, 6. Trinity (Walsh, Koehler, 

Montgomery, Karoblis) 1:59.9 Buchart, Brian) 2:40.4 

Beechwood (Deters, Shook, 

Eddy, Michaels) ___-.-._—__— 2:06.4 The Highlands team set a new state 
record in this event with the time of 
1:49.4, breaking the previous record 
time of 2:01.4 set by Unlverstly in 1954. 



Bellevue (Parker, Wuilleumier, 

Leurck, Giles) 2:07.5 

Bardstown (Rout, Guthrie, 
Hammond, Brooks) 2:24.2 



K. H. S. C. C. A. Meetings 

Executive Board Meeting 

Held in Lexington, February 25, 1956 

A meeting of the Executive Board of the 
Kentucl<y High School Coaches Charity Associa- 
tion was held at 10:00 A. M., February 25, 1956, at 
Memorial Coliseum, Lexington, Kentucky. 

The meeting was called to order by President 
Edgar McNabb. Members present were Secretary- 
Treasurer Joe Ohr and Manager Bob Miller. Also 
present were: Don Shelton, Head Coach of West 
Football; William Tucker, Head Coach of East 
Football; William Shannon, Ass't. Coach of West 
Football; and Blanton Collier, Head Football Coach, 
University of Kentucky. 

The pui-pose of the meeting was to acquaint 
the All-Star coaches with the rules and regulations 
governing the All-Star games and to submit to them 
a list of boys eligible to participate. 

It was announced that Don Shelton, Henderson 
(city) High School, had been elected to coach the 
West team. He is to be assisted by Bill Shannon, 
Dixie Heights, and George Claiborne, Daviess 
County. 

It was announced that William Tucker, Corbin 
High mentor, had been elected to guide the East. 
He will be assisted by Clayton Powers, Pikeville 
High School. The second assistant was not 
announced. 

The next meeting of the Executive Board was 
scheduled for Friday, March 16. 

The meeting adjourned at 12:10 P. M. 



Executive Board Meeting 
Held in Lexington, March 16, 1956 

As provided in the Constitution, the Executive 
Board of the Kentucky High School Coaches Charity 
Association met at 10:00 on Friday morning dur- 
ing the State Basketball Tournament, March 16, 
1956, in the squad room of the Coliseum at the 
University of Kentucky. 

Members of the Executive Board present were: 
Edgar McNabb, Secretary-Treasurer Joe Ohr, and 
Manager Bob Miller. Guests present were: Athletic 
Director Bernie Shively, Head Football Coach Blan- 
ton Collier, and Assistant Coach Ermal Allen, all of 
the University of Kentucky staff. 

The purpose of the meeting was to make final 
selections and to check all data relative to football 
squad members of the East and West teams. Coacih 
Don Shelton of the West was present. However, 
Coach William Tucker of the East was unable to 
attend because of his assignment at Fort Knox. 

It was agreed that both coaches would have 
their squad rosters completed by K.E.A. week, and 
that they would meet with members of the Univer- 
sity of Kentucky coaching staff for their recom- 
mendations prior to that time. 

Coach Blanton Collier offered several valuable 
suggestions relative to publicity in connection with 
the 1956 games. Perhaps the most important of the 
suggestions was that a meeting of press, radio, 
and television representatives be called prior to the 
games. It was also suggested by Mr. Collier that the 
publicity be channeled through Mr. Ken Kuhn's 
office. 

It was announced at this meeting that the follow- 
ing speakers were to appear on the program of the 

(Continued on Page Nine) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY 1956 



Page Seven 



The Flying Dutchman 




There's no doubt that the athletic banquet 
held during K.E.A. has again proved to be 
the most enjoyable dinner meeting of the 
whole fiesta. It is another tribute to the 
imagination and planning genius of those 
in charge of these affairs. 

Russell Williamson, a modest chap of many 
abilities, did a masterful job as master of 
ceremonies. He also earned a new title be- 
stowed by the speaker of the evening. Dr. 
Henry Hill, the president of Peabody College. 
Henceforth and hereafter, Russ, who is a 
Mason, Elk, Lion and bank president, be- 
sides directing the educational destiny of 
Inez, may properly be referred to as "The 
Gentleman of the Garter." 

Little Patty Kipp, seven-year-old dancer, 
was so "smitten" with the President of the 
Board of Control that, after the completion 
of her garter dance, she presented Russ with 
her red garter as an everlasting memento 
of her admiration. So you can see that this 
banquet wasn't stiff and stuffy. Everybody 
was there for fun and there were fun and 
good fellowship in abundance. 

Board member Jack Dawson drew praise 
for the entertainment he provided. Jack 
called on the talented kids of Jefferson Coun- 
ty's recreation program to supply fifteen 
minutes of relaxation for the harassed ath- 
letic leaders who had just come from their 
big afternoon session, and they "delivered 
the goods." To say that the fellows got a 
"bang" out of the new kind of program Jack 
came up with would be putting it mildly. 
Their thunderous applause proved that. 

You'd think that, with the athletic ban- 
quet one of the last things on the K.E.A. 
program, the crowd wouldn't be large, but 
the mammoth Brown Hotel Crystal Ballroom 
housed the largest group ever to turn out for 
the annual event. 



It's a cinch that the fellows who missed 
this meeting missed plenty by not hearing 
Dr. Henry Hill, the most relaxed and enter- 
taining college president the Dutchman has 
ever heard in an after dinner address. It 
took Henry about two minutes to win his 
audience completely and from there on he 
really performed. 

Eddie Ginter, the Game Guy from Mont- 
gomery County High School of Mt. Sterling, 
was there along with his Dad ; his school 
principal, E. G. Jones ; D. C. Anderson, Mont- 
gomery County School Superintendent; and 
his coach, "Jeep" Clark. As Eddie walked 
forward to receive his award from Bob Kir- 
chdorfer, who won it the first time in 1949, 
four hundred school men stood up to applaud 
the kid who refused to let a physical handi- 
cap keep him out of schoolboy sports. This 
Game Guy Project of the Kentucky High 
School Athletic Association is now a tradition 
and widely acclaimed across the nation. 

For the Dutchman, this dinner brought 
many thoughts. You know, all of us are too 
prone to take too many things for granted : 
the fun we had this night for one thing, and 
the members of our Board of Control for 
another. 

Kentuckians have no way of realizing, 
unless they have served themselves, just how 
much service they receive from the members 
of their Board of Control. Sure, it's an honor 
to be elected to that administrative body, 
but, brethren, take it from the Dutchman, it 
also means work and personal sacrifice. For 
this reason, it was heart-warming to hear 
one chap stop Hazard's Roy Eversole, retir- 
ing board member, to say, "I want to be one 
of the first among the many Kentuckians 
you have served to express my thanks to you 
for what you have done for schoolboy ath- 
letics in the state." 

Roy, indeed, did his job well and helped 
write another chapter of the success story 
of Kentucky's high school athletic program. 
As we hail his successor, popular Cecil Thorn- 
ton, of Harlan, Kentucky salutes the Hazard 
educator as one of "Nature's Noblemen." 

Touring the spacious new Kentucky Fair- 
grounds and inspecting the fabulous coliseum 
and the breath-taking stadium with the mem- 
bers of our Board of Control, The Dutchman 
realized that he had waited too long to honor 
these gentlemen with the coveted Corn Cob 
Pipes of Honor Award for unselfish service 
to their fellowmen. 

So we announce with the greatest of pride 

(Continued on Page Nine) 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY 1956 



Summary of K. F. H. S. G. S. A. 
Activities for 1955-56 

In April of 1955, during a meeting held at 
Louisville, the Kentucky Girls' Sports Assoc- 
iation elected the following officers to serve 
a two year term : President. Miss Betty 
Langley, Bowling Green ; Vice-President, 
Mrs. Dew Drop Rowlett, Murray ; Secretary, 
Miss Loyce Meadows, Ft. Thomas ; and 
Treasurer, Miss Robye Anderson, Bowling 
Green. 

At a meeting held during K.E.A. week this 
year, it was reported that our original mem- 
bership of twelve has doubled, giving us a 
current membership of twenty-four. Not all 
of these members have clubs organized in 
their schools. One of our objectives there- 
fore, is to encourage each school to meet the 
requirements for Active Membership (see 
Constitution). 

Two Play Days and organizational meet- 
ings were held during the past year. One of 
these was at Bowling Green in October, and 
the other at Ft. Thomas in February. Eleven 
schools were represented and approximately 
100 girls took part in the play, and in the 
planning of our state sports association. The 
girls were divided into committees to work 
on certificates of membership, state colors, 
and a handbook. The results of the efforts 
of these three committees will be in the 
hands of each member by the opening of 
school next September. 

All of the girls attending these two meet- 
ings expressed a strong desire that more 
play days be conducted throughout the state. 
As a result of this, a tentative schedule has 
been made for a Play Day in each of the 
following districts. For the exact dates, or 
for further information, contact the follow- 
ing: First District, Murray High School, 
Mrs. Dew Drop Rowlett; Second District, 
Daviess County High School, Mrs. Jean 
Smith Jewell; Third District, Bowling Green 
High School, Miss Robye Anderson ; Fourth 
District, Munfordville High School, Mrs. 
Ruby Dobson; Fifth District, University of 
Louisville, Miss Peggy Stanaland ; Northern 
District, Ludlow High School, Mrs. Bewley 
or Dolf H. Grolock. Plans for the Central 
District Play Day have not been completed. 
If you are located in any of the districts men- 
tioned above, plan now to attend your Play 
Day. 

The N.S.G.W.S. has been most helpful to 



our organization, both financially and other- 
wise. In December the N.S.G.W.S. conducted 
a basketball clinic at Bowling Green High 
School. The girls who were in attendance 
requested more clinics of this type in various 
sports for next year. 

The fine cooperation from all members 
has made it possible to do the things he have 
done. By continuing to cooperate we shall 
grow in the years to come. 

— Betty Langlev. 



New Designs In Gymnasiums 

First in a Series of Construction Suggestions 

by Dr. Don Cash Seaton 

Head. Dept. of Phys. Ed.. University of Kentucky 

A folder came to my desk yesterday with a 
picture of another beautiful gymnasium which has 
been constructed in Kentucky. Much to my dismay, 
however, I find that the same old mistake of in- 
stalling permanent bleachers was made. It is too 
bad that school architects and school officials con- 
tinue to include such an obsolete idea in a modern 
building. Permanent bleachers present a terrific 
maintenance problem of cleaning after each usage 
that most schools can ill afford. But, more import- 
ant, they rob the gymnasium of valuable space, 
which is used for seating usually not more than 
twenty times per year, and that could be used daily 
for recreation and instruction. 

RoU-a-way bleachers are the most economical 
method of seating; they can be cleaned in one-tenth 
of the time that permanent bleachers take; and, 
when rolled away, provide additional space for class 
instruction and recreation. 

If a large seating capacity is desired, the play- 
ing floor can be surrounded by flat balconies (actu- 
ally rooms on which roll-a-way bleachers are in- 
stalled. If these balconies are made wide enough, 
they provide space for such sports as table tennis, 
dancing, tumbling, etc., while the space beneath 
allows space for rooms with flat ceilings that can 
be used for showers, toilets, storage, dressing rooms 
and offices. The accompanying picture shows a 
gymnasium of the type mentioned. 



AVAILABLE PLOM AREA 

mrsiCAL coucATion 




'i:im)i miimmimrmTm: 




THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY 1956 



Page Nine 



K.H.S.C.C.A. MEETINGS 

(Continued from Page Six) 
general meeting of the Coaches Association in 
Louisville, Aril 12, 1956: Mr. Rex Alexander, Basket- 
ball Coach at Murray State College; and Mr. Briscoe 
Inman, Football Coach of the 1955 undefeated 
Centre Colonels. 

The date of the annual East-West All-Star 
games was set for August 11, 1956. 

The meeting adjourned at 11:20 A. M. 

Annual Business Meeting 
Held in Louisville, April 12, 1956 

The annual business meeting of the K.H.S.C.C.A. 
was held at the Kentucky Hotel, Louisville, on 
Thursday evening, April 12, 1956. 

The meeting was called to order at 7:40 with 
President Edgar McNabb presiding. One hundred 
twenty-five members were in attendance. 

President McNabb introduced the 1956 All-Star 
football and basketball coaches who were present 
at the meeting. Don Shelton of Henderson and Wil- 
liam Tucker of Corbin were introduced as the 
coaches of the West and East football teams, re- 
spectively, and Morton Combs, who coached the 
State Champion Carr Creek quintet, was introduced 
as the head mentor of the East basketball squad. 

President McNabb presented to the audience 
W. B. Jones of Somerset and Russell Williamson 
of Inez, both members of the K.H.S.A.A. Board of 
Control; and Commissioner Theo. A. Sanford and 
Assistant Commissioner J. B. Mansfield, both of 
Lexington. 

The minutes of the April, 1955, meeting were 
read by Secretary Joe Ohr. It was moved by 
Leathers (Frankfort) and seconded by Pace (K.M.I.) 
that the minutes be approved as read. The motion 
carried. 

Along witli the reading of the minutes, a re- 
port concerning membership was submitted to the 
group. The paid membership for 1955-56 was re- 
ported to be 739, as compared to 686 in 1953-54, and 
689 in 1954-55. The number of currently registered 
members was reported as 628, with every district 
registered with the exception of District 51. Of the 
628 members, fewer than ten paid their own dues. 

A complete financial report, including the 
Savings Fund, the All-Star Fund, and the Kentucky 
High School Coaches Fund, was made by Ohr. 
These accounts are with the Columbia Federal 
Building and Loan Association, Covington; the 
First National Bank and Trust Company, Lexing- 
ton; and the Union Bank and Trust Company, 
Irvine. It was moved by McRight (Tilghman) and 
seconded by Waldon (Grant County) that the 
Treasurer's report be accepted. The motion carried. 

It was moved by Charmoli (duPont Manual) 
and seconded by Howard (Falmouth) that a com- 
mittee be apointed to represent the K.H.S.C.C.A. 
in choosing a Coach of the Year in football and in 
basketball, and that a suitable trophy be presented 
to each of these coaches at the annual meeting each 
year. The motion carried. 

Charmoli and Goranflo (Eastern) spoke to the 
group informally on the subjects of insurance and 
the disposition of insurance claims, and on encour- 
aging the best football and basketball players to 
participate in the All-Star games. 

As in the past, two speakers, each represent- 
ing a major sport, addressed the assembly. Briscoe 
Inman, Football Coach of the Centre Colonels, and 
Rex Alexander, Basketball Coach of the Murray 
State College Racers, both gave interesting talks. 



The following were elected to take office 
March 1, 1957: Ralph McRight of Tilghman, Presi- 
dent; Ollie Leathers, Frankfoi't, Vice-President; Joe 
Ohr, Irvine, Secretary-Treasurer; and John Hackett, 
Ft. Knox, Sergeant-at-Arms. 

There being no further business, the meeting 
adjourned. 



U. K. COACHING CLINIC 

(Continued from Inside Front Cover) 

be rivals in the fourth annual U. K. Invitational Tournament 
next December. Harry Lancaster, assistant to Rupp since 
1947. will help in the outlining of Kentucky defense. 

Rounding out the coaching portion of the program will 
be Dr. Don Cash Seaton, now in his ninth season as coach of 
the Kentucky thinlies, and Dr. John Heldman, successful veteran 
baseball coach at University of Louisville. With a panel of high 
school coaches aiding in the discussion, the two collegiate 
mentors will attempt to bring out some accepted methods of 
teaching winning track and baseball. Both Seaton and Held- 
man double at their respective schools as Director of Physical 
Education. Baseball has been added to the clinic for the first 
time this year. 

Also part of the lecture staff on this year's clinic will be 
Kentucky athletic trainer John Payne and a pair of news- 
papermen, .Tohnny Carrico of the Louisville Courier-Journal 
and Billy Thompson of the Lexington Herald, prepared to of- 
fer some tips to coaches on the subjects of training practices 
and newspaper publicity. 

The usual television party and dinner for visiting coaches 
is planned again at Joyland Casino where several TV sets 
will be installed to allow viewing of the football contest be- 
tween the College All-Stars and the pro champion Ceveland 
Browns taking place in Chicago. 

— Ky. Sports Publicity, Ken Kuhn. 



THE FLYING DUTCHMAN 

(Continued from Page Seven) 
that joining Stanford's Ralph Leedy as re- 
cipients of the honor award for the month 
of April are Board Members Russ William- 
son, Roy Eversole, W. B. Jones, "Johnny" 
Crowdus, Jack Dawson, Louis Litchfield, Bob 
Forsythe and Ken Gillaspie. There will be 
few ever to receive the award who will de- 
serve it more than these men who have 
given so much of themselves for Kentucky's 
kids. 

By the way, here's a short shot for those 
basketball coaches already thinking about 
next season's play. The Commissioner has 
ruled that Kentucky will use the narrow foul 
lanes during the season of 1956-57, so don't 
buy any paint this year. 

Two more Kentucky communities are 
getting ready to go big-time in their com- 
munity recreation programs. The Dutchman 
has already been to Stanford this month 
and is packing shortly for a "hop" to Pa- 
ducah to help with recreation planning there. 
The Dutchman is looking forward to seeing 
Ralph McRight, newly elected president of 
the Coaches Association, and Otis Dinning, a 
top flight coach if Kentucky ever had one, 
down in the Purchase country. 

Can't help thinking, as we sign off our 
last Dutchman article for the season, how 
much fun it has been to have been with you 
in your communities, and to have written a 
few Dutchman columns, and how privileged 
anybody is to be a Kentuckian. 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY 1956 



Why Play Football? 

One of the high school coach's major problems is allaying 
parental fear over the health and safety of the boys. At North 
Chicago (Illinois) High School. Coach Tom Parker does this 
with a direct mailing piece to the parents of all squad mem- 
bers. Entitled "Why Football?" his letter is a model of sane, 
sensible, and objective logic. 

Dear Parent: 

Why should your son play football ? Why should 
he run the risk of severe injury? What good does 
football do him ? He comes home late for meals . . . 
he's busy after school and can't earn any money 
. . . his time isn't his own ... he won-ies about 
winning games ... he comes home dead tired. 

Is football worth all this sacrifice and effort? 

These are the questions that run through every 
parent's mind. As a coach, I feel obligated to answer 
them. And I believe I have the answers — answers 
which I've thought out for myself, which I'd give 
to myself if my own son were concerned. Believe 
me, I'm deeply aware of the heavy responsibility 
invested in me in the care and health of your sons. 

To me, football isn't just a game to be won or 
lost. It's deeply meaning-ful experience in the lives 
of gi-owing younsters. 

During the coming months, your son will be 
required to follow a strict and stringent set of 
rules. He'll either abide by these rules or be dis- 
missed from the team — thus experiencing the dis- 
cipline so essential in a democratic society. 

What's more, your sons will frame these rules 
themselves, as well as the punishments for infrac- 
tions — affording another lesson in democratic ac- 
tion. 

Our government is based on democracy, and 
our economic system is predicated on the capital- 
istic principle of competition. What agency in the 
educational field embodies a more vivid lesson in 
competition than an athletic contest such as foot- 
ball? 

Your son will learn the meaning and value of 
competition on the practice and game fields. First 
of all, he will compete with others for his position 
on the team. Secondly, he will compete against 
other sons from other schools. 

Your son will learn: 

1. That he must get along with his teammates. 
(Community living.) 

2. That he will have to work hard to make the 
team. (Anything worthwhile in life is worth work- 
ing for.) 

3. That things won't always go his way. (Ad- 
justing to the adversities of life.) 

4. That the only way to prevent these set- 
backs is through finding out what caused them and 
then trying to eliminate them by self-improvement. 

Your son will learn that difficult situations 
and setbacks are inevitable . . . that he must learn 
to "take" them in stride . . . that it doesn't pay to 
feel sorry for himself when they do occur . . . 
that it's necessary to readjust and try to improve 
himself. 

These are but a few of the many benefits to 
be derived from football. There are many others. 
Football is a contact sport — man against man, 
l)rawn against brawn, brain against brain. To make 



the squad, your son will have to be smart, aggres- 
sive, and coachable. 

The danger of serious injury is extremely re- 
mote. We have the best equipment available for 
your son's protection. I personally am a stickler 
for conditioning and can assure you that your son 
will be in top physical condition for every game. 

However, in order to do this, I will require him 
to work hard and he may come home dead tired at 
times. But even this, I believe, is better than having 
him ride around in hot rods or hang around in gangs 
until late hours. 

I could go on and on with my conception of 
the benefits of athletic competition. But this mes- 
sage has already stretched out farther than intended, 
and I'd like to sum up my feelings. 

The coaches at North Chicago are determined 
to implant a high standard of moral and social 
behavior in the athletes of our school. And it should 
be reassuring to know that your son will be assoc- 
iating with other boys whose behavior standards 
approximate his own. 

Some of your sons will be able to obtain a free 
college education through athletic scholarships. But 
even the least talented of your sons will profit by 
the lesson in democratic living engendered by ath- 
letic competition. 

Speaking for myself and the rest of my staff, I 
want you to feel free to contact any of us on any 
questions pertaining to your son or our football 
program. I hope it will be possible to meet the par- 
ents of every boy on my squad. This, however, is up 
to the parents themselves. 

I hope this note has answered some of your 
questions. I hope it has clearly explained my feel- 
ings and the policies of our coaching staff. In clos- 
ing, I'd like to relay one parting thought: The ju- 
venile delinquency rate among high school athletes 
is practically zero! 

Sincerely, 

Thomas F. Parker, 

Football Coach, North Chicago H.S. 

— Scholastic Coach 



MINUTES OF THE ANNUAL MEETING 

(Continued from Page One) 

in By-Law 10, Undue Influence, be tabled. The 
motion was carried. 

Clyde Lassiter moved, seconded by John Heber, 
that Proposal XVIII, providing that additional State 
Basketball Tournament passes be given to member 
schools and superintendents, be tabled. The motion 
was carried. 

John Heber moved, seconded by James E. 
Bazzell, that Proposal XIX, providing that each 
K.H.S.A.A. member school shall receive four passes 
to the regional tournament and each superintendent 
of a participating school district shall receive two 
passes to the regional tournament, be tabled. The 
motion was carried unanimously. 

John Heber moved, seconded by Clyde Lassiter, 
that Proposal XX, setting up a plan for declaring 
K.H.S.A.A. football class champions, be tabled. The 
motion was lost. Charles Snyder moved, seconded 
by Alton D. Rudolph, that Proposal XX be adopted. 
The motion was lost. 

Clyde Lassiter moved, seconded by T. T. Knight, 
that Proposal XXI, providing that the date limit 
for selecting opposing teams for Kentucky high 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY 1956 



Page Eleven 



school bowl games shall be October 31, be tabled. 
The motion was carried. 

Roy Dorsey moved, seconded by Clyde Lassiter, 
that Proposal XXII, naming certain periods during- 
which bands may play at basketball games, be 
tabled. The motion was cai-ried. 

Clyde Lassiter moved, seconded by Arthur 
Mullins, that Proposal XXIII, regarding the resi- 
dence of a basketball official with respect to school 
teams for which he works, be tabled. The motion 
was carried. 

Oran C. Teater moved, seconded by Clyde Las- 
siter, that Proposal XXIV, providing that regional 
basketball tournament games be played on a neutral 
floor, be tabled. The motion was carried. 

Clyde Lassiter moved, seconded by Kenneth 
Kuhnert, that Proposal XXV, providing that an 
official must be rated among the top three in reg- 
ional tournament selections in order to qualify for 
selection as a State Tournament official, be tabled. 
The motion was carried. 

John Heber moved, seconded by Henry Ed 
Wright, that Proposal XXVI, providing that K.H. 
S.A.A. files or other material concerning schools or 
people involved in protests or hearings shall be open 
to any school or individual requesting said informa- 
tion, be adopted. Prin. Charles S. Combs, who had 
submitted the proposal, moved to amend the pro- 
posal by substituting "school officials" for "schools" 
and by deleting "individuals." The motion to amend 
was seconded by W. B. Sydnor and was carried. 
The amended motion was then put to a vote, and 
was lost. 

Clyde Lassiter moved, seconded by Denzil J. 
Ramsey, that Proposal XXVII, providing that dis- 
trict, regional, and state basketball tournament 
trophies and awards be furnished by the K.H. S.A.A. 
be tabled. The motion was carried. 

T. T. Knight offered the follovnng motion: 
"Mr. Chairman: In light of the service that Lyman 
V. Ginger has made to this organization and 
others in the state, I move that the Kentucky High 
School Athletic Association go on record as en- 
dorsing him as a candidate for First Vice-President 
of the National Education Association." The mo- 
tion was seconded by Herschel Roberts, and was 
carried unanimously. 

After some announcements concerning spring 
sports had been made by Commissioner Sanford, 
Clyde Lassiter moved, seconded by R. C. Hinsdale, 
that the meeting adjourn. The motion was carried. 

The dinner meeting of the Association was held 
in the Crystal Ballroom oft he Brown Hotel, at 
6:00 P. M., with more than 300 delegates and other 
school officials present. Several singing and danc- 
ing-g acts were presented by members of the Jeffer- 
son County recreation group. The Flying Dutchman, 
Charlie Vettiner, introduced Bob Kirchdorfer, who 
had won the Game Guy Award the first time in 
1949. He introduced the 1956 Game Guy, Eddie Gin- 
ter, of the Montgomery County High Sohool. Dr. 
Henry H. Hill, President of George Peabody College 
for Teachers, Nashville, Tennessee, gave the address 
of the evening. Dr. Hill's subject was "Athletics and 
Education: Rivals or Partners?" The speaker's talk 
was well received by the school men present, many 
of whom had been in his classes when he was on 
the College of Education faculty at the University 
of Kentucky. 



1955-56 ANNUAL REPORT 

(Continued from Page Two) 

V. Ginger, and eighteen football officials took the 
National Federation football examination for the 
hig-her ratings. The basketball clinics were conducted 
by Charlie Vettiner, as was the School for Basket- 
ball Officials. Mr. Vettiner held fourteen clinics. 
Additional meeting-s and clinics were held by the 
regional representatives who continued to render a 
fine service to the officials and schools in their 
respective areas. One hundred twenty-four officials 
took the basketball examination, with nineteen 
being added to the "certified" list and fifty-four 
receiving the "approved" rating. 

Three hundred twelve schools insured their 
athletes under the K.H. S.A.A. Protection Fund this 
year. Three thousand, eight hundred seventeen boys 
were insured in football; 6,324 in all sports except 
football; and 211 in Physical Education. Six hun- 
dred ninety-eig'ht claims, amounting to $15,310.29, 
have been paid to date. This figure is approximately 
$1,700.00 more than the amount reported a year 
ago for a comparable period of time. The Board of 
Control for 1955-56 gave each member school insur- 
ing its athletes in the Protection Fund a credit of 
$30.00. To date this free insurance has cost the Asso- 
ciation $11,000.00, this amount having been trans- 
ferred from the General Fund to the Protection Fund. 

Two schools have been suspended from the 
Association this year, and two placed on proba- 
tion. One suspension came as a result of the 
violation of K.H. S.A.A. By-Law 17, Practice of 
Sportsmanship; the other for violation of By-Law 
1, Section 7, Certification of Ineligible Player. Both 
of the schools placed on probation were judged 
guilty of having violated By-Law 17. 

Interest in spring sports continues to increase. 
Twenty schools sent entries to the State Swimming 
Meet, which was held in Lexington on April 7 under 
the supei-vision of the State Swimming' Committee. 
One hundred twenty-two member schools have in- 
dicated that they will send teams to the twelve 
regional track meets. The interest in baseball, as 
indicated by the number of teams going to the 
forty district tournaments each spring, continues 
to increase from year to year. The number of tennis 
and golf teams continues to grow. 

1955-56 has been a good year for the K.H. S.A.A. 
The Association's new office building was com- 
pleted in September of 1955. An "open house" was 
held in the building on October 22, to which school 
administrators, coaches, officials; and representa- 
tives of press, radio, and television were invited. 
Since that time, the K.H. S.A.A. staff has had the 
privilege of welcoming- many representatives of 
the member schools throughout the state who have 
visited the State Office. The State Basketball 
Tournament set a new record in attendance and re- 
ceipts, and the finances of the Association continue 
to remain in excellent condition because of the tour- 
nament receipts. 

The program of the K.H. S.A.A. is an ever 
expanding one, and it is with sincere aippreciation 
that we recognize the assistance of our school men, 
who have been most cooperative in furthering the 
projects and activities of the Association. Sugges- 
tions for the improvement of the Association are 
always welcomed by the members of the Board of 
Control and by the Commissioner. 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY 1950 



JLiP: 



layer 



(The following praver was offered bv Dr. 


Blake Smith at 


the Texas-Baylor football game on November 7, 


1953. We agree 


with the editors of The Illinois Interscholastic 


:. the Wisconsin 


and Michigan Bulletins who, in reprinting 


it. wrote, "the 


praver expresses in such a fine wav the bas 


ic philosophy of 


inter-school athletics that it is reproduced 


here for vour 


thoughtful consideration.") 




"Dear God and Father of our lives: 




For one brief moment our voices 


are still, our 



excitement is relaxed and we lift our minds and 
hearts heavenward. And no sooner do we lift them 
than some things become clear, as when the sun 
suddenly breaks through the clouds that envelop us. 

It is clear that Thou has given to us life with 
many different shades and colors. For this we are 
grateful. We humbly accept the fact that some 
things in our lives are not very important. They 
are to be enjoyed but not taken to seriously. The 
occasion that brings us together today is one of 
those happy interludes in life. Help us to accept it 
as such. 

In Thy presence we know that no issues of great 
importance are going to be settled here this after- 
noon. No souls are g'oing to be lost or saved by the 
final figures on the scoreboard. No great cause is 
at stake. It is one of those pleasures which Thou 
hast meant for Thy children to enjoy. Do not let us 
spoil it by forgetting that it is just a game — to be 
enjoyed today, talked about tomorrow and forg'otten 
the day afterward. Keep us mindful of this, dear 
God, for we are human and we easily lose our per- 
spective and allow the things that are most impor- 
tant to become the victim of the things that are 
least important. 

In Thy presence it is clear that the really im- 
portant thing here today is not the visible score 
but the invisible spirit which all of us — players and 
spectators alike — shall manifest. For the young men 
who play, our prayer is that they shall maintain the 
spirit of good sportsmanship throughout every mo- 
ment of the game. If possible, preserve their bodies 
from physical injury, but because it is more import- 
ant, preserve their minds and souls from every un- 
worthy intention or act. 

For ourselves, our prayer is that we shall have 
a kindly spirit which transcends our separate loy- 
alties; that we shall be careful to show good man- 
ners as becomes mature people; and that every 
thought, word and deed of ours shall strengthen 
the bonds of admiration and respect between these 
two fine schools. May we be gracious in defeat or 
humble in victory. 

We make this prayer sincerely, for we know 
that when the spirit and the act are good and right, 
everybody wins and nobody loses. So let it be with 
us here today. 

For Thy names' sake. Amen. 

— Texas Jnterscholastic Leaguer. 



The Educational Yardstick 

In these columns, and in many others, we fre- 
(juently read that all parts of the total high school 
program must be justified from the standpoint of 
educational results. We have heard that anything 
that does not square itself with this educational 
yard-stick should be made to conform or to be 
thrown overboard. Good, sound advice, too; if you 
don't get picayunish about it; yes, or downright 
silly. 

In the days of the sacred "Seven Cardinal Prin- 



ciples," school administrators and teachers, dazzled 
by this shiny new measuring gadget, sometimes went 
to ridiculous extremes. Attempts were made to 
measure each small facet of the whole educational 
experience in terms of these "Principles." For ex- 
ample, a school administrator was reported to have 
discarded a geometry text because it said nothing 
about the worthy use of leisure! This winter spent 
an unprofitable portion of a summer graduate course 
in counting the number of pages in each of a dozen 
civics texts which could be said to meet the ob- 
jectives of the "Holy Seven." Reported on this earth- 
shaking piece of research with a perfectly straight 
face, too. Probably there wasn't much wrong with 
the "Principles," only with some foolish people who 
went overboard in trying to use them. 

Carrying this idea to another field, it is doubtful 
that a rummage sale by the women of a church 
group can, in itself, be justified as a religious ex- 
perience. Yet, there has been no concerted move- 
ment directed against rummage sales. 

It is just as problematical that all forms of 
extra-curricular and interscholastic activities can 
always be measured by a stern educational yard- 
stick. Certain phases of these programs keep slip- 
ping out from under the ruler and refuse to be 
measured. But there is usually something that will 
justify the progi-am, and no one with good sense 
would root out a tree because it had a few bare 
branches. Neither would they disband the Ladies 
Aid because their rummage sale and silver teas do 
not, in themselves, contain promise of eternal life. 

Many of the pleasant, but not necessarily impor- 
tant, facets of school and church life do not directly 
or immediately further the ultimate and final aims 
of these groups. Yet, we ask ourselves what a 
church would be like without such unified efforts 
as a rummage sale. Furthermore, it is doubtful that 
a school can provide the best possible environment 
for the learning process without such pleasant things 
as basketball games, debate activities, music festi- 
vals, etc. Without such as these, 't would be a drab 
place, indeed. 

— The Illinois Interscholastic. 



Ten Commandments of Sportsmanship 

1. Thou shalt be loyal in the support of your own 
team, winning or losing. 

'1. Thou shalt be generous in applauding the ex- 
cellent play of an opponent. 

3. Thou shalt be modest in victory and refrain 
from gloating over your opponent. 

4. Thou shalt not give alibis or excuses for defeat. 

5. Thou shalt not criticize, publicly, an official of 
the game nor treat him with rudeness or dis- 
courtesy. 

(3. Thou shalt not seek to win by tactics that are 
not fair or clearly within the rules. 

7. Thou shalt be considerate of an injured oppon- 
ent as a fel'ow human being in distress. 

8. Thou shalt not belittle, jeer, nor discourteously 
address an opponent on the field or in the grand- 
stand. 

9. Thou shalt not criticize nor exhibit contempt foi' 
a player who makes a mistake or fails to live 
up to your expectations in the game. 

10. Thou shalt congratulate your opponent at the 
end of the contest, win or lose, on a game well- 
played. 

— Inter-High School Council, 
Seattle, Washington. 



W. S. HUNT 



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1 ^YST0p g[^ 



PHONE 104 



C. A. BYRN, JR. 



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HUNT^S ATHLETIC GOODS CO. 

MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 



ITS PLAY TIME 

Outdoor playground programs will be conducted in many schools during 
summer months. 

Our stock is complete on all types of playground and play time equip- 
ment. 
Try our "WE SHIP THE DAY YOU BUY" service on: 

Basketballs 

Basketball goals 
Volleyballs 

Volleyball nets and posts 
Playground balls of all sizes 
Softballs and softball bats 

Badminton racquets, shuttlecocks 
Nets and complete badminton sets 

Regulation horseshoes in steel and rubber 
Shuffleboard sets and supplies 
Tennis racquets, nets and balls 
If you plan to have baseball in connection with your recreation program, 
we have a complete stock of uniforms, shoes, bats, balls and gloves in 
Little League, Babe Ruth League and regulation sizes. 

Please write or call for complete information and prices, and our salesmen 
will be glad to call or give you any information and assistance you may 
need. 

Thanks to our many friends and customers who visited us in Louisville 
during the 1956 K.E.A. Convention. It was nice to have you and we ap- 
preciate the nice business that you gave us for the present spring and 
summer season as well as the coming fall and winter season of football 
and basketball. 




Hunt's Athletic Goods Co 




THE LARGEST INDEPENDENT EXCLUSIVE ATHLETIC HOUSE IN THE SOUTH 



ORDER YOUR FALL ATHLETIC 
EQUIPMENT NOW m 

HAVE A HAPPIER VACATION 

Soon the summer vacation period will be in full swing all 
over Kentucky. We hope your vacation will be pleasant, 
refreshing and relaxing. 

One thing that can add to your pleasure is to eliminate 
all worry about fall athletic equipment before you close up 
shop. Check over your football and basketball equipment 
now. Order what you need. Then that worry will be off your 
mind and you'll be ready for action when school opens in the 
fall. We'll be glad to be of service. Let us hear from you. 

A PERSONAL NOTE 

We want to thank you, our friends the Superintendents, 
Principals and Coaches, for the many orders you have placed 
with us during the past school year. We appreciate it. We have 
enjoyed the pleasant association. We shall do everything pos- 
sible to deserve your continued confidence. 



(OTHE 

^^--■y^^-^^r^T- - - ■j\- ■J\- ■j\ COMPANY 


225 South Fourth Street 
LOUISVILLE 1, KENTUCKY 



P.S. If you need personal summer vocation equipment, drop us a line. 

P.P.S. It was good to have been able to renew acquaintances with so 

many of you at the State Basketball Tournament and the K.E.A.