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Full text of "Athlete, The"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/athletethe195657unse 





Hiqh School Athlete 






NEWPORT CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOL BASEBALL TEAM 
K. H. S. A. A. CHAMPION-1956 







(Left to Right) Front Row: Mgr. Thiery, Stevens. Capt. Ferring, 
Mershon, Welscher, Belting. Carr. Shea. D. Schneider, Myer, Mgr. LeDonne. 
Second Row: Rev. Hegenauer (Prin. ). Coach Connor, Rice, Ruwe. Scheidel, 
Schwartz, Sena, JSiles, Ass't. Coach G. Schneider, Rev. John P. Reilly 
(Ass't. Prin.) 







Official Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 

AUGUST - 1956 




Kentucky High School Track Meet 



Lexington, Kentucky, May 18-19, 1956 

VALLEY HIGH SCHOOL TRACK TEAM— K.H.S.A.A. CHAMPION- 



■1956 




(Left to Right) Mgr. Keys, Metcalfe, Zipperlein, Mitchell, Thompson, Coach Bruce. Lacefield, Shelton, 
Voffel, Craig, Dening. Not in picture: Carter. 



120 Yard Hurdles— 

1. Hogg — Lafayette 

2. Havcraft — Eastern 

3. Vogel— Valley 

4. Fultz— Ashland 

5. Hammond — Bardstown 

*Time: 14.9 
100 Yard Dash— 

1. Shelton — Valley 

2. Lowen — Atherton 

3. Merritt— M.M.I. 

4. Parker— St. Xavier 

5. Bryant — Henderson 

Time: 10.1 
Mile Run— 

1. Plummer — Danville 

2. Whelan — St. Joseph 

3. Wood— Highlands 

4. Joseph — Shawnee 

5. Poore — Walton-Verona 

*Time: 4:33.8 
880 Yard Relay— 

1. Valley 

2. duPont Manual 

3. Henderson 

4. Henry Clay 

5. Eastern 

Time: 1:32.7 
110 Yard Dash— 

1. Lowen — Atherton 

2. Rutledge — Ashland 

3. Gum— Henry Clay 

4. Pinson — Henderson 

5. Baker — Dixie Heights 

Time: 51:5 
180 Yard Hurdles— 



4. Cleaver — Bourbon Co. 

5. Tucker — Shawnee 

Time: 2:01.2 
229 Yard Dash— 

1. Shelton— Valley 

2. Lowen — Atherton 

3. Bryant — Henry Clay 

4. White— Henry Clay 

5. Merritt— M.M.I. 

Time: 23.6 
Mile Relay— 



1. 
2, 

3. 

1. 
5. 



Valley 

duPont Manual 

Shawnee 

Danville 

Murray 



Shot 



Time: 3:35.8 



Put— 

1. Shaw — Tilghman 

2. Tharp— Fern Creek 

3. Carter — Valley 

4. Rhodes — Tilghman 

5. Pappas — Wilmore 

*Distance: 52' 6 
Pole Vault — ■ 



1/2 



Murphy — Lafayette 
W h i t e — H o 1 m es 
Hipp — Tilghman 
Sadosky — Highlands 
Young — Clay 
Craig — Valley 

Height 
Discus — 



1. 

1. 
3. 
4. 
4. 

4. 



11' 4" 



1. 



Adams — Highlands 
Hogg — Lafayette 
Vogel — Valley 
Haycraft — Eastern 
Maguire — Somerset 

Time: 21.4 
880 Yard Run— 

1. Plummer — Danville 

2. Buchanan — Murray 

3. Myers — Shawnee 



3. 

4. 
5. 

Broad 

1. 
2 

3'. 



Everett— M.M.I. 
White — Holmes 
Grissom — Atherton 
Tharp — Fern Creek 
Carter — Valley 

''Distance: 157' 5" 
Jump — 

Wolff — Shawnee 
Smith — duPont Manual 
Mendell — Bellevue 

4. Marcum — London 

5. Henson — Southern 

Distance: 21' 1 1/4" 



High Jump — 

1. Haycraft — Eastern 
■1. Mitchell— Valley 

2. Schuette — Henderson 
4. Reader — St. Xavier 
4. Williams — Dayton 

4. Murphy — Lafayette 
4. Hogg- — Lafayette 
4. Westmeier — St. Xavier 
4. White — Danville 

*Height: 6' 2" 
*New Record 

TOTAL POINTS 

Valley 38</ 2 

Atherton 17 

Lafayette 16 

Shawnee 15 

Danville UVi 

Eastern 13 

Henderson (City) 12'/ 2 

duPont Manual 12 

Tilghman 11 

Highlands 10 

M.M.I. 10 

Holmes 9 

Henry Clay 7 

Ashland 6 

Fern Creek 6 

Murray 5 

St. Joseph 4 

Bellevue 3 

St. Xavier 3 

Bourbon Co. Voc. 2 

London 2 

Bardstown 1 

Clay 1 

Dixie Heights 1 

Somerset 1 

Southern 1 

Walton-Verona 1 

Wilmore 1 

Dayton Vi 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XIX— XO. 1 



AUGUST, 1956 



$1.00 Per Year 



Report of Audit 

Louisville, Kentucky, July IS, 1956 
Mr. Theodore A. San ford, Secretary & Treasurer 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 
Lexington. Kentucky 
Dear Sir: 

Pursuant to instructions received, we have made an audit 
of the books and records of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL 
ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION for the period of one year be- 
ginning July 1, 1955, and ending June 30, 1956. In addition, 
we have prepared and attached hereto, statements of the 
Receipts and Disbursements, which, in our opinion, reflect 
the true financial condition of the Association as of June 30, 
1956. 

The Cash Funds on Hand and U. S. Savings Bonds Accounts 
were found to be correct and verified by letter from your 
depositories. 

We find the records presented to us for the purpose of 
audit to be in agreement and in good condition. 
Respect fullv submitted, 
JOHNSON-FOWLER & COMPANY 
by Huet L. Johnson 
Certified Public Accountant 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL 
ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

PERIOD FROM JULY 1, 1955 TO JUNE 30. 1956 
STATEMENT OF 
RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
RECEIPTS: 

Balance in Checking Account July 1. 1935 $ 17.238.12 

Annual Dues - 433 ■• S3.00___ .__$ 1,299.00 

Officials' Dues — 

Football - 302 .. S3. 00 906.00 

Basketball - 1104 / S3.00 .. 3.312.00 

Reciprocitv Officials — 

Football - 22 S SI. 00 22.00 

Basketball - 21 (5 SI. 00 21.00 

Officials' Fines - 14 ■> S5.00 70.00 

School Fines - 11 .. S5.00 35.00 

Redeposits (Bad checks made good > 15.00 

Advertising in Magazine 800.00 

Sale of Rules Books 133.30 

Sale of Equipment 680.00 

Sale of Bonds 41,738.50 

Ticket Sales - Annual Meeting 87.50 

Interest Received from Government Bonds 1,452.50 
Interest Received from Union Federal 

Loan Association 275.00 

Transferred Torn Union Federal Loan 

Association Savings Account 7.000.00 

Short-term Loan _ 15,000.00 

Transferred from State Basketball 

Tournament Account 89,768.02 

Refunds 846.86 

Receipts - State Baseball Tournament 572.50 164.054.18 

181,292.30 

DISBURSEMENTS: 

Board of Control Expense $ 5,316.74 

Commissioner's Salary (Base Sal., §10,500) 8,436.24 

Expense - Commissioner's Office 171.62 

Ass't Commissioner's Salarv 

(Base Sal.. §7,500) 6,466.98 

Travel Expense -Assistant Commissioner-- 347.57 

Clerical Help 4.432.17 

Janitor Service 490.80 

Postage 1,276.64 

Office Supplies 416.64 

Janitor Supplies 107.86 

Purchase of New Equipment 6,568.10 

Insurance 512.12 

Equipment Repairs and Service Contracts 227.77 

Office Rent (July - September, 1955) 1,159.80 

Moving Office Equipment 51.50 

Pavment of Short-Term Loan, and Interest 15,300.00 

New Office Building 48,420.20 



Utilities 




608.82 


Tele phi- ne and Telegraph 




937.91 


Investigations - Board of Control 




100.12 


Fidtditv Bonds 




42.50 








Appropriation to Kentuckv Coaches 




Charity Ass'n. 




500.00 


Purchas of National Federation 






Publications _ 




1.906.12 


Delegates to National Federal ion 






Meetings 




4.0S7.37 






116.70 
3011.00 


Girls Division— N.S.G.W.S. 




Rental on Films 




495.00 


Audit _ _ 




50.00 






9.00 


Meals - Annual Banquet 




1.100.00 


Speaker - Annual Banquet 




125.00 


Taxes : 






Federal Income Tax Withheld 


S3, 197. 70 




Social Securitv 


584.76 




City Income Tax Withheld 


239.70 




State Income Tax Withheld 


444.01 


4,466.17 


Transfer of Funds: 






To Savings Accounts 


7.000 no 




To K.H.S.A.A. Protection Fund 


13.000.00 


20.000 on 


Magazine : 






Printing and Kngraving 


3.364.97 






67.75 


3.432.72 






Officials' Division: 






Honorariums and Expenses - 








87S.40 




Printing and Miscellaneous 








56.50 




School for Basketball Officials . 


964.60 




Expenses - Regional Basketball 








222.47 




Officials' Emblems 


392.99 


2,514.96 


Swimming: 






Expenses - State Swimming 








97.25 




Troohies and Medals 








391.50 
65.27 








Officials (State Meet) 


122.40 




Mileage and Local Entertain- 






ment (Stale Meet) . 


1.265.45 


1,941.87 



Golf: 

Mileage and Local Entertain- 
ment (State Tournament) 673.07 

Trophies and Awards 615.09 

Miscellaneous Expenses 46.60 1,334.' 



Tennis : 

Mileage and Local Entertain- 
ment (State Tournament) 226.15 

Trophies and Balls _. 862.37 

Miscellaneous Expenses 25.20 

Refund on Expenses - National 

Tournament _ 100.00 1,213.72 

Track: 

Regional Expense 227.50 

Trophies and Medals .. 1.734.07 

State Committee Expense 472.68 

Officials . 4S0.00 

Mileage and Local Entertain- 
ment (State Meet) 5,543.75 

Miscellaneous Expenses 

(State Meet) 137.57 

New Equipment 77.86 

Labor (State Meet) 20.00 

Films 57.68 

State Clinic 220.00 8,971.11 

(Continued on Page Four) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1956 



AUGUST, 1956 VOL. XIX— NO 1 

Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association. 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor__ THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Russell Williamson (1956-60), Inez 

Vice-President Louis Litchfield (1953-57), Marion 

Directors — W. B. Jones (1953-571 Somerset; W. H. Crowdus 
11954-581. Franklin: Jack Dawson (1954-5S), Middletown ; 
Robert P. Forsythe (1955-591, Greenville; K. G. Gillaspie 
(1955-591, Georgetown; Cecil A. Thornton (1956-611}, Harlan. 
Subscription Rates 51.00 Per Year 

~Trom the Commissions s Office 

Football Clinics 

The 1956 clinics for football officials will be 
conducted by iDt. Lyman V. Ginger, member of the 
National Federation Football Committee. The dates 
and sites of the nine meetings are as follows: 
August 20, K. H. S. A. A. Building, Lexington, 8:00 
P. M. (CDT); August 21, Newport High School, 
8:00 P. M. (EST); August 22, Ashland Y. M. C. A., 
8:00 P. M. (EST); August 23, Pikeville High School, 
8:00 P. M. (EST); August 24, Pineville High School, 
8:00 P. M. (EST); August 27, Kentucky Hotel, 
Louisville, 8:00 P. M. (CDT); August 28, Bowling 
Green High School 8:00 P. M. (CDT); August 29, 
Mavfield High School, 8:00 P. M. (CST); August 
30, Henderson High School, 8:00 P. M. (CDT). 

Registration of Officials 

Previously registered football and basketball 
officials have received their renewal application 
cards for the 1956-57 school year. More than one 
hundred officials failed to file their 1955-56 reports 
on or before the deadline set by the Board of Con- 
trol for the submittting of reports, and it was 
necessary to impose a fine on each official who thus 
failed to comply with Association rules. It is an 
Association requirement that each registered offi- 
cial attend a clinic in the sport in which he is reg- 
istered. Twenty-six football officials and forty- 
seven basketball officials were suspended in 1955- 
56 for failure to attend clinics. Unless an official 
plans to attend one or more clinics during the sea- 
son and to file his report on member schools prompt- 
ly at the end of the season, he should not apply for 
registration in the Officials' Division of the Asso- 
ciation. 

Protection Fund Credit 

The Board of Control in its April meeting- 
voted a dividend credit out of State Basketball 
Tournament funds in the amount of $30.00 to each 
school insuring its athletes in the K. H. S. A. A. 
Protection Fund for 1956-57. Since the fee of each 
player in "All Sports Except Football" is SI. 00, the 
action of the Board is equivalent to giving free 
coverage to each K. H. S. A. A. member school for 
thirty players in all sports but the one mentioned. 
This is the fifth year in which a dividend has been 
declared by the Board. The dividend may be ap- 
plied only as a Protection Fund credit. 

Principals of member schools maintaining foot- 
ball have been mailed a supply of Protection Fund 
examination cards nad summary sheets. Similar 
material will be miled to principls of non-football 
schools within the next few weeks. The coverage 
under the Protection Fund does not begin until 



the summary sheets, listing the players, are mailed 
to the Secretary. These summary sheets are filled 
out by the principal after the completed examina- 
tion cards are in his possession. It is not necessary 
to file the examination cards with the Secretary 
except in support of claims. 

K.H.S.A.A. Leaders 




Russell Williamson 

President 



Louis Litchfield 
Vice-President 



Prin. Russell Williamson of the Inez High 
School, Board of Control member represent- 
ing Section 8, was re-elected President of the 
Board and of the Kentucky High School Ath- 
letic Association at the summer meeting of 
the Board of Control, held on July 27-28. 
Mr. Williamson is beginning a new four-year 
term on the Board. Supt. Louis Litchfield of 
the Crittenden County Schools is the new 
Vice-Presidednt of the Association. He re- 
places Supt. Roy G. Eversole of Hazard, 
whose term on the Board ended on June 30, 
1956. 

Several articles concerning Mr. William- 
son's educational activities have appeared in 
the ATHLETE at various times. He is a 
graduate of Morehead State College, and has 
spent all of his thirty-one years of teaching, 
coaching, and administrative experience at 
Inez. He coached his 1941 basketball team 
to the K.H.S.A.A. championship, and the 
team representing his school was also 
crowned champion in 1954. 

Mr. Williamson is a member of the Baptist 
Church. He also holds membership in the 
Masonic, Elks, and Lions fraternal and civic 
organizations. At the present time he is 
President of the Inez Deposit Bank. 

The new Vice-President, Mr. Litchfield, 
was elevated recently from the principalship 
of the Crittenden County High School to the 
county superintendency. He represets Sec- 
tion 1 on the Board of Control. He is a grad- 
uate of the Blackford High School and of 
Murray State College. Mr. Litchfield had 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1956 



Page Three 



teaching and coaching - assignments at the 
Blackford Junior High School, Fredonia High 
School, Cobb High School, Nebo High School, 
Farmersville High School, Frances High 
School and Crittenden County High School. 
On several occasions he was a member of the 
K.E.A. and K.H.S.A.A. delegate assemblies. 
He was a "certified" official for several years, 
and he was a State Tournament referee four 
times. He is currently a member of the Board 
of Regents of Murray State College. He is a 
deacon of the Marion Baptist Church. 



,-- 



.~mii- 




H. B. Gray 

IN MEMORIAM 

H. B. Gray, Principal of Bowling Green 
High School, died on Monday, May 21, 1956. 
Mr. Gray was born in Warren County and 
was educated in the public schools of his 
native county. He received his undergraduate 
training at Western Kentucky State College, 
graduating in the class of 1926. He later at- 
tended the University of Kentucky where he 
received the M.A. degree in 1932'. 

Mr. Gray spent his entire lifetime, with 
the exception of two years, in teaching and 
administrative positions in Kentucky. Im- 
mediately before coming to Bowling Green 
he spent twelve years as principal of Wood- 
burn High School and also as coach of 
basketball. The last nineteen years of his 
profession he was principal of Bowling Green 
High School. He was principal of a high 
school in Georgia for two years. 

Due to Mr. Gray's unusual ability as an 
educator, he was asked to serve in many 



capacities in the profession. He served as 
president of the Third District Education 
Association, was a director of the Kentucky 
High School Athletic Association for two 
terms, and was chairman of the Credentials 
Committee of the Kentucky Education As- 
sociation at the time of his death. 

Active in the community and church life 
of his native county, Mr. Gray was a Kiwan- 
ian and past president of this international 
organization, and he was a teacher of the 
Men's Bible Class in the Presbyterian Church 
of Bowling" Green. He was also an elder of 
this church. He gave much of his time and 
energy to the work of the International Red 
Cross. 

Mr. Gray's wife was the former Miss Ruby 
Hopper of Woodburn, Kentucky. His son, 
Harry Barcus Gray, is a senior in Western 
Kentucky State College. 

The passing of this educator caused great 
grief in the hearts of the people whom he 
loved and who loved him. His contribution to 
the youth was of such quality that it will 
have lasting effect upon the future citizens 
of Bowling Green. — L.C.C. 



Eastern's Championship Tennis Team 




(Left to Right) .lim Tarr, state singles champion and mem- 
ber of the doubles championship team; Coach Emmett Goran- 
flo: Burton Shelley, of the doubles team. 

Falls Cities Clinic 

Secretary Jack Howerton, Jr. of the Falls Cities 
Football Officials Association writes that final prep- 
arations have been made for the fall football clinic 
of his organization. The clinic will be held on Mon- 
day, August 27, at Maxwell Field, Louisville. The 
clinic will consist of live demonstrations, and Dr. 
Lyman V. Ginger, official K.H.S.A.A. clinic director, 
will be moderator. Veteran football official Fred 
Koster of the Southeastern Conference will also be 
present. This clinic immediately precedes the of- 
ficial K.H.S.A.A. clinic, scheduled to be held at the 
Kentucky Hotel early in the evening on the same 
date. 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 195(5 



REPORT OF AUDIT— 

(Continued from Page One) 

Baseball: 

Refunds on District Tourna- 
ment Deficits 2,447.05 

Trophies and Awards 1,190.01 

Refunds on Regional Tourna- 
ment Deficits 322.96 

Baseballs (State Tournament ) ._ S5.26 

Transportation (State Tourna- 
ment! 592.94 

Meals (State Tournament) 940.00 

Rental and Services - 

Parkway Field 418.60 

Ticket Sellers and Takers 

(State Tournament) 25.00 

Lodging (State Tournament) __ 530.05 

Scorer (State Tournament) 25.00 

Umpires (State Tournament) 127.50 

Expenses - Assistant Manager 

(State Tournament) 3S.00 

Films 508.50 7.250.87 

First National Bank. Trustee, 

Annuity Trust Fund 2,000.00 $165,503.29 

Receipts $181,292.30 

Disbursements 165,503.29 

Cash Balance 15,789.01 

BANK RECONCILEMENT: 

Balance per Bank Statement, 

June 30, 1956 $18,346.48 

Less Outstanding Checks: 

No. 423 $ 34.20 

No. 435 62.50 

No. 562 19.32 

No. 618A 372.50 

No. 633 245.00 

No. 634 5.20 

No. 635 60.75 

No. 636 112.56 

No. 637 16.34 

No. 638 1.629.10 2.557.47 

True Bank Balance June 30, 1956 J15.7S9.01 

FUNDS ON HAND: 

Cash Balance - First National 

Bank & Trust Company. .$15,789.01 

U. S. Savings Bonds 

(Value June 30, 1956) 33,665.00 

Savings Account - Union 

Federal Savings & Loan 
Association 10,000.00 

K.H.S.A.A. Protection Fund... 611.80 



Total Funds on Hand, 
June 30, 1956 __. 



$60,095.81 

Estimated Value of K.H.S.A.A. 

Building and Equipment-. $99,518.47 

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 

1956 STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 

RECEIPTS: 

Ticket Sales 8109.631.25 

Profit on Program 4,070.57 

WLEX-TV 2.000.00 $115,701.82 

DISBURSEMENTS: 

Printing 685.64 

Trophies and Awards 659.60 

Postage 109.66 

Refunds on Tickets 12.00 

Public Liability Insurance 509.20 

Incidental Expenses -(16 Teams) 4.800.00 

Transportation 1,194.69 



Taxi Service for Teams 116.25 

Lodging 3,000.25 

Meals 4.675.35 

Coliseum Rental 3,046.10 

Organist 50.00 

Officials' Fees and Expenses 1,504.90 

Scorers and Timers 400.00 

Shot Chart Keepers and Statisticians 200.00 

Ushers 200.00 

Ticket Sellers. Ticket Takers, and Guards 2,189.00 

Public Address Announcers 125.00 

Telephone and Telegraph 43.89 

Films 345.00 

Towel Service 14.42 

Additional Clerical Help - Ticket Sales.. 81.25 

Graves-Cox Ticket Sales 232.00 

Miscellaneous Expenses - Tournament 

Manager 14.05 

Honorariums and Expenses - Assistant 

Tournament Managers 980.55 

Bad Checks 60.00 

Detective Service 660.00 

Audit 25.00 25,933.80 

Transfer of Funds - Amount transferred 

to K.H.S.A.A. as Tournament Profit.. $ 89.768.02 

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
K.H.S.A.A. PROTECTION FUND 
JULY 1, 1955 TO JUNE 30, 1956 
RECEIPTS: 

Balance in Checking Account 

July 1, 1955 $ 413.12 

Footbali Fees - 3818 @ $2.50 $ 9.545.00 

Fees for All Sports Except 

Football - 6511 m $1.00 6.511.00 

Physical Education Fees - 

211 (S) $.50 105.00 



16.161.50 
Less Credit Allowed 8,399.50 $ 7,762.00 

Redeposits (bad checks made 

good 17.50 

Officials' Insurance Fees 

Football - 26 <S $2.50 65.00 

Basketball - 38 IS $1.00 38.00 103.00 

Cash Transferred from 

K.H.S.A.A. Account 13.000.00 

20,882.50 

Total Receipts $21,295.62 

DISBURSEMENTS: 

Postage $ 100.00 

Printing 276.50 

Refunds on Overpayments 15.00 

Claims Paid: 

Football 13,164.18 

Basketball 4.624.34 

Baseball 419.60 

Track 28.00 

Wrestling 30.00 

Clerical Help 1.635.66 

Taxes: 

Federal Income Tax Withheld 230.10 

Social Security 77.40 

State Income Tax Withheld.. 11.19 

City Income Tax Withheld... 19.35 

Filing and Recording Fee 5.00 

Bad Checks 17.50 

Total Disbursements $20,653.82 

Cash Balance in Bank $641.80 

BANK RECONCILEMENT: 

Balance per Bank Statement. .June 30. 1956 $945.22 

Less Outstanding Checks: 

No. 844 $ 77.50 

No. 846 12.00 

No. 851 71.50 

No. 852 5.00 

No. 854 10.00 

No. 855 40.00 

No. 858 4.95 

No. 859 2.97 

No. 860 79.50 

No. 860 79.50 303.42 

True Balance, June 30, 1956 $641.80 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1956 



Page Five 



K.M.I.s Championship Golf Team 




(Left to Right i Pedley. Howell, loach Richmond. Stigger. 
Canon. 

K.M.I. Golf Team 
Wins State Tournament 

The Kentucky Military Institute golf team won the 1956 
State High School Golf Tournament with the low score of 918. 
The tournament was held at Ft. Knox on June 1-2, and was 
managed by Coach John Hackett. The St. Xavier High School 
team was runnei--up with a score of 936, and Male was third 
with 951. 



George Stigger of K.M.I, was individual champion, with a 
score of 221, and Joe Floden of Male and Ronnie Howell of 
K.M.I, tied for runner-up with scores of 225. Mike Conliffe of 
Flaget was fourth with a score of 226. 

Richard Casabella of Flaget was first in the putting con- 
test, with Harcourt Kemp of Eastern second. Francis Beard of 
3t. Xavier won the approaching contest, and Richard Casabella 
of Flaget was second. In the driving contest Gerald Belcher of 
Bowling Green was first with 245 yards, 8 inches. Terry Lally 
of St. Xavier was second with a drive of 242 yards, ll 1 -,- inches. 

A summary of the individual scores is as follows : 

221— Stigger (K.M.I.) 

225— Floden (Male), Howell (K.M.I. ) 

226— Conliffe (Flaget) 

229— Kemp (Eastern) 

230 — Jones ( Dixie Heights ) , Goeing ( St. Xavier) , Jaggers 
(Caldwell County). Re-Falo (St. Xavier) 

231— Casabella (Flaget) 

233 — Settle (Owensboro), Carrico (Ft. Knox ) , Kennedy 
(Fern Creek) i 

2:^4— Pedley (K.M.I. I T. Lally (St. Xavier), Jim Ramsey 
(Male! 

235 — Harmon ( Danville) 

236— Beard (St. Xaviert, G. Belcher (Bowling Green) 
Knight (Danville), Cody (duPont Manual), Crutcher (Atherton) 

237— Owen (Shawnee) 

238 — Canon (K.M.I. i. Hall (Paintsville), White (Fulton) 

239— Dale (Ft. Knox I 

240 — Jack Ramsey (Male). Watts (Eastern), N. Belcher 
(Bowling Green) 

241 — Patrick (duPont Manual ), Simpson (Atherton) 

242— Ethington ( Shelby ville), Faught (Glasgow) 

214 — McDade ( K.M.I. ) , Rosen (Dixie Heights) , Curry 
(Eastern), Ryan (Holy Trinity) 

245 — McNamara ( Danville) , Cook ( Prestonsburg) , Barrick- 
man (Eastern). Taylor (Greenville) , Harrison (Cumberland) 

246 — Veeneman (Holy Trinity) 

248 — Sheene (Danville) , VanHoose ( Paintsville) 
249 — Shouse (St. Henry), Queenan (Flaget), Wheeler 
(Glasgow) Young ( Owensboro) 



Twenty-Fourth Annual Kentucky High School Tennis Tournament 

Shawnee Park, Louisville — May 21 - 22. 1956 

SINGLES 



Tarr - Eastern QUARTER-FINALS SEMI-FINALS 

1 Tarr - 6-0; 6-0 



Braun - Holmes 

Buschmever - Flaget Buschmever 

1 6-4; 6-4 ' 

Stites - Male 



Tair - 6-0; 6-2 



Hamilton - St. Xavier Hamilton 

^. . I 6-0; 6-2 

Dixius - Bellevue 



Wilson - Owensbor o Rutledge 

4-6; 7-5; 6-2 
Rutledge - Ashland 



Hamilton - 6-4; 6-2 



FINALS 

Tair - 6-1; 6-0 



Fangman - St. Xavier Fangman - 

I 6-4; 9-7 
Travis - Glasgow 



Imhoff - Shawnee 
Bye 

Rupert - Ashland 
Roth - Holmes 

Bibb - Male 

Hag-berg - Bellevue 






Imhoff - 
6-2; 6-8; 8-6 


Imhoff 


Hagberg - 6-3; 6-4 


Rupert - 6-2; 9-7 




Hagberg - 7-5; 6-1 





Imhoff - 6-1; 6-4 



Tarr - 6-1; 6-0 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HrGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1956 

TENNIS DOUBLES 

QUARTER-FINALS 



Eastern 


Eastern 


SEMI-FINALS 

Eastern - 6-2; 6-0 






FINALS 


Bye 


Glasgow 








Glasgow 


Ashland - 
6-1; 4-6; 6-3 




Bye 


Owensboro 


Eastern - 6-2; 6-2 


Owensboro 

. 




Bye 







Ashland 



Bye 



Male 



Flaget 



St. Xavier 



Bve 



Holmes 



Rve 



Bellevue 



Bv» 



Ashland 



Flaget - 
3-6; 6-4; 6-2 









St. Xavier - 6-2; 6-3 


St. Xavier 




Holmes 






Bellevue - 6-3; 6-2 


Bellevue 





Bellevue - 6-3; 6-2 



Schools' Ratings on Basketball Officials 



The following ratings were received on basketball officials 
registered with the K.H.S.A.A. during 1955-56. The numbers 
following each name represent respectively the number of 
Excellent. Good. Fair, and Poor ratings given to the official. 

Adkins. Raymond C, 16-22-6-0; Alexander. Rex E., 17-9-2-0: 
Alexander. William F., 0-1-0-0; Alford. William, 0-15-4-3; 
Allen. Jack R., 4-22-1-0: Allen, Stanley M.. 0-4-1-0: Almond, 
Alvin. 13-9-0-0: Anderson. Elmer D., 11-10-4-3: Armstrong, 
Fred W.. 0-0-1-0; Arnold. Kenneth L.. 14-16-2-1; Arnold, Marvin 
R., 0-1-3-0: Arnzen. Stanley, 0-1-0-0: Ashby, Carl C, 0-5-1-2: 
Ashley, Kenneth, 1-12-6-4 ; Atkinson, Charles D., 0-2-1-0 ; Austin. 
Bruce E.. 4-12-2-0. 



Bailey. Arville. 1-14-0-5; Bailey, 
10-6-2-0 ; Baker. E. C. Jr.. 1-5-2-0 : 



Kerney. 3-1-0-0; Baird, Bill. 
Baker, James E.. 28-21-1-1 ; 



Baldwin, Ronald R.. 0-4-1-1 : Ball, Denver. 0-10-2-1 ; Ballard, 
Clark, 6-5-1-0 : Ballard, Jack H., 9-17-5-1 ; Bandy, Jack. 5-6-5-0 ; 
Barker, Donald, 0-5-1-0 : Barker, Walter D., 3-2-0-0 ; Barlow, 
B'll B.. 0-1-2-1; Barlow. James L.. 4-2-0-0; Barnes, Judson, 
13-2-2-2: Barnett, J. W., 7-27-1-1; Barrett. Jack. 0-1-3-1; Bart- 
ley. Robert E., 0-3-0-0 ; Barton, Walter, 1-4-0-0 : Basham, James 
L., Jr.. 1-1-0-0; Basham. Willard, Jr.. 3-5-1-3: Beaslev. Maurice, 
0-1-0-0 ; Begley, James P.. 6-12-7-2 ; Belcher, Elster E., 0-2-1-0 ; 
Bell. Thomas P.. 21-8-1-1 : Bennett, Bert A., 5-16-10-4 : Bennett. 
Gene. 2-1-0-0 : Bentley. Roy E.. 2-2-3-1 ; Betz. Dick, 23-14-1-7 : 
Bigelow, Ralph, 9-9-2-1 : Binder. Keith. 0-4-1-1 ; Black. Charles 
D., 3-9-3-0 : Black. Clarence, 5-16-6-0 ; Black. Ralph Amos, 
3-6-2-0; Blackburn. Bill, S-6-6-2 ; Blackburn, Clyde W., 6-12-2-1; 
Blackburn, Viley O., 1-5-2-0 ; Blankenship. Zeb, 2-7-3-1 ; Blan- 
ton. Homer. 18-21-5-3 : Blumer. Sherry, 2-3-0-0 ; Bolander. Albert 
J.. 0-4-0-1; Bolin. Herman, 1-5-0-0: Bonner, William, 3-9-0-0; 
Booth, Leonard. 1-6-0-1 ; Bowling, Roy. 0-2-0-0 ; Bowman, Earl 
G. (Dick), 6-7-1-0; Boyd, Thomas. 4-3-1-0; Boyles, Jerry F., 
1-4-2-2 : Bradberry, Calvin. 1-6-0-0 ; Bradshaw. Bill, 0-1-2-2 ; 
Brady. James W., 0-5-0-0 ; Brantlev. Alfred C. 2-18-7-0 ; Brash- 
ears, Bobby F., 3-14-5-2; Bridges, Bennie E.. 18-8-1-0; Brizen- 
dine, Vic, 12-57-10-2 ; Brock. James J.. 0-0-0-1 : Broderick. 
Carroll. 36-28-0-1 ; Brooks, Carroll C, 5-8-2-1 ; Brooks. Charles 
D., 5-7-0-3 ; Brooks, James A., 6-12-5-2 : Brotzge, Maurice J., 
1-6-1-0 ; Brown, Bryant, 5-20-7-0 ; Brown. Carlton. 6-11-3-0 ; 
Brown, Doyle, 0-1-1-0; Brown. James H., 0-0-1-0: Brown, 
James W., 31-24-3-0; Browning, William Henry, 0-1-6-3; Bruce, 
W. D., 0-3-0-2 ; Brugh. Walter J.. 5-8-1-0 ; Brumback, 



Buford, 3-11-7-1; Brummett, Joseph W.. 6-10-1-0; Bryan. Wil- 
liam B., 11-9-2-1 ; Bryant. Jack E., 0-7-4-2 : Bryant. Roy P., 
2-3-2-0; Buchanan. Bobby M.. 0-3-1-2; Buck. Al. 3-3-1-0: Buis. 
Nathaniel, 5-10-3-1 ; Bunnell. Kenneth L., 2-5-2-0 : Burchett. 
Lanier. 4-15-8-1 ; Burke. David L., 0-10-0-0 : Burke. Raymond, 
16-23-4-2 ; Burman, Jack, 0-2-1-0 ; Butcher, Granville, 2-12-1-0 ; 
Butcher. Paul, 2-11-2-3 ; Butler, Donald Alexander, 0-21-8-6 ; 
Butts. Delbert L., 0-2-0-0. 

Caldwell. James, 0-1-2-0 : Calhoun. Foster C. 5-8-4-1 ; 
Campbell, John D.. 13-12-1-0 : Campbell. John E.. Jr., 20-20-0-1 : 
Campbell, William C. 1-3-3-0 ; Carpenter. Bill, 10-33-7-2 ; Car- 
penter. Leonard F., 0-0-0-1 : Carr, Scott B.. 0-3-0-1 ; Carter, 
Gene S.. 3-0-1-0 ; Cartwright. James F., 18-29-2-2 ; Case, David 
A.. 11-10-4-0: Case. Martin A., 0-2-1-1; Cassady. Charles W., 
13-31-3-2: Cassadv, Richard, 20-21-4-S; Casteel. Ralph M.. 2-10- 
1-0 ; Cates, Vernon R., 0-7-3-0 : Caudill. Gary A., 0-6-3-0 : 
Chadwell, Lester, 2-0-0-0 ; Chandler, James. 0-3-1-0 ; Chaney. 
Joseph G.. 17-21-2-1; Chattin, Charles, 15-11-1-4; Chattin, 
Ernie. 1-1-0-0 ; Chestnut. Ray, 0-2-0-0 : Chilton. William R.. 
0-0-1-1; Chumbler. W. W.. 3-11-4-0: Ciolek, Robert W.. 0-2-0-0; 
Clark. Charles E., 21-18-0-5 ; Clark, Owen B.. 1-2-1-0 : Clark, 
Tom, 1-12-4-0 ; Coe. Jimmy. 1-4-0-0 ; Coffey. Kenneth B., 5-26- 
3-4; Cole, Lvnn M.. 7-23-3-3: Coleman. L. J. "Duke", Jr.. 4-15- 
3-2 ; Combs. James Glenn, 6-12-2-2 ; Combs. Raymond. 3-8-2-2 ; 
Combs, Roy B.. 1-5-3-0 ; Combs, Travis, 4-17-4-6 : Compton, 
Marvin L., 1-8-3-0: Conley. George. 24-6-2-1: Conley. Tom W., 
0-2-1-0 : Connor. James R.. 3-4-0-0 ; Connor, Neal. 4-3-0-0 ; 
Coomer, Charles, Jr., 2-6-0-1 ; Cooper, John Wellington, 8-14- 
4-0 ; Cooper. Warren. 21-8-2-0 ; Coppage. Donald L., 0-4-0-0 ; 
Cornn, Harold. 3-8-0-0 ; Cotton, Larry Joe, 1-3-4-0 ; Coulter, 
William M., 0-1-0-0; Cox, C. Glenn, 0-1-0-0; Cox, Layton. 12-22- 
9-4 ; Cox, William J.. 2-22-2-0 ; Craft, James T., 0-1-2-0 ; Craig. 
John G., 2-23-2-1; Craig, Randy. 1-2-1-0; Cravens. Earl F., 
0-1-0-0: Crawford. Fred T„ 8-24-8-2; Creasey, Fred, 1-5-1-0; 
Creech. Harvey. 1-5-1-0 ; Crosthwaite, John S„ Jr.. 2-17-2-3 ; 
Crowe. Emmett H., 0-1-0-0; Crutcher, Joseph L.. 0-2-1-2: Cub- 
bage, Tom, 3-5-1-1 ; Cullivan, Jim, 2-9-0-0 ; Cummins, Albert B., 
3-15-4-3; Cummings. Dale A- 5-7-2-2; Current, Ellis R., 0-1-2-1; 
Curtis. James E., 2-12-4-4; Curtis, Robert L.. 0-3-0-0. 

Damico, Ernie. 3-8-1-0; Damron. William B., 0-3-0-0; 
Davenport, Robert B.. 0-3-4-0 : Davenport, William T., 0-1-1-0 ; 
Davis, Donald, 13-16-3-2 ; Davis, Dwight R., Jr., 4-16-5-2 ; Davis, 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1956 



Pae-e Seven 



Kentucky High School Baseball Tournament 

Parkway Field, Louisville, Kentucky 



Lafayette (0) 



Murray (6) 



Henderson (7) 



McKell (4) 



Fort Knox (1) 



June 1-2, 1956 



Murray (5) 



Henderson (4) 



Newport Catholic (3) 



Newport Catholic (2) 



Southern ( 1 ) 



Elkhorn City (0) 



Southern (0) 



Murray (3) 



Newport Catholic (4) 



Newport Catholic-Champion 



Ralph E., 15-10-3-n : Decker. William K.. 7-2-0-0: DeCoursey, 
Edgar. 32-10-2-0: DeMoisey, Fox. 14-38-4-0; DeMoisey, Truett 
R.. 17-41-3-0: Deskins. Tilden, 9-13-2-0: DeVary. Blackie. 
1-1-0-0: Dexter. Glenn E.. 0-1-0-0: Dexter. Sam. 0-14-2-1: Dial, 
Jack W., 2-0-0-0: Diddle. Eddie A.. Jr.. 21-11-2-1: DiMuzio, 
Robebrt. 0-1-0-0; Dixon. Sam. 0-0-0-1; Dobson. Kenneth, 12-18- 
6-1: Doehring. D. E. iButchi. 1-13-3-0: Dotson. John B.. 33-7- 
5-0: Downing. Dero. '.hi. 21-1-2: Downing. Thomas E.. 0-1-1-2; 
Doyle. Donald, 0-3-0-0; Drake. Richard R.. li-lrt-1-1 ; Duerson, 



0-1-0-1 : Duncan. Earl S.. 
-6-0-1 : Dunn. Sherley Ray. 



6-26-3-4 : 
1-11-3-0 



Duncan. Hick- 
Durkin, Jack 



Robert W., 
man E.. 
H.. 27-34- 

Eades, Jimmy, 0-4-0-2; Eads, Walter, 0-11-6-6: Earle. 
Herschel G„ 0-2-0-0: Eaton, James M.. 0-18-15-4; Eddings. For- 
rest. 2-10-2-1; Edelen. Ben R.. 24-30-1-3; Edens. Ray D.. 0-2-1-1; 
Edwards. Hubert. 0-1-0-0; Elkin. Benjamin J., 0-0-1-0: Elling- 
ton. James E.. 5-22-5-1: Ellis, Jack D„ 1-0-0-0; Ellspermann. 
George. 14-8-0-2: Elovitz. Carl. 0-11-2-0; Klrod. Turner, 
37-31-1-1: Engle. Orville, 1-0-1-0: Estes. A. D.. 0-4-1-0: Evans. 
James W., 2-5-1-1: Everett. Harold E.. 2-2-0-0; Ewing, C. M. 
iHopl. 2-19-17-5. 

Faber, William F.. 0-1-1-0; Fagues. 
ning, Homer. 9-11-1-1; Farley. James F., 
Clay "Jack". 0-7-1-0 ; Farmer. John H., 
T.. 32-20-0-5: Fey. Allen. 1-10-2-0: Fields. 
Charles Raymond, 6-2-3-1 ; Fish. Earl 
W. B.. 0-3-1-0; Fitchko. Bill. 51-12-1-1; 
Ford. Douglas. 0-0-0-2 ; Forrest. Billy 



Robert. 22-11-0-0; 
14-16-2-1 ; Fraley, 



Homer, 4-11-8-1; Fan- 

0-1-1-0 : Farmer. John 

1-5-1-1 ; Ferrell. Doctor 

Joe D., 3-19-3-0: Figg. 

G.. 8-21-5-1 : Fisher. 

Flynn. Bobby, 27-33-7-8 : 

Joe, 2-2-1-0: Forsythe. 



Foster, William R-. 10-30-7-2 ; Fraley. James 
William L.. 0-1-0-0; Franc. Anthony E.. 



7-4-3-0: Fritz. Sherman. 10-45-2-0: Fryman. 
Fugate. Johnnie. 1-0-0-0 : Fugate. E. Hugh 
Gaither. Gene. 26-34-0-3 ; Gaither, Jack. 
Daniel H.. 8-19-6-0: Gardner. Howard E., 
Edison,. 0-2-2-11: Garrett. Nevil M., 2-16-3-0 
1-5-7-3 ; Gates, William A 
0-2-0-1 : Gettler. John F., 



Bobbbv G„ 0-5-0-0 ; 

2-15-2-2. 

28-36-0-2 ; Gardner, 

15-23-8-4; Garrett. 

Gates, Thomas F.. 

.Ir„ 1-12-4-1; Gentry. David Robert, 

3-18-1-1; Gibson. Romulus, 2-18-1-0; 



Gilbert. Lawrence. 4-18-3-3; Gillaspie, Robert H.. 5-14-0-1: 
Gillespie. Robert C. 10-22-7-4 ; Gish. Delmas. 0-1-1-0 ; Goebel, 
Bill. Jr., 3-3-0-O ; Golden. Billy Joe. 27-0-2-0; Goley, James E., 
0-1-1-0: Goodin. Charles L.. 3-11-3-0; Goodin. Shirley Glenn. 
2-1-5-1; Goranflo. R. E., 14-38-6-1: Gourley. Harold E.. 0-1-0-0: 
Grace, Charles K.. 8-10-1-1; Grace. H. E.. Jr.. 13-5-3-0; Graeh- 
ler, Albert J., 1-1-0-0; Gray. Raymond, 0-10-4-0; Green. Walter. 
24-12-2-0: Greene. Tolbert E.. 1-1-6-0; Greenslait. James. 5-6- 
3-2: Griffin. William R.. 1-8-0-0; Grimes. Mike, 0-0-0-2; 
Grisham. Jesse, 9-27-1-1: Grissom, William H.. 1-14-14-4; 
Grone. Freddy F.. 1-1-0-0 : Gustafson. Alford "Gus". 19-33-4-0. 
Hackworth. Harvey, 2-3-1-0 ; Hadden. Newell P.. Jr., 
20-33-0-0; Hagan, Joseph E., 11-41-3-2; Hagerman, Bart, 4-11- 
3-2: Hale. Don C 16-27-5-1; Haley, Dalton D., 18-16-6-5; Haley, 
James. 1-0-0-0: Hall. Billv Joe. 14-14-1-0; Hall. Bob, 5-3-2-0; 
Hall. C. E.. Jr.. 0-5-0-1 : Hall, Elvis. 0-4-0-0 ; Hall, Mallan. 
0-2-2-0 : Hammonds. Brooks, 0-1-0-0 ; Hammons. Norman, 9-17- 
1-3 : Hampton. Darrel C, 0-3-0-0 : Hancock. Morris W., 0-3-1-1 : 
Hancock, Thomas E., 0-2-1-1 ; Hardin, Jack H.. 3-3-1-0 : Har- 
mon. Charles W., 0-13-8-0 : Harrell. Bill D., 7-10-0-0 : Harris. 
Jerry Lee, 0-1-0-0 : Harris. Thomas P.. Jr.. 0-3-1-5 : Harris, 
Wallace R., 0-1-0-0 : Hartley. William E. "Ox", 2-1-0-0 ; Hat- 
field, Gene Edwin. 0-0-1-0; Hartman. John W., Jr., 0-1-0-0; 
Hayden, Samuel J., 4-4-0-1 ; Hayes, Charles R., 10-25-14-0 ; 



Haynes. John. 5-32-6-1 ; Head. Elmo C. 1-4-0-0 ; Heldman. John, 
Jr., :l-2l-n-2 Henderson, Robert. 1-13-11-3: Henry. Maxwell 
"Red". 0-2-0-0; Herndon. Alton E., 0-1-5-0: Hewitt, Raymond 
T.. 3-3-u-O; Howling, Franklin C, 1-16-5-1; Hewling. Richard. 
0-27-7-3; Hill. Earl F.. 1-2-0-O ; Hill. Jimmie, 7-0-0-0: Himes. 
Harold, 0-2-0-1; Hines. G. Cliff. 10-47-4-5; Hinton. David, 
0-3-0-0; Hiton. John W.. 0-4-1-0; Hoagland. Charles R.. Jr.. 
5-9-2-0; Hobbs, Charles V.. 2-0-1-0; Hobbbs, Ralph E., 27-37-4-2: 
Hodge. Fred A.. 7-7-1-1; Hogg. Bill, 4-4-5-1; Hodges, Holbert. 
1-8-1-0: Hodges. Mendell, 1-1-3-0: Hoffer. William Edward, 
0-3-0-0: Hoffmann. Garnet S.. 2-7-1-2: Hofstetter. Joe, 4-7-0-0; 
Holbrook. Harold. 14-0-3-1; Holbrook. William M.. 0-0-1-0; 
Hollander, James A.. 3-3-0-0; Hollowell, James R.. 0-11-0-1; 
Holzknecht. George L.. 1-5-0-2; Hood, Clayton. 0-3-1-0: Hooks. 
Floyd. 0-0-1-1: Hoover. Ermon. Jr. 0-1-0-0: Hornsby. John 
William, 0-1-1-1; Horton. John B.. 5-19-12-6; Howard. Carl F., 
22-24-2-3; Howard, Harry. Jr., 3-8-1-0; Howard. Jimmy D., 
1-5-2-2; Howard. Joe M., 1-1-1-1: Howard. Ray. 0-4-0-1: Hub- 
bard. Joel M., u-2-0-0; Hudson. Douglas, 3-8-7-1: Hudson. 
.1. D., 1-6-2-0; Hudson, Oscar, 0-6-1-0; Huff, Carl R., Jr.. 
1-0-0-0; Hughes, Charles F., 34-26-2-2; Hulse. Robert K.. Jr.. 
2-4-H-l ; Hummer. Irby, 3-7-3-0 ; Hunley, Neil P., 10-21-5-0 ; 
Hunter. Charles. 1-1-0-0; Hurd, Fred. 2-3-4-0; Hurst. David E., 
4-11-4-1; Huter. James J., 2-2-0-0; Hutt, Joseph, Jr.. 9-46-7-1; 
Hvatt. Robert L.. 4-4-2-3 : Hyland, F. D.. 0-1-1-1 ; Hyland. John 
L., l-o-l-o. 

Irwin. Charles R., 5-3-1-0. 

James. Edward U., 5-3-3-0 ; Jenkins, James D., 21-57-8-3 ; 
Jenkins. Kean, 9-20-6-0; Jerger. Carl B., 5-4-0-0; Jeter. John 
B., 3-0-2-0: Johnson. Lonny R., 1-3-2-0: Johnson, Walter, 
36-29-6-0 : Johnson. William B.. 0-5-1-1 : Johnston, Edward E., 
1-0-1-0; Jones. Boyer. 3-14-1-0; Jones, Carson C... 4-18-3-2; 
Jones. Charles Junior. 0-5-1-0: Jones, George W., 10-14-1-2; 
Jones. Robert E.. 17-10-2-0; Jordan, Ken, 21-18-1-0. 

Keeton. Bill. 3-3-0-0 ; Kemp. Bobby, 0-2-1-2 ; Kenney. Joe. 
0-7-1-0 ; Kereiakes, Spero G., 2-12-2-1 ; Key, Calvin, 8-3-2-1 ; 
Kimmel. George H.. 2-11-10-0; King, Allen. 2-15-2-0; King. Bob. 
11-29-0-2: King. James A.. 10-25-7-1; King. John J.. Jr., 0-2-0-1; 
King. P. J., 0-4-0-0; King, Raymond, 11-13-1-1: Kinman, Joe 
T., 31-32-5-2 ; Kitchen. Leslie. 2-0-0-0 : Knight, Bill. 36-24-3-0 ; 
Koenigsmark. Ted. 0-7-4-1 ; Kohlmeyer. 
George W., 1-1-1-0; Krekel. John W., 
A.. 1-12-5-7. 

Lambert. Kenneth L,, 1-2-1-0; Langston. Marvin C, 0-0-1-0; 
Lashbrook, H. E., Jr.. 1-5-1-0: Law. Ray L.. 0-3-0-1: Layman, 
Fred D.. 0-1-1-0; Leach, Aaron. 1-14-2-2; Leathers. Ollie. 
1-3-4-1; Ledford. James, Jr.. 1-7-3-0; Leech, Joseph C. 0-8-1-1; 
Leet. Warren R., 14-29-4-2 ; Lequire. Harold Monroe, 0-2-0-0 : 
LeVan. Thomas F.. 3-17-2-0; Levicki, A. P., 1-2-0-n ; Lewis, 
Jack E., 0-1-0-0 ; Lile, William A., 1-0-0-0 ; Lindloff. Gilbert 
E., 2-4-0-0 : Linville, Shelby E„ 3-1-1-1 ; Little, Calvert C, 
9-11-5-1; Little. J. B.. 2-2-0-0; Littral. James W, 1-1-0-0: 
Llewellyn, Charles S.. 0-4-1-2; Long, James H.. 1-0-3-1; Long. 
Russell. 0-1-0-0 ; Long. William G.. Jr.. 1-20-8-3 ; Longenecker, 
David Merlin. 25-38-5-1 ; Looney. Dick, 19-34-7-2: Lucas. Gene T., 
22-17-0-0 ; Luckett, Gale. 0-0-1-0 : Ludwig. Harry F.. 0-6-2-0 ; 
Lvkins. Clayton G.. 2-10-2-0; Lyons, Harold M., 0-3-0-0; Lytle, 
William P.. 4-14-4-2. 

McAllister. Jack, 0-0-2-0; McAninch. E. R., 2-15-6-5; Mc- 
Bride. W. Kenneth, 0-16-3-1 : McClanahan, Charles. 0-0-1-0 ; 
McClaskey, Booker, Jr., 0-10-0-2 ; McClellan, Leonard B., Jr., 



Robert L.. 2-3-3-0 : Kok, 
4-9-4-2 ; Kremer, Joseph 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1956 



15-33-3-0: McCollum, Robert G.. 3-3-1-2; McCord, Anthony, 
3-5-2-0: MeCowan, Connell, 12-11-4-2: McDonald, Robert, 0-1-0-0: 
McDowell, Glen D., 4-20-3-1 ; McGuffey. Harold B., 1-1-0-0 : 
McKenzie, James C. 3-5-0-1; McLane, Hardin, 3-7-13-2; Mc- 
Leod. Robert N.. Jr., 6-8-1-0 ; McMurtry, Joe, 1-8-4-2; McNeil, 
Patrick. 1-15-1-0 ; McPike, Ray S., Jr., 2-11-9-7 ; McQuilling, 
Gerald. 4-0-3-1. 

Macon. Alan Leon, 3-19-4-3 ; Macon, Max, 2-14-1-3 ; Mahan, 
Boyd W., 5-25-9-5: Mahan, Robert, 16-18-3-4; Maines, George, 
8-25-9-0 : Major, Cecil P., 0-1-4-1 ; Marble, L. R.. 1-3-3-1 : Mar- 
tin, Bobby E., 0-2-0-0 ; Martin, Howard I.. 0-3-1-2 : Mason, 
Gene. 5-0-5-1 : Mason. James E., 25-16-0-0 ; Matarazzo. Salvatore, 
1-6-2-1 : May, Elijah B.. Jr., 6-32-3-1 : May, Harold M., 0-1-0-0 ; 
Mavo, Henry Lewis. Jr., 1-0-1-1 : Mays. Ralph ,T., 21-24-2-0 ; 
Mazza. Albert "Babe". 0-0-1-0: Meacham, Jack R., 0-2-0-0; 
Meade. Foster "Sid", 13-11-1-2: Meeks, Jack, 7-14-3-1; Metcalf, 
Earl L.. 52-22-4-0 ; Metcalf. Harold E. "Hal", 0-1-1-0 ; Meyer, 
H. "Bud", 0-1-0-0: Miller, Bob, 8-15-0-1; Miller, Dencel. 2-12- 
0-0: Miller, Ferrel. 3-10-6-2; Miller. Jack Tyre, 7-7-5-0; Miller, 
Lonnie, 0-0-1-0 : Miller, Rex J., 6-6-2-0 ; Miller. Roy, 1-11-2-0 ; 
Mills. Claude, 1-0-0-0 ; Mills, Herman. 2-3-2-1 ; Miracle, Edward, 
5-4-1-1 ; Molen. James P.. 3-5-0-1 ; Moll, Francis, 5-1-0-0 ; Mona- 
han, Wiliam G.. 7-13-1-2: Monroe, R. W.. 0-3-2-0: Moody, 
Adrian, 0-10-4-2 ; Moore. Ed, 0-1-0-1 ; Moore. Edward C Jr., 
2-6-1-0 : Moore, James E., 0-1-3-1 ; Moore, Robert, 18-18-4-2 ; 
Moreman. Lucian Y., 12-30-9-2 ; Morgan, Charles A.. 0-2-0-0 ; 
Morgan, James H-. 0-3-1-0; Morris. Buddy G.. 0-0-1-0; Morris, 
Rodney A., 0-2-1-1 : Moss, Bobbby G., 0-0-1-0 ; Moss, Howard A., 
0-3-3-0: Moss. Julian (Moose), 2-7-1-2; Mouser, Henry D., 
2-26-9-5 ; Mudd, Edward, 8-29-6-3 ; Mulligan, J. T., 1-6-3-0 : 
Mullins, Arthur, 3-3-1-0; Mullins. Bobby E., 1-4-2-0; Mullins, 
Noah, Jr.. 0-2-2-0 : Mullins, Thomas W., 2-2-1-0 ; Mussman, 
Ralph, 34-23-2-0 ; Mvers. Edward B.. 2-3-7-0. 

Napier, Bill, 0-1-0-0 : Nau, Bill, 15-17-1-0 ; Neal, Gene, 
30-28-2-0 ; Neal, Marion. 2-0-0-0 ; Newman. Bill, 1-4-0-0 : New- 
Marley. 9-26-10-7; Newsome. Forest, 3-9-1-0: Newton, C. M., 
15-20-1-1: Newton, Reason G.. 9-14-0-0: Nie, Allen F., 0-9-0-0; 
Nielsen, Stanley, 0-2-4-0 ; Niemeier, Pelsor, 3-7-2-0 ; Nimmo, 
Lo, 14-10-6-1: Nixon. James W., 3-10-3-2; Noble. Charles B., 
24-14-10-3: Noble. Leonard, 1-14-2-4: Noel, Paul, 3-15-4-2; 
Noel, Roy D., 0-2-1-1 ; Nord, Ed, 13-59-13-0. 

O'Daniel, Jeff, 0-1-6-2 : Oglesby, Durwood, 0-1-0-0 ; Old- 
ham, John, 0-1-1-0 ; Omer. Billy W., 16-42-11-1 : O'Nan. Eugene, 
18-42-1-2 ; O'Nan. Norman. 17-16-4-4 ; Osborne. Bill, 9-21-3-0 ; 
Osborne, Homer L., 12-19-6-0 ; Osborne, James C, 0-2-0-0 ; 
Osborne. Nick. 6-2-0-1 ; Owen, Arthur P., 0-1-2-0. 

Padgett, R. K., 4-16-11-2: Page. Forrest C. 4-9-0-0; Pal- 
more. Ralph L.. 1-3-1-0; Park, .1. M., 1-22-3-1: Parker, Billie 
E., 16-21-4-0; Parker, J. P., 4-7-3-1; Partridge. Donald E., 
0-0-1-0 ; Patrick, Ralph, 0-1-0-0 : Patterson, Norman H., 0-2-0-2 : 
Patton, Harold L., 1-7-0-1 ; Paulin, AI, 3-4-0-0 ; Peay, Cm-tis 
E., 6-11-5-1; Penrod, Joe B., 3-4-2-0; Pergrem, Nard, 33-19-5-0; 
Perry, George, 0-1-0-0 : Perry. James E.. 0-2-2-0 ; Pewitt, 
Charles, 10-14-1-2 ; Phelps, Rudy, 34-18-3-5 ; Picciano, John A., 
0-0-1-0 : Pinchback. Ronald, 0-3-0-0 : Poe, Thomas Ervin, 3-9-5-4 ; 
Polk. John C, 0-10-5-1 ; Poppas. Nickolas. 22-30-11-6 ; Porter, 
C. A.. 23-32-3-0 : Powell. Logan, 10-20-2-0 ; Powers, Clayton 
E., 15-27-4-5 : Preece, Boyce C, 1-11-1-0 ; Preece, James A., 
3-19-8-1; Pruden, Jim. 0-1-2-0: Puckett, Calvin, Jr., 0-2-3-3; 
Pursifull. Cleophus, 22-23-5-1 ; Pyle, George E., 1-0-0-0. 

Radjunas, Stan, 1-1-1-0 ; Rainey, Jimmy, 1-2-0-0 ; Rail, 
Eugene. 9-27-5-4; Randall. H. C, 1-4-11-2; Randolph. Donald 
M., 1-3-0-1 : Rapier. Burl. 0-1-0-1 ; Ratchford. Charles R.. Jr., 
0-1-3-0 : Ratliff . Albert H., 0-1-0-0 : Ratterman, Bernard W., 
Sr., 9-13-1-0 ; Ray. Damon. 1-1-0-0 : Ray, Robert R.. 5-10-3-0 : 
Redman, Malvern G.. 5-0-0-0 ; Redmon, Jack Ray, 0-3-0-0 ; 
Reed, Charles R., 8-9-1-0 ; Reed. Gordon, 11-14-17-2 ; Reeves, 
Kenneth H., 13-14-5-3 ; Reinhardt, Myron S., 4-13-0-0 ; Rein- 
hart, Gene, 9-2-0-0 ; Renfro, John E.. 5-2-0-0 ; Rentz, Thomas 
W., 16-16-6-0; Reynolds, W. J., Jr.. (Bill), 2-2-1-1; Rice, 
Homer, 4-11-2-0 ; Rice, Thomas A., 0-1-0-0 : Richards. James S., 
1-4-4-0 ; Richardson, Joe M., 11-31-7-0 ; Richardson, Lewis H., 
1-12-3-2: Richeson, King. 10-18-1-1: Ricketts, Claude "O", 
10-22-6-3 ; Riggs. William T., 3-19-1-0 ; Ring. William H., 
0-5-3-5 : Ritter, Goebel. 1-9-0-0 ; Roach, Earl W., 1-7-2-1 ; 
Roberts, Clayton. 1-11-0-0; Roberts. Earl C, 10-28-7-3: Robin- 
son, Donald C. 0-3-1-0 : Rocke, James M., 24-17-3-0 : Rodgers, 
David Glenn. 6-13-3-0; Rogers, Earl, 2-1-1-1; Roller, Otis, 
11-2-10-1; Rolph, Harold J., 5-2-0-0; Rose. Harold S., 0-3-1-0; 



Rose, Wallace C. 15-17-7-0 : Rosenbaum, Robert, 3-12-8-2 ; Ross, 
Bill, 0-2-1-1 ; Rothfuss, Richard F., 1-7-4-3 : Rountree. Jack, 
3-6-0-0 ; Rountree, John T., 3-15-7-2 : Rouse. Clyde L., 13-18-4-3 ; 
Rozen, Morris, 10-19-4-1 : Rubarts, Leland G.. 1-14-8-3 ; Russell, 
Allen W., 16-14-6-3 : Russell, Dewey, 0-0-1-2 ; Russell, Eugene 
D., 7-2-3-0 ; Russell, Joe, 18-21-8-4. 

Sabato. Al, 0-6-3-0; St. Clair. Robert L., Jr., 2-8-1-0; 
Sallee, Charles, 0-1-0-0 : Samples. Gilbert, 2-1-0-0 : Sandefur, 
Rudy, 0-1-0-0 ; Sanders, Mel, 36-34-5-0 : Sang, Bob. 10-3-1-0 ; 
Savior, Deward B.. 15-8-1-1 : Scheben, W. J.. 0-1-0-0: Schellhase, 
David G.. 6-1-0-0; Schlick. Paul, 3-10-3-4: Schu, Wilbur L., 
6-13-0-0; Schutz, Eugene R., 1-0-0-0; Schwitz. Frank, 4-3-4-0: 
Schwitz, Joe. 1-1-1-0: Scott, Bill, 1-2-1-0: Scully, Thomas L„ 
Jr.. 0-2-0-0 : Seelye. Arthur L.. 2-4-3-1 ; Selvy, Curt, 7-11-1-1 ; 
Settle. Evan, 0-1-0-0 : Settle. Roy G.. 32-31-9-1 : Sexton. Wil- 
liam L., 1-12-5-8 ; Sharp, Claude, 0-1-0-0 ; Shelton, Robert. 
1-10-5-1 ; Showalter, John, 7-8-2-1 : Shuck, Steve, 0-4-0-0 : 
Shuck. Thomas G., 3-8-1-0 : Siler, Clarence M.. 5-2-0-0 ; Simp- 
son. Jack. 1-3-0-3 ; Sloan. Wallace. 5-20-4-0 ; Small. Rex. 0-2-0-0 ; 
Small. William W. (Bill), 4-15-9-1; Smith. David W., 2-23-3-2: 
Smith. E. H., Ill, 0-1-1-0 : Smith, Edgar J.. 9-24-1-1 : Smith, 
Elza, 0-3-3-0; Smith Eurie H., 1-9-4-2; Smith, John K.. 2-1-0-0; 
Smith, Wilbur G.. 7-8-1-0 : Sosh. LaRue. 26-8-0-0 : Sosh. Nelson. 
22-4-0-0 ; South. William F., 8-19-15-2 ; Spaulding, Stan, 13-3- 
1-1 : Spencer, Billy C.. 0-1-0-0 ; Spencer, Edward, 11-0-0-1 ; 
Spiceland. S. E., 2-1-3-0 : Spurgeon. Kermit, 1-2-0-0 ; Stamper, 
Paul, 9-2-0-0: Stamper, Robert L„ 2-9-1-0: Stanfill, Robert, 
11-13-2-1; Steenkin, William R., 5-16-6-1: Stephenson, Harry 
S., 10-9-1-0 ; Stewart, Charles W.. 0-3-0-0 ; Stewart, Herbert 
T.. 1-8-0-0 ; Stone, Clifton, 4-0-0-0 : Straight. Roy, 0-0-1-0 : 
Strange, Frederick, 1-5-2-0 ; Strange, William L.. 7-10-4-5 : 
Strong. Arnett. 22-19-5-3: Strong, David A.. 2-S-3-1 : Sturgill. 
Barklev J., 2-7-2-1 ; Sullivan. Durwood, 1-9-10-3 : Surface, Wil- 
liam E.. 8-9-1-4 : Susott, Wilfred, 0-1-0-0 ; Swartz, Dan, 0-1-1-0. 

Tavlor, Dennis "Tubbv", 4-6-2-1 : Taylor, Ed, 1-4-0-0 ; 
Taylor, Hal, 8-30-4-1 ; Taylor, Robert S., 10-33-4-1 ; Teague, 
Amos, 58-34-6-0 : Teer, Forrest D., 1-1-0-0 : Temple, J. B., 
11-9-5-4; Thoma, M. L., 20-34-7-7: Thompson, Jack, 51-31-2-0; 
Thompson, Paul. 1-0-0-0 ; Thurman, Armon E„ 2-5-2-0 ; Thur- 
man, Harold W., 0-1-1-0; Thurman, Robert, 8-0-1-0: Thweatt. 
Barnev G.. 1-5-0-0 : Tilley. H. M., 3-10-3-0 ; Tincher, Robert. 
12-23-3-1 ; Tipton, Asa I., 14-22-5-2 ; Tobe. Larry. 1-16-8-2 ; 
Topmiller. Ben. Jr.. 2-2-1-0: Trivette, John W.. 18-12-0-0; 
Troutman, Doyle C, 15-3-0-0 ; Tuck. Lillard O.. 1-32-2-0 ; Turner, 
A. J.. 14-8-3-1 ; Turner, Aaron P. 2-3-1-0; Turner. Bruce, 0-1-2-1. 

Urlage, Richard C. 0-3-0-0. 

Vance, Earl G.. 4-19-4-3; Vandergriff, Gene, 0-6-7-2; 
Vanhooser, James. 1-1-0-0 : VanSant. William E.. 1-2-0-0 ; 
VanZant. Jim G., 1-1-0-0 ; Varble, William E., 25-4S-8-2 : Var- 
ner. Ray G., 3-14-2-2 ; Vaughn. Melvin, 0-2-1-0 ; Vice, Cliff, Jr., 
0-1-0-0. 

Wade, Bill, 4-9-6-2 : Walke. Glenn R., 12-19-3-1 : Walker, 
Paul R„ 9-27-1-0 ; Wallace, W. C, 9-12-3-1 ; Waller, Charles L., 
0-10-3-1 : Wallings, Blaine R.. Jr.. 0-0-0-1 ; Walter. Lafayette, 
0-1-1-0 ; Wanchic. Nicholas. 4-9-4-2 : Ward, Robert L., 0-2-0-1 ; 
Ward. Tommy. 7-1-0-0 : Warren, Bill, 1-2-0-0 ; Warren, Joe, 
4-3-5-1 ; Watts, Paul, 1-7-0-0 ; Webb, Oren. 1-3-1-2 ; Webb. 
Walter Edward, 0-2-1-1 : Weddington, Herbert. 1-2-0-1 : Weis- 
brodt, Paul, 11-3-6-2; Welch, Ralph W.. 11-27-12-4: Wellman. 
Bill, 1-2-2-2 : Wellman, Earl. 2-0-1-3 ; Wells. Milford. 17-40-6-7 : 
Wesche. James A., 2-3-1-0 ; Westerfield. Glenn, 5-16-3-1 ; Whalen, 
William C. 0-1-4-1 : Whipple. Lloyd G., 4-3-0-0 ; White. David 
B.. 5-12-8-2 ; Wiederhold. Robert G., 1-7-4-1 : Wilder, Charles 
D.. 0-2-0-0: Wilham. Earl, 0-3-0-0: Willett, Arthur G., 1-7-1-1; 
Willet. Irvin H., 1-8-0-0 ; Williams. James H„ 1-16-4-4 : Wil- 
liams, Lewis P.. 1-0-0-0 : Williams. Reid V., 1-12-2-1 ; Williams. 
Roger. 9-14-1-1: Williams, Tom M.. 15-16-7-0; Willoughby, James 
T., 0-2-0-0 ; Wilson, Burnell "Zeke", 0-8-1-2 ; Wilson, Herman, 
0-2-1-1: Wilson, Jack R., 23-14-0-0: Wilson, Kenneth, 0-0-0-1: 
Winchester, Roy L., 31-34-5-1 ; Winfrey, Shelby, 44-13-10-2 ; 
Wise, Jack, 6-6-2-0: Witschger. Leroy J.. 0-0-0-1; Witt, Fred, 
0-2-3-0 : Woford. Ernest. 4-17-4-0 : Womack. William H., 0-2-3-2 ; 
Wood, James W., 0-8-4-2 ; Woods, Gene, 2-1-3-0 ; Wray, Darrel. 
0-1-0-1 ; Wright, Billy Joe. 2-13-1-3 : Wright, John A., 0-5-3-3 ; 
Wright, John G., 0-3-0-0 ; Wurtz, Emil. 3-6-2-0. 

Yates, William D., 0-1-0-1; Yeary. William H., Jr.. 0-2-1-0; 
Yessin, Humsey. 15-24-4-1 ; Yessin. Rudy. 1-1-0-0 : Young, Cole- 
man L., 0-9-0-1 ; Young. Roy. 0-10-9-0. 



MOVIES ARE YOUR BEST COACHING MEDIUM whether you lake your own or have 
us take them. 

Contact HARVEY & HUGHES FILM ASSOCIATES 
503 E. High, Lexington, or phone collect 2-6470. 

NO WAITING — we guarantee development and delivery within 24 hours. 
Please write for free brochure and information. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1956 



Page Nine 



Officials' Ratings on Sportsmanship of K. H. S. A. A. 
Member Schools in Basketball, 1955-1956 



SCHOOL 



Adair County (Columbia) 

Adairville 

Ahrens Trade 

Allen Co. (Scottsville) 

Almo 

Alvaton 

Anderson i Lawrenceburg I 

Annville Institute 

Arlington 

Ashland 

Athens (Lexington I 

Atherton (Louisville) 

Auburn 

Augusta 

Austin Tracy i Lucas ) 

Auxier 

Bagdad 

Bald Knob i Frankfort i 

Ballard Memorial (Barlmv i _. 

Barbour ville 

Bardstown 

Bard well 

Beaver Dam 

Beech wood (Ft. Mitchell) 

Belfry 

Bell County (Pinevillei 

Bellevue 

Benham 

Benton 

Berea 

Bearea Foundation 

Betsy Layne 

Black Star (Alva) 

Blaine 

Bloom field 

Boone Co. t Florence! 

Bourbon Co. (Paris I 

Bowling Green 

Boyd County (Ashland i 

Bracken Co. (Brooks ville I 

Breathitt Co. i Jackson i 

Breckinridge Co. (Hardinsburgi _ 
Breckinridge Trg. (Morehead > - _. 

Bremen 

Brewers 

Bridgeport (Frankfort I 

Bristow 

Brodhead 

Brownsville 

Buckeye ( Lancaster I 

Buck horn 

Buffalo 

Burgin 

Burnside 

Bush (Lida) 

Butler 

Butler Co. (Morgantowni 

Caldwell Co. ( Princeton ) 

Calhoun 

Camargo (Mt. Sterling I 

Campbell County (Alexandria) __ 

Campbellsburg 

Campbellsville 

Camp Dick Robinson (Lancaster i 

Caney ville 

Carlisle 

Carr Creek 

Carrollton 

Carter 

Catlettsburg 

Caverna (Horse Cave I 

Cayce 

Center 

Centertown 

Central I Clinton* 

Central < Richmond) 

Central City 

Central Park (McHenry i 

Chandlers Chapel (Auburn) 

Charleston (Dawson Springs I 

Clark Co. (Winchester I 

Clarkson 

Clay 



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5 






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8 






33 


13 


2 


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35 


10 


2 



Pase Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1956 



SCHOOL 



Clav Co. (Manchester) 

Cliffy 

Clinton Co. (Albany) 

College (Bowling Green) 

Corbin 

Cordia 

Covington Catholic 

Crab Orchard 

Crittenden Co. (Marion) 

Crofton 

Cuba (Mayfieldl 

Cub Run 

Cumberland 

Cumberland Co. ( Burkesville)- 

Cunningham 

Cynthiana 

Dalton 

Danville 

Daviess Co. (Owensboro) 

Dawson (Dawson Springs) 

Dayton 

Deming (Mt. Olivet) 

Dilce Combs Mem. (Jeff) 

Dixie Heights (Covington) 

Dixon 

Dorton 

Drakesboro 

Dundee 

Dunmor 

duPont Manual (Louisville) 

Earlington 

Eastern (Middletownl 

Edmonton 

Elizabethtown 

Elizabethtown Catholic 

Elkhorn (Frankfort) 

Elkhorn City 

Eminence 

Erie (Olive Hill I 

Estill Co. (Irvine) 

Eubank 

Evarts 

Ezel 

Falmouth 

Fancy Farm 

Farmington 

Feds Creek 

Ferguson Ind 

Fern Creek 

Flaget (Louisville) 

Flaherty (Vine Grove) 

Flat Gap 

Fleming Co. ( Flemingsburg) 

Fleming-Neon (Fleming) 

Floyd Co. ( Prestonsburg l 

Fordsville 

Forkland (Gravel Switch) 

Fort Knox 

Frankfort 

Franklin-Simpson (Franklin I __ 
Frederick Fraize (Cloverport)- 
Fredericktown (Springfield) __ 

Fredonia 

Frenchburg 

Fulgham (Clinton ) 

Fulton 

Gallatin Co. (Warsaw) 

Gamaliel 

Garrett 

Garth (Georgetown) 

Glasgow 

Glendale 

Good Shepherd (Frankfort) 

Graham 

Grant Co. (Dry Ridge) 

Greensburg 

Greenup 

Greenville 

Guthrie 

Haldeman 

Hall (Grays Knob) 

Hanson 

Hardin 

Harlan 

Harrison Co. (Cynthiana) 

Harrodsburg 

Hartford 

Hawesville 

Hazard 

HazeL_. 

Hazel Green Aca 



39 
33 
29 

27 
26 
12 
17 



21 
11 
16 
23 



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1 




15 


4 





THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1956 



Page Eleven 



SCHOOL 



Hazel Green ( East Bernstadt ) _ 

Heath (West Paducah) 

Helller... 

Henderson 

Henderson Co. 

Henderson Settle. (Frakes) 

Henry Central (New Castle)-. 

Henry Clay (Lexington) 

Hickman 

Highlands i Ft. Thomas) 

Hindman 

Hiseville 

Hit chins 

Hodgen ville 

Holmes I Covington I 

Holy Cross ( Covington) 

Holy Family ( Ashland) 

Holy Name ( Henderson) 

Holy Trinity (Louisville) 

Hopkinsville 

Horse Branch 

Howevalley (Cecilia) 

Hughes Kirk ( Beechmont ) 

Huston ville 

Inez 

Irvine 

Irvington 

Jackson 

Jenkins 

Johns Creek I Pikevillel 

Junction City 

Kingdom Come iLineforki 

Kirksey 

Knott County I Pippapass) 

Knox Central ( Barbourville i 

Kyrock (Sweeden ) 

Lacy Consol. i Hopkinsville I __ 

Lafayette i Lexington) 

Lancaster 

Leatherwood (Slemp) __. 

Lebanon 

Lebanon ■! unction 

Lee County ( Beattyville) 

Leitchfield Ind. 

Leslie Co. (Hyden) 

Lewisburg 

Lewis port 

Lexington Catholic 

Liberty 

Lily__. 

Livermore 

Livingston 

Livingston Co. i Smith land i 

Lloyd i Erlanger i 

London 

Lone Jack (Four Mile) 

Lone Oak (Paducah) 

Louisa 

Lowes 

Loyall 

Ludlow 

Lynch 

Lynn Camp (Corbin) 

Lynn drove 

Lynnvale (White Mills) 

Lyon Co. (Kuttawa) 

McCreary Co. (Whitley City)__ 

McDowell 

McKee 

McKell (South Shore) 

Mc Kinney 

Mack ville 

Madison-Model ( Richmond I 

Madison ville 

Magnolia 

Magoffin Baptist 

Male ( Louisville) 

Marion 

Marrowbone 

Martin 

Mayfield__- 

May's Lick 

Mays ville 

Maytown i Langley ) 

M. C. Napier (Darfork) 

Meade Co. (Brandenburg) 

Meade Mem. I Williamsport) 

Memorial (Hardyville) 

Memorial ( Waynesburg) 

Mercer Co. (Harrodsburg) 

Middleburg 



32 | 

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17 
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19 
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32 
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30 
28 



COACH OTHER SCHOOL 

OFFICIALS 

G I F' P E ! Gj F|P 



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Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1956 



SCHOOL 



Middlesboro 

Midway 

Milburn 

M. M. I. (Millersburg) 

Minerva 

Montgomery Co. (Mt. Sterling) __ 

Monticello 

Morehead 

Morgan 

Morgan Co. (West Liberty) 

Morganfield 

Mt. Sterling 

Mt. Vernon 

Mt. Washington 

Muhlenberg Centra! (Powderly)- 

Munfordville 

Murray 

Murray Trg. 

Nancy 

Nebo 

New Concord 

Newport 

Newport Catholic 

Nicholas Co. (Carlisle) 

Nicholasville 

No. Marshall Co. 

North Middletown 

North Warren (Smiths Grove) __. 

Norton ville 

Oakdale 

Oil Springs 

Oldham Co. (LaGrange) 

Old Ky. Home (Bardstowni 

Olive Hill 

Olmstead 

Oneida 

Orangeburg (Maysville) 

Ormsby Village ( Anchorage ) 

Owen Co. ( wenton ) 

Owensbobro 

Owensboro Catholic 

Owensboro Tech. 

Owingsville 

Owsley Co. (Booneville) 

Paducah Tilghman 

Paint Lick 

Paintsville 

Paris 

Park City 

Parksville 

Peaks Mill (Frankfort) 

Pembroke 

Perry ville 

Phelps 

Pikeville 

Pine Knot 

Pineville 

Pleasant View 

Pleasureville 

Poplar Creek iCarpenter) 

Powell Co. (Stanton) 

Prichard (Grayson) 

Providence 

Pulaski Co. (Somerset) 

Raceland 

Red Bird Settle. (Beverly) 

Reidland (Paducah) 

Richards ville 

Riney ville 

Riverside Inst. ( Lost Creek ) 

Rockhold 

Rockport 

Russell 

Russell Co., ( Russell Springs ) — 

Russell ville 

Sacramento 

St. Agatha (Winchester) 

St. Agnes (Uniontown) 

St. Augustine (Lebanon) 

St. Catherine 

St. Charles (Lebanon) 

St. Francis (Loretto) 

St. Henry (Erlanger) 

St. Joseph Prep I Bardstown i 

St. Mary (Alexandria) 

St. Mary's (Paducah) 

St. Patrick I Maysville) 

St. Thomas (Ft. Thomas) 

St. Vincent (Morganfield) 

St. Xavier (Louisville) 

Salem 





COACH 




OTHER 


SCHOOL 




CROWD 






TEAM 








OFFICIALS 














E 


G 


P | P [ E 


G 


F | P 


E 


G 


F | P 


E 


! G 


1 F ; 


25 


2 


1 


1 


20 


1 7 




i 


22 


1 3 


2 




20 


7 




20 


24 


2 




16 


27 


2 




19 


1 21 


6 




21 


21 


3 


21 


3 




3 


23 


2 






17 


1 9 


1 




18 


7 




16 


3 






18 




1 




14 


2 


1 




16 


2 


1 


16 


6 


2 




14 


10 






12 


9 


2 




9 


11 


4 


28 


6 






27 


5 






22 


8 


3 




25 


9 




28 


3 


3 




25 


8 






19 


9 


6 




22 


9 


1 


18 


4 


2 




16 


6 


1 




15 


6 


2 




13 


7 


1 


17 


4 


1 




18 


3 


1 




13 


8 




1 


14 


6 


2 


10 


9 






12 


7 






9 


8 


2 




8 


10 


1 


26 


14 






30 


8 






22 


15 


1 




26 


10 


3 


11 


4 


5 


2 


17 


3 


1 


i 


15 


5 


1 




15 


6 


1 


20 


4 






21 


4 






10 


1 1 


3 




15 


7 




12 


7 


4 


1 


17 


6 






9 


10 


3 




11 


8 


2 


1 1 


1 






10 


1 






8 


2 






10 


2 




18 


5 






17 


5 






18 


4 






IT 


5 




18 


2 






18 


2 






14 


9 


1 




13 


7 




15 


2 


9 


1 


18 


2 






12 


6 


1 




9 


7 


1 


14 


6 


1 




15 


6 






13 


7 


1 




14 


7 




11 


5 


2 




1 1 


3 


1 




8 


6 


2 




10 


4 


1 3 


16 


8 






20 


4 






14 


9 


1 




18 


4 


2 1 


21 


1 


1 


1 


20 


9 






18 


6 






22 


2 




25 




1 




23 


1 


1 


i 


12 


7 


5 


2 


19 


6 


1 | 


20 


7 






25 


2 






24 


3 






19 


8 




14 


4 






14 


3 






11 


6 


1 




13 


5 




16 


(i 


1 




13 


8 


1 




9 


11 


1 




15 


5 


2 


35 


2 






26 


4 






26 


6 


9 




29 


8 




25 


2 






25 


2 






19 


8 






17 


5 




23 


2 






20 


3 


9 




14 


8 


3 




19 


6 




12 








12 








12 








12 






25 


6 




2 


31 


2 


1 




25 


8 


1 




30 


3 




25 




1 




25 




1 




22 


3 


1 




24 


1 




34 


2 






35 


1 






30 


4 






35 


1 




17 


3 






18 


2 






11 


5 


1 




16 


3 




30 


3 


1 




29 


5 






26 


8 






2(1 


4 




21 


7 


2 




26 


5 






23 


8 






18 


11 




24 


7 


9 




33 


4 


9 




31 


6 


2 




30 


8 




24 


6 






24 


4 






21 


8 






16 


8 




20 


1 


1 




21 








12 


9 






17 


5 




20 


1 






111 


2 






13 


5 


3 




12 


8 




23 


7 






27 


4 






18 


11 


9 




20 


11 




20 


3 


2 


i 


21 


5 






15 


9 


2 




16 


8 




13 


8 


3 


2 


17 


7 






12 


14 






13 


11 


2 1 


21 


9 


1 




28 


1 


1 




28 


2 


1 




28 


2 


1 1 


23 


4 


4 




26 


6 


1 




18 


12 


1 




20 


11 


1 1 


30 


5 




1 


30 


1 






26 


10 






24 


6 


1 1 


23 








23 








21 


9 






9 9 


1 




22 


4 






23 


4 






23 


4 






23 


4 




23 


2 


1 




23 


2 






23 


3 






23 


3 


1 




3 


1 




18 


2 


2 




18 


5 






19 


4 




l!i 


2 


2 




16 


5 


1 




16 


6 






18 


5 




31 


3 


9 




33 


2 






31 


2 


2 




33 


1 


2 


17 


4 




1 


21 


1 






18 


4 






15 


5 


2 


25 


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27 


1 






20 


7 


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9 






31 








30 


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23 




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12 


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8 


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19 


4 


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23 


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5 


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26 


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25 


7 






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6 


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3 


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13 


11 






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9 


9 




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11 


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1 


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21 


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1 


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21 


1 




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3 


1 




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3 


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7 






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6 


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18 


4 






16 


7 


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16 


8 


2 


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4 


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99 


5 






17 


10 






19 


7 


1 


13 


11 


1 


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15 


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11 


2 




23 


1 




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23 


3 




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7 




in 


1 






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1 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1956 



Page Thirteen 



SCHOOL 



Salyers ville 

Sandy Hook 

Scott Co. (Georgetown i 

Scottsville 

Sebree 

Sedalia 

Sharpsburg 

Shawnee t Louisville) 

Shelbyville 

Shepherds ville 

Shopville 

Silver Grove 

Simon Kenton (Independence! 

Simpson ville 

Sinking Fork ( Hopki ns ville i 

Slaughters 

Somerset 

Sonora 

South Christian (Herndoni 

Southern i Louisville) 

So. Hopkins 

South Portsmouth 

Springfield 

Stanford 

Stearns 

Stinnett 

Stuart Robinson 

Sturgis 

Sunfish 

Symsonia 

Taylor Co. (Campbellsvillei 

Taylors ville 

Temple Hill I Glasgow i 

Todd Co. lElktoni 

Tollesboro 

Tompkins ville 

Trenton 

Trigg Co. iCadizi 

Trimble Co. ( Bedford i 

Tyner 

Union town 

University i Lexington i 

Utica 

Valley I Valley Station i 

Vanceburg-Lewis Co. ( Vanceburg 

Van Lear 

Versailles 

Vine Grove 

Virgie 

Waddy 

Wallins 

Walt on- Verona (Walton i 

Warfield 

Warren Co. ( Bowling Green i 

Way land 

Wayne Co. (Monticelloi 

Western i Hickman i 

Western I Sinai ) 

West Point 

Wheelwright 

Whitesburg 

Williamsburg 

Williamstow r n 

Willisburg 

Wilmore 

Winchester 

Wingo 

Wolfe Co. tCampton i 

Woodbine 

Wurtland 



99 

M 
37 

12 
41 
11 
20 
I- 

1 1 
16 
13 
21 
14 

9 
IS 

21 
20 

22 
IT 
23 
I 
2" 
IS 
IT 

2 1 
17 
13 
21 
13 
IT 
18 
20 
20 
17 
21 
15 
IT 
15 

9 
23 
18 
19 
20 
l'i 
is 
26 
is 
1 1 

1 : 
IT 
23 
IT 

2 I 

12 
2 I 
23 

^7 

28 

30 

16 

9 

in 

is 

24 
28 

12 
23 
23 
20 



3 


9 


9 




3 




7 


3 


6 


1 


4 




1 


1 


1 




3 


2 


4 




5 


1 


2 





1" 

6 

3 
:: 
6 

: 

2 
1 

1" 
3 



1 


1 


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1 


1 


2 


11 


2 


9 


1 


7 




9 




7 


3 


1 


2 



1 



OTHER SCHOOL 

OFFICIALS 
E G F P 



25 


3 


18 


6 


37 


:; 


15 


1 


11 


3 



1 I 

24 

11 
17 
2n 
16 
20 
1 '. 

9 
I". 
22 
2" 
19 
2" 
28 

6 
20 
1- 
17 
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13 
16 

2T. 
11 
I ! 
23 
21 
18 
17 
22 
16 
17 
16 
1 '. 
22 
20 
2" 
19 
19 
21 
25 
IT 
HI 
22 
2" 
19 
19 
26 
T 
13 
2". 
2.: 
2.1 
26 
29 
19 
12 
12 
20 
25 
2T 
15 
19 
2'.i 
IS 



3 

5 
2 

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111 
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4 
6 

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3 

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6 
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2 
4 
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15 

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23 

12 

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17 

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13 
18 

9 
15 
17 
19 

5 
16 
13 
15 
22 
IT 
13 
16 
12 
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15 
11 
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13 
22 
15 
11 
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12 
20 

12 
18 

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3 

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1 

12 
6 
4 
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3 
5 

7 
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3 

4 
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1 

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3 

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8 




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4 


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2 




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5 


3 


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3 


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7 


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15 
27 
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22 
1 1 
11 
16 
14 
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in 
9 
s 
19 
12 
IT 
19 
24 
4 

19 
16 
15 
23 
16 
11 
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11 
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16 
21 
13 
16 
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13 

18 

1 ! 

12 
20 

11 
18 

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in 
19 

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19 
20 
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15 
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22 
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17 
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16 



V 


1 I 


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■■ 


13 


1 | 


1 




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5 


1 


3 


1 




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6 


1 


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5 




3 


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2 


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1 


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4 


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1 


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1 


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4 


5 




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1 


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5 


3 


7 


1 


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9 1 


7 


1 


6 


2 


12 




7 


1 


5 


9 


2 


1 


3 




6 


" 


9 


1 


3 


1 


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2 


4 


2 


1 


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9 


1 


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3 


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1 


9 


1 



REPORT OF INSURANCE CLAIMS 

Three hundred twelve schools insured their athletes under the K.H.S.A.A. Protection Fund in 1955-56. In football 3818 boys 
were insured, in all sports except football 6511, and in physical education 211. Eight hundred seventy-four claims were submitted, 
with eight hundred thirty-two totaling §18,266.12 being paid. 



School Claimant Injury 

Almo Jerry Roberts X-ray (wrist) 

Almo Jerry Roberts Dental injury 



Almo Earl Phillips Laceration — suture 

Almo Gene Herndon X-ray i ankle I 

Alvaton Wendell Gentry X-ray (arm I 

Anderson Darrell Clark X-ray (spine) 

Ashland Ronnie Perry Broken nose 

Ashland Dick Vaughan Tendon — separation from bone_ 

Ashland Charles Haugh X-ray (arm ) 



Amount Paid 
§ 5.00 

(special) 37.50 



5.00 
5.00 
10.00 
20.00 
20.00 
10.00 
6.00 



Page Fourteen THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1956 

Ashland Ralph Clere X-ray (kidney) 10.00 

Ashland _ Roy Cordial Dislocated shoulder 35.00 

Ashland _. Bill Salyers Broken finger, X-ray 25.00 

Athens Billy Mullins X-ray larml 6.00 

Atherton Richard Young Dental injury (special) 51.50 

Atherton _. Courtney Noe X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Atherton _. Dee Gatterdam Laceration — suture 2.00 

Atherton _. Herbert Krietman Broken nose, X ray 12.00 

Atherton _. Bob Lowen Broken nose 12.00 

Atherton _. Bunny Solomon X-ray (tooth) 5.00 

At! rrinn __Ronnie McFarland X ray larmi 6.00 

Atherton _. Harvey Huff X-ray I foot) 7.50 

\therton Bucky Bales Laceration — suture 5.00 

Atherton _. Gordon Baer X-ray (chest) 10.00 

Atherton Doug Stewart Broken tooth, X-ray 26.00 

Atherton _. Larry Smith Laceration — suture 5.00 

Atherton _. "~"__Martm Klotz X-ray (dental) 6.00 

Atherton _. __Dick Young Laceration— suture. X-ray (chest) 17.00 

Atherton Vernon Rothenburger Broken finger, X-ray 20.00 

Atherton Z__I William Shaver X-ray i ankle i 12.50 

Atherton Ronnie Biddle Fractured fibula 36.25 

Atherton Tom Stroud Dislocated elbow, X-ray 39.50 

Atherton _. "~~ ~_~Jack Crutcher X-ray (knee) 12.00 

Atherton __Bill Young Broken tooth 9.00 

Atherton ___-Terry Sheppard Broken tooth, replaced knocked out filling. X-ray 27.00 

Austin Tracy __ Roy Francis Broken finger. X-ray 22.00 

Austin Tracy Jimmy Hall Fractured metatarsals 13.00 

Bagdad ___Riley Hasfurder Broken tooth 9.00 

Ballard Memorial Harold Farmer X-ray (knee) 10.00 

Barbourville Ted Stewart X-ray (arm) 5.00 

Barbour ville Jack Osborne Laceration — suture 5.00 

Barbourville Walter Ray Jones Dislocated shoulder 35.00 

Bardstown __ Frank Hammond Dental injury (special) 60.50 

Bardstown ~ " Bobbby Rout Dislocated shoulder 20.00 

Bardstown Cecil Robinson X-ray (spine) 10.00 

Bardstown Robert Linder X-ray < ankle i 6.00 

Bardstown " __ Billy Ballard X-ray (ankle) 7.00 

Bardstown Cecil Robinson X-ray (finger) 8.00 

Bardstown George Robinson Leg injury (special) 126.95 

Bardwell Walter Hoskins X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Beech wood _Don Mescher Leg injury (special) 99.25 

Beech wood Doug Foster Dislocated toe 10.00 

Beechwood Doug Foster Arm injury (special) 57.50 

Beech wood Frank Thurman X-ray (ankle i 5.00 

Beechwood Gary Lee, Jr. X-ray ( foot) 5.00 

Beechwood Ed Bader X-ray (ankle I 6.00 

Belfry Johnny Maynard X-ray (arm i 10.00 

Bellevue Clark Millard Fractured clavicle 35.00 

Bellevue II_Ken Watkins X-ray (wrist) 5.00 

Bellevue James Wadsworth Injured shoulder (special) 64.00 

Bellevue __ David Graham Fractured radius 40.00 

Bellevue _ _ Don Dixius X-ray ispinei 10.00 

Bellevue "___" Bi11 Fletcher X-ray (head) 10.00 

Bellevue Ronnie Mendell Laceration — suture 5.00 

Bellevue ~I_ BiI1 Harmon X-ray (foot) 6.00 

Bellevue _ Larry Knarr Fractured radius and ulna 75.00 

Bellevue *_ _Ronnie Mendell Fractured fibula 50.00 

Bellevue __~Tim Wuilleumier Broken tooth 20.00 

Bellevue "Clifford Eibeck Loss of tooth 25.00 

Benham Henry O'Dell . Laceration — suture 5.00 

Benham I.Ray Simpson X-ray (hand) 5.00 

Benham __ Bobby Davis Leg injury i special i 150.00 

Benham ~ George Trent X-ray ( shoulder I 10.00 

Benham James Hurd .__ Fractured radius 40.00 

Benham I.Don Carroll Leg injury (special) 36.30 

Benham Phillip Nunnery Loss of teeth 50.00 

Benton Steadman Baker Laceration — suture 5.00 

Benton J. D. Gammel. Jr. Dislocated finger. X-ray 15.00 

Benton William Stone Dislocated knee 35.00 

Benton Frederick English Heart injury (special) 100.00 

Benton Edward Jones Dental injury (speical) 60.00 

Benton "__ _~ Paul Dailey, Jr. Fractured fibula 10.00 

Benton ~~~J. D. Gammel, Jr. X-ray (ankle) 12.00 

Bei-ea David Singleton X-ray (ankle) 5.00 

Berea Maurice Davidson Abdomen injury (special ) 47.49 

Berea Johnny Stivers Fractured humerus 8.00 

Berea .I"I"Phil Ed Hammond X-ray i f oot j 5.00 

Berea Dorse LeMaster Ankle injury (special) 22.50 

Berea Dorse LeMaster X-ray (finger) 5.00 

Betsy Layne Charles Blevins Shoulder injury (special) 116.55 

Betsy Layne Thomas Spears Knee injury (special) 29.60 

Betsy Layne Jackie Slone Laceration — suture 5.00 

Boone County Cecil Martin X-ray (finger) 5.00 

Boone County Larry Yelton X-ray (ankle) 5.00 

Boone County William Stephenson X-ray (ankle) 5.00 

Boone County Arlyn Easton Broken tooth 20.00 

Boone County ...James Duvall Loss of teeth 49.00 

Bowling Green Donald Wiltshire Loss of tooth 5.00 

Bowling Green .__ Jerry Resch X-ray (arm) 6.00 

Bowling Green ...Charles Newton X-ray (arm) 6.00 

Bowling Green ...Don Ferrell X-ray (leg) 10.00 

Bowling Green Dale Lindsey Laceration — suture 5.00 

Bowling Green Frankie Jackson X-ray (kneel 6.00 

Bowling Green Jerry Polston X-ray (knee) 6.00 

Bowling Green Don Wiltshire Loss of tooth 3.00 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE EOR AUGUST. 1956 Page Fifteen 



Bowling Green Bob Hovious Dental injury (special) 42.50 

Bowling Green Harold Reynolds X-ray (hand) 5.00 

Bracken County Jerry McCane Fractured clavicle . 29.00 

Bracken County Raymond Tally X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Bracken County John Lenox X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Bracken County John Lenox __Loss of tooth 25.00 

Bracken County Emery Lucas Leg injury (special I (19.72 

Breathitt Leander Clair Laceration suture 5.00 

Brewers Glen Stone Laceration — suture 5.00 

Brewers C'aude Butler Laceration -suture 5.00 

Bridgeport Sidney Thomas Gaines _. Broken nose 8.00 

Brodhead Ronnie Sutton Loss of tooth 10.00 

Buckeye 1. W. Tyree Broken nose 17.00 

Buckeye Glenn Miller X-ray (elbow) 6.00 

Buffalo Ronnie Baumgardner Laceration suture 5.00 

Buffalo William Thompson _ X-ray (foot) 6.00 

Burgin Bob Krahulek Broken finger _. 5.00 

Burnside Charles Wallace X-ray (arm i 6.00 

Bush Homer Woods X-ray (wrist anil arm) in. on 

Bush William Jackson Fractured metacarpal 10.00 

Calhoun Bruce Young X-ray (ankle) 7.00 

Campbell County Bob Hlghley Head injury (special) 37.00 

Campbell County Roger Schnitzler __X-ray (ankle) 10.00 

Campbell County Charles Johnson X-ray (hip) 10.00 

Campbell County Jim Cliff Knee injury (special I ._ 150.00 

Campbell County Lucian McCumas _ X-ray (kneel 10.(10 

Campbell County Lloyd Schalck .__ X-ray (knee) 10.00 

Caneyville Granville Cornet t Loss of tooth, X-ray 29.00 

Caneyville Leon Remington __X-ray (elbow) 15.00 

Carlisle Ronald Wilson X-ray (hand) 6.00 

Carlisle Bobby Henry ...Fractured clavicle 35.00 

Catlettsburg John Ross X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Catlettsburg Joe Griffith _ __ .J) is located finger. X-ray, laceration — suture _. 2n.mi 

Catlettsburg Hubert Sloan Back injury (special i 49.95 

Catlettsburg John Ross Dislocated elbow (special) 39.50 

Catlettsburg Paul Rice Dislocated knee 35.00 

Catlettsburg John Spaulding __Hand injury (special) 44.00 

Caverna William Proffitt .__ Dislocated fifnger, laceration — suture 13.00 

Caverna Bobby Campbell __X-ray (hand) ___ 5.00 

Caverna James Earl Lindsey Broken finger. X-ray 15.00 

Caverna Jimmy Lindsey Chipped tooth 3.00 

Caverna Rondal Hogan Broken tooth __ 20.00 

Cayce Leon Shelton _ Broken finger. X-ray 25.01) 

Central i Richmond i Ronald Moberly Back injury i special i ._ 60.88 

Central i Richmond ) Tommy Reams Laceration— suture 5.00 

Chandlers Chapel Morris Ashby _ X-ray (ribs) ___ Hi. DO 

Clarkson Eugene Edwards Loss of sight of one eve (permanent) 150.00 

Clay Bobby Carl Hill X-ray ifooti ___ 10.00 

Clay Billy Youngs ^Fractured fibula _ 28.00 

Clay _Gene Young Loss of teeth 50.00 

Clay _ Diquie Omer _ __ Fractured radius 40.00 

Clinton County Billie K. Smith _ .__ X-ray (foot) 10.00 

College Hoyte Harwood Fractured humerus 7.50 

College Lamar Herri n Broken finger, X-ray 13.00 

College Dickie Thomas Laceration suture 5.00 

College David Denton X-ray t wrist i 12.00 

Corbin George Jones Broken finger. X-ray 15.00 

Corbin Ronnie Riley Knee injury (special ) 150.00 

Cordia Wilbur n Combs Laceration suture 5.00 

Covington Catholic Charles Frank _ __X-ray (spinel 10.00 

Covington Catholic _ Richard Mayer _ X-ray (finger) 5.00 

Covington Catholic Richard Mayer Fractured fibula 50.00" 

Crab Orchard Kenneth McLemore _ __X-ray i elbow ) 5.00 

Crab Orchard Stanley Hopkins Fractured tibia 40.00 

Croft on Larry Mitchell Head injury (special ) 40.00 

Cuba 'immy Bivins Leg injury (special) 20. 7K 

Cub Run Houston Jaggers „ X-ray f knee I 10. 0G 

Cub Run Kenneth Jaggers Hernia (special ) . 120.88 

Cumberland Henry Ison Broken teeth 40.00 

Cumberland Raymond Scott _ Fractured fibula 20.00 

Cumberland T:m Walters X-ray (knee) 6.00 

Cumberland Rodney Harris X-ray (arm > 6.00 

Cumberland Rodney Harris X-ray (shoulder) 10.00 

Cumberland Tim Walters X-ray (arm I 6.00 

Cumberland Henry Ison Vertebra process ( non-operative I 30.00 

Cumberland Maurice Creech Replaced knocked out filling 5.00 

Cunningham Donald Cullen X-ray (foot i 4.00 

Cynthiana James Swinford Laceration — suture 5.00 

Cynthia na Ottis Tussey Laceration — suture 5.00 

Cynthiana William R. McKee Leg injury (special) 79.13 

Cynthiana John Tubbs X-ray (finger) 5.00 

Cynthiana Kenton Barnett X-ray (leg) 10.00 

Cynthiana Lee Hatcher Broken ribs 9.00 

Cynthiana Glendon Ravenscraft X-ray (finger) 5.00 

Cynthiana William McKee X-ray (ankle) 25.00 

Cynthiana Francis Vest Laceration — suture 5.00 

Cynthiana Darl Feix Dislocated knee - 24.00 

Cynthiana Ronald Richie X-ray (ankle) 7.50 

Danville John Marshall Boone Broken tooth 3.00 

Danville Billy Bob Barker Back injury (special) 45.23 

Danville Jim Million Laceration — suture 5.00 

Danville Marvin Saylor Dislocated knee 22.00 

Danville Marvin Saylor Knee injury (special ) 150.00 

Danville Glenn Alcorn Broken tooth 8.00 

Danville Virgil Chambers X-ray (ankle) 6.00 



Page Sixteen THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1956 

Danville Don Chambers Head injury ((special) 32.40 

Danville Tack League Leg injury (special) 48.00 

Danville John Camenisch X-ray (knee) 10.00 

Danville Virgil Chambers X-ray (ankle) 8.00 

Danville Roddy Smith X-ray (knee) 10.00 

Danville Noel White Laceration — suture 5.00 

Daviess County Louis Ray Norris Laceration — suture 5.00 

Daviess County Lee Wiles X-ray (head) 10.00 

Daviess County Roy Blandford Loss of teeth 35.00 

Daviess County Jerry Wells X-ray (wrist) 6.00 

Daviess County Roy Blanford Dental injury (special) (additional payment) 45.00 

Dayton Robert Landrum Loss of tooth 25.00 

Dayton Gerald Daniels Broken tooth. X-ray 22.00 

Dayton Bill Loving Loss of tooth 25.00 

Dayton William Sorrell Laceration — suture 5.00 

Dayton James Boehmer Broken tooth 20.00 

Dayton Ronald Braun Fractured metacarpal. X-ray 30.00 

Dilce Combs Woodard Lyttle. Jr. Loss of tooth 25.00 

Dilce Combs Carlton Reynolds Broken tooth 20.00 

duPont Manual Don Gambrall X-ray (knee) 10.00 

duPont Manual Truman Strausburg X-ray (knee) 7.50 

duPont Manual Jack Forrest X-ray (ankle) 7.50 

duPont Manual Chris Larmee Loss of tooth. X-ray 32.00 

duPont Manual Larry Cotton Broken nose 20.00 

Eastern Robert Totten Broken finger. X-ray 16.00 

Eastern Gary Gerst Nose injury (special ) 81.15 

Eastern Sam Dameron fractured carpal 11.00 

Eastern Sam Durham X-ray (knee) 6.00 

Eastern Carl Kimmel Loss of teeth 44.00 

Eastern John Slack X-ray (leg) 12.00 

Eastern William Dobbins Broken tooth 24.00 

Eastern William Dobbins X-ray (hand) 6.00 

Eastern Sam Durham Knee injury (special ) 19.00 

Eastern John Doninger Knee injury (special ) 150.00 

Eastern Ronnie Curry X-ray (ankle) : 10.00 

Elizabethtown Norman Hollan X-ray (hip) 7.50 

Elizabethtown Bobby Jenkins X-ray (wrist) 6.00 

Elizabethtown Ray Bishop Shoulder injury (special) 150.00 

Elizabethtown Vernon Coyle Loss of teeth 50.00 

Elizabethtown Charles Logsdon X-ray (wrist) 6.00 

Elizabethtown Louis Jenkins X-ray (rib) 10.00 

Elizabethtown Tom Perry Fractured fibula 50.00 

Elizabethtown Phil Hale Broken finger, X-ray 10.00 

Elizabethtown James DeLisle Fractured metacarpal 12.00 

Elizabethtown Carroll Coffman X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Elizabethtown Bill Lewis Fractured tibia and fibula 55.00 

Elizabethtown Bill Ransdell Knee injury, requiring surgery 75.00 

Elizabethtown Ronnie McCray Broken finger 10.00 

Elizabethtown James Best Fractured clavicle 35.00 

Elizabethtown Louis Jenkins Broken finger 10.00 

Elizabethtown Catholic Tim Wathen Leg injury (special) 66.10 

Elkhorn Tommy Shelton Head injury (special) 30.13 

Eminence Emmett True X-ray (knee) 6.00 

Evarts Wert Pace Hip injury (special) 54.15 

Ezel Robert Pieratt Fractured metacarpal. X-ray 21.00 

Falmouth Danny Woodhead Laceration — suture 5.00 

Falmouth Delmar Moore X-ray (ankle) 5.00 

Ferguson Ray H. Cowan X-ray (foot) 6.00 

Fern Creek Edward Street X-ray (hand 5.00 

Fern Creek William Dennison X-ray (finger) 5.00 

Fern Creek Paul Wesley Loss of tooth 3.00 

Fern Creek Mike Gassaway X-ray (head) 5.00 

Fern Creek Phil Hanna Nose injury (special ) 57.50 

Fern Creek James Pike Broken finger 5.00 

Fern Creek Robert Cline X-ray (spine) 10.00 

Fern Creek Eugene Hinderer Dislocated finger 5.00 

Fern Creek Dennis Thompson X-ray (ankle) 10.00 

Fern Creek Carl Wigginton X-ray (hand) 5.00 

Fern Creek Jerry Martin X-ray (spine) 10.00 

Fern Creek Tommy Reed X-ray (hand) 5.00 

Fern Creek lames Pike X-ray (hand) 8.00 

Floyd County Lowell Hughes X-ray (shoulder) 10.00 

Floyd County Montie Rice X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Floyd County Lowell Hughes Loss of tooth, broken tooth, X-ray 47.00 

Floyd County Lowell T. Mackenzie Fractured metacarpal. X-ray 26.00 

Floyd County Carl Sizemore Loss of tooth 25.00 

Fort Knox Edward M. Fryxell, Jr. X-ray (knee) 10.00 

Frankfort Frank Tullis X-ray (head) 20.00 

Frankfort Bruce Hogg X-ray (shoulder) 7.50 

Frankfort Ewell Scott X-ray (rib and spine) 10.00 

Frankfort Tommy Leonard X-ray (spine) 15.00 

Frankfort Jack T. Phipps X-ray (ankle) 6.50 

Frankfort Bruce Hogg X-ray (shoulder) 7.50 

Frankfort Bert Stevenson X-ray (hand > 5.00 

Franklin-Simpson Eddy Whitley Leg injury (special) 32.50 

Franklin-Simpson J. W. Neal Fractured clavicle 35.00 

Franklin-Simpson Carl Freas X-ray (hand) 5.00 

Franklin-Simpson Mark Thompson X-ray (leg) 6.00 

Franklin-Simpson Billy Bennett Fractured ulna 35.00 

Franklin-Simpson Robebrt James, Jr. Fractured radius 14.00 

Franklin-Simpson David Gentry Broken nose 20.00 

Franklin-Simpson Bill Moody Broken fingers 15.00 

Frederick Fraize William Pierce X-ray (leg) 6.00 

Frederick Fraize Paul Embry X-ray (ankle) 8.00 

Fredonia --Charles Riley ^ Arm injury (special) 76.60 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1956 Page Seventeen 

Fulgham .__. — Bennie Hawks Head injury (special) 21.25 

Fulgham Gilbert Bizzle X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Fulgham --Jerry Stewart Fractured radhis 27.50 

Fulgham Kent Hickerson __X-ray (kneel 10.00 

Fulton Ken Winston Broken Finger. X-ray 11.00 

Fulton Robert Bone Laceration — suture 5.00 

Fulton ---Robert Bone X-ray I foot I 0.00 

Fulton ---Will H. Bondurant Laceration— suture 5.00 

Fulton David Daniels X-ray (hand) 6.00 

Fulton -Timmy Hicks Fractured fibula 31.00 

Fulton Ronnie McAHster __ F oot injury (special) 25.00 

Fulton Dale Breeden Broken nose 11.00 

Fulton J oe Dallas ...Broken nose 17.50 

Fulton ---David Holland Fractured metacarpal. X-ray 26.00 

Gallatin County . --Floyd Hicks „_X-ray llegl 6.00 

Gamaliel Freddie Kirkpatrick ..Fractured carpal 10. 00 

Gamaliel Fay Hunt __ Tendon— separation from bone. X-ray 15.00 

Garth Eddie Ashurst ..X-ray i leg ) 6.00 

Garth Billy Bruin X-ray (kneel 6.00 

Garth . --Charles Gibson _. Broken finger 8.00 

Garth Richard Weisenberger Fractured metacarpal. X-ray 33.00 

Glasgow --Billy Bishop ... X-ray (ankle) 10.00 

Glasgow — Roy Ramsey X-ray (ankle) 10.00 

Glasgow -Billy Myers ..X-ray (anklel ... 6.00 

Grant County _ Tary Beach Arm injury (special) ._ 150.00 

Grant County _ Howard Epperson Laceration — suture 5.00 

Grant County _ Vergil Knight Laceration— suture 5.00 

Greensburg _ Homer Edwards X-ray Iribsl 4.00 

Greenup Larry Archey Loss of teeth 50.00 

Greenville Harry Pollock Dislocated wrist 16.00 

Greenville —Tohn Smi(h X-ray (arm) 6.00 

Greenville ---Roger Newman ... Fractured tibia 50.00 

Guthrie ---Bobby Frey __X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Guthrie ---Bobby Frey Dental injury (special) 55.50 

Hardin ---Donald Lynch X-ray (anklel 7.50 

Harlan ---Tony Halburnt X-ray (legl 0.00 

Harlan Perry Walls X-ray (kneel 0.00 

Harlan ---Leslie Roark Fractured radius 40.00 

Harlan -—Jim Ledford Broken finger 10.00 

Harlan Taekie Jones Laceration suture. X-ray (hand) 10.00 

Harlan Dick Parsons Knee injury (special l 63.25 

Harlan ---Don Adkisson X-ray (legl 5.00 

Harlan - — Sonny Shepherd X-ray (arm I 5.00 

Harlan —Sonny Shepherd _„ ...Loss of tooth 3.00 

Harlan Perry Walls ...Broken teeth 10.00 

Harlan Carmen Wright _ _. X-ray (kneel 5.00 

Harlan — jj m Ledford Laceration — suture 5.00 

Harlan ---Tim Gross X-ray (shoulder and handl 10.00 

Harlan Jimmie Greer X-ray (handl 5.00 

Harlan Perry Walls X-ray (ribs) 10.00 

Harlan . _--T ony Halburnt X-ray (elbow I 5.00 

Harlan Kenneth Hyatt X-ray (footl 5.00 

Harlan _.. --Randy Myers X-ray (handl 5.00 

Harlan George Pollitte Laceration- suture 3.00 

Harlan . — ^Gerald Broome X-ray (footl 10.00 

Harrison County . Jem- Jenkins X-ray (elbow and kneel 12.00 

Harrison County . Joe Patterson X-ray lanklel 6.00 

Harrison County _ Jerry Jenkins Head injury (special) _ 35.40 

Harrodsburg . ---David Wampler X-ray (kneel 10.00 

Harrodsburg _ —-Jim Martin X-ray (spine) 15.00 

Harrodsburg _ ---Ben Lykins X-ray (spinel 32.00 

Harrodsburg _ ---Dave Hood X-ray (kneel 10.0(1 

Hawesville Hugh Gaynor Laceration — suture 5.00 

Hawesville . —Bobby Lamar X-rav Ihead) 15.00 

Hawesville . Billy Bryant X-ray (anklel 6.00 

Hazard Bobby Davis Broken nose 13.00 

Hazard Jimmy Ozee X-ray (elbow) 5.00 

Hazard Bobby Joe Bellis X-ray (ankle) 5.00 

Hazard rj on sinor X-ray (kneel 12.00 

Hazard Vernon Rowe Fractured tarsal 30.00 

Hazard D on Sinor X-ray lanklel 5.00 

Hazard p ete Miniard X-ray (ankle) 5.00 

Hazel Green Russell Patton. Jr. - Replaced knocked out fillings. X-ray 12.0(1 

Henderson Bobby Glover Fractured radius 1S.00 

Henderson Tames McMahon Dislocated finger 10.00 

Henderson ._ Harrv Tate Broken nose 5.00 

Henderson . Fre(i Gibson Loss of tooth, X-ray 27.00 

Henderson County ... Charles Litton Broken teeth. X-ray 38.00 

Henderson County Charles Litton Fractured humerus 71.50 

Henry Clay _. —Jerry Mangione Fractured ulna, dislocated elbow 62.00 

Henry Clay _. --Charles Owen X-ray (wristl 8.00 

Henry Clay Richard Rose Dislocated elbow 16.00 

Hickman Terrv Cunningham Fractured radius 40.00 

Highlands Bill Finch Fractured patella 50.00 

Highlands .. Don Combs Fractured fibula 50.00 

Highlands Eddie Noel Broken nose 20.00 

Highlands Jerry Stortz X-ray (ribs I 30.00 

Holy Cross Thomas Gallagher Laceration -suture 5.00 

Holy Cross John Noel Broken nose. X-ray 30.00 

Hopkinsville Bobby Hardin Broken nose 20.00 

Hopkinsville _ Marion Ladd Fractured tibia 50.00 

Hopkinsville _ Henry Rittenberry Fractured vertebra 54.35 

Inez Johnny Hardin Broken tooth 5.00 

Irvine Harlan Dawes X-ray (hip) 10.00 

Irvine „_„ ,- Cornelius Witt Laceration — suture 5.00 



Page Eighteen THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1956 



Irvine Charles Muncy Laceration — suture 5.00 

Jenkins Franklin Hodges Broken rib, X-ray 13.00 

Jenkins Charles Elkins Dislocated elbow 10.00 

Jenkins Charles Elkins Back injury (special) 87.00 

Jenkins James Morgan Fractured radius 40.00 

Jenkins Kenneth England Fractured pelvis 100.00 

Jenkins Donald Blair Fractured femur 100.00 

Jenkins David Davis X-ray (ankle) 10.00 

Jenkins Larry Holmes X-ray (spine) 20.00 

Jenkins Russell Mullins X-ray (ankle) 10.00 

Jenkins Kenneth England Fractured tibia 42.00 

Junction City Nelson Lockhart X-ray (ankle) 8.00 

Kentucky School for the Blind OIlie Howard Dislocated wrist. X-ray 30.00 

Kirksey William Edwards X-ray (foot) 5.00 

Kirksey - Chester Reeder X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Knox Central Harold Gregory Laceration — suture 5.00 

Knox Central Harry L. Martin Replacing knocked out fillings 12.00 

Knox Centi'al Rodger Burch X-ray (spine) 10.00 

Knox Central John Shelton Loss of teeth 50.00 

Knox Central Barry Messer Loss of teeth 50.00 

Kyrock Lonard Webb X-ray (knee) 9.00 

Lacy Marshall Fletcher Loss of tooth. X-ray 27.00 

Lacy Marshall Fletcher Loss of tooth, X-ray 27.00 

Lafayette Don Bates Fractured metacarpals. X-ray 30.00 

Lafayette Don Hillard Knee injury (special) 150.00 

Lafayette John Paul Kent Fractured toe, X-ray 15.00 

Lafayette John Fernandez X-ray (head ) 12.50 

Lafayette -Toe Holman X-ray (elbow) 10.00 

Lafayette Kenneth Eaves X-ray (head and spine) 20.00 

Lafayette Ronnie Curry Broken finger 8.00 

Lafayette Billy Bates Fractured carpal. X-ray 38.00 

Lafayette James Gladden Laceration — suture 5.00 

Lafayette Donnie Bates X-ray (spine) 10.00 

Lafayette William Seale Shoulder injury (special) 150.00 

Lafayette Ronnie Hacker X-ray (head) 12.00 

Lafayette Herbie Gaines Fractured fibula 50.00 

Lafayette Bobby Hiler X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Lancaster Hugh McCulley X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Lebanon Tommy Simpson ■ X-ray (spine) 10.00 

Lebanon Bobby Harmon Fractured finger. X-ray 15.00 

Lebanon Eddie Deep X-ray (chest) 10.00 

Lebanon Billy Graham . Laceration — suture 5.00 

Lebanon Gerald Graham Loss of tooth 25.00 

Lebanon Rodney Wilcher X-ray (ankle) 10.00 

Lee County Bobby Robinson Fractured metacarpal 15.00 

Lee County Danny White __: Laceration — suture 5.00 

Lee County Clay Cundiff Broken tooth. X-ray 22.00 

Lee County Tracy Farmer Fractured metacarpal, X-ray 38.00 

Lee County Billy Shackelford Laceration — suture 5.00 

Leitchfieid Richard Roberts X-ray (finger) 6.00 

Livermore Lester Humphrey X-ray (spine) 15.00 

Livingston --Tilmon Owens Laceration — suture 5.00 

Livingston Myrel Ballinger Fractured clavicle 25.00 

Livingston County Jimmy Ringstaff Fractured tibia 25.00 

Lloyd Ronyl Lindley Dislocated shoulder 25.00 

Lloyd William Hyatt Broken nose 20.00 

Lloyd Edwin McCall Head injury (special) 35.25 

Lloyd Charles Sims X-ray (finger) 5.00 

Lloyd Charlie Dees - X-ray (elbow) 5.00 

Lloyd Donald Knapmeyer X-ray (arm) 5.00 

Lloyd Tames Lucas X-ray (elbow) 10.00 

Lloyd Gilbert Fleek Fractured humerus 65.00 

Louisa George Vinson X-ray (knee) 12.00 

Louisa George Vinson Arm injury (special) 83.49 

Louisa Robert Bartram Dislocated shoulder 35.00 

Louisa Albert Lee Akers X-ray (knee) 6.00 

Louisa lohn Vaughn Dental injury (special) 112.50 

Louisa Jody Adams Dislocated shoulder 35.00 

Louisa Larry Porter Broken rib. X-ray 20.00 

Louisa Kelly Patton X-ray (finger) 5.00 

Louisa Thomas Collins worth X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Louisa Robert Collins Broken tooth 20.00 

Louisa Darrell Patrick Laceration — suture 5.00 

Louisa Tody Adams Dislocated shoulder 35.00 

Louisa James Moore X-ray (leg) 6.00 

L<>v< < > Jack Wilkerson Dental injury (special) 46.50 

Loyall Morton Boggs Loss of tooth 25.00 

Lowes Robert Summerville Dental injury (special) 41.50 

Loyall Bobby Goforth X-ray (knee) 6.00 

Ludlow Noel Young X-ray (wrist) 6.00 

Ludlow Ronnie Colwell Knee injury (special) 91.00 

Ludlow John Draud X-ray (rib) 10.00 

Ludlow Dave Riddle Broken teeth 16.00 

Ludlow Kenneth Williams Loss of tooth. X-ray 27.00 

Ludlow Edwin Trammel X-ray (spine) 10.00 

Lynch Rodney Kincer Broken tooth 19.00 

Lynch Tackie Adams _-, Dislocated elbow 25.00 

Lynch James Prather X-ray (knee) 6.00 

Lynn Camp lack Taylor Dislocated shoulder 35.00 

Lynn Grove Steve Paschall Laceration— suture 5.00 

Lynn Grove Tommy McNeely Fractured sternum 10.50 

McDowell Ozzie Henson Broken finger 10.00 

McDowell Sammy Martin Fractured fibula 36.00 

McDowell Wendell Martin Fractured tibia 50.00 

McKinney Gerald Durham Fractured radius 25.00 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1956 Page Nineteen 

McKinney Herbert Toombs Finger injury (special i 14.50 

Madison-Model Ray Teater Fractured metatarsal. X-ray 37.00 

Madison-Model Johnny Coy Dental injury (special i 39.50 

Madison-Model Jimmy Sloane Leg- injury ispeciali 150.00 

Madisonville Tom Rodgers X-ray i ankle) 6.00 

Madison ville Roger Haynie X-ray (spine) 7.50 

Madisonville Glen Branson Laceration — suture 5.00 

Madisonville Albin Appleby Chipped tooth 3.00 

Madisonville David Salmon X-ray t spine i 22.50 

Madisonville Tom Rodgers Broken tooth 20.00 

Madisonville Mark Eastin, Jr. Leg- injury (special) 150.00 

Magnolia Donque Heath Laceration— suture 5.00 

Magnolia lames Akins Laceration — suture 5.00 

Magrnolia Norman Heath X-ray (finger I 5.00 

Meade County Jimmy Wright X-ray (hand t 5. 00 

Meade County Dennis Raley Laceration — suture 5.00 

Memorial i Hardy ville i Denny Vaughn X-ray (ankle) 5.U0 

Middlesboro Horace Mullins X-ray i rib i 10.00 

Middlesboro Jimmy Hinel X-ray i finger i 5.00 

Middlesboro Bernard Beach X-ray i rib i 10.00 

Middlesboro Alva Day Broken rib 10.00 

Middlesboro Harvey Yeary. Jr. X-ray ikneei 12.00 

Middlesboro Walter Walker Dislocated knee 19.50 

Middlesboro Buddy Callison X-ray (arm I 5.00 

Middlesboro Larry Lyon X-ray (hand! 7.50 

Middlesboro Doyle Milligan X-ray i ankle I 7.50 

Middlesboro H. E. LThl Nose injury (special i 62.50 

Middlesboro Charles Wiedenhoefer Shoulder injury (special i 150,00 

Middlesboro Larry Lyon X-ray (hand) 12.50 

Middlesboro Paul She' ton X-ray ( hand i 5.00 

Middlesboro Tommy Stapleton X-ray i finger I 5.00 

Middlesboro Terry Gooding Leg injury (special ) 68. J 5 

Middlesboro Ronnie Sharpe Head injury i special i 95.25 

Middlesboro Donald Denny Broken tooth 5.00 

Middlesboro Ben Miller X-ray I spine) 10.00 

Middlesboro Harvey Yeary X-ray lanklei 8-00 

Montgomery County Gerald Crockett X-ray (ankle) 5.00 

Montgomery County Ollie Snedegar Pubic injury (special i 55. on 

Morgan County Darrell Adams X-ray I ankle) 10.00 

Morganfield Warren Riley Fractured ulna 3.00 

Morganfield Larry Sheffer Fractured clavicle 13.50 

Morgan field William Wat hen _ X-ray (shoulder! 15.00 

Morganfield Elmer Fowler X-ray i foot i 0.00 

Morganfield Larry Sheffer Fractured clavicle 7.50 

Morganfield Warren Riley Fractured ulna 10.00 

Morganfield James Yarbrough Back injury (special i 63.10 

Morganfield Johnny She! ton X-ray (ankle) IL00 

Mi Sterling Robert Goldey X-ray (hand i 5.00 

Mt. Sterling Dudley Pendleton X-ray I spine ) 15.00 

Mt. Sterling Lyle Stone X-ray (head) 10.00 

Mt. Sterling Dick Fuller Dislocate 1 wrist. X-ray 25.00 

Mt. Sterling Gary Broten Broken finger. X-ray 28.00 

Mt. Sterling Buddy Messer X-ray (shoulder) 7.50 

Mt. Vernon Billy Gregory X-ray i ankle \ 11.00 

Mt. Washington Charles A. Gentry _ Dislocated finger. X-ray 23.00 

Mt, Washington Robert Carnes X-ray (ankle) S.OO 

Mt. Washington Jack L'oyd Fractured tibia 19.50 

Murray Tommy Wells X-ray (chest I 10.00 

Murray Tommy Rushing Dislocated shoulder 15.00 

Murray Harry Allison Fractured tibia 50.00 

Murray Gerald Tabers X-ray i ankle) 6.00 

Murray Jerry Buchanan X-ray (ribs) 10.00 

Murray Billy McLemore X-ray (hand) 6.00 

Murray Nelson Shrout X-ray (shoulder) 10.00 

Murray lohn Koertner X-ray (leg) 5.00 

Murray Jimmy Cook Laceration — suture 5.00 

Murray Wells Purdom X-ray i ankle i 10.00 

Murray John Koertner Laceration — suture 5.00 

Murray Gene King Broken tooth 20.00 

Murray Training Ralph Emerine Fractured radius 26.00 

New Concord J. W. Willoughby Broken tooth 2o.i)0 

Newport Marvin Wander Broken nose. X-ray 3'i.OU 

Newport Ervin Deaton Laceration — suture 5.00 

Newport Bill Jones X-ray i foot i 5.00 

Newport Dale Landell Broken rib. X-ray 13.00 

Newport Harry Walters X-ray (foot) 5.00 

Newport John Turner Fractured metacarpal 10.00 

Newport Ronnie Pigg Shoulder dislocation 23.50 

Newport Hay den Combs Broken ribs 14.00 

Newport : Bill Morton X-ray (knee) 5.00 

Newport Jerry Jones Fractured clavicle 35.00 

Newport Ronnie Downard Loss of tooth 20.00 

Newport Jim Wood Loss of tooth 3.00 

Newport Norman Youtsey Fractured radius 40.00 

Newport Ervin Deaton Chipped tooth 3.00 

Newport Dan Points X-ray ( ankle i 6.00 

Newport Larry Harden Shoulder injury (special) 48.90 

Newport Phil Hamilton Loss of teeth 18.00 

Newport Dan Points Broken tooth. X-ray 22.00 

Newport Angelo Hall Laceration — suture, X-ray 15.00 

Newport _ Henry Green X-ray i spine) 15.00 

Newport Dick Lang X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Newport Bill Jones X-ray ielbobw) 6.00 

Newport Lester Temple X-ray (ankle) 6.00 



Page Twenty THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1956 

Newport Bill Morton X-ray (ankle! 6.00 

Newport Jerry L. Morris X-ray (head) 10.00 

Newport Catholic Kenneth Niehaus X-ray (ankle) 10.00 

Newport Catholic Walter Menetrey . X-ray (arm I 10.00 

Newport Catholic Charles Kallmeyer Broken finger, X-ray 12.50 

Newport Catholic Sam Bauer X-ray (head and spine) 30.00 

Newport Catholic Paul Carr Broken tooth. X-ray 22.00 

Newport Catholic Jerry Beiting Arm injury (special) 80.38 

Newport Catholic Robert Zimmerman X-ray (finger I 10.00 

Newport Catholic Robert Neuroth X-ray (ankle) 10.00 

Newport Catholic Ronald Cooney X-ray (ankle! 10.00 

Newport Catholic Jerry Beiting Dislocated finger, laceration — suture 15.00 

Newport Catholic Paul Meyers Loss of tooth. X-ray 31.00 

Nicholas County Ned Jennings Dislocated elbow 9.50 

Nicholas County Billy Mathes Broken ribs — -multiple 10.00 

Nicholasville Paul Hager Laceration — suture, X-ray (head) 15.00 

Nicholasville Gene Cobb Leg injury (special ) 150.00 

North Marshall Billy Metcalfe Laceration — suture 5.00 

North Marshall Joe Story Groin injury (special) 137.33 

Oldham County David Walling X-ray (foot) 7.50 

Oldham County Kenneth Brooks Broken nose 10.00 

Oldham County Lawrence Vaughn Broken rib, X-ray 15.50 

Oldham County Kenneth Brooks Broken finger 10.00 

Oldham County Kenneth Brooks X-ray (finger) (additional payment) 5.00 

Oldham County Thomas Manby, Jr. X-ray (foot) 5.00 

Oldham County Terry Ashbrook X-ray (anklet 7.50 

Oldham County David Walling X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Oldham County Danny Williams Broken nose 15.00 

Oldham County Jimmie Horine Broken nose 15.00 

Old Kentucky Home Tommy McClure Dental injury (special) 72.50 

Old Kentucky Home Tyler Downs Loss of tooth, X-ray 27.00 

Oneida Institute Daniel Davidson, Jr. X-ray (ankle) 10.00 

Orangeburg Johnny Breeze Broken nose. X-ray 25.00 

Orangeburg Forrest .Jackson X-ray (wrist) 6.00 

Owensboro Allen Kirtley Dislocated knee 35.00 

Owensboro Wayne Hall X-ray (shoulder) 7.00 

Owensboro Lewis Johnson X-ray (spinel 10.00 

Owensboro Charles Sturgeon X-ray (chest) 7.00 

Paducah Tilghman Bill Trevarthen X-ray (shoulder) 10.00 

Paducah Tilghman Leonard Morris X-ray (hand I 6.00 

Paducah Tilghman Bill Smith Laceration — suture 5.00 

Paducah Tilghman Bill Mallory X-ray (hand) 6.00 

Paducah Tilghman Glenn Shaw X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Paducah Tilghman Bob Boucher X-ray (knee) 6.00 

Paducah Tilghman Bob Burton __X-ray (shoulder) 10.00 

Paducah Tilghman Harry Overby X-ray (shoulder) 10.00 

Paducah Tilghman James A. Hopper Fractured metacarpal, X-ray 43.00 

Paducah Tilghman Chris Boyd Broken nose, X-ray 27.50 

Paducah Tilghman Otis Dinning, Jr X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Paducah Tilghman Gary Jenkins Broken ribs — multiple, X-ray 30.00 

Paducah Tilghman Henry Clark X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Paducah Tilghman Dick Barrett Broken tooth 6.00 

Paducah Tilghman Kit Adkins Loss of tooth 3.00 

Paducah Tilghman _ Bill Ashley Broken tooth 8.00 

Paducah Tilghman John Anderson Loss of tooth, X-ray 31.00 

Paducah Tilghman _. Bob Boucher Dental injury (special) 66.00 

Paducah Tilghman Don Hack Vertebra proess (non-operative), X-ray 30.00 

Paducah Tilghman _ Henry Clark _. Fractured carpal 35.00 

Paducah Tilghman Leeman Bennett X-ray (shoulder) 10.00 

Paducah Tilghman ...Gene Hipp Broken tooth 20.00 

Paintsville __ Franklin Kennard Fractured fibula 50.00 

Park City Louis Thomas X-ray (thumb) 5.00 

Park City ..Adrian Cutliff _. Broken tooth 20.00 

Perryville __ Laddie Garrison X-ray (spine) 20.00 

Perryville Carlos Reynolds Broken finger. X-ray 16.00 

Perryville __ Neal Gibson Dental injury (special ) 74.00 

Pineville __Bert Gibson X-ray (head) 5.00 

Pineville Danny Haley Fractured toe, X-ray 25.00 

Pineville Raleigh Anders X-ray (ribs I 15.00 

Pineville __ Douglas Roper X-ray (hand) 5.00 

Pineville Raleigh Anders Broken rib. X-ray 15.00 

Pineville John White Loss of tooth. X-ray 27.00 

Pineville Walter Sanderson Loss of tooth. X-ray 30.00 

Pleasant View ..Ronnie Bishop X-ray (ankle) 5.00 

Pleasant View Billy Von Davenport Broken teeth 9.00 

Prichard ...Micky Wilhoit X-ray (arm) 6.00 

Prichard Jack Adams X-ray (knee) 6.00 

Pulaski County Curtis Tarter Fractured metatarsal 18.00 

Raceland ..Luther Craig _. Loss of tooth, X-ray (head) 35.00 

Raceland Donald Brown _. Shoulder injury (special) 150.00 

Richardsville Richard Cherry Fractured radius 40.00 

Richards ville Joe Richards Fractured fibula 50.00 

Riverside Institute Emery Smith Fractured clavicle 22.00 

Rockhold Ewell T. Cobb _. X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Rockhold George A. Sexton X-ray (leg) 5.00 

Russell County Gilbert Hammond Fractured sternum 35.00 

Russell County ...Noel Riggins Broken tooth 10.00 

Russell County Ralph Richardson X-ray (spinel 10.00 

Russellville Lawrence Monroe Loss of tooth, X-ray 27.00 

Russellville Donald Monroe Loss of teeth 50.00 

Russellville Charles Lockhart _ Fractured sternum 19.00 

Russellville Glenn Gilliam Loss of teeth 40.00 

(Continued in September Issue of the ATHLETE) 



"We ShipThf DaV You BuY" 

HUNTS ATHLETIC GOODS CO. 

INCDR PORATED 

PHONE 104 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 



U. OF K. COACHING CLINIC 

We hope you visited our display in the Coliseum during the University of 
Kentucky Coaching Clinic in Lexington, Kentucky on August 8, 9, 10 and 
11. We certainly did enjoy the visit with those of you who did. We are 
sure you met and talked with our new traveling representatives for the 
State of Kentucky. 

Herbie Hunt, former quarterback on the University of Kentucky football 
team and pitcher on the baseball team, will travel West Kentucky and live 
in Mayfield. 

Frank Seale of Lexington, Kentucky will show our merchandise to the 
Eastern Kentucky schools and live in Lexington. Frank also played football 
at the University of Kentucky and is well known to many of you coaches. 
We are certainly pleased to have these fellows as our representatives in 
their territories. 

We are distributors for "the very best" manufacturers of athletic goods, 
namely: McGregor. Spalding, Riddell, King-O'Shea, Voit, Bike, Cramer, 
Johnson & Johnson, Wigwam. Powers, General, Spanjian, Southern, etc. 

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satisfactory manner in our historv. From our complete stock we can handle 
your incidental football and basketball supplies. We feel confident that 
we can have special-made merchandise in your possession in due time for 
your requirements. 

Any shipments made during the month of August will carry October 1, 
1956, dating. 

We will be looking forward to seeing you at various times throughout the 
year. 



Hunt's Athletic Goods Co 

PHONE 104 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 

THE LARGEST EXCLUSIVE ATHLETIC HOUSE IN THE SOUTH 




SUTCUFFE IS REAW 

with complete foot ball, basketball 
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quality for which Sutcliffe is now well 
known — nationally-distributed, nation- 
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SUTCLIFFE SERVICE 

Write us about your needs — we'll give one day service. For extra-quick "^^r^ 
service or information — pick up your phone and ask for Al Seekamp or 
W. Head in our main Louisville office— JUniper 3-0251. For "on-the- 
ground-service", Sutciiffe's school representatives will contact you during 
the year as usual — Harry Blackburn, 1340 Linwood Ave., Columbus, 
Ohio, will cover the Big Sandy Valley; Bob Reis, 74 Pleasant Ridge Ave., 
South Fort Mitchell, Ky., will cover Northern, Central and Eastern Ken- 
tucky, Charles (Chuck) Shuster, Horse Cave, Ky., will travel Western 
and Southern Kentucky, and Al LeComte, 600 Orchard Drive, Louisville, 
Ky., will cover the Louisville area, home telephone EMerson 6-7445. 



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No. RSS Rawlings official 

College Ball $21.00 

No. RS3 Rawlings official 

High School Ball $15.95 

No. 100 Spalding official 

College Ball \ $2 1 .00 

No. 125 Spalding official 

High School Ball $15.95 

No. XB20 Voit official Rubber Ball $15.85 



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No. I5V-T Spalding All Tan $14.95 

No. (R5) Rawlings All Tan $14.95 

No. F1000 Wilson All Tan $14.95 



SUTCLIFFES SCHOOL CATALOG 

If you have not received our Fall 1956 cat- 
alog by Sept. 5, drop us a card and we will 
send one promptly. 





thecsUTCLIFFEco. 

INCORPORATED 

225 SO. FOURTH ST., LOUISVILLE, KY. 



f 







High School Athlete 

K. H. S. A. A. SCHOOL FOR BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Howard Gardner. R. 6; Roy Settle, R. 3; Ben Edelen, 
R. 7; Evan Settle, R. 8; Bennie Bridges, R. 10. Second Row: Charlie Vettiner, School 
Director; Dick Looney, R. 15; Rex Alexander, R. 1; Amos Teague, R. 2; Bob Miller, 
R. 9; Ernie Chattin. R. 18. Third Row: Joe Richardson, R. 4; Arnett Strong. R. 14; 
Harry Stephenson, R. 11; R. K. Padgett, K. 12; John Crosthw aite, R. 13; Turner Elrod, 
R. 5. 




OHicial Organ o/ the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 

SEPTEMBER - 1956 











I 



Football Officials Meet at Lexington 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Tom Bell. Lexington; Ralph Mussman, Newport; 
Howard Bennett, Maj field; Jim Barlow, Lexington; Bill Gammon, Ashland. Second 
Row: Kean Jenkins. Elizahethtown; John H. Shaw, Mayfield; Joe Sthuhmann, Louis- 
ville; Dave Longenecker, Louisville. 



The Officials Booking Department of the 
Central Kentucky Conference conducted a 
two-day meeting for football officials on 
August 10-11 in Lexington. The sessions 
were well attended by members of the local 
organization, and also present were repre- 
sentatives of most of the area organizations 
of football officials in Kentucky. 

Jim Barlow of the Central Kentucky or- 
ganization had been asked by his group to 
set up the program. Jlr. Barlow was in gen- 
eral charge of the sessions, with official 
Tommy Bell of Lexington being especially 
effective in his discussions of the mechanics 
of the game and in his interpretations of the 
rules. Dr. Lyman V. Ginger, K.H.S.A.A. rep- 
resentative on the National Football Commit- 
tee and official rules interpreter for the As- 
sociation, discussed rules changes at one of 
the sessions. One session was given over to 
a panel discussion in which the representa- 
tives of the football groups from the various 
parts of the state took part. 

In addition to covering the rules changes, 



the group spent much time on controversial 
questions relating to rules interpretation. 
The most important items covered in the 
meeting are given below. The interpretations 
are the result of much discussion and an 
agreement with respect to state-wide stand- 
ards. These agreements were passed along 
to Dr. Ginger, and, with a few minor changes, 
these are the results: 

1. Roughing the passer. Any contact that 
results from defender who is in the act of 
tackling or is in the air attempting to block 
the pass will be ignored. In short, the im- 
portant factor is whether the defensive man 
had an opportunity to avoid contact after 
the pass was thrown. In regard to contact 
after the passer has regained his balance, it 
was agreed that, if the passer stood still or 
faded backwards out of the play, contact will 
be prohibited. However, if he makes a move 
that is indicative of his intent to get back 
into the play, contact will be permitted. The 
officials believe that this interpretation will 

(Continued on Page Fourteen) 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 

Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



Vol. XIX— Xo. 2 



SEPTEMBER, 195fi 



$1.00 Per Year 



National Federation Annual Meeting 



The thirty-seventh annual meeting of the 
National Federation of State High School 
Athletic Associations was held at Jackson 
Lake Lodge, Moran, Wyoming, on June 24-28, 
1956. Forty state associations and the af- 
filiated Ontario Federation of School Athletic 
Associations were represented. Fifty-three 
state executive officers or assistant execu- 
tive officers, forty-eight state association 
board of control officers, and sixty-eight 
additional board of control members were in 
attendance. The total individual attendance 
was 527. This represents a new record for 
total attendance. 

Kentuckv was represented by K.H.S.A.A. 
President Russell Williamson ; Directors W. 
B. Jones. Louis Litchfield, W. H. Crowdus, 
Jack Dawson, Robert P. Forsythe, and Ken- 
neth Gillaspie; Commissioner Theo. A. San- 
ford, and Assistant Commissioner J. B. 
Mansfield. 

Canada was represented by Executive 
Officer Charles V. Box (Ontario Federation 
of School Athletic Associations) and Char- 
les G. Prince (Board of Control Member). 
The meeting was made the occasion for an- 
nouncements concerning several executive 
officers. Irvin A. Keller, formerly director of 
teacher training at Southwest Missouri 
State College at Cape Girardeau, Missouri, 
has been elected Secretary of the Missouri 
State Hi^h School Activities Association to 
succeed T. L. Noel, whose resignation took 
effect on Julv 1. Those in attendance at the 
annual meeting extend best wishes to Past- 
Secretary Noel and express the hone that he 
will find happiness and satisfaction in his 
new field of endeavor. Thev also welcome Mr. 
Keller into the organization and hope that 
he will enjov the new associations and the 
new work. Florida announced the appoint- 
ment of Flovd Lav, recentlv athletic and 
recreation director of Polk County, to be 
Director of Field Services for the Florida 
Hieh School Activities Association to assist 
Secretary Lafayette Golden in the general 
administration of association work. Secretary 
Walter E. Short (New Jersey State Inter- 



scholastic Athletic Association) has an- 
nounced his retirement as of January 1, 
1957. Norman J. Mansfield, formerly high 
school principal at Montclair, has been ap- 
pointed as Assistant Secretary who will work 
in the State Association office with Mr. 
Short. Commissioner E. A. Thomas (Kansas 
State High School Activities Association) 
has announced his retirement as of January 1, 
1957. Carl Kopelk, who has been Assistant 
Commissioner, has been appointed to the 
commissionership as of January 1, 1957. Mr. 
Thomas has served as a full-time state execu- 
tive officer longer than any other executive. 
He has been a very active member of many 
committees and groups in State Association 
and National Federation work. It is planned, 
at the proper time, to give proper recognition 
to the many services he has rendered. 

The meeting was also the occasion for an 
announcement by A. A. Schabinger (Direc- 
tor of the Official Sports Film Service) of 
his retirement to take effect July 1, 1956. Mr. 
Schabinger was included with those to re- 
ceive a National Federation citation for out- 
standing services in connection with the 
school athletic program. Also, an appropriate 
ceremony extending the appreciation of the 
entire Federation group for his many serv- 
ices was held in connection with the showing 
of the most recent of the series of sports 
motion pictures. 

Secretary R. Rex Dallev (Montana) and 
family were unable to attend the meeting 
because of a serious accident to son Ronald 
John Dalley and because of the illness of 
Rex. During the course of the meeting a 
resolution of sympathy was adopted and 
relayed by telephone. Later reports indicate 
rapid improvement for both Secretary Rex 
and Ronald John. 

An initiation ceremony, in charge of the 
committee, welcomed three executives to 
National Federation ranks. Assistant Secre- 
tary S. E. Alkire (Illinois), Secretary C. V. 
Davis, (Nevada) and Director W. M. Run- 
yon (Official Sports Film Service) were 

(Continued on Page Three) 



Vags Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE EOR SEPTEMBER, 1956 



SEPTEMBER , 1956 VOL. XIX— NO. 2 

Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association. 

Office of Publication, Lexington. Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1S79. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington. Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Russell Williamson (1956-60), Inez 

Vice-President Louis Litchfield (1953-57), Marion 

Directors — W. B. Jones (1953-57) Somerset; W. H. Crorcdus 
(1954-58). Franklin; Jack Dawson (1954-58), Middletcwn; 
Robert P. Forsythe (1955-59), Greenville; K. G. Gill .spie 
(1955-59). Georgetown: Cecil A. Thornton (1956-6(1), Harlan. 
Subscription Rates $1.00 Per j'ear 

^from the tommissionet s L/fflce 

Basketball Clinics 

Charlie Vettiner, who has served the 
K.H.S.A.A. for many years as basketball 
clinic director, will be in charge of the 1956- 
57 rules meetings. Clinic attendance is re- 
quired of all registered officials under As- 
sociation rules. 

Coaches and athletic directors are invited 
to attend the forthcoming series of state 
and regional clinics. The meetings are held 
primarily for the training of officials, but 
much good could be accomplished if all of- 
ficials and coaches should attend the clinics 
and receive the same interpretations of the 
rules. The dates and sites of the meetings 
are as follows: 

September 30, Louisville Armorv, 7:30 
P. M. (CDT) 

October 7, University High School. Lex- 
ington. 2:00 P. M. (CDT) 

October 7, Somerset High School. 7 :30 
P. M. (CST) 

October 8. Hazard High School. 2:00 P. M. 
(CST) 

October 8, Bell High School, Pineville. 
7:30 P. M. (EST) 

October 9, Pikeville High School, 7:30 
P. M. (EST) 

October 10, Morehead State College, 2:00 
P. M. (CST) 

Octo'-er 10, Ashland Y. M. C. A., 7:30 
P. M. (EST) 

October 11, Newport High School, 2:00 
P. M. (EST) 

October 14, Daviess Co. High School, 
Owensboro, 2:00 P. M. (CST) 

October 14, Henderson High School, 7:30 
P. M. (CST) 

October 15, Mavfield High School. 2:00 
P. M. (CST) 

October 15. Madison ville High School, 
7:30 P. M. (CST) 

October 16. Bowling Green High School, 
2:00 P. M. (CST) 

October 16, Elizabethtown High School, 



7:30 P. M. (CST) 

Use of Registered Officials 

The attention of principals and coaches is 
called to the lists of registered football and 
basketball officials which appear in this issue 
of the ATHLETE. School men should study 
the current lists to determine whether or not 
all officials with whom contracts have been 
signed have registered this fall. Supplemen- 
tary lists of officials will appear in subse- 
quent issues of the magazine. If there is 
any question about registration, the official 
should be asked to present his card. K. H. S. 
A. A. By-Law 22 provides that member 
schools should use registered officials in all 
football and basketball games, and that fail- 
ure to comply with this regulation makes 
the home school liable for suspension. 
Basketball Tournament Trophies 

Specifications are now being written for 
the trophies which will be used in the 1957 
district and regional basketball tournaments. 
Bids will be taken by the Trophy Committee 
during the next few weeks. Firms interested 
in submitting bids on the tournament 
trophies should write to the Commissioner 
for information. 

Football Examinations 

Part II of the National Federation Foot- 
ball Examination for Officials will be given 
in Kentucky on Monday, October 1. An of- 
ficial who has been registered for at least 
one year prior to the current season is elig- 
ible to take the examination and work for 
a higher rating. Officials who hold the 
"approved" rating in football are required to 
make a minimum percentage grade of 80 in 
order to maintain this rating from year to 
year. Officials who hold the "certified" 
rating keep this rating bv attending one or 
more clinics each year. Eligible officials who 
wish to take the test should write the state 
office. 

Delegate Assembly 

Article IV, Section 2-b, of the K.H.S.A.A. 
Constitution provides that members to the 
Delegate Assembly at the annual meeting 
shall be elected by the principals of each 
basketball district on ballots distributed by 
the Commissioner before October 1 and re- 
turned on or before November 15. Delegates 
serve for a period of one year, beginning 
January 1 immediately following their elec- 
tion. 

School for Officials 

The eighth annual School for Basketball 
Officials was held on August 12-13 at the 
Phoenix Hotel, Lexington. The school was 
directed bv Charlie Vettiner. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1956 



Page Three 



The sixteen officials and the regions 
which they represented were: Rex Alexand- 
er, Region 1 : Amos Teague, Region 2 : Roy 
Settle, Region 3 ; Joe Richardson, Region 4 : 
Turner Elrod, Region 5 : Howard Gardner, 
Region 6 ; Ben Edelen. Region 7 : Evan Settle, 
Region 8 ; Bob Miller, Region 9 ; Bennie 
Bridges, Region 10 : Harry Stephenson, 
Region 11; R. K. Padgett, Region 12; John 
Crosthwaite, Region 13 ; Arnett Strong, 
Region 14: Dick Loonev, Region 15: Ernie 
Chattin, Region 16. 

In the first session of the School, held 
on the afternoon of August 12. the agenda 
included the following: New Rules Study, 
Signal Brill, Floor Technique on Jump Balls, 
Floor Technique on Fouls, Floor Technique 
on Field Goals. In the evening session on 
the same day, discussion centered around the 
following: How to Determine Primary Re- 
sponsibility in "Charging and Blocking" Sit- 
uations, How to Determine Primary Re- 
sponsibility for Contact on Stationary 
Screens, How to Determine Primary Respon- 
sibility on Moving Screens, and Technical 
Fouls on Coaches. 

The morning session on August 13 was 
given over almost entirely to a discussion of 
offensive and defensive fouling. Final in- 
structions and suggestions to the regional 
representatives were given by Assistant 
Commissioner Mansfield and Commissioner 
Sanford. 

The services of the sixteen regional rep- 
resentatives will be available to member 
schools of the Kentuckv High School Athletic 
Association throughout the forthcoming 
basketball season. These men will conduct 
schools, clinics, demonstration games and 
assembly programs at the requests of school 
administrators and coaches. They will also 
assist new officials in becoming registered. 
It is hoped that school men will take advant- 
age of this Association service, which has for 
its purpose uniformity in officiating and the 
teaching of the rules of the game to all those 
who can profit by such instruction. 



NATIONAL FEDERATION MEETING 

(Continued from Page One) 
put through the severe test which greets 
all new executives. They qualified for mem- 
bership in the select group of State Associa- 
tion Executives identified with the National 
Federation brand. 

Following the chuck wagon dinner and 
outdoor initiation ceremonies, a short pro- 
gram was held in the recreation hall on 
Monday night. This included the serious 
part of the initiation ceremonies involving 



the National Federation seal, music by 
accordionist Tom Collins and his talented 
seven-year old son Pat ; expression of appre- 
ciation by S. F. Burke to Official Sports Film 
Service Director A. A. Schabinger, who is 
retiring, and introduction by Albert Willis 
of the new director, W. M. Runyon ; the pre- 
sentation of attractive sewing kits to each 
of the ladies ; the premier showing of the 
new baseball picture "Baseball-by-the-code ;" 
pictures showing activities at previous Fed- 
eration meetings by Lee K. Anderson; and 
the showing of colored slides of European 
scenes bv Executive Committee member W. 
R. Fugitt. 

Speakers and others who had an active 
part in the program included many of the 
state executive officers and board of control 
officers and members. In addition, excellent 
presentations were made by Wyoming At- 
torney General George F. Guy: Dr. R. R. 
Hamilton (Dean of the University of Wyom- 
ing Law School) ; and Miss Velma Linford 
(State Superintendent of Public Instruction 
for Montana). George M. Gosman (Lieuten- 
ant Governor of Montana) ably presented 
greetings and extended a welcome for Gov- 
ernor J. H. Aronson of Montana, who. along 
with Wyoming Governor Milward L. Simp- 
son, was attendim? an important conference 
of governors in Atlantic City. Manv excellent 
brief reports were presented by those listed 
on the program as consultants or as com- 
mittee representatives who were authorized 
to make progress reports. On Sunday after- 
noon at 400 P. M., an inspiring service was 
held at the nationally known Chapel of the 
Transfiguration. This was in charge of 
Bishop J. Wilson Hunter. The invocation at 
the onening session on Sundav night was 
delivered bv Executive Committee Member 
Homer Williams. A set of colored slides il- 
lustrating an interesting lecture on the won- 
ders of the Grand Teton area was given by 
Park Ranger Harold Hagen, assisted by 
Park Ranger Marion Ferguson. Dr. Otto 
Hughes, representing the Activities Com- 
mittee of the North Central Association of 
Colleges and Secondary Schools gave the re- 
sults of an interesting survey as a part of 
the program on Monday afternoon. 

Divisional sessions were held on Monday 
morning, June 25. One division was composed 
of State Executive Officers and others who 
are especially interested in their problems. 
The other group was made up of Members 
of State Association Boards of Control. 

Program and entertainment details were 
(Continued on Page Twelve) 



Pag-e Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1956 



The Flying Dutchman 

Things spring to life again each fall when 
the autumn breezes blow open the locker 
room doors and schoolboys reach for their 
football togs to open another athletic year 
in Kentucky. Here's another fact: There 
are a lot of young fellows more than sixty 
years old in this Commonwealth who would 
have been dead for all practical purposes 
twenty years ago had not their youthful 
vigors been renewed each year by the new 
crop of athletic hopefuls. 




Bob Miller 

You can really stay young working with 
these kids. That thought occurred to the 
Dutchman as he observed the glow on the 
face of the gentleman from Northern Ken- 
tucky, Bob Miller, as he gave his all to make 
the All-Star games at Lexington the grand 
success they were this year. With all of the 
trials and headaches which go with the 
management of these contests, Bob seemed 
to become a schoolboy again as he grace- 
fully took everything in stride to do a mag- 
nificent job for the kids. 

Nobody knows better than the Dutchman 
how much age bier pi-omotions, like the one 
sparked by youthful Bob, can put on a chap 
unless he gets a new "shot of youth serum" 
from the boys — and believe me, they'll sup- 
ply that "charge." So it is Bob Miller, coach, 
official, and promoter of wholesome recrea- 
tion for young men, who receives the first 
Corn Cob Pipe of Honor of the year for un- 
selfish service to his fellowmen. 

On the subject of recreation, the Dutch- 




man is advising Kentucky communities that 
his new book, "A NEW HORIZON OF REC- 
REATION," is just off the press and is 
available at Hunt's Athletic Goods Co., in 
Mayfield and at Sutcliffe's in Louisville. 

All of you remember Bob Pay, who made 
quite a reputation for himself as a coach of 
all sports at Eminence and other Kentucky 
towns. Here's good news about Bob. May- 
field, where Pay is pioneering a brand new 
year-round program of recreation, sends 
word that the well known and popular chap 
has done a tremendous job with the summer 
program there. Those Mayfield people 
haven't seen anything yet. Wait until Bob 
gets up his full steam ! 

Officials at the eighth annual School for 
Basketball Officials, sponsored by the 
K.H.S.A.A. at Lexington on August 12 and 
13, proclaimed this year's school the best of 
them all. Roy Settle, Joe Richardson, Howard 
Gardner and Arnett Strong, representing 
their regions for the first time, made sub- 
stantial contributions toward the betterment 
of the school. 

As usual, there were lots of visitors from 
Kentucky and elsewhere. We especially re- 
call with much pleasure the presence of Carl 
Schnebelt of Hanover, Indiana, and Gale 
Luckett of Madison, Indiana. The mutual 
friendship of Kentucky and Indiana officials 
is re-emphasized to the Dutchman each time 
he has the opportunity to be at a study ses- 
sion where the officials are thrown together. 
Right now your Dutch friend is looking for- 
ward to September when he will renew his 
friendship with L. V. Phillips, Indiana Com- 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1956 



Page Five 



missioner; Bob Hinshaw, his assistant; and 
the officials of the Indiana High School 
Athletic Association at the big Hoosier clinic 
at Indianapolis. 

Many things of importance came out of 
the Officials' School, but space here allows 
us to mention only a few. You'll get the 
others when your local clinics are held. 

Kentucky officials have most attractive 
new emblem which all of them are expected 
to wear. The standard set of signals must 
be learned and used religiously by all of the 
new officials coming on, as well as by the 
veterans. The coaches association has given 
indications that it will take steps to have all 
of our coaches attend at least one rules clinic 
during the year, and it was emphasized that 
there is no place for diplomats in the officiat- 
ing ranks of our athletic army. 

A good motto resulted from the study 
sessions, which might be helpful to officials 
and others: "He who receives no criticism 
does nothing. He who receives too much 
criticism loses his job." 

George Conley, Tommy Bell and Dick Betz 
were on hand. These three ranking college 
officials enjoyed not only the sessions, but 
also the cigars which they were mooching 
off Conley. It seems George took up cigar 
smoking after his numerous trips to the 
maternity ward of his local hospital caused 
him to purchase box after box to give away. 
As George puts it, "I'm the guy who should 
be honored, so why should I give all of them 
away? I just started smoking a few, myself!" 

Here is more recognition for the Kentucky 
High School Athletic Association. Mr. H. V. 
Mason of Hannibal (Missouri) High School 
has been attracted by the steps taken in our 
state to improve spectator sportsmanship, to 
develop pep clubs and to instill the correct 
philosophies in the minds of our cheerleaders. 
He has asked for and received the Kentucky 
Plan with all accompanying material. 

Will you remember to recommend that 
individual doing things unselfishly for 
others for the Corn Cob Pipe of Honor 
Award ? Will you look for that Game Guy in 
your community who is overcoming a phy- 
sical handicap to engage in sports, and tell 
the Dutchman about him? Will you remem- 
ber to ask recognition in the form of the 
Abou Ben Adhem citation for those schools 
and communities who go beyond the "call 
of duty" to be good neighbors to visiting 
teams, fans and officials? 



Registered Football Officials 

of The K. H. S. A. A.- 1956 

(List Compiled September 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone unless otherwise designated. If two numbers 
are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Adams, J. Mark, 2S Whirla Way, Lyndon, Belmont 8648, 

Clay 1824 
Adams, Eoy D., 302 Brunswick Rd., Louisville, Be 6367, 

Anchorage 912 
Adkins, Raymond C, 1526 Beverly Blvd., Ashland. Ea 4-7229 
Allmon, Raymond T., 108 Art.-i Drive, Madison, Tenn. 7-6075 
Anderson, E. W., Jr.. 504 Highland, Mayfield, 1927, 71 
Bach, Leonard. 3137 North Bend Rd., Cincinnati, Ohio 
Baird. Daniel, 313 Main St.. Fulton. 1550, 100 
Ballard, Robert A., Route 3, Shelbyville, 1490, 152 
Barlow, Bill. Route 5, Paris. 1095 W 
Barlow, Bob, Highland Ave., G'-urgetuwn, ,S94 
Barlow. James L.. 282 So. Ashland. Lexington, 4-9287, 2-5858 
Barters, John T., 423 Third. Dayton, Ju 14250, He 19088 
Beiersdorfer, Jim, 5517 Surrey Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio. Hu 1-7194, 

Hu 1-7194 
Bell, Thomas P., 1S43 Glennhill Dr.. Lexington. 2-2958, 2-1477 
Bennett. Howard, 955 So. 6th. Mayfield, 2690, 1420 
Betz, Dick. 250 Albany Rd., Lexington. 4-7394. 3-2880, Ext. 322 
Black, Charles D., 223 So. Main, Barbourville, 193, 439 
Blanton, Homer, Box 312, Catlettsburg, Ashland East 4-1730, 

Catlettsburg 404 
Boeing, Charles F., 3959 Delmar Ave., Cincinnati 11, Ohio, 

Mo 17032, Mu 16300 
Bohanon. J. B., 2226 Madison St., Paducah. 28149, 21652 
Bond. Jack C. 596 Mitchell Dr., Lexington, 24287, 28775 
Bostick. Lord M., Jr., 419 W. 12th, Bowling Green, Vi 33319, 

Vi 26650 
Bowling, Harry. Hodgenville, 25702. 24 

Bowman. Earl G., 511 Park Avi., Lexington, 50473, 23343 
Boyles, Jerry F., 3200 Park St., Ashland, Ea 469995, Ea 41111, 

Ext. 229 
Brichler, Joe A., 5737 Kiefer Ct., Cincinnati, Ohio, Ki 1-6049, 

Pa 1-1984 
Briggs. James P., 2526 Harrison, Paducah. 2-1235, 3-6214 
Brizendine, Vic, 2711 Lakeside Dr., Louisville 5, Gl 46843, 

CI 4866 
Brotzge. Maurice J., 3800 W. Broadway, Louisville, Ar 2506, 

Ar 2506 
Brown, George W\, 1625 Quarry Hill Rd., Louisville, Gl 8-4857, 

Ju 4-1161, Ext. 462 
Burnett. Gerald, 624 Stewart, Elizabethtown, 9019. 4606 
Byrd, Harry G.. 7331 North Timberlane Drive, Madeira, Ohio, 

Locust 1-8745, Locust 1-8745 
Caiman, Edwin C, Jr., Box 218, Sturgis. 3900, 3545 
Campbell. Harry K., Liggett, 47S. 731 and 1333 
Campbell, John J., Route 6. Fulton. 1773, 14 
Campbell, William C-, 2359 Frankfort Ave., Louisville 6, 

Tw 33526, Me 77621, Ext. 226 
Canter. John. 1809 Shady Lane. Apt. 3, Louisville, Hi 72S1-M, 

Wa 8862 
Carlson, David A.. 2916 Washington. Paducah, 5-7943 
Carroll, Thomas J., 1045 Parkway Dr., Louisville, Me 6-2412, 

Em 3-3582 
Caruso, J. T., 123 Oak, Norton, Va.. 154. 410 
Chaney. Joseph G., Horse Cave, St 6-6341, St. 6-6181 
Chaput. Louis E., 410 College St., Elizabethtown. 3069, 4125 
Chattin. Ernie P.. 2147 Central. Ashland. 1088. East 4-6191 
Clinard, Fred L., Snow Ave., Madison, Tenn. 44-7-2437, 

Nashville At 67235 
Coleman. Jim, Box 485. Fairdale. Em 7-8843. Em 8-2251 
Combs, Travis, 1701 Deer Lane, Louisville, Hi 3887, Wa 7371, 

Ext. 275 
Coulter, William M.. 2002 N. Fifth Ave., Evansville 10, Ind., 

Ha 3-7510, Ha 4-4915 
Cox. Layton, 190 N. Hanover, Lexington, 2-0570 
Craig. Randy, 446 Elm, Ludlow, Co 1-2765, Ga 1-4460 
Crosthwaite, John S. Jr., Box 589, Harlan, 2075. 57 
Crura, Edward E., 3242 Greendale Dr., Louisville, Sp 8-6067, 

Me 7-7621, Ext. 294 
Culp, Willard E., Co. "A", 326th Abn. Eng. Bl., Fort Campbell, 

4307, 2971 
Cummins. Joshua W., 2139 Memorial Pkwy.. Fort Thomas, 

Hi 1-1679, Po 1-4100, Ext. 748 or 749 
Dallmann, James W., 12 Center St.. Jeffersonville, Ind., 3-7255 
Damico, Ernie, 1758 E. McMillan St., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

Wo 1-8058, Ch 1-5820, Ext. 386 
Davis, Clyde E., 2531 E. Euclid Ave.. Ashland. Eh 47S04 
Derrington, Robert, Route 9, New Harmony Rd., Evansville, 

Ind., Wo 35133, Ha 24171, Sta. 518 
DeMuth, Paul E., 1509 Oleanda Ct.. Louisville, Em 6-4354, 

Wa 6719 
DeVary, W. B.. 217 W. Hickman, Winchester, 302 W 
DeVault, Don, 3017 E. Walnut St., Evansville, Ind., Gr 61696, 

Ha 55252 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1956 



DiMuzio, Robert M., 6422 Golfway Dr., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

Ki 12220, Wa 11180 
Dolan, Richard S.. 5111 Emerald Dr., Louisville. 21-9-7239, 

.Teffersonville 36611, Ext. 206 
Doll. Howard D., Quarters 2, V. A. Hospital, Fort Thomas, 

Hi 18200. Hi 18341 
Drever, .Tack, 3305 Lookout Dr., Cincinnati, Ohio, Ea 1-3009, 

Ma 1-534S 
Durkin, .Tack H„ 240 Hillsboro. Lexington. 44396, 41717 
Edelen. Ben R., 3309 Wellingmoor, Louisville, Gl 4-3518, 

Ju 4-1361. Ext. 313 
Ellspermann, George A.. 1305 S. Ruston, Evansville, Ind., 

Gr 65693. Ha 47741, Ext. 364 
Elovitz. Carl. 1920 Spring Grove Ave., Lexington, 5-1222, 

Versailles 720 
Elrod, Richard. Route 1, Box 14, Portsmouth, Ohio. Ul 85366 
Engle. Orville. 208 Tennessee Ave., Pineville, 72916 
Ewing. C. M.. 7409 U. S. 42. Florence, Atl 3-3147, Un 1-4100 
Farmer. John H., Box 286, LaFollette. Tenn., 1531, 1060 
Faust, John F.. 2427 Concord Dr.. Louisville. Me 72043. Me 73651 
Fey, Allen, 123 Garden Way, Fort Thomas, Hi 16288, Ki 11800, 

Ext. 1265 
Figg, Charles R., 404 Roberts St., Frankfort, 42146, 30565 
Fisher. W. B.. 1722 Beechview Ct., Louisville 16, Em 6-6488, 

21-7-1431 
Fitchko, Bill, Norton, Va„ 466 W, 554 
Fletcher. John L., 122 I Gaffey, Fort Knox. Rt 3-2742, Fort 

Knox 234S 
Florence, Robert H.. 242 Glenwood Dr.. Paducah. 5-7910, 

5-6311. Ext. 576 
Forbes, John W., Jr., 208 Granvil Dr., Louisville, Gl 46025 

Cy 2731 
Forsythe, Robert, Browder, Greenleaf 6-8007, Greenville 474 
Fortney, Robert Lee, 2805 Breckenridge Lane. Louisville, 

Gl 81079, Ju 43231. Ext. 474 
Freihaut, Herman P.. 2601 Heidelbach, Evansville, Ind., Ha 

21774, Ha 56155 
Funkhouser, Roy A., Bldg. 432 "A", Fort Campbell, 3257, 2804 
Gammon, William H.. 908 Highland, Ashland, East 4-6519, 

East 4-1111 
Geiser, C. H.. Jr., 1093 Keller, Louisville 13, Em 88191, 

Cy 5521 
Gettler, John F., 314 Sheridan Dr., Lexington, 28845, 25494 
Gish, Delmas. 204 W. 3rd St., Central City, 518 W, 9 
Godbey. Edsel T.. 657 Maxwelton Ct„ Lexington, 50986 
Gorham, Robert J.. 174 St. James Dr.. Lexington, 26610, 41717 
Gosiger, Paul, 3036 Linview, Cincinnati 8, Ohio, Ea 11753, 

Ch 11654 
Grace, Charles K., Tennessee Ave., Pineville, Ed 73331, 

Ed 72392 
Grace, Hickory E., Middlesboro, 413 J 
Grady. Clarence. Marion, 95, 50 
Greene. Omar Paul. Box 5. ByPro. 2573, 2573 
Greenslait, James W., Brown St.. Raceland 
Grieco, Joseph R.. 2832 Shaffer Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

Mo 1-3346 
Gruneisen, Sam, 1101 Samuel St., Louisville. Me 4-9964, Wa 6951 
Hadden, Newell P., Jr.. 121 Lackawanna Rd., Lexington, 

35332, 27866 
Haffey, Stan, 1243 Garden Circle. Wyoming, Ohio, Po 1-2884, 

Ki 1-6600 
Hagan. Joseph E.. 3000 Sherbrooke Rd., Louisville, Gl 81325, 

Wa 4327 
Hagerman, Bart, 715 Magnolia Ave., Bowling Green, Vi 27S65. 

Vi 22481 
Hagy, Harold J., 201 Lovell Dr., Charleston, W. Va. 
Hall. Frank P.. 236 Glenwood Dr., Paducah, 23073, 21627 
Hanes. Edward C. Route 1. Cecilia. 5400 (Bus. No.) 
Harris, Gene, 201 Riverside Dr.. Russell, 822, Ashland Ea 

4-1155, Ext. 253 
Harmon, Charles W., 217 5th St., Williamsburg. 3426 
Harrod, Robert, 141 Cleveland Ave., "Versailles, 657 Y 
Hartley. William E.. 1121 Marshall. Evansville, Ind., Gr 7-0631, 

Gr 7-0631 
Hatfield, Gene. 202 Taylor St.. Fulton, 1274. Mayfield 2137 
Hawkins, Charles C 350 Maple Ave., Hodgenville, 20011 
Hawkins, Ralph B.. 661 E. Broadway, Madisonville, 2927. 210 
Hawkins. Robert W., Echo Lane. Madisonville. 2722. 210 - 112 
Heinold. Jack, 3642 Wilshire Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, East 19263, 

Main 11901 
Hellard. George D.. Jr., 572 Longview, Lexington, 3-0871. 3-0484 
Hewling, Richard. 211 Linden, Newport, Ax 12299 
Himmler. Bob. 521 Van Voast. Bellevue. Ju 13779, Wo 19200 
Hoferer, Louis R., 420 McClelland, Cincinnati 17, Ohio, 

Ca 13022, Wa 19841 
Hofstetter, Joe, 1423 W. 4th Ave., Williamson, W. Va. 
Holbrook. William, 2421 Forest Ave., Ashland, Ea 45850, 

Ea 42144 
Holeman, D. Fletcher, 329 Poplar. Dawson Springs. 2302, 4241 
Howard, Z. R.. Corbin. 1981 
Howerton, Jack, Jr., 416 Lotis Wav, Louisville, Tw 37490, 

Wa 6002 
Huff. Carl R., Jr., 1017 W. Delaware, Evansville 10, Ind., 

Ha 27234 
Isaac, John K., 917 Carte St., Charleston, W. Va. 



Janning, Robert L., 151 Pleasant Ridge, South Fort Mitchell, 

Ed 13538, Ki 12142 
•Tarboe, Clem E., 321 Concord Blvd., Evansville, Ind., Ha 41965, 

Ha 34435 
Jenkins, Joseph K., 210 Morningside Dr., Elizabethtown, 4087, 

3230 
Jeter, John B„ 1702 Versailles Rd.. Lexington, 5-0562. 4-9895 
Johnson, Bernard, 322 Blueberry Lane, Lexington 
Johnson, James H., 2028 Robin Rd., Owensboro, MU 3-7134, 

MU 3-8678 
Johnson, James M-, Box 367, Jenkins, 64 J 
Kathman, Bernie, 48 Beech Drive, Edgewood, South Fort 

Mitchell. Dixie 18207, Main 17541 
Keith, William E., Jr., Hqts. 148th Engr Bn. (C), Fort Camp- 
bell, 3535, 2616 
Kemper, Russ, 5732 Lauderdale, Cincinnati, Ohio, Mu 14380, 

We 16222 
King, Allen, 424 N. Brady, Morganfield 

Kraesig, Charles F„ 3851 C Fincastle Rd.. Louisville, Gl 84969 
Kyle, Leslie. Jr., 25 Chalfonte. Fort Thomas, Hi 1S601, Ki 12622 
Lancaster, Morris B., 106 Penmoken Pk., Lexington, 26592, 

43644 
Lawson, Carl E., Ivy Hill. Harlan, 1327, 1546 
Lenahan, Thomas F., 1655 A Belmar Dr., Louisville, Gl 84490, 

Ju 49825 
Lescisin, George A., 118V> Shepherd Ave., South Charleston, 

W. Va. 
Levicki, A. P., 340 Oak, Norton, Va., 556, 554 
Lindloff. Gilbert E., 6004 So. 3rd, Louisville, Em 30225, 

Sp 45781 
Long, James S., Route 2, Bedford, 3945 
Longenecker, David M., 3910 Olympic, Louisville, Be 3401, 

Ext. 301-2, Tw 69071 
Lucas, Gene T.. 412 Clayton, Georgetown. 1371. 1215 
Ludwig. Harry F., Louisville Country Day School, Louisville 7, 

Be 5380, Be 3452 
McBee, William K., Burlington, 342 

McClaskey, Booker, Boston, Te 34725. Fort Knox 4916 
McCollum, Robert G., 406 Holliday Rd.. Lexington, 23710 
McCord, Anthony A., 1636 Courtney Ave., Lexington, 33814 
McCorkle. Wade E., 119 N. Main, Harlan, 283, 1527 
McCowan. Connell, Route 1, Box 251, Corbin, 2361 
McKown, C. H., Wayne, W. Va. 

McMillan, .1. N., 305 Riverside Dr., Russell, 0-367, Ashland 370 
McTigue, Joe. 647 Eastlawn, Louisville, Ar 6120, Me 7S726 
Makepeace, William H.. Jr., 2346 East Hill, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

East 14042, East 14042 
Manning, Louis, 383 Laurel Ave., Westwood, Ashland 
Martin. Bill. 153 Clay St., Erlanger. Di 18172 
Marushi, Rudy, 553 Stratton St., Logan, W. Va. 
Matarazzo. Sal, 320 N. Mulberry, Elizabethtown, 5689, Fort 

Knox 5255 
May. E. B.. Jr.. Box 185, Prestonsburg. 2314, 7661 
Mayhew, Happy, Barbourville, 619 L 
Meeks, Jack. 407 Fifth St., Corbin, 415, 561 
Mercke, Frank R., 417 Lotis Way, Louisville, Tw 68460, 

Wa 4206 
Meyer, Harry J., 5319 Lilibet Ct., Cincinnati, Ohio, Bl 13459, 

Du 15412 
Miller, Maurice, 417 Elm St., South Charleston, W. Va. 
Millerhaus. Bill. 923 Harris Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, Gr 17904, 

Wa 19722 
Milliken, John S., Jr., 1217 Cardinal Dr.. Louisville, Me 44391, 

Ju 431S1 
Mitchell. Emmett, 284 Tavlor Dr.. Lexington, 52480, 44255 
Mitchell, Vyron W.. 901 Walnut, Fulton, 1648, 30 
Monroe, Robert. 307 College St., Elizabethtown, 3889 
Moran, W. Carl, 3104 Horton Ave., Louisville 5, Gl 89778, 

Sp 23661 
Mordica, William A., 800 Edgewood Ave., Ashland, East 47741 
Muntan, Peter J., 125 Woodmore Ave., Louisville, Em 88236, 

Me 77621 
Mudd, Ed L„ 400 No. 42nd St., Louisville. Ar 6S88 
Mussman. Ralph. 502 Monroe St., Newport, Ju 14562, Co 11300 
Nau, Bill, Barbourville, 203, 317 

Neal, Gene. 549 Washington, New Richmond, Ohio, Ri 23641 
Nimmo, Lo. 207 Price Rd.. Milford. Ohio, Terrace 13170 
Noland, Douglas. 707 E. Main, Stanford, 2609, 2619 
Noland, James H., Jr., Route 2, Box 17, Lyndon, Be 3996, 

Ju 44379 
Ogles, Charles M.. 1903 Cedar Lane. Nashville, Tenn., Cy 73597, 

Ch 28311, Station 3264 
Omer, Billy W„ Madisonville. 851 W 
O'Nan, Norman, Route 3, Henderson. 79912, 73455 
O'Neal, Bud, 4205 Berkshire Ave., Louisville, Gl 89051. Me 76494 
Osborne. Ted G., 408 Henry Clay. Lexington, 45270, 45270 
Overly, William H., P. O. Box 579, Somerset. 1294, 1294 
Parker, M. L., 202 Cardinal Lane. Paducah, 56204, 23501 
Parsley, Clyde E.. Route 2, Providence, 2524 
Patrick, Charles C, Route 2, Lexington, 44516, 44516 
Pearce, Horace Lee. 5324 Halsey Ct., Louisville 14. Em 84133, 

Sp 42341 
Perkins. Bill R.. Route 1. Georgetown, 464 W 
Perry, A. L., 321 Meadow Lane, Elizabethtown, 3735, Fort 
Knox 2140 or 2149 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 195(5 



Page Seven 



Poore. William E., 3sth Winchester, Middlesboro. 1358 J 
Potter, Sam, Lynch, 2673, 2591 

Radjunas, Stan E.. 1644 Elliott Ave.. Ashland. E 41896 
Raines, Max. 60S Cedar St.. Owensboro, Ma 39933 I Bus. No. I 
Ralterman. Bernard W.. Si\. 1222 So. list St.. Louisville. 

Cy 6085, Wa 1241, Ext. 6274 
Reddington, .lames T.. 2539 Ridgewood, Louisville, Me 77964, 

Cy 4421. Ext. 258 
Reed. Gordon. 1603 North Fort Thomas \ve., Fort Thomas, 

Hiland 14946, Dunbar 14507 
Reinhart, Gene, 4813 Sweetzer, Evansville. End., Gr 60568, 

Ha 20892 
Renfro. John Edwin. Pikeville College, Pikeville, 145 R. 

9102 or 2S9 
Rentz, Thomas W.. 107 Swigert Ave., Lexington, 41091. 32SS0 
Riddle. Maurice G-, Route 1. Georgetown, 661-M-2. 22220. 

Ext. 2238 
Riggs. William T.. 28 Congress, P. O. Box 21. Morganfield, 

590, 916S 
Rocke, James M.. Cynthiana, 1384, Midway 22 11 
Rolph. Harold J.. 915 So. 7th St., Ironton. Ohio. 2059 U. 1390 
Ruddle. Guy R.. 502 Meadows Hill Dr., Dawson Springs, 2526 
Rudolph. Fred. Jr.. 1020 Parkway Dr., Louisville. Me 40737, 

Me 57441 
Russell. Charles B., Jr.. Lynch 
Russell, Joe, Orchard Dr., Russellville. 398, 398 
Sabato. Al. 4121 Forest Av,.., Norwood 12. Ohio. Me 16771, 

Pa 11052 
Sacra. Gresham. 920 Darley Dr.. Lexington, 26036, 22220, 

Ext. 3217 
Sallee. W. E.. 107 Cochran Rd.. Lexington. 10305, 24628 
Sauter, Harold S., 1227 Crown Ave., Louisville, Highland 

5512 J, Em 83381. En'. 15! 
Saylor, Deward, Box 407. Wallins Creek, Wallins 3 (Bus. No.) 
Scharfenberger. Irv T.. 7267 .lethve Lane, Madeira. Ohio. 

Locust 16378, Cherry 154 10 
Sehuluna on, Jo-. -|.h K . \ltawo,„l, A nelioi a e:e. 21-Onss, Wa 7341 
Schultz, Edward Jake, 69111 Gloria Dr.. Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Jackson 16665. Cherry 11960 
Schutz, John J.. Jr.. Rout..- 21. McDonald Lane. New Albany. 

Ind., 16984 
Schmitt, K. F-. 636 So. 40th, Louisville, Sp 201 II, Ju 48269 
Scott, Bill, 1816 McDonald. Lexington, 23316. 13663 
Shaw. John H.. 219 E. Lee. Mayfield, 1435 
Shaw, Stanlev E.. 4460 W. Sth St.. Cincinnati, (lino. Gr 11100. 

Wa. 15300 
Sheets. James W.. 837 Darley Dr.. Lexington, 52234, 34460 
Showalter, John. Georgetown, 662 
Sinclair. George H-. 512U Lammers Lane. Louisville, 21-9-7925, 



M, h 



7621. Line 204 



Sledd. T.. 712 Poplar St.. Murray. 219, 740. Lin. :, 

Sloan, Wallace. 419 Oread R.I.. Louisville, Ho 1126. Tw 72554 

Smith. Edgar J.. 3901 Farmview, Louisville. Ch S12S6 

Smith. Walter K.. 728 So 38th. Louisville, Sp 20586, Wa 9201 

Snider. Louis G.. 2103 Debera Way, Louisville, Glendale 

85248, GI 47511 
Sparks. Harry M.. 210 Woodland, Murray 1193-J, 740, Ext. 1" 
Stephens. Robert J.. Box 529, Montgomery, W. V;i. 
Stephenson. B. H.. 331 Taylor Dr., Lexington. 2707" 
Stephenson, Harry S., 22IU Circle Dr.. Lexington. 49620, 24789 
Stevens. Paul B.. Dawson Springs. 2120, 3811 
Stevens. William D.. lis Culpepper Rd., Lexington. 51071. 

22220. Ext. 3223 
Stone. Clifton. Route 3. Oak Hill Rd.. Evansville, Ind., Gr 

60973, Ha 53311 
Sweeney. James Patrick, Jr., 3320 Trinity Rd.. Louisville. 

Tw 60401 
Thompson. A. W.. Route 1. Box 680, Louisville, Fern Creek 

3790, Hi 5682 
Thompson. Jack. 2347 Saratoga. Louisville, Hi. 4183 
Thompson. Jack F.. Jr.. 1310 Rammers St.. Louisville. Me 

43517. Ju 45311 
Thompson. Paul. 2624 Blackburn Ave.. Ashland. 48639 
Thompson. Ralph. 5599 Surrey, Cincinnati. Ohio. Mo 17196. 

Wa 10047 
Thurman. J. W.. Manchester. 2313 
Timmering, George E.. 1741 Boiling Ave.. Louisville, Ar 0309, 

Wa 6710 
Todoran, Roman D., Camden Rd.. Jenkins, 423 iBus. No.) 
Treas. Joe W.. 607 Green St.. Fulton, L056, 41 
Troutman. Doyle C. 504 N. Main. Harlan. 522 (Bus. No. I 
Tucker. William R.. 230 So. Highland. Winchester, 941 W. 

Lexington 22222. Ext. 2272 
Vanderberg, Ralph H., 3126 So. Farmcrest, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Me 19H72. Ki 11 sou. Ext. 846 
Vankirk, Alvia S„ 401 Center, Corbin, 1546, 146 
Varner, Ray G.. 103 Ashton Dr.. Lexington. 25432, 34224. 

Station 210 
W r anchic, Nicholas. 311 Pepper Dr., Lexington, 31838 
Wash. Johnnie. 110 West Picadome, Lexington, 5-2474, 3-0484 
Watson, John T., 1808 16th St.. Huntington. W. Va.. 

Ja 55398, 9162 
Weber, Edward H.. 3707 St. Germaine. Louisville, Tw 64298. 

Hi 5613 



Weber, Walter. 33S Anderson Ferry Rd., Dehli Hills, Ohio, 

Bl 10161, Va 14280. Ext. 316 
Weddle, Bob, Pikeville. 1243, 200 
Welch, Bill. 3601 Warsaw, Cincinnati 5, Ohio, Gr 18090, 

Pa ls57s 
Welch, Tom. 3560 Beldare, Cincinnati, Ohio. Av 18094, Ga 

15700. Line 371 
Wells. Milford, Prestonsburg. 6101. 2629 
Werkowitz, Jack C, 4614 Miller Rd., Blue Ash, Ohio, Sv 15382, 

Sy 16382 
Wigginton, A. M.. Sr., 1037 Cecil Ave., Louisville, Ar 7881, 

Ar 7NS1 
Williams, James H., 116 Grove, Russell, Oak SS9, Ashland 

East 4S282 
Williams, Keid V., Mt. Hermon 

Williams, Roy E.. Deepwood Dr.. Route 3. Elizabethtown, 1 s : ; i 
Williamson, Jimmie. 325 B So. Seminary. Princeton. 5388, 2036 
Wilson, John Pope. 812 E. Main St.. Louisville. Wa 4591. 

Tw 60211 
Winfrey, Shelby, Holly St., Berea, 805, 850 
Witt, Fred. Whitesburg, 2661 

W r omack, William H., 1500 Oak, Henderson, 9780, 2735 
Wurtz, Emil H., IS E. 4th St., Cincinnati, Ohio, Gr 10526, 

Dtl 11232 



Registered Basketball Officials 

of The K. H. S. A. A. 1956-1957 
(List Compiled September 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone unless otherwise designated. If two numbers 
are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 
Adams, Roy D.. 302 Brunswick Rd.. Louisville 7. Be 6367. 

Anchorage 912 
Adkins. Raymond C. 1526 Beverly Blvd., Ashland, Ea 47229 
Alexander, Rex E., College Station. Murray, 1292-W, 740, 

Ext. 15 
Alexander, William F., Fulton, 716 W, 716 W 
Alfonl. William C. Thatcher Ave., Alexander, Myrtle 7-2162 

Myrtle 7-S221 
Allen, .lack. Rt. .;. l:,,x 109, Bardstown, 1291, 3282 
Allen, Nelson R., Morehead Slate 1 College, Morehead 
Allen, Stanley M., Hawesville. 3401 

Anderson, Elmer D„ South Main. West Liberty. Sh 33132 
Ai'm-oi one:. 1:0 \V.. Route 2. LaCetlter. No. 58660 
Arnold. Kenneth, Box 65s. Fern Creek. 35445, 3207 
Ashby. Carl Cooper. Elkton, Co 52262 
Ashley, Kenneth, Eubank, 2604 
Austin, Bruce E.. Dundee. 25, 8 
Back. Adrian G., Jr.. Hodgenville, 245. 'JO 
Bailey, Arville, Flat Gap, Cy 73965 (Bus. No.) 
Bailey, Kerney L., Hazel, Murray 195:; W 
Hand. Bill. Fi] I St., Box 493, Harlan, 532 532 
Ballard, Clark T„ 8806 Plainfield Rd., Cincinnati 36. Ohio. 

Sy 15540, Du 12000, Line 512 
Bankemper Thomas F., 709 Maple, Newport. He 10600 
Barker. Donald. 209 Bibb. Campbellsville. 173 W. 156 
Barrett, Lloyd, Box 389, Jackson, 21, 9123 
Barton, Walter, Box 316, Route 2, Corbin. 648 M. 9144 
Basham, Willard, Jr., Leitchfield 
Baumeyer, William A.. Jr., 312 Euclid Ave.. Evansville. Ind.. 

Gr 73108, Ha 52214 
Beiersdorfer. Jim, 5517 Surrey Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, Hu 

17194, Hu 17194 
Bell. Thomas P.. 1843 Glenhill Dr., Lexington. 22958. 21477 
Bennett, Bert A., 14 Doris Dr., Covington. Ju 12121. Co 11114 
Betz. Dick. 250 Albany Rd.. Lexington, 47394. 32880, Ext. 322 
Black. Charles D., 223 So. Main. Barboui ville. 193. 439 
Black, Ciarence. West Liberty, Sh 34262. Sh 33105 
Blackburn. Viley O., 114 Richardson Dr.. Somerset. 1113. 993 

or 162 
Blankenship, Zeb. Lake Reba Dr., Richmond, 2229 M. 583 
Blanton, Homer, Box 312, Catlettsburg, Ashland East 41730, 

Catlettsburg 404 
Bolander, Albert J., 415 No. 26th St.. Louisville. Ar 2046, 

Ar 9051 
Bonner, William. P. O. Box 426, Vanceburg, 143, It; 
Bowman, Earl G.. 511 Park Ave.. Lexington. 511473, 23343 
Boyles, Jerrv F., 3200 Park St., Ashland, Ea 469995, Ea 41111, 

Ext. 229 
Bradberry, Calvin, Baxter, 2073 R 
Bradshaw, Bill, Burgin. 5265 
Brichler, Joe A., 5737 Kiefer Ct., Cincinnati, Ohio, Ki 16049, 

Pa 11984 
Briscoe, Hubert, Route 3. Shelbyville, 14S4. 263 
Brizendine, Vic, 2711 Lakeside Dr., Louisville 5. Gl 46843. 

CI 4866 
Brotzge, Maurice J., 3S0O W. Broadway. Louisville, Ar 2506, 

Ar 2506 
Brown, Doyle. Route 3, Winchester 
Browning, William Henry, Route 2, Lebanon, 6413 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1956 



Brugh, Walter J., Box 624, Paintsville, 587-M, 97 

Bryan, William B., Route 4, Paris, 2061 

Bryant, Jack E., 135 Morris Rd., Lookout Heights, Covington, 

Edison 12819, Du 11400, Ext. 277 
Burchett, Lanier S-, Appen Ave., Columbia, 2654, 4111 
Burke, David L., 224 Cumberland Ave., Louisville, Em 6694S 
Burke, Raymond, Pikeville, 971-J, 38 or 39 
Butcher, Granville, Paintsville, 399 (Bus. No.) 
Byrd, Harry G., 7331 North Timberlane Drive, Madeira, Ohio, 

Locust 18745, Locust 18745 
Caldwell. James, 65 Biehl St., Newport, Co 11786 
Campbell, French, Garrett, 5521 
Campbell, Harry K„ Liggett, 478, 731 and 1333 
Campbell, John E., Jr., Garrett, 5521 
Campbell, William C, 2359 Frankfort Ave., Louisville 6, 

Tw 33526, Me 77621, Ext. 225 
Canter, John, 1G09 Shady Lane, Apt. 3, Louisville, Hi 7281 M, 

Wa 8862 
Carnes, Richard, 305 Light St., New Richmond, Ohio, Ri 24151, 

Ri 22257 
Carpenter, Leonard F., Salyersville 
Cassady, Richard. 508 Nutwood, Bowling Green, Vi 33506, 

Vi 39078 
Caudill, Gary A., 408 Cline, Pikeville, 811 
Chandler, James F., 134 Main, Paintsville, 374, 866 
Chaney, Joseph G., Horse Cave, St 66341, St 66181 
Chattin, Ernie P., 2147 Central, Ashland, 1088, East 46191 
Chumbler, W. W., Lowes, Mayfield 699 (Bus. No.) 
Coffey, Kenneth B., Elder St., Berea, 53 R, 880 
Coieman, Jim, Box 485, Fairdale, Em 78843, Em 82251 
Combs, James Glenn, 280 E. 3rd St., London, 27S R 
Combs, Raymond, 101 Sawyer, Somerset, 1544 L, Burnside 35 
Combs, Travis, 1701 Deer Lane, Louisville, Hi 3887, Wa 7371, 

Ext. 275 
Combs, Walter H., 2709 Iroquois Ave., Ashland, East 44219, 

East 42144 
Conley, George, 2436 Roosevelt Ave., Ashland, East 46042 
Conn, Hershel, Dana 

Cooper, John Wellington, P. O. Box 332, Danville, 2090 J, 9102 
Coppage, Donald, Route 1, Independence, Fl 75572, Fl 73071 
Coppage, Eugene, Route 1, Walton 

Cotton, Larry Joe, Walnut St., Dawson Springs, 2610, 1076 
Cox, Layton, 190 N. Hanover, Lexington, 20570 
Craft, William N., Jr., 638 Longview, Lexington, 42361, 44195 
Crawford, Fred T., 1711 Blake Ave., Bowling Green, Vi 36441, 

Vi 39061 
Creech, James Harvey, Leatherwood 
Crosthwaite, John S., Jr., Box 589, Harlan, 2075, 57 
Crutcher, Joseph L., Edlen St., Vine Grove, 011 M, Fort Knox 

4176 
Cubbage, Tom, 317 N. English, Leitchfield, 80, 67 M 
Cullivan, Jim, College Station, Murray. 1668 W. 740, Ext. 15 
Cummins, Albert B., 8706 Plainfield Rd., Cincinnati 36, Ohio, 

Sy 11536. Po 14100, Ext. 2156 
Cummings, Dale A., Route 3, Fulton, 908 
Cummins, Joshua W., 2139 Memorial Pkwy., Fort Thomas, 

Hi 11679, Po 14100, Ext. 748 or 749 
Curtis, Robert L., 32 W. Third St., Maysville, Lo 45483, 

Manchester, Ohio 38 
Damico, Ernie, 1758 E. McMillan St., Cincinnati, Ohio, Wo 

18058, Ch 15820, Ext. 386 
Davenport, William T., 315 Village Dr., Elizabethtown, 5451, 

2160 
Davis, Dwight R-, Jr., 3516 Hycliffe Ave., Louisville, Be 7302, 

Wa 7531, Ext. 201 
Davis, Ralph E., Vanceburg, Swift 62521, Swift 64501 
DeBoor, Matthew, 248 So. Ashland, Lexington, 30156, 30235 
Decker, William K., 364 4th St.. Paintsville, Paintsville High 

School (Bus. No.) 
Denton. Charles, 1427 Clay, Henderson, 4020, 3195 
DeVary, W. B., 217 W. Hickman. Winchester, 302 W 
DiMuzio, Robert M., 6422 Golfway Dr., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Ki 12220, Wa 11180 
Dixon, Sam, Appalachia, Va, 

Dobson. Kenneth, 416% So. 10th, Mayfield, 1193 
Doehring, D. E„ 131 s"o. Harrig, Madisonville, 510 J, 1298 
Downing, Thomas E., Gamaliel. He 58677, Gl 72341 
Drake, Richard, 61 Edwards Ct., Fort Thomas, Hi 14235 
Driskell, Earl, Jr.. 1002 Cecil Ave., Louisville 11, Ar 6774, 

Ca 7621 
Dunn. Sherley Ray. 2123 Madison. Paducah, 32914, 37338 
Durkin, Jack H., 240 Hillsboro, Lexington, 44396, 41717 
Eads, Walter, Monticello, 170 B, 19 
Earle, Herschel G-, Route 2, Berry 
Eaton, James Marvin, 214 Carolyn, Greenville, 624 J 
Edelen, Ben R., 3309 Wellingmoor, Louisville, Gl 43518, Ju 41361, 

Ext. 313 
Eddings, Forrest, 418 Kinkead, Paducah, 28697, 21621 
Edwards, Hubert, Columbia, 4592, 4531 
Egerton, John W., P. O. Box 95, Cadiz 
Ellington, James E., 18 Division St., Erlanger, Di 16058, 

Ju 17946 
Elliott, Carroll Lee, Hodgenville, 2303, Elizabethtown 6118 
Ellspermann, George A., 1305 So. Ruston, Evansville, Ind., 

Gr. 65693, Ha 47741, Ext. 364 



Elovitz, Carl, 1920 Spring Grove Ave., Lexington, 61222, Ver- 
sailles 720 
Elrod, Richard, Route 1, Box 14, Portsmouth, Ohio, Ul 85366. 

Detroit Steel 
Elrod, Turner, 332 Sumpter, Bowling Green. V2-5110, V3-4334 
Engle, Orville, 208 Tennessee Ave.. Pineville, 72916 
Espie, Sidney C, 1614 Algonquin Pkwy, Louisville, Me 72703, 

Wa 1121, Ext. 292 
Estes, A. D., Box 202, Hawesville, 4491 

Ewing, C. M., 7409 U. S. 42. Florence, Atl 33147, Un 14100 
Fagues, Homer, Combs, Oak 907, 1833 
Fanning, Homer, Route 1, Winchester, 1696 R, Lexington 

22220, Ext. 3222 
Fields, Joe D„ Route 1, Gilbertsville, FOrest 24362, Paducah 

24311 
Figg, Charles R.. 404 Roberts St.. Frankfort, 42146, 30565 
Fisher, W. B.. 1722 Beechview Ct., Louisville 16, Em 66488, 

21-7-1431 
Fitchko, Bill, Norton, Va., 466 W, 564 

Flynn, Adam E., Jr., 549 Market St.. Charlestown, Ind., 490 
Flvnn, Reynolds, Route 3, Paris, 4467 

Ford, Joe T., 600 Hillside Dr.. Mayfield, 1379 X-M, 1213 
Forsythe. C. M., Belton, Gr 68002, 11S0 

Forsythe Robert, Browder, Greenleaf 68007, Greenville 474 
Frazer, Thomas Roe, 212 E. Belleville, Marion, 20, 4 
Fritz, Sherman, Route 2, Richmond, 1344-R-4, 1595 
Fryman, Bobby G., 227 Broadway, Carlisle, 131-J, 101 
Fugate. E. Hugh, Price, 3360. Prestonsburg 2649 
Fugate, Johnnie, P. O. Box 334. Hindman, 1202 
Fultz, Jack, Box 636, Olive Hill. 3661, 4591 
Gaither, Gene. 400 South Lafayette, Beaver Dam, 3365 
Gaither, Jack, Beaver Dam, 3365 
Gatliff, Grover W., 2638 Lynnwood Ave., Ashland, Ea 40197, 

Ea 42114 
Gamble, Gerald, 108 Highland Ave., Earlington, 5435 
Gardner. Daniel H., 104 So. Adams. Henderson, 71297 
Gardner, Howard E., 307 Poplar Dr., Elizabethtown, 4451, 6638 
Gates, William A.. Jr., 125 Travois Rd., Louisville, Belmont 

2310, Juniper 48121 
Gettler, John F„ 314 Sheridan Dr., Lexington, 28845, 25494 
Gilbert, Lawrence, 600 Nutwood Ave., Bowling Green, Vi 

3476S, Vi 39779 
Gish. Delmas. 204 W 3rd St.. Central City, 518 W, 9 
Goebel, Bill, Jr., P. O. Box 142, Prestonsburg, 2407 
Golden, Billy Joe, 568 Main, Lynch 
Goley, James E., 10 Utz Drive, Florence. Atlantic 35646, 

Axtel 15447 
Gourley, Harold E., 1700 N. Alvord Blvd., Evansville, Ind., 

Gr 66191. Ha 34016 
Grace, Charles K., Tennessee Ave., Pineville, Ed 73331, 

Ed 72392 
Graehler, Albert J., 1227 Hess Lane, Louisville, Me 61601, 

Am 2514 
Graham. Harry G., Swigert Ave., Frankfort, 38440 
Gray, Raymond, Island, Hu 62151 
Greene, Omar Paul, Box 5, ByPro, 2573, 2573 
Griese. Warren J., 362 Craig Ave., Evansville, Ind., Ha 20339, 

Ha. 34012 
Griffin, William R„ 1648 E. Blackford, Evansville, Ind., 

Gr 69816, Ha 47741, Ext. 311 
Grimes, James W., Lewisburg 

Gritton. Robert A., 794 W. Office. Harrodsburg. 963 
Gustafson, Alford, Jr., 240 Francis Bldg., Louisville, Ju 42058 
Hackel. John Carl, Jr., 846 Linwood Ave., Louisville, Me 48730 
Hadden, Newell P., Jr., 121 Lackawanna Rd., Lexington, 

35332, 27866 
Hagan, Joseph E., 3000 Sherbrooke Rd., Louisville, Gl 81327, 

Wa 4327 
Hale, Don C, 45 Center, Berea, 341 R 
Haley, Dalton D., 230 W. College, Mayfield, 943 W 
Hall, Billy Joe. 120 Bridge. Morehead, 327 R 
Hall, Bob, Smith St.. Cumberland. 43 W 
Hammons, Norman, Route 4. Hopkinsville, 44914, 55914 
Hannum, Harry, 3192 West Tower, Cincinnati, Ohio, Hu 11603, 

Wo 13760 
Hardin, Ben, Marrowbone, 6S30 (Bus. No.) 
Hardv, Henry C, 4845 Peachtree, Louisville. Em 86692, 

Wa 7271, Ext. 294 
Harmon, Charles W„ 217 5th St., Williamsburg, 3426 
Harris. Thomas P., Jr., Route 1, Allensville, Co 52791. Co 52111 
Harris, Jerry Lee, Box 19, Rockhold, Corbin 1064-J-l, Corbin 

1064- J-l 
Hartley, William E., 1121 Marshall, Evansville, Ind., Gr 70631, 

Gr 70631 
Hatfield, Gene Edwin, 202 Tavlor St., Fulton, 1274, Mayfield 

2137 
Haury, John R.. 3817 Parker Ave., Louisville 12, Ar 3816 
Haynes, John, 416 Clay, Henderson, 75137 
Hewling. Richard. 211 Linden. Newport, Ax 12299 
Hill, Earl F„ 132 Holly St., Pineville, Ed 72601 
Hillyard, David, 1622 Lee Dr., Henderson, 75147, 3688 
Hiten, John W., 722 Melrose Ave., Lexington, 48672, 22626 
Hodge, Don Robert, 1012 S. E. 2nd St., Evansville, Ind., 

Ha 32436 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1956 



Page Nine 



Hodge. Fred A.. 2011 Joyce Ave., Evansville. Ind., Gr 72993, 

Ha 21111 
Hoferer, Louis R., 420 McClelland. Cincinnati 17, Ohio, Ca 

13022, Wa 19S41 
Hoffer, William E., 530 Purcell Ave.. Cincinnati 5. Ohio, 

Wa 19235 
Hoffman, Jack J., P. O. Box 455, Vine Grove 
Hofstetter, Joe. 1423 W. 4th Ave., Williamson, W. Va. 
Holeman. Bill R.. Manchester. 2289 

Hollander. James A.. 733 11th St., Tell City, Ind. 179, 966 
Hopper. Edwin. Russell Springs 

Hornsby, John. 420 Harahan, Paducah. 21752, 56311, Ext. 284 
Houchin. Robert R.. Route 2. Smiths Grove 

Hubbard, Joel M., Morehead State College, Morehead, Thomp- 
son Hall 
Hudson, Oscar, 708 Highland Ave., Hazard. Grand 698, 3300 
Huff, Carl R.. Jr.. 1017 W. Delaware. Evansville 10, Ind., 

Ha 27234 
Hunley. Neil P.. West Liberty. Sh 33131, Sh 34195 
Hurd, Fred. Clinton. 6440, 2381 

Hutson. C. R., 1612 1st St.. Bedword. Ind.. 8892, 8892 
Hutt, Joseph D.. Jr.. 60S Wallace, Louisville, Tw 35060. 

Ju 43545 
Hyland, Frank D.. Box 1511. South Webster, Ohio. Scioto 2211. 

Waverly 5100 
James, William V.. 537 So. Lafayette, Beaver Dam, 4928, 

Owensboro Mu 33575 
Jarvis, Lindle F-, 2SN Burke Rd.. Lexington. 49465 
Jenkins, James D., Route 1, Bowling Green. Vi 25954. Vi 25954 
Jenkins, Joseph K.. 210 Morningside Dr.. Elizabethtown. 4087, 

3230 
Jeter. John B., 1702 Versailles Rd., Lexington, 50562. 49895 
Johnson, James M., Box 367. Jenkins, 64 J 
Johnson, Walter. Fourth St., Grayson, GRanite 44931, 

GRanite 45581 
Johnson. William B., Route 7, Hopkinsville. Tu 55366 (Bus No.) 
Jones. Boyer. 437 Jackson St.. Campbellsville 
Jones. Carson G.. 709 N. Main. Evansville. Ind., Ha 23069. 

Ha 41171, Ext. 21u 
Jones, Charles Junior. 2834 Yorkshire Blvd., Louisville. Gl 81293. 

CI 7697 
Jones, Elmon, East Bernstadt, 17 X, 40 
Jones, George W., Jr.. 216 Christ Rd.. Evansville, Ind., Ha 

23348, Ha 52661 
Jordan. Ken. 104 W. Orchard Rd.. Fort Mitchell. Ed 12747. 

Ga 13100 
Judy. Russell Max. Box 207. Millersburg. 4425 
Keene, Marcum. Feds Creek 
Keeton, Bill, Louisa, 84346, 84547 

Kereiakes, Spero, 515 Nutwood, Bowling Green, Vi 36498 
Kessinger, Hubert B., Cadiz 
Key, Calvin E.. Hazel. Hy 23431. Hy 22341 
King, Allen, 424 N. Brady. Morganfield 
King. Bob. 119 So. 39th. Louisville. Cy 4660 
King, James A., 720 So. 43rd. Louisville. Cy 3690. Ar 2466 
King, John J. Jr., 1758 Dixdale. Louisville 10, Arlington 3732, 

Melrose 48313 
Knight. Bill. 752 No. 36th, Paducah, 32775. 31957 
Kohlmever, Robert L.. 1760 N. Alvord, Evansville, Ind., 

Gr 70500 
Kok, George W.. 9406 Janna Dr., Valley Station. Pleasure 

Ridge 79330 
Kremer. Joseph A., 3727 Glenmeade, Louisville 18, Gl 43991, 

Wa 7747 
Lashbrook, H. E., Jr.. 1603 Daviess. Owensboro. Mu 30831, 

Mu 32431 
Leach, Aaron, McHenry 
Leet, Warren R., 432 Queenswav Drive. Lexington. 20060, 

20939 
LeVan. Thomas F., Box 823, Benton, Lakeside 73221, Paducah 

23210 
Lindloff, Gilbert E.. 6004 So. 3rd. Louisville. Em 30225. 

Sp 45781 
Linville. Shelby. Box 101. Vanceburg, Sw 64831 
Little, James Glenn, Hellier 
Logsdon, David L., 1160 Lincoln Ave.. Louisville, Me 73192, 

Ar 3921 
Long. William G., Jr.. 209 Idlewylde Dr.. Louisville. Be 8731, 

Ma 9060 
Longenecker, David M.. 3910 Olympic. Louisville. Be 3401, 

Ext. 301-2, Tw 69071 
Looney. Dick. Pikeville, 813 

Lucas, Gene T.. 412 Clayton. Georgetown. 1371, 1215 
Luckett. Gale. Route 5. Madison. Ind., 75401, 2000-4238 
Ludwig, Harry F., Louisville Country Day School, Louisville 7, 

Be 5380, Be 3452 
Lusby. George, SOS Clayton, Georgetown. 1073 
Lykins, Clayton G., Vanceburg 
McBee. William K., Burlington. 342 
McClaskey, Booker, Boston. Te 34725. Fort Knox 4916 
McCollum, Robert G., 406 Holliday Rd., Lexington. 23710 
McCord. Anthony A., 1636 Courtney Ave.. Lexington, 33814 
McCowan, Connell, Route 1, Box 251, Corbin, 2361 
McCuiston, Pat M., Pembroke, Granite 54232, Tuxedo 55321 
McCully, Ray, Route 2, Sebree, Dixon 3831 



McDonald, Robert, Springfield, llardstown 3548 (Bus, No.) 
McGlasson, Galen. Route 1. Burlington, Hebron 3342, Hebron 

: ■. I ' 
McGuffey. Harold B., 1109 Nutwood. Bowling Green, 25090, 

Smiths Grove 77 
McPike, Ray S.. Jr., 309 Theatre Bldg.. Louisville 2. Hi 639SW. 

Ju 52832 
Macon. Alan Leon. 1759 Wilart Dr.. Louisville 10, Ar 7906 
Marble, Luther R., Monticello. 70 B 
Matarazzo, Sal. 320 N. Mulberry, Elizabethtown, 6689, Fort 

Knox 5255 
May, E. B., Jr.. Box 185. Pi-estonsburg, 2314. 7661 
May. Harold M.. 251 No. 3rd. Danville, 2566. 1400 
Mayo. Henry L., Jr.. Paintsville 856. 768 
Meade, Foster ,, Sid", So. Portsmouth, Fl 21391, Fl 21311 
Menshouse, Glen. 2017 Main, Ashland, East 45397 
Metcalf. Earl L.. Paducah, 21359 
Meyer. Harry J.. 5319 Lilibet Ct.. Cincinnati 38, Ohio, Bl 13459, 

Du 15412 
Miles, Joseph D., 124 Harrison. Jeffersonville. Ind., 24794, 

Louisville Cy 1061 
Miller, Lonnie. Wakefield. Ohio, Piketon 3510 
Miller, Roy J., 644 Whitcomb, Clarksville, Ind., 212-36335. 

Em 14140 
Miracle. Ed.. Millstone. 4521 

Mitchell. Emmett. 284 Taylor Dr.. Lexington. 52480. 44255 
Moll. Francis B., 820 Mulberry, Mt. Vernon. Ind.. Po 32870, 

Po 34426 
Moore, Ed, Apt. 15, Vet Village, Morehead 
Morris, Rodney A., Bowling Green. Vi 25764 (Bus. No. I 
Moss, Bobby G.. 2721 Adams. Paducah. 24251 
Mouser, H. D.. Jr.. Princeton Rd., Madisonville, 327 M, 129b 
Mudd, Ed L., 400 N. 42nd St.. Louisville, Ar 6888 
Mueller, Frank J.. 516 Springdale Dr., Elizabethtown, Fort 

Knox 2227 (Bus. No. I 
Mullins. Arthur, Elkhorn City, 4151. 3401 
Mullins. Bobby E., Paintsville. 432, 545 

Mussman. Ralph, 502 Monroe St.. Newport, Ju 14562. Co 11300 
Myers. Edward B.. 626 Columbia Ave.. Glasgow, 01 12878. 

01 12S7S 
Nally. Charles Leo. Route 1. Loretto, 34 W 
Nau, Bill. Barbourville. 203, 317 

Neal, Gene, 549 Washington. New Richmond. Ohio, Ri 23641 
Neal, Marion, 2215 Sth St.. Portsmouth, Ohio, El 33948. 

El 34401 
Newman, E. B., 570 Fifth St.. Paintsville. 1287. 399 
Newnam, Luther G., Beattyvile. 109. 91 
Newsom, Marley. 109 Division St.. Pikeville, 866 R 
Newton, C. M., 363 N. Broadway, Lexington. 26559. 24789 
Newton, Reason G., Lebanon Junction, 146 
Nielsen, Stanley, 242 Chenoweth Lane. Louisville 7, Tw 3:1600. 

Tw 60177 
Nimmo. Lo. 207 Price Rd., Milford, Ohio. Terrace 13170 
Nixon, James W., Route 7. Hopkinsville. Tu 62641 
Noble. Charles, Main St., Box 371. Jackson, 43 W, 9109 
Noel. Paul, Midway, 4681 

Noel, Robert AJan, Route 3, Winchester, 76li-m-2 
Nord, Ed, 1734 So. 23rd, Louisville, Sp 41958, Be 3401, Ext. 202 
O'Daniel. Jeff, Route 1, Lebanon, 7112 
Oldnam. John. Prospect. 214-366-J, Tw 33636 
Omer, Billy W., Madisonville, 851 W 

Osborne, Bill. Box 594. Vine Grove. 095 W. Elizabethtown 9042 
Osborne. James C, Star Route. Harlan, 2237 
Overly, William H , P. O. Box 579. Somerset, 1294, 1294 
Owen, Arthur P., 1161 South Kentucky Ave., Evansville, Ind., 

Ha 2S61S 
Pack, Ervin B., Baxter, 35 Stevenson Hall, Union College 
Page. Forrest C, 3007 Taylor, Evansville, Ind., Gr 70088, 

Gr 67211 
Park. J. M.. 924 Yarbro Lane. Paducah. 56567. 55292 
Patrick, Charles C. Route 2, Lexington, 44516, 44516 
Patrick. Ralph. Salyersville. Fi 94121. Ashland East 41641 
Patton, Harold L.. Auxier. 2870, 2085 
Paulin, Al, 538 Franklin. Tell City. Ind., 435 R. 435 R 
Pergrem, Nard. 2616 Country Club Ct., Ashland, Ea 47664, 

Ea 41155, Ext. 390 
Pewitt, Charles, 111 Bechwood Ave., Frankfort. 44425, 42281 
Phelps. Ralph. Russell. G 172, 253 
Pittard, Fred W.. 129 Mimosa Lane. Paducah, 36680, Calvert 

City - Penn Salt Co. 
Poe, Thomas E., Route 6. Benton, La 77663, La 77663 
Porter. C. A., 1202 Center, Bowling Green. Vi 38315 
Pruden. Jim. 118 W. 22nd St., Owensboro, Mu 38575. Mu 34555 
Pursifu], Darrell, Box 59, Four Mile, EDgewood 72983 
Pvle, George E., 1507 Phelps Ave.. Hopkinsville, Tu 61855. 

Tu 634S5 
Radjunas. Stan E.. 1644 Elliott Ave., Ashland, E 41896 
Raines. Max. 608 Cedar St.. Owensboro. Mu 39933 (Bus. No.) 
Rainev. Jimmy, 20 Euclid. Winchester. 292 M, 558 
Randall. H. C, 106 Church St.. Columbia, 4661. 4711 
Randolph, Donald M., 1523 Aletha Dr.. Louisville 13, Okolona 

96359, Okolona 95145 
Rapier. Burl. 4518 Louisville Ave., Louisville. Em 88273 
Ratterman, Bernard W., Sr., 1222 So. 41st St., Louisville 11, 

Cy 6085, Wa 1241, Ext. 6274 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1956 



Ray, Robert R., Cave City. Pr 37614 

Redman. Malvern G.. 206 Edson St., Mt. Vernon, Ind., Po 3332S, 

Po 32637 
Reed. Charles R., 147 Walnut St., Versailles. 605 Y. 42231. 

Ext. 436 
Reed. Gordon. 1603 North Fort Thomas Ave., Fort Thomas. 

Hiland 14046, Dunbar 14507 
Renfro. John Edwin. Pikeville College. Pikeville. 1456 R. 

9102 or 289 
Rents. Thomas W., 107 Swigert Ave., Lexington. 41091, 32880 
Reynolds. Howard M.. 407 Holt Ave., Mt. Sterling. 1058 
Reynolds, W. J.. Jr., Martin, 3020 
Rice, Homer, Highlands High School. Fort Thomas, Hi 12501, 

Hi 11301 
Rice. James F.. 506 Morehead, Central City. 205, 525 
Richards, Jim S.. Box 94. Columbia, 3135 
Richardson, .Toe M.. 210 York. Greenville, 1077 W, IS 
Richardson. Lewis H.. Lewisburg, 70 J. 70 J 
Richeson. King. 790 Allendale Dr.. Lexington. 46306, 25564 
Riggs. William T.. 28 Congress Dr.. Morganfield, 590, 9168 
Roberts, Bob, 215 Southport, Lexington, 25495, 23595 
Roberts. Earl C, Science Hill. 19 R. 19 
Robson, Boynton A.. 2956 N. Wallace. Indianapolis. Ind., 

Li 74800, St 69226 
Rocke, James M.. Cynthiana. 1384. Midway 2241 
Roller, Otis C, 3712 Nanz Ave.. Louisville, Be 6356. Wa 1121, 

Ext. 302 
Rolph. Harold J., 915 So. 7th St.. Ironton. Ohio, 2059 R. 1390 
Rosenbaum. Robert ., 117 Fairlawn Rd., Louisville, Tw 72833, 

Ju 48191 
Rouse, Clyde L., 630 Erlanger Rd.. Erlanger, Dixie 16943, 

He 13604 
Rubarts. Leland G., Dunnville. Liberty 2784 (Bus. No.) 
Russell, Allen W., 1503 Sycamore, Murray. 439 W 
Russell, Eugene. 1106 Gallia St.. Portsmouth, Ohio. Elm 37653. 

Elm 34370 
Russell, Joe, Orchard Dr.. Russellville. 39S, 398 
Sabato. Al. 4121 Forest Ave., Norwood 12, Ohio, Me 16771, 

Pa 11052 
St. Clair. Robert L.. Jr.. 435 No. 29th. Louisville, Spring 

42911. Emerson 32871 
Sallee. Charles, 1572 E. Morgan, Evansville. Ind., Ha 56526, 

Ha 31179 
Saylor. Deward, Box 407. Wallins Creek, Wallins 3 (Bus. No.) 
Scharfenberger. Irv T., 7267 .Tethve Lane. Madeira. Ohio. 

Locust 16378, Cherry 15430 
Scheben. W. J.. Erlanger. Dix 15054. Dix 15832 
Schnebelt. Cai'l R., Hanover, Ind., 94523, 94561 
Scott, Bill. 1816 McDonald. Lexington, 23316, 43663 
Settle. Evan. 102 Alton Rd., Shefbyville, 561 W. 144 
Settle, Roy G., 1000 E. 20th St., Owensboro, Mu 32136, 

Mu 33575 
Sexton. William L.. 324 4th Ave., Dayton, He 15941, Ma 14321. 

Line 40 
Sharp. Claude, Greensburg 
Shaw, Stanlev E.. 4460 W. 8th St.. Cincinnati 5. Ohio. Gr 11100. 

Wa 15300 
Shelton, Robert, 514 Pelham. Maysville, Lo 44031 
Showalter, John. Georgetown. 662 

Shrewsbury. Richard P.. D-125 Cooperstown. Lexington, 50569 
Shuck, Thomas G., 455 Sheridan, Lexington. 24635. 24635 
Siler, Clarence M., 8th St. and Cumberland Ave., Williamsburg. 

618S, 3411 
Simpson, Fred C, 900 Carter Ave., Ashland, 40655 
Skaggs, Billy W., Morehead State College, P. O. Box 690, 

Morehead 
Sloan. Wallace, 419 Oread Rd.. Louisville, Be 1126, Tw 72554 
Smith, Darrell Carlton. 2090 Edgeworth Dr., Lexington, 

43166. 22776 
Smith. Edgar J., 3904 Farmview. Louisville 18. Ch 81286 
Smith, Edwin B., 1905 Gary Ave., Bowling Green. 27112, 39051 
Smith, Elza, Beauty 

Smith, Wilbur G-. 62 Brown. Raeeland, Oak 954 
Smith, Wilbur W-, P. O. Box 75. Horse Cave. State 66131, 

State 66181 
Snider, Louis G., 2103 Debera Way, Louisville 18, Glendale 

85248, Gl 47511 
Solomon, Jim, 309 West 14th, Benton, La 72131 
Sosh, LaRue, Uniontown, 200, 1 
Sosh, Nelson. Uniontown. 123. 1 
Spencer. Billy C Route 2. Lawrenceburg, 2645 
Spencer, Edward, 319 Veteran Village, Richmond 
Spencer. Irvin E.. 1811 Dobourg Ave., Louisville 16, Cy 6281 
Spiceland. S. E., 305 So. 13th, Murray, 852 
Stamper. Paul, West Liberty, SHerwood 33275, SHerwood 

34575 
Stanfill, Robert, Louisa, Me 84657 
Steenken, William R.. 1636 Highland Pike. Covington, Ed 

137S9. Co 13710 
Stephens. Robert J., Box 529, Montgomery, W. Va. 
Stephenson, Harrv S.. 2210 Circle Dr., Lexington, 49620, 24789 
Stewart. Charles W.. 425 Main St.. Ceredo, W. Va., 2036, 2036 
Stewart, Herbert T., Lothair, High 89 

Stidham, Thomas E., D-126 Cooperstown, Lexington, 29916 
Strange, William L., 305 Sycamore. Elizabethtown, 3851, 5286 



Strong. Arnett, 425 Cedar, Hazard, N 389, 3300 

Strong, David A., 1413 Maple Ave.. Owensboro, Mu 41355, 

Mu 39624 
Sturgill, Barkley. Prestonsburg. 2080, 2391 
Stutler, John P.. 1621 Cumberland, Covington, Ed 12631 
Sullivan, Don C. 523 Riverside Dr., Prestonsburg. 4791, 2530 
Tavlor. Robert S.. 2231 Hawthorne, Louisville. Gl 43423. 

Me 41581 
Teer. Forrest D., So. Main. Marion. 773 

Thomas. William G., 13914 So. Madison, Madisonville. 3069. 2591 
Thompson, Jack, 2347 Saratoga. Louisville 5, Hi 4183 
Thompson. Paul, 2624 Blackburn Ave.. Ashland. 48639 
Thompson. Ralph. 5599 Surrey, Cincinnati, Ohio, Mo 17196, 

Wa 10047 
Tiehenor, Billy, Route 3. Hartford, 224-LLs. 286 
Tipton. Asa I., 828 Hillwood. Frankfort, 38714, 31641 
Todd. Lonnie, Route 2, Madisonville, 897 R, 271 
Topmiller, Ben, Jr., Browder, Drakesboro Gr 62628, Greenville 

942 
Toy, Eddie N., No. Maysville. Mt. Sterling, 186, 7 
Troutman, Doyle C, 504 N. Main. Harlan, 522 (Bus. No.) 
Tuck. Ochell, 124 Lexington Dr., Glasgow. 3331, 2723 
Tucker, Morris E.. Route 3. Hopkinsville, 62950, 61236 
Turner, Aaron P., Cave City, Pr 3733 

Ulsas, Charles F.. 501 Rosewood Dr.. Evansville, Ind.. Ha 51013 
Urlage, Richard. 333 E. 16th St., Covington. Co 10068, Gr 18120 
Vandenberg, Ralph H., 3126 So. Farmcrest. Cincinnati 13, 

Ohio, Me 19072, Ki 11800-846 
VanSant, William E., 101 Holaday Lane, So. Fort Mitchell, 

Di 16087, He 12986 
Varner, Ray G., 103 Ashton Dr., Lexington, 25432, 34224, 

Station 210 
Vaughn, Melvin, Route 5, London. 106 
Vettiner, Charles J., Armory Bldg. . Louisville 
Vice. Cliff. Jr.. 613 East Main, Carlisle, 464 W, 3 
Waldon, Tot, Box 14, Bandana, Ca 42335 
Walke, Glenn R.. 902 First St., Paintsville, 91, 2680 
Walling, Blaine R., Jr.. 3509 Pennway, Louisville 11. Cy 5374 
Walter, LaFayette, 55th St., Ashland 
Ward Tommy. Marsee Drive. Harlan, 1930 W, 522 
Warren, Bill, Morgantown, La 63942 
Watson, Everett M., 1319 Cypress, Louisville, Ar 7627, Wa 1121, 

Ext. 292 
Webb, Oren H., Sweeden, Ly 73605 (Bus. No.) 
Webb, Walter E., Sweeden, Ly 72347 
Weber, Walter, 338 Anderson Ferry Rd., Dehli Hills, Ohio, 

Bl 10161. Va 14280. Ext. 316 
Welch. John H., Neon, 2771 

Welch. Ralph W., 3011 Wedgewood Way. Louisville 5, Gl 81746 
Welch. Tom, 3560 Beldare, Cincinnati, Ohio. Av 18094, Ga 15700, 

Line 371 
Wells. Milford. Prestonsburg, 6101. 2629 
Whalen, William C. 558 W. 2nd St., Maysville. Lo 43942, 

Lo 43461 
White. David B.. 209 Sharon Dr., Bowling Green, Vi 39S70, 

Vi 25624 
Wigginton, A. M., Sr., 1037 Cecil Ave., Louisville, Ar 7881, 

Ar 7881 
Williams, .Tames H., 116 Grove, Russell, Oak 889, Ashland 

East 48282 
Williams. Reid V.. Mt. Hermon 
Williams, Roger, 706 Poplar, Ravenna. 139 L 
Winfrey, Shelby, Holly St., Berea. 805, 850 
Withers. Frank. 213 Willow, Providence. 2422 
Witschger. LeRoy J., 1412 Antoinette, Cincinnati 30, Ohio, 

Be 15859. Pr 18931, Line 335 
Woerner, Robert Frederick, 123 Grand Ave.. Jeffersontown, 

52174, Ar 2475 
Woford. Ernest, 222 So. 4th. Danville, 1275 W, 708 
Womack, William H., 1500 Oak, Henderson, 9780, 2735 
Wray, Barrel, Water Valley 
Wurtz, Emil H., 18 E. 4th St.. Cincinnati, Ohio. Gr 10526, 

Du 11232 
Yates, William D., Route 2, Fulton, 1580 R. 9176 
Yeary, William H., Jr.. 156 Lowry Lane. Lexington. 26945, 

26945 



The Athlete's Creed 

I Believe .... 

IT IS A PRIVILEGE to play on a high school team. 

ADHERENCE TO TRAINING RULES is a duty of 
each squad member. 

QUESTIONABLE PRACTICES and border-line 
ethics are not profitable. 

HE WHO ABIDES by the rules of the school de- 
serves homage and respect. 

THE GREATEST SATISFACTION conies from 
giving one's best through the season of prep- 
aration and during the game. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER. 1956 



Page Eleven 



THE HIGHEST TYPE of enjoyment comes from 
working in a worthy cause. 

CONTESTS should engender good will between 
schools, and it is the duty of each player to 
promote this feeling. 

THE PROPER QUESTION for the athlete is "What 
can I do for the school?" instead of "What will 
the school give me if I win?" 

THE SUCCESS of an athletic department, school 
or nation depends on the adherence of its mem- 
bers to the laws of the organization. 

THE MAKING and retaining of friends on faculty, 
in the student body, among fans and on oppos- 
ing teams are among' the most valuable assets 
of" life. 

—Basketball Player Handbook. 

1956 Football Rules Changes 

Editor's note: The material given below, pre- 
pared by official Tommy Bell, was used by him 
and by Dr. Lyman V. Ginger, official K.H.S.A.A. 
rules interpreter, in the recent football clinics. 

1-3-1 Rubber covered balls now have of- 
ficial status. Unless a specific type of ball 
has been officially adopted by a conference, 
either a leather or composition-covered ball 
may be chosen by a team at the beginning 
of each half for use in all downs for which 
that team snaps or free-kicks. 

May a team change type of ball during the 
first or second halves '.' 

1-5-1 Officials are instructed to prompt- 
ly penalize any intentional grabbing of a 
face protector except in the rare occurrence 
when a runner is tackled and the situation 
is such that is necessary to grasp the head 
of the opponent. 

What is the foul in the above situation? 

l-5-3d Shoe cleats longer than 7 8 inch 
are illegal. 

1-5-4 The referee may charge himself 
with a time out to permit prompt repair of 
defective equipment which becomes illegal 
or defective through use. 

To whom will the time out be charged in 
following situations: (a) To fix chin strap; 
(b) Pad lace; (c) Obvious advantage to get 
clock stopped. 

2-15-1 Scrimmage line determined when 
ball is ready-for-play. This makes it clear 
that the neutral zone remains about 11 inches 
wide even though ball might be tilted. 

Is it a violation to tilt ball more than 45 '.' 

2-20-3 The initial direction determines 
whether a pass is forward or backward. 

2-25 Except for the player "under the 
snapper" as outlined in Rule 7-2-3, it is also 
a shift when one player of A moves from any 
position less than one yard behind the line 
to a new position which is not at least 5 yards 
behind the line. 



Play: From the huddle, Al moves to a 
position such that his head is within a foot 
of the scrimmage line but he faces side- 
wise. Because he is not "on the line," he at- 
tempts to change his position by moving to- 
ward a sideline. He does not stop one second 
before the snap. 

Palling: Movement of Al is a shift. Hence, 
his action is illegal. 

3-4-2 Four legal time-outs may lie 
charged to a team during each half on re- 
quest of the Captain (or any other author- 
ized player). 

Who authorizes player to call time out ? 

3-5-la The clock shall be started when 
the ball is ready-for-play if the clock was 
stopped because of a time-out charged to the 
referee. 

Play: What constitutes a Referee's time- 
out? It is a Referee's time-out when the Of- 
ficial initiates the action and points to him- 
self to signal that the time-out is to be 
charged to him. He will do this when there 
is a measurement or when he notifies the 
coaches as to the time remaining or when it 
is necessary to dry the ball or when he finds 
it desirable to examine equipment or a player 
who is in distress but for whom no time-out 
has been called. Referee's time-out will some- 
times be followed by a time-out charged to 
a team or by a time-out which is not charged 
to anyone. In such cases, the clock was 
stopped because of the Referee's time-out. 
Hence it should be started when the ball is 
ready. 

5-2-2 An insert in the first sentence 
makes provision for a foul which occurs be- 
fore a scrimmage-kick is touched beyond the 
line by R. Reason : If the foul should occur 
after such touching of a kick, the next clown 
is 1st as provided in 5-2-5 (d). 

Play: 2nd and 10 on the 50. Punt by Kl is 
is touched beyond the line by Rl and muffed 
so it rebounds behind the line where K2 re- 
covers. K2 attempts to advance : (a) by punt- 
ing again; or (b) by throwing a forward 
pass which is incomplete; or (c) by running. 
In either case. B holds during the run or 
during the loose ball. 

Ruling: Whether penalty is accepted or 
declined, the next down is 1st, regardless of 
where the ball might become dead. Penalty 
measurement is from the previous spot in 
(a) and (b) and from spot where the run 
ended in (c). 

Play: Punt by Kl is touched beyond the 
line by Rl after which it rebounds behind 
the line to K2. K2 advances beyond the line 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1956 



and then throws an illegal forward pass 
which is incomplete. 

Ruling: Regardless of whether penalty for 
the illegal forward pass is accepted or de- 
clined, the next down is 1st. If the distance 
penalty is accepted, it is measured from spot 
of the pass. The distance to be gained on 
1st down is 10 yds. 

5-3-2 After a 4th down incomplete legal 
forward pass, the ball shall be placed as at 
the start of the down. After a touchback or 
safety, the ball shall be placed with its fore- 
most point on the 20-yard line. 

6-2-5 Play (2) (c) Blocked punt rebounds 
behind K's line and is near intersection of 
goal line of sideline and K2 intentionally 
bats ball. Ruling: Touching is ignored as it 
applies to right to recover or advance but 
it is a foul for illegally batting a kick. 

6-4-5 While any kick is in flight beyond 
the line K shall not touch ball. 

Does the above rule apply even though no 
plaver of R is in position to catch the kick? 

7-2-5 Same as 2-25. 

7-5-4 Or if the illegal pass is caught, of 
having the ball put in play as determined 
by the action which followed the catch. See 
Play (2). 

8-2-2 Play (2) new 

8-3-3 Play new 

8-5-2c Play (3) new 

9-4-3 Revised to make it clear that K 
does not have the right to intentionally bat 
their own kick. 

K3 intentionally bats K's scrimmage kick 
in the neutral zone so that bat goes forward 
and touches Rl beyond line and then goes 
into R's end zone where K4 falls on it. Is this 
a touchdown? 

9-6-1 and 2 (Note: 9-6-1) The rule pro- 
hibiting coaching from the sideline should be 
strictly enforced. Coaching includes any ges- 
tures such as pointing, waving, kicking, or 
similar communication with players. It ap- 
plies to any person officially associated with 
the teams. Art. 2. Revised. 

10-1 Unless the foul (1) is part of a 
double foul (2) or is followed by a touch- 
down scored by the offended team (3) or is 
after any touchdown (4) or is during or 
after a try-for-point, the referee shall ex- 
plain the number of the clown and status of 
the ball for each available choice. 

1. What is the proper procedure when a 
penalty is automatically accepted or de- 
clined? 

2. Play: What are the situations where the 
Referee considers acceptance or declination 
of a penalty automatic? Ruling: There are 



three such situations. (1) When a foul by 
one team is followed by the scoring of a 
touchdown by the offended team, penalty for 
the foul is automatically declined unless 1st 
touching of a scrimmage-kick is involved. 

(2) When a foul, not complicated by any pre- 
vious foul, occurs after a touchdown which 
counts or after the ball becomes dead fol- 
lowing a try-for-point, the penalty is auto- 
matically accepted since, in each case, 
measurement is on the succeeding kick-off. 

(3) When a foul occurs during a try-for- 
point, it is automatically accepted or declined, 
depending on which team committed the foul 
and whether the try-for-point was successful. 

3. Play: Punt by Kl is first touched be- 
yond the line by K2 after which it rebounds 
behind the line where K3 recovers and ad- 
vances across R's goal line. During the run 
by K3, R holds. Ruling: If K declines the 
penalty, R has the choice of taking the ball 
at the spot where the kick was first touched 
by K. If K accepts the penalty, measurement 
is from the goal line (where the run ended) 
and measurement results in a touchdown. 

10-2 Revised to conform and harmonize 
with reworded Section 1. 

1. Bl is offside and Al crawls after ball 
becomes dead. Ruling: 

2. Bl is offside and Al advances beyond 
the line to gain. Is declination of penalty 
automatic? Ruling: 

3. During a try-for-point, Al is offside 
and the try is not successful. Is penalty auto- 
matically declined ? Ruling : 

10-5-2 Last sentence is revised to correct 
error of last year and simplify the state- 
ment. No rule change involved. 

Last year: If the defensive team commits 
a foul for which the enforcement spot is on 
or behind their goal line and the direction 
is toward the field of play, measurement is 
from the goal line and if direction is toward 
end line, it is a touchdown. 

This year: For a foul by the defensive 
team, if the enforcement spot is on or behind 
the offended team's goal line any measure- 
ment shall be from the goal line. 



NATIONAL FEDERATION ANNUAL MEETING 

(Continued from Page One) 
efficiently supervised by committees. Their 
work was coordinated by the General Plan- 
ning Committee made up of J. F. Jiacoletti, 
Chairman, R. Rex Dalley, L. T. Havig. H. R. 
Peterson, C. C. Thompson and R. M. Walseth. 
All members of Executive Staffs and Boards 
of Control of Wyoming and Montana (direct 
hosts) and of the other four states in the 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER. 1956 



Page Thirteen 



host section (Minnesota, Nebraska, North 
Dakota and South Dakota) rendered many 
services and contributed to a smoothly func- 
tioning organization. These states, along 
with Idaho, which made a contribution as a 
neighborly gesture, contributed a fund of 
more than $500.00 to provide special features 
for the entertainment of the group. One of 
these features was a rodeo which was held 
at Jackson, Wyoming, on Tuesday night, 
June 26. 

The registration committee, made up of 
Mrs. E. F. Grider, Chairman, Mrs. H. W. 
Jennings, Mrs. Herman Keller, Mrs. W. G. 
Rafter. Mrs. J. Leslie Rollins. Homer Wil- 
liams and Sandra Williams, served as a clear- 
ing house for all activities, including the 
issuing of Federation courtesy cards contain- 
ing coupons, one of which served as a ticket 
for the Chuck Wagon dinner on Monday 
night and the other of which provided ad- 
mittance to the rodeo on Tuesday night. 

Citation certificates were preesnted in an 
impressive ceremony with Vice-President R. 
H. Cole presiding and with the committee 
giving assistance. 

Here is a brief summary of action taken 
by the National Council. The mutual aid pact 
for assisting any State Association which 
finds it necessary to carry a court case as 
far as the State Supreme Court was approved 
as outlined in previous corresnondence to all 
State Associations and the Executive Com- 
mittee was authorized to present specific 
plans for its continuance and expansion at 
next year's meeting and, in the meantime, to 
assist, if necessary, any state which becomes 
involved in such a suit during the current 
year. The group approved the plan as recom- 
mended by the group which attended the 
baseball session on Wedne-day afternoon, to 
help solve the problem which is created by 
activity of certain unorganized baseball 
groups which have placed the eligibility of 
certain high school boys in jeopardy. The 
Executive Committee was authorized to in- 
augurate a sportsmanship program designed 
to apply to baseball contests the same prin- 
ciples which have been applied to basketball 
and football as far as questioning of decis- 
ions and treatment of opponents is concerned. 
The Executive Secretary was authorized to 
conduct a survey about the need and prob- 
able support which might be given a motion 
picture based on track activities and to ex- 
plore the possibilities of production of such 
a picture as one of the series to be made by 
the Official Sports Film Service. The group 
unanimously expressed disapproval of the 



attendance of high school athletes at coach- 
ing or training camps in basketball, football 
or any of the other sports which are a promi- 
nent part of the interscholastic program. It 
was stronglv urged that each State Associa- 
tiontion which does not alreadv have a rule 
prohibiting such attendance explore the pos- 
sibilitv of adopting such a rule at the earliest 
practible date. 

Recommendations from the baseball group 
were approved. These involve the prescribing 
of a baseball batter to wear a helmet and ex- 
ploration, with power to act, of the need and 
probable support for a code of softball rules 
to have the same wording as regulation base- 
ball except in those few sections where fun- 
damental differences require revised rules. 

The Treasiu-er's renort was approved . For 
the fiscal year ending January 31, the report 
showed an excess of receipts over disburse- 
ments of approximately $10,700.00. Of this 
amount, aDproximatelv $6,700.00 were re- 
ceived as interest and dividends from secur- 
ities in the Federation (endowment) fund. 
In addition, approximately $4,400.00 were re- 
ceived as interest and dividends from secur- 
ities in the Retirement Fund. Sales earn dur- 
imr the past fiscal vear was annroximately 
$6,500.00 for the Federation fund and an 
additional sales gain for the Retirement 
Fund was approximately $7. 500. 00 for a total 
sales gain of aDproximatelv $14,000. A list of 
?11 securities in both funds was distributed. 
This provided complete data concerning each 
of the securities. Attention was called to the 
fact that the market value of securities in 
the Retirement Fund exceeds $100.000 00. 
This represents the reachinsr of a s-oal which, 
for a number of years. Q eemed ouite remote. 

An election for Section? 1 and 5 resulted in 
the reelection of W. P. Fusritt (West Vir- 
ginia) to represent Section 1 for » term of 
another three years on the Federation Exec- 
utive Committee and the election of Vauehn 
E. McColev (KansaO to rpnre^ent Section 
5 on the Executive Committee for a term of 
three years. As a reminder, announcements 
about the 1957 meetings were made. The 
winter meeting of t^e National Federation 
Football Committee. State Evecutive Offic- 
ers and National Federation Executive Com- 
mittee will be held at the Hamilton Hotel in 
Chicatro on January 2 to 5. 1957. The next 
annual meeting will be held at the Balmoral 
Hotel, Bal Harbour. Miami Beach. Florida on 
Wednesday, June 26 through Saturday, June 
29, 1957. 

Presentations of progress reports at the 
session for executive officers included the 



Page Fourteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1956 



following; topics: Public Relations, Brochures 
and Devices, Standardizing Interstate Prac- 
tices and Regulations, Athletic Honor Rolls 
and All-American Lists, New Publications on 
Athletic Administration, Track and Field De- 
velopments, Track and Field Committee Ac- 
tivities, Swimming, and Expansion of All- 
Star Regulations. 

Presentations at the board of control ses- 
sions were: Survey on State Association Ac- 
tivity, Centralized vs. Decentralized Opera- 
tion, Athletic Honor Rolls and All-American 
Lists, Charity and All-Star Contest Controls, 
State Association Owned Buildings, and 
State Basketball Tournament Revisions. 

In the general sessions the following sub- 
jects were discussed: Report on Distribution 
and Use of Federation Publications, A Sur- 
vey on Athletic Practices, Colorado Court 
Case and Mutual Aid Pact, Legal Aspects of 
State High School Association Activity, Min- 
or Spoils Survey, and various assigned topics 
in the football, basketball, and baseball ses- 
sions. 



FOOTBALL OFFICIALS MEETING 

(Continued from Inside Front Cover) 

afford protection to quarterbacks, who gen- 
erally are key men. from being "worked 
over" by the defense. 

2. Is it an incomplete pass or a fumble? 
Play : Passer is about to throw ball when 
contacted by the defense and a loose ball re- 
sults. It was agreed that two factors enter 
into consideration. First, the arm of the 
passer must have stated in a forward mo- 
tion, and secondly, it is left to the official's 
judgment as to whether the ball had left 
the passer's hand. 

?>. Roughing the kicker. It is the intended 
blocker's responsibility to miss the kicker if 
he misses the ball. Incidental contact such as 
brushing, etc., should be ignored. After the 
kicker has regained his balance, he may be 
blocked. 

4. Swinging of hands, arms, or elbows — 
either in close line play or open field where 
offender fails to make contact. If, in the 
judgment of the officials, the attempt was 
malicious, a penalty should be called ; other- 
wise, it was suggested that a first warning 
be given. 

5. Improper Alignment. It was agreed 
that officials should do what they could to 
assist players in proper alignment. However, 
if the infraction occurs, it should be penal- 
ized. There will be no "first warning." 

6. Ineligibles down field. As long as con- 



tact is maintained in driving a lineman back- 
wards, the charge is allowable. If contact 
on a linebacker is made directly, it is pass 
interference. However, if incidental contact 
results from driving the lineman backwards, 
it should be ignored. 

7. Handing the ball on the belly series. 
The rule book confirmed the interpretation 
that on rare occasions, when the quarter- 
back and another back go across the scrim- 
mage line with both men holding to the ball, 
the player who relinquishes possession must 
be in advance. Otherwise, it will be illegal 
handing. It was urged that officials use a 
slow whistle on these types of plays. 

8. Players momentarily within 15 yards 
of ball after ready for play. It was pointed 
out that as long as a player passes through 
the "15 yard circle" around the ball he is 
complying with the spirit of the rule. In 
the event that a huddle is taking place more 
than 15 yards from the ball, it was agreed 
that the captain should be requested to move 
the huddle. 

9. Coaches box. Dr. Ginger suggested that 
the home school be requested to line off a 
coaches box if none is in existence when the 
field is examined by the officials just prior 
to game time. It should be snecifically re- 
quested of the coaches before the game that 
they keep all members of their staffs off the 
field until signalled by the referee to come 
on. 

10. Pass interference. As is discussed in 
the rule book, contact between two players 
making a legitimate attempt to get to the 
ball should be ignored. This interpretation 
is based on the assumption that the ball is 
in the immediate vicinity of the two players. 
In a situation in which one player runs up 
the back of another player, even in an ob- 
vious attempt to get to a ball thrown to a 
point some yards beyond the point of con- 
tact, it should be ruled interference. 

In regard to contact occurring in a vicinity 
removed from the spot of the intended pass, 
obvious interference with an eligible receiver 
who is far removed from the spot when the 
pass is being thrown is callable on the 
grounds that it may prevent his subsequent 
participation if the pass is completed or in- 
tercepted, or the passer may have had to 
throw elsewhere because of the interference. 

11. Piling on. It was agreed that these in- 
fractions should be called more frequently. 
Some of the officials were particularly con- 
cerned over the type of action described as 
"head pouncing." It usually occurs when a 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER. 1956 Page Fifteen 

ball carrier is downed by one tackier and, requested before the game to have one player 
after he hits the ground, a second player specified at all times to call time-out. This 
throws his body on the ball carrier's head, will prevent time-outs being called when it 
There have been many serious injuries on is not intended by team strategy, 
just this type of play, and it is the consensus 13. It was suggested that officials notify 

that, in most cases, this type of contact can the coach immediately, and identify by num- 
be avoided. ber the player who commits a serious infrac- 

12. Calling time-out. Coaches should be tion. 

REPORT OF INSURANCE CLAIMS 

(Continued from August Issue of the Kentucky Hiirh School Athlete) 

School Claimant Injury Amount Paid 

St. Charles Joe Buckman Broken rib. X-ray 26.00 

St. Marys Jim Hart Laceration — suture 3.00 

St. Marys Mike Sanders Laceration — suture 3.00 

St. Marys Charles Kortz X-ray i shoulder I 5.00 

St. Marys John Harris X-ray (shoulder! 12.00 

Salem Duke Ramage Ankle injury (special) 77. 50 

Scottsville John Mutchler Fractured tarsal 2 5. nil 

Sedalia E. C. Guthrie. Jr. X-ray (hand) 6.00 

Shelbyville Bobby Arnold Loss of teeth 50.00 

Shelbyville John Daniel X-ray t rib > 10.00 

Shelbyville Herbie Kays Loss of tooth 25.00 

Shelbyville Tohn Brown X-ray i shoulder i 5.00 

Shelbyville John Daniel X-ray i ankle i 6.00 

Shelbyville Russell Hickman X-ray tkneei — 6.00 

Shelbyville Lewis Mathis X-ray i kneel 6.00 

Shelbyville Bill Clements Ankle injury i special ) 27. mi 

Shelbyville Bobby Carter -. „_X-ray (rib) 10.00 

Shelbyville John Brown . __ Laceration — suture 5.00 

Shelbyville Billy Ellis Broken tooth. X-ray 22.00 

Shelbyville Sammy West X-ray i chest i 10.00 

Shelbyville Sammy West Broken finger. X-ray 15.00 

Shelbyville Bobby Carter Broken nose. X-ray 30.00 

Shelbyville Russell Hickman _ X-ray .hand/ 6.00 

Shelbyville Chester Ethington Broken tooth. X-ray 26.00 

Shepherdsville Howard Tate Broken rib. X-ray 1 1.00 

Shepherdsville James Wagoner Arm injury i special) 72.50 

Shepherdsville Ronald McCubbins Fractured clavicle . 25.00 

Shepherdsville Delbert Tracy .__ Broken teeth _ 38.00 

Simpsunville Timmy Smith Los- of tooth, broken tooth 45.00 

Somerset Allen Mitchell X-ray (toe) 5.00 

Somerset Tim Daulton X-ray i ankle) 6.00 

Somerset Philip Maguire X-ray (knee) 6.00 

Somerset Sammy Tweedy X-ray (spine) 5.00 

Somerset Eugene Prat her X-ray ( knee) 6.00 

Som< rset David Massey Chipped teeth 5.00 

Somerset Sam Tweedy X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Somerset Kenny Baker X-ray (shoulder) 5.00 

Somerset Gerald Phelps Fractured metacarpal 8.00 

Somerset Carleton Godsey Broken teeth 20.00 

Somerset Thomas Anderson Broken tooth. X-ray j 24.00 

Springfield Ronnie McCabe Dislocated elbow 12.00 

Springfield Joe McGill X-ray (shoulder) 7.50 

Springfield Onis Pinkston fractured metacarpal 17.00 

Springfield Tommy Thompson X-ray i arm i 8.00 

Springfield Joe McGill Laceration — suture 5.00 

Springfield Tohn Scott Fractured radius 40.00 

Springfield Tom Moore Fractured fibula, dislocated ankle 75.00 

Springfield Tommy Dowling Broken finger 10.00 

Stanford Hugh Sam Williams X-ray (anklei 5.00 

Stanford Boyd Gilliam X-ray (hip) 15.00 

Stanford Jimmy Wright Broken ribs 10.00 

Stanford Carl Rogers Broken nose 10.00 

Stanford Jimmy Wright Fractured finger, X-ray 15.00 

Stanford Tohnny Lasure Loss of teeth 50.00 

Stanford Boyd Gilliam Fractured fibula 25.00 

Stinnett Earl Wilson X-ray I anklei 5. on 

Suda E. Butler Billy Scott Fractured radius 40.00 

Suda E. Butler M'chael Surface Leg injury (special I 69.18 

Suda E. Butler Wilbur Gill Nose injury (special) 90.05 

Suda E. Butler Charles Winebrenner X-ray ihandi 5.00 

Suda E. Butler Tom Worthington Broken finger. X-ray 2(1.00 

Suda E. Butler David Neel Back injury (special ) 35.00 

Suda E. Butler Norman Cureton X-ray (leg and arm i 15.00 

Suda E. Butler Ralph Buckley Dislocated finger 10.00 

Suda E. Butler Charles Kellogg Laceration — suture 5.00 

Suda E. Butler Bill Gill Laceration — suture 5. On 

Sunfish Timmy Joiner Laceration — suture 5. en 

Sunfish Dudley W. Sanders, Jr. X-ray ( anklei 7.00 

Taylor County J. C. Richardson Back injury (special) 35.00 

Taylor County Brent Cox X-ray (spinel 7.00 

Taylor County Rancell Campbell X-ray (head) 10.00 

Taylor County Rancell Campbell Broken facing i tooth i 3.00 

Taylor County David Beck Loss of tooth, X-ray 35.00 



Page Sixteen THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1956 



Taylorsville Darrell Patterson Loss of tooth 5.00 

Taylorsville Darrell Patterson X-ray (finger) 6.00 

Taylorsville Claude Brock X-ray (ankle) 12.00 

Temple Hill James Jones X-ray (knee) 6.00 

Temple Hill Allan Chambers X-ray (foot) 10.00 

Todd County Darriel Johnson X-ray (leg) 10.00 

Tompkinsville Joe Russell X-ray (head) 10.00 

Tompkinsville Ralph Smith Broken toe 10.00 

Tompkinsville Sammy Brown X-ray (elbow) 6.00 

Tompkinsville James Ritter X-ray (hip) 10.00 

Tompkinsville Jack P. Carter Fractured tibia 50.00 

Tompkinsville Veachel Harlan Broken nose 15.00 

Tompkinsville Leon Denham Fractured clavicle 35.00 

Tompkinsville Donald Headrick Shoulder injury (special) 113.25 

Tompkinsville Prentice Stanford Fractured fibula 50.00 

Tompkinsville Douglas McPherson X-ray (foot) 6.00 

Tompkinsville J. E. Petett X-ray (elbow) 6.00 

Trigg County Billy Redd Broken nose 20.00 

Trigg County Zelner Cossey Broken finger 10.00 

Trigg County Hollis Litchfield Laceration — suture 6.00 

Trigg County Buddy Wilson Laceration — suture 5.00 

Trigg County Mickey Larkins Broken nose 15.00 

Trigg County Chappell Wilson Broken rib, X-ray 18.00 

Trigg County Bruce Thomas Head injury (special) 33.10 

Trigg County Hollis Litchfield Broken tooth. X-ray 22.00 

Trigg County William Lawrence X-ray (hand) 5.00 

Trigg County Jackie Alexander X-ray (hip) 10.00 

Trimble County Leroy Liter Laceration — suture 5.00 

Trimble County Johnny Brown Laceration — suture 5.00 

Trimble County Bobby Dunaway X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Uniontown Philip Franklin Fractured vertebra, X-ray 40.00 

LTniontown .Timmie Stephenson Loss of tooth, X-ray 27.00 

Uniontown Bonnie Gibson Loss of teeth 50.00 

Utica Howard Coffey Laceration — suture 5.00 

Valley Billy Van Fleet Laceration — suture. X-ray (hand) 11.00 

Valley George Nickle X-ray (hip and shoulder) 20.00 

Valley Harold Craig X-ray (knee) 6.00 

Valley Donald Lacefield X-ray (pelvis) 10.00 

Valley Donald Lacefield X-ray (head) 10.00 

Valley Willie Carter X-ray (hand) 6.00 

Valley Fergie Seheynost X-ray (hand and chest) 16.00 

Valley Melvin Vogel X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Valley David Alexander Fractured fibula 50.00 

Valley Claude Kennedy Broken rib. X-ray 20.00 

Valley Frank Wallace X-ray (elbow) 6.00 

Valley William Beanblossom X-ray (chest) 10.00 

Valley Hugh Dening X-ray (pelvis) 10.00 

Valley Jesse Ellis X-ray (head) 10.00 

Valley Buddy Rosenberger Laceration — suture 5.00 

Valley Bill Seward X-ray (spine and head) 12.00 

Valley Rodger Roberts Laceration — suture 5.00 

Valley Bobby Fields X-ray (knee and chest) 16.00 

Valley Eugene Speer X-ray (spine) 10.00 

Valley Melvin Vogel Knee injury (special) 112.50 

Valley Jerry Watkins X-ray (knee) 12.00 

Valley John Needy X-ray (hand) 7-50 

Valley Billy Van Fleet Laceration — suture 5.00 

Valley Carl Cooper X-ray (hand) 6.00 

Valley Jesse Henon X-ray (elbow) 10.00 

Versailles David Atwood X-ray (shoulder) 10.00 

Versailles Jimmy Gay Fractured metatarsal 25.00 

Versailles Jimmy Tipton X-ray (ankle) 5.00 

Versailles Paul Smith Broken tooth 5.00 

Versailles James Lear Broken tooth 20.00 

Waddy Marvin Reynolds Dental injury (special) 56.50 

Warren County Jerry Shields X-ray (arm) 6.00 

Warren County Billy Cassady X-ray (ankle) 12.00 

Warren County Willard Hanes Laceration — suture 5.00 

Whitesburg Kenneth Collins Loss of teeth 50.00 

Whitesburg Jimmy Jones X-ray (shoulder) 10.00 

Whitesburg Jimmy Jones Broken tooth, X-ray 22.00 

Whitesburg Joe Cook Loss of tooth, broken tooth, X-ray 45.00 

Whitesburg Elmer Ray Webb Broken tooth, X-ray 22.00 

Whitesburg Billy Joe Hall Leg injury (special) 124.50 

Whitesburg Billy Ray Maggard Broken nose 12.00 

Williamsburg Wesley Jones X-ray (head) 10.00 

Williamsburg Donnie Rains X-ray (head) 10.00 

Williamstown James Hale X-ray (ankle) 10.00 

Wilmore Larry Cox Leg injury (special) 150.00 

Winchester David Scott Dental injury (special) 45.00 

Wingo Tony Henson X-ray (hand) 2.50 

Wingo Wilford Perry Broken nose 11-00 

Wingo Jimmy Tucker X-rav (ankle) 5.00 

Wingo Max Mayes X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Woodbine A. C. Gibbs Broken nose, X-ray 20.95 

Wurtland Henry Horton Fractured ulna 40.00 

Wurtland Phillip Stephens Fractured clavicle 35.00 

Wurtland James Stephens Fractured radius 40.00 

Wurtland Bobby Gene Lucas Fractured clavicle 35.00 



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Hi qh School Athlete 



JLhe Sportsman s Creed 






The Player 



1. He lives clean and plays hard. He plays for the love of the game. 

2. He wins without boasting, he loses without excuses, and he never quits- 

3. He respects officials and accepts their decisions without question. 

4. He never forgets that he represents his school. 

The Coach - - 

1. He inspires in his hoys a love for the game and the desire to win. 

2. He teaches them that it is better to lose fairly than to win unfairly. 

3. He leads players and spectators to respect officials by setting them a 
good example. 

4. He is the type of man he wants his boys to be. 

The Official - - 

1. He knows the rules. 

2. He is fair and firm in all decisions. He calls them as he sees them. 

3. He treats players and coaches courteously and demands the same 
treatment for himself. 

4. He knows the game is for the boys, and lets them have the spotlight. 



The Spectator - 




1. He never boos a player or official. 

2. He appreciates a good play, no matter who makes it. 

3. He knows the school gets the blame or the praise for his conduct. 

4. He recognizes the need for more sportsmen and fewer "sports.*" 



Official Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 

OCTOBER - 1956 



r/1 



/ 






V. : 



tj] 



Clinic For Cheerleaders 

By George I). Wheeler 

On Saturday, November 17, when the Uni- 
versity of Kentucky plays Xavier University 
of Cincinnati, Ohio, the Kentucky State 
Y. M. C. A. will hold its sixth annual Youth 
Day and Cheerleaders Clinic on "Building 
Better Sportsmanship in High School Ath- 
letics." 

Starting six years ago, the Youth Day and 
Cheerleaders Clinic had a few more than 600 
students and faculty members from about 
twenty-eight high schools, and last year had 
more than 3,000 students and faculty mem- 
bers from more than 200 high schools, with 
300 majorettes in uniform, 800 cheerleaders 
in uniform, and more than 2,000 other stu- 
dents. 

The purpose of the Cheerleaders Clinic is 
to emphasize sportsmanship through good 
cheering and to encourage cheerleaders to 
take the lead in building better sportsman- 
ship. Ted Sanford has said that "since these 
clinics started six years ago, there has been 
a marked improvement in sportsmanship in 
high school athletics." 

The purpose of the program for majorettes 
is to make them feel their importance in 
working with the band, to encourage them 
in learning skill in baton twirling, and to 
impress them with the feeling that they rep- 
resent their schools when in uniform. 

The purpose of the Youth Day is to en- 
courage high school students to go to college 
by showing them what they may expect to 
find there, to impress them with the value 
of an education, to advise them in the choice 
of courses, to introduce them to a college 
campus, and to challenge them to acquire 
higher education. 

The program for cheerleaders includes a 
panel dealing with such subjects on cheering 
as: "Why Do We Cheer?" "Cheering and 
the Spectators :" "Cheering and the Play- 
ers ;" "Cheering and the Officials ;" and 
"The Cheerleader as a Representative of the 
School." In the past five years, members of 
this panel have been superintendents, prin- 
cipals, coaches, radio announcers, newspaper 
sports writers, the Commissioner of high 
school athletics, the Superintendent of Public 
Instruction, game officials, cheerleader spon- 
sors, and U. of K. athletic staff members. 
The panel this year will be made up of faculty 
sponsors of cheerleaders and Bob Hardy, last 
year's co-captain of the University of Ken- 
tucky football team. Sponsors agreeing to 
serve are Mrs. Jane McCoy of Shelbyville, 
Mrs. Arthur Adams of Clark County, Miss 



Pat Carter of Old Kentucky Home, and Mrs. 
Woodrow Crum of Maysville. 

Sandwiched in between the speakers will 
be demonstrations by cheerleaders from the 
different high schools at the clinic, after 
which Suky and the University cheerleaders 
will teach the high school cheerleaders a 
number of yells which will be given just be- 
fore the game starts. 

A. D. Litchfield, State Secretary of the 
Kentucky Y.M.C.A., will preside at the clinic 
which will be held in the Alumni Gymnasium. 

Walter Hall, Director of the Lafayette 
High School band, will be in charge of the 
program for majorettes, which will be held 
in Guignol Theatre. Warren Lutz and Don 
Wilson will assist. Greetings will be given 
this year by Miss Judy Ruffner, University 
of Kentucky Band Sponsor. 

The cheerleaders and majorettes will be 
in uniform, and will perform on the field 
just before game time. They will repeat a 
feature of last year's program by forming 
arches through which teams of both colleges 
will enter the field just before start of the 
game. 

The Youth Day program will be held at 
the Coliseum, and will be presided over by 
Dr. Hambleton Tapp, Assistant to the Presi- 
dent of the University of Kentucky. Special 
music will be furnished by the Music Depart- 
ment of the University. Dr. Chamberlain, 
Vice President of the University, will speak, 
and a panel of college students, under the 
leadership of Bart Peak, Student Secretary 
of the Y.M.C.A., will discuss the academic, 
social, cultural, and spiritual activities of the 
University. Following the program, a tour of 
the campus, under the direction of the Stu- 
dent Y.M.C.A., will be held. 

At 11:30 in Guignol Theatre, a showing 
of the new University moving picture will 
be held for all who are interested. 

Special guests have been invited to parti- 
cipate in the program including the new 
President of the University, Dr. F. G. Dickey ; 
the President of Xavier University, Father 
O'Connor; Dr. R. R. Martin, Superintendent 
of Public Instruction ; and Governor Chand- 
ler. 

All students and faculty members parti- 
cipating in the program will attend the foot- 
ball game. 

This year's program is expected to be the 
largest and best of the series, with 4,000 
high school students and leaders anticipated. 
Dr. Tapp says this is the outstanding event 
for high school students held on the campus 
each year and urges principals to do their 
utmost to see that not only their cheerleaders 
(Continued on Page Ten) 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL XIX— NO 



OCTOBER, 1956 



$1.00 Per Year 



Early Season Football Questions 

Note: These rulings do not set aside or such that it does not apply when a kick is 

recovered by A beyond the line nor to a foul 
which occurs after the touching by R and 
before recovery by R either beyond or behind 
the line, nor to a foul which might occur dur- 
ing a 2nd punt by A nor to an incomplete 
forward pass which might follow recovery 
behind the line. 

In discussing the revision in Rule 3-5-la, 
the question will lie raised as to whether 
any time-out which is not charged to a team 
is to be considered "an Official's time-out." 
There are several situations in which a time- 
out is not charged to either a team nor to 
an Official. One common case is that in which 
the ball is out of bounds. Another is that in 
which a team requests and is granted a time- 
out but later has the charge nullified be- 
cause of removal of an injured player. 
Neither case is considered "an Official's 
time-out." However, if an Official initiates 
the action such as stopping the clock for a 
measurement or for examining a player or 
drying the ball, it is an "Official's time-out" 
and the clock is started as outlined. 
Installment II 
1. Play. CORRECTIONS TO 1956 PUBLI- 
CATIONS: Installment one called attention 
to a wrong statement in the last sentence of 
Play 12 of the Football Case Book and to re- 
moval of one of the code differences in the 
Meeting Folder. Here are a few comments 
about other material. Football Rules Book: 
In the rule comments on page 53, the last 
sentence of the paragraph under Rule 8 is 
correct provided the situation occurs on 4th 
clown. If it should not be 4th down, the ball 
would remain in possession of team A. 
Football Case Book: In item 1 of Play 201, 
the word "usually" should be omitted. Under 
the current rule, the listed act would always 
be fair catch interference. In Play 248, the 
inclusion of a ball handed forward to an op- 
ponent might be questioned. Such an act 
would probably be classified as a fumble even 
though 7-3-1, if taken literally, would classify 
it as a forward handing situation. It is pos- 
(Contimied on Page Eleven) 



Editor's Note: These rulings do not set aside or 
modify any rule. They are interpretations on some 
of the early season situations which have heen pre- 
sented. 

Installment I 

CORRECTIONS— Football Rules: No er- 
rors reported. See comment on Questions 6 
and 10 of the Meeting Folder for unusual 
situations. 

Football Case Book: Last sentence of rul- 
ing in Play 12 is not correct since tackle can- 
not receive ball handed forward. 

Football Meeting Folder: In rule differ- 
ences on Page 8, delete last clause of 2nd 
paragraph under Rule 7. College rule has 
been changed on eligible linemen. 

COMMENT ON SELECTED SECTIONS - 
Questions 6 and 10 on Page 1 of the Football 
Meeting Folder are thought provokers. Item 

(b) of Question 6 is a touchback situation 
since the force came from the opponent of 
the team in possession — as outlined in Item 

(c) of 8-5-3. However, if Item (c) of 8-5-2 is 
taken literally, it could be claimed to be a 
safety. The last clause of the safety state- 
ment is intended to apply when the force has 
been provided by the team in possession and 
not to the case outlined in Question 6. 

Question 10 outlines the unique situation 
in which a team cannot afford to decline a 
penalty in order to retain a touchdown they 
have scored. It is the only case in which there 
is need for the last clause of 8-2-2 other than 
for the theoretic case as outlined in Play 
(2) under 8-2-2. The situation also affects 
the second sentence of 10-1. Declination can- 
not be automatic but acceptance may be so 
considered. It is not expected that the dis- 
tance will be stepped off by the Official. 

The revisions in 5-2-2, 5-2-5 and the 3rd 
sentence of 7-5-4 provide coverage for the 
infrequent cases where a forward pass (legal 
or illegal) or a 2nd scrimmage-kick or any 
foul should occur after a scrimmage-kick 
has been touched by R beyond the line. In 
any of these cases, the next down is first. 
For the college game, a similar change was 
to be authorized but the final wording is 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 195G 



OCTOBER, 1956 VOL. XIX— NO 3 

Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association. 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Russell Williamson (1956-60), Inez 

Vice-President Louis Litchfield (1953-571, Marion 

Directors — W. B. Jones (1953-57) Somerset; W. H. Crowdus 
(1954-5S). Franklin; Jack Dawson (1954-58), Middletcwn: 
Robert P. Forsythe (1955-59). Greenville; K. G. GilU.spie 
(1955-59), Georgetown; Cecil A. Thornton (1956-60), Harlan. 
Subscription Rates $1.00 Per i'ear 



^from the Commissioned s 



ice 



The Cross Count rj Run 



The K.H.S.A.A. is attempting to set up five 
regional cross country meets, scheduled to be held 
on Saturday, November 3, 1956. The sites are Mur- 
ray, Bowling- Green, Louisville. Morehead, and Berea. 
Letters have been sent to the principals of all 
member schools in an effort to secure tentative 
enrollment of cross country teams in the regional 
meets. The state cross country run is scheduled to 
be held in Lexington on November 17. The number 
of entrants in the state championship meet has be- 
come so great that the proposed regional meets are 
necessary. School administrators planning on enter- 
ing teams are urged to write to the State Office at 
once. 

Falls Cities Clinics 

Secretary- Treasurer Robert L. Rosenbaum of the 
Falls Cities Basketball Officials Associtaion has 
scheduled eight rules clinics in areas where his 
group supplies many of the officials. These meet- 
ings have the approval of the K.H.S.A.A. The dates 
and sites of the clinics are as follows: Henry Cen- 
tral High School, Friday, October 26; Frankfort 
High School, Monday, October 29: Elizabethtown 
High School, Wednesday, October 31; Anderson 
County High School, Monday, November 5; Camp- 
bellsville High School, Thursday. November 8; 
Springfield High School, Wednesday. November 14; 
Shelbyville High School, Monday, November 19; 
Fern Creek Hig-h School. Thursday, November 29. 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED FOOTBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled October 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Alston. E. D.. 1016 S. 43rd Street, Louisville 

Ash-worth, Fred G.. 825 11th Street. Huntington. W. Va. 

Autore. Daniel. Box 172, Wheelwright, 2362 

Baker, Charles Joe. 2547 Harrison, Paducah, 33043, 56311 

Ball. Al, 306 Monroe. So. Charleston. W. V., Ri 49847, 25441 

Barbour. Morris, c/o 536 S. 12th, Louisville 

Bell. Clarence. 1228 S. 41st, Louisville 

Broderick. Carroll A., 1760 Normal Dr., Bowling Green. 

38594, 3S212 
Brown. John W.. 525 E No. Aspendale. Lexington. 5085S. 23212 
Carpenter, Dalton O., 132 I Wherrv Housing. Ft. Campbell. 

GE 93378, Ft. Campbell 2302 
Carter, Darrell, Tompkinsville, 46M. 53 
Clagg. Harry G.. 1336 13th St.. Huntington. W. Va. 
Coleman. L. J. "Duke", 115 Arcadia Park, Lexington, 51400, 
51400 



Corea, Frank, Box 452, "Williamson, W. Va. 

Creasey, Fred, 204 W .Washington. Sebree, 2172 

Davis, Charlie, Benham 

Dixie, Cornelius. 621 S. Preston, Louisville 

Dosker, Henry E., Box 22, Madisonville, 2593-J, 88 , 

Dotson, William S., 432 E. 5th, Lexington, 25131, 40350 

Duke, Jesse W., Jr.. 8422 Staghorn, Louisville. Be 7321. CI 1249 

Ernst, Ray C 3574 Larkspur Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, East 

16758, Dunbar 2200-LA7S 
Fitch, F. A., 156 Wilson Ct., Huntington, W. Va. 
Foreman. Earl V., Jr.. 711 Briscoe Drive, Jeffersonville. Ind. 

23470, WA 1241. Ext. 6220 
Foster, Berryan E., 927 Waverly, Lexington, 31827, 20515 
Garrity. E. F.. 105 Bradford St., Charleston. W. Va. 
Giles, Jonathan, 3404 Greenwood Ave., Louisville 
Gillespie, Robert C. Pikeville. 1114, 1418 
Goebel, Bill. Jr., Box 142, Prestonsburg, 2407 
Goodwin, William H., 403 E. Sixth, Lexington, 32715, Frank- 
fort 47625 
Greenlee. O. C 105 Wilson Ct.. Huntington, W. Va. 
Heinze, Frank. 204 Maple Ave.. Prestonsburg. 2436 
Heinze, John G., 206 N. Arnold Ave., Prestonsburg, 2195 
Jacobs. Edwin. 320 Queensway. Lexington. 25784. 42855 
Johnson. Ellis T., 1617 Lawrence, Ashland. 43849 
Jones. George W-, 6207 Pine Drive, Huntington, W. Va. 
Josephs. Michael. 326 Walnut St.. Huntington. West Va. 
Kraesig, Raymond A.. 927 Ardmore, Louisville, ME 49366, 

ME 77621 
Lawson, Leland, 949 DePorres Ave., Lexington, 41009 
Long. Leo J., 1105 Batterv Lane, Nashville, Tenn., 8-1300, 

7-0420 
McConachie. B. E., 1416 Oakwood Ave., Louisville 
MuDade, C. F. Mickey. 918 6th Ave.. St. Albans. W. Va. 
Malcolm. Donald C. Route 1. Kenova. W. Va. 
Martin. Edwin J., Ho. & Hq. Co.. 3rd Reg.. USATCA, Ft. Knox, 

2550 I Bus. No.) 
Mayo, Henry L., Jr.. Paintsville. 856, 768 
Merrick, Robert A.. 155-F Wherry Apts., Ft. Campbell, GE 

94576, Ft. Campbell 2289 
Moellering, Louis H.. 62S7 Lilbur Lane. Cincinnati, Ohio. 

BE 18701 
Moss. Howard A.. Box 1042. Paducah. 31072. 31234 
Mullins. Bobby E.. Paintsville, 432, 545 
Newman, Charles O.. 42-F Rose Terrace. Fort Knox. 2050 

(Bus. No.) 
Nord, Ed, 1734 So. 23rd, Louisville. Sp 41958, BE 3401, Ext. 202 
Palmer, Carl A.. 2506 So. 7th, Ironton. Ohio. 4171 
Perdue. Paul. 523 Broad. Murray, 1018-J, 298 
Powell, Logan, 1031 Oak Hill. Lexington. 29794 
Qualey, L. V.. Lot 107 Post Trailer Court, Ft. Campbell, 

GE 93521-3059, GE 93521-CB260 
Reece, Fred, 149 Elm Street, Versailles, 33. Paris 1465 
Robertson, Everett. 341 Etna St., Russell, Oak 328 
Rogers. J. B., 840 12th Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Rose, Alfred William. 5713 Washington Ave.. Evansville, Ind., 

GR 60892, HA 45551 
Rupert. Joe F., Route 1, Ashland, Catlettsburg North 6825. 

Ea 43159 
St. Charles, Thomas A., 2S29 Dogwood Place. Nashville, Tenn., 

CY 29958. AL 55497 
Saylor, Ben H.. Box 383. Corbin 
Selvy. Curt. Steele, Corbin. 1333 
Schlich. Paul, 3150 Talisman, Louisville 
Scullen. Allan R., School Troops, Ft. Knox, 6998, 4341 
Seale, Frank E.. 1001 Tates Creek Rd., Lexington. 35028 
Seidel, Herb, Special Services. TAC. Ft. Knox. 3727, 5757 
Simms. Wavelan J.. Jr.. Co. B Sp Tng Regt USATCA, Fort 

Knox, 6033, 2648 
Sloan, Earl Dean, Diane Ct., Madison, Tenn., 76316 
Sortet, Wither J., 1582 Washington Blvd., Huntington. W. Va. 
Stephens. Grover O.. 921 DePorres Ave.. Lexington. 48797. 

20640 
Sullivan, Don C. Prestonsburg, 4791, 2530 
Swope, William W., 405 Breckinridge St., Lexington 
Teague, Amos, Princeton Ave.. Madisonville, 1897-W 
Thompson, Bruce D.. 674 So. 43rd. Louisville, Sp 21806, Wa 5251 
Vance, Wendell, 27 Whirlaway, Lyndon, Bel 6618, Anch 182 
VanMeter, John W.. Jr., 1933 Olive, Louisville, Cy 6032, Wa 6951 
Vinson. William J., Box 327, Ceredo, W. Va. 
Walkenhorst. Walter, Jr., 7400 Graves Rd., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Lo 19500, Pa 16649 
Walker. Paul R., 105 Leech Court, Glasgow. OL 13013, OL 13811 
Walter, Lafayette, 55th, Ashland, 46191, 46192 
Wedge, Don, Box 66, Fairborn, Ohio, Cargy 67731, Dayton 

KE 7111, Ext. 64190 
Whedbee. Mel. 1301 So. 32nd St.. Louisville 
Williams. Bert, 658 Ohio St., Lexington, 4-0057, 2-2626 
Williams, Felix, 708 E. Charlotte Ct., Lexington. 26297, 29011 
Wilson, C. P.. 499 13th Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Wilson. Jack R.. 1137 Walnut Ave., Ashland. EA 44956, 

EA 51611 
Zimmerman, William E., 3103 Wedgewood Way. Louisville, 

GL 44439, GL 44439 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER. 1956 



Page Three 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled October 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 
Abny. Bob. 342 Stratford. Lexington. 51777. 45193 
Adams. Charles C. Somerset. 1432, 1427-R 
Adkins. Tom. Sandy Hook. Re S6215, Re 86515 
Akins. Charlie. White Mills. Cecilia 5662 (Bus. No.) 
Almond. Alvin. 644 14th St.. Bowling Green. VI 34850, VI 34334 
Barker. Walter D.. Star Route. Buena Vista. Ohio. TJL 82770, 

EL 30190 
Baker. James; E.. 2425 Main St.. Westwood Station. Ashland. 

East 45457. East 40226 
Baker, James Monroe. P. O. Box 486. Hazard. 656, 493 
Barnes. Judson. Box 127. Cavvood, 1074-1. Mary Helen School 
Barnett. J. W.. 201 College, Somerset 
Bartley. Robert E.. Box 48S, Hellier 
Barry. Harold L.. Elizabethtown 
Basham, James L.. Jr., 511 Lee Rd., Elizabethtown, 5286 

(Bus. No.) 
Batten. Wade Howard. 312 W. Iowa St., Evansville. 1ml.. 4222s 
Begley. James P., Blue Diamond 

Bennett. Gene, Box 21S, Whcelcrsburg. Ohio. Scioto 07ol, 
Berman. Milton A.. 1809 Hartman. Louisville. Hi 2760W. 

Gl 44541 
Best. Gene, 214 Briar Cliff. Frankfort. 33527, 38 159 
Blackburn, Clyde W*.. Sue Bennett College. London. 241-X 
Bowling. Roy. London. 309-J 
Brady. .Tames W., Carlisle. 569-T-3, 71-.1 
Branaman, Bill. Jr., Box 46, London. 523-R 
Brantley, Alfred C Box 253. Madisonville, 1SS0. 1880 
Braun. Robert M., 27 Hollywood Dr., Florence. At 35484 

Re 16000 
Brown. Brvant. 1408 West Third. Owensboro. MU 4-1273 
Brown. J. Carlton. 411 O'Hara. Danville, 1569-J, 58 
Brown. John W-, 525 E. North Aspendale. Lexington, 50858, 

23212 
Brummett. Joseph W„ 519 O'Hara Dr., Box 236, Danville. 

2921. 1900, Ext 26 
Bunnell. Kenneth L.. Munfordville. Ja 15454 
Burton. Dennis. Hox 816. Hazard. P 777 
Butcher. Paul. West Van Lear. 967 M-4, 1181 T-3 
Campbell, John D.. Wayland. 5901, 5241 
Carpenter. Bill, P. O. Box 12. Bowling Green. VI 21253 
Cartwright. James F.. Hox 154. Olive Hill 
Casteel. Ralph M.. East Bernsta.lt. 904-J, 906-1. 
Cates. Thomas Henry, Route 1. Nebo 

Chafin. David Lee. P. O. Box 158, Wheelwright, 2261 (Bus. No. I 
Chandler. Tommy, Dixon 

Chaput. Louis E.. 410 College. Elizabethtown. 3069, 4125 
Collie, James E.. Sr.. mil Merrill Lane. Lebanon. KE 74585, 

KE 72031 
Conlev. Ted Lynn. 3227 Walters Hill Drive. Ashland, EA 12912. 

EA 42912 
Connor, James R., 1939 Alexandria Pike. Highland Heights. 

HI 1S9S7. JU 11235 
Connor, Neal B.. 322 Division. Bellevue, JU 11369, JU 12800 
Coomer, Charles, Jr., Box 476. Somerset. 1322-W, 545 
Cooper. Warren. 120 Barbour Ct., Morehead 

Cornelius. Huel R.. Jr.. 129 W. loth St.. Hopkinsville. Tu 53507 
Cornn. Harold. 229 Taylor Dr.. Lexington, 42812. 20265 
Cox. Charles Glenn. 326 S. Morgan. Morganfield. 160 
Craft. James T.. 134 N. Main. Madisonville. 2179. 54S oi 3059 
Craig. John G., Ennis. 83 

Creasey, Fred, 204 W. Washington. Sebree, 2172 
Crowell. Jimmie R.. Route 2, Benton. LA 77671, LA 776,71 
Crutcher, James W.. 6216 Strawberry, Louisville. 21-74697. 

EM 67072 
Curry. Ellis. Bypro 

DeMoisey. Jean Fox. 227 Highland. Ft. Thomas. Hi 10795 
Dial. Jack W„ 1239 26th St., Huntington, W. Va. 
Dorroh. Glenn U.. Jr.. 106 Cochran Rd.. Lexington. 42234, 23632 
Dotson. William S.. 32 E. 5th. Lexington, 25131. 40350 
Dubrock. Donald M.. 1227 Bourbon Ave.. Louisville. EM 68836 
Duerson. William R.. Stanford. Lancaster. 401, 9110 
Duncan. Earl. 10.007 Taylorsville Rr., Jeffersontown, 21-52478, 

Tw 60177 
Eades. Jimmy. South Carrollton. 4M-.I I Bus. No. I 
Edwards. Llovd. Prestonsburg. 2314. 2:17 

Fallon. Robert J., 204 E. Main. Hazard. High 339. Main 173 
Ellis. Jack D.. P. O. Box 406, Morehead. 1050. '97 
Felts. Charles A.. Box 14, Elkton. CO 52125, CO 52125 
Finley. Sam. Campbellsville 

Flynn. Robert D.. 110 Halls Lane. Lexington, 47924. 46373 
Forrest, Billy, 401 W. State Line, Fulton, 1019-.I 
Foster, Berryan, 927 Waverly, Lexington. 31827. 20515 
Fraley, Bill, Henderson. 4733 

Franc. Anthony E., Equality High School. Equality, Illinois 
Francis, Rovce Lee, 105 Morgantown Road, Bowling Green, 

VI 38252 (.Bus. No.) 



Francis. Wendell Yarbrough. 899 N. Race St., Glasgow, OL 

156S7, OL 12136 
Gates, Thomas F.. Route 6, Hopkinsville. TU 62837 
Gillespie. Robert C. Pikeville. 1114. 1418 
Godsey. Garland D.. So. Portsmouth 

Goodin, Charles L.. Summit Dr.. Pineville. ED 72365. ED 72151 
Goodwin. William H., 403 E. Sixth. Lexington. 32715. Frank- 
fort 47625 
Griffith, Daryel, Mouth Card 

Griffith, William, 1551 Jackson St., Charleston. W. Va. 
Grimes, Mike, Route 1, 13 Beckridge Drive, So. Ft. Mitchell. 

DI 16724. MA 151183 
Grone. Freddie F.. 1525 Carew Tower. Cincinnati, Ohio. 

CH 14900. Ma 15600. Ext. 13 
Hamby, Larry B-. College Heights Post Office. Western Ky. 

State College, Bowling Green 
Hancock. Morris W.. Route 1, Fulton. 1222-R2 
Hardy, Alvin. Campbellsville College, Campbellsville 9090 
Harrell, Bill D., Ky. Methodist Home. Versailles. 107. 1"7 
Haws. Claud F., Jr.. 2721 So. 28th. Paducah. 55656 
Hayden. Samuel. Fancy Farm. 33461. 33181 

Hayes. Douglas J.. Box 377, Morehead State College. Morehead 
Henry, Maxwell "Red". Frenchburg. 2103, 2203 
Hampton, Darrel. c o Butler Co., H. S.. Morgantown. Logans- 
port Ex.. LA 63062 
Head. Elmo C, 113 Alton. Shell. yville. 1273 W. 142 
Herndon, Alton. 424 College Ave.. Paducah. 2281 s 
Hewling, Franklin C, 1125 Orchard. Newport. CO 17380. 

GA 13700 
Hibbs. Eugene M.. 109 E. Arch St.. Madisonville. 2639, 210 
Hines, G. Cliff. 1113 Covington. Bowling Green, VI 34810 
Hodges. Holbert. 516 N. Hill St.. London. 208L, S53R 
Holbrook. Harold, Grayson, GR 44541 

Hollowell. James R.. 1199 Atkinson. Henderson, 79502 
Horton, John B., Box 602, Monticello, 130-G, 130-G 
Hoover, Ermon, Jr., 1662 Koch Ave.. Evansville, Gr 68295 
Houchin, William B.. 3510 Janet Avenue, Louisville 5. Ky.. 

Gl 8-6490, Fern Creek 3-5338 
Hubbs. Cletus L.. Jr.. Sedalia. FA 83 15:'.. FA 83241 
Hudson. J. D.. Caneyville 

Hunt, Leonard P.. 316. E. 5th. Lexington. 29236 
Hurst. David E.. Main St.. P. O. Box 425. Neon, 3601. 2101 
Hyatt. Robert I... 1291 Airway Ct.. Louisville. Glendale 8156", 
Inman. Briscoe, 812 Alton Road. Danville. 1866W. 1900 (Ex. 26. 
Irwin. Charlie. Route I. Hopkinsville. Tu 58884. Laf 6592 
James. Edward U., 30:1 North 5th. Mayfield 
Johnston, Edward F... 300 College. Paducah. 29216 
Johnson. Ellis T.. loiT Lawrence, Ashland, 43840 
Johnson, .lames P.. Big Hill. 640-M, 63S-R 
Jones, Robert E., 220 W. 5th. Winona. Minn. 
Johnson. Vernon Lee, 307 Holt Ave.. Mt. Sterling. 642 
Jones, Donald. 112 Davis Roa.l. Campbellsville. 160 I Bus. No. I 
Jury, W. Robert, Route 1. New Haven, 3434. L'ville-Melrose 

4-0541 
Kellev. William A.. Frazer 

Kidd. William A.. Box 1531, Albany. 25 L. 31 
Kimmel. George H.. Jr.. 601 Tott St.. Columbia. 5322. 3121 
King. Dan. 1.720 Stair St.. Howling Green. VI 3.0172 
King. P .1.. 307 Coast Guard Lane Owensboro. 32401 (Bus. No.) 
Kinman, Joe T.. Roselawn Dr.. Williamstown, Taylor 48631 
King, Russell. 13 Whitney Ave.. Lexington. 20896 
Lambert. Kenneth, 2221 Bayard Park Dr.. Evansville, Ind., 

GR 661 16. HA 5:.2:,2 
Lance, Walter N.. Jr.. 2.710 W. Cloverdale, Owensboro, Murray 

3-307 1 
I.asMter. Riley. Box 71. College Sta.. Murray. 1077XM 
Law. Kay Lewis. 809 Broadway. Howling Green. 38850, 27030 
Lawson. Leland, 949 DePorres Ave., Lexington. 41009 
Ledford, James. Jr., Box 144, Crab Orchard 
Long. James H.. 309 N. 4th. Murray. 181 
Lyons. Harold M.. Webster Ave.. Cynthiana. 332-R, 99 
Lytle. William Price, 027 E. 13th. Hopkinsville. TU 58803. 

TU 58588 
McClellan. Leonard B., 2512 Goldsmith Lane, Louisville. GL 

82598, CI. J861',. Ext. 3B 

McBride, W. Kenneth. 157 St. William Dr., Lexington, 48287. 

33335, No. 1 Station 
McCartv, William "Ken." 314 Transylvania Park, Lexington, 

32.7S0 
McLeod. Robert N. Jr., Cooper Drive, Somerset. 571, 545 
Mack. Harry L.. 1304 Main. Murray 

Maines. George E.. 44 Clover St.. Erlanger, DI 17460, CO 18120 
Manasco. Estel, Route 2, Nortonville 
Martin. Howard I., Murray State College. Murray 
Massengill. Thomas. 606 Winchester Ave., Middlesboro, 1910 
Mayes. Edward, 838 Crosshill Rd., Danville, 986 R, 1008 
Melton, Curtis R-, General Delivery. Neho, 2801, Madisonville 

1043 
Miller, Ferrel, 415 Pyke Road. Lexington. 23648 
Miller, Jack T., Black St.. Barbourville. 417, 227 
Miller, Rex. 704 23rd. Ashland, EA 45023. EA 46641 
Mills, Claude. 3557 Glorious Rd., Columbus, Ohio. Br 90435, 

Br 90646 
Moore, James E., Route 1, Box 14, Lily, London 844L, Corbin 

1915 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1956 



Moore, Robert W., Jr., 217 Center, Florence, AT 3557S, HE 14040 

Napier, Bill, Court St., Prestonsburg, 2663 

Newman, Charles O., 42F Rose Terrace, Ft. Knox, 2050 (Bus. 

No.) 
Newsome, Forest, Wheelwright, 2784, 2142 
Nie, Allen Frank, 1031 Isabella, Newport, Ax 16S47 
Nipp, Bill, Route 2, West Paducah 
Noel, George E., Box 113, So. Portsmouth, FL 21271 
O'Bryan, Robert H., 1736 Harvard Dr., Louisville, Hi 6933R 
O'Connell, James M., 3823 Church St., Covington, HE 12951 
Orwin, Charlie, Route 4, Hopkinsville, Tu 58884, Laf 6502 
Osborne, Nick, Wallins Creek, 334 (Bus. No.) 
Padgett, R. K., 117 Griffin Ave., Somerset, 470-W 12 
Palmer, Carl A., 2506 So. 7th, Ironton, Ohio, 4171 
Parker, J. P., 355 Columbus, Paducah, 34463 
Peay, Curtis E., Route 5, Bowling Green, VI 38171 
Perry, James E., Route 6, Paducah, 36740, 56886 
Phelps, John B., 301 Johnson Road, London, 26W, 317 
Poppas, Nickolas, Box 127, Blue Diamond, 1829 
Qualey, L. V., Lot 107 Post Trailer Court, Ft. Campbell, 

GE 93521-3059, GE 93521-CB260 
Rains, Richard, Kevir 
Reinhardt, Myron S., 1443 N. Ft. Thomas Ave., Ft. Thomas, 

Hiland 13730, Maysville 78081 
Reeves, Kenneth, 132 E. Gray St., Louisville, Sp 29635, WA 6201 
Ricketts, Claude "O", 10217 Starlight Way, Valley Station, 

Pleasure Ridge 79583, Louisville ME 41551 - Ext. 220 
Rison, Johnny B., Box 148, Irvine 

Ring, William H., Route 3, Maysville, Logan 45892, Logan 43929 
Roberts, Clayton C, 122 Garrett, Lexington, 21402 
Rodgers, David G., 222 S. Mill, London, 3537 
Rose, Harold S., Box 691, M.S.C., Morehead 
Rose, Wallace C, 623 Southridge, Lexington, 27255 
Rothfuss, Richard, 37 Gregory Lane, Fort Thomas, Hi 19190, 

CO 12980 
Rountree, John T., 1068 Laurel, Bowling Green, 25546, 22411 
Rozen, Morris, Richmond, 1859W, 2038 
Salisbury, William J., Morehead State College, Morehead 
Salyer, Paul H., Box 156, Salyersville, FI 94532 
Samples, Gilbert, 306 E. 3rd, London, 221J, 624 
Sanders, Mel, 3910 Sunset, Paducah, 23650, 56311, Apt. 685 
Sang, Bob, 4312 Gartin Ave., Ashland, EA 48404, 46641 
Schlich, Paul, 3150 Talisman, Louisville 
Seelye, Arthur L., 30D Elmwood Ct., Paducah, 34405 
Shaw, Earl, 109 Hillcourt, Lancaster, 524, Bryantsville 2201 
Shope, Lowell Marting, 30 Webb St., P. O. Box 71. South 

Webster, Ohio, Porter 2131. Waverly 5100, Ext. 2586 
Shuck, Steve, 135 Louisiana, Lexington, 23206 
Simpson, Jack, 325 Orchard St., Owensboro, 34280 
Simms, Wavelan .]., Jr., Co. B Sp Tng Eng Regt USATCA, Fort 

Knox, 6033, 2648 
Small, William W., Jr., 1846 Mary Catherine Dr., Louisville 

16, EM-S-8365, HI-4900 
Smith, John K., Box 456, 120 Bridge St., Morehead 
Stamper, Robert L., Morehead, 500-W, 194 or 195 
Stephens, Grover O., 921 DePorres Ave., Lexington, 48797, 

20640 
Stinson, John M., P. O. Box 695, Bowling Green, VI 39867 
Straub, Charles, Jr., Box 103, Morganfield, 533W, 291 
Sullivan, Dan L., 239 Berry, Bellevue 

Surface, William E., 801 S. Limestone, Lexington, 44270, 22270 
Swope, William W., 405 Breckenridge St., Lexington 
Teague, Amos, Princeton Ave., Madisonville, 1897-W 
Thoma, M. L., 103 Holly, Berea, 520, 95 
Thomas, Harold E., 459-B, Ft. Knox, 5860, 4552 
Thurman, A. Earl, 3025 S. Allen, Owensboro, Mu 39583, 

Ro 45151 
Thurman, Harold W., Livermore, BR 82231, Owensboro Mu 35935 
Tindall, Gene D., Route 3, Shelbyville, 926-M2, 1214 
Tompkins, Chester B., Box 13, Slaughters, 2793 
Trivette, John W., Pikeville 
Upton, Leon, Greensburg, 192 (Bus. No.) 

Vance, Earl G., 537 W. Main, Glasgow, OL 13083, OL 15205 
Vandergrgiff, Gene, 1307 Park Ave.. Paducah, 55752, 22768 
Wade, Bill, 522 Capitol Ave., Frankfort, 33034, Lexington 

28353 (Bus. No.) 
Varble, William, 1705 Cypress. Louisville, SP 56712, SP 23621 
Walker, Paul R., 105 Leech Court, Glasgow, OL 13013, OL 13811 
Wallace, William C, 637 Delray, Owensboro, MU 4-2117, 

MU 4-1416 
Waller, Charles L., Elkton, CO 52670, CO 52670 
Warren, Charles H., R. R. 1, St. Joseph, AC 9-2472, MU 43221 
Wheatley, C. Donald, Route 2, Lebanon, 2413 
White, Jason, Eddyville, 3052, 5201 

Willett, Arthur G., Box 29 Morehead College. Morehead, 9107 
Williams, Bobbie, 144 Aspen Ave., Richmond, 2671 
Williams, Harold (Hade) 1415 Jefferson, Cincinnati 15, Ohio, 

PO 14546, PO 14546 
Winchester, Roy L., Vaughn Mill Rd., Box 164, Route 10, 

Louisville Fern Creek 35202, Fern Creek 3267 
Wing, Howard R., Jr., 3001 Frazier Ave., Latonia, JU 1-8707 
Wortham, Robert W., Cecilia 
Wright, Billy Joe, Salt Lick, 3927 
Young, Coleman L., 340 Veterans Village. Richmond 



Suggestions From An Official 

by Dick Betz 
Side Line 

The football official will appreciate your 
cooperation in advising the delegated auth- 
ority in charge of your side line control to 
see that all photographers and other miscel- 
laneous side line personnel are instructed to 
remain behind the limit lines at side and end 
lines. We are having difficulty with such 
people coming within this area, and we need 
your help on this. 
Corner Flags at Goal Lines 

It has been brought to our attention that 
some schools are not installing these flags 
on playing fields. Rule 1, Section 2, Article 
2, page 5, of the National Federation Football 
Rules states that flags with flexible shafts 
shall be placed at the inside corners of the 
four intersections of the goal lines and the 
side lines. We would appreciate your coopera- 
tion in setting up the required routine to see 
that there is compliance with this rule. 
Clocks 

We would appreciate the cooperation of 
your Athletic Director in having an official 
game clock ready for use by the officials, and 
in having the extension cord and complete 
electric clock equipment available, tested 
and ready, thirty minutes ahead of actual 
game starting time. We have had several 
failures this year, and need this equipment 
tested ahead of time. The extension cord 
should be long enough to reach both goal 
lines. 

Chains, Box and Football 

Please periodically check accuracy of 
chains during the season. Chains and box 
should be presented to Linesman at least 
thirty minutes ahead of actual game start- 
ing time. 

Referee should receive football or foot- 
balls to be used at least thirty minutes ahead 
of actual game starting time. Reference is 
made to Rule 1, Section 3, page 6, of the 
National Federation Football Rules. 

Proper Marking of Fields 

Refer to page 4 of the National Federation 
Football Rules on how to properly mark off 
a regulation football field. It is very import- 
ant that these fields be marked off correctly ; 
that the players, coaches, spectators and of- 
ficials can actually see the lines ; and last 
but not least that the material used in mark- 
ing off these fields is not injurious to the 
eyes or skin. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1956 



Page Five 



Member Schools of the K. H.S.A. A. 



The fallowing schools are members of the Kentucky High 
School Athletic Association for the year ending June 30, 1957. 
Principals of member schools should check this list carefully to 
see if the names of schools with which they have scheduled 
games are included. This list was compiled and sent to the 
printer on October 1. _A supplementary list of member schools 
joining in October will appear in the November issue of the 
magazine. 



Ahrens Trade 

(Louisville) 
Albany-Clinton County 

(Albany) 
Allen County 

(Scottsville) 
Almo 
Alvaton 
Anderson 

(Lawrenceburg) 
Annville Institute 
Athens 

(Lexington) 
Ashland 
Atherton 

(Louisville) 
Auburn 
Augusta 
Austin Tracy 

(Lucas) 
Auxier 
Bagdad 
Bald Knob 

(Frankfort) 
Ballard Memorial 

(Barlow) 
Barbourville 
Bardstown 
Bardwell 
Beaver Dam 
Beechwood 

(So. Ft. Mitchell) 
Belfrv 
Bell 

(Pineville) 
Bellevue 
Benham 
Benton 
Berea 

Berea Foundation 
Betsv Lavne 
Black Star 

(Alva) 
Blaine 
Bloomfield 
Bourbon Countv 

(Paris) 
Bowling Green 
Boyd Countv 

(Ashland) 
Bracken County 

(Brooksville) 
Breathitt 

(Jackson) 
Breckinridge County 

(Hardinsburg) 
Breckinridge Training 

(Morehead) 
Bremen 
Bridgeport 

(Frankfort) 
Bristow 



Brodhead 

Brownsville 

Buckeye 

(Lancaster) 
Buffalo 
Burgin 
Burnside 
Bush 

(Lida) 
Butler 
Butler County 

(Morgantown) 
Butler 

(Shively) 
Caldwell County 

(Princeton) 
Calhoun 
Camp Dick Robinson 

(Lancaster) 
Campbell County 

(Alexandria) 
Campbellsburg 
Campbellsville 
Caneyville 
Carr Creek 
Carlisle 
Carrollton 
Carter 
Catlettsburg 
Caverna 

i Horse Cave) 
Cayce 

Central City 
Central 

(Clinton) 
Central 

(Louisville) 
Chandlers Chapel 

(Auburn) 
Charleston 

(Dawson Springs) 
Clarkson 
Clav 
Clark County 

( Winchester) 
Clifty 
College 

(Bowling Green) 
Corbin 
Cordia 

Crab Orchard 
Crittenden County 

(Marion) 
Crofton 
Cub Run 
Cuba 

(Mayfield) 
Cumberland 
Cumberland County 

(Burkesville) 
Cunningham 
Cynthiana 



Dalton 
Danville 
Daviess County 

(Owensboro) 
Dawson Springs 
Dayton 
Deming 

(Mt. Olivet) 
Dilce Combs Memorial 

(Jeff) 
Dixie Heights 

(Covington) 
Dixon 
Dorton 
Douglass 

(Lexington) 
Drakesboro 
Dubois 

(Mt. Sterling) 
Dunbar 

(Mayfield) 
duPont Manual 

(Louisville) 
Earlington 
Eastern 

(Middletotwn) 
Edmonton 
Elizabethtown 
Elizabethtown Catholic 
Elkhorn 

(Frankfort) 
Elkhorn City 
Elminence 
Erie 

(Olive Hill) 
Estill County 

(Irvine) 
Evarts 
Ezel 
Fairview 

(Ashland) 
Falmouth 
Farmington 
Ferguson 
Fern Creek 
Flaget 

(Louisville) 
Flaherty 

(Vine Grove) 
Flat Gap 
Fleming-Neon 

(Neon) 
Fordsville 
Forkland 

(Gravel Switch) 
Fort Knox 
Frankfort 
Franklin-Simpson 

(Franklin) 
Frederick Fraize 

(Cloverport) 
Fredericktown 

(Springfield) 
Fredonia 
Frenchburg 
Fulgham 

(Clinton) 
Fulton 



Gallatin County 

(Warsaw) 
Gamaliel 
Garth 

(Georgetown) 
Glasgow 
Glendale 
Good Shepherd 

(Frankfort) 
Graham 
Grant County 

(Dry Ridge) 
Greensburg 
Greenup 
Greenville 
Guthrie 
Haldeman 
Hall 

(Grays Knob) 
Hanson 
Harlan 
Harrison County 

(Cynthiana) 
Harrodsburg 
Hartford 
Hawesville 
Hazard 
Hazel 

Hazel Green Academy 
Hazel Green 

(East Bernstadt) 
Heath 

(West Paducah) 
Hellier 
Henderson 
Henderson County 

(Henderson) 
Henderson Settlement 

(Frakes) 
Henry Central 

(New Castle) 
Henry Clay 

(Lexington) 
Hickman 
Highlands 

(Ft. Thomas) 
Hindman 
Hiseville 
Hitchins 
Hodgenville 
Holmes 

(Covington) 
Holy Cross 

(Covington) 
Holv Family 

' (Ashland) 
Holy Name 

(Henderson) 
Howevallev 

(Cecilia) 
Hughes-Kirk 

(Beechmont) 
Hustonville 
Inez 
Irvine 
Irvington 
Jenkins 
Johns Creek 

(Pikeville) 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1956 



Junction City 
Ky. Mili. Inst. 

(Lyndon) 
Ky. Sen. for the Blind 

(Louisville) 
Kingdom Come 

(Linefork) 
Kirksey 
Knox Central 

(Barbourville) 
Lacy 

(Hopkinsville) 
Lafayette 

(Lexington) 
Lancaster 
Leatherwood 

(Slemp) 
Lebanon Junction 
Lebanon 
Lee County 

(Beattyville) 
Leitchfield 
Leslie County 

(Hyden) 
Letcher 
Lewisburg 
Lewisport 
Lexington Catholic 
Liberty 
Lincoln Institute 

(Lincoln Ridge) 
Livermore 
Livingston 
Livingston County 

(Smithland) 
Lloyd Memorial 

(Erlanger) 
London 
Lone Jack 

(Pour Mile) 
Louisa 
Lowes 
Loyall 
Ludlow 
Lynch 
Lynn Camp 

(Corbin) 
Lynn Grove 
Lvnnvale 

(White Mills) 
Lyon County 

(Kuttawa) 
McCrearv Countv 

(Whitley City) 
McDowell 
McKee 
McKell 

(South Shore) 
McKinney 
M. C. Napier 

(Darfork) 
Mackville 
Madison Central 

(Richmond) 
Madison-Model 

(Richmond) 
Madisonville 
Magnolia 
Magoffin Baptist Inst. 

(Mountian Valley) 
Male 

(Louisville) 
Marion 



Marrowbone 

Martin 

Mayfield 

Mayslick 

Maysville 

Maytown 

(Langley) 
Meade County 

(Brandenburg) 
Meade Memorial 

(Wiiliamsport) 
Memorial 

(Hardyville) 
Memorial 

(Waynesburg) 
Mercer 

(Harrodsburg) 
Middleburg 
Middlesboro 
Midway 
Milburn 

Millersburg Mili. Inst. 
Monticello 
Moiehead 
Morgan 
Morgan County 

(West Liberty) 
Morganfield 
Mt. Sterling 
Mt. Vemon 
Mt. Washington 
Muhlenberg Central 

(Powderly) 
Munfordville 
Murray 

Murray Training 
Nebo 

New Concord 
Newport 

Newport Catholic 
Nicholas County 

(Carlisle) 
Nicholasville 
North Middletown 
North Warren 

(Smiths Grove) 
Oil Springs 
Oldham County 

(LaGrange) 
Old Kentucky Home 

(Bardstown) 
Olive Hill 
Olmstead 
Oneida Institute 
Orangeburg 

(Maysville) 
Ormsby Village 

(Anchorage) 
Owen County 

(Owenton) 
Owensboro 
Owensboro Catholic 
Owensboro Technical 
Owsley County 

(Booneville) 
Paducah Tilghman 
Paint Lick 
Paintsville 
Paris 
Park City 
Parks ville 
Paul Laurence Dunbar 

(Lexington) 



Peaks Mill 

(Frankfort) 
Pembroke 
Perry ville 
Pikeville 
Pine Knot 
Pineville 
Pleasureville 
Poplar Creek 

(Carpenter) 
Powell County 

(Stanton) 
Prichard 

(Grayson) 
Pulaski County 

(Somerset) 
Raceland 
Red Bird 

(Beverly) 
Reidland 

(Paducah) 
Richardsville 
Rinevville 
Rockhold 
Russell 
Russell County 

(Russell Springs) 
Russellville 
Sacramento 
St. Agatha Academy 

(Winchester) 
St. Agnes 

(Uniontown) 
St. Augustine 

(Lebanon) 
St. Catherine 

(New Haven) 
St. Francis 

(Loretto) 
St. Henry 

(Erlanger) 
St. Jerome 

(Fancy Farm) 
St. John 

(Paducah) 
St. Joseph Prep 

(Bardstown) 
St. Mary 

(Alexandria) 

St. Patrick's 

(Maysville) 
St. Thomas 

(Ft. Thomas) 
St. Vincent 
St. Xavier 

(Louisville) 
Salem 
Salyersville 
Scott County 

(Georgetown) 
Scottsville 
Sebree 
Sedalia 
Sharpsburg 
Shawnee 

(Louisville) 
Shelbyville 
Shepherdsville 
Shopville 



Silver Grove 
Simon Kenton 

(Independence) 
Simpsonville 
Sinking Fork 

(Hopkinsville) 
Slaughters 
Somerset 
Sonora 
South Christian 

(Herndon) 
Southei'n 

(Louisville) 
South Hopkins 

(Nortonville) 
South Marshall 

(Benton) 
South Portsmouth 
Springfield 
Stearns 
Stinnett Settlement 

(Hoskinston) 
Sturgis 
Symsonia 
Taylor County 

(Campbellsville) 
Taylorsville 
Temple Hill 

(Glasgow) 
Todd County 

(Elkton) 
Tollesboro 
Trimble County 
Trinity 

(Louisville) 
Tyner 
University 

(Lexington) 
Valley 

(Valley Station) 
Van Lear 
Versailles 
Villa Madonna 

(Coving-ton) 
Vine Grove 
Virgie 
Waddy 
Wallins 

'Wallins Creek) 
Walton-Verona 

(Walton) 
Warren County 

(Bowling Green) 

Wayne County 
(Monticello) 

Western 

(Sinai) 

West Point 

Wheelwright 

Whitesburg 

Williamsburg 

Williamstown 

Wilmore 

Winchester 

Wingo 

Wolfe County 
(Camp ton) 

Woodbine 

Wurtland 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER. 195(1 



Page Seven 



The Flying Dutchman 

As you read this column, the 1956-57 state- 
wide basketball clinics are almost history. 
Since these state-wide clinic tours started 
in 1942, we have always been impressed by 
the loyalty of the members of the Board of 
Control and the support they constantly give 
the clinic director. Year after year the first 
individal seen entering the Pikeville gym for 
the clinic is Russ Williamson. Now a letter 
comes from Cecil Thornton of Harlan, in 
which he says he looks forward to the clinic 
at Pineville with a lot of pleasure. Well he 
might, since this clinic has become one of 
the biggest social gatherings of the year in 
the Eastern Kentucky Mountains. 

It's a cinch that somewhere along the 
clinic route, we'll run into Louie Litchfield, 
Jack Dawson. Ken Gillaspie and Johnie 
Crowdus. It's also a safe bet that the man 
who will greet The Dutchman as he enters 
the door at Somerset will be W. B. Jones, and 
Bob Forsythe will be on hand to give us 
some of our best help as the Western Ken- 
tucky clinics are unfolded. 

A lot of fellows ask The Dutchman if the 
clinics are not a grind and if he really en- 
joys the sessions each year. To that, we 
answer that anything is fun that you want 
to make fun, and anything is a grind that you 
want to make a grind. Just for the record, 
the clinic director would be "missing the 
boat" if he did not carry his rod and reel in 
the back of his worn-out Pontiac to hook a 
few fish as he passes Dewev Lake up in the 
Paintsville country. He'd also be missing a 
wonderful chance to gloat if he forgot to put 
his golf clubs alongside the fishing tackle, 
so that he could administer his annual "les- 
son in golf" to the "Sage of the Mountains," 
Dick Looney, on the Pikeville golf course in 
the heart of "them thar mountings." 

Maybe you think it's a grind to sit down 
for one of those big social dinners that Ernie 
Chattin and his officials of the Ashland area 
pitch each year! You can just bet that if it 
were not fun. The Dutchman wouldn't be 
doing it. If this writer could just be assured 
of having as much fun in the next forty 
years as he has had in the first forty, he 
wouldn't want anybody shedding any tears 
when he takes his last ride. 

An unhappy thought just occurred, that 
being that when the Commissioner reads 
about how much fun the annual clinics are, 
he may send your Dutch friend a bill for 
recreation provided rather than an honor- 
arium for services rendered. 



The reference just made to golfing in the 
mountains of Pikeville with Dick Looney 
brings to mind a tip which is valuable to you 
fellows engaged in physical education work 
in Kentucky's high schools. If you ever have 
the opportunity, drop by Bellarmine College 
in Louisville and ask Eddie Weber, Athletic 
Director, to take you over the very unusual 
"confidence golf course." Eddie, who is a 
most personable chap, is proud of his in- 
novation, and well he may be, since it seems 
to lie an answer to the problems of many 
instructors in physical education relative to 
what may be supplied boys and girls not 
interested in the sports already provided. 

This "confidence golf course" is small 
enough that most Kentucky high schools 
have sufficient adjoining ground to set one 
up. It is a par-three course, meaning that it 
is small enough that you could play the nine 
holes in about forty-five minutes, yet large 
enough to make good golf competition for 
both boys and girls. Eddie tells The Dutch- 
man that kids who have not shown any in- 
terest in anything else grab an old driver 
and a putter and are found enjoying this 
recreational activity regularly. It's a tip 
worth considering. 

Will you help The Flying Dutchman proj- 
ects in your area ? Find the individual who 
has done something unselfishly for somebody 
else. Drop The Dutchman a recommendation 
that he receive the Corn Cob Pipe of Honor. 
Officials working the games will render serv- 
ice to the sport they love if they will call for 
the Abou Ben Adhem Citation to be sent to 
schools and communities doing outstanding 
things for the promotion of good neighbor 
practices. All of us feel better in our hearts 
when we do something for those physically 
handicapped young people by seeing that 
they are recognized with the Game Guy 
Awards. It's a lead pipe cinch that if you 
really want to get a charge out of living, 
you'll get it from doing something for some- 
body else. 

On the subject of the Corn Cob Pipe of 
Honor Awards, we find the month of October 
bringing two gentlemen forward, in the per- 
sons of Jack McGrath, Public Relations Direc- 
tor of Hillerich & Bradsby Co., maker of 
Louisville Slugger Bats, and Bird H. Meers, 
a funeral director of Louisville. 

Jack McGrath is honored because of the 
interest he has taken in the promotion of 
wholesome projects for young people. It was 
through Jack's efforts that hundreds of 
souvenir Louisville Slugger Bats were taken 
to Mexico by the Youth Ambassadors of 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1956 



Friendship this summer. It was also due to 
Jack's efforts that many boys have become 
interested in baseball and have learned to 
win and lose gracefully. 

On the other hand, while Jack was work- 
ing in the field of athletics for young people, 
Bird Meers has been using his limousine to 
supply transportation for teen-age groups 
who go about the countryside entertaining 
for hospitals, shut-ins and other unfortunate 
groups. 

Bobby Laughlin, Director of Athletics of 
Morehead State College, gets a salute from 
The Flying Dutchman because of his work 
with boys in Little League play in the More- 
head area this summer. This is a human in- 
terest story worth reading. Little Louie Ken- 
ney of Morehead was due to play in Lexing- 
ton in a play-off on Saturday, but on Friday 
found out that he needed a birth certificate 
in order to qualify. The little fellow was 
brokenhearted since it was his last oppor- 
tunity ever to play in Little League com- 
petition. Everything looked pretty hopeless 
until Bobby Laughlin stepped in. The office 
handling the Vital Statistics is in Louisville, 
which is a good long way from Morehead, 
and to make the situation appear more hope- 
less, it was closed on Saturday. That didn't 
stop Bobby from wanting to do something for 
this kid and he promised that if there was 
any way to move "mountains" to get that 
birth certificate for him, he'd do it. Bobby 
was ready to drive to Louisville all the way 
from Morehead to get that birth certificate 
for Louie when he realized that he didn't 
have time to make it. That still didn't stop 
him. A long distance call to Bob Kirchdorfer 
of Louisville, the kid who won the first 
Game Guy Award in 1949, did the trick. An 
hour later, Kirchdorfer was boarding a plane 
for Lexington, armed with the precious birth 
certificate. You might call this a triple play 
from Bob Kirchdorfer to Bob Laughlin to 
little Louie Kenney. 

Occasionally The Dutchman gets a letter 
which really gives him a lift, and one came 
from Johnie Crowdus of Franklin this 
month, complimenting the new textbook, A 
New Horizon of Recreation. Words from 
Johnie constitute "praise from Caesar," 
since he will shortly be Kentucky's only Doc- 
tor of Philosophy in the field of Recreation. 

Closing out The Dutchman this month, 
we pass on to you the information that a 
former Kentucky high school athlete has 
been voted the highest honor which can come 
to an athlete at Georgia Tech. Bobby Kimmel, 
former Valley High star now serving his 



third year as captain of Georgia Tech's 
basketball team, has been elected President 
of the T Club, made up of letter winners of 
all sports in that university. It couldn't hap- 
pen to a nicer guy. I remember Bobby re- 
marking to me this summer, "A winner never 
quits and a quitter never wins!" That's an- 
other good tip for Kentucky athletes. 



Bred in the Bone 

Doctors are as subject to human error as 
anyone else. Just as you and we, they are 
most likely to err when they stray from the 
fields of their specialties into the broader 
arena of every-day human relations. The 
American Academy of Pediatrics seems to 
have slipped a little over the border in its 
"play for fun" edict for pre-teen-age children. 

The Academy was on firm ground in its 
recommendation the other day, at its annual 
conference in Chicago, against bruising 
sports on an organized, highly competitive 
level for youngsters not yet in their teens. 
Few parents would consent to putting their 
gangling 10-year-olds into a Rose Bowl 
game. It is time enough to test muscle and 
reflexes when the muscle has grown tough 
enough to protect the bones beneath. 

The doctors were still on the same firm 
ground in condemning overpowering adult 
pressure on young children to win whatever 
contest they might engage in. Any test of 
skill or luck should be, above all, fun. The 
loser can and should enjoy a good game of 
tag, tennis or tiddlywinks as much as the 
winner. After all, there is always the hope 
of winning the next bout. 

Where the doctcors went off the track was 
in a general criticism of exploiting the desire 
to win in athletics at any age level. The im- 
plication seemed to be that athletics, like a 
ride on a merry-go-round, should end at the 
beginning. A human being's life pattern just 
isn't laid out that way, whether it is in ath- 
letics or business, courtship or hobbies. The 
person who does not desire to excel in some- 
thing isn't worth a bent penny. 

There has been a noticeable inclination 
among many social theorists in the last few 
yeai's to preach the evils of competition. 
They argue that utopia is a state in which 
no person tries to be better than another. 
Since athletics provides the most primitive, 
clear-cut kind of competition, athletics na- 
turally comes in for a great deal of attention 
by this group. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1956 



Page Nine 



The desire to win, or to excel, is not evil, 
either on the playing fields or in the labora- 
tories and business offices. It is the thing 
which has pushed civilization forward step 
by step since the earliest ages. It is as nat- 
ural as hunger, and shows up almost as soon 
in a child. As a national asset, it is vital. As 
an individual attribute, it is unavoidable. 

The thing a wise parent teaches is not to 
avoid defeat by avoiding competition, but to 
accept defeat gracefully when it comes and 
regard it as simply another lesson on the 
road to victory. Competition can be fun for 
its own sake, but it is silly to pretend that 
winning isn't fun, too. 

Children should by all means be free from 
undue pressure by parents, teachers or others 
to win at all costs, by fair means or foul. 
Athletic exploitation of youngsters makes no 
more sense than their exploitation of sweat- 
shops. But to refuse to share in child's in- 
born natural jubilation over his small vic- 
tories, out of some mistaken idea that it is 
a shame to want to win, makes less sense yet. 

America as a nation would be in a sorry 
state indeed if the next generation grew up 
with the idea that it is sinful to try to be 
better than anyone else. — Indianapolis Star. 



Cliff Fagan Goes National 

On January 1, 1957, Clifford B. Fagan 
becomes Associate Executive Secretary of 
The National Federation of State High 
School Athletic Associations. 

After a canvass of the nation's top leaders 
in school athletic administration. Cliff was 
recommended by the Executive Secretary 
and unanimously chosen by the Executive 
Committee. The Wisconsin Interscholatic 
Board of Control has regretfully accepted his 
resignation as Executive Secretary of that 
Association but generously, and with some 
justifiable pride, has released him as another 
of Wisconsin's many contributions to a for- 
ward looking and progressive nation-wide 
program. Cliff was born in Mankato, [Minne- 
sota, 45 years ago. He grew up in Marshall, 
Wisconsin, secured a Bachelor's Degree at 
Wisconsin State College at Eau Claire, a 
Master's Degree at Iowa University and did 
advanced work at University of Wisconsin. 
He specialized in physical education, athletics 
and school administration. He served as 
coach or athletic director in Wisconsin high 
schools at Fairchild, Sturgeon Bay and Green 
Bay and at Wisconsin State College at Eau 
Clair before becoming Assistant Secretary 
of the W.I.A.A. in 1947 and then Executive 



Secretary in 1951 when veteran Secretary P. 
F. Neverman retired. 

He has been a popular athletic official and 
lecturer in college physical training courses. 
He has served as President of the Wisconsin 
Association for Health, Physical Education 
and Recreation. 

During his 9 years as a State Association 
Executive, he was in the thick of almost 
every major activity in State and National 
Federation programs. His background and 
experience were such as to insure his having 
a healthy philosophy in connection with these 
programs. In controversies which were in- 
evitable in the formulation of playing rules 
and the entire rules training machinery his 
interests were in adapting the game to high 
school needs rather than in attempting to 
adapt the high school boy and the high school 
program to machinery set up by other groups 
for other purposes. In action designed to 
make the games as free from injury 
as possible and to provide assistance to 
those who are injured, no member of 
the national group has worked more 
diligently in the interests of the schools. 
In matters concerning the relationship of 
those who are employed to render profes- 
sional services to the Association and those 
who serve without compensation as direct 
representatives of the schools to determine 
policies and regulations, his views and ac- 
tions have been sound. In any promotion in 
which the friendly unified spirit of the State 
Association or of the National Federation 
has been involved, he has taken a determined 
and commendable stand. On the Editorial 
Committee of the National Football Commit- 
tee, his first-hand knowledge of the prob- 
lems which are involved in administering the 
rules and planning game strategy has been 
of great value. His entire attitude toward the 
place of athletics and physical education in 
the school scheme of things is wholesome. 

A wise old man at a recent political con- 
vention called attention to a fortunate fate 
which seems to provide the right man for the 
right place at the right time. In National 
Federation circles it is universally agreed 
that by training, experience and personal 
characteristics. Cliff has always commanded 
respect in his association with National 
Federation events and activities and is high- 
ly qualified for this important place on the 
Federation Executive Staff. The Executive 
Committee has wisely provided double as- 
surance of the perpetuation of competent 

(Continued on Page Ten) 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1956 



Here and There 

JOSEPH A WIGGIN. Secretary of the 
Vermont Headmasters' Association passed 
away on August 14. His death was sudden 
and notice concerning it did not arrive at 
the Federation office in time to permit early 
notification of the State Executives. The 
Federation and State Association offices ex- 
tend sympathy to the family and friends of 
Mr. Wiggin. He was a highly respected mem- 
ber of the State Department of Public In- 
struction and one of his several duties was 
to administer the work of the Vermont State 
High School Association. He was a pioneer 
in the formation of the State Association 
and was one of the several influential men 
in the New England area to become interest- 
ed in state-wide and nation-wide policy form- 
ing groups which have attempted to provide 
intelligent direction for high school athletic 
activity. Joe Wiggin was always acknowl- 
edged to be a tower of strength in the early 
years when interest in State Association and 
National Federation activities was just be- 
ginning. His influence still lives in a well 
established Vermont Headmasters' Associa- 
tion. 

NEW FOOTBALL PICTURE: The new- 
Football motion picture to be produced by 
the Official Sports Film Service for use in 
1957 will be made in California during the 
week of November 19 to 24. The name of the 
picture has not yet been chosen but all other 
details are near completion. Demonstrations 
will be by the football team of Redlands, 
California High School and the scenes will 
be filmed on the field of Redlands University. 
An attractive theme has been chosen to in- 
sure continuity. As in the past, situations of 
general interest will be included. Use of these 
motion pictures continues to expand. The 
International Relations Division of the Fed- 
eral Government will use a number of the 
prints and they will substitute a sound track 
in the language of the country to which the 
film is to be sent. In addition, there is a 
trend in the direction of purchase of one or 
more prints by city school systems and by 
conferences. The following are illustrations. 
The city school system of Buffalo, New York, 
acting on the advice of Superintendent Par- 
mer Ewing, will purchase one or more of the 
prints for use in the city schools. Acting on 
recommendation of Superintendent LeRoy 
Knoepple of Proviso Township High School, 



the Suburban League, made up of the larg- 
est high schools in the Chicago suburban 
area, are purchasing one or more of the 
prints for conference use. In several of the 
states, interest has been shown by the teach- 
er colleges. 

FOOTBALL SURVEY IN PENNSYL- 
VANIA: Near the end of the 1955 football 
season, F. P. Maiguire, member of the Na- 
tional Federation Football Committee, made 
a survey of the problems which are consider- 
ed most important by football coaches and 
officials. The greatest number of those who 
express concern about listed problems, in- 
dicated that most difficulty is caused from 
an official blowing his whistle at the wrong 
time. The second greatest difficulty is 
caused by illegal coaching from the sidelines 
and the third involves a type of shift which 
is designed to draw the opponent off-side. 
Of the 420 who responded to the question- 
naire, the number listing the^e three prob- 
lems as significant was 111, 102 and 91, 
respectively. 



CLIFF FAGAN 

(Continued from Page Nine) 

leadership in the administration of affairs 
of the Federation. 

The Fagan family is made up of Mrs. Vera 
Fagan, a former popular teacher of physical 
education and director of health, 17 year old 
Kathryn, 13 year old Patrick and l'o year 
old Dennis. Their church affiliation is Episco- 
palian and their political preference ( in this 
election year) is wisely undisclosed. 

From all of the Federation familv to all 
of them. WELCOME ! 



CLINIC FOR CHEERLEADERS 

(Continued from Inside Front Cover) 

and majorettes participate in the program, 
but that as large a number as possible of 
their students, from freshmen to seniors, 
attend this event. 

From the first youth day and clinic held 
at the University of Kentucky have stemmed 
similar programs at Western Kentucky State 
College, Morehead College, and Kentucky- 
State College, with an additional clinic to be 
held this year at Murray. 

This program is under the sponsorship of 
the Kentucky State Y.M.C.A. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1956 



Page Eleven 



FOOTBALL QUESTIONS 

(Continued from Pajje One) 

sible that 7-3-1 should be revised to make it 
clear that forward handing applies only when 
the ball is handed forward to a teammate. 
Football Meeting Folder: In the first ruling 
at the top of the first column on page 4, 
"touchdown" should be changed to "touch- 
back." The situation involves a kick which 
goes into R's end zone. It becomes a touch- 
back as soon as it touches something behind 
the goal line. 

3. Play: During a try-for-point, is it pos- 
sible for team A to advance the ball by 
means of a punt ? 

Ruling: There is nothing in the rules to 
make such a kick illegal. However, the try 
is not successful because 8-4-1-a specifies 
that a point may be scored only by a place- 
kick or drop-kick or by a free-kick other than 
a kick-off. 

Play: During a try-for-point, is it possible 
for team A to advance the ball by means of 
a punt ? 

Ruling: Yes: In an unusual situation, the 
punt might be such that the ball comes down 
behind the line or rebounds to a point be- 
hind the line where A2 recovers and advances 
across the goal line. 

4. Play: Is the effect of the touching of a 
scrimmage-kick by R beyond the line the 
same as for a change of team possession? 

Ruling: It is the same as far as ending a 
series of downs is concerned. Such touching 
of a kick differs from a change of team pos- 
session in three ways. After a kick is touch- 
ed (but not possessed) by R, if it rebounds 
and is recovered by K behind the neutral 
zone, K may advance the ball by throwing 
a legal forward pass. They could not do this 
after a change of team possession. If the 
kick, after such touching by R, rebounds 
behind the line and K chooses to advance by 
a second punt, such punt is a scrimmage- 
kick while it would be classified as a return- 
kick if it occurred after change of team pos- 
session. The touching of a kick by R does not 
change the status of the two teams as far as 
offense or defense is concerned, while a 
change of team possession would reverse the 
status of the two teams. This would make a 
difference only in case a foul should occur 
after the touching or after the change of 
possession. 

5. Play : The third sentence of 7-5-4 re- 
fers to an incompletion which occurs before 
there has been any change of team posses- 
sion and before there has been any touch- 



ing beyond the line by R of a scrimmage- 
kick. Is it possible to have a scrimmage-kick 
after an incompletion? 

Ruling: No. The statement is designed to 
show that for the outlined situation, the 
touching by R and the change of team pos- 
session are in the same classification as far 
as counting the down is concerned. The in- 
completion is before there has been any 
touching because there has been no scrim- 
mage-kick to touch. The same result might 
be achieved by making two independent 
statements such as the following. "If an in- 
completion occurs before team possession has 
changed, the clown counts. Also, if an incom- 
pletion occurs before there has been any 
scrimmage-kick, the down counts." This 
would involve repetition which might be con- 
sidered unnecessary. The reason for such a 
statement being needed is illustrated in the 
following play. 

6. Play: 3rd down. Punt by Kl is touched 
by Rl beyond the line, after which it re- 
bounds behind the line where it is recovered 
by K2. K2 chooses to attempt to advance by 
means of a legal forward pass (assuming 
that linemen have held their positions). The 
pass is incomplete. Is the next down 4th or 
is it a new series? 

Ruling: If it were not for the new state- 
ment in 7-5-4, it would be necessary to "count 
the down" after the incompletion. This would 
mean that it would be 4th down. Such ruling 
would not be in harmony with other situa- 
tions which follow touching of a kick by R. 
The new statement makes it clear that such 
an incompletion is followed by a new series. 
This is probably on the assumption that Rl 
had an opportunity to secure possession of 
the kick and "muffed" the opportunity. 

7. Play: What changes are involved in the 
rewriting of 5-2-5? 

Ruling: Onlv one. Complete coverage is 
now provided for all situations which might 
follow the first touching by R beyond the 
line of a scrimmage-kick. If any foul follows 
such touching, the series of downs has end- 
ed with such touching regardless of whether 
the penalty for the subsequent foul is accept- 
ed or declined. As with all rules statements, 
it is assumed that no double foul has oc- 
curred to change conditions. In the case of a 
double foul, the double foul rule applies and 
the down is replayed even though one or both 
of the fouls should occur after the touching 
of the kick by R. 

8. Play: What is the effect of the change 
in 10-1 on the number of double fouls ? 

Ruling: The change in 10-1 reduces the 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1956 



number of situations in which the Referee 
does not consult the offended Captain but 
assumes that the penalty is automatically 
declined or accepted. Last year there were 
a number of situations in the field of play 
where the advantage of acceptance or de- 
clination was obvious so that the Referee 
did not consult the Captains. In some of these 
cases, judgment was involved. The slight 
change in the rule removes nearly all of the 
judgment situations. The result as far as 
the double foul rule is concerned, is that the 
interval before a penalty is actually accepted 
or declined has been lengthened. This auto- 
matically increases the number of cases 
where a second foul becomes a part of a 
double foul. The following play is an illustra- 
tion. 

9. Play: On 4th down, Al is offside and 
runner A2 is thrown for a 10-yard loss. Clear- 
ly after the ball has become dead, Bl com- 
mits a personal foul. Is this a double foul? 

Ruling: Under last year's statement in 
10-1, the declination of the offside penalty 
would have been considered automatic. 
Hence, the foul by B would have occurred 
after the penalty for the first had been de- 
clined. Hence, these would not have been 
considered a double foul. Under this year's 
statement, such declination of penalty for 
the first foul is not automatic. The second 
foul ocurs before there has been an declina- 
tion and it is a double foul. 

10. Play: Why is the statement in 10-1 
about automatic declination or acceptance of 
a penalty in the case of a touchdown limited 
to a touchdown by the offended team? 

Ruling: If the touchdown should be scored 
by Al after a teammate A2 had been offside 
and if B should then commit a personal foul 
after the ball becomes dead, there would be 
no way to enforce the penaltv for the per- 
sonal foul if penalty for the first foul were 
considered automatically accepted. This is 
because penalty for one foul is enforced from 
the previous spot and the other from the 
succeeding kick-off when there is to be no 
kick-off. Under present wording, there is a 
double foul situation which permits reason- 
able enforcement. 

11. Play: Scrimmage-kick by K-l is touch- 
ed beyond the line by K2. It then rebounds 
behind the line where K3 recovers and ad- 
vances for a touchdown. During the run by 
K3, Rl holds. Is penalty automatically de- 
clined ? If not, is this an exception to the 
second sentence of 10-1 ? 

Ruling: The second sentence of 10-1 does 
not limit the automatic decision to declina- 



tion. In this case, the penalty is automatically 
accepted, and enforcement results in a touch- 
down. If K were to decline the penalty. R 
would have the right to take the ball at 
spot of first touching since there was no 
touching of the kick by R. 

12. Play : Where is the rules coverage 
which specifies that first touching of a kick 
by K is ignored if penalty for any foul 
during the down is accepted? 

Ruling: Any legal action is ignored if a 
foul occurs and penalty is accepted. This is 
evident in Rule 10-1 which specifies that a 
foul is followed by administering the penalty. 
To illustrate, if a foul occurs during a for- 
ward pass which is complete or incomplete, 
the completion or incompletion is ignored 
if penalty is accepted. The 1st touching of a 
kick by K is a legal act and not a foul. Just 
as for any other legal act, the acceptance 
of a penalty takes precedence. 

13. Play: In the following formations, 
which players are eligible to receive a for- 
ward hand-off without turning ? 

(a) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 
0x000 

(b) 12 3 4 5 6 7 
0x00000 

(c) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 
x 

Ruling: In (a) 1 and 7. In (b) and (c) only 
7 may receive a forward hand-off without 
turning. Any other lineman may receive 
such hand-off by properly turning and being 
one yard back. 

14. Play: End Al goes from the huddle to 
a position near the line of scrimmage but he 
faces in the wrong direction so he is not 
"on the line." Before the snap he starts in 
motion backward and is in motion a couple 
of yards behind the line at the snap. Is his 
motion a shift and is his action legal? 

Ruling: Under current rule this is a shift. 
It is a foul by Al for not coming to a stop 
for one second. The shift rule applies to any 
player who has not established himself as 
a back. 

15. Play: May players grab the opponent's 
face protector? 

Ruling: For a runner (player in posses- 
sion), it may sometimes be necessary to 
tackle the head. In any other case, inten- 
tional grabbing of the face protector is 
either holding or unnecessary roughness. 
More than 50' < of all injuries are to the 
teeth or face. To help reduce these, all 
coaches and all officials will prohibit any 
action which would discourage use of pro- 
tectors. 



We ShipThf DaV Vou BuY 



HUNTS ATHLETIC GOODS CO. 

I N CO R PC-RATED 

PHONE 104 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 



SERVICE 

IS OUR MIDDLE NAME 

Whether your order is for a few special items or for outfitting a complete 
team, we give undivided and personal attention to every order that comes 
to our store. 

As distributors for the VERY BEST MANUFACTURERS of athletic 
goods, namely : 



MACGREGOR 


SEAMLESS 


WIGWAM 


SPALDING 


HIKE 


NELSON 


KING-O'SHEA 


CRAMER 


POWERS 


RIDDELL 


JOHNSON 


GENERAL 


YOIT 


SOUTHERN 


WILSON 



We try to make our SERVICE match the quality of the items we sell. 
Each and every item we sell is fully guaranteed. 

If you would like to see our salesman for either football or basketball 
supplies, call us at 103 or 104. 

ROY BOYD. HERBIE HUNT, JIM MITCHELL, BILL HUNT OR C. A. 
BYRN, JR. are always in our store ready to assist you in every way pos- 
sible. 

If you want the BEST QUALITY and the BEST SERVICE, contact HUNT'S. 



Hunt's Athletic Goods Co. 

PHONE 104 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 

THE LARGEST EXCLUSIVE ATHLETIC HOUSE IN THE SOUTH 





SUTCLIFFE HAS THE 

SWEATERS! ;&gjji 

CLASS AND HONOR SWEATERS 

in Stock for Immediate Delivery 
With Lettering Service, 10-Day Delivery 




ORDER 
NOW 



ORDER FOOTBALL 
HONOR SWEATERS 

NOW SO THEY'LL 
BE READY FOR YOUR 
PLAYERS THE MOMENT 
THE SEASON IS OVER. 




V-NECK SWEATERS 
No. 1030— A Sand Knitting Mills sweater of 100% wool 
in heavy baby shaker weave. Stock colors — Black, White, 
Royal, Scarlet, Purple, Kelly, Old Gold, Cardinal; 
each $ I 2.45 

No. 58V-W — Another Sand sweater in solid white. Choice 
of cheerleaders, bands, etc. Also very popular as athletic 
awards. White only; each „ $9.15 

No. 58-V — Made by Imperial Knitting Mills. Very popular 
throughout the U.S. and a remarkable value. 100% wool. 
Stock colors — Black, Old Gold, Royal, Scarlet, Purple, 
Maroon, Kelly, Light Gold, Burnt Orange; each ... . $9.75 

n 'II Reversible Honor Jackets 

DUlWin JaCketS Write us for our catalog with 

Special School Prices 

LETTERING: 6" chenille letters, each $ 
chenille chevrons, 45c; name plates, 
in sleeves cost 35c additional per sw 



COAT SWEATERS 
No. 1020 — A Sand product of heavy baby shaker weave. 
100% pure wool yard. Demanded by schools who want 
the best. Stock colors — Black, White, Royal, Scarlet, Purple, 
Cardinal, Kelly, Old Gold; each $13.65 

No. 58J — An Imperial product, and favored by many 
schools. Coat style with 2 pockets; 100% wool. Knitted 
in the popular baby shaker weave. Stock colors — White, 
Kelly, Royal, Black, Old Gold, Purple, Maroon; 
each $ I 1 .25 

No. 2620J— A Sand Knitting Mills Heavy Jersey Weave. 
Button Front Coat Sweater — 1 00% pure wool and one 
of our most popular honor garments. Stock colors — Royal, 
Kelly, Scarlet, Black, Old Gold, White, Maroon, Purple; 
each $10.65 

1.35; 8" letters $2.05; chenille bars, 40c each; 
15c each. Delivery of woven service stripes 
eater and requires three weeks for delivery. 



All prices quoted ore wholesale school prices — nor retail prices. 




UTCLIFFE CO. I 



LOUISVILLE 1, KENTUCKY 



A 

T 




J 



High School Athlete 

NEW AUDITORIUM- GYMNASIUM AT FRANKFORT HIGH SCHOOL 




Construction on the new auditorium-gymnasium at Frankfort High School started 
during the summer of 1955. The building, costing more than §400.00(1, will be complet- 
ed this month, with the dedication scheduled for November 27. There are 2000 per- 
manent seats in the gymnasium. 




Official Organ of the KENTUCKY HfGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 

NOVEMBER - 1956 




Thorough Physical Exams Needed by High School Athletes 



By Mrs. Joyce Clements and J. Irvin Nichols 



Editor's Note: Mrs. Joyce Clements is Health Educator of the 
Louisville Tuberculosis Association. J. Irvin Nichols is Execu- 
tive Secretary of the Kentucky Tuberculosis Association. 

"Come on, Charlie, get another basket!" 
These words were shouted often at a young 
high school student in central Kentucky dur- 
ing exciting basketball games in the 1954-55 
season. Charlie is a real person who was 
having a wonderful time playing basketball 
and baseball that year. He was the picture of 
health with no symptoms to indicate any ill- 
ness. But at some time in his life Charlie had 
become infected with TB. 

In May, 1955, Charlie had an x-ray in the 
mobile unit when it came to his home town. 
TB was discovered and Charlie spent 11 prec- 
ious months in the Paris Tuberculosis Hos- 
pital. He is well now and has a good future 
ahead of him in business. To look at him you 
would never guess he had fought a battle 
with the TB germ. 

When Charlie's tuberculosis was found it 
was moderately advanced. He had a positive 
sputum and therefore could have been in- 
fecting others. Could this case of tuberculo- 
sis have been discovered earlier and cured 
earlier? Probably so, if Charlie had received 
a tuberculin test or a chest x-ray as part of 
the physical examination required of ath- 
letes. 

Are we providing adequate health protec- 
tion for our young athletes? Are we suffi- 
ciently interested in their physical well be- 
ing? The physical examination required by 
the School Health Code is designed to protect 
our young boys and girls. Sometimes these 
exams are done hurriedly. Manv students 
are examined rapidly, due to time limitations 
of the examining physician and the school. 
It is imnortant that these physical exams be 
thorough. A tuberculin test or an x-ray as a 
part of the routine physical would reveal 
any presence of tuberculosis. The x-ray would 
also help detect other abnormalities of the 
lungs and heart. 

Unlike most other communicable diseases, 
tuberculosis has no visible symptoms in the 
earlv stages. The infection takes place with- 
out the person being aware of it. The germs 
begin their work destroying tissue in a quiet, 
unnoticed way. Even after several months 
of disease activity the person mav not look 
or feel sick. Only with the help of x-rav and 
laboratory tests can the physician detect 
the disease. 

Beginning with age 15 the percentage 
spiral of newly reported active cases of 



tuberculosis ascends rapidly. During 1955 
one hundred and fourteen new cases of tu- 
berculosis were discovered among Kentucky 
students 15-19 years of age. We are not sure 
why the incidence of tuberculosis is so large 
in this age group. It may possibly be attri- 
buted to greater opportunity for infection or 
to hormonal changes taking place in the body 
during this period of rapid growth. An ath- 
lete, engaging in strenuous, physical effort, 
can give any existing TB infection an oppor- 
tunity to become active disease. But a tuber- 
culin test or a chest x-ray would reveal TB 
infection early, before obvious symptoms in- 
dicated advanced disease. 

TB is a complex disease and is peculiarly 
difficult to control. It is caused by a micro- 
scopic germ, the tubercle bacillus. The germs 
enter the body through the mouth and nose. 
The disease chiefly affects the lungs but can 
affect any or all parts of the body. The 
incubation period varies from a few weeks 
to many years. A person may be infected 
early in life and not develop active tubercu- 
losis until many years later. 

There is no evidence of natural specific 
immunity to tuberculosis. And once a person 
has had TB there is no assurance that he 
will not either break down or be reinfected. 
Resistance to tuberculosis is enhanced by 
good nutrition, adequate rest and observance 
of good health habits, but no vaccine has 
been discovered that will protect a person 
from catching the disease. 

Once a person has been found to have tu- 
berculosis hospitalization is usually recom- 
mended. There his recovery is speeded with 
complete rest, good food, drugs and possibly 
chest surgery. 

Insidious, unpredictable, destructive — 
these are only a few of the adjectives com- 
monly used to indicate the difficult charac- 
teristics of TB. 

Kentucky has never had reason to be 
proud of her tuberculosis case rates and 
death rates. In 1955 our State had the third 
highest case rate (the number of newly re- 
ported cases per 100,000 population), and 
the second highest death rate (the number 
of deaths per 100.000 population). The case 
rate was 74.2, and the death rate was 15.7. 
Yet, Kentucky can be proud of the progress 
that is being made. During the past five 
years the death rate from TB in Kentucky 
has been cut fifty per cent, and in the past 
(Continued on Page Ten) 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Officio] Organ of the 

Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



Vol. XIX— No. 4 



NOVEMBER, 1956 



1.00 Per Year 



Early Season Basketball Questions — Installment 1 

It does not apply to a batted ball during re- 
bounding. The prohibition against such 
touching by an opponent of the thrower is 
the same as for a teammate of the thrower. 

3. Play: Tall Al jumps while holding the 
ball and pushes (dunks) it down through 
the basket. His hand is in the basket cylinder 
and in contact with the ball while it is on 
the way down. Is this a violation of the 
"goal tending" rule? 

Ruling: No. The restriction in Rule 9-11 
applies to a ball in flight. In the case cited, 
the ball remains in contact with the hand 
and is not yet in flight. 

4. Play : In an unusual situation, Al tries 
for field goal. He follows the ball in and rises 
near the basket. As the try is in downward 
flight and before it has touched ring or back- 
board, he pushes the ball through the basket. 

Ruling: Violation of 9-11. The prohibition 
applies to the thrower for field goal as well 
as to his teammates. 

5. Play: Al tries for field goal. The try 
strikes the ring, bounces above it and is in 
downward flight when it is pushed through 
the basket by A2. 

Ruling: Not a violation. The prohibition 
ended when the try touched ring or back- 
board. 

6. Play: Does the exception in Rule 9-9 
apply to a jump in the free throw circle? _ 

Ruling: It applies to any jump ball. This 
provision was adopted at a time when the 
ball was not taken to one of the circles after 
a held ball. A good case could be made for 
making this apply only to a jump ball in the 
center circle. 

7. Play: During jump ball between Al and 
Bl, there is a violation because: (a) A2 has 
a foot in the restraining circle before the 
tap; or (b) Bl taps the tossed ball before it 
reaches the highest point; or (c) Al legally 
taps the ball which then goes directly out 
of bounds; or (d) Al legally taps the ball 
and then catches it. What is the proper 
procedure for Officials and when would the 
clock be started? 



Editor's Note: These rulings do not set aside or modify any 
rule. They are interpretations on some of the early season 
situations which have been presented. 

1. Play: How does the held ball definition 
differ from that of last year? 

Ruling: Under the current rule the re- 
striction on a player who is holding the ball 
is slightly greater than that for a dribbler. 
Under the stated circumstances, the 5-second 
time limit applies anywhere in the front 
court while a player is holding the ball. For 
the dribbler (other than one enclosed In- 
screening teammates) it applies only to the 
floor area which is roughly within 15 feet 
in front of the division line and in a corner 
of the front court where intersecting bound- 
ary lines restrict the activities of the op- 
ponent. 

Comment : Last year's experience indicates 
that having the 5-second time limit almost 
eliminates situations in which it is necessary 
for the Official to enforce the time limit. 
The primary purpose of the revision in this 
year's rule is to designate a more specific 
area where a dribbler is restricted. For 
practical purposes, the administration will 
be about the same as for last year. 

2. Play: Al tries for field goal. Teammate 
A2 touches the ball in downward flight in 
the vicinity of the basket. Under what cir- 
cumstances is this legal? 

Ruling: A teammate of the thrower may 
legally touch the ball in an attempt to guide 
it into the basket if such touching is after 
the ball has touched the ring or backboard 
or is after the try for field goal has ended. 
Here are illustrations. If a try by Al strikes 
the backboard at one side, A2 may time 
his jump to touch the ball as it rebounds and 
guide it into the basket. If a try is short or 
clearly off-direction so it is obvious that it 
cannot enter the basket without help, the 
try has ended and subsequent touching by 
A2 is legal. Touching is prohibited only in 
those cases where a try for field goal is 
accurate enough in distance and direction so 
that it might be successful without any ad- 
ditional help. The prohibition ends as soon 
as such try has touched ring or backboard. 



(Continued on Page Eleven) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1956 



NOVEMBER, 1956 VOL. XIX— NO. 4 

Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association. 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor— J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Russell Williamson (1956-60), Inez 

Vice-President Louis Litchfield (1953-571, Marion 

Directors— W. B. Jones (1953-57) Somerset; W. H. Crowdus 
(1954-58). Franklin; Jack Dawson (1954-58), Middletcwn; 
Robert P. Forsythe (1955-59). Greenville; K. G. Gillnspie 
(1955-59), Georgetown; Cecil A. Thornton (1956-60), Harlan. 
Subscription Rates $1.00 Per fear 



Jtrom the Commissioned s CJfp 



ice 



REPORTS NOW DUE 

1. 1956 Football Participation List 

2. School's Report on Football Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Football) 



State Tournament Reservations 

The 1957 State High School Basketball 
Tournament will be held in Louisville on 
March 13-16. Because of the great number of 
lodging reservations available in the city of 
Louisville and in Jefferson County, it has 
not been thought necessary to set up priority 
periods with the hotels and motels in the area 
as has been done in recent years when the 
tournament was held in Lexington. 

The Louisville Chamber of Commerce 
stands ready to assist State Tournament pa- 
trons who have trouble in securing lodging 
accommodations during tournament time. 
The address of the Louisville organization is 
300 West Liberty Street, Louisville, and any 
correspondence concerning tournament reser- 
vations should be called to the attention of 
Mrs. Rita Decker. It is believed that most 
school men and others requiring lodging 
during tournament time will be able to se- 
cure accommodations at the hotels and mo- 
tels of their choice. 

National Federation Basketball Test 

Part II of the National Federation basket- 
ball examination will be given all over Ken- 
tucky on Monday, December 3, to officials 
who wish to work for the "approved" and 
"certified" ratings. Officials registered with 
the K.H.S.A.A. for the first time this year, 
and who have not been registered previously 
in any other state associations, are not 
eligible to take the test. Those interested 
should advise the State Office immediately 
in order that necessary arrangements can 
be made with the school administrators who 



will supervise the taking of the exam. Of- 
ficials living in Kentucky need not suggest 
the name of an examiner, since it is probable 
that one examiner for each county will be 
named. The "approved" rating does not carry 
forward from year to year, but must be 
earned each year. After an official has re- 
ceived the "certified" rating, he keeps this 
rating by attending clinics without having 
to continue to take the exam each year. 



Approved and Certified Officials 

Twenty-one football officials have quali- 
fied for the "Certified" rating this fall, and 
seven for the "Approved" rating. These 
officials are: 

Certified Officials — Jim Barlow, Thomas 
P. Bell, Howard Bennett, Richard Betz, 
George W. Brown, Travis Combs, Layton 
Cox, John S. Crosthwaite, Jr., Jack H. Dur- 
kin, Gene Harris, Fletcher Holeman, Bernard 
Johnson, Ravmond Kraesig, Carl Lawson, 
Bob McColhim, Bill Nau, K. F. Schmitt, 
Joseph R. Schuhmann, John H. Shaw, Clif- 
ton Stone, Edward H. Weber. 

Approved Officials — E. C. Caiman, Jr., 
William Gammon, Clem Jarboe, Morris B. 
Lancaster, Douglas Noland, A. L. Perry, 
Gordon Reed. 



Protection Fund News 

One hundred ninetv-nine member schools 
of the K.H.S.A.A. had insured their athletes 
with the Protection Fund at the time this 
issue of the magazine went to press. One 
hundred eighty-one claims, totaling $3,493.16 
have been paid since July 1. 

Employment Bureaus 

Sixteen employment bureaus for officials, 
one in each basketball region, have been es- 
tablished. Each registered official should file 
at once with his bureau head and/or the 
nearest bureau head his schedule of games 
and a list of dates on which the official will 
be available to call games. The names of the 
bureau heads, with their business and resid- 
ence phone numbers, are as follows : 

Region 1. Rex Alexander, Murray State 
College, Murray; Business No. 740, Ext. 15; 
Res. No. 1292W. 

Region 2. Amos Teague, Princeton Ave., 
Madisonville; Res. No. 1897W. 

Region 3. Roy Settle, 1000 E. 20th St., 
Owensboro; Business No. MU 3-3575; Res. 
No. MU 3-2136. 

Region 4. Joe Richardson, 210 York, 
Greenville; Business No. 48; Res. No. 
1077-W. 



THK KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1956 



Page Three 



Region 5. Carroll Broderick, 1760 Normal 
Dr., Bowling Green: Business No. 3-8212: 
Res. No. 3-8594. 

Region 6. Howard Gardner. 307 Poplar 
Dr., Elizabethtown ; Business No. Ft. Knox 
6638: Res. No. 4451. 

Region 7. Dave Longenecker, 3910 Olym- 
pic, Louisville ; Business No. BE 3401 ; Res. 
No. Ta. 6-9071. 

Robert L. Rosenbaum. 117 Fairlawn Rd., 
Louisville; Business No. JU 4-8191; Res. 
No. TW 7-2833. 

Region 8. Elmo Head, Shelbvville; Busi- 
ness No. 142 ; Res. No. 1273W. 

Region 9. John Sehaar, Bellevue; Business 
No. Co. 1-2980 ; Res. No. Co. 1-5069. 

Region 10. Bennie Bridges, North Middle- 
town ; Res. No. 4392. 

Region 11. Harry Stephenson. 2210 Circle 
Dr.. Lexington; Business No. 2-4789; Res. 
No. 4-9620. 

Region 12. Bob McLeod, Somerset: Busi- 
ness No. 545; Res. No. 571. 

Region 13. John S. Crosthwaite, Harlan; 
Business No. 57 ; Res. No. 2075. 

Region 14. Arnett Strong, 425 Cedar, 
Hazard; Business No. 3300; Res. No. North 
389. 

Region 15. Dick Looney, Pikeville ; Res. 
No. 813. 

Region 16. Ernie Chattin, 2147 Central. 
Ashland; Business No. East 4-6191 ; Res. No. 

East 4-2665. 

SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
MEMBER SCHOOLS OF THE K.H.S.A.A. 

Adair County Lone Oak 

(Columbia) (Paducah) 

Adairville Minerva 

Arlington Montgomery County 
Bate (Mt. Sterling-) 

(Danville) Mullins 
Booker T. Washington (Pikeville) 

(Ashland) Nancy 

Boone County North Marshall 

(Florence) (Calvert City) 

Buckhorn Owingsville 

Camargo Phelps 

(Mt. Sterling) Prestonsburg 

Centertown Providence 

Clav Countv Sandy Hook 

"(Manchester) St. Charles 
Eubank (Lebanon) 

Feds Creek Stanford 

Fleming County Sunfish 

(Flemingsburg) Tompkinsville 

Garrett Trenton 

Hopkinsville Trigg County- 
Jackson (Cadiz) 

Knott County Uniontown 

(Pippa Passes) Utica 

Kyrock Vanceburg-Lewis County 

(Sweeden) (Vanceburg) 

Lily Wayland 
Willisburg 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED FOOTBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled November 1 ) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 
Cox, Bill, Tennessee Avenue, Pineville, ED 73209. ED 79131 
McCubbin, James A., 328 12h Ave., Hunting-ton. W. Va. 
Malone, Donald R., Dept. of Recreation, Ironton. Ohio 
Parker, Billie E„ P. O. Box 731, Pineville. ED 73293 
Snowden, Ken, S44 Boyd Avenue, Danville, 2S41, 708 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled November 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 
A bell. James Alvie. Burna, 3400 
Almond, Bennett M.. 1009 18th Street. Portsmouth. Ohio. 

4-155S. EL 32195 
Amato. S. Joseph. Jr.. 522 Shelby St., Frankfort, 42231. Ext. 

280 (Bus. No. I 
Amburgey, Jesse Lee. College Station, Box 3, Berea. 9129 
Ark. Billie D.. Athletic Office. Ft. Knox. 4427. 5757 
Arnold, Marvin R.. 365 MeLeod Ave.. Madisonville. 2329 
Arnzen. Stanley. 33 Ohio Avenue. Newport. JU 16262, AX 16827 
Babbs, Don, Honshaw, Sturgis 2520 
Baker, .lames A.. R. F. D. 2. Wingo. EV 22142 
Ballard, Shirley Lee. 2A Gay Street, Winchester, 1933W, 1700 
Ballinger. Richard L.. 820 E. Washington St.. Louisville 6, 

WA 0394 
Beard, Monio. 617 Hampton Road, Bowling Green. VI 38848, 

VI 36036 
Black, Amos, College Street, Harrodsburg. 501, 711J 
Blevins, Johnny. Langley. 3300 
Blevins, Kedrick, Langley, 3300 

Blumer, Sherry, 376 Park Avenue. Lexington. 30312 
Bowen, D. C, Apt. 33-L Wherry, Ft. Campbell. 2057 iBus. No.) 
Bowers, Hugh S. Jr., 45 E. Center. Madisonville. 2598 (Bus No. I 
Bridges. Bennie E.. North Middletown, 4392 
Britt, Glenn Jr.. 1238 College Street. Bowling Green 
Brooks, James A., Box 120. Betsy Layne. Pikeville 1465 (Bus. 

No. I 
Brown, E.ldie. R. F. D. 1, Florence, AT 34285, Georgetown 913U 
Brown, James William. 124 Lancaster Ave.. Richmond. 155s, 

Waco 4071 
Buis. Nathaniel. Liberty. 3471. 2852 
Butcher. Joe M.. Pikeville College. Pikeville. 1219 
Butler, Donald A., 2505 Iroquois Drive. Owensboro, Mil 3-3175, 

MU 3-2401 
Butner, Billv, 122 Aspen Avenue, Richmond. 564W 
Carlisle. John B.. R. R. 2. Box 217, LaCenter 

Cartee, Ralph, Jr.. Second Street. Grayson, GR 44931, C.R 44101 
Cassadv, Charles W., 1127 Kentucky St., Bowling Green. 

VI 39538 
Cates, Vernon R., Sedalia 
Chattin, Charles, 2325 Harrod Street, Ashland. EA 45385. 

EA 46464 
Clark. Charles. Black Oaks Apt. No. 5S, Paducah 
Collins, John J. "Jack", 3424 Decoursey, Covington. CO 1S027 
Collins, Owen David, R. R. 1, Jackson. 325J 
Combs, Roy B., 132 E. Gray Street, Louisville. WA 6201. 

JU 44283 
Conley, Tom W., Paintsville 

Cooper. John. R. F. D. 1, Brooksville, Augusta 2343 
Cox. Ralph, Box 555, Benham 

Crase. Darrell, Berea College. Box 458, 301 (Bus. No.) 
Crowe. Emmett H., 7420 Joseph Street, Cincinnati 81, Ohio. 

J A 16980, MA 14680 
Culp. Willard E.. Co. A. 326th ABN ENGR BN. Ft. Campbell, 

4307, 2971 
Current, Ellis R.. 670 Springridge. Lexington. 20382. 34660 
Davis. Donald, 39 Harrison. Bellevue. JU 19813. HE 16990 
Davis. Kenny. Delbarton. W. Va. 
Deskins, Tilden, Phelps 

Dixon, Charles T.. 101 Humston Dr., P. O. Box 180, Lawrence- 
burg. 3608 I Bus. No. I 
Dotson, John B., Route 1. Milltown, Ind. 
Doyle, Donald, 302 Underwood. Campbellsville, 470M. 321 
Elliott. Humphrey T., Liberty. 4291 
Ensslin, Charles William. 716 North Main Street. Barbourville. 

145, 1S5 
Evans. Carl L„ 1920 29th Street. Ashland, EA 44058 
Evans. James W.. Auxier, Prestonsburg 2072 
Farmer, John Clav "Jack". 122 North First St.. Danville. 

631W. 2192 
Fenne. Donald, Asbury College. Box 175. Wilmore 
Fort, John W.. General Delivery, Pleasant View, Tenn., 4841 
Foster, William R. "Bob", Science Hill. 234 



Pas - e Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1956 



Franklin. James P., 3 Belmont Park. Moseley Dr., Hopkinsville. 

58162 
Gibson, Eomulus D.. Box 212, Campbellsville, 2530 
Gilbert, Gerald L., Box 235. Vine Grove, 133M, Ft. Knox 4950 
Gish, Stanley David Jr., 1130 Columbia St.. Newport, JU 10917 
Goodin. Shirlely, Four Mile, 72031 
Graham, John, West Elm Street. Clay, 2495 
Green, Walter, 112% Chester Street, Middlesboro. 2128, 263 
Greene, Tolbert E.. 1511 Linden Avenue. Owensboro. MU 4-4208, 

MU 3-2459 
Grisham, Jesse R.. 1525 Roosevelt Street, Henderson, 71035 
Hall. Roval A.. Jr., 3823 Park Avenue, Covington, AX 17300, 

CO 14908 
Hardin. Jack H., 1105 "B" Street, Ceredo, W. Va.. Kenova 

93881, Huntington ,TA 55151 
Harned, Victor C, Route 1, Elizabethtown 
Head, Eugene, Route 2. Philpot. PA 94294, MU 37305 
Heitzman. Don. 26 Janet Drive, Winston Park, CO 15820, 

HE 10462 
Heldman. John Jr., 140 Seneca Trail, Louisville. EM 32181. 

ME 72531 
Helton, George H., 51 IV, Fourth St., Pikeville. 148W 
Hesse. Bob E., 611 North 39th Street, Louisville, CY 8562, 

JU 43211. Ext. 324 
Hill. Jimmie, Gausdale 

Hinkle, Melvin B., 1442 Cypress Street, Paris 
Hobbs. Charles V.. 2121 Main St., Westwood Station. Ashland. 

EA 49150, EA 42175 
Hogg, Bill. 400 Sycamore, Elizabethtown, 9892. Elizabethtown 

High School. (Bus. No.) 
Holbrook. William M.. 2421 Forest Avenue, Ashland, EA 45860, 

EA 42144 
Hoskins, Charles, 2922 Finn Avenue, Louisville 8 
Howard. Carl. Route 1, Mayfield 
Howard. Jimmy D., 1021 Husbands Road, Paducah, 20198, 

55629 
Howard, Joseph William. 606 South Seminary, Madisonville, 

3117. 92 
Huff. David N.. Cumberland, 161N, 52W 
Hughes. Charles. Wayland. 3491, 4711 

Hummer. Irby H., 110 College Heights, Hodgenville. 20M 
Hunt, Jackie L-, 920 Greenwood Avenue, Clarksville, Tenn., 

MI 55804 
Huntsman, William L. Jr.. 114 Doris Ave., Glasgow, OL 15440, 

OL 12233 
Huter, James S.. 3505 Vermont Avenue. Louisville. CY 3891 
Johnson. Glenn. Route 1, Hazard. 399 (Bus. No.) 
Jones, Jack S.. 835 Hilltop Road, Danville, 2696W, 1400, Ext. 37 
Kelly, Callis, Volga. Paintsville 19 (Bus. No.) 
Kenahan, Thomas F.. 3107 Doreen Way. Louisville, GL 84490, 

JU 49825 
Kime. Haldon L., Asbury College, P. O. Box 404, Wilmore 
Kimmel, Jerry. Beechmont. GR 62656. CR 62266 
King, Randall E.. 1171/. South Central St., Campbellsville, 

695M 
Kingston. Waldo H.. Box 2466, Charleston. W. Va. 
Lavoy, Robert W., 1335 Grandview Dr., Ashland. EA 46685, 

EA 46641 
Lazarus, Rhea Price. 516 East 14th St., Bowling Green, VI 38398 
Leathers, Ollie C, 6 Tanner Dr.. Frankfort, 44116, 48030 
Lee, Lonnie W., Keavy, Corbin 568J3 
Lenahan. Thomas F., 3107 Doreen Way. Louisville, GL 84490. 

JU 49825 
Leonhardt, A. C, 1417 Oleanda Ave., Louisville, EM 61919, 

WA 2211, Ext. 697 
Lindauer. Jerry D., 2407 Lindberg Dr., Louisville, ME 74598 
Littlepage, Pryce, 431 Sugg Street, Madisonville. 3364 
Littral. James W., 460 Locust Ave., Lexington, 30354. 33335, 

No. 1 Station 
Lones, Joe Jr., Scottsville, 453 

McDowell, Charles R., 724 Avalon Pike, Lexington, 40061 
McNeil, Patrick, 325 Race. Madisonville, 3460, 2402 
Mahan, Boyd W. 8 Circle Drive. Florence. AT 33335. LO 18686 
Mahan. Carle E.. French Ave.. Winchester. 1717, Lexington 

20290 
Malone. Donald R., Dept. of Recreation. Ironton. Ohio 
Martin, John B., 202 South Kentucky St., Corbin, 377W, 1348 
Mason, James E.. 121 South Second St., Mayfield, 1210M 
Mazza, Albert Babe, 285 "A" Street, Ceredo, W. Va.. 94811, 

5421 
Miller, Dencel, Auburn High School, Auburn 
Miller, Roy Lee. Belton, Greenleaf 62666, Central City 440 
Miller, William L., Belton, Greenleaf 62666 
Mills, Herman, Lovely 
Monroe, Robert W.. 501 West Poplar St., Elizabethtown, 4900, 

6189 
Morris, Buddy. 2177 Winchester Ave.. Ashland. EA 49783 
Morgan, Charles A., R. F. D. 3, Clinton. 3533 
Moore, Roy Jr.. Reams Street, London, 398J. 24 
Newman, Bill. 1614 6th Street, Portsmouth, Ohio, 56503 
Oglesby, Durwood, Nortonville 
Oldham. Charles M.. Route 1. Hartford 
Osborne. Homer L.. 5359 New Cut Rd.. Louisville 
O'Nan, Eugene, Route 3, Henderson, 79077 
Onty, Leo T. Jr., 603 Perry St., Greenup 



Partridge, Donald E.. 1621 North Willow Rd., Evansville, Ind. 

HA 41566. HA 58181 
Penrod. Joe B., 1115 W. Third St., Owensboro. MU 35068 
Perkins. Wayne, 114 West Boyle Ave.. Box 144, Earlington, 

5316 
Perry, George B., Dawson Springs 

Polk. John C. 217 East Jacob, Louisville, JU 41079. JU 44283 
Price. James E., Sar Route, Liberty, 2581 
Price, Jimmy, Route 1, Demossville. GR 25758. TA 44489 
Prior, Lowell F.. Route 6. Portsmouth, Ohio, BOS 824W 
Pursifull, Cleophus. Box 1. Loyall, 1110 
Rail. Eugene, 124 West Todd St., Frankfort, 42355, 42231, 

Ext. 202 
Ratehford, Charles R. Jr.. 516 North 33rd St., Louisville. 

SP 20108 
Reynolds. Richard D.. Co. A. 2128th SU. Ft. Knox. 3727, 5257 
Ritter, Goebel. 119 Baker Ave., Hazard, 835, 355 
Robinson, Donald C. Route 4. Box 350, London, 142L 
Rose, Lee H., 209 East Maxwell St., Lexington, 24568 or 

44265 
Rush, Ralph, Lida Street, London 

Schmalfuss. Werner, 3021 Scioto. Cincinnati, Ohio, CA 10027 
Schu, Wilbur, 106 West Main, Georgetown, 1297 
Shaw. Don. 2 1 1 > % Black Street, Barbourville, Union Ath. Dept., 

(Bus. No.) 
Sheffer. Joseph W., 203 East Lyon Street, Morganfield, 560W, 

232 
Singleton, Vesper, Anco 
Smith. David W., 4511 Bishop Lane. Louisville. GL 83748. 

GL 85369 
Smith, Eurie H., 3730 Taylorsville Rd.. Louisville, GL 40374 

BE 3452 
Stanley, Haskell. Route 1, Pikeville 

Steely. Stanley E„ South 11th Street, Williamsburg. 3641 
Stephens, Clarence W.. 943 Bryan Ave., Lexington, 41224, 34660 
Stikeleather, Clyde L.. 315 West Main, Box 231, Leitchfield 

115, 104 
Taylor, Carl, R. F. D. 3. Box 250, Corbin, 1718 
Taylor, Carl L., Box 1243, A.P.S.C, Clarksville, Tenn. 
Taylor. Dennis, 710 West Main. Murray, 185, 76 
Taylor, Edwin L.. 435 North 41st., Louisville 12. SP 20126 
Taylor, Hal, 320 North 32nd St., Louisville, Ar 4859, 218-912 
VanMeter. Kaye Don. Bee Spring. LY 73676 
Tilley. H. M.. Box 132. LaCenter, 58393 
Tincher. Robert, Route 4, Nashville Rd., Bowling Green 

VI 33380, VI 22424 
Tucker. Neal R., Box 76. Dunmor. 185, Hughes Kirk H. S.. 

Beechmont. (Bus. No.) 
Turner. A. J.. Langley, Martin 3202, Martin 3241 
Turner. Bruce. 1114 Pleasant St.. Paris, 534. 9060 
VanWinkle, Stephen N. Jr., 4601 Picadilly Ave. Louisville 

EM 67094 
VanZant. Jim. 502 Prichard St.. Williamson, W. Va 
Waggoner. Philip, 2938 Clark St., Paducah 
Wallin, Buddy Malcolm. Box 886. E.K.S.C. Richmond. 9159 
Warner. Marvin, 228 Vets Village. Richmond 
Weisbrodt. Paul E., 350 Stratford Dr.. Lexington, 46665 
Westerfield. Glenn, 536 Stanley Ave., Evansville 11 Ind 

HA 39570, HA 58161 
Whipple, Lloyd G., 216 S. Frederick, Evansville, Ind., GR 65809 

HA 43311, Ext. 384 
Williams. Donald D., Route 2, Waltersville Irvine 139L 

Irvine 106 
Williams. Tom M. Jr.. 116 East Broadway, Bardstown, 3079, 

Fern Creek 3267 
Wilson, Jack R., 1137 Walnut Ave., Ashland, EA 44956 

EA 51611 
Witt. Fred, Whitesburg, 2661 
Wise. Billy V., 363 N. Broadway, Lexington 
Wise, Jack. 176 Lincoln Ave., Lexington, 26974, 25494 
Wood. James W.. 827 East 19th St.. Owensboro, Murray 41789, 

Murray 32401 



Building Projects 

Eight State High School Associations now 
own the building in which headquarters are 
located. These are the Associations in 
Georgia, Florida, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Iowa, 
Kansas, Kentucky, and California. Some of 
these buildings represent an investment of 
from $50,000 to $75,000. This might seem to 
be a rather large investment until compared 
with the building project of the National 
Education Association which has nearly com- 
pleted the raising of a $5,000,000 fund for 
erecting a headquarters building in Wash- 
ington, D. C. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1956 



The Flying Dutchman 

Valley High School's principal, J. C. Can- 
trell, gets the Flying Dutchman Salute and 
the Corn Cob Pipe of Honor for this month. 
Principal Cantrell is honored because he 
demonstrated his belief that high school 
sports belong to the boys who play them 
and that profits accruing from such activities 
are side issues. 

When Valley and powerful St. Xavier 
clashed in their annual football game, which 
was a home encounter scheduled on the 
Valley gridiron, the Valley athletic fund 
could have been enriched by several thous- 
and extra dollars, had not Cantrell's fine 
philosophy that sports belong to the boys 
prevailed. By moving the game to Louis- 
ville, Valley could have gained financial 
profit, but would have sacrificed the ad- 
vantage of the home field, which was so 
important to the players. When the kids 
pointed out this fact, Cantrell said, "The 
game belongs to you and we'll play it here." 

It is a sound practice to play such games 
where a greater number of spectators may be 
accommodated, provided the boys who play 
the game are agreeable. Certainly the spec- 
tators who pay the costs of our sports de- 
serve consideration, but Kentucky's athletics 
continue to excel because school adminis- 
trators place their young athletes first. So it 
is that seven thousand spectators saw the 
football classic at Valley, whereas fifteen 
thousand would have witnessed the struggle 
in the big metropolis, but the important 
thing is that thirty football players know 
that they are the most important issues 
involved in any contest. 

Kentucky boasts many colorful personal- 
ities among its school administrators and. 
undoubtedly, one of the most outstanding is 
Foster "Sid" Meade, the chief educator of 
South Portsmouth Schools. Referred to by 
Ashland's George Conley as one of Ken- 
tucky's top basketball officials, "Sid" is also 
hailed as one of Eastern Kentucky's out- 
standing school administrators. The month 
of November will find "Sid" dedicating a 
fine new building at South Portsmouth and 
presenting a program which will be as color- 
ful as the gentleman himself. 

It is impossible to be "down in the dumps" 
if you are around "Sid" for any length of 
time. His dry humor is matched only by 
that of our late Irvin S. Cobb, of the other 
section of Kentucky. Most basketball of- 
ficials deserve commendation for the effort 



Page Five 




Sid Meade 

made to attend one basketball clinic, but it 
is not unusual to find "Sid" attending three 
in one season. This year "Sid" was the first 
official we saw in Morehead, and that night 
he was again the first we saw as we started 
the Ashland session sixty miles away. 
Again, "Sid" came to Lexington last year 
and spent two days at his own expense in 
the School for Basketball Officials. For our 
money, "Sid" Meade has to be classed among 
Kentucky's finest gentlemen, outstanding 
officials, and lovers of sports. 

Whenever you get to Pikeville, expect a 
lot of things to happen. Here's what hap- 
pened to us. First off, Ann Looney, attrac- 
tive wife of official Dick, set up her annual 
social gathering after the Pikeville clinic. 
Next, we found scores of Pikevillians offer- 
ing hospitality which varied from watching 
the World Series on their TV sets to golf- 
ing with them on Pikeville's new course. In- 
cidentally, Ray Burke, one of the mountains' 
better known officials, also is a banker and 
a golfer who shoots in the low 70's. Take 
him on for eighteen holes when you're in 
that country. 

Another event of note was that when we 
examined the clinic attendance sheet for the 
Pikeville session, we found that an Elvis 
Presley, of Memphis, Tennessee, had signed 
the register. This signature, we found, was 
due to the courtesy of one of the Pikeville 
teen-age basketball players in attendance 
who could also sing "Hound Dog." 

More news of the mountain section ! At 
Hazard we learned that Lawrence Davis, 
who built the fine Recreation Memorial in 
that mountain city, plans a most modern 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1956 



summer resort motel with a swimming pool 
and all of the lavish trimmings of a Miami 
Beach resort on top of Hazard's highest 
mountain. Hazard's citizens are enthusias- 
tic in telling you that what Lawrence Davis 
sets out to accomplish always turns out to 
be the best. You can shortly schedule your 
vacation at this newly planned Hazard sum- 
mer resort. 

Undoubtedly, the finest practices initiated 
in the annual basketball clinics are the social 
hours which are being arranged as "breaks" 
in the middle of the sessions or for periods 
immediately following them. All of this 
started when James Pursifull at Bell Coun- 
ty High set the tempo with a fine whole- 
some affair at his school ; next. Jack Story 
at Mayfield enlarged on the idea and, with 
the support of everybody's friend, Bill Hunt, 
made everybody want to come again next 
year; and in the same breath the Louisville 
and the Falls Cities official associations 
went all out to make their social affair the 
top event of the Falls Cities season. 

There is a lot of talk over the state that 
the coaches are going to ask for legislation 
at the K.E.A. session which will include them 
in attendance at the annual basketball clinics. 
If this happens, these social affairs will be- 
come even more important as the officiat- 
ing and coaching fraternities are drawn 
closer together. 

Of one thing we are certain, that being 
that the Kentucky High School Athlete is 
not only read, but is eagerly awaited by all 
of our men connected with sports. Daviess 
County's Buck Sydnor sounded the keynote 
when he said that it is one of the finest 
things done by the K.H.S.A.A. and one of 
the most informative magazines which 
crosses his desk. Buck, who in The Dutch- 
man's book is the kind of coach that high 
school boys are privileged to play under, 
has promoted the Daviess County basket- 
ball clinics in such a manner as to bring 
commendation from the large crowds in at- 
tendance. On the subject of crowds, T. K. 
Stone, Elizabethtown Superintendent, and 
Howard Gardner, regional representative of 
the K.H.S.A.A., did a magnificent job in 
packing almost two hundred officials and 
coaches in at the Elizabethtown clinic. This 
was the first clinic to be held at Elizabeth- 
town and the results justify continuation 
of the clinic there in 1957. 

Here are some short shots which will in- 



terest you. Evansville's Ox Hartley and 
Clyde Castle are now full-fledged Big Ten 
basketball officials. Morehead's new gym, 
which has automatic windows, will be ready 
in December and will seat five thousand, 
while the new look in Newport's gymnasium 
was brought about by Stan Arnzen's basket- 
ball players, who worked out the color scheme 
and applied the paint. Incidentally, that new 
gymnasium which T. L. Plain has in opera- 
tion in Henderson is just about as beautiful 
as anything The Dutchman has ever seen, 
as is also that new Henderson High School. 

Western Kentucky State College's 1956 
Homecoming impressed everybody with the 
fine young leadership which President Kelly 
Thompson is giving to that institution. The 
campus was an array of color, old graduates 
were back in droves, numbering among them 
such well known figures as Hugh Poland, 
scout for the New York Giants ; Arnold 
Winkenhoffer, a Western immortal: and 
Charlie Blake, the old Fairdale Flash. Smiths 
Grove's Wilmer Meredith was elected presi- 
dent of the "W" Club to succeed Don "Duck" 
Ray. If Tom Ellis is reading this column, 
here's a message: Aubrey Hoof nail, who has 
been campus policeman at Western for forty- 
three years, asked where you were. His 
concern may be out of personal friendship 
or it may be that he is still looking for you. 
Nobody has ever forgotten the leadership 
Covington's Tom Ellis gave the Hilltoppers 
while he captained the championship eleven 
of 1928. 

"Ole Ben" Edelen, the state tournament 
official, has left Uncle Sam's Internal Rev- 
enue Department after ten years to open 
his own bookkeeping and tax service busi- 
ness for small businesses and individuals 
at 3309 Wellingmoor in Louisville. Good 
luck, Bennie. 

Just for the records, the 1956-57 basket- 
ball clinics involved 1900 miles of driving, 
thirty hours of talking when all sessions 
were added, and an attendance of almost 
2000. Sometimes in these sessions we heard 
coaches joking about building character be- 
cause their teams were not "loaded." All 
joking aside, character building is the most 
important. 

Character is what a man is before his God 
and his judge; his reputation is what men 
say he is. Reputation is for time, but char- 
acter is for eternitv. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1956 



Page Seven 



Guest Editorals 

About "Booing" 

We have always been concerned about the 
practice of "booing." 

Recently a newspaper carried the story 
of a group of college students holding a 
convention. Prominent individuals were in- 
vited to speak before the group. The story 
said that the speakers were alternately ap- 
plauded and "booed." 

It is discouraging to see this type of dis- 
courtesy to invited guests, practiced by sup- 
posedly educated young men and women. We 
fear we are getting old and of the Victorian 
era but we can't adjust our thinking to be- 
lieve that "booing" is an act of a lady or 
gentleman. Perhaps these words are obsolete. 

Of course those who engaged in this prac- 
tice may comfort themselves and alibi for 
their action by saying the major political 
parties and other adult groups are guilty. 
But to us it is not sound reasoning to con- 
tend that we are excused from rudeness be- 
cause others are impolite. 

We are old fashioned enough to believe 
that we can listen politely to a speaker with 
whom we disagree, particularly one we have 
invited. There are many courteous ways to 
show our disapproval. 

In the publication of one of our state 
athletic associations, the observation was 
made that the entire tournament was played 
with school officials, coaches and players 
showing the best ideals of sportsmanship. 

The author of the article observed that 
the only act which marred an otherwise fine 
exhibition was the "booing" of officials by 
some spectators. Rude behavior, in our opin- 
ion, of this kind is less excusable than a 
player who "loses his head" in the emotions 
caused by competition. 

Perhaps a serious campaign in schools by 
the administration might help to rid inter- 
scholastic activities of the chief blot on the 
sport scene. Perhaps if the "booers" were 
asked to leave, we would have the support of 
the great majority of spectators. 

For many who "boo" do not recognize a 
double dribble from a "too many steps" vio- 
lation. And rarely have we seen the ex- 
perienced player or official guilty of "booing" 
a decision, for while they may not agree 
with the "call," they recognize a judgment 
decision and know the official is in the best 
position to call the play. 

The next step after "booing" is throwing 
eggs at the speaker, littering the playing 



floor with refuse or throwing bottles on the 
playing field. And following that comes acts 
of violence. Whether the scene be sports, 
conventions or meetings, there is a relation- 
ship between misbehavior and anarchy. 

It may be difficult to make youth under- 
stand that the example of their elders is not 
always commendable. But then perhaps 
youth may want to take a step forward in the 
area of social behavior. It might be worth a 
trial. 

—The P'athlete. 



Selected Sanitation Suggestions 

Editorial Note: \ complete list of suggestions for maintaining 
clean and healthy conditions in connection with the school 
athletic department would approach the size of a medical dic- 
tionary. From the many possibilities. Director Forsythe of 
-Michigan has compiled a practical list which ought to be 
helpful through display on the athletic department bulletin 
board. 

1. Insist on properly fitted equipment. It 
lessens the chance of infection by irritation 
from loose or tight apparel. 

2. Sterilize personal equipment prior to any 
interchange between players. 

3. Provide sanitary drinking facilities. Use 
individal half-pint pop or milk bottles or pa- 
per cups on the field and a fountain in the 
gymnasium. 

4. Always have a clean, well-stocked first- 
aid kit on hand. 

5. Keep personal equipment aired and dry 
between practice sessions. 

6. Be sure players are cooled off and have 
thoroughly dried themselves before leaving 
locker rooms. 

7. Inspect shoes regularly for nails and 
breaks that might cause infection. 

8. Inspect showers frequently and keep 
them adjusted so that the possibilities of 
scalding and hot-water burns are reduced to 
a minimum. 

9. Insist on the use of individual towels 
for each class or squad member. 

10. Provide or insist upon clean, dry towels 
every day. 

11. Permit no exchange between players of 
personal equipment without coach's permis- 
sion ; penalty to be dismissal from squad. 

12. Provide proper facilities in gymnasium 
for spitting. 

13. Insist on a warm shower being followed 
by a cold one. 

14. Keep players off wet grounds between 
halves of football or soccer games. 

15. Provide side line sweaters or jackets 
for substitutes on rainy, cold days and dur- 
ing outdoor night contests. 

16. Insist that injuries, no matter how 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1956 



slight, be reported immediately after they 
are received. 

18. Clean lockers, showers and toilets fre- 
quently and scientifically. 

19. Be sure that taping and bandaging 
are done correctly. 

20. Do not allow ill or injured players to 
participate in practice or games. 

21. Check weights of squad members fre- 
quently. 

22. Provide a separate towel for each team 
member for use at time-outs or between 
halves of contests. Hand it to him or provide 
a sanitary receptacle for it. Don't allow it to 
touch the ground or floor. 

23. Launder uniforms and sweat clothes 
frequently. 

24. Provide foot baths, antiseptic power, 
or other accepted treatment for the preven- 
tion of athlete's foot. 

25. Keep gymnasium floors scientifically 
clean. 

— C. E. Forsythe, Michigan. 



Nolo Contendere 



To save some readers a trip to the diction- 
ary, the heading above is a legal phrase 
whose loose interpretation might be, "I do 
not choose to fight," "I give up," "The heck 
with it!" and other possible expressions of 
abnegation or evasion. Occasional reports 
from officials and other observers lead us 
to believe that within some member schools, 
principals and athletic directors have entered 
pleas of nolo contendere against a rising tide 
of poor sportsmanship and bad manners. 
Booing, temper displays, near riots are ex- 
cused by statements to the effect that con- 
ditions are no worse than in other places 
and in previous years. As a result, nothing 
is done to improve a situation which con- 
tinues to deteriorate. Abuse is heaped on 
officials, visiting teams and fans, and some 
of the very purposes for which athletics were 
instituted are thwarted and defeated. 
Coaches often urge their players to fight for 
the glory and honor of the schcool but will 
themselves not raise a finger to fight in de- 
fense of the virtues athletics are supposed 
to teach. 

Perhaps this story is overdrawn but it 
illustrates the point. The story deals with a 
principal who was asked what he did about 
booing and bad manners at basketball games. 
His answer: "It bothers me so much that I 
often leave the gym and retire to my office 
where I can't hear it." Yet many school ath- 
letic authoiities are guilty of the same 



"head-in-the-sand" attitude; the same feel- 
ing of "don't look now; maybe it will go 
away." 

Poor sportsmanship at athletic contests 
does not cure itself. It takes doing. Student 
assemblies, enlistment of community sup- 
port, supervision, employment of capable of- 
ficials, are all a part of a long-term program 
of education. Without these efforts, and 
others, high school athletics will bring out 
the worst, instead of the best, from those 
who play and watch the games. 

— M. F. Sprunger. Illinois H.S.A. 



Brawl Versus Sport 

An undisciplined contest involving the 
physical prowess of individuals or groups 
of individuals would soon degenerate into a 
brawl or possibly a struggle for survival. 
Such a contest under the discipline of a sys- 
tem of rules governing conduct and actions 
of the participants becomes a game. In a 
game every rule can be observed to the let- 
ter, yet may not qualify as a sporting event. 
To elevate a game to the level of a sport 
there must be the added self-imposed dis- 
cipline of observing the high ideals of sports- 
manship. When you are out in front and the 
breaks have been going your way and victory 
seems assured, it is easy to display respect 
and a friendly spirit towards opponents. 
You will want to be generous and see that 
your opponent gets a fair and equal chance 
in every situation or you may even forego 
an advantage that is within the rules. The 
test as to whether you can discipline your- 
self comes when the breaks are going against 
you. you are behind and possibly an opponent 
has taken an unfair advantage of you or 
committed a personal foul against you. If 
you can take it and not retaliate or become 
resentful you have applied the discipline that 
elevates a contest into the realm of sport, 
and above all, your character has been en- 
nobled and strengthened. 

Self-discipline and self-administered cor- 
rection of an infraction of accepted sports- 
manlike practices are desirable. If an athlete 
fails in self-discipline and a game official 
finds it necessary to disqualify him, the 
school administrator should see that he is 
withheld from competition until after a con- 
ference provides assurance that the athlete 
fully understands his responsibility as a rep- 
resentative of his school and that he will 
abide by the rules and observe the ethics of 
competition. The administrator is obligated 
to send to his State Association office a full 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1956 



Page Nine 



report of the occurrence, including a state- 
ment of corrective measures which have been 
taken. 

If a low ebb in discipline in a school com- 
munity has permitted an act of violence 
against a game official by any fan, student, 
player or member of a school staff, further 
competition by the offending school should 
be delayed until full report has been made 
and acted upon by State Association author- 
ities. According to the bylaws of many State 
Associations, such act immediately and auto- 
matically places the school on probation pend- 
ing reinstatement by the proper authorities. 

The exercising of control over impulses 
and emotions is one of the first prerequisites 
of a sportsman and of a good school citizen. 

— Lee K. Anderson, Oklahoma U.S.A. A. 



Youth Day at U. K. 

By George I). Wheeler 

"Every student in our high school should 
hear this panel on sportsmanship," remarked 
a sponsor of cheerleaders from one of the 
high schools recently to a member of the 
staff of the State Y.M.C.A. His answer was, 
"It can be done." 

Last year in one of our high schools in 
which there was a strong home room athletic 
program in which sportsmanship was not too 
good, the cheerleaders of the high school de- 
cided to do something about sportsmanship 
in the school. Taking a day, the school cheer- 
leaders used the morning session in present- 
ing the panel program they had heard at the 
University of Kentucky to the home room 
cheerleaders. In the afternoon the home room 
cheerleaders repeated the program in each 
home room. It is reported that there has 
been an improvement in sportsmanship in 
the entire school. 

This experience suggested that sportsman- 
ship could be emphasized in every school if 
the cheerleaders of the school would hold a 
"Sportsmanship" Assembly in the high 
school shortly after they returned from the 
Clinic. When the program was talked over 
with a number of principals and cheerleader 
sponsors, it received instant and wholeheart- 
ed approval. A number of schools have indi- 
cated they plan to hold such assemblies. We 
would like to suggest the following procedure 
in planning for such an assembly: The cheer- 
leader sponsor should assign each of her 
cheerleaders to take notes on one of the 
speakers at the clinic so that when they re- 



turn to their school they can repeat the pro- 
gram at the assembly. 

From visits to the high schools of Central 
and Eastern Kentucky, it looks like the larg- 
est attendance at this year's clinic that we 
have ever had since the clinics started six 
years ago. The success of these clinics is due 
to the wonderful cooperation of University 
officials, school officials, the Kentucky High 
School Athletic Association, and the many 
men and women who have given their serv- 
ices in making the clinics successes. The 
newspapers have been exceptionally generous 
in giving us publicity. The State Y.M.C.A. 
is very appreciative of this fine cooperation. 

The Youth Day and Cheerleaders Clinic, 
scheduled to be held in Lexington on Novem- 
ber 17, will have the following programs for 
cheerleaders, majorettes, and other students: 
Cheerleaders 

8:00-10:00, Registration at Coliseum 

10:00-11:00, Cheerleaders Clinic at Alumni 
Gym ("Building Better Sportsmanship" 
Panel — Mrs. Arthur Adams, Mrs. Woodrow 
Crum, Mr. Robert Hardy. Miss Pat Carter, 
Mrs. Jane McCoy) 

11:00, Practice Session led by U of K 
Cheerleaders 

11:45, Free Period for Lunch 

12:45, Parade Formation 

2:00, U.K. vs. Xavier 

Majorettes 

8:00-10:00, Registration at Coliseum 

10:00, Meeting of all Majorettes at Guignol 
Theatre, Fine Arts Building 

1 1 :30, Free Period for Lunch 

12:45. All Majorettes will meet with Band 
and Cheerleaders in Driveway off Rose Street 
to parade into stadium 

2:00. U.K. vs. Xavier 

Other Students 

8:00-10:00, Registration at Coliseum 

10:00, Gala Program Presented by the 
University of Kentucky at Coliseum 

11:00, Tour of Campus, Directed by Stu- 
dent Y.M.C.A. 

11:30, Free Period for Lunch 

2:00 U.K. vs. Xavier 



Book Review 

State Director Charles E. Forsythe of the 
Michigan High School Athletic Association 
is the author of "The Athletic Director's 
Handbook," which came from the Prentice- 
Hall press not many months ago. Director 
Mark N. Funk of the Pennsylvania Inter- 
scholastic Athletic Association reviewed the 
book at the 1956 Annual Meeting of the Na- 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1956 



tional Federation. Among many complimen- 
tary remarks made by Mr. Funk concerning 
the new book, were the following: 

"If you have read or scanned Charles 
Forsythe's 'The Athletic Director's Hand- 
book,' you will now be penalized by being 
compelled to listen to things you know al- 
ready. Those who wish to look at the scenery 
may be excused. 

"I have nothing but commendatory re- 
marks to make about this new publication. 
One of the weaknesses in courses in schools 
of education, from my point of view, is their 
lack of content regarding techniques. There 
is plenty of philosophy and perhaps of the 
science of education but little of the art and 
practice of education. The normal school 
administrator does not have the time to 
study techniques by methods of research. 
What he needs is the practice an intern re- 
ceives in the field of medicine. 

"This book will help to fill in this void, at 
least in the field of interscholastic athletics. 
It should be a time-saver for the busy ad- 
ministrator. If I were to suggest one im- 
provement, it would be concerning the title. 
I would call it a Handbook for the Adminis- 
tration of High School Athletics, for it is 
more than an Athletic Director's Handbook. 
Perhaps my school experience is different 
from others, but as Principal I had the re- 
sponsibility for organization ; the athletic- 
director, the responsibility of executing the 
organization. Therefore, this book would 
have been very helpful to me. 

"I think one of the commendable features 
of the book is that it does not set up one 
plan as best. It shows practices in high 
schools with good athletic programs. Since 
almost all localities have different problems, 
they will be able to select one for themselves 
or devise a new one to fit local needs, and it 
can be done without taking a lot of time to 
investigate, either personally or through 
questionnaires, how others are doing a job. 

"The book is very comprehensive. I 
checked it with several school men in this 
manner. I asked them to think of any athletic- 
subject and then I checked to see if I could 
fincl it. All that was suggested, I could find. 
Perhaps all questions about a subject are not 
answered, but that would require an encyclo- 
pedia. But the book does indicate where the 
answers can be found. 

"The book is organized alphabetically by 
subject, which makes it a quick reference 
text. The cross reference system used is ex- 
cellent. 

"There are about 350 forms and directives 



illustrated. As I stated before, these will save 
a busy administrator a great amount of time 
for he will not have to spend a lot of time 
investigating procedures of other schools. It 
would be foolish for me to try to review the 
200 or more topics listed. You will want to 
do this yourself, if you have not already done 
so. 

"Mr. Forsythe has made, in my opinion, 
a very fine contribution to the literature on 
the administration of high school athletics. 
I would recommend it not only for the ath- 
letic director, faculty manager or coach but 
most of all for the professional library of the 
Principal and Superintendent." 



THOROUGH PHYSICAL EXAMS 

(Continued from Inside Front Cover) 

year the number of newly reported cases of 
tuberculosis was reduced fourteen per cent. 

Much of Kentucky's recent success against 
tuberculosis can be attributed to good case 
finding by private physicians, hospitals and 
health departments, and to modern methods 
of treatment. Last year 2,193 Kentuckians 
found out for the first time that they had 
active tuberculosis. Many of these people 
are now being treated in the State and Coun- 
ty tuberculosis hospitals that have facilities 
for approximately 1,600 patients. 

Although tuberculosis is gradually becom- 
ing a disease of older age groups, a critical 
period for its development is in the late 
"teens." This presents high school adminis- 
trators and coaches with an important re- 
sponsibility. Searching for those students 
who may be sick and securing the necessary 
treatment for them, as well as protecting 
those who are well, is a responsibility to be 
shared by many. Parents, private physicians, 
health departments, voluntary health 
agencies, school administrators and coaches 
all have an important role to play, for tuber- 
culosis and other infectious diseases are com- 
munity problems. 

It is currently estamated that there are 
5,000 people in Kentucky who have tubercu- 
losis but do not know it. So long as the di- 
sease of one of these people goes undetected, 
others are in danger of being exposed. Surely 
it's worth the time and effort necessary to 
provide examinations for the students in 
vour school and the people of vour commun- 
ity. 

Charlie, the young man we described in 
the introduction, has two brothers in Ken- 
tucky high schools this fall. The health pro- 
tection offered by your school could assure 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1956 



Page Eleven 



them, and others like them, that eleven 
months of their young lives will not be spent 
in a tuberculosis hospital. 



BASKETBALL QUESTIONS 

(Continued from Page One) 
Ruling:: The violation in (a) causes ball 
to become dead. Hence, in (a) and (b), it is 
not a legal tap of a live ball. Official should 
immediately raise his hand above his head 
to instruct Timer to keep the clock stopped. 
In (c) and (d). it is a legal tap and the cluck 
starts with such tap. Following a toss, it is 
not essential that the Official signal time-in 
but it is essential that he signal that the 
clock remain stopped or be stopped if erron- 
eously started when the toss is defective or 
the tap is not in accordance with the rules. 

8. Play: As the 4th quarter ends, the score 
is: (a) tied: or (b) A 31— B 30. Al commits 
a foul before the ball becomes dead or clearly 
after the ball becomes dead. 

Failing: If the foul occurs before the ball 
becomes dead, the free throw is attempted 
as a part of the 4th period. This applies in 
either (a) or (b). If the foul is clearly after 
the ball has become dead, an extra period is 
played in (a) and this extra period begins 
with the throwing of the free throw or 
throws. But in (b). the score is not tied at 
the time the ball becomes dead and there is 
no reason for playing the extra period unless 
the free throw or throws result in a tie 
score. Consequently, in (b), the free throw 
or throws are attempted as a part of the 4th 
period and unless the free throw or throws 
result in a tie score, no extra period is played. 

9. Play : After a first extra period has end- 
ed in a tie score, a flagrant foul is committed 
by Al. If both throws are successful, is an 
extra period played and is the game ended 
when the second point is scored ? 

Ruling: Yes to both questions. The second 
extra period begins with the throwing of the 
free throws. If both are successful, two points 
have been scored by Team B after the end- 
ing of the first extra period. The second 
extra period and the game are ended as soon 
as the second point is scored. 

10. Play : If a game develops into an action- 
less contest, may the Official choose to in- 
voke a time limit on continuous control in 
the front court? 

Ruling: The rules do not give him this 
authority unless it is a case where the player 
in control is closely guarded. However, the 
National Rules Committee urges state-wide 
groups or conference-wide groups to experi- 



ment by authorizing Officials in the given 
situation to announce to both teams that for 
the remainder of the period, a 15-second 
time limit on continuous control in the front 
court will be in effect. While such time limit 
is in effect, an Official is authorized to esti- 
mate the first 5 seconds and to count the re- 
maining 10 seconds in the same way he 
counts in administering the 10-second rule 
for advancing the ball from the back court. 

11. Play: What is the status of the wide 
free throw lane and the fan-shaped back- 
board for high school courts? 

Ruling: For high school, junior high school 
and Y.M.C.A. courts, the narrow lane is 
designated for the season of 1956-57. For the 
current season, state-wide groups have been 
authorized to make the transition immediate- 
ly. Unless the state-wide group has an- 
nounced such adoption, the narrow lane will 
be used. On courts which are being newly 
surfaced and marked, it is recommended 
that the permanent markings lie with the 
wide lane and that tape or other temporary 
marking be used to indicate the narrow lane. 
The rules do not prohibit the use of a solid 
color for the restricted part of the lane or 
for the center circle. If a solid color is used, 
it is not necessary to mark the 2-inch lane 
lines. The half-circle in the free throw lane 
and the diameter of the center circle should 
be clearly shown. 

At latest report, the wide lane will he 
used this season in: Arkansas, Arizona. 
Georgia, Kansas, Massachusetts, New Hamp- 
shire, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, 
Utah, Washington and one or two sections 
in New York. The remaining 36 states will 
use the narrow lane unless adoption without 
a report has been made. 

For all groups except the college group, 
the fan-shaped backboard is official. Such 
backboard is prescribed for all high school 
or Y.M.C.A. courts when new equipment is 
being installed. For the A.A.U. group, either 
the large backboard or the small backboard 
is authorized. For the college group, trans- 
parent large backboards are prescribed. 

12. Play: While the Official is getting 
ready to start a period with a center jump, 
a foul or violation occurs before the ball is 
tossed. What is the proper procedure? 

Ruling: There is no violation which can 
occur under such circumstances. Any infrac- 
tion of the jumping rules would occur after 
the ball has become alive by having left the 
Official's hand. Any foul which occurs at 
the indicated time would be a technical foul. 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1956 



Under such circumstances, the ball becomes 
alive and the period begins when the ball is 
placed at the disposal of the free thrower. 
The free throw for technical foul is followed 
by a throw-in at mid-court. 

13. Play: Free throw by Al is in flight 
toward the basket when Bl jumps above the 
lane to tap the ball. After his tapping of 
the ball: (a) it goes out of bounds; or (b) 
falls in the basket. Is this a violation for the 
ball going out of bounds or a violation for 
touching a free throw in flight? Also, does 
the free throw in (b) count? 

Ruling: It is not a violation for either of 
the listed reasons. It is a violation for Bl 
having a foot above the lane too soon. The 
ball becomes dead as soon as the free throw 
ends, i.e., when touched by any player. This 
is before the ball has gone out of bounds in 
(a) and before it goes in the basket in (b). 
The free throw is not successful. In either 
case a substitute free throw is awarded. 

14. Play: While Al is rebounding he bats 
the ball into his basket. Bl pushes: (a) be- 
fore the batted ball is in flight; or (b) after 
ball is in flight. Is this a try for field goal? 
Is the action of Al a form of continuing mo- 
tion ? Does goal count ? 

Ruling: It is neither a try nor continuing 
motion. The foul by B causes ball to become 
dead immediately, hence, it is not a field 
goal. In certain rebounding activity, a player 
may have the ball balanced on his hand and 
then throw with a flip of the wrist. Such a 
movement may be termed a throw rather 
than a bat. 

15. Play: Is there any circumstance under 
which a throw-in might be made from the 
free throw lane extended? 

Ruling: No. The prohibition applies at 
either end of the court and after a success- 
ful goal as well as after any other out of 
bounds ball. After a successful goal, a player 
might run through or pass the ball through 
the free throw lane extended. 

16. Play: During free throw by Al, A2 
occupies one of the number one alleys or 
one of these alleys is not occupied by any 
plaver. Is this a violation? 

Ruling: No. It is the responsibility of the 
Official to have these two alleys occupied by 
opponents of the free thrower. He should 
not permit the throw to be made until these 
two alleys are properly occupied. If he fails 
to observe this, no penalty is enforced. 

17. Play: Free thrower Al chooses to at- 
tempt his free throw from a position several 
feet behind the free throw line. The throw 



is attempted from: (a) inside the free throw 
circle; or (b) outside of such circle. 

Ruling: In (a), it is a legal free throw. In 
(b), the throw is not in accordance with the 
conditions in Rule 4-8. No penalty is pre- 
scribed for this specific act but it would be 
almost impossible to have such a throw fol- 
lowed by a subsequent legal attempt without 
having the free thrower violate the 10-second 
time limit as prescribed in 9-1- (a). If the 
Official discovers the intent before the throw 
is in flight, he should kill the ball immediate- 
ly and order the free thrower into the circle 
with the 10-second count continuing. If he 
does not stop the action until after the ball 
is in flight, he should penalize for violation 
of the 10-second time limit. 

18. Play: What is the reason for the re- 
vised wording in the last paragraph of Rule 
5-7 concerning tie games? 

Ruling: The onlv purpose is to provide 
more specific coverage. No change in pro- 
cedure is intended. There are a great many 
factors which might affect the procedure. 
It is almost impossible to cover all of these 
without having someone claim that the mean- 
ing is not clear. The present wording may be 
an improvement over last year's wording. 
Opinions will differ. 



MEASURE OF MAN 

The man's no bigger than the way 
He treats his fellow man ! 
This standard has his measure been 
Since time itself began. 

He's measured not by race or creed, 
High-sounding though they be; 
Nor by the gold that's put aside; 
Nor by his sanctity. 

He's measured not by social rank. 
When character's the test; 
Nor by his earthly pomp or show, 
Displaying wealth possessed. 

He's measured by his justice, right; 
His fairness at his play, 
His squareness in all dealings made ; 
His honest upright way. 

These are his measures ever near 
To serve him when they can ; 
For man's no bigger than the way 
He treats his fellow man ! 

— Rotary Bulletin 



Wp Ship The DaV Vou BuY' 

hunt's athletic goods co 

I N C D R P D R AT E D 

PHONE 103 OR 104 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 



Award Sweaters and Jackets 

We have award sweaters made especially to our own exclusive patterns 
by HAND KNIT. IMPERIAL, STADIUM and, of course O'SHEA. 

We have jackets made for us especially by BUTWIN and POWERS ; also 
made to our special order, reversible, all styles and fabrics. 

We know of no better values anywhere. 

We can furnish you with athletic award letters in chenille to your order 
of the very highest quality and at reasonable prices. 

Remember that each and every order for any type of merchandise, 
whether special-made or out of stock, gets the personal attention of every 
person in our store. 

If you would like to see our salesman for either football or basketball 
supplies, call us at 103 or 104 Mayfield. 

ROY BOYD, HERBIE HUNT. JIM MITCHELL. BILL HUNT or C. A. 
BYRN, JR. are always in our store, ready to assist you in every way 
possible. 

If you want the BEST QUALITY and the BEST SERVICE, contact 
HUNT'S. 



Hunfs Athletic Goods Co. 

PHONE 103 OK 104 
MAYFIELD. KENTUCKY 



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St. Xavier 35 — ' 



St. X , 



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MADISON-MODEL— CENTRAL KENTUCKY CONFERENCE CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Humble. Dunn, Noland, Parks, Wilcox, Rucker, Adams, Roberts, Long", Blount. 
Second Row : Mgr. Figart, Cosby. Elam, Abner. Walker, Bottoms. Harkleioad, Hughes. Aldridge. Chambers, Tay- 
lor, Mgr. Strong. Third Row : Ass't Coach Blankenship, Smith. Azbill, Isbell, Curry, Greene, Crump, Moberly, 
Mgr. Hancock, Head Coach Kidd. 

CATLETTSBURG— NORTHEASTERN KENTUCKY CONFERENCE CHAMPION 




f 



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-i m L ml % • 
* f f f, *fi * 
&k p 'ps !i jgj^i !|0 








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(Left to Right) Front Row: Coach Snyder, Brewer, Lee, D. Rice, Sloan, T. Stewart, Griffith. J. Stewart, 
Scott, Deskins, Wynne. Second Row: B. Stewart, Brown, Crank, McWain, Robinson, Strait, Home, Bernard, Elliott, 
Edison, T. Butler. Third Row: Alley, Chaffin, Jordan, Crider, J. Rice, J. Butler, Johnson, Braham, May, Howell, 
Nunley, Ferguson. 

NEWPORT— NORTHERN KENTUCKY CONFERENCE CHAMPION 









/-♦ A ^ **> 




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--A^fn 







(Left to Right) Front Row: Whitaker. Shields, Pruitt, Quigley, Sprinkle, B. Morris, Miller, Knapp, Walters, Gib- 
son, Cooper, Mgr. Ackesson. Second Row : Mgr. Curtis, Murphy, Strunk, Bird, J. Jones, M. Stull, Lee, Simpson, 
Pitman, IS. Stull, Schoo, Feldkamp, Peltry, Axt. Mgr. Eb ers. Third Row: Coach Harmon, Coach Miller, Gross, 
Scharstein, E. Morris. Downard, Points, Holzschuh, -I. Turner, Deaton, C. Turner, Rush, Slack, Pabst, Coach Bur- 
ton, Coach Riley. Fourth Row: Wallace, B. Jones, BlauL, W. Harden. Hamilton, Ratliff, Schneider, L. Harden, 
Combs, Hatfield, Williams, Hightchew. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Officio] Organ of the 

Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XIX— No. 



DECEMBER, 1956 



$1.00 Per Year 



Early Season Basketball Questions — Installment 2 

Editor;, Note: These rulings do not set aside or modify an) COlTieS ali\e and the period IjegillS whell the 
rule. Thev are interpretations on some of the earlv season in- i i t • e> >i 

situations which have been presented. ball is placed at the disposal oi a tree thrower. 

22. Play: Clearly after ball has become 
dead to end a period, there is a technical 
foul. When is the free throw attempted if 
this occurs: (a) after the first quarter, or 
(b) after the second quarter: or (c) after 
the fourth quarter? 

Ruling: For (a) and (b), the free throw or 
throws are attempted at the start of the sub- 
sequent quarter, even though in (b), this is 
alter a long intermission. In (c), the free 
throw or throws are also attempted at the 
beginning of the subsequent extra period, 
unless the foul occurs in the dead ball period 
following the end of a game which does not 
have a tied score. In that case, an extra 
period is not always necessary and the free 
throw or throws must be attempted as a part 
of the preceding period. 

23. Play. During throw-in from the end of 
the court, thrower-in Al stands outside the 
free throw lane extended but in making the 
throw-in, the ball is held above the restricted 
area or passes through it on its way to the 
court. Is this an illegal throw-in? 

Ruling: No. The position of the feet of the 
thrower-in should be the determining factor. 
If neither foot is above the restricted area 
before the ball is in flight, it should be con- 
sidered legal. 

24. Play: Thrower-in Al carries the ball 
through the plane of the boundary line or 
the throw-in is from the free throw lane ex- 
tended. During the action, Bl or A2 runs 
into an opponent. Is this a personal foul? 

Ruling: Under ordinary circumstances, 
contact which is neither intentional nor flag- 
rant is ignored if it occurs during dead ball. 
In the case cited, the exception to the dead 
ball foul rule as outlined in the note under 
10-4 makes such contact a personal foul. En- 
forcement of the penalty for such foul nulli- 
fies the penalty for the violation. 

25. Play: Timer inadvertently or erron- 
eously stops the clock. During the time the 
clock' is not running, a foul is committed or 
a field goal is scored. Should these be ignor- 

(Continued on Page Twelve) 



19. Play: The rules state that each jumper 
shall have both feet on or inside his half of 
the jumping circle. If a jumper has his toes 
on the circle and the rest of his feet outside 
the circle, is this a legal position ? 

Ruling: Yes. The jumping circle is the only 
circle on the court for which diameter mea- 
surement is to the inside of the marking 
arc. The reason for this is that player's feet 
are sometimes so large that a 2- foot semi- 
circle (minus the width of the dividing line) 
does not permit freedom of action during a 
jump. The arc which marks the circle is con- 
sidered a part of the area where the feet may 
be placed. Actually, the jumping circle has 
a radius of two feet and two inches. In Rule 
6-4, the statement is intended to apply to the 
marking arc. If a player has some part of 
his feet touching this marking arc, he is in 
legal jumping position. However, if he has 
only the tips of his toes on the marking arc. 
the Official should be alert for any action 
which might result in the jumper charging 
into his opponent during the jump. 

20. Plav: During a free throw both of the 
number 1 alleys are occupied bv opponents 
of the free thrower and both of the number 
2 alleys are occupied by teammates. Are on- 
ponents of the free thrower entitled to only 
one or to both of the number 3 positions? 

Ruling: To both. But if the team entitled 
to any 2nd or 3rd position does not desire to 
occupy it, an opponent may take it. 

21. Play: When does a period begin? 
Ruling: While Rule 5-6 is specific about 

when a period ends, there is no definite state- 
ment as to when a period beeins. A period 
mieht be considered as besrinning when the 
clock starts but this would lead to several 
difficulties in situations which involve acti- 
vity before the clock starts. A better solution 
is to consider the period as beginning when 
the ball becomes alive. Usually this is when 
it leaves the Official's hand on a toss for a 
jump. However, in a few cases the ball be- 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1956 



DECEMBER, 1956 VOL. XIX— NO. 5 

Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association. 

Office of Publication. Lexington. Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Russell Williamson (1956-60), Inez 

Vice-President Louis Litchfield (1953-57), Marion 

Directors— W. B. Jones (1953-57) Somerset; W. H. Crowdus 
(1954-581. Franklin; Jack Dawson (1954-oSl, Middletown ; 
Robert P. Forsythe (1955-59), Greenville; K. G. Gillaspie 
(1955-591, Georgetown; Cecil A. Thornton (1956-60), Harlan. 
Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 

~£rom the Commissionet s (Jffice 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1. 1956 Football Participation List 

2. School's Report on Football Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Football) 



State Tournament Information 

The 19-57 State High School Basketball 
Tournament will be held at the Kentucky 
Fair and Exposition Center Coliseum, Louis- 
ville, on March 13-16. The first session is 
scheduled for Wednesday night. Three ses- 
sions will be held on Thursday, two on Fri- 
day, and two on Saturday. 

At some time in the month of December 
the Commissioner will send K.H.S.A.A. mem- 
ber schools forms which may be used in re- 
questing passes to the tournament. These 
forms may be returned on and after Janu- 
ary 3. 

Complete sets of tickets are priced at 
$8.00 (end seats, bleachers), $12.00 (chairs 
and chair backs), and $16.00 (box seats). 
The general sale of tickets (not school or- 
ders) will be conducted by the State Tourna- 
ment Ticket Sales. P. O. Box 1173, Lexing- 
ton. These orders should not be placed be- 
fore January 15. The amount of 35c should 
be added to each remittance to pay for post- 
age and insurance charges. Orders mailed 
prior to January 15 will receive a lower 
priority than those mailed on that date. 
Delegate Assembly Members 

Members to the Delegate Assembly at the 
forthcoming 1957 annual meeting of the 
Association were elected by the principals 
of K.H.S.A.A. member schools on ballots re- 
turned to the State Office before November 
15. There were several ties in the voting for 
delegate and alternate. These ties were 
broken recently by the Board of Control, the 
delegates or alternates involved being deter- 
mined by lot. The names of the district rep- 
resentatives are as follows: 



Delegates 

(1) R. L. Petrie, (2) Ralph McRight, (3) 
Howard V. Reid, (4) Preston Holland. (5) 
Ercel Little, (6) Mervil Phelps, (7) Vincent 
Zachem, (8) Billy Brannock, (9) Wendell 
Johnson, (10) Thomas Brantley, (11) J. Lee 
Robertson, (12) Lawrence McGinnis, (13) 
Edwin J. Mayes, (14) Bowman Davenport, 
(15) Charles S. Combs, (16) Charles Eades, 
(17) Andrew Renick, (18) B. H. Weaver, 
(19) George Sadler, (20) Cortez Butler, (21) 
Paul Coop, (22) W. B. Borden, (23) James T. 
Alton, (24) Charles Kolasa, (25) W. S. Mil- 
burn, (26) John W. Trapp, (29) Arthur 
Moody., (30) Harding Lowrv, (31) D. W. 
Quails, (32) John M. Potter, (33) Chester 
Goodridge, (34) Tom Ellis, (35) James L. 
Cobb, (36) Rev. John V. Hegenauer, (37) 
Joe H. Anderson, (38) Jarvis Parsley, (39) 
Woodrow Crum, (40) R. E. Davis, (41) Ray 
Butler, (42) A. L. Berrv, (43) John Heber, 
(44) Roy N. Walters, (45) Earl Shaw, (46) 
Denzil J. Ramsey, (47) Edward B. Webb, 
(48) Clark E. Chesnut. (49) Jack Powell, 

(50) R. H. Plavforth, (51) W. M. Slusher, 

(52) Charles Hunter, (53) Rav Russell, (54) 
Joe Gill, (55) Claude Frady, (56) Mrs. Henry 
A. Stovall, (57) Johnnv Benedict. (58) John 
D. Campbell, (59) Paul Butcher, (60) How- 
ard C. Yates, (61) Dawson Orman, (62) 
Julian Rees Cunningham, (63) Hayden C. 
Parker, (64) Marvin Meridith. 

Alternates 

(1) O. J. Allen, (2) John Robinson, (3) 
McCoy Tarry, (4) W. B. Moser, (5) Denzil 
Mefford, (6) Charles Quisenberry, (7) Or- 
lando Wvman, (8) Edward P. Hickey, (9) 
Bill Bird well, (10) Russell R. Below, (11) 
Delbert Settle, (12) Harold Mischel, (13) D. 
T. Starks, (14) Robert Burres, (15) William 
T. Leach, (16) Bill Stokes, (17) Elvis Don- 
aldson, (18) Harold Hunter, (19) T. C. Sim- 
mons, (20) John C. Marrs, (21) John Burr, 
(22) T. Y. Tabor, (23) Paul Ford Davis, (24) 
J. H. Harvev, (25) H. D. Glenn, (26) J. C. 
Cantrell, (29) Glenn B. Smith, (30) Herbert 
Garner, (31) D. P. Parsley, (32) Palmore 
Lyles, (33) James S. Smith, (34) Bill Shan- 
non, (35) Stan Arnzen, (36) Thomas L. Gab- 
bard, (37) Kellev B. Stanfield, (38) Richard 
Gulick, (39) Gayle Bowen, (40) William Nut- 
ter, (41) Claude Logan, (42) Donald Brad- 
shaw, (43) Bob Abney, (44) Joe Ohr, (45) 
Jim Farlev, (46) Jack L. Laswell, (47) Ray- 
mond Combs, (48) C. Frank Bentley, (49) 
Bruce Morris, (50) Clinton B. Hammons, 

(51) Willie Hendrickson, (52) Joe Gilly, 

(53) Jason Holbrook, (54) Kenneth Wilson, 
(55) Joe S. Caudill, (56) H. G. Pennycuff, 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1956 



Page Three 



(57) W. F. Doane. (58) Jack F. Wells, (59) 
Oran C. Teater, (60) Willis H. Conley, (61) 
Phillip Owen, (62) Len Stiner, (63) Max E. 
Calhoun, (64) Bob Lavoy. 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
MEMBER SCHOOLS OF THE K.H.S.A.A. 



Coving-ton Catholic 

(Park Hills) 
Louisville Catholic 
Pleasant View 



Riverside Christian 
(Lost Creei I 

St. Mary's Acad. 
(Paducah) 

Western 

(Owensboro) 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled December 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 
Adkins. Alec K.. P. O. Box 184, Pikeville. 432 (Bus. No.) 
Akridge. Dean. Fredonia, 1531, Marion 497 

Allen. Henry L.. ;U4 North Hill. Morristown, Tenn., 2179. 2109 
Bach. Bert C, Eastern Kentucky Stat.- College, Richmond 
Ballard. .lack H.. 128 Pine Street, Barbourville, 153, 472 
Bandy. Jack. Box S. Harlan, 1386-J 
Beasley, Harvey L.. R. F. D. 4. Kevil. Hobait 26483 
Bell. Clarence. 1228 South 41st.. Louisville. SP 87792 
Blankenbaker. Kenneth H.. 1303 Mill Lane. New Albany, Ind., 

46134, 47711. Ext. 37 I 
Boehm. Robert R.. 1411 Central. Ashland, 5242.".. 16641 
Bolen. Edmon. Box 209. Loyall, 568J 
Boswell. Albert R.. Wickliffe 

Buchanan. Ned. 236 Albany Ave.. Paducah. 31871, 55491 
Burnett. Gerald. 624 Stewart St., Elizabethtown. '.'"19, 9230 
Calhoun. Foster "Tubby", Hindman, 2410 I Bus. No.) 
Carter. James A.. R. F. D. 2. Carlisle. 25M. 1 
Caswell. Johnny W.. 317 North Mantle. Elizabethtown, 4522, 

Ft. Knox 4527 
Chadwell, Lester. Box 25:!. Loyall, 1075, "77 
Clark, Owen B.. Route 3. Georgetown, 946M 
Clark, Tom, 430 Spalding Ave.. Lebanon. 29B 
Coe, James B., Burkesville, 11211 

Coleman. L. J. "Duke". Ill Arcadia Park. Lexington. 51400 
Correll, Eugene, 273 Vets Village. Richmond 
Crace. James. 3354 Court Street, Catlettsburg. 21S 
Curtis, James E.. Rockport. Beaver Dam 4424 (Bus. No.) 
Dale, Pat, 700-A College Street, Georgetown 
Dauni, Charles A.. 620 1 -, North Fourth Ave., Evansville, Ind., 

HA 44933. HA 228805 
Davenport. Robert B-, Shakertown Road. Burgin 5204, Harrods- 

burg 511 or 95 
Denney. Billy L.. 2600 Nolte St.. Ashland. EA 18464 
Devers. Marvin. 209 Kentucky Ave.. Lexington. 52102. 22418 
Dixie. Cornelius. 621 South Preston. Louisville, JU 77680 
Downing. Dero. Smallhouse Road. Bowling Green. 5368, 8571 
Ferguson. Ford, College Street. Paintsville. 274 
Foster. Joseph \\\, s21 Carneal Road. Lexington. 48058. 33335 
Franklin. Robert. West Depot. Marion 
Erasure, Lois Eugene, M. S. C, Box 337, Morehead 
Fuson. Shelvie, 312 Englewood Road. Middlesboro, 1541. 263 
Garrett, Edison. Whitesburg. 2618, 2719 
Giles. Jonathan W.. 34U4 Greenwood Avenue, Louisville. 

SP 81976. JU 461S3 
Golding. Rodman Dean. Clarksville Base. Box S. Ft. Campbell, 

Clarksville Base 236-349. Clarksville Base 236-348-233 
Goranflo, R. E.. 133 Bonner, Louisville. TWS 28(15. ANCH 912 
Grace. Joe D., 2700 Holt Lane. Hopkinsville. 58445. 53626 
Greenslait. James W.. Brown St.. Raceland 

Hagedorn. Thomas. 57 Custis. Ft. Thomas. Hi 14218, CH 1476s 
Hammond, William, 15 Walnut Street. Berea. 104W. 820 
Harp, Gene Wallace, R. F. D. 2. Cynthiana. Sunrise 520 
Haves, Charles R.. 401 East 21st Street. Owensboro. MU 30114, 

MO 42301 
Hildreth, David P., 4633 Southcrest Drive. Louisville, George- 
town 1218 



Hobbs, Ralph E.. 1413 St. Mary's Avenue. Owensboro. MU 32136 

Hoffman, Lewis, 611 First Street. Georgetown. 568W 

Holden. Frye H.. 1425 West 11th Street, Owensboro. MU 12660. 

MU 34561 
Holzktu-cht. li.-mt . 2:>il2 Miles Road. Louisville. GL 85661 
H,.,.ks. Floyd L., 800 East 20th St., Owensboro, MU 34146, 

MU 33112 
Howard. H. H, Kingswood School, Bean Station. Tenn.. 

Rutledge 2759 
Keffer. Dick. 1485 Squires, Louisville. EM S4618 
King. James E.. R. R. 2. Vine Grove, Ft. Knox 2182 (Bus No.) 
Larson. Robert A.. 309 Walnut St.. Springfield. 4117. 3601 
Lequire. Harold Monroe, Box 484. Harlan 
Lyon, Manual R.. 340 Holly Hill Drive. Lexington. 51661, 

12331 
Lyons. Charles, Sharpsburg, 3457 

McBride, Donald, 29S American Ave., Lexington, 52153 
McCord. Coleman, 1476 Meadowthorpe, Lexington. 49327, 

42SSO 
McDowell. Glen D.. 501 6th Street. Pikeville, 252 
Marks. Howard R., Jr.. 2425 South York St., Owensboro, 

MU 30543 
Martin, Charlie. Box 53. Sharpsburg 
Meeks, Jack F.. 4U7 5th Street, Corbin. 415, 561 
Merrick. Robert A., 155-F Wherry Apartments, Ft. Campbell, 

GE 94576. Ft. Campbell 2289 
Merritt. Boh. Evarts, 1262 

Miller, Bob, 530 Berry Avenue. Bellevue. CO 15655, CO 12860 
Mill,,. John D., Clarksville. Tenn.. MI 55525 (Bus. No.) 
Miller. Victor Leon. West Irvine. 26SR, 357 
Morse, Clarence 1.., 152:, Ferrell St.. Hopkinsville. TU 61S51, 

Ft. Cam], hell 3320 
Moser, Rudy. R. F. D. 2. Sebree 

Newcomb, Kenneth, 2821 Greenwood Ave.. Louisville, SP 67002 
O'Nan, Norman. Route 3, Henderson, 79912, 73455 
Pate, Roy E., Campbellsville College, Campbellsville. 3121 
Pence, Clyde, Cordia 

Petty, John l-\. U. F. D. 1, Gracey, AD 55063 
Pierce, Ray O., 917 Oak Hill Road. Evansville. Ind., HA 30454. 

HA 47741. Ext. 552 
Powell, Logan, 1031 Oak Hill. Lexington 
Powers, Hazel Allen, Curdsville, West Louisville AC 92016. 

AC 93595 
Quigg, Ben Franklin. IV. Box 276. Livermore. BR 82247 
Reeser, Gene. 1103 Main Street. West Point. West Point 2240. 

Ft. Knox 6411 
Ross, Billy F... Cumberland College. Williamsburg. 6259, 4391 
Schellhase, David. 1630 Wedeking, Evansville, Ind.. HA 59790 
Schwitz, Joe. 1119 Sweetser Ave., Evansvile, Ind. 
Scott, Emmanuel. 706 West 8th Street. Cincinnati, Ohio, 

DU 1646S 
Shiv.lv. Howard. Jr.. R. F. D, 2. Vine Grove. 192M 
Smith, Charles Donald. 102 Fast Oak St.. Somerset. 6S9R 
Smith. Eurie Hayes. III. 3730 Taylorsville Rd., Louisville, 

GL 40374 
Smith. Wayne N.. 210 East 13th St., Apt. 7, Bowling Green 
Snetz. James Morris. Morehead State College. Box 152. More- 
head, 9104 
South. William F. 180 Versailles Road. Frankfort, 46565. 33447 
Spaulding, Stanley H. Ill North St.. Waverly, Ohio. 51100 
Straight, Roy. 1701 Jackson Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Summers. James F., Box 2. Lynch. VI 82891 
Thomas. Bill L.. R. F. D. 4. Elizabethtown, 9511. Ft. Knox 

2193. Ext. 301 
Thurman, Robert. 204 Alpha Ave.. Buechel, JU 37644 (Bus. No.) 
Tolle. Charles W-, 108 Third St.. Cynthiana. 1017 M. 1452 
Towles, Gayle, 1005 Patricia Lane. Lexington, 3126S 
Vineyard. Chalmer E.. 401 South Main Street. Somerset. 1 124 
Wagoner. Elton Wayne, 1107 East Seventh St., Hopkinsville, 

TU 62533 (Bus. No.) 
Want-hie. Nick. 311 Pepper Drive. Lexington. 31838. 32880. 

Ext. 322 
Ward. Bobby G.. Box 676 Southern Baptist Seminary, Louisville 
Weber, John. 4829 Kollman. Covington. AX 15199 
Whe.ll.ee, Mel, 1301 South 32nd St.. Louisville, SP s;i|65, 

ME 55211 
White. James Evarts. VI 85608, Evarts High School 
Wilcox, Edgel M.. Auxier. 4411 (Bus. No.) 
Wilcox, L'rsal B.. Auxier. 4411 (Bus. No. I 

Wilder. Munis E.. P. O. Box 302. Cumberland. 73 (Bus. No.) 
Williams. Lewis P.. Burkesville. 4003. 91 
Willis. Robert A., 2916 West Walnut St., Louisville. SP 813.91. 

JU 52251 
Wilson. Burnell Zeke. 2020 Heatherway. Lexington. 26940 
Wilson, Louis O., 1765 Normandy Road. Lexington, 44913. 

41717 
Withrow, Roy D., Kentucky Wesleyan College, Owensboro, 

MU 39160 
Wright. Ben. Box 295. Leitchfield, 121.J, 320 
Yessin, Humzey. Louisville Road. Frankfort, 44555, 44350 
Zimmerman. David F.. 544 Sayre Avenue, Lexington, 50653. 

31828 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1956 



ST. JOSEPH— SOUTH CENTRAL KENTUCKY CONFERENCE CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Taylor, Bivins. T. Carrico, Sanzone, P. Carrico, Major, Bunning. Barnes, Larcina, 
Saltsman, Ross, Misner, Bro. Gery, C.F.X. Second Row: Hertel, Montgomery, Conlan, Vogel, Pezzarossi, Hicks, 
Wilson, Havill, J. Carrico, Lamey. Gavigan, Herman, Head Coach Stoll. Third Row: Hamilton, Simms, C. Haydon, 
Thunning, Throgmorten, Moraja. Downie, Ballard, Dug an, Downs, T. Hayden. Sweeney, Karoblis, Bro. Shawn. 
C.F.X. 



The 1956 Cross Country 

The St. Joseph Prep School won the fourth 
official K.H.S.A.A. Cross Country Run, 
which was held in Lexington on November 
17. First place was won by Robert Shrote of 
Male, with a time of 11:17. The St. Joseph 
team was coached by Brother Berard. 

The Fern Creek High School team, coach- 
ed by John S. Pittenger, won second place. 

The Run was held on the Picadome Golf 
Course, and was managed by the Spiked Shoe 
Society of the University of Kentucky. Tom 
Jones is president of the organization. The 
course was laid off for a distance of approxi- 
mately two miles. 

Three regional runs had been held on 
November 3 for the purpose of qualifying 
teams and individuals for the state event, 
with the following teams advancing to the 
state : Bellarmine Regional : Fern Creek, 
Trinity, and Southern ; Bowling Green Reg- 
ional: St. Joseph Prep. Bowling Green, and 
Vine Grove; Morehead Regional: Flat Gap, 
Montgomery County, and Johns Creek. In- 
dividual runners in the regional events who 
qualified for the State Run by placing in 
the first ten in their respective regionals 
were: Tom Jackson of Trimble County, 
Chester McDowell of Trimble County, Carl 
James of Valley, Carl Megee of Wilmore, 
Robert Shrote of Male, and David Castle 
of Meade Memorial. 

Sixty-five boys took part in the Cross 
Country. The order in which the first fifty of 
these finished is given below, including the 
times. 

1— Shrote, Male (11:17) ; 2— T. Clements, 



St. Joseph (11:23); 3— H. Groce, Southern 
(11:24); 4— Wine, Trinity (11:30); 5— 
Wathen, St. Joseph (11:31); 6— Cissell, St. 
Joseph (11:32) ; 7 — Jackson, Trimble County 
(11:34) ; 8— Branham, Johns Creek (11:35) ; 
9— Cantrell, Flat Gap (11:42) ; 10— Burchett, 
Flat Gap (11:45); 11— Belcher. Bowling 
Green (11 :46) ; 12— Snawder, Fern Creek 
(11:51); 13— McDowell, Trimble County 
(11:52); 14 — Johnson, Southern (11:55); 
15 — Swan, Fern Creek (11:58; 16 — Kincaid, 
Trinity (12:00); 17— Bealmear, Trinity 
(12:05); 18— Graves, Fern Creek (12:09); 
19— Meehan, St. Joseph (12:10) 20— Bostic, 
Johns Creek (12:15); 21— Pawley, Bowling 
Green (12:16) ; 22— Larkin, Trinity (12:17) ; 
23— Castle, Meade Memorial (12:18); 24— 
Farmer, Fern Creek (12:19); 25— Melchior, 
St. Joseph (12.21); 26— Blackburn, Johns 
Creek (12:22); 27— Greenwell, Fern Creek 
(12:26) ; 28— Ginter, Montgomery County 
(12:28) ; 29— Stratton, Johns Creek (12:30) ; 
30 — James, Valley (12:30); 31 — Dadisman, 
Southern (12:32); 32— D. Lemaster, Flat 
Gap (12:33); 33— W. Groce, Southern 
(12:33) ; 34— Hawkins, Vine Grove (12:33) ; 
35_Taylor, Johns Creek (12:34); 36— R. 
Clements, St. Joseph (12:38); 37— Wegner, 
Johns Creek (12:40); 38— Jones, Bowling 
Green (12:41) ; 39— Fuchs, Trinity (12:44) ; 
40— Houk, Bowling Green (12:45); 41— 
Barnes, Fern Creek (12:47); 42 — Cleary, 
Fern Creek (12:49); 43— Brooks, Southern 
(12.52); 44 — Bewley, Vine Grove (12:54); 
45_Perkins, Bowling Green (12:55); 46— 
K. Lemaster, Flat Gap (12:56) ; 47— Phelps, 
Bowling Green (13:00) ; 48 — Townsend, Vine 
Grove, (13:00); 49— Conley, Flat Gap 
(13:01); 50— Stith, Vine Grove (13:15). 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1956 



Page Five 



NEW AUDITORIUM-GYMNASIUM AT THE BEAVER DAM HIGH SCHOOL 




Residents of Beaver Dam are quite proud of their new high school gymnasium, which 
was dedicated on the evening of November 16. The seating capacity is 1800. 



A ."Message to Athletic Directors and 
Athletic Teams 

Let's finish the Polio Job ! 

You can help see to it that your team, your 
family, your school and your community are 
protected against polio in 1957 and there- 
after. Here are the facts: 

The Salk vaccine is one of the safest 
known. Over 4.">.000,000 persons have been 
given this vaccine in perfect safety. 

The last two years have provided conclus- 
ive evidence that this is an extremely effec- 
tive vaccine. 

This is what remains to be done 

I. In Immunization 

The two major problems are: 

1. To extend vaccination to all persons 
of the ages 15 to 35. (30'. of polio cases in 
1955 fell within that age range.) 

2. To vaccinate those millions of chil- 
dren under 15 years of age who have missed 
immunization so far. (Two shots are given, 
spaced two to six weeks apart, with a booster 
dose 7 months to a year later. Ask your 
physician, health officer or school doctor 
about the immunization procedure followed 
in your community.) 

II. In Professional Education 



The .March of Dimes is helping to finance 
the training of various health specialists 
needed for research and treatment. (Doctor 
Salk studied viruses under a fellowship from 
March of Dimes funds.) 

III. In Research 

March of Dimes money is supporting 
research for : 

1. Further improvement in the vaccine. 

2. Learning more about the duration of 
immunity. 

3. Finding a drug that will prevent 
paralysis in polio. 

4. Learning more about related viruses 
which cause polio-like diseases. 

5. Developing better methods for the 
treatment and rehabiliation of the disabled. 

IV. In Patient Aid 

Some 80,000 persons stricken by polio 
in past years still are disabled and need help 
in their voyage back to more normal living. 
There are over 12,000 new cases of polio 
between January 1 and October 1, 1956, and 
there will be still other cases in 1957 among 
those persons who do not complete their vac- 
cination in time. — The National Foundation 
for Infantile Paralysis. 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1956 



The Flying Dutchman 

It's Christmas time in Kentucky for those 
physically handicapped kids who look to you 
for help. It's also a fine time of the year to 
look around for people deserving the Corn 
Cob Pipe of Honor Award for unselfish serv- 
ice, and to consider the community you 
should recommend for the Abou Ben Adhem 
Citation for good neighbor practices. 

The Game Guy interest reached a new 
peak in Bowling Green when Western Ken- 
tucky State College's "W" Club, sparked by 
President Wilmer Meredith, "Duck" Rav, 
Buddy Cate, Charlie Ruter and Teddy Horn- 
back, really got the spirit of the Game Guy 
Project. The club decided to make Joe David 
Johnson its protege. Joe David, who is one 
of the finest all-around athletes ever turned 
out in Bowling Green, is now in a convales- 
cent home there paralyzed from his neck 
down. He still maintains great interest. Be- 
cause of his fighting heart and his deter- 
mination to be connected with the games he 
loves, the "W" Club bought and presented to 
Joe David a television set, making it possible 
for him to watch the sports events as they 
are televised. The club also adopted a resolu- 
tion that each member would make a personal 
visit to Joe David any time he happened to 
be in the vicinity of Bowling Green. That's 
Christmas spirit! 

Now Bob Kirchdorfer, the first boy to win 
the annual award, has recommended Jerry 
Geiser, who is paralyzed in his legs and arms 
but has that fighting spirit, for the Lion- 
heart Citation. Jerry is presently coaching 
grade school football for Our Mother of Sor- 
rows Parish in Louisville. Formerly a St. 
Xavier athlete, he is now forced to forego 
his personal activities on the track and grid- 
iron, but keeps his fighting contact with 
sports because he is determined not to let a 
handicap whip him. Besides the Dutchman 
Award, Jerry has already received two 
awards for his determination and achieve- 
ment, one from the Rotary Club in 1953 and 
one in 1954. 

It's rare, indeed, when a state is blessed 
with a list of coaches like Oakley Brown, 
formerly of Hopkinsville, "Ty" Holland, the 
"Immortal of Murray," and Doug Smith, the 
late and revered coach of Bowling Green and 
Elizabethtown High Schools. These men leave 
footprints in the athletic sands of time be- 
cause they play to win, and teach boys to lose 
gracefully and be gentlemen at the same 
time. 



To this select list The Dutchman now adds 
the name of "Shorty" Jamerson. Carrying 
on his coaching in high school circles of the 
Kentucky mountains, you'll find that the 
people up that way are proclaiming "Shorty" 
the kind of coach boys should all be privileg- 
ed to play for. A great guy, a fine gentle- 
man, and a hard worker, "Shorty" becomes 
the recipient of The Flying Dutchman's Corn 
Cob Pipe of Honor for the month of Decem- 
ber because of the "mountain" of work done 
beyond the call of duty in making men out 
of boys. 

Keep your eyes focused on Bowling Green. 
The citizens there have decided that Bowling 
Green must progress recreationally and are 
lining up behind a comprehensive and sound 
program for that city and county. Present 
plans call for a sports center seating ten 
thousand and surrounded by every sports 
facility available. With the leadership Bowl- 
ing Green has to offer, this dream should 
shortly become a reality. 

Ashland's Courtney Clark calls attention 
to a poll taken of youth throughout our coun- 
try showing that their interest in sports 
tends to be on the increase as spectators but 
not as participants. Here is a challenge to all 
communities both from a recreational and 
physical educational standpoint. Definitely, 
this is an unfavorable trend which is damag- 
ing as far as the moral and physical develop- 
ment of our kids is concerned. It now be- 
comes more pronounced that our physical 
educators, coaches and recreationists must 
design year-around sports programs to help 
build good citizens, take roles in leadership 
and be generous with financial support. 

Indiana and Virginia have recognized this 
responsibility and are redoubling their ef- 
forts to develop programs of recreation 
throughout their states. During the month 
November, The Dutchman was in Blooming- 
ton to speak to the Indiana Park and Recrea- 
tion Association and at the University of 
Virginia working with the teachers of physi- 
cal education and recreation of that state. 
Courtney Clark is right! Kentucky must 
strongly ui'ge the use of every possible means 
in getting juveniles to become sports com- 
petitors. 

Here's a suggestion for you principals 
and coaches of Kentucky if you are really 
interested in guiding the activities of our 
young athletes in the right direction. Has it 
ever occurred to you that Sunday afternoons 
are dull and trying times for boys of teen- 
age years? Has it occurred to you that they 
(Continued on Page Eight) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER. 1956 



Page Seven 



CUMBERLAND— CUMBERLAND VALLEY CONFERENCE CHAMPION 







kAAJk 

. ** »'• *- „* 

„ jfc£t£ I _ T, - -IT J A " ^ .J 117 J"! ^ 

ft ft ££s? S*S Sit ££Ui wu&^iMfaj. La' 

**« 

iLeft to Bight t Front Row: Bowman, Blake. Barger, Lewis, Creech, Lowery, Stragnolia, Coach Bradford. Har- 
rison. R. Scott, Cain, Richard McKnight. Haniby. Second Row : Jacobs, McDaniels. Davis, Marich, Cooper, Bailey. 
Poore, Sparks. Howard. Rogg-;, Shelby. Wiggington. Third Row : Cornet t. Williams, Smiddy, J. Hall, Petrey, 
Yaden, D. Hall, Garland, Metcalfe, Parker, E. Hall, Roy McKnight. Fourth Row: Mgrs. Falls and Simmons, Day, 
Jesse, Kristo. Jones, B. Scott, Mgrs. VanHooser and lson. 

CAVERNA— BARREN RIVER SIX-MAN CONFERENCE CO-CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Mgrs. Isenberg, Tarter. Gentry. Bailey, Cates. Second Row: Bastow. McGee, 
McLellan, Lindsey. Campbell, Gentry. Esters. M. Hatcher. Third Row: Coach Chaney, Coach Reynolds, Frasier, 
G. Hatcher. Ross, Lyon, Goodhue, Walters, Smith. Veluzat. Overfelt, Coach Watkins. 

MADISONVILLE— WESTERN KENTUCKY ATHLETIC CONFERENCE CHAMPION 




l Left to Right l Front Row: Mgr. Maddox, Mabrey. Wright. G. Smith. Haynie, Edwards. Ritchie, Scott. Haworth. 
R. Butler, Root. D. Martin, Mgr. Bennett. Second Row: Mgr. Butch Utley. Cardwell. Ashby, Stephens. B. .Tones. 
Bob Utley. Foreman, J. Martin, Pendley, Luckett, Pidcock, DeMoss. Woodruff, Crowley. Third Row: Coach Welborn, 
Wilson Carlisle, Poole, Whitledge, Teague, Cole, R. Smith, Miner. Rodgers, Appleby, B. Butler, J. Jones, Buie. 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER. 1956 



CORBiN SOUTHEASTERN KENTUCKY CONFERENCE CHAMPiON 




§s7C" w p*| 

m -f 



> :■.■:■:>•;, :..■ 



*■ 













1 11^ W %^« «T i v * ' 












■ ■ ■ -i) ' fi* ""■"■"'"■ ., 


M 
Gi 


{Left to Right) Front 
jrris, Jones, Turrentine, 
ant. Smith, Barton, Ha 


Row: Alsip. Williams, Steely, Po: 
Queary, Lanham, C. Bird, Ho war 
rt, Terrell. Fourth Row : Ra mey 


•nter, Meador 

i, Riley. Bai 

Radar. Dut; 


3, Greene, Chandler, Boone. Second Row: 
ey. Third Row: Bunch, Miller, Goins, 
- , Hodge, B. Bird, Underwood. 





THE FLYING DUTCHMAN 

(Continued from Page Six) 
are going to do something on Sunday after- 
noon ? 

To guide leisure hours wisely, have you 
considered opening your school gymnasium 
on Sunday afternoons between the hours of 
2:00 and 5:00 for Basketball Open House, 
allowing any youngsters who want to come in 
to play ball to do so under supervision which 
your community could provide ? Did you know- 
that many a boy joins a gang because he 
never had the chance to join a team? Such 
hours would not interfere with church serv- 
ices either in the morning or in the evening. 

Sure, there'll be opposition to such a pro- 
posal, but would your community rather have 
the kids in a basketball gym shooting baskets 
or in a questionable picture show, parked in 
a Lovers' Lane or building up death totals on 
the highways, which is most distressing 
reading in our papers every Monday morn- 
ing? 

Too much praise cannot be showered on 
the powerful football teams of St. Xavier 
and Newport, coached by Johnny Meihaus 
and Stan Arnzen respectively, two of the 
most efficient mentors and cleanest gentle- 
men it has been The Dutchman's privilege 
to call friends. St. Xavier won the State 
Championship and Newport, while losing, 
won respect because they were a team of 
well trained schoolboy sportsmen. 

Kentuckians often say, "Dutchman, why 
are you never critical of anybody?" There 
are lots of writers who are critical and who 



will always be able to discover the bad in 
people, but we believe that with a little effort 
you can find something good to say about 
anybody. 

Attention, basketball officials and coaches ! 
This ruling is important and must be con- 
sidered as official in basketball rulings this 
season. It involves the free throw lane ex- 
tended. 

Play: Thrower-in Al is in the free throw 
lane extended. In making the throw-in, he 
jumps from the floor and ball is released 
while he is in the air. He alights outside the 
free throw lane extended. Is this legal? 

Ruling: No. A player's position while he 
is not touching the iloor is the same as it 
was when he last touched the floor. Hence, 
the throw-in is considered as having been 
made from restricted area. 

Elizabethtown's gain is Glasgow's loss! 
Young Paul Walker, who pioneered public 
recreation in Glasgow, has now moved over 
to Elizabethtown where he has assumed the 
directorship of that recreation program. 
E-town may expect a lot of progress under 
his leadership. Unquestionably one of the 
finest young recreation leaders in our state, 
Paul is destined to go far in the recreational 
field. 

Here's a good thought that Lawrence 
Ludwig, of the University of Virginia, passed 
on to me. "Be sure to live until you die." The 
thought is good because so many people 
fail to live up every minute of their lives. 
They won't turn their backs on disappoint- 
ments. They often forget to keep fighting 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1956 



Page Nine 



and looking ahead with a 

humor. 



rood sense of 



Probably one of the best examples of a 
chap who is living every minute of his life 
is our youthful Assistant Commissioner, Joe 
Billy Mansfield. He is a chap who laughs 
easily, kids gently and can always find some- 
thing to be cheerful about. He kidded The 
Dutchman all the way across the state on our 
basketball clinic trip because the top of his 
(The Dutchman's) head, which was formerly 
adorned with thick curly locks, seemed to be 
thinning somewhat (to put it mildly). To 
bring a note of cheer to you who are in the 
same predicament as your Dutch Reporter, 
Joe Billy has written the following poem 
which offers some hope to all "Balding 
Eagles." 

It's easy enough to be cheerful 
As man has hair from the start. 
But the lad worthwhile 
Is he lad who can smile 
After he has seen it all depart. 

It's easy for a man to be cheerful 

While on his head there's hair: 

But the lad worthwhile 

Is the one who can smile 

When the dome shines through so bare. 

It's time you fellows met the wives of the 
Commissioner and Assistant Commissioner 
of Kentucky athletics. You've heard much of 
Ted and Joe Billy, but too little about Nelle 
and Deal. 

There is no gentler lady in the Common- 
wealth nor one who practices Christianity 
more devotedly than Nelle Sanford. A de- 
lightful, attractive person, her work with 
underprivileged young people in Lexington 
has gone too long unheralded. If she were 
not already the possessor of a Cob Pipe of 
Honor, one would be dispatched now. The 
kind of unselfish work she does makes it 
Christmas the year around for lots of people. 

"Deal" Mansfield is one of the finest and 
prettiest girl athletes ever developed in Ken- 
tucky. She was The Dutchman's student at 
Fairdale in geometry and trigonometry and 
taught him more about those subjects than 
any professor in college was ever able to get 
through his "chrome dome." Unexcelled as a 
hostess, she is only equalled in public rela- 
tions work by her distinguished husband. A 
couple of grand gals are Nelle and Deal! 



Before giving you the closing thought for 
the month of December and wishing you our 
annual "Merry Christmas," The Dutchman 
asks a favor. Will each one of you. right now, 
drop him a card or a letter at the Armory, 
Louisville 2. Kentucky, commenting on the 
column either critically or otherwise? 

A phone call just came in from Muncie, 
Indiana. It looks like The Dutchman will 
make the Basketball Banquet address at that 
high school on February 23, 1957. 

Now for our closing Christmas thought, 
"It's good to have money and the things 
money can buy, but it's good, too, to check 
up once in a while and make sure you haven't 
lost the things that money can't buy." 



Here and There 

COMMISSIONER E. A. THOMAS of the 
Kansas High School Activities Association 
has announced his retirement as of January 
1. 1957. Well deserved retirement follows 30 
years of service on the firing line during the 
most active development years for the Kan- 
sas Association, all related State Associa- 
tions and of the National Federation. "Tom- 
my" has been in the thick of innumerable 
battles to establish state and national con- 
trols and policies which have made the high 
school groups a vital force in keeping the 
school activity program efficient and respect- 
able. On controversial questions he might be 
pro or con but never hesitant about taking a 
stand and maintaining a position until the 
"stars came out and the cows came in." 
When the history of school activity develop- 
ment is recorded, the names of several vet- 
erans of the pioneering era will have a promi- 
nent place. E. A. Thomas will be in the top 
echelon of those whose influence is indelibly 
stamped on the state-wide and nation-wide 
organizations which keep the high school 
activity program progressive and effective. 
Carl Kopelk, who has efficiently served as 
Assistant Commissioner under the efficient 
leadership of E. A. Thomas, has been chosen 
by the Kansas Association Board of Control 
as Commissioner beginning January 1, 1957. 

STATE ASSOCIATION RESERVE 
FUNDS : The attitude concerning a State As- 
sociation reserve fund has undergone a great 
change from earlier years. At one time, it 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1956 



was customary for a State Association to 
depend on anticipated receipts to meet ex- 
penses of operation. More recently, it has 
been considered good policy to defray operat- 
ing expenses from funds on hand rather than 
on credit backed by funds which are expected 
to accrue during the year. Also, the early 
years' policy was based on the assumption 
that if a State Association had more than 
".$5.00" in the bank, someone would be at- 
tempting to "get it" or find a quick way to 
spend it. Experience has shown that mem- 
bers of an Association take pride in the fact 
that the Association is on a sound financial 
basis. To be on a souud basis, it is essential 
that there be a reasonable reserve fund 
which can be drawn upon in an emergency. 
In addition to this, there has been a change 
in connection with the attitude toward using 
funds on hand to produce income which may 
supplement the fixed income of the Associa- 
tion. There is still a wide difference in the 
practices concerning the amount of the re- 
serve fund. A report in a recent issue of the 
Tennessee Association bulletin indicates that 
the Board of Control has approved a reserve 
fund of at least $80 7 000, if and when the 
Association can accumulate such a fund. In 
general, State Associations believe they are 
on a sound financial footing if the reserve 
fund is such as to permit the operation of the 
Association activities for a period of from 
one to two years even if some emergency 
should cut off all income from that period 
of time. 



Guest Editorials 

Missouri Problem 

Editor's Note: The excellent article below appeared in the 
Missouri High School Activities Journal recently under the 
heading. "The Reason and Need for Good Officials." The prob- 
lem of getting good game officials is certainly one which 
exists in all of our states. 

It is generally accepted that it is important 
to have qualified, mature officials to officiate 
athletic contests and other school activities, 
but little has been said about the educational 
possibilities inherent in good officiating. 
A point of view that is greatly needed is that 
one of the primary functions of an official 
is that he is more than a judge of events; 
he should be a teacher in the sense that it is 
one of his principal responsibilities to help 
boys and girls to learn to "live by the rules." 
A good citizen, among other things, is a law 
abiding citizen, one who complies with the 
rules laid down by society for the mutual 
benefit of its members. In accordance with 



the old psychological principle that one 
"learns by doing" one learns to conform to 
rules and laws by practicing such in the acti- 
vities of life in which he engages. It is reason- 
able to believe that "one who learns to play 
by the rules will also live by the rules." An 
official who sympathetically but firmly 
guides players and students to play and con- 
duct themselves according to the rules of the 
game is contributing to the development of 
future law abiding citizens. Learning to re- 
spect the authority of the official will help 
youth learn to respect authority in our demo- 
cratic way of life. 

This places a great responsibility upon an 
official and requires certain qualities in him. 
In addition to knowing the sport concerned 
and the rules of that sport, as well as pos- 
sessing ample skill as an official, he must 
have a conscientiousness of purpose and a 
love of the particular sport because of what 
it has to offer an individual. He must feel 
that he is working to help the schools pro- 
vide a better program for youth ; not pri- 
marily for any glory or material reward for 
himself. He must be interested in youth and 
enjoy his work with them. His personality 
is a significant factor in his success as an 
official. A smile is worth a tremendous lot 
on the court or field and should be cultivated 
by the official. Firmness executed with a 
smile shows a kind of maturity that youth 
respects. These and other desirable qualities 
will enhance the effectiveness of the official. 

The problem of getting enough officials of 
the type that can assume and carry out this 
responsibility should be the concern of all 
member schools and persons affiliated with 
our activities. Hence, it is appropriate that 
we consider some possible means of encourag- 
ing more capable young people to consider 
officiating. 

Fundamental in causing more capable 
young persons to want to be officials is the 
matter of establishing the integrity and re- 
spect due good officials. A good official does 
a conscientious impartial job. He doesn't 
help either team to win or lose the game. 
His duty is to see that it is played according 
to the rules. Although you may disagree with 
him on a particular "call", or criticize an 
occasional mistake, if you will tally the num- 
ber of times that you agree and disagree 
with his decisions and the number of times 
that you do not know what the decision 
should be (do not know the rule that applies), 
you will have more respect for his integrity 
and ability as an official. Youth must be led 
to respect the integrity of officials by observ- 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1956 



Page Eleven 



ing such respect in adults. Coach, teachers, 
and all who work with high school students 
should work to establish this ideal. When it 
is accomplished, more young people will be 
interested in assuming the responsibilities of 
officiating. 

A good positive program is needed to bet- 
ter prepare beginning officials. No one will 
argue that officiating is an easy task, yet 
we seem to expect some one to "pick up a 
whistle" and do a respectable job, or com- 
plain bitterly if he doesn't. Relatively few of 
our beginning officials receive much in the 
way of training prior to their registration as 
an official. Those that attend college have 
the opportunity to take instruction in of- 
ficiating or other courses that will provide a 
background for officiating, but a large num- 
ber of beginning officials have not attended 
college, while others who do have not availed 
themselves of this opportunity. Some of the 
officials associations in the state have pro- 
grams that offer instruction for beginning 
officials, but again this is not a uniform 
practice. The testing program for beginning 
officials of the M.S.H.S.A.A. requires a study 
of the rules of a particular sport, but offers 
little more. Hence, there is a real need for 
the M.S.H.S.A.A. in cooperation with the col- 
leges and officials associations of the state 
to formulate and implement a positive pro- 
gram that will interest prospective officials 
and offer them greater training before their 
initial registration. 

A feeling of mutual respect and support 
must exist between schools and officials. 
Qualified officials merit the courtesy of the 
schools that engage them. Efforts should be 
made to provide for their convenience when 
working a contest and an appreciation of 
their work must be shown. Likewise, officials 
must show respect for the most worthwhile 
objectives the schools have in their programs 
of curricular and extra-curricular activities. 
The associations of officials with students 
must contribute toward a better understand- 
ing of activities as thev fit into the schools' 
total educational programs. The attitudes of 
officials must help students to understand 
that participation in activities is a privilege 
to further enhance their educational oppor- 
tunities : that school attendance is not 
merely a primary prerequisite for engaging 
in snorts and other activities. This tvne of 
relationship between schools and officials 
will help to increase the number of good of- 
ficials. 

It is reasonable to believe that there are 



many capable young people who would be 
interested in officiating contests and activ- 
ities if we will respect the integrity of offi- 
cials, extend the proper courtesies, and com- 
mend them for the educational opportunities 
they provide boys and girls through officiat- 
ing. This will also encourage those who be- 
come officials to strive to improve their abil- 
ities as officials and continue to help the 
school provide a good program of activities 
for boys and girls. 

Genesis of the 
State High School Association 

In the beginning your scribe, a young man 
who was submaster, athletic director, faculty 
manager, coach and full-time classroom 
teacher — all at one time — played on the 
baseball and football school teams he was 
coaching. At the time, this was rather com- 
mon practice. It was not considered that the 
teacher was replacing some student who 
might wish to participate, since it was often 
difficult to muster enough candidates to 
compose one of these teams. In football the 
coach was sometimes the only player with 
any previous experience in the game. 

The rampant spirit of competition was as 
keen then as now. Soon we met a school 
team in a football game which included not 
only the submaster and some much overage 
boys but also the young but quite mature 
principal. The next step in the progression 
of team strength was one which included a 
local dentist who, a couple of years ago pre- 
viously, had been a star tackle on a Univer- 
sity team. He messed us all up considerably. 

Enough was enough and too much was too 
much. The school authorities in the area 
came together to take remedial action in the 
form of an interschool agreement. A six- 
school league was the result. It operated un- 
der a few simple rules — the first and fore- 
most of which was that only bona fide stu- 
dents of a school should participate on the 
school team. 

Unbridled practices such as those which 
caused the formation of this league were 
occurring in other areas and created the nec- 
essity for some type of over-all direction of 
interschool activities. From the unbearable 
results of competitive greed a controlling or- 
ganization was born. As the means of com- 
munication and travel improved, succeeding 
steps in larger group organizations took 
place, covering cities, counties, and sections 
of the state. In time, the State Association 
came into existence. Finally one was formed 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1956 



in each state in the U.S.A. and they later 
joined forces in the National Federation of 
State High School Athletic Associations. 

This first chapter of Genesis is recited for 
a purpose. Those who bicker and rave and 
sometimes threaten or bring legal action 
against the State or National controlling and 
directing bodies may, through acquaintance 
with some of the backgrounds, be brought to 
realize that these state-wide and nation-wide 
organizations were not superimposed on the 
schools by master minds "in clouded castles 
met." — that they do not represent an at- 
tempted assuagement of the hankering for 
authority by autocratic school administra- 
tors, — but that they are creations of neces- 
sity, conceived in the wisdom of unfavorable 
experiences and developed through the tra- 
vail of trial and rejection, and perceived ad- 
vantages — a process of evolution of what is 
in the best educational interests of all con- 
cerned in interscholastic competitive activi- 
ties.— F. H. Pierce, Massachusetts S.S.P.A. 



BASKETBALL QUESTIONS 

(Continued from Page One) 
ed because the clock was not running? 

Ruling: No. There is no direct connection 
between the counting of the score or the com- 
mitting of a foul and the running of the 
clock. Whether the ball is alive or dead has 
a bearing on whether contact is considered a 
foul and whether points are counted when 
the ball goes through the basket. 

26. Play: May the home school choose to 
use the wide free throw lane for a high 
school or Y.M.C.A. contest? 

Ruling: Not unless the State Association 
has been designated as an experimental unit 
to make the transition to the wide lane dur- 
ing the current season. States which have 
made the transition for the current season 
are: Alabama, Arkansas. Arizona, Georgia, 
Kansas, Massachuetts, New Hampshire., New 
Mexico. Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, 
South Dakota, Utah, Washington and one or 
two sections in New York. The remaining 
states will use the narrow lane unless adop- 
tion without a report has been made. 

27. Play : The home team provides a rub- 
ber-covered basketball and the visitors ob- 
ject. 

Ruling: For all groups except college 
teams, such a ball has official standing if its 
reaction complies with Rule 1-12. The visitors 
have no right to object. A list of balls which 
have been tested and approved as having the 
proper reaction follows. Top grade fully ap- 
proved balls are "Approved." In addition, 



balls suitable for practice and for any game 
when neither team objects are "Sanctioned." 
Balls which have been tested are: Denkert — 
Approved D800; Dubow — Approved XLB, 
Sanctioned X101 ; MacGregor — Approved 
MBR, Sanctioned F931; Pennsylvania— Ap- 
proved PB6, Sanctioned PBT-6 or PBC-6 ; 
Rawlings — Approved B2B, Sanctioned B4B : 
Reach — Approved 260 (Tournament), Sanc- 
tioned 262 (All-Court) ; Seamless — Approved 
590 (DeLuxe), Sanctioned 580 (Kolite) ; 
Spalding — Approved 160 (Tournament), 
Sanctioned 162 (Fast Flite) ; Voit— Approv- 
ed XB20 (Custom Built), Sanctioned XB22 
or CB2 ; Wilson— Approved B1604 (Finalist), 
Sanctioned B1610 (Comet) or B1606. 

28. Play: Rule 9-1 item (b) refers to "his" 
basket instead of "the" basket as used last 
year. What is the reason for this change? 

Ruling: The prohibition applies to the 
thrower's basket only. If this prohibition 
were to apply to the wrong basket when 
directions are confused, some complex situa- 
tions could arise. 

There is a Good Reason — or is There? 

Note : Somewhat similar items were listed 
last year and the year before. Eleven of the 
items resulted in rules improvements. This 
new set provides food for thought. 

1. Why should the exception in Rule 9-9 
about right to cause ball to go to the back 
court apply to a jump ball other than in the 
center circle? 

2. With rigid contact administration, is 
the limit on number of air dribbles necessary ? 

3. Has the recent balance in value of pen- 
alties for technical and personal foul made 
the exception for contact during a throw-in 
unnecessary? 

4. Should center circle be listed as having 
a mathematical radius of 2 feet and 2 inches? 

5. Why are the lower 6 or 8 inches and 
sharp corners of the large backboard re- 
tained ? 

6. Should foot position on the floor or in 
the air be the determining factor in admin- 
istering the 3-second rule (as for free 
throws) ? 

7. Why shouldn't all players be prohibited 
from touching the ball while it is in or on 
the basket or in the cylinder above it, thus 
prohibiting the "dunk shot"? 

8. Has the wide lane and more rigid con- 
tact administration removed the need for 
applying the 3-second time limit to the player 
without the ball? 



We Ship Tie Day You BuY" 

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INCDR PDRATED 

PHONE 103 OR 104 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 



Basketball Season Is Here 

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W e can furnish you with athletic award letters in chenille to your order 
of the very highest quality and at reasonable prices. 

Remember that each and every order for any type of merchandise, whether 
special-made or out of stuck, gets the personal attention of every person 
in our store. 

If you would like to see our salesman for either basketball or football 
supplies, call us at 103 or 104, Mayfield. 

ROY BOYD. HERBIE HUNT, JIM MITCHELL. BILL HUNT or C. A. 
BYRN, JR. are always in our store, ready to assist you in every way 
possible. 

If you want the BEST QUALITY and the BEST SERVICE, contact 
HUNT'S. 



Hunt ? s Athletic Goods Co. 

PHONE 103 OR 1(11 

MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 



THE LARGEST EXCLUSIVE ATHLETIC HOUSE IN THE SOUTH 



Superior 

UTCLIFFE^S^BASKETBALL 

Equipment 



TOURNAMENT BALLS 

No, RSS Rawlings "Seam Sealed" 
I'ly-Fused Basketball « as one of the 
official balls in the 1956 State Tour- 
nament and will be an official ball for 
the 1957 Tourney at Louisville. 

EACH $21.00 

No. 100. The famous Spalding 
"Last Bilt" fully molded ball. Official 
ball for any tournament and will be 
one of the official balls sanctioned for 
the 1957 Stale Tourney at Louisville. 

EACH $21.00 
BASKETBALL GOALS 




No. 260. Schutt "Rigid Build" are 
tops for all college and high school 
use — nothing better. Complete with 
nets— Pair $10,25, 

No. 5. Playground and Backyard 
Practice Goals— Full official size and 
heavy weight — complete with nets — 
Pair $4.25 

No. BN 1 20. Extra Heavy Tourna- 
ment Nets — Pair $3,10 





OUTDOOR or 
PLAYGROUND BALLS 

No, CB 2, The popular Voit Rubber 
Co. official top grade rubber covered 
ball for outdoor use. Not affected 
by cinders, gravel, cement or wet 
weather. For outdoors will outwear 
two or more of even the top grade 
leather balls. EACH $11.75 

No. L B 2. Another rubber cov- 
ered Basketball made by the Voit 
Rubber Co., but the inside carcass is 
not quite so durable as the No. CB 2 
above. EACH $5.00 



CONVERSE BASKETBALL SHOES 



Nothing finer and their "All-: 
shoes are demanded by most oi 
top ranking College and Professional 
teams. 

NO. 9160. Converse "AH Star" 
Black Duck Uppers— PAIR $7.50 
NO. 9162. Converse "AH Star" 
White Duck Uppers___PAIR S7.50 
NO. 9350 Converse "Lucky Boy" 
Black Duck Cppers. 
NO. 9350 Converse 



PAIR S5.50 
"Lucky Bov" 
White Duck Cppers. _PAIR S5.50 





MISCELLANEOUS 

No. 610. "Wigwam" Brand Basketball Sox — 
white nv ool with cotton reinforcement. PAIR 60c, 
No. 637. White Wool Sox with Colored Tops. 
Scarlet, Kelly, Royal, Lt. Gold, Purple, Maroon. 

PAIR 80c. 

No. 9. Official Basketball Score Book — Spiral 
»ire binding — 25 games. EACH 65c. 
No. 166. Individual Suit Bag — 16 inch length — 
made of heavy leatherette material. EACH $2.10 

TROPHIES 

Tournament and individual Trophies in a com- 
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ment. Write us for catalog showing a complete 
assortment for vour selection. 



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225 SOUTH FOURTH ST. 



LOUISVILLE I, KENTUCKY 








Hiqh School Athlete 

St. Joe's State Championship Cross Country Team 








(Left to Right) Bro. Berard, Meehan, Clements, Wathen, Cissell, Melchior. 

The team representing the St. Joseph Prep School of Bardstown won the K.H.S.A.A. Cross 
Country Run, held in Lexington on November 17. The same group placed first in the regional 
meet, and won the Shamrock A.A.U. meet, the Trinity Relays, and the St. Joe Trep Invita- 
tional. 



Official Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 

JANUARY - 1957 




PERRYVILLE HIGH SCHOOL— BLUEGRASS SIX-MAN CONFERENCE CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Coach Peden, Glasscock, Roy Bonta. Ray Bonta. Adkins, Reynolds, Garrison, Hen- 
dren. Second Row: Hundley, Quinn, Norvell. Galloway, Jackson, Warren, Cheatham, Engle. 



Conference Standings 



Won 



Lost 



Tied 



Dickinson 
Rating 

Barren River Six-Man Conference 

Austin Tracy 4 10 

Caverna 4 10 

Hiseville 3 2 

Temple Hill 2 3 

Park City 5 

Bluegrass Six-Man Conference 
Perryville 4 

Burgin 2 2 

Berea 4 

Central Kentucky Conference 



Madison-Model 


8 


II 


ii 


28.00 


Frankfort 


> 


1 





23.00 


Danville 


3 


■' 


II 


22.00 


Cynthiana 


* 


1 





21.00 


Shelbyville 


5 


2 


II 


20.00 


Lancaster 


7 


1 


II 


19.38 


Winchester 


4 


o 


1 


17.50 


Georgetown 


4 


5 





14.44 


Nicholasville 




4 


1 


14.38 


Carlisle 


2 


3 


1 


14.17 


Irvine 


Q 

■ i 


5 


II 


13.75 


Harrodsburg 


2 


4 


1 


13.56 


Versailles 


2 


5 


2 


13.33 


Anderson 


■ > 


5 


2 


13.33 


M. M. I. 


i 


4 


1 


12.50 


Paris 


ii 


6 


1 


11.43 


Mt. Sterling 


i 


7 





11.25 


Stanford 


n 


i; 





10.00 


Henry Clay 


■ i 


i 





No Rating 


Somerset 





i 


II 


No Rating 



Cumberland 


Valley 


Conference 


Cumberland 


7 


2 





Loyal 


5 


2 


l 


Harlan 


4 


2 





Lynch 


3 


2 


3 


Benham 


i 


4 





Evarts 


4 


4 


1 


Black Star 


3 


4 





Wallins 


3 


5 





Hall 


2 


5 


1 


Leslie County 





5 





Eastern Kentucky Mountain 


Conference 


Pikeville 


5 


|| 


l 


Paintsville 


7 


1 


o 


Hazard 


r. 





l 


Fleming 


4 


• ' 


2 


Belfry 


3 


3 


i' 


Whitesburg 


2 


4 





Prestonsburg 


2 


4 


1 


Jenkins 


2 


5 


1 


Elkhorn City 


1 


5 





M. C. Napier 





5 





North Central Kentucky Six-Man Conference 


Oldham County 


1 








Eminence 


2 


2 





Ormsby Village 


ii 


4 





Northeastern Kentucky Athlet 


ic Conference 


Catlettsburg 


5 








Louisa 


4 


1 





Russell 


•'! 


2 





McKell 


■1 


q 


o 


Raceland 


1 


i 





Wurtland 





:. 






(Continued on Page Sixteen) 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 

Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XIX— NO. 6 



JANUARY, 1957 



$1.00 Per Year 



Commissioner's Message 

With the 1956-57 basketball season well 
under way, it appears that all areas of the 
state have their quota of outstanding teams 
this year. For many years now Kentucky has 
produced an annual crop of fine basketball 
players. After graduating from high school 
these boys have gone on to win acclaim in 
collegiate and professional ranks. Kentuck- 
ians thrill to their many achievements in this 
state and elsewhere in the nation. 

What can the administrator and coach do 
to make this current season a better one. to 
make the sports program follow educational 
objectives, to see to it that the basketball 
game in which their team takes part is a 
contest of friendly competition rather than 
a war between enemies ? Most of our school 
men know the answer to this question and 
act accordingly. A few may be like the farm- 
er who refused to go to the Farm Bureau 
meeting and listen to a lecture on better 
farming methods, saying that he already 
knew more good farming methods than he 
was putting to practice. 

This season has been a comparatively quiet 
one to date, but pressures will begin to mount 
as tournament time approaches. There are 
four or five areas of potential trouble which 
might be explored briefly. 

Most of our administrators and coaches 
realize that one or more officers of the law 
should be present at all athletic contests. 
This is implied under the provisions of By- 
Law 17. Well policed games in Kentucky are 
now the rule rather than the exception. 
However, some of our schools are not provid- 
ing peace officers at their home contests. 
They are running a great risk by their fail- 
ure to do this. 

Some of our school officials are careless 
in the matter of compliance with By-Law 23 
with respect to agreement on officials. Of- 
ficials for any contest are to be agreed upon 
at least ten days before the contest. No coach 
likes to take his team on the floor and find 
out for the first time the names of the per- 
sons who will call the game. He is entitled 
to consideration in the selection of officials, 



and he should extend the same courtesy when 
the situation is reversed. 

The home principal should be alert in the 
matter of reporting disqualifications to the 
Commissioner's office. By-Law 7, Section 2, 
says: "When an official disqualifies a player, 
he shall report the name of the player to this 
(home) principal." The official sometimes 
fails to see the home principal, making his 
report direct to the State Office. This is 
satisfactory, although it is not necessary 
that the official report to the Commissioner 
unless he thinks that a violation of By-Law 
17 might be involved. It is importnt that the 
home principal know about the disqualifica- 
tion. 

Many of our principals and coaches take 
a dim view of transfers late in the season, 
and rightly so. K.H.S.A.A. By-Law 8. Sec- 
tion 1, says: "Any person who is a first 
team player on one secondary school team 
shall lie ineligible to represent any other 
secondary school for the remainder of the 
season in that sport, even though his parents 
move to the school district in which the 
school to which he transfers is located .... 
The provisions of the first sentence of this 
section may be waived bv the Commissioner 
in any case where there is evident injustice. " 
As soon as a first team plaver transfers from 
School A to School B. the principal of School 
B should send immediately to the principal of 
School A a K.H.S.A.A. transfer blank. If the 
player does not enroll in School B, after his 
parents have moved to this district, but 
merelv inouires about his possible eligibility 
at School B, the principal of School B should 
call or write the other principal, asking if 
he knows of any reason for the Commissioner 
not being requested to waive the penaltv of 
By-Law 8, Section 1. It is the opinion of the 
Commissioner that most principals are very 
fair in requesting that transfer students be 
declared eligible at School B if they are con- 
vinced that the moves are bona fide ones 
and no undue influence is involved. 

Many arguments occur late in the season 
concerning the adding of names to prelim- 
inary and final tournament lists. Tournament 

(Continued on Paye Twelve) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1957 



JANUARY, 1957 VOL. XIX— No. 6 

Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association. 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 

BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Russell Williamson (1956-60), Inez 

Vice-President Louis Litchfield (1953-57), Marion 

Directors— W. B. Jones (1953-57) Somerset: W. H. Crowdus 
(1954-5S), Franklin; Jack Dawson (1954-5S), Middletown : 
Robert P. Forsythe (1955-59), Greenville; K. G. Gillaspie 
(1955-59), Georgetown; Cecil A. Thornton (1956-60), Harlan. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 



~£rom the Commissioned s Offt 



ice 



Reports Past Due 

1. 1956 Football Participation List 

2. School's Report on Football Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Football) 



"Approved" and "Certified" Officials 

One hundred thirty-five basketball of- 
ficials have qualified for the "Certified" 
rating this year, and forty-four have received 
the "Approved" rating. The latter rating- 
does not carry forward from year to year, 
but must be earned each year. After an of- 
ficial has received the "Certified" rating, he 
keeps this rating by clinic attendance. Only 
officials receiving these higher ratings are 
eligible to work in the regional tournaments. 
Only "Certified" officials, who are residents 
of Kentucky, are eligible to work in the State 
Tournament. 

Basketball officials who qualified for ad- 
vanced ratings during the current season are 
as follows : 

Certified Officials 
Raymond C. Adkins, Rex Alexander, Alvin 
Almond, Bill Baird, James E. Baker, J. W. 
Barnett, Thomas P. Bell, Bert Bennett, Rich- 
ard I. Betz, Clyde W. Blackburn, Bennie 
Bridges, Vic Brizendine, Carroll A. Broderick, 
Brvant Brown, James W. Brown, Raymond 
Burke. Ralph M. Casteel, W. W. Chumbler, 
Charles E. Clark, L. J. "Duke" Coleman, 
Travis Combs, Walter Combs, George Conley, 
John Wellington Cooper, Layton Cox, Fred 
T. Crawford, John S. Crosthwaite, Jr., Tom 
Cubbage, Al Cummins, Don Davis, Dwight 
R. Davis, Jr., John B. Dotson, Dero Downing, 
Earl Duncan, Jack Durkin, James M. Eaton, 



Forrest Eddings, Ben R. Edelen, William 
Turner Elrod, Allen Fey, Bill Fitchko, Rob- 
ert Forsythe, Howard E. Gardner, William A. 
Gates, Jr., Delmas Gish, R. E. Goranflo, Al 
Gustafson, Jr., John Heldman, Jr., Franklin 

C. Hewling, Richard Hewling, G. Cliff Hines, 
Ralph E. Hobbs, Fred A. Hodge, Holbert 
Hodges, Joe Hofstetter, J. D. Hudson, Joe D. 
Hutt, Jr., Charles R. Irwin, James Jenkins, 
Kean Jenkins, Kenneth P. Jordan. Bob King, 
Jim King, P. J. Kin?, Joe T. Kinman, Bill 
Knight, Joe Kremer, Gilbert E. Lindloff, Bill 
Long, David M. Lon^enecker, Dick Loonev, 
L. B^. McClellan, Anthony A. McCord, Glen D. 
McDowell, Harold McGuffev, Robert N. Mc- 
Leod, Ray S. McPike, Jr., Alan Leon Macon, 
James E.' Mason, Foster Meade, Earl L. Met- 
calf, Bob Miller, Rex J. Miller, Roy J. Miller, 
Ed Mudd, Frank J. Mueller, Ralph Mussman, 
William E. Nau, Gene Neal, Ed Nord, Billy 
W. Omer, R. K. Padgett, Bernard Pergrem, 
Ralph "Rudy" Phelps, C. A. Porter, Logan 
Powell, Cleophus Pursifull, Stan Radjunas, 
Bernard W. Ratterman, Malvern G. Redman, 
Gordon Reed, James F. Rice, Joe M. Richard- 
son, C. 0. Ricketts, Earl C. Roberts, James 
M. Rocke, Otis Roller, Clyde L. Rouse, Morris 
Rozen, Leland G. Rubarts, Mel Sanders, Evan 
E. Settle, Jr., Rov G. Settle. Stanlev Shaw, 
Wallace Sloan, Bill Small. Edgar J. Smith, 
LaRue Sosh, William R. Steenken, Harry S. 
Stephenson, Bill Strange, Ed Taylor, Robert 
S. Taylor, Amos Teague, Jack Thompson, 
William Varble, Charlie Vettiner, Paul Weis- 
brodt, Ralph W. Welch, Milford Wells, Lloyd 
G. Whipple, David B. White, Tom M. Wil- 
liams, Jr. Roy L. Winchester, Shelby Win- 
frey, Ernest Woford. 

Approved Officials 

Charles Akins, Kenneth Ashley, Judson 
Barnes, James L. Basham, Viley O. Black- 
burn, Joe G. Chaney, Charles E. Chattin. 
Warren Cooper, Ralph E. Davis, Dick Drake, 
Earl Driskell, Jr., Charles R. Figg, Robert 
Flynn, Sherman Fritz, Daniel H. Gardner, 
Romulus Gibson, Walt Green, Joseph Hagan, 
John Haynes, Bill Hogg, Neil P. Hunley, 
Walter Johnson, Allen King, R. E. King, 
Gene T. Lucas, George Lusby, Booker Mc- 
Claskey, George Maines, Robert Monroe, H. 

D. Mouser, Luther G. Newnam, Reason G. 
Newton, Curtis E. Peay, Myron S. Reinhardt, 
William T. Riggs, Allen W. Russell, Deward 
Saylor, Paul E. Schlich, L. G. Snider, Robert 
Stanfill, A. I. Tipton, Doyle Troutman. Blaine 
R. Walling, Jr., Humzey Yessin. 

(Continued on Page Fifteen) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1957 



Page Three 



1956-57 MEMBERSHIP IN THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

REGION 1 



School 



Address 



Principal 



Baskethall Coach 



I). 1 Arlington 
Bardwell 
Cayce 
Central 
Cunning-ham 
Fulgham 
Fulton 
Hickman 
Milburn 



Arlington 

Bardwell 

Cayce 

Clinton 

Cunning-ham 

R. 1, Clinton 

Fulton 

Hickman 

Milburn 



0. J. Mitchell 
R. L. Petri e 
Edmund Clark 
James H. Phillips 
O. J. Allen 
E. L. Clark 
J. M. Martin 
Robert L. Summers 
Henry O'Daniel 



Jim Voig'ht 
L. G. Tubbs 
Albert F. Rice, Jr. 
James H. Phillips 
James R. DeSpain 
Jim Walker 
Charles Thomas 
Kenneth Middle-ton 
Henry Johnson 



I). 2 Ballard Memorial 
Heath 
Lone Oak 
Paducah Tilg'hman 
Reidland 
St. John 
St. Mary's 

D. 3 Cuba 

Dunbar 

Farming-ton 

Lowes 

Mayfield 

St. Jerome 

Sedalia 

Symsonia 

Wing-o 

I). 1 Almo 
Benton 
Hazel 
Kirksey 
Lynn Grove 
Murray 

Murray Training 
New Concord 
North Marshall 
South Marshall 



Barlow 

R. 1. West Paducah 

1!. 6, Paducah 

Paducah 

R. 8, Paducah 

R. 5, Paducah 

Paducah 

R. 1, Mayfield 

Mayfield 
Farmin^ton 
Lowes 
Mayfield 
Fancy Farm 
Sedalia 
Symsonia 
Win go 

Almo 
Benton 
Hazel 
Kirksey 
Lynn Grove 
Murray 
Murray 
New Concord 
Calvert City 
R. 1, Benton 



Richard Winebarger 
A. L. Roberts 
John Robinson 
Walter C. Jetton 
Lvndle Barnes, Sr. 
Sr. Mary Marcia, RSM 
Sr. Alma Clare 

Joe McPherson 

F. I. Stiger 

J. Ernest Fiser 

Conrad E. Carroll 

Robert G. Fiser 

Sr. Rose Angeline Ogg 

McCov Tarry 

Cecil Reid 

Howard V. Reid 

William B. Miller 
Joe P. Duke 
Guy Lovins 
M. B. Rogers 
Ravmond L. Story 
W. B. Moser 
Mac G. McRaney 
Edward T. Curd 
Robert Goheen 
Reed Conder 



Willard Carroll 
W. E. Carter 
Don Stephenson 
Otis Dinning, Sr. 
Lynn Cole 

Jack McKinney 

Carl Kriesler 
A. Dawson 
Vernon Cates 
Rex Smith 
J. B. Story 
Samuel Havden 
Cletus Hubbs 
Joe Ford 
Virgel Yates 

Bill Williams 
Billy Joe Farris 
Bob Chaney 
John W. Jones 
John Cannon 
Preston Holland 
Garrett Beshear 
Bobby Harg-is 
Charlie Lampley 
Jimmy Soloman 



REGION 2 



D. 5 Crittenden County Marion 

Livingston County Smithland 

Marion Marion 

Salem Salem 



Wilbur Horning 
Kenneth T. Hardin 
T. A. Parrish 
Mrs. H. B. Alderdice 



Ercel Little 
Frank Wright 
Denzil Mefford 
G. H. Whitecotton 



I). 6 Caldwell County Princeton 

Fredonia Fredonia 

Lyon County Kuttawa 

Trigg County Cadiz 



Guv G. Nichols 
Odell Walker 
John A. Wells 
John Minton 



Fred Clayton 
Mervil Phelps 
Jason White 
Charles Quisenberry 



D. 7 Charleston 
Dalton 

Dawson Springs 
Earlington 
Hanson 
Madisonville 
Nebo 
South Hopkins 



R. 1, Dawson Springs 

Dalton 

Dawson Springs 

Earling-ton 

Hanson 

Madisonville 

Nebo 

Nortonville 



Lewis Good 
A. 0. Richards 
R. A. Belt 
James W. Larmouth 
Ina D. Moore 
Vincent Zachem 
A. C. Carneal 
Charles Jenkins 



Jewel Logan 
Edwin Martin 
George Perry 
James W. Larmouth 
James White 
C. V. Sherrill 
Frank Bacon 
Orlando Wyman 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1957 



School 



Address 



Principal 



Basketball Coach 



I). .8 Clifty 
Crofton 
Guthrie 
Hopkinsville 
Lacy 

Pembroke 
Sinking- Fork 
South Christian 
Todd County 
Trenton 



Clifty 

Crofton 

Guthrie 

Hopkinsville 

R. 7, Hopkinsville 

Pembroke 

R. 5, Hopkinsville 

Herndon 

Elkton 

Trenton 



O. P. Hurt 
Thomas N. McCoy 
H. C. Malone 
Charles J. Petrie 
Ed P. Hickev, Jr. 
Mrs. L. W. Allen 
R. C. Johnson 
Clovis W. Wallis 
A. R. Rochelle 
W. B. Ray 



Duel Claiborne 
John Rendek 
Waldo L. Wolfe 
Billy Brannock 
Don Holmes 
Larry Tribble 
Charles Clayton 
Charles R. Irwin 
Wesley Coffman 
Bobby McCord 



REGION 3 



1). 9 Clay 
Dixon 
Providence 
Sebree 
Slaughters 



Clay 

Dixon 
Providence 
Sebree 
Slaughters 



Mrs. Irene Powell 
P. D. Fancher 
Wendell Johnson 
James M. Lynch 
F. F. McDowell 



James W. Holland 
Billy Birdwell 
Guy Newcom 
James M. Lynch 
Eldon Bradley 



I). 10 Henderson 

Henderson County 

Holy Name 

Morganfield 

St. Agnes 

St. Vincent 

Sturgis 

Uniontown 



Henderson Russell R. Below 

Henderson Lewis N. Johnson 

Henderson Sr. Albert Mary 

Morganfield Thomas Brantley 

Uniontown Rev. R. G. Hill 

St. Vincent Sr. Frances Ann 

Sturgis H'Earl Evans 
Uniontown (Supt.) B. L. Sizemore 



T. L. Plain 
Robert Watson 
James K. Lindenberj 
Charles Straub 
Wilbur Clark 
Charles Gorman 
H. D. Holt, Jr. 
Y. L. Watkins 



I). 11 Bremen 
Calhoun 
Livermore 
Sacramento 



Bremen 
Calhoun 
Livermore 
Sacramento 



K. Forbis Jordan 
A. G. Crume 
J. Lee Robertson 
Paul Phillips 



Delbert Settle 
H. T. Hackworth 
J. Lee Robertson 
Charles Summers 



I). 12 Daviess County 



Owensboro 



Owensboro Owensboro 

Owensboro Catholic Owensboro 

Owensboro Tech. Owensboro 

Utica Utica 

Western Owensboro 



J. T. Sandefur 
Joe 0. Brown 
Sr. Joseph Mary 
C. F. Crilev 
W. P. Wheeler 
H. E. Goodloe 



W. B. Sydnor 
Lawrence McGinnis 
Harold Mischel 
John C. Simpson 
Frank A. List 
Bob Dowery 



REGION 4 



D. 13 Breckiiu-idge Co. 
Flaherty 

Frederick-Fraize 
Hawesville 
Irvington 
Lewispm-t 
Meade County 



Hardinsburg- 

R. 3, Vine Grove 

Clovei-port 

Hawesville 

Irvington 

Lewisport 

Brandenburg 



R. F. Peters 
D. T. Starks 
Mrs. L. B. Miller 
B. H. Crowe 
Edwin J. Mayes 
S. R. Mason 
Mrs. C. P. Miller 



Dewey A. Parson 
D. T. Starks 
Howard Owen 
Billy Bruce 
Gerald Dryden 
Edgar Payne 
Willis Simpson 



I). 14 Brownsville 

Butler County 

Caneyville 

Clarkson 

Kyrock 

Leitch field 

Sunfish 



Brownsville 

Morgantown 

Caneyville 

Clarkson 

Sweeden 

Leitchfield 

Sunfish 



J. P. Alexander 
W. Foyest West 
Ramon Majors 
James M. Wood 
R. E. Hendrick 
O. A. Adams 
Mills M. Lowe 



J. E. Yarber 
W. O. Warren, Jr. 
Hardin McLane 
Bowman Davenport 
Robert Burres 
John H. Taylor 
Mills M. Lowe 



D. 15 Beaver Dam 

Centertown 
Fordsville 
Hartford 
Horse Branch 



Beaver Dam 
Centertown 
Fordsville 
Hartford 
Horse Branch 



Shelby C. Forsythe, Jr. 
J. Neil Embry 
M. S. Greer 
Charles S. Combs 
W. M. Arnold 



Maurice Martin 
William T. Leach 
Bill Carter 
Charles S. Combs 
Reathel Goff 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY. 1957 



Page Five 



School 

I). 16 Central City 
Drakesboro 
Graham 
Greenville 
Hughes-Kirk 



Address 

Central City 

Drakesboro 

Graham 

Greenville 

Beechmont 



Muhlenberg Central Powderly 



Principal 

Delmas Gish 
\V. J. Wilcutt 
W. L. Winebarger 
John R. Owens 
Lvle Baugh 
T. H. Spears 



Basketball Coach 

Delmas Gish 
Tom Neathamer 
L. B. Gaston 
Hugh Vernon Smith 
Charles Eades 
Bill Stokes 



REGION 5 



I). 17 Alvaton 

Bowling Green 
Bristow 
College 

Franklin- Simpson 
North Warren 
Richardsville 
Warren County 

I). 18 Adairville 

Auburn 

Chandlers Chapel 
Lewisburg 
Olm stead 
Russellville 



Alvaton 
Bowling Green 
Bristow 
Bowling Green 
Franklin 
Smiths Grove 
Richardsville 
Bowling Green 

Adairville 

Auburn 

R. 2, Auburn 

Lewisburg 

Olmstead 

Russellville 



Estil Griffis 
James W. Depp 
Prentice L. Gott 
Dero G. Downing 
J. W. Dunn 
Basil Smith 
G. E. Rather 
C. H. Harris 

I). W. Lovan 
H. M. Watkins 
Morris Shelton 
G. L. Summers 
W. N. Alexander 
Gene G. Wilson 



Clarence R. Sallee 
Denval Barriger 
Jess Kimbrough 
Alvin Almond 
Jim Ownby 
Andrew Renick 
William Covington 
William (Buddy) Cate 

John Sweatt 
Dencel Miller 
R. B. Porter 
James Young 
Earle Shelton 
B. H. Weaver 



I). 19 Allen County 
Ausin Tracy 
Glasgow 
Hiseville 

Park City 
Scottsville 
Temple Hill 

I). 20 Albany-Clinton Co. 
Cumberland County 
Edmonton 
Gamaliel 
Marrowbone 
Tompkinsville 



Scottsville 
1 ,ui as 
Glasgow 
Hiseville 
Park City 
Scottsville 
R. 4. Glasgow 

Albany 

Burkesville 

Edmonton 

Gamaliel 

Marrowbone 

Tompkinsville 



T. C. Simmons 
Kenneth B. Sidwell 
E. R. Jones 
Lenis Reece 
W. L. Gardner 
(Supt.) Lewis Baker 

David Montgomery 

L. H. Robinson 
Lewis P. Williams 
Samuel L. Smith 
Edwin Steen 
Ralph Clark 
Randall Glider 

REGION 6 



Jimmy Bazzell 
James Rush 
William Huntsman 
George Sadler 
Lloyd Sharp 
Ernest Neil 
Bob Pardue 

Bill Kidd 

Lewis P. Williams 
Ralph Reece 
Thomas E. Downing 
Cortez Butler 
John C. Marrs 



I>. 21 Adair County 
Campbellsville 
Greensburg 
Lebanon 
St. Augustine 
St. Charles 
St. Francis 
Taylor County 

1). 22 Buffalo 
Caverna 
Cub Run 
Hodgenville 
Magnolia 
Memorial 
Munfordville 



Columbia 

Campbellsville 

Greensburg 

Lebanon 

Lebanon 

R. 2, Lebanon 

Loretto 

Campbellsville 

Buffalo 

Horse Cave 

Cub Run 

Hodgenville 

Magnolia 

Hardyville 

Munfordville 



Joe B. Janes 
Thomas F. Hamilton 
E. E. Tate 
Charles F. Martin 
Sr. Nerinx Marie, SL 
Sr. Michelle Drury 
Sr. Charles Asa 
J. G. McAnelly 

Edwin R. Harvey 
Joseph G. Chanev 
T. Y. Tabor 
Everett G. Sanders 
W. B. Borden 
Lynn D. Thompson 
H. D. Puckett 



John Bun- 
Paul Coop 
Jim Dupree 
Ted Cook 

Rev. James E. Hargadon 
Owen Dieterle 
Sam Thomas 
B. B. Smith 

Montie Singleton 
Ralph C. Dorsey 
Clyde Smith 
Courtland K. Cox 
Little C. Hale 
Jimmy Edwards 
Don B. Bales 



I). 23 Elizabethtown 

E'town Catholic 

Fort Knox 

Glendale 

Howevalley 

Lynnvale 

Rineyville 

Sonora 

Vine Grove 

West Point 



Elizabethtown 
Elizabethtown 
Fort Knox 
Glendale 
R. 1, Cecilia 
White Mills 
Plineyville 
Sonora 
Vine Grove 
West Point 



Paul E. Kerrick 
Sr. Doloretta Marie 
Salvatore Matarazzo 
Damon Raj- 
Edward C. Hanes 
Paul Ford Davis 
H. L. Perkins 
Dellard Moor 
James T. Alton 
Charles Rawlings 



Ed Shemelva 
Fred S. Allen. Jr. 
John W. Hackett 
Edwin Goodman 
Bill Jones 
Bill Tabb 
C. R. Perkins 
Jesse Richards 
Chester Redmon 
Charles Rawlings 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1957 



School 



Address 



Principal 



Basketball Coach 



D. 24 Bardstown Bardstown 

Bloomfield Bloomfield 

Fredericktown R. 2, Springfield 

Mackville Maekville 
Old Kentucky Home Bardstown 

St. Catherine New Haven 

St. Joseph Bardstown 

Springfield Springfield 

Willisburg Willisburg 



J. M. Burkich 
T. T. Etheredge 
Sr. M. Raphael 
John S. Hambleton 
J. H. Harvey 
Sr. Marv Ephrem 
Bro. DeSales, CFX 
Bennett R. Lewis 
Geraldine Galloway 



Garnis Martin 
Ernest Ruby 
Robert Hamilton 
Lloyd Haydon 
J. H. Harvey 
Rev. L. A. Hardesty 
John Stoll 
Charles Kolasa 
Charles Wood Pearce 



REGION 7 



25 Ahrens Trade Louisville 

Atherton Louisville 

Central Louisville 

dePont Manual Louisville 

Flaget Louisville 
Louisville Catholic Louisville 

Male Louisville 

St. Xavier Louisville 

Shawnee Louisville 



Alfred H. Meyer 

Russell Garth 

Atwood S. Wilson 

Arthur J. Ries 

Rev. Bro. Mark, CFX 

Sr. James Teresa 

W. S. Milburn 

Bro. Thomas More, CFX 

Robert B. Clem 



Thomas Bryant 
Robert McGuire 
William L. Kean 
James R. Riffey 
Gene Kenny 
Rev. W. D. Hines 
Guy Strong 
Gene Rhodes 
J. A. Keiffner 



D. 26 Butler 
Eastern 
Fern Creek 
Ky. Military Inst. 
Ky. Sch. for Blind 
Southern 
Trinity 
Valley 



Shively H. L. Hatfield 

Middletown John W. Trapp 

Fern Creek W. K. Niman 

Lyndon N. C. Hodgin 

Louisville L. P. Howser 

Louisville T. T. Knight Clarence Smith 

Louisville (Supt.) Rt. Rev. A. W. Steinhauser Charles Quire 

Valley Station J. C. Cantrell Garland Garrison 



Lucian Moreman 
Roy Adams 
Roy Winchester 
W. T. Simpson 



REGION 8 



D. 29 Lebanon Junction 
Mt. Washington 
Shepherdsville 
Taylorsville 

D. 30 Bagdad 

Lincoln Institute 
Ormsby Village 
Shelbyville 
Simpsonville 
Waddy 

D. 31 Campbellsburg 
Eminence 
Henry Central 
Oldham County 
Pleasureville 
Trimble County 

D. 32 Carrollton 

Gallatin County 
Grant County 
Owen County 
Williamstown 



Lebanon Junction 
Mt. Washington 
Shepherdsville 
Taylorsville 

Bagdad 
Lincoln Ridge 
Anchorage 

Shelbyville 

Simpsonville 

Waddy 

Campbellsburg 

Eminence 

New Castle 

LaGrange 

Pleasureville 

Bedford 

Carrollton 
Warsaw 
Dry Ridge 
Owenton 
Williamstown 



Thomas S. Jeffries 

C. L. Francis 
Willis G. Wells 
W. A. Threlkeld 

Harding Lowry 
Whitney Young 
Anna B. Moss 
Elmo C. Head 
Bruce Sweeney 
W. R. Martin 

G. H. England 
Ivan Knifley 

D. P. Parsley 
Rov H. Dorsey 
D. W. Quails 
Eugene Robinson 

Palmore Lyles 
John M. Potter 
Fred Bunger 
Cyrus E. Greene 
(Supt.) William T. McGraw 



Glenn B. Smith 
L. W. Mullins 
Joe B. Hall 
E. C. Brown 

Arnold Thurman 
Herbert Gamer 
Kenneth Cole 
Evan E. Settle 
Kenneth Slucher 
W. K. Gordon 

Mitchel Bailey 
Ivan Knifley 
Lee Peyton 
Barney Threawt 
Howard Cardoe 
Ray Pig-man 

Shirley Kearns 
Chas. "Jock" Sutherland 
Delbert R. Walden 
Paul Marshall 
Charles Reeves 



REGION 9 



D. 33 Boone County 

Lloyd Memorial 
St. Henry 
Simon Kenton 
Walton-Verona 



Florence 

Erlanger 

Erlanger 

Independence 

Walton 



Chester Goodridge 
James Tichenor 
Sr. M. Clarita, OSB 
R. C. Hindsdale 
James S. Smith 



Rice Mountjoy 
Paul Champion 
Don Nie 

William Faulkner- 
Dyke Vest 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1957 



Page Seven 



School 



A (Id res: 



Principal 



Basketball Coach 



1). 31 Beechwood 

Covington Catholic 

Dixie Heights 

Holmes 

Holy Cross 

Ludlow 

Villa Madonna 

William Grant 



So. Ft. Mitchell 
Park Hills 
Covington 
Covington 
Co\ ington 
Ludlow 
Co\ ington 
Covington 



Thehna \V. Jones 
John S. Feldmeier, SM 
W. N. Shropshire 
H. T. Mitchell 
Sr. M. Judith, OSB 
Charles O. Dawson 
Sr. Aileen, OSB 
Charles L. Lett 



Harold Williams 
Robert Naber 
Lou Phillips 
Thomas Ellis 
Edward Toner 
Heulyn Bishop 

James E. Brock 



I). 35 Campbell County 
Highlands 
Newport 
St. Mary 
St. Thomas 



Alexandria 
Ft. Thomas 
Newport 
Alexandria 
Ft. Thomas 



F. I. Satterlee 

Harold Miller 

James L. Cobb 

Sr. Marv Honora, SND 

Sr. Mary Barbara, CDP 



Lawrence Kinney 
Owen Hauck 
Stanley Arnzen 
Rev. Carl Schaffer 
James M. O'Connell 



1). 36 Bellevue 
Dayton 

Newport Catholic 
Silver Grove 



Bellevue Ben Flora 

Dayton Kenneth R. Kuhnert 

Newport Rev. John V. Hegenauer 

Silver Grove (Supt.) Tom L. Gabbard 



Ben Flora 
George Houston 
James R. Connor 
Tom L. Gabbard 



REGION 10 



I). 37 Cynthiana 
Garth 

Harrison County 
Scott County 



Cynthiana 
Georgetown 
Cynthiana 
Georgetown 



Kelley B. Stanfield 
James B. McEuen 
Joe H. Anderson 
Tonv Raisor 



James Cinnamon 
Dorman McFarland 
Kenton Campbell 
James Johnson 



I). 38 Augusta 

Blacken County 

Butler 

Deming 

Falmouth 

Morgan 



Augusta 
Brooksville 

Butler 
Mt. Olivet 
Falmouth 
Morgan 



Alice Kate Field 
Jarvis Parsley 
Patrick E. Napier 
H. O. Hale 
L. H. Lutes 
Richard Gulick 



Jarvis Parsley 
Dwight Wolfe 
H. 6. Hale 
Cecil Hellard 
Richard Gulick 



39 Fleming County 
Mayslick 
Maysville 
Minerva 
Orangeburg 
St. Patrick's 
Tollesboro 



Fleminasburg 

Mayslick 

Maysville 

Minerva 

K. 3, Maysville 

Maysville 

Tollesboro 



Leroy G. Dorsey 
Finley Eagle 
Orville B. Haves 
H. W. Wilkey' 
Charles A. Browning 
Sr. M. Monica, OSF 
Eugene Fox 



Arthur L. Cotterill 

Randall Pelfrey 

Woodrow Crum 

Elza Whalen 

Gayle Bowen 

Rev. Eugene P. Wagner 

William Ryan 



40 Bourbon County Paris 
Carlisle Carlisle 

Millersburg M. Inst. Millersburg 
Nicholas County Carlisle 
North Middletown North Middletown 
Paris Paris 



Joe E. Sabel 
Nancy E. Talbert 
W. A. Buckner 
Willard Sandidge 
John T. Gentry 
Alonzo Combs 



Fred Reeee 
Ed Wells 
Herman Bowlin 
Charles Finnell 
William Nutter 
Everett Vanover 



REGION 11 



I). 41 Bald Knob 
Bridgeport 
Elkhorn 
Frankfort 
Good Shepherd 
Peaks Mill 



R. 4, Frankfort 

R. 2, Fankfort 

Frankfort 

Frankfort 

Frankfort 

R. 1, Frankfort 



Roy W. Bondurant 
A. F. Kazee 
Ronald Connelly 
F. D. Wilkinson 
Sr. Charles Benedict 
Howard Cohorn 



Ray Butler 
J. Lapsley Cardwell 
Claude Logan 
Homer Bickers 
Charles Furr 
Eddie Ward 



42 Anderson 
Burgin 
Harrodsbur< 
Mercer 
Midway 
Versailles 
Western 



Lawrenceburg 

Burgin 

Harrodsburg 

Harrodsburg 

Midway 

Versailles 

Sinai 



Walter Marcum 
D. R. Riggins 
A. F. Young 
Albert L. Berry 
Daniel R. Baugh 
Clyde L. Orr 
Robert B. Turner 



Jim Boyd 
Don Bradshaw 
Forrest "Aggie" 
Henry F. Pryse 
Ed Allin 
James McAfee 
Bobby Disponett 



Sale 



Page Eig'ht 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1957 



School 



Address 



D. 43 Athens R. 5, Lexington 

Douglass Lexington 

Henry Clay Lexington 

Lafayette Lexington 
Lexington Catholic Lexington 

Nieholasville Nicholasville 

P. L. Dunbar Lexington 

University Lexington 

Wilmore Wilmore 



Principal 

R. L. Grider 

Mrs. Theda VanLowe 
Clyde T. Lassiter 
H. L. Davis 
Rev. Leo G. Kampsen 
Billv Lockridge 
P. L. Guthrie 
Morris B. Cierley 
Dan R. Glass 



Basketball Coach 

Robert Abney 
Charles H. Livisay 
Elmer T. Gilb 
Ralph Carlisle 
Nick Wanchic 
Elmer Stephenson 
S. T. Roach 
Eugene Huff 
Bill Maxwell 



I). 44 Berea 


Berea 




Mrs. Morris Todd 


Berea Foundation 


Berea 




Roy N. Walters 


Estill County 


Irvine 




Luther Patrick 


Irvine 


Irvine 




Joe Ohr 


Madison Central 


Richmond 




James B. Moore 


Madison-Model 


Richmond 




Kenneth B. Canfield 






REGION 12 


D. 45 Bate 


Danville 




William Summers 


Buckeye 


R. 3, Lancaster 




Mrs. Gladys S. Brunei- 


Cp. Dick Robinson 


Lancaster 




W. R. Tudor 


Danville 


Danville 




Don R. Rawlings 


Forkland 


Gravel Switch 




Garland Purdom 


Junction City 


Junction City 




Earl Cocanaugher 


Lancaster 


Lancaster 




Stanley Marsee 


Paint Lick 


Paint Lick 




Fay Ward Little 


Parksville 


Parksville 




Joseph E. Wesley 


Perryville 


Perryville 




M. W. Rowe 


I). 46 Brodhead 


Brodhead 




D. A. Robbins 


Crab Orchard 


Crab Orchard 




Charles W. Bryant 


Hustonville 


Hustonville 




Cecil Purdom 


Liberty 


Liberty 


(Supt.) 


Garland Creech 


Livingston 


Livingston 




Charles Parsons 


McKinney 


McKinney 




M. C. Montgomery 


Memorial 


Waynesburg 




Lawrence Hale 


Middleburg 


Middleburg 




Nathaniel Buis 


Mt. Vernon 


Mt. Vernon 




William Landrum 


Stanford 


Stanford 




Denzil J. Ramsey 


D. 47 Burnside 


Burnside 




Raymond Combs 


Eubank 


Eubank 




J. B. Albright 


Ferguson 


Ferguson 


(Supt.) 


Howard Moore 


McCreary County 


Whitley City 




Dewey Ball 


Monticello 


Monticello 




Robert E. Woosely 


Nancy 


Nancy 




Herbert T. Higgins 


Pine Knot 


Pine Knot 




Mrs. C. D. Harmon 


Pulaski County 


Somerset 




Edward B. Webb 


Russell County 


Russell Springs 




L. A. Johnston 


Shopville 


Shopville 




Miss Bethel G. Burdine 


Somerset 


Somerset 




W. B. Jones 


Stearns 


Stearns 


(Supt.) 


C. W. Hume 


Wayne County 


Monticello 




Arthur J. Lloyd 


D. 48 Bush 


Lida 




C. Frank Bentley 


Hazel Green 


East Bernstadt 




Clark E. Chesnut 


Lily 


Lily 




R. S. Baldwin 


London 


London 




Henry Payne 






REGION 13 


D. 49 Annville 


Annville 




Zilda R. Heusinkveld 


Clay County 


Manchester 




Robert Campbell 


McKee 


McKee 




W. L. Anderson 


Oneida 


Oneida 




Joe Mobley 


Tyner 


Tyner 




James W. Wilson 



Edmund LeForge 
Darrell Crase 
Rodnev Brewer 
Joe Ohr 
Russell Roberts 
Zeb Blankenship 



Ozenia Hawkins 
Harold Murphy 
Earl Shaw 
Ken Snowden 
Donald Lamb 
Garis Ball 
Leslie Coy Dyehouse 
W. R. Duerson 
Hillard Combs 
Harlan Peden 

Joe Harper 
Bud Ledford 
Jack Johnson 
Earl Land, Jr. 
Preston Parrett 
Llovd Gooch 
Doyle McGuffey 
Truman Godbey 
Jack L. Laswell 
Denzil J. Ramsey 

Leonard Sears 
Lester Abbott 
Joe Moore 
Conlev Manning 
Gayle* Taft 
Audrey Johnson 
Howard Jones 
Robert Randall 
Charles Mrazovich 
Rov Holt 
Edward Tucker- 
Kenneth Stephens 
Lloyd Hudnall 

Claude McKnight 
Holbert Hodges 
Harold Storm 
Gilbert Samples 



Jerry Hacker 
J. W. Thurman 
Bruce Morris 
David C. Jackson 
Jack Powell 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1957 



Page Nine 



School 

D. 50 Barbourville 
Corbin 

Knox Central 
Lynn Camp 
Pleasant View- 
Poplar Creek 
Roekhold 
Williamsburg 
Woodbine 

I). 51 Bell 

Henderson Settle. 
Lone Jack 
Middlesboro 
Pineville 
Red Bird 

D. 52 Benham 

Black Star 

Cumberland 

Eva its 

Hall 

Harlan 

Loyall 

Lynch 

Wallins 



I). 53 Fleming-Neon 
Jenkins 

Kingdom Come 
Letcher 
Whitesburg 



Address 

Barbourville 
Corbin 
Barbourville 
Corbin 

Pleasant View- 
Carpenter 
Roekhold 
Williamsburg 
Woodbine 

Pineville 

Frakes 

Four Mile 

Middlesboro 

Pineville 

Beverly 

Benham 

Alva 

Cumberland 

Evarts 

Grays Knob 

Harlan 

Loyall 

Lynch 

Wallins Creek 



Neon 

Jenkins 

Linefork 

Letcher 

Whitesburg 



I). 5 1 Buckhorn Buckhorn 

Dilce Combs Mem. Jeff 
Hazard Hazard 

Leatherwood Slemp 

Leslie County Hvden 

M. C. Napier Darfork 

Stinnett Settlement Hoskinston 



IX 55 Breathitt 

Can- Creek 

Cordia 

Hindman 

Jackson 

Knott County 

Magoffin Baptist 



Principal 

Charles V. Singleton 
H. A. Howard 
Clinton B. Hammons 
P. M. Broughton 
Rev. Clive Smith 
Charles M. Lawson 
Dan L. Cobb 
H. B. Steely 
Raymond Wells 

James A. Pursifull 
Thomas Winkler 
Robert Hendrickson 
Shelvie Fuson 
Effie Arnett 
P. P. Estridge 

James H. Powell 
William L. Mills 
Talmage Huff 
Leonard F. Woolum 
Mildred Rowland 
Roy G. Teague 
Lee P. Jones 
Sam Potter 
John H. Howard 



REGION 14 



Jackson 

Can- Creek 

Cordia 

Hindman 

Jackson 

Pippa Passes 

Mountain Valley 



Riverside Christian Lost Creek 



Jason Holbrook 
Dave Craft 
W. W. Watts 
Jeff B. Mayes 
Kendall Boggs 

Marshall D. Colwell 
Grazia K. Combs 
11. M. Wesley 
Bingham Brashear 
Larry Lovott 
Monroe Fugate 
Raleigh L. Couch 

Millard Tolliver 
Morton Combs 
Alice H. Slone 
Claude Frady 
Orloff L. Knarr 
Lovell Ison 
Miss Anna Starkey 
Adah Drushal 



Basketball Coach 

Herb D. Tye 
Harrv Tavlor 
Harold Cole 
Z. R. Howard 
Earl R. Centers 
Tony McKiddy 
Orval Davis 
J. B. Mountjoy 
Warren Peace 

Willie Hendrickson 
A. H. York 
G. B. Hendrickson 
Carl Eagle 
Orville Engle 
Ray Shilt 

Charlie A. Davis 
D. C. Tavlor 
Earl Bradford 
Charles Hunter 
Joe Campbell 
Joe Gilly 
Needham Saylor 
James F. Summers 
James L. Howard 



Preston M. Armstrong 
Ray Russell 
Dorsey Crose 
Henry E. Wright 
Earnest Trosper 

Fred W. Johnson 
James F. Buckner 
Goebel Ritter 
Joe Gill 
Ray Howard 
Grant Combs, Jr. 
Kenneth Wilson 

Fairce Woods 
Morton Combs 
George Cornett 
Pearl Combs 
James B. Goff 
E. Roy Reynolds 
Miss Jessie Smith 
Dorman Rouk 



56 Hazel Green Aca. 
Lee County 
Owsley County 
Powell County 
Wolfe Countv 



D. 57 Belfry 
Dorton 
Elkhorn City 
Feds Creek 
Hellier 
Johns Creek 
Mullins 
Phelps 
Pikeville 
Virgie 



Hazel Green 

Beattyville 

Booneville 

Stanton 

Campton 



Belfry 

Dorton 

Elkhoni City 

Feds Creek 

Hellier 

R. 1, Pikeville 

R. 1, Pikeville 

Phelps 

Pikeville 

Virgie 



Mrs. Henry A. Stovall 
T. L. Arterberrv 
W. O. Gabbard 
H. G. Pennvcuff 
Ora Watts 



REGION 15 



W. F. Doane 
C. E. Morgan 
James V. Powell 
Nelson Hamilton, Jr. 
William M. Justice 
Quentin R. Howard 
Landon Hunt 
Tilden Deskins 
Clvde Senters 
Fred W. Cox 



E. B. O'Donnell 
H. K. Hampton 
Steve Turner 
William Orme 
A. M. Richie 



Charles Hutchins 
Monroe Hall 
Arthur Mullins 
W. S. Risner 
Donald Childers 
Glenn McDowell 
Don F. Burchett 
George Bailey 
Bill Trivett 
Johnny Benedict 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1957 



School 



Address 



Principal 



Basketball Coach 



1). 58 Auxier 

Betsy Layne 

Garrett 

McDowell 

Martin 

Maytown 

Prestonsburg 

Wayland 

Wheehvrig'ht 



Auxier 

Betsy Layne 

Garrett 

McDowell 

Martin 

Langiey 

Prestonsburg 

Wayland 

Wheelwright 



John C. Wells 
D. W. Howard 
Charles Clark 
George L. Moore 
James W. Salisbury 
Edwin V. Stewart 
Ottis D. Spurlock 
Lawrence B. Price 
Boone Hall 



Bill Goebel, Jr. 
Thomas Boyd 
J. E. Campbell, Jr. 
Estill Hall 
Denzil Halbert 
Ray Heinisch 
Jack Frost Wells 
John D. Campbell 
Wilbur Jamerson 



1). 59 Blaine 

Flat Gap 

Inez 

Louisa 

Meade Memorial 

Paintsville 

Van Lear 

Warfield 



Blaine 
Flat Gap 
Inez 
Louisa 

Williamsport 
Paintsville 
Van Lear 
Warfield 



Paul H. Gambill 
Virgil Porter 
Russell Williamson 
William A. Cheek 
Russell Bovd 
Oran C. Teater 
(Supt.) Hysell Burchett 
Clyde Copley 



Andy Wheeler 
Francis S. Stapleton 
Ira R. Adams 
Paul Watts 
Paul Butcher 
Jim Wheeler 
Howard Ramey 
John Marcum 



I). 60 Ezel 

Morgan County 
Oil Springs 
Salyersville 
Sandy Hook 



Ezel 

West Liberty 

Oil Springs 

Salyersville 

Sandy Hook 



Ottis Murphy 
Llovd E. Patterson 
Willis H. Conley 
Creed Arnett 
Roy Lewis 



Glen Helton 
Merle Nickell 
Howard C. Yates 
Leonard Marshall 
Shelby Linville 



REGION 16 



I». 61 Camargo 

Clark County 

Dubois 

Frenchburg 

Montgomery Co, 

Mt. Sterling 

St. Agatha Acad. 

Winchester 



R. 2, Mt. Sterling- 
Winchester 
Mt. Sterling 
Frenchburg 
Mt. Sterling 
Mt. Sterling- 
Winchester 
Winchester 



Walter H. Power 
Letcher Norton 
Arthur Hawkins 
(Supt.) Adrian Wells 
L. J. Cooper 
Dawson Orman 
Sr. Caroline Mary 
Nelson Jones 



Luther Risner 
Letcher Norton 
William H. Elster 
Mr. Ratliff 
Eugene Clark 
James Floyd 
John Danz 
E. J. Bi-anham 



I). 62 Breckinridge Trng 
Haldeman 
Morehead 
Owingsville 
Sharpsburg 



Morehead 

Haldeman 

Morehead 

Owingsville 

Sharpsburg 



Monroe Wicker 
James 0. Botts 
Calvin Hunt 
Edsel L. Karrick 
J. B. Cunningham 



John Sonny Allen 
Jack Roberts 
Warren Cooper 
Len Stiner 
Julian R. Cunningham 



I). 63 Carter Carter 

Erie Olive Hill 

Hitchins Hitchins 

Olive Hill Olive Hill 

Prichard Grayson 

V'burg-Lewis Co. Vanceburg 



Everett T- Phillips 
James L. Ivey 
Harold H. King 
Hayden C. Parker 
Max E. Calhoun 
Teddy Applegate 



Glenn Sparks 
Todd Tennyson 
John R. Hartig 
Andrew J. Fultz 
Ralph Cartee, Jr. 
Robert Wright 



I). 64 Ashland 

B. T. Washington 

Boyd County 

Catlettsburg 

Fairview 

Greenup 

Holy Familv 

McKell 

Raceland 

Russell 

South Portsmouth 

Wurtland 



Ashland 

Ashland 

R. 1, Ashland 

Catlettsburg 

Ashland 

Greenup 

Ashland 

South Shore 

Raceland 

Russell 

South Portsmouth 

Wurtland 



H. L. Ellis 

C. B. Nuckolls 

Webb Young 
(Supt.) Floyd Hall 

Louis Manning 
(Supt.) Fred Maynard 

Sr. M. Herbert 

Jesse Stuart 

Denver Ball 

Frank V. Firestine 
(Supt.) Foster Meade 

Stanley Ramey 



Bob Lavov 
W. A. West 
Delmis Donta 
Charles Snvder 
W. A. Harris 
H. R. Bowling 
CDP Rev. Donald Erwin 

Bennett Webb 
Ronnie Potter 
Marvin Meridith 
Garland Godsey 
Gilbert Edwards 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1957 



Page Eleven 



The Flying Dutchman 

Here's a state-wide study of fees paid 
basketball officials throughout Kentucky 
which will prove interesting. The Dutchman 
failed to receive reports from Regions 9, 
11, 12, 13 and 15, but here's the dope on the 
others. 

Region 1 pays its happy arbiters $12.50 to 
$15.00, with nearly all officials being re- 
quired to work both varsity and junior var- 
sity games; in Region 2 it is $10.00 to $12.50 
for one game and $12.50 to $15.00 for two, 
with a few schools going as high as $18.00; 
Region 3 finds officials averaging $12.50 for 
a singleton and $15.00 for a double: Region 
4 reveals that if a whistler works one game, 
he gets $12.50, and the same if he works two ; 
in Region 5, officials are generally required 
to work two games and are sent home richer 
by $12.50 to $15.00 ; In Region 6 the boys get 
fifteen bucks if they work one and the same 
if they work two: Region 7 finds the metro- 
politan area of Louisville chipping in $15.00 
to $20.00 for one game, while it is $15.00 in 
the surrounding county area (the officials 
working junior varsity games usually take 
home from $5.00 to $8.00) ; Region 8 says it 
is $15.00, regardless of whether one or two 
contests are involved ; here's something new 
in Region 10, with the whistlers getting mil- 
eage besides $15.00 for working one, and 
$17.50 to $20.00 for two; Region 14 swells 
the official's billfold by $10.00 to $15.00 for 
a single effort and $12.50 to $17.50 for a 
double, while in Region 16 mileage plus 
$10.00 to $15.00 is paid for one game, with 
an additional $3.00 to $5.00 being tacked on 
if the boys work the second game. 

These fees are a far cry from the late 
twenties, frugal thirties and early forties, 
when the Dutchman was joined in the 
"Officiating Gold Rush" by such nifties as 
Edgar McNabb, "The Magnificient ;" Louis 
Litchfield, "The Economical;" Delmas Gish, 
"The Thoughtful" ; and Bill Utley, "The De- 
bonair." Any of these chaps will tell you that 
it would have been easier, then, to get the 
athletic director's right arm than $15.00 for 
working a single game and you worked alone, 
not with two officials on the floor as now. 

Back in the early thirties, district tourna- 
ment managers were regarded as financial 
geniuses if they could just make expenses on 
tournaments. The year of 1931 recalls the 
pride W. B. Owen radiated when, as district 
tournament manager of the fiasco at Horse 
Cave, he announced, "Ladies and gentlemen, 





The Dutchman 

we have made expenses and no school will 
be out any money for paying the cost of this 
tournament." In 1929 it was this same 
"Sarge" Owen (as Coach Diddle used to call 
him) who could not dig up six bucks from 
gate receipts to pay the Dutchman for work- 
ing the boys, girls, midget and independent 
games in one evening, but who saved the day 
by coming up with collateral in the form of 
a country ham. 

The year 1930 found Coach Ed Diddle and 
the Dutchman contracting to work nineteen 
boys and girls games in the three-day district 
tournament at Tompkinsville for forty bucks 
apiece flat. It also found Porfessor Rudolph, 
tournament manager, with only twenty cash 
dollars for each of us when it ended. He made 
up fifteen of it by giving us the equivalent 
in chickens and eggs, which we sold on the 
way home, and a kindly lady of the town, 
Mrs. Eubanks, gave us enough angel food 
cake and grape juice to make up the rest. 
Hugh Poland, now scout for the Giants, 
played for Tompkinsville in this meet. 

In the middle thirties Dillard Moor, of 
Sonora, wasn't embarrassed when he paid 
your reporter off in $7.50 worth of pumpkins 
because he hadn't taken in enough at the 
gate. My car's back seat, front seat and trunk 
were filled with the fruits of the autumn 
harvest. Herb Ockerman, now superintend- 
ent of Boone County Schools, offered me 
$8.00 worth of fresh country sausage to work 
three games at Mount Washington and we 
contracted. It's true that officials coming 
along in the heyday of "The Magnificent," 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1957 



"The Economical," "The Thoughtful." and 
"The Debonair" didn't make much money, 
but they had an awful lot of fun. 

In our state-wide study, based only on the 
regions which did report, we learned that 
there are officials' associations existing in 
scattered locations. "Jolly Amos" Teague is 
the president of the Second Region Basket- 
ball Officials Association which meets at 
Madisonville, Howard Gardner heads up the 
South Central Officials Association at 
Elizabethtown, Claude Ricketts and Bob 
Taylor are presidents of the Falls Cities and 
Louisville Basketball Officials Associations, 
respectively, in the seventh region, and Bill 
Gammon leads the North Eastern Kentucky 
Officials Association at Ashland. If you know 
of others, drop the Dutchman a line. 

The best columnists tell us that when let- 
ters are received griping about your "stuff" 
you may feel encouraged because you know 
you are being read : when you get communi- 
cations of praise a celebration is in order, but 
when you get neither gripes nor commenda- 
tions, you are dead because you can't stir up 
enough interest one way or the other to cause 
anybody to write anything. Send the Dutch- 
man's wreaths to "Ole Ted." He'll know 
where the remains are. In December's column 
we begged you to compliment or condemn, 
using a post card. As we go to press, we 
haven't even had a chance to say "Hello" to 
the letter carrier. 

Back to our facts about Kentucky's offic- 
iating problems. There are 1400 football and 
basketball officials registered in the state. 
It's odd how some areas have plenty, others 
just about enough to supply demand, while 
there are serious shortages in some areas. 
As far as we can ascertain, there is not one 
registered basketball official in Caldwell, 
Webster and Letcher counties. Here's a com- 
parison: In some mountain counties the 
coaches schedule their games on nights when 
officials are available, while in the Louisville 
area the coaches' "cup runneth over" as of- 
ficials "scrap" for the games. 

The Falls Cities Officials Association 
draws a salute from the Dutchman for being 
alert and public relations conscious. When 
the University of Louisville played Notre 
Dame in Freedom Hall, forty-five high school 
coaches were the invited guests of the As- 
sociation. They'll also put on a "spread" for 
them in March, as will the Louisville Offic- 
ials Association. 

Reports coming in from officials indicate 
that a lot of good will is in evidence when 
colored and white teams come under their 



jurisdiction. John Gettler, recreation super- 
intendent of Lexington, worked the Dunbar- 
Pikeville game and called for an Abou Ben 
Adhem certificate to be sent to Dunbar High 
School. Said popular Johnnie, "I highly 
recommend that you recognize Dunbar High 
School for carrying out the standards in 
athletics that are in keeping with true com- 
munity spirit." Shepherdsville also won an 
Abou award when officials Bill Long and Bob 
Rosenbaum pointed out that Coach Joe Hall 
and his community do much to bring about 
good community relations. Bill Long, Paul 
Schlich and Mel Whedbee worked a tourney 
in Nashville involving two colored and two 
white teams. These Louisville arbiters re- 
port that everything was smooth even though 
it was the first time for such competition 
that far south. Bill said that the considera- 
tion and courtesy each race extended the 
other was good to see. 

The first Corn Cob Pipe of the new year 
goes to AI Brantley of Madisonville for un- 
selfish service. For three years he has been a 
volunteer coach of the V.F.W. baseball team, 
for two years has served as chairman of 
the grade school football and basketball com- 
mittee, was grounds chairman for Little 
League Baseball, and has been voted the out- 
standing citizen for contributions to civic 
improvements. It couldn't go to a nicer guy. 

Here's the Dutchman's closing thought for 
January. "No man has ever risen to the 
real stature of spiritual manhood until he 
has found that it is finer to serve somebody- 
else than it is to serve himself." 



COMMISSIONER'S MESSAGE 

(Continued from Page One) 

Rule VIII provides that no name may appear 
on the final list which is not on the prelim- 
inary list. It has long been a policy of the 
Board of Control and the Commissioner, 
however, to allow the addition of a name 
to the tournament list if such an addition 
was to correct a clerical error. We do not be- 
lieve that it was ever the intention of those 
who have formulated our Association rules 
to deny an eligible player the right to parti- 
cipate in the tournament if his name was left 
inadvertently off the preliminary list. How- 
ever, regardless of this philosophy, how 
much better will it be if each principal has 
his preliminary lists double-checked care- 
fully, and if he sends out a squad list to 
each of the member schools in his district 
rather than just a list of some twelve or fif- 
teen players who might be the fortunate 
ones at tournament time. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY 



1957 



Page Thirteen 



Films 



The basketball films listed below are in the Film 
Library of the University of Kentucky Department 
of Extension. The code letters "e. j, s. c, a" refer 
to elementary, junior high, senior high, college and 
adult audiences who may enjoy the particular film 
listed. The rental prices shown do not apply to 
schools which use one of the special subscription 
service plans, offered by the Bureau of Audio- Visual 
-Material. 

BALL HAXDLIXG IN BASKETBALL, j-s-e, 1 reel. 
•SI. 50 

Teaches fundamentals of basketball handling- in- 
eluding stance, grip, control, adjustment before 
shooting-, catching the hall, and other points. Pre- 
sents game shots, using special photographic tech- 
niques to illustrate principles. 

BASKETBALL BY RUPP, j-s-c-a. 2 reels. S2.50 

Animated play diagrams, slow motion photog- 
raphy, and action shots are combined in this new- 
film prepared under the personal direction of Mr. 
Rupp especially for coaching use. Among the drills 
and plays covered in this film are: pivot man's slide 
into the basket: Play Xo. 6, the famous Kentucky 
Basket Maker; legal screening; penetrating zone 
defense: and the Kentucky fast break. 

BASKETBALL FUXDAMEXTALS— INDIVIDUAL 
1KCHXIQUES. j-s-c-a, l 1 * reels, S2.50 
Branch McCracken, Indiana L'niversity basketball 
coach, uses his team to demonstrate the fundamen- 
tals of basketball. Slow-motion photography is 
used to break the various court techniques down 
into easily grasped essentials. 

BASKETBALL KENTUCKY STYLE, j-s-c-a, 2 

reels. §2.50 (in statei. $5. out of state) 

This is the revised edition of the film "Basketball 
By Rupp" prepared under the personal direction of 
Mr. Rupp especially for coaching use. 

BASKETBALL STRATEGY FOR GIRLS, i-s-c-a, 1 
reel, $1.50 
The basic strategy of offense play (fakes, rolls, 
cutting, screening, varying pace) and defense play 
(player to player, basic zone, shifting zone, triangle, 
and diagonal) is demonstrated and explained in this 
film. 

BASKETBALL TECHXIQUES FOR GIRLS, j-s-c-a, 
1 reel, §1.50 
Basic movement skills (running, starting, stop- 
ping, turning), passing (finger control, movement 
with the pass, leading the receiver, choice of the 
right pass), catching (side pass, high pass), shoot- 
ing (finger control, arm extension, wrist flip, choice 
of the right shot), dribbling, faking, and pivoting 
are demonstrated and explained in this film. 

BETTER BASKETBALL, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, color, $.75 
This film is produced by the Official Sports Film 
Service under the sanction of the Xational Federa- 
tion of State High School Athletic Associations. It 
demonstrates current rules and good officiating 
procedure, with colorful action by skilled players. 

CARR CREEK vs. HENDERSON (1956 Finals), 
e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, silent, $.75 
The final game of the 1956 Kentucky High School 



State Basketball Tournament is shown in this film. 
Can- Creek High School defeated Henderson by a 
narrow margin, 72 to 68, to win the championship. 

CHAMPIOXSHIP BASKETBALL— TEAM TECH- 
XIQUES. j-s. 1 reel, SI. 50 
Man-to-man defense is shown, with the means 
best used under varying conditions. 

DEFENSIVE FOOTWORK IX BASKETBALL, 
j-s-c, 1 reel, §1.50 
Striding with an opponent, checking, maneuvering 
him out of position and other basic skills are illus- 
trated, using- special photography to demonstrate 
points. Rebounding, pivoting, and correlated arm 
action are taught also. 

HAZARD VS. ADAIR COUNTY (1955) K.H.S. 

STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 

FIXALS, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, silent, $.75 

This is an excellent film of the game in which 

Hazard defeated Adair County by the score of 74-66 

fur the championship. Johnny Cox bore the brunt 

of the attack by the champions while all-state play- 

ei 5, Ralph Shearer and Terry Randall, were best 

to Adair County. The presentation of all awards 

and trophies for the tournament is shown also. 

HIGHLIGHTS OF 195ii STATE BASKETBALL 
TOURNAMENT, e-j-s-c-a. 3 reels, sound, §.75 
Interesting scenes of events during the tourna- 
ment are shown in this film. Action shots of the 
crowd, cheerleaders, and bands are shown in addi- 
tion to a part of the play in each tournament game. 

KING BASKETBALL, j-s-c-a. 3 reels, §.75 

The official rules for the 1953-54 season are in- 
terpreted in this film. In addition, play situations 
are demonstrated by members of the Shawnee Mis- 
sion basketball team, finalists in the Kansas State 
High School Tournament. Particular skills are 
shown by Robin Freeman, jump shot artist, who 
averag-ed thirty points a game for Hughes High 
School, Cincinnati; Wade Holbrook, a 7 foot 3 4 
inch giant from the Portland, Oregon, State High 
School champions; and Chuck Darling, Ail-Ameri- 
can center from the University of Iowa. 

MODERX BASKETBALL, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, §.75 

This film presents two high school teams playing 
basketball, illustrating the techniques of the game. 
It presents various infractions of the rules and how- 
to avoid them. 

NEWPORT VS. IXEZ (1954) K.H.S. BASKETBALL 
TOURXAMEXT FIXALS. e-j-s-c-a. 3 reels, 
silent, §.75 
This is the final game of the 1954 State Basketball 
Tournament, in which Inez defeated Xewport by 
the score of 63-55. The sparkling play of Newport's 
Redmon, and Inez's Cassady and Triplett. is the 
highlight of the film. The three players were select- 
ed as members of the All-State Team. 

PADUCAH TILGHMAX VS. LEXIXGTON LA- 
FAYETTE (1953) K.H.S. BASKETBALL 
TOURNAMENT FINALS, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, 
silent, $.75 
This is the final game of the 1953 State Basket- 
ball Tournament in which Lafayette High of Lex- 
ington, Kentucky defeated Padueah Tilghman of 
Paducah, Kentucky, by the score of 84-53. This 



Paae Fourteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1957 



film shows the superior play of two very excellent 
teams. 

RUPP'S FUNDAMENTALS OF BASKETBALL, 
j-s-c-a, 1 reel, silent, $1.25 
Coach Rupp's University of Kentucky Wildcats 
(1949-50) demonstrate ten different plays in such 
a clear manner that it is easy to follow and leam 
each play. 

SHOOTING IN BASKETBALL, j-s-c, 1 reel, $1.50 
Concentrating on the set shot, this film pictures 
the action of the throw, stance, aim, trajectory, and 
fingertip control. Special attention is given total 
body coordination, especially inward rotation of the 
hand and arm making the throw. 



Report and Appreciation 

By Geo. D. Wheeler, Associate State Secretary 

Kentucky State YMCA 

The program of the Kentucky High School 
Athletic Association, under the leadership 
of Commissioner Ted Sanford, emphasizes as 
one of its main aims the building of sports- 
manship. Through its "Sportsman's Creed"; 
its evaluation of officials, coaches, players, 
and spectators, on the basis of sportsman- 
ship; and its emphasis on sportsmanship) in 
all athletic events the Kentucky High School 
Athletic Association is rendering a real serv- 
ice to the high schools of the State of Ken- 
tucky. 

It is for this reason that the Kentucky 
State Y.M.C.A. is happy to help in this pro- 
gram of develonin? better sportsmanship in 
high school athletics by sponsoring its an- 
nual Y.M.C.A. Youth Dav and Cheerleaders 
Clinic. 

On November 17, 1956. the sixth annual 
program was held at the University of Ken- 
tucky, with more than 3,000 high school 
students and faculty members attending. Too 
much cannot be said of the wonderful co- 
operation of the University of Kentucky, the 
high schools, principals and faculty members, 
newspapers, radio and TV stations, and the 
officials and members of the Kentucky High 
School Athletic Association. 

Because of the strong support of the Ath- 
letic Association we have been able to get 
superintendents principals, coaches and fac- 
ulty members, all or most of whom are mem- 
bers of the Athletic Association, to serve in 
various capacities in this program. And we 
appreciate it. 

Warren Lutz, Director of the University 
"Marching 100," and Walter Hall, Band Di- 
rector of Lafayette High School, have been 
especially helpful with the program for the 
majorettes. Mrs. Stella Gilb, University High 



School, has year after year given of her 
time and thought with the cheerleaders. Dr. 
Hambleton Tapp and Bart Peak have helped 
with the Youth Day program ever since its 
beginning. Bernie Shively and Ken Kuhn 
have since the beginning of the program 
given of their time, energy, and advice. 
Bernie Shively, especially, has rendered a 
great service to us in planning and carrying 
out this program ever since the first event 
held six years ago. To all these and many 
more we want to say a deep from the heart 
"thank you." 



Here and There 

R. J. DALLEY, son of Secretary Rex 
Dalley, is making satisfactory progress fol- 
lowing a serious injury to his right arm. 
This injury occurred during the time of the 
Federation annual meeting and prevented 
attendance of the family at the meeting. 
Through skill in surgery, amputation has 
been avoided. The arm, with a fixed elbow 
joint, is healing and R. J., in his senior year 
in high school, is regaining use of fingers 
and hand. The best wishes for continued 
rapid recovery are extended by the entire 
Federation group. 

DECREASE IN NUMBER OF HIGH 
SCHOOLS: The number of hiem schools is 
slierhtly fewer than for a few years ago. 
This probably represents a healthy state of 
affairs. In most states, there has been a 
definite trend toward combining several 
smaller high schools into one district. This 
has been partially balanced by the growing 
practice of dividing hiorh schools which have 
an enrollment of more than anDroximatelv 
2500. The number of small high schools 
which have been combined into one is great- 
er than the number of larsre high schools 
which have been divided. This is because of 
the large percentage of small his-h schools. 
State Association memberships have remain- 
ed about the same as in former years be- 
cause of the admission, in manv states, of 
junior high schools. The situation in Towa 
is an illustration of what is hapneniner in 
these connections. A year ae;o. the Iowa State 
Association had a membership of 921 high 
schools. The number has now been reduced, 
because of consolidation, to 905 high schools. 
In that state there are 82 junior hi";h schools 
which are not a Dart of a senior hisrh school. 
Such schools are Granted junior member- 
ships in the State High School Association. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1957 



Page Fifteen 



COMMISSIONER'S OFFICE 

(Continued from Pas'e Two) 

The Perryville Six-Man Team 

Although there is no official Kentucky 
champion in the sport of six-man football, it 
is probable that the Perryville High School 
1956 six-man football team was the best in 
the state. In addition to winning its own con- 
ference championship, the Perryville team 
defeated Caverna, Barren River Six-Man 
Conference Co-Champion, decisively. Scores 
of the games played by Perryville during the 
1956 season were: Perryville 34 — Berea 6, 
Perryville 56 — Burgin 18, Perryville 30 — 
Berea 12, Perryville 51 — Burgin 32, Perry- 
ville 30— Eminence 24, Perryville 46— Ca- 
verna 0. 

Guide for Planning 

The Athletic Institute. 209 South State 
Street, Chicago 4, Illinois, ha-; printed recent- 
lv a revised edition of a GUIDE FOR PLAN- 
NING FACILITIES FOR HEALTH. PHY- 
SICAL EDUCATION. AND RECREATION. 
which was produced as a result of a national 
workshop of experts. The first edition of the 
Facilities Guide was published in 1947. and is 
now being used in more than 20,000 com- 
munities. There are hundreds of facts, 
figures, and ideas in the book, formulated by 
professional experts, including the follow- 
ing : Swimmintr Pool Design, Heating and 
Ventilation of Buildings, Indoor Surface Ma- 
terials. Lighting', Common Errors in Plan- 
ning, Traffic Circulation Within Buildings, 
Sanitary Facilities, Multiple-Activity Teach- 
ing Station Arrangements. Service Units, 
Suggested Locker-Dressino: Storage Arrange- 
ments. Administrative Suites. Desis-ninp; Out- 
door Snaces, General Plant Layouts. Teach- 
ing Rooms. Facilities Utilization, Facilities 
for the City, Health Service Units, Camp 
Planning. 



SUPPLEMENTARY T 1ST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled January 1) 

If one telephone number is ?iven for an offi-ial listed it is 
the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 
Able. Forest. 4616 South Second St.. Louisville 14. Em 66077. 

EM 6S752 
Allen, -Tames W. "Dink". "444 Monel Ave.. Huntington. W. Va. 
Alwes. Donald Rav. Vet's Village. Box 151. Bowline; Green 
Angel. Jack F., PS&M Co. 101st ABN Div., Fort Campbell. 

Edgoten. Ky. GE 94757, 4367 
Anthonv. Kenneth. 2624 Hale Ave., Louisville 11 
Ball. Denver, 142S Wuvts Ave.. Ashland. 40531. Russell 1140 
Bankemper, Jerome. 64 Licking Pike. Newoort 
Beeler, Arthur Louis, 436 West Court. Louisville 
Boling, J. I... 1016V. East Fourth St.. Owensboro MU 4292!!, 

MU 34555 
Broderick. Carroll A.. 1760 Normal Dr.. Bowling Green. 

38594, 38212 



Brown, Charles. 1S24 Broadway, Louisville 3 

Brummett, Bill G., Gray. 650W3 

Butler. Cortez, Marrowbone. 6712 l Bus. No.) 

Chandler, Bobby G., R. F. D. 1. Sturgis, 3841, Morganfield 89 

Clark. Harold B.. E. K. S. C. C.P.O. Box 121, Richmond. 9144 

(Keith Hall) 
Copley, Clyde. Warfield, 4802. 4762 

Courte, Donald .1.. Illo Larkwood, Louisville 12. SP 56600 
Cox. William .1., Oak Street, Pineville, 57.3M, 371 
Davis. William. 128 East Seventh St.. Danville 
Edmiston, Raymond L., R. F. D. 1. Nebo 
Fannin. Benny, Betsy Layne, 735. Allen 4472 
Fey. Allen. 123 Garden Way, Ft. Thomas, HI 16288, KI 11800, 

Ext. 1265 
Fortney, Robert L.. 2S05 Breckenridge Lane. Louisville, 

GL 81079. JU 43231. Ext. 474 
Fugitt, Karl F.. 224 Sunset Ave., Richmond, 699 M 
Garrett. Jack, S01 Center St.. Corbin, 874 J 
Gordon, Billy K.. Waddy. 2133. 2111 

Greathouse, Bobby, Old Scottsville Road, Bowling Green 
Hall. Elvis. McHenry. 2610 

Hamhlin, Gayle, Krypton. Williamsburg 620X 
Harris. Joe. General Delivery. Nebo, 4441 

Hatfield, Paul E., 1102 Madison, Evansville. Ind., 55621, 52471 
Hawkins, Charles C, 35(1 Maple Ave . Hodgenville. EL 83340. 

3141 
Hawkins, Ralph B.. 661 East Broadway. Madisonville. 2927. 210 
Hodges. Don. R. R. 5. P. O. Box 169. London, S41 L 
Irvin. T. Hugh. Rose Hill. Virginia 
Jenkins, Neel. 302 West Morton, Morganfield, 503 W 
Terger, Carl B.. 1601 East Sycamore, Evansville. Ind.. 

HA 45842, H \ 5331 1 
fustice, M.inis \v. 722 Scott Ave.. Pikeville. 916 M 
Kazee, William Wallace. Ill Maple Ave.. Danville. 9115. 1721 
Kitchen, Leslie. 1701 Lindy Lane. Lexington, 30396, 51575 
Lefevers, Jasper N., Jr.. Cardinal 
Levicki. A. P.. 340 Oak St., Norton, Va.. 556. 554 
Litteral. Ray. Morehead College, Box 391. Morehead 
Macon, Max C, 3001 Tremont Dr., Louisville. CH 5744 
Mays. Ralph J.. Heidi-ilk. 710R 

Miller. Claude O., 332 12th. Huntington. West Va. 
M 1 1 I.e. William A.. 1601 Shelbv Ave., Evansville 14, Ind.. 

GR 69542. HA 57276 
Minor, Edgar, Ivy Hill. Box 522. Harlan, 1243, 522 
Molen, James P. 102 Richardson Dr.. Somerset, 894L. 1507XR 
Moody, Adrian B-, 123s Frederica St., Owensboro. MU 36759. 

MU 36759 
Morton. Robert B.. P. O. Box 517. Uniontown. 66.T, 66 
Park,.. Rillie E. P. O. Box 731, Pineville, Edgewood 73293 
Parrott, Lannv L.. 215 Matthew St.. Campbellsville, 334R. 579 
Pall, hi. John B.. 1419 McHenry St.. Louisville. ME 43828 

■ IU 43231 
Fridemore Franklin D.. Union College. Barbourville 
Quinn. William 1., 1803 Seventh St.. Portsmouth. Ohio 
Reliford Paul Glenn Transylvania College. Ewing Hall. 

Lexington. 44260 
Riddle. George W.. Route 1. Maceo. RLT 15482 
Ritter. Donald. Waddy. Shelbvville 739 (Bus. No.) 
Robertson, William R., 121 Main St.. Springfield 4154. 9955 
Roll. Tom, Bethel Colege. P. O Box 31. Hopkinsville, TU 59207 
Routh, William E.. 603 South 21st St., Middlesboro 1504 
Scully. Thomas L.. Jr. 1427 Earl Ave., Apt. 4. Louisville 
Sebest, John A.. E. K. S. C, Box 762. Richmond, 9159 
Selvy, Curt, Steele St., Corbin. 1333 

Small, Rex, 300 East 27th St.. Owensboro. MU 42S45. MU 32431 
Smith, Leo. 715 Garland Ave.. Louisville 

Smith. Willard N.. 210 East 13th St., Apt. 7. Bowling Green 
Stergeos. Gus. P. O. Box 285. Morehead 

Stevens. Thomas E., 2240 Bath Ave.. Ashland. EA 42IS0 
Stokes. James W., 105 Highland Ave.. Earlington, 2791 
Stone. Doyle Clayton. 215 Burns St.. Winchester, 2973 
Stone. Robert E.. Manle St., Pineville. ED 73328. ED 72 125 
Svkes. Harry N., 439 Bamberger Rd.. Lexington, 5225(1 
Tate, Harohl D.. R. F D. 5. Richmond. Ford 4503 
Tolbert. John L., 2769 Greenup Ave.. Ashland 
Utley, James H.. 516 West Arch St.. Madisonville. 3272 J 
White. James D.. 1 145 Beech St . Louisville 11 
Winstead Melvin S2S Triplett St.. Owensboro. 43890, 44242 
Wright, Paul. 400 Laurel St.. Hazard. 825. 502 
Wvthes, Paul Morrison. Clarksville Base, Clarksville, Tenn.. 

GE 93521. Clarksville Base 272. GE 93521, Clarksville 

Base 221 



Protection Fund News 

Two hundred eighty-eight member schools 
of the K.H.S.A.A. had insured their athletes 
with the Protection Fund at the time this 
issue of the magazine went to press. Four 
hundred eighty-eight claims, totaling $9,- 
368.02, have been paid since July 1, 1956. 



Page Sixteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1957 



CONFERENCE STANDINGS 

(Continued from Inside Front Cover) 
Northern Kentucky Athletic Conference 



Newport 


1 


1 





25.00 


Dixie Heig'hts 


7 


1 





25.00 


Highlands 


7 


2 





20.00 


Bellevue 


6 


3 





18.89 


Holmes 


2 


3 





16.00 


Boone County 


4 


4 


II 


15.00 


Lloyd 


4 


5 


II 


14.44 


Beechwood 


2 


3 





14.00 


Campbell County 


-> 


5 





12.86 


Ludlow 


2 


• ) 


II 


12.50 


Davton 





7 





10.00 


South Centra] 


Kentucky 


Conference 


St. Joseph 


6 








25.0 


Bardstown 


4 


1 





22.5 


Tompkinsville 


4 


n 





20.0 


Elizabethtown 


5 


• > 





20.0 


Springfield 


3 


9 
o 





17.5 


Lebanon 


2 


4 


1 


15.0 


Glasgow 


2 


3 





14.0 


St. Charles 


2 


4 


1 


13.6 


Old Kentucky Home 


1 


6 


II 


11.4 


Fort Knox 





C 





10.0 


Southeastern 


Kent 


UC'ky 


Confer 


ence 


Corbin 


6 








30.00 


Middlesboro 


6 


1 





22.50 


Williamsburg 


4 


2 


1 


17.9 


Bell County 


2 


4 





15.8 


Pineville 


2 


4 





15.8 


Barbourville 


■> 


5 





15.0 


Knox Central 


1 


5 


1 


14.8 


Lynn Camp 


■_> 


4 





13.3 


Western Kentucky Athletic Conference 


Madisonville 


9 


ii 


II 


25.55 


Morganfield 


8 


1 





22.77 


Sturgis 


8 


9 





21.66 


Owensboro 


5 


1 


II 


20.83 


Caldwell County 


6 


3 


1 


19.75 


Franklin- Simpson 


4 


o 

O 


II 


19.28 


Murray 


5 


3 


1 


18.61 


Hopkinsville 


6 


4 





18.50 


Owensboro Catholic 


q 


■ i 


II 


16.66 


Mayfield 


2 


3 





14.00 


Henderson 


3 


6 





13.33 


Fulton 


1 


^> 





13.33 


Russellville 


3 


6 





13.33 


Daviess County 


2 


5 


1 


13.12 


Trigg- County 


2 


6 


1 


12.77 


Marion 


1 


6 





11.42 


Providence 


1 


7 





11.25 


Bowling Green 





9 





10.00 



All-Conference Teams 

Barren River Six-Man Conference 

Ends: Campbell, Caverna; Shipley, Austin-Tracy; 
Gentry, Hiseville; Lindsev, Caverna; Harlow, Temple 
Hill. 

Centers: Thompson, Park City; Reece, Hiseville. 

Backs: Lyon, Caverna; Poynter, Hiseville; Cox, 
Austin-Tracy; Gentry, Caverna; Wilkinson, Temple 
Hill; Cox, Hiseville; Powell, Austin-Tracy. 
Bluegrass Six-Man Conference 

Linemen: Garrison, Perry ville; Montgomery, Bur- 
gin; Goodlet, Burg-in. 

Backs: Adkins, Perry ville; Reynolds, Perryville; 
Lowe, Burgin. 



Cumberland Valley Conference 

Ends: GaiTett, Hall; Melzoni, Evarts. 

Tackles: Goforth, Loyall; Hodges, Lynch. 

Guards: Stephenson, Harlan; Harrison, Cumber- 
land. 

Center: R. Toby, Evarts. 

Backs: J. Toby, Evarts; White, Loyall; Creech, 
Cumberland; Hensley, Benham; Carmony, Black 
Star; Ray, Leslie County. 

Eastern Kentucky Mountain Conference 

Ends: Wright, Whitesburg; Stidham, Jenkins. 

Tackles: Sinor, Hazard; Johnson, Fleming. 

Guards: Horner, Jenkins; Browning 1 , Fleming. 

Center: Thomas, Fleming. 

Backs: Conley, Paintsville; Hodge, Whitesburg; 
Hill, Fleming; Justice, Pikeville. 
Northeastern Kentucky Athletic Conference 

Ends: Ball, Louisa; Morton, McKell. 

Tackles: McSurley, Russell; Collins, Louisa. 

Guards: Rose, Raceland; Alley, Catlettsburg. 

Center: Riffe, Wurtland. 

Backs: Griffith, Catlettsburg; Stewart, Catletts- 
burg; Rose, Louisa; Williams. Russell. 

Northern Kentucky Athletic Conference 

Ends: Kappas, Dixie Heights; Turner, Newport; 
Sarakatsannis, Highlands; Fleek, Lloyd. 

Tackles: Harmon, Bellevue; Fletcher, Dixie 
Heig'hts; Holzschuh, Newport; Bradford, Bellevue. 

Guards: Depp, Dixie Heights; Eibeck, Bellevue; 
Lear, Holmes; Condron, Highlands. 

Centers: Steele, Dixie Heig'hts; Downard, Newport. 

Backs: Hamilton, Newport; Straub, Highlands; 
Harden, Newport; Isaacs, Dixie Heights; Rawlings, 
Boone County; Martin, Highlands; Dougherty, Belle- 
vue; Remley, Ludlow; Mendell, Bellevue; Cochran, 
Highlands. 

South Central Kentucky Conference 

Ends: Petett, Tompkinsville; Lewis, Elizabeth- 
town; Pedigo, Glasgow. 

Tackles: Thomas, St. Charles; Moraja, St. Joseph. 

Guards: Stanford, Tompkinsville; Mudd, Spring- 
field; Bishop, Elizabethtown. 

Center: Steen, Fort Knox. 

Backs: Ransdell, Elizabethtown; Herman, St. 
Joseph; Wilson, Glasgow; Robinson, Bardstown. 
Southeastern Kentucky Conference 

Ends: Yeary, Middlesboro; Cheek, Bell County; 
Canady, Barbourville. 

Tackles: Hatfield, Middlesboro; Williams, Corbin; 
Haley, Pineville; Yancey, Williamsburg; Jones, Cor- 
bin. 

Guards: Patrick, Williamsburg; Clark, Middles- 
boro; Steely, Corbin. 

Center: Poynter, Corbin. 

Backs: Bird, Corbin; Byrd, Williamsburg; Harris, 
Barbourville; Terrell, Lynn Camp. 

Western Kentucky Athletic Conference 

Ends: Butler, Madisonville; Berry, Sturgis; Pick- 
ering, Caldwell County; Purdom, Murray. 

Tackles: Moody, Franklin-Simpson; Elliott, Mor- 
ganfield; Appleby, Madisonville; Poynter, Owens- 
boro. 

Guards: Sparks, Bowling Green; Duncan, Russell- 
ville; Yarbrough, Morganfield; Wright, Mayfield. 

Centers: Hardin, Hopkinsville; Thomas, Trigg 
County. 

Backs: Hunt, Franklin-Simpson; Lewis, Sturgis; 
Rodgers, Madisonville; Sturgeon, Owensboro; Buch- 
anan, Murray; Nay, Morganfield, Fisher, Morgan- 
field; Richey, Madisonville. 



We ShipThb DaV Vou BuY" 

HUNTS ATHLETIC GOODS CO. 

INCORPORATED 

PHONE 103 OR 104 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 



TOURNAMENT DIRECTORS 

IN STOCK FOR IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 

TROPHIES AND CHARMS 

We have in stock for at once delivery a complete line of trophies from the 
cheapest to the best. We engrave and made immediate shipment. Write 
for our new 1957 catalog. 

We also have gold filled, gold plate or sterling silver miniature basketball 
charms which are very appropriate for Championship Team or individual 
awards. 

ADMISSION TICKETS 

Two thousand to a roll in various colors for only $1.25 per roll. Reserved 
seats, special imprinted tickets and pass-out tickets can be supplied on 
short notice. 

FAIR PLAY ELECTRIC BASKETBALL SCOREBOARDS 

We have in stock the No. FD-60 at $375.00 and the famous Figurgram No. 
FF-1S at $465.00 complete with controls and ten feet of cable. Extra cable 
30c per foot. Carry a twelve months' guarantee. Two service men in this 
territory if any trouble should arise. 

WE HAVE THESE IN STOCK FOR IMMEDIATE DELIVERY. 

OUR NEW NO. AFR BASKETBALL 

Here's our finest PANEL-LOCK basketball. Exclusive PANEL-LOCK 
design eliminates panel lifting and peeling — assures far superior shot con- 
trol .... uniform dribble .... uniform backboard rebound. Finest quality 
deep pebbled grain cowhide leather. Wider channel seams for better finger 
tip control. This ball bears the signature of Coach Adolph Rupp of the Uni- 
versity of Kentucky and is used by the Kentucky Wildcats Basketball Team. 
Try one. The price is $21.95. 

May 1957 have many good things in store for you. 



Hunt's Athletic Goods Co. 

PHONE 103 OR 104 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 

THE LARGEST EXCLUSIVE ATHLETIC HOUSE IN THE SOUTH 



TROPHIES 

WIN AGAIN! 




REGIONAL TKOI»HIES DISTRICT TROPHIES 

Sutcliffe will supply the KHSAA Regional and District Trophies for 1957. In February 1957, Sutcliffe 
will send two KHSAA trophies to each Regional and District — for presentation to the victors. 



INDIVIDUAL TROPHIES 

You will like Sutcliffe's in- 
dividual awards for sports- 
manship — foul shooting — Sec- 
ond Team awards — and charm 
balls for individual players. 
Our salesman will feel it a 
privilege to show them to you. 
Order now. 




OFFICIAL TOURNAMENT 
BALL 

The Rawlings RS5 Official Basket- 
ball is the choice of most Kentucky 
High School teams . . . and It will 
be used in most of the Regional 
and District tournaments . . . and 
at the State Tournament at the 
new Freedom Hall! Of course you 
may buy this recognized Basketball 
at Sutcliffe's. 




UTCLIFFE CO 

LOUISVILLE 1, KENTUCKY 



N 



o o 



c 








High School Athlete 






Big Day at the University of Kentucky 











On November 17, 1956. the sixth annual Youth Day and Cheerleaders Clinic was 
held at the University of Kentucky, under the sponsorship of the Kentucky State TMCA. 
More than 3000 high school students and faculty members attended the Kentucky- 
Xavier football same. 



Official Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 

FEBRUARY - 1957 





'Above, lfft to rifihti As^ist^nt Superintendent of Public Instruction, -lames L. Sublett ; George I). Wheeler, State 
YMCA Representative; President Frank G. Dickey. University of Kentucky. These men took part in the Youth Day 
program on November 17. (Below) Cheerleaders and majorettes welcome the Kentucky football team on the field. The 
Xavier team received a similar welcome. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 

Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XIX— NO. 



FEBRUARY, 195 



1.00 Per Year 



National Federation Meeting 

The Kentucky High School Athletic As- 
sociation and the Kentucky High School 
Coaches Charity Association were represent- 
ed at the National Federation meeting, held 
in Chicago, Illinois, on January 3-5, by As- 
sistant Commissioner J. B. Mansfield : Ath- 
letic Director Edgar McNabb of the Beech- 
wood High School, President of the Kentucky 
Coaches Association ; and Prin. Joe Ohr of 
the Irvine High School, Secretary of the 
coaches' organization. 

The three-day meeting included sessions 
for state executive officers and for members 
of the National Federation-National Junior 
College Football Committee. Delegates from 
forty states were in attendance. 

Mr. H. V. Porter. Executive Secretary of 
the National Federation, has summarized the 
more important rule modifications which 
received the approval of the Football Com- 
mittee. Mr. Porter's summary follows: 

CHECK-UP OX 1956 CODE: Approxi- 
mately 20,000 football questionnaires were 
distributed to National Federation and Na- 
tional Junior College Athletic Association 
schools and officials. About 6000 were re- 
turned and tabulated. National Federation 
and National Junior College returns were in 
agreement concerning acceptance of the 1956 
rules and recommended changes for 1957. 

Questionnaire results from all sections of 
the country signify an overwhelming ap- 
proval of the provision which permits a team 
to choose either a properly constructed com- 
position or leather-covered ball while on of- 
fense. Returns indicate schools strongly 
favor the present rule requiring the Referee 
to start the clock when the ball is ready-for- 
play after a time-out charged to the Referee. 

The check-up indicated it was very accept- 
able to always consider K's first touching 
of its kick beyond the line as fair catch in- 
terference. A majority of 10 to 1 favored 
continuing to consider R's touching of a 
kick beyond the line as ending a series even 
if a subsequent foul should occur. Satisfac- 
tion with the 1956 provision for automatic 
acceptance or declination of a penalty when 
associated with certain scoring acts was 



also reported. 

95'".' reported it was satisfactory to penal- 
ize as unsportsmanlike the intentional grab- 
bing of an opponent's face protector other 
than in tackling. Previous action making 
white stripes below the elbow illegal be- 
ginning in 1957 was endorsed by a vote of 
approximately 20 to 1. 

ABOUT PROPOSALS FOR 1957: Ques- 
tionnaire returns favored revising the trip- 
ping definition to apply only to the foot and 
lower leg. The vote indicated a majority of 
approximately 3 to 1 favoring the deletion 
of the flying block and tackle and the re- 
moval of penalties for these acts. A sugges- 
tion that the clipping definition be revised 
to exempt a line area 10 yards wide instead 
of the present 8 yards did not receive a 
favorable vote. 

The returns indicated the rule requiring 
one-half inch knee pads should be revised 
to reduce the thickness when nads are made 
of an approved shock-absorbing material. 
Two questions about attempts to draw de- 
fensive opponents offside received a suffic- 
ient number of favorable responses to war- 
rant the Committee considering the neces- 
sitv of taking additional action to eliminate 
false starts. The returns from the ques- 
tionnaire made it conclusivelv apparent that 
the football rules of the National Federation 
and Junior College Code are becoming in- 
creasingly popular and better understood. 

REPORTS were made by the Safety, 
Equipment. Statistical. Game Administra- 
tion. Injury and Research committees. Sev- 
eral carry-over problems and new studies 
were referred to standing committees for 
study and action. 

AUTHORIZED RULES REVISIONS 

1-2-2: In 5th sentence, "at least" will be 
inserted after "extend." This makes it clear 
that a goal post which extends more than 
10 feet above the crossbar is not illegal. 

1-3-1 : A slight revision will make it clear 
that any type of approved ball may be used 
by the team which puts the ball in play pro- 
vided choice has been made before the be- 

( Continued on Page Eleven) 



Pag-e Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1957 



FEBRUARY, 1957 VOL. XIX— NO. 7 

Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association. 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor _THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Russell Williamson (1956-60), Inez 

Vice-President Louis Litchfield (1953-57), Marion 

Directors— W. B. Jones (1953-57) Somerset; W. H. Crowdus 
(1954-58), Franklin; Jack Dawson (1954-58), Middletown ; 
Robert P. Forsythe (1955-59), Greenville; K. G. Gillaspie 
(1955-59), Georgetown; Cecil A. Thornton (1956-60), Harlan. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 



Jtrom the Ct 



ommissionet s 



Offi 



ice 



1957 District Tournament Sites 

(1) Fulton, (2) Heath, (3) Symsonia, (4) 
Murray Training, (5) Marion, (6) Trigg 
County, (7) Madison ville, (8) Hopkinsville, 

(9) Providence, (10) Henderson (city), (11) 
Sacramento, (12) Owensboro, (13) Flaherty, 
(14) Butler County, (15) Beaver Dam, (16) 
Central City, (17) Bowling Green, (18) 
Russellville, (19) Hiseville, (20) Marrow- 
bone, (21) Lebanon, (22) Memorial, (23) 
Elizabethtown, (24) Old Kentucky Home, 
(25) Male, (26) Fern Creek, (29) Shepherds- 
ville, (30) Shelbvville, (31) Oldham County, 
(32) Owen County, (33) Llovd Memorial, 
(34) Dixie Heights, (35) Highlands, (36) 
Dayton, (37) Scott County, (38) Augusta, 
(39) Maysville, (40) Paris, (41) Frankfort, 
(42) Harrodsburg, (43) University, (44) 
Madison Central, (45) Junction City, (46) 
Memorial, (47) Somerset, (48) Hazel Green, 
(49) Annville, (50) Knox Central, (51) Pine- 
ville, (52) Wallins. (53) Letcher, (54) 
Hazard, (55) Jackson, (56) Owslev County, 
(57) Virgie, (58) Auxier, (59) Blaine, (60) 
Oil Springs, (61) Mt. Sterling, (62) More- 
head, (63) Prichard, (64) Greenup. 

1957 Regional Tournament Sites 
(1) Murray State College, (2) Madisonville 
High School, (3) Owensboro Sportscenter, 
(4) Beaver Dam High School, (5) Bowling 
Green High School, (6) Adair County High 
School, (7) Louisville, (8) Oldham County 
High School ; (9) Boone County High School, 

(10) Harrison County High School, (11) 
U. K. Coliseum, (12) Somerset High School, 
(13) Bell Countv High School, (14) Hazard 
High School, (15) Paintsville High School, 
(16) Morehead State College. 

News About Swimming 
The 1957 State High School Swimming 
Meet for Classes B and C will be held in 
Lexington on Saturday, March 30, at the 



University of Kentucky pool. The Class A 
meet will be held at the same location on 
Saturday, April 6. 

The State Swimming Committee and the 
Board of Control have not completed the 
preparation of swimming regulations for 
the divisions of the state meet mentioned, 
but it is probable that these regulations will 
be essentially the same as those in effect 
last year. There may be a few changes in 
Class B events. 

Class A schools will include those high 
schools with an enrollment of 750 or more 
(grades 9-12), Class B will include those 
schools with an enrollment between 300 and 
750, and Class C will be schools with an en- 
rollment of less than 300. Any school may 
enter a class above its classification, and 
any school entering a team in the meet for 
the first time may enter the class below its 
classification. 

The method of entering teams in the meet 
will be the same as in past years, with the 
State Office supplying entry blanks to the 
schools whose principals have indicated that 
they will enter teams in the meet. The As- 
sociation will probably make the same allow- 
ance to participants for transportation, lodg- 
ing meals, as is given State Track Meet 
participants, this allowance applying to not 
more than two participants in each event. 
Expenses for the swimming coach will be 
paid if the school has as many as four entries 
in the State Meet. 

Allotment of State Tournament Tickets 

Followers of teams winning the regional 
basketball tournaments will have an oppor- 
tunity to purchase State Tournament tickets 
from their school principals. Thirty-two 
hundred sets of tickets, calling for seats in 
the end and corner sections of the State 
Fairgrounds Coliseum, will be saved for the 
supporters of regional winners. Because it 
is anticipated that there will be no ticket 
problem during the first and second rounds 
of the tournament, each of the four schools 
in any session will be allowed to purchase ap- 
proximately 800 tickets if this many are 
needed. For the semi-final and final sessions 
the tickets mentioned will be allotted to the 
schools on the basis of their enrollments if 
such a plan becomes necessary because of 
heavy advance ticket sales for sessions seven 
and eight. 

School Passes and Ticket Sales 

The State Basketball Tournament passes 
for member schools and the tickets pur- 
chased for school personnel, the orders for 
which have been filled, call for the best chair 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1957 



Page Three 



seats. Nine rows of chair seats in the arena 
at each side of the floor were used. On the 
East side of Freedom Hall, the sections are 
Q, R, S, T, U, and V ; on the West, K, J, H, 
G, and F. Because of the fact that the school 
orders were especially heavy, it was neces- 
sary to fill the first six or eight rows in the 
middle sections of the Coliseum, above the 
boxes. These sections are 221, 222, 223, 224, 
and 225 on the East side ; and 206, 208, 209, 
and 210 on the West. Superintendents' orders 
were filled in the same sections. 

Tickets purchased by schools, in addition 
to those allowed for school personnel, call 
for the next best seats. Sometimes the orders 
were so large that it was necessary to fill 
them with tickets calling for seats in two 
different locations in order that administra- 
tors and coaches would receive the best 
seats. 

Protection Fund News 

Two hundred ninety-four member schools 
of the K.H.S.A.A. had insured their athletes 
with the Protection Fund at the time this 
issue of the ATHLETE went to press. Six 
hundred thirty-four claims, totaling $13,- 
039.60, have been paid since .July 1, 1957. 

"Certified'* Officials 

Since the list of "certified" officials ap- 
peared in the January issue of the magazine, 
four additional officials have qualified for 
the "certified" rating. Thev are : Jack H. 
Ballard, Doctor T. Ferrell, Warren Leet, Al- 
len W. Russell. 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled February 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 
Alexander. .lack M.. 151(1 Werner Ave.. Owensboro, MU 41823, 

MU 315X5 
Barlow. Billy B., Route 5, Paris. 1095W 
Boyles. Paul. Box 594, Russell. Park 892 
Busse. Carl Edward. 3113 Red Bud Lane. Louisville. GL 84431. 

AR 5748 
Craig. Randy. 446 Elm Street, Ludlow, CO 12765, GA 14460 
Early. Robert Gray, Bagdad, 2532 
Ferrell. Doctor T„ 541 Hill-n-Dale. Lexington 
Flagg. Robert A., 3212 Ainslie Way. Louisville 5, GL 86896, 

TW 53452 
Grace, Hickory E., Box 232, Middlesboro, 413J 
Hale, Ed, 303 Boiling Springs Drive, Lexington 
Kalfus, James, 2624 Hale Ave., Louisville 
King, Edwin O, 1715 East Fourth St., Owensboro, MU 30806. 

MU 35636 
Miles. Francis, 2624 Hale Ave., Louisville 
Monahan. William G., 103 Oaklawn. Frankfort, CA 33352, 

CA 72231, Ext. 312 
Preece, Boyce C Box 544. Kermit, West Virginia 
Racel. David, Watterson Trail, Jeffersontown, 5491, U. of K. 

Ext. 3651 
Raitt. William C 2531 Bremont Ave.. Cincinnati 13, Ohio 
Ray, Shirley G., 46 Woodford Avenue, Owensboro 
Salchli, Stanley W., 105 Aspen Ave., Frankfort, CA 38420, 

CA 33350 



By-Law 21 

School administrators and coaches should 
check their schedules carefully and see to it 
that their teams are not playing more than 
the number of basketball games allowed un- 
der the provisions of K.H.S.A.A. by-Law 21. 
In only one county, conference, or invitation- 
al tournament may the games played by a 
team representing a member school count 
as only one game. If a team plays in more 
than one of these tournaments, the one in 
which the most games are played may be 
counted as the one game mentioned in the 
Bv-Law. 



Films 



The films listed below are in the Film Library of the Depart- 
ment of Extension. University of Kentucky. The rental prices 
shown do not apply to schools which use one of the special 
subscription service plans, offered by the Bureau of Audio- 
Visual Materials. 

Baseball Films 

Baseball by the Code, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, $.75 

This picture g'ives an official interpretation of 
the rules and a demonstration of game administra- 
tion by Umpires from the Major and Minor Leagues. 
Play situations are demonstrated by high school, 
college, and professional players. Correct pitching 
procedure, interference and obstruction, live and 
dead ball, trap plays, infield fly, and strike zone 
are illustrated. 

Baseball Today, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, $.75 

This is the annual edition of a film covering 
generally all aspects of baseball as a professional 
sport. This sponsored film shows scenes of major 
league games and various personalities in the sport 
as they perform in various games. The film is not 
designed to teach different phases of the sport, but 
rather to create general interest. Useful for all ages 
except primary. 

Batting Fundamentals, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

This film shows basic skills which must be 
mastered before one becomes an accomplished 
hitter. Bat selection, stance, grip, stride, swing and 
follow through are clearly demonstrated by pro- 
fessional players. 

The Batting Stars of Baseball, s-c-a, 3 reels, $1.00 
Who are the big names among batters and what 
makes them good? Watch the featured hitters as 
shown in this film, learn the secrets of their styles 
and forms, and try it yourself. For clubs as well as 
classes. 

Catching in Baseball, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

The basic skills in baseball catching are present- 
ed in this film. How to catch a high rapid ball, a 
batter ball, a thrown ball, and a ground ball are 
shown. Stance, footwork, and body balance are de- 
scribed. Slow motion and close-up photography are 
used to enable the viewer to follow each step or 
movement in each of the basic skills. 

(Continued on Page Eig-ht) 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1957 



Schools' Ratings of Football Officials for 1956 



NAME 



Excel. Good Fair Poor 



NAME 



Excel. Good Fair Poor 



Adams, J. Mark 

Allmon, Raymond T.— 

"Honey" 
Alston, E. D. (Rev.)-- 

Anderson, E. W., Jr. 

Bach, Leonard 

Baird, Daniel McDade. 

Baker, Charles Joe 

Ballard, Robert A. 

Barbour, Morris 

Barlow, Bill 

Barlow, Bob 

Barlow, James L. 

Bell, Clarence 

Bell, Thomas P. 

Bennett, Howard 

Betz, Dick 

Black, Charles D. 

Blanton, Homer 

Boeing, Charles F. 

Bond, Jack C. 

Bostick, Lord M. Jr.— 

Bowling-, Harry 

Bowman, Earl G. "Dick" 

Boyles, Jerry F. 

Briggs, James P. 

Brizendine, Vic 

Broderick, Carroll A.__ 

Brotzge, Maurice 

Brown, George W. "Bill" 

Brown, John W. 

Burnett, Gerald 

Byrd, Harry G. 

Caiman, Edwin C, Jr._ 

Campbell, John J. 

Canter, John 

Carlson, David A. 

Carroll, Thomas J. 

Carter, Darrell 

Caruso, J. T. 

Chaput, Louis E. 

Chattin, Emie P. 

Clagg, Harry G. 

Clinard, Fred L. 

Coleman, Jim 

Coleman, L. J. "Duke" 

Combs, Travis 

Corea, Frank 

Coulter, William M. __ 

Cox, Bill 

Cox, Layton 

Craig, Randy 

Creasey, Fred 

Cmsthwaite, John S., Jr. 

Crum, Edward E. 

Cummins, Joshua W.__ 
Dallmann, James W— 

Davis, Charlie 

Davis, Clyde E. 

Derrington, Robert 

DeVault, Don 

DiMuzio, Robert M. — 

Dixie, Cornelius 

Dolan, Richard S. 

Doll, Howard D. 

Dotson, William S. 



4 
7 
3 
2 

ii 

4 
4 

6 
7 

10 
8 
5 
1 
1 
3 



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19 

5 
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1 
2 
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10 
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7 

19 
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3 


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1 Dreyer, Jack 

Duke, Jesse W., Jr 

Durkin. Jack H. 

Edelen, Ben R. 

Ellspermann, George A. 

1 Elovitz, Carl 

Ernst, Ray C. 

Ewing, C. M. Hop — 

Farmer, John H. 

1 Faust, John F. 

Fey, Allen 

4 Figg, Charles R. 

Fisher, W. B. 

Fitch, F. A. 

Fitchko, Bill 

Fletcher, John L. 

Florence, Robert H. __ 

Forbes, John W., Jr.— 

Foreman, Earl V., Jr.__ 

Forsythe, Robert 

Fortney, Robert Lee __ 

Foster, Berryan E. 

1 Freihaut, Herman P. — 
Funkhouser, Roy A. — 

Gammon, William H.__ 

1 Gettler, John F. 

Giles, Jonathan 

Gillespie, Robert C. — 

Gish, Delmas 

Godbey, Edsel T. 

Goebel, Bill, Jr. 

Goodwin, William H. — 

Gorham, Robert J. 

1 Gosiger, Paul 

Grace, Charles K. 

Grace, Hickory E. 

3 Greenlee, O. C. 

Greenslait, James W— 

Grieco, Joseph R. 

2 Gruneisen, Sam 

Hadden, Newell P., Jr. 

Haffey, Stan 

Hagan, Joseph E. 

Hageiman, Bart 

Hagv, Harold J. 

1 Hall, Frank P. 

1 Hanes, Edward C. 

Han-is, Gene 

1 Harrod, Robert 

Hartley, Wm. E. "Ox" 

Hawkins, Charles C.__ 

1 Hawkins, Ralph B. 

1 Hawkins, Robert W. — 

Heinold, Jack 

Heinze, Frank 

1 Heinze, John G. 

Hellard, George D., Jr. 

Hewling, Richard 

Himmler, Bob 

Hoferer, Louis R. 

Hofstetter, Joe 

Holbrook, William M 

Holeman, D. Fletcher— 

Howard, Z. R. 

1 Howerton, Jack, Jr 

Huff, Carl R., Jr 



2 

1 

11 

7 
4 
4 
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1 

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THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY 1957 



Page Five 



NAME 



Excel. Good Fair Poor 



\ wii; 



Excel. Good Fair 



Poor 



Isaac, John K. 1 

Jacobs, Edwin 3 

Janning, Robert L. 6 

Jarboe, Clem E. . 1 

Jenkins, Joseph Kean__ 

Jeter, John B. 2 

Johnson, Bernard 8 

Johnson, Ellis T. 5 

Johnson, James H. 3 

Jones, George W. 

Josephs, Michael 2 

Kathman, Bernie ' 

Kemper, Russ ! 4 

King, Allen 

Kraesig, Charles F. __ 

Kraesig, Raymond A._ •"> 

Kyle, Leslie, Jr. t 3 

Lancaster, Morris B. __ 

Lawson, Carl E. 18 

Lawson, Leland () 

Lenahan, Thomas F. _ . 1 

Lescisin, George A 1 

Levicki. A. P. _ 24 

Lindloff, Gilbert E. - 5 

Long, James S. 4 

Long, Leo J. '■'• 

Longenecker, David M._ 11 

Lucas, Gene T. ■"> 

Ludwig, Harry F. 2 

McClaskey, Booker ... 1 

McCollum, Robert G. _. 5 

McConachie, B. E. 

McCord, Anthony A. 1 

McCowan, Cormell 5 

McCubbin, James A. _^ 1 

McDade. C. F. _ 1 

McMillan, J. N. 8 

McTigue, Joe . 

Makepeace, Win. H., Jr. 4 

Malcolm, Donald C. — 1 

Manning, Louis 

Martin, Bill i 3 

Martin, Edwin J. 

Marushi, Rudy 2 

Matarazzo, Sal 2 

May, E. B., Jr. 

Mayhew, Happy 10 

Mayo, Henrv L., Jr (> 

Meeks, Jack 8 

Mercke, Frank P. 2 

Meyer, Harry J. "Bud" 

Miller, Maurice 1 

Millerhaus, Bill <> 

Milliken, John S.. Jr.— 

Mitchell, Emmett I 5 

Mitchell, Vyron W. __| 3 

Monroe, Robert I 

Moran, W. Carl 

Mordica, William A. __ 13 

Moss, Howard A. 9 

Mudd, Ed L. 4 

Mullins, Bobby E. 1 

Muntan, Peter J. j 2 

Mussman, Ralph 18 

Nau, Bill 19 

Neal, Gene 12 

Newman, Charles 0. _ 1 

Nimmo, Lo I 4 

Noland, Douglas | 4 



o 








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Nord, Ed 

Ogles, Charles M. . 

Omer, Billy W. 

O'Nan, Norman 

O'Neal, Bud 

Osborne, Ted G. 

Palmer, Carl A. 

Parker, Billie E. 

Parker, M. L. 

Parsley, Clyde E. 

Patrick, Charles C. __ 
Pearce, Horace Lee __ 

Perdue, Paul 

Perkins, Bill R. 

Perry, A. L. 

Poore, William E. 

Potter, Sam 

Powell, Logan 

Radjunas, Stan E. 

Ratterman, B. W.. Sr. 

Reed, Gordon 

Reinhart, Gene 

Rent'ro, John Edwin _. 

Rentz, Thomas W. 

Kiddle, Maurice G. ___ 

Riggs, William T. 

Robertson, Everett 

Koike, James M. 

Rogers, J. B. 

Rolph, Harold J. 

Rose, Alfred William__ 

Ruddle, Guv R. 

Rudolph, Fred, Jr. ___ 

Rupert, Joe F. 

Russell, Charles B., Jr._ 

Russell, Joe 

Sabato, Al 

Sacra, Gresham 

Sallee, W. E. 

Sauter, Harold S. 

Savior, Ben H. 

Schlich, Paul 

ociimitt, K. F. 

Schuhmann, Joseph R. 
Schultz, Edward Jake 

Schutz, John J., Jr 

Scott, Bill 

Scullen, Allan R. 

Seidel, Herb 

Selvy, Curt 

Shaw, John H. 

Shaw, Stanley E. 

Sheets, James W. 

Showalter, John 

Sinclair, George H. 

Sledd, T. 

Sloan, Wallace 

Smith, Edgar J. 

Smith, Walter K. 

Snider, Louis G. 

Sparks, Harry M. 

Stephens, Grover 0. __ 

Stephenson, B. H. 

Stephenson, Harry S.__ 

Stevens, Paul B. 

Stone, Clifton 

Sullivan, Don C. 

Thompson, Jack 

Thompson, Jack F., Jr. 



13 


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Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1957 



NAME 

Thompson, Paul 

Thompson, Ralph 

Thurman, J. W. 

Treas, Joe W. 

Tucker, William R. __. 

Vance, Wendell 

Vankirk, Alvia S. 

Van Meter, John W., Jr. 

Vamer, Ray G. 

Walkenhorsvt, Walter, Jr. 

Walker, Paul R. 

Walter, Lafayette 

Wanchic, Nicholas 

Wash, Johnnie 

Weber, Edward H. 

Weddle, Bob 

Wedge, Don 

Welch, Bill 



Excel. Good Fair 



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Poor NAME 

Welch, Tom 

Wells, Milford 

Werkowitz, Jack C. _. 

Whedbee, Mel 

Wigginton, A. M., Sr._ 

Williams, Bert 

1 Williams, James H. __ 

Williams, Reid V. 

Williams, Roy E. 

Wilson, C. P. 

Wilson, Jack R. 

Wilson, John Pope 

1 Winfrey, Shelby 

1 Wing, Howard R., Jr. ._ 

Womack, William H. __ 

Wurtz, Emil H. 

Zimmerman, William E. 
1 



Excel. Good Fair 



2 


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We Quote 



Competitive Athletics 

Editor's Note: Hollis F. Fait, writing in the 
December '56 issue of The Physical Educator, asks 
whether or not competitive athletics is a culprit or 
contributor in emotional development. 

Ask a loyal and enthusiastic supporter of 
inter-school competitive sports what contri- 
butions the program makes to the develop- 
ment of the young participants and his 
answer will likely be that it engenders sports- 
manship, emotional control, a cooperative 
spirit. By the use of these phrases he con- 
veys his belief that athletic competition 
is a positive influence in developing desirable 
behavior and character traits. 

But make the same query of someone who 
seriously questions the values of strenuous 
competitive athletics, particularly for pubes- 
cent and pre-pubescent children, and you will 
be told that the anxiety and worry created 
by strenuous competition are definitely 
harmful to immature youngsters. Thus the 
question of the effects of athletic competi- 
tion upon the emotional adjustment of the 
immature participant has been debated in 
educational circles for the past several years. 

A review of the literature dealing with the 
problem reveals these two distinct and op- 
posing points of view: (1) the emotional 
stress and mental readjustment required by 
strenuous competition produce harmful re- 
sults in a growing child; (2) participation in 
competitive athletics offers the youth un- 
usual opportunities for self-satisfaction and 
the development of desirable personality and 
character traits. 

The factors which contribute to the emo- 
tional stability or instability of an individual 
cannot be easily traced to their sources. 



Consequently, the degree to which the emo- 
tions aroused by competitive athletics cause 
or contribute to adjustment or maladjust- 
ment cannot be readily measured. But be- 
cause of the great divergence of opinions on 
the question, it is well for all of us to examine 
such scientific evidence as is available and 
apply it to our problem in the hope of seeing 
the values or lack of values that the inter- 
school athletic program has for our children. 

Experimental evidence demonstrates pro- 
found changes in the function and structure 
of some of the organs of the body do take 
place when an individual becomes highly 
emotionalized. It is widely believed that these 
emotions hasten a breakdown of the visceral 
functions. The frequent loss of appetite and 
weight and severe digestive disturbances 
under prolonged sorrow, anxiety, or worry 
are indications of this. However, these phy- 
siological changes are not evident When 
emotions of this class are preparatory re- 
actions in the form of mobilization of organic 
and visceral resources for the maximal phy- 
sical exertion; and, when these resources are 
not used, a probable detrimental effect upon 
body functions results. It would appear, 
then, strenuous physical activity prevents 
bodily disturbances engendered by emotions. 
However, there are many other facets to 
emtional development besides this aspect of 
the problem. 

It is difficult to determine the effects win- 
ning or losing a game or even being a com- 
petitor will have upon the participant. How 
a player responds to having struck out with 
the bases loaded and the educational impli- 
cations of the situation undoubtedly depend 
upon many factors among which will be the 
type of coaching, crowd response, parental 
(Continued on Page Eight) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1957 



Page Seven 




The Flying Dutchman 

The Dutchman's Hospitality Committee is 
determined that visitors in Louisville for 
the State High School Tournament will be 
extended every courtesy. High school stu- 
dents, especially, have a treat in store for 
them, with a state-wide Youth Night Club 
and Breakfast Club being set up in the Ar- 
mory, close to all of the downtown hotels. 
To provide the kind of fun the high school 
set goes for in a big way while the games 
are not in session, they will have their own 
Xight Club in operation from 10 :00 p.m. 
until 1 :00 a.m. on Thursday and Friday 
nights, with their own Breakfast Club func- 
tioning at the same Armory location from 
8:00 a.m. until 12:00 noon on Friday and 
from 8:00 a.m. until 11:00 a.m. on Saturday. 
There will be dancing, games and recreation 
of all kinds, plus some live talent floor shows 
during dancing intermissions, and all this is 
free as a courtesy from the Hospitality Com- 
mittee of Louisville to the young people of 
Kentucky ! 

Back to the committee for a moment! 
When anybody assembles such hustlers as 
Bill Moore and Andy Rose, of Louisville's 
Recreation Department ; Mayor Broaddus, of 
Louisville; Judge Van Arsdale, of Jefferson 
County; Mr. Dave Quinn, representing the 
hotels; Earl Ruby of the Courier-Journal; 
Dean Eagle, of the Louisville Times ; George 
Walsh, WHAS : Ed Kallay, WAVE ; Richard 
Van Hoose, Superintendent of Jefferson 
County Schools; Charlie Spears and Oakley 
Brown, of the Jefferson County Recreation 
Program : Ray Wimberg, promoter par ex- 
cellence of the Falls Cities ; and K. P. Vinsel, 
of the Louisville Chamber of Commerce, a 
group has been assembled which can make 
anybody feel glad they came to the State 
Tournament. 



In last month's column, we told you that 
there were no registered basketball officials 
in Letcher County, but we must correct that 
statement since Dave Hurst and Ed Miracle 
have been located there. How we overlooked 
two of the finest of Kentucky's officials re- 
mains a mystery! 

From Ben Flora, the personable Bellevue 
gentleman, comes information that one of 
the best officials' associations in Kentucky is 
located in Region 9, up in Northern Ken- 
tucky. With such leadership as Ben and John 
Schaar can give to any group, that associa- 
tion would, of necessity, have to be one of 
the best. Certainly, some of the finest of- 
ficiating in Kentucky is found in this area. 

Ben Flora points out that while $12.50 is 
a pretty good medium for the fees paid 
basketball officials, a larger one probably 
would be in effect if the gyms were lai'ger 
and the schools were placed in a better finan- 
cial situation by larger gate receipts. One 
thing is certain, that being that the schools 
in that area make up in good neighbor rela- 
tionships and sportsmanship for any inabil- 
ity to pay higher officiating fees. Officials 
have another big advantage in that area, in 
that there are little or no travel problems 
because the schools are so close together. 

Johnny Crosthwaite, Harlan's Hope for 
Hollywood, reports a basketball officials' or- 
ganization doing a grand job under the lead- 
ership of Julian Pitzer at Middlesboro and 
functioning under the name of the South- 
eastern Kentucky Officials' Association. 
Johnny says that officials in this area make 
$12.50 plus mileage for one game. 

Kentucky communities interested in 
recreation will do well to keep their eyes 
focused on Bowling Green, where the City 
Council voted to get a fun program started, 
and on Paducah, where Mayor George Jacobs 
and his Council have already acquired new 
ground for recreational purposes and are 
getting ready to launch a full scale recrea- 
tion program. 

Nick Poppas, the rough diamond from 
Blue Diamond, has long laid claim to being 
Kentucky's shortest official. His whole 
frame, measuring 4'10" from the bottom of 
his feet to the top of his head, houses one of 
the biggest hearts in the Commonwealth. 
Now Nick lays claim to having the youngest 
basketball player in the person of his three- 
year old son, named Steven Cooper Poppas 
after the great Warren Cooper of Morehead 
fame. Little Steve knows all of the teams in 
the fourteenth region and most of the 
(Continued on Pag'e Ten) 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1957 



WE QUOTE 

(Continued from Page Six) 

attitude and the past experiences of the bat- 
ter. 

Personality, which may be defined as the 
sum total of behavior, is definitely affected 
by emotions. Thus the intensity of emotions 
engendered in athletic competition has an 
effect upon the attitudes and personalities 
of the participants. It is these attitudes and 
personality changes that have led to the 
conception that athletic competition develops 
character, personality, leadership, and the 
ability to take democratic action. Such broad 
generalizations without reservations or fur- 
ther explanations are largely false. It would 
be impossible to assume that such develop- 
ment is automatic in competitive athletics 
and hence, an inherent part of such activity. 
Dishonesty, unfairness and arrogancy are 
just as readily and easily developed in the 
participant in competitive athletics as the 
qualities of honesty, fairness, and humility. 
The characteristics developed depend upon 
the approach to and the guidance offered in 
specific situations. 

There is reason to believe that emotional 
stability or instability is not an inherent 
result of competitive athletics but is, rather 
dependent upon the guidance received and 
the example set by the coaches and other 
school personnel. If one sees team members 
displaying an excessive amount of emotion 
in winning or losing a game, one can often 
see a similar type of action on the part of 
their coach. A coach who stalks from his 
bench in anger every time a foul is called 
upon one of his players is probably not go- 
ing to instill emotional control in his charges. 
On the other hand, a coach who exhibits emo- 
tional control and insists upon the same 
from his players will probably help the par- 
ticipants to develop greater emotional sta- 
bility and maturity. 

Mouthing the great benefits to be derived 
from inter-school sports does not insure 
their existence. A definite plan for the de- 
velopment of desirable characteristics must 
be made and carefully worked out during 
practice sessions and actual competition. 
This precludes that winning the game is not 
the most essential feature of inter-school 
competition. The great emphasis upon win- 
ning which permeates inter-school sports 
from junior high school to college is largely 
responsible for the development of many of 
the undesirable characteristics mentioned 
above. To aid in the development of good 
character and personality, inter-school sports 



must be directed toward the individual, not 
toward the trophies, the gate receipts, not 
the press box. 

Competitive athletics, if properly directed, 
then, may be of some value in the develop- 
ment of a good personality and in attaining 
maturity. (This is not to be construed to 
mean that competitive athletics are the only 
physical activity in which such development 
can take place, or that they are necessary for 
such development to occur.) In many cases, 
however, too many factors outside of the 
actual educative process have exerted in- 
fluence upon the competitive athletic pro- 
gram with the undesirable result that too 
much emphasis has been placed upon the 
need to win games. Under such conditions 
it is difficult to create favorable situations 
for desirable emotional development. 

While those who opposed inter-school 
sports may be overly positive in asserting 
that the anxieties of competitive play are 
harmful to the participants, their criticism 
of over-emphasis and misdirection is sound. 
Even the most biased proponents of inter- 
school competitive athletics must recognize 
that only in the most healthy of educational 
environments can the program make any 
positive contribution to emotional maturity 
and character development. It would be nec- 
essary to recognize also that other school or 
home activities which are less likely to be 
twisted into non-educational channels could 
be just as valuable to the students' emotional 
growth and development. 



FILMS 



(Continued from Page Three) 



Catching Stars of Baseball, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $.75 

This is a film designed to assist in the coach- 
ing of catchers but it is also interesting and enter- 
taining. Correct methods and techniques of receiv- 
ing, throwing, signalling and fielding- are illustrated 
by Bill Dickey, Sherman Lollar, Yogi Berra and Roy 
Campanella. 

Democracy of Baseball, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $.75 

The purpose of this film is for further develop- 
ment of young baseball players in our modern 
democracy and illustrates this through sports and 
sports competition. This film includes a brief his- 
tory of baseball along with a cavalcade of past 
and present stars. 

Double-Play Kings of Baseball, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $.75 
This film presents an analysis of the double 
play in baseball. Different players from several 
major leagues are shown in action. Fielding, tagging, 
and throwing are illustrated and explained. 

Hitting In Baseball, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Slow motion and close-up photography are used 
to follow accurately and graphically the basic fun- 
damentals of hitting in baseball. Coordination of 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1957 



Page Nine 



feet, legs, hips, shoulders, arms, and head is ex- 
plained. How to select a bat, how to hold it, and 
correct batting positions are shown. 



baseball. Correct methods of hitting, catching, and 
throwing are demonstrated in natural and slow mo- 
tion. Based on book by Bert V. Dunne. 



Infield Play at First and Third, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $.75 
The fundamentals and finer points of infield 
play at first and third bases are illustrated by big- 
league players. Fielding stance, throwing, tagging 
runners, etc., are pictured, often in slow motion. 

Inside Baseball, j-s, 3 reels, $1.00 

Fundamentals of baseball, including pitching-, 
batting, fielding-, and base-running, are demonstrat- 
ed. 

1953 Kentucky High School A. A. Baseball Tourna- 
ment, j-s-c-a, 4 reels, b & w, color, $.75 

This film has some shots from each of the 
games played in the tournament. A large part of 
the final game, St. Joseph vs. Jenkins, is presented. 
The daytime games were filmed in color. 

1954 Kentucky High School A. A. Baseball Tourna- 
ment, j-s-c-a, 4 reels, silent, b & w, color, $.75 

A part of each game played in the first round 
is shown. Several innings of the final game with 
Newport Catholic defeating Louisville Male and Girls 
6-0, are included in the picture. Daytime action was 
filmed in color. 

1955 Kentucky High School A. A. Baseball Tourna- 
ment, j-s-c-a, 4 reels, silent, b & W, color, $.75 

This film has some shots from each of the 
games played in the tournament. duPont Manual 
defeated Hall Hig-h School for the championship by 
a score of 13-3. All the final game is shown in color. 

1956 Kentucky High School A. A. Baseball Tourna- 
ment, j-s-c-a, 4 reels, silent, $.75 

Group pictures and action shots of the eight 
teams in the tournament are shown in the film. 
Also included are the first innings of the semi- 
final games and four innings of the final game be- 
tween Newport Catholic and Murray. 

Modern Baseball, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, color, $.75 

This film deals mainly with the rules of the 
game. It presents various infractions of the rules 
and the results of errors made in the game. 

Pitching Stars of Baseball, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $.75 

Shows four of the leading pitchers in action. 
Types of pitches and methods of practice are por- 
trayed. 

Play Ball, America, j-s-a, 3 reels, $1.00 

This film takes up defensive baseball. Illustrated 
under pitching are overhand, sidearm, and under- 
hand deliveries, fast curve, slow, knuckle and screw- 
ball pitches; positions on the rubber and ways of 
catching a man off base. Infielding, tagging, double 
plays and catching pegs to the bases are illustrated. 
Catching a fly and throwing in are demonstrated 
in outfielding. The film turns to an analysis of 
offensive baseball. Purposes of the hit and run play 
are explained. Base running is taken up. 

Play Ball, Son., j-s, 1% reels, $2.50 

Joe Cronin introduces this film, showing- a 
g-roup of fourteen-year-old boys who are experts in 



Throwing- In Baseball, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Slow motion, close-up, and stop photography 
are used in presenting the basic fundamentals of 
throwing in baseball. Instructions are given for the 
overhead, three-quarters side, side, and underhand 
throws. Coordination of foot and aim motion is 
stressed, as well as coordination of the body as a 
whole. 

Touching All Bases, j-s-a, 4 reels, $1.00 

This film is intended to teach youngsters base- 
ball by showing various American League stars 
playing their positions. It is also intended to give 
fans as a whole a better understanding and knowl- 
edge of the national pastime. This film shows Father 
Flanagan and his Boys Town Team, the Hall of 
Fame ceremonies in Cooperstown, New York, and 
scenes from night baseball games. 

The Umpire in Baseball, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $.75 

Summarizes importance of the umpire to the 
baseball g-ame. Explanation of the duties of umpire 
and also qualifications for job, showing where they 
receive their training. 

Winning Baseball, j-s-a, 3 reels, $.75 

The "cut-off" play, how the pitcher catches a 
man off base and how to call for a catch of a fly 
ball are explained. Art of base coaching is depicted. 
Ways of keeping in condition throughout the sea- 
son and of caring for equipment are shown. Players 
of the National League show their style of pitching, 
batting and fielding. Umpires' techniques are demon- 
strated. The picture concludes with scenes from the 
final game of the 1940 World Series. 

World Series of 1952. e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, $.75 

The two teams playing were the Brooklyn 
Dodgers of the National League and the New York 
Yankees of the Amei-ican. The Yankees won the 
championship and were again the world's champ- 
ions after a long and exciting series. 

World Series of 1953, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels, $.75 

This is the fiftieth anniversary of world Series 
games between the American and the National 
Leagues. The two teams participating- were the 
Brooklyn Dodgers of the National League and the 
New York Yankees of the American League. The 
Yankees retained the championship by winning the 
first, second, third and sixth games of the series. 

World Series of 1954, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, $.75 

A picture of the series in which the New York 
Giants defeated the Cleveland Indians in four 
straight games. The Indians had set a record for 
the number of games won during a season in win- 
ning the American League Pennant. 

World Series of 1955, j-s-c-a, 4 reels, $.75 

Exciting moments of the seven games between 
the Brooklyn Dodgers and the New York Yankees 
are shown in this film. The commentary leading up 
to each game makes the film interesting as the 
Dodgers win the championship. 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1957 



Swimming Films 

Aquatic Artistry, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

The film presents a diving- exhibition by Har- 
old Smith, an Olympic champion. Slow motion 
photography brings out clearly various points in 
Smith's techniques. 

Beginning Swimming, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Throug'h scenes photographed both above and 
beneath the surface of the water, basic techniques 
of swimming - for beginners are demonstrated. Land 
and water drills involving kicking, breathing, float- 
ing, paddling, and stroking and pulling with the arm 
are practiced separately, then coordinated as the 
swimmer learns the American crawl. The back float, 
back stroke, and breast stroke are also illustrated 
and explained. 

Breast Stroke, Side Stroke, and Underwater Swim- 
ming, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

This film presents the conventional breast, 
stroke, timing the strokes, and the kick. 

Crawl Stroke, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

The basic principles of the stroke are presented 
in this film. The arm stroke, the kick, and breath- 
ing are demonstrated. This film also includes slow 
motion shots under water. 

Diving Fundamentals, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

After a brief history of the sport of diving, the 
following points are explained and demonstrated: 
The hurdle jump, determining the correct distance, 
proper arm action, correct way of landing on the 
feet, proper takeoff and lift, correct entry into the 
water. The backward dive is also taught, including 
lift, arching the body, and entry into the water. The 
motion is stopped at various points to enable de- 
tailed study of form. 

1953 Kentucky High School A. A. Swimming Meet, 
j-s-c-a, 2 reels, silent, $.75 

This film shows the finals of all events in the 
1953 State Swimming Meet. The individual divers 
are included. St. Xavier was the winner in Class A, 
Berea Foundation in Class B, and Newport in Class 
C. 

1955 Kentucky High School A. A. Swimming Meet, 
j-s-c-a, 4 reels, silent, $.75 

Highlights of the meet and championship heats 
are shown in the film. St. Xavier of Louisville won 
the Class A title for the ninth consecutive year. 
University High of Lexington won the Class B and 
Bellevue the Class C. 

Learn to Swim, e-j-s-a, 2 reels, $.75 

This film outlines the buddy system in learning 
to swim. Steps illustrated are as follows: Breathing, 
floating and gliding, arm stroke, leg stroke, elemen- 
tary swimming, demonstration of stroke combina- 
tion, and adaptation of stroke to individuals. 

Swim and Live, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $.75 

Men of the Army Air Forces at Miami are 
taught to swim from floating to swimming through 
burning oil. The film is useful for pre-induction in- 
struction and for safety classes as well as for gen- 
eral programs. 



THE FLYING DUTCHMAN 

(Continued from Page Seven) 

coaches. Russ Williamson, of Inez, would 
have twenty years knocked off his chrono- 
logical table if he could see the little guy 
shooting and dribbling between halves like 
his little boy used to a couple of decades ago. 
Such father and son relationships as exist 
between Nick and little Steve and Russ and 
his boy are the finest products of Kentucky. 
In the same breath, for The Dutchman's 
money, Nick is one of his favorite officials 
while Russ will always have his highest re- 
spect as a coach. 

Bob Miller, of Newport High School, who 
is the representative of the K.H.S.A.A. for 
officials in that region, has turned in an ex- 
cellent officiating clinic in Northern Ken- 
tucky. The complimentary remarks which 
have come into our office from the officials 
in attendance can only mean that Bob has 
proven himself as good a teacher as he is a 
coach and official. 

Don't forget the Game Guys. When the 
State Tournament closes in March, the com- 
petition of those fighting Kentucky young- 
sters who are overcoming physical handicaps 
to engage in sports will close. Let us know 
immediately the Game Guy in your region 
who is worthy of the Lionheart Lapel Button 
Award and whom you think should be con- 
sidered for the Game Guy Plaque of 1957, 
which will be presented during K.E.A. Your 
interest in these Game Guys does much to- 
ward making Kentucky's athletic program 
great. 

The Dutchman made a strong effort to get 
recommendations from each region of Ken- 
tucky citing men he could classify in the 
column as "Nature's Noblemen" because of 
outstanding sportsmanship, love of fellow- 
men and willingness to do anything to make 
life a little better for somebody else. From 
Region 1, it was Mutt Carroll; Region 3, 
Walter Lance ; Region 4, Delmas Gish, whom 
Bob Forsythe says is a gentleman and a 
scholar all the way; Region 5, Elvis Donald- 
son, who wins The Dutchman's Corn Cob 
Pipe of the Month Award because of the in- 
fluence he has had on athletes and students 
and because of the personal example his life 
reflects ; Region 6, Charlie Kolasa ; Region 7, 
it had to be Ray Wimberg for promoting 
everything in Louisville that's good, gratis; 
Region 8, Bruce Daniel ; Region 9, Julian 
Cunningham; Region 13, James Pursiful; 
Region 14, Morton Combs; and Region 16, 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1957 



Page Eleven 



Max Calhoun. We're still waiting for your 
recommendations. 

Drop by The Dutchman's Armory head- 
quarters while you're in Louisville for the 
State Tournament. 



NATIONAL FEDERATION MEETING 

(Continued from Page One) 
ginning of a half. 

1-4-2: A system for numbering players is 
recommended. Players who usually play in 
the backfield should wear numbers 10 to 49. 
Centers should wear 50 to 59, guards 60 to 
69, tackles 70 to 79 and ends 80 to 89. 

1-5-1 : A revision will include two slight 
changes. If knee pads are composed of ap- 
proved shock-absorbing material, a thickness 
of three-eights inch will be permissible. They 
must be one-half inch thick unless material 
has been submitted for shock tests and ap- 
proved as giving the needed protection. 

Numerals of modern Gothic design may be 
used. If Arabic block numerals are used, the 
bars will continue to be 1*4 inches wide. If 
Gothic numerals are used, a width of ap- 
proximately l'j; inches will be authorized. 
The exact standards for each digit will be 
worked out with manufacturers. 

1-5-3. d and f: An addition will provide 
for use of soft covering material for shin 
and thigh guards with a thickness of 3 8 
inch provided they are of approved shock-ab- 
sorbing material. The note under d will be 
deleted but related material will call atten- 
tion to certain cleats which do not require 
metal posts. Item f will specify that there 
shall be no transverse white stripes on the 
sleeve below the elbow for the current sea- 
son. It will also state that beginning with 
1958, no transverse stripe of any color will 
be permitted below the elbow. 

1-5-4: This will be revised to state that 
when equipment becomes defective through 
use, the Referee will charge himself with a 
time-out. Such time-out may be followed by 
a time-out charged to the team but. in all 
such cases, the clock will be started when 
ball is ready-for-play. 

2-2-3 and 9-5: All reference to flying 
block or flying tackle will be deleted. 

2-29 : The definition of "tripping" will be 
revised to include action with the lower leg 
but to omit reference to grasping of the op- 
ponent's lower leg or foot with the hand. 
This deletion is made possible because the 
penalty for illegal use of hands is now the 
same as for tripping. Consequently, the act 
which was once included in the tripping 
definition is no longer needed. 



3-1-1: This will be revised to provide that 
for Junior College games, the length of 
periods is 15 minutes. There is no change in 
the length of periods for High School or 
Junior High School games. 

3-4-3: Play (2) will be slightly reworded 
to harmonize with the change in 1-5-4. 

3-5-1: Item (a) will be slightly revised to 
provide that after any excess time-out, the 
clock will be started when the ball is ready- 
for-play. 

6-2-4: In the last sentence, the expression 
"during the down" will be inserted to make it 
clear that this does not apply to a foul com- 
mitted after the ball has become dead. 

6-4-3 : A slight addition will make it clear 
that in case of fair catch interference, the 
snap or free-kick is at the spot of interfer- 
ence. 

7-1-2: After the 2nd sentence, a 3rd sen- 
tence will be inserted to state that it is a 
false start if there is any movement of hand, 
foot, head or body by any player other than 
the players on each end of the line, after 
he has taken a position on the line with one 
or both hands on or near the ground. It is not 
intended that this will prohibit a return to 
the huddle for checking signals. 

7-3-1 : The phrase "to a teammate" will 
be inserted at the end of this article. 

7-5-4 : The 3rd sentence will be replaced 
by the following statement: "The down 
counts if an incompletion occurs before there 
has been any change of team possession or, 
it there has been a scrimmage-kick, before 
such kick has been first touched by R." 

8-3-5: To make the wording of this article 
consistent with that in 8-4-2, it will be as 
follows : "After a try-for-poin#, the oppon- 
ent of the trying team shall designate which 
team will kick off." 

8-5-2-c: The clause "and with the ball hav- 
ing been forced into the end zone by the of- 
fending team" will be added. The purpose 
is to cover a rare situation in which B is in 
his end zone when he intercepts a forward 
pass and this is followed by his throwing of 
an illegal forward pass for which A chooses 
to decline the penalty. Under such circum- 
stances, it is a touchback rather than a 
safety. 

9-2-2-h : Item h will become Item i and a 
new Item h will be as follows: "No player 
shall grasp an opponent's face protector." 
The penalty will lie 15 yards as for other 
personal fouls. 

9-5: See comment under 2-2-3. 

9-6-1-a: This item will be revised to make 
it clear that it is not illegal coaching if, dur- 



Pase Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1957 



ing a time-out charged to either team, one 
player from either team, who is on the field 
near the sideline, confers with one coach who 
is in the out-of-bounds area in front of the 
coaches box. 

10-1: The 2nd sentence will be slightly re- 
vised by omitting "scored by the offended 
team." This revision affects only a rare oc- 
currence in which the team which scores a 
touchdown has committed a foul during the 
down and this is followed by a dead ball foul 
by the opponent. With the revised wording, 
it will be assumed that the succeeding spot 
was established as soon as the ball became 
dead. Penalty for each of the two fouls would 
be administered as separate fouls rather than 
as a double foul. 

GENERAL: While details about supple- 
mentary action will be in the complete min- 
utes which will follow at a later date, a few 

items are included with this Synopsis. 

1. A discussion of a proposal to permit 
the snapper to turn the ball with long axis 
parallel to the line of scrimmage for the 
snap resulted in a negative vote because of 
difficulties which might be encountered in 
establishing the line of scrimmage for team 
A. Further study and experimentation were 
authorized. 

2. The State of North Carolina was author- 
ized to experiment with a revision of the 
kick rule. The experimental rule will pro- 
vide that whenever K first touches their 
scrimmage or return-kick, the ball becomes 
dead immediately. If experience during the 
earlv season games warrants, the item will 
be included on next year's questionnaire. 

3. A motion to shorten the Coaches Box 
to the area between the 40 yard lines was 
carried but then rescinded after attention 
was called to some of the bench and mark- 
ing difficulties which might be encountered. 
One or more states may choose to experiment 
with the shorter box. 

4. Because 1 vard is such a short distance 
as compared with positions on the line, it was 
suggested that a back be required to be at 
least 2 yards behind the line. The Research 
Committee was authorized to study this mat- 
ter and, if possible, to promote experimen- 
tation. If the proposal appears to have merit 
after such study, the item is to be included 
on the 1958 questionnaire. 

5. Problems which are created in some 
areas by "trick" snaps were discussed. The 
Editors were authorized to revise the related 
section of the Case Book to further dis- 



courage the "center-keep" type of play. 

6. Further attempts to reduce the dead 
ball time between downs will be made. The 
20 second time limit for the snap will be 
further studied. 

7. The Game Administration Committee 
was instructed to attempt to secure experi- 
mentation with a modified rule which would 
give the team which is behind in the score 
the right to receive the kick-off after a try- 
for-point. 

8. Further study will be made of the pro- 
posal to prohibit communication by an en- 
tering substitute in any situation other than 
after a time-out charged to either team. 
The item will be included on next year's 
questionnaire. 

CASE BOOK: Several play situations in 
the Case Book were discussed and slight re- 
visions were authorized. One of these con- 
cerns certain hidden ball plays which cause 
a player other than the runner to be tackled. 
Officials will be urged to make reasonable 
allowance in a situation where the receiver 
of a kick makes a fake handoff. Officials 
will be authorized to use judgment similar 
to that which is applied in the so-called 
"belly series" behind the line. 

A play situation will urge the visiting team 
to have a manager available to assist in 
changing the ball if the visitors exercise 
their right to choose a specific type ball. 

OTHER SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL: 
Proper signals for acts affected by the new 
rules will be designated. Full information 
about proper padding will be given. No 
material other than sponge rubber or similar 
soft material will be permitted on arm pads 
and a soft covering on the outside of should- 
er, rib and hip pads will be further encour- 
aged. Several suggestions for additions to 
the Football Official's Manual will be in- 
cluded in supplementary meeting folder* or 
interpretation bulletins. 

At two meetings of the state executive 
officers, the following topics were under dis- 
cussion: Interstate Relationships. Surveys 
on Coaching Clinics and Forfeited Game 
Policies, Cooperative Action in Producing 
Public Relations Brochures, State High 
School Association's Relation to other State 
and National Groups, Current Basketball 
Practices, State Association Aid in Collecting 
Basketball Hall of Fame Material. Problems 
Caused by Attendance of Athletes at Coach- 
ing Clinics, Progress Reports on Legislature, 
Court and School Board Activity. 



Wf SmipThb DaV Vou BuY" 

hunt's athletic goods co. 

INCORPORATE*") 

PHONE 103 OK 104 
MAY FIELD, KENTUCKY 



LET US MAKE YOUR JOB EASY 

In one package we can send to you from our large and complete stock every- 
thing you need for the successful management of your district or regional 
tournament. A quick call or letter to us will get you service on anything 
and everything you may need to run a smooth tournament. 

OUR NEW NO. AFR BASKETBALL 

Here's our finest PANEL-LOCK basketball. Exclusive PANEL-LOCK 
design eliminates panel lifting and peeling — assures far superior shot con- 
trol .... uniform dribble .... uniform backboard rebound. Finest quality 
deep pebbled grain cowhide leather. Wider channel seams for better finger- 
tip control. This ball bears the signature of Coach Adolph Rupp of the 
University of Kentucky and is used by the Kentucky Wildcats Basketball 
Team. Try one. The price is $21.95. 

The new AFR ball will definitely be the official ball for the 1957 Kentueky 
High School Basketball Tournament, so get your tournament winner used 
to the ball before he gets to Louisville. 

ACCESSORIES 

How about your No-Whip nets, scorebooks, Cramer's First-Aid supplies, 
whistles, stopwatch, umpire's horn, basketball posters, powdered resin, 
bath towels, shoe laces, colored top sweat sox, individual carry-all bags, 
fan-shaped backboards and goals (either steel or glass), "pass out" 
tickets and other items necessary to carry on your tournament ? 

We only wish that every school in Kentucky could send its team as a 
participant to the 1957 Basketball Tournament. Best of luck to the sixteen 
who finally make it. 

All of you who visit in Louisville come and see our display. Our display 
will be as usual in Room 512 at the Kentucky Hotel. Please drop in and 
see us. We'll be looking for you. 



Hunt's Athletic Goods Co. 

PHONE 103 OR 104 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 

THE LARGEST EXCLUSIVE ATHLETIC HOUSE IN THE SOUTH 



WHILE YOU ARE IN LOUISVILLE 

* FOR THE 

State Basketball Tournament 

Visit Our Sample Room. 
Kentucky Hotel - Room 812 

YOU are cordially invited to join the happy 
throng of players . . . coaches . . . fans . . . celebrities 
. . . school and factory representatives who make our 
special Sample Room their meeting place and head- 
quarters during the Tournament. 

YOUR traveling Kentucky school representatives: 
Bob Reis, Harry Blackburn and Chuck Shuster, Al Le 
Comte and John Head will be there to greet you. 



It will be our pleasure to show you the new 1957 
nationally advertised football and basketball equip- 
ment, honor sweaters 
and award jackets. 












Write For Our Spring 
Catalog 

If you have not received 
your copy of the new 1957 
Sutcliffe Catalog which 
features the very finest in 
Baseball - Track - Softball - 
Tennis and other Athletic 
Equipment, please let us 
know at once — by letter or 
post card. 



Si 'IVLIITI 








Hiqh School Athlete 

Site of the 1957 State Basketball Tournament 





Above is an aerial view of the main entrance to the Exposition Center and Coliseum 
of the new Kentucky Fair plant at Louisville. Freedom Hall, the basketball arena, 
will be the site of the State High School Basketball Tournament this year. The ap- 
proximate seating capacity is 18,000. 

Official Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 

MARCH - 1957 




J 




Modern Ides of March 



The gym lights gleam like a beacon beam 

And a million motors hum 
In a good will flight on a Friday night; 

For basketball beckons, "Come !" 



A sharp-shooting mite is king tonight. 

The Madness of March is running. 
The winged fleet fly, the ball sails high 

And field goal hunters are gunning. 



The colors clash as silk suits flash 
And race on a shimmering floor. 

Repressions die, and partisans vie 
In a goal acclaiming roar. 



On Championship Trail toward a holy grail, 
All fans are birds of a feather. 

It's fiesta night and cares lie light 
When the air is full of leather. 



Since time began, the instincts of man 
Prove cave and current men kin. 

On tournament night the sage and the wight 
Are relatives under the skin. 



It's festival time. — sans reason or rhyme 
But with nation-wide appeal. 

In a world of hate, our ship of state 
Rides hisrh on an even keel. 



With war nerves tense, the final defense 
Is the courage, strength and will 

In a million lives where freedom thrives 
And libertv lingers still. 



Let commies clash and empires crash 
'Neath the wreck of a victory arch ! 

Let our boys tread where hate is dead,- 
In this happy Madness of March ! 

H. V. Porter 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 

Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XIX— XO. 3 



MARCH, 1957 



$1.00 Per Year 



State Swimming Meet 

Regulations concerning the two sections 
of the forthcoming State High School Swim- 
ming Meet have been sent to schools whose 
principals have indicated that they will enter 
teams in the meet. Other principals who 
have not received these regulations and entry 
blanks should write to the State Office for 
this material if they are interested. Classes 
B and C will meet at the University of Ken- 
tucky pool on Saturday, March 30, and Class 
A swimmers will meet in Lexington on Sat- 
urday, April 6. 

The State Swimming Committee will be in 
charge of the State Swimming Meet. This 
committee is currently composed of Chair- 
man Alfred M. Reece of the U. K. faculty, 
Mr. E. W. Craik of Louisville, Coach M. J. 
Cavana of Newport, Supt. K. G. Gillaspie of 
Georgetown, Supt. Frank Ogden of Win- 
chester, and Commissioner Theo. A. Sanford. 

The various classes will have the following 
events : 

Class A 



50 


Yard 


Freestyle 


100 


Yard 


Breaststroke 


200 


Yard 


Freestyle 


100 


Yard 


Backstroke 


100 


Yard 


Freestyle 


Fan 


cy Diving 


150 


Yard 


Individual Medlej 


200 


Yard 


Medley Relay 


200 


Yard 


Freestyle Relay 
Class B 


50 


Yard 


Freestyle 


100 


Yard 


Breaststroke 


100 


Yard Backstroke 


100 


Yard Freestyle 



Fancy Diving 

150 Yard Medley Relay 

200 Yard Freestyle Relay 

Class C 

50 Yard Freestyle 

50 Yard Breaststroke 

50 Yard Backstroke 

Fancy Diving 

200 Yard Freestyle Relay 



As previously announced, Class A schools 
will include those high schools with an en- 
rollment of 750 or more (grades 9-12), 
Class B will include those schools with an 
enrollment between 300 and 750, and Class 
C will be schools with an enrollment of less 
than 300. Any school may enter a class 
above its classification, and any school en- 
tering a team in the meet for the first time 
may enter a class below its classification. 

A school in Class B or Class C should send 
its entry blank and eligibility list to Mr. 
Reece so that this material will be received 
by him not later than midnight, March 28. 
Class A forms should be received not later 
than midnight. April 4. 

All dives must be listed with entries as 
final. Meet preliminaries will begin at 9:00 
A. M.. with the finals scheduled at 2:00 
P. M. The six best contestants will be in the 
finals. Class B and Class C events will run 
consecutively. 

Other regulations governing the meet, 
which will be of interest to the principals and 
coaches involved, are as follows: 

1. Rules governing this meet will be the 
Interscholastic Swimming Rules as stated 
in the 1957 N.C.A.A. Official Swimming 
Guide. 

2. A school is limited to four entries in 
Class A and B events and two entries in 
Class C events. It shall have only one team 
in each relay. 

3. Individual contestants are limited to 
two swimming events including relays, but 
may enter Fancy Diving as a third event. If 
a competitor enters two individual events 
and fails to qualify for the finals, he may 
not be an added entrant on a relay team. 

4. A faculty representative delegated by 
the principal of the school must accompany 
each team. 

5. The course for the meet is a 25-yard 
pool having six lanes. 

6. Trophies will be awarded the winning 
school and the runner-up. and medals will 
be presented to the winners of the first 
three places in each event. 

7. Points will be scored as follows: 7-5-4-3- 

( Continued on Page Eight) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1957 



MARCH, 1957 VOL. XIX— NO. 8 

Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association. 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Russell Williamson (1956-60), Inez 

Vice-President Louis Litchfield (1953-57), Marion 

Directors— W. B. Jones (1953-57) Somerset; W. H. Crowdus 
(1954-58). Franklin; .lack Dawson (1954-58), Middletown ; 
Robert P. Forsythe (1955-59). Greenville; K. G. Gillaspie 
(1955-59), Georgetown; Cecil A. Thornton (1956-60), Harlan. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 



~£rom the Comtnissione'i s Dffi 



ice 



Reports Now Due 

1956-57 Basketball Participation List 
School's Eeport on Basketball Officials 
Official's Report on Schools (Basket- 
ball) 



Spring Meets 

Tentative dates have been set for the 
various spring meets and tournaments in 
baseball, golf, track, and tennis. 

May 6-8, district baseball tournaments 

May 10, regional track meets 

Mav 13, regional tennis tournaments. 

Mav 17-18, State Track Meet 

May 20-21, State Tennis Tournament 

May 22, regional golf tournaments 

Mav 23-24, regional baseball tournaments 

May 28-29, State Golf Tournament 

June 6-7, State Baseball Tournament 



Board Election 



Terms of Board of Control members for 
Sections 1 and 6 expire on June 30. Two 
nominated for membership 
principals of Section 6. They 
Jones of the Somerset High 
Director from the Section ; 



men have been 
on the Board by 
are Prin. W. B. 
School, currenth 



and Prin. Don R. Rawlings of the Danville 
High School. In Section 1, Supt. Louis Litch- 
field of the Crittenden County Schools was 
the only nominee. Mr. Litchfield has been a 
member of the Board since 1953. 

Protection Fund News 

Three hundred member schools of the 
K.H.S.A.A. had insured their athletes with 
the Protection Fund at the time this issue 
of the ATHLETE went to press. Six hundred 
ninety-six claims, totaling $14,483.76, have 
been paid since July 1, 1956. 



ANNUAL MEETING SPEAKER 




Edwin Kelly Thompson 

President Kelly Thompson of the Western 
Kentucky State College, Bowling Green, will 
be the principal speaker at the annual din- 
ner meeting of the K.H.S.A.A., scheduled to 
be held in the Crystal Ballroom of the Brown 
Hotel, Louisville, at 6:00 P. M., April 12. The 
subject of Mr. Thompson's talk will be 
"Whose Responsibility?" 

Kelly Thompson has devoted twenty-eight 
of his forty-seven years to working for 
Western. All his efforts during his mature 
life have been expended consistently in the in- 
terest of the college he now heads. He was 
elected president of Western on October 17, 
1955, to serve as the third president of the 
college in its fifty year history. He had 
served as assistant to Dr. Paul L. Garrett, 
president of the college, from 1946 until Dr. 
Garrett's death in 1955. 

Mr. Thompson entered Western as a fresh- 
man in the fall of 1928. By the following 
spring, Dr. H. H. Cherry, the first president 
of the college, had employed the Lebanon, 
Kentucky, native as a part-time field repre- 
sentative. He attended classes and continued 
as a successful representative until his grad- 
uation in 1935. Following graduation, he 
was appointed public relations director, the 
first person to hold this position at the col- 
lege. 

Mr. Thompson continued his duties in 
public relations until 1944, when he entered 
the United States Navy. He served in the 
Navy's education program until he was dis- 
charged in 1946 with the rank of Lieutenant, 
Senior Grade. Upon his return to Western, 
Mr. Thompson was appointed assistant to 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1957 



Page Three 



Dr. Garrett. In 1947 he completed work for 
the M.A. degree from Western. 

Long an active member of the Bowling 
Green Kiwanis Club and prominent in the 
activities of the Kentucky-Tennessee District 
of Kiwanis International, Mr. Thompson was 
elected District Governor in 1952. after hav- 
ing twice served as Lieutenant Governor of 
the district's Division 2. He has served on 
numerous state educational and civic com- 
mittees, and he has been a civic leader in 
Bowling Green for more than twenty-five 
years. 

When the Ohio Valley Conference was 
formed in 1948, Mr. Thompson was appointed 
public relations director of the league. He 
managed the conference's annual tourna- 
ment, held in Louisville each spring, through 
1955, and the annual Kentucky Invitational 
Tournament, also held in Louisville during 
the Christmas holidays. 

Mr. Thompson married Sarah Pearce of 
Bowling Green in 1930. They have three chil- 
dren : Pattye, twenty, now teaching in the 
Fort Campbell school system ; Hardin, eigh- 
teen, a sophomore at Western; and Kelly. Jr., 
eight. 



Films 



The films listed below are in the Film Library of the Depart- 
ment of Extension. University of Kentucky. The rental prices 
shown do not apply to schools which use one of the special 
subscription service plans, offered by the Bureau of Audio- 
Visual Materials. 

Track Films 

The Broad Jump, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, SI. 50 

Controlled speed — timing' and coordination — de- 
velopment of legs and torso — mobility of pelvis and 
hips, one, two, three style — foot roll — single and 
triple air stride — soft versus hard take off — arm 
position. 

Discus, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, SI. 50 

Principle of centrifug-al force — muscle develop- 
ment for side arm throw — grips — finger roll — heel 
of thumb pressure — finger exercises — clockwise 
spin — hip snap — reverse and non-reverse styles. 

Distance Races, s-c. 1 reel, SI. 50 

Races from 1,000 to 10,000 meters and steeplechase 
are demonstrated. Style of distance runner is con- 
trasted with that of dash man. Differences in 
typical physiques are shown. Slow motion photo- 
graphy is used to analyze movements. 

Distances, j-s-c-a, 1 reel. SI. 50 

Style — developing stamina — calisthenics — avoiding 
shin splint — controlled tension — forward knee reflex 
— straight line running — automatic stride. 

The High Jump, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, Sl-50 

Belly roll or straddle and improved Western style 
— body lean and reverse — approach — body tension — 
coordination of arm and leg action. 



The Hurdles, j-s-c-a. 1 reel, $1.50 

Basic hurdling styles — rear hip and leg action — 
rhythmic running — hurdling calisthenics — body bal- 
ance — correct clearance — circular stepover action — 
adapting styles of physiques. 

The Javelin, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Four stage catapult throw — preliminary run — 
concluding stride — throwing stance — throwing and 
reverse — alternative hand and finger grips — facing 
position — balance of stomach and back muscle ten- 
sion — throwing angle — body and leg coordination 
drills — flexibility exercises. 

Jumps and Pole Vault, s-c, 1 reel, $1.50 

Demonstrations from actual competition are 
shown for running high-jump; running broad-jump; 
hop, step and jump; and pole vault. Slow motion 
photography is used for detailed study of form. 

1954 Kentucky High School A. A. Track Meet, 
j-s-c-a, 2 reels, silent, $.75 

Portions of the state meet are presented in this 
film. Several of the qualifying events are shown 
with the finals of all the track and field events. 
Lafayette High School won the title with 41 1 3 
points. Ashland was second and Henry Clay third. 

1955 Kentucky High School A. A. Track Meet, 
j-s-c-a, 4 reels, silent, $.75 

The finals of all the track and field events are 
shown as Ashland Hig'h School won the meet with 
26 points. Tilghman High School of Paducah was 
second with 20 1 4 points. Xew records were set in 
the Mile Run, Mile Relay, and Discus. 

Middle Distances, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Sprinting techniques — ball of foot running — auto- 
matic stride — pendulum and bicycle stride — exercise 
— counter balanced aim action — push drive — jockey- 
ing for position. 

Pole Vault, j-s-c-a, 1 reel. $1.50 

Basic vaulting principles — importance of exercises 
— i mining action — grip — selecting the pole — take- 
off — Western and Eastern style — slotting — novice 
training. 

The Relays, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Passing — visual pass — blind pass — right and left 
exchange — merging of runners' speed — baton grips 
— relay starts, underhand action — cup style — over- 
hand sprint pass — fly scoop — practice and team 
work. 

Shot Put. j-s-c-a. 1 reel, $1.50 

Fitting style to physiques — tension control — one, 
two, three rhythm — exercise — finger and hand grip 
— finger and wrist snap — foot positions — progressive 
tension and effort — explosive hip snap. 

The Sprints, j-s-c-a. 2 reels, $2.50 

Fundamentals of 100 yard and 200 yard dash — 
impact style and natural stretch stride — synchro- 
nizing leg and arm action — conditioning exercises — 
starting techniques — slow motion of musclar utili- 
zation and coordination. 

Tennis Films 

Advanced Tennis, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

WTiile working with a tennis pupil, Bill Tilden 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1957 



narrates and demonstrates, showing advanced tech- 
niques of tennis. 

Tennis Rhythm, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Bobby Rigrg'S is shown winning national tennis 
championship of Forest Hills. Later, at his tennis 
school in Chicago, he demonstrates how to make 
various shots correctly — the grip, service, forehand 
drive, backhand, etc., using- regular speed and slow 
motion. 

Golf Films 

From Tee to Green, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, color, $.75 

The camera makes a tour of the Canadian golf 
courses from Newfoundland to Vancouver Island. A 
caddy starts out hitchhiking across Canada and 
stops at courses in each province to earn his way 
on by caddying for awhile. Final scenes are of Bing 
Crosby enjoying a game at Jasper. Beautiful scenery. 

Saving Strokes with Sam Snead, s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 
Golf champion Sam Snead illustrates his grip, 
his stance, his swing on each of several types of golf 
situations. Slow motion and "freeze" shots help to 
clarify the instruction. Shots with driver, brassie, 
and various irons for difficult lies are illustrated 
and finally his putting technique is shown. 



We Quote 

Sideline Coaching 

In the editorial of the October, 1956, issue 
of The Pa'thlete, Dr. Frank P. Maguire re- 
lated that at a recent meeting in a discus- 
sion of rules forbidding sideline coaching, 
one of the coaches remarked, "Is it all right 
for us to attend the games ?" Recent events 
warrant a continuation of the discussion. 

If sports have an educational objective as 
part of a school, we cannot see any reason 
why they should be given wholly different 
treatment from any other department. 

We have often said that the sports field 
of the school is just another classroom. The 
coach is the teacher, the athlete is the pu- 
pil. Practice sessions are class sessions. But 
the day of the game is the test. 

In any classroom when pupils are being 
tested, the teacher gives no assistance. The 
teacher is testing to discover how well he has 
taught. The test of the coach's ability is how 
well the athletes do in the contest. So per- 
haps if the coach persists in helping the ath- 
letes in the test, he should be placed in the 
grandstand. 

We have always contended that the suc- 
cess of a coach cannot entirely be measured 
in the won and lost column any more than 
the teacher can be measured by test results 
alone. There are other measures of success. 

The native ability of the pupil or athlete 
must be considered. We would hardly expect 
a good teacher to have superior results in 



teaching advanced subjects to pupils of low 
I.Q. And in sports such items as schedules 
must be considered. If schools schedule con- 
tests with opponents of like potential, a 50- 
50 won and lost record is all we should expect 
over a period of years. 

Coaching from the sidelines has developed 
evasive maneuvers as restrictions by rule 
have been made. We remember the day when 
teams lined up in formation, the quarterback 
barked the signals and play was under way. 
Then came the huddle, and with it all kinds 
of gesticulations by the coach and finally the 
employment of messenger boys who dashed 
in and out between every play. This is dang- 
erous in that since one coach usually loses, 
he has no one to blame but himself for the 
defeat because he called the play. 

This year came the development of the 
application of science of electronics in foot- 
ball with radio communication established 
between the coach and team. For the pro- 
fessionals who used it temporarily we have 
no criticism for the single objective of the 
professional is finance. For schools who play 
for an educational objective, it is the height 
of absurdity. 

Fortunately, the professionals outlawed 
it. But we have no doubt of its return in 
perfected form. We only hope the wave 
length jammers will be able to totally con- 
fuse those who use it. 

We are quoting from an editorial of 
October 16, 1956, written by Chet Smith, 
sports editor of the Pittsburg Press. 

"There can no longer be any doubt that 
football is getting far too modern and com- 
plex for its own good. Unless it is quickly 
taken in hand it will soon be sending youths 
out into the world who will be of no earthly 
use to themselves or anybody else unless they 
are tuned in to the proper wave length. 

"The transmission of signals and other in- 
structions from the bench to the field by 
way of radio has done it. Without a strong 
stand by those who have the future of the 
game at heart the death knell of rugged in- 
dividualism on the gridiron has been sound- 
ed." 

We believe the use of radio is the final 
chapter in coaching from the sidelines. Un- 
less coaches reverse the trend themselves, 
we predict that for school boy athletics, more 
severe rules restrictions. Perhaps the coach 
will be left at home while his pupils take the 
test. 

In recent years we have heard murmurs 
for restricting the use of boys for messenger 
(Continued on Page Eight) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1957 



Page Five 



The Flying Dutchman 

Ninety-seven per cent perfect is the sports- 
manship record of the coaches affiliated with 
the Kentucky High School Athletic Associa- 
tion. Small wonder that Kentucky is re- 
ferred to as "The Sportsmanship Capitol of 
the Nation," when reports of sports officials 
indicate that only three per cent of our high 
school coaches leave something to be de- 
sired in sportsmanship practices. This is 
quite a credit to the athletics program of 
the secondary schools of the Commonwealth. 

From Wiliam 0. Utley, "The Debonair," 
hailing from Madisonville, come some rem- 
iniscences occasioned when this veteran re- 
tired official read our recent column on past 
experiences in the officiating field. Instead 
of "Bill," possibly we should have referred 
to him all these years as "Obie," since we 
have information that his middle name is 
Obadiah. Here are some of "Obie's" thoughts 
from the past. 

Says "Obie". "In 1928. I officiated the red 
hot game between Nebo and Sebree with a 
hugh crowd of forty-two fans in attendance 
with the game ending Sebree 23 - Nebo 21, 
and my leaving the gymnasium with $3.40 
for my efforts. 

"In 1929, when Slaughters lost to Dixon 
by 15 to 13, I carried home all of $2.50, called 
twenty-eight fouls all by myself, and the 
newspapers said that it was the roughest 
game seen since Paul Revere's Ride. 

"My first district tourney was in 1929, in- 
volved ten games, and I was paid $10 for of- 
ficiating the whole meet. I did fine because 
my hotel and food bill was only 84.25 and I 
was eating turkey all the time. I was really 
happy about being able to make all this 
money in two days and nights. In 1930, 
when Earlington pasted Nebo to the tune of 
18 to 16, I was really on my way to riches, 
collecting $4 for two games, and in 1937, of- 
ficiating with Louie "The Great" Litchfield 
in the Pennyrile Tournament, we handled 
fourteen teams in a four-day affair and were 
rewarded with checks for $12.50." 

"Obie" goes on to say that his most en- 
joyable tournament was the State Meet in 
Lexington in 1944 when he worked the en- 
tire tournament with Edgar McNabb. That's 
understandable because anybody who ever 
worked with "Ole Reliable" says the same 
thing. "Obie" Utley is now on the shady side 
of fifty years, is a grandfather to two little 
girls, and is a Shriner of prominence. Just 
an afterthought, William Obadiah Utley is 




Bill Utley 

man ever worked with in a state tourna- 
ment, but is also one of the nicest chaps any- 
body will ever meet. 

From Dick Looney, "The Sage of the 
Kentucky Mountains," come stories of hero- 
ism of the people of Pikeville and the sur- 
rounding mountain areas as they dug out of 
the mud and lifted themselves up by their 
boot straps after the recent terrible flood. 
Dick, who is one of the greats among Ken- 
tucky's basketball officials, recommends 
Maytown High School and McDowell High 
School for the Abou Ben Adhem Citation 
because of outstanding courteous treatment 
of officials. Dick points outt hat, due to the 
flood, he was the only referee able to make 
it for the big game at McDowell, and with 
these two teams being natural rivals, any- 
thing might have happened had not sports- 
manship made it possible for the 200-pounder 
to work the game alone. Not only does Dick 
commend the schools and the crowd for their 
excellent conduct, but he calls for Corn Cob 
Pipes to go to George Moore and Estill Hall, 
principal and coach, respectively, of Mc- 
Dowell High School, and Edwin Stewart and 
Ray Heinisch, principal and coach, respect- 
ively, at Maytown High School. 

Vic Brizendine and Jack Thompson are 
loud in their praises of the schools in the 
Salt River Valley Conference. Vic and Jack, 
who worked this tournament at Bloomfield, 
said they would stack the neighborly attitude 
and sportsmanship of West Point, Sheph- 
erdsville, Lebanon Junction, Mt. Washington, 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1957 



not only one of the finest officials The Dutch- 
Bloomfield, Taylorsville, Mackville, Western 
at Sinai and Willisburg against anybody's in 
the country. The Dutchman can go along 
with that, knowing such leaders in that area 
as Charlie Rawlings, Ernie Ruby, Lloyd Hay- 
don, Charlie Pearce, "Red" Anderson. Glen 
Smith, Lloyd Mullins, Joe Hall and E. C. 
Brown. An Abou Ben Adhem Certificate 
to the teams of the Salt River Valley Con- 
ference is on its way to Vic Brizendine, who 
will make proper presentation. 

Something just occurred to me. Vic Brizen- 
dine and Bill Utley are alike in many re- 
spects. Both officiate a basketball game ex- 
actly alike, both are immaculate in dress and 
appearance, with the only difference being 
Vic gets an awful lot more for his whistling 
than "Obie" used to, and Vic is not a grandpa. 

More compliments from basketball offi- 
cials to Kentucky's school men! "Energetic" 
Al Gustafson reports that he and "Speedy" 
Dave Longenecker have only the highest 
praise for the conduct of everybody connect- 
ed with athletics at Lafayette and Harrods- 
burg. Something new was added to good 
neighbor practices here when Aggie Sale 
invited Dave and Al to an after-game snack 
in the school cafeteria and there they found 
both the victor and the vanquished munch- 
ing on hamburgers, cheese, donuts and milk. 
Says Al. "I have seen a lot of sportsmanship 
practices, but this goes everything one bet- 
ter when the winners and the losers can sit 
down and digest food happily together after 
a ball game. This type of hospitality can 
only mean better school relations and finer 
characters developed in our boys who play 
the game." 

The name of Billy W. Omer in Western 
Kentucky has just about the same meaning 
in that section today as that of Irvin S. Cobb 
several decades ago. Billy is possessed of 
outstanding leadership qualities and is mak- 
ing his influence felt for the improvement 
off officiating in his area. His jokes also 
excel those of Carlos Oakley and Joe B. 
Mansfield. 

Billy, who also has been reading our com- 
parison of fees paid officials "back yonder" 
and now, thinks that a precedent has been 
set in the district tournament at Henderson, 
where four officials have been hired at $20 
a game each to handle the contests. It's a 
cinch that Billy is correct when he says that 
a better brand of officiating should be pre- 
sented in District No. 10 because with four 
officials working, they will be much fresher 



than if only two were employed as is usually 
the custom. 

John Ramey informs us that the Senior 
Scouts of Pikeville are making an effort to 
sponsor their annual East-West All-Star 
Basketball Game at the Fairgrounds Free- 
dom Hall in Louisville during the week of 
June 2. Our old friend, Vernon Johnson, of 
Mt. Sterling, is expected to be one of the 
officials in this game. During the past nine 
years, all of these games have been played 
in towns in Eastern Kentucky. 

Here are some questions and answers on 
basketball rulings: Answering Turner El- 
rod's question concerning whether or not 
time can expire on a jump ball, the answer 
is "no". It may expire immediately after 
the clock starts when the ball is tapped, but 
not before. Charlie Irwin, the rambling ar- 
biter of Hop Town, wants to know if free 
thrower A-l intentionally misses his free 
throw in an attempt to gain control of the 
ball by throwing it hard against the basket 
rim, has he been guilty of a violation? 
The answer again is "no". Formerly, the 
rules stated that an honest effort for the 
free throw had to be made, but no more. 

Lexington's Paul Weisbrodt says that he 
wishes that all officials in Kentucky, for the 
sake of uniformity, would work the way they 
are taught by the regional officials who at- 
tend the annual August school in Lexington. 
Already, Paul says, he has worked three dif- 
ferent ways this year. Most Northern Ken- 
tucky officials are still crossing over, while 
Central Kentucky faces the scorer's table. 
Paul goes on to say that in the regional 
clinics next year, it should be made manda- 
tory to officiate according to the practices 
taught there and make it stick that way. 
If the officials are not working according to 
the method adopted, then certainly they are 
defeating the efforts being made to bring 
about uniformity, which we are all striving 
for. 

Before heading for the State Tournament, 
here are two short shots racking up two more 
scores for the athletic program of the 
K.H.S.A.A. Newport's Jim Cobb and Bob 
Miller draw the commendation of The Dutch- 
man for their interest in the Game Guy 
Project in their area, while Coach Eddie 
Ward gets another salute for his Peaks Mill 
High School because of the outstanding cour- 
tesy practices of his high school cheerleaders, 
led by attractive Lissy May. Lissy is quite 
a gal and she and her friends contribute 

(Continued on Page Eight) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1957 



Page Seven 



Football Officials' Ratings on Sportmanship of K. H. S. A. A. 

Member Schools— 1956 



SCHOOL 



Anderson i Lawrenceburg) __. 

Ashland 

Atherton i Louisville) 

Austin Tracy (Lucas) 

Barbour vi lie 

Bardstown 

Beechwood (So. Ft. Mitchell!--. 

Belfry 

Bell iPineville! 

Bellevue 

Benham 

Berea 

Black Star (Alva) 

Boone County i Florence i 

Bowling Green 

Burgin 

Butler (Shively ) 

Caldwell County (Princeton i 

Campbell County (Alexandria).. 

Carlisle 

Catlettsburg 

Caverna ( Horse Cave I 

Central (Louisville) 

Corbin 

Cumberland 

Cynthiana — 

Danville 

Daviess County (Owensborol — 

Dayton 

Dixie Heights (Covington) 

Dubois iMt. Sterling! 

duPont Manual (Louisville) 

Eastern (Middletown i 

Elizabethtown 

Elkhorn I Frankfort! 

Elkhorn City 

Eminence 

Evarts 

Fern Creek 

Flaget ( Louisville i 

Fleming-Neon I Neon I 

Fort Knox 

Frankfort 

Franklin-Simpson I Franklin ) — 

Fulton 

Garth (Georgetown ! 

Glasgow 

Hall (Grays Knobi 

Harlan 

Harrodsburg 

Hazard 

Henderson 

Henderson County I Henderson) _ 

Henry Clay i Lexington i 

Highlands (Ft. Thomas I 

Hiseville 

Holmes i Covington) 

Hopkinsville 

Irvine 

Jenkins 

K.M.I. (Lyndon! 

Knox Central (Barbourville) 

Lafayette I Lexington) 

Lancaster 

Lebanon 

Leslie County (Hyden) 

Lincoln Inst. iLincoln Ridgel__ 

Lloyd Memorial (Erlanger) 

Louisa 

Loyall 

Ludlow 

Lynch 

Lynn Camp (Corbin) 

McKell (South Shore! 

M. C. Napier (Darforkl 

Madison-Model ( Richmond! 

Madisonville 

Male (Louisville! 

Marion 

May field 

Middlesboro 

Millersburg Military Institute 

Morganfield 

Mt. Sterling 













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I 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1957 



SCHOOL 



Murray 

Newport 

Newport Catholic 

Nicholas ville 

Oldham County ( LaG range) 

Old Kentucky Home (Bardstown)-_ 

Ormsby Village (Anchorage ) 

Owensboro 

Owensboro Catholic 

Paducah Tilghman 

Paints ville 

Paris 

Park City 

Paul Laurence Dunbar (Lexington I- 

Perry ville 

Pikeville 

Pine ville 

Prestonsburg 

Providence 

Raceland 

Russell 

Russell ville 

St. Charles ( Lebanon ) 

St. Joseph Prep. ( Bardstown ) 

St. Xavier I Louisville) 

Shawnee (Louisville! 

Shelby ville 

Shepherds ville 

Somerset 

Southern (Louisville) 

Springfield 

Stanford 

Sturgis 

Temple Hill (Glasgow) 

Tompkins ville 

Trigg County (Cadiz) 

Trinity (Louisville) 

Valley (Valley Station) 

Versailles 

Wallins (Wallins Creek) 

Wheelwright 

Whitesburg 

Williamsburg 

Winchester 

Wurtland 



COACH 



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THE FLYING DUTCHMAN 

(Continued from Page Six) 

much toward pleasant evenings at athletic 
contests by the fine examples they set. 

Pick up your "State Tournament Guest 
Card," giving you admission to the Hospital- 
ity Room at Freedom Hall, free play on 
Louisville's golf courses, and all other privi- 
leges being arranged for you by the Louis- 
ville-Jefferson County Hospitality Commit- 
tee, in the lobby of the Kentucky Hotel after 
identifying yourself as a coach, official, 
principal, board member or superintendent. 



Class A Fancy Diving will be according to 
the Interscholastic Division in the N.C.A.A. 
1957 Swimming Guide. There will be one re- 
quired dive, the plain front dive, and five 
optional dives. These must be selected to 
include at least one dive each from four of 
the five groups listed in the guide. 

9. The Association will make the same al- 
lowance to participants for transportation, 
lodging and meals as is given State Track 
Meet participants, this allowance applying 
to not more than two participants in each 
event. Expenses of the swimming coach will 
be paid if the school has as many as four 
entries in the State Meet. 



STATE SWIMMING MEET 

(Continued from Pag-e One) 

2-1 for individual events; 12-9-7-5-3-1 for the 
150 yard medley relay; and 14-10-8-6-4-2 for 
the 200 yard medley relay and the freestyle 
relays. 

8. Class C Fancy Diving will consist of 
one required dive, the plain front jackknife 
or swan ; and two optional dives. 

Class B Fancy Diving will include the 
same required dive as Class C, and three 
optional dives. 



AVE QUOTE 

(Continued from Page Four) 

service. Such use of athletes is certainly not 
flattering to the boy and has robbed the 
game of an essential value. Free substitution 
is good but unless it is used as it was in- 
tended, that is to give more boys an oppor- 
tunity to play and eliminate dangers from 
fatigue, we predict restrictions on such sub- 
stitution. 

Many rules of the book which complicate 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1957 



Page Nine 



and confuse the game are the results of at- 
tempts by coaches and players to circumvent 
the intent of the game. 

Chet Smith, quoted previously, concludes 
his comment as follows, "The possibilities 
for more brilliant football are becoming more 
remote and will only be halted one of these 
years to come when a forthright young man 
flings away his concealed receiver, refuses 
to go into the huddle and screams a few old- 
fashioned signals into the startled ears of 
his fellow stooges." 

We hope school administrators and coaches 
will help to preserve the educational value 
of sports. We hope communities will insist 
that schools use their activities for the bene- 
fit of the pupil athlete and not the teacher 
coach. 

—Editorial in The I'a'thlete. 



Psychology in Coaching Basketball 

There is psychology in coaching basket- 
ball. A great deal of the psychology of coach- 
ing basketball is wrapped up in the follow- 
ing maxims. The list is by no means com- 
plete, but if adhered to should bring about 
pleasing results. 

Be cordial and friendly to each player, not 
impartial or contemptible. 

Give credit for a job well done. It's human 
to want recognition. 

Listen to your players' side. There are 
two to every story. 

Be fair and just in your treatment. Cheap 
standards are likened to autumn leaves in 
the wind. 

Keep practice sessions alive with new in- 
teresting twists. Monotony and staleness 
are deadly killers. 

Teach clean living, sportsmanship, dis- 
cipline, three offsprings of a good athletic 
program. 

Know your players' school and home en- 
vironment. They often give actions under- 
standing. 

You are the coach, synonym for boss. Too 
many of these breed confusion. 

Make practice organized work, not or- 
ganized confusion. 

Control your temper at all times — impul- 
sive actions may bring unwanted results. 

Teach well during practice — it is too late 
between quarters or halves. 

Be true to your players always and it will 
follow as one quarter another, they will 
bring pride to any coach. 

— O. M. Thompson in Delaware 
News Bulletin. 



What Is A Coach? 

A coach is an interesting creature. He is a 
man of many moods, sometimes pleading, 
then demanding, sometimes kind and un- 
derstanding, and then like an enraged tiger 
when things are not going so well. 

He may be found in a variety of places 
such as a first aid room, at a banquet for 
the alumni, or on the sideline of a gridiron. 

You won't be able to identify him by 
physical appearance, because he may be one 
of many sizes, shades, or facial shapes. How- 
ever, he will usually be seen wearing an old 
trench coat and a hat — which is usually a 
veteran of many ball games and fishing 
trips. 

He is a mastermind at inventing new drills 
— and calling plays of which no one seems 
to have heard. He appears to get a great 
deal of pleasure out of seeing sweat fairly 
pour off some hard-working, dirt-eating 
trainee, (or should we say "victim"). 

He loves to hold two-hour scrimmages and 
wind sprints are his favorite form of torture. 
His by-words are "Down! Hup!" 

He doesn't seem to care for sick or in- 
jured players, busted assignments, soft 
stomachs, players' girl friends, or the losing 
end of a game. 

No other human can tell so many funny 
stories about his playing days or find so 
much fault in his "bread-and-butter" boys 
than this "All American Man." 

This man has a job to do, and has enough 
responsibility to cope with without criticism 
and offers of unwanted help from well- 
meaning outsiders who only hinder instead 
of help him in his job. 

Despite his seemingly hard and cruel 
disposition on the practice field, he is every 
boy's friend, helper, and hero. 

— Harold Ledbetter, 10th Grader 
Alabama Bulletin 

Is This Good Teaching? 

There seems to be an increasing number 
of basketball players who work hard at the 
task of drawing a foul from opponents. 
These players fall to the floor at the slightest 
contact from an opposing player — sometimes 
without contact — and then look appealingly 
at the official. If the official calls the foul, 
a satisfied smile breaks out ; if the foul is 
not called, there is a look of injured disdain. 

Such conduct tends to provoke disrespect 
for the decisions of the officials because 
the home fans usually support such players, 
and the opposing fans often become highly 
indignant in games where a point or two 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1957 



makes the difference between loss and vic- 
tory. It also makes it hard for the official 
to call a good game because he hesitates to 
call a foul when he feels that a player is 
trying to trap him into making a bad call. 

Like the story of the boy who cried 
"Wolf" when there was no wolf, such play- 
ers damage themselves in the eyes of many 
spectators and may also damage others in 
the game by making the work of the officials 
more difficult. 

Feigning a foul in basketball is somewhat 
similiar to feigning an injury to stop the 
clock in football. In each case the action of 
the player is an attempt to gain an advant- 
age by misrepresentation. Our sports pro- 
gram should not teach that it is good prac- 
tice to lay aside the truth in order to gain 
an advantage in a contest. 

— T.S.S.A.A. News. 



Rebounding in Basketball 

The placing of opponents of the free 
thrower in each of the first two alleys has 
made the penalty for a common foul less 
severe. The reason is that a greater number 
of rebounds are secured by opponents of the 
free thrower. Automatically, this has an 
influence on the amount of congestion in 
the area near the basket and it could have 
an influence on size of score and number of 
fouls committed. 

Statistics have been secured for early 
season tournament games. The following 
conclusions are warranted from a study of 
data for approximately 100 tournament 
games in the states of Illinois, Indiana and 
South Dakota. The total number of per- 
sonal fouls committed by both teams is 
about the same as for last year. The number 
of total points scored per game is about 7% 
less than for last year. After free throws, 
the ball remained alive for rebounding about 
16 times per game. 11 of the 16 rebounds 
were by the free thrower's opponent and 5 
of them were by the free thrower's teams. 
Thus, the opponents did 68'- of the re- 
bounding. This compares with a rebound- 
ing of 57' * in previous years when positions 
in the first alley were alternated. This lesser 
number of rebounds secured by the free 
thrower's team automatically lessens the 
severity of the penalty for a common foul. 
Based on computation of last year's value of 
a penalty, after allowance is made for the 
customary value of possession, the net value 
of the bonus penalty is now .57 (slightly 
more than half a point). 



Which is the most valuable position for 
rebounding? To answer this, statistics were 
secured on the rebounder's position during 
free throws. 50% of all rebounding was by 
a player in the first alley. A free thrower's 
teammate in the second alley rebounded 29% 
of the time. The free thrower's opponent 
in the third alley rebounded 18% of the time 
and the free thrower himself rebounded 3% 
of the time. 

For each game, there were about 96 re- 
bounds after unsuccessful tries for field 
goal. Of these, the opponent of the thrower 
rebounded 59'<' of the time and teammates 
of the thrower rebounded 41%. of the time. 

During the rebounding after tries for field 

goal, a personal foul occurred 13 '< of the 
time. Rebounding was followed almost im- 
mediately by the scoring of a field goal about 
10 '< of the time. Thus, an unsuccessful try 
for field goal resulted in fouls or a follow-up 
goal about 23'- of the time. 

These fouls have a bearing on the attitude 
which should be taken toward certain other 
rules proposals. This includes the suggestion 
that the penalty for a common foul should be 
one free throw only during the early part 
of each half. There is also a relationship to 
the suggestion that rebounds should be re- 
duced by requiring that the ball be tapped 
out of the free throw lane area before a 
second try is permitted. The relationship 
to the further lessening of the penalty for 
a common foul is obvious. The net value of 
a penalty for such foul under present rules 
is only about .57 of a point. There are cer- 
tain to be some objections to further reduc- 
ing this net worth since there is a point 
which would make it profitable to commit 
fouls except as players are restrained by 
fear of being disqualified because of the 
five-foul limit. The relationship to a re- 
duction of number of rebounds is less ob- 
vious but is no less important. If it is 
desired to reduce the advantage of the ex- 
tremely tall player, one method would be to 
require that the ball be tapped out of the 
congested area before a second try can be 
attempted. It seems obvious that this would 
have a direct influence in reducing the 23 7o 
of the times a rebound is followed by a per- 
sonal foul or by the scoring of a field goal 
which some basketball authorities regard 
as a "cheap" basket. 

Since these statistics are from early season 
games, they may not be as reliable as those 

(Continued on Page Twelve) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1957 



Page Eleven 




Exterior and interior views of the fine new gymnasium at Morehead State College, site of the 
Sixteenth Regional Basketball Tournament. 



Paa'e Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1957 



BASKETBALL REBOUNDING 

(Continued from Page Ten) 

which are gathered at the state-sponsored 
final tournaments during March. All of the 
early data will be checked against those 
which are secured from the final tourna- 
ments. It should then be possible to draw 
reliable conclusions as to how rebounding is 
related to fouls, the new worth of the penalty 
for a common foul and the relative advant- 
age of the various positions along the free 
throw lane. 

— National Federation Press. 



New Look For 6-Man Football 

THE TWO-THOUSAND high schools 
which include 6-Man Football in their ath- 
letic program will find that something has 
been added for the 1957 season. In addition 
to several important changes which have 
also been made because of revision of the 
11-Man rules, there are three significant 
changes which apply only to the 6-Man game. 

THE CLEAR PASS requirement in 6-Man 
is the major difference from the 11-Man 
game. Before any running play can occur, 
the snap receiver must pass the ball to give 
defense reasonable opportunity to analyze 
the type of advance which is to be attempted. 
Over the years, there have been suggestions 
for modifying the clear pass rule and experi- 
mentation with a revised rule which would 
permit a hand-off instead of a clear pass. 
For 1957, the clear pass must always be 
backward. Heretofore the clear pass could 
be in any direction. 

THE REVISION of the clear pass rule is 
related to another revised rule which now 
treats a forward pass which is completed or 
is incomplete behind the line the same as 
any other forward pass. In former years, 
such a pass was considered a backward pass 
in the 6-Man same. The forward pass in 
6-Man is now the same as in 11-Man except 
that all 6-Man plavers are eligible to receive 
any forward pass. The relation of this change 
to the revised clear pass rule is in the fact 
that the snap receiver may now throw the 
ball forward the same as in the past but if 
he does toss the ball forward and it becomes 
incomplete, the ball becomes dead immediate- 
ly. Under last year's rule, it might have been 
recovered and advanced by any player of 
either team since it was then considered a 
backward pass. 



THE KICK RULES revision is the third 
important change. In past years, the kick-off 
regulations about right of recovery and ad- 
vance were the same as for a kick from 
scrimmage. Under this year's rules, the 
rights during a kick-off are the same as 
those for any free-kick in the 11-Man game. 
Likewise, the rights during a scrimmage- 
kick are the same as those in the 11-Man 
game. If a free-kick is out of bounds, the re- 
ceiving team takes the ball at the inbounds 
spot or on the yardline which is ten yards 
behind the receiver's kick-off line. If the 
kickers recover their own kick-off, they may 
retain possession provided it is not a "short" 
kick-off. No fair catch is permitted in the 
6-Man game but the kickers are restrained 
from interfering with the catching of any 
kick. The penalty for such interference is 
loss of 15 yards but there is no fair catch 
award. 

In addition to the three changes which 
are primarily 6-Man revisions, the recent 11- 
Man revisions have also been incorporated in 
the 6-Man code. During a time out charged 
to either team, one player from each team 
may confer with his coach at the sideline. 
Grasping of the face mask of an opponent 
is specifically listed as a personal foul. Most 
of the other changes which have been made 
to keep the code in harmony with the 11- 
Man code are of an editorial nature. 

— National Federation Press. 



CHARITY BEGINS AT HOME 

The newly formed Hawaiian Hieh School 
Athletic Association is surveying the attitude 
of State High School Associations regard- 
ing use of high school teams and hi?h school 
facilities for raising funds for charity or 
similar causes. The schools are constantly 
being called upon to make contributions. No 
one will question the desirability of working 
together in the interests of fund raising 
operations for worthy purposes. Questions 
arise when school teams and school receipts 
are involved in such operations. Very few 
school systems have sufficient money for do- 
ing all the good things which could be done 
in the interests of those in the athletic pro- 
gram. Use of available funds for anv purpose 
other than for increasing the efficiency of 
the school program is a questionable prac- 
tice. Charitable contributions should be a 
personal and individual matter rather than 
one in which funds needed for one good pur- 
pose are allocated to some other purpose. 



"We ShipIme DaY You BuY" 

HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO. 

INCORPORATED 

PHONE 103 OR 104 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 

ROOM No. 912 AT THE KENTUCKY HOTEL 

Due to circumstances beyond our control and the Kentucky Hotel we will be in 
Room 912 this year instead of Room 512 during the State KHSAA Basketball 
Tournament. 

Please make this room your Headquarters for your friends will definitely be there. 

"WE ARE ON THE BALL" 



Here's our finest 
PANEL-LOCK Basket- 
ball. Exclusive PANEL- 
LOCK design elimin- 
ates panel lifting and 
peeling — assures far 
superior shot control 
. . . uniform dribble . . . 
uniform backboard re- 
bound. Finest quality 
deep pebbled grain 
cowhide leather. Wider 
channel seams for bet- 
ter finger-tip control. 




This ball bears the sig- 
nature of Coach Adolph 
Hupp of the University 
of Kentucky Wildcats 
Basketball Team. Try 
one. The price is S21.95. 
The No. AFR Ball will 
be used in the 1957 
KHSAA Tournament. 
Get the feel of this ball 
in your district and 
regional tournament. 



NO. 97 BASEBALLS OFFICIAL FOR KHSAA BASEBALL TOURNAMENT 

The official No. 97 League MacGregor baseball will be the official baseball for the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association Baseball Tournament to be held in 
Louisville later on this year. 

BASEBALL AND SOFTBALL 

We have uniforms in stock ready for immediate delivery. 

Also Louisville Slugger Bats. MacGregor No. 97 baseballs, gloves, shoes and every- 
thing you need. 

Our spring and summer catalog will be gladly mailed upon request. 
Please remember that for the best possible service call 103 or 104 and remember 

'•WE SHIP THE DAY YOU BUY." 



Hunt's Athletic Goods Co. 

PHONE 103 OR 104 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 



"THE LARGEST EXCLUSIVE ATHLETIC HOUSE IN THE SOUTH' 



Sutcliffe always has them— on time! 

BASEBALL UNIFORMS 




ML - CxM 

Custom 
Made 




IN STOCK FOR 

IMMEDIATE 
DELIVERY 

2 PIECE SUITS — . SHIRTS and PANTS 
*|)00 m s §|)'»0 m s |2 5 ° - ' S I0 3 ° 

Swatches of Fabric in Each Price Range 
Sent Promptly On Request. 

You may select your team's Caps, Belts and 
Stockings from the several grades shown In our 
New 1957 Athletic Catalog. 

Jf you have not received your copy, please let us 
know. 

ML-CM quality uniforms will be appreciated by 
your team . . . made of Sanforlan (65% Wool - 
35% Dacron). the same material used in the Major 
League's uniforms. Athletic Catalog, Page 12. 




USE OUR 

EXPERT 

LETTERING 

SERVICE 



K.E.A. When in Louisville be sure to visit Sutcliffe's Display quarters at Room 
812, Kentucky Hotel, April 1 0-1 1-12. See, inspect and order your athletic goods 
equipment for Summer, for next Fall and next year. 



*** STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 
Louisville March 13-14-15-16 
See SUTCLIFFE REPRESENTATIVES 
Room 812 - KENTUCKY HOTEL 



*** 



Reach American League Baseballs ...$2.35 

Wilson American Ass'n Baseballs $2.35 



Spalding Nat'l League Baseballs $2.35 

Sutcliffe Official League Baseballs $2.35 



LOUISVILLE SLUGGER BATS 

25— Natural White Ash, each $3.25 No. 150— White Ash, each $2.55 

Plenty of lower price Bats also in Stock for At Once Delivery. 
^'rite us for complete, illustrated Catalog and listing of school prices on Baseball, 
Soft Ball, Track, Tennis and Golf. 




UTCLIFFE CO. 

LOUISVILLE 1, KENTUCKY 







High School Athlete 



LAFAYETTE HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL TEAM 
K. H. S. A. A. CHAMPION - 1957 




(Left to Right) Seated in Front: Ronnie Duvall, "Corky" Carlisle. Front Row: 
Jimmy Whit more, Don Duvall, Dave Filer. Billy Ray Lickert, Tim Thompson. Gerald 
Dennv, Robbv Newsome. Dallous Reed. Second Row: Coach Ralph Carlisle. Coach 
Rov Walton. Mgr, John Gerlack. Trainer Harold Moberlv, Frank Martin, Mitchell 
True, Freddie Brown, Art West, Mgr. Sam Downing-, Statistician Dickie Hatter. Mgr. 
Billy Hammond, Coach Kenneth Caudill. 



District Tournament Games Won 

Lafayette 87-29 Wilmore 

Lafayette 64-50 Dunbar 

Lafayette 51-41 Henry Clay 



Regional Tournament Games Won 

Lafayette 75-54 Bridgeport 

Lafayette 63-53___ Madison Central 

Lafavette 55-46 Henry Clay 




Official Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 

APRIL - 1957 






Eastern— Runner-Up 
1957 State Basketball Tournament 




Left to Right) Front Row: Dick Peloff, Bill Mowry, Jack Miller, Steve Simpson, Boonie 
Sutherland. Second Row: Mgr. Bill Mason, Buddy Leathers, Jimmy Mardis, Tommy Brooks, 
John Doninger, John Laurent, Danny Williams, Mgr. George Martin. Third Row: Ass't. Coach 
Bill Hoke, Tony Elam, David Wollenhaupt, Charles Long, Tim Reitmeyer, R. C. King, Coach Roy 
Adams. 

Pikeville— Third, Place Winner 
1957 State Basketball Tournament 




Seated in Front: Billy Hopkins. (Left to Right) Front Row: Mgr. Butch AVoods, Tommy Ad- 
kins, Adrian Elkins, Chester Rowlett, Larry Phillips, Hilly Elkins, Grant "Hooker" Phillips. Sec- 
ond Row: Howard Lockhart, Pat Keene, Darwin Smith, Lloyd Keene, Jimmy Hodges, Foster Cole- 
man, Coach John Bill Trivette, Ass't. Coach Bobby Phillips. Third Row: Emil Dixon, Mgr. Darrell 
Hall, Harvey Lee Justice, Supt. John M. York, Mgr. Tommy Charles. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



Vol. XIX— X... 9 



APRIL, 1957 



SI. 00 Per Year 



1957 ANNUAL MEETING 



The business meeting of the Kentucky High 
School Athletic Association will be held on Friday, 
April 12. at 2:30 P. M. The place will be the South 
Room at the Brown Hotel. Louisville. The dinner 
meeting will be held in the Crystal Ballroom of the 
Brown Hotel, the hour being 6:00 P. M. 

The principal speaker at the dinner meeting 
will be President Kelly Thompson of the Western 
Kentucky State College. Bowling Green. The sub- 
ject of Mr. Thompson's talk will be "Whose Re- 
sponsibility?" The presentation of the Game Guy 
Award will be made during the meeting, and the 
program will also include entertainment features. 

As provided in Article IX, Section 1, of the 
K.H.S.A.A. Constitution, the following changes in 
the By-Laws and Tournament Rules, to be acted 
upon by the Delegate Assembly, are hereby sub- 
mitted to all members of the K.H.S.A.A. for their 
information. 

PROPOSAL I 

The Board of Control proposes that "shall" be 
substituted for "should" in the first sentence of 
Bv-Law 31. 

PROPOSAL II 

The Board of Control proposes that "twelve" 
be substituted for "ten" in the second sentence of 
Tournament Rule VI-B-1 (clarification). 
PROPOSAL III 

The Board of Control proposes that the follow- 
ing be added to By-Law 29, Section 3: "A head coach 
in football or basketball shall attend one clinic in 
the sport involved." 

PROPOSAL IV 

The Board of Control proposes a new By-Law. 
to read as follows: "A cheerleader, student manager, 
and any other student having an official connec- 
tion with the athletic program shall be enrolled 
and in attendance at the school which he repre- 
sents." 

PROPOSAL V 

The State Track Committee proposes that Track 
Rule X be amended to read as follows: "four places 
shall count in the scoring in each event of the 
regional meets, with values of 5-3-2-1 except in 
Relay races, in which the points shall be 10-6-4-2. 
PROPOSAL VI 

The State Track Committee proposes that 
Track Rule XVI be amended to read as follows: 
"Five places shall count in the scoring in each event 
of the State Track Meet, with values of 6-4-3-2-1 
except in Relay races, in which the points shall be 
12-8-6-4-2." 

PROPOSAL VII 

Coach J. Rice Mountjoy, and six administra- 
tors and coaches (Flora, Connor, Shropshire, Davis, 
Cobb, Goodridge), propose that the following be 
substituted for the first sentence of By-Law 1. 
Section 2: "Before certifying to the eligibility of a 
player, a principal shall secure from the State 
Bureau of Vital Statistics in the state in which the 



player was born a birth certificate for the player, 
based on information filed in the year of birth. If 
such a state record is not available, the principal 
shall report this to the Commissioner, who shall 
then advise the principal concerning the method 
to be followed in establishing the birth date of 
the player. Any school which allows a student to 
represent it on any team without first having a 
birth certificate for the player on file or having 
the birth date approved by the Commissioner, if 
no state record is available, shall be liable for sus- 
pension from the Association." 

PROPOSAL VIII 

Prin. Dawson Orman (Mt. Sterling) proposes 
that the By-Laws be amended to provide that the 
recipient of a contract for officiating any athletic 
event sanctioned by the K.H.S.A.A. shall return 
the contract, either signed or unsigned, to the 
sender within thirty days afer having received it. 
The contract will become void if not returned with- 
in this time. 

PROPOSAL IX 

Prin. Dawson Orman proposes that the follow- 
ing be added as paragraph c to Article VIII, Sec- 
tion 3, of the K.H.S.A.A. Constitution: "The re- 
cipient of a contract for an athletic contest be- 
tween two member schools of the K.H.S.A.A. shall 
return the contract, either signed or unsigned, to 
the sender within thirty days after having received 
it. The contract will become void if not returned 
within this time." 

PROPOSAL X 

Prin. Ben Flora (Bellevue) proposes that Ar- 
ticle IV, Section 3-C-7 be amended to read as 
follows: "Be responsible for editing and publishing 
The Kentucky High School Athlete, and shall cause 
to be published in the 'Athlete' the complete record 
of the minutes of each regular and called meeting 
of the Board of Control, said minutes to appear in 
the next issue of the 'Athlete' immediately follow- 
ing the meeting of the Board of Control." 
PROPOSAL XI 

Prin. Charles O. Dawson (Ludlow) proposes 
that By-Law 3 be amended to read as follows: "A 
contestant must have, for the current semester up 
to Monday of the week preceding that in which 
the contest occurs, a passing average in all full-credit 
high school studies. Grade school students partici- 
pating in athletics shall be passing in all subjects. 
No special recitations or tests are to be given for 
the purpose of making a student eligible. Student 
managers and any other student having an official 
connection with the athletic program shall come 
under the same scholarship rule." 
PROPOSAL XII 

Prin. Orville B. Hayes (Maysville) proposes 
that the By-Laws be amended to provide that if a 
contestant reaches his twentieth birthday during the 
district, regional or state tournament, he shall be 
allowed to complete tournament play. 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1957 



APRIL, 1957 VOL. XIX— NO. 9 

Publi8hed monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association. 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Russell Williamson (1956-60), Inez 

Vice-President Louis Litchfield (1953-57), Marion 

Directors — W. B. Jones (1953-57) Somerset; W. H. Crowdus 
(1954-58), Franklin; Jack Dawson (1954-5S), Middletown ; 
Robert P. Forsythe (1955-59). Greenville; K. G. Gillaspie 
(1955-59), Georgetown; Cecil A. Thornton (1956-60), Harlan. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 



~£rom the Commissione'i s (Jjfi 



ice 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1. 1956-57 Basketball Participation List 
(Eligibility) 

2. School's Report on Basketball Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Basket- 
ball) 



REGIONAL TRACK MEETS 

The Board of Control has established 
twelve track regions for 1957. The scheduled 
date for the regional meets is May 10. Only 
first and second place winners in the regions 
will qualify for the State Meet. Sites of the 
meets are: Murray, Henderson, Bowling 
Green, Danville, Louisville (Bellarmine Col- 
lege), Louisville (Shawnee), Bellevue, New- 
port, Lexington, Barbourville, Elkhorn City 
and Ashland. 

The assignment of schools by regions is 
as follows: 

Murray Region — Ballard Memorial, Cald- 
well County, Crittenden County, Crofton, 
Cuba, Fulton, Hopkinsville, Lowes, Murray, 
Murray Training, Paducah Tilghman, Reid- 
land, Sedalia, Trigg County. 

Henderson Region — Breckinridge County, 
Clay, Daviess County, Douglass, Henderson, 
Henderson County, Owensboro, Providence, 
Sturgis, Utica. 

Bowling Green Region — Austin-Tracy, 
Bowling Green, Brownsville, College, Edmon- 
ton, Franklin Simpson, Gamaliel, Glasgow, 
Greensburg, Greenville, Hiseville, Meade 
County, Muhlenberg Central, North Warren, 
Park City, Temple Hill, Tompkinsville, Vine 
Grove. 

Danville Region — Bardstown, Berea, Berea 
Foundation, Camp Dick Robinson, Danville, 
Eubank, Harrodsburg, Junction City, Old 
Kentucky Home, Perryville, St. Charles, St. 
Joseph, Springfield, Wayne County, Western, 
Wilmore. 



STATE TRACK MEET SCHEDULE 

Lexington, Kentucky, May 17-18 
(Time is Central Daylight Time) 
FRIDAY 

2:15 P. M.— 120 Yard High Hurdles (4 heats), 
3 from each heat qualify for Semi-finals; Shot Put 
and Pole Vault, Finals. 

2:35 P. M.— 100 Yard Dash (4 heats), 2 from 
each heat qualify for Finals. 

2:50 P. M.— 120 Yard High Hurdles (Semi- 
finals), 3 from each heat qualify for Finals. 

3:05 P. M— 880 Yard Relay (4 heats), 3 from 
each heat qualify for Semi-finals. 

3:35 P. M.— 440 Yard Dash (3 heats), 2 from 
each heat qualify for Finals. 

4:00 P. M.— 180 Yard Low Hurdles (4 heats), 3 
from each heat qualify for Semi-finals. 

4:20 P. M.— 880 Yard Run (3 heats), 2 from 
each heat qualify for Finals. 

4:45 P. M.— 220 Yard Dash (4 heats), 2 from 
each heat qualify for Finals. 

5:05 P. M.— 180 Yard Low Hurdles (Semi- 
finals), 3 from each heat qualify for Finals. 

5:20 P. M.— 880 Yard Relay (Semi-finals), 3 
from each heat qualify for Finals. 

5:35 P. M— Mile Relay (3 heats), 2 from each 
heat qualify for Finals. 
SATURDAY 

1:00 P. M.— High Jump and Discus 

2:00 P. M.— 120 Yard High Hurdles 

2:15 P. M.— 100 Yard Dash 

2:30 P. M.— Mile Run and Broad Jump 

2:45 P. M.— 880 Yard Relay 

3:00 P. M.— 440 Yard Dash 

3:15 P. M.— 180 Yard Low Hurdles 

3:30 P. M.— 880 Yard Run 

3:45 P. M.— 220 Yard Dash 

4:00 P. M.— Mile Relay 

Bellarmine Region — Butler, Eastern, Emi- 
nence, Fern Creek, K.M.I. . Kentucky School 
for the Blind. Lincoln Institute, Oldham 
County, Ormsby Village, Pleasureville, Sou- 
thern, Simpsonville, Trimble Countv, Trinity, 
Valley. 

Louisville Region — Atherton, duPont Man- 
ual, Central, Flaget, Male, St. Xavier, Shaw- 
nee. 

Bellevue Region — Bellevue, Dayton, Dixie 
Heights, Holmes, Lloyd Memorial, Simon 
Kenton. 

Newport Region — Boone County. Campbell 
County, Falmouth, Grant County, Highlands, 
Ludlow, Newport, Silver Grove, Walton- 
Verona. 

Lexington Region — Bourbon Vocational, 
Bridgeport, Camargo, Dunbar, Elkhorn, 
Garth, Henry Clay, Irvine, Lafayette, Lex- 
ington Catholic, M.M.I., Montgomery Coun- 
ty, North Middletown, Peaks Mill, Scott 
Countv, University, Versailles. 

Barbourville Region — Barbourville, Cor- 
bin, Harlan, Hazel Green, Henderson Settle- 
ment, Knox Central, London, Middlesboro, 
Pineville, Pleasant View, Red Bird, Somerset, 
Williamsburg. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1957 



Page Three 



Elkhorn City Region — Belfry, Elkhorn 
City, Flat Gap, Fleming-Neon, Johns Creek, 
M. C. Napier, Martin, Oil Springs. Paints- 
ville, Pikeville, Frestonsburg, Virgie, Way- 
land, Whitesburg. 

Ashland Region — Ashland, Catlettsburg, 
Fairview, Russell, McKell, Raceland. Wurt- 
land. 

TENNIS TOURNAMENTS 

On May 13 four regional tennis tourna- 
ments will be held. The sites are Bowling 
Green, Louisville, Lexington and Bellevue. 
The State Tennis Tournament will be held 
in Louisville on May 20-21. The assignment 
of schools by regions is as follows: 

Bowling Green Region — Bardstown, Bowl- 
ing Green, Caverna, College, Daviess County. 
Douglass, Glasgow. Henderson. Hopkinsville, 
Muhlenberg Central. Owensboro, St. Joseph, 
Tompkinsville. 

Louisville Region — Atherton, Butler. Cen- 
tral. Eastern. Fern Creek. Flaget, K.M.I., 
Male. St. Xavier. Shawnee, Southern, Trinity, 
Valley. 

Lexington Region — Ashland. Berea Foun- 
dation. Elkhorn, Garth, Hazel Green. Paints- 
ville. University. 

Bellevue Region — Bellevue, Boone County, 
Covington Catholic. Falmouth. Grant County, 
Highlands. Holmes. Villa Madonna. 
GOLF TOURNAMENTS 

Seven regional tournaments have been set 
up in golf. These tournaments will be held 
on May 22 at Madisonville, Bowling Green, 
Louisville, Dixie Heights. Lexington, Middles- 
boro and Paintsville. The State Golf Tourna- 
ment will be held at Fort Knox on May 28-29. 
The assignment of schools by regions is as 
follows : 

Madisonville Region — Caldwell County, 
Daviess County, Douglass, Fulton, Green- 
ville, Hartford. Henderson. Hopkinsville, 
Owensboro. 

Bowling Green Region — Bardstown, Bowl- 
ing Green, College. Ft. Knox. Franklin 
Simpson, Glasgow, St. Joseph, Tompkinsville. 

Louisville Region — Butler, duPont Manual, 
Eastern, Fern Creek, Flaget, J. M. Atherton, 
K.M.I.. Male, St. Xavier, Shawnee, Southern, 
Trinity. Valley. 

Dixie Heights Region — Beechwood, Cov- 
ington Catholic, Dixie Heights, Highlands, 
Holmes, Lloyd Memorial. Newport, St. Hen- 
ry. St. Thomas. 

Lexington Region — Berea, Clark County, 
Danville, Maysville. 

Middlesboro Region — Cumberland, Lynch, 
Middlesboro, Somerset. 

Paintsville Region — Ashland. Boyd Coun- 
ty, Martin, Paintsville. 



BOARD MEMBERS RE-ELECTED 




Louis Litchfield 



W. B. Jones 



Supt. Louis Litchfield of the Crittenden 
County Schools and Prin. W. B. Jones of the 
Somerset High School will represent Sections 
1 and 6 respectively on the Board of Control 
for a four year period, beginning July 1, 
1957. Each Director is beginning his second 
term of Board membership. Mr. Litchfield 
was elected without opposition, and Mr. 
Jones defeated Prin. Don R. Rawlings of the 
Danville High School in balloting which end- 
ed on March 1. 

Mr. Litchfield., currently Vice President 
of the Association, was born in Blackford in 
Webster County on August 29, 1910. A 
graduate of the Blackford High School, he 
attended Murray State College, receiving his 
B.S. degree from that institution in 1937. 
He had teaching and coaching assignments 
at the Blackford Junior High School. Fre- 
donia High School, Cobb High School, Nebo 
High School, Farmersville High School, 
Frances High School, and Crittenden County 
High School. In July of 1956 he became 
Superintendent of Crittenden County Schools. 

In 1939 Mr. Litchfield married Miss Birdie 
Quisenberry of Princeton. They have two 
children. During the period of 1943-1947, he 
was Assistant Commissioner of Agriculture 
for the state of Kentucky. Mr. Litchfield is 
a member of K.E.A. and N.E.A. On several 
occasions he has been a member of the 
K.E.A. and K.H.S.A.A. delegate assemblies. 
He was a "certified" basketball official for 
several years, and he was a State Tourna- 
ment referee four times. He is currently a 
member of the Murray State College Board 
of Regents. He is a deacon of the Marion 
Baptist Church. 

Mr. Jones was born in Monroe County on 
August 8, 1900. He attended schools in Mon- 
roe and Barren counties, graduating from 
the Cave City High School in 1920. He re- 
ceived his A.B. degree from Western Ken- 
tucky State College in 1925. He had teaching 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1957 



assignments in a rural one-room school, the 
Cave City grade school, and Merry Oaks 
School (Barren County). He was principal 
of the Middleton High School in Simpson 
County in 1925-1927, assistant principal and 
principal of the Anchorage High School dur- 
ing the 1928-1935 period, and he has been 
principal of the Somerset High School since 
1935. 

In 1928 Mr. Jones received his M.A. degree 
from the University of Chicago. He married 
Miss Willie Boyer in 1930. They have three 
children. 

Mr. Jones was a member of the K.E.A. 
Research Committee in 1929-1932. He is the 
author of numerous articles on the subject 
of Education. He was chairman of the K.E.A. 
Credentials Committee for the 1933-1939 
period. He is a member of K.E.A., N.E.A., 
the Department of Secondary School Prin- 
cipals, and Phi Delta Kappa. He is a Mason, 
an elder in the Somerset Presbyterian 
Church, and is past president of the Somerset 
Kiwanis Club. 

At present Mr. Jones is president of the 
Kentucky Association of Secondary School 
Principals. At the meeting of the National 
Association of Secondary School Principals, 
held in Washington, D. C, he was awarded 
on February 23 a certificate of merit for 
distinguished service in the promotion of 
secondary education in Kentucky. 



BASEBALL TOURNAMENTS 

The district baseball tournaments are 
scheduled to held on May 6-8. The dates 
should be set by the district tournament 
managers, and should represent the think- 
ing of the majority of principals or coaches 
in the district involved. The regional tourna- 
ments will be held on May 23-24, and the 
State Baseball Tournament is scheduled to 
be played at Parkway Field, Louisville, on 
June 6-7. The assignment of schools to the 
various districts and regions is as follows: 

MURRAY REGION 

South Christian District— Clifty, Crofton, 
Hopkinsville, Lacy, Pembroke, Sinking Fork, 
South Christian, Trigg County. 

Murray District — Benton, Farmington, 
Hazel, Murray, Murray Training, North Mar- 
shall, South Marshall'. 

Heath District— Arlington, Ballard Me- 
morial, Heath, Reidland, St. John. 

Mayfield District — Cayce, Central, Cuba, 
Fancy Farm, Fulgham, Hickman, Lowes, 
Mayfield, Sedalia, Wingo. 



New Baseball Film 

The K.H.S.A.A. has received from the Na- 
tional Federation office a print of the new 
film, The 1956 All Star Game, and has placed 
it on loan with the Department of University 
Extension, University of Kentucky. The film 
was produced by the National League, the 
American League, and A. G. Spalding & Sons. 

The 1956 all star game was played in Grif- 
fith Stadium, and was dedicated to the late 
Clark Griffith. The film opens with a pre- 
game ceremony in his honor. Close-ups of 
the stars of today are shown, as the narrator, 
Lew Fonseca, comments on the past per- 
formances of each player. 

The picture catches the highlights and 
scoring plays of the entire game. The offen- 
sive power of both leagues is in evidence 
as home runs are numerous. The pitching 
style of each pitcher working in the game 
is caught by the camera. 

The film is in color and is designed to run 
about twenty minutes. Action moves at a 
rapid pace. The National League wins by a 
score of 7 to 3. 

The film is suitable for all age groups, 
while coaches could use it as a training film 
by allowing their players to study the play 
of the game's greatest players of today. 

Marion District — Caldwell County, Fre- 
donia, Livingston County, Lyon County, 
Marion, Salem. 

MADISONVILLE REGION 

Henderson District — Douglass, Hender- 
son, Henderson County, Holy Name, Sebree, 
Slaughters. 

Irvington District — Breckinridge County, 
Flaherty, Frederick Fraize, Hawesville, 
Irvington, Lewisport. 

Hartford District — Beaver Dam, Center- 
town, Fordsville, Hartford, Horse Branch. 

Owensboro District — Daviess County. Ow- 
ensboro, Owensboro Technical, Utica. 

Madisonville District — Calhoun, Dawson 
Springs, Earlington, Livermore, Madisonville, 
Nebo. Sacramento, South Hopkins. 

Central City District — Bremen, Central 
City, Drakesboro, Graham, Greenville, 
Hughes-Kirk, Muhlenberg Central. 

Morganfield District — Clay, Morganfield. 
Providence, St. Vincent, Uniontown. 
BOWLING GREEN REGION 

Bowling Green District — Alvaton, Bowl- 
ing Green, College, Franklin-Simpson, North 
Warren, Richardsville, Warren County. 

Russellville District — Adairville, Auburn, 
Guthrie, Olmstead, Russellville, Todd County. 
(Continued on Page Eleven) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1957 



Page Five 



In Memoriam 




Henry Chambers 

Mr. Henry Stum Chambers, Superintendent 
of McCracken County Schools at Paducah, 
Kentucky, died from a heart attack on Feb- 
ruary 10, 1957. He would have been fifty- 
one years old on February 16, 1957. 

Born at Harris Grove in Calloway County, 
Mr. Chambers attended school in Calloway 
County and was graduated from Almo High 
School, where his brother, the late Tullus 
Chambers, was then principal. He attended 
Murray State College and Western State Col- 
lege where he received his B.S. degree in 
agriculture. He later did graduate work at 
the University of Kentucky. 

Mr. Chambers began teaching at Almo as 
a grade teacher in 1926, and became prin- 
cipal there in 1928. He went to La Center, 
Kentucky, as an agriculture teacher in 1929, 
and in 1930 he became principal there. He 
served as principal at La Center for four 
years, and was then elected as principal of 
Memorial High School in Hart County, where 
he taught for five years. Mr. Chambers then 
went to Heath High School in McCracken 
County. In 1945 he became principal of Wick- 
liffe High School and served in this position 
for two years, at the end of which time he 
was elected Superintendent of McCracken 
County Schools. He served in this capacity 
until the time of his death. 

On several occasions Mr. Chambers was 
honored by the teachers and administrators 
of Kentucky for the splendid work he did 
in the field of education. While he was prin- 



cipal at Memorial High School in Hart 
county, he was elected president of the 
Fourth District Education Association and 
first vice-president of the Kentucky Educa- 
tion Association. 

He was a member of the Board of Directors 
of the Kentucky Education Association and 
of the Planning Board. In 1950 he was elect- 
ed president of the Kentucky Education As- 
sociation, and he became one of the most 
outstanding presidents of this great organi- 
zation. 

Mr. Chambers was made a Kentucky 
Colonel by Governor Laffoon. He was a 
member of the Phi Beta Kappa Fraternity 
and of McKendree Methodist Church. Other 
organizaitons in which he was affiliated were 
the West McCracken County Lion's Club, the 
Odd Fellows, and the First District Adminis- 
rators Club. 

Throughout his whole life he devoted full 
time to the field of education. He was 
teacher, principal, agriculture instructor, 
coach and superintendent. He loved athletics. 
Proof of this was the building of three fine 
gymnasiums in McCracken County while he 
was superintendent. 

Henry Stum Chambers will be missed by 
his many friends all over the state, especially 
during the meetings of the Kentucky Edu- 
cation Association, where his advice was 
always welcomed. If one remark could be 
made to describe Henry Chambers, it would 
be that he was always honest and fair with 
his fellow man. 

Survivors of Mr. Chambers are his wife ; 
two sons, Tullus and Stum; a daughter, Alta 
Herrold ; and three grandchildren. 

—J. R. 



Insurance Committee 



Several months ago President Russell 
Williamson of the K.H.S.A.A. appointed an 
Insurance Committee from the Board of Con- 
trol. The committee is composed of Chairman 
W. H. Crowdus ; Directors Cecil A. Thorn- 
ton, K. G. Gillaspie, and Jack Dawson ; and 
Commissioner Theo. A. Sanford. The com- 
mittee is making a study of current K.H.S. 
A. A. Protection Fund fees, benefits, and 
regulations, along with contracts written by 
various commercial companies, in an effort 
to make recommendations to the Board of 
Control for the improvement of the service 
rendered Association member schools by the 
insurance program. 



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Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1957 



The Flying Dutchman 

The 1957 Game Guy Award goes this year 
to a courageous fighter, Danny Duncan, of 
Hazel High School, Hazel, Kentucky. This 
award, which is an annual presentation of 
The Flying Dutchman, honors that physically 
handicapped athlete who overcomes the 
greatest handicap to accomplish the most in 
sports in our Commonwealth. 

A junior at Hazel High School in Callo- 
way County, he is not only a star, but one 
of the most aggressive and spirited players 
in the First Region. He is Calloway County's 
fifth high scorer with 470 points, averaging 
sixteen points per game playing with a team 
that lost nineteen games in a row. Danny is 
highly commended also for his fine sports- 
manship. Dozens of letters from Western 
Kentucky say that he is admired by players 
and coaches of opposing teams everywhere. 
Danny has done all of this with the handicap 
of a deformed and useless right arm. Al- 
though he operated with only his left arm, 
many of his opponents confusedly thought 
he was operating with three or four arms as 
he often faked two or three defenders out 
of action as he drove to the basket for a 
goal. 

When Coach Ed Diddle, of Western Ken- 
tucky State College, presents the Game Guy 
Award to Danny Duncan at the annual din- 
ner of the Kentucky High School Athletic 
Association during K.E.A., he will be recog- 
nizing not only a stellar athlete, but one who 
is serving as an example to countless hun- 
dreds who have handicaps and will be in- 
spired to have the same fun which the Game 
Guys are having. 

It is singular to note that among the many 
commendations of Danny Duncan for the 
award was one from Price Lytle, of Hopkins- 
ville, who said he had taken a particular in- 
terest in this young man because he, himself, 
is physically handicapped with Osteo in his 
right leg and that it gives him satisfaction 
to see people overcoming physical handicaps 
as Danny is doing. 

Miss Lissy May, of Peaks Mill High School, 
who recently received the Corn Cob Pipe of 
Honor for outstanding work with cheerlead- 
ers, writes the Dutchman as follows : "What 
a wonderful name ! — And do you sit on Pan- 
dora's troublesome box ? My certificate is 
proudly framed and the Corn Cob Pipe oc- 
cupies a place of prominence. I am highly 
complimented and you have another avid 
admirer." 

Fred Hodge, of Evansville, Indiana, who 



ranks high among the sports officials of that 
area, writes the Dutchman as follows: "I 
cannot help but believe that the Dutchman's 
projects, Commissioner Sanford and Assist- 
ant Commissioner Mansfield are largely re- 
sponsible for the high level on which Ken- 
tucky's athletic program rests. I think the 
clinics help greatly and I want to say that 
it is a pleasure to work in Kentucky." 

Such remarks coming from in and out of 
Kentucky are greatly stimulating and con- 
stitute encouragement to "keep pitching" 
for improvement of the projects aimed at 
building character in boys, sportsmanship 
in communities and unselfish desires on the 
part of individuals to help others. 

Kentucky crowned sixteen champions at 
the State Tournament this year when the 
coaches of the sixteen regional representa- 
tive teams displayed a brand of coaching 
sportsmanship both on and off the bench 
which drew compliments from hundreds of 
people in attendance. Another champion was 
crowned when the teen-age students attend- 
ing the meet drew applause for outstanding 
behavior not only from fans, but from hotel 
people, beside public praise from the press. 
Kentucky had another champion when the 
crowd also displayed admirable behavior 
with only an occasional "boo", which is to 
be expected as emotions run wild. Still five 
more champions were crowned when George 
Conley, Dick Betz, Jim Baker, Roy Win- 
chester and Ralph Mussman turned in of- 
ficiating performances which were consistent 
and efficient. 

One gentleman said to me, "Dutchman, it 
seems like the crowd was not satisfied on 
several occasions with the calls the officials 
made." Our reply was that it is not the job 
of the officials to satisfy the crowd, but 
rather to enforce the rules consistently. On 
officiating calls, it is impossible for an of- 
ficial to be more than fifty per cent correct 
from the fans' viewpoint, assuming the crowd 
is evenly divided. So the officials join the 
other champions crowned at the 1957 Ken- 
tucky State High School Basketball Tourna- 
ment. 

The K.H.S.A.A. may have the solution to 
the problem of students' conduct in town 
and in hotels when games are not in session. 
Teen-Ville, the youth club provided for teen- 
agers, kept a total of 9,000 youngsters off 
the streets and supervised during the three 
days and nights it was open. Other states 
are asking, "How was this done? . . . Please 
send us the plan." 

Bobby Kimmel, captain of the Georgia 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1957 Page Nine 

1957 State Basketball Tournament Statistics 

Average Score: For Winners: 66.1: For Losers: 54.2. Total for both: 121 per game 

Average No. Personal Fouls (fouls by A plus fouls by B) 30.4 per game 

Average No. Technical Fouls (fouls by A plus fouls by B) .12 per game 

Total No. Free Throw Attempts (per. and T. for all Games) 816. Successful 59'- per game 

Total No. Players Disqualified for Flagrant Fouls per tour. 

Average No. Times per game a player committed 5 Personals _ .87 per game 

Average No. charged time-outs (total for both teams): 5 4 per game 

DATA COLLECTED BY FIRST STATISTICIAN 

Average No. (a) Personal fouls made by players while on Offense: 4.3 per game 

Average No. (b) Cases of traveling, include illegal dribble: 7.4 per game 

Average No. (c) Times 2 throws were awarded because foul occurred 

during unsuccessful try: 5.8 per game 

Average No. (d) Times a bonus penalty foul occurred: 24 per game 

', of times 1st throw in (d) was successful: 60'. 

'. of 2nd throws which were successful: 66', 

Average No. (e) Field goals (both teams): 45.5 per game 

', scored without ball touching backboard: 57.4'. 

Average No. (f) Over-all time from first toss to final gun: 1 hr. and 13 minutes 
Average No. (g) Times jump ball occurred because player held or 

dribbled ball for 5 seconds: .19 per game 

DATA COLLECTED BY SECOND STATISTICIAN 

Average No. (a) Jump ball situations (include center jumps): 7 per game 

(1) Times above jumps followed held ball: 1.2 per game 

(2) Times jump ball rules were violated: 2.5 per game 

Average No. (b) Throw-ins from end of court (Do not include 

throw-in after any goal): 12.5 per game 

Average No. (c) Throw-ins from side (Do not include after Tech. foul) : 11 per game 

Average No. (d) Violations of 3-second lane rule: .50 per game 

Average No. (e) Free Throw violations: per game 

For Last Three Minutes: 

(1) No. Pers. fouls against a thrower: 1.4 per game 

(2) No. Per?, fouls other than against a thrower: 2.9 per game 

Tech basketball team, remarked at the final who will be involved and encourage strong 
session of the big show that there were more competition, with sportsmanlike practices 
people in attendance on that one night than being emphasized at the same time. This idea 
watched the entire Georgia State High might well be copied everywhere. Incidental- 
School Tournament. ly. Cliff Barker, the spark-plug of the 

L. V. Phillips. Commissioner, and Bob Hin- "Fabulous Five" of the University of Ken- 

shaw. Assistant Commissioner, of the Indiana tucky, was in that banquet audience as coach 

High School Athletic Association, and two of Eton. Indiana High School, 
first rate chaps, were in Freedom Hall dur- On the subject of gymnasiums. Jarvis 

ing one day's competition, along with count- Parsley passes on the information that a 

less visitors from other states. Commissioner new gymnasium is under construction at 

Phillips holds the finals of the Indiana High Brooksville which will be a landmark in that 

School Basketball Tournament in Butler area, involving not only excellent seating 

Field House, which has a seating capacity of capacity and a fine playing floor, but includ- 

14,943. He tells me that the total seating ing class rooms besides, 
capacity for all the tournaments played in R av Heinisch. of Maytown High School, 

Indiana is 434. 793. is loud in the praises of Dick Looney. popu- 

Commissioner Phillips introduced the lar mountain official, whom he says is one 

Dutchman at a pre-sectional tournament of the greatest gentlemen of that section, 

banquet at Muncie, Indiana, where thirteen Ray says that Dick has a knack of turning 

Indiana high school teams were banqueted away sharp remarks made to him by coaches 

just prior to the opening of the tournament in such a manner that they are taught les- 

competition. The idea of this dinner is to sons. On one occasion when a coach belliger- 

bring together the 550 coaches and players ently assailed Dick, the big official made of- 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1957 



Russell County— Fourth Place Winner 
1957 State Basketball Tournament 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Joe Polston, Don Grider. Brently Bernard. Lowel 
Robertson, Erthcl Popplewell, Mgr. Ballenger. Second Row : Ralph Richardson, Bruce 
Richardson. Bill Skaggs, Robert Stevens, Gilbert Hammond, Phillip Garner, Carlie 
Roy, Coach Mrazovich. 



ficiating history with this gentle remark, 
"Son, you've got a lot to learn, but you're 
smart and I believe will soon regret your re- 
marks to me." This same coach is now ask- 
ing that Dick he recognized by a Flying 
Dutchman Award. Dick already possesses the 
Corn Cob Pipe of Honor, but he will be pre- 
sented with an inch-thick T-bone steak the 
next time the Dutchman is in Pikeville. 

"How much should an official be paid?" 
is one question the Dutchman has been asked 
to answer, and here it is: A laborer is en- 
titled to his hire and his employer to a day's 
work. Good officials have never been paid 
enough anywhere; poor ones are often over- 
paid. Good contests depend on good officiat- 
ing. There are no officiating bargains. If you 
want good officials, expect to pay good fees. 

The Kentucky High School Athletic As- 
sociation Banquet Committee racked up a 



big score when it tied up Western Kentucky 
State's youthful president, Kelly Thompson, 
for its annual banquet address during K.E.A. 
Without question, Kelly is not only one of 
the country's most progressive college presi- 
dents, but he is also one of the finest after 
dinner speakers anywhere. Kelly's latest ad- 
ministrative masterpiece was to sign Nick 
Denes as Varsity Football Coach. 

We want to close on this note because Nick, 
who handled the press table for Commission- 
er Sanford at the State Tournament for 
years and did an outstanding job, is one of 
the best men with boys it has been our privi- 
lege to meet. Nick is gentle, firm, and the 
kind of man you like to see your boy associat- 
ed with. 

Drop by the Dutchman's office for a visit 
during K.E.A., Nick. We're missing you up 
this way. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1957 



Page Eleven 



BASEBALL TOURNAMENTS 

(Continued from Page Four) 

Tompkinsville District — Austin-Tracy, 
Clinton County, Gamaliel, Glasgow, Scotts- 
ville, Tompkinsville. 

Caverna District — Caverna, Cub Run, Ed- 
monton, Hiseville, Hodgenville, Memorial. 

Brownsville District — Butler Count y, 
Brownsville, Clarkson. Kyrock, Leitchfield, 
Sunt'ish. 

Campbellsville District — Adair County, 
Campbellsville, Greensburg, Lebanon. St. 
Augustine, St. Charles. St. Francis, Taylor 
County. 

St. Joseph District — Bardstown, Frederick- 
town, Lebanon Junction, Mt. Washington, 
Old Kentucky Home, St. Joseph, Shepherds- 
ville, Springfield. 

Vine Grove District — Elizabethtown, 
Elizabethtown Catholic, Ft. Knox. Glendale, 
Howevalley, Lynnvale, Rineyville, Sonora, 
Vine Grove, West Point. 

LOUISVILLE REGION 

Louisville District — Atherton. Central, 
duPont Manual, Flaget. Male, St. Xavier, 
Shawnee. 

Trinity District — Butler, Eastern, Fern 
Creek, K.M.I.. Southern. Trinity, Valley. 
NEWPORT REGION 

St. Henry District — Boone County, Lloyd 
Memorial, St. Henry, Simon Kenton. 

Beechwood District — Beechwood, Coving- 
ton Catholic, Dixie Heights. Holmes. Ludlow. 

Ft. Thomas District — Campbell County, 
Highlands. St. Mary, St. Thomas, Silver 
Grove. 

Grant County District — Falmouth, Grant 
County, Morgan, Williamstown. 

Newport District — Bellevue, Dayton, New- 
port, Newport Catholic. 

Maysville District — Bracken County, 
Mayslick, Maysville, Minerva, Tollesboro. 
Vaneeburg-Lewis County. 

VERSAILLES REGION 

Frankfort District — Anderson, Elkhom, 
Frankfort, Garth, Good Shepherd, Peaks 
Mill, Scott County, Versailles. 

Paris District — Cvnthiana, Harrison Coun- 
ty, M.M.I., Nicholas County, Paris. 

Harrodsburg District — Buckeye, Camp 
Dick Robinson, Danville, Harrodsburg, Lan- 
caster, Mercer County. 

Stanford District — Crab Orchard, Junc- 
tion City, McKinney, Mt. Vernon, Paint Lick, 
Stanford. 

Carrollton District — Carrollton, Eminence, 
Henry Central, Pleasureville, Trimble Coun- 
ty. 



Lexington District — Athens, Henry Clay, 
Lafayette, Lexington Catholic, Nicholasville, 
University. 

Richmond District — Berea, Estill County, 
Irvine, Lee County, Madison Central, Madi- 
son-Model. 

Shelbyville District — Bagdad, Lincoln In- 
stitute, Oldham County, Shelbyville, Simp- 
sonville, Taylorsville, Waddy. 

MIDDLESBORO REGION 

Somerset District — Bush, Ferguson, Hazel 
Green, London, Pulaski County, Russell 
County, Somerset, Wayne County. 

Harlan District — Black Star, Cumberland, 
Evarts, Hall, Harlan, Loyall, Lynch, Wallins. 

Middlesboro District — Barbourville, Cor- 
bin, Henderson Settlement, Middlesboro, 
Pleasant View. 

Jenkins District — Buckhorn, Carr Creek, 
Combs Memorial, Fleming-Neon. Hazard. 
Leatherwood, Leslie County, Letcher, Ma- 
goffin Baptist, M. C. Napier, Stinnett Settle- 
ment, Whitesburg. 

GRAYSON REGION 

Ashland District — Ashland, Boyd County, 
Catlettsburg, Fairview, Greenup, McKell, 
Raceland, Russell, South Portsmouth. Wurt- 
land. 

Mt. Sterling District — Camargo, Clark 
County, Montgomery County. Mt. Sterling, 
Owingsville, Sharpsburg, Winchester. 

Grayson District — Breckinridge Training, 
Fleming County, Hitchins, Morehead, Olive 
Hill, Prichard. 

Elkhorn City District— Belfrv, Elkhorn 
City, Feds Creek, Martin, Pikeville. Prestons- 
burg, Wayland, Wheelwright. 

Paintsville District — Louisa, Meade Me- 
morial, Morgan County, Oil Springs, Paints- 
ville, Sandy Hook, Van Lear. 



Lafayette Cheerleaders Best 

Cheerleaders representing the Lafayette 
High School were first place winners in the 
third annual competition for the Cheer- 
leaders' Cup. awarded by K.A.P.O.A. The 
runner-up honors went to the Eastern High 
School, with honorable mention to Hazard 
High School. The presentation of the cup 
was made by K.H.S.A.A. President William- 
son during an award ceremony following the 
final game of the 1957 State Basketball 
Tournament. The cheerleaders were judged 
on the basis of a rating schedule which in- 
cluded appearance, ability, conduct while in 
uniform, and sportsmanship toward oppon- 
ents and officials. 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1957 



TABULATION OF VOTES ON HIGHEST RATED OFFICIALS - 1957 STATE TOURNAMENT 

Listed below are the tabulations of votes on the thirteen officials who received the 
highest ratings by coaches of the sixteen teams which participated in the recent State 
High School Basketball Tournament. Each coach voted on six Certified officials in the 
order of his preference, the official whose name was listed first by the coach receiving six 
points, the second official five points, etc. This is the method which has been used for 
many years by the Board of Control and the Commissioner in selecting State Tournament 
officials. The schools given below are not listed in order by regions nor are they listed 
in the order of the tournament bracket. 



Official 


A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


11 


I 


J 


K 


I. 


M 


X 


() 


P 


TOTAL 


George Conlev __ 


9 




o 

O 


5 




5 








1 


6 


1 




6 






35 


Ralph Mussman_ 


1 












1 


1 




- > 




(i 


1 




5 


6 


30 


Rov Winchester- 






5 


6 




O 

a 








2 


Q 




3 


2 




Q 


27 


James Baker 










Q 


i 


6 








4 


1 




5 




5 


25 


Richard Betz 


1 




4 




1 




5 




5 








5 








24 


Travis Combs 








4 


5 


4 














1 


1 






21 


Doc Ferrell 


















6 




5 




6 








17 


Jack Thompson. _ 




1 










2 






5 




2 








1 


17 


Joe Kinman 








2 








6 






2 








<; 




L6 


D. Longenecker_ 




1 


6 














(i 












1 


11 


Robert McLeod__ 


• ) 


6 






■ ) 
























13 


Ben Edelen 




3 




1 






1 


2 














4 




11 


Clyde Rouse 










1 






5 












3 


2 




11 



The Flying Dutchman Honored 

Charlie Vettiner, The Flying Dutchman, 
was flown to Asheville, North Carolina, 
April 2, by the Southern Association of 
Colleges and Secondary Schools to receive 
the Honor Award of the Southern District 
for 1957 at its annual convention April 2. The 
convention dates were April 2-5. 

Betty Autrey, Stetson University, presi- 
dent of the Health, Physical Education and 
Recreation section of the Southern Associa- 
tion of Colleges and Secondary Schools, sent 
her personal congratulations and the deep 
appreciation of the Association for the meri- 
torious service and outstanding contributions 
to health, physical education and recreation 
which Vettiner has made in the Southern 
District when she announced him the winner 
of the highest award the Association can 
bestow. The Honor Award was presented at 
the General Session of the Southern District 
Convention, April 2, after which Vettiner 
was in a receiving line with officers of the 
Association at the honor reception. 

To receive this honor, the executive must 
be at least 40 years of age. His contributions 
must be in the field of health, physical educa- 
tion and recreation. He must have rendered 
at least ten years of meritorious service in 
these fields in the South. His work must be 
outstanding and express the spirit of serv- 
ice which this award represents. 



Vettiner is 48 years of age; a graduate of 
Louisville Male High School and Western 
Kentucky State College, of Bowling Green; 
and a Rotarian. He holds national honors 
conferred by the National Recreation Assoc- 
iation ; and is a member of the De Molay 
Legion of Honor. On June 28, 1956, President 
Adolfo Ruiz Cortines, of Mexico, conferred 
on him a citation recognizing the valuable 
contributions he has made to the further- 
ance of mutual understanding and respect 
between the people of the United States and 
Mexico through the Youth Ambassadors of 
Friendship. This honor was conferred in 
Mexico City. President Fulgencio Batista, of 
Cuba, also cited him in Havana for the same 
contribution. 

Widely known as an author, recreation 
consultant and lecturer, Vettiner is recog- 
nized as an authority in the field of recrea- 
tion. He has written three textbooks on 
the subject, his latest being A New Horizon 
of Recreation. 



New Book 

The State Office of the K.H.S.A.A. has received 
from the Interstate Printers of Danville. Illinois, a 
copv of Dr. Joe Dolan's recent book, TREATMENT 
AND PREVENTION OF ATHLETIC INJURIES. 
Dr. Dolan, who is Associate Professor of Education 
at Xavier University, has covered his subject well. 
This book is recommended to Kentucky adminis- 
trators, athletic directors and coaches. 



We Ship The DaYYou BuY" 

HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO. 

INCORPORATED 

PHONE 103 OK 104 
IMAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 



VISIT OUR DISPLAY ROOM 
DURING K. E. A. 



We extend a hearty welcome to you and your friends to make Room 912 at the 
Kentucky Hotel your headquarters during K.E.A. in Louisville, Kv., from April 10 to 
April 13. 

We will have a complete showing of baseball, softball, track, tennis and other 
spring sports. We will also have our new football and basketball samples for the 
coming- 1957 and 1958 season; also a complete line of award jackets, sweaters, blankets, 
trophies, etc. 

The K.H.S.A.A. Tennis Tournaments for 1957, both regional ami state, will again 
use the MacGregor Tennis Ball. 

The K.H.S.A.A. State Baseball Tournament will use the famous MacGregor No. 97 
Ball for 1957 - same as in previous years. 

Do you have one of our Spring and Summer 1957 Catalogs, and one of our advance 
Fall and Winter Catalogs for 1957-58? If not, write us and another copy will be 
gladly sent. 

We enjoyed seeing our many friends during the State Basketball Tournament in 
Louisville. To our many old and new customers, "Many Thanks" for the nice orders 
placed with us for at once and future delivery. Rest assured that these will receive 
our usual prompt and personal attention. 

Visit us during the K.E.A. Have a coke "on the house." 

We are going to have a complete line of PHYS ED supplies for both Ladies and 
Men. Come and discuss your problems and needs with us. We are agents for the 
E. R. Moore Shorts, Pinnies, etc., for Girls. 

Please come in and visit with our representatives. Bill Hunt and Herbie Hunt. 
They will be most happy to show you our fine merchandise and advise you on any 
of your athletic goods needs. If, in the meantime, you run into problems, call Mayfield 
103 or 104. We will have a man on the spot at once. 



Hunt's Athletic Goods Co. 

PHONE 104 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 

"THE LARGEST EXCLUSIVE ATHLETIC HOUSE IN THE SOUTH' 




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? '.60 



UTCLIFFE JCO 



LOUISVILLE 1. KEN 



TH-ICKff 







Jn 



Hiqh School Athlete 



ST. XAVIER HIGH SCHOOL SWIMMING TEAM 
KENTUCKY CLASS "A" CHAMPION - - 1957 





(Left to Right) Front Row: Mgr. Mike Daugherty, John Sullivan, Joe Sprauer, 
Jerry Hutti, Tom Gettlefinger, Jim Remitters. Second Row: Co-Capt. Martin O'Toole, 
Bill McMahon, Gary Parsons, Ed Schmidt, Co-Capt. John Hubbuch. Third Row: Mike 
Hefferman, Larry Heim, Joe Roehrig, Bill Reid. Roger Lucheta, Bro. Howard — Coach. 
Not in picture: Bill Matthews. 



Official Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 

MAY - 1957 



U. K. Coaching Clinic 




i ! IS ; 

Ara Parseghian 




Johnnv Jordan 



Another outstanding lineup of nationally known collegiate 
coaches will join with some of Kentucky's most widely respected 
tutors as the instructional staff advising: on new developments 
and explaining: professional secrets at the University of Ken- 
tucky's annual free Coaching; Clinic scheduled on the Lexing- 
ton campus August 7-8-9-10. 

Bernie A. Shively, UK's affable Athletic Director who is 
in charge of the highly successful coaching school, announced 
that this year's visiting lecturers from the collegiate field will 
include Ara Parseghian, head football coach at Northwestern 
University; David Nelson. Delaware's grid chief: Johnny Jor- 
dan, Notre Dame's basketball mentor; and John Heldman, 
University of Louisville baseball coach. 

In addition. University of Kentucky Football Coach Blanton 
Collier and staff. Assistant Basketball Coach Harry Lancaster, 
and Track Coach Don Cash Seaton will present lectures and 
lead discussions in their special fields. Athetic Director John 
Heber of the Lexington Henry Clay High School, Chairman of 




~*% 




John Heldman, Jr. 



Bernie A. Shively 



the K.H.S.A.A. State Track Committee for many years, will be 
in charge of the track discussions. On this panel will be Coach 
Brad Jones of Georgetown College. Nolan Fowler of Morehead 
State College, and high school coaches John Meihaus and 
Bernie Sadosky. 

Special features of the working vacation school for Ken- 
tucky high school coaches include the annual all-star games 
in football and basketball, pairing carefully selected groups 
of high school athletes from the east and west sections of the 
Commonwealth and the traditional TV party at Joyland Amuse- 
ment Park Casino. 

The star-studied sixth annual All-Star Basketball Game is 
slated for UK's spacious Memorial Coliseum, which will be 
the site for all lecture sessions of the clinic as well, on Saturn 
day night at 7 o'clock. Immediately following the cage contest. 
the ^choolhnj grid standouts ivili ;quar< off on Stoll Field. 
Both tilts will be open to the public at a small admission 
charge. High school coaches get in on their membership cards. 

The traditional TV party coincides with another All-Star 
Game, the annual football match between the College All-Stars 
and the National Football League champion New York Giants 
on Soldier's Field in Chicago. In one of the highlights of the 
four-day school, the coaches and visiting lecturers gather for 
dinner and to watch the game over several big-screen tele- 
vision sets located around the room. 

The clinic prpogram also includes two different ninety- 
minute sessions for the showing and explanation of football 
movies plus a lecture on athletic injuries. 

Coach Parseghian's lectures on the Northwestern offense 
and Big 10 foot hall are scheduled on Thursday morning. Aug. 
8th. Parseghian is widely recognized as one of the outstanding 
young football coaches in America today. He has had exemplary 
success with both the Inside and Outside Belly series and should 



be able to help high school mentors with their problems along 
this line. 

In his first season as head coach at Northwestern last 
fall. Parseghian earned the plaudits of the football world by 
pulling the sagging Wildcats up from last place to the posi- 
tion of a power to be reckoned with in the Big 10 Conference. 
A native of Akron, Ohio. Parseghian starred in four sports in 
high school and three in college at Miami (Ohio) University. 
He began his coaching career at his alma mater and his 
teams won thirty-nine while losing only six and tying one in 
five seasons. Parseghian payed service ball under Paul Brown 
at Great Lakes. 

Coach Nelson of Delaware has developed and popularized a 
slightly different version of the Wing-T. It is. according to 
the experts, the same type of Wing-T offense used so effective- 
ly by Iowa in their Rose Bowl victory over Oregon State. 
His informative lectures will follow the same pattern as the 
talk he presented before the American Football Coaches As- 
sociation ;;t the last NCAA convention. Nelson's part on the 
clinic program will be presented Fridav morning, 
i i v tr ,? Dame ' s Jordan will offer tips on his brand of 
basketball against a background of twentv-seven vears as a 





Blanton Collier 



mm \* H 

Harry Lancaster 



collegiate star with the Fighting Irish, as one of the nation's 
top prep coaches, as head coach at Loyola (Chicago), and for 
the last six years as basketball tutor at Notre Dame. Jordan 
has the distinction of guiding three of his Irish squads to the 
quarter-finals of the NCAA Tournament in the past five years, 
including an appearance in the Midwest Regional at Lexing- 
ton this past season. He was named College basketball's "Coach 
of the Year" in 1954. 

Kentucky cage assistant Harry Lancaster also has sessions 
on basketball. A former high school coach for nine years and 
principal for six before coming to UK as a physical education 
instructor in 1942, Lancaster knows the problems on both 
sides at the high school level. He has been full-time assistant 
to Kentucky's fabulous Adolph Rupp for nine years. Coach 
Rupp will be away at the time of the clinic. 

Rounding out the football phase of the school, Kentucky's 
own Blanton Collier and staff will devote an entire after- 
noon to explaining the offensive and defensive systems used by 



** 






/ 




John Heber 



Don Seaton 



the Wildcats. Collier draws on his unique background of 16 
years as a high school coach, eight seasons in the professional 
ranks as Paul Brown's chief aide at Cleveland and three highly 
successful years as Kentucky football chief. Assisting their 
boss will be Erma.1 Allen, Charlie Bradshaw, Bill Arnsparger, 
Matt Lair and Dominic F'ucci. 

For the second year, baseball also will occupy the time of 
interested coaches. Baseball tips of the trade will be offered by 
Dr. John Heldman. Jr.. Head of the Department of Health. 
Physical Education and Recreation at the University of Louis- 
ville. Dr. Heldman is considered one of the most successful 
college baseball coaches in the country. 

— Ky. Sports Publicity. Ken Kuhn. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 

Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XIX— NO. 10 



MAY, 11)51 



$1.00 Per Year 



MINUTES OF THE ANNUAL MEETING 



The fortieth annual meeting of the Ken- 
tucky High School Athletic Association was 
held at the Brown Hotel, Louisville, on Fri- 
day afternoon, April 12, 1957. 

President Russell Williamson called the 
meeting to order at 2:30, and asked Commis- 
sioner Theo. A. Sanford to call the roll of 
delegates. Fifty-five regularly elected dele- 
gates or alternates answered the roll call. 
The following delegates were seated in the 
absence of the delegates or alternates from 
their respective districts: Joe Duke, D. 4: 
C. W. Knudson, D. 25: Henry Pryse, D. 42. 
The motion to seat these delegates, made by 
John M. Potter and seconded by Ralph Mc- 
Right. was carried unanimously. Districts 
30, 31, 55, 58. and 63 were not represented 
at the meeting. 

John W. Trapp moved, seconded by James 
L. Cobb, that the minutes of the 1956 annual 
meeting of the Association, which had been 
sent previously to all member schools, be ap- 
proved without being read. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

Commissioner Sanford then gave a report 
on the activities of the Association during 
the 1956-57 school year. John M. Potter 
moved, seconded by Dawson Orman, that the 
report of the Commissioner be accepted. The 
motion was carried unanimously. 

President Williamson announced that 
Louis Litchfield and W. B. Jones had been 
re-elected to membership on the Board of 
Control for a four-year period, beginning 
July 1, 1957, to represent Sections 1 and 6 
respectively. 

President Williamson stated that consid- 
eration of the proposals was the next order 
of business. 

John W. Trapp moved, seconded by Thomas 
Brantley, that Proposal I, providing that 
"shall' be substituted for "should" in the 
first sentence of Bv-Law 31, be adopted. The 
motion was carried. 

J. Lee Robertson moved, seconded by 
Henry Pryse, that Proposal II, providing that 
"twelve" be substituted for "ten" in the 
second sentence of Tournament Rule VI-B-1, 
be adopted. The motion was carried. 



Dawson Orman moved, seconded by 
George Sadler, that Proposal III, providing 
that a head coach in football or basketball 
shall be required to attend one clinic in the 
sport involved, be adopted. The motion was 
carried. 

R. L. Petrie moved, seconded by Ralph 
McRight, that Proposal IV, providing that 
"a cheerleader, student manager, and any 
other student having an official connection 
with the athletic program, shall be enrolled 
and in attendance at the school which he 
represents," be adopted. The motion was 
carried. 

Ralph McRight moved, seconded by John 
Heber, that Proposal V, providing that Track 
Rule X be amended to change the scoring of 
relay points in the regional meets to 10-6-4-2. 
be adopted. The motion was carried. 

Ralph McRight moved, seconded by Vincent 
Zachem, that Proposal VI, providing that 
Track Rule XVI be amended to change the 
scoring of relav points in the State Track 
Meet to 12-8-6-4-2, be adopted. The motion 
was carried. 

John Heber moved, seconded by Ralph 
McRight, that Proposal VII, providing that 
certain changes be made in By-Law 1, Sec- 
tion 2, concerning methods to be followed by 
a member school principal in establishing the 
birth dates of players, be tabled. The mo- 
tion was carried. 

Ralph McRight moved, seconded by Marvin 
Meredith, that Proposal VII, providing that 
officiating contracts, signed or unsigned, 
shall be returned to the sender within thirty 
da vs. be adopted. The motion was carried. 

Ralph McRight moved, seconded by Joe 
H. Anderson, that Proposal IX, providing 
that game contracts, signed or unsigned, 
shall be returned to the sender within thirty 
days, be adopted. The motion was carried. 

John M. Potter moved, seconded by R. L. 
Petrie, that Proposal X, providing that the 
minutes of Board of Control meetings be 
printed in the "Athlete", be tabled. The mo- 
tion was lost. John Heber moved, seconded 

(Continued on Pag-e Eleven) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1957 



MAY, 1957 VOL. XIX— NO. 10 

Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association. 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered a9 second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3. 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington. Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Russell Williamson (1956-60). Inez 

Vice-President Louis Litchfield (1953-57), Marion 

Directors — W. B. Jones (1953-57) Somerset: W. H. Crowdus 
(1954-58), Franklin; Jack Dawson (1954-58). Middlerown ; 
Robert P. Forsythe (1955-59), Greenville; K. G. Gillaspie 
(1955-59), Georgetown; Cecil A. Thornton (1956-60), Harlan. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 



Jirom the Commissioned s Dffi 



ice 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1. 1956-57 Basketball Participation List 
(Eligibility). 

2. School's Report on Basketball Officials. 

3. Official's Report on Schools — Basket- 
ball. 



Fines for Late Reports 

More than one hundred seventy mem- 
ber schools had not filed their reports on 
basketball officials and their basketball par- 
ticipation (eligibility) lists for the 1956-57 
season when this issue of the ATHLETE 
went to press. Approximately six hundred 
basketball officials have not filed their re- 
ports on member schools. The Board of Con- 
trol has established a fine of $5.00 for both 
schools and officials delinquent with their 
reports. A deadline of June 15 has been set 
for the filing of all reports required under 
Association rules. 

State Track Committee 

The forthcoming State High School Track 
Meet, which is scheduled to be held in Lex- 
ington on May 17 - 18, will be managed by 
Athletic Director John Heber of the Henry 
Clay High School, Lexington. Chairman of 
the State Track Committee. Other members 
of the committee are: Preston Holland. Mur- 
ray; Don Shelton, Henderson: Turner Elrod, 
Bowling Green ; Joe Brummett, Danville : 
Eddie Weber. Louisville : Joe Curtsinerer, 
Louisville ; John Schaar. Bellevue : Bob Mil- 
ler, Newnort; Charles Black, Barbourville ; 
Arthur Miller, Elkhorn City; and Ernie 
Chattin. Ashland. These regional managers 
will assist Mr. Heber in conducting the state 
meet. 

Tennis Tournaments 

Four regional tournaments will be held in 
tennis. Thev will be managed by the fol- 



lowing men: Coach Ted Hornback, Western 
Kentucky State College, Bowling Green; 
Coach Emmett Goranflo, Eastern High 
School, Middletown ; Coach Eugene Huff, 
University Hitrh School, Lexington; and 
Coach Roger Klein, Bellevue High School. 

Principals who have indicated previously 
that their schools will have tennis teams this 
spring have been mailed entry blanks by the 
regional managers. The tentative date for 
the regional tournaments is May 13. The 
State Tennis Tournament will be held in 
Louisville on May 20-21, and will be managed 
by Coach Emmett Goranflo. 

Golf Tournaments 

The seven regional golf tournaments, 
scheduled to be held on May 22, wall be man- 
aged by the following men: Prin. Vincent 
Zachem, Madisonville High School; Coach 
Elvis Donaldson, Bowling Green High 
School ; Charlton Hummel, Louisville Male 
Hig-h School ; Coach Charles Crum, Dixie 
Heights High School, Covington ; Coach Ken 
Snowden, Danville High School ; Julian 
Pitzer, Middlesboro ; and Prin. Oran Teater, 
Paintsville High School. The state Golf 
Tournament will be held at Fort Knox on 
May 28-29, and will be managed by Coach 
John Hackett. Principals who have not re- 
ceived their regional entry blanks should 
write to their respective managers for these 
forms. 



1956-57 Annual Report 

Four hundred thirty-six schools joined the As- 
sociation during; 1956-57. This is three more than 
were enrolled in 1955-56. One hundred twenty 
schools had eleven-man football teams, and eleven 
played six-man football. This is an increase of ten 
eleven-man teams over 1955-56, a decrease of two 
in six-man football. 

Financial reports filed by the sixteen regional 
basketball tournament managers show total receipts 
of $109,465.85. This represents an approximate in- 
crease of $8,500.00 over 1956 receipts. Receipts in the 
sixty-two district basketball tournaments amounted 
to $161,902.62, which was an approximate increase 
of $10,000.00 over 1956 receipts. Receipts from 
ticket sales at the State Basketball Tournament, ex- 
clusive of refunds, will exceed $130,000.00. Addition- 
al receipts from radio fees and from the tourna- 
ment program will bring- total tournament receipts 
to a figure in excess of $135,000.00. Profit to the 
Association on the tournament should be approxi- 
mately $100,000.00. A few tournament bills are still 
being received by the State Office, with the result 
that it is necessary to give an estimate of tourna- 
ment profit at this time. A complete record of all 
receipts and disbursements wall appear in a subse- 
quent issue of the Association mag'azine. 

One thousand ninety-five basketball officials 
and 373 football officials registered with the As- 
sociation in 1956-57. Nine football rules clinics were 
held under the direction of Dr. Lyman V. Ginger 
(Continued on Page Eleven) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1957 



Page Three 



1957 Kentucky State High School Swimming Meet 

University of Kentucky Coliseum, Lexington, Kentucky 
Classes B & C, March"30, 1957; Class A, April 6, 1957 



Highlands High School Swimming Team 
Kentucky Class n B" Champion - - 1957 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Gene Taylor, Barry Roberts, Bob 
Stoneburner, Charles Dorsey, Allem Fulmer. Second Row : Ray How- 
ard. Spence Wadsworth, Tom Beineke, Ken Glass. Jerry McAtee. 
Third Row : Denny .McAfee. Ellwyn Berlekamp. Lee Hryson. Rob Goes, 
Bob Bootes. 



(I. vss ■ \" 

Results 

St. Xavier 77 

Atherton 70 

Lafayette 67 

K. M. I. 10 

duPont Manual (5 

Eastern 

1. 50 Yard Freestyle — 

Heat No. 1: Lussky. Atherton ( :26.4) •, 
Sturgeon. Atherton ( :26.4) ; Thompson. 
Lafayette I :27.2i ; Berg. Atherton I :27.6) ; 
Sprauer, St. Xavier ( :26.9) ; Heffernan, 
St. Xavier 1 :29.9). 

Heat No. 2 : Hubbuch, St. Xavier 
( :26.8| ; Belker, Atherton ( :27.4) : Reid, 
St. Xavier <:27.6l: Patterson. duPont 
Manual I :29A) ; Whittington, K. M. I. 
(:30.0i: Cull. duPont Manual (:33.6). 

Heat No. 3: Cooke. Lafayette ( :25.7) ; 
Hammonds. Lafayette I :27.1) : Jones. 
K. M. I. (:27.3); Stamatis, Lafayette 
(:28.3). 

Finals 

1. Cooke, Lafayette :25.6 

2. Lussky, Atherton :25.7 

3. Hubbuch, St. Xavier :26.7 

4. Sturgeon. Atherton :26.S 

5. Belker, Atherton :26.8 

8. Hammonds, Lafayette :28.0 

2. 100 Yard Breaststroke — 

Heat No. 1 : Parsons, St. Xavier 
(1:10.11: Hill, Lafayette (1:11.9): Mor- 
rison, Atherton (1:21.2): Carrell. Ather- 
ton (1:22.2): McDonald. duPont Manual 
(1:44:5). 



Heal No. 2: Roberts, Lafayette 
(1:05.1); Roehrig, St. Xavier (1:11.3); 
Hillerich, K.M.I. (1:22.1) Lowry. Lafay- 
ette 11:25. it; Swann, duPont Manual 
.1 :33 2i. 

Heat No. 3: O'Toole, St. Xaxier 
(1:03.1); Lawrence, Atherton (1:11.7); 
Sklles. Lafayette (1:18.9); Sullivan. St. 



Xavier 

1 :23.6 



(1 :23.5) ; 



Sharwell, 



K.M.I. 



Finals 
St. Xavier 



O'Toole, St. Xavier 1:01.9 

2. Roberts, Lafayette 1 : 3 - 1 i 

3. Roehrig, St. Xavier 1:09.6 

1. Parsons. St. Xavier 1:10.1 

5. Hill. Lafayette 1:10.9 

6. Lawrence, Atherton 1 :11.2 

O'Toole set a new state record in vhis 
event with his time of 1:01.9, breaking 
the record time of 1:02.2 which he set 
in 1956. 
3. 200 Yard Freestyle — 

Heat No. 1 : Monroe. Atherton 
(2:20.6) Essene, Lafayette (2:2:-). 4): Ham- 
monds. Lafayette (2:34.51; Weiss, Ather- 
ton (2:50.0). 

Heat No. 2. Freeman. Lafayette 
Martin. K.M.I. (2:25.3); Draper, 
(2:26.7); Litkenhous, Eastern 
Berry, duPont Manual (3:21.7). 
No. 3: McMahon. St. Xavier 
Gettlefinger, St. Xavier (2:31.1): 
Atherton (2:35.4); Kessler, 



(2:17.7) ; 
Atherton 
(2:47.1) ; 
Heat 
(2:14.01 ; 

1 1. . 1 1 1 ; i : i [in. 

Lafayette 
(2:50.2). 



Finals 
Xavier 



1. McMahon, St. Xavier 2:10.3 

2. Freeman, Lafayette 2:12.5 

3. Monroe. Atherton 2:10.2 

4. Essene, Lalayette 2 :21.7 

5. Martin, K.M.l. 2 :23.4 

0. Draper, Atherton 2:33.8 

1. Juu lard Backstroke — 

Heat No. 1: Scnmidt, St. Xavier 
(1:12.3); Langston, Lafayette (1:14.3); 
tiemmers, St. Xavier (l:K'.7j; Hall, 
Atherton 1 1 :24.1). 

Heat No. 2: Davis. Atherton (1:10.7); 
Homcan. Lafayette (1:12.3); Sympson. 
(1 :19.7i ; Tingley, K.M.I. 



Lafayette 

ll :21.5l. 

Heat 

i 1 :11.1) ; 



(2:44.6); Lucheta, St. Xavier 4 



No. 3: Musselman, Atherton 
Mathews, St. Xavier (1:15.5); 
Atherton (1:17.*); Crawford, 
K.M.I. (1:24.1). 

Finals 

1. Davis, Atherton 1:05.2 

2. Musselman. Atherton 1 :08.0 

Schmidt, St. Xavier 1:11.8 

4, Homcan, Lafayette 1:12.7 

5. Mathews. St. Xavier 1:15.2 

(i. Langston, Lafayette 1 :15.7 

Davis set a new state record in vhis 
event with his time of 1 :05.2. The pre- 
vious record time was I :07.6, set by John 
Remmers of St. Xavier in 1955. 
5. 100 Yard Freestyle — 

Heat No. 1 : Monroe. Atherton ( :59.3) ; 
Lussky, Atherton (:59.6); Stamatis, La- 
Cayette 11:05.5); Whittington, K.M.I. 
(1:21.1); Wright, duPont Manual (1:26.2). 
Heat No. 2: Dillard. Lafayette 
(1:00.4,1; Hammonds, Lafayette, (1:03.8); 
Eraser, Lafayette (1 :uo.u) ; Hohmann, 
Atherton (1:1)9.6); Weiss, Atherton 
(1:1)1.2). 

Heat No. o: O'Toole. St. Xavier 
( :55.8) Parsons, St. Xavier (1:00.3); 
Riehl, St. Xavier (1:011.3); Litkenhous. 
Eastern (1:09.7); George, duPont Manual 
I 1 ill. 3). 

I inals 

St. Xavier :55.5 

Atherton :59.0 

Lafayette :59.3 

Atherton :59.3 

Riehl, St. Xavier 1:00.0 

Parsons, St. Xavier 1:02.4 

Fancy Diving — 

Finals 

Atherton 164.6 

Atherton 150.3 

St. Xavier 142.15 

Lafayette 137.1 

Whittenberg. K.M.l. 105.0 

Leim, St. Xavier 101.5 

150 Yard Individual .Medley — 
Heat No. 1 : McMahon, St. Xavier 
47.6i: Schmidt, St. Xavier (1:51.8); 
Berry, duPont Manual (2:30.4); Wright, 
duPont Manual (disqualified I. 

Heat No. 2: Lawrence. Atherton 
(1:50.4); Hill. Lafayette (1:55.7): Rem- 
mers, -si. Xavier (2:02. 9); Crawford, 
K.M.I. (2:1!). 7i. 

Heat No. 3 : 
i 1 :42.5) ; Morrison. 
Maggard, Lafayette 
fayette (2:13.1). 

Finals 

1. Roberts, Lafayette 

2. Lawrence, Atherton — 

3. McMahon. St. Xavier — 

4. Schmidt, St. Xavier .. 

5. Hill. Lafayette 

6. Morrison, Atherton 
8. 2110 Yard Medley Relay- 
Finals 

1. St. Xavier, (Mathews, Roehrig. 
Gettlefinger, Hubbuch) 2:02.1 

2. Lafayette (Honican. Essene, 

Skiles. Thompson) 2:02.3 

3. Atherton I Musselman, Davis. 

Carrell. Sturgeon) 2:04.6 

K.M.I. I Tingley, Sharmell, 

Hillerich, Jones) 2:10.0 



1 . 



I I . 



O'Toole, 

Lussky. 
Dillard. 
Monroe, 



Belkei 
Foley, 

Hum. 
Bui us. 



Roberts, Lafayette 

Uherton (1:56.4) ; 

I 2 :lis.s.| ; Lowry, La- 



... 1:42.0 

... 1:45.1 

... 1 :45.3 

... 1:51.4 

1.52.2 
.__ 1:55.2 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1957 









TEAM 


SCORING— Class "A" 














SI 




t) 






>> 

<0 


"3 


i 

a 
w 




TEAM 


50 Yard 
Freestyle 


03 w 

?-( w 

ai 

o ^ 

O H 


t3 a) 

o <u 

(M fa 


■22 

03 ^ 

>-l M 

=> 3 


"2.2 

o g 

Sfa 


Fancy 
Diving 


150 Yard 
Ind. Medl 


"OK 


03 0J 


M 

03 C 
O O 


St. Xavier_ 


4 


14 


7 


6 


10 


5 


7 


14 


10 


77 


Atherton 


10 


1 


5 


12 


8 


12 


6 


8 


8 


70 


Lafavette . 


8 


7 


8 


4 


4 


3 


9 


10 


14 


67 


K.M.I. . 


() 







2 











2 







6 




6 


10 


duPont Manual- _ 


6 


Eastern 

































200 Yard Freestyle Relay — 
Finals 

1. Lafayette (Cooke, Dillard, 

Fraser, Freeman) 1:44.7 2. 

St. Xavier (Heim, Reid, 

Sullivan. Riehl) 1:50.1 

Atherton (Belker, Hall, Draper, 

Berg) 1:50.9 

duPont Manual (Swann, Patterson, 

Clay, George) 2:05.5 

The Lafayette team set a new state 

record in this event with its time of 

1:44.7, breaking the old record time of 

1:46.1, set by Flaget in 1952. 



CLASS "B" 
Results 

Highlands 77 

Fort Knox 28 

Trinity 22 

University 21 

Berea Foundation 17 

Newport 15 

Danville 8 

Lexington Catholic 

1. 50 Yard Freestyle — 

Heat No. 1 : Beineke, Highlands 
( :2S.6) ; Strunk, Berea Foundation ( :29.4) ; 
Hobbs, University (:33.1). 

Heat No. 2 : Fulmer. Highlands 
( :28.8) ; Queenan, Trinity ( :32.2) ; Ray, 
Fort Knox ( :34.3) ; Cushing, Fort Knox, 
( :34.4). 

Heat No. 3 : Bryson, Highlands 
I :27.7) ; Wherle, Berea Foundation ( :31.1) ; 
O'Kelley. Lexington Catholic ( :33.0) ; 
Whitehouse, Fort Knox ( :35.5). 

Heat No. 4: Pierce, Danville (:29.7); 
Haney, Lexington Catholic (:31.6); 
Baker, Berea Foundation (:33.0): Quig- 
ley, Newport ( :37.6) ; McGuire, Trinity 
i disqualified). 

Heat No. 5 : Hollenbach, Trinity 
1:28.1 1 : Minor. Danville ( :28.8) : Cole. 
University (:30.1): Taylor, Highlands 
(:30.2): Bedzyk. Fort Knox (:35.4). 

Heat No. 6: Brian. Trinity ( :28.4) ; 
Taylor, University ( :29.5) : Colclough. 
Danville ( :31.7) ; Goode. Danville (:32.6). 
Semi-final Heat No. 1 : Hollenbach, 
Trinity ( :28.0) ; Brian, Trinity ( :28.4) ; 
Minor, Danvile ( :28.6) : Strunk, Berea 
Foundation ( :29.7) ; Haney, Lexington 
Catholic ( :30.7) ; Wherle, Berea Foun- 
dation (.32.3). 

Semi-final Heat No. 2 : Bryson, High- 
lands ( :27.8) ; Fulmer, Highlands ( :28.6) : 
Taylor, University ( :29.2) ; Beineke. 
Highlands ( :29.4) ; Pierce, Danville 



(:30.4); Queenan, Trinity (:32.S). 
Finals 

1. Bryson, Highlands :27.5 

Hollenbach, Trinity :28.0 

3. Brian, Trinity 28.2 

4. Fulmer, Highlands :28.0 

5. Taylor, University :29.2 

0. Minor, Danville :29.8 

2. 100 Yard Breaststroke — 
Heat No. 1 : Goldman, Fort Knox 

(1:20.5); Gail. University ( :32.8) ; DeWitt, 
Trinity (:46.9); Haney. Lexington Cath- 
olic (1:45.7); Strunk, Newport (1:58.9); 
Dorsey, Highlands (disqualified). 

Heat No. 2: Stephenson, Berea Foun- 
dation (1:23.1); Glass, Highlands (1:24.5); 
Russell, University (1:45.9); Schildt, 
Trinity (1:50.5); Kew. Newport (dis- 
qualified) ; Minor, Danville( disqualified). 

Heat No. 3: Bootes, Highands (1:21.8) ; 
Wright, Berea Foundation (1:25.6); 
Stewart, University (1:32.4); Talbot, 
Trinity (disqualified) ; Weissinger, Dan- 
ville (disqualified). 

Finals 

1. Glass, Highlands 1:19.5 

2. Bootes, Highlands 1:20.4 

3. Goldman, Fort Knox 1:21.7 

4. Stephenson, Berea Foundation 1.22.3 

5. Wright, Berea Foundation 1 :28.0 

6. Stewart, University 1 :28.7 

3. 100 Yard Backstroke — 

Heat No. 1 : Wenneker, University 
(1:17.9); Roberts, Highlands (1:21.3); 
Hubbard, Fort Knox (1:27.4); Owen, Fort 
Knox (1:37.3); Hoffmeyer, Danville 
(1:38.5); Lisle, University (1:41.0). 

Heat No. 2 : Howard, Highlands 
(1:11.5); Reeves, University (1:40.3); 
Gail, University (1:45.4); Campbell, Lex- 
ington Catholic (1:58.2); Seifreid, New- 
port (disqualified). 

Heat No. 3 : Gramzow, Fort Knox 
(1:13.31; Veeneman, Trinity (1:24.2); 
Wright. Danville. (1:28.0); Berlekamp 
Highlands (1:28.4); Patterson, Lexing- 
ton Catholic (1:46.1); Davis, Danville 
(2:16.0). 

Heat No. 4: Goes. Highlands (1:13.5); 
Kute, Trinity (1:26.3); Hile, Berea Foun- 
dation (1:27.6); Hodge, Berea Foundation 
(1:33.2); Neil. Fort Knox (disqualified). 
Finals 

1. Gramzow, Fort Knox 1:11.4 

2. Howard, Highlands 1:11.4 

3. Goes, Highlands 1:12.2 

4. Wenneker, University 1:18.4 

5. Veeneman. Trinity 1:20.1 

6. Roberts, Highlands 1:21.2 

Gramzow set a new state record in 
this event with his time of 1:11.4. This 
mark breaks the record time of 1:13.6, 
set by Ken Thompson of Berea Founda- 
tion in 1953. 



4. 100 Yard Freestyle — 

Heat No. 1 : D. McAtee, Highands 
(1:09.3); J. McAtee, Highlands (1:10.8); 
Cowden. University (1:22.9): Eberts. Dan- 
ville (1:22.2) : Russell, University (1:22.2) ; 
Massey, Danville (disqualified). 

Heat No. 2 : Clarke. University 
(1:06.0) ; Fiske, Berea Foundation (1.08.5) ; 
Cullen, Fort Knox (1:15.4); Tramontin, 
Lexington Catholic (1:20.2): Monahan, 
Trinity (1:29.7); Minor, Danville (1:39.7). 

Heat No. 3 : Fulmer, Highlands 
(1:04.6); Whipple, Berea Foundation 
(1:09.9); Heriot. Fort Knox (1:12.41; 
Roberts, Berea Foundation (1:14.4); 
Wade, Lexington Catholic (1 :16.4) ; 
Weissinger. Danville (1:29.7). 

Heat No. 4: Wadsworth, Highlands 

(1:00.8); Fisher, Fort Knox (1:12.6); 

Brock, University (1:16.5); Bedzyk. Fort 

Knox (1:28.71: Hines, Trinity (1:38.4). 

Finals 

1. Wadsworth. Highlands 1:00.7 

2. Fulmer, Highlands 1:04.0 

3. Clarke, University 1 :06.6 

4. McAtee. D.. Highlands 1:09.2 

5. Whipple, Berea Foundation 1 :10.4 

6. Fiske, Berea Foundation 1:10.8 

Wadsworth set a new state record in 
this event with his time of 1 :00.7, break- 
ing the old record time of 1 :00.9, set 
by Robert Gunkler of Berea Foundation 
in 1953. 

5. Fancy Diving — 

Finals 

1. Minor, Danville 83.6 

2. Cushing, Fort Knox 83.1 

3. McAtee, J.. Highlands 78.9 

4. Fisher. Fort Knox 77.8 

5. Berea Foundation (Hile. Stephenson, 

6. McGuire. Trinity 75.4 

6. 150 Yard Medley Relay- 

Finals 

1. Highlands (Goes, Bryson, 

3ootes) 1:30.9 

2. Fort Knox (Gramzow, Goldman. 
Mullins) 1:32.2 

3. Newport (Keen, Ebert, 
Hettleberg) 1 :39.S 

4. University (Wenneker, Stewart, 
Combs) 1:42.8 

5. Berea Foundation I Hile, Stephenson, 
Baker) 1:44.9 

The Highlands team set a new state 

record in this event with the time of 

1:30.9, breaking the old record time of 

1:33.5, set by Berea Foundation in 1953. 

7. 200 Y'ard Freestyle Relay- 

Finals 
1. Highlands (Wadsworth, Beineke, 

D. McAtee, Howard) — 1 :50.T 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1957 



Page Five 



St. Joseph Prep School Swimming Team 
Kentucky Class "C" Champion - - 1957 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Stan Karoblis, Larry Downie, John 
Conlan, Dan Sweeney, William O'Farrell, Richard Gavigan. Second 
Row: J. R. Montgomery, Bob Muth. John Throgmorten, Tom Hayden, 
William Barnhorst, Tom Wespiser, M. Levy. Third Row: Tom 
Meehan, Joe Wycof'f, William Mooney. Dan Levy. Not in "iicture: 
Dennis Toberj;. 



2. Trinity (Veeneman, Hollinbach, 
Brian, McGuire) . 1:50.9 

3. Newport (Lynn, Hetterberg:, 
Donnelly. Peper) 

4. University (Cole. Taylor, 

Combs, Clarke! 1 :57.'J 



1:51.4, set by the Atherton team in 1952. 

CLASS "C" 
Results 

St. Joseph 43 

Bellevue 40 

Beechwood 25 

Bardstown 17 

1. 50 Yard Freestyle — 

Heat No. 1 : Karoblis. St. Joseph 
l :27.6) : Montgomery, St. Joseph ( :2S.5) : 
Rece. Bellevue ( :34,2). 

Heat No. 2: Giles. Hellevin- i:27.7); 
Rhodes. Bardstown ( :29.9) ; Shook, Beech- 
wood (:31.8); Eddy, Beechwood (:31.9). 
Finals 

1. Giles, Bellevue :27.0 

2. Karoblis. St. Joseph :27.2 

3. Montgomery, St. Joseph :28.3 

4. Rhodes, Bardstown _ :29.4 

5. Shook. Beechwood :30.6 

(1. Eddy, Beechwood _ :31.4 

2. 50 Yard Breaststroke — 

Heat No. 1 : Mendell, Bellevue 
I :33.0) : Sweeney. St. Joseph l :37.8) : 
Ballard. Bardstown I :40.5) ; Southgate, 
Beechwood ( :52.0 i . 

Heat No. 2: Elo. D., Beechwood 
l :36.7) : Downie, St. Joseph I :41.7) : 
Molyneux, Bardstown (:46.5). 
Finals 



5. Berea Foundation ( Fiske. 

Wherle. Rogers, Strunkl 2:04.5 

The Highlands team set a new state 
record in this event with the time of 
1 :50.7. The previous record time was 



1. Mendell. Bellevue 

2. Elo, D., Beechwood _ 

3. Sweeney. St. Joseph 

4. Downie, St. Joseph 

5. Ballard. Bardstown 

Mendell set a new state 

this event with his time of 

mark breaks the record 

set by James Bailer of 

1956. 

3. 50 Yard Backstroke — 

Heat No. 1 : Elo 
i :35.7) Rhein, Bellevue 
mond, Bardstown ( :39.6) : 
wood ( :42.0). 

Heat No- 2 : Mendell. Bellevue ( :36.41 : 
Mooney. St. Joseph. I :38.1 I : O'Farrell. St 
Joseph ( :38.5) : Majors, Bardstown 
I :44.2). 



32.4 
36.5 
37.2 
37.7 
41.4 
record in 
:32.4. This 
time of :33.5, 
Beechwood in 



I).. Beechwood 
i :38.9) : Ham- 
El.,. T.. Beech- 



Mendell, 
Mooney, 



Finals 
Beechwood 

Bellevue 
St. Joseph 



34.7 
36.4 

37.7 



TEAM SCORING— Class "B" 















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1 






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T3 h 


0) 

a 5 


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■art 






TEAM 


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CS j" 


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5'> 


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03 






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o ^ 


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<= >> 


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£- Oh 






s« 


^m 


2£ 


feQ 


££ 






10 

II 


12 
4 


10 

7 


15 




4 
8 


12 
9 


14 



77 


Fort Knox _ 


28 




9 



1 


3 


(1 

4 


1 





5 


1(1 
6 


22 


University __ _ __ -_ 


21 







5 





3 


2 


3 


4 


17 



















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8 


15 




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Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 



1957 



TEAM SCORING— Class "C" 







O 






a) 






„-, S 


O 






£ >> 
08 




TEAM 


a! ** 
10 « 




EoPQ 




200 Yd 
style R 


Total 
Points 




9 


7 


7 


6 


14 


43 


Bellevue _ 


7 


7 


6 


10 


10 


40 


Beechwood 


3 

o 


5 

2 


7 
2 


2 

4 


8 
6 


25 


Bards town 


17 



O'Farrell, St. Joseph :27.7 

Hammond, Bardstown :38.9 

Rhein, Bellevue :41.2 

Fancy Diving — 

Finals 

Cavana, Bellevue 74.3 

Barnhorst, St. Joseph (53.6 



Rhodes, Bardstown 63.0 

Giles, Bellevue 61.3 

Elo, D., Beechwood 53.2 

Muth, St. Joseph 48.4 

200 Yard Freestyle Relay — 

Finals 
St. Joseph ( Gavigan, Conlon, 



Montgomery, Karoblis) 1:53.6 

Bellevue (Bevis, Rhein, Parker, 
Giles) 2:03.2 

Beechwood (Eddy, Shook, Deters, 

Kingsburgi 2:05.6 

Bardstown (Rhodes, Maiors, 
Hammond, Brook) 2 :12.0 



Baseball Rulings 

Kditor's Note: These rulings do not set aside or modify any 
rule. They are interpretations on some of the early season 
situations which have been presented. 

1. Play: With 2 strikes on Bl, a pitch hits the 
ground in front of the plate or behind the plate and 
bounces into the catcher's mitt. Bl swings for 3rd 
strike. 

Ruling: The batter is not out. He must be 
tagged out or thrown out at 1st. (2-1-1; 2-3-1). 

Comment: By definition, the ball is "in flight" 
only until it has touched the ground. It is not a 
catch unless the ball is in flight. Therefore, in the 
above play, the catcher lias not "caught" the 3rd 
strike. 

2. Play: Rl is on 1st with one out. F5 gets foul 
fly in his glove: (a) on edge of dugout and then 
falls into it; or (b) and runs against the dug-out 
roof but does not fall in. May R advance ? 

Ruling: In (a), the batter is not out. F5 did not 
make a legal catch but technically only touched a 
foul ball which then became dead. Rl could not ad- 
vance. On (b), the batter is out and the ball remains 
alive. After tagging up, Rl may advance at his 
own risk. (2-3-1). 

3. Play: Before pitcher delivers, catcher posi- 
tions himself with one foot outside the catcher's 
area. 

Ruling: Legal. Catcher's normal position is with- 
in the catcher's area but it is not mandatory that 
he be there during a pitch. (2-3-2) 

Comment: In Professional game, catcher must 
be in his box. 

4. Play: Batter hits (a) infield fly; or (b) 
"pop-up" fair which falls so that no infielder can 
reach it. 

Ruling: In (a), the batter is out immediately. 
In (b), there is no infield fly. (2-7-5) 

Comment: By definition, a fair fly (not includ- 
ing a line drive or attempted bunt) is an infield fly- 
only when it can be caught by an infielder with 
ordinary effort and providing the hit is made before 
two are out and at a time when 1st and 2nd or all 
bases are occupied. 




5. Play: There is one out. Rl is on 1st base. 
Batter hits pop fly to F4 who traps ball approxi- 
mately 20 feet behind baseline. Rl holds 1st base. 
F4 throws to F3 who touches Rl first and then 
touches the batter-runner before he reaches 1st. 

Ruling: Double Play. There was no infield fly 
because only 1st base was occupied. (2-7-5) 

6. Play: Rl attempts to stretch a double into 
a triple and slides into 3rd base where he is tagged 
for oversliding. It is then discovered 3rd base is 
loose and held by only one strap, the second strap 
being broken. 

Ruling: Rl is out. Under the circumstances, 
there would almost always be some question as to 
whether the runner would have been tagged out even 
if the base had been securely fastened. It is only 
in obvious cases, where in the Umpire's opinion a 
loose base is the sole reason for the runner having 
(Continued on Page Twelve) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 



195v 



Page Seven 



The Flying Dutchman 

The Dutchman looks back over one of the 
finest years that has ever been enjoyed dur- 
ing the lives of school and athletic men in 
Kentucky. As we pen our last article of the 
1956-57 year, we doff our hats to Kentucky's 
leaders who have brought praise to our state 
through the training of fighting young men 
possessed of character, high ideals of fair 
play, and sportsmanship. 

Enjoying the annual K.H.S.A.A. Banquet 
during K.E.A., the thought kept running 
through our mind that few people fully ap- 
preciate the magnificent job being done, not 
only by the members of the Board of Control 
and their professional staff, but also by the 
multitude of people interested in our young 
men and the athletics they engage in. 

So it is that one of The Flying Dutchman's 
salutes must go to Louis Litchfield, whose 
presentation of the Game Guy Award to 
Danny Duncan, of Hazel, Kentucky, was out- 
standing. The important point about Louie's 
remarks was that he built up the idea be- 
hind the Game Guy Award in such a way that 
not only was Danny proud to be the winner, 
but also many other young men possessed 
of physical handicaps will be inspired to keep 
trying to be some day in that select class of 
Game Guys. 

When Louis and The Dutchman used to 
officiate state tournaments together in the 
"Roaring Forties," his athletic knowledge 
was apparent, but it took his presentation of 
the Game Guy Award to bring out another of 
his abilities, which makes us proud that he 
represents a section of Kentucky on the 
Board of Control. 

The second salute goes to Western's youth- 
ful president, Kelly Thompson. In making 
his principal address, Kelly emphasized that 
the responsibility for the right kind of ath- 
letics belongs to all of us. That thought is 
in keeping with the athletic program of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association. 
In it Kentuckians recognize clean, hard- 
fought competition as one phase of the pro- 
gram ; encouragement of physically handi- 
capped youngsters to become Game Guys as 
another; the recognition of communities for 
neighborly and sportsmanlike practices as a 
third phase of the plan ; and the acclaim of 
individuals rendering unselfish services by 
the Corn Cob Pipe of Honor Awards as the 
fourth and final phase of a well rounded pro- 
gram aimed at building future men of char- 
acter. 
Corn Cob Pipes of Honor were dispatched 




Danny Duncan 

during April to two of Kentucky's unselfish 
leaders. One went to Coach Bowman "Bo Bo" 
Davenport, of Clarkson, and the other to 
Edward W. Barry, of Louisville. Both of 
these men should have had this coveted 
award long ago and it is with pleasure that 
The Flying Dutchman recognizes them now. 

"Bo Bo" Davenport is honored because 
of his countless hours of service to the young 
people in and around Clarkson and for his 
leadership manifested throughout that en- 
tire area. "Bo Bo" never works by the clock. 
but gives himself wholeheartedly to the pro- 
motion of events bringing wholesome fun 
and better living. Bowling Green, where 
Coach Davenport played his first high school 
games under The Flying Dutchman's officiat- 
ing, can well be proud of this lad who is re- 
flecting credit on his native city. 

When people of Louisville and Jefferson 
County talk of Ed Barry, they pay tribute 
to a fellow who is willing to go out of his way 
to be of unselfish service to anybody who 
needs his help. There are few people who 
like other people as much as Ed. The kids of 
Jefferson County recognize in him their 
friend, and the adults know the chap as one 
who will go far beyond what anybody has a 
right to expect to render a favor. Truly de- 
serving of the little race horse with the Corn 
Cob Pipe around his neck is popular Edward 
W. Barry. 

It seems fitting to close our last article 
of the current season by giving you some 
quotes from letters which have come to The 

(Continued on Page Ten) 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1957 




Kentucky High School Athletic Association 
in January, 1945, and served as a Director 
from that time until June, 1946. 

A born school man, "T's" life was mark- 
ed by kindly sympathy, unfailing enthusiasm, 
unselfish character, and high ideals. 

— C.P. 



C. T. Ward 

IN MEMORIAM 

Clyde T. Ward, director of the school lunch 
program of the State Department of Educa- 
tion and former Superintendent of Anderson 
County Schools, died of a heart attack on 
April 9, 1957. He was affectionately known 
as "T" to hosts of school people and friends. 

Mr. Ward, a native of Tyrone, graduated 
from the Kavanaugh High School. He re- 
ceived his A.B. degree at the University of 
Kentucky, and his master's degree from 
Columbia University. After teaching in the 
Tyrone Elementary School for several terms, 
he became the first principal of Western 
High School in 1925 and served in this ca- 
pacity until 1933. "T" was elected Superin- 
tendent of Anderson County Schools in 1933, 
a position which he held until 1948, at which 
time he was named director of the census de- 
partment of the State Department of Educa- 
tion. He served in that post until a few 
months ago, when he became director of the 
school lunch program. 

Mr. Ward was an elder and former chair- 
man of the board of the Lawrenceburg Chris- 
tian Church, and had been a teacher in the 
Sunday School for many years. He was a past 
master of the local Masonic lodge, a director 
of the First National Bank, and a member 
of the Rotary Club and the Chamber of 
Commerce. 

Due to Mr. Ward's vital interest in high 
school athletics, he was selected to become 
a member of the Board of Control of the 



K. H. S. C. C. A. Meetings 

Executive Board Meeting 

Held in Louisville, April 11, 1957 

The executive meeting of the Kentucky High 
School Coaches Charity Association was held at 
2:00 P. 1V1. Thursday, April 11, ly57, at the Kentucky 
Hotel, Louisville, Kentucky. 

Members of the execucive committee in attend- 
ance were: Ralph McRig'ht, fresiuent; Olhe Leathers, 
Vice President; Joe Unr, Secretary-Treasurer; 
John Hackett, Sergeant-At-Arms; Edgar McNabb, 
Retiring President; and Estill Branham, Manager 
of 1957 All-Star Games. Commissioner Theo. A. 
Sanford was guest and auvisor for the meeting. 

The program for the regular business meeting, 
Thursday night, April 11, was outlined and several 
important business items were disposed of. Secre- 
tary-Treasurer Joe Ohr was authorized to buy 
watches for members of the All-Star squads. The 
executive committee authorized Mr- Ohr to inquire 
as to rates for insuring the players in the August 
All-Star games. It was proposed that a new method 
for filling the offices in the Kentucky High School 
Coaches Charity Association be as follows: Officers 
to be elected annually are the sergeant-at-arms 
and the secretary-treasurer, the other officers are 
to progress each year. 

The meeting adjourned at 3:15 P. M. 

Annual Business Meeting 

Held in Louisville, April 11, 1957 

The twentv-eighth annual meeting of the K.H. 
S.C.C.A. was held Thursday night, April 12, 1957, 
in the Mirror Room of the Kentucky Hotel, Louis- 
ville, Kentucky. 

President Ralph McRight called the meeting to 
order at 7:-'!5 and immediately went into the routine 
business of the meeting. 

Secretary-Treasurer Joe Ohr reminded the 
members that the minutes of the 1956 annual meet- 
ing had been publsihed in the ATHLETE. A motion 
by Lawrence McGinnis, seconded by Ben Flora, dis- 
pensed with the reading of the minutes. 

A complete financial report was made by the 
treasurer, and on a motion of T. L. Plain, seconded 
by Tom Ellis, the financial report was approved. 
The report covered the All-Star Account, on 
deposit in the First National Bank and Trust 
Company, Lexington. Kentucky; the Kentucky 
High School Coaches Association Account, on deposit 
in the Union Bank and Trust Company, Irvine, Ken- 
tucky; and an account with the Columbia Building 
and Loan Association, Covington, Kentucky. 

President McRight briefly outlined a proposed 
method of electing officers for the Association and 
after a short discussion it was moved by Lawrence 
McGinnis and seconded by L. J. Charmoli that 
the officers progress each year, with only the ser- 
geant-at-arms and the secretary-treasurer being 
elected annually. It is believed that the officers will 
gain experience by this method. The motion carried. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 195 



Page Nine 



The new method of electing officers was follow- 
ed in choosing officers to take office March 1, 1958. 
They were: Ollie Leathers of Frankfort, President; 
Jonn Hackett of Ft. Knox, Vice-President; Joe Ohr 
of Irvine, Secretary- treasurer; John Meihaus of 
St. Xavier, Sergeant-At-Arms. 

On a motion by Edgar McXabb, seconded by 
Joe Gilly, Joe Ohr was reelected Secretary-Treas- 
urer. 

John Meihaus was nominated for Sergeant-At- 
Arms by William Tucker, seconded by Ralph Genito. 

Two former members of the Kentucky High 
School Coaches Association spoke to the audience 
of ninety members. 

Nick Denes, Head Football Coach of Western 
Kentucky State College, was introduced by Presi- 
dent Ralph McRight and in his speech presented 
several important items for consideration by the 
Kentucky Coaches Association and the Kentucky 
High School Athletic Association. 

Some of his points were: 

1. A system other than the Litkenhous systsem 
should be used in selecting the football champion- 
ship of Kentucky. He suggested that the state be 
divided into four sections with a play-off to deter- 
mine the championship. 

2. Football practice: To protect the players 
and coaches, there should be a definite starting time, 
the last week of August. 

3. Spring baseball: because of inclement weath- 
er and the short season, both being detrimental to 
the boys, the season should start on Decoration 
Day and end on Labor Day. Nick submits the idea 
of twilight ball for the answer of those who must 
work. 

4. Insurance: that the Kentucky High School 
Athletic Association should subsidize the K.H.S.C.A. 
in providing insurance for permanent injuries. 

5. Encourage Football: Denes suggested that 
the aid of school administrators, civic clubs, P.T.A.'s 
and other organizations be solicited in encouraging 
boys to participate. He also suggested that colleges 
prepare boys to coach football. 

Coach Bobby Laughlin, of the Morehead State 
College basketball team was introduced by a former 
Eagle, Edgar McNabb. retiring president of the 
Kentucky High School Coaches Association. 

Laughlin, in a down, to earth talk to the coaches, 
praised them for the instruction given the boys of 
Kentucky. He extended an invitation to the coaches 
to visit Morehead and to watch the Eagles play as 
his guests. His informal talk caused several coaches 
to remark that Laughlin should be named the "Good 
Will Ambassador of Morehead." 

A motion presented at the 1956 meeting by 
L. J. Charmoli provided that the Kentucky High 
School Coaches Association honor the outstanding 
coaches of football and basketball in their respective 
sports based on a ballot cast by members of the 
association and that suitable awards be presented 
them. This is to be an annual award and for the 
first time a regulation football and regulation 
basketball were presented to the Coach of The Year 
in each sport. Those receiving the award were: John 
Meihaus, Coach of The Year in Football for 1956, 
St. Xavier High School, Louisville; and Ralph Car- 
lisle, Coach of The Year in Basketball for 1957, 
Lafayette High School, Lexington. The Lafayette 
Generals copped the championship of Kentucky un- 
der the coaching of Carlisle. 

Secretary Joe Ohr presented a membership re- 
port showing that 720 members were enrolled for 
1956-1957. 

The meeting adjourned at 8:30 P. M. 



KENTl/CKY HIGH SCHOOL COACHES ASSOCIA- 
TION. STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS AND 
DISBURSEMENTS FOR THE PERIOD MARCH 
25. 1956. THROUGH FEBRUARY 27, 1957. 
RECEIPTS: 

Total Receipts $ 650.00 

Plus. Bank Balance March 24, 1956 _. ._ 4.149.10 

TOTAL $4,799.10 

DISBURSEMENTS: 

Postage $ 3.00 

Delegate Expense to KEA _. 25.00 

Audit of Secretary's Books . 15.00 

-Membership Collection Expense 182.75 

Treasurer's Bond 31.25 

Verification of Corporation Charter 1.00 

Refund of Dues 2.00 

Printing 38.50 

All-Star Headquarters & Meals 153.47 

Travel and Meals 22.00 

Transportation National Rules 

Meeting 161.85 

Expenses - Joe Ohr .. 6.05 

Total Disbursements $ 641.87 

Excess of Receipts oxer Disbursements, S4.157.23 

Balance in Bank on February 25. 1957_. S4.157.23 

In addition to the above balance, there is a balance of 
S3.379.42 in KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL COACHES ASSOC- 
IATION SAVINGS ACCT. NO. 9315 in the Columbia Federal 
Savings & Loan Association. Covington. Kentucky. This 
halance is as of March 27. 1957. 

EAST-WEST ALL-STAR FOOT B A L L AND 
BASKETBALL GAMES OF THE KENTUCKY 
HKJH SCHOOL COACHES ASSOCIATION. 
STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS AND DIS- 
BURSEMENTS FOR THE PERIOD FROM 
MARCH 10. 1956 THROUGH MARCH 27. 1957. 
RECEIPTS: 

Receipts from All Star Games S7.722.25 

Receipts from Programs 725.00 

Refund for Watch .__ 16.00 

Total Receipts 8.463.25 

Plus: Bank Balance March 9, 1956 6.981.61 

TOTAL $15. 444. 86 

DISBURSEMENTS: 

Reimbursement for Travel Expense $ 23.20 

Promotional Expenses 64.85 

Photos 146.00 

Printing 215.54 

Change for All Star Games 600.00 

Watches for All Star Players ._ 1.455.85 

Misc. Travel & Telephone for Coaches__ 193.77 

Managers' 5- Coaches' Salaries 1,900.00 

Travel & Meals for All-Star Players 2.276.29 

Advertising & Entertainment 158.20 

Medical Bills - Plavers . 460.65 

Federal Taxes on All-Star Games 729.00 

Total Disbursements 8,223.35 

BALANCE $7,221.51 

Balance in Bank on March 27. 1957__. _ S7.221.51 

(First National Bank & Trust Company. 
Lexington. Ky.l 

Basketball Rules Change 

The National Basketball Committee has 
made several changes in basketball rules for 
1957-58. 

National Federation Executive Secretary 
H. V. Porter reports the following significant 
change: "3-4 and 10-4: The last sentence,, 
the note and the second question will be re- 
placed with statements that no digit greater 
than 5 shall be used and a note to indicate 
that the provision about use of even numbers 
on light suits and odd numbers on dark suits 
is recommended but not mandatory. In Rule 
10, a penalty will be provided for use of il- 
legal numbers by any players." 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1957 



Who Hates Who? 

Interscholastic Athletics is a saint or sin- 
ner, depending on the angle from which it 
is viewed. Some crusaders charge over-em- 
phasis, poor leadership, rabid and hysterical 
partisanship, limited participation, unbal- 
anced programs, interference with other 
school activities and bad sportsmanship but 
athletic banquet speakers stress the benefits 
of loyalty, cooperation, persistence, obedi- 
ence, getting along with others, leadership, 
fellowship, physical and mental conditioning, 
fair play, alertness, modest winning, gracious 
losing and courage. 

As a good citizenship laboratory, the ath- 
letic machinery has no peer. If the test of 
the product is negative, the chances are that 
it is because of the poor leadership and in- 
fluence of adults who have not grown up. 
Benefits will be derived from the natural 
eLxuberance of wholesome, contest loving 
youth unless ruined by wrong adult influ- 
ence. 

Historical half truths have it that in some 
effete institutions of the East, the sons of 
the "across the tracks" poor battered the line 
to advance the ball to the one yard line and 
then bulldozed a hole for the sons of the 
two carriage families to score without get- 
ting their suits soiled. Those days are gone 
— if they ever existed. Equality of oppor- 
tunity and fair play is a characteristic of the 
school population. Citizens of a school want 
their team to win and they don't give a hoot 
who carries the ball or does the blocking as 
long as it's an all-out performance on the 
part of qualified players. The line drawn by 
the young is on obnoxious conduct and lack 
of ability. They want performance to the 
utter disregard of mama's bank account, 
papa's political influence, race, color, religion 
or ancestral social status. With the kids, 
'A Man's a Man for A' That and A' That" 
in high school athletics. The most spon- 
taneous and enthusiastic applause at a re- 
cent State High School Swim Meet came for 
the diving performance of a boy of a minor- 
ity race. 

A key line in the play, South Pacific, is 
"you have to be carefully taught to hate." 
Where does this teaching begin and who are 
the teachers and why? What alters the at- 
titude of some students after graduation? 
Why ever substitute bigotry and snobbish- 
ness for performance and accomplishment? 
That's an enigma, isn't it? For top citizen- 
ship — a good program of interscholastic ath- 
letics for all students, taught by the school 



and not nulified by the antics and bias of 
those adults whose actions belie any real in- 
terest in sportsmanship and fair play — is a 
must. 
KIDS MEASURE UP ! ! ! 

HOW ABOUT ADULTS ? ? ? 

—Com H. W. Emswiler (Ohio) 



THE FLYING DUTCHMAN 

(Continued from Pag-e Seven) 
Flying Dutchman in the past from people 
honored with The Flying Dutchman Awards. 
These will not only interest you, but will 
emphasize that here is another phase of our 
state's athletic program which causes it to 
be one of the outstanding in the nation. 

Alben W. Barkley, Vice President of the 
United States, February 10, 1951, "I am 
highly complimented to be the recipient of 
this pipe. ... I sincerely hope that I may 
continue to merit your esteem." 

Edgar A. Guest, the Detroit Free Press, 
February 4, 1952, "I don't deserve it, but I 
am very proud to possess it .... I appreciate 
all this more than I can tell you and shall 
cherish the award as evidence of your good 
will." 

Mayor deLesseps S. Morrison, City of New 
Orleans, January 15, 1951, "Receiving this 
pipe and its attendant honors is a genuine 
pleasure, and I thank you. I am grateful for 
the honor bestowed on me." 

W. Freeland Kendrick, Shriners Hospital 
for Crippled Children, Philadelphia, June 4, 
1951, "I assure you that I will keep the 
pipe and the certificate on display in my of- 
fice for the benefit of many callerss and 
friends." 

Barry Bingham, The Courier-Journal, Jan- 
uary 16, 1951, "I greatly appreciate The Fly- 
ing Dutchman Honor Pipe which you have 
presented to me. I am delighted that you 
feel the service rendered has won such fine 
response." 

Dr. George W. Pedigo, Jr., Heyburn Build- 
ing, Louisville, May 24, 1951, "It is with a 
great deal of humility that I accept the Corn 
Cob Pipe of Honor and the beautiful certi- 
ficate which arrived with the pipe. I am sure 
that it will give me a sense of responsibility 
for the future, to stimulate me in every way 
to live up to the standards as expressed on 
the certificate." (Dr. "Billy" Pedigo set the 
woods on fire as quarterback on Coach Ray- 
mond Ridley's great Glasgow teams of 1927- 
30.) 

Bob Hudson, Official, Evansville, Indiana, 
March 5. 1952, "In receiving this award, I 
had a feeling of great pride. I don't know why 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY. 1957 



Page Eleven 



I was awarded this honor, but let me assure 
you I will treasure it the rest of my life." 

Ralph J. Bunche, United Nations. Lake 
Success, New York, January 16. 1951, "I am 
very appreciative of this high honor awarded 
me by The Hying- Dutchman." 

Coach Wes Koffman, Drakesboro High 
School, January 27, 1953, "I will do every- 
thing in my power to live up to its stand- 
ards." 

Carlos Oakley, Superintendent of Union 
County Schools, May 26, 1951. "The senti- 
ment attached to this award and the great- 
ness of characters who heretofore have been 
accorded the same, makes one who labors in 
the field of small things most humble. I shall 
try to live up to the standards of this award." 

So it is that it is a continuing pleasure to 
be associated through this column with the 
people who make Kentucky great. It is with 
anticipated pleasure that The Dutchman 
looks forward to the fall when the Kentucky 
High School Athlete again resumes its pub- 
lication and when again a hum will be heard 
in the autumn air as The Flying Dutchman 
comes in for his first landing of the 1957-58 
season. 



ANNUAL MEETING 

(Continued from Pag'e One) 

by Billy Brannock. that Proposal X be adopt- 
ed. The motion was carried. 

Joe Ohr moved, seconded by Dawson Or- 
man, that Proposal XI, providing that a con- 
testant must be passing currently in all grade 
or high school studies to be eligible for par- 
ticipation in athletics, be tabled. The motion 
was carried. 

Ralph YIcRisrht moved, seconded by W. B. 
Borden, that Proposal XII., providing: that a 
contestant who reaches his twentieth birth- 
day during the disrict, regional, or state tour- 
nament, shall be allowed to complete tourna- 
ment play, be tabled. The motion was car- 
ried. 

After several announcements concerning 
spring snorts had been made by Commis- 
sioner Sanford, President Williamson de- 
clared the meeting adjourned. 

The dinner meeting of the Association was 
held in the Crystal Ballroom of the Brown 
Hotel at 6:00 P. M., with approximately 300 
delegates and other school officials present. 
Director Jack Dawson introduced students 
representing the Southern High School, who 
gave several excellent vocal numbers. Direc- 
tor Louis Litchfield introduced Danny Dun- 
can of the Hazel High School, the recipient 



of the 1957 Game Guy Award. President 
Kelly Thompson of the Western Kentucky 
State College. Bowling Green, gave the ad- 
dress of the evening. The subject was 
"Whose Responsibility V" President Thomp- 
son's talk was well received by all present. 



ANNUAL REPORT 

(Continued from Pane Two) 

and Mr. Thomas P. Bell, and twenty-two football 
officials took the National Federation football ex- 
amination for the higher ratings. The basketball 
clinics were conducted by Charlie Vettiner, as was 
the School for Basketball Officials. Mr. Vettiner 
held fifteen clinics. Additional meetings and clinics 
were held by the regional representatives who con- 
tinue to render a fine service to the officials and 
schools in their respective areas. Ninety-nine offic- 
ials took the basketball examination, with twenty 
being added to the "certified" list and forty-six 
receiving the "approved" rating. 

Three hundred schools insured their athletes 
under the K.H.S.A.A. Protection Fund this year. 
Three thousand, seven hundred twenty-four boys 
were insured in football; 6,197 in all sports except 
football: and ninety-five in Physical Education. Sev- 
en hundred ninety-nine claims, amounting to $16,- 
iiL'4.o0. have been paid to date. This figure is ap- 
proximately $1,300.00 more than the amount re- 
ported a year ago for a comparable period of time. 
The Board of Control for 1956-57 gave each mem- 
ber school insuring' its athletes in the Protection 
Fund a credit of $30.00. To date this free insurance 
has cost the Association S12.000.00. this amount 
having been transferred from the General Fund 
to the Protection Fund. 

Three schools have been suspended from the 
Association this year, and one of these schools was 
also placed on probation. All of these suspensions 
and nrobation came as a result of the violation of 
K.H.S.A.A. By-Law 17. Practice of Sportsmanship. 

Interest in minor and spring* sports continues 
to increase. Regional cro<s country runs were held 
in Louisville. Bowling Green, and Morehead last 
November for the purpose of qualifying teams and 
individuals for the state event, which was held in 
Lexington two wees later. Additional regional runs 
are nlanned for 1957. Seventeen schools sent entries 
to the two sections of the State Swimming Meet, 
held on March 30 and April 6. One hundred forty- 
six member schools have indicated that they will 
send teams to the twelve regional track meets, a 
new high. Forty-six district tournaments in base- 
ball will be held to accommodate some 300 teams 
which will enter these tournaments. Fifty-four 
schools will have golf teams this spring, and these 
teams will enter six regional tournaments to qualify 
for the State Golf Tournament. Forty-one tennis 
teams will be entered in four regional tennis tour- 
naments. 

1950-57 has been another good year for the 
Association. The State Basketball Tournament set 
a new record in attendance and receipts, and the 
finances of the Association continue to remain in 
excellent condition because of the tournament 
profits. The Board of Control and the Commissioner 
recognize and appreciate the assistance of school 
administrators, coaches, and officials, who have been 
most cooperative in furthering' the projects and 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1957 



activtiies of the Association. The program of the 
K.H.S.A.A. has been expanding through the years, 
and this expansion and improvement of services 
should continue. 



BASEBALL RULINGS 

(Continued from Page Six) 
lost contact with it, that the Umpire might exercise 
his authority to declare a runner safe. (1-3-1 Note; 
2-8-1; 8-4-2c) 

7. Play: Is it a strike if a pitch goes over home 
plate even with the batter's shoulders? 

Ruling - . No. A strike must pass over the plate 
between the batter's arm pits and the top of his 
knees when the batter assumes his natural stance. 
(2-15) 

8. Play: Rl holds 1st base when B2 drives ball 
deep to right field. Coacher pushes Rl from 1st to 
start him toward 2nd. 

Ruling: Interference. Rl is out. (3-2-2) 

9. Play: Rl is on 1st with no one out and 2 
strikes on B2. On the pitch, Rl starts for 2nd. 
The pitch grazes the batter's shirt but he swings 
and misses the 3rd strike. Catcher throws to 2nd 
where Rl is tagged before reachind 2nd base. 

Ruling: B2 is out. Ball became dead on touch- 
ing' batter. Rl may not advance. (5-1-la) 

10. Play. Rl is on 2nd. B2 hits grounder be- 
tween 2nd and 3rd which: (a) strikes Umpire before 
F6 has opportunity to field the ball; or (b) F6 at- 
tempts to field the ball but it goes through him and 
strikes Umpire. In both situations, F5 recovers the 
ball in time to throw to 1st base before B2, a slow 
runner, reaches it. 

Ruling: In (a), ball becomes dead and batter 
is awarded 1st base. In (b), ball remains alive 
and batter-runner is out. (5-1-lg) 

11. Play: Pitcher roughs up ball with sand or 
other foreign substance or spits on the ball or in 
glove. He delivers pitch. Batter: (a) swings and 
misses; or (b) hits a fly which is caught; or (c) 
makes a safe hit. 

Ruling: Pitcher is disqualified. In (a) or (b), 
if there is no runner, the pitch is a ball and if there 
is a runner, the pitch is a balk and neither a ball 
nor a strike because ball became dead when the 
infraction occurred. In (c), the balk is ignored and 
batter is credited with a hit. (6-2-1) 

12. Play: From a set position, pitcher is at the 
top or bottom of his stretch motion when he: (a) 
throws to a base; or (b) pitches to batter without 
coming- to a complete stop for at least on scond 
before making- the delivery. 

Ruling: In (a), the action is legal. A pitcher 
may throw to a base before the begins his actual 
delivery motion. In (b), it is illegal pitch. If a run- 
ner is on base, it is a balk. If there is no runner 
on base, it is a ball excepting that the infraction is 
ignored if the batter reaches 1st base through a safe 
hit or otherwise. (6-4-2) 

13. Play: After pitcher has started his delivery, 
Bl steps out of the batter's box without requesting- 
time. 

Ruling. After entering the box, Bl leaves it at 
risk of having a strike thrown while he is out of 
position. If leaving appears to be for the purpose 
of confusing the pitcher, the Umpire will call the 
pitch a strike or ball. The batter may request 
"time" if he desires to step out for a valid reason. 
In nearly all cases, the Umpire considers stepping 
out an automatic request for time because of dust 
in the eyes or some other emergency. The Umpire 



is expected to use good judgment. (7-3-1) 

14. Play: What are appeal plays and how many 
types are there ? 

Ruling: Appeal plays are situations in which 
the Umpire Makes his decision only upon a fielder's 
request. Under the current code, there are only two 
types, i.e., failure of a runner to touch a base in ad- 
vancing or returning, and failure of a runner to 
retouch his base after a fielder has touched a batted 
ball which is then caught. (5-2-1-e; 8-2-1) 

Comment: In these, the Umpire makes no de- 
cision until the Defense has made a play for an out 
and then asks the Umpire for his decision. 

15. Play: With one out, Rl is on 1st when B2 
hits. Rl advances to home base but fails to touch 
3rd. 3rd base coach calls Rl back to tag 3rd. F6 re- 
ceives throw from outfield, hurriedly tags 3rd be- 
fore Rl has returned and quickly relays the ball to 
2nd. Does the baseman's touching- of 3rd base with 
the ball in his possession before Rl's return con- 
stitute an appeal? Is Rl out? 

Ruling: Yes to both questions. (8-2-3-Penalty) 

16. Play: With Rl on 1st. B2 hits to F9 who 
fields the ball and overthrows 2nd so that ball goes 
into the stands. Should two bases be awarded or 
can an overthrow occur only at 1st and 3rd? 

Ruling: Rl is awarded 3rd and B2 is awarded 
2nd. The overthrow rules are not limited to 1st 
and 3rd. (8-3-2c) 

17. Play: With Rl on 1st, B2 hits ground ball 
between 1st and 2nd: (a) Rl purposely stops mo- 
mentarly between ball and F4 to confuse F4; or (b) 
F4 contacts Rl while attempting to reach ball; or 
(c) F4 intentionally pushes Rl to field the ball. 

Ruling: In (a), the Umpire will usually consider 
this an infraction and declare the runner out. There 
may be borderline cass where the intention is some- 
what in doubt or where, despite the attempt of Rl, 
there has been no hindrance of the fielder. In (b) 
and (c), the action is legal provided it occurs be- 
fore any fielder has touched the batted ball. (8-4-2b) 

18. Play: On a safe hit, Rl advances from 1st 
to 3rd but fails to touch 2nd. The missed base is not 
noticed by F4 but ball is returned to him after which 
he accidentally steps on 2nd base. No appeal is made. 
Is runner out? 

Ruling: Runner is out but not because of the 
missed base. When F4 stepped on 2nd, it caused Rl 
to be out because he was forced at 2nd. Umpire 
would have no authority to ask for an appeal but he 
is obligated to declare a runner out when he is 
forced. (8-2-Penalty; 8-4-2e) 

19. Play. Bl apears at bat without a head pro- 
tector. 

Ruling: Umpire must order Bl to secure one 
and declare him out if he does not comply. Protec- 
tors covering the temples and back of head give 
maximum protection and this style is strongly recom- 
mended. (1-1-5) 

20. Play: Last half of 5th inning begins with 
score V. 2— H. 1. H. scores one run before Umpire 
calls game before the inning is completed. 

Ruling: Regulation tie game and records count. 
(4-2-2a) 

21. Play. F3 throws cap or glove against a 
batted ball which is: (a) over foul ground with no 
chance of becoming a fair ball; or (b) on or over 
foul ground in such position that it might have be- 
come fair if there had been no interference. 

Ruling: In (a), the act is ignored. In (b), batter 
is awarded 3rd. Ball does not become dead unless 
because of being a foul ball. (8-3-2b) 



We Ship The DaY You BuV 



w - S. HUNT C . A. BYRN, JR. 



A 1 



HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO. 



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,V> INCORPORATED J 

^ PHONE 103 S 

MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 



IT'S PLAY TIME 

Outdoor playground programs will be conducted in many schools during 
summer months. 

Our stock is complete on all types of playground and play time equip- 
ment. 

Try our "WE SHIP THE DAY YOU BUY" service on: 

Basketballs 

Basketball °oals 
Volleyballs 

Volleyballs nets and posts 
Playground balls of all sizes 
Softballs and Softball bats 

Badminton racquets, shuttlecocks 
Nets and complete badminton sets 

Regulation horseshoes in steel and rubber 
Shuffleboard sets and supplies 
Tennis racquets, nets and balls 

If you plan to have baseball in connection with vour recreation program, 
we have a complete stock of uniforms, shoes, bats, balls and gloves in 
Little League, Babe Ruth League and regulation sizes. 

Please write or call for complete information and prices, and our salesmen 
will be glad to call or give you any information and assistance you may 
need. 

Thanks to our manv friends and customers who visited us in Louisville 
during the 1957 K.E.A. Convention. It was nice to have you and we ap- 
preciate the nice business that you gave us for the present spring and 
summer season as well as the coming fall and winter season of football 
and basketball. 

Hunt's Athletic Goods Co., Inc. 

MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 

"THE LARGEST EXCLUSIVE ATHLETIC HOUSE IN THE SOUTH" 



ORDER YOUR FALL ATHLETIC 
EQUIPMENT WOW 

HAVE A HAPPIER VACATION 



Dear Friends, 

It was a great pleasure to see so many of you at the State Basketball 
Tournament and the K.E.A.! 

The fine camaraderie that has existed among you — Coaches, Teachers, 
Principals and Superintendents — this past year has brought honor to 
Kentucky! It has inspired public interest in and unparalleled attendance 
at Kentucky games. 

We want to thank you for the many orders you have given us. We have 
enjoyed the pleasant association. We will be constantly on the alert so that 
we may continue to offer you the finest and best in Athletic Equipment. 

May we suggest that you place your orders NOW for Fall Football and 
Basketball equipment so that you may enjoy a carefree vacation. 

If you need personal Summer vacation equipment, please drop us a line. 

With every best wish to you for the finest ever vacation. 



Cordially, 




THE 

UTCLIFF] 



T< 



H 



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COMPANY 
INC. 



225 South Fourth Street 
LOUISVILLE 1, KENTUCKY