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Full text of "Atlanta woman'a club cook book"

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COPYRIGHT DEPOSir. 



Atlanta Woman's Club 



COOK BOOK 

Edited by 

Home Economics Department 



MRS. NEWTON C. WING, 

Chairman. 

MRS. J. A. CARLISLE, 

Chairman of Cook Booh. 



H oooooo H 

Bncn^nfl 



Decorations by 
MISS MARIE HAINES. 

Censored by 
MISS MARY PINCKNEY MEANS. 



Copyright 1921 

ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB. 



M 25 1922 
©CI.A659209 



ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOKBOOK 

Decorations by Miss Marie Haines, Miss Mary Means, Censor of Recipes. 



CHAPTER PAGE 

I SECRETS OF KITCHEN HAPPINESS 8 

My-s. Newton C. Wing, Chairvian Home Economics. 

II NECESSARY KITCHEN EQUIPMENT 10 

Home Ecoyiomics Department. 

III BUDGETING YOUR TIME 12 

Introduction by Mrs. B. M. Boykin, President Atlanta Woman's Club. 

IV RECIPES FROM FAMOUS HOMES 14 

Mrs. W. F. Melton, Chairman. 

V QUEEN SWEET POTATO 21 

Mrs. J. E. Hays, President State Federation Women's Clubs. 

VI ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB FAVORITE RECIPES 27 

Mrs. Katherine Fitts, Club Cateress. 

VII NEEDFUL FACTS FOR HOUSEWIVES 30 

Home Ecoyiomics Department. 
NOTE — following recipes arranged in order of meals. 

VIII BREAKFASTS 36 

Fruits in Season Mrs. Norman Sharp. Chairman Markets. 

Cereals Mrs. J. A. Carlisle, Chairman Cook Book. 

Breads, Battercakes and Waffles Mrs. Frank Daub. 

Egg Dishes and Croquettes Mrs. Lee Hagan. 

IX LUNCHEONS AND SUPPERS 58 

Salads and Sandwiches Mrs. Norman Pool. 

Chafing Dish Suggestions Mrs. Charles Evans. 

Beverages Mrs. A. C. Plage. 

Pickles, Marmalades and Relishes Mrs. J. L. Minsen. 

Cakes, Cookies and Icings Mrs. H. A. Manning 

Confectionery Mrs. George Obear. 

X DINNERS 131 

Soups Mrs. J. M. Manry. 

Poultry, Game, Fish and Oysters Mrs. C. E. Cresse. 

Meats Mrs. J. M. Manry. 

Vegetables Mrs. Ernest Covington 

S.alads (see Luncheon Chapter). 

Dainty Desserts Mrs. J. B. Dinwiddle. 

Pastries, Puddings and Dumplings Mrs. W. R. Bean. 

XI MRS. THOMAS' FAVORITE RECIPES 191 

Mrs. Irving Thomas. 

XII THRIFT RECIPES 197 

Thrift Comrnitte of Club. 

XIII PIONEER CHAPTER 206 

Mrs. Lollie Belle Wylie 

XIV FAMOUS CREOLE DISHES 211 

Mrs. Marie Hubert of New Orleans. 

XV SCIENTIFIC CANNING 215 

State College of Agriculture 

XVI SCHOOL AND BUSINESS LUNCHES 223 

Mrs. S. R. Dull. 

XVII FIRELESS COOKERY 225 

Mrs. J. B. Rowe. 

XVIII DISCOVERIES 229 

Mrs. Frank Graham. 

XIX HOME GARDENS 236 

Mrs. H. G. Hastings. 

XX RECIPES FOR SPECIAL OCCASIONS 241 

XXI ADVERTISING CHAPTER 245 

Mrs. Newton C. Wing, Chairman Home Economics. 



FOREWORD. 



In offering this book to the pubHc, the cook book committee 
is divided between two impulses — the first, to apologize for its 
temerity in offering a cook book compiled and edited for the most 
part by amateurs and which, if advanced sales are an indication, 
will be passed in review by housewives from coast to coast; and 
second (much the stronger we fear) a feeling that we have done 
our very best and are willing to be judged according to the standard 
of the very best cook books. 

For six months this committee composed of some of the most 
prominent women of the state, has labored almost unceasingly to 
present to other women who honor their profession as housewives 
the recipes which thousands consider to be their choicest. Each 
of these recipes has been thoroughly tested by the contributor, and 
after reaching us has been censored by the Home Economics Direc- 
tor, Miss Mary Means of the Girls' High School Faculty. We re- 
gret deeply that space could not be found for every one of the 
delicious recipes sent us, but the necessity for having, as nearly 
as possible, an evenly balanced book, and one in which every 
direction is clearly stated, and with no duplicates, caused many to 
be eliminated by the censor. Some recipes will be found in other 
places in the book, where they seemed more necessary. 

The fact that this cook book is published by the Home Econo- 
mics Department of our club renders it necessary for it to conform 
to the rules for service inaugurated by this Department for its 
members. Accordingly the wording of each recipe has been given 
more plainly than is customary in most cook books, so it will form 
not only an excellent hand book for our own members, but may 
be easily used by those hitherto entirely unfamilar with cooking 

Altho this volume specializes in typical Southern recipes, 
it also contains many choice tid-bits from other sections owing 
to the cosmopolitan character of the Woman's Club membership, 
which numbers many residents formerly from other parts of the 
United States. 

In omitting special menus, which in our experience rarely can 
be used exactly as printed, we have substituted instead the order, 
of recipes naturally followed during the day, leaving the house- 
wife the liberty of choice. 

Chairmen for our chapter have been selected because of es- 
•pecial fitness for the work. Each has taken the greatest pride in 
the collection of recipes and their arrangement. They should not, 
however, be held responsible for any omission of recipes, as that 
necessarily had to be decided by the censor and the editors. 

It was not required that recipes contributed should be ab- 
solutely original, as so few really can be, but that they should have 
been in use by the contributor or some close friend for some time. 



In view of the fact that all money from the sale of this book 
goes towards the building fund of our wonderful new auditorium — 
that temple of unselfish service— we ask that our club members 
deal lovingly with this book, that each purchase at least one for her- 
self or a friend, that each encourage its sale in every way possible 
and that all criticisms, for or against, be given to the editors to the 
end that the next edition may benefit thereby. 

Even before this goes to press hundreds of dollars have been 
sent together with addresses to our Sales-Chairman, Mrs. Alonzo 
Richardson, 682 West Peachtree St., Atlanta, Ga. The cook books 
are two dollars each and out of town orders should be accompanied 
by ten cents (10c) postage. 

In conclusion we thank most heartily those who have in any 
way contributed to the success of the cook book and if, as we hope, 
it becomes part of the necessary kitchen equipment in thousands 
of homes we will feel we have not labored in vain. 
Mrs. Newton C. Wing, 

Chairman Home Economics Department. 
Mrs. J. A. Carlisle, 

Chairman of Cook Book. 

Advisory board — Mrs. J. E. Hays, State Federation President, 
Mrs. B. M. Boykin, President Atlanta Woman's Club, Mrs. Alonzo 
Richardson, Mrs. Irving Thomas, Mrs. W. B. Price-Smith, Mrs. 
Wilmer Moore, Mrs. W. F. Melton, Secretary; Mrs. Arthur Haz- 
zard, Treasurer; Mrs. George Brower, Auditor; Mrs. H. C. Phipps, 
Printing; Miss Corinne Chisholm, Mrs. Norman Pool, Mrs. A. C. 
Plage, Miss Cobbie Vaughn, Mrs. C. P. Ozburn, Mrs. Victor Kriegs- 
haber. 




CHAPTER I. 



THE SECRET OF KITCHEN HAPPINESS. 
Mrs. Newton C. Wing, Chairman Home Economics. 



House-work may be made either a delight or drudgery, accord- 
ing to the mental attitude which accompanies it. It is impossible, 
naturally, to love one's house-work, if one does not have the proper 
equipment and if one's house, especially the kitchen, is not properly 
arranged, ventilated and lighted. 

We realize that few houses are built which follow any scientific 
arrangement as to the kitchen. Speed the day when the architect 
and the experienced house wife will together plan all kitchens. In 
building a new house, the housewife should insist on having the 
kitchen built as she desires, always considering, of course that it 
harmonizes with the general architectural plans of the house. 

Even if a house wife employs servants, she can not secure that 
servant's contentment or best efforts, unless she saves her time and 
strength by labor-saving methods. 



MORE EFFICIENCY MAY BE SECURED 

I. By having a small kitchen, (but not crowded). 

II. By covering walls with washable materials such as tile, 
enamel, or any good washable paint. 

III. By covering the floor with linoleum, one with dark back- 
ground being preferred. Wax well after laying. 

IV. By grouping certain apparatus and utensils, according to 
their use. Common sense shows that many steps are avoided if: 

First — The sink, with its two large drain boards, one on each 



side, is placed next to the dining room or pantry. Ideal arrange- 
ment consists in having a dish-window opening directly between the 
dish-closet and the sink. This should be large enough to allow the 
passage of the wire dish drainer filled with dishes. Soiled dishes 
are placed on right hand drain board, where they are picked up by 
the dish-washer's right hand, scrubbed under running water, by 
brush held in left hand, and then placed in dish pan. When pan is 
full, place one tablespoon of washing powder over dishes (this is 
enough to cut grease, but does not make water soapy) , fill pan with 
very hot water. With dishmop tilt plates until easily grasped by 
left hand, rub with dish mop, and place in dish drainer at left. Very 
much hotter water may be used than in the old fashioned way of 
using a dishcloth, — the hot water filling the two-fold purpose of 
cleaning the dishes and making them dry more easily. When 
drainer is full, pass thru dish-window or carry to dish-closet. This 
leaves room for washing cooking dishes and by the time these are 
done the china dishes are dry and sparkling and may be put away 
in the china closet without wiping. This is much more sanitary 
than the old way of wiping with dish towel, which is never perfectly 
dry and clean except for the first dish. Towels of best linen 
toweling should of course be used for glasses and silver. Sinks and 
tables are generally built too low. Housewives should msist on 
having sinks built, so that, without stooping, one may touch the 
inside floor of the sink with the flat of the hand. The same holds 
good with the tables (note the height of kitchen cabinet table). 
For the average person, the height of sinks, etc., should be 36 inches. 

Second — The stove should be next to dining room door on the 
other side from the sink to facilitate serving. Thus a tea wagon 
can be used both to take food directly from the stove to the dining 
room table and also to bring soiled dishes from the table to the sink. 

Third — Grouped on opposite side from the stove, should be 
the kitchen cabinet, and working table with store closet near. If 
table is on casters, it can be rolled over near table or sink when 
needed. 

Fourth — If the kitchen is sufficiently large there should be 
a rest corner with a desk and bookcase above for working on 
kitchen accounts and for keeping cook books thus utilizing the 
spare minutes which often occur in the kitchen while meals are 
cooking. 



CHAPTER II. 



NECESSARY KITCHEN EQUIPMENT. 

Two factors cause much loss of time in most kitchens : the 
first arises from the use of old worn-out tools, and the second be- 
cause of an insufficient supply of utensils adapted to certain uses. 

Kitchen equipment should always be kept near the place in 
the kitchen where it is to be used. In most homes the kitchen 
cabinet becomes the receptacle for most of the articles used in the 
preparation of the meals and therefore will be treated first in this 
article. Keep in mind that the utensils used most often should be 
kept where most accessible, i. e., in top drawers, while other seldom 
used articles may be packed away. As various kitchen cabinets 
have different spaces, the following arrangement is merely sugges- 
tive. 



THE KITCHEN CABINET SHOULD CONTAIN 

All spices, baking powder (Royal), salt, pepper, tea, coffee, 
sugar, soda, flour, corn-starch, cocoa, chocolate, Worcestershire 
Sauce, catsup, canned salad dressing (for seasoning), flavoring ex- 
tracts, crackers, canned soups, pimentos, and other canned products 
for an emergency meal. 



IN DRAWERS OF KITCHEN CABINET. 



1 wooden spoon. 




bread knife. 


2 large spoons 




biscuit cutter. 


2 tablespoons. 




cookie cutter. 


4 t-spoons. 




doughnut cutter. 


1 combination set aluminum 




carving set. 


measuring spoons. 




funnel. 


1 spatula. 




pair scissors. 


1 long-handled fork. 




corkscrew. 


2 small paring knives. 




pancake turner. 


1 pastry bag and tube. 




egg beater (wheel) 


1 potato ricer. 




egg beater (whisk) 


1 strainer. 




strainer. 


1 large grater. 




apple corer. 


1 can opener. 







NECESSARY KITCHEN EQUIPMENT 



11 



IN CUPBOARDS OF KITCHEN CABINET. 



1 frying pan. 

5 saucepans. 

One-1-pint. 

Two-1-quart. 

One-2-quart. 

One-1-gallon. 



1 double boiler. 

2 bread pans. 
2 sets muffin pans (different 

shapes). 

2 oblong cake pans. 

A high stool, a bread board, a rolling pin, scales for weighing 
groceries, a clock, and a nest of earthenware and enamel bowls; 
food chopper. 



2 baking sheets. 

3 different size pie tins. 

1 set fire-proof glass dishes. 

1 iron mould for cornsticks. 

1 lemon squeezer. 

2 measuring cups. 
2 qt. measures. 
1 coffee pot. 
1 tea pot. 
1 wooden chopping bowl. 



China used in cooking. 



KITCHEN OR PANTRY DRAWERS AND SHELVES. 



Wax paper. 

Labels. 

Pad. 

Pencils. 

Pliers. 

Pen-knife. 

String. 

Screw-driver. 

Hammer. 

Cheese-cloth. 

Trays. 

China and glass used daily. 

1 doz. hand towels and dish 

towels. 
3 dish cloths. 



3 holders. 

Paper doilies. 

Preserving kettle. 

Bread mixer. 

Iron frying-pan. 

Roasting pan. 

Moulds for steam mixtures. 

Deep fat kettle. 

Colander. 

Ladle. 

Skimmer. 

Frying basket. 

Angel cake pan. 

Bean pot. 

Steamer. 



KITCHEN FURNISHINGS AND APPURTENANCES. 



1 chair (or more). 

1 rocking chair (if there is 

room). 
1 white porcelain table on rol- 

lers (should have 

drawer) . 
ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB 

COOK BOOK. 
Book shelf for cook books, etc. 
Electric toaster. 



Ice-cream freezer. 

Fireless cooker. 

Refrigerator. 

Meat grinder. 

Ice-pick. 

Ironing-board. 

Waffle iron. 

Tea wagon. 

Electric flat iron and rest. 

Electric washing machine 



Matches. 



STOVE. 

3 cloth holders. 



Holder for burned matches. 



CHAPTER III. 

BUDGETING YOUR TIME. 

Introduction by Mrs. B. M. Boykin — President Atlanta Woman's 
Club. 

In these very busy days when every woman is working, as 
she thinks, to her greatest capacity and then does not always gel 
through, suppose she stops and takes stock. — She will find that she 
could have done much more and been less tired if only she had 
mapped out her day and stuck to her schedule, but she lets every- 
thing hinder her. 

While starting out to buy her groceries somebody called and 
talked so long over the 'phone she was late. Consequently, after 
marketing she was late to her engagement and so on. Let us learn 
to shorten unnecessary conversation, be prompt for each engage- 
ment, conduct our daily lives with the same efficiency which is 
used by business men. A place for everything, everything in its 
place — a time for everything and everything on time ; — leaves plenty 
of opportunity for healthful recreation and, at the same time, a 
consciousness of carrying one's program of work satisfactorily. 

The war helped every woman toward economy. Let us carry 
on now in saving our strength and getting better results from our 
time. 



THE WORKING SCHEDULE IN A HOME ECONOMICS HOUSE- 
HOLD. 

While the following schedule may not fit every one's domestic 
arrangements, yet it may serve as a help to other women in planning 
their work whether done by themselves or by servants. 

This has been found invaluable in training a new servant. 



GENERAL OUTLINE OF WORK. 
Everyday Do The Following 

6:45 to 9:00 — Prepare breakfast and serve: While family is 
eating, have servant sweep front porch and steps ; afterward clear 
table, wash dishes, wipe off kitchen table, kitchen cabinet, stove, 
shelves, etc. Shine all aluminum dishes used for the meal and polish 
oooking utensils. Nothing should be left lying about in the kitchen 
or butler's pantry. Sweep kitchen, butler's pantry and eating porch 
(dining room). Should be thru by about nine. 



GENERAL OUTLINE OF WORK 13 

10 to 10 :30 — All downstairs should be in order : floors swept 
or floor mopped, lavatory cleaned, etc. 

10:30 to 11:00 — Bath room cleaned — Any special job if there 
is time. 

11:30 to 12:00— Prepare lunch. 

AFTERNOON. 

1 :00 to 2 :00 — Do dishes and put kitchen and dining room in 
order. 

2:00' to 4:00 — Any special work assigned for that day (see list 
later) . 

4:00 to 5:00 — Rest or recreation (this always applies to the 
cook). 

5:00 to 7:30 — Prepare dinner, wash dishes and put dining 
room and kitchen in order. 

SPECIAL WORK. 

Leave all special work to time provided in outline. This con- 
sists in cleaning silver, washing windows, straightening up closets, 
drawers, etc., cleaning brass door knobs, mirrors, china closet", 
glass doors and any metals. 

SPECIAL TASKS FOR EACH DAY. 

Monday — Wash anything in the laundry bag which is too delicate 
to send to the washwoman. Cook allowed to wash her own 
things also at this time. 

Tuesday — Do any ironing — clean eating porch, (or dining room). 

Wednesday — Clean kitchen and butler's pantry thoroughly, wash- 
ing all wood work — inside of store closet, outside of boiler, 
scrub floors, clean kitchen cabinet inside and out and the 
stove. See that all utensils are clean. 

Thursday — Follow morning schedule and clean refrigerator also, 

Thursday Afternoon — Half holiday, (applies to the house wife too. 

If acting as cook, she deserves a dinner out) . 
Friday — Clean all upstairs. 
Saturday — Clean all downstairs except kitchen, etc. Bake. 

Sunday Morning— After breakfast see that house is straightened up. 
prepare dinner, and supper which is set away in refrigerator. 

"Every Woman." 




CHAPTER IV. 

RECIPES FROM FAMOUS HOMES. 
(Compiled by Mrs. W. F. Melton, Secretary Home Economics). 

The Home Economics Department of the Atlanta Woman's 
Club, wishes to express its deep appreciation for the recipes contri- 
buted by "The First Lady of the Land," Mrs. Warren G. Harding, 
by the wives of so many of our governors, and by other notables. 



CHICKEN PIE. 
1 qt. flour. 
Lard size of egg. 
1 t-spoon salt. 
Milk. 



MRS. HARDING'S 

1 good-sized chicken. 

6 small potatoes. 

1 onion. 

5 level t-spoons baking powder. 

Boil chicken gently until it falls from bones ; cut in small pieces. 
Cook potatoes and onion in chicken broth. Make a pastry of flour, 
lard, salt and baking powder — add milk enough to make a soft 
dough. Line baking dish with pastry and bake in hot oven. Then 
fill this with the chicken, potatoes, and a small amount of broth, 
cover with pastry and brown in quick oven. Thicken remaining 
broth, and serve over pie. 



HARDING'S WAFFLES. 

1 pt. milk. 

Flour to make thin batter. 

2 large t-spoons baking powder 



MRS. 
2 eggs. 
2 tbls. sugar. 
2 tbls. butter. 
1 t-spoon salt. 

Beat yolks of eggs, add sugar and salt, melt butter, add milk 
and flour; last just before ready to bake add beaten whites of eggs 
and baking powder. Bake on hot waffle iron. 

Mrs. Warren G. Harding. 

LEMON SAUCE (FROM MASSACHUSETTS.) 
1 tbl. spoon corn starch. 2 tbl. spoons lemon juice. 

Vi cup sugar. 1 cup boiling water. 

Mix the corn starch, sugar and lemon juice, then add the cup 



RECIPES FROM FAMOUS HOMES 15 



of boiling water, stirring slowly. Cook five minutes in a double 
boiler, stirring constantly. Add two tbl. spoons of butter. 
Mrs. Channing H. Cox, — ^Wife of Massachusett's Governor. 

Boston, Massachusetts. 

ECLAIRS FILLED WITH SALAD (FROM GEORGIA.) 

14 cup shortening. V2 cup boiling water. 

1/2 cup flour. 2 eggs. 

Mix the ingredients ; bake, cool, cut into eclairs 4 inches long 
and % inches wide. Split the eclairs; line with lettuce leaf; fill 
each eclair with one boneless sardine mixed with 1/3 chopped hard- 
boiled egg and two tbl. spoons Mayonnaise. 

Mrs. T. W. Hardwick, — Wife of Georgia's Governor. 

Atlanta, Georgia. 

JELLIED APPLE SALAD. 

1 cup diced apples. 2 tbls. sugar. 

1/4 cup diced celery. 1/3 cup lemon juice. 

l/i cup chopped figs. 14 t-spoon salt. 

2 tbls. gelatine. 2 red pimentos, cut in small 
1/4 cup cold water. strips. 

1 and 1/2 cups boiling water. 

Mix ingredients with mayonnaise. Soften gelatine with cold 
water. Dissolve with boiling water. Add ingredients to the 
gelatine mixture. Pour into mold. When congealed serve with 
Mayonnaise. 

Mrs. T. W. Hardwick, 

Atlanta, Georgia. 

"UNCLE REMUS" RECIPES. 
"I'se mighty glad you said dat," remarked Uncle Remus, 
smacking his lips, "kaze ef you hadn't said it, I'd 'a' been bleeze 
ter say it myse'f." (From "The Reason Why.") 

DEVILED SHRIMP. 
1 can shrimp, or one pint fresh Mince shrimp and add tomatoes, 

shrimp. mixing thoroughly. 

1 can tomatoes. A half cup tomato catsup is an 

1 tbl. butter. improvement. 

Red or black pepper and salt to Cover the whole with crackei 
taste, crumbs and brown on 

Stew tomatoes and when nearly top. 

done, season. 

Mrs. Joel Chandler Harris, 

Atlanta, Georgia. 

FROZEN FRUIT CAKE. 
1 cup white raisins. 1 cup macaroons. 

1 cup chopped pecans. 1 pt. whipped cream. 

1 cup lady fingers. 1 pt. boiled custard. 

Break lady fingers and macaroons in large crumbs. Put rai- 



16 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



sins in whole. Cut nuts in quarters. Whip the cream slightly. 
Mix all together lightly with pint of boiled custard. To freeze : 
Put mixture in mold (with hole in center). Cover contents with 
waxed paper. Put lid on mold. Pack well. Let it remain packed 
three-and-one-half hours. When ready to serve, pour hot water 
over mold. Slide on platter. Pour glass of eggnog in hole in 
center. 

Mrs. Joel Chandler Harris, 
"Wren's Nest," Atlanta. Georgia. 

STEAMED HUCKLEBERRY PUDDING (FROM GEORGIA). 

1 qt. berries. II/2 cups milk. 

1 cup syrup (Georgia cane). % t-spoon soda. 
1/2 t-spoon salt. Flour. 

"Wash and dry berries; flour them as if for fruit cake. Stir 
soda into syrup; add milk and salt; add flour sufficient to make 
very stiff batter. Carefully stir in berries — avoid breaking them ; 
put in greased steamer or mold ; steam three hours, and serve with 
hard sauce. 

Mrs. Hugh Dorsey, Wife of former Governor of Georgia. 

RICE WAFFLES. (FROM DELAWARE). 
1 34 cups flour. 1 egg. 

2 tbls. sugar. 
2/3 cups cold cooked rice broken 4 t-spoons Royal Baking pow- 

up with fork. der. 

1 1/2 cups warm milk. 1 tbl. melted butter. 

Mix and sift dry ingredients; add rice, milk, well-beaten egg 
yolk, butter, and egg white beaten stiff. 

Mrs. W. D. Denney, 
(Wife of Delaware's Governor). 

BAKED OYSTERS. (FROM ALABAMA). 
3 pts. oysters. 1 t-spoon Worcestershire 

1 pt. tomato catsup. Sauce. 

1 cup cream. Pepper and salt to taste. 

Butter size of an egg. 

Open oyster shells, and boil oysters slightly in their own li- 
quid ; then combine this with sauce made of the remaining ingred- 
ients', place in oyster shells, and bake in oven, adding sauce from 
time to time, until all possible is used. Care must be taken not 
to have the oven too hot, or juice will burn on edges. Fancy shells 
may be used or ramekins. 

Mrs. Thos E. Kilby, 
(Wife of Governor of Alabama). 

FRUIT SALAD. 
1 can pineapple. 1 stalk celery. 

1 grape fruit. 1 cup pecan meats. 

1 can white cherries. 2 lemons (juice). 

1/2 box gelatine. 



RECIPES FROM FAMOUS HOMES 17 



Cut celery, pineapple, and grapefruit in pieces. Add nuts 
chopped fine, cherries stoned, and juice of lemons. Use juice of 
pineapple and cherries. Put gelatine in i/i cup cold water, dissolve 
by setting cup in hot water. Stir into fruit and congeal. Serve 
with Mayonnaise. 

Mrs. Thos E. Kilby, 
(Wife of Governor of Ala). 

PRUNE WHIP. 

1 lb. prunes. 1/2 cup sugar. 

Whites of 5 eggs. 1/2 cup cream. 

Cook prunes well, put through potato masher, add sugar, and 
fold in well beaten whites of eggs. Put in pan, set in larger pan. 
Place over gas flame on hot stove. Steam 2 hours, keep water 
boiling rapidly all the time. Serve in same pan with whipped 
cream. 

Mrs. Thos. E. Kilby, 
(Wife of Governor of Alabama) , 

ANGEL CAKE (FROM ARKANSAS.) 
1 dozen eggs (whites). 1 t-spoon vanilla. 

11/2 cups sugar. 1 t-spoon cream of tartar. 

1 cup flour. 

Sift sugar eight times, the last time into the beaten whites and 
stir until smooth. Sift cream of tartar into the flour and sift flour 
eight times, the last time into the mixture. Fold in gently, but do 
not beat. Put in ungreased pan and bake slowly 50 minutes. When 
done, the cake should be turned down on the edge of two cups 
until thoroughly cold before removing from pan. 

Mrs. L. C. McRaye, 
(Wife of Governor of Arkansas). 

ORANGE ICE-CREAM. (FROM CALIFORNIA). 
1 pt. California orange juice. 1 pt. plain cream. 
1 pt. whipping cream. Sugar to taste. 

Mix ingredients, freeze and pack for at least two hours. 

Mrs. W. D. Stephens, 
(Wife of Governor of California). 

FRENCH SALAD DRESSING (FROM CONNECTICUT.) 
Vinegar. Black pepper. 

Piece of ice. Paprika. 

Salt. Mustard. 

Red pepper. 

Put good sized piece of ice in boMd. Put into tbls. a salt 
spoon of salt, a little red pepper and black pepper, paprika, and 
mustard. Mix this with oil until smooth. Pour this over the 
ice. Take 4 tbls. of oil to 1 of vinegar. Pour over the ice until 
thick. 

Mrs. Everett L. Lake, 
(Wife of Governor of Connecticut). 



18 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



OATMEAL COOKIES. 
3 cups uncooked oatmeal. 1 cup raisins (chopped and 

1 cup flour. floured). 

1 cup sugar. i/p cup buttermilk. 

% cup lard. 1 level t-spoon soda. 

1 egg. 
Spices to suit taste. Mix ingredients and drop from a t-spoon 
upon a greased platter. Cook in a moderate oven, from fifteen to 
twenty minutes. The dough must be very stiff or the cookies will 
run together. 

Mrs. Everett L. Lake, 
(Wife of Governor of Connecticut.) 

THOUSAND ISLAND DRESSING. (FROM MISSOURI). 
1 bottle small pickled onions. Paprika. 
1 box pimentos. Salt. 

8 eggs (hard boiled). Cayenne pepper. 

Grind eggs in meat chopper, slice pimentos and cut up onions 
fine. Mix all together, adding salt, paprika and cayenne to taste. 

Mayonnaise. 
Yolks of two eggs. 1 lemon (juice). 

I cup of chili sauce. 1 cud olive oil. 

Beat egg yolks, add olive oil drop by drop ; when it thickens 
add lemon juice, continue beating and adding oil until all oil is used. 
Add with the chili sauce to the above ingredients. Sliced green 
pepper improves this dressing. 

Mrs. Hortense S. Hyde. 
(Wife of Governor of Missouri) . 

FEATHER PUDDING. 
6 eggs whites. 1 cup sugar. 

Coloring. Whipped cream. 

Beat egg whites well ; sift in sugar, still beating. Pour hall 
in pan and color other half pink. Set the pans in another pan of 
hot water and bake half an hour. 
Serve with whipped cream. 

Mrs. Hortense E. Hyde, 
(Wife of Governor of Missouri). 

BRIDAL CAKE. (FROM GEORGIA). 

II eggs (whites). V2 t-spoon almond extract. 
1 1/2 cups sugar. 1/2 t-spoon cream of tartar. 
1 cup flour. 

Beat whites stiff, add sugar, spoonful at a time, beating all 
the while. Add flavoring; then flour, little at a time, in which 
cream of tartar has been sifted. Bake in tube pan about 1 hour. 
When cold, remove from pan and slice in layers, or can be baked 
in layers. 



RECIPES FROM FAMOUS HOMES 19 



CREAM FILLING. 

2 tbls. gelatine. 1 pt, whipped cream. 
14, cup cold water. 1 cup pulverized sugar. 

3 eggs (whites). 1 t-spoon vanilla. 

Add gelatine to cold water; dissolve over hot water. Add 
pulverized sugar to cream, then gelatine, and well beaten egg whites ; 
stir until it thickens. Then pin a collar of buttered paper around 
the first layer so that it stands above the top of cake 1/2 inch. 
Spread a layer of cream on cake, filling in the collar. Alternate 
layer of cake and collar until all cakes are used. Cover with plain 
icing. Set away until cold when collars may be removed. 
Mrs. Allen D. Candler. — Wife of former Governor of Georgia. 

SAUSAGE. (FROM GEORGIA). 
66 lbs. lean pork. 1/3 cup red pepper. 

33 lbs. fat pork. 2 1/2 cups salt. 

5/12 cup black pepper. 3 1/3 cups sage. 

Cut meat in oblong strips, one to two inches thick, three to five 
inches long. In grinding, alternate fat and lean meat in order 
to secure thorough mixing. Work well through meat the seasoning, 
or same can be sprinkled over meat before grinding. Casings of 
unbleached domestic should be made 3 to 5 inches wide and 10 to 15 
inches long, sewed up all but one end. Fill with sausage and tie 
with strong cord. One pound of casings stuffs 50 lbs. of sausage. 

Mrs. J. E. Hays, 
State Federation President Women's Clubs. 

PIMENTO MOUSSE SALAD. 

1 pt. cream. Red pepper. 

2 pimento'^. Salt. 

1 cup cold water. Grated cheese. 

1 package gelatine. 

Add gelatine to cup of cold water and let stand half hour. 
Dissolve by setting in pan of boiling water. Whip cream stiff, 
add pimentos mashed fine, salt and red pepper to taste. Stir 
dissolved gelatine in mixture set on ice until congealed. Serve 
with grated cheese and mayonnaise. 

Mrs. J. E. Hays, 
State Federation President. 

DATE AND NUT PUDDING. (FROM TENNESSEE). 
1 cup chopped nuts. 2/3 cup flour. 

1 cup chopped dates. 2 eggs. 

1/2 cup sugar. 1 t-spoon baking powder. 

Cream sugar and butter, sift baking powder in flour, add eggs 
beaten separately and lightly, add nuts and dates last and slightly 
floured, bake as you would cake, when cold, slice and eat with 
whipped cream. 

Mrs. A. A. Taylor, 
Wife of Governor of Tennessee. 



20 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



SNOW CAKE. 

Whites of 8 eggs. 1 cup corn-starch. 

2 cups sugar. 2 cups flour. 

1 cup butter. 3 t-spoons baking powder. 

Cream Filling, 
Whip one pint whipped cream until it resembles ice cream in 
appearance, make quite sweet, then flavor with vanilla, spread the 
layers of cake with grated pineapple, then cover thickly with the 
cream. This filling should be freshly made. 

Mrs. A. A. Taylor, 
Wife of Governor of Tennessee. 

COCOANUT DUCHESS POTATOES. 

3 cups hot mashed potatoes. 6 tbls. milk. 

3 egg yolks. 1/4 t-spoon pepper. 

1 t-spoon salt. 3 egg whites. 

Mix thoroughly all the ingredients except egg whites, beat the 
egg whites and fold in carefully, put the mixture in a greased bak- 
ing dish and sprinkle top lightly with cocoanut, set in a pan of hot 
water and bake in a moderate oven until firm. 

Mrs. A. A. Taylor, 
Wife of Governor of Tennessee. 





■"Life is a 


joint job 


for both 


men and 


women, and the 


home 


the brood 


ing place 


for citizenship — 


the 


spiritual center 


of th( 


3 universe. 


77 
















Mrs. 


Thomas 


^G. 


Winter, 




President, 


General Federation of W 


omen's Clubs. 




CHAPTER V. 

QUEEN SWEET POTATO. 

Recipes compiled by Mrs. J. E. Hays, State President Federa- 
ted Women's Clubs. 

A lowly sweet potato am I, 
Tho, you may call me "a poor man's pie," — 
For I'm good to eat without sugar or salt. 
Many are my virtues and I haven't a fault. 

The Sweet Potato, a native of the South, is capable of being 
served in more tempting ways than any other product of the soil — 
it is a vegetable that may be used as a breakfast dish, an entree 
or a dessert, made tempting with very little embellishment. 

Truly a "poor man's pie," given by a generous Maker! It 
contains all the necessary elements, and is easily digested. Geor- 
gians should sing the praises of Queen Sweet Potato, as California 
does the raisin and Ireland the "spud." 

ROAST OPOSSUM, AND SWEET POTATOES 
1 Opossum. 1 dozen sweet potatoes. 

Salt. Black pepper. 

Dress and place opossum (whole) in large pan with one and 
one-half gallons cold water; boil until tender. Drain and place in 
covered roaster — Surround with sweet potatoes (which have pre- 
viously been peeled and boiled). Season with salt and pepper to 
taste. 

Put roaster in oven until both potatoes and possum are crisp 
and brown. 

Mrs. Norman Pool. 

FRIED POTATOES, 
(a). Peel and slice (not too thin), soak in weak salt water 
10 minutes, fry in deep hot fat, drain on paper. Serve hot. 



22 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 

(b). Bake large size potatoes and when cold, peel, slice and 
fry brown in deep hot fat, salt and serve. 

BAKED POTATOES. 

Wash, trim and bake in moderate oven until soft. If po- 
tatoes are slightly greased before baking, they bake more quickly, 
are soft and easy to peel. 

CANDIED YAMS— (PLAIN). 

(a). Peel and slice (long way), boil in clear weak salt 
water until tender, sprinkle liberally with sugar, (spices may 
be added if liked) cook until brown and candied. 

(b). Thick slices of unpeeled apples may be added with pota- 
toes while boiling. Proceed as with (a), and you have candied 
yams with apple sauce. 

(c). When potatoes are tender sprinkle with sugar, grated 
cocoanut, spice or grated pineapple. 

SWEET POTATO SOUFFLE NO. 1. 

1 cup nuts. 1/2 cup seeded raisins. 

2 tbls. butter. 1/2 cup milk. 

2 eggs. Flavored as desired. 

Boil potatoes whole until very tender, peel and mash well, add 
sugar (about 1/2 cup for baking dish). Do not have batter too 
stiff. Bake slowly until light brown. Place marshmallows on 
top, return to oven long enough to melt slightly. Nicest served 
with mid-winter dinner and subject to many variations: 
(b) . Use half glass of jelly instead of sugar, 
(c). Add bananas sliced instead of nuts and raisins, 
(d). Stick an almond or cherry in marshmallows for fancy 
dish. Add any crystallized fruit with nuts and raisins. 

(e). Omit milk, add 2 t-spoons baking powder and 1 cup 
cocoanut. 

"PIG-IN-A-PEN." 
Bake medium sized potatoes. When well done, peel, mash 
w'ell, adding salt and pepper. To each potato add small all 
pork sausage cake (cooked) . Mix thoroughly, make in cakes, brown 
in oven or refill potato cases with mixture. Can be served "en 
masse" as meat course. 

POTATO CUSTARD. 
2 small potatoes. 2 eggs. 

1/3 cup butter. % cup sugar. 

1 t-spoon vanilla. 

Boil tender, peel, mash; add eggs, .butter, sugar and vanilla. 
Mix thoroughly (bake in rich crust and top with meringue). 

POTATO PIE. 
Peel and slice raw potatoes thin; cook tender in slightly 
salted water. Place all in baking dish, add spice, sugar to taste and 
a little butter. Top with rich crust and brown in moderate oven. 

THE ABOVE SEVEN RECIPES BY MRS. OSCAR McKENZIE, MONTEZUMA. GA. 



QUEEN SWEET POTATO 23 



SWEET POTATOES. 
Sweet potatoes. Raisins. 

Apples. H p-o-lite. (Marshmallow 

cream). 
Bake sweet potatoes. Peel. Put in bowl. Make apple sauce. 
Put in the same bowl an equal quantity of apple sauce and sweet 
potatoes. Mash them up together so that you can't tell where the 
potato stops and the sauce begins. Chuck into a bowl a handful of 
small sweet seedless raisins. Put the whole batch into casserole. 
Cover with one-half inch of Hip-o-lite. Bake to your hearts con- 
tent, and serve hot. 

Mr. Lewis Lee, 
Mgr, Information Dept. Georgia Railway & Power Co. 

SWEET POTATO DELIGHT. 
2 potatoes (medium sized). 1 box seedless raisins. 

1 cup sugar. 1 box shredded cocoanut. 

1 cup nuts. 20 marshmallows. 

Add potatoes peeled and sliced thin to sauce pan, cover with 
sugar and water; cook until tender, place alternately layers of 
potatoes, cocoanut and raisins sprinkled with nuts. Add syrup in 
which potatoes were candied and cover with marshmallows. Cook 
in moderate oven until a golden brown. Serve in dish in which it 
is cooked. 

Mrs. John O. Teasley, 

Lilly, Ga. 

RAISIN POTATOES. 
Peal three potatoes and steam till done. Mash well. Add 
lump of butter about size of egg; IV2 cups sugar; 1/3 cup raisins. 
Bake till brown. Pacify the family by promising a bigger dish 
tomorrow. 

Mrs. Otis DeVaughn, 

Montezuma, Ga. 

SWEET POTATO SOUFFLE NO. II. 
6 medium sized potatoes. 2 tbls. butter. 

1/2 cup of sugar. 1 small can of marshmallow 

%, cup of pecan meats. paste. 

Boil potatoes — run through potato masher — cream until light 
and fluffy. Add sugar — melted butter — pecan meats. Place in 
baking dish — cover with marshmallow paste — run in oven until 
brown. 

Mrs. Norman Sharp. 
SWEET POTATO SOUFFLE NO. III. 

2 cups sweet potatoes. 2 eggs. 

1 cup hot milk. 1 t-spoon nutmeg. 

2 tbls. sugar. 1/2 cup seeded raisins. 
1/2 t-spoon salt. 1/2 cup walnut meats. 
2 tbls. butter. i/| doz. marshmallows. 



24 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



Mash potatoes well. Heat milk and dissolve sugar and salt 
in it. Add butter, stirring until melted. Add this mixture to 
potatoes and beat until light and fluffy. Add nutmeg, raisins and 
nuts. Fold in well beaten egg whites. Pour mixture into buttered 
baking dish ; arrange marshmallows one-half inch apart on top. 
Bake in moderate oven until the Souffle is set and the marshmal- 
lows a delicate brown. Serve at once. 

Mrs. M. E. Paden. 

CANDIED POTATOES. 

Slice steamed potatoes in half inch slices. Add butter and 
brown sugar abundantly, with enough water to make a syrup. Add 
also a little molasses or cane syrup. Flavor with cinnamon. Let 
cook slowly for a good while till syrup is thick and potatoes brown. 

Mrs. C. H. Richardson, 

Montezuma, Ga. 

SWEET POTATO CROQUETTES.— NO. I. 
Mash steamed potatoes. Add butter, sugar, pinch of salt, and 
egg. Shape into croquettes, roll in flour and fry. Better make 
more than two apiece for each of the family to avoid trouble. 

Mrs. T. A. Dixon, 
Montezuma, Ga. 

SWEET POTATO CROQUETTES.— NO. II. 

4 medium size potatoes. 1 tbls. cream. 

1 egg. 1/4, t-spoon salt. 

1 cup chopped pecan meats. 1 tbls. butter. 

Boil unpeeled potatoes until done. Remove peelings and mash 
fine. Add butter, cream, pecan meats, salt. Mix well, mold into ob- 
long shapes. Roll in well beaten eggs, then cracker dust, fry in 
hot fat until light brown. Drain on paper. These are nice served 
with creamed toast. 

Mrs. T. L. Mudd, 

Kentucky. 

CREAMED SWEET POTATOES. 

3 sweet potatoes. i/4 lb, marshmallows. 

1 cup milk. 1/8 lb. butter. 

1/2 cup sugar. 1 can or package cocoanut. 

Boil sweet potatoes until tender; peel and cream while hot, 
stirring into the potatoes the butter, sugar and milk. Add last the 
cocoanut. Place mixture, which should be soft in baking dish; 
cover over the top with marshmallows and brown in moderate oven. 

Mrs. T. T. Stevens, 
President, Fifth District. 

POTATO CAKES. 

Peel, steam and mash several potatoes ; add butter, a pinch of 



QUEEN SWEET POTATO 25 



salt — an egg or two, and as many pecan meats as you have. Shape 
into little cakes and bake. 

Mrs. Jere M. Moore, 

Montezuma,Ga. 

OSCAR POTATOES. 

Steam potatoes until nearly done, peel and cut into slices about 
1/2 inch thick. Slice tart apples, put alternate layers potatoes and 
apples with potatoes on top, add sugar to taste, bits of butter, a 
little salt and very little water. Bake until there is a thick syrup 
and potatoes are brown on top. Oh, Oscar ! Oscar ! 

Mrs. Jake Happ, 
Montezuma, Ga. 

SWEET POTATO PUDDING NO I. 

3 cups grated potatoes. 2 cups milk. 

5 eggs. 1 cup syrup. 

11/2 cups sugar. 1 tbls. butter. 

1/2 t-spoon mixed spices ground. 
"Beat sugar, butter and eggs; add potatoes, sugar and milk, 
then flavoring. Pour in pan and bake in moderate oven. When 
top is brown stir in and let second crust form. 

Mrs. J. A. Sibley. 

POTATO PUDDING NO. II. 

3 potatoes (good sized) 2 eggs. 

1 cup milk. 1/2 t-spoon nutmeg or cinna- 

2 tbls. sugar. mon. 
1/4 t-spoon salt. 2 tbls. butter. 

2 egg whites. 

Peel and grate potatoes, add milk, butter, eggs, sugar, spices; 
mix thoroughly, place in greased pan, bake covered in moderate 
oven half an hour, then uncover, add whites of eggs beaten stiff, 
in which tablespoon of sugar has been added. Return to oven and 
brown slightly. Serve hot with cream, plain or whipped. 

Mrs. D. W. Easterlin. 

Montezuma, Ga. 

SWEET POTATO PONE. 

3 or 4 msdium sized potatoes. V2 cup brown sugar. 

4 eggs. 1/2 cup molasses. 
1 cup milk. 3 tbls. butter. 
1/3 t-spoon each allspice, cinna- 
mon, cloves and nutmeg. 

Pare and wash the potatoes, grind in food chopper, beat eggs 
with sugar. Add butter, molasses, milk and spices. Mix well. 
Bake 45 minutes in slow oven. 

Contributed by G. A. Cardwell, Agricultural and Industrial 
Agent, Atlantic Coast Line Railway. 



26 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



SWEET POTATO MERINGUE. 

6 medium sized potatoes. 2 eggs. 

1 tbls. sugar. Salt to taste. 

1/4 cup milk. 

Boil potatoes until tender ; peel and mash, adding sugar, milk, 
yolks of eggs and salt. Beat hard for 5 minutes until potatoes are 
very light and creamy. Pile lightly into a dish and bake for 1/2 
hour. Remove from oven, add egg whites beaten stiff ; return to 
oven and brown. 

Mrs. P. R. Brittain. 

CREAMED SWELT POTATOES. 



1/2 pt. cream. 


3 eggs. 


1 tbls. butter. 


1 cup sugar. 


1/2 cup water. 


2 tbls. sifted flour. 


2 t-spoons baking powdei". 


Other seasoning to taste, 



Thoroughly steam potatoes, peel and mash. Mix thoroughly, 
cream, butter, eggs, sugar, water, flour in which baking powder 
has been sifted. Put other seasoning if desired. Bake in muffin 
rings or deep pan and serve hot. 

Mrs. S. S. Cheves, 
Montezuma, Ga. 



CHAPTER VI. 



ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB FAVORITE RECIPES. 

Chaiiman, Mrs. Katherine Fitts. 

CREAMED CHICKEN. 

(Original recipe used only for the Woman's Club.) 
11/2 cups cold chicken, cut in 3 hard boiled eggs cut in dice 
dice. like chicken. 

1 cup rich white sauce. 1/2 of a canned pimento, cut in 
1/2 cup rich chicken stock. strips. 

1 cup of celery, diced. 
For seasoning use salt, pepper, (white), and paprika. Heat 
ingredients in white sauce. 

BROILED CHICKEN. 

2 broilers. Butter. 

Sprig of parsley. Green corn fritters. 

Clean, wipe and split down the back 2 broilers. Sprinkle with 
salt and pepper, place in greased broiler and cook over dripping 
pan in hot oven for 20 minutes. Remove from oven and broil 
under gas flame until a golden brown, basting 3 times with butter. 
Remove from broiler to hot platter, spread with butter and finely 
chopped parsley. Surround with corn fritters and sprigs of parsley, 

CARROT PUDDING. 

1 cup carrots (ground). 1 cup sugar (scant). 

1 cup Irish potatoes (ground). 1/2 t-spoon salt. 
1 cup nuts (ground) . 1/2 t-spoon cloves. 

2/3 cup suet (ground). 1 t-spoon nutmeg. 

1 cup dates (cut). 1/2 t-spoon cinnamon. 

1 cup raisins (cut). 1/2 t-spoon soda. 

1 cup flour (scant). 

Cream suet and sugar, add soda dissolved in water, then the 
other ingredients, turn into buttered molds and steam 4 hours. 
Serve with sea foam sauce, also hard sauce. 

GREEN CORN FRITTERS. 

2 cups scraped corn. 1 t-spoon salt. 

2 egg yolks (slightly beaten). % t-spoon white pepper. 

2 tbls. butter. 1 cup flour. 

2 tbls. sugar. 2 t-spoons baking powder. 

Fold in whites of eggs stiffly beaten. Drop from spoon in hot 
deep fat and fry. Drain on brown paper and serve with fried 
chicken, broiled chicken or any meat suitable for summer. 



28 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



HOT TEA MUFFINS. (Original). 
2 cups flour. 3 tbls. melted butter. 

1 cup milk. 1 t-spoon salt. 

1/4 cup sugar. 4 t-spoons baking powder. 

2 eggs. 

Cream butter, add sugar and eggs well beaten. Then add milk 
alternately with flour mixed and sifted with remaining ingredients. 
Drop in greased pans and bake in hot oven from 15 to 20 minutes. 

SOUTHERN BROWN BREAD. (Original). 

1 cup corn meal. 1 t-spoon salt. 

2 cups Graham flour. 2 t-spoons soda. 

3/4 cup sorghum. 1 cup chopped raisins. 

1 cup buttermilk. 

Mix and sift soda with dry ingredients, add molasses and milk, 
add raisins last, turn into well greased pound molds filled 2/3 full ; 
steam three hours. For steaming, place mold on trivet in kettle 
containing water, boiling hot, allowing water to come up around 
mold ; cover and steam, adding water as needed. 

LADY BALTIMORE CAKE. 

1 cup butter. 31/2 cups flour. 

2 cups sugar. 2 t-spoons baking powder. 
1 cup milk. 1 t-spoon vanilla. 
Whites 6 eggs. 

Cream butter and add sugar gradually, while beating. Mix 
and sift baking powder and flour several times, and add alternately 
with milk to first mixture. Add flavoring. Cut and fold in whites 
of eggs beaten stiff and dry. Turn into three seven-inch square 
tins and bake in a moderate oven. Put layers together with fruit 
and nut filling and cover sides and top of cake with ice-cream frost- 
ing. 

FRUIT AND NUT FILLING. 
8 cups sugar. 1 cup pecan meats. 

1 cup water. 5 figs. 

Whites 3 eggs. 1 tbls. lemon juice. 

1/2 doz. cherries. 1 cup raisins. 

'Seed and chop raisins and pecan meats. Cut figs in thin strips. 
Cut cherries in fine pieces. Put sugar and water in smooth granite 
saucepan, bring to boiling point and let boil until syrup will form 
a dry, hard ball in coM water. Pour gradually over the stiffly 
beaten egg whites until mixture is of right consistency to spread; 
then add other ingredients and spread over cake. 

ICE-CREAM FROSTING. 

2 cups sugar. Whites 4 eggs. 

1/2 cup water. 1/2 t-spoon vanilla. 

Put sugar and water in smooth granite saucepan. Let boil 
until syrup forms a dry ball in cold water. Pour gradually, while 



WOMAN'S CLUB RECIPES 29 

beating constantly, on whites of eggs (beaten stiff, but not dry) , and 
continue beating until mixture is of right consistency to spread. 
Add flavoring. 

WHITE FRUIT CAKE. 

2/3 cup butter. II4 cups sugar. 

1-2/3 cups flour. 2/3 cup candied cherries. 

14 t-spoon soda. 1/3 cup almonds. 

1/2 tbls. lemon juice. 1/2 cup citron. 

Whites 6 eggs. 1 t-spoon almond extract. 

Blanch and shred almonds. Slice citron thin. Cream butter, 
adding gradually, flour mixed and sifted with soda ; then add lemon 
juice. Beat whites of eggs until stiff, adding sugar gradually. 
Combine these two mixtures and add fruit and extract. Bake in 
deep pan 1 hour. 

CHOCOLATE LAYER CAKE. 

1/2 cup butter. 2 cups flour. 

1 cup granulated sugar. 21/2 t-spoons baking powder. 

3 whole eggs. 1/2 cup milk or cold coffee. 

4 oz. chocolate. 1 t-spoon vanilla. 

Cream butter ; add sugar, melted chocolate, the whole eggs, and 
beat until smooth. Let this cool. Add vanilla and one-half the 
amount of flour, in which has been sifted the baking powder. Then 
add milk or coffee and remaining flour, and beat until smooth. Bake 
in round tins. Put together with thick white frosting. 

CHOCOLATE CREAM CANDY. 

2 cups sugar. 2 tbls. butter. 

2/3 cup cream. 4 squares chocolate. 

1 t-spoon vanilla. 

Put butter into granite saucepan ; when melted, add sugar and 
cream. Heat to boiling point. Add chocolate, stirring constantly 
until chocolate is melted. Boil until a soft ball is formed in cold 
water. Remove from fire, add vanilla and beat until creamy. Pour 
into buttered pan, cool slightly, and mark in squares. Any fruit 
or chopped nuts may be added if desired. 

PARISIAN SWEETS. 
1 lb. figs. 1 lb. English walnuts. 

1 lb. dates. Confectioners' sugar. 

Run fruit and nuts through a food-chopper. Work mixture 
with the hands on board dredged with confectioners' sugar, until 
well blended. Roll to 1/4 inch thickness, using confectioners' sugar 
for dredging board and pin. Shape with any fancy cutter. Roll 
in sugar and pack in layers in a tin box, putting paper between each 
layer. 




CHAPTER VII. 



NEEDFUL FACTS FOR HOUSEWIVES. 

TERMS USED IN COOKING. 

Aspic — A jelly usually made with gelatine, and made of meats, 
fish, vegetables or fruits. Also used as a salad course. 

A. la Creole — Cooked with onions, peppers and tomatoes. 

Au Gratin — Usually with cheese — baked or cooked with brown 
crumbs. 

Bechamel — A very rich white sauce made with milk or cream and 
stock. 

Bisque — A thick sauce or soup, generally made from shellfish, but 
also from rabbits, game, etc. 

Blanch — To whiten by scalding. 

Bouillon — A meat broth. 

Braise — To stew or cook in a closely-covered stewpan with vege- 
tables. 

Canape — An appetizer, composed of a finger strip of toast, spread 

with some savory mixture, such as fish or egg, and daintily gar- 
nished. 

Entree — A savory dish, served either as a course by itself, or be- 
tween heavier courses as at a dinner. 

Fondue — 'Eggs and cheese cooked together. 

Frappe — Half-frozen. 

Glace — Glazed over. Iced or brushed over the egg-white, or boiled 
down to a glaze, in savory dishes with meat stock. 

Hors d' Oeuvres — Small dishes served during the first course of a 
dinner. 

Marinate — To let stand for some time in a mixture of seasoning — 
usually oil and vinegar or oil and lemon juice. 

Meringue — Sugar and egg-white beaten together. 

Mousse — Savory or sweet. A light frothy mixture, thickened 
usually with gelatine, whipped with a whisk, and when spongy 
in texture, pack in salt and ice for several hours. 



ECONOMY IN GAS 31 



Pate — A shell made of puff -paste, containing savory or sweet. 

Puree — Vegetables, fish, meats, etc., cooked till tender, then passed 
through a sieve. 

Saute — Cooked brown in a shallow pan, with little fat. 

Fry — Cooked brown in deep fat. 

Souffle — Savory or sweet. Puffed up and made light by well- 
beaten eggs. 



ECONOMY IN GAS. 
Every house-wife may save time and money by observing the 
following: 

I. Have the gas man regulate the flame, so that it will burn 
blue. 

II. Don't use the large burners for small utensils. 

III. After foods come to a boil, use the burner for simmering. 

IV. Always turn off the gas, before removing vessels from 
the stove. 

V. Don't allow burners to become clogged with grease. 

VI. A large steamer may be used for cooking several foods 
at once. 

VII. Make use of fireless cooker and pressure cooker. 

VIII. Triplet kettles, and double folding omelet pans may be 
used for cooking two or more things at once. 

IX. When baking or cooking a meal, cook several things at 
once. A whole dinner may be prepared in the oven by having a 
roast, etc., and baked potatoes, vegetables en casserole, and a baked 
dessert. 

X. Although the heat should be turned on an oven (both 
burners) five or ten minutes before using — in most cases one 
burner may be turned off or both burners turned lower, after food 
is placed within. 

XL Every good cook should have a chemical thermometer to 
test oven heat, and this is more easily done when the stove has a 
glass front as opening the oven door causes a drop in temperature. 
There is no such thing as "luck" in cooking. If the conditions are 
controlled by the house-wife as they should be, the results will al- 
ways be the same. ^ 



THE TEMPERATURE TABLE. 
Copy and Hang on Wall Near Stove. 
Product to be Baked. Range of Temperature Over Which It 

May be Baked. 
Biscuits, baking powder.. 400 F. to 500° F. 

Bread 350° F. to 450° F. (Begin low and raise 

temperature rapidly, reducing again, or 
begin high and reduce sharply.) 



32 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



Cakes 300 F. to 400 F., according to size. Or, 

Angel Food put a six-egg cake (turk's-head pan) into 

400' F. oven ; when it begins to brown, 
turn gas out for 5 to 10 minutes, then 
raise to 330 F., then at last to 370' F. 
(These temperatures are approximate and 
cannot be expected to fit all cases exactly.) 

Cookies 375° F. to 400 F. 

Cup Cakes 300 F. to 400° F. 

Ginger Bread 370 F. to 400° F. 

Layer Cake 300° F. to 400° F. (Begin low, raise grad- 
ually.) 

Loaf Cake 280° F. to 375° F. (Begin low, raise tem- 
perature very gradually at first, then more 
rapidly.) 

Sponge Cake 300° F. to 400 F. (See angel food.) 

Custard 250° F. to 350° F. (Or set in pan of hot 

water, and use 350 F. to 450 F. oven 
temperature.) 

Meat, Roasted 400° F. to 500° F., then 350 F. to 250° F. 

(Sear at the highest temperature men- 
tioned or else in heavy kettle or skillet on 
top of range, reduce sharply and finish at 
a lower temperature.) 

Muffins 400 F. to 450° F. 

Pastry (no filling) 450° F. to 550° F. 

Pies (uncooked filling) . .450° F. to 400 F. (Put into hot oven, 

lower when it begins to color.) 

Popovers 450° F. to 350 F. 

Potatoes 400° F. to 500° F. (or at lower tempera- 
tures, increasing the time according to the 
reduction in temperatures.) 

Puddings 350° F. to 400° F. (If high in eggs or milk, 

bake like custard.) 

Rolls 400° F. to 450° F. 

Souffle 350° F. to 400 F. (See custard.) 

From December, 1920, "Journal of Home Economics". 
Issued U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

COOKING BY RULE. 

Measure! Whether by cup or spoon the only sure way to secure 
success is by accurate measurement. 

All measures should be lerel and only standard vessels used. 
Only an experienced house-keeper repeating her own recipes, can 
measure by eye, or by weight of an object in her hand. 

It is necessary to have in every kitchen a set of measures 
(quart, pint and half -pint; graduated measures divided into 
quarters, halves and thirds are best). For liquids a glass cup 



TIME TABLE FOR COOKING 33 



divided and marked on the outside in iA-V2-% and 1 cup, one side 

of the cup ; while on the other is marked 1/3, 2/3 and 1 cup, Avill 

eliminate guess work. 

A set of accurate scales is an absolute necessity in the kitchen 
A set of aluminum measuring spoons are necessary. They 

measure 1 tbls., 1 t-spoon, 1/2 t-spoon and l^ t-spoon. 

WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

4 tbls 1 wineglass 4 cups sifted flour 1 lb. 

4 wineglasses 1 cup 9 large eggs 1 lb. 

1 cup 1 pint 2 cups granulated sugar . . 1 lb. 

4 cups 1 quart 21/2 cups powdered sugar . . 1 lb. 

3 t-spoons liquid 1 tbls. 2 tbls. butter (level) 1 oz. 

1 gill Yz cup 4 level tbls. flour 1 oz. 

16 tbls. liquid 1 cup 2 cups butter (solid) 1 lb. 

3 tbls. grated choc 1 oz. 1 qt. sifted corn meal . 1 lb. 1 oz. 

BOILING. 

Corned meats 4 to 6 hours 

Ox tongue 3 to 4 hours 

Ham — 12 to 14 lbs 4 to 5 hours 

Turkey— 10 lbs 3 to 31/2 hours 

Fowl — 4 to 5 lbs 4 to 5 hours 

Chicken — 3 lbs 1 to li/o hours 

Fish — 2 to 5 lbs 30 to 45 minutes 

Lobster 25 to 30 minutes 

Asparagus 20 to 30 minutes 

Beans, shell, string or snap 1 to 3 hours 

Beets, young 50 minutes 

Beets, old 3 to 4 hours 

Brussels sprouts 15 to 20 minutes 

Cabbage 35 to 60 minutes 

Carrots 1 hour 

Cauliflower 25 to 30 minutes 

Corn 12 to 20 minutes 

Macaroni 25 to 30 minutes 

Turnips and parsnips 30 to 45 minutes 

Onions 45 to 60 minutes 

Spinach 15 to 20 minutes 

Tomatoes, stewed 15 to 20 minutes 

Rice 20 to 30 minutes 

BROILING. 

Steak — 1 inch 4 to 10 minutes 

Steak — 11/2 inch thick 8 to 12 minutes 

Lamb or mutton chops 6 to 10 minutes 

Chicken 20 minutes 

Quails 8 minutes 

Squabs 10 to 12 minutes 

Shad, white fish and blue fish 15 to 20 minutes 



34 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUE COOK BOOK 



Fish, slices 12 to 15 minutes 

Liver 4 to 5 minutes 

TIME TABLE FOR COOKING. 
BAKING. 

Mutton, leg rare per pound 10 minutes 

Mutton, forequarter " " 15 to 25 minutes. 

Mutton, leg, well done " " 14 to 20 minutes 

Lamb, well done " " 15 to 20 minutes 

Beef, loin or ribs, rare " " 8 to 10 minutes 

Beef, loin or ribs, well done " " 12 to 16 minutes 

Beef, ribs, rolled, rare " " 12 to 15 minutes 

Beef, ribs, rolled, well done " " 15 to 18 minutes 

Beef, fillet, rare " " 20 to 30 minutes 

Veal, well done " " 18 to 22 minutes 

Pork, well done " " 20 to 25 minutes 

Chicken " " 15 to 20 minutes 

Turkey — 9 lbs 3 hours 

Goose — 9 lbs 21/2 hours 

Duck, domestic 1 to II/4, hours 

Duck, wild 20 to 30 minutes 

Ham, whole 4 to 6 hours 

Fish — 3 to 4 lbs 45 to 60 minutes 

Small fish and fillets 20 minutes 

Bread, white — loaf 45 to 60 minutes 

Graham, loaf 35 to 45 minutes 

Baking powder biscuits 12 to 15 minutes 

Gems or muffins 25 to 30 minutes 

Cookies 8 to 10 minutes 

Gingerbread 20 to 30 minutes 

Cake, sponge 45 to 60 minutes 

Cake, layer 20 to 30 minutes 

Cake, loaf 40 to 60 minutes 

Cake, fruit 2 to 3 hours 

Cake, wedding 3 to 5 hours 

Cake, small 15 to 25 minutes 

Pies 30 to 50 minutes 

Tarts 15 to 20 minutes 

Patties 15 to 25 minutes 

Pudding, rice or tapioca 1 hour 

Puddings, bread 45 to 60 minutes 

Scallop dishes 15 to 20 minutes 

Custard 35 to 45 minutes 

Custard in cups 20 to 25 minutes 

FRYING. 

Smelts and other small fish 3 to 5 minutes 

Breaded chops 5 to 8 minutes 



BALANCED MEALS 35 



Potatoes, raw 4 to 8 minutes 

Fish balls and croquettes 1 minute 

Muffins, fritters and doughnuts 3 to 5 minutes 

Eggs, hard boiled 10 minutes 

Eggs, soft boiled 31/2 to 4 minutes 

EVERY MEAL SHOULD CONTAIN. 

1 protein dish( meats). 

2 carbohydrate dishes (bread and cereals). 
1 mineral dish (green vegetable). 

1 fat dish (butter, etc.). 
1 water dish (beverage). 

TO HAVE A BALANCED MEAL. 

Plan your menus for the day with this in mind if it is not 
possible to give all the values at one meal. 

PROTEINS— Milk, Meat, Eggs, Poultry, Fish, Cheese, Le- 
gumes, Nuts and Cereals. 

CARBOHYDRATES— Cereals, Potatoes, Rice, Bananas, 
Breads, Macaroni and Tapioca. 

MINERALS — Fruits, Green vegetables. Tomatoes, Cauliflower, 
Cabbage and Onions. 

FATS — Cream, Butter, Oleo, Meat fats. Vegetable fats and Nut 
oils. 

Milk should have a part in the meals every day. It is an es- 
sential for adults as well as children. 

Food supplying vitamins — necessary elements for health are 
Milk, Whole grain. Legumes, Spinach, Cabbage, Onions, Carrots, 
Turnips, Beets, Tomatoes, Oranges and Eggs. 
Miss M. P. Means, Instructor Home Economics Girl's High School. 




CHAPTER VIII. 



Mrs. 



BREAKFASTS. 

FRUITS IN SEASON. 
Norman Sharp — Chairman City Market. 



Most essential from the standpoint of hygiene is the inclusion 
of fruit in the daily diet, and this in Atlanta is a simple matter, for 
farmers supplying Atlanta's Municipal Curb Market furnish a con- 
tinuous rotation of fruits during the entire year. 

Beginning with the early spring the strawberry is the first 
and one of the most delightful fruits. Strawberries are 
usually served with cream and sugar and are delightful appetizers, 
with which to begin the breakfast menu. Following the straw- 
berry come the no less popular raspberry and blackberry which 
are served with cream and sugar as the first course. The dew- 
berry, a species of blackberry, is popular also. Cherries served 
on individual platters with the stems on make an attractive break- 
fast dish. 

The Georgia peach, famous the world over is well adapted foi 
a breakfast fruit. An attractive breakfast is served with whole 
peeled peaches on individual platters, in the center of which is a 
sugar bowl surrounded with peeled peaches and garnished with 
green peach leaves. 

Then comes the cantaloupe and honey-dew melon, which may 
be served in many artistic and attractive ways — peeled, halved and 
served with crushed ice is one of the most practical methods of 
serving cantaloupe as a breakfast fruit. Some enjoy iced water- 
melon also, a fruit for which Georgia is famous. Figs peeled and 
served whole with cream and sugar constitute a delicious breakfast 
course. Later come the plum and grape, which are served most 
attractively in a large fruit bowl, which graces the center of the 
breakfast table and is passed and served from individually. Scup- 



BREAKFAST 37 

pernongs, a light green, and muscadines, a purple brown, are thick 
skinned and resemble grapes. 

For the fall and winter breakfast the apple reigns supreme and 
may be prepared in a variety of appetizing ways. Perhaps the most 
popular is the baked apple. Apple sauce is another favorite 
Southern breakfast course. To prepare, peel apples, quarter 
and stew until tender with a few slices of lemon ; after which rub 
through colander with spices, sweeten to taste and serve cold with 
or without cream. 

During the winter months Georgia calls on her sister state, 
Florida, for grapefruit and oranges, which may be served in many 
ways and are used extensively for breakfast menus. 



BREAKFAST CEREALS, 

Mrs. J. A. Carlisle, Chairman Cook Book. 

Of the many varieties of cereals, all are lacking in fats, so they 
are more nutritious if butter or cream and sugar are served with 
the cooked cereals (only cream and sugar with the uncooked) . Most 
cooked cereals are very indigestible if cooked less than one hour. 
When preparing the evening meal, cook cereal in a double boiler 
for an hour or more, then place (covered) on back of stove. Next 
morning add boiling water to lower boiler and upper boiler if cereal 
is too thick. Cook 10 to 15 minutes and serve. 

Rolled or Quaker Oats should be put to cook in boiling salted 
water,proportions 1 t-spoon of salt to 1 qt. of water, and will cook 
quicker if soaked over night in cold water. To keep out insects, 
when cereals are opened contents should be placed in glass fruit 
jars with lids screwed on tightly. 

OATMEAL— ROLLED OR QUAKER OATS. 
1 cup oats or oatmeal. 3 cups boiling water. 

1/2 t-spoon salt, 
'stir oats and salt gradually in boiling water. If cooked ovei 
direct heat, cook slowly, (stirring occasionally) about 40 minutes 
or cook in double boiler one to two hours. May be placed in fire- 
less cooker over night. 

CREAM OF WHEAT. 
1/2 cup cream of wheat. 21/2 cups water. 

1/2 t-spoon salt. 

Add salt to boiling water, stir in cream of wheat and continue 
stirring a few moments to prevent lumping. Cook slowly over 
direct heat 20 minutes or more, or in double boiler one hour or 
more. Can be placed in tireless cooker three or four hours. Serve 
with cream and sugar. 



38 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



FINE HOMINY OR GRITS— SOUTHERN. 
Grits, like corn meal, absorb a great deal of water in cooking. 
Cook as other cereals or leave in fireless cooker over night. May 
be eaten with butter or gravy. Pack while warm in one-pound 
baking powder cans, cool, turn out and cut in slices, dip in flour, 
saute in bacon drippings a golden brown. Serve bacon crisp on 
hominy slices for breakfast. 

STEAMED RICE. 
1 cup rice. 3 cups water. 

1 t-spoon salt. 

Wash rice and pour slowly in water boiling briskly. Add salt 
and cook until grains are tender, drain in colander, serve with sugai 
and cream, raisins may be added. Rice should be cooked in double 
boiler. 

BAKED SHREDDED WHEAT. 

Shredded wheat is delicious, when divided into two parts by a 
sharp knife, each part being buttered, placed in the oven and 
heated till crisp. It tastes very much like pop-corn, and may be 
eaten as a sandwich or with milk and sugar. 

Mrs. Newton C. Wing. 



ONE OF MRS. THORNTON'S FAVORITE BREAKFAST 

DISHES. 

1 cup meal. II/2 cups well cooked grits or 

1/2 cup boiling water. hominy. 

1 tbls. Royal baking powder. 1 cup milk. 
Butter size of walnut. 3 eggs. 

Salt to taste. 

Put in mixing bowl butter, salt, meal, hominy and milk ; mash 
fine, beat a few minutes, then stir in hot water. Add eggs, baking 
powder and beat well. Bake in shallow pan. 

Mrs. Albert Thornton, 
Pres. Atlanta City Federation Women's Clubs. 

A NEW ENGLAND BREAKFAST. 

Apple sauce. 

Fish balls and bacon. Fried Indian pudding. 

Maple syrup. Coffee. 

FISH BALLS. 

1 cup cod fish. 1 egg. 

2 cups mashed potatoes. 1 lump butter. 

Freshen cod fish slightly and cook, about a minute ; chop 
fine. Beat all ingredients together till well blended, and sea- 
son. Form into cakes, dip into meal and fry in bacon or fat. 



BREAKFAST 39 



FRIED INDIAN PUDDING. 

1 qt. water. 1 tbls. flour. 

1 cup Indian meal (yellow). 

Into a quart of boiling water, turn in slowly the meal 
stirring constantly. 1 tbls. flour added, will help hold it together, 
when later it is sliced for frying. It should cook slowly 20 minutes ; 
then pour out in wide shallow pan. 

Mrs. J. C. Wing, 
Palmer, Mass. 




BREAD, BATTER CAKES AND WAFFLES. 

Mrs. Frank Daub — Chairman. 

SHE BAKES THE BREAD 

It's happy every mornin', 

Every evenin' I will be, 
For I hoe the corn for Sally 

And she bakes the bread for me ! 

Frank L. Stanton. 

BREADS. 

Quick breads should be made as rapidly as possible and cooked 
at once. Where soda is used in a recipe, add it to the other dry in- 
gredients. Flour should be sifted before measuring. Serve hot 
breads in a folded napkin on a plate. 

M. P. Means. 

KENTUCKY BUTTERMILK BISCUIT. 
1 qt. flour. 1 t-spoon soda. 

1 t-spoon salt. 2 tbls. lard. 

Sift flour, mix soda and salt well with flour, work in lard, poui 
in buttermilk to make soft dough. Roll thin, cut and bake in hot 
oven. 

Mrs. W. B. Price-Smith. 
Auditorium Chairman. 

BREAD. 
Never Fail, or Milk Bread. 

2 cups water. 3 tbls. sugar. 

1 cake yeast. 1 tbls. salt. 

2 cups milk. 1 tbls. lard. 

Boil all together. When cool, add yeast dissolved in 1/2 cup 
luke warm water. Stir in from five to seven cups flour or enough to 
make a good dough, set in warm place over night. Next morning 



BREAD, BATTER CAKES AND WAFFLES 41 



knead for 15 or 20 minutes. Mould into loaves and let rise again 
Bake about 40 minutes in moderate oven. 

Mrs. Edwin Beaver. 

VIRGINIA SALT RISING BREAD 
3 qts. sifted flour. 1 tbls. lard. 

1 cup milk. 2 cups water. 

1 tbls. sugar. 1 tbls. salt. 

Put two cups boiling water in pitcher. Add milk, sugar, 3 
cups flour and 1 t-spoon salt. Stir well. Cover pitcher and set 
in pan of moderately warm water 3 hours. Keep at uniform tem- 
perature. Beat well; afterwards do not disturb. In 2 hours it 
should be light. Mix salt and lard in balance of flour. Pour 
yeast in this. If not sufficient to make moderately soft dough, add 
little more water; knead well and mold in loaves. Put in warm 
oven to rise. Bake slowly. 

Mrs. Bun Wylie. 

DELICIOUS SALT RISING BREAD, 
(should be made in hot weather). 
11/2 cups milk. 3 scant tbls. lard. 

2 qts. flour. 1 tbls. salt. 

1/3 cup corn meal. 1 cup boiling water. 

Scald meal with V^ cup hot milk. Stand mixture over night in 
covered bowl, then add 1/2 cup boiling water and 1/2 cup milk mixed. 
Stir well and thicken to consistency of waffle batter with part of 
flour. Set in sun about 21/2 hours. Put salt, sugar and shortening 
in balance flour. Add above yeast with 1/2 cup milk and V2 cup 
boiling water ; rinse the bowl, from which the yeast was emptied 
and add to mixture. Be sure to knead bread well. Mold in loaves 
set in sun to rise until level with top of pan. Bake in moderate oven. 

Mrs. T. D. Longino. 

ROLLED OATS BREAD (NEW ENGLAND RECIPE). 
2 cups boiling water. 2 tbls. Crisco or lard. 

1 cup rolled oats. 2 t-spoons salt. 

1/2 cup molasses, 1 yeast cake dissolved in 1/2 cup 

Flour. luke warm water. 

Add boiling water to rolled oats and allow to stand one hour. 
Add molasses, salt, shortening and dissolve yeast cake. Add flour 
to make stiff dough, knead well, let rise. Knead very little. Divide 
into two bread pans, let rise again, bake 40 minutes in moderate 
oven. Enough for two small loaves. 

Mrs. Rowland T. Cresse. 

Boston, Mass. 

NORWEGIAN SWEETBREAD. 

1 cake fresh yeast. 1 cup of sugar. 

2 tbls. of sugar. Season well with cinnamon. 

3 t-spoons of salt. 1 fresh egg well beaten. 



42 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



1 large tbls. of lard. Half a citron cut in medium 

4 cups of water. size pieces. 

Flour enough to make stiff A handfull of large raisins cut 

dough. in half. 

When risen work over and add, 1 tbls. full of butter or lard. 

This takes longer to rise than plain bread. When about to 
brown, brush with lard, and sprinkle with sugar and cinnamon. 

This is a delicious bread and a favorite in Norway. When 
stale may be toasted and served for breakfast. 

Lollie Belle Wylie. 

FAMOUS VIRGINIA SPOON BREAD. 

1 pt. corn meal (scalded). 4 eggs. 

2 tbls butter. 1 t-spoon soda. 

1 qt. buttermilk. 1/2 t-spoon baking powder. 
Salt to taste. 

Thin the scalded meal to consistency of a batter for cakes 
with the buttermilk. Melt butter in pan in which bread is to be 
baked ; add, with salt, to mixture. After stirring well, pour into hot 
pan and bake quickly in hot oven. When well browned, serve hot 
from pan with spoon. Hence the name "Spoon Bread." 

I. H. Goss, M. D. 
President Medical Society, Athens, Ga. 

NUT BREAD NO. I. 

2 cups flour. 1 cup chopped nuts. 

2 t-spoon Royal baking powder 1 egg. 

1/2 cup sugar. % cup milk. 

1/2 t-spoon salt. 

Combine flour, sugar, nuts, salt and baking powder ; add milk, 
and well beaten egg. Let stand in pan 20 minutes. Bake in m.od- 
erately hot oven one-half hour. 

Mrs, Andrew P. Stewart. 

NUT BREAD NO II. 

3 cups flour. 1 cup sugar. 
1 cup nuts. 1 egg. 

1 cup milk. 1 t-spoon baking powder. 

Butter size of egg. 1 t-spoon salt. 

Combine flour, baking powder, sugar, and nuts. Beat eggs 
lightly ; add milk and butter. 

Miss Pattie James, 

Hamilton, Ga. 

NUT BREAD NO. III. 

4 cups flour. 1% cups milk. 
11/2 cups chopped pecans. 1 egg. 

1 cup sugar. 1 t-spoon salt. 

4 t-spoons Royal baking pow- 
der. 



BREAD, BATTER CAKES AND WAFFLES 43 



Combine flour, sugar, nuts, salt and baking powder, add milk 
and well beaten egg. Let stand in pans fifteen minutes. Bake 
forty minutes in slow oven. This makes two loaves. 

Mrs. L. R. Wright. 

WALNUT BREAD. 
1 egg. 1 cup suga^. 

1 cup milk. 2 t-spoons salt. 

4 cups flour. 4 t-spoons baking powder. 

2 cups chopped black walnuts. 

Combine flour, sugar, nuts, salt and baking powder, add milk 
and well beaten egg. Let rise in pans 20 minutes. Bake 45 minutes 
in hot oven, standing in pan of w^ater. Keep covered first 15 min- 
utes. 

Mrs. Edgar Barett. 

BOSTON BROWN BREAD. 
1 cup flour. 1 cup buttermilk. 

1 cup corn meal. 1 t-spoon soda. 

1 cup graham flour. 1 pinch salt. 

1 cup black molasses. 1 pinch cloves or other spice. 

Combine soda, salt and spice in the flours ; sift all together. 
Add buttermilk and molasses, put in greased baking powder cans, 
cover with their own tops, and steam for two hours, letting the 
water come to within an inch of the top. Cover the vessel in which 
the bread is steamed, replenishing the water around the cans, when 
necessary. A cup of blackberry jam added to the batter is delicious. 

Mrs. Alonzo Richardson, 
State Chairman of Citizenship. Vice-Pres. Atlanta Woman's Club. 

JOHNNY CAKE. 

(delicious). 
1 pt. buttermilk. 1/2 cup flour. 

11/2 cups corn meal (sifted). 2 eggs. 

1 t-spoon salt. 2 tbls. sugar. 

1 t-spoon soda. 2 level tbls. shortening. 

Combine meal, flour, salt and sugar; rub shortening in mix- 
ture with fingers, add well beaten eggs, then milk in which soda is 
dissolved. Stir all together and beat with egg beater 3 minutes. 
Bake in large pan in moderate oven 1 hour. 

Mrs. Charles Myers. 

DATE BREAD. 
11/^ packages dates. 1 cup English walnut meats. 

1 cup sugar. 4 eggs. 

4 t-spoon baking powder. 1 pinch of salt. 

3 cups flour measured before 1 t-spoon vanilla. 

sifting. 
Beat eggs thoroughly and cream with sugar. Mix flour and 
baking powder add to mixture. Chop walnuts and cut dates into 



44 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



small pieces, stir into mixture, add salt and vanilla. Bake slowly 
one hour. 

Mrs. Virlyn B. Moore, 

Bolton, Ga. 
RAISIN BREAD. 
2 yeast cakes. 1 t-spoon salt, 

1 cup milk. 1 cup seeded raisins. 

2/3 cup Snowdrift. 1 egg. 

1/2 cup water. Flour (Capitola). 

1 tbls. sugar. 

Dissolve yeast cake in 1/2 cup warm water. Add sugar, salt 
and Snowdrift to milk ; warm until Snowdrift melts. Add to this 
the yeast dissolved in warm water, the well beaten egg and suf- 
ficient flour to make drop batter. Cover and set in warm 
place to rise about 4 hours. Add raisins well floured and flour 
enough to make stiff dough. Mold into 2 loaves that fit nicely 
in pans. Set to rise about an hour. Bake in moderate oven. 

Mrs. F. S. Hall. 

CxINGER BREAD. (1865). 

2 cups syrup. 1 t-spoon soda. 

1 cup lard and butter mixed. 1 cup hot water. 
1 qt. sifted flour. Spices. 

Heat lard and butter together until melted. Pour this over 
the flour mixing well. Add spices to taste — preferably ginger and 
cinnamon. Add the hot water, in which the soda has been dissolved. 
Bake in paper lined biscuit pan, well greased. May be eaten hot, 
served with hard butter, or liquid sauce. 

Mrs. Edward H. Barnes. 

MILK BREAD, (four small loaves) . 
1 qt. milk, scalded. 3 tbls. lard. 

1 cake compressed yeast. 3 qts. sifted flour. 

2 tbls. sugar, 1 t-spoon salt. 

Put into quart measure, the lard, salt and one cup boiling 
water; fill with scalded milk ; let cool until luke warm ; stir and pour 
into bread maker, keeping back just enough liquid to dissolve yeast, 
add the dissolved yeast to other liquids, lastly the sifted flour. 
If bread mixer is used turn the crank three minutes, or until dough 
forms into a ball around the kneading rod. Cover, set away to 
rise. After rising, turn crank until the dough forms a ball around 
the kneader; lift out. Cut into four pieces, put in four greased 
baking tins. Let rise about an hour. When raised to top of 
pans, brush top of loaves with milk. Light burners of gas stove; 
after five minutes put bread in and after both burners are on for 
ten minutes, shut off one burner and let other burner on full for 
five minutes more; then turn off half way for five minutes; then 
turn off entirely, but leave bread in oven till cool. Have gas burn- 
ing for 25 minutes onlv. 

Mrs. W. Frank Daub, 



BREAD, BATTER CAKES AND WAFFLES 45 



SOUTHERN BEATEN BISCUIT. 

1 qt. unsifted flour. 1/2 t-spoon Royal baking pow- 

1 t-spoon sugar. der. 

Equal parts ice-water and milk. 1 t-spoon salt. 

1/2 cup lard. 

Sift flour, baking powder, sugar and salt together. Rub 
lard into flour thoroughly. Add gradually equal parts of milk 
and ice-water, just enough to make a very stiff dough. (Almost 
dry). Work on a kneader, or beat with a mallet until the dough 
is smooth and glossy. This will require at least 1/2 hour. Roll 
out about 1/4 inch thick. Cut and pierce with fork. Start cooking 
in moderate oven, gradually increasing heat. In about 30 minutes 
biscuit should be light brown. Turn off heat or allow biscuit to 
stand in warm oven about 20 minutes to dry out thoroughly. 

Mrs. W. M. Seay. 

EMERGENCY BISCUIT. 
3 cups self rising flour. 2 tbls. melted butter. 

11/2 cups milk. 

After sifting flour rub in butter and add milk. Beat into a 
soft dough and drop with tablespoon a good inch apart into well 
greased baking pan. Bake in hot oven. 

Mrs. James R. Bachman, 

Kirkwood, Ga. 

BRAN BISCUIT. 
1 cup of bran. 1 cup of flour. 

1 t-spoon soda. 1/2 cup of sour milk. 

14 cup of butter. 1/2 t-spoon salt. 

Sift soda into flour, add salt, mix butter well into this; add 
bran, stir in milk, mix well and bake. 

Mrs. Hugh Willet, 
Chairman State Federation. 

SWEET POTATO BISCUIT. 

1 qt. flour. 3 t-spoons Royal baking pow- 

2 large sweet potatoes. der. 

1 cup sugar. Pinch of salt. 

2 t-spoons butter or substitute. Milk. 

Boil potatoes and mash adding sugar and butter. Sift flour, 
salt and baking powder, add potato mixture. Make into a soft 
dough with milk. Roll out and cut. Bake in moderately hot oven. 

Mrs. J. L. Minson. 

CHEESE BISCUIT. 
5/8 cup milk. 2 t-spoons Royal baking pow- 

6 tbls grated cheese. der. 

11/2 cups flour. 1 t-spoon shortening. 

14 t-spoon salt. 
Sift together baking powder, salt and flour: add shortening 



46 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



and cheese; slowly just enough milk to hold the dough together. 
Roll on flour board 1/2 inch thick ; cut with small biscuit cutter and 
bake 15 minutes. 

Mrs. Newton C. Wing. 

CREOLE QUICK ROLLS. 
1 yeast cake dissolved in 1 cup 1 cup sugar. 

tepid water. 1 cup of water in which pota- 

1 cup boiled Irish potatoes toes were boiled. 

(mashed). 
Combine above ingredients together well, let rise in warm place 
three hours. This mixture will keep in ice box several days and is 
used as one would use buttermilk to make biscuit. When ready to 
make rolls, break one egg in bowl, beating slightly, add one cup of 
this yeast mixture (dipping from bottom of bowl) 3 tbls. melted 
fat, 1 tbls. sugar (less if preferred) 1 t-spoon salt, enough flour to 
knead a little but not too stiff, roll out, cut with large size biscuit 
cutter, turn edges together, with dot of butter between making 
pocket book rolls. Let rise 2 hours, bake in moderately quick oven. 
This amount will serve six people. Double or triple the quantity for 
more, but never use more than two eggs. This will also make very 
good bread and rolls. 

Mrs. William Percy. 

ALLINE'S MUFFINS. 

2 cups flour. 2 tbls. sugar. 
2 eggs. V2 tbls. salt. 

1 cup milk. 2 t-spoon Royal baking powder. 

2 tbls. butter. 

Beat sugar and butter together, add whites and yolks of eggs 
beaten separately until light. Sift together flour, salt, and baking 
powder ; add this to first mixture. Fold in milk, but do not stir. 
Put in greased muffin pans. Bake about 15 minutes in hot oven. 
The delicacy of these muffins depends, upon the mixing and baking. 

Mrs. Edward H. Barnes. 

CHEESE STRAWS No. 1. 

1 lb. grated cheese. 1 cup butter and lard mixed. 
Dash of salt. Dash of red pepper. 

Flour enough to make a stiff 
dough. 
Roll thin and cut into strips. 

Mrs. Lela C. McKinney. 

CHEESE STRAWS NO. 2. 

14 lb. flour. Pinch of salt. 

2 oz. grated cheese. 2 oz. butter. 

1 egg yolk. Dash of cayenne pepper. 

Combine above ingredients to a paste with egg yolk. Roll thin 
one-third inch wide from three to five inches long. Straws may be 



BREAD, BATTER CAKES AND WAFFLES 47 



twisted if desired. Place on hot baking pan, cook in moderate oven 
light brown. 

Mrs. C. R. Hardy. 

POPOVERS. 
2 cups pastry flour. 2 cups milk. 

2 eggs. salt to taste. 

1 tbl. butter, 1 t-spoon baking powder. 

Beat together the flour, baking powder, milk and salt, break 
eggs into this mixture, stir well. Turn into a hot, well buttered, 
iron popover pan (Tin gem pans may be used) . Bake in a very hot 
oven twenty to twenty-five minutes. 

Mrs. Rupert E. Hall. 

VIRGINIA SALLY LUNN. 
1 qt. flour. 2 eggs. 

1 level t-spoon salt. 1/2 yeast cake. 

2 tbls. Snowdrift. 2 cups tepid water. 
2 tbls. sugar. Butter size of egg. 

Mix salt and Snowdrift in sifted flour. Dissolve yeast cake in 
tepid water to which has been added two tablespoons sugar. Mix 
thoroughly, adding yeast mixture enough to make dough soft as 
biscuit dough. Let rise four or five hours. Add the well beaten 
eggs and butter. Work well with the hand, put in greased tube cake 
pan, let rise until double in bulk. Bake from 35 to 40 minutes in 
gas oven with one burner. Finish baking with the one burner 
turned about half way off for 25 minutes. 

Mrs. J. M. Manry. 

SALLY LUNN MUFFINS. 
2 cups flour. 3 eggs. 

1 tbl. of sugar. 3 t-spoons Royal baking pow- 

1 cup milk. der. 

A little salt. i^ cup butter. 

Cream yolks, sugar, and butter together until light. Add 
flour. Beat whites until stiff, add, folding in until well mixed. 
Last of all add baking powder to batter, and stir in thoroughly. 
Bake at once in muffin tins. The above receipe makes the most de- 
licious Muffin Cakes, by adding one cup of sugar. 

Mrs. E. Rivers. 

GRAHAM MUFFINS. 

% cup graham flour. 1/4 cup corn meal. 

1 cup white flour. II/2 cups buttermilk. 

1/2 t-spoon salt. % t-spoon soda. 

Put in buttermilk, meal, graham and white flour, soda sifted 
with flour. Stir gently until stiff drop batter is formed. Bake in 
hot oven, in well greased muffin irons. 

Mrs. John Hardwick. 



48 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



SOUTHERN CORN BREAD. 
1 qt. meal. 1 t-spoon salt. 

3 tbls. lard. li/> cups butter milk. 

14 t-spoon soda. 1 cup water. 

Dissolve soda in buttermilk, add to meal with lard and salt- 
then add water to right consistency (add more water if necessary). 
Cook in hot oven. 

Mrs. J. H. Merritt. 

PARKER HOUSE CORN CAKE. 

1 cup flour. 14 cup sugar. 

1 cup corn meal. li/4 t-spoons cream of tartar. 

1 cup milk. 1 egg. 

1 t-spoon soda. Butter size of egg. 

Combine flour, corn meal, cream of tartar, soda and salt to- 
gether. In another bowl, mix egg, sugar, butter and milk ; add this 
to dry ingredients. Beat well and bake in greased muffin tins. A 
half cup of floured raisins may be added. 

Mrs. W. Frank Daub. 

VIRGINIA CORN PONES. 

1 pt. water ground meal. i/4 t-spoon soda. 

1 cup buttermilk. 1/2 t-spoon salt. 

1 tbls. lard. 

Sift meal, soda and salt, work in lard, then milk, work quickly, 
adding water enough to make soft dough. Make into pones with 
hands, put in hot greased pan, bake in hot oven twelve or fifteen 
minutes. 

Mrs. R. T. Bell, Sr. 

Lynchburg, Va. 

LIGHT ROLLS. 

% cake yeast. 1/2 cup tepid water. 

1/2 pt. milk. 1/2 pt. cold water. 

1 tbls. sugar. 1 tbls. lard. 

1 t-spoon salt. 

Soak yeast in tepid water while scalding milk, add lard and 
sugar to hot milk, then the cold water and salt, beat in enough floui 
to make stiff batter, add yeast cake, put in covered pail, stand in 
warm place and let rise for 2V2 hours. Knead in enough flour to 
make a light dough. Roll one half inch thick, spread with melted 
butter, cut with large biscuit cutter, fold half over, put in baking 
pan, cover, let rise in warm place 2l/> hours. Bake 20 minutes. 

Mrs. W. M. Jenkins, 

Smyrna, Ga. 

DOUGHNUTS. 
3 medium size Irish potatoes. 1 cup milk. 
3 cups sugar. 6 t-spoon Royal baking powder 

3 eggs. 2 qts. flour. 

Butter size of egg. 



BREAD, BATTER CAKES AND WAFFLES 49 



Cream together butter and sugar. Add well beaten eggs. Stir 
in potatoes boiled and mashed ; then add milk. Sift in flour, baking 
powder and nutmeg or cinnamon. Make into a stiff dough. Cut 
and fry in deep fat (Snowdrift). Drain on brown paper, then rol) 
in powdered sugar. This makes a large quantity but they keep well 

Mrs. John Z. Lawshe. 

DOUGHNUTS. 
1 cup sugar. 3 t-spoons Royal baking pow- 

1 cup milk. der. 

2 eggs. 1/2 t-spoon salt. 

1 t-spoon vanilla. 4 tbls. melted butter. 

3 cups flour sifted with 

Add sufficient flour to above mixture to roll out; fry in deep 
fat. Sugar while warm, 

Mrs. Fred J. Stilson. 

WAFFLES. 
1% cups flour. 2 eggs — yolks. 

3 t-spoons baking powder. 2 eggs — whites. 

1/2 t-spoon salt. 1 tbls. melted butter. 

1 cup milk. 

Combine and sift dry ingredients, add milk gradually, yolks of 
eggs beaten well, butter, whites of eggs beaten stiff. Cook on a 
greased waffle iron. Serve with maple syrup. Waffle iron should 
be well heated on one side, turned, heated on other side, and thor- 
oughly greased before iron is filled. In filling put a tablespoon full 
of mixture in each compartment near center of iron, cover, and 
mixture will spread to just fill iron. 

Mrs. Robert A. Sewell. 

SOUTHERN PLAIN WAFERS. 
1 pt. milk. 1 pt. flour. 

1 t-spoon baking powder. 1 tbls. butter. 

Sift baking powder with flour, cream flour and butter well, 
add milk gradually, salt to taste. Bake in wafer irons. When 
finished trim with scissors. 

Mrs. Hugh Willet. 

TRY THIS METHOD OF "PREPARING TOAST". 

Cut bread one half inch thick (or thickness desired) and put 
under flame in gas oven to brown slightly. (Browning process 
should be done quickly; be careful not to scorch.) Remove bread 
put a light spread of butter on one or both sides, return to oven un- 
til a golden brown. This is a little trouble, but toast is crisp and de- 
licious. 

Mr. George Ellis. 




CROQUETTES AND EGG DISHES. 

Mrs. Lee Hagan, Chairman. 

Eggs cooked at a low temperature (poached) are more quickly 
digested than eggs cooked at a high temperature (fried). Always 
buy yard or guaranteed eggs as these are cheaper in the end. Eggs 
may be served as a substitute for meat as they have similar food 
value. 

Miss M. P. Means. — Censor. 

' CHICKEN CROQUETTES A LA PIEDMONT. 

1 lb. ground cooked chicken. 2 tbls. butter. 
1 cup milk. 1 egg yolk. 

1 tbls. flour. 

Cream butter and flour together, add yolk, then milk. Cook 
all until thick. Mix with the chicken — season with salt and pepper 
to taste. Shape into balls — roll in flour — next in beaten egg and 
then in cracker crumbs. Fry in deep fat. 

Piedmont Driving Club. 

CHICKEN CROQUETTES. 

1 cup ground chicken. 1/2 cup cracker or bread crumbs 

1 tbls. melted butter. 



2 eggs well beaten 
Season to taste. 

Mix all together, making into cakes. 



Fry in boiling lard. 
Mrs. Charles Ray. 



VEAL CROQUETTES. 

2 cups cooked veal. Season with onion, salt and pep- 

1 egg. per to taste. 

1 cup white sauce. 

Mix all together, making into balls, 
in cracker crumbs. Fry in hot lard. 

Mrs. O. R. Williams. 



Dip in beaten eggs — then 



CROQUETTES AND EGG DISHES 51 



GREEN CORN CROQUETTES. 
1/2 dozen ears grated corn. 1 cup flour. 

1 cup milk. Pepper and salt to taste. 

4 tbls. butter. 3 eggs. 

Warm the milk and butter, add the corn. When cold, add eggs 
well beaten. Make into balls. Fry in hot lard. 

Mrs. O. C. Fuller. 

SALMON CROQUETTES. 

1 large can salmon. 1 cup milk. 

3 tbls. butter. 2 tbls. flour. 

2 eggs. 1/2 cup bread crumbs. 
Salt, pepper and lemon juice to 

taste. 
Mix butter and flour together. When milk begins to boil, stii 
in flour, butter, salmon and seasoning. Boil up for two minutes. 
Then stir in eggs well beaten. When cold, shape up and fry in hot 
fat. 

Mrs. J. Ben L-Gette. 

BANANA CROQUETTES. 

4 ripe sound bananas. 1 egg. 

1/2 lemon. Pinch salt. 

Cut bananas in four parts lengthwise. Mix beaten eggs with 
lemon juice and salt. Dip bananas in the mixture and then roll in 
cracker crumbs. Fry in deep fat — drain on brown paper and sprin- 
kle with powdered sugar. 

Mrs. Lee Hagan. 

NUT AND POTATO CROQUETTES. 

1 cup black walnut meats. 1 cup mashed potatoes. 

2 eggs. 1 cup bread crumbs. 

Chop walnut meats coarsely, mix with the potatoes mashed and 
seasoned. Have bread crumbs soft and stir in with well beaten 
eggs; mould into croquettes. Dip each one in beaten egg, roll in 
fine crumbs and fry in deep hot fat. 

Mrs. E. O. Pritchard. 

BRAIN CROQUETTES. 
1 set brains. 3 eggs. 

1 cup cracker crumbs. Salt and pepper to taste. 
Parboil brains twenty minutes; drain. Stir into them the 

cracker crumbs and the well beaten eggs. Make into cakes, roll in 
eggs and then in cracker crumbs. Fry in boiling lard. Garnish 
with parsley. 

Mrs. D. R. Wilder. 

VEAL CROQUETTES. (Original). 

2 lbs. lean veal. 1 cup white sauce. 
1/2 t-spoon black pepper. 1 tbls. salt. 

1 t-spoon chopped parsley. V^ t-spoon celery seed. 

1 egg. Bread crumbs. 



52 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



Cook veal until very tender, then run through meat choppei 
and mix with white sauce and seasoning. Roll into any shape de- 
sired and dip in egg and then in browned bread crumbs. Fry in bas- 
ket in deep fat. 

Mrs. E. B. Havis, Jr. 

MEAT CROQUETTES. 
1 cup cold meat. 1 egg. 

1 cup milk. 1 bell pepper. 

1/4 t-spoon salt. 2 tbls. flour. 

1/8 t-spoon pepper. 2 tbls. butter. 

Grind any kind of cold meat, cream butter, flour, salt and pep- 
per together, warm milk and pour on creamed mixture cook in dou- 
ble boiler until real stiff, add cold meat and chopped pepper, mix 
well and drop on platter to harden. When ready to cook dip in 
beaten egg roll in cracker crumbs, and fry quickly in deep fat. 
Drain on brown paper, and serve garnished with parsley. 

Mrs. Jesse M. Manry. 

MEAT CROQUETTES. 
Fish or meat. Cracker crumbs or corn meal. 

Rice. Salt. 

1 well beaten egg. Pepper. 

Take equal parts of ground meat, and rice, 1 well beaten egg, 
salt and pepper to taste. Dip in beaten eggs and roll in cracker 
crumbs or corn meal. Fry in hot fat. Drain on paper. Cream.ed 
peas are lovely with croquettes. 

Mrs. Tom. Germany. 

BEEF CROQUETTES. 
1 pt. chopped cold beef. Pepper and salt to taste. 

i/o pt. hot boiled rice. 

Bind with white sauce and fry. Serve with tomato or brown 
sauce. 

Mrs. Le-Roy Gregory. 

RICE CROQUETTES. 
1 cup boiled rice. 2 eggs well beaten and salted. 

1/2 cup cracker or bread crumbs 

Mix rice and crumbs in eggs, make into balls and fry in boiling 
lard. When done, place for a few minutes on brown paper. 

Mrs. O. L. Jernigan. 

EGGS AU BECHAMEL. 
1 tbls. butter. 1 tbls. flour. 

1/2 cup thin cream. 1/2 cup chicken broth. 

3 hard boiled eggs. Salt and pepper to taste. 

Mix butter and flour together until smooth, add the cream 
chicken broth and seasoning, cook until thick, pour sauce over brown 



CROQUETTES AND EGG DISHES 53 



toast, then the hard boiled eggs, which have been put through 
colander, next minced bacon on top. Serve hot. 

From Tea-Room Chamberlin-Johnson-DuBose Co. 

HAM OMELET. 
11/2 tbls. corn starch. 1 cup milk. 

1 tbls. butter. 3 eggs. 

1/2 cup minced ham. 
" Stir corn starch in the milk, add beaten eggs and ham. Bea1 
all together. Melt butter in omelet pan and cook. Serve hot. 

Mrs. Chas. McCarty. 

OMELET FOR TWO. 

4 eggs. 4 tbls. warm water. 
1/2 t-spoon salt. A dash of pepper. 

'Break eggs into round bottom bowl. Add seasoning and water. 
Beat rapidly with dover beater until light and foamy. Turn into 
cooking pan and as one part cooks, slip knife under that portion, 
lift it to let soft portion run under and so continue until only the 
bubbly top remains uncooked. Place in moderately hot oven to 
"set" the top. With left hand tilt the pan and with knife in right 
hand fold and turn at the same time into the platter. Serve in- 
stantly. 

Mrs. Robert Andoe. 

BEEF OMELET. 
1 lb. round steak (ground). 4 beaten eggs. 

1 cup bread crumbs. 

Add salt, pepper to taste and a little nutmeg; add enough 
whole milk to make the mixture the consistency of stiff cream 
sauce. Put 3 tbls. of butter or breakfast bacon fat in hot skillet. 
Turn in mixture and scramble until brown. Serve hot. To any 
omelet left, add cream sauce and serve for another meal ; this with 
scallopped tomatoes and potatoes au gratin make a delicious lun- 
cheon. 

Mrs. Paul Dismukes, 

Columbus, Ga. 

MILK AND EGG OMELET. 

5 eggs. 1/2 cup milk. 
1/2 cup bread pieces, not ground 1 tbls. fat. 

Pour into frying pan the grease, either bacon, butter, cooking 
oil or fat, (use twice as much, if hinged omelet pan is used). Soak 
in milk, for a few minutes, the pieces of bread. Add to beaten 
eggs the milk and bread ; season to taste with salt and pepper and 
pour all into frying pan when it is very hot, reducing the heat as 
soon as it is in. Keep it from sti<!king to the sides, with a silver 
knife, occasionally tilting pan slightly so that liquid parts will run 
underneath and cook. Fold one part over on the other while it is 
still soft, turn out on hot platter, garnish and serve. The trick of 



54 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 

an omelet is to have just the right amount of grease, or else it will 
stick if too little is used or be watery if too much. Bread may be 
omitted, if a smaller omelet is desired, and more milk may be used. 

Mrs, Newton C. Wing, 
Chairman Home Economics. 

TOMATO OMELET. 

5 eggs. 1/^ cup canned tomatoes. 
1/2 cup bread pieces. 2 tbls. fat. 

If possible, use regular omelet pan for this, i. e., one that is 
hinged in center. Divide amount of bacon grease, butter, lard or 
butter substitute, putting half in each side of omelet pan. When 
bubbling hot, pour in an equal amount on each side, of the eggs, 
beaten ; the tomatoes, in which have been soaked the small pieces 
of bread for several minutes and salt and pepper to taste. A? 
soon as the mixture is in it requires less heat. With a silver knife, 
keep it from sticking to the sides and also tilt pan slightly, to allow 
the more liquid parts to get underneath. While still soft, turn one 
half of the omelet over on top of the other half, then turn out on hot 
platter and garnish with parsley ; serve. 

Mrs. Newton C. Wing, 
Chairman Home Economics. 

FLUFFY OMELET. 
4 eggs. 4 tbls. water. 

2 tbls. butter. Salt and pepper to taste. 

Separate eggs, beat yolks, add salt, pepper and water. Fck: 
in the beaten egg whites, to which a little salt has been added. 
Melt butter in hot omelet pan — turn in egg and spread evenly over 
pan. Shake gently just above the flame until the omelet is slightly 
brown. Set in the oven and cook top. It is done when knife thrust 
into the center, comes out without the egg adhering. Fold to- 
gether and turn out on a hot plate. Garnish with parsley. Serve 
at once. 

Mrs. J. B. Dinwiddle. 

EGGS BENEDICTINE. 

On rounds of toast put thin slice of baked ham, cut to match. 
Upon this place one whole boiled egg and over this pour a rich 
cream sauce. Serve hot. 

Mrs. J. E. McRee, (The Daffodil). 

SCRAMBLED EGGS. 

6 eggs. 6 t-spoons milk. 

1 tbls. butter. Season with salt and pepper. 

Beat the yolks until light, add the milk, beat again. Put the 
butter in a warm pan, pouring the yolks in the pan first, then the 
unbeaten whites, adding a pinch of salt and white pepper. Cook 
until the whites are opaque. Serve hot. 

Mrs. J. N. Bateman. 



CROQUETTES AND EGG DISHES 55 



STUFFED EGGS. 
1 dozen hard boiled eggs. 2 tbls. butter. 

1/4 t-spoon salt. l^ t-spoon pepper. 

1/2 cup mayonnaise. 

Cut eggs in half — remove yolks. Mix with the butter, salt, 
pepper and mayonnaise. Stuff the whites with the mixture 
Sprinkle paprika over them, serve cold. Garnish with parsley. 

Mrs. Lee Hagan. 

CHEESE SOUFFLE. 
1 cup hot milk. 3 eggs. 

1 tbls. butter. 1 cup grated cheese. 

3 level tbls. flour. 

Make white sauce of the milk, butter and flour; while it is 
still hot on the stove, add grated cheese, stir until well blended, 
then add beaten of yolks and pinch of salt. Fold in stiffly beaten 
whites and bake in moderate oven 20 minutes, using only one 
burner. 

Mrs. L. G. Neal. 

CHEESE MOUSSE. 
1 pt. cream. 1 pkg. gelatine. 

1 lemon (juice). Salt to taste. 

1 cup grated cheese. Cayenne pepper to taste. 

2 green peppers. 

Whip cream and when nearly stiff add lemon juice; then whip 
stiff. Put in peppers ground fine (through meat chopper) and 
cheese ; add salt and pepper to taste. Then fold in gelatine (softened 
in a little cold water and dissolved over hot) . Set in ice box to 
cool, serve with mayonnaise and lettuce. 

Mrs. E. O. Pritchard. 

COTTAGE CHEESE SALAD. 
2 cups cottage cheese. 1/2 chopped green pepper. 

1/2 t-spoon salt. l78 t-spoon pepper. 

Mix thoroughly, make into balls size of an English walnut 
Serve on lettuce with French dressing. 

Mrs. D. J. Jones. 

CHEESE RELISH. 

1 lb. cream cheese. Pinch each paprika, salt and 

mustard. 
Add cream until smooth consistency. Mold in palm of hand 
in small balls and place walnut or pecan on one half. 

Mrs. A. C. Plage, 

East Lake. 

CHEESE STRAWS. 

2 cups grated cheese. II/2 cups flour. 

2 tbls. melted butter. l^ cup ice water. 

Pinch of salt and pepper. 



56 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



Mix cheese, flour, salt, pepper and butter well together, adc 
ice water to make a soft dough, roll out thin — Bake in hot oven. 

Mrs. W. M. Zirkle. 

WELSH RAREBIT. 

1/2 lb. cheese (grated). 1 tbls. fine bread crumbs soak- 

1/4 t-spoon cayenne pepper. ed in milk. 

1 tbls. mustard. 

Rub bottom of heated pan with butter. Rub in cheese, stirring 
fast. When melted, put in butter, mustard, pepper and lastly 
crumbs pressed dry. Spread smoking hot on toast. Serve at once. 

Miss Jennie Ikerd, 
Fort Worth, Texas, 

A LA GOLDEN ROD TOAST. 
4 hard boiled eggs. 6 rounds of buttered toast. 

Put whites thru potato masher, grate yolks. Bread should 
be toasted on both sides. 

THICK CREAM DRESSING. 
1 cup milk. 2 tbls. melted butter. 

4 tbls. flour. Salt and cayenne pepper. 

Cream butter and flour together, stir this in the hot milk 
until smooth, cook until rather thick, add the mashed egg whites, 
salt and cayenne to taste. Put a spoonful on each round of toast, 
sprinkle the top with grated yolks, serve immediately. 

Miss Silvia Northcutt, 

Louisville, Kentucky. 

CHEESE SALAD. 
1 pt. stiff whipped cream. 1 cup grated cheese. 

1 pk. gelatine. 1/2 pimento. 

1/2 green pepper. Juice of 1 lemon. 

14 t-spoon salt. 

Soak gelatine in a little cold water, then mix all together. 
Place in mold to congeal. Turn out on platter of lettuce. Serve 
with mayonnaise. 

Mrs. Beckley Griffin. 




CHAPTER IX. 

LUNCHEONS AND SUPPERS 
SALADS. 

Mrs. Norman Pool, Chairman. 

All salad ingredients should be chilled and all salads should be 
served very cold — Green and fruit salads with French or cooked 
dressings are less fattening than meat and eggs or cheese salads 
with mayonnaise. The beaten white of egg added to mayonnaise 
makes it thicker but holds it longer and gives more mayonnaise. To 
marinate foods let stand in oil, vinegar, salt and pepper. 

Miss M. P. Means. 



TOMATO & CHICKEN LAYER SALAD. 
Aspic Mixture 



can tomatoes, 2 lbs. 
tbls. gelatine, 
cloves, 
pepper corns. 



1 medium sized onion (sliced) 

2 t-spoons salt. 
1 t-spoon sugar. 
1 small bay leaf. 



Cook above ingredients 20 minutes, then strain. Soak gela- 
tine in a little cold water until soft, add this to the hot liquid and 
stir until dissolved. Divide the liquid into 2 equal parts ; one- 
half goes on bottom, remainder on the top, chicken mixture between! 

Chicken Mixture. 
2 or 3 cups chicken (chopped Salt and pepper, 
fine). 2 tbls. gelatine. 

4 tbls. mayonnaise. 

Add gelatine (which was put in a i/t cup cold water and dis- 
solved over hot water) to chicken, salt and pepper to taste ; mix well 
together. Stir in mayonnaise last. Allow to cool. Use either a 
square mold or a pyrex bread pan. Pour 1/2 of tomato liquid into 
the mold and set aside to cool. When quite firm, spread the chicken 
mixture smoothly on top of it. Pour other half of tomato jelly on 
top and place in ice box, 3 or 4 hours. Remove from mold by plac- 
ing hot towel around it or dipping into hot water a few seconds. 




< 

O 
W 
M 
o 

h:3 



U^ 



SALADS, SANDWICHES AND DRESSINGS 59 



Slice like brick ice cream and place over lettuce leaf, 1/2 tbls. mayon- 
naise on side. This amount serves 8. 

Mrs. F. J. Massenburg. 

CLAM SALAD. 
Small Little Neck clams. White or red pepper. 

Head of lettuce. Mayonnaise or tabasco sauce. 

Lemon juice. 

The very small neck clams may be served in a salad. Put 
them on crisp lettuce. Season with a little lemon juice and white 
or red pepper. Mayonnaise or tabasco sauce can be used. 

Mrs. K. G. Hardin. 

BOLIVIA SALAD. 

11/2 cups hard boiled potatoes 1/2 tbls. chopped chives. 

(cubed). 11/2 tbls. finely chopped red 

3 hard boiled eggs. peppers. 

Mix thoroughly and pour over cream dressing, given below. 

CREAM DRESSING. 

i/i tbls. salt. 21/2 tbls, melted butter. 

1/2 tbls. mustard. % cup cream. 

% tbls. sugar. 14 cup vinegar. 

1 egg slightly beaten. 

Mix ingredients in order given, adding very slowly. Cook 
over boiling water, stirring constantly until mixture thickens, 
strain and cool. 

Mrs. D. F. Stevenson. 

PINEAPPLE AND CUCUMBER ASPIC. 
1 qt. cold water. 2 cups diced cucumbers. 

3 lemons. 1 box gelatine. 

1 can sliced pineapple (2 cups). 1/2 cup cold water. 

Add juice from lemons to water; dice pineapple, peel and cut 
up cucumbers and add to lemon juice and water; sweeten witt 
pineapple juice to taste. Dissolve gelatine in a little cold watei 
and melt over hot water and add to mixture. Add a few drops of 
green vegetable coloring, pour in mold and let congeal. Serve on 
lettuce with mayonnaise. 

Mrs. S. R, Dull. 

WHIPPED CREAM SALAD, 
1/2 lb. of marshmallows, 1 large can slice pineapple. 

1/1 lb. shelled and blanched al 
monds. 
Cut each marshmallow in 4 pieces, dice pineapple and cut al- 
monds in half. Mix above ingredients together, 

DRESSING. 
3 egg yolks. 2 tbls, sugar, 

1 pt, cream. 4 tbls. vinegar. 



60 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



Mix eggs, sugar and vinegar together. Cook in double boiler 
stirring gently until thick (about 7 minutes). Whip cream stiff 
and fold into this dressing. Then add to ingredients for salad by 
folding in very gently. This serves 10 people. 

Mrs. Chas. F. Rice. 

FROZEN PEAR SALAD. 
1 can pears. Lettuce. 

Mayonnaise. 

Pack 1 can of pears in a bucket with ice and salt ; cover the top 
of the bucket. Let stand from li/o to 2 hours and it should be 
frozen. Test by shaking can. When ready to serve cut the can 
around the center with can opener. Then slice the frozen block 
as you do brick cream. Serve on lettuce with mayonnaise. Grated 
pineapple also is delicious frozen this way. 

Miss Martha Lawshe. 

OYSTER SALAD. 

1 pt. water. 1 tbls. vinegar. 

2 slices lemon. A dash of salt. 

2 cloves. 2 or 3 dozen oysters. 

Put all above ingredients in a sauce pan. Let simmer 5 
minutes. Remove oysters, cool, place on lettuce. Sprinkle with 
finely chopped celery. Use mayonnaise. 

Mrs. C. E. Cresse. 

CUCUMBER ASPIC. 
(serves 12). 
4 cucumbers. 2 t-spoons onion. 

1 qt. stock (chicken preferred). 3 tbls. vinegar. 

2 t-spoons salt. 1 box gelatine. 

1/2 t-spoon red pepper. Green vegetable coloring. 

1/4 cup cold water. 

Moisten gelatine with one-half cup cold water; dissolve. Use 
chicken or veal stock, or dissolve three bouillon cubes in qt. hot 
water. Mix stock, seasoning, grated vegetables, gelatine and green 
coloring matter. Pour in mold and put on ice. Serve when firm 
with mayonnaise on lettuce. Any grated vegetables can be used, 
as celery, bell peppers etc. 

Mrs. H. B. Rogers. 

BANANA SALAD. 

8 large ripe bananas. Mayonnaise. 

1 small head lettuce. 3 cups parched peanuts. 

Hull peanuts, and grind fine. Peel the bananas and dip m 
mayonnaise. Roll them in ground peanuts. Serve with lettuce on 
individual salad plates. 

Katrina Van Pool. 



SALADS, SANDWICHES AND DRESSINGS 61 



MOULDED SHRIMP SALAD. 
2 cans shrimp. Green pepper, cut fine. 

1 can tomato soup. 2 tbls. gelatine. 

Slice of onion. 

Wash and clean shrimp, cut in small pieces. Heat soup with 
onion and green pepper to boiling point and boil 2 minutes. Soak 
gelatine in one-half cup cold water for 5 minutes. Soak in soup, 
add dissolved gelatine and shrimp. Pour into molds already rinsed 
in cold water. Chill on ice until thoroughly set. When ready to 
serve remove from molds and serve on lettuce leaf with mayonnaise. 

Mrs. Edgar Barrett. 

MARSHMALLOW SALAD. 

1/2 lb. marshmallows. 1/2 t-spoon salt. 

1 lb. almonds. 21/2 tbls. vinegar. 

1 lb. can pineapple. 1/4 tbls. butter. 

3 egg yolks. 1 tbls. sugar. 

1/2 pt. cream. 

Blanche almonds ; cut in small pieces. Cut marshmallows in 
quarters. Cut pineapple in small pieces. Mix together in bowl 
and let stand. Beat yolks of eggs lightly and add salt, vinegar, 
butter and sugar ; boil till thick, stirring all the time. Remove from 
fire and when almost cold stir in the bowl of prepared marsh- 
mallows, almonds and pineapple. Put in cold place and just before 
serving fold in the half pint cream (previously whipped and on ice) 
serve on crisp lettuce leaves. This will serve 8 people. 

Mrs. L. C. Matthews. 

BAKED APPLE SALAD (A La PERLEE PLACE) 
6 small uniform tart apples. Mayonnaise 
1/4 cup chopped peanuts. Lettuce. 

1 cup cubed marshmallows. Currant jelly. 

Core the apples and put them in a baking pan. Fill the centers 
with brown sugar and a lump of butter each. Bake as usual, bast- 
ing them with a little hot water. Then chill. Mix together the pea- 
nuts, marshmallows and three fourths cup of mayonnaise, fill the 
centers, and the top with a little more mayonnaise and cubes of 
currant jelly. Serve garnished with lettuce hearts. 

Mrs. T. F. Abercrombe. 

CANDLE SALAD. 
8 medium uniform bananas 8 red cherries or strawberries. 

peeled. 1 cup mayonnaise. 

8 slices pineapple. 1 head lettuce. 

4 medium sized green bell pep- 
pers. 
Cut the green pepper into round rings after removing seed — 
then cut each ring in half. This is for handle on side of banana 
held there by 2 tooth picks. Place a lettuce leaf flat on plate, lay 
one slice of pineapple upon it — in center of pineapple stand upright 



62 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 

the banana (whole) after cutting a bit off each end. Stick the red 
cherry on top with tooth pick, fasten handle, place mayonnaise on 
side of lettuce leaf which is base of candle sticks. 

If the banana is made to stand erect, in slice of pineapple with 
a red cherry or strawberry stuck on top and a handle of green pep- 
per, a lighted candle is well represented. 

Mrs. E. A. Stevens. 

"AS YOU LIKE IT" SALAD. 
8 tomatoes. Mayonnaise. 

4 eggs. Lettuce. 

Peel sound tomatoes, and scoop from stem end a part of center. 
Place them on ice and just before serving partly fill with mayon- 
naise. Press into each tomato 1/2 of hard boiled egg, letting the 
rounded top rise a little above the tomato. Serve on lettuce leaf. 

Mrs. Norman Pool. 

"THE MARION CLUB SALAD". 
1 qt. cream. 1 large can Royal Anne cher- 

1 qt. mayonnaise. ries. 

1 box gelatine. 2 large can pineapple sliced. 

3^ cups sugar. 1 large grapefruit. 

1 t-spoon salt. V2 lb. blanched almonds. 

Soak each envelope of gelatin in cup of pineapple juice 5 min- 
utes ; add one pint boiling water, sugar and set in cool place. Whip 
cream stiff, place on ice. Cut pineapple, grapefruit and almonds in 
small pieces, seed cherries. As soon as gelatine begins to congeal 
add in the following order cream, mayonnaise, cherries, pineapple 
and almonds. Last add grapefruit and salt. Put into mold size of 
teacup, to congeal. (Serves 20 people.) 

Nelle Pilcher Koch. 

FRUIT SALAD NO. 1. 
1 can pineapple. 4 oranges. 

1 can white cherries. 1 pk. gelatine. 

1 cup cold water. 2 tbls. sugar. 

Soak gelatine in cold water; dissolve over hot water; cut the 
fruit in small pieces, then pour over the fruit juices to which has 
been added the gelatine and sugar. Harden and serve. 

Mrs. L. T. Patillo. 

FRUIT SALAD No. 2. 
Celery. Seedless raisins. 

Apples. Lettuce. 

Mayonnaise. 

Equal parts of celery, apples and seedless raisins, chopped in 
small pieces. (Steam raisins until tender and let it cool before 
using) Combine, serve on lettuce with mayonnaise dressing. 



SALADS, SANDWICHES AND DRESSINGS 63 



MAYONNAISE. 
4 egg yolks. Pinch cayenne pepper. 

2 tbls. vinegar. 1 t-spoon dry mustard. 

1 lemon (juice). IV2 pts. oil. 
1/2 t-spoon salt. 

Have eggs and oil cold. Mix mustard, salt and pepper with 
eggs in bowl, stir well, add a few drops of vinegar, then a few drops 
of oil etc., alternating vinegar, oil and lemon juice, after oil is 
thoroughly blended, adding very slowly at first. You can then add 
it more rapidly until desired consistency. This should make one 
quart mayonnaise. 

Mrs. Tull C. Waters. 

FRUIT SALAD FOR SIXTEEN. 

2 cans pineapple No. 2. Marshmallow 1/3 lb. 
1/2 lb. pecan nut meats. 1 pkg. dates. 

2 small bottles cherries. 1 lb. malaga grapes. 

Chop fruit and mix with whipped cream salad dressing. 

Mrs. M. H. Stevens. 

GINGER ALE SALAD NO. 1. 

1 box gelatine. 1 cup chopped apples. 

Iqt. ginger ale. 1 cup chopped pineapple. 

14 pt. boiling water. 1 cup chopped celery. 

1 cup cold water. 1/8 lb. crystalized ginger. 

1/2 cup sugar. 1/2 t-spoon salt. 

1/2 cup lemon juice. 
Soak gelatine in cold water then dissolve in boiling water. To 
this add sugar, ginger ale, lemon juice and salt and allow to cool. 
When the mixture begins to thicken stir in lightly chopped fruits ; 
allow it to congeal. Serve on crisp lettuce with mayonnaise dres- 
sing. 

Mrs. Jesse M. Manry. 

GINGER ALE SALAD NO. 2. 
1 pt. ginger ale. White grapes. 

Gelatine. English walnuts. 

Lettuce. Canned peaches. 

Make a quart of unflavored gelatine, using 1 pint of ginger ale 
in place of water. When it has begun to solidify pour enough of 
the mixture into individual molds to cover the bottoms. When it 
has stiffened add white grapes, which should be cut in halves and 
enghsh walnuts. Then pour on the remaining gelatine, allow to 
stiffen. Serve on lettuce leaves and decorate with halved peaches. 

Mrs. Edwin Beaver. 

FROZEN FRUIT SALAD. 

1 small can pears. 1/, cup mayonnaise. 

1 small can white cherries. li/2 cups whipped cream. 

1 small can sliced pineapple. 



64 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



Drain juice from fruit; cut into pieces pears and pineapple 
and stone the cherries. Add mayonnaise and whipped cream and 
freeze immediately. Serve on lettuce leaf with mayonnaise. Add 
nuts if desired. 

Mrs. J. E. McRee, (The Daffodil). 

FROZEN SALAD. 

6 bananas. % cup sugar. 

2 cans pineapple No. 2. Ipt. mayonnaise. 

4 lemons. 2 cups hot water. 

2 tbls. gelatine. 

Dissolve gelatine in cold water ; add hot water, sugar and lemon 
juice. When half congealed, add cut up bananas, pineapple and 
mayonnaise, stir. Pack in ice and salt and leave until frozen. 

Mrs, J. W. Hardwick. 

COOKED OR CANNED PEAR SALAD. 

1 can pears. Whipped cream. 
Chopped celery. 

Walnut meats. Mayonnaise. 

Serve on individual plates ; one half of large pear sprinkled 
with nuts, chopped celery and mayonnaise dressing to which has 
been added considerable rich whipped cream. 

Miss Ella Shaunty. 
Springfield, Ky. 

VEGETABLE SALAD. 

2 cups green or can peas. 1 cup chopped celery. 
2 cups diced potatoes. 1 t-spoon salt. 

1 cup diced carrots. !/> t-spoon paprika. 

Mix and serve with cooked dressing on lettuce. 

Mrs. T. L. Mudd. 
St. Louis, Mo. 

FRUIT SALAD. 

1/2 pkg- gelatine. 1 cup chopped pineapple. 

1 cup maraschino cherries. 1 cup sliced peaches. 
1/2 cup boiling water. Juice from fruit. 

"Dissolve gelatine in a little cold water. Add 1/2 cup boiling 
water and stir until dissolved. Add fruit and fruit juices. Put on 
ice to congeal. Serve on lettuce with mayonnaise or whipped cream. 

Mrs. B. M. Boykin, 
President Atlanta Woman's club. 

ALLIGATOR PEAR SALAD. 
(Ensalada de Agucate Mexicana) 

2 alligator pears. 1 cup apple vinegar. 

3 ripe tomatoes. 2 tbls. french mustard. 
1/2 small onion. 1 t-spoon salt. 

l"cup olive oil. Grated cheese. 



SALADS, SANDWICHES AND DRESSINGS 65 



Peel and slice length wise the pears and tomatoes; add onion 
chopped fine. To vinegar, add mustard, salt, pepper; stir thor- 
oughly then add olive oil. Pour this over pears and tomatoes, sprin- 
kle grated cheese over top and serve cold. 

Carmen M. De Rueda, 
Calle Alvarado N. 11, Mexico City. 

ENGLISH SALAD. 
1 head lettuce. 3 cucumbers. 

4 cooked beets. 4 radishes. 

5 raw tomatoes. Water cress. 

Pull to pieces the head of lettuce. Peel and slice thinly beets, 
tomatoes, cucumbers, radishes and mix with the chopped water 
cress. Garnish with tomato and hard boiled egg. Serve with 
french dressing (not on the salad but in separate bowl). 

Mrs. Bertram Ibbetson. 

CUCUMBER SALAD. 

6 cucumbers. Vinegar. 

Olive oil. Salt and pepper. 

Parsley. Lettuce. 

Peel cucumbers thinly, cut into thin slices, pour over 2 parts 
olive oil and 1 part vinegar, season with salt, pepper and a little 
chopped parsley, Mix well by tossing and set on ice before serving. 

Mrs. John Walter Buckels, 

Houston, Texas. 

CHERRY SALAD. 

1 can white cherries. 1/2 lb. blanched almonds. 

1 can sliced pineapple. Mayonnaise. 

Remove seed from cherries and stuff with almonds; place a 
slice of pineapple on lettuce, cherries on top of pineapple ; then may- 
onnaise 

Mrs. 0. J. Redwine. 

GUACAMOLE. 

2 alligator pears. 1 t-spoon olive oil. 
14 onion. 1 pinch cayenne. 

1 clove of garlic. 1 sweet pomegranate. 

Mash pears and mix with crushed onions, Cayenne and garlic. 
Have all perfectly smooth, then stir in seeds of pomgranate. Serve 
cold. 

Carmen M. De Rueda, 
Calle Alvarado No. 11, Mexico City. 

EASTER EGG SALAD. 
Lettuce. Maraschino cherries. 

1 can pineaple. White pitted cherries. 

Paprika. Tokay grapes. 

Mayonnaise. American or Cottage cheese. 

On a crisp lettuce leaf, place a slice of pineapple. On this ar- 



66 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 

range a circle of mayonnaise, sprinkled with paprika. In the hol- 
low formed by the mayonnaise place varicolored balls made of cher- 
ries, grapes, shaped cheese, nuts and etc., made into balls. 

Mrs. J. F. Ryan. 

ORANGE PEANUT SALAD. 

1 banana. V2 cup peanuts (shelled). 

2 oranges. 

Remove the skin from banana, scrape and cut in quarters 
(lengthwise) and thirds (crosswise) ; roll in finely chopped pea- 
nuts. Peal oranges, cut in slices crosswise, cut out center of oranges, 
insert banana through each slice; arrange on lettuce leaf. Pour 
over French dressing. 

Mrs. F. J. Massenburg. 

FRUIT SALAD. 
2 pkgs. lemon jello. Mayonnaise. 

1 can pears. Lettuce. 

1 can pineapple. 

Follow directions on pkg. for mixing jello ; when it begins to 
cool, put in cut pieces of pear and pineapple. When congealed 
serve with mayonnaise on lettuce. 

Ida V. Sewell. 

TOMATO AND EGG SALAD. 
6 large cooked eggs. Lettuce. 

1/2 cup melted butter. Tomatoes. 

Chop eggs until fine, add melted butter and seasonings. Pack 
very tightly in a tumbler and chill. When ready to serve cut toma- 
toes in half inch slices. Remove eggs from glass and cut in half 
inch slices to correspond with tomato. Place slice of tomato, egg 
and top with another slice of tomato. Arrange on lettuce leaf and 
serve with mayonnaise. 

Mrs. Edward Porter Van Valkenburgh, 

Harper, Kansas. 

NUT GELATINE SALAD. 
1 pkg. gelatine. 1 can pimentos. 

1 cup broken walnut meats. 2 sweet pickles. 

5 hard boiled eggs. 1/2 cup small pickled onions 

Salt and pepper. V4. cup vinegar. 

Soak gelatine in cold water; dissolve in one cup of boiling 
water. Then add nuts, eggs, pimentos, onions (all chopped fine) 
now add vinegar, salt pepper and paprika. Let stand until cold 
then stir in one cup of mayonnaise and chill in individual molds. 
Serve on lettuce with mayonnaise. 

Mrs. Sydney Smith. 

DELICIOUS SALAD. 
2-lb. can sliced pineapple. 1 cup nut meats, pecan. 

1/2 lb. white grapes. 1 bunch celery. 

1 dozen marshmallows. 1 head lettuce. 



SALADS, SANDWICHES AND DRESSINGS 67 



Drain all juice from pineapple, place each slice on crisp lettuce. 
Cut grapes in halves removing seed, marshmallows in 4 pieces. Use 
only tender celery, cut in small pieces. Mix last 3 ingredients with 
nuts ; place portion of mixture on each slice of pineapple and top 
v^^ith following dressing ; 

Dressing. 

1 cup pineapple juice. 1 egg. 

1 tbls. flour. 1/^ cup whipped cream. 

1 t-spoon sugar. l^ t-spoon salt. 

1 t-spoon lemon juice. 

Combine sugar, salt and flour; stir this in 14 pineapple juice 
until very smooth, add well beaten egg, lemon juice and remainder 
of pineapple juice. Cook in double boiler until thick. When cool 
beat in whipped cream until whole is perfectly smooth. Ingre- 
dients for salad may be prepared — but not mixed or dressing added 
until ready to serve. 

Mrs. J. A. Carhsle, 
Chairman Cook Book. 

APPLE SALAD. 

Apples. Nuts. 

Vegetable tablet of pink. Lettuce. 

Chopped raisins. Cooked dressing. 

Peel and core any number of apples, leaving them whole. Place 
in a pan, cover with boiling water. Let simmer until tender add the 
tablet of pink; when apples are well colored, remove to cool, then 
fill with chopped raisins and nuts. Serve on lettuce with dressing 
or with whipped cream as a desert. 

Miss Ella Shaunty, 
Springfield, Ky. 

CUCUMBER BASKETS. 
4 tbls olive oil, 6 cucumbers, 

8 tbls, vinegar. 6 ripe tomatoes. 

Dash of pepper. Pinch of salt. 

Select regular shaped cucumbers; cut a piece from both the 
stem and blossom end, then cut in halves crosswise, cut two pieces 
from each section, leaving remaining piece in shape of basket with 
handle. Remove pulp in large pieces to cut in squares for refilling 
1/2 of each basket, the remaining half being filled with pieces of 
tomatoes. Pour over French dressing, serve cold, 

Mrs, Samuel L, Dabney. 

MARSHMALLOW SALAD, 

1/2 lb. marshmallows. 1 cup broken pecan meats. 

1 large can pineapple. 

Mix and serve with the following sauce ; 

11/2 tbls. flour cooked with 1 tbls. of butter. Blend well, add 



68 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



one cup sweet cream cook until thick. Take from fire add 1 cup 
clabbered cream, juice 1 lemon, and pinch of salt. Serve on lettuce 
leaves. 

Mrs. J. C. Tegder. 

CHEESE GELATINE. 

11/2 pts. of cream whipped stiff. 3 minced pimentos. 
1 cup grated American cheese. Salt and pepper. 
11/2 tbls. gelatine. Mustard. 

9 chopped olives. 

Soak gelatine and dissolve over hot water ; add olives and pep- 
per, also seasoning — ^when cool — add grated cheese and then fold in 
carefully the whipped cream. Let congeal. Serve individually with 
mayonnaise dressing. 

Mrs. J. E. Hayes, 
Pres. Ga. Federation of Women's Clubs. 

PERFECTION SALAD. 
1 envelope gelatine. 1 cup cabbage. 

1/^ cup of cold water. Juice of 1 lemon. 

V2 cup tarragon vinegar. I/2 cup of sugar. 

1 pt. boiling water. 2 cups chopped celery. 

1 tbls. salt. 1/4 can sweet red pepper. 
Soak gelatine in cold water 5 minutes, add boiling water, vin- 
egar, lemon juice, sugar, and salt. Strain and when beginning to 
set add remaining ingredients. Turn into a mold and chill. Serve 
on lettuce. 

Mrs. Harry L. Wills. 

JELLIED VEAL SALAD. 

2 lbs, veal. 1 cup olives, chopped fine. 
1 onion, chopped fine. 4 hard boiled eggs. 

1 stalk celery, cut in small 1 t-spoon salt. 

pieces. i/i t-spoon pepper. 

3 sprigs parsley, cut up. 2 tbls. gelatine. 
1 lemon (juice). 

Boil veal till it falls from bone. Remove meat, add onion and 
celery to broth, cook a few minutes ; strain stock. Soak gelatine a 
few minutes in half cup cold water, add to hot stock, then the lemon 
juice. Mix veal (cut up) eggs, olives and parsley, pour stock over 
mixture, mold in individual molds, serve on lettuce with cooked 
mavonnaise. 

Mrs. T. L. Mudd, 
St. Louis, Mo. 

SHRIMP SALAD NO. L 

1 pt. shrimp. Lettuce or watercress. 

2 hard boiled eggs. Mayonnaise. 
Ripe tomatoes. 

If canned shrimp are used, they should be thoroughly washed 



SALADS, SANDWICHES AND DRESSINGS 69 



in cold water. Pull the shrimp to pieces. Place on sliced ripe to- 
matoes. Around this use sliced hard boiled eggs over lettuce or 
watercress, and cover with Durkees or mayonnaise dressing. Serve 
very cold. 

Mrs. Kate Gramling Hardin. 

SHRIMP SALAD NO. 2. 
2 cups shrimp. V2 cup chopped celery. 

2 hard boiled eggs, sliced. 14 cup mayonnaise. 

2 green peppers, cut in rings. 
Wash and prepare shrimp, rinse in clear cold water — ^then cut 
in halves — marinate in French dressing 20 minutes ; then add celery 
and stir in the mayonnaise. Garnish with pepper rings and sliced 
boiled eggs. Serve on lettuce leaf. 

Mrs. F. J. Massenburg. 

SALAD a la RUSSE. 

6 tomatoes. 1/3 cup cold cooked peas. 

1/3 cup cucumbers cut in dice. V2 cup cold cooked chicken. 

1/4 cup pickles finely chopped. Parsley. 

2 tbls. capers. 

Peel 6 tomatoes and remove thin slices from top of each. Take 
out seeds and pulp. Sprinkle inside with salt, invert and let stand 
1/4 hour. Place seeds and pulp removed from tomatoes in a 
strainer and drain. Mix cucumbers, pickles, capers, peas, chicken, 
with 1/3 cup tomato pulp and season with salt, pepper and vinegar. 
Put in cheese cloth and squeeze; then add I/2 cup cold cooked 
chicken cut in very small dice. Mix with mayonnaise dressing, re- 
fill tomatoes, sprinkle with finely chopped parsley, and place each 
on lettuce leaf. 

Mrs. D. F. Stevenson. 

COLD SLAW. 
4 cups white cabbage. 1/2 t-spoon salt. 

2 tbls. sugar. Dash of pepper. 

3 tbls. vinegar. 1/2 cup of evaporated cream. 
Mix sugar and salt in cream, stir well ; add vinegar and pepper, 

pour over finely shredded cabbage ; set on ice until ready to serve. 

Mrs. Wm. D. Alexander. 

FRUIT SALAD OR ASPIC. 
1/2 pkg. gelatine. 1 cup maraschino cherries. 

1 cup chopped pineapple. 1 small can sliced peaches. 

Dissolve gelatine, put in juice and fruit of cherries, pineapple 
and peaches. Let congeal and serve on lettuce with mayonnaise 
dressing. 

Mrs. E. B. Havis, Jr. 

GRAPEFRUIT AND PINEAPPLE ASPIC. 
3 grapefruits. 2 envelopes gelatine. 

1 can shredded pineapple. 1/2 cup sugar. 



70 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



Peel grapefruit and remove white pulp, add pineapple and 
juice, also sugar. Dissolve gelatine in cold v^ater, melt over hot 
v^ater and add to fruits. Add enough water to make li/o quarts of 
the mixture. Put on ice to congeal. Serve with mayonnaise. 

Mrs. H. B. Rogers. 

RAW CARROT SALAD. 
2 cups carrots, peeled and run 1 cup green peas or 

through large disc of 1 cup lima beans cooked, 
meat grinder. 1 chopped green pepper. 

1 cup diced celery. 1 finely minced onion. 

1 cup green beans cooked. 

Mix all together with fork, adding 2 teaspoons salt, 1 tbls. 
sugar, l^ cup vinegar. Let stand one half hour to marinate, then 
stir, drain, and add one cup mayonnaise. Serve on lettuce. 

Mrs. G. B. Denman. 

ENGLISH WALNUT SALAD. 
1 pt. English walnuts. 1 cup chopped apples. 

1 cup minced celery. 1 tbls. olive oil. 
4 tbls. lemon juice. Mayonnaise. 

Soak walnuts in lemon juice 30 minutes, drain, then mix with 
celery and apples. Pour over all the olive oil, let stand in ice box 
2 hours. Serve on lettuce leaf with 1 t-spoon mayonnaise. 

Mrs. F. J. Massenburg. 

ORIENTAL SANDWICHES. 
Chopped nuts. Butter. 

Package of dates. Milk or cream. 

Grated cheese. 

Mix a cup of any kind of chopped nuts, package of dates, cup 
of grated cheese and butter, also a little milk or cream to soften 
mixture so as to spread nicely between thin slices of bread. 

Mrs. E. 0. Pritchard. 

A DIFFERENT SANDWICH. 
6 slices bacon. 2 hard boiled eggs. 

2 tbls. relish. 1 tbls. mayonnaise. 
(Heinz India). 

Crisp bacon, mix with eggs chopped fine, stir in the relish, add 
mayonnaise. Spread rather thickly on thin slices of white bread. 

Mrs. H. Wason. 

HAM SANDWICH. 
1/2 lb. boiled ham. 6 sweet pickles. 

4 hard boiled eggs. Mayonnaise. 

Grind ham, eggs pickles through food chopper, add enough 
mayonnaise to moisten. 

Mrs. Geo. W. Singer. 



SALADS, SANDWICHES AND DRESSINGS 71 



PRUNE SANDWICH. 
Prunes. Lemon juice. 

Nuts (pecan). Salt. 

Butter. 

Soak large prunes over night. Boil with very little sugar. Re- 
move stones and run prunes and equal quantity of pecan nuts 
through meat grinder. Mix into a smooth paste with a pinch of 
salt a little butter and lemon juice. Spread on thin slices of whole 
wheat or white bread and trim into attractive shapes. 

Mrs. J. F. Ryan. 

CHICKEN SANDWICH. 

1 cup chicken. 1 cup of celery. 

2 tbls. butter. 4 tbls. mayonnaise. 

1 egg. Salt and pepper. 

Put chicken through meat grinder, add egg hard boiled and 
mashed. Cut celery very fine, add with mayonnaise salt and 
pepper to mixture and stir well together, put melted butter on one 
slice of bread, and mayonnaise on the other. Spread mixture be- 
tween slices and press together. 

Mrs. J. A. Carlisle, 
Cookbook Chairman. 

RIBBON SANDWICH. 

2 pkg. Phil, cream cheese. 2 sandwich loaves. 
1/4 cup nut meats. Dash of salt. 

1/4 cup seedless raisins. Red coloring. 

Cream cheese with fork, add mayonnaise to thin ; stir in a few 
drops of coloring, enough to make a clear pink, mix in finely chopped 
nut meats. Cut loaf lengthwise into 6 slices, spread thick with 
cheese filling to make one layer of white and one layer of pink. 
Wrap in wet napkin, leave in ice box one hour. Take out and slice 
in 1/4 inch slices. 

Mrs. Walter Marshall. 

RAISIN SANDWICH. 
14 lb. seedless raisins. Bread. 

Allspice. Butter. 

Sweet cream. 

Grind raisins, season with allspice, thin with cream. Butter 
slices of bread, then fill with raisin mixture. 

Mrs. Harry Reynolds. 

CUCUMBER SANDWICH. 
2 cucumbers. Salt, pepper. 

1 small onion. Paprika. 

1 slice of bacon. Bread. 

Grind and drain. Spread bread with mayonnaise then fill 
with mixture. Cut bread in thin oblong slices. 

Mrs. Walter Marshall. 



72 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 

ROLLED SANDWICH. 
1 loaf fresh bread. II/2 cups mayonnaise. 

6 dill pickles. Dash of cayenne. 

Half lb. boiled ham. Pinch of salt. 

Cut perfectly fresh sandwich loaf into six slices, lengthwise 
of the loaf. Grind boiled ham fine, mix with mayonnaise and sea- 
son. Spread each slice of bread with ham mixture, lay pickle on 
one end and roll. Wrap in wet napkin and put in refrigerator over 
night. Next morning cut into one-fourth inch slices crosswise. This 
makes a round sandwich, with a round pickle for center. 

Mrs. Tom Branch. 

SARDINE SANDWICH. 
1 box American sardines. 2 tbls. butter. 

1 lemon. Salt and red pepper. 

Free the sardines from skin and bones; chop to a fine paste, 
add lemon juice and seasoning, and lastly melted butter. Spread 
between wafers or thin slices of bread and butter. This makes 20 
sandwiches. 

Mrs. A. O. Woodward. 

PIMENTO SANDWICH. 

1 pkg. cream cheese. 1 tbls. pimento. 

2 tbls. sweet cream. 1 tbls. nuts. 

Mix all ingredients and spread between thin slices of bread. 

Mrs. Edwin Beaver. 

ORANGE HONEY SANDWICHES. 
Bread and butter. 1/2 cup orange peel. 

1 cup sugar. 1/2 cup orange juice. 
l^ cup water. 1/2 t-spoon vanilla. 

Chop orange peel fine; bring sugar, orange juice and water 
to a boil and cook until syrup will thread when dropped from end 
of a spoon. Add orange peel and vanilla, bring again to the boiling 
point and cool. Spread sparingly white bread cut in thin slices, 
with creamed butter and the orange honey. Put together in sand- 
wich form, remove crusts, and cut in finger-shaped pieces. Pile in 
log-cabin fashion, on dainty doily-covered plate. 

Mrs. Newton C. Wing. 

SALAD DRESSING. 

2 eggs. 1 tbls. sugar. 

1 tbls. mustard. 1 cup of whipped cream. 

1/2 t-spoon salt. Butter size of an egg. 

3 tbls. vinegar. 

Beat eggs, add mustard, salt, pepper, butter and vinegar. Boil, 
stirring until thick and smooth. Add cup of whipped cream. Mix 
thoroughly. 

Mrs. W. Frank Daub. 



SALADS, SANDWICHES AND DRESSINGS 



73 



DRESSING FOR LETTUCE. 



2 t-spoons sugar. 

1 t-spoon salt. 

2 t-spoon white pepper. 

1 heaping t-spoon paprika. 
Mix well. Will be thick. 



2 t-spoons Worcester sauce. 
1 tbls. prepared mustard. 
1 tbls. vinegar or lemon juice. 
4 tbls. oil. 

Mrs. Wm. L. Percy. 







CREOLE 


SAUCE. 


6 


green peppers. 




1 can tomatoes. 


6 


sprigs of celery. 




1/2 lb. butter or 1 pt. 


2 


small onions. 




1 t-spoon sugar. 


1 


can mushrooms. 




1 t-spoon salt. 


1 


can peas. 




Pinch of red pepper, 



Put peppers, celery and onions through meat grinder, add other 
ingredients and cook slowly, down to half the quantity. Thicken 
with a little flour. 

Mrs. J. H. Zachry. 

COOKED SALAD DRESSING. 
Yolk 1 egg (well beaten). 1 t-spoon chopped parsley. 

1 t-spoon sugar. 8 tbls. vinegar. 

1 t-spoon salt. 1 boiled egg. 

1 t-spoon mustard. 

Cook in double boiler until mixture thickens, stirring con- 
stantly. Thin with milk or cream. Add boiled egg, chopped fine, 
before serving. 

Mrs. J. C. Duggan. 

MAYONNAISE DRESSING. 
1 t-spoon mustard. Yolks of 2 eggs. 

1 t-spoon salt. 2 tbls. lemon juice or 1 tbls. 

1 t-spoon sugar. vinegar. 

11/2 cups oil. 1 extra t-spoon vinegar, put in 

Few grains cayenne. immediately after break- 

ing yolks. 
Mix salt, sugar, pepper and mustard thoroughly, then add 
yolks. Beat with dover egg-beater, add vinegar, then oil, drop 
by drop and beat until very thick. Add lemon juice to thin mixture, 
alternate until all is used. 

Mrs. Horace J. Pope. 



THOUSAND ISLE DRESSING. I. 



t-spoon chopped onion, 
t-spoon chopped dill pickle, 
t-spoon chopped parsley, 
cup stiff mayonnaise, 
tbls. chili sauce. 



1/2 t-spoon worchester sauce. 
1 t-spoon chopped pimento. 
1 t-spoon chopped cucumber. 
1 t-spoon chopped beets. 
1 hard boiled egg, chopped fine. 



Mix all together; add mayonnaise dressing. If higher season 
is liked, add a little tobasco. Serve on head lettuce. 

Mrs. Carlisle Smith. 



74 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



HOLLANDAISE DRESSING. 
4 tbls. olive oil. 1/2 t-spoon salt. 

4 egg yolks. 1/10 t-spoon cayenne pepper. 

11/2 tbls. lemon juice. 1 cup hot water. 

Put oil in double boiler, add beaten yolks of eggs, and season- 
ing. Beat together, then add slowly the hot water, stirring con- 
stantly until it thickens, but do not boil. Remove from the fire and 
continue to stir for a few minutes. It should be creamy and con- 
sistent. 

Mrs. S. L. Dabney. 

WHIP CREAM FRUIT SALAD DRESSING. 

1 heaping tbls. butter. 1/2 cup scalded milk. 

1 tbls. flour. 3 tbls. vinegar. 

1/2 t-spoon salt. 2 egg yolks. 

1 t-spoon sugar. 1/2 Pt- whipped cream. 

Pinch of mustard. 

Cream butter and dry ingredients and beat in egg yolk, add 
scalded milk slowly, and then vinegar. Cook slowly stirring con- 
stantly until thickens. Put in deep bowl and beat until creamy 
with fork. 

This will keep indefinitely. 

When ready to serve whip 1/2 pirit cream and add 3 tbls. dress- 
ing, beating it in well. Excellent on any combination of fruit. 

Mrs. M. H. Stevens. 

SLAW DRESSING. 
1 cup vinegar. 1 egg yolk. 

1 t-spoon flour. 2 t-spoon sugar. 

1 t-spoon butter. 1 t-spoon salt. 

1 small t-spoon mustard. Pinch of cayenne pepper. 

Cream butter and all dry ingredients except sugar, then add 
egg yolk. Gradually beat in vinegar, cook in double boiler until 
thick. When cool add sugar. 

Mrs. W. L. Northern, 

Norfolk, Va. 

EGGLESS BOILED SALAD DRESSING. 
% t-spoon mustard. V4, t-spoon celery salt. 

1 t-spoon salt. 1 tbls. flour. 

1/8 t-spoon pepper. 1 tbls. sugar. 

3 tbls. vinegar. 1 cup cream. 

Mix dry ingredients and add cream. When smooth turn in 
boiling vinegar and cook until creamed. If inconvenient to use 
cream, % cup milk and 1/4 tbls. melted butter may be used. 

Mrs. T. F. Abercrombie. 

MAYONNAISE. 

1 pt. can Wesson oil (chilled). V4, t-spoon red pepper. 

2 egg yolks. 1/2 lemon (juice). 
1/2 t-spoon salt. 



SALADS, SANDWICHES AND DRESSINGS 75 



Break eggs in bowl add salt and pepper. Add oil slowly until 
1 cup has been used, have the juice of one lemon ready and add 
half. Continue whipping with fork adding oil and lemon until 
right consistency. 

This keeps splendidly if put in fruit jar and kept in ice box. 

Mrs. J. M. Manry. 

THOUSAND ISLE DRESSING . II. 

2 cups mayonnaise. 1 large green pepper. 
1 small bottle chili sauce. 1/2 t-spoon salt. 

3 hard boiled egss. Dash of red pepper. 
3 pimentos. 1/2 t-spoon paprika. 

1 small onion. 1/2 cup grated cheese. 

Mash eggs fine and stir part of mayonnaise into mixture. Put 
other ingredients through meat grinder, or chop very fine. Stir in 
rest of mayonnaise. Serve on lettuce or tomatoes. 

Mrs. D. J. Jones. 

ITALIAN DRESSING. 
1 t-spoon tomato ketchup. 4 tbls. olive oil. 

1/2 t-spoon paprika. 1 tbls. lemon juice. 

1/2 t-spoon salt. 1/2 t-spoon onion juice. 

Pinch of dry mustard. 2 tbls. capers. 

Put all together in a cruet and shake until they mix. 

Mrs. Norman Pool. 

ROQUEFORT DRESSING. 
6 tbls. roquefort cheese. l^ t-spoon paprika. 

11/2 tbls. dry mustard. 1 tbls. vinegar. 

■14 t-spoon salt. i/i cup salad oil. 

■14 t-spoon pepper. 

Cream cheese and olive oil, add seasoning. When smooth and 
thick, add 1 t-spoon Worcester sauce. 

Mrs. T. D. Body. 




CHAFING DISH SUGGESTIONS. 

Mrs. Charles F. Evans. 
Chairman. 



''The merry chafing-dish bring forth, 

Place in a lump of butter 
Of quality and best renown, 

And at expense don't mutter. 

Of mushrooms now, take teacups two, 

Cut fine, and gently simmer ; 
Ten minutes just about will do — 

Don't scorch, or you're a sinner. 

Of strained tomatoes use a cup, 

A quarter one of cheese ; 
Stir constantly with no let up ; 

Add pepper, if you please. 

Two eggs you next must briskly beat, 

And smoothly make all leaven ; 
Pour over toast — then quickly eat 

And dream you are in Heaven !" 

CRAB MEAT. 
1 can, (large) Japanese crab. 1 can (large) evaporated cream 
1 can, (small) pimentos. 2 eggs. 

1 large cup chopped cheese, 
(American). 
Place butter, size of an egg, in chafing dish. Put in crab meat, 
remove bones as it heats. Add cheese and pimentos. When 
cheese melts add milk and eggs beaten together. Salt and red 
pepper to taste. When cream sauce thickens serve at once. 

Palmer Johnson. 



CHAFING DISH SUCxGESTIONS 77 



OLIVE STUFFED EGGS. 
(In cream sauce). 
4 eggs hard boiled. 1/4 t-spoon curry powder. 

34 cup ripe olives. 1/2 t-spoon salt. 

2 tbls. butter. 1/8 t-spoon pepper. 

3 tbls. flour. 11/2 cups milk. 

Cut eggs in halves and remove yolks. Stone olives and chop 
one-fourth of them very fine. Mix these with the yolks, season, 
and refill whites with mixture. Chill thoroughly, cut in slices. 
Melt the butter in chafing dish, add dry ingredients, then the milk, 
and stir constantly until it boils. Arrange the slices of eggs on hot 
buttered toast, pour cream sauce over and serve. 

Mrs. Howard H. McCall. 
State Chair. Georgia Federation of Woman's Clubs. 

RED DEVIL. 
(For The Chafing Dish). 
% lb. American cheese. I/2 t-spoon dry mustard. 

1 can tomato or tomato-okra 
soup. 
Dice the cheese, melt in chafing dish over boiling water and 
stir until cheese is smooth Add the soup and mustard, stirring un- 
til thoroughly mixed. Sprinkle with paprika and serve on rounds 
of hot toast. 

Mr. Newton C. Wing. 

FIG CUPS. 
14 lb. dried washed figs. 2 tbls. sugar. 

1/2 lb chopped salted almonds. 1 t-spoon lemon juice. 
1/2 cup wine. Lady fingers. 

Stuff figs with almonds. Put sugar, lemon juice and wine in 
chafing dish and when hot add stuffed figs. Cover and cook until 
figs are tender. Serve with lady fingers. 

Mrs. D. J. Jones. 

WOODCHUCK. 
1 pt. milk. 1 t-spoon salt. 

6 tbls. flour. 1 t-spoon mustard. 

4 tbls. butter. 1/2 t-spoon paprika. 

3 hard boiled eggs. 1 cup cheese, (Amer.), 

Cream flour and butter together in chafing-dish set over hot 
water ; when bubbling mix in milk gradually. When smooth, season 
with salt, mustard, and paprika. Add cheese cut in small cubes. 
When thoroughly melted, add eggs sliced. (Enough for 8 people.) 

Mrs. E. L. Harris. 
Chattanooga, Tenn. 

CHICKEN ALMOND. 
1 cold boiled chicken. 1 small can mushrooms. 

1/^ lb. blanched almonds. 1/8 lb. butter. 

1 small stalk celery. 



78 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



Put butter in chafing-dish, add chopped celery and almonds. 
When celery is cooked tender add chicken and mushrooms also 
chopped. Add 1 cup water in which chicken was boiled, 2 cups 
if small. Add 2 t-spoons Worcester sauce. Season with salt and 
red pepper. Serve soon as thoroughly hot. 

Palmer Johnson. 

ENGLISH MONKEY. 

1/2 cup grated cheese. 1/2 t-spoon salt. 

1 cup grated bread crumbs. Pinch of cayenne. 

1 cup milk. 1 egg. 

1 tbls. butter. 

Stir butter and cheese together until melted ; add bread crumbs, 
milk and beaten egg ; season and cook till thick and creamy. Serve 
on buttered rounds of toast or saltines. 

Mrs. E. L. Harris, 
Chattanooga, Tenn. 

HOT STUFF. 
1 can tomato soup. 4 eggs. 

1 onion (small). Red pepper to taste. 

1 cup Amer. cheese (grated). 

Slice and par-boil the onions. Let soup come to a boil, add the 
onion and cup of grated cheese. Beat the yolks and whites of the 
eggs separately ; mix and fold into the boiling soup and cook 1 min- 
ute. Serve on toast. 

Mrs. J. E. McRee, (The Daffodil). 

SCOTCH WOODCOCK. 

1 small onion. 2 eggs. 

1 can tomatoes. 2 dozen saltines. 

1 tbls. butter. 

Slice and fry the onion slowly in butter, add tomatoes. Heat 
thoroughly and add the eggs beaten. Serve on saltines. 

Mrs. E. L. Harris. 

CHICKEN A LA KING. 

1 small can pimentos. 1 small can button mushrooms. 

2 cups diced chicken. 

Make a cream sauce, then add pimentos drained, mushrooms 
and chicken. Salt and pepper to taste. Serve on toast. 

Mrs. E. H. Sims. 

ITALIAN MACARONI. 

1 can tomato soup. 1 can mushrooms. 

1 cup grated cheese, (Amer). 2 cups cooked macaroni. 

Melt cheese, stir in soup gradually. Put chopped mushrooms 
in, then macaroni. Season highly with red pepper, paprika, salt. 
Serve on crackers after cooked down. 

Mrs. Carroll McGaughey. 



CHAFING DISH SUGGESTIONS 79 



PIGS IN BLANKETS. 

Dry large fat oysters on a cloth, roll around each one a very 
thin slice of bacon and skewer with new tooth-picks. Fry in greased 
chafing-dish. Serve on rounds of toast. 

Mrs. C. E. Cresse. 

WELSH RAREBIT. 

1 tbls. butter. 1/2 lb. soft mild cheese, (cut in 

1 t-spoon corn starch. small pieces). 
1/2 cup thin cream. l^ t-spoon mustard. 

Few grains cayenne. 
Put butter in chafing-dish and when melted add corn starch 
and stir until well mixed, then add cream gradually while stirring 
constantly, and cook two minutes. Add cheese and stir until cheese 
is melted. Serve with crackers. 

Mrs. D. J. Jones. 

WELSH RAREBIT. 

1/2 cup milk. 14 t-spoon salt. 

2 cups grated American cheese. 1/2 t-spoon paprika. 

1 t-spoon mustard. 2 eggs. 

Put milk in sauce pan and set over fire. When hot add cheese 
and stir until it melts. Add quickly mustard, salt, paprika and 
eggs well beaten. Stir until mixture begins to thicken. Pour 
over toast and serve at once. 

Mrs. Carroll McGaughey. 

CHEESE DISH. 

2 eggs. 1 t-spoon dry mustard. 
1 cup of milk. 1 tbls. butter. 

1 cup fresh bread crumbs. A pinch of salt and paprika. 

2 cups grated Amer. cheese. 

Place butter in blazer of chafing-dish. When hot add milk, 
bread crumbs, cheese, paprika and salt. Stir constantly and when 
well blended add two well beaten eggs. Cook one minute and 
serve at once on hot crackers. 

Mrs. George Rice, 
New Orleans, La. 

LOBSTER NEWBERG. 
1 boiled lobster. 1 gill sherry. 

Large lump butter. 1 pt. cream. 

Yolks 3 eggs. 

Put lobster in chafing-dish with butter, stir gently until buttei 
is melted and lobster heated through. Mix sherry with cream and 
egg yolks — fij-st blending latter with enough cream to make thick 
as mayonnaise. Pour mixture into the chafing-dish over the lob- 
ster. Let simmer a moment, then pour sherry or bevo over the 
whole and serve hot. 

Mrs. Newton C. Wing. 



80 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



CHEESE FONDUE. 

1 cup milk. 1 t-spoon flour. 

2 eggs. American cheese. 

1 t-spoon butter. 

Rub butter and flour together, melt, and add milk and beaten 
eggs. Cook in upper part of chafing-dish over boiling water until 
thick. For each cup of sauce add a cup of grated cheese and cook 
just a moment. Pour on to rounds of toast. 

Mrs. J. E. McRee, (The Daffodil.) 
SCRAMBLED EGGS WITH CALF'S BRAINS. 
4 eggs. 1/2 cup milk. 

1/2 t-spoon salt. 1/3 t-spoon pepper. 

2 tbls. butter. 1 calf's brain. 

Par-boil calf's brain and cut in small pieces. Beat eggs slightly 
using silver fork; add salt, pepper, milk and calf's brains. Place 
butter in hot chafing dish and when melted pour in the mixture. 
Cook until creamy and constantly stir and scrape the bottom of pan. 

To prepare calf's brains: Soak one hour in cold water to 
cover. Remove membrane, and par-boil 20 minutes in boiling 
salted, acidulated water. Drain, put on cold water; as soon as 
cold, drain again, and separate in small pieces. 

Mrs. D. F. Stevenson. 

CREAMED OYSTERS. 
1 pt. oysters. 1 rounded tbls. flour. 

1 tbls. butter. 2 cups milk. 

Melt butter, put flour in butter and when thoroughly blended 
add liquor from oysters and milk. Let cook until thick and then 
add oysters. Salt and pepper to taste. Serve on toast. 

Mrs. E. H. Sims. 

LOBSTER A LA NEWBERG. 

3 eggs. 1/2 pt. cream. 
1 gill of wine. 1 tbls. butter. 

Cut lobster in small pieces, put in chafing-dish with butter, 
season to taste with salt and pepper. Pour wine over this and 
cook ten minutes. Add beaten yolks of eggs and the cream and 
then let all come to a boil. 

Mrs. H. E. West. 

OYSTERS A LA D'UXELLES. 

1 pt. oysters. 1/2 t-spoon salt. 

2 tbls. chopped mushrooms. Y2 t-spoon lemon juice. 
2 tbls. butter. Few grains cayenne. 

2 tbls. flour. 1 egg yolk. 

Clean oysters, heat to boiling point and drain. Reserve liquor 
and strain through double thickness of cheesecloth ; there should be 
% cup. Cook butter and mushrooms 5 minutes, add flour and 
oyster liquor gradually, then cook 3 minutes. Add seasonings, 
oysters, egg. Serve on crackers or pieces of toasted bread. One 
tl3ls. of sherry wine may be added. Mrs. D. F. Stevenson. 




BEVERAGES. 

Mrs. A. C. Plage-Chairman. 

Beverages have little food value with the exception of milk 
and cocoa and are used chiefly as regulators of body temperature, 
and to introduce water into the system. Tea and coffee should 
never be used by anyone under twenty-five years of age except by 
a doctor's prescription. Cocoa is a mild stimulant also and should 
not be given regularly to children. 

Mary P. Means. 

DELICIOUS ICED TEA. 
1 qt. strong tea. 1 dozen lemons. 

1 qt. mineral water. 1 cup (or more) sugar. 

Mrs. Hugh Willet, 
State Chairman Tallulah Falls School. 



12 lemons. 

6 oranges. 

12 limes. 

4 cups cold water. 

Extract juice from fruit 



NORMAN PUNCH. 

1 qt. sugar syrup. 

2 cups strong tea. 
8 cups sweet cider. 



Make sugar syrup by boiling 4 



lbs. sugar in 4 cups water until sugar is thoroughly dissolved. Stir 
all ingredients well and when ready to serve, add slices of pine- 
apple and orange, strawberries in season and a few mint leaves. 
This recipe will fill about 50 small punch glasses. 

Mrs. Walter S. Campbell. 

GRAPE JUICE. 
To one gallon of grapes after freed from stem and washed add 
3 pts. water. Let come to boiling point and boil two minutes. 
Strain through cloth and sweeten to taste, return to fire and boil five 
minutes. Strain again. Put in bottles and seal immediately. 

Mrs. G. C. Chick, 
Lexington, Ky. 



82 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



A REFRESHING DRINK. 
1/2 glass orange juice. 1 t-spoon ginger ale. 

Sugar to taste. Crushed ice. 

Mrs. LeRoy Rogers. 

CHOCOLATE MILK FLOAT. 
1 glass milk. Chocolate sauce. 

Vanilla ice cream. 

Combine milk and chocolate sauce, add spoonful of ice cream to 
each glass and shake well. 

Mrs. Alec Halstead. 

EGG NOG. 

5 eggs. 4 this, sugar. 

1 pt. cream. 1 t-spoon vanilla. 

Beat eggs separately. Whip cream stiff and combine with 
egg yolks, folding in whites last. Serves 8 people. 

Mrs. Walter S. Campbell. 

FRUIT PUNCH. 
1 can grated pineapple. 3 cups hot water. 

10 oranges, (juice). 6 lemons, (juice). 

1 cup tea. 1 qt. strawberry or white grape 

1 gal. ice water. juice. 
3 cups sugar syrup. 

Combine mixtures and place on ice. Add ice water and garnish 
with strawberries and mint leaves. 

Mrs. D. F. Stevenson. 

RASPBERRY SHRUB. 
3 qts. raspberries. 1 qt. mild vinegar. 

2 cups sugar to each pint of 

juice. 
Pour vinegar over raspberries and let stand over night. Drain 
through double thickness of cheesecloth. Measure juice and to 
each pint allow 2 cups sugar. Boil 30 minutes. Pour into jars 
or bottles when cold. 

Mrs. Clyde Allison Stevenson. 

FRUIT PUNCH. 

6 dozen lemons. 1 dozen oranges. 
14 lb. tea. Cherries to suit. 

3 cans grated pineapple. 3 gals, water or 4 qts. ginger 
6 cups water. ale. 

8 cups sugar. 

Heat sugar with water until thoroughly dissolved. Add plain 
water to tea. Mix in fruit and juices. Serves 125 people. 

Mrs. Jack Branch. 



BEVERAGES 83 



HOT CHOCOLATE. 
11/2 squares chocolate. 5 t-spoon sugar. 

Pinch salt. 1 cup boiling water. 

3 cups milk. 1/2 t-spoon vanilla. 

Melt chocolate over hot water. Add sugar, salt and boiling 
water. When smooth, add heated milk and cook 10 minutes. Then 
beat with dover egg beater and flavor. Top with whipped cream. 

Mrs. A. C. Plage, 
Beverage Chairman. 

ELDER FLOWER BEVERAGE. 

1 qt. Elder flowers. 9 lbs. sugar. 

3 gals, water. 3 lbs. seeded raisins. 

Pick flowers from stems, add sugar to water and boil, and 
pour over flowers. Dissolve 2 yeast cakes in luke warm water. 
Stir night and morning for 7 days, add raisins seeded and chopped, 
after which stir once a day for 10 days. Strain and bottle, being 
careful not to cork tightly until fermentation ceases. A tested and 
tried recipe many years old. 
Mrs. A. McD. Wilson, Pres. Gen. of Southern Confed. Mem, Assn. 

ICED MILK CHOCOLATE. 
1/2 cup sugar. 1/2 Pt. boiling water. 

2 tbls. cocoa. l^ t-spoon salt. 

Mix cocoa and sugar, add water, boil 3 minutes, add salt. This 
makes a rich smooth paste. Place 3 tbls. in a glass, fill with 2/3 
milk and 1/3 water and crushed ice. 

Mrs. Arthur W. Chase. 

CLUB PUNCH. 
1 gal. ginger ale. 1 qt. brick orange ice. 

Put ginger ale in punch bowl with orange ice and dip up some 
of the orange ice with each glassful of ginger ale. 

Mrs. Jack Cornell, 

Buffalo, N. Y. 

ORIENTAL PUNCH. 
11/2 cups orange juice. 6 cloves. 

1/2 cup lemon juice. 1 inch stick cinnamon. 

1 cup sugar. Fresh mint leaves. 

1 cup water. 1 drop oil of peppermint. 

Preserved ginger, (size of wal- Green coloring, 
nut). 
Boil together for five minutes the sugar, water, cloves, 
cinnamon, and ginger Cool, add fruit juices, strain, add 
coloring, and peppermint. Let stand one hour in covered dish, then 
pour over large cake of ice in punch bowl, and garnish with mint 
leaves. 

Mrs. Newton C. Wing. 



84 



ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



1 gal. tea, 

1 lemon. 

14 bottle ginger ale. 



ICED TEA. 

1 orange. 
1 lime. 



Mrs. A. L. Milligan. 



FOR A SUMMER DRAUGHT. 
Juice 1 lemon. 1 cup cold water. 

Sugar to taste. 1/2 t-spoon carbonate of soda. 

When well mixed put in the soda, stir well and drink while ef- 
fervescing. 

Mrs. C. J. Stovel. 

STRAWBERRY WATER. 
1 cup strawberries. 1/2 lb. pulverized sugar. 

11/2 pt. cold water. Juice 1 lemon. 

Crush berrries and add rest of mixture, pouring through fine 
sieve. Ice. 

Mrs. Shelley Newman. 

GINGER ALE FRUIT PUNCH. 

1 cup sugar. % cup hot tea. 

% cup orange juice. 1/4 cup lemon juice. 

2 cups ginger ale. 2 cups charged water. 

Mix cup sugar with hot tea. Stir until sugar is dissolved. Adc 
orange juice, lemon juice and a few thin slices of orange and ba- 
nana. Pour into punch bowl over large square of ice and just before 
serving add ginger ale and charged water. 

Mrs. D. F. Stevenson. 

GRAPE JUICE. 
10 lbs. nearly ripe grapes. 3 cups water. 

Sugar. 

Mash grapes and put to boil with water. Simmer until seeds 
and pulp separate, then strain in jelly bag. Do not mash as this 
will cause juice to become muddy. To each pint of juice add 14< 
cup sugar. Boil and skim. In 5 min. put in bottles that have stood 
in hot water. Cork and keep in cool dry place. 

Mrs. James Wilson. 



Juice of 5 lemons. 
2 bottles ginger ale. 



2 qts. tea. 
Juice of 3 lemons. 
1 bottle ginger ale. 
Sweeten to taste. 



MINT ALE. 

11/2 cups sugar. 
6 stalks mint. 

Mrs. C. J. 



Stovel. 



FRUIT PUNCH. 

Juice of 3 oranges. 

Juice from 1 can pineapple. 

1 pt. White Rock. 

Mrs. Geo. Alden Wight. 



BEVERAGES 85 



GINGER ALE PUNCH. 
11/2 cups sugar. Juice of 4 lemons. 

1 pt. grape juice. 2 qts. water. 

1 qt. ginger ale. 

Make syrup by boiling sugar and water together for 10 min. 
Add remainder water and lemon juice. Add grape juice and just 
before serving, the ginger ale. Makes 2 gallons. 

Mrs. J. Edward Ball, 

East Lake. 

A DELICIOUS ICED TEA. 
6 t-spoons tea. Juice of 12 lemons. 

1 qt. boiling water. 1 qt. White Rock. 

Pour boiling water over tea, steep 10 min. Strain and sweeten 
Add lemon juice and carbonated water just before serving. 

Mrs. Emily McDougall. 

CLEAR PUNCH. 
1 qt. cold tea. Juice 12 lemons. 

Juice 6 oranges. 1 large can pineapple. 

1 qt". water. Sweeten to taste. 

Just before serving, add 3 pints ginger ale. 

Mrs. R. F. McCormack, 
President, Parent Teachers Assn. 

BLACKBERRY BEVERAGE. 

Mash any quantity of blackberries. Cover with boiling water 
and let stand 24 hours. Strain. To every gallon of juice add 3 lbs. 
sugar. Put in bottles with 1 raisin to each quart. Cover with white 
cloth and change cloth each morning for nine days, keeping the 
bottles overflowing by filling them each morning from an extra 
bottle of juice saved for this purpose. Cork gradually. 

Mrs. Arthur Stitt. 




PICKLES. 

Mrs. J. L. Minsen-Chairman. 



CHOW-CHOW. 



(Superior English recipe over 100 years old.) 



seed. 



red peppers. 

tbls. mustard 

oz. tumeric. 

tbls. celery seed. 

tbls. each allspice and cloves, 

cup sugar. 



2 qts. small white onions. 6 

1 qt. small cucumbers. 4 

2 qts. tender string beans. 1 

3 qts. tomatoes. 2 
2 heads cauliflower. 2 
2 heads white cabbage. 1 
2/3 cup ground mustard. 

Cut beans in halves. Slice and chop coarsely the tomatoes 
Cut cauliflower into small pieces. Mix and place in stone jar 
sprinkling a small amount of salt over vegetables. Stand 24 hours 
Drain off well all brine. Place vegetables in preserving kettle ovei 
fire. Stir in tumeric for coloring. Add peppers, (chopped 
coarsely), sugar, mustard, celery seed and spices. Cover with best 
cider vinegar. Cook slowly, stirring constantly until all vegetables 
are tender. Seal hot in glass jars. 

Mrs. J. P. Snelgrove. 



TOMATO CHOW-CHOW. NO. 1. 



gal. large green tomatoes. 2 

doz. large onions. 3 

lemon, (sliced). 3 

cups sugar. 3 
pods red pepper, (sliced), 

tbls. whole black pepper. 1 

tbls. whole cloves. 1 



tbls. whole allspice. 

tbls. celery seed. 

tbls. mustard seed. 

t-spoons anise or corander 

seed, 
t-spoon horse radish, 
t-spoon ground mustard. 



Wash and slice tomatoes and onions thin. Sprinkle over them 
a cup of salt. Put into stone jar or enamel vessel. Cover and let 
stand over night. Next morning, wash well with cold water and 
drain. Put a gallon of pure apple vinegar into a porcelain kettle. 



PICKLES, MARMALADES AND RELISHES 87 



Set over fire and add seasonings. Stir mixture well and when 
hot add tomatoes and onions sliced. Cook all together for half hour 
or until tender. Stir gently at intervals to prevent burning. Seal 
hot. 

Mrs. J. L. Williams. 

CHOW-CHOW NO. 2. 
3 qts. onions. 3 qts. tomatoes, (green), 

3 qts. cabbage. 3 qts. green bell peppers. 

3 tbls tumeric. 4 lbs. sugar. 

1 qt. red bell pepper. 13 doz. pickled cucumbers. 

1 to 3 bunches celery. 6 tbls. mustard. 

1 gal. white vinegar. 1 cup flour. 

Shred vegetables and pack in salt over night. Drain off water 
before cooking. Make a paste of sugar, flour, vinegar and season- 
ings. Then put in vegetables. Let come to boil and seal in glass 
jars. 

Mrs. W. W. Berly, 
South Carolina. 

PICCALILI OR CHOW-CHOW NO. 3. 
(Awarded first prize at Southeastern Fair) 
1 pk. green tomatoes. 1 tbls. ground cloves. 

1 pt. salt. 1 tbls. ground allspice. 
6 onions. 1 cup brown sugar. 

6 green peppers. 1 cup grated horseradish. 

2 qts. white cabbage, (ground 1/2 pt. white mustard seed. 

fine). Little red pepper, if desired. 

1 bunch celery. 

Slice tomatoes and cover with salt over night. Drain well and 
chop with onions and peppers. Add cabbage, celery, (cut fine) the 
pepper if desired. (Celery and cabbage may be omitted) Cook a 
little at a time long enough to scald in weak vinegar (one-part vin- 
egar to two of water) . Add other ingredients. Mix well. Fill jars 
nearly full of mixture. Fill to over-flow with hot apple vinegar, 
and seal. Vinegar may be added to mixture before filling jars. 
Mrs, A, O, Woodward, — Ex-Chairman, Home Econ, 

VERY FINE CHOW-CHOW NO. 4. 
(Old Recipe) 
1/2 pk. green tomatoes, 1/2 cup tumeric powder. 

2 medium size cabbages. 1 wine glass each, spice cloves, 
25 cucumbers, (medium size). cinnamon. 

15 onions, (medium size). 1/2 nutmeg. 

1/^ pt. white mustard seed. 1 tbls. black pepper, 

1 oz. seed or 2 bunches fresh 1/8 t-spoon red pepper, 
celery (fresh being more 1 gal. vinegar, 
desirable than the seed). 2 lbs. sugar. 
Cut vegetables into small pieces, sprinkle with salt and leave 
over night. Next morning put in a bag and allow all water to drip 



88 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



out, then cover with vinegar and water and leave one day and night. 
Drain off and squeeze very dry. Then take 1 gallon good vinegar 
and 2 pounds sugar, let it boil and pour over the pickles. Add all 
the spices in a muslin bag, boil for an hour or more, add green pep- 
per to taste and a bunch of fresh celery if you like it. 

Mrs. Aurelia Patterson. 

CHOW-CHOW PICKLE NO. 5. 

2 large cabbage. 1 cup sugar. 

6 onions. 1/2 t-spoon cayenne. 

8 cucumbers. 1 oz. tumeric. 

1 box mustard. 

Chop fine the cabbage, onions and cucumbers, sprinkle with 
salt and let stand over night. Drain off all water, cover with good 
vinegar, adding mustard, sugar, cayenne and tumeric. Let simmer 
1 hour. Seal. 

Mrs. J. W. Frederick, 

Marshallville, Ga. 
NEW ENGLAND MUSTARD PICKLE NO. 1. 

2 qts. green tomatoes. 1/2 cup salt. 

2 qts. small onions. 2 cups sugar. 

2 small heads cabbage. l^ lb. mustard. 

1 small cauliflower. I/2 oz. tumeric powder. 
1/2 dozen hot green peppers. % cup flour. 

Slice all fine, cover with water, add salt, and let stand over- 
night. In the morning, let come to a boil in the brine. Drain well 
and cover with vinegar. Mix together mustard, tumeric powder, 
sugar and flour. Stir all into pickles. Flour should be made into a 
paste by using a little vinegar before mixing. Cook until tender, 
pack in jars, and seal. When cool it is ready for use. 

Mrs. H. C. Phipps. 
MUSTARD PICKLE NO. 2. 

2 qts. cucumbers. 2 qts. vinegar. 

2 qts. onions. 3 cups brown sugar. 

2 qts. tomatoes. 1 tbls. celery seed. 

2 qts. cauliflower. 1 cup flour. 

2 tbls. mixed mustard. 1 t-spoon tumeric. 

Cut vegetables and soak in salt water over night. Cook to- 
gether 2 qts. of vinegar and the sugar. Add celery seed, and bro- 
ken up pieces of vegetables. When tender take out vegetables, and 
thicken vinegar with 1 cup flour, the tumeric, and mustard. Re- 
place pickles, and cook a few minutes. 

Mrs. Charles E. Myers. 
MIXED MUSTARD PICKLE. 

1 cup flour. 1 tbls. pepper. 

1 cup sugar. 1 cup vinegar. 

1 tbls. tumeric. Cucumbers. 

Tomatoes. Beans. 

Cabbage. 



PICKLES, MARMALADES AND RELISHES 89 



Cut up cabbage, cucumbers, beans, tomatoes and small onions 
to the quantity of about six quarts. Sprinkle lightly with salt, al- 
ternating layers. Let stand over night. Squeeze out all water, 
place in preserving kettle and let scald. 

Make paste of flour, vinegar, sugar, tumeric and pepper. Mix 
well and stir thoroughly with vinegar to make one-half gallon. 
Cook until slightly thick, stirring constantly. Pour over the pickle 
mixture, adding more vinegar if too thick. Let boil and seal hot. 

Mrs. J. R. McKenzie, 

Montezuma, Ga. 

MUSTARD PICKLE NO. 4. 
1 qt. small cucumbers. 4 qts. water. 

1 qt. small button onions. 4 green peppers, cut fine. 

1 qt. green tomatoes. 1 cup flour. 

6 tbls. ground mustard. 1 tbls. tumeric. 

1 cup sugar. Salt. 

Make a brine of water and salt. Pour over the mixed vegeta- 
bles and let stand 24 hours, cutting vegetables fine. Place mixture 
over fire to boil ; then drain well. Mix flour, mustard and tumeric 
with enough cold vinegar to make a paste. Add sugar and suffi- 
cient vinegar to make two quarts in all. Place this on stove, cook 
until it thickens, stirring constantly. Add vegetables and cook until 
well heated through. Seal in glass jars. 

Miss Gussie Overby. 

CUCUMBER PICKLE. 
75 cucumbers. 2 oz. allspice. 

2 large onions. 2 oz. cloves. 

1 t-spoon celery seed. 2 oz. mace. 

2 oz. whole black pepper. 2 oz. nutmeg. 

3 lbs. sugar. Vinegar. 

Use fresh cucumbers (size for eating) and put in brine for 
two days. Then soak them in fresh water until not so salty. Wipe 
dry, cut in pieces one inch thick. Boil cucumbers until tender in 
vinegar enough to cover. Add seasonings just before canning. Two 
lemons sliced add very much to the flavor. Add 3 lbs. of sugar if 
desired sweet. 

Mrs. W. W. Berly. 

DUTCH SALAD PICKLE. 
Following vegetables should be ground coarsely before measur- 
ing: 

1 qt. green tomatoes. 9 green peppers without seed. 

1 qt. white onions. 1/2 cup salt. 

1 cabbage. 

Put above ingredients in kettle, pour over enough water to keep 
from sticking. Boil about 5 minutes, then drain off water and add 
dressing. 



90 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



Dressing. 

5 t-spoons dry mustard. 1 cup flour. 

31/2 cups sugar. 2 qts. vinegar. 

Mix and cook until thick. Add above ingredients with 1 quart 
of small cucumber pickles. Cook all one-half hour. 

Mrs. Chas. W. Bell. 

CABBAGE PICKLE NO. 1. 
1 large head cabbage. 2 qts. vinegar. 

1 qt. green tomatoes. 3 t-spoon flour. 

1/2 doz. onions. 2 t-spoon mustard. 

3 cups sugar. 2 t-spoons allspice. 

2 t-spoon tumeric. 

Chop cabbage, tomatoes, and onions fine. Add water enough 
to cover, stand over night. Drain in the morning. Add all vinegar 
except 1/2 cup for mixing spices. Boil until tender; add flour to 
vinegar with spices, making a paste. Add this to pickle, then sugar. 
Boil 20 minutes. If too thick, add a little vinegar and boil two min- 
utes or more. Seal hot. 

Mrs. Tom Germany, 
LaFayette, Ala. 

CABBAGE PICKLE NO. 2. 
11/4 doz. cucumbers, (chopped 8 green bell peppers. 

fine). 2 oz. white mustard seed. 

2 large heads cabbage. 1 oz. tumeric. 

2 doz. small onions. 1/2 box ground mustard. 

2 lbs. white sugar. 

Chop all vegetables well, sprinkling a little salt through them 
and let stand over night. Drain well, place in preserving kettle and 
add mustard seed, sugar, ground mustard and tumeric. Cover with 
good vinegar and boil until thick. Seal hot. 

Mrs. Oscar McKenzie. 

RUMMAGE PICKLE. 
1 qt. tomatoes. 1 qt. onions. 

1 qt. cabbage. 1 qt. apples. 

1 stalk celery. 4 or 5 green peppers. 

1/2 cup salt. 2 lbs. sugar. 

1 t-spoon each mustard, cloves, 
allspice, cinnamon and cel- 
ery seed. 
Chop fine or leave coarse. Sprinkle salt over this and mix 
well. Let stand five or six hours, or over night. Place vinegai 
over fire into which sugar has been mixed. Add spices and celery 
seed. Drain vegetables by squeezing out handsful and drop in vin- 
egar. Let boil a few minutes— not too long. Stir from bottom so 
all will be cooked alike. Add 4 or 5 hot peppers if desired. 

Mrs. Charles Walker. 



PICKLES, MARMALADES AND RELISHES 



91 



SOUR KRAUT PICKLE. 
1 qt. sour kraut. 1 cup brown sugar. 

3 large onions, (sliced). 14 t-spoon tumeric powder. 

14 t-spoon ground mustard. i/^ t-spoon black pepper ground. 

Put in jar and cover with cold strong vinegar. Canned kraut 
is fine for making this pickle. Wash and squeeze to remove all 
water ; if not enough salt, add necessary amount to suit taste. 

Mrs. Wm. A. Davis. 



ARTICHOKE PICKLES. 



pk. artichokes. 

pts. vinegar. 

large onions. 

cups sugar. 

tbls. white mustard seed. 

Grind artichokes and onions. 



1 tbls. celery seed. 

4 t-spoons salt. 

1 t-spoon tumeric. 

1 t-spoon cayenne pepper. 

Cook all together until done. 
Mrs. Wm. L. Percy. 



SWEET PEACH PICKLES NO. 1. 
5 lbs. peaches, (weighed after 1 pt. vinegar, (to every 4 qts. 

peeling). fruit.) 

3 lbs. sugar. 

Dissolve vinegar and sugar. Let come to boil. Stick cloves 
into peaches and drop gradually into boiling vinegar. When fruit 
is tender drop into sterilized jars, cover with hot syrup and seal 
tight. 

Mrs. Virlyn B. Moore. 

SWEET PEACH PICKLE NO. 2. 
1 qt. fruit. 1 tbls. whole cloves. 

1 cup sugar. 1 tbls. allspice (whole). 

1 pt. cider vinegar. 1 oz. stick cinnamon. 

Cook until tender, seal in glass jars. Pears, plums and cher- 
ries can be pickled in same way but must be pricked with a needle. 

Mrs. G. W. Eaves. 

SWEET PEACH PICKLE NO. 3. 

9 lbs. fruit. 4 lbs. sugar. 

1 qt. apple vinegar. 1 cup water. 

Spice. 

Peel firm cling-stone peaches of uniform size. Drop into cold 
water to prevent discoloration. Put sugar and vinegar into large 
enamel pan over moderate fire; stir until sugar is dissolved. Re- 
move peaches from water and stick two whole cloves into each 
peach. When all are prepared, drop into the vinegar, which should 
be boiling. Stir gently; cook until fruit is tender. Be careful not 
to cook peaches too long, or they will burst. Have enough pint or 
quart jars ready (that is hot with rubbers adjusted) with from 
five to twenty wholespice in each jar. Put peaches in jar carefully 
until jar is full. Fill to overflow with the boiling vinegar. Seal 



92 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 

immediately. Turn jar down. If any liquid runs out the fruit will 
not keep. Remove top, add a little more boiling vinegar and «eal 
again. Ready for use from two to four weeks. 

Mrs. J. A. Carlisle. 
DAMSON PLUM SWEET PICKLE. 

7 lbs, fruit. 1 oz. whole cloves. 

4 lbs. brown sugar. 1 pt. best apple vinegar. 

2 oz. stick cinnamon. 

Wash plums and prick with large needle. Put them in large 
stone jar. Boil vinegar, sugar, and spices together, pour over 
plums. Cover, repeat the vinegar and pour on fruit four days in 
succession — on fifth day put plums into glass jars and fill with 
boiling hot vinegar, seal immediately. 

Mrs. Hugh Willet. 

WATERMELON RIND PICKLE NO. 1. (sweet) 
1 medium size melon. 2 lemons. 

4 lbs. sugar. 1 t-spoon ginger. 

3 pts. vinegar. 1 t-spoon whole cloves. 

Cut rind in small squares and peel. Soak over night in weak 
salt water in a stone jar. Rinse in cold water and let rind come to 
a boil in cold water containing a piece of rock alum the size of a 
pigeon's egg. Drain off alum water and discard. Put in cold water 
the ginger and let rind come to a boil. Cook until rind can be 
pierced by a straw. Take rind from ginger water and drain. Make 
a syrup of sugar and vinegar. Let boil and add lemons sliced thin, 
removing seed and cloves. Drain rind and add it to syrup. Let 
cook until transparent. Put in jars hot. Glass top jars with new 
rubbers are best for pickles. 

Mrs. Joel Hunter. 

WATERMELON RIND PICKLES NO. 2. 

Salt water. 3 blades mace. 

Alum water. 3 blades ginger, (broken). 

71/2 lbs sugar. 1 t-spoon whole cloves. 

3 sticks cinnamon. 1 t-spoon whole allspice. 

1 t-spoon fine mustard seed. 6 lbs. rind. 

3 pts. apple vinegar. 

Let rinds soak in salt water over night, in fresh water all next 
day, then in alum water ; next day in fresh water until three o'clock. 
Then boil in clear water for 45 minutes. Let sugar, vinegar and 
spices come to boil, add rind and boil until clear and rind can be 
pierced with straw. 

Put in glass jar, cover well with syrup and seal. 

Mrs. E. Rivers. 

WATERMELON RIND PICKLE NO. 3. 

8 lbs. rind. 1 qt. vinegar. 

4 lbs. brown sugar. 1 cup whole spices. 

Cut rind into shape desired, boil in clear water until tender. 



PICKLES, MARMALADES AND RELISHES 93 



Add sugar and spices (tied in muslin bag) to vinegar and bring to 
boil. Then add rind and boil ten minutes. Remove from fire and 
set aside in granite or earthenware vessel. For four successive 
mornings, drain off syrup, boil and pour over hot rind. Then put 
in jars and seal. 

Miss Mary Randolph Kent. 

ARTICHOKE RELISH. 

1 pk. artichokes. 1 tbls. cayenne pepper. 

3 pts. vinegar. 1 tbls. tumeric. 

2 cups brown sugar. 1/2 lb. mustard seed. 
2 tbls. celery seed. Salt to taste. 

4 medium size onions. 

Thoroughly wash and cleanse the artichokes with a brush, 
(scraping unnecessary) . Grind artichokes and onions in meat chop- 
per, using coarsest part of chopper. Mix all ingredients and cook 
thirty minutes. (One cup of Olive oil may be added last if desired) 
Seal mixture while hot. Glass jars and tops preferred. 

Mrs. Hugh Willet, Director Tallulah Falls Industrial School. 

CELERY RELISH. 
18 ripe tomatoes. 2 t-spoons salt. 

2 red peppers. 1 t-spoon each, cloves, allspice, 

21/4 cups sugar. cinnamon, mustard, and 

11/2 cups vinegar. celery seed. 

Celery. 

Remove roots and leaves from four bunches of celery. Chop 
vegetables, mix, and put in preserving kettle. Add sugar, vinegar, 
salt and celery seed. Bring gradually to a boil and let simmer one 
and one half hours, stirring occasionally. Fill bottles and seal 
while hot. 

Clementine B. Rawling. 

CORN SALAD RELISH. 
11/2 doz. ears corn. 1 head cabbage. 

4 red sweet peppers. I/2 cup salt. 

1 lb, mustard. 1 qt. vinegar. 

11/2 lbs. light brown sugar. 

Mix all together and cook until tender, then seal. Excellent 
relish for any cold meats. 

Mrs. M. H. Stevens. 

PEPPER HASH. 

1 doz. green bell peppers. 1 qt. vinegar. 

2 small hot peppers. 1 doz. ripe peppers. 
2 cups sugar. 2 large onions. 

2 tbls. salt. 

Grind and mix ; cover with boiling water. Let stand 10 min- 
utes. Drain, cover again with boiling water. Let come to boil. 
Remove from fire and let stand another 10 minutes. Drain thor- 
oughly, removing as much water as possible. Add vinegar, sugar, 



94 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



salt. Place on fire and cook like sauce, stirring well. This can be 
sealed or used at once with meats. By using grated cheese and 
salad dressing with it, most delicious sandwiches can be made. 

Mrs. Homer Dawson. 

PEPPER RELISH NO. 1. 
12 bell peppers. 4 or 5 red peppers. 

16 onions. 1 cup sugar. 

8 apples. 1 qt. vinegar. 

4 or 5 hot peppers. 1 cup salt. 

Remove seeds from peppers; chop onions, apples and peppers, 
and grind thru food chopper. Mix ingredients together with the 
salt and cover with boiling water. Let stand fifteen minutes. 
Drain through a colander. Add vinegar and sugar to mixture and 
let cook till thick. Seal while hot. 

Mrs. W. B. Cox. 

PEPPER RELISH NO. 2. 
1 dozen green peppers. 1 tbls. tumeric. 

1 dozen red peppers. 1 tbls. celery seed. 

1/2 tbls. flour or corn starch. 1 qt. vinegar. 

1 medium cabbage. 2 cups sugar. 

1 dozen onions. Salt to taste. 

1 t-spoon prepared mustard. 

Boil vinegar first; then add ground vegetables. Thicken with 
cornstarch or flour, after adding seasonings. 

Mrs. J. E. Hays, 
President State Federation of Women's Clubs. 

SPICED GREEN TOMATOES. 
8 lbs. green tomatoes. 3 tbls. mixed pickle. 

8 cups granulated sugar. 1 pt. cider vinegar. 

Pare thin as possible so seeds will remain in fruit. Make a 
syrup of the sugar, vinegar and spice. Drop in the fruit and boil 
gently until clear. Dip out whole into sterilized jars. Pour over 
the syrup and seal as usual. 

Mrs. T. F. Abercrombie. 

PEPPER RELISH NO. 3. 
1 dozen green peppers. 1 dozen onions. 

1 dozen red peppers. 1 qt. vinegar. 

1 medium size cabbage. 1 t-spoon mustard. 

1 tbls. tumeric. 2 tbls. flour or corn starch. 

1 tbls. celery seed. 2 cups sugar. 

Salt to taste. 

Let vinegar come to boil ; then add all ingredients. Add flour, 
which has been rubbed to paste, or corn starch. Cook a few minutes 
and seal. 

Mrs. Harry Parker, 
Montezuma, Ga. 



PICKLES, MARMALADES AND RELISHES 95 



SOY RELISH. 
4 qts. green tomatoes. 1 t-spoon black pepper. 

1 qt. sugar. 1 t-spoon salt. 

1 qt. vinegar. 1 t-spoon celery seed. 

6 onions. 1 t-spoon red pepper. 

Mash fine and boil two and one half hours. 

Edith Patterson. 

CHILI SAUCE NO. 1. 

1 can or qt. ripe tomatoes. 1 t-spoon cloves. 

2 cups vinegar. 1 t-spoon salt. 

1 cup sugar. 1 t-spoon celery seed or, 

1 t-spoon black pepper. 1 bunch celery, (cut fine). 

1 t-spoon cinnamon. 1 small onion, (cut fine) . 
Mix all ingredients and boil until onion is soft. Seal hot. 

Mrs. George S. Obear, Jr. 

CHILI SAUCE NO. 2. 

24 large ripe tomatoes. 4 cups vinegar. 

6 large onions. 2 t-spoon cinnamon. 

4 pods hot red pepper. 1 t-spoon each cloves and all- 

3 tbls. salt. spice. 

2 cups sugar. 

Pour boiling water over tomatoes, let stand few minutes until 
skin slips off easily. Cut up fine, tomatoes, onions and peppers. 
Cook all together, stirring constantly until thick. Seal hot. 

Mrs. W. V. Green. 

GREEN TOMATO SAUCE. 

V'l pk. green tomatoes. 1/2 Pt. white mustard seed. 

2 white hard head cabbages. 4 lbs. sugar. 

15 white onions. 1 tbls. celery seed. 

1 large stalk celery. 1 tbls. ground cloves. 

25 cucumbers. 1 tbls. ground allspice. 
11/2 gals, best vinegar. 

Cut vegetables into small pieces, salt down over night in stone 
crock. Pour off brine and rinse vegetables in cold fresh water. 
Pour over vegetables vinegar and sugar ; add mustard, celery seed, 
and spices. Cook until tender. Seal hot in jars with glass tops 
and new rubbers. 

Mrs. Joel Hunter. 

CHILI SAUCE NO 3. 
(Made with canned tomatoes) 
1 No. 2 can tomatoes. 14. t-spoon red pepper. 

1/2 cup vinegar. 1 tbls. cinnamon. 

1/4 cup sugar. 1 medium onion chopped fine. 

1/2 t-spoon salt. 1 green pepper chopped fine. 

Mix thoroughly and boil 45 minutes. 

Mrs. Claude B. Davis. 



96 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



GREEN TOMATO SAUCE. 
1 qt. green tomatoes (cut fine). Pepper, salt, allspice, cloves (to 
1 cup brown sugar. taste). 

1 cup vinegar. 1 small onion (shredded fine). 

Boil to a jam, stirring frequently to prevent scorching. 

Mrs. Charles Walker. 

PLUM SAUCE NO. 1. 
5 cups plums, (seeded). 1 lb. nuts. 

5 cups sugar. 1 lb. raisins. 
3 oranges, (grind peel and all). 

Mix and let stand over night. Then cook 25 minutes. 

Mrs. Fred Cornell. 

PLUM SAUCE NO. 2. 

8 qts. plums. 1 t-spoon ground cloves. 

6 qts. sugar. 1 t-spoon mace. 

1 qt. apple vinegar. 1 t-spoon cinnamon. 

Cook plums until soft (about fifteen minutes). Drain off 
water, add vinegar, sugar and spices. Cook one hour, stirring con- 
stantly. 

Miss Carroll Campbell. 

SCUPPERNONG BUTTER. 

1 qt. scuppernongs. 3 cups sugar. 

Cover scuppernongs with water and cook twenty minutes. 
Rub through colander. .Add sugar and cook twenty minutes, stir- 
ring frequently. 

Mrs. S. L. Dabney. 

APPLE BUTTER. 

16 lbs. apples. 1 pt. vinegar. 

6 lbs. sugar. 

Stew apples and strain through colander. Add vinegar and 
sugar, cook slowly three hours. When nearly done, flavor with 

cinnamon. 

Mrs. C. E. Cresse. 

PLUM CHUTNEY. 

2 qts. plums, (damsons) . V4, t-spoon each of ground mace, 
1 cup sugar to every 2 qts. allspice, and cloves. 

1 t-spoon ground cinnamon. 1/2 t-spoon salt. 

1 grated lemon rind. 1 pt. vinegar and water mixed. 

Cook the plums in the liquid until they may be pressed through 
a seive; add sugar and other ingredients. Simmer until thick as 
catsup. Keep in stone crock, or sealed in fruit iars. 

Mrs. Howard H. McCall, 
State Chairman Georgia State Federation Woman's Clubs. 



PICKLES, MARMALADES AND RELISHES 97 



INDIAN CHUTNEY. 
1 qt. malt vinegar. 4 oz. ground ginger. 

1 lb. sour apples. 2 oz. dry mustard. 

14 lb. onions. 4 oz. salt. 

1 lb. moist sugar. 14 oz. cayenne pepper. 
14 lb. raisins. 4 cloves garlic. 

Peel, core and slice apples. Peel and coarsely chop onions. 
Stone and quarter raisins. Chop the garlic finely. Cook apples, 
onions and garlic with salt, sugar and vinegar until quite soft and 
pass thru a fine hair sieve. Add raisins, mustard, ginger and 
Cayenne — mix well together — turn into a jar, let stand in a warm 
place until the following day. Have ready some perfectly dry wide 
necked small bottles or jars, fill them with the Chutney and cover 
so as to exclude the air. This Chutney may be kept for a year or 
two. 

Mrs. Rupert E. Hall. 

CHUTNEY SAUCE. 
12 large apples. 2 pods sweet green pepper. 

8 medium size green tomatoes. 1 cup seeded raisins. 
4 medium size onions. 1 qt vinegar. 

2 cups brown sugar. 1 t-spoon cinnamon. 
2 tbls. mustard seed. 1 t-spoon cloves. 

1 t-spoon salt. 1 t-spoon allspice. 

Boil vinegar, sugar, and spices five minutes. Add other ingre- 
dients chopped fine. Boil one hour. Seal hot. 

Mrs. Tom Germany. 

JOHN MACK TOMATO CATSUP. 
(Very Old Recipe.) 
Tomatoes. 1 cup brown sugar. 

1 qt. vinegar. 1 t-spoon each, cloves cinnamon 

2 tbls. salt. and mace. 

2 tbls. mustard, (ground). 2 lemons, (sliced). 

2 tbls. black pepper. 2 large white onions. 

1 t-spoon allspice, (whole). 6 pods green pepper, unbroken. 

Wash and mash any desired quantity of tomatoes, put into 
preserving kettle and boil one hour. Strain the mass through a 
sifter, then, to 4 quarts of the liquid add above ingredients. Boil 
down to half, stirring to prevent burning. Strain off spices through 
a sifter, bottle in brown beer bottles if possible. Cork with new 
corks that have been soaked in hot water to soften them. Put seal- 
ing wax over top. 

Mrs. Aurelia Patterson. 

PRESERVED PEACHES. 
Peaches. Sugar. 

Water. 

Peaches for preserving may be ripe but not soft; pare them 
neatly, cut in halves and take out the stones ; take as many pounds 



98 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



of white sugar as of fruit, put to each pound of sugar a teacupful 
of water ; stir it until it is dissolved ; set it over a moderate fire ; 
when it is boiling put in the peaches and let them boil gently until 
a pure, clear, uniform color; turn those at the bottom to the top 
carefully with a skimmer. When they are clear, take each half up 
with a spoon, spread on flat dishes to cool. When all are done, let 
syrup boil until quite thick, put peaches in jars, pour syrup over 
them. Some kernels added will improve the flavor. 

Mrs. G. W. Eaves. 

GINGER PEARS. 

1/2 lb. green ginger. 1 pt. water. 

8 lbs. sugar. Juice and shredded peel of 3 

8 lbs. pears weighed after par- lemons and 3 oranges, 

ing and coring. 
Scrape and chop ginger. Cook in pint of water with orange 
and lemon peel until tender. Add sugar, orange and lemon juice 
and cook until the sugar is dissolved. Put in pears, chopped 
coarsely, and cook very slowly for two hours. Place in small jars 
and cover when cold. 

Miss Mary R. Kent. 

MOCK PINEAPPLE PRESERVES. 
5 lbs. watermelon rinds. 5 lbs. sugar. 

1 small can pineapple (grated). 1 small cup salt. 

2 tbls. alum. 

Pare and peel watermelon and cut in fancy shapes if desired. 
Cover in cold water, add salt and let stand in sun 24 hours. 
Wash and drain. Cover in cold water and let stand in sun 24 
hours. Drain off water, cover in cold water and boil until tender. 
Dissolve sugar in boiling water, boil twenty minutes, dip out rinds 
and drop in sugar. Cook until transparent. Just before canning, 
add pineapple. 

Mrs. J. P. Setzler. 

WATERMELON RIND PRESERVES. 
Soak 2 days in salt water. Ginger tea. 

Soak 2 days in alum water. Use as many lbs. of sugar as 

Soak 2 days in fresh water. there is fruit. 

Select thick watermelon rind. Trim off carefully all green 
from outside and allpink from inside. Cut in squares or any shape. 
Change fresh water each morning. Boil in ginger tea until tender. 
Make syrup of sugar (1 lb. to each lb. of rind). Let syrup come 
to a boil, then transfer fruit from ginger tea to syrup and let boil 
until transparent or pretty clear yellow. Put into glass jars. If 
syrup is not thick enough let it boil longer, then cover fruit and 
seal. If soaked according to directions, preserves will be firm and 

brittle. 

Mrs. E. Rivers. 



PICKLES, MARMALADES AND RELISHES 99 

CRABAPPLE PRESERVES. 
Water. Sugar. 

Crabapples. 

Wash apples and leave whole. Use a pound of sugar to a pound 
of fruit. Put in preserving kettle and add enough water to pre- 
vent sticking. Cook until transparent and syrup thick. Seal hot. 

Mrs. Lanham Minson. 

FIG PRESERVES. 
Figs. Lemon. 

Sugar. Water. 

Peel figs and weigh, using ^/^ lb. of sugar to a pound of fruit. 
Add sliced lemon (use one lemon to 2 qts. of fruit). Cook until 
tender and seal hot. 

Mrs. J. B. Withers. 

PRESERVED GREEN TOMATOES. 

1 pk. tomatoes. 6 lemons. 

6 lbs. sugar. 

Wash tomatoes. Slice lemons and remove seeds. Add sugai 
and boil until transparent and the syrup thick. Ginger root may 
be added if liked. 

Mrs. L. P. Bellamy. 

STRAWBERRY JAM. 
To each pound of firm, selected berries allow % lb. of sugar. 
Place in preserving kettle, stirring gently. Cook slowly for 1/2 
hour. Put in jars and seal hot. Blackberries may be used instead 
of strawberries. 

Mrs. Frank Mershon. 

SEEDLESS BLACKBERRY JAM. 

Wash berries, weigh and allow % lb. sugar to each pound of 
berries. Mash berries, pour in preserving kettle and cook until 
soft. Mash through sieve, adding sugar to pulp. Return to fire 
and simmer for one-half hour. Seal. 

Mrs. T. H. Stewart, Jr. 

CARROT MARMALADE. 
3 cups carrots. 3 lemons. 

3 cups apples. 4 cups sugar. 

3 cups cold water. 

Method — Grate carrots, apples, and lemon rind together; add 
lemon juice. Cook all together with sugar, simmering gently till 
thick, about 30 minutes. 

Mrs. J. C. Wing, 
Palmer, Mass. 

GENUINE ENGLISH ORANGE MARMALADE. 
1 grapefruit. 2 lemons. 

4 oranges. 



100 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



Pare the fruit and slice skins fine, chop the fruit and mix to- 
gether, adding three pints of water to each pound of fruit mixture. 
Put seeds in pint of water and simmer down to half. Let fruit 
stand forty-eight hours in water, then boil until tender. Let this 
stand until next day then add water from seeds strained and add 
one lb. of sugar to each pound of mixture, boil rapidly until it jells. 

Mrs. Chas. W. Bell 

GRAPE CONSERVE. 
3 lbs. grapes. 1 cup English walnut meats. 

3 oranges. 6 cups sugar. 

Skin grapes and cook pulp until seeds separate. Put through 
colander, add skins and juice of oranges, walnut meats and 
sugar. .Cook twenty minutes as for jelly. 

Mrs. Edwin Beaver. 

GRAPE, PLUM, OR CHERRY CONSERVE. 
6 pts. drained fruit. 4 oranges. 

8 cups granulated sugar. 1 cup English walnut meats. 

2 lbs. seeded raisins. 

Grate orange peel and extract juice. Chop raisins and nuts 
together ; combine all ingredients, and cook gently for forty minutes. 
This will make twelve glasses. 

Mrs. T. F. Abercrombie. 

GRAPE FRUIT CONSERVE. 
2 grapefruit. 2 oranges. 

2 lemons. 2 cups nut meats. 

Slice off skin from each end of grapefruit. This prevents 
it from being bitter. Remove seeds and put through coarse^ meat 
grinder. Do same with lemons and oranges, except dvm't cut 
off end. Add three times as much water as you have fruit and 
let stand over night. Add equal quantity of sugar and boil until 
it jells. This makes about thirty glasses of conserve. 

Mrs. J. H. Zachry. 

APPLE CONSERVE. 

8 cups of unsweetened apple 8 scant tbls. syrup. 

sauce. 2 t-spoons cloves. 

2 cups brown sugar. 1 tbls. cinnamon. 

2 oranges sliced thin. 1 lb. English walnut meats. 

2 lemons sliced thin. Pinch of salt. 

1 lb raisins. 

Boil above ingredients (except nuts) 15 mmutes. Add nuts 

last and seal. ^ ^ ^ 

Mrs. W. L. Percy. 

CRAB APPLE JELLY. 
Crab apples. Sugar. 

Water. Lemons. 



PICKLES, MARMALADES AND RELISHES 101 



Wash and wipe crab-apple, quarter but do not core, put in 
kettle, and cover with cold water; cook until soft. Strain twice 
through a jelly bag. Put juice on and boil for twenty-five minutes. 
Add a pound of sugar to every pint of juice, with juice of one lemon. 
Boil until it jells. 

(Miss) Annie J. H«ad. 

PARADISE JELLY. 

6 apples. 1 pt. cranberries. 

6 quinces. Water. ^ 

After washing the fruit, core the apples and quinces but do 
not peel. Put all over the fire in water enough to cover and cook 
till soft. Strain off the juice and proceed as in currant jelly. 
A pint of juice to a pound of sugar. The pulp remaining may have 
sugar added to it and then be canned for tapioca pudding, or for 
marmalade. 

Mrs. D. L Carson. 

GOOSEBERRY JELLY. 
3 qts. green gooseberries. Sugar. 

3 qts. water. 

Wash gooseberries, put in kettle with water and cook over 
slow fire until berries are soft enough to mash easily, strain and 
press through jelly bag. To every pint of juice add one pound 
sugar. Cook rapidly for ten minutes, skimming well while boiling. 
Turn into glasses and seal when cold. 

Mrs. L. P. Bellamy. 

CRANBERRY JELLY. ^ 

1 qt. cranberries. 1 pt. sugar. 

1 pt. cold water. 

Cook berries in water until soft, strain through sieve. Then 
add sugar and boil five minutes. 

Mrs. J. P. Averill. 

GRAPE JELLY. 
Grapes. Water. 

Sugar. 

Stem ripe grapes and put into a preserving kettle, let come to 
boil, mash and strain. Put juice on to boil for twenty minutes, 
then add three-quarters of a pound of sugar to every pint of juice. 
Skin while boiling, let cook fifteen minutes. Put in glasses and 
cover. Green grape jelly may be made the same way, but will re- 
quire a pound of sugar to a pint of juice. 

Mrs. J. B. Withers. 

QUINCE JELLY. 
Quinces. Sugar. 

Water. 

Cut ripe quinces in slices, put in a kettle and cover with cold 
water ; boil until soft, strain, and put in preserving kettle. To every 



102 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 

pint of juice add three-quarters of a pound of sugar. Boil until 
it jells. 

(Miss) Annie J. Head. 

PINEAPPLE JELLY. 

Apples. Sugar. 

Pineapple. Water. 

Take tart apples, cut up without peeling and drop into watei 
to prevent them turning dark. Add peeling and cores of one oi 
two pineapples; boil all (covered with water) until apples are quite 
tender, strain juice through a jelly bag, add measure for measure 
of juice and white sugar. Boil quickly for ten minutes in shallow 
vessel. Put in glasses while hot. 

Mrs. J. L. Minson. 




CAKES, FILLINGS, ICINGS AND COOKIES. 

Mrs. Henry A. Manning, Chairman. 

CAKES. 

There are two classes of cake — the sponge and the butter cake. 
The first is less fattening and best for children. All our cakes are 
variations made on the true sponge or on the cup cake recipes. Cakes 
have much food value, which should be remembered in planning a 
meal. 

M. P. Means. 



SCRIPTURE CAKE 

11/2 cups of Judge, 5:25 last 6 cups Jeremiah, 17 : 11 

clause. 
2 cups Jeremiah, 6 :20. 
2 cups Nehum, 3:12. 
1 cup Numbers, 17 :8. 
41/2 cups I Kings, 4:22, first 

clause. 



A pinch of Leviticus, 2 :13. 
2 tbls. I Samuel, 14:25, last. 
II Chronicles, 9:9. season to 

taste. 
1/2 cup Judges, 4 :19, last clause. 
2 tbls. Amos, 4:5, first clause. 



Method — Follow Solomon's prescription fov making a good 
boy, Proverbs 23:14, and you will have a good cake. 

Emily E. Rice. 

ANGEL CAKE. 

12 egg whites. 10 oz. flour. 

Generous pinch of salt. 4 oz. granulated sugar. 

2 level t-spoons cream of tartar. 1 t-spoon vanilla. 

Have everything ready before breaking the eggs, and proceed 
rapidly. Have eggs thoroughly chilled and avoid having even small 
particles of the yolk of the egg in the whites. Weigh sugar and 
flour, sifting each on a separate piece of paper. Beat eggs, after 
adding salt, till large bubbles disappear ; sift in cream of tartar un- 
til eggs are dry and stiff. (If beaten too long the cake will be dry 
and tough) . Fold in (not beat in) the sugar and then the flour by 



104 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 

sifting a little in at a time. Light the oven and then add vanilla. 
Put in an ungreased aluminum pan and place in oven, about three 
or four inches from the floor of the oven. Reduce gas until it 
looks like rows of beads and let it stay that way for thirty minutes. 
Then increase heat until the gas is nearly full. In 15 minutes more, 
the cake should be a pretty brown all over. As gas pressure and 
sizes of ovens vary, each person must learn by experience just when 
the cake is done, but 45 minutes is the average time. As soon as 
taken out of the oven the cake should be turned up side down and 
left till thoroughly cold. By running a knift around the sides and 
then knocking the sides of the pan on the edge of the kitchen table, 
the cake can be gotten out of the pan in perfect condition. Dust 
powdered sugar over the top or ice the cake according to taste. By 
using a carving knife and dampening it often, the slices may be kept 
even and light. If you press hard on the knife, you will have a 
ragged slice. 

Mrs. R. L. Turman 
ANGEL FOOD CAKE. 

12 egg whites. II/2 cup sugar. 

1/4 t-spoon salt. 1 scant cup flour. 

1 t-spoon cream of tartar. 1 t-spoon vanilla. 

Place the whites in deep bowl, sprinkle in the salt and beal 
with dover egg beater until entirely stiff. Stir in cream of tartar 
This helps the whites to remain stiff. Next, thordughly beat in 
sugar with egg beater or open spoon. Measure a scant cup of flour, 
sift three times and remeasure, filling the cup by gently laying in 
the flour by spoonfuls. This is to insure having a scant and light 
cup of flour. Then fold the flour into the cake mixture, about a 
third at a time. The flour should not be beaten in. Add vanilla 
and pour mixture into an ungreased tin with a funnel center. The 
oven should be quite warm, but not hot, when cake is put in. Let 
heat be moderate throughout the baking, which may be from forty 
to sixty minutes. 

Mrs. Alan Griffith Stanford. 

DEVILS FOOD CAKE. 

2 cups sugar. 3 eggs. 

3 cups sifted flour. % cup grated chocolate. 
1/2 cup Snowdrift. 1 t-spoon soda. 

1 cup sour milk. 1 t-spoon baking powder. 

1 cup hot water. lA t-spoon salt. 

Add sugar to Snowdrift, cream well, put in egg yolks, then 
chocolate dissolved in hot water, beat well. Dissolve soda in milk 
add to mixture, gradually sift in 2 cups of flour, beating well. Al- 
ternate last cup of flour and baking powder with well beaten egg 
whites. Add salt and favorite flavoring, bake in moderate oven, put 
together and ice with caramel. 

CARAMEL FILLING. 

2 cups of brown sugar. 1 t-spoon vanilla. 
2 cups white sugar. 2 tbls. butter. 
11/2 cups milk. Pinch of salt. 



CAKES, COOKIES AND ICINGS 105 



Cook sugar, milk and salt together, (stirring constantly) to 
soft ball degree when tested in cold water. Just before removing 
sauce pan from fire add vanilla and butter, beat until cool enough 
to spread. If mixture should happen to cook too long add a few 
drops of milk and beat until right consistency. 

Mrs. J. A. Carlisle, 
Cookbook Chairman. 

OLD FASHIONED POUND CAKE. 
21/2 cups sugar. 4 cups sifted flour. 

1 lb. butter. 10 eggs. 

14 t-spoon baking powder. 1 t-spoon salt. 

Cream butter and sugar together thoroughly. Do not break 
yolks, but add 1 at the time alternately with flour (sifted several 
times with baking powder) until well mixed. Add well beaten 
whites last. Bake in slow oven for about 2 hours. 

Mrs. F. R. Lane. 

POUND CAKE. 
1 cup butter. 2 scant cups sifted flour. 

1 cup sugar. 1 level t-spoon baking powder. 

5 eggs. 1 t-spoon vanilla. 

Cream butter well, add sugar slowly, beating thoroughly. Add 
whole egg, alternately with flour which has been sifted with baking 
powder; add flavoring. Bake in a moderate oven about 1 hour. 

Mrs. R. L. Mason. 

CREAM LAYER CAKE. 
1 cup granulated sugar. 2 t-spoon Royal baking pow- 

1 cup butter. der. 

6 large or seven small eggs. Vanilla or lemon flavoring to 

2 l^ cups sifted flour. taste. 

Cream butter and sugar together, add well beaten yolks of 
eggs, stir well, sift flour with baking powder three times, then 
add to the mixture, and stir in beaten whites gently. Flavor 
and pour into layer tins. Bake in a moderate oven. 

FILLING. 

1 cup granulated sugar. 1/2 cup evaporated milk. 
1/4 cup butter. 

Dissolve all together and cook over a moderate fire until it 
sheets from the spoon. Spread between layers and on top of the 
cake. 

Mrs. J. C. Gentry. 

PINEAPPLE CAKE. 
% cup butter. 5 eggs. 

2 cups sugar. 1 level t-spoon Royal 
1 cup milk. baking powder. 

3 cups sifted flour. i/^ t-spoon vanilla. 



106 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



Cream together butter and sugar until very light, add eggs 2 
at a time, beating 5 minutes between each addition. Add alter- 
nately milk and flour, adding baking powder to the last flour. Then 
add vanilla. Bake in layer tins in moderately hot oven. When 
cooled put the layers together with boiled icing. On top of each 
layer of icing put a layer of pineapple. Sprinkle powdered sugar 
over the pineapple. 

Mrs. Simon Weill. 
LANE CAKE. 
(Original.) 
8 egg whites. 2 cups sugar. 

1 cup milk. 3 t-spoons baking powder, 

31/4 cups sifted flour. 1 tbls. vanilla. 

1 cup butter. 

Add baking powder to flour and sift three times. Cream 
butter and sugar gradually until very light. Add alternately milk 
and flour. Lastly, fold in well beaten whites with flavoring. Pour 
in tube pan and bake in moderate oven for loaf cake, or bake in 
layers. | H 

FILLING. 
7 egg yolks. 1 cup sugar. 

1 cup seeded raisins. 1/2 cup butter. 

1 wine glass wine. 1 cup English walnut meats. 

1 t-spoon vanilla. 

Cream butter and sugar ; add well beaten egg yolks. Cook in 
double boiler, stirring constantly until quite thick. Remove from 
fire and while hot add raisins and walnuts chopped. Lastly, add 
wine and vanilla. 

Mrs. W. C. Lane, 
Roanoke, Ala. 

DELICIOUS CAKE. 
3 cups sifted flour. 3 t-spoons baking powder. 

2 cups sugar. 1 cup butter. 

1 cup milk. 1 t-spoon vanilla. 

Whites 8 eggs. 2 squares chocolate. 

Cream together butter and sugar, add milk and vanilla, alter- 
nating with sifted dry ingredients. Fold in egg whites, adding last 
the melted chocolate. Bake in moderate oven. 

FILLING. 

1 pt. milk. 1 tbls. butter. 

2 eggs. Vi cup corn starch. 
1 cup sugar. 1 cup nut meats. 
Flavor as desired. 

Mix corn starch and sugar with a little cold milk, add slightly 
beaten eggs. Heat rest of milk and add to first mixture. Cook in 
double boiler until thick, adding butter while hot. When cool add 
flavoring and nuts, spread on layers. 

Mrs. Nellie Singleton. 



CAKES, COOKIES AND ICINGS 107 



FUDGE CAKE. 

1/2 cup melted butter. 2 eggs well beaten. 

3 squares unsweetened choco- 1/2 cup flour, 
late or 6 tbls. cocoa. 1 tbls vanilla. 

1 cup sugar. 1 cup nut meats. 

Beat together in above order and bake in biscuit pans three- 
fourths inch thick. 

Mrs. J. P. Snelgrove. 

MOCHA CAKE. 

2 eggs. 1 t-spoon vanilla. 
1 cup sugar. 14 cup hot milk. 
1 cup sifted flour. 1 t-spoon butter. 
11/4 t-spoons baking powder 

(Royal). 
Beat eggs very lightly. Add sugar beaten in very light anc^ 
flour in which baking powder has been sifted. Melt butter intc 
hot milk, adding vanilla. Pour this into the first mixture and bea1 
until thoroughly mixed. Pour into greased and floured layer tins 
and bake in quick oven about 15 minutes. This makes two layers. 

MOCHA FILLING. 

1 cup powdered sugar. 2 tbls. coffee. 

1/2 scant cup butter. 1 t-spoon vanilla. 

2 t-spoon cocoa. 

Cream sugar and butter together, add cocoa, cold boiled coffee 
and vanilla. Mix thoroughly, spread between cake layers and ice 
top. 

Mrs. W. Frank Daub. 
DELIGHTFUL SPONGE CAKE. NO 1. 
1 cup sugar. 6 eggs. 

1 cup sifted flour. 1 lemon (juice). 
Pinch of salt. 

Beat yolks with dover egg beater until very light, add sugar 
which has been sifted 5 times ; add lemon juice then flour sifted 
5 times. Sprinkle salt in egg whites and beat very stiff, fold into the 
cake mixture. Pour in well greased cake pan, place in oven hot 
enough to brown paper in 5 minutes. Cook over one burner 15 
minutes, then turn on both lights 30 minutes. Turn out cake on 
face until cool. For a delicious dessert, bake in layers. 

FILLING. 

2 cups strawberries. 1/2 glass jelly. 

1 egg white. Whipped cream. 

Beat jelly gradually into unbeaten egg white until thick and 
foamy (about 5 minutes). Place strawberries cut in pieces be- 
tween layers and on top of cake ; pouring jelly mixture over berries. 
Top with whipped cream. 

Mrs. B. M. Boykin, 
Pres. Atlanta Woman's Club. 



108 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



VELVET SPONGE CAKE NO 2. 

2 cups sugar. 21/2 cups sifted flour. 

5 eggs. 2 t-spoons Royal baking pow- 

1 cup boiling water. der. 

Flavoring. 
Add sugar gradually to slightly beaten egg yolks and beat for 
about fifteen minutes. Add flour alternately with well beaten 
egg whites. Stir in boiling water in which baking powder has 
been sifted. Add flavoring. Bake in moderate oven. 

Mrs. A. C. Ryley, 
Fort Valley, Ga. 
SPONGE CAKE NO 3. 
4 eggs. Pinch salt. 

3 tbls. cold water. 1 cup sugar. 

2 t-spoons Royal baking pow- II/2 cups sifted flour. 

der. 1 t-spoon lemon extract. 

Add sugar gradually to well beaten yolks. Stir in water, salt 

and extract. Add well beaten whites alternately with the flour; 

stirring as little as possible to mix. If baked in loaf, oven should be 

moderate ; if in layers, oven should be hot. Grease and flour pan. 

Mrs. J. F. Ryan. 
WHITE LAYER CAKE. 
12 whites of eggs. 4 level cups of sifted flour. 

1/2 cup cream. 1 t-spoon baking powder. 

14 lb. butter. 3 cups sugar. 

Cream butter with sugar, add cream. Stir in flour mixed with 
baking powder. Whites beaten thoroughly added last. Bake in 
layers in a moderate oven, and put together with any filling de- 
sired. 

Mrs. Virlyn B. Moore. 

DELICIOUS WHITE CAKE. 

4 cups unsifted flour. 2 cups sugar. 

4 t-spoons Royal baking powder. 1 1/3 cups milk. 

1 1/3 t-spoons salt. 1 1/3 t-spoons either orange or 

2/3 cup Crisco. lemon flavoring. 

4 egg whites. 

Add Crisco to sugar gradually and cream well together. Sift 
dry ingredients together twice, add alternately with milk, then 
flavoring; last fold in well beaten egg whites. This makes 4 de- 
licious layers. Put together with any desired filling. 

Emory Circle. 

RIBBON CAKE. 



1 cup milk. 


1/2 t-spoon soda. 


1 cup butter. 


1 t-spoon mace and cinnamon. 


4 eggs. 


1 t-spoon brandy or wine. 


3% cups sifted flour. 


1/2 cup seeded raisins, chopped 


1 t-spoon cream of tartar. 


14 lb. citron, sliced. 


2 cups sugar. 


2 t-spoon molasses. 



CAKES, COOKIES AND ICINGS 109 



Cream butter and sugar thoroughly together. Add well beaten 
egg yolks, then flour sifted twice with cream of tartar and soda, 
alternately with milk. Then fold in well beaten whites. Have 
ready three oblong shallow tins (greased) of equal size. Divide 
cake batter in three equal parts, cook two as plain cake. Add in- 
gredients of second column to third part of batter, (Dredge fruit 
with little flour before mixing) . Bake. Put fruit layer between 
two plain ones, with either jelly or white icing as filling. Press 
lightly together, trim edges evenly and cover with white icing. 
Mrs. Allen D. Candler, — Wife of former Governor of Georgia. 

WHITE CAKE WITH CARAMEL FILLING. 
6 egg whites. 2 cups sugar. 

1 cup butter (scant). 3 cups flour. 

1 cup milk. 2 t-spoons Royal baking pow- 

1 t-s-poon vanilla. der. 

Cream butter and half sugar together thoroughly. Add balance 
of sugar to stiffly beaten egg whites. Beat well. Add flour sifted 
three times with baking powder alternately with milk. Fold in 
whites last. Bake in moderate oven. 

CARAMEL FILLING. 
3 cups sugar. 1 cup butter. 

3 t-spoons flour (scant). 

Cream butter, sugar and flour together well. Add just enough 
milk to moisten thoroughly. Cook until creamy, then beat until 
firm enough to spread. 

Mrs. Oscar McKenzie, 

Montezuma, Ga. 

MARBLE CAKE. 

% cup butter. % t-spoon vanilla. 

1% cups sugar. 6 egg whites. 

3 cups sifted flour. 1/2 t-spoon cinnamon. 

% cup milk. 1/^ t-spoon cloves and allspice. 

3 level t-spoons baking powder. 

Measure flour, add baking powder and sift three times. Cream 
butter and sugar together until light; to this add flour and milk 
gradually with egg whites beaten stiff. For the marble — take 
one cup of batter, beat in one egg yolk, and spices. Mix in dark 
batter with white in filling pan. Bake as a loaf cake. 

ICING. 
1 cup sugar. 1 t-spoon vinegar. 

3 tbls. water. 1 egg white. 

Boil until sugar threads. Pour slowly over white of one egg 
beaten stiff. Flavor with 14 t-spoonful of almond extract. 

Mrs. W. M. Jenkins. 



110 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



JELLY ROLL. 
4 eggs. 1 cup sifted flour. 

1 cup sugar. 1 t-spoon baking powder. 
Rind of lemon. Pinch of salt. 

2 tbls. cold water. Jelly. 

Cream eggs and sugar ; add other ingredients in order. When 
cold, place cake on a towel, spread jelly and carefully roll up in 
the towel. Rind of lemon can either be grated or run through 
meat chopper. 

Mrs. D. M. Therrell. 

ORANGE CAKE. 

8 egg yolks. 44 cup butter or good shorten- 

3 cups sifted flour. ing. 

1 cup milk. 1 tbls. corn starch. 

1 tbls. orange juice. 3 tbls. baking powder. 

2 cups sugar. 

Cream butter and sugar until thoroughly mixed, add eggs 
beaten until very light. Sift baking powder, corn starch, and 
flour together twice. Add alternately with milk to mixture, add 
orange juice. Bake in moderate oven. 

ORANGE FILLING. 

4 egg yolks beaten light. 1 cup water. 

2 cups sugar. 1 cup grated orange peel. 
Cook sugar and water until the syrup drops from spoon. Then 

into this beat the eggs gradually, allowing syrup to continue cook- 
ing, as the beating is in progress. Add grated peel just before 
the filling is cool. 

Mrs. Tull C. Waters. 

LEMON JELLY CAKE. 
(A Favorite with Men). 

3 cups sifted flour. 1 cup milk. 

11/2 cups sugar. 2 t-spoons Royal baking pow- 

34 "cup butter. der. 

3 eggs. 
Cream butter and sugar ; add yolks of eggs ; beat thoroughly. 
Add three-fourths of milk, stirring constantly. Sift baking powder 
and flour several times together. Begin adding flour so sifted, a 
handful at a time. Stir rapidly. Add remainder of milk and 
flour as needed for batter of good consistency; add whites last, 
(beaten until plate can be turned up-side-down without slipping 
off beaten whites). Bake quickly in layer-cake pans. In turning 
out layers, whisk layers over quickly as soon as top touches paper, 
as the bottom will not stick, but top of cakes will. 

FILLING. 

1 lemon. 1 tbls. butter. 

1 cup sugar. 1 tbls. corn starch. 

1 Qgg, 1 cup boiling water. 



CAKES, COOKIES AND ICINGS 111 



Put juice and grated rind of lemon in double boiler. Pour in 
boiling water ; combine corn starch and sugar in mixing bowl, beat 
in egg, add this to mixture in double boiler. Cook until clear and 
somewhat thick, add butter just before removing from fire. Spread 
between layers and do not serve for twenty-four hours. 

Mrs. D.F. Stevenson. 
RAISIN CAKE. 
4 eggs. 1 grated cocoanut. 

2 cups sugar. 1 grated nutmeg. 

1 cup butter. 1 grated orange peel. 

1 cup milk. 1 t-spoon soda. 

3 cups sifted flour. 2 t-spoons cream of tartar. 
1 lb. seeded raisins. 

Beat eggs separately, cream butter and sugar, add milk, beat 
all together. Mix soda and cream of tartar with flour, sift into 
batter, add raisins floured, cocoanut, nutmeg and orange peel. 
Bake 50 minutes in moderate oven. 

Mrs. J. P. Selzter, 
South Carolina. 
WALNUT SHORT CAKE. 
11/2 cups of sugar. 2 t-spoon vanilla. 

1 cup of cracker crumbs. 4 dozen English walnut meats 

9 eggs beaten separately. chopped fine. 

1 t-spoon Royal baking pow- 

der. 
Beat yolks and sugar, add crumbs and nuts, then baking powder 
and beaten whites. Bake in layers and put together and top with 
raspberry jam. Serve with whipped cream. 

Mrs. Porter King. 
PECAN WHITE CAKE. 

2 cups sugar. 1 cup butter. 

3 14 cups sifted flour. 8 egg whites. 

1/2 cup milk. 2 t-spoons Royal baking pow- 

1 cup chopped pecans. der. 

Cream butter and sugar together gradually until very light. 
Have egg whites beaten stiff and add alternately with flour. Last, 
add milk into which the baking powder has been dissolved. Stir in 
nuts and put immediately into stove. Bake slowly two hours. Ice 
with plain white icing. 

Mrs. Moreland Zellars, 
Grantville, Georgia. 
CHOCOLATE NOUGAT CAKE. 
1/2 cup butter. 21/2 t-spoons Royal baking pow- 

1 cup sugar. der. 

2 eggs. l^ t-spoon salt. 

1/2 cup milk. 2 squares chocolate. 

1-1/3 cups flour. 1/2 cup raisins. 

1/2 cup chopped walnut meats. 



112 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



Cream butter and sugar together; add milk, beaten eggs, and 
melted chocolate. Sift together flour, baking powder, salt and 
add to mixture. Lastly add nuts and raisins which have been 
dredged in flour. Bake in greased pan in moderate oven 45 minutes. 

Mrs. J. C. Wing, 
Palmer, Mass. 

UNCOOKED FRUIT CAKE NO. 1. 
(very special). 
2 lbs. seedless raisins. 1 t-spoon ground cloves. 

2 lbs. currants. 1 t-spoon allspice. 

1/4 or 1/2 lb. citron as preferred. 1 t-spoon grated nutmeg. 
Grind fruit through meat chopper as fine as possible. Cut 
the citron as for cooked fruit cake. Mix well, and press into a 
pan or vessel with sides straight, so the cake can be cut in even 
slices. Press for a day and night, when it will be ready for use. 
Though the blend is more perfect if left longer. A few almonds or 
other nuts may be added. 

Mrs. Homer Dawson. 

UNCOOKED FRUIT CAKE NO. 2. 
1 lb. raisins. 1 lb. currants. 

1 lb. dates. 2 lbs. nuts, (shelled). 

1 lb. figs. English walnuts preferred. 
Chop nuts. Run the remaining ingredients through a food 

chopper. Knead well and moisten with juice of an orange, if nec- 
essary. Shape as desired. Wrap in parchment paper until ready 
to serve. 

Mrs. L. C. Fischer. 

DATE CAKE. 
4 eggs. 1 cup sugar. 

2 cups dates. 2 cups pecan meats. 
2 t-spoons baking powder. 1 cup sifted flour. 

1 tbls. vanilla. 

Beat eggs and sugar together. Roll dates in about 3 tbls. 
of the flour; add these and rest of flour with baking powder tc 
mixture. Add pecans and vanilla. Bake in moderate oven, using 
shallow pan. 

Mrs. E. K. Ayer, 

ENGLISH WALNUT AND RAISIN CAKE. 

1 cup butter. 3 cups flour. 

2 cups sugar. 4 eggs. 

2 lbs. seeded raisins. 1 lb. English walnut (meats). 

1 t-spoon Royal baking powder, 1 t-spoon vanilla. 

114 cups milk. 

Cut raisins in halves and roll walnut meats fine on biscuit 
board with rolling pin. To sugar and butter creamed thoroughly 
together, add yolks of well beaten eggs. Dredge raisins and wal- 



CAKES, COOKIES AND ICINGS 113 



nuts in the flour, add to above mixture with enough milk to moisten. 
Dissolve baking powder in balance of milk, add vanilla and stii 
well into mixture. Last add egg whites beaten very stiff. Pour 
in well greased tube pan and bake in moderate oven about 1 hour. 

Mrs. Alonzo Richardson. 
State Chair, and Vice-Pres., Atlanta Woman's Club. 

WHITE FRUIT CAKE NO. 1. 



3 cups sifted flour. 


1 lb. almonds meats. 


2 cups sugar. 


1 lb. English walnut meats. 


1 cup butter. 


1 lb. citron. 


1 cup milk. 


1 t-spoon baking powder. 


2 t-spoons lemon extract. 


2 tbls. rose water. 


1 lb. figs. 


1/2 lb crystallized cherries. 


8 egg whites. 


1/2 lb. crystallized pineapple 



Cream sugar and butter, add milk, then two cups flour, using 
one cup flour to dredge fruit, then the egg whites beaten stiff — next 
cocoanut and flavoring — last the fruit dredged in the flour. Bake 
in a moderate oven about 3 hours. 

Mrs. D. J. Jones. 

WHITE FRUIT CAKE NO 2. 
12 egg whites. 2 lbs. almonds (in shell). 

5 cups flour. 2 lbs. English walnuts in shell. 

3 cups sugar. 1/2 lb. candied citron. 
1 cup butter. 1 grated cocoanut. 

1 cup milk. 3 t-spoons Royal baking pow- 

der. 
Cream butter with half the flour, add whites well beaten into 
which the sugar has been folded and slightly stirred. Then add 
remainder of flour in which baking powder has been sifted and 
milk, adding and beating alternately a little of the flour and then a 
little milk. Stir in cocoanut, nuts (chopped) and shredded citron. 
Leaving out fruits from above mixture makes a beautiful white 
cake when baked in a large tube pan and heavily iced, or makes 
lovely small cakes for parties if baked in large square pan, iced 
thickly on top, cut into squares before icing is set hard, a half of 
English walnut, pecan or crystallized rose pressed lightly into top 
of each square. 

Mrs. Robert Andoe. 

BIRTHDAY CAKE. 

1 cup (I/2 lb.) butter. 1 t-spoon grated nutmeg. 

2 cups (1 lb.) sugar. 1 t-spoon Royal baking pow- 

4 eggs. der. 

1 cup (I/2 pt.) milk. 4 cups flour. 

1 cup (60Z.) Sultana raisins. 1 wine glass brandy or fruit 

1/^ cup currants. juice. 

14 t-spoon salt. 1/2 cup" shredded citron. 

Cream butter and sugar together. Add eggs, one at a time, 



114 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 

and beat well. Add milk, fruit and brandy, also flour sifted with 
baking powder, salt and nutmeg. Pour into a well greased papered 
cake tin. Bake in a moderate oven two hours. Turn out, and when 
cool cover with white frosting. If desired, this cake may be dec- 
orated with tiny shamrocks and candles. This is sufficient for 
14 to 16 persons. 

Mrs. Henry A. Manning. 

JAPANESE FRUIT CAKE. 

1 cup butter. 1 cup milk. 

2 cups sugar. 1 level tbls. baking powder. 

3 cups flour. 1 t-spoon each cloves and spice 

4 eggs. 1 t-spoon cinnamon. 

1 t-spoon vanilla. 1/2 lb. seeded raisins. 

Cream butter and sugar thoroughly, add well beaten egg yolks 
Then add gradually the cup of milk. Put baking powder in flour, 
sift and add to mixture, alternating with well beaten egg whites. 
Divide this batter into 3 parts. Into one, put cloves, cinnamon, 
spice and raisins floured. Cook in layers. 

FILLING. 

2 lemons. 1 cup water. 

2 cups sugar. 1 tbls. corn starch. 

1 cocoanut. 

Add juice of lemons and rind grated, sugar and cocoanut to 
water (boiling) . Add corn starch and cook until mixture drops in 
lumps from a spoon. Spread between layers and ice with plain 
white icing. 

Mrs. Fount Lane, 
Roanoke, Ala. 

EXCELLENT FRUIT CAKE. 

2 scant cups butter. 4 cups sifted flour. 

3 cups dark brown sugar. 1 level t-spoon soda. 

6 eggs. 1 wine glass of wine or grape 

1 lb. seeded raisins. juice. 

1 lb. currants. 1/2 nutmeg. 

1 lb. citron (cut in thin strips). 1 tbls. cinnamon. 

1/2 cup molasses. 1 t-spoon cloves. 

i/> cup sour milk. 1 t-spoon mace. 

" Cream butter and sugar together thoroughly ; add grated nut- 
meg, cinnamon, cloves and mace. Stir in molasses and sour milk, 
beat well. Add stiffly beaten egg yolks and the wine, stir again 
thoroughly. Add sifted flour, alternating with well beaten egg 
whites ; add soda dissolved in a little water. Dredge cut up fruit 
with 2 heaping tbls. flour and mix thoroughly in the cake. Grease 
two average size baking pans, line with greased paper and bake 
in moderate oven 2 hours. Let cool in pan. 

Mrs. J. L. Minson. 



CAKES, COOKIES AND ICINGS 



115 



JAM CAKE. 



2 cups sugar. 

2/3 cup butter. 

1 

2 



1 t-spoon soda. 
4 cups sifted flour. 
6 eggs. 

1 t-spoon each of cloves 
nutmeg, 
lb. seedless raisins. 



and 



V2 



cup buttermilk, 
t-spoons Royal baking pow- 
der. 
2 t-spoon cinnamon. 
2 cups jam. 

Cream butter and sugar thoroughly. Add egg yolks, then 
buttermilk in which soda has been dissolved. Add spices and jam. 
Then fruit, which has been dredged in little flour. A little citron, 
sliced thinly, may be added. Last, add flour in which baking pow- 
der has been sifted, alternately with well beaten egg whites. Bake 
in layers in moderate oven or in loaf. 

Mrs. E. V. Carter, Sr. 

OLD VIRGINIA FRUIT CAKE. 



6 eggs. 1 

6 cups sifted flour. 1 

3 cups sugar. 1 

1 cup black molasses. 1 

11/2 cups butter. 1 

3 lbs. raisins. 1 

1 lb. currants. 1 

2 lbs. figs. 
Cream butter and sugar together ; add well beaten eggs. Stir 

spices into molasses and add to mixture ; then pour in buttermilk. 
Cut fruit in pieces and dredge with flour. Stir in mixture; add 
remaining flour. Stir in brandy. Bake very slowly for 5 or 6 
hours over large pan boiling water. 

Mrs. Harry L. Wills. 



lb. citron. 

lb. nut meats. 

t-spoon each cloves and mace. 

tbls. cinnamon. 

wine glass brandy. 

t-spoon soda dissolved in 

cup buttermilk. 



SUPERIOR FRUIT CAKE. 



lbs. sifted flour, 
lb. butter, 
lb. sugar, 
lbs. stoned raisins, 
lbs. currants. 
14 lb. blanched almonds. 



1/2 lb. crystallized pineapple. 



1^ lb. crystallized cherries. 
1 doz. eggs. 
1 tbls. allspice. 

1 t-spoon cloves. 

2 tbls. cinnamon. 

2 nutmegs (grated). 
1 cup molasses. 



Add spices to molasses, steep gently twenty or thirty minutes 
(not boiling hot). Beat the eggs very light; add fruit, stirring it 
gradually. Also 1 t-spoon of soda, dissolved in a tbls. of water. 
The fruit should be cut in pieces and well floured. If necessary, 
add flour after fruit is in mixture. Butter a sheet of paper and 
lay in pan. Pour in cake mixture and bake 3 or 4 hours, according 
to the thickness of the loaves, in a moderately hot oven with a 
steady heat. Allow cake to cool in the oven gradually. Ice when 



116 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



cold. It improves this cake to add 1 t-spoon of baking powder to 
the flour. 

Mrs. J. P. Snelgrove. 

PRIZE BLACK CAKE. 

1 cup butter. 2 t-spoons Royal baking pow- 

2-2/3 cups brown sugar. der. 

21/4 cups flour. 1/2 cup sherry wine or fruit 

11/2 cups molasses. juice. 

6 eggs. 1 t-spoon powdered cloves. 

6 cups currants. 1 desert spoon powdered cin- 

4 cups seeded raisins. namon. 

4 cups shredded citron. 1 tbls. powdered ginger. 

1 nutmeg (grated). 
Add spices to one-half of sugar, cream this and butter well to- 
gether. Stir remainder of sugar in well beaten egg yolks. Dredge 
currants and raisins (cut into halves) in the flour, stir baking 
powder and wine in molasses. Mix above ingredients together (ex- 
cept citron). Beat in egg whites. Put one-fourth of mixture in 
large tube pan lined with greased paper. Sprinkle in layer of 
citron and repeat this until batter and citron are used. Bake in 
moderate oven about 4 hours. Place a large pan of boiling water 
under cake to keep moist and prevent burning. 

Mrs. Henry A. Manning. 

CHEAP FRUIT CAKE. 
1 cup dried fruit (apples or 1 cup raisins, lightly floured. 

peaches). 1 t-spoon soda. 

1 cup molasses. 1 cup buttermilk. 

1 egg. 1 t-spoon cloves. 

1 cup sugar. 1 t-spoon nutmeg. 

31/2 to 4 cups flour. 1 t-spoon cinnamon. 

Dissolve soda in buttermilk. Soak the dried fruit over night, 
drain, and cook with the molasses until the mixture is thick. Add 
the butter to the hot mixture and allow it to cook before adding the 
remaining ingredients. Bake cake in moderate oven. This makes 
a good-sized loaf. 

Miss Esther Stubbs. 

DIVINITY FILLING. 
31/2 cups sugar. 2/3 cup white Karo syrup. 

2/3 cup hot water. 3 egg whites. 

Dissolve syrup in the hot water; pour over the sugar and 
cook until it ropes. Have whites of the eggs beaten to a stiff 
froth ; pour the above mixture on the eggs slowly, and beat as for 
icing. When it begins to harden, it is necessary to work rapidly. 
Use your own tried and favorite recipe for the white cake and 
sprinkle chopped nuts between the layers. 

Mrs. J. B. Bussey, Cuthbert, Ga. 
Past President 3rd District. 



CAKES, COOKIES AND ICINGS 117 



CHOCOLATE CAKE FILLING NO 1. 
3 cups sugar. 1 cup grated chocolate. 

3 tbls. Karo syrup. 2 tbls. butter. 

1 cup milk. 

Cook sugar, syrup, milk and grated chocolate until it forms soft 
ball in water. Remove from stove and add butter; beat until 
creamy. This will ice and fill one cake. 

Mrs. Lela C. McKinney. 
CHOCOLATE FILLING NO 2. 

2 eggs. 1/2 cup milk. 

2 cups sugar. 1 t-spoon vanilla. 

14 cake chocolate (cocoa if de- Butter size of walnut, 
sired). 
Cream eggs and sugar; add milk and cook until mixture 
thickens ; then add butter and vanilla. Beat until it is the right 
consistency to spread between cake layers. This mixture fills, 
covers top and sides of a three layer cake. 

Mrs. D. M. Therrell. 
MOCHA FILLING 

1 lb. pulverized sugar. 5 tbls. strong liquid coffee. 
6 tbls. cocoa. 4 t-spoons vanilla. 

4 tbls. butter. 

Cream sugar, cocoa and butter together; add coffee slowly, 
stiring mixture until right consistency. Add vanilla, spread be- 
tween layers, on top and sides of cake. 

Mrs. Nellie B. Dumas. 

BUTTER FILLING FOR SPONGE CAKE. 

% cup butter. % cup boiling water. 

2 cups sugar. 

Mix all together, boil until it thickens. Remove from fire and 
beat. This quantity is sufficient for one layer. 

Mrs. Capers Hightower, 

Thomaston, Ga. 

SHERRY GINGER CAKE. 

3 cups sifted flour. 1 cup molasses. 
1 cup sugar. 1 egg. 

1 t-spoon each 1/2 cup shortening. 

Cinnamon & Ginger. 1 t-spoon orange juice. 

1 t-spoon soda. i/^ t-spoon orange peel 

1/4 cup sherry. (grated). 

1 cup sour milk. 

Cream sugar and shortening; beat in egg. Add spices, then 
milk in which soda has been dissolved. Add flour gradually — fla- 
voring. Bake in layer tins. Put together with boiled icing into 
which a cup of chopped raisins has been added. 

Mrs. Hamilton Douglas, 
Parliamentarian Atlanta Woman's Club. 



118 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 

UNCOOKED FILLING. 

1 egg white. Nuts, candied fruit or cocoa if 

1 cup powdered sugar. desired. 

V2 t-spoon extract. 
"The egg should be cold and the platter on wnich it is 
beaten also cold. Sift the powdered sugar. Sprinkle small quan- 
tity of sugar over egg-white as soon as you begin beating; keep 
adding at intervals until all is used. The egg must not be beaten 
until the sugar has been added in this way, which gives a smooth, 
tender frosting. Spread with a broad knife over the layers and 
on top of cake. Dip knife constantly into hot water in order to 
smooth icing. If it seems too thin beat in a little more sugar. 

This recipe may be varied as desired by the addition of ex- 
tract, finely chopped nut-meats or candied fruit, chocolate or col- 
oring. The extract and coloring should be added soon after beat- 
ing is begun ; the other ingredients just before spreading on cake. 

Miss Esther Stubbs. 

FRENCH FILLING. 
4 tbls. cream. 11/2 cups fine sugar. 

1 t-spoon vanilla. 2 tbls. melted butter. 

Add sugar and butter gradually until thoroughly mixed; stir 
in cream add vanilla. Beat well. 

Mrs. C. B. Rawling. 

COCOANUT FILLING 

2 cups sugar. 1 cup water. 

2 egg whites. 2 cups grated cocoanut. 

1 tbls. lemon juice. Pinch cream of tartar. 

Boil sugar, cream of tartar and water together until syrup 
spins a thread, adding lemon juice a few minutes before removing 
from fire. Beat until right consistency to spread. Place icing on 
layers and top of cake, sprinkle generously with the cocoanut. 

Mrs. J. F. Ryan. 

LEMON CHEESE FILLING 
6 egg yolks. % cups sugar. 

1/7 cup water. 2 tbls. butter. 

2''tbls. corn starch. 1 lemon (juice and rmd). 

1 orange (juice annd rind). 2 cans cocoanut. 

1 slice crystallized pineapple. lV-> cups crystallized cherries. 
Cook yolks sugar, water, and other ingredients together m 
double boiler until very thick. When cool enough to put between 
layers, add cocoanut (straining off all milk) and crystallized fruit 

(cut fine). _ , , 

Mrs J. W. Goldsmith. 

ORANGE GLACE ICING 
ly^ cups confectioner's sugar. 1 orange (juice). 
l^ "t-spoon baking powder. Few drops yellow coloring. 



CAKES, COOKIES AND ICINGS 119 



Add orange juice (strained) to sugar, stir well and dissolve 
over fire. Add coloring and baking powder. If necessary a little 
warm water may be added. This icing should not be hot, only 
warm. Sufficient to ice one small cake. 

Mrs. H. A. Manning. 

SOFT WHITE ICING. 

2 egg whites. V2 t-spoon cream of tartar. 

3 cups sugar. 14 t-spoon baking powder. 
Flavoring. 

Mix sugar, cream of tartar and baking powder. Cover with 
water (add only enough to cover) and when this begins to boil 
add by the spoonful, as it boils, until all has been used, to the 
whites which have been broken up but not beaten. Flavor. Will 
be soft but firm. 

Mrs. Wm. L. Percy. 

MARSHMALLOW FROSTING. 
1 cup sugar. 1 cup marshmallows cut fine. 

1/3 cup water. 1 square chocolate. 

1 egg white. 

Boil sugar and water until it spins a thread. Pour slowly 
on the egg-white, beating constantly with a wire whisk. Put in 
half of marshmallows at once and when dissolved spread first layer. 
Put in remainder of marshmallows beat a little longer ; then spread 
on top layer. Melt the chocolate and from a distance of one foot 
from cake shake the chocolate on gently. 

Mrs. M. H. Stevens. 

WHITE ICING 
% cup sugar. 1 egg white. 

1/3 cup water. 

Cook sugar and water until it threads when poured from 
a spoon. Beat egg to a stiff froth and pour on the syrup slowly 
in a fine stream. Beat until it is thick enough to spread. 

Mrs. W. D. Coleman. 

UNUSUAL CHOCOLATE ICING 

1 cup confectioner's sugar, 14 t-spoon vanilla. 

2 tbls. cocoa. * Strong hot coffee. 
2 tbls. butter. 

Cream sugar, cocoa and butter well together; add vanilla 
and enough coffee to make right consistency to spread. 

Mrs. A. C. Plage, East Lake 

CARAMEL ICING. 
1 cup brown sugar. 2 or 3 tbls, sweet or sour milk. 

1 tbls. butter, 1 t-spoon vanilla. 

Melt the brown sugar until like butter scotch. Add milk and 
let boil until it forms a soft ball in cold water. Add vanilla just 
before taking from stove and put on cake while hot. 

Mrs. S. B. Phillips. 



120 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



BOILED FROSTING 

2 cups milk. 1 level tbls. flour. 
1 cup sugar. UA egg yolks. 

1 tbls. butter. 1 cup shredded citron. 

1 cup almonds (chopped fine). 

Add sugar and butter to milk and bring to boiling point. Blend 
flour with remainder of milk, add well beaten yolks and pour in- 
to above mixture; stir and cook until it thickens, and when cool 
add vanilla. Divide in two portions, add almonds to one-half 
and citron to the other half; put almonds on the first and citron 
on the second. Place them together and top with white icing. 

Miss Wynnette Manning. 

BOILED ICING 
1 cup sugar. 1/2 cup water. 

1 egg white. Flavoring. 

Boil sugar and water until syrup spins a thread; pour very 
slowly into beaten eggs, beat smooth. Spread on cake. 

Mrs. R. L. Mason. 

RELIABLE OR SEVEN MINUTE ICING. 

7/8 cup sugar. 1 egg white (unbeaten). 

3 tbls. cold water. 

Place above ingredients in double-boiler, have water in lower 
boiler boiling briskly and high enough to surround upper boiler 
containing icing. Beat constantly with Dover egg-beater seven min- 
utes. Remove from fire, add 1 doz. marshmallows cut in fourths, 
flavor and ice cake. If above directions are followed and right uten- 
sils used this icing will never fail to be proper consistency. 

VARIATIONS OF RELIABLE ICING. 

Chocolate. 
Add 4 tbls. grated chocolate when removing from fire. 

Caramel. 
Melt lA tbls. sugar in small pan (stirring constantly) until 
light brown sirup, add 1 cup boiling water and cook to a sirup con- 
sistency. Add 2 tbls. this caramel sirup to icing. Pineapple juice 
may be used instead of water. 

Mrs. J. Carlisle Smith. 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

DATE BARS. 

4 cups dates. Pinch of salt. 

2 cups nuts. 2 eggs. 

2/3 cups brown sugar. 2/3 cup of flour. 

2/3 t-spoon baking powder. 

Cream the sugar with yolks of eggs and add whites beaten 
light. Add the flour in which baking powder and salt have been 
mixed. Stir in the dates and nuts, spread in a buttered pan and 
bake in a quick oven. When cold cut in squares. 

Mrs. Omar F. Elder, — State Chairman. 



CAKES, COOKIES AND ICINGS 121 



DATE STICKS. 
1 cup dates. 2 eggs. 

1 cup sugar. 2 tbls. milk. 

1 cup nut meats. 1 t-spoon Royal baking pow- 

1 cup flour. der. 

Cut dates in four (4) pieces, break up nuts and mix with dates ; 
add sugar then milk with yolks of the eggs — put in mixture and 
mix well, then the flour with the baking powder. It will seem too 
stiff but not so — bake in biscuit pan about V2 hour and cut sticks 
and roll in powdered sugar. 

This is very nice for picnics, afternoon teas, etc. If you like 
they can be cut in little squares for tea. 

Mrs. George Brower, — Auditor Woman's Club. 

FRUIT BARS. 
1 cup sugar. 3 eggs. 

1 cup nut meats, 1 cup dates cut up. 

1 cup flour. 1 t-spoon Royal baking pow- 

1/8 t-spoon salt. der. 

Beat sugar and eggs together; sift baking-powder and salt to- 
gether. Combine all ingredients, adding last the dates and nuts 
which have been dredged in flour, and pour into a large, greased 
pan and bake 1/2 hour. It may then be frosted, or else cut in bars, 
and dipped in powdered sugar. This recipe makes 21/0 dozen. 

Mrs. Clayton Mosher, 

Dunkirk, N. Y. 

BOSTON COOKIES. 
1 cup butter or substitute. 1 t-spoon salt. 

11/2 cups sugar. 1 t-spoon cinnamon. 

3 eggs. 1 cup chopped nuts. 

1 t-spoon soda. V2 cup currants. 

11/2 tbls. hot water. 1/2 cup raisins (chopped). 

314 cups (sifted) flour. 

Cream butter and sugar, add well beaten eggs, then soda dis- 
solved in hot water and half of flour with salt and cinnamon, then 
add nut meats, fruit and remaining flour. Drop by spoonfuls on 
buttered sheets about an inch apart. Bake in moderate oven. 

Mrs. W. W. Berley. 

South Carolina. 

PECAN STRIPS. 

2 cups brown sugar. II/2 t-spoons baking powder. 
11/2 cups flour. 11/2 t-spoons vanilla. 

1 cup pecan meats. 4 eggs. 

Beat eggs separately, then mix with sugar and cook in double 
boiler, stirring until mixture begins to thicken. Cool, then stir in 
other ingredients. Bake about 20 minutes in a biscuit pan. Cut 
in inch wide strips and dust with powdered sugar. 

Mrs. Eugene Black. 



122 



ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



OATMEAL 
2 cups oatmeal. 

1 cup sugar. 
1/2 cup butter. 

2 cups seeded raisins. 
1 t-spoon soda. 
1 t-spoon vanilla. 

Combine soda, flour, spices and oatmeal. Cream butter, lard, 
and sugar together, add beaten eggs ; stir the two mixtures together 
and add milk. Drop off spoon on buttered tin and bake. 

Mrs. J. W. Hardwick. 



JUMBLES. 
2 cups flour. 
1/2 cup lard. 
14 cup milk. 
2 eggs. 
1 t-spoon each cloves, allspice. 



TEA CAKES (VERY GOOD) 
Flour. 



2 eggs. 

1/2 cup butter. 

2 t-spoons Royal baking pow- 
der. 



1 cup sugar. 

2 tbls. milk. 

1 t-spoon vanilla. 



Cream butter and sugar well ; add eggs beaten together, then 
milk and flavoring, sift in baking powder. Add sufficient flour to 
this mixture to make stiff dough. Roll 14 inch thick and cut any 
desired shape. Bake in moderate oven. 

Mrs. J. E. Collier. 



SOFT GINGER BREAD. 

4 cups sifted flour. 



1/2 cup butter. 

1 cup sugar. 1 

1 cup molasses. 2 

1 cup sour milk. 1 

Add above ingredients in order given ; beat well together. Dis- 
solve 1 t-spoon soda in i/> cup cold water and stir in the last thing. 

Mrs. R. S. Hilley. 



cup chopped raisins. 

eggs. 

tbls. ginger. 



FRUIT COOKIES. 



1 t-spoon soda. 

IV2 tbls. boiling water. 

1 t-spoon each cloves, cinnamon 

and allspice. 
1 cup nuts (chopped fine). 



1 cup butter. 
11/2 cups sugar. 

2 cups flour. 
V2 t-spoon salt. 
14 cup raisins. 
1/) cup currants. 

"Mix sugar and butter, beat in eggs. Add soda dissolved in 
boiling water. Mix flour and spices and add to mixture. Then 
sift one and one-fourths cups flour and into this roll the nuts, 
raisins and currants. Add this to balance of mixture. The dough 
will be very stiff. Drop one teaspoonful at a time on buttered pan 
— put far enough apart that cookies may spread. Bake very slowly. 
Requires about one-half hour to cook. 

Mrs. John R. Hansbrough. 



CAKES, COOKIES AND ICINGS 123 

KEWPIES. 
1 cup butter or Crisco. 1 level t-spoon soda. 

11/2 cups brown sugar. 2 cups nut meats. 

3 eggs (beaten). 1 lb. raisins, 

3 cups flour. 

Mix together into a stiff batter. Drop by teaspoonfuls on a 
warm greased pan and bake. If Crisco is used, add 1 t-spoon salt 
to mixture. 

Mrs, E. B. Havis, Jr. 

CHOCOLATE DROP CAKES, 
1/2 cup butter. 2 cups nut meats, 

1/2 cup milk (sour). 1 egg. 

1 cup brown sugar. I/2 t-spoon soda. 

1 cup dates. 2 tbls. cocoa, 

1/2 cup raisins. 

Cream butter and sugar. Add milk and well beaten egg. Add 
soda dissolved in 1 t-spoon of water. Add to above cocoa, and flour 
to make batter stiff enough to drop from spoon. Add raisins, dates 
and nut-meats. Bake on greased pan, 

Mrs, D. P. Spang, 

ROLLED WAFERS. 

14 cup butter, 7/8 cup bread flour (Capitola). 

14 cup powdered sugar. 1/2 t-spoon vanilla. 

14 cup milk. 

Cream the butter, add sugar gradually, and milk drop by drop ; 
then add flour and flavoring. Spread very thinly with a broad, 
long-bladed knife on a buttered inverted dripping pan. Crease in 
3 in. squares, and bake in a slow oven until delicately browned. 
Place pan on back of range, cut squares apart with a sharp knife, 
and roll while warm in tubular or cornucopia shape. If squares 
become too brittle to roll, place in oven to soften. If rolled tubular 
shape, tie in bunches with narrow ribbon. These are very attrac- 
tive, and may be served with sherbet, ice cream, or chocolate. If 
rolled cornucopia shape, they may be filled with whipped cream 
just before sending to table. Colored wafers may be made from 
this mixture by adding leaf green or fruit red. If colored green, 
flavor with 14 t-spoon almond and % t-spoon vanilla. If colored 
pink, flavor with rose. Colored wafers must be baked in a very 
slow oven and turned frequently, otherwise they will not be of uni- 
form color that is desired. 

Hazel Allison Stevenson, 

MACAROONS. 
1/2 lb. almond paste. 3/8 lb. powdered sugar. 

Whites 3 eggs, (get this from baker or confec- 

tioner). 
Work together almond paste and sugar on a smooth board or 
marble slab. Then add whites of eggs gradually, and work until 



124 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



mixture is perfectly smooth. Confectioners at first use the hand, 
afterwards a palette knife which is not only of use for mixing but 
for keeping board clean. Shape, using a pastry bag and tube, on a 
tin sheet covered with buttered paper, 1/2 inch apart; or drop mix- 
ture from tip of spoon in small piles. Macaroon mixture is stiff 
enough to hold its shape, but in baking spreads. Bake 15 or 20 min- 
utes in a slow oven. If liked soft, they should be slightly baked. 
After removing from oven, invert paper, and wet with a cloth 
wrung out of cold water, when macaroons will easily slip off. 

Mrs. George S. Obear, Jr. 

INDIVIDUAL NUT CAKES. 

Makes 24 
1 cup brown sugar. 1/3 t-spoon soda. 

1 cup nut meats. 1/2 t-spoon salt. 

1 cup flour. 2 eggs. 

Combine sugar, salt, soda and flour together, add nut meats 
and then add the two eggs unbeaten to this. Stir only enough to 
mix. Bake in moderate oven in tiny muffin rings, which have been 
oiled and floured. 

Mrs. H. B. Rogers. 

COCOANUT COOKIES. 

Whites of 2 eggs beaten stiff. 2 cups corn flakes (crumbled) . 
1 cup sugar. 1 cup shredded cocoanut. 

Mix well and drop on buttered pan in small cakes and brown 

slowly. 

Mrs. W. W. Berly. 



CONFECTIONERY. 

Mrs. George Obear, Chairman. 

DIVINITY CREAMS. 

1st mixture : 1 cup water. 

1 cup Karo. 3 cups white sugar. 

Boil together to soft ball degree. 
2nd mixture : 1 t-spoon vanilla. 

1 cup sugar. 4 tbls. water. 

3 Q^g whites. 1 cup nuts. 

Boil sugar and water together until spins a thread. Pour this 
over well beaten ^gg whites. Combine first and second mixture, 
beat well, adding nut meats and vanilla. Drop fram spoon on but- 
tered paper. 

Mrs. W. M. Seay. 



CONFECTIONERY 125 



STUFFED DATES. 

2 cups granulated sugar. % cup cold water. 

14 t-spoon cream of tartar. 1/8 t-spoon salt. 

5 drops or more desired color- 

ing. 
Stir above ingredients together in saucepan until sugar is dis- 
solved. Place over fire, boil rapidly to soft ball degree. (Do not 
stir mixture after beginning to boil) Test by dropping little of 
syrup in cold water. Remove from fire, let stand until about luke- 
warm; then stir rapidly until mixture begins to gather into a solid 
mass. Knead with the hands until fondant is the right consistency. 
Cut off small pieces and stuff dates from which stones have been 
removed. Lay on oil paper in cool place for at least 12 hours. Fon- 
dant should not be made in damp weather. 

Mrs. W. E. Andrews. 

DATE LOAF. 

6 cups sugar. 1 cup nut meats. 
1 cup milk. 1 pkg. dates. 
Butter size of walnut. 

Boil sugar and milk together to soft ball degree. Do not stir 
after liquid begins to boil. Add butter and dates, which have been 
stoned, and cut in small pieces. Let boil up once or twice ; then re- 
move from fire. Beat until stiff and creamy, add nuts and con- 
tinue beating until mixture is stiff enough to stand. Place in clean 
cloth, which has been wrung in cold water. Roll into a loaf, and 
when cold cut in slices. 

Mrs. William A. Davis. 

BAKED BONBONS. 

1 QSS- Chopped hickory nuts. 
Orange extract. Pinch salt. 

114 cups brown sugar. 

Beat egg to a stiff froth, adding gradually brown sugar and 
salt. When smooth and creamy flavor with orange extract. Stir 
in enough chopped nuts to form a stiff paste, spread in sheets on 
greased pans. Bake about 20 minutes in a moderate oven. Cut in- 
to squares when cold. 

Mrs. A. H. Hazzard. 

BETTY CARAMELS. 

2 cups brown sugar. 1 t-spoon coffee extract. 
1/2 cup milk. 1 cup pecan nut meats. 

1 tbls. butter. 

Cook sugar, milk and butter until it forms a soft ball when 
dropped in cold water. Add nut meats and extract. Roll into large 
marbles and place on wax paper. 

Mrs. Annabelle Champion Banks, 

Greenwood, Fla. 



126 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



CARAMEL CANDY. 

2 cups white sugar. 2 cups brown sugar. 
1 cup milk. 1/2 cup butter. 

Few drops vanilla. 

Place sugar, milk and butter in boiler, and cook until a drop 
will harden in water. Add vanilla. Pour on buttered dish and let 
cool. Stir while cooking. 

Miss Florence Obear. 

MAPLE CARAMELS. 
1 lb. maple sugar. 1 cup pecan meats. 

1 pt. milk. 1/2 cup black walnut meats. 

Boil maple sugar, broken up, in milk, stirring occasionally to 
avoid burning, until a little of it hardens when dropped in cold 
water. Remove from fire and stir in nut meats. Then mold into 
balls. 

Mrs. Edward Porter Van Valkenburgh. 

TUTTI FRUTTI FUDGE. 

3 cups sugar. 2 slices crystallized pineapple. 

1 cup milk. 1 orange. 

2 t-spoon butter. 1 cup English walnut meats. 
Cook sugar, milk and butter together, stirring constantly, 

until it forms a soft ball when tested in cold water. Add juice 
of orange. Remove from stove and add nuts and pineapple, which 
have been broken in small pieces. (Cherries may also be used). 
Beat until creamy. Pour into buttered dish. Mark into squares. 

Mrs. S. A. Ledbetter, 

ANGEL FUDGE. 

3 cups white sugar. 2/3 cup (Red Label Karo.) 
1/2 cup boiling water. 1 cup nut meats. 

3 egg whites. 1 t-spoon vanilla or almond. 

Pinch of salt. 14 t-spoon Royal baking pow- 

der. 
Boil sugar, syrup, water and salt until brittle or forms a hard 
ball in cold water, pour slowly into stiffly beaten egg whites, beat- 
ing constantly with wire whisk. When nearly cool add baking pow- 
der, nuts and flavoring. Beat together. Drop on buttered or waxed 
paper by spoonfuls. Half walnuts and half almonds may be used. 

Mrs. Tull C. Waters. 

CHOCOLATE FUDGE. 
3 sq. chocolate of 1/2 lb block 1 lump butter size walnut, 
or, 6 heaping t-spoons 4 cups sugar, 
cocoa. % cup evaporated milk. 

Cook until it forms a soft ball when tested in water. Remove 
from fire, beat. When begins to candy add 2 t-spoons vanilla and 
turn into a greased dish. Mark in squares when a little cool. 

Mrs. John Hardwick. 



CONFECTIONERY 127 

ROSE CREAM MINTS. 
11/2 cups sugar. White 1 egg. 

2 tbls. white corn syrup. 4 drops oil wintergreen. 

1/4 cup water. Pink coloring. 

Put sugar, corn syrup and water into a smooth granite sauce- 
pan, heat gradually to boiling point, and boil without stirring until 
syrup will spin a long thread (238°F.). Pour slowly on the beaten 
white of egg, and beat until mixture will hold shape. Add flavoring 
and coloring. Force on an oiled paper, using a pastry bag and 
rose tube. The work must be done quickly. 

Miss Hazel Allison Stevenson. 

MOLASSES CANDY. 
1 cup brown sugar. 1 cup molasses. 

1 tbls. vinegar. 2 tbls. melted butter. 
V2 t-spoon soda. 

Stir above ingredients together. Boil until brittle when tested 
in cold water. Just before removing mixture from fire stir in soda. 
Pour in buttered tins. 

Estelle Cresse. 

PEANUT BUTTER CREAM CANDY. 

2 cups sugar. %. cup peanut butter. 
% cup water. 

Make the same as pulling candy ; pour on marble slab or plat- 
ter, add peanut butter and pull until creamy. 

Mrs. Arthur Stitt. 

"MODERN TOPICS" CANDY 
2 cups granulated sugar. 1 pkg. dates. 

2 cups milk. 1 tbls. butter. 

2 cups shelled pecans. 1 pinch salt. 

Cook sugar and milk until it forms a soft ball. Remove from 
fire, add butter, salt, dates. Mix thoroughly, then add nuts and beat 
like fudge. Pour on buttered platter and cut into oblong pieces. 

Mrs. L. T. Patillo. 

FRENCH NOUGAT. 

1/2 lb. confectioner's sugar. 14, lb. almonds, blanched and 

Confectioner's chocolate. finely chopped. 

Put sugar in a saucepan, place on range, and stir constantly 
until melted ; add almonds, and pour on an oiled marble. Fold mix- 
ture as it spreads with a broad-bladed knife, keeping it constantly 
in motion. Divide in four parts, and, as soon as cool enough to han- 
dle, shape in long rolls about 1/3 inch in diameter, keeping rolls 
in motion until almost cold. When cold snap in pieces ly^ 
inches long. This is done by holding roll at point to he snapped 
over the sharp edge of a broad-bladed knife and snapping. Melt 
confectioners' chocolate over hot water, beat with a fork until light 
and smooth, and when slightly cooled dip pieces in chocolate and 



128 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



with a two-tined fork or bonbon dipper remove from chocolate to 
oiled paper, drawing dipper through top of each the entire length 
thus leaving a ridge. Chocolate best adapted for dipping bonbons 
and confections must be bought where confectioners' supplies are 
kept. 

Mrs. D. F. Stevenson. 

NOUGATINE DROPS. 
Drop French Nougat mixture from the tip of a spoon on an oiled 
marble very soon after taking from fire. These drops have a rough 
surface. When cold, dip in melted confectioners' chocolate. 

Mrs. D. F. Stevenson. 

FONDANT. 

2 cups sugar. 1/8 t-spoon cream of tartar. 
14 cup boiling water. 1/2 t-spoon glycerine. 

1 t-spoon flavoring. 10 drops desired coloring. 

Stir sugar, water, cream of tartar and glycerine together and 
place on fire in smooth granite saucepan. Boil rapidly without 
stirring until a jelly like ball will form in cold water. Pour into a 
bowl, cool, and beat until white and creamy. Knead until smooth. Re- 
turn to bowl and cover with oiled paper and let stand 1 hour. When 
ready to use reheat until soft, take off fire and knead as formerly. 
Then flavor, color and make into fancy shapes. 

Mrs. Katherine S. Fitts. 

Club Cateress. 

PEANUT BUTTER CANDY. 

3 cups white sugar. 1 cup brown sugar. 

2 tbls. butter. 1 medium jar peanut butter. 
Few drops vanilla. 

Cover sugar with water and cook until it strings. Pour on a 
greased marble slab and pour peanut butter over the candy. Pull 
and then place on a dish. If it does not cream put dish with candy 
in stove and in a few minutes it will be creamed. 

Mrs. L. C. Flanders. 

PEANUT BRITTLE. 
1 cup sugar. 1 cup nuts. 

Prepare, roll fine, and measure nuts. To every cup of nuts al- 
low 1 of sugar, white or brown, or both combined. Put the sugar 
without water in a saucepan over a slow fire. Stir until sugar 
is all in liquid form. Stir in the nuts and pour into well-buttered 
pan. Just before it is cold mark off into squares with back of knife 
dipped in cold water. Any kind of nut can be used. 

Miss Lillian Pierpont. 

POPCORN BALLS. 
Pop the corn in an iron vessel in very hot lard that has been 
salted. Dip off the popped grains into a bowl or pan. Make a syrup 



CONFECTIONERY 129 



of 11/2 cups of granulated sugar and % cup of water. Let this boil 
until a soft ball forms when dropped into cold water. Pour the 
syrup over the popped corn, stirring the corn all the time. Then, 
with the hands, form the corn into balls. 

Mrs. W. F. Melton. 
Emory University, Ga. 

POP-CORN BALLS. 

4 qts. pop-corn. 1 cup sugar. 

2 cups molasses. 1 cup water. 

Cook all except corn until candied, stir in corn. Mold in balls 
before it is cold. Oil fingers if they stick. 

Elizabeth Garretson. 

PARISIAN SWEETS. 
1 lb. figs. 1 lb. English walnuts. 

1 lb. dates. Confectioner's sugar. 

Pick over and remove stems from figs and stones from dates. 
Mix fruit with walnut meat, and force through a meat-chopper. 
Work, using the hands, on a board dredged with confectioners' 
sugar, until well blended. Roll to one-fourth inch thickness, using 
confectioner's sugar for dredging board and pin. Shape with a 
small round cutter, first dipped in sugar, or cut with a sharp knife 
in % inch squares. Roll each piece in confectioners' sugar, and 
shake to remove superfluous sugar. Pack in layers in a tin box, 
putting paper between each layer. These confections may be used 
at dinner in place of bonbons or ginger chips. A combination of 
nut meat (walnut, almond, and filbert) may be used in equal pro- 
portions. 

Mrs. Clyde Allison Stevenson. 

Camilla, Ga. 

CHOCOLATE CREAM CANDY. 

2 cups sugar. 20 marshmallows. 
% cup milk. 1 t-spoon vanilla. 

V2 cup cocoa or 14 cake choc. Butter size of walnut. 

Boil sugar, milk, cocoa and butter until it forms a rather firm 
ball in cold water. Remove from fire, add marshmallows and va- 
nilla ; beat until creamy. Pour on platter, when cool cut in squares. 

Mrs. Arthur Stitt. 




o 




CHAPTER X. 

DINNERS. 

SOUPS. 

Mrs. J. M. Manry, Chairman, 

We begin a meal with soup to start the flow of the digestive 
juices. The clear soups have very little food value. All soups 
should be started with cold water, heating slowly, and never allowed 
to cook above the simmering point. 

Mary P. Means. 

CREAM OF ONION SOUP. 

Salt. White pepper. 

2 cups onions. 1 cup milk. 

1 cup of cold water. 2 tbls. flour. 

Place 2 cups of thinly sliced onions in sauce pan and add 1 cup 
of cold water. Cook until soft and then rub thru a fine sieve. 
Measure and return to sauce pan, and add 1 cup of milk for every 
cup of onion puree and 2 level tbls. flour to every cup of milk. Stir 
to dissolve flour then bring to a boil and cook slowly for 5 mins. 
Season, using salt and white pepper. Serve, then add 1 tbl. of but- 
ter to every qt. of cream soup. Croutons or toasted strips of bread 
make a delicious accompaniment to the cream soup. (See receipe) 
for croutons. 

Method Of Preparing Croutons. 

Cut slices of bread into one-inch blocks, and place on a baking 
sheet and bake until golden brown. Place in a tin box or jar and 
seal. When ready to use just reheat to crisp and then serve. Stale 
bread may be used for this purpose. 

Mrs. Newton C. Wing. 



132 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 







VEGETABLE SOUP. 


1 


chicken. 


l^ t-spoon pepper. 




or 


1 can tomatoes. 


1 


soup bone (beef). 


1 onion. 


2 


t-spoons salt. 


1 pt. lima beans. 


6 


ears corn. 


3 slices b. bacon. 


3 


Irish potatoes. 


2 qts. water. 



Dress chicken, cut in small pieces, place in pot with water, 
cook until meat drops from bone, add salt, pepper, onion, tomatoes, 
beans, and potatoes cut fine. Cook slowly liA hrs. then fry bacon 
crisp, mince fine, pour bacon and grease into soup mixture, cut corn 
from cob, add and cook 10 mins. Serve with Virginia corn pones. 
(See recipe under Breads.) 

Mrs. Jesse M. Manry. 

CLAM SOUP. 
1 pt. water. 3 potatoes. 

1 small onion. 1 tbls. butter. 

1 qt. clams. Salt and pepper. 

1 qt. milk. 

Chop clams, potatoes and onions fine; add salt and pepper to 
taste. Cook in water 15 minutes. When ready to serve, add milk 
boiling hot. 

Mrs. C. B. Cresse. 

RED KIDNEY BEAN SOUP. 
(Very delicious). 

1 pt. kidney beans. 2 bay leaves, 
(soaked over night). 12 whole cloves. 

2 qts. cold water. 6 whole spice. 
2 whole grains pepper. 1 gill cream. 

1 egg. 1 small onion. 

Small steak bone 1 lemon. 

Salt to taste. 

Place steak bone and beans on in the cold water, add bay leaf, 
cloves, pepper and spice. Boil slowly 3 hours, adding water if neces- 
sary. Add onion sliced. Boil 2 hours longer, mash thru sieve twice. 
When ready to serve add salt, cream, sherry, lemon sliced thin, 
egg boiled hard and chopped fine. 

Mrs. Albert Thornton, 
Pres. Atlanta City Federation Woman's Clubs. 

CREAM OF TOMATO SOUP. 

1 can tomato soup. 1/2 pt- cream, whipped. 

1 pt. milk. Salt. 

Combine soup and milk, add seasoning, and heat. Drop spoon- 
ful of whipped cream on each serving, and sprinkle paprika over 
top. 

Mrs. A. C. Plage, 

East Lake. 




FISH AND OYSTERS. 

Mrs. C. E. Cresse, Chairman. 

All sea food spoils easily and therefore should be kept very cold 
and used as soon after catching as possible. In buying fish, see 
that the gills are bright red the flesh firm, and the eyes bright. 
Oysters should be cooked as little as possible, never after they begin 
to shrivel. 

M. P. Means. 

PLANKED FISH. 

1 fish. 4 medium size potatoes. 

2 tbls. butter. 1 lemon. 

1 t-spoon parsley. Salt and papper to taste. 

Prepare a whole fish, weighing about 3 lbs. as for baking. 
If possible remove backbone. Have ready a smooth oak plank 
1x8x12 inches long. Heat Plank hot, place fish on it, and bake in 
oven about 1 hour according to size of fish. Remove from oven, salt 
and pepper to taste. Have potatoes cooked, mashed and seasoned. 
With pastry bag and tube place 2 rows of potatoes around fish. 
Return to oven and brown. When well browned dress fish with 
sauce of butter, lemon juice and chopped parsley. Garnish with 
slices of lemon and sprigs of parsley. 

Mrs. J. A. Carlisle. 

BAKED TUNA FISH. 



2 eggs. 

1 onion (chopped). 
1/2 t-spoon celery seed. 
34 cups milk or water. 



1 seven ounce can Tuna fish. 
4 cups bread crumbs. 
11/2 t-spoon Royal bkg. powder. 
1 green bell pepper (chopped). 
Butter size of walnut. 

Mix all ingredients with Tuna fish and bake in a Pyrex dish 30 
minutes. Serve with tartar or Worcester sauce. 

Mrs. W. F. Melton, 
Emory University, Ga. 



134 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



BROILED SHAD. 
Select male shad, split down the back. Use a double grid iron. 
Heat it and rub the bars with a piece of suet before laying on the 
fish. Broil ten or fifteen minutes, according to the size, turning 
frequently prevents scorching. It is done when the bone will lift 
readily from the flesh. 

Miss May Tindall. 

BROILED MACKEREL. 
Select choice mackerel, split open on back. Pour over fish 2 
t-spoons of melted butter. Place in hot pan and broil. Turn, 
cooking about 15 minutes. Place in hot platter, pouring over a 
little melted butter. Season with salt and pepper and garnish with 
sliced lemon and sprig of parsley. 

Mrs. Jesse M. Manry. , 

SHRIMP GUMBO. 

Salt and pepper. 
Butter size of egg. 1 can tomatoes. 

1 small onion. Parsley. 

1 green pepper. Little celery. 

Brown onion (minced) in butter, thicken with a little flour, 
then add tomatoes and other vegetables all minced fine and season- 
ings. Thoroughly wash shrimps, and add to mixture. 

Mrs. S. S. Selig, Jr. 

FRIED FROG LEGS. 
Skin legs and let stand in salt water one hour. Wipe dry, 
season, roll in flour or cracker crumbs and fry brown. 

Mrs. G. T. Weaver. 

FRIED FISH. 
Wipe fish dry inside and out with clean towel. Season with 
pepper and salt and roll in corn meal. Fry in boiling deep fat, 
preferably lard, as it browns them better and they keep firmer. 

Mrs. L. R. Smith. 

DELICIOUS SHAD ROE. 
1 shad roe. 1 level tbls. flour. 

1 cup hot water salted to taste. 1 level tbls. butter. 

Clean roe well and drop in boiling water, cooking gently 
twenty minutes. Drain. Butter a tin and lay the drained roe 
upon it. Dredge well with salt and pepper, spread with butter and 
then dredge with flour. Cook in oven for half an hour. Baste 
frequently with the mixture of flour, butter and water. 

Clementine B. Rawling. 

FISH CHOWDER. 
(New England Recipe). 
11/2 lbs. fish. 3 slices salt pork. 

3 medium sized potatoes. 2 cups milk. 

1 large onion. 1 tbls. butter 



FISH AND OYSTERS 135 



Boil fish till done, using haddock, cod, or any large fish. Cook 
potatoes and onion slowly in liquor from fish. Fry out pork, add 
bones and skin. Add to potatoes and onions (chopped fine). Salt 
and pepper to taste. 

Mrs. H. M. Larrabee, 

Boston, Mass. 

MOLDED HALIBUT OR HADDOCK. 
1 lb. halibut or haddock. 1 cup cream. 

1 lb. bread crumbs. 1 tbls. butter. 

1/4 t-spoon celery salt. 4 egg whites. 

Add cream and butter to bread crumbs and cook to a smooth 
paste. Put in fish which has been through meat grinder. Then 
the celery, salt and egg whites, beaten stiff. Bake 3/4 of an hour in 
bread pan lined with oiled paper and placed in under pan of hot 
water. Serve with almond sauce. 

OYSTERS ON THE HALF SHELL. 
Keep on ice till serving time. Have small soup plates half 
full of fine ice, and lay the deep half shell on the plates as soon as 
opened. Salt, pepper and cut lemon should be served at the side. 
Small oysters are preferred and four to six are enough for each 
plate. 

Mrs. L. E. St. John. 

FRIED OYSTERS. 
Lay oysters on a cloth and press another upon them to 
absorb the moisture. Roll in cracker crumbs and then dip in 
beaten eggs, then again in cracker crumbs. Season with salt and 
pepper. Fry in deep fat. 

Mrs. D. L. Farrow. 

FRIED OYSTERS A LA THORNTON 

1 pint oysters. 1/2 cup cracker meal. 

1/2 cup corn meal. Post toasties. 

Mix the corn meal and cracker meal well on a large platter. 
Salt and pepper oysters and dip lightly into meal mixture. Beat 
2 eggs well and drop the oysters into them, have the post toasties 
arranged on a large platter and drop the oysters into them and 
pat lightly so as to make them stick to the oysters. Fry in deep 
very hot fat. Garnish with sour pickle and parsley and serve on 
toast. 

Thornton Cafeteria. 

BROILED OYSTERS. 
50 large oysters. 1 cup milk. 

3 t-spoons cornstarch. 1 tbls. butter. 

Drain oysters through colander and lay on cloth. Have cake 
griddle perfectly clean, hot and well buttered. Put on as many oys- 
ters as it will hold and as soon as they begin to curl up, turn, cook on 



136 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



the other side, not too much. Then put in sauce pan, so on until oys- 
ters are all done. 

Mix corn starch with milk and pour over oysters, put in butter, 
season with salt and pepper to taste. Let boil up and serve hot. 

Mrs. Mary Phillips. 

OYSTER STEW. 
1 qt. oysters. 1 cup milk. 

1 cup hot water. 1 t-spoon butter. 

1 t-spoon flour. Salt and pepper. 

Drain liquor from oysters, add 1 cup water and let come to a 
boil. Then add oysters, and when this comes nearly to a boil, re- 
move oysters to dish in which they are to be served. Mix to a paste 
the flour with a little milk, add butter and the rest of the milk and 
let come to a boil. Pour over oysters and serve. 

Mrs. C. E. Cresse. 

OYSTER TOAST. 
15 large oysters. 2 well beaten eggs. 

1 gill cream. 

Chop oysters fine, salt and pepper to taste, and a little grated 
nutmeg. Add the well beaten eggs, also the liquor from oysters 
and the cream. Let come to a boil and when set pour over hot 
buttered toast. 

Mrs. C. L. Williams. 

CLAM CHOWDER. 

2 slices salt pork. 3 pts. hot milk. 

25 clams, II/2 cups cracker crumbs. 

2 large Irish potatoes. 4 onions. 

11/2 cans tomatoes. 1 bunch celery. 

Salt. Pepper, 

2 qts. water. 

Cut pork into small pieces and fry slowly in bottom of kettle 
until all fat is fried out. Add clams and potatoes, onions and celery, 
all of which have been put through chopper. Add tomatoes and 2 
quarts of water, and enough pepper and salt to season, being care- 
ful as clams are already salty. Boil slowly four hours and fifteen 
minutes before serving. Add milk and crackers. 

Mrs. Charles Myers. 

PICKLED SHRIMP. 

Charleston Style. 

1 qt. shrimp (boiled & picked) . 1 t-spoon allspice. • 
1 t-spoon whole black pepper. 1 t-spoon salt. 
1/2 pint vinegar. 

Heat up vinegar, salt and spices and pour over shrimp while 
hot. Set away to cool before serving. 

Mrs. C. E. Cresse. 



FISH AND OYSTERS 137 

CRAB FARCIS. (STUFFED CRABS) 
A CREOLE DISH. 

2 cans crab meat. 1 large onion. 

3 tbls. lard. 1 this, butter. 

2 bay leaves. 3 sprigs parsley. 

1 cup wet bread. 

As lard heats in frying-pan, add chopped onion. Add crab 
meat as onion curls ; let fry and add bread, squeezed free of water. 
Mix all well together, add salt, pepper, bay leaves and butter. Sim- 
mer five minutes, stirring constantly. Remove from fire and when 
cold, place in butter-greased shells. Dot with butter and top with 
grated bread crumbs. Bake five minutes. Serve, garnishing with 
sprigs of parsley or celery. 

Mrs. G. L. Pratt. 

CLAM FRITTERS. NO. 1. 

1 pt. clams. 2 eggs. 

1 pt. flour. 1 t-spoon Royal baking powder, 
1/2 pt. milk. l^ t-spoon salt. 

Pinch Cayenne pepper. Butter size of egg. 

Grind clams in food chopper, beat eggs light, add milk, sifted 
flour, salt, pepper and butter which has been warmed but not melted 
then baking powder and clams. Cook in deep fat and drain on 
brown paper. Serve hot. 

Mrs. N. C. Booker, 
. . Norfolk, Va. 

CLAM FRITTERS. NO 2. 

12 clams. 2 eggs. 

1/2 cup milk. 1 t-spoon baking powder. 

2 tbls. flour. 

Open clams, wash in cold water and drain. Put in chopping 
bowl and chop fine. Add flour with baking powder and yolks of 
eggs, put in milk and mix. Beat whites of eggs to a stiff froth and 
add last. Fry in deep fat. 

Mrs. P. H. Grace, 
Cape May, N. J. 

CLAM CHOWDER. 

12 clams. l^ lb. salt pork. 

2 white onions. 2 potatoes, 

6 crackers. 1 tbls. butter. 

1 pt. milk. 

Chop clams fine. Cut up pork fine and fry. Slice onions thin, 
cut potatoes in dice, adding crackers crushed. Put all in kettle in 
alternate layers with pieces of butter, using enough water to keep 
boiling 30 minutes. Add hot milk and serve, 

Mrs. J. A. Beam. 



138 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



LOBSTER. 

Lobster to be edible should be perfectly fresh. One of the 
tests of freshness is to draw back the tail ; if it springs into position 
again, it is safe to think the fish good. 

The time of boiling varies with the size of the lobster and in 
different localities. In Boston and other places on the Massachu- 
setts coast, the time is fifteen or twenty minutes for large lobsters 
and ten for small. 

The usual way is to plunge them into a pot with enough boiling 
water in the bottom to create a steam without boiling dry. Cover 
tightly. There are few ways of cooking lobster in which it should 
be more than thoroughly heated, as much cooking toughens it and 
destroys the fine delicate flavor. 

Mrs. R. T. Cresse, 

Boston, Mass. 
STEWED LOBSTER. 

1 tbls. butter. 14 lemon. 
Pinch cayenne. 1 tbls. flour. 

2 medium sized lobsters. 1/2 cup water. 

Boil or steam lobster till done. Pick out and dice, season with 
salt to taste cayenne and lemon juice. Make a sauce of 1 tbls. of 
flour 1/2 cup of water and 1 tbls. of butter. Add the seasoned lobster 
and simmer five minutes — serve. 

Emily B. Thompson. 

LOBSTER CROQUETTES. 

Chop the lobster very fine and mix with it pepper, salt and 
bread crumbs, season well with celery sauce and moisten with melted 
butter, mold into shape ; dip in beaten egg, then in cracker crumbs 
and fry brown. 

Mrs. S. H. Moore. 

DEVILED CRABS. 
1 qt. crab meat. 1 cup bread crumbs. 

lA lb. butter. Yolks of three hard boiled eggs. 

1 t-spoon mixed mustard. 

Mix crab meat, bread crumbs, egg yolks, and mustard. Melt 
butter and pour over. Salt and pepper to taste. Pack in well 
cleaned crab shells, sprinkle with bread crumbs and brown in quick 
oven. 

Mrs. E. H. Hughes. 

SALMON MOUSSE. 
1 cup milk. 2 eggs. 

1/2 t-spoon salt. 1 envelope gelatine. 

1/2 cup cold water. 1 cup salmon. 

1/4 cup whipped cream. 

Heat milk in double boiler; when scalded add it slowly to 
well beaten eggs, add salt. Soak gelatine in cold water and 



POULTRY AND GAME 139 



add to hot custard mixture and stir until dissolved. Add salmon 
and set in a cool place. When the mixture is just beginning to 
stiffen, beat in whipped cream. Serve the salmon, mold with a 
cucumber sauce, made by adding to half cup of whipped cream, 
salt, cayenne and very gradually two tbls. of vinegar, and one 
cucumber chopped fine and drained. A little onion juice is also a 
good flavor. 

Mrs. R. T. Aderhold, 
President, Woman's Club, College Park, Ga. 

POULTRY. 

Mrs. C. E. Cresse, Chairman. 

To dress poultry. After the bird is picked, singe hairs over a 
flame. Cut off head, draw out pin feathers. Then cut thru skin 
around joint of leg and draw out tendons, by holding upper leg in 
left hand and slipping a skewer under each cendcn and pulling it 
from the flesh. Break joint and leg can be removed with the tough 
tendons. Cut through skin carefully below breastbone and with 
the hand loosen and remove organs. The crop may be removed 
from the other end of bird, with wir.dpipe. Wash bird out with 
water, or soda and water, being careful to remove all bits of lung. 

ROAST TURKEY. 

(Chestnut Dressing) . 



1 turkey (10 to 14 lb.) 


Sage. 


1 loaf dry bread. 


1 lb. of chestnuts, 


2 tbls. butter. 


1 cup celery. 


1 small onion. 


1 egg. 


1 apple. 


Parsley. 



Select a plump turkey, draw and wash thoroughly. Make 
stuffing of bread, season with salt, pepper, butter, sage. Add 
onion and celery chopped fine, and the chestnuts hulled and scalded, 
to take off the inner coating, add the well beaten egg, and enough 
hot water to moisten. Place apple in the crop — the juice tends to 
keep the turkey moist and the blending of the different savors, gives 
a delicious flavor. It must not be pasty, therefore use chopping 
knife or large mixing knife to work ingredients together. Do 
not allow to brown much the first hour. Time required 3 hours. 
Oysters may be substituted for chestnuts. 

Mrs. Norman Pool. 

CRANBERRY SNOW. 
' 4 cups cranberries. 2 cups sugar. 

1 cup water. 2 egg whites. 

Cook berries in water until soft, strain through sieve, add 
sugar and cook from 5 to 10 minutes. When mixture jellies, fold 
in stiffly beaten egg whites. Pour in mold and set in cool place 



140 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



until firm. May be served with either baked chicken or turkey. 
Must be used at once. 

Miss Silvia Northcutt, 
Louisville, Ky. 

ESCALLOPED TURKEY. 

2 or 3 cups turkey meat. i/4 cup butter. 

Vi) cup milk. Salt and pepper to taste. 

1 cup bread crumbs (more if 

needed). 
Pick meat from bones of cold turkey, chop fine. Put in well 
buttered baking dish a layer of bread crumbs, then of turkey, and 
add small pieces of butter, salt and pepper. Alternate these in- 
gredients until all are used or dish is nearly full. Pour the milk 
over this, then mix. 

2 eggs beaten. 2 tbls. milk. 
1 tbls. melted butter. Salt to taste. 

Add to this mixture enough cracker crumbs to spread. Cover 
turkey mixture with seasoned cracker mixture, put bits of butter 
over top, and bake in moderate oven about 3/4 hour. 

Mrs. Wm. Rawling. 

CRYSTALLIZED CRANBERRIES. 
1 qt. cranberries. 1 pt. sugar. 

1 pt. water. 

Wash and drain cranberries, add water, boil ten minutes, then 
add sugar and cook 15 minutes, or until juice jells when tried on 
saucer. Do not stir while cooking. 

Mrs. W. B. Price-Smith. 

ALMOND SAUCE. 

1/4 lb. almonds. 1 pint cream. 

2 tbls. butter. 2 tbls. flour. 

Blanch almonds, cut fine and brown in best butter. Blend 
cream and flour and let come to a boil in double boiler. Add butter 
and gradually the almonds. Salt to taste. Pour over fish. 

Mrs. E. H. Nickerson, 

Portland, Maine, 

BAKED CHICKEN. 
Select a chicken with soft feet, smooth skin and soft cartilege 
at the end of the breast bone. Dress, clean and stuff. Hold 
chicken in original shape by means of skewers. Place on its back 
on rack in baking pan. Sprinkle salt over the surface of the chicken. 
Cover breast and wings with a paste made of two tbls. each of 
butter and flour. Place in a hot oven until chicken is well browned. 
Pour 1 cup of boiling water and 1/4 cup butter (melted in water) 
into the bottom of the pan. Place cover on pan, lower temperature 
of oven and cook slowly until breast meat is tender when tested 
with a fork. A four pound chicken requires about two hours for 
baking. 



POULTRY AND GAME 141 



STUFFING. 

1 cup bread crumbs. 4 tbls. butter (melted) . 
1/2 cup boiling water. Salt and pepper. 

Soak crumbs in boiling water, add butter and seasonings. 

Miss Clara Lee Cone, 
Head of Economics Dept. Girls' High School. 

POULTRY STUFFING NO 1. 

2 cups dry bread crumbs. 1 tbls. chopped parsley. 
1/2 cup fine sausage meat. 1 tbls. chopped onion. 
14 cup butter. 1 t-spoon salt. 

Pinch nutmeg. 2 eggs. 

1/2 t-spoon pepper. 

Soak bread in cold water until soft, press out all water. 
Add sausage meat, seasonings, melted butter and eggs well beaten. 
If sausage meat is too fat the butter can be omitted or chopped 
pork may be substituted. If one objects to pork in any form, use 
1/2 cup butter and an extra cup of crumbs. 

Mrs. Amelia R. Woodall. 

POULTRY STUFFING NO 2. 

1 cup coarse cracker crumbs. 14 cup butter. 
14 tbls. salt. 1/3 cup milk. 
Dash pepper. 

This will fill a chicken of 3 or 4 pounds. Sage, summer savory 
or parsley may be added if liked. 

Mrs. M. Oliver. 

CHICKEN DRESSING. 

2 loaves bread. 4 eggs (well beaten). 
1 cup milk. 2 tbls. butter. 

1/2 cup celery (chopped fine). 1 large onion (chopped fine). 
1 cup fresh corn meal (scald- i/? t-spoon black pepper, 
ed). 
Place above mixture in pan (bread crumbled) and pour over it 
the chicken broth, which has been cooled. Mix thoroughly to right 
consistency. Bake and serve with chicken. 

Mrs. Joseph M. Wusthoff, 
Secretary Pioneer Society. 

CHICKEN A LA KING. NO 1. 
Breast of chicken. 3 cups milk. 

1/2 cup flour. 14 grated onion. 

1 minced green pepper. I14 cups mushrooms. 

Salt. Paprika, 

Place above ingedients in sauce pan; stir until flour is dis- 
solved and bring to boil. Add chicken diced, parboiled mushrooms 
and seasonings. Cook 10 minutes. 

Mrs. Harry L. Wills. 



142 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



FRIED CHICKEN (SOUTHERN STYLE). 

Dress a young chicken weighing 1 14 to 2 pounds. Cut in 
pieces and wash in cold water. Drain and set in ice box or 
cool place from six to twelve hours. When ready to cook, salt and 
pepper to taste. Roll each piece of chicken in flour until covered 
nicely. Put in hot fat over moderate fire ; turn once or twice until 
a golden brown. Place chicken on platter, drain off fat, leaving 
about two tbls. Into this sprinkle 1 tbls. flour. Let brown, then 
add 1 cup of boiling water (with little milk added), stirring con- 
stantly. Cook 3 or 4 minutes, adding a little salt. Can be poured 
over chicken, but is usually put in a separate dish and served on 
rice cooked so each grain is separate. 

Mrs. J. A. Carlisle. 

CHICKEN PIE (Southern Style). 

1 chicken. 2 cups milk. 

2 cups broth. 1/2 cup butter. 

1/3 t-spoon black pepper. 2 level t-spoons salt. 

Clean and dress young chicken from 1 to 1 1/2 lbs. Cut in 
pieces, wash in cold water, drain and set in cool place a few hours. 
Cook chicken in boiling water until tender. There should be about 
2 cups of broth when chicken is cooked. Make rich biscuit dough. 
Place 1/2 chicken in pan, pour in broth. Roll dough for dumplings 
very thin, cutting in 1 inch strips, tear off in 2 inch lengths. Place 
layer over chicken, adding some of butter, salt and pepper. Place 
over this balance of chicken, another layer of dumplings, butter, 
salt and pepper. Roll top crust. Cut in three strips. Place over 
top of pie. Moisten all over with about 1/4 cup milk, placing small 
pieces of butter at intervals. Cook pie in moderately hot oven 
1/2 hour until crust is rich golden brown. Raise crust and pour in 
remainder of milk. Cook a few minutes and serve. 

Mrs. J. M. McMillan, 

Palmetto, Ga. 

MY MOTHER'S CHICKEN POT PIE. 

Dumplings. 

1 tbls. butter. 1 pt. pastry flour. 

3 level t-spoons Royal baking Salt. 

powder. Milk. 

Sift baking powder into flour, cut butter into flour — salt and 
add enough milk for soft dough. Form into balls a little larger 
than a walnut and drop into the gravy which is not to be thickened. 

Place 1/2 cup butter or substitute in iron pot and let brown 
slightly, then drop in the parts of a young hen piece by piece. After 
the meat is well soaked in the butter, pour in boiling water to cover, 
simmering gently until the meat will almost drop from the bones. 
Salt and pepper according to taste. Twenty minutes before serving 
take up the meat and place in center of platter where it will keep 



POULTRY AND GAME 143 

warm, then drop dumplings into the gravy, close tight and boil well 
for 20 minutes. Serve dumplings around the meat, covered with 
a rich golden brown gravy. 

Mrs. Wm. Marion Camp, 

CHICKEN A LA KING. NO. 2. 
2 tbls. flour. 1 t-spoon salt. 

1 cup mushrooms. 1 tbls. chopped green pepper. 

1 tbls. butter. 3 chopped pimentos. 

1 pt. cream. 3 cups minced chicken. 

'I4 cup butter. 3 egg yolks. 

Cook flour, mushrooms, butter, salt, green pepper, pimentos 
until frothy, add cream and stir until thick over hot water. Add 
chicken and butter and beaten egg yolks. Serve in pastry shells. 
An excellent party dish, 

Mrs. A. C. Plage. 

JELLIED CHICKEN. 

1 chicken. • 3 stalks of celery. 

1 onion (diced). 6 sprigs of parsley. 

1 hard boiled egg. 2 tbls. gelatine. 

Stew a full grown fowl until very tender, putting it on in cold 
water with the onion, celery (cut up) and half of the parsley. Let 
come to a boil slowly and cook until the meat slips from bones. 
Remove meat from stock and cut in pieces. Strain 2 cups of 
stock and add the gelatine which has been soaked in cold water. 
Season well with salt and white pepper. Arrange pieces of chicken 
in bottom of brick shape pan, pour in gravy with part of the jelly 
stock, put in more chicken alternating until mold is full. Set in 
cool place until perfectly firm. Turn out, serve with balance parsley 
and egg sliced as garnish. 

Mrs. Fred J. White. 
PRESSED CHICKEN. 
1 chicken. . 1 t-spoons grated onion. 

1/2 box gelatine. 1 t-spoon finely minced parsley. 

Boil a two or three pound chicken until tender. Pick to pieces. 
Pour enough boiled water over gelatine to melt. Then mix with 
the chicken. Add the grated onion and minced parslev, salt and 
cayenne pepper to taste. Put in mold. Press closely and let 
stand until ready for use. Serve with cranberry sauce. 

Frances Kersey. 

SMOTHERED CHICKEN. 

Clean and dress young chicken about grown; cut down the 
back, flatten out; dredge with flour, salt and pepper. 

Add 2 cups boiling water, place in oven and cook till done; 
turning several times, browning on all sides. Keep sufficient water 
in pan for gravy — about 1 cup full. When nearly done, thicken by 
adding 1 level teaspoonful flour and 1 tbls. of milk (beaten 
until smooth) to gravy. Cook a few minutes and serve with rice, 



144 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



which should be cooked so every grain stands separately. From one 
to one and a half hours will be required to cook a good sized chicken. 

Mrs. A. G. Carlisle. 

CHICKEN PILAU. 
1 hen. 2 cups water. 

1 t-spoon peppercorns. 1 cup rice. 

Steam hen in water (salted to taste) till tender, remove, add 
rice to liquor and steam till done. Brown hen in oven and serve on 
platter surrounded with rice. 

Mrs. M. G. Campbell. 

BRUNSWICK STEW (VIRGINIA). 
Use one of three meats — chicken, lamb, or squirrel. If chicken 
is used parboil, cut up as for frying ; put in pot and cover with cold 
water. To one, three or four pound hen ; add one sliced onion, one 
thick slice boiling meat, cut in small pieces. Add black pepper and 
salt to taste. Cook chicken until meat leaves the bones, adding 
water as the first water boils away. 6 ears fresh scraped corn or 
1 can corn. 1 quart tomatoes, 1/2 pound butter. Let cook until 
corn and tomatoes are done. Before serving add two cups stale 
light bread crumbs and a few slices of lemon. Accompany this 
dish with stuffed baked peppers, or sliced peppers, cucumbers, and 
onions. 

Mrs. Edward H. Barnes. 

FRICASSEE CHICKEN. 
1 chicken. 2 egg yolks. 

3 tbls. flour. 1 tbls. butter. 

1 tbls. salt. 1/2 cup celery, cut fine. 
Clean, dress and cut a young chicken in parts. Put in stew 

pan with just enough water to cover. Place lid on pan, let 
heat slowly until it boils. Then stew until tender. Mix flour with 
milk, add a dash of pepper and thicken gravy in which the chicken 
was cooked. The eggs should be added to a little of the gravy and 
well blended before being put into hot gravy. The celery and salt 
should be boiled with the chicken. 

Mrs. W. B. Cox. 

CHICKEN SPAGHETTI. 

2 lb. chicken. IV2 lbs. spaghetti. 

Boil chicken until tender, remove meat from bones and chop 
fine. Boil spaghetti in chicken broth until broth is absorbed. 

DRESSING. 
1 small can tomatoes. 2 onions cut fine. 

1 t-spoon celery salt. Vs t-spoon red pepper. 

Salt to taste. 1 tbls butter. 

Boil tomatoes until very tender, mash thru sieve, add above 



POULTRY AND GAME 145 



dressing ingredients, then chicken; pour spaghetti over this, mix 
well, put in casserole ; cover with grated cheese. Bake brown. 

Mrs. T. L. Mudd, St. Louis, Mo. 

CHICKEN CROQUETTES. 

1 chicken. 1 cup cream. 

2 ounces melted butter. 2 eggs. 

2 ounces flour. 1 t-spoon chopped parsley. 
Boil chicken till tender. Cool and mince. Boil the butter, 

flour and cream with 1 cup of liquor the chicken was boiled in, two 
minutes. Mix with the finely minced chicken, adding a sprinkle 
of red pepper. Salt to taste. Then cool and mold. Roll in egg 
and bread crumbs and saute a delicate brown. 

Miss Clara Cheshire. 

ROAST DUCK. 

Prepare duck for roasting and use the following plain filling. 

3 cups bread crumbs. Salt and pepper to taste. 
1/2 t-spoon each of thyme and 1 onion. 

sage. 
Sprinkle bread crumbs lightly with cold water. Cut onion fine. 
Fry together quickly in butter the size of an egg. Then add salt, 
pepper and herbs. Mix well (1 cup of mashed potatoes can be sub- 
stituted for one of crumbs.) 

Duck requires more cooking than turkey or chicken and needs 
plenty of water in the pan to start with, if an open pan is used. 

Mrs. Robert Paden. 

GAME. 

VENISON. 

Roast venison is best to be thoroughly larded, using half a 
pound of pork to a leg or saddle weighing eight to ten pounds. Cut 
the flanks from saddle and trim the haunch to good shape. 

Roast according to general directions, basting at the end of 
the first five minutes, and every fifteen minutes after. It is very 
nice to use claret instead of the dripping of the pan. An hour and 
a quarter will cook it very rare. For most people an hour and three 
quarters will be none too much. Make a good gravy from the drip- 
pings in the pan, adding stock made from bits trimmed away before 
roasting. 

Currant jelly is usually served with it, but barberry, or wild 
plum jelly is equally as good. Mrs. Beulah Bates. 

VENISON STEAKS. 
Venison steaks are prepared and served like beef steaks, cut- 
ting them only about three quarters of an inch thick. Slices of cold 
roast venison are extremely nice when reheated in brown or curry 
sauce. Mrs. Anice Carlton. 



146 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



TO COOK BIRDS. 

Most game birds are best broiled, but the larger ones are fine 
stuffed with plain filling and baked. 

TO SAUTE BIRDS— Dip in lemon juice before putting into 
hot fat. 

REED BIRDS — Should be fried in deep fat and served on 
toast. 

Mrs. K. G. Hardin. 

RABBITS. 

After rabbits are cleaned and cut in parts they should soak in 
cold salted water an hour before being cooked. 

SAUTE RABBIT. 

1 rabbit. 1 tbls. flour. 

Salt. Pepper, 

1 cup hot water. 1/2 cup cold water. 

Wipe the rabbit dry and fry it brown. Then nearly cover with 
hot water and simmer (with lid over) for fifteen minutes. Mix 
flour with cold water to thicken gravy. Salt and pepper to taste. 

Mrs. C. E. Cresse. 




xMEATS. 

Mrs. J. M. Manry, Chairman. 

To obtain a tender roast, a steak, or chops, meat should be 
cooked at a low temperature after the first few minutes, in a cov- 
ered roaster — this saves the flavor, does away with basting, and 
gives a tender dish. Water should never be added to the tender cuts 
while cooking, if cooked in this way. 

Miss Mary P. Means. 

CASSEROLE OF RICE AND MEAT. 



2 cups cooked meat (ground), 

1 t-spoon salt. 

1 beaten egg. 

Vi cup fine bread crumbs. 

4 cups cooked rice. 



1 tbls. chopped parsley or bell 

pepper. 
14 t-spoon pepper. 
14 t-spoon onion juice. 



MEAT STOCK. 
Mix first 7 ingredients. Line buttered casserole with 3 cups 
rice, fill with meat mixture, add enough meat stock to moisten mix- 
ture well, and cover with remainder of rice. Place top on cas- 
serole and cook 45 minutes. Serve with tomato sauce. 

Miss Clara Lee Cone, 
Director Home Economics, Girls High School. 

VEAL LOAF. 

1 pimento. 

3 tbls Worcester sauce. 

12 saltine crackers (crushed). 



lbs. veal, 
tbls. Rosemary, 
tbls. of Thyme, 
onion. 



1 t-spoon black pepper. 



cup veal stock, 
tbls. gelatine, 
eggs hard boiled, 
onion. 



1 t-spoon paprika. 
1 tbls. salt. 
1/4 lb. butter. 

Boil veal until tender, add onion, rosemary and thyme. 



Drain, 




A iHind Shank 
Soup Bone 

B Round 

Shank and Rump off 
Dried Beef 
Hamburger Steak 
Round Steak 

C Rump 

Roast 
Corned Beef 

1) Loin 

Sirloin Steak 
Porterhouse Steak 
Club Steak 
Beef Tenderloin 

E-Flank 

l-'lank Steak 
Hamburger Steak 
Corned Beef 

I Rib 

Rib Roast 

G Plate 

Navel End 

Short Ribs 
Corned Beef 
Soup Meat 

II Chuck 

Shoulder Steak 
Shoulder Roast 
Pot Roast 
Stews 

I Brisket 

Corned Beef 
Soup Meat 
Pot Roast 

J Fore Shank 

Soup Bone 



MEATS AND SAUCES 149 



run through meat grinder ; mix well the stock, pepper, salt, paprika, 
butter, Worcester and crackers. Add gelatine which has been 
previously added to i/o cup cold water and dissolved over hot water. 
Cut pimento into small pieces, slice eggs and sprinkle pimento over 
them, pack mold alternating with meat and eggs. Put in cool place 
until congealed, then serve. 

Mrs. D. J. Jones. 

MELMORE BEEF EN CASSEROLE. 
1 lb. cooked veal or beef. I qt. cold water. 

1 bay leaf. 4 hard boiled eggs. 

4 cloves. 1 cup fine bread crumbs, 

2 t-spoon salt. 5 tbls. butter. 
Cayenne (taste). 5 tbls. flour. 

Put meat in saucepan ; add seasoning and water ; put over fire*, 
cook till well done, keeping covered all the time. Allow meat to cool 
in the liquor in which it was cooked. Grind meat in meat choppei 
(there will be about three cups) and reserve liquid. For each cup 
of meat make a half-cup of white sauce using the meat stock for 
the liquid instead of milk. Use three tbls. of the butter with two of 
flour for sauce. 1 cup milk. Strain out bay leaf, and use one 
and a half cups of liquid if you have three cups of meat. Prepare 
the buttered crumbs by pouring the extra two tbls. of butter over 
them and mixing thoroughly with a fork. Put material in a but- 
tered earthen casserole, a layer of meat, then sliced eggs, then sauce. 
Make in two layers and cover with the crumbs. Cook with cover on 
dish in moderate oven about twenty minutes, remove cover, and 
brown, serve hot. 

Mrs. L. C. Matthews. 

BACON AND LIVER. 

1 lb. calf liver. Six bacon slices. 

1 onion. Pepper. 

Salt. 

Have liver sliced about 1/2 i^ich thick, remove skin and wipe 
with damp cloth; dip liver in flour which has been seasoned with 
salt and pepper. Broil bacon crisp, put liver in bacon grease and 
cook turning on both sides for about 12 or 15 mins. Chop fine 1 
onion and fry a golden grown in fat that liver was cooked in. Place 
liver on dish, pour over onions, garnish with bacon and parsley. 

Mrs. N. C. Booker. 

Norfolk, Va. 

SWISS STEAK. 
Select fresh round steak at least 1 inch thick (thicker if de- 
sired) . Beat in both sides all flour it will take. Salt and pepper to 
taste. Brown both sides quickly in about 1 tbls. fat in iron skillet, 
add boiling water cover closely. Reduce heat, cook from one to 
two hours. Steak may be covered with onions, mushrooms, or 
served with tomato sauce. 
, Mrs. Andrew P. Stewart, Jr. 



MEATS AND SAUCES 151 



BEEF STEAK AND OYSTERS. 

1 qt. oysters. 
3 lbs. steak. 2 tbls. butter. 

Broil the steak without salt as quickly as possible, placing it 
close to a very hot fire ; as soon as it is brown season with salt 
and pepper, place on a hot platter, and pour over the drained oys- 
ters ; lay on these butter, cut in small pieces. Place the platter in a 
very hot oven, until the oysters are done, which will be when their 
edges curl, serve hot at once. 

Mrs. D. F. Stevenson. 
Chairman Study Classes. 

CALF BRAINS. 

1 set brains. 1 t-spoon lemon juice. 

2 hard boiled eggs. 1 tbls. catsup. 

Soak brains a few minutes in salt water, remove outside mem- 
brane, wash and parboil in cup of water 10 minutes. Cut in pieces, 
add salt and pepper to taste, lemon juice, catsup and eggs cut fine. 
Place in baking dish, sprinkle top with bread crumbs and dot with 
small pieces of butter. Cook in moderate oven until brown. Serve 
immediately with buttered toast and thin slices of dill pickles; or 
brains may be prepared for cooking as above ; parboil about 20 mins. 
or until all water is absorbed. Cut up very fine, add 3 well beaten 
eggs, salt and pepper to taste, stir well together ; cook about 2 mins. 
Serve on rounds of toast ; garnish with parsley. 

Mrs. J. A. Carlisle. 

RICE AND MEAT MOLD. 
2 cups cold boiled rice. 1 tbls. chopped parsley. 

1 t-spoon onion juice. 1/2 lb. cold meat, minced. 

Grease a plain mold and line it throughout with rice Mince and 
season the meat, add onion and parsley, fill the mold, packing closely. 
Cover with more rice and steam 3/4 hour. Turn out and cover 
completely with gravy, tomato sauce or oyster sauce. 

Mrs. J. P. Snelgrove. 

PORK CHOPS. 
Purchase as many chops as desired, have frying pan hot, add 1 
tbls. lard, flour chops into which salt and pepper has been added 
to taste, place in hot fat and fry about twelve or fifteen mins. Gar- 
nish with parsley. 

Mrs. Thomas H. Pitts. 

CHOP SUEY. 
1 lb. pork, beef or veal. Salt. 

1 cup onions. 2 tbls. molasses. 

1 cup celery. 1 t-spoon paprika. 

Use choice meat and to each pound add onions, celery and 
molasses. Cut up meat, sear in lard and add paprika. Cover with 
water and cook until done. Serve with Kik Kermans Soy Sauce. 

Mrs. George A. Clayton. 



MEATS AND SAUCES 153 



MEAT PIE. 

1 cup diced cold meat. 1 t-spoon salt. 

2 cups diced boiled potatoes. 1/2 t-spoon pepper, 

1 can tomatoes. 2 tbls. butter or stock. 

Line sides only of a baking dish with good pie pastry. Be- 
ginning with meat at bottom, alternate with layers of meat, pota- 
toes, tomatoes and seasoning to the top of the pan. Cover with 
pie crust, add enough hot water to cook thoroughly but without 
becoming dry. Bake until done about 3/4 hour. It will make 
its own gravy. One or two onions may be added if desired. 

Mrs. Alonzo Richardson, 
State Chairman Federated Women's Club, 
Vice-President Atlanta Woman's Club. 

BROILED TENDERLOIN, SIRLOIN OR PORTERHOUSE 

STEAK. 

Select steak from 1 to 1 1/2 ^^ch thick with fresh, juicy ap- 
pearance ; the fat a creamy white. Wipe dry, cut a few small pieces 
of fat from steak and dot over it. Place meat on broiler in pan 
and put under gas flame. Sear each side quickly. This will re- 
tain juices. Reduce heat to finish cooking, rare or well done as 
liked. Place on warm platter with melted butter in it, season with 
salt on both sides. Add 2 tbls. or more of hot water to drippings for 
gravy, stir well and pour over steak. Serve immediately with 
steamed rice so grains stand separately. Garnish with potato 
chips, 

Mrs. J. A. Carlisle. 

POT ROAST. 

Get a nice 5 lb. roast either rump or a number 7 cut, wipe off 
with a damp cloth, cut off some suet and try out. Place roast in pot, 
sear on all sides, (in suet) , then add salt and pepper to taste. Cook 
over a very low gas flame until tender. Add no water as this 
method of cooking with lid on pot will make its own gravy. Pour 
over 1 can tomatoes, cook for 15 mins. Lift roast from pot; add 
flour enough to thicken gravy. Brown same, then add cold water 
enough to make sufficient gravy; season to taste with salt and 
pepper. 

Mrs. Jesse M. Manry. 

BAKED CORNFIELD HAM. 

1 ham. 1/, cup sugar. 

1/2 cup cracker crumbs. Cloves. 

% cup of syrup. II/2 pt. ginger ale. 

Select ham with care (Cornfield Brand) preferred soak over 
night in cold water. Before cooking scrub with stiff brush. Bake 
in 3 inches of water, to which syrup has been added. Use covered 
roaster, bake 10 to 14 lbs, ham 3 to 31/2 hours. After ham is 
thoroughly done, remove skin and roll in mixture of sugar and 



MEATS AND SAUCES 155 



cracker crumbs. Stick whole cloves in ham, place in oven to brown, 
while browning baste with IV2 pt. bottle ginger ale. 

Mrs. Norman Sharp, 
Chairman Market Committee. 

LEG OF LAMB ROAST. 

1/? can tomatoes. 1 tbls. prepared mustard. 

- 2"tbls. vinegar. 1 large onion (chopped fme). 

1/2 bottle catsup. 1 leg of lamb. 

Wash roast thoroughly in soda water ( 1/2 t-spoon soda to 1 gal- 
lon of water). Salt and pepper and add a dash of cayenne. Sift 
a little flour over top of roast, spread a little butter on this to brown 
the flour. Place meat in covered roaster and add other ingredients. 
Place on a round rack in moderate oven and cook 3i/> hours. Baste 
3 or 4 times. 

Mrs. J. H. Merritt. 

CORN BEEF HASH A LA BELL. 
1 can corn beef hash. 1/3 t-spoon each salt and pepper 

1 onion. 1 green bell pepper. 

1 small can tomatoes. 3 slices bread. 

Add to beef, tomatoes, onions and green pepper well minced. 
Then bread, salt and pepper, mix together well, bake for 1 hour in 
hot oven. 

Mrs. Fanny Bell. 
Lynchburg, Va. 

BROILED MEAT CAKES. 
1 lb. top side round steak. 2 slices bread. 

1 egg. 3 tbls. milk. 

1/3 t-spoon butter. Salt and pepper. 

Run steak through food-chopper with little suet, add egg, salt, 
pepper, milk and bread crumbled fine. Work all together well. 
Make into small cakes, place on hot greased griddle and brown on 
both sides, pour a little melted butter over them. Garnish with 
parsley. 

Mrs. Jesse M. Manry. 

BEEF A LA MODE. 

1 pt. stewed tomatoes. 2 t-spoons salt. 
14, cup butter or beef drippings. 1/0 t-spoon pepper. 

2 lbs. round beef. 4 cloves. 

5 medium sized onions. 2 tbls. flour. 

Slice onions and cook until yellowed in the fat. Add cloves, 
and beef cut into cubes and fry until brown. Add pt. of boiling 
water, the tomatoes, seasoning, and simmer for hour and half. 
When ready to serve, thicken the gravy with flour moistened in a 
little cold water. 

Mrs. Newton C. Wing. 



156 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



BOULLETS. 


(CREOLE DISH) 


1 lb. round steak or veal. 


1 large onion. 


3 tbls. lard. 


1 egg. 


1 cup bread crumbs. 


Salt and pepper. 


1 tbls. water. 


2 sprigs parsley, 



Tomato sauce. 

Beat beef till tender, cut into pieces 2 inches square. Rub salt 
and pepper well into meat, dip into egg batter to which water has "^ 
been added, then into grated crumbs. Fry till nicely browned. 
Serve with tomato sauce. 

Mrs. G. L. Pratt, 
Ex-Regent Joseph Habersham Chapter D. A. R. 

CHILI SAUCE. 
(For use on roast beef) . 

18 large ripe tomatoes. 1 grated nutmeg. 

4 large onions. 1 t-spoon ground cloves. 

4 large green, sweet peppers. 2 t-spoon ground allspice. 

4 small hot, green peppers. 1 t-spoon ground ginger. 

4 tbls. salt. 1 t-spoon black pepper. 

4 tbls. sugar. 1 qt. good apple vinegar. 

Scald, peel tomatoes, onions and pepper and drain. Put thru 
meat chopper saving all juices. Put in large pan on stove and when 
thoroughly hot, lower heat, add spices, sugar and salt. Boil gently 
stirring almost constantly, (as mixture burns easily), for one hour. 
Then add vinegar and boil 5 minutes. Fill large mouth bottle or 
small fruit jars, cover tightly. 

Mrs. D. F. Stevenson. 

MINT SAUCE FOR LAMB. 
2 tbls. mint. i/_> cup vinegar. 

1 tbls. sugar. 2 tbls. water. 

Chop mint fine, mix all ingredients, cook together a few mins., 
and allow it to cool. Add to lamb gravy or serve separately. 

Mrs. Jesse M. Manry. 

TOMATO SAUCE NO. 1. 

2 tbls. butter. Va t-spoon salt. 

2 tbls. flour. l/s t-spoon pepper. 

1 cup tomato juice. 

Melt butter, add flour, salt, pepper and tomato juice slowly. 
Cook about ten minutes, stirring frequently. 

Miss Clara Lee Cone, 
Director Home Economics, Girls High School. 

TOMATO SAUCE NO. 2. 
1 can tomatoes. 1 bell pepper. 

1 onion. Dash Worcester sauce. 

1/2 t-spoon each salt and pepper. 



MEATS AND SAUCES 157 



Cook tomatoes, salt, pepper, onion, bell pepper (free of seeds) 
until it thickens. Add sauce. This sauce is delicious over roast beef, 
pork or stuffed peppers. 

Mrs. J. S. Boardman. 

VIRGINIA SAUCE. 
1 cup. mayonnaise. 2 tbls. mixed chow-chow pickle. 

1 t-spoon tomato catsup. 

Blend ingredients and serve with fried soft crabs. This 
recipe is a famous one in Virginia. 

Mrs. W. L. Northern. 

Norfolk, Va. 

TARTAR SAUCE. 
1 cup mayonnaise. 2 t-spoons parsley. 

4 small cucumber pickles 6 chopped olives, 

(sour). 1/2 t-spoon capers. 

1/2 medium sized onion. 

Cut up last five ingredients very fine and stir into the mayon- 
naise. Serve on meat. 

Mrs. F. J. Massenburg. 

MINT SAUCE. 
Bunch of mint. 1/3 cup vinegar. 

1/2 cup boiling water. Pinch of sugar. 

Pinch of salt. Cayenne pepper. 

Bruise a bunch of mint. Pour over it 1/2 cup of boiling water 
Ift stand ten minutes, then add 1/3 cup vinegar, pinch of salt and 
cayenne pepper. Serve with roast lamb. 

Mrs. W. L. Northern. 

Norfolk, Va. 




VEGETABLES. 

Mrs, Ernest Covington, Chairman. 

Some vegetables should be cooked a long time, such as carrots, 
beets, parsnips, etc., but vegetables like cauliflower and cabbage re- 
quire only short cooking. Cabbage should never be boiled longer 
than 25 minutes. All vegetables should be put on in boiling salted 
water. Vegetables are more easily digested when served hot with 
butter, sauces, or meat, than when served cold with vinegar. 

Miss Mary P. Means. 



ASPARAGUS 
3 eggs beaten light with pepper 

and salt. 
2 cups grated bread crumbs. 



TIMBALES. 
2 cups milk. 
1 can of asparagus. 
Butter size of an egg, (melted), 



Put mixture in buttered timbale molds, set in pan of hot water 
and bake twenty minutes. Serve with cream sauce to which chop- 
ped mushrooms may be added. 

Mrs. J. E. Sommerfield. 



1 doz. ears of corn. 
3 eggs. 

1 pt. of milk 

2 tbls. butter. 
Cut corn off cob. 

then milk and corn. 

liquid is needed add a little water 

moderate oven for about 20 minutes 



CORN PUDDING. 

2 tbls. sugar. 
1/2 t-spoon salt. 
Pinch of black pepper. 



Beat eggs until light, add sugar, salt, pepper, 

Have pudding well mixed, and if any more 

Dot with butter and bake in 

Mrs. J. M. Manry. 



ASPARAGUS WITH EGGS. 
2 bunches asparagus. l^ t-spoon salt. 

4 egg. Vs t-spoon pepper. 

2 tbls. mglted butter. 

Cook asparagus, cut off tender tops and lay them on buttered 
pie dish, seasoning with salt, pepper and melted butter. Beat eggs 



VEGETABLES 159 



just enough to break the yolks, pour over the asparagus and bake 
eight minutes in a moderate oven. Serve with slices of boiled ham. 

Mrs. Roger Brown. 

SPINACH WITH EGG. (Something Different). 
i/> peck spinach. 2 eggs. 

2"tbls. butter. 1 t-spoon mayonnaise. 

1 t-spoon pickle. Salt and pepper. 

Wash spinach well in vessel of water. Remove ; put into about 
3 qts. of boiling water and cook 30 minutes. Drain in colander, 
cut up fine, adding salt and pepper; pour butter (melted) over it. 
Have ready eggs hard boiled ; mash yolks and add mayonnaise, a few 
drops vinegar and cucumber pickle cut fine. Sprinkle over top of 
spinach. Garnish with egg cut into rings. This is nice served 
with thin slices of cold beef tongue. 

Mrs. J. A. Carlisle. 

POTATO SURPRISE. 

Mold mashed potatoes (seasoned) into balls; with spoon form 
cavity in end large enough for medium size oyster. Place oyster in 
cavity, cover with potato, dip in beaten egg, roll in bread crumbs. 
Fry in deep fat. Cold minced or ground meat may be substituted 
for oysters. Serve with tartar sauce. 

Mrs. Tull C. Waters. 

STUFFED BAKED TOMATOES. 

12 ripe tomatoes. Salt, pepper and sugar. 

1 small head of cabbage. 1 cup of sweet milk. 

1 small onion. Small piece of butter. 

Bread crumbs. 

From the blossom end of a dozen smooth ripe tomatoes cut a 
thin slice, and with small spoon scoop out the pulp without breaking 
the skin surrounding it. Chop a small head of cabbage and a small 
onion finely ; mix the fine bread crumbs and the pulp ; season 
with salt, pepper, and sugar and add a cup of sweet cream or milk ; 
when all is well mixed fill tomato shells ; place in baking dish, 
cut-end up, and put just enough water in the pan to keep from burn- 
ing; drop a small piece of butter on each tomato, and bake half hour 
or so. Place another bit of butter on each and serve in same dish. 

Mrs. F. L. Gillette. 

SCALLOPED TOMATOES. 
Cover bottom of baking dish with bread crumbs or crushed 
crackers. Place on this a layer of sliced tomatoes, season with salt 
and pepper, a little sugar and dot with bits of butter. Continue to 
add alternate layers of crumbs and tomatoes, seasoning each time, 
until the dish is full. Sprinkle crumbs on top, dot with butter, 
slightly moistened with water. Bake about 20 minutes. 

Mrs. A. R. Brittain. 



160 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



SCALLOPED POTATOES. 

1 qt. sliced raw potatoes. 3 tbls. flour. 

2 cups scalded milk. 1 t-spoon salt. 

4 tbls. butter. 14 t-spoon pepper. 

Cover the bottom of a buttered baking dish with layer of sliced 
potatoes. Sprinkle with salt and pepper, dot with pieces of butter 
and dredge with flour. Repeat until the materials are used. Pour 
over all the scalded milk and bake in moderate oven from 45 to 50 
minutes. 

Miss E. Hunt. 

POTATO PUFF. 

2 cups mashed potatoes. 1/2 cup scalded milk. 

2 tbls melted butter. I/2 t-spoon salt. 

2 eggs. 

Stir melted butter in potato, beat to a white cream; add eggs 
beaten very light, then milk and seasonings. Bake in deep buttered 
dish in quick oven, for 20 minutes or until brown. 

Souffle — Use 4 eggs, beat yolks and whites separately until 
stiff; use seasonings and butter as given above. Fold in yolks and 
lastly whites. 

Mrs. M. B. Horton. 

SPANISH PEPPERS. 
Remove seeds from 6 green peppers. Cut three cups corn 
(thin). Chop fine one onion and the tops of the peppers and fry 
until yellow in butter, with 2 ripe tomatoes chopped fine: season 
with salt and pepper, add corn and let get hot thru (add a little 
hamburg if you have it) ; place mixture in peppers after they have 
been brought to a boil in water. Cover with cracker crumbs and 
bake in a pan with as small amount of water as possible. 

Mrs. E. H. Gillespy. 

STUFFED PEPPERS. 
6 green peppers. 1/2 cup brown sauce. 

1 onion. 1/2 cup bread crumbs. 

1/2 cup mushrooms. 1 tbls. butter, 

"chop onion and mushrooms fine and cook with the brown 
sauce about 15 minutes. Put in butter, salt and pepper to taste. 
Remove seeds from peppers. Pour over them boiling water and 
let stand about 10 minutes. Drain, stuff with above ingredients, 
sprinkle with the bread crumbs. Bake 15 minutes, serve with 

brown toast. 

Mrs. W. D. Jones. 

EGG PLANT. 

1 egg plant. A small piece of butter. 
4 tbls. olive oil. A sprig of garlic. 

2 ripe tomatoes. 

Peel egg plant, cut into small pieces and soak in salt water for 
a while. Put in casserole with a small piece of butter, four tbls. of 



VEGETABLES 161 



olive oil and a sprig of garlic or small onion. Cook until tender. 
Then add several very ripe tomatoes cut into pieces, stirring all to- 
gether. Season lightly with salt and pepper. 

Mrs. W. W. Austell. 

EGG PLANT EN CASSEROLE. 

1 large egg-plant. 1 green pepper. 

3 small onions. 4 tbls. melted Wesson or short- 

3 tomatoes ening, 

2 garlick cloves or leaks. 

Peel egg plant, slice in thin slices, and soak in salted water one 
hour. Rinse, slice other vegetables thin, and arrange alternately 
in greased casserole, seasoning each layer with salt and pepper. 
Bake in moderate oven 45 minutes. 

Mrs. Newton C. Wing. 

OKRA. 

Cut stems to the tender part of pod; cook whole in boiling 
salted water (if cooked in iron they will blacken) until tender, drain 
and return to the sauce pan with plenty of butter, a taste of vinegar, 
salt and pepper ; simmer slowly until they are thoroughly seasoned. 
They are nice sliced and stewed with an equal bulk of tomato, sea- 
soned with 1 sweet pepper, 1 t-spoon salt and 1 ounce of butter to 
each pint. Sometimes 1/4 cup rice and 1/4 pound of diced ham are 
added to a quart of the above stew. 

Mrs. James Chandler. 

CORN SALAD. 
18 ears fresh corn. 2 large red peppers. 

14 lb. powdered mustard. 1 large white cabbage. 

2 lbs. brown sugar, 2 qts. good vinegar. 

4 large onions. 4 good sized bunches celery. 

2 large green peppers. 

Cut off corn and scrape cob as when cooking, cut up cabbage, 
celery, onions and peppers fine, add sugar, mustard, salt and then 
vinegar. Cook over slow fire for forty minutes stirring constantly. 
Just before removing from fire add two level t-spoons of tumeric. 

Mrs. Thompson H. Jones. 

GUMBO. 

1 qt. tomatoes. 1/2 cup bacon fat. 

2 green sweet peppers. 

1 pt. okra. 1 large onion. 

Peel and cut up tomatoes, okra, onion and pepper. Fry in ba- 
con fat until brown. Season with salt and pepper. Cook slowly, 
adding no water. To be served with rice. 

Mrs. Wm. A. Davis. 

SLICED CUCUMBERS. 
Put cucumbers in cold or ice water for about forty minutes be- 
fore serving. Peel and cut in thin slices. Put in glass dish with 



162 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



layers of thinly sliced white onions ; salt and pepper to taste. Gar- 
nish top with rings of sweet green peppers, pour over the whole 
good apple vinegar. If vinegar is very strong, use one part of water 
— two of vinegar. Serve immediately. If cucumbers stand too long 
they will be tough. 

Lucy Parker. 

CORN OYSTERS. 

1 qt. grated corn. Butter size of an egg. 
3 egg yolks. 4 tbls. flour. 

Add white of an egg beaten stiff to above ingredients with ex- 
ception of lard and butter which is put in frying pan. When hot 
drop in mixture and fry a nice brown. 

Mrs. M. M. Voorhies. 

ASPARAGUS IN AMBUSH. 

2 bunches cooked asparagus. 1 tbls. flour. 

1 cup scalded milk. I/4, t-spoon salt. 

2 eggs. i/s t-spoon pepper. 
1 tbls. butter. 6 rolls. 

Cut off tops of the rolls to serve as covers. Remove the crumb, 
dust the shells and covers with melted butter and brown in oven. 
Make white sauce of the milk, butter and flour. Cut the tender part 
of the asparagus fine, cook a few minutes in the white sauce ; fill 
the rolls with the mixture, place on the tops and serve hot. 

Mrs, A. C. Leonard. 

HOPPING JOHN. 

1 pt. of cow peas. Bacon. 

1 cup of rice. A small piece of minced onion. 
Soak the peas in cold water during the night. Put the bacon 

on in cold water to boil — when done, remove and put in the soaked 
cow peas to cook until done — then add the minced onion and a cup 
of well washed rice on top of the peas and the water in which cooked. 
The rice will be done in about thirty minutes, stir together and the 
mixture will be almost dry. 

Dr. Emma Reba Bailey, 

Washington, D. C. 

FLAVORED BEETS. 

2 cups sliced cooked beets. 2 tbls. butter. 
1/2 cup sugar. I/4 t-spoon salt. 

1/2 cup vinegar. % tbls. corn-starch. 

Dissolve the corn-starch in vinegar, add sugar and salt, and let 
come to a boil, stirring constantly — cook five minutes, then beat in 
the butter, pour over the beets and serve hot. 

Mrs. T. F. Abercrombie, 

FRIED SQUASH. 

Wash and pare the squash ; slice about 1/2 inch thick, sprinkle 



VEGETABLES 163 



with salt, pepper and dredge with flour, fry until a nice brown, in 
half butter and half lard. Cook slowly with cover over frying pan. 

Mrs. Newton C. Wing. 

STUFFED TOMATOES. 
Pour boiling water over firm tomatoes and skin them. Chill. 
Cut a hole in the top of each tomato and stuff with equal parts of 
baked ham (run thru meat chopper), cucumber and celery. Put 
spoonful of mayonnaise on top and serve on lettuce leaf. 

Mrs. E. H. Gillespy. 

TOMATO FRITTERS. 
1 qt. tomatoes. Bread crumbs. 

1 t-spoon salt. . 1 egg yolk. 

1/4 t-spoon pepper. 

Stew tomatoes until reduced to 1 pint ; set aside to cool. When 
cold, add salt, pepper, egg yolk and sufficient bread crumbs to make 
a thick mixture. Drop by spoonfuls into boiling lard and fry as you 
would doughnuts. 

Mrs. A, R. Brittain. 

STUFFED EGGPLANT. 
1 large egg-plant. 1 tbls. flour. 

3 tbls. Wessons Oil. II/2 t-spoon salt. 

1/2 cup bread crumbs. i/^ t-spoon pepper. 

1/2 cup stock. 1 tbls. vinegar. 

1 egg. 1 medium onion. 

3 tbls. chopped parsley. 1 small piece garlic. 

2 medium tomatoes. 1 cup soaked bread crumbs. 
1/^ cup mushrooms. 

Cut egg-plant in halves, and carefully remove pulp without 
breaking skin. Mix pulp with some of the salt, pepper and vinegar, 
the onion, garlic and parsley chopped very fine, and the mushrooms 
and tomatoes coarsely chopped and pack all tightly down in a bowl, 
letting remain thus one hour. Fry all in a frying pan, adding rest 
of seasoning, until mixture is tender. Fill egg-plant shells with 
this, dot with butter, and bake till shells are tender, in a moderate 
oven. The stock, parsley, mushrooms and garlic may be dispensed 
with if not on hand. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Wing. 

TURNIPS WITH PORK. 

Cook in covered sauce-pan in about a quart of boiling watei 
for half an hour, a small piece of either salt or fresh pork. (If salt 
pork is used soak about twenty minutes in hot water to freshen). 
Then add turnips which have been washed, peeled and sliced thin. 
Cook all together until turnips are tender. The water should then 
be about all evaporated. Remove turnips, salt to taste and m.ash 
fine. Put in dish and sprinkle over them a little black pepper. 
Serve with hot corn meal muffins. 

Mrs. A. G. Jones. 



164 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 

TURNIP SALAD OR GREENS COOKED WITH PORK, 
Greens should be tender and fresh. If wilted, soak in cold 
water 1 hour. Wash well one peck, or desired amount, cutting off 
small roots. Put greens in large uncovered boiler, filling two-thirds 
full of boiling water. If greens are old enough to have large stems 
to leaves, these should be removed and discarded. This boiling takes 
away the bitter taste, which so many find objectionable. Drain 
greens, add small pieces of sliced salt pork, cook in 1 qt, boiling 
water for II/2 hours more, (Time in cooking depends on how 
young and tender greens are). Water may be added as it boils 
away. Water should be evaporated by time greens are ready to 

serve, 

Mrs, W. F. Wimberley, 

STRING OR SNAP BEANS WITH PORK, 

(Southern Style,) 
Beans to be good should be young and tender. If not perfectly 
fresh should be placed in cold water for an hour. Cut or break 
ends, taking strings (if any) with them. Wash, put in covered 
boiler with small piece of salt pork. (Wash pork well with hot 
water) Keep covered with boiling water about three hours or until 
beans are well done. Water should be evaporated when beans are 
ready to serve. Add salt to taste just before serving. These are 
good served warm with spoon corn bread (hot). 

Mrs. Grady Carlisle. 

STRING BEANS. 
Wash and snap beans. Put meat drippings or lard into cooking 
utensil and get frying hot. Pour beans into kettle, stirring until 
they change color. Add a little water occasionally to keep from 
burning. Beans will cook in a third less time than the old way. 

Z. V. Dabney. 

BAKED BEANS. 

2 cups Navy Beans. 4 slices bacon. 

1/2 t-spoon mustard. 14 t-spoon soda. 

2"tbls. molasses. Salt to taste. 

Add soda to water in which beans are boiled. Cook until ten- 
der. Put in baking dish; add above ingredients, placing strips of 
bacon on top. Cover and bake for one half hour, taking care not to 
let them cook dry. 

Mrs. Wm. A. Davis. 

MOTHER'S BAKED BEANS. 
1 qt, navy beans, 1/2 t-spoon mustard. 

1/2 lb. salt pork. 1 tbls. molasses. 

1 tbls salt. 

Wash and pick beans and soak over night. In the morn- 
ing drain, cover with cold water, bring slowly to the boiling point 
and parboil for about 1/2 hour. To test, take up a spoon full and 
blow on them, if the skin curls back they are done. Drain in colan- 



VEGETABLES 165 



der; place in a 2 qt earthen bean pot, put layer of beans, add salt 
pork, which has been previously washed and gashed across the top ; 
fill pot with the beans. Dissolve the seasoning and molasses in hot 
water, pour over the beans, then fill the pot with hot water, cover 
and bake from 6 to 8 hours, renewing the water as it cooks away 
until nearly done, then let the water cook away. 

Mrs. M. B. Horton. 

LIMA OR BUTTER BEANS. 

1 qt. green shelled butter beans, l^ cup milk. 

2 tbls. butter. Salt and pepper. 

Cover beans with boiling water in saucepan, cook uncovered 
about an hour, or until beans are tender. Water should be evap- 
orated when beans are cooked. Add milk, butter and salt. Simmer 
a few minutes. Pour into dish, sprinkle over a little black pepper. 
Serve immediately. Two or three slices of bacon may be cooked 
with the beans which gives them a delightful flavor. In this case 
omit milk and butter, using salt and pepper to taste, having about 
three tbls. of liquid in which beans were cooked. 

In cooking dry beans, wash and put in saucepan. Pour boiling 
water over them. Cover tightly and let stand forty minutes. Drain, 
and proceed as above for green beans. 

Mrs. W. F. Wimberley. 
LIMA BEANS AND MUSHROOMS. 
2 cups cooked lima beans. i/j[< t-spoon salt. 

1 tbls. butter. 14. cup cream. 

2 cups fresh mushrooms. 

Use beans that have been cooked, season with salt, pepper 
and butter. Put butter in saucepan, add beans, mushrooms and 
cream ; let simmer for about ten minutes ; serve hot. Dried lima 
beans should be soaked over night before using, drained and cooked 
in boiling water until soft. Season with cream and butter. 

Mrs. E. Covington. 
SUCCOTASH. 
10 ears of com. 1 tbls. salt. 

1 qt. lima beans. 14 t-spoon pepper. 

2 tbls. butter. 1 cup sweet cream. 

With sharp knife, cut corn from the cob, and add to the lima 
beans the last 15 minutes of cooking. The mixture should be cooked 
nearly dry. Add butter, seasonings and cream, and simmer for 10 
minutes. 

Mrs. Chas. Myers. 
SCALLOPED CABBAGE. 
Choose a hard crisp head of cabbage cut in quarters and cook 
till tender (25 min.) in boiling salted water. Chop rather fine, 
place in buttered baking dish pour over a generous amount of cream 
sauce and sprinkle top with bread crumbs. Bake 20 min. and serve 
in the same dish. This is as good as cauliflower. 

Mrs. Spencer R. Stone. 



166 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



STUFFED CABBAGE. 
Select firm hard head cabbage, take out inside, leaving four or 
five leaves. Make dressing similar to turkey dressing (see recipe) 
minced meat, oysters or chestnuts may be added to dressing. Re- 
stuff cabbage, tie up and put in thin sack. Boil in salt water two 
hours. Remove from sack and serve. 

Mrs. B. R. Adams, 
Montezuma, Ga. 

CAULIFLOWER. 

Trim off outside leaves and lay blossoms in cold salted water. 
Slugs and other insects will drop out, especially if gently shaken in 
the water. Tie in piece of mosquito netting and lay, head up in boil- 
ing salted water and cook gently from twenty to thirty minutes or 
till very tender. Drain and serve with Hollandaise or Cream Sauce. 
This makes a delicious garnish for fried spring chicken or fried 
sweet breads. 

Cauliflower with Parmesan cheese is made as above, adding a 
t-spoon of Parmesan cheese to the sauce before it is poured over the 
cauliflower; sprinkle melted butter over it and bake a few minutes 
in a hot oven. 

Mrs. Charles Myers. 

FRIED CORN. 
6 medium ears com. 1 cup water. 

4 slices bacon. 1 t-spoon salt. 

Cut through center of kernel of tender corn, scrape carefully 
from cob so pulp and juices may be extracted without the removal 
of hulls. Fry fat from bacon. Remove meat, add corn, boiling 
water and salt. Cook over moderate fire stirring occasionally, 
about 20 or 25 minutes. Corn should be slightly brown when done. 

Mrs. J. A. Carlisle. 

CORN SALAD. 
10 ears of corn. 3 onions. 

1 small cabbage. 1 tbls. dry mustard. 

2 stalks celery. 1 t-spoon tumeric. 
2 red and 2 green bell peppers. 1 cup sugar. 

2 tbls. salt. 

Cut corn from the cob, and chop vegetables fine ; mix altogether, 
cook slowly for two hours, put up in small air tight cans, keep in a 
refrigerator when opened. 

Mrs. J. C. Gentry. 

ASPARAGUS. 
Wash carefully 2 green bunches of asparagus, cut the ends un- 
til the tender part is reached. Arrange in one large bundle and 
fasten with broad band of coarse muslin, pinned at each side. Boil 
gently in salted water until done, about 20 to 30 minutes, use only 



VEGETABLES 167 



enough water to cover. Let water cook down toward the last of 
cooking. Serve on slices of buttered toast with Hollandaise Sauce. 

Miss Alice Needham. 

DUTCH POTATOES (Very Good). 

6 medium size boiled potatoes. 3 slices bacon. 
2 t-spoons sugar, less if desired, i/j, cup vinegar. 

1 medium size onion. Salt and pepper. 

Crisp bacon in frying pan, cut in small pieces. Stir sugar and 
salt in the vinegar. Pour this into the frying pan, add potatoes, 
onions (sliced), salt and pepper to taste. Cover. Steam about ten 
minutes. Serve immediately with any cold sliced meat. 

Mrs. William D. Alexander. 

LYONNAISE POTATOES. 

6 boiled potatoes. i/8 t-spoon pepper. 

2 tbls butter. 1 t-spoon minced parsley. 
1 onion chopped fine. 1/4 t-spoon lemon juice. 

1 t-spoon salt. 

Cook butter and onions in an omelet pan, add potatoes and sea- 
sonings, mix well and saute a nice brown. Just before serving add 
parsley and lemon juice. 

Miss Irma Rankin. 




DAINTY DESSERTS. 

Mrs. J. B. Dinwiddie, Chairman. 

Frozen desserts prolong the digestion of a meal, as does a sweet 
taste, and so are used to finish a meal. There is little food value in 
water ices, gelatine deserts or cold beverages outside of this fact — 
pies, ice-creams, puddings, and custards are rich in food value which 
should be remembered in planning a meal. 

Mary P. Means. 

BANANA CUSTARD. 

% cup sugar. 1 egg (well beaten). 

2 cups milk. 1 t-spoon vanilla. 

1/2 cup corn starch. 1/2 cup marshmallow whip, 

"stir to dissolve ingredients mentioned in first column and then 
bring to a boil and cook slowly for 5 minutes. Add ingredients of 
second column. Rinse 6 small custard cups in cold water and then 
pour in custard. Set in ice box to chill. When ready to serve, un- 
mold and cover the entire custard with thinly sliced bananas which 
have been dipped in sugar to make the bananas stick. Sprinkle with 
finely chopped nuts and top off with one t-spoonful marshmallow 
whip. Garnish with maraschino cherry. Then pour 1 t-spoon of 
the syrup from bottle of cherries over the custard. 

Mrs. Newton C. Wing. 

FROZEN PUNCH. 



cups sugar. 

qt. ginger ale. 

can shredded pineapple. 

When cold add other ingredi- 



3 
1/2 &al. tea. 1 

1/2 doz. lemons. 1 

'stir sugar in hot tea to dissolve, 
ents and stir well. Freeze and let stand packed for two hours. Use 
two parts finely crushed ice to one of salt. Serve with cherry on top 
of each serving. Serves 25. 

Mrs. A. C. Plage, 
East Lake. 



DAINTY DESSERTS 169 



MARSHMALLOW FRAPPE. 
6 egg whites. 2 cups hot water. 

6 this, sugar. 1/2 cup fruit, (candied). 

1 envelope gelatine. V2 cup nuts. _ ^ 
1/3 cup cold water. ' . i^r ■ j-^,- 

Soak gelatine in cold water five minutes ; dissolve in hot water. 
Beat eggs very stiff, add sugar and beat in the dissolved gelatine, 
fruit and nuts. Place in pan of ice water, stir until creamy. Put 
on ice. Serve with yellow sauce. 

Sauce. 

6 egg yolks. 3 cups milk. 

8 tbls sugar. Vanilla to taste. 

2 tbls flour. 

Cream sugar, egg yolks and flour together well. Put milk in 
double boiler, add mixture and stir until creamy. Cool and add va- 
nilla. 

Mrs. F. D. Waite. 

MARSHMALLOW DAINTY. 

1/2 lb. marshmallows. 1 cup nut meats. 

1 pt. thick cream. Sugar to sweeten cream. 

1 t-spoon vanilla. 

Cut marshmallows into small pieces ; chop nuts not too fine. 
Whip cream, flavor and slightly sweeten. Place in serving or in- 
dividual dishes in alternate layers, cream on top. Serve very cold. 
Garnish with candied flowers or fruit. Serves 8. 

Mrs. H. E. VanVoorhees. 

MARSHMALLOW CREAM. 

1 pt. heavy cream. 1 doz. marshmallows. 

2 egg whites. 1/4 lb. crystallized cherries, 
1 t-spoon vanilla. 

Beat cream until stiff and sweeten to taste ; add well beaten egg 
whites, vanilla, cherries, and marshmallows cut up fine. Set on ice 
about 3 hours. Serve in Parfait or Sherbet glass. 

Mrs. J. H. Gibbs. 

HAVANA CREAM. 
8 oz. fresh grated cocoanuts. 4 oz. butter. 

1 lb. sugar. 6 egg yolks. 
4 large oranges. 2 whole eggs. 

2 lemons. 

Grate rinds of 1 orange and 1 lemon, squeeze the juice; 
mix well with sugar and bring to a boil. Add butter, then cocoanut, 
boil five minutes; stir in eggs and cook slowly until thick. Excel- 
lent to serve with fruit cake. It can be kept indefinitely in a glass 
jar in refrigerator. 

Mrs. James N. Austin. 



170 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



CHARLOTTE RUSSE. 
1/2 envelope gelatine, 3 cups whipped cream. 

1/3 cup scalded cream. 1 t-spoon vanilla. 

1/4 cup water. 1/3 cup powdered sugar. 

1/2 doz. lady fingers. 

Soak gelatine in cold water and stir this in scalded cream. 
Strain : add sugar and vanilla. Set in ice box until thick. Fold in 
gradually the whipped cream. Place lady fingers in mold, pour in 
mixture and chill. 

Mrs. R. T. Aderhold, 
Pres. College Park Woman's Club. 

CHOCOLATE SOUFFLE. 
2 sq. unsweetened chocolate. 1 pt. milk. 
1/3 cup sugar. 3 eggs. 

2 t-spoons vanilla. 1/2 cup sugar. 

1 tbls. gelatine. 

Dissolve gelatine in 1/4 cup cold water. Melt chocolate with 
sugar over hot water; add milk gradually. When milk is scalded 
stir and cook into it, yolks of the eggs beaten with 1/2 cup sugar. 
Cook until mixture coats the spoon ; add vanilla and gelatine dis- 
solved in cold water. Strain all this over the stiffly beaten whites 
of eggs. After folding in egg whites, turn mixture into chilled mold 
to congeal. Serve with sweetened whipped cream. 

Mrs. Edward H. Barnes. 

PRUNE SOUFFLE. 
1 cup prune pulp. 4 egg whites. 

4 tbls. sugar. Chopped nuts. 

Stew 1/2 lb. prunes in as little water as possible. Drain and 
put through colander. Add sugar to well beaten egg whites, and 
add prune pulp. Pour in buttered pudding dish, set in pan of hot 
water, bake very slowly until set. Serve with whipped cream. 
Sprinkle with chopped nut meats if desired. 

Mrs. F. J. Massenburg. 

CHERRY GELATINE. 

1 envelope gelatine. 1/2 cup lemon juice. 

1/2 cup cold water. 1 pt. sweetened red acid cher- 
% cup sugar. ries. 

2 cups boiling water. 2 egg whites. 
1/2 cup cherry juice. 

Soak gelatine in cold water five minutes. Dissolve with boil- 
ing water, add sugar, cool ; add lemon juice and cherry juice. When 
half congealed add beaten whites ; when almost congealed add pitted 
cherries. 

Mrs. John Hardwick. 



DAINTY DESSERTS 171 



PINEAPPLE AND GRAPEFRUIT GELATINE. 
2 envelopes gelatine. 1/4 cup lemon juice. 

2 cups cold water. 21/2 lb canned pineapple. 

214 cups sugar. 2 grapefruit, medium size. 

4 cups boiling water. 

Dissolve gelatine in 1 cup cold water; add 1 cup cold water 
or pineapple juice. Add boiling water, sugar, lemon juice. When 
half congealed, add diced grapefruit and pineapple. Congeal, serve 
as a dessert or a salad with mayonnaise. 

Mrs. E. D. McDonald. 

COFFEE GELATINE. 

1 envelope gelatine. V2 cup milk. 
14 cup cold water. 1 cup sugar. 

2 cups boiling coffee. 1 t-spoon vanilla. 

3 eggs. 

Dissolve the gelatine in a little cold water. Add boiling clear 
coffee, beat together yolks of eggs, milk and sugar. Turn into coffee 
and gelatine and cook in double boiler until it thickens slightly. Re- 
move from fire and add the stiffly beaten whites of eggs, stirring 
together only until well mixed, add 1 t-spoon of vanilla. Turn 
into mold to harden. Serve cut in slices with a sauce made of thick 
cream slightly sweetened and flavored with vanilla. 

Mrs. Frank Daub. 

STRAWBERRY DELIGHT. 
1 pkg. fresh marshmallows. 1 pkg. lady fingers. 

1 qt. strawberries. 1 pt. whipped cream. 

Mash berries, reserving whole, a few of the choicest ones ; cut 
marshmallows with shears into 4 parts, and soak in strawberry juice 
2 hours until soft. Mix lady-fingers, crumbled, marshmallows, 
fruit juice and whipped cream together 5 minutes before serving 
time. Serve in tall glasses, with spoonful of whipped cream and 
strawberry on top. Pineapple, or any tart fruit may be substituted. 

Mrs. Newton C. Wing. 

ORANGE TAPIOCA. 

l^ cup tapioca. 1 orange. 

11/2 cups water. 1/2 cup sugar. 

Cook tapioca and sugar in double boiler until clear. Add orange 
(cut in small pieces). Serve cold with cream. Canned peaches cut 
in cubes and maraschino cherries may be added. 

Mrs. J. B. Dinwiddle. 

FRUIT DESSERT. 
3 bananas. 3 slices chopped canned pine- 

5 oranges. apple. 
Cocoanut, 1/2 cup honey. 

1 cup chopped nut-meats. 
Skin and dice bananas, slice peeled oranges, removing seeds. 
Put these into a glass dish and add a layer of cocoanut, pineapple, 



172 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



honey and chopped nut-meats. Chill and serve with whipped cream, 
sweetened with a little honey. Maple-syrup may be used instead of 
honey. 

Mrs. Henry Alford Porter. 

BAKED BANANAS. 
6 bananas. 1 lemon. 

1 cup brown crumbs. 1 tbls. butter. 

1/2 cup sugar. Water. 

'Brush baking dish with butter; peel bananas and place in the 
dish whole; fill in with crumbs, sugar, juice of lemon and butter. 
Add enough water to almost cover fruit. Bake. 

Mrs. B. Christopher. 

APRICOT JELLY. 

1 lb. dried apricots. 2 tbls. gelatine. 

1 cup sugar. 1/2 cup cold water. 

Wash apricots, cover with cold water and let soak several hours. 
Add sugar and boil slowly for one hour in same water. Strain 
through a fine wire sieve. With the juice they should be of the con- 
sistency of fruit butter. While hot stir in gelatine which has been 
softened in cold water. Mold and serve with whipped cream. 

Mrs. J. A. Sibley. 

APRICOT SHERBET. 

1 qt. can apricots. 1 cup sugar. 

2 cups water. Juice 3 lemons. 
1 egg white. 

Mash apricots through sieve. Make a syrup of water and sugar 
boiled together five minutes. Add mashed apricots to syrup; cool 
and freeze. When mixture begins to freeze, add beaten egg white. 

Miss Clara Lee Cone, 
Director Home Economics, Girls High School. 

BISQUE ICE CREAM. 
1 qt. milk. 1 doz. almond macaroons. 

1 pt. cream. 1 t-spoon vanilla. 

2 junket tablets. i/4 t-spoon salt. 
11/2 cups sugar. Few drops coloring. 
1 cup pecan meats. 

Heat milk until luke warm, add sugar, salt and junket tablets 
that have been dissolved in 2 t-spoons of cold water. Put in warm 
room for 20 minutes. When firm, mix with cream which has been 
whipped. Add nut meats, macaroons, vanilla and coloring. Freeze 
as you would any ice cream. Serves 8. 

Mrs. H. B. Rogers. 

TUTTI-FRUTTI ICE CREAM. 
1 pt. milk. 1 cup grated pineapple. 

3 eggs. 1 cup sugar. 

1 qt. whipped cream sweetened 1 cup pecan meats, 
to taste. 



DAINTY DESSERTS 173 



1 cup strawberry preserves. 1 small bottle of maraschino 

cherries, cut in pieces. 
Mix fruit and nuts and let stand for several hours. Make cus- 
tard of milk, sugar and eggs, cool and add to cream. When ready 
to freeze add fruits and nuts. Freeze, using one measure of salt to 
three of crushed ice. 

This cream is very much improved by pouring a small amount 
of wine or brandy over the fruit while standing. 

Mrs. P. V. Oswald. 

PEPPERMINT ICE CREAM. 
1 pt. milk. 1 lb. peppermint stick candy, 

1 qt. cream. 

Crush candy and dissolve in milk ; add cream and freeze. This 
is delicious. 

Mrs. S. A. Ledbetter. 

NOUGAT ICE CREAM. 
3 cups milk. 1/3 cup each, pistachio, filbert. 

1 cup sugar. English walnut and al- 

5 egg yolks, mond meats. 

1 t-spoon salt. 1 t-spoon almond extract. 

11/2 cups heavy cream. 1 tbls. vanilla. 

Whites 5 eggs. 

Make a custard of first four ingredients, strain, and cool. Add 
heavy cream beaten until stiff, whites of eggs beaten until stiff, nut 
meats finely chopped, and flavoring. Then freeze. 

Mrs. D. F. Stevenson. 

MARSHMALLOW ICE CREAM. 
1 qt. thick cream, whipped stiff. 8 marshmallows. 
Parched almonds. Flavoring. 

1 tbls. gelatine. 

Beat marshmallows into whipped cream, sweeten and flavor to 
taste; add gelatine to a little cold water, dissolve over hot water 
and beat into whipped cream last. Freeze. Serve with rolled 
parched almonds. 

Mrs. C. K. Ayer. 

VANILLA ICE CREAM. 
11/2 cups sugar. 3 pts. milk. 

2 t-spoons vanilla. 3 eggs. 
5 tbls. cornstarch mixed with 

cold water. 
Stir sugar in milk, bring to a boil ; add slowly and stir in corn- 
starch. To the beaten yolks add a little of the mixture, then a little 
more until all is mixed with milk. Turn off gas ; add beaten whites 
and vanilla. Freeze. 

Mrs. John Hardwick. 



174 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



FRUIT ICE. 
Pack a can of peaches, pears, apricots, or any fruit put up in a 
syrup heavy enough for table use in ice and salt; freeze like a 
mousse. Remove the contents of the can carefully, (by cutting 
around center of can) in a block, slice and serve as an ice. 

Mrs. J. W. Yopp. 

APRICOT ICE. 

2 cans apricots. 2 cups sugar. 

1 doz oranges. II/2 pts. water. 

1/2 doz. lemons. 

Press apricots through a fine sieve, squeeze the oranges and 
lemons adding the juice to the apricot pulp. Boil v^ater and sugar 
for several minutes, allows to cool. Add this to fruit juice, stir well 
and freeze. 

Mrs. R. E. Wynn. 

ORANGE SHERBET. 
6 oranges. 1 lb. sugar. 

1 lemon. 1 qt. water. 

Add grated yellow rind of 3 oranges to sugar ; add water, 
stir until sugar is dissolved and boil five minutes after mixture be- 
gins to boil. Strain ; when cool add a pint of orange juice and juice 
of lemon. Freeze. 

Mrs. James, L. Logan. 

MILK SHERBET. PINEAPPLE OR PEACH. 
1 pt. milk. 1 pt. water. 

11/2 cups sugar. 1 small grated pineapple. 

Juice of 2 lemons. 1 tbls. gelatine. 

Add lemon juice and one half of the sugar to water. Scald 
milk (be careful not to boil it). Put gelatine in ^4 cup cold water a 
few minutes, add to hot milk with balance of sugar. Stir until dis- 
solved and let cool. Add pineapple to lemonade, put in freezer turn 
crank a few minutes until mixture thickens ; remove top from 
freezer add milk and gelatine and finish freezing. Soft peaches in- 
stead of pineapple are fine for this sherbet. 

Mrs. John F. Daniel. 

PINEAPPLE SHERBET. 

1 can grated pineapple. 2 cups sugar. 

3 oranges, (juice). 1 qt. whole milk, or 

2 lemons, (juice). 1 pt. milk and 1 pt. cream. 
Add 1 cup sugar to fruit. Mix milk with other cup of sugar 

and partially freeze. Add fruit and fruit juices and complete freez- 
ing. 

Mrs. J. C. Kirk. 



DAINTY DESSERTS 175 



FRUIT SHERBET. 
1 qt. water. 1 pt. fruit juice, and fruit. 

11/2 cups sugar. Whites of 2 eggs. 

Juice of 1 lemon. 

Boil water and sugar together five minutes; let cool. Add 
lemon and fruit juices. Put in freezer and when half frozen add 
the beaten whites of 2 eggs, and then continue to freeze until stiff. 
Remove dasher and pack. Canned red raspberries, apricots (put 
through sieve) or shredded pineapple, also fresh orange, straw- 
berry, or grape juices are delightful for this ice. 

Mrs. H. B. Rogers. 

FROZEN NEWPORT WHIP. 
1 pt. strawberry juice. 1 pt. sugar. 

1 cup heavy cream. 2 egg whites. 

Boil strawberry juice and sugar together until a heavy syrup ; 
let cool ; add egg whites beaten until foamy to syrup, add cream and 
stir until very frothy. Pour into wet mold and bury two hours in 
salt and ice. Raspberry juice can be used as well as strawberry. 

Mrs. J. B. Rowe. 

CHOCOLATE MOUSSE. 

2 squares unsweetened choc. 3 tbls. boiling water. 
1/2 cup powdered sugar. % cup sugar. 

1 cup cream. 1 t-spoon vanilla. 

% tbls. gelatine. 1 qt. cream. 

Melt chocolate, add powdered sugar, and gradually one cup 
cream. Stir over fire until boiling point is reached ; add gelatine, 
soaked in cold and dissolved in boiling water, sugar and vanilla. 
Strain mixture into a bowl, set in ice-water, stir constantly until 
mixture thickens ; fold in the remaining cream. Mold, pack in salt 
and ice, and let stand 4 hours. 

Miss Hazel A. Stevenson. 

RUBY MOUSSE. 

1 glass jelly. 1 pt. cream. 

Beat cream until stiff, add jelly and freeze. Grape jelly makes 
a beautiful lavender color. 

Mrs. A. C. Plage. 

MAPLE PARFAIT. 

6 egg yolks. % cup maple syrup. 

2 cups whipped cream. 

Beat egg yolks until very light, pour over them the maple syrup. 
Cook in double boiler until it makes a thick coating on the spoon. 
Pour into a bowl and beat with a wire egg beater until light. Add 
whipped cream, put in mold, pack in ice and salt about 4 hours. 

Mrs. W. M. Seay. 



176 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



MAPLE MOUSSE. 
% cup hot maple syrup. 1/2 pt. whipped cream. 

2 eggs. 

Pour hot syrup over eggs beating constantly. Cook slowly un- 
til the mixture thickens. When cool fold into the cream whipped, 
and pack in equal parts of ice and coarse salt. Let stand 3 hours. 

Mrs. M. H. Stevens. 

COFFEE MOUSSE. 
1 pt. sweet cream. 1/2 cup strong coffee. 

1 cup sugar. 

Whip the cream, add sugar sifted ; then coffee. Put in a mold, 
surround with salt and ice and let stand two hours. 

Mrs. J. B. Dinwiddle. 

BISCUIT TORTONI. 

% cup sugar. 3 eggs well beaten. 

% cup water or coffee. 12 macaroons well browned. 

1 pt. heavy cream, whipped. Almond flavoring. 

Boil sugar and water or coffee until it spins a thread ; mix with 
eggs ; beat until cool, add whipped cream. Put one half the maca- 
roons crumbled in the bottom of the mold, fill in with the mixture, 
crumble balance of macaroons. Pack in ice and salt and let stand 
four hours. 

Mrs. P. V. Oswald. 

PINEAPPLE MOUSSE. 
1 can pineapple. % cup sugar. 

11/2 cups whipped cream. 1 egg white. 

brain juice from can of pineapple, add enough water to make 
1 pt., boil with sugar. It should be like rich syrup when cool. Add 
to cool syrup cream whipped stiff and egg white whipped dry. Beat 
until it is frothy ; put in mold and pack with ice and salt two hours. 

Mrs. J. B. Rowe. 

NESSELRODE PUDDING. 
1 pt. large chestnuts. 1 pt. cream. 

1 pt. water. 6 egg yolks. 

1 lb. sugar. 1 pt. grated apple. 

French candied fruit. 1 tbls. vanilla. 

Boil chestnuts until tender, remove the shell and brown skins, 
press pulp through a strainer, boil sugar and water together for five 
minutes, beat yolks until light, add to boiling syrup, beat contin- 
uously, until thick and cool, then add candied fruit chopped very fine 
vanilla, pineapple and chestnuts. Put into freezer, when frozen 
stir in the cream whipped to a stiff froth. 

Mrs. J. P. Snellgrove. 




PASTRIES, PUDDINGS AND DUMPLINGS. 

Mrs. W. R. Bean, Chairman. 



BANANA PUDDING. 



2 boxes vanilla wafers. 
6 large bananas. 
11/2 cup sugar. 
2 egg yolks. 



4 tbls. flour. 

1 tbls. butter. 

1 tbls. vanilla. 

1 pt. milk. 



Mix flour and sugar, dissolve with milk, put in beaten yolks and 
butter. Cook in double boiler until thick. (Pineapple may be used 
instead of bananas.) Pour this over wafers and bananas which 
have been sliced lengthwise into pudding dish. 

Mrs. F. A. Smith. 



EGOLESS STEAMED PUDDING (Suitable For Children). 
1 pt. flour. 1 t-spoon soda. 

1 t-spoon salt. 2 tbls. brown sugar. 

114 cups butter milk. 1/3 cup molasses. 

1/2 cup raisins. V2 cup currants. 

1 cup chopped apples. 
Mix all together, pour into well greased mold, steam 2-1/2 hours. 
Serve with any kind of sauce. 

Mrs. G. B. Denman. 



A DELICIOUS NUT PUDDING. 
1 cup molasses. 1 cup suet. 

1 cup sour milk. 1 cup raisins. 

1 cup English walnuts. V2 cup figs. 

1 tbls. nutmeg. 1 t-spoon soda. 

21/2 cup flour. 1/2 t-spoon salt. 

Put suet through meat grinder, add molasses, then soda dis- 
solved in milk. Chop nuts and raisins and mix with flour. Add 



178 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



nutmeg, put in greased 1 pound coffee cans and steam from 2-1/2 
to 3 hours. 

Sauce. 

1 cup powdered sugar. 1/2 cup butter. 

1 cup sweet cream. 1 t-spoon vanilla. 

Beat to a cream butter and sugar. Whip cream, and add to 
this. Put in double boiler and cook until foamy and smooth, add 
flavoring and serve on pudding. 

Mrs. M. L. Smith. 

i BAKED INDIAN PUDDING. 

New England Style. 

1 pt. milk. 1/2 cup molasses. 

3 tbls. yellow meal. 1 tbls. butter. 

1 egg. 1/4 t-spoon salt. 

1/4 t-spoon cinnamon. 

Stir meal into scalding milk while cooking; when cooked take 
from stove add well-beaten egg, molasses, butter, salt and cinnamon ; 
add 1 pt. cold milk. Bake slowly 3 or 4 hours. 

Mrs. J. C. Wing, 
Palmer, Mass. 

GRATED SWEET POTATO PUDDING. 

4 cups grated potato. 1/2 cup chopped nuts. 
1 cup Georgia cane syrup. 2 t-spoon salt. 

1 cup sugar. 2 tbls. ground ginger. 

1 cup milk. 1 t-spoon cinnamon. 

1/2 cup butter. 3 eggs. 

1/2 pt. whipped cream. 
In iron skillet melt butter, stir in all ingredients except nuts 
which should be added when half done. Cook in hot oven about 40 
minutes, adding 1 cup hot water if it gets very stiff. Serve almost 
cold with whipped cream. A favorite dessert of my family. 

Mrs. L. G. Neal. 

CHOCOLATE BREAD PUDDING. 

1 cup bread crumbs. 1/3 cup sugar. 

2 cups scalded milk. 1 egg. 

1 oz. chocolate. i/4 t-spoon salt. 

14 cup boiling water. 1/2 t-spoon vanilla. 

1/2 cup nuts. 

Add bread crumbs to scalded milk and allow to soak until soft. 
Cut chocolate in pieces, add boiling water and cook until a smooth 
paste is formed. Add this to bread mixture. Beat eggs ; add sugar 
and salt. Add the first mixture to the egg mixture ; add vanilla and 
turn into a buttered dish ; bake in a moderate oven. Serve with 
plain or whipped cream or lemon sauce. 

Mrs. J. A. Sibley. 



PASTRIES, PUDDINGS AND DUMPLINGS 179 



DATE PUDDING. 
1 cup chopped dates. II/2 t-spoon baking powder. 

1 cup chopped nuts. 3 tbls. milk. 

1 cup sugar. 2 beaten eggs. 

2 tbls. flour. Salt to taste. 

Stir all together and steam 1 hour. This well be a sticky mess, 
but set it aside for a few hours, serve with whipped cream, and 
you will find it delicious. 

Mrs. A. C. Plage. 

KISS PUDDING NO. 1. 

1 qt. milk. 2 tbls. corn starch. 
4 eggs. 1/2 cup sugar. 

2 tbls. butter. 

Stir together gradually corn starch and well beaten yolks, add 
with butter to milk near boiling, stir until thick ; pour into baking 
dish, add sugar to stiffly beaten egg whites, top pudding with this 
meringue, brown in moderate oven, and serve with light sauce. 

Mrs. C. R. Hardy. 

DATE PUDDING NO. 1. 
1/2 pt. whipped cream. 3 eggs. 

1 cup dates. % cup sugar. 

1 cup walnut meats. 14 t-spoon salt. 

11/2 tbls. flour. 1 t-spoon vanilla. 

1 t-spoon baking powder. 

Mix dates, walnut meats, sugar and salt together; add flour 
mixed with Royal Baking Powder, then egg yolks and vanilla. Beat 
lightly with fork then fold in whites. Bake nearly an hour in mod- 
erate oven. Serve with whipped cream in tall glasses. 

Mrs. Earle Harris, 
Chattanooga, Tenn. 

SOUTHERN PUDDING (Excellent.) 

3 tbls. corn starch. 5 eggs. 

6 tbls. sugar. 1 qt. milk. 

Canned peaches or preferred Pinch salt, 
fruit. 
Beat yolks of eggs light, add sugar and beat again until very 
light. Mix corn starch with a little cold milk and stir into 1 qt. 
scalded milk. Add salt and stir until it thickens. Pour into pudding 
dish, place in oven, let remain until it will bear icing. Place over 
top, layer of canned peaches or preferred fruit. (It improves to 
mix the syrup of fruit with custard.) Beat white of eggs to stiff 
froth with 2 tbls. of sugar to each egg. Spread on custard, brown 
evenly in oven. This is a very delicate pudding. 

Mrs. D. F. Stevenson. 



180 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



COCOANUT PUDDING. 
14 lb. grated cocoanut. V2 Pt. cream. 

14 lb. butter. 9 eggs. 

1 lb. sugar. 1 gill rose water. 

Stir the butter and sugar as for cake, add the eggs well beaten, 
put in other ingredients and bake with or without crust. 

Miss Alma Levy. 

DATE PUDDING NO. 2. 

1 cup dates, (pitted). 1 t-spoon Royal baking pow- 

1 cup walnuts, (quartered). der. 

1 cup sugar. 2 tbls. flour. 

2 eggs. Pinch salt. 

Grind dates and nuts together; stir unbeaten eggs, sugar and 
salt together. Add to mixture flour, baking powder, dates and nuts. 
Mix well. Bake 40 minutes in slow oven. Serve with thick cream. 

Mrs. Alfred E. Buck. 

MACAROON PUDDING. 
1 tbls. gelatine. 3 eggs. 

1/2 cup cold water. % pt. milk. 

13/4 cups sugar. 1 t-spoon vanilla. 

Soak gelatine in cold water 10 minutes; dissolve over warm 
water. To well beaten yolks of eggs add sugar, milk, gelatine and 
cook for 15 minutes; (mixture should look curdled). While hot 
pour over well beaten whites stirring all the time. Add flavoring. 
Line a bowl or mold with macaroons, pour part of mixture over 
macaroons. Add more macaroons and rest of mixture. Set aside 
to cool. Nice served with whipped cream and maraschino cherries. 

Mrs. A. M. Floyd. 

BLACKBERRY PUDDING. 
1 cup milk. 1 cup berries. 

1/2 cup sugar. 1 t-spoon soda. 

1 egg. 

Beat eggs and sugar together ; add milk and soda ; to this add 
berries drained and flour enough for thin batter. Bake until done. 

Sauce, 

1 cup berry juice. 1/2 t-spoon butter. 

1 cup water. Corn starch. 

1/2 cup sugar. 

Boil water, berry juice and sugar together, add butter and 
enough corn starch to thicken. 

Mrs. J. B. Rowe. 

PLUM PUDDING. 

1 cup finely chopped beef suet. 1 cup chopped blanched al- 

2 cups bread crumbs. monds. 

1 cup sugar. V2 cup citron sliced thin. 



PASTRIES, PUDDINGS AND DUMPLINGS 181 



1 cup seeded raisins. 1 t-spoon salt. 

1 cup currants. 1 t-spoon cinnamon. 

1 cup figs. 1 t-spoon cloves. 

4 well beaten eggs. i^ grated nutmeg. 

1 cup wine. 
Flour fruit thoroughly, using part of 1 pint flour. Mix re- 
mainder as follows ; pour beaten eggs into large bowl, add sugar, 
spices, salt and wine. Stir in the dredged fruit, chopped nuts, 
bread crumbs and suet alternately until all are used ; adding last 1 
t-spoon of soda dissolved in 1 tbls. of warm water. Then add bal- 
ance of flour to make fruit stick together. Boil or steam in mold 
four hours. 

Mrs. T. J. Hightower, Jr. 

EASY APPLE PUDDING. 
1 pt. flour. 1 tbls. shortening. 

3 t-spoons baking powder. 2/3 cup milk. 

1 t-spoon salt. 

Slice enough tender apples to fill pan 3/4 full ; make soft dough, 
as for biscuit. Spread over apples and bake. When done turn out, 
apples up, spread with butter and sugar, use your judgment for this 
amount, return to oven to melt, serve warm with sweet cream. 

Mrs. W. B. Disbro. 

KISS PUDDING NO. 2. 
% cup sugar. 2 tbls. corn starch or flour. 

1/^ tbls. butter. 3 eggs. 

1 qt. milk. 

Mix dry ingredients and add yolks of eggs and milk. Put over 
fire and stir until it is a thick cream. Add butter. Whip whites of 
eggs with part of sugar for meringue. Put on top and brown lightly 
in hot oven. Flavor to taste. 

Mrs. J. A. Sibley. 

DATE PUDDING NO. 3. 
1 cup sugar. 1 cup dates. 

3 eggs. 3 tbls. flour. 

1 cup chopped nuts. 

Separate eggs, beat whites until stiff, yolks until frothy. Mix 
flour and sugar, add to the eggs, then chopped fruits, stir just 
enough to mix. Bake 45 minutes in slow oven. 

Mrs. J. B. Rowe. 

CHRISTMAS PLUM PUDDING (English). 

8 oz. moist sugar. 4 oz. flour. 

8 oz. finely chopped suet. 4 oz. bread crumbs. 

8 oz. sultanas, (cleaned). 2 oz. blanched almonds (shred- 
8 oz. seeded raisins, (halved). ed). 

8 oz. currants, (washed and 1 lemon, (grated rind), 

dried). 4 eggs. 



182 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



1 saltspoon grated nutmeg. I/4. pt. milk. 

1/2 t-spoon salt. 1 wineglass brandy. 

4 oz. mixed candied peel, shred- 
ed. 
Mix all dry ingredients together, stir in the well beaten eggs, 
milk and brandy. Turn the mixture into two well buttered basins ; 
steam from 5 to 6 hours. Sufficient for eight or nine persons. 

Mrs. Rupert E. Hall. 

CABINET PUDDING. 

4 doz. macaroons. 1/2 cup maraschino cherries. 

1 cup pecans. II/2 cups sugar. 
6 eggs. • 2 tbls. gelatine. 
1/2 cup warm water. 1 cup grape juice. 

Beat yolks of eggs and sugar together. Add gelatine which has 
been dissolved in warm water and grape juice. Put in double boiler 
and cook till thick. When cool enough add whites of eggs which 
have been beaten very stiff. Add crumbled macaroons, cherries 
and pecans. Put in a mold, set in refrigerator to congeal. To serve 
place on platter and cover with whipped cream and cherries if de- 
sired. 

Mrs. Chester Alexander. 

FROZEN PUDDING. 
11/2 qts. milk. 4 eggs. 

2 cups sugar. V2 cup flour. 

1 envelope gelatine. 1 cup strawberry preserves. 

1 cup crystallized fruit. 1 cup pecans. 

1 qt. cream. 

Dissolve gelatine in a little cold water and add to the hot milk. 
Make a custard of milk, eggs, sugar and flour. When thick strain 
and cool, then add any flavoring desired (Sherry preferred). Add 
cream and freeze; when about half frozen add pecans, fruit and 
preserves. 

Mrs. S. F. Boykin. 

ONE-TWO-THREE PASTRY (Good). 

1 cup (unsifted) flour. 3 tbls. ice water. 

2 tbls. butter or lard. 1/2 t-spoon salt. 

Mrs. Porter King. 
PIE CRUST. 
4 cups flour. 1 t-spoon salt. 

1 cup cooking oil. 1 cup cold water. 

Rub flour, oil and salt together, then add water. 

Mrs. Walter E. Smith. 

FRENCH PASTRY. 

1 egg. 1 or 2 tbls. ice water. 
1/2 lb. flour. 1/2 lemon (grated peel). 

2 tbls. sugar. i/4 lb. butter. 

4 egg yolks. 1/2 t-spoon salt. 



PASTRIES, PUDDINGS AND DUMPLINGS 183 



Sift together flour, sugar and salt. Cut in butter and lemon 
rind. Add beaten yolks and ice water. Set on ice to chill. Roll 
about 1/8 inch thick, glaze top with beaten egg (white and yolk) 
sprinkle sugar. Bake in moderate oven, after cutting into desired 
shapes. 

Mrs. Bruce Young. 

PASTRY. 

1 cup good flour. Iced water. 
14 cup Snowdrift, Pinch of salt. 
1/2 t-spoon baking powder. 

Rub shortening into the flour very thoroughly ; add salt and 
baking powder, which have been mixed well together. Add enough 
water to make a dough that can be rolled out, handling as little as 
possible. Turn pie pan up side down, grease with butter and fit the 
pastry over it. Stick with fork and bake. 

Clementine G. Rawling. 

BLACKBERRY DUMPLING. 

2 cups flour. 2 t-spoons baking powder. 
1/2 t-spoon salt. 2 tbls. sugar. 

2 cups shortening. 1/2 cup ice water. 

2 tbls. brown sugar. 1/2 t-spoon butter. 

Mix flour, salt, baking powder, sugar and water together mak- 
ing a dough. Roll out 1/4 inch thick and cut into 4 squares. Place 
pastry in muffin pans and fill with blackberries. Brush with water 
and dust lightly with brown sugar and butter. Bake in moderate 
oven for 25 minutes. Serve with vanilla sauce. 

Mrs. Lily R. Mell. 

PEACH DUMPLING. 
2 cups flour. 1/2 cup sugar. 

4 tbls. shortening. 1 t-spoon cinnamon. 

% cup milk. 1 tbls. butter. 

4 t-spoons baking powder. Several peaches. 

1/2 t-spoon salt. 

Mix first 5 ingredients together. Roll 1/2 inch thick, cut into 
squares, put peaches in each square with cinnamon and sugar to 
taste. Take corners and pinch together. Place in greased pan, dot 
with sugar and butter. Bake in moderate oven until brown. Serve 
hot. 

Mrs. J. F. Buchanan. 

APPLE DUMPLING OR COBBLER. 

1 cup sugar. 1/2 t-spoon cinnamon. 

8 apples. 1/2 t-spoon nutmeg. 

l^ t-spoon salt. 1/2 tbls. butter. 

Sprinkle lower crust with flour then add sugar. Pare apples 
and slice thin. Place in deep pan, add cinnamon, salt, nutmeg and 
butter. Cover with upper crust, bake 1 hour. Use plain pie crust 
for dumplings. Mrs. Tom Hatton. 



184 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



CHICKEN DUMPLING. 
3 cups flour. 2 cups milk. 

1 t-spoon baking powder. 1 t-spoon salt. 
6 Irish potatoes. Yolk of 1 egg. 

Cut chicken as for frying, stew until tender with potatoes. 
Make a dough using one cup of milk, drop in large spoonsful into 
boiling pot, which should be about 1/2 full, cover closely and boil 
slowly for thirty-five minutes without lifting cover. Thicken gravy 
remaining in pot with yolk, one spoon flour and remaining cup of 
milk. Dumplings should be light and spongy. 

Mrs. W. B. Disbro. 

VANILLA SAUCE. 
1/2 cup sugar. 2 tbls. corn starch. 

1/2 cup white corn syrup 1 tbls. vanilla. 

1/2 cup water. 

Stir to dissolve and bring to a boil, cook 3 minutes. Add vanilla 
after boiling. 

Mrs. Lily R. Mell. 

LEMON SAUCE. 
6 tbls. powdered sugar. 1 tbls. lemon juice. 

2 tbls. butter. 

Beat all until smooth. 

Mrs. Walter E. Smith. 

WOODFORD SAUCE. 
2 tbls. butter. 1 tbls. vanilla. 

14 t-spoon salt. 1 cup whipped cream. 

Pulverized sugar. 

Cream butter, add as much sugar as it will take up. Add salt. 
Place over boiling water until it becomes a liquid. Just before 
serving add vanilla and whipped cream. Serve hot. 

Mrs. W. R. Bean. 

CARAMEL SAUCE. 
1 cup brown sugar, 1 cup boiling water. 

1 tbls. water. 1 tbls. butter. 

Mix sugar and water, let stay on stove until it melts. Add 
butter and boiling water. Boil until it begins to thicken. 

Mrs. J. W. Shelor. 

FOAMING SAUCE. 

2 tbls. butter. 1 egg (well beaten). 
1 cup powdered sugar. 1 t-spoon vanilla. 

Cream together butter, sugar and well beaten egg. When 
smooth add vanilla. When ready to serve blend carefully with a cup 
of whipped cream. Spread over pudding and sprinkle lightly with 
grated nutmeg. 

Clementine G. Rawling. 



PASTRIES, PUDDINGS AND DUMPLINGS 185 



YELLOW SAUCE. 
2 eggs. 1 t-spoon lemon. 

1 cup sugar. 

Beat eggs until very light, add sugar, beat again, then add 
lemon. Steam for 10 minutes. 

Mrs. W. R. Bean. 

HARD SAUCE. 

1 cup butter. 1 lemon (juice). 

2 cups pulverized sugar. 1 t-spoon nutmeg. 
2 t-spoons vanilla. 

Cream butter and sugar, add lemon juice and nutmeg. Serve 
cold. 

Mrs. D. M. Haynes. 

BUTTER SCOTCH PIE NO. 1. 

(Kentucky Recipe). 

2 cups brown sugar. 2 cups milk. 

3 tbls. flour. 1 t-spoon vanilla. 
3 eggs. 1 tbls. butter. 

Separate the eggs ; mix the ingredients in order given, using 
egg yolks. Cook over double boiler till thick. Pour into crust al- 
ready baked. Use egg w^hites and three tbls. sugar for meringue 
and brown in oven. Recipe makes two pies. 

Recipe for crust. 
1 cup flour. 3 level tbls. Snowdrift. 

V'l t-spoon salt. 3 tbls ice water. 

Sift flour and salt into a bowl, adding Snowdrift and three tbls. 
ice water. 

Mrs. W. H. Letton. 

COCOANUT CUSTARD. 
3 eggs. 1 cup grated cocoanut. 

1/2 cup sugar. A little salt. 

1/2 cup milk. 

Cream together egg yolks and sugar. Add milk, salt and cocoa- 
nut ; let them come to a boil. Pour mixture into pie crust that has 
been partially cooked. Cook in moderate oven. Cover with me- 
ringue made of 3 beaten egg whites and 2 tbls. of sugar. Brown in 
oven. 

Mrs. J. Z. Lawshe. 

LEMON PIE NO. 1. 
3 eggs. 2 lemons. 

1 cup sugar, 1 slice bread. 

2 tbls. butter. 

Soak slice of bread one inch thick in cold water to soften. Grate 
rind of lemon, mix with sugar, butter and well beaten egg yolks. 
Stir moist bread in mixture, add lemon juice, cook in double boiler 



186 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 

until thick. Have pie crust ready, pour in mixture, top with me- 
ringue made of well beaten egg whites and 3 tbls. sugar. Brown 
in oven. 

Mrs. Joseph Avd^ry. 

JAM PIE. 

2 eggs. 1 cup sugar, 

1 cup jam. 1/2 cup cream or milk. 

1/2 cup butter. 1 level tbls. flour. 

Cream butter and sugar together, add well beaten egg yolks. 
Stir flour gradually in milk until smooth, add with jam mixture. 
Cook in double boiler until thick. Put mixture in rich crust ready 
baked. Cover with meringue made from the well beaten egg white 
and two tbls. sugar. Brown in oven. 

Mrs. W. M. Seay. 

BUTTER SCOTCH PIE NO 2. 
1 cup brown sugar. 1 egg. 

3 tbls. flour. 3 tbls. water. 
1 tbls. butter. 1 cup milk. 

1 t-spoon vanilla. 

Add water and sugar gradually to egg yolk, stir in milk and 
butter melted. Cook in double boiler until thick. Pour in ready 
baked shell and set in oven about 5 minutes. Meringue — Beat the 
egg white stiff, add 1 tbls. sugar, spread on top and brown. 

Mrs. M. L. Smith. 

BUTTER SCOTCH PIE NO. 3. 
1 cup brown sugar. 2 eggs. 

1/2 cup water. 2 tbls. flour. 

1 tbls. butter. 1 cup milk. 

Cream butter, egg yolk and sugar together ; mix smoothly flour 
and milk, add vanilla and pinch of salt. Mix all together well and 
cook in double boiler until it thickens. Pour into rich pastry crust 
(not baked) and cook in moderate oven. Make meringue of well 
beaten egg whites and 2 tbls. sugar. Place in oven a few minutes 

to brown. 

Mrs. A. E, Arnold. 

MOLASSES PIE. 

1 cup sugar. 3 eggs. 

2 tbls. flour. 1 cup nuts. 

1 cup molasses. Butter size of egg. 

Cream sugar, butter and eggs together well ; add molasses. Put 
nuts in the flour and add to mixture. Bake pastry a bit, put m fil- 
ling and bake in moderate oven until done. 

Mrs. C. K. Ayer. 

ENGLISH MINCEMEAT. 
1 lb. suet. Vi lb. shredded mixed candied 

1 lb, currants. peel. 



PASTRIES, PUDDINGS AND DUMPLINGS 187 



1 lb. raisins. 2 lemons. 

1 lb. apples. y^ gill brandy. 

1 lb. sugar. V^ salt spoon nutmeg. 
1/2 lb. Sultanas. V^ salt spoon mace. 

1/2 saltspoon cinnamon. 
Chop suet finely, wash and pick currants, stone and quarter 
raisins, chop apples. Pare lemons thinly, simmer the rinds in a lit- 
tle water until perfectly tender and then pound them or rub thru a 
fine sieve. Mix all ingredients well together, press into a jar, cover 
closely and keep in a cool dry place for at least one month before us- 
ing. Mrs. Rupert E. Hall. 

BURNT CARAMEL PIE. 

2 cups sugar. ■ 4 eggs. 

2 cups milk. 5 tbls. flour. 

2 tbls. butter. 1 t-spoon vanilla. 

Cream butter and sugar together with well beaten ^^^ yolks. 
Mix to a paste the flour with one half cup milk. Add with balance 
of milk to mixture. Cook in double boiler stirring constantly until 
very thick. Put remaining sugar in iron skillet or heavy aluminum 
pan, melt until a very dark brown liquid. Stir this liquid in boiler, 
add flavoring. Put in rich crust already baked and hot. Set in top 
of moderate oven 10 minutes. Make meringue of well beaten whites, 
adding two tbls. sugar. Place on pies and brown. This amount 
makes two pies. Mrs. J. A. Carlisle. 

PINEAPPLE PIE. 

1 can grated pineapple. IV2 cups sugar. 

2 lemons. 2 tbls. corn starch. 

3 eggs. 1/2 cup water. 

1 tbls. butter. 

Drain juice from pineapple ; add lemon juice, sugar; boil 3 min- 
utes, add corn starch and water which have been well mixed ; then 
pineapple. Break yolks in hot mixture stirring quickly, cook until 
thick. Line and bake pastry shell ; then fill with mixture. Make me- 
ringue of whites into which 3 tbls. sugar have been added. Spread 
on custard and bake in oven until meringue is firm and brown. 

Mrs. Jesse M. Manry. 

CARAMEL PIE. 

2 cups brown sugar. 1 tbls. butter. 
ll^ cups cream or milk. 4 tbls. flour. 

3 egg yolks. 1 t-spoon vanilla. 
1 white of Q%%, (beaten). 

Mix flour and sugar, stir in milk, add well beaten egg yolks, 
melted butter, vanilla and Q%g white. Cook in double boiler until 
thick. Put mixture in rich crust, ready baked but warm. Cover 
with meringue made of 2 well beaten %%^ whites and 2 tbls. sugar. 
Brown in oven. Mrs. G. C. Chick, 

Lexington, Ky. 



188 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



MOCK CHERRY PIE. 
1 cup cranberries, (cut in half) 1 cup boiling water. 
1/2 cup raisins. Butter size of walnut. 

34 cup sugar. 1 t-spoon vanilla. 

Mix flour and sugar, pour on hot water, add butter, cook until 
thick. Remove from fire, add fruit and flavoring. Bake in pastry, 
with strips of pastry on top. 

Mrs. Porter King. 

LEMON PIE NO. 2 
1 cup sugar. 1 large lemon. 

1 cup water. 3 eggs. 

2 tbls. flour. 1 tbls. butter. 

Cream butter, sugar and flour together; add water (boiling) 
lemon juice and grated rind; then add one whole egg and yolks of 
other two. Stir all together and cook in double boiler until thick. 
Bake rich crust, prick all oved with fork before baking. Make me- 
ringue of two well beaten whites, add tablespoon sugar — place on pie 
and brown slightly in oven. 

Mrs. Frank Daub. 

ENGLISH APPLE PIE (No Pastry). 
2 very large mellow apples. 1 t-spoon white sugar. 

1 cup sifted flour. l^ t-spoon nutmeg. 
1/2 cup brown sugar. 1 t-spoon lemon juice. 
Butter size of an egg. 

Mix well the brown sugar, flour and butter (dry). Grease 
deep baking dish, put in all the apples sliced very thin, add an extra 
piece of butter about size of English walnut sliced thin and placed 
over apples ; sprinkle over this white sugar. Add t-spoon water, 
nutmeg and lemon juice. Place on top of pie the dry mixture 
(sugar, butter and flour). Cover contents thoroughly. Bake in 
moderate oven 30 minutes. Serve hot or cold with whipped cream. 

Mrs. Lucien York. 

LEMON CUSTARD PIE. 

2 tbls. flour or 1 cup boiling water. 

2 medium potatoes grated raw. 2 tbls. butter. 
1 cup sugar. 1 lemon. 

3 eggs. 

Add butter to hot water, stir in flour and sugar thoroughly to 
prevent lumping. Add lemon juice and peel (run peel through food- 
chopper) . Cook in double boiler until thick. Put mixture in ready 
baked pie shell, make meringue of 3 tbls, sugar in the well beaten 
egg whites. Brown in moderate oven. Those who have never used 
raw Irish potato as a thickening for lemon pie will be agreeably 
surprised. 

Mrs. D. F. Stevenson. 



PASTRIES, PUDDINGS AND DUMPLINGS 18»- 



AMBER PIE (Rich But Delicious). 
4 eggs. 11/2 cups brown sugar. 

1/2 cup butter. 1/2 cup cream. 

1/2 cup tart jelly. 4 tbls. flour. 

Cream butter and sugar, add well beaten egg yolks. Stir flour 
into 1/2 cup cream until very smooth ; add jelly and vanilla to mix- 
ture. Cook in double boiler until thick. Put in rich baked crust. 
Cover with meringue of well beaten egg whites and 4 tbls. sugar. 
This is large pie with thick meringue. 

Mrs. Lawrence Petty, 

West Virginia. 

MOCK CHERRY PIE. 
11/2 cups flour. 3 tbls ice cold water. 

4 tbls. shortening. 1 t-spoon salt. 

Cut shortening into flour, add salt, add water one spoonful at 
a time. Do not knead, pinch into balls, turn out on board and roll, 
put in pie pan and trim. 

Filling. 
1 cup raw cranberries. Butter size of walnut. 

1/2 cup raisins. 1 cup boiling water. 

% cup sugar. 1 t-spoon vanilla. 

3 tbls. flour. 

Cut cranberries and raisins in halves, mix sugar and flour dry. 
Pour boiling water over sugar and flour and cook to boiling 
point. Put raw fruit into mixture; add flavoring, pour into un- 
cooked pastry. Cut left over pastry into lattice strips, place 
over pie and cook 30 minutes. 

Mrs. Chas. Marshall. 

MACAROON PIE. 
3 eggs yolks. 6 almond macaroons, crushed. 

1 cup cream or milk. 3 tbls. flour. 

1 t-spoon vanilla. 1/2 cup butter. 

1 cup brown sugar. 

Make a custard of above ingredients except macaroons. Cook 
in double boiler until thick. When cool add 1/2 macaroons, put mix- 
ture in crust ready baked, sprinkle balance macaroons over this, 
cover with meringue made of the egg whites beaten stiffly and two 
tbls. sugar. Brown in oven. 

Mrs. W. M. Seay. 

LEMON PIE. 

3 eggs. 4 tbls. cold water. 

1 lemon, juice and grated rind. Butter size of an egg. 

1 cup sugar. 

To one egg and 2 yolks well beaten add sugar, juice and 
grated rind of lemon, beat until smooth, adding water and melted 
butter. Put in partially baked crust, and finish baking in mode- 



190 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



rate oven, top with meringue made from 2 stiffly beaten egg whites, 
beating in 4 tbls. sugar. Brown slightly. 

Mrs. J. B. Guerry, 
Montezuma, Ga. 

MRS. FRANK L. STANTON'S "BANANA PIE." 

3 bananas. 1/3 cup flour. 

%, cup sugar. % cup boiling water. 

1 tbls. butter. 1/4 t-spoon vanilla. 

2 eggs. 1/4 t-spoon salt. 

Cream sugar and butter, beat in yolks of eggs, add flour and 
boiling water, cook until thick, stirring all the time. When cool add 
flavoring. Use whites of eggs for meringue for top as in lemon pies, 
also make pastry as in lemon pies. These proportions are suffi- 
cient for one pie. Slice bananas very thin, round and round, place 
on crust, cover with the custard and add meringue and brown 
lightly in oven. Bake pastry before putting in the filling. Deli- 
cious ! 

Mrs. Frank L. Stanton. 

MOLASSES PUDDING. 

3 eggs. 1 cup sour milk, 
1 cup sugar. 1 t-spoon soda. 

1 cup molasses. 1 t-spoon ginger. 

1 cup mixed butter and lard. 1 t-spoon cinnamon. 
3 cups flour. 1 tbls. wine. 

Beat eggs separately, add soda to molasses. Mix all together as 
egg batter. Serve hot with hard sauce flavored with lemon, 
wine, and grate nutmeg over sauce. 

Mrs. Samuel Inman, 
Director for Georgia of the National Federation of Women's Clubs. 



CHAPTER XL 

MRS. THOMAS' FAVORITE RECIPES. 

Mrs. Irving Thomas, President of the Atlanta Woman's Club 
for three years, and elected Honorary Life President at the expira- 
tion of her term .of office, is famed as well for her cookery as for 
her leadership in civic affairs. In answer to many requests for her 
recipes, she has given her favorites herewith. It is fitting that these 
should occupy a special chapter, both because they are all so deli- 
cious, and because the Auditorium, for which the proceeds from this 
book's sale will be used, is known as the Lucile King Thomas Audito- 
rium. 

CREAMED CELERY. 

3 cups celery, (diced). 2 tbls. flour. 
11/2 cups milk. 14 t-spoon salt. 

4 tbls. butter. 1/2 cup grated bread crumbs. 
Boil celery in salt water until tender; make cream sauce by 

adding butter, salt and flour to boiling milk ; put celery in casserole, 
alternating sauce and celery till casserole is filled; cover top with 
bread crumbs moistened with melted butter. Bake and serve hot. 

EGGS EN SURPRISE. 
6 even sized tomatoes. 6 strips broiled bacon. 

6 eggs. 1/4 t-spoon salt. 

Break eggs whole into tomatoes which have been scooped out 
and salted. Add crisp bacon broken into small pieces. If necessary 
to fill more, add tomato pulp, seasoned. Bake 30 minutes in hot 
oven. 

CELERY SYLVAN. 
1 bunch celery. i/^ cake Philadelphia cream 

14 cup pecans. cheese. 

1/4 cup raisins. 1 tbls. lemon juice. 

Place celery in ice water to which lemon juice has been added; 
later fill celery stalks with mixture of chopped nuts, raisins, cheese 
and lemon juice and serve cold. 

CREAMED SWEET BREADS EN CASSEROLE. 
1 lb. sweetbreads. 3 tbls. butter. 

11/2 cups milk. 1/2 cup rolled bread crumbs. 

Parboil sweetbreads in salt water; then break apart in small 
pieces. Mix with cream sauce in casserole and top with bread 
crumbs and melted butter, bake and serve hot. 



192 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



SPONGE CAKE. 
1 cup sugar. 1 t-spoon baking powder. 

4 eggs. 3 tbls. water. 

1 cup flour. 1 t-spoon vanilla. 

11/2 this, corn starch. 
Beat eggs separately, cream sugar and yolks, sift corn starch, 
flour and baking-powder, and mix all together, adding whites of 
eggs last. Flavor. 

SYLVAN CREAM. 
1 pf. milk. 1/2 pkg. gelatine. 

4 eggs. 1 cup cream. 

34 cups sugar. 1 t-spoon vanilla. 

Make boiled custard of milk, yolks of eggs, and sugar. Dissolve 
gelatine in tepid water, and stir into custard. When cooled and 
beginning to congeal, stir slowly in beaten whites. Fold in whipped 
cream, and flavor. Let cool. 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE. 
1 qt. very thick cream. 1 cup blanched almonds. 

1/2 lb. marshmallows. 1/2 cup crystallized cherries. 

14 pkg. gelatine. 1 t-spoon vanilla or cherry. 

4 tbls. sugar. 

Whip cream stiff. Cut marshmallows into quarters. Add to 
beaten cream, gelatine which has been soaked in tepid water, sugar, 
fruit and nuts. Let set until thoroughly chilled. 

HARD SAUCE. 
1 tbls. butter, (creamery). 1 egg. 

1 cup sugar. Nutmeg flavoring. 

Cream butter, yolk of egg and sugar. Add beaten whites ; f la- 
vorvor with nutmeg. 

TEA CAKES NO 1. 
10 eggs. 1 t-spoon soda. 

1/2 lb. butter. 1 lemon juice and rind. 

3 lbs. sugar. 

Cream butter and sugar, add yolks well beaten; beat whites 
stiff; put soda into lemon juice and grated rind, and stir in batter. 
Add flour and work well. If not thick enough, add more flour. Roll 
thin, sprinkle with sugar, and bake. 

TEA CAKES NO 2. 

2 eggs. 2 cups flour. 

8 tbls. sugar. 1 t-spoon baking powder. 

2 tbls. butter or lard. 

Beat eggs, sugar and butter. Mix with flour, roll thin, cut and 
bake on buttered pan. 

RICH FRUIT CAKE. 
12 eggs. 1 teacup Karo syrup. 



MRS. THOMAS' RECIPES 193 



11/2 lb. butter. 1 cup wine. 

11/2 lb. flour. 1 level t-spoon soda. 

4 fbs. raisins. 1 lb. English walnuts. 

3 lbs. currants. 1 lb. crystallized cherries. 
11/2 lbs. citron. V2 lb- crystallized pineapple. 
1 lb. pecans. 1 t-spoon allspice. 

1 t-spoon cloves. 1 t-spoon cinnamon. 

1 nutmeg grated. 1/2 lb. flour to flour fruit. 

Separate whites and yolks of eggs ; beat half of the yolks with 
half of the sugar ; cream the butter with the other half and mix all 
together. Add half the flour ; then whites of eggs beaten with the 
other half of the flour. Add the syrup with soda beaten in, and add 
the ground spice. Lastly add the fruit, which has been dredged in 
flour. Stir quickly into batter. Cut citron into thin strips and lay 
across bottom in order to hold batter together. It is sometimes nec- 
essary to put several thicknesses of paper in bottom of pan to pre- 
vent burning. Bake slowly about six hours — pour wine over cake 
when baked. Half this quantity makes nice size cake. 

DELICIOUS LIGHT BREAD OR ROLLS. 

1 Fleischmann's yeast cake. 2 tbls. water. 

2 cups milk. 2 tbls. sugar. 
8I/2 cups sift'^d flour. 1 t-spoon salt. 
1 tbls. lard. 1 egg. 

1 tbls. butter. 

Let milk come to a boil, and then cool till tepid. Dissolve 
yeast in water and sugar and add milk. Add II/2 cups flour and 
mix this for sponge, beating till smooth. Let stand about one 
hour. Then cream butter, lard, and salt; beat egg separately, add 
sponge and mix thoroughly. Add remainder of flour, one cup 
at a time (about 7 cups). Knead until smooth. Let rise 2 or 
2 1/2 hours, to double its former size ; knead again with a little 
flour, form, place in greased pans and bake about 35 minutes. 

SPOON BREAD. 
1 qt. milk. 2 level tbls. baking powder. 

1 cup corn meal. 1 tbls. sugar. 

4 eggs. 1/2 t-spoon salt. 

Let milk come to boil; beat egg-whites and yolks separately. 
Add to milk, meal, sugar, salt — egg yolks and baking powder mixed, 
and lastly, the beaten whites. Turn into well greased baking dish, 
bake until light brown, and double in bulk. Serve hot in baking 
dish. This bread is soft when done, and should be eaten hot. 

BUTTERMILK SPOON BREAD. 

1/2 t-spoon salt. 1/2 cup meal. 

1 pt buttermilk. 3 eggs. 

1 tbls. butter. 1 level t-spoon soda. 

Put soda in milk ; add egg-yolks, then melted butter ; gradually 



194 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



beat in meal, and lastly add beaten whites. The batter must be thin, 
so if necessary, use less meal. Bake in well-greased baking dish, 
and serve hot with butter. 

SIMPLE ROLLS. 

1 pt. milk. 1/2 t-spoon salt. 

2 tbls. lard. 2 qts. flour. 

1 tbls. sugar. I/4. cup tepid water. 

Heat milk to boil, let cool till tepid ; add lard, sugar and salt. 
Dissolve Fleischmann's yeast cake in tepid water, add to above; 
then add flour slowly, beating constantly in bucket or break-mixer. 
Before dough gets too heavy to beat, put in warm place to rise. The 
more it is beaten, the quicker it will rise. When risen, add sufficient 
flour to make dough stiff enough to be rolled ; then put three balls 
of dough into each ring of a muffin pan, rub surface with beaten 
egg, let rise until double in bulk, and bake. 

SYLVAN BARBECUED LAMB. 
Medium sized lamb roast. 2 tbls. Worcester Sauce. 

1/4 cup tomato catsup. 1 t-spoon pepper. 

1 cup vinegar. ' 1 t-spoon salt. 

11/2 cups water. 1/2 cup chopped onions. 

Mix all together, pour over lamb, and bake till tender. 

CRYSTALLIZED APPLES. 
6 firm apples. 2 cups water. 

2 cups sugar. 3 tbls. butter. 

Peel and core 6 firm, well shaped apples ; slice into three pieces 
(circles). Boil syrup of sugar and water 20 minutes; add apples, 
placing flat in the pan, and 1 layer deep, putting butter in center of 
each ring. Bake in hot oven and serve cold. 

EGGS A LA SYLVAN. 
8 eggs. 1/2 cup almonds. 

11/2 cups milk. ■ 6 strips broiled bacon. 

3 tbls. butter. 1 cup toasted bread crumbs. 
1/2 t-spoon salt. 

"Put sliced hard-boiled eggs in buttered casserole, alternating 
with bread crumbs, until dish is filled, then pour over hot milk with 
melted butter. Cover with bread crumbs moistened in melted but- 
ter, bake and serve hot. 

CARAMEL CUSTARD. 
11/2 tbls. white sugar. 1 pt. scalded milk. 

3 eggs. 1 tbls. water. 

1 cup brown sugar. 1/2 t-spoon vanilla. 

Melt brown sugar; stir constantly; beat eggs slightly; stir 
melted sugar into boiling milk, add eggs white sugar and flavoring. 
Bake in quick oven and serve cold. 



MRS. THOMAS' RECIPES 195 



RABUN POTATOES. 

14 lb. breakfast bacon. 1/2 cup bread crumbs. 

3 green peppers. 1 tbls. butter or bacon drip- 
6 large Irish potatoes. pings. 

Cream SaucQ For Same. 
114 cups milk. 1 tbls. butter or bacon drip- 

2 tbls. flour. pings. 

1/2 t-spoon salt. 

Boil and slice potatoes ; broil bacon. Place in casserole in 

layers, the potatoes, bacon, peppers cut in strips, the cream sauce, 

alternating until dish is filled. Place on top the cream sauce, butter 

(or drippings) and bread crumbs. Bake and serve hot in casserole. 

CHICKEN A LA "WOMAN'S CLUB." 
(Serves 25). 
1 large hen. 1 can pimentos. 

4 sets brains. 1 lb. breakfast bacon. 

1 bottle stuffed olives. 1 can mushrooms. 
Salt and pepper to taste. 1 cup rice. 

Clean brains, removing outside membrane. Cook in boiling 
water about 20 minutes, drain and cut fine. Boil chicken until meat 
is very tender, cut in small pieces, crisp bacon, cut in pieces, cut 
pimentos fine, olives each into 3 pieces, cook rice about half done, 
finish cooking in chicken broth, then add above ingredients- 
cook slowly until mixture is fairly thick. Cream sauce may be 
added if there isn't enough chicken broth. Serve in timbals or on 
rounds of toast. 

CUCUMBER ASPIC. 

2 cucumbers (fresh). 1 can sliced pineapple. 

3 lemons (juice). 2 tbls. gelatine. 

3 tbls. sugar. 1 pint hot water. 

1 tbls. green coloring. 

Add sugar and lemon juice to hot water, stirring gelatin which 
has been previously dissolved in Yi cup cold water then add juice of 
pineapple, coloring, then cool. Mix in pineapple cut in small pieces, 
cucumber peeled and grated fine (if seeds of cucumber are large 
and tough discard them). Mixture may be poured in fancy molds 
or large square pan and cut in any desired shape. Serve on lettuce 
with mayonnaise. 

Mrs. I. Thomas. 

DELICIOUS DATE AND NUT SQUARES. 

1 package dates. l^ cup flour. 

1 cup pecan (meats). 1 tbls. water. 

1 cup sugar. 2 t-spoons baking powder. 

1 tbls. butter. 1 t-spoon vanilla. 

1 ^'g%- 

Combine %%%, sugar, water and flour. Add baking powder, 
nuts then dates which have been cut in 4 pieces (stones discarded). 



196 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



This mixture will be very thick, add flavoring. Put butter in shal- 
low-baking pan to prevent sticking. Bake in moderately hot oven, 
placing vessel of hot water under pan to keep mixture moist while 
cooking. When cooked to golden brown cut in squares. 

SUGARED PECANS. 

1 cup pecan (meats). 1 cup granulated sugar. 
% cup water. 1 cup sugar X X X X. 

Boil granulated sugar and water to soft ball degree, drop pe- 
cans (one at a time) in hot syrup, dip out, roll separately in pow- 
dered sugar which has been sprinkled generously on a marble slab — 
lay on waxed paper. 

MOCK SWEET BREADS. 
Delicious Filling For Timbals. 

2 sets brains. l-i/o cups milk. 
i/o lb. bacon. 2 tbls. butter. 

1 can mushrooms. 2 tbls. flour. 

6 eggs. Salt and pepper to taste. 

Clean brains — removing outside membrane, cook in cup of boil- 
ing water about 20 minutes, crisp bacon, break in small pieces, add 
with eggs hard boiled and chopped. Mix in mushrooms, stir all 
together in cream sauce (made from ingredients column 2). Melt 
butter in small pan over slow fire, add flour, blend to a paste, stir 
in the scalded milk, beat till sauce is creamy. 

BRAIN CUTLETS. 
1 set brains. 1 cup Post Toasties. 

1 cup tomato sauce. 1 egg. 

1 lemon. Parsley. 

Clean brains well, mash and stand in salt water Yz hour. Slice 
in 4 slices, roll each slice in well beaten egg, then in Post Toasties, 
fry in hot fat. Serve with tomato sauce and garnish with sliced 
lemon and parsley. 

CHICKEN FILLING FOR TIMBALS. 
1 hen. 1 tbls. flour. 

1 can mushrooms. 1 tbls. butter. 

3 eggs. Salt and pepper. 
1 cup milk. 

Boil chicken until tender, cut dark meat in dice, mix chicken, 
mushrooms, eggs hard-boiled and chopped with cream sauce made 
from ingredients column 2. 

CHICKEN SALAD. 

2-1/4 cups white meat chicken. l-|/2 cups mayonnaise. 

l-'/2 cups celery. I-I/2 cups almonds (shelled). 

l-i/o cups Malaga grapes. 

Use white meat of chicken from above recipe, peel and remove 
seed from grapes, cut celery in small pieces, cut chicken in dice, mix 
all together with mayonnaise. Serve on hearts of lettuce. 



CHAPTER XII. 



THRIFT CHAPTER. 



Recipes Compiled by Mrs. E. B. Havis, Jr. 
Co-Chair. Sudie Heard Memorial Com. 

IN MEMORIAM, SUDIE HEARD, CHAIRMAN. 

It is eminently fitting that this chapter of this book should be 
prefaced by a few words concerning one who during the war period 
stood for Thrift in its every phase. Mrs. Heard talked thrift ; she 
worked for thrift; she lived thrift, because it was the duty of the 
moment ; it was the call of her Government to her patriotism. She 
answered this call as she did every other call to duty, with every 
fibre of her whole being. She never did anything in a half hearted 
way. 

When the cook book was planned, her ready response to the sug- 
gestion of a Thrift Chapter, and her acceptance of the responsibility 
of such a chapter, gave encouragement to those in charge, but the 
call to "Come up Higher" came to her, and like a tired little child 
she lay down to rest, secure in the thought that in the very love and 
co-operative spirit her example had engendered, those who loved 
her would carry on her work to completion. 

It is in this spirit, the desire to go on with her work, as nearly 
as possible in her way, in loving memory of Mrs. Heard, her co- 
workers present this Chapter. 

Mrs. Alonzo Richardson, 
Vice-Pres. Atlanta Woman's Club. 

MRS. HEARD'S ITALIAN SPAGHETTI. 
1 lb. beef. 1 can tomatoes. 

1 pkg. spaghetti. 14 lb. grated cheese. 

1 large green pepper. 1 t-spoon salt. 

1 t-spoon black pepper. Dash of garlic. 

Cook beef very tender, season with salt, pepper, green pepper, 
onion and garlic. When beef is tender, add tomatoes and cook for 
about 15 minutes. Cook in another vessel 1 package spaghetti until ■ 
tender. Place the cooked meat and tomatoes in baking dish or cas- 
serole, putting a layer of meat, then a layer of spaghetti, and last 
the grated cheese. Place in oven until cheese is melted. Serve in 
casserole. 

Mrs. Joseph Heard, Sr. 




MRS. JOSEPH HEARD, SR. 



THRIFT CHAPTER 199 



CHICKEN GUMBO. 
3 lbs. chicken. 1 cup rice. 

1 can tomatoes. 1 t-spoon whole black pepper. 
Cut chicken in pieces. Place in boiler; cover well with water 

and cook until very tender. Salt to taste; add rice, tomatoes and 
pepper. Season with file' and let cpok slowly three hours. File' is 
obtained from the sassafras herb. 

Mrs. Joseph Heard, Sr. 

Mrs. J. E. Hays, President State Federation of Women's 
Clubs, recommended the following 4 for use during the World War. 
What we then learned, as disciples of Mr. Hoover, may well be kept 
in mind. 

POT ROAST OF MUTTON WITH CURRANT MINT SAUCE. 
11/^ lbs. mutton — seasoning. 

Wipe meat, sprinkle with salt and pepper, place on rack in 
dripping pan and dredge meat and bottom of pan with flour. Bake 
in hot oven for two hours, basting frequently with butter or butter 
substitute. Serve with Currant Mint Sauce. 

CURRANT MINT SAUCE. 

Separate 2/3 cup currant jelly in pieces, but do not beat it. Add 
one to two tbls. finely chopped mint leaves and shavings from one 
orange rind. Serve around roast, 

ESCALLOPED CORN BEEF, 

2 cups cooked corn beef, 1 cup white sauce. 

1 cup chopped celery. 2 slices onion. 

Cook celery and onions in sauce. Put the corn beef in a shal- 
low baking pan. Remove celery and onions from sauce. Add sauce 
to meat. Sprinkle with bread crumbs, moistened with butter or but- 
ter substitute. Brown in hot oven. 

VEAL CUTLETS, AND SOUP, 

3 lbs, veal shank — seasoning. 

Cook a veal shank in boiling salted water until tender. Remove 
as much meat as possible from the bone. Cut the pieces to resem- 
ble chops. Take this veal and season well. Roll in crumbs and egg 
and crumbs again, and saute in butter or butter substitute. Gar- 
nish with parsley. 

For the soup take the remaining portion of the shank and put 
it into a kettle with three cups of brown stock and a few pepper- 
corns, salt, celery salt, and any other seasoning desired. Add 1/2 
cup each of diced potatoes, turnips and parsley. Cook for 1/2 hour, 

WHITE CAKE. 

114 cups sugar. 1/2 cup shortening. 

3 egg whites. 1 t-spoon lemon extract. 

2 level t-spoons baking powder, 3 cups sifted flour, 

1 cup milk, 1 t-spoon salt, if Crisco is used. 

Cream sugar and shortening, add alternately liquid and dry 



200 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



ingredients ; beat well and add last the well beaten egg whites and 
extract. Bake in two layers in moderate oven about 30 minutes. 

Mrs. B. M. Boykin, 
Pres. Atlanta Woman's Club. 

FRIED SANDWICHES. 
The daintiest breakfast dish may be made from sandwiches 
left over from the picnic, especially if they have been cut thin and 
placed in the refrigerator before frying. Any sandwiches can be 
used for this except those made of cucumbers, tomatoes, lettuce, etc. 
Fry lightly in hot fat, turning often, till a golden brown, and serve, 
garnished with parsley, sliced tomatoes or eggs. 

Mrs. Newton C. Wing, 
Chairman Home Economics. 

VEGETABLE SALAD. 
1 head lettuce. 1 small stalk celery. 

4 large tomatoes. 1 t-spoon salt. 

1 cup mayonnaise. 1/2 t-spoon black pepper. 

Cut celery fine, dice tomatoes ; mix with mayonnaise, salt and 
pepper. Serve on lettuce. 

Mrs. T. T. Stevens, 
Chairman Education. 

DEVILS FOOD CAKE 

1 cup butter. 2 cups sugar. 

3I/2 squares Baker's chocolate. 1 cup milk. 
3 t-spoons baking powder. 21/2 cups flour. 

Whites of 2 eggs. Yolks of 5 eggs. 

Cream butter, sugar and egg yolks together. Add 1 cup milk 
and melted chocolate. Mix in alternately flour and egg whites. 

Mrs. H. G. Carnes, 
Chairman Sudie Heard Memorial Com. 

TWIN MOUNTAIN MUFFINS. 
1/1 cup butter. 14, cup sugar. 

1 cup milk. 1 egg. 

1/2 t-spoon salt. 2 cups flour. 

5 t-spoons baking powder. 

Cream butter, add sugar, egg M^ell beaten, sift baking powder 
with flour and add to first mixture, alternating with milk. Bake in 
greased gem pans for 25 minutes. 

Mrs. Geo. Brower. 

WAFFLES WITHOUT EGGS. 

2 cups flour. 11/2 cups buttermilk. 
1 t-spoon sugar. 3 tbls. melted lard. 

1 t-spoon baking powder. 1 t-spoon salt. 

1/2 t-spoon soda dissolved in a 
little water. 



THRIFT CHAPTER 201 



If self rising flour is used omit the salt and baking powder. 
Mix the flour and milk adding water if batter is too stiff, add the 
lard, salt, baking powder and sugar and beat well. Just before cook- 
ing add soda, dissolved in water. These waffles are very light and 
crisp. If no sour sweet milk or butter milk are convenient use water 
or sweet milk and leave out the soda. 

Mrs. Wm. C. King, 
Secretary Thrift Committee. 

CHOCOLATE FUDGE. 

21/2 cups sugar. 21/2 squares chocolate. 

1 cup milk. 1 t-spoon butter. 

1 t-spoon vanilla. 1/2 t-spoon salt. 

Melt chocolate and stir into milk and sugar. Add butter. Do 
not stir after candy begins to boil. When it makes a soft ball when 
dropped in cold water, remove from fire, add the vanilla extract. 
Beat until creamy and spread upon buttered dish. Cut in squares. 

Mrs. A. McD. Wilson, 
Ex-Pres. Atlanta Woman's Club. 

FIG PUDDING. 
1/2 lb. figs, (chopped fine). 3 tbls. melted butter. 

l"cup bread crumbs. 2 eggs, (well beaten). 

1 cup milk. Pinch of salt. 

Stir well, steam one hour and serve with whipped cream or 
foaming sauce. 

Clementine G. Rawling. 

CHOCOLATE PIE. 

4 eggs. 1 cup sugar. 

1 tbls. corn starch. 1 cup milk. 
1/2 cup chocolate. 1 tbls. butter. 

Beat yolks of eggs thoroughly, stir in sugar, then the chocolate 
and cornstarch ; add milk and melted butter. Bake in single crust 
until custard is set. Beat the whites of eggs until stiff, adding 4 
level tbls. sugar for meringue. 

Mrs. E. B. Havis, Jr. 

ORANGE PUDDING. 

2 oranges cut very fine. 1 banana cut very fine. 

Let stand in a little sugar while preparing the following cus- 
tard which goes over it. 

Custard. 

1 egg. 1/2 cup sugar. 

1/^ pt. milk. 1 tbls. corn starch. 

Cream egg and sugar together, add corn starch to thicken. 
Cook until thick, pour over the orange and banana. Serve with 
whipped or plain cream. 

Mrs. J. B. Rowe, 
Chairman Hospital Committee. 



202 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



BEATEN BISCUIT. 

1 lb. flour. 1/4 lb. lard. 

% cup milk. 1 t-spoon salt. 

Mix as for other biscuit, except the dough should be very stiff. 
Either beat with rolling pin until dough blisters, or run through 
biscuit machine. Cook very slowly about 3/4 of an hour. Con- 
densed milk is preferred in making these biscuit. This quantity 
makes two dozen small biscuits. 

Mrs. S. F. Boykin. 

DOUGHNUTS. 

2 eggs. 1 cup milk. 
1 cup sugar. 3 pts. flour. 

3 t-spoons baking powder. 1 t-spoon butter. 

Make a stiff dough, cut out with doughnut cutter and fry in a 
basket in deep fat. 

Mrs. E. B. Havis, Jr. 

LEMON MERINGUE PIE. 
1 cup water. Juice and grated rind of 1 lemon 

1 cup sugar. Pinch of salt. 

2 level tbls. corn starch. 2 level tbls. of sugar for mer- 
2 eggs. ingue. 

Boil water and sugar together ;-'add cornstarch moistened with 
cold water and cook five minutes. Put in yolks of eggs ; lemon juice, 
rind and salt. Cool slightly and pour into previously baked crust. 
Cover with meringue and brown. 

Mrs. J. P. Savage. 







FRUIT CAKE. 




V2 


lb butter. 




1 1 


b. : 


figs. 


6 ( 


3ggS. 




1/2 


lb. 


English walnuts, (shell- 


2 ] 


lbs. raisins. 








ed). 


1/2 


lb. citron. 




1/4 


lb. 


each candied orange and 


1/2 


lb. almonds 


(shelled). 






lemon peel. 


1/2 


t-spoon soda, 




1/4 


(level) t-spoon baking pow- 



cup buttermilk. der. 

1 cup brandy or wine. 1 t-spoon each cinnamon, 

14 t-spoon salt. cloves, allspice and nut- 

l/> lb. brown sugar. meg. 

1/2 lb. flour. 

Put all fruit through coarse knife of meat chopper except 
citron and nuts. Cut citron in thin strips and nuts in half. Cream 
butter and sugar well, add beaten egg yolks, then butter milk, in 
which soda has been dissolved. Sift flour and baking powder to- 
gether, add one half flour, alternately with beaten egg-whites. 
Dredge fruit well with other half of the flour and add gradually to 
cake mixture. Stir in nuts last, then add half of the wine. Stir all 
together well. Put in well greased baking pan (with tube) two 
layers of paper on bottom of pan. Put mixture in pan, putting 



THRIFT CHAPTER 203 



strips of citron in layers until pan is nearly full. Set cake near top 
of oven with large pan of boiling water beneath the cake. The 
steam from the water keeps the cake moist while it is cooking. Cook 
slowly four hours. When cake is entirely cold pour remaining one 
half cup of wine gradually over it. Will keep in covered tin box for 
several months. Keep several mellow apples in box with cake. 

Mrs. J. A. Carlisle, 
Cook Book Chairman. 

GINGERBREAD. 
14 cup butter. 2 eggs. 

1/2 cup sugar. 2 cups flour. 

1 t-spoon soda. 1 t-spoon ginger. 

1 t-spoon salt. Pinch of cinnamon. 

1 cup molasses. 

Cream butter, add sugar and then molasses. Beat into this two 
eggs and add alternately flour (sifted with soda, salt, ginger and 
cinnamon) and milk. Pour in a buttered and floured pan and bake 
in moderate oven about 30 minutes. 

Mrs. Arthur Hazzard. 
Treas. Auditorium Committee. 

BLUEBERRY TEA-CAKE. 
1 small cup sugar. 1 pt. flour. 

Butter size of an egg. 4 level t-spoons baking powder. 

1 egg well beaten. 1 qt. berries. 

1 cup milk. 

Cream butter and sugar, add egg, then milk alternately with 
flour in which baking powder has been sifted. Put in berries last, 
washed and floured. Bake in shallow tin. 

Mrs. D. I. Carson. 

CHILI RELISH. 
12 large ripe tomatoes. 3 tbls. sugar. 

3 large green peppers. 1 tbls. cinnamon. 

2 large white onions. 3 cups vinegar. 
2 tbls. salt. 

Grind all vegetables and add to boiling vinegar and spices. 
Boil from 1-1/2 to 2 hours. If it boils dry, add more vinegar. Seal 
hot. Mrs. Wm. A. Davis. 

PINEAPPLE SALAD. 

4 slices whole pineapple. 4 oranges. 

1/2 cup celery. 1 cup mayonnaise. 

11/2 cups chopped nut meats. 

Place slice of pineapple on lettuce leaf. Lay in center celery 
cut in two (2) inch lengths filled with chopped nut meats which 
have been rolled in mayonnaise. Place four sections of oranges 
symmetrically on pineapple leaving the celery in center. Upon each 
serving place one tbls. of mayonnaise. 

Mrs. F. J. Massenburg. 



204 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



APPLE JELLY. 
Wash and cut apples which should be just ripe. Put in pre- 
serving kettle with cold water, enough to cover fruit. Let cook until 
apples are just done, but not cooked to pieces. When cool, strain 
through jelly bag. Measure 2 cups juice to 1 cup white granulated 
sugar. Boil until it drops stiffly from spoon. Pour in glasses hot 
and when cool cover tops with paraffin and tin lids. 

Mrs. Joel Hunter 

"KEWPIES." 
1 cup shortening. II/2 cups brown sugar. 

3 eggs. 3 cups flour. 

1 t-spoon salt. 1 level t-spoon soda. 

2 t-spoons cinnamon. 2 cups nut meats. 

1 lb. raisins. 

Cream together sugar and shortening, add well beaten eggs 
then the flour and other dry ingredients, adding the raisins and nuts 
last. This will make a very stiff batter. Take t-spoon and drop 
mixture in a warm greased tin and bake in moderate oven. 

Mrs. James Erwin. 

GRIDDLE CAKES. 

2 cups white or whole wheat 1 cup meal. 

flour. 1 t-spoon salt. 

2 cups milk. 8 t-spoons baking powder, 

1 t-spoon syrup. (level). 

Sift dry ingredients, stir in milk and cook in hot greased grid- 
dle. Condensed milk or water may be used. 

Mrs. George Obear, Jr. 
(Original) 

SPOON BREAD. 

1 pt. sweet milk. 1 cup corn meal. 

1 egg. 1 tbls. butter. 

1 t-spoon salt. 

Place milk in double boiler. Mix meal with enough water 
to form a stiff dough. Stir this mixture into hot milk and 
cook until thick. Beat into this mixture, while hot, 1 egg and the 
butter. Pour into a pan and bake in moderate oven until a light 
brown. 

Mrs. Harold Carlock. 

THRIFT CAKE. 
1/2 cup shortening. 2 eggs. 

1^ cups sugar. 21/2 cups flour. 

1 cup milk. 4 t-spoons baking powder. 

14 t-spoon salt. 1 t-spoon nutmeg. 

1 t-spoon cinnamon. 

Cream shortening, add sugar and beaten eggs. Mix well and 
add ( sifted together) half the flour and baking powder, salt and 



THRIFT CHAPTER 205 



spices ; add milk and remainder of dry ingredients. Bake two thirds 
of batter in two greased layer tins and to remaining third, add one 
tbls. cocoa which has been mixed with 1 tbls. boiling water. Use 
this for middle layer. Bake in hot oven. Put following filling and 
icing between layers and on top of cake. 

Filling for Thrift Cake 

2 tbls. butter. 1 tbls. cocoa. 

2 cups confectioners sugar. 3 tbls. coffee. 

1 t-spoon vanilla extract. 

Cream butter, add sugar and cocoa very slowly, beating until 
light and fluffy. Add vanilla and coffee slowly, a few drops at a 
time, making soft enough to spread. 

Mrs. Alva D. Kiser. 

ONE EGG CAKE. 
1 egg. IV2 cups sugar. 

1 rounding tbls. butter. 2 cups flour. 

1 cup milk. 1 level t-spoon baking powder. 

1 t-spoon vanilla. 

Cream butter and sugar together add the whole egg, well 
beaten, then milk and flour alternately. Add flavoring. Bake in 2 
layer cake pans. 

Mrs. D. R. Wilder. 

LIBERTY CAKE. 

2/3 cup sugar. 3 cups flour. 

' 1/2 cup Snowdrift. 1 cup buttermilk. 

1 cup molasses. 1 t-spoon soda dissolved in milk 

1 t-spoon baking powder. 1 cup citron or nuts. 

11/2 cups raisins. 1 t-spoon each cinnamon, cloves 

V2 t-spoon ginger. and spice. 

Cream shortening and sugar, gradually together. Mix baking 
powder and spices in flour and add alternately with milk and syrup, 
then add fruit which has been dredged in flour. Bake about 1-1/4 
hours in moderate oven. 

Mrs. Porter King. 

INEXPENSIVE CHARLOTTE. 
1/2 pt. cream. 1 pkg. gelatine. 

' 1/2 pt- milk. Small bottle cherries. 

2 egg whites. Vanilla to taste. 
1/2 cup sugar. 

Soak gelatine in one eighth teacup cold water for half an hour. 
Set vessel containing gelatine on stove until thoroughly dissolved 
then cool. Beat milk and cream separately, add milk, sugar, dis- 
solved gelatine and flavoring to cream. Fold in stiffly beaten 
whites. Add cherries — let stand until congealed. Stir occasionally 
to keep cherries from settling to bottom. 

Mrs. J. A. Sibley. 




CHAPTER XIII. 

ATLANTA PIONEER CHAPTER. 

Mrs. Lollie Belle Wylie — Chairman. 



The Atlanta Woman's Pioneer Society is an organization of 
women residing in Atlanta since the city was a little place called 
Terminus, in 1847, later Marthasville, (for Miss Martha 
Lumpkin), and later Atlanta, named by Joseph Thompson, a civil 
engineer, and Colonel Richard Peters. The name is a coined one, 
and was probably suggested by the Atlantic ocean, Atlanta being in 
a way the feminine for Atlantic. 

In February, 1909, Mrs. Joseph H. Morgan called together the 
women who were residents of Terminus, Marthasville and Atlanta, 
from 1847 to 1870. Fifty prominent women met and organized into 
the "Atlanta Woman's Pioneer Society." There are about 90 mem- 
bers. 

The organization has for its purpose the renewing and perpet- 
uation of early friendships, and the preservation of historical facts 
and reminiscences of early Atlanta. 

Atlanta Woman's Pioneer Society was the first to establish a 
permanent Memorial Service for its members and this is an annual 
event with the organization. It is held the first Wednesday in 
April. An annual picnic is a feature of the social life of the society. 
The picnics assemble both pioneer men and women. 

Mrs. Joseph H. Morgan is the founder of the society and its 
president for life. The members are home makers, mothers and 
wives aft«r the old fashion. They are not politicians, and though 
the members belong to modern organizations for women and take 
part in church, civic and social life, as individuals, they do no work 



PIONEER CHAPTER 207 



in the Pioneer Society but meet and talk over old times when pota- 
toes were not bought by the pound, or eggs sold by the twos and 
threes. They have seen their tables literally groan under the weight 
of southern dishes, and the following recipes have been contributed 
by several of the members. 

Lollie Belle Wylie. 
Historian for Life. 



IN LOVING APPRECIATION. 

The Home Economics Department wishes to acknowledge its 
indebtedness to Mrs. John McDougald of Atlanta and Mrs. Lamar 
Rucker of Athens, daughters of Mrs. Nellie Peters Black, for the 
recipes which head the Pioneer Chapter. 

Mrs. Black was known to all the Southland as a Pioneer in 
thought and in deed. President, as she was, of the Georgia State 
Federation of Women's Clubs, she utilized to the utmost the oppor- 
tunity presented for making acquaintance with all of the women in 
the state, and particularly the women in the remote farming dis- 
tricts, To them she carried the message of service to Georgia and 
to the world — she taught them and their husbands the new idea of 
diversified farming. She was among the first in Georgia to see the 
handwriting on the wall which doomed the "one-crop" idea, that of 
cotton,- and through her precepts and powerful example, she taught 
them that Georgia could raise her own food stuffs. Owner of large 
plantations herself and familiar with every detail in their manage- 
ment, a splendid housewife and mother, she taught not only by pre- 
cept but through experience. The recipes given below have been 
shared by Mrs. Black with many Georgia housewives, and we hope 
through the Cook Book, will help many more. — (The Editors.) 

GRAPE NUT JAM. 

3 pts. grape pulp. 1 lb. nuts in shell. 

3 lbs. sugar. 1 lb. seedless raisins. 

Pop the pulp from grapes, cook until tender, save half of the 
skins, cut in half with scissors and cook in separate vessel until ten- 
der, with enough water to cover them. Cook pulp until seeds come 
out then rub through colander, then add skins, nuts, raisins and 
sugar. Cook until it jellies. Put in jelly glasses and seal with wax. 

HOT STUFF OR CHILI SAUCE. . 

1/2 peck onions. 2 qts. vinegar. 

1/2 peck green bell peppers. 1 cup brown sugar. 

1/2 peck green hot peppers. 1 tbls. salt. 

1 peck ripe tomatoes. 1 oz. celery seed. 

Peel tomatoes after scalding in hot water, then cut up. Grind 
other ingredients in meat grinder, put all together and cook an hour 
or more until mellow and brown looking. Delicious with roast beef. 



208 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



MIXED YELLOW PICKLE ("Miss Nellies" PICKLE). 
2 qts. cabbages. . . i gallon water. 

2 qts. green tomatoes. 2 cups salt. 

2 qts. onions. i cup mustard. 

3 red bell peppers. 2 tbls. tumeric. 
3 hot peppers. i cup flour. 

8 green bell peppers. 4 cups sugar. 

3 heads celery. 2 tbls. celery seed. 

2 qts. cucumbers. % cup Wesson oil. 

2 qts. vinegar. 2 tbls. mustard seed. 

Chop vegetables fine or put through coarse meat grinder, cover 
with salt and water for 24 hours. Drain and dry with towel. Mix 
dry ingredients with vinegar making paste and gradually adding 
the 2 quarts, mixing well. Boil, stirring to prevent burning, until 
thick. Add vegetables, boil a few moments. Add the Wessons oil 
when cool. 

GRAPE JUICE. 

Wash and cover the quantity of grapes to be used, with water. 
Cook well. Strain through jelly bag. To each quart of juice after 
it is strained, add one cup of sugar. Then to each gallon of juice 
add one quart of water. Let this boil 15 to 20 minutes. Put while 
boiling hot, in warm bottles, cork well and seal with paraffin. The 
Concord grapes so rich in meat and flavor make the best grape 
juice. This makes an excellent substitute for the wine we formerly 
had to offer a guest when calling, and comes ''within the law." 

Mrs. Joseph H. Morgan, 
President of the Womans' Pioneer Society. 

CHICKEN FRICASSEE. 
Prepare two young chickens for serving, dividing into pieces. 
Sprinkle with salt and pepper and roll thoroughly on flour. Brown 
in deep fat. When richly browned, cover with boiling water, adding 
a bay leaf and parsley. Simmer until chicken is done and very ten- 
der. Melt 1/2 cup butter in a saucepan, 3 tbls. flour, add one cup 
cream or milk (if milk is used add yolk of one egg) . Add mixture 
to chicken, and serve with waffles, or pour over toast. 

Mrs. Mary C. Bell, 
Vice-Pres. Pioneers. 

POINSETTA SALAD. 
Take large ripe tomato, peel and cut in eights, length-wise, 
but do not separate the sections at one end. Open and place each 
tomato on a lettuce leaf. In the center of each tomato put a ring of 
green pepper and fill with grated cheese and India Relish. 

Mrs. Joseph Wusthoff, 
Secretary Pioneers. 



PIONEER CHAPTER 209 



SIMPLE GUMBO FILE. 

1 nice fat hen. 50 to 100 fresh oysters, (small) 

2 medium size onions. Salt and pepper to taste. 
1 tbls. of lard. V^ cup sifted flour. 

Cut hen to pieces. Bring lard to boiling point. Gradually stir 
in lard, flour until brown. Add Chicken. Pour in at once 2 qts. of 
water milk warm. Add salt and pepper. Boil until chicken falls off 
the bones. Add oysters as soon as ready to remove from the fire, 
and let remain in just long enough for the frills to curl. When soup 
is done remove from stove and add sufficient file, (Sassafras leaves 
gathered in August and dried) to rope mixture. Serve in bowls 
half filled with dry cooked rice. Keep boiling water ready to re- 
plenish pot during boiling. This is delicious. Will serve from 15 to 
20 persons. 

Lollie Belle Wylie, Historian Pioneers. 

OLD TIME FRUIT CAKE. 
1 lb. seeded raisins. 1 doz. eggs, beaten separately. 

1 lb. currants. 1/2 t-spoon soda. 

1 lb. citron. 1/2 t-spoon cloves. 

1 lb. sugar. 1/2 t-spoon cinnamon. 

1 lb. butter. 1/2 t-spoon nutmeg. 

1 lb. flour. 1/2 t-spoon allspice. 

1 cup black molasses. 1 cup brandy. 

Mix well and bake slowly for four hours. 

Mrs. Joseph M. Wusthoff, 
Secretary Atlanta Woman's Pioneer Society. 

ORANGE MARMALADE. 

1 orange. 1 moderate size grapefruit. 

1 lemon. 

Shave fruit very thin. Discard seed and core. Cut in quarters 
and run through the grinder. To each measure of fruit add three 
times the quantity of water. Let stand over night. In the morning 
boil ten minutes, remove, and place in bowl. Let stand over night 
again. In the morning add a cup of sugar to each cup of juice and 
fruit, and cook until it jellies. This is delicious. 

Mrs. Joseph H. Morgan, 

President Pioneers. 

LEMON WHIP. 
6 eggs. 1 cup sugar. 

2 lemons. 

Release the juice of the lemons and grate the rind. Beat yolks 
of eggs, lemons and sugar together. Cook in double boiler until 
creamy. Remove from stove and fold in the well beaten whites of 
the eggs. Serve cold in parfait glasses topped with whipped cream. 

Mrs. Madison Bell, 
Vice-President Pioneers. 



210 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



LADY BALTIMORE PRESERVES. 

1 medium size pumpkin. Not quite a lb. of pumpkin for 
9 lemons. lb. of sugar. 

Peel pumpkin, cut in pieces the size of string beans. Add sugar 
and lemons sliced very thin. Let stand over night, to make syrup. 
Boil slowly about three hours or until tender. Seal in air tight jars. 

Lollie Belle Wylie, 
Historian Pioneers. 

CHICKEN PIE, COUNTRY STYLE. 

Cook two chickens, cover with boiling water, add one onion 
and simmer until meat is tender. When half cooked, add 1/2 tbls. 
salt, one-eighth t-spoon of pepper, remove chicken, strain off fat 
and return, simmer to reduce stock to four cups, thicken stock with 
1/3 cup of flour, and dilute with enough cold water to pour easily. 
Add three tbls. butter, bit by bit, and more salt if necessary. Place 
a small cup upside down in center of baking dish, arrange pieces of 
chicken around it, after removing some of the larger bones and pour 
over gravy. 

CRUST. Sift three cups of flour, two tbls. baking powder, one and 
one-half t-spoons salt. Work in three tbls. each of butter and lard, 
using tips of fingers ; then add one and one-fourth cups milk, roll 
crust for top one-half inch thick, and remaining dough one-fourth 
inch thick, cut in three pieces and braid and place around top of cup. 
Bake in hot oven. Mrs. J. Sid Holland. 

MOTHER'S SWEET POTATO PUDDING. 

2 lbs. grated sweet potatoes. 1 pt. fresh milk. 

4 fresh eggs. 1 t-spoon ground cloves. 

4 oz. fresh butter. 1 t-spoon ground spice. 

1 lb. sugar. 1 t-spoon salt. 

Mix well and pour into a hot greased pan and bake. Stir twice 
whilst baking then leave to brown. This recipe was used over sixty 
years ago. Miss Almeda Harris. 

COFFEE CAKE. 

1 egg. 1/3 cup melted butter. 

1 cake yeast. 14, cup sugar. 

1 cup milk, scalded and cooled. 1/2 t-spoon salt. 

l^ cup luke warm water. Grated rind of 1 lemon. 

11/2 cups sifted flour. 

Dissolve yeast in lukewarm water and add lukewarm milk and 
one and half cups of flour for sponge, beat until light and let rise. 
When well risen, add 1/3 cup melted butter, 14 cup of sugar, 1/2 
t-spoon salt, and one egg well beaten, grating of whole lemon, and 
flour to make a firm dough, knead and place in well greased pan and 
let rise again until double in bulk, (about an hour), sprinkle top 
with chopped almonds and save enough of beaten egg to cover top. 
Bake in moderate oven from forty-five to fifty minutes. 

Mrs. J. Sid Holland. 




CHAPTER XIV. 

FAMOUS CREOLE DISHES. 

Mrs. Marie Hubert, Chairman. 



FOREPIECE. 

Creole cookery — magic words! So often a misnomer, being 
used for concoctions a Creole would never recognize. Within this 
chapter, on the contrary, will be found, an intimate glimpse into a 
genuine Creole kitchen. Mrs. Marie Hubert, herself a Creole, of 
distinguished ancestry, and a famous cuisiniere, contributes recipes 
which have been in her family for generations, and many of which 
have been priceless. The Atlanta Woman's Club, and our cook book 
readers, owe Mrs. Hubert much. 

The Editors. 

FISH A LA CREOLE. 
"Nature has blessed New Orleans with a greater abundance 
and variety of fish, both salt and fresh water kinds, than any other 
place in the country and the epicurean Creole has taken advantage 
of this munificence by devising strange and wonderful combina- 
tions, that are at once the delight and despair of the visitor." 

NEW ORLEANS OYSTER LOAF. 
2 doz. large oysters. 1 loaf stale bread. 

2 eggs. Salt and pepper. 

Corn meal. Kettle full of boiling fat. 

Split the loaf lengthwise, and toast the inner sides, butter gen- 
erously and put away to keep hot. Drain the oysters, salt and pep- 
per and dip into the eggs, which have been beaten until light; then 
into sifted cornmeal. Place in wire frying basket and immerse in 
boiling fat. When they are a golden brown in color, remove from 



212 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



the fat, and place between the halves of toasted and buttered bread. 
Serve at once. Pickles, catsup and horseradish are usually served 
at the same time. 

FRIED OYSTERS. 

The same rule may be followed for fried oysters as that given 
for New Orleans Oyster Loaf, with the exception that the oysters 
after being fried are placed on a serving dish, and garnished v/ith 
sliced pickles, lemon slices, and triangles of toast. 

RECIPE FOR MAKING CUBION. 
A Great New Orleans Recipe. 
2 tbls. lard. 6 tomatoes. ^ 

6 green sweet peppers, (sliced) 3 large onions. 

Smother above ingredients in lard ; when cooked, add 5 lbs. red 
or any other good fish. Add salt, black and cayenne pepper to taste. 
Cover tightly and cook for about twenty minutes ; then it will be 
ready to serve. 

GREEN PEPPERS STUFFED WITH SHRIMP 

1 lb. fresh lake shrimp or Bay loaf. 

1 cup canned shrimp. Salt and pepper. 

6 slices toasted bread. 6 large green peppers, (seeds 

1 onion. removed). 

2 cloves of garlic. 1 green pepper (minced). 
1/2 cup olive oil or drippings. 

Brown the onions and garlic in hot fat, add three cups of hot 
water, the toast, which should have been soaked in water, then 
squeezed dry, the minced green pepper, the shrimp, bay-leaf, salt 
and pepper. Let the mixture cook down until thick, stirring from 
the bottom as it browns. Remove from the fire ,and fill the peppers, 
from which the seeds should have been removed. Fill a baking pan 
about one-third full of hot water, lay the stuffed peppers in this, and 
bake forty five minutes in a hot oven. 

CRAB SALAD. 

1/2 doz, crabs. 1 bunch celery. 

Put crabs in boiling water, and boil 20 minutes with plenty of 
salt and red pepper, when cool, pick out meat. The crab meat is 
sweet and the flavor must not be destroyed by too much seasoning. 
Mix crab meat, celery and 1/2 pt. mayonnaise and you will have a 
delicious salad. 

TARTAR SAUCE FOR FISH AND CRABS. 

Make a tartar sauce of mayonnaise with a few sprigs of pars- 
ley and pickles chopped fine, a few capers and some onion juice to 
taste. Delicious when served with tenderloin trout, soft shelled 
crabs or any fish where tartar sauce is required. 

SHRIMP AND TOMATO SALAD. 
1 lb. fresh shrimp or 1 small green pepper (minced). 



FAMOUS CREOLE DISHES 213 



1 cup canned shrimp. Lettuce leaves. 

6 large firm tomatoes. Mayonnaise. 

1 stalk heart celery, (chopped) 

With a small spoon, scoop out the center of the tomatoes. The 
flesh may be set aside for soup or stews. Cut the shrimp in small 
pieces. A small onion is an addition. Bind together with a little 
mayonnaise, fill the tomatoes and set on ice. Serve on lettuce leaf 
and garnish with nasturtiums and top with a spoonful of mayon- 
naise. 

GUMBO A LA CREOLE. 

As one advertiser has it, this is the soup that made New Orleans 
famous. It is a great fast day soup, as it is so substantial that it con- 
stitutes a whole meal in itself, when served with the dry boiled rice 
that invariably accompanies it. The beef brisket is usually sliced 
and served with mustard or horseradish, as the meat course that 
follows when used other than a fast day meal. 

6 crabs (boiled and cleaned). Large onion and garlic minced. 

1 lb. lake shrimp (boiled and 2 t-spoons file. 

cleaned). 1 qt. okra (sliced). 

1 lb. beef brisket (if desired). Salt, pepper, bay leaf. 

1 lb. canned tomatoes. 

Brown the onions and garlic in beef drippings or butter. Then 
add okra and cook until that is brown, then add the shrimp and 
brown that. Put into a soup pot and cover with two quarts hot 
water. Salt and pepper the brisket, dredge with flour and brown on 
both sides in a little fat. Add this to the soup, also the tomatoes, 
crabs, the claws and bodies of which should be broken ; add season- 
ing last, cover pot and allow to simmer 2 hours. When ready to 
serve, place some of the crabs in each soup plate with a serving of 
gumbo ; a tbls. of boiled rice is served with each helping at the table. 
The crabs are eaten with the fingers. 

BOILED RICE A LA CREOLE. 

2 cups head rice. 2 qts. salted boiling water. 
Wash rice, stir into boiling water little at a time so as not to 

disturb the boiling; boil hard for 20 minutes, remove, place in col- 
ander and blanch with cold water, drain, put in pot, cover tightly 
and set on back of stove and allow to steam for 20 minutes or more. 
Each flake of rice should stand separate. 

VEAL DAUBE GLACE A LA CREOLE. 
"Much Used In Ante-Bellum Days." 

3 lb. shoulder of veal. 1 large can tomatoes. 

2 tbls. granulated gelatine. 1 large onion (minced. 

Bay leaf. Garlic as desired. 

Have shoulder boned, rolled and tied instead of skewered. Salt 
and pepper, dredge with flour and brown in hot fat. Remove from 
pan and brown the onions and garlic in the fat, add gelatine, toma- 
toes, 2 quarts hot water and seasoning. Return veal to vessel, cover 



214 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



closely and simmer until very tender, then remove very carefully to 
avoid breaking and place in a mold. Pour over enough stock to 
cover veal, allow to cool, then place on ice. When ready to serve dip 
mold an instant in boiling water, turn out on platter in which it is 
to be served. Slice and garnish with parsley. 

RUSSIAN SAUCE FOR COLD MEATS. 
1/2 pt. of Mrs. Huberfs Mayon- 2 tbls. catsup. 

naise. A few drops of Tobasco. 

Vi lb. grated cheese. 2 tbls. Worcestershire Sauce. 

Mix above ingredients well together. 

EGG PLANT A LA CREOLE. 
2 large egg plants. 1 large onion. 

■ 6 slices toasted bread. Several cloves of garlic minced. 

V2 cup olive oil or butter. Bay leaf, salt and cayenne. 

Cut egg plant lengthwise and scoop out inside without break- 
ing the skin. Boil skin and all until tender, then remove skins to 
buttered baking dish and fill with the following mixture. Fry 
onion and garlic a dark brown in the fat, add egg plant pulp, the 
toasted bread (broken into bits) salt, cayenne and bay leaf. Let 
simmer until thick and brown, stirring from the bottom constantly. 

EGG BREAD AS MADE IN THE SOUTH. 
2 cups white corn meal. 14 cup lard or butter melted. 

2 eggs. Buttermilk to make stiff batter. 

1 tbls. soda in 2 tbls. hot water. 1 t-spoon salt. 

1 tbls. sugar. 1 cup buttermilk. 

Beat eggs until light, add buttermilk, salt, sugar and melted 
fat; sift cornmeal into this, batter should be rather stiff. Mix soda 
in a little hot water and stir thoroughly in the above mixture, (add- 
ing a little more milk if batter is not right consistency) . Pour into 
well greased hot pan ; cook in moderate oven until top is a golden 
brown. Do not have batter more than one-half inch thick in pan be- 
fore baking. Cut in squares, split and butter generously ; eat hot. 

NEW ORLEANS PRALINES. 

2 cups powdered sugar. 1/2 cup of cream. 

1 cup maple syrup. 2 cups pecan meats (whole). 

Boil sugar, cream and syrup together until mixture forms soft 
ball tested in cold water. Beat until smooth and creamy, then stir 
in nuts and drop from t-spoon in small piles on paraffin paper. 

DAINTY FROZEN SALAD FOR PARTIES. 
1 can white cherries. 1 can sliced pineapple. 

1 can pears. 6 oranges (pulp). 

Cut fine above ingredients, add orange pulp and enough of 
equal parts of fruit juices to mix salad. Stir in 1-1/2 pints of Mrs. 
Hubert's mayonnaise and freeze as you would ice cream. Serve on 
fancy ferns. 



CHAPTER XV. 

SCIENTIFIC CANNING. 
State Agricultural College. 

By Miss Mary Cresswell, State Director Home Economics, 
Mrs. Bessie Stanley Wood, Assistant State Agent. 

A healthful diet demands the use of fruits and vegetables 
every day in the year. Of these the most necessary for health, as 
wellas the most neglected, are the green vegetables which appear 
on many tables only during a brief season. Their use can be made 
possible during the entire year and the health and prosperity of the 
home greatly increased by canning the surplus products, which 
would otherwise be wasted. 

For home use, glass jars are more economical because they can 
be used many times, and with care will last for years. New rubbers 
must be used each year, and it pays to get the best quality of red 
rubbers. 

When screw cap jars are used, new caps are usually essential 
for success. The best type of jar for home use is one with so-called 
"lightning" seal, having glass lid and wire clamp. This lid is not 
only more sanitary, but can be used as long as the jar lasts. For in- 
termittent processing the lightning seal jars are suitable, because 
the lifting of the wire clamp each day during processing insures 
that the jar will not be broken by expansion and the rubber not 
worn by the unscrewing of the cap. 

TYPES OF CANNERS. 
In choosing a canner the kind and amount of canning to be 
done should be considered. The least expensive of the commercial 
outfits is the small hot-water canner. Some of the advantages are 
that it is easily handled by inexperienced people and it is also pref- 
erable to other canners for processing fruits and tomatoes. The 
texture, flavor and color of the finished products so processed at 
boiling temperature are superior to those which have been canned 
at higher temperature. 

Hot Water Canner, 
An outfit which can be placed on the kitchen stove, is the sim- 
plest form of hot-water canner. Blanching trays, a false bottom, 
tongs for handling hot jars are also included in these outfits. There 
are several types of portable canners on the market at very reason- 
able prices. 

Steam Pressure Canner, 
Another type of canning outfit is one which is constructed of 
strong material and provided with a closely fitting lid. When in 



216 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 

operation it is possible to hold steam under pressure and obtain a 
correspondingly high temperature, but since the canner is made of 
heavy material a greater degree of heat is required to bring the 
temperature up quickly. This canner has a steam gauge and ther- 
mometer attached to the lid and these register the temperature and 
the corresponding number of pounds of pressure. Much time, la- 
bor and fuel can be saved by using a steam pressure canner. 

Preparation of Vegetables. 
In securing a fine quality, much depends upon having the vege- 
tables or fruit absolutely fresh, crisp and clean, and kept cool. Have 
all surroundings and utensils spotlessly clean, and carry on all steps 
from beginning to end of any lot of canning as rapidly as possible. 
A good slogan is "one hour from the field to the can". First have 
cans and lids thoroughly washed and scalded. Sort and grade fruit, 
discarding all defective ones, and use together those of same size. 
Use only uniformly well ripened products. In canning, the flavor is 
retained only when young, tender, quickly grown vegetables are 
used, 

STEPS TAKEN IN CANNING IN GLASS. 

1. Sorting and grading fruit or vegetables, washing, peeling, 
etc. 

2. Scalding, peeling and, coring (for tomatoes). Put into trays 
and lower into boiling water for one minute. Remove at once to 
prevent cooking. Plunge into cold water to make the fruit firm, 
and peel promptly. In tomato peeling use a slender pointed knife 
to cut out the core and be careful not to cut into the seed cells. Keep 
the tomatoes whole when possible. 

3. Blanching consists of plunging the vegetables or fruit into 
boiling water for a short time. Use a wire basket or cheese cloth 
square for this. The blanch gives a more thorough cleaning, re- 
moves the strong odor and flavor from certain kinds of vegetables, 
improves the texture and gives a clearer liquor. It also shrinks the 
fruit or vegetable and makes it more flexible. A full pack is then 
more easily made. The time required for blanching varies with the 
state of maturity. Beans should be blanched until tender enough 
to bend without breaking. Peaches will pack better if blanched for 
an instant in water below boiling (about 180 degrees F.), lowering 
peaches into it for fifteen seconds. The same blanch will make the 
hard varities of pears pack better and give them a more transpar- 
ent appearance; and used for cherries will prevent splitting and 
cracking. Spraying fruit with cold water after blanching will make 
it firmer. Frequently it is well to put the vegetables into cold water 
for an instant after blanching to make more crisp. In blanching 
asparagus, tie a few stalks into each bundle, lower bundles into 
water, tips up, blanching the lower ends one or two minutes before 
immersing the tips. Blanch the tips only two or three minutes. 

4. Packing. After selecting fruit or vegetables for uniformity 
in ripeness and size and after blanching, it should be arranged with 



SCIENTIFIC CANNING 217 



reference to symmetry and the best use of the space with the jar. 
In placing the fruit or vegetables in a jar, a thin, slender, flexible 
paddle made out of cane is useful. This paddle is also used to take 
out bubbles of air by running it down the side of the jar to touch 
these bubbles after the liquor has been added to the pack. 

5. Adjustment' Before placing the cap be sure that the rub- 
ber is flattened in its groove, without the presence of any seed or 
particle of the fruit. When a screw top jar is used, screw the cap 
evenly about half way. When a glass top jar with wire clamp is 
used, place lid on evenly and raise both clamps up, the upper one 
fastened to hold the lid in place. With an hermetic jar, fasten the 
cap on the jar evenly with the clamp. The last jar is self-sealing as 
it cools. The clamp must not be removed until the jar is entirely 
cold. 

6. Processing. Place the jars in a water bath on a rack 
(wooden one best) to avoid breaking. Have water the same tem- 
perature as the contents, letting it come to within two inches of the 
top of jars. Have a tight cover for the vessel to keep in the steam. 
Do not count time until the water begins to boil; keep it boiling 
steadily for the time required. Seal the jars airtight promptly at 
end of processing and remove them from the bath, being careful 
not to allow a cold draft to strike them. In intermittent process- 
ing, raise the clamp of each jar at the beginning of each process- 
ing to allow for expansion. Seal at close of each processing. The 
hermetic jar is not a suitable one for intermittent processing. 

7. Label and store products in a cool, dry, dark place. 

SYRUPS. 

In the instructions for canning fruits, syrups of appropriate 
density for standard products are indicated. These are made of 
varying densities, as indicated by a Balling saccharometer. Each 
syrup indicated by number represents the degrees from 10 to 50 de- 
grees. No. 1 syrup is of 10 degrees density. No. 2 of 20 degrees 
density, and so on. 

To make these syrups, boil sugar and water together in the pro- 
portion given below until sugar is dissolved. Strain all impurities 
out of the syrup before using : 

Syrup No, 1 use 14 oz. to 1 gal. water. 
Syrup No. 2 use 1 lb. 14 oz. to 1 gal. water. 
Syrup No. 3 use 3 lb. 9 oz. to 1 gal. water. 
Syrup No. 4 use 5 lb. 8 oz. to 1 gal. water. 
Syrup No. 5 use 6 lb. 13 oz. to 1 gal. water. 



PRESERVING. 

A preserve is the product resulting when fruits are cooked 
in syrup until clear and transparent. When properly made the 



218 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



fruit in the preserve keeps its form, is plump, tender, clear and of 
good color; the surrounding syrup is also clear and of proper den- 
sity. 

In making preserves, the object is to have the fruit permeated 
with the syrup. It is well known that if two liquids of different 
densities be brought into contact with each oher, they tend to mix 
or diffuse until they equalize each other and become of equal density. 
This diffusion takes place through the cell walls of fruit or vege- 
tables as readily as if they were not present between the fruit juice 
and the denser liquid syrup. When fruit is placed at once in a very 
heavy syrup, the difference in density between the two liquids is so 
great that the syrup absorbs the fruit juice so rapidly that the fruit 
shrinks and becomes shriveled and toughened. The syrup can then 
enter the fruit with great difficulty. In order to prevent this 
shrinking it is necessary to put fruit at first in thin syrup and in- 
crease its density slowly enough for diffusion to take place and the 
fruit be permeated with the syrup. This is done by boiling the fruit 
in syrup or by alternately cooking and allowing the product to stand 
immersed in the syrup, the density of the syrup being increased by 
evaporation or by substituting a heavier syrup for the lighter one 
after each period of standing. If at any time the fruit shrivels or 
wrinkles, the syrup should be made less dense by the addition of 
water. If this process be carried on gradually enough the fruit 
may be completely saturated with sugar (as is the case with crys- 
talized products) without shrinking. 

JAMS AND MARMALADES. 

In making jam the whole fruit is used, but prepared in such a 
way as to give a mixture alike throughout, not having the fruit re- 
main whole and the syrup clear as in preserves. The small fruits 
are ordinarily used for jams, while larger ones are sliced and made 
into marmalades in which the product is not smooth in consistency, 
but has the fruit appearing in small pieces throughout the mixture. 
GRAPE MARMALADE. 

Select grapes about one-half of which are under-ripe rather 
than entirely ripe. Wash and stem the fruit. Separate the pulp 
from the skins. Cook pulps for 10 minutes and press through a 
sieve or colander to remove seeds. Add % cup water to each quart 
of skins and boil until tender. Then put the pulp and skins together 
and measure. For every quart of the mixture, use 1 pound of sugar. 
Bring the fruit to a boil, add the sugar, cook, stirring frequently un- 
til it will give the jelly test or reaches 222 Fahrenheit. Pour into 
sterilized jars and process as for jam and preserves. 

SPICED GRAPES. 

Soften hulls and pulps and combine as for canned grapes. For 
every 5 pounds fresh fruit, use 2-1/2 pounds sugar, 2 ounces ground 
cinnamon, 1-1/2 ounces cloves, 1 cup vinegar. Boil over slow fire 
for one hour. Put into sterilized jars and process pints at simmer- 
ing for 30 minutes. 



SCIENTIFIC CANNING 219 



FIG CONSERVE. 
2 lbs. fresh figs or 1/2 lb. raisins. 

1 qt. figs (plain canned). II/2 lbs. sugar. 

1 orange. Mi cup pecans (shelled). 

Yq tsp. salt. 

Cut all, except nuts, into small pieces and cook until thick and 
transparent, about 1 hour. Add nuts five minutes before remov- 
ing from stove. Pack into sterilized jars and process pint jars at 
simmering 30 minutes. 

GRAPE MINCE MEAT. 
Pulp grapes and add 1 cup water to each quart pulps. Boil un- 
til tender and eliminate seed. Run hulls through meat chopper, us- 
ing coarsest plate, and cook until soft. Mix pulp, juice and hulls. 
To each quart of mixture add pulp 1 lemon, ground white rind of 
lemon, 2 cups sugar, 2 tsp. cinnamon, 2 tsp. nutmeg. Boil until 
smooth, thick consistency and it flakes from spoon. Put into ster- 
ilized jars and simmer pints 30 minutes. To a pint of this mince 
meat, add 1 pint chopped apple for making pies. 

GRAPE KETCHUP. 

4 lbs. grapes, 2 tbsp. cinnamon, 1 tbsp. cloves, 1 tbsp. allspice, 
1 cup vinegar, 1 tbsp. salt, 2 lbs sugar, a little cayenne if desired. 

Stew the grapes until soft and remove seeds. Use whole spices 
and tie in a bag to prevent darkening the product. Add the spices, 
sugar, salt and vinegar and simmer for 15 minutes. Put into steril- 
ized bottles and seal. 

PEACH JAM. 

2-1/4 lbs. peaches cut in small pieces, 1 lb. sugar, 1/2 cup juice, 
tsp. bark cinnamon, 5 allspices berries, 1 cracked peach seed, 10 
whole cloves, 1 sprig mace, 1 inch ginger root. Tie spice in cheese 
cloth bag. 

APPLES shrink more in canning than most fruits and for this 
reason should be blanched for one minute. Plunge them into cold 
bath, then pack. Cover with No. 1 syrup. Process quart jars 10 to 
12 minutes. Exhaust No. 3 cans two minutes and process eight 
minutes at boiling temperature (212 Fahrenheit). 

For DEWBERRIES, BLACKBERRIES and RASPBERRIES, 
practically the same methods of canning may be used. The condi- 
tion of the fruit will have much to do with the quality of the product. 
The berries should be gathered in shallow trays or baskets and not 
in deep vessels which allow them to be bruised and crushed. They 
should be uniformly ripe, sound and as large as possible. It is nec- 
essary to can all varieties of berries in glass or else to put them in 
enamel lined cans, because if canned in ordinary tin cans, the berries 
will lose color and flavor very quickly, and be unfit for use for sale. 

The flavor of canned berries will be finer if sugar is used in 
canning. It is best to make this into a syrup. The use of berry 



220 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 

juice instead of water in this syrup will give a richer color and 
flavor. For fine berries, use a syrup of 30 degrees density (about 
3-1/2 lbs. sugar to- one gal. juice or water). 

After the berries have been carefully sorted and lightly 
washed by placing in colander and pouring water over them instead 
of putting into a pan of water, pack as closely as possible without 
crushing. This can be done by putting a few berries in the jar, 
pressing them gently into place and proceeding layer by layer, than 
by nearly filling the jar loosely and then trying to press them down. 

Fill jars full of fruit, and cover with cooled syrup. Fit rubber, 
and then the lid, loosely on glass jar and process pints six minutes, 
quarts 12 minutes, counting the time after boiling begins. 

CHERRIES keep their flavor and color with difficulty in tin, 
even in enamel lined cans. For this reason glass is preferable. When 
canned whole they should be blanched to prevent splitting and then 
dropped into a cool syrup to plump. For sour cherries use No. 4 
syrup ; for sweet ones No. 3. Process quart 25 minutes. 

FIGS for canning should be sound and firm. They may be 
treated with the soda bath as for preserving (see p. 36), cooked in 
the syrup from 40 to 60 minutes, then cooled and packed in No. 3 
syrup and processed for 30 minutes in quart jars. 

Before preparing PEACHES make fruit Syrup No. 3 or 4 (see 
table), allowing about one cup water for each quart jar or No. 3 
can. Put in one cracked peach pit for every quart of syrup. Boil 
for five minutes and strain. 

Sort the fruit, using firm, sound, uniform peaches for canning, 
and putting aside the soft broken ones for jam. Peeling may be 
done by placing the peaches in a wire basket or cheese cloth square 
and immersing in boiling water about one minute, until skins slip 
easily. Remove, plunge for a minute into cold water and slip off 
the skins. Cut into halves, remove seeds and immerse in the hot 
syrup. Allow to stand in the syrup until thoroughly cold. Pack at 
once, placing halves in overlapping layers, the concave surface of 
each half being downward and the blossom end facing glass. Fill 
each jar with syrup and paddle carefully to remove air bubbles. 
Process quart 20 minutes and half gallon, 35 minutes. 

Firm, perfect peaches may be lye peeled, but if very ripe the 
fruit is made too soft by this process. Have ready a boiling lye so- 
lution (4 tbsp. concentrated lye to one gal. water). Immerse the 
peaches in it for about 20 to 30 seconds. Lift them out and drop 
into clear boiling water for a like period. Then put through two 
cold water baths and in the second rub off all remaining skin. Keep 
the lye hot and abandon it for a fresh solution as soon as it turns 
dark. 

Select PEARS ripe but not soft. Peel, blanch, put in cold soda 
bath (1 tsp. soda to 1 gal. water), drain and pack rapidly. When 



SCIENTIFIC CANNING 221 



packed whole, leave stems on and place each layer stems up, letting 
the second row fill the spaces between the two stems and repeat. 
Pack pears in No. 3 syrup and process quarts 30 minutes. 

Select sound uniform PLUMS, prick with needle to prevent 
bursting. Pack as firmly as possible without crushing, in No. 4 
syrup and process quarts for 15 minutes. 

Use GRAPES sound but not dead ripe. Weigh and pulp. 
Heat pulp over a slow fire until soft, then run through a colander to 
get rid of seeds. Add 1 cup water to each quart hulls and cook 
slowly until tender. Combine hulls and pulps and add 1 pound sugar 
for each 6 pounds fresh fruit. Boil 5 minutes. Put into sterilized 
jars and process pint jars at simmering 30 minutes. 

It is of the greatest importance that ASPARAGUS for canning 
be fresh and tender. Select tips of uniform size and maturity, and 
wash them. Cut in right length for cans ; scrape off tough outer skin 
and tie in bundles. Blanch by immersing the lower ends part way in 
boiling water for two minutes. Then immerse the entire tips for 
one to two minutes longer. Plunge into cold wa' er, then pack neatly 
having the tips up. Fill jars with brine (4 oz. salt to 1 gal. water) 
and process intermittently, one hour daily for three days. 

The Refugee is a good variety. STRING BEANS should 
be tender and fresh. When the beans within the pod have grown 
to any size canning is more difficult and the product of poorer qual- 
ity from a commercial standpoint. For canning only well sorted, 
small, tender beans should be used. String the beans and cut them 
into two-inch lengths, cutting diagonally or "on the bias" giving a 
pretty product. In glass they may be canned whole, packed log 
cabin fashion in square jars. Blanch three to eight minutes and 
plunge into cold water for an instant. Drain well and pack quickly, 
cover with brine (2-1/2 oz. salt to 1 gal, water), process intermit- 
tently, or if very young, tender beans are used, process for two con- 
secutive hours. 

Lima, or Butter Beans, are treated as string beans, blanching 
2 to 5 minutes. Always process intermittently. Add sugar and salt 
mixture as for corn. 

The best variety of BEET for canning is the Detroit. From a 
standpoint of quality, only young tender beets should be canned. 
Sort, putting uniform sizes together. Boil until three-fourths done, 
peel, pack in layers of three or four, fitting the second layer into the 
spaces left by the first layer and repeat. Cover with clear hot water. 
Process quart jars 1 to 2 hours. Do not allow cold water to touch 
the beets after they have been cooked. 

CARROTS — Proceed the same as for beets, processing one 
hour. 



222 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



Only the Spanish varieties of SWEET PEPPER, known as pi- 
mentos are suitable for canning. The fruit of these peppers has very 
thick meat, tough skin and is comparatively smooth and free from 
ridges. Peppers should be ripe, sound and free from bruises. Pre- 
pare for peeling by placing peppers in a hot oven for 6 to 8 minutes. 
Peel, cut out stem, remove seeds and pack dry in flattened layers. No 
water is used in the preparation of these peppers; the processing 
brings out a thick liquor which almost covers them in the can. In 
glass a good package is a 10 ounce tumbler-shaped jar with her- 
metic cap. Process this jar 25 minutes and pint jars 30 minutes. 

SOUP MIXTURE. 

Any desired mixture of vegetables may be packed for home use. 
For the standard club product use 1/2 tomato pulp, 1/4 corn, or tiny 
lima beans and 1/4 okra, with seasoning of salt, sugar, pepper and 
slice of onion for each can. Heat the tomatoes, put through a sieve 
to remove seeds and cook down to about the consistency of ketchup. 
Measure, add the corn or beans and okra and seasoning. Cook to- 
gether for 10 minutes, then pack in No. 2 cans or glass jars. Ex- 
haust 5 minutes and process 1 hour continuously or intermittently. 
With tomatoes not red enough add 1 c. pimento to each gallon of 
pulp. This also adds flavor. 

Peel TOMATOES so as to keep as nearly whole as possible. Cut 
out the core with a slender pointed knife without cutting into the 
seed cells. Pack only red ripe, sound tomatoes whole or in large 
pieces. Put 2 teaspoonfuls of the sugar and salt mixture in each 
quart jar. Process quart jars 25 to 30 minutes. 

In glass for home use whole tomatoes may be packed and sur- 
rounded with cooked tomato juice, giving when opened, a sauce 
for soups and whole tomatoes for salads or other use. 



CHAPTER XVI. 

SCHOOL AND BUSINESS LUNCHES. 

Mrs. S. R. Dull. 

This day and time we keep well by proper eating, so every 
home maker, should be informed about food stuffs. It is an old 
subject, but always new, and as long as the world stands will be 
needed. Get away from medicines and learn how to prepare meals 
and lunches which will keep. the family well. Does it pay? Your 
pay is rosy cheeked children, a well and happy family. 

First, it is important to know something about the person for 
whom the lunch is being made, whether he is lean or fat, old or 
young, whether outdoor worker or inside. The man or woman who 
sits all day requires less and a different kind of lunch from the one 
who does not. The strong, fat, romping child would need a differ- 
ent lunch from the thin child who does not romp. The playing of 
children means to them what work does to the grown-ups and grow- 
ing children require a good deal of food to build the body. 

It is necessary for those carrying lunches to co-operate with the 
one who prepares them by eating all kinds of food, and thus keep 
the body well. Some folks pamper their appetites, eating just 
what they like, never getting a balanced meal, and then wonder why 
they have so many ailments. They do not stop to think that it could 
be improper eating. Some of their digestive organs are never exer- 
cised, while others are over-taxed. 

We used to think we should have a balanced meal each time, 
but now many of our good, specialists say if we get it in the three 
meals of the day it is just as well. This last method is easiest for 
the housewife. Consequently, you could fix for some a lunch en- 
tirely of fruit. Have cereals, milk, bread and butter for breakfast, 
and meat, vegetables, salads and desserts for dinner. If you prefer, 
there can be a more general mixture in all meals — the person and 
occasion would determine this. 

For fixing lunches, the first thing needed is the proper tools 
with which to work: a good sharp knife, waxed or white paper, 
rubber bands and the lunch box, which should contain a teaspoon, 
jelly glass with top, or the equivalent, a drinking cup and if soup or 
milk is ever carried, a small thermos bottle. 

Next, the bread is considered — whether you are to make at 
home or buy, what kinds, white, whole wheat, graham or biscuit; 
brown or nut bread, too, occasionally. Since sandwiches are the 
most convenient way of carrying lunches, the bread is an important 
part and the sandwiches we will put in two classes, meat or salad, 



224 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



and sweet. The first kind is made of meat, eggs, cheese or nuts. 
If the person does not require much meat, a small portion chopped 
and shredded can be spread more evenly. Have your butter soft, so 
it can be readily spread — you cannot spread hard butter and to melt 
it gives an entirely different taste. 

For grown folks and large children, a slice of pickle or mayon- 
naise may be added to the meat ; in this case you can leave out these 
made of salad. Sandwiches of lean meat, eggs, cheese, fish (sar- 
dines) , or nuts is protein food and for building and re-building the 
body. The lunch is apt to have more of this particular food, so the 
lunch maker should see that cereals and all vegetables, particularly 
green or leaf ones, are given in the meals eaten at home. Vegetables 
and cereals give energy and heat and are just as important. 

The sweet sandwiches made of jam, jelly, cottage cheese, rai- 
sins, nuts, fresh and dried fruit, give more heat and energy, as well 
as some minerals and some protein. Fat meat, butter, mayonnaise 
(oil) and nuts give still more and supply the fats for the body. You 
can readily see it is important to vary the lunch. 

The breakfasts in many homes have become rather scant and I 
wonder if it is wise. The school teacher says "NO", that the child 
who does not have a good, substantial breakfast a7id time to eat it 
is the one who becomes restless, tired and cannot study well and 
often is not the bright child. 

From the above list, many lunches may be formed. A few 
additional lunch suggestions follow : 

SCHOOL CHILD'S LUNCH. 
1 meat sandwich. 6 nuts, cracked, picked and 

1 jam or jelly sandwich. wrapped in waxed paper. 

1 apple or orange. 1 slice of cake or cookies. 

2 or 3 pieces of candy or sweet 

chocolate. 

BUSINESS MAN'S LUNCH. 
2 meat sandwiches. 1 jam or sweet sandwich or 

1 cheese sandwich. 1 fruit tart or pie. 

THE BUSINESS WOMAN. 
2 meat sandwiches. 

1 tasty or salad sandwich which contains pickle, celery or 
something pertaining to a salad mixture. Something sweet— stuffed 
dates, candy, slice of cake, sweet sandwiches (sliced pineapple with 
mayonnaise). 

The drink to be carried or bought. 

Mrs. Henrietta Stanley Dull. 
(Mrs. S. R. Dull.) 



CHAPTER XVII. 

FIRELESS COOKERY. 

Mrs. J. B. Rowe. Chairman. 

The average housewife desires efficiency in the home. The 
duty of nourishing the family, which heretofore has required, not 
only thought and work in preparing the meals but much time has 
been minimized by tireless cookery, the principle of which is sim- 
plicity itself. 

In the tireless there is little evaporation. Food retains its 
full weight, flavor and nutriment; does not overcook, burn or 
dry out. It needs no turning, stirring or basting, and may remain 
in the cooker hours after it is cooked, and still be hot and delicious. 

The saving in fuel is about SO^c. The heat used to cook the 
food is stored up in radiators or stones, which may be heated by 
any kind of fuel, and require only a few minutes to heat sufficiently, 
to cook thoroughly any kind of food, that by the old method re- 
quired hours of continuous fire. After the food is placed in the 
cooker, the cooker is sealed and no more thought given it until time 
to serve, eliminating heat from the stove, confusion in the kitchen, 
and constant watching. 

SELECTION OF COOKER. 
Care should be taken in selecting because it lasts a life time and 
the best is found to be the most economical. The following consid- 
erations are essential to obtain the best results. 

SELECT A COOKER 

A. With a steam valve in the lid. 

B. That is lined with seamless aluminum, and is metal outside 
so that it may be thoroughly washed and not contain odors of food, 
from one cooking to the next. 

C. That has a thermometer and table of rules for heating, 
radiators and a book on instructions. 

It is advisable to buy the stand on which to set the cooker thus 
making it a convenient height, and avoiding any chance of rust on 
the bottom of the cooker. 

DIFFERENT WAYS FOOD MAY BE COOKED. 

Foods may be roasted, baked, steamed, stewed, boiled, fried 
and broiled in the tireless. The baked variety includes pies, pas- 
tries, cakes and puddings. Fruit may be canned by the fireless 
method. 

Since the fireless retains cold just as well as heat, delicious tid- 
bits may be frozen in it. Ice cream may be made early in the 
morning in a freezer, and packed in the fireless in the regular 



226 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 

way (taking just the can containing the cream, placing it in 
one compartment of the cooker, and packing around it three parts 
of ice to one of salt) . Seal the cooker and it will stay hard from 
eight to ten hours. 

Foods are prepared in the usual way, using the same recipe 
as for a regular stove, and then placed in cooker. 

The difference in cooking such as baking or boiling is in the 
number of radiators used and difference in degrees of tempera- 
ture. 

A rule will be found in the instruction book governing each. 
The cooking time is about the same as on the regular stove. 

THE THINGS TO KNOW ARE : 

A. Right temperature of radiators. 

B. When to use one or two radiators. 

C. When to use and when not to use covers of utensils. 

D. When to use water with the food and right amount to use. 

E. How to place the radiators close enough to the food to have 
the proper heat contact. 

F. How to clear utensils, steam valve, and radiators. 

Fireless cooking is done by fixed rule, and if the food is pro- 
perly placed in the cooker, the radiators heated to the proper tern- 
perature and placed correctly, the fireless left unopened until 
cooking is complete, it will be impossible to have anything but good 
results. 

The instruction book with each cooker teaches these rules. The 
fireless method is so simple and economical, that every house wife 
should teach her servant to use it. 

Owing to limited space only recipes will be given for each kind 
of food, which differs in treatment in the cooker. Other recipes 
will be found in regular recipe chapters. 

CEREALS. OAT MEAL. 
Time — over night. Place oat meal in double boiler of fireless. 

BOILED RICE. 
« Heat one radiator to 450 degrees, and place rice, cold and raw 
on radiator in cooker for one hour or longer. 

SOUPS. SOUP STOCK. 
4 lbs. soup meat and bone. 2V2 Qts. water. 

1 onion. 1 carrot. 

1 tbls. salt. Vi t-spoon pepper. 

1 stalk celery. 1/2 bay leaf. 

1 turnip. 

Bring the entire mixture to a boiling point and allow to simmer 
ten minutes. Place in cooker for eight hours or over night. Re- 
move and skim fat from top before using. Use one radiator. 



FIRELESS COOKERY 227 

TOMATO SOUP. 
Boil 5 minutes and place in cooker for 2 hours. Use 1 radiator. 

GREEN OR SNAP BEANS (Southern Style). 
String beans, leaving whole; place three strips of bacon or 
salt pork in bottom of pail, then beans on top. Remove to cooker 
three to four hours, using one hot radiator, 450 to 500 degrees. 

BAKED MACARONI WITH CHEESE. 
1 hour in fireless, between 2 radiators — heated 450 degrees. 

MEATS— ROAST BEEF. 

The best shaped roast to prepare for cooking by fireless is a 
rolled roast from five to eight pounds. Prepare in the usual way 
for oven. Then put roast in the largest vessel and raise tempera- 
ture of the two radiators to highest possible point; then place the 
vessel in the large compartment and allow it to remain twenty 
minutes for each pound, or fifteen minutes per pound if desired 
rare. 

Never use water when roasting beef. The fireless process 
is the most satisfactory method of all for cooking meat; enough 
juice from the meat is developed during the cooking to make the 
best gravy ever served. During the cooker method this juice acts 
as a self baster. 

ROAST LAMB. 

Select a small leg of lamb and cut off the shank, and season 
well in the usual way. Place in the largest vessel and use both 
Prepare gravy in usual style. Use two radiators heated 500 de- 
radiators. Allow thirty minutes or more for each pound of meat, 
grees. 

VEAL LOAF. 
Three hours. Use two radiators. Heat 475 degrees. 

ROAST CHICKEN. 
The time necessary for roasting a chicken depends on the age 
of the bird. II/2 hours is sufficiently long for a young chicken 
but an older one should be roasted two hours, and a very tough 
chicken three hours. Old chickens will turn out as tender and 
savory as spring chickens. Prepare chicken by usual method for 
oven. It will not be necessary to heat the chicken to brown before 
it has been placed in the fireless. If both radiators are made hot 
the chicken when roasted will turn out very nice and brown. The 
chicken therefore can be placed cold in the vessel and placed at once 
in the cooker for roasting. It is not necessary to open the cooker 
for basting as the hot steam prevents burning. Heat 500 degrees. 

ESCALLOPED POTATOES. 
Peel and slice one quart raw potatoes, place in kettle one 
layer of potatoes and small pieces of butter, salt and pepper, and 



228 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



slice one small onion until required quantity is prepared. Pour 
one pint of scalding milk over this, sprinkle with bread crumbs and 
place in the fireless. Use two radiators heated 450 degrees and 
bake 21/2 hours. 

APPLE PIE. 

Place in the fireless, using two radiators heated 450 degrees 
for about 40 minutes. Any fruit pies can be baked like this. 

PUMPKIN PIE. 

Line pan with pie pastry — using 1 crust only. 
2 eggs well beaten. 2 cups milk. 

% cup sugar. IVo cups pumpkin. 

Salt to taste, season with nutmeg, cinnamon and a little ginger. 
Add a little melted butter. Bake in the fireless 30 minutes. Use 
two radiators heated 450 degrees. When cold cover with whipped 
cream, seasoned to taste with vanilla and sugar. 




CHAPTER XVIIL 



DISCOVERIES. 

Mrs. Frank J. Graham, Chairman. 

The old saying "'Tis the little things in life that count" has in- 
spired us to give you this chapter of little things that have counted 
in the lives of others. It is our sincere wish that "Discoveries" may 
prove of use to the possessors of the Atlanta Woman's Club Cook 
Book. 

REFRIGERATORS — To keep refrigerators pure, wash out 
twice a week with sal-soda and cold water. 

Mrs. R. M. Striplin. 

MERINGUE — If meringue or any egg mixture is cooked in 
oven too hot, it invariably falls. Cook in moderate oven or leave 
oven door open. 

Mrs. W. B. Price-Smith. 

FISH — will scale much easier if dipped into boiling water. 

Mrs. Porter King. 

IODINE — may be removed from any fabric by soaking the 
article in lime water. 

Mrs. Alonzo Richardson. 

SILVER — To clean easily, put pieces into a large pan of 
boiling water, into which you have put a small amount of Ivory 
soap flakes. When tarnish has disappeared, rinse in hot water and 
dry thoroughly. 

Mrs. M. H. Stevens. 

SHERBET— In making fruit sherbet, add a pinch of salt. 
Sherbet will have more body and taste better. 

Ida Crossett. 



230 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



GILT FRAMES — When gilt frames are new, go over with a 
coat of colorless varnish. All specks can then be washed off with 
water without injuring. 

Mrs. W. F. Melton. 

CLEANING FLUID FOR BLANKETS. 
2 bars ivory soap (grated). 1 gal water. 

6 tbls. powdered borax. 

Mix above ingredients thoroughly, place on fire and dissolve. 
When cold add 6 or 8 tbls. household ammonia. Make this mixture 
the day before planning to use. This forms a white jelly which, 
when used in the proportion of a cup of mixture to several gallons of 
water, cleanses perfectly. 

TO SET COLORS. 
1 tbls. alcohol. 1/2 gal. water. 

1 tbls. turpentine. 1/2 cup salt. 

Soak goods over night to retain color. Fold cloth carefully and 
place in tub, pouring over the above mixture. The next morning 
take out, but do not wring. Stretch on line and pin with clothes 
pins. Cloth thus treated needs pressing. If goods should be shrunk, 
heat the mixture before pouring over. 

Mrs. Hugh Willet. 

PUNCH — When making punch, put large silver spoon in bot- 
tom of bowl, add ice. In this way there is no danger of breaking 
bowl. Put silver teaspoon in jelly glass. You can fill slowly with 
no danger of breaking glass. 

Mrs. J. A. Carlisle. 

CURDLING — In serving acid fruits, put a large piece of ice 
in dish with fruit; then pour cream over all. The cream will not 
curdle. 

Mrs. Lee Hagan. 

MINT — Fresh mint and parsley placed in air-tight fruit jars 
will keep in good condition for a number of days. 

Mrs. Beaumont Davison. 

RECIPE HOLDER — Paste an envelope in your cook book for 
new recipes. 

Miss Cobble Vaughn. 

TO LOOSEN FRUIT SKINS— To quickly peel ripe tomatoes— 
and peaches, immerse for a moment in boiling water, which will 
loosen the skin. 

Mrs. Chas, Evans. 

TO BEAT EGGS— In beating eggs separately add pinch of salt 
to whites. They beat more quickly in this way. Then add a little 
of the beaten whites to the yolks as the yolks beat up nicer. 



DISCOVERIES 231 



TO PRESERVE EGGS— use one part Silicate of Soda, (liquid 
glass) to ten parts of water which has been boiled and cooled. Put 
fresh, clean eggs in an earthen or glass vessel and cover with a 
weight to keep them submerged in liquid. Wash off before using. 

These will keep indefinitely and are good for all cooking pur- 
poses, with the exception of boiling and poaching. 

Do not wash eggs first, as it removes the natural coating. 

Mrs. C. E. Cresse. 

CORN and batter breads should be made with fresh buttermilk. 
Biscuits are better when made with buttermilk a little acid. 

TO SWEETEN MILK— Add a little sweet milk to buttermilk 
which has become sour. It will be quite fresh again. Taste it and 
use own judgment in regard to amount to add. 

SCORCH — In boiling, if contents become scorched, immediately 
remove vessel from fire and set in pan of cold water. In a few min- 
utes the scorched taste will have disappeared. Put food in another 
vessel, discarding the scorched part, reheat and serve. 

Mrs. J. A. Carlisle. 

INSECTS IN VEGETABLES— Before using vegetables that 
form heads such as lettuce, cabbage, cauliflower, wash thoroughly, 
cover with cold water; adding a little vinegar. Let stand for 30 
minutes or longer. Any insects hidden within will immediately 
crawl out. Also, your vegetables become crisp and fresh from 
being in the cold w^ater. 

Mrs. W. F. Wimberly. 

TO SEAL JELLY — Put paraffine in jelly glasses and pour in 
your hot jelly. When cold, the jelly will be covered and sealed 
without any trouble. 

TO OPEN A COCOANUT— bore hole in eye and empty milk. 
Put in hot oven and the heat will crack the shell, so that meat can 
be removed easily. 

RELISH — Chopped onion and parsley added to any dumplings 
greatly improves their taste. 

POTATOES — Parboil potatoes before putting in soup. 

Mrs. G. B. Denman. 

INK STAINS — Salt on fresh ink stains will help to remove 
them. 

TO WHIP CREAM— When whipping cream, add the white of 
one egg to each cupful of cream. It will be firmer and double in 
quantity. Whip egg and cream separately, put together and then 
whip a little more. 

Mrs. R. M. Striphn. 



232 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



SUGAR SAVING — To save sugar in cooking acid fruits, add 
a pinch of soda when cooking. If this is done, it will be necessary 
to use about one-half as much sugar. 

PIN FEATHERS— To pick out the pin feathers of a fowl, use 
a small pair of tweezers. 

CUT GLASS — When washing cut glass, add a little borax to 
the suds and rinse in water with a few drops of bluing. 

Mrs. J. B. Rowe. 

INSECTS — The best remedy for ants is cayenne pepper spread 
on shelves. Moths will avoid clothes sprinkled with turpentine. 

Mrs. Newton C. Wing. 

POTATOES — May be baked more quickly by putting them in 
boiling water, for a few minutes, before putting them into the oven. 

Mrs. George S. Obear, Jr. 

DRY SALT — A little corn starch in the salt cellar will keep 
the salt dry. 

Mrs. Clarence Bemis. 

USE A HAIRPIN— To keep the outlets of bowls, bath tubs or 
laundry tubs clean, use a buttonhook, or wire hairpin straightened 
out, and then hooked at the end. 

WATER CURE — If onions are peeled under cold water, it 
does away with the odor and does not cause the eyes to smart. 

ICING — To prevent icing from running, lightly dust cake 
with corn starch. 

SCORCH STAINS — may be removed immediately with dry 
starch and then sponging off. Repeat if necessary. 

TAR — Every Mother of small children will be glad to know 
that tar may be removed from clothing by rubbing with kerosene 
or turpentine. 

NO STARCH — Do not put cotton articles that contain starch 
away for the winter, as the starch will cause them to rot. 

SHELVES — Varnishing or enameling shelves or the inside of 
drawers, looks better, and they can be kept cleaner, than by use of 
paper. 

Mrs. Newton C. Wing. 

DUST — Left over tea leaves kept moist in a cup and sprinkled 
on a floor to be swept, will prevent any dust. 

IRON RUST — To remove iron rust from white material, wet 
the goods with lemon juice, rub on salt and put in sunshine. 

Mrs. J. L. Minson. 



DISCOVERIES 233 



GRAVY Keep a pot of beef extract on hand to use for soup 

on quick notice, or for gravy. If for soup, cook vegetables in clear 
water, strain and add one or more teaspoonsful of the extract. 

BROOMS — Always buy a new broom before the old one is 
worn out,' so that the old one may be used for rough work. 

Mrs. Charles E. Myers. 

DUST— Use a paint brush to remove dust from the cracks 

and carving on furniture. 

Mrs. E. G. Foreacre. 

ODORS — After peeling onions rub salt or a raw potato on 
hands and you will find that the onion odor will disappear. 

CURDLED MAYONNAISE— When mayonnaise curdles the 
quickest way to bring it back is to take a teaspoonful of cold water, 
mix in a generous pinch of corn starch stir smooth and beat slowly 
into the curdled mayonnaise. 

Mrs. Roger Winter. 

WHEN FRYING— Add a little salt to the fat, when frying 
croquets or doughnuts and it will not spatter on the stove. 

GASOLINE — The ring sometimes left in clothes, when cleaned 
with gasoline, may be removed by steaming over a teakettle. 

MEALY POTATOES— Baked potatoes will cook mealy if the 
ends are nipped off before putting in the oven. 

Mrs. John Carlson. 

SCORCHING— A pan of salt in the oven, under the baking, 
will prevent scorching. 

GELATINE — When unmolding a gelatine dessert, first pour 
cold water over the dish on which you wish to unmold it, shaking 
off as much as possible. If the mold fails to fall into the proper 
place, it is an easy matter to slide it into position. 

Mrs. W. Frank Daub. 

IRONING BOARDS— may be protected from dust by taking 
long paper bags of desired width, cutting bottom from bags, and 
pasting together to required length. Slip over board when not in 
use. 

Lucy Parker. 

COLORING — To color successfully and daintily chiffon, veiling 
artificial flowers, feathers, wings, straw hat braid, etc., take a small 
amount of tube oil paint, which artists use, thin with gasoline, ac- 
cording to whether you wish to darken the shade with more paint, 
or lighten with more gasoline. If the worker is careful, the color 
will be even and permanent. Select a bright, windy day for the 
work ; do the dipping by an open door, and see that each part dries 



234 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



at the same time. Be careful to leave no undissolved particles of 
paint in the gasoline ; this is easy and satisfactory, giving pastel 
shades that can be acquired in few other w^ays. 

Mrs. D. F. Stevenson. 

MERINGUE — A pinch of baking powder added to meringue 
will keep same from falling. 

A way to test meringue : when brown touch lightly with fin- 
gers and if no imprint is left same is done. 

Mrs. J. M. Manry. 

REFRIGERATOR DRIPPINGS— are splendid for watering 
box plants, being rich in ammonia. Let stand in sun and warm up 
before using. 

Mrs. Frank L. Stanton. 



MEMORANDUM PAGE FOR YOUR OWN RECIPES. 




CHAPTER XIX. 



HOME GARDENS. 

Mrs. H. G. Hastings, Chairman. 

Landscape gardening has been in practice since 3000 B. C. as 
shown in records on an Egyptian tomb. The best of the earlier 
gardens were those of the Romans, which combined the ideas of the 
Egyptians, Persians and Greeks. 

In England the idea of gardening has been developed to a large 
degree. The Elizabethen gardens became more decorative and had 
more relation to the architecture of the house. 

One of Queen Elizabeth's chief policies was frugality and her 
reign was marked by increased resources. At that time the vege- 
table gardens were separated from the formal gardens and were 
screened from the more public views of the place. 

Landscape architects are especially trained men for laying 
out of grounds and when possible should be consulted, but, where 
the places are not large enough to warrant this, much pleasure in 
planning and carrying out one's ideas is found. 

It is necessary to have a complete plan, regardless of whether 
the work is all done at once or year by year. One owner planted, 
the first year, his trees, his foundation planting in front, and 
shrubbery to screen objectionable features ; the second year, all cor- 
ner plantings ; the third season, foundation planting completed and 
evergreens added; the fourth season, herbaceous perennials and 
architectural features completed the plans. In informal planting, 
the general mass of the borders follows the lot lines, paralleling 
them on the outside edge, with curved lines of planting on the inside 
edge. Where accents are needed to emphasize division of lot into 
various areas, the border line swells in width, and a corresponding 
height in plants is called for. The planting should follow the gen- 
eral outline of the house, so it would seem that the out-door living 
rooms are a part of the house itself, introducing variation in form, 



HOME GARDENS 237 



height and color. The front lawn area should be kept open up to the 
house. 

Foundation planting around the house must harmonize in coloi 
with house and grounds, accenting corners, openings and views 
with shrubs of varying height. Vines are used to relieve expanse 
of house walls, furnish privacy for porches, arbors and pergolas. 
They are helpful in covering banks and unsightly effects. Ever- 
greens are especially rich for planting about the house — mixed with 
deciduous plants whose flowers, twigs or fruits make a pleasing 
contrast with lower values of the evergreens — and produces a 
cheerful effect the year around. 

Roses of garden type, including Tea Roses, Hybrid Teas and 
Hybrid Perpetuals, should be restricted to gardens. The Rugosa 
Rose is available for border planting. 

Flowers may be planted in borders to serve as*the fore ground 
or "facers" to shrubs along paths or massed in beds of formal de- 
sign, if they are kept well back from the centers of open spaces. 
Bulbous plants, such as Narcissus or Daffodils, are effectively 
planted in colonies similar to those formed by wild flowers planted 
by nature. They can be left to themselves as the tops soon disappear 
and the lawn is not injured. 

Annuals are best confined to garden beds or borders and are 
valuable for cut flowers and continuous bloom. 

The best guarantee for success is : choosing plants of known 
hardiness : nursery grown plants with well developed masses of fi- 
brous roots from a dependable nurseryman ; planting with an under- 
standing of the requirements of the plants and shrubs for healthy 
growth, such as their needs of watering, cultivation, mulching or 
fertilizing. Flower seed planting should follow packet or seed cat- 
alog directions. 

WHAT AND WHEN TO PLANT FOR TABLE USE. 

While many high-sounding adjectives are used in a few seed 
catalogs, responsible seedsmen illustrate by actual photographic re- 
productions. Descriptions and cultural directions are dependable 
and it is well for every person who plants a garden, flower bed or 
window box to have and follow closely the catalog of thoroughly re- 
liable seedsmen. 

General planting tables are fine and being quickly decipher- 
able are quite handy to keep as a reference and reminder. For such 
a purpose in this short space is given a list of vegetables that do wel/ 
and are in common use in the latitude of Atlanta. For cultural di- 
rections, follow the simple directions printed on the packets or pack- 
ages of seeds you buy or that you will find in the seed catalogue. 
The making of garden and flower beds is a simple matter and will 
repay us greatly for all the time we may spend on their care. Let 
us grow our own vegetables and flowers. The fresh home grown 
vegetables are much more delicious than any we can buy at the 
stores and the flowers make a real home of even the simplest cottage. 



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CHAPTER XX. 



RECIPES FOR SPECIAL OCCASIONS. 

The following recipes are of such an unusual nature it 
seems best not to classify them in any particular chapter. Other 
casserole dishes have been placed in chapters, where they seemed to 
belong, being classified according to their chief ingredient. Many 
of the following will be found useful for children's parties. 

The Editors. 



ITALIAN SPAGHETTI. 

(Original Recipe.) 
Each item of the following should be multiplied by the num- 
ber of persons partaking. 
1/2 lb- medium-caliber Spaghet- V4. of a "bloom" of garlic. 

ti. 1/^ tin tomato-paste (Italian 

1/4 lb. butter. brand). 

1 medium-sized onion. 14 Parmisan or Roman cheese. 

Mince onions and fry in butter till brown. Then add in follow- 
ing rotation at 2 minutes intervals: (1) tomato paste properly di- 
luted in little water, (2) garlic finely minced, (3) 1 large spoon 
grated cheese per person, saving balance for serving time. During 
above proceeding, start cooking spaghetti in boiling water. Time 
for cooking runs usually as long as time for frying of sauce. Strain 
spaghetti very carefully and mix it with sauce. Serve hot. Sprin- 
kle individual helpings with remaining cheese. 

Enrico Leide, 
(Manager Howard Theatre.) 

JACK IN THE BOX. 

1 cup butter. 1 cup water. 

1/2 pt. whipped cream. 2 t-spoons Royal baking pow- 

2 cups sugar. der. 

3 cups flour. 3 eggs. 
1/2 t-spoon vanilla. 

Cream butter and sugar together ; add eggs beaten ; then add 
flour into which baking powder has been sifted. Mix well and bake 
in muffin pans and set aside after baking. The following day cut 
off top of cake, scoop out the inside and fill with whipped cream 
sweetened and flavored with vanilla. Replace the top and ice with 
heavy chocolate or caramel icing. 

Mrs. George A. Dewald. 



242 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



MEXICAN SPAGHETTI. 
3 pork chops. 1 Bell pepper. 

1 can tomatoes. 1 onion. 

1/4 lb. cheese. i/i t-spoon salt. 

14 package Spaghetti. 

Boil spaghetti in salty water until tender, then drain. Cut 
meat in small pieces and cook with tomatoes, onions and bell pep- 
per. Place this in a baking dish, alternating with layers of spa- 
ghetti, the vegetable mixture and grated cheese. Season with pep- 
per and salt. Bake 20 minutes. Serve hot. 

Mrs. L. D. Williams. 



NEW ENGLAND BOILED DINNER. 

5 lbs. corned beef. 1 medium sized cabbage. 

6 carrots. 6 medium sized potatoes. 
2 rutabaga turnips. 6 medium sized beets. 

Cook beef in boiling water slowly S-V^ hrs. or until tender. Re- 
move meat, put cabbage, turnips, and carrots into liquor, and boil 
1/4 hr. Add potatoes and cook 1/2 hr. longer. Cook beets separately. 
Serve beef on large platter surrounded by vegetables. Use pickled 
beets if preferred. 

Mrs. Katherine Cummings. 
I " Tewksbury, Mass. 

HUNGARIAN GOULASH. 

1/2 dozen onions. 1 red pepper. 

1 pound round steak. 1 green pepper, 

2 cups raw potatoes (diced). 3 tomatoes. 
2 cups raw carrots (diced). 1 bay leaf. 
2 tbls. lard. 2 cloves. 

1 qt. water. 6 allspice. 

Cut up onions and brown in frying pan with two tbls. lard. 
Put in a little flour to thicken. Add the round steak cut in small 
pieces. Stir so meat sears. Add the diced potatoes and carrots, 
also the tomatoes, and one bay leaf, two cloves, six allspice and the 
peppers chopped fine. Add one quart water and cook until all are 
tender. 

Mrs. Harry L. Wills. 

DOLLY CAKES IN CAPS. 
Bake any reliable cake mixture in round patty or muffin pans, 
and cover the tops with white icing. With a fine, new, paint brush 
dipped in melted chocolate, indicate eyes, nose and mouth. Much 
variety can be secured by slanting the eyes, turning the corners of 
the mouths up or down, etc. Cut circles of white tissue paper 
larger than the cakes, pink the edges, and run a white ribbon or 
thread around each, one inch from the edge. Set the cakes each in a 
cap, and tie the ribbon. Grownup children will enjoy these as much 
as the little ones. 

Mrs. Newton C. Wing. 



RECIPES FOR SPECIAL OCCASIONS 243 



SAVORY PUDDING. 

1 lb. boiled onions. 1/2 tbls. of sage. 

1/2 lb. bread crumbs. 1 egg and a very little milk. 

Sozs. shredded suet. Salt and pepper to season. 

Chop the onions, heat the breadcrumbs and onions together, 
add all the other ingredients and lastly mix with egg and milk. Add 
hot drippings to mixture, spread even over the pan and bake in a 
quick oven for about 40 minutes. Let it stand a few minutes, then 
cut in squares and serve with gravy. 

Mrs. Bertram Ibbetson. 

BAKED MACARONI, WITH CHEESE. 
34 cups macaroni, broken in 2 tbls. butter. 

pieces. V2 cup grated cheese. 

2 qts. boiling water. I-V2 cups scalded milk. 

1 tbls. salt. 14 cup buttered bread crumbs. 

2 tbls flour. 

Cook macaroni in the boiling salted water for twenty min- 
utes ; drain and blanch in cold water. Make a white sauce of the 
butter, flour and milk. Add seasoning to the sauce. Arrange a 
layer of cooked macaroni in the bottom of a buttered baking dish; 
sprinkle with the grated cheese, repeat until all the macaroni and 
cheese are used ; pour over the white sauce, cover the top with but- 
tered crumbs and bake for twenty minutes in a hot oven, or long 
enough to give the top a nice brown. 

Mrs. Ernest Covington. 

APPLE BASKETS. 
6 apples. 1 lemon-juice and rind. 

3/4 lb. light brown sugar. 1 oz. ginger root. 

Cut two pieces from each apple, leaving what remains, in the 
shape of a basket with a handle, after hollowing it out. Chop the 
apple pulp, amounting to about two cups, add sugar, lemon juice 
and rind, the ginger, pinch of salt and enough water to cover. Cook 
slowly four hours, adding water from time to time. Serve in bas- 
kets. These are particularly good with roast pork. 

Mrs. Newton C. Wing. 

. MACARONI WITH TOMATO SAUCE. 

•%. cup macaroni. 3 tbls. flour. 

2 qts. boiling water. I-I/2 cups tomato juice. 

1 tbls. salt. 1 slice onion. 

2 butter. 2 slices green pepper. 

Cook the macaroni in the boiling salted water for twenty min- 
utes, drain and blanch. Brown the butter, add the flour and sea- 
soning. Cook the tomato juice with slice of onion and green pep- 
per ; strain into cooked butter and flour slowly. Cook until smooth 
and thick, and pour over the macaroni. 

Mrs. Lester White. 



244 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



STUFFED GREEN PEPPERS. 
1 dozen peppers. 1 small chicken. 

1 stalk celery. 3 large tomatoes. 

3 ears tender corn. 1 cup bread crumbs. 

1 tbls. butter. i/2 cup cream sauce. 

1/2 cup crackers. Salt and pepper to taste. 

Select nice peppers average size, cut off ends and remove in- 
side surplus and seed. Stand peppers in cold water while filling is 
prepared. Have ready small size young frier boiled tender. Add 
chopped celery to chicken and allow all to cool in liquid in which 
chicken was boiled. Remove meat from chicken and put through 
meat chopper. Cut tomatoes and corn fine, add with bread crumbs 
butter, salt and pepper. Mix well together the above ingredients 
with the cream sauce and stuff each pepper. Sprinkle thickly with 
crushed cracker crumbs. Add a little water to baking dish to pre- 
vent sticking. Bake thirty minutes. . 

Mrs. Moreland Zellers, 

Grantville, Ga. 

ESCALLOPED HAM AND EGGS, EN CASSEROLE. 

2 cups cold boiled ham. 2 tbls. milk. 

4 hard boiled eggs. 1 cup cream sauce. 
2 cups bread crumbs. 

Chop ham fine; slice eggs; grease dish, covering the bottom 
with about 1/3 of bread crumbs; then add layers of eggs, ham, 
cream sauce and crumbs. Cover top with crumbs moistened with 
butter, and pour milk in around top. Bake in moderate oven 20 
minutes. Make cream sauce of 

1 tbls. butter or bacon grease. 1 tbls. flour. 

1 cup milk. 1 tbls. onion juice. 

Mrs. Charles Myers. 



CHAPTER XXI. 

OUR ADVERTISING FAMILY. 

By Mrs. Newton C. Wing 
Chairman Home Economics Dept. 

After a careful investigation of the following firms, the Home 
Economics Department of the Atlanta Woman's Club takes great 
pleasure in inviting them to be advertisers in the Cookbook. One 
firm only of its kind has been selected with the purpose in mind 
always, of having the advertiser one in whom our readers could 
have entire confidence, and in this way avoid time spent in making 
investigations themselves. We regard this as one of the most 
important features of this work, and hope sincerely that our read- 
ers will show their appreciation of our efforts by liberally patroniz- 
ing these firms. Be sure to read their advertisements which fol- 
low this Advertising Chapter, 



THE CALORIC FURNACE CO. belongs most properly in the 

Cookbook, even if it has nothing to do with food, for common sense 
tells us that we must first be warm and comfortable, else how can 
we enjoy eating? The Home Economics Department welcomes it 
gladly therefore both because it makes home cozier, and because 
it is so economical. 

THE FRIGIDAIRE— Just think, a refrigerator never damp! 
Never to have to watch out for the Ice-man's coming, to see that 
tickets or change are ready, or that we have been given correct 
weight — and then finally, perhaps to clean up after muddy feet. 
All these things are unnecessary with the Frigidaire. For several 
months we studied this delightful electrical contrivance at close 
range, the Frigidaire Company being kind enough to install it in 
our model kitchen at the Club House for that purpose, and we rec- 
ommend it most heartily. 

ROYAL BAKING POWDER— The Cookbook editors feel that 
a commendation of Royal needs must be superfluous, so long has 
it been the standard of excellence. Confirming this belief, the only 
baking powder mentioned in our recipe^ is the Royal. A new 
feature introduced by this firm is their selection of a consulting 
household specialist, who will be glad to answer all questions con- 
cerning household problems addressed to the Educational Depart- 
ment, Royal Baking Powder Company. 



246 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



OPTICIANS, A. K. HAWKES & CO. We would really not 
need to say anything more about A. K. Hawkes & Co. than to re- 
mind our readers that this sterling Atlanta firm has been in busi- 
ness over fifty years in our city. That fact certainly speaks for 
itself, but we can't resist the opportunity to tell you also that it's 
a reliable place to get one's eyes tested and fitted ; that they have 
the latest thing in cameras and photographic methods, and that we 
fell in love with an oven thermometer we saw there, which every 
one who reads our chapters on baking will want to purchase. 

JESSUP & ANTRIM— ICE CREAM MANUFACTURERS.— 
This firm has been a member of our Woman's Club "family" for 
some time, having supplied delicious ice-cream for practically all 
the big aflfairs held at the club house and also at the Children's 
Play Room, established by our Home Economic Department down- 
town, to care for children while the mothers shop. We have found 
this firm to be thoroughly dependable in the things that count — 
their cream is uniformly good, their deliveries are always on time, 
and they are kindness itself in filling rush or emergency orders. 

THE WHITE PROVISION COMPANY— The story which our 
beloved Henry W. Grady told of the poor "one gallus" fellow from 
Georgia who, when it came time to die, found that the South fur- 
nished him nothing but the hole in the ground in which to be 
buried — that everything else for the funeral had to be imported 
from the North seems a far cry from the prosperous times of pres- 
ent Southland. The time is here, when Georgia cannot only furnish 
us the necessary elements of a funeral, but what is more important 
— can provide the necessities of life. 

A pioneer who has helped to bring about this happy change is 
Mr. W. H. White, Jr., President of the White Provision Company. 
By stimulating the livestock industry in Georgia, by building a mod- 
ern packing house in Atlanta, establishing the home of the famous 
CORNFIELD BRAND HAMS AND BACON, he has earned the 
admiration and gratitude, not only of all true Georgians, but of 
good Americans everywhere, for he is helping to develop his own 
part of the country, without harming any other part which surely 
is the duty of all citizens. 

McCRARY — PHOTOGRAPHER — This Department takes 
great pleasure in recommending the McCrary Studios, for artistic 
portraits, and for sensible prices. Even during the period of the 
late war, these prices did not take upward trend, with which we 
became so unpleasantly familiar, in so many cases of necessities 
and luxuries. We find in the McCrary Studios pleasant atmosphere, 
of genial welcome and artistic accomplishment. 



OUR ADVERTISING FAMILY 247 



THE HOWARD THEATRE— Built with the artistry inspired 
by years of foreign travel on the part of Mr. Troup Howard, this 
wonder-place satisfies the artistic longing of the most cultured, and 
raises the standard of others who have grown accustomed perhaps 
to consider the tawdry finery purchased by money alone — the cri- 
terion. Even without its wonderful moving pictures, it would be 
soul-satisfying to rest in the luxurious seats breathing in the har- 
mony of color and music. After a year of its charm, it still holds 
us spell-bound, and thankful that such things can be. 

WISE DRUG COMPANY. After leaving the Howard, we 
find it the most natural thing in the world to turn to the left into 
the beautiful home of the Wise Drug Co. and get one of their de- 
licious orange drinks. Aside from the hospitality dispensed at 
the soda-fountain, we are assured of all the necessities to be found 
in a good drug store. When added to this is a satisfaction pro- 
duced by the elegance and simplicity which marks this in common 
with the Howard Theatre, we find — it easy to form a Wise habit. 

THE DAFFODIL TEA ROOM AND RESTAURANT— Con- 
tinuing down Pryor street, about a block from the Howard, we 
find one of the coziest places to eat. Accomplishing the usually 
impossible feat of providing delicious individual cooking on a large 
scale, the Daffodil has become the rendezvous for all who like an 
atmosphere of home. Here every day, friends meet friends, and 
one has the feeling of hospitality offered in a delightful personal 
manner by the owner, Mrs. J. E. McRee, and her assistants. 

JOY'S FLOWER SHOP— There may be a flower shop with a 
prettier name but we doubt it, for to all women joy and flowers 
are synonymous. Our acquaintance with this florist, where the 
Woman's Club Hospital Committee purchase its many floral gifts, 
and which numbers among its clientele many other club members, 
assures this firm of our hearty co-operation. 

M. MILLER'S PECANS— Pronounced "pecawns", "pecons" or 
"pecans" according to the section in which you live, does not af- 
fect the thinness of the shell the delicate flavor, nor the food value 
of the delicious pecans grown by J. R. and J. B. Miller, Pecan Nur- 
serymen of Baconton, Ga. We strongly recommend readers of 
this book to order direct from Baconton — "the Home of the Pecan" 
and then use them in our cake and salad recipes, 

ATLANTA NATIONAL BANK— The modern housewife or 
professional woman whether she "budgets" or uses a salary eco- 
nomically, finds an indispensable adjunct to be a good bank. After 
several years' acquaintance with the Atlanta National, we recom- 
mend it as a place where women will receive special consideration 
and the fact that it is especially near the shopping district, adds 
to the convenience. 



248 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



BLOCK BISCUIT AND CRACKER COMPANY is an Atlanta 
firm acquiring- national prominence owing to the excellence of its 
wares. This firm has given an elaborate demonstration of its 
products at a general meeting of our Home Economics Department, 
and we endorse it most heartily. A visitor to its large factories is 
immediately impressed by the hygienic conditions under wKich 
these dainty cakes and crackers are made. 

L. W. ROGERS GROCERY CO. enjoys the friendship and ap- 
pi*eciation of Atlanta housewives to the fullest extent. This firm 
made it possible, during the difficult war period, for a great many 
of us to furnish our tables with the necessaries of life at a price 
which was not prohibitive. Continuing this policy during peace 
times, makes the "Rogers Habit" part of the daily life of ninety per 
cent of Atlanta housewives. 

KING HARDWARE— Seems to have everything that anbody 
could wish to equip a home, both inside and outside. Through 
this store, our Department purchased many hundred dollars worth 
of equipment to furnish our model club kitchen, and we are prom- 
ised by the management that the articles mentioned in our chaptf'r 
on KITCHEN EQUIPMENT will be on hand, when the Cookbook 
readers ask for them. 

SOUTHERN DECORATING CO. A trip through this store 
makes one want to give a party every day in the year, for such 
fascinating things as are to be seen ! Dainty favors for tea par- 
ties, funny favors for children's parties (old or young), and ma- 
terials to decorate the walls of immense halls, or large areas — for 
auto parades, or at any time when the spirit moves us to "dress 
up". Entertainers at the many social functions of the Woman's 
Club and elsewhere, will find a delightful variety of table decora- 
tions. 

GEORGIA RAILWAY & POWER COMPANY.— Doesn't that 
seem like a big subject to handle in one little paragraph? Visions 
of elemental powers harnessed and brought into subjection are 
more understandable, however, when we think of them in terms 
of cooking, baking, and in the evening, the cheery reading lamp. 
Furnished in such abundance, and with no eflfort on our part we 
are apt to take such luxuries as a matter of course, without paus- 
ing to think of the arduous labor that makes them possible. Let 
us give thought, now and then, to the time and effort which have 
made these comforts ours, and let us do our part, in conservation 
and co-operation. Our readers will find our chapter on gas economy 
very useful in this connection. 



OUR ADVERTISING FAMILY 249 



ATLANTA MILLING COMPANY. — Two very important 
events will happen simultaneously in Atlanta — the production of 
this Cookbook and the introduction of a brand new pastry flour 
called 'Tride of Atlanta". We are glad to recommend its use in 
our cake recipes ; and as Irwin Cobb says, "Say it with flours". A 
long time has been spent in making ready for the market this 
pastry flour, inspired by the desire to call only the very best — 
"PRIDE OF ATLANTA". As all good cooks know a fine pastry 
flour is absolutely necessary for the making of fine pastries, so 
we are glad to be among the first to sponsor this brand. 

JEWEL FURNITURE POLISH— The invention of an Atlanta 
woman, this polish abundantly proves the theory that home prod- 
ucts may be as good or sometimes better than those for which we 
go far afield. This polish has been thoroughly tested by the Depart- 
ment, and we heartily recommend it. 

In presenting it to our readers of the fair sex, we wish to add 
this word of caution — "Be sure that Hubby has one for his own 
use, or you will find that he has borrowed it to polish his car, as 
it is equally effective for that." 

BINDERS GIFT SHOP AND PICTURE FRAMERY is just 
the place to get those new pictures for which you have been longing, 
as a splendid assortment may be found there, and at unusually rea- 
sonable prices. Almost everybody has prints on hand to be framed. 
Why not take them into Binders on Pryor Street, just below the 
Daffodil, and get them framed, and while there, look at the attrac- 
tive things in the gift shop. 

SOUTHERN COTTON OIL CO.— We feel honored to welcome 
into our Home Economics family the advertisement for Wessons Oil 
and Snowdrift. The development of these products serves to ex- 
emplify the wonderful progress in Southern industry, which has 
been made in the last few decades. We can imagine no home com- 
plete without both these necessary adjuncts, and recommend them 
for all of our recipes calling for shortening, frying, or any cooking. 

AMERICAN BAKERIES CORPORATION— Merita Bread is 
fast making friends on its merits, for its really home made bread, 
and priced so reasonably, too. Its just the thing to put in the school 
lunch, and when everything's ready, what could be more convenient 
than to wrap the whole lunch in the sanitary oiled paper which has 
served to keep the bread so sweet and moist. 

JOHNSON-DALLIS COMPANY.— The very surest proof 
that this firm is very popular with this Department, lies in the fact 
that, after a search of months for a firm that suited exactly the 



250 ATLANTA WOMAN'S CLUB COOK BOOK 



very high requirements for the production of this Cookbook, we at 
last selected Johnson-Dallis Co., and we are sure that; you will agree 
with us after reading our book and seeing the high quality of work- 
manship. 

BUICK MOTOR CO.— For the person who wants a car of 
which its owner will never need be apologetic — which will take its 
place among the most expensive cars, yet be within reach of those 
in only comfortable circumstances ; which is luxurious to ride in, 
yet economical in the amount of gasoline needed ; easy for a woman 
to drive, yet tough enough to stand long, hard trips — we recommend 
the Buick, They say that when a better car is made, they will make 
it and we believe them, for we have tested them ourselves, covering 
a period of ten years, 

ELLA SMITH DOLL CO.— In selecting our Cookbook adver- 
tisers, we were not thinking particularly of singling out women- 
Is it a coincidence, or a sign of the times, that three of our new 
"family" are inventors and originators of things unique? This 
ALABAMA INDESTRUCTIBLE DOLL was born in a womans 
love for her own children. Made first for them, the demand spread 
like wildfire, until now it seems as if the whole world wants this 
darling doll, that can withstand the punishment, to which, unwit- 
tingly, its little mothers and daddies submit it. 




Children Will Wake Up Early 

You know how they hop out of bed before the house is warm and play 
around while dressing! Colds and sickness are too often the result. 

At best, grates and stoves keep only part of the house fairly warm. 
Then there is the ever present danger of your children being burned in 
your absence — a fate that overtakes many little ones every winter. 

With a Caloric circulating warm, pure air to every nook and corner, 
your children may get up as early as they please and play around to their 
hearts' content. Then they run through a warm hall to the dining room 
and eat their breakfast in comfort. 

Over ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY FIVE THOUSAND families 
— three hundred of them in Atlanta — testify to the comfort, convenience, 
economy, healthfulness and genuine all round goodness of the 




LOR I 




Let us show you how to make YOUR home comfortable in winter 

THE CALORIC FURNACE COMPANY, 

E. BUNNELL, Manager. 

31 -A South Broad Street Phone Main 2366. 




FRIGID AIRE 

ECOIVOM^" — SAFETY IN THE HOME 

In Your Home Frigidaire stops food waste- 
protects health-saves doctor's bills and lost 
time-prevents danger. 

It eliminates the iceman with all his attend- 
ing nuisances. 

It makes ice for your table; it enables you 
to serve your family and your guests with 
a quality of food not possible with an ice box. 

E. H. DANFORTH, 

DISTRIBUTOR, 
187 Peachtree Street, -:- Atlanta, Georgia 




5a£:^::^:^:r5> 



YOXJR 
SERVICE 



ESTABLISHED 8"'0 



Founded in 1870, our store has for 

over fifty years been identified with the 
gro\vth of Atlanta, and we feel justified 
in the belief that it has wielded a strong 
influence in the affairs of the comnnunity. 

Our effort to add to the comfort 

and convenience of our patrons by giving 
them the best optical service, careful and 
pains-taking effort, long experience and 
modern science afford, has its reward in 
the great number of people who are our 
patrons, whose parents before them, wore 
"Hawhes Glasses," and whose children, 
when they need glasses, come to our store. 

And just as Atlanta has improved 

year by year, so, too, have we striven to 
do things better, to employ every faculty 
for increasing our usefulness and to con- 
tinue to merit your fullest confidence. 

A. K. HAWKES CO., 

Opticians Optical Instruments 

KODAKS AND SUPPLIES 

Atlanta, Georgia 



^s=^2CMC^ 



Healthful 

Reliable 

Economical 



The prudent 

housewife avoids 

substitutes, which may 

contain alum^ and uses 

ROYAL 

BAKING 
POWDER 

\ 
Absolutely Pure ^^t> 

Made from Cream of Tartar, \ 
^ derived from grapes. ^ 



m\ 



m 



a 


■ ■■■■^■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■l ■ M.J MaillklBI 


■ ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ Bj. 




When you eat 

Ice Cream, 

Eat the best- 
Made by 

Jessup &" Antrim. 

Get it from 
Your dealer. 




■■■■■■■■■mmm 


■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ 


■ ■■■■■■■■■■■igiii 



White's Cornfield Brand 

PRODUCTS 




J Keep i rs a Cool Place i i 



^BRM^D*^ 



„ WHITE PROVISION Cof 

i ATLANTA. GA. jj' 



The Sign O'QuALiTYt 
tri I ffl l¥ nffm rrrri 



THE SIGN 0'QUA.LITY. 




WHITE'S 

Grandmother Brand 

Breakfast Sausage 



Dear Consumer: 

Your order for the above products indicate that you want the best. 
You pay for ihe best and are entitled to the best. Therefore, ac- 
cept no substitute. Every pound of these products is guaranteed 
to be first in quality. 



W. H. WHITE, JR., President 

WHITE PROVISION CO., 



ATLANTA, 



GEORGIA 



ATLANTA'S LEADING PHOTOGRAPHERS 



0n the bestperfrai^S 
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SERVICE AND REASONABLE PRICES. 





Daffodi' Tea Room 

111 North Pryor Street 

The splendid reputation we enjoy has been gained by our policy 
of presenting to the public, only food that is fit to eat. 

Our private dining-room may be reserved 

for all kinds of special occasions. 

Space for 125 guests. 






We have made a special study of all delicatessen dishes. 
Our cold cuts, salads and dressings are prepared to suit the 
most fastidious tastes. They are tempting and delicious. 






During the winter months /\ The Daffodil Goodie Shop 

we are featuring afternoon )( has for sale all hinds of cake., 

sandwiches, home made can- 
teas. Delightful affairs with ji ^-^^^ ^-^^^ ^^^ everything 

good music. \) that is luscious to the taste. 

We furnish and. deliver refreshments for parties and picnics. 
Daffodil Cakes are Delicious. 

Phone Ivy 3757 





\ 



/ 



The Atlanta Woman's 

CLTJB 

— and the— 

HoTvaircl Theatre. 




''Two Atlanta Institutions!' 



/ 



\ 



WE are gratified to know that the zoomen of 
Atlanta J especially you women of the At- 
lanta Woman^s Cluhy find pleasure in vis- 
iting the Wise Drug Store in the Howard. Your 
increasing patronage we appreciate and accept as 
a compliment to our selection of those requisites 
that please you. Our desire to serve you should 
be expressed by the prompt and courteous service 
you receive ahvays. Should it ever be at faulty 
tell us so that we may correct it. 



OUR fountain is the gathering place of those 
who desire the very best of refreshment be- 
fore or after the theater. Make it a point to 
meet here. 

Among the best of candies you will find your 
favorite. Sometimes try a Whitmans Sampler. 
Our care is always that your candy be fresh. 



Wise Drug Co., 

Howard Theater. 
''In the heart of the Amusemeni Five Points.'' 

ALSO FOR ^'OUR CONVEMENCE-- 

Wise Brothers' Peachtree Pharmacy 

Peachtree at Linden. 



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No 



meal 

complete 
Without 
flowers 
from 




Hemlock 
4214 




MILLER 

MADE 

Package Pecans 

FAMOUS 

Miller's hand selected pecans packed in fancy 

paper cartons, make a nice gift to a friend. 

Delivered to any address in the U. S. A. 

Write for prices 

Good Pecan Trees at $1.00 Each. 

ORDER FROM 

J. R. & J. B. MILLER, Baconton, Georgia. 

Package Pecans Made Miller Famous 



1 86S Oldest National Bank iii the Cotton States 1 32 1 

The Atlanta National Bank 

— and — 

The W^omen of Atlanta 



THE women of today are business women. 
They know where their money goes, and 
why. They operate their homes upon the 
same budget system that apphes to the success- 
ful business house downtown. They know 
how much money they can spend each month, 
AND THEY MAKE THEIR ALLOW- 
ANCE COVER THEIR EXPENSE. 



Thousands of these women have found the 
Atlanta National a wonderful convenience. 
They appreciate the conveniences and courtesy 
extended to them. 



To the women who are not Atlanta National 
patrons, we extend a cordial invitation to open 
accounts. We promise them the same service 
that has been characteristic of the Atlanta 
National during the more than half century of 
its business life. 



The Atlanta National Bank 

Active Designated Depository 

United States Government, State of Georgia, County of Fulton 

and City of Atlanta. 




at tlie Capital City Club 



Where the best Is 
demanded, Block's Sal- 
tines are always 
served. 




Block s Saltines 




There Are No\v 



1 35 

Rogers' Stores 

LOCATED AS FOLLOWS: 



98 in Atlanta 
6 in Columbus 
3 in Greenville, S.C. 
2 in Marietta 
1 in LaGrange 
1 in Cedartown 
1 in Cartersville 
1 in Griffin 
1 in Americus 



11 in Macon 
2 in Rome 
2 in Athens 
1 in Gainesville 
1 in Newnan 
1 in Carrollton 
1 in Monroe 
1 in Fort Valley 
1 in Milledgeville 



Where satisfaction is a certainty. 




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SEVEN 

STORES 

IN 

ATLANTA 



KINGS 



SEVEN 
STORES 



IN 
ATLANTA 



FOR 35 YEARS 



WE HAVE STOOD FOR THE 

Home of Quality 

There should not be a room in 
any good housekeeper's home 
any closer to her heart's desire 
than her kitchen, and for these 
many years we have studied 
and strived to make of our 
kitchen furnishings department 
the best and most completely 
locked with the finest quality 
of goods to be found in any 
southern city. 







'Any of our Stores canouppiy Yoy 



122D«ca1:^ 
34 Gordon 



\M. W 

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DECORATIONS 

FOR EVERY OCCASION 
PUT UP ON RENTAL BASIS. 

Complete assortments of everything used 
for decorating. The only shop in the city 
where you can rent flowers, baskets, "willow 
stands and other decorations. 



FOR YOUR PARTY 

PLACE CARDS. DANCE PROGRAMS. 

TALLY CARDS, FAVORS, NUT 

CUPS, NOVELTIES. 



JUST FOR FUN 

SERPENTINE, CONFETTI, NOISE MAKERS, 

HORNS, BALLOONS, FIREWORKS, 

NOVELTIES. 



WE RENT MASQURADE COSTUMES. 



We can take care of any or- 
der, no matter how large, 
and welcome any order, no 
matter how small. 



Southern Decorating Co, 

77 S. Broad— Main 4174. 



How to Cut Down Your Gas Bill 

T HAS BEEN demonstrated that more than 
11% of the gas fuel supply is wasted. A 
large portion of this waste is directly due to 
improper methods in the use of gas equipment. 

Waste can be reduced to the vanishing point, 
service can be vastly improved, and gas bills can be 
diminished by a proper observance of a few rules 
governing the use of this fuel. 




All gas range burners should 
burn with a clear, blue flame. 
If they do not, the consumer 
should call up the gas company 
(Ivy 4400). 

Do not light the top burners 
until the food is ready to put 



When the water in the vessel 
has come to the boiling point, 
reduce the flame by turning the 
gas valve handle. 

Never let the flame lap up 
around the vessel. Turn down 
the valve. 

When the burner is not in 
use, turn it out. It is very easy 
to light again. We recommend 
the use of some handy lighter, 
such as the round file Safety 
Lighter, which is always ready 
for use. 

Try oven cooking, that is, 
cooking the whole meal in the 
oven at one time. It is the eco- 
nomical way of cooking. 



If Your Gas Bill Seems 
High 

Note on your bill the 
dates covered by the meter 
readings; take the average 
cost per day, and it will as- 
tonish you how nearly the 
same this average cost will 
be each month. The differ- 
ence in your gas bills usu- 
ally covers a few days' dif- 
ference between the meter 
readings — or different con- 
ditions of consumption — 
there is no difference in the 
price of gas. 



In case of any trouble with your gas, telephone Ivy 
4400 and ask for the Gas Service Department. 

GEORGIA RAILWAY AND POWER CO. 

P S. ARKWRK;HT, President 



The Pride of Atlanta 




BLEACHED 

jFiiiorirmi 



We are pleased to announce to 
Southern housewives our new su- 
perlative patent flour— "Pride of 
Atlanta." 

"Pride of Atlanta" is the last word 
in flours. It ranks equal or supe- 
rior to the superlative patent 
flours of America's leading mills. 

If you have been using only the 
BEST patent flours, try "Pride of 
Atlanta""an Atlanta product wor- 
thy of its home. 

Packed in restitched sacks. At 
your grocers. 



The Atlanta Milling Co., 



Atlanta, Ga. 



Beautiful Gifts 

MODERATE IN PRICE. 

Pretty framed mirrors, 

Fancy bowls and vases, 

Candlesticks and book ends, 
Boudoir lamps, 

Framed and unframed pictures, 
Cards for every occasion. 

Picture frames made to order for less. 

Binder Picture Frame Manufacturing Co. 

1 13 N. Pryor St.. Next to Daffodil Restaurant 



JEWEL POLISH 

Cleans as it Polishes 

JEWEL FURNITURE, FLOOR and AUTOMOBILE POLISH is 
different from ordinary polishes. It restores the surface to its orig- 
inal brilliancy, brings out the grain of the wood, leaves a perfectly 
dry surface, and goes twice as far as other polishes. 

It is more than a polish, removing ink, grease, grime or dirt on 
which other polish has no effect. Absolutely harmless, and without 
an equal for cleaning ivory furniture and white wood-work. 



Look for this Trade-IUark. 




ANUFACTURED BV 



Sold by Leading Dealers 



The Jewel Furniture, Floor and Automobile Polish Co., 

ATLANTA, GA. 



The secret of a good salad 

is a home made dressing 

that exactly suits 

your own taste. 

A salad is the appetizing way to 
serve bits of food which might other- 
wise be thrown away or wasted. 
With Wesson Oil the art of salad 
making becomes simple. 

Wesson Oil is pure, bland and de- 
licious. It makes the most delicate 
of French Dressings and a mayon- 
naise of unusual stability. 

In making Wesson Oil Mayon- 
naise the very best results are obtain- 
ed by slightly warming the bowl in 
which you intend to mix the ingre- 
dients. 

Wesson Oil 

for Salads and Cooking 



When- 



You just must have the very best 
bread the market affords — you 
want something especially nice for 
company--sandwiches, etc., try 




B 



rea 



Then — 



A happy medium in bread, and yet 
a very delicious, "wholesome, satis- 
fying loaf, will be found in our 

BUTTER NUT BREAD 



While- 



for a delicious, inexpensive dessert 
that will be enjoyed by the entire 
household, we recommend 

HOLSUM CAKE 




AMERICAN 
BAKERIES 
COMPANY 



The Automobile 

And Home Economics 




IN THE CONDUCT of the modern Ameri- 
can home, motor transportation for the 
family plays an increasingly important part. 

The Atlanta Woman's Club, thru its Home 
Economics Committee, has given its endorse- 
ment to the product of the Buich Motor Com- 
pany. 



On account of its dependability — ease of opera- 
tion — roomy comfort, and low cost of up-heep, 
the Buick is the ideal car for the family. 



Buick Motor Company, 

FLINT, MICHIGAN. 

Division of General Motors Corporation, Atlanta Branch, 
241-243 Peachtree St., Atlanta, Ga. 




u 



The Alabama Indestructible Doll" 



In this booh of unusually good things, we wish 
to call your attention to the very best doll 
that is made—an indestructible one. Trul:p 
so. Will last a life time with just ordinary 
care. The head is a patented combination — 
not wood, metal, nor rubber. The doll is 
entirely hand-made, hand painted. The 
body made of good heavy fabric, stuffed with 
cotton by hand. Doll can be washed. 
We have instances of use for as long as 
twenty-two years and thousands of them in 
constant use five and ten years. Very rea- 
sonable in price, and all that we claim them 
to be in every respect. Such is the "Ala- 
bama Indestructible Doll." For sale by 
dealers and the 



Ella Smith Doll Company, 

ROANOKE, :: :: ALABAMA 




JOHNSON-DALLIS CO 

PRINTERS 



Specialists in the Production of High Class 

BOOKLETS 

CA TALOGUES 

COLLEGE ANNUALS 

DIRECT ADVERTISING 

AND COMMERCIAL WORK 

ATLANTA. :-: :-: ' :-: GEORGIA 



INDEX. 



Page 

advertisi>;g chap- 
ter 245 

Almond Sauce 140 

Apples- 
Baked 61 

Baskets 243 

Butter 96 

Conserve 100 

Crystalized 194 

Asparagus — 

Canning 221 

In Ambush 162 

Timbals 158 

With eggs 158 

Aspic — 

Cucumber 60-195 

Fruit 69 

Grape Fruit 69 

Pineapple (i9 

Bacon with liver 149 

BALANCED MEALS 35 

Banana Salad 60 

Beans with Mushrooms. .165 

Beef— 

A La Mode 155 

Casserole 149 

Cuts (Photo) 150 

BEVERAGES-CHAP- 
TER 

Blackberry 85 

Chocolate Milk Float.... 82 

Clear Punch 85 

Club Punch 83 

Egg Nog 82 

Elder Flower 83 

Fruit Punch 82-84 

Ginger Ale Punch 84-85 

Grape Juice 81-84-208 

Hot Chocolate 83 

Iced Tea 81-84-85 

Mint Ale 84 

Norman Punch 81 

Oriental Punch ... 83 

Raspberry Shrub 82 

Strawberry Water 84 

Summer Draught 84 

Birds-Method of Cook- 
ing 146 

Biscuit — 

Beaten 202 

Bran 45 

Cheese 45 

Emergency 45 

Kentucky Buttermilk .. 40 

Southern Beaten 45 

Sweet Potato 45 

Boullets (Meat) 156 

BREADS— CHAPTER 

Boston Brown 43 

Corn meal 28-48-204 

Corn Pone 48 

Date 43 

Egg Corn meal 214 

Ginger 44- 122-200 

Griddles 204 

Johnny Cake 43 

Milk 44 

Muffins ^8-46-47-200 



Page 

Neverfail 40 

Norwegian Sweet 41 

Nut 42-43 

Raisin 44 

Rolled Oats 41 

Rolls 46-48-193 

Salt Rising 41 

Southern Brown 28 

Southern Corn 28 

Spoon 42-193 

Tea Muffins 28 

Waffles 14-16-49-200 

Boiling — Time For 33 

Brains — • 

Calf 151 

Cutlets 196 

BREAKFASTS— 

New England 38 

Mrs. Thornton's 38 

Broiling — Time For 33 

Brunswick Stew 144 

Cabbage— Stuffed 166 

CAKE-CHAPTER 

Angel 17-103 

Angel Food 104 

Birthday 113 

Black - 116 

Blueberry Tea 203 

Bridal 18 

Chocolate Drop 123 

Chocolate Layer 29 

Chocolate Nougat HI 

CofTee 210 

Cream Layer 105 

Date (Uncooked) 112 

Date & Nut 195 

Date Bars 120-121 

Deliciou s - 106 

Devil's Food 104-200 

Dinner Table (phot.) ...130 

Dolly Cakes 242 

Doughnuts 48-49-202 

Eng. Wal. & Raisins 112 

Fillings 116-117-118 

Fruit 15-112-113-114 

115.-116-192-202 

Fruit (Frozen) 15 

Fruit (Japanese) 114 

Fruit (Uncooked) 112 

Fruit (White) 29-113 

Fudge 107 

Ginger _ 117 

Icings 118-119-120 

Jack in the Box 241 

Jam ...- 115 

Jelly Roll ..110 

Lady Baltimore 23 

Lane 106 

Le>-ion Jelly HO 

Libcity 2&S 

Macaroons 123 

Marble 109 

Mocha 107 

Nut (Individual) 124 

One Egg 205 

Orange HO 

Pecan Strips 121 

Pecan White Ill 

Pingapple 105 

Pound— Old Fashioned ..105 

Raisin HI 

Ribbon 108 



Pag 

Rolled Wafers .^ 123 

Scripture - 103 

Snow - 20 

Sponge 107-108-192 

Tea 122-192 

Thrift ., 204 

Walnut Short HI 

White 108-109-199 

CAKE FILLINGS- 

Cream ^^ 

Frosting 28 

Fruit & Nut 28 

Candy (See Confectionery) 

CANNTNG- 

Asparagus ff^ 

Berrie s 219 

Carrots 221 

Cherries 220 

Figs 220 

Fig Conserve 219 

Glass 216 

Grapes - 221 

Grape Ketchup 219 

Grape Marmalade 218 

Grape Mincemeat 219 

Hot Water Canner 215 

Jams & Marmalade 218 

Peach Jam 219 

Plums 221 

Peaches & Pears 220 

Preserving 217 

Soup Mixture 222 

Spiced Grapes 218 

Steam Pressure 215 

String Beans 221 

Sweet Peppers 222 

Tomatoes 222 

Carrot Salad 70 

Cereals— 

Cream of Wheat •'{^ 

Hominy .-38 

Oatmeal 3/-226 

Pudding (Fried Indian) 39 

Rice— Boiled 226 

Rice— Steamed 38 

Shredded Wheat 38 

Chili Sauce ..._ ■■■^-■-_: 95 

Chow- Chow 86-87-88 

Chutney 96-^7 

CHAFING DISH- 

Cheese Dish ^9 

Cheese Fondue 80 

Chicken Almond 77 

Chicken A la King 78 

Chicken Omelet 77 

Crab Meat 76 

Creamed Oysters 80 

English Monkey 78 

Fig Cups II 

Hot Stufif 78 

Italian Macaroni /8 

Lobster Newberg "9-80 

Olive Stuffed Eggs .... 77 
Oysters a la D'Uxelles 80 

Pigs-in-Blankets 79 

Red Devil 77 

Scotch Woodcock 78 

Scrambled Eggs with .... 

Calves' Brains 80 

WoQdchuck 77 



INDEX— Continued 



Page 

Cheese^ 

Cheese Dish 79 

Fondue 80 

Gelatine 68 

Mousse 55 

Relish 55 

Salad 55-56 

Souffle 55 

Cheese Straw ; 46 

Welsh Rarebit 56 

CHICKEN— 

A la King 141-143 

Almond - 77 

Baked 140 

Broiled _ 27 

Creamed 27 

Croquettes 50-145 

Dumpling 1§4 

Filling' for Timbals ....196 

Fricassee 144-208 

Fried 142 

Gumbo l?9 

Jellied 143 

Pie - 210-142 

Pie (Mrs. Harding) 14 

Pilau 144 

Pressed 143 

Roast - 227 

Salad 196 

Smothered 143 

Sandwich 71 

Spaghetti 144 

Stuffing 141 

Woman's Club 195 

Cl.ocolate — 

Iced Milk 83 

Milk Float 82 

Chop Suey 151 

Chowder — Clam 136-137 

Chowder — Fish 134 

Clams — 

Chowder ..136-137 

Fritters - 137 

Salad - 59 

Chops— Pork 151 

CONFECTIONERY— 

Baked Bon Bons 125 

Caramels 125-126 

Chocolate Cream ...29-129 

Date Loaf 125 

Divinity Creams 124 

Fondant 128 

French Nougat 127 

Fudge 125-201 

Modern Topics 127 

Molasses 127 

Parisian Sweets 29-129 

Peanut Brittle 128 

Peanut Butter 127-128 

Pecans (Sugared) 196 

Pop-Corn Balls 128-129 

Pralines 218 

Rose Cream Mints 127 

Stuffed Dates 125 

Conserve^ 

Apple 100 

Apple Butter 196 

Cherry 100 

Crab Apple 99 

Fig .,...99-219 

Ginger Pears 98 

Grape 100 

Cream Tomato 99 



Page 

Peaches 97 

Pineapple (Mock) 98 

Scuppernong 96 

Watermelon Rind 98 

COOKIES— 

Boston 121 

Cocoanut 124 

Fruit 122 

Turn bo 122 

kewpies 123-204 

Oatmeal 18 

COOKING TIME TABLE 34 

Corn — 

Croquettes 51 

Pudding 158 

Salad 166 

Crab Meat- 
Creamed 76 

Deviled 138 

Stuffed 137 

Cranberry — 

Crystallized 140 

Snow 139 

Creole Sauce 73 

CROQUETTES— 

Banana 51 

Brain SI 

Chicken 50-145 

Corn 51 

Lobster 138 

Meat 52 

Nut & Potato 51 

Piedmont 50 

Rice 52 

Salmon 51 

Veal 50-51 

Croutons 131 

Crystallized Cranberries 140 

Cucumber — 

Aspic - 195 

Baskets 67 

Salad - 65 

Sandwich 71 

DAINTY DESSERTS- 

CHAPTER— 

Apricot Ice 174 

Apricot Jelly 172 

Apricot Sherbet 172 

Bananas Baked 172 

Banana Custard 168 

Biscuit Tortoni 176 

Bisque Ice Cream 172 

Charlotte Russe 169 

Cherry Gelatine 169 

Chocolate Mousse 175 

Chocolate Souffle 170 

Coffee Gelatine 171 

Coffee Mousse 176 

Frozen Punch 168 

Frozen Whip 175 

Fruit 171-174 

Fruit Sherbet 175 

Havana Cream 169 

Maple Mousse 176 

Maple Parfait 175 

Marshmallow Dainty ...169 
Marshmallow Cream ...169 
Marshmallow Frappe .169 
Marshmallow Ice Cream 172 

Milk Sherbet 174 

Nesselrode Pudding ...176 



Page 

Nougat Ice Cream 173 

Orange Sherbet 174 

Orange Tapioca 171 

Peppermint Ice Cream 173 
Pineapple Grapefruit ....171 

Pineapple Mousse 176 

Pineapple Sherbet 174 

Prune Souffle 170 

Ruby Mousse 175 

Strawberry Delight 171 

Tutti Frultti 172 

Vanilla Ice Cream 173 

Date Loaf _ 125 

Dates— Stuffed 125 

DINNERS 131 

New England Boiled .242 

Recipes for 131 

Table (Photo) 130 

DISCOVERIES 229 

Brooms 233 

Cleaning Fluid 230 

Cocoanut - 231 

Coloring _ 233 

Corn, & Batter Bread....231 

Cream whipping 231 

Curdled Milk 230 

Curdled Mayonnaise 233 

Cut Glass .232 

Dry Salt 232 

Dust 232-233 

Fish 229 

Fruit Skins 230 

Frying 233 

Gasoline 23.j 

Ge'atin" 233 

(iilt I-r;.mes 230 

Gravy - 233 

Hair Pins 232 

Icing 232 

Ink Stands 231 

Insects 231-232 

Ironing Boards 233 

Iodine 239 

Iron Rust 232 

Mealy Potatoes 233 

Meringue 229-234 

Milk Sweetening 231 

Mint 230 

No Starch 232 

Odors 233 

Pin Feathers 23^ 

Potatoes 231-232 

Punch 23C 

Recipe Holder 2J0 

Refrigerator .229 

Refrigerator Drippings234 

Relish 231 

Scorch 231-232-233 

Sealing Jelly 231 

Setting Colors 230 

Shelves 232 

Silver 229 

Sugar Saving 232 

Tar 232 

To Beat Eggs 230 

Water Cure 232 

Doughnuts 48-49-202 

Dressing 

Chicken 141 

Thick Cream 56 

Duck— Roast 145 

Dumplings 

Apple 183 

Blackberry 183 

Cnickeu 184 

Peach 183 



INDEX— Continued 



Page 

EGGS— 

Au Bechamel 52 

Beef Omelet [53 

Benedictine 54 

En Surprise 191 

Fluffy Omelet "54 

Ham Omelet 53 

Milk and Eg-g 54 

Omelet for Two 53 

Scrambled _ 54 

With Calves Brains .. 80 

Stuffed 55 

Sylvan (Mrs. Thomas) 194 
Tomato Omelet 54 

FIRELESS COOKERY ...225 

Apple Pie 228 

Baked Macaroni 227 

Boiled Rice 226 

Escalloped Potatoes ....'227 

Oatmeal 226 

Pumpkin Pie 228 

Roast Beef 227 

Roast Chicken 227 

Roast Lamb ..227 

Snap Beans 227 

Sotips .,. 226 

Veal Loaf 227 

FISH— 

A la Creole 211 

Balls - 38 

Chowder 134 

Crab 212 

Cubion 212 

Discoveries _ 229 

Fried 134 

Moulded Halibut 134 

Shad—Broiled 134 

Shad Roe 134 

Shrimp — Deviled 15 

Shrimp— Gumbo 134 

Planked 133 

Tartar Sauce 212 

Tomato & Shrimp 212 

Tuna 133 

Fritters — 

Clam _...137 

Green Corn 27 

Frog Legs (Fried) 134 

FRUITS (BREAKFAST) 36 
(See Canning, Desserts, 
etc.) 

Gas (Economy in) 31 

Ginger Bread 117-44-122 

Gelatine 

Apricot Jelly 172 

Charlotte Russe 192 

Charlotte 205 

Cheese Salad 68 

Cherry 169 

Coffee 171 

Nut Salad "... 66 

Pineapple Grapefruit .171 
Sylvan Cream 192 

Goulash — 
Hungarian 242 

Gravy — 
Beef Extract for 233 

Gumbo — 

A la Creole 213 

Chicken 199 

File ' 209 



Page 

Shrimp 134 

Vegetable 161 

Ham — Baked 153 

Hash — Corned Beef 155 

HOME GARDENS 234 

Table for Planting 238 

ICES— 
Apricot Sherbet ....172-174 

Fruit 174 

Fruit Cake — Frozen 15 

Fruit Sherbet 175 

Milk Sherbet .174 

Orange Sherbet 174 

Pineapple Sherbet 174 

Sherbet 229 

ICE CREAM— 

Bisque 172 

Frozen Whip 175 

Marshmallow 178 

Nougat 173 

Orange 17 

Peppermint 173 

Tutti Fruitti .....i'2 

Vanilla 173 

Icing (Discoveries) 232 

JAM— 

Grape and Nut 207 

Peach 219 

Seedless Blackberry .... 99 
Strawberry 99 

JELLY— 

Apple 204 

Chicken 143 

Crab Apple 100 

Cranberry 101 

Gooseberry ..., 101 

Grape 101 

Quince 101 

Paradise 101 

Pineapple 102 

Jelly Roll 110 

KITCHEN ARRANGE- 
MENT 18 

KITCHEN FURNISHING 13 

LAMB— 

Lamb Cuts (PhotJ 152 

Ba rbecued 194 

Roast 155 

Lemon Whip 209 

Liver (Bacon) 149 

LOBSTER— 

Croquette 138 

Newberg 80 

Stewed 138 

LUNCHES— " 

Lunches 223 

Business Man's .,..224 

Business Woman's 224 

School Child's 224 

Luncheon Table (Phot.).. 58 
(Mrs. W. H. Kiser's) 

Macaroni — 
Baked with Cheese .......227 

With Tomato Sauce ....243 

Italian 78 

Macaroons 123 

Marmalade — 
Carrot 99 



Page 

Grape 218 

Orange 99-209 

MEATS— 

Beef (Roast) 227 

Boullet _ 156 

Brain Cutlets 196 

Ca ke s 155 

Lamb (Roast) 227 

Rice Casserole 147 

Pork Chops 151 

Corn Beef 199 

Ham & Eggs 244 

Mutton (Pot Roast) ....199 

Meat Pie 153 

Pot Roast _ 153 

Sausage _ _ 19 

Stock _ 147 

Veal Cutlets 199 

Veal Daube Glace 213 

Veal Loaf '. ....227 

Meringue ji229-234 

Milk (Prevent Curdling )230 

Milk (To Sweeten) 231 

Mint (To keep fresh) ...230 

MOUSSE- 

Chocolate 175 

Coffee ., 176 

Maple "176 

Pineapple _ 176 

Ruby _ irS 

Pimento 19 

Muffins 28-46-47-2(0 

NEEDFUL FAC^S 30 

New England Boiled Din- 
ner 2 12 

OYSTERS— 

A la D'Uxelles 80 

Baked 16 

Broiled' 135 

Creamed _ 80 

Fried 212 

A la Thornton 135 

Loaf (New Orleans) 211 

On Half Shell 135 

Pi'g«-in-BIanlvets 79 

Stew 136 

Toast 136 

Pastry — 

French _ 182 

One-Two-Three 182 

Pie Crust 182 

PERCENTAGE TABLE 
(BEEF) 148 

PICKLES— 

Artichoke '. 91-93 

Cabbage 90 

Chili Rehsh 203 

Chili Sauce 95 

Chow-Chow 86-87-88 

Chutn«jy Sauce 97 

Corn Salad 93 

Cucumber 89 

Damson Plum 92 

Dutch Salad 89 

Green Tomato .95-96 

Indian Chutney 97 

John Mack Tomato 97 

Zvli.xed Yellow 208 

Mustard 88-89 

Pepper Hash 93 

Pepper Relish 94 

Plum Chutney 96 

Plum Sauce 96 



INDEX— Continued 



Pnge 

Rummage 90 

Spiced (jreen Tomato .. 94 

Sauer Kraut 91 

Soy Relish 9o 

Sweet Peach 91 

Watermelon Rind 92 

PIE— 

Amber 189 

Banana 190 

Burnt Caramel 187 

Butter Scotch 18S-185 

Caramel 187-194 

Chicken :.... 142-210 

Chocolate 201 

Cocoanvit 18t 

Crust 182 

English Apple 188 

Jam _ 186 

Lemon Custard 188 

Lemon Meringue 202 

Macaroon 189 

Meat Ii3 

Mince Meat 186 

Mock Cherry 188-189 

Molasses 186-190 

Pineapple 187 

Planked Fish 133 

Pork Cuts (Phot.) 154 

POTATO— 

Bake Mealy - 233 

Bake Ouicker -232 

Dutch - 167 

Rabun 19i 

Scalloped 160-227 

Soup 231 

Surprise 159 

POULTRY— 

Roast Turkey -139 

Preserves — 

Apple Conserve 103 

Carrot Marmalade 99 

Crab Apple 99 

Cranberry Jelly.- 101 

Lady Baltimore 210 

Popovers 47 

Prune Whip 1" 

Pl'DDIXOS— 

Apple Easy 181 

Banana 177 

Blackberry 180 

Cabinet 182 

Carrot 27 

Cocoanut •. 180 

Christmas Plum 181 

Chocolate 178 

Date 19-179-180-181 

Eggless 177 

Feather 18 

Fig : 201 

I- rozen 182 

Indian-baked j 178 

Kiss 179 

Macaroon 180 

Nesselrode 176 

Nut 177 

Orange 201 

Plum 180 

Savory 243 

Southern 179 

Steamed Huckleberry .. 16 
Sweet Potato ...178-210 



Page 

Punch — 

Clear 85 

Club 83 

Fruit 82-84 

Ginger Ale 84-85 

Norman 81 

Oriental 83 

Silver Spoon 230 

Rabbit 146 

RELISHES— 
Added to Dumplings . .231 

Chili Sauce 95 

Chow Chow 86-87-88 

Chutney Sauce 96-97 

Rice Croquettes 52 

Rice & Meat 151 

Rolls 46-48-193 

SALADS— 

A la Russe 69 

Alligator Pear 64 

Apple 67 

As You Like It 62 

Baked Apple 61 

Bolivia , 59 

Candle 61 

Cheese Gelatine 68 

Cherry 65 

Chicken 196 

Clam Salad 59 

Cold Slaw 69 

Corn 161 

Crab _ 212 

Cream Dressing 59 

Cucumber Baskets 67 

Cucumber 65 

Delicious 66 

Easter Egg 65 

Eclairs Filled 15 

English 65 

English Walnut 70 

French Dressing 17 

Frozen 64-214 

Frozen Pear 60 

Fruit Aspic 69 

Fruit for Sixteen 63 

Fruit 62-64-65-16 

Ginger Ale 63 

Grapefruit & Pineapple 69 

Guacamole 65 

TelHed Apple 15 

"Jellied Veal 68 

Marion Club 62 

Ma rshm allow 61-67 

Mayonnaise 63 

Moulded Shrimp 61 

Nut Gelatine 65 

Orange Peanut 66 

Ovster 60 

Pear 64 

Perfection . 68 

Pimento Mousse 19 

Pineapple & Cucumber.. 59 

Pineapple 203 

Poinsetta 208 

Raw Carrot 70 

Shrimp 68-69 

Tomato & Chicken 58 

Tomato & Egg 66 

Tomato & Shrimp .. .... 212 

Vegetable 200-64 

Whipped Cream 18-59 

Sala.d Dressing 72 

Cooked 73 

Creole 73 

Egeless Boiled 75 

Hollandaise _ 74 



Page 

Italian 75 

Lettuce 73 

Mayonnaise 73-74 

Roquefort Cheese 75 

Slaw 74 

Thousand Island ...73-75-18 

Whipped Cream 74 

Salmon Mousse 138 

Salt-(to dry) 232 

SANDWICH— 

Chicken 71 

Cucumber 71 

Different 70 

Fried 200 

Ham 70 

Orange Honey 72 

Oriental 70 

Pimento 72 

Prune 71 

Raisin 71 

Ribbon 71 

Rolled 72 

Sardine 72 

Scalloped Potatoes 160 

SOUFFLE— 

Chocolate 170 

Prune 170 

Sweet Potato 22 

Banana 60 

Cheese 55-56 

Sally Lunn 47 

Salmon Croquettes 51 

SAUCE- 

Almond 140 

Caramel 184 

Chili 156-207 

Foaming 184 

Hard 185-192 

Lemon ..., 14-184-185-188 

Mint 156-157-199 

Russian 214 

Tartar 157-212 

Tomato 156 

Vanilla 184 

Virginia 157 

Woodford 184 

Yellow 185 

SHRIMP— 

Gumlio 134 

Peppers (stuffed with) .212 
Pickled ...136 

SO UPS- 
Clam 132 

Cream of Onion 131 

Tomato 113-227 

Kidney Bean 132 

Stock 226 

N'egetable 132 

Spagetti— 

Chicken 144 

Italian 197-241 

Mexican 242 

SPAGHETTI— 

Broiled 153 

Swiss 149 

With Oysters 151 

Stew-Brunswick 144 

Stuffing 141 

Sweetbreads 191 

Sweetbreads (Mock) 195 



INDEX— Continued 



Page 

SWEET POTATO- 

Baked 22 

Cakes 24 

Candied Yams 22-24 

Casserole 23 

Creamed 24-26 

Croquettes 24 

Custard 22 

Delight 23 

Fried 21 

Meringue 26 

Osca,r's 25 

Pie 22 

Pig-in-a-pen 22 

Pone 25 

Pudding _ 25 

Raisin 23 

Roast Opossum 21 

Souffle 22-23 

TEMPERATURE TABLE* 

31 

TERMS IN COOKING .... 30 
Thousand Island Dressing 

18 

Toast Golden Rod, 56 

Tomatoes (Stuffed) 163 

Turkey, (Scalloped) 140 

Turkey, (Roast) 139 

Uncle Remus Recipes... 15 
\'eal— 
Croquettes 50-51 



Page 

Daube Glace 213 

Loaf 147-227 

VEGETABLES— 

Asparagus 158-166 

Asparagus Ambush 162 

Timbals (Asparagus) ....158 

Baked Beans 164 

Beans & Mushrooms ....165 

Beets 162 

Butter Beans 165 

Cabbage (Scalloped) ...165 

Carrot Pudding 27 

Celery (Sylvan) 191 

Celery (Creamed) 191 

Corn (Fried) 166 

Corn Oysters 162 

Corn Pudding 158 

Corn Salad 161-166 

Cucvunbers (Sliced) 161 

Egg Plant 

(Casserole) 160-161 

Egg Plant 214 

Gumbo 161 

Hopping John 162 

Okra 161 

Peppers (Spanish) 160 

Peppers (Stuffed) 160 

(212-244) 
Potato Dutchess 20 



Page 

Potato (Dutch) 167 

Potatoes Lyonnkise 167 

Potato Puff 160 

Patato Scallop .160 

Potato Surprise 159 

Rice (Boiled) .213 

Sauer Kraut 91 

Succotash 165 

Spinach 159 

Squash (Fried) 162 

String Beans 164 

Planting Table 238 

Tomato (Scalloped) 159 

Tomato (Stuffed) ....159-163 

Tomato Fritters 163 

Turnips 163 

Turnip Salad 164 

VENISON^ 

Steak 145 

Roast 145 

Waffle 14-16-49-200 

Wedding Table (Photo)....240 
WEIGHTS AND 

MEASURES 33 

Welsh Rarebit 56 

WORKING SCHEDULE.. 12 



S|:::^:^-^-Hss. 




^^^"^488 291 A