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Full text of "Augusta State University 2010-2011"

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in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS IVIembers, Sloan Foundation and ASU Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/augustastateuniv2010augu 



s.c. 

LD270.06 

.B81 

2010/2011 



Augusta State 
University 

Continuing Our Commitment to 

Excellence in Teaching 

Advancement of Knowledge 

Enrichment of Community 



University System of Georgia 

General Catalog 
2010-2011 



REESE LIBRARY-AUGUSTA STATE UNIVERSITY 



2010-2011 



Augusta State University 
Augusta, Georgia 30904-2200 



This catalog is intended primarily to guide Augusta State University students through their chosen academic programs 
Although the university takes pride in a good student advising system, the individual student bears the main responsibility fo 
his or her program, and this catalog should be the basic source of information. Prospective students, parents, and high schoc 
counselors should find the information useful as well. 

Augusta State University (ASU) is an equal educational opportunity institution in that no person shall, on the grounds of race 
color, sex, creed, national origin, or handicap, be excluded from participation in or be otherwise subjected to discriminatioi 
by any educational program, activity, or facility. This is in compliance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. ASU is ai 
affirmative action, equal opportunity institution. 

The statements set forth in this catalog are for informational purposes only and should not be construed as the basis of ; 
contract between a student and this institution. 

While the provisions of this catalog will ordinarily be applied as stated, Augusta State University reserves the right to changi 
any provision listed in this catalog, including but not limited to academic requirements for graduation, without actual notice t 
individual students. Every effort will be made to keep students advised of any such changes. Information on changes will b 
available in the Office of the Registrar. It is especially important that all students realize their individual responsibility to kee' 
apprised of current requirements for their particular degree programs. 

As part of an on going effort to make this a better catalog — accurate, up-to-date, and well organized — all Augusta Stat 
University students, faculty, and staff are encouraged to submit editorial suggestions for improvement. Suggestions dealin 
with inaccuracies, clarity, organization and presentation of information may be submitted at any time to: 

Mr. Jeff Heck 

Augusta State University Secretary and Catalog Editor 

c/o Office of the VPAA 

706-737-1422 

jheck@aug.edu 

Photos courtesy of Public Relations and Publications 



A MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT 

Augusta State University is first and foremost a place of learning, where students learn from and with outstanding professors. 
It is also a place where students are individuals, not numbers. 

This catalog describes our programs, lists our courses, and explains the procedures and policies of the university. I encourage 
you-as students-to use it for these purposes. I also encourage you to look at the listing of our faculty. Note their names, 
their fields of study, and the dozens of superb universities from which they earned advanced degrees. They are the key to the 
success of our students. 

If you have any questions about academic programs or services, please consult the directory of administrative offices at the 
back of this catalog. Our Office of Admissions (706-737-1632 or 800-341-4373) can answer any inquiries about admissions 
criteria, enrollment procedures, or the transfer of credit from other institutions. 




Welcome to Augusta State University! 
Sincerely yours. 



William A. Bloodworth, Jr., Ph.D. 
President 



2010-2011 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 



2010-2011* 












Fall 2010 


Spring 2011 




Summer 2011 


Application Deadline 


July 16 


Dec 4 




April 15 


Registration** 


Aug 10-13 


Jan 3-4 




May 17 


Classes Begin 


Aug 16 


Jan 5 




May 18 


Schedule Adjustment 


Aug 16-18 


Jan 5-7 




May 18-19 


Student Holiday 


Sep 6 


Jan 1 




(sess 1 -June 20-22) 




Nov 24-26 


Jan 17 




July 4 




Dec 10-Jan 3 


Apr 4-9 






Midterm 


Oct 11 


Marl 




June 23 


Legislative Exams 


Sept 3, Nov 5, 


Nov 29, Jan3, Febl- 


1,Apr1, 


TBA 




Dec. 20 


Apr 25, May 


13 




Regents' Test 


Oct 20-27 


Mar 9-1 6 




June 23, 24, 27 


Prereg. Next Term 


Nov 15-19 


Apr 11-15 




Apr 11-15 


Next Term Fees Due 


Dec 2 


Apr 27 




July 29 


Classes End 


Dec 2 


Apr 27 




July 26 


Examinations 


Dec 6-9 


Apr 29, May 


2-4 


July 28-29 


Grades Due 


Dec12 


May 5 




July 31 


Graduation 




May 9 







The above dates were correct when this catalog went to press in summer 2010. Always refer to the most current 
edition of the campus calendar before making planning decisions. 

julian.aug.edu 

There will be no registration after these dates. Only add/drop (schedule adjustment) is permitted after registration ends. 



Table of Contents 



Introduction to Augusta State University. 

History of ASU 1 

Accreditations 1 

University System of Georgia .. 1 



ASU Mission Statement 2 

University Vision 2 

University Goals 2 



Admissions Policies and Enrollnnent 

Preparation of Application 

Materials 4 

Admissions Requirements 6 

Freshman 6 

Transfer Students 8 

Transient Students 9 

Add. Degree Students 10 

Other Non-Degree 
Admissions Req 10 



Senior Students 10 

Former Students 10 

ASU-Paine College 

Co-enrollment 10 

International Students: 

Special Requirements.... 11 
Admissions Decisions and 

Notification 13 

Preparing for Registration 13 



Financial Information 

Fees and Other Costs 14 

Refunds and Withdrawals 16 

Georgia Resident Status 17 

Acquiring In-state Status 18 



14 



Waivers for Non-Resident 

Tuition 18 

Financial Aid 20 



Academic Regulations and Information. 

Academic Standing & GPA.... 21 
Additional Baccalaureate 

Degree 22 

Auditing a Course 22 

Class Attendance 23 

Classification 23 

Course Changes 23 

Course Repeat Policy 23 

Course Substitution 23 

Curriculum Changes 23 

Deans' Lists 23 

Grade Changes 24 

Grading System 24 



.21 



Graduation Application/Exer.. 24 

Graduation Requirements 24 

Regents' Testing Program 

(BOR Policy) 26 

Honors Program 28 

Learning Support 28 

Load/Overload 29 

Majors 29 

Minors 30 

Transient & Co-enrolled ASU 

Students 30 

Unit of Credit 30 

Withdrawal from a Course 30 



Where to Go - Information on Facilities, 
Services and Activities at ASU 

Academic Advisement Center 32 

Alumni Association 32 

Athletics 32 

ASU Foundation 32 

Bookstore 32 

Business Office 33 

Campus Dining 33 

Career Center 33 

Conservatory Program 34 

Continuing Education 34 

Cooperative Education 34 



.32 



Copy Center 34 

Counseling Center 35 

Cultural & Entertainment 

Programs 35 

Curriculum Center 35 

Email Policies & Procedures . 35 

Endowed Professorships 36 

First Year Experience 37 

Grants Administration 37 

HIV Policy 37 

Information Technology Srvcs 38 



2010-2011 



Insurance 39 

Jag Card 39 

Library 39 

Maxwell Performing Arts Th... 39 

Media Services 40 

Parking Services 40 

Physical Plant 41 

Public Rel.and Publ. Office.... 41 

Public Safety Sen/ices 41 

Research Center 43 

Student Activities 43 



Student Development 44 

Student Government Assn 44 

Student Organizations 44 

Student Records 44 

Student Services 44 

Study Abroad 44 

Testing and Disability Srvcs... 44 

Veterans' Affairs 45 

Web Site 45 

Writing Center 45 



Student Rights and Responsibilities. 

Academic Honesty 46 

Discipline 47 

Student Academic Appeals.... 48 



.46 



Student Acad. Grievances 48 

Confidentiality of Student 

Records 52 



Undergraduate Programs. 

Gen. Ed. Learning Outcomes. 53 

Core Curriculum 55 

Honors Program 57 

College of Arts and Sciences.. 59 



.53 



College of Education 153 

James M. Hull College of Business 
167 



Graduate Programs 

College of Arts & Sciences.. 177 
College of Education 185 



176 



James M. Hul 



College of Business 
211 



Course Descriptions 213 



Directories 

Board of Regents 328 

ASU Senior Officers 328 

ASU Foundation 

Board of Trustees 328 

ASU Alumni Association 

Officers 328 



328 



Faculty Listing 329 

Emeritus Faculty 335 

Campus Maps 338 

Administrative Offices 340 

Academic Departments 340 

Campus Services 341 



Index 342 



INTRODUCTION TO AUGUSTA STATE UNIVERSITY 
A Brief History of Augusta State University 

The principles of equality and opportunity that animated the American Revolution are at the root of Augusta State University's 
historic mission. In 1 783 the state of Georgia was newly free of British rule and undertook a broad effort to extend educational 
opportunity throughout the state. One of the first steps was to charter the Academy of Richmond County. The Academy offered 
secondary diplomas and post-secondary instruction which prepared students for their junior year at major American universities. 
In 1925, post-secondary instruction was assigned to the newly formed Junior College of Augusta, the first public junior college 
in the state of Georgia. When the site of the Augusta Arsenal, formerly the estate of Freeman Walker, was given to educational 
purposes, the Junior College moved to its present location. From the century-old oaks and magnolias of the former estate to 
the thick masonry of the old Augusta Arsenal, the campus remains rich in reminders of bygone eras and its military origins. 

The institution changed its name to Augusta College in 1958 when it became a part of the University System of Georgia. 
Augusta College continued to grow in size and programs: the first four year degrees were awarded in 1967 and graduate 
degrees in 1973. Now, more than 50 associate, bachelor, masters, and specialist degree programs are offered. On June 12, 
1996, the college became Augusta State University. 

Asa member of the University System of Georgia, Augusta State University is the primary public institution of higher learning in 
the state's second largest city. While it shares the technological and innovative resources of the University System, it maintains 
the historical roots that make the learning experience as unique as the campus itself. The university is well known for its 
dedication to expanding educational opportunities for people of all ages and backgrounds, with a special emphasis on service 
to Georgians in the Central Savannah River Area. We express this dedication in the first sentence of our mission statement, 
the central point of reference for all our academic and other programs (The full text of the ASU Mission Statement begins on 
p. 2): 

As a unit of the University System of Georgia, Augusta State University is committed to excellence in teaching, 
advancement of knowledge, and enrichment of the community in a climate that fosters humane values and a lifelong 
love of learning. 

Accreditations 

Augusta State University is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools 
(SACS) (1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097: Telephone number 404-679-4500, extension 4504) to award 
associate's, bachelor's, master's and specialist's degrees. Contact the Commission on Colleges at 1866 Southern Lane. 
Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097 or phone at 404-679-4500 for questions about the accreditation of ASU. 

All courses offered at Augusta State University, other than those identified as developmental/remedial, are acceptable as 
either requirements or electives applicable in at least one of the degree programs at Augusta State University as authorized 
by the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia. The James M. Hull College of Business is fully accredited by 
the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB). All teacher education degree programs for elementary, 
middle, secondary, and P-12 teachers, special education, administrators, counselors, and supervisors, are approved by the 
Georgia Professional Standards Commission (PSC) and accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher 
Education (NCATE). In addition, the counselor education program is fully accredited by the Council for Accreditation of 
Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP), a corporate affiliate of the American Counseling Association (ACA). 
The nursing program is accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC) and approved by 
the Georgia Board of Nursing. The music programs are accredited by the National Association of Schools of Music (NASM). 
The art programs are accredited by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD). The graduate program 
in psychology is accredited by the Masters in Psychology Accreditation Council (MPAC). The graduate program in public 
administration is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration (NASPAA). 

The University System of Georgia 

The University System of Georgia includes all state-operated institutions of higher education in Georgia: four research 
universities, two regional universities, 13 state universities, four state colleges, and 12 two-year colleges. These 35 public 
institutions are located throughout the state. The University System's mailing address is 270 Washington Street. S.W. Atlanta. 
Georgia 30334. An 18-member constitutional Board of Regents governs the University System, which has been in operation 
since 1932. Appointments of Board members are made by the Governor, subject to confirmation by the State Senate. The 
regular term of Board members is seven years. The Chairperson, the Vice Chairperson, and other officers of the Board are 
elected by the members of the Board. The Chancellor, who is not a member of the Board, is the chief executive officer of the 
Board and the chief administrative officer of the University System. 



Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 



The policies of \he Board of Regents provide a high degree of autonomy for each institution. The executive head of each 
institution is the President, whose election is recommended by the Chancellor and approved by the Board. State appropriations 
for the University System are requested by, made to, and allocated by the Board of Regents. The overall programs and services 
of the University System are offered through three major components; Instruction, Public Service/Continuing Education, and 
Research. 

Instruction consists of programs of study leading to certificates and to degrees, ranging from the associate (two-year) level 
to the doctoral level. Requirements for admission of students to instructional programs at each institution are determined, 
pursuant to policies of the Board of Regents, by the institution. The Board establishes minimum academic standards and 
leaves to each institution the prerogative to establish higher standards. Applications for admission should be addressed in all 
cases to the institutions. 

Public Sen/ice/Continuing Education consists of non-degree activities, primarily, and special types of college-degree-credit 
courses. The non-degree activities are of several types, including short courses, seminars, conferences, lectures, and consultative 
and advisory services in a broad range of interests. Typical college-degree-credit public service/continuing education courses 
are those offered through extension center programs. 

Research encompasses investigations conducted primarily for discovery and application of knowledge. These investigations 
cover matters related to the educational objectives of the institutions and to general societal needs. Most of the research is 
conducted through the universities; however, some of it is conducted through the state colleges. 

Augusta State University IVIission Statement 

As a unit of the University System of Georgia, Augusta State University is committed to excellence in teaching, 
advancement of knowledge, and enrichment of the community in a climate that fosters humane values and a lifelong 
love of learning. 

This mission is based upon the value of a liberal arts education for students who are diverse in ethnicity, background, age, and 
preparation. The mission obligates the university to be open to the voices of all its members, to be responsive to the needs of 
its community, and to measure its success by the success of its students. 

To accomplish its mission, the university offers undergraduate programs in arts, sciences, and professional fields of study, as 
well as graduate programs below the doctoral level. It fosters the intellectual growth of students through learning assistance in 
a university college, honors courses, and student research and cultivates faculty members who are excei'ent in teaching, active 
in scholarship, and generous in service. 

University Vision 

Augusta State University will be recognized as an outstanding comprehensive university focused on student learning and the 
educational needs of its community and state. 

University Goals 

1 . Assisting and encouraging students to become intellectually and ethically informed individuals with defined skills and knowledge, 
who are capable of leadership and creative endeavors and have an appreciation of the importance of lifelong learning; 

2. Maintaining high-quality academic programs in which curricular offerings are continuously updated to meet the needs of a 
rapidly changing world and a dynamic career marketplace; 

3. Improving recruitment, retention, and satisfaction of students through effective marketing, adequate course offerings, 
convenient course scheduling, and programs that meet the needs of traditional and nontraditional students who are diverse in 
ethnicity, gender, background, age, and academic preparation; 

4. Hiring, retaining, and developing highly proficient faculty, staff, and administrators; 

5. Providing and maintaining superior technology and facilities to support the university's educational purposes; 

6. Making Augusta State University education as seamless as possible with K-12 and other accredited colleges and universities; 

7. Providing educational, cultural, and professional services to the community through continuing education programs, 
performing arts programs, faculty and staff public service and consultation, and technological resources and programs; 



Augusta State University Catalog 



8. Improving the community's economic development by producing graduates who meet employers' needs and expectations, 
by faculty and staff participation in economic development programs, and by marketing the university as an economic asset; 

9. Following the most effective "best practices" for university business and services. 




Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 



UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSIONS POLICIES AND ENROLLMENT 

The Admissions staff extends best wishes for the new academic year. Augusta State University offers the unique advantages 
of outstanding academic programs, a convenient location, flexible class scheduling, and very affordable cost. Our faculty 
members truly enjoy teaching and sincerely endeavour to assist all students in obtaining their educational goals. We invite 
students to learn more about the various benefits and opportunities at Augusta State University by visiting the campus. Out 
office hours are from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday-Tuesday, and 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Wednesday-Friday. Tour reservations and 
other admissions information are available by calling 706-737-1632 or 800-341-4373 or by visiting our web site at www.aug 
edu/admissions. 
- Katherine Sweeney, Registrar and Director of Admissions 

PREPARATION OF APPLICATION MATERIALS 

To seek admission to the university, a student must file an official application for admission with the Office of Admissions) 
Students who need an application should write or visit the Admissions Office in The Benet House, 2500 Walton Way, Augusta J 
Georgia 30904-2200, or phone us at 706-737-1632 or (800) 341-4373. Students can also download an application from oui; 
web site at www.aug.edu/admissions or apply electronically at www.gacollege411 .org. Applications and materials are free. 

The application and all supporting documents should be received by the Admissions Office no later than 30 days prior to the' 
beginning of the semester in which a student plans to enroll. Applications and documents received after this deadline wil; 
be processed; however, no guarantee can be made for admission for that semester. Applications and documents receivec' 
during the five working days preceding the first day of class will not be processed for that semester. A $30.00 non-refundable 
application fee must accompany the application. An applicant who wishes to change his semester of enrollment is required tc 
pay $30.00 for each semester change. A high school candidate may submit an application for admission after the junior yeai; 
is completed. 

Because additional time is required for processing, international student applicants should apply at least 90 days prior to the! 
beginning of the desired semester. 

Students who do not register in the semester for which they are admitted and wish to attend a later semester should inforn"! 
the Office of Admissions at least 30 days prior to the desired semester of entrance. If one year has expired since the initia 
application and a student has not yet attended, the student must re-apply and re-submit all supporting documents. 

Required Documents: Undergraduates 

It is the responsibility of the applicant to request that official documents required for admission be sent directly from the previous 
institutions to the Office of Admissions. Documents that have been faxed or that have been in the hands of the applicant, sucf 
as student copy transcripts or letters, grade reports, diplomas, or graduation lists, are not official. The documents must be 
issued and mailed directly by the registrar of the previous institution(s) in a sealed envelope. These documents become a par 
of the applicant's permanent record and will not be returned. Candidates are considered when all required documents have 
been received. Notification of acceptance is by mail. The Office of Admissions requires the following; 

Official Application Form: A candidate seeking admission must file an official application for admission prior to the 
specified deadline. An application may be obtained from the Office of Admissions and local high schools. Care should be 
taken to answer all questions on the application. An incomplete application will cause delay and may be returned to the 
candidate. 

Application Fee : ($30, Non-refundable); This processing fee is required from all applicants. The application fee is waived 
for students who provide an ACT or SAT I Fee Waiver. 

Official Transcript(s) of Courses Completed: A freshman candidate should ask his or her guidance department to send 
an official copy of the secondary school record. A transfer candidate should ask the registrar from each accredited college 
attended to send an official transcript of grades (a separate transcript from each college). A holder of a GED certificate must 
request that an official score report be sentto the Augusta State University Admissions Office. Documents must be received 
by the Office of Admissions before the acceptance is final. 

Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or the American College Testing Program (ACT) Scores: A freshman candidate! 
is required to submit SAT scores of the College Board or the ACT score of the American College Testing Program. A 
holder of the GED certificate is not required to submit SAT or ACT scores. A transfer candidate who has earned fewer: 
than 30 semester hours (45 quarter hours) of transferable credit, including English Composition I and College Algebra or 
Mathematical Modeling, must also submit SAT or ACT results. The College Board code number assigned to Augusta State 
University is 5336. For information concerning test dates and centers, students should consult their high school or college 
guidance office. 



Augusta State University Catalog 



PLEASE NOTE: ASU uses the re-centered scale of the SAT to determine whether students meet the minimum admissions 
requirements. All original SAT scores received will be converted to the re-centered scale. 

Immunization: All new students, born 1957 or later, enrolling in schools within the University System of Georgia, are 
required to provide proof of immunization for mumps, measles, rubella, and tetanus-diphtheria or provide a valid reason 
for exemption. New students born prior to 1957 must show proof of immunization for tetanus-diphtheria or provide a valid 
reason for exemption. New students born in the United States in 1966 or later and all international students regardless of 
age must show proof of immunization against or history of varicella (chicken pox). In addition, new students who are 18 
years of age or younger at time of matriculation must provide proof of immunization for hepatitis B. This documentation, 
including dates of all required immunizations and the signature and address of a health care provider, must be submitted 
to the admissions office prior to registration for classes. Certificate of Immunization forms are available in the Office of 
Admissions. [Failure to meet this requirement will prohibit registration for classes.] 




Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 



ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS 

Admissions requirements depend on the degree program you wish to enter. For freshman admissions, further information is 
available from the Office of Admissions. (See p. 4 for hours and phone numbers.) 

Freshman Admissions Requirements 

Normal Freshmen: Every applicant for freshman admission must be a high school graduate from a high school accredited 
by a regional accrediting association (such as the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools) or the Georgia Accrediting 
Commission, the Georgia Private School Accrediting Commission, or from a public school regulated by a school system and the 
State Department of Education. High school students who receive a "Certificate of Attendance" do not satisfy the graduation 
requirements. In addition, to gain regular admission to ASU, the applicant must have completed the entire College Preparatory 
Curriculum (CPC) in high school. The required CPC is listed below (16 units): 

English: 4 units required 

Mathematics: algebra, 2 units required; geometry, 1 unit required; 

1 additional unit of higher mathematics beyond Algebra II required. 
Science: 3 units required. 
Social Science: 3 units required. 
Foreign Language: The same foreign language, 2 units required. 

In the determination of eligibility for freshmen admissions, the most important consideration is the Freshman Index. The 
Freshman Index is determined by a formula which uses two variables: the high school average computed on academic courses, 
and the SAT (or ACT) scores. The following formula is used to compute the SAT Freshman Index: 

Freshman Index = SAT Verbal + SAT Math + 
(High School Academic GPA x 500) 

For students submitting ACT scores, the following formula is used to compute the ACT Freshman Index: , 

Freshman Index = (GPA x 500) + (ACT Composite x 42) + 88 | 

Regular Admission: For regular freshman admission, specific requirements are as follows: 
Freshman Index > 1 940 

Test Scores*: SAT Verbal score of 430+ and a SAT Math score of 400+ 

or 
ACT English and Mathematics score of >17 
College Preparatory Curriculum (CPC): 16 required units must have been completed in high school. 

I 
*Students with verbal SAT scores less than 500 or ACT English less than 21 will take the English and Reading 
portions of the COMPASS Examination for placement. All students bound by freshmen admissions requirements 
must take the COMPASS Examination for placement in math. 

Limited Admission: Freshman applicants who show potential but fail to satisfy any one of the requirements above mayi 
be eligible for limited admission if they meet the following criteria listed below: 
Freshman Index > 1 790 

Test Scores*: SAT Verbal score of 430+ and a SAT Math score of 400+ 

or 
ACT English and Mathematics score of >17 
College Preparatory Curriculum (CPC): 16 required units must have been completed in high school. 

Admission to University College: University College is a two-year unit of Augusta State University designed to assist 
Georgia resident students who live in Burke, Columbia, Glascock, Jefferson, Jenkins, Lincoln, McDuffie, Richmond, 
Taliaferro, Warren or Wilkes counties but do not meet the admissions requirements for the university. Applicants who do 
not meet regular admissions standards will be reviewed for consideration for admission to University College. Students 
enrolled through University College are not eligible to live in campus owned housing, are not eligible for membership in a 
fraternity or sorority and are not eligible for participation in intercollegiate athletics. To exit University College, students must 
meet the following criteria: satisfy all Learning Support deficiencies, satisfy all outstanding CPC requirements, complete 
ASUO 1000 with a grade of "C" or better, complete area A of the core curriculum, earn 30 credit hours in areas A-E of the 
core curriculum, and earn a minimum overall GPA of 2.0. Until exit requirements are satisfied. University College students 
are limited to a maximum of 1 3 credit hours per semester and to 1 000 and 2000 level courses. Exit from University College 
is seamless and requires no action on the part of the student. 



Augusta State University Cataiog 



Home Schooled Freshmen; University System of Georgia policy dictates that in addition to SAT I scores and Freshman 
Index, students must present sixteen specific college preparatory curriculum units or CPCs to be accepted to a state university 
and a minimum of thirteen units to be accepted to a two-year program for students graduating from high school 2001 and 
beyond. (See prevailing regular freshman admission standards for specific details, above.) These units must be completed 
in high schools that have been accredited by a regional accreditation association (such as SACS) or the Georgia Accrediting 
Commission, the Georgia Private School Accrediting Commission, or from a public high school regulated by a school system 
and the State Department of Education. 

For students who have completed their CPCs in a home schooled program or secondary school that is not accredited by one 
of the agencies mentioned above, five options are available to validate CPC units. Students can select the option per subject 
area that is most suitable for them. For instance, a student who has earned 500 on the SAT I math and verbal tests can validate 
CPCs in English and mathematics in this manner, and provide the items in option one or option two to validate CPCs in other 
areas. Files of students who select options two to validate CPC subjects will be reviewed by a university committee consisting 
of the Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs, Director of Admissions, and the Associate Director of Admissions. 

Options: 

1 ) Submit a high school transcript and subject test scores from the Stanford Achievement, California Achievement Test or Iowa 
Achievement Test of Basic Skills for each CPC subject area. Scores greater than or equal to the 50'^ percentiles of national 
test takers will validate acceptable proficiency in CPC subject areas. 

2) Submit a high school transcript and a syllabus for each college preparatory course completed. In addition, submit chapter, 
unit or final, cumulative subject tests taken. Provide research papers and/or projects if grades for courses are based on these 
items rather than examinations. 

3) A score greater than or equal to 500 on SAT I math or 21 on ACT math will validate CPCs in mathematics. English CPCs can 
be validated with a score greater than or equal to 500 on the SAT I verbal or 21 on the ACT English. In addition, students can 
validate subject area CPCs by presenting other standardized tests such as CLEP or SAT II. For SAT II score requirements as 
put forth by the USG Board of Regents, please see below. 

4) If a student wishes to submit other evidence to validate CPCs (tests not specifically mentioned above, certifications, etc.), 
committee members can use their discretion to validate CPC units. 



SAT II SUBJECT TEST 


PROPOSED SCORE 


English Literature 


530 


American History and Social Studies 


560 


Math IC, or Math IIC 


500, or 570 


Biology 


520 


Chemistry 


540 


Physics 


590 


World History 


540 



ASU recognizes that most home-schooled students are amply prepared for college work. For more information on Augusta 
State University's Home School admission policies, please contact the Office of Admissions. 

GED Freshmen: Applicants must have official GED Scores sent by the testing center or the State Board of Education. 
GED freshmen are also required to submit an official copy of their partial high school transcript for determination of College 
Preparatory Curriculum deficiencies. A GED applicant's high school class must have graduated prior to enrollment at Augusta 
State University. Admission as a GED freshman is admission to University College. This type of admission is limited to students 
residing in specific counties. See page 5, Admission to University College, for residency requirements. 

College Preparatory Curriculum: 

GED students who show potential but failed to meet the College Preparatory Curriculum (CPC) requirements under the 
requirements for regular freshman may be admissible under ASU 's Limited Admissions policy. Further testing and validation 
of preparedness may be required. Contact the ASU Office of Admissions for details. 

COMPASS Exam: 
All GED applicants will be required to take the COMPASS Exam. 

Other Testing/Further Requirements: 
For further information about entrance requirements for GED Freshmen, please contact the Office of Admissions. 



Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 



COMPASS Examination 

Freshman applicants who show potential but fail to satisfy any one of the freshman requirements listed below, or are classified 
as Life Enrichment or GED Freshmen, will be required to take a diagnostic examination, the COMPASS Exam: 

(1 ) Completion of the English or mathematics portion of the CPC. 

(2) Satisfactory achievement of SAT Verbal Score of 500 or ACT English of 21 

(3) All students bound by freshmen admissions requirements must take the COMPASS Examination for placement in 
math. 

The Office of Admissions will notify the applicant by email with directions to locate the COMPASS testing schedule on the web. 
The student shall complete any Learning Support requirements indicated. 

College Preparatory Curriculum Requirements 

Applicants who are admitted to the university but fail to satisfy the College Preparatory Curriculum requirements for science, 
social science, or foreign language will be required to complete, with a grade of C or better, at least one college course in each 
area of deficiency within the first 30 semester hours earned. In the case of students who have completed no high school foreign 
language course, two college courses in the same foreign language will be required, with a grade of C or better in each. No 
credit earned in these courses will be applied to the requirements of the university degree. 

Other Freshman Categories 

Life Enrichment Student Admissions Requirements: A life enrichment applicant is one who files a completed application 
form, has graduated from high school or the equivalent, whose high school class graduated at least five years ago, and has 
earned no more than 30 transferable semester hours (45 quarter hours) of college credit. 

Although neither the American College Test (ACT) nor the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) is required of Life Enrichment 
applicants, the COMPASS Examination will be required for admission consideration. After testing, the student shall complete 
any Learning Support requirements indicated. Students who fail to meet the Life Enrichment admissions criteria may be 
required to submit SAT or ACT scores. 

If life enrichment students can provide official SAT verbal > 500 from a test administration within the past 7 years (or equivalent 
ACT scores), the COMPASS test can be waived. 

Joint Enrollment Admission Requirements for High School Students: A qualified high school student may enroll for 
college courses while completing his or her enrollment in high school as a junior or senior. This type of enrollment is primarily 
designed to provide the opportunity to take courses not available in the high school curriculum. To be eligible for admission 
consideration, the student must have completed the sophomore year of high school and have: 

(1) an overall 3.00 high school average in all academic courses completed 

(2) a combined SAT score of 1100 or higher with at least a 490 on the verbal section and a 450 on the math section (or 
equivalent ACT score). In addition, a minimum verbal score of 530 and a math score of 530 are needed to take those 
respective courses. 

(3) a Joint Enrollment Clearance form signed by parent/guardian and school official. 

(4) a personal interview with a university admissions officer. 

If the SAT verbal score is 530 and the math score is 530, a student accepted into this program will be permitted to enroll in any 
course for which he or she is prepared. 

Transfer Student Admissions Requirements 

An applicant who has previously attended a regionally accredited institution of higher education and who is not classified as a 
Life Enrichment student is considered a transfer student. Transfer students are divided into two categories as listed below for 
regular admission: 

(1) Fewer than 30 transferable semester hours: Meet prevailing freshman admissions requirements. 

(2) 30 transferable semester hours: College Composition I and either College Algebra or Mathematical Modeling. These 
students must have at least a 2.0 or greater for non-probationary entrance. All others will be reviewed for possible 
entrance into Augusta State University on probation, or into University College. Students with 30 or more transferable 
semester hours, but lacking College Composition I and/or College Algebra or Mathematical Modeling will take the 
appropriate parts of the COMPASS Examination. 



° Augusta State University Catalog 



All transfer students entering ASU with <2.0 overall transfer GPA nnay be reviewed for probationary entrance and are subject 
to possible additional admission requirements. Students admitted on probation must achieve a minimum 2.0 GPA in their 
first term at Augusta State University to revoke the probationary status. Those who fail to achieve a 2.0 will be placed on 
suspension. The transfer applicant whose only attendance has been at a regionally accredited technical college in a "Non- 
College Transfer Program" is considered a freshman applicant and must satisfy freshman admission requirements. 

Evaluation of Transfer Credit: An evaluation of accepted transferable credits is made by the Office of the Registrar. A 
complete transfer evaluation report will be mailed to the student once he or she is accepted by the university and all official 
transcripts have been received from each college previously attended. The basic policy regarding the acceptance of courses 
by transfer is to allow credit for courses completed with satisfactory grades in other regionally accredited colleges, provided the 
courses correspond in content to courses offered at Augusta State University. Additional validation will be required for courses 
taken at another institution that were previously completed with a penalty grade at Augusta State University. In addition, credit 
earned at accredited technical colleges may not transfer unless the credit was earned in a designated college transfer program. 

Advanced Placement Credit and Credit by Examination 

Advanced Placement: A qualified student who has taken college-level work in secondary schools may receive academic credit. 
Examinations used to determine advanced placement are the Advanced Placement Test of the College Entrance Examination 
Board and The Achievement Tests in English Composition and intermediate Mathematics (Level 1 ). A final determination of 
credit is made after results have been evaluated by the university. 

Credit by Examination: College credits are traditionally earned through attendance in scheduled classes. However some 
courses allow credit by examination. A student currently enrolled who presents satisfactory evidence that he or she is qualified 
in a particular subject may receive credit for a course by an examination approved by the appropriate instructional department, 
or through the College Level Examination Program (CLEP). Satisfactory evidence may be, but is not limited to, work experience, 
non-credit courses, course work taken at non-accredited institutions, or military courses. There is a $5 per credit hour fee for 
credit by departmental examination. 

A student may take challenge examinations before enrolling, but will receive credit for courses challenged only after successfully 
completing six semester hours at Augusta State University. Courses in which a student is or has been enrolled may not be 
challenged, and courses which require demonstrations and application of skills (practical, laboratory sciences, and courses 
requiring field work or performance, for example) may be challenged only with the permission of the chairperson of the 
department offering the course. 

Credit by examination is listed as such on the transcript along with the course number, title, and hours of credit; however, no 
grade is assigned and the credit is not included in computing the Grade Point Average. Credit by examination is limited to 10 
semester hours in a discipline and 30 semester hours in the university. 

A current list of tests available for credit by examination for courses offered at Augusta State University may be found at www. 
aug.edu/registrar_va. 

Transient Student Admissions Requirements 

A transient student is a degree candidate at another institution who is granted the privilege of temporary enrollment at Augusta 
State University. To apply for admission as a transient student applicants must: 

(1) File a completed application form. 

(2) Submit a letter of permission confirming good standing from the registrar of the college in which enrolled or matriculated. 
In addition, applicants must submit a transcript from their home institution. Applicants can be admitted to Augusta State 
University as transient students only if they are currently eligible for re-admission to their home institution. 

Transient students will be required to adhere to the same academic standards that govern regulariy enrolled students. They 
may renew their status for additional enrollment periods for a maximum of two semesters per calendar year. For an exception 
of a third semester, they must submit written approval from their home institution and complete a new application for the 
Augusta State University Admissions Office at least 30 days prior to the scheduled registration for the third enrollment period. 

If financial aid is needed, transient students must approach the home institution's Financial Aid Office to request a consortium 
agreement for financial aid purposes. 



Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 



Additional Degree Admissions Requirements 

An Additional Degree applicant is classified as a student who has successfully completed a baccalaureate degree at a regionally 
accredited institution and wishes to pursue a second undergraduate degree at Augusta State University. To apply as an 
Additional Degree student, applicants must: 

(1) File a completed application form. 

(2) Submit official transcripts from all colleges attended. 

(3) Complete an interview with an admissions officer. 

Once the applicant has been accepted, a transfer evaluation of credit will be completed by the Office of the Registrar for those 
courses that are pertinent to the desired program. 

Non-degree Admissions Requirements 

A non-degree applicant is classified as a student interested in enrolling at Augusta State University for credit without pursuing 
a college degree. The non-degree student may be a transient student (see above), post-baccalaureate, postgraduate, or 
audit student. A candidate for this type of limited enrollment seeks instruction in particular courses for personal or professional 
purposes, or for completion of degree requirements at another institution. 

Applicants holding a baccalaureate degree or graduate degree from a regionally accredited college and wishing to enroll in 
undergraduate courses as a non-degree student must request that an official transcript be sent to the admissions office from 
the college or university which awarded the highest degree. 

Each applicant for admission as a special student must: 

(1) File a completed application form. 

(2) Provide evidence of satisfactory past academic work at the secondary or post-secondary level. 

(3) Satisfy all other admission requirements as determined by the Office of Admissions. 

Senior Citizens Admission Requirements 

Georgia residents 62 years of age or older are eligible to enroll in units of the University System free of charge on a space 
available basis. Senior citizens from Aiken and Edgefield Counties qualify for the contiguous county tuition waiver and pay 
in-state tuition and fees (see Waivers, p. 18). Senior citizens who pay tuition are not required to register on a space available 
basis. 

Former Student Readmission Requirements 

students who have attended any other college or university since their last enrollment at Augusta State University, regardless 
of how long they have been away from ASU, must re-apply through the Office of Admissions. In addition, they must provide the 
Office of Admissions with official transcripts of all college work attempted since their last enrollment in Augusta State University. 
Failure to provide required transcripts may result in loss of credit or dismissal from Augusta State University. 

Students who have not enrolled in Augusta State University or attended any other college or university for two academic years, 
must apply for readmission through the Office of the Registrar at least 30 days before the desired semester of re-entry. In order 
to determine degree requirements, returning students should see the entry for Graduation Requirements: Undergraduate 
in this catalog. 

Augusta State University-Paine College Co-enrollment 

Augusta State University and Paine College offer co-enrollment for students who want courses that are not offered at the 
student's home institution during a given semester or for students who have schedule conflicts that may be resolved by co- 
enrollment. 

Students who are enrolled at one institution for the equivalent of at least six semester hours of course work, may enroll for three 
or more semester hours of course work at the other institution. Courses for co-enrolled students from Paine College are offered 
on a space available basis, after the registration period for Augusta State University students. 

Students should submit applications for co-enrollment, official transcripts, and immunization forms to the other institution at 
least two weeks prior to the scheduled registration date. Applications are available from the Registrar's Office at Augusta State 
University. Students will pay all fees required of a full-time student at their home institution. Students wishing to register for an 
overload must satisfy the overload requirements of their home institution. 



'^ Augusta State University Catalog 



International Students: Special Requirements 

students who are not U.S. citizens or permanent residents should ask the Office of Admissions to send special information, 
including an international application, for international students. In addition to satisfying the regular requirements for admission, 
these students must provide documented evidence of adequate financial support to meet educational and personal expenses. 
If academically eligible, students will also be required to remit a non-refundable tuition deposit of 52,000.00 (U.S.) by bank 
check, payable to Augusta State University, before being issued an acceptance letter and a Certificate of Eligibility, (Form 1-20). 
The following guidelines apply to the tuition deposit; 

Students who are receiving institutional support (athletic scholarships, graduate assistantships, etc.), students participating 
in formal exchange programs, or students sponsored by recognized international education organizations such as Rotary 
Club, are exempt from this policy. 

A student who is denied a student visa and who provides evidence to that effect will receive a refund of the tuition 
deposit. 

Students who receive a student visa and enter the United States, but do not matriculate for the semester to which they 
were admitted, forfeit their deposit. 

When ASU receives the student's tuition deposit and the student is officially accepted, ASU will forward official notification that 
the student's deposit is on file, along with his or her 1-20 and letter of acceptance. Evidence of a tuition deposit may assist the 
student in acquiring a student visa. 

The prescribed method for demonstrating English proficiency is the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). The 
TOEFL is required for freshman, non-native English speaking applicants who completed secondary school outside the U.S. 
Secondary School System or who completed high school within the U.S. Secondary School System. The TOEFL is also 
required of transfer applicants who lack credit for College Composition I (ENGL 1101). A minimum total score of 173 on 
the computer-based TOEFL or 45 on the reading, listening and writing sections of the Internet-based TOEFL is required for 
admissions consideration. In addition to the TOEFL, international students must provide official SAT I scores. The test scores 
should be forwarded directly from the testing agencies to the Office of Admissions. 

Students who state on their application for admission that their native language is other than English are required to take the 
TOEFL as described above. Placement in the first semester English classes is based on the reading, listening and writing 
sections of the Internet-based TOEFL as follows: 

Computer-based TOEFL score of 250 or higher or Internet-based TOEFL of 75 or higher: The student is admitted and 
placed in English 11 01 Z, a special section of Freshman English for non-native speakers. 

Computer-based TOEFL score of 213 to 247 or Internet-based TOEFL of 59/60 to 74: The student is admitted and placed 
in English 0091 and Reading 0091. 

Computer-based TOEFL score of 173 to 210 or Internet-based TOEFL of 45 to 58: The student is admitted and placed in 
English 0090 and Reading 0090. 

International students, or students for whom English is a second language, who complete the ESL program at Augusta State 
University or who declare English as their second language and who have already completed English 1101 should contact the 
Department of English and Foreign Languages for the policy concerning the Regents' Test process. 

All international, post-secondary transcripts must be forwarded to a credential evaluation agency for a "course by course" 
evaluation. Official evaluations (sent directly to Augusta State University) from an agency that is a member of NACES www. 
naces.org/members.htm or AACRAO Foreign Education Credential Services are acceptable. The official credential evaluation 
is required before an application for admissions can be processed. 

For eligibility for resident tuition fees, see the paragraph on International Students in the Waivers section (p. ^8). 

Because additional processing time is required for international students, they should submit the application and all supporting 
documents at least 90 days prior to the desired semester of entrance. The Certificate of Eligibility (Form 1-20) cannot be 
forwarded to the student until an offer of acceptance has been extended and the student's tuition deposit has been received 
by Augusta State University. 

International Student Services is dedicated to serving the special needs of international students and helping to create a 
supportive environment for living and studying. The Office of International Student Services provides an orientation program 
each semester for all new international students. The office also provides immigration advising, tax assistance and programs 
specifically designed for international students. Visit the International Student Services website at http://www.aug.edu/student_ 
services_division/instit_waiver.htm or contact the Assistant Dean of Students at 706-737-1411. 

Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 11 



Foreign Languages for Freshmen 

Foreign Language 1001 is designed for students wtio have never studied the foreign language. Students who entered ASU 
for the first time in the fall of 1998 or later, or those returning students who have not been enrolled for two consecutive years 
prior to 1998, will not be able to count Foreign Language 1001 towards graduation if it is the same language they took in high 
school. (First time freshmen who graduated from high school five or more years ago may count Foreign Language 1001.) 
However, is does count for computing eligibility for financial aid and calculating full-time student status. Students taking the 
foreign language for the first time will receive credit. For CPC students, consult p. 6 of the catalog. Foreign Language 1001, 
1002, 2001, and 2002 are not open to native speakers. Heritage speakers should take the placement exam. 



PERFORMING ARTS THEATRE 




12 



Augusta State University Catalog 



ADMISSIONS DECISIONS AT AUGUSTA STATE UNIVERSITY 

Graduate and undergraduate applications to Augusta State University are considered on an individual basis. After all required 
data have been received, the student will be notified by letter of the action taken. Although the University System of Georgia 
sets certain minimum standards for admission, the individual institutions retain the right to impose additional requirements. 
Accordingly, the university reserves the right to refuse admission to any applicant who, in its judgment, is not qualified to 
pursue work at Augusta State University. Such a decision may be based on a variety of factors: social maturity, character, or 
intellectual potential as indicated by previous academic work and appropriate examinations. Appeals of admission denials for 
reasons other than an applicant's academic credentials shall be referred by the President to a committee composed of the 
chairs of the Faculty Policies and Academic Policies Committees and the chair of the Student Judicial Cabinet. 

Similarly, the university reserves the right to determine the level of admission. Clearly, some students exhibit superior academic 
achievement and will enter at an advanced level and receive some college credit. Other students will enter Learning Support 
courses that attempt to provide the academic experiences and counseling designed to aid the student in overcoming his or her 
academic deficiencies. 

Undergraduate Admissions Decision Notification 

Undergraduate applicants may check the status of an application online at http://www.aug.edu/admissions/applyonline.htm 
Undergraduate applicants will be notified by letter as to the conditions of acceptance. Included in the same mailing will 
be orientation and registration information and the assigned department for advising. Students accepted on an unofficial or 
incomplete transcript must submit a final and official transcript before the admission is final. If this information has not been 
received by the day of registration, students may register on a conditional basis for one semester only. Registration for the 
succeeding semester will not be permitted unless the required document has been received. Under certain conditions, the 
university may release admissions decisions to high schools and colleges. 

PREPARING FOR REGISTRATION 

www.aug.edu/infocentral 

After admission, students are sent an information packet which includes document requests, orientation and registration 
details, housing, financial aid and other program information. Students should read these materials carefully and supply any 
information to the requesting office prior to registration. 

An Orientation Program for new students is offered at the beginning of each semester that includes the opportunity to register 
with the aid of an academic advisor. For more information about new student orientation, contact the Orientation Coordinator 
in the Jaguar Student Activities Center or call 706-729-2347. New graduate students should consult with their department 
advisors for assistance. New Student Convocation and Week of Welcome activities are all included in the packet provided by 
the orientation coordinator. Additional current information about registration can be located at www.aug.edu/infocentral. 



Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 13 



FINANCIAL INFORMATION 

FEES AND OTHER COSTS 

Registration at the beginning of each semester is not complete until all general fees have been paid. No student may be 
admitted to classes without having met his or her financial obligations. 

Expenses are charged and payable by the semester since each semester constitutes a separate unit of operations. Students 
may enroll at the beginning of any semester. To ensure sound financial operation and conformity with the policies of the Board 
of Regents, certain regulations must be observed. 

The Business Office is in Fanning Hall. Payments made by check or cash are accepted in the Business Office. Payments byj 
Visa, MasterCard or Discover Card may only be made online. Electronic check payments (ACH) may also be made online. The 
payment link can be reached by clicking on EIroy or Pipeline on the ASU Home page at www.aug.edu. Payments with financial 
aid are disbursed to the student's account by the Financial Aid Office. Students are to verify online that their financial aid has 
been approved. If tuition and fees are not paid by the payment due date or sufficient financial aid is not in process, classes will! 
be canceled. If a student is allowed to re-register for any reason, a $50 late fee will be charged. 

Returned Check Policy: A fee of the greater of $30.00 or 5 percent of the face amount will be charged for non-sufficient fund 
checks. A student has ten days from the date the Business Office sends a certified notice to the maker that a check given to pay 
tuition and fees was returned by the bank on which it was drawn after having been presented twice; if the check is not clearedi 
within the ten-day period, the registration will be canceled, and instructors will be notified that the student is no longer enrolled.] 

A check given for any other purpose that is not honored by the maker's bank will be sent to a collection agency, if it is not 
cleared by the date specified in the fourth written notification. The maker will be responsible for collection fees. Augusta State 
University reserves the right to withhold all records (diplomas, transcripts, etc.) and/or revoke enrollment of students who fail 
to meet financial obligations to Augusta State University. All tuition charges, board, room rent, or other charges are subject to 
change at the end of any semester. 

Any and all financial obligations owed to Augusta State University, including University Village, will result in a HOLD being 
placed on the student's account. The HOLD shall prevent student registration, transcript release, and any refunds owed to the! 
student until such time as the financial obligation is paid in full. 

Tuition 2010-2011 



Non-Guaranteed Tuition Rate (Students who entered prior to Fall 2006, entering freshmen or transfer students Summer 
2009-Spring 2010, undergraduate students who do not qualify for the Guaranteed Tuition Plan, and students whose 
guarantee has expired.) 

In-State Out-of-State 

Fewer than 12 Credit hours (per hour) $143.00 $530.00 

12 hours credit hours $1,716.00 $6,360.00 

13 hours credit hours $1,859.00 $6,890.00 

14 hours credit hours $2,002.00 $7,420.00 

15 hours credit hours $2,137.00 $7,944.00 



Guaranteed Tuition Rate (Entering Freshmen Summer 2007- 
Fewer than 1 2 credit hours (per hour) $ 1 20.00 

12 or more credit hours (full-time) $ 1 ,434.00 

Guaranteed Tuition Rate (Entering Freshmen Summer 2008 
Fewer than 12 credit hours (per hour) $ 130.00 

12 or more credit hours (full-time) $1 ,549.00 



Spring 2008) Tuition rate fixed until Summer 2011. 

$ 478.00 
$ 5,736.00 

- Spring 2009) Tuition rate fixed until Summer 2012. 

$517.00 
$6,195.00 



Graduate Tuition 








In-State 




Out-of-state 




Per credit hour $165.00 




$615.00 




Mandatory fees assessed per semester to all students: 








Fall/Spring 


Summer 


Fall/Spring 


Summer 


Athletic Fee $145.00 


$ 97.00 


$ 145.00 


$ 97.00 


Institutional 135.00 


135.00 






Student Activities Center Fee 45.00 


45.00 


45.00 


45.00 


Student Services Fee 50.00 


33.00 


50.00 


33.00 


Technology Fee 45.00 


45.00 


45.00 


45.00 


Transportation Fee 35.00 


35.00 


35.00 


35.00 



14 



Augusta State University Catalog 



Fees and Descriptions 

Application Fee: A fee of $30.00 must accompany a prospective student's application for admission. This fee is 
non- refundable and does not apply toward registration or matriculation fees. 

Art and Music Fees: Private instruction in piano, organ, orchestral instruments, voice or composition, two one-half hour lessons 
or one 1 -hour lesson each week, for two or three hours credit, costs $68 in addition to the matriculation fee. Secondary applied 
music instruction, consisting of a one-half hour lesson per week for one hour credit costs $38 in addition to the matriculation 
fee. There is no special music fee for class piano or class voice. Any student may enroll in applied music instruction on a space 
available basis upon payment of the music fee. Please note: Many art courses charge a $75 supplies fee per class. Contact 
the Department of Music or Department of Art for details. 

Athletic Fee: A $145 Athletic Fee per fall and spring semester is charged to each student. The fee is $87 in the summer 
semester. This fee supports the men's and women's varsity athletic programs. 

Course Credit By Exam: An administrative fee of $5.00 per credit hour is charged to administer a single comprehensive exam 
for course credits. 

Graduation Fee: A $50 fee is charged each graduate for a diploma for processing the application and to support the graduation 
ceremony. The charge is the same for undergraduate and graduate students. This is payable when the student applies for 
graduation — no later than the mid-term date of the semester preceding the final semester of course work. The charge is $50 
for the master's or Specialist in Education diploma. This is payable at the time the student applies for graduation no later than 
the mid-term date of the semester preceding the final semester of the course work. 

Institutional Fee: A fee of $135.00 is charged to all students each semester to help schools offset budget reduction - thus 
protecting the System's core teaching mission and maintaining academic quality. 

Motor Vehicle Registration Fee: All student motor vehicles must be registered to park in designated student lots on the 
ASU campus. One annual permit, valid for the full academic year, is included in the transportation fee. Replacement and/or 
additional permits may be purchased at a cost of $40.00 each. The university assumes no responsibility for any damage to or 
loss of a motor vehicle or other personal property in a motor vehicle parked on campus. 

Nursing Program Fees: Nursing students are assessed an $18.00 liability insurance fee annually. A nursing testing fee of 
$140.00 and a skills lab fee of $35.00 is assessed per semester. 

Student Activities Center Fee: A $45 fee is charged to each student each semester to fund the Student Activities Center. 

Student Services Fee: A $50 Student Services fee per fall and spring semester is charged to each student. The fee is 333 
summer semester. The fee pays expenses for needed student services not covered in the instructional and education budget. 

Student Teaching Fees: Education majors and Counselor of Education majors are assessed a $200 fee for supervision during 
the semester internship. Educational Leadership majors are assessed a $35.00 site supervision fee. 

Technology Fee: A $45 Technology Fee is charged to each student to help defray the costs of hardware, software, licenses, 
training, laboratories, systems, etc., that benefit ASU students in meeting the educational objectives of their academic programs. 

Transcript Fee: On request, a student who has discharged all financial obligations to the University may receive, without 
charge, transcripts of his or her full academic record. (Transcript processing takes 2-3 business days.) 

Transportation Fee: A $35 per semester fee is charged to each student for transportation. This fee includes passage on the 
Jaguar Express campus shuttle, passage on Augusta City Transit busses and one parking permit per student 

Out-of-State Tuition: The Out-of-State tuition is charged to students who are not classified as Georgia residents for tuition 
purposes. Residents of Aiken and Edgefield Counties in South Carolina are charged In-State tuition. (See pages 16 through 17 
for information regarding classification of a student as In-State or Out-of-State.) Contact the Offices of Admissions or Student 
Records for more information. 

Other Expenses: In estimating costs of attending Augusta State University, a student should consider these miscellaneous 
expenses: (1 ) books and supplies, particularly for courses such as art, nursing and biology, which require special supplies; and 
(2) an official uniform for anyone enrolled in nursing. 



Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 15 



REFUNDS 

Official Full Withdrawal from the University: The refund amount for students withdrawing from the University shall be based 
on a pro rata percentage determined by dividing the number of calendar days that the student completed in the semester by 
the total calendar days in the semester. The total of calendar days in a semester is calculated from the beginning to the end 
of classes and includes weekends, but excludes scheduled breaks of five or more days, including weekends. The unearned 
portion will be refunded up to the point in time that the number of calendar days completed is equal to 60 percent of the number 
of calendar days in the semester. 

Students who withdraw from the University when the calculated percentage of completion is greater than 60 percent are not 
entitled to a refund of any portion of institutional charges. 

Example: Fall semester contains 104 calendar days, calculated as described above. The student withdraws from all classes 
on the 50th calendar day of the semester. 

50 divided by 104 = 48% (This is referred to as the "earned portion.") 

100% minus 46 = 52% (This is referred to as the "unearned portion.") 

Refundable institutional charges multiplied by 52% = amount of refund. 

Official withdrawals must be made through the Registrar's Office. Refunds are based on the number of credit hours a student 
is enrolled in at the end of the schedule adjustment period. Tuition, student activity, student center payback, student teaching, 
technology and transportation fees are refundable. Parking fees are non refundable. 

Special note for HOPE Scholarship recipients: Complete withdrawal from the university under certain circumstances 
may result in a requirement that you return a portion of your HOPE Scholarship award to the Georgia Student Finance 
Commission. Contact the Financial Aid Office or the Business Office for more information. 

Medical Withdrawals 

Student Medical Withdrawals: It is the responsibility of the student to withdraw from courses when a medical situation arises. 
The student must contact each instructor in case of a medical reason which could include such situations as an illness, accident, 
or death of a family member. The following section explains in detail the medical withdrawal process after the midterm date. 

Medical Withdrawal Process: A student may request a Medical Withdrawal through the Dean of Students Office. The Medical | 
Withdrawal process is outlined below. It should be noted that a Medical Withdrawal can only be requested after mid-term. A\ 
student wanting to withdraw before mid-term must follow the Withdrawal from a Course policy stated in this catalog. Questions | 
regarding this policy should be directed to the Office of the Registrar (706-737-1408). It is the student's responsibility to I 
withdraw officially in accordance with university regulations as printed in this catalog. 

Students must contact the Dean of Students Office and give written permission allowing the Dean of Students Office to 
withdraw them from all of their current semester classes. The Dean of Students Office strongly encourages students to 
contact their professors/instructors by phone and/or email to notify them of their intention to withdraw. 

Students must provide medical documentation from their physician on their physician's letterhead and it must be 
signed by the physician (documentation on a prescription pad is unacceptable). 

The Dean of Students Office will verify the authenticity of the physician's letterhead. 

The medical withdrawal process can not begin until both the student's written permission and the physician's documentation 
have been received and verified. 

Since this request comes after midterm, the Dean of Students Office will request whether the professor/instructor wishes to 
assign a grade of W or WF for the course. It is important that the professor/instructor respond to this request via email because 
this documentation supports the medical withdrawal. 

The Assistant Dean of Students will contact the Registrar's Office to complete the withdrawal process. A request will be 
forwarded to the Registrar's Office without medical and supporting documentation. All medical and supporting documentation 
will be on file in the Dean of Students Office under lock and key. 

No refunds will be issued after 60 percent of the semester has passed. (This is normally 10-14 days after midterm.) The ASU 
refund policy will be followed for medical withdrawals. See the ASU refund policy for specific information, http://www.aug.edu/ 
business office/refunds. html 



'° Augusta State University Catalog 



A full withdrawal, even for medical issues, may have an impact if you receive financial aid. You may be required to repay some 
funds received. Contact the Financial Aid Office if you have questions. 

Per Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) the Dean of Students office is not permitted to discuss a 
student's medical issues with professors/instructors. 

The Dean of Students Office will not accept any medical withdrawal requests after the last day of class as indicated by the 
Academic Calendar. Once a grade has been assigned for the class, the issue becomes a grade change. The student must 
contact the professor for the course. If the professor is unavailable, the Department Chair should be contacted for approval. 

Student Administrative Medical Withdrawals: A student may be administratively withdrawn from the university when, in the 
judgment of the Vice President for Student Services, and after consultation with the student's parents and personal physician, 
if any, it is determined that the student suffers from a physical, mental, emotional or psychological health condition which: (a) 
poses a significant danger or threat of physical harm to the student or to the person or property of others or (b) causes the 
student to interfere with the rights of other members of the university community or with the exercise of any proper activities 
or functions of the university or its personnel or (c) causes the student to be unable to meet institutional requirements for 
admission and continued enrollment, as defined in the student conduct code and other publications of the university. Except in 
emergency situations, a student shall, upon request, be accorded an appropriate heanng phor to final decision concerning his 
or her continued enrollment at the university. 

Unofficial Withdrawal from the University: No refund will be made to a student who leaves the university without filing official 
withdrawal forms with the Registrar's Office. The student may also be given an F or WF for any course in which he or she is 
still enrolled. Also, under new regulations issued by the U.S. Department of Education, federal financial aid recipients who do 
not complete any class and who do not follow the withdrawal process may be required to pay an amount equal to half of the 
federal financial aid applied to charges for tuition and fees. 

Reduction in Course Load Initiated by the University: If the university drops a course from the semester's schedule, each 
student affected will be refunded the difference between total fees paid and charges on the course work remaining. 

Reduction in Course Load Initiated by the Student: Students who reduce their course load before the end of the official add/ 
drop period resulting in a reduction ofthe matriculation fees will receive a 100 percent refund of the fees for the courses reduced. 
No refund will be made for a reduction in credit hours after that time. Dropped classes will not appear on the permanent records. 

Shortly after registration, new students will receive an ASU OneCard by mail. In order to receive a refund of any kind, students 
must visit wAAAA/.augustastateonecard.com and, using the account number on the card, choose the refund method they prefer. 
There are two choices: (1) You may choose to have your funds deposited into a new Higher One account the same day they 
are received, or (2) you may choose to have your funds electronically transferred to your current financial institution which will 
take 2 to 3 business days. The second option does not require you to open a Higher One account. If you have questions, please 
contact the Student Accounts Division ofthe Business Office. 

REGENTS' REQUIREMENTS FOR GEORGIA RESIDENT STATUS 

A person's legal residence is his or her dwelling place. It is the place where he or she is generally understood to reside with the 
intent of remaining there indefinitely and returning there when absent. There must be a concurrence of actual residence and 
of intent to remain to acquire a legal residence. 

Students are responsible for registering under the correct residence classification, for notifying promptly the residence auditor 
of incorrect residence classifications or changes of residence status, and will be liable for additional fees. For example. 
residence status may change for students if their parents' states of legal residence change or if their visas change. Individuals 
who are classified by Augusta State University as Out-of-State but who later claim to qualify as legal residents must file a 
"Petition for Georgia Residence Classification" form with the residence auditor in the Office of the Registrar. Residence status 
is not changed automatically, and the burden of proof rests with the student to demonstrate that he or she qualifies as a legal 
resident under the regulations of the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia. To insure timely completion of 
required processing, a student/applicant requesting a change of residence classification for a specific semester should file the 
"Petition for Georgia Residence Classification" and all supporting documentation not later than three weeks (15 working days) 
prior to registration. Decisions prior to registration cannot be guaranteed when petitions and all supporting documentation are 
received after the specified deadline. 

Petitions for Georgia Residence Classification and all supporting documentation must be filed with the residence auditor 
no later than 60 days after the beginning of a specific academic semester for which classification as a legal resident for fee 
payment purposes is requested. Petitions received after that time will not be considered for that semester. If the petition is 
approved, classification as a legal resident for fee payment purposes will not be retroactive to prior semesters. 

A student/applicant wishing to appeal a denial decision resulting from his or her or Petition for Georgia Residence Classification 
may request a review of that decision before the Vice President for Student Services, submitting such request in writing within 



Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 1 7 



20 days of the decision. If the petition is denied and the student/applicant wishes to petition for a later semester, a new Petition 
for Georgia Residence Classification must be submitted for that semester. 

OBJECTIVE STANDARDS FOR ACQUIRING IN-STATE STATUS 

For purposes of these regulations, a resident student is defined as a student domiciled in the state of Georgia. A non-resident 
is defined as one whose domicile is elsewhere. A student shall not be considered domiciled in Georgia unless he or she 
is in continuous physical residence in this state and intends to make Georgia his or her permanent home, not only while in 
attendance at an institution of the University System of Georgia, but indefinitely thereafter as well, and has no domicile or intent 
to be domiciled elsewhere. 

Normally a person from another state who comes to an institution of the University System of Georgia does so for the primary 
or sole purpose of attending the institution rather than to establish a domicile (residency) in Georgia. Thus, one who enrolls in 
a system institution as a non-resident is presumed to remain a non-resident throughout his or her attendance at the institution 
unless and until he or she demonstrates t)y clear and convincing evidence that his or her previous domicile has been abandoned 
and that Georgia domicile has been established. . 

No person shall be eligible for classification as an in-state student unless he or she has been domiciled in Georgia and has 
resided in Georgia continuously for not less than 12 months immediately preceding the date of registration. However, there is a 
strong presumption that such person shall continue to be classified as a non-resident throughout the entire period of his or her 
enrollment. Ordinarily, such periods (while enrolled in school) will not count as periods of domicile to meet the twelve-month 
durational residency requirement. 

The following facts and circumstances, although not necessarily conclusive, have probative value to support a claim for in-state 
status after twelve months continuous domicile in Georgia (durational residency requirement): 

a. Continuous presence in Georgia during periods when not enrolled as a student. 

b. Payment of ad valorem (property) taxes. 

c. Payment of Georgia income taxes. 

d. Reliance upon Georgia sources for financial support. 

e. Domicile in Georgia of family, or other relatives, or persons legally responsible for the student, 
f Former domicile in the state and maintenance of significant connections therein while absent, 
g. Ownership of a home or real property. 

h. Admission to a licensed practicing profession in Georgia. 

i. Long term military commitments in Georgia. 

j. Commitments to further education in Georgia indicating an intent to stay here permanently. 

k. Acceptance of an offer of permanent employment in Georgia. 

I. Location of spouse's employment, if any. 

m. Address of student listed on selective service (draft or reserves) registration. 

Other factors indicating an intent to make Georgia the student's domicile may be considered by the system institution in classifying 
a student. Normally, the following circumstances do not constitute evidence of domicile sufficient to effect classification as an 
in-state student under Regents' policies: 

a. Voting or registration for voting. 

b. Employment in any position normally filled by a student. 

c. The lease of living quarters. 

d. A statement of intention to acquire a domicile in Georgia. 

e. Automobile registration, address on driver's license, payment of automobile taxes. 
f Location of bank or saving accounts. 

WAIVERS 

Contiguous Counties: The border tuition policy set forth by the Board of Regents states that students from counties bordering 
on a county in which a University System of Georgia institution is located shall pay resident tuition fees. This policy includes 
students from Aiken and Edgefield Counties, South Carolina, who wish to attend Augusta State University. Students must fill 
out a waiver form and tiave it signed by a magistrate. 

Military Personnel: Active duty military personnel and their spouses and legal dependents stationed in Georgia may qualify 
for waiver of non-resident tuition. Military personnel should contact the Education Center at their installation for information 
about current financial and other assistance available to them as members of the armed forces. All military personnel planning 
to use military tuition assistance programs to defray expenses associated with matriculation at Augusta State University should 
be sure to coordinate with the Director of Admissions for guidance as to procedures. 

International and Superior Out-of-State Students: These students may be selected by the Vice President for Student 
Services for a waiver, provided, however, that the number of such waivers in effect at any time does not exceed two percent 



' ° Augusta State University Catalog 



of the equivalent full-time students enrolled at the institution in the fall semester immediately preceding the semester for which 
the out of state tuition is to be waived. 

Aliens shall be classified as non-resident students provided, however, that an alien who is living in this country under an 
immigration document permitting indefinite or permanent residence shall have the same privilege of qualifying for in-state 
tuition as a citizen of the United States. Contact the Assistant Dean of Students at 737-1411 or visit the website http://viww.aug. 
edu/student_services_division/instit_waiver.htm for more information and an application. (Also see Int Stud: Spec Req, p. 11.) 

Teachers: Full-time teachers in the public schools of Georgia and their spouses and dependent children may enroll as 
students in University System institutions on the payment of resident fees. 

Employees: All full-time employees in an institution of the University System, their spouses, and dependent children may 
register for courses on the payment of resident fees, even though the employee has not been in residence in Georgia for a 
period of twelve months. 

Families Moving to Georgia: A dependent student who, as of the first day of term of enrollment, can provide documentation 
supporting that his or her supporting parent or court-appointed guardian has accepted full-time, self-sustaining employment 
and established domicile in the State of Georgia for reasons other than gaining the benefit of favorable tuition rates, may qualify 
immediately for an out of state tuition differential waiver which will expire 1 2 months from the date the waiver is granted. At that 
time, an affected student must petition for residency status according to established procedures. 

VETERANS' EDUCATION BENEFITS 

See the entry for Veterans' Affairs (p. 45) or contact the office of Veterans' Affairs for further information (706-737-1606). 



/<">_ rr r-s-*^ 




Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 



19 



FINANCIAL AID 

(Office - 706-737-1431; Fax - 706-737-1777) 
http://www.aug.edu/financial_aid/ 

The mission of the Financial Aid Office is to provide financial resources to all qualified applicants who would like to obtain 
a postsecondary education. In doing so, the Financial Aid Office supports the mission of the university in its commitment to 
excellence in teaching, advancement of knowledge, and enrichment of the community, in that many students would not have 
the wherewithal to access higher education without adequate financial support. We also support the mission of the Student 
Affairs Division by providing students with the wherewithal to achieve academic and professional growth by providing the 
financial resources that contribute to student success and retention. 

The process of applying for financial aid may seem complicated, but it really is not. The Financial Aid staff will assist you in 
completing the process. You may complete your Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) online atwww.fafsa.ed.gov 
from any personal computer or use our technology lab which is located on the second floor of Payne Hall during normal hours 
of operation. If you wish to apply for the HOPE Scholarship ONLY, the FAFSA is not required, and you may complete an on-line 
application available under GSFAPPS, atwww.gacollege411.org. 

To receive aid under any of the federal or state programs, you must: 

1. Be a citizen of the United States or be in the United States for other than a temporary purpose, or otherwise be 

classified as an eligible non-citizen. 

2. Demonstrate financial need (where applicable). 

3. Make satisfactory academic progress as defined by the ASU Financial Aid Office. 

The annual financial aid application deadlines for each term are as follows: Fall Semester -March 1 ; Spring Semester -October 
1 ; and Summer Semester -March 1 . You are expected to submit all required applications and support documents on or before 
the published financial aid application deadline for the chosen enrollment term. Failure to do so may result in incurring your own 
educational expenses until your financial aid file is complete and aid can be processed. 

All scholarships awarded by the Augusta State University Scholarship and Financial Assistance Committee require an institutionaf 
scholarship application, available January 1 through March 1 , for each upcoming academic year. The ASU Academic Scholarshipj 
Application is accessible through your ASU ELROY account. After completing your application, you may electronically submit iti 
to the ASU Financial Aid Office via ELROY. The application deadline is March 1 for each upcoming academic year. 

All financial aid programs fall into one of four categories: grants, loans, scholarships and employment opportunities. The Office 
of Student Financial Aid provides educational funds from all four sources. For further information about available programs 
and required forms, visit our website; or contact us via telephone; or visit the Office of Student Financial Aid, located on the^ 
second floor of Payne Hall during normal business hours. Institutional forms are available in a PDF format on our website. We^ 
also encourage you to explore other financial aid opportunities outside of Augusta State University. Your family background, 
affiliations and activities may provide keys to other sources of assistance. Publications in your local or school library or guidance 
office will assist you in obtaining information on scholarship programs. Web sites are also available. 

The primary responsibility for financing a college education belongs to you and your family. Students who need financial 
assistance are expected to work for and/or borrow a reasonable portion of the funds needed to meet educational expenses. 
Your family is expected to make a maximum effort to assist in satisfying the cost of education. 



^^ Augusta State University Catalog 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS and INFORMATION 

This section explains regulations that affect students after admission. Regulations regarding admission may be found in the 
Admissions Policies and Enrollment section of this catalog (p. 4). 

When a student registers at Augusta State University, he or she accepts the official academic regulations. The student is 
expected to follow the program outlined by his or her college and department and should do sufficient planning, in consultation 
with his or her faculty advisor, to avoid scheduling difficulties which may impede normal academic progress. The student should 
plan his or her program so as to meet the core curriculum, graduation, and major and minor requirements. 

Academic Standing and Grade Point Averages 

Undergraduates: There are two grade point average computations in use at Augusta State University. These computations 
produce a student's Institutional GPA and Regents' GPA. The Regents' GPA is used to measure the quality of a student s entire 
performance while at Augusta State University. The Regents' GPA appears on a student's transcript, is used for calculating 
honors and awards, is used to measure the ability to take overloads, and is used as the basis for measuring continued eligibility 
for scholarships. Graduate schools and employers are interested in a student's GPA so as to compare that student's collegiate 
performance with the performance of others. 

The Institutional GPA was first put into effect at Augusta State University in Spring Quarter 1989 and was modified in May of 
1 994 and again in February of 1 997. The current rules apply regardless of the student's enrollment date. A student's Institutional 
GPA is used only to determine whether or not institutional requirements concerning probation, suspension, and graduation are 
being met by the student. The performance measured by the Institutional GPA is of interest only within the institution. 

Computations: The Regents' GPA is computed by dividing the total number of hours attempted that count in a GPA at Augusta 
State University (that is, those hours for which a grade of A, B, C, D, F or WF has been earned) into the total number of quality 
points (sometimes called grade points) earned on those hours (See Grading System, Undergraduate: p. 24). A GPA is 
determined for each student at the end of each semester. It is similar to the Regents' GPA but is based only on the hours 
attempted that semester. 

The Institutional GPA is determined by computing the number of hours attempted by summing together those hours associated 
with the most recent attempts o^ courses iaken at Augusta State University numbered from 1000 through 4999 in which a grade 
of A, B, C, D, F, or WF has been earned. The Institutional GPA is computed by dividing the hours attempted into the number 
of quality points earned on those hours. All grade point averages are truncated at two decimal places. They are not rounded 
up. Hours accumulated at Augusta State University by a transfer of credit or an approved examination process are not used in 
computing any grade point averages. They are, however, used in determining the credit level, which is discussed next. 

Probation and Suspension: The credit level is the sum of all institutional hours attempted, plus all transfer credit hours 
attempted, plus all credit hours earned with grades that do not count in the GPAs, such as S and K. The credit level is a 
rough measure of the actual amount of time a person has attended college. It is not the same as the total of the hours earned 
towards a degree. It is an important concept because it has an effect upon probation and suspension. Students who earn 
an Institutional GPA (or Academic Renewal GPA, see below) of less than 2.00 will be placed on academic probation. 
Students on probation are restricted to a twelve-hour course load and may continue to attend Augusta State University only if 
they meet the following minimum requirements which are based on credit level: 





Required Minimum Average 


Credit Level 


either Term GPA or Institutional GPA 


0- 16 


1.00 0.50 


17- 29 


2.00 1 .30 


30- 59 


2.00 1.60 


60- 89 


2.00 1.90 


90 and above 


2.00 2.00 



Students who are on probation and fail to meet the requirements specified above will be suspended. The time of suspension 
will be one semester for the first suspension, two semesters for the second suspension, and three semesters for all suspensions 
thereafter. Any suspensions prior to academic renewal do count in the number of suspensions received by the student. Credit 
earned at other institutions during periods of mandatory suspension from Augusta State University will not transfer back to 
ASU. 

Appeal for Reinstatement: After the mandatory period has passed, students suspended for academic deficiencies may be 
considered for reinstatement by petitioning the dean of the appropriate college. The petition must be submitted in writing 
to the dean at least 30 days prior to the desired semester of reinstatement. Appeals for reinstatement after the third and all 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 21 



subsequent suspensions must also be approved by the Vice President for Academic Affairs. If a student has been out of school 
for more than two years, he or she must also file a Former Student Application with the Office of the Registrar. 

If circumstances warrant, the dean or vice president may require special testing and successful completion of all or a part of the 
Learning Support program as a condition of reinstatement. See Learning Support, Rules for Students in (p. 28). 

Having appealed and having been reinstated according to the above procedure, should the student again fail to meet the 
probation requirements, the student again will be suspended. Normally a student will not be reinstated after the fourth 
suspension. 

Academic Renewal: The Academic Renewal policy allows Augusta State University undergraduate, degree-seeking students 
who have experienced significant academic difficulty at Augusta State University to have one opportunity to make a fresh start 
after an absence of five consecutive calendar years from Augusta State University. 

Restrictions : The student must apply for academic renewal at the time of re-enrollment or within three academic semesters 
of re-enrollment or one calendar year (whichever comes first). A student can be granted academic renewal status only once. 
If academic renewal status is approved, no transfer credit will be granted for coursework completed during the 
absence. 

Advantages : A revised Institutional Grade Point Average is begun when the student re-enrolls following the five-year period 
of absence. The new Institutional GPA begins with zero hours attempted and zero quality points as if the student were a new 
transfer student. The new Institutional GPA is used for the minimum grade point average graduation requirement and for 
probation/suspension decisions. If taken at Augusta State University, all academic credit earned with grades of A, B, C, and S 
in previously completed course work is retained and will count towards the residency requirement. Any prior completion of the 
Regents' Test, Legislative, and College Preparatory Curriculum requirements will be retained. 

Disadvantages : Any credit earned with a grade of D is not retained. All suspensions count towards the number of suspensions 
received. Financial aid policies regarding Satisfactory Academic Progress are still in effect. The minimum grade point average 
needed for admission to particular programs may or may not utilize the new Institutional GPA (see the requirements for the 
desired program). Both the new Institutional GPA and the Regents' GPA will appear on the student's transcript with a statement 
that Academic Renewal status was granted. 

Graduate Students: The determination of academic accomplishment is based solely upon a student's grade point average, 
which is computed by dividing the number of hours attempted in which a grade of A, B, C, D, F or WF has been received into 
the number of quality points earned on those hours. (The Institutional and Regents' GPAs are identical.) A GPA of 3.00 must 
be maintained in all courses attempted in a graduate program. For more information, consult listings of specific programs in 
the Graduate Programs section of this catalog. 

Additional Baccalaureate Degree 

A student holding a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited college or university who wishes to work for another 
degree must complete the minimum residence requirements of the university (30 hours of course work in courses numbered 
3000 or above with an average grade of C or better) with at least 30 hours of resident credit in excess of the requirement for 
the original degree. In addition, he or she must complete the exact requirements of major courses, allied fields, mathematics, 
and foreign languages. 

Auditing a Course 

A student who has been admitted to Augusta State University may be permitted to enroll in credit courses as an auditor on 
a non-credit basis. However, a student may not change his or her status from credit to audit or vice versa during the course. 
Credit may not be earned in courses taken as an auditor except by re-enrollment for credit in and completion of the course with 
a satisfactory grade. An auditor is assumed to be seriously interested in courses that he or she audits. Therefore, a student 
enrolled as an auditor is expected to attend class regularly and perform such other tasks as may be assigned by the instructor. 
An auditor who does not attend regularly may be dropped from the class with a grade of W. 

Class Attendance 

The resources of Augusta State University are provided for the intellectual growth and development of the students who attend. 
A schedule of courses is provided for the students and faculty to facilitate an orderly arrangement of the program of instruction. 
The fact that classes are scheduled is evidence that attendance is important and students should, therefore, maintain regular 
attendance if they are to attain maximum success in the pursuit of their studies. 

It is recognized that the degree of class attendance may vary with the student, the professor, or the course. It is also recognized 
that, on occasions, it may be necessary for the student to be absent from scheduled classes or laboratories for personal 
reasons. On such occasions, all matters related to a student's absences, including the making up of work missed, are to be 

"^■^ Augusta State University Catalog 



arranged between the student and the professor. A student must not be absent from laboratory periods, announced quizzes 
and tests, or final examinations unless the reasons for the absences are acceptable to the concerned professors. A student 
should also understand that he or she is responsible for the academic consequences of any absences. 

At the beginning of each semester, all professors will provide a clear written statement to all their classes regarding their 
policies in handling absences. Professors will also be responsible for counseling with their students regarding the academic 
consequences of absences from their classes or laboratories. Students are obligated to adhere to the requirements of each 
course and each course professor. 

Professors will be flexible enough in their attendance and grading policies to allow students a reasonable number of absences 
without penalty for extraordinary personal reasons or for officially representing the university. However, if the student has 
been absent for more than the equivalent of 10 percent of class time, regardless of cause, then the professor may withdraw 
the student from the class for excessive absences. A student withdrawn for excessive absence may appear before a board of 
review appointed by the Academic Policies Committee for reinstatement. In the event a student is reinstated, he or she is fully 
responsible for making up all work missed while the case was pending. 

It is important to note that the instructor may — or may not — withdraw a student from class based upon attendance. In any case, 
a student should not assume that the instructor has initiated the withdrawal form. A student not withdrawn from a course who 
stops attending class (or who never attends class) is subject to receiving a grade of WF or F for the course. 

Classification 

For the purpose of class organization, an undergraduate is classified on the basis of number of hours of academic credit earned 
at the time of registration as follows: Freshman, 0-29; Sophomore, 30-59; Junior 60-89; Senior, 90 or more. 

Course Changes 

In the case of course changes, the student must initiate an "Add/Drop" form, which can be obtained from his or her academic 
advisor's office. Students are strongly advised to consult with their academic advisor before dropping and/or adding courses. 
The last day a student may enroll in a class is given in the university calendar as the last day of Add/Drop. 

Course Repeat Policy 

Any student may repeat a course taken at Augusta State University. No student may receive additional hours of credit for a 
repeated course in which the student has already earned credit, with the exception of such courses as WELL activity courses. 
"Selected Topics" courses, and other courses specifically designed for repetition. Such courses are labelled in the "Course 
Descriptions" section of the catalog with a phrase such as "may be repeated for credit." However, if a student fails a repeated 
course in which he or she had already earned credit, the student will lose any credit previously earned. 

If an undergraduate course (numbered 1000 through 4999) is repeated, only the last grade received is used in the calculation 
of the Institutional Grade Point Average (IGPA). See Academic Standing and Grade Point Averages, p. 21. 

Course Substitution 

Each student is responsible for following the requirements of his or her selected program as specified in the catalog and 
in accordance with the regulations of the catalog. Variations in course requirements are permitted only upon petition and 
the written approval of the chairman of the department responsible for the required course and the appropriate dean. The 
approved change to the program of study will be forwarded to the Office of the Registrar. Variations from course requirements 
are approved only under exceptional circumstances and only in cases where courses of the same academic value and type 
can be substituted. 

Curriculum Changes 

The academic programs of Augusta State University are offered through the James M. Hull College of Business, the College of 
Education and the Katherine Reese Pamplin College of Arts and Sciences. These units, including the appropriate departments, 
furnish the basic organization of the faculty and provide the framework for the generation and maintenance of quality education 
in the variety of courses and programs listed in this bulletin. The Academic Policies Committee serves as the major source for 
recommendations to the faculty on policies in these areas. The faculty reserves the right to make changes in curricula, and 
in rules, at any time when in its judgment such changes are in the best interest of the student and Augusta State University. 
Recommendations for such changes can originate with any one of a number of key faculty committees. 

Deans' Lists 

The Deans' Lists for the James M. Hull College of Business, the College of Education, and the Katherine Reese Pamplin 
College of Arts and Sciences are compiled each semester for undergraduate students. To qualify for this academic honor, a 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 23 



student must (1) earn nine or more hours of undergraduate course work numbered 1000 or above, exclusive of K grades, (2) 
achieve a grade point average of 3.66 for the semester, and (3) receive no grade of I, F, or WF during the semester. Also see: 
Graduation with Honors (p. 28). 

Grade Changes 

Any grade changes must be accomplished in the semester immediately following the semester in which the grade was originally 
reported. 

Grading System, Undergraduate 

Grades used in calculating the undergraduate grade point average are as follows: 



Grade 


Meanina 


Q 


jalitv points/credit hour 


A 


Excellent 




4.0 


B 


Good 




3.0 


C 


Satisfactory 




2.0 


D 


Passing 




1.0 


F 


Failure 




0.0 


WF 


Withdrew, failing 




0.0 



The following symbols are used in the cases indicated, but are not included in the determination of the grade point average: 
/; Incomplete— Student doing satisfactory work, but unable to meet the full requirements of the course because of 

non-academic reasons. The maximum time for completing course work to remove an I is one semester; otherwise, the 

I will be automatically changed to F. 
W: Withdrawal, without penalty— The W will be assigned if the student officially withdraws from the course by semester 

midterm, unless the student has been charged with academic dishonesty. A grade of WF will be assigned after 

midterm unless the student withdraws because of non-academic hardship and has a passing average at the time of' 

withdrawal. 
S; Satisfactory*— Indicates satisfactory completion of degree requirements other than academic course work. 
U: Unsatisfactory*— Indicates unsatisfactory performance in an attempt to complete degree requirements other thanj 

academic course work. 
V: Audit— Indicates that the student was enrolled in the course as an auditor. Students may not transfer from audit to credit 

status or vice versa. 
K: Credit by examination. 

NR: Not Reported— Indicates that the grade was not reported. 
IP: In Progress— Indicates that credit has not been given in courses that require a continuation of work beyond the semester 

for which the student signed up for the course. The use of this symbol is approved for project courses. 
*The S and U symbols are used for dissertation and thesis hours, student teaching, clinical practicum, internship, and proficiency < 
requirements in graduate programs, and specifically designated courses. 

Graduation Application and Graduation Exercises 

Application for Graduation: The application must be completed and filed with the registrar no later than the mid-term date of 
the semester preceding the final semester of course work. Students must be approved formally for graduation by the faculty. 

Graduation Exercises: Degrees are conferred formally at the close of the spring semester (in May). Graduation applications 
are due in the Office of the Registrar by midterm of the semester prior to the last semester of scheduled coursework. 
Students who complete all requirements for the degree by the end of spring semester receive degrees in May. Students 
who complete all requirements for the degree by the end of the summer term or fall semester receive degrees at the end 
of the term completed. These students will receive instructions concerning ceremony participation when their graduation 
applications are submitted to the Office of the Registrar. Degree candidates are encouraged to attend graduation exercises. 
However, if they are unable to do so, they are required to notify the Office of the Registrar in writing. 

Graduation Requirements: Undergraduate 

All candidates for the bachelor's degree at Augusta State University must satisfy the following conditions: 

Students must earn 39 or more hours in upper level courses with at least 21 hours in the major and 15 to 18 total hours in the 
minor (if a minor is required), depending upon the field, with a grade of C or better in each course in the major and the minor. 
(The Bachelor of Music degree and the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree are more professionally oriented programs and require 
more hours in the major field.) Together with the core curriculum and electives and/or foreign language, statistics, and computer 
science courses, depending on the major, these requirements will normally total 1 20 hours, not including the physical education 
requirement. Specific graduation requirements for undergraduate programs in the Katherine Reese Pamplin College of Arts 



'^^ Augusta State University Catalog 



and Sciences, the College of Education, and ttie James M. Hull College of Business are found in tine UNDERGRADUATE 
PROGRAMS section of tiiis catalog (p. 53). 

Payment of Financial Obligations: No student will be permitted to graduate if he or she is in default on any payment due 
to the university. 

Additional Degrees: Normally, two identical degrees are not awarded. However, a student may receive the appropriate 
degree of any other program by completing the additional requirements of that program and earning at least 30 hours of 
resident credit (20 hours for the associate degree) in excess of the requirement for the original degree. 

Core Curriculum: The core curriculum was developed by the University System of Georgia for the purpose of facilitating the 
education of students as they pursue baccalaureate degrees within and among the units of the University System. It includes 
60 hours of lower level courses that would normally be covered in the first half of a baccalaureate degree program. A student 
who completes the requirements of the core, or any area of the core, will have the assurance that credit for all of this work 
can transfer to any other unit of the University System. All candidates for the bachelor's degree at Augusta State University 
must satisfactorily complete the core curriculum. The list of courses in the core curriculum is presented at the beginning of 
the UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS section of this catalog (p. 53). 

Course Requirements: Complete a minimum of 60 hours for the associate degree or 1 20 hours for the baccalaureate degree 
(exclusive of credit earned in lower division Physical Education courses) as specified for the candidate's program. There will 
be a minimum of 39 hours of upper division courses required for students graduating with the baccalaureate degree. 

Credit from Other Institutions: See Residence Requirement and Credit from Ottier Institutions (p. 26). 

Degree Requirements in Effect at Candidacy for Graduation: A candidate for graduation is subject to requirements in 
effect at the time of initial enrollment; however, changes may have been made while the student is enrolled. The changes 
in requirements shall be implemented so as to minimize the problems of transition for currently enrolled students, but since 
some changes are considered to be improvements, the new requirements may apply. Exceptions may be made by the 
department chairperson in conjunction with the advisor, appropriate department faculty, and, as necessary, the dean. 

A student who is not enrolled for two or more consecutive years or who transfers for two or more semesters to another 
institution will be required to complete a new application for graduation and will be subject to the requirements for graduation 
in effect at that time, or if readmitted, will be subject to the requirements in effect at the time of readmission. 

English 1101 and 1102, When to Enroll: (a) Students must enroll in English 1101 no later than the first semester they 
register following completion of 20 hours of Augusta State University residence/transfer credit, (b) Students must continue 
to register for English 1101 each successive semester until they have completed the course with a grade of C or better, (c) 
Students who complete 1101 must enroll in English 1102 no later than the first semester they register following completion of 
30 hours credit, (d) Students must continue to register for English 1 1 02 each successive semester until they have completed 
the course with a grade of C or better. 

Grade Point Average: Students must achieve an institutional grade point average (see p. 21) of at least 2.00 on all work 
attempted at this university or an academic renewal grade point average of at least 2.00 on all work since the date of 
academic renewal (if the student is eligible for academic renewal and elects to accept academic renewal). 

Graduation Fee: This $50 fee is to be paid to the Business Office at the time the application for graduation is submitted. 

Legislative Requirements: In 1975, the Georgia legislature enacted a measure that requires all graduates to have passed 
examinations on the history of the United States and of Georgia and on the provisions and principles of the constitutions 
of the United States and of Georgia. No academic credit is given for these examinations, which are administered each 
semester by Testing and Disability Services. 

Certain history and political science courses (i.e., HIST 2111, HIST 2112, HIST 3711, POLS 1101, and POLS 4101), which 
are described later in the catalog, will satisfy this requirement. Students who fail one or both of the examinations should 
contact the chair of the appropriate department (History or Political Science) soon after the examination date. 

Wellness Requirement: Students must complete the required courses in Wellness as described below: 

Baccalaureate Degree : Each student is required to pass three courses which should normally be completed during the 
freshman and sophomore years. Unless a waiver (as described below) is granted, the requirement will consist of the 
following: 

Wellness 1000 (3 hrs.) 

Two Physical Activity Classes: (2 hrs.) 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 25 



A physical activity class may be a repeated course offering, but it is suggested the student take advantage of this opportunity 
to develop other skills by taking another activity class. 

Associate Degree (Note the exception for nursing students described in section A below): Each student is required to pass 
two courses. Unless a waiver (as described below) is granted, the requirement will consist of the following: 

Wellness 1000 (3 hrs.) 

One Physical Activity Class (1 hr.) 

Waivers and Substitutions : Waivers are the same for the Baccalaureate Degree program and the Associate Degree program, 
as follows: 

(A) Wellness 1000 (3 hrs.) 

All students are required to successfully complete this course with the following exception. 

Nursing Students: Nursing students may satisfy the Wellness 1000 

(3 hrs.) course requirement through the course studies within their degree program. The department chair of nursing 
will sign off on this requirement on the application for graduation. All nursing students are required to satisfy 2 hours 
of physical activity course requirements. Note that only degree candidate nursing students will have the Wellness 
and Fitness course waived. 

Effective Fall 2007 ttiere is no swim activity requirement for current or entering undergraduate students. 

Residence Requirements and Credit from Otiier Institutions: If seeking an associate degree, a student must complete 
in residence at Augusta State University a minimum of 20 hours of academic credit. If seeking a baccalaureate degree, a 
student must complete in residence at Augusta State University at least 25 percent of the credits required for the degree and 
a minimum of 30 hours of academic credit in courses numbered 3000 or above. At least one-half of the major concentration 
and at least one-half of the minor concentration must be completed in residence at Augusta State University. 

The amount of credit that the university will allow for work done in another institution within a given period of time may not 
exceed the normal amount of credit that could have been earned at the university during that time. A maximum of 62 hours 
of credit earned in a junior college may be applied toward a degree. 

Regents' Testing Program Examination: A student must demonstrate proficiency in reading and writing skills by passing 
all parts of this examination. The examination is administered each semester and undergraduate students must take this 
examination. Transfer students who are eligible will be notified of the earliest testing date following their initial enrollment. 

The following is the policy of the Boat'd of Regents of the University System of Georgia and Augusta State University 
regarding the Regents' Testing Program: 

A) Requirements: Students enrolled in undergraduate degree programs shall pass the Regents' Test as a requirement of 
graduation. Passing the Regents' Test is defined as having passed all components of the test by scoring above the cutoff 
score specified for each component. If one component of the test is passed, that component need not be retaken; this 
provision is retroactive to all students who have taken the test in any form since the inception of the program. 

B) Exceptions: 

1. Students who hold a baccalaureate or higher degree from a regionally accredited institution of higher education will 
not be required to complete the Regents' Test. 

2. Students whose mother tongue is other than English may be exempted from taking the Regents' Test Essay, but they 
will be expected to demonstrate their skills by performing acceptably on a comparable examination. 

3. Students with SAT-I Verbal scores of at least 510 or ACT Reading scores of at least 23 will be considered to have 
fulfilled the reading comprehension requirements of the Regents' test and do not need to take the reading portion of the 
Regents' Test. Scores must be from a national administration of the SAT or ACT. 

Policy for student wfio entered between Fall 2005 and Spring 2007: 

Students with the following combinations of SAT Verbal or ACT English scores and grades in ENGL 1101 will be 
considered to have fulfilled the writing requirements of the Regents' test and do not need to take the essay portion of 
the Regents' Test: 

1 . Students with SAT-I Verbal scores of at least 530 or ACT English scores of at least 23 who also earn an A in ENGL 
1101. 

2. Students with SAT-1 Verbal scores of at least 590 or ACT English scores of at least 26 who also earn a B in ENGL 
1101. 

^^ Augusta State University Catalog 



I 



Policy for student who enter Sun)mer 2007 or later: 

Students with an SAT Reasoning, Writing Section score of at least 560 will be considered to have fulfilled the writing 
requirements of the Regents' test and do not need to take the essay portion of the Regents' Test. 

In addition, students with College Board Advanced Placement (AP) English scores of at least a 3, International 
Baccalaureate (IB) higher-level English scores of at least 4, or SAT II English Writing scores of at least 650 will be 
considered as having fulfilled the essay requirement of the Regents' Test and students with these scores do not need to 
take the essay portion of the Regents' Test. 

C) When to take the Regents' Test: 

1. Upon initial enrollment, students will receive notification that they must take the Regents' Test. Students who fail to 
take the test at this time will not be allowed to preregister or register for subsequent semesters until they have signed 
up to take the test during the next semester. Students who fail to take the test for a second time will not be allowed to 
register for subsequent semesters until they have taken the test. 

2. Students are required to take only the segment(s) that they have not passed or exempted. 

3. Transfer students will be held to all policies as described herein. 

4. Non-native speakers of English who have followed the ESL track for their English classes should contact the Department 
of English and Foreign Languages for specific procedures concerning the Regents' Test process. 

D) Remediation Requirements: 

1. Students who have earned 44 or fewer hours and who fail one or both parts of the Regents' Test must take English 
1101 or 1102 if they have not satisfactorily completed these courses: students who have earned 45 hours of credit or 
more must take RGTR 0198 and/or RGTE 0199 (as appropriate) for remediation whether or not they have completed 
English 1101 or 1102. Students not enrolled in the appropriate remediation will be dropped from all courses for that term. 

2. Students required to enroll in English 1101, 1102, RGTR 0198 and/or RGTE 0199 as required above must meet all 
requirements of these courses. Students required to take English 1101, 1102, RGTR 0198, and/or RGTE 0199 may not 
take an overload or withdraw from this class. Students who miss the equivalent of one week of class will be withdrawn 
from the class, prohibited from taking the Regents' Test that semester. 

3. Part-time students taking only one course per semester may be permitted to take remediation and repeat the test in 
only one area at a time although they may have previously failed both components of the Regents' Test. Students who 
select this option may not take regular degree credit courses during that semester. 

E) Regents' Test Remediation Appeal Procedure: 

Students who wish to appeal the requirement that they remediate, as specified in D above, should make their appeals 
in writing to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. Students who appeal merely because remediating is inconvenient 
or because they have already registered for the current semester should not expect to have their appeals approved. 

F) Review of Essay: 

A student may request a formal review of his or her failure on the essay component of the Regents' Test if that students 
essay received at least one passing score among the three scores awarded and if the student has successfully completed 
English 1101 and 1102. Any student who fails the essay component of the Regents' Testing Program may secure a copy 
of his or her essay from the Department of English and Foreign Languages. The student should enroll in RGTE 0199 
and take the copy of the essay to his or her first class. The instructor will review and mark the essay indicating if he or 
she thinks the essay should be appealed. If the instructor and the student agree that the essay should be appealed, they 
will submit an unmarked copy of the essay to a committee consisting of three faculty members appointed by the Vice 
President for Academic Affairs. If the student does not concur with the 01 99 instructor's evaluation of the essay, he or 
she may appeal the essay by immediately notifying the committee of his or her intent to appeal and requesting that an 
unmarked copy of the essay be sent to the committee. If a majority of the review panel feels that the essay should be 
appealed, the committee will send its recommendation, along with a copy of the essay, to the System's Director of the 
Regents' Testing Program. On the other hand, a vote by the committee to sustain the essay's failing score will terminate 
the review process. 

The initial step in the review and the review itself are intended to deal with perceived errors in ratings. The review is 
not automatically indicated by a student's failure to pass the essay. A review is indicated only when there is substantial 
question concerning the accuracy of scoring and when the criteria set forth in the first sentence of this section on Review 
of Essay have been met. 

The on-campus review committee will consist of three members, each of whom is an experienced essay rater. A decision 
by the on-campus review panel to terminate the review is final; this decision cannot be appealed to any other office. 

Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 27 



except in cases where it is reasonably alleged that an adverse decision was based on discrimination with respect to the 
student's race, religion, sex, handicap, age, or national origin. 

Special Examinations; Special examinations may be required of the student as he or she progresses through various levels 
of the curriculum. 

Graduation with Honors: Excellence in academic worl< is recognized at graduation by the award of honor ranl< in general 
scholarship. For students completing all worl< at Augusta State University the Regents grade point average is used in the 
awarding of academic honors. A student who averages 3.85 or more is graduated summa cum laude; one who averages 
3.65, but less than 3.85, is graduated magna cum laude; and one who averages 3.50, but less than 3.65, is graduated cum 
laude. This distinction of high academic achievement is placed on the student's diploma and is noted on the permanent 
record. 

A student who has transferred to Augusta State University is eligible to graduate with honors only if the grade point average 
for his or her university career meets one of the above requirements and the student has completed at least 60 hours of 
courses in residence for the bachelor's degree (30 hours in residence for the associate's degree). Also the Augusta State 
University Regents' GPA must meet the above requirements. The honors will be determined by the lower of the two GPAs. 

Honors Program 

The Augusta State University Honors Program offers special opportunities to superior undergraduate students who enjoy the 
challenges and rewards of a stimulating academic environment. Students in any major may apply for the Honors Program 
and complete requirements to be recognized as ASU Honors Program graduates. Honors classes are open to other excellent 
students on a space available basis. Honors classes are small, offer more personal contact with professors, and ask students 
and professors to explore course content actively and intensively; they do not, however, have a different grading scale and are 
not graded more strictly than other courses. A complete description of the ASU Honors Program is located at the beginning of 
the UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS section of this catalog. 

Rules for Students in Learning Support 

A student in the Learning Support Program who is permitted to take regular credit courses is subject to the university regulations 
concerning probation and suspension. However, these regulations do not apply to hours of "institutional credit" attempted or 
earned. 

1. During each semester of enrollment, all Learning Support students, including those attending part-time, must first register 
for all required Learning Support courses before being allowed to register for other courses. 
Two exceptions are possible; 

a. When two or three Learning Support courses are required and a student is enrolled in at least one Learning Support 
course, a freshman orientation course or physical education or other activity or performance courses may be taken that 
semester instead of one of the required Learning Support courses. These courses must be chosen from Augusta State 
University orientation (ASUO 1000), physical education (WELL), military science (MILS), or music (MUSAor MUSI). 

b. In the event that a required Learning Support course is not offered, a student may enroll in a course for degree credit 
if the student has met the course prerequisites, subject to the written approval of the Chair of Learning Support. No 
exceptions shall be made regarding prerequisites. 

2. Until individual Learning Support requirements have been satisfied, students will not be permitted to take credit courses 
which assume the content or the skills of a student's required Learning Support courses as prerequisites; 

a. Mathematics 0096, 0097, and 0099 are prerequisites for Mathematics 1111, 1101 and Biology 1101, 1102, 1107, and 
2111; English 0097 and 0099 are prerequisites for English 1101, Biology 1107, 1108,2111 and 2112; Reading 0097 and 
0099 are prerequisites for English 1101. 

b. In addition, students who are enrolled in Reading 0097 may enroll only in the following credit courses; Mathematics 
courses; all 1000-level Applied Music (MUSA) courses; all music ensembles and all 0000 - 1000-level music courses; 
all 1000- and 2000-level art courses; 1000- and 2000-level Military Science courses; all 1000-level Physical Education 
courses; Military Science courses; Communication/Drama 2500, 2510, FINC 1410. 

c. Students enrolled in Reading 0099 may enroll in the courses listed above, in Communication/ Speech 1010 and 1020 
and in ASUO 1000. 

3. Once assigned to the Learning Support Program, a student may not accumulate more than 20 hours of academic credit 
before completing all Learning Support requirements. A student who accumulates 20 hours of academic credit and has not 
successfully completed required Learning Support courses may enroll only in Learning Support courses until requirements 
in Learning Support are successfully completed. 

4. Students who do not complete the requirements for passing each required area of Learning Support after a maximum of 
three attempts per area or two attempts at an area without satisfactorily completing the non-exit level course (0090 / 0096 



^° Augusta State University Catalog 



/ 0097) in the area, will be placed on Learning Support Dismissal and will not be eligible to continue in the progrann. The 
student may not be considered for readmission within three years of the dismissal. 

Prior to placing the student who has not exited the Learning Support area within three attempts on Learning Support 
Dismissal, the Department of Learning Support considers the student for one additional attempt in the area. (An attempt is 
defined as a semester in which the student receives any grade except W.) The student must: 

* be individually evaluated and determined to have a reasonable chance for success, 

* be in the exit level course (0091/0099) of that area, and 

* have reached the limit in only one Learning Support area. 

If granted the additional attempt, the student may enroll in only the Learning Support course. 

5. No degree credit is earned in Learning Support, though institutional credit is awarded. Time spent in Learning Support 
course work is cumulative within the University System, as is the number of attempts per area. Students with transfer credit 
or credit earned as a certificate student may be granted up to a total of three attempts in an area of Learning Support. 

6. The following grade symbols are used in Augusta State University's Learning Support program: 

S: satisfactory (passed course work, passed institutional requirement, passed COMPASS Exam) 
IP: insufficient progress (passed course-work, passed institutional requirement, failed COMPASS) 
U: unsatisfactory (failed course work, ineligible to attempt institutional requirement, ineligible to attempt COMPASS: 

withdrew after midterm) 
W: withdrawal before midterm (not counted as an attempt) 
V: audit (volunteer enrollment only) 

7. Students enrolled in both Learning Support and credit courses may not withdraw or be withdrawn from a Learning Support 
course unless they also withdraw or are withdrawn from all credit courses. All course changes must have advisor approval. 

8. All Learning Support students must satisfactorily complete ASUO 1000 with a grade of "C" or better. Students required to 
take READ 0097 must satisfactorily complete that course prior to enrolling in ASUO 1000. 

Load-Overload, Academic 

An undergraduate student is considered full time with enrollment in at least 12 hours per semester and one-half time with 
enrollment in at least 6 hours per semester. A typical course load for a full-time undergraduate student is 15-17 hours. A 
student should carefully consider the advisability of taking an overload; he or she should not attempt to do so solely for financial 
reasons. A student wishing to schedule up to, but no more than, 18 hours may use regular registration procedures, which 
include approval of the course schedule by the academic advisor. A student required to take remediation due to Regents' 
Testing Program policies may not take an overload. A student with a verified disability shall be able to apply through the Office 
of Disability Services for full-time enrollment status with a course load of 9 semester hours. This status will only be granted 
when official documentation certifies that a reduced course load is an appropriate accommodation. 

A student may be approved to preregister for more than 18 hours only if: 

(1 ) he or she has a Regents' GPA of 3.25 at Augusta State University, or 

(2) he or she is within 30 hours of graduation (15 hours for associate degree candidates) at the beginning of, but not 
including, the semester of current enrollment. 

A student may be approved to register for more than 18 hours only if: 

(1 ) he or she has a Regents' GPA of 3.00 at Augusta State University, or 

(2) he or she is within 30 hours of graduation (15 hours for associate degree candidates), or 

(3) the student is granted permission by his or her dean, even though he or she is not eligible under the above 
conditions. 

Credit hours earned by music students in the areas of private instruction (MUSA) and/or music ensemble credits (i.e.. university 
band, chamber choir, etc.) do not contribute to an overload status. Rather, such credits should be regarded as outside the 
normal academic load. 

Majors 

A major concentration normally requires a minimum of 21 hours. (Also see Graduation Requirements: Undergraduate, p. 
24) Grades below C are not accepted for courses in a major concentration. Some departments or colleges require general 
education or cognate courses in addition to the core curriculum and major courses. Satisfactory completion of the major 
concentration is certified by the major department or appropriate college. A student pursuing a degree program may declare a 
multiple major, in which case a minor concentration will not be required. The student must complete all requirements for each 
major. Upon completion, each major will be recorded on the permanent record. For details on a specific major concentration, 
see the UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS section of this catalog. 



Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 29 



Minors 

Most bachelor's degree programs require a minor, with the exception of those leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Business 
Administration, Bachelor of Fine Arts, the performance major in the Bachelor of Music, and Bachelor of Science in Education, 
Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and Secondary Education. A minor consists of 15 to 18 hours of courses with at least 9 hours of 
upper division courses, depending upon the area of concentration. Grades below C are not accepted for a minor concentration. 
Satisfactory completion of the minor concentration is also certified by the minor department or college. Once the minor field is 
selected, the student should seek academic advisement for this concentration within the department or college in which he or 
she is minoring. 

For details on a specific minor field, see the UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS section of this catalog. Minor programs offered 
at Augusta State University are listed in the Index under Minor Programs. 

Transient and Co-enrolled Augusta State University Students 

An Augusta State University student must be in good standing and must obtain prior approval to enroll in any and all credit 
courses at any other institution as a transient or co-enrolled student. This prior approval of each course must be obtained 
from the Augusta State University department or college that offers a course most comparable to the one that will be taken 
elsewhere. A transient student is defined as a degree candidate at Augusta State University who is granted the privilege of 
temporary registration at another institution and will not be enrolled at Augusta State during that period of temporary registration. 
A co-enrolled student is defined as a degree candidate at Augusta State University who is granted the privilege of enrolling at 
both Augusta State and another institution during a semester. 

A student who has attempted a course at Augusta State University and received a penalty grade in that course may not take 
the course at another institution and transfer it back to Augusta State University. (Penalty grades include Fs, and WFs in all 
courses, and Ds, Fs and WFs in English 1101, English 1102, and major and minor courses.) A statement granting permission 
to attend another accredited institution will be provided by the Augusta State University Registrar after department or college 
approval has been obtained. 

Unit of Credit (The Semester System) 

Wherever this catalog uses the term "hours," it is referring to "semester hours" as understood within the semester system. 
Augusta State University is organized on this system. Each of the two semesters in the regular academic year covers a period 
of approximately 1 6 weeks, which includes 1 5 weeks of instruction. The summer session is 1 1 weeks, with some courses being 
offered in one of two half sessions. Each half session has 23 class days. The "semester hour" is the unit of credit in any course. 
It represents a recitation period of one fifty-minute period a week for a semester. A course meeting 150 minutes a week for 15 
weeks would thus give credit of 3 hours when completed satisfactorily. For credit purposes, 2 to 3 laboratory or activity hours 
are usually counted as the equivalent of one recitation class period. Also see Course Repeat Policy, p. 23. 

Witiidrawal from a Course 

The responsibility for initiating a withdrawal resides with the student. A student who registers for a course and stops attending 
class (or never attends class) is not automatically withdrawn by the instructor and is subject to receiving a grade of WF or F 
for the course. Forms for initiating a withdrawal may be obtained from the Office of the Registrar (Office of Veterans' Affairs). 
A student is strongly advised to consult with his or her advisor before withdrawing from a course. A student must obtain the 
signature of the instructor to officially withdraw from a course. An instructor may withdraw a student for excessive absences. 
(See Class Attendance, p. 22, for attendance policies and Grading System, p. 24, for grading policy upon withdrawal.) The 
official date of withdrawal is the date the Withdrawal Form is received in the Office of the Registrar. 



"'^ Augusta State University Catalog 



The Augusta State University Crest 
(any use requires permission of the President's office. 




Vincit Omnia Veritas - Truth Conquers All 

President Jerry Robbins designed the College Crest, based on the coat of arms of the Princess Augusta, Dr. Robbins added 
the mace and the lamps of knowledge on the seal. The crown is the same. -- From an interview with Mr, Lee Wallace. 9/1982. 



CliOtUN and CREST 
"Princess -Aogusta 



VINCIT OMWIA VERITAS 
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MACE of AUTHORITY 
ORDMA.NCE Vire Power 



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CROSSED CANNOHS 

Arstfial of ■Educat'on 



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Augusts College "Paper 




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Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 



31 



WHERE TO GO for Information on Facilities, 
Services and Activities at ASU 

This section includes a wide variety of facilities, services, and activities, arranged alphabetically, which are available to members 
of the ASU community. 

Academic Advisement Center (706-731 -7979) www.aug.edu/advising/ 

Academic Advisement promotes student success by providing general advising information and referrals, coordinating 
advising services, offering core academic advisement, and an array of academic program supports. The center partners with 
faculty, staff and administrators in upholding the mission, standards and requirements of the university. A primary function 
of Academic Advisement is to advise undergraduates who are as yet undecided about their majors. The staff assists with 
the major decision process providing regular communications regarding academic skills and programs along with referrals 
to appropriate campus services. Located on the second floor of Washington Hall (212), Academic Advisement is open 8:00 
a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday with extended hours during registration periods matching the published campus 
schedule. Academic Advisement's Front Desk located on the second floor of Allgood Hall (N205) provides quick advisement 
and registration information when classes are in session (see posted hours each term). Timely information is also available on 
the center's website and large screen displays in both Allgood and Washington Halls. 

Alumni Association (706-737-1759) wvw.aug.edu/aiumni 

The Augusta State University Alumni Association dates back to when "Augusta College" was only a two-year institution in 1 927. 
The association is composed of former students and graduates of Augusta State University and is governed by a board of 
directors. The purpose of the association is to promote the growth, progress and welfare of Augusta State University and serve 
as a link between Alumni and ASU. A complimentary one-year membership is given to each graduate. Other alumni achieve 
active status by paying annual membership dues. For information on alumni programs, please call the Office of Development 
and Alumni Relations. 

Athlletics (706-737-1626) www.aug.edu/athletics 

Augusta State University is affiliated with the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA Division II) and is a member of the 
Peach Belt Athletic Conference. Augusta State University supports men's teams in baseball, basketball, golf (Division I), and 
tennis. The university supports women's teams in volleyball, basketball, softball, tennis, golf (Division I), and cross-country. 

Augusta State University Foundation (706-737-1759) www.aug.edu/alumni/Foundation.htm 

The Augusta State University Foundation was established in 1963. The purpose of the Foundation is to advance the mission 

of Augusta State University and its long-term academic priorities through the following means: 

• The development of financial support from individuals, corporations, and other organizations. 

• The investment and management of funds donated to the foundation. 

• The use of its assets to fund and assist specific university functions and activities. 

• Any and all other lawful activities that the trustees and the president of the university deem to be useful to advance the 

mission of Augusta State University. 
The Foundation is located in the Office of Development and Alumni Relations, Maxwell Alumni House. 

Bookstore (706-737-1 61 1 ) www.aug.edu/bookstore 

The ASU Bookstore is committed to excellence in providing a trusted resource for course materials, services, and other 
merchandise while enhancing and supporting the educational and social experiences of Augusta State University students, 
faculty, and staff. The ASU Bookstore is the source for all course materials including textbooks, lab supplies, course packets, 
school supplies, and study aids. The bookstore is located in Washington Hall. The bookstore accepts cash, check. Visa, 
Mastercard, Discover, ASU Jag Card, ASU Higher One Card, and Financial Aid for all payments. Financial Aid is accepted for 
several days prior to the start of each academic session; be sure to check the bookstore web site for exact dates. Operated 
by Augusta State University, a primary goal of the bookstore is to provide educational materials to students at the lowest cost 
possible. 

Additional products and services: 

ASU and Jaguar clothing and gift items 

College rings 

Trade books and greeting cards 

Cold beverages, snacks and other convenience items 

Computer software at up to 80% off for students, faculty and staff 

Computers at discounted prices 

Graduation items 

Money savings tips for purchasing course materials: 

Purchase used books when possible; used textbooks are 25% cheaper than new and help conserve our 

environment. 

Purchase books as early as possible; more used books are available, and the bookstore is not as busy. 

^^ Augusta State University Catalog 



Purchase only the required materials before class; if a textbook is listed as optional or recommended, wait until after 
classes begin. You may not need this book. 

Sell unwanted textbooks during regular business hours. Please be aware that you may receive more money at the 
end of each semester. During exams, the ASU Bookstore will pay 50% of the purchase price for books that have been 
readopted for the next semester, are in current edition, and are not overstocked at the bookstore. All other books may 
be purchased by a national used-book dealer. 

Refund Policy 

The ASU Bookstore is happy to offer refunds and exchanges. 

An original sales receipt is required for all refunds and exchanges. 

Return the merchandise in the same condition as when purchased. 

Make returns within the proper time frame. The final day for refunds will be posted in the bookstore, printed on the 

receipt, and listed in campus publications each semester. 

We cannot offer refunds at any time for study outlines or unwrapped course packets. Software, electronics. 

and multimedia products are non-refundable. 

The staff of the ASU Bookstore would be happy to answer any questions students may have about our refund policy. 

Hours 

Regular bookstore hours are 7:45 a.m.- 6 p.m. Monday through Thursday and 7:45 a.m. -3 p.m. on Friday during academic 
sessions. Extended hours, often as late as 7 p.m., are offered at the start of each academic session. 

Business Office (706-737-1767) www.aug.edu/business_office 

The Business Office is located on the first floor of Fanning Hall. Normal business hours are 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Monday and 
Tuesday, and 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday. When classes are not in session, the hours on Monday 
and Tuesday are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 

The Business Office is responsible for all accounting and payroll functions for the university. The services to students 
include: 

■ Distribution of financial aid. 

■ Processing of refunds and payables. 

■ Student loan administration and collection. 

■ Payroll processing and distribution. 

■ Billing and receiving of payments. 

Campus Dining (706-737-1599) www.augustastatedining.com 

Whether dining in or carrying out, students may use their Jag Card at all campus dining locations. Campus dining locations 

also accept cash and major credit cards. 

Allgood Cafe offers a great place to eat and to meet friends. A large selection of sandwiches and beverages is available. 

The Jaguar Student Activities Center Food Court features a Starbucks, Freshens Smoothies, Stacks Deli, Arsenal 

Grille, and LaVincita Pizza & Italian Food. 

Hours of operation are posted in each dining location. 

Catering: Our experienced, professional staff would be happy to help plan your student event! 

Career Center (706-737-1 604) www.aug.edu/career_center 

The Career Center provides employment and career development assistance to all currently enrolled students at Augusta State 
University. Graduating seniors have access to services in the career center office for one full year after graduation. Alumni 
Services after this period are available for a nominal fee. The office is located in Boykin Wright Hall at 1 01 5 Johns Road. Office 
hours are 8 a.m.- 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday with evening appointments available upon request. We also offer walk- 
in hours that do not require an appointment and satellite office hours where students can meet career advisors in academic 
buildings on campus. 

Some of the primary activities of the office are: 

JOB SEARCH AND PREPARATION: Once enrolled at Augusta State University, students have automatic access to an 
on-line job search database called ASU CareerLink. This database has listings of current full-time degree required and 
non-degree required vacancies, part-time on and off campus opportunities, internships, volunteer jobs and cooperative 
education jobs. Students can search ASU CareerLink by job title, location, and employer or position type to find jobs 
locally or nationwide that meet their needs. Students may use ASU CareerLink to view the majority of the Federal Work 

Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 33 



Study, Graduate Assistant and Student Assistant job listings. Most jobs require the submission of an approved resume 
ttirough ASU CareerLinl<. Students can practice their interviewing techniques with Interview Stream directly from ASU 
CareerLink. The system also lists upcoming employer visits to campus as well as upcoming career center seminars. 
Career Center Career Advisors assigned by major can assist students directly with resume development by email 
or by appointment. Business majors can receive career advising through the Hull College of Business satellite office 
and should call 706-737-1560 to schedule an appointment. 

CAREER DEVELOPMENT: Meet with our career advisors through individual appointments to receive customized 
job search and career guidance assistance by major. Advice and critique services include resume, cover letter, 
on-line profile, and mock interviews. Career Advisors are available to assist students with career exploration, self- 
assessments, career trends, labor and salary data and employer research methods. Throughout the academic year 
we conduct campus and major-specific seminars on job search strategies, career exploration and career preparation. 
These seminars include resume, CV, and cover letter writing , portfolio development and presentation, interviewing 
techniques, choosing a major, developing effective job search tools, and networking resources. 

CAREER FAIRS: The Career Center offers two campus job fairs in February each year. The Employer Expo links 
students and graduates to employers with part-time and full-time opportunities and with graduate and professional 
schools that have graduate programs of interest. The Educator Expo is also held each February for Education students 
and alumni seeking K-1 2 teaching opportunities. Each fall and spring the office sponsors a job fair with other colleges 
in the state that is hosted in Atlanta for those considering relocation upon graduation. Throughout the year, the 
office also promotes career fair events coordinated by other organizations. 

TECHNOLOGY: The Career Center website provides links to a number of electronic applications for ASU student use. 
In addition to ASU CareerLink, we offer an electronic Career Guide, SIGI and GCIS career assessment and exploration 
systems. Career Spot Videos, and links to other job search and career exploration sites. In the Career Center, on-site 
computers are available for students' use in creating resumes, accessing ASU CareerLink, and researching employment 
opportunities. A fax machine is available to students for submitting application materials to employers free of charge. 

The Center for Teaching and Learning (706-729-2451 ) drichardson@aug.edu 

The Center offers programming designed to nurture the professional development of new and veteran faculty and supports 

research efforts in the context of scholarship of teaching and learning. 

The Conservatory Program at ASU (706-731-7971 ) www.ced.aug.edu/Conservatory 

The Conservatory Program provides professional instruction in music to children and adults in the Greater Augusta area. The 
Conservatory Office is located in, and most of the instruction takes place in, the ASU Fine Arts Building. The program offers 
four kinds of musical instruction: 1) private lessons in voice, all orchestra and band instruments, piano, guitar, and recorder; 
2) class lessons for voice, beginning guitar, beginning piano, and music theory; 3) ensembles for middle and high school 
students (string orchestra, wind ensemble, jazz band); 4) summer camps — week-long day sessions for piano, choir, band, and 
orchestra. Public concerts and recitals are scheduled for both soloists and ensembles each semester. 

Continuing Education (706-737-1636) www.ced.aug.edu 

Continuing Education is proud to offer courses to benefit ASU faculty, staff, and students, as well as Augusta's community at 
large. Our offerings include test prep, medical coding, computer applications and programming, foreign language, job skills, 
management, and a wide variety of other non-credit courses on an ongoing basis. A number of these courses are available on 
campus and over 600 online courses are offered monthly. For the most part, there are no admissions requirements to register 
for Continuing Education classes. 

The Continuing Education Unit (CEU) is awarded for satisfactory completion of a professional development program. PLUs 
(Professional Learning Units) are available to teaching professionals for designated courses. Permanent records are maintained 
by the Continuing Education Division and transcripts are available upon request. 

Cooperative Education (706-737-1604) www.aug.edu/career_center 

Cooperative Education is an academic program that provides an excellent means to develop marketable skills in the workplace 
to complement a student's educational experience in the classroom. Co-op positions are paid positions that are structured to 
enhance the curriculum and expand the knowledge of the student. Students receive documentation of the Co-op experience on 
the academic transcript as a non-credit course. There are three Co-op plans for student participation. Under the Parallel plan, 
students work part-time and attend school concurrently. The Alternating plan allows students to rotate between semesters of 
full-time work and school. The Co-op Intern program is a paid, career related work experience for one semester only. 

To apply for the Co-op program, a full-time student must have a declared major and a minimum Overall 2.5 GPA, be of 
sophomore standing or better, and be willing to work at least two academic semesters in a Co-op assignment (Co-op Intern 
excluded from two semester commitment). Call the office for an appointment for more details. 



^^ Augusta State University Catalog 



Copy Center (706-667-4161 ) www.aug.edu/cso/ 

The copy center can meet all duplication needs and give documents the professional quality that students want and need. 
Services include: color copies, black and white copies, transparencies, folding, binding, shrink-wrapping, and much more. The 
copy center is located in the Central Service warehouse behind the Science Building. Hours of operation are Monday-Friday 
8a.m.-4:30 p.m. 

Counseling Center (706-737-1471) www.aug.edu/counseling/ 

The Counseling Center strives to promote services for personal growth and development. Free and confidential counseling 
services are available for currently enrolled students and employees of ASU. Alumni career counseling services are available 
to eligible ASU graduates for a reasonable fee. The Center is located on the 1 st floor of Boykin Wright Hall, 1015 Johns Road. 
Office hours during the semester are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. After hours appointments may be scheduled by calling 706-737-1471 . 

• Counseling Services: The Center provides individual academic, career and personal counseling. Examples of 
counseling issues may include helping clients choose an appropriate major or career goal, improving study skills or test 
taking or addressing personal problems related to stress, anxiety or depression. Those seeking career exploration have 
access to various career and interest inventory assessments. The Center provides career resources and computer- 
assisted career guidance programs such as the Georgia Career Information System (GCIS). Clients pursuing personal 
counseling for issues that may require long term counseling or specialized treatments not appropriate for the Center 
will receive assistance with an appropriate community referral. 

• Self Help Seminars: Each semester, the Center offers free seminars on study skills, time management, test taking 
and stress management. Other specialty seminars vary by semester but typically include topics such as money 
management, career decision making, relationships, and math anxiety. Faculty and staff development programs target 
special professional issues. 

• Internship Opportunities: Graduate internships are available to ASU students enrolled in the psychology and 
counselor education masters programs. Interested students should visit or call the Center to learn more details and to 
obtain an internship application. Internships are granted on a space available basis following a careful screening and 
interview process. Interns are supervised by licensed counselors and complete an orientation and training period prior 
to providing individual career, academic and personal counseling. Interns also participate in coordinating and facilitating 
outreach programs such as classroom presentations and self-help seminars. 

Cultural and Entertainment Programs 

A wide spectrum of cultural and entertainment programs is provided for students through the dance-concert series, film series. 
and Lyceum series. Outstanding members of the creative and performing arts are brought to campus to enrich the educational, 
personal, social, and cultural components of the student life. These programs are funded by Student Activity fees. 

Lyceum Series: The Augusta State University Lyceum Committee was formed with the spirit of the ancient Lyceum 
in mind. The committee presents to the Augusta State University community the finest in stimulating and entertaining 
lectures, music, theatre, and dance. The result has been a series of uniformly high quality programs funded by Student 
Activity fees. 

Film Series: Each semester from August through May the university presents films of outstanding international 
reputation. Most have been unavailable in local theaters or rental outlets. The series thus provides film students and 
film lovers with an invaluable opportunity to study the art of cinema, wvwv.aug.edu/student_activities/film_series.html 

Curriculum Cenferwww.aug.edu/ccenter/ (706-737-1659) 

The Curriculum Center, a part of Media Services, (see also p. 40), provides a variety of materials and services designed to 
meet the needs of the university's students and faculty. Located in University Hall Room 1 52, the Curriculum Center features 
a collection of children's literature, activity-based magazines and other materials for preparing lesson plans for K-12. a small 
collection of K-12 textbooks, study guides for the GACE tests, and other materials that students will find useful, especially in 
preparing class and lab assignments for education courses. Laminating and book binding are also provided for small fees. A 
die-cut machine is available for use in cutting out letters and shapes for bulletin boards. Information about most Curriculum 
Center materials may be obtained through GIL, the library's online catalog. 

Disabilities Services, Office of (See Testing and Disability Services, p. 44) 

Email Policies and Procedures 

Policies 

Electronic mail (email) is an official method of communication at Augusta State University, delivering information in a convenient. 
timely, cost-effective and environmentally sensitive manner. It is the policy of this institution that: 

all students, faculty and applicable personnel have access to email, and 

the university may send official communications via email and electronic mailing lists. 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 35 



student Email. All students registered for classes at Augusta State University are provided an email account through their 
access to the ASU Campus Pipeline system. The University may use this email account to send communications to the student 
body. Student email addresses will be recorded in the university's electronic directories and records. Students are responsible 
for reading official university email in a timely fashion. 

Privacy Issues. While email is personalized and relatively confidential, there is no guarantee of absolute privacy in a computer 
system. Computer users should be aware that the Georgia Open Records Act applies to records stored in computers as well as 
on paper. Recent rulings indicate that the public has a right to review any documents created on email by government officials 
and that companies who own the media on which email is implemented have the right to read that email. Federal and state law 
may require the university to examine email under some circumstances including provision of messages to outside agencies. 
However, employees of Information Technology Services at Augusta State University are prohibited from accessing information 
for which they have no job-related "need to know." They are also expected to maintain the strictest confidentiality regarding any 
information obtained during the course of fulfilling their job function. 

Appropriate Use of Email. All use of email will be consistent with other university policies, including the Augusta State 
University computer and network usage policy. Policies concerning acceptable use of information technology resources can be 
found on the Information Technology Services website (www.aug.edu/its/policies.html). Email is not appropriate for transmitting: 

sensitive or confidential information hoaxes, scams, false warnings 

obscene material mass mailings 

chain letters or "mail bombs" 

Misuse of Augusta State University email is subject to penalty including, but not limited to, suspension from email use, banning 
from email use, suspension from Augusta State University, or expulsion from Augusta State University. 

Legal Issues. All use of email will be consistent with local, state, and federal law including laws against private use of state 
property, divulging confidential educational records, copyright infringement, fraud, slander, libel, harassment, and obscenity. 
Laws against obscene or harassing telephone calls apply to computers that are accessed by telephone. 

Procedures 
Information Technology Services. Contact Information Technology Services immediately if: , 

you are bothered by uninvited email and have asked the sender to cease yet the email persists; i 

you require specific instructions about or assistance with email accounts. 

Helpdesk services for students are also available from Information Technology Services. 

Student Use of Email. The following procedures apply to student email accounts: 

1 ) Students are expected to check their Augusta State University official email no less than twice per week; 

2) Faculty may require students to check their email more frequently than twice per week; 

3) Faculty may also require students to subscribe to university provided electronic mailing lists or other lists related to their 
coursework. 

Changes to this policy will be authorized by approval of the Faculty Policies Committee. Questions or comments about this 
policy should be directed to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. 

Endowed Professorship Positions 

The Cree-Walker Chairs: The Cree-Walker Professorships in Business Administration, Communications, and Education 
were established in memory of the Reverend and Mrs. Howard T Cree and Mr. J. Miller Walker, the parents and husband of 
the late Mrs. J. Miller Walker. The chair in business administration was established to help in bridging theory to practice and 
maintaining links between the James M. Hull College of Business and the community. The chair in communications is intended 
to be a catalyst to enhance the interface between the School of Business Administration and the communications program in 
the College of Arts and Sciences and to ensure a contemporary perspective in teaching, research, and professional service 
associated with the field of communications. The chair in the College of Education is intended to be a catalyst to enhance 
pre-service and in-service teacher education programs at the university. 

William S. IVIorris Eminent Scholar in Art: The Eminent Scholars Chair in Art was approved in March of 1988 by the 
Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia. The chair, named in honor of the late William S. Morris, is the first 
Eminent Scholars Chair at any University System state university-level institution. The $1 million endowment for the chair 
was established through contributions from William S. Morris III, chairman of the board and chief executive officer of Morris 
Communications Corp., parent company of The Augusta Chronicle; the Georgia General Assembly; and the Augusta State 
University Foundation, Inc. The Georgia Eminent Scholars Endowment Trust Fund was created in 1985 by the Georgia 
General Assembly. The purpose is to provide challenge grants to University System of Georgia colleges and universities to 
endow chairs designed to attract eminent scholars to join their faculties. 



^" Augusta State University Catalog 



The Maxwell Chair: The Graver C. Maxwell Chair of Business Administration was established by the three sons of Grover 
Cleveland Maxwell, Sr. A $150,000 trust fund was established to pronnote and encourage teaching proficiency and high 
scholastic attainment at Augusta State University, The Maxwell Professor of Business Administration is selected by the 
President of Augusta State University with the advice of a special committee. 

Financial Aid (706-737-1 431 ) 
See p. 20 of this catalog. 

First Year Experience (706-729-2174) fye@aug.edu 

The First Year Experience (FYE) is designed for first time students as a way to make an easy and fun transition into college. FYE 
provides a supportive network for students to adjust to Augusta State University's academic, social, and cultural environment. 
The goal of the FYE is to increase retention and help students successfully progress toward graduation. Participants will take 
classes with other FYE students, live together at University Village, have an immediate support group with assigned staff 
mentors, participate in study sessions, attend campus social and athletic events, be a part of a social support system that will 
help students meet new people, interact, share experiences with other first year students. The First Year Experience program 
is open to all first year students who have signed a lease with University Village. Visit ASU's First Year Experience website at 
http://www.aug.edu/fye for more information. 

Grants Administration and Sponsored Programs 

Grants Administration and Sponsored Programs Office, or Grants Office, is the primary point of contact for all faculty and 
staff seeking funding for research, instruction, service and other related activities. The office provides extensive support in 
the development of proposals, budget development, editing, and preparation. The Grants Office is the official gateway for all 
proposals, contracts and other applications submitted to external funding sources and is the home for all compliance matters 
related to research and all sponsored program activity. 

Grover C. I\^axwell Performing Arts Theatre (See - Maxwell Performing Arts Theatre) 

HIV Policy 

NOTE: This policy is based in part on recommendations from The American College Health and Human Services' Guidelines 
for Prevention of Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis B Virus Health Care and Public Safety Workers. 

The spread of HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) is a serious public health problem in the United States. The medical, 
social, legal and ethical issues associated with HIV/AIDS affect colleges and universities as well as society as a whole. 

HIV is the causative agent of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). AIDS destroys the human body's defense system 
and allows life-threatening infections and unusual cancers. There is no known cure or vaccine for prevention. An individual 
can transmit the virus even in the absence of symptoms. Available medical knowledge indicates the transmission is pnmarily 
through sexual contact or through sharing of needles. According to the Centers for Disease Control, contracting the disease in 
one's normal daily activities is not known to occur. 

Because of the seriousness of the HIV/AIDS issue, Augusta State University establishes this policy, which focuses on prevention 
(through education of students, faculty, and staff) and on the compassionate treatment of those afflicted. 

Anyone in the Augusta State University community who becomes aware of an HIV/AIDS related situation involving an employee. 
student, or visitor shall follow the guidelines stated in this policy. 

1. ADMISSION OR EMPLOYMENT: Augusta State University accepts otherwise qualified individuals presenting themselves 
for admission, or employment, irrespective of their HIV status. 

2. DISABLING CONDITIONS: Persons who are HIV positive may be considered by law to have disabling conditions. The 
legal rights of these individuals must be guaranteed, and existing support sePi^ices for disabled individuals made available 
to students or employees disabled by HIV infection. 

3. STUDENT ATTENDANCE: Augusta State University students who are HIV infected, whether they are symptomatic or 
asymptomatic, will be allowed regular class-room attendance as long as they are physically and mentally able to attend 
classes as determined by current Augusta State University standards. 

4. ACCESS TO FACILITIES: There will be no unreasonable restriction of access on the basis of HIV infection to student or 
employee facilities, snack bars, gymnasiums, swimming pools, recreational facilities, or other common areas. 

5. SELF-DISCLOSURE: Neither students, student applicants, employees, nor applicants for employment at Augusta State 
University will be routinely asked to respond to questions concerning the evidence of HIV infection. 

6. IMMUNIZATIONS: Incoming students known to have HIV infection need not be exempted from Augusta State University 
requirements for non-live virus vaccinations since only live-virus vaccinations have potentially serious consequences for HiV- 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 37 



infected persons. Persons who are required to receive live virus immunizations should consult vj\\h their private physician 
or the Richmond County Health Department for current recommendations. 

7. INFORMATION, TESTING, AND COUNSELING: 

TESTING: Students or employees requesting HIV antibody testing will be referred to the local board of health. 
INFORMATION AND COUNSELING: Information and counseling are available through the campus Counseling Center. 
EDUCATION: All undergraduate students at Augusta State University must take WELLNESS (WELL 1 000) as a graduation 
requirement. This course includes information on HIV/AIDS. Seminars, lectures, and the campus newsletter will be used 
to update faculty, students, and staff on HIV-related issues as new information is made available or additional issues need 
to be addressed. 

8. CONFIDENTIALITY: According to the American College Health Association, current medical information concerning HIV 
status neither justifies nor requires warning others of the presence of someone with HIV/AIDS. Situations in which disclosure 
will be made will be determined on a case-by-case basis in consultation with counseling services. 

9. TEACHING LABORATORIES: Laboratory courses requiring exposure to blood, in which blood is obtained by a finger stick, 
will use disposable equipment, and no lancets or other blood-letting devices should be reused or shared. All sharps and 
needles will be disposed of in puncture-resistant containers designated for this purpose. All teaching laboratories should 
conform to OSHA standards for management of blood-borne pathogens. 

10. COLLEGIATE SPORTS: Augusta State University Sports programs conform to NCAA sports guidelines concerning the 
management of blood borne pathogens. Disposal of biohazardous waste shall be disposed of in accordance with the 
Occupational Safety and Health Act, Standard 1910.1030. 

11. JOB PERFORMANCE: Faculty, staff, students, and all other persons affiliated with Augusta State University shall perform 
the responsibilities of their positions irrespective of the HIV status of students or co-workers. 

12. BEHAVIOR RISK: Students, faculty, and staff who are HIV positive and who are aware of the potential danger of their 
condition to others and who engage in behavior (while performing their employee or student-related activities) which 
threatens the safety and welfare of others may be subject to discipline in accordance with Augusta State University 
disciplinary procedures and/or prevailing law. 

13. PUBLIC SAFETY: When responding to an emergency situation where there is the threat of, or evidence of blood or body 
fluids, officers will wear disposable latex gloves and disposable face masks if necessary. The portable pocket mask will be 
used for artificial respiration by those performing CPR. 

14. APPLICABILITY TO OTHER AUGUSTA STATE UNIVERSITY HIV POLICIES: More specific written policies may be 
developed as needed by Department Chairpersons. All policies must be compatible with the university-wide policy. 

Information Technology Services (706-737-1484) vww.aug.edu/its 

Information Technology Services (ITS) is the primary provider of information technology for Augusta State University. Our goal 
is to support the mission of ASU by providing technological leadership and service for the campus while focusing on customer 
service for our constituent groups: our students, our faculty and our staff. 

The resources available to the university community are rapidly expanding. JagNET, the Augusta State University Network, is 
the campus-wide fiber optic network linking computer labs, academic and administrative offices, and Reese Library. JagNET 
provides access to PeachNet, the University System of Georgia's state-wide network, and the Internet, which provides access 
to computing resources all over the world. 

Our computing environment is composed of a state-of-the-art fiber optic network, a combination of Windows-and UNIX-based 
servers and minicomputers, and an extensive array of computer labs available for student use. Our administrative offices and 
faculty have access to a wide range of evolving technology to support the campus. Most of our academic and administrative 
systems use Oracle for the database management system. 

All students are assigned a JagNET computer account called a JagNET ID. This account permits use of campus student 
computers, Internet resources and personal network and web server space. This personal storage can be accessed remotely 
by individuals with a valid JagNET ID. In addition, all students are assigned a Campus Pipeline portal account that gives access 
to campus news and events, web mail, classroom tools, and a calendaring system. Grades, registration for classes, financial 
aid information, and more are all accessible in the portal using ELROY (Electronic Resources On-line for You.) 

WAASU (Pronounced Wah/Zoo), is Wireless Access @ Augusta State University. Wireless network access is available for all 
ASU faculty, staff, and currently enrolled students. With a laptop computer or other portable device and an 802. 1 1 b compatible 
wireless Ethernet card installed, you can access the web from wherever there is a wireless "cloud" (A cloud is that area covered 
by the wireless network-check the ITS website for the latest cloud coverage). Clouds are available in Allgood Hall, Washington 



^" Augusta State University Catalog 



Hall, Reese Library, Christenberry Fieldhouse, Science Hall, University Hall, the Jaguar Student Activities Center and the J. 
Fleming Norvell Golf House. 

The university provides special training on campus-specific softw/are packages, electronic mail, and other resources through 
a combination of periodic seminars and individual instruction. This training is available to students, faculty, and staff and is 
provided free of charge. 

The university has been able to expand significantly and update student technology resources using the student technology 
fee. Computer labs are systematically updated and new/ resources are continually added. There are over 900 computers in 
e-study areas, Internet cafes, departmental labs, and general campus labs, including a lab in the student housing at University 
Village. Services include printing, scanning, and laptop checkout. Information Technology Services is the Intemet Service 
Provider (ISP) for University Village. The ITS HelpDesk is available to assist students connecting their computer to the network 
and to provide basic PC management tools. The Helpdesk is available in multiple locations w/ith phone support available by 
calling 706-737-1482 Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. (regular business hours with the exception of ASU 
holidays). 

Insurance 

By special arrangement the university approves a student health insurance policy which also provides benefits for accident and 
accidental death and dismemberment. The magnitude of student participation in the plan allows the insurer to offer excellent 
benefits for a minimal premium. Applications for student insurance are available in the Office of the Vice President for Student 
Services in Bellevue Hall. 

Jag Card (706-737-1400) jagcard.aug.edu Email: jagcard@aug.edu 

The JagCard is the official student identification card at Augusta State University. The JagCard is used for door and gate 
access at University Village and other locations around campus. Students, faculty, and staff may also use the card as payment 
at locations such as vending machines, campus dining, the bookstore, media services, library, public safety, copy center, 
photocopiers and many other locations. Students, faculty, and staff may add value to their JagCard using cash, check or charge 
at the JagCard Office in the Jaguar Student Activity Center, the ASU Bookstore in Washington Hall or the Business Office in 
Fanning Hall; they may add value using cash only at the JagCard terminals in the Allgood Hall lobby, Jaguar Student Activity 
Center lobby or the University Village clubhouse. The JagCard, which remains the property of ASU, should be carried with 
you at all times and must be presented when requested by a University official. Lending the card to anybody is a violation of 
regulations and is subject to penalty. Lost or stolen JagCards must be reported immediately to the JagCard Office, second floor 
of the Jaguar Student Activities Center, Room 236, 706-731-7080 or online atjagcard.aug.edu and the replacement charge is 
$15.00, 

Library (706-737-1744) vww.aug.edu/library 

Reese Library, the information center of Augusta State University, provides a wide variety of services for students. Thousands 
of journals, newspaper articles and books are available in electronic full-text through GALILEO, an initiative of the University 
System of Georgia. In support of student learning and research, there is a collection of more than 500,000 print and online 
books, plus an extensive collection of government publications, special collections and archives of materials relating to Augusta 
State and the greater Augusta area, over 400 print periodicals and more than 45,000 online journal titles. 

There are quiet study areas, casual seating areas and study rooms, a family room for students with children, wireless connectivity 
to the Internet, photocopiers, microform copiers, and laptops available to borrow, computer equipment and enlargers for those 
visually-challenged, and almost 100 public computers providing access to online databases and full-text information. 

GIL, the library's computerized catalog, gives access to information about library materials and other university system libraries. 
GALILEO, a statewide computer system, provides a wealth of additional information resources including more than 300 journal 
and newspaper databases, some with full text. These and other electronic information resources are available in the library, 
on the campus computer network, and, in most cases from off-campus computers with a password. Contact the Reese Library 
Reference department (706-737-1748) for current availability and access information. 

Materials from other libraries may be obtained through interlibrary loan via the University System of Georgia Universal Catalog's 
GIL Express for books and via ILLIAD for books and journal articles, with the option of having journal articles delivered directly 
to campus email accounts. 

Instructional sessions for classes and individuals are scheduled each semester (706-737-1748). Reese Library also offers a 
two-credit-hour course, ILIT 1500, which focuses on finding and evaluating research materials for a term paper. The course is 
offered each semester. 

The building is named for Dr. and Mrs. John T. Reese, parents of alumna Katherine Reese Pamplin. The three-story 80,000 
square foot library has a seating capacity of just over 500. The library is open 85.5 hours a week when classes are in session. 
Hours are abbreviated during breaks in the academic schedule. For assistance, the Reference and Circulation Desks are 
staffed whenever the library is open, call 706-737-1748, or email reference@aug.edu. 



Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 39 



Maxwell Performing Arts Theatre (706-729-2310) www.aug.edu/pat/ 

The Grover C. Maxwell Performing Arts Theatre is the cultural heart of the ASU campus. Students take center stage at the 
Maxwell Theatre. The Department of Music ensembles and the ASU Theatre events provide ample performance opportunities 
for students. Students, faculty, staff, and community members attend a broad variety of events. The Student Activities Lyceum 
Series presents national and international music, dance, and theatre companies. Also part of Lyceum, the Harry Jacobs 
Chamber Music Society brings a rich series of world class performers to campus and the Augusta Symphony calls the Maxwell 
Theatre home for its Publix Family Series. 

The Maxwell's stage and stage thrust multi-level extension make the theatre extremely versatile. Performances from opera 
and theatre to symphony and dance all feel at home on the Maxwell stage. The theatre is an intimate venue for the audience 
with each of its 750 seats remarkably close to the stage. Many performances at the Maxwell Theatre are free to ASU students, 
faculty, and staff with a valid ASU ID, and all performances are reasonably priced for the general public. For information about 
upcoming performances, call the box office at 706-667-4100. For technical information about the theatre call the Theatre 
Production Coordinators' office at 706-667-4099. 

Media Services (706-737-1703) www.aug.edu/media_services/ 

Media Services, a part of Reese Library, is located in University Hall Room 156. Dedicated to serving the university's 
instructional technology needs, Media Services includes the Media Center, Classroom Services, Curriculum Center, (see 
also p. 35), satellite conferencing and IP videoconferencing. Tours and instructional training are provided for individuals and 
classes. Viewing Rooms 157 and 160 are available with state-of-the-art Surround Sound, high resolution video projection, 
VCR, DVD players, and a computer with Internet. 

The Media Center features a media collection of over 6,500 items in different formats, including interactive laser disc, audio 
cassette, compact disc, record albums, 16mm film, CD ROM, and 35mm slide. Items can be used at 30 individual carrels. 
Instructional support services include an equipment and material check out system, video and audio duplication and editing, 
and the production of presentations using videotape, audiotape, 35mm slide, multimedia, DVD, CD duplication, and color 
laser printing. Items available for checkout include laptop computers, digital still cameras, digital video cameras, tripods, and 
videos. 

Classroom Services provides a wide range of audiovisual presentation equipment available to students for use in all academic 
classrooms. Reservations for delivery and setup are requested in advance. 

Parking Services (706-729-2090, Fax 706-667-4353) www.aug.edu/public_safety/parkingintropage.html 

PARKING RULES AND REGULATIONS 

Student, Faculty, and Staff. All motorized vehicles parked on the ASU campus must display a current parking decal which 
should be properly displayed on the vehicle's rear view mirror. Decals on motorcycles/scooters should be affixed to a front fork 
or to the rear of the bike where it is visible. Motorcycles/scooters must park in spaces designated for motorcycles. Bicycles do 
not require a decal for parking. Should you desire, however, its description and serial number can be recorded. Bicycles must 
be parked in bicycle racks and a lock is recommended to deter possible theft. For safety and liability reasons, no skateboarding 
or rollerblading on sidewalks, walkways and/or in or around campus buildings will not be allowed. 

Decals may be picked up at the Public Safety Office Monday through Friday (see hours listed on parking web page at http:// 
www.aug.edu/public_safety/parkingintropage.html ). A current parking decal must be displayed by the end of the first week of 
the semester. Replacement and second decals and can be obtained for a fee. 

Temporary decals are issued free of charge to students, staff, and faculty who have previously purchased a current decal. 
Temporary decals are limited to a two-week period. A note affixed to the vehicle is not accepted as a temporary decal. Part time 
faculty, staff, work-study, student assistant, transient, graduate and alumni students who are attending classes are required to 
obtain a current parking decal (not a temporary decal). Parking lots and spaces are designated for students or faculty/staff 
parking and vehicles therein must display the appropriate, valid decal. Students may park in faculty/staff lots between the hours 
of 4:30 p.m. until 6:30 a.m. Students may not park in visitor spaces. 

All vehicles illegally parked are subject to be issued a citation. This includes parking on yellow curbs, on the grass, next to fire 
hydrant, or in handicap spaces without the proper handicap decal displayed. Motorcycles will also be cited for parking near 
building entrances, on the grass or areas not designated a motorcycle parking space. Overflow parking spaces are located 
in St. Mary's Catholic Church, First Southern Methodist Church, Adas Yeshurun Synagogue, and Trinity on the Hill Methodist 
Church. 

Handicap Decals: Valid handicap plates and permits issued by the State of Georgia or other states will be honored on the 
campus. Applications for State handicap decals are available in the Public Safety Office. 

Visitors: Visitors must stop at the Public Safety Office to obtain a current visitor decal before parking on campus. 



^^ Augusta State University Catalog 



student Appeals: Citations may be appealed to the Student Government Judicial Cabinet within five (5) business days 
inclusive of the date of the citation or the right to appeal is forfeited. Citations must be paid prior to appealing. Appeal forms 
are also available in the Public Safety Office. For procedural questions contact the Student Judicial Cabinet at 706-737-1608. 
Towing and Immobilization: Individuals who have received three citations and have neglected to respond either by appeal or 
payment will be placed on a tow/immobilization list. A fourth citation may result in the vehicle being towed or immobilized by a 
car boot. All fines including a boot removal fee must be paid before a vehicle is released. In addition, a vehicle may be towed 
if it presents a traffic safety hazard. ASU assumes no responsibility for damage as a result of vehicle being towed. The owner 
of the vehicle will be responsible for the towing expenses. 

Accidents: The driver(s) involved in any accidents on campus resulting in the injury to, or death of, or damage to any property 
of another shall immediately stop their vehicle at the scene of the accident. The persons involved should remain at the scene 
of the accident until an officer arrives and completes their investigation. Drivers must present the officer(s) with valid proof of 
insurance and driver's license. 

Speed Limits/Traffic: Posted speed limits must be observed: Parking lots speed limit 10 mph and all other areas 15 mph. 
Pedestrians have the right of way and caution must be exercised at all times while driving on campus. 

VIOLATION FINE 

Handicap Access or Space 75.00 
Fire Lane or Within 5' of the Hydrant 75.00 

Boot Fine 50.00 

Failure to Display Current Decal 25.00 

Service Area 25.00 

Yellow Curb or Lines 25.00 

Roadway 25.00 

Visitor Space 25.00 

Faculty/Staff Space 25.00 

improperly Parked in Space 25.00 

Other (Specify) 25.00 

Warning Notice (No Fine) 

Performing Arts Theatre (See - Maxwell Performing Arts Theatre) 

Physical Plant {706-737-^59Q■, FAX 706-731-7970) vww.aug.edu/php/ 

The mission of the Physical Plant Department is to efficiently construct, renovate, maintain, operate and service the campus 
building, utilities, and grounds in order to provide a clean, comfortable, safe, healthy, and attractive environment for learning 
and working. Requests for facility work should be submitted to the Physical Plant using a work-request form or calling in a 
service call to x1590 from any campus phone. 

Public Relations and Publications Office (706-737-1444) www.aug.edu/pubiic relations/ 
The Office of Public Relations and Publications offers and coordinates services to enhance the visibility and accurately project 
the image of Augusta State University. The office is responsible for news/media relations, publications, advertising, institutional 
identity, web design, and strategic public relations planning. 

Public Safety Services (706-737-1401 ) wvw.aug.edu/pubiic_safety/ 

Police, Fire, and Medical Emergencies Dial 706-729-2911 or Non Emergencies Dial 706-737-1401 

The mission of the Augusta State University Department of Public Safety is to complement and support the University by 

providing services which contribute to the preservation of life, the protection of property, the safety of the campus community 

and the facilitation of vehicle and pedestrian traffic movement on campus. To contact public safety call 1401 from any campus 

phone. 

Communications: 

Public Safety maintains 24-hour communications for Police Services. Communications personnel have access to both national 
and statewide law enforcement databases. Dispatch and patrol have direct radio communication with area law enforcement 
agencies. 

Code Blue Emergency Telephones have been placed in strategic locations throughout campus. All campus elevators are 
equipped with emergency telephones for emergency contact with Public Safety. 

The University Police Department Communications Center operates 24 hours a day, 365 days a year providing a direct link from 
the university community to the on-duty police units. Communication officers receive calls on the business line 706-737-1401 
and the emergency line 706-729-291 1 . After obtaining the necessary information from the caller, police units are then directed 
to accomplish their assigned duties and related tasks. Communication is maintained with other local law enforcement agencies. 

Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 41 



Assistance is provided and received by request from these agencies including the dissemination of pertinent information in the 
location of a particular subject and/or vehicle. 

The communication officers use the Computer Aided Dispatch (CAD) System for centralized record keeping and the dispatching 
of officers to assigned calls. The communication officers are certified to operate and monitor the National Crime Information 
Center/Georgia Crime Information Center (NCIC/GCIC) for regional broadcasts that are received by this terminal. Any 
information that may be relevant for the surrounding area is disseminated to the officers by radio. The dispatcher is responsible 
for entering information from crime reports such as stolen vehicles, license plates, weapons and different types of articles that 
have a serial number. Also information pertaining to driver's license, vehicle tags, stolen vehicles, stolen property, etc. can also 
be obtained through this system. 

Patrol: 

Public Safety maintains a 7 day / 24 hour police patrol of all University property. Officers patrol in vehicles, on bikes, and on 
foot. They provide accident reports, incident reports, and all other normal police department functions. 

The Patrol Division of the Augusta State University Police Department is responsible for patrolling the campus and affiliate 
sites, responding to requests for service 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. This division is responsible for the protection of life 
and property on campus. Seventeen (17) sworn/certified police officers patrol the campus utilizing cars, bikes, and foot patrol. 
The Patrol Division is comprised of three shifts, each consisting of a Supervisor, and supporting officers. 

All officers are certified in accordance with the Georgia Peace Officers Standards and Training Council rules and regulations. 
They respond to calls for service, make preliminary investigations of reported crimes, provide escorts, provide in-service 
trainings and assist the campus community in any way possible. Uniform police officers receive a minimum of twenty (20) hours 
in service training each year that includes topics such as crisis management, legal updates, active shooter training, domestic 
violence, CPR, conflict resolution and assorted other areas that enhance their ability to enforce the law and help our community. 

Lost and Found: 

Public Safety maintains lost and found property for the University. These services are located at the Public Safety Building. If 
you have lost some property you can stop by the Public Safety Office and have an officer complete a Lost Property Form. In 
the event the property is turned in or found, you will be notified. Found property should be turned in to Public Safety. We will 
make every effort to locate the legal owner. 

ASU ID cards are delivered to the Student Activities Office. All other real property is held for sixty days and then disposed of 
according to Georgia law. 

The Augusta State University Police Department maintains a found property repository. 

Found property should be turned into the University Police Department. You may either call 706-737-1401 to have an officer 
meet with you to pick up the found property or you may take the property directly to the University Police Department located 
in Public Safety BIdg off Gorgas Road. DO NOT send found property through inter-campus mail. 

Lost property should be reported to the Augusta State University Police Department by telephoning 706-737-1401. University 
Police make every effort to locate the owner of found property and return it. Found property with some form of identification can 
be returned to the rightful owner without delay. Found property is held for ninety (90) days and if the owner cannot be located, 
it is transferred to the ASU found property custodian to be disposed of in accordance with Board of Regents Policy. 

After-Hours Building Access: 

• Must have a valid ASU ID. 

• Must have prior written permission from the Administrator in charge of the area where access is needed. 

• Must have a "lab partner " in certain restricted areas designated by the university for safety reasons. 

• Students are not allowed to bring non- students / unauthorized person(s) into ASU facilities. 

• Facilities are defined as buildings, labs, athletic fields, and or other real property owned or leased by ASU. 

• Failure to present a valid ID card will result in the person not being allowed to enter the area and being asked to leave 
campus. 

University Policy allows for students to enter campus facilities after-hours when they have received Prior written Authorization. 
This means your professor, supervisor, or building manager must submit the proper paperwork to the Public Safety Office prior 
to you being admitted to the locked building or area. In the event the University is closed for an Emergency during the semester, 
there will be no access granted to any student, faculty, or staff without authorization from the Office of the President. 

Access to ASU computer rooms are for current enrolled students only. The Department of Information Technology sets computer 
room hours. 



'^^ Augusta State University Catalog 



Motorist Assistance: 

Public Safety Officers can provide assistance in jumping off dead car batteries and unlocking vehicles. Due to insurance 
restrictions, officers are not allowed to change flat tires. 

Officer Escorts: 

Public Safety Officers are available to provide personal Safety escorts upon request. 

Crime Prevention: 

Crime prevention and personal safety information is available from the Public Safety Office. Officers provide class lecture, 

handout materials and or instruction for interested groups both on and off campus. 

Locate Persons: 

Public Safety will attempt to locate students, faculty or staff for life safety emergency situations only. 

Special Duty: 

Public Safety Officers provide police coverage at many University events. 

First Aid Injuries I Safety Hazards Reporting: 

For first aid assistance, you should call the Departmentof Public Safety at 706-737-1401 (non-life threatening) or 706-729-2911 
for serious injuries. All injuries, which occur on ASU property no matter how minor, should be reported to the Department of 
Public Safety and a student / visitors / employee injury report filed. 

Any unsafe working condition, unsafe acts or safety hazards should also be reported to the Public Safety Department 
immediately at the numbers listed above. 

CPR, First Aid and AED Training: 

Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and First Aid training is available through the Public Safety Office. Officers are certified 
by The American Red Cross to deliver this life-saving training. Instruction is also available for the use of an Automatic External 
Defibrillator (AED). Annual training is provided to Public Safety, Physical Plant, Athletics, and other university employees. 
Others can receive this training through the ASU Continuing Education Department by calling their office at 706-737-1636. 
Visit site. 

Child Safety Restraint: 

A Public Safety Officers can provide instruction and or information relating to Child passenger safety. Georgia State law 40-8-76 
requires that all children under the age of five be in an approved child safety seat. 

Community Involvement: 

Public Safety personnel are active in many professional organizations such as: 

International Association of Campus Law Enforcement Administrators, Georgia Association of Chiefs of Police, Georgia 
Association of Campus Law Enforcement Administrators Georgia Council on Child Abuse, East Central Georgia Traffic 
Enforcement Network, Safe Communities Coalition, Augusta Judicial District Domestic Violence Task Force, Prevent Child 
Abuse Augusta, Rape Crisis & Sexual Assault Services of Augusta, and others. Officers also participate in The Richmond 
County Adopt-a-School program by providing various services at Joseph Lamar Elementary School Augusta, Ga. 

Fire Safety: 

As part of our Fire Safety Program here at ASU, Public Safety conducts monthly inspections on all campus fire extinguishers. 
Annual fire extinguisher training is provided in conjunction with the Augusta-Richmond County Fire Department. 

Crime Prevention: 

The Crime Prevention Officer's primary function is the reduction or elimination of criminal opportunities before a crime can 
occur. Chief Cooke teaches ASU 1000 classes to students covering topics of identity theft, car thefts and other campus 
safety issues. Additionally, other Officers are assigned to conduct seminars in the residence hall such as Sexual Assault/Rape 
Prevention, Personal Safety. 

Research Center (706-667-4426; FAX: 706-667-4116) wvw.aug.edu/rcenter/ 

The Research Center is a nonprofit organization established to serve the Central Savannah River Area. The center is an 
integral part of Augusta State University and utilizes the expertise of the faculty and staff. The center provides all types of 
research. Specific survey services offered include political surveys, market research, focus groups, and other data collection 
and analysis projects. 

A benefit to the university is student involvement in research activity. Many of the projects are of a type that permits students 
to serve effectively as support personnel. The center is self-supporting and depends upon users' fees charged to the clientele. 

Student Activities (706-737-1 609) vww.aug.edu/student_activities/ 

The Office of Student Activities provides students with the opportunity to become involved in areas outside the classroom that 
complement academic undertakings. It also strives to provide an educational foundation by learning through doing and by 
enatDling students to be creative, responsible, and productive citizens. The development of the "whole person" is a cornerstone 

Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 43 



of student Activities programming. These outside activities support the stated purpose of Augusta State University and are part 
of the institution's philosophy. 

The Office of Student Activities is responsible for many areas funded by the Student Activities fee. This office provides advice 
and assistance to the Student Senate, Jaguar Activities Board, Judicial Cabinet, fraternities, sororities, and chartered clubs 
and organizations. In addition, the office provides ID cards, meeting room reservations, a leadership library, and a central 
information center. The office also publishes the Jaguar Student Handbook and the semester calendar. 

Student Development (706-729-2351 ) www.aug.edu/student_development 

The Office of Student Development assists Augusta State University students in retention and academic advancement efforts. 
The office serves to bridge the gap between students, faculty, and staff. For some students, the pursuit of higher education 
may present particular challenges and the office provides special assistance and motivation to such students, as well as 
offering guidance and assistance with academic, social, cultural, and personal concerns. This office also oversees the efforts 
of the Minority Advising Program, which is open to all students and was specifically established to enhance the academic 
welfare of minority students in the University System of Georgia. The Program's goals include the promotion of academic 
success, development of human potential, and the creation of an environment that fosters the success and retention of minority 
students. For additional information please visit the office web site at http;//www.aug.edu/student_development 

Student Government Association (706-737-1608) www.aug.edu/sga/ 

The Student Government Association (SGA) serves as a means for student input and involvement. It is composed of four 
branches: Executive, Judicial, Senate, and Jaguar Activities Board. All student positions on faculty-student committees and 
the Judicial Cabinet are appointed by the SGA President. Traffic appeals are heard by the Judicial Cabinet. The Senate is 
the legislative body for the SGA. The Jaguar Activities Board is the primary programming board of the university. Numerous 
positions are available to students interested in collegiate planning and service. 

Student Organizations 

A complete listing can be found in the Student Handbook, www.aug.edu/student_activities/docs/handbook.pdf. 

Student Records (706-737-1408) 

Permanent academic records are maintained by the Registrar in the Office of Student Records located on the main floor in Payne 
Hall. Under the provisions of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (often referred to as the "Buckley Amend- 
ment"), a student attending a post-secondary educational institution may examine his or her permanent record maintained by 
the institution to assure the accuracy of its contents. This Act also provides that no personally identifiable information will be 
released to any party not authorized to have access to such information without the written consent of the student. 

Student Services (706-737-1411 ) www.aug.edu/student_services_division/dean_of_students.html 
The mission of Student Services is to provide opportunities for student growth at all levels of development — personal, social, 
academic, cultural, and professional — and to provide student services that contribute to educational programs and student 
success. The Vice President for Student Services and Dean of Students is charged with supervising the Counseling Center, 
the Career Center, Testing and Disability Services, Financial Aid, Student Activities, International Student Programs, the First 
Year Experience Program, University Village and the Grover C. Maxwell Performing Arts Theatre. The Assistant Dean of 
Students works closely with the Vice President to coordinate International student programs and other special projects focusing 
on the first-year experience. The Vice President enforces the Student Code of Conduct and serves as faculty advisor to the 
Student Judicial Cabinet. The office also provides housing and student health insurance information. The Student Services 
office is located in Bellevue Hall and is open from 8 a.m. until 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. To arrange an appointment 
after hours, call 706-737-1411 or email the office at: deanofstudents@aug.edu. 

Study Abroad Office (706-729-2306) http://www.aug.edu/studyabroad/ 

The study abroad office is located in Allgood Hall El 34 and is open from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. every day. The office provides 

opportunities for students to travel abroad on academic programs and earn credit towards their degree. 

Additionally, the office provides opportunities for students to earn money towards the payment of their study-abroad experience 
through fundraising, work opportunities and scholarships. Students should come to the office for more information on programs, 
funding, academic content, and any other issues pertaining to experiences abroad. 

Testing and Disability Services (706-737-1469) (TDD 706-667-4684) 

www.aug.edu/testing_and_disability_services 

The Office of Testing and Disability Services provides national and institutional testing and helps to ensure an accessible and 
positive college experience for students with disabilities. The Center is located in the quadrangle next to Fanning Hall. Office 
hours are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 

• Testing Services administers the University System of Georgia COMPASS exam, the University System of Georgia Regents' 
Test, departmental Exit Exams, and other institutional tests. Testing Services also oversees the administration of national testing 
programs such as the PRAXIS, Graduate Record Examination (GRE) subject tests, the American College Testing Program 
(ACT), Law School Admissions Tests (LSAT), Test of Essential Academic Skills (TEAS), Miller Analogies Test (MAT), College 

^'^ Augusta State University Catalog 



Level Examination Program (CLEP), and other national tests as the need arises. Call to inquire about other examinations not 
listed here. Some of the tests have fees and require registration. Fees and test dates vary and can be obtained by calling the 
Office. Testing information can be picked up from the Office. 

• Disability Services provides assistance to students who have either a physical, emotional or learning impairment which 
substantially limits one or more life activities. To receive services, students must provide current documentation of the disability 
from a qualified professional. The Board of Regents' criteria for evaluations must be follovi/ed in the documentation of learning 
disorders or attention deficit disorders. 

It is important to note that Disability Services may require advanced notice (two months or more before the student's first day 
of class) in order to coordinate reasonable accommodations. Please contact the Office in order to schedule an appointment. 

Certain auxiliary aid services, like sign-language interpreters, may take several months to coordinate. Augusta State University 
uses the services of the Alternative Media Access Center (AMAC) to provide books in an alternative format for students who 
have a documented need for this accommodation. Depending on availability, books in an alternative format may take seven to 
ten days (if already available in an alternative form) to several months for production (if the text is not available in an alternative 
form). It is therefore necessary for students who need specialized services to plan their future accommodations at least a 
semester in advance. 

Learning Disabilities (LP) : Students who have been diagnosed within the last three years or believe that they have a learning 
disability, should contact the Office of Testing and Disability Services for information related to LD documentation and testing. In 
assisting students with learning disabilities, Augusta State University follows the definition and criteria for evaluation established 
by the Board of Regents (BOR) of the University System of Georgia. The Office of Testing and Disability Services does not 
provide testing for learning disabilities, however, referrals to the appropriate Regents' Center for Learning Disorders must be 
received through this office. Testing may also be conducted by a qualified professional utilizing the BOR criteria for outside 
evaluations (only assessments meeting BOR criteria will be accepted as documentation of a learning disability). 

Veterans' Affairs (706-737-1606) www.aug.edu/registrarvaA/A/va.htm 

Augusta State University maintains a full-time Office of Veterans' Affairs (OVA) to assist veterans in maximizing their educational 
experience. The OVA coordinates and/or monitors ASU and VA programs, policies, and procedures as they pertain to veterans. 
The Office of Veterans' Affairs is housed in the Registrar's office on the first floor of Payne Hall. 

As students at Augusta State University, veterans and certain other persons may qualify under Chapters 30. 31. 32, 33. 35. 
Title 38, and Chapter 1606 and 1607 Title 10, UNITED STATES CODE, for financial assistance from Veterans Affairs. Eligibility 
for such benefits must be established in accordance with policies and procedures of the VA. Interested persons are advised 
to investigate their eligibility early in their planning for college. Pertinent information and assistance may be obtained from the 
Augusta State University Office of Veterans' Affairs. New or returning students should make adequate financial provisions for 
one full semester from other sources, since payments from the VA are sometimes delayed. 

The Office of Veterans' Affairs furnishes the Veterans Affairs certifications of enrollment. Eligible persons should establish and 
maintain contact with the OVA to ensure their understanding of and compliance with both VA and university policy, procedure, 
and requirements, thereby ensuring timely and accurate receipt of benefits and progress toward an educational objective. 

Each person receiving VA education benefit payments is responsible for ensuring that all information affecting his or her receipt 
of benefits is kept current, and each must confer personally with the staff in the OVA at least once each semester to keep his or 
her status active and current to receive funds. Those persons using Chapter 33 must bring their Certificate of Eligibility (COE) 
into the OVA prior to the beginning of their first semester. 

Web Site, ASU www.aug.edu/ 

Writing Center (706-737-1402) www.aug.edu/writing_center/writing_center.htm 

The ASU Writing Center is located in University Hall Room 235. It is open during fall and spring terms 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday 
through Thursday and 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday. Summer hours are 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. We assist students from all disciplines with 
their composition skills. From planning and organization, to the final editing, our tutors will assist all currently enrolled students 
with all aspects of the writing process. Visit our web site at http://www.aug.edu/writing_center. 



Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 45 



student Rights and Responsibilities 

ASU is committed to nurturing intellectual diversity on the campus. While faculty members have the responsibility to present in 
the classroom their understanding of current scholarship in their fields, and at appropriate times should feel free to express their 
personal opinions, they should create an atmosphere where students feel free to retain their own beliefs, and should treat with 
respect dissenting opinions which are civilly and sincerely expressed. However, faculty bear responsibility for managing the 
classroom and are under no obligation to ensure that all opinions are expressed or that opposing opinions receive equal class 
time; faculty members may determine that some opinions or subjects — which might be maintained and discussed elsewhere 
on campus — are inappropriate for individual classrooms. Students should not be rewarded or assessed according to whether 
they as individuals share their professors' personal opinions; students should be appropriately assessed on their understanding 
of generally accepted theories and ideas current in the field. 

In an academic community, honesty and integrity must prevail if the work done and the honors awarded are to receive their 
respect. The erosion of honesty is the academic community's ultimate loss. The responsibility for the practice and preservation 
of honesty must be equally assumed by all of its members. 

Academic Honesty 

Definition: Academic honesty requires the presentation for evaluation and credit of one's own work, not the work of others. In 
general, academic honesty excludes: 

1. Cheating on an examination of any type: giving or receiving, offering or soliciting information on any examination. This 
includes the following: 

a. Copying from another student's paper. 

b. Use of prepared materials, notes, or texts other than those specifically permitted by the instructor during the examination. 

c. Collaboration with another student during an examination. 

d. Buying, selling, stealing, soliciting, or transmitting an examination or any other material purported to be the unreleased 
contents of an upcoming examination, or the use of any such material. 

e. Substituting for another person during an examination or allowing such substitution for oneself. 

f. Bribery of any person to obtain examination information. 

2. Plagiarism is the failure to acknowledge indebtedness. It is always assumed that the written work offered for evaluation 
and credit is the student's own unless otherwise acknowledged. Such acknowledgment should occur whenever one quotes 
another person's actual works; whenever one appropriates another person's ideas, opinions, or theories, even if they are 
paraphrased; and whenever one borrows facts, statistics, or other illustrative materials unless the information is common 
knowledge. 

3. Collusion is collaboration with another person in the preparation or editing of notes, themes, reports, or other written work 
or in laboratory work offered for evaluation and credit, unless such collaboration is specifically approved in advance by the 
instructor. 

4. Credential misrepresentation is the use of false or misleading statements in order to gain admission to Augusta State 
University. It also involves the use of false or misleading statements in an effort to obtain employment or college admission 
elsewhere, while one is enrolled at Augusta State University. 

Faculty Responsibility: It is the duty of the faculty to practice and preserve academic honesty and to encourage it among 
students. The instructor should clarify any situation peculiar to the course that may differ from the generally stated policy. He or 
she should furthermore endeavor to make explicit the intent and purpose of each assignment so that the student may complete 
the assignment without unintentionally compromising academic honesty. It is the responsibility of the faculty member to provide 
for appropriate supervision of examinations. 

Student Responsibility: It is the duty of the student to practice and preserve academic honesty. If the student has any doubt 
about a situation, he or she should consult with his or her instructor. 

Procedures: Upon encountering a violation of academic honesty by a student, a faculty member should; 

1. Confront the student and make the charges known. 

2. Discuss the matter thoroughly with the student so that each position is clearly delineated. 

3. Decide what action is appropriate. 

4. Remind the student to refer to the Student Academic Appeals and Student Academic Grievances procedures outlined 
below. 

If the action is less severe than a WF for the course; 

1 . Report the violation and the action taken to the chairperson of the department in which the violation occurred, who will then 
report the matter to the Dean of that College. 

2. Decide whether the incident shall be made part of the academic dishonesty file in the office of the Vice President for 
Academic Affairs. 

If a WF for the course: 
^" Augusta State University Catalog 



3. Notify the Dean of the College through his/her departmental chairperson and initiate a WF withdrawal form. At this point, the 
matter shall be reviewed by a departmental committee, the chairperson, or the Dean. 

4. If those reviewing the matter do not agree with the interpretation of the evidence or with the action taken by the faculty 
member, they may ask him/her to reconsider. After reconsidering the matter, the faculty member may stand by the original 
decision and forward the WF withdrawal form to the Dean. 

5. If those reviewing agree with the faculty member, the withdrawal form shall be forwarded to the Dean. 

The Dean shall: 

1 . Review each faculty member's recommendation for a WF for the course, check the academic honesty status of the student 
via the academic dishonesty file, and either let the WF stand or make some other recommendation. The final decision shall 
be made by the faculty member. 

2. If the WF is to stand, send the withdrawal form to the Registrar and request the Vice President for Academic Affairs to enter 
the violation in the academic dishonesty file. 

3. Notify the student in writing of the action taken, remind the student of his/her right to appeal as outlined below, and inform 
the student that if he/she plans to appeal, the appeal must be filed within three calendar days. 

4. Notify the involved faculty member in writing of the action taken. 

The Vice President for Academic Affairs shall: 

1. Upon a student's second offense requiring a WF for a course, expel the student from Augusta State University and direct 
the Registrar to enter the phrase "Ineligible to Register" on the student's permanent record. 

2. Maintain the academic dishonesty file so that all appropriate administrators have access to the record of violations but also 
so that the student's rights to limited access shall be safe-guarded. 

Should the student desire to appeal the decision that a violation of academic honesty occurred, he or she may appeal that 
finding via the academic grievance process. A student who wishes to appeal shall submit a written grievance (as defined in 
stage two of the Student Academic Grievance policy) to the appropriate dean. The dean will provide copies of the written 
grievance to the instructor, the department chair, and the Academic Policies Committee and will ask the Academic Policies 
Committee to arrange a hearing in the manner set forth in this catalog under stage three of Student Academic Grievances. The 
grievance will proceed beginning at stage three, section A of the grievance process. 

Discipline 

Augusta State University has defined the relationships and appropriate behavior of students as members of the university 
community through the document Student Code of Conduct in the Student Handbook. The document is available to all members 
of the university community through the Office of the Dean of Students. 

The students of Augusta State University have established a precedent of exemplary behavior as members of the university 
and civic communities. Individuals and groups are expected to observe the tradition of decorum and behave in no way which 
would precipitate physical, social, or emotional hazards to other members of the university community. Improper behavior is at 
once a breach of tradition and inconsistent with the aims and objectives of the university. Such behavior subjects the student 
to disciplinary probation, suspension, expulsion, or other appropriate disciplinary measures. 




Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 



47 



student Academic Appeals 

An academic appeal is a request for review of an administrator's decision made with respect to an individual student which 
bears upon his/her student career. The appeals procedure does not apply to issues which have broad application to the 
university as a whole or to constituent groupings within the university. However, appeals can be made in matters such as 
admission, transfer of credit, probation, suspension, dismissal, and other similar matters. A supervisor's decision in an appeal 
can itself be appealed, but there is no appeal of the President's decisions except in cases where it is reasonably alleged that a 
decision against the student was based on discrimination with respect to race, sex, age, handicap, religion, or national origin. 

A student may file an appeal whenever he or she can reasonably claim that an administrator's decision affecting his or her 
program of study was not justified by the procedures and/or guidelines established to govern that decision. It is not necessary 
that the student allege discrimination or other wrongdoing on the part of the administrator. 

The student should submit the appeal in writing to the immediate supervisor of the administrator whose decision he or she 
questions. It is the student's responsibility to gather the evidence necessary to support his or her case and to include that 
evidence when submitting the written appeal. In preparing the appeal, the student should keep in mind that the primary issue 
is whether the administrative decision was justified by the procedures and/or guidelines established to govern that decision. 

The supervisor to whom the appeal is made may choose to appoint and be advised by a consultative board composed of 
students and/or faculty and/or administrators of the supervisor's own choosing, and may also choose to charge such a board 
with hearing oral arguments and/or with making inquiries into specified matters of fact. However, if a student has alleged 
discrimination on the basis of race, sex, age, handicap, religion, or national origin, a consultative board must be appointed and 
must include at least one student and at least one faculty member who is not an administrator. In no case will the supervisor 
be bound by the advice of the board. 

Student Academic Grievances 

The following grievance procedure primarily applies to a student's alleged violations of his or her rights by his or her instructor. 
However, if a student's problem is related to admission, transfer of credit, probation, suspension, or dismissal, he or she 
may wish to enter an academic appeal, as described in the previous section of this manual. If the student's problem is with 
an administrator's decision regarding a matter between the student and the instructor, the student should use the academic 
appeals process unless he or she can reasonably claim that the administrator's decision constitutes a violation of his or her 
rights. In the latter case, the student may choose to use the academic grievance procedure, adapting it to his or her case so 
as to begin with the administrator and his or her supervisor rather than the instructor and his or her chair and dean (as outlined 
below). The Academic Policies Committee is the final arbiter of whether such a grievance against an administrator should be 
resolved instead through the appeals process. If the student's problem is related to a non-academic issue, the student should 
refer to the Student Conduct Code. 

If the student wishes to initiate a grievance, he or she must follow the student academic grievance procedure as outlined below, 
keeping in mind the following principles: 

1 . As outlined in Stage One below, except when the complaint is of the most egregious nature or is related to intellectual 
diversity, the student must start with a sincere attempt to settle the dispute in an informal manner with the instructor. In 
general, administrators can initially hear the student's concerns and refer him or her to this document, but they will not 
discuss any specific grievance until the appropriate procedural steps have been taken. The Dean of Students or designee 
may serve an advisory role for the most egregious incidents or those involving intellectual diversity by hearing specific 
grievances and facilitating the procedures outlined below. 

2. Within the guidelines of the institution, faculty have authority and responsibility for course content, classroom procedure, 
and grading, except insofar as it can be shown that a decision was arbitrary or capricious, or based on discrimination with 
respect to race, religion, sex, handicap, age, or national origin. 

3. In order for a student to prepare his or her case, keep in mind that when he or she presents the facts, the burden of proof is 
on him or her, not on the instructor. 

4. Students who have legitimate grievances which cannot be resolved at the departmental level are encouraged to pursue their 
cases and follow the procedures outlined below. However, frivolous or mendacious complaints are discouraged. Students 
and faculty are further advised that adherence to the full truth represents the best service to their cases, and indeed 
that misstated or overstated claims by the principals or their witnesses about the misdeeds of others may lead to civil 
penalties. 

Administrators shall not discuss the details of a specific grievance with a student who has not followed the procedure outlined 
herein, and any representative of a student must follow the same procedure. Public statements about a case shall be 
withheld by the parties involved, by the board of review, and by all participants in the hearings until the final decision has been 
communicated to the parties to the grievance. If and when an official statement is made of the result of the procedures outlined 
below, it shall be made through the office of the appropriate dean. Access to the written record of the hearing, and to all other 



^° Augusta State University Catalog 



records, findings, and recommendations of the board of review and any administrators involved in appeals shall be limited to 
authorized personnel. 

In the following document, the term "faculty" shall be construed to mean those persons defined as "faculty" by the Bylaws and 
Policies of the Board of Regents, the Statutes of the University and those persons appointed by the President to administrative 
positions at the Institution. Further, the term "days" denotes normal working days on which university classes meet. Weekends, 
holidays, final exam periods, and breaks between and within semesters are not to be counted in calculating these time lines. 
It should be understood that, at each level in the academic chain of command above the instructor, e.g. the department chair, 
dean of the college, vice president for academic affairs, and president of the institution, the administrator may designate an 
appropriate representative. Once a student has initiated a written grievance procedure, all responses along this chain of 
command must be in writing. 

I. Stage One: The Informal Procedure. Unless the complaint is of the most egregious nature or is related to 
intellectual diversity, the student must make a sincere attempt to settle a dispute in an informal manner with the instructor. 
If the student is still not satisfied with the instructor's decision, the student may then discuss the matter with the instructor's 
department chair Should the dispute involve an issue of intellectual diversity, the student may choose to discuss the issue 
with the department chair instead of with the instructor. If the problem remains unresolved, the student may then discuss the 
matter with the instructor's dean. 

For the most egregious incidents or those involving intellectual diversity, the student may feel uncomfortable speaking to the 
instructor about the matter. In these cases, the student may elect to have initial discussions of the matter with the instructor's 
immediate supervisor. Prior to meeting with academic personnel, the student may contact the Dean of Students or designee 
who may be able to assist in informal resolution with the academic unit but is otherwise not a party to the grievance process. 

II. Stage Two: The Written Grievance. If the student has exhausted the procedures outlined in section I above, he/she may 
continue as follows: 

A. The student shall submit the grievance in writing to the instructor involved. 

This document, hereinafter referred to as the written grievance, shall include, but not be limited to, all supporting 
documentation and a statement of the specific relief sought by the student. The written grievance must be submitted to 
the instructor no later than midterm of the semester following the actions which gave rise to the grievance. 

B. If agreement is not reached within five days of the receipt of the written grievance by the instructor, the student may 
appeal the instructor's decision to the department chair. The student shall so advise the chair within five days of receiving 
that decision. 

C. The department chair shall respond to the written grievance within five days of receiving it. The student may choose to 
appeal the chair's response by submitting a copy of the grievance to the dean of the appropriate college. The appeal 
must be made within five days of the student's having received the response. No appeal may be initiated after the fifth day 
following the student's receipt of the chair's response. As an alternative to a formal hearing (see Stage 3). if the student 
is not satisfied with the solution, the student is encouraged to refer the matter to the Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADRj 
Committee. Augusta State University has chosen mediation as its ADR process. Mediation involves the use of a neutral 
third party who seeks to aid the disputants in their effort to reach a mutually satisfying resolution. A student choosing 
the ADR process should submit a written grievance to the Dean of Students, rather than to the academic dean. Upon 
completion of the ADR process, if no formal resolution has been reached, the student may then move on to Stage 3 by 
submitting a written grievance to the appropriate academic dean within five days. 

III. Stage Three: The Formal Hearing. If agreement is not reached within five days of the submission of the written grievance 
to the dean, the dean or either party may ask the Academic Policies Committee to arrange a hearing before a formal board 
of review. 

A. The person submitting this request to the Academic Policies Committee shall transmit with it a copy of the written 
grievance and any other documents or exhibits which he/she considers pertinent. 

B. Within five days of receiving the request to arrange a hearing, the Academic Policies committee shall act upon 
that request. In the case of a grievance against an administrator, the committee shall first determine whether the 
problem should more appropriately be resolved through the academic appeals process or whether the academic 
grievance process is the appropriate context. In the latter case, the committee shall then determine how to adapt 
the procedures of the academic grievance process to this particular situation. It shall then appoint a board of 
review, hereinafter referred to as the board, in the following manner: 

1 . The board shall consist of five to seven members, including faculty members, at least one student, and the 
Dean of Students or his/her designate. One of the faculty members shall be designated by the Academic 
Policies Committee to serve as the chair of the board. 

2. The Academic Policies Committee shall consult with the parties to assure that its selection of a chair is 
acceptable to both parties. Each party shall also be permitted to strike from one to three other proposed 
members from the board. When a party strikes a proposed member the committee will name another in 
his/her place; such substitutions may also be struck by either party if that party has not already exhausted 
his/her three strikes. 

3. No party to the dispute shall be a member of the board. 



Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 49 



4. Immediately upon acceptance of the appointment by the chair of the board, the chair of the Academic 
Policies Committee shall deliver to him/her the written grievance and all other documents and/or exhibits 
received by the committee in the context of the grievance. 

C. Within five days of the appointment of the board, the chair shall convene a preliminary closed session of the board 
for the following purposes: 

1. To determine the day and hour of the hearing. The hearing must begin within 10 days of the preliminary 
session. 

2. To distribute to the board all prior communications and documents pertinent to the grievance, including 
copies of the written grievance. 

D. After the preliminary meeting of the board, the chair shall: 

1 . Continue attempts at arbitration at any appropriate point in these proceedings. 

2. Prepare an agenda for the hearing and arrange for a meeting place. 

3. Engage the assistance of the Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs in utilizing the services of a 
confidential secretary or other appropriate means to obtain a verbatim written record of the proceedings. 

4. Give written notice to both parties at least five days before convening the hearing. In so doing, the 
chair shall advise the parties of their procedural rights, which shall include the right of due process and 
specifically the right to: 

a) Have present a non-participating advisor. The faculty member may have present either a member 
of the legal profession or a full time Augusta State University faculty member. The student may 
have present any one individual and may choose to replace that individual with another at any 
point during the hearing. 

b) Call for supporting witnesses. 

c) Inquire into all written and oral testimony, depositions, and exhibits of evidence. 

d) Know the identity of all witnesses and the authors of all written testimony and have the opportunity 
to confront all such persons by cross-examination or by affidavit. 

e) Endeavor to rebut all evidence. 

f) Interpret and summarize their individual positions, particularly in relation to wider issues of 
academic rights and responsibilities. 

g) Be informed of the findings and recommendations of the board. The chair shall be deemed to 
have satisfied this requirement if he/she calls the attention of the parties to section lll(D)4 of this 
document. 

E. The hearing shall be held in closed session. The chair shall distribute copies of the agenda to the parties, the 
board members, and any witnesses who may have been called. The chair shall supervise the proceedings and 
shall rule on any unusual or special elements with respect to procedures of the board after giving due notice to 
disputing parties or their representatives of their procedural rights. 

F. The parties involved must present their own cases even though counsel may be present during the formal hearing. 
Normally, the presentations shall include a lucid statement of the case, a presentation of the case by affidavits, 
testimony and/or exhibits, and a summary which includes a statement of the specific relief sought from the board. 

G. The board shall try to complete the agenda for the hearing in one session. If this is not possible, the term "hearing" 
as used throughout this document shall apply collectively to all sessions taken together. The board shall in any 
case see to it that all sessions of the hearing have been concluded within five days of the first session of the 
hearing. 

IV. Stage Four: Deliberations of the Board and its Report 

A. Within five days of the conclusion of the hearing, the chair shall see to it that copies of a written verbatim record of the 
hearing are distributed to the members of the board, to the two parties, and to the appropriate dean. 

B. Within five days of the distribution of the written verbatim record, the board may choose to meet more than once, but in 
no case may the deliberations continue past the tenth day following the distribution of the written verbatim record. The 
board shall confine its deliberations to the case presented. 

C. Within five days of reaching a decision, the board shall issue to the appropriate dean a written report giving its findings 
and recommendations. 

V. Stage Five: The Dean's Decision 

A. If the board has found that the instructor made an arbitrary or capricious decision against the student, or one based on 
discrimination with regard to race, religion, sex, handicap, age, or national origin, and if the board has recommended 
appropriate relief the dean may order that relief Such relief may include, but is not limited to, a change in a disputed 
course grade. If the board has made a recommendation on a basis other than a finding that the instructor made an 
arbitrary or capricious decision against the student, or one based on discrimination with regard to race, religion, sex, 
handicap, age, or national origin, the dean may order that the recommendation shall be followed. 

B. Within five days of receiving the board's findings and recommendations, the dean shall forward the following by registered 
mail to each of the parties involved: 

1 .A copy of the board's findings and recommendations. 

2. The dean's decision with regard to any relief sought by the parties and/or recommended by the board. 
3. Notification to both parties of the right to appeal before the dean takes action. The dean shall be deemed to have 
satisfied this requirement if he/she calls the attention of the parties to section VI of this document. 

^^ Augusta State University Catalog 



C. If no party makes a written appeal within five days of having been notified by the dean of his/her decision, that decision 
shall be considered final and the dean shall see to its implementation. 

VI. Stage Six: The Appeals Process 

A. It is particularly emphasized that senior administrators are not to be contacted about the details of a grievance except in 
the context of an appeal. Neither of the parties is to take his/her case to senior administrators until after the procedures 
set forth above have come to their conclusion. This rule applies equally to any representative of the parties. 

B. Neither the faculty grievance procedure nor any other procedure may be invoked as a substitute for the appeals process 
set forth below. 

C. Appeal to the Vice President for Academic Affairs 

1. If either party wishes to appeal the decision of the dean, he/she must do so in writing to the Vice President for 
Academic Affairs within five days of receiving notification from the dean. The appeal shall include, but is not limited 
to, the following; 

a) Copies of the written grievance, of the findings and recommendations of the board, of the written verbatim 
record of the hearing, and of the dean's letter notifying the parties of his/her decision. 

b) An explanation of the reason for the appeal. 

c) A specific statement of the relief which the appellant is seeking from the vice president. 

2. In the case of an appeal by the student, if the vice president finds that the instructor made an arbitrary or capricious 
decision against the student, or one based on discrimination with regard to race, religion, sex, handicap, age, or 
national origin, he/she may order relief for the student, including but not limited to a change in a disputed course 
grade. 

3. Within five days of receiving the written appeal, the vice president shall forward his/her decision to the appropriate 
dean, to the two parties, and to the chairs of the board and the Academic Policies Committee. In communicating 
this decision, the vice president shall advise the two parties of the right to appeal to the president before the vice 
president's decision takes effect. The vice president shall be deemed to have satisfied this requirement if he/she calls 
the attention of the parties to sections VI(D) and VI(E) of this document. 

4. If no party makes a written appeal within five days of having been notified by the vice president of his/her decision, 
that decision shall be considered final and the vice president shall communicate it to the appropriate dean, who shall 
see to its implementation. 

D. Appeal to the President 

1 . If either party wishes to appeal the decision of the Vice President for Academic Affairs, he/she must do so in writing to 
the president of the university within five days of being notified of the vice president's decision. 

2. At the same time, the appellant shall give notice of the appeal to the Vice President for Academic Affairs, who shall 
thereupon forward to the president the materials listed above in section VI(C)1 . 

3. In the case of an appeal by the student, if the president finds that the instructor made an arbitrary or capricious 
decision against the student, or one based on discrimination with regard to race, religion, sex, handicap, age. or 
national origin, he/she may order relief for the student, including but not limited to a change in a disputed course 
grade. 

4. The president shall communicate his/her decision to the two parties, the chairs of the board and the Academic Policies 
Committee, the Vice President for Academic Affairs, and the appropriate dean. 

5. If either party wishes to appeal the president's decision to the Board of Regents, he/she shall so advise the president 
in writing within five days of receiving that decision. If no party so advises the president within those five days, the 
decision shall be considered final and the president shall communicate this to the appropriate dean, who shall see to 
its implementation. 

E. Final Disposition 

Final disposition of the case shall be made in accordance with Article XIII of the bylaws of the Board of Regents of the 
University System of Georgia: 

Any student or employee in the University System aggrieved by a final decision of the president of an institution may 
apply to the Board of Regents for a review of the decision. The Board's review shall be limited to the record from the 
institutional appeal process. Nothing in this policy shall be construed to extend to any employee or student substantive 
or procedural rights not required by federal or state law. This policy shall not be construed to extend to employees or 
students any expectation of employment, admission, or additional due process rights. 

Each application for review shall be submitted in writing to the Board's Office of Legal Affairs within a period of twenty 
days following the decision of the president. It shall state the decision complained of and the redress desired. A hearing 
before the Board (or a Committee of or appointed by the Board) is not a matter of right but is within the sound discretion 
of the Board. 

Appeals brought by students shall be governed by Policy 4. 7. 1 of The Policy Manual of the Board of Regents. Appeals 
brought by employees shall be governed by Policy 8.2.21 of The Policy Manual of The Board of Regents. 

The Board may at its discretion refer a matter for mediation, arbitration, or evaluation of settlement options. If an application 
for review is granted, the Board, a Committee of the Board, a Committee appointed by the Board, or a hearing officer 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 51 



appointed by the Board shall investigate the matter thoroughly and report its findings and recommendations to the Board. 
The decision of the Board shall be final and binding for all purposes. 

Under current Board of Regents procedures, action by the president on grade appeals is the final and binding administrative 
decision; however, in making a policy decision to reject routine grade appeals, the Board of Regents did not intend to bar the 
receipt of grade complaints grounded upon alleged invidious discriminatory motivations, such as improper considerations of 
race, gender, national origin, religion, age, or handicap. 

Confidentiality of Student Records 

Under the provisions of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, Augusta State University has established 
policies concerning the confidentiality of student educational records. Students have the right to seek correction of the contents 
of these records, to place an explanatory note in a record when a challenge is not successful, and to control (with certain 
exceptions) the disclosure of the contents of their records. 

Directory information concerning an individual student, including name, address, email address, telephone number, place of 
birth, height and weight of members of athletic teams, major, participation in athletic and student activities, dates of attendance, 
degrees, awards and honors, photographs and most recent institution attended, is generally available for release unless a 
student specifically requests in writing that this information not be released. This request must be submitted in writing to the 
Registrar's Office. 




52 



Augusta State University Catalog 



AUGUSTA STATE UNIVERSITY 
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Augusta State University offers scores of carefully designed undergraduate programs. Each has been approved by the faculty 
of Augusta State University, by the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia, and by accrediting authorities. 

The Core Curriculum, (described below) is a required part of all Bachelors programs at Augusta State University and is 
presented first, followed by a description of the ASU Honors Program. Finally, descriptions of individual academic programs 
are listed alphabetically by college. 

Substitutions of courses are permitted only under certain circumstances; see the entries entitled Course Substitution and 
Curriculum Changes (p. 23). Except as provided in these entries, you must take a program exactly as it is set forth in this 
catalog. 

General Education Statement 

From the origins of intellectual study to the present, general education has been a key to a fulfilling life of self-knowledge, 
self-reflection, critical awareness, and lifelong learning. General education has traditionally focused on oral and written 
communication, quantitative reasoning and mathematics, studies in culture and society, scientific reasoning, and aesthetic 
appreciation. Today, general education also assists student in their understanding of technology, information literacy, diversity, 
and global awareness. In meeting all of these needs, general education provides college students with their best opportunity to 
experience the breadth of human knowledge and the ways that knowledge in various disciplines is interrelated. 

In the University System of Georgia, general education programs consist of a group of courses known as the Core Curriculum 
as well as other courses and co-curricular experiences specific to each institution. The attainment of general education learning 
outcomes prepares responsible, reflective citizens who adapt constructively to change. General education programs impart 
knowledge, values, skills, and behaviors related to critical thinking and logical problem-solving. General education includes 
opportunities for interdisciplinary learning and experiences that increase intellectual curiosity, providing the basis for advanced 
study in the variety of fields offered by today's colleges and universities. 



Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 53 



General Education Learning Outcomes 

I. Communication: Oral and written communication will be characterized by clarity, critical analysis, logic, coherence, 
persuasion, precision, and rhetorical awareness. 

The student will demonstrate competence in communication by 

a. Demonstrating information acquisition skills using a variety of techniques and methods. 

b. Comprehending and interpreting written and spoken communications in various disciplines. 

c. Analyzing critically and assimilating a body of information in oral and written forms. 

d. Presenting information in oral and written form, according to contemporary professional standards of delivery, using 
standard English and appropriately cited sources, such that the presentation is accurate, coherent, ethical, effective, 
and appropriate for the audience and goal of the communication. 

These outcomes are primarily addressed in core areas A and B. 

II. Quantitative Reasoning and IVIathematics: Quantitative reasoning and mathematics will be characterized by logic, critical 
evaluation, analysis, synthesis, generalization, modeling, and symbolic, verbal, numerical, and graphical problem solving. 

The student will demonstrate competence in quantitative reasoning and mathematics by 

a. Modeling and expressing various quantitative relationships in symbolic, verbal, numerical, and graphical forms and 
shifting among these forms to solve problems. 

b. Solving problems by evaluating, analyzing, and synthesizing information using appropriate technology. 

c. Extracting quantitative data from a given situation, analyzing the data, making logical deductions and arriving at 

reasonable conclusions. 

These outcomes are primarily addressed in core areas A and D. 

III. Historical, Cultural, and Social Perspectives: Historical, cultural, and social perspective will be characterized by cultural 
awareness and an understanding of the complexity and dynamic nature of social/political/economic systems; human and 
institutional behavior, values, and belief systems; historical and geographical relationships; and flexibility, open-mindedness, 
and tolerance. 

The student will demonstrate competence in historical, cultural, and social perspectives by 

a. Understanding and appreciating the diversity and complexity of individual and group human behavior. 

b. Describing and analyzing historical, economic, political, social and geographical structures and how they develop, 
persist, interact, and change. 

c. Identifying and analyzing multiple perspectives on issues relevant to contemporary society. 

These outcomes are primarily addressed in core area E. 

IV. Scientific Reasoning: Scientific reasoning will be characterized by understanding science as a process, developing 
laboratory techniques, using quantitative relationships, and applying experimental design in order to understand and predict 
phenomena. 

The student will demonstrate competence in scientific reasoning by 

a. Using scientific principles and knowledge to explain and predict natural or human phenomena. 

b. Distinguishing theoretical from empirical relationships. 

c. Demonstrating qualitative and quantitative skills in using appropriate tools to critically observe and analyze phenomena. 

These outcomes are primarily addressed in courses from the natural and social sciences in core areas D and E. 

V. Aesthetic Perspective: Aesthetic perspective will be characterized by critical appreciation of the arts of various cultures as 
media for human expression. 

The student will demonstrate competence in aesthetic perspective by 

a. Appreciating individual works of art and art forms from various cultures. 

b. Interpreting works of art as expressions of human experience. 

c. Discerning the impact and role of artistic achievement in society. 

These outcomes are primarily addressed in core areas B and C. 
^^ Augusta State University Catalog 



Core Curriculum For all Bachelors Degrees 

Area A Essential Skills 9 

English 

ENGL 1101 English Composition I 

or ENGL 1113 Honors Frestiman Composition I 3 

ENGL 1102 Englisli Composition II 

or ENGL 1114 Honors Freshman Composition II 3 

(A grade of C or better is required in English 1101, 1102, 
1113, and 1114; see ENGL 1101 and 1102 Policy, p. 25) 
Mathematics 3 

Non-Science Track: 
MATH 1111 College Algebra or MATH 1101 Introduction to 
Mathematical Modeling 
Science Track: (Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, 
Mathematics, Physical Science, Physics) 
MATH 1113 Precalculus Mathematics 

Area B Institutional Options 4 

HUMN 2001/HUMN 2002 World Humanities (Part of a two 2 

semester, eight-hour sequence; remainder in Area C) 

COMS 1010 Introduction to Communication or 2 

COMS 1020 Fundamentals of Human Communication 
(a 3-hour alternative to COMS 1010) or 
HONR 1010 Honors Introductory Seminar: The Nature of Inquiry 
(a 3-hour Honors alternative to COMS 1010/COMS 1020) 

Area C Humanities and Fine Arts 6 

HUMN 2001/HUMN 2002 World Humanities I and II 

(Part of a two semester, eight-hour sequence, remainder in Area B) 

Area D Science, Mathematics and Technology 11 

Option I Non-Science Majors 8 

Choose two of the following: 
ASTR 1000 Introduction to the Universe 
BIOL 1101 Fundamentals of Biology or 

BIOL 1107 Principles of Biology I 
BIOL 1102 Environmental Biology or 

BIOL 1108 Principles of Biology II 
CHEM 1 1 51 Survey of Chemistry I or 

CHEM 1211 Principles of Chemistry I 
CHEM 1152Survey of Chemistry II 
CHEM 1212 Principles of Chemistry II 
GEOG 1112 Introduction to Weather and Climate 
GEOL 1121 Geology (Physical) I 
GEOL 1122 Geology (Historical) II 
PHSC 1011 Physical Science 
PHYS 1111 Introductory Physics I or 

PHYS 2211 Principles of Physics I 
PHYS 2212 Principles of Physics II or 

PHYS 1112 Introductory Physics II 

Choose one additional course from those above or from: 3-4 

MATH 1120 Contemporary Mathematics 

MATH 1113 Precalculus Mathematics 

MATH 1220 Applied Calculus 

MATH 2011 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 

MATH 2210 Elementary Statistics 

Option II Science Majors 
Choose a sequence of two laboratory courses from the following: 8 

BIOL 1107/BIOL 1108 Principles of Biology I and II 
CHEM 1211/CHEM 1212 Principles of Chemistry I and II 
PHYS 1111/PHYS 1112 Introductory Physics I and II 
PHYS 2211/PHYS 2212 Principles of Physics I and II 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 55 



Choose one of the following mathematics courses: 4 

MATH 2011 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 

(Note; 4th hour counted in Area F or non-core 60 hours) 
or 
MATH 2210 Elementary Statistics (option for biology majors only) 
Area E Social Sciences 12 

HIST 2111/HIST 2112 United States to 1877/United States 3 

since 1877 
POLS 1101 American Government 3 

Choose one of the following: 3 

ANTH 2011 Cultural Anthropology 
ECON 1810 Introduction to Economics 
PSYC 1101 Introduction to General Psychology 
SOCI 1101 Introduction to Sociology 

Choose one of the following: 3 

ANTH 1102 Introductory Anthropology 
ANTH 2011 Cultural Anthropology 
ECON 1810 Basic Economics 
ECON 2105 Macroeconomics 
ECON 2106 Microeconomics 
GEOG 1111 World Geography 
HIST 1111 Pre-Modern World Civilization 
H 1ST 1 1 1 2 Modern World Civilization 
HIST 2111 United States to 1877 
HIST 2112 United States since 1877 
PHIL 1000 Introduction to Philosophy 
POLS 2401 Global Issues 
PSYC 1101 Introduction to General Psychology 
PSYC 1103 Introduction to the Behavioral and Social Sciences 
PSYC 2150 Introduction to Human Diversity 
SOCI 1101 Introduction to Sociology 

SOCI 1103 Introduction to the Behavioral and Social Sciences 
SOCI 1160 Social Problems Analysis 
SOCI 2241 Multiculturalism in Modern Society 

Area F Courses Related to the Major (see specific degree programs) 18 

Total Hours 60 



^^ Augusta State University Catalog 



AUGUSTA STATE UNIVERSITY HONORS PROGRAM 

The ASU Honors Program offers superior students the opportunity to pursue a program of study that leads to recognition as 
an Augusta State University Honors Program Graduate. Balancing breadth and depth, the ASU Honors Program includes 
sections of core courses specifically designed for able and energetic learners, seminars that cross the boundanes of discipline 
and/or culture, a thesis, and the possibility of additional honors work in the major field. The Honors Program is not a separate 
degree program, but is designed to augment the course work required for a degree. In most cases, honors courses can be 
substituted for required credits. The Honors Program offices are housed in Allgood Hall E122 (706-729-2083). 

The ASU Honors Program is affiliated with the National Collegiate Honors Council, the Southern Regional Honors Council, and 
the Georgia Honors Council, making available to interested ASU students a variety of honors opportunities nationwide. 

Honors Program Classes 

Honors classes differ in kind from other classes. They are usually smaller; they involve more interaction with the instructor; 
they encourage independent work and collaboration among students and between students and professors. Often professors 
in honors courses see themselves more as facilitators than as instructors or lecturers, and, when possible, guide students to 
work with primary materials. Honors classes ask students to explore course work more actively and intensively, but students 
are nof evaluated on a more demanding grading scale than in other courses. 

Recognition 

Honors Program Graduates are honored with a certificate at ASU's Honors Night, and their diplomas and transcripts carry the 
designation Honors Program Graduate. 

Program Requirements 

To earn recognition as an ASU Honors Program Graduate, a student accepted into the program must complete the requirements 
below and have an overall GPA of 3.3. Should the GPA drop below the required 3.3, the student will be allowed to continue in 
the program on probationary status as long as the GPA does not drop below 3.2. Students will not be allowed to begin work 
on a thesis proposal (HONR 3999) or thesis (HONR 4000) with a GPA below 3.3. 

Freshman/Sophomore Requirement: 5 courses - 15 semester hours 
HONR 1010: Honors Introductory Seminar: The Nature of Inquiry 

(and) 
4 Honors Sections of Core Courses. A section of HONR 1900 can count as one of these four. One of the four must be 
multicultural or interdisciplinary. 

Junior/Senior Requirement: 

HONR 3900: Honors Seminar: Breaking Boundaries - 3 semester hours 
One upper division honors elective to be selected from the following: 
• a second section of HONR 3900, 

a departmental honors course (departmentally approved independent study or a regular departmental offering with 

an additional honors component), or 

an approved honors alternative - 3 semester hours 

The HONR 3999-4000 sequence (begun in the junior year and completed by the end of student's penultimate term): 
HONR 3999: Thesis Prospectus-1 semester hour 
HONR 4000: Honors Thesis-2-3 semester hours 

HONR 4500: Honors Capstone-1 semester hour 
Taken in the senior year, ideally in student's last term. 

Eligibility and Admissions 

Students may seek entry into the Honors Program by submitting a completed application to the Honors Program Director. 
Application forms are available in the Honors Program office or at http://www.aug.edu/honors_program/Forms.htm. 

An Entering Freshman who meets one of the following criteria is invited to join the Honors Program: 

(1) Combined SAT scores of 1160 or more and a cumulative high school GPA of 3.2 or better. 

(2) Combined SAT scores of 1100 or more and a cumulative high school GPA of 3.5 or better. 

Students Already Enrolled at ASU are invited to join the Honors Program if they are not simultaneously in Learning Support, 
have completed 9 semester hours of academic work at ASU, and have an overall GPA of 3.4. 

To be able to complete program requirements without taking several additional courses, students should seek acceptance into 
the program and begin taking honors courses early in their careers. 



Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 57 



Transfer students who bring in an unadjusted 3.4 GPA on at least 9 semester hours of course work from another institution and 
have SAT scores at least equivalent to those required of entering ASU honors freshmen will be eligible to register immediately 
for honors courses on a space available basis. They will be eligible to apply for admission to the Honors Program after they 
have completed 6 semester hours at ASU with an ASU overall GPA of 3.4. Honors courses taken before a student is formally 
admitted to the program may count toward Honors Program Graduation. 

Students transferring from another institution's Honors Program are subject to the general transfer policy defined above, but, 
once admitted to the Honors Program, will be able to count Honors Program hours completed at their previous institution(s) 
toward completing Honors Program Requirements at ASU. 

ASU students who are not simultaneously in Learning Support, and who have completed 6 or more semester hours at ASU with 
an unadjusted GPA of 3.4 may take Honors Program courses on a space available basis. 




58 



Augusta State University Catalog 



Katherine Reese Pamplin 
College of Arts and Sciences 

The Katherine Reese Pamplin College of Arts and Sciences, by offering a broad array of undergraduate courses and degree 
programs and selected graduate degrees, provides students with strong foundations in liberal arts and sciences as well as 
preparation for careers, citizenship, and a life-long love of learning. Dedicated to excellence in teaching and advising, the 
Pamplin College of Arts and Sciences is also committed to creating opportunities for intellectual growth, community involvement, 
and development of an academic community which models humane values and respects human diversity. 

Members of the faculty of the Pamplin College of Arts and Sciences are as follows: 

Dean: Parham, R.R. 
Associate Dean: Jarman, R.O. 
Assistant Dean: Gardiner, T.C. 

Director of Georgia Science Olympiad: Wellnitz, W.R. 

Assistant Vice President for International Affairs: Carter, H. 

Department of Art 

Professor: Casaletto, K.; Hollingsworth, P.; MacTaggart, A.C., Chair; Onofrio, J.L.; Rust, B.L.; Schw/artz, M.; 
Williams-Whiting, J.E. 

Department of Biology 

Professor: Saul, B.M.; Wear, D.J.; Wellnitz, W.R. 

Associate Professor: Christy, CM.; Griner, R.D., Chair; Snyder, D.C.; Tugmon, C.R. 
Assistant Professor: Bates, C.S.; Bennetts, S.T.; Cromer, R.B.; Reichmuth, J.M.; Terry, C.H. 
Lecturer: Diver, V.M.; Simoneau, S.N. 

Department of Chemistry and Physics 

Professor: Colbert, T.M.; Crute, T.D., chair; Hauger, J.A.; Myers, S.A.; Sullivan, S. 
Associate Professor: Hobbs, D.S.; Stephens, C.E.; Zuckerman, E.J. 
Assistant Professor: Datta, T; Miao, S.; Poppeliers, C.J. 

Department of Communications and Professional Writing 

Professor: Clements, S.R.; Kellman, L.A.; van Tuyll, D.R. 

Associate Professor: Aubrey D'Ambrogi, K.L.; Cope, C.S.; Davis, R.; Hayward, P.A., Chair; Johnson. E.D.. Ill: 

Pukis, R.E. 
Assistant Professor: Bosisio, M.J. 
Lecturer: Joiner, D.E.; Ortiz, G.W. 

Department of English and Foreign Languages 

Professor: Bloodworth, W.A., Jr.; Evans, W.E.; Johnson, L.B., Chair; Parham, R.R.; Sandarg. J.D.: Robertson, 

J.D. 
Associate Professor: Bledsoe, R.S.; Heckman, CM., Assistant Chair; Hoyos-Salcedo, P.P.; Prinsky, N.R.; 

Sadenwasser, T.L.; Sladky, P.D.; Williams, S.D. 
Assistant Professor: Armstrong, R. J.; Botero, C.G.; Drev^^s, M.I.; Garcia, M.L.; Griswold, S.Y.; Hoffman, T.A.; 

Johnson, K.L.; Kisting, W.R.; Leveziel, F.C; Sutherland, N.E. 
Lecturer: Brodak, M.A. 

Department of History, Anthropology, and Philosophy 

Professor: Bishku, M.B.; Fissel, M.C; Mixon, W.; van Tuyll, H.P., Chair 

Associate Professor: Turner, W.J.; Weiss, S.D. 

Assistant Professor: Abdelnur, H.J.; Bratton, A.R.; Cantu-Trunzo, J.M.; McClellend-Nugent, R.E.; Searles, M. 

Department of Learning Support 

Professor: Dodd, W.M. 

Associate Professor: Duignan, M.M.; Gardiner, T.C 

Assistant Professor; Cohen, J.T.; Craig, CM., Chair/Director of University College; Kelliher, M.W.; Luoma, K.E.; 

Richardson, S.; Whittle, S.T. 
Instructor: Cook, S.R.; Hayes, K.M.; Huggins, E.W.; Reed, P.M.; Veldboom, B.J. 



Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 59 



Department of Mathematics and Computer Science 

Professor: Benedict, James M.; Robinson, S.L., Chair; Setliuraman, S.N. 

Associate Professor: Dowel!, IVI.L.; Jarman, R.O.; Rychly, C.J., Assistant Ciiair; Sligar, J.C.; Smith, N.O.; 

Thiruvaiyaru, D.S.; Wang, Y. 

Assistant Professor: Benedict, J. IVlichelle; Crawford, L.B.; Holt, D.E.; Freitag, iVl.A.; Sexton, J.; Stallman, C; 

Terry, C.A. 

Lecturer: Reich, N.B.; Skeen, T.T. 

Department of Military Science 

Professor: Roe, K.J., Chair 
Assistant Professor: Short, R.J. 

Department of Music 

Professor: Banister, L.L; Floyd, R.W.; Foster, R.L.; Hobbins, J.W.; Jones, M.D.; Morgan, A.L., Chair; Shotwell, 

CM. 

Associate Professor: Crookall, C.E. 

Assistant Professor: Fallin, D.G 

Lecturer: Myers, P.A. 

Department of Nursing 

Professor: Price, C.R., Chair 

Assistant Professor: Collins, B.R.; Hunter, C.E.; Lorenti, S.L.; McKethan, T.L.; Merriweather, J.G.; Paul, E.E.; 

Pawl, J.D.; Roberts, J.B.; Robillard, D.L.; Slone, F.M.; Williams, M.T. 

Department of Political Science 

Professor: Bourdouvalis, C; Ratan, S., Chair; Reinke, S.J.; Whiting, R.A. 
Assistant Professor: Ginn, M.; Flanagan, P.J.; Hammond, A.; Miller, R.D. 

Department of Psychology 

Professor: Hobbs, S.H.; Reeves, R.A.; Richardson, D.S.; Widner, S.C, Acting Chair 

Associate Professor: Hammock, G.S.; Rogers, R.L.; Topolski, R.L. 

Assistant Professor: Bell, CD.; Hartmann, J.Q.; Janit, A.S.; Patton, T.B.; Rossi-Bastarache, N.E. 

Department of Sociology, Criminal Justice and Social Work 

Professor: Davies, K.A., Chair; Johnston, R.L.; Reese, W.A. 

Assistant Professor: Foley, A.J. ; Huisman Jezowski, S.J.; Hunt, H.D.; Powell-Williams, M.A.; Powell-Williams, 

T.A.; White, S.D. 

Lecturer: Ness, R.C 





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60 



Augusta State University Catalog 



Arts and Sciences Undergraduate Programs 



Three programs which are available to all undergraduate students and which are not allied with one specific departnnent - 
Associate in Arts, Associate in Science, and Minor in General Studies - are listed first. All rennaining programs are listed 
alphabetically by departments, which are also listed alphabetically. 

ASSOCIATE OF ARTS 

This is a two-year program for the student who may not complete a four-year college program. It includes the first tv/o years of 
a standard non-science bachelor's degree program and would allow the student to move into the bachelor's degree program 
with no loss of credit. 

Core Areas A-E 42 

Core Area F as specified in the chosen discipline's 18 

bachelor's degree program. 

Physical Education 4 

Must include WELL 1000 

Total Hours for the Degree 64 



ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE 

This is a two-year program for the student who may not complete a four-year college program. It includes the first two years 
of a standard bachelor's of science degree program and would allow the student to move into the bachelor's degree program 
with no loss of credit. 

Core Areas A-E, for Science Majors 42 

Core Area F as specified in the chosen science discipline's 18 

bachelor's degree program 

Physical Education 4 

Must include WELL 1000 

Total Hours for the Degree 64 



GENERAL STUDIES MINOR IN GENERAL STUDIES 

(Grade of C or better is required in all courses used.) 

The minor requires 15 hours of course work at the 3000 and 4000 level in at least two disciplines, with at most 9 hours from 
one discipline. At least 9 hours must be taken at Augusta State University. Courses may not be chosen from the student's 
major field. 

The student and the student's advisor should plan the minor around a theme appropriate to the student's educational goals. 
The minor is not designed to serve as a spot for placing courses which have been completed, but which do not meet another 
requirement. The advisor and the department chair for the student's major must approve the courses used for the minor, and 
the chair must sign the application for graduation as chair of the minor. 

Total hours for the Minor 15 



Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 61 



ART PROGRAMS 



ART Bachelor of Fine Arts: Art (General) 

The Bachelor of Fine Arts program is designed to prepare students for professional careers in art. It should be selected 
by students who plan to pursue graduate degrees in art. (Students wishing to concentrate in either two-dimensional art or 
three-dimensional art should refer to the B.F.A. Drawing/Painting Track or the B.F.A. Sculpture/Ceramics Track.) 

Portfolio Review 

All art majors are required to submit their work for a review by the studio faculty after the completion of the following courses: 
Art 1520, 1530, 1211, and 12 additional hours of studio art courses (21 hours total.) Portfolio Reviews are scheduled during 
the fall semester. The Portfolio Review must take place the academic year preceding the year of graduation. Passing the 
Portfolio Review is a prerequisite for Art 4999 and a graduation requirement. If the Portfolio Review is not passed, it must be 
repeated and passed during the following fall semester. Portfolio Review occurs on the day after the last day of class of the fall 
semester. 

Transfer students must meet this requirement with the provision that a minimum of three hours be done while in residency at 
Augusta State University and that the transfer courses for the remaining 18 hours be equivalent to the required courses listed 
above. 

Each student should submit a minimum of 15 studio works. These are to include both two-dimensional and three-dimensional 
works. Media variety in works is encouraged in order to aid faculty appraisal of the student's progress. 

The Senior Exhibition 

The B.F.A. degree candidate is required to mount an exhibition of artwork. The work for this exhibition must be accepted by 
the studio art faculty and judged to be of significant quantity and quality to demonstrate the student's professional abilities. The 
exhibition is completed in Art 4999 and is a graduation requirement. 

Core Curriculum Area A-E for Arts Majors 42 

Core Curriculum Area F 18 

Take each of the following: 

ART 1211 Visual Arts I: Drawing and Design 

ART 1520 Visual Arts Freshman Studio Seminar 

ART 1530 Visual Arts II: Sculpture and Design 

ART 2212 Drawing II 

ART2611 Art History I 

ART 2612 Art History II 

Major Concentration 60 

Required courses: 27 

ART 3213 Drawing III: Figure Drawing 
ART 3221 Painting I 

ART 3222 Painting II or ART 3261 Watercolor 
ART 3231 Photography I 
ART 3311 Sculpture: Carving or 

ART 4321 Sculpture: Casting or 

ART 4341 Sculpture: Multimedia 
ART 3331 Figure Modeling 
ART 3401 Ceramics I 
ART 3700 Color Experience 
ART 3721 Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art I 

Choose two from the following: 6 

ART 3251 Printmaking I 
ART 4261 Printmaking II 
ART 3232 Photography II 

Choose two from the following: 6 

ART 3402 Ceramics II 
ART 3403 Ceramics III 
ART 3311 Sculpture: Carving I 
ART 4321 Sculpture: Casting I 
ART 4331 Sculpture: Installation 

"^ Augusta State University Catalog 



ART 4341 Sculpture: Multimedia 
Two upper level Art History 
Studio Art Electives 
ART 4999 Senior Exhibition 
Physical Education 
Total Hours for the Degree 



6 

12 

3 



5 
125 




Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 



63 



ART 

Bachelor of Fine Arts: Art (Drawing/Painting) 

The Bachelor of Fine Arts program is designed to prepare students for professional careers in art It should be selected by 
students planning to pursue graduate degrees in drawing and painting. 

Portfolio Review 

All art majors are required to submit their work for a review by the studio faculty after the completion of the following courses: 
Art 1520, 1530, 1211, and 12 additional hours of studio art courses (21 hours total.) Portfolio Reviews are scheduled during 
the fall semester. The Portfolio Review must take place the academic year preceding the year of graduation. Passing the 
Portfolio Review is a prerequisite for Art 4999 and a graduation requirement. If the Portfolio Review is not passed, it must be 
repeated and passed during the following fall semester. Portfolio Review occurs on the day after the last day of class of the 
fall semester. 

Transfer students must meet this requirement with the provision that a minimum of three hours be done while in residency at 
Augusta State Univ. and that the transfer courses for the remaining 18 hrs be equivalent to the required courses listed above. 

Each student should submit a minimum of 15 studio works. These are to include both two-dimensional and three-dimensional 
works. Media variety in works is encouraged in order to aid faculty appraisal of the student's progress. 

The Senior Exhibition 

The B.RA. degree candidate is required to mount an exhibition of artwork. The work for this exhibition must be accepted by 
the studio art faculty and judged to be of significant quantity and quality to demonstrate the student's professional abilities. The 
exhibition is completed in Art 4999 and is a graduation requirement. 

Core Curriculum Area A-E for Arts Majors 42 

Core Curriculum Area F 18 

Take each of the following: 

ART 1211 Visual Arts I: Drawing and Design 

ART 1520 Visual Arts Freshman Studio Seminar 

ART 1530 Visual Arts II: Sculpture and Design 

ART 2212 Drawing II 

ART 2611 Art History I 

ART 2612 Art History II 

Major Concentration 60 

Required courses: , 30 

ART 3222 Painting II 

ART 3213 Drawing III: Figure Drawing 

ART 3221 Painting I 

ART 3231 Photography I 

ART 3261 Watercolor 

ART 3331 Sculpture: Figure Modeling 

ART 3401 Ceramics I 

ART 3700 Color Experience 

ART 3721 Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art I 

ART 4223 Painting III 

Choose two: 

ART 4224 Painting IV 6 

ART 3262 Watercolor II 

ART 3263 Watercolor III 

ART 421 4 Drawing IV 

ART 4225 Painting IV 

ART 4950 Selected Topics (Drawing or Painting) 

Choose one: 3 

ART 3251 Printmaking I 

Choose two upper level Art History courses 6 

Choose four Studio Art Electives: 12 

ART 4999 Senior Exhibition 3 

Physical Education 5 

Total Hours for the Degree 125 

"^ Augusta State University Catalog 



ART 

Bachelor of Fine Arts: Art (Sculpture/Ceramics) 

The Bachelor of Fine Arts program Is designed to prepare students for professional careers in art. It should be selected by 
students planning to pursue graduate degrees in sculpture or cerannics. 

Portfolio Review 

All art majors are required to submit their work for a review by the studio faculty after the completion of the following courses: 
Art 1520, 1530, 1211, and 12 additional hours of studio art courses (21 hours total.) Portfolio Reviews are scheduled during 
the fall semester. The Portfolio Review must take place the academic year preceding the year of graduation. Passing the 
Portfolio Review is a prerequisite for Art 4999 and a graduation requirement. If the Portfolio Review is not passed, it must be 
repeated and passed during the following fall semester Portfolio Review occurs on the day after the last day of classes of the 
fall semester. 

Transfer students must meet this requirement with the provision that a minimum of three hours be done while in residency at 
Augusta State Univ. and that the transfer courses for the remaining 1 8 hrs be equivalent to the required courses listed above. 

Each student should submit a minimum of 15 studio works. These are to include both two-dimensional and three-dimensional 
works. Media variety in works is encouraged in order to aid faculty appraisal of the student's progress. 

The Senior Exhibition 

The B.F.A. degree candidate is required to mount an exhibition of artwork. The work for this exhibition must be accepted by 
the studio art faculty and judged to be of significant quantity and quality to demonstrate the student's professional abilities. The 
exhibition is completed in Art 4999 and is a graduation requirement. 

Core Curriculum Area A-E for Arts Majors 42 

Core Curriculum Area F 18 

Take each of the following: 

ART 1211 Visual Arts I: Drawing and Design 

ART 1520 Visual Arts Freshman Studio Seminar 

ART 1530 Visual Arts II: Sculpture and Design 

ART 2212 Drawing II 

ART 2611 Art History I 

ART 2612 Art History II 

Major Concentration 60 

Required Courses: 27 

ART 3213 Drawing III: Figure Drawing 
ART 3221 Painting I 
ART 3231 Photography I 
ART 3311 Sculpture: Carving 
ART 3331 Sculpture: Figure Modeling 
ART 3401 Ceramics I 
ART 3402 Ceramics II 
ART 3700 Color Experience 
ART 3721 Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art I 

Choose one: 3 

ART 3251 Printmaking I 
ART 3232 Photography II 

Choose two: 6 

ART 4341 Sculpture: Multimedia 
ART 4331 Sculpture: Installation I 
ART 4321 Sculpture: Casting I 

Choose one additional sculpture or ceramics course 3 

Choose two upper level Art History courses 6 

Choose four Studio Art Electives: 1 2 

Any studio courses 
ART 4999 Senior Exhibition 3 

Physical Education 5 

Total Hours for the Degree 125 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 65 



ART 

Bachelor of Fine Arts with a iViajor in Art 
(Art-Printmaking/Photography Track) 

The Bachelor of Fine Arts program is designed to prepare students for professional careers in art. It should be selected by 
students planning to pursue graduate degrees in art with a concentration in Printmaking and/or Photography. 

Portfolio Review 

All art majors are required to submit their work for a review by the studio faculty after the completion of the following courses: 
Art 1520, 1530, 1211, and 12 additional hours of studio art courses (21 hours total.) Portfolio Reviews are scheduled during 
the fall semester. The Portfolio Review must take place the academic year preceding the year of graduation. Passing the 
Portfolio Review is a prerequisite for Art 4999 and a graduation requirement. If the Portfolio Review is not passed, it must be 
repeated and passed during the following fall semester. Portfolio Review occurs on the day after the last day of classes of the 
fall semester. 

The Senior Exhibition 

The B.F.A. degree candidate is required to mount an exhibition of artwork. The work for this exhibition must be accepted by 
the studio art faculty and judged to be of significant quantity and quality to demonstrate the student's professional abilities. The 
exhibition is completed in Art 4999 and is a graduation requirement. 

Core Curriculum Area A-E for Arts Majors 42 

Core Curriculum Area F 18 

Take each of the following: 

ART 1211 Visual Arts I: Drawing and Design 

ART 1520 Visual Arts Freshman Studio Seminar 

ART 1530 Visual Arts II: Sculpture and Design 

ART 2212 Drawing II 

ART 2611 Art History I 

ART 2612 Art History II 

Major Concentration 60 

Required Courses: 33 

ART 3213 Drawing III 
ART 3221 Painting I 
ART 3231 Photography I 
ART 3232 Photography II 
ART 3233 Photography III 
ART 3251 Printmaking I 
ART 3401 Ceramics I 
ART 3700 Color Experience 
ART 3721 Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art I 
ART 4261 Printmaking II 
ART 4262 Printmaking III 

Choose two from the following: 6 

ART 3222 Painting II 
ART 3234 Photography IV 
ART 3402 Ceramics II 
ART4214 Drawing IV 
ART 4263 Printmaking IV 
ART 4331 Sculpture: Installation 
ART 4341 Sculpture: Multimedia 
ART 4950 Selected Topics in Printmaking 
ART 4950 Selected Topics in Photography 

Choose two upper level Art History courses: 6 

ART 4620 Art Since 1955 
ART 4630 "Primitivism" in 20th Century Art 
ART 4640 Raphael 

ART 4650 Early Renaissance Italian Painting 
ART 4660 American Art 
ART 4670 Far Eastern Art 
ART 4722 Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art II 
SABR 4930 Study Abroad in Art and Culture I 

^° Augusta State University Catalog 



SABR 4930 Study Abroad in Art and Culture 
Choose Four Upper Division Studio Art Electives 

ART 4999 Senior Exhibition 



12 

3 



Physical Education 
WELL 1000 
Wellness Elective 
Wellness Elective 



3 

1 
1 



Total Hours for the Degree 



125 




Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 



67 



ART 

Bachelor of Arts: Art (General) 

The major in art under the Bachelor of Arts degree follows established guidelines for treating art as a subject within the 
framework of liberal arts. It is recommended for the student whose interest in art is more general. (Students interested in the 
professional degree should read the requirements for a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree.) 

Portfolio Review 

All art majors are required to submit their work for a review by the studio faculty after the completion of the following courses: 
Art 1520, 1530, 1211, and 15 additional hours of studio art courses (21 hours total.) Portfolio Reviews are scheduled during the 
fall semester. The Portfolio Review must take place the year preceding the year of graduation. Passing the Portfolio Review is 
a prerequisite for Art 4998 and a graduation requirement. If the Portfolio Review is not passed, it must be repeated and passed 
during the following fall semester. Portfolio Review occurs on the day after the last day of the fall semester. 

Transfer students must meet this requirement with the provision that a minimum of three hours be done while in residency at 
Augusta State Univ. and that the transfer courses for the remaining 18 hrs be equivalent to the required courses listed above. 

Each student should submit a minimum of 15 studio works. These are to include both two-dimensional and three-dimensional 
works. Media variety in works is encouraged in order to aid faculty appraisal of the student's progress. 

The Senior Exhibition 

The BA degree candidate is required to mount an exhibition of artwork. The work for this exhibition must be accepted by the 
studio art faculty and judged to be of significant quantity and quality. The exhibition is completed in Art 4998 and is a graduation 
requirement. 

Core Curriculum Area A-E for Arts Majors 42 

Core Curriculum Area F 18 

Take each of the following: 

ART 1211 Visual Arts I: Drawing and Design 

ART 1520 Visual Arts Freshman Studio Seminar 

ART 1530 Visual Arts II: Sculpture and Design 

ART 2212 Drawing II 

ART 2611 Art History I 

ART 2612Art History II 

Major Concentration 42 

Required courses: , 15 

ART 3221 Painting I 
ART 3231 Photography I 
ART 3700 Color Experience 
ART 3401 Ceramics I 
ART 3721 Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art I 

Choose one: 3 

ART 3213 Drawing III: Figure Drawing or 
ART 3331 Sculpture: Figure Modeling 

Choose one: 3 

ART 3251 Printmaking I 
ART 3232 Photography II 

Choose one: 3: 

ART 3311 Sculpture: Carving I 

ART 4321 Sculpture: Casting I 

ART 4331 Sculpture: Installation 

ART 4341 Sculpture: Multimedia I 
One upper level Art History course 3 

Choose 2 studio or Art History courses 6 

ART 4998 Senior Exhibition 3 

Free electives 6 

Minor Field 18 

Physical Education 5 

Total Hours for the Degree 1 25 

"° Augusta State University Catalog 



ART 

Bachelor of Arts: Art (Pre-Medical Illustration Track) 

The major in art under the Bachelor of Arts degree follows established guidelines for treating art as a subject within the 
framework of liberal arts. It is recommended for the student whose interest in art is more general. (Students interested in the 
professional degree should read the requirements for a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree.) 

Portfolio Review 

All art majors are required to submit their work for a review by the studio faculty after the completion of the following courses: 
Art 1520, 1530, 1211, and 15 additional hours of studio art courses (21 hours total.) Portfolio Reviews are scheduled during the 
fall semester. The Portfolio Review must take place the year preceding the year of graduation. Passing the Portfolio Review is 
a prerequisite for Art 4998 and a graduation requirement. If the Portfolio Review is not passed it must be repeated and passed 
during the following fall semester. Portfolio Review occurs on the day after the last day of class of the fall semester 

Transfer students must meet this requirement with the provision that a minimum of three hours be done while in residency at 
Augusta State University and that the transfer courses for the remaining 18 hours be equivalent to the required courses listed 
above. 

Each student should submit a minimum of 15 studio works. These are to include both two-dimensional and three-dimensional 
works. Media variety in works is encouraged in order to aid faculty appraisal of the student's progress. 

The Senior Exhibition 

The BA degree candidate is required to mount an exhibition of artwork. The work for this exhibition must be accepted by the 
studio art faculty and judged to be of significant quantity and quality. The exhibition is completed in Art 4998 and is a graduation 
requirement. 

Core Curriculum Area A-E for Arts Majors 42 

Core Curriculum Area F 18 

Take each of the following: 

ART 1211 Visual Arts I: Drawing and Design 

ART 1520 Visual Arts Freshman Studio Seminar 

ART 1530 Visual Arts II: Sculpture and Design 

ART 2212 Drawing II 

ART 2611 Art History I 

ART 2612 Art History II 

Major Concentration 58 

Required biology courses: 1 6 

BIOL 2111 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 
BIOL 2112 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 
BIOL 3100 Zoology 

BIOL 3310 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy 
Required art courses: 33 

ART 3213 Drawing III: Figure Drawing 
ART 3221 Painting I 
ART 3231 Photography I 
ART 3232 Photography II 
ART 3261 Watercolor I 
ART 3331 Sculpture: Figure Modeling I 
ART 3332 Sculpture: Figure Modeling II 
ART 3401 Ceramics I 
ART 3700 Color Experience 
ART 3721 Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art I 
ART 4214 Drawing IV 

One upper level Art History course 3 

Choose one studio or Art History course 3 

ART 4998 Senior Exhibition 3 

Elective 2 

Physical Education 5 

Total Hours for the Degree 125 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 69 



ART 



Minor in Art 



ART 1211: Visual Arts I: Drawing and Design 
ART 1520: Visual Arts Freshman Studio Seminar 
ART 1530: Visual Arts II: Sculpture and Design 



3 
3 
3 



Select 3 upper-division Studio Art or Art History courses. 
Grade of C or better is required in these courses. 



Total Hours for the Minor 



18 




70 



Augusta State University Catalog 



BIOLOGY P ROGRAMS 



BIOLOGY 

Bachelor of Science 
with a Major in Biology 

Core Areas A - E for Science Majors 42 

Core Area F 1 8 

(Grade of C or better is required in all Area F courses) 

BIOL 1107 and 1108 Principles of Biology I and II 8 

CHEM 1211 and 1212 Principles of Chemistry I and II 8 

Select one of the following: 2 

Foreign Language 3 

CHEM 2410 Chemistry of Organic and Biomolecules 4 

CSCI 1200 Introduction to Computers and Programming 3 

CSCI 1210 Introduction to Java Programming 3 

CSCI 1301 Principles of Computer Programming I 4 

MINF2201 Microcomputer Applications 3 

Required Lower Division Courses (may be used in the Core 

Curriculum) and spill over hours from Area F 5-16 

(Grade of C or better is required in all these courses.) 

1. One year Foreign Language or 

MATH 2210 Elementary Statistics and 
CSCI 1200 or 1210 or 1301 or MINF 2201 

2. CHEM 2410 or 3411 Organic Chemistry I 

3. PHYS 1111 and 1112 Introductory Physics I and II 

or 
PHYS 2211 and 2212 Principles of Physics I and II 

Major Concentration 27 

(Grade of C or better is required in all these courses) 

BIOL 3000 General Botany 4 

BIOL 3100 Zoology 4 

BIOL 3200 Genetics 4 

BIOL 3400 Cell Biology 4 

BIOL 41 00 Principles of Ecology 4 

BIOL 4980 Seminar 1 

Select two upper-division biology courses 6 

Upper Division Electives 12 

(Grade of C or better is required in all these courses.) 

To be chosen with the assistance of the student's 

faculty advisor. 
Free Electives 5-16 

Physical Education 5 

Total Hours for the Degree 125 

(A Senior Exit Examination is required of all graduating biology majors. A Scaled Score of 135 or Higher on the ETS Major 
Field Test is required. Should a student fail to obtain a score of 135, he/she will be required to take the ETS Major Field Test 
a second time. Failure to obtain a score of 135 or higher on the second attempt will result in the student taking an oral exam 
administered by the department of Biology.) 

If a student does not successfully complete a biology course after two attempts (i.e.. hie/she receives a D. F. W. or WF). the 
student will be limited to specific registration times for any subsequent attempts. Any student meeting these criteria will not be 
allowed to register for the course until the last day of late registration. Appeals may be made to the Chair of the Department of 
Biology in hardship cases. 

Students who declare a major in Biology will be classified as Pre-Biology majors until they complete MATH 1113 and BIOL 1108 
with grades of C or better Upon successful completion of these requirements, a student will be classified as a Biology major 

Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 71 



BIOLOGY 

Biology 
with Secondary Education Certification 

Core Areas A-E for Science Majors 42 

Core Area F 18 

(Grade of C or better required in all Area F courses) 

BIOL 1 1 07, 1 1 08 Principles of Biology I and II 8 

CHEM 1211, 1212 Principles of Chemistry I and II 8 

Select one of the following: 
Foreign Language 

CHEM 2410 Chemistry of Organic and Biomolecules (4) 
CSCI 1200 Introduction to Computers and Programming(3) 
CSCI 1210 Introduction to Java Programming(3) 
CSCI 1301 Principles of Computer Programming I (4) 
MINF2201 Microcomputer Applications (3) 

Required Lower Division Courses (may be used in Core Curriculum) 5-16 

and spill over hours from Area F 
(Grade of C or better is required in all these courses) 

One year of Foreign language or 

MATH 2210 Elementary Statistics and 

CSCI 1200 or 1210 or 1301 or MINF 2201 

CHEM 2410 or 3411 Organic Chemistry I 

PHYS 1111 and PHYS 1112 Introductory Physics I and II 
or 

PHYS 2211 and PHYS 2212 Principles of Physics I and II 

The following courses should be taken before the start 9 

of the junior year 

EDUC 2110 Investigating Critical and Contemporary 

Issues in Higher Education 3 

EDUC 2120 Exploring Socio-Cultural Perspectives 

on Diversity 3 

EDUC 2130 Exploring Learning and Teaching 3 

Major Concentration 27 

(Grade of C or better is required in all these courses) 

BIOL 3000 General Botany 4 

BIOL 31 00 General Zoology 4 

BIOL 3200 Genetics 4 

BIOL 3400 Cell Biology 4 

BIOL 4100 Principles of Ecology 4 

BIOL 4980 Seminar 1 

Select two upper-division biology courses 6 

Upper Division Secondary Education Courses Required for Certification 25 
(Grade of C or better is required in all these courses) 
Students must be admitted to Teacher Education to be able to enroll in 
these courses. 

SCED 4101 Secondary School Student: Implications for 3 

Curriculum, Instruction, Assessment and Management 
SCED 4102 Context and Curriculum Coherence 

and Classroom Management 3 

SCED 4401 Science Pedagogy I 3 

SPED 4002 Instructional Strategies for 

Teaching Students with Disabilities 

in General Education Settings 3 

SCED 4901 Secondary Apprenticeship 13 



Physical Education 5 

Total hours for the degree 131-142 



Certification Requirement: Successful completion of the Georgia Assess Online Technology Test or EDTD 3011 

Physical Education 
Total hours for the degrei 
(see note on next page) 

' ^ Augusta State University Catalog 



(A Senior Exit Examination is required of all graduating biology majors. A Scaled Score of 135 or Higher on the ETS Major 
Field Test is required. Should a student fail to obtain a score of 135, he/she will be required to take the ETS Major Field Test 
a second time. Failure to obtain a score of 135 or higher on the second attempt will result in the student taking an oral exam 
administered by the department of Biology.) 



BIOLOGY 

Minor in Biology 

Students minoring in biology should see a biology faculty member as early in their careers as possible. 

Prerequisites 8 

Biology 1107 and 1108 Principles of Biology I and II 



Upper Division Courses 



15 



In consultation with your major department and the Biology Department, select 1 5-1 8 hours of 3000 and 4000 
level biology courses. Grade of C or better is required in all these courses. 



Total Upper Division Hours for the Biology Minor 



15 




Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 



73 



CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS PROGRAMS 



CHEMISTRY - Professional Track 

Bachelor of Science 
with a Major in Chemistry 

The professional track prepares the student for graduate study in chemistry and provides for job entry level as a chemist. 
(Grade of C or better is required in all chemistry courses) 

Core Curriculum Areas A-E for Science Majors - 42 

Core Curriculum Area F 18 

CHEM 1211, 1212 Principles of Chemistry I, II 8 

CHEM 2810 Quantitative Analysis 4 

MATH 2011, 2012 Calculus I - (one hour), II 5 
CSCI 1200 (or higher) Introduction to Computers 

and Programming, one hour 1 

Non-Core Courses 5-16 

MATH 2011 (if not in D, transfer student) 0-3 

CSCI 1200 (or higher)(two hours from F) 2 
PHYS 2211, 2212 Principles of 

Physics I, II (if not in D) 0-8 

MATH 3020 Differential Equations 3 

Major Concentration 40 

CHEM3411,3412 0rganicChemistry I, II 8 

CHEM 3721 , 3722 Physical Chemistry I, II 8 

CHEM 3810 Advanced Organic Chemistry 4 

CHEM 3820 Laboratory Management and Safety 2 

CHEM 421 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 4 

CHEM 4551 Biochemistry I 4 

CHEM 4840 Instrumental Analysis 4 

Select two of the following: 6 

CHEM 4552 Biochemistry II (3) 

CHEM 4830 Principles of Instrument Design (3) 

CHEM 4950 Selected Topics (3) may be repeated 

with different topic 
CHEM 4990 Undergraduate Research (maximum 3 hours 

total towards major concentration) 

Electives 4-15 

Physical Education 5 

Satisfactory Chemistry Oral Exam (Departmental Requirement) 

Scaled score of 140 or higher on ETS Major Field Test 

Total Hours for the Degree 125 



' ^ Augusta State University Catalog 



CHEMISTRY - Biochemistry Track 

Bachelor of Science 
with a Major in Chennistry 

The pre-professional track is ideal for pre-med, pre-dentistry, or graduate study in biochemistry. 
(Grade of C or better is required in all chemistry courses) 

Core Curriculum Areas A-E for Science Majors 42 

Core Curriculum Area F 18 

CHEM 1211, 1212 Principles of Chemistry I, II 8 

CHEM 2810 Quantitative Analysis 4 

MATH 2011 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I - (1 hour) 1 

PHYS 1111 Introductory Physics I 4 

PHYS 1112 Introductory Physics II 1 
Non-Core Courses 6-9 

MATH 2011 (if not in D, transfer student) 0-3 

PHYS 1112 (three hours from F) 3 

CSCI 1200 (or higher) 3 
Major Concentration 33 

CHEM 3411 , 3412 Organic Chemistry I, II 8 

CHEM 3721 Physical Chemistry I 4 

CHEM 3810 Advanced Organic Chemistry 4 

CHEM 3820 Laboratory Management and Safety 2 

CHEM 4210 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 4 

CHEM 4551 , 4552 Biochemistry I, II 7 

CHEM 4840 Instrumental Analysis 4 

Minor or Upper Division Electives 15-18 

(grade of C or better is required in all of these courses.) 
To be chosen with the assistance of the student's faculty 
advisor, CHEM 4990 not to exceed 3 hours credit 

Electives 0-6 

Physical Education 5 

Satisfactory Chemistry Oral Exam Departmental Requirement 
Scaled score of 140 or higher on ETS Major Field Test 

Total Hours for the Degree 125 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 75 



CHEMISTRY 



Core Curriculum Areas A-E for Science Majors 

Core Curriculum Area F 

(Grade C or better In all these courses) 

CHEM 1211, 1212 Principles of Chemistry I, II 8 

CHEM 2810 Quantitative Analysis 4 

MATH 2011 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 

(other hours in Area D) 1 

PHYS 1111 Introductory Physics I 4 

PHYS 1112 Introductory Physics II 1 

Lower level Requirements of Chemistry Major 

(Grade C or better in all these courses) 

BIOL 1107 and 1108 (hours not taken in Area D) 

PHYS 1112 (three hours from F) 3 

CSCI 1200 (or higher) 3 

EDUC 2110 Investigating Critical and Contemporary 

Issues in Higher Education 3 

EDUC 2120 Exploring Socio-Cultural Perspectives 

on Diversity 3 

EDUC 2130 Exploring Learning and Teaching 3 

*EDUC and SPED courses should be taken before junior year 

Chemistry Concentration 

(Grade of C or better is required in all these courses) 

CHEM 3411, 3412 Organic Chemistry I, II 8 

CHEM 3721 Physical Chemistry I 4. 

CHEM 381 Advanced Organic Chemistry 4 

CHEM 3820 Laboratory Management and Safety 2 

CHEM 4210 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 4 

CHEM 4551 , 4552 Biochemistry 1,11 7 

CHEM 4840 Instrumental Analysis 4 

Secondary Teacher Certification 

(Grade of C better if required in all these courses) 

SCED 4101 Secondary School Student: Implications for 3 

Curriculum, Instruction, Assessment and Management 
SCED 4102 Secondary School Context and 

Curriculum Coherence and Classroom Management 3 
SCED 4401 Science Pedagogy I 3 

SPED 4002 Instructional Strategies for Teaching Students 

with Disabilities in General Education Settings 3 

SCED 4901 Secondary Apprenticeship/Seminar 13 

Certification Requirement: Successful completion of the 
Georgia Assess Online Technology Test or EDTD 3011 

Elective ( to handle transfers within the University System) 
Physical Education 

Total Hours for the Degree 



Bachelor of Science 

with a IVIajor in Chemistry 

with Certification in Secondary Education 



42 
18 



15 



33 



25 




5 

138 



76 



Augusta State University Catalog 



CHEMISTRY 



Minor in Chemistry 



(Grade of C or better is required in all chemistry courses) 
Prerequisite Courses 

CHEM 1211, 1212 Principles of Chemistry I, II 

CHEM 2810 Quantitative Analysis 
Minor Concentration 

Includes four hours from CHEM 2810 

CHEM 3411 Organic Chemistry I 
Select one 4-hour and one 3- or 4-hour course from 

CHEM 3412, 3721, 3722, 3810, 4210, 4541 or 4551, 4830, 
4840 
All courses must be approved by the Chair of the 

Department of Chemistry and Physics. 
(Prior approval is recommended) 



4 
4 

7-£ 



Total Hours for the Chemistry Minor 



15-16 




Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 



77 



ENGINEERING 

Pre-Engineering Curriculum 

The curriculum offered by the Department of Chemistry and Physics and the Department of Mathematics and Computer 
Science includes most courses required of freshmen and sophomores at colleges of engineering. Students wishing to 
transfer from ASU to a college of engineering should select appropriate courses in consultation with a faculty advisor from 
one of these departments. 

PRE-ENGINEERING TRANSFER PROGRAM 

The Pre-Engineeering curriculum is part of an Engineering Transfer program in which an undergraduate student may engage 
in a pre-engineering preparatory program at Augusta State University and then transfer to an engineering program at the 
Georgia Institute of Technology Savannah Campus. After completing the academic requirements of the two participating 
institutions, the student will have earned an associate of science degree from Augusta State University and a bachelor 
degree in engineering from Georgia Tech. Students participating in this program may seek a degree from any engineering 
degree-granting program at the Georgia Tech Savannah Campus. 

To be admitted to Georgia Tech in this program a student must (1) complete the program of study below; (2) submit 
application materials for evaluation by the Office of Undergraduate Admissions at Georgia Tech that include a positive 
recommendation from the designated faculty advisor within the Department of Chemistry and Physics or the Department 
of Mathematics and Computer Science at Augusta State University; and (3) attain a minimum overall Grade Point Average 
(GPA) based on residency: if the student is a Georgia resident, a minimum overall GPA of 2.7 and a GPA of 2.7 in the math, 
science, and engineering courses specified below is required. Non-Georgia residents must earn a minimum overall GPA of 
3.0 and a GPA of 3.0 in the math, science and engineering courses specified below. 

Pre-Engineering Curriculum (total of 69 - 80 credit hours) 

Grade of C or better is required in all courses transferred to GA Tech) 

Core Curriculum Areas A-E for Science Majors 42 

In Area D, select: 11 

MATH 2011 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 3 

CHEM 1211 Principles of Chemistry I 4 

CHEM 1212 Principles of Chemistry II 4 

In Area E, select: 3 

ECON 1810 Introduction to Economics, 3 

or ECON 2105 Macroeconomics 

or ECON 2006 Microeconomics 

Area F for Physics Majors 18 

Non-Core Courses 9 

CSCI 2060 (one hour can be used in Area F) 3 

MATH 3020 Differential Equations 3 

MATH 3280 Linear Algebra 3 

Directed Electives 0-11 

One or more other courses may be required for transfer to GATech - Savannah 
depending on the student's chosen engineering field. Students should consult 
their pre-engineering advisor in the Department of Chemistry and Physics or the 
Department of Mathematics and Computer Science for the proper selection of these courses. 

Wellness Requirement (4 credit hours) 
WELL 1000 Wellness 
One Physical Activity Course 



' ° Augusta State University Catalog 



PHYSICS 



Bachelor of Science with a Major in Physics 



This program prepares the student for graduate study in physics and provides for job entry level as a physicist. 
(Grade of C or better is required in all physics courses.) 



Core Curriculum Areas A-E for Science Majors 

Core Curriculum Area F 

PHYS 2211, 2212 Principles of Physics I, II 
MATH 2011, 2012, 2013 Calculus I one hour, II 
CSCI 1301 or 2060 Programming for Science 
and Engineering 

Non-Core Courses 

MATH 2011 (if not in D, transfer student) 
CSCI 1 301 or 2060 (three hours from F) 
CHEM 1211, 1212 Principles of Chemistry I, II 

( if not in D) 
MATH 3020 Differential Equations 

Major Concentration 

PHYS 3011, 3012 Electronics I, II 

PHYS 3250 Theoretical Mechanics 

PHYS 3260 Computational Physics 

PHYS 3300 Modern Physics 

PHYS 4010 Advanced Laboratory 

PHYS 4051 , 4052 Electromagnetic Theory I, II 

PHYS 4310 Thermal Physics 

PHYS 4530 Mathematical Methods of Physics 

PHYS 4600 Quantum Mechanics 



III 



8 
9 

1 

0-3 
3 

0-8 
3 



8 
4 
3 
3 
3 
6 
3 
3 
3 



42 



18 



6-17 



36 



Electives 
Physical Education 

Satisfactory Physics Oral Exam Departmental Requirement 
Scaled score of 135 or higher on ETS Major Field Test 
Total Hours for Degree 



■18 



125 





Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 



79 



PHYSICS/MATHEMATICS 



Core Curriculum Areas A-E Science Majors 



Bachelor of Science with a Major in Physics/IVIathematics 
with Certification in Secondary Education 



Core Curriculum Area F 

(Grade C or better in all these courses) 

PHYS2211, 2212 Principles of Physics I, II 
MATH 2011, 2012, 2013 Calculus I one hour, II, III 
CSCI 1301 Principles of Computer Programming I 

Lower Level Requirements 

(Grade C or better in all these courses) 

CHEM 1211 and 1212 (hours not taken in Areas D) 

CSCI 1301 (3 hours from Area F) 

EDUC 2110 Investigating Critical and Contemporary 

Issues in Higher Education 
EDUC 2120 Exploring Socio-Cultural Perspectives 

on Diversity 
EDUC 2130 Exploring Learning and Teaching 



8 

9 
1 




3 



3 

3 



*EDUC and SPED courses should be taken before junior year 



Physics Concentration: 
PHYS3011 Electronics I 

or PHYS 3040 Advanced Optics 
PHYS 3250 Theoretical Mechanics 
PHYS 3300 Modern Physics 
Select three courses from 3000 and 4000 level Physics 



Mathematics Concentration: 

(Grade C or better in all these courses) 

MATH 2030 Logic and Set Theory 

MATH 3020 Differential Equations 

MATH 3280 Linear Algebra 

MATH 4211 Modern Abstract Algebra I 

MATH 4251 Probability and Statistics I 

MATH 431 Modern Geometry 

MATH 4800 Secondary Mathematics from an Advanced 
Perspective 

Secondary Teacher Certification 

(Grade of C or better is required in all these courses) 

SCED 4101 Secondary School Student: Implications for 

Curriculum, Instruction, Assessment and Management 
SCED 4102 Secondary School Context and 

Curriculum Coherence and Classroom Management 
SPED 4002 Instructional Strategies for Teaching Students 

with Disabilities in General Education Settings 
Select one of the following two courses: 

MATH 4430 Methods of Teaching Secondary Math. 

or SCED 4401 Science Pedagogy 
SCED 4901 Secondary Apprenticeship/Seminar 

Certification Requirement: Successful completion of the 
Georgia Assess Online Technology Test or EDTD 3011 

Electives (to handle transfers within the University System) 
Physical Education 

Total Hours for the Degree 



4 
4 
9 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



3 
13 



42 
18 



12 



21 



21 



25 




5 

144 



80 



Augusta State University Catalog 



PHYSICS 



Minor in Physics 



(Grade of C or better is required in all Physics courses) 



Prerequisite Courses 

PHYS 2211, 2212 Principles of Physics I, II 
or PHYS 1111, 1112 Introductory Physics 
MATH 2012 Calculus II 



I, II 



Minor Concentration 

Include four hours from MATH 2012 
Select three or four courses 11 hours nninimum 
from approved Physics Major Concentration 

All courses must be approved by the Chair of 
the Department of Chemistry and Physics. 

(Prior approval is recommended) 

Total Hours for the Physics Minor 



4 
11-12 



15-16 




Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 



81 



COMMUNICATIONS AND PROFESSIONAL WRITING 



COMMUNICATIONS AND PROFESSIONAL WRITING 

Bachelor of Arts 

with a Major in Communications: 

Communication Studies Track 

Core Curriculum Areas A-E for 

Communications/Communication Studies Majors 42 

Core Curriculum Area F 18 

COMC 2010 Communications and Culture {w\Vn a grade 3 

of C or better) 
FREN, GRMN, or SPAN 1002, 2001,2002 9 

Select two from ttie following: 6 

ANTH 1002, ANTH 2011, ART 1000, ART 1001, ART 1002, 

ART 1003, ART 1211, ART 1520, ART 1530, ART 2541, 

ART 2611, ART 2612, COiVlC 2010, COIVID 2100, 

COMD 2200, COMD 2210, COMD 2250, COMD 2550, 

COMD 2950, ENGL 2110, ENGL 2250, ENGL 2950, 

FREN 1001-2002, FREN 2950, GRMN 1001-2002, 

HIST 1111-1112, HIST 2111-2112, HONR 1900, 

HUMN 2950, LATN 1001-2002, MUSI 2310, MUSI 2320, 

MUSI 2330, PHIL1000, POLS 2101, POLS 2301, 

POLS 2401, PSYC 1101, PSYC 1105, PSYC2101, 

PSYC2103, PSYC 2150, SABR 2930, SOCI 1101, 

SOCI 1103, SOCI 1160, SOCI 2241, SPAN 1001-2002, 

SPAN 2950, WMST 1101, WMST 2950 

Major Concentration 

(Grade of C or better is required for all major courses) 30 

Required courses: 18 

COMC 3000 Media Law and Ethics 

COMS 3010 Human Communication Theory / 

COMS 3040 Interpersonal Communication 
COMS 3110 Public Speaking 
COMS 3250 Persuasion 
COMS 4971 Senior Capstone Project I 
COMS 4972 Senior Capstone Project II 

Choose two additional 3000 or 4000 level COMS courses 

from the following courses: 6 

COMS 3000 / COMD 3000 Voice and Diction 

COMS 3070 Organizational Communication 

COMS 3100 Intercultural Communication 

COMS 3200 Topics in Rhetoric 

COMS 4110 Argumentation and Debate 

COMS 4120 Gender and Communication 

COMS 4950 Special Topics 

Choose two additional courses from any remaining 

3000 or 4000 level COMS courses or from any upper-level 

COMC, COMD, COMJ, COMP, or COMT courses 6 

Minor Concentration 15-18 

Electives 12-15 

Physical Education 5 

Total Hours for the Degree 1 25 



°^ Augusta State University Catalog 



COMMUNICATIONS AND PROFESSIONAL WRITING 

Bachelor of Arts 
with a Major in Communications: Theatre Track 

Portfolio Review - All Communications majors in the Theatre track are required to submit their work for a reviev^r by the faculty 
after the completion of the following courses: COMC 2010, COMD 2250, COMD 2550, and at least 15 additional hours of 
upper level theatre courses (30 hours total). Passing the Portfolio Review is a required component of COMD 4970 Senior 
Project and a graduation requirement. Transfer students must meet this requirement with the provision that a minimum of 
15 hours be done while in residency at Augusta State University and that the transfer courses for the remaining 15 hours be 
equivalent to the required courses listed above. 

All students should have a resume with a minimum of five shows representing at least two on-campus productions and at 
least one off-campus production. In addition to the resume, acting students should submit a headshot, two approved audition 
pieces, and three letters of recommendation. Design students should submit drawings, production shots, and close-up 
photos of their work on at least two ASU Theatre shows, and three letters of recommendation. Directors and playwrights 
should submit written work, concept statements, and photographs of their produced work, as well as three letters of 
recommendation. 

Underclassmen are strongly encouraged to participate in Portfolio Review annually so that they can develop their portfolio 
and prepare for job opportunities throughout their time here at ASU. 



Core Curriculum Areas A-E 



42 



Core Curriculum Area F 18 

FREN, GRMN, LTN, or SPAN 1 002, 2001 , and 2002 9 

COMC 2010 Communications and Culture 3 

COMD 2250 Acting I 3 

COMD 2550 Stagecraft 3 

Major Concentration 30 

(Grade of C or better is required for all major courses) 

Required courses 12 

COMD 3100 Performance Practicum 1-2 

COMD 3200 Production Practicum 1-2 

(The two practicums together must total 3 hours) 

COMD 3221 History of the Theatre I 3 

COMD 3222 History of the Theatre II 3 

COMD 4970 Senior Thesis/Project 3 

Choose four from the following list 12 

COMD 3000 Voice and Diction 3 

COMD 3250 Acting II 3 

COMD 3710 Directing 3 

COMD 3750 Scenography I 3 

COMD 3850 Stage Management 3 

COMD 401 Performance for the Camera 3 

COMD 4210 Acting III 3 

COMD 4750 Scenography II 3 

COMD 4950 Selected Topics 3 

ENGL 3620 Writing for the Theatre 3 

Choose one from the following list 3 

COMD 4220 Contemporary Theatre 3 

COMD 4420 Shakespeare 3 

Choose one from any COMC, COMJ, COMR COMS, 3 

COMT, and COMW at 3000-4000 level 



Minor Concentration 
Electives 
Physical Education 

Total Hours for the Degree 



15-18 

12-15 

5 

125 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 



83 



COMMUNICATIONS AND PROFESSIONAL WRITING 

Bachelor of Arts 
with a Major in Communications: Journalism Track 

Core Curriculum Areas A-E 
for Communications/Journalism Majors 42 

Core Curriculum Area F 18 

COMC 2010 Communications and Culture (with a grade 3 

of C or better) 
FREN.GRMN, or SPAN 1002, 2001,2002 9 

Select two from the following: 6 

ANTH 1002, ANTH 2011 , ART 1000, ART 1001, ART 1002, 

ART 1003, ART 1211, ART 1520, ART 1530, ART 2541, 

ART 2611, ART 2612, COiVlC 2010, COMD 2100, 

COMD 2200, COMD 2210, COMD 2250, COMD 2550, 

COMD 2950, ENGL 2110, ENGL 2250, ENGL 2950, 

FREN 1001-2002, FREN 2950, GRMN 1001-2002, 

HIST 1111-1112, HIST 2111-2112, HONR 1900, HUMN 2950, 

LATN 1001-2002, MUSI 2310, MUSI 2320, MUSI 2330, 

PHIL1000, POLS 2101, POLS 2301, POLS 2401, 

PSYC 1101, PSYC 1105, PSYC 2101, PSYC 2103, 

PSYC 2150, SABR 2930, SOCI 1101, SOCI 1103, 

SOCI 1160, SOCI 2241, SPAN 1001-2002, SPAN 2950, 

WMST 1101, WMST 2950 

Major Concentration 30 

(Grade of C or better is required for all courses 
in the major) 

COMC 3000 Media Law and Ethics (required) 3 

COM J 3010 History of Journalism (required) 3 

COMJ 3020 introduction to Newswriting (required) 3 

COMJ 3030 Feature Writing (required) 3 

COMJ 3041 and 3042 Practicum (required) 3 

COMJ 4020 Advanced Reporting (required) 3 

COMJ 4960 Internship (required) 3 

Select two courses from another Communications track 6 

Select one course from any Communications tracl< 3 

Minor Concentration 1 5-1 8 

Electives 12-15 

Physical Education 5 

Total Hours for the Degree 125 



°^ Augusta State University Catalog 



COMMUNICATIONS AND PROFESSIONAL WRITING 

Bachelor of Arts 
with a Major in Communications: Professional Writing Track 

Core Curriculum Areas A-E 42 

Core Curriculum Area F 18 

COMC 2010 Communications and Culture (with a grade 3 

of C or better) 
FREN.GRMN, or SPAN 1002, 2001,2002 9 

Select two from the following: 6 

ANTH 1002, ANTH 2011, ART 1000, ART 1001, ART 1002, 

ART 1003, ART 1211, ART 1520, ART 1530, ART 2541, 

ART 2611, ART 2612, COMC 2010, COMD 2100, 

COMD 2200, COMD 2210, COMD 2250, COMD 2550, 

COMD 2950, ENGL 2110, ENGL 2250, ENGL 2950, 

FREN 1001-2002, FREN 2950, GRMN 1001-2002, 

HIST 1111-1112, HIST 2111-2112, HONR 1900, HUMN 2950, 

LATN 1001-2002, MUSI 2310, MUSI 2320, MUSI 2330, 

PHIL1000, POLS 2101, POLS 2301, POLS 2401, 

PSYC 1101, PSYC 1105, PSYC 2101, PSYC 2103, 

PSYC 2150, SABR 2930, SOCI 1101, SOCI 1103, 

SOCI 1160, SOCI 2241, SPAN 1001-2002, SPAN 2950, 

WMST 1101, WMST 2950 

Major Concentration 30 

(Grade of C or better is required for all major courses) 

Required course: 

COMC 3000 Media Law and Ethics 3 

And four of the following six courses: 12 

COMC 3100 Communications for Professionals 

COMW 3600 Creative Writing Workshop (Sandhills) 

COMW 3610 Writing Book Length Prose 

COMJ 3020 Introduction to Newswriting 

COMP 3200 Public Relations Writing 

COMT 4200 Writing for Television 
Choose five courses from the following list (or four of 15 

these courses and the remaining course not already 
taken from the five in the list above). 

COMW 3620 Writing for the Theatre 

COMW 3630 Writing Song Lyrics and Poems 

COMW 3650 Grant Writing 

COMW 3680 Technical Writing 

COMW 4940 Writing Creative Non-Fiction 

COMW 3660 Writing On-Line 

COMW 3670 Graphics for Technical Documents 

COMW 3675 Writing Across Cultures 

COMW 4610 The Literary Marketplace 

COMW 4950 Selected Topics 

COMW 4960 Internship In Professional Writing 

Minor Concentration 15-18 

Electives 12-15 

Physical Education 5 

Total Hours for the Degree 125 

Graduating seniors in the Professional Writing track must submit a portfolio acceptable to the Professional Writing Portfolio 
Committee. 



Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 85 



COMMUNICATIONS AND PROFESSIONAL WRITING 

Bachelor of Arts 
with a Major in Communications: Public Relations Tracl< 

Core Curriculum Areas A-E for 
Communications/Public Relations Track 42 

Core Curriculum Area F 18 

COMC 2010 Communications and Culture (with a grade 3 

of C or better) 
FREN.GRMN, or SPAN 1002,2001,2002 9 

Select two from the following: 6 

ANTH 1002, ANTH 2011, ART 1000, ART 1001, ART 1002, 

ART 1003, ART 1211, ART 1520, ART 1530, ART 2541, 

ART 2611, ART 2612, COMC 2010, COMD 2100, 

COMD 2200, COMD 2210, COMD 2250, COMD 2550, 

COMD 2950, ENGL 2110, ENGL 2250, ENGL 2950, 

FREN 1001-2002, FREN 2950, GRMN 1001-2002, 

HIST 1111-1112, HIST 2111-2112, HONR 1900, HUMN 2950, 

LATN 1001-2002, MUSI 2310, MUSI 2320, MUSI 2330, 

PHIL1 000, POLS 2101, POLS 2301 , POLS 2401 , 

PSYC 1101, PSYC 1105, PSYC 2101, PSYC 2103, 

PSYC 2150, SABR 2930, SOCI 1101, SOCI 1103, 

SOCI 1160, SOCI 2241, SPAN 1001-2002, SPAN 2950, 

WMST 1101, WMST 2950 

Major Concentration 30 

(Grade of C or better is required for all major courses) 

COMC 3000 Media Law and Ethics 3 

COMJ 3020 Introduction to Newswriting 3 

COMP 3600 Public Relations Practices 3 

COMP 3501 Publication Production I 3 

COMP 4500 Communications Campaigns 3 

COMP 3041 Magazine Writing and Production I 1 

COMP 3042 Magazine Writing and Production II 2 

COMP 4100 Public Relations Theory and Cases 
Choose one of the following: 

COMJ 3030 Feature Writing 

COMJ 4010 Copy Editing and Layout 

COMP 3200 Public Relations Writing 

COMP 4700 Creative Strategies in Advertising 

COMW 3650 Grant Writing 

COMW 3680 Technical Writing 

Choose two from 3000 and 4000 level communications 
courses COMC, COMD, COMJ, COMP, COMS , COMT 6 

Minor Concentration 1 5-1 8 

Electives 12-15 

Physical Education 5 

Total Hours for the Degree 125 



°° Augusta State University Catalog 



COMMUNICATIONS AND PROFESSIONAL WRITING 

Bachelor of Arts 
with a Major in Communications: Television and Cinema Track 

(Fall Semester start is strongly recommended) 

Core Curriculum Areas A- E 42 

Core Curriculum Area F 18 

COMC 2010 Communications and Culture (with a grade 3 

of C or better) 
FREN.GRMN, or SPAN 1002, 2001,2002 9 

Select two from the following: 6 

ANTH 1002, ANTH 2011, ART 1000, ART 1001, ART 1002, 

ART 1003, ART 1211, ART 1520, ART 1530, ART 2541, 

ART 2611, ART 2612, COMC 2010, COMD2100, 

COMD 2200, COMD 2210, COMD 2250, COMD 2550, 

COMD 2950, ENGL 2110, ENGL 2250, ENGL 2950, 

FREN 1001-2002, FREN 2950, GRMN 1001-2002, 

HIST 1111-1112, HIST 2111-2112, HONR 1900, HUMN 2950, 

LATN 1001-2002, MUSI 2310, MUSI 2320, MUSI 2330, 

PHIL1000, POLS 2101, POLS 2301, POLS 2401, 

PSYC 1101, PSYC 1105, PSYC 2101, PSYC 2103, 

PSYC 2150, SABR 2930, SOCI 1101, SOCI 1103, 

SOCI 1160, SOCI 2241, SPAN 1001-2002, SPAN 2950, 

WMST 1101, WMST 2950 

Major Concentration 30 

(Grade of C or better is required in all major courses) 

Required: 15 

COMC 3000 Media, Law and Ethics 3 

COMT 3000 Introduction to Filmmaking 3 

COMJ 3020 Newswriting 3 

COMT 3040 /COMJ 3040 Broadcast Journalism 3 

COMT 4971 Preparation for Senior Thesis/Project in 
TV/Cinema 1 

COMT 4972 Senior Thesis/Project 2 

Select three of the following courses: 9 

COMT 3020 Introduction to Television Production 

COMT 3022 Theories and Techniques of Editing 

COMT 3030 Introduction to Electronic Field Production 

COMT 3050 Introduction to Film History 

COMT 3060 The Business of Television 

COMT 3070 Film Appreciation 

COMT 3220 Digital Techniques for Television and Cinema 

COMT 3222 Independent Filmmaking 

COMT 3224 Documentary Filmmaking 

COMT 4000 Digital Techniques of Editing 

COMT 401 / COMD 401 Performance for the Camera 

COMT 4030 Filmmaking for the Web 

COMT 4050 History of Television 

COMT 4200 Writing for Television 

COMT 4950 Selected Topics 

COMT 4960 Internship in Television and Cinema 

Select two from any COMC, COMD, COMJ, COMP, 

and COMS at 3000-4000 level 6 

Minor Concentration 1 5-1 8 

Electives 12-15 

Physical Education 5 

Total Hours for the Degree 125 



Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 87 



COMMUNICATIONS AND PROFESSIONAL WRITING 



Prerequisite to the IVIinor 

COMC 2010 Communications and Culture 

(with a grade of C or better) 3 

Select four 3000-or 4000-level courses from 

the following tracks: 12 

COMC Communications 

COMD Communications/Drama 

COMJ Communications/Journalism 

COMP Communications/Public Relations 

COMS Communications/Communication Studies 

COMT Communications/Television and Cinema 

COMW Communications/Professional Writing 

(Grade of C or better is required for all work in the minor) 

Total Hours for the Minor 1 5 



Minor in Communications 



THEATRE 



Prerequisites to the Minor 

COMC 201 (with a grade of C or better) 3 

Required Courses 9 

COMD 2250, Acting I 3 

COMD 2550 Stagecraft 3 

Select one of the following: 3 

COMD 3221 History of the Theatre I 
COMD 3222 History of the Theatre II 
COMD 4220 Contemporary Theatre 

Upper-division Courses 6 

Select three of the following courses: 

COMD 3000 Voice and Diction 

COMD 3221 History of the Theatre I 

COMD 3222 History of the Theatre II 

COMD 3250 Acting II 

COMD 3620 Writing for the Theatre 

COMD 3710 Directing 

COMD 3750 Scenography I 

COMD 3850 Stage Management 

COMD 4010 Performance for the Camera 

COMD 4210 Acting III 

COMD 4220 Contemporary Theatre 

COMD 4420 Shakespeare 

COMD 4750 Scenography II 

COMD 4950 Selected Topics 

(Grade of C or better is required for all work in the minor) 
Total Upper-Division Hours for the Drama Minor 1{ 



IVIinor in Theatre 



88 



Augusta State University Catalog 



ENGLISH AND FOREIGN LANGUAGES 



ENGLISH 



Bachelor of Arts 
with a Major in English, Concentrating in Literature 



Core Curriculum Areas A-E for Arts Majors 42 

Core Curriculum Area F 18 

FREN, GRIVIN, LATN, or SPAN 1002, 2001 and 2002 9 

ENGL 2250 Introduction to Literary Studies (Grade of C 3 

or better) 

Six hours of electives to be chosen from: 6 

ANTH 1102, ANTH 2011, ART 1000, ART 1001, ART 1002, 
ART 1003, ART 1211, ART 1520, ART 1530, ART 2541, 
ART 2611, ART 2612, COMC 2010, COMD 2100, COMD 2200, 
COMD 2950, CRJU 2950, ENGL 2110, ENGL 2250, 
ENGL 2950, FREN 1001-2002, FREN 2950, 
GRMN 1001-2002, HIST 1111-1112, HIST 2111-2112, 
HONR 1900, HUMN 2950, MUSI 2310, MUSI 2320, 
MUSI 2330, PHIL 1000, POLS 2101, POLS 2401, 
PSYC 1101, PSYC 1105, PSYC 2101, PSYC 2103, 
PSYC 2150, SABR 2930, SOCI 1101, SOCI 1103, SOCI 1160, 
SOCI 2241, SOCI 2950, SOWK 2950, SPAN 1001-2002, 
SPAN 2950, WMST 1101, WMST 2950 

Major Concentration 30 

(Grade of C or better required for all major courses) 

ENGL 4420 Shakespeare 3 

Three of four English literature surveys 

(3001,3002,3003,3004) 9 

One of two American literature surveys (3101, 31 02) 3 

Five additional upper-division English courses 15 

Minor Concentration 1 5-1 8 

Electives 12-18 

Physical Education 5 

Total Hours for the Degree 125 

Graduating seniors must take and pass the English exit exam and 
submit an exit portfolio acceptable to the appropriate portfolio committee. 



Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 89 



ENGLISH 

Bachelor of Arts 
with a Major in English, Concentrating in Creative Writing 

Core Curriculum Areas A-E 42 

Core Curriculum Area F 18 

FREN, GRMN, LATN, or SPAN 1002, 2001 and 2002 9 

ENGL 2110 Creative Writing 3 

ENGL 2250 Introduction to Literary Studies (Grade of C 3 

or better) 
Three hours of electives to be chosen from: 3 

ANTH 1102, ANTH 2011, ART 1000, ART 1001, ART 1002, 

ART 1003, ART 1211, ART 1520, ART 1530, ART 2541, 

ART 2611, ART 2612, COMC 2010, COMD2100, 

COMD2200, COMD 2950, CRJU2950, ENGL 2110, 

ENGL 2250, ENGL 2950, FREN 1001-2002, FREN 2950, 

GRMN 1001-2002, HIST 1111-1112, HIST 2111-2112, 

HONR 1900, HUMN 2950, MUSI 2310, 

MUSI 2320, MUSI 2330, PHIL 1000, POLS 2101, 

POLS 2401, PSYC 1101, PSYC 1105, PSYC 2101, 

PSYC 2103, PSYC 2150, SABR 2930, SOCI 1101, 

SOCI 1103, SOCI 1160, SOCI 2241, SOCI2950, 

SOWK2950, SPAN 1001-2002, SPAN 2950, WMST 1101, 

WMST 2950 

Major Concentration/Creative Writing 1 5 

Choose five of the following: 

ENGL 3600 Creative Writing Workshop (Sandhills) 3 

ENGL 3620 Writing for the Theatre 3 

ENGL 3630 Writing Song Lyrics and Poems 3 

ENGL 3640 Writing Short Fiction 3 

ENGL 4601 Major Project I 3 

ENGL 4602 Major Project II 3 

ENGL 4630 Poetry Workshop 3 

ENGL 4640 Fiction Workshop 3 

ENGL 4680 Studies in Writing . 3 

Major Concentration/Literature 15 

ENGL 4420 Shakespeare 3 

Choose two of the following: 6 

ENGL 3001 Anglo-Saxon and Middle English Literature 

ENGL 3002 Eng. Lit. from the Renaissance to the Restoration 

ENGL 3003 Eng. Lit. from the Restoration to the Romantics 

ENGL 3004 Eng. Lit. of the Victorian and Modern Periods 
Choose two of the following: 6 

ENGL 3101 American Literature to the Rise of Realism 

ENGL 3102 American Literature Since the Rise of Realism 

ENGL 3110 African-American Literature 

Minor Concentration 1 5-1 8 

Electives 12-15 

Physical Education 5 

Total Hours for the Degree 125 

Graduating seniors must take and pass the English exit exam and 
submit an exit portfolio acceptable to the appropriate portfolio committee. 



"^ Augusta State University Catalog 



ENGLISH 

Bachelor of Arts 
with a Major in English, Concentrating in Rhetoric and Connposition 

Core Curriculum Areas A-E 42 

Core Curriculum Area F 18 

FREN, GRMN, LAIN, or SPAN 1002, 2001 and 2002 9 

ENGL 2250 Introduction to Literary Studies (grade of C 3 

of better) 

Six hours of electives to be chosen from: 6 

ANTH 11 02, ANTH 2011, ART 1000, ART 1001, ART 1002, 
ART 1 003, ART 1211, ART 1 520, ART 1 530, ART 2541 , 
ART 2611, ART 2612, COMC 2010, COMD 2100, 
COMD 2200, COMD 2950, CRJU 2950, ENGL 2110, 
ENGL 2250, ENGL 2950, FREN 1001-2002, FREN 2950, 
GRMN 1001-2002, HIST 1111-1112, HIST 2111-2112, 
HONR 1900, HUMN 2950, MUSI 2310, MUSI 2320, 
MUSI 2330, PHIL 1000, POLS 2101, POLS 2401, 
PSYC 1101, PSYC 1105, PSYC21C1, PSYC2103, 
PSYC 2150, SABR 2930, SOCI 1101, SOCI 1103, 
SOCI 1160, SOCI 2241, SOCI 2950, SOWK 2950, 
SPAN 1001-2002, SPAN 2950, WMST 1101, WMST 2950 

Major Concentration/Rhetoric and Composition 1 5 

Choose one of the following: 3 

ENGL 4711 Introduction to Linguistics 

ENGL 4712 Modern Grammatical Systems 

ENGL 4720 History and Structure of the English Language 
Choose two of the following: 6 

ENGL 3650 Grant Writing 

ENGL 3680 Technical Writing 

ENGL 3683 Feature Writing 
Choose two of the following: 6 

ENGL 3681 Advanced Writing 

ENGL 4680 Studies in Writing 

ENGL 4520 Theories of Writing 
Major Concentration/Literature 15 

ENGL 4420 Shakespeare 3 

Choose two of the following: 6 

ENGL 3001 Anglo-Saxon and Middle English Literature 

ENGL 3002 Eng. Lit. from the Renaissance to the Restoration 

ENGL 3003 Eng. Lit. from the Restoration to the Romantics 

ENGL 3004 Eng. Lit. of the Victorian and Modern Periods 
Choose two of the following: 6 

ENGL 3101 American Literature to the Rise of Realism 

ENGL 3102 American Literature Since the Rise of Realism 

ENGL 3110 African-American Literature 
Minor Concentration 1 5-1 8 

Electives 12-15 

Physical Education 5 

Total Hours for the Degree 1 25 

Graduating seniors must take and pass the English exit exam and submit 
an exit portfolio acceptable to the appropriate portfolio committee. 

ENGLISH 

Bachelor of Arts 
with a Major in English with Secondary Teacher Certification 

Core Curriculum Areas A -E for Arts Majors 42 

Core Curriculum Area F 18 

Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 91 



FREN, GRMN, LAIN or SPAN 1002, 2001 and 2002 9 

ENGL 2250 Introduction to Literary Studies (Grade of 3 

C or better) 
Six hours of electives to be cinosen from; 6 

ANTH 1 1 02, ANTH 2011, ART 1000, ART 1001, ART 1002, 
ART 1 003, ART 1211, ART 1 520, ART 1 530, ART 2541 , 
ART 2611, ART 2612, COMC 2010, COIVID 2100, 
COIVID 2200, COIVID 2950, CRJU 2950, ENGL 2110, 
ENGL 2250, ENGL 2950, FREN 1001-2002, FREN 2950, 
GRMN 1001-2002, HIST 1111-1112, HIST 2111-2112, 
HONR 1900, HUMN 2950, MUSI 2310, MUSI 2320, 
MUSI 2330, PHIL 1000, POLS 2101, POLS 2401, PSYC 1101, 
PSYC 1105, PSYC 2101, PSYC 2103, PSYC 2150, 
SABR 2930, SOCI 1101, SOCI 1103, SOCI 1160, SOCI 2241, 
SOCI 2950, SOWK 2950, SPAN 1001-2002, SPAN 2950, 
WMST 1101, WMST 2950 



Major Concentration 

(Grade of C or better is required for all courses in the major) 

ENGL 4420 Shakespeare 

Three of four English literature surveys 
(3001,3002,3003,3004) 

Two American literature surveys (3101, 3102) 

ENGL 3681 Advanced Writing 

ENGL 4720 History and Structure of the English 
Language 

Two additional upper-division English courses 

(English 3320 is strongly recommended) 

At least one of the courses taken to satisfy the above 
requirements must include contemporary literature; 
choose from ENGL 3004, 3102, 3110, 3120, 3310, 3320 
4220, 4230, 4250, 4262. 



30 



9 
6 
3 

3 
6 



At least one of the courses taken to satisfy the above 
requirements must include American minority 
literature; choose from ENGL 3102, 3110, 3120, 3310. 

Secondary Teacher Certification Sequence 

EDUC 2110 Investigating Critical and Contemporary 

Issues in Higher Education 
EDUC 2120 Exploring Socio-Cultural Perspectives 

on Diversity 
EDUC 2130 Exploring Learning and Teaching 
The above courses are to be taken before admission to 
Teacher Education 



3 
3 



37 



SPED 4002 Instructional Strategies for Teaching Students 

with Disabilities in General Education Settings 
SCED 4101 Secondary School Student: Implications 

for Curriculum, Instruction, Assessment 

and Management 
SCED 4102 Secondary School Context and Curriculum 

Coherence and Classroom Management 
SCED 4501 Secondary English Pedagogy I 
ENGL 3820 Teaching Writing in the Secondary School 
SCED 4901 Secondary Apprenticeship/Seminar 

Physical Education 

Total Hours for the Degree 



3 
3 

3 
13 



5 

132 



(Graduating seniors must take and pass the English exit exam and submit an exit portfolio acceptable to the appropriate 
portfolio committee.) 



92 



Augusta State University Catalog 



(English post-baccalaureate initial certification students must submit an exit portfolio acceptable to the appropriate portfolio 
committee to complete their English requirements.) 

Additional certification requirement: Successful completion of the Georgia Assess Online Technology Test or EDTD 3011 . 



ENGLISH 



Prerequisites to the minor: 

ENGL 1101 or 1113, ENGL 1102 or 1114 (with a grade of C or better in each course) 
HUMN 2001-2002 

Grade of C or better required in each course that counts toward the minor 



Literature Concentration 

ENGL 2250, (Grade of C or better) 3 

Two of the following courses: 

ENGL 3001, 3002, 3003, 3004, 3101, 3102, 3310, 4000, 4100, 
4250, 4261 , 4262, 4420, 4440, 4450 6 

Two additional upper-division courses in literature, film, or theory 6 

Total Hours for the Minor 15 



Creative Writing Concentration 

ENGL 2210, (Grade of Cor better) 3 

Four of the following courses: 

ENGL 3620, 3630, 3640, 4601, 4602, 4630, 4640, 4680 12 

Total Hours for the Minor 1 5 



Rhetoric and Composition Concentration 

ENGL 2250, (Grade of or better) 3 

Four of the following courses: 

ENGL 3650, 3681, 3683, 4520, 4711, 4720, 4680 12 

Total Hours for the Minor 15 



Minor in English 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 93 



FRENCH 

Bachelor of Arts in Foreign Languages: 
French Tracl< with P-12 Teacher Certification 

Core Curriculum Areas A-E 42 

Core Curriculum Area F 18 

FREN 1002, 2001, and 2002 9 

Nine hours of electives to be chosen from: 9 

ANTH 1102, ANTH 2011 , ART 1000, ART 1001 , ART 1002, 

ART 1003, ART 1211, ART 1520, ART 1530, ART 2541, 

ART 2611, ART 2612, COMC2010, COMD2100, 

COMD 2200, COMD 2950, CRJU 2950, ENGL 2110, 

ENGL 2250, ENGL 2950, FREN 2950, GRMN 1001-2002, 

HIST 1111-1112, HIST2111-2112, HONR 1900, HUMN 2950, 

MUSI 2310, MUSI 2320, MUSI 2330, PHIL 1000, POLS 2101, 

POLS 2401, PSYC 1101, PSYC 1105, PSYC 2101, 

PSYC2103, PSYC 2150, SABR 2930, SOCI 1101, SOCI 1103, 

SOCI 1160, SOCI 2241 , SOCI 2950, SOWK 2950, 

SPAN 1001-2002, SPAN 2950, WMST 1101, WMST 2950 

Major Concentration 30 

(Grade of C or better is required for all courses in the major) 

FREN 3100 Oral Expression in French 3 

FREN 3300 Written Expression in French 3 

FREN 3400 French Phonetics 3 

Select seven courses from the following: 21 

FREN 3210 French Culture I: The Francophone World 

FREN 3221 French Culture II: The Hexagon 

FREN 3222 French Culture III: French in 
Contemporary Europe 

FREN 3510 Introduction to French Literature 

FREN 3710 Masterpieces of French Film 

FREN 4100 Advanced Oral Expression in French 

FREN 4300 Advanced Written Expression in French 

FREN 4550 Masterpieces of Poetry 

FREN 4560 Masterpieces of the Novel 

FREN 4590 Literature in Translation 

FREN 4950 Special Topics in French 

SABR 3930 Study Abroad 

SABR 4930 Advanced Studies Abroad 

Teacher Certification Sequence 35 

EDUC 2110 Investigating Critical and Contemporary 

Issues in Higher Education 3 

EDUC 2120 Exploring Socio-Cultural Perspectives 

on Diversity 3 

EDUC 2130 Exploring Learning and Teaching 3 

The above courses are to be taken before admission to 
Teacher Education 

Choose one of the follow/ing curriculum courses: 3 

ECED 3151 Early Childhood Curriculum 
MGED 3112 The Middle School Classroom: Environment, 

Curriculum and Practices 
SCED 4102 Secondary School Context and Curriculum 

Coherence and Classroom Management 

Complete the following required certification courses: 

SPED 4002 Instructional Strategies for Teaching Students 

with Disabilities in General Education Settings 3 

SCED 4101 Secondary School Student: Implications 

for Curriculum, Instruction, Assessment 

and Management 3 

FREN 4801 Methods and Materials for Teaching Foreign 

Languages I in the Elementary School 2 

"'^ Augusta State University Catalog 



FREN 4802 Methods and Materials for Teaching Foreign 

Languages II in the Elennentary School 
SCED 4901 Secondary Apprenticeship/Seminar 

Physical Education 

Total Hours for the Degree 



2 

13 



130 



For information on foreign language credit by examination through CLEP, the International Baccalaureate Program or the 
Defense Language Institute, see the ASU Admissions web page: http://www.aug.edu/admissions/ 

Portfolios - Students who are completing their third upper-division Spanish, French or German course must submit their 
Junior Portfolio (JP) by the deadline indicated that semester. Students who do not successfully complete their JP will receive 
an Incomplete in the course. 

Students who have completed nine upper-division Spanish or French courses, or will complete the nine courses during 
that semester must submit their Senior Portfolio (SP) by the deadline indicated. The successful completion of the SP is a 
graduation requirement. 

Departmental Exams - Students who are completing their fourth upper-division Spanish, French or German course must take 
the departmental exam, level one, during that semester. Students who are completing their tenth upper-division Spanish or 
French course must take the departmental exam, level two, during that semester. 

Exit Interviews -All foreign language majors are required to participate in the exit interview the semester they are completing 
their tenth upper-division foreign language course. 



FRENCH 



Bachelor of Arts in Foreign Languages: 

French Track 



Gore Curriculum Areas A-E 

Core Curriculum Area F 

FREN 1 002, 2001 , and 2002 9 

Select three of the following courses: 9 

ANTH 1102, ANTH 2011, ART1000,ART1001,ART1002, 
ART 1 003, ART 1211, ART 1 520, ART 1 530, ART 2541 , 
ART 2611, ART 2612, COMC 2010, COMD 2100, COMD 2200, 
COMD 2950, CRJU 2950, ENGL 2110, ENGL 2250, ENGL 2950, 
FREN 2950, GRMN 1001-2002, HIST 1111-1112, 
HIST 2111-2112, HONR 1900, HUMN 2950, MUSI 2310, 
MUSI 2320, MUSI 2330, PHIL 1000, POLS 2101, POLS 2401, 
PSYC 1101, PSYC 1105, PSYC 2101, PSYC 2103, 
PSYC 2150, SABR 2930, SOCI 1101, SOCI 1103, SOCI 1160, 
SOCI 2241, SOCI 2950, SOWK 2950, SPAN 1001-2002, 
SPAN 2950, WMST 1101, WMST 2950 



42 

18 



Major Concentration 

(Grade of C or better is required in all major courses) 

FREN 3100 Oral Expression in French 3 

FREN 3300 Written Expression in French 3 

FREN 3400 French Phonetics 3 

Select seven courses from the following: 21 

FREN 3210 French Culture I: The Francophone World 

FREN 3221 French Culture II: The Hexagon 

FREN 3222 French Culture III: French in Contemporary Europe 

FREN 3510 Introduction to French Literature 

FREN 3710 Masterpieces of French Film 

FREN 4100 Advanced Oral Expression in French 

FREN 4300 Advanced Written Composition in French 

FREN 4520 Classical and Romantic Theatre 

FREN 4530 Modern Theatre 

FREN 4550 Masterpieces of Poetry 

FREN 4560 Masterpieces of the Novel 

FREN 4590 Literature in Translation 



30 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 



95 



FREN 4950 Special Topics in French 

SABR 3930 Study Abroad 

SABR 4930 Advanced Studies Abroad 

Minor Concentration 15-18 

Electives 12-15 

Physical Education 5 

Total Hours for the Degree 125 

For information on foreign language credit by examination through CLEP, the International Baccalaureate Program or the 
Defense Language Institute, see the ASU Admissions web page: http://www.aug.edu/admissions/ 

Portfolios - Students who are completing their third upper-division Spanish, French or German course must submit their 
Junior Portfolio (JP) by the deadline indicated that semester. Students who do not successfully complete their JP will receive 
an Incomplete in the course. 

Students who have completed nine upper-division Spanish or French courses, or will complete the nine courses during 
that semester must submit their Senior Portfolio (SP) by the deadline indicated. The successful completion of the SP is a 
graduation requirement. 

Departmental Exams - Students who are completing their fourth upper-division Spanish, French or German course must take 
the departmental exam, level one, during that semester. Students who are completing their tenth upper-division Spanish or 
French course must take the departmental exam, level two, during that semester. 

Exit Interviews - All foreign language majors are required to participate in the exit interview the semester they are completing 
their tenth upper-division foreign language course. 

FRENCH 

Minor in French 

Prerequisites 

FREN 2001- 2002 6 

Upper-division courses 

(Grade of C or better is required in all these courses) 12 

Complete 12 hours of French courses at the 3000/4000 
level, including at least one of the following courses: 

FREN 3100 Oral Expression in French 

FREN 3300 Written Expression in French 

FREN 3400 French Phonetics 
Total Hours for the Minor 18 

Portfolios - Students who are completing their third upper-division Spanish, French or German course must submit their 
Junior Portfolio (JP) by the deadline indicated that semester. Students who do not successfully complete their JP will receive 
an Incomplete in the course. 

Students who have completed nine upper-division Spanish or French courses, or will complete the nine courses during 
that semester must submit their Senior Portfolio (SP) by the deadline indicated. The successful completion of the SP is a 
graduation requirement. 

Departmental Exams - Students who are completing their fourth upper-division Spanish, French or German course must take 
the departmental exam, level one, during that semester. Students who are completing their tenth upper-division Spanish or 
French course must take the departmental exam, level two, during that semester. 

Exit Interviews - All foreign language majors are required to participate in the exit interview the semester they are completing 
their tenth upper-division foreign language course. 



"" Augusta State University Catalog 



GERMAN 

Prerequisites 

GRMN 2001-2002 



Minor in German 



Upper Division Courses 

(Grade of C or better is required in all these courses) 

Complete 12 hours of German courses at the 3000/4000 
level, choosing 4 of the following: 12 

GRMN 3100 Oral Communication in German 
GRMN 3220 German Society and Culture 
GRMN 3300 German Grammar and Written Communication 
GRMN 3510 Introduction to German Literature 
GRMN 3520 Studies in German Literature 
GRMN 4950 Selected Topics in German 
SABR 3930 Study Abroad 
SABR 4930 Advanced Study Abroad 
Total Hours for the Minor 1 8 

Portfolios - Students who are completing their third upper-division Spanish, French or German course must submit their 
Junior Portfolio (JP) by the deadline indicated that semester. Students who do not successfully complete their JP will receive 
an Incomplete in the course. 

Students who have completed nine upper-division Spanish or French courses, or will complete the nine courses during 
that semester must submit their Senior Portfolio (SP) by the deadline indicated. The successful completion of the SP is a 
graduation requirement. 

Departmental Exams - Students who are completing their fourth upper-division Spanish, French or German course must take 
the departmental exam, level one, during that semester. Students who are completing their tenth upper-division Spanish or 
French course must take the departmental exam, level two, during that semester. 

Exit Interviews - All foreign language majors are required to participate in the exit interview the semester they are completing 
their tenth upper-division foreign language course. 




Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 



97 



HUMANITIES 

Minor in Humanities 

The Humanities minor is designed for students who wish to study art, literature, music, and related fields beyond the two 
required World Humanities courses. It allows students to explore arts and culture from an interdisciplinary perspective. A 
student who plans to minor in Humanities should complete an application for the minor during the semester in which the student 
is enrolled in World Humanities II. The form is available in the Department of English and Foreign Languages. The student will 
then select courses in consultation with a Humanities advisor. 

Prerequisites 
(Grade of C or better) 

HUMN 2001 World Humanities I 4 

HUMN 2002 World Humanities II 4 

Upper-Division Courses 15 

(Grade of C or better is required in all these courses) 

You may count up to 9 hours of appropriate study abroad 

(i.e., courses numbered 3000 and above). 
Select 3 to 9 hours: 
Humanities 

HUMN 4010 Postmodernism 

HUMN 4101 Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art 

HUMN 4210 Literature into Opera 

HUMN 4220 The Harlem Renaissance 

HUMN 4950 Selected Topics 

Select at least 3 hours each from any two of the following 

disciplines: 

Art 

ART 3000 Humanities Studio Experience 

ART 4620 Art Since 1955: Neo-Avant-Gardes in 
Europe and America 

ART 4630 "Primitivism" in 20th Century Art 

ART 4640 Raphael 

ART 4650 Early Renaissance Italian Painting, 

ART 4660 American Art 

ART 4670 Far Eastern Art 

ART 4722 Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art II (If not taken as HUMN) 
Music 

MUSI 3310 From the Monastery to the Concert Stage 

MUSI 3320 Music and Popular Culture 

MUSI 3330 Music of the World's Peoples 

MUSI 3610 ASU Wind Ensemble 

MUSI 3620 ASU Choir 

MUSI 3630 ASU Orchestra 

MUSI 3660 ASU Jazz Ensemble 

MUSA1100- 1900 Applied Lessons: Secondary 

MUSA 21 00 - 2900 Applied Lessons: Secondary 

MUSA3100 - 3900 Applied Lessons: Secondary 

MUSA 41 00 -4900 Applied Lessons: Secondary 
Literature 

Communications/Drama: COMD 3221, 3222 History of the Theatre I and II, COMD 4220 Contemporary Theatre, 
COMD 4420 Shakespeare 

Communications/ Telecommunications: COMT 3050 

Introduction to Film History, COMT3070 Film Appreciation 

Upper-division literature courses in a foreign language or in English, 
excluding ENGL 3330. 

Select 0-6 hours in the following courses: 
Anthropology 

ANTH 3851 Religion, Culture, and Society 

ANTH 3271 History and Culture of India 
Philosophy 

PHIL 3020 Existentialism 

PHIL 3095 Major Philosophers in History 

^° Augusta State University Catalog 



PHIL 4030 Ancient Greek Philosophy 

PHIL 4032 Contemporary Continental Philosophy 

PHIL 4950 Ancient Political Philosophy 

PHIL 4990 Undergraduate Research 
Political Science 

POLS 3501 Ancient Political Thought 

POLS 3601 / PHIL 3601 Modern Political Thought 
History 

Any History course numbered 3111 to 4951 which is approved by 

the student's advisor. 
Honors 

HONR 3900 Breaking Boundaries 
Psychology 

PSYC 4115 History and Systems of Psychology 
Total Upper-Division Hours for the Humanities Minor 



15 



Variable content courses listed above (e.g. 3900, 4900, 4950, 4990) will be appropriate for the Humanities minor when focused 
on the arts, culture, history, or philosophy. All variable content courses must have prior approval of the student's humanities 
advisor. 



SPANISH 



Core Curriculum Areas A-E 
Core Curriculum Area F 



Bachelor of Arts in Foreign Languages: 
Spanish Track with P-12 Teacher Certification 



42 
18 



SPAN 1002, 2001,2002 < 

Nine hours of electives to be chosen from: i 

ANTH 1102, ANTH 2011, ART 1000, ART 1001, ART 1002, 
ART 1003, ART 1211, ART 1520, ART 1530, ART 2541, 
ART 2611, ART 2612, COMC 2010, COMD 2100, 
COMD 2200, COMD 2950, CRJU 2950, ENGL 2110, 
ENGL 2250, ENGL 2950, FREN 1001-2002, FREN 2950, 
GRMN 1001-2002, HIST 1111-1112, HIST 2111-2112, 
HONR 1900, HUMN 2950, MUSI 2310, MUSI 2320, 
MUSI 2330, PHIL 1000, POLS 2101, POLS 2401, 
PSYC 1101, PSYC 1105, PSYC 2101, PSYC 2103, 
PSYC 2150, SABR 2930, SOCI 1101, SOCI 1103, SOCI 1160, 
SOCI 2241, SOCI 2950, SOWK 2950, SPAN 2950, 
WMST 1101, WMST 2950 



Major Concentration 

(Grade of C or better is required in all major courses) 
SPAN 3100 Spanish Conversation 
SPAN 3300 Spanish Composition 
SPAN 3400 Applied Linguistics 
SPAN 3510 Introduction to Literature 

Select one course from the following: 

SPAN 3211 Hispanic American Culture I 
SPAN 3212 Hispanic American Culture II 
SPAN 3220 Spanish Culture 

Select five courses from the following: 

SPAN 3211 Hispanic American Culture I 

SPAN 3212 Hispanic American Culture II 

SPAN 3220 Spanish Culture 

SPAN 3520 Drama in Spanish 

SPAN 3610 Business Spanish 

SPAN 3620 Medical Spanish 

SPAN 4100 Advanced Spanish Conversation 

SPAN 4300 Advanced Spanish Composition 

SPAN 4530 Twentieth-century Spanish Literature 

SPAN 4540 Hispanic Nobel Laureates 



30 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



15 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 



99 



SPAN 4550 Hispanic American Poetry 

SPAN 4560 Twentieth-century Hispanic American Literature 

SPAN 4570 Hispanic Sinort Story 

SPAN 4710 Spanish Film 

SPAN 4720 Hispanic American Film 

SPAN 4950 Selected Topics 

SABR 3930 Study Abroad 

SABR 4930 Advanced Study Abroad 

Teacher Certification Sequence ^ 35 

EDUC 2110 Investigating Critical and Contemporary 

Issues in Higher Education 3 

EDUC 2120 Exploring Socio-Cultural Perspectives 

on Diversity 3 

EDUC 2130 Exploring Learning and Teaching 3 

The above courses are to be taken before admission to 
Teacher Education 

Choose one of the following curriculum courses: 3 

ECED 3151 Early Childhood Curriculum 
MGED 3112 The IVliddle School Classroom: Environment, 

Curriculum and Practices 
SCED 4102 Secondary School Context and Curriculum 

Coherence and Classroom Management 

Complete the following required certification courses: 

SPED 4002 Instructional Strategies for Teaching Students 

with Disabilities in General Education Settings 3 

SCED 4101 Secondary School Student: Implications 

for Curriculum, Instruction, Assessment 

and Management 3 

SPAN 4801 Methods and Materials for Teaching Foreign 

Languages I in the Elementary School 2 

SPAN 4802 Methods and Materials for Teaching Foreign 

Languages II in the Elementary School 2 

SCED 4901 Secondary Apprenticeship/Seminar 13 

Physical Education 5 

Total Hours for the Degree 130 

(Graduating Seniors must take and pass the Spanish exit exam.) 

For information on foreign language credit by examination through CLEP, the International Baccalaureate Program or the 
Defense Language Institute, see the ASU Admissions web page: http://www.aug.edu/admissions/ 

Portfolios - Students who are completing their third upper-division Spanish, French or German course must submit their 
Junior Portfolio (JP) by the deadline indicated that semester. Students who do not successfully complete their JP will receive 
an Incomplete in the course. 

Students who have completed nine upper-division Spanish or French courses, or will complete the nine courses during 
that semester must submit their Senior Portfolio (SP) by the deadline indicated. The successful completion of the SP is a 
graduation requirement. 

Departmental Exams - Students who are completing their fourth upper-division Spanish, French or German course must take 
the departmental exam, level one, during that semester. Students who are completing their tenth upper-division Spanish or 
French course must take the departmental exam, level two, during that semester. 

Exit Interviews - All foreign language majors are required to participate in the exit interview the semester they are completing 
their tenth upper-division foreign language course. 



^ ^^ Augusta State University Catalog 



SPANISH Bachelor of Arts in Foreign Languages: 

Spanish Track 

Core Curriculum Areas A-E 42 

Core Curriculum Area F 18 

SPAN 1002,2001,2002 3 

Select three of the following courses: 9 

ANTH 1102,ANTH2011,ART1000,ART 1001, ART 1002, 

ART 1003,ART 1211, ART 1520, ART 1530, ART 2541, 

ART 2611, ART 2612, COMC 2010, COMD 2100, 

COMD 2200, COMD 2950, CRJU 2950, ENGL 2110, 

ENGL 2250, ENGL 2950, FREN 1001-2002, FREN 2950, 

GRMN 1001-2002, HIST 1111-1112, HIST 2111-2112, 

HONR 1900, HUMN 2950, MUSI 2310, MUSI 2320, 

MUSI 2330, PHIL 1000, POLS 2101, POLS 2401, 

PSYC 1101, PSYC 1105, PSYC 2101, PSYC 2103, 

PSYC 2150, SABR 2930, SOCI 1101, SOCI 1103, 

SOCI 1160, SOCI 2241 , SOCI 2950, SOWK 2950, 

SPAN 2950, WMST 1101 , WMST 2950 

Major Concentration 

(Grade of C or better is required in all major courses) 30 

SPAN 3100 Spanish Conversation 3 

SPAN 3300 Spanish Composition 3 

SPAN 3510 Introduction to Literature 3 

Select one course from the following: 3 

SPAN 3211 Hispanic American Culture I 

SPAN 3212 Hispanic American Culture II 

SPAN 3220 Spanish Culture 
Select six courses from the following: 18 

SPAN 3211 Hispanic American Culture I 

SPAN 3212 Hispanic American Culture II 

SPAN 3220 Spanish Culture 

SPAN 3400 Applied Linguistics 

SPAN 3520 Drama in Spanish 

SPAN 3610 Business Spanish 

SPAN 3620 Medical Spanish 

SPAN 4100 Advanced Spanish Conversation 

SPAN 4300 Advanced Spanish Composition 

SPAN 4530 Twentieth-century Spanish Literature 

SPAN 4540 Hispanic Nobel Laureates 

SPAN 4550 Hispanic American Poetry 

SPAN 4560 Twentieth-century Hispanic American Literature 

SPAN 4570 Hispanic Short Story 

SPAN 4710 Spanish Film 

SPAN 4720 Hispanic American Film 

SPAN 4950 Selected Topics 

SABR 3930 Study Abroad 

SABR 4930 Advanced Study Abroad 

Minor Concentration 15-18 

Electives 12-15 

Physical Education 5 

Total Hours for the Degree 125 

For information on foreign language credit by examination through CLEP, the International Baccalaureate Program or the 
Defense Language Institute, see the ASU Admissions web page: http://wviw.aug.edu/admissions/ 

Portfolios - Students who are completing their third upper-division Spanish, French or German course must submit their 
Junior Portfolio (JP) by the deadline indicated that semester. Students who do not successfully complete their JP will receive 
an Incomplete in the course. 



Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 101 



students who have completed nine upper-division Spanish or French courses, or will complete the nine courses during 
that semester must submit their Senior Portfolio (SP) by the deadline indicated. The successful completion of the SP is a 
graduation requirement. 

Departmental Exams - Students who are completing their fourth upper-division Spanish, French or German course must take 
the departmental exam, level one, during that semester. Students who are completing their tenth upper-division Spanish or 
French course must take the departmental exam, level two, during that semester. 

Exit Interviews - All foreign language majors are required to participate in the exit interview the semester they are completing 
their tenth upper-division foreign language course. 

SPANISH Minor in Spanish 

Prerequisites 6 

SPAN 2001-2002 

Upper Division Courses 

(Grade or better is required in all these courses) 12 

Complete 12 hours of Spanish courses at the 3000/4000 
level, including at least one of the following courses: 

SPAN 3100 Conversation 

SPAN 3300 Composition 

SPAN 3510 Introduction to Literature 

SPAN 3211 Hispanic American Culture I 

SPAN 3212 Hispanic American Culture II 

SPAN 3220 Spanish Culture 
Total Hours for the Minor 18 

Portfolios - Students who are completing their third upper-division Spanish, French or German course must submit their 
Junior Portfolio (JP) by the deadline indicated that semester. Students who do not successfully complete their JP will receive 
an Incomplete in the course. 

Students who have completed nine upper-division Spanish or French courses, or will complete the nine courses during 
that semester must submit their Senior Portfolio (SP) by the deadline indicated. The successful completion of the SP is a 
graduation requirement. 

Departmental Exams - Students who are completing their fourth upper-division Spanish, French or German course must take 
the departmental exam, level one, during that semester. Students who are completing their tenth upper-division Spanish or 
French course must take the departmental exam, level two, during that semester. 

Exit Interviews - All foreign language majors are required to participate in the exit interview the semester they are completing 
their tenth upper-division foreign language course. 



WOMEN'S STUDIES 

Minor in Women's Studies 

The Women's Studies Minor is designed for students who wish to study women's cultures, contributions, and perspectives from 
an interdisciplinary standpoint. 1 5 hours of course work is required, with at least 9 hours of upper-division credit. A grade of C 
or better is required in all courses. 

Before graduation, a student minoring in Women's Studies will submit a portfolio for review to the Women's Studies Program 
Committee (WSPC). The portfolio must contain work from three different disciplines; it may also contain a project undertaken 
outside of a Women's Studies class. The student will also participate in an exit interview. 
Required course: 

WMST 1101 Introduction to Women's Studies 3 

Select 9-12 hours from the following courses, with courses from 

at least three different departments: 9-12 

History, Anthropology and Philosophy 

ANTH 3871/WMST 3871 Sex, Gender and Culture 

HIST 4011/6011/WMST 4011 History of Women 

HIST 4021/6021/WMST 4021 Gender and Family History 

' ^^ Augusta State University Catalog 



English and Foreign Languages 

ENGL 3310/WMST 3310 Women's Literature 

ENGL 431 0/WMST 431 Studies in Feminism 
Communications and Professional Writing 

COMS 4120/WMST 4120 Gender and Communication 
Psychology 

PSYC 3155/WMST 3155 Psychology of Gender 
Sociology, Chminal Justice and Social Work 

CRJU 3336/SOCI 3336/WIVlST 3336 Women, Crime, 
and the Criminal Justice System 

SOCI 4442/WMST 4442 Gender and Society 

You may select up to 3 hours of other appropriate WMST 
courses to fulfill requirements for the minor. These may include: 



0-3 



WMST 4950 Selected Topics 

WMST 4960 Undergraduate Internship 

WMST 4990 Undergraduate Research 

You may also select up to 3 hours of other appropriate courses, 

provided they are approved by the Women's Studies Program 

Committee (WSPC). 0-3 

Total Hours for the Minor 1 5 




Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 



103 



HISTORY, ANTHROPOLOGY AND PHILOSOPHY PROGRAMS 

ANTHROPOLOGY 

Minor in Anthropology 

Anthropology integrates scientific and humanistic approaches for understanding people and cultures by way of the study of 
archaeology, culture, language, human evolution, and non-human primates. Students interested in human biology, behavior, 
culture, history, or origins will find the anthropological perspective useful. Anthropology complements studies in history, 
humanities, international studies, sociology, psychology, political science, biology, economics, and education and is also 
suitable preparation for those intending to pursue advanced anthropology degrees. 

Prerequisites 3 

(Grade of C or better is required.) 

Anthropology 1102 Introductory Anthropology 

Anthropology 2011 Cultural Anthropology 

Upper Division Courses 15 

(Grade of C or better is required.) 

Take five courses from the following; at least three 

must be taken in residence at Augusta State University: 

ANTH 3271 History and Culture of India 

ANTH 341 1 Indians of North America 

ANTH 3817 African Comparative Cultural Issues 

ANTH 3831 Archaeology 

ANTH 3841 Biophysical Anthropology 

ANTH 3851 Religion, Culture, and Society 

ANTH 3871 Sex, Gender, and Culture 

ANTH 4217 Travelers, Migrants, and Refugees 

ANTH 4861 World Ethnology 

ANTH 4950 Selected Topics 

ANTH 4990 Undergraduate Research 

HIST4111 History of World Religions 

MUSI 3330 Music of the World's People 

Total Hours for the Minor 18 



HISTORY 

Bachelor of Arts 
with a Major in History 

The student contemplating work beyond the baccalaureate level is encouraged to take one and, if possible, two languages 
through the intermediate level. 

Core Curriculum Areas A-E 42 

Core Curriculum Area F 18 

Foreign Language Sequence 6 

Select 6 hours from the following courses: 6 

(Grade of C or better is required) 

HIST 1111 Pre-Modern World Civilization 

HIST 1112 Modern World Civilization 

HIST 2111 United States to 1877 

HIST 2112 United States since 1877 
Select 6 hours from the following courses: 6 

ANTH 1102 Introductory Anthropology 

ANTH 2011 Cultural Anthropology 

CSCI 1200 Introduction to Computers and 
Programming 

ECON 1810 Introduction to Economics 

GEOG 1111 World Geography 

HIST 1111 Pre-Modern World Civilization 

HIST 1112 Modern World Civilization 

' ^^ Augusta State University Catalog 



HIST 2111 United States to 1877 

HIST2112 United States since 1877 

HONR 1900 Contemporary Issues (with department 
approval) 

MATH 2210 Elementary Statistics 

PHIL 1000 Introduction to Philosophy 

POLS 2301 Comparative Politics 

POLS 2401 Global Issues 
Degree Requirements if not taken in the Core 3 

(Grade of C or better is required) 

HIST1111, 1112, 2111, or2112 3 

Major Concentration 28 

(Grade of C or better is required in all major courses) 

HIST 3001 Historical Research Methods 4 

Select twenty-four hours from the offerings 
on the 3000 and 4000 levels 24 

(Students may count up to 6 hours from the following PHIL 
courses toward the major: 3010, 3095, 3601, 4030, 4031, 
4032, 4033) 

Concentration of more than three courses in any field of 
history in the upper division is discouraged. Graduating 
majors must submit at least four term papers for an exit 
interview and take the Major Field Achievement Test in history. 

Minor Concentration 15-18 

Electives 14-17 

Physical Education 5 

Total Hours for the Degree 125 



HISTORY 

Minor in History 

Select one of the following courses 3 

(Grade of C or better is required) 

HIST 1111 (Pre-Modern World Civilization) 

HIST 1112 (Modern World Civilization) 

Select five courses from the upper-division history offerings 

Concentration of more than two upper-division courses in 

any field of history is discouraged. (Grade of C or better 

is required in all of these courses) 15 

Total Hours for the Minor 1 8 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 105 



HISTORY 

Bachelor of Arts with a Major in [History 
and a Certificate in Secondary School Teaching 

Important note: Students must study the requirements for admission to teacher education, which include specific grade 
requirements for a number of core courses. 

Core Curriculum Areas A-E for History Majors 42 

Core Curriculum Area F 18 

Foreign Language Sequence 6 

Two of the following courses: ~ 6 

HIST 1111 Pre-Modern World Civilization 

HIST 1112 Modern Word Civilization 

HIST 2111 United States to 1877 

HIST 2112 United States since 1877 
Two of the following courses: 6 

ANTH 1101 Introductory Anthropology 

ANTH 2011 Cultural Anthropology 

CSCI 1200 Introduction to Computers and Programming 

ECON 1810 Introduction to Economics 

GEOG 1111 World Geography 

HIST 1111 Pre-Modern World Civilization 

HIST 1112 Modern Word Civilization 

HIST 2111 United States to 1877 

HIST 2112 United States since 1877 

HONR 1900 Contemporary Issues (with dept. approval) 

MATH 2210 Elementary Statistics 

PHIL 1000 Introduction to Philosophy 

POLS 2301 Comparative Politics 

POLS 2401 Global Issues 

Degree Requirements if not taken in Areas E-F of the Core: 0-6 
GEOG 1111 World Geography 3 

HIST 1111 or 1112or2111 or2112 3 

Note: The Department and the College of Education 
strongly recommend that the student take 
ECON 1810 InAreaE or F. 

Major Concentration (grade of C or better is required) 28 

HIST 3001 Historical Research Methods 4 

HIST 3711 Georgia History 3 

Three upper-level courses in U.S. history: 9 

HIST 3411, 3431, 3441, 3481, 3491, 4401, 4411, 

4421 , 4431 , 4441 , 4451 , 4471 , 4481 , and 4491 
Two upper-level courses in non-Western history: 6 

HIST 3111, 3211, 3271, 3391, 3511, 3521, 3531, 

3591, 3811, 4111, 4211, and 4221 
Two upper-level courses in European history: 6 

HIST 3311, 3371, 3381, 3851, 3891, 4351, 4361, 

4341, 4371, 4381, and 4391 
(HIST 4011 , 4021 , 4321 , 4900, 4950, 4960, and 4970 are variable-content courses and will be allocated to the above 
areas by the department depending on the focus of the class in the semester it is taken. Other courses with substantial 
historical content may be accepted for the above areas with department permission.) 

Certificate in Secondary School Teaching 

(grade of C or better is required) 34 

1 . Courses taken prior to admission to Teacher Education 9 

EDUC 2110 Investigating Critical and Contemporary 

Issues in Higher Education 3 

EDUC 2120 Exploring Socio-Cultural Perspectives 

on Diversity 3 

EDUC 2130 Exploring Learning and Teaching 3 

^ ^" Augusta State University Catalog 



2. Courses taken after admission to Teacher Education 25 

SCED 4101 Secondary School Student: Implications 

for Curriculum, Instruction, Assessment 

and Management 3 

SCED 4102 Secondary School Context and 

Curriculum Coherence and Classroom 

Management 3 

SCED 4201 Secondary Social Studies Content 

Pedagogy 3 

SPED 4002 Instructional Strategies for 

Teaching Students with Disabilities 

in General Education Settings 3 

SCED 4901 Secondary Apprenticeship 13 

Certification Requirement: Successful completion of the Georgia Assess Online Technology Test or EDTD 3011 

Physical Education 5 

Total Hours for the Degree 1 27 



PHILOSOPHY 

Minor in Philosophy 

The objective of the philosophy program is to focus critically on the deepest questions of human experience and on the 
philosopher's commitment to rationality in a continuous effort to understand the relationships of world, values, and oneself. 
The philosophy minor is also structured to prepare the student for further study in philosophy toward a B.A. degree. A minor 
in philosophy complements any major program at Augusta State University and is applicable in any human endeavor where 
rational thought is required. (All courses submitted for the minor must carry a grade of C or better). 

Prerequisite for all PHIL courses: ENGL 1101 
Prerequisite for upper division philosophy courses 

PHIL 1000 Introduction to Philosophy 3 

Upper Division Courses 15 

Select 15 hours from the following: 

PHIL 3005 Philosophy of the Human Person 3 

PHIL 3010 Ancient Political Philosophy 3 

PHIL 3020 Existentialism 3 

PHIL 3095 Major Philosophers in History 3 

PHIL 3601 / POLS 3601 Modern Political Philosophy 3 

PHIL 3701 / POLS 3701 Contemporary Political Philosophy 3 

PHIL 4030 Ancient Greek Philosophy 3 

PHIL 4032 Contemporary Continental Philosophy 3 

HIST 4111 History of World Religions 3 

May be repeated when subject varies: 

PHIL 4990 Undergraduate Research 3 

Total Hours for the Philosophy Minor 18 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 107 



MATH AND COMPUTER SCIENCE PROGRAMS 



Admission Requirements for Majors 

Students choosing to major in Mathematics or Computer Science begin as Pre-iVlathematics or Pre- 
Computer Science majors. Students with an institutional GPAof at least 2.0 may declare a major in 
Mathematics upon completion of MATH 2012 with a grade of C or better or a major in Computer Science 
upon completion of CSCI 1302 with a grade of C or better. 



COIVIPUTER SCIENCE 



Core Curriculum Areas A-E for Science Majors 

Core Curriculum Area F 

(Grade of C or better is required in all these courses) 

MATH 2011- 2012 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I and II, 

1 hour of MATH 2011 from Area D 
CSCI 1301 Principles of Computer Programming I 
CSCI 1302 Principles of Computer Programming II 
CSCI 2700 Ethics in Computer Science 
Choose one 4-credit laboratory course from Core Area D 
for science or non-science majors except PHSC 1011 
orASTRIOOO 



5 
4 
3 
2 

4 



Bachelor of Science 
with a IVIajor in Computer Science 



42 
18 



Major Concentration _ 40 

(Grade of C or better is required in all these courses) 31 

MATH 2210 Elementary Statistics 

or MATH 3110 Statistical Analysis for Business 3 
CSCI 3030 Mathematical Structures for Computer Science 3 

CSCI 3170 Computer Organization 3 

CSCI 3271 Operating Systems I 3 

CSCI 3370 Assembly Language Programming 3 

CSCI 3400 Data Structures 3 

CSCI 3410 Database Systems 3 

CSCI 3500 Applied Theory of Computing 3 

CSCI 4711 Software Design 3 

CSCI 4712 Senior Capstone Project 4 

Select one of the following courses 3 
MATH 3280 Linear Algebra 
MATH 3710 Combinatorics 
MATH 4350 Numerical Analysis 
MATH 4420 Introduction to the Theory of Graphs 
MATH 4211 Modern Abstract Algebra 1 
MATH 4251 Probability and Statistics I 

Select six hours from the following courses 6 

CSCI 3300 Programming Languages 3 

CSCI 3600 Internet Programming 3 

CSCI 4272 Operating Systems II 3 

CSCI 4280 Data Communications and Networking 3 

CSCI 4800 Compiler Writing 3 

CSCI 4820 Computer Graphics 3 

CSCI 4950 Selected Topics Variable 

CSCI 4960 Undergraduate Internship Variable 

CSCI 4990 Undergraduate Research Variable 



108 



Augusta State University Catalog 



Minor Concentration 

Electives 

Physical Education 

Scaled Score of 140 or Higher on ETS Major Field Test 

Total Hours for the Degree 



15-18 

2-5 

5 

125 



COMPUTER SCIENCE 



Minor in Computer Science 



CSC! 1301 Principles of Computer Programming I 4 

CSCI 1302 Principles of Computer Programming II 3 

Select nine hours from the following courses: 9 

CSCI 3030 Mathematical Structures for Computer Science 3 

CSCI 3300 Programming Languages 3 

CSCI 3370 Assembly Language Programming 3 

CSCI 3410 Database Systems 3 

These courses also are available but require 
prerequisites such as CSCI 3030 or CSCI 3370 

CSCI 3400 Data Structures 3 

CSCI 3500 Applied Theory of Computing 3 

CSCI 4950 Selected Topics Variable 

CSCI 4990 Undergraduate Research Variable 

or any other 4000 level Computer Science courses with 
permission of the instructor 



Total Hours for the Minor 



16 




Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 



109 



MATHEMATICS 



Core Curriculum Areas A-E for Science Majors 

Core Curriculum Area F 

(Grade of C or better is required in all courses) 

MATH 2012, 2013 Calculus and Analytic Geom. II and III 
+1 hour of MATH 2011 from Area D 

MATH 2030 Logic and Set Theory 

CSCI 1301 Principles of Computer Programming I 

Or 
CSCI 2060 Programming for Science and Engineering 

Select one course from the following: 

Any 1 000 or 2000 level CSCI or AIST course, any Area 
D Science course, or FREN or GERM 1 002 or 2001 . No 
course may duplicate any previous selection. (Overflow 
hours go into General Electives.) 

Major Concentration 

(Grade of C or better is required in all these courses) 

MATH 3020 Differential Equations 

MATH 3280 Linear Algebra 

MATH 4011 Real Variables I 

MATH 4211 Modern Abstract Algebra I 
Select one two-course sequence from: 

MATH 4211-4212 Modern Abstract Algebra I, II 

MATH 4011-4012 Real Variables 1,11 

MATH 4251-4252 Probability and Statistics I, II 
Elective 
Select three, or four if necessary, courses from the following: 

MATH 3710 Combinatorics 

MATH 4012 Real Variables II 

MATH 4212 Modern Abstract Algebra II 

MATH 4251 Probability and Statistics I 

MATH 4252 Probability and Statistics II 

MATH 4310 Modern Geometry 

MATH 4320 Theory of Numbers 

MATH 4350 Numerical Analysis 

MATH 4410 History of Mathematics 

MATH 4420 Introduction to Graph Theory 

MATH 4510 Complex Variables 

MATH 4520 General Topology 

MATH 4530 Mathematical Methods of Physics 

MATH 4800 Secondary Math, from an Adv. Perspective 

MATH 4950 Selected Topics 

MATH 4960 Undergraduate Internship 

MATH 4990 Undergraduate Research 

MATH 5110 Introduction to Biostatistics 

MATH 5220 Estimation and Hypothesis Testing 

MATH 5210 Linear Models 

MATH 5320 Time to Event Data Analysis 

Minor Concentration 

Electives 

Physical Education 

Scaled Score of 140 or Higher on ETS Major Field Test 

Total Hours for the Degree 



Bachelor of Science 
with a Major in Mathematics 



9 
3 
4 



42 
18 



27 



3 
3 
3 
3 

6 
6 
6 



3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

Variable 

1-9 

Variable 

3 

3 

3 

3 



15-18 
15-18 
5 



125 



110 



Augusta State University Catalog 



MATHEMATICS 



Core Curriculum Areas A-E for Science Majors 42 

Core Curriculum Area F 1 8 

(Grade of C or better is required in all courses) 

MATH 2012, 2013 Calculus and Analytic Geom. II and III 

+1 hour of MATH 2011 from Area D 9 

MATH 2030 Logic and Set Theory 3 

CSCI 1301 Principles of Computer Programming I 4 

Or 
CSCI 2060 Programming for Science and Engineering 

Select one course from the following: 2 

Any 1 000 or 2000 level CSCI or AIST course, any Area 
D Science course, or FREN or GERM 1002 or 2001. No 
course may duplicate any previous selection. (Overflow 
hours go into General Electives.) 

Major Concentration 27 

(Grade of C or better is required in all these courses) 

MATH 3020 Differential Equations 3 

MATH 3280 Linear Algebra 3 

MATH 4011 Real Variables I 3 

MATH 4211 Modern Abstract Algebra I 3 

MATH 4251 Probability and Statistics I 3 

MATH 4252 Probability and Statistics II 3 

MATH 5110 Introduction to Biostatistics 3 

MATH 5220 Estimation and Hypothesis Testing 3 

Choose one of the following courses: 

MATH 5210 Linear Models 3 

MATH 5320 Time to Event Data Analysis 3 

Minor Concentration 15-18 

Electives 15-18 

Physical Education 5 

Scaled Score of 140 or Higher on ETS Major Field Test 

Total Hours for Degree 125 



Bachelor of Science 

with a Major in Mathematics 

Biostatistics or Statistics Track 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 111 



MATHEMATICS 



Bachelor of Science 
with a Major in Mathematics with Certification in Secondary Education 



Core Curriculum Areas A-E for Science Majors 

Core Curriculum Area F 

(Grade of C or better is required in all courses) 

MATH 2012, 2013 Calculus and Analytic Geom. II and III 

+ 1 hour of MATH 2011 from Area D 9 

MATH 2030 Logic and Set Theory 3 

CSC! 1301 Principles of Computer Programming I 4 

Or 
CSC! 2060 Programming for Science and Engineering 

Select one course from the following: 2 
Any 1000 or 2000 level CSC! or AIST course, any Area 
D Science course, or FREN or GERM 1002 or 2001 . No 
course may duplicate any previous selection. (Overflow 
hours go into General Electives.) 

Major Concentration 

(Grade of C or better is required in all these courses) 

MATH 3020 Differential Equations 3 

MATH 3280 Linear Algebra 3 

MATH 4011 Real Variables I 3 

MATH 4211, 4212 Modern Abstract Algebra I and II 6 

MATH 4251 Probability and Statistics I 3 

MATH 4310 Modern Geometry 3 
MATH 4800 Secondary Mathematics from an Advanced 

Perspective 3 

Select 3 hours from the following electives: 3 

MATH 3710 Combinatorics 3 

MATH 4012 Real Variables II 3 

MATH 4252 Probability and Statistics II - 3 

MATH 4320 Theory of Numbers 3 

MATH 4350 Numerical Analysis 3 

MATH 441 History of Mathematics 3 

MATH 4420 Introduction to the Theory of Graphs 3 

MATH 451 Complex Variables 3 

MATH 4520 General Topology 3 

MATH 4530 Mathematical Methods of Physics 3 

MATH 4950 Selected Topics V 

MATH 4960 Undergraduate Internship 1-9 

MATH 4990 Undergraduate Research V 

MATH 5110 Introduction to Biostatistics 3 



42 
18 



27 



Secondary Teacher Certification 

(Grade of C or better required in all these courses) 

These courses include a lab (field experience) component totaling 

920 clock hours. 

EDUC 2110 Investigating Critical and Contemporary 

Issues in Education 3 

EDUC 2120 Exploring Social-Cultural Perspectives 

on Diversity 3 

EDUC 2130 Exploring Learning and Teaching 2 

SCED 4101 Secondary School Student: Implications for 2 

Curriculum, Instruction, Assessment and Management 
SCED 4102 Secondary School Context and 

Curriculum Coherence and Classroom Management 2 

SPED 4002 Instructional Strategies for Teaching 

Students with Disabilities in General Education Settings 2 
MATH 4430 Methods of Teaching Secondary Mathematics 2 



34 



112 



Augusta State University Catalog 



SCED4901 Secondary Apprenticeship/Seminar 13 

Scaled Score of 140 or Higher on ETS Major Field Test 

Additional certification requirement: Successful completion 
of the Georgia Assess Online Technology Test or EDTD 3011. 



General Electives 
Physical Education 

Total Hours for the Degree 



1-3 
5 



127-129 



MATHEMATICS 



Minor in Mathematics 



Grade of G or better is required in all courses. 
Prerequisite 

MATH 2011 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 

Course Requirements in the Minor 

MATH 2012 Calculus and Analytic Geometry II 

Select one of the following: 
MATH 2013 Calculus and Analytic Geometry III 
MATH 2030 Logic and Set Theory 
MATH 2210 Elementary Statistics 
MATH 3110 Statistical Analysis for Business 

Select 9 hours from upper division mathematics 

courses that are approved for the Mathematics Major 



4 

3-4 



Total for the Mathematics Minor 



16-17 




Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 



113 



MILITARY SCIENCE PROGRAM 



MILITARY SCIENCE Military Science Curriculum 

This curriculum ultimately qualifies the college graduate for a commission as an officer in the U.S. Army, Army Reserve, or Army 
National Guard. 

Basic Courses, Freshman Year (MS I) 

MILS 1011 Foundations of Officership 3 

MILS 1021 Basic Leadership 3 
Basic Courses, Sophomore Year (MS II) 

MILS 2011 Individual Leadership Studies 3 

MILS 2021 Leadership and Teamwork 3 

Leader's Training Course: The Leader's Training Course is a 28-day "World-Class" leadership development experience 
qualifying and motivating college students to enter into the senior Army ROTO program. A student who did not participate in the 
basic program who has no more than two years remaining before graduation may qualify for the advanced program through the 
summer course given at Fort Knox, KY each year. ASU graduate students are eligible for this program as well; those attending 
receive approximately $800 with all meals, lodging, and transportation while attending the summer internship. This program 
enables the student to determine if he or she desires a career in the military and qualifies the student for the advanced course 
if he or she chooses. No obligation is incurred by attending Leader's Training Course, (MILS 3060, Leader's Training Course 
Summer Internship.) Successful completion of this course can qualify the student for a two year scholarship for the remaining 
two years. 

Compression: While the normal sequence of course work requires two full academic years, it is possible to compress the 
course work into less than two years by taking two Military Science courses during the same semester. Compression is not 
recommended or desired but will be considered on an individual basis by the Department Chair. 

Exemption: Credit for all or part of the basic course may be granted upon presentation of evidence that the student has had 
equivalent training. Examples of such training are active military service, Senior Division Navy or Air Force ROTC credit, or 3 
years Junior ROTC credit. In every case, exemption credit must be approved by the Department Chair. No academic credit is 
given for courses exempted under this program. 

Eligibility Requirements for Advanced Course: GPA of 2.00 or higher; completion or credit for completion of the basic 
course; meeting Army physical requirements; have no more than two years remaining until graduation; permission of the 
Department Chair. 

Advanced Courses, Junior Year (MS III) 

MILS 3011 Leadership and Problem Solving 3 

MILS 3021 Leadership and Ethics 3 

MILS 3060 Leader's Training Course (LTC) 3 

Advanced Courses, Senior Year (MS IV) 

MILS 401 1 Leadership and Management 3 

MILS 4021 Officership 3 

MILS 4060 Leader Development and Assessment Course (LDAC) 3 

MILS 4950 Selected Topics 3 

Leadership Development and Assessment Course: A five-week summer course conducted at Fort Lewis, WA. Only open 
to (and required of) students who have completed MILS 3011 and MILS 3021. Students will also receive half the base pay 
of a Sergeant for 5 weeks (approximately $800). Travel, lodging and meal costs are defrayed by the U.S. Army. The Leader 
Development and Assessment Course environment is highly structured and demanding stressing, leadership at small unit 
levels under varying, challenging conditions. Prior to attending this course students must demonstrate and be able to pass a 
swim test. This swim test consists of a 10 minute swim using any combination of strokes and 5 minutes treading water. 



^ '^ Augusta State University Catalog 



MILITARY SCIENCE Professional Military Education Requirements 

The principal element of the Professional Military Education (PME) requirement is the bachelor's degree. As an integral part of 
that undergraduate education, prospective officers are required to take at least one course in Military History and consult the 
department chair of Military Science for approved courses. 

MILITARY SCIENCE Minor in Military Science 

The Military Science minor is primarily designed for the student planning a career in the U.S. Army as a commissioned officer. 
Military Science teaches skills that are vital for professional success on and off the battlefield, such as group leadership, 
management positions and public speaking. Leadership is the process of influencing an individual or a team of people by 
providing them purpose, direction, and motivation to accomplish assigned missions and to improve the team for the future. 
Courses should be arranged in consultation with your major department and the Professor of Military Science. 

Required Courses 15 

(Cadets must maintain a 3.0 or higher each semester and 
cumulative GPAin Military Science classes) 

MILS 3011 Leadership and Problem Solving 3 

MILS 3021 Leadership and Ethics 3 

MILS 4011 Leadership and Management 3 

MILS 4021 Officership 3 

MILS 4060 Leader Development Assessment Course 3 

Total Upper-Division Hours for the Military Science Minor 15 



MILITARY SCIENCE Program Features 

Admission and Incentives: A student enrolled in basic course classes incurs no obligation to the U .S. Army. Advanced 
course students are obligated to serve and will receive a subsistence allowance of $450/500 per month for up to 20 academic 
months while in college. Other training opportunities such as Air Assault, Airborne School, Arctic Warfare School, and Cadet 
Troop Leadership Training (CTLT) in active units are available on a competitive basis with military subsistence and some paid 
benefits. A student in any major/minor field of study is eligible. During the senior year of study (MS IV), the student is offered 
the option to select the type of job that he or she desires to perform, the first permanent duty post, and the type of commission, 
either Regular Army or Army Reserve, that he or she prefers. The Army at no charge provides all necessary uniforms to the 
individual. Academic credit, applicable toward graduation, is granted for all military science course work. Any advanced course 
credits earned apply within the general studies minor. 

The Scholarship Program: The Army Military Science Scholarship Program awards full-time four, three, and two-year 
scholarships to eligible students on a competitive basis. The Department of Military Science accepts applications for two and 
three-year scholarships throughout the year. A student does not have to be currently enrolled in Military Science to apply for 
two and three-year scholarships. In addition to the National Scholarships, the Department Chair awards multiple four, three, 
and two-year scholarships annually to students. Each scholarship pays full tuition, books, lab fees, and other educational 
expenses. In addition, all Military Science scholarship students receive $300 to $500 per month for up to 10 months of each 
school year the scholarship is in effect. Upon Commissioning as a Second Lieutenant, most agreements call for graduates to 
serve three or four years of active duty, or six years in the National Guard or Army Reserves. 

The Simultaneous Membership Program: The Simultaneous Membership Program (SMP) allows cadets to be enrolled in 
the Military Science Advanced Course and a local Army National Guard or Reserve unit at the same time. The benefits of this 
program are that cadets not only receive $250 per academic month from the Military Science Department but also receive drill 
pay from their Army National Guard or Army Reserve equivalent to an E-5 pay. Cadets in this program perform the duties of 
an officer trainee in their Army National Guard or Army Reserve unit. Some National Guard programs offer tuition assistance 
as well. This program provides valuable management experiences which will interest future employers and prepare cadets for 
leadership and management positions after graduation. 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 115 



MUSIC PROGRAM 



The Music Department is a professional unit whicli regards music as both an art and a discipline. It recognizes the artistic values 
of creativity, experimentation, and music discrimination as well as the disciplinary attributes of scholarship, independent and 
critical thinking, self-motivation, skill development, and dedication. Musical performance is a vital component of all programs of 
study. Individualized instruction allows for a nurturing environment reflecting high regard for the musical legacies of the past as 
well as preparedness for the future. Graduates in music at Augusta State University have gone on to careers as professional 
performers, public school music teachers, band directors, choral directors, and church musicians. ASU graduates have been 
accepted for graduate study at some of the most prestigious music schools in the country, including Indiana University, the 
University of North Texas and the Eastman School of Music. 

The music unit provides intensive musical training on the collegiate level for musicians preparing for professions in music 
education, music performance, music management/business, music history, music theory/composition, conducting, and general 
studies in music, while serving non-music majors and music minors with a variety of offerings. Public school teachers are 
served through the offering of courses which satisfy the requirements for Staff Development Units. Persons of all ages in the 
community are encouraged to participate in musical activities through the Conservatory Program at Augusta State University. 

All members of the faculty represent professional expertise and diversity of background and experience. Several members 
of the faculty hold prominent positions in area professional musical organizations, including the Augusta Choral Society, the 
Augusta Opera, the Augusta Symphony Orchestra, and the Harry Jacobs Chamber Music Society. 

The music unit is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Music. 

Bachelor of Music 

Two areas of professional study are available in the Bachelor of Music degree: Performance prepares students for careers as 
instrumentalists in symphonic, jazz and popular styles; as singers in opera, theatre, and popular music; and as solo recitalists, 
accompanists, private and college teachers, and church musicians. Music Education prepares musicians for careers as music 
teachers at all levels in public and private schools. 

Bachelor of Arts in Music 

The Bachelor of Arts in Music is a degree designed for the emphasis of study in music within a liberal arts curriculum. Students 
pursuing the BA in Music typically conduct the majority of their course work outside the field of music and focus on the 
interrelationship of music with other academic disciplines. 





116 



Augusta State University Catalog 



Minor in IVIusic 

The Music Minor is available to all university students who have interest and ability in music. The progrann requires courses in 
applied music, ensembles, music history, and music theory. 

GENERAL DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL MUSIC MAJORS 

1. Minimum Hours Requirement/Grade Requirements 

All Bachelor of Arts degrees in Music require a minimum of 120 hours. All Bachelor of Music in Performance degrees require 
a minimum of 124 hours. The Bachelor of Music in Music Education degree requires a minimum of 128 hours. Music majors 
must achieve a grade of C or better in each course required of the major, including those in the minor field. 

2. All students declaring a music major are expected to show proficiency in functional keyboard and computer applications, 
as outlined in the Augusta State Music Student Handbook. This requirement will be satisfied through the following required 
courses: MUSI 1521 - Class Piano I, MUSI 1522 - Class Piano II, MUSI 2523 - Class Piano III, MUSI 2524 - Class Piano IV, 
and MUSI 1810 - Music Technology. Keyboard majors will substitute the following courses for Class Piano I, II, III and IV: 
MUSI 2525 - Advanced Keyboard Skills, MUSI 3551 - Keyboard Accompanying (2 credits) and either MUSI 4670 - Keyboard 
Ensemble (1 credit) or MUSI 3660 ASU Jazz Ensemble (1 credit). 

3. Applied Lessons 

Lessons in applied music (principal performing medium) must be taken each semester of residence according to the major 
field specifications. Composition lessons are not a substitute for lessons in a principal performing medium. Applied Lessons 
in Jazz Winds, Jazz Piano, Jazz Percussion, Jazz Strings, Drum Set, and Composition are available only at the secondary 
level. 

4. Major Ensembles 

All music students are required to participate for credit in a minimum of one major ensemble each semester of residence 
whether of full-time or part-time status. Exceptions may be granted through petition to and approval of the full-time music 
faculty. All students will be assigned to a major ensemble upon entrance, but are encouraged to participate in other major 
ensembles. Major ensembles are defined as follows: 1) ASU Wind Ensemble (all woodwinds, brass and percussion): 2) 
ASU Orchestra (all string instruments); and 3) ASU Choir (all voice types). Students who choose piano or guitar as their 
principal performing medium will be assigned to one of the three depending upon their experiences in secondary performing 
areas. 

5. Recital Laboratory and Studio Class 

Music majors and minors are required to be enrolled in and achieve a passing grade in Recital Laboratory (MUSI 1500j and 
Studio Class (MUSA 2X05) according to the major or minor field specifications. For further information, consult the Augusta 
State University Music Student Handbook. 

6. Advising 

All music majors are required to have an advisor on the full-time music faculty. Self-advising for a degree in music is not 
allowed. The student must obtain their advisor's signature on all registration forms and Add/Drop forms. 

7. Exit Exams 

All music majors are required to take the Music Major Exit Exam, which is given during the final semester of study. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

Students declaring a music major must complete the requirements of the university-wide program which includes Core Areas 

A-E. 

CORE CURRICULUM IN MUSIC (AREA F) 

All music majors take a basic core of music courses, studies and activities. This core curriculum educates the musician in the 
art form. It strives to improve music literacy, develop artistic sensitivity and provide a broad artistic experience for all music 
students. Further, it is designed to raise the quality of music-making in each student regardless of individual professional goals. 
The Core Area F in music is required of all music majors in the university. 

PLACEMENT EXAMINATIONS UPON ENTRANCE 

All entering freshmen music majors must perform a placement audition before a faculty panel in their major performing medium. 
These auditions will be scheduled during the week prior to the beginning of classes. Students are expected to demonstrate 
background and experience through high school programs or prior collegiate work in band/wind ensemble, orchestra, choir, 
and/or private study, church music, musical theater, etc. Students without this background must show extraordinary potential to 
be admitted as a music major. Students who are unable to demonstrate these abilities will not be admitted into the music major 
and will be advised to seek another major. 

Entering freshmen and those who have previous college credit, but are new to the music major, must also take an evaluative 
exam in music fundamentals. Students will be placed into appropriate course work based on the results of this exam. This test 
can be pre-empted by earning a grade of C or better in MUSI 1201. See the Music Department website for further information 
on these topics. 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 117 



MUSIC 



Bachelor of Arts 
with a Major in Music 



Core Curriculum Areas A-E for Music Majors 42 

Music Major Core Area F 17 

(Grade of C or better is required in all these courses) 
Lower Division Theory Courses 10 

Take each of the following courses: 

MUSI 1101 Elementary Ear Training and Sight Singing I 

MUSI 1211 Elementary Part Writing and Analysis I 

MUSI 1 1 02 Elementary Ear Training and Sight Singing II 

MUSI 1212 Elementary Part Writing and Analysis II 

MUSI 1521 Class Piano I 

MUSI 1522 Class Piano II 
Lower Division Applied Lessons 4 

Take each of the following courses: 

MUSA 1XX1 Applied Lessons: Concentration 

MUSA 1XX2 Applied Lessons: Concentration 

MUSA2XX1 Applied Lessons: Concentration 
Major Ensembles as assigned 3 

Bachelor of Arts in Music Common Curriculum 22 

(Grade of C or better is required in all these courses) 
Recital Experience 

Fulfill each of the following requirements: 

MUSI 1500 Recital Laboratory (7 semesters minimum) 

MUSA 2X05 Studio Class (6 semesters minimum) 
Music Theory Curriculum 9 

Take each of the following courses: 

MUSI 2101 Advanced Ear Training and Sight Singing I 

MUSI 2211 Advanced Part Writing and Analysis I 

MUSI 21 02 Advanced Ear Training and Sight Singing II 

MUSI 2212 Advanced Part Writing and Analysis II 

MUSI 3210 Form and Analysis 
Music History Curriculum 8 

Take each of the following courses: 

MUSI 2230 Introduction to the Masterworks of Western 
Music Literature 

MUSI 3340 Music History I: 

MUSI 3350 Music History II 
Miscellaneous Requirements 5 

Take each of the following: 

MUSI 2523 Class Piano HI 

MUSI 2524 Class Piano IV 

MUSI 1810 Music Technology 

MUSI 4090 Senior Project for the Bachelor of Arts in Music 
Electives (6 at Upper Division Level) 10 

Liberal Arts Emphasis Curriculum 14 

(Grade of C or better is required in all these courses) 
Applied Concentration Lessons (at least 2 at upper division level) 4 
Major Ensembles (at upper division level) 2 



Middle Ages Through the Baroque 
Classical Period to the Present 



Upper Division Hours in Music 

MUSI 3560 (Fundamentals of Conducting) 
Select 6 hours from MUSI 3XXX-4XXX (with the 
exception of MUSI 3310) 
Additional Requirements 
Minor Field 



15-18 



Foreign Language 

(Take through 1002 level in a foreign language, or satisfy 

the foreign language proficiency exam for that level). 

Physical Education 

Total Hours for the Degree 



0-6 



5 
125 



118 



Augusta State University Catalog 



MUSIC 

Bachelor of Music 
with a Major in Music Education, Instrumental Track 

Core Curriculum Areas A-E for Music Majors 42 

Music Education Core Curriculum: Area F 18 

(Grade of C or better is required in all these courses) 

Take each of the following courses: 11 

EDUC 2110 - Investigating Critical and 

Contemporary Issues in Education 3 

EDUC 2120 - Exploring Social-Cultural 

Perspectives on Diversity 3 

EDUC 2130 - Exploring Learning and Teaching 3 

MUSI 1521 -Class Piano I 1 

MUSI 1522 -Class Piano II 1 

Lower Division Applied Lessons 4 

Take each of the following courses: 
MUSA 1XX1 Applied Lessons: Concentration 
MUSA 1XX2 Applied Lessons: Concentration 
MUSA2XX1 Applied Lessons: Concentration 
Major Ensembles as assigned 3 

Music Education Curriculum 44 

(Grade of C or better is required in all these courses) 

Applied Concentration Lessons (at least 4 at 6 

upper divisional level) 
Recital Experience 

Fulfill each of the following requirements: 

MUSI 1500 Recital Laboratory (7 semesters minimum ) 

MUSA 2X05 Studio Class (7 semesters minimum) 

MUSA3XX5 Junior Recital 
Music Theory Curriculum 18 

Take each of the following courses: 

MUSI 1101 Elementary Ear Training and Sight-Singing I 

MUSI 1102 Elementary Ear Training and Sight-Singing II 

MUSI 1211 Elementary Part Writing and Analysis I 

MUSI 1212 Elementary Part Writing and Analysis II 

MUSI 2101 Advanced Ear Training and Sight Singing I 

MUSI 2211 Advanced Part Writing and Analysis I 

MUSI 2102 Advanced Ear Training and Sight Singing II 

MUSI 2212 Advanced Part Writing and Analysis II 

MUSI 3210 Form and Analysis 

MUSI 4210 Instrumentation and Orchestration 
Music History Curhculum 8 

Take each of the following courses: 

MUSI 2230 Introduction to the Masterworks of Western 
Music Literature 

MUSI 3340 Music History I: Middle Ages Through the Baroque 

MUSI 3350 Music History II: Classical Period to the Present 
Major Ensembles (2 hrs. minimum at upper division level) 3 

Miscellaneous Requirements 4 

Take each of the following: 

MUSI 3560 Fundamentals of Conducting 1 

MUSI 2523 Class Piano 111 1 

MUSI 2524 Class Piano IV 1 

MUSI 1 81 Music Technology 1 

InstrumentA/oice Methods, Instrumental Track 5 

MUSI 3420/6420 Brass Methods 

MUSI 3430/6430 Woodwind Methods 

MUSI 3440/6440 String Methods 

MUSI 3450/6450 Percussion Methods 

MUSI 3460/6460 Marching Band Methods 
Professional Music Education Requirements 24 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 119 



(Grade of C or better is required in all these courses) 

Take eacii of the following courses: 9 

MUSI 3410 Elementary and Middle School Music Methods (3) 
MUSI 4410 Conducting and Methods of Secondary School 

Instrumental Music (3) 
MUSI 4420 Conducting and Methods of Secondary School 

Choral Music (3) 

Admission to Teacher Education, followed by: 

SPED 4002 Instructional Strategies for Teaching Students 

with Disabilities in General Education Settings 3 

MUSI 4492 Music Apprenticeship and Seminar 12 



Physical Education 5 

Total Hours for the Degree 133 



MUSIC 

Bachelor of Music 
with a IVIajor in IVIusic Education, Vocal Track 

Core Curriculum Areas A-E for Music Majors 42 

Music Education Core Curriculum: Area F 18 

(Grade of C or better is required in all these courses) 

Take each of the following courses: 1 1 

EDUC 2110 - Investigating Critical and 

Contemporary Issues in Education 3 

EDUC 2120 - Exploring Social-Cultural 

Perspectives on Diversity 3 

EDUC 2130 - Exploring Learning and Teaching 3 

MUSI 1521 -Class Piano I 1 

MUSI 1522 -Class Piano II , 1 

Lower Division Applied Lessons 4 

Take each of the following courses: 

MUSA 1XX1 Applied Lessons: Concentration 

MUSA 1XX2 Applied Lessons: Concentration 

MUSA2XX1 Applied Lessons: Concentration 

Major Ensembles as assigned 3 

Music Education Curriculum 44 

(Grade of C or better is required in ail these courses) 

Applied Concentration Lessons (at least 4 at upper 6 

divisional level) 
Recital Experience 

Fulfill each of the following requirements: 

MUSI 1500 Recital Laboratory (7 semesters minimum) 

MUSA 2X05 Studio Class (7 semesters minimum) 

MUSA3XX5 Junior Recital 
Music Theory Curriculum 1 8 

Take each of the following courses: 

MUSI 1101 Elementary Ear Training and Sight-Singing I 

MUSI 1102 Elementary Ear Training and Sight-Singing II 

MUSI 1211 Elementary Part Writing and Analysis I 

MUSI 1212 Elementary Part Writing and Analysis II 

MUSI 2101 Advanced Ear Training and Sight Singing I 

MUSI 2211 Advanced Part Writing and Analysis I 

MUSI 2102 Advanced Ear Training and Sight Singing II 

MUSI 221 2 Advanced Part Writing and Analysis II 

MUSI 3210 Form and Analysis 

^ ^^ Augusta State University Catalog 



MUSI 4210 Instrumentation and Orchestration 

Music History Curriculum 8 

Take each of the following courses: 

MUSI 2230 Introduction to the Masterworks of Western 
Music Literature 

MUSI 3340 Music History I: Middle Ages Through the Baroque 

MUSI 3350 Music History II: Classical Period to the Present 
Major Ensembles (2 hrs. minimum at upper division level) 3 

Miscellaneous Requirements 4 

Take each of the following: 
MUSI 3560 Fundamentals of Conducting (1 ) 
MUSI 2523 Class Piano III (1) 
MUSI 2524 Class Piano IV (1) 
MUSI 1810 Music Technology (1) 

Instrument/Voice Methods, Vocal Track 5 

MUSI 3420/6420 Brass Methods 

MUSI 3430/6430 Woodwind Methods 

MUSI 3440/6440 String Methods 

MUSI 3450/6450 Percussion Methods 

MUSI 3470/6470 Vocal Methods 

Professional Music Education Requirements 24 

(Grade of C or better is required in all these courses) 

Take each of the following courses: 9 

MUSI 3410 Elementary and Middle School Music Methods (3) 
MUSI 4410 Conducting and Methods of Secondary School 

Instrumental Music (3) 
MUSI 4420 Conducting and Methods of Secondary School 
Choral Music (3) 

Admission to Teacher Education, followed by: 

SPED 4002 Instructional Strategies for Teaching Students 

with Disabilities in General Education Settings 3 

MUSI 4492 Music Apprenticeship and Seminar 12 

Physical Education 5 

Total Hours for the Degree 1 33 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 121 



MUSIC 



Bachelor of Music 
with a Major In Performance, Instrumental Track 



Core Curriculum Areas A-E for Music Majors 

Music Major Core Area F 

(Grade of C or better is required in all these courses) 

Lower Division Theory Courses 10 

Take each of the following courses: 

MUSI 1101 Elementary Ear Training and Sight Singing I 2 

MUSI 1211 Elementary Part Writing and Analysis I 2 

MUSI 1102 Elementary Ear Training and Sight Singing II 2 

MUSI 1212 Elementary Part Writing and Analysis II 2 

MUSI 1521 Class Piano I 1 

MUSI 1522 Class Piano II 1 



42 



18 



Lower Division Applied Lessons 
Take each of the following courses: 
MUSA 1XX1 Applied Lessons: Concentration 
MUSA 1XX2 Applied Lessons: Concentration 
MUSA 2XX3 Applied Lessons: Major 
Major Ensembles as assigned 

Bachelor of Music in Performance Common Curriculum 
(Grade of C or better is required in all these courses) 
Applied Major Lessons (at least 12 at upper 

divisional level) (*one hour taken from MUSA2XX3) 
Recital Experience 

Fulfill each of the following requirements: 

MUSI 1500 Recital Laboratory 7 semesters minimum 

MUSA 2X05 Studio Class 7 semesters minimum 

MUSA 3XX5 Junior Recital 

MUSA4XX5 Senior Recital 



46 



16* 



Music Theory Curriculum 

Take each of the following courses: 

MUSI 2101 Advanced Ear Training and Sight Singing I 

MUSI 2211 Advanced Part Writing and Analysis I 

MUSI 2102 Advanced Ear Training and Sight Singing II 

MUSI 221 2 Advanced Part Writing and Analysis II 

MUSI 3210 Form and Analysis 

MUSI 4210 Instrumentation and Orchestration 



10 



Music History Curriculum 8 

Take each of the following courses: 

MUSI 2230 Introduction to the Masterworks of Western 
Music Literature 

MUSI 3340 Music History I: Middle Ages Through the Baroque 

MUSI 3350 Music History II: Classical Period to the Present 
Major Ensembles (at upper division level) 3 



Miscellaneous Requirements 

Take each of the following: 

MUSI 3560 Fundamentals of Conducting 

MUSI 2523 Class Piano III 

MUSI 2524 Class Piano IV 

MUSI 1810 Music Technology 

Upper Division Music Theory 

Select from MUSI 32XX-42XX, MUSI 3720, MUSI 3810 

Instrumental Performance Track Curriculum 
(Grade of C or better is required in all these courses) 



18 



122 



Augusta State University Catalog 



Pedagogy and Studio Teaching Practicum Experience 4 

Take each of the following courses: 

MUSI 3540 Instrumental Pedagogy 

MUSI 4541 Directed Studio Teaching - Instrunnental 
Music History and Literature 8 

Select from MUSI 3330-43XX, MUSI 4730, MUSI 4900 
Small Ensembles (as assigned from MUSI 3660-46XX) 6 

Physical Education 5 

Total Hours for the Degree 1 29 



MUSIC 

Bachelor of Music 
with a Major in Performance, Piano Track 

Core Curriculum Areas A-E for Music Majors 42 

Music Major Core Area F 1 8 

(Grade of C or better is required in all these courses) 
Lower Division Theory Courses 10 

Take each of the following courses: 

MUSI 1101 Elementary Ear Training and Sight Singing I 2 

MUSI 1211 Elementary Part Writing and Analysis I 2 

MUSI 1102 Elementary Ear Training and Sight Singing II 2 

MUSI 1212 Elementary Part Writing and Analysis II 2 

MUSI 2525 Advanced Keyboard Skills 1 

MUSI 3551 Keyboard Accompanying 1 

Lower Division Applied Lessons - 4 

Take each of the following courses: 

MUSA 1XX1 Applied Lessons: Concentration 

MUSA 1XX2 Applied Lessons: Concentration 

MUSA 2XX3 Applied Lessons: Major 
Major Ensembles as assigned 4 

Bachelor of Music in Performance Common Curriculum 46 

(Grade of C or better is required in all these courses) 
Applied Major Lessons (at least 12 at upper 
divisional level) (*one hour taken from MUSA 2XX3) 16* 

Recital Experience 1 

Fulfill each of the following requirements: 

MUSI 1500 Recital Laboratory (7 semesters minimum) 

MUSA 2X05 Studio Class (7 semesters minimum) 

MUSA3XX5 Junior Recital 

MUSA4XX5 Senior Recital 
Music Theory Curriculum 10 

Take each of the following courses: 

MUSI 21 01 Advanced Ear Training and Sight Singing I 

MUSI 2211 Advanced Part Writing and Analysis I 

MUSI 2102 Advanced Ear Training and Sight Singing II 

MUSI 2212 Advanced Part Writing and Analysis II 

MUSI 3210 Form and Analysis 

MUSI 4210 Instrumentation and Orchestration 
Music History Curriculum 8 

Take each of the following courses: 

MUSI 2230 Introduction to the Masterworks of Western 
Music Literature 

MUSI 3340 Music History I: Middle Ages Through the Baroque 

MUSI 3350 Music History II: Classical Period to the Present 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 123 



Major Ensembles (at upper division level) 
Miscellaneous Requirements 
Take each of the following: 

MUSI 1810 Music Technology 
MUSI 3560 Fundamentals of Conducting 
MUSI 3551 Keyboard Accompanying 
MUSI 4670 Keyboard Ensemble 

OR MUSI 3660 ASU Jazz Ensemble 



3 
4 



Upper Division Music Theory 4 

Select from MUSI 32XX-42XX, MUSI 3720, MUSI 3810 

Piano Performance Track Curriculum 18 

(Grade of C or better is required in all these courses) 

Pedagogy and Studio Teaching Practicum Experience 4 

Take each of the following courses: 

MUSI 3530 Piano Pedagogy 

MUSI 4531 Directed Studio Teaching-Keyboard 
Piano Performance 9 

Take each of the following courses: 

MUSI 4341 Piano Literature I 

MUSI 4342 Piano Literature II 

MUSI 4670 Keyboard Ensemble (2 hours minimum) 

MUSI 3551 Keyboard Accompanying 

MUSI 3552 Keyboard Accompanying Practicum (2 hrs minimum) 
Music History and Literature 4 

Select from MUSI 3330-43XX, MUSI 4730, MUSI 4900 
Chamber Music Ensembles 1 

MUSI 4690 Chamber Music Ensemble(s) 

Physical Education 5 

Total Hours for the Degree 129 




124 



Augusta State University Catalog 



MUSIC 



Bachelor of Music 
with a Major in Performance, Vocal Track 



Core Curriculum Areas A-E for Music Majors 42 

Music Major Core Area F 1 8 

(Grade of C or better is required in all these courses) 

Lower Division Theory Courses 10 

Take each of the following courses: 

MUSI 1101 Elementary Ear Training and Sight Singing I 2 

MUSI 1211 Elementary Part Writing and Analysis I 2 

MUSI 1102 Elementary Ear Training and Sight Singing II 2 

MUSI 1212 Elementary Part Writing and Analysis II 2 

MUSI 1521 Class Piano I 1 

MUSI 1522 Class Piano II 1 

Lower Division Applied Lessons 4 

Take each of the following courses: 

MUSA 1XX1 Applied Lessons: Concentration 

MUSA 1XX2 Applied Lessons: Concentration 

MUSA 2XX3 Applied Lessons: Major 
Major Ensembles as assigned 4 

Bachelor of Music in Performance Common Curriculum 46 

(Grade of C or better is required in all these courses) 

Applied Major Lessons (at least 12 at upper divisional 16 

*level) (*one hour taken from MUSA2XX3) 
Recital Experience 1 

Fulfill each of the following requirements: 

MUSI 1500 Recital Laboratory (7 semesters minimum) 

MUSA 2X05 Studio Class (7 semesters minimum) 

MUSA3XX5 Junior Recital 

MUSA4XX5 Senior Recital 
Music Theory Curriculum 1 

Take each of the following courses: 

MUSI 2101 Advanced Ear Training and Sight Singing I 

MUSI 2211 Advanced Part Writing and Analysis I 

MUSI 2102 Advanced Ear Training and Sight Singing II 

MUSI 2212 Advanced Part Writing and Analysis II 

MUSI 3210 Form and Analysis 

MUSI 4210 Instrumentation and Orchestration 
Music History Curriculum 8 

Take each of the following courses: 

MUSI 2230 Introduction to the Masterworks of Western 
Music Literature 

MUSI 3340 Music History I: Middle Ages Through the Baroque 

MUSI 3350 Music History II: Classical Period to the Present 
Major Ensembles (at upper division level) 3 

Miscellaneous Requirements 4 

Take each of the following: 

MUSI 3560 Fundamentals of Conducting 1 

MUSI 2523 Class Piano III 1 

MUSI 2524 Class Piano IV 1 

MUSI 1810 Music Technology 1 

Upper Division Music Theory 4 

Select from MUSI 32XX-42XX, MUSI 3720, MUSI 3810 

Vocal Performance Track Curriculum 18 

(Grade of C or better is required in all these courses 
Pedagogy and Studio Teaching Practicum Experience 4 

Take each of the following courses: 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 125 



MUSI 3520 Vocal Pedagogy 

MUSI 4521 Directed Studio Teaching - Vocal 
Vocal Performance 6 

Take each of the following courses 

MUSI 3511/6511 English Diction for Singers 

MUSI 3512/6512 Italian Diction for Singers 

MUSI 3513/6513 German Diction for Singers 

MUSI 3514/6514 French Diction for Singers 

MUSI 4320 Vocal Literature 
Music History and Literature 6 

Select from MUSI 3330-43XX, MUSI 4730, MUSI 4900 
Small Ensembles (as assigned from MUSI 4610-4620) 2 

Physical Education 5 

Total Hours for the Degree 129 



MUSIC 

Minor in Music 

The Minor in Music is designed for students who have an interest and ability in music. 

Students wishing to declare a music minor must consult with the Chair of the Department of Music. 

Lower Division Theory Courses 4 

MUSI 1101 Elementary Ear Training and Sight Singing I 
MUSI 1211 Elementary Part Writing and Analysis I 

Miscellaneous Requirement 

Computer Applications in Music Proficiency 

Major Ensembles (as assigned at upper division level) 4 

Music History Requirement 2 

MUSI 2230 Introduction to the Masterworks of Western 
Music Literature 

Upper Division Miscellaneous Hours . 2 

Select from the following courses: 
MUSI 3330 Music of the World's Peoples 
MUSI 3340 Music History I 
MUSI 3350 Music History II 
MUSI 4310 Choral Literature 
MUSI 4350 Orchestral Literature 
MUSI 4370 Wind Ensemble Literature 
MUSI 4320 Vocal Literature 
MUSI 4330 Opera Literature 
MUSI 4341 Piano Literature I 
MUSI 4342 Piano Literature II 
MUSI 4360 Chamber Music Literature 
MUSI 4730 Jazz History and Literature 

Recital Experience 

MUSI 1500 Recital Laboratory (4 semesters minimum) 
MUSI 2X05 Studio Class (4 semesters minimum) 

Applied Secondary Lessons (at least 3 hours at upper 3 

division level) 

Choose from the following: 

MUSA 1XX0 Applied Secondary Lessons (1) 

MUSA 1XX1 or MUSA 1XX2 Applied 
Concentration Lessons (2) 

MUSA Applied Secondary Lessons (1) 

MUSA3XX1 or MUSA 3XX2 Applied 
Concentration Lessons(2) 
Total Hours for the Music Minor 18 

' ^" Augusta State University Catalog 



NURSING PROGRAM 



The Nursing BSN degree 

Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) 

The complexity of health care, the rapidly changing arena in which it occurs, and the expanding roles of nurses require 
that professional nurses enter practice as competent nurses with the ability to care for diverse populations in a variety of 
healthcare and community settings. Baccalaureate nursing education better prepares the undergraduate nursing student for 
entry into the nursing profession. 

Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) Degree Program 

The essential components of the ASU BSN program include liberal education, professional values, core competencies, 
and role development. The BSN program prepares graduates to become expert providers of nursing care. It incorporates 
professional standards and values while imparting the skills of a registered nurse and ensures that graduates are effective 
communicators, embracers of positive change, protectors of the environment, and skillful users of research to improve 
nursing, healthcare, and healthcare systems. The ASU BSN program is designed to produce graduates who are socially 
responsible, internationally competitive, and globally informed. The program also aims to equip students with an excellent 
foundation for admission into graduate level nursing education programs. 

The program has initial approval by the Georgia Board of Nursing (Secretary of State, Professional Licensing Boards 
Division, 237 Coliseum Dr., Macon, GA 31217-3858, 478/207-1 300, (wvw.scs.state.ga.us/plb/rn). 

It has candidacy status from the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC Inc., 3343 Peachtree Road 
NE, Suite 500, Atlanta, GA 30326, (404)-975-5000, www.nlnac.org). Upon successful completion of the program, graduates 
are awarded the Bachelor of Science in Nursing Degree and are eligible to take the National Council Licensure Exam for 
Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). 

Approval for admission to the licensing examination and subsequent Registered Nurse licensure of qualified applicants for 
the state of Georgia is granted by the Georgia Board of Nursing. 

Applicants to the nursing program should be aware that the State Board of Nursing has the right to refuse to grant registered 
nurse licenses to any individuals regardless of their educational credentials under circumstances of: 

1 . Falsification of application for licensure. 

2. Conviction of a felony or crime of moral turpitude. 

3. Other moral and legal violations specified in the Georgia law. 

Students who think they may have an applicable situation are strongly advised to speak with the department chair early in 
their program of study. 

Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) Degree Program Requirements 

The BSN degree requires 122 credit hours (60 credit hours in the core curriculum, 60 credit hours in the nursing major, 
and a University requirement of 2 credit hours in wellness). In accordance with graduation requirements, students must 
satisfy mandates set by August State University, the University System of Georgia, and the Georgia legislature. The ASU 
Department of Nursing offers three tracks leading to a BSN degree. Two tracks are designed for pre-professional licensure 
students. The third track is for RNs seeking completion of the baccalaureate degree. 

Legislative Requirements 

1 . Georgia History / U.S. History 

2. Georgia Constitution / U.S. Constitution 

3. Regents' Exam 

Departmental Requirements 

1. Ongoing Contact and Interview with Designated Nursing advisor 

2. Application to and Acceptance into the Nursing Program 

3. Tests of Essential Academic Skills (TEAS) Exam 

4. Criminal Background Checks * 

5. Drug Screens * 

6. Minimum Grade of "C" in all core and nursing courses 

7. Standardized Nursing Achievement Tests 

8. Exit Survey 

9. Exit Interview 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 127 



*AII students admitted into the nursing program must successfully satisfy the requirements for the clinical components of the 
nursing courses to successfully complete the nursing course. Clinical agencies have the right to refuse students access to 
their sites based on information obtained from criminal background checks and/or drug screen results. In the event a student 
can not satisfy the requirements for the clinical component of a course, the student will receive a failing grade for the course 
and will be dismissed from the nursing program. 

The Department of Nursing reserves the right to deny students admission to the nursing program and/or dismiss students 
from the nursing program under the circumstance of: 

1. Falsification of nursing application for program admission. 

2. Conviction of a felony or crime of moral turpitude. 

3. Other moral and legal violations specified in the Georgia law. 

Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) Degree Program Core Requirements: 60 Credits * 
CORE AREA A: 9 Credits 

ENGL1101; English Composition (ENGL 1113 Hon) (3) 
ENGL1102: English Composition II (ENGL 1114 Hon)(3) 
MATH1111: College Algebra (3) 

CORE AREA B: 4 Credits 

HUMN 2001/HUMN 2002: World Humanities (2) 

COMS 1010: Intro Comm. (2) or COMS1020 (3) 

CORE AREA C: 6 Credits 

HUMN 2001/HUMN2002: World Humanities l/ll (6) 

CORE AREA D: 11 Credits 

CHEM1151 &CHEM 11 52: Survey of Chemistry l/ll (8) 

or CHEM1211 & CHEM1212 Prin. of Chem. l/ll (8) 

MATH 2210: Elementary Statistics (3) 

CORE AREA E: 12 Credits 

HIST 2111/2112: History (3) 

POLS 1101 : Intro to Political Science (3) 

PSYC1 101: Intro to General Psychology (3) 

SOCI1101: Intro to Sociology (3) 

CORE AREA F: 18 Credits 

BIOL 2111/2112: Anatomy/Physiology I & II (8) 

BIOL 2500: Microbiology (4) 

PSYCH 2103: Intro to Human Development (3) 

Select One Of The Following: 

POLS 2401 : Intro to Global Issues (3) 

or SOCI 2241 : Social & Cultural Diversity (3) 

or ECON 1810: Intro to Economics (3) 

orANTH 1102: Intro to Anthropology (3) 

*Grade of C or better is required for eacli core course. Each core course may be repeated only once. 

*Two (2) Activity Wellness Courses are required for graduation. 

*Students with a baccalaureate degree in another discipline are required to complete Core Areas D and F. 

Basic Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) Track 

The Basic BSN Track is designed for pre-professional licensure students without previous nursing experience and who are 
not licensed as practical nurses. These students complete the 60 credit-hours in core requirements prior to application to the 
nursing program and once accepted into the program complete 60 credit -hours in the major. 

Nursing Major Concentration* 

NURS 3000 Foundations of Nursing Practice (7) 

NURS 3001 Health Promotion in Individuals/Families (3) 

NURS 3002 Nursing Research (3) 

NURS 3003 Evidence Based Nursing Practice I (9) 

' ^° Augusta State University Catalog 



NURS 3004 Nutrition and Health Care (2) 

NURS 3005 Clinical Pharmacology (3) 

NURS 3010 LPN to BSN Transition Course (5) 

NURS 4001 Evidence Based Nursing Practice II (9) 

NURS 4002 Health Promotion in Communities (4) 

NURS 4003 Nursing and Spirituality (2) 

NURS 4004 Evidence Based Nursing Practice III (8) 

NURS 4005 Nursing Trends and Issues (2) 

NURS 4006 Nursing Leader/Designer/Manager (5) 



NURS Electives 

NURS 4007 Nursing and Technology 

NURS 4008 Public Policy and Health Care 

NURS 4010 Cultural Diversity 

NURS 4011 Ethics in Health Care 

NURS 4012 Future Trends in Geriatrics 

NURS 4950 Selected Topics 

NURS 4960 Undergraduate Internship 



(2) 

(3) 

(3) 

(3) 

(3) 

(1-3) 

(1-3) 



(Select 3 credit hours) 



Grade of C or better is required for each Nursing course. 



SAMPLE SCHEMA for BASIC BSN TRACK 
Completion of 60 Credit-Hours in Core Required Prior to Admission into Program. 



Year1 

Fall 



ENGL 1101 (3) 
MATH 1111 
PSYC1101 
COMS 1010 
HIST2111/2112 
WELL 



(15) 



(3) 
(3) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 



Spring 



ENGL 1102 
POLS 1101 
CHEM 1211/1151 
SOCI 1101 
WELL 



(3) 
(3) 
(4) 
(3) 
(1) 



(14) 



Year 2 

Fall 



HUMN2001 
BI0L2111 
CHEM 1212/1152 



(4) 
(4) 
(4) 



(12) 



Spring 



HUMN 2002 

BIOL2112 

POLS 2401/SOCI 2241 

PSYC2103 



(4) 
(4) 
(3) 
(3) 



(14) 



Summer 



BIOL 2500 
MATH 2210 



(4) 
(3) 



(7) 



Years 

Fall 



NURS 3000 Foundation of Nursing Practice 
NURS 3004 Nutrition and Health Care 
NURS 3005 Clinical Pharmacology 



(7) 
(2) 
(3) 



(15) 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 



129 



NURS 



Free Elective 



(3) 



Spring 



Year 4 

Fall 



Spring 



NURS 3003 Evidence Based Nursing Practice I (9) 

NURS 3001 Healtli Promotion in Individuals/Families (3) 
NURS 3002 Nursing Researcli (3) 



NURS 4001 Evidence Based Nursing Practice II (9) 

NURS 4002 Health Promotion in Communities (4) 

NURS 4003 Nursing and Spirituality (2) 

NURS 4004 Evidence Based Nursing Practice III (8) 

NURS 4005 Nursing Trends and Issues (2) 

NURS 4006 Nurse Leader/Designer/Manager (5) 



(15) 



(15) 



(15) 



LPN to BSN Track 

The LPN to BSN Track is designed for pre-professional licensure students who hold a valid and unrestricted license as a 
practical nurse (LPN) in the state of Georgia. These students complete the 60 credit-hours in core requirements prior to 
application to the nursing program. Upon acceptance into the nursing program, the students in the LPN to BSN track must 
successfully complete a five credit-hour LPN to BSN Transition course (NURS 3010). Students who are successful in NURS 
3010 receive 18 hours of credit toward the major and exempt Nursing Foundation and Evidence Based Nursing I (NURS 
3003). Students must complete the following additional 42 credit-hours in the major: 



Nursing Major Concentration 

NURS 3001 Health Promotion in Individuals/Families 

NURS 3002 Nursing Research 

NURS 3005 Clinical Pharmacology 

NURS 3010 LPN to BSN Transition Course 

NURS 4001 Evidence Based Nursing Practice II 

NURS 4002 Health Promotion in Communities 

NURS 4004 Evidence Based Nursing Practice III 

NURS 4005 Nursing Trends and Issues 

NURS 4006 Nursing Leader/Designer/Manager 

* Grade of C or better is required for each course 



42 Credit Hours 



(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(5)* 

(9) 
(4) 
(8) 
(2) 
(5) 



SAMPLE SCHEMA for LPN TO BSN TRACK (Part-Time Option) 
Completion of 60 Credit-Hours in Core Required Prior to Admission into Program. 



Summer 

NURS 3010 LPN to BSN Transition 
NURS 3005 Clinical Pharmacology 

Fall 

NURS 3001 Health Promotion in Individuals and Families 

NURS 3002 Nursing Research 

NURS 4002 Health Promotion in Communities 

Spring 

NURS 4001 Evidence Based Nursing Practice II 

Summer 

NURS 4004 Evidence Based Nursing Practice III 



(8) 



Fall 



NURS 4005 Nursing Trends and Issues 

NURS 4006 Nursing Leaders/Designers/Manager 



(5) 
(3) 




(3) 
(3) 
(4) 


(10 


(9) 


(9) 


(8) 


(8) 


(2) 
(5) 


(7) 



SAMPLE SCHEMA for LPN TO BSN TRACK 

(Accelerated Option) 



130 



Augusta State University Catalog 



Completion of 60 Credit-Hours in Core Required Prior to Admission into Program. 



Summer 

NURS3010 
NURS 3005 
NURS 3001 



Fall 



NURS 3002 
NURS 4002 
NURS 4001 



LPN to BSN Transition 
Clinical Pharmacology 
Health Promotion in Individuals and Families 



Nursing Research 

Health Promotion in Communities 

Evidence Based Nursing Practice 



Spring 

NURS 4004 Evidence Based Nursing Practice III 

NURS 4005 Nursing Trends and Issues 

NURS 4006 Nursing Leaders/Designers/Manager 



(5) 
(3) 
(3) 



(3) 
(4) 
(9) 



(8) 
(2) 
(5) 



(11) 



(16) 



(15) 



RN to BSN Track 

Students who enter the RN to BSN track are registered nurses w/ho hold a valid and unrestricted license as a registered 
nurse (RN) in the state of Georgia. They must complete 60 credit-hours in core requirements prior to applying to the nursing 
program. Once admitted into the program, they receive 32 hours of credit toward the major and must earn another 28 hours 
in the major to satisfy the degree. 



Nursing Major Concentration 

NURS 3001 Health Promotion in Individuals/Families 

NURS 3002 Nursing Research 

NURS 3004 Nutrition and Health Care 

NURS 3005 Clinical Pharmacology 

NURS 4002 Health Promotion in Communities 

NURS 4005 Nursing Trends and Issues 

NURS 4006 Nursing Leader/Designer/Manager 

NURS Electives 

NURS 4007 Nursing and Technology 

NURS 4008 Public Policy and Health Care 

NURS 4010 Cultural Diversity 

NURS 4011 Ethics in Health Care 

NURS 4012 Future Trends in Geriatrics 

NURS 4950 Selected Topics 

NURS 4960 Undergraduate Internship 

Grade of C or better is required for each course.* 



(3) 
(3) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(2) 
(5) 



(2) 

(3) 

(3) 

(3) 

(3) 

(1-3) 

(1-3) 



28 Credit Hours * 



(6 credit hours) 



Summer 

NURS 3001 
NURS 3002 
NURS 3005 
NURS 3004 
NURS 



Fall 



NURS 4002 
NURS 4005 
NURS 4006 
NURS 



SAIVIPLE SCHEMA for RN to BSN 
(Accelerated Track) 
Completion of 60 Credit-Hours in Core Required Prior to Admission into Program. 



Health Promotion in Individuals/Families 

Nursing Research 

Clinical Pharmacology 

Nutrition and Health Care 

Elective 



Health Promotion in Communities 

Nursing Trends 

Nurse Leaders/ Designer/Manager 

Elective 



(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(2) 
(3) 



(4) 
(2) 
(5) 
(3) 



(14) 



(14) 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 



131 



SAMPLE SCHEMA for RN to BSN 

(Part Time Option) 

Completion of 60 Credit-Hours in Core Required Prior to Admission into Program. 

Summer (8) 

NURS 3001 Health Promotion in Individuals and Families (3) 

NURS 3002 Nursing Research (3) 

NURS 3004 Nutrition and Health Care (2) 

Fall (10) 

NURS Nursing Elective (3) 

NURS 4002 Health Promotion in Communities • (4) 

NURS 3005 Clinical Pharmacology (3) 

Spring (10) 

NURS Elective (3) 

NURS 4005 Nursing Trends And Issues (2) 

NURS 4006 Nurse Leaders/ Designer/Manager (5) 



Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) Degree Program: Admission Process 

The ASU Department of Nursing will make every effort to keep students apprised of admission criteria. However, admission 
criteria is subject to change and it is the student' s responsibility to contact a nursing advisor as soon as possible upon 
declaring nursing a major and to maintain frequent contact with the designated nursing advisor 

Students seeking admission into the BSN program must be accepted into the University and meet the criteria for full and 
unconditional admission to the University. Students must also submit a separate nursing application to the Department 
of Nursing. At the time of application to the program, students must be in good standing v^^ith the University and satisfy all 
admission criteria for the BSN track for which the student seeks application. The nursing application is obtained from the 
nursing advisor. 

*AII students admitted into the nursing program must successfully satisfy the requirements for the clinical components of the 
nursing courses to successfully complete the nursing courses. Clinical agencies have the right to refuse students access to 
their sites based on information obtained from criminal background checks and/or drug screen results. In the event a student 
can not satisfy the requirements for the clinical component of a course, the student will receive a failing grade for the course 
and will be dismissed from the nursing program. 

Students applying for admission to the nursing program are expected to meet at least the minimum departmental 
requirements for program admission and program progression at the time of application. Enrollment is limited to a specific 
number of students based on clinical spaces and available resources, and students are admitted into the BSN program 
based on a selection process, faculty recommendation, space availability, and approval of the department chair. The 
minimum admission criteria for each track of the BSN program follow below: 

Prelicensure (Basic) BSN Track: Admission Criteria 

■ Unrestricted Admission into ASU with evaluation of all transcripts 

■ Interview with assigned ASU Nursing advisor 

■ Submit Nursing Application to the nursing program 

■ Minimum Institutional GPAof 2.5 

■ If transfer student, minimum transfer GPAof 2.5 

■ Minimum Nursing GPA of 2.5 * 

■ Successful completion of the Regent's Exams 

■ Completion of all core courses 

■ Minimum grade of "C" in all core courses 

■ Each core course may be repeated only once 

■ No more than one unsuccessful attempt to successfully complete any professional nursing degree program, including 

associate and baccalaureate degree nursing programs. 

■ Completion of the TEAS exam above decision score 

■ Criminal background checks are required of all students accepted into the nursing program. 

■ Drug Screens are required of all students accepted into the nursing program. 

■ Students are admitted into the BSN program based on a selection process, faculty recommendation, space availability, 

and approval of department chair. 

*The Nursing GPA is computed from grades of core courses required for the nursing program using the most recent attempt 
' ^2 Augusta State University Catalog 



of a repeated course. 

LPN to BSN Track: Admission Criteria 

■ Unrestricted Admission into ASU with evaluation of all transcripts 

■ Interview with assigned ASU Nursing advisor 

■ Document Proof of valid and unrestricted GA LPN license 

■ Application to the nursing program (if qualified) 

■ Minimum Institutional GPAof 2.5 

■ If transfer student, minimum transfer GPA of 2.5 

■ Minimum Nursing GPAof 2.5* 

■ Successful completion of the Regent's Exams 

■ Completion of all core courses 

■ Minimum grade of "C" in all core courses 

■ Each core course may be repeated only once 

■ No more than one unsuccessful attempt to successfully complete any professional nursing degree program, including 

associate and baccalaureate degree nursing programs. 

■ Completion of the Test of Essential Academic Skills (TEAS) above the decision score. 

■ Criminal background checks are required of all students accepted into the nursing program. 

■ Students are admitted into the LPN to BSN program based on a selection process, faculty recommendation, space 

availability, and approval of department chair. 

*The Nursing GPA is computed from grades of core courses required for the nursing program using the most recent attempt 
of a repeated course. 

RN to BSN Program: Admission Criteria 

■ Unrestricted Admission into ASU with evaluation of all transcripts 

■ Meet with assigned ASU Nursing advisor 

■ Document Proof of valid and unrestricted GA RN license 

■ Submit Nursing Application to the nursing program 

■ Minimum Institutional GPAof 2.5 

■ If transfer student, minimum transfer GPA of 2.5 

■ Minimum Nursing GPAof 2.5 

■ Successful completion of the Regent's Exams 

■ Completion of the following prerequisite courses with minimum grade of C: English Composition I (ENG 1101); English 

Composition II (ENG 1102); College Algebra (MATH 1111), Statistics (MATH 2210), Human Grov^rth and Development 
(PSYC 2103); Anatomy and Physiology I ( BI0L2111); Anatomy and Physiology II (BIOL 21120; Microbiology (BIOL 
2500), Human Growth and Development, (PSYC 2103), Introduction to Psychology (PSYC 1101) and/or Introduction 
to Sociology (SOC 1101), Survey of Chemistry I (CHEM 1151) ; Survey of Chemistry II (1152), or Pnnciples of 
Chemistry I (CHEM 1211 ) and Principles of Chemistry II (1212). 

■ Completion of all remaining core course requirements with minimum grade requirements. 

■ Each core course may be repeated only once 

■ No more than one unsuccessful attempt to successfully complete any professional nursing degree program, including 

associate and baccalaureate degree nursing programs. 

■ Criminal background checks are required of all students accepted into the nursing program. 

■ Students are admitted into the RN to BSN program based on a selection process, faculty recommendation, space 

availability, and approval of department chair. 

*The Nursing GPA is computed from grades of core courses required for the nursing program using the most recent attempt 
of a repeated course. 

How to Apply 

1 . Apply to Augusta State University and receive an unrestricted admission into ASU with evaluation of all transcripts. 

2. Meet with the designated ASU nursing advisor to determine eligibility for admission consideration. 

3. Complete all core courses with a grade of C or better prior to application to the nursing program. All official transcripts 

must be evaluated by the ASU Admissions/Registrar office. 

4. Successfully satisfy the Regents Testing requirements prior to application to the nursing program. Students may 

obtain more information about the Regents' exam by visiting the web site of the Augusta State University Testing and 
Disability Office: (www.aug.edu/testing_and_disability_services/testing/regents.html). 

5. Complete the Test of Essential Academic Skills (TEAS) above the decision score. Students may obtain more 

information about the TEAS exam by visiting the web site of the Augusta State University Testing and Disability 
Office: (www.aug.edu/testing_and_disability_services/testing/TEAS.html). 

6. Obtain a nursing application from the nursing advisor and submit it for admission consideration to the Department of 

Nursing by October 31 st for the spring semester of the same academic year and by February 1 st for the fall semester 
of the next academic year. (An academic year is defined as August of one year to May of the next year.) 

7. Background checks and drug screens are required for all students accepted into the nursing program. Students are 

subject to random drug screening throughout the program. 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 133 



The selection of applications will be based on a ranked score of the adjusted NGPA, a weighted score based on the 
completed core courses, and the TEAS results. Students are admitted into the nursing program upon the recommendation of 
the nursing faculty and with the approval of the department chair. 

The decision to admit transfer students from other nursing programs will be made on a case-by-case basis. Because 
achievement of a grade of C or better in each nursing course (including nursing courses transferred into Augusta State 
University from other nursing programs) is necessary for successful program completion and because a nursing course may 
be repeated only once, students who have two or more recorded grades lower than C in nursing courses from a previous 
nursing program(s) will not be considered for admission into the ASU Nursing program. 

Pre-Nursing Students 

Augusta State University pre-nursing students are those who have declared Nursing as their major and are working on 
required core courses before seeking admission to the nursing program. Pre-nursing students will be advised by faculty 
in the Department of Nursing. Pre-nursing students are encouraged to meet with their designated nursing advisor prior to 
registration each semester and as the need for additional academic counseling as the need arises. 

Students who declare nursing as a major and who are completing learning support requirements are advised through the 
Learning Support Department. Students in Learning Support are encouraged to meet with a nursing advisor to learn more 
about the nursing program and its requirements. 

Post Baccalaureate / Additional Degree Students 

Students who hold a baccalaureate or higher degree in another discipline and who declare nursing as a major are considered 
pre-nursing students, and they must complete Core Areas D and F. These students are exempt from Regents' testing, 
legislative, and wellness requirements. Post baccalaureate students must satisfy all other university and program admission 
and progression requirements including minimum grade requirements and course repeat rules. Post baccalaureate students 
are encouraged to meet with their designated nursing advisor as soon as they declare nursing as a major. 

Nursing Students 

Students who are admitted into the nursing program are considered nursing students. In order to complete the nursing 
program, majors are required to maintain a minimum adjusted GPAof 2.00 or higher (Institutional GPA). 

Students who do not satisfy a minimum-grade requirement will automatically be dismissed from the ASU nursing program. 
Nursing students must earn a minimum grade of C in all nursing courses to remain in good standing in the nursing program. 
A student who earns less than a C in (or withdraws from) a nursing course at ASU will be dismissed from the program. 

A student who has been dismissed from the nursing program for a single violation of the minimum-grade requirements 
explained above may apply to the Department of Nursing for readmission to the program. The Department of Nursing will 
consider each request on a case-by-case basis. 

However, nursing students are permitted no more than two attempts to successfully complete the nursing curriculum 
(program); attempts include nursing coursework transferred into the University from other nursing programs. Thus a student 
who transfers in a grade lower than C in a nursing course and then makes a grade below C in a nursing course at ASU will 
be dismissed from the program and will not be considered for readmission. 

Nursing students will have additional requirements related to liability insurance, GPR certification, physical examination, 
background checks, substance (drug) screenings, immunizations, and TB skin test. Some clinical agencies require students 
to show proof of health insurance. Students receive information regarding these additional requirements after acceptance. 
Students may be assessed additional costs related to the program (i.e. liability insurance, uniforms, skills lab fees, and 
testing fees). 

Transfers from Other Nursing Programs 

Students who wish to transfer from other nursing programs must apply to ASU and meet regular ASU admission 
requirements along with nursing program requirements. In addition, they will be required to submit two letters of reference 
from the previous program: one from the Chair/Director of the program and the other from the faculty member of the last 
clinical nursing course. For transfer students accepted into the ASU program, placement into the nursing curriculum will be 
determined by review of course descriptions and content outlines of nursing courses from the previous institution. 

Students who have a recorded grade of less than C in one nursing course attempted in another nursing program will be 
required to meet all the regular institutional admission requirements as well as nursing program requirements. In addition, 
these students will be required to submit two letters of reference from the previous nursing program: one from the Chair/ 
Director of the program, and one other letter from the clinical faculty member in the nursing course in which the student 
earned the grade of less than C. If the student is accepted into the ASU nursing program, placement into the nursing 
curriculum will be determined by review on course descriptions and content outlines of nursing courses successfully 
completed (grade of C or better earned) from the previous institution. 



^ ^^ Augusta State University Catalog 



The decision to admit transfer students will be made on a case-by-case basis and upon space availability. Because 
achievement of a grade of C or better in each nursing course (including nursing courses transferred into Augusta State 
University from other nursing programs) is necessary for successful program completion and because a nursing course may 
be repeated at most only once, students who have two or more recorded grades lower than C in nursing courses from their 
previous nursing program(s) will not be considered for admission into the ASU Nursing program. 

LPN to BSN Transfer Students with Transfer Nursing Credit-Hours 

Applicants who hold a current and valid Practical Nursing License (LPN) in the State of Georgia and who transfer coursework 
from other nursing programs into Augusta State University are considered transfer nursing students and must meet all 
admission and progression criteria related to transfer nursing students, including transfer GPA requirements (at least 2.5), 
Nursing GPA (at least 2.5), minimum grade achievement in required courses and nursing courses, and course repeat policy 
(only one nursing course, at most, may be repeated). The Nursing GPA is computed from grades of core courses required for 
the nursing program using the most recent attempt of a repeated course. 




Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 



135 



POLITICAL SCIENCE PROGRAMS 
POLITICAL SCIENCE 



Bachelor of Arts 
with a Major in Political Science 



The objective of the political science program is focused on the study of politics, governments, governmental systems, and the 
making of public policy. The B.A. degree is offered to better prepare the citizen to exercise political responsibilities and to ground 
the student for subsequent functioning in the public political system. The major is also structured to prepare the student for post- 
graduate study in political science; in professional schools of law, journalism, international relations, and public administration; 
and in post-graduate work leading to specialized careers in research and teaching. (All Political Science Majors are required 
to take an Oral and Written Exam before graduation. Their papers must be in students' departmental files.) 

Core Curriculum Areas A-E (see p. 55) 42 

Core Curriculum Area F - prerequisite POLS 1101 18 

(Grade of C or better is required in all Area F courses) 
Required Courses: 

POLS 2101 Intro to Political Science 3 

MATH 2210 Elementary Statistics (if not taken in 3 

Area D; if taken in Area D any 2000-level Political 
Science course) 

Option 1 

Select a language sequence (1002, or higher) 6 

or 
Option 2 

Select either CSCI 1200 Introduction to 
Computers and Programming 6 

or 
MINF 2201 Microcomputer Applications 
And an elective from the approved Area F 
Courses listed below 

Electives in Political Science (recommended) 0-6 

POLS 2000 Society, Law, and the Criminal 

POLS 2401 Intro to Global Issues 
Electives in Social Science 0-6 

PHIL 1000, HIST 1111, HIST 1112, HIST 2111, HIST 2112 

PSYC 1101, SOCI 1101, SOCI 2241, ANTH 1102, 

ECON 1810, ECON 2105, ECON 2106, GEOG 1111 

Major Concentration 30 

(Grade of C or better is required in all these courses) 

POLS 3800, Introduction to Political Research 3 

Six hours in American Politics from: 6 

POLS 3000 State and Local Government 

POLS 3301 Judicial Process 

POLS 3401 The Presidency 

POLS 3901 Electoral Behavior and Political Parties 

POLS 4101 State Government 

POLS 4201 Urban Policy Analysis 

POLS 4302 Political Economy 

POLS 4501 Constitutional Law: Distribution of Power 

POLS 4601 Constitutional Law: Civil Liberties 

Six hours in International Relations/Comparative 

Politics from: 6 

POLS 3100 Introduction to the European Union 

POLS 3101 Comparative European Governments 

POLS 3201 Government and Politics of Post Communist Russia 

' ^" Augusta State University Catalog 



POLS 3801 International Relations Theory 
POLS 4701 Governments of Developing Nations 
POLS 4902 World Politics 
POLS 4903 International Law 
POLS 4904 Politics of Latin America 
POLS 4905 US Foreign Policy 

Three hours in Political Theory from: 

POLS 3501 Ancient Political Thought 

POLS 3601 / PHIL 3601 Modern Political Thought* 

POLS 3701 / PHIL 3701 Contemporary Political Thought 

PHIL 3005 Philosophy of the Human Person 

PHIL 3020 Existentialism 

PHIL 3095 Major Philosophers in History 

PHIL 4030 Ancient Greek Philosophy 

PHIL 4032 Continental Philosophy 

PHIL 4990 Undergraduate Research 

Twelve hours from any other 3000 and higher 
Political Science courses 



12 



Other Upper Level Political Science courses include: 

POLS 4301 Principles of Public Administration 

POLS 4401 Government Organization and Administrative Theory 

POLS 4950 Political Science Topics 

POLS 4960 Undergraduate Internships 

Minor Concentration 
Electives 
Physical Education 

Total Hours for the Degree 



15-18 
12-15 
5 

125 




Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 



137 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Bachelor of Arts 

with a Major in Political Science 

International Studies Concentration 

International Studies is designed to enable and encourage students to become more proficient in understanding global affairs. 
The curriculum combines a student's choice of area studies; 21 hours in Political Science and 9 hours of a number of courses 
offered in the Departments of History; Sociology; English and Foreign Languages; Communications and Professional Writing; 
Psychology and the James M. Hull College of Business. The concentration in International Studies requires language proficiency 
and/or the study of statistics and/or computer science and mastery of the methodological and theoretical perspectives of the 
discipline. The education and training provided by this concentration will provide a background for a career in government, 
business, education, and communications or to pursue advanced degree(s) in Political Science, International Relations, 
International Law or International Business. All courses require a grade of a C or better. 

Core Curriculum Areas A-E (See p. 55) 42 

Core Curriculum Area F - prerequisite POLS 1101 18 

(Grade of C or better is required in all Area F courses) 

Required Courses; 

POLS 2101 Introduction to Political Science 3 

MATH 2210 Elementary Statistics (if not taken in Area D; 3 

if taken in Area D any 2000-level Political Science course) 

Option I 

Select a language sequence (1002, or higher) 6 

or 
Option II 

Select either CSC! 1200 Introduction to 

Computers and Programming 6 

or 
MINE 2201 Microcomputer Applications 

And choose an elective from the approved Area F 
Courses listed below 

Electives in Social Science (recommended) 0-6 

POLS 2000, Society, Law and the Criminal 
POLS 2401 Introduction to Global Issues* 

Electives in Social Science 

PHIL 1000, HIST 1111, HIST 1112, HIST2111, 
HIST2112, GE0G1111, PSYC 1101, SOCI 1101, 
SOCI2241,ANTH 1102, ECON 1810, ECON 2105 

Major Concentration 30 

(Grade of C or better is required in all of these courses) 

POLS 3800, Introduction to Political Research 3 

International/Comparative Politics 

POLS 3801 International Relations Theory 3 

POLS 4902 World Politics 3 

Choose 3 hours from the following courses: 3 

POLS 3501 Ancient Political Thought 

POLS 3601/PHIL 3601 Modern Political Thought 

POLS 3701/PHIL 3701 Contemporary Political Thought 

Choose 12 hours from the following courses: 12 

POLS 3100 Introduction to the European Union 
POLS 3101 Comparative European Politics 
POLS 3201 Govt, and Politics of Post-Communist Russia 
POLS 4701 Govt, of Developing Nations 

' ^° Augusta State University Catalog 



POLS 4801 Govt, and Politics of China 

POLS 4903 intemationa! Law and Organization 

POLS 4904 Politics of Latin America 

POLS 4905 United States Foreign Policy 

POLS 4906 International Terrorism 

POLS 4950 Selected Topics* 

POLS 4960 Undergraduate Internship* 

*must be track specific and with the permission of the chair 

Choose 6 hours from the following courses: 

Major Concentration 6 

ANTH 4861; BUSA4200; COMS 3100; ECON 4820; 

ENGL 4360; HIST 3211, 3311, 3521, 4391, 4950; 

HUMN 4950; FREN 3210, 3221, 3222; SPAN 3211, 

3212, 3220, 3520, 3610, 4530, 4550, 4560, 4710, 4720; 

SABR 4000. Other foreign language courses 3000 and above. 

Minor Concentration 15-18 

Electives 12-15 

Physical Education 5 

Total Hours for the Degree and Concentration 125 



POLITICAL SCIENCE/LEGAL STUDIES 

B.A. in Political Science, 
Legal Studies Track 

The Legal Studies track is open to Political Science majors only and is designed to aid students in their effort to orient their course 
of study to a particular purpose or goal. It will prepare students for careers in law-related fields, federal and state governments, 
public and private interest groups, or business and management. In addition, the track can provide a foundation for the 
ongoing study of law or for graduate study in Political Science. Grade of C or better is required in POLS 1101. prerequisites for 
all upper division classes and in all program specific courses. 

Core Curriculum Areas A-E (see p. 55) 42 

Core Curriculum Area F - prerequisite POLS 1101 

(Grade of C or better is required in all Area F courses) 18 

Required Courses: 

POLS 2101 Intro to Political Science 3 

MATH 221 Elementary Statistics (if not taken in Area D; 3 
if taken in Area D any 2000-level Political Science course) 

Option I 

Select a language sequence (1002, or higher) 6 

or 
Option II 

Select either CSCI 1200 Intro to Comput. and Programming 3 

or 
MINF 2201 Microcomputer Applications and an elective 
from the approved Area F courses listed below 3 

Elective in Political Science (recommended) 0-6 

POLS 2000 Society, Law, and the Criminal 
POLS 2401 Intro to Global Issues 

Elective in Social Sciences 

PHIL 1000; HIST 1111, 1112, 2111, 2112; PSYC 1101; 
SOCI 1101, 2241; ANTH 1102; ECON 1810; ECON 2105, 
ECON 2106, GEOG 1111 

Major Concentration 30 

(Grade of C or better is required in all of these courses) 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 139 



POLS 3800, Introduction to Political Research 3 

Select 12-15 hours from the following courses: 12-15 

POLS 3301 Judicial Process 3 

POLS3302 Judicial Process II 3 

POLS 3401 The American Presidency 3 

POLS 3501* Ancient Political Thought 3 

or POLS 3601 / PHIL 3601* Modern Polit. Thought 
or POLS 3701 / PHIL 3701* Gontemp. Pollt. Thought 
POLS 4401 Govt. Organization and Admin. Theory 3 
POLS 4501 Gonstltutional Law: Distribution of Power 3 
POLS 4601 Gonstltutional Law: Givil Liberties 3 

*one of these courses must be taken 

Select 6-12 hours from any other 3000 and higher 6-12 

Political Science courses; at least one 3-hour course 
must be in international relations or comparative 
government 

Select 3-6 hours from the following: 3-6 

COMG 3000 Media Law and Ethics 3 

SOGI 3332 Juvenile Delinquency 3 

SOGl 4431 Grimlnology . 3 



Minor Goncentratlon 15-18 

Electlves 12-15 

Physical Education 5 

Total Hours for the Degree 125 



POLITICAL SCIENCE/PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 



B.A. in Political Science 
Public Administration Track 



Prepares students for careers In government administration, private research and consulting firms, and public planning 
agencies. A grade of G or better is required In Political Science 1101, prerequisite for all upper division courses. 

Gore Gurrlculum Areas A-E (see p. 55) 42 

Gore Gurrlculum Area F 

(Grade of G or better Is required In all Area F courses) 18 

Required Gourses: 

POLS 2101 Introduction to Political Science 3 

MATH 221 Elementary Statistics (if not taken In Area D; 3 

If taken in Area D any 2000-level Political Science course) 

Option 1 
Select a language sequence (1002, or higher) 6 

Electives in Social or Political Science 6 

OR 

Option 2 
GSGl 1200 Intro, to Gomputers and Programming 3 

or MINF 2201 Microcomputer Applications 

Electives In Social or Political Science 9 

Electives In Political Science (recommended) 
POLS 2401 Introduction to Global Issues 

Electives In Social Sciences 

PHIL 1000, HIST 1111, HIST 1112, HIST 2111, 



^^" Augusta State University Catalog 



HIST2112, PSYC 1101, SOCI 1101, 
ECON 1810, ECON2105, 
ECON2106, GEOG 1111, ANTH 1102 
ECON 2105 and 2106 highly recommended 

Major Concentration 

(Grade of C or better is required in all these courses) 30 

POLS 3800 Introduction to Political Research 3 

POLS 4301 Principles of Public Administration 3 

POLS 4302 Political Economy 3 

POLS 4303 Public Budgeting 3 

POLS 4304 Public Human Resource Management 3 

POLS 4401 Govt. Organization and Administrative Theory 3 

Select 3 hours from the following: 3 

POLS 3000 State and Local Government 3 

POLS 4101 State Government 3 

POLS 4201 Urban Policy Analysis 3 

Select 9 hours from any other upper division Political Science course; at least one three-hour course must be in international 
relations or comparative politics. 

Minor Concentration 15-18 

Electives 12-15 

Physical Education 5 

Total Hours for the Degree 125 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Bachelor of Arts, with a Major in Political 
Science with Secondary Teacher Certification 

Core Curriculum Areas A-E for Non-Science Majors (p. 55) 42 

Core Curriculum Area F- prerequisites POLS 1101 18 

(Grade of C or better is required in all Area F courses) 

Required courses: 
POLS 2101 Introduction to Political Science 3 

MATH 2210 Elementary Statistics (if not taken in Area D: 

if taken in Area D, any 2000-level Political Sci. course.) 3 

Option 1 

Select a language sequence (1002, or higher) 6 

OR 

Option 2 6 

Select either 
CSCI 1200 Introduction to Computers and Programming 
or MINF 2201 Microcomputer Applications 
and choose an elective from the approved 
Area F courses below: 

Electives in Social Science 

PHIL 1000, HIST 1111, HIST 1112, HIST2111, 
HIST 2112, PSYC 1101, SOCI 1101, SOCI 2241, 
ANTH 1102, ECON 1810, ECON 2105, 
ECON 2106, GEOG 1111 

Electives in Political Science (recommended) 6 

POLS 2000 Society, Law, and the Criminal 
POLS 2401 Introduction to Global Issues 

Major Concentration 30 

(Grade of C or better is required for all major courses) 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 141 



POLS 3800, Introduction to Political Research 3 

POLS 3101 Comparative European Governments 3 

or POLS 4701 Governments of Developing Nations 

POLS 3601 / PHIL 3601 Modern Political Thought 3 

or POLS 3701 / PHIL 3701 Contemporary Political Thought 

POLS 4101 State Government 3 

or POLS 4201 Urban Policy Analysis 

POLS 4301 Principles of Public Administration 3 

or POLS 4401 Government Organization and 

Administrative Theory 
POLS 4501 Constitutional Law: Distribution of Power 3 

or POLS 4601 Constitutional Law: Civil Liberties 
POLS 4902 World Politics 3 

or POLS 4905 United States Foreign Policy 
Select 9 additional hours of 3000/4000 level 

Political Science courses 9 

Secondary Teacher Education 34 

(Grade of C or better required in all these courses) 

Courses taken prior to admission to Teacher Education 9 

EDUC 2110 Investigating Critical and Contemporary 

Issues in Higher Education 3 

EDUC 2120 Exploring Socio-Cultural Perspectives 

on Diversity 3 

EDUC 2130 Exploring Learning and Teaching 3 

Courses taken after admission to Teaclier Education 25 

SCED 4101 Secondary School Student: Implications for 3 
Curriculum, Instruction, Assessment and Management 

SCED 4102 Secondary School Context and Curriculum 

Coherence and Classroom Management 3 

SCED 4201 Secondary Social Studies Content Pedagogy I 3 

SPED 4002 Instructional Strategies for Teaching Students 
with Disabilities in General Education Settings 3 

SCED 4901 Apprenticeship/Seminar 13 

Physical Education 5 

Total Hours for the Degree 129 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Minor in Political Science 

Courses submitted for the minor, including prerequisites, must be completed with a grade of C or better. 

Prerequisites: POLS 1101 Intro to American Government 3 

Upper Division Courses 15 

POLS 3800, Introduction to Political Research* 3 

Select 4 courses in Political Science which are numbered 
3000 and above. 

* IF the student's major has a required research methods course, 
POLS 3800 is NOT required. The student may substitute any 
other Political Science course numbered 3000 or above. 

Total Hours for the Political Science Minor 18 



'^^2 Augusta State University Catalog 



INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 



Minor in International Studies 



All courses submitted for the minor, including prerequisites, must be completed with a grade of C or better 

Prerequisites: POLS 1101 Intro to American Government 3 

Upper Division Courses: 15 

POLS 3800 Introduction to Political Research* 3 

POLS 3801 International Relations Theory 3 

POLS 4902 World Politics 3 

Select tw/o of the following courses: 9 

POLS 3101, 3201, 4701, 4801, 4900, 4901, 4903, 4950, 
4960; HIST 3211, 3311, 3521, 3531, 4391, 4950; 
ANTH 4861; BUSA4200; COMS 3100; ECON 4820; 
ENGL 4360; Any foreign language course 3000 and above, 
SABR 4000, All Study Abroad, Honors 3900, 4900, 4950, 
and 4960 offerings 

* If the student's major has a required research methods course, POLS 3800 is NOT required. The 
student may substitute any other Political Science course numbered 3000 or above. 



Total Hours for the International Studies Minor 



18 



EUROPEAN UNION STUDIES CERTIFICATE 

This is a six-course certificate program that is a collaborative effort among ASU, the University System of Georgia, and 
the University of Munich, Germany. This program is open to all academic majors. Contact Dr. Christos Bourdouvalis for 
information. 

A certificate in EU Studies must be taken in tandem with a formal degree program. Students from all academic majors are 
eligible to participate so long as they possess a minimum 2.75 cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA). A student may formally 
apply to enroll in the program after successful completion of the following: 

(1) the certificate's introductory course in European Union Studies with a grade of "C" or better; 

(2) 30 semester hours of academic credit; and, 

(3) a course in World or Western Civilization. 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 



143 



PSYCHOLOGY PROGRAMS 



PSYCHOLOGY 

Core Curriculum Areas A-E 

Core Curriculum Area F 
Take one of the following: 
(Earning grade C or better) 

PSYC 1101 Introduction to General Psychology 3 

PSYC 1103 Introduction to the Behavioral 

and Social Sciences 3 

PSYC 1105 Honors Seminar in Psychology 3 

Take two of the following: 

(Earning grade C or better in each) 

PSYC 2101 Introduction to the Psychology of Adjustment 3 

PSYC 2150 Introduction to Human Diversity 3 

Select remaining 9 hours from approved 1000-2000 courses 

ANTH 1102 Introductory Anthropology 3 
ANTH 2011 Cultural Anthropology . 3 

BIOL 2111 Anatomy and Physiology I 4 

BIOL2112Anatomy and Physiology II 4 

COMC 201 Communications and Culture 3 
CSCI 1200 Introduction to Computers and Programming 3 

CRJU 1103 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3 

ECON 1810 Introduction to Economics 3 

ECON 2105 Macroeconomics 3 

ECON 2106 Microeconomics 3 

GEOG 1111 World Geography 3 
GEOL 1122 Introductory Geosciences II: Historical Geology 4 

HONR 1900 Contemporary Issues 3 

MATH 1120 Contemporary Mathematics 3 

MATH 1 220 Applied Calculus 3 

MATH 2210 Elementary Statistics 3 

MILS 2010 Individual Leadership Studies 2 

MINE 2201 Microcomputer Applications 3 

PHIL 1000 Introduction to Philosophy 3 

POLS 2000 Society, Law and the Criminal 3 

POLS 2401 Introduction to Global Issues 3 

PSYC 2103 Introduction to Human Development 3 

SOCI 1101 Introduction to Sociology 3 

SOCI 1160 Social Problems Analysis 3 

SOCI 2241 Multiculturalism in Modern Society 3 

SOWK 1101 Introduction to Social Work Practices 3 

WMST 1101 Introduction to Women's Studies 3 

Foreign Languages, 2000 level only 3 



Bachelor of Arts with a Major in Psychology 

42 
18 



Major Concentration 30 

Students should be aware that the best set of courses to 
take as a psychology major will vary depending upon one's 

career expectations. Always consult with an academic advisor, and take PSYC 3190, Psychological 
Careers, in which course selection is thoroughly examined. The minimum requirements are presented 
below. Most students will be able to take additional elective psychology courses, if they wish. 

Take the following in sequence: 
(Earning grade C or better in each) 

PSYC 3190 Psychological Careers 1 

(Psych 3190 is required for the psychology 
major and must be taken before 
or concurrently with PSYC 3121 Quantitative Methods) 
PSYC 3121 Quantitative Methods 4 

PSYC 3122 Research Methods 4 



144 



Augusta State University Catalog 



Take at least two of the following: 

(Earning grade C or better in each) 

PSYC 4115 History and Systems 3 

PSYC 4125 Psychological Tests and Measurement 3 

PSYC 4165 Learning Principles and Applications 3 

PS YC 4 1 73 Social Psychology 3 

PSYC 4180 Biological Psychology 3 

Select remaining hours from any advisor-approved 

PSYC 3000-4000 courses. (Earning grade C or better) 1 5 

Restrictions: No more than 3 hours of credit to be counted 
in the major may come from undergraduate research 
PSYC 4990, internship PSYC 4960, and/or independent 
study PSYC 4950. This policy does not apply to 
non-repetitive special topics courses which might carry a 
PSYC 4950 designation. 

Minor Concentration 15-18 

Students majoring in psychology are required to have a minor 
and should consult with their advisor on this selection, especially 
in cases where the student wishes the minor to support career goals. 

Elective Courses 12-15 

Electives may be taken at any level, and could include 
additional psychology courses. Students may substitute a 
second major for the minor and elective courses. Details on 
taking a second major are provided elsewhere in the catalog. 

Physical Education 5 

Total Hours for the Degree 125 



PSYCHOLOGY Minor in Psychology 

Prerequisite Course 
(Earning grade C or better) 

PSYC 1101 Introduction to General Psychology 3 

Psychology Courses 
(Earning grade C or better) 

in advisor-approved PSYC 3000-4000 courses. 15 

Total Hours for the Minor 18 

The best combination of courses to take in a psychology minor will vary depending upon one's career expectations. Always 
consult with an academic advisor and consider taking Psychological Careers, PSYC 3190. in which course selection issues are 
thoroughly examined. Restrictions: Please note that 4000-level courses may not be taken unless both PSYC 31 21 and PSYC 
3122 have been completed with earned grades of C or better. No more than 3 hours of credit to be counted in the minor may 
come from independent study PSYC 4950, internship PSYC 4960, and/or research PSYC 4990. This policy does not apply 
to nonrepetitive special topics courses which might carry a PSYC 4950 designation. Depending upon major requirements, 
students may be able to take additional psychology courses as electives. 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 145 



SOCIOLOGY. CRIMINAL JUSTICE AND SOCIAL WORK PROGRAMS 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 



Bachelor of Arts 
with a Major in Criminal Justice 



Core Curriculum Areas A-E 42 

Core Curriculum Area F 18 

THESE FOUR ARE REQUIRED 
(These classes require a grade of C or better) 
CRJU 1103 Introduction to Criminal Justice " 3 

POLS 2000 Introduction to Society, Law, and the Criminal 3 
SOCI 1101 Introduction to Sociology 

or SOCI 1103 Intro, to Behavioral and Social Sciences 3 
SOCI1160 Social Problems Analysis 3 

Select six hours of the following courses not chosen above: 

ACCT2101 Principles of Accounting 

CRJU 2950 Selected Topics 

ECON 1810 Introduction to Economics 

Or ECON 2105 Macroeconomics 

Or ECON 21 06 Microeconomics 
MATH 2210 Elementary Statistics 
PHIL 1000 Introduction to Philosophy 
PSYC 1101 Introduction to General Psychology 
SOCI 2241 Multicultural Diversity (Grade of C or better) 
SOWK 1101 Introduction to Social Work Practices (Grade 

of C or better) (or) Two course sequence in a foreign language 

Major Concentration 

(Grade of C or better is required in each course) 33 

CRJU 3330 Social Deviance 

POLS 3301 Judicial Process 

POLS 4401 Governmental Organization and Administrative Theory 

SOCI 3001 Methods in Social Research I 

SOCI 3002 Methods in Social Research II 

SOCI 3380 Sociological Theory 

Select five from the following courses: 

SOCI 3187 Sociology of Murder 

CRJU 3329 Introduction to Police Science 

CRJU 3331 Youth and Society 

CRJU 3332 Juvenile Delinquency 

CRJU 3333 Introduction to Corrections 

CRJU 3334 Institutional Corrections 

CRJU 3335 Community Corrections 

CRJU 3336 Women, Crime, and the Criminal Justice System 

CRJU 3341 White Collar Crime 

CRJU 3395 Selected Topics 

CRJU 4431 Criminology 

CRJU 4433 Juvenile Justice 

CRJU 4436 Obedience and Authority 

CRJU 4441 Violence and the South 

CRJU 4950 Selected Topics (Limit 6 hours) 

CRJU 4960 Internship 

CRJU 4990 Undergraduate Research 
Minor Concentration 15-18 

Physical Education 5 

Graduation Requirements 1 

Speech spillover from Core Area B 
Electives 9-11 

Total Hours for the Degree 125 

146 



Augusta State University Cataiog 



CRIMINAL JUSTICE 



Minor in Criminal Justice 



It is the responsibility of the student to initiate and maintain contact with an advisor to insure the proper selection and sequence 
of courses. A minimum grade of C is required in all prerequisites and upper division courses. 

Prerequisites: CRJU 1103 Introduction to Criminal Justice is a prerequisite to all upper division courses; POLS 1101 Introduction 
to Political Science is a prerequisite to all upper division POLS courses; SOCI 1101 is a prerequisite to all upper division SOCI 
courses. 

Upper Division Courses: In consultation with a criminal justice advisor, select five 3000/4000 courses from the specific courses 
used to satisfy the Criminal Justice major. 



CRIMINAL JUSTICE 



ENGL 1101 College Composition I 
ENGL 1102 College Composition II 

Select one of the following mathematics courses: 

MATH 1101 Introduction to Mathematical Modeling 

MATH 1111 College Algebra 

MATH 1113 Precalculus Mathematics 

MATH 1120 Contemporary Mathematics 

Select two of the following science courses: 
BIOL 1101, 1102 
CHEM 1151, 1152, 1211, 1212 
GEOL1121, 1122 
ASTR 1000 
PHYS 1111, 1112, 2211,2212 

Select one of the following history courses: 
HIST 2111 United States to 1877 
HIST 2112 United States since 1877 



3 
3 



Associate of Applied Science 
in Criminal Justice 



POLS 1101 Introduction to American Government 
POLS 2000 Introduction to Society, Law, and the Criminal 
PSYC 1101 Introduction to General Psychology 
PSYC 3143 Abnormal Psychology 
SOCI 1101 Introduction to Sociology 
SOCI 1160 Social Problems Analysis 
CRJU 1103 Introduction to Criminal Justice 
CRJU 3329 Introduction to Police Science 
CRJU 3333 Introduction to Corrections 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



Social Science Electives 
General Elective 
Physical Education 
COMS lOIOorCOMS 1020 
Total Hours for the Degree 



6 
3 
4 

2-3 

60-61 



GERONTOLOGY 

Prerequisites 

SOCI 1101 Introduction to Sociology 

PSYC 1101 Introduction to General Psychology 

Upper Division Courses 

PSYC 3133 Psychology of Adult Development and Aging 
SOCI 3320 Sociology of Aging 
SOCI/SOWK 4421 Gerontology 



Minor in Gerontology 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 



147 



Select one of the following: 

PSYC 4960 Undergraduate Internship 

PSYC 4990 Undergraduate Research 

SOWK4960 Undergraduate Internship 

SOWK 4990 Undergraduate Research 

SOCI/SOWK 3375 Sociology of Death, Grief, and Caring 

SOCI 4460 Undergraduate Internship 

SOCI 4990 Undergraduate Research 
Minor Concentration 18 

Total Hours for the Minor 36 



SOCIAL WORK 

Bachelor of Social Work 

The Bachelor's of Social Work (BSW) program prepares students for entry into professional social worl< practice and entry 
into graduate programs in social work. With a focus on diverse populations, students gain knowledge needed for responsible 
entry into professional social work practice including a foundational understanding of humans and cultural diversity, ethics, 
practice standards, values and skills. The program has been developed following the standards set by the Council of Social 
Work Education (CSWE), a nationwide accrediting body. As of 2005, the program is in the early stages of preparation for 
accreditation by CSWE. 

CSWE standards require that students apply for admission into the BSW program. Applicants for admission to the program 
will be considered by the BSW Program Admissions Committee, which is composed of social work and other social science 
faculty. 

Applicants for admission to the BSW program will be expected to meet the following requirements: 

* Must be accepted for admission to Augusta State University. 

* If already an ASU student, must have an ASU institutional GPA of at least 2.5. 

* If a transfer student, courses transferred for social work core (that is, courses within the Areas A -F) must meet Social Work 
GPA requirements of at least 2.5. 

* Satisfactory completion of Areas A-E of the core curriculum. 

* Satisfactory completion of SOWK 1101 (Grade of B or better) or equivalent from another accredited college. 

* For admission to the program in the fall semester, the application must be submitted to the Department of Sociology, 
Criminal Justice, and Social Work by midterm of the preceding spring semester; for admission in the spring, by midterm of 
the fall semester. Students may obtain the form the Department of Sociology, Criminal Justice, and Social Work. 

* Submission of one letter of reference from a professional social worker attesting to the student's suitability for the social 
work profession. 

* Submission of a statement of interest to the BSW Program Admissions Committee explaining his or her reasons for 
choosing a career in Social Work. 

Once admitted to the program, a grade of "C" or above must be attained in each course to be counted toward the BSW 
major. 

Augusta State University pre-social work students are those who have declared Social Work as their major and are working 
on required core courses in areas A-F before seeking admission to the social work program. 

After acceptance into the BSW program, students will be assessed additional fees for CSWE membership and requirements. 



'^° Augusta State University Catalog 



Core Curriculum Area A-E 42 

Core Curriculum Area F 18-19 

Courses Related to Major 9 

(Grade of C or better is required for each course) 

SOWK 1101 Introduction to Social Worl< Practices 3 

SOWK 2100 Social Welfare History and Philosophy 3 

SOWK 2102 Fundamentals of Social Work Practice 3 

Select nine to ten hours not chosen above; 9-10 

ANTH 2011 Cultural Anthropology 3 

ECON 1810 Introduction to Economics 3 

or ECON 2105 Macroeconomics 
PSYC 1101 Introduction to General Psychology 3 

SOCI 1101 Introduction to Sociology 3 

(grade C or better) 
SOCI 1160 Social Problems Analysis 3 

(grade C or better) 
CRJU 1103 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3 

(grade C or better) 
BIOL 1101 Fundamentals of Biology 4 

Two-course Foreign language (preferably Spanish) 6 

(Lower Level requirements if not taken in Area A-F: 

MATH 2210, BIOL 1101, BIOL 1102 Strongly recommended.) 

Major (Grade of C or better) 35 

SOCI 3001 Methods in Social Research I 3 

SOCI 3002 Methods in Social Research II 3 
SOWK 3300 Human Behavior in the 

Social Environment 3 
SOWK 3301 Human Behavior and the 

Social Environment II 3 

SOWK 3400 Social Work Practice I 3 

SOWK 3401 Social Work Practice II 3 

SOWK 3500 Social Welfare Policy 3 

SOWK 3501 Child and Family Welfare 3 

SOWK 4421 Gerontology 3 

SOWK 4601 Integrative Seminar I 1 

SOWK 4602 Integrative Seminar II 1 

SOWK 4701 Field Placement I 3 

SOWK 4702 Field Placement II 3 



Minor Concentration 15-18 

Physical Education 5 

Electives 6-12 

Total Hours for the Degree 125 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 149 



SOCIAL WORK 



Minor in Social Work 



Prerequisites 

SOWK 1101 Introduction to Social Work Practices 
Upper Division Courses 

SOWK 2102 Fundamentals of Social Work Practice 

SOWK 3358 Field Placement 
Select three courses from the following list: 

SOWK 3375 Sociology of Death, Grief and Caring 

SOWK 3300 Human Behavior in the Social Environment 

SOWK 3301 Human Behavior in the Social Environment II 

SOWK 3331 Youth and Society 

SOWK 3500 Social Welfare Policy 

SOWK 3501 Child and Family Welfare 

SOWK 4421 Gerontology 

SOWK 4495 Selected Topics 

SOWK 4960 Undergraduate Internship 

SOWK 4990 Undergraduate Research 



3 

15 



May include one of the following: 
PSYC 3143 Abnormal Psychology * 

* (Psychology majors may not elect this course) 
SOCI 3303 Sociology of the Family 

SOCI 4441 Racial and Ethnic Minority Groups * 

* (Sociology majors may not elect SOCI 3303 or SOCI 4441) 



Total Hours for the Minor 



18 




150 



Augusta State University Catalog 



SOCIOLOGY 



Core Curriculum Areas A-E 



Bachelor of Arts 
with a Major in Sociology 



42 



Core Curriculum Area F 

(Grade of C or better is required in each course) 18 

SOCI 1101 Introduction to Sociology 

or SOCI 1103 Introduction to Behavioral and Social Sciences 3 
SOCI 1160 Social Problems Analysis 3 

Select twelve hours from the following courses not chosen above: 12 

ACCT 2101 Principles of Accounting 
ANTH 2011 Cultural Anthropology 
ECON 1810 Introduction to Economics 

Or ECON 2105 Macroeconomics 

Or ECON 2106 Microeconomics 
CRJU 1103 Introduction to Criminal Justice (grade of C or better) 
COMC 2010 Communications and Culture 
MATH 2210 Elementary Statistics 
PHIL 1000 Introduction to Philosophy 
PSYC 1101 Introduction to General Psychology 
SOCI 2241 Multicultural Diversity (Grade of C or better) 
SOCI 2950 Selected Topics 
SOWK 1101 Introduction to Social Work Practices 

(Grade of C or better) 
WMST 1101 Introduction to Women's Studies 
A two-course sequence in a foreign language 



Major Concentration 

(Grade of C or better is required in each course) 

SOCI 3001 Methods in Social Research I 3 

SOCI 3002 Methods in Social Research II 3 

SOCI 3380 Sociological Theory 3 

Complete two courses from a departmentally approved 

track* (must include the 3000-level course) 6 

*Notes 

Deviance Track: SOCI 3330 and choose either 
SOCI 4431 or SOCI 4436* 

Stratification Track: SOCI 3340 and one of the following: 
SOCI 4441, or SOCI 4442, or SOCI 4443 

Social Institutions Track: Choose one 3000- and 
one 4000-level from the following: 
SOCI 3303, SOCI 3317, SOCI 3323, 
SOCI 3413, SOCI 4451, SOCI 4385 

* Deviance Track may not be selected by criminal justice majors 

Take at least two of the following not to include 

courses selected for the track 6 

SOCI 4385 Sociology of Religion 

SOCI 4421 Gerontology 

SOCI 4431 Criminology 

SOCI 4436 Obedience and Authority 

SOCI 4441 Racial and Ethnic Minority Groups in the US 

SOCI 4442 Gender and Society 

SOCI 4443 Social Movements 

SOCI 4451 Sociology of Work and Occupations 

SOCI 4461 Urban Sociology 

SOCI 4462 Urban Social Problems 



30 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 



151 



Select remaining 9 hours from SOCI 3000-4000 courses. 

Restrictions: No more than 6 hours of credit to be counted 
in the major may come from SOCI 3950 and SOCI 4950. 

Minor Concentration 

Physical Education 

Electives 

Total Hours for the Degree 



15-18 
5 

11-15 
125 



SOCIOLOGY 



Prerequisites 
SOCI 1101 Introduction 

or SOCI 1103 Introduction to Behavioral and 
Social Sciences 



Minor in Sociology 



Minor Concentration 

Select five courses from the following list: 
SOCI 3001 Methods in Social Research I 
SOCI 3002 Methods in Social Research II 
SOCI 3303 Sociology of the Family 
SOCI 3317 Sociology of Medicine 
SOCI 3320 Sociology of Aging 
SOCI 3323 Sociology of Popular Culture 
SOCI 3330 Social Deviance 
SOCI 3331 Youth and Society 
SOCI 3332 Juvenile Delinquency 

SOCI 3336 Women, Crime, and the Criminal Justice System 
SOCI 3340 Social Stratification 
SOCI 3373 Social Psychology 
SOCI 3375 Sociology of Death, Grief, and Caring 
SOCI 3380 Sociological Theory 
SOCI 341 3 Sociology of Education 
SOCI 3950 Selected Topics (not repeatable for minor) 
SOCI 4385 Sociology of Religion 
SOCI 4421 Gerontology 
SOCI 4431 Chminology 
SOCI 4436 Obedience and Authority 
SOCI 4441 Racial and Ethnic Minority Groups in the US 
SOCI 4442 Gender and Society 
SOCI 4443 Social Movements 
SOCI 4451 Sociology of Work and Occupations 
SOCI 4461 Urban Sociology 
SOCI 4462 Urban Social Problems 
SOCI 4950 Selected Topics 
SOCI 4960 Undergraduate Internship 
SOCI 4990 Undergraduate Research 

Total Hours for the Minor 



15 



18 



152 



Augusta State University Catalog 



College of Education 

Since its founding in 1925 with the stated purpose of extending educational opportunity throughout the state to its designation 
as a state university in 1996, the preparation of quality professional educators has been a part of the mission of Augusta State 
University. As the role of the professional educator has changed, so have the educational programs offered by the College 
of Education. The courses and related practicums and field experiences utilized in the current teacher preparation programs 
focus on standards from state, regional, and national accrediting agencies, best practice, and relevant research. Utilizing 
these as a base, preparation programs have been developed which emphasize what beginning teachers should know and 
be able to do at the end of their undergraduate studies. All teacher preparation programs in the College of Education require 
extensive clinical and field experiences in which teacher apprentices demonstrate the ability to assess, plan, implement, and 
evaluate appropriate curriculum strategies with a diverse population of students. These experiences are conducted under 
the close supervision of a professional educator in the public schools and a college supervisor. In order to graduate and be 
recommended for certification, all students must demonstrate with "real children" the competencies for success as a beginning 
teacher in their chosen field of study. 

Mission of the College of Education 

The College of Education is committed to excellence in the preparation of teachers, counselors, and administrators for service 
with diverse populations in a wide variety of educational settings. The professional educators involved in the various preparation 
programs prepare students for today's classrooms through a collaboratively developed series of courses and appropriate field 
experiences while demonstrating outstanding teaching techniques and procedures from relevant research and best practice. 

The College of Education is committed to relevant research and other scholarly activities leading to the advancement of 
knowledge and good practice in the total learning and schooling process of children. Research is conducted in collaboration 
with students, public school practitioners, and colleagues from other colleges to determine those things that work, do not work, 
and/or need to be revised in order to maximize the learning opportunities for children. 

The College of Education is committed to a service mission which provides leadership in the development and dissemination of 
relevant knowledge to address the wide range of challenges faced by students, parents, teachers, counselors, and administrators 
in the learning and schooling process. 

Conceptual Framework 

The preparation of teachers and other school personnel is critical to all other professions, and to communities, the state, and the 
nation. The professional educator plays an essential role in student learning. The Conceptual Framework of the professional 
education unit at Augusta State University consists of a mission and vision with an overarching theme to produce prepared. 
able, and responsive professionals to teach and support diverse learners. 

This mission and vision requires a partnership between the professional education unit including the College of Education, the 
College of Arts and Sciences, the local community educational system, community agencies, and the Professional Development 
School Network. 

Conceptual Framework: Mission 

Our mission is to educate prospective school professionals to be knowledgeable, effective, and ethical practitioners. 

Conceptual Framework; Vision 

Our vision is to prepare school professionals who transform P-12 learners into thinking, productive citizens. 

Standard: Prepared 

Disposition: To think critically about the process of teaching, learning and assessment. 

Competencies: Candidates who are prepared will: 

PI - demonstrate strong content and pedagogical preparation in their respective subject area or professional field. 

P2 - use self assessment and analysis as a basis for collaboration with colleagues, continuing professional 

development and lifelong learning. 

P3- possess an understanding of the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the discipline(s) or 

professional field of study and create learning experiences that enable all students to learn. 

P4- demonstrate an understanding about how students learn and develop (intellectually, socially, and individually) 

and provide developmentally appropriate curricula, learning opportunities and support. 

P5- demonstrate knowledge about how to use information and technology effectively to foster active inquiry, 

collaboration, and supportive interaction in educational settings. 

Standard: Able 

Disposition: To be creative, challenging, and flexible in teaching/professional practices. 

Competencies: Candidates who are able will: 

A1 - understand, use and support a variety of instructional strategies to encourage critical and creative thinking, 

problem solving, and achievement. 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 153 



A2- create a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and 

self-motivation for all learners. 

A3- plan, guide, and support instruction using knowledge of subject matter, the learners, the community, and 

curriculum goals. 

A4- understand and use authentic assessment to evaluate and ensure the continuous development of the learner. 

A5- organize, allocate and manage resources to support learning. 

Standard: Responsive 

Disposition: To act in a manner that is empathetic, responsive, enthusiastic, inclusive, and reflective in relations with 

students, parents, peers, and others. 

Competencies: Candidates who are responsive will: 

R1 - respect the dignity of all persons believing that all children can learn and have the right to an opportunity to do 

so. 

R2- translate knowledge into creating and supporting meaningful experiences for diverse learners. 

R3-accept responsibility for teaching and working in authentic settings with diverse populations of learners. 

R4- demonstrate a commitment to meet the educational needs of learners in a fair, caring, nondiscriminatory, and 

equitable manner. 

R5 reflect on practice and continually evaluate the effects of choices and actions on others (students, parents, and 

other professionals in the learning community). 

R6- foster professional relationships with school colleagues, parents, and agencies in the larger community to 

support the learning and well-being of all students. 

Degree Programs 

Undergraduate and graduate degree programs leading to certification are offered by the College of Education in collaboration 
with the Pamplin College of Arts and Sciences. 

These degree programs(undergraduate and graduate) lead to initial certification: 

Early Childhood Education (B.S.Ed., MAT) 

Middle Grades Education (B.S.Ed., MAT) 

Secondary Education (B.S., MAT in Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, and 

Physics/Mathematics; B.A., MAT in History, Political Science and English) 
Foreign Languages (B.A., MAT in French and Spanish) 
Health and Physical Education (B.S.Ed., MAT) 
Music Education (B.M., MAT) 
Special Education (B.S.Ed., MAT) 

Counselor Education (M.Ed, in School and/or Community Counseling) 
Educational Leadership (M.Ed., Ed.S) 

Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology with a Major in Kinesiology (B.S.K.) 

This degree leads to a B.S.K. with an area of concentration in Exercise Sport 
Science, Pre-Physical Therapy, or Health Science. It does not lead to a 
teaching certificate. 

These graduate degree programs lead to advanced certification: 

Master of Education (M. Ed.): 
Curriculum and Instruction: 

- General Education track 

~ Secondary English Education track 

~ Secondary Mathematics Education track 

~ History Education track 

Special Education (M. Ed.) 

-Adapted Curriculum track 

~ General Curriculum track 

Counselor Education (M. Ed. In School and/or Community Counseling) 

Additional Graduate Degree: 

Master of Science in Kinesiology (M.S.) 

Education Specialist (Ed. S.): 
Teaching and Learning: 
~ General Education track 

- Secondary English Education track 

' ^^ Augusta State University Catalog 



- Secondary History Education track 

- Secondary Matlienriatics Education track 

Bachelor of Science Degree in Kinesiology with a Major in Kinesiology (B.S.K.) 

Kinesiology is the scientific study of the anatomy, physiology, and mechanics of body movement, especially in humans. The 
field of kinesiology is quite varied but generally consists of biomechanical, physiological, psychological, and sociocultural 
approaches to the study of movement. A degree in Kinesiology leads to careers in exercise; fitness, wellness, and health 
promotion; sport; and rehabilitation. The B.S.K is an appropriate undergraduate degree in preparation for professional 
graduate programs in physical therapy, occupational therapy, public health, exercise physiology and other related areas. 
Coursework includes that in motor learning, exercise physiology, sport and exercise psychology, structural kinesiology, 
nutrition, fitness testing, and exercise prescription. Students majoring in Kinesiology select one of three concentrations (focus 
area) for their degree: exercise and sport science, pre-physical therapy, or health science. 

Exercise and Sport Science 

The Exercise and Sport Science concentration is designed to provide a strong science-based academic preparation for 
students who wish to pursue study in physical fitness and training. This track is also appropriate for students desiring to 
enter a graduate program in exercise science, exercise physiology, or who plan to work in fitness and cardiac rehabilitation 
professions. 

Pre-Physical Therapy 

The Pre-Physical Therapy concentration is an excellent preparatory program for graduate study in physical therapy as well 
as post-baccalaureate study in exercise physiology and cardiac rehabilitation. Students learn the principles of measurement/ 
evaluation as they relate to injury assessment and rehabilitation, principles of exercise physiology to prescribe safe and 
effective rehabilitation programs, and identify preventative techniques. 

Health Science 

This is a comprehensive training program for students interested in pursuing a graduate degree related to public health, 
wellness, health education or health promotion. It also prepares students to work as general health educators in health 
promotion/wellness programs at fitness/wellness facilities and/or corporations. 

Special Note: The B.S.K. degree does not lead to initial certification for teaching P - 12 physical education. The 
undergraduate degree in Health and Physical Education - Bachelor of Science in Education (B.S. Ed.) will lead to initial 
certification. To obtain the initial certification, students must complete the requirements in the Kinesiology and Health 
Science department that are specific to health and physical education as well as the required education classes and teacher 
certification requirements. Refer to the College of Education Teacher Education sections for more information on these 
requirements. 

Faculty 

Dean: Elsenman, G. 
Associate Dean: Dohoney, P. 

Department of Educational Leadership, Counseling, and Special Education 

Professor: Deering, T.E.; Geren, P.R.; Harris, P.P., Cree-Walker Chair of Education; Jackson, C.C; Pollingue. A. 

Associate Professor: Anderson-Wiley, M.J.; Halbur, D.A.; Hardy S.B.; Smith, PL. 

Assistant Professor: Agunloye, O.O; Anderson, L.F.; Deaner, R.G.; Isaacs, A.J. ; Lord, E.W., Chair; O'Connor, M.P.; Schenck, P.M. 

Department of Kinesiology and Health Science 

Professor: Dohoney, P.J. 

Associate Professor: Darracott, C.R.; Darracott, S.H.; Gustafson, R.P. 

Assistant Professor: Connolly G.J.; Cooper, C.R.; Hardy L.A.; Schultz, S.F.; Wish, K.W., Chair. 

Department of Teacher Education 

Professor: Eisenman, G.; Hoosain, E.; Jenks, C.E. 

Associate Professor: Pendergraft, E.C.; Thompson, B.R.; Wilson. J.H., Chair 

Assistant Professor: Beatty C.L.; Cushman, C.A.; Edwards, S.; Harrison, R.; Hill, A.J. ; Kemp, A.T.; Page, C.S.; Root, W.L. 

Lecturer: Farmer K.H.; Franklin, K.H. 

Instructor: Harper, R.G. 

Accreditations 

The preparation programs offered by the College of Education at Augusta State University are accredited by the Professional 
Standards Commission (PSC) of the state of Georgia and the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). 
This accreditation includes the basic and advanced levels of the professional education programs offered at ASU through the 
College of Education and the collaborative programs with the Pamplin College of Arts and Sciences. 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 155 



Admission to Teacher Education 

Students may become "an education major" at the time of application to the university or at any point thereafter by selecting one 
of the teacher preparation programs offered in the college. Admission to teacher education, however, is a separate function 
and requires that the student meet all college, department, and program criteria. The following minimum admission 
criteria apply to all students seeking admission to Teacher Education. In some fields of study, additional requirements may 
apply. Students should check with the appropriate department to determine these special requirements. Foreign Language 
students may apply and be admitted after taking 60 semester hours. 

1. Students must earn a minimum Regents' GPA of 2.5 (4.0 scale) on all attempted hours in the system core curriculum in 
areas A-F, as required for teacher preparation. Transfer students must have an overall GPA of 2.5, which includes any 
undergraduate transfer work and the Regents' GPA for ASU undergraduate work. 

2. A grade of Cor better in ENGL 1101 and ENGL 1102. 

3. A grade of Cor better in MATH 1111 or MATH 1101. 

4. A grade of C or better in all courses used in Area F of the Core. 

5. For students in the early childhood, middle grades, secondary, and P-1 2 programs, except Health and Physical Education, 
a grade of C or better is required on all Core courses utilized in the certification program. For secondary and P-1 2 
students, a cumulative grade point of at least 2.5 (4.0 scale) is required on all upper division courses taken as part of the 
major in which the student is seeking certification. 

6. Successful performance on all portions of the Regents Examination. 

7. Successful performance on the GACE Basic Skills exam at the following scores: Mathematics 220; Reading 220; and 
Writing 220. 

Students may exempt GACE Basic Skills with: 
SAT- composite of 1000 using verbal and math scores 
ACT- composite of 1030 using verbal and quantitative scores 
GRE - composite of 43 using English and math scores 

8. A record free of criminal, disciplinary, and psychological problems. 

9. Verification of physical health appropriate to the requirements of a classroom teacher. 

Admission to Teacher Education is a prerequisite for all upper division level professional education courses. Students must be 
admitted to Teacher Education in order to enroll in these courses. The Grade Point Average for admission to Teacher Education 
is calculated using all course work in the education preparation program attempted by the student. 

Advisement 

Due to the many, and sometimes changing, requirements for certification, advisement of students is a very important process 
in the College of Education. Because of this, students enrolled in a teacher preparation program may not utilize the self- 
advisement process. All students in teacher preparation programs should meet with and obtain approval from their advisor in 
order to register for courses. 

Advisement Prior to Admission to Teacher Education 

Students who have not been admitted to Teacher Education are advised by a faculty member in their specialized area. The 
Coordinator of Undergraduate Advisement is located in University Hall. This individual is available to assist students with a wide 
range of scheduling and planning issues. 

Clinical and Professional Field Experiences 

The teacher preparation programs at Augusta State University place a strong emphasis on "hands-on" experiences with 
professional educators in actual classroom settings. Students should expect a field experience as a part of most courses in the 
preparation process. Clinical and field experiences are monitored for each student to insure that they have had the opportunity 
to work with diverse populations in a wide variety of educational levels and settings. 

Due to the sensitive nature of working with children in the public schools, the Department of Public Safety at Augusta State 
University will conduct a background review of all students at three specific points in the preparation program. The first check 
will be made as part of enrollment in EDUC 21 1 - Investigating Critical and Contemporary Issues in Education. Only students 
who present a record free of criminal and/or disciplinary activity will be allowed to enter a public school classroom. The second 
check will be made as part of the admission to Teacher Education process. The third check will be made as a prerequisite to 
entering the apprenticeship experience. Students who are admitted to the apprenticeship experience must have a record free 
of criminal and/or disciplinary activity. 

Apprenticeship Experience 

The apprenticeship experience is the culminating activity in all of the teacher preparation programs. Successful completion 
of this experience is required of all undergraduate students seeking a degree and certification in a teacher preparation field of 
study. In this experience, a student spends an entire semester working with a master teacher in a school classroom. At the 
end of this semester's experience, students are expected to demonstrate all of the prerequisite skills required of an entry level 
teacher. Criteria for admission to the Apprenticeship Semester are: 



' ^" Augusta State University Catalog 



1 . Completion of all course work in the major area of study. 

2. A cumulative grade point average of at least 2.5 on all course work. 

3. A cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0 on all upper division course work in the major (ECED, MGED, SPED). 
For secondary and P-12 education majors, a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.5 is required on all content 
courses utilized as part of the major and a cumulative grade point of at least 3.0 is required on all professional education 
courses. 

4. Successful completion of the Comprehensive Portfolio. 

5. A record free of criminal, disciplinary, and psychological problems. 

6. Verification of physical health appropriate to the requirements of a classroom teacher. 

7. The written recommendation of the student's academic advisor. 

Due to the intensive nature of the experience, students may not enroll in any additional course work during the Apprenticeship 
Semester. 

Recommendation for Certification 

Professional teacher certification is granted by the Professional Standards Commission upon the recommendation of the 
College of Education. In order to be eligible for a recommendation for certification in the field of study, a student must: 

1 . Complete all of the required course work in field of study. 

2. Successfully complete the Apprenticeship Experience. 

3. Earn a passing score on the Georgia Certification Exam in the appropriate certification field. 

4. Complete the application process for certification. 

Alternative Certification Programs 

Individuals who hold an undergraduate or graduate degree from a regionally accredited institution and wish to become certified 
in one of the teacher preparation fields ofl'ered in the College of Educafion should apply to the Master of Arts in Teaching 
program. The phone number for the Graduate Admissions office in the College of Education is 706-729-2465. 
http://www.aug.edu/school_of_education/ 

Integrating Honors Students into Teacher Education 

Early Childhood Education 

The Honors student will determine, in conjuncfion with his or her education advisor, where the 3900 courses will fit into the 
student's program of study. 

Honors 3999, and 4000 (2 hours) will be subsfituted for the Apprenficeship seminar in ECED 4491. The Honors capstone 
course will be subsfituted for 1 hour of the student's apprenticeship. The Honors thesis will be done in conjunction with field 
experiences. 

Middle Grades Education 

The Honors student will determine, in conjuncfion with his or her educafion advisor, where the two Honors 3900 courses will be 
substituted. The 3900 courses will be substituted in the student's content concentrafion. 

Honors 3999, and 4000 (2 hours) will be substituted for the Apprenticeship seminar in MGED 4210. The Honors capstone 
course will be substituted for one hour of the student's apprenficeship. The Honors thesis will be done in conjuncfion with field 
experiences. 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 157 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP. COUNSELING. AND SPECIAL EDUCATION 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 

Bachelor of Science in Education 
witli a Major in Special Education: General Curriculum 

Core Curriculum Areas A-E for Non-Science Majors 42 

Area F 18 

EDUC 2110 Investigating Critical and Contemporary Issues 

in Education 3 

EDUC 2120 Exploring Social-Cultural Perspectives 

on Diversity 3 

EDUC 2130 Exploring Learning and Teaching 3 

1 required elective: (choose one) 

PSYC1101 orSOCI 1101 or PHIL 1000 or ANTH 1102 3 

2 electives (approved by advisor) 2000 level or below 6 

Major Concentration 60 

In addition to classroom seat time, all Special Education 
courses have a required field experience in the public schools 
of 20-30 hours. 

SPRING ENTRY (Admission to Teacher Education) 

Spring -1st Year 12 

EDTD 3011 / MUSI 3011 Educational Technology 3 

SPED 4002 Instructional Strategies for Teaching Students 

with Disabilities in General Education Settings 3 

Elective: Advisor-approved 3000-level course or above 3 

Elective: Advisor-approved 3000-level course or above 3 

Fall -1st Year 12 

SPED 3001 Policies and Procedures 3 

SPED 3110 Characteristics of Students with Mild Disabilities 3 
SPED 4003 Classroom Management 3 

SPED 4008 Literacy: Diagnosing and Prescribing (P-12) 3 

Spring - 2nd Year 12 

SPED 3005 Effective Learning Environments 3 

SPED 3006 Language Development 

and Communication Disorders 3 

SPED 4007 Literacy Fundamentals (P-12) 3 

SPED 4120 Methods and Materials for Teaching Students 

with Mild Disabilities 3 

Summer - 2nd Year 9 

SPED 3003 Educational Assessment 3 

SPED 4004 Collaboration/Consultation 3 

SPED 4005 Family Literacy 3 

Fall -2nd Year 15 

SPED 4491 Special Education Apprenticeship 

Physical Education 5 

Total Hours for the degree 125 



158 



Augusta State University Catalog 



FALL ENTRY (Admission to Teacher Education) 

Fall -1st Year 12 

SPED 3001 Policies and Procedures 3 

SPED 3110 Characteristics of Students with Mild Disabilities 3 
SPED 4003 Classroom Management 3 

SPED 4008 Literacy: Diagnosing and Prescribing (P-12) 3 

Spring- 1st Year ' 12 

SPED 3005 Effective Learning Environments 3 

SPED 3006 Language Development 

and Communication Disorders 3 

SPED 4007 Literacy Fundamentals (P-12) 3 

SPED 4120 Methods and Materials for Teaching Students 

with Mild Disabilities 3 

Summer- 1st Year 9 

SPED 3003 Educational Assessment 3 

SPED 4004 Collaboration/Consultation 3 

SPED 4005 Family Literacy 3 

Fall -2nd Year 12 

EDTD 3011 / MUSI 3011 Educational Technology 3 

SPED 4002 Instructional Strategies for Teaching Students 

with Disabilities in General Education Settings 3 

Elective; Advisor-approved 3000-level course or above 3 

Elective: Advisor-approved 3000-level course or above 3 

Spring - 2nd Year 1 5 

SPED 4491 Special Education Apprenticeship 15 

Physical Education 5 

Total Hours for the Degree 1 25 




Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 



159 



HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Bachelor of Science in Education 
with a IVIajor in Health and Physical Education -- Track for Teacher Certification 

Core Curriculum Areas A-E for Non-Science Majors 42 

Core Curriculum Area F 18 

KNHS 2200 CPR, First Aid and Sports Safety Training 1 

EDUC 2110 Investigating Critical and Contemporary 

Issues in Education 3 

EDUC 2120 Exploring Social-Cultural Perspectives 

on Diversity 3 

EDUC 2130 Exploring Learning and Teaching 3 

BIOL 2111 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 4 

BIOL 2112 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 4 



Major Concentration 

Kinesiology and Health Science Core (18 hrs.) 

KNHS 3100 Introduction to Kinesiology and Health Sci. 3 

KNHS 321 Motor Behavior 3 

KNHS 3220 Structural Kinesiology 3 

KNHS 3310 Exercise/Sport Psychology 3 

KNHS 4220 Exercise Physiology 3 
KNHS 4340 Measurement and Evaluation in Kinesiology 

and Health Science 3 



68 



Teacher Certification Courses (35 hrs.) 

KNHS 3311 Introduction to Human Sexual Behavior 3 

KNHS 3312 Introduction to Human Diseases 3 

KNHS 331 3 Teaching and Assessing Physical Fitness 2 

KNHS 3314 Team Sports 2 
KNHS 3315 Individual/Dual Activities and 

Outdoor Education 2 

KNHS 331 6 Movement and Dance Methods 2 

KNHS 3321 Conducting Quality HPE Programs 3 
KNHS 3343 Elementary Methods of Physical Education 

and Health 3 

KNHS 3420 Instructional Strategies in Health Science 3 

KNHS 4330 History and Philosophy of Kinesiology 3 
KNHS 4342 Physical Education for Middle 

and Secondary School Students 3 
KNHS 4360 Physical Education for Students with 

Diverse Needs 3 
SPED 4002 Instructional Strategies for Teaching Students 

with Disabilities in General Education Settings 3 



Apprenticeship Teaching 

KNHS 4970 Apprenticeship Teaching 

Wellness Graduation Requirement 
Wellness 1000 
Activity Course 
Activity Course 

Total Hours for the Degree 



(15 hrs. 



15 



3 
1 
1 



133 



160 



Augusta State University Catalog 



DEPARTMENT OF KINESIOLOGY AND HEALTH SCIENCE 



KINESIOLOGY 

Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology 
with a Major in Kinesiology and a Concentration in Health Science 

Core Curriculum Areas A-E for Non-Science Majors 42 

Core Curriculum Area F 18 

KNHS2100 2 

KNHS 2200 CPR, First Aid, and Sport Safety Training 1 

BIOL 2111 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 4 

BIOL 2112 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 4 

MATH 221 Elementary Statistics 3 

Any 1000/2000 level Science or Physics 4 

Major Concentration 60 

Kinesiology and Health Science Core 18 

KNHS 3100 Introduction to KNHS 3 

KNHS 3210 Motor Behavior 3 

KNHS 3310 Exercise and Sport Psychology 3 
KNHS 3320 Fitness Assessment and Exercise Prescription 3 

KNHS 4220 Exercise Physiology 3 

MINF 2201 Computer Applications 3 

Professional Preparation Courses 18 

KNHS 3311 Introduction to Human Sexual Behavior 3 

KNHS 3312 Introduction to Human Diseases 3 

KNHS 3420 Instructional Strategies in Health Science 3 
KNHS 4311 Epidemiology and Health Science Research 

OR KNHS Alternate Approved by Advisor 3 

KNHS 4350 Nutrition in Health and Human Performance 3 
SOCI 3317 Sociology of Medicine 

OR SOCI/PSYC Alternate Approved by Advisor 3 

Internship -KNHS 4960 15 

Three Approved Electives 9 

Wellness Graduation Requirement 5 

WELL 1000 3 

WELL Activities Course 1 

WELL Activities Course 1 

Total Hours for the Degree 125 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 161 



KINESIOLOGY 



Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology 
with a Major in Kinesiology and a Concentration in Exercise and Sports Science 



Core Curriculum Areas A-E for Non-Science Majors 42 

Core Curriculum Area F 18 

KNHS2100 2 

KNHS 2200 CPR, First Aid, and Sport Safety Training 1 

BIOL 2111 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 4 

BIOL 2112 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 4 

MATH 2210 Elementary Statistics ' 3 

CHEM course Area D 
OR 
PHYS course Area D 4 

Major Concentration 60 

Kinesiology and Health Science Core 21 

KNHS 3100 Introduction to Kinesiology and Health Science 3 

KNHS 3210 Motor Behavior 3 

KNHS 3220 Structural Kinesiology 3 

KNHS 4220 Exercise Physiology 3 
KNHS 4340 Measurement and Evaluation in Kinesiology 

and Health Science 3 

KNHS Elective 3 

EDTD 3011 / MUSI 3011 Educational Technology 3 

Exercise Science Courses 15 

KNHS 3300 Practicum 3 

KNHS 3310 Exercise and Sport Psychology 3 

KNHS 3320 Fitness Assessment and Exercise Prescription 3 

KNHS 4320 Adult Fitness and Rehabilitation 3 

PSYC 31 83 Health Psychology 3 

Approved Electives 9 

Internship - KNHS 4960 • 15 

Wellness Graduation Requirement 5 

WELL 1000 Wellness 3 

WELL Activity Course 1 

WELL Activity Course 1 

Total Hours for the Degree 125 



^"2 Augusta State University Catalog 



KINESIOLOGY 

Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology 
with a Major in Kinesiology and a Concentration in Pre-Physical Therapy 

It is important that students work closely with a departmental advisor for this program because specific courses are required to 
be completed for consideration for the MPT program at the Medical College of Georgia. 

Core Curriculum Areas A-E for Non-Science Majors 42 

Core Curriculum Area F 18 

KNHS2100 2 

KNHS 2200 CPR, First Aid, and Sport Safety Training 1 

BIOL 2111 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 4 

BIOL 2112 HumanAnatomy and Physiology II 4 

MATH 2210 Elementary Statistics 3 

CHEM course Area D 

OR 

PHYS course Area D 4 

Major Concentration 60 

Kinesiology and Health Science Core 18 

KNHS 3100 Introduction to Kinesiology and Health Sci. 3 

KNHS 321 Motor Behavior 3 

KNHS 3220 Structural Kinesiology 3 

KNHS 3310 Exercise/Sport Psychology 3 

KNHS 4220 Exercise Physiology 3 

KNHS Elective 3 

Exercise Science Courses 9 

KNHS 3300 Practicum 3 
KNHS 3320 Fitness Assess, and Exercise Prescription 3 

KNHS 4320 Principles of Exercise Therapy 3 

Ancillary Courses 18 

EDTD 3011 Educational Technology 3 

MATH 2210 Elementary Statistics 3 

PSYC 3131 Child and Adolescent Development 3 

PSYC 3143 Abnormal Psychology 3 

approved Elective 3 

approved Elective 3 

Internship: KNHS 4960 15 

Wellness Graduation Requirements 5 

WELL 1000 Wellness 3 

WELL Activity Course 1 

WELL Activity Course 1 

Total Hours for the Degree 1 25 



HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



Minor in Health and 
Physical Education 



A minor may be earned in Health and Physical Education by successfully completing 1 8 upper division credit hours with a grade 
of C or better. All credit for a minor must be approved by an advisor in the Department of Kinesiology and Health Science. 



Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 163 



DEPARTMENT OF TEACHER EDUCATION 



EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION PRE K-5 CERTIFICATION 

Bachelor of Science in Education 
with a Major in Early Childhood Education 

Core Curriculum Areas A-E for Non-Science Majors 42 

AreaF 18 

EDUC 2110 Investigating Critical and Contemporary 

Issues in Education ' 3 

EDUC 2120 Exploring Social-Cultural Perspectives 

on Diversity 3 

EDUC 2130 Exploring Learning and Teaching 3 

ISC! 2001 Life/Earth Sciences for Elementary Education 3 

ISCI 2002 Physical Science 3 

MATH 2008 Foundations of Numbers and Operations 3 

Major Concentration 57 

BLOCK 1 15 

MATH (Recommended MATH 3241 or 3242) 

ENGL 3320 Children's Literature 
ECED 3151 Early Childhood Curriculum 
ECED 3161 Management and Family Involvement 
ECED 3252 Language Arts Curriculum 

BLOCK 2 12 

MATH (Recommended MATH 3241, 3242, or 4260) 

ECED 3212 Literacy I: Basic Literacy Instruction for 

Early Childhood Education 
ECED 3231 Early Childhood Science Education 
ECED 3241 Early Childhood Social Studies Education I 
Geography and History in K-5 Curriculum 

BLOCK 3 15 

MATH (Recommended MATH 3242 or 4260) 

ECED 4322 Early Childhood Mathematics Education 
ECED 4313 Literacy II: Advanced Literacy Instruction 

for Early Childhood Education 
SPED 4002 Instructional Strategies for Teaching Students 

with Disabilities in General Education Settings 
ECED 4342 Social Studies II 

BLOCK 4 (all course worl< must be successfully completed 

PRIOR to apprenticeship) 15 

ECED 4491 Apprenticeship (15) 

(Each ECED course in Blocks I, II, and III will have 30 clock hours of lab.) 

Students must take 6 

MUSI 2400 (2) 

ART 2100 (2) 

KNHS 2350 (2) 
These courses can be taken prior to admission into the program. 

Physical Education 5 

Total Hours for the Degree 128 



'"'^ Augusta State University Catalog 



MIDDLE GRADES EDUCATION 4-8 CERTIFICATION 



Bachelor of Science in Education 
with a Major in Middle Grades Education 



Core Curriculum Areas A-E 42 

(Area D: Science Concentration must take BIOL 1107, 1108) 

Area F 18 

EDUC 2110 Investigating Critical and Contemporary Issues 

in Education 3 

EDUC 2120 Exploring Social-Cultural Perspectives 

on Diversity 3 

SPED 2130 Exploring Learning and Teaching 3 

Choose 9 hours from Area D or E according 9 

to your concentration: 
*MATH 1113, 1220,2011,2012, 2013 are recommended. 
*Social Studies concentration must have a geography course 

(and a Georgia History course is strongly recommended). 
'Language Arts concentration must have English 2250 

Major Concentration 60 

Core: 21 

MGED 3111 Middle School Teacher and Student Roles 

MGED 3112 Middle School Classroom 

MGED 3213 Middle School Organization 

MGED 3222 Integrated Reading to Learn 

SPED 4002 Instructional Strategies for Teaching Students 
with Disabilities in General Education Settings 

MGED 4111 Integrated Instruction 

EDTD 3011 / MUSI 3011 Educational Technology 

Content Specialization Courses 24 

Choose tw/o of the following sets: 
Language Arts 

MGED 3221 Middle Grades Language Arts 3 

ENGL 3810 and ENGL 3330 (6) 
One 3000-4000 Arts and Sciences course 
in language arts 3 
Mathematics 

MGED 3231 Mathematics Education for Middle Grades 3 
MATH 3261, 3262, 4260(9) 
Social Studies 

MGED 3241 Social Studies Education for Middle Grades 3 
Three 3000-4000 Arts and Sciences courses 
in social studies (9) 
Science 

MGED 3251 Science Education for Middle Grades 3 
Three 3000-4000 Arts and Sciences courses in science 9 
MGED 421 Apprenticeship and Seminar 1 5 

(EDUC, SPED, EDTD, and MGED courses will each have 
30 clock hours of lab.) 

Physical Education 5 

Total Hours for the Degree 125 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 165 



SECONDARY EDUCATION 

P-12 Certification Programs Page 

1. French 88 

2. Spanish 92 

6-12 Certification Programs 

1. Biology Education 67 

2. Chemistry Education 71 

2. English Education 86 

3. History Education 98 

4. Mathematics Education 105 

5. Physics/Mathematics Education 75 

6. Political Science Education 130 




166 



Augusta State University Catalog 



James M. Hull 
College of Business 

The James M. Hull College of Business, fully accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB), 
offers both Bachelor of Business Administration degrees and the Master of Business Administration degree. The James M. 
Hull College of Business schedules required and most elective courses to allow students to earn their undergraduate degrees 
by attending classes during either day or evening hours. Most students earning business degrees are v^/orking in the local 
community, and many of them are working full-time. The James M. Hull College of Business maintains high quality programs 
while meeting the educational needs of its current and potential student body. 

Our mission is to prepare students for career success by providing quality baccalaureate and master's level education in 
business disciplines. 

Our teaching helps students develop professional competence, enhance the quality of their lives, and appreciate the need 
for continuous learning and renewal. Our programs are managed to accommodate students who live and work in the greater 
Augusta metropolitan area. 

We engage in scholarship that strengthens classroom instruction and assists the community and the business professions. We 
provide service to the university in faculty governance, to the community through professional, civic, and chantable activities, 
and to the business professions through involvement in professional organizations and programs. 

The James M. Hull College of Business is advised and supported by an advisory board chaired by Mr. Larry DeMeyers. This 
group of local business leaders meets quarterly and serves as a bridge between the College and the community. Members in 
2008-2009 were: 

Mr. Patrick Blanchard, President and CEO, Georgia-Carolina Bancshares, Inc. 

Mr. Thomas M. Blanchard, Blanchard & Calhoun 

Mr. Dan Blanton, President and CEO, Georgia Bank & Trust 

Mr. Marshall Brown, UBS Paine Webber 

Mr. David Burton, Business Advisor 

Mr. Roy F. Chalker, Jr., Chalker Publishing Company 

Mr. John T Cosnahan, Administrative Partner, Baird and Company 

Mrs. Dee Crawford, President & CEO, D & G Management 

Mr. Larry DeMeyers, Business Advisor 

Mr. Edwin L. Douglass, Jr., President, E.L.D., Inc. 

Mr. Walter Dukes, Regional Vice President, Georgia Power Company 

Ms. Linda Hardin, Manager, Augusta Mall 

Ms. Helen Hendee, Vice President for Development & Alumni Relations, Augusta State University 

Mr. Gary Jones, Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Co. 

Mr. Brian Marks, President, Augusta Sportswear 

Mr. Sam Nicholson, Attorney 

Ms. Rhonda Oellerich, Vice President for Sales, Keystone Homes 

Mr. H. M. Osteen, Jr., Retired Chairman of the Board, Banker's First 

Judge J. Carlisle Overstreet 

Mr. Joe Pollock, President, Pollock Office Machine Company 

Mr. Ed. Presnell, SRP Federal Credit Union 

Mr. Paul Simon, Retired President, Morris Communications Corporation 

Mr. Preston Sizemore, President and CEO, Sizemore, Inc. 

Ms. PatTante, Retired, Community Relations Director, Pfizer 

Mr. William Thompson, President, SunTrust Bank 

Mr. Philip Wahl II, Vice President, First Citizens Bank 

Mr. Ray Walters, Treasurer, Koger-Walters Oil Co. 



Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 167 



Members of the faculty of the James M. Hull College of Business are as follows: 

Dean: Miller, M.D. 
Associate Dean: Furman, M. 
Associate Dean: Coleman, B. C. 

Professors: Brannen, D.E.: Brauer, J.; Coleman, B.C.; Grayson, J.M.; Howard, D.P.; Ibrahim, N.A.; Leightner, J.E.; Miller, 

M.D.; Schultz, T.A.; Ziobrowski, B.J. 

Associate Professors: Basciano, P.M. 

Assistant Professors: Amos, C.L.; Fritz, D.A.; Loda, M.D.; Medcalfe, S.K.; Robinson, A.T.; York, P.T.; Zhang, L.G. 

Instructor: Kirk, R. 

The Knox School of Accountancy 

We, in the Knox School, are dedicated to excellence in accounting education. As a part of the Hull College of Business, 
we have a commitment to offer our students the finest in business education. 

Professors: Jackson, P.Z.; Miller, J.R., Siegel, P.H., Knox Distinguished Chair 
Associate Professors: Styron, W.J., Director 
Assistant Professors: Smalley, R.L. 
Lecturers: Blackwood, B.J. 

Admission into the James M. Hull College of Business 

In order to provide a meaningful educational experience for our students, we require that students successfully complete 
the majority of their general education requirements prior to enrolling in any upper division business courses. The core 
curriculum provides general knowledge and skills in language, communication, quantitative techniques and analysis, and 
scientific techniques as well as historical, social, political, and economic foundations upon which modern business is based. 
This background allows the student to study the specific business disciplines and to place them in appropriate context. 

All aspiring business majors entering Augusta State University under the 2006-2007 catalog or after will be designated as 
Pre-business majors. In order to enroll in any upper division business courses, students must have gained admittance into the 
James M. Hull College of Business. Upon meeting the prerequisites for admission into the HCoB, students will select one of 
the following majors: Accounting, Finance, Management, Management Information Systems, or Marketing. The Undergraduate 
Advising Office in the James M. Hull College of Business will provide advising services to pre-business majors as well as to 
those in the specific business majors. 

The prerequisites for entry into the James M. Hull College of Business are as follows: (1) Completion of at least 45 semester 
hours of courses; and (2) Completion of the following courses with an overall GPA of 2.5 on these seven courses: ENGL 
1101, ENGL 1102, MATH 1111, MATH 1220, ACCT 2101, ECON 2106 (or ECON 2105), and MINF 2201. Students may retake 
any of these courses and only the most recent grade in the course will count toward the minimum required GPA. Once the 
prerequisites have been met, the student may apply for admission into the HCoB in the Undergraduate Advising Office. 

Prerequisites and Course Sequencing 

In some cases specific courses are listed as prerequisites. If a course is listed specifically as a prerequisite, it must be 
successfully completed prior to enrolling in the course for which it is a prerequisite. The two courses may not be taken 
concurrently. A course rotational plan is available in the Undergraduate Advising Office so that business majors may best plan 
their courses in order to make the most efficient use of their time in the classroom. 

It is important that the students' major courses be taken during both the junior and senior years. Although all major courses are 
offered regularly, they may not be offered each semester during both day and evening hours. For this reason, it is important to 
learn which courses are required and to note their scheduling patterns. Failure to take a course when it is offered, withdrawing 
from, or failing a course will most likely lead to delays in the graduation process. 

Because business majors deserve to know which courses are required for their degree program and the order in which they 
should enroll in them, the HCoB requires students to be advised each term. Business and prebusiness majors will receive a 
Term PIN only after discussing their pending schedules with an advisor in the Undergraduate Advising Office. 

Undergraduate Minor Requirements 

Business administration minors entering Augusta State University under the 2007-2008 catalog or after will need to meet the 
following requirements before enrolling in MGMT 3500, MKTG 3700, or BUSA 4200. Students must complete these seven 
courses with an overall GPA of 2.5: ENGL 1101, ENGL 1102, MATH 1111 (or MATH 1101), Third Core Area D math/science 
course, ACCT 2101, ECON 2106 (or ECON 2105 or ECON 1810), and MGMT 2106 (or FINC 1410). Students may retake any 
of these courses and only the most recent grade in the course will count toward the minimum required GPA. 

' "° Augusta State University Catalog 



BACHELOR OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

A student pursuing a business administration curriculum may choose an area of major concentration from one of the following: 
Accounting, Finance, Management, Management Information Systems, or Marketing, All courses listed below carry 3 semester 
hours of credit, except as noted. 

No more than three of the Junior/Senior Common Courses and no more than two of the Major Emphasis courses may be 
transferred from another institution into the BBA Program. 

Core Requirements 

Since the core curriculum (Areas A,B,C,D,E, and F) is preparatory, the student must take these courses during the freshman 

and sophomore years. 

Area A 9 

ENGL 1101 and ENGL 1102 

MATH 1101 or MATH 1111 (MATH 1111 recommended) 
Area B 4 

Humanities (2 hours extra from Area C) 

COMS 1010 
Area C 6 

HUMN 2001 and 2002 
Area D 11 or 12 

Two lab sciences (does not have to be sequence) 
(extra hour to electives) 

One additional math or science (MATH 1220 Applied 

Calculus must be taken as an elective if not taken in Area D.) 
AreaE 12 

POLS 1101 

HIST2111 or HIST 2112 

PSYC 1101 or SOCI 1101 or ECON 1810 or ANTH 2011 

One additional social science 

Requirements for Enrolling in HCoB Upper Division Courses 

In order to enroll in any upper division courses taught by the HCoB, students must have completed the specific prerequisites 
for the courses and must have met the following admissions requirements: 

1. Completion of at least 45 semester hours of courses. 

2. Completion of the following core courses with an overall GPA of at least 2.5 on these seven courses: ENGL 1101. ENGL 

1102, MATH 1111, MATH 1220, ACCT 2101, ECON 2106 (or ECON 2105), MINF 2201. Students may retake any of these 
courses and only the most recent grade in the course will count toward the minimum GPA. 

3. Students will be advised to enroll in the following three courses as soon as possible: ACCT 2102, ECON 2105 (or ECON 

2106), MGMT 2106. 

4. These requirements will apply to students who must meet the new ASU catalog requirements. 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 169 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Bachelor of Business Administration 
with a Major in Accounting 

Core Curriculum Areas A-E (See p. 55) 42 

Core Curriculum Area F 

(Grade of C or better is required in all these courses unless noted) 18 

ACCT 2101 Principles of Accounting I (Grade of B or better needed) 

ACCT 2102 Principles of Accounting II (Grade of B or better needed) 

ECON 2105 Macroeconomics 

ECON 2106 Microeconomics 

MINF 2201 Microcomputer Applications 

MGMT 2106 Legal and Ethical Environment of Business 

Junior/Senior Common Courses 30 

(Grade of C or better is required in all Junior/Senior level courses) 

FINC 3400 Corporate Finance 

MATH 3110 Statistical Analysis for Business 

MGMT 3500 Management Theory and Practice 

COMC 3100 Communications for Professionals 

MKTG 3700 Principles of Marketing 

QUAN 3600 Introduction to Management Science 

BUSA4200 International Business 

MGMT 4500 Human Resource Management 

ACCT 4350 Accounting Information Systems 

MGMT 4580 Strategic Management 
Major Emphasis 21 

ACCT 3311 Financial Accounting Theory I 

ACCT 3312 Financial Accounting Theory II 

ACCT 3321 Cost Accounting 

ACCT 3331 Federal Income Taxation 

ACCT 4360 Auditing 
Select tw/o of the following courses: 

ACCT 4322 Cost Management 

ACCT 4370 Advanced Accounting 

ACCT 4332 Advanced Federal Income Taxation 

ACCT 4380 Governmental and Institutional Accounting 

ACCT 4620 Spreadsheet Modeling and Decision Analysis 

ACCT 4950 Selected Topics in Accounting 
Electives 9 

Must include MATH 1220 if not taken in Area D. 

No more than 6 hours can be taken within the HCoB 
Physical Education 5 

Total Hours for the Degree 1 25 



' ' '-' Augusta State University Catalog 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Bachelor of Business Administration 
with a Major in Finance 

Core Curriculum Areas A-E (See p. 55) 42 

Core Curriculunn Area F 18 

(Grade of C or better is required in these courses) 

ACCT 2101 Principles of Accounting I 

ACCT 2102 Principles of Accounting II 

ECON 2106 Microeconomics 

ECON 2105 Macroeconomics 

MINF 2201 Microcomputer Applications 

MGMT 2106 Legal and Ethical Environment of Business 

Junior/Senior Common Courses 30 

(Grade of C or better is required in all 
Junior/Senior level courses) 

FINC 3400 Corporate Finance 

MATH 3110 Statistical Analysis for Business 

MGMT 3500 Management Theory and Practice 

COMC 3100 Communications for Professionals 

MKTG 3700 Principles of Marl<eting 

QUAN 3600 Introduction to Management Science 

BUSA 4200 International Business 

MGMT 4500 Human Resource Management 

MINF 3650 Management Information Systems 

MGMT 4580 Strategic Management 

Major Emphasis 21 

FINC 3405 Financial Planning 
FINC 4421 Investment and Portfolio Analysis 

Select five of the following courses: 
ACCT 3331 Federal Income Taxation 
ECON 4820 International Economics and Finance 
FINC 3410 Risk Management 
FINC 3420 Real Estate 
FINC 4410 Advanced Corporate Finance 
FINC 4420 Financial Markets and Institutions 
FINC 4430 Estate Planning 
FINC 4440 Retirement Planning 
FINC 4950 Selected Topics in Finance 
QUAN 4620 Spreadsheet Modeling and Decision Analysis 

Electives 9 

Must include MATH 1220 if not taken in Area D 

No more than 6 hours can be taken within the HCoB 
Physical Education 5 

Total Hours for the Degree 1 25 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 171 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Bachelor of Business Administration 
with a Major in Management 

Core Curriculum Areas A-E (See p. 55) 42 

Core Curriculum Area F 18 

(Grade of C or better is required in all these courses) 

ACCT 2101 Principles of Accounting I 

ACCT 2102 Principlesof Accounting II 

ECON 2106 Microeconomics 

ECON 2105 Macroeconomics 

MINF 2201 Microcomputer Applications 

MGMT 2106 Legal and Ethical Environment of Business 

Junior/Senior Common Courses 30 

(Grade of C or better is required in all Junior/Senior level courses) 

FINC 3400 Corporate Finance 

MATH 3110 Statistical Analysis for Business 

MGMT 3500 Management Theory and Practice 

COMC 3100 Communications for Professionals 

MKTG 3700 Principles of Marketing 

QUAN 3600 Introduction to Management Science 

BUSA 4200 International Business 

MGMT 4500 Human Resource Management 

MINF 3650 Management Information Systems 

MGMT 4580 Strategic Management 

Major Emphasis 21 

MGMT 3510 Organizational Behavior 

MGMT 4550 Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management 
QUAN 4640 Operations and Supply Chain Management 

Select four of the following courses: 

MGMT 3540 Leadership and Ethics in Management 
MGMT 4520 Industrial Relations and Collective Bargaining 
MGMT 4560 Advanced Topics in Human Resources 
MGMT 4950 Selected Topics in Management 
MINF 3625 Project Management 
MINF 4390 Introduction to E-Commerce 
MKTG 4740 Marketing Research 

Electives 9 

Must include MATH 1220 if not taken in Area D. 
No more than 6 hours can be taken v^^ithin the HCoB 

Physical Education 5 

Total Hours for the Degree 1 25 



' '2 Augusta State University Catalog 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Bachelor of Business Administration 
with a Major in Management Information Systems 

Core Curriculum Areas A-E (See p. 55) 42 

Core Curriculum Area F 18 

(Grade of C or better is required in all these courses) 

ACCT 2101 Principlesof Accounting I 

ACCT 2102 Principlesof Accounting II 

ECON 2106 Microeconomics 

ECON 2105 Macroeconomics 

MINE 2201 Microcomputer Applications 

MGMT 2106 Legal and Ethical Environment of Business 

Junior/Senior Common Courses 30 

(Grade of C or better is required in all Junior/Senior level courses) 

FINC 3400 Corporate Finance 

MATH 3110 Statistical Analysis for Business 

MGMT 3500 Management Theory and Practice 

COMC 3100 Communications for Professionals 

MKTG 3700 Principles of Marketing 

QUAN 3600 Introduction to Management Science 

BUSA4200 International Business 

MGMT 4500 Human Resource Management 

MINE 3650 Management Information Systems 

MGMT 4580 Strategic Management 

Major Emphasis 21 

AIST 3410 Database Management Systems 
AIST 3610 System Analysis and Design 
MINE 3625 Project Management 

Select twelve additional semester hours from the following courses: 
(Visit the MIS Major site at http://mis.aug.edu for 
suggested course tracks) 

MINE 3612 Business Introduction to Programming 
MINE 3614 Business Introduction to Networking 
MINE 3618 Business Introduction to Web Development 
MINE 4390 Introduction to e-Commerce 

MINE 4950 Selected Topics in Management Information Systems 
QUAN 4620 Spreadsheet Modeling and Decision Analysis 
QUAN 4630 Business Analytics 

QUAN 4640 Operations and Supply Chain Management 
Any other AIST CSCI, CSIA, MINE or QUAN 
course at 3000-4000 level 

Electives 9 

Must include MATH 1220 if not taken in Area D. 
No more than 6 hours can be taken within the HCoB 

Physical Education 5 

Total Hours for the Degree 125 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 173 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Bachelor of Business Administration 
with a Major in Marketing 

Core Curriculum Areas A-E (See p. 55) 42 

Core Curriculum Area F 18 

(Grade of C or better is required in all these courses) 

ACCT 2101 Principles of Accounting I 

ACCT 2102 Principles of Accounting II 

ECON2106 Microeconomics 

ECON 2105 Macroeconomics 

MINF 2201 Microcomputer Applications 

MGMT 2106 Legal and Ethical Environment of Business 

Junior/Senior Common Courses 30 

(Grade of C or better is required in all Junior/Senior level courses ) 

FINC 3400 Corporate Finance 

MATH 3110 Statistical Analysis for Business 

MGMT 3500 Management Theory and Practice 

COMC 3100 Communications for Professionals 

MKTG 3700 Principles of Marketing 

QUAN 3600 Introduction to Management Science 

BUSA 4200 International Business 

MGMT 4500 Human Resource Management 

MINF 3650 Management Information Systems 

MGMT 4580 Strategic Management 

Major Emphasis 21 

MKTG 3710 Buyer Behavior 
MKTG 4740 Marketing Research 
MKTG 4750 Marketing Planning and Strategy 

Select four of the following courses 

MGMT4550 Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management 

MINF 3618 Business Introduction to Web Development 

MINF 4390 Introduction to E-Commerce 

MKTG 3720 Retail Management 

MKTG 4770 Product Innovation and Product Management 

MKTG 3730 Salesmanship and Sales Management 

MKTG 4720 Services Marketing 

MKTG 4780 Advertising and Promotion Management 

MKTG 4950 Selected Topics in Marketing 

QUAN 4630 Business Analytics 

QUAN 4640 Operations and Suppy Chain Management 

Electives 9 

Must include MATH 1220 if not taken in Area D. 
No more than 6 hours can be taken within the HCoB 

Physical Education 5 

Total Hours for the Degree 125 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Minors in the College of Business 
Accounting Minor 

Lower Division Courses 6 

ACCT 2101 Principles of Accounting I (Grade of B or better) 

ACCT 2102 Principles of Accounting II (Grade of B or better) 
Upper Division Courses 12 

(Grade of C or better is required in all these courses) 

ACCT 3311 Financial Accounting Theory I 

' ' ^ Augusta State University Cataiog 



Select three of the following courses: 

ACCT 3312 Financial Accounting Theory II 

ACCT 4350 Accounting Information Systems 

ACCT 3321 Cost Accounting 

ACCT 3331 Federal Income Taxation 

ACCT 4380 Governmental and Institutional Accounting 



Business Administration Minor 

(Grade of C or better is required in all these courses) 
Lower Division Courses i 

ACCT 2101 Principles of Accounting I 
ECON 1810 or ECON 2106 or ECON 2105 
Introduction to Economics 
Microeconomics 
Macroeconomics 
FINC 1410 or MGMT 2106 
Personal Finance 
Legal and Ethical Environment of Business 

Upper Division Courses ! 

BUSA 4200 International Business 
MGMT 3500 Management Theory and Practice 
MKTG 3700 Principles of Marketing 
(MGMT 3500 and MKTG 3700 are prerequisite to BUSA 4200) 



Economics Minor 

(Grade of C or better is required in all these courses) 

Lower Division Courses 6 

ECON 2105 Macroeconomics 

ECON 2106 Microeconomics 
Upper Division Courses 12 

ECON 3105 Intermediate Macroeconomics 

ECON 3106 Intermediate Microeconomics 
Select one of the following courses: 

ECON 4820 International Economics and Finance 

ECON 4830 Public Sector Economics and Public Policy Analysis 
Select one of the following (if not already taken for the student's 
major or minor field of study). 

Any 3000 or 4000 level course in the Hull College of Business 

ANTH 3851 Religion, Culture, and Society 

ANTH 4861 World Ethnology 

BIOL 3120 Man and the Environment 

CRJU 3341 White Collar Crime 

CRJU 4431 Criminology 

ECON 4820 International Economics and Finance 

ECON 4830 Public Sector Economics and Policy 

Any HIST 3xxx or HIST 4xxx 

(except HIST 3891 , HIST 4950, HIST 4970) 

MATH 3110 Statistical Analysis for Business 

POLS 3801 International Relations Theory 

POLS 4302 Political Economy 

POLS 4303 Public Budgeting 

POLS 4701 Governments of Developing Nations 

POLS 4902 World Politics 

PSYC 3170 Consumer Behavior 

PSYC 4173 Social Psychology 

SOCI 4431 Criminology 

SOCI 4451 Sociology of Work and Occupation 

SOCI 4461 Urban Sociology 

SOCI 4462 Urban Social Problems 

Total hours for each of the above minors 18 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 175 



AUGUSTA STATE UNIVERSITY 
GRADUATE PROGRAMS 



' ' " Augusta State University Catalog 



Katherine Reese Pamplin 
College of Arts and Sciences 

POLITICAL SCIENCE Master of Public Administration Degree 

The Master of Public Administration degree is designed to help prepare an individual for career service in national, state or 
local government; in regional planning agencies; and in non-profit or voluntary organizations. It is a two-year program of study 
which encourages post-baccalaureate students to utilize their education as a foundation upon which to build organizational and 
managerial skills which are highly valued in the public and non-profit sector. 

Admissions Procedures and Requirements: The Department of Political Science will provide written materials and answer 
inquiries about the Master of Public Administration program, but application must be made through the Augusta State University 
Office of Admissions. Information can also be obtained from the program's web site: www.aug.edu/mpa. The application 
process begins when a candidate submits the application for admission. Thereafter, the applicant assembles materials for a 
portfolio which is opened for him or her in the Admissions Office. The applicant is responsible for having the following materials 
placed in the portfolio: 

1. Official transcripts from all colleges and universities attended by the applicant. The applicant must have completed 
requirements for the bachelor's degree in a regionally accredited college or university. Admission to the program targets 
a minimum grade average equivalent to 2.5 on a 4.0 scale. 

2. Official scores on the Graduate Record Examination. The GRE scores must be recent (applicant having taken the 
Graduate Record Examination within the last five years). 

3. Two letters of recommendation. The letters of recommendation should come from persons familiar with the applicant's 
academic and/or employment experience. 

4. A current resume. 

5. Medical History Form (available from Admissions Office) 

When the portfolio is completed, the applicant's record will be sent to the MPA Director for review. The following formula will 
be applied: 

GRE verbal score + (GRE analytical score x 100) + GRE quantitative score + (GPA x 100) 

For regular admission, a student is expected to achieve a composite score of 1500 or higher. Probationary admission may be 
granted for students scoring 1400 - 1499. Probationary admission is not automatic. The Admissions Committee examines the 
applicant's undergraduate transcripts, resume, and letters of recommendation in making its determination. 

Conditions for Provisional Admission: Those applicants who have at least a 3.0 undergraduate grade average and are 
awaiting their scores on the Graduate Record Examination may enter into a contract with the MPA program which states that 
they are provisionally accepted for one semester while the portfolio is completed. Provisionally accepted students may take 
one course. If the student's completed application is subsequently accepted after the GRE scores are known and course is 
successfully completed, the course will count toward his or her degree requirements. 

Conditions for Probationary Admission: The MPA Admissions Committee has the option of admitting a student on a 
probationary basis with a set of specified conditions to be met before the student is considered to be regularly accepted. 
These conditions are determined on a case-by-case basis. Conditions may include, but are not limited to. provisions that the 
student achieve, at a minimum, a B on each of the first three core courses taken in the MPA Program, or that the student take 
an undergraduate course in quantitative methods as a pre-requisite in order to remedy a deficiency in his or her performance 
on the quantitative subtest of the Graduate Record Examination. In any case, the conditions must be met within the first two 
semesters of course work within the MPA program in order for the student's academic status to change from probationary to 
regular. 

Admissions Appeals: Students who are not accepted for admission to the Master of Public Administration program and who 
believe that there are extenuating circumstances which affect their eligibility may request in writing an appeal of the decision of 
the MPA Admissions Committee. This appeal is sent to the Director of the MPA Program, who will forward it to the Admissions 
Committee. The committee makes its decision and conveys it in writing to the MPA Program Director, who contacts the applicant 
by letter to inform him or her of the decision. 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 177 



Academic and Professional Standards: An average of B is required for all courses attempted in the progrann. Ttiere is a 
time limit for completion of the degree. Only the course work earned within the six calendar years before the final completion 
of degree requirements will apply toward graduation. 

The program of study is 36 semester credit hours. Of the 36 hours, 25 hours (nine courses) constitute the core requirements. 
The remaining hours are selected from among the elective offerings, culminating in a capstone course of 2 semester hours. 

Transfer Credit: No more than nine semester credit hours shall be transferred from another institution for the purpose of 
earning credits for the Master of Public Administration degree. The institution from which the credits are transferred must be 
an accredited one, and each transfer course is subject to review in order to determine its equivalency in the Augusta State 
University MPA Program. 

Internship: An internship experience is required by the MPA program for those students who lack a significant professional 
work background. Students who need an internship will be matched with an appropriate organization. This internship may be 
the basis for the student's capstone project. 

Capstone Project: The purpose of the capstone project is to have the student demonstrate his or her ability to apply the 
knowledge acquired in the two years of study to an actual work setting and to utilize skills of observation and analysis as 
demonstrated in a formal research paper. 

Core Curriculum 25 

Required Courses (core curriculum of eight courses) 

PADM 6000 Survey of Public Administration . 3 

PADM 6050 Constitutional and Administrative Law 3 

PADM 6100 Organization Theory and Behavior 3 

PADM 6200 Human Resources Management 3 

PADM 6300 Public Budgeting 3 

PADM 6500 Research Methods in Public Administration 4 

PADM 6600 Quantitative Methods 3 

PADM 6650 Public Policy Analysis 3 

Electives 9 

PADM 6020 CIS for Public Management 2 

PADM 6030 Grant Writing 1 

PADM 6250 Introduction to Urban Planning 3 

PADM 6301 Financial Management for Nonprofit Org. 3 

PADM 6350 Emergency Management 3 

PADM 6550 Human Services Administration 3 

PADM 6650 Public Policy Analysis 3 
PADM 6700 Urban Government Administration 

and Policy Analysis 3 
or 

PADM 6700 Urban Administration and Policy Analysis 3 

PADM 6750 Program Evaluation 3 

PADM 6900 Graduate Internship 3 

PADM 6950 Selected Topics in Public Administration 3 

PADM 7000 Directed Reading 3 

PADM 7050 Capstone Project 2 

Total Hours for the MPA Program 36 



' ' ° Augusta State University Catalog 



HOMELAND SECURITY 

This track prepares students for careers in the fast-growing field of homeland security. 

Required Courses 

(Same as the generalized MPA degree except for PADM 6000) 22 

PADIVl 6350 Emergency IVIanagement 3 

PADM 6351 Introduction to Homeland Security 3 
PADM 6352 The Unconventional Threat 

OR PADM 6353 Information Security Management 3 

Electives 3 

PADM 7050 Capstone Project 2 

Total hours for the HS track 36 



HUMAN SERVICES ADMINISTRATION 

This track prepares students for the challenges of working 
in Human Services Administration (MSA). Agencies involved in 
providing services to citizens, such as welfare, food banks, 
shelters, and community centers, face unique challenges 
including mixed funding streams, board structures, dependence 
on volunteers, and infrequent planning. This track prepares 
students to meet these challenges. 

Required Courses 

(Same as above with the exception of PADM 6000 and 6300 1 9 

PADM 6550 Human Services Administration 3 

PADM 6300 Public Budgeting 

OR PADM 6301 Financial Management for Nonprofit 
Organizations 3 

PADM 6750 Program Evaluation 3 

Electives 6 

(Any of the electives listed above may be used) 

PADM 7050 Capstone Project 2 

Total hours for the HSA track 36 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 1 79 



PSYCHOLOGY 

Master of Science Degree in Psychology 

The graduate program in psychology at Augusta State University provides intensive master's degree level education and 
training, with most students selecting an applied track which emphasizes clinical and counseling psychology. The program can 
also provide preparation for further graduate education or, for a limited number of students, the opportunity to pursue specific 
interests in experimental psychology. 

Unlike some other graduate programs at the university, the M.S. program in psychology is designed as a full-time, day-time 
and year-round program. Most students complete their degree requirements in two years or less, earning credits in advanced 
foundation courses (e.g., learning, social, personality, statistics), applied course work (e.g., psychometry, counseling/therapy, 
psychopathology) and supervised internship experience in treatment facilities or research laboratories. The department 
operates a psychometric and clinical training facility, and an animal and human research laboratory. Internship opportunities 
are available at many local agencies including a Veterans Administration Medical Center, a regional state psychiatric hospital, 
the Medical College of Georgia, a regional state school and hospital for the developmentally disabled, a regional state training 
center for juvenile offenders, and the Dwight David Eisenhower Army Medical Center at Fort Gordon. 

The Department and its faculty members maintain active relationships with the discipline's various governing and professional 
bodies, such as the American Psychological Association (APA), American Psychological Society (APS), Council of Graduate 
Departments of Psychology (COGDOP), Council of Applied Master's Programs in Psychology (CAMPP), and North American 
Association of Master's in Psychology (NAMP). 

Admission Procedures and Requirements 

Persons interested in taking graduate courses in psychology should be processed by the Department of Psychology, not the 
Augusta State University Office of Admissions. The formal deadline for submitting applications to the M.S. program is set by 
the institution. However, the limited number of positions for each fall entering class often results in the program filling sooner 
than that deadline. It is therefore recommended that applications for admission be made at least five months prior to the 
anticipated admission date. Admission to the program in semesters other than fall is possible if openings exist, but is rarely 
permitted given the sequencing of some courses. A final decision regarding acceptance into the graduate program can be 
made only upon receipt of official GRE scores, official transcripts, letters of reference, and a personal statement of educational 
and professional goals. Under exceptional circumstances students may be granted permission to enroll in certain courses in 
a post-baccalaureate status while the application is being processed. 

Inquiries are encouraged especially from members of minority groups and older persons, from human service personnel 
employed by local community agencies, and from persons possessing otherwise adequate credentials but who may have 
a deficit in a single credential such as quantitative GRE scores or freshman grade point average, or who may lack specific 
undergraduate preparation in psychology. In such cases, the department may use other appropriate information in the admission 
decision, and may require satisfactory remediation of any academic deficits prior to full acceptance. 

The minimum admission requirements are: 

1 . Completed requirements for the bachelor's degree in a regionally accredited college/university. 

2. A grade point average equivalent to 3.0 on a 4.0 scale. 

3. A score of 400 on each of the verbal and quantitative portions of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). The GRE 
Writing score must be 3.5 or higher, and one of the remaining scores must reach 450 or better 

4. Satisfactory letters of recommendation (at least two from academic sources) and transcripts. 

5. A 150-200 word statement regarding personal and professional goals with respect to graduate study at Augusta 
State University. 

6. For students whose native language is other than English, the examination scores of the Test of English as a Foreign 
Language (TOEFL). An oral expression and comprehension evaluation may also be required. 

7. For foreign students, a financial aid form provided by the Office of Admissions. 

Successful applicants for regular graduate status will, at a minimum, have satisfactorily completed undergraduate courses 
in general psychology, abnormal psychology, quantitative methods for the social or behavioral sciences, and experimental 
psychology. Courses in learning, physiological psychology, and tests and measurement are strongly recommended and may 
serve as prerequisites for certain graduate courses. 

After all required application information has been received, the Psychology Graduate Admissions Committee will make an 
admission decision, subject to approval by the Department Chair; and the Director of Graduate Studies in Psychology will 
inform the applicant of this decision. 

Applicants who have acceptable credentials but who are deficient in one area, such as Verbal GRE Scores or grade point 
average, may be offered provisional admission. Provisional graduate students must petition for regular graduate status after 
satisfactory completion of at least six and not more than nine hours of admissible graduate work. 



' °^ Augusta State University Catalog 



Financial Aid and Graduate Assistantships 

Students are expected to arrange their own means of paying tuition and other fees. Persons requiring financial assistance 
should first contact the Office of Financial Aid to inquire about funding alternatives, including the Work Study Program and 
low-interest loans. The department offers a limited number of graduate assistantships which reduce tuition and provide a 
monthly income in return for services to the university. These are assigned on a competitive basis each semester from among 
those students applying or recommended by the faculty. The award of an assistantship one semester is not a guarantee 
of future awards, and the university and department reserve the right to modify the number and conditions of awards as 
necessary. Graduate assistants are required to carry an academic load of at least nine semester hours with no more than three 
hours of internship. 

Degree Requirements 

The Master of Science in Psychology offers three tracks: The clinical/counseling track, the general experimental track and the 
applied experimental track. Students who seek to pursue the doctoral degree are advised to complete the general experimental 
track. Those individuals who wish to work in more applied settings after graduation, such as a medical research environment, 
technical college, or community agencies are advised to choose the applied experimental track. 

V 
General Experimental Track 

The general experimental track requires the satisfactory completion of a minimum of 47 semester hours of graduate work 
including Professional and Ethical Foundations (PSYC 6190), Research Methods I and II (PSYC 6121 and 6122), Research 
Methods Lab I and Research Methods Lab II (PSYC 6921 and PSYC 6922), six semester hours of Research Practicum fPSYC 
6930 and PSYC 6931 ), and six semester hours of Thesis Research (PSYC 6990). Beyond this, an individualized plan of study, 
as approved by the student's academic advisor, is used to establish specific course requirements. Students will be given formal 
permission by the faculty to pursue a thesis or internship at the end of the spring of their first year of graduate studies. The 
faculty will review the student's professional goals, academic performance and professional and ethical behavior to determine 
whether the student will be in the thesis or internship track. For this track, at least 38 of 47 total hours required must be earned 
in the major field; and no more than six of the 45 total hours may be earned in PSYC 6990. 

Applied Experimental Track 

The applied experimental track requires the satisfactory completion of a minimum of 47 semester hours of graduate work 
including Professional and Ethical Foundations (PSYC 6190), Research Methods I and II (PSYC 6121 and 6122). Research 
Methods Lab I and Research Methods Lab II (PSYC 6921 and PSYC 6922), six semester hours of Research Practicum (PSYC 
6930 and PSYC 6931), Psychological Assessment I (PSYC 6126), and six semester hours of Internship (PSYC 6940. 6970 
and/or 6980). Beyond this, an individualized plan of study, as approved by the student's academic advisor, is used to establish 
specific course requirements. Students will be given formal permission by the faculty to pursue a thesis or internship at the end 
of the spring semester of their first year of graduate studies. The faculty will review the student's professional goals, academic 
performance, and professional and ethical behavior to determine whether the student will be in the thesis or internship track. 
For this track, at least 38 of the 47 total hours required must be earned in the major field; and no more than six of the 47 total 
hours may be earned in PSYC 6940, 6970, and/or 6980. 

Clinical/Counseling Track 

The clinical/counseling track offers a thesis or a non-thesis (internship) option. The plan of study, as approved by the student's 
Academic Advisor, is used to determine whether the student will be in the thesis or internship track. The non-thesis option 
requires the satisfactory completion of a minimum of 53 semester hours of graduate courses as detailed below. Students who 
pursue the non-thesis option will need to complete at least 8 hours of PSYC 6960 Clinical Internship. All clinical/counseling 
students are strongly encouraged to carefully study the license requirements in the states where they may be employed in the 
future. For this track, at least 50 of the total hours required must be earned in the major field; and no more than 8 of the 53 
hours may be earned in PYSC 6940, 6960, 6970, 6980, and/or 6990. 

Clinical/Counseling Non-Thesis Track Courses (53 hours) 

Research Foundations (Required) 
PSYC 6121 Research Methods I (3 hours) 
PSYC 6921 Research Methods Lab I (1 hour) 
PSYC 6122 Research Methods II (3 hours) 
PSYC 6922 Research Methods Lab II (1 hour) 

Assessment Foundations (Required) 

PSYC 6926 Psychological Assessment Practicum I (1hour) 

PSYC 6126 Psychological Assessment I (3 hours) 

PSYC 6927 Psychological Assessment Practicum II (1 hour) 

PSYC 6127 Psychological Assessment II (3 hours) 

Therapy Foundations (Required) 

PSYC 6143 Behavior Pathology (3 hours) 

PSYC 6145 Therapeutic Interventions I (3 hours) 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 181 



PSYC 6945 Therapeutic Interventions Practicum I (1 hour) 

PSYC 6146 Therapeutic Interventions II (3 hours) 

PSYC 6946 Therapeutic Interventions Practicum II (1 hour) 

Social/Cultural/Systemic Bases of Behavior (Required) 
PSYC 6173 Social Psychology and Human Diversity (3 hours) 

Learned Bases of Behavior (Choose One) 

PSYC 6130 Developmental Psychology (3 hours) 

PSYC 6165 Learning Principles and Applications (3 hours) 

Biological Bases of Behavior (Choose One) 

PSYC 6181 Behavioral Neuroscience (3 hours) 

PSYC 6182 Clinical and Addictive Psychopharmacology (3 hours) 

Professional Foundations (Required) 

PSYC 6190 Professional and Ethical Foundations (3 hours) 



Internship Requirements (Required) 
PSYC 6960 Clinical Internship (8 hours) 



Additional internship hours may be selected from PSYC 6940, 6970, or 6980. 



Select at least two additional courses to include: 
PSYC 6115 History and Systems of Psychology (3 hours) 
PSYC 6130 Developmental Psychology (3 hours) 
PSYC 6165 Learning Principles and Applications (3 hours) 
PSYC 6147 Seminar in Group Process (3 hours) 
PSYC 6148 Marriage and Couples Therapy (3 hours) 
PSYC 6178 Industrial Organizational Psychology (3 hours) 
PSYC 6950 Special Topics (3 hours) 



CLINICAL COUNSELING TFJACK Sample Plan of Study, 53 hours 



YEAR I 

FALL (11 hours): 



Prof, and Ethical Foundations 
Psychological Assessment I 
Assessment I Practicum 
Research Methods I 
Research Methods Lab I 



(PSYC 6190) (3 hours) 
(PSYC 6126) (3 hours) 
(PSYC 6926) (1 hour) 
(PSYC 6121) (3 hours) 
(PSYC 6921) (1 hour) 



Select Major Professor 

File Preliminary Plan of Study 



SPRING (11 hours): 



Behavior Pathology 
Research Methods II 
Research Methods Lab II 
Psychological Assessment II 
Assessment II Practicum 



(PSYC 6143) (3 hours) 
(PSYC 6122) (3 hours) 
(PSYC 6922) (1 hour) 
(PSYC 6127) (3 hours) 
(PSYC 6927) (1 hour) 



File Complete Plan of Study 



SUMMER (9 hours): 



Social Psychology and Hum. Div.(PSYC 6173) (3 hours) 
Learning (PSYC 6165) (3 hours) 

Seminar in Group Process (PSYC 6147) (3 hours) 

* File Admission to Candidacy 



182 



Augusta State University Catalog 



YEAR II 

FALL (10 hours) 



Therapeutic Interventions I 
Therapeutic Inter, Practicum 
Developmental Psychology 
Internship 



(PSYC 6145) (3 hours; 
(PSYC 6945) (1 hour) 
(PSYC 6130) (3 hours) 
(PSYC 6960) (3 hours) 



Subnnit Application for Graduation 
Take Comprehensive Exams 



SPRING (10 hours) 



SUMMER (2 hours) 



Therapeutic Interventions II 
Therapeutic Inter. Practicum II 
Clinical Psychopharmacology 
Internship 

Internship 



(PSYC 6146) (3 hours) 
(PSYC 6946) (1 hour) 
(PSYC 8182) (3 hours) 
(PSYC 6960) (3 hours) 

(PSYC 6960 2 hours) 



Schedule Exit Interview 



Clinical/Counseling Thesis Option (53 hours) 

Research Foundations (Required) 
PSYC 6121 Research Methods I (3 hours) 
PSYC 6921 Research Methods Lab I (1 hour) 
PSYC 6122 Research Methods II (3 hours) 
PSYC 6922 Research Methods Lab II (1 hour) 

Assessment Foundations (Required) 

PSYC 6926 Psychological Assessment Practicum I (1hour) 

PSYC 6126 Psychological Assessment I (3 hours) 

PSYC 6927 Psychological Assessment Practicum II (1 hour) 

PSYC 6127 Psychological Assessment II (3 hours) 

Therapy Foundations (Required) 

PSYC 6143 Behavior Pathology (3 hours) 

PSYC 6145 Therapeutic Interventions I (3 hours) 

PSYC 6945 Therapeutic Interventions Practicum I (1 hour) 

PSYC 6146 Therapeutic Interventions II (3 hours) 

PSYC 6946 Therapeutic Interventions Practicum II (1 hour) 

Social/Cultural/Systemic Bases of Behavior (Required) 
PSYC 6173 Social Psychology and Human Diversity (3 hours) 

Learned Bases of Behavior (Choose One) 

PSYC 6130 Developmental Psychology (3 hours) 

PSYC 6165 Learning Principles and Applications (3 hours) 

Biological Bases of Behavior (Choose One) 

PSYC 6181 Behavioral Neuroscience (3 hours) 

PSYC 6182 Clinical and Addictive Psychopharmacology (3 hours) 

Professional Foundations (Required) 

PSYC 6190 Professional and Ethical Foundations (3 hours) 



Internship Requirements (Required) 

PSYC 6990 Thesis (3 hours) 

PSYC 6960 Clinical Internship (5 hours) 



Additional internship hours may be selected from PSYC 6940. 6970. or 6980. 



Select at least two additional courses to include; 

PSYC 6115 History and Systems of Psychology (3 hours) 

PSYC 6130 Developmental Psychology (3 hours) 

PSYC 6165 Learning Principles and Applications (3 hours) 

PSYC 6147 Seminar in Group Process (3 hours) 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 



183 



PSYC 6148 Marriage and Couples Therapy (3 hours) 
PSYC 6178 Industrial Organizational Psychology (3 hours) 
PSYC 6950 Special Topics (3 hours) 

The M.S. program is scheduled on a year-round basis; students attend the summer term as full-time students. 

Transfer of credit from another institution is contingent upon a positive recommendation by the student's Academic Advisor and 
approval by the Department Chair, and may not exceed nine semester hours. The plan of study may also not include more 
than nine semester hours taken in academic units other than the Department of Psychology. Only that course work completed 
within the six calendar years prior to completion of degree requirements will apply toward graduation. 

Admission to candidacy for the Master of Science degree may occur no earlier than the completion of 15 semester hours of 
graduate work. To be admitted to candidacy, the student must additionally be classified as a regular graduate student, earn (and 
maintain) the endorsement of three graduate faculty sponsors, successfully complete Professional and Ethical Foundations 
(PSYC 6190) (including the general psychology component), successfully complete the Research Methods sequence (PSYC 
6121 and 6122), and achieve a GPA of at least 3.00 in all graduate course work. 

Comprehensive written and oral examinations are an integral part of the program of study and are designed to measure 
the student's knowledge of and competency in the field of psychology, to include conceptual, language, interpersonal and 
professional competencies commensurate with an advanced degree. The admissibility of candidates to the comprehensive 
examination will be based on the following criteria: possession of a currently viable admission to candidacy, a GPA of 3.0, 
successful completion of 33 semester hours of the plan of study, and official enrollment at Augusta State University in the 
semester during which the candidate will be examined. 

Students are expected to maintain a GPA of at least 3.00 across all courses attempted in the M.S. degree program. Dismissal 
is probable for the student whose GPA shows a deficit of greater than six quality points at any time in the program. Work with 
a grade of U may be repeated once if the student's Academic Advisory Committee so recommends. Dismissal may also occur 
when students in post baccalaureate or provisional status have deficient academic records or when students fail to be admitted 
to candidacy in a timely manner. 

Please Note: The Policy Manual for the M.S. Program in Psychology may be obtained from the department, and should be 
consulted for a more thorough and sometimes more current description of the program and its regulations. 

Typical Plan of Study 

Course sequences vary somewhat among students depending on a number of factors. The following plan of study may be 
considered representative, but by no means universal, of a clinically focused student completing the program with 45 semester 
hours in five consecutive semesters. Many students develop plans of study with more than the minimum number of hours. 

Year I 

Fall 9 

PSYC 6190 Professional and Ethical Foundations 3 

PSYC 6121 Research Methods I 3 

PSYC 6126 Psychological Assessment I 3 
Spring 9 

PSYC 6127 Psychological Assessment II 3 

PSYC 6122 Research Methods II 3 

PSYC 6143 Behavior Pathology 3 
Summer 9 

PSYC 6147 Seminar in Group Process 3 

PSYC 6140 Personality 3 

PSYC 6165 Learning Principles and Applications 3 

Year II 

Fall 9 

PSYC 6145 Therapeutic Interventions I 3 

PSYC 6130 Developmental Psychology 3 

PSYC 6960, 6970, 6980 Internship 3 

Spring 9 

PSYC 6173 Social Psychology and Human Diversity 3 

PSYC 6182 Clinical and Addictive Psychopharmacology 3 

PSYC 6960, 6970, 6980 Internship 3 

Total Hours 45 



^ °^ Augusta State University Catalog 



College of Education 

GRADUATE PROGRAMS 

OVERVIEW 

The College of Education, in collaboration with the Pamplin College of Arts and Sciences, offers graduate programs leading to 
the Master of Education degree, the Master of Arts in Teaching degree, the Master of Science in Kinesiology (M.S.), and the 
Education Specialist degree. 

The Master of Education degree and the Education Specialist degree are designed to extend and enrich previous course work 
in education as well as previous clinical and field experience. These programs prepare individuals to become master teachers, 
exercise-science professionals, counselors, and administrators. 

The Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) degree is designed for those seeking initial certification at the Master's degree level. It 
has a dual function: to provide initial certification as well as the Master's degree. A student must pass all Georgia certification 
requirements before receiving this degree. Individuals who possess at least a baccalaureate degree and who do not hold a 
teaching certificate are eligible for this program. The baccalaureate degree must be in a field of specialization closely related 
to the certification area being sought. 

DEGREES AND PROGRAMS OF STUDY 

The College of Education offers the Master of Science (M.S.), Master of Education (M.Ed.), the Master of Arts in Teaching 
(M.A.T), and the Education Specialist (Ed.S.) degree in these areas: 

Master of Arts in Teaching: Master of Education: Education Specialist: Master of Science 

Concentrations In: in Kineseology 

Curriculum and Instruction Teaching and Learning 

Early Childhood Education -- General Education track - General Teaching/Learning 

Middle Grades Education - Secondary English Education track - Mathematics Education 

Biology Education - Secondary Mathematics Education track - English Education 

Chemistry Education -- Secondary History Education track 

Health and Physical Education Counselor Education: Educational Leadership (PL-6) 

History Education -- School Counseling track 

Physics Education - Community Counseling track 

Mathematics Education Educational Leadership 
Music Education Special Education 

Political Science / Mathematics Educational Leadership {NL-5) 

Foreign Language Education 
Special Education 



APPLICATION PROCESS 

Applications: Applications are available 

On-line: www.aug.edu/college_of_education/ 

Items to be submitted are: 

A completed application for admission to graduate study 

A transcript from each college or university from which a degree was received. 

A non-refundable fee of $25 (check or money order payable to Augusta State University) 

Augusta State University Certificate of Immunization (required for all who have not previously attended Augusta 

State University) 

Master of Arts in Teaching applicants must submit passing scores on GACE Basic Skills Assessment (Reading 

Mathematics, Writing) 

* Master of Arts in Teaching applicants must submit GACE Teaching Field Content scores in the certification area 

applied for 

Background Investigation Questionnaire and Release Form --«►'-- 

Release of Academic Information Form (MAT only) 

Note: All transcripts must: 

include the date the degree was conferred 

Indicate a cumulative GPA, including all work attempted 

Be sent directly from the registrar of the degree-granting institution to the Coordinator of Graduate Admissions, 

College of Education, Augusta State University, 2500 Walton Way Augusta. GA. 30904 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 185 



* Applicants to the MAT in Special Education are not required to submit GACE Teaching Field Content scores as part 
of the application process. 

ADMISSIONS CRITERIA 

MAT 

Minimum 2.5 cumulative GPAat the Baccalaureate level. 

Passing scores on GACE Basic Skills Assessment (may exempt with combined verbal and mathematics SAT score 

of 1 000 or combined verbal and quantitative GRE score of 1 030 or combined English and mathematics ACT score 

of 43). 

A record free of criminal and disciplinary problems. 

GACE Content test scores supplied (not required for Special Education candidates). 

There may be additional requirements to continue in the program after initial admission. 

M.Ed, in Curriculum and Instruction 

Minimum 2.5 cumulative GPA at the Baccalaureate level. 

Clear, renewable certification. 

A record free of criminal and disciplinary problems. 

M.Ed, in Special Education 

Minimum 2.5 cumulative GPA at the Baccalaureate level on all undergraduate work attempted in which letter 

grades were awarded. 

There may be additional requirements to continue in the program after initial admission. See an advisor in Special 

Education. 

Clear, renewable certification. 

A record free of criminal and disciplinary problems. 

M.Ed, in Counselor Education 

* Minimum 2.5 cumulative GPAat the Baccalaureate level. 

* Passing scores on GACE Basic Skills Assessment School Counselor program only (may exempt with combined 
verbal and mathematics SAT score of 1000 or combined verbal and quantitative GRE score of 1030 or combined 
English and mathematics ACT score of 43). 

Minimum score of 800 on the Graduate Record Examination (minimum 400 on Verbal portion) or minimum score 
of 388 (old format 35) on the Miller Analogies Test. Tests must have been taken within the past five years. 
Three satisfactory letters of recommendation. 
An autobiographical essay. 
Successful personal interview. 
A clear or expunged criminal background record. 

Counselor Education applicants may be admitted for one semester on the basis of the GPA and the GACE 
Basic Skills Assessment scores. All other requirements must be satisfactorily fulfilled within the first semester of 
coursework in order to continue in the program. 

M.Ed, in Educational Leadership 

Minimum 2.5 cumulative GPA at the Baccalaureate level (Baccalaureate need not be in education) calculated on 
all undergraduate work attempted in which letter grades were awarded. 

Test scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) OR the Miller Analogies Test (MAT) with either test 
taken within 5 years of the date of application. 

1) Each applicant must score a minimum of 400 Verbal and 400 quantitative and 3.0 Analytical Writing 
on the GRE - OR - an undergraduate cumulative GPA of at least 3.0 may be substituted for EITHER 
the GRE verbal or quantitative score OR, 

2) A Miller Analogies Test (MAT) minimum score of 390 AND a GRE Analytical Writing score of 3.0. 
Undergraduate cumulative GPA will not be considered as a substitute for the MAT exam. 

There may be additional requirements to continue in the program after initial admission. See an advisor in 

Educational Leadership. 

A record free of criminal and disciplinary problems. 

Master of Science in Kinesiology 

Undergraduate degree in a closely related field (e.g. exercise science, health science, nutrition, kinesiology) 
Three letters of recommendation (at least two from academic sources) and transcripts 
A Personal Statement that should include: 

• A one-paragraph statement that speaks to your interest in the field of Kinesiology. 

• A statement that specifies and elaborates upon your future career goals. 

' °" Augusta State University Catalog 



•A statement that describes why you believe the M.S. program in Kinesiology at ASU will help you to further your 
professional preparation and career goals. 
A record free of criminal and disciplinary problems. 

Acceptance of transfer graduate credits will be considered based upon the recommendation of the kinesiology graduate 
advisor and approval of the department chair but will not exceed nine (9) semester credit hours. 

Ed.S. in Educational Leadership 

Minimum 3.0 GPA at the Master's level (Masters need not be in education) calculated on all graduate work 
attempted in which letter grades were awarded. 

Test scores from the Graduate Record Examination (ORE) OR the Miller Analogies Test (MAT), with either test 
taken within 5 years of the date of application. 

1 ) Each applicant must score a minimum of 450 Verbal and 450 quantitative and 3.5 Analytical Writing 
on the GRE - OR - a graduate cumulative GPA of at least 3.5 may be substituted for EITHER the GRE 
verbal or quantitative score OR, 

2) A Miller Analogies Test (MAT) minimum score of 400 AND a GRE Analytical Writing score of 3.5. 
Graduate cumulative GPA will not be considered as a substitute for the MAT exam. 



There may be additional requirements to continue 

Educational Leadership. 

A record free of criminal and disciplinary problems. 



in the program after initial admission. See an advisor in 



Ed.S. in Teaching and Learning 

Minimum 3.0 GPA at the Master's level. 
• Clear, renewable level 5 certificate. 

A record free of criminal and disciplinary problems. 
Minimum 2.5 GPA at the Baccalaureate level. 

All questions concerning either the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or the Miller Analogies Test (MAT) should be 
directed to the testing service. 



GRE-ETS 

PO Box 6000 

Princeton, NJ 08541-0600 

1-609-771-7670 or 

1-866-473-4373 (toll free) 

www.ets.org 



Pearson Education, Inc. 
19500 Bulverde Road 
San Antonio, TX 78259 
1-800-211-8378 (toll free) 
www.milleranaiogies.com 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 



187 



APPLICATION DEADLINE 

Completed applications and ALL supporting materials must be received on or before the following deadlines. If all supporting 
materials are not received by the application deadline, the application will be processed for the next semester after all 
materials are received. 

December 2 for spring semester acceptance 
April 2 for summer semester acceptance 
July 2 for fall semester acceptance 

Admission is for a specific semester and a specific program. If a student wishes to make changes in either the program of 
study or the semester of admission, a written request must be made to the coordinator of Graduate Admissions, College 
of Education. All admissions criteria for the new program must be met. A fee of $25.00 will apply to all changes requested. 

Financial Aid: 

Information concerning scholarships, grants, loans, etc. may be found at the Financial Aid Office at www.aug.edu/financial_ 
aid. It is strongly recommended that applicants take note of financial aid application deadlines, since these are usually 
earlier than application deadlines. 

RETENTION AND EXIT FROM THE MASTERS DEGREE PROGRAMS: 

Transfer Hours: 

A maximum of 9 semester hours of graduate work from an accredited institution may be transferred into a graduate program 
at Augusta State University. At the time of admission, the student must discuss the transfer hours with the advisor(s) and file 
a formal request with the chair of the department of the discipline of the course(s) being considered for transfer hours to be 
included in the program of study. 

Academic Standing: 

Good Standing: A student must maintain a grade point average of at least 3.0 throughout his/her graduate program. 
Only a grade of C or better will be counted as successful completion of a course for the graduate program. A grade 
of D or less will be counted in the cumulative GPA. A student must have a cumulative 3.0 GPA in order to graduate. 

Probation: A student who fails to maintain the required average will be placed on "academic probation." In order to 
remain in the graduate program, the student must reestablish the cumulative grade point average of 3.0 during the 
next semester of enrollment. 

Suspension: A student who is unable to remediate the grade point average after one semester will be placed on 
"academic suspension" for a period of one semester. 

Reinstatement: To apply for reinstatement, the student must meet with the advisor(s), prepare a formal plan to address 
the academic problems, and submit a letter of appeal for readmission to the department chair of the appropriate 
program after one semester of academic suspension. 

Dismissal from the Graduate Program: If a student is suspended for the second time, the student will be dismissed 
from the graduate program. A student who has been dismissed may petition for readmission to the graduate program 
after one calendar year from the date of dismissal. A new application for the graduate program must be accompanied 
by a letter of appeal for admission. 



' °° Augusta State University Catalog 



RETENTION AND EXIT FROM THE EDUCATION SPECIALIST PROGRAM: 

Academic Standing: 

Good Standing: A student must maintain a grade point average of at least 3.25 throughout his/her graduate program. 
Only a grade of C or better will be counted as successful completion of a course for the graduate program. A grade 
of D or less will be counted in the cumulative GPA. A student must have a cumulative 3.25 GPA in order to graduate. 

Probation: A student who fails to maintain the required average will be placed on "academic probation." In order to 
remain in the graduate program, the student must reestablish the cumulative grade point average of 3.25 during the 
next semester of enrollment. 

Suspension: A student who is unable to remediate the grade point average after one semester will be placed on 
"academic suspension" for a period of one semester. 

Reinstatement: To apply for reinstatement, the student must meet with the advisor(s), prepare a formal plan to address 
the academic problems, and submit a letter of appeal for readmission to the department chair of the appropriate 
program after one semester of academic suspension. 

Dismissal from the Graduate Program: If a student is suspended for the second time, the student will be dismissed 
from the graduate program. A student who has been dismissed may petition for readmission to the graduate program 
after one calendar year from the date of dismissal. A new application for the graduate program must be accompanied 
by a letter of appeal for admission. 

TIME LIMITS FOR DEGREE COMPLETION 

All requirements for the Master of Arts in Teaching degree. Master of Education and Education Specialist degree must be 
completed within seven years of the first semester of enrollment. 

GRADUATE APPEALS 

A student who is denied admission to, retention in, and/or exit from a graduate program has the right to appeal. Appeals are to 
be filed in writing with the Dean of the College of Education. 

A student also has the rights afforded by the Student Academic Appeals procedures and by the Student Academic Grievances 
procedures as specified in the Augusta State University Catalog. 

COOPERATIVE PROGRAMS WITH GEORGIA SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY 

Through a cooperative program with Georgia Southern University (GSU), the Doctor of Education Degree in Educational 
Leadership is available on the ASU campus. Students must apply directly to, and meet all admission requirements of. Georgia 
Southern University. Inquiries should be directed to: 

Georgia Southern College of Education 
Coe.georgiasouthern.edu/coeoffcampus.html 



Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 189 



MASTER OF EDUCATION PROGRAMS 



Counselor Education 



The Counselor Education Master's Degree graduate program at Augusta State University prepares students for professional 
careers as either school guidance counselors or counselors in community mental health or private practice settings. Early 
in the program students are assisted, as needed, in determining which specialty area will most adequately match with their 
career goals. Most courses require outside field experiences, coordinated by the faculty, to help students gain a sense of both 
professions early in their professional training. Both the School Counseling and Community Counseling concentration areas 
are accredited by the Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP). Although our 
student body is already quite diverse, we are committed to increasing the numbers of minority students in our program to be 
more representative of the surrounding community. 

The Counselor Education program is designed to meet the needs of both traditional and non-traditional students. The majority 
of courses are offered during evening hours to accommodate those persons who may already be working as school teachers 
or in other professional career areas. It is not required, however, that applicants have a teaching certificate or work experience 
for acceptance into the program, (although those with at least some work experience will be considered more highly). Both 
the School Counseling and the Community Counseling concentration areas also require intensive practicum and internship 
experiences near the end of the course of study. For future school counselors, the practicum and internship placements are 
completed in school settings at the elementary or secondary levels. For those specializing in community counseling, internships 
are held at local hospitals, mental health centers, and other community agencies. 

All of the full-time Counselor Education faculty hold doctoral degrees and have professional experience in their particular subject 
areas. Several hold professional licensure (LPC) and certifications from the National Board of Certified Counselors. They are 
also actively involved in the counseling profession, many holding membership and/or offices in the American Counseling 
Association (ACA), the Association for Counselor Education and Supervision (ACES), Georgia School Counselor Association 
(GSCA), Licensed Professional Counselors of Georgia (LPCG), and other state organizations. Faculty members frequently 
present at regional and national conferences, quite often in collaboration with counseling students, reporting on descriptive or 
experimental research which has been conducted during the program courses. 

Admissions Procedures and Requirements 

The Counselor Education Program faculty seeks to admit only those individuals who are personally and academically prepared 
to complete the Master's degree in community or school counseling successfully. Diversity is a foundational concept of this 
program. As such, faculty are committed to admitting students who demonstrate an awareness of self and others regardless of 
race, religion, ethnicity, age, physical ability, sexual orientation, gender, or other forms of diversity. 

Admission to the program is competitive and based on several criteria. There are two tiers, or levels of acceptance, to the 
process. Applicants are strongly encouraged to complete both tiers in one semester. 

Tier 1 : Admission to the College of Education 

The first tier is to gain acceptance into the College of Education Master of Education (MEd) Graduate Program by submitting the 
graduate program application to the office of the Dean of the College of Education and completing admissions requirements, 
which include a criminal background check, submission of all undergraduate and graduate transcripts, and other necessary 
materials. For those desiring to be school counselors, a passing score on the GACE Basic Skills Tests also is required. 
Applicants may obtain an application packet and more detailed admissions criteria from the Dean's office in the College of 
Education or refer to the website for forms and information. 

The completed packet should be submitted to the College of Education Dean's office. The office of the Dean of the College of 
Education sends each applicant a formal letter of acceptance or denial. Letters of acceptance will provide information on the 
student's advisor/mentor, the process for development of the Program of Study, and time and date of the required attendance 
at the New Student Orientation. 

Once a letter of acceptance into the College of Education MEd Program is received, applicants may take up to three courses 
in the counseling program, during which time they must complete the second tier of admission requirements. Applicants who 
choose to take courses before completing the Tier 2 requirements should keep in mind that there is no guarantee that they 
will be permitted to continue in the program, since continuation depends on the extent to which Tier 2 requirements are met. 
Applicants should notify the Dean's office if they wish to postpone the start of their academic program. 

Tier 2: Additional Requirements of the Counselor Education Program 

The second tier of the admissions process is to gain acceptance into the Counselor Education Program. This requires submission 
of additional documents including the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or Miller's Analogy Test (MAT) scores, three letters 
of recommendation, an autobiographical essay, and successful completion of an interview. When all requirements are met 
satisfactorily, applicants will have completed the second level and will be accepted into the Counselor Education Program. 



' ^^ Augusta State University Catalog 



Tier 2 application files are reviewed three times a year: 

Fall semester admission: May 15 

Spring semester admission: October 15 
Summer semester admission: March 15 

Shortly after these dates, complete files will be reviewed by program faculty. Based on the quality of the Tier 2 admissions 
packet, program faculty determine which applicants will be invited to the personal interview - the final step in the admissions 
process. Upon completion of the personal interview, program faculty will determine which applicants are accepted into the 
Counselor Education Program. All applicants will be informed of their admission status. 

Applicants who do not meet the minimal test score or GPA requirements outlined above, but who demonstrate exceptional talent 
or skill in other areas, such as technology, work, or volunteer experience, or who supply outstanding letters of recommendation, 
may still be considered for admission and are encouraged to apply. 

The following is a detailed description of requirements for Tier 2 admissions process. 

A. GRE or MAT Scores: 

Graduate Record Exam (GRE): 

Regular admission: minimum of 800 on the test overall, with a score of at least 400 on the Verbal subtest 

Miller's Analogy Test (MAT): 

Regular admission: minimum of 388 (old format 35) 

B. Three Letters of Recommendation: Recommendations, one of which must be from the most recent employer, 

should outline the applicant's character and potential as a counselor, the ability to form and maintain positive 
interpersonal relationships, and the ability to complete a graduate degree program. 

C. Personal Autobiographical Essay: Applicants will write an autobiographical essay in which they discuss their 

reasons for wanting to become a counselor, what attributes they may possess which would contribute to their 
effectiveness as a counselor, what personal characteristics they possess that might hinder their relationships 
with clients, and how they are planning to address those issues. The essay must be double-spaced and three 
to four pages in length. 

D. Personal Interview: A personal interview with the Admissions Committee is required. The Admissions Committee is 

composed of counseling faculty. The personal interview is designed to assess applicants' potential for forming 
effective interpersonal relationships in individual and group contexts, their openness to self-examination and to 
personal and professional growth, their potential to work effectively with diverse populations, their receptiveness 
to supervision, the degree to which the Program's objectives and mission are consistent with the vocational and 
professional goals of applicants, and the degree to which the Program faculty can meet the applicants' needs 
and interests. 

Students are evaluated by the faculty with a rubric which considers all of the above criteria. Students who gain admission are 
those who, based on the information given and the course of the interview, best match the characteristics described in the 
above paragraph and on the number of available openings for the upcoming semester. 

Applicants should submit all Tier 1 and Tier 2 application materials to the College of Education Dean's office. Please note that 
applicants who complete Tier 1 requirements and take courses for one semester, but do not complete the Tier 2 requirements 
during that same semester, may not register for another semester of classes until the Tier 2 requirements have been met. 

Degree Requirements 

School Counseling Concentration 

48 semester hours of academic work (39 hours must be completed at ASU) 

3 semester hours credit in Exceptional Children 

3 semester hours credit in Educational Technology 

2 semesters of intensive internship in a school setting 

Completion of a professional portfolio during the capstone course 

Successful completion of the GACE examination will yield school certification in the state of Georgia. (For candidates 

without a Bachelor's degree in Education, the GACE School Counseling (Tests I and II) must also be taken.) The student 

applies to the ASU Certification Officer for certification after completion of all requirements for the degree. 

Upon successful completion of the program, students will meet all the requirements for certification as a school guidance 
counselor in the state of Georgia. 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 191 



COUNSELOR EDUCATION 

Master of Education 
with a IVIajor in Counselor Education - School Counseling Concentration 

Program of Study 

Core Courses 27 

COUN 6620 Human Development for Counselors 3 

COUN 6630 Professional Orientation and Ethics 3 

COUN 6660 Communication Skills in Counseling 3 

COUN 6680 Theories and Techniques of Counseling ' 3 

COUN 6720 Career Development Theories and Practice 3 

COUN 6760 Diversity Sensitivity in Counseling 3 

COUN 6770 Crisis Intervention Counseling 3 

PSYC 6147 Seminar in Group Process 3 

COUN 6880 Counseling Practicum 3 

Foundation Courses 6 

EDUC 6021 Introduction to Research Design 3 

EDUC 6040 Tests and Measurement for Educational Leaders 3 

School Counseling Specialized Courses 15 

COUN 6780/7780 School Counseling 3 

COUN 6820 Administration and Consultation for 3 

School Counselors 
COUN 6860/7860 Counseling Children and Adolescents 3 

COUN 6900 Counseling Internship I 3 

(School Counseling section) 
COUN 6920 Counseling Internship II (Capstone) 3 

(School Counseling section) 

Total hours for the degree 48 



Degree Requirements - Clinical Mental Health Counseling Concentration 

• 60 semester hours of academic work (51 hours must be completed at ASU) 

• 2 semesters of intensive internship in a community setting 

• Completion of a professional portfolio during the capstone course 

Upon successful completion of the program, students will meet all the requirements for the Licensed Professional Counselor 
(LPC) credential, except for the two years of supervised post-graduate work experience. Students are expected to maintain 
an overall GPA of at least 3.0 across all courses attempted in the M.Ed, program. Students showing deficiencies in either 
academic or interpersonal relationships may be placed on probation and/or remediation. Any course in which a student earns 
a grade of D or F will need to be retaken. Consult the Counselor Education Program Student Handbook (Department of 
Educational Leadership, Counseling, and Special Education website) for more specific and updated information. Also, consult 
the College of Education Admission Requirements portion of this catalog for information on transfer hours, retention and exit 
from programs, time limits for completion of degree, graduate appeals and financial aid. 



'""^ Augusta State University Catalog 



COUNSELOR EDUCATION 

Master of Education 
with a Major in Counselor Education - Clinical Mental Health Counseling Concentration 

Program of Study 

Core Courses 27 

COUN 6620 Human Development for Counselors 3 

COUN 6630 Professional Orientation and Ethics 3 

COUN 6660 Communication Skills in Counseling 3 

COUN 6680 Theories and Techniques of Counseling 3 

COUN 6720 Career Development Theories and Practice 3 

COUN 6760 Diversity Sensitivity in Counseling 3 

COUN 6770 Crisis Intervention Counseling 3 

PSYC 6147 Seminar in Group Process 3 

COUN 6890 Practicum in Clinical Mental Health Counseling 3 

Foundation Courses 6 

EDUC 6021 Introduction to Research Design 3 

PSYC 6125 or EDUC 6040 Tests and Measurement 3 

Clinical Mental Health Counseling Specialized Courses 21 

COUN 6700 Marriage and Family Counseling 3 

COUN 6790 Community Counseling 3 

COUN 6800 Assessment, Diagnosis, and Intervention 3 

COUN 6840 Introduction to Addictions Counseling 3 

COUN 6850 Treatment Planning in CMHC (pre-prac) 3 

COUN 6910 Internship I in CMHC 3 

COUN 6930 Internship II in CMHC (Capstone) 3 

CMHC Electives - Select one in collaboration with Advisor 6 

COUN 6860 Counseling Children and Adolescents 3 

COUN 6870 Gender Issues in Counseling 3 

COUN 6950 Special Topics in Counseling 3 

PSYC 6182 Clin, and Addictive Psychopharmacology 3 

PSYC 6143 Behavior Pathology 3 

Total hours for the degree 60 



CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION 



Master of Education 
Curriculum and Instruction - General Track 



Core 18 

EDTD 6491 Classroom Management Techniques 

and Strategies 3 

EDTD Course in Content Pedagogy 

(Area of content teaching) 3 

EDTD 6432 Multicultural Education 3 

EDTD 6012 Oualitative Research in Education 

OR EDTD 6021 Introduction to Educational Research 3 
An Assessment Course: 

3 



EDTD 6410 Teaching for Understanding in Action 3 

Concentration 18 

Concentration courses may come from Arts and Sciences 
or the College of Education 

Total Hours for the Degree 36 

Successful Completion of Master's Portfolio Required. 



*AII students in Teacher Education Department M.Ed. Programs will be required to complete these courses within the first 
twelve semester hours of graduate work. 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 193 



CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION 

Master of Education 
Curriculum and Instruction - Secondary English Track 

Core 18 

EDTD 6491 Classroom Management Techniques 

and Strategies 3 

EDTD 6432 Multicultural Education 3 

EDTD 6012 Qualitative Research in Education 

OR EDTD 6021 Introduction to Educational Research 3 
An Assessment Course: 

3 

3 



A Pedagogy Course: 



EDTD 641 Teaching for Understanding in Action 3 

Concentration 18 

ENGL 6620 English Linguistics 3 

ENGL 6625 Contemporary English Grammar and Usage 3 

ENGL 6800 Issues in Literary Criticism 3 
Select two courses in literature 

3 

3 



Select one 7000 level research course in English 



Total Hours for the Degree 36 

Successful Completion of Master's Portfolio Required. 



*AII students in Teacher Education Department M.Ed. Programs will be required to complete these courses within the first 
twelve semester hours of graduate work. 



CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION 



Master of Education 
Curriculum and Instruction - Secondary History Track 



Core 18 

EDTD 6491 Classroom Management Techniques 

and Strategies 3 

EDTD 6432 Multicultural Education 3 

EDTD 6012 Qualitative Research in Education 

OR EDTD 6021 Introduction to Educational Research 3 
An Assessment Course: 

3 

3 



A Pedagogy Course: 



EDTD 6410 Teaching for Understanding in Action 3 

Concentration 18 

Content Courses in History 



Total Hours for the Degree 36 

Successful Completion of Master's Portfolio Required. 



*AII students in Teacher Education Department M.Ed. Programs will be required to complete these courses within the first 
twelve semester hours of graduate work. 



' ^^ Augusta State University Catalog 



CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION 

Master of Education 
Curriculum and Instruction - Secondary Mathematics Track 

Core 18 

EDTD 6491 Classroom Management Techniques 

and Strategies 3 

EDTD 6432 Multicultural Education 3 

EDTD 6012 Qualitative Research in Education 

OR EDTD 6021 Introduction to Educational Research 3 
An Assessment Course: 

3 

3 



A Pedagogy Course: 



EDTD 6410 Teaching for Understanding in Action 3 

Concentration 18 

Select AT LEAST ONE course from each area below with 
approval of a mathematics department advisor: 

Foundational Mathematics 

MATH 6080 Foundations of Geometry 3 

MATH 6410 History of Mathematics 3 

MATH 6520 General Topology 3 

Analytical Mathematics 

MATH 6011 Real Analysis I 3 

MATH 6012 Real Analysis 11 3 

MATH 6250 Mathematical Statistics 3 

MATH 6350 Numerical Analysis 3 

MATH 6510 Complex Analysis 3 

Discrete Mathematics 

MATH6211 Abstract Algebra I 3 

MATH 62 12 Abstract Algebra II 3 

MATH 6320 Advanced Number Theory 3 

MATH 6420 Introduction to the Theory of Graphs 3 

Mathematics Curriculum and Instruction 

MATH 6360 Mathematics Curriculum 3 

MATH 6460 Strategies for Teaching Mathematics 3 

MATH 6800 Secondary Mathematics from an 

Advanced Perspective 3 

Total Hours for the Degree 36 

Successful Completion of Master's Portfolio Required. 



*AII students in Teacher Education Department M.Ed. Programs will be required to complete these courses within the first 
twelve semester hours of graduate work. 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 195 



Educational Leadership 

The graduate program in Educational Leadership at Augusta State University (ASU) is a performance-based program that is 
aligned with both NCATE standards and Georgia Professional Standards Commission (PSC) standards. Graduates from the 
Master's (M.Ed.) and Specialist (Ed.S.) programs may obtain a Georgia leadership certificate upon successful completion of 
the required courses and the Georgia Assessments for the Certification of Educators in Educational Leadership. Information 
on educational leadership certification rules, as stipulated by the Georgia PSC, is available on the PSC's web site (www. 
gapsc.com). 

A performance-based educational leadership program offers candidates significant opportunities to apply knowledge and 
skills in real educational settings. In courses, field-specific experiences require candidates to demonstrate to faculty and 
personal leadership coaches the ability to transfer classwork to the demands placed upon today's educational leaders. 

The Master's program in Educational Leadership has an emphasis on foundational knowledge, skills, and dispositions 
essential for school leaders, and the Education Specialist in Educational Leadership is focused on building and district level 
administration. Both degrees require candidates to complete at the school and district levels a variety of administrative, 
organizational, managerial, supervisory, and instructional experiences. A Beginning Leader Candidate Support Team 
(BLCST) develops specific field residency requirements for each candidate. The BLCST consists of the candidate, a faculty 
member, and a personal leadership coach. The BLCST collaborates to support and guide a candidate and to provide the 
candidate with authentic responsibilities that increase over time and in complexity. The residency experiences include direct 
interaction with appropriate staff, students, and the school/district community. 

The Master's in Educational Leadership is a 36-hour program leading to a Georgia NL-5 certificate which is required prior 
to accepting building level positions. Candidates holding a Master's degree in educational leadership from an accredited 
college or university program are eligible to apply for the Education Specialist degree 30-hour program which leads to a 
clear, renewable Georgia PL-6 certificate. A PL-6 certificate holder may apply for building and district educational leadership 
positions. Candidates who have earned a Master's degree from an accredited college or university in a field other than 
educational leadership, may apply for the extended 48-hour Education Specialist degree in educational leadership. 



EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP 



Master of Education 
with a Major in Educational Leadership 



Courses in the Performance-based M.Ed, program 

EDLR 6205 Capstone Course M.Ed. 

EDLR 6400 Fundamentals of School Leadership 

EDLR 6410 Educational Personnel Administration 

EDLR 6420 Educational Business Administration 

EDLR 6430 School Law 

EDLR 6500 Curriculum Development for Educational 

Leaders 
EDLR 6550 Instructional Supervision for Educational 

Leadership 
EDLR 6610 The Principalship 
EDLR 6620 Human Relations for Education Leaders 
EDLR 6630 Administration of Literacy Programs 
EDLR 6900 Practicum in Educational Leadership I 
EDLR 6901 Practicum in Educational Leadership II 
EDLR 6902 Practicum in Educational Leadership III 
EDLR 6021 Educational Research 



3 
3 
3 
3 

3 



3 
3 

3 
3 

1 

1 
1 
3 



Total Hours for the Degree 

All students must be advised prior to registering for any course 
in Educational Leadership. 



36 



196 



Augusta State University Catalog 



SPECIAL EDUCATION 



Master of Education 
in Special Education 



The IVl.Ed. in Special Education, with concentrations in General Curriculum (mild disabilities) and Adapted Curriculum (severe 
disabilities), is offered to persons with Bachelors degrees in all areas of education. Persons with degrees in education and 
current teacher certification in Georgia do not need pre-requisite courses. Application for admission is made directly to the 
Office of Graduate Admissions in the College of Education. 

Persons with Bachelors degrees in areas other than education must do the following pnor to admission to the graduate 
program: Meet with an Advisor, as assigned by the program. 

All special education courses contain a 20- to 30-hour lab component (in addition to classroom time) that provides the student 
with a public school experience during the semester. The required lab time should be considered when planning the course 
schedule. Depending upon the course requirements and with permission of the instructor, students who are employed as 
teachers or paraprofessionals in special education classrooms may be able to complete some of their lab hours in their 
school. Prior to the first field experience, students who are not employed by a school district must satisfactorily pass 
a criminal background check (conducted by ASU). All field placements must be approved by the instructor prior to the 
student's first visit to the school. 

All special education courses are "by permission only." Students must be advised by a member of the special education 
graduate faculty each semester and given permission to register. 

Students who do not have a Bachelors degree in an educational field are eligible for the Master of Arts in Teaching program 
explained later in this catalog. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 

Professional Core Courses 15 

EDUC 6140 Advanced Educational Psychology 3 

EDUC 6021 Introduction to Educational Research 3 

EDUC 6040 Tests and Measurement 3 

SPED 6204 Single Subject Research with 

Special Populations 3 

SPED 6205 Capstone in Special Education 3 

Special Education Core 15 

SPED 6001 Policies and Procedures in Special Education 3 
SPED 6003 Classroom Management and Applied 

Behavior Analysis 3 

SPED 6004 Facilitating Inclusive Instruction 3 

SPED 6006 Educational Assessment in Special Education 3 
SPED 6011 Language Development and Communication 

Disorders 3 

Special Education Concentration 6 

[SPED 6009 Characteristics of Students 

with Mild Disabilities 3 

-AND- 
SPED 6010 Methods of Teaching Students 
with Mild Disabilities 

- OR - 

[SPED 6014 Characteristics of Students 

with Severe Disabilities 3 

- AND - 
SPED 6015 Methods of Teaching Students 

with Severe Disabilities 3] 



3] 



Total Hours for the Degree 



36 



Students are expected to maintain an overall GPAof at least 3.0 across all courses attempted in the M.Ed, program. Students 
showing deficiencies in either academics or performance in field experiences may be placed on probation and/or remediation. 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 



197 



Any course in which a student earns a grade of D or F will need to be retaken. A graduate research project and portfolio are 
required for graduation and are components of the Capstone course (SPED 6205). In addition to meeting all requirements for 
graduation, the GACE II is required for certification. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING PROGRAMS 



EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 



Certification Requirements: 

SPED 4002 Instructional Strategies for Teaching Students 
with Disabilities in General Education Settings 3 

Successful completion of State Certification Exam 

Program Area 

EDTD 6364 Integrated Curriculum Models of Teaching 3 

EDTD 6491 Classroom Management Techniques and 3 

Strategies 
EDTD 6432 Multicultural Education 3 

EDTD 6120 Basic Instruction in Language Arts 3 

EDTD 6221 Best Practices in Language Arts 3 

EDTD 6228 Using Children's Literature in the Classroom 3 
EDTD 6251 Best Practices in Science Education 3 

EDTD 6231 Current Best Practices in Social Science 3 

Education 
MATH 5241 Numbers and Operations for Teachers 3 

MATH 5243 Algebra. Probability and Data Analysis 

for Teachers 
MATH 5242 Geometry and Measurement 3 

EDTD 6910 Education Practicum 6 

Total Hours for the Degree 39 



Master of Arts in Teaching 
Concentration in Early Childhood Education 



HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



Master of Arts in Teaching 
Concentration in Health and Physical Education 



Certification Requirements: 

SPED 4002 Instructional Strategies for Teaching Students 

with Disabilities in General Education Settings 3 

KNHS 3313 Teaching and Assessing Fitness 2 

KNHS 3321 Conducting Quality Programs 3 

Completion of State Certification Exam 

Certification Exam scores will be used to determine any additional prerequisites. 

Program Area 39 

EDTD 6364 Integrated Curriculum Models of Teaching 3 

EDTD 6432 Multicultural Education 3 

EDUC 6020 Foundations of Education 3 

KNHS 6411 Motor Learning 3 

KNHS 641 3 Advanced Measurement and Evaluation 3 

KNHS 6430 Advanced Health and Wellness 3 

KNHS 6333 Program Design and Development 3 
KNHS 6334 Methods of Presentation in Kinesiology and 

Health Science 3 

KNHS 6335 Seminar in Pedagogy and Teaching Methods 3 

KNHS 6339 Trends and Issues in KHS 3 

Elective (Advisor Approved) 3 

EDTD 6910 Practicum (600 Classroom Hours) 6 

Total Hours for the Degree 39 

Electives may be any graduate courses on campus. Successful Completion of Masters Portfolio Required. 



198 



Augusta State University Catalog 



MIDDLE GRADES EDUCATION 



Certification Requirements: 

SPED 4002 Instructional Strategies for Teaching Students 
with Disabilities in General Education Settings 3 

Successful completion of State Certification Exam. 
These scores will be used to determine content needs. 
If the State Certification Exam is passed, content is deemed 
to be satisfactory. Areas of content weakness 
will be addressed as prerequisites. 

Program Area 

EDTD 6364 Integrated Curriculum Models of Teaching 3 

EDTD 6120 Basic Instruction in Language Arts 3 

EDTD 6222 Current Best Practice in Literacy 3 

EDTD 6221 Best Practices in Language Arts 3 
EDTD 6491 Classroom Management Techniques and 

Strategies 3 

EDTD 6432 Multicultural Education 3 

EDUC 6020 Foundations of Education 3 

An Assessment Course EDTD 3 

Content Pedagogy EDTD 3 

Content Pedagogy EDTD 3 

Elective 3 

EDTD 6910 Education Practicum 6 



Master of Arts in Teaching 
Concentration in Middle Grades Education 



Total Hours for the Degree 



39 



SECONDARY EDUCATION 

Master of Arts in Teaching 
Concentration in Secondary Education 

Certification Requirements: 

SPED 4002 Instructional Strategies for Teaching Students 
with Disabilities in General Education Settings 3 

Completion of State Certification Exam. These scores will be used to determine content needs. If the State Certification 
Exam is passed, content is deemed to be satisfactory. Areas of content weakness will be addressed as prerequisites. 



Program Area 

EDTD 6364 Integrated Curriculum Models of Teaching 3 

EDTD 6491 Management 3 

EDTD 6432 Multicultural Education 3 

EDUC 6020 Foundations of Education 3 

A Reading Course EDTD 3 

An Assessment Course EDTD 3 

Content Pedagogy EDTD 3 

Electives 12 

EDTD 6910 Practicum 6 

Total Hours for the Degree 



39 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 



199 



SPECIAL EDUCATION 



Certification Requirements: 

SPED 4002 Instructional Strategies for Teaching Students 

with Disabilities in General Education Settings 3 

GACE Basic Skills exam and GAGE Content Exam 



Master of Arts in Teaching 
Concentration in Special Education 



Professional Core Courses 

EDUC 6140 Advanced Educational Psychology 3 

EDTD 6364 Integrated Curriculum Models of Teaching 3 

MATH 5241 Numbers and Operations for Teachers 3 

SPED 6013 internship in Special Education 6 

Special Education Core 

SPED 6001 Policies and Procedures in Special Education 3 
SPED 6003 Classroom Management and Applied 

Behavior Analysis 3 

SPED 6004 Facilitating Inclusive Instruction 3 
SPED 6006 Educational Assessment in Special Education 3 
SPED 6007 Literacy Fundamentals I for P-12 

or SPED 6008 Literacy Fundamentals 3 
SPED 6011 Language Development and 

Communication Disorders 3 



15 



18 



Special Education Concentration 

[SPED 6009 Characteristics of Students 
with Mild Disabilities 

-AND- 
SPED 6010 Methods of Teaching Students 
with Mild Disabilities 

- OR - 



3 
3] 



[SPED 6014 Characteristics of Students 

with Severe Disabilities 
-AND- 
SPED 6015 Methods of Teaching Students 

with Severe Disabilities 

Total hours for Degree 

Successful Completion of Master's Portfolio Required 



3 

3] 



39 



200 



Augusta State University Catalog 



MUSIC EDUCATION 



Prerequisites: 

SPED 4002 Instructional Strategies for Teaching Students 
with Disabilities in General Education Settings 



Master of Arts in Teaching: 
Concentration in Music Education 



Successful completion of State Certification Exann, These scores will be used to determine content needs. 

If the State Certification Exam is passed, content is deemed to be satisfactory. Areas of content weakness will be 

addressed as prerequisites as determined by the appropriate Pamplin College of Arts and Sciences department(s). 

Program Area 

EDTD 6364 Integrated Curriculum Models of Teaching 3 
EDTD 6491 Classroom Management Techniques and 

Strategies 3 

EDTD 6432 Multicultural Education 3 

EDTD 6224 Writing Across the Curriculum 3 

EDTD 6225 Reading Across the Curriculum 3 

An Assessment Course: EDTD 3 

MUSI 6413 3 

MUSI 6410 2 

MUSI 6411 or MUSI 6412 2 

Music Elective 1 

Music Elective 1 

Elective 3 

Elective 3 

EDTD 6910 Education Practicum 6 



Total Hours for the Degree 



39 



Electives may be any graduate courses on campus 
with the approval of the academic advisor. 

Successful Completion of Masters Porfolio Required. 




Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 



201 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

Master of Arts in Teaching: 
Concentration in Foreign Language 

Prerequisites: 

SPED 4002 Instructional Strategies for Teaching Students 
with Disabilities in General Education Settings 3 

Successful completion of State Certification Exam. These scores will be used to determine content needs. If the State 
Certification Exam is passed, content is deemed to be satisfactory. Areas of content weakness will be addressed as 
prerequisites as determined by the appropriate Pamplin College of Arts and Sciences department(s). 

Program Area 

EDTD 6364 Integrated Curriculum Models of Teaching 3 

EDTD 6491 Classroom Management Techniques and 

Strategies 3 

EDTD 6432 Multicultural Education 3 

EDTD 6224 Writing Across the Curriculum 3 

EDTD 6225 Reading Across the Curriculum 3 

EDUC 6020 Foundations of Education 3 

An Assessment Course: EDTD 3 

FREN/SPAN 6801 3 

FREN/SPAN 6802 3 

Elective 3 

Elective 3 

EDTD 6910 Education Practicum 6 



Total Hours for the Degree 



39 



Electives may be any graduate courses on campus 
with the approval of the academic advisor. 

Successful Completion of Masters Portfolio Required. 




202 



Augusta State University Catalog 



KINESIOLOGY 

Master of Science in Kinesiology 

The Masters of Science in Kinesiology (M.S.) degree provides the knowledge and experience to students who have a related 
degree (e.g. B.S. Ed. in Health and Physical Education, B.S. in exercise science, exercise physiology, health science, allied 
health, etc.) to enhance their professional expertise. Programs of study will be individualized but will emphasize physical 
activity and health/wellness topics at the advanced level, advanced level education courses for those with a background in 
HPE, and other areas of specialization based on their science or health background. The M.S. degree offers a thesis (oral 
exam) and non-thesis option (a comprehensive written and/or oral examination). 

The oral exam (Thesis option): Students selecting the thesis option will present their research and defend this to their 
committee as their final requirement for graduation. The student must have a minimum of three members on their committee; 
at least one must be from the kinesiology department. 

Written and/or Oral Exam (Non-thesis option): For students selecting the non-thesis option, they will have a Committee of 
three Faculty Members; two must be from the kinesiology department. The selection of the Committee Members will be 
based on matching expertise to the Emphasis of Study and the career objective of the student. Committee selection will also 
consider workload across the faculty. A four-hour block of time will be reserved for the written Comprehensive Exam. After 
completion of the exam, the Committee will deliberate about whether the responses to the exam questions satisfactorily 
demonstrate expertise to confer completion of the degree. Should the Committee determine it necessary, the student will 
be offered an oral exam which allows the student to more clearly answer questions the committee found to be insufficiently 
answered. 

The Comprehensive Exam will focus on global knowledge in Kinesiology as well as specific questions from coursework 
the committee feels reflect the expertise expected of the student given his/her overall program of study. The nature of 
the questions will be global and open ended, with an emphasis on application, critical thinking, and problem solving. The 
questions will be oriented to the student's career objective and graduate emphasis of study. The exam will be pass/fail in 
nature. After the exam, the Committee will debrief the candidate concerning areas of strength and weakness on the exam. 
In the event that a candidate fails the exam, the debriefing will clarify the area(s) of weakness that should be addressed by 
the student when preparing to repeat the Comprehensive Exam. If a candidate fails the exam (s)he must wait until the next 
semester to apply to take the Comprehensive Exam. 

Prerequisites: 

Typical Plan of Study: Following are two options for M.S. in Kinesiology students. Students may choose either the non- 
thesis or thesis option. Note that those students interested in pursuing a doctoral degree would benefit from the thesis option 
in preparation for their dissertation research. A research course similar to the ones listed with a lab would be appropriate 
as preparation to conducting a research study. Non-thesis option students do need to have a research course but will not 
be conducting research as part of their degree. NOTE: The specific research course depends upon the approval of the 
appropriate departments and scheduling of classes. 

1. Non-Thesis Option 

Research Core Requirement 3-4 

a. EDUC 6021 Intro to Ed Research 3 

OR 

b. PSYC6121 Research Methods 1 3 
AND 

PSYC 6921 Research Methods Lab I 1 

Program Area Requirements 18 

KNHS 6334 Methods of Presentation 3 

KNHS 6339 Trends & Issues in KHS 3 

KNHS 6411 Motor Learning 3 

KNHS 641 3 Adv. Measurement and Evaluation 3 

KNHS 6430 Advanced Health and Wellness 3 



Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 203 



KNHS 6431 Adv. Appl. of Nutrition in Health 

and Human Performance 



Select from the Following 

KNHS 6311 Advanced Behavioral Fitness 3 

KNHS 6312 Cardiovascular Response to Exercise 3 

KNHS 631 3 Prin. of Strength and Conditioning 3 
KNHS 6331 Org. and Admin, of Physical Education 

and Athletic Programs 3 

KNHS 6333 Program Design 3 

KNHS 6400 Internship in KHS 3 

KNHS 6412 Motor Development 3 

KNHS 6442 Applied Research Project 3 

KNHS 6950 Selected Topics (Varied) 3 

OR Any APPROVED electives 

designed to meet the career interests of the student. 

Total Hours for the degree: 



14-15 



36 



2. Thesis Option 

Research Core Requirement 

PSYC 6121 Research Methods I 
PSYC 6921 Research Methods Lab 



3 

1 



Program Area Requirements 

KNHS 6339 Trends & Issues in KHS 
KNHS 6411 Motor Learning 
KNHS 6413 Adv. Measurement and Evaluation 
KNHS 6431 Adv. Appl. Of Nutrition in Health 

and Human Performance 
KNHS 6990 Thesis Research 



15-18 



3 
3 
3 

3 
3-6 



Select from the Following 

PSYC 6122 Research Methods II 3 

PSYC 6922 Research Methods Lab II 1 

KNHS 6311 Advanced Behavioral Fitness 3 

KNHS 6312 Cardiovascular Response to Exercise 3 

KNHS 6313 Prin. of Strength and Conditioning 3 
KNHS 6331 Org. and Admin, of Physical Education 

and Athletic Programs 3 

KNHS 6333 Program Design 3 

KNHS 6334 Methods of Presentation 3 

KNHS 6400 Internship in KHS 3 

KNHS 641 2 Motor Development 3 

KNHS 6430 Advanced Health and Wellness 3 

KNHS 6442 Applied Research Project 3 

KNHS 6950 Selected Topics (Varied) 3 

OR Any APPROVED electives 

designed to meet the career interests of the student. 



14-17 



Total Hours for the degree: 



36 



NOTE: Classes for this degree were still being determined at the time of publication of this catalog. Please 
contact the department to verify the course options, or see the draft version of the 2011-2012 Catalog for updates. 



204 



Augusta State University Catalog 



EDUCATION SPECIALIST PROGRAMS 



TEACHING AND LEARNING 



Education Specialist 
in Teaching and Learning - General Track 



Leadership Core 9 

EDUC 7001 Education Specialist Seminar I 3 

EDUC 7002 Education Specialist Seminar II 3 

EDUC 7003 Education Specialist Seminar III 3 

Content Concentration 12 

EDTD 7160 Curriculum Design and Program Assessment 3 

EDTD 7162 Advanced Topics in English Education 3 

EDTD 7163 Advanced Topics in Social Sciences Education 3 

EDTD 7164 Advanced Topics in Science Education 3 

EDTD 7165 Advanced Topics in Mathematics Education 3 

EDTD 7210 Issues and Trends in Middle Level Educ. 3 

EDTD 7221 Authentic Literacy Assessment 3 

EDTD 7222 Engaging Students in Literacy 3 

EDUC 7021 Conducting Educational Research 3 

EDTD 7909 Thesis I 3 

EDTD 7910 Thesis II 3 
EDTD 6000 Level Courses with Advisor Approval 

Electives - Selected with Graduate Advisor 9 

Total Hours for the Degree 30 



Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 205 



TEACHING AND LEARNING 

Education Specialist 
in Teaching and Learning - Secondary English Education Track 



Leadership Core 9 

EDUC 7001 Education Specialist Seminar I 3 

EDUC 7002 Education Specialist Seminar II 3 
EDUC 7003 Education Specialist Seminar 111 ' 3 

Education Concentration 12 

* EDTD 7160 Curriculum Design and Program Assessment 3 

* EDTD 7162 Advanced Topics in English Education 3 
EDTD 7163 Advanced Topics in Social Sciences Education 3 
EDTD 7164 Advanced Topics in Science Education 3 
EDTD 7165 Advanced Topics in Mathematics Education 3 
EDTD 7210 Issues and Trends in Middle Level Educ. 3 
EDTD 7221 Authentic Literacy Assessment 3 
EDTD 7222 Engaging Students in Literacy 3 
EDUC 7021 Conducting Educational Research 3 
EDTD 7909 Thesis 1 3 
EDTD 7910 Thesis II 3 
EDTD 6000 Level Courses with Advisor Approval 

Graduate English Courses in Arts and Sciences 9 

Selected with Graduate Advisor 

Total Hours for the Degree 30 

* = required courses 



'^^^ Augusta State University Catalog 



TEACHING AND LEARNING 



in Teaching and Learning 



Education Specialist 
Secondary Mathennatics Education Track 



Leadership Core 9 

EDUC 7001 Education Specialist Seminar I 3 

EDUC 7002 Education Specialist Seminar II 3 

EDUC 7003 Education Specialist Seminar III 3 

Content Concentration 12 

' EDTD 7160 Curriculum Design and Program Assessment 3 

EDTD 71 62 Advanced Topics in English Education 3 

EDTD 7163 Advanced Topics in Social Sciences Education 3 

EDTD 71 64 Advanced Topics in Science Education 3 

* EDTD 7165 Advanced Topics in Mathematics Education 3 

EDTD 7210 Issues and Trends in Middle Level Educ. 3 

EDTD 7221 Authentic Literacy Assessment 3 

EDTD 7222 Engaging Students in Literacy 3 

EDUC 7021 Conducting Educational Research 3 

EDTD 7909 Thesis I 3 

EDTD 7910 Thesis II 3 
EDTD 6000 Level Courses with Advisor Approval 

Graduate Mathematics Courses in Arts and Sciences 9 

Selected with Graduate Advisor 



Total Hours for the Degree 
* = required courses 



30 



EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP 



Courses in the Performance-based Ed.S. program 

EDLR 7110 Supervision for Teacher Support Specialist 3 

EDLR 71 20 Internship for Teacher Support Specialist 3 

EDLR 7351 Internship I 1 

EDLR 7352 Internship II 1 

EDLR 7353 Internship III 1 

EDLR 7450 Public School Finance 3 

EDLR 7460 Leadership Styles 3 

EDLR 7470 School Facilities 3 

EDLR 7500 Organizational Development in Education 3 

EDLR 7570 Ethics and Issues in Educational Leadership 3 

EDUC 7021 Conducting Education Research 3 

Required Elective (advisor approved) 3 

Total Hours for the Degree 



Educational Specialist 
with a Major in Educational Leadership 



30 



Successful completion of EDLR 7110 and EDLR 7120 leads to a Teacher Support Specialist Endorsement (Georgia 
Certificate). 

All students must be advised prior to registering for any course in Educational Leadership. Students who seek a PL-6 Georgia 
certificate must first pass the GACE and complete the requirements for a Georgia NL-5 or PNL-5 certificate. The student is 
directed to the Georgia Professional Standards Commission's web site www.gapsc.com for all leadership certification rules 
and updates. 



Augusta State University Catalog 



2010-2011 



207 



EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP 

Educational Specialist 
with a Major in Educational Leadership (Extended Performance-based Program) 



Ed.S. Prerequisites 

EDLR 6400 Fundamentals of School Leadership 3 

EDLR 6410 Educational Personnel Administration 3 

EDLR 6420 Educational Business Administration 3 

EDLR 6430 School Law ' 3 
EDLR 6500 Curriculum Development for Educational 

Leaders 3 
EDLR 6550 Instructional Supervision for Educational 

Leaders 3 

EDLR 6900 Practicum I 1 

EDLR 6901 Practicum II 1 

EDLR 6902 Practicum III 1 

Total Hours for the Prerequisites 21 

Courses in the Ed.S. program 

EDLR 7110 Supervision for Teacher Support Specialist 3 

EDLR 71 20 Internship for Teacher Support Specialist 3 

EDLR 7351 Internship I 1 

EDLR 7352 Internship II 1 

EDLR 7353 Internship III 1 

EDLR 7450 Public School Finance 3 

EDLR 7460 Leadership Styles 3 

EDLR 7470 School Facilities 3 

EDLR 7500 Organizational Development in Education 3 

EDLR 7570 Ethics and Issues in Educational Leadership 3 

EDUC 7021 Conducting Education Research 3 

Total Hours for the Degree ■ 27 

Successful completion of EDLR 7110 and EDLR 7120 leads to a Teacher Support Specialist Endorsement (Georgia 
Certificate). 

All students must be advised prior to registering for any course in Educational Leadership. Students who seek a PL-6 Georgia 
certificate must first pass the GACE and complete the requirements for a Georgia NL-5 or PNL-5 certificate. The student is 
directed to the Georgia Professional Standards Commission's web site viww.gapsc.com for all leadership certification rules 
and updates. 



Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
^*-'° Augusta State University Catalog 





Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=varlable. 
Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 



209 



ENDORSEMENT PROGRAMS 



GIFTED EDUCATION 

Certification as teacher of gifted students requires 12 semester hours of graduate work. Students take: 
EDUC 6040 Tests and Measurement for Educational 

Leaders 3 

EDUC 6271 Identifying Outstanding Talents 3 

and Potentials in Students 
EDUC 6272 Developing Outstanding Talents 3 

and Potentials in Students 
EDUC 6273 Curriculum and Program Design 3 

for Developing Talents 

TEACHER SUPPORT SPECIALIST 

Graduate course sequence for adding Teacher Support Specialist endorsement: 
EDLR 7110 Supervision for Teacher Support Specialist 3 

EDLR 7210 Internship for Teacher Support Specialist 3 

READING ENDORSEMENT 

In order to add the Reading Endorsement, the student must hold initial certification in a teaching field. The required graduate 
courses for the Reading Endorsement are: 

EDTD 6120 Basic Instruction in Literacy 3 

EDTD 6222 Current Best Practices in Literacy 3 

EDTD 6223 Applications of Effective Reading Strategies 3 



Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
^ ' ^ Augusta State University Catalog 



James M. Hull 
College of Business 



MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION PROGRAM 

The objective of the Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree program is to provide advanced business education, 
beyond the baccalaureate level, to prepare students to assume responsible management and professional positions in private 
and public organizations. The curriculum has been designed to provide breadth of exposure to business administration 
disciplines rather than specialization in any single discipline. In addition to the regular MBA curriculum, foundation courses have 
been developed to accommodate students whose previous academic degrees are not in the field of business administration. 
To accommodate students who also have part-time or full-time careers, all MBA courses currently are taught in the evening. 

Students who enter the MBA program with a bachelor of business administration degree and have undergraduate grades of 
C or better in foundation courses usually will be able to complete the MBA program with 30 semester hours (10 courses) of 
required course work plus six semester hours of electives. Students who must take some or all of the foundation courses 
may require up to 54 semester hours of course work, including the foundation courses. Specific course requirements for each 
student are determined by the student's previous academic experiences and are approved by the Director of Graduate Studies. 

Up to nine semester hours (three courses) of required or elective MBA course work, with grades of B or higher, may be 
transferred from other accredited graduate programs with approval of the Director. Basic computer literacy (word processing, 
spreadsheet software) is required of all entering MBAgraduate students and may be acquired through formal academic courses, 
on-the-job experience, or self study. 

Only students enrolled in the MBA program may register for or attend MBA graduate courses. 

Application Requirements 

Items to be submitted by Master of Business Administration (MBA) applicants are: 

1 . Application for Graduate Study. 

2. Fee of $30.00, check or money order. 

3. One official transcript from each baccalaureate program previously attended at a regionally accredited college or 
university. 

4. Official scores on the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT). 

Admission Criteria for the MBA Program 

Admission to the MBA program is based upon an applicant's successful completion of at least a baccalaureate degree from a 
regionally-accredited college or university and a combination of a satisfactory undergraduate grade point average (GPA) and 
an acceptable score on the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) administered by the Educational Testing Service. 
These two scores are combined into an eligibility index, defined as: (200 x GPA + GMAT score). An eligibility index is used 
widely by business schools in the United States. 

The requirement for admission as a regular MBA student is an eligibility index of 1,000 (using the overall undergraduate GPA 
from all undergraduate programs) or 1,050 (using the undergraduate GPA from the last 60 semester hours or 90 quarter hours 
of the most-recently-completed baccalaureate degree program). In either case, the absolute minimum acceptable GMAT score 
is 450. 

Graduate Admissions Appeals 

Students who are not accepted for regular admission to the graduate program in business administration and who believe that 
there are extenuating circumstances that affect their eligibility may write a letter of appeal to the Director of Graduate Studies. 
James M. Hull College of Business. The appeal will be heard by the Graduate Admissions Appeals Committee which consists 
of representative faculty of the James M. Hull College of Business. 

Academic Standing 

A GPA of at least 3.00 is required for graduation and to remain in good academic standing in the MBA program. In addition, 
degree candidates may not have earned more than six semester hours (two courses) in 6000-level MBA required and elective 
courses with a grade of C. Grades below C will not be accepted for MBA course work. If a course is repeated, only the most 
recent grade earned will be included in the institutional GPA calculation used to determine an MBA student's academic status 
and satisfaction of graduation requirements. 

Academic Probation/Suspension 

At the end of any academic term in which an MBA student's institutional GPA falls below 3.00, the student will be placed on 
academic probation. A student on academic probation 1 ) may not enroll for more than two MBA required or elective courses per 
term and 2) must raise the institutional GPA to at least 3,00 within the next nine semesters hours (three courses) of graduate 
course work to remain in the MBA program. An MBA student on academic probation who does not raise the institutional GPA 
to at least 3.00 within nine semester hours may not continue in the MBA program or register for additional MBA courses for a 

Example; (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture. hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 211 



period of at least one calendar year. The student may not transfer credit for MBA courses from any other institution while on 
academic probation at Augusta State University. 

Reinstatement 

A student who wishes to apply for reinstatement after having been dismissed must write a letter to the MBA program director 
requesting reinstatement as an MBA student. The letter should describe the student's rationale and approach for improving 
academic performance if reinstated. 

If accepted for reinstatement, the returning student may enroll for a maximum of two MBA required or elective courses per term 
until the student's institutional GPA has reached at least 3.00. If the reinstated student has not achieved an institutional GPA 
of at least 3.00 within the first nine semester hours (three courses) of 6000-level MBA course work following reinstatement, the 
student will not be eligible to continue in the MBA program. 

Upon being dismissed for the second time, a student would not be eligible to reapply for readmission to the MBA program for 
a period of at least six calendar years. At that time, the student would become a new applicant and would have to meet all 
admission requirements in effect at the time. No credit for any previous MBA course work at ASU and no transfer credit from 
other programs would be granted and the student would have to begin the MBA program as a "new" MBA student. 

Time Limitation 

All requirements for the MBA degree must be completed within six consecutive years, beginning with the student's enrollment 
in the first 6000-level course. 

GIMAT 

The Graduate Management Admission Test is a standardized examination administered by the Educational Testing Service. 
The test is a computer-adaptive test and is offered throughout the year at computer-based testing centers throughout the 
country. The test does not attempt to measure specific knowledge obtained in college course work or achievement in any 
particular subject area. It does cover basic mathematical skills and the ability to reason quantitatively as well as reading 
comprehension and writing ability. Persons who take the test should request that their scores be reported to the James M. Hull 
College of Business at Augusta State University. The test must be taken and scores must be reported before the deadline for 
applications for a particular semester. The application deadline for each semester may be obtained from the graduate office in 
the James M. Hull College of Business. 

Applications to take the GMAT and more detailed information may be obtained from the graduate studies office in the College 
or by writing to: Pearson VUE, Attention: GMAT Program, 5601 Green Valley Drive, Suite 220, Bloomington, MN 55437. You 
may schedule your test appointment online at www.mba.com. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION IVIaster of Business Administration 

MBA Foundation Courses 18 

ACCT 4999 Financial Accounting for Managerial Control 
ECON 4999 Economic Concepts 
FINC 3400 Corporate Finance 
MATH 3110 Statistical Analysis for Business 

or MATH 2210 Elementary Statistics 
MGMT 3500 Management Theory and Practice 
MKTG 3700 Principles of Marketing 

Required MBA Core Courses 30 

ACCT 6300 Accounting Systems for Managerial Control 
ECON 6800 National and International Economics for Managers 
FINC 6400 Managerial Finance 
MGMT 6510 Societal Issues in Business Decisions 
MGMT 6520 Management of Human Resources 
MGMT 6580 Strategic Management 
MINF 6620 Management of Information Technology 
MKTG 6700 Marketing Management 
QUAN 6600 Applied Business Research 
QUAN 6610 Designing, Managing, and Improving Operations 

Elective MBA Course 6 

Total Hours for the Degree 36 



Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
^^ ^ Augusta State University Catalog 



Graduate and Underqraduate 
Course Descripiions 



This section is arranged alphabetically by subject designator and sequentially by course nunnber. The three numbers in 
parentheses after each course title give the number of hours of lecture, the number of hours of laboratory, and the number of 
credit hours the course carries. The letter V means that hours are variable. 

Some course descriptions include information about the semester w/hen they will be offered, but Augusta State University reserves 
the right to make changes in the course schedule and to cancel any section Vi/here enrollment is considered insufficient. 

Subject designators for courses offered by the university's three colleges are as follows; 



Katharine Wl. Pamplin College of Arts and Sciences 

AIST Applied Information Systems and Technologies 

ANTH Anthropology 

ART Art 

ASTR Astronomy 

ASUO Orientation 

BIOL Biology 

CHEM Chemistry 

COMC Communication 

COMD Drama 

COMJ Journalism 

COMP Public Relations 

COMS Communication Studies 

COMT Telecommunications 

COMW Professional Writing 

COOP Cooperative Education 

CRJU Criminal Justice 

CSCI Computer Science 

CSIA Computer Science information Assurance - See AIST 

ENGL English 

FREN French 

GEOG Geography 

GEOL Geology 

GRMN German 

HIST History 

HONR Honors 

HUMN Humanities 

ISC! Integrated Science 

ILIT Information Literacy 

LATN Latin 

MATH Mathematics 

MILS Military Science 

MUSA Applied Music 

MUSI Music 

NURS Nursing 

PADM Public Administration 

PHIL Philosophy 

PHSC Physical Science 

PHYS Physics 

POLS Political Science 

PSYC Psychology 

READ Developmental Reading 

RGTR Regents' Test 

SABR Studies Abroad 

SOCI Sociology 

SOWK Social Work 

SPAN Spanish 

WMST Women's Studies 



James M. Hull College of Business 



ACCT Accounting 

ECON Economics 

BUSA Business Administration 

FINC Finance 

MGMT Management 

MINF Management Information 

MKTG Marketing 

QUAN Management Science 



College of Education 

COUN Counseling 

ECED Early Childhood 

EDLR Educational Leadership 

EDTD Teacher Education 

EDUC College of Education Core 

KNHS Kinesiology and Health Sciences 

MGED Middle Grades Education 

SCED Secondary Education 

SPED Special Education 

WELL Wellness 



Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 



213 



ACCT -Accounting Courses 

Note: in order to enroll in any ACCT course numbered 3000-4950, a student must be accepted into the James M. Hull 
College of Business (see p. 167) and meet the listed prerequisites for the class. 

ACCT 2101 Principles of Accounting I (3-0-3) 

This is an introductory course in financial accounting. The focus is on accounting as a system for reporting business activity. 
It includes study of the accounting cycle, the preparation and interpretation of basic financial statements, and the study of 
fundamental accounting principles. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1101 or I^ATIH 1111 witti a grade of C or better 

ACCT 2102 ' Principles of Accounting II (3-0-3) 

This is an introductory course in managerial accounting. The focus is on accounting as a system for providing information 
for organizational management. It includes the study of budgeting, cost-volume-profit analysis, and information for decision 
making. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 2101 and MINF 2201 with a grade of C or better in each course. 

ACCT 3311 Financial Accounting Theory I (3-0-3) 

The primary emphasis of the course is to provide the student with a thorough understanding of financial accounting theory as 
it applies to preparation of financial statements. The course includes a review of theoretical financial accounting concepts, 
present value, financial statements, and the analysis of asset accounts. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 2101and 2102 with a grade of 
B or better in each course and completion of 50 semester hours. 

ACCT 3312 Financial Accounting Theory II (3-0-3) 

The primary emphasis of the course is on financial accounting theory as it relates to basic problem areas in financial reporting 
including liabilities, stockholders' equity, investments, leases, pensions, revenue recognition, earnings per share, and income 
taxes. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 3311 with a grade of C or better 

ACCT 3321 Cost Accounting (3-0-3) 

This is a basic course in cost accounting for manufacturing and non-manufacturing sectors. The emphasis is on the development 
of cost systems for organizational planning and control. The course includes study of such areas as analysis of variances; 
determination of overhead rates; job order and process cost product costing; and capital, operating and financial budgets. 
Prerequisite(s): ACCT 2102 with a grade of B or better and completion of 50 semester hours. 

ACCT 3331 Federal Income Taxation (3-0-3) 

This course is a survey of theories and practices governing federal income taxation of individuals and business entities, 
including partnerships and corporations. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 2101 and ACCT 2102 with a grade ofB or better in each course 
and completion of 50 semester hours. 

ACCT 4322 Cost Management (3-0-3) 

This course provides the student with an in-depth analysis of managerial-cost concepts and techniques required for developing, 
analyzing, and interpreting information for organizational planning and control. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 3321 with a grade of C 
or better 

ACCT 4332 Advanced Federal Income Taxation (3-0-3) 

This course presents an overview of federal tax law for corporations, partnerships, estates, and trusts, with an emphasis on tax 
research. Prerequisite(s). ACCT 3331 with a grade of C or better 

ACCT 4350 Accounting Information Systems (3-0-3) 

The course introduces students to the design and operation of accounting information systems as affected by information 
theory, computer and behavioral concepts. This includes a study of internal controls in the design and analysis of systems. 
EDP audit concepts and techniques are considered. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 3311 and MINF 2201, both with a grade of C or 
better 

ACCT 4360 Auditing (3-0-3) 

This course provides basic coverage of financial statement audits and related attest, assurance and other services performed 
by certified public accountants. The emphasis is on audits of financial statements, including auditing standards and procedures 
as well as the auditor's professional responsibilities. The course also covers the use of analytical skills, the study and testing of 
internal controls, evidence accumulation and evaluation techniques, forensic accounting topics, and the ethical responsibilities 
of certified public accountants. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 3312 with a grade of C or better 

ACCT 4370 Advanced Accounting (3-0-3) 

The emphasis of this course is on the application of accounting theory to business combinations and international operations. 
Prerequisite(s): ACCT 3312 with a grade of C or better 



Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
^ ''* Augusta State University Catalog 



ACCT 4380 Governmental and Institutional Accounting (3-0-3) 

The emphasis of this course is on accounting for state and local governments. The accounting requirements and processes for 
hospitals, universities, and other not-for-profit organizations are also examined. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 2101 and ACCT 2102 
with a grade of B or better in each course and completion of 60 semester hours. 

ACCT 4620 Spreadsheet Modeling and Decision Analysis (3-0-3) 

Will use visual techniques to understand, document, and communicate business models and then apply information technology 
to the modeling process for business decisions in accounting, management, operations, finance, and marketing. Prerequisite(s): 
50 semester hours, including C's or better in MATH 3110 and also in 12 hours of BBA Core Area F including MINF 2201. 

ACCT 4950 Selected Topics in Accounting (3-0-3) 

This is a course and/or directed study of a major issue, practice, or problem in the area of accounting. Content is to be 
decided based on needs and professional objectives of students and the expertise and availability of faculty. Prerequisite(s): 
Permission of advisor to use in the major area and senior standing. 

ACCT 4999 Financial and Managerial Accounting Concepts (3-0-3) 

This course provides students w/ith an understanding of basic financial accounting terminology, processes, and statements; 
the ability to analyze financial statements; an understanding of managerial accounting terminology and techniques such as 
process costing, standard costing, and cost-volume-profit analysis. Prerequisite(s): Graduate (MBA) or Post Baccalaureate 
student status. 

ACCT 6300 Accounting for Managers (3-0-3) 

This is a case-oriented course designed to teach the effective use of accounting systems and accounting data in organizational 
planning, control and decision making. The focus is on how to use measurement and management systems for value creation 
in a business organization. Prerequisite(s): Graduate (MBA) student status and ACCT 4999 and FINC 3400 or equivalents. 

ACCT 6322 Cost Management (3-0-3) 

This course consists of analyzing cases on actual companies to provide the student with an in-depth analysis of managerial- 
cost concepts and techniques required for developing, analyzing, and interpreting information for organizational planning and 
control. Each student will have to prepare a paper comparing the cost structure of two companies from the same industry selected 
by the instructor. Students who have successfully completed ACCT 4322 may not take this course for credit. Prerequisite(s): 
Graduate (MBA) or Post Baccalaureate student status and ACCT 3321 with a grade of C or better 

ACCT 6332 Advanced Federal Income Taxation (3-0-3) 

This course presents an overview of federal tax law for corporations, partnerships, estates, and trusts, with an emphasis on tax 
research. The course also includes a corporate tax return project. Students who have successfully completed ACCT 4332 may 
not take this course for credit.. Prerequisite(s): Graduate (MBA) or Post Baccalaureate student status and ACCT 3331 with a 
grade of C or better 

ACCT 6370 Advanced Accounting (3-0-3) 

The emphasis of this course is on the application of accounting theory to business combinations and international operations. 
Partnership accounting will also be examined. This course also includes a term project on accounting for international operations. 
Students who have successfully completed ACCT 4370 may not take this course for credit. Prerequislte(s): Graduate (MBA) or 
Post Baccalaureate student status and ACCT 3312 with a grade of C or better 

ACCT 6380 Governmental and Institutional Accounting (3-0-3) 

The emphasis of this course is on accounting for state and local governments. The accounting requirements and processes for 
hospitals, universities, and other not-for-profit organizations are also examined. This course also includes a paper comparing 
not-for-profit organizations within the same industry. Students who have successfully completed ACCT 4380 may not take this 
course for credit. Prerequisite(s): Graduate (MBA) or Post Baccalaureate student status and ACCT 2101 and ACCT 2102 with 
a grade of B or better in each course. 

ACCT 6950 Selected Topics in Accounting (3-0-3) 

This is a variable content course individually designed to meet the needs, interests, and professional objectives in business 
administration. Prerequisite(s): Graduate (MBA) student status and ACCT 4999 or equivalent. 

AIST -Applied Information Systems and Tecfinoiogies 

AIST 2220 Introduction to Web Development (3-0-3) 

Students will be exposed to appropriate format and page layout, adding and manipulating visuals, images, and rich media, 
creating a navigation scheme and linking together multiple pages and sites, creating basic forms, building interactive features, 
and publishing/maintaining web sites. Prerequisite(s): none. 



Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 215 



AIST 2320 Introduction to Computer Networking (3-0-3) 

Introduces networking technology to include networking standards, networking media, networking hardware, access methods, 
network operating systems, TCP/IP basics, network security and the fundamentals of local area network and wide area network 
technologies. Prerequisite(s): CSC! 1200, CSC! 1210, CSC! 1301, or CSC! 2120. 

AIST 2330 System Administration (3-0-3) 

A basic study of the UNIX and Windows operating systems geared towards the operating system user, future system 
administrator, and security officer. Topics include listing, finding, displaying and printing files; system security; command- 
line editing; handling backups, system resources, and file permissions; script programming; and other administrative tasks. 
Prerequisite(s): CSCI 1200, CSCI 1210, CSC1 1301, CSCI 2120 or permission of instructor 

AIST 2950 Special Topics in Applied Information Systems & Technologies (3-0-3) 

A course or directed study in applied information systems and technologies. Content to be decided based upon instructor 
expertise and student interest. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor 

AIST 3410 Database Management Systems (3-0-3) 

Designing, developing, and maintaining database resources is treated, emphasizing application of established database 
development tools within a structured development method. Prerequisite(s): MINF 3650 or CSCI 2120 or equivalent. 

AIST 3520 Principles of Information Security and Assurance (3-0-3) 

Overview of information security practices and needs. Topics include information security, types of attacks, risk analysis and 
management, security technologies, and basic information security implementation. Prerequisite(s): CSCI 2700 and either 
AIST 2320 or MINF 3614, or permission of instructor 

AIST 3531 Introduction to Network Security (3-0-3) 

Overview of network security activities and techniques. Heavy use of information security tools will be demonstrated and 
practiced. Prerequisite(s): AIST 2320, AIST 2330, and AIST 3520, or permission of instructor 

AIST 3532 Network Defense and CounterMeasures (3-0-3) 

Emphasis placed on understanding the tools and devices used to secure a computer network (i.e., firewall, IDS, IPS). Course 
includes hands-on labs where techniques and procedures are displayed and tested. Prerequisite(s): AIST 3531 or permission 
of instructor 

AIST 3541 Digital Forensics (3-0-3) 

Overview of information security forensics activities. Topics include digital forensics investigative basics, techniques, and digital 
forensics examination criteria. Course includes hands-on lab activities where techniques and procedures are displayed and 
tested. Prerequisite(s): AIST 3520 or permission of instructor 

AIST 3610 System Analysis and Design (3-0-3) 

Introduces students to modern approaches for analyzing and designing information systems. Prerequisite(s): 50 semester 
hours and C or better in MINF 2201 or CSCI 21 20 or equivalent. 

AIST 4950 Special Topics in Applied Information Systems & Technologies (3-0-3) 

A course or directed study in applied information systems and technologies. Content to be decided based upon instructor 
expertise and student interest. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor 

AIST 4960 Applied Information Systems & Technologies Internship (0-0-V) 

An applied professional learning experience in applied information systems and technologies emphasizing faculty oversight of 
a directed work experience. Prerequisite(s): Permission of AIST curriculum committee. 

ANTH - Anthropology Courses 

ANTH 1 1 02 Introductory Anthropology (3-0-3) 

A general survey of the biological and cultural origins and development of human beings and their societies. Based on 
archaeology, biological anthropology, cultural anthropology, and linguistics, this course emphasizes human adaptation through 
biological and cultural evolution. 

ANTH 201 1 Cultural Anthropology (3-0-3) 

Emphasizes and illustrates the role of culture as a major systematic determinant of human behavior and social life. Examines 
examples from both modern and traditional societies. 



Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
^'^ Augusta State University Catalog 



ANTH 3271/5271 History and Culture of India (3-0-3) 

Indian history and culture from Indus Valley civilization to modern times including topics such as religions, philosophy, art, 
architecture, society, and family. Prerequisite(i>): ANTH 1102 or ANTH 2011 or HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 or permission of 
instructor. 

ANTH 3411/5411 Indians of North America (3-0-3) 

Origins and cultures of native peoples of America north of Mexico. Discusses impact of arrival of Europeans in North America, 
Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1102 or ANTH 2011 orHIST2111 or permission of instructor. 

ANTH 3817 African Comparative Cultural Issues (3-0-3) 

This course seeks to introduce students to an understanding of Africa that reaches beyond the sound bites and stereotypes 
of the evening news as well as presents the diversity among African cultures. Students will explore both northern and sub- 
Saharan Africa. The course will consider the impact of colonialism on the formation of contemporary Africa's geographic political, 
economic, social and religious landscapes. Students will debate such topics as the relevance of circumcision, polygyny, sexual 
education, and religious syncretism. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1102 or ANTH 2011. 

ANTH 3831/5831 Archaeology (3-0-3) 

Examines theories, methods, and techniques used by modern archaeologists in an integrated scientific approach to investigate 
and understand historic and prehistoric cultures. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1102 or ANTH 2011 or permission of instructor. 

ANTH 3841/5841 Biophysical Anthropology (3-0-3) 

Study of integrated biological and cultural adaptation of human beings. Topics include modern synthetic theory of evolution, 
fossil record, geochronology, nonhuman primates, and human variation. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1102 or permission of instructor. 

ANTH 3851/5851 Religion. Culture, and Society (3-0-3) 

The nature, role, and functions of religious belief and behavior in human society. Examines the range of religious practices 
including ritual, myth, symbolism, shamanism, cults, witchcraft, magic, religious drug use, healing, and others. Prerequisite(s): 
ANTH 1102 or ANTH 2011 or permission of instructor. 

ANTH 3871/5871A/VMST 3871 Sex, Gender and Culture (3-0-3) 

Information from biophysical anthropology, archaeology, linguistics, and cultural studies is combined in a cross-cultural, 
evolutionary approach to examine sex and gender roles. Prerequisite: WMST 1101. ANTH 1102 or ANTH 2011 or permission 
of instructor. 

ANTH 4217 Travelers. Migrants, and Refugees (3-0-3) 

The purpose of this course is to explore the movement of people and the impact of that movement on home and globalization. 
The course will discuss the meaning of home and the reasons why people travel. Each motivation affects peoples perceptions 
of their destination and their attachments to home. These issues are global issues as well as localized (e.g.. rural to urban). 
Students will discuss issues such as the impact of war, HIV/AIDS, political and religious policies, tourism, religious missions, 
fieldwork, etc. on people's movement. The course will consider how globalization and movement impacts identity and inter- and 
intra-group dynamics. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1102 or ANTH 2011. 

ANTH 4861/6861 World Ethnology (3-0-3) 

Examines historical, economic, political, and social forces that have converged to produce a worldwide political and economic 
system. This approach stresses the linkages between Western development and Third World underdevelopment. Prerequisite(s): 
ANTH 1102 or ANTH 2011 or permission of instructor. 

ANTH 4950/6950 Selected Topics (V. 1-3) 

A variable content, variable credit course intended to meet the needs of students minoring in anthropology. Offered by special 
arrangement. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1102 or ANTH 2011 or permission of instructor. 

ANTH 4990 Undergraduate Research (V, 1-3) 

A variable content, variable credit course offered by special arrangement and intended to meet the needs of anthropology 
minors. Students will carry out supervised independent research in a selected area of anthropology. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 
1102 or ANTH 2011 or permission of instructor. 

ART - Art Courses 

ART 1 000 Ceramics I for non-art majors (3-V-3) 

Fundamentals of working with clay as an art form, including vessels, sculpture, and pottery. Introduction to glazing 
techniques. 



Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 217 



ART 1001 Oil Painting for non-art majors (3-V-3) 

Experiences involving basic use of color and oil painting techniques. Life model may be used. 

ART 1 002 Photography I for non-art majors (3-V-3) 

An introduction to the processes and materials of black and white photography, as well as understanding photography as an 
art medium, gaining a working knowledge of the camera and darkroom equipment. 

ART 1 003 Watercolor for non-art majors (3-V-3) 

Applied basic and experimental techniques with opaque and transparent watercolor media. Life model may be used. 

ART 1211 Visual Arts I: Drawing and Design (3-V-3) 

Visual Arts I is an introduction to compositional fundamentals examined through the act of drawing. The course is designed to 
provide essential visual and verbal skills in preparation for upper-division study in studio art. 

ART 1 520 Visual Arts Freshman Studio Seminar (3-V-3) 

Visual Arts Freshman Studio Seminar synthesizes course content from Art 1211 (Visual Art I: Drawing and Design) and Art 
1530 (Visual Arts II: Sculpture and Design) regarding elements and principles of two and three-dimensional art. The course is 
designed to provide art students with essential visual, verbal, and written skills in preparation for upper-division study in studio 
art. Prerequisites/corequisites: Art 1530 or Art 1211. 

ART 1530 Visual Arts II: Sculpture and Design (3-V-3) 

Visual Arts II is an introduction to compositional fundamentals examined through the act of sculpting. The course is designed 
to provide essential visual and verbal skills in preparation for upper-division study in studio art. 

ART 2100 Art Education, K-8: Teaching (2-0-2) 

Teaching methodology and projects for teaching art in the elementary school classroom. Prerequisite(s): None 

ART 2212 Drawing II (3-V-3) 

Continuation and expansion of skills taught in Drawing I. Life models, nude and occasionally costumed, often will be used and 
are a required part of the course. Prerequisite(s): ART 1211, ART 1520, and ART 1530 or permission of instructor. 

ART 2541 Graphic Design I (3-V-3) 

Introduction to hand lettering with emphasis on forming, spacing, and visual organization. Prerequisite(s): ART 1520 or 
permission of the instructor. 

ART 261 1 Art History I (3-V-3) 

The study of artworks from major world cultures, especially Western, with stress on the premodern. Prerequisite(s): None 

ART 2612 Art History II (3-V-3) 

The study of artworks from major world cultures, especially Western, with stress on modern and contemporary developments. 
Prerequisite(s): ART 2611. 

ART 3000 Humanities Studio Experience (3-V-3) 

The course is designed for the non-art major student desiring a studio experience. Media choice and class time must be 
arranged with the individual instructor Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor 

ART 31 00 Art Education, Secondary School (3-V-3) 

An exploration of art education theories and projects using methods and materials adaptable for classroom instruction. 
Prerequisite(s): ART 1520, ART 1530, and ART 1211; or permission of instructor 

ART 321 3 Drawing III: Figure Drawing (3-V-3) 

Applied studies in drawing with particular attention to articulation of the figure, using life models. Particular attention to anatomy 
understanding and expressive interpretation of the human figure. Life models (nudes and occasionally costumed) often will be 
used and are a required part of the course. Prerequisite(s): ART 2212 or permission of instructor 

ART 3221 Painting I (3-V-3) 

Experiences involving basic use of color and oil painting techniques. Life model may be used. Prerequisite(s): ART 1520, 
ART 1530, and ART 1211; or permission of the instructor 

ART 3222 Painting II (3-V-3) 

Further problems in color, composition, and techniques. Life models (nudes and occasionally costumed) often will be used and 
are a required part of this course. Prerequisite(s): ART 3221. 



Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
■^ ' ° Augusta State University Catalog 



ART 3231 Photography I (3-V-3) 

An introduction to black and white photographic processes and materials, study of photography as an art medium, and study 
of the camera and darkroom equipment. Prerequisite(s): ART 1520, ART 1530, and ART 1211; or permission of the instructor 

ART 3232, 3233, 3234 Photography II. III. IV (3-V-3) 

Continuation of the previous level of Photography. The student \n\\\ be responsible for developing a personal artistic direction 
with photography. Prerequisite(s): ART 3231 or permission of instructor 

ART 3251 Printmaking I (3-V-3} 

An introduction to the technical and aesthetic possibilities of major printmaking processes, including intaglio, relief, and 
lithography. Prerequisite(s): ART 1520, ART 1530, and ART 1211; or permission of instructor. 

ART 3261 Watercolor I (3-V-3) 

Basic experience with opaque or transparent watercolor media. Life model may be used. Prerequisite(s): ART 1520, ART 
1530, ART 1211. and ART 2212; or permission of instructor 

ART 3262 Watercolor if (3-V-3) 

Continuation of Watercolor I. Life model may be used. Prerequisite(s): ART 3261. or permission of instructor 

ART 3263 Watercolor III (3-V-3) 

Advanced level instruction of Watercolor II. Life model may be used. Prerequisite(s): ART 3262, or permission of instructor 

ART 3311 Sculpture: Carding I (3-V-3) 

Basic experiences with subtractive methods working with wood and/or stone using simple carving tools and techniques. 
Prerequisite(s): ART 1520, ART 1530, and ART 1211: or permission of instructor 

ART 3312 Sculpture: Can/ing II (3-V-3) 

Continuation of the study of the Fine Arts applications of subtractive methods of sculpture using wood and stone. Prerequisite(s): 
ART3311. 

ART 3313 Sculpture: Can/ing III (3-V-3) 

Advanced level continuation of the study of the Fine Arts applications of subtractive methods of sculpture using wood and 
stone. Prerequisite(s): ART 3312. 

ART 3331 Sculpture: Figure Modeling I (3-V-3) 

Applied studies in proportion and articulation of the figure, using life models, typically nudes. All work from the model is a 
required part of the course. Materials include oil-based and water-based clay. Prerequisite(s): ART 1211, ART 1520, ART 1530 
and ART 3401 or permission of instructor 

ART 3332 Sculpture: Figure Modeling II (3-V-3) 

Continuation of applied studies in proportion and articulation of the human figure using life models, typically nudes. All work 
from the model is a required part of the course. Materials include oil-based and water-based clay. Prerequisite(s): ART 3331 . 

ART 3333 Sculpture: Figure Modeling III (3-V-3) 

Continuation of applied studies in proportion and articulation of the human figure using life models, typically nudes. All work 
from the model is a required part of the course. Materials include oil-based and water-based clay. Prerequisite(s): ART 3332. 

ART 3401 Ceramics I (3-V-3) 

Fundamentals of working with clay as an art form, including vessels, sculpture, and pottery. Introduction to glazing techniques. 
Prerequisite(s): ART 1520. ART 1530, and ART 1211: or permission of the instructor 

ART 3402 Ceramics II (3-V-3) 

Continuation of Ceramics 1 with further emphasis on developing the student's own ideas about form and content. More 
intensive work with glazing, introduction to mixing glazes and to firing. Prerequisite(s): ART 3401 or permission of instructor 

ART 3403 Ceramics III (3-V-3) 

Continuation of Ceramics II, with emphasis on developing the student's artistic direction with clay. Continued development of 
glazing techniques, including glaze testing and responsibility for firing. Prerequisite(s): ART 3402 or permission of instructor 

ART 3542 Graphic Design II 3-V-3) 

Acontinuation of Graphic Design 1, and a general survey of computer graphic programs. Prerequisite(s): ART 2541 orpermission 
of instructor 

ART 3700 Color Experience (3-V-3) 

Experience, study, and analysis of color and color systems. Prerequisite(s): ART 1520 or permission of the instructor 

Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 219 



ART 3721 Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art I (3-V-3) 

A seminar devoted to the critical study and analysis of contemporary art theory and practice, aesthetics, and philosophy of art. 
Prerequisite(s): ART 2612. 

ART 3811 Scene Design I (3-0-3) 

This course will focus on various aspects of scene design for the theater, including sketching, drafting, rendering and model 
building techniques, and research. Prerequislte(s): ENGL 1101-1102 or ENGL 1113-1114 with a grade of C or better; HUMN 
2001 with a grade of C or better 

ART 3812 Scene Design II (3-0-3) 

Students will perfect techniques learned in Scene Design I. Additional concentration will be placed on historical aspects of 
design, applied research, and design concepts. Prerequlslte(s): ART 3811 or permission of the instructor 

ART 3900 Studio Printmaking Lab (0-0-0) 

Printmaking Studio Lab is designed to provide studio lab access for students who have taken the beginning printmaking 
course and need continued access to the lab to pursue upper-level research. Prerequisite(s): Permission must be granted by 
printmaking professor overseeing the studio lab to be used. 

ART 3901 Studio Photography Lab (0-0-0) 

Photography Studio Lab is designed to provide studio lab access for students who have taken the beginning photography 
course and need continued access to the lab to pursue upper-level research. Prerequisite(s): Permission must be granted by 
photography professor overseeing the studio lab to be used. 

ART 4214 Drawing IV (3-V-3) 

Continuation of the Drawing course sequence with emphasis on advanced problems. Life models, nudes and occasionally 
costumed, may be used and if so are a required part of the course. Prerequisite(s): ART 3213. 

ART 4223, 4224, 4225 Painting III, IV, V (3-V-3) 

More advanced study of painting with emphasis on personal conceptual growth and technique development. Life models may 
be used. Prerequisite(s): The previous level of Painting or permission of instructor 

ART 4261 , 4262,4263 Printmaking II, III , IV 

More advanced exploration of printmaking processes with an emphasis on using the media to create personal visual statement. 
Prerequisite(s): ART 3251 

ART 4321 Sculpture: Casting (3-V-3) 

Introduction to basic substitution methods of sculpture using aluminum and bronze. Prerequisite(s): ART 1520, 1530, and 
1211; or permission of instructor 

ART 4322 Sculpture: Casting II (3-V-3) 

Continuation of the study of the Fine Arts applications of substitution methods of sculpture using bronze and aluminum. 
Prerequisite(s): ART 4321 

ART 4323 Sculpture: Casting III (3-V-3) 

Continuation of the study of Fine Arts applications of substitution methods of sculpture using bronze and aluminum. 
Prerequisite(s): ART 4322. 

ART 4331 Sculpture: Installation I (3-V-3) 

The study and application of context-based and time-based artworks using a variety of sculpture methods and techniques sited 
on the ASU campus. Prerequisite(s): ART 1520, ART 1530, and ART 1211; or permission of instructor 

ART 4332 Sculpture: Installation II (3-V-3) 

The continuation of the study and application of context-based and time-based artworks using a variety of sculpture methods 
and techniques sited on the ASU campus. Prerequisite(s): ART 4331. 

ART 4333 Sculpture: Installation III (3-V-3) 

Continuation of the advanced study and application of context-based and time-based artworks using a variety of sculpture 
methods and techniques sited on the ASU campus. Prerequisite(s): ART 4332. 

ART 4341 Sculpture: Multimedia I (3-V-3) 

Continuation of applied studies in sculpture using a variety of media and methods. Emphasis of course work will be on using 
more than one sculptural medium and/or method within a single body of artwork. Prerequisite(s): ART 1520, ART 1530, ART 
1211, and one upper level sculpture class (ART 3331,4321, or4331). 



Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
^^^ Augusta State University Catalog 



ART 4342 Sculpture: Multimedia II (3-V-3) 

Continuation of applied studies in sculpture using a variety of media and methods. Emphasis of course work will be on using 
more than one sculptural media and/or method within a single body of artwork. Prerequisite(s): ART 4341 . 

ART 4343 Sculpture: Multimedia III (3-\/-3) 

Continuation of applied studies in sculpture using a variety of media and methods. Emphasis of course work will be on using 
more than one sculptural media and/or method within a single body of artwork, Prerequisite(s): ART 4342. 

ART 4404, 4405, 4406 Ceramics IV, V, VI (3-V-3) 

Continuation of the previous level of Ceramics. The student will be responsible for developing a personal artistic direction 
with clay. Advanced firing techniques. Glaze development, including extensive testing. Prerequisite(s): The previous level of 
Ceramics or permission of instructor. 

ART 4620 Art Since 1955: Neo-Avant-Garde in Europe and America (3-V-3) 

An art- historical seminar dedicated to the critical study of the movements of post- Duchampian art since 1955. Prerequisite(s): 
ART 2612 and ART 3721 or permission of instructor. 

ART 4630 "Primitivism" in 20th Century Art (3-V-3) 

An art-historical seminar dedicated to the critical study of "primitivism" in 20th century Western art. Prerequisite(s): ART 261 2 
and ART 3721 or permission of instructor 

ART 4640 Raphael (3-V-3) 

An art-historical seminar dedicated to the critical study of the paintings, murals, and drawings of the Italian Renaissance artist 
Raphael (1483-1520). Prerequisite(s): ART 2612 and ART 3721 or permission of instructor 

ART 4650 Early Renaissance Italian Painting (3-V-3) 

An art-historical seminar dedicated to the critical study of painting in Renaissance Italy during the fifteenth century. Prerequisite(s): 
ART 2612 and ART 3721 or permission of instructor 

ART 4660 American Art (3-V-3) 

Survey of eighteenth through twentieth century American painting, sculpture, and architecture. Prerequlsite(s): ART 2612 or 
HUMN 2002 or permission of the instructor. 

ART 4670 Far Eastern Art (3-V-3) 

A survey of paintings, sculpture, and architecture of Japan, China, India, and Southeast Asia. Prerequisite(s): ART 2612 and 
ART 3721 or permission of instructor 

ART 4722 Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art II (3-V-3) 

A seminar devoted to the critical study and analysis of art theory and practice, aesthetics, and philosophy of art. More advanced 
than ART 3721 . Prerequisite(s): ART 3721 or PHIL 1000. 

ART 491 1 , 491 2, 491 3 Major Project (3-V-3) 

Individual advanced work with direction and approval of instructor. Prerequisite(s): ART 1520. ART 1530. and ART 1211; or 
permission of instructor. 

ART 4950 Selected Topics (Variable) 

Reserved for special study of techniques and media not normally covered in regular course work. Course may be repeated 
when topic varies. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor 

ART 4960 Undergraduate Internship (1-15) 

An internship is a service-learning experience based in an institution or agency emphasizing the completion of a specific 
task and the acquisition of specific skills under the supervision of Augusta State University and the cooperating institution or 
agency. 

ART 4998 Senior Exhibition (B.A.) (3-V-3) 

Degree requirement for B.A. candidates in art. Students prepare and mount an exhibition of their own artwork. All work for 
this exhibition must be accepted by the studio art faculty and judged to be of sufficient quantity and quality to demonstrate the 
student's artistic achievement on a level acceptable for the B.A. degree. Students also study other aspects of their chosen fine 
arts field. Prerequisite(s): Portfolio Review/ passed and permission of instructor 

ART 4999 Senior Exhibition (B.F.A.) (3-V-3) 

Degree requirement for B.RA. candidates in art. Students prepare and mount an exhibition of their own artwork. All work for 
this exhibition must be accepted by the studio art faculty and judged to be of sufficient quantity and quality to demonstrate the 
student's artistic achievement on a level acceptable for the B.RA. degree. Students also study other aspects of their chosen 
fine arts field. Prerequisite(s): Portfolio Review passed and permission of instructor. 

Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 221 



ART 5950 Selected Topics in Art (Variable) 

By permission of Chair of the Department of Art. To be arranged. 

ASTR -Astronomy Course 

ASTR 1000 Introduction to ttie Universe (3-2-4) 

A survey of the universe, examining the historical origins of astronomy; the motions and physical properties of the Sun, Moon, 
and planets; the formation, evolution, and death of stars; and the structure of galaxies and the expansion of the universe. 
Prerequisite(s): Recommended but not required: MATH 1101 or MATH 1111. 

ASUO - Orientation Course 

ASUO 1000 Augusta State University Orientation (3-0-3) 

This course is designed to familiarize students with the policies and services of ASU and to provide instruction in the fundamental 
skills necessary to succeed in college level courses. Topics include study skills, setting goals, self-management, test-taking 
skills, memory techniques, stress management, library utilization, and other topics relevant to academic and personal success. 
Prerequisite(s): completion of READ 0097, or COMPASS reading placement > 67, or no Learning Support reading required. 

BIOL - Biology Courses 

If a student does not successfully complete a biology course after two attempts (i.e., he/she receives a D, F, W, or WF), the 
student will be limited to specific registration times for any subsequent attempts. Any student meeting these criteria will not be 
allowed to register for the course until the last day of late registration. Appeals may be made to the Chair of the Department of 
Biology in hardship cases. 

BIOL 1 1 01 Fundamentals of Biology (3-2-4) 

Designed for the non-science/non-math major; topics covered include chemical foundations of biology, cell structure and 
function, cell division, genetics, animal organ systems and mechanisms of evolution. This course will not substitute for the BIOL 
1107 course that is designed for science/math majors. Credit may not be earned for both BIOL 1101 and BIOL 1107. Normally 
offered each semester. 

BIOL 11 02 Environmental Biology (3-2-4) 

Designed for the non-science/non-math major; topics covered include organismal diversity and behavior, ecology, and 
environmental topics. This course will not substitute for the BIOL 1108 course that is designed for science/math majors. Credit 
may not be earned for both BIOL 1102 and BIOL 1108. Normally offered each semester. BIOL 1101 IS NOT a prerequisite for 
this course. Prerequisite(s): none. 

BIOL 1 1 07 Principles of Biology I (3-2-4) 

A study of the unifying concepts of the biotic world including biochemistry, cell biology, energy and metabolism, physiological 
systems of both plants and animals, animal and plant diversity, animal and plant development, genetics, ecology and evolution, 
and animal behavior. Credit may not be earned for both BIOL 1101 and BIOL 1107. Normally offered each semester. 

BIOL 11 08 Principles of Biology II (3-2-4) 

A continuation of Biology 1107. Credit may not be earned for both BIOL 1102 and BIOL 1108. Normally offered each semester. 
Prerequisite(s): BIOL 1107 with a grade of C or better 

BIOL 1150 Bioscientific Terminology (1-0-1) 

A study of the Greek and Latin bases, prefixes, and suffixes that provide much of the foundation of modern bioscientific 
terminology. Prerequisite(s): None. 

BIOL 21 11 Human Anatomy and Physiology I (3-2-4) 

An introduction to physical and chemical principles necessary for understanding human anatomy and physiology. A study of 
cellular and tissue levels of organization, followed by a study of the skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Normally offered 
each semester. Prerequisite(s): Nine hours of successfully completed college credit prior to enrollment into BIOL 2111. 

BIOL 2112 Human Anatomy and Physiology II (3-2-4) 

A continuation of Biology 2111, dealing with the circulatory, respiratory, digestive, excretory, endocrine and reproductive systems 
and their interrelationships. Normally offered each semester. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2111 with a grade of C or better 

Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
222 Augusta State University Catalog 



BIOL 2500 Microbiology for Nursing and Allied Health (3-2-4) 

An introduction to microbiology as it relates to the human, including viruses, prokaryotic and eukaryotic anatomy, metabolism, 
growth, nutrition, immunology, important disease causing microbes, physical/chemical control and chemotherapy. Normally 
offered fall and summer. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 1108 or BIOL 2112 and MATH 1101 or 1111 with a grade of C or better. 

BIOL 2950 Special Topics In Biology (Variable) 

An examination of various biological topics with emphasis on relating biological principles to the understanding and solving of 
every day situations. Prerequisite(s): will vary depending upon the topics course offered. Permission of the instructor may also 
be required. 

BIOL 3000 General Botany (3-3-4) 

Introduction to plant function and development, evolution, diversity, ecology, and economic importance. Normally offered fall 
and spring. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 1108 with a C or better 

BIOL 3040 Horticulture (3-2-4) 

A study of the practical aspects of plant cultivation using fundamental biological knowledge of plant structure and function. 
Prerequisite(s): BIOL 1102 and permission of instructor or BIOL 1108 with a C or better 

BIOL 31 00 Zoology (3-2-4) 

An introduction to the morphology, physiology and life histories of representative animals with emphasis on taxonomy and 
systematics. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 1108 with a C or better 

BIOL 3120 Man and the Environment (3-0-3) 

A treatment of such contemporary problems as air and water pollution, biocides, urban planning, population control and the 
energy crisis. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 1102 or 1108 with a C or better 

BIOL 31 30 Biology and Society (3-0-3) 

An examination and discussion, through use of various books, novels, and videos, of recent advances in biology and their 
implications for society. Ethical issues will be stressed. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 1108 with a C or better, or BIOL 1102 with a C or 
better and permission of instructor 

BIOL 3200 Genetics (3-2-4) 

A study of the principles of genetics and how they apply to various aspects of biology. Course content divided evenly between 
classical and molecular genetics. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 1108 with a C or better and CHEM 1212. 

BIOL 3210 Human Genetics (3-0-3) 

An examination of human genetic principles with emphasis on unifying modern, molecular findings with the classical pattems 
of inheritance. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 1108 and CHEM 1212 (C or better in each) or permission of the instructor BIOL 3200 is 
recommended, but not required. 

BIOL 3310 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (3-3-4) 

A systematic survey of the morphology of vertebrates with emphasis on phylogenetic relationships among the major classes. 
Prerequisite(s): BIOL 3100 with a C or better. 

BIOL 3320 Comparative Vertebrate Physiology (3-2-4) 

A comprehensive study of vertebrate physiology, including adaptive mechanisms for specific environments. Prerequisite(s): 
BIOL 1108 with a C or better and CHEM 1212. 

BIOL 3350 Histology (3-3-4) 

A detailed study of tissue types and their organization in the vertebrate body. Laboratory emphasis is given to morphological 
detail using prepared slide material. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 1108 with a C or better; BIOL 3100 with a C or better or permission 
of instructor 

BIOL 3370 Neurobiology (3-0-3) 

An introduction to the development, anatomy and physiology of the vertebrate nervous system. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 1108 with 
a C or better 

BIOL 3400 Cell Biology (3-3-4) 

A detailed study of structural and functional organization of eukaryotic cells including cell surfaces, organelles, cell cycle, 
regulation of information flow, and cellular differentiation. Normally offered fall and spring. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 1108: CHEM 
1212: and CHEM 2410 or 3411: all with a C or better 



Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture. hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 223 



BIOL 3500 Microbiology (3-2-4) 

An introduction to microbiology, including viruses, protozoans, fungi, prokaryotic anatomy and genetics, metabolism, growth, 
nutrition, immunology, biotechnology and genetic engineering, physical/chemical control and chemotherapy. Normally offered 
every 2-3 years. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 1108 and MATH 1111, witli a C or better in each. 

BIOL 41 00 Principles of Ecology (3-3-4) 

A study of the interactions among organisms and their environment. Topics covered include physiology, nutrient cycling, 
energy flow, trophic dynamics, populations, and community structure. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 3000 and 3100, with a C or better; 
CHEM 1212; or permission of instructor 

BIOL 41 50 Evolutionary Biology(3-0-3) 

A study of the factors effecting change in the genetic composition of organisms. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 1108 with a C or better 
or permission of instructor 

BIOL 4420 Herpetology(3-2-4) 

An examination of amphibians and reptiles with emphasis on their structural and functional characteristics, geographical 
distribution, relation to the environment, behavior, speciation, and man's interaction with them. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 3100 with 
a C or better 

BIOL 4430 Ornithology (3-2-4) 

A study of taxonomy, ecology, morphology, physiology, behavior and field identification of birds. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 3100 
with a C or better 

BIOL 4450 Introductory Entomology (3-2-4) 

A study of the structure, life history, taxonomy and economic importance of insects. A collection is required. Prerequisite(s): 
BIOL 1108 with a C or better 

BIOL 4500 Ichthyology (2-4-4) 

A treatment of the organ systems, life histories and taxonomic aspects of fishes of southeastern U.S. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 
3100 with a Cor better 

BIOL 4520 Marine Biology (2-4-4) 

A study of marine organisms and their habitats in the Atlantic Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico. Ecosystem components are 
emphasized. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 3100 with a C or better 

BIOL 4530 Aquatic Biology (2-4-4) 

A study of pond, lake, stream and marine organisms. Ecosystem components are emphasized. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 3100 
with a or better 

BIOL 4600 Biology of Cancer (3-0-3) 

A study of the prevention, causes, treatment, characteristics and research of various types cancer. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 1108 
with a C or better 

BIOL 4630 Reproductive Physiology (3-0-3) 

An investigation of the physiological processes involved with the mammalian and non-mammalian reproductive systems. 
Topics addressed include embryological development and function of the reproductive system, conception and parturition. 
Prerequisite(s): BIOL 1108 with a C or better and CHEM 1212. 

BIOL 4650 Endocrinology (3-0-3) 

A systematic survey of the mammalian and non-mammalian endocrine systems including properties of hormones, methods 
of study, and regulation of physiological functions. For Biology majors, this course must be passed with a C or better. 
Prerequisite(s): BIOL 1108 with a C or better and CHEM 1212. 

BIOL 4950 Selected Topics (Variable) 

Designed to treat areas of biology not in the normal curriculum. These courses may include Animal Behavior, Economic 
Botany, Introduction to Toxicology, Introductory Araneology, Neurobiology, Phycology, Plant Physiology, Principles of Human 
Physiology, Techniques in Biology and Wildlife and Fisheries Techniques. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 1108 with a C or better or 
permission of instructor 

BIOL 4980 Seminar (1-0-1) 

The investigation of current topics in biology with students giving presentations and leading discussions. Normally offered fall 
and spring. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 1108; 18 additional hours of biological science with a C or better 



Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
^2^ Augusta State University Catalog 



BIOL 4990 Undergraduate Research (Variable) 

An introduction to research problenns. No more than 3 hours nnay be counted toward the major. Normally offered each 
semester. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 1108 with a C or better, 12 additional hours of science or math with a C or better, and 
permission of instructor 

BUSA - Business Administration Courses 

Note: in order to enroll in any BUSA course numbered 3000-4950, a student must be accepted into the James M. Hull 
College of Business (see p. 167) and meet the listed prerequisites for the class. 

BUSA 4200 International Business (3-0-3) 

This course covers all aspects of international business including, but not limited to international politics, culture, economics, 
finance, technology, marketing, ethical decision-making, strategic planning and management, and human resource development 
in a global environment. Prerequisite(s): MGMT 3500 and MKTG 3700. with grades of C or better 

BUSA 4950 Selected Topics in Business Administration (3-0-3) 

A course and/or directed study of a major issue, practice, or problem in the area of business administration. Content to be 
decided based on needs and professional objectives of students and the experience and availability of faculty. Prerequisite(s): 
permission of advisor to use the course in the area of the major and senior standing. 

BUSA 6950 Current Issues in Business Administration ( 3-0-3) 

A variable content course individually designed to meet the needs, interests, and professional objectives of students in the MBA 
Program. Prerequisite(s): Graduate (MBA) student status. 

CHEM - Chemistry Courses 

CHEM 1000 Chemistry Orientation (1-0-1) 

An introduction to chemistry and its subdisciplines. Major concepts and perspectives will be introduced through projects and 
case studies that illustrate the utility and role of chemistry both in modern times and in the past. Additional topics shall include 
scientific ethics and careers in chemistry. Students will be introduced to the tools of library research. Prerequisite(s): none. 

CHEM 1 1 51 Survey of Chemistry I (3-2-4) 

First course designed for pre-allied health students and non-majors; includes elements, compounds, stoichiometry. solutions, 
equilibrium, acid-base and nomenclature. Credit may not be earned for both CHEM 11 51 and CHEM 1 21 1 or 1 21 2. Prerequisite(s): 
MATH 1111 or 1101. 

CHEM 1 1 52 Sun/ey of Chemistry II (3-2-4) 

Organic and biochemistry designed for allied health students; covers common classes of organic compounds including uses 
and chemical and physical properties and introduction to structure and function of biological molecules. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 
1151 (grade of C or better) or CHEM 1211 (grade of C or better). 

CHEM 1211 Principles of Chemistry I (3-3-4) 

First course in a sequence designed for science majors; topics include composition of matter, stoichiometry. periodic relations, 
gas laws, molecular geometry and nomenclature. Credit may not be earned for both CHEM 1151 and CHEM 1211 Prerequisite(s): 
MATH 1111 or 1101 (C or better). 

CHEM 1 21 2 Principles of Chemistry II (3-3-4) 

Second course in a sequence for science majors; topics include solutions, acid-base, colligative properties, equilibrium, 
electrochemistry, kinetics, and descriptive chemistry. Credit may not be earned for both CHEM 1151 and CHEM 1212 
Prerequisite(s): MATH 1113 and CHEM 1211 (C or better in each). 

CHEM 1950 Selected Topics: (V) 

Concepts/topics in special areas of chemistry. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor 

CHEM 241 Chemistry of Organic and Biomolecules (3-3-4) 

A systematic examination of the properties and reactions of the major classes of organic compounds and their relevance to 
the metabolic roles of carbohydrates, lipids and proteins. Modern spectroscopic methods of structure determination will be 
included. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1211. 1212 (C or better in each). 



Example; (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture. hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 225 



CHEM 281 Quantitative Analysis (2-6-4) 

Theories, principles and practice of volumetric, gravimetric and elementary instrumental analysis. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1212 
(C or better). 

CHEM 2950 Selected Topics (V) 

Concepts/topics in special areas of chemistry. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor. 

CHEM 3411 Organic Chemistry I (3-3-4) 

A study of the structure, nomenclature, properties, and reactivity of organic compounds with an emphasis on modern electronic 
and mechanistic theories. Spectroscopy will be introduced. The laboratory portion will explore common reactions and laboratory 
techniques. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1212 ( C or better). 

CHEM 341 2 Organic Chemistry II (3-3-4) 

A continuation of Organic Chemistry I. Mechanisms, synthesis, and spectroscopy will be emphasized. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 
3411 (Cor better). 

CHEM 3721 Physical Chemistry I (3-3-4) 

A study of gases, first, second, and third laws of thermodynamics, thermochemistry, and chemical equilibria, followed by an 
introduction to the basic principles of chemical kinetics. Prerequisite(s): PHYS 1112 or 2212 and MATH 2011 (C or better in 
each:) Corequisites: CHEM 2810 (C or better), permission of the instructor 

CHEM 3722 Physical Chemistry II (3-3-4) 

Further applications of chemical kinetics. The principles of quantum mechanics, approximation methods, theory of chemical 
bonding, symmetry and optical spectroscopy. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 3721 and MATH 3020 (C or better in each) or permission 
of the instructor. 

CHEM 3810 Advanced Organic Chemistry (3-3-4) 

A detailed theoretical and practical examination of mass spectrometry, infrared spectroscopy, and nuclear magnetic resonance 
spectroscopy (including multinuclear and multidimensional techniques), synthesis and properties of Polymeric materials, and 
selected advanced organic chemistry topics. Laboratory experiments will introduce advanced topics and techniques and 
incorporate hands-on MS, IR, and NMR analysis. Prerequisites: CHEM 3412 (0 or better) 

CHEM 3820 Laboratory Management and Safety (1-3-2) 

Formal instruction and practical experience in all phases of assisting with instructional laboratories. Safety instruction includes 
proper use of protective equipment and fire extinguishers, and CPR training. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 2410 or CHEM 3411 ( C 
or better), or permission of instructor 

CHEM 3950 Selected Topics (V) 

Concepts/topics in special areas of chemistry. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor 

CHEM 4210 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (3-3-4) 

A study of advanced topics in inorganic chemistry including molecular orbital theory, coordination chemistry, descriptive 
chemistry of the elements, atomic structure and nuclear chemistry. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1212 (C or better; CHEM 3412 
recommended). 

CHEM 4541 Biochemistry for Premeds (3-0-3) 

The physical chemistry of macromolecules. An examination of the chemical behavior of amino acids, proteins, lipids, 
carbohydrates, and nucleic acids, emphasizing the relationship between structure and physiological function. This course 
is intended for non-chemistry and pre-professional majors who do not need a laboratory component. Students needing a 
laboratory component should enroll in CHEM 4551 . Prerequisite(s): CHEM 3412; MATH 1220 or 2011 (C or better in each). 

CHEM 4551 Biochemistry I: Physical Biochemistry (3-3-4) 

The physical chemistry of macromolecules. An examination of the chemical behavior of amino acids, proteins, lipids, 
carbohydrates, and nucleic acids, emphasizing the relationship between structure and physiological function. Prerequisite(s): 
CHEM 1212 and 3412; MATH 2011 or 1220 (C or better in each). 

CHEM 4552 Biochemistry II: Bioenergetics and Metabolism (3-0-3) 

A study of the metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, nucleotides, and related compounds; the regulation and 
energetic of the metabolic pathways; and oxidative and photophosphorylation. Prerequlsite(s): CHEM 4541 (C or better) or 
CHEM 4551 (C or better) or permission of the instructor 

CHEM 4830 Principles of Instrument Design (2-3-3) 

A study of instruments including signal transducers, signal conditioning, and computer data logging. Logic gates, digital control, 
counters, analog-to-digital conversion and spectroscopic techniques will be discussed as needed. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 2810 
or PHYS 3011: and PHYS 1112 or 2212: (C or better in each) or permission of the instructor 

Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
^'^" Augusta State University Catalog 



CHEM 4840 Instrumental Analysis (3-3-4) 

Theories and applications of instrumental methods of analysis. Spectroscopic techniques (including atomic absorption, 
ultraviolet/visible, infrared, and fluorescence spectroscopy), separations and electrochemistry will be discussed. Prerequisite(s): 
CHEM 2810. CHEM 3412 (C or better in each). 

CHEM 4950 Selected Topics (V) 

Designed to explore areas of chemistry not in the normal curriculum. Topics may include heterocyclic, organometallic, medicinal, 
or forensic chemistry. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 3412 (C or better). 

CHEM 4960 Undergraduate Internship (V, 1 to 15) 

An internship is a service-learning experience based in an institution or agency, emphasizing the completion of a specific task 
and the acquisition of specific knowledge and skills under the supervision of Augusta State University and the cooperating 
institution or agency. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor 

CHEM 4990 Undergraduate Research (V) 

Individual modern chemical research. A minimum of three hours of laboratory work per week for each semester hour of credit. 
Report/thesis required. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor 

COMC - Communication Courses 

COMC 2010 Communications and Culture (3-0-3) 

A study of the history, organization, politics, economics, control, regulation, and effects of the mass media and affiliated 
industries, particularly in the United States. Issues of influence on the media by, as well as media influence on. government, 
politics, industry, society, culture, international relations, and the audience are addressed through discussion, reading, and 
writing-intensive assignments. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1101- 1102 or ENGL 1113-1114. with a grade of C or better in each. 

COMC 3000 Media Law and Ethics (3-0-3) 

Abroad application of the principles of law and ethics to the mass communications media, media practice, advertising, freedom 
of information, libel, contempt of court, copyright, private and self/professional censorship. Required for all communications 
majors except for those following the drama track. Prerequisite(s): COMC 2010 or permission of the instructor. 

COMC 3100 Communications for Professionals (3-0-3) 

A skill-building course in various forms of professional oral and written communication. Included are business memo and 
letter writing, short report writing, informal and formal oral presentations, and the use of modern technology to improve written 
and oral presentations. Students will learn and demonstrate skills in organizing, writing, and presenting factual, promotional, 
attitudinal, and technical materials for various audiences. Technology will include current library research methods for business, 
presentation software, and communication media. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1102 with a grade of C or better COMS 1010, and 
MINF 2201 or CSC 1 1200 or equivalent. 

COMC 6100 Communication for Managers (3-0-3) 

The course emphasizes informative oral, written, and electronic media communication theory and skills for effective private 
and public sector managers. Students will have the opportunity to learn the basics of good letter and memo writing, as well as 
news releases, media interviews, graphics and crisis management. To be taken within the first two semesters of enrollment. 
Prerequisite(s): Graduate (MBA) student status and MGMT 3500. 

COMD - Drama Courses 

COMD 2100 Performance Practicum (Variable 1-2) 

Participation as an actor in an ASU Theater production. May be repeated. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor 

COMD 2200 Production Practicum (Variable 1-2) 

Participation as a crew member or shopworker in an ASU Theater production. May be repeated. Prerequisite(s): Permission 
of instructor 

COMD 2210 Introduction to Theatre (3-0-3) 

Experiential, conceptual, historical, and cultural study of theatre as a unique form of artistic expression and mirror of human 
experiences and values throughout the world; survey of constituent elements of a theatrical work and its major forms of 
expression. Attendance at live theatre productions required. Prerequisite(s): None. 



Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 227 



COMD 2250 Acting I: Acting Worksfiop (3-0-3) 

An introduction to the craft of the actor, including training in voice, movement, emotional sensitivity, improvisation, and scene 
study. Prerequisite(s): None. 

COMD 2550 Stagecraft ( 2-2-3) 

Asurvey of the techniques for designing, building, painting, costuming, and managing a production. Included is a lab practicum, 
which provides the hands-on experience needed for the understanding of the techniques. Prerequisite(s): None. 

COMD 2950 Selected Topics (3-0-3) 

A study of various aspects of theatre (acting, directing, scene design, stage technology, costuming, theatre management, and 
related areas of performance and production) of interest to lower-division undergraduate students. 

COMD 3000 / COMS 3000 Voice and Diction (3-0-3) 

This course covers vocal production (voice, pitch, tone, projection, and articulation) and uses mastery of general American 
phonetics to train students to hear distinctions in vocal sounds. Students will explore language codes and dialects of the 
English language, with emphasis on Standard American English as it applies to professional standards of oral communication. 
Prerequisite(s): CO/WS 1010 or COMS 1020 or HOA/R 1010 witli a grade of C or better, and COI\/IC 2010 or permission of 
instructor 

COMD 3100 Performance Practicum (Variable 1-2) 

Participation as an actor in an ASU Theater production. May be repeated for up to four credit hours. Prerequisite(s): permission 
of instructor 

COMD 3200 Production Practicum (Variable 1-2) 

Participation as a crew member or shopworker in an ASU Theater production. May be repeated for up to four credit hours. 
Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor. 

COMD 3221 / ENGL 3221 History of tfie Theatre I (3-0-3) 

An introduction to the art of theatre, as well as an historical survey, of the development of Western drama from Ancient Greece 
to the Elizabethan Era. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1101-1102 or ENGL 1113-1114 and HUMN 2001, each with a grade of C or 
better; HUMN 2002 

COMD 3222 /ENGL 3222 History of the Theatre II (3-0-3) 

A continuation of COMD 3221 , beginning with English Restoration; a study of the history of stage design and technology and 
the development of dramatic literature to the Modern period. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1101-1102 or ENGL 1113-1114 and HUMN 
2001, each with a grade of Cor better; HUMN 2002. 

COMD 3250 Acting II: Scene Study (3-0-3) 

A continuation of COMD 2250. A study of text and subtext, the course will concentrate on scene study and character analysis. 
Prerequisite(s): COMC 2010 with a grade of C or better; COMD 2250 with a grade of C or better 

COMD 3620 / COMW 3620 / ENGL 3620 Writing for the Theatre (3-0-3) 

A workshop in the writing of one-act and full-length plays or screenplays. Topics include Aristotle and dramatic theory, plot 
structure, character, dialogue, naturalism, symbolism, theme, production problems, and manuscript format. Students will write 
a one-act play or a short screen play. Students cannot receive credit for more than one of the following: ENGL 3620, COMD 
3620, and COMW 3620. Prerequisite(s): COMC 2010. 

COMD 3710 Directing (3-0-3) 

A study of the fundamental techniques of stage directing. We will study stage space, blocking and movement, script analysis 
and interpretation, and style. Reading, discussions, laboratory work, the directing ofscenes and one-act plays, and the creation 
of a prompt book are required. Prerequisite(s): COMC 2010; COMD 3221 or COMD 3222; or permission of the instructor 

COMD 3750 Scenography I (3-0-3) 

Basic principles and techniques of design in contemporary performing arts, including the development and practice of designing 
scenery, costumes, lighting, and other visual aspects of stage and media production. Prerequisite(s): COMD 2250; COMD 
3221 or COMD 3222; or permission of instructor for non-majors. 

COMD 3850 Stage Management (3-0-3) 

A survey of the organization and practical application and execution of performance events. Emphasis will be on details 
concerning planning, budgeting, and coordination of all production areas as well as duties related to rehearsal, performance, 
and post-performance procedures. Prerequisite(s): COMC 2010, COMD 2250 and COMD 2550, each with a grade of C or 
better 



Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
2^° Augusta State University Catalog 



COMD4010/COMT4010 Performance for the Camera (3-0-3) 

An introduction to tine craft of performing in video, filnn, and for the radio. The class will perform from film and video plays, read 
"copy," and present news programs for television. Prerequisite(s): COMC 2010. 

COMD 4210 Acting III: Period Styles (3-0-3) 

The problems of enacting period literature from Greek to early twentieth century. Students address problems of deportment 
and stage movement, diction, and meter. Scenes performed from Greek, Roman, Renaissance, Restoration, and early Modern 
repertoires. Prerequisite(s): COMD 3250 or permission of the instructor 

COMD 4220 / ENGL 4220 Contemporary Theatre (3-0-3) 

A survey of major world dramatists and their works, from the end of the nineteenth century to the present. Prerequisite(s): 
ENGL 1101-1102 or ENGL 1113-1114 and HUMN 2001. each with a grade of C or better; HUt\AN 2002. 

COMD 4420 / ENGL 4420 Shakespeare (3-0-3) 

The major histories, comedies, and tragedies: the Elizabethan theater. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1101-1102 or ENGL 1113-1114 
and HUMN 2001, each with a grade of C or better; HUMN 2002. 

COMD 4750 Scenography II (3-0-3) 

Advanced study in design for contemporary performing arts. Student may choose to focus on two of the four design areas 
covered in COMD 3750, or develop a professional-quality portfolio incorporating all design work. Work developed at this level 
may be selected for main stage theatre productions. Prerequisite(s): COMD 3200 and COMD 3750. 

COMD 4950 Selected Topics (3-0-3) 

A directed theater project, such as lighting a production for the stage, designing a set, directing a production, or participating 
in a seminar on a particular subject. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1101-1102 or ENGL 1113-1114 with a grade of C or better: HUMN 
2001 with a grade of C or better 

COMD 4960 Internship (Variable 1 - 3) 

In-service learning experience in theater. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1101-1102 or ENGL 1113-1114 with a grade of C or better; 
HUMN 2001-2002 with a grade of C or better. Senior standing, and permission of the instructor 

COMD 4970 Senior Thesis/Project (3-0-3) 

Capstone course including a historical/analytical thesis and/or project in literature, history, theory, design, or performance. 
Written component for all projects is mandatory. Students will also put together their portfolios and resumes for Portfolio 
Review in this class. To be directed by at least one theatre instructor and juried by a committee selected from the Department 
of Communications and Professional Writing faculty. Prerequisite(s): COMD 3100, COMD 3200, senior level status, and 
permission of the instructor 

COMJ -Journalism Courses 

COMJ 3010 History of Journalism (3-0-3) 

Study of the development of American journalism and the mass media from colonial times to the present. Prerequisite(s): 
ENGL 1101-1102 or ENGL 1113-1114 and HUMN 2001. each with a C or better: COMC 2010, or permission of instmctor. 

COMJ 3020 Introduction to Newswriting (3-0-3) 

Study of various news gathering and writing techniques; practical assignments written to a deadline. Prerequisite(s): For 
Communications majors: ENGL 1101-1102 or ENGL 1113-1114. HUMN 2001. with a C or better COMC 2010. with a C or 
better or permission of instructor; for English majors: ENGL 1101-1102 or ENGL 1113-1114. HUMN 2001-2002. and ENGL 
2250. 

COMJ 3030 / ENGL 3683 Feature Writing (3-0-3) 

A practical course in writing and marketing various types of feature articles for newspapers, magazines, and other periodicals. 
Students cannot receive credit for both ENGL 3683 and COMJ 3030. Prerequisite(s): COMJ 3020 with a C or better or 
permission of instructor. 

COMJ 3040 / COMT 3040 Broadcast Journalism (3-V-3) 

Historical overview of broadcast journalism in America: processing local and wire service news for radio and television 
newscasts; researching, writing and producing broadcast news stories for production in a radio or television project. Significant 
reading and writing assignments. Prerequisite(s): COMC 2010. 

COMJ 3041 Student Newspaper Practicum 1 (V-2-1) 

Students will gather, compile, and set copy for campus briefs; assist with paste-up; and write stories assigned by an editor. 
Prerequisite(s): COMC 2010 and COMJ 3020 with a C or better, or permission of instructor 

Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 229 



COMJ 3042 Student Newspaper Practicum 2 (V-3-2) 

Students will proofread copy, write stories assigned by an editor, and cover a beat for the semester, participate in staff 
meetings, and learn procedures for laying out the newspaper. Prerequisite(s): COMC 2010 and COMJ 3020 and COMJ 3041 

or permission of Instructor. 

COMJ 401 Copy Editing and Layout (3-0-3) 

Methods of preparing all types of news copy for publication; analysis of page makeup and headline writing. Prerequisite(s): 
Communications majors: ENGL 1101-1102 or ENGL 1113-1114, HUMN 2001 (with C or better), COMC 2010 (with C or better) 
or permission of instructor, for English majors: ENGL 1101-1102 or ENGL 1113-1114, HUMN 2001-2002, and ENGL 2250. 

COMJ 4020 Advanced Reporting (3-0-3) 

Study of and practice in more specialized and complex forms of news gathering and writing, including such topics as civic 
reporting, in-depth and investigative reporting, multi-part series, doing research using paper and electronic sources, interpreting 
and using numbers. Prerequisite(s): COMJ 3020. 

COMJ 4950 Selected Topics (3-0-3) 

A directed project or class in an advanced journalism topic such as freelancing, community reporting, documentary journalism, 
reviewing, etc. Prerequisite(s): COMJ 3020 with a C or better or permission of instructor. 

COMJ 4960 Internship/Practicum (Variable) 

In-service learning experience in electronic or print media. Prerequisite(s): COMJ 3020 with a C or better or permission of 
instructor. 

COMP - Public Relations Courses 

COMP 3041 Magazine Writing and Production I (1-0-1) 

Basic instruction on magazine writing and production in the introduction course. Students will practice the skills they learn 
by creating magazine articles, layouts, ads, etc., that may be used in the professional portfolios. These materials may be 
published by the ASU magazine, the Phoenix. Prerequisite(s): COMC 2010 and COMJ 3020, or permission of the instructor. 

COMP 3042 Magazine Writing and Production II (2-0-2) 

Advanced instruction and experience in magazine writing and production. Students are required to write articles for the Phoenix 
magazine that conform to professional standards and to contribute in other creative and business areas of magazine production. 
Prerequisite(s): COMC 2010, COMP 3041, and COMJ 3020, or permission of the instructor. 

COMP 3200 Public Relations Writing (3-0-3) 

Study of various forms of public relations writing used in both corporate and non-profit settings. Prerequisite(s): COMC 2010 
and COMJ 3020, or permission of the instructor. 

COMP 3501 Publication Production I (3-0-3) 

Introduction to desktop publishing software and techniques used in production of fliers, brochures, newsletters and print 
advertising. Prerequisite(s): COMC 2010 or permission of the instructor. 

COMP 3502 Web Publication Design (3-0-3) 

Instruction in photo-editing software, web-page layout software, and advanced design techniques used in print and web 
communications. Prerequisite(s): COMC 2010 or permission of the instructor. 

COMP 3600 Public Relations Practices (3-0-3) 

An introduction to the field of public relations. The course includes a study of the publics served and an evaluation of the 
effectiveness of public relations campaigns with concentration on image building. Prerequisite(s): COMC 2010 or permission 
of the instructor. 

COMP 3700 Advertising Strategy and Campaigns (3-0-3) 

An introduction to the history and theory of advertising, including the setting of ad objectives, handling campaigns and measuring 
results. Prerequisite(s): COMC 2010 or permission of the instructor. 

COMP 41 00 Public Relations Theory and Cases (3-0-3) 

A survey of public relations theories. Students will be introduced to audience, media, psychological, sociological, and learning 
theories that are relevant to the practice of public relations. Instruction in practical uses of theory will be addressed through the 
vehicle of case studies. Prerequisite(s): COMC 2010 and COMP 3600. 



Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
^^^ Augusta State University Catalog 



COMP 4500 Communications Campaigns (3-0-3) 

This is the capstone course for the PR track. In this class, students will undertake a public relations campaign for an actual 
client. The campaign should demonstrate the student's skills in PR planning, research, writing, and design. Students will also 
put together their portfolios and resumes in this class. Prerequisite(s): COMC 2010 and COMP 3600 with a grade of C or 
l)etter, and senior standing or permission ofttie instructor. 

COMP 4700 Creative Strategy in Advertising (3-0-3) 

A study of the principles and practices involved in preparing copy and designs for all media. Students will design projects 
appropriate for broadcast, print, outdoor, transit and specialty advertising. Prerequisite(s): COMC 2010 and COMP 3700, or 
permission of ttie instructor. 

COMP 4950 Selected Topics (3-0-3) 

Study of various topics relating to public relations and advertising. Prerequisite(s): COMC 2010 or permission oftfie instructor. 

COMP 4960 Internsliip/Practicum (3-0-3) 

In-service learning experience in electronic or print media. Prerequisite(s): COMC 2010 or permission oftlie instructor. 

COMS - Communication Studies Courses 

COMS 1010 Introduction to l-iuman Communication (2-0-2) 

An introduction to the communication process focusing on effectiveness in day to day communication opportunities as well as 
basic public speaking skills. Students cannot receive credit for both COMS 1010 and COMS 1020. 

COMS 1020 Fundamentals of Human Communication (3-0-3) 

An overview of the various disciplines of communication: intrapersonal communication, interpersonal communication, small 
group communication, and public communication. Students cannot receive credit for both COMS 1010 and COMS 1020. 

COMS 3000 / COMD 3000 Voice and Diction (3-0-3) 

This course covers vocal production (voice, pitch, tone, projection, and articulation) and uses mastery of general American 
phonetics to train students to hear distinctions in vocal sounds. Students will explore language codes and dialects of the 
English language, with emphasis on Standard American English as it applies to professional standards of oral communication. 
Prerequisite(s): COMS 1010 or COMS 1020 or HONR 1010 with a grade of C or better, and COMC 2010 or permission of 
instructor. 

COMS 3010 Human Communication Theory (3-0-3) 

This course will review the major theories, concepts, and models of human communication and provide the necessary vocabulary 
to discuss theory. This course will also expose students to a variety of theoretical viewpoints. Prerequisite(s): COMS 1010 or 
COMS 1020 or HONR 1010 with a grade C or better, and COMC 2010 or permission of instructor. 

COMS 3040 Interpersonal Communication (3-0-3) 

This course addresses the theories and practice of interpersonal communication. Topics to be explored include family 
communication, friendship communication, communication in romantic relationships, and conflict in interpersonal relationships. 
Prerequislte(s): COMS 1010 or COMS 1020 or HONR 1010 with a grade of C or better and COMC 2010 or permission of 
instructor. 

COMS 3070 Organizational Communication (3-0-3) 

This course examines various approaches to the study of communication as it occurs in various small group and organizational 
contexts. Particular emphasis is placed on relationships, motivation, structure, and power within organizations. Prerequisite(s): 
COMS lOIOorCOMS 1020orHONR 1010 with a grade of C or better and COMC 2010 or permission of instructor. 

COMS 3100 Intercultural Communication (3-0-3) 

This course explores intercultural theories and research and examines the interactions of members of various cultures. 
Barriers to effective intercultural communication will be examined, as will methods of improving intercultural communication. 
Prerequisite(s): COMS 1010 or COMS 1020 or HONR 1010 with a grade of C or better and COMC 2010 or permission of 
instructor 

COMS 3110 Advanced Public Speaking (3-0-3) 

This course examines the principles used when speaking in informative, persuasive and small group situations. Researching 
skills and use of audiovisual technology will be learned and applied. Prerequlsite(s): COMS 1010 or COMS 1020 or HONR 
1010 with a grade of C or better and COMC 2010 or permission of instructor. 



Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 231 



COMS 3200 Topics in Rlietoric (3-0-3) 

Ttiis course provides an oven/iew of theories, concepts, and areas of scholarsliip witfiin the rhetorical studies discipline. 
Students will cover materials chosen from among the following topics: history of rhetoric, rhetorical theory, rhetorical criticism 
and analysis, semiotics, audience studies, political communication, rhetoric of social movements, public address, visual 
communication, and media studies. Prerequisite(s): COIvIS 1010 or COMS 1020 or HONR 1010 with a grade of C or better, 
and either COMC 2010 with a grade of C or better (Communications majors) or permission of instructor (non-majors) 

COMS 3250 Persuasion (3-0-3) 

This course explores how communication influences perceptions, thoughts, and actions. Students learn the skills necessary 
to critically analyze persuasive communication in various contexts, including speeches, advertising, and popular culture. 
Prerequisite(s): COMS 1010 or COMS 1020 or HONR 1010 with a grade of C or better, and COMC 2010 or permission of 
instructor 

COMS 41 1 Argumentation and Debate (3-0-3) 

This course provides extensive training in critical thinking, listening, reading, and advocacy. Students learn to prepare logical, 
sound, and reasoned arguments. Emphasis is placed on the ability to anticipate and address various alternative perspectives 
on controversial issues in crafting arguments. Prerequisite(s): COMS 1010 or COMS 1020 or HONR 1010 with a grade of C 
or better and COMC 2010 or permission of instructor 

COMS 41 20A/VMST 41 20 Gender and Communication (3-0-3) 

This course explores gendered communication patterns in a variety of contexts and examines how communication creates 
and reinforces gender. Theories that explain how culture shapes gendered communication and how gendered communication 
shapes culture will be examined. Prerequisite(s): COMS 1010 or COMS 1020 or HONR 1010 with a grade of C or better, and 
COMC 2010 or permission of instructor 

COMS 4950 Selected Topics (3-0-3) 

This course entails advanced study of a specialized topic in speech communication. Prerequisite(s): COMS 1010 or COMS 
1020 or HONR 1010 with a grade of C or better, and COMC 2010 or permission of instructor 

COMS 4971 Senior Capstone Project I (1-0-1) 

Each Communications major with a concentration in Communication Studies is required to design and execute an independent 
Senior Capstone Project. The parameters of the project will be set by the student in consultation with the Communication 
Studies Senior Capstone Project course instructor, who must approve the final proposal. This course is the first to be taken in 
a two-semester sequence, and should be taken the semester before the semester in which the student plans to graduate. In 
this course, the student will write a formal proposal for the Senior Capstone Project, which must satisfy the specific proposal 
requirements set by the Communication Studies faculty, and assessed by the instructor of record for the course. Prerequisite(s): 
COMS 1010 or COMS 1020 or HONR 1010; COMC 2010; three of the following courses COMC 3000, COMS 3010, COMS 
3040, COMS 3110, COMS 3250. All courses must be passed with a grade of C or better Requires permission of the instructor. 

COMS 4972 Senior Capstone Project II (1-0-1) 

Each Communications major with a concentration in Communication Studies is required to design and execute an independent 
senior capstone project. The parameters of the project will be set by the student in consultation with Communication Studies 
Senior Capstone Project instructor in COMS 4971. In this course the student will complete the Senior Capstone Project 
proposed in completing the COMS 4971 Senior Capstone Project 1 course. This course should be taken in the semester 
in which the student graduates. Prerequisite(s): In order to register for COMS 4972, student must be enrolled in, or have 
completed, COMS 4971. 

COMT - Television and Cinema 

COMT 3000 Introduction to Filmmaking (3-V-3) 

This course is designed as an introduction for students who will be directly or indirectly involved with electronic media production. 
Historical background along with practical production skills and technologies, including the Macintosh OS and Apple's iLife 
suite of tools will be investigated in depth. The students will examine the difference between film and video and analog and 
digital technologies. Concepts and information learned in this class will be utilized in future communications classes. 

COMT 3020 Introduction to Television Production (4-V-3) 

This entry-level course in television production emphasizes the basics of cameras, microphones, support audio, lighting, 
recording, graphics, producing, directing and program development and management in a studio environment. Students will 
research, write and produce a studio television program. Prerequisite(s): COMC 2010, COMT 3000. 



Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
^^^ Augusta State University Catalog 



COMT 3022 Theories and Techniques of Editing ( 3-V-3) 

An introductory course in the theory and application of picture and sound f.-flitin'] Dr /jj-Mon and initial hands-on use of 
analog and digital systems. Editing techniques such as capturing, digitizing, color '.ofrc'.iion ^md first assembly are analyzed. 
Prerequisite(s): COMS 2110, COMT 3000. 

COMT 3030 Introduction to Electronic Field Production (EFP) ( 4-V-3) 

Entry-level course in location production of television new/s and feature packages. The study and practice of contemporary 
news and news feature production using electronic news gathering (ENG) and electronic field production (EFPj techniques. 
Students will research, write, produce and edit a complete story which can be added to their portfolio. Prerequisite(s): COMC 
2010. COMT 3000. 

COMT 3040 / COMJ 3040 Broadcast Journalism (3-V-3) 

Historical overview of broadcast journalism in America. Processing local and wire service news for radio and television 
newscasts. Researching, writing and producing broadcast news stories for production in a radio or television project. Significant 
reading and writing assignments. Prerequisite(s): COMC 2010. 

COMT 3050 Introduction to Film History (3-0-3) 

A study of the history and technique of the motion picture concentrating on film from 1890 to 1960. Prerequisite(s): COMC 
2010. 

COMT 3055 History of Film II - 1 960 to Present (3-0-3) 

A look at how the films produced after 1 960 began to reflect the social, political and economic situations in America. Significant 
emphasis will be placed on the classic films of the 1 970s - a time of upheaval in America that resulted in outstanding filmmaking 
and, ultimately, the recognition of film as a major art form. Prerequisite(s): COMC 2010. 

COMT 3060 The Business of Television (3-V-3) 

Discussion and production of contemporary business applications of radio, television and evolving technologies. Significant 
emphasis on oral presentation skills. Students create and produce audio and video teleconferences, multimedia meetings and 
distance training. Prerequisite(s): COMC 2010. 

COMT 3070 Film Appreciation (3-0-3) 

An introduction to the art of the motion picture, including a consideration of camera movement, camera angles, lighting, editing, 
mise en scene, acting, plot and story. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1101-1102 or 1113-1114: HUM 2001-2002. and COMC 2010. 

COMT 3220 Digital Techniques for Television and Cinema (3-V-3) 

In the fields of television and cinema, knowing different digital software packages and techniques is a must. This course 
introduces and teaches a number of digital software technologies that can be used in cinema, broadcast and other media 
based industries. Students will learn the various digital file types, how to manipulate them, and how to incorporate them into a 
variety of multimedia projects. Prerequlsite(s): COMC 2010, COMT 3000. 

COMT 3222 Independent Filmmaking (3-V-3) 

Unleash your creativity with moving pictures. Film is an amazing art form because of its size, texture, and impact. Learn the 
fundamentals of filmmaking (history, cameras, film stocks, and techniques) and how it all fits into the current digital revolution. 
Examine independent and experimental films and learn how they were made. Prerequisite(s): COMC 2010. COMT 3000. 

COMT 3224 Documentary Filmmaking (3-V-3) 

Documentary filmmaking emphasizes production as a process of discovery, experimentation, and collaboration between subject 
and filmmaker. This class will introduce students to the documentary format. Students will explore developing methodologies, 
shooting styles, and editorial strategies. Students will watch, discuss, analyze, and produce a documentary film. Prerequisite(s): 
COMC 2010, COMT 3000. 

COMT 4000 Digital Techniques of Editing (3-V-3) 

An advanced course in the theory and application of digital software editing, including in-depth use of digital editing software. 
The refinement of editing techniques, editing rhythms, and unifying material will be emphasized that integrates and complements 
the editing process. Prerequislte(s): COMS 2010. COMT 3000. COMC 3000. COMT3040.or COMJ 3020. 

COMT 401 / COMD 401 Performance for the Camera (3-0-3) 

An introduction to the craft of performing in video, film, and for the radio. The class will perform from film and video plays, read 
"copy," and present news programs for television. Prerequisite(s): COMC 2010. 

COMT 4030 Filmmaking for the Web (4-V-3) 

This class examines digital environments and instructs students in understanding new principles and skills for creating video 
and audio for the web. The course will cover file formats, creation, editing and delivery of professional moving images and audio 
files for viewing and interaction. Prerequisite(s): COMC 2010. 

Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 233 



COMT 4050 History of Television (3-V-3) 

This course gives students the opportunity to watch the medium evolve from its beginnings in the late 1940s to the present. 
Students will have the opportunity to see the work of pioneers in news and entertainment, and learn how each genre evolved 
as a reflection of the events and lifestyles of the second half of the 20"' century. Video unseen for decades will be screened and 
analyzed. Prerequisite(s): COMC 2010. 

COMT 4200 Writing for Television (3-V-3) 

This is a workshop for new writers who are willing to investigate their talents as writers through experience in writing a variety 
of television genres, including situation comedies, dramatic shows, and sketch comedy programs. Students will adapt style of 
writing to the needs of each situation or program as well as analyze and evaluate the structure and effectiveness of specific 
programs. Prerequisite(s): COMC 2010. 

COMT 4950 Special Topics (3-0-3) 

Advanced-level production projects in radio and television or specialized courses in topics such as current trends in broadcast 
production, programming and technology, etc. Prerequisite(s): COMC 2010, COMC 3000, COMT 3000, COMT 3040, or COMJ 
3020. 

COMT 4960 Internship in Television and Cinema ( 3-V-1 to 3) 

Senior level, in-service radio, television or related field program available as an elective to Telecommunication track students 
who have completed all required Television and Cinema track courses with a grade of C or better. Permission of the instructor, 
a portfolio, a GPA 3.0 or higher. An employer interview may be required. Prerequisite(s): Senior level status and permission 
of instructor 

COMT 4971 Preparation for Senior Thesis/Project in Television and Cinema (1-0-1) 

Preparation for Senior Thesis/Project in Television and Cinema- Create and develop plan for production, research paper or 
script that will be the basis for the student's senior thesis. All elements, including story, scripting and story boards must be 
approved for productions; detailed description of paper, including sources to be used must be approved for papers; concept, 
characters, detailed plot elements must be approved for a script with a minimum "C" grade. Anyone who does not meet the 
criteria at the end of this semester will fail the course and not be allowed to take COMT 4972. COMT 4971 must be repeated. 
Prerequisite(s): COMC 2010, COMT 3040, COMT 3000, Senior level status, and permission of instructor 

COMT 4972 Senior Tfiesis/Project in Television and Cinema (2-0-2) 

Senior Thesis/Project in Television and Cinema-The actual projects will be produced or written. Various deadlines will be set 
by supervising professor to guarantee satisfactory completion, and a contract will be signed with the TV/Cinema track so 
expectations are understood. Failure to meet deadlines promised by midterm will result in a "W." Prerequisite(s): COMT 4971. 

COMW - Professional Writing Courses 

COMW 3600 / ENGL 3600 Creative Writing Worksfiop (Sandhills) (3-0-3) 

Study and application of the techniques of fiction, poetry, and drama. Enrollment in this course entails free participation in the 
Sandhills Writers Conference, attendance at its sessions, and individual conferences with and critiques by its staff. Students 
cannot receive credit for both ENGL 3600 and COMW 3600. Prerequisite(s): COMC 2010. 

COMW 361 Writing Book-Length Prose (3-0-3) 

A workshop-based course which develops each student's idea for a book-length prose work through the critique of several 
chapters during the semester, the idea may be drawn from prose types including the novel, inspirational writing, autobiography, 
family history, nature writing, and long-form feature. The course will provide information on writing the book proposal and 
finding a literary agent. Prerequisite(s): COMC 2010 or permission of the instructor 

COMW 3620 / COMD 3620 / ENGL 3620 Writing for the Theatre (3-0-3) 

A workshop in the writing of one-act and full-length plays or screenplays. Topics include Aristotle and dramatic theory, plot 
structure, character, dialogue, naturalism, symbolism, theme, production problems, and manuscript format. Students will write 
a one-act play or a short screenplay. Students cannot receive credit for more than one of the following: ENGL 3620, COMD 
3620, and COMW 3620. Prerequisite(s): COMC 2010. 

COMW 3630 / ENGL 3630 Writing Song Lyrics and Poems (3-0-3) 

An introductory course in the writing of verse and poetry. Students will study successful songs and poems and write numerous 
songs and poems of their own. Some studio recording and public reading of selected student writing will be required. Students 
cannot receive credit for both ENGL 3630 and COMW 3630. Prerequisite(s): COMC 2010. 

COMW 3650 / ENGL 3650 Grant Writing (3-0-3) 

An introduction to the basic concepts, strategies, and practices essential for producing effective grant proposals. Integrates 
study of grant-writing theory and mechanics with assignments that enable students to apply knowledge in practical form. 

Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
^^^ Augusta State University Catalog 



Develops skills useful to majors across the curriculum and applicatjje in various professional careers. Students cannot receive 
credit for both ENGL 3650 and COMW 3650. Prerequisite(s): COMC 2010. 

COMW 3660 Writing Online (3-0-3) 

Intensive study of w/riting that takes place online. Focus w/ill be on the challenges of collaborative v\^riting over long distance, 
online publications, blogs, web pages, emails, messaging, "open-source" writing, and how these forms of writing differ from 
hard copy writing. Emphasis will be placed on online writing issues confronted in a workplace setting. Prerequisite(s): COMC 
2010. 

COMW 3670 Graphics for Technical Documents (3-0-3) 

Study of the theory and practice of forms of graphics used in business documents, including: basic text enhancements, 
photographs, charts, graphs, tables, pictographs, diagrams, drawings, icons. Students will explore the effective use of color 
and other visual enhancements in graphics and effective placement within a document. While learning to render graphics on 
the computer, students will study how graphics choices persuade the reader, reinforce the document text, and how graphics 
can effectively manipulate data interpretation through tone and appropriate graphics modes. Students will learn appropriate 
and effective methods of integration of graphic materials with written text. Additionally, students will learn successful use of 
graphics in oral presentation of a technical document. Prerequisite(s): COMC 2010. 

COMW 3675 Writing Across Cultures (3-0-3) 

This course examines theories and practices of written document styles, forms and format choices across various cultures, 
especially in the context of international exchange in the technical and business fields. We will study imbedded cultural 
assumptions, cultural taboos, and varying protocols in the writing, method of distribution, and initiation of written technical 
documents for a multi-cultural audience. Prerequisite(s): COMC 2010. 

COMW 3680 / ENGL 3680 Technical Writing (3-0-3) 

Intensive study of the theory and practice of writing procedures, proposals, grants, manuals, reports, summaries of technical 
processes, basic forms of business correspondence, and of creating effective supporting graphics. Attention is given to editing 
skills, effective use of format, headings, table of contents, and appendices, and mastery of tone manipulation through vocabulary, 
syntax, content, and layout. Students communicate complex subject matter to specific audiences, lay and technical, in primary 
technical forms. Students cannot receive credit for both ENGL 3680 and COMW 3680. Prerequisite(s): COMC 2010. 

COMW 461 The Literary Marketplace (3-0-3) 

A study of the writer in the professional worid, this course provides students with marketing skills needed for getting various 
genres of creative writing published in national print and web-based publications. The course explores the roles of editors and 
agents, book and music publishers, and covers areas of the publishing business such as contracts, copyright, adaptations, 
collaborations, manuscript preparation, editing, and ethics. Prerequisite(s): COMC 2010 or Permission of Instructor 

COMW 4940 Writing Creative Non-Fiction (3-0-3) 

A course in writing creative non-fiction. Students will learn how to apply proven techniques of the genre to their own creative 
nonfiction works, analyze numerous models, and receive feedback from classmates and the instructor. Emphasis will be placed 
on the flexibility of the form to include memoir writing, feature stories, essays in verse, and the mosaic essay. Prerequisite(s): 
COMC 2010 and permission of the instructor 

COMW 4950 Selected Topics (3-0-3) 

Intensive study of a specialized topic of professional or creative writing. Prerequisite(s): COMC 2010. 

COMW 4960 Internship in Professional Writing (3-0-3) 

In-service learning experience in the field of professional writing. Prerequisite(s): COMC 2010. senior status and permission 
of instructor. 

COOP - Cooperative Education 

Note: The following zero hour, non-graded courses are for transcript documentation only. 

COOP 2000 Alternating Cooperative Education (0-0-0) 

The student participates in a Co-op work experience related to his or her field of study and alternates between semesters of 
full-time work and enrollment in school full-time. Registration for this course during work semesters is equivalent to full-time 
student status. Alternating positions require a minimum of two work terms. Prerequisite(s): Minimum overall GPA (cumulative 
or adjusted) of 2.5. a declared major with at least 24 semester hours complete toward a baccalaureate degree or one full 
semester (9 hours) toward a master's degree or post- baccalaureate work. Approval from the Career Center's Cooperative 
Education Office. 



Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 235 



COOP 2001 Parallel Cooperative Education (0-0-0) 

A part-time, on-going work plan directly related to the student's field of study. Students must work a minimum of fifteen hours 
per week while continuing enrollment in school. The student can only maintain full-time academic status by being enrolled 
as a full-time student concurrent with their work plan. Prerequisite(s): Minimum overall GPA (cumulative or adjusted) of 2.5, 
a declared major, with at least 24 semester hours complete toward a baccalaureate degree or one full semester (9 hours) 
toward a master's degree or post-baccalaureate work. Minimum of two terms of work experience and approval from the Career 
Center's Cooperative Education Office. 

COOP 2002 Internship (0-0-0) 

A one semester, non-credit, paid work experience related to the student's field of study. The number of work hours is determined 
by the student's individual academic needs and the agency's needs. This course number is not used if the student is enrolled 
in an internship for credit with an academic department. Registration for this course is equivalent to full-time student status 
only if the internship is full-time and the student is not enrolled for course work concurrently during this period. Prerequisite(s): 
Minimum overall GPA (cumulative or adjusted) of 2.5, a declared major, with at least 24 semester hours complete toward a 
baccalaureate degree or one full semester (9 hours) toward a master's degree or post- baccalaureate work. Minimum of one 
term of work experience and approval from the Career Center's Cooperative Education Office. 

COUN - Counseling Education 

Before registering for any of the following courses, an advisor in Counselor Education must be seen. The sequence of the 
courses is very important. 

COUN 6620 Human Growth and Development for Counselors (3-0-3) 

The course is designed to broaden understanding of human growth and development across the life span with emphasis on 
the interwoven domains of development (physical, cognitive, social, and emotional) and the contextual factors influencing each. 
Theoretical, practical, and research perspectives will be examined as they apply to the profession of counseling. 

COUN 6630 Professional Orientation and Ethics (3-0-3) 

This course is an introduction to the role, responsibilities, identity, and functions of the professional counselor. It will also provide 
basic legal and ethical information for issues involving school and community counselors. Resources will be provided to assist 
students in processing and confronting a variety of professional and ethical issues that do not have specific or clear solutions. 
Ideas will be exchanged to help clarify individual positions on many current issues that must be met by counselors. 

COUN 6660 Communication Skills in Counseling (3-0-3) 

A didactic and experiential study of the core dimensions of counseling practice that include verbal and non-verbal skills aimed 
at establishing an empathic relationship that facilitates the client's exploration of developmental problems and assists the 
client's transition to awareness and initiating steps toward cognitive/behavioral change. 

COUN 6680 Theories and Techniques of Counseling (3-0-3) 

An introduction to the theoretical approaches to counseling and their practical applications in a variety of clinical settings. 
Students will examine the effects of different counselor roles and values, ethical and legal considerations, and professional 
organizations. 

COUN 6700 / 7700 Marriage and Family Counseling (3-0-3) 

An introduction to the principles of family systems theory and their applications in family therapy practice. Included are family 
life cycle development, stages of relationships, premarital assessment, marriage enrichment, intervention strategies, divorce 
adjustment, and issues such as codependency, single-parent families, and child, spouse, and elderly abuse. Specific techniques 
for conducting marriage and family therapy will be presented along with considerations of current issues and ethical practices. 
Students completing the course at the 7700 level will complete additional assignments. 

COUN 6720 Career Development Theories and Practice (3-0-3) 

This course will provide student counselors with the knowledge and skills necessary to conduct career counseling aimed at 
providing clients insight and direction related to their vocational goals. Students will examine theories of career development, 
sources of occupational and educational information, life-style and career decision-making processes, assessment instruments 
and program development. 

COUN 6760 Diversity Sensitivity in Counseling (3-0-3) 

This course is designed to introduce the counselor trainee to the many aspects of counseling which are important to specific 
considerations for persons of a race, ethnicity, nationality, gender, sexual orientation, age, or physical disability different from 
her or his own race, ethnicity, nationality, gender, sexual orientation, age, or physical disability. 



Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
^^" Augusta State University Catalog 



COUN 6770 Crisis Intervention Counseling (3-V-3) 

This course is designed to prepare students to respond effectively in critical situations, and to help counsel clients who are 
experiencing crisis events in their lives. Students will learn that crises interventions are founded on theory and be able to apply 
that theory to crisis intervention techniques. Special attention will be paid to counseling approaches for use with circumstantial 
and developmental life crisis. 

COUN 6780 / 7780 School Counseling (3-V-3) 

The course will provide an introduction to current concepts relative to the school counseling profession. Practical application 
of concepts within the diverse range of school environments will be covered. Structuring and implementation of a feasible, 
comprehensive school counseling program will be emphasized. Students completing this course at the 7780 level will complete 
additional course requirements. Prerequisite(s): COUN 6630 and COUN 6660, or permission of the instructor 

COUN 6790 / 7790 Community Counseling (3-V-3) 

The practice of community counseling will be discussed as well as the most current issues and practices for community work 
in the 21st century. Special emphasis will be placed on the practice of diversity, ethics, and the role of the counselor as a 
change agent and advocate. This course will include planning and implementing productive community counseling programs, 
providing students with a basic understanding of the role of the community counselor, service offered by community agencies 
and information regarding the settings in which they are offered. Students completing this course at the 7790 level will complete 
additional course requirements. Prerequisite(s): COUN 6630 and COUN 6660. 

COUN 6800 / 7800 Assessment. Diagnosis, and Intervention (3-0-3) 

This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to develop a knowledge base regarding the nomenclature 
and criteria imperative in the analysis and diagnosis of mental disorders. The student will also have an opportunity to become 
acquainted with treatment suggestions and crises intervention techniques. Students completing this course at the 7800 level 
will complete additional course requirements. 

COUN 6820 Administration and Consultation for School Counselors (3-0-3) 

This is a didactic/experiential course providing beginning counselors with the knowledge necessary to: 1 } develop and administer 
a comprehensive counseling program in school or community settings, and 2) develop the skills necessary to function as a 
consultant in psycho-educational and organizational settings. Prerequisite(s): COUN 6780/7780. 

COUN 6840 Introduction to Addictions Counseling (3-0-3) 

This course is specifically designed to function as a specialty course in the graduate counselor training program. The course 
experience provides an overview of the strategies, methods, and knowledge necessary for the effective identification and 
treatment of a broad range of addictive behaviors. The course will examine the biological, psychological, sociological, and 
behavioral components of addiction. As such, the course will focus on such issues as drug effects, assessment and diagnosis, 
counseling interventions, effects on family functioning and family interventions, relapse prevention, change maintenance 
strategies, primary prevention programming, and the related research. 

COUN 6850 Treatment Planning in Clinical Mental Health Counseling (3-0-3) 

This course is advanced study in theoretical techniques and interventions in counseling. Experiential in nature, the course 
will help students integrate diagnostic, case conceptualization and treatment planning skills, and review empirically-supported 
treatments and best practices for measuring client outcomes in a managed care context. Prerequisite(s): COUN 6680. COUN 
6800. 

COUN 6860 / 7860 Counseling Children and Adolescents (3-0-3) 

This course has been specifically designed for graduate students specializing in the school counseling track and for those 
students in the community counseling specialty who hold a professional interest in working extensively with children and 
adolescents in a variety of community practice settings. The course is designed to address both theoretical and practice 
aspects of counseling children. The course will synthesize concepts from research and practice and will involve students in 
current methods for helping children and adolescents with specific developmental, social, or behavioral problems. Special 
issues relative to counseling exceptional children, as well as children attempting to contend with divorce, death, abuse, satanic 
cults, homelessness, alcoholism, and AIDS will also be addressed. Students completing this course at the 7860 level will 
complete additional course requirements. Prerequisite(s): COUN 6620. 

COUN 6870 Gender Issues In Counseling (3-0-3) 

This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to develop a knowledge base regarding the theories and 
research about gender and sex-role socialization. Biological, cognitive, psychological, and emotional differences between 
males and females are explored. Gender-related problems, situations, and other counseling concerns are addressed (i.e.. 
domestic violence, single-parent families, mid-life crises). Students apply concepts and constructs to develop gender-appropriate 
treatment plans and implement gender-sensitive therapeutic techniques and skills. 

COUN 6880 Counseling Practicum (3-0-3) 

This course is designed to function as the student's first clinical skills-building experience with particular emphasis on helping 
each student develop his/her therapeutic skills with a range of client presenting concerns. Students are required to complete a 

Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture. hours of lab. 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 237 



supervised clinical experience that totals a minimum of 1 00 clock hours. Prerequisite(s): COUN 6630, COUN 6660 and COUN 
6680. 

COUN 6890 Mental Health Counseling Practicum (3-0-3) 

The Practicum in Clinical Mental Health Counseling is designed to function as the first clinical skills building experience with 
particular emphasis on helping each candidate develop her or his therapeutic skills w/ith a range of client presenting concerns 
within a clinical mental health setting. Candidates are required to complete a supervised clinical experience that totals a 
minimum of 100 clock hours. Prerequisite(s): COUN 6630, COUN 6660, COUN 6680, and COUN 6850. 

COUN 6900 Counseling Internship (3-0-3) 

This is the Capstone course for the M.Ed, program in counseling. Counseling Internship is designed to meet certification and 
accreditation standards. This is a tutorial form of instruction designed to be completed in a counseling facility outside of the 
university. The internship provides an opportunity for the student to perform a variety of professional counseling activities that 
a regularly employed staff member in the setting would be expected to perform. The program requires students to complete a 
clinically supervised internship of 300 clock hours each semester. Prerequisite(s): COUN 6880. 

COUN 6920 Counseling Internship II (3-0-3) 

This is the second part of an Internship experience. This is a tutorial form of instruction designed to be completed in a school 
counseling facility. The internship provides an opportunity for the student to perform a variety of professional counseling 
activities that a regularly employed counselor in the schools or community would be expected to perform. The program requires 
students to complete a clinically supervised internship of 300 clock hours to bring the total number of internship hours to 600 
clock hours. Prerequisite(s): COUN 6900. 

COUN 6950 / 7950 Problems and Issues in the Practice of Counseling (VAR 1-3) 

The course is a variable credit, supervised independent study or seminar in contemporary problems and issues in the field 
of counseling. Students will receive instructor supervision and expertise, and complete a collaboratively developed research 
project. Course may be repeated for credit. Students completing this course at the 7950 level will complete additional course 
requirements. Prerequisite(s): Graduate status and prior approval by the faculty instructor or supen/isor 

COUN 7910 Professional Identity and Development in Counseling (V-V-3) 

This course is designed to build upon basic knowledge of the role, responsibilities, identity, and functions of the professional 
counselor. It will provide information on the characteristics and practices of expert counselors. Resources will be provided to 
assist students with initiating personal wellness and professional development plans. Students will write and submit a formal 
proposal for presentation at a professional counselors meeting. Ideas will be exchanged to help clarify individual positions on 
a variety of current issues in counseling. Prerequisite(s): Program admission is required. 

COUN 7930 Advanced Multicultural Awareness for Counselors and Educators (V-V-3) 

This course is designed to build upon a basic knowledge of the cultural context of relationships, issues, and trends in a 
multicultural and diverse society. Factors such as culture, ethnicity, nationality, age, gender, sexual orientation, mental and 
physical characteristics, education, family values, religious and spiritual values, socioeconomic status, and unique characteristics 
of individuals, couples, families, ethnic groups, and communities will be considered. Students also will explore how counselors 
and clients experience crossing cultural boundaries, methods for effecting change related to culture, multicultural strategies for 
working with clients, and multicultural issues in counselor supervision. Prerequisite(s): Program admission or permission of the 
instructor is required. 

COUN 7940 Advanced Counseling Theory (V-V-3) 

This course is designed as a didactic and experiential in-depth study of counseling theories including traditional, multicultural, 
feminist, and developmental perspectives. Formulation and evaluation of the theoretical basis for approaches to counseling 
include a study of historical and contemporary perspectives. Prerequisite(s): Program admission is required. 

COUN 7960 Counseling Supen/ision (V-V-3) 

A comparative study of major approaches to counseling supervision and related research with emphasis on historical foundations 
of supervision, supervisor traits, and application of concepts and techniques to specific practice settings. Prerequisite(s): 
Program admission is required. 

COUN 7965 Advanced Practicum in Counseling Supervision I (V-V-1) 

This course provides practical experience for counseling professionals who will have responsibility directing personal and 
professional development of counselors, promoting counselor competency, and developing and implementing counseling 
services and programs. Students gain practice in the supervisory role over three semesters through their participation as 
individual and/or group supervisors as they are monitored by counseling program faculty. Prerequisite(s): Program admission 
is required; completion of or concurrent enrollment with COUN 7960. 

COUN 7966 Advanced Practicum in Counseling Supervision II (V-V-1) 

This course provides practical experience for counseling professionals who will have responsibility directing personal and 
professional development of counselors, promoting counselor competency, and developing and implementing counseling 

Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
^"^^ Augusta State University Catalog 



services and programs. Students gain practice in the supervisory role over three semesters through their participation as 
individual and/or group supervisors as they are monitored by counseling program faculty. Prerequisite(s): Program admission 
is required: completion of COUN 7960. 

COUN 7967 Advanced Practicum in Counseling Supervision III (V-V-1) 

Ttiis course provides practical experience for counseling professionals who will have responsibility directing personal and 
professional development of counselors, promoting counselor competency, and developing and implementing counseling 
services and programs. Students gain practice in the supervisory role over three semesters through their participation as 
individual and/or group supen/isors as they are monitored by counseling program faculty. Prerequisite(s): Program admission 
is required: completion of COUN 7960. 

COUN 7970 Advanced Seminar in Group Counseling (V-V-3) 

This course is structured as a supervision seminar and is designed for students who have had introductory coursework in 
group techniques, at least one counseling practicum, experience as a group member, and preferably, some experience leading 
groups. It is assumed that students understand fundamental group dynamics, group development theory, the role of the group 
leader, and basic skills necessary to lead groups. The goals of this course are to deepen students' understanding of essential 
group leadership concepts and skills and to help students achieve advanced levels of theoretical conceptualizations in working 
with groups. Prerequisite(s): Program admission is required. 

COUN 7990 Professional and Community Collaboration for Counselors and Educators (V-V-3) 

This experiential and collaborative inter-program course is designed to equip educators with proven skills and tools for initiating 
and sustaining systemic change to transform schools through promoting, leading, and participating in high performance 
integrated educational teams. This course will focus on effective interpersonal and organizational communication related 
to today's pressing issues in American schools. Key areas will include presentation skills, facilitation, team building, and 
organizational change. The course is intentionally designed to be delivered in three intensive weekends to immerse students in 
course content and group dynamics. Prerequisite(s): Program admission or permission of the instructor is required. 



CRJU - Criminal Justice Courses 

CRJU 1103 Introduction to Criminal Justice (3-0-3) 

The history and philosophy of law enforcement, criminal justice administration, and criminal rehabilitation. Criminal justice is 
examined as a product of social forces and as a modern institution which impacts upon other social institutions. Emphasis on 
criminal justice as a process involving many organizations and agencies with diverse clientele and purposes. Prerequisite(s): 
None. 

CRJU 2950 Selected Topics (V-O-V) 

A variable content course. Either 1 ) a faculty-initiated course which allows students the opportunity to enroll in specifically titled 
courses, or 2) a student-initiated directed study at an introductory level. Prerequisite(s): CRJU 1103: permission of instructor; 
and contractual agreement with department chain Only one 2950 course may be included in the major 

CRJU 3329 Introduction to Police Science (3-0-3) 

A survey of the philosophical and historical background of law enforcement and the role it plays in our society today. Emphasis 
will be placed on the development, organization, operation, and results of the different systems of law enforcement in America. 
Prerequisite(s): CRJU 1103, SOCI 1160 or permission of the instructor 

CRJU 3330 / SOCI 3330 Social Deviance (3-0-3) 

Covers theoretical and empirical issues in the understanding and designations of deviant behavior: addresses the analysis or 
the social causes and consequences of deviance, conformity, and societal reactions. Prerequisite(s): SOC1 1101: SOC1 1160. 

CRJU 3331 / SOCI 3331 / SOWK 3331 Youth and Society (3-0-3) 

A study of the history of changing conceptions of childhood, the family, and childhood socialization: the invention of adolescence 
and the various attributions to childhood and adolescence: and a survey of major developmental schemes of adolescence with 
an emphasis on characteristics of American adolescence as conducive to delinquency. Prerequisite(s): SOC1 1101: SOC1 1160: 
CRJU 1103: or SOWK 1101. 

CRJU3332/SOCI3332 Juvenile Delinquency (3-0-3) 

The philosophy, theory, and history of juvenile delinquency, including its causes, preventions, and measurement from sociological 
perspectives. Prerequisite(s): CRJU 1103 or SOCI 1101: SOCI 1160. 



Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 239 



CRJU 3333 Introduction to Corrections (3-0-3) 

A survey of the correctional field, including probation, imprisonment, parole, and community corrections. Specific concern 
will be with the evolution of these programs, their present structure, and current problems. Prerequisite(s): CRJU 1103 or 
permission of instructor 

CRJU 3334 Institutional Corrections (3-0-3) 

A survey of institutional confinement or the punishment and rehabilitation of criminal offenders. Specific concerns will focus 
on the history of confinement, the philosophical, legal, and social justifications of incarceration, and the current problems and 
criticisms of correctional institutions. Prerequisite(s): CRJU 103 or SOCI 1101, or permission of the instructor 

CRJU 3335 Community Corrections (3-0-3) 

A survey of non-institutional corrections in the American administration of justice including relevant legal and philosophical 
issues surrounding those practices. Specific concerns include the use of probation and parole in relation to institutional 
confinement, the variety of contemporary programs, and their presence in society. Prerequisite(s): CRJU 1103 or SOCI 1101, 
SOC1 1160, and permission of the instructor 

CRJU 3336 / SOCI 3336 / WMST 3336 Women, Crime, and the Criminal Justice System (3-0-3) 

A sociological analysis of women as criminal offenders, victims, and as workers in criminal justice fields. Examines how gender 
influences criminal law and the practices of criminal justice agencies. Covers historical perspectives on women and crime, the 
adequacy of contemporary criminological perspectives for explaining female criminality. Prerequisite(s): SOCI 1101 or CRJU 
1103: SOC1 1160. 

CRJU 3341 White Collar Crime (3-0-3) 

The study of criminal abuse of trust and power in corporations and government, including corporate abuse of power against 
owners, employees, publics-in-contact, and the public-at-large, as well as official response to such crimes. Organized crime, 
computer crime, electronic crime, securities fraud, and relevant law enforcement strategies are analyzed and contrasted with 
street crime. Prerequisite(s): CRJU 1103 or SOC1 1101. 

CRJU 4431 / SOCI 4431 Criminology(3-0-3) 

The study of criminal behavior and its treatment. The development of criminal behavior and societal reaction in contemporary 
society are addressed in terms of major social theories of crime and its causation. The treatment and rehabilitation of the 
offender by probation, imprisonment, and parole are addressed in terms of philosophy and policy. Prerequisite(s): CRJU 1103 
or SOCI 1101 or SOCI 1103/PSYC 1103; SOCI 1160; SOCI 3002 and SOCI 3380. 

CRJU 4433 Juvenile Justice (3-0-3) 

The historical development of juvenile justice including the establishment of the juvenile court and juvenile corrections in 
America, including the philosophical, social, and legal justifications of juvenile justice, contrasts the processing of juveniles with 
that of adult offenders, and focuses on contemporary issues and problems in juvenile justice. Prerequisite(s): CRJU 3332 or 
CRJU 4431 or SOCI 4431; or permission of the instructor 

CRJU 4436 / SOCI 4436 Obedience and Authority (3-0-3) 

An examination of the interactions among social structures, societal conditions and social selves that promote obedience to 
authority as well of those that build communities of dissent and resistance. Prerequisite(s): CRJU 1103 or SOC1 1101 or SOCI 
1103/PSYC 1103; SOCI 1160; SOCI 3002 and SOCI 3380. 

CRJU 4441 Violence and the South (3-0-3) 

Explores whether there is a relationship between the South and violence and examines different explanations for southern 
violence. Examines contemporary and historical studies about violence, including racial violence, homicide, violence against 
women, and violence in the criminal justice system. Prerequisite(s): Sociology 1101 or CRJU 1103. 

CRJU 4950 Selected Topics (3-0-3) 

A variable content course. Either as a faculty initiated course which allows students the opportunity to enroll in specifically titled 
courses, or as a student initiated directed study. Prerequisite(s): Junior or senior standing; 20 hours of advanced sociology: 
permission of instructor; and contractual agreement with department chair Only two 4950 courses may be included in the 
major 

CRJU 4960 Undergraduate Internship (Variable) 

A service-learning experience based in an institution/agency, emphasizing the completion of specific tasks and the acquisition 
of specific knowledge, skills, and values under the supervision of Augusta State University, the academic supervisor, and the 
cooperating institution/agency. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor 

CRJU 4990 Undergraduate Research (3-0-3) 

Independent research on a topic of student choice selected in consultation with an instructor, who will supervise the research. 
The student must submit a contract proposal for the research project prior to enrolling in the course. Prerequisite(s): Junior or 
Senior Standing; 12 hours of advanced criminal justice courses; and contractual agreement with department chair 

Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
'^'^^ Augusta State University Catalog 



CSCI - Computer Science Courses 

CSCI 1200 Introduction to Computers and Programming (2-2-3) 

The nature of computers and computing, hardware, software and systems. The use of computers in the solution of problems. 
Coverage of algorithm development and programming, information storage and accessibility, and computer networking and 

internetworking. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1101 or MATH 1111. 

CSCI 1210 Introduction to Java Programming (3-0-3) 

An introduction to the basic concepts, logic, and syntax of the Java programming language. The use of elementary programming 
techniques and algorithms is presented. Topics include: arithmetic operations, input/output, data types, variables, selection 
and control statements, applications, applets, and event-driven programming. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1101 or MATH 1111 or 
MATH 1113 or permission of instructor 

CSCI 1 301 Principles of Computer Programming I (3-2-4) 

A rigorous study of the principles of computer programming with emphasis on problem solving methods which result in con-ect, 
well-structured programs. Other topics: an introduction to data representation, data types and control structures, functions, and 
structured data types. Prerequisite(s): CSCI 1210 or CSCI 1200 or MATH 1113 or MATH 1220. 

CSCI 1302 Principles of Computer Programming II (3-0-3) 

A continuation of problem solving methods and algorithm development. Topics include data structures and their implementation, 
algorithm development and programming. The emphasis is on program development and style. Prerequisite(s): CSCI 1301 
(grade of C or better). 

CSCI 2120 Introduction to C# Programming (3-0-3) 

This course introduces the fundamental principles of object-oriented programming using C#. The focus is on applications 
development using object-oriented design and implementation techniques. Topics include: objects, classes, inheritance, 
interfaces, GUI components, layout managers, events, multimedia, exception handling, and I/O files. Prerequisite(s): MATH 
1111 or MATH 1113. 

CSCI 2060 Programming for Science and Engineering (3-2-4) 

An introduction to computer programming using a high-level language supporting mathematical programming. Emphasis will 
be on methods for solving numerical problems. Programming assignments will be based on typical mathematical problems. 
Corequisite: MATH 2011. 

CSCI 2700 Ethics in Computer Science (2-0-2) 

A study of the ethical, social and legal impacts of computers and their applications. Specific attention will be paid to professional 
responsibility, issues of privacy, property rights, legal issues and real risks. Corequisite(s): CSC1 1302. 

CSCI 2950 Selected Topics (Variable) 

Modern concepts in special areas of computer science. Prerequisite(s): Permission of Instructor. 

CSCI 2980 Applications Seminar (1-0-1) 

Study and analysis of current computer applications, current computer hardware and computer-related careers. Corequisite: 
CSCI 1301 or CSCI 2060. 

CSCI 3030 Matfiematical Stnjctures for Computer Science (3-0-3) 

The course prepares Computer Science majors for advanced study by emphasizing components of Discrete Mathematics 
related to Computer Science. The topics include sets, functions and relations, logic. Boolean algebra, graph theory, proof 
techniques and matrices. Examples will emphasize Computer Science applications. Prerequisite(s): MATH 2011 or MATH 
1220. either with C or better. 

CSCI 31 70 Computer Organization (2-2-3) 

A study of computer architecture and organization. Topics range from Boolean algebra and logic design, through microprocessor 
construction to performance enhancements. Laboratory projects construct simple digital circuits and devices. Prerequisite(s): 
CSCI 1302 with C or better 

CSCI 3271 Operating Systems I (3-0-3) 

A study of computer operating systems and related computer architecture topics. Topics include process management, 
scheduling, synchronization, deadlock, memory management, and virtual memory. Labs illustrate operating systems principles. 
Prerequisite(s): CSCI 1302 with C or better. 



Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 241 



CSCI 3300 Programming Languages (3-0-3) 

A comparative study of programming languages to prepare the student to learn and evaluate such languages. Programming 
assignments in several languages to illustrate features of the languages. Prerequisite(s): CSCI 1302 with C or better. 

CSCI 3370 Assembly Language Programming (3-0-3) 

A study of computer systems and programming at the assembly language level. Topics include computer structure, instruction 
execution, addressing techniques, digital representation of data, assemblers and associated system programs, and control of 
input/output devices. Prerequisite(s): CSCI 1302 with C or better. 

CSCI 3400 Data Structures (3-0-3) 

A study of the techniques for representation and manipulation of structured data within a digital computer. Programming 
assignments illustrating a variety of data structures. Prerequisite(s): CSCI 1302 and CSCI 3030. both with C or better 

CSCI 3410 Database Systems (3-0-3) 

Logical and physical database organization, data models, design issues, and secondary storage considerations. Emphasis is 
on actual participation in the design and implementation of databases. Prerequisite(s): CSCI 1302 with C or better 

CSCI 3500 Applied Theory of Computing (3-0-3) 

A study of the major theoretical topics needed for a well-rounded knowledge of computer science. These will include automata, 
formal languages, asymptotic, NP-completeness, formal verification and the design of algorithms. Prerequisite(s): CSCI 3030 
and CSCI 3400. both with C or better 

CSCI 3600 Internet Programming (3-0-3) 

This is an advanced course in Internet programming for real-world business applications. The focus is on the complete 
application development cycle including analysis and design, implementation, verification, and demonstration/support. Course 
topics include multi-tier application design, network programming, XML, web server and client programming, JavaScript, AJAX, 
and web services. Prerequisite(s): CSCI 1301, Principles of Computer Programming, and CSCI 3410, Database Systems, or 
permission of the instructor 

CSCI 4272 Operating Systems II (3-0-3) 

A continuing study of computer operating systems and architecture. Topics include distributed operating systems, distributed 
process coordination, distributed file systems, protection and security, distributed resource management, multiprocessor 
systems, distributed database systems. Prerequisite(s): CSCI 3271 with C or better 

CSCI 4280 TCP/IP Protocol Analysis (3-0-3) 

Introduces network packet analysis and network traffic analysis techniques. Course provides in-depth coverage of the TCP/IP 
protocol suite. Popular diagnostic tools are used to monitor protocols in action and to understand how the network protocols 
work. Prerequislte(s): AIST 2320 and AIST 2330, or permission of instructor. 

CSCI 4711 Software Engineering (3-0-3) 

The software development process is examined. Current tools and techniques of software system analysis, design, 
implementation, and maintenance are presented in conjunction with case studies and team-oriented projects. Topics include 
process modeling, logic modeling, object-oriented modeling, UML, software metrics, prototyping, and software security. 
Prerequisite(s): Senior standing and permission of instructor 

CSCI 471 2 Senior Capstone Project (3-2-4) 

An individual or group project in the application of computer science. Emphasis is on the production of real-world software 
systems and may be conducted in cooperation with an external organization such as a commercial company or public agency. 
Prerequisite(s): CSCI 4711 with C or better. 

CSCI 4800 Compiler Writing (3-0-3) 

An examination of compiler techniques used in generating machine code. Topics covered include scanning and parsing, code 
generating, optimization and error recovery. Programming projects in compiler construction. Prerequisite(s): CSCI 3370 and 
CSCI 3500, both with C or better 

CSCI 4820 Computer Graphics (3-0-3) 

An examination of the hardware and software components of graphics systems and their applications. Programming 
assignments to illustrate the creation and manipulation of graphic displays using a simple graphics package. Prerequisite(s): 
CSCI 1302 with C or better 

CSCI 4950 Selected Topics (Variable) 

Modern concepts in special areas of computer science. Prerequisite(s): Permission of Instructor and approval by Computer 
Science Curriculum Committee. 



Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
'^^'^ Augusta State University Catalog 



CSCI 4960 Undergraduate Internship (Variable: 1-5) 

An internship In a service-learning experience based in an institution or agency, emphasizing the connpletlon of a specific task 
and the acquisition of specific knowledge and skills under the supervision of Augusta State University and the cooperating 
institution or agency. Prerequisite(s): Permission of Department Chair 

CSCI 4980 Computer Science Seminar (Variable: 1-2) 

To expose the students to current areas of computer research and advanced topics in computer science, such as artificial 
intelligence, nonprocedural languages, CASE tools and software engineering, parallel computing, computer modeling and 
expert systems. Prerequisite(s): Permission of Instructor 

CSCI 4990 Undergraduate Research (Variable) 

Individual research In computer science. A minimum of three hours per week for each semester hour credit. Prerequisite(s): 
Permission of Department Chair. 

CSCI 6950 Selected Topics (Variable) 

A variable content course intended to meet the needs and interests of graduate students in selected areas of computer science. 
Prerequisite(s): Permission of Department Chair and Instructor 

ECED - Early Childhood Courses 

ECED 3121 Early Childhood Mathematics Education (2-2-3) 

The course will focus on mathematics as a conceptual approach enabling children to acquire clear and stable concepts by 
constructing meanings in the context of physical situations and allows mathematical abstractions to emerge from empirical 
experiences. The students will be expected to Integrate knowledge of mathematics, learning, pedagogy, and students and 
apply that knowledge to teaching mathematics. Prerequisite(s): Courses in Block I and Block II. 

ECED 31 51 Early Childhood Curriculum (2-2-3) 

Students will be expected to demonstrate knowledge of theory and practices necessary to plan and Implement curriculum for 
Individual children and groups; to systematically develop and conduct assessments of individual children; and to engage in 
reflection about their practices. Prerequisite(s): Admission to Teacher Education. 

ECED 3161 Classroom Management for Learning (2-2-3) 

Management and Family Involvement fosters the attitudes, skills, and knowledge necessary for the effective management of 
productive learning environments. Issues such as management of students' behavior, classroom procedures, and classroom 
organization, situated within and related to the larger framework of successful planning and conduct of instruction, are 
addressed. Prerequisite(s): Admission to Teacher Education. 

ECED 3212 Literacy I: Basic Literacy Instruction for Early Childhood Education (2-2-3) 

This course is designed to help beginning early childhood teachers learn how to teach reading, writing, oral language 
development, and listening In their classrooms. It will focus on the best practice supported by research In these fields and 
will emphasize how the teacher can set up a classroom that fosters literacy learning for students aged 5-12. Prerequisite(s): 
Courses in Block I. 

ECED 3231 Early Childhood Science Education (2-2-3) 

This course will engage prospective teachers in active learning that will address Issues, events, problems, and process skills In 
science In grades Pre-K through 5. The students will be expected to integrate knowledge of science, learning, and pedagogy 
and apply that knowledge to science teaching. Prerequisite(s): Courses in Block I. 

ECED 3241 Early Childhood Social Studies Education I- Geography and History in K-5 Curriculum (2-2-3) 

This course will develop an understanding of the themes and learning standards identified in both the national geography 
standards and the national history standards. Students will explore the implications of these understandings for instruction and 
assessment activities in these content areas that are appropriate to K-5 learners. Prerequisite(s): Courses in Block I. 

ECED 3252 Language Arts Curriculum (2-2-3) 

The development of listening, speaking, and writing skills of children along with effective uses of language in oral/written 
communication are stressed. Prerequisite(s): Admission to Teacher Education. 

ECED 431 3 Literacy II: Advanced Literacy Instruction for Early Childhood Education (2-2-3) 

This course will examine reading and writing difficulties encountered in the classroom. It will emphasize diagnostic/prescriptive 
teaching through experience with informal diagnostic assessment tools. Students will then use results of these assessments 
to design and implement tutoring for children experiencing difficulties. Prerequisite(s): Courses in Block I and II. 

Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
Augusta State University Cataiog 2010-2011 243 



ECED 4322 Early Childhood Mathematics Education (2-2-3) 

This course will focus on mathematics as a conceptual approach enabling children to acquire clear and stable concepts by 
constructing meanings in the context of physical situations and allows mathematical abstractions to emerge from empirical 
experiences. The students will be expected to integrate knowledge of mathematics, learning, pedagogy, students and 
assessment, and apply that knowledge to teaching mathematics in grades Pre-K through 5 in the context of the recommendations 
of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) and the Georgia Performance Standards (GPS). Prerequisite(s): 
Admission to ECED Program: successful completion of Block I and II courses. 

ECED 4342 Early Childhood Social Studies Education II- Civics. Sociology. Economics in K-5 Curriculum (2-2-3) 

This course will develop an understanding of the national social studies standards. Special emphasis will be placed on 
instructional approaches that actively engage young learners in concept formulation, skill introduction and development, 
performance assessment. Prerequislte(s): Courses in Blocks I and II. 

ECED 4381 The Creative Arts (2-2-3) 

Designed to meet the unique needs of the early childhood regular classroom teacher; this course, based on the arts infusion 
model, will emphasize aesthetic perception, creative expression, cultural heritage, and aesthetic valuing as reflected in the 
content areas of music, creative dramatics, movement and the visual arts. Prerequisite(s): Courses in Blocks 1 and 2. 

ECED 4491 Early Childhood Apprenticeship/Seminar (0-30-15) 

Students are placed with selected master teachers for an entire semester during which they teach in the curriculum areas 
for which they are seeking certification. During the semester the apprentice teacher, under the supervision of the master 
teacher, assumes the responsibilities of professional teaching practice. Students reflect on and synthesize the conceptual and 
theoretical constructs of pedagogy with the complexity of practice. Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of all components 
of early childhood sequence. 

ECON - Economics Courses 

Note: in order to enroll in any ECON course numbered 3000-4950, a student must be accepted into the James M. Hull 
College of Business (see p. 167) and meet the listed prerequisites for the class. 

ECON 1810 Introduction to Economics (3-0-3) 

A survey course for non-business majors. It covers both macro and micro-economics and is aimed at developing an 
understanding of economic policies and problems. This course may not be taken for credit if a student has earned credit in 
ECON 2106 or ECON 2105 or their equivalents. Prerequisite(s): None. 

ECON 2105 Macroeconomics (3-0-3) 

This introductory course explains the nature of the economic problems which any society must solve and how a mixed economy 
solves these problems. Topics covered include supply and demand, income and employment, money and banking, and fiscal 
policy. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1101 or MATH 1111 with a grade of C or better. 

ECON 2106 Microeconomics (3-0-3) 

The determination of prices and output levels and the explanation of economic equilibrium of individual economic units-the 
consumer, the firm, and the industry. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1101 or MATH 1111 with a grade of C or better 

ECON 3105 Intermediate Macroeconomics (3-0-3) 

This course will explain, at an Intermediate level, the major controversies and theories that have shaped macroeconomics. 
Students will learn to apply these theories in order to understand current International and national news. Prerequisite(s): 
ECON 2105 and MATH 1220 (or MATH 2011) with grades of C or better in each course. 

ECON 3106 Intermediate Microeconomics (3-0-3) 

This course develops modern mlcroeconomlc theory at an Intermediate level and applies it to a large number of personal, 
business, and global public policy cases. Prerequisite(s): ECON 2106 and MATH 1220 (or MATH 2011) with grades of C or 
better in each course. 

ECON 4810 Economic Development of the United States (3-0-3) 

Traces development of economic institutions and policies, especially since 1860; deals with agriculture, manufacturing, 
commerce, transportation, money and banking, and the repercussions of periods of prosperity and depression. Prerequisite(s): 
C's or better in ECON 2106 and ECON 2105 or in ECON 1 81 0. 

ECON 4820 International Economics and Finance (3-0-3) 

The theory of international trade, balance of payments, exchange rates, monetary movements, capital markets, and commercial 
policy. Implications of international financial reforms and international economic integration. Prerequisite(s): ECON 2106 and 
ECON 2105, with grades of C or better and 50 semester hours. 

Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=varlable. 
^^^ Augusta State University Catalog 



ECON 4830 Public Sector Economics and Policy Analysis (3-0-3) 

This seminar-style course uses intermediate-level microeconomic theory to examine taxation and public expenditure and 
analyzes global public policy (e.g., climate change, communicable diseases, and transnational terrorism), Prerequisite(s): 
ECON 3106 with a grade of C or better 

ECON 4950 Selected Topics in Contemporary Economic Tlieory and Practice (3-0-3) 

A course and/or directed study of a major issue, practice, or problem in the area of economics. Content to be decided based 
on needs and professional objectives of students and the experience and availability of faculty. Prerequisite(s): Permission of 
the advisor to use the course in the area of the major and senior standing. 

ECON 4999 Economic Concepts (3-0-3) 

This course is designed to cover the subject of introductory micro and macro economics. It includes selected topics of 
intermediate micro and macro theory. Prerequisite(s): Graduate (MBA) student status. 

ECON 6800 National and International Economics for Management (3-0-3) 

This course demonstrates how economic theory is applied to national and international managerial decision-making. 
Prerequisite(s): Graduate (MBA) student status, ACCT 4999, ECON 4999, FINC 3400, and MATH 3110 or equivalent. 

ECON 6950 Current Issues In Economics (3-0-3) 

A variable content course individually designed to meet the needs, interests, and professional objectives in business 
administration. Prerequisite(s): Graduate (MBA) student status and ECON 4999 or equivalent. 

EDLR - Educational Leadership Courses 

EDLR 2900 Leadership in Mentoring and Tutoring (2-2-3) 

This course introduces university students to literacy training in mentoring and tutoring. 

EDLR 6205 Capstone in Educational Leadership (0-6-3) 

A culminating portfolio (electronic and/or hard copy) will allow the student to synthesize the concepts and content learned in the 
educational leadership program. The portfolio will tDe presented in a public forum. 

EDLR 6400 Fundamentals of Educational Leadership (2-2-3) 

This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of educational administration. Major concepts in administration 
will be covered leading to a conceptual understanding and competence for effective school leadership. School/District-level 
performance-based field/lab exercises required. 

EDLR 641 Educational Personnel Administration (2-2-3) 

Organizational dimensions and human resource planning will be discussed as they pertain to recruitment, selection, placement 
and induction, staff development, appraisal, rewards, collective negotiations, and legal, ethical and policy issues in the 
administration of human resources. School/District-level performance-based field/lab exercises required. 

EDLR 6420 Educational Business Administration (2-2-3) 

This course surveys the non-instructional areas of educational administration. Topics studied include the management of 
finance, information, time records, physical facilities, and resource management. The management aspects of related topics 
such as student affairs, personnel services, sensitive educational programs, special education services and other public and 
private educational arrangements are also discussed as part of the course. School/District-level performance-based field/lab 
exercises required. 

EDLR 6430 School Law (2-2-3) 

This is a survey of the field of school law emphasizing the legal requirements of managing the public school, the legal status 
of teachers and students, group discrimination law, tort liability, legal controls of school finance, and the issues of religion and 
public education. School/District-level performance-based field/lab exercises required. 

EDLR 6440 Developing Professional Learning Communities (3-0-3) 

This course prepares teacher leader candidates to develop and implement professional learning communities in their schools. 
School/District-level performance-based field/lab exercises required. 

EDLR 6500 Curriculum Development for Educational Leaders (A/S) (2-2-3) 

Problems of the school, teaching, and curriculum development; emphasis on the preparation and implementation of curriculum. 
School/District-level performance-based field/lab exercises required. 



Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 245 



EDLR 6550 Instructional Supervision for Educational Leaders (2-2-3) 

This course is designed to introduce students to an understanding of their supervisory role to all personnel in the school/district 
setting. Students will develop the awareness, understanding, and capability related to the concepts of supervisory leadership, 
employ adult learning theory, encourage human relations, provide staff development, apply administrative functions, and 
organize for change in a collaborative mode with the administrator, teaching staff, adjunct faculty, non-contractual school 
personnel and community. School/Dlstrict-level performance-based field/lab exercises required. 

EDLR 661 The Principalship (2-2-3) 

Competencies required for effective and productive educational leadership will be discussed: theory of change, leadership, 
organization, instruction, human resource development, school climate, evaluation and assessment. A field experience 
component (shadow-a-principal) is included. School/District-level performance-based field/lab exercises required. 

EDLR 6620 Human Relations for Educational Leaders (2-2-3) 

This course is designed to provide candidates in educational leadership knowledge, performance, and attitudinal competencies 
as they relate to principles of human relations and group dynamics: communication, motivation, attitudes, conflict resolution, 
positive energy, and group leadership. School/District-level performance-based field/lab exercises required. 

EDLR 6630 Administration of Literacy Programs (2-2-3) 

This course is designed to introduce educators to theories and practices involved in creating and supervising literacy programs. 
School/District-level performance-based field/lab exercises required. 

EDLR 6640 Institute for Current and Aspiring Educational Leaders (2-2-3) 

This course is designed as a comprehensive institute for aspiring and current educational leaders. A variety of resources will be 
provided to give an overview of what demonstrates effective school leadership through the medium of foundational leadership 
course themes (honesty, inner coherence, courage, keen sense of justice, right use of power, and "for the common good") and 
personal transformational leadership principles. School/Dlstrict-level performance-based field/lab exercises required. 

EDLR 6650 Grants Writing for Educational Leadership (2-2-3) 

This course is designed to allow students the opportunity to learn methods/processes of grants writing, I.e., project development, 
funding source development, and proposal writing. School/District-level performance-based field/lab exercises required. 

EDLR 6900 Practicum in Educational Leadership I (0-2-1) 

This course is designed to provide students with leadership opportunities in the solution of an administrative or leadership 
problem at the school site. In collaboration with the building level coach, performance based, building level projects will be 
identified, planned, designed, implemented, and evaluated. Prerequisite(s): none. 

EDLR 6901 Practicum in Educational Leadership II (0-2-1) 

This course is designed to provide students with leadership opportunities In the solution of an administrative or leadership 
problem at the school site. In collaboration with the building level coach, performance based, building level projects will be 
identified, planned, designed, implemented, and evaluated. Prerequisite(s): EDLR 6900. 

EDLR 6902 Practicum in Educational Leadership III (0-2-1) 

This course is designed to provide students with leadership opportunities in the solution of an administrative or leadership 
problem at the school site. In collaboration with the building level coach, performance based, building level projects will be 
Identified, planned, designed, Implemented, and evaluated. Prerequisite(s): EDLR 6900 and EDLR 6901. 

EDLR 6950 Selected Topics in Educational Leadership (2-2-3) 

This course examines problems In the light of recent knowledge and research In educational leadership. The focus Is on 
specifically designated areas of educational leadership. School/Dlstrict-level performance-based field/lab exercises required. 

EDLR 6990 Practices in Teacher Leadership (2-2-3) 

This course examines the role of teacher leaders in guiding and supporting Instructional planning to Improve academic 
achievement for all students. The course emphasizes field-based coaching and mentoring experiences that allow the teacher 
leader to demonstrate the content expertise, pedagogical knowledge, interpersonal skills, planning skills, and supervision skills 
needed to successfully guide the process of effective teaching and learning In a school setting. 

EDLR 7000 Selected Topics in Educational Leadership (2-2-3) 

This course examines problems In the light of recent knowledge and research in educational leadership. Focus Is on specifically 
designated areas of educational leadership. School/District-level performance-based field/lab exercises required. 

EDLR 7110 Supen/ision for Teacher Support Specialists (2-2-3) 

This course is designed to introduce educators to the theories and practices involved In supporting and supervising apprentice 
student teachers, interns, other field experience students, new teachers, school volunteers, substitute teachers, etc. It will 
provide opportunities for the participants to develop cognitive and affective skills necessary for guiding their proteges, etc. in 

Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
'^^^ Augusta State University Catalog 



planning, implementing, and evaluating classroom instruction and class room management. This is the first of two courses 
required for teacher support specialist endorsement. School/District-level performance-based field/lab exercises required. 

EDLR 7120 Internship for Teacher Support Specialists (0-6-3) 

This is the second course in a two course series for the teacher support specialist endorsement. This internship is designed 
to allow the support educator to demonstrate and apply knowledge, skills, and attitudes of supportive supervision in a clinical 
setting. Emphasis will be placed on the demonstration of specific support skills as required to supervise field experience 
students, student teachers, beginning teachers, veteran teachers, substitute teachers, school volunteers and others. School/ 
Central Office improvement projects required. 

EDLR 7130 Philanthropic Development for Educational Leaders (3-0-3) 

This course encompasses an ethical framework for addressing the roles of educational leaders in regards to leading, managing, 
and overseeing philanthropic development and fundraising activities. 

EDLR 7351 Internship I (0-2-1) 

Performance-based internship in Educational Leadership for students enrolled in the Educational Specialist program. 

EDLR 7352 Internship II (0-2-1) 

Performance-based internship in Educational Leadership for students enrolled in the Educational Specialist program. 
Prerequisite(s): EDLR 7351. 

EDLR 7353 Internship III (0-2-1) 

Performance-based internship in Educational Leadership for students enrolled in the Educational Specialist program. 
Prerequisite(s): EDLR 7351 and EDLR 7352. 

EDLR 7420 Economics of Public Education (3-0-3) 

The course is designed to create an understanding of economic principles so that the candidate becomes aware of how 
changes in the macro economy can have an influence on public institutions. Emphasis will be placed on the analysis of policy 
issues and where economic trends influence public schools. 

EDLR 7450 Public School Finance (2-2-3) 

The course will examine the equity and efficiency of tax supported public education, current trends in funding of public 
education and administrative tasks of the budget process such as determining needs, establishing cost, compensating 
personnel, purchasing, accounting, auditing, inventorying, warehousing, and paying the bills will be studied. School/District- 
level performance-based field/lab exercises required. 

EDLR 7460 Leadership Styles (2-2-3) 

This course provides the opportunity for students to study leadership theory and effective management practices in American 
and International organizations. School/District-level performance-based field/lab exercises required. 

EDLR 7461 Leading Educational Change (3-0-3) 

This course addresses change theories, how they apply to reform measures in schools, and the impact of change on teaching 
and learning. Candidates apply strategies for leading and managing change in schools. 

EDLR 7470 School Facilities (2-2-3) 

This course surveys the school facilities needed to provide a suitable teaching/learning environment necessary to meet current 
and emerging education needs. The management aspects related to topics such as planning, modernizing, risk management. 
and technology are also discussed as part of the course. School/District-level performance-based field/lab exercises required. 

EDLR 7500 Organizational Development in Education (2-2-3) 

This course will introduce the student to the unique organizational behaviors of educational institutions. The processes of 
leadership, organization, development, theory, decision-making, and administrative processes will be studied. The overreaching 
goal will be to develop leadership traits that will directly facilitate and impact levels of teaching and learning. School/District-level 
performance-based field/lab exercises required. Prerequisite(s): admission to the Ed.S. program in Educational Leadership. 

EDLR 7570 Ethics and Issues in Educational Leadership (2-2-3) 

This course addresses educational leadership as a crucial component in improving school effectiveness and student 
achievement. Students will examine and develop advocacies and ideological platforms for moral and ethical dimensions of 
leadership centered around purpose, values, and beliefs. The course examines problems and emerging practices in light of 
recent knowledge, research and societal demographics related to school leadership. School/District-level performance-based 
field/lab exercises required. 



Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 247 



EDLR 7960 School Performance Analysis and Evaluation for Educational Leaders (3-0-3) 

This course is designed to provide candidates with an understanding of the relevant domains of school performance (DoSP). 
The course introduces candidates to the identification, measurement, analysis, synthesis and evaluation of relevant DoSP and 
the implications for school improvement. 

EDTD - Teacher Education Courses 

EDTD 3011 Educational Technology (3-0-3) 

Examines creative use and assessment of various computer platforms, specialty hardware, integrated software, presentation 
software, communication software, and information systems which are directly related to effective teaching. Students will 
participate in and complete training for InTech, an intensively structured Georgia Department of Education Professional 
Development Program. Upon satisfactory completion of this course (minimum grade of B), students will earn certification in 
InTech. 

EDTD 491 Education Practicum (0-3-3) 

A year long practicum course designed for students who have a degree, have a teaching job and are seeking certification only. 
A mentor teacher and university faculty member will work with the student to support the student's teaching. Students will be 
supervised as they plan, reflect, and refine their teaching practice. Prerequisite(s): Post-baccalaureate status. 

EDTD 4950 Selected Topics (1-6 hrs) 

A variable content course intended to meet the needs and interests of undergraduate students in selected areas of education. 
Prerequisite(s): Permission of department chair. 

EDTD 601 Teaching for Understanding (3-0-3) 

In this course, students will be introduced to the tenets of Teaching for Understanding, the learning theory underlying Teaching 
for Understanding, and the structure and organization of the masters program and portfolio. Students will be able to develop 
and evidence their ability to apply the Principles of Teaching for Understanding. Students will be able to develop and explain 
prototype units that apply the principles of Teaching for Learning. Prerequisite(s): Admission to graduate program 

EDTD 6011 Instructional Technology Applications (3-0-3) 

This course will examine and evaluate seven basic technology strands as they relate to the instructional process: (1 ) curriculum 
integration, (2) productivity, (3) operating systems and networking, (4) telecommunications and on-line services, (5) distance 
learning-exploration, (6) multimedia/presentations, (7) desktop publishing. Students previously successfully completing EDTD 
3011 or the equivalent test-out may not take EDTD 6011 . Prerequisite(s): Admission to Graduate Program. 

EDTD 6012 Qualitative Research in Education (2-2-3) 

The course will include an oveni/iew of the qualitative research process, its methods, goals and foundations. Students will then 
employ several of the strategies in a mini-action research project aimed at improved practice within their classrooms/schools. 

EDTD 61 20 Basic Instruction in Literacy (2-2-3) 

This course focuses on current research regarding effective instructional strategies in the area of reading. It is intended 
for students who have never had a course in literacy instruction or who have had one more than five years ago. Informal 
assessment and authentic assessment are included. This course is required for the Reading Endorsement. Prerequisite(s): 
Admission to the graduate program. 

EDTD 6121 Research in Language Arts Education (2-2-3) 

Students in this course will examine current research and initiatives concerning English Language Arts Education, including 
the areas of reading, writing, listening, speaking, and using media. The philosophical underpinnings of a variety of curricular 
and instructional approaches will be examined. Results of these studies will be compared to the recommendations made in 
Standards for English Language Arts. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the graduate program. 

EDTD 6131 Research in Social Science Education (2-2-3) 

This course will examine research in strategic learning and schema theory and the implications for social science curriculum 
and instruction. 

EDTD 6141 Research in Mathematics Education (2-2-3) 

This course will examine research models related to the teaching and learning of mathematics. Emphasis will be on development 
of the student's ability to search, read, interpret, and critique research literature. Implications for curriculum and instruction in 
mathematics will be derived. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the graduate program. 

EDTD 6151 Research in Science Education (2-2-3) 

The students in this course will research current literature and initiatives concerning the teaching of science. Areas will include 
but not be limited to initiatives espoused by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and the National 

Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
•^^" Augusta State University Catalog 



Science Teachers Association (NSTA). Other areas of study will include the results found by authors conducting research 
in K-12 classrooms. The results of this research will be compared to the recommendations made in the National Science 
Education Standards. Prerequisite(s): Admission to graduate program. 

EDTD 6221 Best Practices in Language Arts (2-2-3) 

This course focuses on helping teachers learn the basic development and integration of skills in the areas of reading, writing, 
listening, and speaking as well as how to effectively implement these skills in the classroom. Topics such as spelling, grammar, 
speaking and writing process are also addressed along with practice in informal, formal, and authentic assessment. 

EDTD 6222 Current Best Practice in Literacy (2-2-3) 

This course focuses on helping teachers learn to implement current best instructional practice in literacy in their classrooms. 
It will emphasize assessment and remediation for students experiencing literacy difficulties. This is the second course of the 
Reading Endorsement series. Prerequisite(s): EDTD 6120. 

EDTD 6223 Applications of Effective Reading Strategies (1-4-3) 

This course will examine best reading practices in schools, implementation of these practices in classrooms, and the research 
upon which they are founded. These practices will include, but will not be limited to, the following: assessment and remediation, 
content area reading, and program planning at the classroom and school levels. Educational theory and practice will come 
together to enable students to development strategies to employ best reading practices within their field and classroom. 
Prerequisite(s): EDTD 6120 and EDTD 6222 - Iftfiis course is to be used to fulfill M.Ed, program requirements, admission to 
graduate program required. 

EDTD 6224 Writing across the Curriculum (2-2-3) 

Designed for content area teachers (grades 4-12) who wish to use writing as a tool to enhance student understanding. Emphasis 
is placed upon teaching for understanding by taking advantage of the contributions of writing strategies and processes to 
subject area thinking and achievement. Topics include types of writing; use of journals; strategies for improving writing skills; 
strategies in math, science, social studies, English/language arts, art and music; and assessment. Prerequisite(s): Admission 
to the graduate program. 

EDTD 6225 Reading across the Curriculum (2-2-3) 

Designed for content area teachers (grades 4-12) who wish to improve their students' ability to read and comprehend subject 
area materials. Emphasis is placed upon teaching for understanding by taking advantage of the contributions of literacy 
processes (listening, speaking, thinking, and reading) to content area achievement. Topics include readability of texts; 
vocabulary development; trade books; strategies to improve reading in math, science, social studies, literature, physical and 
health education; study techniques; and assessment. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the graduate program. 

EDTD 6228 Using Children's Literature in the Classroom (2-2-3) 

This course is designed to familiarize students with a variety of current literature for children and young adolescents. Students 
will design strategies for utilizing literature in the classroom as a basis for sound language arts instruction and as a means 
to integrate reading and literature throughout the curriculum and across various content areas. Issues of student motivation. 
meeting adolescent needs, reading instruction, response to literature, connections to writing and assessment will be addressed. 
Prerequisite(s): Admission to master's program. 

EDTD 6231 Current Best Practices in Social Science Instruction (2-2-3) 

In this course students will examine three models of inquiry centered social science instruction: historical investigations. 
simulation problem solving with decision tree strategies, and hypothesis testing. All three models emphasize the development 
of conceptual understanding and the integral use of complex thinking skills in learning subject matter. Students will examine 
adaptations of these models to learners of varied ages and developmental characteristics. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the 
graduate program. 

EDTD 6232 Science and Social Studies Pedagogy (2-2-3) 

This course will examine best practices and the application of current research on science and social studies pedagogy. This 
course is meant as an introduction to teaching science and social studies for new Early Childhood teachers. Both national and 
state content standards will be used to address planning, teaching, and assessing in science and social studies. This course is 
for Early Childhood MAT students only. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the MAT Early Childhood graduate program. 

EDTD 6241 Best Practices in Mathematics (2-2-3) 

The course examines best practices in mathematics education and theory and research, which supports such practices. 
These best "practices" are drawn from the literature and actual classroom practice. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the graduate 
program. 

EDTD 6251 Best Practices in Science Education (2-2-3) 

Those in this course will study the application of current research in science and design lessons in order to apply the research 
to their classroom. Included in this course will be authentic assessment practices such as hands-on practicums and research 

Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 249 



projects appropriate to K-12 classrooms. Also included will be action research techniques and appropriate dissemination of the 
results. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the graduate program. 

EDTD 6362 Inquiry Models of Teaching (2-2-3) 

Models of teaching will be examined from a content-oriented perspective. Students will use these approaches to plan and 
implement lessons in their specific content areas. 

EDTD 6363 Social Interactive Models of Teaching (2-2-3) 

This course is designed to help teachers develop teaching/learning strategies and to integrate curriculum in their classrooms. 
Emphasis is placed upon helping teachers to adapt strategies, choose materials, and design units that integrate subject areas 
across a non-textbook based, student-centered curriculum. 

EDTD 6364 Integrated Curriculum Models of Teaching (2-2-3) 

This course is designed to help teachers develop knowledge of theory and practices necessary to plan and implement curriculum 
for individual children and groups: to systematically develop and conduct assessments of individual children; and to engage in 
reflection about their practices. This course is designed for the Master of Arts in Teaching programs only. 

EDTD 6381 Performance and Authentic Assessment (2-2-3) 

Designed to examine current trends and proven practices in educational assessment. Participants will evaluate a variety of 
approaches recommended for both traditional and alternative approaches to assessment of student achievement. 

EDTD 641 Teaching for Understanding in Action (2-2-3) 

In this course, students will put into practice the conceptual framework of Teaching for Understanding. Applying the principles of 
Teaching for Understanding, students will be able to develop and implement units of instruction, and to investigate the impact 
these units have on learning. This course is designed as an action research course for teachers. This course is for M.Ed, 
students only and should be taken at the end of the Curriculum and Instruction program. 

EDTD 641 2 Theory into Practice in Middle Grades (2-2-3) 

This course is designed to familiarize students with the research base, which undergirds students-centered pedagogy, and 
student driven curriculum in the middle grades. Current trends and issues related to middle grades education will further 
be examined in light of middle school theory. An examination of the research and theory related to instruction designed 
specially for young adolescents will lead to the development of strategic plans for teachers to use this research within their own 
classrooms, schools districts and state. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the graduate program. 

EDTD 641 5 Qualitative Research in Education II (2-2-3) 

This course is a continuation of EDTD 6111. This course will include an in depth analysis of the qualitative research process. 
Students will review and critique a variety of qualitative studies. Students will extend their knowledge of post positivism with 
a focus on critical research. Students will then apply their knowledge by designing and implementing a critical study aimed at 
school improvement. Prerequisite(s): EDTD 6012. 

EDTD 641 6 Advanced Instructional Technology (3-0-3) 

This course focuses on technology resources and integration strategies for several different content areas with special emphasis 
on incorporating the current trends toward thematic, interdisciplinary instruction. Students will dive deeply into the Internet as 
a tool for inquiry and develop web based activity units that will provide children with opportunities for seeking the information 
needed for authentic problem-solving projects. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the graduate program. 

EDTD 6420 Best Practices in Interdisciplinary Teaming (2-2-3) 

The course will examine best practices in interdisciplinary teaming and the research upon which they are founded. Educational 
theory and practice will come together to enable students to develop strategies to employ best practices related to interdisciplinary 
teaming their fields and classrooms. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the graduate program. 

EDTD 6432 Multicultural Education (2-2-3) 

The course will engage students in developing a sound understanding of what multicultural education is and how its tenets 
may be employed in instruction. Students will examine the theoretical and scholarly literature related to multicultural education. 

EDTD 6491 Classroom Management Techniques and Strategies (2-2-3) 

Designed to examine a variety of approaches for effective classroom management, the course will lead participants to create 
a classroom atmosphere designed for optimal learning for understanding. 

EDTD 6909 Teacher Education Capstone Seminar (3-0-3) 

Students will synthesize and apply both theoretical and practical understandings developed throughout the program. 
Prerequisite(s): successful completion of 30 semester hours of approved M.Ed. Program, permission of graduate faculty 
advisor 



Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
^^^ Augusta State University Catalog 



EDTD 6910 Education Practicum (0-12-6) 

An intensive practicum course designed for students who have a degree, have a teaching job or have been placed in an 
appropriate teaching assignment, and are seeking certification and a Master's degree. A mentor teacher and university faculty 
member will work with the student to support the students teaching. Students will be supervised as they plan, reflect, and refine 
their teaching practice. Prerequislte(s): successful completion of at least 27 semester hours of program requirements, including 
EDTD 6364 and EDTD 6491. 

EDTD 6950 Selected Topics (1-6 hrs.) 

A variable content course intended to meet the needs and interests of graduate students in selected areas of education. 
Prerequisite(s): Permission of department cfiair. 

EDTD 7160 Curriculum Design and Program Assessment (2-2-3) 

This course will examine and analyze the following core elements of curriculum design: conceptual purpose, content, coherence, 
articulation within a subject area across grade levels, and across subjects, alignment with both achievement standards and 
achievement assessments. Program assessment will be examined with particular attention to how it differs from but is relevant 
to student performance assessment. 

EDTD 7162 Advanced Topics in Englisfi Education (2-2-3) 

This course will examine current research, practices, and issues in language arts/English education as delineated in journal 
readings, conference proceedings, and other relevant sources. Students will synthesize these findings and will determine 
implications for curriculum and instruction in language arts. Prerequisite(s): Admission to tfie Ed.S. Program or permission of 
the instructor. 

EDTD 7163 Advanced Topics in Social Science Education (2-2-3) 

This course will examine current research, practices, and issues in social science education as delineated in journal readings, 
conference proceedings, and other relevant sources. Students will synthesize these findings and will determine implications 
for curriculum and instruction in social science. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Ed.S. Program or permission of the instructor 

EDTD 7164 Advanced Topics in Science Education (2-2-3) 

This course will examine current research, practices, and issues in science education as delineated in journal readings, 
conference proceedings, and other relevant sources. Students will synthesize these findings and will determine implications 
for curriculum and instruction in the natural sciences. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Ed.S. Program or permission of the 
instructor 

EDTD 7165 Advanced Topics in Mathematics Education (2-2-3) 

This course will examine current research, practices, and issues in mathematics education as delineated in journal readings. 
conference proceedings, and other relevant sources. Students will synthesize these findings and will determine implications 
for curriculum and instruction in mathematics. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Ed.S. Program or permission of the instructor. 

EDTD 7210 Issues and Trends in Middle Level Education (2-2-3) 

This course examines current issues and trends related to Middle Grades Education, including issues of school reform, 
implementing best practices, assessment, accountability, and teaming and collaborating with parents and other members of 
the school community. 

EDTD 7221 Authentic Literacy Assessment (2-2-3) 

This course is designed to teach educators how to assess what goes on in classrooms where reading and writing for real 
purposes is the norm. It will involve study of the evolution of literacy assessment from standardized tests to informal tests to 
criterion-referenced tests and authentic assessment. 

EDTD 7222 Engaging Students in Literacy: Motivating Learners to be Literate (2-2-3) 

This course will concentrate on interpreting available research on motivation to read. In addition, finding and using motivational 
materials that are also instructionally sound will be studied. 

EDTD 7909 Thesis I (3-0-3) 

Students will carry out empirical research that represents the application of theory, the extension of research, or the development 
of creative approaches to aspects of teaching and learning. Students will describe in a thesis the results of their research. 
Prerequisite(s): successful completion of EDUC 7021 or of comparable graduate coursework. 

EDTD 791 Thesis II (3-0-3) 

This course is a continuation of EDTD 7909. Students will carry out empirical research that represents the application of 
theory, the extension of research, or the development of creative approaches to aspects of teaching and learning. Students 
will describe in a thesis the results of their research, and will orally defend the thesis. Prerequisite(s): successful completion 
of EDTD 7909. 



Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 251 



EDUC - Education Courses 

EDUC 2110 Investigating Critical and Contemporary Issues in Education (2-2-3) 

The course is designed to engage students in observations, interactions, and analyses of critical and contemporary issues in 
education. Students will investigate issues influencing the social and political contexts of education settings in Georgia and the 
United States. Students will actively examine the teaching profession from multiple perspectives both within and outside the 
school. Students will also interpret the meaning of education and schooling in a diverse culture along with the moral and ethical 
responsibilities of teaching in a democracy. There will be a 20-hour field component to this course. 

EDUC 2120 Exploring Social-Cultural Perspectives on Diversity (2-2-3) 

The course is designed to provide future educators with the fundamental knowledge of understanding cultures and teaching 
children from diverse backgrounds. Specifically, this course is designed to examine 1 ) the nature and function of culture; 2) the 
development of individual and group cultural identity; 3) definitions and implications of diversity; and, 4) the influences of culture 
on learning, development and pedagogy. There will be a 20-hour field component to this course. 

EDUC 2130 Exploring Learning and Teaching (2-2-3) 

The course is designed to explore some of the major theories of learning and teaching. Students will examine their own learning 
processes and use them as a basis for exploring the learning processes of others. This course will also serve as a foundation 
for better understanding how to enhance the learning of all students across a variety of educational settings and contexts. 
There will be a 20-hour field component to this course. 

EDUC 6020 Foundations of Education (3-0-3) 

This course is designed to help advanced students develop a connected array of perspectives on the development of educational 
thought including philosophical and historical perspectives; society's great expectations of the school; contemporary schooling 
patterns and the foundations of curriculum; pressing issues of finance, cultural diversity, accountability, and control of the 
schools: and a look at the future of American Education. 

EDUC 6021 Introduction to Educational Research (3-0-3) 

Through this core research course students should understand basic concepts of educational research, including research 
design options. Students should understand data analysis protocols and should be able to perform various data analyses. 
Students will be able to interpret and evaluate published research. Prerequisite(s): Admission to Graduate Program in Education. 

EDUC 6040 Tests and Measurement for Educational Leaders (3-0-3) 

This course is concerned with practical methods and procedures involved in the construction and evaluation of teacher-made 
tests and the interpretation of test scores, as well as with the considerations involved in the selection and use of standardized 
tests. 

EDUC 6140 Advanced Educational Psychology (3-0-3) 

This course involves the application of psychological theories of learning and scientific findings to learning activities of the 
classroom as well as to the more complex problems of the educational process. The main focuses are on the learner, the 
learning process, and the learning condition. In addition to examining the science of learning, the art of teaching will also be 
discussed. 

EDUC 6271 Identifying Outstanding Talents and Potentials in Students (3-0-3) 

An examination of the nature of children and youth having high potential in multiple areas. Includes consideration of definitions, 
characteristics, and identification of the gifted and talented as reflected in historical and contemporary theory and research. 
Prerequisite(s): none. 

EDUC 6272 Developing Outstanding Talents and Potentials in Students (3-0-3) 

An opportunity to develop and implement appropriately challenging instructional strategies and materials, and to examine 
and critique teaching models for meeting the unique educational needs of the bright learner in the classroom. Prerequisite(s): 
EDUC 6040 Tests and Measurement for Educational Leaders. 

EDUC 6273 Curriculum and Program Design for Developing Talents (3-0-3) 

An investigation of administrative designs, conceptual programs, and approaches to provide qualitatively differentiated 
curriculum for the bright learner. Prerequisite(s): EDUC 6272. 

EDUC 6950 Selected Topics in Foundational Education (3-0-3) 

This course examines problems in the light of recent knowledge and research in foundational education. The focus is on 
specifically designated areas of foundational education. 



Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
^^^ Augusta State University Catalog 



EDUC 7001 Education Specialist Seminar I (3-0-3) 

The course involves developing skills of self-analysis, goal setting and building fundamental communication and leadership 
qualities. A personal/ interpersonal approach will be used to examine themes related to developing leadership/change agent 
skills. Themes addressed include the change process, leadership, collaboration, and context issues. 

EDUC 7002 Education Specialist Seminar II (3-0-3) 

School will be examined as a political institution within various contexts and constraints which affect leaders in the school 
community. Themes will include the change process, leadership, collaboration, context and policy issues. Prerequisite(s): 
EDUC 7001. 

EDUC 7003 Education Specialist Seminar III (3-0-3) 

Students will work with their "mentor leader" to apply knowledge and skills gained within their own role and workplace. These 
experiences will allow students to further develop, directly apply, and demonstrate their knowledge and skills related to 
leadership. Prerequisite(s): EDUC 7001 and EDUC 7002. 

EDUC 7004 Philosophy of Education (3-0-3) 

The content of this course includes descriptions of the following branches of philosophy: epistemology, metaphysics, ethics, 
and aesthetics. The focus is on philosophical concepts and questions which have special relevance to education in the 21st 
century. Prerequisite(s): Admission to Graduate Program. 

EDUC 7005 History of American Education (3-0-3) 

The course is intended for graduate level students interested in the area of historical foundations of education in the M.Ed. 
and Ed.S. programs. The intellectual examination of the content is education specific history. Prerequisite(s): Admission to 
Graduate Program. 

EDUC 7006 Comparative Education (3-0-3) 

This course is an in-depth study of representative school systems in the world. Particular attention is given to the role of 
education in economic development; governance and structure. Additional issues will include race, gender, and ethnicity. 
Prerequisite(s): Admission to Graduate Program. 

EDUC 7021 Conducting Educational Research (3-0-3) 

This course prepares students in the application of descriptive and inferential statistics for planning and conducting research 
in education. Data analysis include: central tendency, variability, distributions, correlations, hypothesis testing, t-tests, linear 
regression, and chi-square analysis. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Ed.S. program. 

ENGL - English Courses 

ENGL 0090 Developmental English ESL I (3-0-3) 

Designed for the non-native speaker of English, this course provides instruction in writing at the sentence and paragraph levels. 
Supervised multi-media activities geared towards individual linguistic needs are included. Credit for this course is not applicable 
to degree programs and is not transferable to other institutions. Prerequisite(s): TOEFL Score of 500-549 (Computer-based 
TOEFL Score of 173-212). 

ENGL 0091 Developmental English ESL II (3-0-3) 

Designed for the non-native speaker of English, this course provides instruction in the writing processes at the essay level. 
Supervised multi-media activities geared towards individual linguistic needs are included. Credit for this course is not applicable 
to degree programs and is not transferable to other institutions. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 0090 or TOEFL Score of 550-599 
(Computer-based TOEFL Score of 213-249). 

ENGL 0097 Developmental English I (3-0-3) 

This course provides instruction in writing sentences, composing paragraphs, and editing compositions. Course work includes 
intensive writing practice, analyses of sample compositions, and group and individual assignments. Credit for this course is 
not applicable to degree programs and is not transferable to other institutions. Prerequisite(s): Writing Compass Score < 38. 

ENGL 0099 Developmental English II (3-0-3) 

This course provides instruction in writing and editing essays. Course work includes intensive writing practice, analysis of 
sample compositions, and group and individual assignments. Credit for this course is not applicable to degree programs and 
is not transferable to other institutions. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 0097 or Writing Compass Score of 39-77. 

ENGL 11 01 College Composition I (3-0-3) 

Composition I focuses on skills required for effective writing in a variety of contexts, with emphasis on exposition, analysis, 
and argumentation. This course also includes introductory use of a variety of research skills. The course provides instruction 
in word processing and in computer-based research. A grade of C or better is required. Once students have earned and/or 

Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 

Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 253 



transferred in 18 hours, they must continue to register for ENGL 1101 until successfully completing the course. Prerequisite(s): 
None. 

ENGL 11 02 College Composition II (3-0-3) 

Literature-based, Composition II develops writing skills beyond the levels of proficiency required in English 1101. Interpretation 
and evaluation are emphasized, and more advanced research methods are incorporated. The course includes instruction 
in composition of a research paper. A grade of C or better is required. Once students have successfully completed ENGL 
1101 and have earned 27 hours, they must continue to register for ENGL 1102 until successfully completing this course. 
Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1101. with a grade of C or better. 

ENGL 1113 Honors Freshman Composition I (3-0-3) 

This course develops more advanced skills in critical reading, thinking, and writing than is possible in 1101. The course 
incorporates study of texts by some of the world's most influential thinkers into a framework which develops skills in critical 
reading, critical thinking, and writing at a level more advanced than is possible in English 1101 . The course also includes basic 
instruction in word-processing and in computer-based research. A grade of C or better is required. A student who fails to make 
a C or better in 1 1 1 3 must take English 1101. Prerequisite(s): Eligibility for honors English/Invitation of the Department. 

ENGL 1114 Honors Freshman Composition II (3-0-3) 

A literature-based composition course, ENGL 1114 emphasizes research, analysis, interpretation, and evaluation. Based in 
literature which reflects cultural diversity, English 1114 explores a greater variety of literature and of theoretical approaches to 
literature than is possible in English 1102. This course includes instruction in library and computer-based research and correct 
reporting and documenting of research in a lengthy paper. A grade of C or better is required. A student who fails to make a C 
or better in 1114 must take English 1102. Prerequisite(s): Satisfactory completion of English 1 11 3/Eligibility for honors English/ 
Invitation of the Department. 

ENGL 1210 Preparation for the Regents' Test (1-0-1) 

Intensive instructions in critical reading and expository writing in preparation for the Regents' Test. Suggested for students 
whose teachers recommended additional preparation; students who have made a C in English 1101 and/or 1102 on their first 
try; students who have been out of school for a number of years. Strongly recommended for students who have transferred 
English 1101 credits to ASU; all non-native English speakers; students who have repeated 1101 or 1102 and have made C's. 
Students who have taken the Regents' Test and failed it may not take this course. 

ENGL 2110 Creative Writing (3-0-3) 

Study and application of the techniques of writing fiction, poetry, and drama. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1101-1102 or ENGL 1113- 
1114 with a grade of C or better 

ENGL 2250 Introduction to Literary Studies (3-0-3) 

A course in the fundamental concepts, strategies, and skills needed for the pursuit of a degree in English. Involves study and 
application of literary terminology and a survey of critical and theoretical approaches to literature. Covers major literary genres 
and provides intensive instruction in fundamentals of writing about literature: critical thinking, close reading, bibliography and 
research methods, and conventions of academic writing. Requires completion of a formal research paper with a grade of C or 
better. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1101-1102 or 1113 -1114 with a grade of Cor better. 

ENGL 2950 Selected Topics (3-0-3) 

Astudyofvarious literary developments, including movements, authors, and genres of interest to the lower-division undergraduate 
student. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1101- 1102 or ENGL 1113-1114 with a grade of C or better 

ENGL 3001 Anglo-Saxon and t\Aiddle English Literature (3-0-3) 

A sun/ey of English Medieval literature, including the major genres and works of the period from Beowulf through Mallory. 
Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1101-1102 or 1113-1114: HUMN 2001; ENGL 2250. 

ENGL 3002 English Literature from the Renaissance to the Restoration (3-0-3) 

A survey of English literature from 1485 to the Restoration. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1101-1102 or 1113-1114; HUt\AN 2001; 
ENGL 2250. 

ENGL 3003 English Literature from the Restoration through the Romantics (3-0-3) 

A survey of English literature from the Restoration to 1830. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1101-1102 or 1113-1114: HUh/IN 2001; 
ENGL 2250. 

ENGL 3004 English Literature of the Victorian and r\/1odern Periods (3-0-3) 

A survey of English literature from 1830 to 1945. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1101-1102 or 1113-1114: HUMN 2001: ENGL 2250. 

ENGL 3101 American Literature to the Rise of Realism (3-0-3) 

A survey of major writers, movements, and historical periods to 1875. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1101-1102 or 1113-1114; HUI\/IN 
2001: ENGL 2250. 

Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
^^^ Augusta State University Catalog 



ENGL 3102 American Literature since the Rise of Realism (3-0-3) 

A survey of major writers, movements, and historical periods since 1875. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1101-1102 or 1113-1114; 
HUMN 2001; ENGL 2250. 

ENGL 3110 African-American Literature (3-0-3) 

A survey of African-American literature from the early slave narratives to the present. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1101-1102 or 
1113-1114; HUMN 2001-2002; ENGL 2250. 

ENGL 3120 ' Soutliern Literature (3-0-3) 

A survey of works by Southern writers, with emphasis on twentieth-century prose writers. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1101-1102 or 
1113-1114; HUMN 2001-2002; ENGL 2250. 

ENGL 321 Film Appreciation (3-0-3) 

An introduction to the art of the motion picture, including a consideration of camera movement, camera angles, lighting, editing, 
mise en scene, acting, plot and story. Prerequisite(s); ENGL 1101-1102 or 1113-1114; HUMN 2001-2002; ENGL 2250. 

ENGL 321 2 Introduction to Film History (3-0-3) 

A study of the history and technique of the motion picture, concentrating on film from 1890 to 1940. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 
1101-1102 or 1113-1114; HUMN 2001-2002; ENGL 2250. 

ENGL 3221 / COMD 3221 ' History of the Theatre I (3-0-3) 

An introduction to the art of theater, as well as an historical survey of the development of Western drama from Ancient Greece 
to the Middle Ages. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1101-1102 or 1113-1114; HUMN 2001-2002; ENGL 2250. 

ENGL 3222 / COMD 3222 History of the Theatre II (3-0-3) 

A continuation of ENGL 3221, beginning with the English Restoration; a study of stage design and technology and the 
development of dramatic literature to the modern period. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1101-1102 or 1113-1114; HUMN 2001-2002; 
ENGL 2250. 

ENGL 3310/WMST 3310 Women's Literature (3-0-3) 

An examination of a wide range of women writers, both classic and contemporary, with an emphasis on multicultural and/or 
multidisciplinary approaches. Prerequisite(s); ENGL 1101-1102 or 1113-1114; HUMN 2001-2002; ENGL 2250. 

ENGL 3320 Children's Literature (3-0-3) 

A survey of literature for children, including poetry, picture books, fiction, and non-fiction for use across the curriculum. 
Prerequisite(s); ENGL 1101-1102 or 1113-1114; HUMN 2001-2002. 

ENGL 3330 Literature for Pre-Adolescents and Adolescents (3-0-3) 

Designed for teachers in the middle grades. A survey of types of literature primarily read by pre-adolescents and adolescents. 
This course does not count toward the English major or minor. Prerequisite(s); ENGL 1101-1102 or 1113-1114; HUMN 
2001-2002; ENGL 2250. 

ENGL 3600 / COMW 3600 Creative Writing Workshop (Sandhills) (3-0-3) 

Study and application of the techniques of fiction, poetry, and drama. Enrollment in this course entails free participation in the 
Sandhills Writers Conference, attendance at its sessions, and individual conferences with and critiques by its staff. Students 
cannot receive credit for both ENGL 3600 and COMW 3600. Prerequisite(s); ENGL 1101-1102 or 1113-1114; HUMN 2001- 
2002; ENGL 2110. 

ENGL 3620 / COMW 3620 / COMD 3620 Writing for the Theatre (3-0-3) 

A workshop in the writing of one-act and full-length plays or screenplays. Topics include Aristotle and dramatic theory, plot 
structure, character, dialogue, naturalism, symbolism, theme, production problems, and manuscript format. Students will write 
a one-act play or a short screenplay. Students cannot receive credit for more than one of the following: ENGL 3620, COMD 
3620, and COMW 3620. Prerequisite(s); ENGL 1101-1102 or 1113-1114; HUMN 2001-2002; ENGL 2110. 

ENGL 3630 / COMW 3630 Writing Song Lyrics and Poems (3-0-3) 

An introductory course in the writing of verse and poetry. Students will study successful songs and poems and write numerous 
songs and poems of their own. Some studio recording and public reading of selected student writing will be required. Students 
cannot receive credit for both ENGL 3630 and COMW 3630. Prerequisite(s): 
ENGL 1101-1102 or 1113-1114; HUMN 2001-2002; ENGL 2110. 

ENGL 3640 Writing Short Fiction (3-0-3) 

An introduction to the basic concepts and procedures important to the processes of creating short works of fiction. Students 
will write stories, review stories, critique the work of other students, and analyze selected texts focusing on the writing process. 
Prerequisite(s); ENGL 1101-1102 or 1113-1114; HUMN 2001-2002; ENGL 2110. 

Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 255 



ENGL 3650 / COMW 3650 Grant Writing (3-0-3) 

An introduction to the basic concepts, strategies, and practices essential for producing effective grant proposals. Integrates 
study of grant-writing theory and mechanics with assignments that enable students to apply knowledge in practical form. 
Develops skills useful to majors across the curriculum and applicable in various professional careers. Students cannot receive 
credit for both ENGL 3650 and COMW 3650. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1101-1102 or 1113-1114; HUMN 2001-2002. 

ENGL 3680 / COMW 3680 Teclinical Writing (3-0-3) 

Intensive study of the theory and practice of writing procedures, proposals, grants, manuals, reports, summaries of technical 
processes, basic forms of business correspondence, and of creating effective supporting graphics. Attention is given to editing 
skills, effective use of format, headings, table of contents, and appendices, and mastery of tone manipulation through vocabulary, 
syntax, content, and layout. Students communicate complex subject matter to specific audiences, lay and technical, in primary 
technical forms. Students cannot receive credit for both ENGL 3680 and COMW 3680. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1101-1102 or 
1113-1114: HUMN 2001-2002. 

E N G L 368 1 Advanced Writing (3-0-3) 

Practice in various types of writing appropriate to the academic and career interests of the student. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 
1101-1102 or 1113-1114: HUMN 2001-2002: ENGL 2250. 

ENGL 3683 / COMJ 3030 Feature Writing (3-0-3) 

A practical course in wnting and marketing various types of feature articles for newspapers, magazines, and other periodicals. 
Students cannot receive credit for both ENGL 3683 and COMJ 3030. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1101-1102 or 1113-1114; HUMN 
2001-2002. 

ENGL 381 Teaching Writing in Middle Grades (3-0-3) 

Intensive practice in various types of writing within a study of composition theory and pedagogical issues relevant to teaching 
writing in the middle grades. This course does not count toward the English major or minor. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1101-1102 
or 1113-1114: HUMN 2001-2002: ENGL 2250. 

ENGL 3820 Teaching Writing in the Secondary School (2-2-3) 

A consideration of theory and practice in the teaching of writing and of grammar at the high school level. A field experience of 
45 clock hours is a required component of this course (This course does not count in the English minor or in the Literature, 
Creative Writing, or Rhetoric and Composition Tracks of the English major). Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1101-1102 or 1113-1114; 
HUMN 2001-2002. 

ENGL 4000 Studies in British Literature (3-0-3) 

An intensive study of selected topics in the literature of the British Isles. The course may focus on periods, literary movements, 
or genres. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1101-1102 or 1113-1114; HUMN 2001-2002; ENGL 2250. 

ENGL 41 00 Studies in American Literature (3-0-3) 

An intensive study of selected topics in American literature. The course may focus on literary movements, periods or genres, e.g. 
the Harlem Renaissance, Southern drama, or the literature of New England. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1101-1102 or 1113-1114; 
HUMN 2001-2002; ENGL 2250. 

ENGL 4200 Studies in Genre (3-0-3) 

An intensive examination of a particular genre (e.g. epic, tragedy, or satire). Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1101-1102 or 1113-1114; 
HUMN 2001-2002: ENGL 2250. 

ENGL 4220 / COMD 4220 Contemporary Theatre (3-0-3) 

A survey of major European and American dramatists, including Ibsen, Shaw, Chekhov, Yeats, O'Neill, Sartre, Brecht, Miller, 
and Williams. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1101-1102 or 1113-1114; HUMN 2001-2002.; ENGL 2250. 

ENGL 4230 Modern Poetry (3-0-3) 

A study of the major movements in English and American poetry from World War I to the present. Emphasis is placed on Eliot, 
Yeats, Pound, Frost, and Auden. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1101-1102 or 1113-1114: HUMN 2001-2002; ENGL 2250. 

ENGL 4250 The Modern American Novel (3-0-3) 

A study of several major American novels written since World War I, including works by such novelists as Hemingway, Fitzgerald, 
Faulkner, Morrison, and Bellow. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1101-1102 or 1113-1114; HUMN 2001-2002; ENGL 2250. 

ENGL 4261 The English Novel to 1900 (3-0-3) 

A survey of the English novel, emphasizing the novels of Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Austen, Bronte, Dickens, and Hardy. 
Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1101-1102 or 1113-1114; HUMN 2001-2002; ENGL 2250. 



Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 

OCf! 

Augusta State University Catalog 



ENGL 4262 The Modem British Novel (3-0-3) 

A study of several modern British novels, w/ith emphasis on works by Conrad, Woolf, Law/rence, Forster, Greene, and Joyce. 
Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1101-1102 or 1113-1114; HUMN 2001-2002; ENGL 2250. 

ENGL 431 0/WMST 4310 Studies in Feminism (3-0-3) 

A course which uses feminist scholarship to analyze selected texts and topics. Prerequisite(s); ENGL 1101-1102 or 1113-1114; 
HUMN 2001-2002; ENGL 2250. 

ENGL 4330 ' Studies in Popular Culture (3-0-3) 

An examination of selected topics in popular culture, Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1101-1102 or 1113-1114; HUMN 2001-2002; ENGL 
2250. 

ENGL 4350 Studies in Medieval Literature and Medievalism (3-0-3) 

An intensive study of selected topics in medieval literature and literary traditions that grow out of the Middle Ages. Prerequisite(s): 
ENGL 1101-1102 or 1113-1114; HUMN 2001-2002; ENGL 2250. 

ENGL 4360 Studies in World Literature (3-0-3) 

An intensive study of selected topics in world literature. The course may focus on major figures, periods, literary movements, 
or genres. Prerequisite(s); ENGL 1101-1102 or 1113-1114; HUMN 2001-2002; ENGL 2250. 

ENGL 4410 ' Chaucer (3-0-3) 

Astudy of rro/'/us and Cr/seyde, r/?eCanfer/)ury'ra/es, and some minor poems. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1101-1102or1113-1114; 
HUMN 2001-2002; ENGL 2250. 

ENGL 4420 Shakespeare (3-0-3) 

The major Shakespearean histories, comedies, and tragedies within the context of the Elizabethan theater. Prerequisite(s); 
ENGL 1101-1102 or 1113-1114; HUMN 2001-2002; ENGL 2250. 

ENGL 4430 Milton (3-0-3) 

The major and minor poems and selected prose of Milton. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1101-1102 or 1113-1114; HUMN 2001-2002; 
ENGL 2250. 

ENGL 4440 Studies in Major British Authors (3-0-3) 

An intensive examination of the works of a major British writer (e.g., Blake, Joyce, or Woolf). Prerequisite(s); ENGL 1101-1102 
or 1113-1114; HUMN 2001-2002; ENGL 2250. 

ENGL 4450 Studies in Major American Authors (3-0-3) 

An intensive examination of the works of a major American writer (e.g., Faulkner, Melville, or Morrison). Prerequisite(s): ENGL 
1101-1102 or 1113-1114; HUMN 2001-2002; ENGL 2250. 

ENGL 451 Literary Theory (3-0-3) 

A study of the major critics from Aristotle to the present, with emphasis on the development of various twentieth-century critical 
positions. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1101-1102 or 1113-1114; HUMN 2001-2002; ENGL 2250. 

ENGL 4520 Theories of Writing (3-0-3) 

An introduction to theories of writing, both classical and modern, including the perspectives offered by linguistics, psychology, 
rhetoric, and literary theory. Prerequisite(s); ENGL 1101-1102 or 1113-1114; HUMN 2001-2002; ENGL 2250. 

ENGL 4530 Studies in Theory (3-0-3) 

An intensive examination of selected topics in critical theory and practice; the course may focus on major theorists, periods, or 
movements. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1101-1102 or 1113-1114; HUMN 2001-2002; ENGL 2250. 

ENGL 4601 Major Project I (3-0-3) 

An independent study course which allows the student to devote full attention to a writing project. The student should focus 
on some aspect of narrative, dramatic, or poetic writing and should produce a work of publishable or near-publishable quality. 
Prerequisite(s); ENGL 1101-1102 or 1113-1114; HUMN 2001-2002; ENGL 2110. 

ENGL 4602 Major Project II (3-0-3) 

An advanced independent study course which allows the student to devote full attention to a writing project. The student should 
focus on some aspect of narrative, dramatic, or poetic writing and should produce a work of publishable quality. Prerequisite(s); 
ENGL 1101-1102 or 1113-1114; HUMN 2001-2002; ENGL 2110. 



Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 257 



ENGL 4630 Poetry Workshop (3-0-3) 

An intensive practicum in the writing of poetry. Students will write and revise their own poetry, participate in a weekly workshop 
of evaluation and criticism, and read extensively in the work of contemporary poets. Prerequlsite(s): ENGL 1101-1102 or 
1113-1114: HUMN 2001-2002: ENGL 2110. 

ENGL 4640 Fiction Worl<sliop (3-0-3) 

Advanced concepts and procedures important to the writing process, among them questions of genre, mode, and technique. 
Students will wnte material in the (fiction) genre of their choice, cntique the work of other students, analyze selected published 
works, and read selected texts focusing on the writing process. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1101-1102 or 1113-1114: HUMN 
2001-2002: ENGL 2110. 

ENGL 4680 Studies in Writing (3-0-3) 

An intensive study of selected topics in professional or creative writing. The course may focus on issues of craftsmanship, 
technique or genre. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1101-1102 or 1113-1114: HUMN 2001-2002: ENGL 2250. 

ENGL 4711 Introduction to Linguistics (3-0-3) 

The fundamentals of descriptive and structural linguistics; phonemes and phonemic transcription; morphology and syntax; and 
transformational grammar. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1101-1102 or 1113-1114: HUMN 2001-2002: ENGL 2250. 

E N G L 47 1 2 Modern Grammatical Systems (3-0-3) 

An examination of modern grammatical systems, with emphasis on a description of the grammatical structure of English. 
Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1101-1102 or 1113-1114: HUMN 2001-2002: ENGL 2250; ENGL 4711. 

ENGL 4720 History and Structure of the English Language (3-0-3) 

A study of the history and structure of the English language from Old English to the present. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1101-1102 
or 1113-1114: HUMN 2001-2002; ENGL 2250. 

ENGL 4950 Selected Topics (3-0-3) 

Seminar in a particular author, period, style, subject or movement, often conducted on an interdisciplinary basis. Prerequisite(s): 
ENGL 1101-1102 or 1113-1114; HUMN 2001-2002; and ENGL 2250. 

ENGL 4960 Undergraduate Internship (V-O-V) 

An internship is a service-learning experience based in an off-campus agency or organization. The experience entails the 
completion of a specific task and the acquisition of specific knowledge and skills under the supervision of Augusta State University 
faculty and the cooperating organization or agency. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1101-1102 or 1113-1114; HUMN 2001-2002, ENGL 
2250, and permission of the instructor. 

ENGL 4990 Undergraduate Research (3-0-3) 

A major research project exploring a specific topic under the close direction of the supervising instructor. Emphasis is placed 
on the student's learning research techniques. The student should produce a work of near-publishable quality. Prerequisite(s): 
Permission of the instructor 

ENGL 6010 Special Topics in World Literature (3-0-3) 

An intensive study of selected topics in world literature. The course may focus on major figures, periods, literary movements, 
or genres, and will usually include non-Western as well as Western texts. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the graduate program 
and permission of the instructor 

ENGL 61 1 Special Topics in Genre (3-0-3) 

A comparative study of a particular genre, such as comedy, tragedy, or satire. Prerequisite(s): Admissions to the graduate 
program and permission of the instructor 

ENGL 61 25 Literature for Children (3-0-3) 

A critical study of literature for children. Topics include the history of children's literature, a survey of types of children's 
literature, and problems in teaching. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the graduate program and permission of the instructor. 

ENGL 61 30 Topics in Pre-adolescent and Adolescent Literature (3-0-3) 

A critical study of literature appropriate for middle grades students. Topics include major genres and major authors in the 
context of critical perspectives. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the graduate program and permission of the instructor 

ENGL 6230 Studies in African-American Literature (3-0-3) 

Study of major texts in African-American literature, beginning with early slave narratives. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the 
graduate program and permission of the instructor. 



Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
^° Augusta State University Cataiog 



ENGL 6250 Studies in Women's Literature (3-0-3) 

An examination of a wide range of women writers, witin an emphasis on multicultural and/or multidisciplinary approaches. 
Prerequisite(s): Admission to tfie graduate program and permission of tlie instructor 

ENGL 631 Literature of ttie Englisli Middle Ages (3-0-3) 

Intensive study of the literature of the English Middle Ages, from Beowulf through Mallory. Prerequisite(s): Admission to ttie 
graduate program and permission of the instructor 

ENGL 6315 ' Literature of tlie Englisti Renaissance (3-0-3) 

Intensive study of English literature from 1485 to the Restoration, excluding Shakespeare. Prerequisite(s): Admission to tine 
graduate program and permission of tlie instructor 

ENGL 6320 Englisti Neoclassical and Romantic Literature (3-0-3) 

Intensive study of English literature from the Restoration to 1830. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the graduate program and 
permission of the instructor 

ENGL 6325 English Literature: Victorian through the Early Twentieth Century (3-0-3) 

Intensive study of English Literature from 1830 to 1945. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the graduate program and permission 
of the instructor 

ENGL 6350 ' Topics in British Literature (3-0-3) 

Selected topics in the literature of the British Isles, including periods, literary movements, or genres. Prerequisite(s): Admission 
to the graduate program and permission of the instructor 

ENGL 6410 American Literature to 1875 (3-0-3) 

Intensive study of major writers, movements, and historical periods in American literature to 1875. Prerequisite(s): Admission 
to the graduate program and permission of the instructor 

ENGL 6420 American Literature Since 1875 (3-0-3) 

Intensivestudy of major writers, movements, and historical periods in American literature since 1875. Prerequisite(s): Admission 
to the graduate program and permission of the instructor 

ENGL 6440 Studies in Southern Literature (3-0-3) 

An intensive study of works by Southern writers, with emphasis on the twentieth century. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the 
graduate program and permission of the instructor 

ENGL 6450 Topics in American Literature (3-0-3) 

An intensive study of selected topics in American literature, including literary movements, periods or genres. Prerequisite(s): 
Admission to the graduate program and permission of the instructor. 

ENGL 6550 Studies in Major British Authors (3-0-3) 

An intensive examination of the works of one or two major British writers (e.g. Blake, Joyce, or Woolf). Prerequisite(s): 
Admission to the graduate program and permission of the instructor 

ENGL 6560 Studies in Major American Authors (3-0-3) 

An intensive examination of the works of a major American writer (e.g., Faulkner, Melville, or Morrison). Prerequisite(s): 
Admission to the graduate program and permission of the instructor 

ENGL 6610 English Language: History and Structure (3-0-3) 

Studies in the nature of linguistic change and the development of the English language from Old English to the present. 
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the graduate program and permission of the instructor 

ENGL 6620 English Linguistics (3-0-3) 

Introduction to English linguistics: studies in the nature of language, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and language 
variation. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the graduate program and permission of the instructor 

ENGL 6625 Contemporary English Grammar and Usage (3-0-3) 

Modern grammar and usage. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the graduate program and permission of the instructor 

ENGL 6700 Special Topics in Writing (3-0-3) 

Selected topics in professional or creative writing, appropriate for graduate study. The course may focus on issues of 
craftsmanship, technique, or genre. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the graduate program and permission of the instructor 



Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 259 



ENGL 6800 Issues in Literary Criticism (3-0-3) 

A study of important issues in literary criticism with emphasis on twentieth-century critical thought. Prerequisite(s): Admission 
to ttie graduate program and permission of the instructor. 

ENGL 6950 Special Topics (3-0-3) 

Seminar in a particular author, period, style, subject, or movement, often conducted on an interdisciplinary basis. Prerequisite(s): 
Admission to the graduate program and permission of the instructor. 

ENGL 7000 Research in World Literature (3-0-3) 

A seminar in world literature with emphasis on research and critical evaluation of a specific theme or aspect of world literature. 
Intensive research project required. Prerequisites: Admission to the graduate program and permission of the instructor. 

ENGL 7300 Research in British Literature (3-0-3) 

Studies in selected authors, movements, or subjects in English literature. Intensive research project required. Prerequisite(s): 
Admission to the graduate program and permission of the instructor. 

ENGL 7400 Research in American Literature (3-0-3) 

Studies in selected authors, movements, or subjects in American literature. Intensive research project required. Prerequisite(s): 
Admission to the graduate program and permission of the instructor. 

ENGL 7500 Research: Major Author (3-0-3) 

Study of the works of a major author. Intensive research project required. Prerequisites: Admission to the graduate program 
and permission of the instructor 

ENGR - Engineering Courses 

ENGR 2020 Statics (3-0-3) 

Elements of statics in two and three dimensions, centroids, friction, distributed loads, free-body diagrams. Prerequisite(s): 
PHYS 2211 (Cor better). 

ENGR 2040 Dynamics (3-0-3) 

Kinematics and dynamics of particles and rigid bodies in one, two, and three dimensions. Work-energy and impulse-momentum 
concepts. Prerequisites: ENGR 2020 (C or better). 

FINC - Finance Courses 

Note: in order to enroll in any FINC course numbered 3000-4950, a student must be accepted into the James M. Hull 
College of Business (see p. 167) and meet the listed prerequisites for the class. 

FINC 1410 Personal Finance (3-0-3) 

Provides individuals with the tools necessary to manage their personal financial affairs. Topics covered include budgeting, 
debt management, investments, insurance, taxes, and real estate. This course may not be used to fulfill major requirements for 
business. Prerequisite(s): None. 

FINC 3400 Corporate Finance (3-0-3) 

This course deals with the fundamental tools of financial management: financial statement analysis, the time value of money, 
risk and return measurement, valuation of financial assets, capital budgeting decisions and cost of capital. Prerequisite(s): 
ECON 2106. ECON 2105. ACCT 2101, and ACCT 2102 (all with grades of C or better) and 50 semester hours. 

FINC 3405 Financial Planning (3-0-3) 

This course is designed to introduce the theory and practice of personal financial planning. The course coverage includes 
an overview of the financial planning process including insurance, education funding, cash management and budgeting, 
retirement, investment and tax planning. Prerequisite(s): 60 semester hours including ECON 2105, ECON 2106, ACCT 2101 
and ACCT 2102 (all with grades of C or better) or permission of the instructor. 

FINC 341 Risk Management (3-0-3) 

This course gives the student an understanding of pure risk, the nature of risk management, the role of risk managers, and the 
various tools of risk management with major emphasis on insurance. Prerequisite(s): 60 semester hours or permission of the 
instructor. 



Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
^°^ Augusta State University Catalog 



FINC 3420 Real Estate (3-0-3) 

A fundamental coverage of real property rights and interests, mortgage financing, taxation, leasing and settlement. Course 
provides information for the consumer and/or investor on how to select, finance and manage real property. Prerequisite(s): 60 
semester hours or permission of the instructor 

FINC 4410 Advanced Corporate Finance (3-0-3) 

This course is designed to further both theoretical and practical applications of corporate finance. Substantial emphasis will 
be placed on capital budgeting, cost of capital, capital structure, dividend policy, and financial planning. Prerequisite(s): FINC 
3400 with a grade of B or better 

FINC 4420 Financial Markets and Institutions (3-0-3) 

This course explores the role of financial markets and institutions in the economy. Topics include money and capital markets, 
the role of the Federal Reserve and the function and operating characteristics of financial institutions. Prerequisite(s): FINC 
3400 with a grade of C or better 

FINC 4421 Investment and Portfolio Analysis (3-0-3) 

This course provides an introduction to the various types of securities traded in the financial markets, investment theory and 
practice, portfolio construction and management, and investment strategies and tactics. Coverage includes both fundamental 
and technical analysis. Prerequisite(s): 50 semester hours including ACCT 2101, ACCT2102, ECON 2105, and ECON 2106 
each with a grade of C or better. 

FINC 4430 Estate Planning (3-0-3) 

This course is designed to introduce students to the various techniques available to effectively conserve and transfer wealth. 
The various topics covered in this course include trusts, wills, probate, charitable giving and advanced directives. An emphasis 
is placed on developing an understanding of the underlying financial, non-financial, legal and tax aspects associated with the 
estate planning process. Prerequisite(s): FINC 3405 with a grade of C or higher 

FINC 4440 Retirement Planning (3-0-3) 

This course is designed to introduce students to public and private retirement plans including Social Security, Medicare, 
Medicaid, defined benefit plans and defined contribution plans. Students are exposed to the relevant underlying academic 
theory as well as the practical application and decision making from both individual and business perspectives. Prerequisite(s): 
FINC 3405 with a grade of C or higher 

FINC 4950 Selected Topics in Finance (3-0-3) 

A course and/or directed study of a major issue, practice, or problem in the area of finance. Content to be decided based on 
needs and professional objectives of students and the experience and availability of faculty. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the 
advisor to use the course in the area of the major and senior standing. 

FINC 6400 Managerial Finance (3-0-3) 

This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the role of finance in managerial decision making. 
Cases and/or supplemental readings are used to apply financial concepts. Prerequisite(s): Graduate (MBA) student status and 
FINC 3400 or equivalent. 

FINC 6421 Investments (3-0-3) 

This course provides an introduction to the various types of securities traded in the financial markets, investment theory and 
practice, portfolio construction and management, and investment strategies and tactics. Coverage includes both fundamental 
and technical analysis. Prerequisite(s): FINC 3400 or permission of instructor 

FINC 6950 Selected Topics in Finance (3-0-3) 

A vanable content course designed to meet the needs, interests, and professional objectives of graduate students in finance. 
Prerequisite(s): Graduate (MBA) student status and FINC 3400 or equivalent. 

FREN - French Courses 

Note: For additional courses in French, consult the Studies Abroad (SABR) courses described on p. 311. 

FREN 1001 Elementary French I (3-V-3) 

Fundamentals of listening, speaking, reading, and writing French in a proficiency- based classroom. Introduction to 
French-speaking cultures. Designed for students who have never studied French. Students who entered ASU for the first time 
in the fall of 1998 or later, or those returning students who have not been enrolled for two consecutive years prior to 1998, 
will not be able to count Foreign Language 1001 towards graduation if it is the same language they took in high school. (First 
time freshmen who graduated from high school five or more years ago may count Foreign Language 1001.) However, it does 
count for computing eligibility for financial aid and calculating full-time student status. Students taking the language for the first 

Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 261 



time will receive credit. For CPC students, please consult p. 6 of the catalog. Not open to native speakers. Heritage speal<ers 
should take the placement exam. 

FREN 1002 Elementary French II (3-V-3) 

Acontinuation of French 1001. Students admitted provisionally with CPC deficiency in foreign languages may take this course 
to satisfy the foreign language CPC requirement. Prerequisite(s): FREN 1001 or placement. Not open to native speakers. 
Heritage speakers should take the placement exam. 

FREN 2001 Intermediate French I (3-V-3) 

This proficiency-centered course is designed to build on high school French or on FREN 1002. More emphasis will be placed 
on listening, speaking, and reading skills in practical situations. Students will learn how to "get around" in places where French 
is spoken natively. Prerequisite(s): FREN 1002 or placement. Not open to native speakers. Heritage speakers should take the 
placement exam. 

FREN 2002 Intermediate French II (3-V-3) 

This proficiency-centered course includes a grammar review and more intensive work in listening comprehension, speaking, 
and reading, with more emphasis on writing than in FREN 2001. French-speaking cultures will be studied through music, art, 
film, literary and cultural readings, including current events. At the end of this course, students should have a basic competence 
in French. Students who wish to take upper-division courses in French will need to demonstrate sufficient proficiency as 
determined by the foreign language faculty before enrolling in major/minor courses. Not open to native speakers. Heritage 
speakers should take the placement exam. Students must earn a C or better in order to take classes at the 3000/4000 level. 

FREN 2950 Studies in Francophone Culture (3-V-3) 

A variable content course taught in English that will center on one Francophone country or area, or a specific issue dealing with 
Francophone culture. May not be counted towards the French major and may not satisfy foreign language requirement. 

FREN 31 00 Oral Expression in French (3-0-3) 

An intensive course in which students will learn strategies for communication on levels from conversing in everyday practical 
situations to discussing opinions on politics, culture, and the arts. May not be taken by native speakers of French. Prerequisite(s): 
a grade of C or better in FREN 2002 or placement. 

FREN 3210 French Culture I: The Francophone World (3-0-3) 

French in North America, with emphasis on the history and contemporary situation of Quebec; French in West and North Africa, 
the Caribbean, Vietnam. Prerequisite(s): a grade ofC or better in FREN 2002 or placement. 

FREN 3221 French Culture II: The Hexagon (3-0-3) 

Historical overview of France emphasizing great moments in French history and the arts; a course designed in part to prepare 
students to visit French cathedrals, chateaux, monasteries, museums, and other historical and cultural sites of France. Paris 
will be highlighted. Prerequisite(s): a grade of C or better in FREN 2002 or placement. 

FREN 3222 French Culture III: French in Contemporary Europe (3-0-3) 

This course will examine the role of contemporary France, Belgium, Switzerland, and Luxembourg in the European Union. 
Students will use television broadcasts, journal articles, and the World Wide Web. Prerequisite(s): a grade of C or better in 
FREN 2002 or placement. 

FREN 3300 Written Expression in French (3-0-3) 

An intensive course in which students will learn strategies for written communication on numerous levels and in varied styles: 
compositions based on personal topics, current events, literary readings; styles range from email messages, letters, creative 
writing, imitation of stylistic models. Course includes advanced grammar and stylistics. Prerequisite(s): a grade of C or better 
in FREN 2002 or placement. 

FREN 3400 French Phonetics (3-0-3) 

A course in descriptive, comparative/contrastive and corrective phonetics. Students will learn the sound system of French and 
how it relates to spelling. Emphasis will be put on comparing the French sound system to that of American English. The course 
will address common American phonetic errors in French from both a pedagogical and a corrective point of view. Morphology 
and syntax will be studied as they relate to phonology. Prerequisite(s): a grade of C or better in FREN 2002 or placement. 

FREN 3510 Introduction to French Literature (3-0-3) 

An introduction to literary reading and analysis, based on texts in prose, poetry and dramatic forms. Analysis of narrative 
(short story and novel) in terms of characterization, plot, setting, role of the narrator, etc.; introduction to poetics, including 
versification, and the use of figurative language in classical and romantic forms; selected readings from the classical and 
romantic theater. Prerequisite(s): a grade of C or better in FREN 2002 or placement. 



Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
"^ Augusta State University Catalog 



FREN 371 Masterpieces of French Film (3-0-3) 

Study of films by Jean Renoir, Francois Truffaut, Jean-Luc Godard, Louis Malle and other great French directors; filnns starring 
Gerard Depardieu, Catherine Deneuve, Isabelle Adjani, and others. Development of the film medium in historical-cultural 
perspective. Prerequisite(s): a grade of C or better in FREN 2002 or placement. 

FREN 4100 Advanced Oral Expression in French (3-0-3) 

An intensive, advanced course in which students will use strategies for communication on levels from conversing in everyday 
practical situations to discussing opinions on politics, culture, and the arts. May not be taken by native speakers of French. 
Prerequisite(s): a grade of C or better in FREN 2002 or placement. 

FREN 4300 Advanced Written Expression in French (3-0-3) 

An intensive course at an advanced level in which students will learn strategies for written communication on numerous 
levels and in varied styles: compositions based on personal topics, current events, literary readings; styles range from email 
messages, letters, creative writing, imitation of stylistic models. Course includes advanced grammar and stylistics. Advanced 
stylistics will be stressed. Prerequisite(s): a grade of C or better in FREN 2002 or placement. 

FREN 4520 Classical and Romantic Theater (3-0-3) 

Study of masterworks of drama from the 17th and 19th centuries. In addition to literary-critical discussion, students memorize 
and produce scenes from the plays, which are recorded. Prerequisite(s): a grade of C or better in FREN 2002 or placement. 

FREN 4530 ' Modern Theater (3-0-3) 

Study of masterworks of drama from the 20th century. In addition to literary-critical discussion, students memorize and produce 
scenes from the plays, which are recorded. Prerequisite(s): a grade of C or better in FREN 2002 or placement. 

FREN 4550 Masterpieces of Poetry (3-0-3) 

Study of poetry from the medieval period through the modern era. A survey of major movements and representative writers; 
techniques of poetic artistry (versification, figurative language, strophic forms) and sources of inspiration. Prerequisite(s): a 
grade of C or better in FREN 2002 or placement. 

FREN 4560 Masterpieces of the Novel (3-0-3) 

Studies of the novel, from the medieval romance to modern realistic and philosophical narrative. The art of extended narration 
as developed in France; literary movements, themes and techniques. Prerequisite(s): a grade of C or better in FREN 2002 or 
placement. 

FREN 4590 Literature in Translation (3-0-3) 

Special course, with varying content, cross-listed with Humanities, English and/or other languages. Readings of major French 
literary works in English translation; classroom discussions and writing assignments also in English. French majors may take 
no more than one course in translation for major credit. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1001-1002 or 1113-1114: HUMN 2001-2002; a 
grade of C or better in FREN 2002 or placement.. 

FREN 4801 Methods and Materials for Teaching Foreign Language I 

in the Elementary School (2-1-2) 
Methods and materials for listening, speaking, reading, writing, and cultural activities appropriate for elementary and middle 
school learners. First and second language acquisition theories, a review of foreign language teaching methods, testing 
procedures and teacher preparation and evaluation. Afield experience of 45 clock hours is a required component of the course. 
Prerequisite(s): Junior status and permission of the instructor 

FREN 4802 Methods and Materials for Teaching Foreign Language II 

in the Elementary School (2-1-2) 
Methods and materials for listening, speaking, reading, writing, and cultural activities appropriate for secondary learners. First 
and second language acquisition theories, a review of foreign language teaching methods, testing procedures and teacher 
preparation and evaluation. A field experience of 45 clock hours is a required component of the course. Prerequisite(s): Junior 
status and permission of the instructor 

FREN 4950 Special Topics in French (3-0-3) 

Special course, with varying content, cross-listed with Humanities, English and/or other languages. Topics such as the following; 
Great Thinkers of France; Modern Critical Theory; Modern French Mass-Media; Literature and Spirituality. 
Prerequisite(s): a grade of C or better in FREN 2002 or placement. 

FREN 6801 Methods and Materials for Teaching Foreign Languages I (3-0-3) 

Methods and materials for listening, speaking, reading, writing, and cultural activities appropriate for elementary and middle 
school learners. First and second language acquisition theories, a review of foreign language teaching methods, testing 
procedures, and teacher preparation and evaluation. Afield experience of 45 clock hours is a required component of the class. 
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the graduate program - MAT. 

Example; (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 263 



FREN 6802 Methods and Materials for Teaching Foreign Languages II (3-0-3) 

Methods and materials for listening, speaking, reading, writing, and cultural activities appropriate for elementary and middle 
school learners. First and second language acquisition theories, a review of foreign language teaching methods, testing 
procedures, and teacher preparation and evaluation. A field experience of 45 clock hours is a required component of the class. 
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the graduate program - MAT. 

GEOG - Geography Course 

GEOG 1111 World Geography (3-0-3) 

A study of the world and its topography, political divisions, cultural development, cultural spheres, geographic spheres, and 
climatic regions; as well as cartography, geology, physics, and astronomy, as they pertain to the earth. 

GEOG 111 2 Introduction to Weather and Climate (3-2-4) 

Atmospheric composition and structure, clouds, precipitation, atmospheric motion and winds. Organized weather systems, 
including air masses, fronts and severe weather. Discussion of global climates includes circulation, wind systems and climate 
classification. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1101 or MATH 1111. 

GEOL - Geology Courses 

GEOL 1121 Introductory Geosciences I: Physical Geology (3-2-4) 

The study of minerals and rocks; fundamentals of earth structure and processes including vulcanism, mountain-building, 
erosion, sedimentation and metamorphism. Laboratory includes study of common minerals and rocks, and interpretation of 
geologic maps and cross-sections. Prerequisite(s): Recommended but not required: MATH 1101 or MATH 1111. 

GEOL 1122 Introductory Geosciences II: Historical Geology (3-2-4) 

A study of geologic principles applicable to earth history. Includes basic stratigraphy and paleontology. Survey of geologic 
time periods, including geological and biological events during earth development. Prerequisite(s): GEOL 1121 or permission 
of the instructor. 

GEOL 2950 Selected Topics (V-O-V) 

Concepts/topics in special areas of geology/geoscience. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the 
instructor 

GEOL 4950 ' Selected Topics (V-O-V) 

Concepts/topics in special areas of geology/geoscience. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the 
instructor 

GEOL4990 Undergraduate Research (O-V-V) 

Individual modern geology/geoscience research. A minimum of three hours of laboratory work per week for each semester 
hour of credit. Report/thesis required. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor. 

GRMN - German Courses 

Note; For additional courses in German, consult the Studies Abroad (SABR) courses described on p. 311 . 

GRMN 1 001 Elementary German I (3-V-3) 

Fundamentals of listening, speaking, reading, and writing German in a proficiency-based classroom. Introduction to 
German-speaking cultures. Designed for students who have never studied German. Students who entered ASU for the first 
time in the fall of 1 998 or later, or those returning students who have not been enrolled for two consecutive years prior to 1 998, 
will not be able to count Foreign Language 1001 towards graduation if it is the same language they took in high school. (First 
time freshmen who graduated from high school five or more years ago may count Foreign Language 1001.) However, it does 
count for computing eligibility for financial aid and calculating full-time student status. Students taking the language for the first 
time will receive credit. For CPC students, consult p. 6 of the catalog. Not open to native speakers. Heritage speakers should 
take the placement exam. 

GRMN 1002 Elementary German II (3-V-3) 

A continuation of German 1 001 . Students admitted provisionally with CPC deficiency in foreign languages may take this course 
to satisfy the foreign language CPC requirement. Not open to native speakers. Heritage speakers should take the placement 
exam. Prerequisite(s): GRMN 1001 or placement. 

Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 

9fi4 

Augusta State University Catalog 



GRMN 2001 Intermediate German I (3-V-3) 

This proficiency-centered course is designed to build on high school German or on GRMN 1 002. More emphasis will be placed 
on listening, speaking, and reading skills in practical situations. Students will learn how to "get around" in places where German 
is spoken natively. Not open to native speakers. Heritage speakers should take the placement exam. Prerequisite(s): GRMN 
1002 or placement. 

GRMN 2002 Intermediate German II (3-V-3) 

This proficiency-centered course includes a grammar review and more intensive work in listening comprehension, speaking, 
and reading, with more emphasis on writing than in GRMN 2001 . German-speaking cultures will be studied through music, art, 
film, literary and cultural readings, including current events. At the end of this course, students should have a basic competence 
in German. Students who wish to take upper-division courses in German will need to demonstrate sufficient proficiency as 
determined by the foreign language faculty before enrolling in courses for the minor. Not open to native speakers. Heritage 
speakers should take the placement exam. Students must earn a C or better in order to take classes at the 3000/4000 level. 
Prerequisite(s): GRMN 2001 or placement. 

GRMN 3100 Oral Communication in German (3-0-3) 

An intensive course designed to examine the codes of oral communication in German and to improve the student's productive 
and receptive skills in a variety of practical situations. Special emphasis given to oral communication. May not be taken by 
native speakers of German. Prerequisite(s): a grade of C or better in GRMN 2002 or placement. 

GRMN 3220 ' German Society and Culture (3-0-3) 

A course designed to introduce the student to contemporary German society and culture and the historical dimensions of 
contemporary social, political and intellectual issues. Emphasis on the development of productive and receptive skills in 
German. Prerequisite(s): a grade of C or better in GRMN 2002 or placement. 

GRMN 3300 German Grammar and Written Communication(3-0-3) 

An intensive course designed to teach the student the finer points of German grammar, examine the codes of written 
communication in German, and improve the student's productive and receptive skills in German. Prerequisite(s): a grade of C 
or better in GRMN 2002 or placement. 

GRMN 3510 Introduction to German Literature (3-0-3) 

A course designed to introduce the student to literary reading and analysis using exemplary works from German literature. 
Emphasis on the development of productive and receptive skills in German. Prerequisite(s): a grade of C or better in GRMN 
2002 or placement. 

GRMN 3520 Studies in German Literature (3-0-3) 

A course designed around the study of a particular genre, period or theme in German literature. Emphasis on the development 
of productive and receptive skills. Prerequisite(s): a grade ofC or better in GRMN 2002 or placement. 

GRMN 4950 Selected Topics (3-0-3) 

A variable content course, intended to meet the interests of students studying German and desiring to make an intensive study 
of a specific area of German Studies. Emphasis on the development of productive and receptive skills. May be repeated for 
credit. Prerequisite(s): a grade of C or better in GRMN 2002 or placement. 

HIST - History Courses 

HIST 1111 Pre-Modern World Civilization (3-0-3) 

A survey of world history to early modern times. The course will examine the political, economic, social, and cultural aspects 
of various civilizations from ancient times to the Renaissance. 

HIST 1112 Modern World Civilization (3-0-3) 

A survey of world history from early modern times to the present. An examination of the development of world civilization from 
the beginnings of European colonization to the present, including events, trends, institutions, and ideas that have had global 
impact. 

H 1ST 1 1 1 3 Issues in World Civilization (V. 1 -2) 

Study of a major theme in pre- or post-1500 world history such as conflict, socioeconomic development, cultural interaction, or 
cultural/intellectual trends. Especially for transfers completing the Humanities requirement (Core Areas B and C). 

HIST 2111 United States to 1877 (3-0-3) 

A survey of American history to the post-Civil War period. A satisfactory grade will exempt a student from the requirement of 
passing before graduation an examination on the history of the United States and the history of Georgia. 

Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 265 



HIST 2112 United States since 1877 (3-0-3) 

A survey of the United States from the post-Civil War period to the present. A satisfactory grade will exempt a student from the 
requirement of passing before graduation an examination on the history of the United States and the history of Georgia. 

HIST 3001 Historical Research Metiiods (3-2-4) 

A study of the methods of historical research and analysis as well as the generally accepted usages in historical composition 
and citation. Prerequisite(s): Completion of two of the following courses-HIST 1111. HIST 1112. HIST 2111. and HIST 2112-or 
permission of instructor. 

HIST 3111/5111 ' History and Culture of Africa (3-0-3) 

A survey of the political, economic, social, and intellectual history of the African continent from ancient times to the present. 
Prerequisite(s): Junior or Senior standing or permission of instructor 

HIST 3211/5211 History and Culture of East Asia (3-0-3) 

A survey of Asian civilizations emphasizing cultural institutions and reactions to Western encroachment. Prerequisite(s): Junior 
or Senior standing or permission of instructor. 

HIST 3271/5271 History and Culture of India (3-0-3) 

Indian history and culture from Indus Valley civilization to modern times including topics such as religions, philosophy, art, 
architecture, society, and family. Prerequisite(s): HIST 1111 or HIST 1112. 

HIST 3311/5311 Modern Russia (3-0-3) 

Russia from the late nineteenth century to the present. Origins, development, and collapse of the Soviet state. Prerequisite(s): 
Junior or Senior standing or permission of instructor. 

HIST 3371/5371 England to 1689 (3-0-3) 

A study of the origins and development of England politically, economically, socially, and culturally from the earliest settlements 
through the Revolution of 1688 establishing constitutional monarchy. Prerequisite(s): HIST 1111 or permission of instructor. 

HIST 3381/5381 England Since 1689 (3-0-3) 

A study of the constitutional developments, rise of parliamentary supremacy, impact of the Industrial Revolution, and institutional 
and social reforms in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Prerequisite(s): HIST 1112 or permission of instructor. 

HIST 3391/5391 British Empire and Commonwealth (3-0-3) 

A survey of the political, economic, social, and intellectual history of the British Empire and Commonwealth. Prerequisite(s): 
Junior or Senior standing or permission of instructor 

HIST 341 1 /541 1 Indians of North America (3-0-3) 

Origins and cultures of native peoples of America north of Mexico. Discusses impact of arrival of Europeans in North America. 
Prerequisite(s): HIST 2111 or permission of instructor. 

HIST 3431/5431 African-American History to 1877 (3-0-3) 

An examination of the origins of man; the kingdoms of West Africa; African political, economic, and social systems; the slave 
trade; slavery in the Americas; and the experiences of African Americans through the presidential election of 1876. 

HIST 3441/5441 African-American History since 1 877 (3-0-3) 

An examination of the lives of black Americans in their search for freedom in the South, North, and West following the presidential 
election of 1876 and into the twentieth century. 

HIST 3481/5481 American Social and Intellectual History (3-0-3) 

A study of some of the major social developments and political and cultural ideas that have shaped American history since the 
Revolutionary era. Prerequisite(s): HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 or permission of instructor. 

HIST 3491 /5491 tvlilitar/ History of the United States (3-0-3) 

Overview of American military history from colonization to the present, including major wars, campaigns, battles, institutional 
and organizational development, and strategy. 

HIST 351 1 /551 1 Colonial Latin America (3-0-3) 

A survey of the pre-Columbian era and of the Iberian backgrounds, explorations, conquests, and institutions in Latin America 
through the wars of independence. 
Prerequisite(s): Junior or Senior standing or permission of instructor. 

HIST 3521/5521 /Wodem Latin America (3-0-3) 

A survey of the national histories of the Latin American states since the wars of independence. Prerequisite(s): Junior or Senior 
standing or permission of instructor 

Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
^"° Augusta State University Catalog 



HIST 3531/5531 History of Mexico (3-0-3) 

An examination of pre-Cortesian civilizations, Spanish conquest, colonial institutions, and the period since independence with 
special ennphasis on Mexico since 1917. Prerequisite(s): Junior or Senior standing or permission of instructor. 

HIST 3591/5591 Inter-American Relations (3-0-3) 

A study of the cultural, commercial, and diplomatic relations among the American republics. Prerequisite(s): Junior or Senior 
standing or permission of instructor 

HIST 3711/5711 ' '■ Georgia History (3-0-3) 

A study of the history of Georgia that focuses on state and local history and shows the connections with national and world 
events. This course fulfills the legislative requirement for Georgia history. Prerequisite(s): HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 or permission 
of instructor. 

HIST 3811/5811 History and Culture oftfie Islamic World (3-0-3) 

A survey of the political, economic, social, and intellectual history of the predominantly Muslim-populated regions in the Eastern 
Hemisphere from the seventh century to the present. Prerequisite(s): Junior or Senior standing or permission of instructor 

HIST 3831/5831 Archaeology (3-0-3) 

Examines theories, methods, and techniques used by modern archaeologists in an integrated scientific approach to investigate 
and understand historic and prehistoric cultures. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1102 orANTH 2011 or permission of instructor 

HIST 3851/5851 Military History of the Western World (3-0-3) 

Warfare in the western world from ancient times through the eighteenth century. Attention will be given to military doctrine, 
technology, and style, and the effect of war on the development of the west. Prerequisite(s): Junior or Senior standing or 
permission of instructor. 

HIST 3891/5891 History of Architecture (3-0-3) 

An examination of the great traditions of classic architecture from Greece and Rome through their revivals in England and the 
United States, contrasting them with the Gothic tradition, and concluding with a survey of contemporary styles. Prerequisite(s): 
Junior or Senior standing or permission of instructor. 

HIST 4011/6011/ WMST 4011 History of Women (3-0-3) 

This course will examine the history of women in either a geographical or topical approach. It will examine the female role of 
mother, daughter, sister, and leader in a particular society, such as America, Europe, Asia, Latin America, etc. Or, the course 
will be centered on a particular cross-cultural topic, such as suffrage, family roles, leaders, religion, etc. In ail cases, this course 
is intended to explore the paradox between the ideal woman and actual treatment of women in a given era, society, culture, or 
movement. Students taking the graduate level course will be required to complete additional work. May be repeated for credit. 
Prerequisite(s): HIST 1111 or 1112 or permission of instructor 

HIST 4021/6021/WMST 4021 Gender and Family History (3-0-3) 

This is an in-depth look at the relationship between men and women with particular emphasis on their roles in the family. 
The course will look at childhood, marriage, work, and cultural practices in a particular period from antiquity to modernity. 
Primary and secondary sources will provide comparisons between men and women in both the elite and common sectors of 
society. Students taking the graduate level course will be required to complete additional work. May be repeated for credit. 
Prerequisite(s): HIST 1111 or 1112 or permission of instructor 

HIST 4111/6111 History of World Religions (3-0-3) 

This is a survey course introducing the study of religion. The students will define what "religion" is, examine why so many 
people in the history of the world find religion important, and try to understand some of the major tenets of the religions of the 
world. This course is designed with the theme of ethics and morals as defined by cultures and religions around which many of 
the readings and discussions will take place. Prerequlsite(s): Junior or Senior standing or permission of instructor 

HIST 4211/6211 The Middle East. 622-1914 (3-0-3) 

A survey of the political, economic, social, and intellectual history of the Middle East from the time of the Prophet Muhammad 
to the Ottoman Empire's entry into the First World War. Prerequisite(s): Junior or Senior standing or permission of instructor 

HIST 4221/6221 The Modern Middle East (3-0-3) 

A survey of the political, economic, social, and intellectual history of the Middle East from the First World War to the 
present including such subjects as Western imperialism, Arab nationalism, and the Arab-Israeli conflict and peace process. 
Prerequisite(s): Junior or Senior standing or permission of instructor 

HIST 4231/6231 History of Modern Israel (3-0-3) 

A examination of the political, economic, social and intellectual history of Israel and the Palestinian territories since 1948 with 
background provided on Palestine since the 19th century under Ottoman and later British rule as well as the origins of Zionism 

Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 267 



and Palestinian Arab nationalism. Students taking this course as HIST 6231 will complete additional work not required for HIST 
423 1 . Prerequisite(s): Junior or Senior standing or permission of instructor 

HIST 4321/6321 Ancient Civilizations (3-0-3) 

This course will look at the history of the cultures and practices of the societies that laid the foundation for civilization in Europe 
and the Middle East. This is a survey of the civilizations of the Mediterranean region examining the cultural, political, legal, 
philosophical, and artistic elements of these societies, focusing on Egypt, Greece and Rome. It also will include discussions 
on the lasting effects of classical ideas and institutions. Prerequisite(s): HIST 1111 or permission of instructor 

HIST 4341/6341 Medieval European History (3-0-3) 

A survey of the institutions and communities of the medieval world from dissolution of the Roman Empire until the Renaissance 
reaches northern Europe. This course will include information on the anstocracy and the peasantry, marriage and family, feudal 
politics, and the development of law and technology. Prerequisite(s): Junior or Senior standing or permission of instructor 

HIST 4351 /6351 Renaissance and Reformation (3-0-3) 

A study of social and religious attitudes and conflicts, the significant changes in political theory, and the evolution of capitalism 
in the fourteenth, fifteenth, and sixteenth centuries. Prerequisite(s): HIST 1111 or permission of instructor. 

HIST 4361/6361 Age of Reason and Enlightenment (3-0-3) 

A study of European institutions and ideas in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries with special attention to the growth of 
absolute monarchies, to discoveries in the sciences, and to the application of reason to the progress of human development. 
Prerequisite(s): HIST 1112 or permission of instructor. 

HIST 4371/6371 Age of Revolutions (3-0-3) 

A study of causation, methodology, and effectiveness of revolutions as they occurred in Europe and America from the 1600s 
through 1917. Prerequisite(s): HIST 1112 or permission of instructor. 

HIST 4381/6381 Nineteenth Century Europe (3-0-3) 

An examination of the transition of the European states from agricultural, semi-feudal monarchies to industrialized great powers. 
Prerequisite(s): Junior or Senior standing or permission of instructor. 

HIST 4391/6391 Twentieth Century Europe (3-0-3) 

Major trends in European history from the Russian Revolution of 1905 to the present. Prerequisite(s): Junior or Senior standing 
or permission of instructor 

HIST 4401/6401 Colonial and Revolutionary America (3-0-3) 

A study of the colonization of North America by Europeans; the interaction of native peoples with the colonizers; the political, 
economic, social, and cultural growth of the colonies; the relationship between England and her colonies; and the American 
Revolution. Prerequisite(s): HIST 2111 or permission of instructor. 

HIST 4411/6411 The United States from Confederation to 1850 (3-0-3) 

An in-depth study of the political, economic, social, and cultural development of America during the Confederation, Federalist, 
Jeffersonian, and Jacksonian periods. Prerequisite(s): HIST 2111 or permission of instructor. 

HIST 4421/6421 Civil War and Reconstruction (3-0-3) 

A study of the causes of the American Civil War, the major military campaigns and engagements, and the problems of the 
nation after the war. Prerequisite(s): HIST 2111 or permission of instructor 

HIST 4431/6431 The United States from the Gilded Age 

to the Great Depression (3-0-3) 
An in-depth study of the political, economic, social, and cultural development of America and of American foreign relations 
during the Gilded Age, Progressive 
Era, World War I, and the 1920s. Prerequisite(s): HIST 2112 or permission of instructor 

HIST 4441/6441 The United States since the Great Crash (3-0-3) 

A study of the United States from the beginning of the Great Depression to the present with emphasis on political, social, 
economic, and diplomatic developments. Prerequisite(s): HIST 2112 or permission of instructor. 

HIST 4451/6451 National Security and Foreign Policy 1898-present (3-0-3) 

The emergence of the United States as a world power, the origins and impact of the Cold War, and the forces that have shaped 
America's relationship with the world. Prerequisite(s): Junior or Senior standing or permission of instructor. 

HIST 4471/6471 The Old South (3-0-3) 

A study of the American South from the beginnings of European settlement to the Civil War with emphasis on slavery, the 
development of southern culture, and other topics. Prerequisite(s): HIST 2111 or permission of instructor 

Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
^"° Augusta State University Catalog 



HIST 4481/6481 The New South (3-0-3) 

A study of the American South since Reconstruction with emphasis on race relations, the evolution of southern culture, and 
other topics. Prerequisite(s): HIST 2112 or permission of Instructor. 

HIST 4491/6491 The American West (3-0-3) 

An examination of the westward movement and those factors that defined the West as a land of opportunity; the significance 
of race, ethnicity, and gender in the West's creation; and the role of the West in shaping the identity and image of the United 
States. Prerequlslte(s): HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 or permission of Instructor. 

HIST 4950/6950 Selected Topics (V) 

Content of the course varies. Prerequlslte(s): Junior or Senior standing or permission of instructor. 

HIST 4960 Undergraduate Internship (V) 

A service-learning experience based in an institution or agency, the internship requires the completion of a specific task and the 
acquisition of specific knowledge and skills under the supervision of Augusta State University and the cooperating institution or 
agency. Prerequlsite(s): Permission of department chair. 

HIST 4970 Senior Thesis (3-0-3) 

The composition of an extended paper that employs the methods of historical research and analysis and that incorporates the 
generally accepted usages in historical composition and citation. Prerequlslte(s): Senior standing. 

HONR - Honors Courses 

HONR 1010 Honors Introductory Seminar: The Nature of Inquiry (3-0-3) 

A content based introduction to problem solving and critical thinking from the perspective of the various disciplines, HONR 
1010 explores modes of critical inquiry and prepares entering honors students to succeed at ASU and in the Honors Program. 
Specific topic focus varies from year to year. Readings, lectures, and orientation activities form the basis for writing, speaking 
and discussion so that the course satisfies the COMS requirement in Core Area B for honors students. Prerequlsite(s): 
Admission to ASU Honors Program. 

HONR 1900 Contemporary Issues ( 3-0-3) 

An interdisciplinary exploration of an important issue or theme at a level consistent with freshman or sophomore honors 
standing. Variable topics. Topic chosen by student/faculty committee. Prerequlslte(s): Admission to ASU Honors Program or 
permission of the Honors Program Committee. Freshman or sophomore status. 

HONR 2950 Selected Topics (3-0-3) 

A variable topics honors course that allows faculty to experiment with innovative lower division course offerings. These courses 
will be approved by the faculty member's department and by the Honors Committee. These courses can, with the approval 
of the department or departments responsible for core offerings, count in the core by course substitution. Prerequlsite(s): 
Admission to ASU Honors Program or permission of the Honors Program Committee. 

HONR 3900 Breaking Boundaries (3-0-3) 

An interdisciplinary and/or multicultural seminar which aims to cross boundaries between the disciplines and/or between 
cultures within the United States or within the world. The course provides an in-depth examination of variable selected topics 
at a level consistent with junior or senior honors standing. Topic chosen by student/faculty committee. Prerequlsite(s): Junior 
or senior status and (1) admission to ASU Honors program or (2) permission of the Honors Program Committee. 

HONR 3999 Thesis Prospectus (1-0-1) 

A directed project wherein the student works closely with an honors advisor, usually in her or his major department, to develop 
an acceptable honors thesis proposal. The proposal will include a description of the proposed honors project: its purpose, its 
extent, and its expected outcome; an assessment of materials needed and available for the proposed project; a calendar for 
work on the proposed thesis; and, a description of the assessment procedures for determining the evaluation and awarding 
of credit for the finished thesis. The finished proposal will be submitted to the Honors Committee for comment and approval. 
Prerequlslte(s): Junior status, admission to the ASU Honors Program. 

HONR 4000 Honors Thesis (2-0-2 or 3-0-3) 

(Hours credit determined case by case by honors advisor department chair and Honors Committee chair) 
A directed project wherein the student works closely with an honors advisor, usually in her or his major department, to develop 
an acceptable honors thesis based on an approved thesis proposal designed in HONR 3999. Depending on the field in which 
the work is being done, an honors thesis may take a variety of forms: e.g. traditional library research, an original piece of 
quantitative or qualitative research, a critical or appreciative essay, an exhibit or performance accompanied by a reflective, 
analytic essay, a substantial work of fiction or poetry, or an analysis growing out of an internship. The thesis is the work of an 
individual student, working closely with an advisor, usually in the student's major discipline. The thesis will be presented before 

Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 

Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 269 



members of the honors student community and reviewed by and discussed with a panel established by the Honors Committee 
who will share their comments and recommendations with the writer and advisor. The evaluation of the thesis and the awarding 
of credit are the responsibility of the advisor. Prerequisite(s): Junior status, admission to the ASU Honors Program, and l-IONR 
3999. 

HONR 4500 Honors Capstone (1-0-1) 

An integrative course providing a vehicle for self-assessment and for program-assessment. Variable content defined by the 
graduating honors students. Provides opportunity for possible presentation of honors theses and mentoring of beginning 
honors students in HONR 1010. Prerequisite(s): Senior status, admission to tiie ASU Honors program, and completion of 
majority of course worl<. 

HUMN - Humanities Courses 

HUMN 2001 World Humanities I (3-2-4) 

An interdisciplinary study of literature, art, music, and philosophy designed to develop the student's understanding of the 
evolution of culture in the Western world and create an appreciation of significant cultural elements from Asia and the Middle 
East; the course will highlight cross-cultural ideas, ethics, arts, values, and means of human expression. This course covers 
the historical period from antiquity to the seventeenth century. Prerequisite(s): English 1101-1102 or English 1113-1114. 

HUMN 2002 World Humanities II (3-2-4) 

An interdisciplinary study of literature, art, music, and philosophy designed to develop the student's understanding of the 
evolution of culture in the Western world and create an appreciation of significant cultural elements from Asia and Africa; the 
course will highlight cross-cultural ideas, ethics, arts, values, and means of human expression. This course covers the historical 
penod from the seventeenth century to the present. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1101-1102 or 1113 -1114. and HUMN 2001. 

HUMN 2011 Humanities: Special Topics (0-0-1) 

Guided independent study of various limited topics in the humanities which have interdisciplinary components analogous to 
topics covered in the World Humanities sequence (e.g. Arabic Humanities; The Modern World; Religious Expressions in Art 
and Literature). Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1101-1102 or 1113-1114; five hours of credit in Humanities transferred in from another 
institution or permission of the department. 

HUMN 2021 Aztec. Maya, and Inca Humanities (0-0-1) 

An independent study course on elements of history, culture, literature, art, and music created by the indigenous peoples of 
Mesoamehca and South America. Students take multiple choice tests based on readings and videotapes. All students should 
have an email address and should contact the instructor during the first week of the semester. Prerequisite(s):Students may 
take the course only if they have already earned three hours of Humanities credit toward areas B and C of the core. 

HUMN 2023 North American Indian Humanities (0-0-1) 

An independent study course on elements of history, culture, literature, art, and music created by the indigenous peoples of 
North America. Students take multiple choice tests based on readings, DVDs, and videotapes. All students should have an 
email address and should contact the instructor during the first week of the semester. Prerequisite(s):Students may take the 
course only if they have already earned three hours of Humanities credit toward areas B and C of the core. 

HUMN 2031 Ancient Greek Humanities (0-0-1) 

An independent study course on elements of ancient Greek history, literature, art, music, and culture. Students take multiple 
choice tests based on readings, dvds, and videotapes. All students should have an email address and should contact the 
instructor during the first week of the semester. Students may not receive credit for the course if they receive credit for HUMN 
2001 or for a transfer course which covered literature and/or art of ancient Greece. Prerequisite(s):Students may take the 
course only if they have already earned three hours of Humanities credit toward areas B and C of the core. 

HUMN 2041 African Humanities (0-0-1) 

An independent study course on elements of African history, literature, art, and culture. Students take multiple choice tests 
based on readings, DVDs, and videotapes. All students should have an email address and should contact the instructor during 
the first week of the semester. Prerequisite(s):Students may take the course only if they have already earned three hours of 
Humanities credit toward areas B and C of the core. 

HUMN 2043 Japanese Humanities (0-0-1) 

An independent study course on elements of Japanese history, literature, art music, and culture. Students take multiple choice 
tests based on readings, DVDs, and videotapes. All students should have an email address and should contact the instructor 
during the first week of the semester. Prerequisite(s):Students may take the course only if they have already earned three hours 
of Humanities credit toward areas B and C of the core. 



Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
^ ' ^ Augusta State University Catalog 



HUMN 2045 Chinese Humanities (0-0-1) 

An independent study course on elements of Chinese history, literature, art, music, and culture. Students take multiple choice 
tests based on readings, DVDs, and videotapes. All students should have an email address and should contact the instructor 
during the first week of the semester. Prerequisite(s):Students may tal<e ttie course only if tiiey liave already earned three hours 
of Humanities credit toward areas B and C of the core. 

HUMN 2950 Humanities: Selected Topics (V-O-V) 

A variable-content interdisciplinary course which exploits the approach of two or more academic disciplines to explore topics of 
interest to lower-division undergraduate students. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1101-1102 or 1113-1114. 

HUMN 401 Postmodernism and Beyond (3-0-3) 

An interdisciplinary study of Postmodernism-its theory and its manifestations in literature, art and music. Prerequisite(s): 
ENGL 1101-1102 or 1113-1114; HUMN 2001-2002. 

HUMN 41 01 Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art (3-0-3) 

A seminar dedicated to the critical study and analysis of aesthetic theories and philosophy of art since the late eighteenth 
century. Course will stress close readings and group discussion of texts by Kant, Hegel, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Benjamin, 
Adorno, Merleau-Ponty, and Lyotard. Recommended especially for studio art students, for students minoring in Humanities. 
and for anyone interested in philosophy. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1101-1102 or ENGL 1113-1114 or HUMN 2002 or PHIL 1000. 

HUMN 4210 ' Literature into Opera (3-0-3) 

A combined literary and musical study of the transformations of classic literary works, such as a Shakespearean drama, into 
opera. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1101-1102 or 1113-1114: HUMN 2001-2002 

HUMN 4220 Harlem Renaissance (3-0-3) 

Astudy of the major writers, artists, and musicians of the Harlem Renaissance (1919-1935). Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1101-1102 
or 1113-1114; HUMN 2001-2002. 

H U M N 4950 Selected Topics (3- V-3) 

Variable topics focusing on (1 ) the intellectual and aesthetic movements of a particular period or culture; (2) critical-theoretical 
approaches to the study of literature, music, and art; and (3) interdisciplinary topics in the Humanities. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 
1101-1102 or 1113-1114; HUMN 2001-2002, or permission of the instructor. 

ILIT - Information Literacy 

I LIT 1500 Introduction to Information Literacy (2-0-2) 

Introduction to information literacy concepts and practices, including determining how much information is needed, finding 
source materials relevant to a research topic, and evaluating information sources of all kinds. Course is intended to be taken 
in the same semester as any other course in an academic discipline which requires the completion of a research paper or any 
other project which requires the student to compile a list of sources from which to gather and assimilate information on a chosen 
topic. Prerequisite(s): none. 

ISCI - Integrated Science Courses 

ISCI 2001 Life/Earth Sciences for Elementary Education (2-2-3) 

This course is designed to provide early childhood education majors with hands-on experiences in the life sciences and earth 
sciences that can be incorporated into the P-4 classroom. Emphasis will be placed on experimentation and activities, their use 
in the understanding of concepts in the life and earth sciences, and their direct application in the P-4 classroom. Prerequisite(s): 
MATH 1101, MATH 1111, or MATH 1113, and one Area D laboratory science course. 

ISCI 2002 Physical Science (2-2-3) 

An Area F course for an early childhood education major that focuses upon the most fundamental aspects of physics and 
chemistry. Conceptual understanding through exploration and experimentation will be employed to develop long-term 
connections to the formulaic components of the physical sciences. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1101. MATH 1111. or MATH 1113, 
and one Area D laboratory science course. 



Example; (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 271 



KNHS - Kinesiology and Health Science Courses 

KNHS 21 00 Diet and Nutrition (2-0-2) 

A study of the relationship that exists between diet and nutrition with specific application to maximizing overall health. 

KNHS 2200 CPR. First Aid and Sport Safety Training (1-0-1) 

This course introduces students to Adult, Infant and Child CPR; First Aid and automated external defibhilation training; and, 
sports related injury prevention. 

KNHS 2350 Health and Physical Education at the Early Childhood Level (2-0-2) 

This course presents the Early Childhood teacher education candidate with a guide for teaching health and physical education. 
In addition, this course may be used as a supplement for implementing a sound program. 

KNHS 3100 Introduction to Kinesiology and Health Science (2-2-3) 

An overview of the foundations of the various dimensions of Kinesiology and Health Science such as motor behavior, 
biomechanics, exercise physiology, sociology, health, fitness and teaching are among the topics introduced. Special emphasis 
is devoted to the aims and objectives of Kinesiology and Health Science as a profession and career choices. 

KNHS 3210 Motor Behavior (3-0-3) 

The theory and application of motor skill development and the behavioral characteristics of participants in motor activities will 
be discussed. 

KNHS 3220 Structural Kinesiology (3-0-3) 

A study of the structural basis underlying human motion, with emphasis on the skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. 
An analysis of the mechanical principles which apply to the techniques used in physical activity, sport, and dance, including 
principles of kinetics and kinematics. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2111 and BIOL 2112 with a grade of at least C. 

KNHS 3300 Practicum in Exercise and Sport Science (3-0-3) 

The purpose of the Practicum is to provide the student hands-on experience in exercise testing and prescription of physical 
fitness. Appropriate protocols will be practiced based on the age, health status, and physical activity level of the person to be 
tested. 

KNHS 3310 Sport and Exercise Psychology (3-0-3) 

This course examines physical activity as a health behavior and health-related dimension of physical fitness. The association 
between physical activity and fitness are analyzed. Other topics include health habits, chronic diseases, the behavior physiology 
of stress and mental health. Applications of psychology and exercise are examined. 

KNHS 3311 Introduction to Human Sexual Behavior (3-0-3) 

This course is designed to introduce the student to the multifaceted study of human sexual behavior, each component a 
functional property of individual, social, and psychological development. 

KNHS 3312 Introduction to Human Diseases (3-0-3) 

This course is designed to introduce the student to the multifaceted study of human diseases in terms of classification, etiology, 
and prevention. 

KNHS 331 3 Teaching and Assessing Physical Fitness (2-0-2) 

The purpose of this course is to develop skills and knowledge related to teaching and assessing physical fitness in the K-12 
public school setting. Additionally, this course is designed to provide the student with knowledge specific to the areas of health- 
related physical fitness testing and exercise prescription. 

KNHS 3314 Team Sports (2-0-2) 

Included are sport skill competencies, content knowledge, and pedagogic techniques for specific team sports. This course 
emphasizes concepts related to the development of motor skills. Team sports included are: volleyball, basketball, flag football, 
Softball, and soccer. 

KNHS 331 5 Individual/Dual Activities And Outdoor Education (2-0-2) 

Introduced are the skills rules, tactics, and instructional strategies for golf tennis, badminton, track and field, hiking, backpacking, 
orienteering, canoeing, and other outdoor skills. 

KNHS 3316 Movement and Dance Methods (2-0-2) 

The physical education teacher candidate is introduced to the concepts and qualities of human movement, instructional 
strategies for teaching dance, rhythms, stunts and tumbling, educational games and gymnastics. 



Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 

Augusta State University Catalog 



KNHS 3320 Fitness Assessment and Exercise Prescription (3-0-3) 

This course is an introduction to basic principles of fitness and wellness. The measurement prescription and evaluation of 
health-related factors of physical fitness are critical elements. Practical experience in fitness and wellness programming will 
be an integral part of this course. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2111, BIOL 2112 with a grade of C or better 

KNHS 3321 Conducting Quality HPE Programs (3-0-3) 

Conducting Quality HPE Programs is the initial pedagogy experience for health and physical education majors. The purpose 
of this course is to assist the teacher education candidate in developing teaching skills to promote an effective learning 
environment. 

KNHS 3343 Elementary Methods of Physical Education and Health (3-0-3) 

The purpose of this course is to enable the teacher education candidate to create a variety of learning opportunities for students 
that will be developmentally appropriate for children. 

KNHS 3420 Instructional Strategies in Health Science (3-0-3) 

This course is designed to offer the student a theoretical and practical introduction to the discipline of health science education 
as a tool in both the academic and community setting. 

KNHS 4220 Exercise Physiology (3-0-3) 

This course is an in-depth study of the physiology of exercise. Emphasis will be placed on energy metabolism during exercise 
and its relationship to the circulatory, pulmonary, and neuroendocrine systems. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2111 and BIOL 2112 with 
a grade of at least C. 

KNHS 4311 Epidemiology and Health Science Research (3-0-3) 

The purpose of this course is to introduce the participant to the study of human disease and injury in terms of distribution, 
determinants, and etiology. 

KNHS 4312 Biostatistics (3-0-3) 

The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the theoretical and practical use of statistics as a tool utilized in the 
collection, analysis, and interpretation of mortality and morbidity data. 

KNHS 4320 Principles of Exercise Therapy (3-0-3) 

This course will deal specifically with fitness and the factors involved in the measurements, prescription, and evaluation of 
adult populations. The rehabilitation of athletic and work-related injuries will be discussed. Concepts will be reinforced through 
laboratory experiences. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2111, BIOL 2112 with a grade of C or better. 

KNHS 4330 History and Philosophy of Kinesiology (3-0-3) 

The history of kinesiology will be presented with emphasis on the implications for modern kinesiology and sport. Critical 
thinking skills, problem solving skills, and ethical decision making will be stressed. 

KNHS 4340 Measurement and Evaluation in Kinesiology and Health Science (3-0-3) 

This course teaches how to collect, organize and analyze numerical data to find solutions to problems. Of interest is an 
understanding of how to measure knowledge, physical performance, and affective behavior. 

KNHS 4342 Physical Education for Middle and Secondary School Students (3-0-3) 

Teacher education candidates will learn about developmentally appropriate physical education for youth in middle and high 
school (grades 6-12). 

KNHS 4350 Nutrition in Health and Human Performance (3-0-3) 

This course will examine the science of nutrition as related to health, disease and human performance. Special emphasis 
on how nutrition impacts on development of human disease and possible prevention, and the unique nutritional requirements 
of athletes. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2111, BIOL 2112 and KNHS 2100 with a C or better, or permission of the instructor Senior 
standing. 

KNHS 4360 Physical Education for Students with Diverse Needs (2-2-3) 

This course presents foundations and techniques to teach physical education to most special populations. It is designed for 
both adapted and regular physical education teachers to address the needs of students with disabilities in the regular class. 

KNHS 4950 Selected Topics (3-0-3) 

The content of this course is designed to meet the needs and interests of students who are assigned studies in selected areas 
of health and Physical Education Related Topics. Prerequisite(s): Permission from department. 



Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 273 



KNHS 4960 Internship in Exercise and Sport Science (15-0-15) 

The purpose of the internship is to provide the student an opportunity to observe and practice essential skills of health/fitness 
professionals. The internship will further development of professional competence which enhances classroom knowledge. 
Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor. 

KNHS 4970 Apprenticeship Teaching (15-0-15) 

The purpose of the apprenticeship teaching experience is to develop the essential professional knowledge and skills of teacher 
education candidates who wish to enter the profession of teaching physical education and health. Prerequisite(s): Completion 
of all required Health and Physical Education Teacher Education Certification Courses. 

KNHS 6241 Seminar in Contemporary Kinesiology and Health Science Research (3-0-3) 

This course introduces students to research in the disciplines of kinesiology and health science. 

KNHS 6311 Advanced Behavioral Fitness (3-0-3) 

This course examines physical activity as a health behavior and health-related dimension of physical fitness. Associations 
between physical activity and fitness with health habits, chronic diseases, the behavior physiology of stress, and mental health 
are examined. 

KNHS 6312 Cardiovascular Response to Exercise (3-0-3) 

This course will deal specifically with the cardiovascular function of the human body during physical exertion. Concepts will be 
reinforced through laboratory experiences. 

KNHS 631 3 Principles of Strength and Conditioning (3-0-3) 

This course examines the principles of strength training. Included topics are the physiological responses to training as well as 
the practical considerations for developing a strength training program. 

KNHS 6331 Organization and Administration of Physical Education and Athletic Programs (3-0-3) 

This course will provide the student with an understanding of personnel administration, physical education and athletic 
objectives, and program administration. 

KNHS 6333 Program Design and Development (3-0-3) 

This course is intended to provide the knowledge necessary for guiding the development, maintenance, and improvement of 
the framework for instruction and learning in the school-the curriculum. This course will seek to identify and apply principles 
underlying curriculum improvement for grades K-12. 

KNHS 6334 Methods of Presentation in Kinesiology and Health Science (3-0-3) 

The purpose of this course is to examine and understand systematic methods to improve teaching skills. Two critical subject 
areas of this course will be the creation of conditions foi' effective teaching and a review of the literature on effective teaching 
in physical education. 

KNHS 6335 Seminar in Pedagogy and Teaching Methods (3-0-3) 

This course will critically evaluate common teaching practices that will empower students to combine best teaching practices 
in a physical education setting. In addition, it will include advanced pedagogical methods for integrating cross-curricular 
activities and technology into the physical education curriculum. This will be a dynamic course that will introduce students to 
new methodologies that enhance the delivery of high quality physical education in today's schools. 

KNHS 6339 Trends and Issues in Kinesiology and Health Sciences (3-0-3) 

The purpose of the course is to offer the graduate student an exploration of kinesiology and health science topics which, during 
the offering of the course, is under great discussion and contemplation within the professional community. Topics may differ 
between semesters. 

KNHS 6400 Internship in Kinesiology and Health Science (3-0-3) 

This experience is designed to offer the graduate student a pragmatic and experiential exposure to the fields of kinesiology and/ 
or health science. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor 

KNHS 641 1 Motor Learning (3-0-3) 

This course focuses on theory and application of motor skill development and the behavioral characteristics of participants in 
motor activities will be discussed. Topics include performance and skill, attentional factors, motivational factors, stress, and 
perceptual motor learning and classical research in motor learning. 

KNHS 641 2 Motor Development (3-0-3) 

This course is designed to provide the student with a knowledge base in the study of change in motor behavior across the 
lifespan. Topics include: reviews of cognitive, social, and perceptual development as they apply to motor development and 
factors that affect development. 

Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 

Augusta State University Catalog 



KNHS 6413 Advanced Measurement and Evaluation (3-0-3) 

A study of basic statistics and other issues applied to tine reliability and validity of cognitive, psychological, and physiological 
assessments of human movement. 

KNHS 6430 Advanced Health and Wellness (3-0-3) 

This purpose of this course is to offer the graduate student an in-depth survey of health science. Six content areas will be 
reviewed; physical, mental, social, spiritual, emotional, and environmental health. Current trends and issues specific to the 
discipline will also be explored. 

KNHS 6431 Advanced Application of Nutrition in Health and Human Performance (3-0-3) 

This course will provide essential updates to current standards related to nutrition in health, disease and human performance. 
Special emphasis on applying principles to athletes in specific environments. 

KNHS 6442 Applied Research Project (3-0-3) 

This course is designed to allow the student to conduct an applied research project under the supervision of a faculty member. 
After conducting the study, the student will prepare a written research report in the form of a manuscript. This course may be 
repeated as necessary. 

KNHS 6950 Selected Topics (Var) 

The content of this course is intended to meet the needs and interests of graduate students in selected areas of Kinesiology 
and Health Science. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor 

LATN - Latin Courses 

LAIN 1 00 1 Elementary Latin (3-0-3) 

Fundamentals of reading and writing Latin. Introduction to Roman culture. Designed for students who have never studied 
Latin. Students who entered ASU for the first time in the fall of 1998 or later, or those returning students who have not been 
enrolled for two consecutive years prior to 1998, will not be able to count Foreign Language 1001 towards graduation if it is 
the same language they took in high school. (First time freshmen who graduated from high school five or more years ago may 
count Foreign Language 1 001 .) However, it does count for computing eligibility for financial aid and calculating full-time student 
status. Students taking the language for the first time will receive credit. For CPC students, consult p. 6 of the catalog. 

LATN 1002 Elementary Latin (3-0-3) 

A continuation of Latin 1 001 . Students admitted provisionally with CPC deficiency in foreign languages may take this course to 
satisfy the foreign language CPC requirement. Regular credit will not be given to students who have had Latin in high school. 
Prerequisite(s): LATN 1001 or placement. 

LATN 2001 Intermediate Latin (3-0-3) 

Intermediate Latin grammar, syntax, and vocabulary based on writings of ancient authors; building English vocabulary through 
study of Latin roots. Prerequisite(s): LATN 1002 or placement. 

LATN 2002 Intermediate Latin (3-0-3) 

A continuation of Latin 2001. At the end of this course, students should have a basic competence in Latin. Prerequisite(s): 
LATN 2001 or placement. 

MATH - Mathematics Courses 

MATH 0096 Developmental Math I (4-0-4) 

This course provides instruction in introductory algebra. Course work includes basic arithmetic, operations with real numbers, 
exponents, equations, operations with polynomials, factoring, graphs, and problem solving. Credit for this course is not 
applicable to degree programs and is not transferable to other institutions. Prerequisite(s): Math Compass Score < 20. 

MATH 0097 Developmental Math II (3-0-3) 

This course provides instruction in introductory algebra. Course work includes operations with real numbers, exponents, 
equations, operations with polynomials, factoring, graphs, and problem solving. Credit for this course is not applicable to 
degree programs and is not transferable to other institutions. Prerequisite(s): Math COMPASS Score of 21-29. 

MATH 0099 Developmental Math III (3-0-3) 

This course provides instruction in intermediate algebra including real numbers, exponents, equations and inequalities, graphs, 
polynomials, rational and radical expressions and equations, and problem solving. Credit for this course is not applicable to 

Example; (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 275 



degree programs and is not transferable to other institutions. Prerequisite(s): MATH 0096/0097 or Math Compass Score of 

30-41. 

MATH 1101 Introduction to Mathematical Modeling (3-0-3) 

An introduction to mattiematical modeling using graphical, numerical, symbolic, and verbal techniques to describe and explore 
real-world data and phenomena. Emphasis is on the use of elementary functions to investigate and analyze applied problems 
and questions, supported by the use of appropriate technology, and on effective communication of quantitative concepts and 
results. (Credit will not be awarded for both MATH 1101 and MATH 1111. Not recommended for students planning to tal<e 
MATH 1113 or MATH 1220.) Prerequisite(s): Placement or the successful completion of MATH 0099. 

MATH 1111 College Algebra (3-0-3) 

A symbolically intensive functional approach to algebra that incorporates the use of appropriate technology. Emphasis will be 
placed on the study of functions and their graphs, inequalities, and linear, quadratic, piece-wise defined, rational, polynomial, 
exponential, and logarithmic functions. Appropriate applications will be included. (Credit will not be given for both MATH 1101 
and MATH 1111.) Prerequisite(s): Placement or the successful completion of MATH 0099. 

MATH 1113 Precalculus Mathematics (3-0-3) 

A rigorous study of polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions, primarily intended to prepare science 
and mathematics majors for calculus. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1101 or MATH 1111 (grade of C or better) with MATH 1111 
recommended, or placement. 

MATH 1120 Contemporary Mathematics (3-0-3) 

A second course in mathematics for the liberal arts student. A study of the nature of mathematics and its applications. At least 
seven (7) topics will be chosen from: set theory, logic, combinatorics, graph theory, probability, statistics, consumer mathematics, 
history of mathematics, numeration systems, the metric system, number theory, geometry, and algorithm development and 
computers. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1111 or MATH 1101. 

MATH 1220 Applied Calculus (3-0-3) 

An intuitive approach to the study of differential and integral calculus with applications in a variety of fields. Prerequisite(s): 
MATH 1111 or MATH 1101 (grade of C or better in either course), with MATH 1111 recommended, or placement. 

MATH 2008 Foundations of Numbers and Operations (3-0-3) 

An introductory mathematics course for early childhood education majors. This course will emphasize the understanding and 
use of the major concepts of numbers and operations. As a general theme, strategies of problem solving will be used and 
discussed. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1101, MATH 1111, or MATH 1113. 

MATH 2011 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I (4-0-4) 

An introduction to calculus including limits and continuity, derivatives of polynomial, rational, trigonometric, inverse trigonometric, 
exponential, and logarithmic functions, applications of derivatives, and basic integration. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1113 (grade 
of C or better) or placement. 

MATH 201 2 Calculus and Analytic Geometry II (4-0-4) 

A continuation of calculus including applications of integration, techniques of integration, improper integrals, sequences, series, 
and polar coordinates. Prerequisite(s): MATH 2011 (grade of C or better) or advanced placement. 

MATH 2013 Calculus and Analytic Geometry III (4-0-4) 

A study of calculus on multivariate functions. Topics include vectors, vector-valued functions, functions of several variables, 
parametric equations, partial differentiation, multiple integration with applications, line integrals, and Green's theorem. 
Prerequisite(s): MATH 2012 (grade of C or better) or advanced placement. 

MATH 2030 Logic and Set Theory (3-0-3) 

A course meant to serve as a transition to advanced courses in mathematics. Topics covered include logical connectives, the 
algebra of propositions, quantification, and basic properties of sets, relations, and orders. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1220 (grade 
of C or better) or MATH 2011 (grade of C or better). 

MATH 221 Elementary Statistics (3-0-3) 

A study of frequency distributions of data, graphical and numerical presentations of data, probability, discrete and continuous 
distributions, sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, simple linear regression and correlation and goodness of 
fit. (Credit will not be given for both MATH 2210 and MATH 3110.) Prerequisite(s): MATH 1111 or MATH 1101 or permission of 
instructor. 

MATH 231 Statistical Methods (3-0-3) 

Further study of simple and multiple linear regression and correlation, study of experimental design, analysis of variance, 
analysis of covariance, and non-parametric statistics, categorical analysis and time series. Prerequisite(s): MATH 2210. 

Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
■^ ' ° Augusta State University Catalog 



MATH 2950 Selected Topics (Variable) 

Modern concepts in special areas of mathematics. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor 

MATH 3020 Differential Equations (3-0-3) 

A study of first-order and linear second-order differential equations with applications. Topics include solution techniques, 
qualitative behavior, numerical methods, Laplace transformations, and the use of series. Prerequisite(s): MATH 2012 or 
permission of instructor 

MATH 3110 ' Statistical Analysis for Business (3-0-3) 

A study of frequency distributions of data, graphical and numerical summaries of data, basic probability, random variables and 
their probability distributions, sampling techniques and sampling distributions, estimation and hypothesis testing, simple linear 
regression and correlation, and statistical quality control and forecasting techniques. (Credit w/ill not be given for both MATH 
2210 and MATH 3110.) Prerequisite(s): MATH 1220. 

MATH 3241 Mathematics for Early Ciiildhood Teachers I (3-0-3) 

A study of the real number system w/ith an emphasis on rational numbers. Topics include multiple representations of numbers, 
relationships between numbers, properties, operations, estimation, and flexible and varied approaches to problem solving. 
(This course will not count toward a major or minor in mathematics.) Prerequisite(s): Admission to Teacher Education and 
Permission of Instructor 

MATH 3242 ' Mathematics for Early Childhood Teachers II (3-0-3) 

A study of the concepts related to spatial sense, geometry, and measurement using nonstandard, English, and metric units. 
Topics include a study of two- and three-dimensional objects, geometric transformations, and the location of points on a map 
or grid. (This course will not count toward a major or minor in mathematics.) Prerequisite(s): Admission to Teacher Education 
and Permission of Instructor 

MATH 3261 Mathematics for Middle School Teachers I (3-0-3) 

A study of the real number system including multiple representations of numbers, relationships between numbers, operations, 
properties, and estimation. Additional topics include proportional reasoning, algebraic reasoning, and elementary number 
theory. (This course will not count toward a major or minor in mathematics.) Prerequisite(s): Admission to Teacher Education 
and Permission of Instructor 

MATH 3262 Mathematics for Middle School Teachers II (3-0-3) 

A study of geometric concepts and measurement using nonstandard, English, and metric units. Topics include coordinate 
geometry, inductive and deductive reasoning, and concepts related to two- and three-dimensional objects including similarity, 
congruence, and transformations. (This course will not count toward a major or minor in mathematics.) Prerequisite(s): 
Admission to Teacher Education and Permission of Instructor 

MATH 3280 Linear Algebra (3-0-3) 

A study of vector spaces including finite-dimensional vector spaces, linear transformations, matrices, linear equations and 
determinants. Prerequisite(s): MATH 2012. 

MATH 3710 Combinatorics (3-0-3) 

Afirst course in enumeration. Topics include permutations and combinations of finite sets and multisets, properties of the binomial 
coefficients, the inclusion-exclusion formula, recurrences, generating functions, the Fibonacci sequence, and properties of the 
difference operator. The idea of the combinatorial proof is emphasized throughout the course. Prerequisite(s): MATH 2012 or 
permission of instructor 

MATH 4011 Real Variables I (3-0-3) 

A study of the real number system and functions. Topics include sequences, limits, continuity, differentiation and integration. 
Prerequisite(s): MATH 3280. 

MATH 401 2 Real Variables II (3-0-3) 

A study of differentiation and integration of functions on n-dimensional Euclidian space. Other topics include the elementary 
theory of metric spaces, infinite sequences and series, and Fourier series. Prerequisite(s): MATH 2013 and MATH 4011. 

MATH 421 1 Modern Abstract Algebra I (3-0-3) 

A study of abstract algebraic structure. Topics include groups, subgroups, permutation groups, homomorphisms, and quotient 
groups. Prerequisite(s): MATH 2030 or permission of instructor 

MATH 4212 Modern Abstract Algebra II (3-0-3) 

A continuation of the study of abstract algebraic structure. Topics include rings, ideals, integral domains, fields, and rings of 
polynomials. Prerequisite(s): MATH 4211. 



Example; (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 277 



MATH 4251 Probability and Statistics I (3-0-3) 

A study of combinatorics, probability, mathematical expectation, discrete and continuous distributions, bivariate and multivariate 
distributions, moment-generating functions, the central limit theorem, sampling distributions, estimation and hypothesis testing. 
Prerequisite(s): MATH 2012 (Grade of C or better). 

MATH 4252 Probability and Statistics II (3-0-3) 

A study of game theory and decision criteria, point and interval estimation, theory and applications of hypothesis testing, 
non-parametric tests, regression and correlation, analysis of variance and a general introduction to experimental design. 
Prerequisite(s): MATH 4251 (Grade of C or better). 

MATH 4260 Mathematics for Elementary and Middle School Teachers III (3-0-3) 

A study of data analysis, statistics, and probability through the collection and interpretation of data. Includes graphical 
representation of data, experimental and theoretical probabilities, measures of central tendency and variation, interpretation 
of statistical studies, and making predictions from data. (This course will not count toward a major or minor in mathematics.) 
Prerequisite(s): Admission to Teacher Education and Permission of Instructor. 

MATH 4310 Modern Geometry (3-0-3) 

A modern treatment of geometry primarily from the metric approach, but with some reference to the Euclidean Synthetic 

approach. Topics include parallelism, similarity, area, constructions, non-Euclidean and finite geometries. Prerequisite(s): 
MATH 2030 or permission of instructor. 

MATH 4320 Theory of Numbers (3-0-3) 

A study of the positive integers including divisibility, prime numbers and the theory of congruences. Additional topics may 
include Fermat's theorem, the law of quadratic reciprocity, and perfect numbers. Prerequisite(s): MATH 2012 or MATH 2030. 

MATH 4350 Numerical Analysis (3-0-3) 

A study of non-linear equations, numerical integration and differentiation and numerical solution of initial value problems in 
ordinary differential equations. Prerequisite(s): MATH 3020 and MATH 3280 and either CSC1 1301 or CSCI 2060, or permission 
of instructor. 

MATH 441 History of Mathematics (3-0-3) 

A study of the nature and historical origin of mathematics including analysis of the concepts of algebra, trigonometry and 
calculus and solution of problems pointed toward appreciation of early mathematical developments. Prerequisite(s): MATH 
2012 or MATH 2030. 

MATH 4420 Introduction to the Theory of Graphs (3-0-3) 

A study of graphs, subgraphs, paths, arcs, trees, circuits, digraphs, colorability. Prerequisite(s): MATH 2030 or CSCI 3030. 

MATH 4430 Methods of Teaching Secondary Mathematics (2-2-3) 

An exploration of topics relevant to the secondary mathematics curriculum using materials, technology, and teaching methods 
that model current best practices. Teaching and learning strategies will be examined in the context of national, state, and local 
curriculum standards. A field experience of 45 clock hours is a required component. Prerequisite(s): Admission to Teacher 
Education, MATH 4211, and permission of the instructor 

MATH 451 Complex Variables (3-0-3) 

A study of the field of complex numbers, elementary functions of a complex variable, limits, derivatives, analytic functions, 
mapping by elementary functions, integrals, power series, residues and poles. Prerequisite(s): MATH 2012 or permission of 
instructor 

MATH 4520 General Topology (3-0-3) 

A study of general topology including applications to Euclidean spaces, surfaces, topological invariants, continuous functions, 
and homeomorphisms. Prerequisite(s): MATH 2013 or permission of instructor 

MATH 4530 Mathematical Methods of Physics (3-0-3) 

An introduction to mathematical techniques used in advanced physics. Topics include Fourier series, special functions, integral 
transforms, boundary value problems, and partial differential equations. Prerequisite(s): PHYS 2212 (C or better) and MATH 
3020. 

MATH 4800 Secondary Mathematics from an Advanced Perspective (3-0-3) 

This course is designed so that prospective teachers can gain a deeper understanding of the key ideas of secondary school 
mathematics in the areas of number and operations, algebra, geometry, measurement, and data analysis. Prerequisite(s): 
MATH 4211 (Modem Abstract Algebra I) and permission of department chair 



Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
^' ° Augusta State University Catalog 



MATH 4950 Selected Topics (Variable) 

A study of modern concepts in special areas of nnathematics. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor and approval by 
Mathematics Curriculum Committee. 

MATH 4960 Undergraduate Internship (Variable 1 - 9) 

An internship in a service-learning experience based in an institution or agency, emphasizing the completion of a specific task 
and the acquisition of specific knowledge and skills under the supervision of ASU and the cooperating institution or agency. 
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the department chair 

MATH 4990 Undergraduate Research (Variable) 

Individual mathematics research, a minimum of three hours per week for each semester hour credit, Prerequisite(s): Permission 
of department chair and senior standing. 

MATH 5110 Introduction to Biostatistics (3-0-3) 

This course offers an introduction to the basic statistical techniques used to analyze and interpret data in the health sciences 
and related fields. Emphasis is on applications of these methods, with graphical statistics (estimation and hypothesis testing) 
for numeric and categorical data, nonparametric methods, analysis of variance, regression, and correlation. Prerequisite(s): 
MATH 2013 (Grade of C or better). 

MATH 521 Linear Models (3-0-3) 

This course is a study of the general linear statistical model and the linear hypothesis. Topics include the multivariate normal 
distributions of quadratic forms, and parameter estimation and hypothesis testing for full-rand regression models. Regression 
diagnostics and "dummy" variable coding will also be covered. Prerequisite(s): MATH 3280 and MATH 5110. 

MATH 5220 Estimation and Hypothesis Testing (3-0-3) 

introduction to the theoretical properties of point estimators and tests of hypotheses, sufficient statistics, likelihood, best linear 
unbiased estimates, elements of statistical tests, the Neyman Pearson Lemma, UMP tests, univariate normal inference, 
decision theory and multivariate distributions are covered. Prerequisite(s): MATH 4251 (Grade of C or better) and MATH 5110 
(Grade of C or better). 

MATH 5241 Numbers and Operations for Teachers (3-0-3) 

Designed for students in the MAT program seeking initial certification in early childhood or middle grades, this course focuses 
on developing a deep understanding of the concepts and techniques related to numbers, numerations systems, and numerical 
operations. Collaboration, critical thinking, hands-on explorations using manipulatives, problem-based inquiry, and technological 
tools will be used. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor 

MATH 5242 Geometry and Measurement for Teachers (3-0-3) 

Designed for students in the MAT program seeking initial certification in early childhood or middle grades, this course focuses 
on developing a deep understanding of the concepts related to spatial sense, geometry and measurement. Collaboration, 
critical thinking, hands-on explorations using manipulatives, problem-based inquiry, and technological tools will be used. 
Prerequisite(s): Completion of MATH 5241 (C or better) and permission of instructor. 

MATH 5243 Algebra, Probability and Data Analysis for Teachers (3-0-3) 

Designed for students in the MAT program seeking initial certification in early childhood or middle grades, this course focuses 
on developing a deep understanding of the concepts and techniques related to algebraic thinking, probability, and making 
predictions and decisions through collecting, representing and analyzing data. Collaboration, critical thinking, hands-on 
explorations using manipulatives, problem-based inquiry, and technological tools will be used. Prerequisite(s): Completion of 
MATH 5241 (C or better) and permission of instructor 

MATH 5320 Time to Event Data Analysis (3-0-3) 

This course serves as an introduction to time-to-event (survival) data analysis. Both theory and applications are covered and 
methods include non-parametric, parametric, and semi-parametric (Cox model) approaches. Prerequisite(s): MATH 5220. 

MATH 6011 Real Analysis I (3-0-3) 

A study of the real number system and functions. Topics include sequences, limits, continuity, differentiation and integration. 
Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor 

MATH 601 2 Real Analysis II (3-0-3) 

A study of differentiation and integration of functions on n-dimensional Euclidian space. Other topics include the elementary 
theory of metric spaces, infinite sequences and series, and Fourier series. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor 

MATH 6080 Foundations of Geometry (3-0-3) 

A study of the fundamental concepts of plane geometry, both metric and non-metric and an introduction to finite, coordinate, 
non-Euclidean and projective geometries. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor 

Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 279 



MATH 621 1 Abstract Algebra I (3-0-3) 

An advanced study of group theory. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor. 

MATH 621 2 Abstract Algebra II (3-0-3) 

Furttier study of advanced ring theory. An advanced study of field theory including extension fields and Galois theory. 
Prerequisite(s): MATH 6211 or permission of instructor. 

MATH 6250 t^latfiematical Statistics (3-0-3) 

A detailed study of combinatorics, probability, mathematical expectation, discrete and continuous distributions, bivariate, 
multivariate and conditional distributions, moment generating functions, functions of random variables, transformation and 
change of variables, order statistics, convergence concepts, sampling distributions and the central limit theorem. Prerequisite(s): 
Permission of instructor 

MATH 6320 Advanced Number Theory (3-0-3) 

A brief survey of divisibility and primes followed by in-depth study of congruences, residues, Diophantine equations, number 
theoretic functions, Farey and continued fractions, Pell's equation, and algebraic numbers. Prerequisite(s): Permission of 
instructor 

MATH 6341 f^/lathematics for Early Childhood Teachers I (3-0-3) 

The first mathematics course required to receive the mathematics endorsement. Designed for individuals teaching mathematics 
in grades K-5, the course focuses on enhancing understanding of the concepts and techniques related to numbers, numeration, 
numerical operations, and algebraic thinking. Collaboration, critical thinking, hands-on explorations using manipulatives, 
problem-based inquiry, technological tools, and a variety of print and electronic resources will be used. Prerequisite(s): 
Permission of instructor 

MATH 6342 Mathematics for Early Childhood Teachers II (3-0-3) 

The second mathematics course required to receive the mathematics endorsement. Designed for individuals teaching 
mathematics in grades K-5. the course focuses on strengthening and enhancing educator content competency in the areas 
of geometry, measurement and data analysis. A variety of physical and visual materials for exploration and development 
of geometric concepts and spatial visualization, measurement concepts and procedures, and concepts of probability and 
elementary data analysis will be used. Collaboration, critical thinking, problem-based inquiry, technological tools, and a variety 
of print and electronic resources will be used.Prerequisite(s): Completion of MATH 6341 (C or better). 

MATH 6350 Numerical Analysis (3-0-3) 

Further study of numerical approximations and algorithms, including the solution of non-linear equations and systems of 
equations, numerical differentiation and integration, interpolation and approximation, and the numerical solution of initial value 
problems. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor 

MATH 6360 Mathematics Curriculum (3-0-3) 

The study of the mathematics curriculum in the secondary school and the effects of research and technology on this curriculum. 
Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor 

MATH 641 History of Mathematics (3-0-3) 

A study of the historical origin of mathematics. Analysis of the concepts of algebra, geometry, trigonometry, and calculus. 
Solution of problems pointed toward appreciation of early mathematical developments. Emphasis is placed on the development 
of differential and integral calculus. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor 

MATH 6420 Introduction to the Theory of Graphs (3-0-3) 

A study of graphs, subgraphs, paths, arcs, trees, circuits, digraphs, colorability. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor 

MATH 6460 Strategies for Teaching Mathematics (3-0-3) 

A study of contemporary learning theories as they relate to secondary mathematics and teaching strategies including technology 
and other aids. Prerequisite (s): Permission of instructor 

MATH 651 Complex Analysis (3-0-3) 

A study of elementary functions of a complex variable, limits, derivatives, analytic functions, mapping by elementary functions, 
integrals, power series, poles, residues, applications of residues and conformal mapping. Prerequisite(s): Permission of 
instructor 

MATH 6520 General Topology (3-0-3) 

Further study of general topology including applications to Euclidean spaces, surfaces, topological invariants, continuous 
functions and homeomorphisms. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor 



Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
^°^ Augusta State University Catalog 



MATH 6800 Secondary Mathematics from an Advanced Perspective (3-0-3) 

This course is designed so that teachers can gain a deeper and broader understanding of key ideas of secondary school 
mathematics in the areas of number and operations, algebra, geometry, measurement, and data analysis. Prerequisite(s): 
Admission to graduate program and permission of instructor 

MATH 6950 Selected Topics (Variable: 1-3) 

A variable content course intended to meet the needs and interests of graduate students in selected areas of mathematics. 
Prerequisite(s): Permission of department chair and instructor. 

MGED - Middle Grades Education Courses 

MGED 3111 The Middle School Teacher and Student Roles (2-2-3) 

The course is designed to enable the student to analyze and examine the nature of student and teacher roles in the Middle 
Grades classroom and the relationships which undergird teaching and learning. The student(s)/teacher relationship will serve 
as the context to examine problem solving management strategies when working with early adolescents. Prerequisite(s): 
Admission to Teacher Education Program. 

MGED 3112 ^ The Middle School Classroom: Environment. 

Curriculum and Practices (2-2-3) 
Students will examine the elements of an effective Middle Grades classroom including the classroom environment, a Middle 
School approach to implementing a student centered interdisciplinary curriculum, and Middle School pedagogy and best 
practices. Meeting students individual needs, including those of special needs students is embedded in the course. 

MGED 3213 The Middle School as Organization (2-2-3) 

Students will examine the Middle School as an organization. Middle School philosophy and the origins of the Middle School 
movement will be examined as the basis of organizational components such as teaming, flexible scheduling, interdisciplinary 
curriculum, parental/community involvement programs and educational structures built to meet student/adolescent needs. 
Prerequisite(s): Admission to Teacher Education. 

MGED 3221 Adolescent Language Arts Pedagogy (2-2-3) 

Students will develop instructional skills to effectively teach Language Arts in the Middle Grades classroom. They will develop 
an understanding of Language Arts philosophies and best practices in the Middle Grades. They will explore areas of reading, 
writing, speaking and listening as the context for skill development in students. 

MGED 3222 Integrated Reading to Learn (Reading pedagogy across content areas) (2-2-3) 

Students will develop strategies to effectively engage Middle Grade students in reading across content areas. Students will 
develop approaches which emphasize reading as a means to learn. Students will also develop strategies to enable students 
to deal with reading deficiencies and other challenges students may face as readers in the Middle Grades. Prerequisite(s): 
Admission to Teacher Education and MGED 3213. 

MGED 3231 Content Pedagogy: Mathematics Education for Middle Grades (2-2-3) 

This course focuses on the curriculum and evaluation standards of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) 
and the Georgia Performance Standards (GPS). Emphasis is on problem-solving, measurement, computation, hypothesis 
posing, and hypothesis testing. Teaching and learning strategies are examined. 

MGED 3241 Content Pedagogy: Social Studies Education for Middle Grades (2-2-3) 

This course will emphasize how the conceptual themes and modes of inquiry represented in the national social studies standards 
are to be applied when formulating instruction and assessment activities that are appropriate to middle grade students. Special 
emphasis will be placed on concept formulation, thematic problem solving, strategic learning, complex skill development, 
performance assessment. 

MGED 3251 Science Education for Middle Grades (2-2-3) 

This course emphasizes approaches to teaching science content that reflect understanding of the distinct characteristics of 
middle school students, the importance of inquiry and discovery in the process of coming to understand science content, and 
the framework provided by national and state science standards. 

MGED 4110 Teaching on an Integrated Team (2-2-3) 

Students will engage in a simulation to act as an interdisciplinary team conceptualizing, planning and working together as a 
team engaging in a thematic approach to integrated studies in the middle grades. Prerequisite(s): MGED 3111. MGED 3112. 



Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 281 



MGED 4111 Integrated Instruction in the Middle School (2-2-3) 

Students will engage in collaborative planning of an interdisciplinary unit of instruction for implementation in the field. Students 
will work with a team of teachers to pre-plan, implement and evaluate the interdisciplinary unit of instruction. Prerequisite(s): 
MGED 3111. MGED 3112. 

MGED 41 60 The Creative Arts (2-2-3) 

Designed to meet the unique needs of the middle school regular classroom teacher; this course, based on the arts infusion 
model, will emphasize aesthetic perception, creative expression, cultural heritage, and aesthetic valuing. Content areas include 
music, creative dramatics, movement and the visual arts. 

MGED 4210 Middle Grades Apprenticeship (0-30-15) 

Students are placed with selected master teachers for an entire semester during which time they are teaching in the curriculum 
areas for which they are seeking certification. During the semester the apprentice teacher, under the supervision of the master 
teacher, assumes the responsibilities of professional teaching practice. During this semester apprentices meet regularly with 
the master teachers and university coordinators in seminar to examine issues and problems of practice. Students reflect on and 
synthesize the conceptual and theoretical constructs of pedagogy with the complexity of practice. Prerequislte(s): Successful 
completion of all components of middle grades sequence. 

MGMT - Management Courses 

Note: in order to enroll in any MGMT course numbered 3000-4950, a student must be accepted into the James M. Hull 
College of Business (see p. 167) and meet the listed prerequisites for the class. 

MGMT 21 06 Legal and Ethical Environment of Business (3-0-3) 

This course analyzes the legal, ethical, economic, social, and political environment in which business operates. The cost and 
benefits of regulation are appraised. Prerequisite(s): Completion of 30 semester hours. 

MGMT 3500 Management Theory and Practice (3-0-3) 

A study of the theory and practices of management using a functional approach to emphasize the interdependence of behavior, 
technology, and organizational structure. Prerequisite(s): 50 semester hours including C's or better in 12 hours of BBA Core 
Area F. 

M G M T 3 5 1 Organizational Be ha vior (3-0-3) 

Examines the determinants and consequences of human behavior in formal organizations. Prerequisite(s): MGMT 3500 with 
a grade of C or better. 

MGMT 3540 Leadership and Ethics in Management (3-0-3) 

Addresses both traditional and non-traditional characteristics, behaviors and responsibilities required of contemporary 
organizational leaders. Prerequisite(s): MGMT 3500 with a grade of C or better 

MGMT 4500 Human Resource Management (3-0-3) 

An applications approach to the managerial decisions regarding selection, recruitment, training, performance appraisal, 
compensation, benefits, discipline, termination, and employment law. Prerequisite(s): MGMT 3500 with a grade of C or better 

MGMT 4520 Labor Relations and Collective Bargaining (3-0-3) 

A decisional approach surrounding the union-management relationship including collective bargaining, contract negotiation 
and administration, dispute resolution (arbitration, mediation), the NLRA, and the structure and functioning of organized labor. 
Prerequisite(s): MGMT 3500 with a grade of C or better 

MGMT 4550 Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management (3-0-3) 

An interdisciplinary case and lecture approach is used to provide the student with knowledge of real life as well as simulated 
management experience in areas of entrepreneurship and small business problem solving. Emphasis will be on the 
characteristics of entrepreneurs, small business problems, managing and controlling the operations. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 
2101, ECON 1810 orECON 2106. MKTG 3700, and MGMT 3500 with a grade of C or better in each. 

MGMT 4560 Advanced Topics in Human Resources (3-0-3) 

Course contains module coverage of selected HR topics of selection, compensation, training and development, and safety and 
health issues. Prerequisite(s): MGMT 3500 and MGMT 4500 with grades of C or better in each. 

MGMT 4580 Strategic Management (3-0-3) 

Analysis of the practices and problems in the strategic management of businesses through case studies and other information 
drawn from the functional areas of the enterprise. Serves as a capstone course. Prerequisite(s): C's or better in MKTG 3700. 
MGMT 3500, QUAN 3600 and FINC 3400: senior standing; and all other jr./sr common courses or final semester 

Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
'^°^ Augusta State University Catalog 



MGMT 4950 Selected Topics in Management (3-0-3) 

A course and/or directed study of a major issue, practice, or problem in the area of management. Content to be decided based 
on needs and professional objectives of students and the expertise and availability of faculty. Prerequisite(s): Permission of 
advisor to use in tlie major area and senior standing. 

MGMT 6290 International Management (3-0-3) 

The advanced study of major aspects of international business including, but not limited to, hov*/ and why the world's countries 
differ, the economics and politics of international trade and investment, the functions and form of the global monetary system, 
and the organizational strategies and structures of international businesses. The course covers the international perspective 
of organizational functions including manufacturing and materials management, marketing, research and development, human 
resource management, accounting and finance issues. The course also relates theoretical international business concepts to 
current international issues. Prerequisite(s): Graduate (MBA) status and completion of all MBA prerequisite courses. 

MGMT 6500 Organizational Befiavior (3-0-3) 

An analysis of the determinants and consequences of human behavior in organizations with attention to motivation, leadership, 
and group dynamics. Prerequisite(s): Graduate (MBA) status and completion of MGMT 3500. 

MGMT 6510 Societal Issues in Business Decisions (3-0-3) 

Examines the interrelationships between business and society from a managerial perspective. Decision implications of 
ethics, the natural environment, stakeholder diversity and business regulation are addressed from an application standpoint. 
Prerequisite(s): Graduate (MBA) status and MGMT 3500 or equivalent. 

MGMT 6520 Management of Human Resources (3-0-3) 

A comprehensive survey of the typical personnel management decisions faced by managers, including accepted contemporary 
practice relative to job analysis, EEO regulations, selection, development, discipline, discharge, appraisal, compensation, 
benefits, and global human resource issues. Prerequisite(s): Graduate (MBA) status and MGMT 3500 or equivalent. 

MGMT 6530 Labor and Management Relations (3-0-3) 

Agraduate level survey of organized labor, major labor legislation, and the collective bargaining process. Arbitration, negotiation, 
and unfair labor practices will be studied within an applications framework. Major focus is upon managing in a unionized 
environment. Prerequisite(s): MGMT 3500. 

MGMT 6580 Strategic Management (3-0-3) 

Gives the student an opportunity to develop and appreciate conceptual skills as needed by higher level managers in all types of 
organizations. Emphasis is on the integration of subject matter from all courses in the discussion and analysis of organizational 
problems. Comprehensive analyses of organizations are conducted. To be taken within the last two semesters. Prerequisite(s): 
Graduate (MBA) student status, successful completion of at least eigfit 6000-level MBA courses (including ACCT 6300, FINC 
6400, MGMT 6520, MKTG 6700, QUAN 6600, and QUAN 6610), and permission of the MBA program director 

MGMT 6950 Current Issues in Management (3-0-3) 

A variable content course individually designed to meet the needs, interests, and professional objectives in business 
administration. Prerequisite(s): Graduate (MBA) student status and MGMT 3500 or equivalent. 

MILS - Military Science Courses 

MILS 1011 Foundations of Officership (2-2-3) 

Introduces students to issues and competencies that are central to a commissioned officer's responsibilities. Establishes 
framework for understanding officership, leadership, and Army values followed by "life skills" such as physical fitness and time 
management. This course is designed to give the cadet insight into the Army profession and the officer's role within the Army. 
Open to all students. Prerequisite(s): None. 

MILS 1021 Basic Leadership (2-2-3) 

Establishes foundation of basic leadership fundamentals such as problem solving, communications, briefings and effective 
writing, goal setting, techniques for improving listening and speaking skills and an introduction to counseling. 

MILS 2011 Individual Leadership Studies (2-2-3) 

A study of a leader of a small organization. A practical exercise for the student to learn how to plan, organize, execute tasks, 
manage time and make sound decisions. Enrolled/contracted ROTC cadets can participate in a weekend exercise to put all 
skills to practice. 



Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 283 



MILS 2021 Leadership and Teamwork (2-2-3) 

Study examines how to build successful teams, various methods for influencing action, effective communication in setting and 
achieving goals, the importance of timing the decision, creativity in the problem solving process, and obtaining team buy-in 
through immediate feedback. 

MILS 3011 Leadership and Problem Solving (2-V-3) 

Students conduct self-assessment of leadership style, develop a personal fitness regimen, and learn to plan and conduct 
individual/small group tactical training while testing reasoning and problem-solving techniques. Students will receive direct 
feedback on leadership abilities. Students will also receive an introduction to the basic fundamentals of military map reading 
and land navigation. Prerequisite(s): Permission of Department Chair. 

MILS 3021 Leadership and Ethics (2-V-3) 

Examines the role of communications, values, and ethics in effective leadership. Topics include ethical decision-making, 
consideration of others, spirituality in the military, and a survey of Army leadership doctrine. Emphasis on improving oral and 
written communication abilities and improving land navigation as applied with the military small unit leader. Includes further 
development of small unit tactics, leadership skills, and physical conditioning. Prerequisite(s): Permission of Department Chair. 

MILS 3060 Leadership Training Course Summer Internship (V-V-3) 

A five week summer internship conducted at Fort Knox, KY. Students participate in physical training, land navigation, weapons 
and tactics, and leadership development. Successful completion qualifies individuals to validate or compete for a two year 
scholarship. Prerequislte(s): Permission of Department Chair 2.5 GPA for scholarship. 

MILS 4011 Leadership and Management (^-'\l -3) 

Develops student proficiency in planning and executing complex operations, functioning as a member of a staff, and mentoring 
subordinates. Students explore training management, methods of effective staff collaboration, and developmental counseling 
techniques. Prerequislte(s): MILS 3021. 

MILS 4021 Officership (^-y-3) 

Focuses on completing the transition from cadet to Lieutenant. Study includes case study analysis of military law and practical 
exercises on establishing an ethical command climate. Students must complete a semester long Senior Leadership Project 
that requires them to plan, organize, collaborate, analyze, and demonstrate their leadership skills. Prerequislte(s): MILS 4011. 

MILS 4060 Leader Development Assessment Course (V-V-3) 

Afive week summer internship conducted at Fort Lewis, WA. Students participate in physical training, land navigation, weapons 
and tactics, and leadership development. The final camp score is part of the student's accessions packet for service in the 
Army. Prerequisite(s): MILS 3021. 

MILS 4950 Selected Topics (2-V-3) 

An intensive/detailed study of an Army military battle. Study involves current Army doctrine, tactics, techniques, and procedures 
and how commanders won or lost the battle. Prerequisite(s): Permission of Department Chair. 

MINF - Management information Courses 

Note: in order to enroll in any MINF course numbered 3000-4950, a student must be accepted into the James M. Hull 
College of Business (see p. 167) and meet the listed prerequisites for the class. 

MINF 2201 Microcomputer Applications (3-0-3) 

Hands-on introduction to microcomputer applications which support business functions; word processing, spreadsheets, 
graphics, and database management system. Also exposure to use of an operating system, electronic communication, and 
basic computing concepts. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1101 OR MATH 1111. 

MINF 3612 Business Introduction to Programming (3-0-3) 

Introduces business students to the fundamental principles of object-ohented programming using C#. The focus is on applications 
development using object-oriented design and implementation techniques. Topics include: objects, classes, inheritance, 
interfaces, GUI components, layout managers, events, multimedia, exception handling, and I/O files. Prerequisite(s): MINF 
3650 or equivalent. 

MINF 3614 Business Introduction to Networking (3-0-3) 

Business introduction to networking technology including networking standards, networking media, networking hardware, 
access methods, network operating systems, TCP/IP basics, network security and the fundamentals of local area network and 
wide area network technologies. Prerequisite(s): MINF 3612 or equivalent. 



Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
'^°'^ Augusta State University Catalog 



MINF 3618 Business Introduction to Web Development (3-0-3) 

Business students will be exposed to appropriate format and page layout, adding and manipulating visuals, images, and rich 
media, creating a navigation scheme and linking together multiple pages and sites, creating basic forms, building interactive 
features, and publishing/maintaining web sites. Prerequlsite(s): MINF 3650 with a grade of C or better 

MINF 3625 Project Management (3-0-3) 

Project management is the use of a standardized set of documented processes to control projects in an organization. This 
course addresses the life cycle of a project, the management of the project, how a project scope is written, how the time 
management is constructed and communicated. Prerequisite(s): 50 semester hours and C's or better in MINF 2201 andACCT 
2101. 

MINF 3650 Management Information Systems (3-0-3) 

Develops a broad understanding of the role of information technology, systems, and resources, especially in business settings. 
Prerequisite(s): 50 semester hours including C's or better in 12 hours of BBA Core Area F including MINF2201. 

MINF 4390 Introduction to E-Commerce (3-0-3) 

Concentrates on identifying Internet and E-commerce opportunities that enhance business process service quality and cost 
effectiveness: challenges, opportunities, and issue of the Internet; Internet Service Providers; Intranets; Extranets: marketing 
concepts in an Internet context; marketing sites, search engines; understanding e-customers; ethnic markets; E-commerce 
internationally, growth of Business to Business commerce, customer relationship management. Prerequisite(s): MINF 3650 
with a grade of C or better 

MINF 4950 Selected Topics in Management Information Systems (3-0-3) 

A course or directed study in management information systems. Content to be decided based upon instructor expertise and 
student interest. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor 

MINF 6620 Management of Information Technology (3-0-3) 

Examines the issues of information technology, operations, competitive advantage, and leadership from managements 
perspective. Includes cross-functional issues, relationships with vendors and consultants, RFP's, contracts, hardware, 
software, communications, and ethics. Prerequisite(s): Graduate (MBA) status. 

MINF 6950 Current Issues in Management Information Systems (3-0-3) 

A variable content course individually designed to meet the needs, interests, and professional objectives in business 
administrat/on. Prerequisite(s): Graduate (MBA) student status. 

MKTG - Marketing Courses 

Note: in order to enroll in any MKTG course numbered 3000-4950, a student must be accepted into the James M. Hull 
College of Business (see p. 167) and meet the listed prerequisites for the class. 

MKTG 2950 Selected Topics in Marketing (3-0-3) 

A study of the various aspects of marketing (advertising, public relations, online marketing, consumer behavior) of interest to 
lower-division undergraduate students from a variety of majors and colleges. Prerequisite(s): none. 

MKTG 3700 Principles of Marketing (3-0-3) 

An introduction to the basic principles of marketing and the marketing environment, with a focus on understanding ethical 
planning, implementing, and controlling marketing activities on a local, national, and global scale. Prerequisite(s): 50 semester 
hours including C's or better in 12 semester hours of BBA Core Area F. 

MKTG 371 Buyer Behavior (3-0-3) 

This course examines the decision-making process of individual and organizational buyers. It examines both target market 
selection and segmentation, drawing on concepts from economics, psychology, and sociology, and relating behavior issues to 
strategic planning. Prerequisite(s): MKTG 3700 with a grade of C or better. 

MKTG 3720 Refa;7 Management (3-0-3) 

Identification and analysis of concepts and practices of successful retailing management. Includes environmental and 
opportunity assessments; sales promotion and customer services; organizational and merchandise decisions; accounting 
controls; and leadership. Prerequisite(s): MKTG 3700 with a grade of C or better 

MKTG 3730 Salesmanship and Sales Management (3-0-3) 

Introduction to sales concepts and techniques and how to apply them in a myriad of selling situations. Management and 
evaluation of the sales force are also included. Prerequisite(s): MKTG 3700 with a grade of C or better 

Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 285 



MKTG 4720 Services Marketing (3-0-3) 

The service sector makes up more than two-thirds of the U.S. economy, and includes many industries important to the Augusta 
area such as healthcare, banking, tourism/hospitality, and insurance. This course emphasizes the differences in products and 
services and explores successful strategies for marketing in service industries. Prerequisite(s): MKTG 3700 with a grade of C 
or better 

MKTG 4740 Marl<eting Research (3-0-3) 

Study and practice of planning, designing, organizing, executing, analyzing, reporting, and evaluating and controlling marketing 
research activities as an aid to effective and efficient managerial marketing decisions. Prerequisite(s): MKTG 3700 and MATIH 
3110 with grades of C or better. 

MKTG 4750 ^ Marketing Planning and Strategy (3-0-3) 

An examination of the marketing decision-making process within the corporate strategic planning framework. The course 
explores strategic planning tools and assesses their strengths and weaknesses in helping attain long-range corporate objectives. 
Prerequisite(s): MKTG 3700 with a grade of C or better 

MKTG 4770 Product Innovation and Product Management (3-0-3) 

Examines how the elements of the marketing mix are affected by technological choice, design trade-off, licensing, purchase 
of technology, and timing and entry into the marketplace. The management of R & D activities is discussed and its impact on 
marketing strategy. Prerequisite(s): MKTG 3700 with a grade of or better 

MKTG 4780 Advertising and Promotion Management (3-0-3) 

Introduction to marketing and advertising plans and strategies, the advertising business, advertising media, and advertising 
creativity. Prerequisite(s): MKTG 3700 with a grade of C or better 

MKTG 4950 Selected Topics in Marketing (3-0-3) 

A course and/or directed study of a major issue, practice, or problem in the area of marketing. Content to be decided based 
on needs and professional objectives of students and the expertise and availability of faculty. Prerequisite(s): Permission of 
advisor to use in the major area and senior standing. 

MKTG 6700 Marketing Management (3-0-3) 

Advanced study of the rationale for the marketing functions and the application of the managerial functions to marketing 
problems and opportunities. Prerequisite(s): Graduate (MBA) student status and MKTG 3700 or equivalent. 

MKTG 6950 Current Issues in Marketing (3-0-3) 

A variable content course individually designed to meet the needs. Interests, and professional objectives in business 
administration. Prerequisite(s): Graduate (MBA) student status and MKTG 3700 or equivalent. 

MUSI - Music Courses 

Music Ensembles and Applied Music Lessons (MUSA) are listed after the following MUSI courses. 

MUSI 1 1 01 Elementary Ear-Training and Sight-Singing I (2-0-2) 

The study of the diatonic harmony of the Common Practice Period through aural analysis and recognition and the development 
of sight-singing skills. Emphasis on cadences, melodic form, non-harmonic tones and diatonic triads. Corequisite: MUS1 1211 
must be taken concurrently or prior to enrollment in MUSI 1101. Offered fall semester. 

MUSI 1 1 02 Elementary Ear-Training and Sight-Singing II (2-0-2) 

A continued study of the diatonic harmony of the Common Practice Period through aural analysis and recognition and the 
development of sight-singing skills. Introduction to elementary forms, chromatic harmony, elementary modulation and 
secondary dominants of primary chords. Prerequisite(s): MUSI 1101, MUSI 1211. Corequisite: MUSI 1212 must be taken 
concurrently or prior to enrollment in MUSI 1102. Offered spring semester. 

MUSI 1 201 Music Fundamentals I (2-0-2) 

A course in basic musicianship for non-music majors and music majors, including a study of pitch reading, rhythm reading, 
analysis of music, major scales, key signatures, intenyals from the major scales, and triads; with further application of learned 
theoretical concepts through the development of rudimentary keyboard, ear-training and sight-singing skills. Does not count 
toward the music degree. Offered summer. 

MUS1 1 202 Music Fundamentals II (2-0-2) 

A course in basic musicianship for non-music majors and music majors, including a study of pitch reading, rhythm reading, 
analysis of music, minor scales, key signatures, intervals from the minor scales, and triads; with further application of learned 

Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
^°^ Augusta State University Catalog 



theoretical concepts through the development of rudimentary keyboard, ear-training and sight-singing skills. Does not count 
toward the music degree. 

MUS1 1211 Elementary Part Writing and Analysis I (2-0-2) 

A study of the diatonic harmony of the Common Practice Period through the development of composition, analysis and keyboard 
skills. Emphasis on cadences, melodic form, non-harmonic tones, and diatonic triads. Offered fall. 

Must 1212 Elementary Part Writing and Analysis II (2-0-2) 

A continued study of the diatonic and chromatic harmony of the Common Practice Period through the development of 
composition, analysis and keyboard skills. Emphasis on elementary forms, chromatic harmony, elementary modulation and 
secondary dominants of primary chords. Prerequisite(s): MUSI 1211. Offered spring. 

MUSI 1 500 Recital Laboratory (0-V-O) 

A forum for student performances and recital/concert attendance. Emphasis on exposing the student to a variety of musical 
styles and genres within the classical and jazz traditions. Corequisite: Major or Concentration Applied Lessons. Offered fall. 
spring. 

MUS1 1 501/3501 Class Piano for Non-Music Majors (2-0-2) 

Class piano instruction for non-music majors who have not studied piano previously or are at the elementary level. Emphasis 
on proper hand position and posture, training in basic keyboard technique, and mastery of basic elements of music. May be 
repeated for credit. Offered fall, spring. 

MUS1 1 502/3502 Class Voice for Non-Music Majors (2-0-2) 

Class singing instruction for non-music majors who have not studied voice previously or are at the elementary level. Emphasis 
on proper breathing and posture, tone production, vocal technique, and English and Italian diction. May be repeated for credit. 
Offered fall, spring. 

MUSI 1 503/3503 Class Guitar for Non-Majors (2-0-2) 

Class guitar instruction for non-music majors who have not studied guitar previously or are at an elementary level. Emphasis 
on proper posture and hand positions and mastery of basic elements of music. May be repeated for credit or taken as an upper 
division course (MUSI 3503). Offered fall, spring. 

MUSI 1521 Class Piano I (2-0-1) 

An introduction to the keyboard and training in basic keyboard technique, with emphasis on major scales, repertoire, and 
simple harmonization. Offered fall and spring. 

MUS1 1 522 Class Piano II (2-0-1) 

A continuation of basic piano skills and repertoire, with emphasis on minor scales, repertoire, and extended lead sheet 
harmonization. Offered fall and spring. 

MUSI 1621 ASU Women's Ensemble (4-0-1) or (4-0-0) 

The Augusta State University Women's Ensemble is offered for freshman or sophomore students who do not major or 
minor in music, and who seek a choral ensemble that does not require an audition or prior choral experience. The ASU 
Women's Ensemble performs at ceremonial occasions such as the Martin Luther King, Jr. Birthday Celebration and at spring 
commencement. From time to time, the group may perform at ASU sports events, or at student activity events. Enrollment is 
open to any ASU student. Prerequisite(s): Open to any freshman or sophomore ASU student not majoring in music. 

MUS1 1810 Music Technology (1-0-1) 

The study and utilization of technology in musical applications. Emphasis on basic computer music notation systems. MIDI 
sequencing, and CAI. Offered fall and spring. 

MUSI 21 01 Advanced Ear Training and Sight Singing I (2-0-2) 

A continued study of the chromatic harmony of the Common Practice Period through aural analysis and recognition and 
the development of sight-singing skills. Emphasis on elementary forms, modulation to closely related and foreign keys, and 
secondary leading tone chords of primary chords. Prerequisite(s): MUSI 1102, 1212 Corequisite: MUSI 2211 must be taken 
concurrently or prior to enrollment in MUSI 2101. Offered fall. 

MUSI 21 02 Advanced Ear Training and Sight Singing II (2-0-2) 

A continued study of the harmonic practices of the 19th and early 20th centuries through aural analysis and recognition and 
the development of sight-singing skills. Emphasis on common formal processes, extended tertian chords, modal practices and 
the twelve-tone system. Prerequisite(s): MUSI 2101, 2211. Corequisite: MUSI 2212 must be taken concurrently or prior to 
enrollment in MUSI 2102. Offered spring. 



Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 287 



MUSI 2211 Advanced Part Writing and Analysis I (2-0-2) 

A continued study of the chromatic harmony of the Common Practice Period through the development of composition, analysis 
and keyboard skills. Emphasis on elementary forms, modulation to closely related and foreign keys, and secondary leading 
tone chords of primary chords. Prerequisite(s): MUSI 1212. Offered fall. 

MUSI 221 2 Advanced Part Writing and Analysis II (2-0-2) 

A continued study of the harmonic practices of the 19th and early 20th centuries through the development of composition, 
analysis and keyboard skills. Emphasis on common formal processes, extended tertian chords, modal practices and the 
twelve-tone system. Offered spring. Prerequisite(s): MUSI 2211. 

MUSI 2230 Introduction to the Masterworks of Western Music Literature (2-0-2) 

The art of music listening, involving study of the evolution of musical styles from the western tradition by listening to and 
discussing established masterworks. The course's approach is chronological with an emphasis on developing listening skills. 
Offered spring. 

MUSI 2310 From the Monastery to the Concert Stage: Western Art Music (3-0-3) 

A survey of Western musical styles for non-music majors. Emphasis will be placed upon listening and aural analysis of musical 
works. May be taken as an upper-division course (MUSI 3310). Prerequisite(s): HUMN 2001. 

MUSI 2320/3320 Music and Popular Culture (3-0-3) 

A chronicle of the musical and historical development of rock-based popular music from its formative stages through the 
present day. Popular music will be examined within the sociocultural, political and economic contexts of a rapidly changing 
society where music stands as a dominant force in popular culture. Prerequisite(s): HUMN 2001. 

MUSI 2330/3330 Music of the World's Peoples (3-0-3) 

An inquiry into the dynamics of Western and non-Western value systems and behaviors by studying classical, traditional, 
primitive, and folk music traditions in the context of human life in a variety of cultures. Prerequisite(s): HUMN 2001 

MUSI 2400 Music Methods for Elementary Teachers (2-0-2) 

A study of the fundamentals of music for the elementary classroom teacher with emphasis on strategies for teaching music to 
students in the elementary grades using the Orff and Kodaly methods. 

MUSI 2523 Class Piano III (2-0-1) 

A continuation of basic technical keyboard skills with emphasis on block chords and arpeggios, repertoire, extended lead sheet 
harmonizations and improvisation. Offered fall and spring. 

MUSI 2524 Class Piano IV (2-0-1) 

A continuation of class piano instruction for non-keyboard majors, with emphasis on patriotic songs, repertoire, accompanying 
improvisation and transposition. Offered fall and spring. 

MUSI 2525 Advanced Keyboard Skills (2-0-1) 

A course in functional keyboard skills designed for all piano majors. Emphasis on skill development in transpositions, 
improvisation, harmonizations, and sight reading. Prerequisite(s): Completion of MUSA 1611. 

MUSI 3210 Form and Analysis (2-0-1) 

A study of the formal processes of music in representative works from all style periods through analysis and composition. 
Prerequisite(s): MUSI 2212. Offered spring. 

MUSI 3220 16th Century Counterpoint (2-0-2) 

A study of species and modal counterpoint based on principles of Johann Fux and the style of Palestrina. Projects will develop 
both compositional and analytical skills. Prerequisite(s): MUSI 2212. 

MUSI 3230 18th Century Counterpoint (2-0-2) 

A study of two- and three-voice counterpoint as found in the invention, canon, and fugue. Projects will develop both compositional 
and analytical skills. Prerequisite(s): MUSI 2212. 

MUSI 3310 See MUSI 2310 above. 

MUSI 3320 See MUSI 2320 above. 

MUSI 3330 See MUSI 2330 above. 

MUSI 3340 Music History I (3-0-3) 

A survey of the history of western art music from its beginnings through the Baroque era (approximately 1 750). Emphasis is given 
to the evolution of musical style, beginning with the influence of Greek and other ancient cultures, through the philosophical and 

Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
^°° Augusta State University Catalog 



societal attitudes toward music during the medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque periods. Prerequisite(s): MUSI 2230. Offered 
fall. 

MUSI 3350 Music History II (3-0-3) 

A survey of the history of western art music from the Classic period (approximately 1750) to the present day. Emphasis is 
given to the influence of the various philosophical movements in music from the Age of Enlightenment through the 1 9" and 20"^ 
centuries, and the changes in societal attitudes toward music during this period. Prerequisite(s): MUSI 3340. Offered spring. 

MUSI 3410/6410 ' '' Elementary and Middle School Music Methods (3-0-3) 

A functional course in the techniques involved in teaching general music to students in the elementary and middle school 
grades. Techniques addressed will include the Orff approach, Kodaly method, Dalcroze Eurythmics and eclectic design. May 
be taken for graduate credit and additional coursework will be required. Prerequisite(s): MUSI 1102; MUS1 1212 

MUSI 3420/6420 Brass Methods (1-0-1) 

A functional course for the music educator in the techniques involved in playing and teaching trumpet, horn, trombone, 
euphonium and tuba. Emphasis on development of fundamental skills and teaching techniques through hands-on expenence 
with each of these instruments. May be taken for graduate credit; additional work will be required. Prerequisite(s): MUSI 1102; 
MUSI 1212. 

MUSI 3430/6430 Woodwind Methods (1-0-1) 

A functional course for the music educator in the techniques involved in playing and teaching flute, clarinet, oboe, bassoon 
and saxophone. Emphasis on development of fundamental skills and teaching techniques through hands-on experience with 
each of these instruments. May be taken for graduate credit; additional work will be required. Prerequisite(s): MUS1 1102: MUSI 
1212. 

MUSI 3440/6440 String Methods (1-0-1) 

Afunctional course for the music educator in the techniques involved in playing and teaching violin, viola, cello, bass, guitar, 
and the instruction of string players of all levels within mixed ensembles. Emphasis on the development of fundamental skills 
and teaching techniques through hands-on experience with each of the string instruments. May be taken for graduate credit; 
additional work will be required. Prerequisite(s): MUS1 1102; MUS1 1212. 

MUSI 3450/6450 Percussion Methods (1-0-1) 

Afunctional course for the music educator in the techniques involved in playing and teaching snare drum, mallet percussion, 
timpani and auxiliary instruments. Emphasis on development of fundamental skills through hands-on experience with each 
of the percussion instruments. May be taken for graduate credit; additional work will be required. Prerequisite(s): MUSI 1102; 
MUS1 1212. 

MUSI 3460/6460 Marching Band Methods (1-0-1) 

Developmental experiences in the pedagogical and administrative skills, and knowledge of literature needed for successful 
teaching of marching band in secondary schools. Emphasis on teaching marching fundamentals and drill design. May be taken 
for graduate credit; additional work will be required. Prerequisite(s): MUS1 1102; MUSI 1212. 

MUSI 3470/6470 Vocal Methods (1-0-1) 

Vocal Methods is a study of the skills involved in vocal teaching. Among the areas to be examined are fundamental vocal 
technique, classroom/rehearsal methods, classroom management, development of vocal musicianship, criteria for selection of 
literature, and multicultural choral music. Further, matters such as historical and linguistic contexts, teaching philosophy, and 
administrative tasks will be considered. May be taken for graduate credit; additional work will be required. Prerequisite(s): 
MUSI 1102; MUSI 1212. 

MUSI 3501 See MUSI 1501 above. 

MUSI 3502 See MUSI 1502 above. 

MUSI 3503 See MUSI 1503 above. 

MUSI 3511/6511 English Diction for Singers (1-0-1) 

The study of principles and application of English diction in singing through the use of the International Phonetic Alphabet, 
spoken language drill, and study and recitation of representative song literature. May be taken for graduate credit; additional 
work will be required. Offered on alternate years. 

MUSI 3512/6512 Italian Diction for Singers (1-0-1) 

The study of principles and application of Italian diction in singing through the use of the International Phonetic Alphabet, 
spoken language drill, and study and recitation of representative song literature. May be taken for graduate credit; additional 
work will be required. Offered on alternate years. 

Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 289 



MUSI 3513/6513 German Diction for Singers (1-0-1) 

The study of principles and application of German diction in singing through the use of the International Phonetic Alphabet, 
spoken language drill, and study and recitation of representative song literature. May be taken for graduate credit; additional 
work will be required. Offered on alternate years. Prerequisite(s): MUSI 3511: MUSI 3512. 

MUSI 3514/6514 French Diction for Singers (1-0-1) 

The study of principles and application of French diction in singing through the use of the International Phonetic Alphabet, 
spoken language drill, and study and recitation of representative song literature. May be taken for graduate credit; additional 
work will be required. Offered on alternate years. Prerequisite(s): MUSI 3511: MUSI 3512. 

MUSI 3520 Vocal Pedagogy (2-0-2) 

A survey of the methods and materials related to individual and group instruction in a principal performing medium. Emphasis 
upon solo vocal instruction. Prerequisite(s): Upper Division Status in applied vocal studies. 

MUSI 3530 Keyboard Pedagogy (2-0-2) 

A survey of the methods and materials related to individual and group instruction in a principal performing medium. Emphasis 
on solo piano instruction. Prerequisite(s): Upper Division Status in applied keyboard studies. 

MUSI 3540 Instrumental Pedagogy (2-0-2) 

A survey of the methods and materials related to individual and group instruction in a principal performing medium. Emphasis on 
solo instrumental instruction, all orchestral and wind instruments. Prerequisite(s): Upper Division Status in applied instrumental 
studies. 

MUSI 3551 Keyboard Accompanying (2-0-1) 

An introduction to performance practices for keyboard and solo instrument and/or voice. Emphasis on historic and stylistic 
elements, sight-reading and aural skills. Prerequlsite(s): Permission of the instructor. 

MUSI 3552 Keyboard Accompanying Practicum (V-O-V) 

Supervised, practical experience of vocal and/or instrumental accompanying in weekly lessons. Recital Lab (MUSI 1500), and 
outside performances. Prerequisite(s): MUSI 3551; Permission of the instructor. 

MUSI 3560 Fundamentals of Conducting (2-0-1) 

Training in score reading and the integration of analysis, style, performance practices, instrumentation, and baton techniques 
in order to create accurate and musically expressive performances with various types of performing groups and in classroom 
situations. Laboratory experiences provide opportunities to apply rehearsal techniques and procedures. Prerequisite(s): 
MUSI 2211; MUSI 2101. Offered spring. 

MUSI 3621 ASU Women's Ensemble (4-0-1 or 4-0-0) 

The Augusta State University Women's Ensemble (MUSI 3621) is offered for junior and senior students who do not major 
or minor in music, and who seek a choral ensemble that does not require an audition or prior choral experience. The ASU 
Women's Ensemble performs at ceremonial occasions such as the Martin Luther King, Jr. Birthday Celebration and at spring 
commencement. From time to time, the group may perform at ASU sports events, or at student activity events. Enrollment is 
open to any ASU student. Prerequisite(s): Open to any junior or senior ASU student not majoring in music. 

MUSI 3720 Jazz Improvisation (3-0-3) 

The study and application of jazz improvisation techniques. Emphasis on harmonic progressions, chord/scale relationships, 
patterns, and stylistic considerations. Prerequisite(s): MUS1 1212. 

MUSI 381 Advanced Computer and Technological Applications in Music (3-0-3) 

The study and utilization of technology in musical applications. Emphasis on music notation, MIDI sequencing, and CAI, and 
the Principles of sound sampling and synthesis. Pre req ui site (s): MUSI 0810, MUSI 2212. 

MUSI 4090 Senior Project for the Bachelor of Arts in Music (V-0-2) 

A guided study of topics in music and its interrelationship with other disciplines through an independent research project. In 
consultation with the music faculty, students will choose their own topics for study and research projects. Prerequisite(s): 
Permission of the instructor; Senior Standing; Completion of Piano Proficiency and Computer Applications in Music Proficiency. 

MUSI 4190 Special Topics in Conducting (2-0-2) 

A guided study of topics in conducting through independent research projects or in-depth study. Possibilities include score 
preparation, score study, techniques for conducting specific repertories and public performance. May be repeated for credit. 
Prerequisite(s): MUSI 3560. 



Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 

oqn 

^^^ Augusta State University Catalog 



MUSI 4210 Instrumentation and Orchestration (2-0-1) 

An introduction to the basics of writing for instruments, mixed groups of instruments and arranging music of other genres. 
Emphasis on the development of knowledge about the ranges, capabilities and tonal characteristics of each instrument, while 
writing with musical variety and interest. Prerequisite(s): MUSI 2212; MUSI 2102. Offered fall of alternate years. 

MUSI 4220 Contemporary Theoretical Techniques (2-0-2) 

An exploration of the methods and techniques with which to analyze twentieth century music, including the twelve-tone 
technique in the music of Schoenberg, Berg, and Webern, Allen Forte's theory of pitch sets, and means of analyzing pitch 
centric works and electronic and aleatoric music. Prerequisite(s): MUSI 2212. 

MUSI 4290 Special Topics in Music Theory (2-0-2) 

A guided study of theoretical techniques through independent research and analysis projects or in-depth study in a classroom 
setting. In consultation with the theory faculty, students will choose their own topics for study. May be repeated for credit. 
Prerequisite(s): MUSI 2212. 

MUSI 4310 Choral Literature (2-0-2) 

A survey of sacred and secular choral music from all style periods from plainsong through the 20th century. Emphasis on the 
study of compositional characteristics from each style period. Prerequisite(s): MUSI 2211. 

MUSI 4320 Vocal Literature (2-0-2) 

A study of the development of solo vocal song literature, of major song composers, and of song and song cycle repertoire. 
Prerequisite(s): MUSI 2211. 

MUSI 4330 Opera Literature (2-0-2) 

A comprehensive survey of opera through study of the historical development, characteristics, and composers of opera. 
Prerequisite(s): MUSI 2211. 

MUSI 4341 Piano Literature 1 (2-1-2) 

A history of the piano and harpsichord and an in-depth survey of the major solo repertoire from the 16th through the 18th 
century. Prerequisite(s): MUSI 2211. 

MUSI 4342 Piano Literature 2 (2-1-2) 

A history of the piano and an in-depth survey of the major solo repertoire from the 19th century to the present. Prerequisite(s): 
MUSI 4341. 

MUSI 4350 Orchestral Literature (2-0-2) 

A comprehensive survey of symphonic music styles and history from the Pre-Classic and Baroque Periods to the present, with 
an emphasis on listening, research and score study. Prerequisite(s): MUSI 2211. 

MUSI 4360 Chamber Music Literature (2-0-2) 

A comprehensive study of instrumental chamber music styles and history from the Baroque period to the present. Emphasis 
on aural identification and comparative analysis of representative works. Prerequisite(s): MUSI 2211. 

MUSI 4370 Wind Ensemble Literature (2-0-2) 

A survey of music for wind instruments from the Renaissance to the present. Emphasis on eighteenth-century Harmoniemusik. 
nineteenth-century chamber music as well as wind ensemble, symphonic band and pieces for orchestral wind section. 
Prerequisite(s): MUSI 2211. 

MUSI 4390 Special Topics in Music History (2-0-2) 

A guided study of topics in music history through independent research projects or in-depth study in a classroom setting. In 
consultation with the music history faculty, students will choose their own topics for study and research projects. May be 
repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): MUSI 2211. 

MUSI 441 0/641 1 Conducting and Methods of Secondary School Instrumental Music (3-0-3) 

Developmental experiences in the gestural, pedagogical, administrative skills, and knowledge of literature needed for successful 
teaching of instrumental music in grades 6-12. May be taken for graduate credit; additional work will be required. Offered fall. 
Prerequisite(s): MUSI 3560. 

MUSI 4420/641 2 Conducting and Methods of Secondary School Choral Music (3-0-3) 

Conducting and Methods is a study of the skills necessary for secondary choral teaching. Among the areas to be examined 
are score preparation, gestural skills, artistic judgment, teaching problems and strategies (e.g., learning theories, classroom 
management, discipline, etc.), and rehearsal methodology. Further matters such as cultural, historical and linguistic contexts. 
teaching philosophy and administrative tasks will be considered. May be taken for graduate credit; additional work will be 
required. Offered spring. Prerequisite(s): MUSI 3560. 

Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 291 



MUSI 4490 Special Topics in Music Education (2-0-2) 

A guided study of topics in music education through independent research projects or in-depth study in a classroom setting. 
May be repeated for credit, or may be taken for graduate credit (MUSI 5490). Prerequisite(s): MUSI 3410. MUSI 4410, MUSI 
4420. 

MUSI 4492 Student Apprenticeship/Seminar in Music (V-0-1 2) 

Intensive, field-based apprenticeship in music at the elementary and/or middle/secondary levels. Includes supervised 
teaching and practical application of previous coursework. Prerequisite(s): Senior Standing: fulfillment of all other graduation 
requirements: completion of Junior Recital (MUSA 3XX5): completion of Piano Proficiency: Computer Applications in Music 
Proficiency: admission to teacher education. 

MUSI 4493 Internship in Music Education (V-0-6) 

Intensive, field-based apprenticeship in music for those employed at the elementary and/or middle/secondary levels and who 
are seeking certification in music. Includes supervised teaching and practical application of previous course work. May be 
repeated for credit. Offered; On demand. Prerequisite(s): Fulfillment of other Music Certification requirements. 

MUSI 4521 Directed Studio Teaching: Vocal (V-O-V) 

Studio teaching of beginning to intermediate level voice students under the regular supervision of the voice faculty. May be 
repeated for credit. Prerequlsite(s): MUSI 3520. 

MUSI 4530 Advanced Piano Pedagogy (3-0-3) 

A survey of the methods and materials related to individual and group instruction in piano. Emphasis on advanced solo piano 
instruction. Prerequisite(s): MUSI 3530. 

MUSI 4531 Directed Studio Teaching: Keyboard (V-O-V) 

Studio teaching of beginning to intermediate level piano students under the regular supervision of the piano faculty. May be 
repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): MUSI 3530. 

MUSI 4541 Directed Studio Teaching: Instrumental (V-O-V) 

Studio teaching of beginning to intermediate level instrumental students under the regular supervision of the instrumental 
faculty. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): MUSI 3540. 

MUSI 4590 Special Topics in Music Performance (2-0-2) 

A guided study of topics in music performance through independent projects or in-depth study in a classroom setting. In 
consultation with the applied music faculty, students will choose their own topics for study and/or research projects. May be 
repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): MUSA 3XX1 or MUSA 3XX3. 

MUSI 4730 Jazz History and Literature (3-0-3) 

The study of music in the jazz idiom from its origin to the present, with emphasis on influential musicians, groups, and 
composers. 

MUSI 4910 Special Topics in Music Business and Management (2-0-2) 

A guided study of music business through independent research and analysis projects or in-depth study. May include an 
internship. In consultation with the music and/or School of Business faculty, students will choose their own topics for study. 
May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): MUSI 2102: MUSI 2212. 

MUSI 4950/6950 Introduction to Orff Schulwerk (2-0-2) 

This course will introduce its participants to the ideals and components of Orff Schulwerk. Ideals and components that will be 
addressed include Carl Orff's philosophy for music education, pedagogical aspects of the Schulwerk, the conceptual framework 
of the approach and the experiential aspects of the design. May be taken for graduate credit; additional coursework will be 
required. Prerequisite(s): MUSI 1102: MUSI 1212. 

MUSI 5490 See MUSI 4490 above. 

MUSI 641 3 Foundations in Music Education (3-0-3) 

This course will be divided into three areas of study. First is a sequential study of the history of American music education and 
the emerging trends in the profession. Second is the study of major philosophies guiding music teaching, including Pestalozzi, 
Reimer and the Paraxial approach of Elliott. Third is a contemporary look at the interrelationship of music and society in the 
United States. 

MUSI 6420 See MUSI 3420 above. 

MUSI 6430 See MUSI 3430 above. 

MUSI 6440 See MUSI 3440 above. 

Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 



292 



Augusta State University Catalog 



MUSI 6450 See MUSI 3450 above. 

MUSI 6460 See MUSI 3460 above. 

MUSI 6470 See MUSI 3470 above. 

MUSI 6511 See MUSI 3511 above. 

MUSI 6512 See MUSI 3512 above. 

MUSI 6513 See MUSI 3513 above. 

MUSI 6514 See MUSI 3514 above. 

MUSI 6950 See MUSI 4950 above. 

Music Ensembles: The Music Ensembles at Augusta State University present all students with the opportunity for a hands-on 
experience with music in a shared effort with others. A variety of performance groups exist for the interested student regardless 
of major, including large ensembles and chamber groups. All instruments and voice types are welcome. Major ensembles may 
be taken as an upper-division course with permission of the instructor or upper-division applied lessons status. All ensembles 
are normally offered fall and spring. 

***(Note: the second hours grouping listed is for non-music majors. For example, (1-0-1) represents an hour credit for music 
*** majors; (1-0-0) represents zero credit hours for non-music majors.) 

MUS1 1000 Augusta State University Pep Band (1-0-1) or (1-0-0) 

The ASU Pep Band performs at all home basketball games and at the Peachbelt Conference Tournament. Music performed 
will be selected from a wide variety of sources, including popular and jazz idioms. Everyone is welcome to participate. No 
audition required. 

MUS1 1610 Augusta State University Wind Ensemble (4-0-1) or (4-0-0) 

Prerequisite(s): Previous experience on woodwind, brass or percussion instruments. 

MUS1 1 620 Augusta State University Chioir (4-0-1) or (4-0-0) 

MUS1 1630 Augusta State University Orchestra (4-0-1) or (4-0-0) 

Prerequisite(s): Previous experience on an orcliestral instrument. 

MUSI 3610 See MUSI 1610 above. 

MUSI 3620 See MUSI 1620 above. 

MUSI 3630 See MUSI 1630 above. 

MUSI 3660 Augusta State University Jazz Ensemble (4-0-1) or (4-0-0) 

Prerequisite(s): Permission oftiie instructor. 

MUSI 4610 Augusta State University Opera Ensemble (1-0-1) or (1-0-0) 

Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor: audition for roles in major productions. 

MUSI 4620 Augusta State University Chamber Singers (2-0-1) or (2-0-0) 

Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor. 

MUSI 4640 Woodwind Ensemble(s) (2-0-1) or (2-0-0) 

Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor 

MUSI 4650 Brass Ensemble(s) (2-0-1) or (2-0-0) 

Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor 

MUSI 4660 Jazz Combo(s) (2-0-1) or (2-0-0) 

Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor. 

MUSI 4670 Keyboard Ensemble(s) (2-0- 1) or (2-0-0) 

Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor 

Example; (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 293 



MUSI 4680 

Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor. 

MUSI 4690 

Prerequisite(s): Permission of Instructor. 



Percussion Ensemble(s) (2-0-1) or (2-0-0) 



Chamber Music Ensemble(s) (2-0-1) or (2-0-0) 



MUSA - Applied Music Courses 



APPLIED MUSIC LESSONS: Individual instruction in a performance medium is available for all string instruments, all wind 
instruments, all keyboard instruments and all voice types. All students must receive permission from the Chair of the Music 
Department before beginning their applied lesson sequence. An additional fee is charged for private instruction. Grading will be 
based on the student's preparation and performance in the weekly lessons. Secondary applied music lessons are available for 
music minors who may wish to begin or continue private study of a musical instrument or voice or for music majors who desire 
instruction on a secondary musical instrument or in voice. Permission of the Chair of the Department of Music is required for 
enrollment. May be repeated for credit. Secondary applied lessons are available on the upper-divisional level if the student 
shows significant achievement on the lower division level. 

MUSA XXXO CA-O-I) 

Applied lessons in Jazz Winds, Jazz Piano, Jazz Percussion, Jazz Strings, Drum Set. and Composition are available only at 
the secondary level. 

The following lessons are available only to music majors: 

Transfer students: Music Majors who transfer to ASU from another institution must audition within the first week of their first 
semester for proper placement within the applied lessons sequence. 

Concentration Applied Lessons: Individualized instruction in the student's primary performance medium. One one-hour private 
lesson per week with an additional hour of studio class. Emphasis will be placed upon performance skills. Grading will be 
based on the student's preparation and performance in the weekly lessons and in a jury exam at the end of each semester. 
Corequisite: enrollment in MUSA 2X05, MUSI 1 500 and solo performance in MUSI 1 500. Applied lessons for the concentration 
are available on the upper-divisional level if the student has a successful audition for upper-division status. Students must 
receive a permission form from their private applied teacher prior to registration for their applied lessons. 



MUSAXXX1 
MUSA XXX2 

Music majors must pass an audition for the performance major in order to enroll in Major Applied Lessons. 



(1-0-1) 
(1-0-1) 



Major Applied Lessons: Individualized instruction in the student's major performance medium. One one-hour private lesson 
per week with an additional hour of studio class. Emphasis will be placed upon performance skills and pedagogical concepts. 
Grading will be based on the student's preparation and performance in the weekly lessons and in a jury exam at the end of 
each semester. Corequisite: enrollment in MUSA 2X05, MUSI 1500 and solo performance in MUSI 1500. Applied lessons for 
the major are available on the upper-divisional level if the student has a successful audition for upper-division status. Students 
must receive a permission form from their private applied teacher prior to registration for their applied lessons. 



MUSAXXX3 



MUSA XXX4 



(1-0- 3)* 
(1-0-3)* 



*Not available at the 1000 level. 
Instruction Available for: 



xlOx Voice 


x41x Percussion 


x710 Jazz Winds 




x420 Drum Set 


x720 Jazz Piano 


x21x Flute 




x730 Jazz Percussion 


x22x Oboe 


x51x Violin 


x740 Jazz Strings 


x23x Clarinet 


x52x Viola 




x24x Bassoon 


x53x Violoncello 


x810 Classical Composition 


x25x Saxophone 


x54x Double Bass 


x820 Jazz Composition 




x55x Guitar 


x830 Computer Composition 


x31x Trumpet 






x32x Horn 


x61x Piano 


x900 Early Instruments 


x33x Trombone 


x62x Organ 





294 



Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 

Augusta State University Catalog 



x34x Euphonium x63x Harpsichord 

x35x Tuba 

MUSA 2X05 Studio Class (0-1-0) 

A forum for the discussion of performances, techniques and repertoire in the student's applied performance area. Corequisite: 
major or concentration applied lessons. 

MUSA3XX5 ' Junior Recital (V-0-0) 

Individualized instruction in the student's applied performance medium leading to the performance of a half-hour public solo 
recital. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the student's applied lesson instructor Corequisite: MUSA 3XX2 or 3XX4. 

MUSA 4XX5 Senior Recital (V-0-1) 

Individualized instruction in the student's major performance medium leading to the performance of a one-hour public solo 
recital with program notes researched and written by the student. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the student's applied lesson 
instructor; Completion of the Piano Proficiency and the Computer Applications in Music Proficiency. Corequisite: MUSA 4XX2 
or 4XX4. 

NURS - Nursing Courses 

NURS 3000 Foundations of Nursing Practice (4-9-7) 

Introduction to the historical basis for professional nursing education. This course introduces the student to the Nursing Process 
and Gordon's Functional Health Patterns with a focus on patient care throughout the lifespan. It will also facilitate the students 
role as provider of care, manager of care, and member of the discipline of nursing. Prerequisite(s): Core A-F requrements. 

NURS 3001 Health Promotion in Individuals and Families (2-2-3) 

This course explores the theoretical basis for and basic principles of providing community-based healthcare to individuals and 
families across the lifespan. Emphasis is placed on wellness, health promotion and maintenance, and disease prevention in 
individuals and families. Prerequisite(s): Core A-F requrements, NURS 3000 or NURS 3010. 

NURS 3002 Nursing Research (3-0-3) 

This course introduces the role of research as a foundation for nursing practice. The critique of published nursing research will 
enhance the understanding of the research process and its application to evidenced-based nursing. Students will apply the 
principles learned through select written activities. Prerequisite(s): Core A-F requrements. 

NURS 3003 Evidence Based Nursing Practice I (5-12-9) 

This course will focus on the application of critical thinking skills to develop evidence based care in the patient across the 
lifespan. Emphasis is on the special needs of patients experiencing common physiological problems resulting in alterations 
in functional health patterns and the needs of childbearing families. Communication skills are expanded to emphasize family 
interactions and teaching-learning activities. Prerequisite(s): Nursing program core requirements and NURS 3000. 

NURS 3004 Nutrition and Health Care (2-0-2) 

Explores nutritional concepts in selected disorders. There will be an emphasis on obesity, diabetes, heart disease, renal 
disease, malabsorption and increased metabolic states. Prerequisite(s): Core A-F Requirements. 

NURS 3005 Clinical Pharmacology (3-0-3) 

This course introduces the basic principles of clinical pharmacology as they relate to genetics, selected disorders, healthcare 
economics, drug development and alternative therapies. The focus of this course is on nursing-based pharmacologic 
interventions in response to compromises in health. Prerequisite(s): Core A-F requrements. 

NURS 301 LPN to BSN Transition Course (4-3-5) 

This course builds on prior knowledge and competencies of qualified LPNs and facilitates advanced placement into the 
bachelor's of science in nursing program. The course provides an introduction to the roles of the professional nurse. Emphasis 
is on critical thinking skills, communication, health assessment, test taking strategies, and application of the nursing process 
across the life span to patients experiencing common physiological alterations in functional health patterns and special needs 
of childbearing families at risk. Prerequisite(s): Core A-F requrements. 

NURS 4001 Evidence Based Nursing Practice II (4-15-9) 

Critical thinking skills are applied to developing evidence based care for the patient across the lifespan experiencing complex 
physiological and mental/emotional alterations in health. Emphasis is on competency in the role as provider of care and 
acquisition of skills of collaboration, consultation, delegation, accountability, patient advocacy and respect in the role of manager 
of care. Prerequisite(s): NURS 3001 and NURS 3003. 

Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 295 



NURS 4002 Health Promotion in Communities (2-4-4) 

This course provides an in-depth examination of the theories and principles of community and public health nursing. Emphasis 
is placed on community health assessment, identification of vulnerable populations and the exploration of global health issues. 
Students apply the concepts learned in the classroom in a variety of community settings. Prerequisite(s): Core A-F requrements 
and NURS 3001. 

NURS 4003 Nursing and Spirituality (2-0-2) 

A cross-cultural study of spirituality and religiosity provides a foundation for assisting the student in promoting the health and 
wellness of self and patients. Prerequisite(s): Core A-F Requirements. 

NURS 4004 Evidence Based Nursing Practice III (3-15-8) 

Cntical thinking skills are applied to providing care to the patient across the lifespan experiencing complex alterations in health 
status. Emphasis is placed on developing competency in the roles of provider of care and manager of care during the first half 
of the semester. The second half is focused on the role as members within the discipline of nursing. Students have increasing 
responsibility for the care of patients' needs within a variety of health care and community settings. Prerequisite(s): NURS 3004 
and NURS 4001. 

NURS 4005 Nursing Issues and Trends (2-0-2) 

Seminar to critically analyze national and global socio-political, economical, cultural, ethical-legal, and professional issues 
affecting nursing practice and health care. Prerequisite(s): Core A-F Requirements and NURS 4004. 

NURS 4006 Nurse Leader/Designer/Manager (2-6-5) 

Expands the student's knowledge of nurse leader/designer/manager concepts and provides opportunity to observe and practice 
these concepts in the clinical setting. Concepts discussed include, but are not limited to, human resource management, self 
care, group and organizational dynamics, communications and fiscal management. Co-Requisite(s): NURS 4004 and NURS 
4005. 

NURS 4007 Nursing and Technology (2-0-2) 

This course focuses on the impact of emerging technologies on professional nursing practice, nurse-patient relationships, 
patient care outcomes, and work place dynamics. Prerequisite(s): Core A-F Requirements. 

NURS 4008 Public Policy and Health Care (3-0-3) 

This course explores issues surrounding the development of public health policy and the influence of policy on nursing, health 
care delivery, and other health professions. Classroom and field experience. Prerequisite(s): NURS 3004. 

NURS 401 Cultural Diversity and Nursing (3-0-3) 

This course provides a foundation for providing culturally competent nursing care. Theoretical models and cultural assessment 
tools are explored in depth to provide a framework for students seeking to expand their knowledge of and apreciation for the 
culturally diverse values, beliefs and practices that impact the delivery of healthcare to individuals, families and groups. Students 
apply concepts learned through the completion of a cultural assessment of select groups. Prerequisite(s): NURS 3004. 

NURS 401 1 Ethics in Health Care (3-0-3) 

This course will focus on ethical and moral principles utilized in the health care setting. Case studies will be utilized to illustrate 
the principles and dilemmas faced such as informed consent, refusal of treatment, and quality of life in the healthcare setting. 
Prerequisite(s): Core Requirements. 

NURS 4012 Future Trends in Geriatric Nursing (2-2-3) 

This course focuses on the health care needs of the geriatric patient, the fastest growing population in the medical arena. Topics 
and clinical experiences will include the effects of aging on the human body, health maintenance needs, pharmacotherapy for 
the elderly, special needs for the cognitively impaired, and long-term care issues. Prerequisite(s): Core Requirements and 
NURS 3000. 

NURS 4950 Selected Topics (1-3 hrs) 

A study of concepts and principles in special topics related to the nursing profession and the health care environment. 
Prerequisite(s): Permission by Instructor. 

NURS 4960 Undergraduate Internship (1-3 hrs) 

Selected study in a field of nursing, with emphasis of practice in the clinical setting. Prerequisite(s): Georgia Professional Nurse 
License. 



Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
^^" Augusta State University Catalog 



PADM - Public Administration Courses 

PADM 6000 Survey of Public Administration (3-0-3) 

This course is designed to introduce the MPA student to the intellectual tradition of the field of public administration. It will focus 
on theories, concepts and methods which have become associated with the discipline of public administration, Prerequisite(s): 
Permission of ttie MPA Director 

PADM 6020 GIS for Public Management (2-0-2) 

Introduces students to the use and application of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in public organizations. The principal 
focus is on the use of GIS for planning and problem solving at the local government level. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the 
MPA Director 

PADM 6030 Grant Writing (1-0-1) 

Grants are an increasingly important source of funding for public and nonprofit organizations. This course is a skill-building 
course designed to prepare students to write grants. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the MPA Director 

PADM 6050 Constitutional and Administrative Law (3-0-3) 

The course explores the scope, nature and function of administrative law as it relates to the substantive, procedural and equal 
protection rights; as well as that law which a reasonably competent public official should know. Prerequisite(s): Permission of 
the MPA Director 

PADM 61 00 Organization Theory and Behavior (3-0-3) 

Offers conceptual and practical perspectives for understanding and managing organizations. A spectrum of theories of 
organization will be examined. The concepts and issues to be discussed include mechanical and organismic aspects of 
organizations, organizational culture and politics, organizational psychodynamics, and recent theories of organizing including 
the use of networks and privatization. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the l\/IPA Director 

PADM 6200 Human Resource Management (3-0-3) 

Introduces the student to personnel processes used in the public and nonprofit sector and the legal, political, social, and ethical 
issues affecting the management of human resources. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the MPA Director 

PADM 6250 Introduction to Urban Planning (3-0-3) 

This course introduces students to the legal bases and politics of planning, the tools of land-use planning, community development, 
transportation planning, economic development and growth management, and environmental and energy planning. Particular 
emphasis will be on the legal and technical aspects of planning in cities, counties, and metropolitan regions. The implications 
of citizen participation in planning for democracy and political processes will also be discussed. Prerequisite(s): Permission of 
the MPA Director 

PADM 6300 Public Budgeting (3-0-3) 

This course examines the institutions and techniques of modern financial administration in federal, state, and local government. 
The course introduces the terminology and processes of budgeting as well as teaches competence in analyzing budgetary 
problems and proposing solutions. The role of the budget as a tool in expressing priorities in policy choices is emphasized. 
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the MPA Director 

PADM 6301 Financial Management for Nonprofit Organizations (3-0-3) 

An overview of the financial issues, challenges and opportunities facing nonprofit managers. The course includes instruction 
in budgeting and financial management strategies appropriate for the nonprofit sector. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the MPA 
Director 

PADM 6302 Nonprofit Management (3-0-3) 

This course introduces students to the world of nonprofit management. It covers a broad spectrum of issues including creating 
a nonprofit, fundraising, recruitment and management of volunteers, the role of program evaluation, and the proper role of a 
board. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the MPA Director 

PADM 6350 Emergency Management (3-0-3) 

Introduces students to the discipline and profession of applying science, technology, planning and management to deal with 
disasters. Special emphasis on how local governments and agencies can mitigate, plan, respond and recover from disaster 
situations. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the MPA Director 

PADM 6351 Introduction to Homeland Security (3-0-3) 

Introduces students to the essential ideas in the emerging discipline of homeland security. Includes basic instruction on the 
strategy-making process, fear management, crisis communication, conventional and unconventional threats, civil liberties and 
security, the role of technology, and intelligence and information collection. Prerequisite(s): None. 

Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 297 



PADM 6352 The Unconventional Threat (3-0-3) 

Provides an introduction to the operational and organizational dynamics of unconventional threats, particularly terrorism. 
Course addresses motivation, strategies and finance, the role of the media, and counterterrorism policies and strategies. 

Prerequisite(s): None. 

PADIVI 6353 Information Security Management (3-0-3) 

Overview of information security practice management. Topics include information systems security governance and 
management, risk management, information security program management, incident response management. Prerequisite(s): 
Permission of the MPA Director 

PADM 6500 Research Methods in Public Administration (3-2-4) 

Introduces the student to the principles of designing research, defining and measuring variables and sampling, and the use 
of SPSS to analyze data. During this course, students will develop their capstone proposal. Prerequisite(s): PADM 6600 and 
Permission of the MPA Director 

PADM 6550 Human Sen/ices Administration (3-0-3) 

This course is an in-depth consideration of human service agencies and organizations: staff, clients, structure, service delivery, 
and administration. A strong emphasis is given to developing knowledge and practice skills for interfacing with local regional 
agencies and resources. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the MPA Director. 

PADM 6600 Quantitative Methods (3-0-3) 

Introduces students to the quantitative methods used in the design and implementation of program evaluation and performance 
monitoring systems in the public and nonprofit sector. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the MPA Director 

PADM 6650 Public Policy Analysis (3-0-3) 

Introduces students to basic economic theory on when government should intervene in markets, various methods of analyzing 
policy alternatives, and the social and political forces affecting public policy. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the MPA Director 

PADM 6700 Urban Government Administration and Policy Analysis (3-0-3) 

This course focuses on providing a comprehensive understanding of the origin, development, and growth of urban government. 
Emphasis will be on alternative forms of urban governments, policymaking and implementation, budgeting and delivery of 
services. Case studies will be incorporated. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the MPA Director 

PADM 6701 Comparative Public Administration (3-0-3) 

This course introduces students to the ways different nations, societies, and cultures approach designing and executing public 
programs and policy. Topics discussed include: the factors which influence the structure and working of public administration; 
control over bureaucracies, organizational design, representative bureaucracy; co-ordination and incentive systems; special 
types of bureaucrats and bureaucracies, and administrative reform. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the MPA Director 

PADM 6750 Program Evaluation (3-0-3) 

Focuses on the design and implementation of program evaluation and performance monitoring systems for in-house and 
privatized public programs and services. Prerequisite(s): PADM 6650 and PADM 6600 and permission of the MPA Director 

PADM 6900 Graduate Internship (3-0-3) 

Prerequisite(s): Permission of the MPA Director 

PADM 6950 Selected Topics in Public Administration (3-0-3) 

This course title will be utilized as needed to create seminars around specialized topics as these issues become prominent on 
the current public policy agenda. Prerequlslte(s): Permission of the MPA Director. 

PADM 7000 Directed Reading (3-0-3) 

This course is a problematically structured, individualized research project to be mutually designed by the instructor and 
student. Prerequislte(s): Permission of the MPA Director 

PADM 7050 Capstone Project (2-0-2) 

This is a capstone paper in which the student demonstrates knowledge of public administration principles as applied in practice. 
Prerequlsite(s): Permission of the MPA Director 



Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable 
298 



Augusta State University Catalog 



PHIL - Philosophy Courses 

PHIL 1000 Introduction to Philosophy (3-0-3) 

A critical analysis of the emergence of philosophy and its attempt to explain the meaningfulness of human experience in the world 
from ancient and modern. A grade of C or better is required for all majors and/or minors in Political Science. Prerequisite(s): 
ENGL 1101 or permission of the instructor 

PHIL 3000 ' Environmental Ethics (3-0-3) 

The course offers a philosophical account of the moral relationship between human beings and their natural environment with 
attention to animal interests and rights as well as our responsibilities to species and ecosystems. The course also investigates 
such environmental theories as deep ecology, social ecology and ecofeminism which attempt to explain the origins of 
environmental degradation. Prerequisite(s): PHIL 1000 with a grade of C or better 

PHIL 3002 Ethical Theory (3-0-3) 

The course examines the major ethical theories and philosophers as represented in the virtue-ethics, utilitarian and deontological 
ethical traditions. The focus of the course will be on a critical examination of the rational basis of our moral duties and will raise 
questions about the status of moral beliefs and judgments. Prerequisite(s): PHIL 1000 with a grade of C or better 

PHIL 3005 Philosophy of the Human Person (3-0-3) 

A critical inquiry into the questions of the human condition and the realms of experience that generate the framework for 
thinking and acting, such as myth/religion, knowledge, art, science and the ethical/political. Prerequisite(s): PHIL 1000 with a 
grade of C or better 

PHIL 301 Ancient Political Philosophy (3-0-3) 

A critical examination of ancient Greek political philosophy in the writings of Plato and Aristotle and their expressions of 
fundamental theoretical and practical approaches to political experiences of regime and citizenship. Their contemporary 
relevance will be scrutinized. Prerequisite(s): PHIL 1000 with a grade of C or better 

PHIL 3020 Existentialism (3-0-3) 

In its search for meaning rather than truth, existential philosophy understands the human condition as individual choice in 
the pursuit of self-knowledge. Its discursive language includes vocabularies on love, belief, the other, responsibility, suffering, 
anxiety, despair, and death. Prerequisite(s): PHIL 1000 with a grade of C or better 

PHIL 3095 tJlajor Philosophers in History (3-0-3) 

To acquaint students with fundamental texts in philosophy. This course undertakes a critical reading of the work of one or two 
philosophers alternating ancient with modern in order to examine the meaning, language, and philosophical value of these 
texts. May be repeated. Prerequisite(s): PHIL 1000 with a grade of C or better 

PHIL 3601 / POLS 3601 t^odern Political Philosophy (3-0-3) 

The development of modern political ideas underlying democratic theory and liberalism as found in the works of Hobbes, 
Locke, Rousseau and Mill. Prerequisite(s): PHIL 1000 with a grade of C or better 

PHIL 3701 / POLS 3701 Contemporary Political Philosophy (3-0-3) 

An analysis of political ideas, theories, ideologies, and issues as presented in the writings of contemporary thinkers. 

PHIL 4030 Ancient Greek Philosophy (3-0-3) 

This course undertakes a critical study of the writings of Plato and Aristotle focusing on major teleological, ontological. and 
epistemological concepts such as Plato's forms and their ground in the "good " and Aristotle's "being" and its ground "presence." 
Prerequisite(s): PHIL 1000 with a grade of C or better and permission of instructor 

PHIL 4031 19th Century European Philosophy (3-0-3) 

Acritical analysis of the major ideas and theories of significant 1 9th century European philosophers such as Hegel, Schopenhauer, 
Marx, Nietsche and Kierkegaard. Prerequisite(s): PHIL 1000 with a grade of C or better 

PHIL 4032 20th Century Philosophy (3-0-3) 

A study of selected philosophers and philosophical issues, problems, questions and schools of thought in the 20th century. 
Prerequisite(s): PHIL 1000 with a grade of C or better 

PHIL 4033 1 7th and 18th Century Philosophy (3-0-3) 

A study of some of the significant thinkers from the early modern period of philosophy such as Descartes, Leibniz. Spinoza. 
Locke, Berkeley and Hume; selected topics include epistemology, philosophy of science, metaphysics and philosophy of mind. 
Prerequisite(s): PHIL 1000 with a grade of C or better 



Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 299 



PHIL 4950 Selected Topics (3-0-3) 

An intensive study of a selected philosophical issue, problem or school of thought not addressed in the current curriculum. 
Prerequisite(s): PHIL 1000 with a grade of C or better 

PHIL 4990 Undergraduate Research (3-0-3) 

Independent research that focuses on a particular philosophical theme or philosopher of the student's choice under the direction 
of the philosophy instructor. Emphasis will be on the development of sound philosophical ideas and approaches. Prerequisite(s): 
PHIL 1000 and three additional philosophy courses with a grade of C. Chair and instructor's permission required. 

PHSC - Physical Science Courses 

PHSC 1011 Physical Science (3-2-4) 

A survey of physics including motion and energy. May include heat, sound, light, electricity, magnetism, relativity, atoms and 
nuclei. Simple applications in problem solving. Credit may not be earned for both PHSC 1101 and PHSC 1100. Prerequisite(s): 
MATH 1101 or MATH 1111. 

PHSC 1100 Environmental Physical Science (3-2-4) 

A study of basic physics principles including momentum, force, motion, energy, electricity, magnetism, heat, and fluid motion. 
Specific focus will be on the application of those physics principles to environmental issues. Credit may not be earned for both 
PHSC 1100 and PHSC 1011. Prerequisite(s): Recommended but not required: Math 1101 or MATH 1111. 

RHYS - Physics Courses 

RHYS 1111 Introductory Physics I (3-2-4) 

A trigonometry-based study of mechanics, heat, waves and sound. Emphasis on problem solving. Credit may not be earned 
for both PHYS 1111 and PHYS 2211. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1113 ( C or better). 

RHYS 1112 Introductory Physics II (3-2-4) 

A trigonometry-based study of electricity and magnetism, light, and modern physics. Emphasis on problem solving. Credit may 
not be earned for both PHYS 1112 and PHYS 2212. Prerequisite(s): PHYS 1111 (C or better) or 2211 (C or better). 

PHYS 1950 Selected Topics (V) 

Concepts/topics in special areas of physics. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor 

PHYS 2211 Principles of Physics I (3-3-4) 

A calculus-based study of mechanics, heat, waves and sound. Emphasis on problem solving. Credit may not be earned for 
both PHYS 2211 and PHYS 1111. Prerequisite(s): (Co-requisite) MATH 2012 concurrently. 

PHYS 221 2 Principles of Physics II (3-3-4) 

A calculus-based study of electricity and magnetism, light, and modern physics. Emphasis on problem solving. Credit may 
not be earned for both PHYS 2212 and PHYS 1112. Prerequisite(s): PHYS 2211 (C or better) and MATH 2012 (C or better). 

PHYS 2950 Selected Topics (V) 

Concepts/topics in special areas of physics. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor 

RHYS 3011 Electronics I (2-4-4) 

Alternating current theory, filters, wave-shaping, power supplies, transistors, amplification, integration, feedback, operational 
amplifiers and their application. Applicable solid-state theory will also be discussed. Prerequisite(s): PHYS 221 2 (C or better) 

RHYS 3012 Electronics II (2-4-4) 

Logic gates, multiplexing, flip-flops, counters, open collector and tri-state logic, analog-to-digital converters, data-logging 
systems. Prerequisite(s): PHYS 3011 (C or better) 

RHYS 3040 Advanced Optics (3-3-4) 

Geometric properties of light. Reflection and refraction at boundaries. Thin and thick lenses. Wave optics, diffraction and 
interference. Spectroscopy and absorption of light. Polarization. Modern optical techniques. Prerequisite(s): PHYS 2212 (C 
or better) 



Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 



300 



Augusta State University Catalog 



PHYS 3250 Theoretical Mechanics (4-0-4) 

Newtonian mechanics. Particle kinematics and dynamics in two and tinree dimensions. System of particles. Simple, damped and 
forced harmonic motion. Rigid body motion. Vibrating systems. Lagrange's equations. Hamilton's equations, Prerequisite(s): 
PHYS 2211 (C or better), MATH 3020. 

PHYS 3260 Computational Physics (3-0-3) 

Introduction to computationally based problem solving in physics. Emphasis on understanding and applying various numerical 
algorithms to different types of physics problems. Topics will include realistic mechanical systems. Monte Carlo methods and 
time independent as well as time-dependent quantum physics problems. Prerequisite(s): PHYS 2212 (C or better), CSCI 2060 
(C or better). 

PHYS 3300 Modern Physics (3-0-3) 

Theory of Special Relativity. Quantum Physics; Blackbody radiation, Photoelectric effect, Compton effect, X-rays; Bohr model 
of the atom; wave properties of matter; the uncertainty principle. Prerequisite(s): PHYS 2212 (C or better). 

PHYS 4010 Advanced Laboratory (2-3-3) 

Experiments are conducted in various fields of physics including modern physics and optics. Evaluation, analysis and 
interpretation of experimental data is emphasized. Prerequisite(s): PHYS 3300 (C or better) or permission of the instructor 

PHYS 4051 Electromagnetic Theory I (3-0-3) 

Vector analysis. Electrostatics and Gauss' law. Poisson's and Laplace's equations applied to Electrostatics problems. Electric 
fields, energy and potential. Dielectrics and electrical properties. Currents and magnetic fields. Prerequisite(s): PHYS 2212 (C 
or better), MATH 3020. 

PHYS 4052 Electromagnetic Theory II (3-0-3) 

Magnetization, magnetic fields and properties of matter. Electromagnetic induction. Maxwell's equations and applications. 
Electromagnetic radiation, propagation of electromagnetic waves in free space and in dielectric materials. Prerequisite(s): 
PHYS 4051 (C or better), MATH 3020. 

PHYS 4310 Thermal Physics (3-0-3) 

Thermodynamics and the relation between microscopic systems. Statistical descriptions of microscopic systems. Equilibrium, 
reversible processes, heat and temperature. Ideal gas, specific heats, expansion or compression, and entropy. Equipartition 
of energy. Prerequisite(s): PHYS 2211 (C or better), MATH 3020. 

PHYS 4530 Mathematical Methods of Physics (3-0-3) 

Apply mathematical techniques to specific physics problems. Vector theorems. Variational calculus. Special functions. 
Applications of partial differential equations and integral transforms to problems in physics. Complex variables. Tensors and 
eigenvalue problems. Prerequisite(s): PHYS 2212 (C or better), MATH 3020. 

PHYS 4600 Quantum Mechanics (3-0-3) 

Non-relativistic wave mechanical treatment of physical systems. Definition and interpretation of state functions; construction 
of wave packets; solutions of the Schrodinger equation for simple one-dimensional systems; the hydrogen atom; various 
approximation methods, including perturbation theory. Prerequisite(s): PHYS 3300 (C or better). MATH 3020. 

PHYS 4950 Selected Topics (V) 

Concepts/topics in special areas of physics. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor 

PHYS 4960 Undergraduate Internship (V. 1 to 15) 

An internship is a service-learning experience based in an institution or agency, emphasizing the completion of a specific task 
and the acquisition of specific knowledge and skills under the supervision of Augusta State University and the cooperating 
institution or agency. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor 

PHYS 4990 Undergraduate Research (V) 

Individual modern physics research. A minimum of three hours of laboratory work per week for each semester hour of credit. 
Report/thesis required. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor 



Example: (3-0-3) 3 hours of lecture, hours of lab, 3 credit hours. V=variable. 
Augusta State University Catalog 2010-2011 301 



POLS - Political Science Courses 

POLS 1101 Introduction to American Government (3-0-3) 

An introductory course covering the essential facts of federal, state and local governments in the United States. A satisfactory 
grade will exempt a student from the requirement of passing an examination on the Constitution of the United States and the 
Constitution of Georgia before graduation. 

POLS 2000 Society. Law and the Criminal (3-0-3) 

An introductory examination of the nature of crime, the consequences of crime for society, and an intensive examination and 
evaluation of the law as a social device for coping with crime. Prerequisite(s): POLS 1101. grade ofC or better. 

POLS 2101