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Full text of "Autobiographies and portraits of the President, cabinet, Supreme court, and Fifty-fifth Congress"

AUTOBIOGRAPHIES 
"•AND PORTRAITS'- 



Of the President, Cabinet, Supreme Court 
AND Fifty-fifth Congress. /// t-^-o Vohiim's 



VOL. II 



The Neale Company. General Book Publishers and Engravers, 
4^1 1 1 ill Street, WASHINGTON, D.C.-ii-v^^ia^v?^ MDCCCXCIX. 



copyright. 1898. by 
The Neale Company 

.-/// rifrJits reserved. 



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HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 

CONTINUED 




JOHN E. FOWLER 



JOHN EDGAR FOWLER 



John Edgar Fowler, of Clinton, was born on a farm in 
Sampson County. N. C September 8, 1S()6; was educated in 
the common schools of the county and Wake Forest College; 
taught two years after leaving college ; read law at the 
University of North Carolina, and was admitted to the bar 
in LS94; was formerly a Free-Silver Democi'at, but upon 
the nomination of Mr. Cleveland in \H\)2 left the Democratic 
and allied himself with the Populist party ; was nominated 
for the State house of representatives the same year as a 
Populist, but was defeated by 7 votes; was nominated as a 
Populist for the State senate in 1894, and was elected ; was 
elected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Populist, receiving 
17,989 votes, against 12,534 votes for Frank Thompson. Dem- 
ocrat. He represents the third congressional district of 
North Carolina, which has a population of 160.288. and em- 
braces the nine counties of Bladen. Craven. Cumberland, 
Duplin, Harnett, Jones, Moore, Onslow, and Sampson. 




ANDREW F. FOX 



ANDREW FULLER FOX 



Andrew Fuller Fox. of West Point, Clay County, Miss., 
was born April 2(), 1S49. in Pickens County, Ala. ; studied 
law in the office of Gen. E. C. Walthall, at Grenada, Miss., 
in 1876 and 1877 ; was admitted to the bar in 1877, and 
has since that time been constantly engaged in the active 
practice of law in Mississippi ; was a delegate to the Dem- 
ocratic national convention in 1888 ; was elected State 
senator in 1891, which position he resigned to accept the 
office of United States attorney for the northern district 
of Mississippi, to which he was appointed June 27, 1S93; 
resigned the latter office September 1, 1896. and was 
elected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Democrat, receiv- 
ing 8.148 votes, against 3.086 votes for R. K. Prewitt. Peo- 
ple's party, 347 votes for W. D. Frazee. Republican, and 
161 votes for S. S. Matthews, Republican. He represents 
the fourth congressional district of Mississippi, which has 
a population of 213.236, and embraces the thirteen counties 
of Calhoun, Carroll, I'hickasaw, Choctaw, Clay, Grenada, 
Kemper, Montgomery. Noxubee, Pontotoc, Webster, Win- 
ston, and Yalobusha. 




JOHN WESLEY GAINES 



JOHN WESLEY GAINES 



John WiTsley Gaines, of Nashville, was boru near that' 
city August 24, 1861 ; was educated and taught in the 
public country schools ; was graduated in medicine from 
the University of Nashville and Vanderltilt University in 
1882, and began the study of law upon the day of his 
graduation, and was admitted to the bar in 1884 ; was a 
Cleveland elector in 1892, and led the ballot, and after- 
wards became the leading exponent of free silver in his 
district ; was elected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a 
Democrat by a majority of 4,774 votes over all opponents. 
He represents the sixth district of Tennessee, which has a 
population of IDfi/ll)?, and emliraces the seven counties of 
Cheatham, Davidson, Houston, Humphreys, Montgomery, 
Robertson, and Stewart. 




JOHN J. GARDNER 



JOHN J. GARDNER 



John J. Gardner, of Atlantic City, was born in Atlantic 
County in 1845 ; was raised a waterman until sixteen 
years of age, when he enlisted for three years in the Sixth 
New Jersey Volunteers ; in March, 1865. enlisted for one 
year in the United States Veteran Volunteers; is a farmer 
and conveyancer; is also connected with insurance busi- 
ness ; was elected alderman of Atlantic City in 1807 and 
mayor in 1868; reelected mayor seven times; was coro- 
ner of the county one year; city councilman one year; 
member of the New Jersey State senate fifteen years, 
from 1878 to 185)3; was elected to the Fifty-Third and 
Fifty-Fourth Congresses, and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth 
Congi-ess as a RepuV)lican. receiving 31,418 votes, against 
13.961) votes for A. E. Conraco. Democrat and National Sil- 
ver candidate. 1,036 votes for J. B. Adams, Prohibitionist, 
1,076 votes for R. L. Temi^le. National Democrat, and 115 
votes for G. Yardley. Socialist Labor. He represents the 
second congressional district of New Jersey, which has a 
population of 183,316. and embraces the four counties of 
Atlantic, Burlington, Mercer, and Ocean. 




HENRY R. GIBSON 



HENRY R. GIBSON 



Henry R. Gibson, of Knoxville, was born on Kent Island, 
Queen Anne County, Md., in 1837; was educated at Bladens- 
bur^, Md., and at Holiart College, Geneva, N. Y., from which 
institution he graduated in 1S62 ; served in the commissary 
department of the Federal army from March, 1863. to July, 
1865; in September, 1865. entered the Albany (N. Y.) Law 
School; in December, 1865, was licensed to practice law 
by the supreme court of New York, at Albany; in January, 
1866, removed to Knoxville, Tenn., and there began the 
practice of law; in October, 1866, removed to Jacksboro, 
Campbell County, Tenn.; in 1868 was appointed commis- 
sioner of claims by Gov. William G. Brownlow ; in 1861) was 
elected a delegate to the constitutional convention which 
framed the present constitution of the State. l)ut refused 
to sign or vote for the constitution l)ecause of some obnox- 
ious provisions, especially one making the prepayment of 
a poll tax a qualification for voting; in 1870 was elected a 
member of the State senate ; in 1872 was a Republican 
nominee for presidential elector; in 1874 was elected a 
member of the Tennessee house of representatives; in 1876 
moved back to Knoxville and formed a law partnership with 
Judge L. C. Houk, afterwards Congressman ; in 1879 founded 
the Knoxville Ucjudilicau and became its editor; in 1880 
was the Republican nominee for district presidential elector; 
in 1881 was appointed post-office inspector and as such 
investigated the postal service on the Mississippi River and 
its triliutaries and the star-route service west of the Rocky 
Mountains ; in 1882 became editor of the Knoxville Daihj 



HENRY R. GIBSOX 

Chronicle, then the only morning Kepublican daily between 
the Ohio River and the Gulf; in ISSS was appointed United 
States pension agent at Knoxville for the southern district, 
composed of twelve States ; in 18S6 was elected chancellor 
of the second chancery division of Tennessee for a term 
of eight years, receiving 1S.S2S votes, against 5.225 votes 
for his opponent ; in 1891 published "Suits in Chancery,'' a 
book that has become an authority in the courts of Tennes- 
see and other States ; in 1892 the degree of LL. D. was con- 
ferred upon him by Hobart College, his alma mater; in 
1894 was elected by the Kepublicans of his district to the 
Fifty-Fourth Congress, and in 1896 was reelected to the Fifty- 
Fifth Congress, receiving 28.112 votes, against 9.448 votes for 
W. L. Ledgerwood. Democrat, and 234 votes for W. C. I\Iur- 
phy, Prohibitionist. He represents the second district of 
Tennessee, which has a population of 196.582, and which 
embraces the eleven counties of Anderson. Blount, Camp- 
bell, Jefferson. Knox, Loudon, Morgan, Roane, Scott, Sevier, 
and Union. 




CHARLES W. GILLET 



CHARLES W. GILLET 



Charles W. Gillet, of Addison, was born in Addison, 
N. Y., November 2(j. 1840; graduated at Union College, 
Schenectady. N. Y., class of iSlil ; enlisted as a private in 
the Eighty-Hixtli Regiment New York \'olunteers, August, 
1861 ; was made adjutant of the regiment November, 1861, 
and served as adjutant until discharged the service for 
disabilities in 1S63; was elected to the Fifty-Third and 
Fifty-Fourth Congresses, and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth 
Congress as a Repul)lican, receiving 27. 19-2 votes, against 
17.1)94 votes for Henry W. Banes, Democrat. 369 votes for 
De Merville Page. Gold Democrat, and S65 votes lilank and 
scattering. He represents the twenty-ninth district of 
New York, which has a population of 174,676, and em- 
braces the four counties of Chemung, Schuyler, Seneca, and 
Steuben. 




FREDERICK H. GILLETT 



FREDERICK HUNTINGTON GILLETT 



Frederick Huntington Gillett. of Springfield, was born 
at Westtield. Mass., October 16, Lsol : graduated at Amherst 
College in 1S74 and at Harvard Law School in 1877; 
was admitted to the bar in Springtield in 1877 ; was 
assistant attorney-general of Massachusetts from 1S79 to 
1882 ; was elected to the Massachusetts house of represen- 
tatives in 1890 and 1891 ; was elected to the Fifty-Third 
and Fifty-Fourth Congresses and reelected to the Fifty- 
Fifth Congress as a Republican, receiving 19.793 votes, 
against 7,778 votes for T. A. Fitzgibbon. Democrat. He 
represents the second district of Massachusetts, which has 
a pojiulation of 173,951, and which embraces: Franklin 
County — towns of Erving, Leverett, Montague, New Salem, 
Northfield. Orange, Shutesbury. Sunderland, Wax'wick. and 
Wendell; Hampden County — cities of Chicopee and Spring- 
field and towns of Brimheld, Hampden, Holland, Long- 
meadow, Ludlow, Monson. Palmer, Wales, and Wilbraham ; 
Hampshire County — city of Northampton and towns of 
Amherst, Belchertown, Easthampton, Eu field, Granby, Green- 
wich, Hadley, Pelham, Prescott, South Hadley, and Ware ; 
Worcester County — towns of Athol, Barre, Brookfield. Dana, 
Hardwick. New Braintree, North Brookfield, Oakham. Peter- 
sham. Phillipston, Koyalston, Templeton, Warren, West 
Brookfield, and Winchendon. 

35 




JOSEPH V. GRAFF 



JOSEPH V. GRAFF 



Joseph V. Graff, of Pekin. Tazewell County, was born 
at Terre Haute, Ind., July 1, 1S54; graduated at the Terre 
Haute high school at the age of sixteen years ; also attended 
Wabash College, at Crawfordsville, Ind., one year, but never 
completed a collegiate course ; studied law and was admit- 
ted to the bar while living at Delavau, 111., in 1879 ; was 
a delegate to the national Republican convention at Minne- 
apolis in 1892 ; has never before held a public office, except 
president of the board of education, which jiosition he held 
at the time of his election to the Fifty-Fourth Congress, 
but has engaged in the practice of the law ever since his 
admission to the bar; was elected to the Fifty-Fourth and 
reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Eepublican, re- 
ceiving 25,144 votes, against 2o,413 votes for N. E. Worth- 
ington. Democrat ; 471 votes for D. R. Sheen, Prohibitionist, 
and 392 votes for Theodore Holly, Populist. He represents 
the fourteenth congressional district of Illinois, which has 
a population of 1()0,681, and embraces the six counties of 
Fulton, Marshall, Mason, Peoria, Putnam, and Tazewell. 




WILLIAM H. GRAHAM 



WILLIAM H. GRAHAM 



William H. Graham, of Allegneny, was born in Alle- 
gheny, Pa., August 3. 1S44 ; attended the public schools of 
that city until thirteen years of age, when the death of 
his father forced him to leave school in order to aid his 
mother in the support of a family of younger children ; 
while employed in a brass foundry the Civil War broke 
out, and at the age of seventeen he enlisted in a Pitts- 
burg company, but Pennsylvania's quota being full, they 
chartered a steamer, went down the river to Wheeling, 
and were accepted there, becoming Company A, Second 
Virginia Infantry : after a service of two years the regi- 
ment was mounted, becoming the Fifth West Virginia 
Cavalry ; saw very active service under Generals Averill, 
Crook, and Sheridan ; was in service uutil close of the 
war, witnessing the surrender of General Lee at Appo- 
mattox ; was wounded in engagement at White Sulphur 
Springs, Va.; after the war engaged actively in business 
and has been very successful ; is now the president of the 
Mercantile Trust Company and Central Accident Insurance 
Company of Pittsburg ; has also been active in Repub- 
lican politics : served three successive terms as recorder of 
deeds, Allegheny County ; represented his city during 
four sessions of the Pennsylvania legislature ; was elected 
to the Fifty-Fiftli Congress as a Republican at a special 
election held Novenil)er 21). ISIIS. to fill vacancy caused by 
the resignation of William A. Stone. He represents the 
twenty-third congressional district of Pennsylvania, which 
has a population of 164,215, and embraces the city of Alle- 
gheny and all the townships and boroughs lying north of 
the Allegheny and Ohio Rivers in the county of Allegheny. 




WILLIAM L. GREENE 



WILLIAM L. GREENE 



William L. Greene, of Kearney, was born on a farm in 
Pike County, Ind., October 3. 1849 ; removed with his par- 
ents to Dubois County in the same State, where, during 
his early youth, he worked on a farm in the summer 
months and attended school in winter, thus acquiring an 
education which fitted him to enter the academy at Ire- 
land, Ind.. which institution he attended for three years ; 
engaged in the profession of teaching, which vocation he 
followed until he began the study of law ; in 1876 was 
admitted to the bar in Bloomington. Ind., and liegan a 
successful practice in the Indiana courts; in LS88 removed 
with his family to Kearney, Neb., where he still resides, and 
resumed the practice of his profession ; as a practitioner 
he has been very successful, and made for himself more 
than a State reputation as a criminal lawyer; in politics 
was originally a Democrat, but in 181(0 cast his lot with 
the Populist party, being one of the founders of that or- 
ganization ; in 181)2, without solicitation on his part, was 
brought out before the legislature of the State as a can- 
didate for United States Senator, and came within two 
votes of being elected to fill the position which Senator 
W. V. Allen now occupies, his support, at his instance, 
going to Mr. Allen and assuring that gentleman's election ; 
in 181)5 was elected judge of the twelfth judicial district 
of Nebraska; was elected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a 
Populist, receiving 19,378 votes, against 14,841 votes for 
Addison E. Cady, Republican, and 436 votes for A. D. 
George. Prohibitionist. He represents the sixth congres- 
sional district of Nebraska, which has a population of 
176,556, and embraces the thirty-three counties of Banner, 
Blaine. Boyd, Boxbutte. Brown. Buffalo. Cherry. Cheyenne. 
Custer, Dawes, Dawson, Deuel, Garfield, Grant, Greeley, 
Holt, Hooker. Howard, Keith, Keyapaha, Kimball, Lincoln, 
Logan, Loup, McPherson, Rock. Scotts Bluff, Sheridan, Sher- 
man. Sioux. Thomas, Valley, and Wheeler. 




WILLIAM S. GREENE 



WILLIAM STEDMAN GREENE 



William Stedman Greene, of Fall Eiver. was born in 
Tremont. Tazewell County, 111., April 28, 1841 ; removed to 
Fall River with hi.s parents in 1844 ; was educated in the 
public schools of that city, and was a clerk in the insurance 
business from 1858 to 1865 ; commenced business as auc- 
tioneer, real estate and insurance agent in 1866; was 
elected member of common council in 1876, 1877, 1878, 
and 1879, and was president of the body the latter three 
years; elected mayor in 1880; also alternate delegate to Re- 
publican national convention which nominated President 
Garfield; was reelected mayor in 1881. but resigned the 
same year, being appointed postmaster by President Gar- 
field ; in 1886 was again elected mayor ; was a candidate 
in 1887 and 1888, but was defeated; in July. 1888, was 
appointed by Governor Ames general superintendent of 
prisons for the State, and served until 1898, when he was 
removed by the Democratic governor for political reasons ; 
was again candidate for mayor in 1894 and defeated ; elected 
mayor in 1895 by 734 majority, in 1896 by 1,514 majority, 
and in 1897 by 3,121 majority, and declined a reelection in 
1898; was appointed postmaster by President McKinley, 
and entered upon his duties April 1, 1898; resigned this 
position and was elected as a Republican to Congress May 
81, 1898, to fill the unexpired term of the late John Simp- 
kins for the Fifty-Fifth Congress, receiving 4,858 votes, to 
604 for Charles T. Luce, Democrat, 1,400 for Charles S. 
Randall, Independent Republican, 844 for Walter J. Skahan, 
Socialist Labor, and took the oath of ofKce June 15, 1898. 



WILLIAM STEDMAN GREENE 

He was married in Fall River in 1866 to Miss Mary E. White ; 
they have three children — Mabel L., Chester W., and Foster 
R. Mi\ Greene's great-grandfather on the paternal side, Job 
Greene, Jr., vi'as an officer in the Revolutionary War, and 
on the maternal side his great-grandfather was Benjamin 
Miles, of Rutland, Mass., who was one of the minute men 
of Concord, and afterwards emigrated to Ohio. Mrs. 
Greene's ancestors on the paternal side came from the 
mother country in the Mayflower, and on the maternal 
side her great-grandfather, Major Samuel Phillips, achieved 
distinction by especial service in the war of the Revolu- 
tion. He represents the thirteenth district of j\Iassachu- 
setts, which has a population of 171.535 and which embraces 
Barnstable County — towns of Barnstable, Bourne. Brewster, 
Chatham, Dennis, p]astham. Falmouth. Harwich, Mashpee, 
Orleans, Provincetown, Sandwich, Truro, Wellfieet, and 
Yarmouth; Bristol County — cities of Fall River and New 
Bedford and towns of Acushnet. Dartmouth, Fairhaven, 
Freetown, Somerset. Swansea, and Westport ; Dukes 
County — towns of Chilmark. Cottage City, Edgartown, Gay 
Head, Gosnold. and Tisbury ; Nantucket County — town of 
Nantucket: Plymouth County ^towns of Marion, Matta- 
poisett, Rochester, and Wareham. 




MICHAEL GRIFFIN 



MICHAEL GRIFFIN 



Michael Griffin, of Eau Claire, was born September 9, 
1842, in Ireland ; emigrated with his parents to Canada in 
1847. to Ohio in 1851. thence to Wisconsin in 1856; re- 
ceived his education in the common schools of Ohio and 
Wisconsin ; first resided in Sauk County. Wis., until 1868, 
and then removed to Kilbourn City. Wis., where he re- 
mained until 1876, removing in that year to Eau Claire, 
where he has since resided ; enlisted as a private September 
11. 1861. in Company E. Twelfth Regiment Wisconsin Vol- 
unteer Infantry, and served until the close of the war, being 
promoted successively to the grade of second and first lieu- 
tenant ; served at the siege of Mcksburg, in the Meridian 
campaign, and in the Atlanta campaign, and marched to the 
sea and north through the Carolinas with Sherman ; was 
wounded at Atlanta July 21, 1864, and was mustered out 
July 16, 1865; was a member of the county boai'd of Colum- 
bia County. Wis., in 1874-75; meml)er of assembly in 1S76; 
city attorney of Eau Claire in 1878. 1879, and 1880; State 
senator in 1880 and 1881, and department commander of 
the Graud Army of the Republic in 1887-88 ; served as quar- 
termaster-general of the State, with rank of lirigadier-gen- 
eral, in 1889 and 1890 ; was admitted to the bar May 19, 
1868, and has since been engaged in the practice of law ; was 
elected in 1894 to the Fifty-Third Congress as a Republican, 
to fill the vacancy occasioned l)y the death of Hon. George 
B. Shaw, and at the same election to the Fifty-Fourth Con- 
gress, and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Repub- 
lican, receiving 24,073 votes, against 12.047 votes for Caleb 
M. Hilliard. Democrat, and 791 votes for James H. Moseley, 
Prohibitionist. He represents the seventh congressional 
district of Wisconsin, v,'hich has a population of 150,331, 
and embraces the seven counties of Buffalo. Eau Claire 
Jackson, La Crosse, Monroe, Pepin, and Trempealeau. 




FRANCIS M. GRIFFITH 



FRANCIS MARION GRIFFITH 



Francis Marion Griffith, of Vevay. was born in Switzer- 
land County, Ind., August 21, 1849 : was educated in the 
country schools of the county, the high school at Vevay. 
and at Franklin College ; has l)een engaged in the practice 
of law at Vevay for over twenty years ; served as State 
senator from 1SS6 to 1894 ; was elected as a Democrat to 
the Fifty-Fifth Congress at the special election held August 
10, 1897, to till the vacancy caused by the death of Hon. 
William S. Holman, receiving 19,342 votes against 18,268 
votes for (Jharles W. Lee. Republican, and 778 votes for 
Uriah M. Bi-owder, Populist. He represents the fourth 
congressional district of Indiana, which has a population 
of 176,889, and embraces the ten counties of Bartholomew, 
Brown, Dearborn, Decatur, Jackson, Jefferson, Jennings, 
Ohio, Ripley, and Switzerland. 




JAMES M. GRIGGS 



JAMES M. GRIGGS 



James M. Griggs, of Dawson, was born at Lagrange, 
Ga., on March 29, 1861 ; was educated in the common 
schools of Georgia and at the Peabody Normal College, at 
Nashville, Tenn., from which institution he was graduated 
in Maj% 1881 ; after graduation taught school and studied 
law; was admitted to the bar in 1883, and commenced the 
l^ractice of law in 1884 at Alapaha. Berrien County. Ga. ; 
was for a short while engaged in the newspaper Ijusiness : 
removed to Dawson in 1885 ; was elected solicitor-general 
(prosecuting attorney) of the Pataula judicial circuit in 
1888, and was reelected in 1892; in 1893 resigned; was 
appointed judge of the same circuit, and was twice 
reelected without opposition ; resigned this office in 1S96 
to make the race for Congress ; was a delegate to the 
Democratic national convention of 1892; was elected to 
the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Democrat, receiving 7,454 
votes, against 3,868 votes for J. E. Peterson. Republican, 
and 3,035 votes for J. A. Sibley, Populist. He represents 
the second congressional district of Georgia, which has a 
population of 180,300, and embraces the hfteen counties of 
Baker, Berrien, Calhoun. Clay. Colquitt. Decatur, Dougherty, 
Early, Miller, Mitchell, Quitman, Randolph, Terrell, Thomas, 
and Worth. 
36 




CHARLES H. GROSVENOR 



CHARLES HENRY GROSVENOR 



Charles Henry Grosvenor. of Athens, was born at Pom- 
fret, Windham County, Conn.. September 20, 1833; hi,s 
grandfather was Col. Thomas Grosvenor, of the Second Con- 
necticut IJegiment in the Kevolution, and his father was 
Maj. Peter Grosvenor, who served in the Tenth Connecticut 
Eegiment in the War of 1S12 ; his father carried him from 
Connecticut to Ohio in May. LSoS. but there was no school- 
house near where he settled until he was fourteen years old, 
when be attended a few terms in a country log schoolhouse 
in Athens County, Ohio ; taught school and studied law ; was 
admitted to the bar in 1.S57 ; was chairman of the executive 
committee of the Ohio State Bar Association from its organ- 
ization for many years ; served in the Union army, in the 
Eighteenth Ohio Volunteers, from July. ISGl, to November, 
LSG.") ; was major, lieutenant-colonel, colonel, and brevet 
brigadier-general of volunteers, commanding a brigade at 
the battle of Nashville, in December, 1864 ; has held divers 
township and village offices ; was a member of the State 
house of representatives of Ohio. 1874-78, serving as speaker 
of the house two years ; was presidential elector for the 
fifteenth district of Ohio in 1872. and was chosen to carry 
the electoral vote of the State to Washington ; was pi-esi- 
dential elector at large in ISSO ; was a member of the board 
of trustees of the Ohio Soldiers and Sailors' Orphans' Home, 
at Xenia. from April. 1880. till 1S8S. and president of the 
board for five years ; was elected to the Forty-Ninth, Fif- 
tieth, Fifty-First, Fifty-Third, and Fifty-Fourth Congresses 
and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Eepublican, 
receiving 24,333 votes, against 19.791) votes for Finck, Demo- 
crat, and 74 votes for Crippen. Prohiliitionist. He represents 
the eleventh congressional district of Ohio, which has a 
population of 174,315, and embraces the six counties of 
Athens, Hocking, Meigs, Perry, Ross, and Vinton. 




WILLIAM W. GROUT 



WILLIAM W. GROUT 



William W. Grout, of Barton, was born at Compton, 
Province of Quebec, of American parents, May 24, 1836 ; 
received an academic education and graduated at Pougb- 
keepsie Law Scbool in L857 ; was admitted to the bar in 
December of same year ; practiced law and was State's attor- 
ney 1865-fi6 ; served as lieutenant-colonel Fifteenth Vermont 
Volunteers in I^nion army ; was made brigadier-general of 
Vermont militia at time of St. Albans raid in 1864 ; was 
member of Vermont house of representatives in 1868, 1869, 
1870, and 1874. and of the senate in 1876, and president /»'o 
tempore of that body ; was elected to the Forty-Seventh, 
Foi-ty-Ninth, Fiftieth, Fifty-First, Fifty-Second. Fifty-Third, 
and Fifty-Fourth Congresses and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth 
Congress as a Republican, receiving 26.319 votes, against 
6,202 votes for Henry E. Fitzgerald. Democrat, 209 votes for 
Thomas J. Aldrich, Populist, and 7 votes scattering. He 
represents the second congressional district of Vermont, 
which has a population of 162,482. and embraces the seven 
counties of Caledonia. E,ssex, Orange. Orleans, Washington 
Windham, and Windsor. 





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1 



GALUSHA A. GROW 



GALUSHA A. GROW 



Galusha a. Grow, of (Ueiiwood, Susquehanna County, 
was born in Asliford (now Eastford), Windham County, 
Conn., August 31, 1823; hi.s father died when he was three 
years old ; his mother, with her six childi'en, removed to 
Susquehanna County, Pa., in May. 1834 ; worked on a farm 
summers and went to the common school winters until the 
summer of 1837. when he began a regular course of study 
at Franklin Academy, Susquehanna County, and entered 
the Freshman class, Amherst (Mass.) College, September, 
1840; graduated July, 1844; was admitted to the bar of 
Susquehanna County. April 19. 1847; declined a unanimous 
nomination for the legislature in August, 1850; was elected 
to Congress the following October, succeeding David Wil- 
mot ; was elected from the same district six consecutive 
terms, once by a unanimous vote ; was defeated in a new 
district, composed of Susquehanna and Luzerne Counties, 
in 1862 ; was elected the first three times as a Free-Soil 
Democrat, the last three as a Eepublican ; entered Con- 
gress in December, 1851. being the youngest member of 
that Congress ; was chairman of the committee on the 
Territories in the Thirty-Fourth and Thirty-Sixth Con- 
gresses ; was elected Speaker of the Thirty-Seventh Congress 
July 4, 1861 ; was a delegate to the national Republican 
conventions of 1864, 1884. and 1892; was chaii-man of the 
Pennsylvania State Republican committee in 1868 ; from 
1871 to 1876 was president of the International and Great 
Northern Railroad Company ; in the fall of 1879 declined 



G A LUSH A A. GROW 

the mission to Russia, tendered by President Hayes : Feb- 
ruary 20, 1894, at a special election to fill the vacancy in 
the Fifty-Third Congress, caused by the death of William 
Lilly, was elected Congressman at Large, receiving 486,260 
votes, against 297.966 votes for James D. Hancock, Demo- 
crat; was reelected to the Fifty-Fourth Congress by a 
plurality of 246.462. and a majority over all of 204,715, 
receiving 571,085 votes, against 824.628 Democratic votes. 
22,980 Prohibition votes, 17,299 Populist votes, and 1.465 
Socialist Labor votes ; was reelected Congressman at Large 
to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Republican, receiving 
711,246 votes, against 418.800 votes for De Witt C. De Witt, 
Democrat. 18.091 votes for George Alcorn, Prohibitionist, 
7,482 votes for John P. Correll, People's party, 1.432 votes 
for Fred. W. Long. Socialist Labor, and 668 votes for Isaac 
G. Pollard. National Democrat. His plurality over De Witt. 
Democrat, was 297.446 ; majority over all, 269,778. which 
was the largest plurality and the largest majority ever 
given in any State of the Union to any candidate for any 
office. He is a Representative at Large from Pennsylvania. 




JAMES GUNN 



JAMES GUNN 



James Gunn. of Boise, was born in the State of New 
York March 6, 1843 ; emigrated with his parents when he 
was but a few years old to Wisconsin, settling in the 
western part of that State ; received a common-school and 
academic education ; volunteered as a private in Company 
G, Twenty-Seventh Wisconsin Infantry, with which regi- 
ment he served until the close of the war, ])eing mustered 
out with the rank of captain ; in the early summer of LSCUi 
he went to Colorado, where he resided nine years, making 
his home in the counties of Gilpin and Clear Creek ; was 
mayor of Georgetown three years ; in 1875 moved to the 
Pacific Slope, living temporarily in Nevada and California ; 
a mining excitement broke out in Idaho in 1880 and 
1881, and he joined the rush of prosjjectors to that State, 
making the town of Hailey, in Wood River Valley, his 
home ; was elected to the senate of the first State legisla- 
ture in 1890 ; was nominated by the Populists for Congress 
in 1892 and again in 1894. and though defeated each time, 
received a third nomination from the People's Democratic 
Fusion in 1890, and was elected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress 
as a Populist, receiving 13.487 votes, against 6.054 cast for 
John T. Morrison. Republican, and 8,984 for W. E. Borah, 
Silver Republican ; is Representative at large from Idaho. 




ALVA L. HAGER 



A. L. HAGER 



A. L. Hager, of Greenfield, Adair County, was born near 
Jamestown, Chautauqua County, N. Y., October 29, 1850 ; in 
the spi'ing of 185*,) his family removed to Iowa and settled 
near Cottonville, Jackson County ; in 1863 removed to Jones 
County and engaged in farming near Langworthy ; received 
his education in the common schools and high schools of 
Monticello and Anamosa ; in the fall of 1874 entered the law 
school at Iowa City, and graduated therefrom in June of 
1875 ; began the practice of the law at his present home in 
Greenfield in the fall of 1875, and has pursued that profes- 
sion up to the present date ; in the fall of 1891 was elected 
to the State senate ; was chairman of the Iowa Republican 
State convention of 1892 ; was elected to the Fifty-Third 
and Fifty-Fourth Congresses and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth 
Congress as a Republican, receiving 24,904 votes, against 
22,522 votes for L. T. Genung, Fusionist, and 137 votes for 
T. D. Thomas, Prohibitionist. He represents the fifth con- 
gressional district of Iowa, which has a population of 
168,175, and which embraces the nine counties of Adair, 
Audubon. Cass, Guthrie. Harrison, Mills, Montgomery, Pot- 
tawattamie, and Shelby. 



EDWARD LA RUE HAMILTON 



Edward La Rue Hamilton, of Niles, was bora iu Berrieu 
County, Mich., December 9, 1857 ; educated at public schools ; 
was prepared to enter the University of Michigan in 1876, 
when his father died ; had to provide a living for his mother, 
and took charge of the farm ; in 188'2 removed to Niles : 
entered Judge H. H. Coolidge's law office, and was admitted 
to the bar in 1884; Ijegan making political speeches that 
same year, and has ever since been an active campaign 
worker ; was elected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Re- 
publican, receiving 26.518 votes, against 22,994 votes for 
Roman I. Jarvis, Free-Silver Democrat. He represents the 
fourth congressional district of Michigan, which has a 
population of 180.179, and embraces the six counties of Alle- 
gan, Barry, Berrien, Cass, St. Joseph, and Van Bureu. 




LEVIN I. HANDY 



LEVIN IRVING HANDY 



Levin Irving Handy, of Newark, Del., was born Decem- 
ber 24, 1S6L at Berliu, Md.; he attended public and private 
schools in Maryland and New York ; taught school in 
Somerset County, Md., and came to Smyrna, Del., to teach, 
in 1881 ; was superintendent of free schools in Kent County 
1887-90; was chairman of the Democratic State central 
committee 1892-96 ; was editorial writer on Wilmington 
Every Evening 1894-95; is a popular lecturer and has, since 
1890. delivered lectures in lyceum courses in many sections 
of the country ; was elected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as 
a Democrat, receiving 15,407 votes, against 11.159 votes for 
J. S. Willis. Union Kepublican, 7,123 votes for Robert G. 
Houston, Republican, 844 votes for Thomas F. Bayard, Jr., 
Honest-Money Democrat, and 462 votes for William Faries, 
Prohibitionist. He is a Representative at Large from 
Delaware. 

37 



ALFRED C. HARMER 



Alfred C. Haemer, of Philadelphia, was born in Ger- 
juantown (now part of the city of Philadelphia), Pa.: was 
educated at public schools and at Germantown Acad- 
emy ; was engaged in mercantile pursuits ; is identified 
with railroad enterprises, and is largely engaged in mining 
and land operations ; was elected to the city councils of 
Philadelphia in 1856, and served four years ; was elected 
recorder of deeds for Philadelphia in 1860, and served 
three years ; was elected to the Forty-Second, Forty-Third, 
Forty-Fifth, Forty-Sixth, Forty-Seventh, Forty-Eighth, 
Forty-Ninth, Fiftieth, Fifty-First, Fifty-Second, Fifty-Third, 
and Fifty-Fourth Congresses and reelected to the Fifty- 
Fifth Congress as a Republican, receiving 47.958 votes, 
against 14,484 votes for Wright. Populist and Democrat, 
and 387 votes for Christian. Prohibitionist. He represents 
the fifth congressional district of Pennsylvania, which has 
a population of 267,422. and embraces the eighteenth, nine- 
teenth, twenty-second, twenty-third, twenty-fifth, thirty- 
first, thirty-third and thirty-fifth wards of the city of 
Philadelphia. 




CHARLES S. HARTMAN 



CHARLES S. HARTMAN 



Charles S. Hartman, of Bozeman, Mont., was born at 
Monticello, Ind.. March 1, 1S61 ; read law with Owens & 
Uhl ; removed to Montana in January, 1882 ; was admitted 
to the bar in 1884, and in November, 1884, was elected 
probate judge of Gallatin County, Mont., and served two 
years as such ; in 1888 was a candidate for the legislature 
from Gallatin County, and was defeated ; in 1889 was a 
member of the constitutional convention, and has held no 
other oflBce ; was elected to the Fifty-Third and Fifty- 
Fourth Congresses as a' Republican and reelected to the 
Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Silver Republican (no Demo- 
cratic or Populistic nomination being made against him), 
receiving 33.932 votes, against 9,429 votes for 0. F. God- 
dard. Gold Republican. He is a Representative at Large 
from Montana. 




R. B. HAWLEY 



R. B. HAWLEY 



R. B. Hawley, of Galveston, was born in Memphis, Tenn., 
in 1850; was brought up and educated in that city, and is 
of Southern ancestry ; voted for Grant in 1872, and always 
thereafter acted with tlie Repul)lioan party in national con- 
tests ; became a citizen of Texas in 1875 ; has been a mer- 
chant, importer, and manufacturer in the city of Galveston 
continuously for twenty years; always maintained an active 
interest in politics ; was three times elected president of 
the Galveston board of education ; presided several times 
over State conventions, and attended as a delegate national 
conventions, but never offered for any political office until 
the campaign of lS9fi. when he was unanimously nominated 
by his party for Congress, and was elected as a Republican, 
receiving 17,936 votes, against 15.715 votes for J. H. Shel- 
burne, Democrat, and 5.476 votes for Noah Allen. Populist. 
He represents the tenth congressional district of Texas, 
which has a ijopulation of l('t(),30S, and eml)races the nine 
counties of Austin, Brazoria, Colorado, Fayette, Fort Bend, 
Galveston. Gonzales, Lavaca, and Matagorda. 




JAMES HAY 



JAMES HAY 



James Hay, of Madison, was born in Millwood, Clai-ke 
County, Va., January ij, 1856 ; was educated at private 
schools in Maryland and Virginia, at the University of 
Pennsylvania, and Washington and Lee University, Vir- 
ginia, from which latter institution he graduated in law in 
June, 1S77 ; moved to Harrisonburg. Va.. in 1877. where he 
practiced law and taught school until June. 1879, when he 
removed to Madison, Va., and devoted himself exclusively 
to his profession : was elected attorney for the Common- 
wealth in 1883, and reelected to that office in 1887, 1891, 
and lSi)5 ; was elected to the house of delegates of Vir- 
ginia in 1885 and was reelected in 1887 and 1889 ; was 
elected to the State senate in 1893; was a member of the 
State Democratic committee for four years, and was a 
member of the Democratic national convention of 1888 ; 
was elected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Democrat, re- 
ceiving 17.447 votes, against 13,250 votes for Robert J. 
Walker, Republican, 358 votes for J. Samuel Harnes])erger, 
bolting Democrat, and 195 votes for Mr. Forsyth, Prohibi- 
tionist. He represents the seventh congressional district 
of Virginia, which has a population of 155.197. and em- 
braces the counties of Albemarle. Clarke. Frederick. Greene, 
Madison, Page, Rappahannock. Rockingham, Shenandoah, 
and Warren, and the cities of Charlottesville and Win- 
chester. 




JOEL P. HEATWOLE 



JOEL PRESCOTT HEATWOLE 



Joel Prescott Heatwole, of Northfield, Minn., was 
born in Waterford, Elkhart County. Ind., August 22, 
1856 ; is a pi-iuter by trade : taught country and village 
schools ; engaged in the newspaper business ; served three 
terms as president of the Minnesota Editors and Pul)lish- 
ers Association ; secretary of the Republican State Central 
Committee four years, and chairman two years ; elected a 
delegate at large to the national Republican convention 
in ISSS ; member of the Board of Regents of the Univer- 
sity of Minnesota six years ; ran for Congress in 1892 and 
was defeated ; elected mayor of Northheld, in March. lHi)4 ; 
elected to the Fifty-Fourth and Fifty-Fifth Congresses 
and reelected to the Fifty-Sixth Congress; member of the 
Committee on Foreign Affairs : member of the Committee 
on the Twelfth Census ; Chairman of the Committee on 
Ventilation and Acoustics ; was member of the sub-com- 
mittee of three on the Committee on Foreign Affairs, 
having in charge resolutions relating to Cuban affairs ; 
was member of the Conference Committee on the part of 
the House having under consideration the resolution in 
regard to Cuba which was passed during the second ses- 
sion of the Fifty-Fifth Congress. Is a Republican. He 
represents the third congressional disti-ict of Minnesota, 
which has a population of 187,215, and which embraces 
the ten counties of Carver. Dakota, Goodhue. Lesueui-, Mc- 
Leod, Meeker, Renville, Rice, Scott and Sibley. 




JAMES A. HEMENWAY 



JAMES A. HEMENWAY 



James A. Hemenway, of Boonville, was born March 8, 
1860, at Boonville, Ind., and, with the exception of a few 
years, has continued to reside at Boonville ; was educated 
in the common schools ; commenced the practice of law in 
1885 ; in LSSG and again in 1888 was elected prosecuting at- 
torney of the second judicial circuit of Indiana; in 1890 was 
selected as the member of the Republican State committee 
from the first district; was elected to the Fifty-Fourth and 
reelected to the Fifty-Fifth C!ongress as a Republican, re- 
ceiving 21.907 votes, against 20,856 votes for Thomas Duncan, 
Democrat, and 1,313 votes for Josephus Lee. Populist. He 
represents the first congressional district of Indiana, which 
has a population of 186,263, and which embraces the six 
counties of Gibson, Pike, Posey, Spencer, Vanderburg, and 
Warrick. 




DAVID B. HENDERSON 



DAVID BREMNER HENDERSON 



David Bremner Henderson, of Dubuque, was born at 
Old Deer, Scotland. March 14, 184U ; was brought to Hlinois 
in 1846 and to Iowa in lS4i) ; was educated in common 
schools and at the Upper Iowa University; studied law 
with Bissel & Shiras, of Dul)U(iue, and was admitted to 
the bar in the fall of 1865 ; was reared on a farm until 
twentj'-one years of age ; enlisted in the Union army in 
September. 1861, as private in Company C, Twelfth Kegi- 
ment Iowa Infantry \'olunteers, and was elected and com- 
missioned first lieutenant of that company, serving with 
it until discharged, owing to the loss of his leg. February 
16, 1863; in May. iSli:! was appointed commissioner of the 
board of enrollment of the third district of Iowa, serving 
as such until June. 1864. when he reentered the army as 
colonel of the Forty-Sixth Regiment Iowa Infantry Volun- 
teers, and served therein until the close of his term of 
service; was collector of internal revenue for the third 
district of Iowa from Noveml)er, 1865, until June, 1869, 
when he resigned and became a member of the law firm 
of Shiras, Van Duzee & Henderson ; was assistant United 
States district attorney for the northern division of the 
district of Iowa about two years, resigning in 1871 : is 
now a member of the law firm of Henderson. Hurd, Len- 
ehan & Kiesel ; was elected to the Forty-Eighth, Forty- 
Ninth, Fiftieth, Fifty-First, Fifty-Second. Fifty-Third, and 
Fifty-Fourth Congresses and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth 
Congress as a Republican, receiving 29,654 votes, against 
19,231 votes for George Staehle. Democrat. He represents 
the third congressional district of Iowa, which has a pop- 
ulation of 184.437. and embraces the nine counties of 
Blackhawk. Bremer. Buchanan. Butler, Delaware, Dubuque, 
Franklin, Hardin, and Wright. 




CHARLES L. HENRY 



CHARLES L. HENRY 



Charles L. Henry, of Anderson, was born July 1, 1S49. 
in Green Township, Hancock County, Ind.; his parents 
removed with him in his early youth to Pendleton. Ind.; 
was educated in the common schools and pursued his 
studies through part of a collegiate course at Asbury (now 
De Pauw) University, at Greencastle. Ind.; studied law with 
Hon. Hervey Craven ; graduated from the law department 
of the Indiana University, at Bloomiugtou, in 1872, aud 
immediately commenced the practice of law at Pendleton ; 
removed to Anderson in 1875, where he has since resided ; 
was elected to the State senate in 1880 from the counties 
of Grant and Madison, aud served in the sessions of 1881 and 
1883 ; is married : was elected to the Fifty-Fourth Congress 
from the seventh district, and the State being reapportioned 
he was reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress from the new 
eighth district as a Republican, receiving 30,045 votes, 
against 27.413 votes for John R. Brunt, his Democratic 
Populist opponent. He represents the eighth congressional 
district of Indiana, which has a population of 170.337. and 
embraces the seven counties of Adams, Blackford, Delaware, 
Jay, Madison, Randolph, and Wells. 

38 




E STEVENS HENRY 



E. STEVENS HENRY 



E. Stevens Henry, of Eockville. is of Scotch-Irish an- 
cestry and was born iu Gill, Mass., in 1836, removing when 
twelve years old with his parents to Eockville, Conn.; was 
educated in the public schools and grew up in and with 
that prosperous manufacturing city; a successful business 
man, his fellow-citizens have in many ways shown their 
confidence in him ; he has been and is connected with 
many of the local financial institutions; is also a farmer 
and breeder of thoroughlired stock, and until recently 
president of the Connecticut Jersey Breeders' Association ; 
has served his town and city in various capacities, and 
last as mayor of Eockville ; was a representative in the 
lower house of the Connecticut general assembly of 1S88 ; 
State senator from the twenty-third senatorial district in 
1887-88 ; delegate at large to the Chicago national Eepub- 
can convention in 1888 ; treasurer of the State of Connec- 
ticut from 1889 to 1898. He was the Eepublican nominee 
for Congress in 1892, but was defeated by a small majority ; 
again a candidate in 1894 he was elected to the Fifty- 
Fourth Congress by a majority of 5,207 over his Demo- 
cratic opponent, running over 700 votes ahead of the State 
ticket in that election ; was reelected in 1896 to the Fifty- 
Fifth Congress, receiving 27,623 votes, against 10,859 votes 
for Joseph P. Tuttle, Bryan Democrat, 2,114 votes for E. 
Henry Hyde, Jr., National Democrat, 501 votes for James 
I. Bartholomew, Prohibitionist, and 342 votes for Samuel 
Joseph, Socialist Labor, receiving a plurality of 16,764, 
and the largest majority ever given a congressional candi- 
date in the State of Connecticut. He represents the first 
congressional district of Connecticut, which has a popula- 
tion of 172,261, and embraces the counties of Hartford and 
Tolland, including the cities of Hartford, New Britain, and 
Eockville. 




PATRICK HENRV 



PATRICK HENRY 



Patrick Henry, of Brandon, was born in Madison County, 
Miss., February 12, 1843; entered Mississippi College, at 
Clinton, afterwards Madison College, at Sharon, and when 
the war commenced was at the Nashville (Tenn.) Military 
College ; in the spring of lS(il enlisted in the Confederate 
service in the Sixth Mississippi Infantry Regiment ; served 
through the war, and surrendei'ed at Greensboro, N. C, April 
26. 1865, as major of the Fourteenth (consolidated) Missis- 
sippi Regiment ; returning home, farmed until 1878 in Hinds 
and Rankin Counties, when he commenced the practice of 
law at Brandon ; was a member of the legislature in 1878 
and 1890. and delegate from the State at large to the 
constitutional convention in 1890 ; was elected to the Fifty- 
Fifth Congress as a Democrat, receiving 7.327 votes, against 
192 votes for S. A. Beadle. Republican : 231 votes for J. M. 
Mathews, Republican, and 897 votes for G. M. Cain, Populist. 
He represents the seventh congressional district of Missis- 
sippi, which has a population of 186,692. and embraces the 
nine counties of Claiborne. Copiah. Franklin. Hinds, Jeffer- 
son, Lincoln. Madison. Rankin, and Simpson. 




ROBERT L. HENRY 



ROBERT L. HENRY 



Robert L. He^-ry was boru May 12, 18G4. in Linden, 
Cass County, Tex.; when fourteen years old, went to Bowie 
County, and there lived till January, 1895, when he located 
in McLennan County : graduated with the degree of M. A. 
from the Southwe.stern University of Texas in June. 1885; 
was valedictorian of his class; read law, and in January, 
1886, was admitted to the bar; practiced for a short time, 
and then took a course at the University of Texas, and 
graduated with the degree of B. L. in 1887; was elected 
mayor of Texarkana in 1890; resigned this position to ac- 
cept that of first office assistant attorney-general ; removed 
temporarily to Austin ; served in this capacity for neai-ly 
eighteen mouths; was appointed assistant attorney-general 
October 3, 1893 ; held the latter position for nearly three 
years; filled out an unexpired term and one full term, and 
then located in Waco for the practice of law ; was chairman 
of the Democratic executive committee of Bowie County 
for several years ; w^as a member of the Democratic execu- 
tive committee of the State when Webb Finley was chair- 
man; was elected as a mem]:)er of the Fifty-Fifth Congress 
as a Democrat, receiving 26.151 votes, against 9.634 votes 
for W. F. Douthit, Populist, and 11,632 votes for T. A. Pope. 
Republican. He represents the seventh congressional dis- 
trict of Texas, which has a population of 182,894, and 
embraces the seven counties of Bell, Brazos. Falls. Lime- 
stone. McLennan. Milam, and Robertson. 




WILLIAM P. HEPBURN 



WILLIAM PETERS HEPBURN 



William Peters Hepburn, of Clarinda, was born Novem- 
ber 4, 1833, at Wellsville, Columbiana County. Ohio; was 
taken to Iowa (then a Territory) in April, 1841 ; was edu- 
cated in the schools of the Territory and in a printing 
oflBce ; was admitted to practice law in 1854 ; served in 
the Second Iowa Cavalry as cai^tain. major and lieuten- 
ant-colonel during the War of the Rebellion ; was a dele- 
gate from Iowa to the Republican national conventions of 
1860 and 1888 ; was a presidential elector at large for the 
State of Iowa in 1876 and in 1888 ; was elected to the 
Forty-Seventh. Forty-Eighth. Forty-Ninth. Fifty-Third, and 
Fifty-Fourth Congresses and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth 
Congress as a Republican, receiving 24.786 votes, against 
23.960 votes for W. H. Robb. nominated by both the Dem- 
ocratic and Populist conventions. He represents the eighth 
congressional district of Iowa, which has a population of 
173,484, and embraces the eleven counties of Adams. Ap- 
panoose, Clarke, Decatur, Fremont. Lucas, Page, Ringgold, 
Taylor. Union, and Wayne. 




JOSIAH D. HICKS 



JOSIAH D. HICKS 



JosiAH D. Hicks, of Altoona. wa.s born in Chester County, 
Pa., August 1, ]844. and removed to Blair County in the 
year 1847 ; received his education principally at the com- 
mon schools of Blair and Huntingdon Counties ; removed 
to Altoona in the spring of 1861 ; enlisted in the Union 
army as a private soldier from that place in the fall of 
1862, and served nearly eighteen months ; was admitted to 
practice law in his county and State courts in 1875 ; has 
always been an active Republican ; served his party as 
county chairman and also as member of the State com- 
mittee ; in 1880 he was elected district attorney of Blair 
County, and in 1883 was accorded a unanimous renomina- 
tion and was reelected ; in 1884 he formed a law partner- 
ship in Altoona with his former preceptor. Hon. Daniel J. 
Neff ; this partnership continues at the present time under 
the hrm name of Xeff. Hicks & Geesey ; was elected to 
the Fifty-Third and Fifty-Fourth Congresses and reelected 
to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Republican, receiving 
19,974 votes, against 17.297 votes for R. A. McNamara, 
Democrat, 781 votes for J. W. Bracken. Prohiliitionist, 104 
votes for C. Pietsch, Populist, and 7.468 votes for J. E. 
Thopp, Protectionist. He represents the twentieth district 
of Pennsylvania, which has a population of 213.202, and 
embraces the four counties of Bedford. Blair, Cambria, and 
Somerset. 




SAMUEL G. HILBORN 



SAMUEL GREELEY HILBORN 



Samuel Greeley Hilborn. of Oakland, was born in 
Miuot, Audroscoggiu Count}' (then Cumlierlaud). Me., De- 
cember 9, 1834 ; wa.s educated in the common schools, 
Hebron Academ.y. and Gould's Academy, Bethel, Me., and 
Tut'ts College. Massachusetts, from which latter institution 
he graduated in 1851) ; taught school in Oak Grove Acad- 
emy, Falmouth. Me. ; read law in the office of Fessenden & 
Butler, Portland. Me. ; was admitted to the bar in 1861, and 
immediately went to California : located in Vallejo, Solano 
County, and engaged in the practice of the law ; served in 
the State senate from 1875 to 1879 ; was a member of the 
constitutional convention in 1879 ; was appointed I'nited 
States district attorney for the district of California in 1883. 
and removed to San Francisco, where he resided while 
filling the office ; changed his residence to Oakland in 1887, 
continuing the law business under the firm name of Hilborn 
& Hall in San Francisco : was elected to the Fifty-Second 
Congress as a Republican, to fill the unexpired term of Hon. 
Joseph McKenna, appointed United States circuit judge, and 
was returned elected to the Fifty-Third Congress by 13,163 
votes, against 13,130 votes for Warren B. Fnglish, Democrat. 
3,521 votes for J. L. Lyon, People's party, and 278 votes for 
L. B. Scranton. Prohibitionist, but was unseated April 4. 
1894. in favor of Warren B. English, who contested his 
election : was elected to the Fifty-Fourth and reelected to 
the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a liei)ublican. receiving 19,778 
votes, against 16,119 votes for Warren B. English, Democrat 
and People's party. 387 votes for John H. Eustice. Socialist 
Labor, and 327 votes for W. Shafer. Prohibitionist. He rep- 
resents the third congressional district of California, which 
has a population of 162,750, and embraces the six counties of 
Alameda. Colusa. Contra Costa. Lake. Solano, and Yolo. 




EBENEZER J. HILL 



EBENEZER J. HILL 



Ebenezer J. Hill, of Nonvalk. was born in Redding, 
Conn., August 4, 1845; prepared for college at the public 
school in Norwalk and entered Yale with the class of 1865, 
where he remained two years : in 1892 he received from 
Yale University the honorary degree of Master of Arts; 
is now president of the Norwalk Gas Light Company, and 
vice-president of the National Bank of Norwalk : has served 
twice as burgess of Norwalk. twice as chairman of the 
board of school visitors of Norwalk ; was the fourth district 
delegate to the national Repultlican convention of 1S84; 
was a member of the Connecticut senate for 1886-87 ; 
served one term upon the Repulilican State central com- 
mittee ; was elected to the Fifty-Fourth and reelected to the 
Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Republican, receiving 30.658 votes, 
against 1,404 votes for Seymour, National Democrat ; 15,723 
votes for Houlihan, Silver Democrat, and 430 votes for 
Wooster, Prohibitionist. He represents the fourth congres- 
sional district of Connecticut, which has a population of 
203,623, and embraces the two counties of Fairfield and 
Litchfield. 




WILLIAM H. HINRICHSEN 



WILLIAM H. HINRICHSEN 



William H. Hinrichsex. of Jacksonville. 111., was born at 
Franklin, within a few miles of his pre.sent home. Ma.y •27, 
1S5U : was educated in the pnblic schools and the State 
Universitj' at Champaign. 111.: worked on a farm, in a 
country store, and a railroad office, and Hnally engaged in 
newspaper work ; was suoces-sivelj" editor of the Jackson- 
ville CuiiriiT and Quincy HcrahL two of the leading pro- 
vincial dailies of the State; was elected to the office of 
justice of the peace in 1S71. and reelected in 1878; was 
appointed deputy sheriff' of his county in 1S74. and serveil 
three terms in that position: was elected sheriff in ISSO: 
was elected clerk of the house of representatives of Illinois 
in 1891 : was elected secretary of state in 18112; has been a 
delegate to every Democratic State convention since 1S72. 
and was a delegate at large to the Democratic national con- 
vention of LSDfi ; was a member of his county committee 
from 1S71 to ISNS. most of the time as chairman or .sec- 
retary : has served as a meml)er of the Democratic State 
committee since 1888, and was chairman of it in 1895; 
was elected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Democrat, re- 
ceiving 26.615 votes, against 20.472 votes for John I. 
Rinaker, Republican, and 468 votes for M. M. Coojjer. i'ro- 
hibitionist. He represents the sixteenth congre.ssional 
district of Illinois, which has a population of 1(54.418. and 
embraces the eight counties of Calhoun. Cass, Greene. Jer- 
sey. Macoupin. Morgan, Pike, and Scott. 




ROBERT R. HITT 



ROBERT ROBERTS HITT 



Robert Roberts IIitt. of Mount Morris, was lioru at 
Urbaua, Ohio. Januarv Kl. ls;:!4: removed to Ogle County, 
111., iu 1.So7: was educated at Rock River Seminary (now 
Mount Morris College) and De Pauw liniversity ; was first 
secretary of legation and charge d'affaires (h1 iiiier'nii at 
Paris from Decemi)er. LS74. until March, 18S1 ; was Assist- 
ant Secretary of State in ISSI ; was elected to the Forty- 
Seventh Congress November 7. 1SS2, to fill the vacancy 
occasioned by the death of Hon. R. M. A. Hawk ; w^as 
elected to the Forty-Eighth. Forty-Ninth, Fiftieth, Fifty- 
First. Fifty-Second. Fifty-Third, and Fifty-Fourth Congresses 
and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Republican, 
receiving o-2,".)41) votes, against ir).-J41 votes for C. 0. 
Knudson. Democrat, and SIS votes for James Lamont. 
Prohibitionist. He represents the ninth congressional dis- 
trict of Illinois, which has a iio])ulation of 198,486, and 
embraces the seven counties of Lioone. Carroll. Jo Daviess, 
Lee. Ogle. Stephenson, and Winnebago. 




ALBERT J. HOPKINS 



ALBERT J. HOPKINS 



Albert .1. Hopkins, of Aufoi-a, was born in Dekalb 
County. 111., August 15. 1S4(): graduated at Hillsdale (Midi.) 
College in June. 1H7(>; studied law and roininenced prac- 
tice at Aurora. 111.; was State's attorney of Kane County 
from 1872 to 1S7(5; was a member of the Kepuldican State 
central committee from 1S7.S to ISSO; was presidential 
elect(»r on the Hlaine and Logan ticket 1SS4; was elected 
to the Forty-Ninth. Fiftieth. Fifty-First. Fifty-Second. 
Fifty-Third, and Fifty-Fourth Congresses and reelected to 
the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Repulilican. receiving :!'J.07:! 
votes, against 12,iS(il votes for S. N. Hoover. r)emf)crat. and 
SIS votes for A. N. Dodd. Pi'ohihitionist. He represents the 
eighth congressional district of Illinois, which has a popu- 
lation of LiO.l'J^). and embraces the six counties of Dekalb. 
Dupage, (irundy. Kane. Kendall, and McHenry. 




MILFORD W. HOWARD 



MILFORD W. HOWARD 



]\lii.F()i;i) ^^ . Ildw AKii. of l-'ort I'ayiic. was horn in Floyd 
('oiiiity, (ia.. DeceiiilxT is. isCi-J; was elected to the Fifty- 
Fourth Couji'ress and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress 
as a Populist, receiving G.IOS votes, against 5.62!S votes for 
W. I. Bullock. Free-Silver Democrat, 4.'.KS2 votes for J. J. 
('urtis, l{epul)lican. and 454 votes for (ieorge H. Parker, 
(i old-Standard Democrat. He represents the seventh con- 
gi-essional district of Alabama, which has a population of 
180,451, and embraces the eight counties of Cherokee. Cull- 
man. Dekalb. Etowah, Franklin, Marshall, St. Clair, and 
Winston. 




WILLIAM M. HOWARD 



WILLIAM MARCELLUS HOWARD 



William Marcellus Howard, of Lexiugton, Ga.. was 
born at Berwick City. La., of Georgia parents. December (>, 
1H57: was graduated from the University of Georgia; Itegan 
practice of law February. LS80; was elected solicitor-general 
of the northern judicial circuit of (xeorgia by the State 
legislature in 1SS4: was reelected to that office in ISSS and 
in 1SU2. and was elected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a 
Democrat, receiving il.dSS votes, against "J. 962 votes for G. L. 
Anderson. Populist, and 2.701 votes for W. P. Henry, Repub- 
lican. He represents the eighth congressifjual district of 
Georgia, which has a population of 170.801, and embraces 
the twelve counties of Clarke. Ell)ert. Franklin, (ireene, 
Hart, .Taspe)-. Madison, Morgan, Oglethorpe, Oconee. Putnam, 
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JAMES R. HOWE 



JAMES R. HOWE 



James R. Howe, of Brooklyn, was horn in the city of 
New York, January '21, iSoD ; liis ance:>t(irs were among 
the early settlers of New England; received his education 
in the common schools of his native city, and from his 
youth up has been engaged iu the dry goods business ; is 
trustee in a numlier of public institutions in the city; 
is vice-president of the Amphion Musical Society, and a 
member of the I'nion League Club; his nomination came 
to him unsought, and he was elected to the Fifty- Fourth 
Congress as a Republican from a strong Democratic dis- 
trict, and was reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as 
a liepublican. receiving 15.814 votes, against 14,-2S7 votes 
for William Fickermann, Democrat, :^54 votes for Daniel 
Walsh, National Democrat, and 1)41 votes for C. A. Kosen- 
blath. Socialist Labor. He represents the sixth congres- 
sional district of New York, which lias a population of 
163,648, and embraces the thirteenth, fourteenth, fifteenth, 
sixteenth, and .seventeenth wards of the citv of Brooklvn. 




BENJAMIN F. HOWELL 



BEiNJAMlN F. HOWELL 



Benjamin F. Howell, of New Brunswick, was born in 
Cuml)erland County, N. J.. January, 1S44; in 1.S62 enlisted 
ill the Twelfth New Jersey Volunteers and served until the 
close of the war: engaged in husiness in South Amboy 
until 1(SS2, when he was elected surrogate of Middlesex 
County, and was reelected in 1S!S7 for a second term : was 
a delegate to the Republican national convention at Minne- 
apolis in l.S9'2 ; is president of the People's National Bank 
of New Brunswick, vice-president of the First National 
Bank of South Amboy, and director of the New Brunswick 
Savings Institution ; was elected to the Fifty-Fourth and re- 
elected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Republican, receiving 
24,308 votes, against l(i.()S7 votes for John .\. Wells. Demo- 
crat : 511 votes for ^Marshall, Prohiliitionist, 9S6 votes for 
Jones, National Democrat, and 14.S votes for Henry. Socialist 
Labor. He represents the third congressional district of 
New Jersey, which has a population of 159,H)8. and embraces 
the three counties of Middlesex, Monmouth, and Somerset. 




JOHN A. T. HULL 



JOHN A. T. HULL 



John A. T. Hull, of Des I\Ioine.s. was Imrn at Sabina, 
Clinton County. Ohio, ^lay I. 1S41 ; removed with his 
pai-ents to lowH in Ls41) ; was educated in public schools, 
Asbury (Ind.) Lniversity. and Iowa Wesleyan College, at 
Mount Plea-sant : was graduated from the Cincinnati (Ohio) 
Law School in the spring of lS(i2 ; enlisted in the Twenty- 
Third Iowa Infantry July. lS(i2; was hrst lieutenant and 
captain ; was wounded in the charge on intrenchments at 
Black L'iver .May 17, LS68 ; resigned October, LS()8 ; was 
elected secretary of the Iowa State senate in IS72 and 
reelected in 1S74. 187G, and 1S78 : was elected secretary 
of state in ls78 and reelected in ISSO and 1.S82 ; was 
elected lieutenant-governor in 18S5 and reelected in 1SS7 ; 
is engaged in farming and nianufa<-turing : was elected to 
tlie Fifty-Second. Fifty-Third, and Fifty-Fourth Congresses 
and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Republican, 
receiving 25.578 votes, against 19,352 votes for F. W. 
Evans. Fusionist. He represents the seventh congressional 
district of Iowa, which has a population of ltjl,o20. and 
embraces the six counties of Dallas, Madison, Marion. Polk, 
Storv. and Warren. 




ANDREW J. HUNTER 



ANDREW J. HUNTER 



Andrew J. Hunter, of Paris, wa.s horn in Ureencastle. 
Ind.. December 17. iSol ; removed with his parents while a 
child less than one .vear of a^^e to Edjjar County, ill.: at- 
tended the common scliool nntil he was fifteen years old, 
and was then sent to the Edgar Academy, where he hnished 
his education ; commenced his Imsiness life as a civil 
engineer, spending three years in that employment : studied 
law with Kerby Benedict : was admitted to the bar. and 
has since practiced his profession at Paris: was elected to 
the vState senate in 1SG4. and served four years ; w'as ap- 
pointed and served as a memlter of the board of investi- 
gation of State institutions : in 1S70 was nominated l)y the 
Democrats for Congress in the fifteenth district against Gen. 
Jesse H. Moore ; in 1HS2 was again nominated for Congress 
against Joseph G. Cannon ; was elected county judge of 
the Edgar County court in ISSC). and again in iMiJO. serving 
six years ; in 1SI)2 he was nominated by the State con- 
vention as a candidate for Congressman at Large, and was 
elected to the Fifty-Third Congress as a Democrat, and was 
elected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Democrat, receiving 
24,011 votes, against 2'2.7yo votes for Benson Wood, Republi- 
can, 816 votes for J. J. Sewell. Populist, and 344 votes for 
C. C. Griffith, Prohibitionist. He represents the nineteenth 
congressional district of Illinois, which has a population of 
l(i5.71)(), and embraces the nine counties of Clark, I'oles, 
Crawford, Cumberland, Edgar, Effingham, Jasper, Lawrence, 
and Richland. 




DENIS M. HURLEY 



DENIS ^\. HURLEY 



Denis M. Hurley, of HmoklN u. was Ihii-ii in the city 
of Limerick. L-elancL llarch 14. LS-io : came to reside in 
Brooklyn in June. LS50 : removed to New York City in 
LS54. and returned to Brooklyn in 1S(5(>, where he has since 
resided : was educated in the public schools and learned 
the carpenter's trade : is in the contracting business, and 
at present is connected with The W. H. Beard Dredging 
Company, of New York City ; was an unsuccessful candidate 
(if the lAepulilican i)arty for member of assembly in the 
first assembly district of Kings County in 18S1-S2: was 
elected to the Fifty-Fourth and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth 
Congress as a Republican, receiving 18,268 votes, against 
U.'.Kil votes for John JM. Clancy. Democrat, and 1,5(>1 votes 
for AVilliani ('. IJedfield. (iold Democrat. He represents 
the second congressional district of New York, which has 
a population of l()9.44i). and embraces the first, second, fifth, 
sixth, seventh, eleventh, and twentieth wards of the city 
of F)rooklvn. 




JOHN J. JENKINS 



JOHN J. JENKINS 



John J. Jenkins, of Cliippewa Falls, was horn in Wey- 
mouth. England. Angnst "20. ISJ:} : settled in Baraboo, Wis., 
in June, 1S5'J : attended the conunon schools a few terms; 
served during the war as a memlier of Company A. Sixth 
Wisconsin \'olunteers : served as clerk of the circuit court 
of Baraboo. Sank County, as city clerk and city attorney 
of Chippewa Falls, as mcmlier of the assembly from Chip- 
pewa County, as county judge of Chippewa County, and 
was appointed United States attorney of the Territory of 
Wyoming by President (irant in March. 1.S76 ; v\'as elected 
to the Fifty-Fourth and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Con- 
gress as a liepublican. receiving '2S.14U votes, against 14,S2:^ 
votes for Frederick H. Kemington. Silver Democrat, and 21 
votes for Peter A. Oscai-. Prohibitionist. He represents 
the tenth congressional district of Wisconsin, which has 
a jxiimlation of l-li).S45. and embraces the eleven counties of 
Barron. Baytield. Burnett. Chippewa. Douglas, Dunn. Pierce, 
Polk, Sawyer, St. Croix, and Washburn. 



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THOMAS M. JETT 



THOMAS M. JETT 



Thomas M. Jktt, of Hillsboro. 111., was born on a farm 
in Bond Connty. 111.. May 1, lS&2 ; attended the common 
schools of the counties of Bond and Montgomery, in the 
said State of Illinois, until he was twenty years of age; 
after that he attended college two years at the Northern 
Indiana Normal School. X'alparaiso, Ind.; taught school for 
three terms; read law with Judge Phillips, of Hillsboro, 
111., and was admitted to practice in May, 1887; was 
elected State's attorney of ]\I(>ntgomery County, 111., in 
iSSi). and served two terms, covering a period of about 
eight years ; was elected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a 
Democrat, receiving 22.;]58 votes, against 2().51)!^^> votes for 
W. F. L. Hadley. L'epii))lican. and 471 votes for Frank H. 
Ashcraft, Prohibitionist. He represents the eighteenth con- 
gressional district of Illinois, which has a population of 
164.8(56. and which emln'aces the six counties of Bond, 
Favette, Madison. Montsomerv. Moultrie, and Shell>v. 




HENRY U. JOHNSON 



HENRY U. JOHNSON 



Henry U. Johnson, of Kiclmioiid, was bom at l'anil)ndge 
City. Wayne County, Ind.. October 28, 1S50: receiv^ed his 
education at Centreville Collegiate Institute and at Earlbani 
College, located in Wayne County : is not a graduate ; 
studied law and was admitted to practice at the Wayne 
County bar in February. 1872 : was elected prosecuting at- 
torney for Wayne County in 187() and reelected in 187S ; 
was elected to the State senate from ^^'ayne County in ISSG 
and served in the legislative sessicnis of ls.s7 and iSSi); was 
elected to the Fifty-Second. Fifty-Third, and Fifty-Fourth 
Congresses, and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a 
Republican, receiving 24.0S:5 votes, against 21.s(i7 votes for 
Charles A. Hobinson. Populist. He represents the sixth 
congressional district of Indiana, wbicb has a jiopulation of 
l(il.S26. and eniltraces the eight counties of Fayette, Frank- 
lin. Hancock. Henrv. Rush. Shelby. I'nion, and \^ avne. 




MARTIN N. JOHNSON 



MARTIN N. JOHNSON 



Martin N. Johnson, of Peterslnirg. was born in Wiscon- 
sin in the year iSoO. and removed to Iowa the same year; 
graduated at the Iowa State University in 1873 ; taught 
two years in the California Military Academy at Oakland ; 
studied hiw, and was admitted to the har in 1S7(); served 
a term in each l)ranch of the Iowa legislature, and was a 
Hayes elector for the Dubuque district in the electoral 
college of 1S76 ; removed to Dakota in LSS2. and took up 
government land, on which he still resides; was elected 
district attorney in ISSC) and reelected in 1S8S ; was a 
member of the constitutional convention of North Dakota 
in 1889 and chairman of the first Republican State con- 
vention the same year: received 42 out of a total of 80 
votes in the Republican legislative caucus in November. 
1889. for United States Senator, but was beaten in the joint 
convention by a coalition of Democrats with the minority 
of the Republican caucus ; was elected to the Fifty-Second. 
Fifty-Third, and Fifty-Fourth Congresses and reelected to 
the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Republican, receiving 25.238 
votes, against 21.172 votes for John Burke. Fusion, and 
349 votes for J. A. Garver. Prohibitionist. He is a Repre- 
sentative at Large from North Dakota. 




WILLIAM A. JONES 



WILLIAM ATKlNSOiN JONES 



William Atkinson Jones, of Warsaw, was born in War- 
saw. Va.. March '2\, 1S41) : in the winter of LSij-l-Bo entered 
the Virginia Military Institute, where he remained until the 
evacuation of Kichmond, serving, as occasion required, with 
the cadets in the defense of that city ; after the close of the 
war studied at Coleman's school, in Fredericksburg, until 
October, 1868, when he entered the academic department of 
the l^niversity of Virginia, from which institution he was 
graduated with the degree of B. L. in 1S70 ; was admitted to 
the l)ar in July. 1S70, and has continued to practice law 
since : was elected to the Fifty-Second. Fifty-Third, and 
Fifty-Fourth Congresses and reelected to tlie Fifty-Fifth 
Congress as a Democrat, receiving 15.525 votes, against 
10,752 votes for Tyler. Repuldican. 21(i votes for Winder. 
Prohibitionist, and 82 votes for De Shazier. Socialist Labor. 
He represents the fii'st congressional district of \'irginia, 
which has a population of 1S7,010. and embraces the counties 
of Accomac. Caroline, Essex. Gloucester. King and Queen. 
Lancaster, Mathews, Middlesex, Northampton, Nortlininl)er- 
land. Richmf)nd. Spottsylvania. and \\'estm()reland. and the 
city of Frederickstiurg. 




WILLIAM C. JONES 



WILLIAM CAREY JONES 



William Carey Jones, of Spokane. Wat^b.. \va^ l)()in 
April 5. LS.Vx at Keni.^en. Oneida Count}-. N. Y.; educated 
chiefly at high >ch()ol and seminaiy in We.st Salem. Wis., 
and Ihiiver.sit}- of Wisconsin, at Madison ; admitted to the 
bar at Madelia, Minn., in 187(>, and has since been actively 
engaged in the practice of the profession ; besides holding 
the oftice of city attorney several terms, was twice elected 
district attorney for the twelfth district of the Territory 
of Washington, viz.. in 1S86 and ISSS; elected to the office 
of attorney-general of the State of Washington upon the 
ailmission of the State into the Union in iSSij. and again 
in Isy-J; elected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Free- 
Silver Republican on the fusion ticket, receiving 51.158 
votes, against o7.1)89 for S. C. Hyde. Republican. He is a 
Representative at Large from the State of Washington. 




CHARLES F. JOY 



CHARLES FREDERICK JOY 



Charles Frederick Jot, of the city of St. Louis, was 
born in Morgan County, 111.. December 11. lS4i) ; received his 
early education in the schools of that county, and in 1S70 
entered the academic department of Yale College, from 
which he graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts June 
25. 1874 ; engaged in the practice of law in St. Louis in 
September, LS7(i, and since that time has devoted himself 
exclusively to his profession ; was returned elected to the 
Fifty-Third Congress as a Republican, receiving 14,969 votes, 
against 14.902 votes for John J. O'Neill. Democrat; 241 votes 
for Joseph B. Follett. Populist, and 147 votes for James H. 
Garrison, Prohibitionist, but was unseated on contest in 
favor of John J. O'Neill, his Democratic opponent, April 3, 
1894 ; was elected to the Fifty-Fourth and reelected to the 
Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Republican, receiving 28,353 votes, 
against 24.676 votes for J. T. Hunt. Democrat. He repre- 
sents the eleventh district of Missouri, which has a popu- 
lation of 187,802, and embraces the fourth, sixth, eighth, 
tenth, twelfth, fourteenth, sixteenth, eighteenth, twenty- 
fourth, and twenty-sixth wards, two precincts of the fifteenth, 
four precincts each of the twenty-second and twenty-eighth 
wards, and one precinct of the twentieth ward of the city 
of St. Louis. 




JOHN E. KELLEY 



JOHN EDWARD KELLEY 



John Edward Kelley, of Flaiidreaii, S. Dak., was born 
March 27, 1853, in Columbia County, Wis.; was educated 
in the public schools of that State, and has been a close 
student, especiallj' upon literary topics, nearly his whole 
life; removed to Dakota (then a Territory) in 1878, and 
took up land from the government in the county in 
which he now resides ; is engaged in the newspaper busi- 
ness; in 1890, when the Independent political movement took 
place, he was an active participant, and was elected to the 
legislature in that year ; in lSt)-2 was nominated by the 
People's party for Congress, and was again nominated over 
his own protest in 181)4, but was defeated at both elec- 
tions, and was elected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress, receiv- 
ing 41,125 votes, against 40,04;3 votes for Robert J. Gamble, 
Republican, and 500 votes for the Prohibition candidate. 
He is a Representative at Large from South Dakota. 




WINFIELD S. KERR 



WINFIELD S. KERR 



WiNFiELD S. Kerr, of Manstield, is a graduate of the 
law department of the University of Michigan, and is by 
profession a lawyer ; served four years in the Ohio State 
senate ; was elected to the Fifty-Fourth and reelected to 
the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Republican, receiving 28,650 
votes, against 24,574 votes for J. R. Coffinberry, Democrat, 
and 232 votes for R. F. Mosher, National Democrat. He 
represents the fourteenth congressional district of Ohio, 
which has a population of 17S.20V). and embraces the six 
counties of Ashland, Huron, Knox, Lorain. Morrow, and 
Richland. 




JOHN H. KETCHAM 



JOHN H. KETCHAM 



John H. Ketcham, of Dover I'lains. was born at Dover, 
N. Y., December 21, 1832 ; received an academic education ; 
became interested in agricultural pursuits ; was supervisor 
of his town in iS.jl and 1855 ; was a member of the State 
assembly of New York in 1856 and 1857 ; was a member of 
the State senate of New York in 1860 and 1861 ; entei-ed 
the Union army as colonel of the One Hundred and Fiftieth 
Volunteers in October. 1862, and was appointed brigadier- 
general by brevet, afterwards brigadier-general, serving 
until he resigned, in March, 1865, to take the seat in Con- 
gress to which he had been elected ; was afterwards ap- 
pointed major-general l)y brevet ; was elected to the Thii-ty- 
Ninth, Fortieth, Forty-First, and Forty-Second Congresses ; 
was often a delegate to Republican State conventions, and 
was a delegate to the national Kepublican conventions in 
1876 and 1896; was commissioner of the District of Colum- 
bia from July 3, 1874, until June 30, 1877. when he resigned, 
having been elected to the Forty-Fifth Congress ; was elected 
to the Forty-Sixth. Forty-Seventh, Forty-Eighth, Forty- 
Ninth, Fiftieth, Fifty-First, and Fifty-Second Congresses, 
when, owing to impaired health, declined a renominatiou ; 
was elected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Republican, 
receiving 25,531 votes, against 15.956 votes for Richard E. 
Connell. Democrat, and 462 votes for Henry Metcalf, 
National Democrat. He represents the eighteenth congres- 
sional district of New York, which has a population of 
179.790. and embraces the three counties of Ulster, Dutchess, 
and Putnam. 




WILLIAM H. KING 



WILLIAM HENRY KING 



William Henry King, of Salt Lake City, was born in 
Fillmore City, Millard County, LItah, in June, LS63 ; at- 
tended the district schools, the Brigham Young Academy, 
and State T7niversity, and then went to Ann Ai'bor, Mich., 
from which institution he was graduated ; is a practicing 
lawyer, being a partner of Senator Brown ; in 1882 was 
elected to various ofhces in Fillmore City and Millard 
County, and lietween that time and the year LS89 held for 
four years the office of county attorney ; was also county 
clerk for two years, city attorney for six years, city assessor 
and collector for two years, city recorder for two years, 
member of the city council for two years, and was also school 
trustee, and tilled various other minor offices ; was elected a 
member of the legislature when twenty-two years of age, 
and reelected two years later ; in 1889 removed to Prove 
City. Utah, and entered actively upon the practice of law ; 
in 1891 was elected to the Territorial legislature, and was 
selected as president of the council or upper house ; was also 
elected county attorney of Utah County, and served in that 
capacity for four years; was city attorney of Provo City 
for a number of years ; in July, 1894, was appointed asso- 
ciate justice of the supreme court of Utah by President 
Cleveland, and immediately after was confirmed by the 
senate and entered upon the duties of the office, which con- 
tinued until the advent of Statehood, January 4, 189G ; upon 
retiring from the bench formed a partnership with Senator 
Arthur Brown and Judge H. P. Henderson, of Salt Lake 
City ; was elected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Democrat, 
receiving 47,356 votes, against 27,813 votes for Lafayette 
Holbrook, Eepublican. and 2,279 votes for Warren Foster, 
Populist. He is a Representative at Large from LItah. 




WILLIAM S. KIRKPATRICK 



WILLIAM SEBRING KIRKPATRICK 



William Seeking Kirkpatrick, of Eastoii. Pa., was born 
April 21, 1844, at Easton ; was educated at Lafayette Col- 
lege ; studied law with Hon. H. D. Maxwell, formerly presi- 
dent judge of the third judicial district of Pennsylvania: 
was admitted to the bar October 2, 1S65 ; was solicitor of 
Easton for several years after his admission to the bar; 
was appointed president judge of the third judicial district 
in the early part of 1874 to fill an unexpired term, and 
served in said office until January. 1875; was nominated 
on the Republican ticket for the ensuing term and failed 
of an election by only about 300, the regular Democratic 
majority in the judicial district being 8,400; presided over 
the Republican State convention of 1882 as temporary 
chairman ; was a delegate to the national Republican 
convention at Chicago in 1884 ; was appointed attorney- 
general of Pennsylvania by Governor Beaver, and unani- 
mously confirmed by the senate January 18, 1887, and 
served as such till January 21, 1891 ; was at one time 
lecturer on municipal law in Lafayette College, and for a 
numlier of years has been a trustee of that institution ; 
was elected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Republican, 
receiving 17,072 votes, against 16,743 votes for Laird H. 
Barber, Democrat. He represents the eighth congressional 
district of Pennsylvania, which has a population of 152.8(57, 
and embraces the four counties of Carbon, Monroe, North- 
ampton, and Pike, 




WILLIAM W. KITCHIN 



WILLIAM WALTON KITCHIN 



William Walton Kitchin, of Roxboro. N. C, was born 
near Scotland Neck. K. C. October D, L*5(i(i ; was educated 
at Vine Hill Academy and Wake Forest College, where he 
graduated in 1SS4 ; edited the Scotland Neck Democrat in 
1885 ; after studying law, first under his father, Hon. AV. H. 
Kitchin, and then under Hon. John Manning, at the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina, was admitted to the bar in 
1887; located at Roxboro in January. 188S. where he still 
practices his profession ; was chairman of the county 
executive committee in 1890; was the nominee of his 
party for the State senate in 1892 ; was elected to the 
Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Democrat, receiving 19.082 votes, 
against 18,639 votes for Hon. Thomas Settle, Republican, 
and 507 votes for A. J. Dolby, Populist. He represents the 
fifth congressional district of North Carolina, which has a 
population of 177.537. and embraces the nine counties of 
Alamance, Caswell, Durham. Granville, Guilford, Orange, 
Person, Rockingham, and Stokes. 




RUDOLPH KLEBERG 



RUDOLPH KLEBERG 



EuDOLPH Kleberg, of Cnero, was born June 26. LS4:7, in 
Austin County. Tex.; received a liberal education at private 
schools ; joined Tom Green's lirigade of cavalry in the Con- 
federate army in the spring of LSIU. and served until the 
close of the war: completed his education after the war; 
studied law in San Antonio. Tex., and was admitted to 
the bar in 1872; established the Cuero Sf((j- in 1873; elected 
county attorney in 187G; reelected in 1878, and entered the 
general practice of the law ; formed a law partnership with 
Hon. William H. Crain. his predecessor, in 1SS2 ; was elected 
to the State senate as a Democrat in the fall of 1882 ; was 
appointed United States attorney for the western district 
of Texas under President Cleveland in the fall of 1885. and 
served four years ; reentered the practice of the law with his 
former partner, the late Hon. William H. Crain; was elected 
on April 7, 189(5. as a Democrat, to fill the vacancy caused 
by the death of his partner; was reelected to the Fifty-Fifth 
Congress as a Democrat, receiving 19,159 votes, against 
15,489 votes for H. (irass. Republican, 4.254 votes for J. M. 
Smith, Populist, and 210 votes scattering ; was reelected 
to the Fifty-Sixth Congress by a majority of about 4.000 
over Capt. B. L. Crouch. Republican. He represents the 
eleventh congressional district of Texas, which has a popu- 
lation of 189.958. and embraces the twenty-nine counties of 
Aransas, Atascosa, Bee. Cameron, Calhoun, Dewitt. Dimmit, 
Duval, Encinal. Frio. Goliad. Guadalupe, Hidalgo, Jackson, 
Karnes, Lasalle. Live Oak, McMullen. Nueces. Refugio. San 
Patricio, Starr. Lhalde, Victoria, Webb, Wharton, Wilson, 
Zapata, and Zavalla. 




FREEMAN KNOWLES 



FREEMAN KNOWLES 



Freeman Knowles, of Deadvvood, was Iwrii in Harmony, 
Me., October 10, 1846 ; was educated at Bloonilield Acad- 
emj', Skowhegan, Me.; enlisted in the Sixteenth Maine 
Regiment June 16, 1S6'2, while not yet sixteen years of 
age ; served three years and nineteen days in the Army 
of the Potomac ; w^as captured at the battle of Reams 
Station August 18, 1864, and kept a prisoner at Libby, 
Belle Island, and Salisbury, N. C, until the war closed ; 
immediately after the war he moved to Denison, Iowa, 
where he entered upon the study of the law, and was ad- 
mitted to the bar in April, 1869 ; continued to practice law 
until 1886, when he removed to Nebraska, and liegan the 
publication of the Ceresco T'nncs; removed to the Black 
Hills in 1888, and began the publication of the Meade 
County Times at Tilford : subsequently he moved his plant 
to Deadwood, and began the publication of the Ercnln(j 
Independent, a daily paper ; the Independent is an aggressive 
labor papei", and is the recognized organ of the Federation 
of Miners and other labor organizations, which accounts 
for his nomination and election ; is no politician, having 
never attended a State or congressional convention ; his 
nomination was the spontaneous desire of the elements 
which he represents and which predominate in this sec- 
tion ; is a Populist, and was one of the organizers of the 
party in South Dakota ; never before held any public 
office : carried his own county by a majority of 651 votes, 
and carried every county in the Black Hills, and was 
elected in the State at large to the Fifty-Fifth Congress, 
receiving 41,233 votes, against 40,57o votes for Coe I. 
Crawford, Repulilican. He is a Repi'esentative at Large 
from South Dakota. 




WILLIAM S. KNOX 



WILLIAM S. KNOX 



William S. Knox, of Lawrence, was born in Killingly, 
Conn., September 10, 1843 ; went to Lawrence when nine 
years of age, and has resided there since ; graduated at 
Amherst College in class of 1.S65 ; admitted to Essex bar 
in November, 1S66, and has since practiced law in Law- 
rence ; was a member of the Massachusetts house of 
representatives in 1874-75, serving on the judiciary com- 
mittee ; was city solicitor of Lawrence in 1875, 1876. 1887. 
1888, 1889, and 1890 ; is president of the Arlington National 
Bank of Lawrence ; was elected to the Fifty-Fourth and 
reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Republican, re- 
ceiving 17,786 votes, against 11,308 votes for John H. Har- 
rington, Democrat. He represents the fifth congressional 
district of Massachusetts, which has a population of 172,178, 
and embraces: Essex County — city of Lawrence, and towns 
of Andover, Lynnfield. Methuen. North Andover, and Pea- 
body ; Middlesex County — cities of Lowell and Woburn, 
and towns of Dracut, North Reading, Reading, Tewksbury, 
and Wilmington. 




MONROE H. KULP 



MONROE H. KULP 



Monroe H. Kulp. member for the seventeenth district 
of Pennsylvania in the Fifty-Fourth and Fifty-Fifth Con- 
gress, was born in Barto. Berks County, Pa., October 23, 
1858. and is the son of Darlington R. and Elizabeth Gil- 
bert Kulp. Nine years later his parents, who were de- 
scendants of leading families of that section of the State, 
removed to Shamokin. Northumlierland County, where his 
father engaged in the lumber business, which he followed 
during the rest of his life. He took an active interest 
in the advancement of what was already a thriving coal 
town. After attending the public schools of the neighbor- 
hood for several years, the son. Monroe, as was the custom, 
went to work at the collieries, and in a few years com- 
menced to learn the lumber business. By the time he 
was twenty years of age he had filled nearly every posi- 
tion in the two lines of work in which he had been en- 
gaged. The influence of his father, his interest in public 
affairs, and his association witli the rank and file in his 
daily vocation thus brought him in touch with all classes. 
As he grew older and came in contact with other men, 
Mr. Kulp felt the importance of having a more thorough 
education than the public schools afforded, and. in 1878, he 
entered the State Normal College, Lebanon. Ohio, and in 
1881 he graduated with honors from Eastman National 
Business College, Poughkeepsie. N. Y. He immediately 
commenced his business career by accepting the position 
of bookkeeper and cashier for Kulp. McWilliams & Co., 
which x^lace he held until the dissolution of the firm, in 



MONROE H. KULP 

1886, when he became the general manager for his father, 
who assumed the entire lumber interests of the company. 
He continued to serve in this capacity during the long 
illness of his father, having entire charge of all his enter- 
prises, until October, 1895, when, together with his brother, 
Ct. Gilbert Kulp, and D. C. Kaseman, the former bookkeeper 
of the concern, he formed the tirm of Monroe H. Kulp & 
Co., and added general construction to their already large 
business, forming connections with other firms, which 
enabled them to supply all kinds of timber and lumber used 
within their territory. Finding the supply of proper timber 
rapidly disappearing, Mr. Kulp, in 1897, secured about 25.000 
acres of land in Union and Centre Counties, and organized 
Monroe H. Kulp i Co., Incorporated, and the Lewisburg 
and Buffalo Valley Railroad Company, of which he became 
the president and general manager, in addition to his posi- 
tion as general manager of Kulp, Thomas & Co., of Milroy, 
Pa. He has numerous other Imsiness interests, all indicative 
of his energetic nature and his love of progress, and the 
most important of these are found in his office as president 
of the North and West Branch Telephone Company and a 
director in the Rhamokin Water Company, the White Deer 
Creek Water and Supply Company, the Salt Lake Oil and 
Gas Company, and the Anthracite Sewer Company. In the 
same year, in company with C. R. Savidge, of Sunbury, Pa., 
he purchased from the Pennsylvania Railroad Company 
about eighty-seven acres of undeveloped real estate ad- 
joining the borough of Shamokin, and laid out the two 
important additions. Fairview and Edgewood. which have 
since l^ecome noted for their value for building and manu- 
facturing purposes. Being, thus, essentially a business man, 
Mr. Kulp, while an ardent Republican, never took an active 
interest in politics in his own behalf until 1890, when, at 
the solicitation of many friends, he was a candidate for the 
legislature. Owing to the fact that his nomination would 



MONROE H. KULP 

have caused an unequal distribution of the offices among 
the several sections of the county he withdrew from the 
field, notwithstanding that his success was generally looked 
for. This action made him more popular than ever. and. in 
1894, without any solicitation whatever, he was made the 
nominee of the party for Congress. The district had always 
been strongly Democratic, and the nomination was looked 
upon as more honorary than prohtalile. l)ut so actively did 
Mr. Kulp take up the work, and so faithfully did the friends 
he had made by his genial disposition and trustworthy 
qualities stand by him that when the returns came in it 
was found that the adverse vote had been overcome and he 
had been elected by a majority of nearly 1.000. During 
his term in the House of Representatives ■Mr. Kulp served 
as a member of the committee on piiljlic lands and manu- 
factures, being chairman of a sub-committee of the former, 
in chai-ge of the pul)lic land office of the United States. 
In his work in this new field he applied the same principles 
which had won for him a name in other lines, paying the 
strictest attention to the wishes of his constituents, without 
distinction as to party affiliations or financial standing. His 
reelection in 1S96. by an increased majority, was only the 
natural result of his splendid first term record. ]\Ir. Kulp 
was married on June 8, 1897, to Sara Washington Detweiler, 
of Harrisburg, and took up his residence in Shamokin, where 
he might devote his time to his numerous business enter- 
prises and public duties. He represents the seventeenth 
district of Pennsylvania, which has a population of 138,795, 
and embraces the counties of Columbia. Montour, North- 
umberland, and Sullivan. 




JOHN F. LACEY 



JOHN FLETCHER LACEY 



John Fletcher Lacey, of Oskaloosa. was born at New 
Martinsville, Va. (now West Virginia), May 30, 1841 ; re- 
moved to Iowa in 1855; received a common-school and 
academic education ; enlisted in Company H, Third Iowa 
Infantry, in May, 1861, and afterwards served as a 
private in Company D, Thirty-Third Iowa Infantry, as 
sergeant-major, and as lieutenant in Company C of that 
regiment; was promoted to assistant adjutant-general on 
the staff of Brig.-Gen. Samuel A. Rice, and after that 
ofScer was killed in battle was assigned to duty on the 
staff of Maj.-Greu. Frederick Steele ; served in the Iowa 
legislature one term, in 1870; is a lawyer and author 
of Lacey's Railway Digest and Lacey's Iowa Digest ; was 
a member of the Fifty-First. Fifty-Third, and Fifty-Fourth 
Congresses and was reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress 
as a Republican, receiving "21.970 votes, against 20.769 
votes for Frederick E. White. Democratic and Populist 
fusion nominee, and 268 votes for Abner Branson, Prohi- 
bitionist. He represents the sixth congressional district of 
Iowa, which has a popuhition of 155.354, and embraces the 
seven counties of Davis, Jasper, Keokuk, Mahaska, Monroe, 
Poweshiek, and Wapello. 




JOHN LAMB 



JOHN LAMB 



John Lamb, of Richmond, was born in Sussex County, 
Va., June 12, LS40. where his father was engaged in teach- 
ing school; removed to Charles City County, the home of 
his parents, when five years of age ; the death of his father, 
in 1855, left him at the age of fifteen years the main sup- 
port of his mother's large family of small children ; his 
early education ahnost ceased at this point, but his energy 
and application enal)led him to master, by study at night, 
after the day's work was done, the science of civil engi- 
neering ; at the first alarm of war in 1S60 he went to the 
front as a volunteer in the Charles City Troop, afterwards 
Company D, Third Virginia Cavalry (Wickham's brigade); 
served through the entire war with distinguished gallantry ; 
was repeatedly wounded, once very severely, and laid dow-n 
his arms at Appomattox as captain of his company ; after 
the war returned to his native county and took up the 
business of farming ; was soon elected sheriff of his county, 
and subsequently served his people as treasurer, surveyor, 
and chairman of the county Democratic committee ; is an 
ardent and enthusiastic advocate of the free coinage of 
silver, and was elected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a 
Democrat, receiving 16,034 votes, against 12,716 votes for 
L. L. Lewis, Eepuljlican, 288 votes for Elisha L. Lewis, ISO 
votes for William H. Lewis, 85 votes for John Mitchell, 
Prohibitionist, and 14 votes scattering. He represents the 
third congressional district of Virginia, which has a popu- 
lation of 172,081, and embraces the counties of Chesterfield, 
Goochland, Hanover, Henrico, King William, and New Kent, 
and the cities of Richmond and Manchester. 




CHARLES B. LANDIS 



CHARLES B. LANDIS 



Charles B. Landis, of Delphi, was born July 9, 1858, in 
Millville, Butler County. Ohio ; was educated in the public 
schools of Logansjjort. and graduated from Wabash Col- 
lege, at Crawfordsville, Ind., in 1883 ; served for four years, 
from 1883 to 1887, as editor of the Logansport (lud.) 
Joiinial, and at the time of his nomination for Congress 
was the editor of the Delphi (Ind.) Jo/inidl; in 1894 was 
elected president of the Indiana Republican Editorial As- 
sociation, and reelected in 1895 ; was elected to the Fifty- 
Fifth Congress as a Eepublican. receiving 23,616 votes, 
against 23,367 votes cast for Joseph B. Cheadle, Fusion 
candidate. He represents the ninth congressional district 
of Indiana, which has a population of 165.S25, and em- 
braces the seven counties of Boone. Carroll, Clinton, Foun- 
tain, Hamilton, Montgomery, and Tipton. 




SAMUEL W. T. LANHAM 



SAMUEL W. T. LANHAM 



Samuel W. T. Lanham, of Weatherford, was born July 
4, 1S4(), in Spartanburg district. S. C; received a commou- 
school education ; entered the Confederate arnij' when a 
boy, and served in the Third South Carolina Regiment ; 
removed to Texas in 1S66 ; studied law, and was admitted 
to the bar in 1861) ; was district attorney of the thirteenth 
district ; was Democratic elector for the third congres- 
sional district of Texas in 1880; was elected to the Foi'ty- 
Eighth Congress from the eleventh district, and was 
reelected to the Forty-Ninth, Fiftieth, Fifty-First and Fifty- 
Second Congresses ; declined to stand for reuoraination in 
1892; in 1896 was nominated and elected to the Fifty-Fifth 
Congress as a Democrat, receiving 20,935 votes, against 
17,510 votes for Charles H. Jenkins, Populist, and 747 votes 
for J. Peter Smith, Gold-Standard Democrat. He repre- 
sents the eighth congressional district of Texas, which has 
a i^opulation of 174,048, and embraces the thirteen coun- 
ties of Brown, Coleman, Coryell, Comanche. Erath, Hamil- 
ton, Hood, Lampasas, Mills, Parker, Runnels, Somervell, 
and Tarrant. 




ASBURY C. LATIMER 



ASBURY C. LATIMER 



AsBURY C. Latimer, of Belton, was born July 3L 1851, 
near Lowudesville, Abbeville County, S. C; was brought 
up on his father's farm; spent much of his life in active 
participation in agricultural pursuits ; was educated in the 
common schools then existing ; took an active part in 
the memoraljle campaign of 1S76 ; removed to Belton, An- 
derson County, his present home, in LSSO ; devoted his 
energies to his farm ; was elected county chairman of the 
Democratic party of his county in IS'.tO and reelected in 1S92; 
was urged to make the race for lieutenant-governor of his 
State in 1890. l)ut declined ; was elected to the Fifty-Third 
and Fifty-Fourth Congresses and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth 
Congress as a Democrat, receiving 9,745 votes, against 659 
votes for Anson C. Merrick. Regular Republican, and 192 
votes for J. Gray, Independent Repulilican. He represents 
the third congressional district of South Carolina, which 
has a population of 152.0(50. and embraces the five counties 
of Abbeville, Anderson, Newberry, Uconee, and Pickens. 




GEORGE P. LAWRENCE 



GEORGE PELTON LAWRENCE 



George Pelton Lawrence, of North Adams, was born in 
Adams, Mass., May 19, LSoiJ ; graduated at Drury Academy, 
1876, and at Amherst College, IMSU; studied law at Colum- 
bia Law School ; was admitted to the bar in 1883, and 
has since practiced law at North Adams; was appointed 
judge of the district court of northern Berkshire in 18S5; 
resigned in 1894 upon being elected to the Massachusetts 
senate ; was a member of the Massachusetts senate in 
1895, 1896, and 1897 ; was president of that body in 1896 
and 1897, being elected each year by unanimous vote; was 
elected to the Fifty-Fiftli Congress as a Republican (to fill 
the unexpired term caused by the death of Hon. A. B. 
Wright on August 14, 1897), receiving 11.932 votes, against 
7,491 votes for Roger P. Donoughue, Democrat. He rep- 
resents the first congressional district of Massachusetts, 
which has a population of 17(),'297, and emliraces: Berk- 
shire County — towns of Adams, Alford, Becket, Cheshire. 
Clarksburg. Dalton, Egremont. Florida, Creat Barrington, 
Hancock, Hinsdale. Laneslioro. Lee, Lenox, Monterey, Mount 
AVashington, New Ashford, New Marlboro, North Adams, 
Otis, Peru, Pittsfield, Richmond, Sandisheld, Savoy, Shef- 
field, Stockbridge. Tyringham. Washington, West Stock- 
bridge, Williamstown, and Windsor; Franklin County — 
towns of Ashfield, Bei'nardston, Buckland, Charlemont, 
Coleraine, Conway, Deerfield, Gill, Greenfield, Hawley, Heath, 
Leyden, Monroe, Rowe, Shelburne, and Whately ; Hampden 
County — city of Holyoke and towns of Agawam. Bland- 
ford, Chester, Granville, Montgomery, Russell. Southwick, 
Tolland, Westfield, and West Springfield ; Hampshire County 
— towns of Chesterfield, Cummington, Goshen, Hatfield, Hun- 
tington, Middlefield, Plainfield. Southampton, Westhampton, 
Williamsburg, and Worthington. 




JOHN J. LENTZ 



JOHN JACOB LENTZ 



John Jacob Lentz. of Columbus, was born near St. 
Clairsville. Belmout County, 0.. January 27, 1S56 ; attended 
district school and the St. Clairsville High School ; taught 
school four years, and graduated from the National Normal 
University. Lebanon. Ohio, in 1S77 ; attended University of 
Wooster one year, and graduated from University of Mich- 
igan with degree of A. B. in LSS2 ; took both law coui-ses 
at Columbia College, New York City, receiving the degree 
of LL. B. in LSSo ; admitted to the bar at Columbus in 
October, LSS8. and since 1SS7 has been a member of the 
law firm of Nash & Lentz ; for live years was one of the 
examiners of the city teachers, and was appointed a trustee 
of Ohio University by Governor ^IcKinley : in the Demo- 
cratic State convention at Cincinnati, 1S1)3, received votes 
for governor from a dozen or more counties, although not 
a candidate and refusing to permit his name to l)e pre- 
sented to the convention : was elected national president 
of the American Insm-ance Union in September. 1896; was 
elected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Democrat, receiv- 
ing 23.8LS votes, against 23.712 votes for David Kemper 
Watson. Republican, who had been elected two years 
before by 1.591 majority over Joseph H. Outhwaite. He 
represents the twelfth congressional district of Ohio, which 
has a population of 158,026, and embraces the two counties 
of Fairfield and Franklin. 




RUFUS E. LESTER 



RUFUS E. LESTER 



RuFUS E. Lester, of Savannah, was Itorn in Burke 
County, Ga., December L2, 1S87 ; graduated at Mercer Uni- 
versity, Georgia, 1S57 ; admitted to the bar in Savannah 
and commenced the practice of law in 1859; entered the 
military service of the Confederate States in 1861 ; re- 
mained in the service till the end of the war ; resumed 
the practice of law at the close of the war ; was State 
senator from the first senatorial district of Georgia 1870- 
1879 ; was president of the senate during the last three 
years of service ; was mayor of Savannah from January, 
1883, to January. 1889 ; was elected to the Fifty-First, Fifty- 
Second, Fifty-Third, and Fifty-Fourth Congresses and re- 
elected to the Fifty-Fiftli Congress as a Democrat, receiving 
8,786 votes, against 2.670 votes for Miller. Populist, and 
4,716 votes for Doyle, Republican. He represents the first 
congressional district of Georgia, which has a population 
of 169.809, and embraces the ten counties of Burke, Bulloch, 
Bryan, Chatham, Emanuel. Effingham, Liberty, Mcintosh, 
Screven, and Tatnall. 




ELIJAH B. LEWIS 



ELIJAH BANKS LEWIS 



Elijah Banks Lewis, of JMoiitczuina. was horn in I)ooly 
County, (in.. March 27, 1854; removed to Montezuma, liis 
present home, at tlie age of seventeen years; was educated 
in the (•oiiinKni schools of Dooly and Macon Counties: has 
had a l)iisiness traiiiin.y. his father making him his partner 
in tlie hanking and mercantile lousiness hefore his ma- 
turity, and is still ill (he iiankiiiL;' and mrrcaiit ilc husiness ; 
always took an active interest in pdlitics. working for his 
friends and })olitical party, hut never accepted any office 
until 1894. when he was elected to the 8tate senate for 
the years 181)4 115 : was elected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress 
as a Democrat, receiving 7.451) votes, against ;i.01)() votes 
for Seahorn Montgomery. l{epul)lican. lie n'lireseuts the 
third congressional district of Georgia, which has a popu- 
lation of 151),()5!S. and cinhraces the thiitfMMi counties of 
Crawford. Dooly, Houston, Tjee. jMacon. Pulaski. Scliley, 
Stewart, Sumter, Twiggs, Taylor, Wehster, and Wilcox. 




JAMES H. LEWIS 



JAMES HAMILTON LEWIS 



James Hamilton Lewis, of Seattle, was born in Danville. 
Va.. May LS. 1S63 ; removed with his parents to Augusta, 
Ga., in LS(56 ; was educated at Houghton College, that city, 
and the University of Virginia; enteied the law office of 
Gen. A. E. Lawton, of Savannah. Ga., and after a course of 
study was admitted to the bar in LSS2, at the age of nine- 
teen ; located in Seattle, Wash., November, ISSo ; was 
elected to the Territorial senate, as a Democrat, for the 
eleventh district ; declined the nomination for Congress in 
1890; was nominated for governor in lS".)-2, and declined 
the nomination liecause opposed to the platform ; was one 
of the two nominees of the Democrats in the legislature 
of 1894 for United States Senator: in the national Demo- 
cratic convention in Chicago, 1896, his name was pre- 
sented by the State of Washington for Vice-President of 
the United States, receiving 17 votes, cast by Oregon, 
Washington, California, and Alabama; was elected to the 
Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Democrat, receiving 52,5fi6 votes, 
against 38,'20*2 votes for W. H. Doolittle. Republican, Lewis's 
majority being 14,364. He is a Representative at Large 
from the State of Washington. He was the author of the 
first resolution demanding the recognition of the belliger- 
ency of Cuba, tendered in the special session of the Fifty- 
Fifth Congress. It was at this time that he took the 
position that the subject of the resolution was so privi- 
leged that it took precedence to all governmental ques- 
tions, and then followed the parliamentary battle l)etween 



JAMES HAMILTON LEWIS 

him and the Speaker which resulted in giving him a na- 
tional reputation as a parliamentarian and leader on his 
side of the House. Later. Lewis was the first to advocate 
secession from Congressman Bailey, who, as the leader of 
the minorit}^ sought to bind the Democrats in caucus to 
the anti-expansion policy. Lewis fought the proposition 
in caucus, claiming that the Democratic party from the 
beginning was the party of expansion and acquisition. 
After a long struggle the caucus split in two and adjourned 
without a decision. Subsequently an amendment of Mc- 
Eae, of Arkansas, amended by Cochran, of Missouri, em- 
bodying Lewis's views, was accepted by the caucus. At the 
close of Congress Lewis entered the army in the war be- 
tween the ITnited States and Spain, was assigned to Gen. 
Fred Grant's staff, served to the close of the war and was 
mustered out after the treaty of peace liad been submitted. 
He returned to Congress, continued his tight for investiga- 
tion into the evils which caused the distress in the army. 
at all times pressing for the disclosure of the men or insti- 
tutions that had been responsible for defrauding the gov- 
ernment and furnishing the soldiers with decayed and 
improper supplies. He continued his warfare in behalf of 
the Democratic party, claiming it to be the author of tbe 
acquisition doctrine, asserted that through the minority 
the present war was fought, and the fruits of that contest 
were to be credited to the existence of the minority of the 
Fifty-Fifth Congress, being the Democrats and the Silver 
forces. 




ROMULUS Z. LINNEY 



ROMULUS Z. LINNEY 



RoMt'Lis Z. LixNEY. of Taylorsville. Alexander County, 
was l)orn in Rutherford County. N. C, December 26, 1841 ; 
was educated in the common schools of the country, at 
York's Collegiate Institute, and at Dr. Milieu's school at 
Taylorsville ; served in the Confederate army as a private 
soldier until the battle of Chancellorsville, where he was 
severely wounded; having been discliarged from the army 
because of his wound, he returned to Taylorsville and 
joined the class in Dr. Milieu's school of which Hon. 
William H. Bower was a member ; studied law with Judge 
Armheld; was admitted to the bar by the supreme court 
in 1S()S ; was elected to the State senate in 1870. 1878, 
and again in 1.SS2; is by profession a lawyer; was elected 
to the Fifty-Fourth and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Con- 
gress as a Repul)lican. receiving li).419 votes, against 18.006 
votes for Rufns A. Doughton, Democrat, and 64 votes for 
William M. White. Prohibitionist. He represents the eighth 
congressional district of North Carolina, which has a pop- 
ulation of 190.7S4, and embraces the eleven counties of 
Alexander. Alleghany. Ashe. Burke, Caldwell. Cleveland, 
Forsyth, Gaston, Surry, Watauga, and Wilkes. 




LUCIUS N. LITTAUER 



LUCIUS NATHAN LITTAUER 



Lucius Nathan Littauer, of U lovers ville. was born Jan- 
uary 20, 1859, in Gloversville, N. Y. ; is the son of Nathan 
and Harriet S. Littauer ; removed to New York City in 
1S()5 ; was educated there at Charlier Institute ; entered 
Harvard University, and was graduated in the class of 
1878 ; was a member of Harvard University crew and Uni- 
versity football team ; immediately engaged in the glove- 
manufacturing business of his father at Gloversville. to 
which he succeeded in 1882. and is at present engaged 
extensively therein ; is otlicer and director of many com- 
mercial and financial institutions : never before held pub- 
lic office ; was elected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a 
Kepublican, receiving 32.188 votes, against 67(5 votes for 
John C. Greene. Sound-Money Democrat, 1,640 votes for 
James T. Sweetman. Prohibitionist, and 3,495 votes lilank 
and scattering. He represents the twenty-second congres- 
sional district of New York, which has a population of 
185.123. and embraces the four counties of Fulton. Ham- 
ilton, Saratoga, and St. Lawrence. 




JOHN S. LITTLE 



JOHN S. LITTLE 



John S. Little, of Greenwood, was born at Jenny Lind, 
Sebastian County, Ark., March 15, 1858 ; was educated in 
the common schools and at Cone Hill College, Arkansas ; 
was admitted to the bar in 1874 ; 1877 was elected district 
attorney for the twelfth circuit of Arkansas, composed of 
Sebastian. Scott, Crawford, and Logan Counties, and was 
reelected for four successive terms ; was elected a repre- 
sentative to the legislature in 1884 ; in 1886 was elected 
circuit judge for a term of four years; in 1893 was chosen 
as chairman of the State judicial convention; in September, 
1894, was elected, without opposition, as a Democrat, to 
fill the unexpired term of C. R. Breckinridge in the Fifty- 
Third Congress ; was elected to the Fifty-Fourth Congress 
without opposition ; was reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Con- 
gress as a Democrat, receiving 19.109 votes, against 6,483 
votes for Charles D. Ercoves. Republican. He repi-esents 
the second congressional district of Arkansas, w'hich has 
a population of 206,187, and embraces the fourteen counties 
of Bradley. Cleveland, Dallas, Drew, Garland, Gi-ant, Hot 
Spring, Jefferson, Lincoln, Montgomery, Polk, Saline, Scott, 
and Sebastian. 




LEONIDAS F. LIVINGSTON 



LEONIDAS F. LIVINGSTON 



Leonidas F. Livingston, of Kings, was born in Newton 
County. Ga.. Ain-il 3. LS82 ; is of Scotch-Irish descent ; his 
grandfather immigrated to this country from North Ireland, 
and served under General Washington during the Revolu- 
tionary War ; was educated in the common schools of the 
county ; is a farmer by occupation and has always lived 
on his farm ; was a private soldier in the Confederate army 
from August, 1861, to May, 1865 ; was for two terms a mem- 
ber of the house of representatives and one term a member 
of the State senate; was chairman of the committee on 
agriculture in both the house and senate ; was vice-president 
of the Georgia State Agricultural Society for eleven years 
and president of the same for four years ; was president of 
the Georgia State Alliance for three years, but resigned 
when elected to Congress ; has been prominent in all 
political struggles in his State for many years ; was elected 
to the Fifty-Second, Fifty-Third, and' Fifty-Fourth Con- 
gresses and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Demo- 
crat, receiving '.).258 votes, against 6,715 votes for Hendrix, 
Republican. He represents the fifth congressional district 
of Georgia, which has a population of 165,638, and embraces 
the eight counties of Campbell. Clayton, Dekalb. Douglas, 
Fulton, Newton, Rockdale, and Walton. 




JAMES T. LLOYD 



JAMES T. LLOYD 



James T. Lloyd, of Shelbyville, was born at Canton, in 
Lewis Count j% Mo., August 27. LS57 ; he graduated from 
Cliristian University at Canton, Mo., in 1S78 ; lie taught 
school for a few years thereafter ; he was admitted to the 
bar, and then practiced his profession in Lewis County 
until 1885, when he located at his jn-esent home, where he 
has since resided ; he has held no ofiice except that of 
prosecuting attorney of his county from 1881) to 1893, until 
his election to Congress ; was elected to the Fifty-Fifth 
Congress as a Democrat at a special election held June 1, 
1897, to fill the vacancy occasioned Ijy the death of R. P. 
Giles, Democrat, receiving 18,809 votes, against 18,158 votes 
for C. N. Clark. Repulilican. and 1.078 votes for Joseph Mil- 
ler, Populist. He represents the first congressioiial district 
of Missouri, which has a population of 179.844, and em- 
braces the ten counties of Adair, Clark, Knox, Lewis, Macon, 
Marion, Putnam, Schuyler, Scotland, and Shelby. 




WILLIAM LORIMER 



WILLIAM LORIMER 



William TiORiMER, of Chicago, was liorn in Manchester, 
England. April 27, 1861. and is of Scotch pa7-entage ; came 
to this conntiT with his parents ^^hen five years old and 
settled in Detroit, Mich., in LS66 ; subsequently the family 
removed to Bay City, Mich., thence to Ohio, where they 
lived on a farm for a short time, and finally settled in 
Chicago in 1870; he attended a private school in Chicago; 
his father having died, he was left at the age of twelve 
years to his own resources ; was first an apprentice in the 
business of sign painting and later worked for the Wilson 
Packing Company, for Armour & Co., and for a street rail- 
road company ; in the spring of 1S86 he engaged in the 
real estate business, and later became a member of the 
firm of Murphy & Lorimer. which still exists, and is now 
also engaged in the building and brick manufacturing 
business; was superintendent of the main water extension 
of the city of Chicago under Mayor Roche, and superin- 
tendent of the water department under Mayor Wash- 
burne ; in 1892 was the nominee of the Kepublican party 
for clerk of the superior court, but was defeated ; has 
always been active in politics and is one of the leaders of 
the Republican party: was elected to the Fifty-Fourth 
Congress and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a 
Republican, receiving 35,045 votes, against 28.309 votes for 
J. Z. White, Democrat, 594 votes for Craigmile, Prohibi- 
tionist, and 561 votes for Crenshaw. Xational Democrat. He 
represents the second congressional district of Illinois, which 
has a population of 268,462, and which embraces part of 
Cook County, the tenth, twenty-eighth, twenty-ninth, and 
thirtieth wards of the city of Chicago, and the towns of 
Cicero, Elk Grove. Hanover, Lamont. Leyden, Lyons. Maine, 
Norwood Park. Palos, Proviso, Riverside, and Schaumburg, 




EUGENE F. LOUD 



EUGENE FRANCIS LOUD 



Eugene Francis Loud, of Sau Francisco, was horn in 
Abiugton, Mass., Mai-ch 12, 1847; at the age of thirteen 
went to sea and to California ; in 1862 enlisted in California 
Cavalry Battalion, which formed a part of Second Massa- 
chusetts Cavalry ; was -vith the Army of the Potomac and 
with Sheridan in the Shenandoah Valley nntil the close of 
the war; returned to California and studied law; was in 
the customs service ; followed mercantile business ; was 
member of California legislature in 1884 : was cashier and 
tax collector of city and county of San Francisco ; was 
elected to the Fifty-Second, Fifty-Third, and Fifty-Fourth 
Congresses and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a 
Republican, receiving 19,351 votes, against 10,494 votes for 
Joseph P. Kelly, Democrat, 8.825 votes for A. B. Kinne, 
People's party, 757 votes for Henry Daniels, Socialist Labor, 
and 404 votes for T. H. Lawson. Prohiliitionist. He repre- 
sents the fifth congressional district of California, which 
has a population of 228,717, and embraces the three coun- 
ties of San Francisco, San Mateo, and Santa Clara. 




HENRY C. LOUDENSLAGER 



HENRY C. LOUDENSLAGER 



Henry C. Loudenslager, of Paulsboro, was born in 
Mauricetown, Cumberland County. N. J., May 22. 1852 ; 
removed with his parents to Paulsboro in 1856, where he 
has resided since ; was educated in the common schools of 
•his county ; after leaving the home farm he engaged in 
the produce commission business in Philadelphia. Pa., in 
1872, and continued in it ten years ; was elected county 
clerk in 1882 and reelected in 1887 ; was elected to the 
Fifty-Third and Fifty-Fourth Congresses and reelected to 
the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Republican, receiving 33.659 
votes, against 17.118 votes for John T. Wright, Populist 
Democrat, 1,516 votes for Rudolphus Bingham, Prohibi- 
tionist, and 150 votes for Frank F. Mills. Socialist Labor. 
He represents the first congressional district of New Jer- 
sey, which has a population of 198.193. and embraces the 
five counties of Camden, Cape May, Cumberland, Gloucester, 
and Salem. 




WILLIAM C. LOVERING 



WILLIAM C. LOVERING 



William C. Lovering, of Taunton, was born about sixty 
years ago in Rhode Island ; was educated in Cambridge, 
Mass., at the Cambridge high school and the Hopkins 
Classical School ; has been engaged in cotton manufactur- 
ing nearly all of his life, being the president and chief 
manager of the Whittenton Manufacturing Company, in 
Taunton ; is also interested in many other manufactories, 
in which he is director and manager; served for a short 
period in the war as engineer at Fort Monroe : retired from 
the service an invalid ; was State senator for two years, 
1874-75 ; was a delegate to the national Republican con- 
vention that nominated (jarfield in 18S0; was nominated by 
acclamation in the congressional convention of the twelfth 
district September 22, 1896, and elected to the Fifty-Fifth 
Congress, receiving 21,107 votes, against 6,354 votes for 
EUiridge Gerry Brown. Democrat. He represents the 
twelfth congressional district of Massachusetts, which has 
a population of 173,068, and embraces Bristol County — city 
of Taunton, and towns of Attleboro, Berkley, Dighton, 
Easton, Mansfield, Norton, Raynham, Rehoboth, and See- 
konk ; Norfolk County — towns of Avon, Braintree, Canton, 
Cohasset, Holbrook, Randolph, Stoughton, and Weymouth ; 
Plymouth County — city of Brockton and towns of Abington, 
Bridgewater, Carver. Duxbury. East Bridgewater. Halifax, 
Hanover. Hanson. Hingham, Hull, Kingston, Lakeville, 
Marshtield, Middleboro, Norwell, Pembroke, Plymouth, 
Plympton, Rockland, Scituate, West Bridgewater. and 
Whitman. 




PHILIP B. LOW 



PHILIP BURRILL LOW 



Philip Burrill Low, of New York, was born in Chelsea, 
Mass., May 6. IHM ; graduated from high school after ooni- 
pletiug a preparatorj^ college course : adopted the pro- 
fession of his father — shipmaster: volunteered and was 
appointed acting ensign in tlie United States nav_v and 
served in the North Atlantic sipiadron during 18(52-6^; 
resigned and entered conunercial circles of Boston until 
1865, when he removed to New York, where he has since 
been identified with the shipping and maritime interests: 
was organizer and first commander of the New Yt)rk State 
naval militia : received the nomination for Congress by 
acclamation in 181(4 as the l{e]iul)lican candidate in the 
fifteenth New York district, and was elected to the Fifty- 
Fourth and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth ('ongre.ss as a Re- 
publican, receiving lJ9.(»0"2 votes, against '22,52() votes for 
William K. Burke. Democrat. 122 \()tes for ()scar A. Uage, 
l.S()4 votes for Enoch K. Thomas. 224 votes for Archie E. 
Fiske. 107 votes defective, and (i71 votes blank. He rep- 
resents the fifteenth congressional district of New York, 
which has a population of 228,8:^8, and includes that por- 
tion of the twenty-first assemltly district between the center 
of Seventy-Ninth Street and the center of Eighty-Sixth 
Street, that jiortion of the twenty-second district above the 
center of Seventy-Ninth Street, in the city of New York, 
and the twenty-third assembly district of the county of 
New York. 



4^ 



H< 




ARCHIBALD LYBRAND 



ARCHIBALD LYBRAND 



Archibald Lybraxd. ivpipsentative of the eighth district 
of Ohio in the Fifty-Fifth ami Fifty-Sixth Congresses, was 
1)orn in Tarlton. Pickaway County. Ohio. May 23. 1840. At 
the age of seventeen years lie removed to Delaware, where 
he entered the Ohio Wesleyan University, receiving his 
education at that institution. In ISdl. at the breaking out 
of the Civil War. he enlisted as a private in Company I, 
Fourth Ohio Volunteer Infantry. From this company he 
was soon transferred to Company E. Seventy-Third Ohio, 
and promoted to first lieutenant. He remained in the 
service with the Seventy-Third Ohio for three years, the 
last two of which he was captain of his company. He 
liarticipated in the many l)attles in which his regiment 
was engaged, among which were Rich Mountain. Second 
Bull Run. Frederickslmrg. Chancellorsville. and Getty.sburg. 
Captain Lybrand served part of his time as aid-de-camp on 
the stafTs of Generals Steinwehr and Sigel : went west with 
Hooker, and took part in the battle of Lookout Mountain. 
He participated in the battles of the Atlanta campaign, 
receiving two .slight wounds, one at the battle of Peach 
Tree Creek and the other at Dallas, (la. At the close of 
the war he returned to Delaware, and in LS69 was elected 
mayor of the city. Captain Lybrand then took up the study 
of the law. and was admitted to practice in LS7L He 
praciriced his profession for two years, when he was called 
to an active partnership in the Delaware Chair Company, 
. to which enterprise he has given his energy and attention 



JRL •IHJ<. I/.D L) BRAXl) 

ever since. In issl Captain liVbrand was appointed post- 
master at Delaware by President Chester A. Arthur, and 
served one term of four years. In the sprin^^ of ISIIC) he 
was nominated for Congress by tlie Keimlilicans of the 
eighth congressional district of Ohio, and was elected l)y a 
handsome majority over the candidate on the Democratic- 
Popnlist-Prohihition ticket. His services in the Fifty-Fifth 
Congress were indorsed by his constituents in his renom- 
ination and election to the Fifty-Sixtii Congress. The 
counties in the eighth district, which he represents, are 
Champaign. Delaware. Hancock. Hardin. Logan, and I'nion ; 
population, 17."),"J17. 




WILLIAM McALEER 



WILLIAM McALEER 



William McAleer. of Philadelphia, was horn in County 
Tyrone. Ireland. January fi. lS:iS; ininiigrated with his 
parents to Philadelphia in 1S51 : attended public and pri- 
vate schools ; is a tiour merchant, having engaged in 
business with his Father and brothers in ISOI ; was elected 
a menilter of councils from the hfth ward in ISTI for a 
term of two years : was elected by select and common 
councils in 1S73 a member of the board of guardians of 
the poor for a term of three years, and reelected five 
consecutive terms; was vice-president and president of the 
board ; was president of the First District Charity Organi- 
zation for a number of years ; was president of the 
Hibernian Society, which was organized in 1771 : is presi- 
dent of the board of presidents of the benevolent societies 
of Philadelphia; is a member of the ('ommercial Ex- 
change; was vice-president and president of the same; 
was a director of the Chamber of Commerce ; was unani- 
mously elected to the State senate in ISSH for a term of 
four years, and received the nomination for president pia 
frill jHiir by the Democratic members in issy ; was elected 
to the Fifty-Second and Fifty-Third Congresses ; was not 
a candidate for the Fifty- Fourth Congress; was elected as 
a Democrat to the Fifty-Fifth Congre.ss, receiving 11.965 
votes, against y.o-")!; votes for Frederick Halterman. Kepub- 
lican. and 2. 2:36 votes scattering. He represents the third 
congressional district of Pennsylvania, which has a popu- 
lation of 12*.l,764. and embraces the third, foui'tli. Hfth, 
sixth, eleventh, twelfth, sixteenth, and .seventeenth wards 
of the city cf Philadelphia. 




SAMUEL W. McCALL 



SAMUEL WALKER McCALL 



Samuel Walker McCall. of Winchester, was liorn in 
East Providence. Pa.. February "iS. isr)l ; gradnated at Xew 
Hampton ( X. H.) Academy in 1S7(). and at Dartmouth Col- 
lege in 1S74: was admitted to the l)ar. and since lS7(i has 
practiced law in Boston, except one year when he was the 
editor of the Boston Daili/ Adrcrtiscr; was elected a member 
of the Massachusetts house of representatives of ISSS. issy. 
and 1S*.I2 ; was a delegate to tlie natimial itejiulilican con- 
vention of ISSS; was elected tf) the Fifty-Third and Fifty- 
Fourth Congresses and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress 
as a Kepublican. receiving '22,05-1: votes, against 7.")i)(i votes 
for Fredeiick H. .Jackson. Democrat, and thirteen votes 
scattering. He represents the eighth congressional district 
of Ma.ssachu.setts. which has a population of 20o.4(i7. and 
embraces the cities of Cambridge. Mcdford. and Somerville. 
and towns of Arlington and Winchester, in Middlesex 
County, and the tenth and eleventh wards of the city of 
Boston, in Suffolk Count v. 




JAMES T. McCLEARY 



JAMES THOMPSON McCLEARY 



James Thompson McCleary. of Alankato. was bom at 
Ingersoll, Ontario, February 5. lS5o: was educated at the 
high scliool there and at McGill University. Montreal; 
tauglit foi' some years in Wisconsin. r)eing tor two years 
superintendent of Pierce County schools ; resigned in l.SSl 
to become State institute conductor of Minnesota and pro- 
fessor of history and political science in the State Normal 
School at Mankato. continuing in this position until .lune, 
Isy-J ; during summer vacations conducted institutes in 
Wisconsin, the Dakotas. Virginia. Tennessee, and Colorado; 
in IHSN published "Studies in Civi-cs."and in lSi)4 a '"Manual 
of Civics." which are used in the best .schools of the country ; 
in lSi)l was chosen ju'esident of the Minnesota Educational 
Association; was elected to tiie Fifty-Third and Fifty- 
Fourth Congresses and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress 
as a Republican, receiving 29,481 votes, against *21,182 votes 
for Frank A. Day. Democrat and Populist, and 1,085 votes 
for Richard Price, Prohibitionist, lie represents the second 
congres.sional district of Minnesota, which has a population 
of 1S8,4S0. and embraces the eighteen counties of Blue Earth, 
Brown. C!hippewa. Cottonwood, Faril)anlt. Jackson. Lac qui 
Parle, Lincoln. Lyon. Martin. Murray. Nicollet. Nobles. Pipe- 
stone, Redwood, Rock. \\'atoinvaii. and Yellow MtMlicine. 




GEORGE B. McCLELLAN 



GEORGE B. McCLELLAN 



Gkorge B. McClellan. of New York City, was boru No- 
vember 23, ISO"), in Dresden. Saxony, where his parents had 
gone on a visit : graduated from Princeton College in l.SS(i ; 
w^orked as a reporter and in editorial positions on several 
New York new'spapers : was treasurer of the New Y'ork 
and Brooklyn liridge from ()ctol)er 14. ISSI), to Iteceniber 
;]1. LSl)"2 : was admitted to the liar in June. 1S1I2; since 
then has practiced his profession ; appf)inted colonel and 
aid-de-canip to (iovei'nor David B. Hill, January 1, iSSl) ; 
in 18*.)2 was elected president of the board of aldermen of 
the city and county of New York for a term of two years, 
beginning January 1. IHDo ; was elected to the Fifty-Fourth 
Congress ; was renominated by the Democratic party and 
nominated by the National Democratic party, and reelected 
to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Democrat, receiving l2.Sir» 
votes, against 11. (i:iS votes foi' Charles A. Hess. Kepuhlican, 
881 votes for M. Al. Miller. Populist. 385 votes for Charles 
B. Copp. Socialist Labor. 93 votes for W. S. Hobbs, Prohi- 
bitionist, and 385 votes blank and scattering. He repre- 
sents the twelfth congressional district of New York, which 
has a population of 130.311. and embraces the eleventh, 
sixteenth, and eighteenth assembly districts of the (•(umty 
of New York. 




N. B Mccormick 



N. B. Mccormick 



N. B. McCoRMicK. of Phillip.sburg, was born in Fayette 
County. Pa.. Xovemlier "Jd. 1S47: was brought up on a farm: 
received his education in the common schools of his native 
county; removed to Marion C!ounty. Iowa, in 18(57, where 
he settled upon a farm and engaged in the Inisiness of farm- 
ing and stock raising until his removal to Phillips County, 
Kansas, where he settled upon a homestead in 1S77; while 
engaged in farming studied law in the office of G. W. Stin- 
son. in Phil]ipsl>urg. and was admitted to the ))ar in lSS-2; 
soon thereafter formed a partnership with Hon. S. W. 
McElroy. under whom he served as deputy county attorney 
for four years; was elected county attorney of Phillips 
County in 18^)0 and reelected in l8',l-_'. and served in that 
capacity four years: refused a third nomination: was 
elected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Populist and a 
free-silver advocate, receiving 1 8.(5:^7 votes, against 16.006 
votes for A. H. Ellis, Republican, and 1.547 votes for J. C. 
Bui'ton. Democrat. He represents the sixth congressional 
district of Kansas, which has a population of 179,147, and 
which includes the twenty-two counties of Cheyenne, Deca- 
tur, Ellis, Ellsworth, Gove, Graham, Jewell, Lincoln. Logan, 
Mitchell. Norton. Osborne. Phillips. Rawlins. Rooks. Russell, 
Sheridan, Sherman, Smith, Thomas, Trego, and Wallace. 




PHILIP D. McCULLOCH, Jr. 



PHILIP D. MCCULLOCH, JR. 



Phujp I>. McCri.LOcii. .lu.. of .Marianna. Lee County, 
wa.s horn in Murfreepilxiio, Jiiitherlnnl ('oiinty. Tenn.. on 
the 2'id of June. iSol ; is a son of Dr. Philip I), and 
Lucy V. Mc('nllo«-ii (//rV Hurrus) : reinospil with his parents 
when three years of age to Trenton, (iilison County. Tenn., 
wliere he was reared : was educated at Andrew College, in 
that place; began the study of law in 1S71 at the age of 
twenty ; was admitted to the har of Tennessee in August, 
iST'i. and has been actively engaged in the practice of his 
profession since that time : removed to Marianna. Lee 
County. Ark., in February. 1S74. where he lias .since resided; 
was elected as the Democratic nominee to the oiKce of 
prosecuting attorney of the Hrst judicial district of the 
State in September. LS7S ; was renominated and elected 
for three successive terms: at the expiration of his third 
term he declined to offer again : he was the Democratic 
presidential elector for the first congressional district in 
LSSS ; was nominated !>> the I H'nioci'atic congressional 
convention, at Paragonld. on the l.'Jtti of .Inly. lSl)-2. for 
the Fifty-Third Congress by acclamation and was elected, 
and was elected to the Fifty-Fourth and reelected to the 
Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Democnit. i-eceiving 1*0.414 votes, 
against ().17S votes foi- V. A\ . Tucker. Itepul)licaii. He rep- 
resents the first congressional district of Arkansas, which 
has a population of "Ji'fl.Jdl. and eml)races the Hfteen coun- 
ties of Clay, Craighead. Crittenden. Cro.ss. tireene. Jackson, 
Lawrence, Lee, Mis.sissippi. Phillii)s. Poinsett. Randolph, 
Sharp, St. Francis, and Woodruff. 




JOHN Mcdonald 



JOHN Mcdonald 



John McDonald, of Hockville. ^Id.. was l)orn in Ireland. 
May 24. 1887; was educated in the .schools of Ireland: 
came to this country and enlisted in the United States 
army in Boston, Mass.. in 1857 ; joined his regiment the 
following December in Arizona: participated in several 
Indian camjjaigns in that Territory and in (.'alifornia : in 
1S(')1 was ordered to the seat of war: served in the cavalry 
corps of the Army of the Potomac throughout the war; 
after the war was ordered to the West, where he again 
took part in several campaigns against hostile Indians; 
was retired as a captain of cavalry July 1. 1S(JS. for disa- 
bilities incurred in the line of service ; was elected to the 
Maryland legislature as a Repul)lican in 18S1 ; was elected 
to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Republican, receiving 2"J.40(I 
votes, against 18,487 votes for Blair Lee. Democrat, and 
817 votes for Samuel IL Hockman. Prohibitionist. He rep- 
resents the sixth congressional district of Maryland, which 
has a population of 172.'2()8, and embraces the five counties 
of Allegany, Frederick, Garrett. Montgomery, and Wash- 
ington. 




JOHN A. Mcdowell 



JOHN ANDERSON McDOWELL 



John Anderson- McDowell, of Millers) uirg. was born in 
Killhuck. Holmes County. Ohio. September 25. ]S5:{; his 
father's family moved to a farm in Monroe Township. 
Holmes County, where he received his first years of school- 
ing in a country school : later, the family returned to 
Killbuck. where he clerked in his father's store, and at- 
tended the village school in the winters ; attended the 
Millersbnrg High School and Lebanon Normal University; 
was graduated from Mount Union College: began teach- 
ing a country school at seventeen : taught seven winter 
terms; was principal of Millersbnrg High School two years 
and superintendent of Millersbnrg schools for seventeen 
years : was county school examiner for seven years ; has 
been engaged as instructor in teachers' institutes in sev- 
eral counties in Ohio, also instructoi- in the summer school 
of Wooster University ; has been directly interested in 
agricultural pursuits for several years; was elected to the 
Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Democrat, I'eceiving •2(>.1(I5( votes, 
against "21. Kill votes for Addison S. McClure. liepublican. 857 
votes for I. N. Kieffer. Pi'ohil)itiouist. 104 votes for Homer 
E. Cole. National Prohibitionist, and o4 \otes scattering. 
He represents the seventeenth congressional district of Ohio, 
which has a population of 17().744. and embraces the five 
counties of Coshocton. Hohnes. Licking. 'I'uscarawas. and 
Wavne. 




THOMAS McEWAN, Jr. 



THOMAS iMcEWAN. Jr. 



Thomas McEwan. Jr., of Jersey City, was horn at Pater- 
son. N. J.. February '2(5. LS54 : is a lawyer liy profession. 
and wa.s formerly a civil engineer: was assessor of the 
fourth district. Jersey City, for two years, lSS(i-S7 : was 
I'nited States counnissioner and chief supervisor of elec- 
tions for the district of New Jei'.sey from August. 1S'.I2. to 
October, 1S1)8 ; was a delegate from Hudson County to the 
Republican national conventions of Isy-J and lsy(i; has 
been secretary and one oi the governors of the I'nion 
League Club of Hudson County until iSlKi ; has also been 
.secretary of the Hudson County Kepulilican general com- 
mittee for about fifteen years, up to January. lsy;j ; has 
])een a delegate to and secretary of every Republican con- 
vention of Jersey City and Hudson County for altout 
hfteen years, to January. ISDi*. and also a delegate to all 
the State conventions of the lieimlilican party in that 
period; in 1S98 was elected a membei- of the as.seml)ly in 
a Democratic district in Hudson County by a plurality of 
Si.") over Dr. Stout, who was the representative the yeai' 
before ; in the legislative session of 1S1)4 was cho.sen the 
Republican leader of the house, he Iteing tlie only mem- 
ber who. while serving his first term in the house, has 
been so honored on either side in many years; was elected 
to the Fifty-Fourth and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Con- 
gress as a Republican, receiving 30.557 votes, against 2(i.(IS(l 
votes for Young. Democrat. 17.") votes for McCracken. Pro- 
hibitionist. S75 votes for Wortendyke. National Democrat. 
1.073 votes for Campliell. Socialist Labor, and •_':!•') votes 
for Ginner. Silver Democrat. He represents the seventh 
congressional district of New .ler.sey. which has a popula- 
tion of '25tt.093. and embraces all of Hudson County, e.xcept 
the citv of Bavonne. 




WILLIAM W. MclNTIRE 



WILLIAM WATSON MclNTIRE 



William Watson McIntike, of Baltimore City, was born 
in P'ranklin County, Pa., of Scotcb-lrish and German 
parentage. June 29, 1S5<I; in bis infancy bis parents moved 
to Wasbington County. Md.. wbete bis fatber died in ]S()S 
from tbe effects of wounds received in tbe War of tbe 
liel>ellion ; forced in early life to provide for a dependent 
family, he learned tbe trade of macbinist. and moved in 
July. LS7"J, to lialtimore City, wbere be obtained employ- 
ment in tbe machine shops of the Baltimore and Ohio 
Railroad Company, at Mount Clare ; worked here till 1M74. 
when be received an appointment in tbe LTnited States 
Railway Mail Service : remained in this service till 1SS5, 
after tbe election of Mr. Cleveland, when he resigned and 
became general agent of the United States Life Insurance 
Company for the State of Maryland and tbe District of 
Columltia. which position he still holds : for a sliort time 
attended school at the Hagerstown Academy; while in tbe 
railway mail service studied law and was admitted to tbe 
Baltimore bar: in 1SS7 was elected as a Repulilican to 
tbe city council of Baltimore City, succeeding a Demo- 
crat, and was reelected in ISSS; in tbe caini)aign of ]sy5 
w'as treasurer of tbe Maryland Repul)lican State and city 
committees, and was elected to tbe Fifty-Fifth Congress as 
a Hepul)Iican. receiving 24.S*t9 votes, against 16.424 votes 
for William J. Ogden. Democrat, and ()7o votes for Arthur 
Frey. Prohibitionist. He rei)resents the fourth congres- 
sional district of Maryland, which has a population of 
l,s:].(l()5. and embraces in tbe city of Baltimore the eighth, 
ninth, tenth, eleventh, twelfth, thirteenth, fourteenth, eight- 
eenth, and nineteenth wards. 




FRANK A. McLAIN 



FRANK ALEXANDER McLAlN 



Frank Alexander McLain. of frloster. was born January 
29, 1853, and reared on a farm in Amite County, Miss.; at- 
tended the common schools of the country and graduated 
in the A. B. course at the University of Mississippi in June, 
1874 : commenced the practice of law in Liberty. ^liss., 
1880 ; was elected to the State legislature in 1881 for a 
term of two years ; was elected district attorney for his 
judicial district in ISS:]. in which capacity he served for 
three consecutive terms of four years each : was elected 
to the constitutional convention of Mississippi in 1S9() as 
floater delegate from the counties of Amite and Pike : re 
tired voluntarily from the ofiice of district attorney January 
1. 1896, and resumed his law practice at Gloster. IMiss.. 
where he now resides : was elected as a Democrat, prac- 
tically without opposition, to H!l out tlie unexpired term 
in the Fifty-Fifth Congress of William Franklin Love, who 
died October 17. 1898. He represents the sixth congres 
sional district of Mississippi, which has a population of 
166,913, and embraces the fourteen counties of Adams. 
Amite, Covington, (ireene. Hancock. Harrison. Jackson. 
Jones. Lawrence. Marion. Fearl River. Perry. Pike, and 
Wilkinson. 




BENTON McMILLIN 



BEINTON IWciWILLliN 



Bknton McMilun, of Carth.iLic. wus Imin in Monroe 
Couuty, Ky.. iSepteniber 11. 1S4'> : \v;is educated at Pliilo- 
math Academy, Tennessee, ami Krntucky University, at 
Lexington; studied law ui.der -I iiduc K. L. Gardenliire and 
was admitted to tlie bar; comnifiicnl the practice of law 
at Celina. Tenn., in 1,S71 ; whs clcitfd a member of tbe 
house of representatives of tbe Tennessee legislatuic in 
November. 1.S74. and served out liis trim; whs commissioned 
by the governor to treat with tbe Sljitc of Kentucky for tbe 
purchase of territory in IS?"); \\;is cbosen an elector on 
the Tilden and Hendricks ticket in b^7(»: was commissioned 
by tbe governor special judge ol fiie eircuit court in 1S77 ; 
was elected to the Forty-Sixth. I'mtx -Seventh. Forty-Eighth. 
Forty-Ninth. Fiftieth. Fifty-Fii>l . I'ifty- Second. Fifty-Tiiinl, 
and Fifty-Fourth Congresses and icilrcted to the Fiftj-Fiftb 
Congress as a Democrat, receixin^; 1S.(»70 vote.s, against 
12.^69 votes for ('. II. Whitney. i;e|Mibln-an. In 1S9S be 
was elected governor of Tennessee, mid will resign his seat 
in Congress. He represents the lumih congressional district 
of Tennessee, which has a po|Mihii imi of 1 .■)1).*.)40. and em- 
braces tbe thirteen counties of (Ijx. ( iimlxM-land. Fentress, 
Jackson. Macon. Overton. I'ickelt. riitnani. Khea. Smith, 
Sumner, Trousdale, and Wil.sim. 




THOMAS C. McRAE 



THOMAS CHIPMAN McRAE 



Thomas Chipman McRae. of Prescott. was born at Mount 
Holly. Union County. Ark.. December 21, IS-M ; received a 
limited education at the ]iri\ate schools at Shady Urove. 
Columbia County. Mount Holly. Union County, and Falcon. 
Nevada County. Ark. ; in boyhood he worked on a farm, 
and one year in a wholesale mercantile establishment at 
Shreveport. La., and one year in a retail store at Falcon. 
Ark. : received a full course of instruction at Soule Busi- 
ness College. New Orleans. La., in 1S7(I: graduated in law 
at the Washington and Lee University. \'irginia. in class 
of 1S71 72: was admitted to i)ractice in State circuit 
courts in Kosston. Nevada ('ounty. Ark.. January S. 1S73. 
in the Arkansas supreme court January 27. lS7(i. and in the 
United States Supreme Court January 4. hSSG ; was a mem- 
ber of the State legislature of Arkansas in 1S77, in which 
year the county-seat was changed, and he moved from 
Rosston to Prescott. where he has since practiced his pro- 
fession : was a member, of the town council of the incor- 
porated town of Prescott in 1S79; was a presidential 
elector for Hancock and English in ISSO; was chairman 
of the Democratic State convention in 1SS4 ; was delegate 
to the national Democratic convention in 1SS4. and is now 
the Democratic national committeeman for Arkansas: was 
elected to the Forty-Ninth. Fiftieth. Fifty-First, Fifty- 
Second. Fifty-Third, and Fifty-Fourth Congresses and re- 
elected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Democrat, receiving 
19,321 votes, against 8.244 for J. B. Friedheim. Republican. 
He represents the third congressional district of Arkansas, 
which has a population of UKI.SO"). and embraces the six- 
teen counties of Ashley. Calh(nin. Chicot. Clark. (Columbia. 
Desha, Hempstead. Howard. Lafayette. little River, Miller, 
Nevada, Ouachita. Pike. Sevier, and Union. 



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JOHN W. MADDOX 



JOHN W. MADDOX 



John W. Maddox, of Koine, was born on June 3, 1848, 
in Chattooga Count}', Ua. ; received a common-school edu- 
cation ; enlisted in the service of the Confederate States 
at the age of fifteen and served as a private until the 
end of the war between the States ; read law in Summer- 
ville, Ga.; was admitted to the bar at the September term, 
1877. and practiced law there until 1886 ; was elected 
county commissioner in January, 1878 ; was elected to the 
State legislature iu October, 1880. and reelected in 1882 ; 
was elected to represent the forty-second senatorial district 
in 1884 : was elected judge of the superior court, Rome 
circuit, iu November, 1886, and reelected in November, 
1890; resigned that office September 1, 1892, to accept the 
Democratic nomination for Congress ; was elected to the 
Fifty-Third and Fifty-Fourth Congresses and reelected to 
the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Democrat, receiving 10.719 
votes, against 5.087 votes for W. L. Massey, Republican, 
and 4.256 votes for J. W. Garrity. Populist. He represents 
the seventh congressional district of Georgia, which has a 
population of 179.259, and which embraces the thirteen 
counties of Barton, Catoosa, Chattooga. Cobb, Dale, Floyd, 
Gordon, Haralson, Murray, Paulding, Polk, Walker, and 
Whitfield. 




JAMES G. MAGUIRE 



JAMES G. MAGUIRE 



James G. Maguire. of San Francisco, was born in l^os- 
ton, Mass.. on the 22d of February. 1858 ; removed with 
his parents to California in April. 1S54 ; was educated in 
the public schools of Watsonville. Santa Cruz County. ChI.. 
and in the private academy of Mr. Joseph K. Fallon, of that 
place. Upon leaving school he served an apprenticeship 
of four years at the trade of blacksmithing; afterwards 
taught school for a year and a half; in 1S75 was elected 
to the legislature of the State of California, serving two 
years; in January. 1S7<S. was admitted to the bar by the 
supreme court of California; in 1SS2 was elected judge of 
the superior court of the city and county of San Fran- 
cisco, serving in that office six years ; was elected to the 
Fifty-Third and Fifty-Fourth Congresses and reelected to 
the Fifty-Fifth Congi-ess as a Democrat, receiving 19,07-t 
votes, against 10.940 votes for Thomas B. O'Brien. Repub- 
lican, and 9(iS votes for E. T. Kingsley. Socialist Labor. He 
represents the fourth congressional district of California, 
which has a population of 147.642, and embraces the twenty- 
ninth, thirtieth, thirty-first, thirty-second, thirty-third, thii-- 
ty-fourth, thirty-fifth, thirty-sixth, thirty-seventh, thirty- 
eighth, and forty-first assembly districts of the city of San 
Francisco. 




ROWLAND B. MAHANY 



ROWLAND BLENNERHASSETT MAHANY 



Rowland Blennerhassett Mahany, of Buffalo, was born 
in Buffalo, N. Y., September 28, 1864 ; was educated in the 
public schools ; was graduated with highest honors from 
the high school in 1881 ; in 1882 became instructor in 
Latin and Greek in the Buffalo Classical School ; entered 
Hobart College 1881. and remained two years, during which 
he stood at the head of his class ; went to Harvard Uni- 
versity 1884; was one of the '"Detur" prize men 1885; 
elected president of St. Paul's Society, the Episcopalian 
organization of Harvard College. 1887 ; chosen Phi Beta 
Kappa, 1887, in hrst eight of his class ; first marshal of 
Phi Beta Kappa same year ; Boylston prize man 1887 and 
1888; was graduated. 1888, shhiiiki niiii laiiilc ; delivered 
the poem at (lettysburg. July 1, 18S8, at the unveiling of 
the monument of Ninth Veteran Regiment of New York 
Volunteers ; associate editor Buft'alo Express 1888 ; became 
instructor in history and literature in Buft'alo high school 
18S1); appointed secretary of legation to Chile 18'.J0; ac- 
credited envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary 
to Ecuador 1892 ; nominated for Congress 1892 ; ran ahead 
of the ticket and cut down the normal Democratic majority 
over 1.000 votes; returned to Ecuador 1898 and concluded 
the Santos treaty, negotiations for which had remained un- 
settled for nearly ten years ; elected in 1894 to the Fifty- 
Fourth Congress and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a 
Republican, receiving 18,628 votes, against 14,765 votes for 
Charles Rung, Silver Democrat. 818 votes for Mark B. 
Moore. Cold Democrat, 84 votes for Stephen Lockwood, 
Prohibitionist, 252 votes for Joseph Otto. Socialist Labor, 
and 1,164 votes scattering. He represents the thirty-second 
district of New York, which has a population of 164,450. 
and embraces the first, second, third, fourth, fifth, sixth, 
seventh, eighth, ninth, tenth, eleventh, twelfth, thirteenth, 
fourteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth wards of the city of 
Buffalo. 




THADDEUS M. MAHON 



THADDEUS M. MAHON 



Thaddeus M. Mahon. of Chanibersburg, was Iwni at 
Greenvillage, Franklin County, Pa., in 1840: received a 
common-school and academic education : enlisted as a 
private in Comi^any A. One Hundred and Twenty-Sixth 
Pennsylvania Volunteers, in August, 1S02 ; after term of 
service in this regiment reenlisted as a veteran in Janu- 
ary, 1864, in Twenty-First Pennsylvania Cavalry; served 
until September, 1865 ; pai'ticipated in most of the en- 
gagements with Army of the Potomac, fifth corps ; was 
seriously wounded at Boydton Plank Road. Virginia, on 
November 4. 1864 ; read law. and was admitted to prac- 
tice in 1871 : has been actively engaged in his profession 
in southern Pennsylvania ever since his admission to the 
bar: was a member of Pennsylvania legislature in 1870, 
1871. and 1872; served as chairman of general judiciary 
committee ; was a candidate for Congress in the eighteenth 
district in 1876 and was defeated Ijy Hon. W. S. Stenger 
(who received the support of the Greenbackers) by the 
small majority of forty-nine : has always been a Republi- 
can and has always taken an active part in State and 
national politics ; was elected to the Fifty-Third and Fifty- 
Fourth Congresses and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Con- 
gress as a Repulilican. receiving 22.455 votes, against 
14.222 votes for W. F. Kearns. r)emocrat. He represents 
the eighteenth congressional district of Pennsylvania, which 
has a population of 169.443, and embraces the seven coun- 
ties of Franklin. Fulton. Huntingdon, Juniata, Mifflin, Sny- 
der, and Union. 




JAMES R. MANN 



JAMES R. MANN 



James R. Mann, of Chicago, was born October 20, 1856, 
on a farm near Bloomington. 111., whence his father moved 
to Iroquois County in 1867 ; was graduated at the Uni- 
versity of Illinois in 1876 and at the Union College of 
Law in Chicago in 1881 ; remained in Chicago to practice 
his profession, and is now the head of the law tirm of 
Mann. Hayes & Miller ; in 1887 was elected a member of 
the Oakland school board in the village of Hyde Park, 
and in 1888 was elected attorney of the village of Hyde 
Park, which was then the largest municipality in Illinois 
outside of Chicago ; upon annexation in 1892 of the out- 
lying territory to the city of Chicago, was elected alder- 
man from the thirty-second ward to the Chicago city 
council, and reelected in 1894 ; in the city council for 
three years, was chairman of the judiciaiT committee ; in 
1894 was the temporary chairman of the Repul)lican State 
convention, and in 1895 was the chairman of the Cook 
County Republican convention ; in 1892 was appointed a 
master in chancery of the superior court of Cook County, 
which position he resigned in January, 1896 ; in 1895 was 
elected by the South Park commissioners of Chicago as 
general attorney for the park Ijoard ; was elected to the 
Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Republican, receiving 51.582 
votes, against 23,123 votes for James H. Teller, candidate 
of the Democratic, the Populist, and Free-Silver Republi- 
can parties. 595 votes for Thomas A. Strobridge, Prohibi- 
tionist, and 957 votes for Benjamin J. Wertheimer, Gold 
Democrat. He represents the first congressional district 
of Illinois, which has a population of 316,280. and embraces 
the third, thirty-first, thirty-second, thirty-third, and thirty- 
fourth wards and part of the fourth ward of the city of 
Chicago, with the townships of Bloom. Bremen. Calumet, 
Orlaud, Rich, Thornton, and Worth. 




BENJAMIN F. MARSH 



BENJAMIN F. MARSH 



Benjamin F. Marsh, of Warsaw. Hancock County, was 
born in Wythe Townshii). in said county, and reared on his 
father's farm ; was educated in private schools until foui-- 
teen years old, when he was sent to Jubilee College and 
entered upon a classical course, pursuing the same for four 
years, lacking one year of graduation : entered the law 
office of his brother. Judge J. W. Marsh, at Warsaw, and 
was admitted to the bar in ISfiO; same year was a candidate 
on the Republican ticket for the office of State's attorney 
in the district then composed of Hancock and Adams 
Counties ; the district being Democratic, he was defeated 
by the late Calvin A. Warren, one of the best lawyers in 
western Illinois; under Mr. Lincoln's first call for volun- 
teers, in 18()1. he enrolled a company of cavalry and went 
to Springfield and tendered the .same for and during the 
War of the Rebellion to Gf)vernor Yates, but as cavalry 
was not included iu the call, the company was not then 
accepted : on his way home he enlisted as a private in the 
Sixteenth Illinois Infantry Volunteers, then at Quincy, and 
served in said regiment in northern Missouri until, on the 
fourth day of July, iSlil, while at Monroe Station, he re- 
ceived a telegram from Cxovernor Yates accepting his cavalry 
company; immediately going home, he in a few days re- 
cruited a comi)any of cavalry, was commissioned captain, 
and assigned to the Second Regiment Illinois Cavalry; he 
was finally commissioned colonel of this regiment and 
.served continuously until .lanuary. LS()(). liaving campaigned 



BENJAMIN F. MARSH 

in ever,y seceding State except Virginia and the two Caro- 
linas ; he received four gunshot wounds and carries in his 
bod}' rebel lead ; returning to Warsaw, he resumed the 
practice of law until 1S77 ; in 1861) he was the Republican 
candidate for the constitutional convention ; in 1876 he 
was elected as a Republican to the Forty-Fifth Congress 
from the then tenth district and was reelected to the Forty- 
Sixth and Forty-Seventh Congresses ; in 1882 he was again 
a candidate for Congress, but was defeated ; returning home 
in 1883, at the expiration of his term in Congress, he en- 
gaged in general farming and stock raising, and is still so 
engaged ; in the spring of 1889 he was appointed by Gov- 
ernor Oglesby railroad and warehouse commissioner, and 
held the same four years ; he was a delegate to the Repub- 
lican national convention in 1888; in 1892 he was elected 
as a Republican to the Fifty-Third and Fifty-Fourth Con- 
gresses, and was reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress, 
receiving 24,605 votes, against 24,296 votes for William H. 
Neece. Democrat, and 618 votes for L. E. Gross, Prohibi- 
tionist. He represents the fifteenth district of Illinois, 
having a population of 166.613. and embracing the seven 
counties of Adams. Brown, Hancock, Henderson, McDon- 
ough, Schuyler, and Warren. 




GEORGE A. MARSHALL 



GEORGE A. MARSHALL 



(lEORGE A. Makshall. of Sidney, was born in Shelby 
County. Ohio. Septemlier 14. bs51 : educated in public 
schools of Shelliy County, and later at the Ohio Wesleyan 
Lhiiversity. Delaware. Ohio: is an attorney at law; served 
eight years as prosecuting attorney of Shelby County, be- 
ing elected in 1S78, 1880, and again in 1S83; was elected 
to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Democrat, receiving 25,()88 
votes, against 16.(571 for Jno. P. Macliean. Republican, 
484 for L. M. Kramer, People's, and 3()(J for Geo. N. Mace, 
National — plurality being 9.017. He represents the fourth 
congressional district of Ohio, which has a population of 
168.632. and embraces the five counties of Allen, Auglaize, 
L)arke, Mercer, and Shelby. 




CHARLES H. MARTIN 



CHARLES H. MARTIN 



Charles H. Martin, of Polkton. urreat-grandson of Na- 
thaniel Macon, who served for fifty-seven years as Repre- 
sentative in Congress and United States Senator, w^as 
graduated from Wake Forest College, North Carolina, in 
1S72 ; after graduating he was elected assistant professor 
in that institution, and performed the duties of such pro- 
fessorship for one and a half years : he then took a two 
years' course at the University of Virginia ; soon aftei- 
graduating from this institution he was chosen professor 
of Latin in the C. B. F. Institute, Murfreesboro, N. C; after 
teaching in this school for a short time he studied law 
and was admitted to the bar ; practiced his profession for 
about three years, when he emliraced the Christian religion 
and felt impressed to preach the Gospel ; to better prepare 
himself for the ministry, he took a course at the Southern 
Baptist Theological Seminary, Louisville, Ky. While en- 
gaged in his duties as a pastor, without solicitation on his 
part, he was nominated l)y the Populists for Congress ; his 
competitor. James Alexander Lockhart, Democrat, was given 
the certificate of election, but, owing to certain alleged 
frauds and irregularities. Mr. Martin's friends advised him 
to contest the election ; the result of the contest was that 
Mr. Lockhart was unseated and Mr. Martin seated. Mr. 
Lockhart was again nominated for the Fifty-Fifth Con- 
gress, as also was Mr. Martin, and the latter was reelected 
by over 5,000 majority. He represents the sixth congres- 
sional district of North Carolina, which has a population 
of 204,6SG, and embraces the nine counties of Anson, 
Brunswick, Columlms. Mecklenburg, New Hanover, Pender, 

Richmond, Robeson, and Union. 

48 




SAMUEL MAXWELL 



SAMUEL MAXWELL 



Samuel Maxwell, of Fremont. \va.s born at Lodi (then 
a suburb of Syracuse, N. Y.) May 20, LS2() : was educated 
in the common schools, and in the higher branches under 
private tuition : removed with his father's family to Mich- 
igan in 1S44 ; here he taught school and farmed; in 1853 
was elected township clerk, and the following year school 
inspector ; in 1855-56 removed to Nebraska and preempted 
IfiO acres of government land, which he improved : returned 
to Michigan in 1858 and completed a course in law ; was 
admitted to the bar in I85i), and immediately returned to 
Nebraska and began practice ; was elected a delegate to 
the first Eepublican Territorial convention ; was elected a 
representative from Cass County to the Territorial legisla- 
ture ; was elected to the first constitutional convention, 
held in 1864; was elected to the legislsiture in the same 
year, and reelected in 1865; assisted in framing the con- 
stitution of 1866; v/as elected to the first State legislature 
in 1866 : in the following year was appointed by the gov- 
ernor a commissioner to select the capitol building and 
university lands ; organized the First National Bank of 
Plattsmouth aliout 1870. and w^as one of its officers ; was 
elected in 1871 to the second constitutional convention, 
and was chairman of the committee on suffrage ; in 1871 
the legislature elected him one of three commissioners to 
collect $72,000 insurance for the burned asylum at Lincoln 
and to erect a new^ building; was elected judge of the 
supreme coui-t as a Eepublican in 1872 for a term of six 
vears ; located in Fremont in 1873 ; was elected in 1875 a 



SAMUEL MAXWELL 

member of the third constitutional convention, and was 
chairman of the judiciarj- committee; was elected the 
same year judge of the supreme court under the new con- 
stitution, and was reelected in ISSl and 1887; is the author 
of a Digest of Nebraska Reports. Practice in Justice Courts, 
Pleading and Practice, Criminal Procedure, and Code Plead- 
ing; has been an advocate of free and unlimited coinage 
of silver at the ratio of sixteen to one for twenty years ; 
was elected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Fusionist, 
receiving 23,487 votes, against 18,683 votes for Ross L. 
Hammond, Republican. 254 votes for Charles M. Griffith, 
Sound-Money Democrat, and 521 votes for David Brown. 
Prohibitionist. He represents the third district of Ne- 
braska, which has a population of 163.674, and embraces 
the eighteen counties of Antelope, Boone, Burt. Cedar, Ool- 
fa.x, Cuming. Dakota, Dixon. Dodge, Knox, Madison, Mer- 
rick, Nance. Pierce, Platte. Stanton. Thurston, and Wayne. 




DAVID MEEKISON 



DAVID MEEKISON 



David Meekison, of Napoleon, Ohio, was boru Noveni- 
hev 14. 184'.). at Dundee. Scotland, and emigrated with hi.s 
parents from that country in 1S5") to Napoleon, Ohio, where 
he has since resided, except three years' service in the 
Fourth United States Artillery ; he attended the common 
schools until his fourteenth year, and then entered a print- 
ing office : studied law and was admitted to the Inir in 
1S78 : although always a Democrat lie has been twice ap- 
pointed to office by Republican authorities, first as town 
clerk and afterwards as county prosecuting attorney for 
the county, to till a vacancy ; was afterwards elected and 
reelected to the same office; in issi he was elected probate 
judge, and served two terms; in 1.S86 he established a 
lianking business in Napoleon. Ohio, under the name of 
Meekison Bank, to wliicli he has given his j^rincipal atten- 
tion, except that required l)y the duties of mayor of Na- 
poleon. Ohio, in which office he is now serving his fourth 
consecutive term, and was elected to the Fifty-Fifth Con- 
gress as a Democrat, receiving 24,388 votes, against 18.478 
votes for Frank B. De \Vitt. Itepulilican. and 642 votes for 
(leorge N. Rice, Populist. He represents the first district of 
Ohio, which has a population of l(il.587. and emlu-aces the 
six counties of Defiance. Henry. Paulding, Putnam, Van 
Wert, and Williams. 



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DAVID H. MERCER 



DAVID H. MERCER 



David H. ]\Iercer. of Omaha, was borii in Benton County, 
Iowa. July '.». 1857; removed with his parents to Adams 
County. 111., the following year; his father was captain of 
Company E. iseventy-Eighth Regiment Illinois Volunteer 
Infantry and marched with Sherman to the Sea ; at the 
close of the war he i-emoved with his parents to Brown- 
ville. Neb., where he attended the public schools ; entered 
the Nebraska State I'niversity in 1S77 and graduated in 
1880 ; during the summer vacations he taught school, 
clerked in a store, worked on a farm, and edited a news- 
paper ; studied law one year and then entered senior class 
of the law^ department of Michigan State University, 
graduating in 1SS2. after which he returned to Brownville 
to practice his profession ; served one term as city clerk 
and police judge ; was twice elected secretary of the Re- 
publican State central committee ; moved to Omaha in 
1885 and for several years was chairman of the Republi- 
can city and county committees ; was elected secretary of 
the national Republican congressional committee in ISIK) ; 
was elected to the Fifty-Third and Fifty-Fourth Con- 
gresses and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Re- 
pul)lican, receiving 14.861 votes, against lo,:iS6 votes for 
Judge E. R. Duffie. a fusion candidate who was nominated 
by the Silver Republicans. Democrats, ana Populists, 202 
votes for Charles Watts. Prohibitionist, and 59 votes for 
G. W. Woodbey. National. He represents the second con- 
gressional district of Nebraska, which has a population of 
176.752. and embraces the three counties of Douglas, Sarpy, 
and Washington. 




WILLIAM S. MESICK 



I 

I 



WILLIAM S. MESICK 



William S. Mesick. of Maiiceloua, Antrim County. Mich.. 
was born August 'Jl), 1S5(). at Newark, Wayne County. N. Y.; 
was educated in tlie common schools, Kalamazoo (Mich.) 
Business College, and at the University of Michigan ; ad- 
mitted to the liar in ISSI : has been in active practice of 
the law since: held the ofiice of prosecuting attorney of 
Antrim County. Mich., for one term; was elected to the 
Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Republican, receiving 23,469 
votes, against 1S.7()8 votes for Jonathan G. Ram.sdell, Dem- 
ocratic-Silver nominee, and 315 votes for Bai'uey, Prohibi- 
tionist. He represents the eleventh congressional district of 
Michigan, which has a population of 167,669. and embraces 
the twelve counties of Antrim, Charlevoix, Clare. Grand 
Traverse, Gratiot. Isabella, Kalkaska, Mecosta, Missaukee, 
Montcalm. Osceola, and Roscommon. 




ADOLPH MEYER 



ADOLPH MEYER 



Adolph Meter, of New Orleans, was born October 19, 
1842 ; was a student at the University of Virginia until 
1862, during which year he entered the Confederate army 
and served until the close of the war on the staff of 
Brig.-Gen. John S. Williams, of Kentucky ; at the close of 
the war returned to Louisiana, and has been engaged 
largely in the culture of cotton and sugar since ; has also 
been engaged in commercial and tinaucial pursuits in the 
city of New Orleans ; was elected colonel of the First Reg- 
iment of Louisiana State National Guard in 1S7*.). and in 
18S1 was appointed brigadier-general to command the hrst 
brigade, embracing all the uniformed corps of the State ; 
was elected to the Fifty-Second, Fifty-Third, and Fifty- 
Fourth Congresses and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Con- 
gress as a Democrat, receiving 10,776 votes, against 4.022 
votes for Romain, Republican. 401 votes for Livaudais, 
Regular Republican. 113 votes for Gazin, Labor, and 6 
votes scattering. He represents the first congressional dis- 
trict of Louisiana, which has a population of 154,i)18. and 
embraces of the city of New Orleans the third, fourth, 
fifth, sixth, seventh, eighth, ninth, and fifteenth wards and 
the parishes of Orleans. St. Bernard, and Plaquemines, ex- 
tending from Julia Street, in the city of New Orleans, to 
the Gulf of Mexico. 




ROBERT W. MIERS 



ROBERT W. MIERS 



Robert W. Mier^^. of Bloomington. was liorn in Decatur 
County. Ind.. .laiuiary 27. 1S48 ; is a graduate of lioth the 
literary and the law department of Indiana University; 
commenced the practice of law at Bloomington. Ind., in 
April. 1S72: was elected prosecuting attorney for the tenth 
judicial circuit of Indiana in 1875 and reelected in 1S77 ; 
was elected to the house of representatives of the Indiana 
legislature in 1S71I : was a trustee of the Indiana University 
from iNSl to 1S'.(3: was appointed judge of the tenth judicial 
circuit of Indiana in 1SS8 to till an unexpired term; was 
elected judge of the same circuit in ISilO and served as 
judge until Septemhei*. 1896. when he resigned and accepted 
the nomination of the Democi'atic congressional convention 
for the second district of Indiana : was elected to the Fifty- 
Fifth Congress as a Democrat, receiving 21.757 votes, against 
2(),75y votes for Alexander ^I. Hardy. Republican, and 2.625 
votes for Newel H. ^lotsinger. Populist. He represents the 
second congressional district of Indiana, which has a popu- 
lation of 167.(105. and embraces the eight counties of 
Daviess. (Greene. Knox, Lawrence, Martin. Monroe. Owen, and 
Sullivan. 




WARREN MILLER 



WARREN MILLER 



Warren Miller, of Jackson, was liorn in Meig-s County. 
Ohio. April 2, 1S47 ; went to Virginia (now West Virginia) 
about the year 1850 : was raised on a farm ; attended suli- 
scription schools a few months; attended the Ohio Uni- 
versity, at Athens, about three years : taught school : studied 
law. and was admitted to the bar in LS71 ; served as 
assistant prosecuting attorney of Jackson County one term 
and as prosecuting attorney eight years from January 1, 
ISHI : was a delegate at large to the Republican national 
convention at Chicago in 1884 and supported Mr. Blaine 
for President on every ballot; was a member of the West 
Virginia legislature in 1890 it 1 ; was a candidate on the 
State ticket for supreme judge in lSi)2 and received the 
vote of both Republicans and Populists ; lacked, according 
to the Democratic count, only 95 votes of a majority in 
the State, although he received more votes than the Cleve- 
land electors ; was elected to the Fifty-Fourth and 
reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Republican, re- 
ceiving 24,954 votes, against 28.774 votes for Walter Pen- 
dleton. Democrat, and 21 votes for G. Warren Hays. 
Populist. He represents the fourth congressional district 
of West Virginia, which has a population of 195,360. and 
embraces the twelve counties of Cabell. Calhoun. Jackson. 
Lincoln. Mason, Pleasants, Putnam, Ritchie. Roane. Wayne, 
Wirt, and Wood. 




DANIEL W. MILLS 



DANIEL W. MILLS 



Daniel W. Mills, of Chicago, was born on a farm near 
Waynesville. Warren Connty. Ohio. February 25. 1888: is the 
.'^on of David and Susannah Mills; his mother, who was 
brouglit up near the site where Cincinnati now stands, at 
the age of three years fell into the hands of Indians, and 
was for some time held in captivity by the savages: his 
Quaker great-grandfather. Joseph Brown, accompanied Wil- 
liam Penn to this country in 1682; was thrown upon his 
own resources by the death of his father, and to him fell 
the principal support of a widowed mother, left with liut 
limited means ; worked for neighboring farmers during 
summers and attended the common schools of Rayesville. 
and later the Waynesville High School ; at the age of 
eighteen he secured employment in a mercantile estab- 
lishment, and in is.")'.) engaged in the mercantile, grain- 
shipping, and pork-packing business on his own account at 
Corwin. Ohio ; served in the army as captain of Company 
1). One Hundred and Eightieth Ohio Volunteers, and con- 
tinued in active service until the close of the war; in the 
spring of 18(i(i went to Chicago, and. as owner of a vessel, 
engaged in lake shipping for three years ; made large in- 
vestments in real estate, which yielded px-ofitable returns, 
and has ever since been extensively interested in realty 
transactions; from 1877 to 1881 served as warden of the 
Cook County Hosjiital ; was twice elected alderman of his 
ward: was elected to the tifty-Fifth Congress as a Re- 
publican, receiving 22.5()4 votes, against 20.454 votes for 



DANIEL Ji: MILLS 

James Mc Andrews, Democrat and People's party, 419 votes 
for James E. Gillis, Independent Gold Democrat, 375 votes 
for Charles W. Woodman, Independent Republican, 236 
votes for Archibald Sprott, Prohiliitionist. and 129 votes foi- 
J. Augustus Weaver. Socialist Labor. He represents the 
fourth congressional district of Illinois, which has a pop- 
ulation of 299.208, and emln-aces the eighth, ninth twelfth, 
and nineteentli wards of the cit,v of Chicago. 



\ 




EDWARD S. MINOR 



EDWARD S. MINOR 



Edward S. Minor, of yturgeon Bay. was born in Jef- 
ferson County. N. Y.. in 1S40: went with his parents to 
Wisconsin in 1S45; settled in Milwaukee County and sul)se- 
quently lived in the city of Milwaukee, where he attended" 
the public schools ; went with his parents to Sheboygan 
County in 1.S52. where he lived on a farm for several years ; 
received a public-school and academic education ; in 18(jl 
enlisted in Company C Second Wisconsin \'olunteer Cav- 
alry, as a private ; pai'ticipated in all the expeditions, raids, 
and battles in which the regiment was engaged until the 
close of the war: was mustered out as a first lieutenant 
in November, LS(>5 ; after his return home engaged in mer- 
cantile pursuits until 18H4, at which time he was appointed 
superintendent of the Sturgeon Bay and Lake Michigan 
Ship Canal, which jiosition he held for seven years ; now 
owns some marine property that is operated in connec- 
tion with a stone quarry located near Sturgeon Bay ; is 
also a licensed master of steam vessels : was elected to 
the Wisconsin assembly in 1S77 and reelected in ISKO and 
18S1 ; was elected to the State senate and served in that 
body in 1883 and 1885 ; was president iim tcnipoi-i' of the 
senate during the latter term : was also a member of the 
Wisconsin tish commission for four years ; has held numer- 
ous local offices at various times and is at present mayor 
of the city of Sturgeon Bay: was elected to the Fifty- 
Fourth Congress and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress 
as a Republican, receiving 26.471 votes, against 16,845 votes 
for George W. Cate. Democrat and Populist, 580 votes for 
John Evans. Prohibitionist, and 4 votes for Nelson H. Ken- 
dall, Labor. He represents the eighth congressional dis- 
trict of Wisconsin, which has a population of 179,408, and 
embraces the seven counties of Brown, Door, Kewaunee, 
Outagamie. Portage, Waupaca, and Wood. 




JOHN M. MITCHELL 



JOHN MURRAY MITCHELL 



John Murray ]\1itciiell. of New York, was born at (io 
West Ninth tStreet, in the ujiper portion of the eighth 
congressional district. March 18, 1858. and has ever since 
lived in the same honse in which he was born : his father. 
William Mitchell, was chief justice of what is now known as 
the appellate division of the supreme court in the county 
of New Y'ork. and was also justice of the court of appeals, 
the highest court in the State: was graduated from Colum- 
bia College in 1877 with the degree of A. B.. and was 
class valedictorian, though the youngest member of the 
class; completed a course in the Columbia Law School in 
the spring of 1871). receiving the degree of LL. B.. and was 
admitted to the bar immediately thereafter : spent the fol- 
lowing year in travel in Kuiope and the East, and de- 
voted himself to the study of international law and 
reviewing his other studies : on his return he was given 
the degree of A. M. by Columbia College, and at once 
entered upon the duties of law clerk in a law office : two 
years later he opened a law office of his own : in lss;» he 
entered into partnership with his two brothers. Edward 
and William, the former of whom was United States at- 
torney for the southern district of New York l)y appoint- 
ment of President Harrison : in the spring of 1894 he 
became associated in the practice of law with John R. 
Dos Passos and his brother. Benjamin F. Dos Passos, the 
well-known lawyers and authors of several standard law 
books ; in the fall f)f 18i)4 he was nominated l)y acclama- 
tion for Congress: the result of the election showed an 



JOHX MURRAY MITCHELL 

apparent plurality of o(i7 votes for his opponent, which 
count, however, was found to be erroneous; a contest of 
the right to the seat terminated in seating Mr. Mitchell 
b}' a vote of 162 to 39; he was again nominated by accla- 
mation and stood for election against his former com- 
petitor, and was elected by a majority of 1,'261), and was 
the only gold candidate elected south of Twenty-Third 
Street ; was reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a lie- 
publican, receiving 10.4S8 votes, against 1).219 votes for his 
Democratic (»pponent. and 140 votes for William F. West- 
ertield. Socialist Labor. He represents the eighth congres- 
sional district of New York, which has a population of 
125,778, and emliraces the second, third, and seventh 
assembly districts of the county of New York. 

(Note. — This district now runs from Peck Slip to Catharine 
Street, on the East River ; along Catharine Street to the Bowery ; up 
the Bowerv and Third Avenue to Twentv-Third Street ; across to 
Seventh Avenue ; down Seventh Avenue to Sixteenth Street : then 
over to Eighth Avenue ; down Eighth Avenue to Bleecker Street, and 
thence to Broadway, down tiie east side of Broa<lwav to and includ- 
ing the City Hall ; thence down Spruce Street to the East River.) 




WILLIAM H. MOODY 



WILLIAM H. MOODY 



William H. Moody, of Haverhill, was l)orn in Newbury. 
Mas.s., December 28, 1S53; he was graduated at Phillips 
Academy. Andover. Mass.. in 1S72. and from Harvard Uni- 
versity in 1S7() : is a law^yer by profession ; was district 
attorney for the eastern district of Massachusetts from 
1890 to 1S95 ; he was elected to the Fifty-Fourth Congress 
as a Republican, at a special, election, to till the vacancy 
cau.sed by the death of (ien. William Cogswell, and 
reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Republican, re- 
ceiving 19.947 votes, against 7,460 votes for Eben Moody 
Boynton. Democrat, and 8 votes scattering. He represents 
the sixth congressional district of Massachusetts, which has 
a population of 1()9,41S, and einl)races the cities of Glouces- 
ter. Haverhill, Newlniryport. and Salem, and towns of 
Amesbury. Beverly. Boxford. Bradford. Danvers, Essex, 
Georgetown. Groveland. Hamilton. Ipswich. Manchester. 
Marblehead. Merrimac. Middleton. Newbury. Rockport, Row- 
ley, Salisbury, Swampscott. Topstield, Wenham, and West 
Newbury. 




JOHN A. MOON 



JOHN AUSTIN MOON 



John Austin Moon, of Chattaiiooga. was born April 22. 
1855. iu Albemarle County. Va.: removed with his father 
to Bristol. A'a.. where he resided until Jannary. 1S7(I. and 
then removed to Chattanooga. 'JVnn.. where he has resided 
since; was educated in the academy at Bristol. Va.. and 
in King College. Bristol. Tenn.: studied law. and was ad- 
mitted to the bar at Lebanon. De Kalb County. Ala.. March 
16. 1S74. and at Chattanof)ga i\larch 24, 1(S74. and to the 
Federal court and Tennessee supreme court in 1S75. and to 
the bar of the Supreme Court of the United States in 1S7S; 
was nominated in ISSO l)y Inith wings of tlic Democracy 
for joint representative in the general asseml)ly and was 
defeated ; was elected attorney for the city of Chattanooga 
in 18S1 and 1SS2 : was married October 8. 1884. at Jonesboro, 
Tenn.. to Miss Addie M. Deaderick. the youngest daughter 
of the late Chief Justice James W. Deaderick. of the supreme 
court of Tennessee : was a member of the Democratic execu- 
tive committee of the State in 1888; at the unanimous 
request of the !iar of the fourth judicial circuit of Tennessee, 
was appointed special circuit judge in May. 1889. and twice 
reappointed, and held the office continuously under special 
commissions until January 3, 1891 : was appointed as regu- 
lar judge for the fourth circuit, and held under this com- 
mission until August. 1892. when he was elected circuit 
judge: was reelected in 1894 for a term of eight years; 
August 12 was nominated by the Democrats, and August 
]:'>. 1S9(>. liy the Populists ff>r Congress, and was elected ta 



JOHN AUSTIN MOON 

the Fifty-Fifth Congress, receiving 19.498 votes, against 
17.716 votes for W. J. Clift. Republican. 227 votes for J. L. 
Hopkins, Prohibitionist, 133 votes for W. J. Farris, Populist, 
and 2 votes scattering. He represents the third congres- 
sional district of Tennessee, which has a population of 
199,972, and embraces the fifteen counties of Bledsoe. Brad- 
ley. Franklin, Grundy. Hamilton, James. Marion. McMinn, 
Meigs. Monroe, Polk. Sequatchie, Van Buren, Warren, and 
White. 




PAGE MORRIS 



PAGE MORRIS 

Page Mokris. of Duhith. was horn .June ;J0. 1S58, at Lynch- 
luirg. Va.; educated at u private school and at William 
and Mary College and the Virginia ililitary Institute : 
gradnated at the lattei- institution in IST^J. and was at 
once appointed assistant jirofessor of niatheniatics : in 
\S1'6 was appointed professor of inatlieniatics in the 
Texas Military Institute, and icniovcd to Austin. Tex.; in 
lS7(j was elected professor of ajiplied mathematics in the 
Agricultural and ^lechanical College of Texas, located near 
Bryan, in that State, where he remained for three years; 
studied law 'vhile teaching in college, and was admitted 
to the l)ar at Lynchburg. \ a., wliither he had returned, in 
ISSO; in 1SS4 was nominated Ity the Republicans and ran 
for Congress in the sixth district of Virginia against John 
W. Daniel. Democrat, and was defeated : in ISHO removed 
from Lynchburg to Dulnth. where he has since resided: 
in Februai-y. iSSi). was elected municipal judge of the city 
of Duluth ; in March, 1H94. was elected city attorney by 
the city council of Duluth: in August. ls'.»."). was appointed. 
liy the governor, district judge of the eleventh judicial 
district of Minnesota: in July. iSiJG, was unanimously nom- 
inated, by the Republican congressional convention, for C'on- 
gress, accepted the nomination, and immediately sent to 
the governor his resignation of the office of judge, to take 
effect Septemlier 1. so that he might make the campaign: 
on November :!. is'.M). was elected to the Fifty-Fifth Con- 
gress as a Republican, receiving oO.-jPJ votes, again.st "iy.SOy 
votes for ('harles A. Towne. Populist and Democrat. He 
represents the sixth congressional district of Minnesota, 
which has a poi)ulation of 1S4.S4.S. and embraces the 
twenty counties of Aitkin. Anoka. Beltrami. Benton. Carl- 
ton. Cass. Cook. Crow Wing. Hnl)liard. Itasca. Lake. Millelacs, 
Morrison. Pine. St. Louis. Sherlnirne, Stearns, Todd. Wadena, 
and Wriirht. 




SIDNEY E. MUDD 



SYDNEY EMANUEL MUDD 



Sydney Emanuel Mtdd. of Laplata. was born February 
12. 1S5S. iu Charles County. Md. ; was educated at Ueorge- 
town ( D. C.) College and St. .lohn's College. Annapolis. Md., 
graduating from the latter in 1878: read law privately 
and attended the law department of the University of 
\irginia ; was admitted to the bar iu ISSO. and has prac- 
ticed since : was elected to the State house of delegates 
in 187i) and reelected in bSSl ; was an elector on the <!ar- 
tield and Arthur ticket in iSSO; was elected to the Fifty- 
First and defeated for the Fifty-Second Congress ; was 
elected to the State house of delegates in ISiJo. and was 
speaker of that body : was delegate to the national Hepub- 
lican convention iSiHi; was elected to the Fifty-Fifth Con- 
gi-ess as a Republican, receiving lS.Uo4 votes, against 1.").442 
votes for Robert Moss. Democrat, and 41)1 votes for S. H. 
Neave. Prohil>itionist. He rei)resents the tifth congressional 
district of Maryland, which has a population of 15o.".)12. 
and embraces Anne Arundel. Calvert. Charles. Howard, 
I'l'iuce Ceorge. and St. Mary"s ('ouiities. and the .seventeenth 
ward of Baltimore Citv. 




FRANCIS G. NEWLANDS 



FRANCIS G. NEWLANDS 



Francis G. Newlands. of Keno. was l)orn in Natchez, 
Miss., August 28, 1848 ; entered the chiss of 1867 at Yale 
College and remained until the middle of his junior year; 
later on attended the Columbian College Law School at 
Washington, but prior to graduation was admitted to the 
bar by the supreme court of the District of Columbia and 
went to San Francisco, where he entered upon the prac- 
tice of law : continued in the active practice of his pro- 
fession until 1886, when he became a trustee of the estate 
of William Sharon, formerly United States Senator from 
the State of Nevada: in 1888 he l^ecame a citizen of the 
State of Nevada : engaged actively in the agitation of the 
silver question and was for years vice-chairman of the 
national silver committee : was also active in the irriga- 
tion develoj)ment of the ai'id region, and other questions 
relating to the West ; he was elected to the Fifty-Third 
and Fifty-Fourth Congi-esses. and, having received his nom- 
ination fi-om both the Silver party and the Democratic 
party, was reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress, receiving 
6,529 votes, against 1,819 votes for M. J. Davis, Repuldican, 
and 1,948 votes for J. (A Doughty. Populist. He is a Repre- 
sentative at Large from Nebraska. 



JAMES NORTON 



James Xorton. of Mullins, was born October S. 1843, in 
Marion (.'ounty. S. 0. ; received an academic education : left 
school in lH(il to enter the armj- : served through the war 
in the army of northern Virginia. He was more than once 
wounded, a minie ball at one time passing through the 
body and right lung. From this wound he had sufficiently 
recovered to be able to return to the army just in time, 
with Petersburg, to be captured. After the war he re- 
entered school. Init did not finish regular course : in 1870 
was elected county school commissioner and reelected 187"2 : 
served as a member of the house of representatives of 
South Carolina iSSIv 87 and 1890-91 ; was elected comp- 
troller-general of the State 1894. and reelected 1896. which 
office he resigned to accept a seat in the Fifty-Fifth Con- 
gress. He won the nomination for Congress, to till the 
vacancy caused by the resignaticm of John L. ^IcLaurin. 
over five competitors, and was elected as a Democrat, 
without opposition, October, 1897, having received the en- 
tire vote cast. He represents the sixth congressional dis- 
trict of South Carolina, which has a population of 158,851, 
and embraces the counties of Clarenden, Darlington. Flor- 
ence, Horry, Marion, Mai-lboro, and part of Williamsburg. 




JAMES ALBERT NORTON 



JAMES ALBERT NORTON 



James Albert Norton, of Titiiii. Seneca County, Ohio, 
was born in Seneca County. Ohio, on November 11, 1843; 
was educated in the TiflHn schools; enlisted in United 
States service in August, 1S()2. sergeant Company K, One 
Hundred and First Ohio Volunteer Infantry; was promoted 
to first lieutenant and adjutant One Hundred and Twenty- 
Third United States Colored Infantry in l.Sfi4; mustered 
out of service at close of the war in iSli.j ; Ijegan the prac- 
tice of medicine in 1867; continued that profession until 
lS7i); was admitted to the bar in 1S79 : served six years 
in the Ohio house of representatives from 1878 to 1879; 
was speaker ^^ro tenipoyc of that l)ody for two years; was 
appointed commissioner of railroads and telegraphs by 
(i()V. James E. Campbell, and served in that capacity 
during Governor Campbeirs. and part of the first term of 
(iovernor McKinley's. administration, when he resigned to 
accept position in railroad service, and was elected to the 
Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Democrat, receiving •28,87S votes, 
against 23,506 votes for Stephen R. Harris, Republican. 
458 votes for J. H. Rhodes. Populist, and 249 votes foi 
.b)hn W. Belson, Prohibitionist. He represents the tliii'- 
teenth congressional district of Ohio, which has a popula- 
tion of 185.324, and embraces the six counties of Crawford. 
Erie, Marion, Sandusky, Seneca, and Wyandot. 




BENJAMIN B. ODELL, Jr. 



BENJAMIN B. ODELL. Jr. 



Benjamin B. Odell. Jr., of New burg. N. Y., was born 
in Newburg January 14, 1854 ; was educated in the pul)iic 
schools, also at Bethanj' (W. Va.) College and Columliia Col- 
lege. New York City ; since his majority he has been en- 
gaged in a commercial career, principally in the ice business 
and electric lighting ; never has held a public oliice before ; 
has always been active in politics: for the past ten years 
has represented the seventeenth district on the Kepuljli- 
can State committee and was chairman of the executive 
committee during the past campaign : was elected to the 
Fifty-Fourth and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a 
Republican, receiving •J'J.C^'i votes, against 15,50(1 votes for 
Uavid A. Morrison. Democrat, and 445 votes for R. A. Widen- 
mann. National Democrat. He represents the seventeenth 
congressional district of New York, which has a population 
of 164.052. and embraces the three counties of Orange, Rock- 
land, and Sullivan. 




HENRY W. OGDEN 



HENRY W. OGDEN 



Henry W. Ogden. of Benton, was born at Abingdon. 
Va.. October '21. 1S42; at the age of nine years removed 
with his father to Warrensburg, Johnson (.'ounty. Mo.; was 
educated in the common schools, working on his father's 
farm in spring and summer and attending school in winter : 
entered the Confederate service and served through the war 
in the Trans-Mississipi)i department; was Hrst lieutenant 
of Company D. Sixteenth Missouri Infantry, and afterwards 
on the staff of Brigadier-General Lewis, second brigade. 
Parsons's division of Missouri infantry : was paroled at 
Shreveport on the Sth of June. ISGO; remained in Louisiana 
and engaged in agricultural pursuits, which occupation he 
has followed since continuously : was a member of the con- 
stitutional convention in 1S71I and of the State house of 
representatives in ISSO; in 1SS2 was chairman of the com- 
mittee on ways and means; reelected in 1884, and was 
speaker of the house from 1884 to 1888; was elected as a 
Democrat to the Fifty-Third Congress, to fill the vacancy 
caused by the appointment of N. C. Blanchard to he Ignited 
States Senator ; was elected to the Fifty-Fourth and re- 
('lected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Democrat, receiving 
10.775 votes, against 4.726 votes .for B. W. Bailey. Populist, 
and 647 votes for Robert P. Hunter. Republican. He rep- 
resents the fourth congressional district of Louisiana, which 
has a population of li)3.760. and enil)races tlie parishes of 
Bienville. Bossier. Caddo. De Soto. Crant. Natchitoches. 
Rapides. Red River. Sal)ine. Vernon, Webster, and Winn. 




MARLIN E. OLMSTED 



MARLIN EDGAR OLMSTED 



Marlin Edgar Olmsted, of Harrisburg, was born in 
Ulysses Township. Potter County. Pa. : educated in com- 
mon schools and Coudersport Academy ; at an early age 
w^as appointed assistant corporation clerk by Auditor-Gen- 
eral (afterwards Governor) Hartranft ; one year later was 
promoted to corporation clerk, in charge of collection of 
taxes from corporations under Pennsylvania's peculiar 
revenue system ; was continued in same position by Har- 
rison Allen, auditor-general ; read law w'ith Hon. John W. 
Simonton (now president judge of twelfth judicial district) 
at Harrisburg ; was admitted to the bar November 25. 
1878 ; was at the time of his election president and gen- 
eral counsel of Beech Creek Railroad Company, also of 
Buffalo and Susquehanna Railroad Company, and counsel 
for Lehigh Valley Kaihoad Company : Delaware. Lacka- 
wanna and Western Railroad Company ; New York Central 
and Hudson River Railroad (.'ompany : Lake Shore and 
Michigan Southern Railway Company ; Lehigh Coal and 
Navigation Company : Fall Brook railway system ; Western 
I' nion Telegraph Company : Pullman Palace Car Company ; 
Central Railroad Company of New Jersey, and many other 
corporations ; was elected to represent Dauphin County in 
the proposed constitutional convention in 1891 ; was elected 
to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Republican, receiving 
25,(114 votes, against 462 votes for Jacob F. Klugh, Demo- 
crat, 1,101 votes for Benjamin H. Engle. Prohibitionist. 
1,948 votes for Abraham Mattis. People's party, and 22 
votes scattering. He represents the fourteenth congres- 
sional district of Pennsylvania, which has a population of 
171,384, and embraces the three counties of Dauphin, 
Lebanon, and Perry. 



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JOHN E. OSBORNE 



JOHN E. OSBORNE 



John E. Osborne, of Rawlins, Wyo., was born in West- 
port, Essex County. N. Y., June 9. 1858; graduated from 
the high school of his native town at the age of eighteen 
years, after which he began the study of medicine, and 
graduated from the University of Vermont in the class of 
ISSd : removed to Rawlins. Wyo.. immediately thereafter, 
and engaged in the practice of his profession ; later en- 
gaged extensively in raising live stock upon the open 
range : he was elected in 1883 to the Wyoming Terri- 
torial legislature ; was appointed in 1888 by (iovernor 
Moonlight to the position of chairman of the Territorial 
penitentiary building commission ; was the same year 
elected mayor of the city of Rawlins ; was selected as an 
alternate to the Democratic national convention in 181)2, 
and at the November election of the same year was elected 
governor of Wyoming; at the expiration of his official 
term as governor, he was unanimously renominated by his 
party for a second term, but owing to important Inisiness 
engagements declined the honor ; was chosen a member 
of the Ijimetallic Democratic national committee for the 
State of Wyoming in 1895 ; was chairman of the Wyoming 
delegation to the national convention at Chicago in 1896, 
and was elected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Democrat, 
receiving 10,310 votes, against 10,044 votes for Frank W. 
Mondell, Republican, and 628 votes for William Brown, 
Populist. Mr. Osborne is a Representative at Large from 
Wyoming. 




PETER J. OTEY 



PETER J. OTEY 



Peter J. Otey. of Lynchlmrg. was born in that city 
l)eceml)er 22, 1840: was educated at the Virginia Military 
Institute and graduated July 1. 1860; while a cadet he 
participated in the defense of Virginia in the John Brown 
raid : on graduating he entered the profession of engi- 
neering on the Mrginia and Kentucky Railroad, under the 
distinguished Claudius Crozet ; in April. 1861. he joined the 
Confederate army and participated in the western campaign 
culminating at Donelson and Shiloh ; returned with his 
command and was with the army of northern ^'irginia and 
remained in the infantry until the close of the war: was 
badly wounded at the battle of New Market in the Valley 
of Virginia : after four months he returned : commanded a 
brigade under Early : his career lias been that of a thor- 
ough business man in railroad, banking, and insurance 
since 186^1. from which time he has been active in the 
politics of his State, though never asking for office till 
181(4. when he was elected to the Fifty-Fourth Congress 
and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Democrat, 
receiving 17.187 votes, against 11.702 votes for Duval Rad- 
ford, National Democrat, and 748 votes for J. H. Hoge, 
Republican. Major Otey represents the sixth congressional 
district of Virginia, which liiis a population of 184,498. 
and embraces the counties of liedford. Campbell. Charlotte, 
Halifax. Montgomery, and lioanoke. and the cities of 
Lynchburg, Radford, and Roanoke. 



THEOBOLD OTJEN 



Theobold Otjen. of Milwaukee, was born in West China, 
St. Clair County. Mich.. October 27, 1851 ; was educated at 
the Marine City (Mich.) Academy and at a private school 
in Detroit conducted by Prof. P. M. Patterson ; was em- 
ployed as foreman in the rolling mill of the Milwaukee 
Iron Company at Milwaukee from 1870 to the fall of 1872 ; 
entered the law department of the University of Michigan, 
at Ann Arbor, in October. 1873; graduated March 25, 1875, 
and was immediately admitted to the bar at Ann Arbor; 
practiced law in Detroit until the fall of 1883. when he 
removed to Milwaukee, where he has since resided, engaged 
in the practice of law and in the real-estate Inisiness ; was 
elected a member of the common council of the city of 
Milwaukee in April, 1887, and was reelected for three suc- 
cessive terms, serving seven years in all ; was a trustee of 
the Milwaukee Pul>lic Library from 1887 to 1891, and a 
trustee of the Milwaukee Public Museum from 1891 to 1894; 
ran for comptroller of the city of Milwaukee in April. 1892, 
but went down to defeat with the rest of the Republican 
ticket under the Bennett law tidal wave ; was nominated 
as the Republican candidate for Congress in 1892 and ran 
against Hon. John L. Mitchell, now Senator. l)ut was de- 
feated ; was again the Republican candidate in 1893 for 
the seat in Congress made vacant by the election of Mr. 
Mitchell to the Senate, but was again defeated ; was elected 
to the Fifty-Fourth and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Con- 
gress as a Republican, receiving 25,896 votes, against 21,429 



THEOBOLD OTJEN 

votes for Robert Schilling, Democrat and Populist, and 433 
votes for Robert May. Socialist. He represents the fourth 
congressional district of Wisconsin, which has a population 
of IHI.OOO, and embraces the first, second, third, fourth, fifth, 
sixth, seventh, eighth, ninth, eleventh, twelfth, fourteenth, 
fifteenth, sixteenth, seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteentli 
wards of the city of Milwaukee, and the towns of Franklin, 
Greenfield, Lake, and Oak Creek. 




JESSE OVERSTREET 



JESSE OVERSTREET 



Jesse Overstreet. of ludianaiJolis. was born in John- 
son County, Ind.. December 14, 1859 ; received a common- 
school and collegiate education, and was admitted to the 
bar in ISSO ; was elected to the Fifty-Fourth and reelected 
to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Republican, receiving 
29,075 votes, against 24,1<S7 votes for Charles M, Cooper. 
Free-Silver Democrat, and 757 votes for Evans Woollen, 
National Democrat. He represents tiie seventh congres- 
sional district of Indiana, which has a population of 160,- 
717, and embraces the two counties of Johnson and Marion. 



HORACE B. PACKER 



Horace B. Packer, of Wellsboro, was born in Wells- 
boro. Pa.; is a son of the late Dr. Nelson Packer; was 
educated at Wellsboro Academy and Alfred University, 
New York ; was admitted to the bar and has continued 
in practice of law since ; was elected district attorney for 
three years, and served one year by appointment just prior 
to his election ; in 18S4 was elected to the Pennsylvania 
house of representatives and reelected in 188(i ; in 1888 
was elected to the State senate ; has presided over two 
Eepublican State conventions, and was elected to the 
Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Republican, receiving 21,543 
votes, against 12,152 votes for Luther B. Seibert, Demo- 
crat, and 1,654 votes for ("levan Dinges, Prohibitionist. 
He represents the sixteenth congressional district of Penn- 
sylvania, which has a population of 174,375, and embraces 
the four counties of Clinton, Lycoming, Potter, and Tioga. 




RICHARD W. PARKER 



RICHARD WAYNE PARKER 



KiCHARD Wayne Parker, of Newark, was born August 6, 
1848; graduated from Princeton College in 1867 and from 
the law school of Columbia College in lS6iJ ; was admit- 
ted to the bar of New Jersey in June, 1870; was a mem- 
ber of the house of assembly of New Jersey in 1885 and 
1886 ; was the Repulilican candidate for the Fifty-Third 
Congress and was elected to the Fifty-Fourth and reelected 
to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Repulilican. receiving 
31,059 votes, against 15,398 votes for J. A. Beecher. Demo- 
crat. 328 votes for 0. B. Harden. Prohibitionist. 791 votes 
for W. J. Peojiles. National Democrat, and 781 votes for 
J. E. Billings. Socialist Lal)or. He represents the sixth 
congressional district of New Jersey, which has a popula- 
tion of 168,964. and embraces the city of Newark and the 
township of East Orange. 




SERENO E. PAYNE 



SERENO E. PAYNE 



Sereno E. Payne, of Auburn, was born at Hamilton. 
N. Y.. June 26, 1843; graduated from the university at 
Rochester in 1864; was admitted to the bar in 1866. and 
has since practiced law at Auburn ; was city clerk of Au- 
burn 1868-71; w^as supervisor of Auburn 1871-72; was 
district attorney of Cayuga County 1873-79 ; was presi- 
dent of the board of education at Auburn 1879 82; was 
elected to the Forty-Eighth. Forty-Ninth. Fifty-First. 
Fifty-Second. Fifty-Third, and Fifty-Fourth Congre.sses and 
reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Repulilican. re- 
ceiving 33,628 votes, against 19.822 votes for Robert L. Drum- 
mond, Democrat and Populist. 468 votes for Francis 0. 
Mason. National Democrat, and 79 votes blank and scat- 
tering. He represents the eighteenth congressional district 
of New York, which has a population of 213.142. and em- 
braces the five counties of Cayuga, Cortland, Ontario. 
^^'ayne. and Yates. 




CHARLES E. PEARCE 



CHARLES EDWARD PEARCE 



Charles Edward Pearce. of St. Louis, was born in 
Whitesboro, Oneida County, N. Y., and subsequently be- 
came a resident in the city of Auburn, county of Cayuga; 
was educated at Fairfield Seminary and Union College; 
enlisted into the army immediately after graduating ; was 
commissioned captain. Battery I), Sixteenth New York 
Heavy Artillery, in 11S()3 ; was promoted to the rank of major 
in June. l.S()4 ; served in the Army of the James, also that 
of the Potomac; was appointed to the staff of Maj.-(ien. 
A. H. Terry after . the capture of Fort Fisher, and on 
the occupation of Wilmington was detailed as provost- 
niarshal-general of the eastern district of North Carolina; 
quit the army in the fall of 1805; settled in St. Louis in 
1866, where he was admitted to the bar, and began the 
practice of law in 18(57 ; retaining interest in military 
affairs, became commander of St. Louis National Guard in 
1875 ; organized the First Regiment in 1877, and was 
elected its colonel; resigned in 1878; was delegate to the 
Republican national convention of 1888, and advocated 
the nomination of John Sherman as candidate for Presi- 
dent; in 1891 was appointed chairman Siou.x Indian com- 
mission ; in 18*.I4 went to India and Jaj^an to investigate 
the industries of the Orient ; in 189G was elected to the 
Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Republican, receiving 21.483 votes, 
against 17,5(i8 votes for Robert H. Kern, Democratic (Bryan) 
candidate, and 71 votes for L. Crusius. He represents the 
twelfth congressional district of Missouri, which has a pop- 
ulation of 155,884, and eml)races in the city of St. Louis 
the first, second, third, seventeenth, nineteenth, twenty- 
hfth, twenty-seventh, and parts of the eleventh, fifteenth, 
twentieth, twenty-first, twenty -second, twenty-third, and 
twenty-eighth wards. 




RICHMOND PEARSON 



RICHMOND PEARSON 



Richmond Pearson, of Asheville. was horn at Richmond 
Hill. N. C. January 26. 1852 ; graduated at Princeton College 
in the class of 1872. delivering the valedictory oration ; was 
admitted to the bar of North Carolina in 1874 : in the same 
year was appointed United States consul at Verviers and 
Liege. Belgium; resigned said office in 1877; was a member 
of the North Carolina legislature in 1885 and again in 1887; 
was one of the originators of the coalition which over- 
whelmed the Democratic party in North Carolina in lSi)4; 
was elected to the Fifty-Fourth Congress as an Independent 
Protectionist and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as 
a Republican, receiving 20.41)5 votes, against 19.189 votes 
for Joseph S. Adams. Bryan Democi-at, and 28 votes for 
J. P. Herran. Populist. He represents the ninth district 
of North Carolina, which has a population of 186.472. and 
embraces the fifteen counties of Buncombe. Cherokee. Clay. 
Graham. Haywood. Henderson. Jackson. Macon. Madison. 
McDowell. Mitchell, Polk, Rutherford, Swain, Transylvania, 
and Yancey. 




GEORGE O PERKINS 



GEORGE D. PERKINS 



George D. Perkins, of Sioux City, was born at Holly, 
Orleans County. N. Y.. February 29. 1S40 ; removed at an 
early age to the West ; learned the printer's trade at 
Baraboo. Wis.; in connection with his l)rother started the 
Gnzcffc at Cedar Falls in ISfiO ; enlisted as a private soldier 
in Company B. Thirty-First Iowa. August 12, 18(52. and was 
discharged from Jefferson Barracks, Mo.. January 12. 1863 ; 
removed to Sioux City in 1869 and has been editor of the 
JouynnJ since ; was a member of the Iowa senate 1874-76; 
was appointed United States marshal for the northern dis- 
trict of Iowa by President Arthur and removed by Presi- 
dent Cleveland; was elected to the Fifty-Second. Fifty- 
Tliii-d. and Fifty-Fourth Congresses and reelected to the 
Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Republican, receiving 29,601 votes, 
against 22,773 votes for A. Van Wageuen, Democrat-Populist 
fusion, and 400 votes for C. F. Farrand, Prohilntionist. He 
represents the eleventh congressional district of Iowa, which 
has a population of 203.470. and embraces the hfteen coun- 
ties of Buena Vista. Cherokee, Clay. Dickinson, Ida, Lyon, 
Monona, O'Brien. Osceola. Plymouth. Sac, Sioux, and Wood- 
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MASON S. PETERS 



MASON SUMMERS PETERS 



Mason Summers Peters, of Kansas City, was born in 
Clay County. Mo.. September 3. 1844 ; his father, Ashby 
Peters, was born in Woodford County. Ky., near Versailles, 
on a tract of land which was granted by the Crown to 
his great-grandfather, Capt. John Ashby, for services as 
an officer under Washington in the French and Indian 
War; was educated at William Jewell College, at Liberty, 
Mo.; was admitted to the bar in 1875; married in Boston 
to Miss Anna Ingalls during the same year; removed in 
1886 to Wyandotte County, Kansas, where he now resides ; 
is engaged in the live-stock commission business ; served 
four years as clerk of the court of Clinton County, Mo.; 
was elected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Democrat 
Populist, receiving 26.807 votes, again.st 25,919 votes for 
John T. Harris. Repulilican. He represents the .second 
congressional district of Kansas, which has a population 
of 209.148, and embraces the nine counties of Allen, An- 
derson, Bourbon, Douglas, Franklin, Johnson, Linn, Miami, 
and Wyandotte. 




RICE A. PIERCE 



RICE A. PIERCE 



Rice A. Pierce, of Union City, was born on a farm in 
Weakley County, Tenn.. July 8. 184S; was for two years 
a member of the Eighth Tennessee Cavalry. Confederate 
States army ; was wounded and captured in a cavalry 
fight near Jackson. Tenn., in 1SG4. and was a prisoner till 
the close of the war ; attended the common schools of the 
county, and was two and one-half years at the London 
High School, London. Ontario ; read law at Halifax, N. C, in 
the office of Judge Edward Coingland ; was licensed to prac- 
tice by the supreme court of North Carolina in July. 186S; 
was elected district attorney-general of the twelfth judicial 
circuit in 1874 and reelected in 1878 for full term of eight 
years ; was elected to the Forty-Eighth. Fifty-First, and 
Fifty-Second Congresses as a Democrat ; i-an as an Inde- 
pendent Free-Coinage Democrat in 1892 and was defeated ; 
was elected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Democrat, 
receiving 19,L38 votes, against 10.714 votes for J. H. Mc- 
Dowell. Populist. He represents the ninth congressional 
district of Tennessee, which has a population of 174,729. 
and embraces the eight counties of Crockett, Dyer, Gibson, 
Haywood. Lake, Lauderdale, Obion, and Weakley. 




MAHLON PITNEY 



MAHLON PITNEY 



Mahlon Pitney, of Morristown, was born in that city 
February 5, 1858; entered Princeton College in 1875 and 
graduated in I87i) : studied law for thi-ee years, and was 
admitted to the bar in 1882 ; has practiced his profession 
continuously since that time ; w'as never a candidate for 
public ofBce until 1894, when he was elected to the Fifty- 
Fourth Congress ; was I'eelected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress 
as a Republican ( indorsed by the National Democracy), 
receiving 20,494 votes, against 17,517 votes for Augustus 
W. Cutler. Democrat, and 1,054 votes for Theodore N. Logan, 
National Prohibitionist, He represents the fourth congres- 
sional district of New Jersey, which has a population of 
154,789, and embraces the four counties of Hunterdon, Morris, 
Sussex, and Warren, 




H. HENRY POWERS 



H. HENRY POWERS 



H. Henry Powers, of Morrisville. was born at Morris- 
town, Lamoille County. Vt., Ma,v 29. 1885 ; was graduated 
from the University of Vennont in 1S55 ; was admitted to 
the bar in 1858 ; was a member of the house of represen- 
tatives of Vermont in 1858; was prosecuting attorney of 
Lamoille County in 1861-62 ; was member of council of cen- 
sors of Vermont in 1861) ; was member of the constitutional 
convention of the State in 1870 ; was member of the State 
senate in 1872-73 ; was speaker of the house of represen- 
tatives in 1874 ; was judge of the sui)renie court of Vermont 
from December, 1874, to December, 1890 ; was elected to 
the Fifty-Second, Fifty-Third, and Fifty-Fourth Congresses 
and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Republican, 
receiving 26.145 votes, against 7.6*.i:] votes for Peter F. 
Mcj\Ianus. Democrat. 36o votes for Andrew L. Bowen, 
People's party, and 17 votes scattering. He represents the 
first congressional district of Vermont, which has a popu- 
lation of 169.940, and comprises the seven counties of 
Addison, Bennington. Chittenden, Franklin. Crand Isle, 
Lamoille, and Rutland 




GEORGE W. PRINCE 



GEORGE W. PRINCE 



George W. Prince, of Galesburg. was born March 4, 
185-4, iu Tazewell County, 111.; attended the public schools 
and graduated from Knox College, Galesburg, 111., in 1878 ; 
studied law and was admitted to the liar in ISSO ; was 
elected city attorney of Galesburg in 1881 ; was chairman 
of the Republican county central committee of Knox 
County in 1884 ; was elected a member of the lower 
house of the general assembly of Illinois in 1888 ; was re- 
elected in 181)0; was the candidate for attorney-general of 
Illinois on the Republican ticket in 1892 ; was elected to 
the Fifty-Fourth Congress at a special election held April 
2. 1895, to fill the vacancy caused by the death of General 
Philip Sidney Post, and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Con- 
gress as a Republican, receiving 31,4.')9 votes, against 15.741 
votes for William R. Moon. Democrat. 536 votes for William 
Goldsworthy. Prohibitionist, and 1.401 votes for William C. 
Holden, Populist. He represents the tenth congressional 
district of Illinois, which has a population of 154,471. and 
embraces the six counties of Henry. Knox, Mercer. Rock 
Island, Stark, and Whiteside. 




SAMUEL J. PUGH 



SAMUEL J. PUGH 



Samuel J. Pugh. of Vanceburg, was horn iu Greenup 
County, Ky.. January :^S. iSfjO; resided in Lewis County 
since 1852 ; was educated at Claandler's Select SchooL 
Rand's Academy, and Centre College. Danville. Ky. ; has 
heen practicing law since liS72. and has held successively 
the offices of city attorney 1S72-78 ; master commissioner 
of the cii'cuit court 1S74 SO ; county attorney LS78-86 ; 
county judge lS8R-i)0; delegate to the Kentucky consti- 
tutional convention lSl)0-i)l. and State senator 1893-94 ; 
was elected to the Fifty-Fourth and reelected to the Fifty- 
Fifth Congress as a Republican, receiving 22.014 votes, 
against 21,591 votes for W. L. Thomas. Democrat. He rep- 
resents the ninth congressional district of Kentucky, which 
has a population of 17(),212. and embraces the thirteen 
counties of Bath, Hoyd. Bracken, Carter, Fleming, Greenup, 
Harrison. Lawrence, Lewis, Mason, Nicholas, Robertson, and 
Roweu. 




LEMUEL E. QUIGG 



LEMUEL E. QUIGG 



Lemuel E. Quigg. of New York City, was born in Cecil 
County, Md., February 12, 1863; common-school education; 
by profession a journalist ; was a member of the editorial 
staff of the New York Tribune for ten years and subse- 
quently editor-in-chief of the New York Press; was 
elected to the Fifty-Third and Fifty-Fourth Congresses and 
reelected to the Fifty-Fifth C!ongress as a Republican, re- 
ceiving 33,233 votes, against 21,443 votes for John Q. Adams, 
Democrat. He represents the fourteenth congressional dis- 
trict of New York, which has a population of 227.978. and 
embraces all of that territory on the west side of New York 
lying north of Fifty-Second Street and west of Seventh 
Avenue to Fifty-Ninth Street, and then west of Eighth Ave- 
nue and north to Spuyten Duyvil Creek, and all territory on 
the east side between Fifty-Ninth and Seventy-Ninth Streets 
and Central Park and East River. 




GEORGE W. RAY 



GEORGE W. RAY 



George W. Ray. of Noiwich. was born in Otselic, Che- 
nango Countj-. N. Y., February 8, 1844 ; was brought up 
on a farm and educated in the common schools and at 
Norwich Academy : was a private in t'ompany 13. Ninetieth 
New Yf)rk Volunteers, and brigade clerk, first brigade, first 
division, nineteenth army corps : was discharged at the 
close of the war; studied law, was admitted to practice in 
November, 18()7, and has practiced his profession since ; is 
lai'gely interested in farming : has been chairman of the 
Republican county committee of his county and was a mem- 
ber of the Republican State committee in ISSO; was elected 
to the Forty-Eighth Congress: is a member of the board 
of education of Norwich Academy and Union Free School; 
was elected to the Fifty-Second. Fifty-Third, and Fifty- 
Fourth Congresses and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress 
as a Republican, receiving o4.6S(5 votes, against 20,383 votes 
for Charles D. Wales, Free-Silver Democrat, 513 votes for 
Charles S. Uall. (Jold Democrat, l.ol'i votes for Will C. Moul- 
ton. Prohibitioni.st. and 07 votes scattering. He represents 
the tw-enty-si.\tli congressional district of New York, which 
has a populati(.)n of 209,103, and embraces the five counties 
of Broome. Chenango, Delaw^are. Tioga, and Tomkins. 




THOMAS B. REED 



THOMAS B. REED 



Thomas B. Reed, of Portland, was boru at Portland 
October 18, 1S39 ; graduated at Bowdoin College, Maine, in 
1860 ; studied law ; was acting assistant paymaster. United 
States navy, from April 19, 1864, to November 4, 1865 ; 
was admitted to the bar in 1865 and commenced practice 
at Portland ; was a member of the State house of repre- 
sentatives in 1868-69 and of the State senate in 1870 ; was 
attorney-general of Maine in 1870, 1871, and 1872 ; was city 
solicitor of Portland in 1874, 1875, 1876, and 1877 ; was 
elected to the Forty-Fifth. Forty-Sixth, Forty-Seventh. 
Forty-Eighth. Forty-Ninth. Fiftieth. Fifty-First. Fifty-Sec- 
ond, Fifty-Third, and Fifty-Fourth Congresses and reelected 
to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Republican, receiving 19,- 
029 votes, against 8,800 votes for Edward Staples, Demo- 
crat, 604 votes for Aaron Clark. Prohibitionist. 169 votes 
for James E. Campion. People's party, and eight votes 
scattering ; he was elected Speaker of the House of Rep- 
resentatives December 2, 1889, and December 2, 1895. He 
represents the first congressional district of Maine, which 
has a population of 153,778, and embraces the two coun- 
ties of Cumberland and York. 




WALTER REEVES 



WALTER REEVES 



Walter Reeves, of Streator. was horn September "25. 
1848, near Brownsville. Pa.: renioveil to Illinois in 1856; 
lived on a farm ; became a teacher and a lawyer ; was 
elected to the Fifty-Fonrth and reelected to the Fifty- 
Fifth Congress as a Republican, receiving 24,705 votes, 
against 18.514 votes for Charles M. Golden, Democrat, and 
557 votes for J. W. Hosier. Prohibitionist. He represents 
the eleventh congressional district of Illinois, which has a 
population of l(i7,0(l(>. and embraces the four counties of 
Bureau, Lasalle. Livingston, and Woodford. 



JOHN S. RHEA 



John S. Rhea, of Russellville, was born in Russellville. 
Logan County, Ky., March 9, 1855 ; educated at Bethel 
College, Russellville. Ky., and Washington and Lee Uni- 
versity, Lexington, Va. ; licensed to practice law in the 
fall of 1873. and has been in constant practice since ; was 
elected prosecuting attorney for Logan County in 1878, 
and again elected in 1882 ; was elected presidential elector 
on the Democratic ticket in 1884 for the third district of 
Kentucky, and elector for the State at large in 1888; was 
a delegate from the third district to the national Demo- 
cratic convention in 1892, and. with the Hon. Henry Wat- 
terson, a delegate who was then of the same oiind and 
faith, voted against the nomination of Grover Cleveland ; 
was delegate from the State at large to the national Demo- 
cratic convention in 1896, and put the name of Senator 
J. C. S. Blackburn in nomination before the convention for 
President; Mr. Watterson was not a delegate to this 
convention ; elected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Dem- 
ocratic Populist, defeating Hon. W. Godfrey Hunter, Repub- 
lican, Hon. Chas. W. Milliken, Aid Society, and Hon. W. R. 
Vaughn. Independent. He represents the third congres- 
sional district of Kentucky, which has a population of 
176.471. and embraces the eleven counties of Allen. Barren, 
Butler, Cumberland. Edmonson, Logan, Monroe, Muhlen- 
berg, Simpson, Todd, and Warren. 




JAMES D. RICHARDSON 



JAMES DANIEL RICHARDSON 



James Daniel Richardson, of Murfreeshoro, was horn 
in Rutherford County. Teun., March 10. 1S48 ; was edu- 
cated at good country schools ; was at Franklin College, 
near Nashville, when the war began, and entered the Con- 
federate army at eighteen years of age, l)efore graduating; 
served in the army nearly fonr years, the first year as 
private and the remaining three as adjutant of the Forty- 
Fifth Tennessee Infantry : read law after the war and 
began practice January 1, l.S()7. at Murfreesl>oro ; was 
elected to the lower house of the Tennessee legislature, 
took his seat in October, 1S71. and on the first day was 
elected speaker of the house, he l)eing then only twenty- 
eight years of age; was elected to the State senate the 
following session, 1873-74 ; was grand master of Masons in 
Tennessee 1873-74, grand high priest of the (irand Chap- 
ter, Royal Arch Masons of the State 1882, and inspector- 
general, Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite„ thirty-third 
degree, in Tennessee; was a delegate to the St. Louis 
Democratic convention in 187(5. was elected to the Forty- 
Ninth. Fiftieth. Fifty-First. Fifty-Second. Fifty-Third, and 
Fifty-Fourth Congresses, and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth 
Congress as a Democrat, receiving 16,089 votes, against 
y,000 votes for S. Houston, Republican, and 2,384 votes for 
W. E. Erwin, Populist. He represents the Hfth congres- 
sional district of Tennessee, which has a population of 
153,773, and embraces the eight ct)unties of Bedford. Can- 
non, Coflee, Dekalb, Lincoln, Marshall, Moore, and Ruther- 
ford. 




EDWIN R. RIDGELY 



EDWIN REED RIDGELY 



Edwin Eeed Ridgely, of Pittsburg, Crawford County, 
Kan., was born May 9. 1S44, in a log cabin on bis parents' 
timber farm near Lancaster. Wabash County. 111.; education 
was acquired in the local district school during the winter 
months ; during his early life his time was devoted to farm 
labor; early in 1862, at the age of eighteen, enlisted as a 
private in Company C, One Hundred and Fifteenth Illinois 
Volunteer Infantry; served continuously to the end of the 
war; in 1S69, in company with his brother, Stephen S. 
Kidgely, moved to Girard, Kansas, where they engaged 
in general merchandising under the firm name of Kidgely 
Bros., and have conducted this business almost continuously 
since; at the present time they are conducting a general 
store in Pittsburg, Kan. ; in the early seventies he engaged 
in the Texas cattle trade, personally sharing in and direct- 
ing the gathering of cattle on the range and driving them 
to the Kansas markets ; subsequently he extended his cattle 
operations to the Pacific Coast, including Washington Ter- 
ritory. Oregon, and California ; lived in Ogden, Utah, from 
1889 to 1893 ; his first vote was cast for U. S. Grant in 1868 ; 
quit the Republican party in 1876 because of its -financial 
policy ; has continuously from that date advocated the 
exclusive issue of all money by the government by using 
all the gold and silver offered as material on which to print 
the money power, supplementing these with paper to regu- 
late and control the total volume ; is an earnest advocate 
of public ownership and operation of all public utilities, 
and thinks it both a necessity and duty of the state to 



EDWIN REED RIDGELY 

supply all iineniployed people voluntary access to all the 
necessary means of production and distribution among 
themselves of food, fuel, clothing, shelter, and education ; 
that all such labor above these needs should be utilized by 
the state in creating public improvements ; to meet demands 
for revenue, also to undo and prevent the dangerous cen- 
tralization of wealth in the hands of a few people, he advo- 
cates a graduated property and income tax ; was nominated 
by the People's and Democratic parties and elected to the 
Fifty-Fifth Congress, receiving ■27,0;i4 votes, against •2"2,4y9 
votes for S. 8. Kirkpatrick, Republican. He represents the 
third congressional district of Kansas, wliich has a popu- 
lation of "201,584. and embraces the nine counties of 
Chautauqua, Cherokee. Cowley, Crawford, Elk, Labatte, 
Montgomery. Neosho, and Wilson. 




JOHN F. RIXEY 



JOHN FRANKLIN RIXEY 



John Franklin Rixey, of Brandy, Culpeper County, Va., 
was educated in the common schools. Bethel Academy, and 
the University of Virginia; is a lawyer and farmer; was 
Commonwealth's attorney for Culpeper County twelve years, 
the only office he ever held till elected to the Fifty-Fifth 
Congress as a Democrat, receiving 17,030 votes, against 
13,114 votes for Pati-ick Henry McCaull, Republican, 140 
votes for Joseph H. Pancoast, Prohilntionist. 24 votes for 
James Selden Cowdon. 47 votes for W. C. C. Coleman, 1 
vote for C. N. Lee. and 1 vote for T. N. Blackford. He 
represents the eighth congressional district of Virginia, 
which has a population of 147,968. and embraces the ten 
counties of Alexandria. Culpeper. Fairfax. Fauquier. King 
Ceorge. Loudoun, Louisa. Orange. Prince William, and Staf- 
ford, and the city of Alexandria. 




EDWARD ROBB 



EDWARD ROBB 



Edward Kobb. of Perryville. was horn at Brazeau, in 
Perry County. Mo.. March H*. ISoT : his father was Dr. 
Ijncius F. Eobb : was ednoated in the coninion schools. 
Brazeau Academy. Fruitland Normal Institute, and the 
Missouri State University ; graduated from the law depart- 
ment of the Missouri State University in March. 1S7'.I. and 
the May following;- located in Perryville. where he has since 
been engaged in the practice of liis profession ; was elected 
prosecuting attorney of Perry County in ISHO. and reelected 
in 1SS2; was elected a memher of the legislature in 18S4, 
and reelected in ISSti; was appointed assistant attorney-gen- 
eral of the State in .Tanuary. lss',1. hy Gen. John M. Wood, 
which position he held foi- the term of four years : was 
elected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Democrat, receiving 
22.81(1 votes, against li).0(i2 votes for George Steel. Republi- 
can. USSB votes for (4eorge Bond, Populist, and S scattering. 
He represents the thirteenth congressional district of Mis- 
.souri, which has a population of lS7.1ti)4. and embraces the 
fifteen counties of Carter. Dent. Iron. .Jefferson. Madison, 
Perry. Reynolds. Shannon. Ste. (lenevieve. St. Francois, 
Texas. Washington. Wayne. Webster, and Wright. 




EDWARD E. ROBBINS 



EDWARD E. ROBBINS 



Edward Everett Robbins. of Greensbnrg. was horn in 
Westmoreland County, i'a., September 27. LSGO ; was edu- 
cated in the pulilic schools, in Indiana Normal School, and 
Eldersridge Academy ; graduated at Washington and Jef- 
ferson College in the class of 1881 ; was registered as a 
law student at Greenslnirg in the same year, and in 18S2 
entered the Columbia Law School in New York ; took the 
course there under Prof. Theodore W. Dwight. and was 
admitted to the Westmoreland bar April 8, 1884, and at 
once engaged in the practice of law ; was nominated for 
district attorney in 1886 ; was elected in 1888 to the State 
senate, and served in that body till 1892 ; was chairman 
Republican county committee in 1885; is major and quarter- 
master of the second brigade. State militia ; was elected 
to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Republican, receiving 32,149 
votes, against 19,464 votes for Samuel S. Blyholder. Demo- 
crat, 1,068 votes for John B. Bair. Prohibitionist, and 1.968 
votes for St. Clair Thompson, People's party. He repre- 
sents the twenty-first congressional district of Pennsylvania, 
which has a poijulation of 245.746, and eml)races the four 
counties of Armstrong, Indiana, Jefferson, and Westmore- 
land. 




SAMUEL M. ROBERTSON 



SAMUEL MATTHEWS ROBERTSON 



Samuel Matthews Kobektsox. of iJatou liouge. was bom 
ill the town of Plaquemine. La., .lanuai-y L lS.")-2 ; received 
his p]-eparatory education in the ('ollegiate Institute of 
Baton Rouge; was graduated from the Louisiana State Uni- 
versity in 1S74 : completed a course of law study and was 
admitted to practice in 1S77 ; was elected a member of the 
State legislature from the parisli of East Baton liouge in 
LS7i> for a term of four years; in ISSO was elected a mem- 
ber of the faculty of the Louisiana State Lniversity and 
Agricultural and Mechanical College ; tilled the chair of 
natural history in that institution and the position of com- 
mandant of cadets until he was elected to the Fiftieth 
Congress to till the vacancy created by the death of his 
father. E. W. Bobertson ; was elected to the Fifty-First. 
Fifty-Second. Fifty-Third, and Fifty-Fourth Congresses and 
reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Democrat, re- 
ceiving 11,872 votes, against 8.(iS(i votes for C. C. Dunson, 
Bepublican, and 924 votes for W. M. Thompson, Populist. 
He represents the sixth congressional district of Louisiana, 
which has a population of 208.S()2. and embraces the par- 
ishes of Acadia, Avoyelles. East Baton Bouge. East Feli- 
ciana. Livingston. Pointe Coupee, St. Helena, St. Landry, 
St. Tammany, Tangipahoa, West Baton liouge. West Feli- 
ciana, and Washington (Kl parishes). 




JAMES M. ROBINSON 



JAMES M. ROBINSON 



James M. Robinson, who represents the twelfth Indiana 
district in the Fifty-Fifth Congress, and has been reelected, 
resides at Fort Wayne. Ind.. near which city he was born 
in 1861. He is of Scotch-Irish descent, his forefathers hav- 
ing come to this country in its early history, and settled 
in the States of New Jersey and Virginia. Both his 
parents, David A. Robinson and Isabelle Bowen Rol)inson, 
were born in the State of Pennsylvania, but removed in 
early life with their parents to Richland County, Ohio, 
and settled ou a farm, and, after theif marriage, to Allen 
County, Indiana, in the district now represented by their 
son and in which he was born. The early education of the 
subject of this sketch was obtained in the country .school ; 
at the age of ten years he moved to the city with his 
parents and attended the public school until he was four- 
teen years of age. when he became collector for a daily 
paper of which he had Iteen a carrier boy for several 
years ; at fifteen he took employment in a shop at Fort 
Wayne as a machine baud, and from that time till the 
present has supported and kept house with his mother. 
While working at his trade he studied law for five years; 
quitting the shop in ISSl. he entered a law office and in 
1SS2 was admitted to practice in the State and United 
States Courts : in 1SS6 and 1888 he was unanimously nomi- 
nated for State attorney, in both elections leading his 
ticket, in the former by 1,500 votes: was defeated in 1892 
by four delegate votes for the congressional nomination, 
but was unanimously nominated by the Democrats in 1896, 



JAMES M. ROBIA'SOX 

aud elected to the Fifty-Fifth (_'oiigre.ss. leading his ticket 
700 votes ill Fort Wayne alone ; was again unanimously 
nominated for Congress in 1S'.)8 and elected, leading his 
ticket in the district 1,100 votes. Mr. Kobinson has made 
many political and other speeches in Indiana and has been 
heard a number of times on the tioor of the House of 
Representatives. He represents the twelfth congressional 
district of Indiana, which has a ])opulation of 162,210. and 
embraces the six counties of Allen, Dekalb, Lagrange. Noble. 
Steuben, and Whitley. 




LEMUEL W. ROYSE 



LEMUEL W. ROYSE 



Lemuel W. Royse, of Warsaw, was born January 19, 
1848, in Kosciusko County, Ind. ; at the age of twelve 
years his father died, and he was left penniless, and there- 
fore was compelled to depend upon his own efforts for a 
living; attended the common schools until he was sixteen 
years of age ; he then took upon himself the support of 
his mother and two sisters younger than himself ; by 
studying at home he acquired sufficient knowledge to teach 
school in the winter season, when he was nineteen years 
old ; while he was teaching school he began reading 
law, and was admitted to the bar in 1874, at Warsaw, 
Ind. ; in 1876 was elected prosecuting attorney for the 
thii-ty-third judicial circuit of Indiana, which office he held 
two years ; was elected mayor of the city of Warsaw in 
1885 and held this office until 1891 : was on the Repuljli- 
can electoral ticket in 1S84 ; was a member of the Repul> 
lican State central committee from 1886 till 1890; in 1892 
was a delegate to the Minneapolis convention which nom- 
inated Harrison for his second term ; was elected to the 
Fifty-Fourth and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as 
a Republican, receiving 25,514 votes, against 23,928 votes 
for C. K. Ellison. Fusionist. He represents the thirteenth 
congressional district of Indiana, which has a population 
of 169,489, and embraces the seven counties of Elkhart, 
Fulton, Kosciusko, Marshall, Pulaski, St. Joseph, and Starke. 




CHARLES A. RUSSELL 



CHARLES ADDISON RUSSELL 



Charles Addison Rtssell. of Killinyly. was Ixii-n in Wor- 
cester. Mass.. March 2. 1852 : received a public school and 
collegiate education, graduating from Yale College in the 
class of IST;!; was aid-de-canii) (colonel) on (Jovernor Bige- 
low's staff 1HS1-S2; was a member of the house, general 
assembly of Connecticut, in ISS:] : was secretary of state 
of Connecticut lSS5-(S(i : is engaged in the woolen i)usiness; 
was elected to the Fiftieth. Fifty-First. Fifty-Second. Fifty- 
Third, and Fifty-Fourth Congresses, and reelected to the 
Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Kepiildican. receiving 15.2(i9 votes, 
against 7.6(55 votes for Joseph T. Fanning, Silver Democrat, 
500 votes for Henry L. Hammond. Cold Democrat, 408 votes 
for William Tngalls. Prohiliiticmist. and sixteen votes scat- 
tering. He represents the thii'd congressional district of 
Connecticut, which has a populati'in of IlM .7'.»"_'. and em- 
braces the counties of New ijondon and Windham, including 
the cities of New London and Norwich. 



EDWARD SAUERHERING 



Edward Sauerhering. of Mayville. was born at Mayville, 
Wis.. June 24, 1864 ; was educated in the Mayville public 
schools and high school and graduated from the Chicago 
College of Pharmacy in 1885; his occupation is that of a 
pharmacist ; was elected to the Fifty-Fourth and reelected 
to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Republican, receiving 23,957 
votes, against 17,480 votes for William H. Rogers. Democrat, 
and 1,025 votes for Jesse Meyers. Prohibitionist. He repre- 
sents the second congressional district of Wisconsin, which 
has a population of 166,442. and embraces the four counties 
of Columbia, Dane, Dodge, and Jefferson. 




JOSEPH D. SAVERS 



JOSEPH D. SAYERS 



Joseph D. Sayers, of Bastroj). was horn at (irenada. 
Miss.. September 28, ISJI : removed with his father to 
Bastrop, Tex., in 1851 ; entered the Confederate army eaiJy 
in 18(51 and served continuously until Aj)ril. I8(i5; was 
admitted to the bar in lS()(i and l»ecame a partner of Hon, 
(ieorge W. Jones: served as a nicinher of the State senate 
in the session of 1S78; was chairman of the Democratic 
State executive committee during- the years 1875 78; was 
lieutenant-governor of Texas in 1879-80; was elected to 
the Forty-Ninth. Fiftieth. Fifty-First, Fifty-Second, Fifty- 
Third, and Fifty-Fourth Congresses and reelected to the 
Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Democrat, receiving l'(M»<S] votes, 
against 11.4i)5 votes for W. K. Makemson. Repuldican, B.787 
votes for Keddin Andrews. Populist, and \)(r2 votes for J. 
T. Harris. Republican. He represents the ninth district of 
Texas, which has a poimlation of 175.149, and embraces 
the nine counties of Bastrop, Burleson, Burnet, Caldwell, 
Hays. Lee. Travis. Washington, and Williamson. 




EVAN E. SETTLE 



EVAN E. SETTLE 



Evan E. Settle, of Owenton, was born in Frankfort, Ky., 
December 1, 1S48; received early education at the classical 
school of B. B. Sayre. a celebrated educator of Frankfort, 
Ky., and graduated from Louisville High School in June, 
1864 ; was licensed to practice law in 1870, and has prac- 
ticed his profession ever since at Owenton, Owen County, 
Ky.; was elected county attorney in 1878, reelected in 1882, 
and again in 18S6 ; resigned in 1887, and was twice elected 
to the Kentucky legislature, and served in that body in 
sessions of 1887-88 and 18.S9-90; was delegate to national 
Democratic convention held in St. Louis in 1888. and was 
elected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Democrat, receiv- 
ing 18.82(> votes, against 17,0iy votes for W. C. P. Breckin- 
ridge, Fusion. He represents the seventh congressional 
district of Kentucky, which has a population of 141,461, 
and embraces the eight counties of Bourlion. Fayette, 
Franklin, Henry, Oldham, Owen, Scott, and Woodford. 




JOHN F. SHAFROTH 



JOHN F. SHAFROTH 



John F. Shafroth. of Denver, was born in Fajette. Mo.. 
June 9. 1854 ; entered the University of Michigan in the 
fall of 1872, and graduated in tlie litei'ary department in 
the class of 187.") ; studied hiw in the office of Hon. Samuel 
C. Major, in his native town : was admitted to the l)ar in 
August. 1876. and soon thereafter formed a jjartnership 
with his preceptor : practiced law at Fayette. Mo., until 
Oct<)l)er, 1879. when he removed to Denver, Colo., where 
he has ever since pursued his profe.ssion ; in April, 1SS7. he 
was elected city attorney of Denver, and was reelected to 
the same position in April. ISS'.); since ]ss7 he has lieen 
in partnership with Judge Flatt Rogers, of Denver; was 
elected to the Fifty-Fourth Congress as a Repui)lican. and re- 
elected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Silver Republican, 
receiving (i7.8-21 votes, against 9.()'25 votes for Thomas E. 
McClelland. Republican, and 1.00<) votes for W. F. Steele. 
Prohibitionist. He represents the first cong're.s.sional district 
of Colorado, which has a population of •J((4.(i59. ami em- 
braces the thirteen counties of Arapahoe. Boulder. Jeffer- 
son. Lake. Larimer. Logan. Morgan. Park. Phillips. Sedgwick. 
Washington. Weld, and Yuma. 




RICHARD C. SHANNON 



RICHARD CUTIS SHANNON 



Richard Cutts Shannon, of New York City, was born 
in New London. Conn., Feln-iiary 12, 1S;3',) ; w^as edncated 
in tlie public schools and at Colby University, from which he 
was graduated as a member of the class of 1862 ; enlisted 
as a private in Company H, Fifth Maine Volunteers. May 
10, 1S()1 ; was pi-omoted to second sergeant, and in Octo- 
ber, ISOI. commissioned first lieutenant of the same com- 
pany ; in Octol)er, 1862, was commissioned captain and 
assistant adjutant-general of volunteers, serving continu- 
ously till the end of the war, receiving the brevets of 
major and lieutenant-colonel of volunteers: in 1871 was 
appointed by President Grant secretary of the United States 
legation at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and served until March, 
1875, when he resigned ; in 1876 took charge of the Botan- 
ical Garden Railroad Company, an American enterprise in 
Brazil, of which he subsequently became the vice-president 
and general manager, and finally the president; in 1SS5 
was graduated from the law school of Columbia University, 
and having been admitted to the New York bar, became 
a member of the firm of Purrington & Shannon, with which 
he is still connected : in 1891 was appointed by President 
Harrison envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary 
of the United States to the Republics of Nicaragua, Costa 
Rica, and Salvador, and served until May, lSi)3, when he was 
relieved by Hon. Lewis Baker, appointed by President Cleve- 
land ; is an alumni trustee of Colby University ; was elected 
to the Fifty-Fourth and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress 
as a Republican, receiving 15,513 votes, against 14,(167 votes 



RICHARD CCTTS SHAXXOX 

for Thomas Smith. Demot-rat. 1.021) votes for Joseph H. 
Madden. National Democrat, ")1*4 votes for Isador Phillips. 
Socialist Labor. 505 votes for John J. I\]urphy. I'opnlist. 
411* votes for Thomas F. Kightmire. Inde}iendeiit Republi- 
can. \)\ votes for France M. Hammond. Prohibitionist. I'l 
votes defective, and 427 votes blank. He represents the 
thirteenth conjjres.sional district of New York, which has 
a jiopulation of lS().'2S::i, and endiraces portions of the tliir- 
teenth. fifteenth, seventeenth, twenty-second, twenty-fourth, 
twenty-seventh, and twenty-ninth assembly districts of the 
countv of New Yoi-k. 




WILLIAM B. SHATTUC 



WILLIAM B. SHATTUC 



William B. Shattuc, of Madisoiiville. was born at North 
Hector, N. Y.. June 11. 1S41 ; removed to Ohio when eleven 
years old. and received his education in the public schools 
of the State ; was a commissioned officer in the Union 
army during the rebellion, in the army of the frontier; 
• for thirty years previous to 1895 was an officer in the 
railway traffic service, and is now retired from business ; 
lives at Madisoiiville, Hamilton County, Ohio; in 1895 was 
elected one of the State senators from Hamilton County 
to the seventy-second general assembly ; was elected to 
the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Republican, receiving '27.093 
votes, against 17,466 votes for T. J. Donnelly. Democrat. 
He represents the first congressional district of Ohio, which 
has a population of 169.280, and emliraces the first, sec- 
ond, third, fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh, eighth, ninth, tenth, 
eleventh, eighteenth, twenty-sixth, twenty-seventh, and 
thirty-first wards of the city of Cincinnati. Anderson, 
Columbia. Spencer, Symmes. and Sycamore Townships, and 
Northeast. Southeast. Bond Hill, and St. Bernard precincts 
of Mill Creek Township. 




CARLOS D. SHELDEN 



CARLOS D. SHELDEN 



Carlos D. Shelden, of Houghton, was elected to the 
Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Repnhliran. receiving '2il.()12 votes, 
against 1 "2.479 for Henry A. Seymour, Democrat Populist. 
He represents the twelfth congressional district of Michi- 
gan, which has a population of 180,658, and embraces the 
sixteen counties of Alger, Baraga, Chippewa, Delta, Dickin- 
son, (xogebic. Houghton. Iron. Isle Royal. Keweenaw. Luce, 
Mackinac. Marquette, Menominee, Ontonagon, and School- 
craft. 




JAMES S. SHERMAN 



JAMES SCHOOLCRAFT SHERMAN 



James Schoolcraft Sherman, of Utica, was born in Utica, 
N. Y.. October '24, 1S55 ; received an academic and collegiate 
education, graduating from Hamilton College in the class 
of 1S78 ; was admitted to the l)ar in ISSO, becoming a 
member of the firm of Cookinham & Sherman ; was elected 
mayor of Utica in March, 1SS4. as a Republican, receiving 
a substantial majority in a Democratic city; was chairman 
of the Republican State convention in Saratoga in 181)5 ; 
was elected to the Fiftieth, Fifty-First. Fifty-Third, and 
Fifty-Fourth Congresses and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth 
Congress as a Republican, receiving 26,996 votes, against 
16,512 votes for Cornelius Haley. Democrat, and 852 votes 
for William D. Towsley, Prohibitionist. He represents the 
twenty-fifth congressional district of New York, which has 
a population of 168.530. and embraces the two counties of 
Oneida and Herkimer. 




JOSEPH B. SHOWALTER 



JOSEPH B. SHOWALTER 



Joseph B. Showalter. of Butler, was born in Fayette 
County, Pa.. February 11. 1S51 ; received a public-school 
and academic education ; taught school for six years ; studied 
medicine at Long island College Hospital and College of 
Physicians and Surgeons, in l?altimore. graduating from the 
latter institution : practicetl medicine for a number of years 
at Chicora. Pa. : is engaged in the production of petroleum 
and natural gas : was elected to the Pennsylvania house 
of representatives in l>SS(i as a Kepuldican. for a term of 
two years ; elected to the l^ennsylvania State senate in ISSS 
for a term of four years ; was chaii-man of committee on 
health and sanitation ; secured the passage through the 
senate of the medical examiners' bill and other important 
measures, one of which was his bill founding tlie Home 
for the Training in Speech of Deaf Chiklren under School 
Age. in Philadelphia : has l)een a trustee of said institution 
since its organization : was elected to the Fifty-Fifth Con- 
gress, representing the twenty-tifth district of Pennsylvania, 
composed of the counties of Beaver, Butler. Lawrence, and 
Mercer : was reelected to the Fifty-Sixth Congress. Novem- 
ber -S. IS'IS. In IST^) Dr. Showalter man-ied Miss Ella Marion 
McKee. daughter of Hon. David McKee. of Slipperyrock. Pa. 




ALONZO C. SHUFORD 



ALONZO CRAIG SHUFORD 



Alonzo Craig Shufokd, of Newton, was born in Catawba 
County. N. C, March 1, 185S ; was educated in the common 
schools of the county and at Newton College; is a farmer 
by occupation; joined the Alliance in 18^9; was made 
county lecturer and later district lecturer; was elected 
delegate to the labor conference in St. Louis in February. 
1S1)2; also delegate for the State at large to the Populist 
convention in Omaha -luly 4, same year: was elected vice- 
president of the State Alliance in ]sl»4: was elected to the 
Fifty-Fourth and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as 
a Populist, receiving 17.166 votes, against 14. '291 votes for 
Samuel Peniberton. Democrat. He represents the seventh 
congressional district of North Carolina, which has a pop- 
ulation of 169.490. and embraces the ten counties of Cabar- 
rus. Catawba. Davidson. Davie. Iredell. Lincoln. Montgomery, 
liowan, Stanly, and Yadkin. 




JERRY SIMPSON 



JERRY SIMPSON 



Jerky Simpson, of Medicine Lodf^e. was l)<)ni in the 
Province of New Urunswick, Miircli ol. IS4'J; wlien six 
years of a^c his parents removed to Oneida County. N. Y.: 
at the a^ife of fourteen he he^ran life as a sailor, wliich 
pursuit lie I'ollipwed for t weiity-tlu-ee years: durin;,' liis 
career as a sailm- lie had conmiand of many lar<<e vessels 
on the Great Lakes: during' the tarly part of the Civil VVai- 
he served for a time in Conipauy A. Twelfth Illinois In- 
fantry, hut contracting a disease, he left the service: in 
1871S he drifted to Kansas and is now living six miles from 
Medicine liodge, IJarher County, where he is engaged in 
farming and stock raising: was a K'epnhlican originally, 
casting his lirst vote for the second election of Ahrahaiii 
Lincoln, hut during the past twelve years has heeii voting 
and afliliating with the (ireenhack and Union iiahoi- |)a,i'ties: 
twice ran for the Kansas legislature on the ln(h^])endent 
ticket in Uarher Connty. hut was defeated hoth times hy 
a small plurality: was nominated for the Fifty-Second 
Congi'ess hy the People's jiarty and elected hy the aid of 
the Democrats, who indorsed his nomination : was reelected 
to the Fifty-Third Congress as a Farmers' Alliance candi- 
date: was nominated for the Fifty-Fourth Congress, hut 
was defeated at the election : was elected to the Fifty-Fifth 
Congress as a Demo-Popnlist. receiving 29,SS'.) votes, against 
2(>. •.)(>(> votes for Chester I. Long, h'epuhlican. I le represents 
the seventh congressional district of Kansas, which has a 
population of liTS.'JdS. and embraces tlie thirty-six counties 
of Jlarher, Barton. Clark. (!omanche. Edwards. Finney, Ford. 
Grant, (iray. Greeley. Hamilton. Harper. Harvey, Haskell. 
Hodgeman. Kearney, Kingman. Kiowa. Lane. McPliersou. 
Meade. Morton, Ness. Pawnee. Pratt, h'eiio. Kice. h'ush. 
Scott, Seward. Sedgwick, Stafford. Stanton. Stevens. Sumner. 
and Wichita. 




THETUS W. SIMS 



THETUS WILLRETTE SIMS 



Thetus Willkette Sims was Iwrn April 25. 1852, in 
Wayne County, Tenn.; was raised on a farm; was edu- 
cated at Savannah College. Savannah. Tenn.; graduated in 
the law^ department of the Cumberland University at Leb- 
anon, Tenn., June, 1S7G; located at Linden. Tenn.. where 
he has resided ever since in the practice of his profession; 
was elected county superintendent of public instruction 
for Perry County. Tenn., in 1SS2, and held that office for 
two years ; was chosen an elector on the Cleveland and 
Stevenson ticket in ls'.l2: was elected to the Fifty-Fifth 
Congress as a Democrat, receiving l(i.5()8 votes, against 
13,()li) votes for Hon. John E. McCall, Republican, and 1.1:^0 
votes for Hon. J. S. Leach. Populist. He represents the 
eighth congressional district of Tennessee, which has a 
population of l(n.S2<*. and embraces the ten counties of Ben- 
ton. Carroll. Chester, Decatur. Hardin. Henderson. Henry. 
Madisou. McNairv, and Perrv. 




HARRY SKINNER 



HARRY SKINNER 



Harry Skinner, of (ireem ille, was horn in Penjuimans 
Connty, N. C. May 25, 1S55 ; attended the Hertford Academy, 
read law at the Kentucky University in 1.S74 75. and was 
licensed to practice in North Carolina in ].S7(i: has since 
resided in Greenville, N. C, and continuously i)racticed his 
profession ; in 1S7S was chosen by unanimous vote as town 
councilman; in IS'.HI was elected to the lower house of 
the North Carolina legislature, and served as chairman of 
the committee on internal improvements, on the judiciary 
committee, and chairman of the house branch of the com- 
mittee on redistricting the State ; has served as chairman 
of the Democratic executive committee of his county, chair- 
luan of the ])enu)cratic executive committee of the first con- 
gressional district, and on the State central committee : is 
at present chairmai] of the Populist executive committee 
of his county and on the State central committee: is a 
trustee of the State I'niversity: was elected to the Fifty- 
Fourth and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Congi-ess as a Poj)- 
ulist, receiving •20,875 votes, against 14,831 votes for W. H. 
Lucas, Democrat. He represents the first congressional 
district of North Carolina, which has a population of 172.- 
()(>4. and embi-aces the sixteen counties of Beaufort. Cam- 
den, Carteret, Chowan, Currituck. Dare, Gates, Hertford, Hyde, 
Martin. Pamlico. Pasquotank. Penpiimans. Pitt, Tyrrell, and 
Washington. 




JAMES L. SLAYDEN 



JAMES L SLAYDEN 



James L. Slayden, of San Antonio, was born June 1, 
1853, in Graves County, Ky. ; was educated at the country 
schools of his native State and at Washington and Lee 
University. Virginia; is a cotton merchant; was a member 
of the Tw'euty-Third legislature of Texas in 1892 ; declined 
reelection, and was elected to the Hfty-Fifth Congress as 
a Democrat, receiving 14.744 votes, against 13.588 votes 
for George H. Noonan. Repul)lican. and 3.210 votes for 
Taylor McRae. Populist. He represents the twelfth con- 
gressional district of Texas, which has a population of 
lofJ.dSS. and embraces the thirty-seven counties of Ban- 
dera, Bexar. Blanco, Brewster, Buchel. Comal. Concho. Coke, 
Crane. Crockett. Ector. Edwards. Foley. Gillespie. Glasscock, 
Irion. Jeff Davis. Kerr. Kendall. Kimble. Kinney. Llano. 
Mason. Maverick. McCulloch. Medina. Menard. Midland, 
Pecos, Presidio. San Saba. Schleicher. Sterling, Sutton. Tom 
Green. Upton, and Valverde. 



DAVID H. SMITH 



David Highbaugh Smith, of Hodgensville, Larue Coiiuty, 
Ky.. was born December li), 1S54, in Hart County, Ky., near 
Hammonville; was educated in the public schools of that 
vicinity and at the colleges at Horse Cave, Leitchfield, and 
Hartford, all in Kentucky: has been practicing law since 
March, lS7(i ; was elected county attorney for Larue County 
at the August election, ISTS, for the term of four years; 
was elected superintendent of common schools for Larue 
County in October, iSTi-i ; resigned the office of county 
attorney in August, ISSI, and at the August. ISSl. election 
was elected to represent Larue County in the house of 
representatives of the general assemlily for two years; at 
the August. 1SS5. election was elected to represent the 
thirteenth senatorial district, composed of the counties of 
Green, Hart, and Larue, in the State senate for the term 
of four years ; reelected at the August, LSH*). election for 
four years ; while in the State senate was chairman of 
general statutes committee and member of committees on 
rules and judiciary; the new constitution, adopted by the 
State in 1S91. created the office of president pro fciujKnr 
of the senate ; at the first meeting of the senate there- 
after was chosen unanimously by the Democratic mem- 
bers for that position, and was elected for the term of 
two years, at the end of which term he was again the 
unanimous choice of the Democrats for the place, and 
was again elected for a second term of two years ; was 
elected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Democrat, receiv- 
ing 21,655 votes, against '20."222 votes for Hon. John W. 
Lewis. Eepublican, l,i)iy votes for Hon. J. E. Durham, 
Populist, and 317 votes for Hon. W. N. Likens. Prohibi- 
tionist. He represents the foui-th district of Kentucky, 
which has a population of U)2,055, and eml)races the thir- 
teen counties of Breckinridge. Bullitt, Grayson. Green, 
Hardin. Hart, Larue. Marion. Meade. Nelson. Ohio. Taylor, 
and Washington. 




GEORGE W SMITH 



GEORGE W. SMITH 



George W. Smith, of Murphysboro. was born in Putnam 
County, Ohio, August 18. 11-146 ; was raised on a farm in 
Wayne County, 111., to which his father removed in 1850 ; 
learned the trade of blacksmithing ; attended the common 
schools ; graduated from the literary department of McKen- 
dree College, at Lebanon, 111., in 18(38 ; read law in Fairfield, 
111., after which he entered the law department of the 
university at Bloomington, Ind., from which he graduated 
in 1870; was admitted to the practice of law liy the sui)reme 
court of Illinois the same year, since which time he has 
resided in Murphysboro, in the active practice of his pro- 
fession ; in 1880 he was the Republican elector for his congres- 
sional district (then the eighteenth) and cast the vote of 
the district for (iarfield and Arthur; is married : was elected 
to the Fifty-First, Fifty-Second, Fifty-Third, and Fifty- 
Fourth Congresses and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress 
as a Republican, receiving 2'2.(>(ifi votes, against 17,811 votes 
for J. J. Hall. Democrat. He represents the twenty-sect)nd 
district of Illinois, which has a population of 159,186. and 
embraces the nine counties of Alexander, Jackson, Johnson, 
Massac, Pope. Pulaski, Saline, Union, and Williamson. 




SAMUEL W. SMITH 



SAMUEL W. SMITH 



Samuel W. Smith, of Pontiac, was born in the town- 
ship of Independence. Oakland Countj', Mich., August 23, 
1852 ; was educated at Clarkston and Detroit, and, after 
admission to the bar of Oakland County, graduated in the 
law department of the University of Michigan ; commenced 
to care for himself at the early age of twelve years, 
engaged in teaching school at sixteen years of age, and 
for the last eighteen years has practiced law where he 
now resides; in 1S80 was elected prosecuting attorney of 
Oakland County, and x'eelected in 1(S82 ; in 1884 he was 
elected to the State senate ; was elected to the Fifty-Fifth 
Congress as a Republican, receiving 26,889 votes, against 
23,473 votes for Quincey A. Smith, Demo-Populist. He 
represents the sixth congressional district of Michigan, 
which has a population of 190.539, and emltraces the coun- 
ties of Genesee, Ingham, Livingston. Oakland; townships of 
Lavonia. Eedford. Greenfield, Nankin. Dearborn, and Spring- 
wells, of the county of Wayne, and the twelfth, fourteenth, 
and sixteenth wards of the city of Detroit. 




WILLIAM A. SMITH 



WILLIAM ALDEN SMITH 



William Alden Smith, of (irand Rapids, was born at 
Dowagiac, Mich., May 12. iSo'.) ; received a common-school 
education ; removed v^^ith his parents to Grand Rapids, 
Mich., in 1872 ; was appointed page in the Michigan house 
of representatives by the speaker. John T. Rich, in 1879 ; 
was assistant secretary of tlie Michigan State senate in 1882 ; 
studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1883 ; was a 
member of the Republican State central committee in 1888, 
1890, and 1892 ; was the Republican candidate for Congress 
in the fifth congressional district in 1894 and elected, and 
was reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Repuljlican, 
receiving 26,819 votes, against 22,155 votes for George P. 
Hummer, Fusionist. He represents the fifth congressional 
district of Michigan, which has a population of 178.081, 
and embraces the three counties of louia, Kent, and Ottawa. 




HORACE G. SNOVER 



HORACE G. SNOVER 



Horace G. Snover. of Port Austin, Huron Count j% was 
born at Romeo, Macomb County. Mich.. September 21, 1847; 
received his early education in the public schools of 
Romeo and in the Dickenson Institute, located there ; 
graduated in the literary department of the Univei'sity of 
Michigan, in the classical course, in 1S69, and in the law 
department in 1871 ; was admitted to the bar in 1871 
and has been engaged in the practice of his profession 
ever since, except for two years, during which he was 
principal of the public schools of Port Austin, Mich., to 
which place he removed in the fall of 1874: was probate 
judge of Huron County from January 1. ISSI. to January 
1, 1885; was elected to the Fifty-Fourth and reelected to 
the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Repulilican. receiving 22.761 
votes against 18,267 votes for O'Brien J. Atkinson. Fu- 
sionist. He represents the seventh district of Michigan, 
which has a population of 181.435. and eml)races the coun- 
ties of Huron, Lapeer. Macomb. Sanilac, and St. Clair, and 
Grosse Point and Hamtramck Townships of Wayne County. 




JAMES H. SOUTHARD 



JAMES HARDING SOUTHARD 



James Harding Southard, of Toledo, was born on a 
farm in Washington Township, Lucas County, Ohio, Janu- 
ary 20, 1851 ; is the son of Samuel and Charlotte Southard. 
Samuel Southard came to this country from Devonshire, 
England, about I8oo, and located in Lucas County, where he 
has since resided ; Charlotte Southard came to Lucas County 
from central New York with hei' i)arents at a later date. 
He attended Hopewell district school. Toledo public schools, 
and studied at Adrian, Mich., and Olierlin, Ohio. ]n-eparatory 
to entering Cornell University, where he graduated in 1874 ; 
began to study law in 1875 and was admitted to practice 
in 1877 : in 1882 was appointed assistant prosecuting at- 
torney of Lucas County : afterwards was twice elected 
prosecuting attorney of said county and served in that office 
six years : was elected to the Fifty-Fourth and reelected to 
the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Republican, receiving 21Mi(>3 
votes, against 25,Gi)8 votes for S. Brophy, Democrat. He 
represents the ninth district of Ohio, which has a population 
of 190,685, and embraces the four counties of Fulton. Lucas, 
Ottawa, and Wood. 




GEORGE N. SOUTHWICK 



GEORGE N. SOUTHWICK 



George N. Southwick. of Albany, was born in All)any, 
March 7, 1S63 ; was educated in the public schools of that 
city ; graduated at Williams College in 1S,S4 ; attended the 
Albany Law School for three months ; began newspaper 
work on the' Albany Morning Express in December, 1884, 
serving as assistant editor of that newsjiaper and also as 
an ofhcial reporter for the Associated Press during the legis- 
lative sessions of 18S(5, 1SS7. and 1888 ; was editor of the 
Morning Express in December, 1888 ; was made editor of the 
Albany Erniing Journal in April. 1881) ; stumped Albany and 
neighboring counties for Harrison in 1888 and 1S9'2 ; served 
as permanent chairman of New York State Republican con- 
vention at Grand Central Palace, New York, March 24, 1896 ; 
was elected to the Fifty-Fourth and reelected to the Fifty- 
Fifth Congress as a Republican, receiving 22,342 votes, 
against 17,637 votes for Thomas F. Wilkinson, Democrat and 
Populist, 401 votes for Simeon Holroyd, Gold Democrat, 
231 votes for John C. Sanford, Prohibitionist, 201 votes for 
Edwin 0. Smith. Socialist, and 121 votes blank and scat- 
tering. He represents the twentieth district of New York, 
which has a population of 1 64. 555. and embraces the county 
of Albany. 




GEORGE SPALDING 



GEORGE SPALDING 



George Spalding, of Monroe, was born in Scotland in 
1837 ; emigrated with his parents to the United States in 
1S43; settled in Bnffalo. N. Y., where he attended the 
pulilic schools ; accompanied his parents to Monroe, Mich., 
in 1S53, where his father pnrchased a farm on the north 
bank of Raisin River, two miles west of Monroe ; taught 
school in the winter of ISCO (>! ; was mustered into the 
United States service June 20. 1.S61. as a pi'ivate in Company 
A, Fourth Regiment, Michigan Volunteer Infantry ; pro- 
moted to first sergeant ; first lieutenant. August 5, LS61 ; 
captain. January 13, 1S()'2: wounded in action at the siege 
of Yorktown. Va.. April. 1S6'2: wounded at Malvern Hill 
July 3, 1862: transferred and promoted to lieutenant-colonel 
of the Eighteenth Michigan Volunteer Infantry July 18, 
I8(i2 ; assigned to command of said regiment and by orders 
of the War Department reported to Major-Ueneral Wright 
at Cincinnati ; was engaged in driving Gen. Kirby Smith 
and General Morgan out of Kentucky ; was ordered to join 
General Rosecrans. in command of the Army of the Cum- 
berland, in the spring of ISB;!; appointed provost-marshal 
of Nashville, Tenn.. and given plenary power as provost- 
marshal by order of the War Department ; resigned to 
accept promotion as colonel of the Twelfth Regiment Ten- 
nessee \'olunteer Cavalry, and was a.ssigned to command 
of brigade known as "Johnson's Guard"; was engaged in 
protecting railroad from Nashville to Johnsonville : assigned 
to command of fourth division of cavalry. Army of the 
Cumberland, headquarters Pulaski, Tenn.; engaged with 



GEORGE SPALDING 

General Hood in Ms advance toward Nashville ; was pro- 
moted at the battle of Nashville, Tenu., "for valuable 
services at the battle of Nashville," to brevet brigadier- 
general, and assigned with full rank and pay by special 
order of the President of the United States ; severely 
wounded in said battle ; mustered out of service October 
24, 1S65; was postmaster of Monroe, Mich., from 1866 to 
1870; special agent of the Treasury Department from 1871 
to 1875 ; elected mayor of Monroe, Mich., 1876 ; president 
of the board of education ; admitted to the bar by examina- 
tion, 1878; elected director of the First National Bank of 
Monroe, Mich., 1876 ; appointed its cashier 1877 ; continued 
as director and cashier until 1892, when he was elected 
president ; appointed member of the board of control. State 
Industrial Home for Girls. 1885, for six years, and reap- 
pointed in 181)2 ; was elected to the Fifty-Fourth and 
reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Republican, re- 
ceiving 26,557 votes, against 25.061 votes for T. E. Bank- 
worth, Fusionist, 155 votes for J. 0. Zabell, Populist. 517 
votes for 0. H. Perry, Prohibitionist, and 230 votes for W. 
Rawson. Independent. He represents the second congres- 
sional district of Michigan, which has a population of 
191,841, and embraces the counties of Jackson, Lenawee, 
Monroe, Washtenaw, and part of Wayne. 




STEPHEN M. SPARKMAN 



STEPHEN M. SPARKMAN 



Stephen M. Sparkman. of Tampa, was born July 20, 1849, 
in Hernaudo County. Fla.; was educated in the common 
schools of Florida, and taught school for about three years, 
from the age of eighteen to twenty-one, for the purpose 
of assisting in his education ; read law under H. L. Mit- 
chell, now governor of Florida, and was admitted to prac- 
tice in October, 1S72 ; has since practiced in the coui'ts of 
the State and the United States ; was State attorney for 
the sixth judicial circuit for nine years, from 1878 to 1887; 
was a member of the State and congressional committees 
from 1S!)0 to 1SIJ2, when he was elected chairman ; was 
tendered the circuit judgeship for the sixth judicial circuit 
of Florida by Governor Perry in 1888, and the position of 
associate judge on the supreme court bench in 1891 by 
Governor Fleming, both of which were declined ; was 
elected to the Fifty-Fourth and reelected to the Fifty- 
Fifth Congress as a Democrat, receiving 14,823 votes, 
against 2,797 votes for E. K. Nichols, Republican. He rep- 
resents the first congressional district of Florida, which 
has a population of 188,630, and embraces the twenty-five 
counties of Calhoun, Citrus, De Soto, Escambia. Franklin, 
Gadsden. Hernando, Hillsboro. Holmes, Jackson, Jefferson, 
Lafayette, Lee, Leon. Levy. Liberty, Manatee, Monroe, Pasco, 
Polk. Santa Rosa. Taylor, Wakulla, Walton, and Washington. 




NEHEMIAH D. SPERRY 



NEHEMIAH DAY SPERRY 



Nehemiah Day Sperry, of New Haven, was born in 
Woodhridge, New Haven County. Conn., July 10. 1827 ; 
received his education in the common schools and at the 
private school of Prof. Amos Smith, at New Haven ; worked 
on the farm and in the mill : taught school for several 
years; learned the trade of house builder; commenced 
business on his own account in 1S47 ; was elected a mem- 
ber of the common council in 1S58 ; in 1854 was elected 
an alderman of the city ; was elected selectman of the 
town of New Haven in 1853 ; was elected secretary of 
state in 1855 ; was reelected in 1S56 ; was a member of 
the convention that renominated Abraham Lincoln in 
1864 ; was made a member of the Republican national 
committee, was elected a member of the executive com- 
mittee, and was chosen secretary both of the national 
and executive committees ; was chairman of the Republi- 
can State committee for a series of years : was president 
of the State convention that nominated (xrant electors ; 
was chairman of the recruiting committee of New Haven 
during the war; was nominated postmaster by Abraham 
Lincoln in 18(il, and continued in office until the first 
election of Grover Cleveland ; was renominated by Presi- 
dent Harrison for postmaster and served until the reelec- 
tion of President Cleveland, making in all twenty-eight 
years and two months ; was appointed a member of the 
commission to visit England, rxermany. and France to look 
into their system of post offices, but declined service ; was 
nominated for Congress in 1886, but declined the same ; 



N EH EMI AH DAY SPERR\ 

was i^resident of the Chamljer of Commerce of New Haven; 
was bondsman for building the Monitor; was nominated 
for Congress again in 1894 ; was elected to the Fifty- 
Fourth and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Re- 
publican, receiving 35,944 votes, against 22,317 votes for 
Fuller, Silver Democrat. 1,213 votes for Wood, Gold Demo- 
crat, 482 votes for Augur, Prohibitionist, and 660 votes for 
Sullivan, Socialist Labor. He represents the second con- 
gressional district of Connecticut, which has a population 
of 248.582, and embraces the counties of Middlesex and 
New Haven, including the cities of New Haven, Merideu, 
Waterbury, Ansonia, Derby, and Middletowu. 




THOMAS SPIGHT 



THOMAS SPIGHT 



Thomas Spight. of Ripley, was born and raised on a 
farm in Tippah County, Miss., and has lived in that county 
all his life; attended the common and hi^di schools of the 
county, and in LS50 entered college at Furdy. Tenu., and 
at the end of one year entered the La Grange (Tenn.) Syn- 
odical College, but the death of his father, in March, 1861, 
and the breaking out of the war, compelled him to return 
home ; entered the Confederate army as a private, and be- 
came captain of his company before he was twenty-one 
years old. being the youngest officer of that rank in the 
famous "'Walthall Brigade," commanded l)y the late dis- 
tinguished Senator from Mississippi ; participated in nearly 
all the battles fought by the Army of Tennessee, and was 
severely wounded on the 2'2d of July. ISIU. at Atlanta, 
(Ja. : was in command of what was left of his regiment 
(the Thirty-Fourth Mississippi Infantry) in April. 1SG5, 
when he surrendered with the army under Gen. Joseph E. 
Johnston at Greensboro, N. C. ; returned home to find all 
the property of his father's estate swept away as a result 
of the war, and commenced teaching school and farming, 
and at the same time studying law ; was admitted to the 
bar and has practiced his profession since at Ripley ; is a 
member of the Baptist Church : represented his county in 
the Mississippi legislature from 1874 to 188(1. and in the 
latter year was district pi-esidential electf)r on the Han- 
cock ticket; established the SoutJicni Sciilinrl in 1879, 
which he continued to own and edit until 1884. when he 
was elected district attorney of the third judicial district, 



THOMAS SPIGHT 

composed of seven counties, which position he held until 
1892, when he voluntarily retired ; he was a candidate for 
the Democratic nomination for Congress in 1894. but was 
defeated by Hon. J. C. Kyle, who was then serving his sec- 
ond term ; was again a candidate in 1S1)6. but was de- 
feated in convention by a comliination of the opposition 
on Hon. W. V. Sullivan, who was elected and afterwards 
appointed United States Senator to succeed Senator Walt- 
hall, deceased ; was elected as a Democrat for the unex- 
pired term in the Fifty-Fifth Congress, July 5, defeating 
Hon. Z. M. Stephens, also a Democrat, and judge of the 
circuit court of the district. ])y a plurality of 254 votes. 
He represents the second district of Mississippi, which has 
a population of 170.512. and embraces the nine counties of 
Benton. De Soto, Lafayette. i\Iarshall. Panola. Tallahatchie. 
Tate. Tippah, and Union. He was nominated in primary 
election as the candidate of his party for a seat in the 
Fifty-Sixth Congress, and at the November election re- 
ceived all the votes cast in his district, except about 200. 




CHARLES F. SPRAGUE 



CHARLES F. SPRAGUE 



Charles Franklin Sprague, of Brookline, Mass., was 
born in Boston, Mass.. June 10, 1.S57 ; was fitted for col- 
lege in the Boston schools and gradnated from Harvard 
University in 1871) ; subsequently studied law at the Har- 
vard Law School and Boston Laiiversity, and is a niemlier 
of the Suffolk bar: in ISS'J and ISDO was a niem)>er of the 
common council of the city of Boston; in isyi ;uul 1892 
was in the Massachusetts house of representatives ; in 1893 
and 1894 was a member of, and latterly chairman of, the 
board of park commissioners of the city of Boston ; in 1895 
and 189() was a member of the Massachusetts senate, 
serving as chairman of the committee on metropolitan 
affairs ; was elected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Re- 
23nbli"an, receiving 22.933 votes, against 10.114 votes for 
William H. Baker, Free-Silver Democrat. He represents 
the eleventh congressional district of Massachusetts, which 
has a population of 173,185, and embraces in Suffolk 
County the twenty-first, twenty-third, and twenty-fifth 
wards of the city of Boston ; in Middlesex County the city 
of Newton and towns of Belmont, Holliston, Sherborn. and 
Watertown ; in Norfolk County the towns of Bellingham, 
Brookline, Dedham, Dover, Foxboro, Franklin. Hyde Park, 
Medfield, Medway, Millis, Needham, Norfolk, Norwood, 
Sharon, Walpole, and Wrentham ; in Bristol County, the town 
of North Attleboro ; in Worcester County, the towns of 
Hopedale and Milford. 




JESSE F. STALLINGS 



JESSE F. STALLINGS 



Jesse F. Stallings. of Greenville, was born near the 
village of Manningham. Butler County. Ala.. April 4, 1856 ; 
graduated from the University of Alabama in 1.S77 ; studied 
law at the law school of the University of Alaliama and 
in the office of the Hon. J. C. Kichardson, of Greenville, and 
was admitted to practice in the supreme court in April, 
1871) : commenced the practice of law in Greenville, where 
he has since resided ; was elected liy the legislature of 
Alabama solicitor for the second judicial circuit in Novem- 
ber, 1886, for a term of six years ; resigned the office of 
solicitor in September. 1892, to accept the Democratic nom- 
ination for Congress ; was a delegate to the national Demo- 
cratic convention which was held in St. Louis in 1888 ; was 
elected to the Fifty-Third and Fifty-Fourth Congresses and 
reelected to the Fifty-J'ifth Congress as a Democrat, receiv- 
ing 11.703 votes, against 5.6H1 votes for T. H. Clark. National 
Democrat, and 3.856 votes for J. C. Fouville, Populist. He 
represents the second congi-essional district of Alabama, 
which has a population of 1SS.'214. and embraces the nine 
counties of Baldwin. Butler. Conecuh. Covington, Crenshaw, 
Escambia, Montgomery, Pike, and Wilcox. 




WILLIAM L. STARK 



WILLIAM LEDYARD STARK 



William Ledyard Stark, of Aurora, was born in Mystic, 
New Loudon County, Conn.. July 29, LS53, of Pilgrim stock ; 
had the usual experiences of a town boy of that locality, 
going to school and following the sea ; graduated from 
the Mystic Valley Institute at Mystic, Conn., in 1872 ; af- 
terwards went to Wyoming. Stark County, 111.; taught 
school and clerked in a store ; attended the Union College 
of Law. Chicago, 111., for eighteen months, during which 
time he was connected with the office of the late G. Gil- 
bert Gilibons ; was admitted to the bar by the supreme 
court of Illinois in January, 1S7.S; removed to Aurora, 
Neb., in February. 1S7S; was superintendent of the city 
schools for nearly two years ; deputy district attorney for 
two years; appointed once and elected five times judge of 
the county court of Hamilton County. Neb.; declined a 
sixth nomination for that office in l.Sl)5; served as major 
in the Nebraska national guard. At the time of the sink- 
ing of the Maine tendered his military services to the 
governor of the State of Nebraska. The offer was ac- 
cepted, and Mr. Stark was commissioned colonel and special 
aid on the governor's staff, and liy order was made the 
military representative of the governor, and stationed at 
Washington, D. C, where he continued in service until 
the close of the Spanish-American War. He was elected 
to the Fifty-Fifth Congress and reelected to the Fifty- 
Sixtli Congress by an increased majority in both Con- 
gresses. He received the loyal and united support of the 
People's Independent Democratic, and the Silver Republi- 
can parties. He represents the fourth congressional dis- 
trict of Nebraska, which has a population of 195.414. and 
embraces the eleven counties of Butler. Fillmore. Gage, 
Hamilton, Jefferson, Polk, Saline, Saunders, Seward, Thayer, 
and York. 




GEORGE W. STEELE 



GEORGE W. STEELE 



George W. Steele, of Marion, was born in Fayette 
County, Ind., December 18, 1889 ; was educated in the com- 
mon schools and at the Ohio Western University, at Dela- 
ware, Ohio; read law, was admitted to the bar. and practiced 
"n Hartford City. Ind.. from April 11 to 21. ISGl, when he 
enlisted in the Eighth Indiana Keginient, but could not 
be mustered into this regiment on account of excess in num- 
bers ; was mustered in the Twelfth Indiana on May 2, 1S(U, 
and served in this regiment and the One Hundred and First 
Indiana until the close of the war — the first year in the 
Army of the Potomac, the latter three in the Army of the 
Cumberland and with Sherman to the Sea; was mustered 
out as lieutenant-colonel in July, 1.S65 ; commissioned and 
served in the Fourteenth United States Infantry from Fel)- 
ruary 28, 1866, to February 1, 1876, mainly in California, 
Arizona. Montana, Nebraska, Wyoming, and Utah ; resigned 
and engaged in farming and pork-packing until 1882 : estalj- 
lished the First National Bank of Marion. Ind.. and became 
its president ; declined the appointment as director of the 
Union Pacific Railroad ; was the first governor of Oklahoma, 
and resigned after serving twenty months ; is president of 
the Marion Commercial Club, of the Philadeli^hia Land Com- 
pany, and a memlier of the Board of Managers of the 
National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers; was a 
member of the Forty-Seventh, Forty-Eighth, Forty-Ninth, 
Fiftieth, and Fifty-Fourth Congresses and was reelected to 
the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Republican, receiving 27,781 
votes, against 23.102 votes for Joseph Larimer. Democrat. 
636 votes for Ratliff. Prohibitionist, and 83'J votes for Lari- 
mer, Populist. He represents the eleventh congressional 
district of Indiana, which has a population of 169,424, and 
embraces the six counties of Cass. Grant. Howard. Hunting- 
ton. Miami, and Wabash. 




JOHN H. STEPHENS 



JOHN H. STEPHENS 



John H. Stephens, of Vernon, was born in Shelby 
County, Tex. : was educated at MansHeld. Tarrant County, 
Tex. ; graduated from the law department of Cumberland 
University. Lebanon. Tenn., in June, 1S72. and has practiced 
law since at Montague. Montague County, and Vernon, Wil- 
barger County, Tex. ; served as State senator in the twenty- 
first and twenty-second legislatures of Texas, and was 
elected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Democrat, receiv- 
ing 22,989 votes, against 14.219 votes for H. L. Bentley, and 
354 votes scattering. He represents the thirteenth con- 
gressional district of Texas, which has a population of 
190.USU, and embraces the eighty counties of Andrews, 
Archer, Armstrong. Bailey. Baylor, Borden, Briscoe, Calla- 
han. Carson. Castro. Childress. Clay, Cochran, Collingsworth, 
Cottle. Crosby, Dallam, Dawson, Deaf Smith. Dickens, Don- 
ley, Eastland, El Paso. Fishei-, Floyd, Foard, (iaines, Garza, 
Gray, Greer, Hale. Hall, Hansford. Hardeman, Hartley, 
Haskell. Hemphill, Hockley, Howard, Hutchinson, Jack, 
Jones, Kent, King. Knox, Lamb. Lipscoml). Loving, Lubbock, 
Lynn, Martin, Mitchell, Moore, Motley, Nolan, Ochiltree, Old- 
ham, Palo Pinto, Parmer. Potter, Randall, Reeves, Roberts, 
Scurry, Shackelford. Sherman, Stephens. Stonewall, Swisher, 
Taylor, Terry. Throckmorton. Waid. Wheeler. Wichita, Wil- 
barger, Winkler, Wise, Yoakum, and Young. 




FREDERICK C. STEVENS 



FREDERICK CLEMENT STEVENS 



Frederick Clement Stevens, of St. Paul, was born in 
Boston, Mass., January 1, 1861 ; educated in common schools 
of Rockland, Me.; graduated from Bowdoin College. Bruns- 
wick, Me., in 1881 ; from law school of the State University 
of Iowa in 1884 ; was admitted to the bar in 1884, and com- 
menced practice in St. Paul ; was elected to the State legis- 
lature of Minnesota in session of 1888-89 and 1890-91 ; was 
elected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Republican, receiving 
24.686 votes, against 14,444 votes for Francis H. Clarke, fusion 
candidate of Democratic, Populist, and Silver parties. He 
represents the fourth congressional district of Minnesota, 
which has a population of 185.383, and embraces the hve 
counties of Chisago, Isanti, Kanabec, Ramsey, and Wash- 
ington. 




ALEXANDER STEWART 



ALEXANDER STEWART 



Alexander Stewart, of Wan.sau. was born September 
12, 1.S29, in York County, province of New Brunswick, and 
received a common-school education at that place ; in 1849 
he removed to what is now Marathon County and settled 
where the city of Wausau is now located, engaging in the 
lumber business, which occupation he has ever since fol- 
lowed; aside from his selection as a delegate from his dis- 
trict to the national Republican convention at Chicago in 
1SS4, he has neither aspired to nor held public office of any 
description ; he was elected to the Fifty-Fourth and re- 
elected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Republican, receiv- 
ing 30,438 votes, against 17,71(5 votes for W. W. O'Keefe, 
Democrat. He i-epresents the ninth congressional district 
of Wisconsin, which has a population of 164,777, and em- 
braces the thirteen counties of Ashland, Clark, Florence, 
Forest, Iron. Langlade. Lincoln, Marathon, Marinette, 
Oconto, Oneida, Price, Shawano, Taylor, and Vilas. 




JAMES F. STEWART 



JAMES FLEMING STEWART 



James Fleming Stewart, of Patersou, was born at Pat- 
erson. N. J.. .Time 15. 1851; attended public and private 
schools in Patersou and the University of the City of New 
York, and graduated at the law school of the latter in- 
stitution in 1870, taking the first prize for best examina- 
tion ; practiced law in New York City until 1875. since 
which time he has followed his profession in his native 
city ; was three times appointed recorder of Patersou I the 
criminal magistrate of the city), which office he occupied 
at the time of his election to Congress ; never held or ran 
for any other office ; was elected to the Fifty-Fourth and 
reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Kepul)lican, re- 
ceiving 23,845 votes against 13.6(57 votes for Ely, Demo- 
crat, 37(1 votes for Reed, Prohiljitionist. 920 votes for 
Banks. National Democrat, and 1.041 votes for Wilson. So- 
cialist Labor. He represents the fifth congressional dis- 
trict of New Jersey, which has a population of 198,642, 
and embraces the two counties of Bergen and Passaic. 




J. WILLIAM STOKES 



J. WILLIAM STOKES 



J. William Stokes, of Orangeburg, was born in Orange- 
burg County. S. C. in LS58 ; was brought up to farm life, 
attending the ordinary schools of his county and town 
until he was nineteen years of age ; graduated from Wash- 
ington and Lee ITuiversity, Virginia, in lS7(i. and taught 
school for twelve years, graduating meantime in medicine 
from Vanderbilt University, Tennessee ; in 1889 he re- 
turned to the farm, assisted in organizing the farmers, and 
was president of the State Farmers' Alliance two terms; 
was elected to the State senate in iSiHl; was a delegate 
at large to the national Democratic convention at Chicago 
in 1892 and was presidential elector on the Democratic 
ticket the same year : was defeated for the Democratic nom- 
ination in the old Hrst congressional district in 1S92 l)y a 
small majority ; in 1894 was nominated without opposi- 
tion in the Democratic primaries in the new seventh con- 
gressional district, which is nearly the same as the old 
first district. He received the certificate of election to the 
Fifty-Fourth Congress, but the seat was declared vacant. 
At the election on November 3. 1896, he was elected to 
the short term of the Fifty-Fourth Congress ; was reelected 
to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Democrat, receiving 8,065 
votes, against 1,342 votes for T. B. Johnson. Regular Re- 
publican. He represents the seventh congressional dis- 
trict of South Carolina, which has a population of 178.930, 
and embraces the counties of Lexington, Orangeburg, 
Sumter, the townships of Bells, Givehams, Burns, George, 
Cain, Dorchester, Heyward. Roger, Sheredon. Verdier, Brox- 
tons, and Warren, of the county of Colleton, and the town- 
ships of St. James, Goose Creek, St. Johns, Berkeley, and 
St. Stevens, of the county of Berkeley, and Lower Town- 
ship, of the county of Richland. 




CHARLES W. STONE 



CHARLES WARREN STONE 



Charles Warren Stone, of Warren, wa.s born in Gro- 
ton, Mass., June 29, 1843. Among his ancestors there were 
Eevolutionary "blue coats" intermarried with the fami- 
lies of Warren. Prescott, and Ureen. In his youth he 
worked at the carpenter's trade with his father. When the 
latter died the young man returned to the homestead of 
his grandfather, and, with the aid of his two younger 
brothers, carried on the farm. He attended school in the 
winter, completed a course at Lawrence Academy, and en- 
tered Williams College, from which, eaining his way by 
teaching and other work, he graduated with honor in 
1868. After leaving college he became principal of the 
Union School at Warren, was elected county superintend- 
ent of schools in 1865, and later in the same year resigned 
that position, having been chosen principal of the acad- 
emy at Erie. While teaching he took up the study of 
law, was admitted to practice in the courts of Warren 
County in 186(5. and entered into partnership with Judge 
Easselas Brown in 1867. which firm continued for more 
than twenty years and was engaged in much of the im- 
portant litigation in the northwestern part of the state. 
In 1869 Mr. Stone was elected to the lower house of the 
State legislature from the district comi)osed of the coun- 
ties of Warren and \'enango, and was reelected without 
opposition, the Democratic party making no nomination. 
In 1876 he was sent to the State senate, and served as 
chaii-man of the general judiciary committee. In the Re- 
publican State convention of 1878 he was urged by the 



CHARLES WARREN STONE 

Republicans of the northwestern part of the State for the 
office of lieutenant-governor and received the nomination 
by a vote of 182 to 59. He was subsequently elected by 
a majority of 23,250, which exceeded the majorities re- 
ceived by the other candidates on the ticket. In the pro- 
tracted joint convention of the House and Senate for the 
nomination of a United States Senator over which he 
presided, resulting in the election of John I. Mitchell as 
United States Senator. Mr. Stone was himself urged to be- 
come a candidate and there was a strong under-current 
in his favor, but he refused to enter the contest. He was 
one of the three commissioners in 18S8 who located the 
United States public building at Erie, and later was a 
repre.sentative from Pennsylvania at the Inter-State Ex- 
tradition Conference called by the governors of several 
States. Subsequently he was a delegate from Pennsylvania 
to the Prison Congress over which ex-President Hayes 
presided. In Januai-y. 1887, he was ajipointed by Governor 
Beaver to be secretary of the Commonwealth, and served 
until his election to Congress from the twenty-seventh 
district in November, 181)0, as the successor of the late L. 
F. Watson. He has been three times reelected by large 
majorities and is consequently now serving his fourth 
full term. During the present and last Congress he has 
been the chairman of the committee on coinage, weights, 
and measures. In the Republican State convention of 
1890 he had strong support for the gubernatorial nomina- 
tion, and in the convention of 1898 received 174 votes, 
lieing within 15 of the number necessary to nominate. 
He was married January 30, 1868, to Elizabeth Moorhead, 
of Erie, Pa., and they have six children. He represents 
the four counties of Cameron, McKean, Venango, and War- 
ren, which have a population of about 138,326. 




THOMAS J. STRAIT 



THOMAS JEFFERSON STRAIT 



Thomas Jefferson Strait, of Lancaster, was born in 
Chester district. S. C. December 25. 1846 ; was educated 
at Maysville. S. C. and Cooper (Miss.) Institute ; entered 
the Confederate service in 1862. in the fifteenth year of 
his age, and served in Company A, Sixth Regiment of In- 
fantry, until November, 1863 : was then transferred to 
Company H, Twenty-Fourth Regiment, Gist's brigade, and 
served as a sergeant therein until the close of the war ; 
graduated at the South Carolina Medical College with 
distinction, in 1885 ; was elected State senator in 181)0 
by a majority of 396 votes over Charles T. Connors, a 
former member of the State house of representatives; was 
elected to the Fifty-Third and Fifty-Fourth Congresses 
and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Democrat, 
receiving 8,000 votes, against 833 votes for John F. Jones, 
Republican. He represents the fifth congressional district 
of South Carolina, which has a population of 141,750. and 
embraces the five counties of Chester. Chesterfield. Ker- 
shaw. Lancaster, and York, and two townships each in 
Spartanburg and Union Counties. 




JESSE B. STRODE 



JESSE B. STRODE 



Jesse B. Strode, of Lincoln, was born in Fulton County, 
111., February 18. 1845 ; attended public school during the 
winter terms and worked on his father's farm in the summer 
seasons until he was about nineteen years of age; in Jan- 
uary, 1864. he enlisted as a private soldier in the Fiftieth 
Illinois Infantry, and was with his regiment during the 
Atlanta Campaign, the March to the Sea, through the Caro- 
linas and Virginia, and the grand review at Washington ; 
was mustered out of the army in July, 1865, and immedi- 
ately thereafter entered Abingdon ( 111.) College, where he 
remained for about three years, when he was made principal 
of the graded schools of Abingdon, which position he con- 
tinued to occupy for about eight years ; was twice elected 
mayor and six times councilman of the city of Abingdon ; 
studied law during vacations while teaching ; removed to 
Plattsmouth, Neb.. May 1, 1879, and was there admitted to 
the bar in November, 1879 ; was elected district attorney 
in 1882 and served two terms ; removed to Lincoln in 1SS7 
and practiced law there until November, 1892, when he was 
elected judge of the district court, which position he resigned 
January 1, 1895, having been elected a representative in 
Congress ; was elected to the Fifty-Fourth and reelected 
to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Republican, receiving 17,856 
votes, against 17,137 votes for Jefferson H. Broady, nom- 
inated by Democrats, Populists, and Free-Silver Republicans, 
429 votes for Charles E. Smith Prohibitionist, and 218 votes 
for H, E. George, National Prohibitionist. He represents 
the first district of Nebraska, which has a population of 
177,055, and embraces the seven counties of Cass, Johnson, 
Lancaster, Nemaha, Otoe, Pawnee, and Richardson. 




WILLIAM F. STROWD 



WILLIAM F. STROWD 



William F. Strowd, of Pittsboro, was born in Orange 
County, N. C, December 7, LSo2; was educated at the Bing- 
ham School, High Hill Academy, and at the Graham Insti- 
tute," was brought up on a farm; removed to Chatham 
County in 1861, and has continued the occupation of farm- 
ing to the present time ; was elected to the State con- 
stitutional convention in 1875 ; was nominated by the 
Populists for Congress in 1892 in the fourth congressional 
district; was again nominated by the Populists in 1894, 
and was elected to the Fifty-Fourth and reelected to the 
Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Populist, receiving 20,947 votes, 
against 16,405 votes for E. W. Pou, Democrat, 257 votes 
for Dr. Banks. Independent Republican, and 26 votes for 
G. B. Alford, Gold Democrat. He represents the fourth 
congressional district of North Carolina, which has a pop- 
ulation of 186.432, and embraces the seven counties of 
Chatham, Franklin, .Johnston, Nash, Randolph, Vance, and 
Wake. 




JOHN C. STURTEVANT 



JOHN C. STURTEVANT 



John C. Sturteyant. of Conueautville. was boru in 
Spring Township. Crawford County, Pa., February 20, 1835 ; 
received a common-school education ; was engaged in teach- 
ing and farming for a numlier of years : was frequently 
elected to various local offices ; in 18(51, 1802. and 1864 
was an officer in the house of representatives at Harris- 
burg; was elected a member of the house of representa- 
tives for the session of 1865 and reelected for the session 
of 1866 ; in 1865 was elected delegate to the Eepublican 
State convention and reelected for six times, the last in 
1890 ; was presidential elector for this district in 1888 ; 
removed to Conueautville in 1S67. his present residence, 
where he engaged in the hardware lousiness, which he fol- 
lowed until 1873 ; was engaged in manufacturing and 
milling until 1888 ; in 1874 was appointed cashier of the 
First National Bank of Conueautville. and in 1875 was 
elected president of the same l)auk. and has held the posi- 
tion continuously since ; was elected to the Fifty-Fifth 
Congress as a Republican, receiving 18.840 votes, against 
18.114 votes for Joseph C. Sibley. Democrat and Populist, 
and 361 votes for Benjamin Mason. Prohibitionist. He 
represents the twenty-sixth congressional district of Penn- 
sylvania, which has a population of 151,398, and embraces 
the two counties of Crawford and Erie. 



CYRUS ADAMS SULLOWAY 



Cyrus Adams Sulloway. of Manchester, was born at 
Grafton. N. H., June 8. 1839; received a common-school 
and academic education; studied law with Austin F. Pike 
at Franklin. N. H.; was admitted to the bar in 18G3 and 
has practiced law at Manchester since January, 1864; was 
a member of the New Hampshire house of representatives 
in 1872-73 and from 1887 to 1893 inclusive ; was elected 
to the Fifty-Fourth and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Con- 
gress as a Republican, receiving 25.6(51 votes, against 13.928 
votes for John B. Nash. Democrat. 614 votes for Henry E. 
Brawn. Prohiliitiouist. 326 votes for Benj. T. Whitehouse. 
Socialist Labor. 121 votes for Charles W. Coolidge. National 
Democrat, and 111 votes for Josiah A. Whittier. People's 
party. He represents the first congressional district of 
New Hampshire, which has a population of 19(1.532. and 
embraces the counties of Belknap. Carroll. Rockingham, and 
Strafford ; Hills))oro County, towns of Bedford. Goffstown. 
Merrimack. Hudson, Litchfield. Manchester, and Pelham : 
Merrimack County, towns of Allenstown. Canterliury. Chi- 
chester. Epson, Hooksett. London. Northfield. Pembroke, and 
Pittsfield. 




WILLIAM SULZER 



WILLIAM SULZER 



William Sulzer. of New York City, was horn in Eliza- 
beth, N. J.. March LS, lS(i:3; received his education in the 
public schools ; was admitted to the bar in 1S.S4. and quickly 
achieved distinction in his profession and as an orator : was 
elected to the State legislature in ISSI). where his force 
and merit sjjeedily found recognition. Not even the most 
implacable foe of Tammany Hall ever aspersed his integrity, 
his generosity, or his ability, and when the Democrats cap- 
tured a majority of the asseml)ly in 1S93 nobody was sur- 
prised to see him installed by the unanimous vote of his 
party colleagues in the Speaker's chair, the youngest man 
to whom such an honor had been accorded. To his clear 
vision and energy the State of New York is indebted for 
the passage of the laws providing for the State care of 
the insane, the anti-Pinkerton police bill, prohibiting net 
fishing in Jamaica Bay. abolishing the sweating system in 
the manufacture of clothing, establishing the woman's re- 
formatory, ventilating and lighting the New York Central 
Eailroad tunnel in the city of New York, codifying the 
quarantine statutes and the military statutes, organizing 
free evening lectures for workingmen and workingwomen, 
wiping out the last vestige of imprisonment for debt, 
guaranteeing freedom of worship, providing for the Colum- 
bian celebration in the city of New York, and providing 
for the constitutional convention, and many others equally 
vital to the liberty and comfort of the people, especially 
in the larger cities of the State of New York. As a 
straightforward, conscientious champion of Jeffersouian 



WILLIAM SULZER 

Democracy. Mr. Sulzer was elected to the Fifty-Fourth Con- 
gress, in November, 1894. As a member of Congress he has 
met the expectations of his friends, and made a splendid 
record of usefulness and activity in the greater arena of 
the national legislature. He was the warm friend of the 
Cuban insurgents and their champion in the House of Repre- 
sentatives. He was a delegate to the Democratic national 
convention at Chicago, and was a firm supporter of William 
J. Bryan for the nomination of and his eloquent advocate for 
President in the presidential canvass. He came very near 
receiving the nomination for governor at the Buffalo State 
convention in 1H1)6 and at Syracuse in iSilS. and was the 
real choice of the masses of the people for that office. He 
was reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress by three times 
the majority he received in his previous race, and was re- 
elected to the Fifty-Sixth Congress by the largest majority 
ever given a candidate in his congressional district. Dur- 
ing his term in Congress he has worked hard for all measures 
in the interest of organized labor, and the wage-earners 
all over the country know him to be their friend and are 
deeply grateful for what he has accomplished for them. He 
represents the eleventh congressional district of New York, 
which has a population of 148.640. and embraces the tenth, 
twelfth, and fourteenth assembly districts of the county of 
New York. 




RODERICK D SUTHERLAND 



RODERICK DHU SUTHERLAND 



Roderick Dhu Sutherland, of Nelson, was born April 
27, 1862, at Scotch Grove, Jones County, Iowa; received 
his education principally at the common schools, attending 
a few terms at College Springs, Iowa ; was admitted to 
the bar in Nuckolls County, Neb., in 1888 ; was elected 
county attorney in 1890. and reelected in 1892 and 1894 ; 
was elected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Populist, re- 
ceiving the nomination from the Populist and Democratic 
parties, receiving 18.332 votes, against 15,621 votes for 
William E. Andrews, Eepublican. He represents the fifth 
congressional district of Nebraska, which has a population 
of 169,459, and embraces the eighteen counties of Adams, 
Chase, Clay, Dundy, Franklin, Frontier, Furnas, Gosper, 
Hall. Harlan, Hayes, Hitchcock, Kearney, Nuckolls, Perkins, 
Phelps, Red Willow, and Webster. 




CLAUDE A. SWANSON 



CLAUDE A. SWANSON 



Claude A. Swanson, of Chatham, was born at Swanson- 
ville, Pittsylvania County. Ya., March 31, 1S62: attended 
the public schools until he attained the age of sixteen, at 
which time he taught pul)lie school for one year, then 
attended for one session the Virginia Agricultural and Me- 
chanical College ; not having means to complete his college 
course, he clerked for two years in a grocery stoi'e in 
Danville. Va.; made arrangements to enter college after that 
time, matriculated at Eandolph-Macon College, Ashland, Va., 
and remained there three sessions, graduating with the degree 
of A. B. in 1SS5 ; studied law at the University of Virginia, 
graduating with the degree of B. L. in 1SS6; has practiced 
law since at Chatham, Va. ; had never been a candidate nor 
held any public office before his nomination and election to 
Congress ; was a delegate at large to the Democratic na- 
tional convention in Chicago in 1896; was elected to the 
Fifty-Third and Fifty-Fourth Congresses and reelected to 
the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Democrat, receiving 14.333 
votes, against 13,782 votes for John E. Brown, Republican. 
He represents the fifth congressional district of Virginia, 
which has a population of 161.577, and embraces the 
counties of Carroll, Floyd, Franklin, Grayson. Henry. Pat- 
rick, and Pittsylvania, and the cities of Danville and North 
Danville. 




W. JASPER TALBERT 



W. JASPER TALBERT 



W. Jasper Talbert. of Parksville, was horn in Edge- 
field County. S. C. in LS4() ; was educated in the schools 
of his native county and Due West Academy. Abbeville : 
served in the Confederate army throughout the war; after 
the war engaged in farming, to which he gave personal 
attention and labor : in 1880 was elected to the legislature, 
and reelected in 1882; was elected to the State senate in 
1884 ; was president of the Democratic convention which 
nominated the farmer governor; was chosen superintendent 
of the State penitentiary, which position he held when 
elected to Congress ; has held various positions in the 
Farmers' Alliance and helped formulate the "Ocala de- 
mands"; is a staunch Democrat; was elected to the P^ifty- 
Third and Fifty-Fourth Congresses and reelected to the 
Fifty-Fifth Congress, receiving 7.999 votes, against (i85 
votes for G. T. Chatfield. Republican. He represents the 
second congressional district of South Carolina, which has 
a population of 146,238, and embraces Aiken, Barnwell. 
Edgefield, and Hampton. 




PARISH C. TATE 



PARISH C. TATE 



Parish Carter Tate was born at Jasper. Pickens County, 
Ga., where he now resides, November 20, 1S56 ; he received 
his education in the common schools and in the North 
Georgia Agricultural College, at Dahlonega, Ga.; was ad- 
mitted to the bar in 1880. and has practiced law since ; 
was a member of the general assembly of Georgia for six 
years, 1882, 1883, 1884, 1885, 1886, and 1887 ; was chairman 
of the railroad committee of 1884-85 and of the judiciary 
committee of 1886-87, and was a member of the special 
committee to redistrict the State in 1882 ; served as a 
member of the Democratic executive committee of Georgia 
from the ninth congressional district in 1884. 1885, 1886, 
and 1887, and was elected a member of that committee 
from the State at large by the Democratic convention of 
1890, but resigned this position in March. 1892. to run for 
Congress; was elected to the Fifty-Third and Fifty-Fourth 
Congresses and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a 
Democrat, receiving 11,037 votes, against 5,421 votes for H. 
P. Farrow, Republican, and 3,926 votes for T. C. Winn, 
Populist. He represents the ninth congressional district 
of Georgia, which has a population of 172.061, and em- 
braces the seventeen counties of Banks, Cherokee, Dawson, 
Fannin, Forsyth, Gilmer, Gwinnett, Habersham, Hall. Jack- 
son, Lumpkin. Milton, Pickens. Rabun, Towns. Union, and 
White. 




JAMES A. TAWNEY 



JAMES A. TAWNEY 



Jamks a. Tawney. of Winona, was born in Mount Pleas- 
ant Township, near Gettysburg, Adams County, Pa.. Janu- 
ary 3, 1855 ; his father was a farmer and a blacksmith ; 
at the age of fifteen he commenced work in his father's 
blacksmith shop as an apprentice ; after completing that 
trade he learned the trade of machinist ; left Pennsylvania 
in July, 1877. and arrived at Winona August 1 following, 
where he obtained employment as machinist, and worked 
at that trade till January 1, 1881, when he commenced the 
study of law in the office of Bentley & Vance, of Winona; 
had studied law during the mornings and evenings for 
about two years before entering a law office ; was admitted 
to the bar July 10, 1882 ; after being admitted to the bar 
he attended the law school of the AVisconsin University, 
at Madison, it being the only school of any kind he had 
attended since he was fourteen years of age : was elected 
to the State senate of Minnesota in 1890. and was elected 
to the Fifty-Third and Fifty-Fourth Congresses and re- 
elected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Republican, receiv- 
ing 27,920 votes, against 17.218 votes for P. Fitzpatrick, 
Fusionist. He represents the first congressional district 
of Minnesota, which has a population of 185.584. and em- 
braces the ten counties of Dodge. Fillmore. Freeborn, 
Houston, Mower, Olmsted, Steele, Wabasha, Waseca, and 
Winona. 




ROBERT W. TAYLER 



ROBERT W. TAYLER 



Robert W. Taylek. of Lisl)on. was born at Yoinigstown, 
Ohio. November 26. 1852 ; graduated at the Western Re- 
serve College. June. 1872 ; in September of that year com- 
menced teaching in the high school at New Lisbon (now 
Lisbon), and was elected suijerintendent of schools in 1873 
and reelected in 1874 ; from January, 1875, to November, 
1876, he was editor of the Buckeye State newspaper at 
New Lisbon ; in April, 1877. he was admitted to the bar, 
and was elected prosecuting attorney of CV)lum):)iana ('ounty 
in 1880. reelected in 1882. and served until January. 1886 ; 
since his admission to the bar has been actively engaged 
in the practice of his profession ; was elected to the Fifty- 
Fourth and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Re- 
publican, receiving 29.814 votes, against 24.770 votes for 
Isaac R. Sherwood. Democrat, and 476 votes for James L. 
Swan. Prohibitionist. He represents the eighteenth con- 
gressional district of Ohio, which has a population of 11)1), 178, 
and embraces the three counties of Columbiana, Mahoning, 
and Stark. 




GEORGE W. TAYLOR 



GEORGE WASHINGTON TAYLOR 



George Washington Taylor, of Demopolis, Marengo 
County, Ala., was born January 16. 1849, in Montgomery 
County, Ala.; was educated at the South Carolina Univer- 
sity, Columbia, S. C. ; is a lawyer, and was admitted to 
practice -at Mobile, Ala., November, 1871 ; entered the 
army as a Confederate soldier at the age of fifteen years, 
in November, 1864, being then a student at the academy in 
Columbia. S. C. ; served a few weeks with the South Carolina 
State troops on the coast near Savannah, and then enlisted 
as a private in Company D. First Eegiment South Carolina 
Cavalry, and served as a courier till the end of the war ; left 
the South Carolina University at eighteen, having graduated 
in Latin, Greek, history, and chemistry ; taught school 
for several years, and studied law at the same time ; was 
elected to the lower house of the general assembly of Ala- 
bama in 1878, and served one term as a member from Choc- 
taw County ; in 1880 was elected State solicitor for the 
first judicial circuit of Alabama, and was reelected in 1886; 
declined a third term ; was elected to the Fifty-Fifth Con- 
gress as a Democrat, receiving 11,890 votes, against 4,281 
votes for Frank H. Threet, Republican, 648 votes for Em- 
ory C. Sterns, Populist, and 47 votes for Andrew J. Hearn, 
Populist. He represents the first congressional district 
of Alabama, which has a population of 151,757, and 
embraces the six counties of Choctaw, Clarke, Marengo, 
Mobile, Monroe, and Washington. 




WILLIAM L. TERRY 



WILLIAM LEAKE TERRY 



William Leake Terry, of Little Rock, was born in Anson 
County, N. C, September 27, 1850; when seven years of 
age removed with his parents to Tippah County, Miss., and 
thence to Arkansas in 18(51 ; received his preparatory ed- 
ucation at Bingham's Military Academy, North Carolina, 
and was admitted to Trinity College. North Carolina, in 
1869, and graduated in June, 1872 ; studied law under 
Dodge & Johnson, attorneys, of Little Rock, and w^as ad- 
mitted to the bar in November. 1873; served in the State 
troops under Governor Baxter in the Brooks-Baxter troubles, 
and was second officer in command of Hallie Rifles in the 
tight at Palarm, in May, 1874 ; was elected to city council 
in April. 1877; was elected to the State senate in Sep- 
tember. 1878, and was elected president of senate at close 
of session in March, 1879; served eight terms as city at- 
torney of Little Rock ; was elected to the Fifty-Second, 
Fifty-Third, and Fifty-Fourth Congresses and reelected to 
the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Democrat, receiving l(i.l33 
votes, against 6,714 votes for Charles C. Waters, Republi- 
can. He represents the fourth congressional district of 
Arkansas, which has a population of 147,806, and embraces 
the eight counties of Conway, Franklin, Johnson, Logan, 
Perry, Pope, Pulaski, and Yell. 




ROBERT T. THORP 



ROBERT TAYLOR THORP 



Robert Taylor Thorp, son of Ann Eliza and Benjamin 
Person Thorp, was born in Granville County. N. C, March 
12, 1850. His mother was the only child of Betsy and 
Henry Norman. His paternal ancestors were among the 
earliest colonial settlers of Virginia, having emigrated from 
England. His grandfather. Benjamin Person Thorp, was 
born in Southampton County. Va., and removed to North 
Carolina when quite a youth, making his home at Goshen, 
the family seat, with Gen. Thomas Person, a maternal 
uncle of regulator and Revolutionary fame, who was early 
distinguished for his uncompromising opposition to British 
oppression, having been one of the jjrime movers in the 
regulator movement, prior to the Revolutionary War, 
which culminated in the disastrous battle of Alamance. 
Mi\ Thorp was prepared for college at the celebrated Horner 
Academy, Oxford, N. C. AVhile a student at this school, 
at the age of fifteen years, he, with other boys, offered his 
services as volunteer to defend the State against invasion 
in the last days of the (_'ivil War. but was not called into 
active service. He took both a collegiate and law course 
of studies at the University of Virginia, graduating with 
the degree of B. L. in 1S70, lieing awarded at the same time 
the debater's medal of the Jefferson Literary Society. He 
removed to Virginia in 1871. and Ijegan the practice of law 
at Boydton, Va.. where he has continued to reside and 
practice his profession ; was appointed l)y the court Com- 
monwealth's attorney in 1877, and held this office by 
successive elections until July, 1895; was nominated as a 



ROBERT TAYLOR THORP 

Republican by acclamation to represent the fourth con- 
gressional district in the Fifty-Fourth Congress, in 1894. 
The certificate of election was awarded to his Democratic 
competitor, Hon. W. R. McKenney. but Mr. Thorp contested 
his election and was seated as a member of the Fifty-Fourth 
Congress by a unanimous vote of the House, upon the unani- 
mous recommendation of elections committee No. 3. In 
1896 he was again nominated for Congress l>y the Repub- 
lican convention of his district. The certificate of election 
was awarded to his competitor, but he again successfully 
contested his election, and after a hard fight upon the floor, 
in which Mr. Thorp, by leave of the House, closed the debate 
in an hour's speech in his own behalf, was seated as a mem- 
ber of the Fifty-Fifth Congress. On the 16th of December, 
1880, he was married to Lucy, a daughter of the late Col. 
George William Brent, of Alexandria, Va., who was a 
member of the Virginia secession convention, and though 
a strong Union man, when his State seceded, cast his for- 
tunes with her. joined the Confederate army, was assigned 
to the Department of the West, distinguished himself at 
Shiloh and other battles, and surrendered with Gen. Joseph 
E. Johnston in 1865. Afterwards he resumed the practice 
of law and soon became one of the most prominent lawyers 
of the State. Of this marriage one son. Roland FitzRobert, 
was born the 11th of August, 1887. The fourth district, 
which he represents, has a population of 159,508, and em- 
braces the counties of Amelia. Brunswick, Dinwiddle, 
Greenesville, Lunenburg, Mecklenburg. Nottoway, Pow- 
hatan, Prince Edward, Prince George, and Sussex, and the 
city of Petersburg. 




ALBERT M. TODD 



ALBERT M. TODD 



Albert M. Todd, of Kalamazoo, was born at the family 
farm home near Nottawa. 8t. Joseph County, Mich., June 
3, 1850 ; his early life was spent on the farm, where he 
attended the district school until about fifteen years of 
age, after which he attended the Sturgis High School, from 
which he graduated ; studied some time at the Northwest- 
ern University, and afterwards visited the countries of 
Europe to study their institutions and people ; meantime, 
he had estal)lished the business of growing and distilling 
essential-oil plants, which he still continues in connection 
with other business as a manufacturing chemist ; having 
made several discovei-ies in chemistry and the natural 
sciences, he has been elected a memlter of a number of 
scientific associations, among them the American Associa- 
tion for the Advancement of Science, the American Chem- 
ical Society, the Society of Chemical Industry (Interna- 
tional), the American Pharmaceutical Association, and was 
elected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress by a union of the 
Democratic, Union Silver, People's, and National parties, 
receiving 24,466 votes against 24,040 votes for Alfred 
Milnes, Republican, 579 votes for John M. Corbin. Gold 
Democrat, and 441 votes for Ashman A. Knappen, Prohibi- 
tionist. He represents the third district of Michigan, 
which has a population of 172,319, and embraces the five 
counties of Branch. Calhoun. Eaton, Hillsdale, and Kala- 
mazoo. 



^^^ 




1 






'^'"^^^^^1 



THOMAS H. TONGUE 



THOMAS H. TONGUE 



Thomas H. Tongue, of Hillsboro, Oregon, was born in 
Lincolnshire, England, June 23, 1844. In November, 1859, 
he removed with his parents to Oregon, and settled upon a 
farm in Washington County, the county in which he has 
since resided. He was educated at Pacific University, 
Forest Grove, Oregon, and graduated from that institution 
in June, 1868. The limited means of his parents not per- 
mitting them to assist him, he paid for the expense of his 
education by teaching school and working in the harvest 
field, and by working in summer for a neighboring farmer 
to pay for board and room while attending school. He 
removed to Hillsboro, his present residence, in September, 
1868, and began the study of the law ; was admitted to the 
bar in September. 187(l, and at once engaged in the active 
practice of his profession. In a short time he l)egan to 
acquire farming property and became interested in agri- 
cultural pursuits and the raising of various classes of live 
stock; while always a Republican, he did not take a par- 
ticularly active part in political affairs until 1888. In that 
year he was elected a member of the State senate, and 
served a term of four years, and during the latter half of 
the term was chairman of the judiciary committee of that 
body. In 1890 he was made the permanent chairman of 
the Republican State convention. In February, 1892, he 
was elected president of the State organization of Repub- 
lican clubs, and served for a term of two years. He was 
a del3gate from Oregon to the national Rei^ublican con- 
vention at Minneapolis in 1892, and was one of the vice- 



THOMAS H. TONGUE 

presidents of that convention. After reaching Minneapolis 
he was convinced that the nomination of either Pi'esident 
Harrison or Mr. Blaine would divide the Republican party 
into warring factions, endanger the election, and for this 
reason worked actively, earnestly, and continuously to 
secure the nomination of William ]\lcKinley. In 1894 he 
was again the permanent chairman of the State Eepubli- 
can convention. He became a member of the State 
central committee in 1S86, and became the chairman of 
the congressional committee of the hrst congressional dis- 
trict of Oregon at the time of its organization. He served 
in both of these capacities until his nomination as a can- 
didate for Congress. He was elected to the Fifty-Fifth 
Congress as a Republican on the first Monday in June, 
1896. His competitors were W. S. Vanderburg. Populist, 
Jefferson Myers, Democrat, and M. C. Christianson. Pro- 
hibitionist. In 1898 he was renominated by acclamation, 
and was reelected by a majority over all competitors, not- 
withstanding the district in November. 1896, had been 
carried for Bryan by a large plurality. His district has a 
population of 155,562, and embraces the sixteen counties 
of Benton. Clackamas. Coos, Curry, Douglas, Jackson, Jose- 
phine, Klamath, Lake, Lane, Linn, Marion, Polk, Tillamook, 
Washington, and Yamhill. 




OSCAR W. UNDERWOOD 



OSCAR W. UNDERWOOD 



Oscar W. Undekwouu, of Biriniiif^hani, was horn in Louis- 
ville, Jefferson County, Ky., May (i, 1862 ; was educated at 
Rigby School, Louisville. Ky.,and the University of Vir^ania; 
commenced the practice of law at Binnington, Ala., Sep- 
tember, 18S-1 ; was chairman of the Democratic executive 
committee of the ninth district in the campaign of 181)2 ; 
was elected to the Plfty-Fourth and reelected to the Fifty- 
Fifth Congress as a Democrat, receiving l.'{,4*.)'.) votes, against 
5,G18 votes for Dr. G. B. Crowe, Populist, and 2,310 votes for 
Dr. A. Lawson, National Democrat. He represents the ninth 
district of Alabama, which has a population of 181,085, and 
embraces the five counties of Bibb, Blount, Hale, Jefferson, 
and Perry. 




THOMAS UPDEGRAFF 



THOMAS UPDEGRAFF 



Thomas Updegraff, of McGregor, was born in Tioga 
County, Pa., April 3, 1834 ; received an academic educa- 
tion ; was appointed clerk of the district court of Clayton 
County, Iowa, in April, 1856 ; was elected to that office in 
August of the same year and reelected in 1858 ; was ad- 
mitted to the bar and entered upon the practice of the law 
in 1S61, and has since followed that profession ; was a mem- 
ber of the State house of representatives of Iowa and chair- 
man of the judiciary committee of that body in 1878; was 
elected to the Forty-Sixth Congress and reelected to the 
Forty-Seventh Congress as a Kepublican ; was member of 
the board of education and city solicitor of McGregor, Iowa, 
for many years ; was delegate to the Republican national 
convention of 1888 and member of notification committee ; 
was elected to the Fifty-Third and Fifty-Fourth Congresses 
and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Republican, 
receiving 26.659 votes, against 17.791 votes for Frank I). 
Bayless, Bryan Democrat, and 269 votes for Charles G. Pat- 
ten, Prohibitionist. He represents the fourth congressional 
district of Iowa, which has a population of 169,344. and em- 
braces the ten counties of Allamakee, Cerro Gordo, Chicka- 
saw, Clayton. Fayette, Floyd, Howard, Mitchell, Winneshiek, 
and Worth. 




WILLARD D. VANDIVER 



WILLARD DUNCAN VANDIVER 



WiLLARD Duncan Vandiver, of Cape Grirardeau, was 
born in Hardy County, Va. (now W. Va.). March 30, 1854; 
his father. Rev. L. H. Vandiver, had married Miss Mary 
Vance, of Virginia, in 1858, and they moved to Missouri in 
1858 ; this son was educated in the common schools and 
at Central College, Fayette, Mo., where he graduated in 
June, 1877 ; in June. 1880. was married to Alice L. Headlee. 
daughter of Rev. J. H. Headlee. and has three children, 
Vance, Helen, and Lilian. His early days were spent on 
the farm, but after graduation he was elected professor of 
natural science in Bellevue Institute, and three years later 
became its president ; in 1889 he accepted the chair of 
science in the State Normal School at Cape Girardeau, 
and in 1893 became its president ; he has been a lifelong 
Democrat, and in 1896 was nominated for Congress on a 
free-coinage platform by the fourteenth district conven- 
tion, after which he made an extensive canvass of the 
district, which is a very large one. embracing seventeen 
counties and containing a population of about 250.000, and 
was elected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress, receiving 25,089 
votes against 20,659 votes for John A. Snider, Republican, 
and 4.860 votes for Ambrose H. Livingston, Populist. He 
represents the fourteenth district of Missouri, which has a 
population of 230.478, and embraces the seventeen coun- 
ties of Bollinger. Butler, Cape, Girardeau. Christian, Doug- 
las, Dunklin. Howell. Mississippi. New Madrid. Oregon, 
Ozark, Pemiscot, Ripley, Scott, Stoddard, Stone, and Taney. 




HENRY CLAY VAN VOORHIS 



HENRY CLAY VAN VOORHIS 



Henry C Van V'^ooriits. of Zanesville. was born in Lick- 
ing Townsiiip. Muskingum County, Ohio. May H, 1S5'2; was 
educated in the public schools and at Denison Ilniversity ; 
was admitted to the bar in 1H74 ; was chairman of the 
Republican county committee from iSTil to 1SS4 ; was a 
delegate to the Repul)lican national convention at Chicago 
in bSS4 ; was elected to the Fifty-Third and Fifty-Fourth 
Congresses and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a 
Republican, receiving '22.560 votes, against 11),S87 votes for 
J. B. Tannehill, Democrat. 2(.)5 votes for T. E. Moore, Pop- 
ulist, and 354 votes for T. H. Paden. Prohibitionist. He 
represents the fifteenth congressional district of Ohio, which 
has a population of 162.131, and embraces the five counties 

of Guernsey, Morgan. Muskingum, Noble, and Washington. 
63 




JOHN H. G. VEHSLAGE 



JOHN H. G. VEHSLAGE 



John H. G. Vehslage, of Xew York, was bom in New 
York City on December 20, 1S42 ; received a public-school 
education, but left school in 1S56, of his own accord, to 
become a clerk in the retail grocery business ; in ISHo en- 
tered the coal and wood ))usines!< at the old established yard, 
Gi(, 71. 78, and 75 Ninth Avenue, corner of Fifteenth Street, 
at which place he is at present carrying on such business; 
in I860 he joined the Third Cavalry, National Guard. State 
of New York, and was commissioned captain by Governor 
Seymour, Fel.)ruary 15. 1864 ; December 12, 1876, was ap- 
pointed inspector of rifle practice with the rank of ca^itain, 
and continued in service until 1880. when the regiment was 
mustered out of service by Governor Cornell : remained as 
supernumerary until November 12, 1883, when he received 
an honorable dischai'ge from Gov. (xrover Cleveland ; 
was elected and served as memlier of assembly from the 
first assembly district, New York City, in the year 18i)4 ; 
at the Democratic State convention held at Buffalo was 
appointed a presidential elector, but resigned on account 
of receiving the nomination for Congress ; was elected to 
the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Democrat, receiving 11,032 
votes, against 9,848 votes for Franklin Bartlett. National 
Democrat. He represents the seventh district of New York, 
which has a population of 114.766. and embraces the county 
of Richmond, together with the hrst and fifth assembly 
disti'icts of the county of New York. 




WILLIAM D. VINCENT 



WILLIAM D. VINCENT 



William D. Vincent, of Clay Center, was ))orn on a 
farm near Dresden. Tenn., October U. lsr)2; moved with 
his ijarents to Kiley County, Kan., in lS(v2 : was educated 
in the public schools and in tlie State Agricultural Col- 
lege at Manhattan ; for the past nineteen years lias been and 
is now engaged in the mercantile business at ('lay Center; 
was elected member of the city council in ISSO; was one 
of the nominees of the (xreenback jiaity for presidential 
elector in 1884 : was a member of the State board of railroad 
commissioners in iSiC! '.»4 : luis been a uiember of the na- 
tional committee of the People's ])iii-ty since I8'.t2; was 
nominated l)y the People's party and by the Democrats, 
and elected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Populist, re- 
ceiving 111. 78") votes, against lU.lOl votes for William A. 
Calderhead. Rei)ul>lican. He represents the fifth congres- 
sional district of Kansas, which has a population of 177,loi, 
and embraces the counties of Clay. Cloud. Dickinson, Geary, 
Marshall, Ottawa, lu'iiublic. Hiley, Saline, and Washington. 




JAMES W. WADSWORTH 



JAMES W. WADSWORTH 



James W. Wadsworth, of Genesee, was born in Phila- 
delphia. Pa.. October 12, 1H-H'> ; was preparin^j at New 
Haven, Conn., to enter Yale College, but left in the fall (»f 
1864 and entered the army, serving on the staff of Gen. G. 
K. Warren to the close of the war; was supervisor of the 
town of Genesee during LS?-). I87(i, and 1877; was member 
of the assembly in 1878 and 1879, and comptroller of the 
State of New York in 1880 and 1881 ; was elected to the 
Forty-Seventh. Forty-Eighth. Fifty-Second. Fifty-Third, and 
Fifty-Fourth Congresses and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth 
Congress as a Repu])lican. receiving 28,478 votes, against 
19,066 votes for Frank V. Hulette. Free-Silver Democrat, 
469 votes for (ieorge A. Sweet, Sound-Money Democrat, 
1.269 votes for Chas. Ergmont Williams, Prohil)itionist, ^97 
votes for John Ideson. Po})ulist, and 5 votes scattering. 
He represents the thirteenth congressional district of New 
York, which has a poi)ulati()n of 19o,553, and embraces the 
five counties of Genesee, Livingston, Niagara, Orleans, and 
Wyoming. 




JOSEPH H. WALKER 



JOSEPH HENRY WALKER 



Joseph Henry Walker, of Worcester, was born in Bos- 
ton, Mass.. December '21. lS'2i>; removed first to Hopkintoii, 
thence to Worcester, wliere lie attended tlie public schools. 
and worked on boots and shoes in his father's factory; 
was admitted to partnership in the firm of Joseph Walker 
& Co., in Worcester, in 1S.")0; was engaged in boot and 
shoe manufacturing until 1SS7, when he retired from JKisi- 
ness in Worcester ; estal)lished the business of manufactur- 
ing leather in Chicago, 111., in 1S()K. and was until recently 
a member of the hrm carrying on that business under the 
firm name of W^alker Oakley Company ; was elected a 
trustee of the People's Savings Bank. Worcester. Mass.. in 
l.S()6. and a director of tlie Citizens' National Bank of the 
same place, in 1S67. resigning from Iwth after several 
years' service because of his large business enterprises ; 
was several years a member and was elected president of 
the common council of Worcester: was president of the 
Worcester Board of Trade for several years ; was three 
times elected to the Massachusetts legislature; is a mem- 
ber of the American Academy of Political and Social 
Science and a trustee of the American Institute of Civics; 
has been for many years a trustee of Brown T iiivei"sity 
and of the Newton (.Mass. I Theological Seminary; has been 
for a quarter of a century president of the board of trus- 
tees of Worcester Academy, an important college prepara- 
tory and scientific school for I)()ys: was elected to the 
Fifty-First, Fifty-Second. Fifty-Third, and Fifty-Fourth 
Congresses and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Congre.ss as a 



JOSEPH HEXRY WALKKR 

Republican, receiving lS,99o votes, again.st 7.185 votes for 
John O'dara. Democrat, and nine votes scattering. He 
represents the thii-d district of Massachusetts, which has a 
population of 171.4S4, and embraces in Middlesex County, 
town of Hopkinton ; Worcester County, city of Worcester, 
and towns of Auliurn. Blackstone, Charlton, Douglas, Dudley, 
Grafton. Holden. Leicester, Mendon, Milbury. Northbridge, 
Oxford. Paxton. Rutland. Shrewsbury. Southbridge. Spencer, 
Sturbi-idge, Sutton. I'pton. Uxbridge, Webster, Westboro, 
and West Boylstou. 




JAMES A. WALKER 



JAMES ALEXANDER WALKER 



James Alkxandkk Walker, of Wytheville, was horn in 
Augusta County. Va.. August 27. LS32 ; was educated at the 
Virginia Military Institute; studied law at the I'niversity 
of \'irgiuia during the sessions of lsr)4 and lSo5; began 
the practice of law in Pulaski County. Va.. in 185(5. and 
has followed the practice of his profession ever since; en- 
tered the Confederate army in April, isiil, as captain of 
the Pulaski (iuards. afterwards Couiiiauy C. Fourth \'irginia 
Infantry, Stonewall brigade ; was promoted to lieutenant- 
colonel and assigned to the Thirteenth Virginia Infantry 
(A. P. Hill. (Mlonel) in July, 1S()1 : promoted to colonel of 
the Thirteenth N'irginia Infantry in March. 1S()2, and in 
May, 18(58. was promoted to brigadier-general and assigned 
to command of the "Stonewall Brigade"; commanded 
Karly's old division at the surrender at Appomattox ; was 
severely wounded at Spottsylvauia Court House. May 12, 
1(S()4; elected Comnu)nwealth's attoi'iiey for Pulaski County 
in 1860; represented Pulaski County in the house of dele- 
gates of Virginia in 1S71 72; was elected lieutenant-gov- 
ernor of Virginia in 1877; was elected to the Fifty-Fourth 
and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Republican, 
receiving 1(5,077 votes against 14,909 votes for S. W. Wil- 
liams, Democrat. He represents the ninth district of \'ir- 
ginia, which has a pojiulation of 187.4(57. and includes the 
counties of Rland, Buchanan, Craig. Dickenson, (iiles, Lee, 
Pulaski, Russell, Scott, Smyth, Tazewell. Washington, Wise, 
and Wythe, and the city of Bristol. 




IRVING P. WANGER 



IRVING PRICE WANGER 



Irving Price Wanger. of Norristown. was born in North 
Coventry, Chester County. Pa.. March 5, 1852 ; commenced 
the .study of law at Norristown in 1H72. and was admitted 
to the bar December IS. 1875 ; was elected burgess of Nor- 
ristown in 1878; was a delegate to the Republican national 
convention in 1880 ; was elected district attorney of Mont- 
gomery County in 1880 and again in 1886; was elected to 
the Fifty-Third and Fifty-Fourth Congresses and reelected 
to the Fifty-F'ifth Congress as a Republican, receiving 26,725 
votes, against 16.740 votes for C. S. \'andegrift. Democrat, 
and 531 votes for B. C Parker. Prohibitionist. He repre- 
sents the seventh congressional district of Pennsylvania, 
which has a population of P.)3.iK)5. and embraces the two 
counties of Bucks and Montgomery. 




WILLIAM L. WARD 



WILLIAM LUCKEiNS WARD 



William Luckens Ward, of Port Chester. N. Y.. was 
born in (Jreenwich. Conn., tSepteniljer 2. LS.')(>, was edu- 
cated at Friends' Seminary, New- York City, and afterwards 
at the School of Mines. Columbia College, class of 1S7S : lias 
devoted all his business life to manufacturing: never iield 
any public office, but has always l)een identified with the 
Republican party in Westchester County, and was named 
as elector from the sixteentb congressional district by the 
State convention in iSiKi. and was elected to Congress and 
also as elector at the sauie election : was elected to tlie 
Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Republican, receiving 8(),7(>i> votes, 
against 23.45(5 votes for Eugene B. Travis. Silver Democrat, 
1.299 votes for Lucien Sanial. Socialist. 1.(597 votes for James 
V. Lawrence. Cold Democrat. 77(1 votes for Ben L. Fairchild, 
Independent candidate. 4(51 votes for James H. Hardy, I'lo- 
hibitionist. and 454 votes blank and scattering. He rep- 
resents the sixteenth congressional district of New York, 
which has a population of 22().S57. an<l embraces the couuty 
of Westchester, together with tlie twenty-fourth asst'iiibiy 
district c)f the citv of New York. 

64 




VESPASIAN WARNER 



VESPASIAN WARNER 



Vespasian Warner, of Clinton, was born at Mount Pleas- 
ant, now Farmer City, Dewitt County, 111.. April 23, 1842 : 
removed with his parents in 1843 to Clinton, 111., which 
has since been his home : attended common and select 
schools in Clinton, and Lombard rniversity at Cale.sbur<r. 
111.; was studying law at Clinton, in the ottice of Hon. 
Lawrence Weldon. now one of the judges of the United 
States Court of Claims, when, on June 13. I8(il. he enlisted 
as a private soldier in Company E. Twentieth Illinois Vol- 
unteer Infantry ; remained an enlLsted man and carried 
a musket in that company until Febi'uary 5. ]S()2, when 
he was commist^ioned a second lieutenant : remained in 
the service until July 18, 18(>6, when he was mustered out. 
then being a captain and brevet major : served in the 
Army of the Tennessee, receiving a gunshot wound at 
Shiloh. until the evacuation of Atlanta, when, being dis- 
aliled. he was ordered north, and from there, early in ISd.'j. 
he was ordered on the Plains, where a campaign was 
being conducted against hostile Indians, where he served 
until mustered out : immediately on leaving the service 
he entered the law department of Harvard University, from 
which he graduated in 18(i.S ; he then returned to Clinton 
and commenced the practice of law. forming a partnership 
with Hon. C. H. Moore, which still continues : was colonel 
and judge-advocate-general of Illinois through the adniin- 
i.strations of Governors Hamilton. Oglesby. and Fifer ; was 
elected a Republican presidential elector in 1SS8: was 
elected to the Fifty-Fourth and reelected to the Fifty- 
Fifth Congre.ss as a Reput)lican. receiving 27.334 votes, 
against 18.811 votes for Frank M. Palmfv. Democrat, and 
833 votes for Thomas J. Scott. Prohibitionist. He i-ep- 
resents the thirteenth district of Illinois, which has a 
population of 183.105. and emliiaces the six counties of 
Champaign. Dewitt. Douglas. Ford. McLean, and Piatt. 




WALTER L. WEAVER 



WALTER L. WEAVER 



Walter L. Weaver, of Springfield, was l)oni in Mont- 
gomery County. Oliio, April 1, 1S51 ; son of Kev. .lolin S. 
and Amanda Hurin Weaver: was educated at the public 
schools. Monroe Academy, and Wittenberg College, gradu- 
ating from the latter institution in 1S70; immediately 
pursued the study of law, and was admitted to the bar by 
the supreme court of his luitive State in 1H72. since which 
time he has continuously pnicticed his profession ; was 
elected prosecuting attorney for Clark County in 1S74, and 
again elected to the same office in ISSO, 18S-2, and ISSf); 
was elected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Republican, 
receiving '2').745 votes, against 21.171 votes for Francis M. 
Hunt, Democrat and Populist, and 884 votes for If. S. 
Thompson. Prohibitionist. He represents the seventh dis- 
trict of Ohio, which has a population of 1(51,537. and em- 
braces the five counties of Clark. Fayette, Madison, Miami. 
and Pickaway. 




GEORGE W. WEYMOUTH 



GEORGE WARREN WEYMOUTH 



George Warren Weymot'th. of Fitchburg, Mass.. was 
born August 25. 1S50, at West Amesl)ary, now Merrimac. 
Mass.; was educated in the public schools of that place; 
is interested in several different kinds of business, giving 
most of his time to the Sinionds Rolling-Machine Com- 
pany as vice-president and general manager ; is director 
of the Fitchburg National Bank and trustee of the Fitch- 
burg Savings Bank ; is dii"ector of the Fitchburg and Leo- 
minster Street Railway, and also of the Orswell Mills and 
Nockege Mills ; is ex-president of the Fitchburg Boai-d of 
Trade; was one year in the city council of Fitchl>urg. in 
the State legislature of 1S96. and a delegate to the national 
convention at St. Louis last June, and was elected to the 
Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Rejiulilican, receiving 'in.dlj-i 
votes, against S.S47 votes foi- 1. Porter Morse. Democrat. 
He represents the fourth district of Massachusetts, which 
has a population of 170.221. and embraces in AVorcester 
County, city of Fitchburg. and towns of Ashbuiiiham. Berlin, 
Bolton, Boylston. Clinton, (iardner. Harvard. Hul)bardston, 
Lancaster. Leominster. Lunenburg. Northboi'O, Princeton, 
Southboro. Sterling, and Westminster : Middlesex County, 
city of Waltham. and towns of Acton, Ashliy. Ashland. Aver, 
Bedford, Billerica. Boxl)oro, Burlington. Carlisle. Chelmsford, 
Concord, Dunstable. Framingham. Groton, Hudson. Lexing- 
ton, Lincoln. Littleton. Marllioro. Maynard. Natick. Pepper- 
ell, Shirley. Stow. Sudbury. Townsend. Tyngslioro. W'ayland. 
Westford, and Weston ; Norfolk County, ^\'ellesley. 



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CHARLES K. WHEELER 



CHARLES KENNEDY WHEELER 



Charles Kennedy Wheeler, of Padncah. was lioni in 
Christian County. Ky., a))out tive miles fioni Hopkinsville. 
on a farm. April IS. ISO;]; worked on the farm during the 
summer and attended neighl)orhood schools until the age 
of thirteen : matriculated at the Southwestern University. 
of Clarksville, Tenn.. and graduated from that institution 
in the winter of 1S79. and graduated from the Lebanon 
Law School, of Lebanon. Tenn.. in the summer of 1S80; 
located at Padncah. Ky.. his present residence, in August, 
1880, and has since that date been engaged in the active 
practice of his profession; has never held any office ex- 
cept the position of corporation counsel for the city of 
Paducah, Ky.. for the years lSi)4 and isyjj ; was Democratic 
elector for the first congressional district of Kentucky in 
1892, and was elected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a 
Democrat, receiving 15,000 votes against 13.000 votes for 
George Thomas, Kepublican. and 12.000 votes for Ben C. 
Keys, Populist. He represents the first district of Ken- 
tucky, which has a population of 170.500, and embraces 
the thirteen counties of Ballard. Caldwell. Calloway, Car- 
lisle, Crittenden. Fulton, (iraves. Hickman, Livingston. Lyon. 
Marshall, McCracken, and Trigg. 




JOSEPH WHEELER 



JOSEPH WHEELER 



Joseph Wheeler, of Wheeler, was born in Augusta, (ia., 
September 10. 1S36 ; graduated at West Point. 1859: was 
lieutenant of cavalry and served in New Mexico; resigned 
ill 1861 ; was lieutenant of artillery in the Confederate 
army ; was successively promoted to the command of a 
regiment, brigade, division, and army corps, and in ].S()2 
was assigned to the command of the army corps of cavalry 
of the western army, continuing in that position till the 
war closed; by joint resolution of the Confederate congress 
received the thanks of that I^ody for successful military 
operations, and for the defense of the city of Aiken received 
the thanks of the State of South Carolina; May 11, lS(j4, 
became the senior cavalry general of the Confederate 
armies; was appointed professor of philosophy, Louisiana 
State Seminary, in LSliC), which he declined; was lawyer 
and planter: was elected to the Forty-Seventh. Forty-Ninth, 
Fiftieth. Fifty-First, Fifty-Second, Fifty-Third, and Fifty- 
Fourth Congresses and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress 
as a Democrat, receiving 15,640 votes, against 11,680 votes 
for 0. R. Hundley. Republican, and 338 votes for W. W. 
Callahan, National Democrat. He represents the eighth 
congressional district of (leorgia, which has a population 
of 176,088, and embraces the seven counties of Colbert, 
Jackson, Lauderdale, Lawrence, Limestone, Madison, and 
Morgan. 




GEORGE E. WHITE 



GEORGE E. WHITE 



George E. White, of Chicago, was liorn in Mas.saclm- 
setts in 1S4.S; after graduating from college at the age of 
sixteen, he enlisted as a private soldier in the Fifty-Sev- 
enth Massachusetts Veteran Volunteers, in which he served 
under General Grant, in the Arm.y of the Potomac, from 
the battle of the Wilderness until the surrender of (ien- 
eral Lee ; after the close of the war he entered a commer- 
cial college at Worcester, Mass.; in 18()7 he removed to 
Chicago a poor young man seeking employment, which he 
found in a lumber yard at $50 a month ; a year later he 
engaged in the lumber business on his own account, which 
he has since pursued with much success ; he is head of 
the extensive hard-wood lumber drm of George E. White 
& Co., and is a director in State and national banks ; has 
served as alderman of Chicago and as State senator, and 
has exercised a large influence in Repul)lican politics in his 
State; in 18S4 was nominated for Congress by the Repub- 
lican convention of his district, but, although the district 
was safely Republican, declined the nomination : was elected 
to the Fifty-Fourth and reelected to the Fifiy-Fifth Congress 
as a Republican, receiving '2'-}.Ob'4 votes, against 19.975 votes 
for E. T. Noonan. Democrat, 257 votes for Haines, Prohibi- 
tionist, 233 votes for Courtney. National Democrat, and 
1.S13 votes for McDonnell. lude])endent. He represents the 
fifth district of Illinois, which has a population of 154.(579. 
and embraces the eleventh, thirteenth, sixteenth, seven- 
teenth, and eighteenth wards of the city of Chicago. 




GEORGE H. WHITE 



GEORGE HENRY WHITE 



George Henry White, of Tarljoro. was born at Rosin- 
dale. Bladen County. N. C December 18. 1S52: attended 
the i>nl)lic schools of his State, and later was trained 
under Prof. D. P. Allen, president of the VVhitten Normal 
School, at Lumberton. N. C. ; afterwards entered Howard 
University. Washington. 1). (.'. : he graduated from the 
eclectic department of that institution in the class of 1877; 
read law while taking academic course, and completed his 
reading under Judge William J. Clarke, of North Carolina, 
and was licensed to practice in all the courts of that State 
by the Supreme Court. January. 1871) ; was principal of one 
of the State normal and other schools in the State : was 
elected to the house of representatives in 1880 and to the 
State senate in 1884: was elected solicitor and prosecut- 
ing attorney for the second judicial district of North Caro- 
lina for four years in 188(). and for a like term in 1890: 
was a candidate for Congress in the second district in 
1894. and was nominated, but withdrew in the interest of 
harmony in his party : and was elected to the Fifty-Fifth 
Congress as a Kepublican. receiving 19.388 votes, against 
15,8(18 votes for F. A. Woodard. Democrat, and '2.788 votes 
for Dr. S. Moss. Populist. He represents the second dis- 
trict of North Carolina, which has a population of 182.4()]. 
and embraces the nine counties of Bertie. Edgecombe. 
Greene. Halifax. Lenoir. Noi'thampton. Warren. Wayne, and 
Wilson. 




DAVID F. WILBER 



DAVID F. WILBER 



David F. Wilber, of Onennta. was born in Milford, Otsego 
County, N. Y., December 7, 1851) ; is a sou of David Wilber, 
who w^as a member of the Forty-Third, Forty-Sixth, Fiftieth, 
and Fifty-First Congresses ; graduated from Cazenovia(N. Y.) 
Seminary in 1879 ; in ]88() engaged in the hop business with 
his father, and since 181)0 has been largely interested in 
farming and stock breeding, devoting especial attention to 
the Holstein-Friesian strain of cattle ; has twice represented 
Oneonta in the board of supervisors ; was a member of the 
New York State cattle tuberculosis commission in 1894; 
is a director of the Wilber National Bank of Oneonta; is 
president of the Holstein-Friesian Association of America 
and of the American Cheviot Sheep Association of the 
United States and Canada ; is trustee of the Cazenovia 
Seminary ; was elected to the Fifty-Fourth and reelected 
to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Republican, receiving 
28,567 votes, against 2'2.2()7 votes for John H. Bagley, 
Democrat, and 4()4 votes for Leslie P. Clarke, Prohibition- 
ist. He represents the twenty-first congressional district 
of New York, which has a population of 187,119. and 
embraces the five counties of Greene, Montgomery, Otsego, 
Schenectady, and Schoharie. 

65 




JOHN S. WILLIAMS 



JOHN SHARP WILLIAMS 



John Sharp Williams, of Yazoo, \va,s born July 30. 1854, 
at Memphis. Tenii. ; his mother having died, his father 
being killed at Shiloh, and Memphis being threatened 
with capture by the Federal army, his family removed to 
his mother's family homestead in Yazoo County, Miss. ; re- 
ceived a fair education at private schools, the Kentucky 
Military Institute, near Frankfort. KJ^, the University of 
the South, Sewanee, Tenn., the University of Virginia, and 
the University of Heidelberg, in Baden, Germany ; subse- 
quently studied law under Professors Minor and Southall 
at the University of Virginia and in the office of Harris, 
McKisick & Turley in Memphis ; in 1877 got license to 
practice in the courts of law and chancery of Shelby 
County, Tenn. ; in December, 1S7S. removed to Yazoo City, 
Miss., where he engaged in the practice of his profession 
and the varied pursuits of a cotton planter ; was a dele- 
gate to the Chicago convention which nominated Cleveland 
and Stevenson ; was elected to the Fifty-Third and Fifty- 
Fourth Congresses and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Con- 
gress as a Democrat, receiving 10.475 votes, against 142 
votes for Denson, Republican. 212 votes for Everett, Re- 
publican, and 2,218 votes for Stinson, Populist. He repre- 
sents the fifth district of Mississijipi, which has a population 
of 224,618. and embraces the twelve counties of Attala. 
Clarke, Holmes, Jasper, Lauderdale, Leake. Neshoba, New- 
ton. Scott. Smith, Wayne, and Yazoo. 



Iir 





,.#"■ 



MORGAN B. WILLIAMS 



MORGAN B. WILLIAMS 



Morgan B. Williams, of Wilkesbarre, was born at Rhan- 
dir-Mwyn, parish of Llanfair-ar-y-Bryn. Caruiarthenshire. 
Wales, September 17, 1S81 ; attended the public schools of 
his native town, and in March, 1S56. emigrated to Australia, 
arriving at Melbourne in the latter part of June after a voy- 
age of one hundred and three days ; returned to Wales in Au- 
gust, 18G1, and in March. 1862, emigrated to Scranton. Pa. ; 
worked in the mines at Scranton until September, 1865, when 
he removed to Wilkesbarre. and was appointed to the position 
of mine superintendent for the Lehigh and Wilkesbarre Coal 
Company, which position he held for fourteen years ; during 
this time he met with an accident by the explosion of gas 
that nearly cost him his life : subsequently he leased a tract 
of coal land in the vicinity of AVilkesltarre and organized 
a company known as the Ked Ash Coal Company ; is at 
present the vice-president and general manager of the 
company, and has been since its organization ; is president 
of the Williams Coal Company of Pottsville. a director of 
the Wilkesbarre Deposit and Savings Bank, Kingston Sav- 
ings Bank of Kingston, Spring Brook Water Supply Com- 
pany, and the Powell Eiver Coal and Iron Company, of 
Virginia, and is also identified with many other industries 
in the Wyoming Valley ; has been a nienil)er of the school 
board and has served as a member of the city council for 
twelve years, and is at present a member and chairman 
of the public property committee : was an alternate delegate 
to the national Republican convention at Chicago in 1884 ; 
was elected to the senate of Pennsylvania in 1884 by a 



MORGAN B. WILLIAMS 

majority of over l.i2()0 in a district which usually gave an 
adverse Democratic majority of 1,500; was a meml)er of 
the World's Fair Commission ; was elected to the Fifty- 
Fifth Congress as a Kepuldican. receiving 20.920 votes, 
against 17.976 votes for John M. Garman. Democrat, and 
234 votes for D. 0. Coughlin, People's party. He repre- 
sents the twelfth district of Pennsylvania, which has a 
population of 201,203, and embraces the county of Luzerne. 




STANYARNE WILSON 



STANYARNE WILSON 



Stanyarne Wilson, of Spartanburg, was born at York- 
ville, S. C; was educated at Kings Mountain Military 
School and Washington and Lee University, Vii-ginia; 
was admitted to the bar by special act of the legislature 
in 1S8U, he being a minor; was elected to the legislature 
in 1884, and to the senate in 1892 ; was a member of the 
State constitutional convention of 1895. serving as chair- 
man of the steering and judiciary committees ; was elected 
to the Fifty-Fourth and reelected to the Fifty-Fifth Con- 
gress as a Democrat, receiving 11,230 votes, against 507 
votes for P. S. Suber, Republican, and 443 votes for D. F. 
Bounds, Republican. He represents the fourth district of 
South Carolina, which has a population of 200,000, and 
embraces the counties of Fairfield, Greenville, and Laurens, 
all of the county of Spartanburg, except the townshii^s of 
White Plains and Limestone, all of the county of Union, 
except the townships of Gowdeysville and Draytonville, 
and the townships of Center, Columbia, and Upper, of the 
county of Richland. 




RICHARD A. WISE 



RICHARD ALSOP WISE 



RicHAED Alsop Wise, of Williamsburg, son of Gen. 
Henry A. and Sarah Sergeant Wise, was born at the resi- 
dence of his grandfather. John Sergeant, in Philadelphia, 
Pa., on the 2d day of Seiiteniber, 1S43 ; was educated at 
private schools in Richmond and at Dr. Gessner Harrison's 
University School ; also studied at William and Mary Col- 
lege for two years, which place he left before graduation 
to join the Confederate army at the commencement of the 
war, and served to the end. part of the time as a private 
in Stuart's cavalry ; at the close of the war he was assist- 
ant inspector-general of Wise's brigade, Army of Northern 
Virginia; graduated in medicine from the Medical College 
of Virginia in 1867, and has practiced his profession ever 
since ; in 1869 was appointed professor of chemistry and 
physiology in the College of William and I\Iary, which con- 
ferred the honorary degree of Master of Arts upon him : 
was appointed assistant physician of the Eastern Lunatic 
Asylum of Virginia in 1878 ; two years after that he re- 
signed from the college; in 1881, as captain of the Wise 
Light Infantry of Williamsburg, and as senior officer, com- 
manded the Fourth Virginia Infantry Regiment at the 
centennial at Yorktown : was elected superintendent of 
the Eastern Lunatic Asylum in 1882. and served until the 
spring of 1884 ; was elected as a Republican to the Vir- 
ginia legislature in 18S5, and served during the sessions of 
1885, 1886, and 1887; was elected in 1887 clerk of the cir- 
cuit and county courts of the city of Williamsburg and 
county of James City, wliich ])lace he held for six years ; 



RICHARD ALSOP WISE 

has been for twenty years chairman of the connty Repub- 
lican committee ; was the Republican nominee for the 
Fifty-Fifth Congress in the second district in 1S96 ; the 
certificate was given to his Democratic opponent, William 
A. Young, but after a contest was declared elected, and 
took the oath of office on the 26th day of April, 1898. He 
represents the second congressional district of Virginia, 
which has a population of 145,586, and embraces the coun- 
ties of Charles City. Elizabeth City, Isle of Wight. James 
City, Nansemond, Norfolk, Princess Anne, Southampton, 
Surry, Warwick, and York, and the cities of Norfolk, Ports- 
mouth, Williamsburg, and Newport News. 



JACOB YOST 



Jacob Yost, of Staunton, was born in Staunton, Va., April 
1, 1853 ; attended primary schools ; at the age of sixteen 
entered a printing office and learned the trade of printer; 
was subsequently employed for three years as a civil en- 
gineer by the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company ; in 
1875 purchased an interest in the Valley Virginian, a 
newspaper published at Staunton, and was actively engaged 
in journalism till 18S1), since which time he has devoted 
himself to general business, principally in connection with 
iron ore and coal ; was a candidate for elector on the Re- 
publican ticket in 1880 ; was the Republican nominee for 
Congress in 1884 ; was elected mayor of the city of Staunton 
in 1886 ; was a member of the Fiftieth Congress ; was the 
Republican nominee for Congress in 1888 and again in 1894 ; 
was elected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Republican, 
receiving 16,194 votes, against 16,047 votes for H. D. Flood, 
Democrat, and 102 votes scattering. He represents the tenth 
congressional district of Virginia, which has a population 
of 155,138, and embraces the counties of Alleghany, Am- 
herst, Appomattox, Augusta, Bath, Botetourt, Buckingham, 
Cumberland, Fluvanna, Highland, Nelson, and Rockbridge, 
and the city of Staunton. 




JAMES R. YOUNG 



JAMES RANKIN YOUNG 



James Rankin Young, of Philadelphia, was born in 
Philadelphia March 10, 1847 ; was educated in the public 
schools of his native city, entering the Central High School 
in 1862 ; enlisted with a number of the professors and 
students of the high school as a private soldier, in June, 
1863, in the Thirty-Second Pennsylvania Infantry, and 
served during the Gettysburg campaign as a part of Gen. 
William F. Smith's division of Gen. Darius N. Couch's 
command ; made a .;ix-months' tour of the Southern States 
soon after the war as a correspondent of the New York 
Tribune ; served as chief of the Washington bureau of the 
New York Tribimc from June, 1866, to December, 1870; was 
chief executive clerk of the United States Senate from 
December. 1873. to March, 1879 ; chief clerk of the depart- 
ment of justice from September, 1882, to December, 1883; 
again chief executive clerk of the United States Senate 
from December, 1883, to April. 1892 ; was one of the 
founders of the Philadelphia Evening Star in 1866, and 
has been a constant contributor to its columns from that 
date to the present time, writing over the signatui-e of 
S. M.; was elected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Repul)- 
lican, to succeed John E. Reyburn, by a plurality of 42,611 
votes over Mark Cunningham, Democrat, the vote standing 
59,147 for Young and 16,536 for Cunningham, with 538 
votes scattering. He represents the fourth congressional 
district of Pennsylvania, which has a population of 309,986, 
and embraces in the city of Philadelphia the fifteenth, 
twenty-first, twenty-fourth, twenty-seventh, twenty-eighth, 
twenty-ninth, thirty-second, thirty-fourth, thirty-seventh, 
and thirty-eighth wards. 



66 




WILLIAM T ZENOR 



WILLIAM T. ZENOR 



William T. Zenok, of Corydon, was born in Harrison 
Township, wntliin three miles of his present place of resi- 
dence, April oO, 184G ; was educated in the common schools 
and at the seminary of Prof. James G. May : at the age 
of twenty-two commenced the study of law under the 
direction of the late Judge D. W. La Follette, of New 
Albany; was admitted to the Ijar and formed a law part- 
nership with Judge Fred. Mathes in ISTO at Corydon ; 
in 1871 removed to Leavenworth. Crawford County, Ind., 
where he established a successful practice : w^as appointed 
by Governor Williams prosecuting attorney for the district, 
which office he held by this appointment and two succeed- 
ing elections till 1882; in 1884 was elected judge of the 
judicial circuit without opi)osition ; was reelected in 1890, 
and was elected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Demo- 
crat, receiving 22,475 votes, against 19,927 votes for Robert 
J. Tracewell, Republican. He represents the third district 
of Indiana, which has a population of 174,067, and em- 
braces the counties of Clark, Crawford, Dubois, Floyd, 
Harrison, Orange, Perry, Scott, and Washington. 



TERRITORIAL DELEGATES 




JAMES Y. CALLAHAN 



JAMES YANCY CALLAHAN 



James Yancy Callahan was born iu Dent County, Mo., 
December 19. 1S52, and was brought up on the farm where 
he was born ; received a common-school education, and after 
he was married completed, by the assistance of his wife, 
nearly all the branches of the academic course at home ; 
was licensed as a local minister in the Methodist PJpiscopal 
Church in 18S0, which relation he holds at the present time ; 
has been engaged principally in farming, sawmilling, and 
mining ; removed from Missouri to Stanton County, Kan., 
in 1885, and was twice elected register of deeds in that 
county ; removed to Oklahoma in 1892 and settled on a 
farm, where he still resides with his family ; was elected 
to the Fifty-Fifth Congress by the Populists and Democrats 
on a free-silver ticket, receiving 27,435 votes, against 26,267 
votes for Dennis T. Flynn, Republican, thus becoming a 
Delegate from Oklahoma. 





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H. B. FERGUSSON 



H. B. FERGUSSON 



H. B. Fergusson, of Albuquerque, is a native of Alabama, 
and was born September 9, 184S ; belongs to a family that 
settled in the South in colonial days, several members of 
which distinguished themselves in the civil and military 
oflSces of the Colonies and later in the service of the 
young Republic ; his father was an officer in the Confed- 
erate army, and did excellent service under General Lee 
until the close of the struggle ; graduated from the Wash- 
ington and Lee University, Lexington. Va., with the degree 
of M. A., in 1873 ; graduated from the law department of 
that university in 1S74. and commenced the practice of his 
profession at Wheeling, W. Va.. where he remained until 
the year 1882; located in Albuquerque in 1884, and has 
resided there since ; has successfully practiced his profes- 
sion, and is one of the members of the firm of Warren, 
Fergu.sson & Gillett ; in politics is a Democrat and always 
has been, and his recent nomination and election was in 
recognition of distinguished service to his party ; was 
elected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a Democrat, receiv- 
ing 18,947 votes, against 17.017 votes for Thomas B. Ca- 
tron, Republican, 66 votes for Mr. Dame, Gold Democrat, 
and 1 vote scattering, thus becoming a Delegate from New 
Mexico. 




MARCUS A. SMITH 



MARCUS A. SMITH 



Marcus A. Smith, of Tucson, was boru near Cj^nthiana, 
Ky., January 24, 1S5'2 ■ was educated at the Transylvania 
University. Lexington, Ky.; is a lawyer by profession; re- 
moved to Arizona in 1881, and the following year was 
elected prosecuting attorney of his district ; was elected to 
the Fiftieth. Fifty-First, Fifty-Second, and Fifty-Third Con- 
gresses as a Democrat ; refused to run for the Fifty-Fourth 
Congress, and was elected to the Fifty-Fifth Congress as a 
Democrat, receiving 6,065 votes, against 4.090 votes for 
Doran, Republican, and 3,895 votes for O'Neill, Populist, 
thus becoming a Delegate fi'om Arizona.