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Full text of "Automobile trade journal"

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•* • 7 




A R T E S SCIENTiA VEklTAS 







■ I 



Gen. Wo, ?g. 61 OUTING NUMBER^J^-j* Price, 20c. 

Vol. Xin, No. 12 PHILADELPHIA JUNE I, 1909 










II II 
IE mWML 



All That the Name Implies 



SILENCE=COMFORT 

These qualities are distinctive Peerless features 

Writt To-day for Catalog F I Li 

THE PEERLESS MOTOR CAR COMPANY | I 

2459 EAST Mrd STIiElIT, C1,F.\ l-LAND, OHIO If W 



ora 



LIGHT FOUR 



i iiti i r.vi i tmjh i il RACYTYPE 

Because of its having individual, detachable, convertible rear seats 
making a tvco, three or four passenger car, this type provides — 

The Gentleman's Ideal Roadster 

for merchants, doctors, sportsmen, and suburbanites. 

Because of Mechanically Right construction, correct deagn and highest 
grade of material throughout Mora Cars are — 

The Greatest Value Offered for 1909 

; RACYTYPE ..... f304H) 

ROADSTER (4 passeiigerj . . 2000 

TOURER 20Se 

LIMOUSINE 3250 



Detail description sent on request 

Mora Motor Car Co. 

(Mi:.MBi:iiS.A.M, 0. M. A.) 

17 Mora Place, Newark, New York 



1 



CTCLE AND AUTOMOBrLE TRADE JOURNAL. 



mmmi g 



N^VH 



"The World's Greatest Lubricant 

is the only satisfactory one for summer use. The hottest 
temperature does not change its consistency in the least,-- 
it remains just the same as in zero weather. Keystone 
Grease is therefore the most cleanly and economical 
lubricant you can use, as it stays where it is needed, in- 
stead of melting and running all over the car and streets. 

^ It is Mof solublt in water. Keystone Grease is a refined, 
high-grade pefroleum oil solely, and will not injure metals, like 
animal and vegetable oils do. If you want genuine satisfaction 
you will buy Keystone Grease and no other. We have a 
special proposition for Jobbers and Dealers, 

Keystone Lubricating Co, gSTKiK^A "?i°"£ 



WE HAVE NO CONNECTION WITH THE OIL TRUST 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



To The Manufacturer 

Who Does Not Yet Know "NON-GRAN 



>> 




H 



*'NON-GRAK" High Speed No. 8 Bearing Bronze does not score the shaft. 

Neither does it melt away at the first little lack of oil. 

It is always uniform, being made of the purest of prime materials and to 
a nicety in the process. 

RESULT — ^We Never Lose a Customer. 



• »iMi fmmn 



Otis Elevator Company 



meonroiiATio unmr thi laws or ki 



S. W. C«p. 12th & Sansofii Ste. 



IIA 



PkMSC AOSMCSS nCPLT TO 

PURCNASim DEPARTMENT 



Afflerlcan Bronze Company , 

Berwyn, Pa. 
Gentlemen:- 



Philadelphia. Deo. 31» 1908. 



Subject:- BRQHZE CASTINGS . 
In TfpXj to your recent favor» wltn regard to the bronze 
castings 9 which we have been buying from you^ would say» that same 
have given us very satisfactory results. 
Ve remain » 

Yours truly y 

OTIS ELEVATOR COMPANY. 



UEW/C 



Purchasing Agent J 



kiTPnl-^ 



To secure prompt 
order for 1910. 



Repairmen : 



ieSy we NOW earnestly solicit your contract 



N0N-6RAN Coral-Bars 




are made for you in 365 different sizes to make your bearing repairs easy, quick and economical 

Booklet containing table of sizes on request 

American Bronze Company, Berwjm, Pa., U. S. A. 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TKADB JOURNAL. 



THE RErL/IABl^B 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TKADE JOURNAL. 




CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



KEMIZITE 

"Worry-Proofs " Tires 

STOPS ALL PUNCTURES 

A PUNCTURE HEAUNG COMPOUND hw been the aim of score. o( patenu. 
but it Tcmained for a New Zcalander to discover a successful and pernianent com- 
poMnd of these unique qualitiet — hannless, clean, inexpensive and positive, and 
tor tlie owners of this company to develop and exploit the material. 

PNEUMATIC TIRES, while as near perfection as manufacturing limitations permit, 
are to-day even a relatively greater item in car up-keep than formerly, largely 
because they are seldom at the proper pressure. 

PUNCTURES IN MOST CASES are responsible for blow-outs, although perhaps 
one in ten comes from other causes, for porous tube*, slow lealu. as w^l as punc- 
tures, are the cause of partially deflated or flat tires. 

BY EUMINATING ALL PUNCTURES, slow leaks and porous tubes, you will 
prolong the life of your casing, will prevent worry and a large amount of incon- 
venience. 

KEMIZITE, A HARMLESS, dean, creamy liquid, is injected by air pressure in snudl 
quantities through the valve stem into the tire and is an absolute necessity; pre- 
venting all of the above. 

FOR ABOUT CMnIEtSIXTH the cost of a casing, or practically one-half the jirice c^ 
a tube, you are assured a constant and proper pressure in each tire, preventing the 
majority of cuts, eliminating about three-fourths of your blow-outs and oU punctures. 

YOU CANT AFFORD to be p rejud iced by the undue skepticism of thow misin- 
formed or ignorant of KEMIZlTE- Investigate for yourself. 

IF YOUR GARAGE MAN will not supply you, send to-day and avoid your punc- 
ture trouble, for you yourself can easuy inject KEMIZITE with your hand pump. 

A DEIALER IS WANTED in every city and town with automobiles, just remember 
that you are not the only live dealer in your locality. Jump at it. 

GENUINE MEIRIT, oroduction equipment the best, modern methods, and a system of 
distribution secona to noiK, insures universal use of 



AUTOTIRE SECURITY CO., Dept S 

1227 Michigan Ave., CHICAGO 14 Cambria St., BOSTON 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 





The Atwater Kent 
Spaik Geaamtor 



DeGcate 

Adjustment 

does not necessarily condemn an otherwise good device. If the 
adjustment, once set, is permanent or nearly so, the need for 
occasional skill may be condoned. Again, if the adjustment can 
be made while the device is working, the untechnical user can 
generally learn to manipulate it. 

The adjustments of some classes of ignition apparatus are 
neither permanent nor capable of being set while the apparatus 
is working. Careful measurements must be resoited to, with a 
large chance of error. Certain other classes of sparking appara- 
tus need adjusting nearly every time the car runs. 

The contact screw is the only adjustable element of the 
Atwater Kent Spark Generator and the UNISPARKER. It 
need be touched only about once in 500 miles, and then only to 
give it a quarter or half turn. The exact setting is not ma- 
terial, provided the contact is long enough to make a spark; 
and the adjustment may be made, not only while the engine runs, 
but even in the dark, by the sense of touch alone. 

Atttmt^r K^nt iManufartitrtns WmkB 

42 North Sixth Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 

When You Buy a Wind Shield You Want 

PROTECTION 

4 You don't get it if you can't instantly — without slackening the speed of your car — 
raise or lower it. 

gives you the protection. 



fl When you overtake a car and there is a cloud o( dust ahead of you — raise the shield. 
When you have passed the car and want fresh and bracing air — lower the shield. All 
done in the twinkling of an eye and with one finger — the Hydraulic pumps fitted with a 
sprina and filled with oil or glycerirte do it- 

^ There is no omparison between the old style shields with the cumbersome and 
bothersome bolts and nuts and the Hydraulic, which works "as smooth as oil." 

Made in Two Widths and Heights 

$35.00 $37.50 

including all fittings and either Mahogany or Walnut boards. 
Q All dealers carry them in slock, or will get them for you. 



nil Crossrnan Company 

iji West -iKth Si., N. y. 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. >J 



d 



10 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



"Pirates and Legitiniate Maniifiichircrs " 

An Open Letter to the Editor 

EDITOR CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL, 

Sir : — It was our pleasure to read in your last issue an editorial titled 
as above. However it may have been intended by you, it seems to us to 
bear with peculiar pertinency on certain experiences of our own with the 
Motor and Accessory Manufacturers* Association. 

We are not members of the M. A. M. A. Most of our competitors 
are. About five years ago, when the Rushmore Lens Mirror Searchlight 
began to be l^nown as the only genuinely effective automobile gas lamp 
then existing, we applied for membership in the M. A. M. A., in whose coun- 
cils certain of our competitors were highly influential. Our application 
was rejected without explanation, and repeated requests for explanation 
were ignored. 

Subsequently a second application was tabled without acl^nowledg- 
ment or explanation. Membership in the association carried ivith it, and 
still carries, the right to preferred locations in the Automobile Shows ; 
and, lacking membership, we had to put up with what we could get in 
that regard. 

During all this time our competitors, large and small, loclntflna 
some of the Icadlna llfllits of the li. A. •!• A., were doing their best 
to appropriate trade they had not the ability to earn, by pirating Rush- 
more design in cheap lamp constructions and trading on the reputation 
of our goods. In these squalid practices a number of the imitators 
came within reach of the law and were enjoined, and a number out- 
side the association were fined a total of thousands of dollars for con- 
tempt of court in disregarding the injunctions. 

Despite the devious tactics of competitors who were afraid to fight 
their battles in the open, the public appreciation of Rushmore quality 
has been so unmistakable that our business in automobile gas lamps is 
to-day more than doable that of our nearest competitor, and it is in- 
creasing as fast as we are able to handle it. 

We can alford to be lenient ivlth beaten competitors* bnt kvc 
shonld like to pnt the qneatlon ivhether* In vleiv of Its past 
record, the Motor and Accessory liannlactarers' Association Is 
the proper body to be entrnsted ivlth the task of repressing 
commercial piracy. 



RUSHMORE DYNAMO WORKS 



CHICAGO 



Plainfield, N. J. 

LONDON 



PARIS 



CTCLB AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



EMPIRE TIRES 

WIN: 



IN HARRISBURG MOTOR 
CLUB CONTEST 

Empires the only make of tires that 
complete the terrific run without 
changing a tire :: :: :: 

EMPIRE TIRES WEAR 
LONGEST 



EMPIRE TIRE COMPANY 

Factory— TRENTON, N. J., U. S. A. 

BRANCHES: 

NEWARK— 264 Hilsey St. DETROIT— 842 Woodward Ave. BOSTON— 292 Devonshire St. 
CHICAGO— 20 La Simile St. CHICAGO— 1301 Michigan Ave. NEW YORK— 73d Si. and Broad- 
way. NEW YORK— 148 Chambers St. 

AGENQES: 

PITTSBURG — Consumers' Auto Supply Co. ATLANTA. G A. —Dunham Rubber Co. CLEVE- 
LAND. O.— Motor Supply Agency Co. NORFOLK, VA.— Wm. H. Grover. DENVER, COL.— 
Denver Auto Goods Co. J\CK30NVILLE. FLA.— Savell Rubber Co. PHILADELPHIA. PA.— 
Penn Auto Supply Co. LOS ANGELES, CAL.— Empire Tire & Rubber Co. BUFFALO, N. Y.— 
Empire Sales Co. MINNEAPOLIS, MINN.— Empire Tire & Rubber Co. SAVANNAH. GA.— 
Harris Tire Co. NEW ORLEANS. LA.— H. A. Testard. ATLANTIC CITY. N. J.— Penn Auto 
Supply Co. DALLAS, TEXAS — Munger Auto Co. PORTLAND, MB. — James Bailey Co. 
PROVIDENCE. R. I.— Waite Auto Supply Co. ST. LOUIS. MO.— Gorman Bros. SYRACUSE, 
N. Y.— Central City Rubber Co. T0LBD6. OHIO— W. G. Nagel Electric Co. BOISE, IDAHO— 
Randall Dodd Auto Co. 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



Kli.iViY 



Sign MAGNETOS 

are being used on three out of every 
five American cars equipped with 
magneto ignition this season 

It Is Estimated by Manu- We Have Sold Over 30,000 

facturers That 72,000 Gasoline Remy Magnetos on Minimum 

Cars Are Being Built in Amer- Specified Delivery for 1909 

1^- Tui^ v«», t„ J Ti,„t «« D« and Have Bought Material for 

ica This Year and That 70 Per ^^ ^^^ ^^^^^f q^^^ 

Cent Are Being Equipped High-Tenslon Magnetos for 
with Magneto Ignition. Motor Cars. 

First Great Classics of Year Won with Remy Magneto 

Fab. 21— Burman ivl:- new Mu.23- KtntnK winx lOO-RiJIe 

Worhi .< Itecunl Kith Rwiy Miw- '«■ ■> I'sylon*. wilh Remy. 04 
MIo. lliirli c»r around circulnr ""Iff "" ^P"[' A'™^^„''ri."^iiS 



Remy Electric Co., Dept. 13, Anderson, Ind. 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 




No. 3— Shows Typr L Remy Magi 






line pulleti to exireino riiH"). >he 
n^nben [faepisloiirotl inlhecyLindpr 

occura before the cylinder i! ftt the 



i Al A A CONTRACT FOR i Ai A 

1910 30,000 lyio 

REMY MAGNETOS 

Has just been given us by the Buick 1910 

Motor Company for the Season of =^^=, 

No Higher Testimony of Several Hew Fire-Proof Fac- 

Merit of a Magneto Could Be ""T Buildings Are Now Under 

Given Than the Placing of £?""■« °' f'?1,"™fS°''. ""5 
uivcii i"»" me rim-uiB m When Completed and Equipped 
This— the Largest Contract ^m qi^j jjj j Capadtv of 



14 CYCLB AND AUTOMOBILE TKAD^ JOURNAL. 

NO OTHER AUTOMOBILE 
HAS DONE AS MUCH 



10,07* MILES WITHOUT STOPPim .jg^ ^ 

ITS EHIIIE IS THE RECORD OF THE i^HaXff^ll" 



A Remarkable Performance 



A MAXWELL su 



vnenol MAXWELL 



CDFnbinaJ jiidorntnt of is manv ptoplc muit bt right. 

To Thoie Who Want the Mo«t 



mobiifl thftt you could ftbaoiutely depond on — 
niie ibat irould be kIv»-i ready, VDuld be t. Kood 



lis engine. Thia is fins! and sbsnlute pimif '^ 
MAXWELL reiisbiiity and equally important 
MAXWELLeoonomy. 



To Thoie Who Want the Mo«t You Cannot Pay Lew Than 



for Their Money 



vice, the 3«6-day-in-llie-yei 
Tbe MAXWELL often t 
The 10,000 mile iioii<aMp n 
ever don* by an aulomobili 
Think of it, more than II 
uoUB runnitifof the engine 
■inale adiuslinent r>r repair 
lo that from New York ( 
mstcly one-half i 



Over Two Seatona' U«e 
Without an Engine Stop 

This i« the reoofd of Ihe MAXWELL. Suob a 



Maxwell Pricet and Get 
Maxwell Values 

™ are building over 12,000 
son. liyordenngrawniBlB- 

Wna— webuyattEelowwtpomiblefigureB. Thafa 
why MAXWELL aulomobilH, thoueh moderate 

be the highest priced can. T^ia 10.000 milen 

any automobile has ever done — it marks an oporh 

*h"e iS'fina om''morrBbout*the MSwEtb'T 
Let US send you the nune of the nearest MAX- 
WELL dealer At any iat«, send for our cataloK 
and copy at oRicial report of this great 10,000 



MAXWELL-BRISCOE MOTOR CO. 

p. O. Box no, TARRYTOWN, N. Y. 

Main OfHc* and Factgrr 

Pawtucket. R. I. New Cattle, Ind. 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILK TRADE JOURNAL. 



"Nothing Succeeds 



Like Success 



w 



We are Moving 

our entire plant and offices to Detroit, 
Mich , on May 1 st and will occupy our new 
factory at Grand River Ave. & Stanton St. 

WHY? 



Q Because the Buffalo Carburetor has 
made good. Increased facilities will 
enable us to take care of the constantly 
increasing demand. There is no need for 
you to experiment. Others hav<; tried 
the Buffalo Carburetor and the demand 
for it indicates its superiority. 



Buffalo Carburetor Co, 

Grand River Ave. & Stanton St., Detroit, Mich. 



M 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



weeki ago — but nothing doing now. Cars have ALL been equipped with Jones 
Speedometers. These wise drivers KNOW their speed— and ihey KNOW I 
KNOW-See ?■■ 

Jones Speedometer 

Will keep you out of the clutches of the law. Can you afford to take a 
chance driving without an ACCURATE, RELIABLE speed-indi- 
cator? Can you afford to drive without a JONES > USE the 
JONEIS and you need not fear arrest — used for years by the Bicycle 
and Motorcycle police of the United States and Europe because it is 
THE STANDARD— THE BEST. 

Get a JONES NOW and PUT IT TO WORK! 

Jones Speedometer Dept. 
United Manufacturers, Inc. 

Broadway and 76th Street, New York 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



A Speedometer 

for cars of the highest grade 

THE STEWART 

MULTIPOLAR 



(Model 14) 



Indicating element carried on a diamond 
bearing, below sapphire guides, indicates 
from a fraction of a mile to 90 miles 
per hour. 



This 



strument 
is bnilt to meet the most 
exacting requirements. 
Is handsomely mounted 
on a bracket that bolts directly to the frame, giving 
it distinctive individuality. Write for Particulars. 

Stewart & Clark Manufacturing Company 

500 Divertey Boulevard, Chicago, U. S. A. 
Branches: 1878 Broadway, New York; 697 Woodward Ave., Detroit, Mich. 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



FED D ERS 
RADIATORS 



The real square tube radiator — 
The New York to Paris Radiator 

Will be very much in evidence on the LEADERS. 

Look for them. Cut shows one. 

You know the make. 

FEDDERS MFG. WORKS 

BUFFALO, N. Y. 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE! TRADE JOURNAL. 1 

NEW DEPARTURE 

"TWO-IN-ONE" 

Ball Bearing 



Some of the Important Advantages: 

Two rowi of ball* give greater load canying capadty and kmgBi life to the bearing. 

Each ball makea contact with the ball race at two diametrinll; different points, 
insuring oorreol rolling action. 

'Die linee through the point of contact are at an anrie trith the plane of the bear- 
ing giving the New Departure diirtinction aa a cambinad rafal asd tbrnal iball 
beariwf, taUag load train mj aafla. 

WriU for Neu> Catalog 

THE NEW DEPARTURE MFG. CO., BRISTOL, CONN. 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 

The MAXIMUS Makes Motors Mote 

Over 12,000 MtitBed incn. It you are not ooe of them, 
jrou ihould be ; tbey Mve your temper, time aod mooey. 



Mora 
Speed 



LeMPluf 
TroaUe 



More 
Power 



LeMCoil 
Trouble 



TBK ■■■UXIUDB'* TtMIR 

We know we have the heU tuna made, and that it will improve the speed, 
power and •mooth-nmtUDg qualitiei oi your motor ; if it doe* not, your mniey wul be 
refuudcd without armmenL 83 per cent of 1908 modd machioet are equipped with 
roller type timert. The Maximui ii ctnrtnicted on the principle of the bed of thete, 
but hat leveral improved featura that overcome the weak poinli of roller-type timen, 
and make the motor mote. A qiecial Maximui, deiigned to be eaiily ^plied to 
2-cylinder Buidc and Models M aiid N Ford ii now ready for delivety. 

The unprecedented luccen of the Maximut Timer encouraged ui to ezperini 
carbuietioa, and, after careful testing and improving, we are now ready to wei 

The MAXIMUS CARBURETOR 



SimpliBed 
Cerburetion 



List Price 

l-imek Sla*. $11410 
lHBehSls*,912J)0 



The BECUET RALSTON CO.. 8IUZ-84 HkUfU Anne, CHICAGO, ILL 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



HEINZE IGNITION 
APPARATUS 



fjT We make a com- 
plete line of Coils, 
Spark Plugs, Timers 
and Magnetos, low or 
high tension. 

SEND FOR OUR 1909 
CATALOGUE 



HEINZE ELECTRIC COMPANY 

Factory and Main Office: LOWELL, MASS. 



2 CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 

A PERFECT TIRE COVER 

GORDON 

Easy-on Tire Cover 

It FiU the Tire When New 
and After Being Used 

Tliis cover is cut and tluped to fit pcr- 

ectlr all Bides of the tire. The only fastening 

JCCcBsary is at the ends. The two enda of the 

cover overlap after being put on the tire. On 

one end of the cover jou will find five brass hooks, the same as on a lace sboc. 

On the other end will be found a brass ring. After drawing the cover perfectlj 

smooth, place the ring over one of the hooka. The use of the several hooka 

allows of considerable adjustment. This cover will fit perfectly any and all 

makea of tires, whether they be round tread, flat tread, Bailey tread, etc., either 

American or foreign make. Furthermore you are assured of a perfectly Bnng 

and smooth fit ^en the tire is new or after the tire has been worn, or after the 

tire haa been retreaded. Something no other style of cover will do. 

We can assure you this is the most satisfactory and economical Tire Cover 
on the market, guaranteed absolutely water and dust proof. 

OUR OFFER 

ia to send you a sample tire cover "express prepaid" for examination. If it pleaaes 
you give us your tire cover business, if it don't please you, send it back at our 
expense. This costs you notliing, we take the chances, and stand the eniensc ba- 
cause we know you will Uke the cover and buy it exclusively. Retail price, IS.7S; 
liberal discount to the trade. Hade in any color, $3.40. 

Send for Catalogue 

Tire Covers, Luggage Bag, l^re Bands, Tool Rolls, Spark Plug Holder, 
Radiator Cover, Inner Patch, Sleeve Protector, Cape Aprons, Inner Tube Cases, 
Top Hoods, Robes, Lamp Covers, Tire Trunks, Wind Shields, Coata, Glovaa, 
Knuckle Cardan and End Thrust Boota. 



THE VEHICLE APRON & HOOD CO. 

272 N. 4th Street :: Columbus, Ohio 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



ALL NEW TOURING CAR 



S-Passengcrt 50 H. P., TO-mllet 100 In. wheel base, 
S4 fn. tires, 1600 lbs. total weight, 01,500, with com- 
merelal tool plant; 01 ,200.00 with good special plant. 
Same motor nnlts, same drive, for cars as low as 
0MO.OO. 

New springs, cannot be closed or broken or toss 
the car. New chassis frame. New motor. New front 
axle. Neiv rear axle. Neiv drive. All speeds for^ 
ward and backward. Fly wheel magneto. Make and 
break spark. New steering gear. New self-start. 
Gmnpressed-alr control, Indodlng steering. 

No carburetor. Motor bnms any fneL Not an 
adinstment on the car save throttle. Motor brake. 
Alr^ooled. Not a key, pin, set-screw or check-nat 
In car. Silent. Direct drive on all speeds. No sliding 
gears. No bevel gears. No fan. 

All patentable In Europe and America. Draivlngs 
how ready to go In shop. Car can be on the nmd 
October 1, 1909, and American patents obtained. 
European patents can be sold for 05,000,000.00 In 1910. 

Exclusive assignments of all rights to make, sell 



Cash required to apply for first 10 American 
patents and place first car on the road, 010,000.00. 

Address ^ Best Car,** care of Cycle and Auto. Trade 
JoumaL 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 

JACKSON 

Model "H**— $1600 



4 Cylinder, 30 H. P^ Bore, 4|"; Stroke, 41" 
Tires, 32 x 4. Ga» Lamp, Magneto. Fnr- 
nished with Tonring or Tourabout Body 



Touring Car or Tourabout. 4 cylinder, 36-40 
H. P., unit power plant, valves inclined in cylinder heads, overhead 
cam-flhaft. 

Touring Car. 2 cylinder, 20-24 H. P., chun drive, 
er Touring Car. 2 cylinders under the 



hood, shaft drive, 15-18 H. P. 

Runabout. 2 cylinders under the hood, shaft drive, 



WRITE FOR CATALOGUE 

JACKSON AUTOMOBILE CO. 

JACKSON, MICH. 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILH TBADB JOURNAL. 2. 

AIR COMPRESSORS 
FOB A WIDE VARIETY OF USES 

FOR THE GARAGE 

INDISPENSABLE 

in the Modern Gar- 
age, because of : 
Saving in labor. 
Convenience in use. 

A full line of imaU belt and motor dliven Air CompreMols, single 
and three cylinder styles. 

Now is the time to install a complete plant 

FOR POWER PURPOSES 

A complete list U medium capacity Air Ccanptenors in all itylei 
for <f>eratiDg : 

Pneumatic Drills 
Pneumatic Hammers 

Our complete Compresaor outfits 
prove themselves invaluable when used 
in connection with Frame and Motoi 
assembling for drilling, riveting and 
chipping. 

All of our designs are new and our construction is such as to with- 
stand hard and c<aitinuous service. A circular upcm request. 

THE F. W. SPACKE MACHINE CO. 

INDIANAPOLIS, IND, U. S. A. 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAU 



Not An AtMmbhd Car 

l! American Simplex 

Frfty Hwie-power VftlvdcM* Twe^jde Motor nus with the nooth rhTtha 
ud appliei power wilfc the ceastaiicj of the Electric Motor 



nPHE day i* inevitable when ibe two- 
^ cycle gu aigine will be tbe mly type 
uied in motor con. 

Q We have recognized tbe vtrtuei o[ the 
two-cycle principle- pioneen among 
manufaduren of htgb-gcade, high-powered 



4 Every manufacturer who puti into hit 
car a lix-cylinder engine adniit* the vital 
dcficioicy of tbe four-cycU principle — 
intermittent power — and hi*, mabihty to 
overcome it 

Q Multiplicity of cylinder! merely ap- 
proaches — never attaint — conitant turning 
power — the continuoui torque you hear lo 
much about. 

4 The American Simplex valveleH two- 
cycle ensine appliei power with tbe con- 
stancy of the electric motor. 
4 There is not a valve, spring, roller, 
cam or camshaft on the American Sim- 
plex two-cycle engine. They would be 
superfluous. They hinder tbe four-cycle 
from generating its power in a steady. 



unceasing rush — yet the four-cycle engine 
cannot be butlt without diem. 
^ The American Simplex is manufac- 
tured in our own plant in its entirety — 
motor, trantminioo, differential, gean, 
frame — every part where strength or har- 
monious actioa u vital to the bng life of 
the car and the smoothness widi whi^ 
its motor runt. 

t| That it the reason tbe American Sim- 
plex it a motor car tymphony — it has that 
complete harmonization of parts which no 
assembled car can have, 
q Our 1 90S literature telU of tbe flexible, 
tfiree-point motor subvention: flexible 
radiator attacliment; tbe rear axle Innt- 
mittion; the interlocking device on die 
seais; tbe improved tmion tube; the eva- 
lasting brake adjustment — every one a 
feature exclusive in the American Simplex 
— ^ogetheT with a comprebentive explan- 
ation of the differencet between the Arner- 
ican Simplex valvelest, two-cycle motor 
and all four-cycle motort 
q Write for n. 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



27 





HERRESHOFF 

THE SMART LIGHT CAR OF CLASS 



There is no car at leM than double the price that is in the same class as the 
$1,500 Herreshoff Car. No other car is planned on the same lines as this 
smart light car o( class. It is built of the same material as the big cars, with 
as painstaking care, on the same proven principles of good practice, with the 
intent to build the best that can be built rather than a low-priced car. 

In appearance, grace of line and refinement of finish, there is no car at any 
price superior to it Its appearance will secure a trial for it an3rwhere and a 
demonstration will convince the most skeptical. 

The quality of its material speaks in every line. The closer examination 
made of the car the better will be the impression gained of it. Its peculiarly 
high efficiency is due to its compactness, its lightness and its correct design. 

©lie ^rtesbufr ©at 




That C. F. Herreshoff designs and builds 
the Herreshoff Car is of itself a guarantee of 
its excellence. Herreshoff stands at the head 
of American engineers constructing gasolene 
motors. He has the reputation of getting 
more out of cylinder sizes than any other 
engineer in the world. 

That Hairy S. Houpt introduces the car is 
a further guarantee of iu character. In the 
conduct of his garage he has taken down in 
fiTe years nearly erery type of motor car in 
use in America, and has expended more 
money in racing, experimentally, than most 
manuifacturers. We feel, tkeiefoie, especially 
qualified to judge automobile Talues. 

The car is backed by guarantees from the 
maker of erecy part which can be best con- 



structed by specialists* calling for the same 
quality of material and workmanship em- 
ployed in the best known American cars. 

In motor tests the Herreshoff motor has 
exceeded the claims made by its designer. It 
deliyers to the rear wheels of the car more 
than 24 horse power. It is one of the most 
flexible motors in use in motor cars. 

The car itself has withstood every test put 
upon it. It has developed 54 miles an hour 
on the road with a low gearing best adaptable 
to hill climbing. Though no claim of speed 
is made for it it is confidently asserted that 
few cars can outstrip it. 

Its easy riding and facile handling can- 
not be described, but must be demonstrated. 
May we demonstrate it to you ? 



Mantiiactttrca by the HERRESHOFF MOTOR CO. of Detfolt^ czclisilvely for 




tts d* ^«pt €0. 



New address :— Broadway and 68th^S treat, New York City 

TELEPHONE: 6150 COLUMBUS 



The Houpt Cars-74 oyU 60 H. P. and 6 oyl., 90 H. P.— are now being built at our factor/ at 
Bristol, Conn., and will be ready for delivery ia midsummer. 




CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL., 



CTCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



FOR 
Comfort 
Safety 
Speed 
Economy 



YOU CAN'T BUY 

Better Shock AbMrben Than 

SUPPLEMENTARY 
SPIRAL SPRINGS 



Because There Aren't Any Better 

tf]T It ii the greatert device in ike world for laving jrour car. Over 1 3,000 
^ can are equipped with theic mringi, and we have letten (torn UMn in 
all parts <^ the world totifying to their latitfactory qualitiet. 

You run no Risk in Specifying 

Supplementary Springs 



St Louis BRANCHES: 

dl. LOUli BOSTON 

Supplementinr 869 bo^ a. 

SplrSl CniCAGO 

Sprlni 1426 M^A^ 

Company, lu. ''^^sSSifi.s. 

4522 DebukT Avana*, FnocHCO. 

ST. LOUIS, MO. _ 

KEW YORK OFFICE: toromto. 

1878 Broadwar. ONTARIO, CANADA 

Roan 202 T. Eaioa CcmiMaj 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



SOLAR LAMPS 

HAVE MORE GOOD POINTS 

and more exclusive features than all other makes combined. 
Examine them critically and you will find- 
Exclusive Special Bausch & Lomb Solar Lens 
Mirror, proven by photometric tests to be the 
most powerful lens mirror made. More Bras^ 
— less solder — riveted parts, fewer parts — 
simple design — entire construction by tools and 
jigs — assembling of all headlights by inferior 
screws, which produces a perfectly smooth ex- 
terior surface — and the experience of 12 years 
in the manufacture of the world's Standard 
Motor Car Lamp' 

Badger Brass Mfg. 
Company 

TWO FACTORIES: 

KENOSHA. WIS. 
437 EleTenth Ave., NEW YORK 



CYCLB AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 3 

Hi.h V O Li 1 A '^*""° 

SETS THE PACE 

It is now the leading magneto of the entire 
field— the rest follow. The VOLTA has many 
DISTINCT advantages. For example: simplest 
construction. No complicated parts. A novice 
handles it as easily as 
an expert. Will not 
"shoot down" an arma- 
ture; wafer-proof and 
almost wear-proof. 
BEST imported mag- 
nets — those that RE- 
TAIN — their magnet- 
ism. BEST imported 
annular ball-bearings. 
In fact, ALL the virtues of the foreign magnetos 
with many distinctive virtues of its own. At a 
price which SAVES YOU FORTY-FIVE 
PER CENT duty. Think that over. Guaran- 
teed for one year to be a "Perfect Ignition 
System in Itself." 

Witherbee Everything for Ignition 

WITHERBEE IGNITER COMPANY 

SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 

Maken of the (amout Witherbe« Battery 

NEWYOWC CHICAGO. UI- BUFFALO. N. Y. DETROIT. HKR 

WntnuAtm 1429 McUau Athuh 41 Eut E>Md>9lrHt 220 MVuua Atmb* 

BALTIMORE OFFICE: 34B N. CbuUa St. 



CTCLB AND AUTOHOBILB TRADE JOURNAL. 

DRIVE A WHITE STEAMER 

and do some real touring 



If you drive a White car, you may plan your tours 
without any thought as to whether the roads are good, 
bad or indifferent. With a White car, you can drive on 
a bad road without any more effort than on a good 
road, and without any inconvenience to your passen- 
gers. Simply by handling the throttle, you can adapt 
the speed of the car, yard by yard, to road conditions. 

Most of the interesting parts of the country are with- 
out good roads and, therefore, unless you drive a White, 
your opportunities for real touring are very limited. 

Write lor ealalofl dcscrlblnfl OMr Toartag Cars at tSOM and SUM 



THE WHITE COMPANY 

CLEVELAND, OHIO 

N««* vmi Cttr, ^raadtnr at SI* M. OcvcIbbM, 4*7 Kv^nvaU Av«. 

■oMoa. n* NcwbuT St. AUaat^ IW-ltt ttarlctiB St. 

PkUaddpUa, 6«»-U M. BrM« M. CM«^^ M* HlcU^aa Ave. 

PftHtavSTiM-HB BMttr M. «■■ FraaeiM*. Hancd BL al IMa Naaa Ava. 



CTCLB AND AUTOMOBILE TRADB JOURNAU 



Recent Victories 

CUP WINNER in 300 Miles Endurance Contest, 

Philadelphia to Wilkes-Barre and Return, 

January 1-2, 1909 

Only THREE out of THIRTY-TWO CONTESTANTS finished this 
contest, over ice and snow-covered mountain roads, with perfect time 
scores; THOSE THREE WERE four-cylinder MATHESONS. 

TWO MORE PERFECT SCORES won by two Mathesons in New 
York-Boaton Endurance Contest, 247 miles, March 11, 1909, 

Two perfect scores won by two Mathesons in Waehington-Hagerstown 
Endurance Contest, 164 miles. May 15, 1909. First place won by aMathe- 
8on in the Norristown-Hagerstown Endurance Contest, 400 miles, May 
18-19, 1909. 

In the above contests regular stock Matheson cars were entered by 
private owners after covering MANY THOUSANDS OF MILES of "per- 
fect score" service before entering these contests. 



50 H. P.— Six Cylinder Shaft Drive - - - $3,000 

Equipped witb eboiet ol TouiioE, Tourabout, Toy-MnD«au, Close- wup led or Runaboul Bodiw. 

50 H. P.— Four Cylinder Chain Drive (with touring body) $5,000 

E^iuipped with Limoiuiiis or Laudaulet bodin, tS,7G0. Roulncr or Toutsbout bodies, M.TSO 

MAinESOti UiTOMOBIIf COMPANV, Hail Sales Office, 6ara!C t IqHir DtpL 

1886-1888 Broadway, cor. 62d St., N. Y. City 



CTCLB AND AUTOMOBILE TKADB JOURNAL^ 



o m 



1 n dL 



CYCLE AND 1^ 

J@iiNiL 

^ Advertisers in the July number of the Journal, 
whose contracts are yearly ones, and who are using 
not less than a quarter page, will have their advertise- 
ments inserted v^fithout further charge in the July 
number of the Directory. 

^ This is a somewhat different policy from most 
publishers, inasmuch as we try to build up a large 
business by endeavoring to see how much value we 
can give the advertiser, and therefore our second 
publication is free upon the terms as above stated. 

CHILTON PRINTING COMPANY 



CTCLB AND AUTOHOBtLB TRADB JOURNAL. 



tion Number 



mm wmmm 

^ Don't miss this opportunity of getting this additional pub- 
licity without additional cost. The combination of these two 
publications means the most widespread and largest circulation 
possible to obtain among automobile owners and the trade. 
The Journal reaches about 20,000 automobile owners and the 
balance of the circulation of the Journal and Directory combined 
takes in practically every manufacturer, dealer, garage, charging 
station and repair shop in the United States and Canada. It is 
a great opportunity for getting much for little. Will you take 
advantage of it > 

Market and 49th Sts., Philadelphia 



ae CTCLB AND AUTOMOBIJUD TRADB JOURNAL. 



9 SPECIAL 
AUTOMOBILE 

POST CARDS 



IN COLORS 



Suitable for Advertising 
Mailing Cards. One Sam- 
ple Free for the Asking. 



9 Samples Mailed on Re- 
ceipt of 10 Cents in Stamps 



Just the "best ever" for 
advertising your auto- 
mobile business. 



CHILTONN PRINTING COMPANY 

Market & Forty-Ninth Streets, Philadelphia 



/ 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



A 1910 WINNER — 

I The low price at which we sell the 

BRIARCLIFF 

I is made possible by our systematic manner of manufacturing and the fact 
I that we are putting our cars through In bts of a thousand at a time for 
the 1910 trade. 

SPECIFICATIONS 



Write to-day for such other information as you may desire. 
Oar TAXICABS are away ahead of anything on the market 

MERCER AUTOCAR CO., Trenton, N.J. 



I CYCLfi: AND AUTOHOBIUB TRaDB) JOURNAL. 

Every Garage and Repair Shop 

CAN AFFORD TO INSTALL 

MORGAN'S 
OXY-ACtTYUNEWtlDINGOUTfIT 



The Banal price for such an outfit is aboat 9800, bat I have adopted a inoch more 
simple and reliable plan irhich enables me to supply it to nnaller repair men and man- 
ufactnrers at a ceasotiable price, enabling ;on to Mve from 9300 to {500 on the ontfiL 

THE PLANT consists of Oxygen and Acetylene Tanks, Barners with 6 tips, 20 ft. 
Hose, Wrenches, Goggles, Metal Flnx, etc., and will weld anything from 1 in. sqnare 
to the smallest material. Bigner Sections than 1 in. may be welded by pre-heating the 
metal in a forge or with a braiing torch. 

With this outfit and a little practice, perfect work can be done on steel, wrought iron, 
cast iron, brass, copper and alnminiim. 

PRICE OF SMALL OUTFIT, $150. 

Many garages and repair fchopa have their own acetylene and oxygen tanks. The 
balance of the outfit will cost only {82.50 in such cases. The tanki may be recharged 
at a nominal cost. 

Write for further particulars of this most practical Welding Outfit. 

B. MORGAN :: :: Newport, R. I. 



CTCLB AND AUTOMOBILB TRADE JOURNAL.. 

IBNEY 
WIRELESS 

THE SOUD TIRE 
FOR SERVICE 



Q The Glbney Wireless Motor Tire Is making good on 
every single point of superiority we claim for It. 

^ There Is none so durable; none so secure; none so 
resUlent as the GIBNEY WIRELESS. 

ITWIUPAYVOUTOINVESTIfiATtlTSMtRITS 

JAMES L. GIBNEY & BRO. 

PHILADELPHIA, U. S. A. 



CYCLE AND AUTOHOBILfi TRADE JOURNAL. 



CTCLB AND AUTOMOBILB TRADE JOURNAL. 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TiiACS iOtHcHAL, 

Crucible Steel 

CASTINGS 




Jl[ Our castings have great tensile strength and are 
jd true to pattern, and owing to their wonderful physi- 
cal properties may be substituted for f orglngs In many 
parts of the automobile. This means a considerable 
saving In first cost as well as In the after cost of the 
machining. 

|7r Our CRUCIBLE STEEL CASTINGS are made of 
Jd vanadium and alloys to conform with specifications 
furnished by customers. 

JIT Prompt deliveries can be made by our process. 
Jd We have a very large plant and most excellent 
facilities and are prepared to deliver in large or small 
quantities on schedule time. This ought to Interest you 
if you want to get your product out without delay. 

Jir Let us figure on your work for your 1910 requlre- 
jII ments. It will pay you to write to us, as we can 
interest you in the three most important essentials in 
buying crucible steel castings, viz. : — quality, price and 
time. 



KEYSTONE STEEL CASTINGS CO 

CHESTER, PENNA. 



1 



CTCLB AND AUTOMOBILE) TRADE JOURNAL. 



CTCLB AND AUTOHOBILE TRADE JOURNAIi. 



Would you like to replace a punctured tire with a fresh, fully inflated 
one with only three minutes of eaay work ? That is what you can do if 
your car is equipped with 

DOOLITTLE RIMS 

Any car can be equipped with them in a few hours, using any standard type 
of tires. 

The key and screw bolts, easily and without a moment's delay, CSCpud 
tbe rllDi forcing it away from the wheel, rcgardlCSS Ol mst< A 
spare lim with fully inflated tire is then locked on the wheel. 

The damaged tire can be replaced at your convenience, the key and 
screw bolte COBtraeUmi the rtm away from the shoe, allowing its easy 
removal and replacement by a new one, 

A postal will bring full description and name of nearest agent. 

The Doolittle Rim Co. (Ltd.) 

1666 Broadway, New York 

TORONTO, CANADA COVENTRY, ENGLAND 



CTCLB AND AUTOUOBILE TRADE 30VKNAL. 



40i! MILES ON ONE GALLON OF GASOLINE 



The Brush Runabout 



$550 



This is the wonderful record of the Brush Runabout in the One Gallon 
Mileage Test of the New York Automobile Associatioa on May 7th — more 
proof of our claim tor this wonderful little car. 

Do you realize that this meana a triSe lew than three-eighths of a cent 
a mile for fuel to run a car that will cany two pasgeagers and baggage 
anjrwhere an automobile will go7 

And this is only one of the features of economy of the Brush. Here 
are othera ; 

, The tire expense is less than on any automobile built in America, due 
to the facts that the car weighs only 950 pounds and that the tires are 
larger, proportionate to the weight, than on any other car. 

The working parts are so few in number and so durable that the coat 
of repairs amounU to almost nothing in a season. 

These are the points in which you are vitally interested — points which 
you cannot afford to overlook, if a two-passenger car will meet your re- 
quirements. 

Brush Runabouts aren't very thick in every locality — can't be, when 
2000 of them are distributed over the United States and eleven foreign 
countries — but we are running our factories 21 hours a day now, and you 
will soon see the Brush everywhere. 

Watch tor the little gray car with the black stripes, and watch it de- 
liver the goods every time. 

There is still a limited amount of open territory. We want good, re- 
liable dealers for it. Write us. 

BRUSH RUNABOUT CO. 

512 BALTIMORE AVENUE DETROIT, MICHIGAN 

ErtmUIslMd 1906 M«M»m A. M. C. M. A. 



46 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



and again! 



The Harrisburg Endurance Run, 3rd, 4th, 3th, 6th and 
7 th of May, was just another conclusive proof of the vast 
difference in automobile tires — and just one more decisive 
victory for 

GOODRICH TIRES 



which equipped the winning Franklin Car and more cars 
than any other two makes combined — and carried the only 
car, an Oldsmobile, that made the entire run on one set 
of tires. 

Endurance contests have but one value to YOU — to 
demonstrate the respective merit and endurance of cars 
and tires in actual usage. There is money in the pocket 
of the reader who realizes the net value of a tire reputa- 
tion based solely on such performances as this. 

Tbe Deadly — but Instractiye — Parallel 

Number of Goodrich Tires in the Number of nearest compedtois 14 

Run 25 Combined number of other tires, 

divided among 8 makes 59 

Number of Goodrich Tires to finish, 25 Number of nearest competitorB to finish, 6 

(Not one user of Goodrich Tires mw fit to cliAiii(e (A loM of Dearly 60% of tbe original equipment.) 

equipment m order to better kit tire condition.) Number of punctures, nearest com- 

Number of punctures, Goodrich .... 1 petitor 18 

(or three times as many, in proportion to repre- 
Numbcr of blowouts or any other ser- senution). 

ious injuries, Goodrich NONE Number of blowouts, other makes. . . 9 

Tires on the winner — GOODRICH. 
Hres on the One Car that came through the Five Days without 

tire change— GOODRICH. 
Goodrich Hres are not called best ; they are proved best. 

The B. F. Goodrich G>. 

AKRON, OHIO 

Branches in all Principal Cities 



CTCLB AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JODRNAl^. 47 

Did You Ever Hear of WESTON,the Great Walker? 



We showed them I So levere wat the test, so well did the K & W do ib part, that Mr. 
Caucell* at once desired the general sales agency of Greater New York. 
How can you afford to run your cat without a K & W ? 
K & W'l are best ; have no equal — so, use no other. 

28 X S 95.00 30 z 3}i $6.00 32 x Z}i $8.50 

30 K 3 S.2S 30 z 4 7.00 32 k 4 7.S0 

Otinr liiaa In proporlion 

II your <I>bUt dcn-l hudU it, WRITE US 

K & W MFG. CO., Ashland, Ohio 



CTCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TUADB JOORNAL. 



GAR AHEAD! 



*"8W 30«.r. 

1700 (UhO 

Ik ■ 



RIDER-LEWIS "FOUR" 

The Biggest Little Car Ever Built 

Q In design, appearance and ability, 
the Rider-Lewis IV easily heads the 
list of popular priced cars. 

FEATURES: 



Four Cylinder! Flexible Motor Supports 

Valves in the Head Rear Azlo Gear Set, 3 Speeds 

Magneto Ignition Straight Line Drive 

Thermo-Syphon Cooling Light Weight 

32' I 3i' Tlrea 100' Wheel Base 

—Simplicity the Very Keynote of the Design — ' 
WE ALSO MANUFACTURE THE EXCELLENT SIX 

(The Moat Luxurious of Cars), Price. $2500 
CATALOG ON REQUEST. AGENTS GET OUR PROPOSITION 

Price $1000 "^ Rider-Lewu Motor Car Co. 

^^^^^^m^^^^ Mnnei* uid Andenoo, Indiana 



CYCLB AHD AUTOUOBILB TIUDB JOURNAL. 



60 CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAIi. 



I TA T 



A new schedule of subscription rates is now in 
force and all previous schedules will be withdrawn. 
The price of 

_ CYCLE — M 

The AinoNOiiLE .3 

TRADE JOURNAL 

One year - - $2.00 
Two years - - 3.00 

Five years - - 5.00 

Foreign subscription, $ 1 .00 per year additional. 
Subscriptions are payable in advance. 

Better take advantage of this offer now and send us 
$5.00 for a five years' subscription. Those who are 
already subscribers can extend their subscription for 
five years from date of expiration by making remit- 
tances within the next sixty days. 

Chilton Printing Co., Publishers 

Market & 49th Sts., Philadelphia 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



51 




SUBSCRIF^TION 

NOTICE 



of our new Directory of the motor industry, 
which is issued quarterly and bears the title of 



The 



»N(noR cvci£.H(rroR boat & « 

JlfCINOBlLE i 
TIIKHRECniir 



One year 
Two years 
Five years 



$1.00 
2.00 
4.00 



The combination of the two- 
Journal and Directory 

One year - - $2.50 

Two years - - 4.00 

Five years - - 7.50 

These two publications are invaluable to anyone desiring accurate 
information regarding the motor industry. They cover the field in a 
thorough and comprehensive manner. Now is the time to subscribe. 



Market & 49th Sts^ Philadelphia 



CTCLB AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAU 



TIRE TRUTHS 

Other tires are guaranteed for "workmanship and mater- 
ial.** What good is that ? 

The average motor car owner knows litde of the con- 
struction of tires or the material that goes into them, 
and cares less. 

What he IS interested in is MILEAGE — how. much 
return he is to get in actual wear for every penny 
invested. 

We GUARANTEE that you will get at least 5.000 
miles of use from every AJAX TIRE. 

Note the recent test of the Maxwell car which broke all 
non-stop records by 5,000 miles. Only SIX AJAX 
TIRES were used in the entire 10,074 J miles. 
One AJAX TIRE ran 7,492 miles before needing 
even a pump. 

Let the •• knockers** of the AJAX GUARANTEE 
and AJAX TIREIS continue to "knock.** It*s 
good advertising for us and makes the man who 
knows the motoring economy and satisf action ac- 
companying the AJAX GUARANTEE root all 
the harder. 

Write for a copy of that guarantee. 

AJAX-GRIEB RUBBER COMPANY 

Ganeral Oflicu : S7tk StiMt uiil Broadway NEW YORK CITY 

Factories : Trenton* N. J. 



BRANCHES 

Ph3adrlphM. 316 No. BroMl Si. Seauk 1 102 Bnwhray 

BortoQ. 1 5 Park Sqiure Sw Fnndtco. 436 Markd Sc 

[>eiroit. 743 Woodwaid Ave. New York City. 

DcoTcr. Col., 1 529 ClcTvUDd Place N. E. Cor. 57th Stroot and Broadway 



LnAoflcka. 1038So.ManSt 
1425 Michinn Atc. 
905 Fmt Ate., So. 
KumM Giy. 1422 Grand An, 



Mflwaukee Asenii, Goodyear Rubber Con^any 



St. Louii Asenii, Goodyear Rubber Company 



CYCL^ AND AUTOMOBILE TKADE JOURNAL. 



READ THIS 



THE BONGARTZ COMPANY, 
CITY. 

GENTLEMEN :— 

Responding to yours of recent date, I take pleasure in advbing 
you of the very satisfactory results I obtained with your "AUTO- LOCK." 
As you kaow, my new MAXWELL car was stolen on Dec. Htli last 
(the same day I bought it), while standing on the curb on Broadway. 
And yet the car was equipped with a so-called "Circuit Breaker," but 
the thieves connected the wires and started away. A few days after this, 
the Police found my car on 8th Ave., damaged — lamps, horn, in 
fact, all brass parts taken away from it — a loss of some SISO.OO. 

I then purchased one of your "AUTO-LOCKS" to protect my car, 
and I highly recommend it as a perfect auto protector and think that 
every automobile owner should possess one. 

Yours very truly, 

LEOPOLD FRIEDMAN. 



PRICE, «S.M 

How about YOUR car? Why not put a Bongartz "AUTO-LOCK" 
on your car now? What's the use in waiting until your car is dam- 
aged or stolen ? Our lock costs only 15 — ^your car cost ? 

Think it over. Lock your car — for your own benefit. 



THE BONGARTZ COMPANY 

Thoroughfare BMg., Broadway and 58th Sts, New York 



CTCLB! AND ADTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



Solves the Lighting Problem for All Time 



4 By th« Neverout Ittvertlble method, the carbide Is Instantly separated from 
the moist residue, positively stopping after-generation. 

Q The attention of a u torn obi lists, who have been troubled with the old-fash- 
ioned gas tanks and faulty generators, is called to the patent system of purifi- 
cation contained In the Neverout bracket. It will be noted that the gas is 
cleansed and cooled, thereby Insuring the life of the burners and giving them 
an Intensely white flame, impossible with other methods. 
Q Bracket fastens to running-board — no extras required. 

q The Neverout system of acetylene gas generation Is now employed by the 
U. S. Government on the Panama Canal with great success. 
4 Made in one, two and three cylinders, holding respectively, two, four and sis 
pounds of carbide. 

4 Guaranteed to be satisfactory or money back after ten days* trial. 
4 Those who have been worried by the exorbitant charges for re-filling gas tanks, 
will do well to Investigate the Neverout eystem, which at once makes acetylene 
safe and dependable, and forever banishes charging stations. It does away with 
the annoyance of the common generators, as well as the uncertainty and dan- 
ger of carrying gas under pressure. Investigate to-day. 



ROSE MANUFACTURING CO. 

911 Arch St., Philadelphia, U. S. A. 



'CLE AND 



II mm 

JMlNiL 



v«i. mi. N0. 11 



MAY EDITION 24,148. 
1B,617 Copiea mailed at pound ratea. 
8,515 Copiea delivered to Newa Com- 
pany. 
608 Copiea to Philadelphia and for- 
eign, etc., under atampa. 
200 Sold and expreaaed In bulk, 
10 Copiea held In reaerve. 



24,146 Total copiea of May edition. 

Of theae 
13,8S5 Were paid aubacrlptlona. 
8,515 Delivered to Newa Company. 
200 Special aalea. 

22,600 
1,662 Returned by Newt Company, to 
May 8th, 1009. 

20,938 Net total paid. 

We print on tbie page each month an 
exact statement of the number ol copies 
printed and distributed of the preceding 
leaue of "The Cycle and Automobile Trade 
Journal." 

The bindery count of actual complete 
copies produced of the May loswe waa 24,- 
146. 

Of these 19,033 pounds were mailed at 
pound rates, as shown by post office re- 
celpU. Bach copy weighs 19H ounces, 
representing 16.617 copies, and 804 copies 
of back numbers and copies returned by 
news companies are accounted for, In ad- 
dition to the totAl for the month. 

We wUl be pleased to verify the above 
Bgnres at any time to anyone interested. 

COMING EVENTS 

June B— Grand Prtee Balloon Race, National 
Chamtilonshlp of the United Statea, etartlng 
from tidlanapollB. ^n^- „ , , . t, 

June 1— Start from Now York oI tranaoontl- 
nental oontert (or Seattle ror Alaska- Yukon - 
Paclflo BJxDoaltlon. _ „ 

Juie Jl-5»-M-Hour Ti«ck Race. Quaker 
City Uotor cau*. Phlladolphla, 



June 12— Dead Horse HUl Climb ol Worcea- 
ler Automobile Club, Worcester, Ma^B. 

June 12-14— Now York City. Catsk I II -Berk- 
shire Endurance Contest, Now York Automo- 
blle Trade Aaaociatlon. 

June 1*-1S— EnduraJioe Hun, Phlladolphia to 
Pittsburg and return. Quaker City Motor Club. 

June 11-21 — Annual Spring' Tour of the Max- 
well -Briscoe Motor Club. Start from New 
York; 660 miles: Now York. Waterbury, Stock- 
bridge, Newburgh, Delaware Water Gap, Pbil- 
adelphla, Atlantic City. Now York. 

June 17— Track Meet of Bay State A. A.. 
Boston, Hass. 

June 18-19— Stock Chassis Hace for Cobe 
Trophy and Ught Car Race. Chicago. 

Juno 21-26 — BInghamton, N. Y.. Fourth An- 
nual Endurance Run, Albany, Boeton, Hart- 
ford, Newburgti, BInghamton Automobile 
Club, 

June 22-28— Fifth Annual Tour, Brotton 
Woods. Portsmouth. Boston, Albany Automo- 
bile Club, Albany, N, Y. 

June 24 -2e— Montreal, Blue Bonnets Track, 
Race Meet. K. M. Jftftray, Manager. 

June 25-16 — Track Race, Point Breoie, 
Quaker City Motor Club. 

July 3 and B— Wildwoofl (N. J.), Straight- 
away Races. Motor Club of Wlldwood. 

July 4— Los Angeles. Cal.. Southern Califor- 
nia Automobile Dealers' Association. Road 
Races, 260 Miles for Large Cars: IGD Miles for 
Light Cars. 

July 7— Detroit. Start of Sixth Annual A, 
A. A. Tour (or Qlldden Trophy. 

September 6-11— Lowell Automobile Club 
'-■— '-g Carr" " " ■■ -- 

mber 1- - — = — , 

.„. ,.._ Wahlgreen Trophy; starts from Den- 
ver to tbe City of Mexico. 

October 7 — Second Annual Stock Chassis 
Race In Falrmount Park. Philadelphia. Pa.j 
Quaker City Automobile Club. 

November 6-lS— National Automobile Show 
at Atlanta, Qa., In the Auditorium -Armory. 

December 29-30— Fourth Annual Mld-Wlnter 
Endurance Contest. Quaker City Motor Club. 

February 6-12— Ninth Annual Automobile 
Show at Chicago. 

May 26-June 1— Annual Automobile Trials of 
ihs Irish Automobile Club. 

June 1-14— Barcelona Exhibition, under di- 
rection of Autoraohlle Club of Spain. 

June 8— Light Car Contest, known as the 
Circuit Provencal, Automobile Club of Mar- 
June lO-lS— Germany. Prince Henry Cup 
"juna J <" 19— Scotland, Scottish RellaWlity 



56 



CTCLB AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



June 24-JuIy 5 — Industrial Vehicle Competi- 
tion, under direction of Automobile Club of 
Sweden. 

July 1-8 — Grand Prix and Voiturette Cup 
Race, under direction of Automobile Club of 
Prance. 

July 7-17 — Light Agricultural Motor Com- 
petition at Winnipeg Industrial Exhibition. 

July 13-17 — Belgium, Oi^tend Automobile 
Race w'eeka 

July 17-26— An Exhibition of Agricultural 
Motors at Amiens, France. 

August 22-29 — France, Reims, Aeroplane 
Races and Grand Prix, Aero Club of France. 

August 24-27 — Circuit of Ardennes; Lleder- 
kerke Cup and Voiturette Race, under direc- 
tion of Automobile Club of Belgium. 

August 29 -September 3 — Small Car Competi- 
tion, under direction Automobile Club of Ger- 
many. 

September 6 — France, Mont Venteoux Hill 
Climb. 

September ll-19^Italy, Bologne, Florio Cup 
Race, Automobile Club of Bologne. 

September 12 — Two Automobile Road Races, 
under auspices of the Automobile Club of 
Ostend. 

September 19 — ^Austria, Semmering Hill 
Climb. 

October 2-17 — Aeronautical Salon in the 
Grand Palais, Paris, France. 



QLIDDEN TOUR TO EVOLVE WINNERS 

There will be a lot more Batisfaction 
than ever before in the Glidden Tour this 
year for the small boy, the general 
wajrfarer and the average citizen — 
those who greet the first arrivals with 
"whose ahead?" or "who wins?" This is 
another way of saying that the human in- 
terest in the contest will be greater. It is 
undeniable that everyone expects to see a 
winner evolved when any sort of a contest 
is under way. They demand a winner. Ex- 
planations do not satisfy. They merely 
mystify. That if you have a contest there 
must be a winner, is a natural postulate of 
every mind, and the club idea and the tied 
scores of former years were mocking to the 
average person. In fact, they tended to 
make the contest seem less serious than it 
was and it will be a great relief to every 
one concerned this year to be able to say 
who is ahead and winning. There will be 
three individual victories to be scored, one 
each for the Glidden, Hower and Detroit 
trophies and the human interest in the tour 
is three times as great therefore. 

Predictions that West would go "Glidden 
mad" are borne out by the actions of the 
Minneapolis Club members and in fact the 
members of all the clubs visited by the 
Pathfinding party thus far. Nothing seems 
to be considered too much of an effort — the 
sky is the limit — and next July when the 
tour for the first time experiences a West- 
ern trip the tourists will all be more than 
surprised at the enthusiasm met with 
through the Western towns, villages and 
cities. In Minneapolis where there is a 
club of 825 members a large entertainment 
fund is being raised. 

Among the merits of the new rules for 
the 1909 Glidden tour contest none is be- 
ing more appreciated by those who com- 
pete, and the public that watches, than the 
one that so divides the cars into classes 
that each will get a proper value for its 



performance. It will not be possible, as in 
other years, for a car of ten horse-power to 
get credit for performing as well over 
mountains as one of 60 horse-power. This 
is something no one expects, and it has 
been confusing in a harmful way to have 
all cars running on the same schedule. 
Another great virtue of the tour this year 
is that of having a course that will afford 
both the heavy and light cars a chance of 
proving prowess. The poor roads will be 
no worse than in former years, but there 
will be a greater variety in the road sur- 
face and many long grades, both up and 
down, going to Denver and back. 

A guiding car was sent by the Denver 
Motor Club as far as Jefferson, Iowa, to 
usher the Glidden pathfinder into Denver, 
where an enthusiastic reception was ac- 
corded the members of the party. 

Entries at $200, each will accordingly be 
received until June 15, and from then until 
July 1 at $300 each. 



N. Y. AND N. J. LUBRICANT COMPANY 

ARE THE ORIGINATORS OF 

NON-FLUID OIL 

We desire to correct a grievous error 
which appeared In the Motorcycle, Motor 
Boat and Automobile Trade Directory, of 
which we are publishers. It is a well 
known fact in the trade that the New York 
and New Jersey Lubricant Company, No. 
14 Church street, N. Y. City, are the orig- 
inators of non-fluid oils, and that they have 
been actively supplying non-fluid oils to 
the- automobile and general power plant 
trade for at least six years past. The 
writer knows from actual use that these 
oils under the name of ''Non-Fluid Oils" 
have been supplied to the trade since 
1903 by the N. Y. & N. J. Lubricant Com- 
pany, and that no other oils of a simi- 
lar character under similar names were 
placed on the market for about two or 
three years later. Notwithstanding this 
fact, under the head of manufacturers of 
"oils" in the Motorcycle, Motor Boat and 
Automobile Trade Directory, the N. Y. & 
N. J. Lubricant Company are stated to 
be manufacturers of non-liquid oils (an 
imitation) instead of non-fluid oils. This 
is a very aggravating error, because of 
the fact that "Non-Fluid" has always been 
a trade name used by the N. Y. & N. J. 
Lubricant Company, and further, because 
several other concerns who have taken up 
the manufacture of imitative oils were 
mentioned as makers of non-fluid oils, 
thus practically transferring the trade- 
mark which had been used so many years 
by the N. Y. & N. J. Lubricant Company, 
as a registered trade-mark, to its competit- 
ors. 

We have adopted this method of correct- 
ing this mistake, as we feel that great in- 
justice would be done to the N. Y. & N. J. 
Lubricant Company if any of their prestige 
should be lost to them by reason of this 
error. 



^ 



CTCLB AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JODBJJAL. 

New York Automobile Carnival 



The BecoDd annual carnival of the New 
York Automobile Trade Association, held 
the week of April 26tb, was a decided suc- 
cess. The weather, on the whole, was 
rather bad, but aside from the delay It 
necessitated, did little harm. The week's 
events consisted of a bill climb, speed 
trials on a level course, a fuel economy 
contest and a parade, besides a smoker, 
a special grand opera performance, etc. 

The first event of the week was the Fort 
George bill climb on Dykman street, and 
despite the cold, bleak wind, which was 



blowing nearly a gate, fully five thousand 
persons were on hand to view the contest 
The incline is 1,900 feet long and tias two 
rather sharp turns. 

The highest bonore of the day went to 
David Bruce Brown, who drove the 120 
horse-power Benz racer up the Incline In 
the free-for-all In 2S 4-6 seconds. 

Mrs. J. N. Cuneo.was barred from both 
the hll) climb and the speed trials. 

The summary of the Qrst day's evente, 
giving the winning cars, drivers, horse- 
power, number of cylinders and time. Is as 
tQlIowB : 

Oaootlne cars Belling for tS50 or lera — Max- 
well (Mannebaoh), 10 H. P., 2 cyl.. time 2,28; 
J861 to »1.800, B-M-F (Taylor), 30 H. P.. * 
cyl., time .S3 2-E; 11,301 to 12,000, Buick (Bur- 
man). SO H. P,, * cyl, time .40 2-S; 12,001 to 
33,000, Chalmers -Detroit (Knipper), 40 H P., 
4 cyL, time .40 4-G: 33.001 to 34.000, Palmer A 
SliiKer (Loacault), 60 H. P., 8 cyl., time 41 2-B; 
4-cytlnder. 34,000 or over, Slmplei (Bobert- 
een). 80 H. P., time Mi-b; 6'cyllnder, 34,000 
or over: National (Aitken), SO H. P.. time, 
.34 2-6; free-for-all, Bern (Brown), 120 H. P., 
4 cyt„ time .38 4-6; electric cars, Batxwck 
(Peck), ; H .P., time ,64 4-6. 

JAMAICA SPEED TBIALS. 

The chief events of Tuesday, the second 
day, were the speed trials on Hillside ave- 
nue, Jamaica, L. I. The summary of the 
winners Is as follows: 

One-mile time trials — Cars under 31.250, E- 
M-F (Stark), 30 H. P,, time 1.09 4-6; 31,261 lo 
33.000, BuIck (Burman), 30 H, P.. time .6S; 
32,001 to 13.000, Knox (Bourque), 38 H. P., 



time .SS 2-6; 33,001 to 34.0001 American (Bed- 
star), 50-60 H. P., time 1.00; 4-cyllnder, over 
54.000, Steams (Butherord), 30-80 H. P., time 
53 1-5; 6-oyilnder, over 34,000, National (Men), 
60 H. P.. time .48 3-6: free-for-all. Bena 
(Brown), 120 H. P., lime .35 2-6; Slock chaa- 
si^ over 3S.O0O, two entries, KnoK (Denison). 
48 H. P,, time .41 3-6; and BlanchI (Hutt), 
70 H. P.. time .43 4-6. _ 

Two-mile time trlalt— Cara under 31.260, E- 
M-F (Stark), SO H. P., time 2.22 3-6; 31,351 
to 32,000; Bulck (BurmaJi), 30 H. P., time 
1,62; 32,000 to M.OOO; Knox (Bourque), 38 H. 
P. time 1.66; 33.001 to 34,000, American (Bed- 
star) 60-60 H. P., time 2,00 1-6; 4-cyllnder. 
over 34,000. Blearns (Butherford), 30-80 H. 
P time 1.51 B-6; 6-cyllnder, over 34,000, Na- 
tional (Meri), 60 H. P., time 1.42: tree-tor-all. 
Bens (Brown). 120 H. P., time 1.1« 2-6; stock 
chaaslB. over 33.000. Knox (Denison), 48 H. F,. 
time 1.14 2-5. 

SPRING OPENING DAY. 

Wednesday, April 2Stb, was the spring 
opening display day. Thousands of per- 
sons visited Automobile Row from Forty- 
second to Seventy-alxth street to see the 
unique and novel designs used by the dif- 
ferent firms to decorate their bulldlngb 
and salesrooms. Inside the salesmen were 
busy distributing souvenirs to all the visi- 
tors, but never missing to Inform any pros- 
perous-looking person they could Interest. 
the advantages of their special line. In 
the evening there was a trade banquet ai 
the Hotel Marseille. General John C, Cut- 
ting presided as toaetmaster. 

The sham battle scheduled for April 
29th was abandoned on account of rain. 

ONE GALJjON mileage TEST, 

The one-gallon mileage test, scheduled 
for Friday, the 30th. was postponed until 
May 7th, on account ol the Inclement 
weather. When It was held there were 
twenty entrants, and of these a 4-cyllnder, 
atr-cooled Franklin, driven by 8. Q. Averell, 
made the best record of the day, 36,6 miles 
or 105,408 ton mileage miles. This per- 
formance won the cup presented by J. W. 
Willys, of the Overland Automobile Com- 
pany for the best score, and also captured 
the cup for Class C, which division com- 
prised cars selling from I1.2B1 to 12.000. 
Class A, for machines (850 and under, was 
won by a Cadillac with 42,6 miles, and a 
ton mileage score of 99,045. A 16 horse- 
power Bulck won the Class B event, for 
cars selling from (851 to $1,250, with 28.2 
miles and 86,571 ton mileage miles. In 
Class D, for cars from $2,001 to $3,000 In 
price, the only competitor, an Overland, 
made 16 mllea and a ton mileage score of 
53,500, Class B. for cars from (3,001 to 
$4,000, was won by a Flat town car. which 
made 25.9 miles and a ton mileage o( 84.- 
434. A Lozler made 17.1 miles and 89,433 
ton mileage miles, winning Class P, (or 
cars over $4,000 In price. A Thomas won 
the taxi cab event, making 22,7 miles and 
a ton mileage of 76,839. 

THE CABNIVAL PAHADR. 

The parade was originally set for Satur- 
day, but owing to the still bad weather It 
was held over to Monday, May 3. 



58 



CTGLB AND AUTOMOBILE TKADB JQURNALi. 



King Guy Vaughan and Queen Annette 
Kellermann presided and were two of the 
main attractions. The royal floats led the 
parade and following them came the his- 
torical and racing machines, among which 
were two contrasting specimens. One was 
a Haynes runabout of '93, chugging along 
under its own power, and the other was 
the representative car of modern automo- 
bile production, the Benz 120 horse-power 
racer. Owing to the high gearing on this 
car it was necessary that it be towed. 

After the antique machines and high- 
powered cars came the autos entered by 
dealers and by private owners all elabor- 
ately decorated. 

The succeeding section consisted of the 
competitors for the decorated car prizes. 
The first prize was won by David C. Good- 
man's six-cylinder Lozier, on which had 
been built an elaborate representation of 
"Industry and Fortune." 

The second prize was awarded to a 
float bearing Cleopatra surrounded by her 
retinue of slaves. A Matheson float bear- 
ing a Greek princess won the third award. 

The star feature in the grotesque sec- 
tion was "Teddy in Africa," and it was 
awarded the first prize. The second prize 
was given to a battleship float bearing a 
pickaninny crew. 

The first honors in the commercial sec- 
tion were awarded to the Michelin float 
bearing the noted Bibendum twins. . The 
second prize was awarded to the Thermos 
float, bearing a huge bottle, on which a 
queen, driving a number of flying white 
doves, was seated. A display float, show- 
ing a number of cups and trophies won 
by the Matheson car was awarded the 
third prize. 



AUTOMOBILE GOOD ROADS TE8T8 

By far the most important step ever 
taken to ascertain whether the automobile 
has been unjustly maligned or not as an 
annihilator of good roads was taken re- 
cently at the Executive Committee meet- 
ing of the American Automobile Associa- 
tion, held at national headquarters, 437 
Fifth avenue, New York City. CoK>perat- 
ing with the United States office of public 
roads and all of the automobile trade and 
manufacturing bodies, the A. A. A. has de- 
cided to hold early this season, probably 
in June, a series of severe tests to deter- 
mine, first. Just what damage the auto- 
mobile does to the road surface, and sec- 
ond, what will be the best measures in 
road building to adopt so as to prevent the 
breaking up of the road surface from con- 
stant automobile traffic. 

In the opinion of the committee the trial 
should be made as follows: On a straight 
level course, two miles from the start, four 
hundred yards should be measured off and 
an apparatus of the most delicate type ar- 
ranged for measuring the speed over this 
400-yard stretch. At the beginning of these 



400 yards four high-speed cameras will be 
stationed to take right angle pictures. A 
second station will be placed 100 feet fur- 
ther on and a third station at 200 feet The 
cars will go over this 400-yard section at 
speeds of 6, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 miles per 
hour and in regular increments of five 
miles increased until the maximum speeds 
are obtained. On the 6 per cent grade 
the cars will go up the grade at maximum 
speeds and down a grade at approximately 
the same speed coasting. 

In addition to these tests over the regu- 
lar highways it is also proposed to hold a 
test over a road especially prepared, the 
surface being bound by asphalt or other 
dustless preparation. 



ATLANTA AUTO MEET 
An auto meet is to be held on the 16th, 
16th and 17th of this month at Fitzgerald, 
Ga., under the direction of the A. A. A. 
The program is arranged as follows: 

TUESDAY, JUNE 16 — Reglfltertng of autos. 
show, and reception. 

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 16— Event No. 1— Five 
miles; stock cars, $1000 and under; prise, sli- 
ver cup. 

Ehrent No. 2 — Five miles; stock car, $1500 
and under; prize, silver cup. 

Event No. 8— -Seven and one-half miles; 
stock cars, $8000 and under; prise, gold medal. 

£^vent No. 4 — ^Ten miles; Ben Hill county 
championship; open local owners, stock cars; 
prize, gold medal. 

THURSDAY. JUNE 17— Event No. 1— Five 
miles; free for all; open to Georgia owned 
cars; prize, silver cup. 

Event No. 2 — Five miles; stock cars, $1000 
and under; prize, silver cup. 

Event No. 8 — Ten miles; stock cars, $2000 
and over; prize, gold medaL 

Event No. 4 — Seven and one-half miles; open 
to cars owned by residents of Georgia; stock 
cars; prize, fifty dollars in gold. 

Event No. 5 — ^Five miles; open to localists; 
stock cars; prize, silver cup. 

Event No. 6 — ^Twenty miles; free for all. 
Prize, gold medal. 



The road signs adopted by the A. A. A. 
are nearly ready and can be ordered ffom 
the main office of the A. A. A., at Phila- 
delphia, Pa. The A. A. A. can furnish these 
signs cheaper than they can be secured 
elsewhere in small quantities and at the 
same time maintain a system of uniform- 
ity. The different signs being prepared 
are: A double^lstance and direction sign, 
12 by 16 inches; a single-distance and di- 
rection sign, 12 by 20 inches, and four 
types of danger signs lettered respectively: 
Run slow, blow horn, sharp turn, steep 
hill. They will be out soon. 



CORRECT PRICES OF ROCKWELL 

CABS 

In the description of the Rockwell Pub- 
lic Service Vehicles in our May issue, the 
chassis price was stated as the price of 
the complete vehicle. The chassis alone 
sells for $2360. Retail prices we are in- 
formed have never been quoted on com- 
plete machines. 



' 



GTCUI AND AUTOHOBILB TK&DB JOURNAL. 

Harrisburg Reliability Run 



The reUablllt; run at the Motor Club ot 
Harrisburg, Pa., was beld Mar 3-6 Inclusive. 
The run was to WastLlngtOQ the first day, 
returning the next day to Harrisburg. The 
third day's run was to Wllkesbaire and the 
fourth day the cars returned to the starting 



was flolflbed with no perfect scores. Penal- 
ties were imposed for tire trouble, road re- 
pairs, road motive help and tardiness In 
checking. 

ClaBs A, for cars selling over tE,3G0, was 
won by a 28 horse-power Franklin, driven 



HAtrlatPUi A 

place, climbing over Giant's Despair Moun- 
tain en route. The course presented nearly 
700 miles of driving over all kinds of roads 
and In all conditions. The roads encoun- 
tered the Brst three days were of the worst 
kind, and Uietr condition was the main 
caoM ot such heavy penalization. Undue 



by C. S. Corlea, with a penalty of only Zi 
points. This car was awarded the Qover- 
nor's trophy, 

A. B. Cocklln, in a Pullman, won the 
Board of Trade trophy for Class B, for ma- 
chines Hating under |2,2S0. Penalty, G6 
points. 



speeding was eliminated by the establish- 
ment of stations all along the line, making 
It necesBary for the cars to check in and 
out on schedule time. 
This, however, was difficult, and the run 






T tllSO. itiO 



Class C was won by P. F. Du Pont's Peer- 
leas, for the Capital City cup for runabouts 
over 12.000. 

J. O. Goodman, in a Pullman, won In the 
runabout class for cars selling under |2,000. 



60 



CTCLB AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



f 



TEST REGULATIONS OF ROYAL A. C. 

A new test of cars has been instituted 
by the Royal Automobile Club, of London. 
The object is to enable manufacturers to 
obtain official certificates concerning the 
qualities of automobile engines. The regu- 
lations governing tests are, in brief, as 
follows: 

The object of the trial is to submit an en- 
gine to a test of comparatively short duration 
representing the equivalent of a considerably 
longer period in ordinary use. 

1. The trial will be held under the certified 
Trials Regulations except as regards Ckiuses 
6, 8, 9, 10 and 12, which shall not apply. 

2. These regulations shall apply equally for 
any engine, irrespective of the number of 
cylinders. 

3. The certificate shall show the results of 
the following tests: a. The fuel consumption 
on the bench, b. The output of the engine 
as specified by the entrant, maintained for a 
period of two hours (at the declared number 
of revolutions), obtained without interruption 
of the test for which the entrant may at the 
time of the test decide to continue; together 
with the period during which he B. H. P. 
does not fall 7 per cent, below the B. H. P. 
as specified by tne entrant, c. The maximum 
B. H. .P. which can be maintained for fifteen 
minutes below somelimitng speed to be de- 
clared by the entrant, d. A record of all' re- 
pairs and adjustments (except those connected 
with the carbureter or igniton gear) which 
may cause stoppage of the engine. 

4. The average temperature of the cooling 
water supplied during the entire test on the 
bench must not be less than 50 C. or 22 F. 

6. Every engine so tested on the bench shall 
be run at least 50 miles in a car (on Brook- 
lands or on a private track). The speed of 
the car shall be such that when it is on the 
high gear the engine will be running at two- 
thirds of the revolutions at which the maker 
has declared the horse-power. The maximum 
speed obtained over any distance of not less 
than two miles shall be recorded. 

6. The weight of the engine, the weight and 
wind area of the car will be recorded. 

7. The club shall test the R A. C. number 
of the fuel used. 

8. No dismantling of any vital part of the 
engine shall be aJlowed between the bench 
and the car test, i. e., no part of the crank- 
case (including any inspection cover, cylin- 
ders, cylinder heads, or valves) shall be re- 
moved. 



INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINEERS 

Ml 



At the regular monthly meeting of the 
Internal Combustion Engineers' Associa- 
tion, held May 14, in the Sherman House, 
Chicago, the following officers were elected 
for the ensuing year: H. R. Linn, Presi- 
dent; H. E. King, First Vice-President; W. 
M. Hampton, Second Vice-President; F. 
Dimond, Third Vice-President; J. C. Mil- 
ler, Fourth Vice-President; D. H. Trow- 
bridge, Fifth Vice-President; Charles 
Kratsch, Secretary; C. C. Sampson, First 
Assistant Secretary; I. J. Babcock, Treas- 
urer. Directors: C. L. Halliday, C. T. Pow- 
ell, W. V. Pye, C. Kane, William Hanson, 
L. G. Poore, F. Dimond, Charles Kratsch, 
H. E. King. 

Mr. P. H. Wood gave the association a 
short talk on gas producers and at the end 
answered questions asked by the members 
present. The next meeting will be held 
June 11, at which the officers elected at the 
last meeting will be installed. 



The national automobile show to be held 
in Atlanta next winter will be opened on 
'November 27 and run until December 4. 
The exhibition will be in the Auditorium 
armory. The dates for the show were set- 
tled recently at a conference attended by 
Alfred Reeves, general manager of the 
American Motor Car Manufacturers' As- 
sociation; S. A. Miles, general manager 
of the National Association of Automobile 
Manufacturers, and officials of the Atlanta 
Chamber of Commerce and the local auto- 
mobile club. 



New York dealers are planning another 
orphans' automobile day to be held some 
time this month, when the inmates of the 
varioys orphan asylums will be taken to 
Coney Island in about 150 automobiles. 
This will be the fifth annual event of the 
kind. 




-^«5?Ji ♦J!S"S checking stations of the trans-continental contest for the M. Robert Qug- 
fn? ni!Uf il?P]i^' ^^Z under way from New York to Seattle. The contest is in charge of 
mntnr°nf%®iJ«S.««t™n*®®i*'.^*'« ^5*^?« Automobile Club. Mr. M. Robert GuggenhelS^pro- 
fRfi LSLi^^.*^°/**if ^^ *"^jJ*^1°'*«o' *^e trophy, is chairman and also referee^ There are 

$i:Ur*fou'rth! $750.''aid ^flffl5; ^S^sS.^'"'^"*'^ ''°^*^^ '^"^ ^^'^'^ '"^ "^«^' '^^°"^' ^^''^'' '"^^^ 
• «i^« t,i"®®y"^* ^J y^^ Contest Board of the Automobile Club of America, held May 18th, 
Sf T I^„J! il ♦^^P*^^ to enforce the rule regulating the speed limit between New York and 
mairnS fS^lS the ocean-to-ocean contest. A representative of the A. C. A. will act as pace- 
maker from city to city, and no contestants will be permitted to pass his official flag. 



CTCLB AND AUTOMOBILE TRADB JOURNAL. 



61 



GENERAL INDEX 

Additional indtzM will b« foimd at tli« bMk of tli« book; « **Btiy«n' ClMdfl«l Index" of 
th« ontire oontonto of the book, both rtiding and ndyortidng pacM, and an alphabotioal 
indox to tho adTorUMiiMnta. 

Advertisers' Index 306 

American Simplex 1909 Cars 100 

Buyers' Index 296 

1909 Cartercars 137 

Coming Events 55 

Commercial Motor Car Department 175 

Dealers' and Garage Department 169 

Editorials 63 

Frontispiece 68 

The Hupmobile 122 

1909 Lamberts 127 

Lane 1909 Cars 112 

Mechanical and Technical Department 151 

Moline Model "M" 118 

Motorcycle Answers 119 

Motorcycle Department 187 

My Hunting Trip in the Maine Woods (Ira H. Morse) 79 

North Dakota Duck Hunt (B. J. Walsh) 80 

Opinions and Suggestions 162 

Outing Accessories 91 

Outing Department 68 

1909 Pullmans 132 

Roughing It a la Motor (Montgomery Hallowell) 75 

Sternberg 1,000 Lb. Delivery Truck 177 

Suggestions for Vacation Motoring (Victor Lahgheed) 81 

Twentieth Century Camping Trip (Chas. D. Hayward) 69 



NOT 1 IN 100 OF 

YOU KNOW THIS: 

That high quality in Ignition cable is just as important as 
high quality in tires. 

That loss of power and a poor spark are often due to leak- 
age, owing to poor insulation of the wires. 

That plain cable is often used when braided cable should 
be put in. 

That this Company is catering to the automobile trade and 
public with a superior line of igniter cables — another 
Diamond product just as superior in its field as Diamond 
tires are in theirs. 

The question of proper cable is interesting and it's important. 

WILL YOU WRITE? 



THE DIAMOND RUBBER CO., - Aknn, Ohio 



OTCLB AND AUTOMOBILE THADB JOURNAU 



CrCUa AND AUTOMOBILB TKAOG JOURNAL. 



63 



CYCLE AND 



m CTCLE AND «j^ 

AinoMOiiiLE 

llAiEJOIllllL 



mmtsD AT ram wmuiimirmA roav omoB 

AM laOOlTD-OLASS MAlIi MATTBB 

PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY THB 

Chilton Printing Company 

Markel mud 49ih Ste., Philadelphia, Pa. 

JAMBS ARTMAN QBO. H. BUZBY 

pTMident Yioe-Premdeot 

C. A. MX788ELMAN. Seo. and Treas. 



BA8TBBN RmnLmmHTkrirm 
F. M . DAMPM AN 

263 Broadway. N«w York 



WMTBUr RBPBBBfTATITB 
J. WALTia 800TT 



Editobial Staff 
JAMES ARTMAN, Editor-in-Caiiaf 
E. S. FOLJAMBB. Manafing Editor 
HUGH DOLNAR, Spedal Rn>i«Mntativ« 

^kmOMAN®^* } M«,hanioal Editof. 



Taarljr Snbseriptiaii sa.00 

PMVlsn SulMcrtptian ....... «.oo 

llnsla OaplM 90 off. 



Ghanfli of adTcrtisiiis oopy muat raaoih thia office 
ool later than the 10th ol eaoh month. New adver- 
tleemento will be aooepted aa late aa the 20th. 



Philadelphia, June lat, 1009 



THE VALUE OF TRADE PAPERS 

It is usually conceded that the upbuild- 
ing of the commercial interests of a coun- 
try is one of the first considerations of 
both its government and citizens. Upon 
this upbuilding depends, to a large extent, 
the strength of the nation. When indus- 
try begins to flag and men seek other 
countries in which to find an outlet for the 
work of either hands or brains, the coun- 
try assuredly starts on a downward path. 
This truth in our own time is well exem- 
plified by Italy, whole districts of which 
are rapidly falling into decay. Commer- 
cial interests and industry have passed 
away, and consequently the communities 
have disintegrated. 

We wish to point out that one of the 
leading elements in building, maintaining 
and cementing into a unit, the commercial 
interests of a country is the trade paper. 
Trade papers are to the commercial in- 
terests what the daily newspapers are to 
the general public. By means of trade 
papers those interested in the various 
lines of industry are kept informed, placed 



in close touch with the work of others and 
generally enlightened as to the best 
means and methods extant in their re- 
spective lines of endeavor. Such papers 
are of vastly more benefit and value, from 
a practical standpoint, than are magazines 
of short stories and heterogeneous infor- 
mation which in a way simply foster dis- 
jointed thinking. The trade paper has a 
definite and important service to render, 
and therefore delivers a definite value. 
Its actual worth to any merchant or manu- 
facturer is often inestimable and its field 
even reaches, to a large extent, individuals 
in the community who are indirectly or 
remotely connected with the commercial 
interests dealt with. 

Occasionally a man is found who claims 
that he is too busy to read trade publica- 
tions. Too often these men are the very 
ones associated with offices and factories, 
the whole appearance of which indicates 
that they are not actively in touch with 
the progress and methods of manufacture 
of the times, and their factories usually 
show that they have been run along the 
same unimproved lines for many years. 
The desks of such men are usually thick 
with papers and the papers with dust. 
They represent the renmants of a past 
generation who have quietly slept on into 
the progressive present, but have not yet 
waked up to the actual conditions sur- 
rounding them. 

Fortunate it is for our American indus- 
tries that the proportion of such dreamers 
is small and that the trade papers are 
recognized, used and profited by in most 
business communities. The man of to-day, 
and the man of the future knows full well 
the value of the trade paper and uses It 
accordingly. 



THE RURAL INNKEEPER'S GRAFT 

At this season of the year the thoughts 
of the motorist turn with longing toward 
the coimtry, the woods, fields and rural 
districts, and each one plans for his or her 
summer outing or series of week-end ex- 
cursions in the car. These short trips or 
tours are usually a source of considerable 
profit to garage, inn and hotel keepers who 
are liberally patronized by the motoring 
fraternity. But on all sides expressions 
of dissatisfaction and outraged pocket- 
books are heard, from the motorists who 
have been exorbitantly taxed for meagre 
and often inadequate accommodations sup- 
plied by some grasping but short-sighted 
innkeeper. 

The time was when "Motorist" was a 
synonym for ."Millionaire," "Sport" or 
"Man of unlimited means," — ^in other 
words, legitimate prey for the rural inn- 
keeper's overcharging and graft, but now 
conditions have entirely changed, at least 
in so far as the status of the motorist ia 



64 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TEADE JOURNAL. 



concerned. The automobile is now as 
necessary and almost as commonly em- 
ployed by the man of moderate means as 
was previously the family horse and buggy, 
but in spite of these pertinent facts many 
of the operators of hostelries on routes 
largely frequented by automobilists, seem 
yet to have the idea that every automobile 
owner must of necessity be a man of large 
means and therefore his legitimate victim. 

The prevalence of the custom of over- 
charging is largely responsible for the in- 
frequency with which trips of two or more 
days are now taken by those of compara- 
tively moderate means operating and own- 
ing their own cars. These people are often 
afraid of inadvertently stopping where the 
bill is likely to be excessive and often bur- 
densome and are Just the people who usu- 
ally, through false pride, dislike to make a 
disturbance and often pay the over-charges 
without remonstrance; in fact, the man of 
considerable means is now much more like- 
ly to kick, and although perfectly willing 
to pay a fair price for services rendered, 
is the first to register a protest when he 
feels he is being victimized. 

The short tour away from the cares and 
worries, heat and bustle of the city is 
one of the most profitable sources of en- 
joyment to the motor car owner, and al- 
though a few are caught unawares by wily 
landlords and forced to pay exorbitant 
rates, these are seldom caught a second 
time and are very apt to warn their motor- 
ist friends not to be caught in like fashion. 
On the whole, this practice of raising the 
rates on everything from a toothpick to a 
night's lodging simply because the patron 
is the owner of an automobile, will event- 
ually do more damage to the landlord who 
persists in mulcting the unwary tourist 
than it will to automobilists in general, 
and we are confident, therefore, the matter 
will in the natural course of events, right 
itself. However, in the meantime we warn 
the rural landlord and innkeeper that this 
practice is not only distasteful in the ex- 
treme to the automobilists, but if persisted 
in will be found very detrimental to his 
own best business interests. 



THE GREATEST OF ALL ROAD 

BUILDERS 

There is one question closely associated 
with the automobile which is now and for 
many years will be, prominently before the 
legislatures and the people of nearly every 
State in the Union. We refer to the great 
question of road building and maintenance. 
There has been a far-reaching and tremen- 
dous awakening among all classes and in 
all sections of our country to the necessity 
and the great importance of building suit- 
able highways. The interest which is be- 
ing shown is evinced by the Second Na- 
tional Good Roads Convention and Con- 
gress recently held in the city of Balti- 



more, by the conventions which have been 
held at various other cities and by the 
plans for further conventions to be held In 
the near future. It is also shown by the 
members of many farming communities 
where the progressive farmers have been 
stirred to action. Why all of this activity? 
To what can be attributed this widespread 
movement, which is destined beyond doubt 
to emancipate the dwellers in our rural 
districts from the mud enslaved condition 
in which they have peacefully wal- 
lowed since the time our forefathers out- 
lined our first highways, by cutting into 
the primeval forests? 

The automobile, the much maligned, the 
destroyer of roads, the dust producer, it is 
responsible. In fact, it is almost the only 
factor which has brought about this cru- 
sade against the miserable road conditions 
which have ever existed In our otherwise 
beautiful country. We say maligned and 
we believe we use the term advisedly, for 
the automobile is to-day the greatest of all 
known road builders. Wherever its ap- 
pearance has been made, there immedi- 
ately followed the desire for better roads; 
individual work was done, meetings held 
and concerted action, sooner or later, fol- 
lowed. In spite of these well-known and 
salient facts, the automobile is held up to 
us as a great road destroyer, and why? 
Simply because excessive automobile traf- 
fic over some of our half built and antiquat- 
ed so-called roads has resulted in tearing 
off the top surface and depositing it on the 
doorsteps, in the houses, and even in the 
very mouths of the adjacent residents. In- 
stead of meeting the question fairly and 
squarely with the acknowledgment that the 
roads were out of date and not fit to cope 
with present day traffic conditions, those 
in the few districts most affected have set 
themselves to legislate out of use the most 
progressive and civilizing infiuence which 
has been felt for many years. 

We do not deny that the automobile 
damages the present inadequate road 83ra- 
tem; but we feel that this is much more 
than offset by the tremendous educational 
infiuence toward good road building which 
the automobile has unquestionably exer- 
cised throughout the length and breadth 
of our country. To point to the isolatea 
and individual roads which have been in- 
jured by excessive automobile traffic is in 
reality begging the main question and is 
certainly overlooking the most important 
item in the case, namely, the good roads 
infiuence, created and maintained by the 
widespread and ever-increasing use, of this 
modern annihilator of distance, the auto- 
mobile. Even at the present time the gov- 
ernment is making tests t& ascertain scien- 
tifically the effect of automobile traffic on 
various kinds of road surfaces. These are 
undoubtedly but the forerunners of many 
varied and exhaustive tests which will be 
made in the near future. That a decided 



GYGLR AND AUTOMOBILE TKADB JOURNAL. 



65 



detrimental effect will be shown, is not tp 
be disputed, but this is no reason to en- 
deavor to legislate the automobile off the 
road, that action is not in keeping with the 
spirit of a progressive nation. The fact 
must not be overlooked that the inevitable 
result of these combined tests will be the 
development of new engineering road-build- 
ing methods, and roads which will with- 
stand automobile traffic, which also car- 
ries with it ability to withstand almost all 
of the usual forms of traffic and will in 
time ensure to this nation roads the like 
of which have never been seen in this 
country, roads which will make possible 
communication with outlying districts, 
roads which will facilitate the marketing 
of the farmers' products, roads which are 
up-to-date and capable of serving the pur- 
pose for which they are intended. 

The Federal Good Roads Department of 
the government states that the direct sav- 



AUTOMOBILE ACCIDENTS FEWER 

THAN TO HORSE-DRAWN 

VEHICLES 

The advent of the automobile as a means 
of conveyance has caused it to be given 
considerable undesired notoriety. The 
press pays practically no attention to 
vehicular accidents unless an automobile 
is involved, in which case great stress is 
laid on the cause of the accident and its 
disastrous results. Statistics prove, how- 
ever, that the number of accidents due to 
automobiles is much smaller in proportion 
than of those due to street cars or wagons. 

According to E. P. Chalfant, general 
manager of the Association of Licensed 
Automobile Manufacturers, the police rec- 
ords show that in New York City from 
January Ist to April 10th, 1909, there were 
434 accidents in vehicles of different kinds. 
Of these, one hundred and sixty-seven 
were due to horse-drawn vehicles, one 
hundred and sixty-two to street cars, nine- 
ty to autos, and fifteen to trains, giving 
a percentage of 38.4 accidents due to 
horse-drawn conveyances and 37.3 per 
cent, due to street cars, while of accidents 
due to automobiles, there were only 20.4 
per cent. But in spite of these figures, the 
automobile, still being somewhat of a nov- 
elty, always receives a rather harsh criti- 
cism whenever it is the cause of an acci- 
dent, and it will continue to do so until 
the newness wears off and it ceases to be 
attractive news matter, thereby receiving 
undue publicity. 



At the recent annual meeting of the Con- 
necticut Automobile Association, held at 
New Haven, W. F. Fuller, of the Automo- 
bile Club of Hartford, was re-elected presi- 
dent; F. T. Staples, of the Automobile Club 
of Bridgeport, was made vice-president; W. 
T. Dill, of the Automobile Club of New 
Haven, treasurer, and John M. Brooks, of 
the Litchfield County Automobile Club, was 
made secretary. 



ing to the farmers of this country from 
properly constructed roads would be $250,- 
000,000 annually; that there would be a 
saving of over |10,000,000 in marketing the 
wheat crop alone; of over $12,000,000 in 
marketing the com crop, and of $6,000,000 
in marketing the cotton crop. 

We have not mentioned the large and 
increasing revenue, pouring into the road- 
building coffers, due to the widespread use 
of the automobile. This is but a small 
part of what will be required and is not to 
be considered when compared with the 
money which will be appropriated when 
the nation, through the use of the automo- 
bile, has been wholly and completely awak- 
ened to the necessity for liberal and imme- 
diate response for the necessary, funds. 
All road users will undoubtedly unite in 
this movement, which will eventually re- 
sult in our nation possessing as good, if 
not better, highways than any in the world. 



TIRE AND RIM COMPETITION 

The committee in charge of the Three- 
Day Catskill-Berkshire Tour, under the 
auspices of the New York Automobile 
Trade Association on June 12th, 13th and 
14th, has announced a novel tire and de- 
mountable rim competition to be held in 
connection with the tour. All the leading 
tire and rim makers will be asked to par- 
ticipate. Observers appointed by the tire 
companies interested will report on the 
condition of each individual make upon 
reaching the different controls. 

This will be the first time in the history 
of the tire trade that such an innovation 
has been introduced in endurance runs in 
this country. 



IMPORTS AND EXPORTS 

For the month of March, 1909, there 
were automobiles and accessories exported 
valued at $39,176, which, compared to $61,- 
439 for the same month last year, shows a 
decrease of $21,263. For the nine months 
ending March, 1909, there was a decrease 
of $59,286 worth of autos and parts, as 
compared to the nine months ending 
March, 1908. For nine months up to 
March, 1909, the valuation was $327,114. 
while for the same length of time ending 
March a year ago, the valuation was $386,- 
390. 

Imports of automobiles and parts for the 
nine months ending March, 1909, amount 
to $2,622,824, and show an increase of 
$246,901 over the valuation of $2,376,923 
for the nine months ending March, 1908. 

Owners of runabouts in New York have 
started a movement to organize what is to 
be known as the First Army Motor Corps. 
The purpose as indefinitely outlined is to 
form a complete military organization, and 
have each car fully manned. The men will 
carry infantry arms and on the different 
cars will be mounted small machine guns, 
searchlights, wireless telephone apparatus 
and surgical outfits. 



CTCLB AND AUTOMOBILE THADB JOURNAL. 



NORRISTOWN ENDURANCE RUN 

On May 18 and 19 ft two-day endurance 
run was made trom NorrlBtown, Fa., to 
Hageratcwn, Md., and return under tlie au- 
Bpfcee at the NorrlBtown Automobile Club. 
The cars were divided Into three clasBee: 
Class A for manufacturers' care, ClasB B 
other entrants, for the club trophy, and 
Clasa C for the member's trophy. 

On May 21 st the technical committee 
finished the examination of the cara which 
participated In the Norrlstown endurance 
run. The Bix-cylluder Oldemoblle, driven 
by Tom Better, was declared the win- 
ner of the B. B. Block trophy in Class A, 
having a perfect road score and only a 
fractional technical point against It. 

In Class B, for runabouts, a Studebaker, 
driven by Frank Terger, carried off first 
honors. 

In Class C, the club division, there were 
four winners, namely: — American Travel- 
er. J. B. Mountain, owner, George Parker, 
driver; Plerce-Arrow, P. V. Hoy, owner 
and driver; Elmore, Frank Hardart, own- 
er, owner's son, driver; Cadillac, J. E. Lee, 
owner and driver. 



E-M-F STOCK TRANSFERRED 
Considerable misunderstanding has been 
caused by the rumor that the Studeb'aker 
had absorbed the E-M-F Company as a re- 
sult of the deal recently conBummated. 
This rumor Is entirely erroneous, as the 
change made was the succession of Hay- 
den Barnes, of Cleveland, and Clement 
Studebaker, Jr., to the positions on the 
Board of Directors formerly held by 
MesBTB. B. F. EverUt and W. E. Metzger. 
The Btock transferred. In connection with 
this change, amcuntB to only one-third of 
the capital stock of the E-M-F concern. 
Walter E. Flanders retains his title of gen- 
eral manager and succeeds to that of 
president, previoualy held by B. F. Everltt. 



DYKE'S COURSE OF AUTOMOBILE 
INSTRUCTION. 

A. L. Dyke, of New Bank of Commerce 
Bldg., St. Louis, Mo., for years connected 
with the automobile Industry, is now aup- 
plytng by mall a course of instruction In- 
tended for auto owners, chauffeurs and the 
"uninitiated" generally. This course con- 
sists of a 300-page book, with many lllus- 
tratlons, 24 lessons each In pamphlet form 
and llIuBtrated by charts and two very in- 
genious working models on heavy card- 
board. The back of each lesson contains 
a series of gueetlons covering the subject 
matter and to be answered by memory. 
Free pamphlets are being distributed ex- 
plaining the course of study and large 
numbers of testimonial letters give proof 
that the course is proving very satisfac- 
tory. 

"The unique feature of the course Is the 
working models. One of these represents 
an automobile engine In vertical cross sec- 
tion and has arranged on one face light- 



weight metal inlet and exhaust valves, 
cams, connecting rod and crank, which 
show at a glance exactly what Is taking 
place In the engine. A revolving diac 
bearing the words induction, compression, 
explosion and exhaust la seen through a 
slot as these various actions take place. 
On the reverse side of the model are brass 
half-time gears which operate the meckan- 
1am. The parts are numbered and ex- 
planations are printed on the card. The 
other model Is that of a high tension mag- 
neto, showing the armature positions and 
the gearing on one side and the distributor 
and timer on the other side, the latter be- 
ing of metal and provided with a suitable 
spring and a wire attached to It to give the 
advance or retard. The subjects of the 
magneto valve setting and timing the Igni- 
tion, which are explained, cannot help but 
be made very much clearer by means of 
these unique working models. The 
course la all sent at one time for ten dol- 
lars (flO.DO) compactly packed in a paste- 
board box as shown in the accompanying 
Illustration. 



LOOKOUt MOUNTAIN CLIMB 
The honors of the climb up Lookout 
Mountain on April 22, In both free for-alla, 
went to Bulcks. One event was won by 
Strang in 7 mln, IE 3-5 sees., and the other 
by Chevrolet In 6 mln. 30 2-B seca. Motor 
cycle honors went to Stubbs In both events. 
The summaries follow: 

First Race — MotorcycleB. 81 cubic Inches and 
under—Stubba on Indian, Orat; Oreen on Cur- 
tis, second. Time, 6.B0 2-B. 

Second Race— Motoroyoles. 11 cubic Inches 
and under — Stubbs on Indian, first. 

Third Race— Stock automobiles sailing at 
11,000 or under— George DeWIlt, Bulck, flrst. 

Fourth Race— Stock automobiles, selUnB at 
J2.0O0 or under— Lewis Strang, Bulck, Brat, 

Fifth Bace — Stock automobiles selling at 
t3,000 and under— All entries scratched except 
Lewis Strang In Bulck, and Harry Tuttle 
In Stoddard -Dayton. Tuttle did not llnlsh. 
Strang's time, e.89 4-B, 

Seventh Race— Free- for- all stock cars — 
Lewis Strang, Bulck. flrst; Charles Dufty, 
Thomas, second. Time, 7.15 3-5. 

Eighth Race— Free-for-all- Louis Chevrolet, 
Bulck, Srst; time, S.ao Z-G, Lewis Strang. 
Bulck, secondi time, S-Se 4-B- 



rk cuDlvsl puwle. t 



llsblllry RuD, Hay 3 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE THADE JOURNAL. 



CTCLB AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



CTCLB AND AUTOMOBILE TKADli: JOURNAL. 

A Twentieth Century Camping Trip 



BT CBABLRS B. HATWAXD. 



Hal and myself were campers of old. 
So many aea'sona of Tacatlons Id the woods 
had we to our credit, that we were well 
above the how-to-camp-out stamp of lltera' 
ture and the compendluma of advice on 
the doD'ts and be-sure-to-take-alongs that 
every would-be oommuner with nature at 
ber best feels called upon to flf to, the 
moment It Is decided to abandon the rut 
of the Bummer hotel vacation for something 
le&B formal. We had long since outgrown 
our novitiate, and not only knew ]uBt what 
to take along, but also, of for more impor- 
tance, what to leave behind. To tell the 



to tote along such a load of excess bag- 
gage. Our tenta, cots, cook stove and the 
rest of the well tried-out paraphernalia 
only had a limited factor of portabllit?. 
Once considered the acme of compactness 
— a veritable multum In parvo of Its weight. 
It was roanlfeetly a stumbling block to an 
automobile camping trip. Hal's machine 
was a Locomcblle touring car, but tents 
alone would bave monopolized the tonneau 
and given the car the semblance of a laun- 
dry wagon. 

"Let's eat at hotels" was unanimously 
voted down, its sponsor being quite as em- 



truth, we had for so many 
ourselves and our kit dumped on the shores 
of some lake or mountain stream, there to 
loaf away the ensuing fortnight, that, while 
we were not ready to revert to the piazza 
round of clothes, dances and flirtations, we 
pined for something new. 

We were keen (or an outing, but Just 
what form and how to achieve It was the 
question; at least until Hal suggested 
"What's the matter with roughing It In the 
car? That settled It, and at one fell swoop 
placed us back In the novice class of camp- 
ers, for our Inventory of necessities that 
had seen ao many summers' services re- 
quired the aid of a farm wagon to trans- 
port from the station to our selected desti- 
nation. Even had we Iieen willing to trans- 
form the car Into a truck, we had no desire 



phatic as the rest of us In discarding such 
an unholy suggestion. And then, we need- 
ed the tonneau, tor, the admission must go 
on record, we're married, and the skirted 
halves of both our establishments bad 
always been quite as keen campers, as 
could be wished. What more entertain- 
ing and enjoyable than to be able to cast 
the burden of culinary cares on the shoul- 
ders of mere man for at least two weeks 
out of the flfty-two? There was no get- 
ting round it, we simply had to have the 
tonneau, and no one relished the Idea of 
the grand wash-up and clean clothes trans- 
formation Involved in putting up at hotels. 
With the proviso — on the fair ones' part, 
of course, that mine host's hospitality waa 
only to be resorted to, weather compelling, 
that alternative was definitely abandoned. 



70 



CYCLE) AND ATJTOHOBtLB TRADE JOURNAL. 



We gave ourselves over to the full d&- 
llgbtB □! a typical attack of camping fever, 
devoured every scrap of literature on the 
subject and as feverishly sought tor mora. 
Unfortunately, there waa not a great deal 
to be found that we were not already fa- 
miliar with. Automobile camping had not 
yet become the pet victim of the advice 
writer. Somehow or other, no one seemed 
to have taken an auto camping trip undei 
exactly the conditioiis that we were plan- 
ning for ourselves. We followed up every 
possible trace, besieged our friends and 
eagerly grasped at every clue, but every 
camping trip that had been carried out 



Bhould practice actually cdme anywhere 
near the succesalul carrying out of our 
beautiful theories and calculations. 

But like the strained efforts of most 
would-be campers In this direction, all our 
preliminary schemes and calculations were 
vain. They were swept away by the happy 
discovery that there waa such a thing to 
be bad as special equipment lor an auto 
camping trip. Then we made another dis- 
covery, and our delight at learning the 
existence of auto camping outfits waa not 
wholly untinged with regret. Like the 
manufacturer who works his old fash- 
ioned equipment long after It has become 




k la automobile, so far as we could learn, 
bad been along different lines. Some bad 
as their chief claim to the title, the con- 
Teraion of the car into a bunk wagon, 
others had been real professional camping 
trips in the depths ol the woods with two 
or three cars, one of which served as a bag- 
gage train, and still others— but why go on, 
none of them had any skirts along, while 
most seem to have had the get-some- 
where idea uppermost. They were simply 
travels without the usual conveniences and 
comforts. 

Though disappointed in not finding prec- 
edents, we were not deterred in the slight- 
eat, but made plans to suit the occasion. 
Figured weights, cubic contents and the 
combined carrying capacities Of running 
boards and trunk rack to a point far be- 
yond what the reality would permit, mean- 
while having Inward misgivings as to the 
effect on the puncture and blow-out crop, 



antiquated, we hated to part with our time- 
tried outflt A prairie schooner camp- 
ing trip might have been possible with It. 
but as automobiles were not built that 
way. we reluctantly relegated the greater 
part of it to the scrap heap, and invested. 
After we got through flguring, making lists 
and buying things, the net reault waa 
about as follows: 

Two small tents of special light weight 
material. 

•Pour sleeping bags. 

Two pneumatic beds. 

Four pneumatic pillows. 

Three aluminum pots of assorted sizes 
and of good capacity. 

Two aluminum frying pans. 

One folding aluminum oven. 

'Fishing tackle. 

Two hunters' axes. 

*One compass. 

Three folding baslni. 



OTdJI AND AUTOHOBILBI TBADB JOUBNAIi.' 



71 



Two Voiding back«U. 

Colt df 100 feet of quarter-inch manlla 
rope. 

■KnlveB, forks, spoons, etc. 

Four auto folding chairs vltb backs. 

One folding table. 

Canvaa bag/for provisions. 

Special bags for Holding outfit (water- 
proof). 

Straps for fastening bags' to. running 
boards. 

Items marked thus (*) were from our old 
outflt 

Before making up the grub list, we foot- 
ed up weights, and to our amazement found 
we had come slightly under the hundred 
pound mark. As we would be within strik- 
ing distance of supplies, particularly during 
the first part of the trip, the matter of the 
provender to be laid in before tbe start 
was not a serious one. The question of 
where to go was settled out of hand. Tbe 
Adirondacks had always been beyond us 
Informer years but now we could realize 
that ambition. ' Just where no longer both- 
ered us, for we were going to cruise quite 
as much as camp. 

A bright, warm morning in July saw us 



detallB, particularly over such & well-beat 
en track? Noon found us a good Sftr 
miles from home, for we respected speed 
lawsr meanwhile' keeping an eye out for in- 
nocuous looking stretches that might har- 
bor'a'lurklng " corns tubble."' as well as the 
temptation to ' "let ber out some." ' The 
heavy hand of the law, aa represented by 
the uniform ohe-sldednesH of cross roads 
justice, aid not Intervene to mar our pleas- 
ure or reduce our grub fund. When grow- 
ing hunger- took the keen- edge oft tbe 
pleasure of driving, we halted for a con- 
sultation, reganled the carefully packed 
cooking kit on the running boards and de- 
cided to postpone ItE baptism. Finally, we 
compromised on a roadside lunch and 
drove on until we found a vIllaRe store 
whose stock provided the wherewithal af- 
ter the customary exchange of values had 
been effected. Then on to the first likely 
spot we came to. 

Approaching twilight found ua close to 
ninety miles on our way and then came tbe 
all Important selection of our first night's 
stop. Farm houses and hamlets were of 
far too frequent occurrence to insure that 
of privacy that is the camper's 



all packed and ready, the car tuned up to 
the last notch of touring pitch, every spare 
we could think of In the tool kit, and a 
trunk full of old clothes on the rack. The 
camping outflt was snugly stowed In Its 
bags and lashed to tbe running boards 
with any overflow on top of tbe trunk in 
the rear. With a parting roar from the 
open exhaust, we were off. bound up the 
Hudson to wherever evening should bap- 
pen to find OB, But wliy indulge in touring 



chief delight. 80 we kept on through Hud- 
son vainly looking for an appropriate site, 
until Bessie— that's Hal's far better half- 
suggested that our only hope was In one 
of the numerous side roads. We turned 
up the first one that looked promising and 
a stretch of woods raised hopes that were 
soon fullllled by finding a small stream. 
By a little skillful manoeuverlng, tbe car 
was piloted off the road and Into Che woods 
on what had evidently once been a logging 



72 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



way. ThIngB were sotten at with a will 
and in less that an hour, tenta were up, 
beds down, the fair part or the crew as- 
suming that part of the reBponsiblllty, and 
eating preparations were well under way. 
Canned soup, hot out of its original con- 
tainers, huge slabs of bread, broiled steak 
that hadn't caught fire more times than 
It could be put out, washed down with a 
liberal supply ot what passed current as 



"Ter hin put up at the house for the 
nlgbt, it jet don't if yer don't want to get 
on further." put an end to the awkward 
silence and brought us to our senses. 
There stood a hospitable up-State tanner 
trying to help us out of what looked like 
an uncomfortable situation 'to him. And 
there was the house, hardly three hundred 
yards away and plainly visible through 
the treea. Up to then, we hadn't even 



coSee and bore numerous traces ot its 
legitimacy In the shape of grounds, com- 
pleted the more substantial portions of the 
flrat evening attempt at Inward relief. To 
top It off. Lou sprung a surprise in the 
shape of a home made cake, whose care- 
ful packing had survived the pounding Of 
the endless tbank-you-ma'ams to be found 
in any ninety-mile stretch of American 
road. The can opener — Indispensable tool 
of the camper — helped provide an accept- 
able accompaniment, and when the empty 
receptacle had been Hung out to repose 
by its mates that had supplied the first 
course, and the last chocolate crumbs had 
been removed from sticky, dusty faces 
with the poor man's napkin, we were a 
well satlsBed but tired quartette. A loll in 
front ot the Are until the bottoms ot the 
pipes were reached, then Ha] and myself 
undertook to shake down for the night 
"Thar's a hotel up the road a bit," 
It the voice had dropped from Heaven It 
could not have precipitated worse confu- 
sion. The girls ran for cover In the tent, 
Hal grabbed the aie, and I looked quickly 
to see what was between me and the re- 
volver under tbe cushions ot tbe front aeat 
of the car. 



suspected the presence of such a thing 
within a radius ot many miles. The spot 
was so thickly wooded and apparently out 
of tbe way that both Lou and Bessie had 
been regaling ua with "This Is the forest 
primeval." 

It seems we were on our kindly disposed 
visitor's land, and seeing our Are, he bad 
suspected the presence of trampe. which 
accounted for the shotgun he carried. We 
thanked him as best we could, explained 
our desire to avoid anything that savored 
of the Interior of a bouse as long as the 
weather favored us and succeeded In get- 
ting him to accept a ctgar and a seat be- 
fore the Are. 

"We wouldn't hev enny spite laid up 
agen you fellers and your machines. If 
some ot yer wouldn't be so unreasonable in 
crowdln' a team often tbe road, when we're 
haulln' loads." 

"Why, Lem HIgglns— that's— my b^othe^ 
In-law, he lives down the road here a piece, 
was forced Into tbe ditch two daya ago 
Just above here by one of them big ma- 
chines like your'n there, a'comlng round 
the comer, full twenty miles an honr, and 
without a bit o' wamin'. Had two cords o' 
hickory and oak on, Lem did. and bad to 



CTCLB AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



73 



dump every bit and load her up agen, In 
order to get them horses of hls'n outea the 
ditch. Lem's sure got It In fer you fellers. 
His mad'B up to the billn' plot." 

This and a great deal more to the same 
effect that our rural friend volunteered 
shed conaiderable llgbt upon the manner In 
wblch the sloB of the tnconslderate and 
reckless few made the farmer look upon 
the automoblUst as an arrogant usurper ol 
the blgbway. We listened attentively and 
could only deplore the lact that the ar- 
raignment was all too true. With the end 
of the cigar, he assured us we were aafe 
from molestation where we were and bade 
us good night, promising to send one ot 
his boys over with some fresh milk and 
eggs In the morning. 

"Seven o'clock," yawned Hal, next morn- 
ing, planting a well-directed kick on my 
anatomy that brought me back to eartA. 
"No signs yet from the 'budwar*' on the 
next alley," be added. Jerking hla thumb In 
the direction of the girl's tent. 

"Oh, to tbe devil with keeping to any 
schedule,'' I grumbled, sleepily, meanwhile 
slowly extracting my lower half from the 



of milk and a small basket of eggs on the 
ground outside, as we lazily put on our 
shoes. 

"Pleas retorn the pitsher," read Hal slow- 
ly from a scrap of can label of our repast 
of the evening before, held down by an egg 
m the basket. 

"We sure will, hoping there'll be more 
good Samaritans who'll leave our breakfast 
on the dumbwaiter without blowing tbe 
whistle. 

"A-a-all bands," rendered In the long 
drawn out rolling bass ot an ex-navy 
bosun's mate by yoUrs truly, brought fortb 
giggles from the "budwar" that showed we 
were not the only ones alive about there, 
and soon there sallied forth the two spick 
and span ones, neat and dapper, with hair 
Immaculately colllured, showing how much 
more loath woman Is to cast aside tbe 
habits of civilization on slight provocation 
than mere man, for neither of ub had as 
yet made the acquaintance of the comb or 
wash basin. 

After breakfast, we made tblnga ship- 
shape for the day'a run and drove over to 
the farmhouse, where we made a vain at- 



sleeplng bag. "That's me," assented Hal, 
and In a breath, onr carefully studied out 
plans to be on the road by seven every 
morning and to cover at least 90 to 100 
miles a day, were forthwith swept off the 
slate. Moral, don't make any hard and fast 
rules for a loafing trip. 

"There's our breakfast. Been waiting 
for us to turn out and eat It, all according 
to contract," said Hal, pointing to a pitcher 



tempt to pay for our breakfast suppllefc, 
either in coin or kind. Finally, our visitor 
of the night before compromised by letting 
the youngest of the boys ride with us as 
far aa he felt like walking back. The temp- 
tation to be seen by his fellows in that 
point of vantage on the foot board was too 
great for bim and he stayed with us right 
into the village. 
A couple of hours' leisurely driving. 



74 



OrOLB AMD AUTOMOBtLB TRADI JOtTBHiLL 



lengthened out somewliat b7 the neoeMlty 
of replacing the right rear tube, brought 
us into Albany about one o'clock, and the 
hotels having the "ayes" on a vote on the 
lunch question, we left them at the Ten 
Eyck — two women naturally constitute a 
majority — and drove to the nearest garage 
to see if we could not get a quidk repair 
job that would again put the punctured 
tube on the emergency list for future con- 
tingencies. 

The second night found us about midway 
between Schenectady, and Syracuse and 
though progress had been far slower than 
originally planned, we were quite content. 
We were again fortunate in locating well 
and were not disturbed this time, nor did 
any Samaritan, disguised as a farm boy, 
come looking for us with a milk delivery 
wagon, so we used the condensed article, 
though in the midst of one of the world's 
richest dairy districts. Then came the 
problem of stowing the opened can of con- 
densed milk, which we had to solve tem- 
porarily by leaving it behind. After con- 
siderable search among the Syracuse 
stores, we were able to provide against fu- 
ture inability in this direction by investing 
in a couple of friction top tins. Hal thought 
we might want to keep perishable stuff at 
times and further added to our outfit by be- 
coming the owner of a refrigerator basket. 

The trip to Utica was uneventful, except 
where punctuated by the necessity of pick- 
ing our way over stretches under construc- 
tion or of making detours to avoid them 
altogether, in spite of which we averaged 
fair time. A short stop in Utica in the late 
afternoon, to replenish the larder and then 
we were finally headed toward our goal — 
the Adirondack region. It was getting to- 
ward striking time, but we kept on in the 
hope of finding a stopping place that was 
up to the ideal we had formed from our 
two nights' experience. Finally, approach- 
ing darkness made a compromise impera- 
tive and we rolled off into a field at the 
edpr of a strip of woods, there being suf- 
ficient indications of a water supply near 
at hand. 

If there is one job about a camp that is 
more irksome than another, it is being 
compelled to tote for some distance every 
drop of water needed. It is something that 
everyone is more than willing to pass on 
to the next man, and we always considered 
a water supply the most essential require- 
ment of a camping site. Darkness found 
us not more than half way settled for the 
night and we rolled the car into position 
about 25 feet from our scene of operations, 
and lit the headlights. Viewed from the 
car itself, the illumination was ideal, but 
the acetylene lights made an uncomfort- 
able glare to move about and work in, and 
we were half blinded during the few min- 
utes we endured it. Sitting down or stoop- 
ing brought us directly in the range of the 
lights and a few trials at meeting those 
white hot eyes and then peering into the 



darknett made ui almoat hel^leM. the 
experiment of draping a handkerohief orer 
the glass made a decided improvement, and 
a hand towel proved even better. We then 
rolled the car much closer and found we 
had an ideal means of illumination. It 
was brought into service every night that 
we needed more than lanterns could phi- 
vide in the way of light during the re- 
mainder of the trip. Lou suggested that 
one be left going all night as a means of 
protection, but we had long ago learned 
that the camper's best safeguard lies in 
concealment and that lights only serve to 
attract unwelcome visitors, so we saved 
carbide and insured freedom from molesta- 
tion by voting the suggestion down. We 
were by no means far enough away from 
the "hobo belt" to be entirely free from 
apprehension of a visit from some of these 
gentry and always picked our camping 
spots accordingly. 

It is marvellous how soon one becomes 
accustomed to consuming three times his 
normal amount of breakfast with a relish 
unknown to the workaday routine. The 
third morning saw us quite settled in the 
way of making and breaking camp and the 
rule of a place for everything made the 
stowage of the new outfit In its canvas 
bags the work of a very short time. But 
the next morning held an awakening for 
us in more senses than one. We had 
broken y^amp and started up the road that 
brought'' us there the night before, when 
we had to slow up and turn out to let a 
car pass going the other way. 

"Where 'you bound for, brother?" inquir- 
ed its lone occupant, in that kindly fashion 
that makes probing into one's affairs by a 
stranger almost welcome. We unfolded 
oUr plans while he quizzically took in all 
the details of our machine and outfit. 



I 



(( 



'Adirondacks, hey? Well, I kind o' hate 
to discourage you, but I think you're on the 
wrong track. There has been one or two 
that got through this way last year, but 
they're not hankering much to try it over 
again, and you'll find the longest way 
round the shortest way of getting there. 
Come from the city, I suppose," to which 
we nodded assent amusedly. New York 
is "the city" to most upstaters. 

"Ton certainly came some past, because 
you ought to have turned off at Amsterdam 
or Fonda to get up into the mountains," 
a piece of information, which though very 
welcome, was no little disappointment. 
"Good you didn't get much further, as you 
certainly would have got into a peck of 
trouble up above here," after delivering 
which piece of parting cheer, he got around 
us and went on, while we manoeuvered to 
get the car headed in the same direction. 
It was not reassuring to find that all our 
carefully mapped out plans had gone awry, 
putting us a whole day beyond where we 
should have turned north, but we made the 
best of it and tried to make up for lost 
time by making a little speed on the back 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAIu 



75 



track. In Utlca, we took on a stock of 
emergency eatables so as not to waste any 
time stopping for lunch, but the morning 
was well advanced so that the best we 
could do was to make Fonda in the late 
afternoon, and to avoid any similar breaks, 
we stopped at the local garage and Jotted 
down detailed directions. After making 
a few miles further we went into camp 
for the night. An early start the next day 
brought us to Indian Lake in ample time 
for lunch preparations, the road passing 
around its southerly end and up along the 
west bank. The scenery and the innumer- 
able ideal sites for settling down that 
presented themselves, brought the touring 
part of the trip temporarily to a close. 
Here we loafed and fished away the after- 
noon and did the same with the following 
three or four days, an occasional side trip 
helping pass the time, but on the whole 
taking things philosophically, as the ex- 
perienced camper should, nevertheless the 
necessity of being home again in a few 
days could not be lost sight of, though 
the longing to get a canoe and stay on the 
lake shore another week kept growing 
stronger upon us. 

The next morning we broke camp and 
leisurely drove northward along Indian 
Lake, past Blue Mountain Lake and the 
end of Long Lake, then doubling back on 
a loop of road that brought us out at Pot- 
tersville, lying at the southerly end of 
Schroon Lake. This was the parting of 
the ways, for northward along Schroon lay 
the road to Lake Placid and the Saranac 
Lake region, that we had fondly hoped to 
reach within little more than a day's drive 
from Utica on our original route. Much as 
we would have liked it, the pleasure had 
to be foregone, as our leisurely pace of the 
first part of the trip and the two days lost 
made a return imperative. We compro- 
mised by driving northward the length of 
Schroon Lake, and then regretfully headed 
south again, vainly imagining the many 



delightful mysteries that the road beyond 
must hold. Back through Pottersville, 
Chesterton, Warrensburg and Lake George 
to Glens Falls, where we arrived Just in 
time to escape a heavy storm, which made 
us try the hospitality of the local hotel 
for the first time on the trip. Much as we 
had scorned the idea at the start, we 
found that in the ability to make stopping 
places suit weather conditions lay one of 
the chief beauties of an auto camping trip 
and we enjoyed the temporary return to 
civilization to the full. Then came the 
question of whether to finish the trip the 
next day by driving right through to New 
York without a stop, arriving home Satur- 
day night, instead of Sunday afternoon, as 
originally planned, or of taking it leisurely 
and getting there the next day. 

"Why not stop over again at our first 
night's camp?" from Lou, ably seconded by 
the observation on Bessie's part "that a 
Sunday in town, right after this, would be 
impossible," settled the matter, the fair 
ones again constituting an overwhelming 
majority. So we took things easy the next 
day, spending some time in driving around 
Saratoga Springs, then on to Troy and then 
down to the site of our first stop, with the 
preliminary precaution this time, however, 
of informing the farmer of our presence, 
quite as much for the supply of edibles 
thus obtainable as to insure against being 
taken for tramps, though we insisted on 
payment in advance, to which no objection 
was raised. But in view of our former 
treatment and the extremely reasonable 
tariff on this occasion, we unanimously 
voted our farmer friend a laurel wreath — 
mentally, of course, for his hospitable atti- 
tude. 

Four o'clock the next day saw us hoibe 
again, more than satisfied with our experi- 
ment and fully resolved to repeat it at t^ie 
very next opportunity, our experiences pro- 
viding an inexhaustible fund of conversa- 
tion and making us universally envied by 
our friends. 



Roughing It a la Motor 

BT MONTGOMERY HALLOWELL. 



Are you one of those blase old motor- 
ists? Have you used up every charming 
stretch of road within a week-end radius 
of your town? Have you exhausted all the 
thrills that the first two or three years of 
automobile ownership kept shooting into 
your system? Are you in that Just-wait- 
ing mood — wondering whether the next 
thing to interest you will be anything short 
of an air ship? 

Then get happy for here's a new one. 
Here's a trick that will revive every old 
Joy of your early days of motoring. Here's 
a chance to remodel, revamp and refurnish 
throughout every one of those merry old, 
nearly forgotten thrills. 

"Roughing it"— that's the answer. This 



story wouldn't do at all if it hadn't really 
happened. So here it goes with nam^s, 
dates and places. Seven of us, Majors Fos- 
ter, Page, Fitch, Ayres, Chalmers, Dowling 
and myself were at luncheon. The day was 
the first Friday in December, last Decem- 
ber — 1908, to be exact. And the place, since 
you insist, was the Hoffman House. 

I don't know how it started, and any- 
how, it makes no difference, but before the 
coffee got to us we had begun to tell hunt- 
ing yarns. And every man in the party 
began to feel that crazy longing that no 
city-bound, asphalt- weary, business-burden- 
ed working man ought to feel until vaca- 
tion time — that longing for the woods and 
the wild things. 



7G 



CYCIM AND AUTOMOBILE TKADE JOURNAL. 



Motor fiends ererr one ot ns — we besan 
to tingle and tbrill with tbat riotous, blood 
stirring "call of the wild" that means gnna 
and dogs and camp Area. You know — or II 
;ou don't, I'm son? for you, that feeling 
has no more to do with motor cars than a 
rabbit. That fs It neTer bad, up to that 
time, for any of us. 

But It does now. That's the story. The 
Major was the Inspired human being who 
sprung the Idea, "Getting there and get- 
ttnE back Is what kills bunting for ua 
chaps." Page had Just said "Here It U 
Friday noon. From now till Monday morn- 
ing we could all be out shooting except 
for one thing— tbere wouldn't be any shoot- 
ing. It would be all traveling — out and 
back again." 

The Major carefully put away what was 
left of his coffee and as carefully set down 
the cap. He didn't seem to have a thing 
on his mind. "Well," be said, "yon know," 
just as If It were notblng at all, "we might 
do the trick with a car." What the rest pf 
us said t don't know. Anyhow It makes no 
difference. Whatever it was we all said 
it at once. 

The next five minutes developed a lot 
of things. The Major knew a place some- 
where back In Labewood where, by start- 
ing that night and allowing six hours for 



"Well sleep to-night," said the Major, "at 
a little place I know, about a hundred and 
tlfty miles from here. I'll 'phone tor mid- 
night lunch and beds tor nine, also for a 
guide and dogs. I hope those cars are all 
right. Page. They'll need to be. And 
Fitcb, be sure to have a couple of axes. 
We may have to chop down some trees to 
get the cars through." 

This sounded good to me — only I was 
glad they weren't my cars. 

In two cars, loaded to the gunwales with 
a marvelous outfit, supplied by FItcb, that 
seemed to be made and packed so as to go 
Just right on every available carrying space 
outside the cars, ten of us left Columbus 
Circle at eight o'clock. 

At one o'clock we were at the little hotel, 
an hour beyond Lakewood. I'd like to tell 
about the fus of that run. But It was Just 
a case of good roads, good cars, beautiful 
night and speed. Just a regular motor ride 
but tblB Isn't that kind of a story. 

Next morning the real fun started. With 
Captain Jeaks, our guide In the leading 
car, It took those blessed cars Just fifteen 
minutes to land us In the very heart of 
the bird country. Over deep sandy roads 
and through timber — the cars never turned 
a hair. To bave walked It would have tak- 



sleep, we could be on the birds by seven 
thirty the next morning. Fitch suggest- 
ed making it a camping trip and offered 
to supply a complete auto camping equip- 
ments from tentH, air mattresses, sleeping 
bags and folding stove down to tea spoons 
with food and every other accessory, all to be 
so completely folded and stowed as to leave 
all seats free to carry us with three guests 
and a guide. Page came to the front with 
a Chalmers "Forty" and a Chalmers-Detroit 
"Thirty." 



en over an hour. Who says that motoring 
Isn't the real way for busy folks to go a 
hunting? We had only two days and tbe 
cars were saving every minute for us for 

Then came another novelty to some of 
ua— particularly the guide. To see the 
Major and Fitch and Dowling transform 
tbe rolls of plunder that had been strapped 
to tbe running boards into a complete 
camp In less than ten minutes was better 
than any fire drill I ever saw. Nothing 



CTCLB AND AUTOMOBILE THADD JOUBNAU 



77 



oeeded, to lire, move and haTe your be- 
ing out of doors was mlselng- and every- 
thlng was made to flt Into eveiythlng else 
so that not an Inch of apace was lost In 
packing. By the time the rest ol as had 
guns out of gun cases and had completed 
plane tor ehootlng, the camp was ready, 

I started out to tell about "roughing It" 
and not about the sbooting Itself; but rigbt 
here I want to remark that, wheo It comes 



For a couple of miles we Just wound 
arouDd, picking our way through the woods 
with no road In sight Talk about walking 
on eggs. That's nothing. Just try a ride 
in an expeDsive car through the trackless 
woods with an eight-Inch ball of leares 
hiding the holes and stumps. 

Once the "Forty," which waa In the lead, 
got tight up against It, and sure enough, 
the Major's prediction about the axes prov- 



to birds, that strip of Jersey woods Is good 
enough for me. When we got back to camp 
at noon not one of us had had leas than a 
dozen shots. 

And that noon-day meat. How Broadway 
would have stared at the way it disap- 
peared. 

Another lightning transformation act that 
would make a bit at Hammersteln's waa 
getting every part and parcel of that 
camping outfit on the cars Inside of fifteen 
minutes and we were oS lor another kind 
of shooting. "I guess this is bad" said 
Page ."Two kinds of shooting the same 
day. Major I would sooner be the father 
of this new idea of yours thau the winner 
of the Vanderbllt cup." 

Our new deatluatlon was to be a certain 
inlet the Captain knew oF on Barnegat Bay 
where he guaranteed ue some good salt 
water duck shooting. By road, It was a 
two hour run. But the Captain knew of 
some short cuts that would save an hour. 
Page said he was game (o try anything 
with the cars but swimming; so we struck 
out for a short way. That hour was worth 
saving, and besides wasn't there a chance 
of some new motoring sensations? 

We didn't save all of the hoar but we 
got the seneatlone. 



ed right. Before the car could make a 
get-away, the Captain had to chop down a 
couple of six-Inch trees. 

At the edge of the woods we struck a 
ploughed field and we began to wish the 
Captain had given us plans and specifica- 
tions of bis boasted "short cuts." How- 
ever, the cars didn't seem to mind and fin- 
ally we came out on a road. It waa a wel- 
come sight, too. even It tt was deep Band. 

After a fairly stiff climb of about a mile. 
we struck the decline leading down to the 
beach and, after another couple of miles 
through the woods, we halted at a spot that 
the Captain had chosen for our camp-slgbt 
for the night. 

For a couple of miles we were strung 
out along the edges and Indentations of 
the little bay. And pretty soon the guoi 
began to "Bang," "Bang." all over the 
place. The birds were coming In thick. 
Everybody was busy and the dogs were be- 
side themselves. 

We had Invented a way to crowd a 
month's vacation into forty-eight hours; but 
even we couldn't keep it from getting dark 
and soon the fun had to stop. But after 
all, which ia the more fun — the shooting or 
the pipe and the talk and the loaf aronnd 
the camp fire after the day's sport is doneT 



78 CTCLB AND AnTOHOBILB TRADE JOURNAL. 

We found the Bbore too cold, and agBln l folding grate with c&avsa bag m iba. 

we thanked out luckj atara for the light- J "ueW^i^'itMiB sw ib^ 

nlng-like camp equipment and the cars, a folding aluminum lanterni'.'.''''.V.V. 7 oiS! 

For in less than forty miDUtee we had 4 folding wash basins 7 ois. 

picked up our trapo and established our- I (oliJJng pain .... g oia. 

aelvea again three mllea back in the woods ^^r"""M^':.."°. *i»?crBtionary 

tinder a protecting hlU. 2 flahlnK rods with reeis, iinas, hooks. 

How good that bunter'a eupper was! Aud "i". etc- discretionary 

how unbelievable It aeemed as we sat f foiiet tent ^t l5" 

around the flre in the evening, to think z wall i^cikoix' '.'.'.', .'.'.'.'.'.','.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 1% ibe." 

that the evening before we had been In the 1 No. 2 retrigerator basket 9 lbs. 

Bnd ua back in our clviliied togs, on as- Qf, g^^jj ^^ ™ TrTT... 7 ou. 

phalt again! How we alept that night! 1 No, 1 medicine case !...!.!. .SI ossi 

How we hated to crawl out ot the warm 1 hypodermic syringe 3 om. 

Bleeping bags Sunday morning— -even to AH of the above articles were packed in 

eat another of those wonderful out of door brown waterproof bags, with bandies on 



meals! And how we hated to break camp. 
But we knew we could do It again — and 
then again. That was the compensating 
thought. For we had discovered and dem- 
onstrated a new Idea — the tabloid outing 
Tor busy sportamen. 

Below la a Hat of the atutt Fitch turniah- 
ed, barring the guns. It is every conceiv- 
able thing needed for eleven men for three 
full days, and all packed to leave room to 
spare on the cars. The total weight, in- 
cluding the 106 pounds of food, waa 203 
pounds, the total cost fl36.00. 

Article. Weight. 

2 automohllo tenia 1S14 [bs. 

Z doz. 12-ln. Bleel tent pins (per doz.) . . 4^i lbs. 

2 tubular steel telescopic tent poEea 3^ lbs. 

S Fitch sleeping bags, stjlo "A.- 21 lbs. 

R No. 1 atr beds 9 Iba, 

Z three-quarter axes and sheaths 3M lbs. 

1 No, 8 aluminum cooking outfit for 8 
ppople In lealherold case with all 
HcceBBorleB 1& lbs. 

1 large Blumlnum. folding baker, with 
pan. bread board, canvas case and 
two broilers 8 lbs. 



bottom and side. In addition, foods, 1 
per the food list below for eight peop 
for one week, were carried packed 
brown waterproof 9-tDch bags: 

Plour - ■■ 

Bouillon capsules ... 
I-eirtlls 

R baking powder ,'., 

Pork .,'.",'.'.'.','.'.'.'.'.".' .'i 

Shredded codtlsh 

Peerless evaporated r 

Rice 

Julienne 

Soup Ublets WEI 

Evaporated apples Z " 

Evaporated apricots I 

Salt . 
Chocol 
Tea 

Dried potatoes . 
Shelled nuts .., 

Dried eggs 

Dried onlona H ' 



CYCtB AND AtTOHOBnj} TRADB JOtTRNAL. 



My Hunting Trip in the Maine Woods 



On September 30, 190S, H. J. Tenney and 
myself left Lowell In my Pope-Hartford 
roadster and drove, the flrot day, to Ban- 
gor, a distance of 217 miles. The next day 
we drove to Calais, Maine, a distance of 
1G7 miles. Tben we fitted up tor ttte woods 
and took on two friends and a guide, mak- 
ing five la the car, which was only adapted 
for four, and was beavlly loaded at ttaat. 
But we fitted an extra seat on the running 

For camping we carried a large folding 
tent, two axee and a good supply of cooking 
utensils, all of tbese, with pillows, were 
strapped on over the hood of the car, Inci- 
dentally showing our confidence that we 
would not have engine trouble. We built 
a special box on the rear for our food, as 
we had to carry enough to last five days. 

Leaving Calais, we rode to Princeton, 
24 miles over bad roads. Tben we took 
a back road for four miles. We tben took 
a very bad logging road to Tomab Lake, 
a distance of 14 miles. It was the first 
automobile that had ever been through 
that section. People at the last house told 
ns we never could get through, as there 
had been bad washouts that bad taken 
bridges away and torn up the road, but In 
Bpite of this news we started In just before 
dark, having been delayed by a bad blow- 
out of one of the Urea. We got through 
all right about midnight, after fording two 
streams by building several rods of cordu- 
roy road, as the banks were very steep. 
One of the streams had to be forded a 
quarter of a mile below where the bridge 
formerly was. 

Just before reacbtng the camping place 



we repaired a weak bridge, but just as the 
car was almost across, the bridge broke 
and the rear wheels went down through 
and left the machine balanced in such 
a way that the five of us were able to lift 
tbe rear end out and push It over. 

We passed .tbrougb an Indian reserva- 
tion and had lots of fun with tbe Indiana 
who had never seen an automobile before. 
When we first struck their little camp, 
many at the braves ran to meet ua am] 
stood Id silent awe contemplating the won- 
derful contrivance which had chugged 
through the woods with such a heavy toad. 
They did not understand how It worked, 
but Id wonder gradually gathered around 
to examine It. 

Then I started the motor with a series 
of explosions that made every mother's 
son of them run to cover. Very few of 
them came back. They hid In the brush' 
and some of them watched tbe machine 
from a distance. The women were fright- 
ened, fearing that it was some new kind 
of a gun with which to shoot deer. One 
old Indian guide was Immensely pleased 
when we showed him how to run tbe car, 
although his fears returned when he saw 
tbe smoke from the exhaust 

We camped near Tomab Lake and built 
a garage out of boughs of trees. The ma- 
chine was left there until we were ready 
to return. We hunted for deer In the early 
morning, and then shot partridge until 
noon. They were very plentiful and Sew 
all about us. I got my first deer one 
morning after a 14-ml1e walk, and when 
we came back we loaded It upon the car. 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE! JOURNAL. 

A North Dakota Duck Hunt 



One morniDg last October my friend 
Jobn O. and I, having arranged a duck hunt 
before hand, started about nine o'clock tar 
Round Lake, wblcb has an area of 
about seven square miles and la one of the 
good shooting spots of vhlch this State 
has many. 

Now In most duck bunting stories too 
run across, the hunters get out of a warm 
bed and hike to the points before sunrise 
BO as to catch the restive duck with only 
one eye open, but that Is a little too much 
a la Roosevelt (bless bis heart) for youra 
tmlr. 



We had not long to wait for our fun to 
begin, as off to the south of us on the open 
water were countless thousands of dncka 
and geese, trenches of which were constant- 
ly on the move. The first flock that swung 
to our decoys was a bunch of Hallards, 
and they paid toll to the extent of three. 
(Ob! by the way, we don't use pump guns.) 
Then a pair of Canvas-backs tried It and 
they liked our company so well both stay- 
ed with us. 

As a matter of tact we put in more time 
picking up our ducks (on account of the 
wind) than In shooting tbem. 



Well, to begin with our equipment, flrat 
and foremost, we had to get there and also 
get our boat there. The motive power 
was amply supplied by my Reliable 
Dayton car, to the bind axle of which 
was fastened with a heavy strap the 
tongue of our two-wheeled boat cart The 
boat Is a sixteen footer, partly decked 
over, built by myself from plans supplied 
by a well known company of Bay City, 
Mich. The above boat and cart with Its 
load and decoys, shellB. oars and other duf' 
fle (not forgetting the "bait") will weigh 
about three hundred pounds and as the 
wheels of the cart will track about twslve 
feet behind the car: it should take a ma- 
chine with a ward politician's pull to handle 
the load, but my little car did the trick 
on high gear with something to spare. We 
had some heavy sand roads to travel, but 
ten o'clock found us In a clump of rushes 
with our decoys riding the water In One 
shape. 



Along about the middle of the afternoon, 
John said, pointing to the pile of ducks, "Say 
Doc, don't you think we had better count 
bills and noses?" To which 1 agreed and 
a careful tally showed forty-seven, all eith- 
er Canvas-backs or Mallards and we real- 
ized that our shoot tor the day was nearly 
over, as we were within three of the limit. 

The end came quickly as a few mlnutea 
later a pair of Canvas-backs tried to beat 
out two loads of number five, but unfortu- 
nately for them, were overtaken In the at' 
tempt; then a lone green head assayed the 
trick but John fooled him with his Parker. 
We picked up our decoys and struck out 
for the shore where our "Auto-mow -hay" 
was standing quietly (which I may say the 
horses don't always do when one leaves 
them securely? tied). 

Now If ne had a load coming down, we 
certainly had a good one to pull home with 
the ducks In the boat, but the little car de- 
livered the goods. 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILB TRADE JOURNAL. 



81 



Suggestions for Vacation Motoring 



BT VICTOR 

The Automobile as a Means of Transporta- 
tion on Hunting, Fishing and 
Camping Trips 

Time was, in the halcyon days when own- 
ership of a motor vehicle was evidence on 
the face of it of great wealth or great ex- 
travagance, that for a car merely to run 
was considered enough of a triumph over 
the perversity of things to satisfy ali pos- 
sible aspirations of the most ambitious. But 
in these more degenerate times — when the 
automobile is becoming more and more the 
common conveyance of plain ordinary peo- 
ple, who insist not only that it. operate but 
that it operate on coldly-calculated terms of 
businesslike economy and reliability — all 
manner of new utilities and applications 
are sought and secured. 

By no means the least of these is the 
use of the automobile to cheapen and make 
comfortable the summer outings with which 



LOUGHBED. 

t- 

all reasonable contingencies, and for the 
secure conveyance of the various impedi- 
menta. 

Since the peculiar requirements for dif- 
ferent trips and different individuals must 
in the nature of things vary through an im- 
mense range, it is possible in an article of 
this scope to suggest only a general out* 
line of the plans to be made and the 
points to be regarded, rather than to at- 
tempt complete and detailed directions foi^ 
the outfitting and conduct of motor expedi- 
tions. Certain main considerations are, 
however, essential. 

To begin with, any sort of a motor out- 
ing will fall into one or another of two 
classes — cross-country journeys in which 
there is continual travel with new camps 
each night, and jaunts in which some ob- 
jective point is quickly reached, a camp 
established, and this made the center of a 
series of local runs. Obviously, in the first 




the round of business and household cares 
is annually intermitted, to the benefit of 
both brain and body for thousands of 
American families. 

A motor outing may or may not involve 
"roughing it," about as the participants 
choose, though, of course, the character of 
the country it is intended to traverse will be 
a factor impossible to disregard. If the 
jaunt is made in an open car, away from 
or disregardfnl of hotel facilities and with- 
out elaborate equipment, there is certain 
to be some work and some discomforts. 
On the other hand, if every luxury avail- 
able is to be provided, there are the closed- 
body types of machines with all the com- 
forts of a pullman, including berths, elec- 
tric lights, heating arrangements, cooking 
facilities, toilet conveniences, etc. For 
most people, however, the happiest medium 
will be found in such an outfit as involves 
neither a specially-built car nor especially 
complex and expensive equipment. Inci- 
dentally.^ not the least pleasurable feature 
of the outing will be found in the scheming 
and contriving necessary to provide against 



case light equipment suitable for hurried 
and emergency use will prove most con- 
venient, while in the second case the prob- 
lem becomes more a matter of moving a 
considerable quantity of material with 
which to set up open-air "housekeeping" at 
the selected spot. 

PROVIDING AGAINST CAR TROUBLES. 

A first essential is proper provision for 
the operation and maintenance of the car. 
Nothing is more unpleasant than to have 
the legitimate hardships of an outing add- 
ed to by car difficulties that could have 
been easily avoided by the exercise of a 
little foresight and care. If the route 
selected passes through territory in which 
the population is very small, or in which 
for other reasons there is litle catering to 
motor travel, common prudence will dic- 
tate a more complete equipment than 
otherwise would be necessary. Thus, in 
the arid regions of the west — a country 
of wonderful interest and easily travers- 
able by modern automobiles — one must 
transport extra supplies of gasoline, water, 



CTCLB AND AUTOHOBILn TRADB JOURNAL. 



and oil, tlteee necesBarlea not being teadilr 
obtainable ea route, nor carried in Buffl- 
cleot quantities In tbe normal tanks ol most 
machltiea. Aleo, In any locality, magneto 
Ignition, though not Inexpensive to Instal, 
affords a posftlve-enougli emancipation 
from battery troubles to be well worth ee- 
curlng. A liberal allowance, too. In tbe 
way of spare tire caslngB and tubes, to- 
gether with a repair kit and antl-skld de- 
vices, provides assurance tbat tire difficul- 
ties will not become as serious a bugaboo 
as otberwlse is likely to prove the case. 
A full kit of tools Is always advisable, as 
also are some spare pflrts — varying In quan- 
tity with the experience of the driver and 
expected remoteness from fresh supplies. 
Waste In some quantity, though bulky,. 




weighs little and can be easily carried, be- 
ing convenient to All corners in packing 
besides eervlng its various purposes of car 
cleanlinesB. The women of the party will 
quickly learn that a handful of waste makes 
a convenient dishrag. Wire, even ordin- 
ary bale wire, is a not-to-be-despised ad- 
junct. Its use permits repairs not possible 
without its aid, not to mention its general 
usefulness about a camp. Of especial Im- 
portance for traveling in rough country re- 
mote from chances of assistance Is a stout 
rope and a couple of tackle blocks, of such 
sort that with their aid the combined ef- 
forts of the party will suffice to pull the car 
out of any sort of ditch or mudhole Into 
which It may be inadvertently driven. 



Some kind of portable housing is likely 
to be useful In almost any locality, no mat- 
ter what the season, as a protection from 
eun if not from rain. For any but a per- 
manent camp, it will be found well to have 
designed some protection that will cover 
the car as well as Its occupants, and Inci- 
dentally, utilize the car as a partial substi- 
tute for tent poles. The construction 
sketched in Pig. 1 shows how such a tent 
may bo arranged — one pole fltted over a 
standard provided on the radiator cap and 
one at the rear of the car, being all that 
are necessary. Two rows of stakes will 
hold the ropes aa. while smaller, hooked 
stakes will catch the vertically tailing flaps 
bb. The small sketch A shows how a rope 
ridge pole may be used, thus doing away 
with cumbersome tent poles. Windows of 
very thin celluloid, buttoned In as at cc 
with patent fasteners to avoid Injury ^m 
rolling, will be an Improveoient over plain 
walls. Th« ends of the teat may he left 



open or may be closed with door Hapa. iB 
which case tbe complete canvas will be In 
one piece as at B. Setting up can be 
slightly facilitated and storage capacity 
increased by carrying the tent material 
down to aa, without the vertical walls. 

A scheme somewhat similar to the fore- 
going is shown in Fig. 2, except that Instead 
of poles, wagon bows are used to hold up 
the covering. In the case of an uncovered 
car this Is of advantage In that In an emer- 
gency It can be used as a protection while 
driving. 

In both the foregoing, sleeping bags or 
pneumatic mattresses can be laid as at dd. 
Very comfortable pneumatic mattresses, 
with sleeping bags, pillows and covering 
combined, can he had for about 120, weigh 
only IS pounds, and roll into very email 
compass. For districts in which there are 
Insect pests, a few yards of fine mosquito 
netting.or bee veiling may make all the dif- 
ference between comfort and misery. 



For only two people it la not a matter of 
any great difficulty to remodel a car suffi- 
ciently to provide comfortable sleeping ac- 
commodations. Figs 3 and 4 show Ideas 
that have been tried out and found practi- 
cal, Tbe last method Is the lees expensive 
and can easily be arranged on any runabout 
with flat rear deck. 



Of tbe other fumishingB of a camp, the 
most convenient are etools and tables 
altbo these are not really necessary. The 



=1..^ 




IToS. 
first are to be bought In very light and 
compact folding forms, while there are 
even some of surprising serviceability con- 
structed purely on the pneumatic princi- 
ple. Tables can often be improvised from 
the floor boards or inverted cushions of a 
car, or they may be built from material 
gathered In the neighborhood of a perma- 
nent camp. For such work, as well aa for 
the cutting of tent stakes, firewood, etc, 



CTCLfi AND AUTOMOBtLB TRADE JOURNAL. 



83 



any sporting goods house will supply the 
effective folding hatchets, to be carried in 
a belt. A small shovel, or at least a trow- 
el, will prove its usefulness in small grad- 
ing operations for beds, campfires, etc. 

To light a camp, small acetylene chan- 
deliers can be hung at convenient points 
and connected by rubber tubing to gen- 
erator or gas tank. For more ambitious 
outfits, regular camp lighting generators 
are sold at low prices by acetylene goods 




^^^ 



3fVaryj>c-jvt^ 



concerns. The portable gasoline lamps 
with mantle burners fed through "hollow 
wires" give still more light at less cost, for 
permanent camps. 

It was Napoleon who said that "an army 
is a collection of stomachs" and what is 
true of an army in this regard is equally 
true of a party of healthy campers, the 
point of which is, that the commissary de- 
partment warrants careful looking after. 

CAMP COOKING AND UTENSILS. 

The simplest means of cooking is, of 
course, the campfire, with dishes suspend- 
ed over it or propped up by stones, but for 
those inclined to disregard the classics of 
primitive cookery, there are folding camp 
stoves of sheet metal, and gasoline and al- 
cohol heaters, which are altogether more 
convenient and cleanly than their primitive 
prototypes. A good combination for the 
average case is the use of a small gasoline 
or alcohol burner for preparing hurried re- 
pasts, supplemented by a campfire for 
heavier meals. A compact modification of 
the modem "fireless cookers" will find 
some uses, and has the merit of keeping 
things warm as well as of cooking them. 

It almost goes without saying that the 
best utensils are the nonbreakable. Espe- 
cially dainty are the dishes of white 
enamelware, which can be had in sets in 
w^icker cases, with knives and forks and 
spoons, or which may be bought individ- 
ually. A cup, saucer and plate of (his sort 
together with a knife, fork and a couple of 
spoons, should be provided for each indi- 
vidual in the party. Folding cups are 
handy to carry in the pocket. Besides the 
individual sets there must be a frying pan, 
and probably a stewpan or two, a double 
boiler, tablesi)oons, steel forks, meat 
knives, etc. Pocket flasks for drinkables 
may be required, but In some respects bet- 
ter than these are the various types of 
vacuum bottles, which preserve liquids hot 
or cold for prolonged periods. In territory 
where good drinking water is uncommon, 
a large canteen covered with blanketing, 
or a canvas water bag, is indispensable. 
One or two of the simple stone drip or suc- 



tion filters, of a size to go in the pocket, 
will be desirable if brackish or muddy wa- 
ter must be used. 

Salt, pepper, baking powder, fiour, cof- 
fee, tea, etc., should be carried in screw- 
topped cans, proof aginst breakage and 
leakage. For butter, cream, milk, pre- 
serves, etc., mide-mouthed glass Jars will 
do, if carefully protected against break- 
age. Individual tastes as well as oppor- 
tunities for replenishing the supply will 
dictate the kind and quantity of provender 
to be carried, but a Judicious assortment of 
canned goods, crackers, cereals, condensed 
milk, and the like, will always constitute 
a safeguard against starvation, and a little 
experimenting with the patent self-heating 
canned goods is not likely to be regretted. 

Toilet essentials, such as soap and tow- 
Is, tooth brushes, and pocket mirrors, will 
hardly be dispensed with by the ladies, 
however the men may regard them, and 
cold cream is almost an essential to pre- 
vent chapping from the wind and allay sun- 
burn. Nor should a small emergency case 
of medical and surgical supplies be omit- 
ted. At the least it will be well to carry 
a few simple remedies for stings, burns and 
cuts, some bandages and surgical tape, dis- 
infectants and stimulants. Safety razors 
are also convenient. 

HOW TO PACK CLOTHING. 

Clothing naturally will be chosen to fit 
the necessities of a given case, but it is. a 
safe general caution to insist that if any 
"glad rags" be carried in reserve they must 
be well protected in a suitable trunk. Good 
automobile trunks are less common than 
might be supposed, and in selecting them 
it is well to bear in mind that there are 
dust, moisture and vibration to be reckoned 
with. The trunks with tiers of trays or 
drawers have the merit that they avoid 
the piled up crush of things that otherwise 
may injure those on the bottom; some are 
even provided with mirrors, clothes hang- 
ers, etc. Almost as important as any other 
consideration is convenience, and though 
absolutely secure fastening is most essen- 
tial, the necessity for frequent undoing of 
multiplied straps, buckles, ropes, clamps, 
etc., is likely in the course of a long trip 
to rouse the most patient to profanity. 
Needles and thread and provision for 
patches, though adding to the list of items 
adds negligibly to the weight and need 
not be worth much, to be well worth their 
room. Goggles and face masks, for sensi- 
tive eyes and skins, have recognized pur- 
poses, and will hardly be omitted. 

FOR THE HUNTEB OR FISHERMAN. 

For hunting and fishing the expert will 
choose his outfit with little assistance, but 
for the tyro a few general hints will not 
be amiss. A modem magazine rifie for 
large game, a shotgun for fowl, etc., and a 
good automatic revolver for emergency 
shots or personal protection are standards. 
Ammunition can be most conveniently car- 
ried In a belt, which also will accommodate 



84 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



a sheath or clasp knife for skinning or 
cutting up carcasses. A supply of salt or 
alum for temporary curing pelts that it is 
desired to save may be serviceable. For 
the fisherman a good jointed pole, with 
reel, bait cans, and baskets, are of general 
utility, as also are certain standard hooks 
and artificial files. If any more serious 
onslaught is contemplated on denizens of 
wood and stream, a little reading on the 
subject will discover abundance of infor- 
mation. Knowledge of how to make the 
simpler deadfall, "figure-four," and other 
traps, together with a standard steel trap 
carried along, will enable almost any con« 
dition to be met, even to ridding camp of 
nocturnal marauders with a disposition to 
raid the commissary. A bottle of anls- 
seed oil to sprinkle traps, effectively dis- 
guises the human odor and deceives the 
craftiest wild animals. Incidentally, in go- 
ing into new localities a little reading up 
on game ordinances may prevent the arm 
of the law from adding other counts to its 
alleged contraventions of the speed limits. 

REGOBDING THE TBIF. 

Camera and notebooks will be indispen* 
sible to those who care for permanent re- 
cords of their more interesting joumeyings. 
Of the former, the box types are far more 
suitable than the bellows forms for quick 
and convenient use from an automobile. 
And some of the very finest instruments to 
he had are the refiecting box cameras, with 
focal-plane shutters and high-grade lenses. 
The writer's fancy is for the stereoscopic 
forms as best calculated to make unique 
and perfect views of remembered scenes. 
An abundance of supplies should be car- 
ried, while a daylight-developing outfit, or 
use of the mantle of night as a dark-room 
will make the enthusiastic amateur inde- 
pendent of the professional finisher. 

Besides notebooks, there should be had 
maps and road books. Regular automo- 
bile road books are best, but in their ab- 
sence government topographic or post route 
maps are a great help. 

Field glasses will help one to enjoy ob- 
jects too distant to be readily visited. By 
all means the best are the prism binocu- 
lars, but these are also the most expensive. 
An aneroid barometer will tell altitudes 
above sea level very accurately, and a pocket 
compass is an unfailing guide to directions. 
It is not generally known to the layman, 
but most of the dealers in surveying instru- 
ments carry pocket range finders and in- 
clinometers, with which distances and dif- 
ferences in elevation between the observer 
and any given point in sight can be very 
closely and quickly approximated. 

CABE OF FIRES. 

Particularly in the north and west it is 
the unwritten and written law that care 
be taken with fires. A few moments to se- 
lect a safe spot for a campfire, or to ex- 
tinguish its embers, may be the means of 
saving millions of dollars worth of indi- 



vidual and government property. Match- 
es are safest carried i(i waterproof casea 
Fire may be kindled when matches are 
gone or spoiled by using a connected spark 
plug to ignite a little gasoline soaked waste 
or a gun with all but the powder removed 
from the cartridge, will ignite dry leaves, 
waste, etc. 

A caution that will impress itself sooner 
or later if good advice is disregarded, is 
not to run at night in unknown country, 
where population is thin and the roads not 
marked. In such conditions lights that 
amply illuminate the road are not sufli- 
cient. One, needs the daytime view of the 
country in general to keep track of his 
IK>sition. 

Although the outline of probable needs 
that has been attempted in this article may 
seem long, it is to be remembered that it 
will be modified to suit individual cases 
and that a mere list of articles always 
looks much more formidable than the same 
things in actuality, compactly packed and 
stowed. 

DUST. MOIBTURB AlfD VIBRATION. 

As a final injunction let it be borne in 
mind that these are thft evils to be guard- 
ed against above all others. In a long trip, 
dust will penetrate the minutest crevices 
and work into the md^st intricate wrap- 
pings; water splashed up from roadside 
puddles will ruin things strapped to the 
running boards if inadequately protected; 
and vibration will almost extract riveted 
nails from trunks, etc. Guard effectively 
against this triumvirate of troubles, and 
in this day of improved cars and improving 
roads even a transcontinental trip becomes 
only a five or six weeks "joy ride." 



«( 



JOURNAL OF A SEVEN DAY AUTO 

TRIP THROUGH NEW ENGLAND 

AND NEW YORK 

BENJ. W. RIDBOUT 

Realizing that the fall rush of business 
would soon be upon me, but bound to make 
the most of the intervening time, I de- 
cided to put my automobile at the pleas- 
ant task of conveying myself and family 
on a week's tour of New England. As 
my party was to consist of my father and 
mother, my two sisters and a brother, with 
the writer acting as driver, it was very 
essential that our Royal Tourist be 
equipped with the most convenient and 
practical accessories. 

After consulting various catalogs we de- 
cided to visit, car and all, the establish- 
ment of Winship in Boston. When we 
finally left the store our auto sported on 
the rear rack, a special trunk containing 
three fairly roomy suit-cases. On top of 
this trunk we carried a folding tent in a 
canvas bag, while underneath, securely 
bolted to the rack, was a shallow trunk 
made to- carry storm curtains, rubber blan- 
kets, etc.. All the extra inner tubes. Jack 



CTCLB AND AUTOMOBILES TRADE JOURNAL. 



85 



and other stuff were put in a round trunk 
which exactly fitted inside the extra shoe 
on the side of the car. On the running- 
board was strapped a roomy lunch trunk, 
above all waterproof, and arranged for 
Thermos bottles. 

The above arrangements left plenty of 
room inside the tonneau for a couple of 
bags. Our robes and wraps were hung 
over a stout leather strap fastened to the 
rear of the front seat. Besides all this we 
securely stowed away a small camp cook- 
ing outfit obtained of Iver Johnson & Co. 

SEPT. 19. NOON. 

We were off in high spirits born of that 
delicious feeling of roaming where chance 
would lead us. Business cares we were 
leaving far behind and we were filled with 
a deep sense of comfort as our car throb- 
bed away on its fascinating journey. 

After a delightful run of 79 miles away 
from the Hub we found ourselves at a 
piece of shore not far from the famous 
York Beach. It looked very inviting, and 
as it bid fair to be a pleasant night, we 
decided to camp on a hospitable knoll 
overlooking the ocean. As the sunset col- 
ors were still tinting the waters they lent 
an added charm to our surroundings. Hun. 
ger, however, cut short our appreciation 
of the scenery and we were overjoyed to 
espy a lone fisherman well laden with 
clams and lobsters. 

He was speedily induced to dispose of. 
his stock, our cooking utensils and reli- 
able lunch trunk were quickly brought 
into play, and we enjoyed a supper of an 
entirely different flavor from our usual 
city repast. 

Supper over, we arranged our sleeping 
quarters. The top of the car was put up 
and the interior transformed by the aid of 
racks and blankets Into comfortable 
couches. 

Our lean-to tent was fastened to the 
side of the car and amply sheltered the 
male members of the party. Underneath 
we piled fragrant "second crop" brought 
from a nearby clover patch and our sleep- 
ing quarters were complete. It is quite 
needless to state that we slept as only 
those can sleep who spend their time in 
the open. 

SKPT. 20. 

Breakfisisting early we were able to get 
away at 7.30 for Portsmouth, N. H., thence 
to Bretton Woods in the White Mountains, 
119 miles distant, where we arrived at 5.30 
P. M. The scenery made brilliant by the 
early tinted fall foliage of the mountains 
where scarlet maples shone and glowed 
among the evergreens, had been a won- 
drous and continued delight. All day we 
had climbed steadily higher and higher 
above sea-level, stopping only for a hearty 
picnic dinner from our lunchean kit. 

As dusk was coming on we took the 
short road across the valley to the Mt. 
Washington House, where we lodged for 



the night. The white frost on the board 
walks and the sharpness of the air made 
us willing to spend our evening near the 
fire where thoughts of winter would not 
Intrude. 

SEPT. 21. 

Morning dawned as it only can unfold 
among the mountains, tempting us down 
the mountains to enjoy again to the full 
the gorgeous foliage far down the valley, 
through which we had passed the day 
before. 

Returning in Reason for a hearty lunch 
we again put our tireless car into action, 
running to Maplewood and Bethlehem 
then over Mt. Agassiz. Thoughts of the 
famous trout-streams of the Franconia 
mountains disturbed some of our party, 
but despite that we persisted on our way 
over the "Three-Mile Hill" to the Profile 
House, to tie up for the night. Our record 
was but 43 miles, but — "Oh, sucU miles!" 
— we were content 

SEPT. 22. 

In the forenoon we ran to the Flume 
by the .Pool. Here it was necessary to 
employ a team to drive in, but it amply 
repaid us, as we had a view of the solemn 
Old Man of the Mountains and other great 
works of nature before we returned to the 
Profile House. 

For the afternoon stunt we chugged up 
over Sugar Loaf Hill to fVanconia and 
toward evening, a bit beyond Bradford, 
we happened on a pretty and secluded 
spot. Night fell on our happy party 
encamped in a quiet grove where the pine 
needles formed a carpet or couch, more 
luxurious than East Indian prince or 
Turkish monarch ever enjoyed. Distance, 
61 miles from the Profile. 

SEPT. 23. 

To-day we followed the lordly Connecti- 
cut dovj^h through the green mountains to 
Claremont. After a bite at this point we 
wended our way down the charming val- 
ley to E. Northfield, Mass., arriving at 
7.30, somewhat weary and with eyes 
smarting from a 111 mile run through 
the smoke of the forest fires, which had 
been so heavy at times as to completely 
obliterate our view and make cautious 
driving necessary. 

SEPT. 24. 

The Northfield Inn we left early this 
morning and the trip on down the Con-, 
necticut valley was continued via Green- 
field to Springfield. On our way we 
passed through the town of Westbrook, 
the birthplace, the historian of our party 
reminded us, of David Bushnell, the in- 
ventor of the "American Turtle," as the 
Adam of sub-marine torpedo boats was 
called. This same relic-hunter added that 
we might find the remnants of the 
"Turtle" in a bam on the Bushnell farm 
if we cared to stop. 



CYCLE AND AnTOMOBILB TRADE JODANAL. 



We preferred to save our time for eome- 
thinE more entertaining, paying a hurried 
vlBlt to Smith and Holyobe coUegea in- 
stead. SpringSeld was reacbed In time 
for dinner. 

Our hunger appeased, otf we started 
DortbweBterlr through the rugged Berk- 
Bhire blllB and over Jacob's Ladder to 
PitUfleld. 

It was then after six and we were all 
too weary after our ride of 111 tnllee to 
be more than mildly interested In finding 
anything outside of a good hotel and a 
comfortable bed. 

SEPT. ZE. 

After a splendid nigbt's rest, we made 
an early start, ran down through Lenox, 
and Great Harrington, passed through the 
northwestern corner of Connecticut and 
over Into New York Btate, lunching at a 
neat little Inn at MUlbrook, N. Y. From 
IMUibrook we headed for Newburgb on the 
Hudson, where we spent the night, 157 
miles from our starting mint this momlog. 



Enjoying to the full the beauty of the 
Catskllls, we glided down the Hudson Val- 
ley from Newburgh to Nyack. Here we 
put the car on the terry and ran on to 
New York City for lunch. As I write we 
are in New Haven for the night 

SEPT. !7. 

This morning bright and early we left 
the Unlveralty city tor home, crossing 
amid more familiar scenes and eager for 
a sight once more of the dear old Hub. 
At noon we used for the last time on the 
trip our restocked lunch trunk, then ran 
on by way ot Narragansett Pier and Provi- 
dence to Boston, voting to repeat the tour 
at an early date. 

We so thoroughly enjoyed our experi- 
ence that I have roughly recorded this 
brief account, hoping that It may be fol- 
lowed by many a Jolly party of tourists In 
the days that are to come. 



HmU II ihtlin unt wbldi nn b* itUctaed to 
NATURE NEAR HOME 

Not all of those who know the Joys of 
automobile camping go Into the wilder- 
ness. They find nature nearer home and 
for brief periods of time can enjoy a mode 
of living akin to that of the gypsies, carry- 
ing such shelter as can be quickly set up 
In connection with the car at any stopping 
place. 

Of the type of those who keep closer to 
civilization and yet gratify the human Ilk- 
lag for the camp are Mr. and Mrs. A. W. 
Seaman, of Brooklyn. Half a shelter tent 
which can be attached to the side of the 



motor car or to convenient trees is car- 
ried, and this protects them from the 
weather when they make a night stop In 
tbelr tours about the country. 

Mrs. Seaman Is known among women 
automoblltste as the winner of the Hoi-Tan 
trophy In the race held last January from 
New York to Philadelphia and back by the 
Women's Motoring Club of New York. She 
Is a southerner and an enthusiastic driver. 
Before she took to the use ' of the auto- 
mobile she had acquired a reputation aa 
a skillful driver of horses, single, tandem, 
four-in-hand and slx-ln-hand. 



CTCLB AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAU 



S7 



AUTO OUTINGS. 

BY C E. DUBYEA. 

There is no need to tell the pleasures ot 
the touring auto. As a means of seeing 
the country there is no equal to it. But 
many do not know the handiness and pleas- 
ure ot the auto for the little outing trips 
that can be taken at an hour's notice and 
on the afternoon of the day that is too 
hot to work. It is well recognized that 
many a holiday is spoiled by unsuitable 
weather, so any plan that permits the trip 
to be suited to the weather is a good one. 

From personal experience I can cite 
some very popular swimming trips. Not 
at the natatorium, where the sun never 
shines, the crowd is not selected and the 
water is artificially heated, but to tiie 
creek where the air is clean, the sun bath 
not less valuable than the water one, the 
location secluded, the water clear enough 
to see the minnows that gather around and 
nibble at one if standing still and the bot- 
tom sandy and pleasant to walk on. 

There are several suitable spots within 
two to five miles from the city where a 
swim can be enjoyed in the hottest part 
of the day with very little loss of time from 
regular duties. Pass the word around to 
the owners of two or three autos. Qrab 
several muslin auto covers. Throw in an 
empty carbide can of large size. 'Phone 
the women to get the bathing suits and 
about the time the children get out of 
school be ready to go. The number of 
folks that can crowd in or on a motor vehi- 
cle for a short, carefully driven trip is 
surprising. But if not all can be carried 
the first trip, make a second. This can be 
done while the auto covers are being put 
up for dressing tents and the first load en- 
joying the air and sunlight. The handiest 
trees are pressed into service by carrying 
the covers around the trunk and out to the 
ends of two branches, thence from tip to 
tip of the branches^ This makes a three- 
cornered structure well suited for a dress- 
ing tent. One cover suffices for a small 
tent; two make a very large one. Only a 
few safety pins are needed. The carbide 
can makes a pretty fair fioating barrel. 
The ones who cannot swim have "water 
wings" which, once Infiated, permit float- 
ing easily. The easy sloping banks permit 
getting the depth wanted. And the whole 
crowd seems to enjoy it better if not too 
deep. Diving for pebbles, bobbing for ap- 
ples, riding the barrel and similar sports 
fill in a half hour quickly. The dressing 
occupies a little more time, but those first 
ready make the first trip home, leaving the 
remainder to roll up the tents, wring out 
the suits and towels and leisurely be ready 
when the autos get back. The relaxation 
from work, the reduction in bodily temper- 
ature, the pleasant though short rides and 
the unconventionality of the thing all af- 
ford the greatest relief from the oppres- 
siveness of a sultry summer day. 

But there are other days when the wind 
is too high or the water too muddy or the 



swimming trip has no attraction. Then 
the outing must be sought along some 
other line. In many directions around 
Reading there are to be found places where 
wild strawberries grow, or where cherries 
unclaimed and largely unpicked • aboimd. 
Mulberries are not so plentiful, but these, 
too, exist. Blackberries and xaspberries 
are quite frequent. Huckleberries cover 
the mountain sides. Apples and various 
kinds of nuts are often found where no one 
apparently owns or cares. Of cherries this 
is i>articularly true. Dozens of trees grow 
along the fences and the over-ripe fruit 
drops into the road till it is covered as with 
a blanket of black, which stains the tires 
as they roll over them. Some of these are 
not the choicest varieties, but when fully 
ripe they are sweet and splendid eating. 
Within several miles of the city all of the 
ownerless trees are picked by those who 
have not the range of the auto user. This 
makes a longer trip necessary, but five to 
fifteen miles will bring trees of the luscious 
fruit into sight and reach, almost any sea- 
son. Trees that are loaded one year may 
have nothing on the next Locality seems 
to exert an infiuence. The cause that in- 
jured the crop on one side of the city may 
not have been active on the other side. 
Thus one year the only good unpicked cher- 
ries were found more than a dozen miles 
north and more than once we indulged in 
a delightful ride and a feast at those trees 
on a secluded road where the over-ripe 
cherries were falling to the ground and the 
sweet sun-kissed ones in the topmost 
branches tempted us to climb as we had 
not climbed since boyhood. The auto 
would be stopped under a well-laden bough, 
two or more members climb onto this and 
force it down where It could be reached 
by those who preferred not to climb. The 
others distributed themselves in the tree 
ad lib. No fruit stand product com- 
pares with fruit that is fully ripe on the 
tree and that is picked and eaten with the 
sunlight fairly radiating health from it. 
Rain washed, unhandled and self-selected. 
This is feasting worth while. 

Of mulberries there are two kinds, and 
some years a shake of the limb will bring 
a shower of fruit into the rig that takes 
some minutes to clean out. That one's 
clothing suffers from stains is a matter of 
course. But what of It? This way of us- 
ing the time is more restful and more 
healthful than rushing at railroad speed 
over dusty roads where goggles are needed 
to enable one to see. The little roads' 
through the country are dustless. They 
are so little used that not many teams are 
met; while some of them wind along the 
little streams and up through the moun- 
tains in a most picturesque manner. On 
many of the half bare hilltops are the short 
huckleberry bushes from under the leaves 
of which peep the fully ripe and tempting 
berries. A little climb, a snap or two of 
the camera, then for the berries. Only 
the choicest are chosen. A handful are 
quickly stripped and the leaves blown 



88 



CTCLB AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



away, leaving berries "fit to eat." Here 
again the air and the sunshine do their 
prettiest and life is worth the living. 

If conventionality tires one, pack the 
reading matter and a lunch and seek the 
solitude of the woods or the hilltops. The 
auto has no choice. If fishing is one's 
hobby, follow the creeks. In either case, 
the solitude can be had by going far 
enough* Hammocks and camp chairs add 
comfort and a touch of heme. The auto 
cushions can be comfortably arranged on 
the rocks or stumps. As evening comes on 
a camp fire adds to the cheer and the nov- 
elty, as well as serving to warm the sup- 
per or cook the fish. If you have ever 
eaten a freshly caught fish after being well 
baked in a sheath of clay till the clay was 
brick and the fish done to a turn with none 
of its own flavor lost, you know the Joy 
of the combination of outdoor exercise, a 
good appetite and good eating. If shelter 
is needed, heavy canvas is practically wa- 
ter-proof and is easily stretched over the 
auto and to close by trees so as to both 
cover the rig and make a shed at the lee- 
ward side, from under which a passing 
shower may be watched without worry. 

If you want an ideal or idyllic legal holi- 
day, telephone to some cross roads hotel 
a few miles out and off the main lines of 
railroad or trolley. Usually these are all 
but deserted on such days, for everybody 
rushes to the city to partake in the cele- 
bration. A typical country dinner, the ta- 
ble loaded to overflowing and everything 
clean and well cooked, Is usually to be had 
for 35 cents or thereabouts. Specialties 
like fried chicken and waffles come a little 
higher. If you arrive early you can help 
kill the chickens and know they are health- 
ful and fresh. If aeronautlcally inclined, 
these are the places to fly kites or send up 
hot air balloons; each according to wheth- 
er the day is windy or calm. One calm 
Fourth of July I sent up the same hot air 
balloon four different times. Each time it 
was followed and recovered. This would 
not have been possible in a city. Kites 
are easily carried, for most of them are 
made foldable nowadays. Pull down the 
middle of the string, attach a bunch of fire- 
crackers to it, fire, and let go. The crack- 
ers at once are carried high in the air and 
the bombardment takes place well up, 
where the noise can be heard far away and 
where the fire looks pretty at night. 

Short over-night trips can be made with- 
out losing any business hours. Drive to 
some little country inn for supper, and 
after supper drive till dark. Then to bed. 
Both places can be secured by 'phone, if 
this is deemed advisable. Next morning 
early the return trip begins before break- 
fast and this is secured after arrival home 
or on the way. Many people turn up their 
noses at the small cross roads inn with 
its simple accommodations, but the good 
wife who presides over the cooking and 
personally sees to the beds, knows her 
business in this part of the country and 
one can always be sure of a good, clean. 



comfortable bed and well-cooked meals. 

During cider-making time the odor of the 
mill may be detected at frequent intervals 
and fresh, sweet cider just as it runs from 
the press can be enjoyed. Vineyards, too, 
abound and grape juice fit for anyone can 
be had and all the more enjoyed because 
of the surroundings. No fermented or 
preserved product can compare with this. 
As well compare old or condensed milk 
with the fresh product as to compare the 
usual cider or wine with the fresh, rich, 
undiluted juice which you see being forced 
from the selected splendid fiavored fruit. 
And the auto makes these pleasures pos- 
sible because it increases the range of its 
owner. Where the hundreds of horse driv- 
ers get out a few miles and other hundreds 
of cyclists and pedestrians overrun the 
territory close to the city, the auto gets 
into a new field farther away. It follows 
roads that are little used and that are all 
the more picturesque because of their 
loneliness. 

Even the little motor buggies have 
speeds about three times as fast as the 
average horse and so permit ranging three 
times as far in a given limited time. This 
means that one's area of pleasure is ex- 
panded nine times beyond that enjoyed by 
the horse owner. But in actual fact the 
difference is much greater. The auto 
never tires and hard or hilly roads do not 
stop it. It is used therefore on many of 
the most beautiful roads that horse drivers 
seldom frequent for pleasure. This added 
choice of roads doubles one's range which 
must be taken into account in comparison 
with horse driving. We are each the sum 
of our experiences. Our length of life is 
not measured by years, but by our experi- 
ence and our actions. 
. The list of pleasures could be continued, 
but why add more? If you are an auto 
owner you probably have enjoyed these 
things. If not, get one now. New or sec- 
ond hand. No matter. It is utility you 
want. And second-hand autos were never 
cheaper. Wander aimlessly into the coun- 
try. If something seems wrong with it, 
stop to the lee of a fragrant apple orchard 
now in full bloom and enjoy both the color 
and the fragrance while you get acquainted 
with the mechanism. Restfulness is not 
rushing through the country at railroad 
speed with all the passengers bracing them- 
selves into the seats as firmly as possible 
and with every nerve taut; but in loafing 
along, enjoying every sight and odor of 
field, orchard and garden, of swamp and 
woodland, of hillside and valley. Not in 
watching the speedometer and preparing 
to brag about it in the smoky "was-air" at 
the club, but in watching the fleecy clouds 
chase each other across the valleys and 
the buzzards idly soar as they loolt for 
food. In lounging in pretty spots of sun- 
shine or shade as the weather may indi- 
cate, in listening to the singing birds or 
chirping crickets, is there rest and relaxa- 
tion from the daily hustling routine that 
must be tried to be known. 









CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 









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CTCUt AND ADTOMOBOiB THADE JOURNAL. 



CAMPING OUTFITS MANUFACTURED 

BY THE NEW YORK SPORTING 

GOODS COMPANY 

Generally speaking, any equipment that 
iB suitable for a regular camping trip would 
b« aultable for an automobile camping trip, 
were tt not for the fact that the matter of 
weight and balk must be seriously con- 
sidered, when carrying capacity la bo 
limited. For this reason the New York 
Sporting Goods Co., of 17 Warren SL, New 
York City, has designed a number of ar- 
ticles suited especially for automobile use. 

The style of tent Bhown herewith has 
the advantage of being easily erected as 
only one pole is required, and this Is fur- 
nished Jointed so as to take up little room 
In the car. It affords comparatively large 
floor space with comparatively little wall 



cording to size. Blankets may be had lor 
from 14 to flO each, the better being light, 
yet exceedingly warm. For very severe 
weather, a "Comfort Sleeping Pocket" ts 
recommended, which costs (25 and f30 for 
the regulation weights (about 20 pounds) 
according to size, or they may be bad In 
extra light weight, say 10 pounds, for |60 
.and |60. They are pneumatic, and a pump 
IB fumlsbed for Inflating. They take up 
very little room when deflated and rolled 
in a bundle. 

Dufllo canvas carrying bags are a real 
necessity, and can be used for many pnr- 
poses. Tbe better grades are practically 



N. r. S. O. Ca.'i DnOa Bii. 

waterproof, and can be strapped to the side 
or rear ot a car without worry abont the 
contents getting wet. They cost from |1 
to f 2.50, according to the size and quality. 

The folding cot or bed shown herewith 
weighs from 12 to IG pounds, and when 
folded, occupiea a space ot 3 ft by 6 In. As 
a quick, comfortable, portable bed, It Is a 
great success when used in connection 



and root bulk. Two can sleep comfortably 
in what Is known as a 7Hx7H-foot size, 
tbougb it will roll up Into a very small 
space, and. If made of "balloon silk," only 
weighs S% pounds. The price Is (17.26, or 
It made of waterproof drill, tbe price is 
111, but tbe weiglit Is about double the 
weight of tbe silk tent. 

Tbe best bed tor easy carrying and real 
comfort is the pneumatic mattress covered 
with duck, costing 117.19 and |19.S0. ac- 




with a sleeping pocket or a generous sup- 
ply of blankets. Prices range from fZ to 
13. SO, according to size and quall^ of 
material used. A particularly popular 
style Is tbe "Gold Medal No. 1," costing 
I2.G0. 

There la quite a variety of folding furni- 
ture that might be taken If apace permit- 
ted: for Instance, a folding table, costing 
>2,60; a washstand, BO cents; a wash 
basin, 86 cents; a bath tub tor 99, and 



CTCLB AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE! JOURNAL. 




flap or fly over tbe top, which acta ae a 
wtDd-break and an extra protection against 
rain. Next to tbis la a thick, seamlsBS 
woolen hag, fitted firmly, but aoft and pli- 
able, with a deep, thick nap, which Is very 
strong and warm. Inside thla Is a bag of 
fine wool, also seamless, thick and warm. 
Tbe fasteners are rawhide loops, and but- 
tons passed through brass eyelets. Each 
bag Is entirely separate and can easily be 
removed to wash, air or dry. This bag lists 
at $15.00. 



The axe shown herewith is fitted with 
a leather sheath and loop for carrying In 
the belt It lists at 11.25. Various other 
styles are offered, listing up to 13.00 and 
fitted with tbe regulation guard. 



AUTOMOBILE CAMPING SPECIALTIES 

MADE BY ABERCROMBIE & 

FITCH CO. 

The Abercromble & Fitch Co., of 67 
Reade St., N. Y. City, is cataloguing a line 
of tents, sleeping bags, cooking outflts. 
food outfits and, In a word, complete auto- 
mobile camping cutflts, which will enable 
tbe automobile tourist to convey a party 
completely across the continent without 
being dependent upon hotels or even stores 
for accommodation or food supplies. 

One of the necessities of the campers' 
outfit which Is many times forgotten la 
the portable bath-tub. Quite a number oE 
these are on tbe market and tbIs company 
alone Is offering two or three styles. A 




Lllley's patent cooker makes a fins all- 
around stove, for ordinary cooking, boiling 
water, etc. It bums wood or denatured 
alcobol, or wood, coal and coke may be 
used, generating Intense heat. The cooker 
Is wind-proof. It lists complete with two 
palls and a U-plnt canister In a strong can- 
vas bag, at f4.50. 




very practical type of bath-tub Is here 
sbo-wn, tbe same being G feet long, 27 
Inches wide, and 16 Inches deep, and when 
folded Is fi ft. long by 6 ins. square, and 
weighs 16 pounds. The frame Is of hard 
wood and Is constructed so as to withstand 
rough usage and to keep In the same posi- 
tion no matter what weight the tub con- 
tains. It Is made ot closely woven duck, 
rubber coated. The tub Is not suspended, 
but rests on tbe ground Its entire length. 
It lists at IS.GO. 
Duplex Folding Bucket: A very neat 
style of folding buck- 
et Is sbown herewith 
which Is made of Ja- 
panned steel frames 
with canvas sides and 
pantasote bottom. 
The regular ball han- 
dle is fitted. It is 




CTCLB AND AUTOHOBILB tKADE JOURNAL. 



m&d« In two BlzeB: 19 Quarts, weight IH 
pounds, price $1.60, aod 12 quarts, weight 
2 pounds, price 11. T&. 

Arizona Camp Orate: This la the moat' 
serviceable article for camp cooking of all 
kinds and eapecialiy for broiling. The ac- 
coiQpanylng cut abowa the method In which 
It la used, also the simplicity ot the device. 
The frame Is very rigid and, next to a 
Btove, la the best portable support for 



pots, pans. etc. It folds up perfectly flat 
when not in use and is usually carried with 
a folding baker. It Is made of strong steel 
rods, heavily tinned. Two sizes are fur- 
nished. No. 1, 14^x10% in., weight Z>^ 
pounda, price 60 cents, and No. 2, 24)lz 
IZU In., weight 4 pounds, 6 cnacea, price 
SG cents. 

Collapsible Meat Safe: 
This device is a very 
very necessary article tor 
keeping flies away from 
meat, fish and provis- 
ions. It can be suspend- 
ed in the tent or from 
the limb of a tree, af- 
fording a perfect protec- 
tion, yet leaving every- 
thing free to the air. It 
Is made of extra strong 
Knglish bobblnet which 
stands repeated wash- 
ings. It la 36 Inches long 
and IS Inches In diam- 
eter and weighs eight 
ounces. It lists at (2. 

Aluminum Cooking 

Utensils: The accom- 
panying cut shows the 
aluminum cooking outfit 
which Is a specialty of, 
tbe Abercromble & Fitch 
Co. This outfit has been 
tested out by campers and explorers, engi- 
neers and army officers and has been given 
the highest praise. With the exception 
ot tbe frying pans, all pieces are made of 
alumlnol, which Is a new and special al- 
loy. Thla alumlnol is harder than regular 
aluminum and la practically Indestructible, 

J|4bA 



and will endure all manner of hard usage 
without aerlouB damage. The steel frying 
pans furnished with the set are ot best 
grade, highly pollslied steel, Stted with 
DarliAg's detachable handle. These outflts 
are made in various sizes for 2, 4, 6 and 8 
persons. As an example, the No. 4, 
equipped for four persons. Includes three 
different sized cooking pots, one coffee pot, 
one large and one small frying pan. four 
plates, four cups, four soup bawls, four 
liniveH. lour forks four dessert spoons and 
four teaspoons. When nested together this 
outfit measures 10x11^ Ins., and weighs 
10 pounds, 14 ounces. Price, Including can- 
vas bag, la 116.60. The No. 2, for two per- 
sons. Hats at t9.85; the No. 6, for alx per- 
sons, at 126.50. and the No. S, for eight per- 
sona, 130. 

Combination Knlte and Fork: This con- 
cern sells a combination knlte and fork 
wbicb la a very handy contrivance. Tbe 
knlte and fork point are pressed together 
when not In use In such a manner that 
each pdnt slips Inside the handle ot the 
other so that the device can be carried 
in the vest pocket. It Is 7% Ins. long and 
% wide, weighs 2 ounces and lists at 46 

Automobile Medicine Case: The auto- 
mobile medicine case, herewith shown. Is 
designed especially tor motorists and con- 
tains such articles and remedies as are 
most likely to be required. It contains the 



lollowing In tablet form: Boric acid, bis- 
muth sallc. cascara sag., 10-graIn lead su- 
bac, chl. of po.tash and borax, 2-grain qui- 
nine sulphate, soda mint, comp. pagnacltm 
and carron oil, castor oil, aromatic am- 
monia, boric acid ointment, surgeon's plas- 
ter, court plaster, protective eliin, oiled 
gauze, eye sponge, camel's hair brushes in 
tube, folding scissors in case, safety pins 
and ordinary pins In tube and compressed 
absorbent cotton, boric itnt, wide, narrow 
and triangular bandages. These articles 
are put up in a strong metal case, size 
7^x414x2 inches, weight 11 ounces, price 
14.20. 

Bobblnet Mosquito Proof Fronts: This 
concerns sells mosquito and fly proof 
fronts made ol best English bobbinet at 
10 cents per square foot. These fronts can 
be either attached to the sides and walls 
of a tent or to the front with a circular 
opening In center. 



04 



OTCUt AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



buckets at SO cents to 11.54. U joa have 
removable extra aeaU in 7our cat, they 
could be utilized, but It would be well to 
take along a few foldlDg atoola or cbatra, 
which Hat from 30 cents to |S.26 each. 

If cooking Is to be done on the road, the 
"Kamp Kook'a Kit" Is very convenient. It 
contains, besides a fire Jack, a complete 
outfit of cooking and serving utensils, be- 
ing Bufflclent tor six persons. It can be 



assembled into a very small space (about 
14x10x8 Inches), weighing only 16 to 20 
lbs. The price Is 16.46. Aluminum cooking 
ontflta save quite a little In weight, and as 
the parts nest into each other, tliey occupy 
small space. They may be had for two, 
four or sis people, costing (10.80, |1S.OO and 
124.00. 

Oil stoves occupy little space, and when 
kerosene can be had, are very convenient 
A particularly suitable style for the auto- 
tourlst Is known as the "Jewel No. P J." It 



heavy brown duck, reinforced and tacked 




at comers. It makes a very comfortable 
seat and lists at 30 cents each. 

WATIKPBOOP CANVAS BAG. 

Tbe Tryon water-proof canvas clothing 
bag Is made In four sizes, 9 In. x 24 In., 12 
in. X 36 In., 16 In. x 36 in. and 18 In. x 36 
In., lisUng at 11.35, 11.65, 12.00 and 12.35. 
Frovtelon bags are made of special water- 
proof fabric, S% inches In diameter and ol 
varying lengths to fit the S-lnch provlsfon 
bags, and to hold up to 5 pounds of sucta 
foods as rice, meal, beans, etc. A 9-lncb 
provision bag packed with these smaller 
bags of food holds about 36 pounds net 
weight. 

TOLDViO ALUIONTM BAKBB. 

The folding aluminum baker shown here- 
with makes a splendid baking and roasting 
device. By removing pins from side 
hinges the baker will lay flat for lacking 



i^n be easily taken apart and packed in a 
small tin carrying case. The price com- 
plete is 16.00. Alcohol stoves may be had 
at from fl.50 to (5.00. (Description fur- 
ntshed by P. R. Roblnsoo. President ot N. 
Y. Sporting Goods Co.) 

TRYON'8 AUTOMOBILE CAMPING 
SPECIALTIES 

The Edward K. Tryon Company, of 611 
Market Street, Philadelphia, carries In 
stock a complete line of camping goods 
designed for automobile tours. 

FOLDtNO STOOL. 

The folding stool, shown herewith, when 
folded. Is 2 feet long and 2H Inches square. 



PtN -~- FOLDED frIH CASE 

purposes. When placed at the Ore, the 
heat will strike both bottom and top of 
the pan and cooking will be done very 
evenly. It roasts well W placing the 
baker agalnet the side of the camp stove. 
A bako pan is furnished witb each baker. 
This baker, open. Is 16 x IS x 10 Inches, 
and together with pan weighs i% lbs. It 
IlGtEi complete at IG.OO. A smaller size Is 
also furnished, 12 x IS x 8 Inches, weight 
ZM lbs., price $3.50. A water-proof canvas 
case and strap fs furnished at fl.BO. 



In the line of sleeping bags this concern 
Is offering the combination Kemwood bag. 
The canvas cover Is made of heavy watei^ 
proof duck, colored brown, and fitted with 
a Sap tor front opening, as well as long 



CTCLB AND AVTOHOBILB TRADB JOURNAL. 



95 



Noepel's Teleicoping Steel Tent Poles: 
Thene tent poles are made in separate 
pieces and are especiallj recommended for 
automobile camping purposes. The poles 
are made ot best grade seamless drawn 
steel tubing, all Joints brased and rein- 
forced wltb electric galvanized satin finish 
to prevent rust To erect on npright the 
second Joint Is withdrawn from the outalde 
Joint, reversed and Inserted In the outside 
Joint and the process repeated In a like 
manner until the complete pole is assem' 
bled. These poles are made In lengths 
from S to 12 feet, listing from 13.50 to 
$5.50 each. The S-foot pole measures 1^ 
Inches in diameter and weighs 3 1-9 
pounds. All poles telescope to 29^ Inches 
in length. 

Ooatslcln Bottles: These bottles are 
mode of genuine Basque Sbahalcoa, made 
in northern Spain entirely by hand out of 
one piece of goat skin and rendered water 
proof by a secret process. They preserve 
the color, flavor, coolness and purity of 
the liquid contained. The cork Is mode 
in two sections of unbreakable horn. The 
bottle la very pliable and can easily be 
rolled up and put In the pocket When 
empty. These bottles make an Ideal flask 
Cor carrying wine or alcoholic liquors. The 
pint size lists at |1.G0, quart 11.76, 14 
quart (2, 2 quart (2.25, and one ^lon 
12.75 



"AJAX" AUTOMOBILE TRUNKS 
The AJai Trunk ft Sample Case Com- 
pany, 191-93 Mercer street. New York City, 
have Incorporated some new improvements 
In their 1909 tire trunk, and are offering 
a line of regular auto trunks. 

The tire trunk is fitted with a rubber- 
coated canvas band on one side, while the 
other side is pulled tight to the strap and 



FUnHTiBMO. 




buckle. This insures absolutely that no 
water or dust can enter into the trunk, as 
the band sheds the water In all directions. 
One of the most noticeable improvements 
Is a steel shoe post, which fastens to the 
wooden sides of the trunk. This prevents 



wear and breaking in at the bottom of the 
trunk where It Jolts on the metal tire bold- 
er when on the car. 

The AJax auto trunk shown herewith 
contains two or three separate suit cases, 
which makes a most convenient manner ot 



carrying luggage. This concern conducts 
a depsrtment for executing special orders, 
ao that motorists can have their luggage 
carriers made to conform with their own 



"WINSHIP" TOURING SPECIALTIES 
The accompanying cuts show three spe- 
cialties manufactured by W. W. wtnship. 
71 Summer street, Boston, Mass., which 
have been designed primarily for touring 
purposea. 

The emergency lunch kit Is used for 
carrying on the car a non-perishable lunch 
In the shape of crackers, sardines, olives. 



chocolate, ApoUlnarls water, etc., put up 
In a small leather case. This Is to be 
stowed away under the rear seat and left 
all summer It necessary, and not to be 
used until some accident or delay occurs, 
when Its use would be needed. This outfit 
Is made In two grades, prices of which are 
15.50 and |7.60. 

Another article of merit Is the Thermos 
BotUe Pocket. This le a soft leather 
pocket, made to hang on the robe rail 
with partitions In same for holding two 
Thermos bottles. It is made In two sizes 
for either pints or quarts. The bottles are 
handy to get at and are always upright, 
thus avoiding any breakage. 



96 



CTCLB AND AUTOUOBILB TKADB JOURNAU 



For the purpose of conveniently currying 
storm aprons, the Wlnshlp curtain trunk 
will be found to be very serviceable. It 
consists of a thin flat trunk, which U bolted 
to the underside of the trunk rack. It 



Tlw "Wlnililp" CurulB Tnink. 

places the curtains out of the way, where 
they are handy to get at, thus nobody need 
be disturbed In putting up the top. The 
trunk will fold with rack against back ot 
car In case top trunk Is not carried. The 
list price of this trunk is tl4.00. 



The "Oodfrey" Automobile Tent and Outllt. 
water-proot. This tent Is furnished with 
one jointed pole, one set Iron tent pins, 
one ground cloth which U water-proof and 
which Is sewn In tent Also two all wool 
gray blankets, one complete aluminum 
cooking set, consisting o( one cooking pot 



holding 7 ptB., one cooking pot holding ID 
pta., one fry pan 9 Ins. diameter, one coffee 
pot, 2 plates, 2 soup bowla, 1 pt., 2 dessert 
spoons, 2 knives, 2 forks, 2 cups, 2 tea- 
spoons. The complete outfit measures on 
the outside, when nested, 9 Ins. diameter, i 
las. high. Besides this is furnished one 
alcohol stove, Z steel Folding stools, 1 fold- 
ing water pall and I folding water bottle. 
Bntlre outQt when nested Is put In a fibre 
case which Is exceptionally strong and dur- 
able. The size IB 30 z 10 X 12, which Is a 
convenient size, as same may be placed on 
the running board of an automobile. The 
fibre case is of the telescopic order. The 
price of the auto-camp for two persons Is 
160.00. This company also furnishes a five- 
persoD outfit at SlOO. 



THE "CRAVEN" FOLDING HAIR 
BRUSH 

The accompanying cut shows a toilet 
article which should appeal specially to the 
tourist. This outflt Includes a folding hair 
brush, aluminum comb, and a beveled edge 
mirror, all three articles fitting Into a 



THE "GODFREY" AUTOMOBILE TENT 
AND OUTFIT 
The Charles J, Godfrey Co., of 10 War- 
ren street. New York City, Is manufactur- 
ing the auto camp outfit, shown herewith. 
This outfit, suitable lor two persons, 
incluses the following : One water- 
proof silk pyramid tent, size 6 z TA 
ft., which is guaranteed to be absolutely 



The "Craven" Folding Hair Brush. 
handsome leather case, only % of an Inch 
thick. The brush is made of tb« fineat 
quality white bristles, which are made to 
stand up or lay flat by means ot a small 
lever. The outside measurements of the 
case are 2*4x4% Inches. This article Is 
made in four finishes, listing as follows: 
Gun metal, |1.G0; silver-plated, f£.00; gold- 
plated, (2.00, and sterling silver. |G.OO. It 
is manufactured by E. J. Sternfels, Flat- 
iron Building, New York City. 



"NONKORODA" 
Nonkoroda is an automobile radiator 
compound recently placed on the market 
by the Nonkoroda Co., of 2B and 27 New 
Chambers Street, New York City. It Is 
claimed to remove and prevent the forma- 
tion ot rust, mineral and vegetable Incrus- 
tation or scale on the Inner surfaces of 
radiators, engine water Jackets, and all 
pipes and connections that come In con- 
tact with the water. By the use of this 
substance these foreign elements are held 
In suspension and when radiators are 
emptied they will be drawn off In the 
form of soft mud which cannot adhere to 
the metal. It is put up in 2-lb. canisters 
listing at (1.00. 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TKADB JOURNAL. 



97 



THE "EVER-READY" BOTTLE 

The accompany Ins cut 1b a sectloD&l 
view of the "Ever-Ready" bottle manufac' 
tured by the American Electrical Novelty 
& Mfg. Co., or 304-22 Hudson St., N. Y. 
City. This view ehows the metal case 
wiUi the removable vacuum bottle In posi- 
tion. 

Cue of the features ot this bottle la the 
fact that when the loalde glaae bottle be- 
comes broken It Is only neceeeary to ebake 
out tbe broken glass and replace a new 




bottle. The bottom cap of this bottle is 
secured to the metal caee by an iDgenloua 
combination of push button and three bay- 
onet catches. In order to remove the cap 
it Ib neceaaary to push the button before 
elving a Blight turn to the cap to the right 
which releasea it from the catches. The 
letters in the Illustration indicate as fol- 
lows: A is a sanitary cup top which is 
made without threads so as not to cut the 
mouti when drinking from the same; B, 
the bayonet catch; C the patent spring 
top; B, sanitary ground glass vacuum stop- 
per; E, bayonet slot on metal case; F, 
soft rubber protective collar; Q, metal 
case; H corrugated paper protective lin- 
ing; I, glass vacuum bottle; J, improved 
bolster to prevent breakage; K, rubber cap 
on eztuuBt nipple; L, bayonet catch; M, felt 
pad; N. bottom spring e«p; O. push but- 
ton catch, and P, bottom cap. This bottle 



la also made with plain cork stopper and 
it la bIbo put up in wicker and leather 
carrying cases. The bottle here illustrated 
la made In pint and quart sizes finiahed in 
either nickel or black, tan, or wine leath- 
er. De Luxe flnlshes can be had in alliga- 
tor akin, p!g skin, snake skin, etc. The 
price ol the pint size In all nickel Is f4.50 
and in the quart sizes, 16.50. 



THE "20TH. CENTURY" QA8 HAND 

LAMP FOR CAMPING AND 

TENT USE 

Tbe accompanying cut shows a lamp de- 
signed especially (or camping and tent 
use. It is manufactured by tbe Twentieth 
Century Mfg. Co.. 19 Warren street, New 
York City. 

This lamp gives a light of about 110 
candle-power and is capable of lighting 
up a full size camp. It is equipped with 
a guard over the chimney cap, so that 
the heat cannot reach the hand. It Is also 
fitted with a long swivel hook, which may 
be used to hang the lamp on a tree or any 
of the tent poteB. The lamp Is made ot 
brass, nick el -plated. Height over all la 14 
inches. The front la C inches In diameter. 
Weight, 3S ozia. Tbe list price ts $7.50. 
This lamp tB also made with a 3^-inch 
front, weight 32 ozs., listing at (6.50. 



THE "HERCULES" FOLDINO CHAIR. 

The accompanying cut shows a. folding 
chair designed especially lor automobile 
use and manufactured by the Cherlngton 
Mfg. Co., Waukegan, 111. This chair can 
be used In the tonneau of the car as an ex- 
tra seat and can also at the same time 
be uaed in connection with a camping out' 
fit. It folds up like a Jack-knife and when 
collapsed measures 9 Ins. long by 2 Ins. 
In diameter. The top of tbe chair is re- 
volvable. It is made of malleable. iron and 
steel and is claimed to support 400 pounds. 
-It is adjustable to 14, le and IS ins. heights 
(rem the ground. The aeat Is made cf 
heavy canvas 12 Ins. square. The flnisb Is 
In nickel plate and black enamel and the 
weight Is less than two pounds. It lists 
at 12.00. 



THE "DOW" TIRE AND TOOL CASE 
The accompanying cut ahows a new 
style tire and tool case which baa recently 
been placed on the market by the Mer- 
rill Manufacturing Company. Old ■ South 
Building. 294 Washington Street, Boaton, 

TbiB tire case is made throughout ot 
Prussia Iron, flnlshed In any color desired, 
and Is Just a trifle larger than the diam- 
eter of the tire. The common size Is made 
to hold two shoes, although it is made (or 
three shoes or for one shoe. The latter 
in many cases slides under the rear of the 
car like a drawer, quite out ot the way. 
The Inner circle is used as a carrying space 
tor other equipment. Tbe upper half of 



CTCLB AND AUTOHOBILB TRADE JODKNAL. 



the Inner space ta divided, forming two 
BhelTea for Jacks, tools, oil tanks, etc. The 
lower half Is made to accommodate Inner 
tubes, hats, caps, gloTee. or even rain- 
coats. This form Is a regular model; the 
Inner space Is, howerer, made to order In 
any form and Is large enough to accommo- 
date a complete wardrobe for the chauDear 
on long tours. 

The cover, also of Pmasla, Is made with 
a handsome panelled front and locks se- 
curely with a small padlock. The case 



This bag Is made to hang on the hack of 
the front seat, and Is very roomy. It pro- 
vides an Ideal means for storing clothing, 
robes, etc., thereby keeping them clean 
and out of the way. The bag Is made ot 
best grade artificial leather, with patent 
leather lining. It Is SO Inches long, 18 
Inches deep and 6 inches thick, heavUy 
padded. Itjlsts at «10.00. This sUe la also 
made In green and red leathers. 

A smaller size ot this bag Is also made 
which lists at tV-OO. It Is 30 X le X 4 Inches, 
made of best quality artlflclal leatber, lined 
with black enameled cloth outside. 



clamps securely to the running board of 
the car In the usual position occupied by 
tires and can be removed In a moment 
from the Inside only by means ot a turn 
buckle. 

This tire case Is also made with the low- 
er half of the Inner circle as an Ice-chest 
or carrying space Interchangeably. A. 
metal perforated drip pan In the bottom 
keeps the water from splashing about. In 
the model made especially for long tours 
the ice-cheat Is made of copper. A mono- 
gram In raised letters completes the fin. 
ishing touches to the case. 

This concern also makes a specialty of 
the Bean puncture-proof tire and the Mer- 
rill speed launch. 

"QORDON'B" LUGGAGE BAG 

The Vehicle Apron ft Hood Company, 

ot Colnmbus, Ohio, have recently brought 

out the Gordon Luggage Bag, Illustrated 

herewith. 



THE "AMERICAN" AUTOMOBILE 
CURTAIN CASE 
It Is a well known fact that automohlle 
curtains when left lying around the car 
or under the seat will accumu- 
late a lot ot dust and mud 
which In time will crack the 
same and ruin the celluloid 
films, etc. In order to pre- 
vent this the American Vul- 
canized Fibre Co., of 600-G07 
Kqultable Bldg., Wilmington, 
Del., have placed on the mar- 
ket the curtain case, a cut of 
which U shown herewith. 
This curtain case Is made of 
fibre and Is lined inside with a 
cotton lining. This case can 
be carried under the seat of 
the automobile or can be 
strapped on the back to the 
luggage carrier without any 
danger ot harm ever coming 

y __ ^^^ „ to the curtain. If the curtains 

'^cw^cuL are put in dry they will be 
found In Just as good condition when taken 
out as when they were put In. It can be 
made In various sizes to suit different 
sizes ot curtains. The case Is riveted and 
the top is held on by a strap and buckle. 



THE "AUTO" 8H0VEL 
The Union Furnace Mfg. Co., of Union 
Furnace, Pa., Is offering to the automobll- 
ist a shovel designed especially tor his use. 
This shovel can be carried In the locker 
or tool box, or fastened to the footboard. 
It Is especially desirable to have on hand 



for cross-country driving or on had roads. 
It Is also a most convenient tool In the 
camping outfit. The blade is G z S Ins. and 
the handle Is 30 Ins. over all with plain 
handle, and 26 Ins. with T-handle. 



CTCLB AND AOTOMOBILE TRADH JOOTINAL. 



CTCLB AND AUTOMOBIL.U THABE JOURNAL.. 



HUOE DOLNAS. 



The simplex Motor Car Company, Mlft- 
', hawaha, Indiana, V. S. A., Is ofterlng for 
, the geason of 1909 a single construction of 
chaaalB In two lengths, respectively inin. 
' and 110-lDch wheel base. The large chas- 
' sla Is fitted with E-passenger, T-passenger 
and llmouaine bodies, and the shorter 
chassis 1b fitted with touiiDg roadster 
bodies, having seats for either two, three 
or tour persons, the rear seat or seats be- 
l Ing stationary. 

', The American Simplex motor, 4 cylin- 
ders, 2-cycle, water cooled. In one slie only, 
la used with both lengths of chassis. The 
' cylinders are E-lnch bore with 5-lnch piston 
stroke, crank box pressure cylinder chaise 
supply, eo B. H. P.. at 900 R. P. M., ac- 
tual reading against dynamo resistance. 

The long chassis hlgb-Bpeed reduction is 
tbree turns ol the crank shaft to one turn 
of the 3(i-lnch rear wheels. Tbe shorter 
' chassis reduction la 2% turns of the crank 
" shaft to one turn of the 36-Inch driving 
wheels. Nine hundred crank shaft turns 
' gives about 32 miles per bour, 3 to 1. re- 
duction. Tbese American Simplex 2 cycle 
' motors are strong at 1600 R. P. M., and the 
longer chassis fitted with either 5 or T- 
passenger body can easily mahe 60 miles 
on a good road. The shorter chassis, with 
touring roadster bodies and 2^ to 1 gear 
reduction, can make 70 miles, easily. The 
T-pasaenger car makes from 10 to 15 miles 
' per gallon of gasoline on fair roadB and the 
roadster body cars do about the same, as 
they are commonly driven faster than the 
T-passenger cars. 

Much interest attaches to these large 
and speedy cars because they are tbe first 
elaborate and heavy cars to be driven by 
2-cycle motora. 



The present 4 cylinder chassis construc- 
tion was begun In 1907 and the capital 
stock of the company was Increased from 
tlOO.OOO to (200,000, and a brick factory. 
384^72 feet, with a stock room addition 
on one side, 24x72 feet, was buUt In 190S. 
This commodious factory was also equipped 
best American machine tools, at a cost ot 
in 1908 with a very complete plant ot the 
over f50,000. One hundred of these Ameri- 
can Simplex cars will be turned out tbe 
season ol 1909. 

This la the first large and comparatively 
high priced motor car to be driven by a 
2-strolie cycle engine. Gullck first placed 
two cylinders, 2-cycle, in a 6-passenger car, 
106-Inch wheel base, 34-lnch tires. This 
first American Simplex car waa roomy and 
speedy, had the same torque aa that of a 
4-cyiinder, 4-cycle motor, was easy riding 
and strongly driven, and seemed to the 
writer to be In every way a very satisfac- 
tory and desirable automobile. But the 
company saw fit to take two years for de- 
signing, constructing and trying out the 
T-paasenger car with a 2-cycle, 4-cy Under 
motor, 50 B. H. P.. at 900 R. P. M.. first de- 
liveries made In 1909, after tbe first one of 
their 4-cyllnder cars bad been driven 
across the continent to the Pacific Ocean 
and bach, and had made about 50,000 miles 
on the road with no repairs or addition 
save tires and brake facing. This first car 
Is now, after 50,000 miles of rough road 
work, aa good as new, and Is the car on 
which the "on the road" run ot this story 

The entire construction ot this 4-CTlln- 
der chassis Is most elaborate. Nothing in 
the way of material la too good for it and 



CtCLHI AND AUTOMOBlbG TRADE JOURNAL. 



CVCLfi aND AtlTOMOBtLB TftADB JOURNAL. 



no attempt haa been made to leesen the 
very high labor product ion-cost by reduc- 
tion in number of pieces or in number and 
class of Onisblug operatlone; ball bearings, 
aluminum and bronze castings and drop 
torglngs are treely employed, while there 
is no stint In grinding, scraping and lap- 
ping operations. The chassis frame has 



plates to alr-ttght seatlngs. The carbur- 
etor is among the most elaborate and cost- 
ly ever seen by the writer. Is Oullck's own 

design, and works well. 






two widths. Is raised in the rear, and has 
no less than Ove cross-glrts, all oC which 
are complex in form and two of which are 
greatly arched. Gullcic prefers to make 
. the gear hox Integral with one bevel gear 
housing member, aluminum casting, and 
gives these aluminum casting rear axle 
members very large diameters, so that no 
truss rods are needed. 

The motor construction is most elabor- 
ate, all Joinings fitted metal to metal, 
milled, scraped and lapped on surface 



1% and 2 Inches, web % and ribs !4< wltb 
% fillet radius, as shown in Pig. 7. 

The yoke opening is G^ Inches, the stub- 
axle pins are cylindrical steel, hardened 
and ground, 1-lncb diameter. In hardened 
and ground steel bushes. The pins have 
hex. beads and heavy grease cups at the 
top, with a castellated hex. out and spUt- 
pln at the bottom. The load Is carried on 
a circle of 5-16 halls. The steel drop- 
forging steering arm is applied, 7^4 Inches 
radius. 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



103 



Tbe front wheels are od Tlmken roUera, 
about 4^ Inches total roller base, have 
10 spokes, 1% laches thick. The spoke 
flanges are TA Inches diameter, with 10 
bolts, T-IG diameter. 

The stub-axle large diameter U 1 3-3Z 
Inches, and the stub-axles and aile-hubs 
are steel drop-Iorglnga. The stub-axle 
pin axis Is vertical, and the axle axis la 
at an angle of 2 deg. to the pin axla, and 
the low vertical spoke axis Is also vertical. 
The front wheel tires are 36x4^ Inches. 

This Is made up of two principal steel 
castings, one for each end, a right-hand 
bevel gear housing member, a left-hand 



nickel steel, oil tempered. The bevel ba^ 
ance gears are 6^ Inches out. diameter, 
1^ Inches face, with 4 bevel pinions, 3H 
greatest diameter, 26 gear teeth and 14 
pinion teeth, balance gears and plniona 
chrome nickel steel, oil tempered; the bal- 
ance gear hubs are carried on F. and S. 
annular bearings % diameter balls. 

The live axles Inside ends are cut with 
six grooves, H-lncb wide by H deep, and 
slide in the correspond Ingl7 broached, bal- 
ance gear huba. The out. diameter of 
these Inner live axle ends Is 1% inches 
for 5% inches, then reduced to 1% inches 
for 10% Inches, then tapered larger tor 5 
Inches to 1 15-16 diameter at the flange, as 



gear housing member Integral with the 
sliding gear box, and a front cover, these 
latter three principal membera being 
aluminum castings of very large diameter, 
to give so great a resistance to vertical 
stress as to make it safe to omit the under- 
neath truss rod commonly applied to the 
bevel-gear drive rear axle asaembly. The 
construction is shown In Figs, g and 9. 

The principal dimensions are, steel cast- 
ing sleeves, 3 11-16 out. diameter, S-16 
wall, expanded inside, to a 7-lnch diameter 
flange, bolted to the aluminum casting 
gear housing with S bolts, 7-16 diameter, 
nnts close on the screw threads, no split 
pins. The out. diameter of the aluminum 
gear bousing membera Is 14^ Inches, and 
the two lengthwise membera are held to- 
gether by a shoulder and 10 holts, 7-16 
diameter. 

The sliding gear box is Integral with the 
left bevel gear casing member. The front 
cover of the gear box outside flange meas- 
urements are 17 Inches, horizontal and 
12^ vertical dimensions, faced flat to the 
gear housing flange and held with 13 bolts, 
7-16 diameter. 

The outside diameter of the bevel gear 
is 12'A inches, 8 teeth, 1% fftce, chrome 



shown In Fig. S. The wheels are on tapers, 
1% large diameter, 1% small diameter, 
taper 4% long, retained with two Wood- 
ruff keys and a castellated hex. nut, and 
spilt pin. 

THE sLwnm insAB. 

This Is selective, 3 speeds forward and 
a reverse, side shaft at the left of line 
shaft, which Is the bevel pinion shaft 
The pinion -shaft large diameter is 1% 
Inches and the side shaft large diameter 
Is 1% Inches, both shafts are In F. and S. 
annular bearings, %-lnch balls. 

The bevel pinion shaft Is prolonged In- 
side the pinion, 1 3-16 diameter. In an In- 
side F. and 8. annular bearing, 11-16 ball 
diameter, making an excellent pinion sup- 
port. The speed-change geara are chrome 
nickel steel, oil tempered, largest gear 
diameter, 7% inches, gear faces from l\i 
to Hi Inches, all gears cut 5, d. p.; these 
large diameter and face gears have done 
over 50,000 miles with only slight wear. 
The bevel gear housing and gear box 
members are fitted oil tight, metal to 
metal, and all gears are packed In heavy 



IM 



CYCLE AND AUTOHOBILB TRADE JOURNAL. 



HpHngs outside tbe cbaaels frame. All 
Bprjng eyes sre fitted with hardened and 
ground ateel bushes, and all spring-eye 
plus are eteel, hardened and ground, with 
beavy grease cups In thetr outer ends and 
grease holes through to the middle of the 
spring eye. The front springs are 40 
Inches long by 2% inches wide, 9 leaves, 
lipped, 2 bandE on each end, first band tak- 
ing S leaves, second band taking 8 leaves, 
perched 19 Inches, front spring eye to 
middle of front axle. The rear springs are 
5G Inches long by 2*4 inches wide. 11 leaves, 
lipped, 2 bands on each spring end, flrst 
band taking 5 leaves, second band taking 
9 leaves, springs perched 27 Inches, from 
rear eye to the rear sjtle middle. The 



TOBSION AMI. 

This is made of steel tube stock 2 Inches 
out. diameter, % bore, by turning the taper 
on the forward part and reaming the hole 
at tbe rear end to lighten the arm. The 
arm tube length Is G2% Inches. The rear 
end Is flnUbed to 1 63-64 diameter for 10>4 
Inches length. The front end diameter is 
Hi inches. This arm terminates in a 
globe IH Inches diameter at tbe forward 
end. the globe having a shank, 1-incb 
diameter, fixed in the arm-bore front end 
by reaming the tube-bore, shrinking and 
fitting a 3-lG diameter cross-pin. 

The globe is in haif-boxes. closed by a 
Btift coiled spring, tbe box casing having 
a stem sliding in a globed guide, top and 



■dfuilHl to lanfUl for oUalnlng tqunL bnka uHiin. 

front springs arc seated on leather and 
have bronze ciip-plates on top. ribbed at 
the ends to retain the clips. The rear 
springs are on capped re voluble perches, 
seated In finished loumals in the steel 
casting rear axle sleeves. 

These are steel tube bodies, 1^ out. 
diameter, % walls, with drop forged eyes 
pinned and brazed Into each end. These 
steel eyes are soft, with steel pins, % 
diameter, hardened and ground, hand oiled. 

The struts are fixed In length, and ex- 
tend from eyes Integral with the steel 
casting axle sleeves, to Parson's bronze 
bracket eyes, the brackets being riveted 
to the chassis frame aides. The rear axle 
ends crosswise positions are fixed In chas- 
sis assembling and remain unchanged, as 
there is no strut-length adjustment. 



bottom colled springs tieing placed to 
slst the rear axle torsion In the usual n 

ner. 



The frame Is a moat elaborate construe' 
tlon of pressed steel side frames, raised 
at the rear end, aqd applied spring eyes 
front and rear, steel casting eyes In front 
and Parson's bronze castings In the rear. 
carried Inside the chassis frame sides and 
rear cross-girt 

The greatest chassis frame depth is 5 
Inches, 2 inches general width, 11-64 stock 
thickness. There are 5 cross-glrts, one 
with a high rise and one with a low drop. 
all as shown In the photograph reproduc- 
tions. Tbe chassis frame Is in two widths. 
35 inches and 31 Inches, there Is no sub- 
frame, the motor base having one point of 



CTCLB AND ADTOHOBILB TRADE JOURNAL. 



b iHTVl-iur drlTtn from Ihv pump ahmri, which hti & cmMwlH iJlApknr In the gw cottr. Tht Iciiltlan la a torn- 
plala douU* irtlffn. two aptrk pIu^eb In each crllQdar brad, wllh aterare battarr ■o'l macneta, 

support lorward and two potnta ol sup- by ^ thick, Id two leDgthe, l\ and Z% 

port on the chassis frame sides near the Inches, retanied by rivets. The wbole of 

motor base rear. The frame Bides have the chassis frame Is cold riveted. The 

reinforcing members about 66 Inches iong chassis frame rear-end rise is 2\i Inches. 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



The fan Is gear-driven by a vertical shaft 
aod spiral gears, has 4 aluminum Tanea 
applied to a bronze spider applied to a 
steel Shalt The vertical abaft Is spiral 
gear-driven from the crank shaft and the 
fan-shaft Is driven by hardened eteel bevel 
gears from the vertical shaft. The verti- 
cal shaft and the fan-shaft are In 2-polnt 
ball bearings. The fan has 4 vanes. Is 
IT-lnch out. diameter and makes two turns 
to one ot the crank shaft. 



The radiator is supported on globe 
washers seated on the chassis frame aldet, 
under the radiator brackets, with bolta 
and springs to press the brackets on the 



This 2-cycle motor is 4 cylinders In dual 
units with integral water jackets, all gray 
iron. The cylinder bore and piston stroke 
are each 5 Inches. The exhaust port top 
Is 1 Inch above low piston position, and 
the intake port top line Is H above low 
piston position. The engine is 3-port and 
the third port Is open % when the piston 
Is at high point. The piston is 6 5-lG 
Inches long, and bas a slightly crowned 
head, with a raised and braced Integral de- 
flector, 1% high. The port bridging and 
circumferential dimeasiooa are not for 
publication. This motor shows 50 B. H. P. 
against electrical resistance at 900 R. P. M. 

nnil In atmnir nt 1RnO R P M Thn anaed 
Bis 






CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



« all 
tft IB 
I are 



2\ long OD tbe piston pin. The piston 
pin Is retained by a H screw in each pis- 
ton hub, screws tapped Into the pin-wall 
and turned hard on copper washers curved 
to flt the pistons Inside, these copper 
washers having lipa turned up to retain 
the screw heads after tbe screws are 
turned borne. Tbe copper washer If pa 
must be turned down before tbe pin screws 
can be removed. 

The pistons have 3 packing rings over 
the pins and one at the lower ends. The 
rings are eccentric, and are G 13-64 inches 
out. diameter when free, the greatest ring 
tbtckness Is 3-16, least thickness ^. The 
ring cuts arc 46 deg. angle, and tbe ring 
ends are slotted and have steel tongues 
1-16 thick, fluished on the out ends of 3-16 
diameter studs screwed In the piston 
groove bottoms. The piston ring-grooves 
are G-1C wide bj 13-64 deep, as shown in 
Fig. 11. piston photograph reproduction. 

Tbe connecting rod top ends are uncut 
and are bushed with special bearing 
bronze sleeves, forced Into the rod eyes. 
Tbe connecting rod lower ends are capped, 
caps held with 2 bolts. 7-16 diameter having 
castellated nuts, spllt-pln retained. The 
rod boxes are die-cast white metal, with 
six brass liners, 6 each G-IOOO thick, and 



BiuBit, ui |i[«veui lesiiiiiKe irum one pit to 
another. Tbe clearance filling disks are 
of aluminum, cored to leave G-32 walls, are 
slotted to flt the crank arms, and tbe fillers 
are held to the crank arms with 3 screws. 
5- 16 diameter, one In the middle and one 
at each end. These filler retaining screws 
being tapped Into tbe crank arms. The 
maximum crank bOT pressure Is about 8 
pounds. Tbe side-pipe Is nearly circular 
In section, about 2 Incbes diameter, to tbe 
Intake port, and tbe third port passage 
to tbe crank box Is about tbe same. 



A double Ignition system Is used, there 
being two Jump-spark plugs In each cylin- 
der, one, wired to the Slmms-Boscb bi^ 
tenalon magneto, in tbe middle of the cyl- 
inder bead, and one spark plug close In- 
side the defiector upright, wired to tbe coll. 
The current supply to colls Is from a stor- 
age battery. The spark plugs are about Z 
inches apart center to center, and tbe 
simultaneous use of both sparks does not 
cause the motor to accelerate without 
change of throttle position, showing satie- 
factory Ignition and combustion with 
either Ignition system alone. 

The &y wheel is 17 inches diameter, 6 
inches face, rim 1 inch thick in front of 
the web, and I>4 inches thick In rear of 



108 



CVCLB AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



the web, welgbt, 79 pouode. The clutch 
U two steel (UbIib, 14% out. diameter by U 
thick, and 3 gray Iron dlakB, with 80 cork 
iDsertB I Inch diameter in each. Ttila 
clutch Is forced Into normal engagement 
by 4 colled springs, tempered steel, about 
880 pounds, total spring thrust. The 
clutch disk hub 1b on two F. anil S. annular 
ball bearings mounted on the rearward 
prolongation ol the crank Btaalt. The pro- 
peller shaft is made In two lengths, fiange 



HIUPLEI CARBtlSCTOB. 

ThiB la all ot ordinary form, regulation 
elements, annular cork floats concentric 
with a single stand pipe and a section- 
operated air valve linked to raise the 
needle valve and Increase the fuel sup- 
ply as the plBton suction raises the air 
valve. Altbough this motor ts 3-port tbe 
carburetor suction 1b not subject to sud- 
den and violent changes because there are 
four motor cylinders, so that one cylinder 



1 S liidi ■!»•• 



Tilt cTltibdcn coimisr 






connection, with Hooke-Jofnt forks at 
front and rear ends. Tbe cross trunnions 
are 1% diameter, the cross Is 414 out. 
diameter, over trunnion ends, is steel, 
hardened, and the trunnions are ground, 
and work In hardened and ground bushes 
carried Inside the sliding clutch bub and 
protected by a cupped leather slipped on 
the universal Joint casing and retained 
with two hose-clips with screws. The 
chrome nickel steel propeller shaft body 
iB 1% Inches diameter, and the propeller 
shaft leneth. C to C of Joint trunnions Is 



I 



sucks the carburetor through nearly ISO 
deg. ot crank angular advance. Hence, as 
the column of mixture in the carburetor 
piping 1b highly elastic, from 250 crank 
shaft turns per minute upward the car- 
buretor Intake air current shows but little 
fluctuation. The gasoline tank Is rectan- 
gular, of galvanized iron, riveted and soft 
soldered, is placed under the driver's seat 
and holds 20 gallons. There is no reserve 
gasoline supply. 

lUBRlCATIOS. 

The lubrication Is by mechanical oLer 
spiral gear-driven from the pump shaft. 10 
oil leads, with Individual Bights, visible 
when the hood is lifted only, four to the 
four cylinders, opening Into cylinder 
grooves about %-lnch below the bottom of 
high piston position: these 4 leads oil the 
pistons and also replenish the splash- 
pools; 6 leads go to tbe crank abaft bear- 
ings and one to the top of tbe fan drive, 
from which the oil descends to lubricate 
the fan joumalB and gears. 






GI inches for tbe llT-lnch wheel base 
chasals. 



This Is cylindrical in form. 30 Inches 
long by 9^ inches out. diameter, with a 
total of six concentric shells, all of sheet 
iron about 22 gauge in thickness, exhaust 
Just going Into tbe Inner shell 3^ Inches 
diameter, and shell perforations forcing 
the exhaust to travel some distance before 
Onally reaching the atmosphere through 
two exterior segmental pipes, opening un- 
derneath to the rear. This muffler gives 
complete silencing. 

The brakes are all Internal Inside of two 
brake drums, malleable castings, single 
integral webi the Internal drum diameters 
are 15 and 10 Inches respectively, with i^ 
Inches air space between the drum sur- 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



Tb* erUndn' flrlAr ordtr tram Ltw mr. !■ 1. 3. 1. t. 

faces. The malleable casting brake shoeB 
are Jointed, are cam-rocker eipandeil and 
are asbestos faced. The larger drum ia 
2H Inches face, tbe smaller drum la 2% 




Incbea face. The brakes are not applied 
through eveners. The large diameter la 
. the ordinary brake drum and the small 
diameter drum Is the emergency brake 
drum. 

The spark and throttle levers are 
ratchet retained on top of the steering 
hand wheel, see FIr. 13. The steering ac- 
tion ia right and left screw threads, exter- 
nal and Internal. In a well known form. 
The outer one of two outside hand levers, 
at the driver's right Is latched, and is 
pulled backward to apply' the emergency 



brake shoes to the smaller internal drums 
on the rear wheel hubs. There Is no In- 
terlinking of control operations. 

The Inner hand lever has 5 positions. Is 
in two slots, and Is moved to effect the 
gear shifts. The two large pedals have 
swinging pedals Jointed to stems which 
can be adjusted In eyes at the free ends of 
the pedal levers, to suit the driver's con- 
venience. Tbe right large pedal Is pushed 
forward to apply the brake shoes to the 
larger, ordinary brake drums on the rear 
wheel huba. The left large pedal Is 
pushed forward to disengage tbe clutcb. 
A horizontal accelerator pedal is placed 
between the large pedals and a plunger 
pedal opens the muftler cut-out valve. 

There Is a vertical air pump on the front 
board, hand-operated to force air Into the 
gasoline tank, and a small gauge la placed 
on the front board to show the gasoline 
tank pressure. The front board also car- 
ries two carburetor adjusting linkages, one 
for adjusting the needle lift" by the air 
valve and one to work a butterfly throttle 
valve In the carburetor auxtllary air valve 
air intake passage. Tbe coll box occupies 
the usual position on the front board. 

On April 18, 1909, the veteran American 
Simplex T-passenger car already men- 
tioned as having covered 50.000 miles with- 
out replacements other than brake fac- 
ings, started in the morning, driven by 
D. A. Shaw, president of the American 
Simplex Company, and the writer, as ob- 
server, to make a 100-mlle, measured-fuel 
run, but the engine began misfiring very 
soon, showed no power and could hardly 
make 20 miles an hour, and the run was 
abandoned for tbe day. The trouble 
proved to be in tbe Insulation of the two- 
year-old wlrlUB, which yet looked good but 
was found on close examination to be all 
gone, full of cracks and current leaks 
which opene<I as soon as the car was 
driven bard. Besides bad Insulation, tbe 



no 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



gasoline supply pipe to the carburetor was 
found to be fumed inside, so that the 
motor was starred for fuel. 

April 26, gasoline pipe clean and new 
wiring, no other changes, the veteran car 
left the Mishawaka shops, L. F. Maurer, 
chief draftsman, driving, President Shaw 
and three other passengers in the tonneau, 
and was driven to the Oliver House, South 
Bend, in 18 minutes, where the writer was 
taken aboard as front-seat observer, 6 pas- 
sengers all told, and the car was headed 
for Michigan City at 3.07 P. M. 

The Simplex was lively as a cricket, the 
day was cool but brilliant, small new 
leaves and pink buds were on the trees, 
and the big Simplex was more than willing 
to run fast. The road was clay, rough and 
bumpy and rutted, with some mud holes, 
to Laporte, 36 miles from the starting 
point, but Maurer can pick a road, and the 
big tires of the Simplex made smooth 
work of the rough side-roads, the main 
track being far too bumpy for our pace, 
which was from 40 to 60 miles. The Sim- 
plex rides very easy indeed with no noise 
and no vibration of the footboard at all, 
but the tonneau got a good tossing over 
the bumps. As we were entering Laporte 
we had a left driver puncture and stopped 
from 3.54 to 4.28 to replace the inner tube; 
and again in Laporte at a garage to make 
the new tire valve tight. 

On the return we dropped two passen- 
gers, leaving only four aboard for the rest 
of the run. The car flew like a bird to 
8 miles west of Michigan City, when the 
motor suddenly went hot, and we stopped 
at 5.20 P. M. for water; the radiator was 



found nearly full, but everything was 
loose forward and the radiator stay-rod 
bad interfered with the fan vanes and 
stopped the fan. Supplies were on board, 
and everything was made right and tight 
before we started at 5.39, and from that 
time on we ran non-stop, to 9% miles 
west of Michigan City, save for one stop 
of 2 minutes to pick the broken g;lass out 
of the glass shield top-frame, and another 
stop at the Oliver House, South Bend, then 
to the shops at Mishawaka at 6.34 P. M.. 
where it took 10^ gallons of gasoline to 
fill the tank full. 

The whole distance covered was about 
113 miles. The time was 209 minutes run- 
ning time for about 113 miles, travel, much 
over half the road being very rou^h clay. 
From Laporte to the end of the white road, 
about 21^ miles, the road is very good and 
most of this 43 miles was made at from 
50 to 60 miles, 55 being common. The re- 
mainder of the road was rough. One se- 
vere bump shattered the top glass of the 
shield, and our tail lamp Jumped ofT some- 
where on the road so that we lost our rear- 
end luminary. 

The weight of this 7-passenger touring 
car without passengers is 3740 pounds. In 
this run we had six passengers to Laporte. 
36 miles, and four passengers all through, 
an average total weight of about 4400 
pounds, average speed 32 7-10 miles, 113 
miles with lO^^ gallons of gasoline, 10.76 
miles to the gallon at nearly 33 miles per 
hour, much more than half the way on 
rough roads, this time and the per gal- 
lon mileage being both very good. 



PRICE OF CAMERON CARS INCREASED 

The Cameron Motor Co., of New York 
City, distributors of the 4 and 6-cylinder 
v^ameron air-cooled cars, manufactured in 
Beverly, Mass., and New London, Conn., 
advise us that the prices of the 3 and 4- 
cylinder models have advanced as follows*. 
Model 14 runabout, $900 to $950; Model 14, 
3-passenger roadster, $950 to $985, and 
Model 16 4-passenger roadster, $1050 to 
$1100. 



Something new in the line of hoods 
which seems likely to become popular has 
been built for George H. Bressette, of the 
Susquehanna Coal Company, by the Ameri- 
can Locomotive Company, Mr. Bressette 
was buying an Alco tourabout and said 
that the ordinary hood did not sufficiently 
shut out the sky and sun. He wanted one 
with such a rake In front as to meet the 
sky line, so that he would have no sun In 
his eyes and be able to sit at the wheel 
and see the road only. It was a difficult 
task, but a hood of this sort was designed 



for him and it proved to be so "classy" in 
appearance as well as serviceable that It 
excites general admiration. The whole 
trick consists in giving the forward part 
a sharper downward slope, but it makes a 
considerable difference to the eye. 



The Pennsylvania Motor Association held 
its annual meeting at Wilkes-Barre, Pa., 
on April 23. Secretary Wolf reported an 
increase of five clubs and 800 members dur- 
ing the year. The officers elected were as 
follows : 

President R. P. Hooper, Philadelphia; 
first vice president, P. A. Meixell, Wilkes- 
Barre; John A. Wilson, Franklin, second 
vice president; Paul A. Wolff, Pittsburg, 
third vice president; secretary, Joseph A. 
Weeks, of Philadelphia; chairman of Good 
Roads, S. Boyer Davis, Philadelphia; 
chairman Legislative Committee, John A. 
Wilson, Franklin; Edward Kneeland, Pitts- 
burg; Jacob B. Rider, Lancaster; J. F. Mc- 
Gourthy, Wilkinsburg; J. Henry Beck, 
Philadelphia, dire^ors. 



CTCLB AMD ADTOHOBILB TRADE JOURNAL. lU 

Here is the $1500 Car 

That Looks Twice That 



jmnk 



MITCHELL MOTOR CAR CO. 

508 Mitchell St., Racine, Wia. 

STANDARD MANUFACTURERS A. U. C. H. A, 

European Branch : No. 20, Rue de HUitt, Paris, France 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 

The Lane 1909 Cars 



Lane Sales Company, 2637-39 Broadway. 
New York, factory at Pougbkeepsle, N. Y.. 
located In Its own building, Broadway and 
lOOth street. New York City, bad Ita flrat 
steam car on the road in the summer ot 
1900 and sold five cars tbat year. The 
sales of Lane steam cars have each year 



P. compound or 76 H. P. simple, steam 300 
lbs., two revs, of crank>shaft to one of bal- 
ance-gear drum. The weight with tanks 
Qlled Is 3400 lbs. Price {3100.00 including 
all accessories. 6 lamps, mats, bom and 
tools, ready for the road. Cape tops from 
flOO to $150 extra. 



since more than doubled those of the year 
Immediately preceding. 89 of these Hteam 
cars were sold In 1908 and the Lane Sales 
Company expects to place about 150 of 
these steam cars during the sea bod of 1303. 

The 7-paBsen8er 30 H. P. touring car has 
a wheel base of 119 ins., gauge GO Ins. The 



The Lane 1909 ■'Close coupled" 30 H. P. 
touring car has the same chassis specin- 
catlons as the 7 passenger car save wheel 
base and tires. The wheel base of this 
"Close Coupled" car Is 125 Ins., and the 
tires are all 30x4 Ins. "CIobe conpled" r«- 
fers to close placing of seats and rear seat 



tires are 36x4 ins. front, ZGxiM Ins. rear. 
Motor, compound or simple, two double- 
actlug steam-cylinders. 3% Ins. and 6^ 
Ins. respective diameters x 4 I us. piston 
Stroke. Chain to divided rear axles, with 
bevel balance gear and driving wheels fixed 
to the rear axle ends. The motor Is 30 H. 



width only, this car seating four passen- 
gers. The car weighs 3300 lbs., price 
J3OOO.00 including same equipment as seven 
passenger car. The spare tires are car- 
ried in the rear. 

The B-pasaenger touring car 20 H, P. has 
103 Inches wheel l>ase, gauge 66 inches. 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 




tires all 32x4 Inches. This car complete 
weighs 2400 IbG. and selU for t^OOO. 

The Lane boiler has always been a ver- 
tical, flre-tuhe construction, -flre-tube car- 
ried directly up through the ateam-Bpttce 
and bave always bad steel ahella. The 
tubes have been subject to change as to 




both diameter and material: the Lane boil- 
ers are now made In two diameters. 20 and 
24 ins., each 16 ins. long, shells >4 in. thick, 
drawn. seamleBS, lower tube sheet Integral 
with shell, all tubes I In. out. dia., I-IG In. 
tube wall tbicknesB, top tube sheet cup- 
ped down and held with % in. diameler 
rivets. The fire tubes are electrically 
welded Into the lower tube-abeet and ex- 
panded in (he upper sheet. All Lane boil- 
ers are tested to IGOO lbs. cold water pres- 
sure and are fitted with spring-loaded safe- 
ty valves to blow off at 500 lbs. These 
Lane hollers are fitted with feed water 
heating colls of % In. brass tube, % in. out. 
dia.. placed in the up-take over the boiler. 
Tbe fuel used la gasoline, vaporized over 
the burners, admission of combustible va- 
por to the burner tubea regulated by the 
ateam pressure. The L^ne motors are all 
2-cyllnders, compound, double acting, all 
naked cyiindera. link valve-motion, two 
sizes, rated at 20 and 30 H. P. The en- 
gines are fitted with vertical condensers In 
front and tbe cars make about four miles 
to the gallon of water and from 7 to 10 
miles per gallon of gasoline burned, ac- 
cording to car weights, which run from 
2250 to 3400 lbs. all on. It will be noted 
that the gasoline consumption is very lit- 
tle. If any, greater than that of 6-cyllnder 
gas-engine driven cars, same weights. 

The company will offer for the season 
of 1909 two different chaesls models. 20 and 
30 H. P. motors, Btted with five different 
bodies, with aeats for from 3 to T pasaen- 
gere. The 30 H. P. chaasls la made in 
three different lengtha of wheel baae, and 
the 20 H. P. In two lengths. 



The boiler lower tube-sheet, integral with 
the drawn-ateel boiler-shell has tbe 1 inch 
dia. steel tubea electrically welded Into it, 
so that the whole lower end of the boiler 



114 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL 



can be heated red liot without oausl&g tab« 
and sheet leaks. 

The engine croes-headB are on one ball 
on each side, the eccentrics are on ball- 
bearings, the connecting rods are fitted 
with roller bearings at the wrfst ende and 
the crank-ahart Is in roller bearings. A 
pump plunger Is died to each cross-head, 
glTlng two plunger pumps, one for the 
water boiler-teed and one tor the air-pres- 
sure Id the gasoline tank. The engines 
are set at about 30 degrees angle, crank- 



The Lane burner is open ^ inch between 
the % Inch diameter burner tubes, bo at 
to ensure a sufficient supply of oxygen for 
complete combustion, and the 2^ Ins. dla. 
mixing tube is carried 3 tns. outside of 
the burner casing bo as to cool the mixture 
enough to prevent firing bach into the bnr> 
ner and mixing tubes. The blow-out of the 
bnmer flame is prevented by reducing the 
Inner mixing tube to 114 Ins. Inside diam- 
eter and by fitting a cowl closed on the 




shaft low, giving an oll-basln for splash 
lubrication, ordinary cylinder lubrication 
by oil drawn in on the piston rod, with an 
emergency special otUng assembly which 
oils the motor cylinder and the indepen- 
dent steam-pump cylinders, two indepen- 
dent steam-pumps, one for water holler- 
feed and one for gasoline-tank alr-presanre, 
being fitted. The drive is by chain from 
the crank-shaft to the rear axle bevel-hal- 
ance-gear. 

There are brake drums on each rear 
wheel and the bevel-balsnce gear drum 
Is used for the ordinary brake. The front 
wheels are on Ttmken rollers and the live 
rear axles are on Lane roller bearings. 
The rear wheels are fixed to the tapered 
live axle ends with keys and hex nuta. 



top, bottom, front and outside, air taken In 
at the rear of the cowl, which acta both 
as a wind-shield and mud-guard. 

The Lane condenser is five vertical rows 
of fiattened brass tubes opening Into a top 
header to which the exhaust is piped, and 
to an unobstructed base cavity which is 
piped to the top of the water tank. The dis- 
charge of this condenser to the water tank 
Is Intermittent, about the base cavity con- 
tent, a quart or eo, at each discbarge. This 
condenser piping avoids a water pump be- 
tween the condenser and the water tank. 
though the bottom of the condenser Is 
about no Ins, below the tank top. 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



in the axle tube ende and pinned aad braz- 
ed, same bb the steel caating aprlog perch- 
es are fixed to front axle. The front wheels 
are on Tlmkea rollera, adjnatable. The 
pareilel steering rod is In the rear of the 
front axle. The stub-axle steering arms 
are 6% Ins. radius, with substantial rod 
connectlona. 

The rear asle Is also a Lane design and 
construction. This rear axle la bnllt up of 
steel tnbe and steel plate 3^x>4 Ins. form- 
ed in an Irregular octagon to take the bevd 
balance gear drum and sprocket. The 
driving chain Is 1 inch pitch, % Inch rollers 
for 20 H. P. and % In. rollers for 30 H. P. 



The rear-hub brake drums are, 20 H. P. 
chassis 8x1% Ins. external bands, vulcan- 
ized-flber faced. The balance drum ordi- 
nary brake la 10x2% Ins., external band, 
vnlcan Ized-flber faced. The 30 H. P. brake 
drums on the rear wheels are 10x2 Ins., ex- 
terior bands, vnlcanlzed-Sbsr faced. The 
balance gear brake drum is 12x3 Ins. ex- 
terior band, vu lean Ued- fiber lined. 

The gasoltoe tank Is of galTanlzed steel, 
cylindrical, oval ends, 17 gallons capacity 
for the 20 H. P. and 23 gallons for the 30 
H. P. motor, and the tank carrying 60 lbs. 
air pressure on top of the gasoline. 



, wiih t pluDior- p«dat Dt«Tii#d 



The 20 H. P. chassis front springs are 37 
In a., long by 2 Ins. wide, five leaves, 
tongue d and grooved, top 4 leaves banded 
together, springs Jointed to chassis frame 
eyes in front aad linked In rear. The rear 
springs are 47 Ins. long by 2 Ins. wide, six 
leaves, tongued and grooved, top 3 leaves 
banded together, rear spring perches Qxed 
to the rear axle, rear springs Jointed to 
chassis frame eyes in rear and linked to 
chassis frame brackets In front. 

The 30 H. P. springs, same general con- 
struction and placing as the 20 H. P., are 
41% Ins, long front, by 2 Ins. wide, 7 leaves 
tongued and grooved, top 4 leaves banded 
together. The rear springs are 50 Ins. long 
hy 2 Ins. wide, 7 leaves, tongued and groov- 
ed, top 4 leaves banded together, rear 
perches ^ed to axle tubes, springs Jointed 
to cbasslB frame In rear and linked to 
frame brackets In front. 



This Is of heavy copper, Is placed be- 
tween the condenser and the boiler, and Is 
piped to the motor water-force-pump, the 
water steam-pump and the water hand 
pump. The condenser discharge pipe 
opens near the top of the water tank In- 
terior, and a water over-flow pipe, % ins. 
below the condenser pipe top end affords a 
steam exit alsa 

TBK BODns. 

The Lane bodies are aluminum, by the 
Springfield Metal Body Company, and have 
fine outlines, as shown by the illnstraUons. 
The painting and upholstering are of the 
best throughout and the cars present 8 
very flne apparance Indeed. 

The auxiliary control Is. by 8 handles, 
covered as shown In Tig. 3, and exposed 
hv removal of cover as shown In Fig. 5. It 
should he clearly understood by the reader 



116 



CTCLB AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



that tbis auxiliary control system has notb- 
Ing to do with the regular coutrol ot the 
car, as handled by the driver when ninninK 
on the road, but simply controls the aux- 
iliary pump driving and oiling, supplying 
steam-driven water and air pumps and 
directing the hand pump oil supply. The 
emei^ency water and air pumping, when 
required, is done by Independent steam 
pumps, the air pump being available tor 
both tank pressure and tire Inflating, bo 
that tbe owner who drives his own car is 
relieved from all pump work as well as 
from starting crank hard and dangerous 

Outside ot the emergency control tb« 
Lane steam car driving is extremely sim- ' 
pie. and the entire control, both ordinary 
and auxiliary. Is ho obvious that it can be 
learned by anyone with a bait hour's atten- 
tion. 



To raise steam, tbe air down-dratt damp- 
er on top ot tbe hood Is opened to permit a 
tree passage ot air to the burner; next a 
door in the side ot tbe hood at the bottom 



ot tbe boiler Is opened, giving access to tbe 
"heater-cup" Into which about a fluid ounce 
of alcohol Is poured, this going to a horizon- 
tal pipe, perforated and asbestos clothed, 
placed below the gasoline vaporizing 
tube; next the asbestos pipe clothing alco- 
hol wick is lighted, and then a hand needle 
valve between the vaporizer and the burner 
middle-mixing tube 1b opened, to permit the 
gasoline vapor Injection to the burner main 
middle tube. As soon as the gasoline va- 
por begins to escape trom the small holes 
in the tops ot tbe burner tubes it is fired 
by the flame ot the heating tube and every- 
thing Is lett as it Is until the steam gauge 
shows, say 300 lbs., and tbe car Is ready 
to run. Raising steam usually takes about 
ten minutes. 

Before beginning to raise steam the dri- 
ver tries the gauge cock screwed directly 
into the boiler shell; K no water shows at 
the gauge the hand force-pump Is worked 
to fill the boiler to the gauge From the 
water tank. There are 3 gauge cocks; 
water at the lower cock shows enough to 
raise steam. 



As soon as steam is raised tbe top air- 
daroper is closed and steam is turned on 
to the torced-draugbt ejector, which sucks 
air up through tbe burner and boiler flues 
and then forces tbe product of combustion 
down to tbe open lower end ot the verti- 
cal down-dratt tube, which is about E ins. 
diameter and extends downward about to 
the bottom ot the burner. 

The motor can be started by moving the 
ratchet- retained band-lever on top ot the 
steering wheel, as soon as there la steam 
pressure enough in the boiler, and after 
the engine begins working the water-level 
and fuel-supply are automatically controll- 
ed. 

Tbe water-by-pass la controlled by two 
horizontal brass tubes on top ot the hood 
and fixed to tbe front side of ths front 
board governs tbe admission of water to 
tbe boiler by tbe expansion ot the brass 
tube lengths, the boiler water supply water 
force pump always works and the brass 
tube expansion and contraction closes or 
opens tbe by-pass to give tbe boiler more 

There are two vertical levers; the out- 
side one, latched. Is pushed forward to ap- 
ply tbe external rear hub drum brake 
bands through a full-length evener. The 
inside band-lever, latched, works the tumb- 
ling-shaft to make the link valve motion 
give an earlier or later cut-off, and the re- 
verse, these functions corresponding to the 
slldlng-gear speed-cbange lever ot gas-en- 
gine driven cars. The forced-draft steam- 
valve Is opened and closed by a small T- 
handie on top of tbe steering wheel. There 
is one pedal on tbe foot board, which is 
pushed forward to apply the balance gear 
drum brake-band, ordinary brake. A 
plunger pedal at the left of the steering 
column is depressed to change the engine 
from compound to simple, the engine re- 
turning to compound as soon as this plun- 
ger pedal is released. The stop-valve be- 
tween the boiler and throttle is opened and 
closed by a wooden hand wheel >at the front 
left of the foot-board. A small handle in 
the middle of the front-board rear face con- 
trols the holler water supply Independent- 
ly. A long vertical glass tube at the right 
of the front board shows the water-tank 
water-level. 

The large, handworked-plunger glasa-oil- 
cup at the top lett of the front-board, sup- 
plies lubricating oil to the two Indepen- 
dent steam pumps. 

The condenser is 5 rows ot fiattened 
brass tubes, vertical, 24% Ins. tube length 
between header flanges, top header and 
the hollow base. 27 Ins. long, condenser 
tube assembly thickness about 5^ ins, Tbe 
top header takes the exhaust, and tbe hol- 
low base Is piped to tbe top inside of the 
water tank. 



Tbe annual hill climb of tbe Worces- 
ter (Mass.) Automobile Club will be beld 
on the 12th of this month on tbe Dead 
Horse bill course. 



CYCLE AND ADTOMOBILB TRADE JOURNAL. 

10,000 MILES 5!^"* "■''•' 



Other Widely Advertised "Speed 
Indicators" Used on the SAME 
CAR so Inaccurate and Unreliable 
as to be Worse Than Useless, Broken 
and Replaced Many Times. 

Proof Beyond Dispute That 
The WARNER 

Auto-Meter 

Is Alone Worthy a Place 
on Every Automobile 

The whole ttory U in the extract from a 
letter from our Boston Branch House 
Manager : 

"About the severest test to which the 19M 
Warner Auto-Meter has yet been put was com- 
pleted when the Maxwell car flniabed Its 10,000 
lulle non-stop run here todaj'. A Model M Auto- 
Meter was attached to this car at the start, 
March 18th. 

"A was attached to the left- 
hand side. The broke the flrst 

day, and a new Inatrunient was put on. 

I understand that three different — 

were put on in all, and there were four 
breaks when almost 8,000 miles had 
t>een run off. Tkm ikt mUtaf Ttcurd 

iktwu M the Buj aiaal 4,S00. 

At the conclusion of the run ttiere 

was no flexible shaft on the 

at all. 

"The official mlleafte on the 
Warner at the end was 10,074.4, 
and the Instrument was then 
running as well as at any timi 
The flexible shaft ran through 
out without a whimper. 

"I submit that this Is ftoiaft 
some. Yourstruly, BROWN.'" 

Gm you, aft*T i*ck a nmvinc- 
inttitl, unitr id&ntical canditimm, 
specify *"' »' anylkiug iut lk§ ae- 
cnratt, itnrJf and depenJabU 
A UTO-METER » your earf 

TW WHIEI inilUIEIT CO. 

'" I. W., I.S.*. 



Waver or Trouble 




ever given 

a Speed 

Indicator 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE THADE JOURNAL. 

Moline Model "M" 



Hollne Motor Car Co., of Eaet Moline, 
111. recognizing tbe demand In many parts 
ot tbe United States for care of exception- 
al road clearance have met this require- 
ment In their new 1909 model "M." The 
power plant of this car conaiats of a 4- 
crllnd«r motor Z% bore and 4% stroke 
wltb thermal water circulation. In tbe 
plan view Fig. 2 is shown the general ar- 
rangement. The drive Is to a counter 
shaft and through side chains to the rear 
wheels, thus doing away wltb the differen- 
tial case at tbe center of the rear axle and 
allowing a very high road clearance. If 



Ing what might be termed a family or 
utility model. Tbe growing demand for a 
moderate price car, especially for farmers, 
caused Its Inception and its construction 
tbrougbout la provided particularly to 
meet the unfavorable road and other con- 
ditions to wblcb such a car 1b necessarily 
subject Large wheels and tires are also 
features which make possible tbe neces- 
sary road clearance as clearly shown in 
Fig. 1, a rear view. 

Tbe engine details and other features 
of this car were described In tbe February 
1909 Issue of the Journal, page 152, and 



a car is Intended for exclusive country 
driving as when used by those living in 
farming communities, large road clear- 
ance aside from general simplicity of con- 
stnicUoD Is perhaps of tbe greatest im- 
portance. Simplicity In the power plant, 
ease of repairing, acceselbility. sufficient 
power, flexibility of control and extra 
strong construction are also features which 
have been the aim of the designer in pro- 
ducing this 1909 model "M" Moline car. 
Another feature whicfi recommends this 
model fs the removable tonneau, this be- 



wlll not be here taken up la detail. Tbe 
side chain drive makes tbe use of a dif- 
ferential bousing unnecessary and. al- 
though the rear axle proper la no further 
from the ground than in many cars, yet 
the axle clearance at the middle is full 
14 in. In addition to this tbe lower edge of 
fly-wbeel. Including tbe mud pan, la ar- 
ranged BO that It does not extend below 
the level of tbe axles. Clearance at the 
center of the rear axle is the feature de- 
sired as this Is the point which Is likely 
to touch when traveling country roads. 



CYCLB} AND AUTOMOBILE TRADB JOURNAL. 



The' chain sprocketB being close to the 
wheels are raised by the wheels and do not 
touch. 

The transmtsalon If of the vertical selec- 
tive three speed and reverse sliding gear 
type. Ignition is by Jump spark using 
quadruple coll and storage battery, 34 
In. wheels fitted with 3^4 In. tires are used. 
The wheel base is 107 In. and the tread 



standard. The equipment consists ot two 
gas lamps, two aide lamps, tall light, horn 
and complete kit of tools and the car sells 
for (1600 thus fully equipped. The body. 
Including the detachable tonneau, seats 
five passeDRera comfortably and full scroll 
end rear elliptic springs give the car ex- 
ceptional riding qualities. If desired, an 
option Ih given of a bevel gear drive which 
cuts down the road clearance to 10 In. 



Monitor Cars 



The Monitor Automobile Works, of 1600 
N. Hatsted Street, Chicago, which concern 
has been for some time engaged in the 
building of buggy- type cars, as well as 
having done a small and conservative, 
though very successful, business with a 
heavy, seven-passenger touring car, have 
made several Innovations In their line for 
1909. The newest machine, on the de- 
algn for which Mr. J. Frank Waters, gen- 



eral manager for the company, has been 
at work for some time. Is a Model B No. 2 
surrey, or, more properly, the chassis of 
this car, since it also is put out as a run- 
about and as a stanhope, the latter with 
a particularly neat panel body, top, and 
glass front. 

These cars are driven by two cylinder 
horizontal opposed IS H. P. Monarch mo- 



120 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



tora, eltber air or water-cooled. Wltb the 
air-cooled the cylinder dlmenalanB are 6x 
i%, while to the water-cooled the strobe 
Is Increased to 4% Inches. The fly wheel 
fan, six bladed, takes care of the. cooling 
of the unjacketed motor, while the water- 
cooled type Is provided with a flnncd tube 
radiator in front. No pump is used, cir- 
culation being by therm 0-8 yph on. The lub- 
ricator includes an oil reservoir built Into 
the crank case, in the case of Che water- 
cooled engines, while the air-cooled mo- 
tors are oiled from a four-lead McCanna 
mechanical otter, one lead to each of the 
cylinders and to each of the main bear- 



The rear springs are ol the full scroll el- 
liptic type, the lower halves being shackled 
to the upper halves; each part has toui 
leaves. The front springs are haU-elUptic, 
with Ave leaves, and their rear ends attach- 
ed to down shackles from the frame. The 
wheels are 3S inches, wood artillery, with 
14 spokes and 1% Inch solid rubber tires. 
The brakes are Internal expanding in the 
rear hub drums, applied by a ratchet pedal, 
and compensated by a singletree device. 
The frame is of chaaoel section, made by 
the A. O. Smith Co. The wheel base is 86 
Inches, and the tread GSU inches. The 
steering Is irreversible, by worm-and- 
plnloQ. 



Ings. In some of the cars Davis motors 
are used, and It is not settled which type 
will be made permanent. 

Ignition Is high tension with Kingston 
double-vibrator coll. Spark and throttle 
levers are on stationary quadrant above 
steering wheel. 

The gear set Is of the planetary type. 
with two speeds forward controlled by a 
side lever and the reverse controlled by 

The final drive Is by propeller shaft and 
bevel gear drive to a live rear axle. The 
propeller shaft Is completely protected by 
an enclosed tube, which also serves to 
meet torsional streaaea doing away with 
a torsion arm. Ball bearings are used 
throughout the rear axle, and roller bear- 
ings are used on the propeller shaft. The 
front axle Is tubular, wltb the drag link 
behind. The steering pivots are of the 
Elliott type, and the front wheels run on 
adjustable ball bearings. 



The prices are fSEO for the aurrey and 
(800 for the runabout, with water-cooled 
motors, and (50 less on each for the air- 
cooled motor. The atanhope Belts for (900, 

Another car, made by the Monitor Auto- 
mobile Works, Is their Model L "Trouble 
Wagon," This vehicle Is a power wagon 
tor the use of telephone and electric tigbt 
companies, being designed for quick trave^ 
Ing to a point where line and other repairs 
are required, and of a carrying capadty 
sufficient to transport men and materials 
necessary for the prompt rectifying 0' 
breakdowns. The toad capacity Is 1500 
pounds, with body space 35x84 Inches. The 
car Is propelled by a two-cylinder opposed 
motor of 20 horsepower and is capable of s 
maximum speed of 25 miles an hour. The 
gasoline capacity is 12 gallons. The equip- 
ment Is oil, tall, and side lamps, horns, aad 
set of tools. The price with water-cooled 
motor la |S26. with air-cooled (775. 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TKADB JOURNAL. 121 



? p ? ? ? ? ? p p p ? 



You Know 



of a mechanical or structural 
improvement in Automobile 
design and building that is 
not incorporated in 



StevenS'Duryea ? 



We pause for a reply 



Stevens-Duryea Company 

CHICOPEE FALLS, MASS. 

Memben AMOciation Liceoted Automobile Muiuf acturen 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE THADB JOURNAL. 



The Hupmobile 



The Hupp Motor Car Company, of De- 
troit, at&rted dellverlDg a light two-paBBen- 
ger runabout March 1st, and are Bcheduled 
to ship 500 of the '09 model by August Iflt. 
Thta racy Ifttle car Is of original deBien 
throtishout, but along what Is generally 
conceded to be up-to-date conBtructlon. 

The company are conflnlog their efforts 
to the production of the one model. The 
wheel base Is 86 iDcbea. standard tread and 
30 X 3-ln. G & J tires. The car U hung 
low, but has 11 -in. road clearance under 
the axlea. and 13-ln. under the fiy-wheel. 
All carB are finished In a pleasing red, witb 
black mouldings and hair strlpeB. The up- 
holstering Is plain black, machined buffed 



shaft has a ?6-lii. offset from the centre ot 
the cylinders. The forward end la tapered 
to carry a 40-ib. helical bladed 14-In. fiy- 
wheel that la clamped on a taper by a two- 
Jaw hardened starting crank nut. Tti« 
starting crank Is Journaled In a castli^ 
bolted to the front cross member of the 
frame and Ib held out of engagement by a 
helical spring. The drop-forged connecting 
rods are two bolt, Parson's bronze busbed, 
scraped to a bearing, with oil scoops in the 
caps. The bone-hardened and ground pis- 
ton pins are a drive fit In rods locked by 
cone pointed set screws and bear in the 
rlstons. The pistons are 3^ In. long, 
ground, taper with an oil groove % In. wide 









T Axla AjHoblj," "Cnlquv Ollter Bjtitm-" 



leather and padded to support the lower 
back, leaving the shoulders tree. The cush- 
ions are 4^ In. at front and 3 m. at the 
rear. Plenty ot leg room Is allowed, as 
there is 28 In. from seat to dash. 

The IG-In. steering wheel and dash are 
mahogany finished. The hood is tbree- 
hlnged, 30 In. long, clamped In place by 
four-lever hold-down clips that slide In 
metal bushing In the hood strips. A pol- 
ished aluminum ledge supports the hood at 
the dash. 

An 11-gallon gasoline tanh Is carried on 
the deck at the rear of the seats at a 
height that insures plenty of gasoline on 
all hllla. 

The car complete weighs 1100 pounds, 
la capable of 50 miles per hour and sells for 
tTSO. This price Includes oil lamps, tools, 
and full equipment tor the road. 

The tour-cylinder motor, ZM bore by 3?i- 
In, stroke, Is rated at 16-20 H. P. The m- 
In- diameter, 30-polnt carbon steel crank- 



for the lubrication ot the piston pins. 
Three eccentric bevel split packing rfngn 
are used, made' of special analysis, hard, 
close grain iron ground on three tacea. 

The valves are 1^ in. In diameter, 46 
degree seat, carbon stems electrically 
welded to nickel steel heads and ground 
all over. All valves are on the left aide 
with a park plugs over the inleis and prim- 
ing cups over the exhaust valves. Inlet and 
exhaust headers are of cast Iron held with 
four clamps and packed with copper as- 
bestos gaskets and centering rings. The 
Inlet header has a chamber that extends 
from the lower air inlet of the Breeie car- 
buretor up to the exhaust header, prevent- 
ing condensation and delivering warm air 
around the spray nozzle. A one-inch pipe 
plug can be removed from the lower part 
ot the hot air duct, allowing a direct air 
Inlet to the carburetor for s 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



In a cast Iron side plate tbat extende the 
full lengtb of the motor, and whea re- 
moved gives tree access to tbe connecting 
rods. This sbaft has Bve bearings open to 
tbe splash of oil and as the babbitting In 
place makes a perfect alignment of these 
bearings, tbey should wear indefinitely 
without shake. Tbe valve tappets also 
bave their bearings In this plate. They are 
% in. in diameter, bone-hardened and 
ground. Tbe cam contact end Is milled on 



a radius giving practically the same effect 
as a roller without tbe chance of lost mo- 
tion. The tappeta have grey fibre inserts 
where contact is made with the valve 
stems, Insuring a quiet valve movement. 

The cam-shaft gear Is of grey non-swell 
fibre backed on tbe sides with steel, run- 
ning with a crank-shaft and magneto gear 
of steel. The centres of tbe gears can be 
adjusted by varying the thickness of gas- 
ket used and thus a quiet gear can always 
be obtained. 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TKADE JOURNAL. 



In timing a oew motor, the side cover is 
bolted In place with the proper teeth in 
mesh, a clamp is put on where the magneto 
gear meshes, which holds the gear flxed In 
relation to the side cover; it is then un- 
bolted and put in a timing Jig on the bench 
and the cams ground with a small emery 
wheel to the correct opening and closing 
of the valves. It Is then put back on the 
motor and clearance Hied off the fibre tap- 
pets. This system bas been found very 
rapid and accurate, aa all slight errors In 
placing key ways and the warping and 



Uia motot irltb oil In pnponliv (o (be woTt belnff dom. 
two CTUik CKjfl ooDuiArtmaitfl. aarta oT whlA li pravldad 

AoodiDff tltber cocnpfttlaot hj dJdplJ Uftltin t plud^r 
Lbs nK««Hr of pourtof utr^ oil LpIo th* cnLok cuf- 

twlstlng of the cam-shaft In hardening are 
eliminated. 

THB lONITION. 

A high-tension Bosch magneto with flied 
ignition is mounted on a ledge on the side 
cover and driven by a housed gear keyed 
on the armature abaft and meshing with 
the fibre cam-shaft gear.. Five wires lead 
from the magneto, one to each apark plug. 
the other to a switch on the dash which Is 
Bhort-circutted to cut out Ignition, and Is 
the only operative device on the dash, 
xnnatn: oilino btbteh. 

The oiling system la by splash with level 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



126 



case computmentB provided with level 
drain cocks, &re led by ao oiler cast In- 
tegral with the Inlet water header. This 
oiler has two hollow cockB held to a seat 
at the lower end hy springs. The upper 
ends of these cocks have small ball and 
socket levers coupled to the accelerator 
pedal tttat controlB the carburetor, so when 
the throttle is wide open the oiler Is also 
open, and when throttled down very little 
oil Is fed, thus the oil Is correctly fed in 
proportion to the work done. Either one 
of the engine compartments may be flooded 
by lifting these cocks from their seats, ob- 

^J^.. .k„ 1 1 „11 >!„«.. .(.„ .,„„. 

tul 



satisfactory Id France, where fixed mac- 
ncto Ignition Is used on 44 per cent, of the 
cars, contributing more toward the life of 
an engine than Sne workmanship and cats 
out at one stroke the "bugaboo" of four- 
cylinder engine Ignition. 

CHANOE OEUt ANO CLDTCi;. 

The traasmlsBlon case of cast iron is 
bolted to the crank case and is of rigid 
construction. It also bouses the self-ad- 
juBting fibre lined cone clutch that Is 
thrown out of engagement by a pedal piv- 
oted on the gear case. The sliding gear 
transmission has a low-speed ratio 2.7 to 1, 



Humnobllt cbtnia ipeed feu a 






lU PRBVENTION. 

The cooling system is thermo-syphon, 
holding less than a pail of water. The ra- 
diator has vertical tubes. The outlet from 
the motor enters a tank eight Inches from 
the top of the radiator. This tank extends 
across and half-way through and Is not 
visible from the front. The hot water en 
terlng this must pass upward through tubes 
four inches In length, which is sufficient to 
prevent steaming. Two studs in the bot- 
tom of the radiator fasten It to the front 
frame cross-member, while a tie rod braces 
It to dash at the top. One pet cock drains 
the entire water system. 

nXEO BPABK. 

The carburetor is controlled by an accel- 
erator pedal and can be set by a hand lever 
under the steering wheel. There la no spark 
control as the magneto Is set with a slight 
advance and generates a hotter spark at 
Ugh engine speeds. This has been found 



with a direct drive on high. The toggle 
operated reveree pinion has the same ratio 
as the low gear. 

There is one neutral position of the side 
control from which any gear can be 
meshad. The movements are back for low, 
forward for high and to the side for re- 
verse. The gears are of 20-polnt carbon 
Bteel, bone-hardened and drawn In oil. The 
tooth Is a generated eight pitch, 10 depth, 
20 per cent, involute of % and 11-16 In. 
face. The counter-Bhaft gears are riveted 
to a bronze hub that ioumals on a hard- 
ened and ground shaft. The hardened . 
sp lined transmission shaft also carries the 
clutch and has a bearing In the clutch drum 
at its forward end and the direct drive gear 
hub at the rear. The latter has a long 
Parson's bronze journal In the transmission 
case and Is broached square to take the 
mate end of the universal Joint 

The rear end of tbe gear case has a largo 



126 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



cylindrical bearing that flta over tbe spheri- 
cal universal housing of the propeller shaft, 
making a duBt-proof Joint and taking the 
torsion of the rear axle. Two ball end ra- 
dius rods exteDd from the rear brake sup- 
ports diaEODalljr up to sockets In the trans- 
mission case, making a very flexible con- 
struction. 



Tbe rear axle is of great strength, the 
21^ in. by ^■3Z In. walled steel tubing Is 
pressed and riveted In a we II- rib bed bevel 
gear bousing, do truss rod being used. The 
axle shafts are IV^ in. diameter, of cold 
drawn piston rod steel Journaled on Hyatt 
bearings at the wheels and large shim ad- 
justment two. point ball bearings at the dif- 
ferential case and propeller shaft. 



ated brakes are lined with wire woven &•• 
bestos. Two are used side by side on each 
rear wheel and are Interchangeable. A 
pedal operates one set and a hand lever 
the other. 

The Inverted double sweep rear cross 
spring has a ball socket clipped in tbe mid- 
dle, taking a ball ended taper shank bolt 
that seats In a bracket In the middle of 
tbe rear cross frame channel member, giv- 
ing the frame a three-point suspension. 

The eyes of the spring are pivoted to 
sliding Journals having a bearing on a cross 
bar parallel wltb tbe axle and supported 
by arms extending rearward from brake 
supports. • Behind each Journal Is a com- 
pression spring that exerts a pressure out- 




The drive pinion and small bevel differen- 
tial gears are of 3Vi per cent, nickel steel, 
bone-hardened ; the large gears meshing 
with these are of 3l)-point carbon, bone- 
hardened. The standard gears have 14 and 
48-6 pitch, 20 per cent, generated tooth and 
a 12-tooth Is furnished for extremely moun- 
tainous country. It la electrically welded 
to tbe propeller shaft, as It has been found 
impractical to successfullj' key a gear on 
of less than 14 teeth. The front axle has 
an angle drop from the axle ends, which 
are of forged steel brazed to 1% In. x M In. 
wall steel tubing. The drop-forged steering 
spindles are 1 3-16 In. dia., raouat«d with 
two point adjustable ball bearings. 

BRAKES ANn SPBINOS. 

Tbe four Internal expanding cam actu- 



THE STEBRINO QE&K. 

The enclosed steering gear la of the rock 
and pinion design, both geara bone-bard, 
ened. Contrary to moat designs of this 
type, there Is no bending movement In the 
rack, as It has a straight line connecUon 
with the axle steering arm by means of 
a drag link with heavy adjustable ball 
sockets at both ends. With this construc- 
tion no movement of the steering wheel 1b 
perceptible when the springs are deflected. 
The steering gear bousing Is riveted to Uie 
front cross member. The steering wheel 
sbaft bears In this and extends backward 
at a rakish slant to the aluminum spider of 
the steering wheel, A tube bousee the 
steering shaft from the dasb up to a ter- 
minal bearing that carries the hand throt- 
tle lever. 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



The Buckeye Mfg. Co., Aodermn, Ind.. 
builders o( Lambert friction drive cars. 
will produce two models tor 1909. Of 
these cars the leader will be a four-cylin- 
der touring car of 28-30 H. P.. with 110- 
Inch wheel base, at fl^SO. The other car 
rated at lS-24 H. P.. ts fitted with a double 
cylinder, opposed engine across the front, 
has 94-lncb wheel base, and will he sold _ 
for tSOO. 



In both cars the well-known Lambert 
friction change gear and single chain drive 
to sprocket gear on the live rear axle will 
be used. This change gear mechanism has 
proven such in the past that the makers 
are thoroughly satisfied with and will con- 



tinue it with only such minor changes as 
make for use of operation and adjustment. 
For the benefit of those few who are 
not thoroughly conversant with the change 
gear system it will be here briefiy out- 
lined, and, since the differences between 
the two designs lie only In sizes, due to 
the difference In H. P. transmitted and not 
In the forms of the parts, the same de- 
scription applies equally to both: Power 
Is transmitted from the engine fly-wbeel 
through three studs set Into its web to a 
three-armed spider, holes In the arms of 
which are bushed with hard fibre and pro- 
vide a sliding fit on the studs. Keyed into 
the hub of the spider Is a shaft connect- 
ing the engine with the driving friction 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



adt tain 



U bruH upjHvtUtt Uv fl 



dlBc. A sleeve, capable of being ebltted 
endwise bf a ratchet retained foot pedal, 
provides the rear Journal of this shaft, 
wliicb Is so mounted wltbln It that relative 
end motion is not permitted between the 
two. Since the aluminum-faced driving 
friction disc Is keyed to the rear end ot 
this sbatt, It Is seen that operation of the 
pedal moves the shaft and disc bodily 
toward or away from the driven disc, and 
tbus provides a clutching or declutching 
action, as the case may be. Between the 
driving disc and the rear end of tbe rotat- 
ing sliding Journal box is placed a ball 
thrust bearing 17% Inches diameter, com- 



posed of SI ^-inch balls operating be- 
tween two hardened and gronnd steel 
discs. It will be noted that tbe stud drive 
at tbe Dy-wheel leaves the engine crank- 
shaft entirely free from end thmet, tbla 
being entirely absorbed in the large thrust 
bearing and pedal linkage. 

The driving disc rotates with the en- 
gine shaft in a vertical plane transverse 
to the length of the car, and engages by 
tbe above mechanism, with the paper-built 
periphery of the driven disc ot tbe same 
diameter and mounted on a shaft Jonr- 
naled across the car. The paper rim of 
the driven disc, together with tbe alnm- 




ldlD( |t^. |MM. 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



iDum facing of the driving disc, affords as 
nearly positive engagement as may be bad 
la this type of change gear, 

Tlie driven disc or wheel Is featbered 
on four keys set Into a large diameter 
tubular shaft carried at Its outer ends on 
Hyatt rollers. Hyatt rollera are also used 
in the shifting journal Just forward of 
the driver. 

Toward the right of the centre of the 
car a spark plalon Is mounted on this 
tubular shaft and drives the enclosed live 



flupllnff uHd tetwcfD Bj «b«a1 ■ 



adequate protection and lubrication possi- 
ble. 



A third change Is In the direction of 
easier riding. To this end the shackles at 
the rear of the front springs have been 
done away with and In their places are 
now fitted large diameter helical springs. 
These springs act as shock absorbers and 
make the front suspension very Qexlble 
and easy. In the rear the springs are also 
changed. Here the rear hair of the seml- 
elltptic spring Is divided and secured by 
a simple system of double shackles, one 
of which la of the ordinary type, while the 
otber Is a helical spring under compres- 
sion. The makers are satisfied that they 
have Improved the riding qualities of their 
cars some 100 per cent by these spring 
changes. 

Frames are of pressed steel channel sec- 
tion strongly reinforced by crosa-members 
of similar section. The great strength, 
maintenance of alignment and flexibility 
secured is well shown by the diagonal 
cross-bracing Just forward of the driving 
discs, in the cuts herewith. The front 
wheels are mounted on Timken rollers In 
both cars, while the rear axle driving 
shafts are on Hyatt rollers, and are ta- 
pered and lieyed Into tbe rear wheel hubs. 



bclnf idliuutilc toT ntv. 

rear axle shaft through a spur differential 
by single chain. A long side lever, work- 
ing over a ratchet quadrant, connects by 
link with a bell crank, one end of which Is 
forked, and, engaging with a shifting ring 
in a groove In tbe bars of the driven wheel, 
serves to shift it toward or away from the 
centre of the driver, thus securing changes 
cf speed and, when shifted across the cen- 
tre of the driver, a change in rotative di- 
rection. Thus far the change gear is the 
same aa that built for 1908. 

BEFINBUENTS FOB IW*. 

For 1909 reference Is made In several 
details: Wear of the paper rim of the 
driven wheel and chain stretch are now 
compensated for by one operation — a 
screw adjustment which shlfte the driven 
disc, its shaft and journals bodily forward 
with reference to the same side members. 
While this Is a considerable advance over 
previously employed methods of adjust- 
ment. In which wear at each of these 
points were taken up Individually, a still 
greater advance has been made tn the 
subsUtutton of a 1%-lnch Reynold silent 
chain lor the formerly used roller type 
chain. 

The Reynold chains run on wide 
gears front and rear, the latter being 
nangcd to prevent jumping. An Ingenious 
and quickly detachable metal boot, leather 
lined to prevent rattling and noise, com- 
pletely encloses gears and chain, making 



The larger car Is equipped with a Ruten- 
ber four-cylinder engine, cylinders 4^ by 
5 laches, and the control in this car Is tbe 
same as la typical sliding gear cars. Steer- 
lag by large hand wheel, above which are 
throttle and spark timing levers moving 
over a stationary quadrant, connected wltta 
a Barnes screw and nut gear; two pedals, 
the clutch a disc engaging pedal, and the 
service brake pedal, both held by ratchets, 
and the speed changing and emergency 
brake levers at the Bide of the car. In 
this car both the service and emergency 



CTCI^E AND AUTOMOBII^E TRADE JOURNAL. 



br&kea are on tbe rear wheel taube, con- 
tracting band and eipandlng shoe, reapec- 

The smaller car la powered by a double 
cylinder opposed Davis engine, cylinders 
5 by 4 Inches, all valvea mechanically 
operated, and cylinders cooled by thermo 
aypfaon water circulation through a large 
radiator. This engine has lugs on the cyl; 
Inder heads, whereby It is bolted directly 
to the main frame members. 

The control Is by steering gear and tbe 



Aitbougb finality ot design bas not yet 
been reached, yet there are certain types 
of construction for standard touring cars 
wblch are accepted as good practice, and 
from these very few of the well known 
manufacturers of high grade cars have the 
temerity to deviate. This Is probably 
due largely to the knowledge ot the 
makers, born of past eiperience, that the 
average purchaser does not paas ludg- 
ment on any particular method of con- 
atruction, but is very apt to condemn as 
freakish, or as untried or eiperimental, 
any construction not shown by the major- 
ity ot well known makers. For this reason 
many manufacturers hesitate to incorpor- 
ate In their new models features which 
they tbemselves have aufflciently tested 
and feel confident ara entirely satisfactory, 

Tbe Luverne Automobile Co., of Lu- 
verne, Minn,, are now located In their new 
factory. They state that they are operat- 
ing both their old and new factories to 
their full capacity, and that they are plan- 
ning on further enlarging tbelr plant. 



engine control as on the larger car. A 
single side lever controls tbe speed 
changes, and clutch and brake pedals, the 
latter pedal operating e:cpandlng shoe 
brakes within the rear wheel hubs, control 
these members. 

Either ot these car chassis can be had 
equipped with any type of body desired: 
tbe prices above quoted are those for tbt> 
five-passenger, open body, four -cylinder 
roadster, special bodies, tops or irregular 
equipment being charged for extra. 



Tbe Columbus Automobile Club Is to 
have a "Sign Raising Day." Tbls Is a 
suggestion for other clubs to consider, in 
localities where road information Is scanty, 
it not utterly lacking. The Columbus Club 
has ordered 100 galvanized signs and tbey 
will be placed at Important points on the 
favorite touring roads adjacent In the city 
within the next month. 

At the annual meeting of tbe Louisville 
Automobile Club, ot Loulsvlle, Ky., the 
following officers were elected: J. P. Boss. 
President; Dr. Henry B. Tulley, First Vice- 
President; Robert C. Morris. Second Vice- 
President; Bugene Straus, Secretary; 
Walter 1. Kahn, Treasurer, 

A special committee was appointed and 
the club decided to build a five or ten-mile 
race track the coming season and hope 
to have it ready for the annual fall racing' 

H. A. Flagg. formerly Eastern saleflman 
of Shelly Tube Co., Is now connected wltb 
tbe Standard Welding Co., of Cleveland, 
as assistant to W. S. Gorton. 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



The Commercial Stork favors the Motoring Fraternity with 



A NET 
LAMP 

COMPAN 

"PMgcdliExdiisiKlytligtiGradeG 



Announcement is made of 
the formation of the 

CM. HALL Li 

Detroit, Mich. Ca 

officers 

John W. Leggett ~ - - - 



J. Wetiel .... 
J. F, Hartz ...... . . . ireasurer 

C. M. Hall Sec'y and General Mgr. 

DIRECTORS— E. H. Broadwell. C. M. Hall, J. F. Harlz. John W. Leftftett, John 
L. McDonald, D. M. Newbro, Thos. J. Wetzel. 

The company is operating in its own building {20,000 sq. ft.) containing 
the most complete equipment in the world for the manufacture of high- 
grade motor lampe. 

Acetylene Head Lights Generators 

OU Side Lamps Oil Tail Lamps 

on and Electric Combination Side Lamps 
OU and Electric Combination Tall Lamps 

There are pleasant surprises for those who have wanted better than the 
"beat." All exclusive patterns are protected by patents. 

Deliveries Guaranteed on Contract Dates 

C.M.HALL UMt>CO. 

DETROIT MICH. U.S.A. 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



The York Motor Car Co., Inc., York, Pa., 
as Id former years, are placing on the mar- 
ket for 1909 a complete line of cars from 
the two-passenger, 4 and 6-cf Under ruu- 
abouta to the 7-pa3senger touring cars, In- 
cluding an entirely new 30 H. P., S-paaaen- 
ger light touring car known as Type "K." 
These models range In price from Ihe 
model "L" runabout which seats 3 passen- 
gers, has a l-cylinder engine of 3% In eq., 
20 H. P., at II500, up to the Model "M," 40 
H. P., 7- passenger touring car which haa 
a 4-cyllnder engine oC 5z5U In. and sells 

for fseeo. 

Tbe new cars are but very slightly 
changed for 1909, the changes being sim- 
ply reflnements. The materials used In all 
tbe Pullman models are claimed to be the 
best and highest priced tbat can be pro- 
cured. 



The body Is wood and metal with a rumble 
seat as regular equipment, double bucket 
seats being supplied as an extra. The 
seats are upholstered with French finished 
leather with soft edges and spring cushions 
in the seats and backs. The bodies are of 
Pullman red with red upholstery; special 
colors to order. The front axle Is a drop 
forging of I-sectlou and the rear Is of the 
floating type, the car being shaft-driven ; 
32x3^ In. tires are used front and rear, 
and the wheels are mounted on TImken 
rollers. Lubrication Is by a Helf-contained 
oiling system from the positive oil level 
controlled by valve adjustment, while the 
change gears, following customary prac- 
tice, are packed with lubricant. Two sets 
of brakes are used, the emergency brake 
being on tbe transmission shaft and the 
internal expanding brakes on the rear 
wheels. The clutch Is of the leather face 
cone type with cork Inserts, This car 
weighs about 17G0 lbs., has 102-in. wheel 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



base and ID -In. road clearance, and Bells, 
completely equipped, Including two acety- 
lene headlights, two side oil Ifthu, tail- 
light, bom, tool bit and gas generator, for 
91500. 



lOH-ln- road clearance, weighs about 2600 
lbs. and U placed on the marhet, com- 
pletelj' equipped, for (3000. 



The T-paseenger touring car has the same 
motor and general chassis arrangeinents, 
but has a wheel base of 119 In. and Is fitted 
with a large side entrance tonneau oF 






holstery. It has a body or wood and metal 
with rumble seat and accommodates three 
persons. The change gear Is of the selec- 
tive sliding type, giving three speeds for- 
ward and reverse shaft drive; I05-ln. wheel 
base, weight 1900 tbs. Price, fzeoO, with 
complete equipment. 



The Model 4-40 la known as the gentle- 
men's roadster, having a specially designed 
runabout body seating three persons. The 
motor has 4 cylinders, 5x5!4. with me- 
chanically operated valves on opposite 
sides. Tires are 3G x 4 In. all around and 
the change gears are of three-Speed selec- 
tive type of chrome nickel teel, oil tem- 
pered. This car has 108-in. wheel base. 






straight line design, the front and rear 
seats being of a somewhat new outline. 
The body Is Ironed for a top. The ftnlsh Is 
Pullman red with black under body, red 
upholstery, or Pullman dark blue, blue up- 
holstery. This car seats Qve or seven pas- 
sengers and has two additional auxiliary 
revolving folding seats In the tonneau. 

The pressed steel frame Is curved upwara 
over the rear axle and has a sub-frame for 
carrying the engine and transmission, and 
Is well bracketed and braced. The motor 
has cylinders cast separately with integral 
water Jackets, cooling being by means of 
a gear-driven centrifugal pump and a flat- 
tube radiator with fan. The springs are 
semi-elllptlc, 41^ x 2^ in front, 46>i x 
214 in. rear, the rear springs being of the 



134 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOUBNAU 



Bemi-elllptic plaUorm type. Tbe front &xle 
\e a Btee! drop forging ot I-section and the 
rear 1b ot tbe fioatlne type with preBsed 
steel housing, nickel Bteel shafts and gears 
and a "V" style torsion rod. The change 
speeds are obtained by sliding gear selec 
tlvely operated, having 4 speeds ahead and 
a reverse with the direct on the third 
speed. All gears are of chrome nickel 
steel, oil tempered and mounted on Hcss- 
Bright annular ,ball bearings. Drive Is by 
shaft to a floating rear axle asBembly, from 
which a housing Is ot pressed steel and the 
gears and shaft are ot nickel steel. A stitt 



a straight line combination ot wood and 
metal bodr, double side entrance tonneau 
and froi)J^ and rear Beats of new design. 
Bodies are all Ironed for tops and specially 
braced wherever strain Is delivered. All 
seats are fitted with soft-edged, aprlng- 
cushioned backs and seats, finished In best 
quality, hand huffed, straight grained 
French finish leather. The color Is Pull- 
man red with black uaderbody and red up- 
holstery or dark blue with upholstery to 



V type torsion rod is used, thus relieving 
the springs of bevel gear reaction. The 
wheel bearings are Timken rollers and all 
wheels have 12 1%-ln, apokes, are 36 In. 
in dla.. and carry 4-ln. tires on the front 
and 4>ii-ln. on the rear. Power is sup- 
plied by a 4-cyIlnder vertical motor with 
cylinders caat separately, water Jackets and 
cylinder heads Integral, B-ln. bore and 6%- 
in. stroke. This motor Is rated at 40 H. P. 
at 900 R. P. M. Ignition is by Bosch high 
tension magneto, with distributor, also sin- 
gle coil and switch, with storage battery 
supplying two separate sets of Ignition. 

Lubrication is by the new self-contained 
system as In the other models. Two con- 
tracting and two Internal expanding brakes 
are fitted on the rear wheels and steering 
Is by IG-ln. hand wheel and an Irreversible 
gear. This model, which Is known as M. 
weighs about 3:i50 lbs. and completely 
equipped. Including two acetylene head- 
lights, two side oil tights, tail light, horn, 
tool kit and gas generator, sells tor J3B00. 
Top and glass front are extra. 

Tbe new ear of the Pullman line Is a SO 
H. P., E-paeeeneer, light touring: car, with 



separately with water Jackets and heads 
Integral, and the rating ot 30 H. P. Is given 
at a speed of 900 revolutions. The valves 
are on opposite sides and Interchangeable. 
Tbe crank-shaft Is a one-piece nlcKel steel 
forging. 



The crank case forms the oil reterrolr 
from the lower portion ot which the oil la 
forced by an eccentric pump located at the 
lower rear end of the case to the top of 
the upper compartments of the case from 
which It feeds to the splash basin. The 
height ot the oil In this base Is controlled 
by eccentric valves which have stems ex- 
tending to the outside of the case, the outer 
ends being fitted with small Indicating 
pointers which move over a scale with 
quarter-Inch spaces. By moving these 
pointers the valves are correspondingly ad- 
Justed BO that the height ot the oil can be 
changed either up or down as required. 

The power plant is mounted on a sub- 
frame of channel section, pressed steel 
which, as well as the main frame of simi- 
lar construction, Is hot-riveted. There are 
three main cross members and two bracea 
to the sub-frame. At the rear ot the en- 



CYCLE AND AtJTOMOBILB TRADE JOURNAL. 



Kb. S. Umial K pulimui. ■ IBog ndillUiHi (o Um 
<TUnd<n cut HpanulT. 4% i 4U. _BII H. P. it MM) B. F. 

hua. clKrann io la. WdtVlt. l.UO ll«. Price. U.DOO. 

glne a clutcli of the ordinary leather-faced 
cone type, but fitted with cork IneertB, Is 
mounted and transmits the power to the 
three-speed selective eliding gear, all gears 
of whicb are oil treated chrome nickel ateel 
and mounted on Heas-Brlght ball bearlngB. 



^M«ri In to. «K^ E.ch Df 'tba, [Ulnltn coclml u 

As in the other models, the drive is by 
Bbaft to a floating type TImfeen rear axle 
coQBt ruction, the bousing of which is of 
pressed steel auto gen oualy welded, thus 
forming a one-piece housing. Th6 tubes 
taper toward the outer ends, the thtckness 
of the metal Increasing as the outside di- 
ameter decreases. The gears which are 
placed In position from the front, are cov- 



INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION OF 
RAILWAYS, AUTOMOBILES, ETC., 

IN ARGENTINE REPUBLIC 
An International exhibition of railways, 
automobiles, etc., will be held from May 
to November of 1910 to celebrate the Cen- 
tenary of Independence of the Argentine 
Republic. This exhibit will be of great In- 
terest and beneflt to American manufac- 
turers, from the fact that Europe will be 
very well represented. 

Casco, Ode 11 Bros, ft Co., Importers, 
manufacturers' agents. 2050 Faaco de Julio 
2064 Buenos Ayres, Argentina, are making 
a special offer to American manufacturers 
to look after the exhibits and the Bale of 
same, and will also take care of shipment 
of goods, etc. Full particulars regarding 
the exhibit can be bad from Argenttnt, 
consuls. 



ered by a piece which is bolted in place 
and which carries the bearing for the bevel 
pinion shaft and also the rear support tor 
the V-shaped torsion rod. 

Two Internal expanding foot operated 
brakes occupy drums on the rear wheels, 
while an emergency brake Is Qtted on the 
rear of the tranamlaslon shafL 

A 15-gaUon gasoline tank is provided un- 
der the front seat, feeding by gravity to a 
Strom berg float feed carburetor. The 
springs are 40 by 2 In., of seml-elllptic type 
at front and 50 z 2 In. at the rear. The 
front azie is a steel I section drop forging. 
A 106-in. wheel base gives this car easy 
riding qualities, yet is short enough to keep 
it from being cnmberBome. The tread is 
standard and the road clearance Is full 10 
Inches. A double set of ignition apparatus 
is provided as on the other models, each 
being independent of the other. 

With an equipment Including two acety- 
lene headlights, two side oil lamps, horn, 
tool kit and generator, the car sells for 
(2600, Its weight, fully equipped, being 
about 2260 lbs. This Model K is made not 
only as a touring car, but as a runabout, 
and Is also fitted with a toy tonneau body, 
all at the same price as the touring car. 
The Model L Is also fitted with a top ton- 
neau, price of which Is (IGOO. 



The Automobile Club of France will hold 
a bommerclal vehicle competition from Oc- 
tober 15 to November 15 In the suburbs of 
Paris. The competition will be held under 
the auspices of the War Department, and 
partly under their regulations, the army 
having decided to offer a substantial In- 
demnity to all commercial vehicles con- 
forming to the successful type evolved 
from the competition, on condition that 
the machines shall be at their disposition 
In time of war. 



An excellent solution for removing verdi- 
gris and stains from the brasa work of 
motor lamps can be made by mixing a 
good metal polish with wood alcohol. This 
should be applied to the brass and allowed 
to dry, when it may be rubbed off with a 
woolen cloth, leaving the surface In excel- 
lent state for polishing. 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



El TKfTJ' 




fl The only practical result of speed and other contests 
is to prove the qualities that make a car right for tour- 
ng. A car that will stand a speed test will prove reliable 
n a tour of any length. Only the most reliable and per- 
fectly constructed ignition apparatus can give satisfactory 
" — ■_ - - -;es and contests demand- 
ition. 
^ No other means of 
igniting gasoline auto- 
mobile engines equals 
the 



Hess- Bright 
High -Tension 

MAGNETO 



for regularity, durability, and continuous operation. The 
use of it assures the Ijest possible engine performance if 
other conditions are right. 

Hess-Bright Manufacturing Company 

2102 Fairmount Avenue n :: Philadelphia 
q Makers of the famous HESS-BRIGHT BALL 

BEARINGS; the bearings that made ball bearings 
popular in automobile engineering. 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 137 

1QOQ CARTERCARS 



The Cartercar. based on friction-drive 
patents issued to Byron J. Carter, began 
its commercial existence In 190G. Carter 
bad bis first car, friction driven, on the 
road In 1903, and made and sold some ID 
or 12 cars, all friction driven, before 1900. 

Carter's Inventions were taken up by 
the Uotorcar Company, which sold 101 
friction driven cars In 1906, 26* In 1907 
and 325 In 1908. The Motorcar Company 
changed its name to the Cartercar Com- 



DOLMAR. 

dust and abundantly lubricated with 
clean oil. It was also well known to the 
Cartercar engineers that many attempts 
had been made to And a suitable and satis- 
factory enclosure for automobile drlvlng- 
chalns, with so little succees that none of 
these chain casings had come Into much 
use. Mr. Carter died suddenly In 190S, and 
the work ot designing the Cartercar chain 
qaslng was taken up by Mr. R, A. Palmer. 
general manager of the Cartercar Com- 
pany, who produced the chain casing here 



■a CTlliKttra. tit It 



pany In November, 1908. and removed from 
its Detroit factory to much larger premises 
in pMitiac. In the same month, November, 
1908. Vith the Intention ot producing 1000 
cars In 1909. 

CASINO IM TffE CKAI.1, 

All Carte rears sold before 1909 had 
naked chains, and It was decided to make 
a determined effort to Bnd a really good 
chalD-casIng. dust-proof and oil -tight, 
which would perfectly protect the chain 
and make It possible to lubricate the chain 
with clean oil. It la well known that the 
clean, well-lubricated chain Is an economi- 
cal and durable power transmission agent, 
having less friction than commercial 
toothed gearing If fully protected from 



Cip* too. llM.Oo' atn, 

flrst shown and described. The new ca*. 
Ing was on the road In July. 1908. and was 
tested out by extended road trials. Only 
very slight changes were made from the 
original form ot this Palmer chain casing. 
patent pending, and in the 10,000 miles ot 
test on the road the new casing has shown 
no failure. 

Naked chains gave constant annoyance 
by Btretchlng due to rapid wear, and had 
a life of only about 3000 miles before re- 
quiring renewal, while a cased-in chain, 
lubricated with clean oil, showed only 
one-sixteenth of an Inch stretch for 5600 
miles of road covered, with almost no side 
wear at all. and was about as good as 
new at the end. 



CTCLE AND AUTOMOBn,B TRADE JOURNAL. 



Tbls good work of the eocaBed chain led oa vulcanized flbre flanged buahes, revolu- 

to the belief that the chain was by far to bly mounted In grooved flanges which are 

be preferred to the bevel gear, and all applied to the balance gear drum ends, 

the 1909 Cartercars will be fitted with and to bang the forward end of the cbaln- 

cbains In the Palmer casing, construction casing b? a globe end stud, horizontal, and 

tally shown In Pigs. 6 and G chain case. a globe-seat link banging down from the 

THE CAaiNO. chassis frame cross-girt to which the link 

~ - - - jg Jointed. 

To avoid as much as may be the twist 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAK 



wbich is Insettarable from tlie variable 
rise and fall of tbe rear aile and tbe croea- 
shaft ends, floating plates, also vulcanized 
fibre bushed, are placed one eacb aide of 
the casing, tbe fibre busbes revolnbt]' 
mounted on tbe cross-Bhaft, and the float- 



Two of the 1909 Cartercars, Models. H 
and L, will have tour-cylinder motors. 
One, Model L, is shown at tbe head of 
tbfs description. Tbis 1909 Model L Is a 
flve-paBaenger touring car. Wheel base, 
110 Ins.; gauge 54% Ins.; tires all quick 












Ing side-plates being retained by outside 
applied plates. The chain casing twist Is 
small, and the slidlng-flt clearance of the 
floating side plates is enough to take care 
of this slight twist, although this chain 
casing Is fitted closely enough to be prac- 
tically dust-proof, the oil in the casing 
remaining clean at the end of 5000 miles 
of very hard road work. 

The extended and severe tests to wblcb 
this chain-casing has been subjected, it Is 
claimed, have developed no fault at all. 



detachable, 32x3^ ins. The motor cylin- 
ders are 4^4x<!^. 30 H. P., 4-cycle, water- 
cooled, centrifugal pump water circula- 
tion. Ignition Is by jump spark and mag- 
neto with one non-vibrating coil, with dry 
cell reserve battery, one set of spark plugs 
only. Drive, friction, with chain, com- 
pletely encased, to divided rear axlee. 
Be mi- float, driving wheels. This model 
weighs 2100 pounds and sells for $1600, 
Including 5 lamps, mats, horn and tools. 

All will have the friction drive, an alum- 
inum alloy disk and paper wheel, eacb 20 
Ins. diameter, new, wbich gives any de- 
sired speed change in cither direction, 
within the range of the mechanism, and 
avoids the use of the clutch and toothed- 
gear speed-change, making. In tbe belief of 
the Cartercar Company, a lighter, cheaper 
and In every way better motor car drive 
than Is possible with any arrangement 
whatever of toothed gearing, no matter 
how costly or bow perfect In choice of 
materials, in design and In vorkmanshlp. 

Tbe Illustration. Fig. 4, is a perspec 
tive view, left and rear oblique, of the 
Cartercar, opposed cylinder motor motive 
assembly, showing the motor at tbe left, 
the fly-wheel with ball-springs and ball, 
friction disk shaft pedals, friction disk, 
paper wheel and paper wheel hand lever 
and transverslng linkage, the chain casing 
and the rear axle with brake shoe and 
brake-shoe action. 

Carter's original drtve, patented, was 3 



140 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TKADE JOURNAL. 



studs fixed in the fly-wheel hub on which 
the 3 eyes of a 3-armed spider keyed to 
the forward end of the disk-shaft were 
fitted to slide, to permit the fore and aft 
engaging and disengaging friction-disk 
movement. The original coiled spring 
which normally disengaged the disk and 
paper wheel has been retained in this new 
disk-shaft drive, the springs bolted to the 
fly-wheel rim and the shaft bail-driver 
serving as carrying and driving links and 
having the merit of being flexible without 
Joints, thus avoiding points demanding 
lubrication. 

The form of the friction drive with mo- 
tor in front makes it convenient to drive 
the rear wheels with either one chain to 
the balance gear drum, or with side chains 
to the rear wheels. 

Chain wear is almost wholly obviated by 
the new 1909 chain case, so that the chain 
life is increased at least ten-fold, from 




3% ins. opening, and are flxed to the axle 
tube ends by pinning and brazing. The 
stub axles are steel drop forgings, 1% 
ins. and 1 3-16 ins. respective large diam« 
eters. All front wheels are on 2 circles 
of balls in 2-point ball-bearings, adjust- 
able, % dia. balls inside and % in. dia. 
balls outside. The yoke pins, hardened 
and ground steel, are % dia., are in steel 
bushes, hardened and ground, load carried 
on the bush flanges. 

The rear axle steel tubes are 2% ma. 
dia., \i in. wall for the heavy axles and 2^ 
ins. dia., ^ in. wall for the light axles. 
The rear axle spring perches are forced 
on the axle tubes and pinned. The brake- 
drum flanges are pressed on the axle tube 
ends and retained with 4 rivets, 5-16 dia. 
in each hub. The balance gear is 8 spur 
pinions. 

The live rear axles are semi-floating, 
are steel, 1% dia., squared at the inside 
ends and tapered to take the wheels at 
the outer ends, key and hexnut wheel re- 
tention, and each axle is carried on two 
circles of Hyatt roller bearings. 

THE WUEELS. 

The wheels are all to take 32-inch tires. 




Fig. 6. 1909 Cartercar aluminum chain caalng construe 
rear axles and the cross shaft. On Uie rear axle the caalnf 
applied to the balance bubs flansed fibre collars, F. being 
flanged metal. The fibre flanged collars avoid metallic 
universal movemeat and also prevent the chain-caslnK oil 
drums. The rear sprocket is marked S. This Is the first 
was revolubly mounted. The eyes of the side plates are 
plates are revolubly mounted on the cross- shaft. Side plates, 
enclosed chamber of oval outline in which the floating 
proof. There Is abundant side clearance between the cross- 
casing support is not theoretically ideal, but in practice it 
friction and keeping the chain caabig oil absolutely free 

3,000 to 30,000 miles, and probably more, 
Judging from the condition of a cased-ln 
chain at the end of 5,600 miles of fall and 
winter work on bad roads. 

THE AXLES. 

These are Weston-Mott Co., Flint, Mich. 
The front axles are steel tubes, two 
weights, 2 ins. out. dia., % and 3-16 re- 
spective wall thickness. Both axles are 
dropped 2 ins. in the middle. The mallea- 
ble cast-iron spring perches are flxed to 
the axle tubes by pinning and brazing. 
The steel drop forging axle yokes are all 



all have malleable cast iron hubs and 
flanges, and all have 12 spokes each, spoke- 
thickness 1^ ins. for heavy wheels and 
1^ thickness for the Runabout wheels. 

THE SPRINGS. 

These are all half-elliptics, front springs 

tion. Casing vertical cross-sections in vertical planes of 
is revolubly mounted in grooved flanges of gray Iron. Q. F.. 

interposed between the casing metal and the grooved 
contact, are slightly elastic and so permit the case a smaU 
from traveling along the live axles to the rear hub brake 

chain casing noted by the writer in which the rear end 
bushed with fibre at T, T, T, F, where these fioating side 

SP. applied to the chain casing members, furnish an 
plates have free movement while remaining practically dust 
shaft sprocket bubs and the floaUng plates. FP. This chain - 
gives entirely satisfactory resulU. showing no appreciable 

from dust. 

all under the pressed steel chassis tramt^ 
and rear springs all outside of the chassis 
frame sides. The front springs are all 
Jointed to the chassis frame eyes in front 
and linked in the rear. All rear springs 
are clipped to the rear axle perches and 
are linked at each end to down-hanging 
links, placed under tension by the load, 
and right and left thread struts, adjusftnent 
pinching screw retained, are placed be- 
tween the rear axle sleeves and the cross- 
shaft boxes. 
Two spring equipments, heavy and 



CTCLB AND AUTOMOBILE TRADH JOURNAL. 



141 



Itgbt, are ased. The beavy springs are all 

2 iDB. vide, front 45^ Ina. long, 7 leaves, 
top 3 leaves banded together. The heavy 
rear sprtngs are 53 ins. long, S leaves, top 

3 leaves banded together. 

The light springs are 38 las. longzl% 
Ins. wide in front, G leaves, top 3 leaves 
banded together. The light rear springs 



greatest side frame depth le 5% ins. The 
light frames greatest side-frame depth is 
3 ins. All the springs have leather pieces 
Interposed between the spring perch and 
the spring. 




which Is highly effective. 



are 4GK Ins. 1ongxI% ins. wide, 6 leaves. Only the rear hah Internal bralie shoes 

top 3 leaves banded together. The leaves are fitted, the friction drive reverse being 

of all Cartercar apricgs are tongued and Instantly available for an emergency brake 

grooved. - . . 

The frames are all pressed steel, chan- 
nel section sides, with pressed steel croas- 
members and substantial gussets all hot- 
riveted. The chassis frame sides are 
curved up over the rear axles in all models. 
The Models K and H chassis frames are 
parallel 34% ins, wide for Model K and 
32^ ins. wide for Model H. AH other 
Cartercar chasais frames are in two 
widths, 34H ins. wide in the rear and 32 
ins. wide in front. The heavy frames 

The Quaker City Automobile Club, of 
Philadelphia, has decided to hold a second 
big race In December, in addition to the 
COO-mile contest In Fairmount Park on Oc- 
tober T. A road contest from Philadelphia 
to PIttaburg and return, over (he route of 
the proposed fS.OOO.OOO State highway is 
also being planned. 



The plant at Pontlac Includes examples 
of the latest and best American duplicat- 
ing machine tools, and grinding is very 
largely employed. The principal shafts, 
as well as the pistons, piston rings, cylin- 
ders and crank-shafts are fitted by grind- 
ing, and the Cartercar shops produce 
many of the ball-bearings included in the 
Cartercar construction; these ball-bear- 
Inga of home construction are all 2-point, 
and adjustable. All ball bearings are In 
dust-proof casings. 

The Professional Chauffeurs' Club ot 
Philadelphia is actively canvassing local 
motordom In an elfort to boost a bill, 
which Is to be introduced Into the Legis- 
lature by Representative Marvin, of Pike 
County, requiring every professional chauf- 
feur to pass a rigid examination before 
being licensed to drive a car. 



142 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



THE "STEIN" PNEUMATIC AUTO TIRE 
The Stein Pneum&tlc Auto Tire Illustra- 
ted herewith Is the product of the Stein 
Double Cnahion Tire Company, Akron, 
Ohio. 

This tire embodies many new features. 
One of the most Important Is the fact that 



THE "SPARKER" BATTERY 
The "Sparker" is one of the latest igni- 
tion batteries placed on the market, it has 
been designed and roanuFactured b; tbe 
Rock Island Battery Company, of Cincin- 
nati, especially for automobile ignition 
work. 



the inside of the tire Is fluab with the en- 
tire inner aurface, thus forming a continu- 
ous, naturally round tube. This construc- 
tion absolutely prevents water, dirt or oth- 
er foreign substance from entering the 
tire. No bolts or lugs are required to keep 
the tire In place, and it is prevented from 
creeping by the valve. The tire la made 
in all standard sizes, and Bts any make of 



KEMIZITE 

Kemlzite Is a tire puncture healing com- 
pound recently placed on the market by 
the Auto Tire Security Company, of De- 
troit, Mich. This substance resemblea 
cream in color and conaiBtency, and is per- 
fectly harmless and clean In Itself. It 
is not used in Humcient quantities to re- 
duce resiliency, and as it does not have 
any bad effects on the Inner tube it does 
not prevent patching in case of a blow- 
out. Kemlzite has been used In New 
Zealand and Auatralla for some time, and 
only lately has been imported in this coun- 
try. 



TIRE8ELE 
The TIresete Company, of 63 and 55 
Bank street, Newark, N. J., has placed on 
the market a new product called Tiresele, 
which is designed to eliminate punctures 
and prevent porous tires from losing air. 
This compound is a very Sne powder, 
which is mixed with water and aquirted 
into the Inner tube. This mixture Is 
claimed not to affect the rubber In the 
least, and Ih harmless to hands, clothing 
or varnish. It is put up in boxes, four 
boxes to the carton, listing at (2.50 per 
wheel, or flO.OO for one carton, enough 
for four wheels. A special pump Is fur- 
nished for 50 cents extra. Tiresele Is also 
put up for motorcycle and bicycle use. 



ThlB battery is claimed to be a hand- 
made article and Is guaranteed to be 15 to 
20 per cent, more efflcient than the ordin- 
ary battery, due to the fact that Japanese 
manganese Is used In its construction 
which It la claimed Is a much better qual- 
ity than the Russian product. 



"STAY-SHINY" METAL PRESERVER 
AND "MAQICLEAN" WOOD POLISH 
Lawrence ft Welch, of Sterling. 111., have 
recently placed on the market a metal pol- 
ish preserver and a wood polish com- 
pounded especially for automobile use. 
Stay-Shiny metal polish preserver Is a sort 
of lacquer which Is applied to the polished 
article by means of a brush, thus effectual- 
ly preventing the article from further tar- 
nishing. It la absolutely grease and water- 
proof, and will stand ail heat and weather 
exposure. 

"Magiclean" wood polish is a liquid 
preparation for cleaning and polishing au- 
tomobile bodies, leather trimmings, cush- 
ions and tops. It Is made of strictly neu- 
tral oils, wbicb leave a hard, glassy, trans- 
parent gloss that will last for months. 



Mr. Jacob Neuman. Vice President and 
General Manager of the Stein Double Cush- 
ion Tire Co., died on March the 27th, 1909. 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



(f 




Model Forty-four, 34 H. P., $2,250. 



RY IT ON THE HILLS 

:st this car at half-speed on a hill or sand road where 
power — and every ounce of it — is needed. Notice how steadily 
and powerfully it pulls when running slowly under load. 

The capacity of the Rambler engine for doing this extra 
work is most noticeable at low engine speeds. This is because 
of the Offset Crank-Shaft. 

All that power which in other engines is lost through frictic 
on the bearings and cylinder walls is added to the driving force 
by the Rambler Offset Crank-Shaft. It reduces friction, elimi- 
nates hammer en bearings, gives more power. The Straight- 
Line Drive delivers the power direct and with least frictional 
loss to the rear axle. 

Seven- passenger model, 45 horsepower, with Offset Crank-Shaft, $2 500. 
Other models, $1, 150 toS2,500. A new Ramblercataloghaajuat been issued. 
It describes and illustrates ali distinctive featumof new Ramblen— the 
Ofliiet Crank -Shaft, Spare Wheel, Straight-Line Drive, eK 
copy on request. 

THE CAR OF STEADY 
SERVICE 



Thomas B. Jeffery & Company, Main Office and Factory, Kenosha, Wis. 

Branekttand DUtribntingAgtucitt: Chicago, Milwaukee, Boston, New York, Cleveland, San Francisco 



144 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



SOME NEW AUTOMOBILE CLOCKS 

The New Haven Clock Compsny, New 

Haven, Conn., has placed on the market a 

line of S day automobile clocks, known ae 

the New Ormrod, Dlpni***. and Savannah. 



on any part of the front or sides, thus 
making It easily polished. 

To wind these clocks It Is only neceeeary 
to unscrew the water-tight bevel. The 
clocks are flnisbcd tn either brass, nickel 
or gun metal. 

THE "RBF" DOUBLE ACTINQ THRUST 
BEARING 
The section herewith Illustrates a new 
thrust bearing designed to take axial thrust 
In either direction. This bearing Is manu- 
factured by Soclete Francalse des Route- 
ments a Bliles (RBF) and is handled in the 
United States by the International Engi- 
neering Co., 1779 Broadway. New York 
City. 



In order to suit the particular conditions 
of automobile service, a specially designed 
movetncnt is fitted which withstands tbe 
Jar of the mactilne when in motion, and yet 



is in perfect beat when the car is stopped. 
The case la dust and water proof. The 
clock la attached to the car b^ a lockiog 
device operated easily and quickly. The 
case Is so constructed that there are no 
winding keys, regulating lever, screws, etc.. 



By referring to the lilustration it will be 
seen that tbe bearing consists of two outer 
rings, R, R, held together by two screws. 
The outer rings are provided with a num- 
ber of oil holes, which afford effective lub- 
rication. These two rings are provided 
with spherical seats S, S, and correspond- 
ing ball races B, B, which arrangement 
permits the bearing proper to adjust Itselt 
lor deflections of the shaft and thereby dis- 
tribute the thrust uniformly among ail the 
balls. The ring D Is put on the collar C 
after being heated in a bath of oil and, od 
cooling, ts found to have a perfect St. 

MONARCH OPPOSED MOTORS 
The Monarch Motor Manufacturing 
Company, 1592-lSOO N. Halated St., Chi- 
cago, are manufacturing a number of op- 
posed type motors. Model A of which is 
shown In the accompanying cut. This con- 
cern manufactures air cooled as well as 
water cooled motors. The air cooled 
motors are made in seven sizes with the 
small size. 4^x4^ and tbe larger size, Cix 
5. also made with a water cooled cylinder. 
Tbe motors are offset. 2-cyllnder opposed, 
and are mechanically operated. The cyl- 
inders are cast of gray Iron and are de- 
signed to put spark plugs either on top or 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



145 



end. The crank cases are ao constructed 
that by removing four screws one can take 
oR the upper part, making the connect- 
ing rod bearings easily accessible. The 
connecting rods are of the hinge type; 
taaving two screws tapped through oppo- 
site sldeB ol the hinge, secured by lock nut 
and cotter pin and are fitted with die cast 
nltlte metal bearings. The crank shafts 
are of steel drop torglngs. The piston pins 
are ot steel and are secured by set screws 
which la turn are locked by cotter pins. 



Monarch Model "A" 14 H. P. Air-cooled Motor, 

4?4-ln. bore »nd stroke. Price, J160.00. 
The pistons have three eccentric expan- 
sion rings with lap Joints, which are re- 
turned and ground, and have cooling ribs 
Inside. The vaWes are of liberal dimen- 
sions, have carbon steel stem and nickel 
flteel head. The stems are fitted with col- 
lars of special design to hold the springs 
In position. The valve lifter rollers are of 
steel, large In diameter, and rotate on drill 
rod pins. The valve lifters are fitted with 
compression springs, Invlalbly located In 
sleeves or guides to insure a positive and 
uniform contact of the rollers and cams. 
They also have adjustments fitted with 
fiber. The half time gears are enclosed 
In the crank case, the large one Is of 
bronse and the small one of steel. The in- 
take manifolds are of brass, can be used 
on either side of engine, and will admit the 
use of any standard carbureter. The bear- 
ings are all of bronze and white metal, and 
of very liberal dimensions. The air cooled 
cylinders have exceedingly deep flna, fln& 
In pistons and ventilation tubes which ad- 
mit constant change of air to crank case. 

The prices of these motors range from 
1140 to 1200 P. O. B. Chicago, Til. 

"FEDERAL" AUTOMOBILE TIRES 
These tires are manufactured by the 
Federal Rubber Co., Milwaukee,, Wis., on 
the welt-known wrapped tread principal. 
The tire carcasses are first made up on 
the proper form, the skeleton of same 
being the finest grade of South Sea Island 
fabric procurable, which la coated with 
the best Up River Para rubber and built 
up In successive layers by expert tire buil- 

When the fabric body of the tire is fln- 
tsbed. It Is covered with % in. pure gum 



rubber, then removed from the form, a 
rubber curing bag placed Inside, and sub- 
jected to partial vulcanization In mold, the 
bag expanding the tire and forcing the 
fabric Into the exact position In which the 
tire is to be used In service. 




iiM r«ltril Wnkpped Tread AuUmnUl* TIie. 

After this, the rubber tread of the tire 
Is applied. It Is then tightly wrapped with 
fabric, and Is now ready for final vulcaniza- 
tion In open steam, being placed on a spe- 
cial form and assuming Identically the 
same shape as It would while carrying the 
weight of a car. 

"RADtUM" TIRE CHAINS 
Among the specialties manufactured by 
the General Accumulator and Battery Com- 
pany, of Milwaukee, are the "Radium" sin- 
gle and double tire chalna shown In the 
accompanying cut. They consist of a plate 
which fits between the spokes of the wheel. 
On each side o( the plate there Is one or 
two clips, as the case may be, into which 
the ends of the chains snap. These chains 



can be attached instantly without Jacking 
up the wheel. There are no wearing parts 
except the chains themselves and these 
can be replaced for 25 cents each. These 
chains are made In three sizes, each of the 
single and double, and range In price from 
75 cents to fl.OO each for the single chain 
and from fl.OO to fl.2& each for the double. 
They are also sold In sets of S. 12 and 24 
at lower rates. 



146 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



THE "ISOTTA" RACING MAGNETO 
SPARK PLUG 

Ell J. Buahey, of 1777 Broadway, Now 
York City, who tnakea a specialty o( spark 
plugs for racing purposes, Is ottering the 
autolst a spark plug called the Isotta, 
which he claims will not short circuit or 
allow oil to get Into the tnslde ot the shell 
or core. 



THE "POWELL" MUFFLER 

The accompanying cut UlustratAS the 

1910 Powell pressed steel muffler made by 

the Powell Muffler & Timer Company. 

Inc., 42 LaFayette street, Utlca, N. Y. 

This cut shows the muffler opened so 
that the perforations in the baffling plates 
can be seen, it also shows the manner In 
which the tie rods are covered to protect 



Tlu "lAoUA" iUcInf UkffibMo Spark Plur. 

The shell of this plug Is made of brass, 
nickel plated. The electrode Is steel, the 
mushroom or umbrella shaped head being 
a composition ot steel and iridium. The 
core is made of a lava composition and Is 
fitted by a perfect mechanical operation, 
which does not need the use of washers, 
packing or gaskets of any kind. The price 
of this plug originally was (2.00. but, in 
order to introduce this plug to the trade, 
the price has been reduced to fl.50. 

STAR CUTTING COMPOUND AND 
DUTCH 0(L SOAP 

The White Star Refining Company, Buf- 
falo, N. Y., has recently placed on the 
market two new products ot use to auto- 
mohi lists, namely. Star "A" Water Soluble 
Cutting Compound and Dutch Oil Soap. 

The Star "A" Water Soluble Cutting 
Compound is designed for use of antomo- 
bile manufacturers and by machine shops 
for lathe work, drilling, tapping, screw 
cutting, automatic machines, etc. This 
compound is soluble in water and makes 
a perfect emulsion. 

Dutch Oil Soap is manunctured parti- 
cularly for the cleaning ot automobile 
bodies. It is absolutely a neutral soap 
which will not damage the flnest surface. 
Milted in somewhat stronger proportions, 
it makes a good medium for cleaning the 
running gear. 

Buying a tire pump without a pressure 
gauge on It is a saving that costs many 
dollars in tire wear, the extra wear being 
due to Improper inflation. 



eliminating nearly all back pressure and 
Btlll have a muffler that Is perfectly quiet 
Two features ot this muffler are that It 
can be readily cleaned and that by adding 
more or taking oft sections the volume can 
be changed so that it will not harmonise 
with the motor. 

THE "ANDERSON" WINDSHIELD 
The Anderson windshield shown here- 
with is manufactured by P. W. Anderson ft 
Co., Brown snd Uber Street. Philadelphia. 
Pa. 

The upper frame can be dropped or 
raised without leaving the seat, and Is held 
absolutely rigid in either position. It drops 



towards the inside or steering wheel side 
ot the dash, and does not interfere with the 
lamps and stay straps on the top. The 
frame is made of the best mahogany, finely 
finished and polished. The glass Is 3-16- 
inch Imported plate. All fittings are solid 
brass. This concern also makes a one- 
plecc stationary windshield. 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILB TRADE JOURNAL. 14 

The Most Trying Test 

ever given to an^ Ignition Apparatus under an^ circumstances 
was successfully met by the 

Splitdorf Magneto 

AND 

Common-Sense Plug 

in the great 10,000 mile Non-Stop run of the Maxwell car. 

Absolutely faultless Ignition by Magneto and Plugs during the 

entire run. 

fl Did you ever hear of Efficiency 
and perfect Reliability being better 
exemplified ? 

fl We build Magnetos with a view 
to superior construction, excellent 
service and great durability, but 
not to run forever without adjust- 
ment. 

fl 10,000 miles - approximately two seasons' run—without a stop 
and without the slightest suspicion of ignition trouble ! If this is 
the sort of service you would like, you should equip your car at 
once with a Splitdorf Magneto. 

ASK FOR MAGNETO CATALOG 

fl?^^A«^ C. F. SPLITDORF 



WALTON AVE. uid 13Btli STREET 
BRANCH. 1679 BROADWAY 

New York 

TURIN BRUSSELS BARCELONA 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAU 



The Stewart & Clark Htg. Co., ol 502 
Dlveraey Boulevard, Chicago, manufao 
turerB ot the well koown Stewart Speedo- 
meter, have receDtlj' added to tbelr line a 
number of new modele, No. 14, o( which la 
herewith Illustrated. 

Model 14, Is a combination ot Model 11, 

60-niile multipolar Instrument mounted on 

a standard with an 

e 1 g h t-day automobile 

i watch. The standard 
used with this model is 
a. distinct speedometer 
Innovation, It lifts the 
speedometer away from 
the dash, making It 
more easily seen and 
read, A steel core runs 
within the standard to 
the Instrument, having 
a bevel gear connection 
with the flexible shaft 
at the bottom ot the 
standard. The arrange- 
ment absolutely elimin- 
ates the necessity of 
bends In the shaft; It 
runs straight to the 
wheel of the car. The 
standard is handsomely 
Qnlsbed In brass. This 
jiodel lists at $75. 

Model 15, a combina- 
tion ot Stewart Speedo- 
meter Model 12, centri- 
fugal type, and an eight- 
day automobile watch. 
the latter mounted on 
top ot the speedometer, 
lists at (25, Model 16, 
Is a combination ol 
Stewart Speedometer, 
Model 11, 90-mlIe multl- 
"HiFwirt" Hi«doaatar; polar Instrument, and 
uoM 11. an eight-day watch. 
This speedometer Is equipped with dia- 
mond bearings. The price la 190. Model 
IT, is a combination of Stewart Speedome- 
ter Model 11, 90-miie multipolar instru- 
ment, with Chelsea clock and electric light. 
The speedometer la equipped with diamond 
bearings. Price tl25. 



The Model 14 Speedometer la also shown 
herewith in phantom view. There are but 
two moving parts, viz., the rotor D and 
the disk H. The rotor, the actuating ele- 
ment, consists of a ring ot non terras ma- 
terial In which four permanent magnets 
are imbedded. These magnets are accu- 
rately machined from imported Tungsten 
steel, made to special analysis. The disk, 
the Indicating means. Is formed of an al- 
loy metal which la exceedingly light and 
with low resistance. The rotor rides on 
hardened ball bearings and the disc on 



a diamond bearing. To the disc Is attach- 
ed a pointer, which moves over an evenly 
graduated scale ot large diameter. 

THE GIBSON VACUUM MUFFLER 

An entirely new muffler which absolutely 
gives a vacuum in the exhaust pipe, has 
Just been placed on the market by H. C, 
Gibson, 630 West I35th Street, New York 
City. The vacuum, surprising as It may 
seem. Increases with the speed of the en- 
gine, and the muffling effect also increases: 
in other words, at high speed, the engine 
exhaust la less audible and the vacuum 
created Is greatest. This was demonstrated 
by means of a U tube Qlled with colored 
alcobol, one branch of the tube being con- 
nected to the exhaust pipe at a point Just 
before Its entrance into the muffler. The 
conatruction consists of a pipe ot continu- 
ously increasing diameter, set spirally so as 
to provide a continuously decreasing angu- 
lar velocity of the gases. The eflect ot 
using this muffler Is to obviate the use ot 
any cut-out, inasmuch as a cut-out would 
be a detriment. This follows from the fact 
above mentioned that at high speeds and 
powers, the vacuum Increases. The com- 
plete removal ot exhaust products provides 
a perfectly scavenging cylinder with all Its 
attendant advantages. Prices compare fav- 
orably with present types ot mufflers. 

To meet the Increase In its business Id 
Boston, the Qoodyear Tire & Rubber Co. 
has secured for its own exclusive occO' 
pancy the nve-atory building at 669 Boyls- 
ton Street. As soon as alterations are com- 
plete the branch will move from Its pres- 
ent location at 261 Dartmoutli Street. 



DID IT EVER OCCUR 



There's not much satisfaction 

in having the pleasure of an other- 

"^W^Wvf^ wise enjoyable trip spoiled by your 

V^Unnlw engine "kicking up' at just the 

time when you want it to behave, — 

is there? 

But don't blame the engine, — 
put the blame where it belongs,— 
on your IGNITION. 

If your engine EVER worked 
right, it can be made to work per- 
fectly ALL THE TIME by installing 

A K-W 
MAGNETO 

The K-W Magneto is the simplest, model b 

most reliable and efficient magneto made """pRicE.'fe^*'"'' 
AT ANY PRICE. It has no complicated traps or trig- 
gers—no moving wires or brushes. 

It is absolutely GUARANTEED 
BY US, THE MANUFACTUR- 
ERS, to give perfect service AT ALL 
TIMES and UNDER ALL 
WEATHER CONDITIONS. 

Read the following pages on 
B.uSS.'-.rwL. K-W Ignition and write To-Day for 
'j:,'SiS'StS?i-» catalogues. 

The K-W Ignition Company 
40 Power Ave., Cleveland, Ohio, U. S. A. 



X. Y. AtiBcr: I6S6 Brwlwir. N< 

1. E. Atao: 70 LmaWhuf. B«mi. Mu. 
Pliik<M[lik Amcr: J» 



Oikjio Astnc,: TTk AuicmoUe SuvOy Co.. 1339 



Michiau A>F., Oikmn. II. 
. L. Gibnjv «, Bn>. 211 Nor* Biouj Smil. 
Gatnl EJe^c Cb.. TsiodIo, Cuuda. 



CTCLB AND AUTOHOBILB THADB JOCRNAU 



CTCIiB AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



149 



THE "CIGLIA" SHOCK PREVENTER 

TbiB shoch preventer 1b manuractured by 
Behrman-Baron Co., 1777 Broadway, New 
York City. Tbfs preventer does not em- 
ploy friction Burfaces fn Its operation. It 
la made of steel' tbrougboiit LCi Is com- 



The ■■Clglltt" Shock Prevenler. 

posed of tbree equal arms, two of wblcti 
embrace tbe otber. Tbe inner faces of 
tbe two outside arms are formed into ser- 
ies ot iDCllned plaoes wblcb neat Into eacb 
otber. The disc centre of the Inner arm 
bas corresponding planes pressed Into It. 
When asBembled, these depreaaiona fit 
snugly Into each other. Tbe outside of 
each of tbe outer disc arms la fitted with 
a saucer-ahaped waster r>f pure rubber, 



over which Is placed a steel disc. The de- 
vice is then securely held together by lock- 
nuts and a through bolt. 

In action the spring deflection causes 
tbe iaclined planea to ride upon each otber 
and compress the saucers of rubber. The 
more severe the Jolt of the car, tbe greater 
Is tbe resistance of these planes, thus in- 
suring absolute control of the spring action 
both on the compreBsloQ and recoil. Tbe 
surfaces of tbe planes are lubricated with 
graphite and the preventer being encased 
Is tbuB made absolutely dust and water- 

This device provides a means of com- 
fortable travel at a maximum speed over 
any kind ot road. It prevents the spring 
from compressing too fast or too far and 
vice versa. It is made in one sise only, 
being adjusted to suit any wefght ol car. 
The price of a set of four with fittings is 
$58.00. 

190» "WARNER" AUTO-METER ADDI- 
TIONS 
The latest additions to tbe extensive line 
of Warner Auto-meters, manufactured by 
tbe Warner Instrument Co., Belolt, Wis., 
are the new models O & P; model O of 
wbich is here illustrated. Model O is 
equipped with a 60-mlle speed scale and 
model P with a 100-mlle scale, otherwise 
the two models are alike. Tbe speed Indi- 
cator consists ol the latest 1909 model with 
100,000 mile total and 1,000 mile trip odo- 



Tbe clock la ot high grade. It Is an 
'eight-day movement with a special winding 
mechanism doing away with the necessity 
of carrying a key and removing the bezel 
to wind. The construction of the reflectors 
Is such tbat the light Is thrown on the dial 
only. It Is claimed with this method of 
Illumination tbe light is diffused evenly 
over tbe 4-in. silvered dials, none being 
lost by outward reflection from the glass, 
as when the light is placed outside of the 
Instrument or clock. 



meUl planes. 



The Mackenzie- Walton Company recent- 
ly organized, in Providence, R. I., tor the 
purpose of manufacturing seamless wire 
tubing tor automobiles. Is planning to erect 
a factory at Pawtucket avenue and Geneva 
street, Pawtucket, R. I. 



CTCLB AND AUTOHOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 

YOU WILL NEVER FIND AN ELMORE 
OWNER DISCONTENTH) WITH HIS CAR 

Three cylinder, $1,750 Four cylinder, $2,500 



Get the confidence 

of a four cycle 

owner — ffct him 

talluDg about hii 

car — and you 

will find him 

telling you more 

of its thortcominp than of its merib. 
He may tell you he has a good car, and 

all that, but- 
Then follows a line of e]q>lanationt and 



mechanism, adr 
justed to a hair 
as it must be, can 
stand up (or long 
under tne terrific 
pounding it re- 
ceives. 
The moment its efficiency begins to suffer 
— the moment its delicate adjustmeid is 
destroyed — that momeiU the four cycle 
owner's trouUes begin. 
You, if you drive an Elmore, know noth- 
ing of all this. 
Your responsilNlity practically beains and 
ends with providing sufficient fuel and 
lubricant 
That's the reason Elmore owners are cmi- 
tented and satisfied — pleased through 
and through with thar can. 
No amount of talk will convince the man 
who owns an Ellmore that any other car 
is better than his; for he knows his El- 
more and he would not take a chance 
with any other car, no matter how many 
cylinders it has, nor how costly it is. 
Go to your EJmore dealer and ride in the 
car. And get the lituature. 



It is the same with every four cycle car. 
Though the machine may be honestly 

built — staunch and strong and speedy — 

nothing can overcome the fact that it is 

a (our cycle car — and iher^ore liable to 

trouUes which the contented Elmore 

o'wner blithely avoids, one and all. 
The very fact that the car is a four cycle 

loads it down with a mass of mechan- 

bm you will not find on the Elmore — 

valves, cams and camshafts, little springs 

and rollers, lifts and what not 
It b not reasonable to suppose that this 

Elmore Manufacturing Company 

904 Amanda Street, Clyde, Ohio 

Member) AmciiliDD of Licaued Automobile MsnufaclUFen 



CTCI^ AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL.. 151 

mechanicaland technical 



EDITORS 

Gaaoline TebiolM — Cbao. E. Duryea, R«adiiig, Pa., Conaulting Engineer, A. H. C. H. A. 
Steam Tehicles — J. A. Kingman, Loeonuritile Co. of America, Bridgeport, Conn. 
Two- Cycle Enginea — Hu^ Dolnar. 



<Wed< 



setad withd 



fILJ Dot b« pubJiahod if ■□ nqiuatad. 
PUTTINQ FRICTION DRIVE INTO OLD 
CAR 
[113.] 1 bave a Mitchell runabout, the 
transmission of which I wish to replace 
with (rlctlon transmission. Is the sliding 
disk type of' friction tTHnamlssion efflclent, 
and It not, what Is the most efficient type? 
Ahout what sprocket ratio would yon ad- 
vise and what size disk and friction wheel? 
Motor Is 2-cyllnder vertical, 3% In. x 4 In. 
or 4U m. and la rated 9-10 H. P. I wish 
compression or the plug or coil is bad. If 
to build transmission here and would ap- 
preciate any Information you would sug- 



REGULATIONS OF THIS DEPARTMENT 

Hatter for Iba MMntioa d tlia Editon «f tbb dcoutmat riiould bs addraMsd lo the putioubu editor it ii 
iDt«id«d (or. CARE OF THE CYCLE AND ADTOHOBILE TRADE JOURNAL, ud muat nwih Philuielphia 
by ths 6tb of the moDtb la iniure ioaartkiD in the next Dumber. (SpeeiBl inforaution od penonel nuttaie not 
(or publioktioD riuniU mt Im aipecled without nmuDentioD.) 

ADimn to Uoloi Cyole inquiriM will Im found Id that det»rtcieDl. 

mien the ioquirer civM hia Dune >nd mddnae. The 

BOILING WATER BEST IN ENGINE 
JACKETS 

[423.] Experimenting with a double ap- 
posed water-cooled engine, I tried to verify 
the statements of a certain engineer, 
claiming that bolting water is the best 
cooler of an engine. I removed the radia- 
tor from the car, and replaced the water 
tank hy an eight-gallon copper tank. En- 
gine has 4x4 cylinder and circulating 
pump. After running car about Ave miles 
water would begin to boil and steam. At 
this moment I would notice a great change 
In the working of the machine. The en- 
gine developed much more power, and the 
next five miles were traveled In much less 
time. I was wondering why engineers 
would use fans and radiators If a tank 
would give better service and satisfaction. 
One day, while repeating the experiment. 
and before the water got hot, there was a 
pop, and out came a cylinder head. Now 
what I want to know is, was the cause of 
this break the expansive force of water 
converted Into steam In the water cham- 
ber, or was It due to a defect In the cylin- 
der walls? I attribute It to the latter 
cause. Please give me your views. Is It 
risky to run when water Is too hot ? 

BBOOIN, TKX. c. V. B. 

Your experiment was good so far as It 
went, but rather crude. The engine should 
be designed for that treatment if it is to 
be used with boiling water cooling. I 
think the design of the casting Is responsi- 
ble for the cracked head. The water bad 
free circulation to the tank, so no pressure 
of steam could force the head ofl. Either 
the casting was under an Internal strain 
or the head was exposed to an Intermittent 
covering of steam and water. This cool- 
ing and heating would likely cause a crack. 



The friction transmission is all right It 
well made. I do not think I would advise 
putting it In a vehicle not designed for It. 
Better take up with the makers the prob- 
lem and they will surely find some way 
to make you happy. The friction disks 
must be carefully supported or they spnng 
and bind the bearings and cause a lot of 
loss of power. The more the loss, the 
more pressure is required to make them 
drive, and the two may so nearly balance 
each other that there Is no power left to 
propel the vehicle. In this case you will 
see that the friction drive is not efficient. 
But with stiff shafts and proper bearings 
the added pressure does no harm and the 
drive takes the loads brought upon it In 
good shape. Use the largest disks that 
will go Into the space at band. The larger 
the disks the higher the speeds of the 
working contacts and the leas the pressure 
required. The ratio of sprockets depends 
on the relation of the disks to each other. 
If the disks .are the same size as. Is quite 
common, the sprockets should give the 
same speed as the present high gear. — C. 



152 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



Steam is not a good cooling medium. Hot 
water is. The hotter the water the better. 
But the engine must be designed for the 
Job. I imagine your great and noticeable 
gain in power was due to the fact that 
when hot the charge self-ignited, and thus 
practically advanced the spark. But the 
difference between the power of an engine 
when hot and when cold is readily estab- 
lished. With the engine on the stand ap- 
ply a brake, and although there seems to 
be quite a little margin of power, suddenly 
turning cold water into the Jackets will 
cause such a loss of power the engine will 
stop. The reason is plain enough. Heat 
is the source of power and It Is not possi- 
ble to lose this heat to the cold walls and 
also use it to drive the vehicle. If it goes 
one place, it cannot be utilized in the other. 
The proper idea is to work the engine Just 
as hot as the oil and metal and igniting 
quality of the mixture will permit. — C. 
E. D. 



ONLY ONE CYLINDER AT A TIME 

WILL RUN 

[427.] I read your good advices month- 
ly, the first thing on opening the Journal, 
and thought I knew about as much as 
there is to know, but I am stung now; I 
can't get my engine to work with both 
cylinders. First cylinder. No. 1 (left), 
worked all the time ; then I changed the 
intake valve and spark plugs to No. 2, 
and No. 2 worked and the other idle. 
Changing a new plug for No. 1, I get them 
to run at times in both, but mostly only 
one at a time. Just as soon as I contact 
the friction It stops the engine. 

GUILFORD. CONIC. F. J. BERNETT. 

When the engine will not pull there is 
something wrong and it is up to you to 
find it. Test carefully till you find the 
trouble. First, be sure you have compres- 
sion. Next, go after the spark. I have 
fooled most of an afternoon with a plug 
that I would not change because I was 
sure it was all right, when it wasn't. Fi- 
nally test the mixture so far as possible. 
If you can run either cylinder at will the 
mixture is probably not far wrong. Try 
heating the inlet pipe. A rag with hot wa- 
ter dripping on it is a good way, but under 
safe conditions you can heat the pipe with 
a blow-torch. See answer to C. P. Houtz. — 
C. B. D. 

(Test your timing and batteries, espe- 
cially if both cylinders spark at once from 
a single coil. — Ed.) 



NO. 382 TROUBLE IS WITH STARTING 

CRANK 

Trouble with Mr. P. Clark's Rambler, 
Article No. 382, page 84, May issue, is his 
starting crank. I have owned one of these 
cars for two years and too have cranked 
myself blue in the face, but all in vain. At 
last I solved the problem for once and 
forever. Cut away the running board 



with a circle saw back to the running 
board brace and about to the tool box in 
front. This will permit you to lengthen 
your starting crank about three inches. 
Any good smith can do this for you. With 
this increased length of the crank you can 
throw the engine over with ease (cylinder 
cocks closed). So much air enters through 
the cylinder cocks and so much of the mix- 
ture escapes that it is almost impossible 
to start the engine with them open. 

I use a light cylinder oil in my transmis- 
sion. A heavy oil on a cold morning has 
a gummy tendency which causes the disks 
of the clutch to drag and consequently 
makes hard cranking. You will also find it 
best to use a heavy air cooled cylinder oil 
in your cam gearing. A light oil is too 
thin to cushion these gears. Nothing but 
cylinder oil should be used because it leaks 
into the crank case thus reaching the cyl- 
inders. 

Do not be afraid to flood your carbureter. 
No harm will result from it. Hold the 
tickler down until the float chamber en- 
tirely fills with gasoline and runs out free- 
ly around the top. and your engine will 
start cold at the third or fourth turn. 

SCOTT CITY. KAN. G. D. LASLEY. 



ANOTHER CONUNDRUM 

[421.] As you very aptly put it, in a re- 
cent issue of the Journal, here is another 
patient sticking his tongue out in the tele- 
phone, and asking the doctor at the other 
end of the line for the prescription to cure 
him. 

We have a 1905 car with 3-cylinder en- 
gine, automatic inlet valves, in same valve 
box as exhaust valves and placed directly 
over the latter. Holley carburetor, 1907 
model. The action of the engine is very 
erratic. One day it will run splendidly, 
take any hill we come to, on the high, and 
have plenty of strength. The next day it 
will develop no power at all, and it is 
necessary to turn gasoline needle valve 
until the power is developed. Even on a 
three or four-hour run it will sometimes 
start out splendidly and at the end of an 
hour or two start to lose power, and then 
it will become necessary to drop into a 
lower gear to negotiate even a moderate 
grade. We have tried all strengths of 
springs, and all points for the needle 
valves, new spark plugs, fixed the contact 
points of the timer, new batteries, new pri- 
mary and secondary wires, and the erratic 
behavior is still there. We are never down 
and out, but can generally get the engine 
pulling strong again by fooling with the 
needle valve. 

Do you think if an adjustment were 
made for the auxiliary air valve, operated 
from the seat, that any better degree of 
regularity could be attained? We appre- 
ciate the fact of the difficulty of prescrib- 
ing by long distance, but hope you have 
been able to see by this very lengthy arti- 
cle that we have tried a great many ways 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



153 



and have not succeeded in getting a relia- 
ble engine. Our conclusion has been that 
atmospheric conditions make a great ait- 
ference in the suction of the pistons and 
thereby makes a greater or less lift of 
the automatic inlet valves and that by 
making an adjustable auxiliary air valve 
spring regulation could be secured to com- 
pensate for change in atmosphere. Will 
you please let us have your opinion at your 
convenience? Our thanks will be due you 
not only on this occasion, but for the many 
helpful hints in your previous answers in 
the Journal, all of which are read with 
great interest. 

PHILADELPHIA. PA. A. H. INSINGER. 

The important thing is to get the symp- 
toms correctly. As I interpret your letter, 
time is an important factor. Note whether 
it goes bad quicker on a hot day or on a 
cold one. If on a hot day the trouble may 
be in the engine overheating and getting 
stiff. If you have to stop to adjust the 
carburetor, it may cool off enough to run 
again, although thereafter with not much 
power. I have had pistons too tight, stick 
and stop the engine, and before I could get 
to the starting crank they had cooled 
enough to let the engine start again only 
to stop me quicker next time. If I fooled 
away much time hunting for the trouble 
the engine cooled quite a little and I had 
a good run when I started up. Be sure 
your oil is high fire test. 

If the run is longer on a hot day, look 
for the trouble in the gasoline supply. Be 
sure your gasoline tank has a vent so 
liquid can get to the carburetor. A cloth 
or rubber blanket may have rested on your 
tank vent and closed it so the tank will 
not supply fuel after the gasoline has been 
drawn out a little. Increasing the opening 
at the- carburetor will let the engine suck 
more effectively and get a little more and 
run for a while longer. Be sure that the 
gasoline pipes are free. If there is water 
in the pipe and it forms a trap in the bot- 
tom you will get fuel very erratically. The 
pipe from the tank should have no low 
parts or should have a drip cock at the 
lowest point. Be sure your exhaust valves 
are free and have good springs, and that 
your inlets are free of short stroke and 
have light springs. Test all these when 
hot. In short go over everything when the 
trouble occurs. Make a list of things that 
may be wrong. First time start at No. 1, 
Second time at No. 2, and so on. In this 
way you finally get at the wrong thing 
while it is still hot. And if you find the 
trouble let us hear about it. We are all 
willing to learn. — C. E. D. 



agent's claim is, that whereas it saves a 
little in the tires, the expense is more 
than counter-balanced in the form of more 
gasoline used and consequently more wear 
and tear on the engine. 

Please let me know through the columns 
of your worthy paper the advantages and 
the disadvantages in the use of such a 
tread. 

I might add that I use my car on rough 
and ruddy roads. 

ABTZ. PA. E. v. K. 

I think the agent's advice is right. Any 
device which makes a tire stiffer and less 
liable to puncture, also makes it less lively 
and 80 requires more power from the en- 
gine and mechanism. Further, a stiff, 
thick thing will not bend so many times 
as a thin fiexible one.' This is self-evident 
and applies to tires as well as to anything 
else. So if your tires are left sufficiently 
soft that you may get the easy riding of 
a thinner tire they will break quickly. 
The pneumatic tire problem is a compro- 
mise. If you want easy riding and easy 
propulsion use tires that are flexible, but 
they will puncture easily. If you wish to 
avoid punctures you must pay the price 
in hard riding, hard running, and quick 
breaking of the walls. — C. E. D. 



PNEUMATIC TIRES A COMPROIVIISE 

[411.] I recently had my runabout 
equipped with a stiff anti-skid tread, and 
the agent from whom I purchased my car 
advised me strongly against doing so, say- 
ing that it was a drawback to the car. 

I claim a saving in tire expense and the 



PECULIAR ACTING TWO-CYLINDER 
OPPOSED MOTOR 

[429.] I have been a reader of The 
Cycle and Automobile Trade Journal for 
the past three years and have saved the 
mechanical part of it. But I fail to locate 
the trouble of a 2-cylinder air-cooled me- 
chanical valve motor on my machine. 
Schebler carburetor is used. This ma- 
chine has been in and out. One day it 
runs well, then it will miss. The makers 
fix it temporarily, but it is hard to keep 
adjusted. With gasoline needle valve ad- 
justed one place, one cylinder will explode 
every time, but No. 2 will not explode. 
With the needle valve a little more open. 
No. 2 will fire every time, but No. 1 will 
not; then it is hard to get the gasoline 
needle valve adjusted so both will fire 
regularly. There seems to be no air holes 
in either inlet pipe. I cannot understand 
why it acts so. If one coil was weaker 
than the other would it make the trouble? 
The machine has been giving trouble ever 
since it came from the factory. Spark at 
plugs seems all right. If you now will help 
me out by your valuable advice I will be 
very much obliged. 

BOIS D'ARC. MO. C. P. HOUTZ. 

Why one cylinder will fire and another 
miss is a problem that has bothered many 
people. This will often happen and change 
from one to another without touching any- 
thing. If you remove the exhaust pipes 
and watch the exhaust you may find one 
cylinder with an invisible exhaust and an- 
other spitting yellow flame. As the en- 
gine warms up and the speed changes or 
the throttle position changes, this result 



154 



CTCLB AND AtJTOMOBILB TRADB JOURNAU 



may change and even reverse the condi- 
tions. It is probably caused by faulty mix- 
ture. The liquid fuel does not fully vapor 
ize and is swept along the pipes. One cyl- 
inder probably gets too little* or too much 
and refuses to fire. Varying the carbur- 
eter may correct this, only to throw the 
other out. Try heating the carburetor or 
supply pipe. 

But there are other causes. The spark 
may be earlier oU one cylinder than on 
the other. This will make a difference in 
action. Or one compression may be bad 
because of a leaky valve. Be sure your 
sparks are both good. If one spark gap is 
too wide for the coil and battery there will 
be misfires unless the mixture is very 
accurately right. A big spark cures a 
multitude of ills. Test your sparks by de- 
taching the wire from the plug and watch- 
ing the distance the spark will Jump while 
the engine is running. Or while wire is 
in place hold one end of an insulated wire 
against the engine and bring the other 
end near the plug. If plug is O. K. and com- 
pression good, the spark will jump fron> 
the plug to your wire more than a quar- 
ter of an inch rather than Jump through 
the compression at the plug point If you 
fail to get a vigorous Jump, there is no 
why engineers were so slow about taking 
you find the trouble let us hear from you. 
— C. B. D. 



(as long as it can be). I would like to 
braze it to the stub end after they are both 
in place and do not believe I can get a 
good job by running the brass from the 
spindle collar down to it. How can I do 
it? 



FRICTION AND OILING OF PLAIN AND 
BALL BEARINGS 

[425] 1st. What is the best oil for ball 
bearings in wheel hubs. One maker will 
advise a heavy coach oil and then the next 
maker sperm oil. etc. Hard oil-grease, 
gums, gets hard and sticks. 

2nd. Car I am building was 14 H. P. air 
cooled engine, wheel base 91 inches, 34 
inch wheel, friction drive, side chains to 
rear wheels, front wheels are ball bearing, 
the rear wheels plain friction spindles 1 
7-16 in. dia. by 4^ in. long, the friction 
wheel countershaft runs in 7 in. long plain 
bronze bearings. Car will weigh 1000 
lbs. This car has been built with great 
care and is very accurate and true in every 
part. The bearings mentioned will al- 
ways have oil and the dust will be exclu- 
ded. What fraction of H. P. do I lose on 
account of the countershaft and rear wheel 
bearings being friction instead of ball 
bearing? 

3d. Can you tell me anything I can do 
to these push rods and stems that will stop 
the spiteful metallic click and ring which 
they make. The valve seats, etc., not be- 
ing surrounded by water Jackets I pre- 
sume accounts for this sharp ring, which 
is not heard in water cooled engines. 

4th. As you advised me to I intend to 
strengthen the axle at the weak place by 
slipping a tube inside the axle and over an 
offset at stub end. This tube is 7 in. long 



AMTHOMT, KAN. 



AUTOSMrPH. 



Balls need a light oil. If they did nov 
touch each other they might not need any 
oil. But they are not so perfect as they 
look and they seldom are mounted in races 
so perfect that there is no twisting or rub- 
bing motion so they do have some friction 
and this requires oil. Graphite is not 
advised for it acts like small chunks in 
front cf the balls and makes them roll hard- 
er. The kind of oil depends somewhat on 
the service* If the load is heavy I would 
use a heavy oil in the hope that it would 
stay under the balls better. It is quite 
common to pack the bearings in grease. 
But this is not the best practice although 
it may be a safe one. The grease tends 
to keep the balls from rotating and they 
often slide and wear fiat spots on them- 
selves. This of course ruins them. If 
grease is used it should be very thin. The 
advantage of grease is that it does not run 
away and let the balls get dry. It also 
keeps out water and so prevents rust. If 
water enters, grit and dirt will also enter. 
The thin oil must be applied oftener unless 
there is a reservoir from which it can not 
escape. Whatever oil is used should be 
the purest mineral oil. Some mineral oils 
are bleached with acid to make them look 
light colored. Generally some of the acid 
remains. This is likely to attack the pol- 
ished steel and ruin tiie balls and races. 
Soak a bit of waste in the oil and wrap it 
around a bit of polished steel. Leave it 
out in the weather for a week or two. If 
the steel is not protected from rust, the oil 
is not what you want. If it rusts quickly 
you may feel sure it contains acid. The 
difference between a good friction spindle 
and an anti-friction one is very slight. 
When both are in good order and the loads 
light there will be found but 2 per cent or 
3 per cent difference, but with heavier 
loads the difference is greater. And with 
high speeds the viscosity of the oil is 
greater than any friction of the balls or 
rollers against each other. It is difficult 
to say what the difterence would be in 
your case. A trial would be the only de- 
cent way of arriving at it. On car axles it 
has been found that roller bearings start 
with % the friction of oil bearings and at 
ten miles per hour show but half the bear- 
ing friction. Size of axle in this case 3^ 
inches. If your shafts can not spring and 
so positively get a bearing the whole 
length, your losses will be much less than 
if they spring and bind. Probably 5 per 
cent is a safe figure for you under best 
conditions. 

To prevent noise from push rods and 
springs requires attention to every detaiL 
The cams should be made so as to approach 



QTCLB AND AUTOMOBILE TKADB JOURNAL. 



155 



the roller easllr and after forcing It up 
enough to get the valve oft the seat Bbould 
abniptl}' throw the valve wide open. The 
abutting ends ot the etem and push rod can 
be enlarged and tipped with hard flber or 
sole leather set to the enlarged ends. This 
will wear down but can be adjusted of 
course. The dUtauce between these ends 
should be kept very slight when hot, for 
this lessens the noise. The long wire which 
forms the body of the usual helical spring 
wtll 'give a musical ring when struck and 
adds much to the noise. The use of shear 
springs is lighter and avoids this ringing. 
I do not think there la anr noticeable dif- 
ference between air and water cooled en- 
gines In the matter of noise If both are 
alike otherwise. But flanges which vi- 
brate like a bell are not conductive to si- 
lence of course. And many air cooled en- 
gines are not mufSed as are the water 
cooled ones. But some are quiet and this 



proves that air cooled engines can be 
qnlet. 

To braze a tube with stub in It put the 
flux In the Joints before putting together 

and put plenty of brass and flux Inside. It 
will run out through the Joints when the 
stub Is properly hot It the stub end Is held 
low.— C. E. D. 

OFFSET CRANK-SHAFTS 
[418.] Will you please send me the 
names of Arms manufacturing gasoline 
motors with offset crank-shafts? 

OLOVSRaVlLLE. N. Y. CHAB. E. PA^■^'ACI. 

The supplement to the April Issue shows 
more than thirty different makes of vehi- 
cles having offset engines and gives in 
most cases the amount of the offset. This 
practice bids fair to become universal. I 
could not awahe any Interest In It when I 
Introduced It In 1898 and often wondeied 
It up.— C. E. D. 



2-Cycle Engines 



Told dnwlniB aud miU la eufalopa mi\h tbe dHcrttrttoi, 

DIAPHRAGM GASOLINE PUMP 

[361. ] I wish to use a diaphragm pump. 

worked by the exhaust of a 2-cycle motor, 

to raise gasoline to the carburetor. 

What shall the diaphragm be made of 
and how should the pump be constructed? 

I should expect very unsatisfactory re- 
sults from Bu exhaust worked diaphragm 
of very thin copper, corrugated, say 3 fns. 



dia.. with hot exhaust on one side and 
gasoline on the other Bide of the dia- 
phragm. If you want to try it, the illuH- 
tration will give you an idea of construc- 
tion. Such a pump has been used for 
jacket water circulation, but in tbe in- 



stance observed by me was abandoned In 
favor of a plunger pump. 

Such a construction as you propose will 
not do at all.— H. D. 

POPPET VALVE IN ^t;YCLE PISTON 
HEAD 

[415.] Referring to page 205, March 
number, 1S09, lost paragraph of reply by 
C. B. D. to question No. 323: As a reader 
of your Journal I am Interested In this 
paragraph which states that Mr. 0. E. D. 
obtains best results on 2-cycIe engines of 
base-compression type by supplying charge 
to cylinder through a large diameter light- 
weight check valve In the head of the pis- 
ton, conical deflector over valve being em- 
ployed to shoot the gas in a central stream 
to the head ot the compression space. 

I am endeavoring to design a small two- 
cycle engine which Is required to operate 
strongly at speeds from 300 to 2000 R. P. 
M., suitable fly-wheel being provided for 
satisfaction at low speeds. I desire to 
port the exhaust all around the cylinder 
(except ring bridges) to provide very free 
exhaust, and to use check admission 
through the piston head as described 
above for symmetrical Inlet. Inertia trou- 
bles at high speed would seem to prohibit 
the piston check valve. The data and my 
reasoning are as follows: 

Cylinder diameter and stroke, 3 ins.; 
length of connecting rod, S.T5 Ins.; depth 
of exhaust port, % In.; area of exhaust 
port, 4 sq. Ins.; diameter of check valve In 
piston head, 2 Ins.; weight ot check valve 
complete, 1-5 lb. Speed assumed In calcu- 
lation below is 3000 R. P. M. 



156 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



I have carefully laid out the actual pis- 
ton positions for each 10 degrees of crank- 
pin position, and have calculated there- 
from the piston velocity at 2000 R. P. M. 
for each 10 degrees crank position. When 
the piston commences to uncover the ex- 
haust port, % in. from the bottom of the 
stroke, the crank pin is about 60 degrees 
from the lower centre. Assuming the ex- 
haust completed sufficiently to permit ad- 
mission through the check valve by the 
time the piston is % in. from the bottom of 
the stroke or the crank 30 degrees from 
the lower centre, the piston check would 
then be opened by base pressure. 

At 35 degrees crank position the piston 
velocity at 2000 R. P. M. is 13.5 ft. per sec, 
and at 25 degrees position it is 9.4 ft. per 
sec' The decrease in velocity during this 
10 degrees crank movement is 13.5 — 9.4 = 
3.1 ft. per sec. The time in which the 
crank at 2000 R. P. M. moves 10 degrees is 
1-1200 sec. Hence at 30 degrees position 
the piston and its check valve are slow- 
ing down at the rate of or have a negative 

acceleration of 1/1*200"^^^^^ '* ^'^ ^^' » ^^ ***''• 
The force due to excess of base pressure 
over cylinder pressure at this instant must 
stop the check valve while the piston com- 
pletes its downward stroke. The neces- 
sary force neglecting frictions and assum- 
ing no valve spring is F — ^2 P^^* ^^^ere W— 
weight of valve in pounds, a^ -acceleration of 
valve in ft. per sec, per sec, and 32 2~Bcof^)' 
Aration constant due to firravity. Hence F— 

^*|^=:23.1 pds. or ^^J-:115.5 times the 

weight of the valve, surely a surprising figure, 
but quite correct. 

The valve is 2 ins. in diameter and thus 
has an area of 3.14 sq. ins. Hence the ex- 
cess of base pressure over cylinder pres- 
sure on the valve necessary to stop the 
valve and permit admission is at least 

1^ J— 7.35 pds. p«r sq. in. If it be »k- 
sumed that the ^ in exbnuet ofrfiiii.g 
corresponding to the 30 degree crank posi- 
tion would at 2000 R. P. M. reduce the 
cylinder pressure to about 3 pds. per sq. 
in., the base pressure with the piston % in. 
from the bottom of its stroke would have 
to be at least 10.35 pds. per sq. in. With 
my design it is not difficult to fill the waste 
space in the base to attain this pressure. 
Questions: (1) The opening of the 
valve as above calculated does not seem 
impossible, but as the piston starts up on 
the compression stroke, it will hit that 
valve a 23 pd. blow 2000 times a minute 
in closing it. Is it possible for a nickel- 
steel valve of slightly conical form for 
strength and stiffness to stand such pun- 
ishment? (2) Is such a valve inside the 
engine quiet or noisy? (3) Would the oil 
from the base lubricate it properly and 
also cushion the shock of closing to any 
extent? (4) Would better results be ob- 
tained by a well designed admission port 



in the cylinder wall, although it involves 
large reduction in exhaust port area? (5) 
Is a spring necessary to assist in closing 
the valve? The piston motion and gas 
pressures seem to me to be entirely suffi- 
cient. (6) Are the exhaust valve dimen- 
sions correct for use with check valve In 
the piston head? 



TORONTO. CANADA. 



H. W. PRICE. 



You seem to grasp the problem quite 
well, but you are not looking out for all 
the needful features. A 2-in. inlet check is 
much larger than you need in so small a 
cylinder as 3-in. bore and stroke. * Next, 
cut the weight. You can make that valve 
so light and with stem so short that it 
need only weigh half the weight you have 
given it. This can be done without reduc- 
ing the diameter and it will of course re- 
duce the base pressure needed. It also 
reduces that "hit" you inquire about. In 
this form of engine I find it unnecessary to 
open the exhaust ports so early as with 
the transfer passage. This means that 
the retardation of the piston and its effect 
on the valve is less than you have calcu- 
lated. Likewise the base pressure can 
hold that valve open till the exhaust port 
has nearly or quite closed. This allows 
more time for the charge to get into the 
cylinder and offers less chance for It to 
get out while the exhaust port is closing; 
one contributing to fuller charges and the 
other to less loss through the exhaust. 
If you make the lift of this valve very 
short the noise cannot be heard and the 
punishment is very slight. Oil does lubri- 
cate and cushion it. At the time the para- 
graph quoted here was written the piston 
check valve type had given better results 
than the side admission port form. Since 
that date some progress has evened them 
up, but the matter of superiority has not 
been decided, perhaps never will be. 
Many things are good in some points and 
bad in others. The piston valve looks best 
to me, but I am using mostly the other 
type for the present. With a vertical en- 
gine a spring is not necessary, but it is ad- 
visable. There seems to be some back- 
firing if a spring is not used. I Interpret 
this to mean that sometimes the valve 
opens early enough to let in the charge 
before dead" centre and at that point the 
valve is full open and does not close quick 
enough to prevent flame propagation 
through the opening. With a spring there 
is always a certain gas pressure and speed 
needed to keep the valve open and this 
speed, If greater than the rate of flame 
travel, will not let any back-flres occur. 
Forty-flve degrees is early enough open- 
ing for the exhaust port in this type of 
engine. This is one of the advantages of 
this type. The valve will open as soon 
as the pressure allows it to do so and will 
remain open till most of the new charge 
sets in, even though at that time the ex- 
haust port is practically ready to close. 
I think you can use smaller exhaust ports. 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADB JOURNAL. 



157 



Your method of figuring tbe valve motion 
is too deep for me. You give probably cor- 
rectly, a maximum valve speed at 35 de- 
grees of 13.5 ft. per second. This is less 
than the speed it would acquire in fallmg 
one second. The energy in that valve 
would be its weight multiplied by the 
square of its velocity and divided by 64.4 
We will probably not agree on this, but I 
simply wish to bring out the fact that 1 
consider the inertia of the valve much less 
than you think. I have not taken time to 
check up your figures. But I do not be- 
lieve the punishment you assume could be 
taken by the valve, nor do I believe it ex- 
ists. Make the vaJve motion quite short. 
Gas will get through a short passage with 
surprising rapidity. And the chance to 
hammer is much reduced. — C. E. D. 



BUILDING 2.CYCLE CAR FOR DESERT 

[352.] I am building a car for my own 
use here on the desert and want it as light 
and strong as possible and with about 25 
or 30 H. P., and I would like to install a 
3-cylinder, 2-cycle, air-<:ooled motor, but 
not being familiar with the 2-cycle air- 
cooled motor, I would like you to give me 
a little advice on the subject as to which 
style of motor and make and where I can 
get same. 

(1) Would you advise air-cooled motor 
• for this dry, hot country, it being hard to 

keep a water-cooled engine cool here? 

(2) If water-cooled, would you not rec- 
ommend gravity instead of a pump for 2- 
cycle engine ? 

(3) What air-cooled 2-cycle suits your 
ideas best for my purpose? 

The Atlas people claim they have the best 
2-cycle motor made. The Speedwell claims 
tl^ same thing, and according to the Scl< 
entific American, the Elmore engine has 
great advantages over all others, but in 
the March issue of 1908 Cycle and Automo- 
bile Trade Journal you give quite an item 
about the Euclid Motor Car Co., of Cleve- 
land, Ohio, which uses the Palmer 2-cycle 
engine and for a water-<:ooled 2-cycle it 
suits my ideas better than anything I have 
seen or read about, as it does away with 
crank-box pressure, which looks good to 
me, as felt packing and all kinds of bear- 
ings will wear, no matter how well built, 
more than piston rings, which means a 
waste in both fuel and power by leaking 
through main bearings. 

(4) What size bore and stroke would you 
consider about right for a 25 to 30 H. P. 
motor running at say 1200 to 1500 R. P. M., 
3-cy Under, 2-cycle? 

(5) Would you advise friction drive for 
a 25 or 30 H. P. motor driving a car weigh- 
ing 1500 to 1800 pounds? If so, what size 
should diameter disc and friction pulley be 
and how wide a face should friction pulley 
have? 

BAESTON. COL. B. I*. MUDGETT. 

(1) I fully believe it possible to build 
a satisfactory air-cooled, 2-cycle motor. 



and I rode on a Page car, built at Adrian, 
Mich., which had 4 cylinders, 2-cycle, air- 
cooled, copper rings for cooling fins, very 
thin, and corrugated, and set into the cylin- 
der mould and the copper cooling flanges 
fixed in the cylinders by pouring the melted 
iron around them at the joining with the 
cylinder. This Page motor had no fan at 
all, was fiexible, cooled well and made 
an excellent showing. The Page Company 
has not proceeded with this car and will 
not give out any story for publication. 
This is the only air-cooled, 2-cycle motor I 
ever saw which cooled well. I cannot ad- 
vise you for or against air-cooled, 2-cycle 
motors, as I have not seen enough of air- 
cooled, 2-cycle motor performance to assert 
any decided opinion in this matter. 

(2) I believe thermal circulation much 
better than pump circulation of cooling 
water. 

(3) I do not know where you can pro- 
cure such a 2-cycle, air-cooled motor as 
you desire. 

The first Euclid motor did not cool well. 
I believe Mr. Palmer is now working on a 
second air-cooled motor at Trenton, N. J. 

Without a doubt there are many valid 
objections to crank-box cylinder supply, 
yet the broad fact stands that the Atlas, 
the Elmore, the Speedwell and the Ameri- 
can Simplex, Mishawaka, Indiana, are all 
putting out cars with 2-cycle motors, 
crank-box cylinder supply, which are sold 
and satisfy purchasers. 

(4) Three cylinders, 4x4, will give you 
what you want, if you can fill the cylinders 
at maximum charge. 

(5) There are several cars on the market 
which make very successful use of the 
friction drive. The disk 18 or 20 ins. dia., 
paper wheel same, with 1% paper wheel 
face, are the ordinary dimensions. See the 
1909 Cartercar story in this issue of the 
Journal. 

You might write to Dr. W. P. Agnew, 203 
Telegraph avenue, Oakland, CaL, about 
Internally air-cooled, 2-cylinder motors, 
and write to Perry Okey, Columbus, Ohio, 
about 2-cycle motors, water-cooled. I 
think Okey can supply you with a very 
good 3-cylinder, 2-cycle, water-cooled mo- 
tor. — H. D. 



2-CyCLE SCAVENGING FAN, STEEL 
PISTONS AND FUEL INJECTION 
[405.] Kindly reply to the following 
three questions through the medium of 
the Journal: 

(a) Can a fan be used successfully, in- 
stead of a displacer cylinder or crank case 
displacer, in a two-cycle engine as a meth- 
od of introducing the charge into the cylin- 
der. 

(b) Can steel pistons be used satisfac- 
torily in steel cylinders. Has this ever 
been tried and by whom. (I understand 
the objection to steel cylinders with cast 
iron pistons; and the reverse practice.) 



158 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



(c) Who manufacture pumps suitable for 
the direct introduction of liquid fuel into 
the cylinder of internal combustion en- 
gines. 

ST. LOUIS. MO. 

AMEDEB V. REYBURN, JR. 

Replying to your three questions: 

(a) Yes, with many qualifications. If a 
carbureter is used and the fan handles 
only air mixed with fuel, then It is clear 
that some means must be supplied to avoid 
waste of fuel by passing the surplus of an 
over-charge through the intake-port out 
through the exhaust-port, and, obviously, 
the fan must be placed between the car- 
bureter and the cylinder intake port 

The fan may be belt-driven or gear- 
driven or motor-exhaust-driven, and the 
fan-shaft may be in plain bearings or in 
ball bearings, and in any case or form the 
fan will be found to have plenty of ob- 
jectionable features of its own. 

C. P. Malcolm was the first, so far as 
I know, to use two fans in separate casings 
on one shaft with a fly-wheel and drive this 
shaft by causing the exhaust to impinge 
the vanes of the driving fan to give the 
two fans and the fly-wheel a high velocity 
to be maintained by the fly-wheel, so that 
the second fan could draw a large volume 
of pure air through the intake port, the 
cylinder and the exhaust, while the intake 
port was uncovered by the piston and then 
force this air through the exhaust pipe and 
the mufller into the atmosphere. This 
plan of course requires injection of fuel In 
liquid or spray or vaporized form, and 
this fuel injection must be late; just before 
the intake port closes, so that air charged 
with fuel will not be drawn out of the ex- 
haust port. This plan of Malcolm's was 
used by him successfully, and he believed 
it very valuable. It is obvious, however, 
that since the intake port closes before the 
exhaust port closes, the fan sucking the 
exhaust port must reduce the cylinder 
charge to below atmospheric pressure at 
the time of exhaust port closing. 

With a pure air charge and fuel Injected 
at the intake port, fuel injection must pre- 
cede intake port closing to mix to the fuel 
with the body of the charge in the cylin- 
der, so that the fuel will surround the 
spark plug when the charge is compressed. 

It is clear that the cylinder-sucking fan 
cannot' become beneficially operative until 
after the intake port is opened by descent 
of the piston, if the charge has access to 
the cylinder through the intake port, or- 
dinary low position, only. But suppose an 
automatic intake valv« opening into the 
cylinder is placed in the cylinder-head and 
that a fan sucks the exhaust port; suppose, 
also that the cylinder-head is thickly set 
with vertical cooling spines under a flat 
cover touching the spines top-ends; then 
if the fan were efficient, a large volume of 



cold air would be sucked from the outside 
cooling the head-spines, and would then 
pass downward and out through the ex- 
haust port, cooling the cylinder exhaust 
side, and with this arrangement fuel could 
be injected close to the spark plug in the 
cylinder head just as the exhaust port 
closed, so that the rich charge would He 
around the spark plug and make ignition 
sure, with pure air below the charge to 
give oxygen for charge burning. This 
seems to me to be the best possible ar- 
rangement for fan cylinder charging, no 
low intake port, an automatic intake valve 
in the cylinder head and the fan sucking 
the low exhaust port opened by piston 
descent. 

Although not asked, I volunteer the 
opinion that fan charging is more costly, 
less reliable and less durable than charg- 
ing by a separate cylinder and piston. I 
also give notice that I am, so far as I 
know, the original Inventor of this here 
described form of fan-supplied 2-cycle 
motor and may apply for patent therefor. 

(b) Without doubt steel pistons have 
been used in steel cylinders of small 
motors, and, if given abundant lubrication, 
they probably work well. But the form 
of piston and piston seat demanded by the 
Frank engine are against a drawn steel 
piston and in favor of a grey iron or steel 
casting piston. 

(c) It is no trick at all to make little 
plunger pumps for fuel charging. I do not 
know where you can buy such pumps. I 
do not believe fuel injection into the com- 
pressed charge can be satisfactory. It is 
an easy thing to make a pump to discharge 
a variable quantity of fuel into the cylin- 
der at atmospheric pressure or a little 
below. — H. D. 



A CORRECTION IN 2-CYCLE H. P. 

The writer has often mentioned the first 
"American Simplex" motor, 2-cycle, 2 cyl- 
inders, as showing over 40 H. P. with a 
muffler and over 50 H. P. without a muf- 
fler, which was and is the fact, giving the 
cylinder bore and piston stroke as 5 ina. 
each, which was an error, the cylinder bore 
being 5% ins. with the 5 ins. piston stroke 
as stated. This error made the proportion 
between the actual piston area and the 
stated area as 30% is to 25, giving the pls« 
ton area at about five-sixths of what It 

really was. ,, ^ ._ 

But with 5% ins. piston diameter the 
power, 20 H. P. with muffler and 25 H. P. 
without muffler, was the highest so far 
brought to the writer's notice for 2-cycle 
and crank-box pressure cylinder supply. 
The port particulars of this motor, which 
is now in service, driving cars, were, first, 
intake port top line % above low piston 
head and top line of exhaust port 1% ins. 
above low piston head, afterward changed 



CYCLB AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL.. 



159 



to exhaust port top line 1^ ins. above low 
piston head. The intake-port had three 
bridges, making four intake port segments 
each 1% ins. circumferential length, a total 
intake port length of 4^ ins. The ex- 
haust port had one bridge, dividing it into 
2 segments, each 1% ins. circumferential 
extent, 3^ ins. total exhaust port circum- 
ferential length. Because of two more 
bridges the intake friction was greater 
than the exhaust friction with only one 
bridge, so that the 1^ ins. excess intake 
port length does not give so much more 
capacity than that of the exhaust port as 
seems probistble at first sight. 

The compression was 60 lbs., cylinders 
full of pure air, crank-shaft turned slowly 
to make compression stroke. With crank- 
shaft at 500 R. P. M. the recording gauge 
showed 85 lbs. compression, full cylinder 
charge of pure air. 

This 2-cylinder motor with ports as specf- 
fied was strong at 1800 R. P. M., and 
showed, maximum, 51 B. H. P. without a 
mufQer and 41 B. H. P. with mufQer, 
against Prony brake resistance, brake 
drum water-cooled, wood-strip brake-band 
facing, making 5-minute runs possible with- 
out burning the wood facing of the brake 
band. 

These are the highest well authenticated 
powers obtained from two 5Hx5 2-cycle, 
water-cooled cylinders, within the writer's 
knowledge. 



ANOTHER REVOLVING 2-CYCLE EN- 
GINE BUILDER 

For some years I have been studying the 
two cycle motor and the result of my re- 
search I am sending under separate cover 
to you. My object was to design a motor 
of light weight, air cooled, without a crank 
and of abundant power for its size. Any 
style of cylinder can be used with the de- 
sign. When using other styles such as 
the two-port etc., the gas is drawn in 
through a hollow piston rod. To make 
an extremely light weight motor the 
charge goes through a piston valve in the 
piston and exhausts through a valve In the 
head. All valves are mechanically oper- 
ated. I use a trip to close the exhaust 
valve. The motor is of the revolving type. 

FLTMOTTTH. MASS. G. R. BARTLETT. 

There are several features of interest in 
your designs but in general they are not 
practical. The idea of feeding a recipro- 
cating engine through the connecting rod 
is very old. It has little to commend it 
There are usually better ways to introduce 
the fresh charge. The use of valves 
through the piston head is also old as is 
the use of the piston to bump open the ex- 
haust valve. 

Your peculiar arrangement of hollow 
shaft, eccentric instead of crank and cyl- 
inder and piston both moving, with a pis- 
ton rod through the center of the firing 
chamber, does not look good. Doubtless 
such a device would work If properly car- 



ried out but what is the use? The world 
is looking for something better than what 
now exists. Your altruism in making 
known what you have is commendable. If 
you can not use it yourself maybe some 
one else can. But confine yourself to few 
things and thresh them out to a finish. It 
is really surprisng how simple things can 
be made if one puzzles over them long 
enough. — C. E. D. 



2'CYCLE ENGINE QUESTIONS 

[4261 I would like to know a few things 
about 2-cycle engines. 

Why should there be only one-half more 
power in a 2-cycle with double as many 
explosions. Is the other half wasted, per 
haps, part of the new charge escaping 
through the exhaust port, for the 2-cycle 
engine uses about the same amount of 
gasoline as other 4-cycle engines with 4- 
cylinders, same bore and stroke. If this 
is correct then the 2-cycle is Inferior to a 
4-cycle, for using the same amount of 
fuel and giving only % the power would 
be rather expensive and undesirable. I 
also see in the atlas auto catalogue the 
claim made, that a 2-cycle would give 
from 40 to 60 per cent, more power than a 
4-cycle, or in other words there would be 
from 40 to 60 per cent waste in a 2-cycle, 
for if one cylinder gives two impulses to 
the other one, only one size being the same, 
it ought to ^ve fully 100 per cent, more, 
anything less would be a waste. In an- 
other leaflet it says a good 2-cycle can 
give more than "double" the power of a 
4-cycle, at same size. In regard to lubrica- 
tion, mixing oil with the fuel, the atlas 
folks say is wasteful, and they also claim 
that air cooling is impossible with a 2- 
cycle, as the explosions are twice as often, 
and should be sure to get too hot 

UPPER SANDUSKY. O. OEO. WTLL. 

Your questions are on lines that seem 
hazy in the minds of many. The answers 
have already been given in many forms 
but will have to be given many more times 
before they are grasped by the public at 
large. The first thing to remember is that 
very few 2-cycle engines take in twice the 
mixture that a 4-cycle of same size does. 

It is common to assume that they do, but 
they do not If the 4-cycle had no clear- 
ance space it would act like a splendid 
pump in taking in the new charge. It has 
some clearance and the gas in this space 
is expanded or stretched out as the piston 
starts to draw in more. Then the new 
charge stretches out and as a result the 
total contents of the cylinder at the end 
of the suction stroke does not fill the total 
space at atmospheric pressure. There are 
some things which modify this statement 
but this is in general true. Thus if the 
cylinder walls are hot enough to warm up 
this charge while the crank passes dead 
center the indicator may show atmospheric 
pressure before the piston starts back. 
Or by holding the valve open late the gas 



160 



GTCLB AND AUTOMOBILE THADE JOURNAL. 



in the supply pipe may continue to flow 
and may ram into the cylinder quite a lit- 
tle more than was actually sucked in by 
the piston. But in ordinary practice there 
is less than a cylinder full. In the two 
cycle the matter is worse. The first move- 
ment of the piston draws old gas back 
from the cylinder or perhaps It is the last 
of the new just transferred. At any rate 
it can not draw in new till the transfer 
port is closed. Thus is lost 30 degrees of 
the crank movement. Then further pis- 
ton movement begins to stretch or expand 
the gas in the case till the Inlet check 
valve or the disk valve is opened. After 
this the new charge is acted upon but this 
action is very feeble as compared with the 
action of the 4-cycle. You can understand 
the two by comparing an attempt to lift 
a weight with a short rubber band and also 
with a long one. The clearance in the 4- 
cycle is about % the piston displacement. 
In the 2-cycle the crank case content is two 
or three times the displacement The dif- 
ference in ability to pull in a full new 
charge is probably ten to one. I have 
seen It stated that at high speeds a four- 
cycle engine probably gets not over half 
charges. If this is true, it is wonderful 
that the two-cycle gets enough to run. I 
think this is sufficient to show you that the 
two-cycle does not put on the new charge 
for its full piston stroke and does not ef- 
fectively pull as does the four-cycle dur- 
ing any part of its stroke. It therefore does 
not take in the amount supposed and so 
bhould not be expected to give double 
power. Further the four-cycle begins to 
compress as soon as the piston starts back, 
if the valve is closed. The two-cycle can 
not begin till the exhaust port is closed 
which is about 50 degrees crank movement 
later than the four-cycle. This means that 
about % of the total cylinder content has 
been expelled through the exhaust before 
the cylinder is closed and compression be- 
gins. Now sometimes this is loss and 
sometimes not. If it is possible to so put 
the new charge into the cylinder that the 
old gases are down at the port end, this ex- 
plosion crowds them out and leaves clean 
and powerful mixture in the cylinder for 
work. But if the old gases are up in the 
top and fresh mixture is down in the 
port region, this is sure to go out and be 
lost This is why It is of great import- 
ance to have proper deflectors and head 
shapes. And to get that arrangement 
which will give the best result at all 
speeds is next to impossible. This ex- 
plains why so many 2-cycles have been 
wasteful and condemned. But good and 
economic 2-cycles have been made and one 
good one is enough. It proves that the 
thing can be done. From the above you 
will see that a 2-cycle should not be ex- 
pected to give double i)ower because it 
does not get in double the quantity of 
mixture at high speeds. Some special 
forms do. But it does one thing of great 
advantage: As it is pulled down in speed 



under hard work it takes in a larger pro- 
portion of new charge and so fills the cyl- 
inder better. This explains why the 2- 
cycle is such a good puller at low and mod- 
erate speeds. This is a feature much de- 
sired in auto work because bad roads can- 
not be driven over fast so the motor must 
be able to pull at low speed or the gears 
must be changed. Further, the usual auto 
engine is seldom run at full speed and 
wide open throttle, but is so large that it 
has much excess power and so runs at 
probably half power most of the time. This 
reduces the compression and the efficiency 
in a 4-cycle, but since any loss of charge 
from the crank-case is made up by reten- 
tion of old charge in the cylinder, there is 
always practically a constant compression 
in the 2-cycle with corresponding high effi- 
ciency. The large proportion of old gases 
is likely to cause misfires, but a large 
spark will prevent most of these. 

Mixing oil with the fuel is certainly the 
best way yet found for a 2-cycle. No more 
regular way of feeding the oil can be 
found. It oils according to the power de- 
veloped. This permits the highest econ- 
omy. 

Air cooling is a peculiar problem. Many 
things enter into the successful air cooler. 
But these things are just as essential in 
the 4-oycle' as in the 2-cycle. In fact, I 
think the 2-cycle probably has the advan- 
tage. High compression increases the 
efficiency because more of the heat goes 
into pressure and less into the cylinder 
walls. The 2-cycle always has its full 
compression and is not heated up by half 
pressure, and consequently slow burning 
charges. The 2-cycle exhaust usually opens 
earlier than the valve of the 2-cycle, and 
so gets out the main heat sooner, and hav- 
ing no hot valve in the head, this delicate 
end of the cylinder does not sufPer so 
much as it does in the 4-cycle. It fires 
twice as often, but only retains each 
charge half as long so the result is about 
equal. — C. E. D. 



TWO-CYCLE FUEL INJECTION 
DISCUSSION 

[428.] Having a few ideas concerning 
2-cycle motors, I submit them to you for 
your opinion on same. I have an idea m 
my mind for a 2-cycle motor in which the 
fuel is injected by plunger pump, consist- 
ing of only three moving parts to each cyl- 
inder. The quantity of fuel will be vaned 
by increasing and decrieasing the length 
of pump stroke. Do you think this is a 
good method of supplying fuel to motors? 
My idea is that there is no fuel wasted 
through the bearings a« occurs in all mo- 
tors using crank case compression. No 
cam or wheels will be used to operate 
pump. The fuel will be injected while the 
piston is traveling upward in the motor. 
Do you think it a better plan to inject the 
full charge, instantly after the piston has 
closed the ports? If I use this latter meth- 
od I will be compelled to use a cam to 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



161 



obtain this instantaneous action. It will 
also permit me to place the pump near the 
lower end of cylinder, where the power of 
the explosion will not be exerted on the 
fuel inlet as would occur if pump was 
placed on compression space of motor and 
the fuel injected gradually as the piston 
travels upward in cylinder. Which do you 
consider the best place to place pump in 
compression space or on lower end of cyl- 
inder? The motor is to be air-cooled. My 
method of scavenging the cylinder is 
assisted by a rotary blower, similar to 
those used on blacksmiths' forges. It will 
be driven from forward end of motor 
through a short shaft. The air pipe will 
be connected to inlet ports of cylinders, 
and will be supposed to fill the cylinders 
with pure air in excess to their demand 
so as to partly internal air cool the cylin- 
der, as mentioned by H. D. in Cycle and 
Automobile Trade Journal of March 1. 
1908, page 190. Do you think. this method 
will supply the necessary amount of air 
providing the piston is sloped towards the 
outlet port, or will the burnt charge tend 
to come out of Inlet port caused by insuffi- 
cient air resistance as in starting when 
the blower would not be furnishing much 
air? My reason for using the blower is to 
avoid crank-case compression, allowing me 
to use ball bearings on crank-shaft. 

GHENT, N. Y. HARRISON M. RAAB. 

The pump method has been tried many 
times and some folks seem to get fine re- 
sults out of it. My own experience is that 
it is very delicate. Also that it does not 
allow the necessary time for vaporization 
and so is likely to send unburned or part- 
ly burned fuel out in the exhaust and so 
be more wasteful than a carburetor 
method. I have used both Injection points. 
There is very little choice. I think I fa- 
vor the earliest injection because of the 
longer time to perfectly mix. The blower 
idea is also not a new one. There is no 
objection to this except the extra parts. 
If your ports are right height the exhaust 
will get out without blowing back, and tnis 
action is more certain at low speeds than 
at high because the interval between the 
opening of the two ports Is greater. At 
high speeds the inlet opens so quickly 
after the exhaust that sometimes the gases 
blow out the inlet port. I favor the crank- 
case compression. This adds no parts and 
works quite well. By a little experiment- 
ing you can ram in some air and so nearly 
or quite fill the case. It allows time for 
the charge of fuel to mix with the air and 
you can use stuffing boxes at less cost than 
a blower and thus use the ball bearings 
if desired. But the saving in friction will 
not be nearly so great as the loss of power 
driving a blower, so why use ball bearings? 
It seems to me that in an engine where 
lubrication must be maintained and dirt 
excluded, ball bearings are an unadvisable 
refinement, not worth their additional cost. 
There is a gain in power if the cylinder 
can be completely washed out with pure 



air, but if this gain is to be had at the 
cost of a blower and its troubles, I would 
prefer making the engine a little larger 
and getting the increase in power that 
way. I think you can get economy with 
less trouble by providing a gaseous mix- 
ture rather than by pumping liquid. — C. 
E. D. 



WRITE THE MAKERS 

[348.] Kindly give me a little advice on 
the following: I have a 4-cylinder, 2-cycle 
Elmore of 1907 which, after having cranked 
engine and gotten it started running idle, 
back-fires out of air shutter in carbure- 
tor, sounding like pistol shots. Sometimes 
while running on the road It back-fires 
now and then, but when engine gets 
warmed up good this back-firing stops even 
when running idle. 

The engine lately had new piston rings 
put in. 

Any advice you can give me in the col- 
umns of The Cycle and Automobile Trade 
Journal will be gratefully appreciated. 

CHICAGO, ILL. F. P. A. 

In matters relating to a car and motor 
in regular and successful use, like the El- 
more, the better course is to address the 
manufacturer directly, as the manufacturer 
is certain to be able to give better advice 
than any outsider. 

Your troubles do not appear to be at all 
serious, and the Elmore factory can un- 
doubtedly advise you understandingly. — 
H. D. 



NO OPPOSED CYLINDER 2-CYCLE 

MOTORS 

[419.] I write for your opinion on 2- 
cycle opposed cylinder motors for small 
cars, advantages and disadvantages. Have 
followed the discussions in the Journal 
closely, but the opposed cylinder type 
seems to be ignored. The one made by the 
Federal Company is the only one noted. 
The Elmore ran their's in pairs, horizon- 
tally, and so does Duryea, but all others 
are vertical. For ease in examining crank 
case interior and pistons, there can be but 
little doubt of the superiority of the hori- 
zontal, and there must be some strong rea- 
son in favor of the vertical, or, it seems 
to me, the opposed type would prevail. 
Can you give me the names of manufac- 
turers of the opposed type? 

SOUTH BEND. IND. MORTON WAGNBR. 

Almost all 2-cycle motors to date have 
used crank-box cylinder supply, which calls 
for least possible crank-box clearance, 
which is not very easy to obtain with op- 
posed cylinders. Vertical cylinders lend 
themselves readily to the individual crank- 
box, and the torque with a pair of 2-cycle 
cylinders, placed side by side, is the same 
as if they were opposed. The vertical form 
has the preference. I cannot give you the 
name of a maker of an opposed cylinder 
2-cycle motor. — H. D. 



162 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



Opinions and Suggestions 



Under the above headinc we will be |>leaeed to publish letters from our rawlen expmrinc 
they have overoome difficulties, or makinc useful suKsestions. In this department will 
oommunications or articles, of either a general or technical nature. 



opinioi 
» De 



publ 



bow 




COMMUNICATION— WHY A LATE 
SPARK CAUSES OVERHEAT- 
ING 

Referring to 341, p. 121. April issue, and 
to 39G, p. 88, May issue, I ask, does a late 
spark cause heating? I claim the opposite 
a late spark keeps the engine cooler. Let 
us verify our statement! Try this ex- 
periment: Take your car. Open the throttle 
a certain amount, say one-fourth. Retard 
the spark. Run your car 30 minutes. Feel 
your cylinder. It is relatively cool and 
you used a late spark. Now let your en- 
gine cool off. Use fresh water in radi- 
ator. Open again your throttle the exact 
amount (i. e.) one-fourth. Run your car 
30 minutes, using an advance spark. Feel 
your cylinder. It is hot, much hotter than 
before. In this case an early spark was 
used. Now haven't we disproved the 
above assertion? A late spark will heat 
the cylinder more than an early spark, only 
in the case where approximately the same 
speed is kept up. The explanation of it 
is as follows: An engine will develop its 
greatest or maximum power when the 
spark occurs at the correct time, which is 
exactly at the dead centre, or perhaps a 
fraction of a second of time previous if 
engine runs very fast. Now any retard- 
ation of spark will cause a drop in speed 
of car; and in order to keep up speed the 
operator is compelled to open the throttle 
the wider, in order to allow a greater 
amount of fuel to enter, caused by a waste 
of energy due to the late spark. For each 
retarding of the spark there must be a 
corresponding wider opening of the throt- 
tle, if the speed is to be kept up. At the 
end of a certain time the operator will 
find his engine much hotter, than it would 
be, had he used an early spark. Disre- 
garding the differeibce in radiation be- 
tween a blue and yellow or red flame, and 
disregarding the difference in amount of 
radiating surface exposed, the engine is 
hotter, because on account of a later spark 
it was necessary to use a much larger 
charge, a larger amount of fuel used, pro- 
duces more heat; and a larger amount of 
heat makes the engine hotter. A spark 
at the correct time would have propelled 
the car over the same distance in the same 
time with much less fuel, and the produc- 
tion of less heat. Hence would have kept 
the engine cooler. In our first experi- 
ment the engine was run thirty minutes 
regardless of speed and space. The total 
number of charges, although a little heav- 
ier — was much less when spark was re- 
tarded, hence the engine was necessarily 
cooler. I hope this explanation will sat- 
isfy the reader. 

SEOUTN. TEXAS. C. F. BLUM6ERG. 



COMMUNICATION,— LUBRICATING 
OILS AND CARBURIZATION 

I have always held to the theory that the 
carbon deposits taken from gasoline en- 
gines were due to the incomplete combus- 
tion of lubricating oil and gasoline used. 
I have just demonstrated by an expert, 
ment noted below that this is a fact. 

I placed in a small steel crucible, a 
handful of scrapings taken from the cylin- 
ders and piston head of a gasoline engine. 
I kept the crucible at a cherry-red heat 
for the better part of an hour, and at the 
end of that time I found a residue which 
proved to be purely iron and nothing else. 

This experiment proves beyond any sort 
of question two things: First, that ineffi- 
cient lubrication produces undue wear, as 
shown by the considerable percentage of 
iron, and that, secondly, hydro-carbon de- 
posits, and it is hydro-carbon not pure 
carbon, is due to imperfect combustion. 
If the combustion had been complete, slh 
it was in the crucible, no deposits what- 
ever would be left. 

It also proves a fact that I have always 
contended for, and one which applies 
equally to gasoline and lubricating oils, 
that the more combustible an oil is. the 
less will be the deposits of hydnx^rbon. 
When applied to gasoline it means that 
the higher the gravity the more perfecv 
the combustion, the less smoke, therefore 
the less carbon. As applied to lubricatins 
oils, the same theory is equally true, the 
higher the gravity and the poorer the fire 
test, that is to say, the more combustible, 
and the lower the viscosity, the less car- 
bon, under the same condition will be de- 
posited, and incidentally, the poorer the 
lubrication. On the contrary, the higher 
the viscosity or consistency, the better the 
lubrication, the more efficient the com- 
pression or the better packing for the 
rings and the greater the deposit for the 
reason stated above. The deposits of car- 
bon are not due to any free carbon that 
the oil may possibly contain, but are due 
entirely to partial combustion. This ai>> 
plies equally to gasoline and lubricating 
oils. 

There is no such thing, or ever Will be, 
as a lubricating oil that will not carbonize, 
unless the heat is intense enough to pro> 
duce absolute combustion, but there is a 
difference in the degree of carbonization. 
The oils advertised as non-carbonizing are 
all what we oil men call neutral oil, and 
the higher the fire test, viscosity and lubri- 
cating efliciency, the greater the percent- 
age of carbonization, while, on the oon« 
trary, the higher the gravity, the poorer 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



163 



the fire test and viscosity, and the less 
efficient the lubrication, and the less car- 
bonization. 

A blended oil with a still higher fire 
test and viscosity and a better lubrication 
gives some increase of carbonization. This 
means that a man who operates an auto- 
mobile must choose between comparative- 
ly poor lubrication and undue wear with 
poor compression, and comparatively little 
carbonization, or a better oil and some 
increase in carbonization. 

T. T. SOUTHWICK. 



ACETYLENE CURE FOR WAYWARD 

TAIL LAMPS 

Reference to tail light trouble, for the 
benefit of your readers. I wish to say that 
I removed the oil lamp frofn my tail light 
and with the use of an ^ in. pet cock and 
a brass plate to fit bottom of lamp I at- 
tached a ^ foot acetylene burner and- con- 
nected this to pipes feeding head lights, 
since when I have had no trouble with ex- 
tinguished or smoking tail lamp. An acety- 
lene tail lamp should be a good seller. 

lOLLERSBUBG. PA. W. DOUDSN. 

(Rose Mfg. Co., 929 Arch St., Phila., i-a., 
manufacture an acetylene tail lamp. — ^ED.) 



Since publishing the statement in the 
Opinions and Suggestions Department, 
page 214, March issue, on the mileage of 
Mr. J. L. Martin, our attention has been 
called to the "Around the World Mileage" 
given by a set of Firestone tires on the 
truck of Mr. A. Goyert, of Greensburg, Ind. 
Mr. Goyert made sworn affidavit that the 
tires on the rear wheels made 25,520 
miles each and those on the front wheels 
31,000 miles. The tires have since been 
removed 'and one of them was exhibited 
by the Firestone Company at the Boston 
Show. The tire itself is worn down to the 
cross bars, but the base remains intacL 



NOTES FOR THE NOVICE 

Passing a thin piece of paper under the 
reed of a horn is about the easiest way to 
remove the dust 

If your oil lamps go out frequently while 
running, it may be that the draught holes 
in the cap are choked up by heavy deposits 
of carbon. 

Never attempt to force spark plugs too 
tightly in hot cylinders or difficulty will 
be experienced later in any attempt to re- 
move theuL 

Keep all oil or grease away from your 
tires. See that the garage floors are as 
clean as possible and wipe off oil from tires 
as soon as seen. 

The greatest error made by autoists at- 
tempting to repair their machines is that 
of not properly locating the trouble before 
tnrlng to remedy it 

EiVery once in a while go over the tire 
casing and pick out the bits of gravel or 
metal which are imbedded. Any small 
cuts should be filled with cement. 



Valve springs, like other parts of a mo- 
tor, will not remain the same for ever, 
After all methods have been tried and the 
motor still lacks its usual power, a new 
set of springs will usually remedy the 
trouble. 

When fitting a speedometer or mileage 
indicator to a car, make sure that the gear 
which is mounted on one of the road 
wheels is exactly centred on the latter, or 
else the gears will wear quickly and will 
also be noisy. 

Make sure that all connections of the 
mixture inlet pipe of a multi-cylinder en- 
gine are perfectly tight, or otherwise small 
quantities of extra air are liable to enter 
which will make the operation of starting 
the engine more difficult 

It is better to renew the whole set of 
ball bearings than to replace one broken 
ball. If the odd ball cannot be carefully 
gauged, it may be a trifle large, and must 
therefore bear most of the load, causing it 
to wear very rapidly. 

If the carburetor drips when standing, 
the float valve should be examined. If 
pressing it shut stops the dripping, the float 
is too high. If the dripping persists, the 
valve leaks and must be ground to a fit, 
preferably using pumice stone, since emery ' 
is liable to imbed itself in the brass. 

Start your machine in a straight line if 
possible, and do not twist around on your 
steering wheel before you get started. Not 
only the tires, but the steering mechanism 
as well, will suffer if this practice is con- 
tinued. Do not run your motor car along 
in the car tracks, as this grinds down one 
edge of the tire. 

A good way to make a nut that is too 
large to do for emergency service is by 
hammering one side of the nut until the 
round hole assumes an oval shape. In this 
manner the threads will take hold of the 
bolt on two sides and will maintain the 
part in position until a nut of suitable size 
can be procured. 

When valves are to be ground it will be 
found worth while to tie a piece of strong 
cord to a piece of waste and push the lat- 
ter into the cylinder. In the grinding oper- 
ation if any of the abrasive should drop 
into the passages, the waste will prevent 
its finding its way to the interior of the 
cylinder, and it can be removed when the 
waste is withdrawn by means of the string. 

Stiff valve springs may close the valves 
with so much force as to break the heads 
from the stems, or break the stems at the 
key slots. Springs too weak to hold the 
valves on the cams will make the engine 
weak at high speeds, and produce clatter- 
ing owing to belated seating of the valves. 
It should be remembered that an exces- 
sively stiff spring, even if it does not in- 
jure the valve seat by constant hammer- 
ing, is consuming power which could be 
better expended in driving the car. 



164 CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADES JOURNAL. 

MACHINE TOOLS 

FOR THE MANUFACTURE OF 

AUTOMOBILES 

AND ACCESSORIES 



^ We are Prepared to Furnish You with 
an Estimate for a Complete Equipment, or 
Necessary AdditionsJ Eiquipment, for the 
Economical Manufacture of Automobiles 
and Accessories. 

KINDLY COMMUNICATE WITH THE 
AUTOMOBILE DEPARTMENT 

PRAH & WHITNEY COMPANY 

111 BROADWAY : : NEW YORK 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 

NEW MACHINE TOOLS 



THE AMERICAN TOOL WORKS CO.'S 
21-INCH BACK-GEARED CRANK 
8HAPER 
Tbe 21-incb back-geared crank shaper 
sbowD berewitb 1b made by tbe Ameri- 
can Tool Works Compan}', Cincinnati, 
Ohio,. This abaper bas a 2I14 locb stroke 
and ft 9 Inch down feed to bead. The table 
trsvelB 1414 Incbes vertically and 26^ 
Inches borlzontally. Tbe stroke of ram 
is poaitive and has elgbt (E) rates of apeed, 
ranging from T.T to US strokes per minute. 
The length of stroke may be changed with- 
out stopping the machine. The device tor 



length, feed screw having an adjustable 
graduated collar reading to .001 in. Has 
large tool post for using holders with In- 
serted cutters and bas tool steel tool post 
screw and tool steel serrated back plate. 
Table Is of box form with three T-slota 
on both top and sides, cut from the solid. 
with ample allowance ot metal around 
them. Is thoroughly braced Internally and 
Is readily detachable. The cross feed Is 
variable and automatic with a range of 
.008 In. to .200 In. Instantly obtainable 
while the machine la running, at alot bead 
near top ot column, conveniently operated 
and accurately set by the star knob ahown. 



posttlontng the stroke Is located on the 
ram near tbe head and may be opemted 
whili the machine is running. A pointer 
an the ram traveling along an index 
shows the length of stroke as set. Rocker 
arm ta extra heavy and thoroughly braced 
and gives to the ram practically a uniform 
rate of speed Its entire stroke, also pro- 
vides an exceedingly quick return. The 
machine is readily changed from single 
to back-geared through a convenient, selt 
locking lever, and has a back-gear ratio 
of 24.3 to 1 which with the large cone pul- 
ley, gives ft extraordinary power for taking 
heavy cuts. Tbe head Is operative at any 
angle wltbln an arc of 100 degrees and bas 
convenient and efflclent locking device. 
Down slide la fitted with continuoua taper 
gib having end screw adjustment, for tak- 
ing up the wear. Down feed Is of unueua) 



Is BuppUed with graduations and pointer 
either side of zero, reading from 1 to 25 
notches, each notch representing .OOS in. 
teed. Construction Is such as to render 
unnecessary any adjuatment of feeding 
mechanism due to change of position of 
rail. Feed is uniform as aet regardless ot 
position ot rail. The feed la thrown In or 
out, also reversed through knob on large 
to afford protection. Feed rack Is cut from 
bar ateel. The vise Is ot heavy pattern 
with deep Jaws faced with steel. Is clamp- 
ed by four (4) bolts to swivel base, (gradu- 
ated In degrees), which Is exceptionally 
large, covering nearly tbe entire area ot 
the table top and being clamped to same 
by four (4) bolts. Vise screw baa bearing 
at both ends and Is always In tension when 
holding the work. 



CTCLB AKD AUTOMOBIU TRADB JOVRNAL. 



> been psid to Ute 
UMroasL Inbrlcatlon of •!) wnrUns puta 
Bun ilides an provided irttti lelt wipers 
feed sear, reed ceart are neatlr covered 
Bun elides are oiled from the center where 
at both the front and center ol the colnnm. 
oil pocketa are proWded. tram which felt 
wipers take their sapplr of oil and dls- 
tnbnte same throogh oil grooves to the 
extrMne ends ctf the slides, thus doing 
awaj with a mnltlpUcitr of oil bolea to be 
attended to. An oil pocket Is cast Integral 
with the column at the rear, storing any 
waste <tf oil, which may be drawn olf at 
anr time through a pipe emending from 
rear of oolnmn. A large qnantitr of oil is 
stored In a pocket cast integral with arm, 
which, with suitable means of diatribntlon. 
Insures thorough inbrtcatlon of crank pin 
and sliding -block in rocker arm. 



plain rooad aoeketa are fitted. BxperleDce 
has ahown that this attachment Is not 
adapted tor boles nearer than % of an 
inch bom c to c. A short light arm is 
attached to the case to hold the drills In a 
given position. The tendency toward rota- 
tion of the case Is verjr sU^t. There 
Is practically no strain on the case or arm, 
It being pnt on merely to Insnre steadiness. 
All bearings are made large and long, wltb 
sDltable oil grooves. 



NEW MULTIPLE SPINDLE DRILLING 
ATTACHMENT 

The Prancla Reed Company, of Worces- 
ter, Maae., has placed on the market a 
line of multiple spindle drilling attach- 
ments one style of which is shown here- 
with. These attachments are built to 
order only upon apeclHcatlons, thus mak- 



xu. 8." BENCH DRILL A CYLINDER 
GRINDER 

The accompanying cnts show two of the 
latest machines placed on tbe market by 
the tJnited States Electrical Too] Co., for 
use In automobile factories, garages, etc. 
The cylinder grinder herewith shown Is 
made In three different slsea. It will 
grind cylinders AM In., 9 In. and 18 In. deep. 



The speed on these grinders can be varied 
from IS.OOO revolutions per minute to anj 
speed desired. The grinder Is fitted with 
an angle plate so that It can be bolted to 
the tool post rest of any lathe. The In- 
ternal grinding attachment can be taken 
off and the grinder can be used with an 
emery wheel for grinding piston rings, 
valve stems and work of a similar charac- 
ter In a lathe. The bearlngB In tbte grin- 
der are adjusted lor wear and dust proof. 



Ing It possible to fulfil almost any require- 
ment. The field of work for these attach- 
ments Is practically unlimited being applic- 
able to any case where two or more holes 
are to be drilled In constant relation to 
each other, or any special work where 
qnallty Is to be considered. When the 
boles to be drilled are tar enough apart, 
drill chucks are fitted, as shown In the 
cut, but when the holes are close together 




The motors are wound for direct current, 
110-220 volts or for alternating current 
of the same voltage, 60 cycle. 1, 2 or 3 

The bench drill will drill boles up to 
M Inch in steel. The speed of this drill 
can be changed by moving a friction disc 
wheel backward and forward wblcb 
changes the range oE speed from 290 to 
950. The motor used In this drill Is pivoted 
and there is a spring placed under the 
back end of a motor to lake up the wear 
on the friction wheel aiilomatlcally. The 
motor Is wound the same as the one used 
on the <^]lnder grinder. 



CTCLB AMD AUTOUOBILB TKADB JOURNAL. 



167 



THE "NEWTON" SPECIAL DOUBLE 

SPINDLE CYLINDER BORINQ 

MACHINE 

The above cut Illustrates the Special 
Double Spindle Cylinder Boring Machine, 
manutactured b; the Newton Machine Tool 
Works, Twenty-fourth and Vine Streets, 
Philadelphia, PenDsylvatila. 

The spindles of this machine are 3 
inches In diameter and revolve In brass 
bushed capped bearings, having a length 
over all in the head of 20 inches. The 
spindles are driven by means of steep lead 
bronze worm wheel and hardened steel 



li arranged to have the boring ban bolted 
to the spindle by means of the (our bolts 
shown to accommodate bars for boring 
open or closed end cylinders as desired. 
When open end cylinders are to be fin- 
ished. It Is convenient to use an outboard 
bearing. In boring cylinders In multiples 
of four or six It Is a usual custom to bore 
alternate cylinders, adjusting the table for 
the different sets. The cylinders to be 
bored are attached to the face plate 
mounted on the table, usually having a pin 
or plain surface tor location, eliminating 
extensive stock of flxtures and expense of 
boring bars. 



~1 



worm, both of which are arranged to re- 
volve In oil for continual lubrication, 
through intermediate spur gearing by a 
cone giving four changes of speed. The 
large spur gear on the end of the worm 
shaft has a very heavy rim and acts as a 
By wheel, giving a steady even drive to the 
spindles, eliminating chatter. The spindle 
heads have hand cross adjustment with 
micrometer adjustment and Uie adjacent 
faces of the heads have finished surfaces 
between which spacing blocks can be Btted 
to give tbe correct centre distances to the 
bore of tbe cylinder. The driving worms 
are made of sufficient length to permit of 
this adjustment. The work table Is 24 
Inches square, has 14 inches of hand cross 
adjustment and the saddle has an In and 
out hand adjustment by means of the hand 
wheel and power feed of 14 Inches. There 
are provided four changes of power feed 
tahen directly from the end of the driving 
worm shaft. As Illustrated tbfs machine 



EiUa iplfidl* e^lB4r bAiing nuditDS^ 
THE "DEFIANCE" MOTOR FLY-WHEEL 
BALANCING MACHINE 

The accompanying cut shows the No. 
66 patent motor fly-wheel balancing ma- 
chine manufactured by the Defiance Ma- 
chine Works, Deflanoe, Ohio, for the pur 
pose of securing a running balance to mo- 
tor fly-wheels and other similar rotating 
parti of not exceeding 1,000 pounds In 
weight. 

Tbe frame Is conical In form, In the cen- 
tre of which Is placed a vertical ground 
steel iplndle standing In a step bearing in 
the base of the frame, and passing up 
through a long bearing at the top of the 
frame. This spindle at Its upper end car- 
ries a face plate provided with two driv- 
ing pins, which project upward parallel 
to the ails of the spindle. A. steel centre 
with taper shank is fitted Into the vertical 
spindle. Its upper end Is reduced to a 
conical point and upon this rests the ob- 
ject to be balanced. 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRASui JOURNAL. 



The Tertical spindle la rotated by frlo- 
Uon gearing driven br a horizontal shaft 
tn suitable bearings at the base o( the ma- 
chine. ThU horizontal shatt Is In two 
pieces, and they are connected by a fric- 
tion clutch and moved longitudinally by a 
counter- weigh ted lever bo arranged that 
the weight may be used to press the 
ctutches together, when It la desired to 
rotate the object to be balanced, and to 



crank caae, original alignment is assnred. 
It is immaterial whether the cylinders aiv 
east separately or together; they are rigid- 
ly held without distortion. 



■n« -OtlUoM" No. M PmUnt UoUr FU Whrri B.UncLni 

dlBcoonect the clutches when it la de- 
sired to examine, test and mark the ob- 
ject while running alone, as the driving 
pins are liable when pressing against the 
object to be balanced to produce uneven 
rotation. The true unbalanced condition 
is best BbowQ when the disturbing Influ- 
ences of tbe motive power are withdrawn 
when the clutch la released. One horse- 
power Ig required to drive the machine. 
The floor space occupied is 36x60 Inches. 



H. B. Underwood ft Co., 1026 Hamilton 
street, Philadelphia. Pa., are manufactur- 
ing a machine for boring and reboring 
automobile cylinders. This machine, which 
Is shown In the accompanying cut, oper 
atea In a vertical position, occupying bat 
tittle space and requires only a 1 H. P. 
electric motor to drive It. The drive shaft 
meshes with a worm wheel revolving the 
cutting spindle, which has about 16 ins. ot 
travel. The spindle is equipped with an 
adjustable head which Is used to centre 
the cylinder and Is then removed and rhe 
cutting tools substituted. The cutter-bead 
consists of four tools set but equally by a 
taper in the centre, making It adjustable 
tor any depth of cut required. The feed 
la automatic, variable and reversible, hav- 
ing a star wheel engaging one or more 
knockers to suit requirements. 

The cylinder to be rebored rests upon 
three adjustable sliding blocks which are 
planed true and at right angles to the spin- 
dle. Clamps hold the cylinder In place 
after It has been centred, and as it rests 
upon the same face which Is boltad to the 



Inasmuch as most automobile cylinders 
are blind, it is only necessary to measure 
the length of cut required and note tbe 
travel needed on tbe spindle, which Is 
graduated for this purpose. As the work 
Is done in a vertical position, the chlpt 
fall out, do not clog the cutters or in any 
other way interfere with tbe work. The 
machine Is easy to operate and as one cut 
is uanally all that is required, the work can 
be done quickly. 

The Auto Rebuilding Company of Chicago, 
is now located In Its new factorr at 13D7-9 
Wabash Ave., where they have about 35.000 
sq. ft of floor space. Tbe ground floor 
will be devoted to rebuilding, painting and 
machine work and the floor above will be 
used for body making, blacksmltbing, up- 
holstering, wood working department, radi- 
ator malting and all automobile sheet metal 
parts. At present this concern Is working 
about 25 people but later on expect to 
have a force of about 60. 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



EDITORIAL 



ADVANTAGES OF CARRYING A FULL 
LINE OF PARTS 

How often It happens that tbe owner 
sends to bis dealer an urgency call for 
some part of his machine only to find that 
the dealer has none of these parts In stocK, 
elttier l^ecause he docs not carry them or 
Is so neglectful that he has allowed him- 
self to run short The owner Is often 
forced to wait for this part, trivial as it 
may be, until the dealer can obtain It from 
tbe manufacturer, bis car in the meantime 
being laid on the shelf to his dlBgust and 
often great Inconvenience. His neighbor 
thin lis the car is no good because he 
knows that It is out of commission and 
everybody connected with the transaction 
Is dissatisfied. 

When a dealer or agent sells a car to a 
customer he ie expected by that customer 
to virtually stand back ot the car's per- 
formance and at least be ready to supply 
immediately the parts which are usually 
required to maintain the car in proper 
running order. The customer is in a meas- 
ure dependent upon tbla dealer to this ex- 
tent. Not being able to furnish such parts 
on short notice, Is not only injurious to 
tbe reputation of tbe car, to the dealer's 
business, but also discredits tbe dealer aa 
a business man and may at some future 
time cause him much more embarrassment 
than that caused by the dissatisfaction or 
loss of a few patrons. 

Inability of tbe owner to obtain parts 
from his dealer baa often lead to the pur- 
chase of such parts from Jobbers or others 
In the immediate vicinity who might han- 
dle them. In this way Jobbers who bad no 
intention of encroaching on tbe fleld ol 
tbe dealer, hare been gradually lead into 
supplying tbe individual, thereby injuring 
the legitimate dealer. 

Tbe dealer who always maintains a com- 
plete line ot parts for his particular make 
of cars, and la enabled to quickly supply 
any of his patrons at short notice and thus 
keep their cars on the road, is certainly 
laying at least one solid stone in tbe foun- 
dation of success. Satisfied customers 
bave always been considered one of tbe 
strangest business assets a dealer could 
bav«, and there Is very little question but 



that ability to quickly supply parts Is one 
of tbe pertinent factors in producing and 
keeping customers satisfied. There is 
probably nothing more distasteful to a car 
owner than to see the machine "hors de 
combat" simply lor the lack of some small 
and apparently insignificant part. Every 
look at the machine makes bim more dis- 
gusted and the fact that while tbe car Is In 
the garage the weather Is beautiful and 
after the part la received it is abominable 
does not tend to Improve bis opinion ot 
the dealer who has been naabla to supply 
him what was needed. 



THE UNITED MANUFACTURERS 
The United Manufacturers, which was 
recently organized, will act as a co-opera- 
tive selling and distributing organization, 
handling the business of tbe Jones Speedo- 
meter, Inc., Weed Chain Tlra Grip Co.. C. 

A. Mczgar, Inc., Connecticut Telephone ft 
Electric Co.. and the N. Y. and N. J. Lubri- 
cant Co. They have established branch 
offices and distributing centres In Chicago, 
at 1430 Michigan avenue; Detroit, 225 Jef- 
ferson avenue; Cleveland, 1932 Euclid ave- 
nue; Philadelphia, 422 Commerce street, 
and Boston. 109 Massachusetts avenue. 
The home office Is at Broad and Seventy- 
sixth street, New York City. Tbe officers 
of tbe new organization are: President, W. 

B. Lasher, of tbe Weed Chain Tire Grip 
Co.; Vice-President, R. M. Owen, of C. A. 
Mezgar, Inc.; Secretary, Robert H. Mont- 
gomery, of New York, and Treasurer, 
George L. Holmes, ^f Jones Speedometer. 
Inc. 

The objects ot the new organization are 
to concentrate the selling efforts ot tbe 
interested companies and to reduce tbe 
expenses of selling and distributing. On 
account of the branch house system, it 
will bring the eelling company in closer 
touch with its customers. The new cor- 
poration does no retail business, con- 
cerning itself solely with the Jobber and 



J. H. Neustadt, formerly president ot the 
Neustadt Auto ft Supply Co., of St. Louis, 
and Eugene De Prez, formerly manager ot 
that concern, have established tbe Pactnc 
Sales Corporation. 50-56 Van Ness avenue, 
San Francisco, Cal. Their territory ex- 
tends from the Canadian to the Mexican 
lines and the Rockies. 



Uo olroUi iM> AttOUOMLI TUDk loinXAL. 



CTCLB AND AUTOMOBILB TRAOB JOURNAL. 



171 



THE NEW BUSINESS HOME OF JAS. L. 

GIBNEY A BRO., 215-17 N. BROAD 

ST., PHI LA., PA. 

The partnership of Jas. L. Gibney & 
Bro., consisting of James L. and John» 
started business at 1015 Arch street in 
1899. It is one of the most conspicuous 
examples of what industry, integrity and 
ability will accomplish in the face of 
great odds, for in the early years, or dur- 
ing the development period, this firm was 
compelled to make headway with practical- 
ly little or no capital. It is for this rea- 
son that this progressive house has had a 
remarkable career, for from the start ten 
years ago, without business prestige or 
capital, it has built up one of the greatest 
tire and accessory distributing depots in the 
United States. The average annual in- 
crease in the volume of its business has 
been over 50 per cent, and this phenom- 
enal growth during the past few years 
made it necessary to obtain new quarters, 
for which purpose the building on Broad 
street above Race was erected. It is in 
the heart of what is known as "Automobile 
Row." 

The first fioor is devoted to show rooms 
and office, both of which are ideal in their 
appointments and show that excellent taste 
has been displayed in their equipment. 
There are two waiting rooms in the for- 
ward part of t&e ground floor, equipped 
with writing desks and comfortable loung- 
ing chairs, which are for the convenience 
of all automobilists, as James L. Gibney 
& Bro. are making an announcement to 
the trade and owners of their facilities and 
inviting them to make their show rooms 
their headquarters for appointments and 
correspondence. This very novel and orig- 
inal courtesy has met with spontaneous re- 
sponse and the saying "Meet me at Gib- 
ney's" is already a popular slogan in Phila" 
delphia. 

The second floor is used principally for 
a stock room. All tires and automobile 
accessories and parts are carefully and 
systematically arranged in bins. 

The upper fioor is known as the shop, 
which is probably one of the best equipped 
in the United States for handling either 
pneumatic or solid tires. 

In the entire building is 16,000 feet of 
floor space. This flrm are manufacturers 
of Gibney wireless motor tires and are dis- 
tributors in seven States for the Conti« 
nental pneumatic tires. Their new head- 
quarters are used for both wholesale and 
retail business and a repair department, 
their tires being manufactured at Akron, 
Ohio 

Upon entering the sales room one is im- 
pressed with the neatness and freedom 
from a disorderly appearance which is so 
noticeable in most automobile supply 
stores. To the left are automobile sun- 
dries and to the right tires. Although the 
retail selling department is one large room, 



it is so arranged that it practically makes 
two stores, thus separating the tire busl- 
ness from the automobile accessory 
branch. 

The marketing of good products and the 
principle of dealing fairly with customers 
has been the chief cause for the growth 
and success of this enterprising flrm. 



NEW WESTERN SUPPLY COMPANY 

The Moore Motor Supply Co., of Golden 
Gate and Van Ness avenues, San Fran- 
Cisco, Cal., has recently been organized, 
with Chas. C. Moore, of the Chas. C. Moore 
Co., engineers, as president Mr. Moore 
and W. E. Duzan are prepared to advance 
as much capital as may be required to 
carry on the business. 

Mr. Chas. C. Moore has been the presi- 
dent of the San Francisco Chamber of 
Commerce until very recently, and is one 
of the most prominent as well as one of 
the most energetic business men on the 
coast. Chas C. Moore & Co., engineers, 
are closely connected with the Babcock ft 
Wilcox Co., and handle engineering work 
on a large scale, having designed and con- 
structed some of the largest power and .en- 
gineering plants on the coast. Mr. Moore 
will take an active part In the business, 
which, it is expected, will materially en- 
large and expand in the near future. 
Branch stores are being maintained in Los 
Angeles and Oakland. 



LOCOMOBILE OPENS WESTERN 

BRANCH 

A new branch of the Locomobile Com- 
pany of America has just been opened in 
San Francisco in palatial quarters at No. 
226 Van Ness avenue. It is In charge of 
Irving J. Morse, who until recently was 
manager of the Locomobile branch in 
Philadelphia. Associated with him is J. 
Murray Page, who has been connected with 
Locomobile interests for the past ten years 
and who has been conspicuous in Paclflc 
coast contests for some time. Page won 
the 24-hour race at Los Angeles with a 
stock Locomobile last fall and more re- 
cently won the famous f 10,000 match race 
in the same city with a 40 H. P. model. 
This car, which was christened "Casey 
Jones," covered 150 miles on a mile track 
in 2 hrs. 47 mln. 1 3-5 sec, establishing a 
new world's record for the distance. 

Morse has been with the company 
for ten years, a considerable portion of 
which was spent in England when the 
Locomobile Company had a large foreign 
business in the early steam cars. 



The Rapid Motor Vehicle Co., Pontlac, 
Mich., announces that Mr. C. S. Bugbee 
has taken the position of district sales 
manager for the city of Detroit. Salesrooms 
are located at 467-69 Woodward Avenue. 



172 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



A NEW AUTO REPAIR TRUCK 
The moat Important feature at ttils re- 
pair truck Is that it 1b provided with 
means of holding tbe truck In position 
while the operator Is doing the work. It 
Is designed to fill the requirements of tbe 
chauffeur and owner. The truck Is pro- 
vided with castors which allow the oper- 
ator to propel himself under the car to 
the place where the work Is to be done. 




To prevent tbe truck [rom moving, when 
using a wrench or screwHlrlver, It Is an- 
chored by throwing the band levers into 
the position shown on tbe cut. This raises 
tbe back castors off the floor and allows 
tbe truck to stand on tbe feet, as shown. 

It Is provided with a sliding shelf for 
carrying tools and for placing small parts 
that are taken off the car. The shelf is 
clamped to tbe side of tbe truck and can 
be removed, placed on either side and In 
any position, back or forward, as desired. 
The truck Is strongly constructed, being 
glued and fastened together by means of 
screws. The head rest Is made of genuine 
leather. The list price of this truck com- 
plete Is M.2&. Without anchor the truck 
lists at 13.25, and without anchor or shelf, 
$3.00. This truck Is manufactured by tbe 
Motor & Mfg. Works Co., Oeneva, N. Y. 

THE "M A E" REPAIR OLOVE 

M & E Mfg. Co., Ashland, Ohio, are 
manufacturing the M ft E Repair Glove 
sbown herewith. This glove Is water and 
grease-proof. The hand Is made of soft 
durable water and grease-proofed black 



goat skin, and tbe cuff Is made of a new 
water and grease -proofed fabric called oil 
skin. It Is stiff yet pliable and will al- 
ways keep its shape. The glove IIbIb at 
11.00 per pair; halt dozen pairs (or (5.00. 

Maintaining all cars purchased from 
them tor one year at a fixed rate per 
month Is a new plan instituted by the 
Cordner Motor Company, which represents 
the Acme car at 1540 Broadway, New 
York City. The rate charged is averaged 
from the actual operation expenses ol a 
large number of Acme cars. 



THE "O-P" QUICK SERVICE PUMP . 

In order to meet the demands for b high 
powered air pump which can be carried 
on the automobile or used in the garage, 
the Qleason-Fetera Air Pump Co., 255-61 
Classon Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y., baa placed 
on the market tbe No. 4 "Quick Service" 
lever pump, abown herewith. 



This pump Is fitted with specially de- 
signed base which Is fastened to the run- 
ning board of an automobile so that the 
pump can be attached to the same Id a 
few seconds. This atta^^hment can be 
screwed to the base of the pump and folds 
neatly up against tbe side of the cylinder 
so that tbe pump can be conveniently 
stored under the side ol tbe machine. The 
price ot the pump Is 17.50. The cylinder 
of this pump is of special gauge aeamleas 
brass tube and the base Is of solid bronse 
metal casting. The yokes, levers, links 
and cross heads are of the finest gray 
Iron. The plunger rod Is 'A In. steel and 
Is fitted with a bronxe metal bushing. The 
price of this pump is 17.50 and tbe price 
ot the attachment Is 11.50. 

The Firestone Tire & Rubber Co., Akron, 
Ohio, has made an Improvement over the 
recently adopted practice of branding the 
required air pressure on all tires of 3^ 
Inches and over by branding tbe air pres- 
sure on the side ol Firestone tires where 
the chauffeur can sec It staring him in 
the face every time he applies the pump. 
The recommended air pressures which are 
thus moulded into the tires are as follows: 
For 314-lnch tires, 60 pounds; for 4-lncb 
tires, 75 ponnda; for 4U-lnch tires. Sb 
pounds; for G-lnch tlrea, 90 pounds, and 
for GH-inch tires, 95 pounde. 

The New i(ork branch of the Sultao 
Motor Co recently moved to its new show 
room, 1569 Broadway, where better facili- 
ties are offered tor the display of its run- 
abouts, town cars and taximeter cabs. The 
sales department and main office are lo- 
cated at this place, but the factory r«- 
malns in Springs eld. 



CTCLB AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNALi. 



173 



RETAIL NOTES. 

A garage and repair shop has been opened 
In Marion, Ohio, by G. £. Abel A Co., who are 
agents for the Mitchell. 

£. W. Ames, of Caldwell, has leased a 
building at 127 W. Douglas avenue, Wichita, 
Kan., and has taken the agency for the Mar- 
mon and Oakland. G. W. Troutman, also of 
Caldwell, is manager of the Wichita sales- 
room. 

The Automobile Sales and Repair Company 
is a new concern formed by the consolidation 
of the business of H. A. Abbott and the 
Franco-American Auto Co., and which has 
located at 909-915 North Broad street, Phila- 
delphia, Fa. The officers are: President, W. 
J. Robertson, Jr.; Vice-President, G. F. Hall- 
man, and Secretary and Treasurer, H. A. Ab- 
bott 

The Oakland Is being represented in Clere- 
land, Ohio, by the Avenue Motor Car Co., at 
the new salesroom, 1860 Euclid avenue. 

R F. Benson is manager of the Studebaker 
garage that was recently opened at 865-857 
North Craig street, Pittsburg. 

Lyman J. Botts, of Red Oak, la., has opened 
a garage and salesroom at 209 Coolbaugh 
streets 

Paul Brookner, of Dixon, 111., has moved 
from Hennepin avenue to E3ast First street, 
where he is conducting a garage and sales- 
room. 

The Drennan Department Stores, of Birm- 
ingham, Ala., have opened a garage and sales- 
room at Avenue C and South Twentieth street, 
under the management of G. B. Kelley. Peer- 
less cars are being shown. 

A Lh Dyke, Broadway and Pine street. Is 
about to purchase a garage and show room, 
in which to display the new $760 Hupmobile, 
for which he has taken the agency. 

The New York branch of the Franklin 
Automobile Company is now selling used cars. 
A salesroom has been opened at Seventy - 
fourth and Broadway. 

Howard C. Harris, of the Idanha Motor 
Car Co., of Portland, Ore., has opened a 
branch of the company at Seattle, Washing- 
ton, 1414 Broadway. 

Fred. R Jenkins & Co. is the name of a 
concern which recently introduced itself into 
the automobile field by opening an agency 
for the -Columbia, at 1330 Michigan avepue. 
Chicago. 111. 

The Kisselkar Co. has opened a salesroom 
at 1122 East Fifteenth street, Kansas City. 
Mo., under the management of C. A. Post. 

The Wisconsin State agency for the Lozier 
was recently established by Willard V. B. 
Campbell in the William F. Mueller garage at 
Farwell avenue and Brady street, Milwaukee. 

The Midland Motor Car Company, of Kan- 
sas City, Mo., expects to move into its new 
$30,000 building some time next month. 

A new company was recently organized in 
Portland, Ind.. under the name of the Port- 
land Automobile Company. The new concern 
has purchased the motor car department of 
the Jones Cycle and Automobile Company and 
will deal in old and new cars and auto sup- 
plies. 

Pink & McVletz, agents for the Franklin 
In Ottawa, Canada, are now occupying the 
Morris Arcade as their headquarters. 

Gus D. Revol, a carriage dealer of New 
Orleans, La., has started In the automobile 
business and will handle cars and accessories. 

A branch of the Royal Tourist Car Com- 
pany of Cleveland, has been opened at Sixty- 
second and Broadway, New York City 

The Segerstrom Automobile Company has 
been Incorporated in Milwaukee, Wis., with a 
capital of $60,000. The new company intends 
to conduct an agency and later on to manu- 
facture motor trucks. The officers are: Fred- 
erick W. Segerstrom, President; J. M, Downs, 
Vice-President, and J. A Hunter, Secretary 
and Treasurer. 

A building, 60x60, is to be erected in 
Beaver Dam, Wis., on West BY-ont street, by 
the newly organized Silo Garage Co., who will 
open a salesroom, garage and repair shop. 



GARAGE NOTES 

Plans for a $160,000 garage and stable have 
been prepared for the Denver Onmibus and 
Cab Company, Denver, Col. 

The Atlantic Automobile Company, of At- 
lantic, la., is enlarging its garage with an 
addition 50x60 feet. 

A 60 X 100 feet garage is being built in 
Marshalltown, la., for the Johnson Automo- 
bile Company. 

Maxwell and Reo agencies are to be estab- 
lished in the large modem garage now being 
erected on Fifth street. Mason City, la. 

R A. Stocking has opened a garage in the 
Sampey Building, on West McDonald street. 
I'Yewton la. 

W. H. Beck, Sioux City, la., is building a 
garage which, when finished, will be equipped 
with all the modem improvements. 

The Cedar Valley Garage & Repair Shop, 
having a fioor space of 5,400 square feet, has 
been opened in Waterloo, la. 

A garage is beine built in Quincy, 111., at 
the rear of 1719 Main street, for Henry Gelse. 

A $6,000 garage has been erected in Quincy. 
111., by Massie & Sons, adjoining their machine 
shop at 219 North Fourth street. 

The new Red Spring Garage at Glen Cove, 
Li. I., has been formally opened by the own- 
ers. Weeks & Underbill. It has accommoda- 
tions for 25 cars, first-class machine shop 
and show room. 

The Arlington Automobile Co., Arlington. 
Mass., has opened its new fireproof garage at 
460 Massachusetts avenue. The building is of 
brick and reinforced concrete, and is equipped 
with all modem garage conveniences. The 
company has the agencies for the Mitchell 
cars and Rapid trucks. It is conducting a 
general garage, sales and repair business, 
and also a livery service with two cars. 

R Groswold, of Minneapolis. Minn., has 
opened an automobile repair shop at Rice 
Lake, Wis. 

The Range Motor Co.. of Virginia, Minn., 
has opened a garage at that place under the 
general management of Arthur L.. Myers. 

A brick garage and storeroom is being 
built at 2218 Farnam street. Omaha. Neb., for 
the Baker Electric Co. The new building 
will be one story and basement, modern in 
every detail and contain a pow^r plant and 
equipment for building, rebuilding and re- 
charging batteries. 

The Atlantic Automobile Company and 
Machine Works Garage, South North Carolina 
avenue. Atlantic City. N. J., was reopened 
under the management of F. A. Broadhead. 
after having been closed for a short period. 
A repair shop and supply store will be con- 
ducted in connection with the garage. 

A concrete, fireproof garage, 36 x 132 feet, 
is being erected at Syracuse. N. Y., for Mrs. 
M. A. Ritchie, who will rent it out. 

A garage has been opened in Leipslc. Ohio, 
at the comer of Defiance and Easton streets, 
by H. H. Townsend & Co. 

J. B. Nolin & Son have leased the Ameri- 
can House Stables at Wooster, Ohio, and are 
making the changes necessary In order to 
use it as a garage. 

Aloysius Jones has opened a 48,000 square 
feet garage at Fortieth and Baring streets, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

F. K. Mears has opened the Regent garage 
and repair shop at 4525 Springfield avenue. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Benjamin EL Sattler, of Philadelphia, Pa. 
has purchased the property at 804 Noble 
street, on which he expects to build a four- 
story automobile warehouse and garage. 

Fred. D. Rathbun is manager of the Central 
Garage, which is the reorganized Central Au- 
tomobile Co., 5989-91 Center avenue, Pitts- 
burg, Pa. 

Armstrong & Brown, plumbers, have estab- 
lished a garagre in Madison, S. Dak. 

The Thomas Botterill Automobile Company, 
of Salt Lake City, Utah, recently opened a 
67x160 feet garage at 38 South State street. 

A garage and repair shop will soon be open- 
ed on Second street Hartford, Wis., by 
James Favour. 



174 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILB TRADB JOURNAL. 



STERLING 




TIRES 



^T 7HE1N one of our tire makers puts a layer of fabric or rubber 
^ ^ on a core, he has to stop till it is inspected — then he puts 
on another, and that's inspected. In addition, each tire maker gets 
a weekly premium for a perfect score — meaning "no seconds.** 

Sterling tires are cured on air-bags, giving internal as well as 
external pressure, and thoroughly amalgamating the different fabric 
plies and layers of rubber. That's why Sterling treads and carcasses 
don't separate — they stay "put." 

Sterling Blue Tubes 

Our tubes are blue and in making them blue we make them 
better than any other tube. There may be other tires nearly as good 
as ours, but the Blue Tube is absolutely unequalled. 

Rutherford Rubber Co., Rutherford, N. J. 



New York, Broadway, at 53d St. 
Baltimore. 300 W. Baltimore St. 
Columbia, S. C, E. A. Jenkins Motor Co. 
Albany, Ga., Clark's Garage 
Troy, N. Y., 1034 Sixth Ave. 
Rochester, 8. B. Roby Go. 
Toledo, O., 436 Summit St. 
Cincinnati. 108 W. 3rd St. 
Newark, O.. Bail-Fintze Co. 
Chicago, 1404 Michigan Ave. 

San Francisco, 50-56 



Philadelphia, 680 North Broad St. 
Richmond, Gordon Motor Co. 
Savannah, 109 W. State St. 
Jacksonville, McGraw Bros. A Vogt. 
Syracuse. 248 W. Washington St. 
Buffalo, 43 Niagara St. 
Columbus, 15 E. Spring St. 
Dayton, O., 4th A Jefferson Sts. 
St. Louis, 3932 Olive St. 
St. Paul, 16 W. Fourth St. 
Van Ness Ave. 



I^TERLING BLUE TUBEC 



CTOLB AND AtrrOMOBUJD TRAOH JOUltNAL. 



175 



COMME 




ClAt MOTOR CAR 

DEPARTMENT 



EDITORIAL 



6om£ advantages or^ Motor 

DELIVERY SERVICE 

Motor trucks are being used In increas- 
ing numbers throughout the entire coun- 
try, particularly by express companies and 
business firms handling large quantities of 
goods, although the increase in the sale of 
trucks has been much slower than during 
the corresponding development in the his- 
tory of pleasure cars, yet this increase has 
been a steady and healthy one which can 
be taken as proof that there are good and 
sufficient reasons why motor trucks should 
be used in place of horses. 

The very large number of motor trucks 
now being operated by two or three of 
the large express companies is a very 
strong argument for the efficiency and sat- 
isfactory performance of the motor truck 
for general delivery purposes, yet many of 
our large business concerns hesitate to 
adont what is to them a new and untried 
method of delivery, and few seem to real- 
ize the many advantages for delivery over 
the horse-drawn vehicle which a modern 
up-to-date commercial vehicle possesses. 
Of course. It is understood that there are, 
and will always continue to be, peculiar 
conditions pertaining to certain classes of 
delivery which will prevent the motor- 
driven truck from showing to advantage 
over the horse, but these are granted by 
most to be decidedly the exception rather 
than the rule. 

Delivery In the larger cities is becoming 
more and more of a difficulty owing to the 
enormous territory which has to be covered 
if a large and successful trade Is to be es< 
tablished. The range of delivery service 
has gradually become extended until the 
horse has been found incapable of cover- 
ing the necessary distances within a day 
and is practically unfit for service on the 
following day, whenever extended routes 
are attempted. With motor trucks these 
routes can be covered easily and with dis- 
patch making possible an earlier delivery 
of goods in districts which previously did 
not receive deliveries until the following 
day. In some cases it has been found 
necessary when horse vehicles were em- 
ployed, to make use of railroads in trans- 
porting goods to a suburban district and 
there either hiring local delivery compa. 
nies to handle the articles or else provide 



what might be termed d sub-station of the 
main delivery service at that point. This 
necessitated the packing of the goods on 
the wagons, unpacking and loading at the 
station, removal from the cars and again 
loading the wagon at the suburban station. 
With motor trucks a single loading at the 
delivery department is all that is now re- 
quired and the goods are taken direct, with 
out any rehandling, to the district in which 
they are to be distributed. In such cases, 
the motor truck has shown itself to be 
much cheaper than any other form of de- 
livery. However, as stated where the hauls 
are shorter, the advantages of delivering 
by motor over horse-drawn vehicles grow 
less. Nevertheless, in innumerable io 
stances, in and around New York, Phila- 
delphia, Chicago, Boston and other centres, 
the speed possibilities of the truck, on 
even comparatively short hauls have made 
it of inestimable value. We refer particu- 
larly to cases in which goods are to^ be 
shipped and railroad stations to be reached 
in quick time in order to insure the goods 
being taken on certain trains. By driving 
the horses to their utmost, some of these 
trains could be made but the slightest con- 
gestion in the traffic, slippery streets, 
snow, or exceptionally hot weather, and 
many other conditions, made it impossible 
to depend upon the uniformity of such de> 
liveries. With the motor-driven trucks, on 
the other hand, equally large and larger 
loads can be carried and the stations 
reached with almost clock-like precision, 
in ample time for shipment, thus gaining 
in the case of goods to be shipped consid- 
erable distances, anywhere from 12 to 24 
hours in the time of their reaching their 
destination. 

A notable advantage of the motor de- 
livery vehicle over the horse is also shown 
in hilly districts where considerable grades 
have to be negotiated. In such localities, 
with the old method of delivery, it was not 
at all unusual to have to make detours of 
from one to two miles in order to avoid 
certain difficult hills which were almost, 
if not impossible, for the teams when heav- 
ily loaded. Another feature of disadvan- 
tage was the fact that with the horses, the 
delivery in these districts was not uni- 
form. Certain hills being possible to the 
horses during seasonable weather direct 
routes were taken, while perhaps the next 
day, or during rainy or inclement weather, 
the same districts which received early 



176 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILB TRADE JOURNAL. 



deliveries the day before, must wait until 
much later, as the hills could not be gov. 
ered under the circumstances by the horse* 
drawn vehicles and longer routes of neces- 
sity must be taken. 

With the amply powered modern auto, 
mobile truck almost anything in the shape 
of a hill can now be successfully climbed; 
in fact, the actual time consumed in climbs 
ing a hill in wet weather is practically the 
same as during dry weather, as in both 
instances the low gear in all probability 
would have to be resorted to. 

Uniformity of service obtainable with 
motor-driven vehicles regardless of weath- 
er conditions which ordinarily would com- 
pletely demoralize any horse delivery ser. 
vice, is one of the strong points in favor 
of motor trucks. 

The foregoing are but a few of the in* 
stances in which the motor truck shows to 
decided advantage in delivery service. 
These are palpable conditions, but per- 
haps no more important than many minor 
circumstances which are not so apparent 
to the uninitiated. Increased satisfaction 
among one's patrons is a strong factor in 
increased sales. The value of promptness 
and uniform delivery of goods, in building 
up a business cannot be overestimated. 
Deliveries within a few hours are always 
appreciated and assuredly work to the ad- 
vantage of the concern which is able to 
guarantee such service. 



COMMERCIAL CARS IN JAPAN 

The advantages of the motor car as a 
means of transportation and as a commer- 
cial vehicle are appreciated even in Japan. 
This style of conveyance is very popular 
and in the thickly settled portions of Japan 
is rapidly leaving the quaint '^rickshas" in 
the rear. A transportation company in 
Tokio is reported as being a financial suc- 
cess. The rates of hauling goods by com- 
mercial vehicles vary from $2.50 to $5.00 
for one mile according to the value of the 
goods and from $11.00 to $25.00 for 5 
miles. In rainy weather there is an extra 
charge of twenty per cent. 

Automobiles with a motorman and a 
porter may be rented for an eleven-hour 
day for $12.00, half a day for $6.50, and one 
hour for $1.50. 



USE OF MUNICIPAL VEHICLES GROW- 
ING 

The commercial motor vehicle as a 
means of conducting the delivery branch 
of a business is no longer an experiment. 
It has been tried and not found wanting. 

Five years ago the automobile as a com- 
mercial car was practically unknown. To- 
day it is a reality and the outlook for the 
coming year is exceptionally bright. With 
the economies attendant upon the recent 
financial stringency the attention of the 



business world was called to the cost of 
horse traffic, which resulted in a thor- 
ough investigation of the power wagon 
and its merits. 

Aside from the saving in the cost of up- 
keep of the commercial car, there is an- 
other reason for its invasion into the in- 
dustrial field being welcomed. In the case 
of police, fire, hospital and other official 
uses the speed of the automobile is a very 
great advantage. The best proof of this 
is the fact that quite a few are being pur- 
chased and used all over the United States 
by municipalities and individual officials. 
The War Department has installed a 
Model 43, 1500-pound Waverly electric de- 
livery wagon. The city of New Tork owns 
and operates about 100 motor vehicles, 
valued at about $300,000. It conducts a 
model garage, and outside of the cost of 
a chaufl^eur, which averages some $1,200 
a year, the cost of up-keep, including tires, 
gasoline, lubricating oil, repairs, etc., does 
not average $260 a machine, and the cars 
are garaged right in the heart of the 
city, where ground rent is higher than in 
any other city in the world. 

A motor chemical wagon, costing $5500, 
has been ordered by the Pioneer Fire Com- 
pany, of Jenkintown, Pa., a small but 
wealthy suburb of Philadelphia. 

George Duckworth, of Hutchinson, Kan., 
figured out that an automobile is cheaper 
than railroad fare, so he purchased a Bnick 
car, which he is using to go after delin- 
quent taxpayers and in summoning Jurors 
and witnesses. 

Another Hutchinson man to gladly suc- 
cumb to the habit is Harry Fenn, a rural 
mail carrier, who, after wearing out seven 
horses in three years, bought a Ford 
roadster, and now makes his rounds in 
about two hours while before It took him 
seven. 

Three more autos will soon be in the 
municipal service of Newark, N. J. They 
will be used by the engineers of the sewer 
and water departments. 

The street car strike in Louisville, Ky., 
last fall taught the authorities of that city 
a lesson which resulted in the purcliase 
of three Cadillac Thirties for use in the 
police department 

Automobile patrols are becoming com. 
mon. The latest of the Southern cities 
to fall into line is New Orleans, La., with 
a Studebaker patrol. The new machine 
is to be used as an emergency vehicle as 
well as a patrol. 

About the latest thing in commercial 
autos is a street sweeper which the inven- 
tor claims can make fifteen miles an hour 
and thoroughly clean the streets. 



Ten taxlcabs have been ordered by the 
Frank Bird Transfer Company and the In- 
dianapolis Transfer Company, of Indianr 
apolis, to which it is affiliated. The cars 
will be placed in service at hotels and 
depots in Indianapolis, Ind. 



CTCU! AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL.. 

The Sternberg 1000 Lbs. Delivery Truck 



The Sternberg Motor Truck Company, 
Milwaukee, Wlaconaln. U. S. A., is offering 
a Dew light delivery track, two ilzes, lOOO 
to 1500 lbs., and 2000 to 3000 lbs., pajlng 
load, gas engine drlveD, the larger truck 
fltted with either friction drive or sliding 
gear, aa purchaser may select, to the di- 
vided counter-shaft with naked slde-chalna 
to the rear wheels. 

This new Sternberg light truck was first 
placed on the road late in 1908, and was 
subjected to some very bard long distance 



The Sternberg light delivery truck here 
shown has a capacity of 1000 lbs., paying 
load, and can handle fifty per cent, over- 
load. The wheel base la 8S Ins. and the 
gauge bS Ins. Solid tires, 34zZK Ins., are 
fltted In front, and 36x3 Ins. In the rear. 
Wheels are either "Indestructible," pressed 
steel side-plates riveted to steel rims, or 
wooden spoke, as ordered. The motor is 
two cylinders, opposed, 5x4 Ins., 4-cyc)e. 
water-cooled by thermal circulation. A 
Schebler carburetor Is fitted. Ignition Is 



able performance, the friction drive giving 
excellent results under most trying condi- 
tions. 

The Sternberg Company la a very strong 
advocate of the friction drive, claiming 
high efficiency, silence and ready bandling, 
with all speeds within the entire range 
from zero to maximum, with low np-keep 
charges. It is asserted that the yearly 
charge for friction paper wheel face re- 
placement Is less than that of lubricating 
oil required by a sliding gear transmitting 
equal power. 

This Sternberg truck Is built In two 
sites. 1000 and 2000 lbs, paying load, actual 
capacity fifty per cent, overload. Any 
style of body is supplied to order. 



by Boacb magneto and dry cells. Nominal 
20 H. P. single disk and paper wheel fric- 
tion drive to the balance gear and divided 
counter-shaft with sprocketa and chains to 
rear wheels. High speed is from 15 to 20 
miles per hour. Price, without body, 
$117S, Including two oil lamps and tools. 
This 1000 lbs. paying load Sternberg truck 
is made with friction drive only. 



Same general appearance as shown In 
Fig. 1, can handle 3000 lbs. paying load. 
Wheel base Is 110 Ins. and gauge G6 Ins. 
Tires are solid. 34 x 3 Ins. In front by 36 x 
Z% Ins. rear. Wheels "Indestructible" 
pressed steel side disks riveted to steel 
tire rims, or wooden wheels, as ordered. 



OTOLS AMD ADTOICOBILB TRAOI JODBMAL. 



Price, Mme cliaaalB and motor, wltbout 
body, bat 8i>eed'«hange through cone- 
clutch and clutch-gearing, all gears always 
In mesh, direct to balance-gear drum on 
high speed, fl960. Including two oil lamps 
and tools. Speed IS to 20 miles per hour. 



Motor, two opposed cylinders, 5^x5 Ins., 
4-cyc!e, water-cooled, thermal circulation. 
The motor is extra heavy throughout, and 
Is under the footboard, where Is Is In- 
atantly accessible. Ignition Is by magneto 
and dry cells, with Jump spark plugs. The 
drive is either friction or ciutch-gear speed- 
change, all gears always in mesh, to bal- 
SDce gear and divided counter-shaft with 
naked side chains to rear wheels. With 
the clutch -gear speed-change a cone-c latch, 
leather faced, with cork inserts. Is fitted. 
Price, friction speed change, without truck 
hody. $1675, Including two oil lamps and 
tools. 



The front axle is a steel drop-forging, 
I-sectlon, 2K Ins. deep by 1^ ins. wide, 
wheels on Tim ken roller bearings. The 
rear axle is 1% ins. square, wheels also 
on Timken roller bearings. The springs 
in front are seml-elliptlcB, 48x2 ins., and 
rear, full eliiptics, 40 ins. long by 2 his. 

The motor: 2 cylinders opposed, 4-cycle, 
water-cooled by thermal circulation, set 
In under footboard. Force-feed oiling. 
Ignition is by magneto and storage bat- 
tery. Nominal 20 H. P. 

Drive Is by friction to balance gear with 
divided counter-shaft and sprocltets and 
chains to rear wheels. The driving disk 
Ib of alloy, 20 ins. dia., Ilbre friction, wheel 
is 24 Ins. ilia, by IVi ins. face. A bail-beer- 
InR thrust collar ia fitted to take dish 
thrust. The counter-shaft is mounted on 
Timken roller bearings, A 20-gallon fuel 
tank is placed under driver's seat. Brakes 
are fitted, one on each rear wheel, and one 
on counter-shaft. Steering is by worm and 
nut. with large hand wheel. AH bodies 
are supplied to order to suit service; body 
price extra, as agreed upon. 

Spark and throttle levers on steering col- 
umn. Two outside hand levers, right of 
driver, outer lever applies Jack-shaft, 
emergency brakes. Inside hand lever con- 
trols speed change. Pedal control of ordi- 
nary brake to both rear wheels. 

The front axle is a steel drop-forging, 2% 
ins. deep, 1% ins. wide, wheels on Timken 
roller bearings. Rear, steel, 1% ins. sq.. 






1 truck. Spavd c^luniB k 



mud uM * t«*<(Mi t& fMK 



CTCLB AND AUTOMOBILE TKADB JUUHNAK 



179 



wheels on Tlmfcen roller bearings. Springs 
are all semi-elUpUcs, front, 40 z Z% Ins. 
wide; rear, 46x2^ Ins. wide. 

The motor la a very heavy Sternberg 
special deilgn. The opposed cylinders are 
6^x5 Ids., 4-cycle, water-cooled, thermal 
water circulation. The motor Is placed 
under the footboard, readily accesalble. 
The oiling Is by a non -adjustable force-feed 
oiler, Id Integral assembly wltb the motor. 
No waste of oil and no failure In oiling 
so long as there la oil In the lubricating 
oil reservoir. The crank-aliaft Ib very 
heavy, 2% Ins. bearings, and wrist dia., 6 
Ins. long at fly-wheel end, i Ins. long In 
front, wrists 3 Ins. long z 2^ Ins. dla., giv- 
ing ample connecting-rod bearing on tbe 
crank-wrist Forts are 2 1-16 Ine. in dla. 
Nominal H. P., 30. 

Drive iB either friction, alloy disk, 20 ins. 
dla.. fiber wheel 21 Ins. dia. xl^ tns; fiber- 
Face; ball-bearing to take disk thrust, coun- 
ter-shaft In Tim ken roller bearings or a 



cone clutch, leathet face, with cork inserts 
and a spur-gear speed-change, all gears In ' 
constant engagement, with solid jaw 
clutches to the shaft. The gear shift la 
selective, with single movement of shift 
lever to obtain any speed. See Figs. 2 and 
3 for exterior view of Sternberg gear box 
and levers, and horizontal view, showing 
arrangement of gears always in mesh and 
the bdI Id-jaw speed selecting clutches. 

The fuel tank Is of 20 gallons capacity, 
placed under the driver's seat. The rear 
wheel hub drums are 14 z 2^ Ins., and are 
used for the ordinary brakes. An emer- 
gency brake drum la fitted to the counter- 
shaft. Steering Is by a worm and nnt, 
with extra large band wheel. 

All bodies are extra, to snlt service, at 
price agreed upon. Boach magneto, flzed 
spark, throttle lever on the steering col- 
umn, no spark lever. Speed change and 
brake levers at driver's right. 



"Cartercar" Delivery Wagon and Taxicab 



Herewith are shown two commercial 
cara manufactured by the Cartercar Co. of 
Pontlac, Mich,, namely, the Cartercar 
Model C Delivery Wagon and the 1909 
Taxicab. 

The delivery wagon is fitted with a 24 
H. P. motor, two cylinders opposed, 5^ z 
4% Ins. The car has a paying load capac- 
ity of 1000 Iba. The wheel base Is 96 
inches and the gauge 64^ Ins. Price of 
this model with standard body as shown Is 
11.400. Including 3 lamps, mats, horn and 



tools. The car complete weighs 2,100 lbs. 
Other styles of body can be furnished as 
desired. 

The Cartercar Taxicab uses the aame 
cbassia aa the Cartercar Model K pleas- 
ure car. The motor is two cylinders, E^ z 
4 Ins., opposed, nominal 24 H. P. The con- 
necting rods are steel castings, and the rod 
caps are hinged above and bolted below, 
oblique, joining plane of rod and cap. Each 
cylinder, water-jacket and half of the 
crank-boz form a single Integral gray iron 



CYCLE AND AUTOHOBILB THADE JOURNAL. 



caeting, the crank-box Joint being fitted 
metal to metal, olUtlgbt. The lubrication 
la by G-lead mechaalcal oiler, gear driTen 
from tbe cam-sliatt. One oil lead goes to 
each main crank-Bbatt bearing, one to eacb 
cylinder, and one to each crank-arm, 
grooved to oil tbe respective crank wriata 
by centrilagal action. The drip from all 
six oil leada replenishes tbe crank-box 
aplasb pool. 

USES RAPID CAR FOR S1GHT8EEINQ 
A. J. Crewford, of Cambridge, 111., tias 
been using a Rapid 22-24 H. P. gasoline car 
tor the last 2 yeara tor alghtaeeing pur- 
poses, and which so far has been giving en- 
tire satisfaction. 

The motor used In thla car Is ol the 
double opposed type set under the body. 
The car cost him 11800. Mr. Crawford 
stores his own car. He covers from 25 to 
80 miles per day with It, averaging about S 
to 10 miles on a gallon of gasoline, and 70 
miles on a gallon of lubricating oil. Re- 
pair work and repair parts cost him about 
tGO per year. His experience has taught 
him that more horse power is required 
when a car ia used atogether on dirt roads 
ttian when nsed on bnilt-up roads. He has 
liad conalderable trouble In aecnrlns a com- 



The body Is of approved deaign, best 
materlala. and excellent finish. The rear 
seat furnishes seating capacity lor three 
passengers and folding seat in front ac- 
commodates two more, making seats ior 
five paaaeogers inaide. The weight is 2,260 
lbs. Price la 11,800, Including G lamps, 3 
oil lamps and 2 acetylene lamps and gen- 
erator, with mata, born and tools. 



CHICAGO TAXICAB COMPANIES 
CONSOLIDATE 
Four of the largest taxtcab campuUea 
ot Chicago. III., have combined, torming 
the Chicago raxicab Company with * capi- 
tal of 12,000.000. Tbe deal waa financed 
by W. W. Tracy, temporary pretident of 
tbe new concern. 

Tail cab drivers in New York, wbere 
twenty blocks on the avenues measure ex- 
actly a mile, boast that on rainy days they 
can register a mile every seventeen blocks, 
on the asphalt, becauae of the skidding of 
the wheels. 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



ISl 



GRAMM-LOGAN TRUCKS 
The accompanying cuts ehow two charac- 
teristic types of trucks manufactured by 
the Gramm-Logan Motor Car Co., ot Bowl- 
ing Qreen, Ohio. 

The stake body truck Is powered by a 45 
horse-power motor, 4-cyilnder, water-cooled. 



4% bore by B-lnch stroke. The carrying 
capacity la 3 tons. The wheel base la 12G 
Inches, The bodies are eitra to or<ler; the 
price of the chasala Is |3.5i)0. 



The order was given In competition with 
other makes of electric vehicles. 

The Detroit model chosen Is built on the 
lines of a gas roadster and Is seated for 
two. Its maximum speed Is 22 miles an 
hour, at which speed the Are chief can 
reach the scene of a conflagration on the 
very outskirts of the city In less than 15 
minutes' time. Two sets of batteries are 
supplied, so that It Is constantly on 
charge, ready for Instant duty the minute 
the alarm clangs In the chief's headquar- 
ters. 

It Is flnlshed In Are department red, and 
In place of the rumble seat Is carried a 
falr-alzed supply box. 

THE "CHURCHER" PUSH BUTTON 
The Churcher Electric ft Mfg. Co., of 
Cincinnati, Ohio, have recently placed on 
the market a push button, which Is de- 
signed especially for electric trucks. The 
cut herewith shows the push button in 
actual size. This switch Is used for oper- 



The delivery car type truck has a carry- 
ing capacity of 1500 pounds. The motor 
Is 25 H. P.. 4-Inch bore and stroke, air- 
cooled. Wheel base Is 112 Inches. Price 
ot thlB model is $1,800. Body Is ot regular 
delivery wagon type. These chassis have 
been described in detail In our January, 
1909. Issue, page 293. 

ELECTRIC AUTO USED BY FIRE CHIEF 
OF DETROIT 

The Board of Fire Commissioners of De- 
troit, Mich., hae recently purchased from 
the Anderson Carriage Company, of that 
city, a Detroit Electric, roadster model. 
for the nee of the fire chief In speeding to 
flree. 

This la the flrst Instance In which an 
electric has been chosen for this purpose. 



atin^ the electric gong usually found on 
electric trucks. The construction of thla 
button is such that It Is Impossible [or ii 
to get out of order and It will not shock 
the operator when It la wet. Tramping 
on It or rough usage cannot break It or 
disarrange it In any way. 



After having been used continuously 
for live years by three ditterent owners 
It Is claimed a 24-horsepower Plerce-Ar- 
row has been placed In commission as a 
general utility car by the Edison Manu- 
facturing Company of West Orange. N. J. 
The ear Is one manufactured In 1904. 
The only change made In the car was 
the removal ot the tonneau and the sub- 
stitution of a platform for boxes and other 
material. 



182 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



EXPERIENCE WITH PACKARD MOTOR 

TRUCK 

That a good motor driven truck is capa- 
ble of much longer service than ordinarily 
would be suspected, is substantiated by 
the experience of the Packard Motor Car 
Co., of Detroit, Mich., which used one of 
its own three-ton trucks exclusively for 
hauling. It has been actually in service 
522 days, during which it has covered 
16,489 miles. Its principal work has been 
in hauling express and freight between the 
Packard factory and the different railway 
freight depots. The truck, in the time it 
has been in use, has made 1373 trips and 
has hauled 7,833,022 pounds of freight, or, 
approximately, 4000 tons. Its tonnage per 
day lias been 15,006 pounds and its average 
tonnage per trip, 5705 pounds. The gasa 
line consumed in these 522 days of work 
has been 3548 gallons, or an average of 
4.64 miles per gallon. 

The Packard factory also employs a spe- 
cial delivery car for carrying mail and 
for other special purposes. Ihis car is a 
1907 Packard "Thirty" experimental car, 
which first went onto the road March 10, 
1906, and was driven 55,000 miles. In 
April, 1908, it was equipped with a light 
delivery body and has since been the spe- 
cial delivery car. On this service it has 
done active work 252 days, and has covered 
17,742 miles, making 1509 trips and an 
average per day of 70.4 miles. Thus, be- 
tween its road service and its later work as 
a light delivery wagon, this car has made 
about 73,000 miles and will be continued 
in its present capacity. 



A large manufacturer of four cylinder 
trucks in Lockport, N. Y.. recently com- 
pleted building a five ton chassis with 
regular trucking body of special dimen- 
sions, the same being 14 feet 6 inches long 
by 6 feet wide, for the Robert MacKinnon 
Co.. of Little Palls, N. Y. The MacKinnon 
Company is one of the largest knitting 
concerns in New York State, and this 
new 60 H. P. truck will take the place of 
three heavy trucking teams that they have 
previously used in freighting raw materials 
from the railroad to the factory, and draw- 
ing the cased goods to the freight house. 
The truck, therefore, takes the place of 
three teams and two men, while the upkeep 
expense it Is expected will be practically 
the same as for one team. 



COMMERCIAL NOTE8 

John Arrington, a ranchman of Kansas, is 
now using an automobile to carry him to 
and from round-ups, and as a general utility 
conveyance for business trips and the like. 

An automobile line has been established be- 
tween Blue Ridge and Melissa, Texas, and 
several trips are made daily. 

The Consumers* Ice Company, of Memphis. 
Tenn., has purchased from the Cullen-Butler 
Company, a three-ton motor truck which will 
be used in supplying Ice to wagons and dei)otfl. 

Des Moines, la., now boasts of an auto- 
mobile patrol wagon. 



A company has been organized at Gr^en- 
fleld. Mass., to operate a line of automobiles 
to Turners Falls and Northfield. 

Ten taxicabs will soon be placed in service 
on the streets of Indianapolis, Xnd., by John 
£. Morand, who has purchased the controlling 
Interest in the Frank Bird and Indianapolis 
Transfer Companies. Both companies are 
backed by the same capital. The Indianapolis 
Transfer Company is located at 215 North 
Delaware street, and the Frank Bird Company 
at 319 East New York street. 

B. T. Lane, of the Southern Garage, Spring- 
field, Mass., has placed in service three Atlas 
taxicabs, one of which is stationed at the 
Worthy Hotel, another at the railroad station 
and the third at the garage. 

Charles Mayer & Co., Jewelers, of Indian- 
apolis, Ind., have discarded ail horse-drawn 
vehicles and added the third motor wagon to 
their delivery service. 

It is intended in the near future to establish 
a motor 'bus line between Moody and Waco. 
Texas. 

The Nashville Taxicab Company, capitalixed 
at $30,000, will soon start a public cab service 
in Nashville. Tenn. 

Four electric wagons were recently placed 
in service between the city college, post office 
station and the Washington Bridge station. 
New York City, N. Y. 

The Schurmeier Wagon Company, 2S-81 
Western avepue, Minneapolis, Minn., has 
started to manufacture auto trucks. 

The Southern Commercial Motor Car Com- 
pany has been created in Atlanta, Ga., with 
offices at 101-103 Fort Street. The new con- 
cern will manufacture comm«reial motor cars. 

A company is being formed to operate a 
motor 'bus service on the new Que^nsboro 
bridge at New York City. 

An auto 'bus line was recently put In opera- 
tion between Seymour and Brownstown, Ind. 

There is an auto stage line in operation be- 
tween Shaniko and Bend, Ore., a 60 H. F. 
car making one trip dally. 

The Stemburg Motor Truck Company, of 
Milwaukee, Wis., has received an order for 
a motor truck from the Board of School Di- 
rectors of Milwaukee. The truck is to be 
used for the transportation of the public 
school supplies. 

St. Louis, Mo., Is soon to have an automo- 
bile ambulance for municipal use, and if this 
one proves successful, autos will be installed 
in other city departments. 

Three 20 H. P. autocar 'busses have been 
installed by a corporation formed by citizens 
of Swarthmore, Pa., for use mainl^ to and 
from the station. The cars each seat ten per- 
sons and make very good time. 

The Taxicab Auto Company, with an office 
and garage at 460 Fourth Street, has been es- 
tablished at Macon, Ga. 

Carl Manning, representing the Trenton 
Auto Garage and Supply Company, has sold 
to the Atlantic City Fire Department a D. R. 
model, 40 horse power Oldsmoblle mnabout to 
be used by the chief of the fire department. 

A $20,000 company is to be formed in the 
near future to operate a motor 'bus service 
in Traverse City, Mich. 

A theatre motor service has been estab- 
lished in Milwaukee by the Wisconsin Auto- 
mobile Exchange, 220 Wisconsin street. Five 
cars are now being used and the charge is 
$1.00 per couple from residence to theatre and 
return. 

The police department of Wilmington, DAI.* 
has purchased two Reading Standard motor- 
cycles. 

The Wyoming Automobile Transit Company. 
capital stock $60,000, was recently chartered 
by the state, and will conduct an automobile 
stage service between Rock Springs, on the 
Union Pacific Railroad and the Yellowstone 
Park, entering the park through the southern 
and most beautiful gateway. The company Is 
backed by Wyoming, Iowa and Chicago capi- 
tal, and has already purchased machines for 
use in the service. 



CYCLB AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



THE TAXIMETER HOLD-UP 
An ordinance 1b under debate tor the 
regulation ot taxlcaba Id New York, the 
provlalona ot whicb seem tor the moat 
part Just and reasonable. It alma to bBve 
a unltorm rate of tariff, to bave tbe meten 
attached to front wheels, so that custom- 
ers will not be charged raileage [or the 
spinning ot the rear wheels on wet pave- 
ments. U has variouB other provisions 
tbat would be more Interesting If It was 
perceptible how they are to be enforced 
and the motor-cab patrons protected. A 
man gets into a cab having a taximeter and 
thereby tacitly agrees to pay according to 
the registration of the meter. He rides 
what be knows to be two miles and what 
be bas paid for as two miles In several 
other cabs. This time, however, tbe taxi- 
meter sbowB figures tbat charge him for 
a ride of three and a half miles. What 
can be do? Tbe driver shrugs his shoul- 
dera; there is the taximeter; he does not 
know about any other taximeter or about 
distance measured otherwise. He knows 
that la tbe charge. He explains tbat he 
must turn In proceeds according to the 
meter. The man knows be Is "stung," but 
he pays. He tries to pick the caba with 
honest meters thereafter, but la not al- 
ways successful. To obviate this situa- 
tion Is difficult. It may be proven that a 
meter registers falsely, but It is quite an- 
other thing to prove that anyone wilfully 
caused It to do so. Certain varieties of 
petty swindles are almost beyond tbe 
fcach of tbe law and the Individual must 
protect himself. 

Realizing that the unceasing onslaught 
ot tbe automobile Into tbe commercial 
field win In the future put horse-drawn 
Teblclea In the rear, Charles W. Sheetes 
k Son, of Indianapolis, who have been en- 
gaged In the livery bnslness for some 
years, are building a til, 000 concrete gar- 
age in the rear of 101& N. Capitol avenue, 
and will conduct an automobile business 
and a taxicab service, four cars tor which 
bave already been ordered. 



R. H. Macey ft Company, proprietors ot 
a large department store In New York 
City, have for the past alx years been us- 
ing electric delivery wagons with tbe 
greatest eatlsfactlon. This firm Is now 
operating thirty machines rated at one ton. 

Most of these machines bave been re- 
modeled, their weight being reduced from 
5S00 to 3700 pounds. About 40 miles per 
day are covered by each vehicle, on a sin- 
gle charge of the battery. The batteries 
are charged during the night In tbe firm's 
garage, which is well equipped and quite 
extensive. 

AH the cars are operated by men who 
were formerly horse drivers. One ot the 
rules laid down by this firm and which no 
doubt helps considerably In keeping this 
service in good running order ie the fact 
that the drivers are not permitted to have 
anything to do with the administration of 
the machines, their duties being atrictly 
confined to steering the vehicles. In case 
of a breakdown the driver reports by tele- 
phone to the garage, when the company's 
emergency wagon Is rushed to the scene 
and expert repair men remedy the trouble 
which has arisen, or else the disabled vehi- 
cle is towed to the ham and there care- 
fully examined and repaired. 

The company's chief engineer alma to 
keep the entire fleet in servlee every 
working day throughout tbe year, and ow- 
ing to the high administrative metbods 
practiced it is seldom that a wagoo is in 
such a condition as to be reported unfit 
for duty. 

At present there are over 4000 motor 
cabs In London, and the number Is In- 
creasing at tbe rate of 1600 a year. Horse- 
drawn caba are doomed to diaappear as no 
one ever uses them If taxicabs are avail- 

The Frayer-Mlller truck is being fea- 
tured hy Charles E. Stone, manager ot tbe 
Motor Truck Company's New York offices 
recently opened at 244-260 West Forty- 
nlntb street. 



The accompanying cuta show two Wblta iteamera used for commercial work. The cut 
on the left ahowH the car lued by the chief of the lire dapKrtroent of Baltimore, Md. A 
similar car haii been delivered lo thai city tor the use of the Deputy Ctilef. At least one 
ot theae cnra reapondB to all alarms. The other cut illustraitea the patrol wagon recently 
deUvered to the police department of Omaha, Neb. This car Is In service twenty-four hour* 
a day, with three ahUta ol drivers. It displaces six horses and does the work quicker 
Mid at !«■» coat. 



184 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



HEWITT TEN-TON TRUCK 

The latest addition to the line of com- 
mercial cars, made by the Hewitt Motor 
Truck Co., 10 E. 31st Street. New York 
City, is a ten-ton truck driven by a 4%x 
5%, 4-cy Under, vertical motor, which, ac- 
cording to the A. L. A. M. rating, should 
deliver 28 H. P., but which is said to have 
shown 3G H. P. on the brake at 1000 R. 
P. M. 

The motor power in this ten-ton trucK 
is the same as In the Hewitt ftve-ton truck. 
The running gear and frame are of special 
construction, the pressed steel frame being 
9 ins. deep. This is, however, a lower 
speed truck than the five-ton type, the 
rated speed being G-7 miles per hour, which 
is considered as fast as safety allows with 
a ten-ton load. The wheels have been de- 
signed so that the pressure on the ground 
does not exceed 700 pounds per inch of tire 
width, which is said to be far less than 
is usual with horse drawn vehicles where 
the loads quite commonly exceed a ton 
per inch of width. 

Special roller bearings are used on the 
rear axle to accommodate large loads. 
Where the weight of material to be carried 
is great and the distance long or the load- 
ing and unloading rapid, these cars show 
great earning capacity. They are particu- 
larly suitable for coal delivery in large 
quantities, also hauling building materials, 
structural iron and machinery. Either 
this or the five-ton truck can be furnished 
to run on alcohol instead of gasoline if so 
desired, and at no extra charge. The use 
of alcohol permits the owner to run the 
trucks on docks as alcohol motors are not 
objected to by the insurance companies. 
The alcohol type develops more power 
than the gasoline type. The gasoline 
capacity is 27 gallons. Cooling is by 
means of a Livingston cellular radiator 
and centrifugal circulation pump. Ignition 
is by a Simms Bosch high tension mag- 
neto with fixed spark. 

The chassis of this ten-ton truck lists at 
$6,000 including driver's seat, lamps and 
tools. For $500 additional a platform 
spoke body is furnished with top over the 
driver and storm curtains. 

Several features of this enormous truck 
are of special interest. The transmission 
is planetary. The Jack shaft is entirely 
mounted on Timken bearings. The control 
is by the Hewitt interlocking pedals for 
the two forward speed changes and the re- 
verse throttle pedal, and throttle accelera- 
tor. This Is all that are needed as they 
use a fixed spark magneto. From the 
Jack shaft drive to the rear wheels is by 
2-in. new design Whitney chain, which is 
the very largest. The brake drums are 28- 
in. in dia., 4%-ln. face, the surfaces be- 
ing cast steel and Raybestos. These 
brakes were sufficient to skid the truck 
with ten tons* load. The wheels are made 
by Schwarz. These w^e are told are the 
largest wheels that have ever been con- 



structed of this type. The hubs and fit- 
tings throughout on the rear axle are steel 
castings. The rear axles are 2%-in. wide 
and 5^-in. deep. The hubs are mounted 
on Timken bearings, being of special large- 
size, which has recently been developed 
by the Timken Co., for use on trolley 
cars for the Brill Company. 

The truck from the top to the ground 
is 8 feet. The coal will all run out through 
the side doors, as is common practice with 
steel horse trucks. 



GREENWICH GETS LOCOMOBILE FIRE 

ENGINE 

Greenwich, Conn., recently celebrated 
the arrival of its long awaited Locomobile 
fire engine. The new engine is mounted 
on a 40 H. P. Locomobile chassis, and has 
a total weight of 5.000 pounds. Although 
it carries heavy equipment, it has demon- 
strated its ability to travel 50 miles an 
hour and climb the steepest hills in the 
State in good time. The fire-fighting ap- 
paratus consists of two 35-gallon tanks for 
chemical solution and 250 feet of 1^-inch 
hose. The flame extinguishing spray is 
generated from sulphuric acid and bicar- 
bonate of soda, which are mixed automati- 
cally in proportions of acid, one quart; bi- 
carbonate of soda, 6 pounds; water, 35 gal- 
lons. It requires four minutes to exhaust 
one tank and during this interval the other 
tank can be refilled and made ready, thus 
insuring a continuous stream for an indefi- 
nite period. A large searchlight and* a 
regular complement of hooks, axes and 
hand extinguishers are also carried. 



The Chicago Daily News, has recently 
purchased three Lambert trucks, each of 
3-ton capacity. 

The New York "Herald" and the "Even- 
ing Telegram" recently installed an auto- 
mobile delivery service of ten cars, which 
are being used to distribute the papers to 
retail and branch offices. 

The Akron, Ohio, postoffice is consider- 
ing plans for establishing an auto service 
for the collection and delivery of mall. A 
test was recently made with a Brush run- 
about and it is said to have been very sat- 
isfactory. 

A branch of the Whipple-Scarritt Com- 
pany, of New York, known as the Taxi- 
Service Company, was recently incorpor- 
ated in Trenton, N. J., for the purpose of 
doing business in Philadelphia. The new 
concern is capitalized at $1,000,000, 

Three automobile stages, with a seating 
capacity of thirty each, have been put into 
service by the Rutherford Transit Com- 
pany, of Rutherford, N. J., between the 
Erie Railroad station and various points 
in the borough. This company was re- 
cently formed, with a capital of $2000, to 
supply proper transportation to the sta- 
tion. 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE THADE JOURNAL. 18 

THE COMMERCIAL MOTORCAR CO. 

INCORPORATED 1905 

TIMES BUILDING 



"NEW YORK, N. Y. 



COUHERCIAL MOTOR VEHICLES 
OF EVERY SIZE AND TYPE, 
BOTH GASOLENE AND ELECTRIC. 



AUTOMOBILE DELIVERY AND 
TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS 
INSTALLED COMPLETE. 



OUR NEW CATALOGUE IS READY. FOR DISTRIBUTION 



A Chance 



for the 



DEALER 



. .3t Tm Truck juil Mppid to thi R. A. McKi 
FaUt, N. Y. Taka M« pJori a/ xhrii IwiM and lu 
^tp-jkaffp fopu at fffufflom, Sixl'ii horse power, four 



YOU know how much — 
or little — you make out 
of your repair deput- 
ment as a dealer in plea- 
sure cars. You know how 
many whims and fancies you 
have to meet in selling them. 
I want to introduce you to a business that has all the possibilities, as to volume, 
of the pleasure car trade, with less selling expense and practically no repair bother. 

"American-Trucks" (4 Cyl.) 

can be sold in any city. The demand is increating every day. The dealer who 
gets the agency now is slated for a good, profitable, growing business. 

American Motor truck Co. Lockport,N.Y. 



e CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 

Sheet Metal Stamping 

Step Hangers, Running Boards, Brake Drums, 
Hub Caps, Flanges, Gear Covers 

A thoua&nd and ODe things made from 
Sheet Metal for AUTOMOBILES. 

The Crosby Company, 169 Pratt St, Buffalo, N.Y. 



j^^nmlr 



4-Wheel Drive Gas-Electric 



Send for CaUlogne. Ageuta Wknted, 

COUPLE-GEAR FREIGHT-WHEEL CO. 




s&y 



GranuD-Logan 

knd r*U^t7,iDitnticth,riin|tUdt]>udta«l 



The 6ramn-L«||aB Motor Car Co. 




Hewitt Trucks 

U&n DEUVEBV 
* T^ S Tm 

S Tm M T^ 

4 rsara' BxjMriMce 
HEWITT MOTOR CO^ 10 E. attt 3«»—t H. Y. 




CHASE MOTOR WAGON 
Price $751 to $ltS* 

TotheUier: 

Hera b a practical motor waBon 
wllboot valTB, water, oSlti or tire 
troublca. It works perfectl; under 
all road asd weather coodltloni. 

To the Dealer: 

The Ctuue wagon has ezcloaiTe Bell- 
ing featurei your competitors can not 
offer. Our prlcee are right, discounta 
liberal and we have tome Tacant 
territory. Onr propodtion wHI lo- 
teiert yon. 

Catalog Ho. 16 tdli the rtoiy. Write 
for it now. 

CHASE MOTOR TRUCK CO. 

332 S. W«l St.. SYRACUSE, N. Y» U. S. A. 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



EDITORIAL 



TRICARS MORE POPULAR ABROAD 
THAN IN UNITED STATES 
It Is sometimes a surprise to tbosc who 
have been abroad and seen the streets and 
even the outside roads, teaming with com- 
mercial vehicles, motor cjrcles and particu- 
larly with three-w heeled deliver? and 
pleasure motorcycles, to And almost an en- 
tire absence of these latter vehicles In use 
In our own country. Tbe use ol side cars 
and fore-carriages Is strikingly larger 
abroad than In this country; In fact, many 
comparatively low-powered motorcycle* 
are seen on the streets with side cars at 
tached, while In this country only the us- 
ers of high-powered machines are com- 
monly found using side cars or mahlng 
their machines carry double. Tbe use of 
fore-cars and regular three-whtel vehicles 
abroad has practically kept pace with the 
growth of the use of the two-wheeled ma- 
chines and the three-wheelers are at the 
present time extremely popular tn many 
of the large cities, motor delivery vans Id 
some sections being as numerous. If not 
more so, than automobile trucks. 

There are Beveral reasons for this ar 
parent diversity of taste between Europeai- 
and American users, but In a I! probability 
tbe most Important factor In the choice of 
two or three-wheel vehicles, is the charac- 
ter of tbe road surface. It will be found 
very difficult, If not Impossible, to success- 
fully operate either fore or side cars on 
many of the Amcricau roads, as soon as the 
city limits have been passed. The third 
wheel is immediately subjected to buc'i 
twisting and wrenching that If rigidly at- 
tached, the entire machine Is severely 
strained and soon gets loose and wobbly. 
Biven what might be termed plvotally at- 
tached, third wheels are of necessity travel- 
ing the roughest part of the road If the 
motorcycle proper 1b driven so as to take 
advantage of the comparatively Biuootb 
track. Tbe third wheel is always in tbe 
bumps and hollows, caused by the horses' 
feet when the road was wet and which 
after drying makes a partlcularlv difficult 
surface over which to travel. Even tbe 
city pavements are, as a rule, very hard on 
the three-wheeler and particularly so If 
the driver, as Is often tbe case, attempts to 



follow one rail of the car line, allowing 
tbe third wheel to pound over the rough 
and uneven cobbles, either between the 
tracks or betueen the rails. For this rea- 
son, although the three-wheeled vehicle Is ' 
very satisfactory on smooth pavements 
it is almost useless outside of tbe city on 
tbe rougher roads. 

In Europe, the roads even outside of the 
cities and connecting the villages, are usu- 
ally BO well kept and originally laid that 
no such difficulties or disadvantages are 
encountered In using three- wheeled ma- 
chines, their well-known lightness, economy 
of operation and low Initial cost, as com- 
pared with even the smallest four-wheeled 
vehicles make them extremely popular. 

Another feature which has also had Its 
Influence In bringing about the extended 
use of side and fore-car attachments 
abroad Is the large number of two and 
three-speed gears which have for several 
years been on tbe market. These attach- 
ments have made it possible for even a ma- 
chine of moderate horse-power to carry 
Buccesstully the additional weight of the 
attachment and rider, so that It was not 
necessary to have a large and powerful 
machine before a more sociable rig could 
be used than the ordinary motorcycle. In 
this country practically none of these de- 
vices made their appearance until within 
the present year. It took considerable pa- 
tience and perseverance on the part of an 
owner of a moderate powered motorcycle 
to cover any extended distance with tbe 
machine carrying double, with no means 
of falling back on a low gear and with al- 
most Invariably poor roads to contend with 
the minute the city's well-paved streets 
were left. 

The third reason for tbe eitenaive use 
of three-wheeled machines abroad may also 
be tbe much longer period that motor- 
cycles have been in use there and the 
much greater familiarity of the public with 
tbis, the cheapest of all methods of trans- 
portation. In all probability as our own 
public become more accustomed to the 
use of motorcycles and side cars, an in- 
creasing number will be used for light 
delivery work and for the more compan- 
ionable outings where two can ride side 
by aide. The gradual Improvement in our 
road conditions, a movement for which, 
largely due to tbe extended use of motor- 
driven vehicles. Is slowly but positively 



CTCLB AND ADTOMOBILB TRADE JOURNAU 



gathering Btrengtb, will also tend to In- 
crease the use of three- wheeled cars. 
After several years have made the public 
familiar with the advantages to be gained 
by the use of two and tbree-epeed gears, 
these will be placed on nearl? all ma- 
chines and the riders will then be enabled 
to more succesBfully use side cars and sur- 
mount the difflcultles of rough roail travel. 
One thing, however. Is certain, and that is 
that tri-cars and small three-wheel deliv- 
ery vehicles will never reach such a stage 
of iJopularlty aa they now enjoy abroad 
until some very niarhed Improvement has 
been made In both the city streets and tbe 
country roads. 



THE 1909 "F. N." BIG FOUR 
Tbe accompanying cut shows the 1909 
"F. N," Big Fonr, marketed by the Oving- 
ton Motor Co., 2234 Broadway, N, Y, City, 
Tbe principal difTerences between this 
model and 'the 190S^ model, which was 
brought out at tbe latter part of last year, 
are as follows: Instead of an internal ex- 
panding drum bralte and a rim brake which 
was formerly put on lo comply with the 
law in Europe, the F. N. Company now fits 
tbe machine with an external contracting 



THE "L. A W." MOTORCYCLE -MOTOR 

The "L. £ W." 30-60 motor shown here- 
with is manufactured by Geo. W. Lyon. 
170 33rd St., Chicago, 111., and is Intended 
to meet tbe demands for a high grade 
motor either for motor bicycle use or any 
purpose where a small light gasoline motor 
is required. The cylinder 3 15-10 Inches 
In diameter by 3 1-2 Inches stroke gives 
a capacity of 30.50 cubic Inches. 

The cooling fins on tbe head are of ample 
size as are those on the cylinder, which la 
machined all over. Insuring even expan- 
sion and good radiating surface. The ex- 
haust valve is 1 H Inches In diameter, 
and allows of a perfectly free escape of 
exhaust. The inlet vaive is proportionately 
large, which permits of short lift, allowing 
it to perform its functions with tbe least 
possible noise and wear. The wrist-pin Is 
of ample size, tooled steel, hardened and 
ground, with a % inch hole through cen- 
ter. It is held in place by two cotter pins, 
one on each end, through hole drilled in 
the bosses in piston, the pins projecting 
into the hollow wrist-pin where the ends 
are spread, making it impossible iu move 
pin until the cotters are withdrawn. The 



band brake acting on the same drum as 
is used by the drum brake. The standard 
equipment is foot rests and pedals. The 
lever which lifts the exhaust valve has 
been changed from the right to the left 
grip and the lever which formerly lifted 
tbe exhaust valves now oiierates the band 
brake, so that If for any reason or other 
tbe foot Itrake is out of commission the 
brake may be applied from the handle 
bars. The same euKine is used, although 
there Is a slight change in the pistons 
which are made much lighter, and there 
are also some slight changes made in the 
carburetor. The Iwo-speed sliding gear 
transmission is furnished as an extra. Un- 
usually heavy rims and spokes as well as 
very large tires are fitted on the 1909 ma- 



Mr. Rose, of Grand Rapids. Mich., the 
first to do the "Globe of Death," has or- 
ganized a motorcycle mcssaKe and packet 
delivery service. 



connecting rod Is 7 5-16, center to center, 
bushed with the best of bronze at each 
end; the lower end is solid, thereby obvi- 
ating any chance of loose bolts or nuts In 
crank case. The fly-wheels are machined 
all over. The shafts are of tooled steel, 
hardened and ground, with a collar, or 
flange, which is made with a pressing fit 
in a counterbore on the outside of each 
wheel. They are then riveted through 
collar and wheel, making it impossible to 
have a loose shaft. They run in Imported 
Hess Bright bearings. 

Tbe timing gears are sixteen pitch, 
twenty and forty teeth, % inch face. The 
cam Is of Vi inch face, of tooled steel as 
is also Ihe lifter, which is made as long 
as possible to insure a nearly direct lift 
to the push-rod; one end being carried 
by a stud, and tbe other end interposed 
between cam and push-rod. The exhaust 
valve lifter is entirely upon the outside 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



1S!> 



of crank case. In which place It Is easU)' 
repaired in case of accident and prevents 
any leakage of oil through holes In case. 
The crank case la made from beat grade 
of aluminum, held in place by eight boIt«. It 
can either be enameled or finished bright. 
The crank'pln Is of tooled steel, hardened 
anil ground, with a taper fit In the lly wheel; 
the drive side of the shaft I3 made with 
a taper to carry either a sprocket or a 
chain drive, or a pulley for belt. 

The motor weighs forty- three pounds. 
The head Is drilled to receive a spark 
plug, either in the top or side as most 
convenient. Provision is made to thor- 
oughly oil all parts of motor. The cap to in- 
let valve fs so made that it can be turned In 
any direction, thereby allowing carburetor 
to he placed In any position, and Is thread- 
ed with a % Inch, standard pipe thread. 
The Schebler carburetor Is part of th« 
equipment. The price of the motor la |100. 



The transmission Is by belt drive which 
consists of M In. nickel steel chain com- 
pletely encased in rawhide, the chain be- 
ing used for strength while the rawhide 
acts as a buffer between the chain and 
the V pulleys. A bait bearing spring Idler 
of new design la fitted. Single grip con. 



1909 "QREYMOUND" MOTORCYCLE 
The moat essential change made for 1909 
In the "Greyhound" Motorcycle is the spe- 
cial racing seat attachment seen Id the 
accompanying cut, which Involves no 
change In the rear frame construction. 
The saddle Is mounted on the ''Greyhound" 
shock absorber which consists of a spring 
packed telescope tube attached to the top 
connection of the frame by a pair of rock- 
ing arms and to the crank hanger connec- 
tion by a swivel Joint so that the rider 



rhfl "GrerbmiiKl"' Tlmrr and ElhftluC LUl, 

trol la used, the connection between the 
grip and control box being by use of 1-16 
inch piano wire carried through the handle 
bar tube. Ignition la by three No, 6 dry 
cells carried In a box. The control box 



Is suspended on a spring adapted to his 
weight, and can negotiate cobble stones or 
any kind of rough roads at any speed In 
comfort. 

The motor is full 3 H. P., hung low and 
In excellent position for cooling ami for 
comfort of the rider. The cylinder and 
bead are cast in one piece and the carbu- 
retor la bolted direct to the cylinder head 
serving as a retainer for the inlet valve. 
This carburetor Is of the float feed type. 
A small convenient device known as the 
flusber tube Is furnished for priming the 
cylinder, the use of which assures easy 
starting of the motor when cold. 



or spark control is dust proof and fitted 
with outside adjustment tor contact points. 
The boit contains a single spring, contact 
being accomplished by cam revolving on 
the crank shaft, the latter being a single 
piece steel drop forging, carefully hard- 
ened and ground. . Extra large phosphor 
bronze bushings are fitted in the crank 
shaft bearings as well as In the counect- 
tng rod bearings giving ample adjustment 
for wear. Tires 2'i inches In diameter 
are furnished as regular equipment. The 
spring fork shown herewith gives 2 In. 
spring compression, 
range of frame movement for an inch of 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 
"SOLAR- 




MOTORCYCLE HEADLIGHT 
AND GENE.RATOR 
The Bftdger Braes Mfg. Co., o[ Kenoaba. 
Wlfl., baa placed on the market a gas head- 
llglit and generator designed spedally For 
motorcycle use. The general conatmctlon 
of the headlight 1b oF same deelgn and con- 
Btrnction as their motor car lamps. It 
Is made of heavy brasa reinforced and 
riveted In assembling. It la 6 Inches high 



The standard flnlsb of this machine Is 
In silver gray enamel ornamented with 
blue. The rims are of hollow Bt«el. The 
equipment Includes a fi quart g&Bollne 
tank, Corbln buba. mud guards, atrong and 
convenient stand and full set of tools. 



THE 'TORPEDO" TANDEM ATTACH- 
MENT 
The Homecker Motor Mfg. Co.. of Gene- 
see, 111., have Just gotten out a new tan- 
riem attachment, cut ot which 1b shown 
herewith. 



and m Inches long. A powerful 4-lncb 
lens mirror reflector ia fltted. togetlier with 
front glass and 5-16 ft. tip. The lens mlr 
ror reflector can be removed if desired. 
The beadllgbt Is made for standard flat 
bracket, wblch nts In a casing concealed 
Inside the back of the single piece body. 
The lamp Is held fast to bracket by means 
of a set screw. 



The "Torpedo" Tandem Attachment. 

The principle of this attachment Is that 
it Is suspended on springs the same as the 
Homecker front spring fork. This spring 
Buspenslon entirely eliminates all Jarrlngs 
and thus allows both riders to ride com- 
fortably. The attachment can be fltted to 
any motorcycle in about ten minutes. It 
lists at JIG. 00 less saddle. 



The Syracuse Motorcycle Club has ar- 
ranged for the following runs this sum- 
mer: June 4th, blind run; June 13tb, re- 
quest run; June SOtb, Utica; June 27th, 
Auburn: July llth. Sylvan Beach; July 
2Gth. South Ba}'. 



Tlie ^ 'Solar" Molorc^rfLa OflucTAtor. 

The generator Is made ot aeamless 
drawn shells of heavy brass. The carbide 
capacity of the generator Is ten ounces. 
The generator is 8K Inches high and 3\ 
inches in diameter. The bracket lugs are 
a part ot the generator, which simplifies at- 
taching with various brackets to any mo- 
torcycle. 

Because of the twenty different makes of 
motorcycles dllTerIng bo radically from 
each other, the manufacturers of this bea<l- 
Itght are obliged to produce a special 
bracket for each make. The lamp, gen- 
erator and bracket complete to fit any 
motorcycle list at $10.00. 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



191 



"M. A M." ^'OTORCYCLE REPAIR KIT 
The M. ft .A. Mfg. Co., of Akron. Ohio, 
have prepared a motorcycle tire repair 
kit especially designed for the motorcy- 
clist. This kit Is packed In a tin screw 



THE "GREYHOUND" FIRE FIGHTER 
The Auto-Bl Company of Buffalo, makers 
of the Greyhound motorcycle, are develop- 
ing the posslbllltleH of the niotorcycle along 
various lines, one of the most Interesting 
of which is the adaptation of Its use as a 
means of delivering efficient apparatus and 
a skilled operator at a Are in a hurry. 

The accompanying cut shows a Grey- 
hound motorcycle equipped with extlu- 
gulshera which are mounted la spring 
brackets on each side of the rear wheel 
In such a way aa to be instantly released 



top box containing a special prepared ce- 
ment, a& assortment of patches, cement 
brush, emery cloth, etc. This kit can b« 
carried in the tool box without any danger 
of being crushed or broken. The cement 
used In this outfit is claimed not to soften 
sufficient to allow separation under Oie 
moat severe conditions. 

A NOVEL MOTORCYCLE REPAIR 
PEDAL 

The Adams quick action motorcycle re- 
pair pedal Illustrated herewith Is manu- 
factured by the Henry T. Adams Co., 684G 
South Park Ave., Chicago, 111. 

mmmmmnnnm 

Patent appU«l for 



This repair pedal la small and light so 
that It can easily be carried in the pocket 
or tool bag, yet It is ao constructed that 
the machine can be pedaled without wear- 
ing out the shoes, neither will the feet slip 
oO sideways. It Is flattened to take a 
wrench and plated to prevent It from rust- 
ing. The list price ot the pedal Is 35 cents. 

The N. S. U. Motor Company, 206 West 
T6th street. New Tork, has established 
agencies with the following: Gus Hablch, 
142 East Washington street, Indianapolis, 
Ind.; Louis Flescber, 1622 Capitol avenue, 
Omaha, Neb.; G. de Gruchy, 1243 North 
High street, Columbus, Ohio; Clarke Mo- 
torcycle ft Auto Repair Co., 1814 Chestnut 
street, St. Louie, Mo.; M. B. Glason. 107 
Post Office court, Minneapolis, Minn.; 
Merrldith ft Guthrie. 63 W. Third street. 
So., Salt Lake City, Utah. 



by throwing a cam lever, enabling the 
operator to snatch them out In no time 
at all. The machine is equipped with an 
automatic stand which takes care of Itself 
when the machine la pushed off and with 
a loud voiced alarm bell Tor the purpose 
of warning traffic. 

For several weeks past the man and the 
machine have been stationed at Chemical 
No. 5 house in Cleveland avenue, Buffalo, 
responding not only to alarms from the 
district covered by Chemical No. 6, hut 
to nearly all other alarms In the city. 

In the most of cases, irrespective of dis- 
tance, the machine has arrived before the 
department apparatus, and In several cases 
the motorcycle firemen killed the fire be- 
fore the regular department could get Into 
action. As a case In point, on April 2Sth 
there came an alarm from Bird avenue and 
Hoyt street in response to which the mo- 
torcycle traveled C5S0 feet, about a mile 
and a quarter, and the fire put out while 
the crew of Engine No. 19, which had to 
travel only ISDO feet, were coming up the 

In another case, the little two-wheeler 
ran 7400 feet and had first water on the 
fire, arriving about the same time aa Truck 
No. 4, which traveled 3000 feet. The dis- 
tances quoted are from the official city 

A recent decision of the Michigan Su- 
preme Court will necessitate motorcycle 
owners In the future to carry the same 
lamp equlnment as automobiles. They will 
be compelled to show two lights In front 
and the usual red llRht In the rear. They 
will also have to register and display Ihelr 
license number. In front and rear. 



192 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



Answers to Motor Cycle Questions 

(We d«atrt not oolf oar iMdtn to mate full om of thli depftitment. but anf oo* who dlaairwt wttb tb* oufnloiH 
lierelD ezpreued.) 



HOW OFTEN SHOULD MOTORCYCLE 
CYLINDERS BE CLEANED? 

Will you please answer the following 
in your next issue of the Journal: — 

How often do you consider the cylinders 
of a motorcycle engine should be burned 
out? What is the best way to burn them 
out — the best way to remove carbon from 
the cylinders? 

Would you recommend using lubricating 
oil in the gasoline for an air cooled motor? 

I am a constant reader of your Journal, 
and always look forward to the next is- 
sue. 

WEAVERVILLE. CAL. W. A. DAY. 

The cylinders of a motor cycle which is 
used daily should be cleaned at least once 
a week by using a half teaspoonful of 
kerosene in them in the morning before 
starting. If the kerosene stands a little 
while in the cylinders it will help to re- 
move the carbon and burned oil deposits. 
Run the motor after the kerosene has stood 
some time. When cylinders are very foul 
the best way to remove the dirt, for a large 
part of so called carbon is simply road dirt 
mixed with the residue of burnt oil, is to 
take down the engine and scrape the pis- 
ton head. The use of good carbon j*emov- 
ers, liquids, which are usually left in the 
cylinder over night, will probably post- 
pone the time of having to take down the 
motor for more thorough cleaning. 

Lubricating oil in the gasoline is only 
successful when the motor is of the two 
cycle crank case compression type. In a 
four-cycle motor this method is not advis- 
able. — Ed. 



MOTORCYCLE RECORDS AND DRY 
CELLS IN PARALLEL 

[383] Will you please answer through 
your columns the following questions: 

1. Are the following records of G. H. 
Curtiss of Hammondsport, N. Y. oflftcial? 

8 cylinder, "Freak," 1 mile, 26 2-5 sec- 
onds. 

2 cylinder, 16 cu. in., 1 mile, 46 2-5 sec- 
onds. 

1 cylinder, 30% cu. in., 1 mile, 56 1-5 sec- 
ends. 

These were supposed to be made at Or- 
mond Beach, Fla. 

2. Is Ormond Beach Track straight or 
circular? 

3. Which can make the best time on a 
circular track without danger of skidding 
into the fence, a motorcycle or an automo- 
bile? 

4. What is the advantage or disadvan- 
tage of connecting dry cells in parallel? 

FOSSTON. MINN. HBNKY A. BKR(J. 

I think the records claimed are not of- 
ficial but I believe they are correct. Re- 
cords do not interest me much. The Or- 
mond Beach is practically straight. It is 
not a track but is a stretch of natural 
beach on which the sand is very hard and 



able to support heavy rigs with practically 
no track. 

The motor cycle can be built to make 
the fastest time on a straight-away be- 
cause it has the least wind resistance but 
on a track the probabilities are in favor of 
the auto. The cycle loses its stability if 
it skids and this requires the rider to take 
less chance if he felt sure of not upset- 
ting 

Dry cells are not like a ton of coal. The 
faster they are used the less there proves 
to be in them. If you take out but a half 
unit at a time they wll last three times as 
long as if you take out a whole unit at a 
time. This may not be strictly the ratio 
but by light using they may give 50 per 
cent, to 80 per cent, more current. A coil 
must have a certain voltage and amper- 
age. More voltage burns the points. More 
amperage will not pass through without 
more voltage. So if two sets of proper 
voltage are connected in parallel each set 
will supply half the needed quantity of 
electricity and last 3 times as long as if 
one was supplying it all. Three and four 
sets are more favorable. The only dis- 
advantage are the large number of connec- 
tions to keep track of, the weight and cost 
of the cells and the danger of wiring them 
up wrong if careless. — C. E. D. 



COMMUNICATION, HOW TO INCREASE 
POWER OF MOTORCYCLE ENGINE 
I notice in your February issue question 
No. 236, page 270. by Geo. D. Tucker, ask- 
ing information about auxiliary parts he 
wished to place in an Indian motorcycle. 
The answer given by C. E. D. came a long 
way from being complete or comprehen- 
sive. Having made exhaustive experiments 
with high compression and auxiliary ex- 
hausts, will give the results for the benefit 
of your readers. 

My experience with the ordinary 3% to 
4 H. P. motorcycle is that the stock ma- 
chine with low compression will average 
about 35 miles per hour on a good dirt 
road. This can be increased to 55 or 60 
miles per hour by increasing the compres- 
sion to the maximum and plsicing auxiliary 
ports. This can be done by reducing the 
compression space to 25 per cent, of the 
piston displacement and regulating the lift 
of the intake valve to 3-16 in. The best 
way to do this in a motor with separate 
cyl. head is to cut off bottom of cylinder so 
piston protrudes through top end of cylin- 
der to middle of first ring. Then bore out 
your cylinder head 1-100 in. larger than 
cone of cylinder, a sufficient depth to al- 
low 3-32 in. clearance for piston on top 
centre. This change, *if motor is in good 
condition, will give about 15 per cent. in> 
crease in speed and power. Your motor 
will not heat and will be fully as flexible 
as before change. Do not use the auxiliary 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOHRNAL. 



Our GEARED 
TRANSMISSION 
Eliminates AH Trouble _ 

TO THE TRADE 

ON and AFTER MAY 
1st. 1909, MAIL ALL 
ORDERS and Corre- 
spondence to our General 
Office and SALES DE- 
PARTMENT. Address 

AURORA AUTOMATIC MACHINBIY CO. 

1307 MICHIGAN AVENUE s CHICAGO. ILL. 



IIH 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



exbaus: nithout flrat getting high compres- 
sion. For B. 3^x3?i alngle cylinder use 
12 3-lC Iioles (or your auxiliary exhaust. 
Centre the holes so your exhaust valve 
lifter will come up hard against end of ex- 
haust valve Btem when the piston has un- 
covered 1-lG In. of holes; In other words, 
give auxiliary exhaust holes 1-16 in. lead 
on your exhaust valve. Now you must 
have all lost motion taken up In your valve 
lifting cam and push rod, allowing only the 
necessary clearance for expansion before 
you lay out the holes. After the auxiliary 
exhaust is installed you add IE per cent, 
more to your speed and power, making a 
total of about 30 per cent., but you have 
more vibration. You will have to re- 
adjust the carburetor to compensate for 
the Induction eRect of air on the suction 
stroke. Do not pipe holes to muffler or 
you will lose fully half of the gain. At high 
speed this materially helps to fill the cylin- 
der, the Induction being air which can 
be made explosive by feeding a little richer 
mixture through the carburetor. When 
piped to muffler the Induction will be ex- 
haust gases which cannot be made explo- 
sive and are a detriment. You now have 
all that is possible to get out of a 4-cycle 
motor. You will lose about one-half of 
the oil out of your auxiliary holes and In 
consequence will use double the amount 
you did before: but there are some ad- 
vantages. 



MAKING A MOTORCYCLE MAGNETO 

[37G.] I am about to make a magneto 
lor my motorcycle and would like you to 
answer a few questions for me, being a 
subscriber. I have a one-cyltnder machine 
and have gears to ran the magneto at cam- 
shaft speed. This Is to be a hlgh-tenalOD 
magneto and I know it will be a Job to 
make. What size prImaiT wire, also sec- 
ondary wire, and how much of each shall 
I use? I expect to have a ehuttle-wound 
armature. Will 3G pieces of tin foil 2x3 
and Insulated from each other by wax pa- 
per, be suitable for condenser? How shall 
1 ronnect the tin-toll to the wlreT 



1 fear that answers as to size and 
amount of wire you need would lead you 
astray. The amount of space on the arma- 
ture must be considered, the speed of the 
magneto and similar features. And I am 
not a magneto builder. So my advice 
would be worth little. Primary wires are 
usually from 18 to 2i, while secondary is 
line aa may be had, 3G to 40. Tour condens- 
er plates sound small to me. The tin-foil 
should be narrower than the paper, but 
same length. The odd toils are allowed 
to project at one end and the even ones 
at the other. Pinch them together at these 
ends and solder the wires to ttiem. If 
they project one-half inch there will be 
a half lich of paper at the other, wtLich 
makes the Insulation.— 0. B. D. 



! 100 MILES l»«-"t»n 100 MINUTES ! 

THE INDIAN DID IT 

Most Decisively Convincing Demonstration 

oi Power, Speed, Reliability, Endurance, Quality ever given by 
any motorcycle in the world. 

Thi» Record— a W<^d't 
Record — vu made at 
Loe Angela, ^ril 16, 
when De Rosier rode 1 00 
milei in 97 minutes 59 
' Kcondt, including 3 ttopt, 

equivalent to nearly 4 
minutes. Indian Quality 
costs no 'more than die 
other kind Gct^CaLp. 

Hendee Mfg. Co. Sprlngfleld, Mass. 

Ctalcage BraMch. IWl HlcUawi Ave 



CTCLB AND AUTOHOBILiB TRADS; JOURNAL. ii 



I GREYHOUND I 




Don't Gmh WUdk Motorcycle to Bnyl 
hfffttigtic TlwrMgUr ud Find Oat 






CT..Hi—wilipMrt.W.T. 



CVCLB aNd automobile Trade journal. 



Merkel 
Wins 



Sati Francisco, CaL, 3-29-09. 
Merkel-Light Motor Co.. 

Pottstown, Pa.: 
Merkel Single won Annual Hill Climb Motor Club in 

one ttvelvt, one-fifth defeating and other twins. 

also established new record for course, making better time 

thanWhite. Stanley, Steams, Peerless. Stoddard Automobiles 

Oilier & Worthington. 



Ju$t Another Illustration of Merkel Power and Reliability 



Merkel-Light Motor Co., Pottstown, Penna. 

Pacific Coaat Distributers: 



CTCLB AND AtlTOMOBILB TRADE JOURNAL 

Corbin Hubs for 190fl 

coKBiN Dcrux Special corbin two-sfeii 

iRBr"4HL Models for 
mUASSSP «ltt>«r Chain 
^IW^V orBeltDrlTe 

COMUr Brake, Model 7 MOtOFCyCleS CeMter Brake. Model 10 

CORBH 

Catalogne oa oJ^^^^lkA Wladow Uipla; 
reqnest W Tfi^^ Mg Cardi on reqnea 

rtml B* Model It 



The Corbin Screw Corporatior 

New Britala, Com. 



CtCLB ANti AtjtOMOSlUl tlUSli lOXMltL, 



Standard D J 1 
Motorcycle I CQSllS 

A "wide trcAd" pedal combining freedom, utility 
and reliabili^ in the higheit deoree. 

The rubbers are tpecially Qeiigned with deep cor- 
rugationa, giving a finn foot-hold and absorbing vibra- 
tiou. The Tubben may be turned when worn, thereby presenting new surfaces for 
foot-hold. The bearings are both the tame size and are placed at Uie extreme end <^ 
the pedal, using large balls. The axle is made from } inch steel, hardened by special 
process. 

Standard Sager Toe Clips 

hold the foot securely, without undue pressure. When 
adjusted they become practically an integral part of 
the pedal, as they are securely attached to rubbers 
and hubs. Th^ are very strona and durable. 

Manufacturers should see that their motorcycles 
have this equipment. Prices quoted on application. 

The Standard Company 
Torrington, Conn. 



THIS IS THE SILENT M.M. 

If you would know the real joys of Motorcycling, ride an M. M. 

Not alone for the speed and its hill cllmblnft ability, but becaus« of its 
perfect silence without loss of power. 

Its reliable magneto Ignition, its efficient transmission. Its ease of con- 
trol and its superior rldlnft qualities. Ask any of the thousands of satlsfled 
M. M. riders. 

We'll let their experience decide. "Won't you }" 

Catalog and details for the asking. 



AMriai 



CM^iy 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILB TRADE JOURNAL. 



Newy but Thousands in Use Already 

The MESINGER Re-bound Check Spring 

is the most effective Shock Absorbing Device and can be attached in 
ten minutei to any car with a pressed steel frame without expense. 

Illustration shows how to at' 
2 tach clamp to the frame 
a orChassls 




H. & F. Mesinger Mfg. Co., 1801-3 First AvcDne, New York 



THE '09 YALE 

3'A H. P. 
MOTORCYCLE 
IS THE BEST 



S9M F. O. B. Toledo 



You need thia agency. You can make money selling the Yale 3)4 
H. P. motorcycle. 

It embodies all the deurable features of the highest priced machines 
and aella at a figure in reach of all. 

WRITE TODAY FOR FULL INFORMATION. YOU! 

The Consolidated Mfg. Co^ lo^L^ED'of ohTo 



8 CYCLB AND AUTOMOBILE TKADB JOURNAL. 

C IT MOTORaCLES lU C YT 
•i3m U« ARE BEST lll«i3« U» 



The World's Record 
1 vMe—W% seconds 

Could ;du poidblf find a better itl-around 
motaccrctethanllteN.S. U.f Weihouldtar nM. 



I— SPROCKETS — i 

for Biqrc U md M otorcycle 

wiMiiini nmni giiapiwt 

!■■ PAUSB « MNfiOAU CO. 




Stmu & Ci. 

M GIMMn «.. In TMI CItT. L I. 



Tried and Proven— 

The Eclipse Coaster Brake 

has for jears been first in power 
and efficiency. Tests have dem- 
I onstrated that It Is the only one 
suitable for high-powered mo- 
torcycles. For sale by all lead- 
ing dealers. 
ECLIPSE MACHINE COMPANY, ELMIRA. N. Y. 



GEER MOTORaCLES 




natesd. Rspunni) 
lor ur^hipg. Hot 
•oipsdeo. Seed for eaUJosuo. 



HARRY R. GEER CO. 
SS6 Ma^uw Aw. St. Lm 



NEW ERA AUTO-CYCLE 



7 DbIc Avcan*. • 



CrCLH AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 
KOrOK-CTOE 
* SEAICHUGHTS 




tr iiu umm^fm. 



THE 1»0» LINE OF 

R.eliance Motorcycles 

will conaiBt of five modela, three of the ringte cylinder typo , 
and two of the double cylinder type. Anyone who ia 
intereeted in the best motorcycle propoflition of the year 
will please write for literature. 

RELIANCE MOTOR CYCLE CO. 

OWEGO, N. Y. 




Winner of the Only Dia- 
mond Medal, 1908 

F. A. M. Endurance Run 

The 1909 
Harley - Davidson 

better than ever 
SEND FOR CATALOGUE 


F.A.BAKER&CU. 

MOTORCYCLE 
SUPPLIES 

n WancH SU New Yark 


Wha wodd tblak 
olbiUdiiv Bnolw 
Cosater B r ft k • I, 
LawnMowm, B«v- 
iil llMllin ud 
rti., eta., irilboiit 
uiii( Tha ITU ULl 
■ETIIIEII tl»n»I 
WHO, toll ul 
^^g^^^^TM mi uu mum n. 

fl^H^BPv>IS7?K'''^iaaai 


lUHR-MVIISW HOIWI COMPANY 

MILWAUKEE 


Motorcycle Accessories 

Bend tor UrgMt ud mort eompleta eaU- 

t. P. WJMiycr iMpiiy, h»w y** cm 



otoLl iHo AOtoUottuD nuna joukhil. 



Indianapolis Fire Department 
Uses Walker Auto Tire Bands 

How? 

canYOU=«ord 
to do without 
Walker Auto 
Tire Bands 

When 

they are good 
. enough for fire 

I service? 

' Must be 
USED to be 
Apprecia- 
ted 
On All FOUR WHEELS in th« Fire Service 

Descriptive circulan and price on application 

Walker Auto Tire Band Co., 18 S. East St., Indianapolis, Ind. 



GASOLENE STRENGTH 



Do you want stroog, powerful gaso- 
lene; the kind that will run your car aa 
far 88 you think it should ? Then you 
' must be sure that it has never been 
exposed to the air, for evaporation takes 
the life right out of gasolene. 

A BOWSER 
GASOLENE TANK 

c»t 41-T1.. 3.™u,j G^„ e™™«. *« built to hold gBSolene. Evaporation 

is an impossibility. In this way your 
gasolene b kept juat as strong and pure as the day it left the refinery. Let 
us send you our new catalog T. A postal will bring it. 



S. F. BOWSER & CO., Inc., 



FORT WAYNB, 
INDIANA 

aeSAtUnllcATC SOChnretaSt. ee-0BPraiBr Ave., 209-210 riMhtrBUg., S12Hiiinid8t., 
Boston, Hau. Ken Tork Cllj Toronto. Ont. Cbloco, m. Ban FnnelMO, €!al. 

1341 Arch St.. Phllkdelphia, Pa. 



CTCXB AND AUTOHOBILE: THADB JODRNAU 



ABOVE ALL 

a cylinder oil must glaze the 
piston and cylinder walls and 
maintain a slippery film to pre- 
vent wear and economize power. 



for cylinder lubricatioD accomplishes 
this without carbonizing where many 
over-filtered oils fail even when used 
extravagantly. 

The lubricatingstabilityof V«Tl1lsi." 
that is, its reaialance to instant and 
complete destruction in the jlash is 
evidenced by the better efficiency of the 
engine, increase in speed, cooler opera- 
tion, absence of knocking under hill 
stress and particularly in increased mite- 
age per gallon of gasoline 
Get a trial gallon from your dealer. 

All you need to know about a cylin- 
der oil is told in our booklet, "A Cylin- 
der Oil with a Pedigree." Procure this 
and sample of "■•Isllsl" by returning 
attached coupon. 

New York & New Jersey 
Lubricant G>mpany 

OMMTWS UD sou ntOMKSS Of WmUIDOft 

UNITED MANUFACTURERS 
N. Y. & N. J. Lubricant Depl. 

Broadway, at 76lh St., N. Y. 



N. Y. t N. ]. Likioit Ci., DfM D. 

165 Broadwar. New York City 
riHM HBd DM frc* MBpl* of Metonl 
htaMt, "A CtU^w Oil with ■ PwliarH." 



CTCUt AND AUTOHOBIUD TRADE JOURNAL. 



Compare the Princq>te of 

^ Thomas Shock Absorber 

with that of some of the so-called 
"standard" absorbers, which have 
working jointa, frictions, pistons, 
plungers or other parts to wear out, 
rattle or brsak. 

The Thomas Shock Absorber 

as shown in the illustration, consists 
of a spring of peculiar construction 
which entirely eliminates up-throw 
jolta, but DOES NOT RETARD THE 
DOWNWARD ACTION OF THE 
SPRINGS. The moment the aprings 
get ABOVE NORMAL the Thomas acts. 

FREE TRIAL. Send for information about our 30 days' trial oSer. 

BUFFALO SPECIALH COMPANY 

Dept. T, BUFFALO. N. Y. 



CYCLE AMD AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



Four Breech-Blocks can 
be opened, cleaned and 
closed in sixteen seconds 
by the watch. 

CoDtrast the ease and rapidity with which 

Breech -Blocks 



id adjusted, with the laborious process 
use other makes. This fact alone should 
the Breech-Block is the plug you want 
ing. 

other reasons why the Breech-BIock is 
use, which we would be pleased to give 



andard Company 

Tonington* Conn. 



Tourists' Oil and Gasoline Kit 

$4.00 Prepaid 



Dover Stamping i Mfg. Co. 

CAMBRIDGE, MASS. 



sr 




CTCLE AND AUTOUOBILE TRADB JOURNAL. 




THE FAI- CAR, $I650 

30 H P., water-cooled motor, 3-apeed selective sliding gear transmisaion, straight 
line drive, 34" wheels, Q D. clinclier tirea, high tension magneto, 2 gas and 3 oil lights, 
generator, speedometer, complete tool equipment. 

A car which eiemplifiea np'to-tbe-moment design and qnality. A cax which 
needs bnt a thorongh comparative examination to win the keenest appreciation. A car 
which was created to f al fill the ideals of service, attractiveness and price in one vehicle- 
Write for complete specificationa and data. 

DEALERS— If yon seek a car which will create a permanent accnmnlative bnsi- 
neas, the opportunity this car presents is worthy of yonr inquiry as to territory and 
conditions. 

FAL MOTOR COMPANY 

SKnss«slihllBIUIIMnMMIIIiCtt% DepLC.4,Cldeago,ia,U.S. A. 



NATIONAL MAGNETOS 

ARE BUILT FOR PRACTICAL USE 


No Gear* 

Run at cam 
■haft tpeed 

Ball ContacU 

Large bait 
bearing* 




Eanlir applied 
Wai adTanee 
and retard to 
an; degree 
increasea in 
power and 
.peed 


NAT 

Wriu for Catalog 


One-hulf actual »je-Weisht9i lbs. 

LOW TENSION-L 2 

PTlee,SSt.M 

nONAL COIL COMPi 

!i LANSI 


VNY 

NG, MICHIGAN 



OrCU AND AQTOMOBILB TBADB SOVSSAL. 



RE YOUR 

ITbrakes 
ineowith 



If not, why not t Impossi- 
ble to get a better braking 
effect by any other tnean% 
not ev«n by metal against 
metal surfaces. Raybestos 
cannot be burned out. Mud 
or dust, oil or water cannot 
injure it in any way. It is 
almost wear-proof; Raybes- 
tos brake linings will wear 
for thousands of miles on 
the heaviest cars. These 
statements are subject to 
proof. Let us tell you 
what Raybestos is — what 
it does. Our IxK^et is 
mighty interesting to those 
who bc^ to make their 
motoring perfectly safe. 

ROYAL EQUIPMENT CO. 

tSt IknsatMic Ave. 

iHDGmjRr - - am. 



Touring 
Abroad? 

Unless your car is "Bosch 
equipped" it is well to bear 
in mind that 

THE BOSCH 
MAGNETO 



h ALWAYS at Hand 

LONDON~23 Stora Street 

PAIU5~17 Rue Theophila Gautier 

STUTTGART— 1 1>13 HoppeolMiitruH 

BRUSSELS— 121 Rua de I'Initniclioii 

VIENNA— MittarbersiaHe II 

MILAN— Via S. Vittoni IS 

STOCKHOLM— Norra Builorset 20 

AMSTERDAM— Keiierigracht 181 

Tlie Most Popular Ignition System 
Used the World Ovrr 



BesGli Magneto Company 

223-225 Witt 46ltSlnit, - Kli Ywk 

ctlMi* Iruci, 1113 llctliu IniH 



CTCIB AND AUTOMOBILE TKADE JOURNAI^ 



IMPERIAL 

Brass Manufacturing Co. 
242 So. Jefferson St., Chicago, III. 
Air Pump. BRASS 

Oil Pumps .— .-.^.^.» 

W..a Pimp. WORK 

Priming Cupi T'O 

Gasoline Cocki * ^ 

Robe R»k ORDER 



■# 



SUIT FOR INFRINGEMENT 



against manufacturers of pipe couplings. 

which infringe the 
Imperial Compression G)Upling 

PATENTED DECEMBER 6. 1908 

will be instituted and all persons are 
warned against making, using or selling 
such infringing couplings. 






CYCLE AND AUTOMODILB TRADE JOURNAL. 



The Perfect Electric Stanhope 

Perfect in every department — as cozy and luxurious as any woman 
would have it — as able and efficient as any man would demand it to be. 

Nothing is skimped in this car. 

It is by far the handsomest stanhope on the market to-day. 

Write for our catalogue describing mechanical features that will at once 
convince you that it's thesoundest andstrongestcarof itskind in America. 
Aftt in mli priuripal cMit 

The Rauch & Lang Carriage Company 
Dept D. 2180 W. 25th St. CleTeland, O. 

Fifty-fivt fton' txp*rimie* imiUini fimt cmrriatn 



NEXT YEAR WILL BEAIWO-CYCLE YEAR 

XITHE WILLET TWO- 
CYCLE ENGINE is the ideal 
one of this type. For seven 
years we have been working on 
it, and now offer the perfected 
product to automobile manu- 
facturen. Itiatwo-cycle, water- 
cooled, fitted with our patented 
Rotary valve which makes it 
silent, powerful, flexible, and 
simple. The valve is ca^t iron, 
driven by miter gears enclosed 
ill housing packed in grease. It 
is self-grinding, adjusting and 
needs no attention, and allows a 
full and positive charge to enter 
the enpne regardless of speed 
or condition. Everything about 
the WILLET is of the finest 
and the workmanship is unaur- 

MADE IN SIZES FROM 8 TO 70 H. P. 

Willet Engine & Carburetor Co., 



CTCLB AND AITTOMOBILE THADB JOUaNAU 



mwm. 

POST CARDS 

IN lUniRAl EOIOIK 



JIT Made to order to 
-^ suit your require- 
ments, make good ad- 
vertisements, at reason- 
able prices. Send us 
pieces of your printed 
matter, and we will 
send samples of cards 
and prices. 



Chiltonn Printing Co. 

Matliet & 49tli Streets 
PHIIADEIPHJA 



Guaranteed not to be 
taken from your cylin- 
der for the entire year 



Send for Catalog 0/ IGNITION GOODS 

The National Steel ProdncU Co. 
500 Superior BIdg, CleTcland, O. 



CVCLfl AMD AttTOltOSlLB TKADO JODAKAL. 



MODEL "O" Raceabout :: Price, $2950.00 

KNOX STOCK CARS 

again 

Prove Superior Construction 

At Jamaica, L. I^ Speed Trials, April 37, 1W». Wlnntag Foar Firsts 

Pint and Mcond boat tjnw Tor American can in two-mile free-tai^all. 
First in one-mile stook ohaiaia, t jm*, .41 3-0 or 87 milea per hour. 

A RECORD FOB AMEBICAN CARS 

FInt in two-mlLe ttork ehwida: time, l.M 2-S, (3000 aad over elan. 

Pint in two-mile 12000 to 13000 Dlaa; time. 1 .M. 

FaatcM time in ooe-mila ttack oar, (2000 to (3000 elan, JW 2-9. 

nurd and rourth place in two-mile [ree-lor-alj, 1.32 and 1.3G. 

Third place in one-mile rree-foi^all. A2 3-S. 

Knox ears were of itrictly etook oonstructioa and were beaten In the free-tor-alb only by the 120 

Knox Automobile Company, Springfield, Mass. 



CTCUI AND ACrr01I0BII.B TRADE JOURNAL.. 



Send for Cattloft 14H 




ASTHESUNISTOTHEEARTM 



liiimuyjiimiiiiii 



CoU'and Tlmv to a motor car. 

IT GIVES UFE 

N.B.— And nofMdy likes a dead one. 



For lull iDformation addrai 



MANUFAaURERS,lnc. 



Connecticut Ignition Departmoit New Totk : Broadway at 76A St 

Bnmdi—- ■B«toa, 1M IfMMohuMtti Ava. Ckvi 
Chiewi. 1481 lllbhi«»n Av«. PhiUdeloha. 422 



KEUOGG 

MiiifMlvii^ 

(mm 

Wr«y Pump A 
Register Co. 
Netkuial PreMure Regnter Dw^Mtir V V 




PRSSMC Rq^istffs 

Kellogg Qiuck Detachable En- r IQAA 

gine Dmen Power Pump IN \mJ 



KeDogg 4 Pivp 



CTCUD AND AUTOUOBILB TRADE JOUBNAL. 

"THE BEST IS NONE TOO GOOD' 

USE A SPICER 

Notice our companioD flanges; they materiaUy reduce 
the cost of aasembling. All bearing surfaces 
case-hardened and accurately 
ground. 

Oa-Tight and Duit-Proof 

■^ointa, will run 3000 to 6000 miles with one 
Tubrication. Best Possible Material Used. Right 
Prices sell our goods. Let us figure with you on your 
1910 equipment. 

SPICER UNIVERSAL JOINT MFG. CO. 

15 MADISON AVENUE PLAINFIELD. N. J. 

FMtory S>Ua lUprMWitmtiTM: ThM. J. WMmL 29 W. 42Bd StrMt Naw York 
K. FrMkliB PtttartM L. D. Boltw 

IM Uk* StrMt, CUcM« 319 HammcMtd BUc, Detroit 



THE McCUE CHASSIS 



CHASSIS:— Furnlihed in any ataie of compledon. 

AXLES i — I Beam Front Aziea, asaembled complete, or foFftinfts onlj'. 

AXLES t — Floating Rear Ailes, the housing of which Is made of sheet 

steel, welded laterally. 
CLUTCHES ^-Transmissions, Frames, Foot Pedals, Brake Rods, Equalizer 

Bars, etc., etc. 

Write for Catalog 

The McCue Company : Hartford, Conn. 



CTCLB AND AUTOHOBILB TRADB JOURNAIi. 



C™" $3S0 

Your 
Saving., B»y» 

You This 

Can $600 

Own 
Thi.Car Tijg j^^ pi^ Car ^" 

My novel selling plan brings this car within reach of all. 
It makes it easy for you. It is practicaL It is liberal. 
What is this Plan ? Book G fully explains. 

C. H. Metz, Waltham, Massachusetts 



CTCIJi AND AUTOMOBILE TRADB JOURNAL. 216 






Gas and Gasolene 

ENGINE 
VALVES 



We ue ipeeUdidng in the Voiglag of High Hlokd Alloy for 
thla purpose. 

We ue Bnoeeediag— P r c w n t oiden prove Material Bight — 
Workomnflhlp Bight— Prioa Bight 

Aflk for Uflt and prion of oyer one hundred Btook die slzeo. 

We also make Drop Etorglngvi generally. 

Crescent Forgings Company 

OAKMONT, PENNA. 



OUR 

SPECIALTY 

IS 



^c*^*"" 



Have you ever given our method consideration ? Q Don't let 
yourself become discouraged about ELECTRIC WELDING 
because you may have had some unfortunate experiences with 
parties not capable of appl3ang the process, but GIVE US A 
CHANCE to show you what can really be accomplished by the 
art of electric welding in the hands of the masters of the process. 

fFriu f9rB$okki**C**iUustratini a number qf interestinz okjects electrically welded. 



THE STANDARD WELDING CO. 

CLEVELAND 



CTCLH AND ADTOHOBILB TRADB JOUBNAL. 





"Not only the best at the price; 






But the best 


at any price." 




MoJtl L, 20 H. 


^ Runabout, #1500 


M^el 6-30, Light Speed Car, 


$2500 


" L, io " 


Toy Tonneau. 160O 


' 4-40, Roadtter, 


3000 


" K,3<. " 


" " 2000 


" M. Touring Car, 


3500 


" K.30 " 


Touring Car, aooo 


" M. Toy Tonneau 


3500 


Once 


"PULLMAN" 


always "PULLNIAN' 




YORK MOTOR CAR CO, Inc, York, Pa. 



LET YOUR CAR DO THE WORK 



WITH 



The RUNG 

AUTOMATIC 

TIRE PUMP 



You can inflate your automobile tire in less than two miautea, through 
the car's own power. Can be operated at any speed. Isn't this an improve- 
ment over the use of ft hand pump 7 

OUR GUARANTY 

If the pump doea not do all that we clum for it, return it within thirty 
days and your money will be refunded. Write for illustrated booklet. 

THE RUNG AUTOMATIC TIRE PUMP CO. 
200 Glrard Trnst Bldg, Pblladelphla, Pa. 

SUNNER ft SUNNER CO.. CUcago, WmIcib MaMfeaton 



CTGLB AND AUTOHONlil TRADE JOURNAU 



$2500 

You Know AutomobileS" 

Rtad These Glide 

Sp^:ificaHons 



rHE audi U the am <*r pofwt ta rti 

taA In Ktlcw Uiu lu* no' been oBssd to tlie pub- ua not two jdnHor tbrM IMiiti, 

Uc M k comet oAtt. caoMruclkiiii. Tlmken OoUa 

Huif T«*» Dt wuaiuiUI* bulMIni u« buk of trwtrt con dI Uw bnt AUof M««L 
IMS rcui Of mwal npoUiK* Uwt bsTs uMtd lo Iba Mi IMn. tin* th mtaaH- 

vlti ud popidulu of qCidb can. ptobar, Srn an nil lUM, oi 

rnal a.-p. bouk. Ttaa cniik *■(( luu B bauUwi,— u 



M I it-in. nn« ui ■■«>■■• — wneai oaaa no n. ita- 
■Mmbar, una an an aUka, oat t4 i 4-1b. In iroBt and 
mT M^n. 1b Iba ifi, Itaa oMlMlna 111* rMJculoui dm«*- 

_.._-^,^ _^ ___ "%M8!nij*uiaiaaTi«SK»«. 

aatoowtkallT — t-m-i-j tSiKOMrlml ot w ^ tba TtaaoUDB can anaoU nnce daalm bgi Uwm. 
mnkcaMaialKia _ Bnrn kaowltatCHUacanMnjWaiidfilOOanlMttw 

Aa iBPCsaad tarn tt ttk n Ven trpa ot tmwBlalva, tan Utti Uiaf can fat (cr tk* nma dmbw asrolur* aln. 

ntWM. bnt alnliBoaia at QUda H ■ 



sa_„ 

l^tif 

d ton c( talictl 




The Bartholomew Co., s tawdard mfK3.. a. m. c mTa., 210 Glide St., Peoria, III. 



THIS SHIELD WILL 
COST YOU ' 

$20:00 I 

' Made in a most aubstaotial ■ 

. manner. ' 

I Mahogany filler; heavy plate . 

glass. I 

I AH brass bound and all 

brass fittings. | 

I A shield that would have cost double this amount if bought a 

year ago. | 

I Two sizes : Ruuabout and Touring Gar. Both same price. 

iBALL-FINTZE COMPANY' 

, 10^ Caul St., NEWARK, 0. 301-310 W. 3nl St., aNGNNAn, 0. ' 



18 OTCU AND AUTOHOBILB TKADB JODBMAU 

BROWN-LIPE GEARS 

Transmission— Differential — Steering 



(T 



Tlmkao roller bsu inii u« used u oiir nculkr Moipinant fat tnntiniauitiu. 

Direct Ftetmf SalniieD:— K FrmakUoFeUnDn, IfM Lake St., Chiaca; Thonui J. WMmI 39 W. 

S^"Aj^U.CuTyini3bHk:— Ohu.S.UiIlw,<ITRewUSt..N*« York; 3I&^S> N. BroM) Sv.PhiU- 
cMpbia: 203-4 Qolumbiu Ave., Boitoa; WQ Brie St., dereluid. Ohio. 
Eastern Belsi Aseota:— Port A L«M*r Co.. Harttord. Coan. 

Brown-Lipe Gear Co^ 206 S. Geddes St, Syncoie, N. T. 




SOfCnvqiYPE JUITOMOBILE TRANSMISSIOII 6URS. 

UedelDbothvertiee 

Tba nin fti* made ■ 

Fitted with an Bulomatia — .. 

Gtled with recialeriu pawls lo ■ 

dianieable. Wa maka many other diffarent typaatr .. 

tyiM onlf. Write us for prices and detailed iDformatioa. 

AMERICAN DIE AND TOOL CO.. IUbcUbk. P*., U. S. A. 



CrCLB AND AUTOHOBILB TRADE JOURNALi. 





If btereated in the 




mcMt powerful line 




of motors ever pro- 




duced, considering 




weight where bear- 




ing surface and 




strength have not 




been sacrificed. 




write for circulars 




givmg hill description. 




IDouble opposed moton built in 




two size^ 5 X 5-18 H. P. and 




5 X 7-24 H. P. Four cylinder 




moton in three sizes, 4 x 5-30 




H. P.. 4i X 5i-40 H. P. and 




5 X 5i-50 H. P. 


MODEL GAS ENGINE WORKS 




PERU. INDIANA, Uck Box 2033 




BABTBBH AMD FOBBIOM OFFICE : 






SCHLOSSER MFG. CO. MOTORS 


OTt 


:for 


p 


OCUE 


Pt 


K 




ibUJat 


1d<U< 


tor.UB- 


inAv 


T Bit 


SpT 


h P«r- 




rkmu- 




FInbh 




Office & Factory: 


151 E. 126th St., New York | 



120 CTCLB AND AUTOHOBILB TRADB JOURNAL. 




Low Price & High Quality 



THE FIRST 4-cylindercaron 
the market al $1230. THE 
FIE^T to demonstrate to the 
American public the reliability 
and durability in the mid-winter 
runs and hill climbs that this 
wonderful car has entered into. 



Live Dealers Notice 

We tiave a little uiuaalftned ter- 
ritory. If you are looklmtt for a 
line that will sell on siftht, write 
ua today for our agency propoal- 
tlon. 



THE CAR THAT HAS HADE GOOD. 
EVERY PART OF REGAL CARS ma- 
chined and aaaembled in our own ahopa. 

Do you want illuttrat«d booklet on lAa 
famou* run of tha R«gal "30" Snow BaU 
LdmiUdt If M terid tu pottal today for ont; 
aUo catalog wpteifieoHont. 

and 



Engina — ^ylindan. 4-e]nila. Vartiial type. 
CrBnkshkft— OiiKle piesa [orciDi, «MdBllr 

hsftt-trMMd, 1u«a Imhjdp wlch OVwIimI, 
_ flange loned inMcnl na cnukiha/t. 
Tnuieaiagion— Seleotive type elldina smt. The 

entintrui*miniODiiopentadanbKnbeuiD(L 
Bpeeds — miree forward ukd one raverM, direct 

OD hi^ ipeMl, 
Shaft Drive. 
Steerinc Gear — Irrevarable. Worm aod Seolor 

Wb'eel Base— lOfi Inohw. 

LubrioatioQ — CLnmlalini and Bplaeh Byatem. 

IsnitioD— Dual Bvatam. eonsuliag of Ramy 
UiBb-TaDsioQ Uagneto with diitrlbutor ttA 
single non-vibratins oDil an daah, alas aet o[ 
batteriea with double-throw iwitsb on soil. 

Regal Motor Car Co. 

Hastingi St, Detrmt, Mich. 




Jaker ei^ctCTcL 

e Aristocrats of MotordonTT ; 



/■VIE "BAKER" name is a big 
X asset to the dealer, for it is 
identified with all that is best 
in electric automobile construction 
— a foot that is of great material 
help in selling. 

Baker Electric Vehidet are made 
in the great Baker Victory — the larg- 
est of its kind in the world — where 
quality, durability and efficiency are 
built into each Baker. 

A Few Baker Features Are 

Vnmviatmii wcmnmmy t» tht a** •/ 

Mlo<*TlK Cof-rani. 
Batttrtu* In tmrtm* at alt apsaifa. 
Lonamttlifmmfthmhatfrt. 
Quia* e«(tt«r*cA«lii drlsa. 
Parfaet alltmnmit (uncteraMcaMdltfaiu. 
I^iBWMt tranamltttoH («M. 
Xjcld* *atl«Pl«a Mtan^atd m^utpmaat. 

These and many other points of su- 
periority make the Baker the stan- 
dard of electric vehicles. 

We Want ReluUe and 
Progressire Agencies 



the many popular Baker Models : 



Baker Motor Vehicle Company 

35 W. 80th StTMl, ClevBland, Obio. 
New York SaleuKiiii. ITSS Brsadvar. 
Oiicaae SaJe T ooea. 



CTCLB AND AUTOHOBmHI TRADB JOURNAL^ 

AUTOMOBILE MOUNTINGSf '"" 



( 



Nowhere else can 
rou Aet our quaU 
Ity at our prices. 
\ii Inspoctlon will 
prove this. 

FOLLOWING ARE 
SOME OF THE ARTI- 
CLES WE MANU- 
FACTURE: 



BIDS DOOR HANDLES 
DASH HOLDINOS 
RUKNIHQ BOARD UOLDtNOB 
CABFBT BINDING 
BOW SBPARAT0B8 
BOW RESTS 
HOOD HDiaSS 
DECK RAILS 
CONTINDOnS HINQEB 
SIDE DOOR LOCKS 
ADTOUATIC HOOK LOCKS 



MALLEABLE COACH HINGES 

BRASS COAOH BINOES 

LAUF BRACKETS 

COAT OR ROBE RAILS 

FOOT RESTS (Faldliic) 

HOOD HANDI^ 

CCRTAIN FASTBHERB 

FOOTHAN LOOPS 

TtRB HOLDERS 

STRAP LOOPS 

BODY OR GRAB HANDLES 



FINIBHINO BOLTS 



MAY WE QUOTE YOU ON YOUR 1910 SUPPLY ? 



JOS. N. SMITH & CO. 



Detroit, Mich. 



"EVER READf SPEEDOMETERS 

Best for Car Owner and Best for the Dealer to Sell 



■ stnog to It. 



Auto Improvement Co. 

316 Hudson St, New York 
755 Fobom St, San Francisco 



TOUROMETER, S3S 

Trip and Season Odometer 

An 81-MlIe Tourometer 

At tM.OO 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



THE 20TH CENTURT AUTO POLISH 

OotaUBM ud OntlmcU TImbi AI 

Tha Onlv PnotiBal Mid EooihmiiIkI fotdi Uwla tor 
Oangi Un. b B ud 10 Qtllon Ouv-Ddm NM BMtk* 

A THICK CXL CItEAH P(»JSH 

Aik Yaw D«br w Write (br Supb 

INTERNATIONAL METAL POLISH CO. 

XI42 Capital An. Nortk ~ ~ - - - 



WE MAKE THE SMARTEST 

Up-to-Date Igpition Coils 

DialribntoT CoiU, Box CoiU and Foot Switch 
Coila for Dual Isnttion 

Mnltiplo UuH Tr^mbUr Coil*, aUo 
Martar Vibrator Coib 



Varioj, Brigham and Lawlon 

Buck Proof Coil Patonl* 

Safotf Spark Gap oB oTorjUoit 

Ffictiaa AdjuOinc 5ct«w (No Jam Nut) 

Oar Mnltiplo Unit Coila arc walorproof and 

contain no oxtomal '"■"'■"t pott* 

Oar Dash Coila are tb* amalloat made and 

«Bcb nnit ba* tb* fall amoont of 

Primary and Socondarj Winding 

THE AUTOCOIL COMPANY 



CTCLS AND AITTOHOBILB TRADE JOURNAL. 



WEBSTER 
GASOUNE GAUGE 



Abolitho the "thin ttick." 

Avoids danger o{ ei^loaon, 

AaiiiTet clean fud. 

Showi tank contenti at a glance. 

Attached without loldei. 

Price, $4^ 

Booklet "T" for detaUs 



"JERICHO" 

THqHOBN 




The Exhaust Blows It 

Attachei to muffler. 

Will not clog. 

Simple — Practical. 

Clean the way. 

$6, $8, $9, $10, according to engine 

uted. 

Booklet "J" tells 



The Randall-Faichney Company 
Sole Manufacturers - - Boston, U. S. A. 



24 CTCLB AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 

Every Element of Strength, Durability, Lightness 
and Smoothness in Our 

Aluminum Castings 

The manufacturer who needs castings should Insist upon 
clean, strong, durable, light productions. 

Each business must have castings adapted to some special 
requirement. Our experience and equipment are combined to 
produce exactly what you need. 

AlUHinUH for lightness and durability. 

BIA5GANESE BRONZE for unusual strength. 

"A" HETAL for Engine, Dynamo, and Motor Bearings. 

Almnmom Gutmgs Manganese Bronze 
Bran Castings Onr "A" Metal 

M. L. Oberdorfer Brass Co., ^^eV'^?^!! 

S; ASMtBarmtlK^ 

Twiniilffigtfanfye n 



The lucceMfu] quan- 
tity production of 
prcBtcd tteel automo- 
bile framet depend ■ 
primarily upon ade- 
quate picas equipment. 
Our splendid Ijic o 
side bar pretsea hat : 
dftdlT of over IM,- Q 
000 ptira of ban per 
annum. Tm want the 
ben ponible Krvice — 
wa are equipped to give 
it you. Let ui quote 
on youi 1910 I 



O 

D 



O. SMITH CO., MILWAUKEE, '"^ Jff 



CTCLB AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



TIRE CHAINS 

BETTER 
TRACTION 
LONGER 
SERVICE 
POSITIVE 
SAFETY 



HARDENED 
CONTINUOUS 

ZIG ZAG 
ntEAD CHAIN 

A ChaiB Tbrnt U 

RIGHT 

At a Pric* That ia 

RIGHT 



28x3 


t 6.50 




6.fi0 


30x3 


7.00 


30x3} 


7.00 


30x4 


8.50 


30x41 


8.60 


31 X 4 




32x3 


8.00 


32x3} 


8.S0 


32x4 


9.00 


32x4} 


0.00 


33x4 




34x3} 


9.60 




9.76 


34x4} 


10.00 




10.60 


36x3} 


10.00 


36x4 


10.00 


36x4} 


10.S0 


36x6 


11.00 



Motor 
Appliances 
Company 

t43llidi|H *K. 
CIICA60, lUHOK 



BRAKE 




ed Wi 
ned 

nton, N 






a . 


O^ P 


"O u. 


<o£ S 


C8 B5 


h-o u] 


n u oQ 


a M 




%0 T, 


cggO 


^SS z 


^SS 


^^ — ^gj- 


;2 It 


LINING 



CTOLS AND AUTOHOBILD TKADB JOURNALu 



AUTOMOBILISTS: 

We have the Larged Antcn«>l»le AcceaxHry E<tab- 
lishment in this secti<Ri, and a trial ordex will convince 
you that OUT rqiutation for satisfactory dealings and 
prompt d^vcries is justified. 

Kindly send ua your name and addreat so we can 
place you on our new mailing list. 

Our New Catalog Almost Ready 
TheAutolight & Motor Supply Co., ik- 

506-8 N. Broad Street - PhUadelpbia 



BLOOD BROS. UNIVERSAL JOINTS 




STYLE A — Our weU-known ^ke and centeM>lo«k pttttMO, 
uotod for ita great atrrngth and durable qualitiea. Ifade b tU 
naea up to 3 indies. 



Blood Bros. Machine Co. 

Kalamazoo, Mich. 



CTCLB AND AUTOHOBIUB TRADE JOURNAL. 




!8 CTCU! AND AUTOHOBtLB TRADB JOURNAU 

Protecting Your Car 



The Bongartz "AUTO-LOCK" prevents 
unauthorized use of automobiles. 

No more joy-rlding ; no more automo- 
biles stolen. 

The "AUTO-LOCK" Is a necessity for 
every automobile owner who cares 
anything about his machine. 

Would you like to have full informa- 
tion ? Write us — write to-day for full 
paztlculan. 

Pat. applied for 

THE BONGARTZ COMPANY 

Thoroughfare Building, Broadway & S7th Sl, New York Gty 

Fm- •>!• hj ALL firal dua DMtkn b Ante S«ppUm 








ViJT» i. H..d 








Price, $2,500 








DORRIS 


MOTOR 


CAR CO. :: :: 


ST. 


LOUIS, 


MO. 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



G/i^^Mfi^ 




Costly 
Construction 

The imptovements on 
the National fiom year to 
year constitute a very good 
history of motor car de- 
velopment. It has gener- 
ally been somewhat in ad- 
vance, but its departures 
have always soon become 
standard practice with the 
best manufacturers. 

In the introduction of 
the all-ball-bearing motor, 
however, only a few of the 
highest priced cars — alt 
costing much more than 
the National — have fol- 
lowed it. It is expensive 
construction, but no ex- 
pense is spared at any 
point to make the National 
the best. 



F»ur Midels—Fauri and Sixej 

■■fiom $2,750 U $5,000. 



National Motor Vehicle Co. 

m3 bst im St, i 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 

SPARK PLUGS 

ar« a most Important aecesslty In your motor. Then why not buy 
a plug that has a reputation and Is as simple as the RELIANCE t 
Especially good features are found In RELIANCE PLUGS that 
make these differ from the ordinary. "THEY SPARK IN WATER." 

SPARK PLUGS 

NOTICE 

We will protect all users of and dealers In any of the plugs we manu- 
facture against any litigation regarding the Muellerft Canfleld patents. 

JEFFERY DEWm CO., 216 High St., Newark, N. i. 

S. « F. Stoph««». Ar«li tor UBitod UmJob. It Cuww PL. LiTHpool. Eu. 
Armud Tny A Ca, AsaBb far CsbUbhUI Eovoa, BhUb. Gamanr. 



EDISON DOUBLE SYSTEM SPARK PLUG 

designed for those desiring a dual system of Ignition, but have 
only provision for one plug in each cylinder of their motor. 

MANUFACTURED AND SOLD BY JEFFERY DEWITT CO. 



CTCLB AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 2^ 

G)mpiete Qiassis for die Buggy Trade 



^ A splendid opportunity fof the Carriage Manufacturer to get into 
the Automobile Business without great investment. All that you 
have to do is furnish the body and trimmings, we do the rest. No 
experimenting. A perfect automobile, built on standard lines. Full 
particulars on application. 

Speed Changing Pulley Company, Anderson, Ind. 



The Only Inner 

Tube GUARANTEED 



Against 



-Expense. 



Repaii 



With «vsi7 —la ofm 
PENNSYLVANIA INNER TUBE 
to bv utedtn 
PENNSYLVANIA CASINGS 
trill go a gtimrmataa for tbo purchtaor 
agaiaat mil nzpenas for ita repair dar- 
ing tho oatirB jot- of 1909 un/aaa tha 
dmmago romalta from driving an deHa- 
todtinn. 

The adrantafte to the dealer, In the 
hacked by this guarantee, deacrres 
propoaldon in the tire marlcet. 



To tlve tills unprecedented motcMinft econ- 
omy the tiroadest possible convenience for 
motorists, all punctures, cuts, etc., within 
the terms of this contract will Immediately 
be patched, free of charge, at the nearest of 
our agencies tliroughout the country, and 
prompt return of tubes inade. List of 
these agencies on request, 
sale of our goods, aflorded by their quality, 
more fsTorable consideration than any other 



Pennsylvania Rubber Co., 



JEANNETTE, 
PA. 



GUrduJi 21434^ E..t NIalk StTHl 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



The Speedwell Finds Favor Bccanse It's ■ Qnalitr car 

' ' WiD B* Kapl Up Lb» MuntHuuea 



iri—lli. • qolilT 



THE SPEEDWELL MOTOR CAR COMPANY, DAYTON, OHIO 

Www Tiirt IMm, *m Mimtwn. •! WUi IL i PUUtKuik, BpHdwall >iik>c Car Co., UM Onbr In-: PUIad^plili. Slu'iiri liAu 
IIU ■iiklBO IH.. U ]<Ui ■>. ^ Dnnc. H^ o. Dilebil. SHOHInl RUIdimI iuliCotondfi fprlim. 1I*>I»ld'« d^: luiu C»I. 
IMdidiiIiIIi Unri On . 111! Binalmr^ Su rnuliB. Bn>d>all lliiUc Cu Co. of tUironli, tl< OoldH OaU In , Bonsa. 



THE B. & S. IGNITER 



Would you like to equip your 1910 cars with 
the most efficient, compact, simple and trouble- 
proof ignition system ever devised? 

The B. & S. Igniter has many absolutely new 
and exclusive features, and manufacturers should 
investigate it thoroughly before closing con- 
tracts for 1910 ignition equipment. 



BRIGGS & STRATTON COMPANY 

MILWAUKEE 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILR TRADE JOURNAL. 



WE ARE THE MAKERS CH' THE 
REUABLE NATIONAL BOX COIL 



. NATIONAL COIL CO^ h,m,mM LuHiiig, Mieh^ U. S. A. 



CTCLB AND AUTOUOBlLB TRADS JOURNAL. 



Crankshaft Insurance 




You can Insure your product, as well as the life and limbs 
of your customers, by getting your crankshafts from a responsi- 
ble manufacturer. We have been specializing on this particular 
part for many years, and are prepared to offer you crankshafts 
that, — so far as human Ingenuity and skill can devise, — will 
stand up under the repeated stresses and strains to which this 
part of the car is subjected. 

Just send us your blue prints and state quantity desired. We 
will be pleased to quote you on any number. 

Standard Connecting Rod Co.^ BeaTer Fallsy Pa. 



lO MORE FINES 

For Driving without your Tail Lamp Lit 



m 

^s?*^ 

^ 



■ gnal d«l ot tttmble. mi 
lltiutraud herewith, ta our 
wlBd proof, win not iar oul 
under any ind ill conditloD 




Dcc and eKpcBie. The VUlUnt, 
popular tail lamp, II la abaolutelT 
can be relied upon to atar allsbt 
Hide Iha led llabt for nar •lonal. 
It aina a powerful white 
llEht. and the rlsld handle 
make! It very hand; and 
convenleot for Inapecllns 






krin . 



•AFETV «R«CKET 



It U filled 
with our new Safelr Lock- 
Idk Handle, which doei 



lamp or baTlns It itolet 
Write f^ ow MW u 
loss*, it win IMatMl r 
KUnmDtwt-'D.- 



C. T. Ham Manufacturing Co. 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBIUB TRADE JOURNAU 



High Grade Beaver Motors 


Work Like Beaven— Silent, Sure, Satisfactory 


eC,li,id.rV.r. 


Tko 4 CrUodar 


U^l 4) I 4) 




4CTlind*rVaF- 


poMd Motor it 


2Crluid« Hm- 


UUy for Com- 


ixMUl OppOf 


mmwxAmi Trucki. 


-d. 41 . 4 Vod 




41>4«5i>4) 




4 Crlindar Hor- 


P 


izfaiU] OppcM- 


«1.5i«4i 




C«ntn 


WriU 


Crank 




Oilin, 


for 


D.Tic« 




All Mot- 


FREE 


ors oro 




Poor 


Bookkt 


CjeU 




Beaver Mfg. Co., 


783 Chase St., MywankecWu. 


(nunut-iTOWEiia)..owiinv 








1909 TMNSMISSIONS AND PARTS 


"•MM.ma'nvm ■i.ii>isa"-M •■ 


<IMH. p. 




For lunken RoDer Beazingi and 




Annular Ball Bearings 




Qmk m inula from special Sear forgiii«., 




nUt "MlMiiv</' eootnd Irrua. WebuUdboth 




nwud bev0l typM of diB«M>tUIi. OUR 
8TEBUN6 «EiUU ant buUt to "■tud up" 








WARNER GEAR CO. x « HUNCIE. IND. 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



roster onocK ADSoroer, 



CLEVELAND. 0. 



THE NEW 

UNTERBERG & HELMLE 
MAGNETOS 

■„^,. .....„, TYPES LD and CD 

contain certain special features making them particularly 
desirable where a battery is desired for starting purposes. 

The bitlcry (Iracr 1* lucorporalcd In Uicmasnetod Ibe end of Ihe djntribu tor shaft. The uiii« 

men) of the spark lever sdvuiices botb (be intemipler Bnil tbc (Imer. Tbe diatiibulor Is so con- 

■tructed aa toe«CBpe the burnlns uiuBlIr caiued by hikh tCDtion ipirks when the motor iiBlarted on 
the switch. 

The lnlemipter Is of ■ new U ft H dnlKD, comblnlns »tivDi« simplldly with IndeBnitely loos life- 
It Is Bkaolntclr tf cv*ld of adl— l»«l. aad Meeds only la be let aloBC Wr comider it otic 
of the moat notable of recent macneto I m Drove men ts. 

TYPE LD, tor lane niotqn ; price, com olete with batten coll and high lensloD switch, 4 cyl..tl»; 
6 cil.. $175. 

TVrECD, for small motors^ price, complete a* above. 4 cyl., II 2S ; 6cyl.. tlSO. 

We mil order the D & H Trpes LB and CB. which are similar to LD aud CDbut without batterrani. 
lliarr, and Ihe well-known Type LB— Ihe Selt'SlartlnE Uainelo for large motors. 



JJIDRETZ COWANY 

JhU Imporiuv - TIMW DUILWNO. NEW YORK 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 





Investigate the Merits 


The Stein PneumaOc Auto Tire! 


IT WILL BE WORTH YOUR WHILE ! 

step in Improved construction, over tires made 

merits without the faults of the Popular Price 
Tires. In addition to exclusive features of 
Its own. 

A Few of the Good Points 

q Requires no luts or stay bolts. No pinching 
or chafing of inner tubes, which causes 7S% 

tabric and heavier tread adds 35% to life and 
strength. Write for the "13 REASONS," 
and prices. 



The Stein Double Cushion Tire Company 

Sold by Responsible l>ealera AKRON OHIO 




Runabout, $750 

One of the ataunclicHt, most attrac- 
tive rigH on the market, at the price. 
Its low price does not nieun cheap. 
flinmy constniction ; on the contrary, 
it i3 built tor hani use and plenty ol 

it 4 f'vIinHnr ■??, U P inntnr o,]uip- 



ixnelleiLt pro|)osition for Hiv dcuk-r. 



The PICKARD RUNABOUT i, 
Bight. Write for particulars. 

PICKARDS are also made in the following modeUi 

RumbI* Saal, Model F, (800. Model A, t1400. 

Surrey, Model O, tS2S. Model B. t1«». 

.--_..._ .. . — Model C, (1450. 

Model O, (1500. 



Touring Car. Model H. f 



PICKARD BROS. 



Brockton, Mais. 



CYCLiB AND AUTOMOBILE TKADB JOOBNAL. 



GILL FORGED 

CRANK- SHAFTS 

The P. H. (^ ft Sons Fore* and 
Machine Worits* Lorraine and Otseco 
Streett, BrooUjrn. N. Y. We wish to 
e&ll the Trade's attention to our Chrome 
Nickel Steel Crank-Shafts and Gear 
Blanks, etc., Domestio and Fonign. 

NO DROP FORCINGS 

We have special adapted Crank Kn 
Machines for making Crank-shafts true- 
round within one-quarter-thouaandth of 
an inch. We also make axles eomplete, 
finished or forged only ; also all kinds 
of automobile and marine forginjp. 

Crank-shafts up to 0" dia. All anvil- 
forged, hammered out of Aud 0. H. Sted 
or Nickel Steel or Chrome Nickel Steel. 



c& 


ECO. 


,M 

Otokh*. 
St. Louis. 


es 


Chosen by Expe- 
rienced Motorists as 
the Most Successful 
Solution of the 
Tire Question. 


Proven by Actual 
Service to be the 
Strongest, Safest 
and most Econom- 
ical Tire to use. 


Write U 

G & J TIR 

NawYotk, Buffklo. 


ianapolis, Ind. 



CTCLB AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



Aiil'AfnAhilo Tiroc 


TANKS 


AUIUIIIUUIK IllCd 


ALL SIZES 


Clincher and 




Quick Detachable 




AU New Goods, all High Grade 




Make. Small Ad, Small Price*. MoDcy 




Refunded at once if diuatiified on receipt 


IN STOCK BEADY 


of goodi. We Bie not going to tell you 
ikat we have contracti with Factoriea, 


SPECIALS TO ORDER 




for they are well able to m11 tfaeii goods 
themic^ves. Oui PRICES do the tn JVinj!. 
Your money rdunded, provided you do 
rtot lae the goods. Betore buying else- 








on tires. \l^e a4 in^ buiineu 15 




yean. Even if you don't buy from us we 




will be ^ad to correspond with you. 
Will give you the bert erf our advice. 


WRITE FOR BOOKLET 


NEW 1909 PRICE UST 


Shoe Tube 




MxVi $ t.M $2M 




»I24 . 




. . 6.M 3.M 




3813*. . 




. . 9.M 3.35 




Mx3 




. It.M 3.M 




Mx3 . . 




. . 8.M 3.M 




36i3 . 




. . ll.M 3.M 




r.;s 




. . 13.M 3.M 






. . I4.M 3.5* 




34i3Js 
36 X 3!s . . 




. . 14.M 3.9t 
. . 12.M 3.M 


LrmJE ONES AND 


3«i4^. . 




. . 16.5« 3.5* 


GREAT BK ONES 


33 s 4 , . 


. . I7.» 3.75 




34x4 . . 


. . . . 19.M 4.M 




36x4 . . 


. 17.M 3.H 




32 X 4!5 . 


15.M 3.H 




341*1 


I9.M 4.M 




3*x4l|, . 


1».M 3.M 




34xP . 


18.H 4.M 




36x5 19.SS 4.W 




(OODrEAD, DMOr, MaiBM lYK 




3« X 3!£ I19.M 


SAFE. SDRE, LEAKLESS 


30x4 I7.0t 


GASOUNE IS DANCERODS 


33 x^ 17.M 




34x^ 17.M 




34x4 M.M 




33x4 I7.» 




Special Tirea to flt M x 3 Clincher 




RIma, Brand New Shoe and Tube 




complete, S6.S0 each. 




MaU Order* EBpwdalty 




A.H. KASNER 


CHEAP "DONT CARE" CARS USE 
CHEAP "MAKESHIFT" TANKS 


Near Chambers Str«et 
152 Church Street, N. Y. City 


TANKS 


L>rf..t Tin> De.k» Jn V. S. 


THAT'S ALL 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 




THE KIND THAT DON'T BREAK 



*'S^! 





Let Ut Figure im your Body or 
Seat Irons for 1910 Models 



Cortland Forging Co. 

CORTLAND. NEW YORK 



SCREW MACHINES 

FOR RAPID AND AC- 
CURATE WORK - - - 
MULTIPLE SPINDLES 
FULL AUTOMATIC 
SINGLE BELT OR 
MOTOR DRIVEN 



SEVERAL of ihe largut and bat 
equipped Automobile Plants 
have given ua repeat orden foT 
(rom two to six machines during the 
laat few month?. 

q The new Independent Electric 
Drive is found to be especially adap- 
ted to use where floor space is at a 
premium. 

4 The ACME completes parts us- 
ually lehandled, and malces more 
Grst-class woik per day than any other 
machine and at a lower cost per 

Eiece. It taLes the same flooi space, 
ut it's faster. It lakes the same 
attention, but it'll do all the others do 
and ihe extras, too. 

THE NATIONAL-ACME 
MANUFACTURING CO. 
CLEVELAND. OHIO 

BRANCH OFHCES; NEW YORK 

BOSTON CHICAGO ATLANTA 

GeuTBl FoniaB RaprwanUtn* : ALFRED 
H. SCHUTTE. SCHUCHARDT & SCHliTTE 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



Those 

Detachable 

Links 



can be taken 
, apart any- 
I where without 
special tools ; 
they make a 
neat appear- 
ing chain, nar- 
row in width 
(and above all 
a chain that 
lasts. 

You can 
subject the 
Diuoid De- 
tichabJA 
, Ckaintohard 
I knocks, steady 
heavy pull or 
intermittent 
jerks at high 
speed,' but the 
pitch will not 
elongate no- 
ticeably, i»r 
will any other 
part show un- 
s due particularly 
onTy such spe- 



due wear. This 
to the fact that we 
cial steels, prepared exclusively : 
as will give the longest and most satis- 
factory service. We further insure 
long life by reaming the holes in 
the side bars to make a perfect bear- 
ing contact with the rivet throughout 
the thickness of the bar. 

Afler one lrL.1 of the Diarnond Detuhible 

Cwlll coniideT It at the head oi Iti dan, 
die comtruction, like ihit oi other Diamond 
Chain ii KienliBcally and piacliullx conect. 
Diamond Detachable Chains coK no more 
than Hveled chaini and the linLi of both are 
inleicbangeible with each other. 

Diamond Chain & 
Mfg. Company 

(CpuitT S.OCO.OOO Ft. t»r Yau) 

zm W. GMoia St., IiTbiviBs, M. 



NATHAN'S 

Auto Fabric Supplies are 
"THE STANDARD" 



Nathan's Lock-Flap 
Tire Cover 



Nathan's 
Improved 
Tire 
Trunk 



Thi* LOCK will protect jour tirea and 
tir« trunk from b«iiic ■loloa. Adjuatable 
to any aiz« tire. 

Tiro Covera, Tool RoIIa, Inner Tube 
C&aea, Lunp Cover* that fit. Top Cover*, 
Dual Cover*, StonuCovert, Auto Trunki, 
Pal. LeKKin*! olc. Evorrthins mad* of 
fabric for the auto. 



NATHAN NOVELTY MFG. CO. 

S4 TO 90 READE ST. 



242 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TKADB JOURNAL. 



ELECTRIC 
.VULCAMZER 



H^^^Ht^ I Mr. Garage-Man, Type C vulcanizes new canvas 
_^^^^^J| DIRECTLY to inaide of a caiins. makei the tire 

^^^^^^^^'^ STRONGEST in repaired part., cost* let* than Uc. 

per hoar to operate and is the lowest in price. 



H lin kud.-boak."Cva»d(t«pdrof TirW 



Writ* .TonUr for MoMyMaldnK Bookkt, Tut Ih* M0M7 in Um CMliJ>r»war" 

C A. SHALER CO., Mfrs., Box P, WaOpan, Wis., U. S. A. 



Everybody Needs fi,i,„ii, bMiJ* 

ADT OOW HEHa, mvc rtwlr blllg. 
CHAnFFEURa. mikeyourMlImonviliuble. 
BBOINNEHS, (tudr flnl— dilvlnt la tuy. but wli« thlsc 

A CURTOUEH SAID — "fvt workBd tfoimd tuoUsflHulAA 
for IVTenl ytan, bul 1 Ifwnfd more Id ttane we^s Ihaa m ■] 



rre intbrbstino— you wiu pi>r wiui thtMDiaditeMi 



Rivett Grinders 



Have 70a any 

INTERNAL GRINDING 

to do ? If 10, write ut for puticulan oS oar 
Gnnden. 

RIVEn UTHE IIF& CO. 

BRIGHTON, BOSTON, MASS., U. S. A. 



RUBBER GOGGLES 

lidi It all Hibbtr lill Sliid Hirri ffiir 

FH Efirrai* Inl Prwf 

Gil hi Withid Mmtt EuHi 

Riii Pntf litirahaipaHi 

InCitiHiMlnlnir 
I Stock Ro*dr for SUpmMl Tha OrisJt»l Rubber G«nl« 

American Thermo-Ware Company 1!J!I!'°'S?''5JS 



••■nil 

A Vkriatr of Style* i 



CYCLB AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



THE 



SPARK-PLUG 

Patant Applied tor. MARCH. IM2 

Invented more than 
seven years ago. 

Right up to the min- 
ute for present-day 
Ignition systems. 

Adapts Itself both to 
i battery and high ten- 
sion magneto circuits. 

• plu£i ««f a dMigned 



The Best Ignition Sqtdpment Co. 

3W W. MTH ST., - HBW YORK 



The longer you as« 

BBLfUSS MOTORS 

the better youll like them. 



Two Cylinder Oppo««d. 

Air-cooled, 10 to 13 M. P. 

Water-cooled, tO to 13 H. P. and 
18-30 H. P. 

Their compactness and light w«ltht 
make them particularly desirable fm 
cars of the runabout class. 

We f:an quote you interesting prices. 
Do you vant full parHculars ? 

The Beilfuu Motor Co. 

Mich. 



PLATINUM IRIDIUM 
POINTS 


F 




L 


L 




I 


A 




G 


S 




H 


THE ONLY PLUG FOR MAGNETO 

Janney, Steinmetz & Co. 

PHILADELPHIA 



Eclipse 



Battery 
Ammeter 



A Trouble-Saver 



Diy battery troublei are many, and 
alnrnt aU due to NOT KNOWING 
how yout battery lUnds. The Eclipte 
indicate! in ANY poaition, and EITHER 
direction. $3. 

Dealers have them. 

Jobbers have them. 

We have them. 

Eldredge Electric Mfg. Co. 

SPRINGFIELD. MASS 

Fort St., and P. O. SqiiM* 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



THE INCREASE IN THE NUMBER OF 
Automobile ManufactureTi that are uting the 



Hancock Oiler 

on their 1 909 Model* ii very noticeable. It 
can only mean that they contidei the 
HANCOCK far tuperior to(rthere.~Andil it. 

HANCOCK MFa CO. 

776 E. Hanrj Stra*t CharlstU, Mieh. 



CRUCIBLE STEEL 

Srooodi and Ttim lo Paltar 

TemUe Strength /^S^^^^^^^ 

80,000 lbs. ^^^^^^^^ 

AUTOMOBILE CASTINGS A 
(Comp/Bta Pattara Deparlm 

NEW PROCESS STEEL CO. 


CASTINGS 


n 

a Elastic Limit 
P S0.0OO lU. 

SPECIALTY 

nt) 

Marshall, Mich. 



F. W. OFELDT A. SONS, Nyack-on-the HutUon. N. Y. 

STEAM GENERATING OUTFITS 

CMslit of Sator Watar Tabe Boilar, Antomatic Watar Ranlator, Bloa Flam* Kara- 

•aaa Boniar, Automatic Fuel RetnUlor. Bnmar Valras and Stralnors 

WaakDmaaotaMtua DODBLB ACTINO IX>IIPODND STBAH BNQINBa. ot ban IS U 10 Honi Pa«w. 

— FBED WATEa BEATBRA. AOTOHATIC AIR PUUPB. 

■ OUK NEW I 



■tartlu, fiO or IfiO pofUHU Er 
r,™ ™ UMlSallB. »oJo!^^ 
oar HmclaltlH an adapted toWblua, 



gisii'- 






(lltM 



LOOK US OVER; THEN BUY. 

MIDDLEBY 

Runabout, price. $850.00 Surrey, price, $1000.00 
Touring Cnr, price, $1250.00 

Foiu cjlindcT, loui cTcte, 4" Mroke and bore, air cooled, ikree ipecdi (oiwaid ud oiw nrtna. Jade 
gear traaimuaiMi, iWl drive, 108" wheel baie, 32 i 3^ (irea on RuuUxit aod Xiter. 33 i 4 line oa 
lourmg ur. eoEapleCe with two gai lampa. generator, (wo lide oil lampa, one Uil lamp, Fraocb kom, (die 
and loola. MagDCto ficc oa SuRef aod Touring Car. 

UVE ACENTS WANTiS 

MIDDLEBY AUTO COMPANY, - Remtlng, Pa. 



CTCLB AND AUTOHOBILB TRADE JO0RNAU 24 

The "Eiibe" Sparking Battery 

Hb* 20 Yean' Experieace bebind it 4 The one battery backed up by 2 Labonloiy Tati bcfoie you 
get It No "Seconda." Q Tbe InuiaDce don't coit mucbbutilmeaai Reliability. Q Dealen alunM 
■el our propontioii on renewali ioi Qecbic Vehicle Battcria. <! Oto 90% oi all Eleclne AutM 
made lue "CliOe" BaUeriea. The experience that hat brought thli about it mIc ioi you to follow. 

iHEmECTRLCSHMGEB^TEEKfCO. S 



ALL SHIPMENTS FROM THE NEAREST ••£xK>e" DEPOT 



MOTORS 



O., Lt^asport, Ind. 




(DniL 

ar« the only coaMm in the world vho make DompJately RJlered P«ia9ylvan 
auffieientdash test and body to properly lubricate a gag engine. 

Iirand ol oili made. ITriM tor mr 1809 /Uuilrtilad Cotolopue — it's frtt. 



"It /tiaiei a Jfftremee" Boatoa 



DROP FORGED CRANK SHAFTS 

We have about 200 
tpedal crank ihafb ^that 
Wl finith like cut, on 
which we will make a 
very low price. II you 
can use any ol them, 
write ut lor price, stating 
how man]' you can uic. 
WESTERN MALLEABLE STEEL CO. 

Man«faclnfar* of Drop FoTstnp, Mallaabk Sl««l Caitln^, Cmcibb Sleol Caalias* 
DETBOIT. laCmCAN 



CTCLHI AND AUTOHOBILB TRADE JOURNAI.. 

"Speaking of Bearings and Mileage." After 54,000 Miles 

of bard service — the bearlnfts InTperfect condltloD. Read the unprejudiced 
testlmoay of the man who has no aie to grtnd^The Garage Man. 
RAY S. DEERING 
AUTOMOBILES 

THE TIMKEN ROLLER BEARING 00- CuitoB, O. ChiMga. FA. 27. 1909. 

Gcadeima: — [ km jut nmored tram • 1 906 moiM Qucca Toorinf Cu, MM ol toiu ku ailH 
which wu duDigcd bf collinoa with ■ Micel car. Om tcamd of the hud Mnrka lh>t the axle hu had 
to ^tuii, 1 dMNight ial k might be of mtcrcrt tojoo to know iht coDdkioa in which it wu foatd. 

Thia cat weighi, witti iti egniinntet. 2984 poawh uti wu piKcd ra lemce id March. 1906, fM 
ihiee jraan ago. It iu beco drirca tm-faai thomaad mile^ ots ■d Hait of atf aai smitry Kwdt. 

Aftct Icaiiag tha axis down, all beaiiag^' cooci, Mc. woe foood to be ia perfect cooditiDD, 
ibe ma^ of the wkael ued m grinding the lollcn and eooet are not worn o9. noi wu it ponible to ttghtcs 

rif of dkc adjulnKali. The ditferatia] and driving pinion, afta being cleaned with ganjinc^ do not 
era die ilightot wear, aad all gcan moh unic^aaif therwen jott Wit of diemilli^ machiDe. 
In all mj o^ieriaKe aa a lepait naa 1 have never (omd an axle on any car at anjr price Amt hu 
Noed the KM dial ihit one baa. To mv poaitive bowledge it bu not bes touched ocepi to Knew the 
»»**«"«l brake band lining, lad replcBiili the aipplj of giaau i> the ca*e nnca i( urai put is Mrrke. The 
amaied ad> of the drive ihafti fit the wbed hnbt and diflootial oofecdv. 
When it b cnarideral that (hit cw bu bad the wont ki 
ion of the axle becoowt more nnaikaUe, and goeato ahon 

TiiMtnig dut thk it of mtaol to too. [ am, Youn Inlr. RAY S. DEERING. 

It Is Bcedlcaa lo »my ImA &« axlca «■« bcutetfa were TUIKEN 
PRODUCT ; ms aAct baarlafl maBBteetarcd e*nM •!■■« up mn€mr Ihc 
severe service— sad ttal Is why over 70% of all Ike Uah-0ra4c aale- 
MebUes ma* 90% ol Ac tracks ballt la thU coaatry ase them. 

If joa would liha to Iwt* detailed facta and fignrea to fit joar cue, write ua. 

THE TIMKEN ROLLER BEARING AXLE GO.. :: CANTON, O. 

Bt—dwai— 10 E. Slat 3t„ Naw Y«fc Citr 43» W»hMt At.- Chjeaaa. Dt 



AUTOMOBILE 

AND 

PHONOGRAPH 

HORNS 



Equal to the best French prod- 
ucts. Look ioi OUT trade- 
mark if you want lo be sure (A getting horns cA quahty and finest work- 
manship. 

We are the largest roanufacturen c^ Horns in the United States ; also 
flexible tubing, reeds and supplies. It will pay you to have our catalog 
and quotations on any quantity. Our prices are right and our horns give 
good service. 

StAMMn lEIIIl m. a, Oitstiit, WfosM nt lUIwi sis., Newaili, N. J. 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



THE STAR 

A qMAdometer with all tho morita and 
DIMM of the defeats of its many eompeti- 
tota. At aeourate aa a waMi, and as 
atamtdi aa a ateam engine. Nothing to 
grt out of ordefj ainee then U imi^ mie 
spring in the entira instnunent. 

Investigate the "STAR" before purdus- 
ing a ^eedometer for your n 



Price, $25.M. DiacHBttatheTrads 

The Star Odometer 

for ElMtrioi and Runabouts has all the 
exeellent featuna of the "Star Speed- 
omster" with the «zo^)tion of the speed 
gauge. 'nievalueoftlw"StarOdoiiieter" 
oan only be detennined by test. It will 
oave its cost many timea over in a onrie 
BMSon to the Eaaotrio Car Owner. (Ha 
be attached to floor or daah. 

Price, $15.06 



MaiBfadand by THE STAR SPSDOMETER CO^ Danville, Pa. 

GEO. W. NOCK CO., PhBacUphia, Pa. 
lor PauMrNtiw. New Jene7. Delawaic, tAaiyUad ud Vbgtnia 



CTCLB AND ADTOMOBILB TRADE JOURNAL. 



MANZEL 

FORCE PEED OILERS 



'"■■*"i:' ot c 



FMd almri In ilclit. 

Bub fMd rnutafod IndaptodMtlr. 

B^^ rtfulatod. 

Abj BDmlMt ot fMd*. 
RotM7 01 Katdut Drin. 

wun rot Fuu. faitkulais 
MANZKL BROTHERS CO. 

320 Babcock St, BwHmlo, N. Y, U. S. A. 



Who Foots Your Bills? 



It Is up to you! 

n« ODt wu ta Mop (11 
this !■ to eqiap tout car 






SI _._ 

The KtnatttaliileTlcc will be ■ 
Uaa ■aJTYOW C*H PBOVE IT 
YODRllAINtBKANCG BllXS. 



^^r^ 



mcblna Ave.. Cblotfo, lu. BuiT»)o. 
A. iL. DntbH, BOX ill, F. B.i 
Tleniu^Otalo. r*o AV& 



ueo. A. Dectot. 014 B. 
ukee B['., HtmaukM. WIS. 
Are., Dslivtl. MlA. 

SAFETY DEVICE COMPANY 



*ay.lf 



I\4arble IVlethods 



By tbe Uarble Hsthod retreadiot bu 
been made a Practical PropoalUw. 

The bead and side walk ofH Ure an 
not overcured in an attempt to cure the ra* 
Blwik on the tr«ad. NOTE THAT TBE 
WALLB OF THE TIRE PROJECT 
ABOVE THE UOULD. not cnminR in 
t ccDtact with the heated auifSM. 



.( Plant. 



oiplw. 



DBtbod a 



cite u«. Let 
1 the Uarble 



M. E. HAYWOOD HFG. CO. 

332 N. IDiiuii St. 
INDUNAPOUS INDIAMA 



IGNITION BATTERIES 

GUARANTEED 
1909 Leader 6-60 

P. $7.50 

Write for Fir..FIy Catalogue. Be«t Made 



Hoosier Storage Battery Co. 



EvansviUe, Ind. 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



-AITTO LUBKICATION,- ftn. 



ALBANY GREASE 

THE PERFECT LUBRICANT 

I For AUTOMOBILES, 

MOTOR BOATS uid MOTOR CYCLES 

«^^hM Look for this Trade iixik on every paekage. 
^^^H lUcoDunended by leading Auto Hanufaetureri. 
SOLD BY SUPPLY WALERS SAMPLES FREE 

ADAM COOirS SONS, 313 West SL, New York 



SHUR-HOLD 

BLOW-OUT 

PATCH 



m&m^ 



Equal to an Extra Tire 
Requires No Cement 

WILL NOT BULGE 
If joar dcaW do** not luiTa tb«m, writ* 



INNER SHOE TIRE CO. 
Grand R^ids, Mich. 



The "Sherwood" 
FOIKE SIGHT FEB) OIL PUMP 



hOir M Daad Skill EWtc 

Gho PwtiTe ud Uufam F«ed 



SHERWOOD MANUFACTURINC CO. 
Bwffalo. NnrYork 

Ctfibcai nd Prim F«»*id aa AffHugm 




Automatic 

LabrieatioD b the only nicoflBaf ul method 
of lubriuting Antomobilat. Alwayt 
readr and aever gets out of order. 
75,000 ia um. 

6. R. ESSEX BRASS CO. 



CTCIA AMD AUTOUOmLB TRASS JOURMAI.. 



ARE YOU LOOKING FOR A LARGE QUANTITY OF 

Shaft-Drive Rear-Axles with 
Transmissions Combined? 

Oon u foe lUllt CVS up 10 aioo pound* emptj wd^t utd lyB. P. Wc km cul 
out all "fiilU" Id makelhe combined ulc ud tranmuniDQ in lirte quaotitiea chsttply, 
but it ia good, dunblcy *nd cSdent in 4II it> dtuil*. Ask ua about It. WE 
ALSO MAKE THOUSANDS OF huner «ile> (front uul ihafi-driTe reut), 
TrmuniuioB*, Cone Clulchei, SlMring Columni, Sleeting Reacbn etc 

THE "LONG-ARM" SYSTEM CO. .... CLEVELAND, omo 



SEATJ 



(ot onfj* m .._.._ 

Uc FonI Runtboiit ud odui can. Al«> mnk 
to cooTot UT moiA tt Fold RmlMMn 'ato ' 
«a. We nuLe k complete Ibe of haitn ud 
boudi for uj maka of cu. One Hundnd 
hud can for ialc Send lol catalogm. 

AUTO REBUILDING CC 

1349 Mlchiftan Ave. Chlca« 



y 



LAMP BRACKETS of 
CAST STEEL 

CHEAPEST ANB BEST 



2^ 



JATAKKBt, BBASS OB NICKEL PIATIS 

WE ALSO HAHUFACrUU AUTOimaE CASTHCS OF OLDCDU STIIL 

CHICA60 STEEL FOUNDRY COMPANY, Cblcaoo, IlL, U. S. A. 



CYCLE AND ADTOHOBILB TRADHI JOUKNAL. 



HOW TO RUN AN AUTO 




owMn, opvaton ■ 



a SdmM of A 

mobilai, hi^ly approv- 
-* *— "Uluhetunn, 
.jvaton utd 

«. CODtaini 

oier 400 illoMntioiu ud 
dlkcnmu, nukfcias avery 
deUil bIoi. writtMi in 
pimin luituut. Haod- 

SPECIAL OFFER 

jDly my tha 
1 caailt of thii 



or raturnad. aftar 



It, tha book will ba fomidad 



Thao. Aadal A Cik. 63 Fifth Ava^ Naw York 

Kindly mail B9a 4opr of " — - — ' " —— — — * ■• 



•'INNERSHU' 

Posltivel7 Makes 




MAKES TIRES LAST 
TWICE AS LONG - 

WRITE 

Inner Shoe Tire Co. 

GRAND RAPIDS, MICIL, . U. S. A. 



J [nulljF ayatam of 

Iinolsnition aqiiipmaiit 

bishiat affidaney unlaai 
I ■yitemaClaiUy and with 



hkhoyt 
pocm 

ITIdUNE 
VOLTAM- 



maola bi oiM^i.*., ftToltmatar iiiaillin to lOvolla, 



t ttonft battariaa; „ „ 

to SO ampans, for taMlna dry oalla. and an Am- 
matar wading to 1} aoparaa tor taatlnc aoll vibn- 
lora. TUalatlarwillbdiaalaaoliannof 1-SOofan 
ampara. Tha Inattumaat if fully Jentad. ud iiaos- 
tainadinkpfnih-linadmOToooooua. Filaa,<13J)0. 



ELECTKICAL IKSTRUIBin' WOIKS 
T, PENACOOK. NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Ismnw Bt. Mew YockOni 



CTCLB AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 

'HEITGERModolGJSOS CARBURETER 



ol o( EUoKne feed, opented 



float idjuatnieiit. Boat valve, and 
VMOllne conntction. New apraj e 
low oaaollae coniumiitioii. 
Spedallr adapted lo all triwa, twacrcle ensinea. 

AgenU Wanted Everywhere 



HEITGER CARBURETER CO. 

203 WmI Sooth StoMt, INDIANAPtnJS, IND. 

Special Ifpei lor Bttidt A Ford IhutabouU 



EUREKA 



Tba SmMtioB of tho Hour 



The Cup Winoer 

Sae baautiluJ aijver lovinc oap at our offios, won 
OD Sokimoa'i HiJl, NoTsmbar 0, 1008. Htihoat 

SHAFT D RIVE— Noi«l«a—ff«ton Uott rear 

aad traaimlaiieB b eaa bbH — Tim* paiat ni>- 

nacbaiikarfoKa faad eU ayatau. MinT wheel 
baaa. Baaattfid basd— RnnaboBt— Roaifatar 
with doable nmUa— Fba paaHBsar SiDnj and 
doMl DaUearr W.IOB. Wbeeli— Front M i H 
—rear 38 i U. 
Fjna propoallion for real live Automobile Asenla. 

EUREKA MOTOR CAR MFG. CO. 



Carries four passengers anywhere, 
removable rear seat affords large car- 
rying space. Supplied with two cyl- 
inder air-cooled 16 H. P. motor, 
planetary transmission, unit motor 
and transmission case insuring per- 
fect alignment; shaft drive; ignition, 
magneto and dry cells; springs, full 
elliptic front and rear; wheels, 36 in. 
front, 38 in. rear. 

Send for Catalog "D." 

J. & M. Motor Car Co. 

hd., U. S. A. 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



Applications for Aftendea Id unas- 
signed territory considered. 



S/ie 

n STRENUOUS.. 

Randolph 



A live propositioD from every point of view. 
Built ID cspacitie* rangiDg from 1500 iba. to 6 

RANDOLPH MOTOR CAR CO. 

175 E. RANDOLPH ST., CHICAGO, U. S. A. 



SLOANE MARINE MOTORS 

A TWO-CYCLE MOTOR WITH A NEW ARRANGEMENT OF PORTS 

THOROUGHLY TESTED AND GUARANTEED 

One Cylinder Two Cylinder 

Si^xSi"^ A^xA" 3}''x3i«' rxA" 

A REVERSE GEAR IS NOT NECESSARY WITH TTE SLOANE 
TWO-CYUNDER MOTOR AS IT CAN BE BROOGHT TO A COHPUETE STOP AND THEN 
STARTED IN EITHER DIRECTION ON THE SPARK 

WRITE FOB CATALOO 

SLOANE MOTOR CO. "-"ailS^W " 



''CENTURY" 

14 BRAKE Horn Powtr 

Air • Cooled Engine 

ii fullj guariDlced, it Mncti; higb fftit. It it 
tupeiiar [roin the atiadpointi of pows, ttmpcn- 
lure, Hze Mad qiulitj of miterUI, Atteation Tf- 
qifltcd ind ttanomj. CjlindECt in 415. 
"-— "— — ^ -T 

CENTOKY ELECTKIC COHPAPIY 

IMk * OUvc Sts., BL LoBl^ Ma. 




k Always There 



PACKARD QUALITY MEANS SOMETHING'. Atk 
any utet — not a*. Send for new booklet, io colora, juet out. 



THE PACKARD ELECTRIC COMPANY, 



300 Dww At«wm, 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



"DEFIANCE" 

WOOD-WORKING 
MACHINERY 

AUTOMOBaTwHEELS 
AND BODIES 

Invented 
ana 
Built by 

He 

Defiance 


Tlie"Excenliic"MicaPlug 

fiUUiUIIIDOIItVHI 
ADJUSTAUfSnUHCAP 

Caa-lnictioii-Oui 
MuKUid douUe insUkd 
MiMCoi.po.idw!7wiU 
not cnck oc ihoit drcniL 
MeMotwiK ip.A point 
rigidlr «und to »d <rf 
c^^t.t right »«lc. 
Shell bound on elceatric. 
Adju.lnxiitm.de br 


Madiiie 
Woriis 

DEFIAMCE. 

Ofln 
CompkU 


pS 75c. eki 

J) ^^^ lit >ia Cire >f{. Ci. 

V ^ MEW VOMK 



The MORSE 

Silent- Running 

Rocker-Joint 

Chain 

For Automobiles 

Loses practically no power 
in transmission and main- 
tains its efficiency fot years. 
It is Doisdess under high 
^>eeds. 

Catalogue No. 7 

Morse Chain Co. 

Ithaca, N. Y. 



ratasM* 



Tfec *'S«lclr~ OBlUt has been 
cxamtacd aad Uatcd aaionfl the 
permitted f asoltec aysicBU by Na> 
tloBal Board ol FlreUoderwritcra. 

You nui buy tbii ontHl rrom your jobber. U bo 
wiJ] not lupply you. wril« us. Send tor istmkis. 



The Tokhefm Mfg. Co. 

- - IOWA 



CTCLa AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JODRNAL. 21 

Automobile Bodies 

Fnmlslied Completely 

Trimmed and Finished 

The B. F. Everitt Co., Detroit, MIeh. 



Luto Tru 

tgk, DeubU. Tri 
wHLIn^da Gr 

Writs f « epwtel 
CUalot 

HuiutHtand by 

w. w. rwUp 



^Oim JfriH aASjSrilllnteiB cu* In p 



W* luv* Jut •aiilppa4 *H 9Mtn mt lb* N»w 
T«rk Tul OBb O*. wllb •nr e 



HOPEWELL BROS. 

CAHBUDGK A, MASS. 



"Niglitingale"Whistle 



The Ideal 
Antomobfle Signal 

Operated by Exhaust— Never 

Cloit. Work! on 1 Cyl- 

mder Car* 

Nolliii;Lilielt-l(ttliiiii"iitstasGeod" 

Complete ^'JM Outfit 



IlilUJinleWiisllellaMfidirimCi. 

1U4 Broadway, Nw Y«A 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



Keep Tabs the Working 
Of Yonr Motor 



Pit u 8. B. a. Cnt-Oot to norailuiMt plp«,iAkb 
will not onlr raUn* baa pnanm, bat fanmaM 
tba Ull olmbliic >blHM el your mi. kod mablt 
rou lo hMp tiaok of bow tba eyhaint an 
wihUdK br UManbic to tba nplorioiw. ^Mj 
sHuhA. Bold Ihraoili daslw*. PrioM, B.TB 
M M.7S. Aak for dMo^tir* mattw. 

S. B. R. SPECIALTY COMPANY 

HO W. (Mm 9nnt - - MEW TORE CTTT 



W IT IS YOUR AIM 

to produce a good cai, START 
RIGHT. The best should be 
none too good for you. If material, 
workmanship, established reputa- 
tion, and the fact that our frames 
are used by the recognized lead- 
ing builders of high-grade can in 
this country mean anything, write 
ua. 

Oor Specialty 

Alloyed Steel, heat- 
treated automobile 
frames 



The Parish Hamtfactiriis Convaiy 



FOR SALrB 

Motors 

5 in. z 4 ilk-Two C^inder 
OppoMd. 18 H. P. 



WE ALSO MAKE 

U in. X 4 in. 2 GyUndw OppcMed 
6i in. X 4* in. 2 " " 

6 in. X 4} in. 2 " " 



DAVIS MFa CO. 

MILWAUKEE, b 



AIJUSTABLE SEGTIOIAL VULCANIZEI 



NEW IMPROVED 1«» MODEL 

V DoekMt. KiA dmUiu la Btud wltli rii aau ot 
bMdifoi^ nar atmat (two (<r t»i± pockM), butt, 

•Utr, ^tey *n mmlibad to touMt «itb« t*tua 
Dollar. IH or fBoollBfl burner. Tbe Bov iiiliaiiiiMi 
«• am Id ooe piMe ud M«u> jMtot Yoo will ■uto- 
IE BMd ou IB TOUT repBlr ttiop Prlna nun bnv 
m.lodlt. KndJorprloudBMlv. 

AUTO TIRE VULCANIZINQ CO. 
Lowall, MiM., U. •. A. 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



Omm B— CmuUBt Ught WmtM 


McCORD 


RADIATORS 
LUBRICATORS 

"MARKS OF A GOOD MOTOR CAR" 


McCORD MFt CO, "" ""^S^^n^ 




■ Schrader Universal Valves JL 

d& Tnd«ll>ikBi|M«idAKrilM.lB9S ^^B 
■ SnPLB UD ABSOLOTELT AH TIGHT ^H 



S. X. Ignition Dry Cell 

BEST FOR SPARKING 

Voltage, 1.6 Volts 

Initial Amperage, 28 to 35 

EFFICIENCY GUARANTEED 

Lntz Lockwood Mfg. Co., ''new'tork "^ 



IMPERIAL PORCELAIN SPARKING TUBES 




The Imperial Porcelain Works, Trenton, N. J. 

WlwD deeiiiiig quotations alwaTs send sample or drawing of sfyle lequirad. 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



Accurate 
Gears 

We oftD fumiBh ftll IdndB of mdu- 
ntety out gears, ^ther in quantity, 
or tingle orders for repair work. 

Let us quote you. 

THE 

NewProcessRawHideCo. 

SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



OPPOSED TYPE 
MOTORS 

buUt In sizes 4^ x 4^, 4I x 4I, 
5x4} and 5 X 5, all or water 
cooled. 

Catalogue for the making 



MONARCH MOTOR MFG. CO. 

15»8 N. HtJrtad St, CUmc» 



ALLEN TIRE COVERS 



el DUCK— Not Drill. Con 



ALLEN 
TIRE HOLDERS 

ADJUSTABLE— DITACH ABLE 

THE ALLEN AUTO SPECIALTY CO. 

Hnvtennn _ 

lt26Bna4w«r.N«wy«k P1»im. SUB Ool. 



STA-RITE 

rCNITION PLUGS 
ALWAYS SPARK ui 



SPARK !■ the epea 

Do you know thm the 
location of the jump 
spark in die cjlinder b 
a tremendouily impor- 
tant mattei ? The (park 
muit be in the opm 
to ignite all the ga* in 
I tuch an infinitenmally 



iPL HARDY £^,^ 

Fkctory 20l-37lh StrMt 
BROOKLYN, N. Y. QTY 



Doobk PorcaUln 
SapWkbU, 
PrtG^$1.2B 



CTCIiE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JODBNALb 



Westinghouse 

Automatic 

Mercury Rectifiers 

for charging 
Automobile Batteries 



You steurt it 

It charges your electric car at 
night without requiring any atten- 
tion whatever. When the charge 
is complete 

It stops itself 



Seo (oldar 4105 

WeililiklllM Electric & Mf|. Ca. 

Pittsburg, Pa. 



GAS ENGINE MANUAL 



.DbUllMd, 

^ «t halp^ 

lulOntuitkni rMp*cliDt thasr - 



1 TbisvolunH, 
pvai tha latcat ai 
lulOntuitiOD rMp*— 
■trnotion, can and 
ot CM,C»oliM«aDC 
Martoa Motan and 
Enria— ■ inalodinE diapMca on 
Prodaecr Ga* P&Dta and the 
Aloohol yotor. 

1 ThsbookiiBpraetiiialadu- 

any ant u»in«» (as anciQear aay 

6i i8( Indiea. w^hi I fxmid*, 
handiDiiiely boDDd^ and id avary 
my a Boe vohune. 

SPECIAL OFFER 

mly vou dia praitteat 

iHikii^llvlSd^ mil nbma 
l«0i4Ttaibtt of Tradt Journal, 
fra* for «iiiinHt<iM,(o b* paid for 
or marntd, ^i/Ur leoUmg ttntr. 

wit (•hidi oao ba otlur 

int or oopied). the book will 
unediats^ fomirded. 



iloftiUiH 



An aa dn 



SAVE HALF THE TIME 

of the Lathe Work by using Our New 

CRANK SHAFT LATHE 

THE LODGE & SHIPLEY MACHINE TOOL CO. 

Cincinnati, Ohio 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



Buckeye Jacks 



I 



Suitabl* for any 

■ii« and rtrM 

Automobile mMla. For cart woigUnf 

from 500 to 8000 pound*. Tbe Urgoat 

Tkrietj of usai mado by tnj 



SDK 


"C- 


"£.'," 




No. 


ITon 


ly 


0" 18" 9 3JxM" 


m 


ITon 
ITon 


13" 


8" 1 18" : 9 i31»Sr 

e** 18" 81 3 i5i" 


"oi 


ITon 
ITon 


91" 


6" 131" i 81 3 riH" 
S" Ml" 1 8* aliM" 


03 


ITon 


10" 


fl" 1 18" 1 5 aii**" 



THE BUCKEYE JACK MFG. CO. 

LOUISVILLE, OHIO 



DIAMOND PULVS VALVE 



GRINDING COMPOUND 



THE BEST AT ANY PRICE 




Th* Only FIrit Clau Grind »t 25e 



not dnip 1dU> srUixlar. 

No (man at cround sLul 

■ ■ "' • ' appllod. 



tonXhiin 
i;annot lather r 
Cat! tspidlr > 



, , _nd imoothly and 

P<MM( OODdiUOQ. 

Dnd todw by,!"— 
BATtSFACTK 



witb FBRFEfTT 



DIAMOND PULVS CO. 



661 Waat 3etL Str«ot Nmr York 
Trial 3inri—~-lhdTaq— It 



I 



Moehanical and alactrical part* all 

■•paratatjr oncloimL 

NEW CATALOGUE No. 7. 

The liisey Wolf MadiineCo. 

Cinciimati, Ohio 



/^ 



1909 




Wbetber Expert or Norice the Craw- 
ford is the Car for Yon 

Tha parfeotioo ot msohaniFal detail and (r«at 
ilus offered in Crawlord Modeli -ill sppeal U> 
le praetical motorist. The simplicity and ease 
[ operation will reeommend tliain (o the novin 

nksricc with. 

InvHllKsU the Crawfoid through the nearest 
denier- NaJne fumishAd on requeet. 

Mad* in the roUowins modeb : 
A •• F," BO H. P., 7 |M_«i«w. S32S0 
"D," 2B H, P., RtmaboBt. 1280 

';,H,;; 2BH. p.. Li^lTomingC^.lSOO 

CRAWFORD AUTOMOBILE CO. 

HAGERSTOWN, MD. 




Mod.lH.UI^Ta»lii«Car,«8H.P. Prfcia,mOO 



CTCLB AND AUTOMUBILB TKAUB JOURNAL. 




Half-Nelson Emergency Tire 

Ib a secttonal rubber, steel and wood, non-punc- 
turabie tire. Sections are carried under the seats 
and can be attached to any rim In two minutes. 
No dettrioration. Will last for years. Cut shows 
lock joints connecting the sections. Sold direct Ui 
consumer on ten days' triaL Honey returned If 
not satisfactory. 

IUif-lfiS0N1ltEa,»19r«IMAK.Iiwipifis,lliM..II.U 



DO YOU KNOW 



That wa make praMed iteel or augls iron frame 
(ean, with diain or ihaft driva, any hci^t of 
wbMla, and any irtieel baae up to 188 imh f 

Our Prices will Interert Yon 
Get our catalog of Chaatia, bodies, wheels, 
axles, steering devices and ears ready for pover. 




The 



RELIANCE Igniter Storage Battery (c«ii«d<u j.r) 
RELIABLE Igniter Storage Battery (H.rdR.bb.r j.r) 

Alto Motor Cycle Tjpe in Cdloloid or Robber 
We make 44 standard styles and uzes 

Our ISth year in the manufacture of Storage 
Batteries and accessories of every kind. 

THE STORAGE BATTERY SUPPLY CO. 

237 Eart Z7tk StraM NEW YORK 

CbtalotolaUM 



Triumi^ ValT* RemoTer 



A4jurtabl« Ball Joints 




DIQTa 



MECHANICAL & ELECTIUCAL MFG. CO., 54 RDaplainsiSu Chicago 



r"^ 



CTCLB AND AUTOHOBILHi TRADU JOURNAL.. 

Abo Skort-Coaplcd Bod; uul Regular 
Roodttcr at Same Price 

Nothlng''extraordiii&r7 is claimed for 

"The Lexington." It's just a good, 

high-grade car, designed for service, which 

it ^ves with a minimum of trouble. 

"TRY TO GET ONE" 

THE IBINGTON MOTOR CAR (OJnc 

$2500.00 LEXINGTON. KENTUCKY 



OOD; OUT OF THE WAY 



Ynur dealer nillmtlach (or IdS.DO-iit haxt, toaa 
dealer will. Write us (or oompleCe descrfpiion of t]ie 
UNIVERSAL «nd name of nearest dealer. 



ITMT\/I7DCAI WIND SHIELD COMPANY 
Ulll V £itVi3/\Li 147 So. Clinton St., CHICAGO, ILL. 



The REX WRENCH 

Indispeneable U, motorist ^^ i£flt*^ 

or mechanic. Mi^ ^^H^^^*^^^ 

All parte drop forged high ifVm % • ^X* 

"i^erSl^Keable heads ad- I B B B C 

ill PUTS WAMAHTED [ / ** *St 

Liberal discount-, to dealer*. ' WW)fl^^ 

ijend for catalog. ^T^j^^^ 

Rex Wrench Co., 184 Sanuner St. Boiton, Nan. 



CYClsa AND AUTOUOBILB TRADE JOURNAL. 



SCHAFER 
BEARINBS 

(MADE IN GERMANY) 

BARTHEL & DALY 
42 Broadway 
New York City 

SOLE IMPORTERS 

Write for Catalogue 
and Price List 



SEAMLESS 
TUBING 

BRASS and 
COPPER 

Prompt Delivery 
Best Quality 
Best Price 

BUFFALO TUBE CO. 

257 Rano SL, Buffalo 



^"K.C."= 



"Kltsee Changeable" 

DRY STOKACE BATTERY 



WOBld ■ Spai-Umii Batlcry wifb 

A Life Guarantee 



YOH? 

WitaU jau lik* ■ battery (h 
«(• whwt di*cbarc*d 
[•d baBoj witb aor ouW. 



and yrAatt A» 

jrwu deaUi abonl il ca write a>> 

EBEN I- BEVAN, Genl. Sales Aflul 



KITSEE STORAGE BATTERT CO. 

628-629 ConnaU Bldc„ SCRANTON. PA. 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



man Standard Motors 

IR COMMERCIAL CARS 



intB of i(a pndeoeHBDri 
Had! ll Uh roDmrlBI ri 



. mil, Oti tt*. uid Tit. • 



Breonan Motor Hfi. Co., Sjinafse, N. V. 




The Weibiid SupplementatY Carburetflf 



lyourold oubuntor kbaolately •aU-prirain^ (riduiut wut« of fua I or dripping 

* It BtarU yuuT eold iDotor van in fneiiDK wemtber oa tha tint eomploto 

implscloiuraCaot opening) al tbe Ibrottla on itDpi^nE your molor will 

akcyourmdnealmoitsurgof ■tartjnson tlislpKrli. 1 It silows ^our motor to atort 

ith piulically closeii throttla, thus prewnlioi »ny radns on lUrtinK. 1 It acta aa ■ 

complats and aepanta urburator for <lo« apaed Knd will run your engine ■loner Chan uiy 

otbar carburetor, l It willroake youreogmapull betlar on hills and atslowapead. 1 ft 

■■■ -le roue old ouburetor lOto 20% looni eoononuoal,^ 1 I*,*"" "^o^var pof" 

■ibie. i It will indiokl* the lava] of lAe nooline in the float chamber and alao 

_.. . _ . ->. -v 1. --aporiiation of the fuel whan the eocine iirtipning, 

it.tt. ^flo«> W^l««. Honar rtfuoded if not 



ndioaI« the laval o( the nnline in the floi 
— Uiorough vaporiiation of the fuel whan tl 

■ktiatBOtorraRertandaya' trial. ^riU for circular. 



AMERICAN DIE * TOOL COMPANY. READING. PA. 



RUBBER GOGGLES 



IN LARGE VARICrr 

Cover Rubber Goggles 



r\/\ This Car Complete 
L/V m Parts 

Shaft Drive 
Air or Water 
Cooled 

AUTO PAKTS CO. 

52 a 84. W. jMkMB BMkwd 
C1I1CAG0.1IU. 



CYCLB AND AUTOMOBILE TKADE JOURNAL. 



B-TK PARTS 



1909 SelecUve TransmlesIonB, eelect- 
Ive and progresslTe Bide levers, cons 
clutches, brcnie or leather faced, with 
or without cork Inserts; three styles 
of Bteertng gears, universal Joints, and 
brass plating; parts made to your de- 
signs. 

W* mica • ^KUIIr af w 



Write for catalogne and prices. 

Aiitt Parts Manufachiring Co. 

MUNCIE, IND. 



NOTICE 
VANGUARDSPARKPLUGS 

work under all engine con- 
ditions with aiiotter spuli 
than in an; other Plug 
and a hotter ipark means 
more power. 



WABCmHK 

A^NGUARD 

HESISTERED 

Vansard lipirk Plujs 

are radically different In 
constructioa and far supe- 
rior to the old etereo^ped 
style of Plngi. Look at 
the cut; It chowi the dif- 
ference. Give us a trial 
order; it will prove our 
claims. Sent postpaid on 
receipt of price, $1 for the 
i" and metric, fl.36 for 
I the A. L. A. H. Discounts to dealers 
application. 




OTCLB ANt) ATrroMOBnJD TIUDB JOtnWAl^ 



The Coolest Glove 



Chilton Stock 
Designs for 

Post Cards 



are money-makers 

for automobile 

dealers. 

Send for Specimen Sheet No. 101 



CHILTON PRINTING CO. 

Market & 49th Sts. , PhiUdelphia 



Auto Bargains! 

THE TIMES SQUARE AUTOMOBILE 
CO. ANNOUNCE THE OPENING OF 
THEIR ST. LOUIS BRANCH HOUSE, 
IStb * PINE STS^ ST. LOUIS, MO, 

Nfw York, uiil now Id our Ihtnl yeu- In Cbln^. It la 
OUT purpoK lo .buy hltib-pul« ubM cars [ram ovvera 

WE ARE THE LARGEST DEALERS IN 
NEW &USEDCARS IN THE WORLD 



vulotia toulldkDSfl ui ercFpUoaHlly large Bjiil good ILdi 
or pomjlsr iuk« anil Rllablo autaino[>Llffl. 

IPTBB SAVINQ OP MONEV m AN OBJECT] 
YOU WILL DO WELL TO COMMUNICATE WITE 
USEiraSR IM PERSON OR BY HAIL. 

Tlu TtDHi Bgum it — ---■■-" — ■■■ i.....i. 



Deal with ■ Raipontibia Concera 

The Times Square Auto Company 

NEWYORK CHICAGO ST.LOUIS 

218 « 217 W. 1332-1234 Cor. IStb * 

4Sdi St. MIeU(u At*. Piua Sli. 



i 



[1 




Rice & Dayton Mfg. Co. 

C«dar FkUi, Iowa 
Mak« af • 

Little Wonder Vulranizers 



tiraa. Tbenei>'19og model Litlle Wonder Vul- 
oaniur is juet out. It ia lbs beat thing on Ihe 

YOU an operate it. Are you paying wo much 

Supply Catalog. It i> an EYE-OPENER. 

Let ua hear Itma you: we want your businn 
Mid know we can please you. WrilB to-day. 

Rice & Dayton Mfg. Co. 

CEDAR FALLS, IOWA 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



The ElweD-Parker 

Electric Co. of 

America 



OmtroUcrs 
FroDi and Rear AsUcs 
Power Planta 
Complete Ctaaaala. 
ready for body, ttrcs 
and baHerlea 

Office, No. 4223 St Clair Ave. 

Works, 4300 Hamilton Ave. 

CLEVELAND, OHIO 



Msda at rABBlO an* BoMw. Hka bb ACTO 

MBOEi wlthkknaaOuiBatbftt pnTvata 

It tnoi "ORBHF1N&." 

you NEED NOT CAMKV EXTKA SHOES 

If ymo iiaiif TrmT*r Falolwl 
THB ONLT rMd npklr Im t, BIH OTTi 

— ~ — —• — "—, w vM Mr ■ BLOWonT 
AWAV 

r- 

JL MONEI-aATBB tm tba OWNKBl 

A TBOUBLB^ATKB far tb* OHAUanCB 
rOUR SIZBB 

No. 0— F<n riMMi M and S in ta.M 

No. 1— For rtwa* 8) in 1.00 

No. 9— For dKMa 4 and M in- S-M 

No. S— For riMMi B and »{ Id 4.00 

TtaraaStylMi OUNOBEB— DDNIJ>P— FtWC 

Stata Itaa and Btyla n«nlrad. 

For 8ala br AIJ Daalan, oi Saat AQ/wharah th« 

Unltad Statai opon taedpt at prlaa. 

Trarer Blowout Patch Co. 

Patantaaa and Mannfaatnran 

NEW YORK 



AUTOMOBILE | 
ACCESSORIES 



Our IS09 eotiilaria af automobils aoceoorias. 
No. Ul , is the moiit oomplatc book of Iti kind aver 
i»ued. It DODtaint one huDdred and Bfty pucti. 
illuatratlns and describini 9uppliM o[ real merit 



These are Sample Prices 



SquareTait Lamps, 'eadi' 
Square SideLmnps. pair.. 
Battery Boxes, poli^eJ n 
Eight-day CIncka. guaranti 
Luther Tool Roria, each.., 



I Catnlogtw No. 421 

^EW YoKR Spoioing Gdods Co 



CTCLB AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



Ciglia Shock Preventers 




P— MhKJ T* C«Ulat 



BEHRMAN-BARON CO. 

1777-1779 Br»«dw»r New York Cily 



Ha dtt« e^Hk Ptaa Bad* MB *o* M* K 

Qnallty Is Onr Hollo 

MiAH AUTO-SUPPIY COMPMY 

Bloomfidd, New JerMjr 

< WkUtuItt muUm. B.L.AW.R.R.i 



PAQlrlOOQAnAQSMT*- Mw 



Never-Miss 



No. 8 

A "Buy" Word for 
Spark PluftB. One 
Year's Actual Ser- 
vice GUARANTEED 
aftalniteTen a brok- 
en Porcelatn. 

One 

Dollar 

Each 

ANY THREAD 

Maftneto Plugs sam« 
price. Try a set to- 
day. If your dealer 
won't supply, send 
direct, and we will 
pay postage and send 
you FREE 1 doxen 
Battery Ckinnectors. 

WRITE TO-DAY 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TKADB JOURNAL. 



PATHFINDING TIRES 

The E.-M.-F. Official Pathfinding Car for the GUdden Tour was 
equipped with MORGAN & WRIGHT TIRES. 



MORGAN & WRIGHT - 



DETROIT 




indntructibla. u the hou xna will give dawn when 
tbar* ia over ten pounds' pceuure put on Et. for it works on b mnvmble joint that allowt the hose arm t» 

We AIm Muinfkctur* Wuheri, Both PImd uid w[lh tha Electric Ligbt Attacbmanl 

The 1. J. Smith Mfg. Co., 178th SL & Park Ave., New York City 



CTCLB AND AUTOUOBILB TRADB JOURNAL. 



SKINNER 
RECOIL 




SKINNER & SKINNER GO,, Nfn. 

I42S HUlpi >n., Wall 



Fawn Magneto 



HiBh Tanuon SysUm for Jump-Spuk Uoton. 
Rnl Hot All«m*lins Current Sptrk— Alwsj'S tha 
Hiih Wave. Perreot SpHk Control on Muneto 
[hemme .son Bsttoiy Ignition. 8t«r« Motor 
Beadily Without Batteritss, No Circuit Bratkgr or 
Other Delicate Mechanism. UnaSeotKl by Oij or 
Water. Always liwdy and Reliable. 

Write for Ciroulan anci Pricee, 

fAWN DIVER MANUfACTURINe CO. 

CONST ANTINE. MICR 



Rogers Auto-Specialties 




W* hold TklM Patant and kUI [nt««t oqr Kalo- 

HMn Don't bxlindTiil. buy th« bt. 

For Ml* hr Iwswt IM)W aad dMlm In U. B. and 

■bnad. DtMoout to (ha mda. 

JM* * *iiiBiiln ■li.a..l4l(li*nh<.Htanll 



Two Port Carbureter 

No 
Springs 

No 
Valves 

AinriRDepL! 



OTOUi Aim AUTOltOBILl T&iOa JOtHtMAL. 



OTCLE AND AtTTOMOBILK TRADE JOURNAL. 



THE GREATEST EXPENSE 

toe. andyoDdon'tnMd tobematxparttooMlt. JuM [ollow dirao- 
Uona uxf you wUl b* ■uiprlMd bow «M]r rapwra OM) ba mwla. 
WiU-Mdh outfit rdDau make ■bout tX.DO worth of npaln— 




tUHVF^CTVUD MY 

THE H. * H. HFQ. CO. : Akron. Ohio 




Alnnilanm, Bnmxe, Mniigiiifiw Brouse 

CASTINGS 

"SUPERIOR" BABBITT 
"PUTA" WHITE BRASS 


ROCHESTER 

New York 


25 YEARS' EXPERIENCE 

CLUM & ATKINSON 



Pixley Floadess Carburetor 

Davelopi the fulJ effiuiency of ths motor. Develop* mor* powar. Givea you 
mors miles (o tbe (allon of iiwiliiia. Qivai you more apwad and aliminalea 
vibration, Givea mom alaatinily of power. 

Write far Cataloa Ns. 32. Mamfmclnred br 

GEORGE H. PIXLET, 31 HUNmGTOR AVI., BOSTOIf, MASS. 




The C. M. B. Socket Wrench 



aneh handle, makinc it poadUe to 

1— -f^, handle wUI swint 

ea with out drill atlMli- 



S.tSriSS:* C.M.B.VreiichG>.,I«lii<tri>llNd|.,S7ncii<e,N.T. 



High Grade Auto Supplies at Low Prices 



GENERAL AUTOMOBILE SUPPLY CO., Inc. J. C. NICHOLS, Pre«t 
1671-1673 Broadway, N. W. Cor. 53nd Street, New York City, U. S. A. 



COMMERCIAL POST CARDS 

IN NAT15HAL COLORS, made to order to suit your requirements. 
Make good ads., at reasonable prices. Send ub pieces of your printed 
matter, but ask for SAMPLES and PRICES. 

CHILTONN PRINTING COMPANY, Market ft 4»th St>., PHILADELPHU 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 
VVLCANIIBBS 



=tr?w? 



cms. E. JMLLER, AaJfo*. toJ. 



Mid tar oS CSnc- 
Uiia boAM M ttaa «^ 
MM at HaMoB kkt- 
wtMOakriiuuHOC 
•taiMe nSliM mU*. 
4Mo aMffolrlk racO- 



INVmCIBLE No. 620 ', 



MnlM 



BULTMAN 



MODEL R 
STEERING GEAR 

FOR RUNABOUTS AND AUTO-BUGGIES 

The F. H. BULTMAN CO., Cleveland, o. 



THE MONARCR ll(wSfia$PratedMi nl Cntnl, willMt iapin; ebsGdty 

A PiogicMTdf Rctudid Cnok with Oaarrting Rod, gndtuJIj uniting !u load en appcMching eilhn of ill 
oppoiite "ilcad cxoleit." 

Spcina dcBcctioa ii gndiully limited botb wifi bf dw MupiMl tad mort eitclive moTammtbuvni in macluBic*. 
lamwdiate ebcck on rebound ia etfaclin); pforidad. EadotNd br aoin - " * ' " 

Mu ■>• ardorsd Ml M dw>' trW tkHfk ur n 




Rotary Pumps 

rculailon •! 
1 ind on on 
1 e. Marine or 

iODirr Ed- 
1 sindforbllie 

CJTJLOGUE 


TlicI^MnaiiHIa.Co. 



ParfMtiiNi Anlo Ckwks ara mad* tmn aaat bnM 
•ad hUily polUiad Bad njekal platad. Hara a 
good M-boor watch moTomiiDt. ■lam winding, 
itam MttbiK also laris plain flcuna 
Wrlta for trad* diiaounte. 

Manofaatuiad by 
PERFECTION MFG. CO., CUralaMl O. 



CTCLB AND AUTOMOBILE TSADB JOURNAL. 

NO MORE CUSS WORDS JS THE DARK ^^^ ^ ^ 



IF YOU CAN 6Er YOUK B 



K ON IT YOU CAH PITT THE i 

""■AY ST*t¥sT*mViHG CO..' WORCCSTEH. MASS 



HIGH-GEUU>E FRXSSURX GAGES 

FOR GASOLENS. ADt. WATER OR STEAM 
■ !•• POr VALVBS. WATER GACES >■« COCKB 

TBE ASBTON VALVE CO. 

271 nANXUH nuR BonoM. lun. 

AlPD laa Ubmtf Bk, Maw T«k: U N. BmobiI St., FUIb.. P>.-. 174 Laka Bk. OiUaca, IB. 



A SPECIALTY 

Crucible Steal Gistings 

FOR 

AUTOMOBILES 



LebaDon Steel Casting Co. 

Lebanon, Pa. 
> 1021 ImJ tMU Trwl BUf . 



LoBO LUc ta Wkal Every ■■•lorlat 
-I iB mm Cw 

It It la • 



Importad ball bavln^ nud 



vhanrar onotieal ■•- 

ownan or Corbln Cua 

bow thay atand up in avarr day uaa, ot writa (or 

MfTi Ia[l Uiil 

Th« Corbin Motor VohEcto Corporatloa 



The Best of Insurance 

Brtwi lidkatir 



^. iiTot "WHITE" REXIBLE VALVE REMOVER A 






"WHITE" TROUBLE LAMP 

A Lmp with f«liir.. or-r etbar l-mM Prlee. «•» 

SAM. B. WHITE CO. r^^^it^i. 




The WACKENHUTH NON-SPRAYING CARBURETOR 

in other »rbun;[or«;BoonomLcBHn tha UMof gaaolina. 




UUEnon CMIIHEIOI a , 21 »«>■« «., Imrt, I. J. 




CYCLfi AUD AtrPOMOfilLfi fRADfl j{)ttR**AL. 



1910 GRAY MUFFLERS 1910 

Tb. Sle>dilr incrauint niuahmr of 

on wiU. Iha Gr»r MufHei— Fortr •ifbt 
of whom hive bt«n unng it ficlusiTslj for iCTei«J 
»<«.-;. the beEl t(.tia,oni«1. If. deiinMl 
Right, If. Built Rishl, It !■ RiKbt ind «< 
m.tlh.Tr«J< Right. 

A Specii] Modd fot «ch Qr. Wnte for 
Catalogue F. J. 
GMT-IUWLET HFC. CO., tkma, KA. 


COMPRESSOMETERS 

For Mins tlw criiadet 

kinJ. of piewro gauge. 
HMd m auto woik. 

^;.^iar.Tio^E^ 

Ik litelrnl WKiMil CMfiir 
Ik iimM (Hit Hi [^Mr 

FOXBORO. H*u. 
Nbw Yom CmcAoo 


A CLEAN SCORE " s^TCXiisriir^^^nrv^ir- 

100%ii^s"VA'ifNBKES 



Uki CndUlki i^ tSf Pnn 



hkn B Inlii el BtlaAtd iw 

waol Banl dnoUtlOD an r< 

or Motor Boat. m» » LOBKI 

Writ* tm alTMlar aad pr 

Lobee Pmp ud 

1Z7-U7 Tn 



ItT. 



AU KIND) OF TOPSforAU KINDS OF CARS 

Aa« EMh KlBd ■■ G«e« M It Cmm Be Hade 



Idb'i iiKill nu cu wHli u UI-MlDi ir •wLrmoJi KrE II 
li'll Il° "' S* 1™"^- Bl"* >»n> ud naM c« nu Hid • 

vu^nLTAuivTap ft dthcksiuiik co. 

102- IDS Diricht St., 8prlDca«1d, Uao. 



Manufacturers; 



piliita and ht M (atmdt a ampla 

STEERING GEAR 

GEMMERMFG.CO.,EJSr.fe 



Anifani 




Sbite 

Doci Mt coaplicale atgioe whli mtia pip«a 
and nlna. Uaaqoalcd efficiocj a>d tmpliekr. 
Hw b«cB m Mc mora dun G*e jean. (Sw <le- 
■ctilitiaa a May nDmber of tUt Jonnia].] 

AUeXANBEK « COX COHPANY 
OadcB « Wcatem Avcs^ CmCASO 



UAVEyou n. 
caved our 
laletl catalog on 
Pocket and 
SwilchbosTd Me. 
ten, CuRcnt Indl- 
caton,etc? 
Send (or one to- 

d.,. 

ROBERT 
WSTiUMEtlTa 



CTCUB AND AUTOMOBILE TRADB JOURNAL. 



Iialttr SolM Tin Motor ViUelu 



Ruiwbauti 



C am mercial 
Cu«. 

wni« for 1«M 

Ciulof. 

Monitor Automobile Work* 

1594 N. H«Uted St.. ChioKO 



Tire 
TroaUes? 

USE 
PERMANIT 



for m aamplo auton whioh is ■ufEdenl to 
lire. BsKUii of imiutiona. Gu«™n 
lumiBhed to every uwr of •■Permw.it.' 
THB ADOLF KAHL CO. 
m A W—W»if m. 



International Exhibition 



Centenary of Independence 
of Argentina 

To be held May to November of 1911 



CASCO, ODELL BROS. & CO. 



) DISCOUNTS, 



CYCLE AND ADTOMOBrLB TRADE JOURNAL. 



C. O* T« Just whar you 

RI M PAI NT h"eb«i, looking 
for to keep your 
tird froiD rusting 
to the rim. Will 
not injure the tire. 
For tale by all 
jobbers. 

CtHries 0. risky 
&Ci. 

KAHWAV, N. J. 




BODIES 

Of aDdascripliMU for n ta aal »t J b u * n . [ 
tb* White or Palntod tad TrimiMd 




ifo.iia. FUrKqapp^Ti 

WrH* (■ M IMOwM on 



jBSffcitTMj OkUbon 



< Cttr ud OkUlkoin* Endunan Hub ; IM car tnat 

WONDER MOTOR CAR CO. 

KANSAS CTTY. MO. 
■■fc^ M tf k Kmmm CitT W«id*r AbHmpM-i 



INSURE TOUR MOTOR 

AOAnST WBAR and CASBOS TROUBLES 
br mliig 

INVADER OIL 

THB on, THAT ORAPHITIZBS 

YoD nuna the car, wVll namt Itw cntde 
Manotaetuisd oaij by 

, CHAS. F. KELLOH ft CO. 

: lU Arch StTMt, PHILADELPHIA 



THE 3^JES1 

Wind'shlelds 

VOLTZ BEBOffiR 
5CHILDES.4CK 

A ikUU ftr tvtrr»nt. ITriu /tr priai. 

Lbnousme Carriage Mfg. Co. 
3515 MlcUcu Atmbs CUcaf* 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL 



TD niBt li •■ ton il a lb_ Cariw 

IK 

unoiui 
inosof 

OUWR 

HUMFna 

o/inU-sl«MliBnlHfl»tatBBvlM. tmtmmUr 
iMorlptl** iMMr »■* tdhiyfcil imm M m» W* 

— tt—ljjj, j_- — ^ 



Noiseless Running Gears 



Ha7 be voura if you buy tbow 
maoufactured by lu. Wb •olidt 
orders fcr all kmda of gearing, 
from the raw material to tha 6n- 
iebed product. 



Ite Vh Dm I hllM b., OmM, Ok* 




riMtollHlka MhOHOK 


Urn 


attd 


ball u 


:?5S 


KIMBALL TIBE CASB CO. 

wnouwAT CMmaL mm; »n 



CYCLE AND AXJTOMOBILB TRADB JOURNAL. 




TRIO MANUFACTURING CO. 

M WOODBMD6E nSEET, IWraOIT. HICB. 



PANIC PRICES-SALE 



1907 ThoMM Cmt*. 9»00 lo 91400. 

Obb. f7S0 to 91200. 

Piwn, 9750 t» 91250. 

PmtUm. 91200. 

Fnttklin D, 9SS0 to 97B0. 

Fi>t 91250. 

MuwalU, $275 to 9650. 

BOO otban,— 9100 up. 

CloMd Bodiaa— 100 in itock to fit 

maj ud an uako*, 9200 to 990a 



BrMdmy AstaaoUk Eickaag^ 



WEIEI PMTAILE TIM-TIILE TROCIS 



Hm U. 8. Oooit hu ]dM dasluw) oar Patant 
nod Mid nUd In aolt t^loal tU Flki* Tmk 
Banotutiirini Oo. W* hav* itarUd adt icaiiwt 
'Vonraod" tor infrlB^ni. Tb» only tm wnj 
ofbiuiHan Anto Tttm-Tabl* or TraA la to ■•• 
«BtA« acabiatKM "Tb* WabM- Fortabia Torn- 

TafalaTniak." FaBtort.UoB' '' " 

bjaBicAbaa. adiim«i«Im 

m ma mu 4 tmit m„ 



(, Tnd. For •■)■ 



B .uiomiic.llr. O 
~ netiiHkTHi.Hkoi 




■ ■«>•• fam Inabu. Huacai rid 

■ tte of lira mad imaat out u the a 
U. S. uiiFortwP " ' 

Wrile for Cireular 

Tlia Bi-Cal-Kj AozUiarr Sprinc Co. 

•M FtM»wl Anaaa. BWTalo, N. Y. 




VEHICLES SPECIALTY CO. 

M Slalc Street HAKTFOKD, CONN. 
pAt Las^ perfect 'ightsfor 
ABbMMtlnlet ul B«ts 

THE ASHTON 

Acetylene Separator 



oount to Ihs Indc. 

W. E. Asltlam a Dorr Co. 
r. 141«BM*n..PUla,Pa. 



CYCLE AUD ADTOUOBILB TRADE JOURNAL. 



Storage 
Batteries 



Make Good 



Write lor Oar 

Trial Otter 

CABPENTER « VOLKHABWT ' 

HU MIcmCAN AVE. 



MANUFACTURERS' SUPPLIES CO. 

418 ARCH STREET, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Importers, Jobbers and Distributers of 
AUTOMOBILE SUPPLIES 



HIGH CLASS RADIATORS 

WHJABS TUBE ONLY 

"Our Tuba in Old Frames Cure Overheating" 
LIVINGSTON RADIATOR CO. HJ^'Ki^ 



Special Parb M'P( 

Hanleniiig •»•> Grinding 

Expert Gear Cutting 

Builders of Machinery 



CMlfKl llaey» Wark ia All Brucki 

CovpUta EqnipBMBl 

SPECIALISTS IN ANYTHING 

twmad tnu Bh BtMi av ta T la. ! « ■ ■> «« « ■ 

tSnilf lAOIK WOHS, IMestir, New Ytit 



CYLINDER CASTINGS 

HIGHEST QUALITY 

lOCmfiAN MOTOR CAS1Di6S CO. 



Tl» imlt fat Owl ivaiked !• 




«BAKER~ Spurk Ping i, 

T««|ln*. T*a<nna>bieMMtKMjii d 



Z » aaj^t^'i. laa* a. ai|k y<» » to 



W?" 



THE VACUUM YANKEE ^ all «Mdi rf the >nflii>*L Ad>|>t«l^tor xitaBnbflN and 
aMW^MTV UITWI VB marina ow. Had* ol haaTT vtlnnlMd Iran. Haad «Hh aa- 

SILENX HUrrLEJI b^uw and nUuad «i>h iMal, «Hti rlratad aMOia. OU as- 

nan^n duunbw diam tlia barat (aM* fram (ha (O'tindw 

■ad praitnU haaUna. Mow and on ancr maka tt oar and 

lor boala, mada In Tariooa aiaik bum 1 to 

L Baa tkat the YANKEE li on >wiT gar 



CYCLB AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAU 



t Onr Offer I 
nA Agent't 
Proporition 



THE INVINCIBLE 

SCHACHT 

whtel aiitoiDiiUla 1p the vorld. 
bUTlDt tDf «i ot tlili typs EK 

tlie ixnk Hud ttnttj propMlilaa. 
Sdfda Mf ■■ Co, zm lirtw Cm Am. 



60™ ?l-°Kn: 

^^ •T«fT detail. 
■II rMdy to butall te 
jaor bottt. 

Mule In At larftt mini 
mott mp-lo-dBU plant te 



t 



ICO. »Utktl,Mnll,n 



LANE STEAM ROADSTER 

Um Hrtw ViUd* C*., rwi^hiipdi. R. T. 



We Manufacture 

WiTHODT DODBT 

Best Transmission Axle 

INAHEUCA 

Mr M 6k IS ■ OppMMr !■ hm Tbf 



DoBRIElir 



DdBrie motor CO. ^ 



COMPLETE LISTS 

AUTO OWNERS (CERTIFIED) 

DEALERS, GARAGES, 

MANUFACTURERS. JOBBERS, 

GAS ENGINE MANUFACTURERS 

AND MOTOR BOAT OWNERS 

Auto Directories Co., Inc. 

1717 Bnadwar, N>w York Gtj 

'Phm, 8S6 ColumbiM 



BKOWNELL MOTORS 

IHdJI cyLINSERS, ntOM so H. p. DP. 
BTANDARD FOB BXCELLBNCB 



VHVr POWEK PLANT 
AntOBMba* Hodd A-a. it B. p., tai 
BoUda or Aaembls 

BAS NO EQUAI. 

F. A. Brawnall Motor Co., Rochaiter, N.Y. 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 




Start Y«r C« EiwiM With 

litsiiftr Aiti-SfulKf 

> *ad raa H willHHrt (ha kid ef 
^UttafiH. NDt ■ cbiikp DM- 

Folij Giurultad. Optnua 

■iniuoa ud UitiUni on « n»U KU^ parTc«l|> mita ow 
RMdil nrlldi bMrd In Ui< drnUt. Tm jmi^maatl 
■win wlin ovtT 94,000 Aulo-SEMHkfn noptnuton to 

UMlTUlUOUTiL 

MOTSINGER DEVICE HFC. CO. 

PENDLETON, 



ALUMINUM SOLDER 
THAT WILL SOLDER 

Directions simple and easy to follow. 

Developed for our own use, now put on 
the market. 

Makes soldering aluminum as certain a 
proceas as Bolderins tin cana. 
Write lor prices. 

CLUM & ATKINSON 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



INLET and EXHAUST 
VALVE SPRINGS 
Sometimes Cause Trouble 



Let U8 save you trouble by 
fumishing you springs that 
STAND THE TEST. 

The WALLACE BARNES CO. 

BRISTOL, CONN. 



COMFORT AND WEAR 

ARE COMBINED IN THIS 

Soft Edge Cushion Spring 



r Thkt'i why it bu bees adopted by pruticmlly 
■II lh« IsadinE aulamohila manulnotunra. Let 
lu Hiure with YOU. 

NATIONAL SPRIN6 A WIRE CO. 

AHhob, MiciL, ■«! St. CatharintK, f>Bl., Cu. 




CTCLB AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAU 



283 



WILLIAMS' 



TOUT i(iilCloii ■ lot moiE mU 

B. Q. WILLIAMS 

STKAOOIB. K. T. 



NtVER LEAK 

YllKtefM- 

■itk Vns 



two Biialllc mtm. Ha wttw No waAsa. aimvtt. 
Apflt f D«pt. A. HmM. m». C^ Bdrtol. R. L 



___^_ PU. BppUn) tor ^^^ a 

fl^B KEVOLVING ^H r 

P^^ CBAR SEATS ^^ S 

II I I For Auuw or BmU. I I I 

I I I I We tito nunufuture ^Hk S 

UBM WINDSBIBUM ^^B S 

^^^^^ Rook bottom pHos. m^^^^ S 



HELE-SHAW CLUTCH 
Patented Grooved Disks 



"Perfect" Antomobile Specialtie* 



UERCHANT * EVANS CO. (VidL D*pl.) 
PUImdaliJlU. P*. 




BOUGH RIDER SPKIHQS opmUma 



KIUBALL 



^^^ISa^^SSSTg- 



OILERS 



flirlnn Triiilip iii Htiitlip 

tar 

UmisIhi, UihilitlH aid Tulcibs 



C COWLES & CO. 



Hakea Autoa look Uk« new. Leading gat- 
agM have it. Write ua for Munple ean. 

THE J. P. DAVIES C«« 



IDEISIII6 

flcripbon 

iE 



1W Triuiph 
Setf-SUrtug Cir 



miENCTH — sntPucrrY 



' SUVA 



Tho Utmost for SISOa 

No anlor oh at anywhw soar tb* prio* bbb Kiin- 
Hta with the CkUnm-DMralt "W>-*^attlMa. 
Wo ain inaka the Cbalman-Datrolt " Fortr " 
(tormMlr Thomaa-Datrott "Fortr ") lor OTHl 

OUUnMEIMn'inNCO. Mni,Kdipi 



CYCLK AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



THE SHOOTING OILER 

HOI Precision Oiler 

Precuion Appliance Company 
833 Amtfai At*.. CUmco. IHinoi* 



BODIES 

AUTO BODY COMPANY 
LansiuB Michigan 

lil>Ul<liM«lilllJ>i« 



Fain tod ud OphobUnd Complsla 

AUTOMOBILE TOPS A SPECIALTY 

Ijt POBTE CAHM1A6E CO^ I^ Pff. !■< 



■■Port" apedu c 

'*Bu1ck" fiperial Cvtbur 

Service" cwi>iirm»i. 



IT Hoddg N, R ud 



171 KlItlT ».. hltrt. I. J. 



THE BUGCYCAR CO. (tatKvmM) 

CINCINNATI, OHIO 



BODIES 



Wrilefor 

■EADINC MEfAI. BMIY CO. 



ODIES 



CYLINDEK CRINCSRS 

RING GRINWRS. INTERNAL GRINISRS 

DRILL GRINDERS 

The Heald Macblne Co. 

14 NEW BOND ST.. WOBCEBTML >lA»g. 



Friction Transmissions 
Automobile Motors 

N«w '09 cataJoe ot 24 pa^ea Juat ouL Pica If you 

CUMAX ELECTRIC WORKS 

NEW SALEM, lUUS. 



HEXABOa HEAD SCREWS, lUTS, ETC. 

Fm y Malal nili OBUBBlMd M A. U A. II. BUBdaid 
Aarthlna IimimJ Irom bar 



BeiROIT SCREW WORKS 



WaldCD Ratchet Wrench 

Ever try our Lug WrenchT 

Elqually good for all around lue. 

Simple, Strong, Serviceable Tool. 

Walden Manntactortaig Co. 



Thi ShirmiD Spuk PIiie 



aar patect. and m 

G. H. UEMIAN ft SOM, 41f SL A^fa An 

Patent apptlol Cor 



IH| "BlIARVEL" 



ffuaraDUed battvj t 
tot ma tmi. Bad to 



WE HAKE DEVICES FOR 



BROKEN TAPS 

THE WALTOH CO. 
306 Paul St., Hartford, Conn 



II FOB aBCtlLAB 



AUTOMOBILE TOPS FOR 1908 CARS 

THE C Z. UGH MFG. CO., TOLEDO, 0. 



"Riglit'' Gaskets and Packings 

An niadi il^t and hava Ihi iWit malsUl In tbdn. 
Copper Aabettoi filled, Copper Cg(ni- 
gated or Plain, Lead, Aabcatoa^ Rubber, 
Btau, Leather, Sted GaduM. 

HSKI SHrrtT CO, ISII S«a SL, 



CTCLB AND AUTOMOB1L.B TRADE JOURNAl^. 



We Make Engines 

'nanminiiMtt, JukdufU uid Rwr 
AxIm for Antomobfla Hanubetup- 
ara. We do OMitnet machioa work. 
Sand blue piipte and data for eati- 

Baipi<iii«iHiCi.,iM. i*w»,adL 



EXCLUSIVE MAKERS OP 

Genuine Barrett Automkile Jadis 



SfCCIFV ••« IWHANB 



»lfita|taNHr.l.T.CI| 



S^ Air Coiprossi 
J "assures 
I ''•^^^^ 
F GBO. 8. cornn 

■ Il lMl 1 1. g 



Coipnssors 

'$25 N 



The Lambert Car 

f tew piitfc fKnphiHduHcsl thiMn, 

rriHaHL Bum ■«(»«(. 
Mob. Wriu lor cbi>Mi«. 



AntomobUe Tools 
and Sundries | 

"*CHAS. WEILAND 

14T-14* OaBbva StTM*. 
i-iai Raaa* SiTHl, H. V. 



45,000 MirOMOIUS 

•n Mdt cqaippod wltti j 
HyUt Hollar BsulacitU* I 
yau-. Aik wbyT I 

HVAnmuniaiiwai.' 



AUTOMOBILE 
SPHNGS 



All St^ea and ffltapea made by 

imu MK omir, a i. m im. otap, ■■ 



MICHELIN 



iaU.TOWN.N.J. 



FELT PACKING 

FOR 

AUTOMOBILES 

MY SPECIALTY 
N. E. BOOTH 

7U-«tMSt., ■wifcfca.K.I. 



SAMSON TYPE COURSE 



SAMSON LEAIHER HRE CO. 



W« praduM troD 4^ Snllil Papbr aU Had* id 

SEAT BENDINGS 

roi Avnnmiua and caiuages 
THE TUCKER WOOD WORK CO. 

SMnay OUo 



EVERYTHING FOR 

Bicycles, Motorcycles C& 
Automobiles 

Oat our CaUlosi 

Sidney B. Robjr Co., Rocheater, N. Y. 



$9.75 



DELTA MFa CO, SK?!!SB 



OnarantMd 1 year 

6 Tolt, 60 Ampere Storage Battery 

DlKonnt In qnantttlM 

S. MtEAKSTONE 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



BURROWES 
SPARE WHEEL 

HUM* no ioerenw fc nmnlQj 1- — <--"t--» *u 



THK B. T, BUKBOWKS OO., P«rtl»aJ. I 



■UIHmWMtJHIUM 



I L 

SniOIIIBBie MOTOR DEVKES COMPANY 

Main Otflci and Fnctoryt 
13tk St. * McUgra At*^ CUcmo. UL 



EMF' 



1 , 2 S 



MAGNETO 
INCLUDED. 
OF COURSE 



EKriU-MzKf-fMcn C*. 



THE AUTOMOBILE SUPPLY COMPANY 

1339 HleUsu Blvd^ Chleaio, Dl. 

RHXtnsi, Bnsine*. TruunUadmu. lAiop*> 
Honia, Clothlnc and all kinds o( Sacpllc* 
and Acccoorlca for Uannfactaren. Dealen. 
Repair Men and Automobile Owneta. 
■•Bd tm ■<■¥ OMalccna 



THE IUND6REN IGNITION SVSIEM 

Ueea leas batteiy cvirront. Contact Maker 
requires no HcfjustiueDt, relinble at all 
speeds. High tension. Send for circular. 

Lundgren Manufacturing Co. 

U^ IHM Ml ftM SM riMdplii. Pi. 



BRASS FITTINGS 

BraM, Bronze sad Almninnm CaotliiKi, 
Special Fittings. Send us yonr Blue 
Prints for estimates. 

TIm Adunj & Weidakc Compiiy 

E«tabU*li«d 1852 CHICAGO, ILL. 



OLDSMOBILE 

"The Car with ft Pedisree** 



OLDS MOTOR WORKS 



"•"Arf Storage 

Batteries 



Helical Gears 



The Grant-Lees Machine Co. 
6901 Qulncy Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 



PerfecUon Spring Co. 



BmcKCars 

BCICK MOTOR 00^ FUut, Hleb. 

gartoriaa at Jaekaop and Flint. Midi. 



KINWOOD 
AUTOMOBILE PARTS 
THE IQNSEY MFG. CO. 

DAYTON. OHIO 

ASK FOR CATAIOCPE 



STEEL 
BRASS 



PRESSED STEEL MFC CO.. 4i41k Imm. PUIa- Pa. 



ENNIS 



AUTOMOBILE 
MOTOR CYCLE 
BICYCLE 



TIRES 



Also a Full Line of Vulcanizing Materia] 



ENNIS RUBBER MANUFACTURING COMPANY 



NEWARK. NEW JERSEY 



CTCLB AND AUTOMOBILE TKADB JOURNAL.. 



TOPS 

ityitt to suit every 
^jtut out. 

Fmi. mw t» 

' tartm.t-l. 



AalomoMlc 



Alumlniiin Castings 



LIGHT MFG. & FOUNDRY CO. 

PoKstown, Penna. 



IForWORNOUTBORES 

«. «el the vnxH 

I PATENT RBNBWAi; FISTOK. wSl 
J nut low comprfrian or wear the crlln- 
1 derafter It la tnwrtcd. Preteeu new 
" cjUudenfTombclDcdcatnrcd. 

P. A. TVILLE. 80l« BItr. 

a- Place. Bmoklyn. M. T. 



CENTAUB HOTOB CO.. Mvi^^ 

tow Ualeatlc Bide. Detnll. Ulcfa. 



THE AMERICAN TOOL WORKS CO. 



LATHES i 
SHARERS 



m^ PLANERS 
RADIAL DRILLS 



CHARGE jnrnr igHitian b*ttarr 
■t hoiua fraa an alterMlinf cor- 
rMrt whb * 

SIMPLICITY RECTIFIER 

Cbaap. doiable and effideat. 

Sava your tfant^ man*? and battarr. 

THE AUTO A SUPPLY MF«. COi 



Monogram Oil 

The Bat lor Yotir Engine 

- — ' --T SOLBLV BY 



LAMINATED WOOD MUD 
GUARDS ud DASH BOARDS 



AMERICAN VENEER CO. 
112 MukM St, Kenavorth, N.J. 



AUTOMOBILE 

CABINET-WORK 

CBS BATTERY BOXB8 UNIT BOXKB 
L. BOXES DASHBOARD BOXES 



Standard CabhiM liU«. Cn.. Rem, ladtaaa 



STANDARD BEARINGS 

STAND THE TEST 

right— right nlong. No higtier in prioB, eilhor. 



NOONAN 

Tools & Specialties are 
Snperlor 



■ TMmM.Wki,lM^ILV„U.S.A. 



Seven Different 
Lamp Bracket Models 

ALL ADJUSTABLE 

MANUFACrURBD BV 

THOS. J. NORTHWAT, RmUiw, N. T. 



NEW VESTA SPARMDKG HATTEKY 

For IssillDc caa enciiw Inthe AuMmakUelmu- 
anteed to enrr parchaaer. Manar will be re- 
hmded if not ■atUfaclorj. Shipped folljr diarnd 
rcadr lot nae, with dlrectlona lor tcchaixlna. 

VESTA ACCUHUUTOR COVANT 
laMtBcyw-AT— a CMuM 




TRUFPAULT- HARTFORD 

SHOCK ABSORBER 

M>jfc 

The Davlea that mada Safe, Speedy and Com- 
fortable AntomobiUDB Foerifate. 
Writ* tor Cataioi. Department D, 

HARTFORD SUSPENSION CO. 

£. V. Hwtfgrd. Free., 145 Bw Si., Jmmt Cit>. N. J. 



CTCLB AND AUTOHOBILB TRADE JOURNAL. 



NATWML AUTO TOP CO. 

^ 1904 Broadway 

V It NEW YORK 



Fine Tops &FoId- 
"r~li in* Wind Shield* 

' .on Wiita for IlliutraMd Cau- 



Mi Impnived Auto SpctMllks 

Ditp Fan*. Maaanm and rimiMU far Oil aad 
SaMtena, OHjr Waata Oana, ate. 

EaUinafaa Fartdakad on Spaciml VTork 

DteltrttKiUteraurtmMpivpBntiMt 
HILL DRYER CO.. Wornator, llMa. 



Glass Fronts 

Onr aaw W tront loldi tovacd Iha Haoinc whiiaL 

Ooaiaata^d Fnoeh plata ^aw. Writs ui f« 

InfoRiwtiHiaDdprioM. 

BOSS ABBOWNE 



CRUCIBLE STEEL CASHNG CO. 



Annrlcin Motor Car Silu Go. 

INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 



DAYTON AIRLESS TIRE 



iasood — that actuallr doai aava ;ou all 
niuiatiD tnublea and livca you avary pnaomatis 
rantata. Writ* foi tha booklata. 

DtTtoB »Mm Wi. Ca., DirtN, OU* 

Naw Yorfc KMnu. 1 W Bwadwaj 



Distribnton of Overland Can 



l«lat«a. BUit*a««lD daMia 



Writ* for CaUlofftM 



••THEBB IS A EBASON" 



DETROIT AUTO-SHIELD CO. 

laOO M 1300 Woodvaid ATa.. Datfefc. tBefc. 






BIHfTOtl. OHIO 



Qeoeral Electric Company 
Battery Charslac Outfltf 
Principal Otfk*: 
ScheoocUdy, N. Y. im 



I 



Oar Sp*claltrl 

ROBBINS 

Removable 

■-GoBpc Top 

tsa.oo. 



STANWOGD STEPS 



AUTOMOBILE TOPS 
$25.00 to $100.00 

FOR ANT 8TTI3 AtJTO 

Chas. P. McaeDan 



PynliB Tnuparat Skeelbf 

Mm^it ~ ■ ■ ■ 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOUHNAL 



COL. SPRAGUE'S 

NEW WIND SHIELDS 

Tb* Laadw In Brui Tb* BurpriM la Wood 

Qet DOT loir prisM on pMxl f<M>d>. 

Tba Spngo* Unbralk Co., Norw^ OUa 



FRONTENA ft 

PUiMn Ctn lai Cualta* Ci— tlJ Tn^ 

Cao ddJvar munadutaly M-t6 H. P. T-Puhiicn 
Tourist On, %9tOO. ud Runabouts. 
AOMNTB WRITX FOB FBOPoaiTIOM 

iMni t M Hi. b., ICn Imtar (mtSM S.) I. T. 

J. J. EVANS. Art, (fwfc AiAm ■wMfc.l 



\ 



wuETinauis 

fUXBU UTTERY CtMNEaORS 



GMMMOM ILECniCft HTG. Ca 
PmUMM, K.L 



Hoimr Brothhs Company 

DETROIT, MICHIGAN 






STAR 



II i* iLa oolf ahfiTi nlial 

nrAnoiYRASsct^ip 



PoshlT* «Dd lUsnUr 

IntUoo iiurtM bad Iw lb* 

"STAR" TIMER 

po«"i't ti>n Mv«i u 70UI wnw 



GILBERT 

HOTOB OAR AOOBSSOBIXa 
■Md toe (htatofl 

GILBERT MFG. CO. 



EISEMANN 

n«B TEN8I9N avSTEII 

MAGNETOS 



10 ^ 50% ''*™.™ 
Auto Supplies 



Ron Gear and Tool Co. 

HANTFAOTUKERB OF 

STEERING GEARS 
Pluiert of Bevel Geen 
Lafoyette 



' A FOmMOiON TOOL" 

Davit^Boumonnlle Company 

Row 1U2. 92 W«t at.. N» Vofk CIlT 
Oxr-AcMrlMM WaMfaw Mid Coltiai 



Dnryea's Biiggyaat,$680 



f^Hll 



TIm ria tor i 

Ssrnl (U 



ft 3-ayQle aif- 
barptu — Oil. 



LLMffa. fcrf^ftm 



EVERY CAR OT HUNinEDS BUILT BY 

The Acme Motor 
Car Company 

dnM lU itart (MV*n ymim tfiii* itill tiinDinc In 
Iha hudj of lU punhuBT. That i> ona nuon 
why It b o^lad THE BtEBNAL ACMB. I 

Tha Acm« Motor CwCo.. R«*Jin» P«- | 



«U50 




CTCLB AND AUTOMOBILB TRADE JODRNAl* 



Motor Car and Motor Boat Topi, 

Glau Wiod Shields, Storm 

Froab, Bumpers, etc 

Quick deliverin M ri^t ptien. Comapondiooe 



AUTO -TOP FABRICS 

Of every descHptlQa. Samples 
md price list larmlshed apoD 
reqacst. 
L. J. HUTTY Co^ BOSTON 



THE 



SirenQ 



CO. 



BUKUFACTUBBHS or 

ELECTRIC SIRENS 

S9-41 Corttand St, Maw ToA, D. B. A. 



HORNS 

AUTOMOBILES, MOTORCVCLES, BICYCLES 

lomBBU iHD HuiiiiiaTuaMU UHD ma uimB* 

RILEY-KLOTZ MFC. CO. 

NEWAHlk N.J. 



Hartford Universal Joints 

have proven tlieir worth by the only real 
meOiDd that oouuta— eveiyniay um. 

HASTVORD ADTO PABTS CO. 
«42 AsylaiR Street, BartiiHrd, Cobb. 



ABl^Mbac aad HarlBC 

MOTORS 

n 10 H. p. M StO H. P. Write w. 



PratocI rav or wtth ma 

ADDISON 
Steering Cbeck 

It intuna rou (vioM daiiftr, holdina lh« front 
■liMlf uriul u the rav. Seauy prarloni inoa. 

Wrila for PrioB. 
TW ADDISON. 113-116 8. Hnyim Aw.. CUeimt 



« 



HUH GKADE MAKINE AND 
AUTO ENGINES 

B<M DtttacW ■ndPallr Oauas- 
Uad. AIM nU Miflng irftt 



SMB.BMtBC, HabvlM.Msn. 



I Built Ri^t, Looks Ri^t, 
Stays Ri^t, Rides like a 
PuUman. Beat motor 
jguilt; simple and eaay to 
nt at. Beat oar on the markat at S2,250. 
Bach oar and each part proven pnfeot 
More it is diipped. 

MIDLAND HOTOB CO^ t HoUac. m. 



Standard 
Automobile Jacks 

COOK'S STANDARD TOOL CO. 
KalatnazoOf Mlcb. 



WRIGHT COOUKS 

TIwBm 



IM(H CmIv I iMi Ml. b. 




We Manufacture 

THt Lowirr 
DOUGLAS * LOMASON CO.. IB 



CYCLEi ANB AtJtOMOBILH TRADE JOURNAL. 



Kissel Kar 

Sand for Catalog 

KISSEL MOTOR CAR CO. 

1» KI8W1 Are.. HARTFORD. WIS. 



CORK INSERTS 



Hotor Ov boUdwi tor tba iaawHd sffiginicy tW 
■Iva. Write tor Booklet diawtoc AO applioatkinii. 

National Brake A Clatch Co. 



AUBURN 

|AMM Five PuaenserToarinBCer, doable 

■ Ml IM '°'^ia<^«'">«lbMe. (1,250. 

I UU O ^f? CytiDder Li(ht Tourinc Cu, 

. H. P., 108-lneh wheellbiiiB. 11.400. 

AUBUIW AUTOMOBILH CO.. AUBURN, IND. 



VARNISHES 

for the Automobfle Trade 
For prices and particulars address 

COLUMBUS VARNISH CO. 

Ohio 



Dp/\$500iuid 



$1000 



thel'f wh»t c 

R. M. Ow«n & Co., Lansing, Mich. 



General Self Ajren 



I for the Ree Mnf Cer Ca. 



LIVE Agentt Wanted For 

THEGAETH 

S •rT-ruMVM' TMrhf Can; TMnUrt; $3,500. 

liwsMhs. $4,500. Wrlta fw niabf. 
THE GAETH ADTOHOBILE CO., Omlmi, OUt 



METAL TOOL AND BATTERY BOXES 

FENDERS, FORCED IRONS, HOODS 
TANKS AND GARAGEJ FLOOR PANS 

HAYES MFG. CO. 

MsriMT —J Cnad Timk Kwlnr. DETROIF 



THE LOCOMOBILE CO. 



Rerce Arrow Matat Car Compuij 

MAKERS OF 

PIERCE ARROW CARS 

Buffalo, New York 

. A.L.A.H. 



"Thirty" 

$1400.!! 



Tie car Hut aitiblUHd ■ new ■tmadaid ia 

ABtemobfla valnae 

CwiilUc Moler Car Co., Dotntit, Bffich. 



THE SCaWARZ WHEEL 

Approved and adopted b^ the leadiuK au- 
ttunobile nujiiifacturerg. Spokea mter- 
lock. Can never loosen. 

SEMD rOR 1IXC8TRATKD 



WriU for f«a pBitietdUr* about the 

Oakland "Forty" 

4-.vllHhr. aluftMn. A]h for . cr ^ 
"OAKLAND TOASTS" 

OAKLAND MOTOR CAR CO. 



THE INTER-STATE 

^Ao8«JSS4SS«!i SHi-SKSB! 



lM.r.St.t. Antemobile CMDpMir 
124 Wabrd St».t. Miod.. IhL 




^ 



GROUT AUTO CO. ORANGE MASS. 



CTCLB AND AUTOMO -H TKADB JOURNAL. 



Detroit Carriage Company 

DETRCHT. KOCHICAN 

Eipart DMisDcn ud Builden of AnlMB*Mlf 
B^Htm, ID the WbiM, Puntad and Tnmmad. 
Ckpsdty 20.000 Bodka AnnDftUy. 
Roier B. McMiillai,GMMT>l SaU* AkmM 
1 IB Aduu StTMt, CMCACO, U- 



i ) 



m 



^,»»^!-.;.^*.**w*' 



MHlSMlGIINnS 

■Irid *i tiunillii tirrm 



Tk U. S. Dm- 
tatnl TwI C*. 



D 



lO 



Amcritafl Belting and TannH^ Co. 



Wktarproof Motor Cjdm Boltint 
*nd Antomabila Chilch LaatkMr* 

135«MrSlnl : : nsm, WSS. 



HAYNES 

40 H. P., $3000 
Htrset AatMiohile Co., KokoBO, lad. 



FOUD 
GIAIS 

lie nanalMd Dot u iwtll 

I^ u ttU Toa whr. 

I^JRIDE COMPANY 

8YKACU8E. N. Y. 



Atwood-Castle Co. 

HIGH GRADE 

AUTOMOBILE LAMPS 

Amesbury, Mass. 



SHEET METAL 



STAMPING AND DBAWING 
DO TOD KNOW OOm BlNDt 

Waxattrt $xnatb fiutl On. 

DUT. 



Hif h Tension 
Magnetos 



Antomatic Wind Shields 

IiijlMtl7 nlHd or lomnd. Nst ud sUimrttr. 



d our pliM* uid uuloi nous DfC. (9. 



"Soot-Proof "Spark Pints 

Th. Mudwd BiiiliiIMnt for Ucb-pBd. .atomoblk.. 

C. A MEZGER, Inc, l 

ins BrwrfwuT H HEW 



Vlvax Slwagc 
Battery Co. 



DDIES 

Limousines & Landaidets 

H H. BABCOCK COMPANY 

WotMtowa. N. Y. 



AMtMwbilt Ante— HdK— Bms 



Weston-MottCo. 

FLINT, MICH. 



QUALITY GUARANTEED 

SXt/D FOB 1«9 CATALOOVZ 

Boston Gear Works 

Norfolk Dovrna, Maaa. 



BALL BEARINGS 

BRASS D ALXltS 

WK HATX TBEU IH ffTOOK OB WILL UAKB 

THEU FROUPTLT. 
AMERICAN BALL CO^ P 



^m 



UitMTMNILflimTn. 



CYCLE AND AUTOMC tr- - ."'IIADB JOURNAI.. 






The wcll-kDOWD ud papular Paariau Automatiil* 

It is B gulak nllsr mad pisua the lui 

OLIVER MFG. COMPANY 

The Manafactnrer will sell patents and 
buainess of a nell-kaown tool used on the 
antomobile and motor boat. Has been on 
the market three years. Handled and 
ottalogned by all the leading Supply 
Honses of the country. Jjiit price ol tool, 
ll.SO- Address "Tool," care this Journal. 



It is nimple, (trons, durable and Ineipenilv*. 
Ddle makes excellent lire tool. 

303 S. Desplalnes Street, CHICAGO 



1, In pwd coDtUt 



. tL OLMSICAD. 



ibip*. FllCf IBI. 



TO FIVE DOLLARS. 

in ind Hint dlilulT 
ys. CO.. DKiDii. MidL 

0-TIBE VULCAKIZER 



BROWII- 



1 Rivldl. ilKb. 






■ wiLL TRADE F6K 
P," AIR-COOLED," (B 



AddrcH "ntANELIN I 



R REOCISITRS. 1 



E RUNABOUT. WBIJ. BQUIPPKi; 



r. THOMPSON, L«nci 



; HAVE Addrni WM. a. LAUTGHBACH, 



REPAIR" 8HoK 

-b KQUIPMENT. ■ REPAntmt 
Tim Eood u MW. 3. I>. WOT- 

HIELD. POLPING OVER PASSr 

FINE CONDITION. M|>»;_ALSO 



FOB BALB— THE BEST BJCCIPE 



CTCLB AND AUTOMOBILB TRADB JOTTRNAI^ 

mtl, mmthlr. Onsud < 
Dfonr, CoL Prte*. 1. 




A Car for Every 
Conceivable Purpose 

20 Models to Chooce Amn 

At a price to suit every pocketbook. 

BuKglei, Surreys, LlmouBlnea, Runabout*, 1, 2 and I- 
ae&ted Pleasure Veblcles, Bxpreas Wftsons, Hural Hall 
Wagons, Open and CoTered DeltTery Wagona, etc. 

Two-paesenger models, 1400 up. Fonr-paaaeMV. 
1600 up. 

No tire troubles, punctures and blow-outs ImpoaslU* 
with a McINTTRH. 




Pbjriidui 

ProfsuioBil 

and 

Bnunesi Bkn 

Mumfactoren 

and 

HerehaDts 

TraTdingMcB 

and 

Solidton 

EzprcH 

TdsphMeaod 

PnUicSenrkc 

Corporatioiu 

Farmers 

Durymen 

Stcckmen 

etc-t and 

The FamilT 



High Wbeel Motor Vehicles will go anywhere an automo- 
bile win and many places they Will not WIU go thronsh 
sand, mud and snow. Cltmb hills, get you where you want 
to go, In all weathers, on all roads. 

Atr-cooled, fouNcycle, planetary transmission, t 
speeds forward, one reverse. Wheel steer, mechanical 
oiler, two-cylinder, horizontal, double opposed, oflset motor. 
Chain drive, 12-14 H. P.. 18-18 H. P. Pour-cylinder, verUcal, 
shaft drive 20-22 H. P. 28-30 H. P. 

Write today for catalog 48, 

W.H.HdNTTRECO. 




Cn. A N.C. M. A g 

14. INDIANA t 



CTCXB AND ATTTOHOBILB TRADE! JOURNAL. 

IAN TO TAKB CI 

a cti mine factorr: mun b'v« ju 



. B. UABBET, 



AiantM "BtlCO," 



,. _r drlrlDi commarcUl iiu>taT 

r lu eniJiM. Addiw uarIon I 



Auzilwry Chair Seat 

atoibad >o u» uwuut. 

lUmabo tfcat >• an tat bUM- 
taaaUMriMiic 




JtJ^ju^oca^ 



^_ __ COMMERCIAL 

LIMOUSIIfE TAXICAb DEUVER' 

WrUa tar CaUiegitt 

THE AUTOCAR CO., ' 




Feonsylvmnta nma are not merely u 
they are enthuaiaelio. 

remsnVAlU AUIO iDTOR CO:, Iryil 



The Thomas Flyer 

Cltamptui Slock Car ol the WorU 



B«id 10 mita la rt 



a TOU a beauuiull; lUunrawd b 



RADIATOR 



Rome-Tumey Radiator Co. 

Wrik hr Mbm / ROME, Nmr TMk 



Iwtta Rtcinf Hafiieto Pbi 

Tbe btn Id Ibe worid al aar pdca. and 

the cpalT one that keena deao, 

II Dai a LAVITE COMFOeiTION 

■peed. One year'! fuaruteB. 
Spadal Price S1.M 

EU J. BU3HEY, hN rkci I I|«Mr 



AJAX TIRE TRUNK 



1 



AJAX TRUNK A SAMPLE CASE CO. 

81-93 MERCER ST., NEW YORK 

Writ* far ear "IMW" Catalea« 



"FEW MAKERS APPRECIATE 
the economy of accuracy— the 
aavlag that quality effects'' 



cSi 




42 W. 43J S*t**t 



CAMERON 

4 and 6 cyL, Air-cooled 

$950 — $1500 

CAMERON CAR COMPANY 

Beverly. Ma»». 



AUTOMOBILE BODIES 

To Your Order 



OFaON CITY BODY COMPANY. 



Lubricating thm Motor^ 

TKU ii the title of a new bool 
lubricatioD €>f mslor cm, matai 
DolDr erclei. Lot* of Tmluable : 
on ■ lilal •ubject. 

JOIEPH DIXON CIUCIBLE CO.. Jmir OH. N. J. 



296 



CTCLB AND AUTOMOBOiB TRADB JOURNAL. 



Ae«tyl«ie Burntrt. 

IMetz. R. E. Co, 40 

Klrcbberger, M. & Co li'6 

AeatyUm 8«parator. 
Aahton. W. E. & I>oit Co 279 

Air ConprMson. 

Comfttock, Geo. S 285 

Gleawn -Peters Air Pump Co.... 274 
Spacke. F. W. Machine Co 25 

Air Coupilnga. 

Imperial Brass hitg. Co 208 

National Tube Co t 252 

Youse. £. S 283 

Aluminuin Caatinpi. 

Adams & Westlake Co 286 

Allyne Brass Foundry Co 288 

Clum & Atkinson 272 

Lifflit Mfff. & Foundry Co 287 

MlUelt Brass Co 204 

Oberdorfer, M. L. Brass Co 221 

Pioneer Brsss Works 297 

Syracuse Alum. & Br. Co 297 

Aluminum Solder. 

Clum & Atkinson 282 

Amnetsrs. 

Conn. Tel. & Elec. Co 212 

Eldredge Elec. Mfg. Co 243 

General Electric Co 288 

Hoyt Elec. InsL Wks. Co 251 

Nerer-Mlss Spark Plug Co 2(58 

Plgnolet. L. A! 28b 

Read- Kite Meter Works 295 

Robert Instrument Co 277) 

United Manufacturers 212 

Anti-Skidt. 

Bailey. C. J. & Co 43 

Brlctson Mfg. Co 208 

Leather Tire Goods Co 26'J 

Motor Appliance Co 225 

Motz Tiro & Rubber Co 285 

N. S. U. Motor Co 200 

Sager. J. H. Co 41 

Walker Auto Tire Band Co 202 

United Manufacturers *. 67 

Automobile Parts. 

Auto Parts Co 2G4 

Bultraan. F. II. Co 27.3 

Crosby Co 184 

Hoi-Tan Co 207 

Klnsey Mfg. Co 288 

Penlrsulnr Milled Screw Co 200 

Rands Mfg. Co 288 

Smith. A. O. Co 224 

Spacke, P. W. Mach. Co 25 

Axles (Auto). 

Covert Motor Veh. Co 281 

Cramp. Wm. ft Sons 186 

Ehvell- Parker Electric Co 267 

Gill. P. H. ft. Sons' Works 238 

Long Arm System Co 250 

McCtie Co 213 

Merchant ft Evans Co 283 

Michigan Automobile Co 285 

Smith, A. O. Co 224 

Timken Roller Bearing Axle Co. .246 
Weston-Mott Co 292 

Ball BeariR0i. 

American Ball Co 292 

Barthel ft Daly 263 

Bretz. J. S. Co 2.36 

Hess-Brlght Mfg. Co 136 

International Engineering Co. ...144 

New Departure Mfg. Co 19 

Pressed Steel Mfg. Co 286 

Standard Roller Bearing Co 287 

Worcester Pressed Steel Co 292 

Bail Joints (Small). 
Mechanical ft Electrical Mfg. Co. 261 
Peninsular Milled Screw Co 290 

Ball Retainers. 
SUr Ball Retainer Co 201 

Battery Boxes. 

Delta Mfg. Co 28^ 

Hayes Mfg. Co 20] 

Kinsey Mfg. Co 28fi 

Standard Cabinet Mfg. Co 287 

Battery Connections. 

Blln-Chester Co 202 

Conn. Tel. ft Elec. Co 21'-' 

Coodsnn Elec. Ignition ft ilfg. Co. 280 

Herz ft Co 89 

Never-MIss Spark Plug Co 2t'.S 

Pltrsflpld Spnrk Coll Co 2:!:^ 

United Maniifnctnrers 212 

Bearing Metal. 

American BronTie Co 2 

Clum & .Atklnynn 272 

Cramp, Wm. & Sons is4 

LlRht Mfg. ft Foundry Co 2S7 

MlUett Bra'»s Co 204 

Bent Woodwork. 

American Veneer Co 2S7 

Dann Wrtxi. ft Co 20' 

Tucker Woodwork Co ] . 285 

^ Bicycles. 

ronsnlldated ■\\Tg. Cn TOO 

Hpnrlop Mfff. Co ...!l92 

Rea-lIiiK .'Standard Co '.'.'. c>2 



BUYERS' INDEX 



Bedlet. 

Auto Body Co 284 

Babcock. EL H. Co 292 

Barndt-Johnston Co. 177 

Borbeln Auto Co 261 

Detroit Carriage Co 292 

Everltt, B. F. Co 255 

Graves ft Gongdon Co 295 

Hayes Mfg. Co 291 

Hill Mfg. Co. 283 

Irvin, Bobbins ft Co 288 

LaPorte Carriage Co. 284 

Reading MeUl Body Co 284 

Union City Body Co 295 

Body Iroat. 

Cortland Forging Co 240 

Boilers. 

Ofeldt. F. W. ft Sons 244 

Steam Carriage Bolljta' .fio^ 283 

Boiler Tl|«r^ ' ' •->:• 

NaUonal Tube Co. ..?;.... 252* 

Belts ft Nutt. 

Detroit Screw Works 284 

Boring Maeliines. 

Newton Machine Tool Wks 167 

Underwood. H. B. ft Co 168 

Bows. 

Brown. S. N. ft Co 283 

Dann Bros, ft Co 294 

Bow Rests. 

Essex Brass Foundry Co 249 

Smith, Jos. N. ft Co 221 

Bow Sooliett. 

Cortland Forging Co 240 

Brakes (Auto). 
National Aluminiun ft Bronze 

Co 268 

Nat. Brake ft Clutch Co 291 

Royal Equipment Co 207 

Youse. £. S 283 

Brake Drums. 

Crosby Co 186 

Cullman Wheel Co 230 

Smith. A. O. Co 224 

Brake Linings. 

Johns- Man ville. H. W. Co 263 

Royal Equipment Co 207 

Trenton Rubber Mfg. Co 225 

Brass Work. 

Imperial Brass Mfg. Co 208 

Brazing Compounds. 

A. ft J. Mfg. Co 807 

Nock. Geo. W, Co 247 

Bronze ft Brass Castings. 

Adams ft Westlake Co 286 

Allyne Brass Foundry (}o 288 

Clum ft Atkinson 272 

Cramp, Wm. ft Sons. S. ft E. Co. 186 

Light Mfg. ft Foundry Co 287 

MlUett Brass Co 204 

Oberdorfer. M. L. Brass Co 224 

Pioneer Brass Works 297 

Syracuse Alum, ft Bronze Co.... 297 
Bumpers. 

Motor Car Supply Co 297 

Sager, J. H. Co 41 

Vanguard Co 265 

Burners (Aeetylens). 

Eirchberger. M. ft Co 223 

Burners (Keroeene ft Qaseilne). 

Ofeldt. F. W. ft Sons 244 

Steam Carriage Boiler Co 283 

Thomson. J. L. Mfg. Co 278 

Buttons (Ventilated). 

Ventilated Cushion ft Spring Co.. 283 

Camping Outfits. 

Godfrey. Chas. J. Co V6 

Tryon. Edw. K. Co 94 

Carbide. 

Acetylene Gas Illuminating Co. .286 

Carbon Removers. 

Detroit Varnish Co 270 

Preat-0-Ute Co 214 

Carburetors ft Generator Valves. 

Allen Fire Dept, Sup. Co 270 

American Die ft Tool Co 264 

Beckley- Ralston Co 20 

Breeze Carburetor Co 284 

Brownell, F. A. Motor Co 281 

Buffalo Carburetor Co 15 

HoltRcr Carburetor Co 252 

Holley Bros. Co 289 

Lnnkcnhelmer Co 211 

Plxley. Ceo. H 272 

Sherwood Mfg. Co 249 

Speed ChanjflnK Pulley Co 231 

Strom here Motor Devices Co 286 

Wackf-nhuth Carburetor Co 274 

Western Motor Co 245 

Wlllet Entrlne ft Carburetor Co.. 209 
Carburetor Floats. 

Goodwin ft Klntz Co 289 

Castings. 

(See nl<»o Rronze and Aluminum, 

MallcaMe Imn and Steel 

Castings.) 

Arme Steel ft M. I. Works 288 

Allyne Rrn«:s Foundry Co 2S8 



Chicago Steel Foundry Co 

Clum ft Atldnson 272 

Crucible Steel Casting Co S44 

Keystone Steel Castings Co 42 

Lebanon Steel Casting Co 174 

Light Mfg. ft Foundry Co S87 

Manufacturers' Foundry Co 297 

Michigan Motor Castings Co 280 

Milieu Brass Co. 204 

New Process Steel Co 244 

Oberdorfer. M. L. Brass Co 224 

Pioneer Brass Works...: 297 

Syracuse Alum, ft B. Co 297 

Western Malleable Steel Co 245 

Cements. 

Fisk Rubber Co 127 

M. ft M. Mfg. Co 172 

Tingley, C. O. ft Co 177 

Cement (Asbestos).' 
;.^ Johns- Manville. H. W. Co 168 

Cement (Mstal). 

Johns-Manville, H. W. Co 168 

Chains. 

Baldwin Chain ft Mfg. Co 299 

Diamond Chain ft Mfg. Co 241 

General Accum. ft Bat. Co 145 

Morse Chain Co 154 

Weed Chain Tire Grip Go 67 

Whitney Mfg. Co 28 

Chain Belts. 

Whitney Mfg. Co ...18 

Chain Linlu. 

Whitney Mfg. Co 18 

Chain Tools. 

Diamond Chain ft Mfg. Co 141 

Charging Apparatus. 

General Electric Co 188 

WesUnghouse Elec ft Mfg. Co... 259 
Wltherbee Igniter Co 31 

Charging Panels. 
Westinghouse Elec. ft Mfg. Co... 259 

Charging Plugs. 

Dayton Electrical Mfg. Co 267 

Chauls. 

Borbeln Auto Co 261 

Brennan Motor Mfg. Co 284 

Elwoll -Parker Electric Co 267 

McCue Co 213 

Mclntyre. W. H. Co 294 

Speed Changing Pulley Co 2SI 

Chimes. 

Oray-Hawley Mfg. Co 276 

Cireulation Pumps. 

(See "Pumps. Cireulatloii.") 

Cleansing Compounds. 

Beckley-Ralston Co 10 

Daries. J. P. Ca 183 

Cioeks. 

Motor Car Equipment Co 176 

Nerer-Mlss Spark Plug Co 268 

New Haven Clock Co 144 

Perfection Mfg. Co 278 

Clothing. 

Vdilde Apron ft Hood Co 22 

Ciutehes. 

Auto Parte Mfg. Co 265 

Brownell, F. A. Motor Co 281 

ConUnental Motor Mfg. Co 282 

Long Arm System Co , 28b 

McCue Co 218 

Merchant ft Evans Co 288 

Nat. Brake ft Clutch Co 291 

Clutoh Leather. 
American Belting ft Tanning Co. . .191 

Coaster Brakes. 

Corbln Screw Corporation 197 

Eclipse Machine Co 100 

Coat Rail Bags. 

Nathan Norelty Mfg. Co 141 

Coeks. 

Ashton Valve Co 174 

Imperial Brass Mfg. Co 208 

Lunkenheimer Co 211 

Coil Boxes. 

Hayea Mfg. Co 191 

Standard Cabinet Mfg. Co 187 

Commereial Vehicles. 

American Motor Truck Co 185 

Atlas Motor Car (>> 868 

Baker Motor Vehicle Co 120 

Brush Runabout Co 45 

Cartercar Co 179 

Chase Itlotor Truck Co 186 

Commercial Motor Car Co 185 

Couple-Gear Frt Wheel Co 186 

Gramm-Logan Motor Car Co. .181-186 

Hewitt Motor Co 184 ft 186 

Knox Automobile Co 211 

Mclntyre. W. H. Co 294 

Randolph Motor Co 258 

Rapid Motor Vehicle Co 185 

Sternberg Motor Truck Co 177 

Compression Relief Valves. 

Ashton Valre Co 274 

Lunkenheimer Co 211 

Connecting Rods. 

Spaeke. F. W. Mach. Co 25 

.Standard Connecting Rod Co 234 



CTCLB AND AUTOHOBILB THADE JOURNAL. 



Mad« ud idU for Rt> t'ui witlmil chusa 
modd or movrmmc Tbt tan yeu-'* lonrumRiti ■ 
Wctt. TDU't 

THE MOTOMETER 

1M>9 Madck, 42B, VzS. tSS. 'cct Clnalu. 

The R. H. Smith Mfg. Co. 
Springfield, Maw. 



^1 A^n spare parts 
r I f\ I and repairs 

The HOL-TAN Co. 

1741 Broadway, NEW YORK 



E. H. KELLOGG A COMPANY 

OILS 

243 SOUTH STREET, NEW YORK 











GREY IRON MOTOR 

Watortmrr, Cam,. 











CASTINGS 

Alnnoiniim Bronze and Brass 



Pioneer Brass Works, Iti 



THE MOTOR CAR SUPPLY CATAIOB 

ia an encyclopedia of automobile 

supplies. Copy will be sent upon 

request. 

The Motor Car Supply Company 

1451-3-5 Micbitan Atb., Chicftgo, UL 



CASTINGS 



Syracasc AIomIdbb a Bn«K« 
CoBtpaay 

SVBACIWE. NEW VOKK 



SACRIFICE TIRES 

39 I 4} in. 3ex3tin. 

COrrnNEMTAL— HARTFORD 

MORGAN A WRIGHT DUNLOP 

FISK HEAVY CAR TYPE 

NAMES ON S0% OFF LIST 

STANDARD TIRE & RUBBER CO. 

102 PORTLAND ST., BOSTON, MASS. 



amot va mimuu nm iw m tmm 

^OlUM tt*r Ut BIVSnOTOlllB— It IMT CCDt |U|K 

HMMU fflimi lUI WS IIN M W MS 

w'l crwp — t«pt rlm.iiut — 90 iwr eat punniin pnwt. 
11 Ooodyeu UalTcrul Him. la uk<o OS or put oa In 
xty tMDBdt mill BO tvnciu looli. 
Aik iboui OaodTew All Boula wrric*— Cm 10 lU 

unoruu. wnw 

(MTUi nH I nm 0., mmoi si., iom, vm 



"PERFECTION" 

UNIVERSAL JOINT 

Theoretically Correct Motion 

ForeifD Tuictb Parts and Rcpain 

T. F. GEROME 

130-32 W. ISlh St., New York City 



SHARR ^ — « 
a* — ►ARROW 



Bausch ^ Iptnb Optical @. 



TIRE TROUBLES PREVENTED 

Tlw O'NaU lB*id> Tir* PnUetor 
FlailU*, LtsM, DnraU*, Posctm-Proof 
notoBti the mat from punotorv produolns objeoli 
■od (0 aonMnieted that it aitaDdi Ui tCa baads, 
T^nforaiDc the 0H« (0 that It wll t prodoM ooriridei- 
abl* extn mUeaae. A punotunt-prtwl oonBtniatkHi 
boUt alms pnctifl and HwofiQs linM. Will* 
torBookkt. 
The 0'N«il Tlr* ft ProtactorCi).. Akron. O. 



UTANT SPEED 
" ralnuM 
you without 



8 milea in IW 



Ra- 



unpoTtaati joa have a h 

■err* Power, the fedlDS that It* eniiuc wu. uu uu 

reanlnd work m mnch more en^i and econom. 

SHARP ARROW Caa Do AH You Want k To, 
Fire Body Dwim^ Pricey t2TS0 to S2SB0. 

Offices and Factwy, TRENTON, I^ J. 



CTCLB AND AUTOMOBILE] TRADE JOURNAI* 

BUYERS' INDEX— Continued 



Aju TnmH A Suw 
NlcboUi, W. a. . 
OUl Tim * Uuli. 


Wcrk. 




■i*ii«V- 






MM. 


Bo4 ci"!!! 



IBUWUI Bnu Mil- Co. . 

Fartlii*."" 

Croant FoekIiih Co- - " ■ ' 

,)»1 GUI Fhw * iiMCh. WU 



Wtnlnth-iif- ElK. * kUI- C 



wd FlUr* Co... H 



tfotorcircle £i;u]pincal C 



Bumbcn Uota Trek Co 

BUffflni-DuiTH Co. ...p.w, 
TlioDua, E. R. Uotor Co. . . , 
WlDUn Motor CwTlua Co... 



CtntniT ElKtrte Co. 

" 1 "lai-'Co'.'.'. 



Mclniin, W, K. Co. 
aUcblnl] Automobllfl 
llotkl Ou Eu Wu 



AlimdrgUl k Boot Uf|. < 



Coin. Til. * m 
LuiUlcnil Ufl. I 



B««<L ribodt c 



BiKtfTI Mljr Co. 



*!^?T----"I 



CkrlRoclm Bna. . 
CsuDi* Oar Fn. v 



iunki Unur Bunr MTi. Co....»W WtU.~li:"F 5." 

■™'"->*-^--Fi>™jai b) m oST* uTrt. ...: 

^rd Motor Co. ........,.....,,.>» Rbh mfb Ca 



»<■"■"' ^^<F^™£k'*^- ■■■"'■■ 

BKMa WfliUm Pioducu'C»....t« KtalS'Molw'c^r^ ^ 

„_ J V'J." ^™"' „. iMlnitni Motor Ca Co 

Bft^U'UD* OHT Cft .. .....lis HHlbflooa Motor Ctr Co....... 



Hallna AulomoUlo Co. . 



xiBiln' M&. Co. v.'.'.'.'.'.','.'.'.'.'.'.' 

WMUad. Chu. 

Fin EjMiialUKn. 

Auia-BI Co 

lolUM-HiIiiUlo. H. w. Co 

^^ Plulklt Drlrln* Wift 

FlHlkk IMti'. 

Antomobae BuiSi Mf«. Co.,,. 

Bundud u«ii1 Mr>, Ca 

Fly WMd tjalantw. 



:t & Whimw Co. 



CTCLB AND AUTOHOBIL& THADE JOURNAXi. 



The Auto Shovel 




Ik Mm fnn >f|. (m«l, IWh Immt, h. 



COMMERCIAL POST CARDS 

IN NATURAL COLORS 

f]| Made to order to suit your requirements. Make good ads., 
at reasonable prices. Send us pieces of your printed matter, 
but ask for SAMPLES and PRICES. 

Chiltonn Printing Company^ 



300 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBUJS TRADE JOURNAIi. 

BUYERS' INDEX-Contmued 



Bmltta, Jos. N. & Co ill 

A-Z Co JJJ 

Briflooe Mfg. Co 305 

Folsom, C. G. Mfg. Co JJJ 

HmjOB Mfg. Co 805 

Wright Cooler & Hood Co 290 

AtttomobUe Supply Mfg. Co 276 

Electro Como Co. 299 

Foster Shock Absorber 23« 

Gary. Theo. H- Co 2T9 

Grsj-Hawley Mfg. Co.. 275 

Motor Car Equipment Co 278 

Motor Car Supply Co 297 

Bandall-Falchney Co. 223 

BUey-Kloti Mfg. Co 290 

SlzenO Co. g2 

Standard Metal Mfg. Co 246 

Stefsns * Co 200 

Hste Cenaeetlons. 

Morgan. B W 

Hvbt (Aute). ^^ 

Wsston-Mott Co »W 

Hubs (Cysls). 
Auron Automatic Maeh. Co. ..191 

Obfbln Screw Corporation 19T 

EellDee Machine Co. 200 

Igaltiea Apparatus (MlsesllaaeottS). 

Apple Blectne Co 276 

BrIgiB & Stratton 232 

Dayton Electrical Mfg. Co 267 

Helnae Electric Co fl 

Hen * Oe W 

Bajah Auto Supply Go 266 

SplUdoif, C. F 1« 

iMltiea Batteries. 

AmMlcan Battery Co 2T3 

Apple Electric Co. 2TJ 

Best Ignition Equipment Co 248 

Breakstone. S 28& 

Carpenter & Volkhardt 260 

Dayton Electrical Mfg. Co 267 

Delto Mfg. Ca . • ■ -A IS 

Electric Storage Bat Co. 245 

Bzoelalor Storage Bat Co 284 

EzoeUlor Supply Co. W 

Hen & Co • -•■ 

Booeler Storage Battery Co 248 

Kltsee Stonge Battery Go 263 

Luta-Lockwood Mfg. Co 257 

Motor Car Supply Co. JJJ 

Northwestom Storage Bat Co 2W 

Bock Island Battery Co.^ i« 

Storage Battery Supply Co zoi 

Union Battery Co. »• 

VmU Accumulator Co. zjj 

VlTax Storage Battery Co^ 292 

Wlllard Storage Battery 0> aje 

Wltherbee Igniter Co " 

Ignition Cable. 

Bosch Magneto Co. 3JJ 

Diamond Rubber Co ^* 

Empire Tire Co. Jj 

Motor Car Equipment Co 276 

Packard Electric Co 253 

SpUtdorf. C. F. "• 

Wltherbee Igniter Co 8* 

Inner Tubes. 

Flsk Rubber Co 231 

Manufacturen' Suppllea Co mo 

Morgan & Wright 269 

Butherford Rubber Co IT* 

Inner Tube Cases. 

HopeweU Bros. 255 

Nathan Novelty Mfg. ^ Co 241 

Yshlde Apron & Hood Co 22 

Inner Tube Shoes. ^ ^ ^., 

Inner Shoe Tiro Co 3*H5] 

O'NeU Tire & Protector Co 29T 

White, S. B. Co 274 

Inspection Lamps. 
Wlthechee Igniter Co SI 

Inslruetlen (Aute). 
Dyke's Correnwndence School of 

Motoring 242 

Insulation. 

Gary. Theo. H. & Co 279 

Imperial Porcrtaln Works 257 

Mica Coro Mfg. Co 254 

Iren Castings. 

ManufaetunBTs' Foundry Co 297 

Jaeks. 

Buckeye lack Mfg. Co 360 

Cook's Standard Tool Co 290 

Duff Mfg. Co 285 

OUfer Mfg. Co 293 

Shawfcr Co. 2T7 

Jobbers. 

AutoUght & Motor Supply Co 226 

Automobile Supply Oo 286 

Auto Parte Co. 264 

▲ulo Supply Go 287 

r. F. A. * Co 201 

r-Ralston Co 20 



Excelsior Supply Co 196 

General Auto Supply Co 272 

Glbney. J. L. & Bro 39-171 

Kaaner, A. H. 239 

Manufacturen' Supply Co 280 

Moore Motor Supply Co 171 

Motor Car Equipment Co 200 

Motor Car Supply Co 297 

N. T. Sporting Goods Co 267 

Nock, Geo. W. Co 247 

Koby, Sidney B. Co 285 

SUndard Tire St Rubber Co 297 

Strauss. Matthew 289 

Times Square Auto Co 266 

35 Per Cent Auto Sup. Co 292 

Keys and Keyway Cutters. 

Whitney Mfg. Co. 28 

Lamps. 

Atwood-CasUe Co 292 

Badger Brass Mfg. Co 30-190 

Dieta. R. E. Co 40 

Gray & DstIs 284 

HaU. C. M. Lamp Co 131 

Ham. C. T. Mfg. Co 234 

Motor Car Equipment Co 276 

New York Auto Lamp Co 250 

Rose Mfg. Co 54 

Rushmoce Dynamo Works 10 

20th Century Mfg. Co soi 

Vesta AocumuUtor Co 287 

Lamp Braekets. 

Chicago Steel Foundry Co 250 

Ham, C. T. Mfg. Co 234 

Northway. Thomas J 287 

Smith. Joa. N. & Co 221 

Lamp Coven. 

Allen Auto Specialty Co 258 

Nathan Norelty Mfg. Co 241 

Vehicle Apron & Hood Co. 82 * 98 
Lamp Hoee Cennsetlene. 

Morgan. B S8 

Lathes. 

American Tool Works Co 287 

Barnes. W. F. & John Co 278 

Lodge & Shipley Mach. Tool Co.. 259 

PraU & Whitney Co 164 

Rivett Lathe Mfg. Co 242 

Seneca Falls Mfg. Co 278 

Leathen. 

Pantasoto Co 289 

Lsflfinps. 

Nathan NorelOy Mfg. Co 241 

Lsnses. 

Bausch A; Lomb Optical Co 297 

Matisse, C. & A 883 

Levers. 

Auto Parte Mfg. Co 265 

Long Arm System Co 250 

Warner Gear Co 239 

Levor Looks. 
Bongarts & Co 53-228 

Lleenso Pads. 

Allen Auto Specialty Co 258 

Stillman, A. P 299 

Lighting Batteries. 

Vlvaz Storage Battery Co 292 

Wlllard Storage Battery Co 278 

Ligbtlng Systems. 

Apple Electric Co 276 

Lists (Auto 4 Motor Boat). 

Auto Directories Co 281 

Lubrieants. 
(See "Oils." "Greases" and 

"Graphites.") 
Lubrieaten. 

Cook's, Adsm, Sons 249 

Essex, G. B. Brass Co 249 

Hancock Mfg. Co 244 

Lunkenhelmer Co., The 211 

McCord Mfg. Ca 2Vi 

Manzol Broe. Co 248 

Precision Appliance Co 284 

Sherwood Mfg. Co 249 

Rice it Dayton Mfg. Co 266 

Luggage Carriers. 
AJax Trunk ft Sample Case Co... 295 

Excelsior Supply Co 196 

Vehicle Apron ft Hood Co. ... .'22-98 

Laneh Boxes. 

Winship, W. W 299 

Maehlne Weriis. 

Ashley Machine Works 280 

Eclipse Machine Co. 200 

Electric Welding Producto Co.... 27b 

Konigslow, Otto Mfg. Co 289 

Michigan Auto Cb 289 

Spacke. F. W. Maeh. Co 29 

Magnetoe. 

Bosch Magneto Co 207 

Brets, J. S. Co 2Sb 

Fawn River Mfg. Co 270 

General Electric Co ^ 288 

Heinxe Electric Co 21 

Hercules Electric Co 292 

Hers ft Co 89 

Hess-Bright Mfg. Co. 136 

HoUey Bros, (^o 289 

K-W Ignition Co 14Sa.b. cftd 



Lavalette ft Co 

Mavlty Sleeper Co 

National CoU Co 

Plttsfleld Spark CoU Co. 

Remy Electric Co 11-11 

SpUtdorf, C. F. 141 

Wltherbee Igniter Co 81 

Maaufaeturen* Agents. 

Centour Motor Co 287 

Marine Lighting Ovtflta. 

20th Century Mfg. Co 801 

Marine Moton. 

Brownell. F. A. Motor Co ui 

Climax Electric Works 284 

Du Brie Motor Co 881 

Gray Motor Co 181 

Herschell-Spillman Co 190 

Houle, A. J. Co. 190 

Putnam Motor Mfg. Co 807 

Sloane Motor Go 193 

Waterman Marine Motor Co 181 

^ _ , Maslsr Vlbratera. 

K-W Ignition Co 148a, h, e ft d 

_ Msasures. 

HiU Dryer Co 888 

Menury Reotlllers. 

General Electric O) I88 

WesUnghouse Elec. ft Mfg. Co... 159 
» .. . Milling Maeblnea. 

Pratt ft Whitney Co. i«4 

Rivett Lathe Mfg. Co Si 

Whitney Mfg. Co n 

»,^ r, ^"^^ (Dasb). 

Motor Car Equipment Co ira 

Lunkenhelmer Co eii 

Metm. 

(See "Gasoline Auto Engines." 

"Steam Auto Englnea," "Cycle 

Moton" and "Marine 

Moton.") 

Meton (Eleetrle). 

Blwell-Parker Elec Co. of Amer...l6T 

Westlnghouse Elec ft Mfg. Co.....lBi 

Meter Cysles. 

.American Motor Co. igg 

Aurora Automatic Mach. Co 188 

Auto-BL Co. 189 ft 189 

Consolidated Mfg. Co .....199 

Excelsior Supply Co. ipg 

Geer, Harry B. Co lOO 

Harley-Davldson Motor Co ..l«l 

Hendee Manufacturing Co 191 

Herring- (Xirtiss Co 199 

Homecker Motor Mfg. Co MI 

Merkel-Llght Motor Co 196 

Motorcycle Equipment Co lOO 

N. 8. U. Motor Co loo 

New Era Gas Engine Co 100 

Ovington Motor Co I88 

Reading Stondard Co 61 

Reliance Motorcycle Co Ml 

Walton Motor Co '.!l9i 

Motor Cyele Acesssorlss. 

Baker, F. A. ft Co. .<'. loi 

Motorcycle Equipment (^o 200 

Wldmayer. F. B soi 

Meter Cyele Belts. 
* Amer. BelUng ft Tanning Co 191 

'*•*•'■ ^y*'« Coven. 

Nathan Novelty Mfg. Co 141 

Motor Cyele Deliveries. 

N. S. U. Motor Co lOO 

Meter Cyele Parts. 

Aurora Automatic Mach. Go. 198 

Auto-Bl. Co 188 ft 199 

Baker. F. A. ft Co lOl 

Motorcycle Equipment Co 100 

Wldmayer, F. B 161 

_ ^ Meter Cyele Stands. 

Hendee Mfg. Co m 

Mouldings. 
Douglas ft Lomaaon Co. 

Meuntlngs. 
Cowles, C ft Co. 



Smith. Joe. ^ ft Co Hi 

M uHlsre- (Exbavst) . 

Gibson, H. C 148 

Gray-Hawley Mf^. Co. 175 

Hayes Mfg. Co 181 

PoweU Muffler ft Timer Cb 146 

Yankee Co 188 

MuMer Cut-Ont Valvat. 

Gray-Hawley Mfg. Co 178 

S. B. R. Specialty Co 196 

Nuts. 

Detroit Screw Works 184 

Peninsular Milled Screw Oo. ....189 

Nep.Flnld Olla. 
N. T. ft N. J. LubL Ob. 
Numbers. 

Stillman, A. P i 

OdMMtort. 

Jones' Speedometer 18 

Nock, Geo. W. Co Ut 

Oils. 

Cook's, Adam. Sods 14t 

Besly. C. H. ft Co 176 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



301 



^ 



S -IP.-. 



^m 




OIL 



>- Ui I Ml( -, 



OIL 



■,^^f^Ot A HAWS i 



TIE NEW CAN 
-ITS SEALED 



The Oil in the Checkerboard Can 

THE LOGIC OF 
A GOOD CYLINDER OIL 

Concerning the Conversion of an Auto- 
mobilist from a ''Cheap'' to a Good OU 
Wherein a Common Error is Exposed 



A MAN NAMED SMITH bought an automobile. In a general way he had the right idea, 
tiiat is, he didn't intend to let his car be the cause of unnecessary expense. He was going 
to economize. 

JUST ABOUT THIS TIME a representative of the Knocko-Carbo Oil Company called. 
"WhatI You paying 60 cents a gallon for cylinder oil! X^&t.'s ridiculous; now, I've got an 
oil," and here the salesman proofuced a sample, ' 'that's 'just as good' as the oil you are 
now buying, and I will let you in on the ground floor, 20 cents a gallon — ^think of that!" 

THIS SOUNDED PLAUSIBLE ENOUGH and here was just the chance to economize. 
The oil was light in color, and hadn't he read in the automobile ''trade papers" that a 
li^t oil meant freedom from carbon? — of course nothing was said about its lubricating 
properties. It was an oil — and to Smith all oils were pretty much alike. 

THEN HIS TROUBLES BEGAN. The motor showed a tendency to "heat up." The cool- 
ing water, which never before reached boiling point, got hot enough to cook an egg. Of 
course, the oil wasn't suspected, so the car was sent to the repair shop to have the pump 
examined — result, six hours' labor to take the pump out, and a repair oil! of S4.00. 

THERE WERE OTHER SYMPTOMS, TOO; for example, whereas formerly the engine 
would start without cranking. Smith found it almost impossible now to do it. Of course, 
he never thought of the oil, so he sent his car to the repair shop again, and lo! when the 
car came back there came with it a bill for regrinding the cylinaers and fitting new pistons 
and rings — a little item of $60.00. 

ABOUT THIS TIME, when Smith was getting desperate, a friend with less economizing 
tendencies and more experience, suggested that poor lubrication might be the cause. Still 
20 cents a gallon was a oig saving. Perhaps it was not the oil, for the tendency to econo- 
mize was still strong. Smith stood it manfully for a while, but the repairs came so thick 
and fast that something had to be done. 

THEN HE TRIED THE OIL that "proves by Test, not by Color" that it is free from car- 
bon. Also, it was an oil in which lubricating value was not sacrificed for lightness of 
color — wonderful what a difference this oil made. His engine resumed its old snap and 
power on hills, the pound disappeared and cooling troubles vanished. 

IT WAS AN EXPENSIVE LESSON for Smith. He had saved perhaps $5.00 at the most 
on his oil bill, but had paid out over $64.00 for repairs, to say nothing of the time he was 
without use of his automobile. This was some time ago — now Smith cheerfully pays the 
price for good oil. 

HERE'S THE POINT. ^^ ^re up against this kind of competition all the time. 
We can't maintain the high quality of Panhard Oil and compete in price with cheap oils. 
We will positively not lower the quality to meet this competition. We believe that the 
great majority of automobilists appreciate our ambition to produce the. highest grade of 
cylinder oil possible from the best crude stock. You can't get something for nothing and 
the oil business is no exception. 

DON'T ECONOMIZE ON YOUR OIL, because it is no economy. The best is always the 
cheapest. Panhard Oil if used intelligently will not carbonize and it will lubricate. 

WE WANT TO SEND YOU our new booklet, " LUBRICATION." The 1909 issue is off the 
press. For over 30 years we have been supplying hi^ grade oils in other lines of manu- 
facture. Panhard Oil has been on the market since 1904. It has set a standard by which 
other cylinder oils are judged. Why not get the best ? 



GEORGE A. HAWS 



110 Pine Street 



New Yoric Ci 



302 



CTCLB AND AUTOMOBILB TRADB JOURNAL. 



Buffalo Spedalty Co S04 

ColuinblA LubrlcanU Co SST 

Oretulado OH Co 277 

HaToUno (Ml Co S45 

Haws, Geo. A. SOI 

Kellofs. E. H. & Co 297 

Kellogg. E. H. & Co 297 

KeUom, Chaa. F. & Co 277 

N. T. A N. J. Lub. Co 203 

Vacuum OU Co 227 

Oil Cant. 

Maple atj Mfg. Co 273 

, Oil Cupt. 

Baj State Stamping Co 274 

Oil 4 Oasollne Kit 
DoTer Stamp. A Mfg. Co.. 205 & 273 

Oil Guna. 
American Thermo- Ware Co. ....242 

DelU Mfg. Co. 285 

Oleaaon-Peten Air Pump Co.... 27 4 

Maple City Mfg. Co. 273 

Bandall-Falchney Co. 223 

Oil Pumpf. 

Lunkenhelmer Co 211 

on Rings. 

Bootb. N. B 28S> 

PaeUng (Asbestos). 

Johns-ManTille, H. W. Co 268 

Paekings (Fsit). 

Booth, N. E 285 

Paints. 

Tlngley. Cbas. O. & Co 277 

Pedals (Cyels). 

Adams, Henry T. Co 191 

Standard (To.. The 198 

Pips Flttiafs. 

Hancock Mfg. CJo 244 

Imperial Brass Mfg. Co .^..208 

Platens. 

Spaeke. F. W. Maeh. Co 25 

Wme. P. A 287 

Pists« Rings. 

Spacke^ F. W. Maeb. Co 25 

Piston Ring Qrindors. 

Heald Machine Co. 284 

Planers. 

Amsrtean Tool Works Co. 287 

Pnllsli (Metal). 

Detroit Yamiah Co. 270 

Intemat Metal PoUah Oi 222 

Lawrenoa * Welch 142 

Pellah (Weed). 

Detroit Yamlsh O) lYU 

Lawrenoe * Welch 142 

Prest Steel Frames. 

Klnacy Mfg. Co. 286 

Smith. A. O. Co. 224 

Priming Devlees. 

Imperial Brass Mfg. Co 208 

Lunkenhelmer Co 211 

Propellers. 

WUmartb St Morman (3o 299 

PnMlsatlens. 

AudeL Tbeo. * Co. 251-259 

Auto Directories Co 281 

Pumps (Bilge). 

Upman Mfg. Co 273 

Lobee Pump St Mach. Co. ......275 

Pumps (CIreulatlon). 

Brownell. F. A. MoU» Co. 281 

Imperial Braaa Mfg. Co 208 

Lipman Mfg. Co 273 

Lobee Pump St Mach. Co 275 

McCord Mfg. Go 267 

Oberdoifcr. M. L. Brass Co 224 

Pumpe (Oil). 

Imperial Brass Mfg. Co. 808 

Sherwood MIg. Co 249 

Pumps (Hand Tire). 
Oleaaon-Petecs Air Pump Co. 172. 274 

Hen St (To 89 

KeUogg Mfg. Co. 212 

Skinner St Skinner 270 

Spacke, F. W. Mach. Co 25 

Pump («onneetloni. 

Park aty Brass Co 289 

Sterena St Co 200 

Paneturs Closing Compounds. 

Auto Tire Security C^>. 6. 142 

Tlresele Co 142 

Pyrmlln Sheeting. 

Arlington Co 288 

Radiators. 

A-Z Co 290 

Briscoe - Mfg. Co. 305 

Fodders Mfg. Co 18 

Hayes Mfg. Co 291 

Kinaey Mfg. Co 286 

Livingston Radiator Co 280 

McCord Mfg. Co 257 

Reliable Radiator Co 290 

Rome-Tumey Radiator (To 295 

Wright Cooler & Hood Co 290 

Radiator Solution. 

NonkorMa Co 96 

Rallners. 

K. * W. Mfg. Co 47 

Retreading Kettles. 
Auto Tire Vxilcanizlng Co 256 



Goodyear Tire St Rubber (To..... 297 

Morgan St Wright 269 

Rime. 

Fireatooe Tire St Bub. Co 101 

(Soodyear Tire St Rubber Co. 297 

Standard Welding Co 215 

Swlnehart Tire Co. . Inalde Back Corer 

Weston-Mott Co 292 

Rims (Rsmovabis). 

Diamond Rubber (To 61 

Firestone Tire St Rub. Co 101 

Fiak Rubber (To 227 

Sager. J. H. Co 41 

Robe Ralls. 

Hancock Mfg. (To. 244 

Imperial Brass Mfg. Co 208 

Motor Car Equipment (To 276 

Rands Mfg. Co 28b 

Smith* Jos. N. St Co 221 

Rsller Bearings. 

Hyatt Roller Bearing (To 285 

Standard Roller Bearing Co. ...287 

Timken B. B. Axle (To 246 

Running Gears. 

Borbeln Auto (To 261 

(Trosby Co. 186 

Van Dom St Dution (To 278 

Rubber Bumpers. 

Smith. Joseph N. ft Co 221 

Saddles. 
Meslttger* H. A F. Mfg. (To..... 199 

Sertw Maahlnas. 
National- Acme Mfg. (To 240 

Serew Maeblae Predusts. 

Ashlcv Machine Works 280 

Detroit Screw Works .: 284 

Electric Welding Products Co.... 278 

National- AcmeMfg. (To 240 

Peninsular Milled Screw Ca ....290 
Seats (Avxillary). 

Auto BebuUdlng Go 250 

Oravea St Congdon (To 295 

BUI Mfg. Ga 283 

KimbaU. C. P. St Ooi 283 

Seats (Ramble) 

Auto, BebuUdlng (To 260 

Dann Broa. 295 

8esMd-Hand Avtemebiiet. 
Broadway Automobllo Bxduuage. .279 

Tlmea Sguara Auto Co. 266 

Sbapen. 

Amerlrsn Tool Workp (To 165 

•bask Absorbsrs. 

Behrman-Baron Co 149-268 

Bl-Cal-Ky AuzillaxT Spring (To.. 279 

Buifalo Specialty Co. 204 

Foster Shock Abeorber 236 

Hartford Suspenaloa (To. 287 

Hers St (To 89 

Kidder. W. P 273 

Mealnger. H. * F. Mfg. (To. ...199 

Sager. J. H. (To 41 

St. Louis Supplementary Spiral 
Spring Co 29 

Shask AbsorblH Shafts. 

Alexander St Cox (To. 275 

Shovels. 

Union Furnace Mfg. (To. ....98-299 

Saan. 

Daries, J. P. St Co 283 

Whlto Star BeOnlng Co. 146 

Spark Coils. 

Auto CoU (To. 222 

(Tonn. TeL & E. (To 212 

Dayton Elec. Mfg. Co 267 

(3oodson Elec. St Mfg. Co 289 

Helnse Electric (To 21 

K-W Ignition Co. ... .148a. b. e A d 

Lundgren Mfg. Co 286 

National Spark CoQ Co. 233 

Pittafleld Spark (ToU Co. 233 

Splitdorf. C. F. 147 

Willlama. E. a 283 

Spark Plugs. 

Baker Mfg. Co. 280 

Best Ignition Equipment Co. ..234 

Bosch Magneto Co 207 

Bushey, E. J 146 * 295 

DelU Mfg. Co. 285 

Groesman, Emll Co. 9 

Hardy. R. E, (To 258 

Helnze Electric Co 21 

Hers St Co 89 

Janney-Steinmeta (To. 239 

Jeffery-Dcwltt Co 230 

K-W IgniUon Co 148a. b. c& d 

C. A. Mezger 292 

Mica Core Mfg. (To. 254 

Mosler. A. R. St Co 99 

Motor Car Equipment Co 276 

N. S. U. Motor Co 200 

Naaonal Coll Co 233 

National St^el Products Co 210 

Never-MUs Spark Plug Co 268 

Rajah Auto Supply Co 868 

Robert InBtrument Co 275 

Shennan. G. H. & Son 284 

Splitdorf. C. F 147 



Standard (To 205 

Standard Sales Co 283 

Vanguard Mfg. Co. 265 

WUfiams. E. Q 288 

Wltherbee Igniter Co 81 

Spark Plug Protsetors. 

Bajah Auto Supply (To 268 

Speed Indicators. 

Auto Improvement Co 221 

Jones' Speedometer 16 

Loring Auto Appliance Co 295 

Nock. Geo. W. Co 247 

Smith. B. H. Mach. Co 297 

Stewart St CUrk Mfg. Ca ..17-148 

Warner Instrument Co 117-149 

Spekss. 

Standard Co 198 St 205 

Springs (Body). 
Bi-Cal-Ky Auxiliary Spring Co. .279 

Perfection Spring Co 286 

Tuthill Spring (To 285 

Springs (Cushion). 

National Spring St Wire Co 282 

Ventilated (Tushlon St Spring Co. 283 
Springs (Small). 

Bamea. Wallace Co 282 

Sproeketa. 

Baldwin (Thain St Mfg. Co 299 

Boston Gear Works 292 

(Tullman Wheel (To 280 

Pariah St Bingham Co 200 

Stamped Auto Parts. 

(Troaby Co 188 

Gasket Supply Co 284 

Konlgslow. Otto Mfg. (To. 289 

Smith. A. O. (To 224 

Worcester Pressed Steel (To. ....292 
Steam Autemebiles. 

Lane Motor Vehicle Co. 111-281 

White Co 8f 

Steam Ante Eaglnes. 

Ofeldt. F. W. St Sons 244 

Stssi Balls. 

American Ball Co. 292 

atssi Casttags. 
Acme 8. A M. Iron Works ....288 

Chicago Steel Foundry (To. 288 

Crucible Steel (Taatlng (To. 250 

Keystone Steel Caatlnga (To 42 

Lebanon Steel (Taatlng Co. ....274 

New Prooeaa Steel Co 244 

Weatem Malleable StMl Co. ....245 
Slaering Apparatua (Auto) 

Auto Parts Mfg. (To 265 

Blood Broa. Machine (To 226 

Borbein Auto (To. 261 

Boaton (3ear Works 292 

Brown-Llpe Gear (To. 218 

Buitmap. F. H. (To 278 

CenUur Motor (To. 287 

Gemmer Mfg. (To. 278 

Grant-Lees Machine (To. 286 

Michigan Auto Co. 285 

Roaa Gear * Tool Go. 289 

Warner Gear Ca 23ft 

Steering Cheek. 

Addison. The 29f 

Steering Wbeols (Ante). 

Centaur Motor Co. 287 

Smith. A. O. (To 224 

Steps. 

Factory Sales (Torp. 288 

Step Braekets. 

(Trosby Co 188 

Pariah St Bingham (To 200 

Storage Battsries (Prapnislen) 

American Battery (Tb^ 278 

Breakatone. S 285 

Carpenter St Volkhardt 280 

Electrio Storage Battery (To. ...24& 
Hooeier Storage Battery (To. ....248 
The Storage Battery Supply (To.. 261 

Willard Storage Battery (To 278 

Storm (Severs. ■ 

Irrin. B. J. Mfg. Co. .199^ 

Nathan Norelty Mfg. Co. 241 

Strainers. Gasoline. 

Austro-Amer. Sepsrator (To 291 

Lunkenhelmer Cou 211 

Surfaes Qrtnders. 

Hesld Machine Worka 28& 

Switehes (Eleetris) 
Churcher Electrio St Mfg. (To.... 181 

Conn. Tel St Elec (Tb 212 

Dayton Electric Mfg. Co. 267 

Hers St Co 89 

Kent. Atwater. Mfg. Co 7 

Safety Derice (Tb. 248 

Splitdorf. C. F 147 

United Manufacturers 212 

WllUamB. E. Q 283 

Tandem Attaobmsnts. 

Excelsior Supply (To. 198 

Homecker Motor Mfg. (TO. 190 

Tanks. 

Fedders Mfg. Co. • 18 

Foliom, C. G. Mfg. (TO 29r 



CTGLB AND ACTOHOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



25 Companies Using 
AUas Taxicabs 



The absolutely essential requirements of a taxicab are the maximum 
amount of body room, with the minimum amount of mechanism with 
ample power and ease of control. Other requirements may be summed 
up in (our words — Reliability, Low Maintenance, E)urability. 

Ejcperimce has shown thai die complicated touring car chassis, with 
thtai conq>Iex four-cylinder engines and three-speed transnissions, did not 
fill these necessary requiremeids. A far simpler and more riigged con- 
struction was essential. 

The Atlas twtxylinder, two-cycle engine successfully solves the 
problem for the power plant requirements, as the engine hai but five 
moving parti, being practically indestructible. The power is ample, 
with a remarlcable speed variation, safe and easy control of both engine 
and transmission. 

The steoing wheel and operating levers are mounted on the left 
nde, which experience has shown to be a radical improvement for safe 
running. 

The other parts <A the Atlas Taxicab are especially designed for 
maximum strength and durabihty, completing a combination which has 
been taken advantage of by twen^-five taxicab companies now using 
the Atlas Taxicab. 

Sand for lllii*trftt«i] Caf-' -* 

S-crcIa CklecUii 



Atlas Motor I 

Manbw* A.M.C.II4.A. 

92 Birnie Avenue 
SpiingHeld :: Mass. 



Comnarcial DapL, 
1924 BroMlwkr. New York 
[Frail- H. Ai]»mi, Manat*' 






304 



CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILB TKADB JOURNAL. 



BUYERS' INDEX— Continued 



Hvicock Mfg. Co. 144 

UayeB Mfg. Co 291 

Janney Steiaineta Co 239 

Kluaey Mfg. Co 286 

Worcesler Pressed Steel Co 292 

Tuk Cutter. 
Randall- Fsiclmfly Co 223 

Taps 4 Diet. 
Motor Car Eaulpment Co. 270 

Tap Extraetort. 

Walton Ca 281 

Termlnala. 

Bliss-Cheater Co 292 

Conn. Tel & Elee. Co. 212 

Goodaon Elec. * Mfg. Co 289 

Morgan, B 38 

United Manufacturers 212 

Tiners. 

Beckley-Balaton Ca 20 

Conn. Tel & Elec. Co 212 

Heinsa Electric Co 21 

Hera * Co 89 

Lundgren Mfg. Co. 286 

Mica Core Mfg. Co. 294 

Nefwcomb. A. H. 289 

Plttafleld Siwrk GoU Co. 233 

Bottert Instrument Co. 275 

Trio Mfg. Co 279 

Wltherbee Igniter Co. 81 

Tires. 

AJax-Gxleb Bubber Co. 52 

BallVp C. J. * Co 43 

Crrder & Co. 273 

Dayton Bubber Mfg. Co. 288 

]>iamond Bubber Go. 61 

Empire Tire 00 11 

Ennls Bubber Tire Co. 286 

Federal Bubber Cou 145 

tinstone Tire & Bubber Co.. 101-172 

Flak Bubber Co. 227 

O & J Tire Co. 238 

Gibner. J. L. Ap Bro. 39-171 

Goodrich. B. F. Ca 46 

Goodyear Tire * B. Co 297 

Hartford Bubber Works Co. .... 3 

BLasner* A. H 239 

Kokomo Bubber Co. 197 

Mlchelln Tire Co 285 

Morgan & Wtlght 269 

Motor Car Supplj Co. 297 

Mots Tire & Bubber Ca 285 

Fenna. Bubber Co 231 

Butherford Bubber Co 174 

Bamsen Leather Tire Co 285 

Stein Double Cushion Tire Co. ..^^ 

142-237 

Svlnehait Clincher Tire Co.. 

Inside Back Corer 

Tranton Bubber Mfg. Co 225 

Tires (Emerfeaey) 

Half-Nelson Tire Co. 261 

Tire Braskets. 

Allen Auto Specialty Co 258 

Smith. Jos. N. & Co 221 

Tire Cases. 

Allen Auto Specialty Co 258 

Empire Tire Ca 11 

Gilbert Mfg. Co 289 

Hopewell Bros 255 

Merchant & Etans Co 283 

Nathan Novelty Mfg. Co 241 

Vehicle Apron & Hood Co 22 

Tire Inflatort (Power). 

Hera & Co '..89 

KeUogg Mfg. Co ^12 

Bohrbacher Automatic Air Pump 

Co 282 

Bung Automatic Tire Pump Co.. 216 

Skinner & Skinner 270 

Tire Irons. 

Morgan, B 38 

Motz Clincher Tire ft Bub. Co.. 285 

Shawrer Oo 277 

Tire Powder. 

Karl. Adolph & Oa 276 

Tire Pressure Registers. 

Brown Co 274 

KeUogg Mfg. Co 212 

Skinner & Skinner 270 

TIrt Prtteetors. 

Brictson Mfg. Co 208 

Empire Tire Ca 11 

Kimball Tire Caae Ca 278 

Leather Tire Goods Co 269 

Motor Car Supply Co. ••••521 

20th Century Tire Protector Ca.265 

Walker Auto Tlrs Band Ca ...202 

Tire Repair Artloles. 

Beddey-Balston Co. 20 

Buffslo Specialty Co. 204 

K & W Mfg. Co 47 

Leather Tire Goods Co. ••••••!S! 

M. & M. Mfg. Co 191 * 272 

•O'Neil Tire it Protector Co. ...297 
'TrsTor Blowout Patch Co 267 



Walker Auto Tire Band Co 101 

Tire Sleeves. 

Diamcmd Bubber Co 61 

Mesinger, H. & F. Mfg. Co. ..199 

Vehicle Apron & Hood Co 22 

Tire 4 Tire Trunk Leeks. 

Nathan Novelty Mfg. Co. 241 

Tire Valve Threadiif Tools. 

Huestls Mfg. Ca 283 

Motor Car Equipment Co. 276 

Toe Clips. 

SUndard Co 198 

Toelieau Peekets. 
Wlnship, W. W 255 

Tools Maekinery, Ete. 

American Tool Works Ca 287 

Barnes, W. F. & John Ca ....278 

Cook's SUndard Tool Co 290 

Crane PuUer 279 

Defiance Machine Works 254 

Hlaey-Wolf Machine Ca 260 

Lodge & Shipley Mach. Tool Ca 259 

National- Acme Mfg. Co 240. 

Noonan Tool & Mach. Works ..287 

PraU & Whitney Co. 164 

BiveU Lathe Mfg. Ca 242 

Seneca Falls Mfg. Ca 278 

WeUand. Chas. 285 

Tool Sexes. 

Hayea Mfg. Ca 291 

Standard Cabinet Mfg. Ca ....287 

Tops (Ante). 

Irrin. B. 7. Mfg. Co 290 

Irrin. Bobbins ft Ca 288 

King Top Mfg. Co. 288 

Kroh, C Z. Mfg. Go 284 

La Porte Carriage Co 284 

McClellan, Chaa. P 288 

National Auto Top Go 288 

Newton. W. H. ft Son 287 

Bands Mfg. Ca 288 

Sprague Umbrella Ca 289 

Spgfd Auto T<9 ft Uph. Co. ..275 

Tee Dreseleg. 
Detroit Varnish Co 270 

Top Hoods. 
Vehlde Apron ft Hood CO. .... 22 

Top Materials. 

Mutty. L. J. Ca 290 

Pantasote Ca 285 

Transmissien Qears. 

American Die ft Tool Co 218 

Auto Parts Co 264 

Auto Parts Mfg. Co 265 

Brown-Upe Gear Co 218 

Climax Electric Works 284 

ConUnenul Motor Mfg. Co 282 

Covert Motor Veh. Co 281 

Grant-Lees Machine Ca 286 

Long Arm System Co 250 

Merchant ft Evans Co. 283 

Michigan Auto Co 285 

New York Gear Works 259 

Rockwood Mfg. Co 265 

Spacke. F. W. Mach. Co 25 

Syracuse Gear Co 304 

Van Dorn ft Dutton Co 278 

Warner Gear Co 235 

Trimmings. 

Cowles, C. ft Ca 283 

Pantasote Co 285 

Truoks. Cliaaffeurs*. 

Brown Co 274 

Motor ft Mfg. Works Co 172 

Truelis. 
AJax Trunk ft Sample Caae Co. 295 

Nathan Novelty Mfg. Ca 241 

Vehicle Apron ft Hood Co. 22 

Wlnship. W. W 255 

Trunk Raeks. 

Pollard Auto Co 287 

Tubiif. 

Buffalo TutM Co 263 

Mackenzie-Walton Co 149 

NaUonal Tube Ca 262 

Turn Tables. 
Auto ft Accessories Mfg. Ca ..270 

Weber Cycle ft Supply Co 279 

TwO'Spoed Gears. 
N. 8. U. Motor Ca 200 

Uaivsrsal Jolett. 

Auto Parts Mfg. Co 166 

Blood Bros. Madilne Co 226 

Boston Gear Works 292 

Gerome. T. F 291 

Hartford Auto Parts Co 290 

Peninsular Milled Screw Co. 290 

Splcer Universal Joint Go 213 

Valves (Miss.) 
Lunkenheimer Ca Ill 

Valvee (Eeglns). 

Crescent Forging Co 215 

Electric Welding Products Co. ..278 
National Tube Co 252 



Valvee (Tlrs). 

HueatU Mfg. Co 

Schrader's Sons. A. 297 

Valve Qrinding Cempenedi. 
Diamond Pulvs Co 260 

Valve Grinders. 
Brown Co 274 

Valve RsMOvsrs. 
Mechanical ft Electrical Oa ..261 
Noonan Tool ft Madi. Works. ..287 
White. Sam. B. Co 274 

Varalskes. 

Columbus Varnish Co 291 

Valentine ft Ca 275 

Veitammetirs. 
Eldredge Electric Mfg. Ca ....248 
Hoyt- Electrical Instrument Co... 251 

Vottwetsrs. 

Conn. TeL ft Elee. Go. 212 

Eldradgo Elec. Mfg. Co 248 

Hoyt Electrical Instrument Wha..251 

Plgnolet. L. M. 286 

Bead-Bite Meter Works 299 

Bobett Instrumant Co 279 

United Manufacturen 212 

ValeaalMTS. 
Auto Tire Vulcanising GO. ....256 

Fisk Bubber Ca 227 

Gibney, J. L. ft Bro 39 

Haywood. M. B. Mfg. Co. .'....248 
Miller. Chas. B. (Anderson. Ind.)27S 
O'Neill Tiie ft Protector Co.... 297 

Bloe ft Dsyton Mfg. Co 266 

Shaler. C. A. Co. 242 

"SUtch-Nlne" Vulcanlaer Ca ..280 

Vaieanlzieg Selutioe 

M. ft M. Mfg. Co 272 

O'Neil Tire Protector Ca 197 

Tingley. Chas. 0. ft Go. 277 

Washers (Felt). 

Booth. N. E 289 

Washers (Metal). 
Gasket Supply 0>. 284 

Washiaf Apparatua. 

Frey. Jno. M 291 

Ideal Carriage Washer Oa ....282 

Smith. L J 269 

Vehicles Specialty Ca 279 

Wests Cans. 
Dover Stamping ft Mfg. Co. ...209 

HUl Dryer Oa 288 

Water Reguiaters. 

Ofeldt. F. W. ft Sons 244 

Water Saver. 

Ideal (Carriage Washer Co 282 

Welding. 

Davia-Boumonville Ca 289 

Standard Welding Co. 219 

Weldiag Outfits. 

Morgan. B 88 

Wheels (Aute) 

Borbein Auto Co 261 

Empire Wheel Works 277 

Hayes Wheel Co 29f 

Indestructible Steel Wheel (^>...186 
Schwars Wheel Co 291 

Wlieeli (Eroerfsney). 

Burrowes, E. T. Co 286 

Wheel Pullers. 

Crane Puller 279 

Empire Wheel Works 277 

Whistlss. 
Gleason-Peters Air Pump Co.... 274 
Nightingale Whistle Mfg. Co. ..255 
Wind Shields. 

Andenon. F. W. (3o 146 

Ball-Fintae Co 217 

Bamdt-Johnson <^ 277 

Burrowea, E. T. 0>. 286 

Detroit Auto-Shield Co. 288 

Earl Automatic Wlndahield Ca..203 

Grossman. Emll Ca 8 

Irvin, B. J. Mfg. Ca IM 

Mezger, C. A 292 

KlmbalL C. P. ft Go 183 

Limousine Carriage Mfg. Co. . .277 

Meager, C. A 291 

Nathan Novelty Mfg. Oo 241 

National Auto Top Co. 288 

Boss ft Browne 288 

Smith. Jos. N. ft (>> 211 

Sprague UmbreHa Ca 289 

Universal Wind Shield Ca ....Ml 

Vanguard Co 289 

Vehlde Apron ft Hood Q> 11 

Weed WerklM Maeblnery. 

Defiance Machine works 194 

WrsMbes. 

BeeUey-Balston 0>. 20 

C. M. B. Wrench Oo 172 

Goes Wrench Oo 4-9 

Factory Sales Oicporatlon 288 

Moasberg. Frank Co. 219 

Quincy, Manchester. Baitent <3a..l83 

Rex Wrench Ok .m 

Walden Mfg. Oo 184 



CTCLH AND AUTOMOBILE TRADE JOURNAL. 



Briscoe Radiators 



Mercedes Type — Square Effect 

Only one of many types we manu- 
facture — and a mighty good one. 
, The shape is right for looks and 
strength; the construction is such 
that it will carry 06 more heat units 
than any other type. 

Write us for quotations. 

BRISCOE MANUfACTURING COMPANY 

General Offices :: Detroit^ Michigan 

Factories, Detroit and Newark, N. J. 



CTCUI AND AUTOHOBILB TRADB JOURNAU 

ADVERTISERS' INDEX 



k Boat Ulc Cd. ....lit 



« I>T 



». Ul 



■tro Cri™W 



ADduett Cfl- - .ITI 



KeritoiH LubrlaUni Co. 



atlni Co 



:::S 

,..tn 

:::S 



Bneuon unr. Ca, 



. Work) SU 



'crrrlilpt'lllli Co."ii:im 



Llrlnfiton HidUtor Co. 



a ik rnntdon Co. . 



Luu-Lorkwond KTm. 



CTCLE AND AUTOMOBILE TRADB JOURNAL. 

ADVERTISERS' INDEX— Contmued 



ilfiata. H. A r Hit. I 



oU« Bntiat Co. ....MT 



8HUI1 CiirUn BoUtr Co. 1 

Sutn Dquu* CiuUoB Tin Co. 1 
Gumu-Dnink Cd! "!!!.'■■'!!!.' i il 
suntin A Cliil Wl- Co 



....*M 

::;;;a 



..-.■.mm 



PflTftctlon MfB. 1 



!^Pftd CbBuint PuUcT Co. 

SpMdweLl aolor Ctr Co. . 

Souuloif. C, P, " ^. 

»Pt«3"*Auto'°Top * Unh. Ca. 



Wibsr CjelB A aupplj Co n 

WHd Chiln Tin fflp Co C 

WclUnd. Ctiu. IW 

Wetun Ualor Co. )t 



■■ Hood Ce. ..n 




PUTNAM 
Stationtrj Melon 



Bprlaiiaeia. tSut. 




CYCLE AND AUTOMOBILB TKABB JOCTIIHAU. 



To the Man Who Has Never 
Owned a Motor Car 

You are fortunate to be planning now to buy your first motot car. You have 
escaped all the grief and expense suffered by owners of one, two and four-cylmder cars 
— cars in process of development. 

It is your oi^rtunity to buy a perfected, high-giade car, a car infinitely superior to 
previous standards, and to buy that car at a price lower than is aslced for several c^ the 
old-style models. 

Some Dew buyert thmk [t wiie lo purchue * cheap ur If you buy a cheap ur, the better cart will outdui youn 

fint — (or eiperience. But why make experience lumec- at eytty poinl and make you rcHTet your choice. 
CBarily expouive? Profit by the e^wrieace of other cheap-car buyen. Every 

To buy a cheap car Gnt Uas wiie when all aulomobila one of them, who can poeaibly do ao, tdli hii cheap car ai 

were eiperlmiitaf. Thta, all buyen look riikt. and cauttoui quickly ai he can, in order lo buy a labifactory car. 
onet took the leatl risk by purchaii^ the loweit.pric«l can. Buy the right car fint, and you buy a cat to lue [nol to 

Today coodilioiu are diBerenl. The aperiiaental features idl at a IobJ — one in which depieciatioa need not figure, 

of one, two and four-cylinder can have been overcome in For thit good ca 

(he ni-cylinder car. And there u no more reaioa why a uliifactoiy lervif 

buyer ihould underyo coitly experimentiag with cheap can will require iti n 
now than thai he ihould write with a qmll before utiog a You can mak 



Has all the advantages of other hi(^-gra<le cart, and many exclusive advantages. Starts from 
the seat without cranking — a feature not to be had in any other car. Holds the woHd's record for 
low cost of maintenance — $1 for 4343 miles. Makes hill climbing easy, is marvelously smooth and 
quiet, and goes the route like coasting down hill. 

Made in the only big plant the world over that produces six-cylinder cars exclusively. We have 
made one, two and four-cylmder cars, and know their short comings. That's why we maiu: sixes onlj- 
Suppose you get the particulars about our 46 h.p. Winton Six at $3,000. 

I "Twalva Ruluto Help Aulemabila BuVEn"iia bwUel ihil ihauld be in iheJiudioi tmr mu who csataDlUEi burm* ■ 1 

k. Botlon. PtaUa^