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Full text of "Avery notes and queries : a quarterly magazine devoted to the history of the Groton Averys"

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http://www.archive.org/details/averynotesquerie118aver 



Br>o. NO. ■ ". . ^^> , . 

1 . G^l 



Hvcry JVotes and C5[ucrie8. 



A Quarterly Magazine devotedf?^*he History of the Groton Averys. 
No. I. "Honor tJKy Father and thy Mother." February, 1 898. 

Notes and »o^ueries will be sent to every member of the Groton 
Avery History Club. Some of the subsequent issues may contain 
only eight pages each instead of sixteen. 

The question is often asked, Who are the "Groton Averys.'"' 
Christopher Aveiy and his only son, later known as Captain James 
Avery, came from England with Winthrop and landed at Salem, 
Mass., in 1630. They subsequently settled at (iroton (pronounced 
Graw-tun), across the river from New London, Conn., and there lived 
until they died. Their descendants are known as the Groton Averys. 

The descendants of Dr. William Avery of Dedham, Mass., are 
known as "Dedham Averys." The Dedham tribe is not nearly so 
numerous as the Groton tribe. The founders of tlie two tribes lived 
at the same time in Massachusetts, but the relationship between them 
is not yet known. 

Mr. vSweet's history of the Averys of Groton w^as indexed in many 
different parts, making search very difficult. Probably fewer than 
two-thirds of the names were indexed at all. The present family 
historian has had made, at considerable cost, a card index of every 
name in the book and of every name reported to him. New names 
are indexed as fast as received. 

Once in a while I receive a letter from an Avery whom I can not 
yet "hitch" to the Groton or the Dedham line. Such letters are put 
on file as "Unidentified Averys." Further information from their au- 
thors, or some n .nv additron to the card index, may take the letter out 
of that list, and enroll another member of the tribe any day. 

The page md number references used in this magazine are to 
Sweet's History of "The Averys of (jroton." 

Sweet's hisiOry of "The Averys of Groton" is out of print, and 
can be secured cnly as a stray copy is picked up. A clean copy read- 
ily sells now for fifteen dollars, thi-ee times the subscription price. 



2 A\ HUV XOPES AND QUERIES. 

Miiny persons are now trying to get copies of ]Mr. Sweet's his- 
tory of the (iroton Averys at prices much greater than the subscrip- 
tion price. And yet Mr. Sweet was not able to get four hundred 
subscribers to his work I 

The family iiislorian has a few pamphlets containing tlie appendix 
to Sweet's "The Averys of Cjroton," and relating to " x\very Coats 
of Arms" (with illustrations of four coats) and to "The Avery 
Family in England and France." These pamphlets will be furnished, 
as long as tiie supply lasts, at fifty cents per copy. 

A GENEALOGICAL METHOD ILLUSTRATED. 

Last October, I received a letter from a lady in Michigan who 
had heard from Groton, Conn., that I was the historian of the Avery 
family. She desired to trace the connection of her family with the 
Groton Averys, if such a connection existed. We. therefore, entered 
into correspondence for that purpose. They knew little of their an- 
cestry ; their grandfather's name was Benjamin Perkins Avery; they 
had a cousin bv the name of Bissell, descended from Benjamin P. 
Avery's sister; their people came from Vermont by way of Palmyra, 
N. Y. 

Search of the records in my possession revealed several things : 
Mr. Sweet's history of "The Averys of Groton," page 434, showed 
that a Nathan Avery had gone from Connecticut to Vermont, and 
thence to Palmyra, N. Y.. where he applied for a pension. He had 
a son by the name of Benjamin Pearson Avery, and a daughter 
"Betsey who married a Mr. Russell.'" After Nathan's death, his 
widow went back to Vermont and there died, after applying for a 
pension. This removal from Vermont to Palmyra, N. Y., was com- 
mon to both parts of the broken chain for which we were seeking 
the connecting link, and suggested careful study on both sides of the 
break. In a case like this, Mrs. Avery has a faculty of " observation 
and inference" worthy of Sherlock Holmes. Study of the applica- 
tions for a pension showed that Nathan's widow returned to Vermont 
"to be with some of her other children, among whom was Betsey 
Bissell." 

Eyidently, the family record had been printed wrong, and the 
daughter Betsey had married a Mr. Bissell, and not "a Mr. Russell." 
This made stronger the probability that " the missing link " had been 
found; but "Benjamin Pearson" was not "Benjamin Perkins." 



AvKRY Notes and Qukries. 3 

Further correspondence with the parties in Michigan brought out the 
fact that the name of the father of Benjamin Perkins Avery was 
Nathan. The probability now was very strong. Still further corre- 
spondence and study established the fact that Benjamin Perkins 
Avery and the alleged "Benjamin Pearson Avery " were identical. 
Nathan Avery, the father, had married a Miss Pearson, and it would 
have been natural for Air. Sweet to assume that the name of a son re- 
ported to him as Benjamin P. Avery should be amplified into " Ben- 
jamin Pearson Avery." The information at his hand was scanty 
enough. However the error arose, it was detected ; and the claim of 
these Michigan Averys to a descent from Captain James Avery of 
Groton was definitely established. 



HELP FROM THE GENEALOGIES OF OTHER FAMILIES. 

In looking iuirriedly over the Burhans' Genealogy in a library at 
Buft'alo, N. Y., I noticed the record of a Louise Snyder, daughter of 
Richard and Blandine (Burhans) Snyder, born October 14, 1834, who 
married January 15, i860, a Hezekiah Avery, v^^ho was born January 
30, 1S30.' They had a daughter Carrie, born October 27, i860. Mr. 
Sweet's history of the Groton Averys does not record a Hezekiah 
Avery who married a Louise Snyder, but it does mention a Hezekiah 
Avery who married a Louise Burnham, time and place not given, 
her birth and parentage not given, and who had a daughter 
Carrie, birth not given. Mr. Sweet had not given the date or place 
of birth of this Hezekiah Avery, but careful study of the record of 
Hezekiah's father showed that the son must have been born not far 
from 1830. 

The following facts suggested, in spite of Mr. Sweet's record, 
that this was the Hezekiah who married Louise Snyder : 

(i.) He was born about the right time. 

(2.) His parents lived in the right neighborhood. 

(3.) His wife's name was Louise. 

(4.) His daughter's name was Carrie. 

(5,) Hezekiah's brothers married wives with Dutch names; 
Burhans and Snyder are also Dutch names; family environment 
counts for something. 

(6.) It was very easy for Mr. Sweet, or some copyist, or com- 
positor, to changd a carelessly written "Burhans" into "Burnham," 



4 Avery Notes and Queuies. 

and to use the maiden name of the mother (Burhans) instead of the 
maiden name of the daughter (Snyder), and that is just ivhat xvas done. 

Thus we gain the date of Hezekiah's birth, the date of his mar- 
riage, the real name of his wife, the names of her parents, and the 
date of the birth of the daughter, Carrie. 

If, in some family genealogy, you tind an Avery connection, 
please copy the record, making reference to page and title of the 
book, and send it to the historian of the Avery family. The club 
treasury should be full enough to enable the employment of copyists 
to make such transcripts at the congressional and otlier great Ameri- 
can libraries. See page eight. 



Judge Edward Avery (page 132) was a member of tl:e supreme 
court of Oliio from 1846 to 1851, when he resigned. A biographical 
sketch of him, written by U. vS. District Judge Martin Welker, may 
be found in Proceedings of Ohio State Bar Association, July, 1889. 

In the seventeenth century, the name Avery was often written 
Averill. For instance, the letter that Joanna Greenslade took from 
the church at Boston to the church at Gloucester, speaks of her as 
"now the wife of James Averill." 

Please send to the family liistorian for a supply of his little circu- 
lar, "Are You an Avery?" and then hand one to every Avery you meet. 

Be sure to read the article printed on the eighth page of this 
magazine. 

Please send to the family historian the name and address of every 
living Avery or Avery descendant that you know. Send him a 
marked copy of any newspaper that contains a notice of an Avery. 
Marriage and obituary notices are especially desirable. 

If a change by birth, marriage or death occurs in vour family, 
report it promptly to the family historian. 

The opening chapter of Sweet's " The Averys of Groton " con- 
tains all that is known of Christopher and James, the founders of 
the Groton Averys. There are a few pamphlets containing this chap- 
ter, and a view of the "Hi\e of the xVverys." These pamphlets (20 
pages) will be furnished by the family liistorian. as long as the supply 
lasts, at one dollar per copy. 



AvERv Notes and Queries. 5 

Many corrections reported show errors in dates as printed in the 
family history. Most of tliese errors are in giving January for June, 
or June for January. (3f course, the source of tiie error lies in the 
similar appearance of the written abbreviations, Jan. and Jun. It is 
safer to write the words out in full, or, at least, to write Jan'y. 



jii-^W--^^ 







THK HIVE OF THE AVERVS. 



The house that Captain James Avery built at (iroton in 1636 
was occupied by eight successive generations of Averys. It was 
burned to the ground on the night of July 20, 189.1.. ^^ was often 
called '"The IIi\'e of tlie Averys," and never passed out of the posses- 
sion of a member of the family. The "Avery Memorial Association" 
was incorporated by the Connecticut Legislature, and has built a 
beautiful granite and bronze memorial on the site of "The Hive." 1 
hope to give other pictures of the old house and of the present 
memorial in later numbers of Notes and Qjlteries. 



6 A\KK^ Notes and Queriks. 

(QUERIES. 

Captain James Avery, the founder of the famil}^ known as the 
Groton Averys, married Joanna Greenslade of Boston, November lo, 
1643. Nothing is known of her ancestry. If you find anything that 
you tiiink may throw any light upon her ancestry, please communi- 
cate it to the family historian. 

Sarah Avery, daughter of James and Deborah (Stallyon) Avery, 
was born May 10, 1688. She married a Mr. Latham (No. 19, page 
29). What were the dates of her death and marriage? What was 
the full name of Mr. Latham.' When and where was he born .f' 
Wlien and where did he die? Who were his parents? 

Benajah Avery, son of Edward and Joanna (Rose) Avery, was 
born October 12, 17 10 (No. 36, page 30). What is his further record? 

Sarah, daughter of Benjamin and Thankful (Averyj Avery was 
born July 29, 1742 ; married Captain Hubbard Burrows (No. 78, 
page 32). Wliat was the date of her marriage? When and where 
was each of her ten children born? 

Dorothy Parke, daughter of Jolin Parke of Preston, Conn., mar- 
ried Ebenezer Avery, June 19, 170S (No. 14, page 30). Her sister 
Abigail married Christopher Avery, December 19, 1704 (No. 15, 
page 31). When and where were Dorothy and Abigail born? What 
was the maiden name of their mother? 



If you have not access to a copy of Mr. Sweet's book, I will send 
you a brief, type-written copy of your line back to the founders 
(Christopher and his son James Avery, A. D. 1630), for fifty cents, or 
a fuller record, giving the names of the children in each generation, 
for one dollar; provided I can ascertain just where you come into 
the line. The profits of this ■' business" will be used in pushing the 
investigations of the Groton Avery History Club. vSee page eight. 

I am under great obligations to many correspondents who have 
taken pains /(; J12111I up the information for which I have asked. 
Some have very kindly undertaken to secure the records of a grand- 
father and of all his descendants. They soon learn something of the 
trials of a family historian, and are led into helpful sympathy with 
one who has to secure the records of hundreds of grandfathers and 
their thousands of descendants. To all who have tlius given help, 
or are now giving it, I tender my most sincere thanks. 



Avery Notes and Queries. 7 

"There may be, and there often is, a regard for ancestry which 
nourishes a weak pride, but there is also a moral and philosophical 
respect for our ancestors which elevates the character and improves 
the heart." — Daniel Webster. 

Many families of Averys and Avery descendants have expressed 
surprise and regret at the omission of their names, and the names of 
their parents, from Mr. Sweet's book, while the records and letters 
sent to me by Mr. Sweet's executor show that the omission was due 
to the refusal or neglect on the part of parents to answer the inquiries 
of the family historian. Every genealogist finds his most discourag- 
ing experience in unanswered letters. Some persons thought that 
Mr. Sweet's self-sacrificing efforts were part of a money-making 
scheme! 1 have, similarly, been offered a copy of a family record in a 
Bible for a mouey consideration. 

" These sought their register among those that were reckoned by 
genealogy, but it was not found ; therefore were they, as polluted, 
put from the priesthood. "-7Vc'//cv;;/rt'// r/7., ilk- Join the History Club. 

It is desirable that search be made in England for the connection 
between the Groton Averys in America and the Avery family in the 
mother country. It is hoped that an expert genealogist will be put at 
this work this year. Many searches ought to be made on this side of 
the Atlantic for items relating to members of the tribe, such as exam- 
inations of the records of colonial, revolutionary and other wars, m- 
cluding the civil war (in which many Averys fought honestly and 
bravely on both sides), pension lists, town histories, family histories, 
city directories and the records of hereditary societies, such as the 
Societv of the Colonial Wars, the Colonial Dames, the Sons and the 
Daughters of the American Revolution, etc., etc. But such mining 
enterprises require a considerable outlay of money-for which the 
Groton Avery History Club is waiting. See page eight. 

Notes and Queries ought to bring every Groton Avery, and 
every Avery descendant who does not know that he belongs to some 
other Avery branch, into direct communication with the historian of 
the Groton Averys. This means you, unless you have already written 
to him, giving your post-office address and wliat you know of your 
ancestry in the Avery line. 



Aa'ekv N()tp:s and Oitkries. 



Hvcry JVfotes and Queries. 

J''ithlis]ieJ at Cleveland, Ohio, by Elrov M. Aver\ 



S/fbsci-iplioi/ Price, Fifty cents per year. Fifteen cents per copy. 

TO THE GROTON AVERYS- GREETING. 

Since the death of Mr. Homer De Lois Sweet of Syracuse, N. Y., 
I have become, by common consent, the family historian. Xo one 
else seemed willing to do the work and bear the expense witiiout any 
possibility of pecuniary compensation. I entered upon the work with 
enthusiastic zeal, and have already secured much in the way of cor- 
rections and additions to the printed record that was the i-esult of Mr. 
Sweet's thirty years' labor. Methods of collecting, arranging and 
utilizing genealogical material that Mr. Sweet did not employ, largely 
because of the pecuniary losses that came to him in his later years, 
have been adopted by me for the reason that you are not 'willing to 
xvait another thirty years fo'' a second edition of the family history. 
In the year 1897, I put more than a thousand dollars into the under- 
taking ; I do not regret it. but two things I do regret : 

1. I can not afford such an outlay every year. 

2. I see ways in which I could advantageously spend a larger 
sum. Some of these are mentioned in other columns of this paper. 

I shall keep right on, doing the best that I can without any help. 
I would not take a cent for my labor; it is a labor of love. But if 
you feel, as I know that some of you do feel, that the burden ought 
not to be borne by one, and that the work should go forward as 
rapidly as possible, I would respectfully call your attention to the 
following suggestions : 

Let us organize the Groton Avery History Club, with annual dues 
ranging from one to ten dollars, each member to fix the exact amount for 
himself or herself. All dues shall be payable to the family historian, 
to be used by him for the sole purpose of defraying the cost of col- 
lecting and arranging for publication all available material for a com- 
plete and satisfactory family history. The historian shall record in a 
book kept for that purpose each payment of dues, giving the name of 
the member, and the date and amount of the payment ; said record 
for each quarter year shall be printed in Notes and C^ueriks, a copy 



AvEKY Notes and Queries. 9 

of which shall be mailed to each member of the club. At the end of 
dach year, the account of receipts and expenditures shall be examined 
by an auditing committee of three, to be chosen by the members of 
the club, or, if that shall not be practicable, to be appointed by the 
probate judge of Cuyahoga county. Ohio. The report of said au- 
diting committee shall be printed in Notes and Qlieries. 

I agree not to take as compensation for my services any of the 
money sent to the club. If, with this understanding, you are wilhng 
to join the club, please make your remittances for dues, as above in- 
dicated, to the self-appointed treasurer of the club, 

Elroy McKendree Averv, 

657 Woodland Hills Avenue, 

Cleveland, Ohio. 



It will be noticed that the " Club" plan outlined on page eight is 
little more than a device for sparing the feelings of the family histo- 
rian, who really holds all the club offices. It does what seems practi- 
cable in the way of business checks, but, after all, it implies confidence 
in his honesty. If you do not know him personally or by reputation, 
you may make inquiry of any bank in Cleveland ; of any judge or 
other magistrate at Cleveland ; of any official of the Cleveland Cham- 
ber of Commerce; of any Cleveland daily paper ; or of his publishers, 
Sheldon & Company, 43-45 East 12th street, New York City (please 
enclose stamped and addressed envelope for reply). If you cannot re- 
move every doubt that all moneys paid in as dues to the club will be 
spent honestly for the purposes above indicated, of course, you 
ought not to pay such dues. 

Will you not copy from your city directory the names and ad- 
dresses of the Averys that appear therein and send them to the family 
historian, Elroy McKendree Avery, 657 Woodland Hills Avenue, 
Cleveland, Ohio. 

The portrait of James Avery facing page 14 is out of its proper 
place. It is not a picture of Captain James Avery, the founder of 
the family. I do not know what James it represents. The picture of 
Samuel Avery that faces page 558 should face page 598. The picture 
of William Avery that faces page 609 should face page 458. These 
mistakes of the binder probably would not have been made had it not 
been for the death of Mr. Sweet just before the completion of his 
thirty years' work. 

Not every modest man can maintain a personal "organ" like 
Notes and Queries. 



lO AVEKV XOTHS AXD (JlEKIES. 

COLONIAL ROSTER. 

Lineal descent from any j^erson mentioned under this heading 
constitutes eligibility for membership in the "Colonial Dames" or in 
the "Society of Colonial Wars." Brief records like those below, with 
citations of authorities, are desired. 

I. Captain James Avery, the founder of the tribe known as the 
Groton Averys. See the opening chapter of Sweet's "The Averys 
of Groton." 

_\ Christopher Avery (Xo. 15, page 31 ), commissioned lieutenant 
in 1714; captain in October, 1730; deputy to the general court of 
Connecticut, 1734 and 1725; justice; town clerk in 1730. See 
Colonial Records of Connecticut (printed). His colonial record does 
not appear in "The Averys of Ciroton." 

3. Christopher Avery (No. 53, page 39, son of No. 15, above 
given), commissioned captain of the eighth Connecticut regiment, 
October, 1735; lieutenant-colonel, same regiment, October. 1739; 
colonel, same regiment, October, 1746: deputy to the general court of 
Connecticut. 1732, 1734. 1736, 173S to 1764 inclusive; speaker of 
the house, 1751; justice. 1732 to 1768: town clerk of Groton for 
many years, the last term being in 176S. See Colonial Records of 
Connecticut (printed). His colonial record does not appear in "The 
Aver3-s of Groton." 

4. Theophilus Avery (No. 35, page 2,:,). commissioned ensign of 
first company, tifth Connecticut regiment, October, 1746, bv the 
general assembly : lieutenant of the .second Groton company, "i 749. 
See Colonial Records of Connecticut (printed). His colonial record 
does not appear in the -"Averys of Groton. "" 

5. Charles Avery, private in 1756 in Ebenezer Billings' com- 
pany; sergeant in 1758 in Captain Benadam Gallup'scompany ; com- 
missioned ensign by the general assembly of Connecticut in 1758, in 
the eighth company ( John Stanton's), second regiment: lieutenant. 
1759, in the second company (Israel Putnam's), fourth regiment; 
lieutenant, 1760, in Captain John Tyler's company. The fourth reg- 
iment was raised in 1759 to invade Canada by way of Crown Point. 
See Colonial Records of Connecticut (printed). Was not this Charles 
Avery, No. 61, page 42? 

(to be continued.) 



Avery Notes and Queries. h 

REVOLUTIONARY ROSTER. 

Lineal descent from any person mentioned under this heading 
constitutes eligibility for membership in the " Daughters of the 
American Revolution," " Sons of the American Revolution, Chil- 
dren of the American Revolution," and similar societies. Briet rec- 
ords of Revolutionary service, with citations of authorities, are 
desired. 

FROM U. S. CENSUS OK PENSIONERS, 184O. 
^^^jjj AGE. RESIDENCE. " THE AVERVS OF GROTON." 

1. Joshua Avery 76.. .Sandwich. Mass 



2. TohTi Averv 82. ..Conway, Mass .....■■■■ "•■•• 

3 Jonathan Averv 84...Charlemont. Mass , No. 92, page 33.) 

4. Mansford Avery 85.. .Southampton, Mass ••• • •■• — • 

5. Rufus Averv 81...Groton, Conn (No. 261, page 86) 

6. Marv Averv 71...Groton, Conn V;"":; 'al[ 

7. Ebene.erAverv 78...Preston. Conn , No. 153, page 64 

8. Oliver Averv 83.. N. Stonington, Conn (No. 18d, page .0) 

9. David Averv 75. ..Lebanon, Conn 

10. Abel Avery 79. ..Cornwall, Conn 

11. Daniel Averv 78.. .Coventry, Conn V;'"'::":' "IV 

12. Nathan Avery 81. .. Newbury, Vt ( No. 15S, page 60) 

13. Constant Avery 81. ..Eaton, N. Y ':;:""":'\ '''^'^{ 

14. Roger Averv 79...Royakon, N. Y (Xo. 231, page .8) 

15. John H. Avery 79...Preston, N. Y 

16. Christopher Avery 75. ..Warren, Pa 

17. Ezekiel Averv 77. ..Auburn, Pa 

IS. George Avery 70...Wilson Co.. Tenn ..^.•••..••. •■■-■ 

19. Denison Averv 90...Salina. N. Y No. 82. page 48 

20. Benjamin Avery 82...Lyons, N. Y (No. 230. page 7 O 

21. WilUams Avery 76. ..Cairo, N. Y Z'"":' ".^'Z 

22. Abraham Avery 76...Hamilton, N. Y (No. o5, page 41b) 

23. Marietta Avery 75...Mentz,N. Y 

21.. Marv Averv 84...Barnstead, N. H :;"';;:; AoV 

25. Pete; Ever; 76...Groton, Conn (No. 2^0, page 98 

26. Stephen Every 77...Manheim, N. Y (No. 96. page 578) 

The surnames given for the twenty-tifth and twenty-sixth in the 
above list are misspellings for Avery. They have been fully identified. 

It is possible that the ninth in the above list is identical with 
David, No. 312. page 447 ; that the eleventh is identical with Daniel, 
No 17^ page 437-, and that the twenty-first is identical with Wil- 
liam, No. 82, page 423. If you can identify any of the above, please 
send the informaiion to the family historian. 



12 AVKRV XCJTES ANU OUHKIKS. 

The next issue of Notes and (Queries will give a list of other 
Avery pensioners taken from the census rolls of 1832. It is thought 
that these rosters, continued from quarter to quarter, will be very 
valuable to the readers of Notes and Queries. 

(TO BE CONTINUED.) 

ENGLISH RECORDS. 

The name Avere appears in the Domesday Book, Vol. L, pp. 44 
and 46. The Domesday Book was completed about A. D. 1084. 
From Salisbury Church Records : 

" 1591 Buriel, Mary, wife to Christopher Aveyre." 
Mr. H. Hatcher, the antiquarian who copied the record in 1842, 
wrote: "There were Avery s in the town within my recollec- 
tion." See Mass. Hist. Collections, 3d. series. Vol. X., p. 139. 

From London Marriage Licenses : 

" Dudley Avery of St. Michael, Bassishaw, citizen and merchant- 

taylor. of London, bachelor, 23, wuth consent of his father, the 

right worshipful Samuel Avery, alderman of London, and Jane 

Large of Camberwell, Surrey, spinster, above 16, dau. of 

Thomas Large, late of the same, Esq., deceased, with consent of 

her mother, Elizabeth Whorwood, at Camberwell or St. Mary, 

Newington. Surrey, or St. Peter, Paul's wharf, London, 28 Feb. 

1647-8." 

" vSt. Michael's, Cornhill, A\'illiam .Avery and Elizabeth Harbye, 

Dec. 13, 1573." 

" St. James', Clerkenwell, Nov. i, 1635, William Avery and Joane 

Cooper." 

" St. James', Clerkenwell, July 3, 1603, Richard Avery and 

Katharine Harmon." 

From Parish Register of .St. Thomas, the Apostle : 

Jane, daughter of Edward Avery, christened Jan. 6, 1560. 
Margaret, daughter of Edward Avery, died Jan 16, 1561. 
Jane, daughter of Edward Avery, buried Sept. 6, 1561. 
Mary, daughter of Edward Avery, buried Sept. 14, 1561. 
Garret, daughter of Edward Avery, buried .Sept. 29, 1561. 
John, son of Edward .'^very, buried Oct. i, 1561. 
Edward .\very, cloth maker, buried ^Lirch 30. 1580. 



Avery Notes and Queries. 13 

Robert Brinklow and Elizabeth Avery, married, Nov. 17, 1588. 
Thomas Fletcher and Luce Avery, married Dec. 8. 1567. 

?"rom Gray's Inn Admission Register : 

• Admitted, April 6, 1657, Robert Avery, son of Robert Avery of 
Witheredge, County Devon, gent." (Page 281.) 
■•May 6, 1647, William Avery, son of Samuel Avery, citizen and 
alderman of London." (Page 244.) 

" William Avery, son of Avery, late of Itchington Bishops, 

County Warwick, gent." (Page 245.) 

From the Register of the University of Oxford, England, Vol. I., 
Page 200, A. D. 1541—" Avery, William, chap., sup. for B. A. 
1541,-1 adm. 12 March, Sup. for M. A., 14 June, 1544." 
Page 598 — " .\very, Thomas, supplicated for 13. A., 31 March, 
1452. Anstay, 521." (Note — •' Anstay, 521 " is a book-reference.) 
In Index — " Aver}^ John, Fasti, 6, 20.'' (Note — "Fasti" is a 
letter-book, containing names of undergraduates from A, D. 
1422 to 1503. ) 

(to be continued.) 



A SUGGESTIVE ANACHRONISM. 

Mk. Elroy M. Anery, 

657 Woodland Hills Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio, 

Dear Sir : Please enrol me as a member of the Groton Avery 

History Club. Enclosed herewith, find postal order for 

dollars, which I send as my dues for the year 1898. 

Yours truly, 

Christopher x\very. 
Salem, Massachusetts Ba}', 
June 12, 1630. 



The best time to forward corrections or new matter is at the 
earliest possible moment. Many corrections may be made by persons 
now living; the data should be secured and put on my record before 
these persons die. If you know of such a case, please "lend a hand," 
and do so nozv. In this way, I have connected several families that Mr. 
Sweet necessarily dropped several generations l)ack. These families 
alone have added hundreds of names to the record. 



14 AvKRY Notes and Ouhkies. 

The fiiinily historian takes pleasure in introducin<^ to the Groton 
tribe, one of their blood who was lost from the fold several genera- 
tions ago, and who has recently worked his way back, bringing an 




cestors and descendants with him. Dr. Aaron B. Ayery of Pontiac. 
Michigan, and his wife. Lillian (Drake) Aver\', have been very effi- 
cient and kind in the aid given to the family historian. His portrait 
is given herewith. 



Avery Notes and (Queries. 15 

I intend to make the records of the daughters of the tribe some- 
what more complete than Mr. Sweet did. In every case, when the 
daughter marries, I desire to "carry her forward," just as Mr. Sweet 
did with the married sons, giving the record of her marriage, of her 
husband's birth and parentage, and the records of their children. As 
these children do not bear the Avery name, and as the line must be 
drawn somewhere, I desire to tell when and where each was born and 
died, and whom each married This will make it much more easy for 
their descendants to "catch on" to the Avery line. For instance, on 
page 135, Mr. Sweet gives as the only record of No. 1179, the fol- 
lowing : 

"Mary Minerva Avery, born June 27, 1S25 ; died May 8, 1S90." 
From a letter written in 1868, and sent to me by ^Slr. Sweet's execu- 
tor, I learn that she married Willard J Deacock, February 11, 1845. 
I should like to learn (so that I may complete the record) where they 
w^ere married, the date and place of his birth and death, his parentage, 
the names of their children, with date and place of birth and death of 
each, and the name of the person whom each married. 

As an illustration of the work of completing the printed record 
left by Mr. Sweet, the case of No. 561, on page 142, may be cited. 
Calvin, the son of Gardner and Amy (Newell) Avery, was born April 
27, 17S5; died February i3, 1S59. He married, time and place un- 
known, a woman, whose name even was unknown. They had two 
children ; names, dates and places of birth not given. It is not stated 
when and where this first wife died. Calvin Avery married a second 
wife, time, place and name unknown. They had three children, 
names, dates and places of birth not given. Could a record be more 
unsatisfactory? 

Chiefly through the instrumentality of Mr. Trueman Gardiner 
Avery of Buffalo, the record of this family has been completed to the 
present time, thus adding scores of names to the roll of the tribe. 

No family historian can write a satisfactory family history. vSuch 
a work is necessarily co-operative. The family historian may do his 
best in the way of direction and persuasion, but, in the last analysis, 
he is much more like a clearing house than a bank of issue. 

Undoubtedly you would like to see a history of the Groton Averys 
that is complete. Then do your share ; see that your own family is 
properly recorded ; then look up " your sisters, your cousins and your 
aunts," et al., to the best of your ability. 



]6 Avery Notes and Qi'eries. 

1 have numerous requests for an immediate publication oi" the 
second edition of the "Averys of Groton." They who make such re- 
quest probably do not realize the magnitude of the work involved in 
the revision, and the importance of the time element in the solution 
of the manv problems. Even if I could devote myself to tiiis work 
exclusivelv, time is needed for research in many fields. The work is 
going on rapidlv, but, at tlie very best and with abv.ndant means (see 
page eight), it will require a few years to get the records into shape 
that would justify printing them. In the meantime, 1 shall try to 
make Notes .\xd Queries as valuable as possible. 

In the preparation of a second edition, I shall have the advantage 
of Mr. Sweet's work ; I shall be able to begin where he stopped. I 
shall correct as many of the errors and omissions of the first edition as 
possible. I shall try to give the date and place of birth of every 
member of the family; the date and place of death of each who has 
died; the post-office address of each who is living. I shall try to 
extend the record of female members of the family, giving at least 
one generation of their descendants after the change from the Avery 
name. I want only one index, that to contain every name in the 
book. I shall modify the form of arrangement, and adhere closely 
to the form recommended by the New England Historical and Gen- 
ealogiccJ Society and generally adopted by genealogists. 

Have you seen " Singing Verses for Children," written by Mrs. 
Lydia Avery Coonley Ward, and published by the Macmillan Com- 
pany? Every Avery child has a right to the joys wrapped up in these 
nursery songs, set to music, and illustrated in colors. 

Decidedly the best Physical Science Text-Books (Physics and 
Chemistry) are those written by the Hon. Elroy M. Avery, 
Ph. D , LL. D., and published by Slieldon & Company, 43 and 45 
East I2th street, New York, and 263 and 264 Wabash avenue, 
Chicago, to whom all inquiries .should be addressed. 

Newspapers that receive copies of Notes .\nd Oleries are respect- 
fully requested to state that : 

All Averys, and Averys descendants, are requested to send their 
names and addresses to Dr. Elr(5y ^3. 'Avery of Cleveland. Ohio. He 
is writing a history of the Avery family. 



thenewtork" 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



Hvery jSfotes arid Queries. 



A Quarterly Magazine devoted to the History of the Groton Avery s. 



No. 2. "Honor thy Father and thy Mother." May, 1898. 



The page and number references used in this magazine are to 
Sweet's History of "The Averys of Groton." 

Notes and Queries will be sent to ever}^ member of the Groton 
Avery History Club. Some of the subsequent issues may contain only 
eight pages. 

If you receive this copy of Notes and Queries, please send a 
postal card or a letter to tlie family historian, announcing that fact. 
He will then be sui-e that he has your correct postoffice address. 

The portrait of .Sidney S. Avery facing p. 531, should face p. 344. 
This error in binding Mr. Sweet's book illustrates the dangers that 
attend the use of mere initials in a genealogical work. 

I have received lists of Averys and their addresses, copied from the 
directories of Chicago, Cincinnati, District of Columbia, Hartford, 
Holyoke, Kansas City, Philadelphia, Providence, San Francisco and 
Washington. Iv you live in some other town, will you not send me a 
list of all the Averys living in your town .? 

If you have any family, bible, grave-stone, town or army i-ecords, 
or wills, n^arriage or obituary notices, or any other information relat- 
ing to any of the Groton Averys or any of their descendants, in your 
possession or know the location of such, please send them or copies 
thereof to the familv historian. Unless you know that complete 
records of your family and of your father's family are in the possession 
of the family historian, please write to him in regard to the matter. 
He will be glad to send you printed blanks for making such records. 

If you have sent in your family record, be careful to report every 
change by birth, marriage or death. 

I intend to send at least one copy of Notes and Queries to every 
member of the tribe who sends me his or her family report, so that there 
may be a full understanding and an opportunity for further co-opera- 



l8 A\KI{V XoiES AND OUEFtlES. 

On pa<^e 41-1 of his liistorv of "Tlie Averys of Groton," Mr. Sweet 
says that Sarah, dau. of Richardson and Sarah (Plumb) Avery, m. 
Stephen Hyde. On the other hand, the descendants of one Jabez 
Fish sa^- that his wife was Sarah, the dau. of Richardson Avery, and 
much correspondence was the result. Most of the genealogical papers 
of the country have publislied queries on the subject. As Sarah was 
born more than a hundred and fifty years ago, the solution of the 
problem proved difficult. Early in the present year, Mrs. Avery put 
on record the following : "Reasons for thinking that the wife of Jabez 
Fisii was vSarah. dau. of Richardson .A.verv :" 

1. Richardson Avery had a daughter Sarah not otherwise ac- 
counted for. She was of the right age and lived in the right part of 
the country to have married Jabez Fish. She died before her father 
made his will in 1784, and Jabez Fish's wife died before that time. 

2. Richardson Avery and all his family went to the Wyoming 
\"alley ; so did Jabez Fish and his wife. 

3. The records show that the first name of the wife of Jabez Fish 
was Sarah, and all the traditions say that she was a daughter of 
Richardson Avery. 

4. Anna, daughter of Richardson Avery married Obadiah Gore, 
and her descendants say that she had a sister who married a Fish. The 
Gores and Jabez Fish were closely associated in the Wyoming Valley. 

5. The names in Jabez Fish's family are such as would naturally 
be given if his wife was Sarah Avery, daughter of Richardson. 

6. Tradition says that Sarah, the wife of Jabez Fish, had a brother 
Christopher; and Richardson Avery had a son Christopher. This 
made a pretty strong case but it was not conclusive. 

The matter has at last been settled. The David Avery manuscript 
mentioned elsewhere in this issue of Notes and Q.ueries, gives a 
record of the family of Lieutenant William Avery, including his son 
Richardson. It then gives a record of Richardson's family, part of 
which is as follows; "Anna, m. Obadiah Gore, son of Obadiah Gore 
of Preston ; Sai'ah, ?n. Jabez jFish, son of Captain Thomas Fish of 
Groton ; Catherine, m. David Brown, son of Comfort Brown of Gro- 
ton ; Elizabeth, m. Asa Gore, son of Obadiah Gore of Preston.; 
Christopher — bachelor." As these persons were cousins of the writer 
and probably personal acquaintances, the account, written more than 
ninety years ago, is authoritative. 



Avery Notes and Queries. 19 

QLTERIES. 

Hannah Avery (No. i, page 37), daughter of James and Joanna 
(Greenslade) Avery, was born October 12, 1644. vShe married Ephraim 
Minor and had ten children. I have the marriage of only one of these 
children, that of Hannah, who married Samuel Frink. To whom was 
each of the other children married? 

Mary Avery (No. 3, page 37), daughter of James and Joanna 
(Greenslade) .^verv, was born February 19, 164S. She married Joseph 
Minor and had seven children. To whom was each of these children 
married ? 

Deborah Avery (No. 10, page 39), daughter of James and Deborah 
(Stallyon) Avery, was born August i, 167 1. vShe married Robert 
Allyn and had ten children. To whom was each of the following 
children married : Elizabeth, John, Ebenezer, Christopher, Lucy and 
Nathan ? 

What became of Prudence Avery (No. 39, page 29), daughter of 
James and Mary (Griswold) Avery, born March 21, 1715? 

I should like the further record of Mary Avery (No. 44, page 30). 
She was the daughter of Ebenezer and Dorothy (Parke) Avery ; she 
was born February 17, 17 16, and married a Mr. Latham. 

Elizabeth, daughter of Jonathan and Elizabeth (Waterman) Avery, 
was born January 7, 1725. What is her further record.'' Hannah, her 
sister, was born October 7, 1727. What is her further record.? 

Joseph L. Avery has four children, Elizabeth, Jonathan, Eunice 
Ann and Louisa, baptized at Westfield, Mass., between 1830 and 1836. 
Wanted : His parentage, and the names and addresses of his living 
descendants. 

I have a few pamphlets containing the appendix to Sweet's "The 
Averys of Groton," and relating to "Avery Coats of Arms" (with illus- 
trations of four coats) and to the ''The Avery Family in England and 
France." These pamphlets will be furnished, as long as the supply 
lasts, at fifty cents per copy. 



In time of war, subscribe for The Avery Notes and Qlteries. 



20 Avery XorKs a.no Queiues. 

ENGLISH RECORDS. 

( Cotit'niiieJ fro/ii J^aj^v J'l.) 

Eroiii the Register of St. Peters, London: — 

Roger Avery, buried I'^ehruary iS, 1556. 

Edward Avery, buried July 12, 1557. 

Alice Avery, buried July 16, 1557. 

Richard Avery, buried August 20, 1544. 
From the Register of St. James, Clerckenwell :— 

Thomas, son of John and Alice Avery, christened November 30, 1642. 

Elizabeth, daughter of Arthur and Alice Avery, christened May 11, 
162S. 

^L\ry. daughter of Arthur and Alice Avery, christened October 24, 
1630. 

Arthur, daughter of Arthur and Alice Avery, christened November 
10, 1639. 

Elizabeth, daughter of Arthur and Alice Avery, christened March 
15, 1643. 

Katharine, wife of Richard Avery, buried December S, 161^. 
From the Kensington Parish Register : — 

^sLirgaret Avery of Hillindon and John Goborne married May 6. 
1560. 

Thomas Avery, buried January 18, 1573. 
( 7"o be continued .) 



COLONIAL ROSTER. 

Lineal descent from any person mentioned imder this heading 
constitutes eligibility for membership in the "Colonial Dames" or in 
the "vSociety of Colonial Wars." Brief records like those below, wnth 
citations of authorities, are desired. 

( Continued from page 10.) 

6. James Avery (No. 2, page 28), commissioned lieutenant, 
May, 1690; captain, May, 1692 ; deputy to the general court of Con- 
necticut from New London, October, 16S9 ; April, 1690; May, 1692; 
May, 1694; May, 169:;; October, 1697; May, 1702; deputy from 
Groton, April, 1707; May, 1708; October, 170S; May, August and 
October, 1710; May and June, 1711; May, 1712 : justice in 1712 ; 
commissioner of the peace. May, 1693; May, 1694; May, 1695. He 



Avery Notes and Queries. 3i 

was one of the guardians of the Pequot Indians from 1694 to his 
death, and several times appealed to tlie courts in their behalf. In 
1700, he was one of a committee to find a tract of land for the 
Narragansett volunteers ; that land is now Voluntown. (For addi- 
tional record, see page 38 of the "Averys of Groton.") 

7. James Avery (No. 11, page 29), deputy to the general court 
of Connecticut from Groton, 1715 to 171S, 1724, 1725, 1726 to 1731, 
and 1735; commissioned ensign in 1716; lieutenant in 1721, and 
captain of the first Groton company, 1728; justice for New London 
county from 1726 to 1735 inclusive. After his father's death, he was 
appointed guardian of the Pequot Indians. His record does not 
appear in the "Averys of Groton." 

8. Humphrey Avery (No. 15, page 560), deputy from Groton 
from 1732 to 1735, 1738, 1740, 1741, 1743; justice for New London 
county from 1735 to 1750. He was ordered to act in conjunction with 
a committee from Rhode Island and " to peraml^ulate the dividend 
boundary" and set the monuments, in 1737 ; also in 1740 and in 1742. 
He was judge of probate in 1750. See Colonial Records of Connecti 
cut (printed). His colonial record does not appear in the "Averys 
of Groton.'' 

\7o he Continued. ) 

The family historian is under great obligation to man}' members of 
the tribe for assistance rendered, to all of whom he desires to tender 
his grateful acknowledgements. It is, however, due that special men- 
tion should be made of the work done by several who have kindly 
undertaken to secure complete records of the descendants of some one 
who died several generations ago, as a grandfather or great-grand- 
father. By reason of personal acquaintance with many of these de- 
scendants, it often happens that another can do such work more 
successfully than the family historian. Moreover, it takes so much of 
the burden from over-loaded shoulders, and gives a fairer distribution 
of the total. Among those who have done or are doing such generous 
work for "The Tribe" are Charles Hedding Avery and Trueman 
Gardner Avery of Buffalo, N. Y., Major George Smith Avery of Ga- 
lena, 111., Mrs. Aaron B. Avery of Pontiac, Mich., and Edwin Leslie 
Avery of Indianapolis, Ind., the last of whom has already sent me 
fifty complete family records, besides valuable information helping to 
fill out other records. 



22 AvKRY Notes and Oiteuies. 

The accomp;mying cut represents tlie battle momunent on Groton 
Ileiijjlits, across the river from New T>ondon, Conn. It is built of 




granite and is a hundred and thirty-five feet high. It was dedicated on 
the sixth of September, 1830. Over the entrance is a marble slab with 
the following inscription : 

" This Monument 

was erected under the patronage of the State of Connecticut, A. D. 

1S30 and in the 55th year of the Independence of the U. S. A. 

In Memory of the Brave Patriots 

who fell in the massacre at Fort Griswold near this spot 

on the 6th of September, A. D. 1781, 

when the British under the command of 

the traitor Benedict Arnold, 

burnt the towns of New London & Groton, and spread 

desolation and woe throughout this region." 

Of the one hundred and seventy persons in the fort at the time of 
the attack, eighty-eight were killed, thirty-tive were wounded and 



Avery Notes and Queries. 



23 



paroled, and twenty-eight were carried off as prisoners. The re- 
maining few escaped. Among them were the following : 

KILLED. 

David Avery (No. 89, page 50). 
Elijah Avery (No. 9S, page 51). 
Christopher Avery (No 81, page 412). 
Jasper Avery (No. 142, page 37). 
Daniel Avery (No. 77, page 48). 
Elisha Avery (No. 147, page 37).- 
Ebenezer Avery, Jr., (No. 108, page 53). 
Solomon Avery (No. So, page 32). 
Thomas Avery (No. 352, page 59). 

WOUXDED AND PAROLED. 

Ebenezer Avery (No. 144, page 37). 
Parke Avery (No. 141, page 37). 
Amos Avery (No. 103, page 33). 

PRISONERS. 

Caleb Avery (No. 262, page 95). 
Rufus Avery (No. 261, page 86). 
Peter Avery (No. 2S0, page 50). 

ESCAPED. 

Nathan Avery (No. 15S, page 65). 

Perhaps the most discouraging feature of the work of a family 
historian is the large number of unanswered letters. Sometimes the 
failure to reply is due to the non-delivery of inquiries, but, in the great 
majority of cases, it is due to the carelessness or the indifference of 
those addressed. The postoflice authorities return to me all letters 
that they do not deliver. Many of these letters are of so much im- 
portance to the family history that I keep a record of the dates of 
sending, the names of the persons addressed, and the subject matter 
of the inquiry. My record shows that between January i, iS98,and May 
I, 1S98, 1 sent one hundred and eighty-three such letters to which answers 
have not been received up to the time of printing this magazine. If 
you find that this paragraph hints at one of your delinquencies, please 
lumt up and promptly answer the inquiry that I sent to you, or, at 
least, ask me to renew it. 



34 



AvEitv Notes and Olkkies. 

Hvcry ]Votc6 and Queries. 

P/tblis/icd by Elroy M. Avery, at (ioT Woodlaud Hills Avenue, 
Cleveland, Ohio. 

Subscriptio)i Price, Fifty cents per year. Fi f tee )i cents per copy. 

Entered at the Cleveland, O., postoffice as second-class matter. 



THE GROTOX AVERY HISTORY CLUB. 



In the February issue of Notks and Queries, I stated that in the 
year 1897 I had spent more than a thousand dollars in gathering mate- 
rial for a more complete history of the Groton Averys. This expendi- 
ture was in addition to the work done by Mrs. Avery and myself. I 
also stated that I could not aft'ord to spend that much money every 
year, that even more could be used advantageously, and suggested the 
formation of "The Groton .^very History Club, with annual dues 
ranging from one to ten dollars, each member to tix the exact amount 
for himself or herself." I promised not to take any of the money as 
compensation for my services, to make quarterly acknowledgenient 
through Xotf:s and Queries of all moneys received, and to publish 
annually the report of an auditing committee to be appointed by the 
judge of probate of Cuyahoga county, Ohio. To this proposition, the 
persons herein named have responded, sending as dues for the year 
1S9S, the amounts severally indicated : 

Edwin Jaquett Sellers, Philadelphia, Pa $ 1-00 

Mrs. M. A. Stockwell, Painesville, 2.00 

Trueman G. Aver\', Buffalo, N. Y 5.00 

Mrs. Louise AYer\' Kelloog, Kansas Cit^-. Mo 1.00 

William Randall .AYer\', Cincinnati, o.OO 

William H. Avery, Los Angeles, California 1.00 

John D. Rockefeller, New York City 10..^0 

Brainard Avery, Washington, D. C 2.00 

Dr. Aaron B. .Avery, Pontiac, Mich 5.u0 

Mrs. Helen .Avery Pope, Norwood, Hamilton Co., 1.00 

Charles B. Gilbert, New Haven, Conn 5 00 

A. L. Avery. Charlemont, Mass 2.00 

Mrs. Sarah E. S. Nighman, Canton, 1.50 

Mis. Mar\- E. Mathewson, Wakefield, Nebraska 1.00 

Daniel H. Treadway, W^est Mystic, Conn 1.00 

Thomas P. Kernan, Utica, N. Y 1.00 



AvKKY Notes and Queries. 25 

William H. Castle, Philadelphia, Pa 1.00 

Miss Sibyl Howe Aver_v, Providence, R. 1 1.00 

Mrs. Elizabetli Avery Talmado;e, Westfield, Mass 1.00 

Mrs. Frances Avery Haggard, Lincoln, Nebraska 2.0C 

Major Cyrus Avery, Camptown, Pa 2.00 

Mrs. Phebe A. Ely Avery, Chicago, 111 1.00 

Dr. Otis Avery, Honesdale, Pa 5.50 

Mrs. George Kingslej^ Paola, Kansas 3.00 

Mrs. Delia Avery Southworth, New^ York City 1.00 

Miss Jenny E. Williams, New London, Conn 5.00 

Miss Antoinette A. Williams, New London, Conn 5.00 

Total receipts for the first quarter oflSOS $72.50 

Many others have expressed warm approval of the plan, and given 
assurance of financial support to the club at a later date. While some 
of these responses have been unexpectedly liberal, and while the ac- 
companying letters express an appreciation of my work that is highly 
gratifying, the number of such responses is not as great as I had hoped 
for. There are many members of the tribe who can ill afford to join 
the club ; there are some who by their active and direct assistance in 
the gathering of historical matter have richly earned honorary life 
memberships in the club ; there are others who are going to join the 
club or to help in the gathering of information ; there are some who 
ought to help in some way but have manifested no disposition to do 
so. If you are in this fourth class, will you not, my dear kinsman, 
please move up a station r 

Perhaps you can not afford to pay the annual dues; perhaps you 
cannot afford an annual subscription to the magazine ; but you can 
write to me : you can see that I get the record of your family ; you can 
show some family pride and manifest some loyalty to the memory of 
your ancestors. I would rather have your active sympathy and per- 
sonal assistance than your money. ]\Iost of those who have joined the 
club have given all of these. You must decide for yourself in what 
way you can best afford to help. The widow and the orphan and 
those poor in this world's goods can help as truly, and, in some cases, 
just as much as the millionaire. Lend a hand ; please lend a hand. 

Yours fraternally, 




26 



Avery Notes and Queries. 



REVOLUTIONARY ROSTER. 

Lineal descent from any person mentioned under this heading con- 
stitutes eligibility for membership in the "Daughters of the American 
Revolution," "Sons of the American Revolution," "Children of the 
American Revolution," and similar societies. Brief records of Revo- 
lutionary service, with citations of authorities, are desired. 
{^Continued fi'om page 12.) 



FROM T'. S. CEXsUS OF PE :I»IO.n:ER: 



.69 



.69. 



NAME. R.\XK. 

1 Samuel Avery Priv 

2 Nathaniel Avery Serg 

3 George Avery Priv 

4 Joshua Averj' Priv 

5 Miles Averj' Priv 

6 Amos Avery Serg 

7 Thomas Avery Lieut 

8 Jonathan Avery Serg 

9 John Avery Matross.. 

10 Nathaniel Aver3' Serg 

11 Ransford .\very Priv 

1 2 Abner Avery Priv 

13 Ebenezer Avery Corp 

14 Park Averj^ Lieut 

15 Amos Avery Priv 

16 Daniel Avery Priv 

17 David Avery Matross 

ISRufus Avery Priy 

19 Oliver Avery Priv 

20 Christopher Avery Priv 

21 Caleb Avery Priv. 75 

22 Ebenezer Avery Priv 73 

23 Denison Avery Priv 87, 

24 Samuel Aver\- Priv 80 

25 Nathan Avery Priv 75 

26 Nathaniel Avery Priv 70. 

27 Richard Avery Fifer 72. 

28 Roger Avery Priv 72 

29 Gardiner Avery Priv 79 

30 Nathan Avery Priv 67 

31 Daniel Avery Priv 66 

32 Benjamin Avery Priv 74. 

33 Uriah Avery Lieut. 

34 Abraham Avery Serg... 

3t William Avery Priv... 

36 Stephen Avery Priv... 

37 Constant Avery Priv. . 

38 Christopher Avery Priv... 

39 John A-t-ery Priv... 

40 George .\very Priv... 

41 Amos Averv Priv... 



AGE. KESIDE.\CE. 

78 Lincoln Co., Me 

82 Merrimack Co., .N. H.. 

75 Sullivan Co., N. H..... 

68 Barnstable Co., Mass 

74 Berkshire Co., Mass... 

.72 Berkshire Co., Mass... 

Franklin Co., 

81 Franklin Co., 

76 Franklin Co., 

82 Franklin Co., 

79 Hampden Co., 

86 HampshireCo 



.No. 



page 



..No. 181 , page 
.No. 92, page 



Mass 

Mass 

Mass 

Mass No. 54, page 

Mass No. 73, page 

, Mass No. 129, page 



.71 .\ew London Co , Jonn....No. 144, page 

79 New London Co., Conn. ...No. 144, page 

63 New London Co., Conn. ...No. 103, page 

... .Tolland Co., Conn...Prob. No. 175, page 



.New London, Co. 
.New London Co., 
.New London, Co., 
.New London, Co., 
.New London Co., 



Conn. ..No. 21 2, page 
L onn....No. 261, page 
Conn. ..No. 185, page 
Conn... 

Conn .\o. 262, page 

New London, Co., Conn. ..No. l.'iS, page 

ToWand, t_o., Conn No. 82, page 

Windsor Co., Vt 

Vt... No. 158, page 

Vt 

N. Y 

N. Y No. 231, page 

N. Y No. 229, page 

N. Y No. 141, page 



69 
337 

415 

329 

431 

60 

58 

51 

437 

447 

8e 

70 

95 
64 

48 



..Orange Co., 
.Orange Co., 
.Ca3'uga Co. 
. Genesee Co. 
..Oneida Co., 
..Ontario Co. 



434 
427 

77 



Oswego Co , N. Y Prob. No. 103, page 

.74 Wayne Co.. N. Y No. 230, page 

73 Chenango Co.. N. Y 

79 Chenango Co., N. Y No. 55, page 416 

70 Greene Co., N. Y 

71... Herkimer Co., N. Y No. 96, page 578 

74 .... Madison Co., N. Y 

75 Bradford Co., Penn 

83 Chowan Co., N. C 

73 Wilson Co., Tenn 

Opelousas Parish, La 



The David Avery of Lebanon, Conn,, whose name appears as Xo. 
9 in the Revolutionary Roster printed in tiie February number of 



Avery Notks and Qup:ries. 27 

"Notes and Que hies," has been identified as No. 212, page 447 » of 
Sweet's "The Averys of Groton." The Abel Avery, whose name 
appears as No. 10, in the same list, has been identified as No. 162, 
page 421. ( To be Continued.) 



The next edition of the "xA-verys of Groton" ought to record the 
the military service of every member of the tribe who had one. If 
you was a soldier please inform the family historian of that fact, 
stating, at least, the regiment and company of which you was a mem- 
ber, thus : Daniel Webster Martin (No. 508, page 650) enlisted at the 
beginning of the war (exact date preferable) in the 3d New York 
Cavalry (company should be stated). Owing to failing health, he was 
detailed as clerk at the headquarters of General B. F. Butler, and re- 
mained with him to the end of the war. Fuller details are desirable. 
If you can help perfect someone's else record in this respect, please do 
so. 

THE LAST ROLL CALL. 

William C. Avery, (No. 1418, page 25S,) died at Staftord Springs, 
Conn., March 26, 1897. 

Col. Isaac Wheeler Avery, (No. 1854, page 289,) died at Atlanta, 
Ga , Sept. 8, 1897. 

Dr. Charles Hudson Avery, (No. 541, page 492.) died at New York 
City, Nov. 2, 1897. 

Oliver Perry Avery, (No. 1048, page 224,) died at Norwich, Conn , 
Dec. 29, 1897. 

Albert Ira Avery, (eldest son of No. 284, page 428,) died at East 
Galena, 111., March 5, 1898. 

John Barber Avery, (No. 615, page 154,) died at Aurora, N. Y., 
March 13, 1S98. 

Harriet Ann (Avery) Rollins (No. 1171, page 234,) died at Fitts- 
ville, Wis , March 24, 1898. 

I have had sent to me for sale, a clean copy of Sweet's "The 
Avery's of Groton;" price, $15. Another volume may be had at the 
same price, by addressing Dr. Alonzo M. Avery. Maquoketa, Iowa, or 
Phineas O. Avery, Humboldt, Neb. 

For amounts less than a dollar, please send one or two cent postage 
stamps in preference to coin. 

Notes and Queries : Have you subscribed for it ? 



28 



AVERV NOTKS AND QUERIES. 




(ric) (hrt>i^, ^y^yj. 






Dr. Otis Avery (No. 230, page 452) of Honesdale, Pa., whose por- 
trait is given herewith, is probably the oldest practicing dentist in the 
world. His certificate is dated December 6, 1833, at which time there 
was not a dental college on either continent, and when teeth were 
pulled by physicians, barbers and blacksmiths. Long may he live. 



Avery Notes and Queries 



STRUCK OIL. 



29 



Of the many new sources of information concerning Avery geneal- 
ogy tliat have been opened to me, tlie richest "find" is the "Manuscript 
of the Rev. David Avery," written in the first years of the present 
century. This good minister "rode the circuit" from Long Ishmd 
Sound to Vermont, staying over niglit with dift'erent members of the 
Avery clan, preaching in tlieir homes, burying tiieir dead, "supping 
with the mourners," and writing down their familv records. So far 
as I know, he was the first genealogist of the family. His record 
appears on page 422 of Sweet's "The Averys of Groton." The docu- 
ment is in the possession of Mrs. Hannah Chaplin (Avery) Partridge, 
of Jewett City, Conn., a grand daughter of the author, and was 
copied and forwarded to me by Miss Helen Morgan Avery of Groton, 
Conn. It adds hundreds of items and is of untold value. It fills gaps, 
corrects errors and solves riddles, in a way that would delight any 
genealogist. For instance, on page 421 of Ids book, Mr. Sweet 
gives the date of birtli of a Rhoda Avery, of whom he gives no 
further record. From this newly found manuscript, we learn that 
she married Levi, the son of Jonathan Jones. On the same page of 
the book, we find the date of birth of her brother John, with no 
further record. The manuscript shows that he married Abigail, the 
daughter of Nathan Marcan of Enfield, and liad four children, Nathan, 
Wealthy, Rhoda, and Buell, The next record in the book is that of 
Lydia, a sister of the above, who is recorded as marrying Joseph Deni- 
son, and having by him ten children. This is certainly wrong, for 
the manuscript says that Lydia married, first, Abner, the son of Dr. 
Seth Johnson, and, second, Nathan, the son of Robert Jennings. The 
ten Denison children above mentioned are thus left motherless. The 
next record in tlie book is that of Abel, a brother of the above, "born 
Aug. 30, 1760 ; a soldier and a pensioner;" no further record. The 
manuscript shows that he married Elizabetli, tlie daughter of Robert 
Jennings, and has six children, Persis, Abel, Polly, John, Betsey and 
Lyman. The book next gives the date of the birth of Jabez, a brother 
of the above ; "nothing farther." The monuscript shows that Jabez 
married vSally, the daughter of John Gilmore of Providence, and had 
five daughters. The book next states that Elizabeth, a sister of the 
above, married Martin Mudge, and became the mother of seven chil- 
dren. Evidently Mr. Sweet had found the record of the family of a 
Martin Mudge, who married an Elizabeth Avery, and assumed that 



30 AVKRV XdTES AND QuFiRIES. 

that wife was this Elizabeth, for he naively adds the remai-k that she 
'"is supposed to be this Elizabeth, although the births do not exactly 
correspond. I could find no other." This assumption was unfortunate, 
for the David Aver}- manuscript says that this Elizabeth married 
Amos Jones. This leaves seven little Mudges, none of whom were 
born later than 1S09, without any known connection with the Groton 
Averys. I hope that some philanthropic person will help me provide 
for these semi-orphans. The book next gives tlie record of Asa, a 
brother of the above. He married Sarah Green : "'children, none re- 
ported." The manuscript confirms the marriage and blesses the union 
with four children. It also magnifies the merit of the parents of the 
above mentioned from Rhoda to Asa, another sister, Charlotte, who 
married John Hyde. I can not doubt the accuracy of the manuscript 
for these were the children of John Avery, the brother of the author 
of the manuscript. 

Again on page 565, Mr. Sweet says that William Avery married 
Abigail Williams. On page 414 is the record of another William 
Avery who married an Abigail Williams. The latter marriage record 
is undoubtedly correct. Mrs. Avery had long been convinced that the 
other w^as an error. She had also found at Preston, Conn, the record 
of the marriage of William .\very and Hannah Meech in 1749, and the 
date of the birth of their child. Cynthia, but was notable to prove that 
this was the William recorded on page 565. The newh' found manu- 
script proves this definitely and shows that the children of the two 
Williams must be re-distributed. Evidently, the "mixing up"' of 
babies is not confined to comic opera. 



Miss iMaude X. Roadstrand, an Avery descendant living at 
Fitchburg, Mas>.. while sending the record of her own famih", also 
sent many items, such as dates of births, marriages and deaths that 
she had obtained from the records of AVestfield, Mass., and from the 
genealogist of the Dewey family. Some of these were very valuable 
and enabled the family historian to fill several gaps in records and to 
make connections that had long puzzled him. It is hoped that others 
will copy similar records and send them to the historian. 

I have a few pamphlets containin.^ the appendix to Sweet's "The 
Avery's of Groton," and relating to ".xvery Coats of Arms" (with illus- 
trations of four coats) and to "The .Avery Famih' in England and 
France." These pamphlets will be furnished, as long as the supply 
lasts, at fifty cents per copy. 



Avery Notes and Queries. 31 

ON TO HAVANA. 

During the "Seven Years' War," England sent a fleet and army 
under command of the Earl of Albemarle to reduce Havana. Fort 
Moro, the chief defense of the place, was beseiged on the sixth of June, 
1762, made a stubborn resistance, and was captured on the thirtieth of 
July. The "incident" was considered one of the military glories of 
English history. By the terms of the treaty of Paris, England re- 
turned the Island to Spain, and Spain gave up Florida to England as 
recompense. The English army evacuated Havana in July, 1763. 
Among the troops that took part in the expedition to Havana were 
many New England men. In Captain John Wheatley's company from 
Connecticut were the following : 

David Aver3% (No. 49, page 410,) serg., died at Havana, Nov. 10, 
,763. 

Benoni Avery, (No. 51, page 410,) priv., died at Havana, Nov. 7, 
1762. 

On account of this victory, the Earl of Albemarle became an admiral. 

Letters sent by me to the following addresses have been returned 
by the postal authorities. If you can give information as to the present 
whereabouts of any of these persons, or of any one who can do so 
please let me have it : 

John Murphy, Asheville, N. C. 

Isaac Snook, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Mrs. Lucien Earned, Blackstone. Mass. 

Mrs. F. F. V.'illiamson, Waynesville, Ohio. 

The Rev. John Howard Avery, El Monte, Calif. 

Nelson W. French, Hartford, Conn. 

Mary Jane Avery, Rochester, N. Y. 

Harry C. Avery, Des Moines, Iowa. 

Mrs. Lurancy ,^ngel, Caledonia, Minn. 

John Mackay Avery, Troy, N. Y. 

Robert Allyn Avery, Ledyard, Conn. 

Mrs. Robert Henderson, Greenville, Conn. 

Mrs. Frank H. Garr' -"r, Groton, Conn. 

Warren Avery, H, -'*■=. 

Mrs. Mary T. A / , Los Angeles, Calif. 

Mrs. Hopkins, cta^g .Iph Geer, Newark, O 

Mrs. Lucy Davis, Lai 

William C. Avery, Hui Greene Co., N. Y. 

H. H. Avery, Spokane I'alls, Wash. 



32 Ayery Notes and Queries, 

The use of initials instead of names is convenient and proper in 
many cases, but in genealogical work it is Yery unsafe. By way of 
illustration : The C. H. Averys with whom I have to deal may be 
counted by the score, and the Charles H. AYcrys by the dozen. I 
have not counted the W. H. Averys ; I do not know how many Wil- 
liam H. Averys there are on my lists, but I do know that said William 
H. Avery is as difficult to corner as a Spanish fleet. I have heard from 
him at Brooklyn, N. Y. ; Los Angeles, Cal. ; St. Albans, Vt. ; Holland, 
Mich. ; Kansas City, ]Mo. ; Groton, Conn., and elsewhere. He actual- 
ly' lives at all these places. It is, therefore, plain that there is good 
reason for writing names in full in genealogical work; that it is not a 
mere fad. 

Notes and Qlteries acknowledges with thanks the receipt of the 
"Record of the Descendants of Samuel Denison," from C M. Denison, 
of VA hitesboro, X. Y., and of "Genealogical Notes of the Williams and 
Gallup Families'" from the author, Charles Fish Williams, of Thomas- 
ton, Conn. 

That a real value attaches to ''Notes and Queries" is sItowu by 
the numerous requests from historical and similiar societies, libraries, 
etc., for copies. Such requests are always gladly complied witn. 

The opening chapter of Sweet's "The Averys of Groton ' contains 
all that is known of Christopher and James, the founders of the Groton 
Averys. I have a few pamphlets containing this chapter, and a view 
of the "Hive of the Averys," and will furnish them as long as the supply 
lasts, at one dollar per copy. 

If you have not access to a copy of Mr. Sweet's book, I will send 
you a brief, type-written copy of your line back to the founders 
(Christopher and his son James Avery, A. D.. 1630,), for fifty cents, or 
a fuller record, giving the names of the children in each generation, for 
one dollar ; provided I can ascertain just where you come into the line. 
The profits of this "business" will be used in pushing the investiga- 
tions of the Groton Avery History Club. See page twenty-four. 

The Groton Averys ought to have -'te and complete record. 

If we all "pull together," we can 1 - we can not. 

Newspapers that receive cop Qle;ries are re- 

spectfully requested to state that : 

All Averys, and Avery desv. ced to send their 

names and addresses to Dr. Elroy jland, Ohio. He is 

writing a history of the Avery family. 



.r"'"s^ 



Mvcry jVofes and Queries. 

A Quarterly Magazine devoted to the History of the Groton Averys. 



No. 3. "Honor thy Father and thy Mother." August, J 898. 

The number and page references used in this magazine are to 
Sweet's History of ''The Aveiys of Groton." 

The portrait facing page 606 in Sweet's "The Averys of Groton" 
should face page 634. 

Edwin Avery (Xo. 1670, page 279) was a soldier in the civil war. 
He was mustered in as a private in the ii6th New York regiment of 
volunteers, vSeptember 4, 1S63, and discharged June 8, 1865. 

George Silas Avery (No. 886, page 491). a graduate of Cj/racuse 
university, has enlisted as a soldier in Co. C, 3d New"^u)k regi- 
ment of volunteers. 

Ralph Washburn Avery ( Xo. 2433 a, page 2S9) has gone to the 
Philippines as a f:oldier in Co. C, 7th California regiment of volun- 
teers. 

At the last annual meeting of the Florida Society of the Sons of 
the American Revolution, the Hon. John Campbell Avery of Pensa- 
cola (Xo. 2145, page 255) was re-elected president. 

I am under great obligations to Morris and Smith, attorneys and 
counselors at law, Lockport, X. Y., for information concerning the 
descendants of Roger Avery, Xo. 231, page 78. 

If you are a Groton Avery. I want the corrected and complete 
record of your family. If you have not sent it to me. please write for 
one of the blanks that I have prepared for that purpose. If you know 
of any other Groton Avery who has not sent me his or her record, 
please urge such person to correspond with me. Even if your record 
was printed without error in Mr. Sweet's book, you may be sure that 
it lacks some item that I want, and that you would like to have in- 
cluded. If you have sent your record, keep it correct by reporting 
changes as they occur. 



34 Avery Notes and Queries. 

If you have not access to a copy of Mr. Sweet's book, 1 will send 
vou a brief, type-written copy of your line back to the founders 
(Christoiihcr Avery and Iiis son James), for fifty cents, or a fuller 
record, ^ix in<jj the names of the children in each generation, for one 
dollar; provided 1 can ascertain just where you come into the line. 
The profits of this "business" will be used in pushing the investiga- 
tions of the Groton Avery History Club. 

The opening chapter of Sweet's "The Averys of Groton" contains 
all that is known of Christopher and James, the founders of the 
Groton Averys. I have a very few pamphlets containing this chapter 
and a view of the "Hive of the Averys," and will furnish them as 
long as the supply lasts, at one dollar per copy. 

I have a few pamphlets containing the appendix to Sweet's "The 
Averys of Groton," and relating to "Avery Coats of Arms" (with 
illustrations of four coats) and to "The Avery Family in England and 
France." These pamphlets will be furnished, as long as the supply 
lasts, at fifty cents per copy. 

Anyone desiring a copy of Sweet's History of the Groton Averys 
at the price of $15.00 may address William B. Avery, Morganton, 
N. C, or Dr, Alida C. Avery, vSan Jose, Cal. 

The best bicycle saddle on the market is that made by Avery and 
Jenness, 297 Wabash Avenue, Chicago, 111. (See No. 11 20, page 
53S.) "It bends doun." 

The " On to Havana " article printed in the May issue of Notes 
AND QiTERiES was reprinted (without credit) in the August issue of 
a certain spirited and patriotic magazine. But that is "sincere 
flattery." 

THE LAST ROLL CALL. 

James Harvey Avery (No. 398, page 355) died at Painesville, Ohio, 
May 20, 1898. 

David Austin Avery (No. 808, page 478) died at Willimanlic, 
Conn., June 5, 1898. His brother, 

George Washington Avery (No. 809, page 4781 died at Ottawa, 
Canada, July 38, 1898. 

Winnifred Walter Booth Avery (No. 703, page 396) died at 
Holyoke, Mass., June 10, 1898. 



Avery Notes and QueRiesi-'^'"'^^^^^ 35 

The next to the last sentence in the first paragraph on page 30 of 
the May issue of this magazine was spoiled by the omission of four 
words. After the word "Asa" in the twelfth line on that page should 
appear the words, "by the addition of." 




EUGENE HENRY AVERY, D. D. 



This quarter's addition to the portrait gallery of Notes and Que- 
ries shows the fine features of the Rev. Eugene Henry Avery, D. D., 
(No. 1535, page 266). For seventeen years Dr. Avery has been pastor 
of the First Presbyterian church' of Vinton, Iowa ; for sixteen years he 
has also been president of the board of trustees of Coe college, at 
Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 



36 AvKHv X()ri:s Axn (JrEiuKs. 

()ri:i^IES. 

Nathan Avery (No. 257, page 363) was a physician, and served 
(probably as surgeon) in the war of 1812. He went to Tennessee 
about 1817 and died at Memphis. The record of his descendants is 
very incomplete. I think that some of his descendants (Averys, Mer- 
riweathers, Trezevants, Lambs, etc ) live at Memphis. I should be 
glad to hear from them. 

Robert Ilanncman Avery (No. 511, page 3S9) served three years in 
the civil war and was a prisoner at Andersonville. I should like to 
hear from some of his descendants. 

Lydia Avery (No. 42^', page 36) married Deacon Medina Fitch. 
Wanted, the places and dates of her birth and death, the parentage, 
dates and places of birth and death of Medina Fitch, and a list of their 
ciiildren. 

Joanna Avery (No. 31, page 34) married Mark .Stoddard. Wanted, 
the date of Joanna's death, tlie parentage, dates of birth and death of 
Mark Stoddard, and a list of their children. 

AliflF Pearson of Lyme married Nathan Avery (No. 141, page 
434). Wanted, the names of her parents and the date of her birth. 

Nathaniel Avery (No. 22, page 41 ij married Abigail, whose last 
name is unknown. Wanted, her maiden name, names of her parents, 
and dates of her birth and death. Also wanted, infcrmation concern- 
ing Desire, Mary, Amy and Abigail, the daughters of the above- 
mentioned Nathaniel and Abigail Avery. 

Nathaniel Avery (No. 54, page 415) married Amy, whose last name 
is unknown. Wanted, information concerning her and their children, 
Keziah, Daniel, vSarah, Josiah and Nathaniel. 

Wanted, information concerning Anna Edgerton, wnfe of Amos 
Avery (No. 73, page42ij. It is known that her father's name was 
Hezekiah, and that he was a cornet 

Very few answers have been made to inquiries previously pub- 
lished in this department. It is very important that those who have 
the information asked for send it to me, thus enabling the publication 
of the revised edition of the family history at a date earlier than would 
otherwise be possible. 



Avery Notes and Queries. 37 

COLONIAL ROSTER. 

Lineal descent from any person mentioned under this heading 
constitutes eligibility for membership in the ''Colonial Dames" or in 
the "Society of Colonial Wars." Brief records like those below, with 
citations of authorities, are desired. 

{ Co)it ill lied fr-om page 21.) 

9. Asa Avery (No. 41, page 35), commissioned captain of 5th 
company, Sth regiment, Groton, October, 1765. 

10. William Avery (No. — , page — ), deputy to the general 
court of Connecticut from Groton, May, 1773; justice. May, 1768 to 
May, 1774, inclusive. 

i[. John Avery (No. — , page — ), deputy to the general court 
of Connecticut from Preston, October, 1771. 

12. Simeon \very (No. — , page — ), deputy to the general 
court of Connecticut from Groton, October, 1769. 

( To he couti lined.) 



ENGLISH RECORDS. 

( Continued from pa or JO. ) 
London Marriage Licenses : 

Edward Avery, of St. Peter, Paul's Wharf, London, dyer, and 
Mary Edgley, of St. Bartholomew-the less, West Smithfield, London, 
widow of John Edgley, late of same, cheesemonger, at Horsney, Mid- 
dlesex, 9 vSept., 1626. 

Henry Avery, of St. Michael, Cornhill, upholsterer, bachelor, 
about 20, and Frances Waith, of Camber well, Surrey, spinster, about 
20, consent of father, Robert Waith, gent, at St. Olave, Southwick, 
Surrey, 12 May, 1674. 

William Avery, silk weaver, and Christian Slater, widow, of city 
of London, at St. Alphage, London, 18 Jan., 1580-1. 

William Avery, of Gray's Inn, gent, bachelor, about 29, and 
Elizabeth Hothersall, of Lewisham, Kent, spinster, about iS, consent 
of her mother, Elizabeth Freeman, widow, at St. Mary Savoy, or St. 
Catharine near the Tower, London, 22 Feb., 1667-8. 



38 Avery Notes and Queries. 

Thomas Avery of St. Olive's in Silver street, and Anne Good- 
ricke. of St. Peter's in Cheape, 16 June. 15S3. 

William Smith. Westminster, joiner, and Joyce Avery, spinster, 

3 July, 1620. 

( To be coni'uiHcd. ) 



REVOLI'TIUXARY ROSTER. 

Lineal descent from any person mentioned under this heading con- 
stitutes eligibility for membership in the "Daughters of the American 
Revolution," "Sons of the American Revolution," "Children of the 
American Revolution."" and similar societies. Brief records of Revo- 
lutionary service, with citations of authorities, are desired. 

( Continued from page 27.) 

MASSACHUSETTS SOLDIERS AND SAILORS IX THE WAR OF THE 
REVOLUTION'. 

The following names are here printed as they appear in the state 
document entitled "Massachusetts Soldiers and Sailors in the Ameri- 
can Revolution." Some of them appear more than once, each entry 
giving some part of the record of service. They are arranged, as far 
as possible, as thev appear in that publication. It will be noticed that 
but few of them have been fully identified as members of the Groton 
clan. Please report anv identification that you can. 

Abel Avery, corporal, Capt. Ambrose Hill's company. Lieut-col. 
Miles Powell's (Berkshire Co.) regiment; enlisted July iS, 1779; dis 
charged Aug. 22. 1779 at New London. 

Amos Avery, private. Xorthheld; enlisted July 22, 1779; discharged 
Aug. 27, 1779; also enlisted March 29. 17S1 for three years: 22 years 
old, :; ft. 9 in. tall, light complexion, light hair, farmer. 

iVmos Averv. private. Capt. John Mills' company. Col. Joseph 
Vose's regiment, on muster roll for April. 1781 ; enlisted April 8, 17S1, 
for three vears : rejjorted deserted same date. 

Benjamin Avery, private, Capt. Nicholas Crosby's company, Col. 
John Allen's regiment; enlisted Oct. S, 1777; discharged Dec. 31, 
1777 ; company raised for defense of Machias. 



Avery Notes and Queries. 



39 



Benjamin Avery, seaman, Brigantine "Massachusetts," engaged 
Jan. 3o, 1778. 

Benjamin Avery, private, Capt. Mark Poole's company. Col. 
Jacob's regiment of guards ; pay for services from Nov. 12, 1777 to Feb. 
3, 1778 at Charleston ; also from Feb. 3 to April :;, 1778 at Cambridge ; 
reported sick and absent March, 1778 at Winter Hill. 

Benjamin Avery, Ipswich ; descriptive list of men raised to rein- 
force the continental army for six months; age 33, 5 ft. 7 in.; light 
complexion, arrived at Springfield July 6, 1780; under Lieut. Taylor, 
3d Massachusetts line ; also at Camp Totoway, Oct. 25, 1780. 

David Avery, Pepperill, private, Capt. John Nutting, Col. William 
Prescot ; marched on the Lexington Alarm. 

David Avery, New Ipswich, Capt. Ezra Towne's company. Col. 
Reid's regiment; enlisted May 4, 1775. 

David Avery, Gageborough (Winsor), chaplain, Col. John Patter- 
son's regiment; engaged April 23, 1775; also pay roll from May 7 to Aug. 
I, 1775 ' '"^^^^ Oct. 6, 1775 ' ^^so Col. John Bailey's regiment; in need of 
clothing at Dorchester, Oct. 23, 1778; also return of officers in Lieut.-col . 
Ezra Badlam's 3d regiment, Sept. 24, 1779 ; also Col. Sherburne's regi- 
ment, continental army, pay accounts from Feb. 15, 1777 to March 5, 
17S0; reported as chaplain of the 4th Mass. brigade. (No. 78, page 423.) 

David Avery, jun., receipted for bounty for three years' enlistment, 
dated at York, May 8, 17S1, 

David Avrey, New Ipswich, Capt. Ezra Towne's company, Col. 
James Reid's regiment ; enlisted May 4, 1775; age 18 years, stature 5 ft., 
3 in., brown complexion, dark eyes, farmer, birthplace Townsend, 
residence New Ipswich ; mustered out July 11, I'J'J^' 

Edward Avery, Cape Elizabeth, private, Capt. vSamuel Dunn's com- 
pany. Col. Edmund Phinney's regiment ; billiting roll from date of enlist- 
ment May 17, 1775 to date of marching to headquarters July 11, 1775 ; 
also company returns ; also order for bounty coat or its equivalent in 
money, dnted Cambridge Nov. i. 1775. 

Edward Avery, matross, Capt. Abner Lowell's company ; marched 
July II, 1776; rolls made up to Dec. 31, 1776 at Falmouth, Cumber- 
land county. 

( Coiitimtcd on page J^.i.) 



40 AVERV XOTES AND QUERIES. 

Hvcry jVotcG and Queries. 

PitbJishcd by Elroy M. Avery, at 657 Woodland Hills Avenue, 
Cleveland, Ohio. 



Subscription l^rice, Fifty cents per year. Fifteen cents per copy. 

Entered at the Cleveland, O., postoffice as second-class matter. 



THE GROTOX AVERY HISTORY CLUB. 

In February, I began the publication of this quarterly magazine, 
and proposed the organization of a club with annual dues ranging from 
one to ten dollars, each member to fix the exact amount for him.self or 
herself. In the May issue of Notes and Queries, I acknowledged 
the receipt of membership dues aggregating seventy-two dollars and a 
half. vSince that time, dues have been received as follows : 

Andrew). Avery, Dunkirk, X. Y $10.00 

Mrs. Clara Avery Miller, Keokuk, la i.oo 

Mrs. Helen Josephine Yeamans, Westfield, Mass i.oo 

Edward Perry Aver\-, New Haven, Conn 3.00 

Mrs. F. W. Goddard, Colorado Springs, Colo 3.00 

D. H. Treadway, West Mystic, Conn 400 

James W. Eldridge, Hartford, Conn i.oo 

Frederick Christopher Avery, Toledo, O 5.00 

Mrs. Harriet A. Jewell, Dunkirk, N. Y i.oo 

Mrs. Edmund C. Cooley, Dunkirk, N. Y i.oo 

Edward Emmett Avery, San Francisco, Cal i.oo 

Lucius Evans Avery, Ferrisburg, Yt 1.50 

Frank Milton Avery, Denver, Col 1.50 

Mrs. Adaline Avery Shepard, Westfield, INIass i.oo 

Irving J. Avery, New London, Conn i.oo 

Charles B. Chapman, Norwich, Conn i.oo 

Florello P. Avery, Tunkhannock, Pa 5-oo 

Mrs. Sarah Averj^ Barnum, Buffalo, X. Y i-oo 

Mrs. Fred EgelhofF, Dallas. Texas i.oo 

Mrs. R. Y. Mitchell, Findlay, 2.00 

John Fletcher Avery, Ann Arbor, Mich 3-50 

Total receipts for the second quarter of 1898 549-50 

vSince the issue of the first number of the magazine, I have also re- 
ceived nineteen subscriptions at hfty cents each, so that the total 
revenue of the ''Club" and of its official organ for the first half of the 



Avery Notp:s and Queiiies. 



41 



year is just a hundred and tliirty-one dollars and a half. This amount 
is sufficient to pay for printing the three nuniljers of Notes and 
Qi'ERiES now issued, and perhaps a quarter of my postage account 
for the corresponding period. Of the thousand members of the family 
to whom the magazine has been sent, just sixty-seven have become 
subscribers — for all club members are considered subscribers. 

The magazine has proved itself an efficient aid in my work as 
family historian, bringing me many items of valuable information that 
I otherwise would not have received. It has also carried information 
to the readers of its pages that many of them have found valuable. I 
hereby return my sincere thanks to those who by their contributions 
and subscriptions have enabled me to publish it so far, and made it 
necessary for me to continue its publication at least to the end of the 
year. Yours fraternally, 

Eeroy M. Avery. 



Some of my correspondents seem interested in "Avery Coats of 
Arms.'" There are perhaps half a dozen such coats, but there is no 
evidence that the Groton Averys have any claim to any of them — even 
if they would care to urge such a claim if they had one. Evidently, 
no such claim can be set up until the English ancestry of our 
emigrant, Christopher Avery, is ascer- 
tained. It would cost money to make 
search in England for the missing link, 
and none of the rich members of the clan 
has yet offered to pay the bill. Simply 
as a matter of general genealogical in- 
terest, I give herewith a picture of the 
coat of arms granted in 1579 to William 
Avery of Filongley, County of Warwick, 
England. The scroll-work and tassels 
constitute no part of the coat, and may 
be used, modified, or omitted at pleasure. 
A description of this and other Avery 
coats, with a glossary of heraldic terms 
used, is contained in the pamphlet mentioned on page 34 of Notes 
AND Queries, 







42 Avery Notes and Queries. 

REVOLUTIONARY ROSTER { Continued from page 39.) 
Edward Avery, jun., Cape Elizabeth, return of men enlisted into 
continental army from Capt. Joshua Jordan's (2d company), Col. Peter 
Noyse's (Cumberland county) regiment, dated Nov. 20, 1778; joined 
Capt. George Smith's company, Col. Joseph Vose's regiment; enlist- 
ment for three years; reported enlisted in 1777. 

Ephraim Avery, private, Capt. Joseph Cook's company, Col. 
Elisha Porter's (Hampshire county) regiment: enlisted July 20, 
1779; discharged Aug. 27, 1779 at New London, Conn. 

Ephraim Avery, Palmer, return of men enlisted into continental 
army, from Capt. Aaron Graves' company, Col. Pyncheon's regiment, 
dated Feb. 9, 1778; joined Capt. Bull's company. Col. Sheldon's reg- 
iment, enlistment for three years. 

Ephraim Avery, private, Capt. Joseph Pride's company, Col. 
Nathaniel Jordon's (Cumberland county) regiment; enlisted Oct. i. 
17795 discharged Oct. 23, 1779. 

Ephraim Avery, private, Capt. Isaac Parson's company. Col. 
Prime's regiment ; enlisted May 4, 17S0; discharged Dec. 19, 1780; 
roll dated at North Yarmouth. 

Frederick Avery, order for wages dated North Winsor. June 16, 
17S3; service in Capt. Jackson's company. Col. Nixon's (6th ) regi- 
ment ; and Capt. Bowman's company, 5th regiment; served in place of 
Alathew Wyman. 

Gideon Avery, Capt. John Poppin's company. Col. Richard 
Gridley's (artillerv) regiment ; order for bounty coat or its equivalent 
dated Winter Hill. Jan. 13. 1776. 

Gideon Avery, seaman, brigantine "Massachusetts," commanded 
by Capt. John Foster Williams; engaged Jan. 20, 1777; discharged 
Feb. 17. 1777. 

Gideon Averv, on the list of prisoners sent on shore at Sheepscott 
river and Townsend, from the British ship "Rainbow," dated Sept. 
12, 1777: certified Nov. 10, 1777 that said Avery was released by Sir 
George Collin witiiout receipt. 

James Avery, Machias, quartermaster, Capt. Jabez West's com- 
pany. Col. Jonathan Eddy's regiment ; enlisted Nov. 14, 1776: dis- 
charged Dec. 16, 1776; regiment raised in Cumberland county, N. S. ; 



Avert Notes and Queries. 



43 



also lieutenant in Capt. John Prebble's company, Col. John Allen's 
regiment; on continental army pay accounts from July 4, 177710 
June I, 1779 at Machias ; also on pay roll -for service from Junei, 
1779 to May I, 1781, Indian department, Machias; also petition sent 
by said Avery asking for discharge from his commission as lieutenant 
in Col. John Allen's regiment; allov^^ed in council March 37, 1781. 

John Avery, private, list of men returned as serving on main 
guard under Lieut. -col. Laommi Baldwin, July 3, 1775. 

John Avery, first lieutenant, schooner "Washington" (privateer), 
commanded by Capt. William Preston, Sept. 6, 1777. 

John Avery, private, Capt. Abel Richard's company. Col. Mc 
Intosh's regiment; enlisted March 23, 1778; discharged April 6, 1778, 
Roxbury. 

John Avery, Gloucester, private, Capt. Jonathan Roby's com- 
pany. Col. Moses Little's regiment; muster roll dated Aug i, 1775, 
enlisted May 29, 1775; also corporal, age 30 years; also order for 
bounty coat or its equivalent in money dated Dec. 11, 1775; also pri- 
vate in Capt. Amos Cogswell's company. Col. James Wesson's regi- 
ment, Jan. 25, 1778, residence, Charleston; enlisted for town of 
Gloucester ; mustered by Col. Barber ; continental army pay accounts 
for service Jan. 8, 1777 to May 20, 1778; reported died May 20, 1778. 

John Avery, description of enlisted men, dated Medway, July 24, 
1779; age 18 years, stature 5 ft. 7 in., complexion light, enlistment 
nine months. 

John Avery, Attleborough, descriptive list of men enlisted by 
James Leonard, muster master, dated Oct. 29, 1779, first company, 
Col. Dean's regiment ; age 19 years, stature 5 ft. 4 in., complexion 
light, hair brown, eyes blue, residence Attleborough ; enlisted for nine 
months. 

John Avery, Brookfield, private, Capt. William H.'s company, 
Worcester county regiment ; enlisted Oct. 2. 1779 ; discharged Nov. 
10, 1779; service at Castle and Governor's Islands. 

John Avery, Dedham, private, Capt. Aaron Fuller's company, 
which marched on the Lexington Alarm, April 19, 1775, from Dedham ; 
also Capt. Joseph Lewis' first company, Col. William Mcintosh's regi- 
ment ; marched to Dorchester on alarm from v'^ulTolk county, March 



44 AVKKY NOTKS ANO QlKKIES. 

4, 1776, ser\ ice four days ; also descriptive list of men from Suffolk 
county in 1779, Capt. l^attles' company ; age 20 years, stature 5 ft. 
7 in . complexion liolil ; delivered to Ensign Edward White ; also list 
of men receivi'il by Justin Ely, commissioner, from Major Stephen 
Badlam. superintendent of Suffolk county, dated Springfield, Sept. 
20, 1779; also on pay roll for six months' men raised by Dedham for 
service in the continental army, 1780; marched July 15, 1780; dis- 
charged Dec. 24, 1780. 

John Avery, private, Capt. Noah Allen's company, Col. Joseph 
Vose's regiment, muster roll for February and March, 1782, dated 
York Hutts; enlisted Jan. 8, 1782 for three years. 

Jonathan .A.very, Dedljam. ensign, Capt. Aaron Fuller's company, 
Lexington Alarm, April 19, 1775, service nine days ; also Capt. Joseph 
Lewis' first company. Col. William ^Mcintosh's regiment ; on alarm of 
ALirch 4, 1776, service four days. 

Joseph Avery, private, Capt. Stephen Smith's company; enlisted 
Sept. 15, 1775; discharged Sept. 27, 1775 at Machias. 

Joshua Avery, Gloucester, private, Capt. Barnabas Dodge's (first) 
company. Col. Gerrish's thirty-eighth regiment, muster roll dated Aug. 
I, 1775; enlisted May 2, 1775, service thirteen weeks; also company 
return dated Chelsea, Oct. 2, 1775; also order for bounty coat or 
equivalent in money, dated Chelsea, Dec. 27,1775; also recruits for 
new establishment, dated Cambridge, Dec. 30, 1775; also return of 
men enlisted for one year from last Dec , 1775, age seventeen years ; 
also pay abstracts Jan., April, 1776 ; also pay abstracts for May and 
June dated New York; also Capt. Dodge's company, commanded by 
Lieut. Cheever ; also list of men in Col. Laommi Baldwin's twenty- 
sixth regiment to serve six weeks from Dec. 31, 1776, dated Trenton ; 
also Capt. Mark Pool's company. Col. Jonathan Titcomb's regiment; 
on alarm at Rhode Island, stationed at Bristol, roll dated June iS, 1777. 

Oliver Avery, Charlemont, captain of a company which marched, 
April 21, 1775, on the Lexington Alarm, .service seventeen days. 
(No. 82, page 334; 

Oliver Avery, jun., Charlemont, private, Capt. Oliver Avery's com- 
pany, which marched April 21, 1775, on the Lexington Alarm, servi 
seven days; company raised in Sherburne,* Charlemont and Meryfield 
reported enlisted under Capt. H. Maxwell, April 27, 1775 ; also Capt 



ce 



AvKKV Notes and Oukrii 



45 



Maxwell's company, Col. Prescotf s rec^iinent, musltM- roll dated August 
I, 1775 ; enlisted April 28, 1775 ; also company return (probably Oct., 
1775), reported at Qiiebec ; also Capt. Lawrence Kemp's company. 
Col. Leonard's regiment, enlisted Feb. 23, 1777, discharged April 11, 
1777, at Ticonderoga ; also Captain Samuel Taylor's company, Col. 
Porter's regiment, enlisted July 10, 1777, marched to reinforce the 
northern army after the evacuation of Ticonderoga. (No. 1S3, page 336. j 

Ransford Avery, Southampton, private, Capt. Lemuel Pomeroy's 
company. Col. John Dickerson's regiment; enlisted Sept. 20, 1777; 
discharged Oct. 14, 1777; marched on an expedition to vSaratoga, 
under command of Col. Ezra May. 

Richard Avery, on account of bounty paid by selectmen of Wells 
to said Avery for serxice in continental army, March 22, 1782; also 
return of men enlisted in continental army, 1781, 1782, reported unfit 
for service ; enlisted for the town of Wells for three years ; reported 
disabled. 

Richard Avery, New Marlborough, private, Capt Joseph Bates' 
company, Lieut-col. John Brooks' (7th) regiment, muster rolls for 
April and May, 1781, dated West Point ; enlisted March 12, 1781, for 
three years; promoted fifer, May 20, 1781; also descriptive list of 
enlisted men, Capt. Collar's company. Col. Ashley's regiment; age 16 
years, stature 5 ft. 3 in., complexion light, hair dark, occupation 
laborer and clothier, rank hfer, birthplace Oblong, N. Y., residence 
New Marlborough; enlisted May 20, 1781 ; joined Capt. Bates' com- 
pany, Lieut-col. Brooks' regiment, enlisted for three years ; on the 
muster rolls June, July, Aug., Sept., Oct., 1781 ; also Feb. 1782, York 
Hutts. 

Roswell Avery, Gageborough (Windsor), private. Captain Nathan 
Watkins' company; marched April 12, 1775, in response to Lex- 
ington Alarm, from Gageborough and Partridgeheld, service four- 
teen days; reported enlisted into army May 5, 1775; also Capt. 
Watkins' company. Col. John Patterson's regiment, muster roll Aug. 
I, 1775; also company returns (probably Oct. 1775); also receipt for 
bounty coat or equivalent, Nov. 13, 1775. (No. 79, page 423.) 

Roswell Avery, sergeant, Capt. William Clark's company, Col. 
Benjamin Simond's regiment ; marched on alarm from Gageborough 
to Manchester, July 9, 1777, by order of Gen. vSchuyler. (No. 79, 
page 423.) 



46 AvERv Notes and Queries. 

Robert Avery, hand on the scliooner " Plymouth," Capt. Isaac 
Bartlet; engaged Dec. 31, 1776; discharged April 16, 1777; sailed to 
the West Indies and back. 

Sanuiel Avery, private. Capt. ^\'illiaIn I'earNon's (3d) company; 
enlisted Feb. 20, 1776. rolls made up to May 31. 1776. at Gloucester. 

Samuel Avery, private. Capt. \\'illiam Pearson's (3d) company; 
pay roll for services from June i. 1776, to Nov. 18, 1776, Gloucester. 

Samuel .\very, Cape Ann. corporal, Capt. Mark Poole's company, 
Col. Titcomb's regiment, service two months on alarm at Rhode Island, 
stationed at Bristol, roll dated June 28. 1777. 

Samuel Avery, Lincoln, descriptive list of men from Middlesex, 
age 40 years, stature 5 ft. 3 in., complexion dark, eyes blue, occupation 
farmer and wheelwright, residence Lincoln; enlisted March 10. 17S1, 
for three years. 

Samuel Averv, Weston, pav roll for six months' men raised by 

Weston for continental army during 1780: reported discharged. 

Samuel .\very, Milton, petition dated Boston. Alay* 9, 1777, signed 
by PaulDudley Sargent and John Winthrop. jun.. and asking that said 
Avery be commissioned commander of schooner "'Eagle" (privateer), 
designed to sail in the fleet commanded by Commodore Manley ; 
allow^ed in council, ]Slay 10, 1777; also petition dated May 26, 1778, 
signed by Samuel Jackson, asking that said Avery be commissioned 
commander of sloop "America" (privateer) ; allowed in council, May 
26, 177S; also petition dated Boston, April 18, 1 781, signed by William 
Foster, asking that said .\very be commissioned commander of the 
sloop '"Twin Sisters" (privateer); allowed in council, April 19. 17S1. 

Thomas .\very, private, Capt. Simon Adams' companv, Col. John 
Coller's regiiuent ; enlisted Oct. 13. 1781 : discharged Oct. 20, 17S1. 

Tob'h .\very. private. Capt. Joseph Smith's company; enlisted July 
19, 1775 : discharged Dec. 3;, 1775. 

Timothy Avery, Temple, descriptive list, Capt. Ezra Towne's 
company% Col. James Read's regiment ; age 21, stature 5 ft. 6 in., 
complexion brown, eyes gray, occupation farmer, birthplace Town- 
send, residence Temple, private; enlisted May 15, 177s; mustered July 
II. 1775; died Aug. 7, 1775. ( Xo. 194, page 337.) 



Avery Notes and Queries. 47 

Walter Avery, Charlemont, private, Capt. Naham Ward's com- 
pany, Col. David Wells' (Hampshire) regiment; enlisted Sept. 22, 
1777; discharged Oct. iS, 1777; service at the capture of Burgoyne. 
(No. 1S5, page 336.) 

William Avery, Capt. Warham Park's company, Col. Timothy 
Danielson's regiment ; order for bounty coat or equivalent, dated Rox- 
bury, Dec. 23, 1775. 

William Avery, private, Capt. Elijah Clapp's company. Col. John 
Dickinson's regiment; marched on the Bennington Alarm to New 
Providence, Aug. 17, 1777. 

William Avery, private, Capt. John Kirkland's company, Col. 
Ruggles Woodbridge's regiment; enlisted Aug. 16, 1777; discharged 
Nov. 29, 1777 ; raised to reinforce the northern army. 

William Avory , Westheld, private, Capt. Warham Park's com- 
pany. Col. Danielson's regiment, muster roll dated Aug. i, 1775; en- 
listed May 4, 1775 ; service three months, four days. 

William Averey, Westtield, private, Captain Park's company, Col. 
Danielson's regiment, company returns Oct., 1775. 
( To be continued.) 

Letters sent by me to the following addresses have been returned 
by the postal authorities. If you can give information as to the present 
whereabouts of any of these persons, or of any one who can do so, 
please let me have it : 

John Murphy, Asheville, N. C. 

Mrs. Lucien Larned, Blackstone, Mass. 

Mrs. F. F. Williamson, Waynesville, Ohio. 

Mary Jane Avery, Rochester, N. Y. 

Harry C. Avery, Des Moines, Iowa. 

Mrs. Lurancy Angel, Caledonia, Minn. 

Robert AUyn Avery, Ledyard, Conn. 

Mrs. Frank H. Gardner, Groton, Conn. 

Mrs. Mary T. Avery-Sawtelle, M. D., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Mrs. Hopkins, daughter of Ralph Geer, Newark, O. 

Mrs. Lucy Davis, Laurel, Md. 

William C. Avery, Hunter, Greene Co., N. Y. 

H. H. Avery, Spokane Falls, Wash. 



48 



AvERv Notes and Oiekie: 



The Februai-y issue of NdiES ami (Queries contained a picture 
of the "Hive of the Averys." built by Capt. James Avery in 1656, 
and occupieil liy eight successive generations of Averys. The "Hive" 
was burned on the night of July 20, 1894. The cut herewith given 




represents the ruins immediately after the fire. The photographic 
negative from which the cut was engraved for Notes and Queries 
was kindly furnished by Miss Williams of New London, Conn, It is 
hoped that a future issue of the magazine may picture the fine 
memorial now standing on the site. 

Newspapers that receive this copy of Notes and Qlteries are 
respectfully requested to state that : 

All Averys and Avery descendants are requested to send their 
names and addresses to Dr. Elroy M. Avery, Cleveland, Ohio. He is 
writing a history of the Avery family. 



Mvcry JVfotes and Queries. 



A Quarterly Magazine devoted to the History of the Groton Averys. 



No. 4. **Honor thy Father and thy Mother." Novembei", 1898. 



The number and page references used in this magazine are to 
Sweet's History of tiie ''Averys of Groton." 

Gurdon Chappell Avery (No. 2234, page 26S) married August 
31, 189S, at North Lyme, Conn , Miss Elsie B. Bebee of North Lyme. 

Miss Alexandra Avery (No. 941, page 496 j was married .Septem- 
ber 14, 1898, at Galena, 111., to Lewis Hunt Tompkins. 

Miss Bertlia Glen Avery, daughter of Herbert Glen AAery (No. 
441, page 635), was married October i, i89S,at Albany, N. Y, , to John 
Toleman Bulkley. 

George Griswold Avery (No. 2232, page 268) married October 5, 
1898, at New London, Conn., Miss Jennie Elizabeth Crosbie of New 
London. 

If you see, in a newspaper or magazine, any advertisement, mar- 
riage, obituary, or other notice of an Avery, please send it to me with 
the name and date of the periodical. It will not be much trouble for 
you, and may give me long-sought information. 

A meeting of the Averett family will be hekl December 20, 1898, 
at Halifax Court House, Va., "to organize for the purpose of giving 
strength and system to the work of investigating the genealogy and 
history of the family." An invitation to attend is extended to all 
Averetts, Aviretts, Averitts, Avritts, and Averys. The signers of the 
circular think it probable that the different branches of the family now 
spelling the name in various ways, but all terminating with the letter 
"t," are descendants of common ancestors who settled in Virginia. 
The further idea that the "Virginia branch of Averys is of the same 
American origin," should go hand in hand with the firmly established 
fact that at least most of the Virginia and North Carolina Averys be- 
long to the Groton branch. Correspondence concerning the meeting 
in December should be addressed to E. C. Averett, Danville, Va. 



50 A\ Kio XoTKs AM) Qup:ries. 

A recent number of llie "Wavne Independent,'" published at 
Honesdale, Pa., gave an interesting account of the ninetieth birthday of 
Dr. Otis Avery (No. 230, page 452). -whose portrait may be found on 
page 28 of the Xotes Axn Q_ikries. The article closes with this par- 
agraph : 

''Dr. A\ery has been a man of .-troiig character. He has lived in 
harnionv with the principle- of a tnie nobleman ; he has cultivuted 
the graces of patience, forbearance, lo\e ;ind self-sacrifice ; socially his 
life has been one of meekness and purity, and in all of his business rela- 
tions and professional duties he has been actuated by liberality, justice 
and the staunchest integrity. He has ever been and now in the even- 
ing of his life is still cheerful and sunny. There is certainly beauty 
in his old age and we can of him truthfully say with Wordsworth : 

'Old age, serene and bright. 
And lovely as a Lapland night. 
Shall lead thee to thv grave." " 

Such te.-timonv from witnesses who have had -uch opportunities 
for exact knowledge is trulv a crown of glorv. 

Long life and sound health, and great jov. 

For our nonogenarian man : 
Golden sunsets whollvfree from alloy — 

Is the wish of our Avery clan. 

(Apologetically ])ut conscientioush-. ) 



1 am under great obligation to Mr. and Mrs. Elisha S. AUvn 
of Ledvard. Conn., for careful and e.xtensive researches among the 
earlv records of the Groton Avervs and of families who inter-married 
with them. The records that they have found, transcribed and 
sent to me. have enabled me to till many gaps and correct manv 
errors in my records. Mr. and Mrs. Allyn are both descendants of 
the founder of the (jroton A\ erys. I also wish to thank Mrs. A. H. 
Simmons of Mystic, Conn., for the loan of \-aluable documents, and 
Mrs. L. R. Southworth of New York City, for carefully compiled 
records. Miss Helen Morgan Avery of Xew London, and ^liss ]Mary 
.\. C. Avery of Norwich have been faithful helpers and deserve the 
gratitude of the whole clan. 



Avery Notes and Ouekiks. 51 

Judge William Ledyard Avery (No. 901, page 199,) died recently 
at'Cincinnati, where he had long lived I have not vet received any 
further^information. 




WILLIAM RANDALL AVERV. 

William Randall Avery, whose portrait is lierewith given, is au- 
ditor of the Cincinnati Street Railway Company, which operates all 
the street cars in that city. He is a knight templar, and a member 
of the much coveted thirty-third degree, and one of the best known 
masons in the country. Mr. Sweet put his record on page 232 of "The 
Averys of Groton." 



c;3 AVKKY NOTKS AM) QfKKlKS. 

Wanted. — Intorniation rcMicerniiit^f jiidertlian Avery (Xo. lyS. 
page 423 j. 

Wanted. — Information concerning Edgar Charles Avery (Xo. 
'^S'l) P^g^ 141.) who in 1889 was manager of the Accommodation 
Banking Company at 51 Eighth Street, South Minneapolis, and in 
1892-4 was president of a Loan Company doing business in the Man- 
hattan Office Building on Dearborn Street, Ciiicago; or any of his 
descendants. 

Jeremiah Avery (Xo. 372, page 643), the son of Jeremiah, mar- 
ried July 4, 1834, Ruth, the daughter of Xehemiah and Elizabeth 
(Sawyer) Chandler. She was born February 26, 1804. at Alstead. 
X. H. They had six children. 

Eliza was born August 8, 182^ and married Charles F. Lincoln. 

Loyal I), was born August i^. 1836. 

Edwin E. was born August i. 1837, probably at Potsdam. X. Y. 

Xathan C. was born Xovember 35, 1839. 

William IL was born April 5, 1S32, probablv at Potsdam, and 
died August 7, 1878. 

Charles Xehemiah was born August 31, 1836. married v'^ally Ilurst, 
and probably lived in Cincinnati. 

I should like to get into correspondence with any of these or with 
any of their descendants. 

Guerdon Fuller Avery (Xo. 553, page 141) married Maria Lum- 
bard. He died in 18^5. It was reported to me that his widow lives 
at Waterville, X. Y., but my letter to her was returned by the post- 
master, unclaimed. Information wanted. 

Desire, daughter of John and Abigail (Cheseborough) Avery, 
baptized May 2, 1697, married Jeremiah Burrows. The further record 
of this family is desired. 

Very few answers have been made to inquiries previously pub- 
lished in this department. It is very important that those who have 
the information asked for send it to me, thus enabling the publication 
of the revised edition of the family history at a date earlier than would 
otherwise be possible. 



AVEKV NoTKS AND OUKKIES. 53 

COLONIAL ROSTER. 



Lineal descent from any person mentioned under this lieadino- 
contitutes eligibility for membership in tlie "Colonial Dames" or in 
. , "Society of Colonial Wars." Brief records like those below, with 
citations of authorities, are desired. 

( Coiitiin/cd fi'ODi page .>"/'.) 

13. Ebenezer Avery (No. 14, page 30), deputy to the general 
court of Connecticut from Groton, May, 1720; October. 1720; Octo- 
ber 1726. 

14. Ebenezer Avery (No. 25, page 33), commissioned lieutenant, 
ist Groton company, May, 172S; captain. Oct. 1733; colonel, Octo- 
ber, 1739; deputy to the general court of Connecticut from Groton, 
May. 173^^; October. 1738. 

15. Ebenezer Avery (No. 47, page 37). commissioned ensign, ist 
Groton company. May, 1741; lieutenant, October, 1748; captain, 
May, 1749; major, Sth regiment, ]\Liy, 1768; lieutenant-colonel, Oc- 
tober, 1770; deputy to the general court of Connecticut, May, 1746; 
October, 1746; October, 1748; October, 1750; October, 1752 ; Octo- 
ber, 1754; October 1763: March, 1764; October 1764; May, 1768; 
justice from May, 1754 to May, 1759 inclusive. He probably was 
justice from May, 1762 to May, 1773, though it is possible that it was 
his son I No. loS, page 53) who held that ofiice during that time. 

16. Ebenezer Avery (No 108, page ^},\, commissioned ensign. 
1st (jroton company. May, 1769. 

( 7(* /'(' cout'niKcd . ) 

Is it not possible for some of the Connecticut members of the fam- 
ily to identify for me Nos. 10, 11, and 12 of this roster, as printed in 
the last number of this magazine.^ William and Simeon Avery were 
deputies in the general court from Groton, the former in 1773, and the 
latter in 1769. John Avery was deputy from Preston in 177 1. It is 
evident that they were Groton Averys ; it is equally evident that some 
one ought to tell me who they were. 



•'Why, Jennie, your cheeks are blue with cold." 

"No; I'm l)lushing." said Jennie; "that's my blue blood. 



54 AVHI{\ XoiKS AXn OlEKIES. 

IIIK COLONIAL TOXATHAXS. 



In 1739. (ireut IJritain declared war a<rainst Spain. hi February. 
1 74 I. \'ice-ailmiral X'crnon was >ent on an expeilition against Carta- 
t^ena. on tlie Spanisli .\hiin, on the north coast of South America. 
The fever ahnost destroyed the troops w^hile they were unsuccessfully 
besieging that place, and in May the expedition sailed for Jamaica. 
In July, the vice-admiral and his remaining forces sailed for St. lago 
(Santiago). Cuba. Manv of the troops were debarked and went into 
camp. The climate was so bad that many died, and the difficulties at 
the mouth of the harbor were so great that the fleet could not co-operate. 
In Xovember, the troops re-embarked and sailed for Jamaica. For 
this unfortunate expedition. Connecticut sent five Iiundred troops, of 
wlioui only al)our fifty li\ed to return. History repeats itself. 

The l)a\itl Avery manuscript savs : "Jonathan Avery and his 
>oii Jonathan ^\■ent in ye expedition to take Carthagena and Cuba and 
they both died in ye expedition at Cuba." David Avery says that the 
older of these Jonathans was the son of James, jr , and that he married 
Elizabeth Bill. According to Mr. Sweet, the Jonathan who ^vas the 
son of JauTcs. jr. | Xo. 16. pages 29 and 31 j. married Elizabeth Water- 
man, while the bmathan who married Elizabeth Bill was the son of 
Thom.is ( Xo. 13. page 325). Baker, in his History of Montville, page 
^2]. -a\s that Jonathan, the son of Thomas, married Elizabeth Water- 
man, tluis supporting David Averv and contradicting ^Ir. Sweet. 
Still another person says that the Jonathan who married Elizabeth 
Bill was the son of Samuel (Xo. 11, page 559). Who can settle the 
matter ? 

According to the testimony now before us we must conclude : 

1. Jonathan, son of James, married Elizabeth Bill and not Eliza- 
Ijeth Waterman. Their children are correctlv given on page 325. 
This Tonathan (Xi<. 16. page 31.) and his son Jonathan (No. 38, page 
325.) are the ones who went on tiie expedition to Cartagena. 

2. Jonatlian. son of Thomas, married Elizabeth Waterman. Their 
children are correctly given on page 31. 

3. The wives and children of the Jonathans on pages 31 and 325 
anc/ all of tJicir descendants, should cliange places. 

If vou are interested in the matter, let me iiear from vou. 



AvERv Notes and Queries. 
WRECKED BY A MISSIONARY. 



The Rev. David Avery (see Notes and Qiieries, pages 29 and 
o:^.) went as a missionarvto Maine in 1S03. His diary during that period 
1- very interesting. A.uong the many items is Found the following : 

September 3i, Wednesday, 1S03. — "Visited at Mr McCurdy's — 
N. B. I find by Mrs. McCurdy, that her father, Mr. Robert Avery, 
was a brother of the Rev. Ephraim Avery late of Brooklyn in Con- 
necticut, and of John Avery, esq., late of Boston. Soon after the 
French war, when many, from N. E. moved to the farms of the Neu- 
tral French, he moved from Lebanon in Connecticut, to Horton, at 
the Bason of Menus, on Windsor River, in Novascotia. He married 
Miss Anna Cushman, near Plymouth. His children are Robert, John, 
Josiah, James, Anna, Susanna, vSarah, Ruth. Anna married Capt. 
Geo. Hallyburton of Exeter, Ne\v Hampshire ; Susa married Major 
Lem'l Trescott of Soward's Neck, opposite Moose Island at the mouth 
of the Passamaquoddy Bay ; Sarah married Mr. John Burnet of Scot- 
land Societv in Windham, C. ; Ruth married Mr. Neal McCurdy of 
St. Andrews on the Schoodick, Newbrunswick. I was urged vehe- 
mently to tarry and preach at this settlement, wiiich is 3 m. N. by W. 
of the town of vSt. Andrews. Here are many families as needy of mis- 
sionarv charitv as any people on the continent. N. B. Mrs. Anna 
Avery now lives at Scotland with Mr. Burnet. Capt. Samuel Avery; 
son of Rev. Ephraim Averv, now lives at Horton on the Avery place. 
Bason of Menus." 

1 iiave long tried to identify a numerous family of Maine Averys, 
descendiints of Robert, with the Groton clan, but the above extract 
definitely shows that they belong to the Dedham Averys. See page 
215 of the Avery Family Record, Dedham Branch. It also robs oin- 
Jonathan Avery (No. 11, page 559 of the Averys of Groton,) of his 
grandchildren by his son Robert, allotted to him by Mr. Sweet. It 
had previously been proved that his wife, Preserved, married not him 
but another Jonathan Avery. It is also probable that the Susanna 
who married Ralph Stoddard was not his daughter, as stated by Mr. 
Sweet, but some widow Susanna Avery. Will not some philanthropic 
genealogist do something for this trebly afflicted Jonathan .- 



Subscribe for Notes and Qijertes before you forget it. 



56 A\EUV XoiRS AND QlfEKIKS. 

Hvcry ]Votc6 and Queries. 

/''/ih/is/icd by Jt/rov M. Avery, at 657 Woodland Hills Avoikc. 
Clevela?id, Ohio. 

Subscription Price, Fifty coits per year . Fifteen cents per copy 

Ivntercd at the Cleveland, O., postoffice as second-class matter. 



THE GROTON AVERY HISTORY CLUB. 

For the benefit of those who now see the Notes and Queries for 
ihe tirst time, it is stated that tliis " chib" consists of persons who, 
being interested in the preparation and publication of a connect history 
of the Groton Averys, Iiave made a certain contribution in aid of such 
a project. These contributions are called annual dues. Each member 
fixes the amount of his or her dues at pleasure between the limits of 
one dollar and ten dollars. Dues are payable to the undersigned, who 
reports all payments on this page, and accounts for his expenditures 
annually. Members assume no obligations other than for the payment 
of dues ; there are no salaries or perquisites. In short, the club is a 
device for helping the family historian pay the expenses necessary to 
his work and without making him ask for such help. The sole test of 
eligibility for membership is a desire and an ability to pav the dues. 
If you are eligible, you are invited to join. 

In the May number of this magazine, acknowledgement of twenty- 
seven payments, aggregating seventy-two dollars and fifty cents, was 
made. In the August number, twenty-one payments, aggregating 
iorty-nine dollars and fifty cents, were acknowledged. Since that 
report, dues have been received as follows : 

Mrs. Geortje R. Stetson, Washington, D. C % i 50 

Christopher Lester Avery, Groton, Conn 10 00 

George M. Buck, Kalamazoo, Mich 2 00 

Mrs. Hannah C. Partridge, Jewett City, Conn i 00 

Charles L. Gillette, Sayville, N. Y i 00 

Mrs. Helen Avery Robinson, Anchorage, Kv 5 00 

Total receipts for the third cpiarter of 189S |2o 50 

All members of the clul) receive the Avehv Notes and Qjl'eries 
without charge. The receipts of the club to date are a little more 



AVKRY NoiKS AND OUEUIES. 57 

than enough to pay tlie expense of publishino- ih^ magazine. The 
report of the auditing committee will be printed in the next issue, as 
announced last February. All moneys received in November or 
December of 1898, will be entered as payment of (.lues for 1899. 

With thanks to all members of the club, all subscribers to the 
magazine, and all who have sent me genealogical information and 
thus helped me in my self-assumed labor, and with all the cordial 
greetings that add to the joys of the holiday season, 1 remain, 

^'ours fraternally, 

El.KOV M. AVKHV. 



No one thing, except my inability to get answers to some of my 
letters of genealogical inquiry, has been more disappointing to me 
than the small numlier of subscribers to the Avery Notes and 
QjLiEKiEs. If you do not feel able to join the club, ask yourself if you 
are not able to become a subscriber to the magazine. That costs fifty 
cents a year. If I can get 3-ou to subscribe, I shall feel pretty sure 
that you will answer my letters about your sisters and your cousins 
and your aunts. Perhaps we can then get some of them to become 
subscribers to the magazine, and, in turn, to interest others of the 
family. 



ENGLISH RECORDS. 



( CoJiti lined from page -AV. ) 

London Marriage Licenses : 

St. Michael, Cornhill. Richard Avery and Ann Barber, by bans, 
October 23, 1626. 

St. Mildreds, Mary Avery, daughter of John Avery of Ipswich, 
Co. .Suffolk, gent., and John 13urlev, September 11, 162 1. 

Visitation of Dorset, 1623 : 

Jacobus 3 filius of Robertus Ryeres (married) Francesca, HI. 
Thome Auerie, Co. Wiltes. 

Visitation of Warwick : 

William Avery (married) Margaret, daughter of William l^elcher. 
William Belcher died April 5, 1609. 

( To be Continued. ) 



58 AVKKV XoTKS AND OrKKlKS. 

REVOLITIONAR^' ROSTER. 



Lineal descent trom anv person mentioned under this heading con- 
stitutes eligibility for membership in the " Daughters of the American 
Revolution," "Sons of the American Revolution," " Children of the 
American Revolution," and similar societies. Brief records of Revo- 
lutionary service, with citations of authorities, are desired. 
( Cont'uiiicd from page 47.) 

A ^tatement from the Bureau of Pensions at Washington shows that 
.Stephen Avery (No. 96, page 578,) enlisted in May, 1780, and served 
about six months as a private in Captain Clifft's compan}', Colonel Dur- 
kee's Connecticut regiment. During this time he was one of the sol- 
diers who guarded Major Andre shortly before his execution ; he was also 
present and witnessed the execution of Andre. In the years 177S 'i"cl 
1779, he was residing in the town of Groton, Conn., and was a mem- 
ber of the company of minute men, commanded by Captain Joseph 
Lewis, and was frequently called out on alarms to render short tours 
of duty as occasion demanded. In 1780, he again became a member 
of tiie companv last named and, during the year 17S1, rendered a 
number of short terms of service. He was at New London when it 
was destroyed by the British. No other details of his services are 
given. His pension was allowed for eight months and six days actual 
service. His application for pension was dated October 11, 1S32, at 
which time his residence was at Salisbury, N. Y. In 1840, his resi- 
dence was at Manheim, N. Y. (vSee Avery Notp:.s and Queries. 
page II.) He died in October, 1842. 

REVOLl'TIONARV WAR ROLLS OP^ NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

Daniel Avery receipted on the pay roll of Captain Eliphaiet 
Daniel's company at Fort vSullivan, IMarch 18, 1776. 

Daniel Avery, private, July 6 to Oct. 22, 1780. Captain William 
Barrow's company. Colonel Nichol's regiment. 

Da^■id Avery, on pay roll of Captain Ezra Towne's company. 
Colonel James Reed's regiment, Aug. i , 1775. 

David Avery receipted for coat promised bv New Hampshire, in 
the same companv. 

David Avery, mentioned in Jaffrey town account of bounties paid 
to soldiers. 



AvEHV Notes and Qjlieiuks. 



59 



Elijah Avery, on the li.st of tliose supplied with lilankets at Winter 
Hill, Sept. 13, 1775, Benjamin Mann, captain. 

Elisha Avery, deputy commissary-general at Winter Hill. Dec. 
14. 1775- 

Jeremiah Avery enlisted for Nottingham, under Colonel John 
McCleary (no date). 

Jeremiah Avery, in Captain Benjamin .Sias's company. Colonel 
John Wentworth, Sept. 5 to vSept. 27, 1779, from Deerfield ; in the 
forts at Pisquataque Harbour ; also private, ist regiment of militia 
raised for three months, Sept. ir, 17S1, Colonel Wentworth ; Sept. 39, 
1781, received .$20 for enlisting for Portsmouth; his father, John 
Avery, receipts for his son, Jeremiah Avery's wages, Feb. 1782 ; also 
private from Portsmouth, Sept. 29 to Oct. 4, 1781, Captain Joseph 
Parson's company. Colonel Runnel's regiment of militia. (No. 120. 
P'^ge 575). 

John Avery, on pay roll of men raised for Canada, under Ca[)tain 
Badger, Aug. 39, 1776; also July 23, 1776. 

John Avery, Captain Wetherbee's company. Colonel Isaac 
Wyman's regiment, Nov. 5, 1776, at Mount Independence. 

John Avery, pay roll of Captain Nathaniel Wilson's company, 
Colonel Thomas Stickney's regiment, July 22, 1777. 

John Avery, on pay roll of Simon Maston's company, Colonel 
Joseph vSenter's regiment, raised for defense of Rhode Island, July 15, 
1777; also on pay roll from June 29, 1777,10 Feb. 7, 1778; also 
receipted for bounty, July 15, 1777 ; also for traveling expenses, vSept. 

^"^^ 1777- 

John Avery, private, July 4, to Oct. 2<>, 1780, Captain Sinclair's 
companv, Colonel Thomas l^artlet's regiment ; also on pay roll. Jan. 
1781. 

Jonathan Avery, Captain Francis Towne's company. Colonel 
David Oilman's regiment, Dec. 5, 1776, to March 12, 1777. 

Joseph Avery, in list of men recruited by Henry Dearborn in 1780. 

Joseph Avery, in Captain Isaac Frye's company, Colonel Scam- 
inel's regiment, Jan. i, 1780, to Jan. i, 1781 ; also on pay roll, Feb. 
13, 1781 ; also on state pay rolls for 1780: also in same regiment in 
1 78 1. 

Joseph Avery, on town returns for North Hampton, mentioned 
twice. 

Joseph Avery enlisted for Nottingham in 1780. 



6o .\\l-.\<\ XoTHS AM) OlKRIES, 

Joshua A\cry. ser<rcam. Au^. 4, 177S, to Aug. 28, 1778,011 pay roll 
of Captain John Folsoni's company. Colonel Moses Kelly's regiment, 
raised for ilefenst- of Rhode Island: also commissioned lieutenant, 
)une 23, 1779. from Durham, in Colonel Hercules Mooney's regiment, 
raised for defense of Rhode Island. (No. 35. page 575). 

Moses Avery, private from Barnsted, July 4 to Dec. 5. 1780; 
also on pay roll for July 12. 1780; age given as 18. 

vSamuel A\ery, private, Barnsted. July 4 to Dec. 13. 1780; on 
pav roll July 12. 1780; agegixen as 20 years. 

Timothy Avery marched from Temple to Cambridge, .April 19, 
1775, enlisted for eight months, and was at P>unker Hill; on pay roll 
of Captain Ezra Towne's comi)any. Colonel James Reeds regiment, 
Aug. 1. 1773. (No. 194' P-'K^' 337-1 

If vou call identify, as Groton Averys, any of these Re\olution- 
arv soldiers whom I have not identified, jilease notify me. 
( Vo be Coiili lined). 



ROSTER OF THE CIX'IL WAR. 

From 'Tievised Roster of X'eniionl N'ohmteers and Lists of Ver- 
monters who served in the Army and Na\y of the l^iited States, i86i- 
1865.'' Compiled by order of the (General Assembly. 

1. Abner S. Avery, private. 12th regiment, Co H ; residence Cor- 
inth ; enlisted vSeptember 6, 1S62 ; discharged July 7, 1863. (No. 667. 
page 467.) 

2. Park Avery, pri\ate. 12th regiment, Co. H : residence, New- 
bury; enlisted August 15, 1S62 : disciiarged July 14. 1863. (No. 9S3, 
page 309 ) 

3. Alberts. Avery, sergeant. 15th regiment, Co. A: residence. 
Vershire ; enlisted July 29, 1862; made 2d lieutenant, May 2. 1863, 
15th regiment. Co K. : mustered out August 5, 1863. 

4. Alfred G. Avery, pri\ ate. 9th regiment, Co. H • residence. 
Hardwick; enlisted Decembei- 12, 1863; died October 27. 1864; bur- 
ied at City Point. Virginia. 

5. Charles Avery, private, ist Cavalry. Co. C; residence, 
Bakerslield ; enlisted July 26, 1863; discharged July 26, 1864. 

6. Cortie H.Avery, private, 9th regiment, Co. G ; residence, 
Corinth; enlisted. December 21. 1863; discharged June 17. 1865. 



Avery Notks and Ouekihs. 6i 

7. George S. Avery, private, 9th regiment, Co. G ; residence^ 
Corinth; enlisted December 31, 1S63; transferred to Co. T). June 
13, 1865 ; mustered out December 7, 1865. 

8. John H. Avery, private, 9th regiment, Co. G; residence. 
Orange; enlisted July 10, 1864; discharged June 13, 1865. 

9. Frederick B, Avery, private, 3d regiment, Co. C; residence, 
Newbury; enlisted June i, i86r ; taken prisoner October 14, 1863; 
died at Andersonville, March 13, 1865. (No. 99S, page 119.) 

10. George W. Avery, private, 8th regiment, Co. D; residence. 
Topsham ; enlisted December 13, 1861 ; died of disease, June 28, 1862. 
(No. 658, page 466.) 

11. .Sylvester II. Avery, private, 8th regiiiu'nt, Co. D: resi- 
dence, Topsham; enlisted December 11. 1861 ; died of disease, June 
3,1863. (No. 655, page 466.) 

12. Gideon H. Avery, private, 9th regiment, Co. D; residence, 
Sttatl'ord; enlisted June 9, 1862; discharged January 15, 1863 for en- 
listment in regular army, 17 U. S Infantry; discharged July 30, 1863. 

13. John W. Averv, private, 9th regiment, Co. D; residence, 
Straflford ; enlisted May 29, 1S62 ; discharged for disability, Novem- 
ber 6, 1862. 

14. Hiram Avery, private. Frontier Cavalry, Co. F; residence, 
Corinth; enlisted January 3, 1865; discharged June 27, 1865. (No. 
690, page 468. ) 

11;. Lorenzo 1?. Avery, private, 3d Bat. Light Infantry ; residence, 
Northiield; enlisted August 19, 1864; discharged June 15, 1864. 

16. Nathan A. Avery, private, ist regiment, Co. D; residence, 
Newbury; enlisted June 2, 1861 ; disciiarged August 15, 1861. (No. 
983, page 1x8.) 

17. N. Ayers Avery corporal, 4th regiment, Co. II; residence, 
Newbury; enlisted Aug. 2^, 1861 ; died of disease March 33, 1863. 
(No. 983, page 118.) 

18. Peter Avery, private loth regiment, Co. C; residence, Clar- 
enden; enlisted July 16, 1862; wounded October 19, 1864; wounded 
April 2, 1865 and died same day. 

19. Sa^lnIe] Avery, private, 7tii regiment, Co. H; residence, 
Sharon; enlisted December 2-^, 1S61 ; died of disease October 19, 
1862. 

20. Seymour Avery, private, ist cavalry, Co. L; residence, 
Fairfield; enlisted September 18, 1862; discharged June 21, 1865. 

( 7o be continued.) 



62 A\i:rv Xoiks and Queuies. 

SI IMM.KMENT TO THE ROSTER OF THE CIVIL WAR. 



It will be noticed that a number of the Averys mentioned above 
have been identified a^ (Jroton Averys. It is requested that any one 
%vlio is able to identify any of tlie otiiers will do so and send the infor- 
mation to me. Tiiere surely are. amon^ the Vermont readers of Notes 
AND QuEKiES. those wlio are able to do this. You may not be able to 
refer to Sweet's "The Axerys of Groton." In that case, tell me what 
you can of the person, the name of iiis father and mother, his brothers 
and sisters, everything, anything, that you can to help me place his 
military service to his proper credit. 

By means of this roster and the identifications above recorded, 
valuable information concerning these persons has been secured, such 
as residence, military service and date of death. This illustrates one 
of the many ways in which the family records are being perfected. 
Similar records in other states, and records for the war with Mexico, 
and the war of 1812, ought to be searched with care. The archives 
of the national government contain information that might be dug out. 
The records of hereditary societies like the Cincinnati, the Sons and 
Daughters of the American Revolution, the Colonial Dames, the 
Society ot Colonial Wars, etc., are veritable mines of genealogical 
information. Town histories and published genealogies of families 
that have intermarried with the Avery family hide facts that would 
help complete the records of the Groton Avervs. Manv other sources 
of information are open to diligent search. 

Do you imagine that your family historian, who, without this work, 
is a very busy man, can carry on the enormous correspondence con- 
nected witli his self-assumed task, and make all of these researches in 
person, or e\en with the help of his wife and stenographer? The 
simple truth is that most of these researches, if made at all, must be 
paid for. Very largely with a view to such researches, the Groton 
Avery History Club was organized and the publication of Notes and 
Queries was begun. After nine months of effort, these agencies 
have not netted enough to pay my postage for the corresponding 
period. Of course, the magazine has been of great help, worth more 
than the work and money it has cost, but these researches have not yet 
been made possib'e. AVhat shall we do about it.' Let the work drag 
along until I die, and trust that vou may then tind a historian with 
the financial ability to work for love and pav all the necessary bills? 



AvEitv Notes and Queiue^ 



63 



Through the kindness of his granddaughter, Mrs. Hannah C. 
Partridge of Jewett City, Conn., I am able to give herewith a portrait 
of the Rev. David Avery (No. 78, page 422). the first genealogist of 
the Groton A^■e^ys. He was born at Norwich, Conn , April ^. 1746. 




THE REV. DAVID AVERY. 



He entered Yale College in 1765 and, in his junior year, served 
as missionary to the Indians of central New York. After his gradua- 
tion in 1769, he took a course in theology at Hanover, N. H. He was 
ordained in 1771, and again went to the Indians of New York. In 
1773, ^'^ became pastor of the Congregational Church at Windsor, 
Mass. In 1775, three days after the initial fight at Lexington, he en- 



64 A\'KHY N(V1F.S AXn (JUKHIES. 

listed twenty ol' his piirishoners ami. as their captain, marched to 
Cambridge. He served diirini^ the war, and in 17S0 was chaplain of 
the 4th Massachusetts brigade. In iSoo, he was sent by the Massachu- 
setts Missionary Societ}' to the wilds of western New York, In 1S02, 
he went as a missionary to Maine. He died in iSiS. A spirited sketch 
of his revolutionary service appears in Headley's "Chaplains and Clergy 
of the Revolution." See A\euv Notes and Q_ikimes. page 39. 



Letters sent by me to the following addresses have been returned 
by the postal authorities. If you can give information as to the present 
whereabouts of any of these persons, or of any one who can do so. 
please let me have it : 

Mrs. Mary T. C. Avery-vSawtelle, M. D., Los Angeles, Calif. 

William C. Avery, ILinter, (jreene Co., N. Y. 

Henry H. Avery, vSpokane Falls. Wash. 

Mrs. Henry (irover. Ann Arbor. Mich. 



The opening chapter of Sweet's "TheAvery'> of Groton," written 
by me, contains, I think, all that is known about Christopher and 
James, the founders of the family now known as the Groton Averys. 
I have a few pamphlets containing this chapter, and a fine picture of 
the " Hive of the Averys," built by James and occupied by himself 
and seven generations of his descendants. Price, one dollar per copv. 

If you have not access to a copy of Mr. vSweet's book, I wnll send 
you a brief, type-written copy of your line back to the founders 
(Christopher and his son James Avery, A. D. 1630), for fifty cents, 
or a fuller record, giving the names of the children in each generation, 
for one dollar: provided I can ascertain just where vou come into the 
line. 

1 have a fev>- pamphlets containing the appendix to Sweet's " The 
Averys of Groton." and relating to " Avery Coats of Arms" (with 
illustrations of four coats) and to "The Avery Family in England and 
France." These pamphlets will be furnished, as long as the supplv 
lasts, at fifty cents per copy. 

Newpapers that receive this copy of Notes and (^ieries are 
respectfully requested to state that : 

All Averys and Avery descendants are requested to send their 
names and addresses to Dr. Elroy M. Avery, Cleveland, Ohio. He is 
writing a historv of the Averv familv. 



livery jVotes and Queries. 



A Quarterly Magazine devoted to the History of the Groton Averys. 
No. 5. "Honor thy Father and thy Mother." February, 1899. 

The number and page references used in this magazine are to 
Sweet's History of the " Averys of Groton." 

If you are a descendant of Captain James A\ery of (iroton, the 
family historian ^. ants yoin- full address whether \-ou bear the Avery 
name or not. 

The John A\'ery mentioned as Xo. ii in the colonial roster on 
page 37 of Notes and Qjjkriks has been identilied as the John Avery 
who appears in the family history as Xo. 167, page 66. According to 
"Connecticut Men in the Revolution,'" the same John Avery was a 
lieutenant of Connecticut militia in 1776. 

On page 191, Mr. Sweet says that Jeremiah (jeorge Harris was 
the pioneer Avery genealogist. As Mr. Harris was not born until 
1S09, he must fall into place behind the Rev. David Avery (No. 78, 
page 432). See Notes and Qjteries, page 63. 

If you served in any of the wars of your country, please report to 
me the name of the military organization (company and regiment) or 
of the naval vessel, date and place of enlistment, engagements, casual- 
ties, and other leading incidents of service, rank, j^romotions, date of 
discharge, etc. If you can send such a report of another member of 
the clan please do so, remembering the importance of the date and 
place of death in cases where the soldier died. 

If you are a member of ^'The Groton Avery History Club.'' re- 
member that dues for 1S99 are payable now. 

William Edwin Hurlbut, son of Mrs. Apphia Ilurlbut (No. 3397, 
page 286) was a soldier in the 33d Michigan Infantry, and served in 
Cuba during the recent war with Spain. 

I have a few sets of the Averv Xotes and Queries for 1898 
(four numbers) that I wall send in an envelope, by mail, to any address, 
for fifty cents per set. 



66 A\•I•;K^■ N'oiEs .\xn (Jii-imfs. 

The beautiful ,u;ey>LT fountain in the public >ciuare, Cleveland, O., 
was designed and buih l)y IIerl)ert (ilenn A\ery. of Albany. N. Y,, 
(Xo. .III. pau\- bj:;). 

Mr-. lC\a ]. Il()pkin> Ilaniillon. 702 X. Park avenue. Chicaj^o, is 
prepared to make genealouical re-earehes tor coats of arms, family 
histories, ancestral lines for ine!iil>er-hip in societies of American 
Revolution. Colonial Dames anil Mavtiower Descendants. Mrs. Ham- 
ilton is a descendant of Cajitain lames Averv and numbers several 
Mavtiower pilurinis amon<^r her ancestors. 

If vou see, in a newspaper, or magazine, anv advertisement, mar- 
riage, obituary, or other notice of an Avery, please send it to me with 
the name and date of the periodical. It will not be much trouble for 
you, and may give me long-sought information. 



ORAXCiE BLOSSOMS. 

As an illustration of the work that I am doing in the line of 
completing the family history left b}- Mr. vSweet, I would call atten- 
tion to Xo. 418, page 444. for whom the only record given is : 

••Christopher, birth unknown." 

I now know that he was l)orn December 10, 1817, at Granville, O., 
that he had one child (the Rev. William H. H. Avery, D. D., of Saint 
Albans, Vermont) by his first wife, and eight children by his second 
wife. I have the names, etc., of all these children. The son by the 
first wife had four children, the eldest of whom is the person men- 
tioned in the following notice : 

John Waite Avery. M. D.. of Proctor, Vermont, married June 
2, 1898, at Burlington, Vermont, Miss Anna Roberts. 

iVIiss Mabelle Averv (Xo. 866, page 488) \vas married vSeptember 
14. 189S, at Le Roy, Minn., to Milan John Hart, M. D . of Le Roy, 
Minn. 

Edward Dewain Avery (Xo. 865, page 67S) married September 
I, 1898, of Ridgway, Pa., Miss Ella May Gardner. 

Miss Bertha Jane Avery (Xo. 863, page 678) was married Octo- 
ber 26, 1898, at Southwest City. Mo., to Dr. Walter Ernest Smith. 

George Pettigrew Avery (page 132) married October 13. 1898, 
(probably at Groton, Conn.) Miss Nancy E. Randal. 



AVHRV X(»Ti:s AND OlKRIKS. 67 

AMERICAN AVERY CLAXS. 

The Groton Branch (descendants of Christopher Averv and his son, 
James) : 

Christopher A\ery. \\ea\er, came from Entrhmd in 1630, in Win- 
throp's fleet, brin<^ing with him his only son James. He went first to 
Gloucester, Alass., and later was a resident of Boston. James re- 
moved to New London about 1650, where his fatlier joined him later. 
About 1636 James built a house across the river at the head of 
Poquonnock Phtin, wdiere he died in 1700. This house was long known 
as " The Hive of the Avery^ ;" from it \vent forth swarms to settle in 
every state of the Union. James Avery married Joanna Greenslade ; 
four of their sons and tiiree of their daughters married and left de- 
scendants. This is the largest of the Avery chins. The history of 
the Groton Averys was published by Homer De Lois Sweet of Syra- 
cuse, N. Y., in 1894. A more complete record is now being prepared 
bv Elrov ^L A\ ery, 637 Woodland Hills a^•enue, Cleveland, O. 

The Dedham Branch (descendants of Dr. W'illiain Avery) : 

Dr. William Avery of Barkham, Berkshire, England, came to 
New England about 1650. He brought with him his wife and three 
children and had four more born at Dedham, Mass. His descendants 
are to be found especially in Massachusetts and ]\Liine. His record 
has been traced back for four generations into England. The history 
of this family was published by Winslow W. Avery of Plymouth, 
Mass., in 1S93. 

The Portsmouth Branch (descendants of Thomas Avery) : 

Thomas Avery, blacksmith, came to America in the "John and 
Mary" in 1633. He was first at vSalem, Mass., and afterwards at 
Portsmoutb, N. H. His descendants are numerous in New Hampshire. 
vSome of his descendants are supposed to have been at Tow^nsend, 
Mass. One of these, Robert, left a large family. No history of this 
family has been written, though much material has been collected in 
searching for records of otber Averys. Miss Clara A. Averv, 47 Eliot 
street, Detroit, Mich., has much information relating to this clan. 

Ths Ipswich Branch (descendants of William Avery] : 

William Avery first appears in Ipswich, Mass., in 1637. His will 
is dated 1653. His wife's name was Abigail ; they had seven child- 



68 AVKKV XdTI-S AND OlKKIIiS. 

reii. His son William hail \vn -ons. Much tlilliiully has been experi- 
enced in tracing this family owinu' to the \ arioiis spellings of the name 
by descendants, 'i'he Averills of Maine are descendants of this Will- 
iam. There has l)een a tratlition in the family of (jroton Averys that 
Christopher of CJroton had a brother \\'illiam in Massachusetts. It 
was easily pro\ed that \\'illiam A\ery of Dedham could not have been 
a brother. I)ut fuller in\ estimation may show that Christopher of 
Groton antl William of Ipswich were akin. Mis- Clara A. Avery. 47 
Eliot street. Detroit, Mich., is preparing a history of this clan. .She 
would like to hear from the Averills, Averells, and Averitts. as well 
as from Ipswicli AA'erys. 

The Delaware Averys (descendants of Captain John Avery) : 

Captain John Avery was in Maryland in 1665, Later he was at 
the Whorekill, Delaware Bay, where he was president judge. His 
wife's name was Sarah. His only son died without issue. The record 
of the descendants in the female line may be found in the genealogy 
of the Kollock family by Edwin Jaquett Sellers of Philadelphia. The 
history of Captain John Avery, president-judge of the W^horekill. has 
been prepared by Mr. Sellers for private circulation. 

The Virginia Averys, Averetts, A viretts, Averitts, Avritts : 

It is believed that many of the Virginia families under the above 
names had a common origin. The Maryland and Virginia records show 
that the following Averys were in that region before 1700: Jacob, 
Edw^ard, Henry. William, Arthur, Robert and Joseph. E. C. Averett, 
Danville, \'^irginia, is investigating the genealogy and history of these 
families. 

Dorchester, Maryland, John Avery : 

One John Avery was at Dorchester, Maryland, as earh- as 1658. 
From his will and other sources, it would appear that he had a wife 
Anne and a daughter of the same name ; also a grandchild, John 
Granger. He seems not to have left any descendants of his name. 

Dorchester, Mass., John Avery; 

Another John Avery appeared at Dorchester, Massachusetts, as 
early as 1642, and his will was proved in 1654. He seems to have had a 
brother Lawrence and a wife Anne in England. There is no record 
of any de.scendants in this country. 



AvKRV Notes and Oi'p:ries. 69 

A very -Everett : 

The descendants of Josiuh Avered, who was the son of Israel and 
Abigail (Morse) Everett, spell their names in various ways. One 
branch, the descendants of Abner Avered, now spell the name Avery. 
This spelling has been followed for more than a hundred and fifty 
3'ears. Much difiiculty has been experienced in sej)arating these twigs 
from the Groton branch. Edward F. Everett. Box 1423, Boston, 
Mass., is preparing a liistorv of the Everett faniilv which will in- 
clude this Averv branch. 



The first annual report of the treasurer of the club and the report 
of the auditing committee appear on another page of this number of 
the magazine. Dues for 1899 are now payable. If you are a member, 
please send your dues to the treasurer. If you have not joined the 
club, please gi\e careful consideration to the fiuestion of joining. 
Each member fixes the amount of his or her annual dues between the 
limits of one dollar and ten dollars. Every member of the club is 
entitled to the Notes and Q_ueries without additional payment. If 
you decide that you cannot afford to pay a dollar or more per year, see 
if you cannot afford to become a subscriber to the magazine, which 
costs fifty cents a year. If you cannot afford that (and will make that 
fact known confidentially) I will gladly send vou the magazine each 
quarter. vSeveral of the clan have written to me that they could not 
afford the money, but that they were interestcl in the work, and 
would help in the gathering of records and information in their 
vicinity and among their near relatives. I count them as among the 
best paying subscribers. Please help as best you can. You can, at 
least, be sure that I have your address and the record of your family 
correct to date. Working together, we shall secure a history with 
which we may be almost satisfied. 



In 1897, I paid out more than a thousand dollars in addition to 
the time given bv my wife and myself. I felt that I could not afford 
to continue such a cash outlav, and ■•• The (jroton Avery History 
Club" was organized for the sake of distributing the burden. The 
success achieved bv that device is told elsewhere in this issue. In 
1S98, I paid out several hundred dollars more than I received, in 
addition to "working for nothing and boarding myself." What have 
you done.- What are you doing? What are you going to do. ^ Yes; 
I mean yo/i. 



yo AvKKV X()Ti:s and (Jikkihs. 

Tlie sixtli (lortrait hunL,^ on I he walls of the Groton Avery History 
Club is that of Courtnoy Chaiulos Avery (No. 756, page 665), the 
genial ami • •llu^t Hul;" inanaL!;er of the advertising department of D. 
M. Osborne iV Co., manufait urers of farm implements at Auburn. 




CorRTNKV CHANDOS AVKRV. 



N. Y. His numerous •"ads" are ingenious, artistic and incomparable. 
They rivet the attention of even the careless reader and win the 
approval of the judicious. Being wide-awake in every tiber. he takes 
an active interest in the new family history, and makes that interest 
manifest by his works. 



Avery Notes and Qiieries. 71 

POOR JONATHAN. 

On page 55 of the AvERY Notes and Queries it is stated that re- 
cent discoveries rob "Jonathan Avery (No. 11, page 559 of the Averys 
of Groton), of the grandchildren by his son Robert, allotted to him by 
Mr. Sweet. It had previously been proved that his wife. Preserved, 
married not him but another Jonathan Avery. It is also probable 
that the Susanna who married Ralph .Stoddard was not his daughter, 
but some widow Susanna Avery. Will not some philanthropic 
genealogist do something for this trebly afflicted Jonathan?" It now 
appears that this ill-starred son of Groton must be deprived of his only 
remaining child, John, who, in the printed familv history, is said to 
have been born in 1729, to have died June 5, 1772, and to have married 
Sarah Bishnell (No. 25, page 562). According to the record of the 
Averys of Dedham, John Avery, son of Jonathan and Lydia (Healey) 
Avery, was born April 21, 1731, and died June 5, 1772, at Ashford, 
Conn. He married December 11, 1751, Sarah Bicknell, who died 
December, 1771. The list of tlieir children is the same as that given 
by the compiler of the " iVverys of Groton " to our Jonathan. This 
Dedham John was the son of Jonathan, the son of Robert, the 
son of Dr. William Avery, the emigrant and the founder of the 
Dedham branch. It looks therefore as if this entire Jonathan line 
must be given up to the Averys of Dedham. Can any one throw any 
furthur light on the subject? W^hat are we to do with our Jonathan, 
now deprived of his wife and all his children? 



A correspondent in Indiana informed me that John Avery (No. 
1764, page 285) was a private in the 182nd Ohio V^olunteer Infantry. 
Taking from a shelf in my library, the "Roster of Ohio .Soldiers" in 
the civil war, I found that he was a member of Co. K, that he entered 
the service October 24, 1864, and died April 28, 1865, at Nashville, 
Tenn It would have been impossible to identify the soldier from the 
roster without the information given, for John Avery is a very coin- 
mon name, and the Ohio roster is in twelve large volumes. If you 
can not tell all, tell me what you know about any of the Groton 
Averys. It may be the key to fuller information, as in this case. 



If you belong to the Groton Avery History Club, remember that 
the dues for 1899 ha\e matured. If you did not join last year, please 
do so now. 



: A\ KIM XoiKs A\n (Jikkies. 

Hvcry fsfotcs and Queries. 

PiiblisJicd by J-llrov M. Avcry\ at 657 H^wd/ai/d Hills Avenue, 
Cleveland, Oliio. 

Suhso-iptioii Price, Fifty cents fer year. Fifteen cents per copy 

Entered at the Cleveland, O., postoffice as second-class matter 



THE (;rot()x avi:ry history club. 

Club dues foi 1S99 li<'ve been received as follows: 

Mrs. Lillian Walden Moon, New London, Conn Ii.oo 

Edwin L. Aven-, Indianapolis, Ind -2.00 

Miss Clara A. Avery, Detroit, Mich 5.00 

Mrs. Kate Aver\- Hallock, Cromwell, Conn i.oo 

Mrs. Elizabeth Aver}' Talmadge, Westfield, Mass i.oo 

Irving J. Aver}', New London, Conn i.oo 

Dr. Alida C. Aver}', San Jose, Calif i.oo 

Mrs. Hannah C. Partridge, Jewett City, Conn i.oo 

Joseph Dixon Aver}', Chicago, 111 i.oo 

Joseph A. Hyde, Deer Lodge, Mont 5.00 

Gates Aver}', Alva, Oklahoma i.oo 

Albert D. Allen, Pittsburg, Pa i.oo 

James Carrington Avery, Anbnrn, N. Y i.oo 

Mrs. Zipporah F. Blake, Yorkville, 111 1.00 

The Rev. Frederick Bart Averv-, Painesville, Ohio i.oo 

Charles Daniel Avery, Concordia, Kas 1.00 

Total receipts for the first quarter of 1899 $25.00 

Eiicb member of the club fixes the amount of his or her dues at 
pleasure between the limits of one dollar and ten dollars per year. 
Dues are payal)le to the undersigned, who reports all payments on this 
page, and accounts for his expenditures annually. jSIembers assume 
no obligations other than for the payment of dues : there are no 
salaries or perquisites. All members of the club i-eceive the Averv 
Notes and Q_ueries without further charge. The first annual report 
of the treasurer, and the report of the auditing committee are given 
on other pages of this issue. If you desire to help pay the expenses 
of preparing a new history of the Groton Averys. you are invited to 
join the clui). 

Yours fraternally, 

Elkov M. A\-erv. 



AvKRY Notes and Queries . 73 
TREASURER'S ANNUAL REPORT. 

To tlie Members of the Groton Avery History Club : 

I hereby submit my first annual report as treasurer. Dues for the 

year 1898 were received from the persons named below, as reported in 
successive issues of the Avery Notes and Qiieriks : 

Dr. Aaron B.Avery | 5 00 

A.L.Avery 2 00 

Andrew J. Avery 10 00 

Brainard Avery 2 00 

Christopher Lester Avery 10 00 

Major Cyrus Avery 2 00 

Edward Emmett Avery 1 00 

Edward Perry Avery 3 00 

Florillo r. Avery 5 00 

Frank Milton Avery 150 

Frederick Christopher Avery 5 00 

Irving J. Avery 1 00 

John Fletcher Avery 3 50 

Lucius Evans Aver}' : 1 50 

Dr. Otis Avery 5 50 

Mrs. Phebe A. Ely Avery 1 00 

Miss Sibyl Howe Avery 1 00 

Truenian G. Avery 5 00 

William H. Avery 1 00 

William Randall Avery 5 00 

Mrs. Sarah Avery Barnum 1 00 

George M. Buck 2 00 

William H. Castle 1 00 

Charles B. Chapman 1 00 

Mrs. Edmund C. Cooley 1 00 

Mrs. Fred Egelhoff 1 00 

James W. Eldridge 1 00 

Charles B. Gilbert 5 00 

Charles L. Gillette 1 00 

Mrs. F. W. Goddard 3 00 

Mrs. Frances Aver}- Haggard 2 00 

Mrs. Harriet A. Jewell 1 00 

Mrs. Louise Avery Kellogg 1 00 

Thomas P. Kernan 1 00 

Mrs. George Kingsley 3 00 

Mrs. Mary E. Mathewson 1 00 

Mrs. Clara Avery Miller 1 00 

Mr. R. Y. Mitchell 2 00 

Mrs. Sarah E. S. Nighman 1 50 

Mrs. Hannah C. Partridge 1 00 



74 . A\-EKv Notes and OI'Euies. 

Mrs. Helen Avery Pope I 1 00 

Mrs. Helen Avery Robinson "> 00 

John D. Rockefeller 10 50 

Edwin Jaquett Sellers 1 00 

Mrs. Adaline Averj- Shepard '••■•• 1 00 

Mrs. Delia Avery Southworth 1 00 

Mrs. George R. Stetson 1 50 

Mrs. M. A. Stockwell 2 00 

Mrs. Elizabeth Avery Talmadge 1 00 

Daniel H. Treadway 5 00 

Miss Antoinette A. Williams 5 00 

Miss Jenny E. Williams 5 00 

Miss Helen Josephine Yeamans 1 00 

Total of the fifty -three subscriptions |;i4-2 50 

It will be noticed that one of the subscriptions above 

mentioned was for the maxinnim amount allowed as dues plus 

the price of the magazine for a year. 

In addition to the club dues, I received twenty-two other sub- 
scriptions to the AvKRY Notes and Queries, at 50 cents 
each 11 00 

Total receipts for 1898 |153 50 

Respectfully submitted, 

Elt?ov M. AvEiiv. 
Treasurer of Groton Avery History Clul). 

Cleveland. O., December 31, 1S98. 

APPOINTMENT OF AUDITING COMMITTEE. 

To the Members of the Groton Avery History Club : 

At the recjuest of Mr. Elroy M. Avery, I hereby appoint a com- 
mittee to audit his accounts as treasurer of said club, and to report to 
the members thereof according to the agreement made in the Avery 
Notes and Qiieries for February, 1S9S. The committee will con- 
sist of Colonel (). J. Hodge and Mrs. X. X. Crum of Cleveland, and 
the Rev. Frederick B. Avery of Painesville, Ohio. 
Attest. 

Henkv C. White. 
Probate Judge, Cuyahoga County. Ohio. 

Colonel Hodge was formerly speaker of the Ohio house of 
representatives, and is the historian of the Plodge family. Mrs. Crum 
is a descendant of Mary (Avery) Ledyard (No. 107. page 52). The 
Rev. Mr. Averv is the rector of St. James' parish. Painesville, Ohio. 



AvKRv Notes and Queries. 75 

He is recorded in the family history as No. 533, page 391. The wife 
of Judge White is a descendant of vSabra (Avery) Capron, No. 383, 
page 64. 

REPORT OF AUDITING COMMITTEE. 

To the Members of the Groton Avery History Club : 

The undersigned, a committee appointed by the probate judge of 

Cuyahoga county, Ohio, to examine the report of the treasurer of the 

club respectfully submit the following report : 

The dues for 189S received by the treasurer and reported by him 

in the Avery Notes and Qiteries aggregate $142.50. Other 

receipts, as shown by his annual report, increases this amount to 

$153.50, which is the amount for which he is accountable to the club. 
Your treasurer has submitted to us receipted bills against the club 

in excess of this amount. These receipts show payments on account 

of the club to 

The Williams Publishing and Electric Company |109 00 

The Pnblishing House of the Evangelical Association 45 05 

#154 05 
As it thus appears that the printing and stationery bills paid by 
the treasurer exceed the total amount of cash receipts, the work of 
auditing has been very simple. It, however, seems proper that the 
committee should call attention to the palpable fact that, with things 
as above reported, all expenditures on account of the club for postage, 
expressage, engraving, mailing, cash paid to town clerks, postmasters 
and others for copying records, etc., stenographer, and the many 
necessary incidentals, have been paid from the private purse of the 
treasurer. When to this is added the cash value of the service ren- 
dered by him and his wife, it clearly appears that his promise "not to 
take as compensation for my services any of the money sent to the 
club" has been fulhlled. Your committee does not feel that any 
comment they might make would add anything to the force of the 
facts as herein reported. 



(Signed.) 



Cle\eland. Ohio. Februarv 6. 1899. 



O. J. Hodge, 

Marcia Phelps Crum, 

Frederick Burt Avery, 

Auditing Committee. 



7^ A\•l•;l{^ XoiKS and (Jikkiks. 

Tiii<: FA^IIL^• lIls'l'()R^■. 

In i8q|. Mr. IIomut I). L. Sweet of Syracuse, published a history 
ol tlie A\erys ot (irolon. a work of 698 pages. In spite of great clis- 
achautages and fre(|uent ih'scouragement, his work had been continued 
for thirty yt-ars. The work wa^ not satisfactory even to himself ; such 
a work nevi-r is satisfactory to it> compiler and. ahnost in the nature 
of events, never can be. While the l)0()k was in press, Mr. Sweet 
ilu'd. Only .px) copies were printed ; he was not able to get even that 
numlKM- of subscribers. Tlie surplus copies were soon inactive de- 
maiul. ^^embers of the family who wouhl not subscribe for the book 
in a(.l\ ance were glad to pay three times the subscription price for a copy 
within three years from the date of issue. 

I had taken an active part in helping Mr. Sweet in various ways, 
for which he made generous acknowledgement in the book. After his 
death, there was a growing demand for a revision of the history; a 
persistent call for an edition that should be more complete, and that 
should avoid as many as possible of the errors that inevitably creep 
into a first eilition of a work of this kind. No one seemed willing to 
take up the work that Mr. Sweet had laid down. This is not to be 
wondered at. for it necessarily involved much labor without anv pos- 
sibility of pecuniary remuneration. It is generally understood by those 
experienced in genealogical matters that it is very difficult to dispose 
of enough books to pay the cost of printing and binding, w ithout giv- 
ing any consideration at all to compensation for the long continued 
labor and expenses of the compiler. Mr. Sweet would not have been 
able to complete his work had he not received tlie financial aid that is 
acknowledged on page 4 of his history. 

In some way, I scarcely knoiv why. I began the work. The 
material accumulated by Mr. Sweet was sent to me. There were 
hundreds of letters to be chissitied, indexed, put on file, and examined.; 
By comparative study of many published genealogies, and after con-' 
ferences with genealogists, plans were formulated and methods 
devised. Among the things first determined upon was the adoption 
of the "Register Plan;"" a fuller record for the families of Averv 
daughters; thegi\ingof the postoffice addresses of living members 
of the family ; and a single index to contain the name of everv person 
mentioned in the book. Blanks were prepared, and an active corre- 
spondence was begun. A year ago, the "(iroton Avery History 
Club" was formed, and the first number of the Avery Notks and 



Avery Notes and Queries. 77 

Queries was issued. While these agencies have not boi-ne as 
abundant fruit as had been hoped, their vahie has been established and 
their possibilities made evident. The num])er of persons ^vho have 
given help is not as great as had been expected, but inianswered 
letters are becoming fewer, and the interest in the work is becoming 
more general. .Such considerations, far more than the cash receipts, 
encourage a continuance of the work. I can not doubt that a quar- 
terly reminder to each of a thousand Averys will, before long, arouse 
the interest of many, and lead them to that active co-operation with- 
out which the best efforts of even an ideal family historian would be 
fruitless. 



THE LAST ROLL CALL. 

Dr. Henry Newell Avery (Xo. 125S, page -^40), the health com- 
missioner of Minneapolis, died April 17, 1S98, at Forman, North 
Dakota. 

Judge William Ledyard A^ery (No. 901, page 199) died May 12, 
1 898, at Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Freda Aver}', the infant grandchild of Oscar Avery (No. 1371, 
page 159), died August 21, 1898, at Waldron, Ind. 

Dr. Amos Geer Avery (No. 1103, page 229), died vSeptember 18. 

1898, near Great Bend, JeflFerson county, N. Y. 

Edward Ely Avery (No. 1,^67, page 159) died November 10, 1898, 
at St. Louis, Mo. 

William Alonzo A\ery (No. 436, page 66t,) died January 6, 

1899, at Chicago, 111. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Avery Hannahs (No. 168S, page 3S0), died Janu- 
ary 18, 1899, at Watertown, N. Y. 



AFPRECL\TION. 

Please pity the sorrows of a poor family historian ! I recently 
received a letter, giving a little of the information for which I had 
asked, and ending with this appreciative declaration: '"My son 

adress is This is the last Acct that we can give and 

it \vi\\ be useless to ask any more questions for we sliell not ans any 
more questions. Yours with hast from 

Mrs. Jane Doe. 

Perhaps a writ of mandamus would be the proper remedy. 



■S A\i:rv Xoiks axo Quehies. 

A i)icture of the '-llivc ..f tlu' .\vciv>." huill in 1656 and burned 
n iSqi. appeared on pa-c 5 of the Xorns a \ n C^rERiES. Herewith 




,>■>'' 

" '-^'^":' 








is given another picture .showin<r the old liouse as viewed from the 
other side. Its site is now marked by a beautiful memorial, of which 
T hope soon to give a picture. 



AvEKV Notes anu Olkkiks. 79 

AN ENGLISH NOTE. 

(From tlie Boston Registry of Deeds, i''i43.) 

Anne Avery of Wapping, Co. Mid. [England] widdowe, does 
;ipp't Wm. Haddock of Wapping mariner and master of the good 
>hip or vessel called the Salutation of London (now bound out to sea 
on a voyage to New Eng.) her attorney to recover from Capt. Gibbons 
of New E. etc. of Boston, all and every debt, duties, goods, cattle, 
merchandises oweing or belonging to s'd Anne from s'd Capt. Gibbon 
and also to receive from all or any tenants in New E. rents, arrearage 
of rents due her for or on any of her messuages lands or tenants 
whatsoever in New Eng. 



(Signed) Anni 



May 12, 1642. 

Wits. Wm. Burrdock. 
Orex Dowish. 
John Goodlove. 



I am anxious for records of military service bv Groton Averys in 
the Confederate army. If you can send me lists ;-orresponding to 
the Union lists that I have published, or if you can send me individual 
records, please do so. 

There are many Avei-ys still living who served the Confederacy. 
As one who wore "the blue," I tender to all such a fraternal greeting. 
We were not comrades, but we are cousins, and ''blood is thicker than 
water." I know that you were as true to your convictions as I was 
to mine. The war of '61 is over, and the war of '98 has, I trust, 
rubbed out all lingering traces of sectional enmity. 

"Johnny" — "Yank" — Shake ! 

Here's my iiaversack ; lend me your canteen. 

Of course, the signature to the letter on page 77 is a fiction, used 
to conceal the identity of the ^vriter who reallv is a Groton Avery. 
Fortunately there are not many such. On the other hand, I receive 
scores of encouraging letters. For instance, a ladv in Detroit (not a 
Groton Avery) joins our history club, speaks enthusiastically of the 
Notes ani^ Qjlteries, and expresses a regret that the. descendants of 
James Avery " do not rally around you with the enthusiasm which 
such efforts as yours merit." Well, they are a little slow about it, 
but they will get there after a while. 



So AVKKV XniKS AM» ULKKIIiS. 

The Hon. Richartl Anson Wheeler of North Stonington. Conn., 
is about to publish a history of Stonington. For many years he was 
probate judge. No other man is so well qualified for the work. The 
book will contain much genealogical information concerning the early 
families, and will certainly be of great assistance to the historian of 
the Groton Averys. Of course, the Groton Avery History Club has 
subscribed for the book. 

Letters sent b}- me to the following addresses have been returned 
by the postal authorities. If you can give info.-mation as to the 
present whereabouts of any of these persons, or of any one who can 
do so. please Jll me have it : 

Mrs. Mary T. Avery-Sawtelle, M. D., Los Angeles, Calif. 

A\'illiam C. Avery, Hunter, Greene Co., X. Y. 

Mrs. Henry Grover, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Mrs. Gueidon Avery, Jr., Waterville, X. Y. 

Cyrus Avery, New Haven, Conn. 

Austin Avery, Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 

Mrs. Clark Hill, Keene, N. H. 

The openii^j,' chapter of Sweet's '-The x\verysof Groton," written 
by me, contains. I think, all that is known about Christopher and 
James, the founders of the famil}^ nowknown as the Groton Averys. 
I have a few pamphlets containing this chapter, and a fine picture of 
the •• Hive of the Averys"' built by James and occupied by himself 
and seven generations of his descendants. Price, one dollar per copy. 

If you have not access to a copy of Mr. Sweet's book, I will send 
you a brief, type-written copy of your line back to the founders 
{Christopher and his son James Avery, A. D. 1630J. for a dollar, or a 
fuller record, givnig the names of the children in each generation, for 
two dollars ; provided I can ascertain just where you come into the 
line. 

I have a few pamphlets containing the appendix to Sweet's "'The 
Averys of Groton," and relating to " Avery Coais of Arms" (with 
illustrations of four coats) and to "The Aver}^ Family in England and 
France." These pamphlets will be furnished, as long as the supplv 
lasts, at fifty cents per copy. 

Xewspapers that receive this copy of the Averv Notes and 
Queries are respectfully requested to state that : 

.All Averys and Avery descendants are recpested to send their 
names and addresses to Dr. Elroy M. Avery. Cleveland, Ohio. He is 
writing a history of the Avery family. 



Hvcry JVotes and Queries. 

A Quarterly Magazine devoted to the History of the Groton Averys. 
JVJo^ ^^ ''Honor thy Father and thy Mother." May, J 899. 



The number and page references used in this magazine are to 
Sweet's History of the "Averys of Groton." 

If you are a member of the Groton Avery History Chib, be sure 
that your dues for 1899 are paid. 

If you are a subscriber to the Avery Notes and Queries, be 
sure that your subscription for 1899 is paid. 

If vou see in any newspaper an obituary notice of an Avery or 
a descendant of an Avery, send a marked copy of the paper to the 
historian of the Groton Averys. This will be easy for you and of 
very great help to him. 

Lee Meriwether, another of "The Tramp at Home," and "A 
Tramp Trip; How to see Europe on Fifty Cents a Day," (both pub- 
lished by Harper & Brothers) and of "Afloat and Ashore on the 
Mediterranean" (published by Charles Scribner's Sons) is the third 
child of Elizabeth Edmunds Avery Meriwether (No. 506, page 364). 

John Bishop, Jr., the oldest child of Fanny Fitch Avery Bishop 
(No. 208. page 446) was, as provost marshal of Richmond, A^a., the 
first Union officer to take charge of the famous Libby Prison. He 
was a first lieutenant in the 29th Conn. Volunteers, provost marshal 
of the Army of the James, and an aide to Major-general Giles A, 
Smith. He now^ lives at New London, Conn,, where he has served as 
a member of the city council and as U. S. inspector of customs. 

David Rossiter Avery, whose death is recorded on another page, 
was much interested in the history of the Avery family and gave 
valuable assistance in making it more nearly complete. For cheerful 
and valuable help rendered along the same line, the thanks of the 
familv historian are also due and are hereby tendered to ^Sliss Nancy 
Jane Avery of Fenton, Erie county, N. Y. 

It would often be a great help to me to know wdiether a corres- 
pondent has a copy of Mr. Sweet's History of the Averys of Groton 



82 AvERv Notes and Queries. 

or not, or whether there is a copy of the book in a certain town. If 
you own a copy of the book, please report the fact to me so that I may 
make a record of it for my own convenience. 

Mr. William A. Eardeley-Thomas, of Middletown, Conn., recently 
sent me the postoffice addresses of a hundred and three Connecticut 
Averys, only three of which were on my lists. I hardly thought 
that there were a hundred living Averys in the Nutmeg State with 
whom I had not corresponded. It is not probable that the list is com- 
plete even now. If you would send me what Avery addresses you 
can collect, in your own vicinity or elsewhere, you would render me 
valuable help. If you chance to include the address of some one who 
has written to me it will do no harm, for my lists are so arranged 
that the new are easily separated from the old. If you know of any 
one whose mother was an Avery, please remember that I want that 
address also. The families of Avery-born daughters (as well as sons) 
are to be given a fair representation in the forthcoming history of the 
clan. 

Some of the Groton Averys seem not to realize what work is in- 
volved in preparing the family history and wonder why the book can 
not be printed this summer. The fact is that the members of the clan 
are just beginning to find out what I am seeking. At the moment of 
writing this (May i6), I have before me a letter from an Avery in 
Texas, asking why I want information concerning his family. 
Another letter from Vermont gives the first information that I have 
received concerning the family of Simeon Avery (No. 396, page 119). 
This Simeon was married in 1814, had three wives, and at least eight 
children. Concerning ten of the eleven, the printed history gave 
nothing but the names, and some of those were wrong. My last mail 
brought me a full report for one of the children who had seven chil- 
dren, four of whom had families. This whole family record will prob- 
ably be well worked up soon. I have fired a good many paper broad- 
sides in the last four years but a good many of the clan have never 
heard the sound of my guns or even heard of me. It would not be wise 
to print what I have collected while new reports are coming in rapidly 
and while there are so many more from whom I ought to hear. Then 
there is the English ancestry of the founders of the family, of finding 
which I have not ceased to dream. 




'7 



^ 



vvz^-y^-/ 



Y NOTES AND QUERIES. 
SUPPLEMENT, 
MAY, 1899. 



AvEKY Notes and Queries. 83 

Daniel Arthur Newman, son of Lucy Ann Avery Newman (No. 
420, page 622), was mustered into the U. S. service, May 10, 1898, as 
a member of Co. F., 3rd U. S. Volunteer Cavalry (Montana Rough 
Riders). He w^as mustered out of the service, September 9, at 
Camp Thomas, Chickamauga. 



Brainard Avery, son of the Rev. William Henry Harrison Avery, 
D. D.. of Saint Albans, Vt., and grandson of Christopher Avery (No. 
418, page 444) married, September 14, 1898, Miss Josephine Baker 
Gray of Middletown Springs, Vt. The marriage of his brother was 
reported in the February issue of this magazine. 



If you are not a member of the Groton Avery History Club, it is 
probable that you ought to be. You can join now. Then you can 
see to it that some one else who ought to join does his duty. There is 
opportunity for all, and there is no good reason why I should do so 
much more than vou. 



AVERY COATS OF ARMS. 

Not long ago an Avery descendant told me that she had a copy 
of the coat of arms belonging to the Averys of Groton; that it was 
copied from the original which belonged to Erasmus Avery of Groton ; 
and that she had been familiar with it from childhood. "Her copy 
was made some twenty-five or thirty years ago and the original had 
come down to Erasmus Avery from his ancestors." I expected to 
see the Fillongly coat of arms (No. 3 on the plate facing page 690 of 
Sweet's "The Averys of Groton") or the Dedham Avery coat of arms 
(No. 4 of the same plate), neither of which belongs to the Groton 
Averys. To my surprise she showed me something entirely different, 
a coat that I had never before known to be claimed by an American 
Avery. The description is "Argent, six annulets gules, three, two 
and one." It belonged to the Averys of Hadden, County of War- 
wick, England, and is identical with No. i on the plate above men- 
tioned. I had long heard of a coat of arms that had been for many 
generations in Groton, but I had never seen it or a copy of it. Who 
can tell where this Erasmus Avery coat of arms is and who can give 
its history? It may help to determine the identity of Christopher, the 
father of Captain James Avery. 



84 AVERV XOTES AND OlKKIES. 

THE LAST ROLL CALL. 

Mrs. Harriet Elizabeth Avery (No. 756/). page 102), wife of 
Charles Denison Avery (No. 1505, page 26^), died June 21, 1898, at 
Ledvard. N. V.. in the house in which she was born. 

Spence Hall Lamb, the husband of Cornelia Estelle Avery Lamb 
(No. 364, p. 509), and secretary and treasurer of the Mississippi and 
Tennessee Railroad, died August 18, 1898, at Laurence Harbor, N. J. 

Mrs. >Liry Elizabeth Avery Green (No 1137, page 231) died 
October j, 1S9S, at Springfield, Mass. 

Ruth Champlin Avery, the widow of George Washington Avery 
(No. S09, page47S). died Oct. 17. 1S98, at Ottawa, Canada. 

Filmore Rogers, son of Sally Ann Avery Rogers (No. 894, page 
197), died Nov. 10, 1897, at North Collins, Erie county, N. Y. 

Mrs. Carrie Newman Gess, daughter of Morris and Lucy Avery 
Newman (No. 420, page 622), died December 25, 1898, at Maple 
Creek Farm near Spokane, Wash. 

Mrs. Lydia Avery Adams (No. 293, page 371) died Dec. 28, 1S98, 
at Somers, Conn. 

vSanford Aver}- (No. 404. page 376) died January 4, 1899, at Wil- 
mington, N. Y. 

Charles Warner, husband of Annette (?) the fifth child of Mrs. 
Salacia Avery Stiles (No. 79;, page 105), died January 5, 1S99, at 
^leriden, Conn. 

Dorus Artemas Stiles, the third of the eight children of Mrs. 
Salacia Avery Stiles (No, 795, page 105), died January 15, 1899, at 
Durham, Conn. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Avery Hannahs (No. 16S8, page 2S0) died Janu- 
ary 18, 1899, at Watertown, N. Y. 

Stephen Taber Davol, son of Eliza Avery Davol (No. 891, page 
197), died Jan. 24, 1899, at ]SLidison, South Dakota. 

Mrs. Sarah Lombard Avery, widow of Richardson Avery ( No. 4S0, 
page 448), died January 28, 1899, at Paw Paw, Mich. 

Frank vSidney Avery, son of George Sidney Aver}- (page 132), 
died January 29. 1899, at Des Moines, Iowa. 



Avery Noths and Queries. 85 

Egbert Hamilton Avery (No. 1515, page 263) died January 31, 
1899, at Rock Island, 111. ; buried at Belvidere, 111. 

Mrs. Frances Elizabeth Avery Morgan (No. 1654, .page 278) died 
February 13, 1899, at Los Angeles, California. 

John H. Pixley, who married Ruby Robinson Sherman, the 
daughter of Deborah Aver}^ Sherman (No. 890, page 197), died Feb. 
16, 1899, at Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Mrs. Rosa Pringle Avery, wife of Jerome Avery (No. 771, page 
679), died February 19, 1899, ^^ ^an Francisco, Cal. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Silvernail Avery, widow of Henry Cyrus Avery 
(No. 197, page 634), died February 27, 1899, aged 94, at Hudson N, Y. 

David Rossiter Avery (No. 1663, page 195) died March i, 1899, 
at North Collins, Erie Co., N. Y. 

Judge Charles W. Avery (No. 1062, page 536) died March 12, 
1899, at Phoenix, N. Y. ;• 

Moses Rogers Avery (No. 1632. page 275) died March 13, 1899, 
at Syracuse, N. Y. 

Mrs. Alma Sherman Avery Russell (No. 1669, page 196) died 
March 30, 1899, at Brant, Erie Co., N. Y. 



The record of No. 381, page 435, of Mr. Sweet's History of the 
Groton Averys, reads as follows : 

"Amos, birth unknown and no farther record." 

This Amos Avery was born near Duanesburg, Schenectady 
county, N. Y., Oct. 15, 1790. He married Olive Gavitt, February 
II, 1813; I have the full record of her birth, death and parentage. 
They had nine children ; I have the complete records of their births 
and deaths. Seven of these nine children married, and I have records 
of all of their families. I have the records of 27 grandchildren and 
of 37 great-grandchildren, some of them born this year. These de- 
scendants are scattered from the Atlantic to the Pacific. In this work 
I have been greatly helped by Edward Emmet Avery of San Fran- 
cisco. Amos Avery died Oct. 8, 1833, at Broome, Schoharie county, 
N. Y. This is a somewhat extreme case of working up these old 
records, but it admirably illustrates much of the work that I am 
doinar. 



86 



Avery Notes and Queries, 



Mrs. Amelia Avery Fisher (No. 243, page 456), whose portrait 
is herewith given, was born in Morrisville, New York, July 16, 1802. 
She was the seventh of the nine children of Robert and Lydia (White) 
Avery. She was a school teacher until her marriage with John 




lEl.IA AVKK^ 



Millard, March 24, 1829. After his death in 1846, leaving her with six 
children, she again taught school until 185 1. In that year she emi- 
grated to Oregon, crossing the plains with an ox team and occupying five 
months in the journey. The train was attacked by the Indians but 
none of the party were killed. In 1854 she married the Rev. Ezra 
Fisher and, since his death in 1874, has lived in Albany, Oregon, 



Avery Notes and Queries. 87 

with her children. She has given much valuable information relating 
to the Avery family. Although she will be 97 years old in July, her 
health is good and she enjoys company. She still reads fine print 
without glasses, crochets fine linen lace, and writes four-page letters 
easily legible and full of interesting information. 



BIRTHS. 



William Eugene Avery, son of John Simeon and Cora (Doremus) 
Avery (No. 3404, page 287), was born at Litchfield, N. Y., December 
17, 1898. 

Edward Carrington Avery, son of Charles Irving and Lillias 
(Pomeroy) Avery (No. 2210, page 299), was born at Auburn, N. Y., 
February 16, 1899, 

Henry Thomas Avery, son of John Henry and Mary Eliza (Cart- 
wright) Avery (No. 1551, page 183), was born near Ozark, Ark., 
March 4, 1899. 

Erwin Emerson, son of Erwin Francis and Susan Elizabeth 
(Avery) Mather (No. 2376, page 301), was born October 11, 1898; 
place not reported. 

Carrie Edna, fourth child of Lucius Evans and Cora (Baker) 
Avery (No. 591, page 376), was born at Ferrisburg, Vt., November 11, 
1898. 

Elizabeth Baldwin, third child of Prof. Wilbur Lucius and Helen 
Mar (Avery) Cross (No. 2224a, page 267), was born at New Haven, 
Conn., April 15, 1899. 

Irene Dewey Avery, the third child of Myron Lyman Avery, the 
fifth child of Alonzo Bailey Avery (No. 648, page 466), was born at 
Sac City, Iowa, October 24, 1898. 

Velma Estelle Avery, the third child of Fremont Avery, the oldest 
son of Amplius Blake Avery (No. 649, page 466), was born at West 
Point, Wis., November 25, 1898. 

Comparison of the last two statements with the records, as printed 
in Mr. Sweet's book, will give a good illustration of the work that is 
being done in completing the family history. 



Subscribe for the Avery Notes and Qjltektes. 



88 AVEUV XOTES AND OVERIES. 

Every jVotes and Queries. 

Pi/blis/icd by Elrov M. Ave?-}', at 657 Woodland Hills Avoiuc. 
Cleveland, Ohio. 



Subscription Price, Fifty cents per year . Fifteen cents per cof) 

Entered at the Cleveland, O., postoffice as secoud-class matter 



THE GROTOX AVERY HISTORY CLUB. 



Since the last report, club dues for 1S99 have been received as 
follows : 

Mrs. Frances Avery Haggard, Lincoln, Nebraska $200 

William R. Avery, Cincinnati, 500 

Mrs. Edna Avery Buckingham, Camp Denison, 2.00 

Maj. Cyrus Aver}-, Camptown, Pa '-o^ 

Elizabeth R. Avery, Ilion, N. Y ^^o 

Brainard Avery, Washington, D. C 2.00 

Sibyl Howe Averv-, Providence, R. 1 2.00 

Daniel H. Treadway, West Mystic, Conn ^oo 

Mrs. F. W. Goddard, Colorado Springs, Colo 6.50 

Mrs. Harriet K. Nickerson, Lander, Wyoming 100 

Mrs. U. H. Painter, Washington, D. C 2.00 

Frank M. Aven,-, Denver, Col i°" 

Phineas O. Aven,-, Humboldt, Neb 2.C0 

Mrs. Clara Aven,- Miller, Keokuk. Iowa 100 

William H. Aver\-, Los Angeles, Calif 100 

Mrs. Griswold George Avery, New London, Conn 100 

Mrs. Delia Avery Southworth. New York City 2.50 

Mrs. ElishaS. Allyu, Ledyard. Conn i°° 

Mrs. Lucy A. Newman, Spokane, ^^ ash '-50 

Charity A. Samaine, Rochester, N. Y ^•°° 

Henry W. Avery, Belvidere, 111 ^^^ 

James W. Eldridge, Hartford, Conn ^■'^ 

Mrs. Fred Egelhoff , Weatherford. Tex ^-S^ 

Roy G. Fitzgerald, Dayton, O '-^ 

Lucius E. Avery, Ferrisburg, Vt ^-5° 

Mrs. Sarah A. Durfee, Decatur, 111 500 

Mabel L. Avery, Arverne, N. Y .^roo 

Total for the quarter *^-^ 

The dues reported in May. 1S9S, aggregated $72.50. The totalj 
amount received as dues in 1898 was $142.50. 



Avery Notes and Queries. 89 

Of the fifty three members who joined hist year, only seventeen 
have, so far, paid their dues for 1S99. If you are one of the other 
thirty-six, will you please pay prompt attention to the matter? As the 
payment is wholly voluntary, I feel sure that this reminder will not 
be construed as a dun. 

Each member of the club fixes the amount of his or her dues at 
pleasure between the limits of one dollar and ten dollars per year. Dues 
are payable to the undersigned, who reports all payments on this page 
and accounts for his expenditures annually. Members assume no obli- 
gations other than for the payment of dues ; there are no salaries or 
perquisites. All members of the club receive the Avery Notes and 
Queries without further charge. If you desire to help pay the ex- 
penses of preparing a new history of the Groton Averys, you are in- 
vited to join the club. Yours fraternally, 

Elroy jM. Avery. 



By way of variation from the unappreciative letter printed on 
page 77, I venture to quote the following from a letter recently 
received from the great West : 

"I have just received No. s- of "Avery Notes and Queries," 
and I believe I had received all of the previous numbers. I am thus 
reminded that none of them have been paid for ; so I send you here- 
with dollars. I hope you will continue to send me "Notes and 

Queries,-" for I read them with much interest. I wish you success 
in your laudable undertaking." 

Another correspondent writes to me from Wisconsin, thus : 

'•'■Dear Sir: — My father copied from his book all about our branch 
of the Averys, as far back as 1600, and sent me. So you need not 
send me "Notes and Qlteries" any more, as there has been nothing 
in them I do not already know. Still I fully appreciate your efforts 
and think you have done remarkably well, and if I can ever help you 
in any way will be glad to do so." 

I am glad to find some one who knows all about our branch of the 
Averys as far back as 1600. The little that I know falls thirty years 
short of that date. Whence came the founders of our family to Salem 
in 1630 .^ Just for a starter, you know. 



I can supply a few complete sets of Avery Notes and Queries 
for 1S98. Price, fifty cents per set, postage prepaid. 



9© Avery Notes and Queries. 

Q.UERIES. 

Sibyl Avery (Xo. 533. page 74) was born January iS, 17S0. 
She was a daughter of Elisha and Sibyl (Sanger) Avery, She married 
Tohn Silsby, May 16, 1824. In 186S, Mrs, Emeline Cady of South 
Woodstock. Conn., wrote that her stepmother, Sibyl Silsby. was living 
and in good health, I should like information concerning this family. 
and especial!}' the addresses of living descendants. 

Sarah Avery (No. 532, page 74) was born January 28. 1778. 
She was a sister of the Sibyl mentioned above. She married (first) an 
Eliphalet Thomas, and (second) a person whose name I do not know. 
She left six sons one of whom wrote from Aurelius, X. Y., mention- 
ing her death. Information wanted as in the case of her sister. 

Abigal Avery (Xo. 536. page 74) was born January 9. 1789. 
She was a sister of Sibyl and Sarah mentioned above. She married 
George Franklin, Her descendants are supposed to live in or near 
Killingley, Windham county, Connecticut. I should be very glad to 
hear from some of them. 

Jabez Avery (No. 163. page 421) was born January 29, 1764, 
He was the son of John and Mehitabel (Buell) Avery. He married 
Sallv, the daughter of John Gilmore, of Providence, R. I. They had 
children : Lovinia, Charlotte. Sally, Betsey and Abigail. I am told 
that their home was at Stafford, Conn. I should like information of 
this family. 

In preparing his History of the Groton Averys, Mr. Sweet sent 
out, not blanks as I am doing, but a printed list of numbered questions. 
His correspondents were expected to give corresponding numbers to 
their answers without otherwise indicating what the questions were. 
I have quite a number of such answers which, for want of the list of 
questions, are only partly intelligible to me. Unfortunately Mr. Sweet 
did not print all the information that he thus received. If I could in- 
terpret the answers with certainty, some of them would give me valu- 
able information. For instance, one of these letters records: 

3S. Xew Haven. 

Does this mean that the grandparents were married at X'^ew Haven 
or does it mean something else ? If any reader of Xotes and Ql'kries 
has one of these old lists of numbered questions sent out by Mr. Sweet, 
I hope that he will send it to me. I will return it if desired to do so. 



Avery Notes and Queries. 



91 



Olive Avery, born in the latter part of the last century, married 
Asahel Adams ; who was she ? 

Mrs. Frederick B. Egelhoff, of Weatherford, Texas, is the daugh- 
ter of William Dudley Knowles, the son of Emily Avery Knowles 
(No. 784, page 105). On the occasion of her recent removal from 



Ar^y 



-^<^> 






ij-Jir: 




MRS. FRED. B. L<,LLHOI I . 

Dallas, Texas, one of the papers of that city spoke of her as one of 
"our most delighful young society matrons," who possesses "that happy 
adaptability that always keeps her thoroughly attuned to her company 
and surroundings. She is a charming hostess and, best of all, a woman 
who delights in carrying the roses of life to her friends rather than 
the thorns." 



92 AVERV XOTKS AND C^CERIES. 

TFIE GRAND ARMY. 

Names of those bearinw the name of Averv who died in the Union 
Army during- the Civil War and are buried in National Cemeteries. 

"On Fame's eternal camping ground 

Their silent tents are spread 
And Glory guards with soh mn round. 

The bivouac of the dead." 

Maine: Charles S. Avery, private, 31st Inf.. Co. C. died Dec. 7. 
1S64: buried at C^mip Parole, Maryland. 

George W. Avery, corporal. 9th Inf., Co D, died Feb. 10, 1S65 ; 
buried at Hampton, Va 

John Avery, private, 8th Inf.. Co. H. died Aug. i, 1S63: buried 
m National Cemetery, Beaufort. S. C. 

Stephen Avery, private, 12th Inf.. Co.— . died Feb. 24, 1S65; 
buried in New York, Department of the East. 

New Hampshire: E. Avery, private. 12th Inf.. Co. I. died Oct. 
30,1863; buried in U. vS. General Hospital. Division No. i. Annapolis, 
Maryland. 

J. Avery, private, 9th Inf., Co. H, died January 9. 1S63: buried 
in Military Asylum Cemeterv. D. C. 

J. Avery, private, ist Cav.. Co. M, died Nov. 3. 1864; buried in 
Andersonville Cemetery, Georgia. 

Lyman A. Avery, private, 9th Inf., Co. A, died Aug. 10, 1863; 
buried in the National Cemetery, Loudon Park. Baltimore, ^Maryland. 

Alfred A. Avery, private, 9th Inf.. Co. D. died Oct. 20, 1863; 
buried in National Cemetery, Lexington, Kv. 

Vermont: A. C. Avery, private, 9th Inf., died Dec. 4, 1864; 
buried in tlie National Cemetery, City Point, Virginia. (See Avery 
Notes and Qleries. page 60). 

S. Avery, private, jtl: Inf.. Co. C, died Oct. 19. 1862 ; buried in 
the National Cemetery. Chalmette, La. (vSee Avery Notes and 
QjL'ERiES. page 61 ). 

Massachusetts: C. Avery, ist serg.. 36 Inf., Co. K, died July 2, 
1864; buried in the National Cemetery, Arlington. Virginia. 

Edward Avery, private. 2d Artillery, Co. A, died June 28, 1865; 
buried in New Cemeter}-. Newbern. N. C. 

John W. Avery, private, ist Heavy Artillery. Co. G, died July 27, 
864 : buried in Andersonville Cemeter\-, Georgia. 



Avery xXotes and Queries. 93 

Connecticut: Charles A. Avery, private, 3 1st Inf., Co. H, died 
May 22, 1864; buried at Ridhmond, Virginia. 

Charles. G. Avery, private, 21st Inf., Co. E, died July 21, 1864; 
buried at New Haven, Conn. 

George F. Avery, private, iSth Inf.. Co. B, died March 7, 1864; 
buried at New Haven. 

New York: Arthur M. Avery, private, 64th Inf., Co. C, died 
July 12, 1862 ; buried at New Haven. Conn. 

D. Avery, private, 4th Artillery, Co. E, died May 14, 1863; 
buried in Military Asylum Cemetery. D. C 

Edwin Avery, private, 161 Inf., Co. I. died Dec. 5, 1S62 ; buried 
in New York, Department of the East. 

George R. Avery, corporal, lOO Inf., Co. H, died June 15, 1864; 
buried in National Cemetery, Hampton, Virginia. 

George W. Avery, private, 11 Inf., Co. — , died April 18, 1866; 
buried in the National Cemetery, Chalmette, La. 

G. R. Avery, private, ist Battery, Co. B, died May 5, 1862 ; 
buried in National Cemetery, Hampton, Virginia. 

Joel Avery, private. 116 Inf., Co. B, died Sept. 9, 1864; buried 
in Camp Parole hospital, Annapolis, Maryland. 

John A. Avery, private, 161st Inf., Co. I, died Jan. 3, 1S64; 
buried in New York, Department of the East. 

Warren Avera, private, 97 Inf., Co. I, died .Sept. 19, 1862 ; buried 
in the National Cemetery, Alexandria, Virginia. 

William Avery, private, 97 Inf., Co. G. died Oct. 25, 1862; 
buried at Antietam, Maryland. 

Michigan. B. M. Avery, private, 7th Inf., Co. G, died December 
29, 1S61 ; buried in the Military Asylum Cemetery, D. C. 

Charles Avery, private, 26th Inf., Co. K, died 2vlarch 5, 1863; 
buried in the National Cemetery, Alexandria. Virginia. 

Alonzo A. i\.very, private, 3d Cav., Co. E, died June 24, 1862 ; 
buried at Spring Grove Cemetery, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

George H. Avery, private. 9th Inf., Co. I, died April i, 1S65 ; 
buried in the National Cemetery, Chattanooga, Tenn. 

James Avery, serg., 17 Inf., Co. I, found on the battlefield of the 
Wilderness ; buried at Hampton, Virginia. 

Ohio: J. Avery, private, nth Inf., Co. B, died April 26, 1864; 
buried at Danville, Virginia. 

J. C. Avery, private, 163 Inf., Co. B, died at ; buried at 

Fort Pocahontas, Wilson's Landing, Virginia. 



94 



AvEKv Notes and Oukries. 



L. H. Avery, serg., 34tli Inf., Co. A; buried in National Ceme- 
tery. Winchester. Virginia. 

Sylvester Avery, Corp., 133d Inf., Co. I, died August 12, 1864; 
buried at Hampton, Virginia. 

W.H.Avery, private, 9th Inf., Co. H, died June 19, 1865; 
buried in National Cemetery, New Albany, Ind. 

Indiana : Henry Avery, private, 35th Inf., Co. G, died April 26, 
1865 ; buried in National Cemetery, Nashville. Tenn. 

Miron E. Avery, private, 6th Inf.. Co. K. died Feb. 26. 1864; 
buried in National Cemetery, Knoxville. Tenn. 

Illinois: Charles W. Avery, private, 21st Inf., Co. D, died May 
4, 1864: buried at Richmond, Virginia. 

"Wisconsin: Amos Avery, Corp., 20th Inf., Co. B, died October 
17, 1863; buried in National Cemetery, Ky. 

Thomas Avery, private, 22d Inf., Co. D., died Dec. 5, 1862; 
buried in National Cemetery, Camp Nelson, Ky. 

Kentucky: Henry H. Avery, private, 21st Inf., Co. A, died 
May I, 1865; buried in National Cemetery, Nashville, Ky. 

William C. Avery, private, ist Cav., Co. C, died Nov. 25, 1862; 
buried in National Cemetery, Nashville, Ky. 

William L. Avery, private, 5th Cav., Co. F, died Feb. 15, 1864; 
buried in National Cemetery, Nashville, Ky. 

Missouri: H. O. Avery, private, 25th Inf., Co. C, died May 29,' 
1862 ; buried in Spring Grove Cemetery, Cincinnati, O. 

Luther Avery, private, Fremont Hussars, Co. G, died Jan. 6, 1862 ; 
buried at St. Louis, Missouri. 

S. S. Avery, private, 7th Cav., Co. B, died May 26, 1862 ; buried 
at vSt. Louis, Missouri. 

Louisiana: Amos B.Avery, private, ist Scouts, Co. B, died 
August 6, 1864 ; buried at Jefferson Barracks, near St. Louis, Missouri. 
'^District of Columbia : ' T. W. Avery, corp., 2nd Inf., Co. E, died 
July 4, 1864; buried in National Cemetery, Alexandria, Va. 

U. S. Army and Navy : Jacob Avery, private, 8ist Inf., Co. C, 
died August 8, 1866. 

Philow Avery, buried at Mill Spring, National Cemetery, Ky. 
Squire Avery, private, ist Chasseurs, Co. D, died January i, 1862 ; 
buried in Military Asylum Cemetery, D. C. 

M. Avery, seaman, navy, died January 2, 1841 ; buried National I 
Cemetery, Barrancas, Florida. 

Miscellaneous : J. Avery, private, buried at Ironton, Missouri. 



i 



Avery Notes and Queries. p5 

The main object in publishing lists like those given above is to 
secure identification of as many as possible of those who were Groton 
Averys. I hope that some reader of Notes and Queries in each of 
the states here represented will take pains to aid in this work. Many 
of the states have published rosters of their troops in the revolutionary 
and civil wars. Examination of such rosters may yield identifications. 
If the roster has not been published, the state archives are open to 
examination. Personal knowledge and inquiry will, in many cases, 
be all that is necessary. You may not be able to refer to Sweet's 
"The Avery's of Groton." In that case, tell me what you can of the 
dead soldier, the name of his father and mother, his brothers and 
sisters, everything, anything, that you can to help me place his military 
service to his proper credit. 



THE ALLEGED THREE BROTHERS. 

We have been often told of three Avery brothers who early 
migrated to America. One settled in Connecticut and was the an- 
cestor of the Groton Averys, another went south and was never heard 
of more, while the third settled in Massachusetts and was the ancestor 
of a numerous family. Sometimes the story varies ; only two brothers 
came, one to Massachusetts and one to Connecticut. From various 
sources we learned that the name of the Massachusetts one was 
William, Abraham Avery (No. 55, page 416) gave such a written 
statement to his nephew, John, son of his half brother John, at least a 
hundred and ten years ago. In it he states that his ancestor had a 
brother William who settled in Massachusetts and left a numerous 
family. We paid little heed to the tradition as we knew that William 
Avery of Dedham, the only such Avery of whom we had any record, 
was not a brother of our Christopher. Is it possible that there is some 
truth in the story and that William Avery or Averill of Ips- 
wich was that brother? Or was there still another William Avery ? 
Investigations show that numerous Averys came over before 1700 
Who can throw light on the subject.? 



When will the new family history be ready .? 

I don't know. 
How much will it cost ? 

I don't know. 



q6 Averv Notes and Queries. 

Letters sent by me to the following addresses have been returned 
by the postal authorities. If you can give information as to the pres- 
ent whereabouts of any of these persons, or of any one who can do 
so, please let me have it : 

Mrs. Mary T. Avery-Sawtelle, AI. D., Los Angeles, Calif. 

William C. Avery, Hunter, Greene Co., N. Y. 

Mrs. Henry (Lucyetta) Grover, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Mrs. Guerdon Avery, Jr., Waterville, N, Y. 

Austin Avery, Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 

Mrs. Clark Hill, Keene, N. H. 

Joseph Osborne, New London, N. C. 

Mrs. Emory Cady, South Woodstock, Conn. 

James Garner Avery, Titusville, Pa. 

Addison Avery, Denver, £^olo. 

Edward Allyn Avery, Grand Junction, la. 

Mrs. Francis O. Ogle, Albany, Ore. 

Miss Ella M. Avery, Washington, D. C. 

Benjamin F. Avery, Albany, N. Y. 

The opening chapter of Sweet's "The Avery's of Groton," written 
by me, contains, I think, all that is known about Christopher ; ' 
James, the founders of the family now known as the Groton Aver; -, 
I have a few pamphlets containing this chapter, and a fine picture of 
the '-Hive of the Averys" built by James and occupied by himself and 
seven generations of his descendants. Price $i.oo per copy. 

If you have not access to a copy of Mr. Sweet's book, I will -cml 
you a brief, type-written copy of your line back to the founders 
(Christopher and his son James Avery, A. D. 1630), for a dollar, or a 
fuller record, giving the names of the children in each generation, for 
two dollars; provided I can ascertain just where you come into the 

line. 

I have a few pamphlets containing the appendix to Sweet's ^'The 
Avery's of Groton, and relating to "Avery Coats of Arms" (with 
illustrations of four coats) and to "The Avery Family in England and 
France." These pamphlets will be furnished, as long as the supply 
lasts, at fifty cents per copy. 

Newspapers that receis^e this copy of the Avery Notes and 
Queries are respectfully requested to state that : 

All Averys and Avery descendants are requested to send their 
names and addresses to Dr. Elroy M. Avery, Cleveland, Ohio. He is 
writing a history of the Avery family. 



Jivcry J^otes and Queries. 

A Quarterly Magazine devoted to the History of the Groton Avcrys. 
No. 7. "Honor thy Father and thy Mother." AugUSt, 1899. 

The number and page references used in this magazine are to 
Sweet's History of "The Averys of Groton." 

If you see in any newspaper an obituary notice of an Avery or a 
descendant of an Avery, send a marked copy of the paper to the his- 
torian of the Groton Averys. This will be easy for you and of very 
great help to him. 

On page 8i of Notes and Queries mention is made of "Lee Meri- 
wether, another of 'The Tramp at Home.' " Of course, this is a typo- 
graphical error for author of "The Tramp at Home." 

Joseph Waig'htstill Avery (No. 547, page 642), late quartermaster- 
sergeant of the Second North Carolina Volunteers, was appointed a 
first lieutenant in the U. S. Volunteers by President McKinley on July 
II, 1899. 

I can supply a few complete sets of Avery Notes and Queries for 
1898. Price, fifty cents per set, postage prepaid. 

The opening chapter of Sweet's "The Averys of Groton," written 
by me, contains, I think, all that is known about Christopher and James, 
the founders of tlie family now known as the Groton Averys. I have 
a few pamphlets containing this chapter, and a fine picture of the "Hive 
of the Averys," built by James and occupied by himself and seven gen- 
erations of his descendants. Price $1.00 per copy. 

If you have not access to a copy of Mr. Sweet's book, I will send 
you a brief, type-written copy of your line back to the founders (Chris- 
topher and his son James Avery, A. D. 1630), for a dollar, or a fuller 
record, giving the names of the children in each generation, for two 
dollars; provided I can ascertain just where you come into the line. 

I have a few pamphlets containing the appendix to Sweet's "The 
Averys of Groton," and relating to "Avery Coats of Arms" (with illus- 
trations of four coats) and to "The Avery Family in England and 
France." These pamphlets will be furnished, as long as the supply 
lasts, at fifty cents per copy. 



g8 Avery Notes and Queries. 

Roy Simeon x\very. a son of Henry Martindale Avery of Sioux 
Falls, South Dakota, and a grandson of Simeon Avery (No. 994, page 
119). served as a sergeant in Troop B., Third U. S. Cavalry, from May. 
to Septeml^er. 1898. 

Alexander Sydleman Avery (No. 1210, page 140) was a sergeant 
in Co. I. 5th Connecticut Volunteers. He was killed in battle at Cedar 
Mountain. Ya.. Aug. 9, 1862. 

Florence Elizabeth Avery (No. 940, page 495), daughter of the 
present postmaster of Galena. III. received the degree of Ph. B. from 
Chicago University, July i, 1899. 

I am under obligation to Mv. Irving J. Aver>- of New London, 
Conn., for several fine photographic views of the Avery memorial at 
Poquonock Plain. 

For intelligent, persistent and systematic help, I am much indebted 
to Miss Edith \'irginia Avery of Seneca Falls, N. Y 

Have you returned those genealogical blanks that you received 
from Elroy 'M. Avery? 

It seems strange that a man should not know the name of his owfljj 
grandfather, but I am finding such m.en at the rate of about one a monthf 

Newspapers that receive this copy of the Avery Notes and 
Queries are respectfully requested to state that : 

All Averys and Avery descendants are requested to send their 
names and addresses to Dr. Elroy M. Avery, Cleveland. Ohio. He is 
writing a history of the Avery family. 



ORANGE BLOSSOMS. 

Dr. Amos Avery of Brooklyn. N. Y. (No. 1792, page 224), mar- 
ried. Tune 6, 1899, at Northampton. Mass., Miss Harriet E. Bryne. 

^Ir. Chancy Avery of Pleasant Lake, Ind. (No. 2387, page 285), 
married, April 25. 1899, at Angola, Ind., Mrs. Arkabel Butts. 

Mr. Charles Clement Avery (No. 2429, page 288), married, June 
28, 1899, at Oakfield. Genesee County, N. Y., Miss Edith M. Pardee. 



Avery Notes and Queries. qq 

COMPLETING THE RECORDS. 



On page 334 of Sweet's "The Averys of Groton" appears the very 
defective family record of Abel and Jerusha (Sackett) Avery. The 
names of ten children are given, but not a date or place of birth or 
death. Only four of the ten are given any further mention, and in 
their cases the records are similarly fragmentary. Of the sixth child, 
nothing was recorded except that his name was Isaac. I now know 
that this Isaac was born about 1798, probably at Westfield, Mass.; that 
he married, November 6, 1823, at Watson, N. Y., Mary Ann Beach, 
the record of whose birth, death and parentage I have. They had 
three children: Irene (who died single), Sydney John and Jerusha. 
Sydney John was Iwrn January 24, 1827; married, February 21, 1853, 
Arvilla Whitney, and had five children, the records of whom I have. 
Three of the children are married and I have the records of their fam- 
ilies. Sydney John Avery died January 18, 1889, at Erie, Pa. I am 
under obligations to his daughter, Miss Jessie V. Avery, for valuable 
assistance. 

Jerusha Avery, the daughter of Isaac, was born March 25, 1829. 
She was married December 29, 1857, to Leonard Davenport. He died 
in 1885 ; she is living at Lowville, N. Y. Their three children are mar- 
ried and living. 

This is a fair sample of the work that the family historian is doing 
in the way of completing the records of the clan. There are manv 
items of information still needed to complete the records of Abel Avery 
and his other nine children, of several of whom I know nothing but 
their names. 



SOLDIERS IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



Nathan F. Avery, Co. I, 26 Conn. Volunteers. 
Nathan F. D. Avery, Co. F, 18 Conn. Volunteers. (No. 1542, 
page 164.) 

Giles W. Avery, Co. K, 26 Conn. Volunteers. (No. 14 13, page 258.) 

The first of the above named is buried in Sec. 12 of the Cedar 

Grove cemetery, New London ; the other two are buried in the Groton 

cemetery at Groton, Conn. Can anyone identify the first as a Groton 

Avery ? 



17041 



Avery Notes and Queries. 

Hvcry ]Votcs and Queries. 

Published by Elroy M. Avery, at 6§j Woodland Hills Avemie, 
Cleveland, Ohio. 



Subscriptio7i Price, Fifty cents per year. Fifteen cents per copy. 

Entered at the Cleveland, O., postofficeas second-class matter. 

THE GROTOX AA^ERY HISTORY CLUB. 

Since the last report, club dues for 1899 have been received as 
follows : 

Theodore S. Blakesley, Rock Island, 111 $1.00 

Trueman G. Avery, Buffalo, N. Y 5-00 

Maj. George S. Avery, Galena, 111 5-00 

Mrs. Helen S. Stetson, Washington, D. C 2.00 

Miss Emily R. Samaine, Roxbury, Mass 1.50 

Charles I. Avery, Auburn, N. Y 500 

Mrs. Mary E. Mathewson, Wakefield, Neb i.oo 

Maj. Cyrus Avery, Camptovvn, Pa.* 100 

Mrs. Mary A. Stockwell, Painesville, O .^.oo 

Mrs. Gertrude Avery Shields, Detroit. Alich i.oo 

Miss Jennie E. Williams, New London, Conn 500 

Miss Antoinette Allyn Williams, New London, Conn 5.00 

Mrs. Rufus Lord Avery, Mansfield, O i.oo 

Dr. Alida C. Avery, San Jose, Calif. i.oo 

Henry M. Avery, Sioux Falls. S. D i.oo 

Mrs. E. C. Cooley, Dunkirk, N. Y i .00 

Mrs. Helen Avery Pope. Norwood, O i.oo 

Total for the quarter $40.50 

*To correct error in report printed on page 88 of Notes and Queries. 



THE AA'ERY REUNION. 



It is probable that next summer the Avery memorial at Poquonock 
Plain ( see picture on the opposite page) will be dedicated. It is pro- 
posed to make this dedication the occasion of a grand reunion of the 
Groton Avery clan. No matter where you live or how busy you are, 1 
begin to get ready to go ; begin now. When the time for the dedica- ; 
tion draws near, buy tickets for the whole family and start for the Xut- -. 
meg State. The Paris exposition will be a small thing in comparison; 
with this. 



Avery Notes and Queries. 
THE AVERY MEMORIAL ASSOCIATION. 



In the year 1656, Captain James Avery built, at the head of Poquo- 
noc Plain, in what is now the tow^n of Groton, Connecticut, the house 
known for many years as "The Hive of the Averys." This his- 
toric home never passed into alien hands, being continuously occupied 
by him or some of his descendants until it was destroyed by fire on the 
night of the twentieth of July, 1894. The "Hive" as it appeared be- 
fore the fire was pictured on pages 5 and 78 of Notes and Queries. 
The ruins as they appeared immediately after the fire were pictured on 
page 48. 





■ 




[^^H9|PPm 


^- 



Soon after the burning of "The Hive," members of the family 
organized and incorporated "The Avery Memorial Association." Mr. 
James Denison Avery, the last occupant of the house, deeded the site 
of his late home to the association. Additional land was bought by 
Mr. William Rockefeller and given to the association. The association 
then secured funds and built a suitable memorial on the site of the old 
house. The accompanying picture represents the memorial in its pres- 



I02 Avery Notes and Queries. 

eat condition. The die and shaft are of poHshed Westerly granite. 
Inscriptions on the die briefly tell the story of "The Hive" and the 
names of its successive owners. The front of the die bears a bronze 
tablet that gives a good representation of the old building. This tal)lL't 
is the gift of Mr. John D. Rockefeller. 

On the fiftli anniversary of the fire (i. e.. July 20, 1899), the asso- 
ciation held its annual meeting. Officers for the ensuing year were 
elected as follows : 

Allen Avery. Mystic, Conn., president. 

Cyrus Aver}% Poquonoc Bridge; Elroy 2^1. Aven,-, Cleveland, O.; 
Christopher L. Avery, Groton; John O. Spicer, Groton, and Mrs. Fran- 
cis M. Manning. Mystic, vice-presidents. 

]\liss Helen Morgan Avery. New London, secretary. 

Miss Addie Avery Thomas, Poquonoc Bridge, treasurer. 

Allen Avery, Helen M. Avery, Addie A. Thomas. A\'illiam S. 
Thomas, Dr. Elroy :M. Aver>\ Christopher L. Aver}-. ^Irs. John O. 
Spicer. Mrs. Francis M. Manning, executive committee. 

At this meeting, it was decided to substitute a bronze bust of Cap- 
tain James Avery, the distinguished founder of the clan, for the cone 
at the top of the shaft. The contract for the bust was awarded to the 
eminent sctilptor, Bela L. Pratt of Boston, an Avery descendant. Pkms 
for the dedication of the memorial were also discussed. It is inten^led 
at this dedication to assemble Avery descendants from every state in 
the Union. 



A BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY. 



There seems to be a persistent notion that in some way I am even- < 
tually to make money out of the genealogical work that I have under- ,: 
taken for the family. Some folks can not appreciate the motive that 
has led me to do so much w^ork without hope or possibility of pecuniary '. 
reward. Some think that the book when printed will yield profits that 
will amplv compensate me for my expenditure of labor and money. 
The truth is that few family histories yield enough to pay the printer 
and binder. I have spent a great deal of time and. probably two thou- 






Avery Notes and Queries. 103 

sand dollars more than I have received. I have about two thousand 
letters and records filed and classified, and a card index of several thou- 
sand names of descendants of James Avery and of persons allied to the 
family by marriage. I will gladly and freely give my material to any 
one who will furnish satisfactory assurance of ability and determination 
to complete the work in a manner that will be worthy of the family. I 
will agree to subscribe for twenty-five copies of the book at the regular 
subscription price. I will also gladly pay twenty dollars a year for five 
years to any one who will take the work off my hands as above indi- 
cated, if die work of completing the family records is that long con- 
tinued. This offer is made in good faith and is unequivocal. If you 
have some literary ability and some money you can do me a favor by 
quickly opening a correspondence with me on the subject. You will be 
less likely to lose the chance if you telegraph or telephone. I have a 
long-distance Bell telephone right in my house. "There is a tide in the 
affairs of men," etc. 



TIME IS MONEY. 



Thomas Morris Avery (No. 544, page 492) went to Chicago about 
185 1 and, at once, went into the lumber business. In 1867, when the 
Elgin Watch Company was in its infancy, Mr. Avery became its presi- 
dent. At that time, the company employed nine men who had lately 
left the works of the American Watch Company at Waltham, Massa- 
chusetts. The development of the watch industry at the West, under 
the direction of Air. Avery, was almost phenomenal, for today Elgin 
watches are well known the wide world over. After a thirty-one years' 
period of progress and prosperity for the organization. Mr. Avery gave 
up the presidency last December. The company then employed 2,400 
operatives. 

Mr. Avery is much interested in the history of the Grotou Averys 
and, although he is nearly eighty years old and is still president of the 
Chicago Brass Company, vice-president of the Equitable Trust Com- 
pany, and treasurer of the firm of Hulburd, Warren & Company, will 
soon find time to get the records of himself, his immediate ancestors and 
his children into proper form for preservation and publication. This 
is the duty of every member of the clan, and especially of every one who 
has secured as honorable a success as has the subject of this brief sketch. 



I04 Avery Notes and Queries. 

QUERIES. 



Jacob Avery of Groton (No. 57, page 41) married a second wife 
in 1753, and had at least ten children, Jacob, Polly. Solomon, Prudence, 
Frederick. Constant, Sally, Cyrus, Olive and Russel. My records con- 
cerning this family are ven*- defective. I want dates and places of 
birth, death, and marriage, and other information relating to them. I 
know scarcely anything about any of the children except Jacoli. Polly 
and Prudence. Constant was living near Eaton. X. Y., in 1840, a revo- 
lutionary pensioner. Russel married a Wells. 

Joseph Avery (No. 20. page 410) married about 1720. He is sup- 
posed to have had a son. Amos, and a daughter, Jerusha. who married 
Ezekiel Yarrington of Stonington. Who was Joseph Avery's wife? 
When was he married ? \\'hat became of his children ? Who can give 
some information relating to this family ? 

Jeremiah Burrows, wlio was baptized June 22, 1690, married De- 
sire Avery (No. 19, page 405). Wanted, date and place of marriage; 
date and place of death of each : names of children, with dates and 
places of their births and deaths, and the names of those whom they 
married. 

Nathaniel Aver}' (No. 22, page 411) is said to have married Abi- 
gail or Desire Yeomans, about 1724, and to have settled on Walnut 
Hill, Lyme, Conn. Wanted, information concerning him and his de- 
scendants. 

W^anted, information concerning Elisha Avery (No. 126, page 
419). born January 7, 1743. son of Elisha and Rebecca (Minor) Avery. 
He married Sarah Gallop and had ]\Iary, Joseph and Elisha. He was 
a revolutionary soldier. 

Who were the parents of Frederick Aver\' who married Charity 
Davis of Lee, Mass., about 1784? He was born in Groton, Conn., and: 
had a brother Waitstill, a sister Lucy who married a Strickland, and a 
sister Esther who married a Mr. Orton. 

Who were the parents of Enoch Avery who married a ^liss \\''ool- 
sey and lived in Westchester county, N. Y. ? His third child, Elisha, 
was born in 1761. 

Wanted, information concerning the descendants of the following 
children of William Avery (No. 144, page 435). who married Lucy 
Everett in Sharon. Conn., in 1771 : Whitfield; Sluman ; Anna who 
married Stephen Smith of Chatham. N. Y. : Amy. who married Henry 
Fairchild of Conneaut, O. : and Lucy, who married Jonathan Hatch. 



Bvcry JVotcs and Queries. 

A Ooarterly Magazine devoted to the History of the Groton Averys. 



No* 8. ''Honor thy Father and thy Mother." NoVCmbcr, 1 899. 

The number and page references used in this magazine are to 
Sweet's History of "The Averys of Groton." 

The "Groton Averys" are the descendants of Captain James 
Avery, who came to America with his father, Christopher Avery, in 
1630, and subsequently settled at Groton, Conn., just across the River 
Thames from New London. 

Samuel Avery (No. 588, page 376) is professor of chemistry in 
the University of Idaho. He is a graduate of Heidelberg, the oldest 
university in Germany. In conjunction with Prof. Nicholson, of the 
University of Nebraska, he has written "Laboratory Exercises in 
Chemistry," published (1899) by Henry Holt and Co., of New York. 

The Jacob Avery (No. 57, p. 41) who married Sylvia Eddy, June 
4> i753j at Swansea, Mass., had ten children. His son, Frederick, mar- 
ried in 1802, at North Broadalbin, Fulton county, N. Y., Eliza Stod- 
^ dard, by whom he had four children, Solomon, Alanson, Frederick, and 
Dolly. Who can tell me anything more of this Eliza Stoddard, or of her 
children, especially Solomon and Dolly? 

The Rev. Eugene H. Avery, D. D., (No. 1535, page 266) whose 
portrait was given on page 35 of Notes and Queries, has moved from 
Vinton, Iowa, to San Francisco. The action of the Cedar Rapids 
(Iowa) presbytery and of his late congregation at Vinton, marked by 
evidences of harmony and affectionate regret, must have gladdened the 
heart of our friend as he laid down his eighteen years' pastorate to 
begin another in a larger field. 

David Avery (No. 224, page 358) and his wife. Prudence Denison 
(Dean) Avery celebrated the sixtieth anniversary of their marriage. 
May 23, 1899, in the old homestead at Charlemont, Mass. In this old 
house, built in 1780, Mr. Avery was bom January 19, 1805, and in it 
he has lived most of his life. The rare event of a diamond jubilee was 
made happy for the venerable couple by the presence, love and gifts of 
numerous descendants, neighbors and friends, 



io6 Avery Notes and Queries. 

Nathan Avery Himter, son of Sally Avery Hunter (No. 982, page 
208), was a member of Co. D, 15th Vermont Volunteers. He enlisted 
in September, 1862, and was discharged, in August, 1863, on account 
of sickness from which he never fully recovered. His son, William 
Hunter, enlisted in May, 1898, and was assigned to the hospital corps. 



THE EDWARD AVERY ASSOCIATION. 



For several years the descendants of Theophilus Avery (No. 1570, 
page 270) have held an annual family reunion at the old Avery home- 
stead in Ledyard, Conn. The northern part of the farm, it i.s thought, 
has always been in the Avery family, being part of the original grant to 
Captain James Avery in 1653 called the "Packetannack" grant. Ed- 
ward (No. 13, page 30) and Christopher (No. 15, page 31), grandsons 
of Captain James Avery, settled in this section, and the district has 
always been called "Avery Hill." The homestead has belonged suc- 
cessively to Theophilus Avery (No. 35, page 35), James (No. 119, 
page 54), Theophilus (No. 309, page 105), Billings (No. 801, page 
185), Theophilus (No. 1570, page 270), and Billings Theophilus (No. 
2245- page 300). 

A permanent organization, called the "Edward Avery Associa- 
tion," was formed at the reunion in 1896. The constitution states that 
the object is "to preserve the history, genealogy and traditions of this, 
our branch of the Avery family, and by our annual reunions to bind 
ourselves closer together as a family." All descendants of Edward 
Avery (No. 13, page 30), with their families, are eligible for member- 
ship. The annual meetings are held the last Wednesday in September. 
At the last meeting seventeen members were present. The officers are 
Billings T. Avery (No. 2245, page 300), president; Mrs. Helen Nor- 
man (No. 2246, page 270), vice-president; Irving J. Avery (No. 2248, 
page 270), secretary. The address of the secretary is New London, 
Conn. 

The new organization has a good field for genealogical research, 
for many items are needed to complete the records of the descendants 
of Edward Avery. Its members are the ones who best can fill the gaps 
and who have the most direct interest in doing so. It is needless to 
say that the family historian will render any assistance to tbe associa- 
tion that he can, and that he holds the movement to be one worthy of 
extensive imitation. 



Avery Notes and Queries. 107 

The Rev. Daniel Avery Whedon, D. D., whose portrait is herewith 
given, is the son of Hiram and Margaret (Avery) Whedon (No. 242, 
page 427). He was born at Rome, N. Y., Dec. 16, 1823; he has long 
lived at East Greenwich, R. I. For eighteen years he was editor of 
the Northern Christian Advocate and has long been regarded as one of 




THE REV. DANIEL AVERY WHEDON. D. D. 

the ablest theological writers of Methodism. He was a delegate to the 
London ecumenical conference in 1880, and has been a member of 
nine general conferences. A recent writer in Zion's Herald (Boston) 
says that a characteristic picture of him "should have him standing, 
with his Discipline in hand, bringing round a conference to his poinit 
of view." 



io8 Avery Notes and Queries. 

Hvcry )Votcs and Queries. 

Published by Elroy M. Avery, at djj IVood/and Hills Avenue, 
Cleveland, Ohio. 



Subscriptioji Price, Fifty cents per year. Fifteen cents per copy. 

Entered at the Cleveland, O., postoffice as second-class matter. 

THE GROTON AVERY HISTORY CLUB. 

Since the last report, clul) dues for 1899 have been received as 
follows : 

Mrs. George Kingsley, Paola, Kansas $ i.oo 

Edward Emmet Avery, San Francisco i.oo 

Mrs. R. Y. Alitchell, Findlay, Ohio 2.00 

Mrs. Harriet Jewell, Dunkirk, N. Y i.oo 

Florillo P. Avery. Tunkhannock, Pa 5.00 

A friend (in Michigan) 5.00 

Ida F. Richardson. Southport, Ind i.oo 

Mrs. Adaline A. Shepard, Westfield, Mass i.oo 

Total for the fourth quarter $ 17.00 

Total for the third quarter (previously reported) 40.50 

Total for the second quarter (previously reported; 53-00 

Total for the first quarter (previously reported) 25.00 

Total for the year 1899 $i35-50 

Total for the year 1898 142-50 

Dues received after the issue of the Xovember number of this 
magazine will be credited as for the year 1900 unless otherwise directed 
bv the sender. 



I 



A FIRESIDE CHAT. 



In the August number of the Notes and Ouerie.s (page 102) I 
made an unequivocal offer of my genealogical material, and of a cash 
contribution (at least thirty times as large as any one has yet made to 
the Groton Avery History Club) to any competent person who would 
take them and complete the history in a manner worthy of the family. 
Xo one has yet manifested any inclination to accept the "business op- 
portunity" thfis presented. The offer is hereby continued. 



Avery Notes and Queries. 109 

It is evident that no other member of the Groton Avery clan is 
willing to do for it what I am doing, although many of them have more 
leisure and money than I have. The feeble success of the Groton 
Avery History Clu'b seems to indicate either that most of the members 
of the clan have little or no interest in the work that I have undertaken, 
or that they count on my doing their share as well as my own. The dues 
so far received do not much more than pay the cost of publishing Notes 
AND Queries. A recent genealogical quest cost me more than the total 
receipts of the club for the year. Some of the largest contributors to 
the club in 1898 have so far failed to forward their dues for 1899. Per- 
haps this was due to forgetfulness ; perhaps it was due to a lapse of 
interest in the enterprise. In either event, the failure is not very full 
of encouragement to the family historian who knows that the work be- 
fore him needs a dollar for every dime that it is getting. 

For a time I intended to suspend the publication of Notes and 
Queries with this issue, to give up the club scheme, to continue the 
work as well as possible, paying from my own resources all the bills 
that I authorized, and when I got tired of that (if I should get tired), to 
quit. But I have concluded to stick to the trial and to continue the club 
and the magazine for another year. 

The family historian fully realizes the fact that one's interest may 
not be fairly measured by the size of one's contribution. Some who 
have not given a dollar have been more helpful than some who have 
given, and in one or two cases the cash dues voluntarily sent w^ere 
larger than the senders could well aiiford. To all who have lent a help- 
ing hand, the historian returns his thanks — as befits this Thanksgiving 
season. To every member of the clan, wherever he or she may be, go 
the hearty greetings, "Merry Christmas!" and "Happy New Year!" 



A PILGRIMAGE AWHEEL. 



One pleasant day last September, Mrs. Avery and I arrived in 
Groton, not on pleasure bent but on an ancestral search. The follow- 
ing is a brief outline of the work accomplished : 

We studied the Groton records of births, marriages and deaths at 
Poquonniock, searching especially for the Avery girls who had mar- 
ried into another name and their children. The Groton books are ad- 
mirably indexed and with due regard for women and children, all of 



no Avery Notes and Queries. 

whom are important in the scheme of life as well as full grown men. 
In many towns, page after page of ill-written records must be scanned 
line by line, and therefore wearily, in search for the names of womai 
and children ; not so in Groton. 

We copied all the inscriptions in the Starr cemetery that relate not 
only to those who bore the name of Avery, but to the married daugh- 
ters and their children. ]^Iuch desired information relating to the 
Lathams and Lesters was thus secured. 

Many items were sccure>l from the books of the Congregational 
church at Groton Bank. 

The New London records of births, marriages and deaths, the 
first four books of probate records, and the inscriptions in the ancient 
burying-ground took all the time that we could spare in that city. 

One day was spent at Hamburg, where are kept the records of 
Lyme, ^^'e reached this place after much difficulty and made a copy 
of the births, marriages and deaths. 

At Stonington, much valuable information was secured from the 
records of births, marriages and deaths, particularly with regard to the s 
wives of Averys and to girls who had married out of the name. The 
Avery wills were scanned and all the inscriptions copied from the 
ancient "" Plain" burying-ground. 

In Xorwich, a systematic search was made for the parentage of 
those who married. Averys; many children whose mothers bore the 
name of Avery were traced. The inscriptions of the ancient burial- 
ground which had been copied were placed at our disposal. We were 
surprised and pleased to find on the liooks of the first Congregational | 
church of Xorwich Town many items of great importance that had 
escaped the notice of others. 

In Canterbury, births, marriages and deaths were copied. 

The records of the strict Congregational church of Preston solved 
many vexed questions. 

]Many Bible records m private hands, and much information by 
word of mouth added to our store of knowledge. 

Miss Benjamin of the Xew London Historical Society, Aliss 
Helen Morgan Aver}- and ^Irs. Crandall of Xew- London, Mr. George 
S. Porter of Xorwich, and ]Mrs. Belton Avery Copp of Groton are par- 
ticularlv entitled to thanks for assistance. 



Avery Notes and Queries. i i i 

Much remains to be done in the towns that we visited : 
' In Groton, the deeds, the wills, the six or seven other cemeiteries, 

and the records of the other churches should be examined. 

In New London, the probate records (except the first four vol- 
umes), the deeds, and the cemeteries except the "ancientesit" one, have 
not been examined; nor have any of the church records except those of 
the first Congregational. 

In Lyme, the church records, wills, deeds, and cemeteries should 
be examined. 

In Norwich, the wills, deeds, cemeteries (except the old cemetery), 
and the church records f except the first Congregational) await exam- 
ination. 

In Stonington, all the cemeteries (except the "Plain" burying- 
ground), the probate records (except, the Avery wills), and the church 
records (except the two old Congregational church records), should 
be examined. 

We much regretted our inability to visit several towns, particu- 
larly Mystic and Ledyard. 

Cannot members of the Avery clan who live near cemeteries not 
yet examined procure the inscriptions for us ; and cannot other mem- 
bers take a little time to look up the records ? 

We wish not only all that relates to the Avery name, but the par- 
entage of those who married Averys, the children of the Avery girls, 
and the marriages of these children. This involves research in other 
families. It means the studying of other wills besides the Avery wills. 
Some of the most important information already obtained has come 
from reading over a will that we had no reason to think had any rela- 
tion to the Avery family. There is much of this work to be done in and 
near New London county. 



I have an inquiry for the heirs of one George W. Avery, who lived 
in Columbia county. Wis., about 1859. He owned some property in 
Missouri which my correspondent wants to buy. 

Ashbel George Avery (No. 1148, page 527), corporation counsel 
for the city of Spokane, Wash., was recently elected president of the 
Country Club of that place, one of the most successful and popular of 
such organizations in the Northwest. 



Avery Notes and Queries. 
BIRTHS. 



Florence Naomi Avery, daugfhter of Isaac Dudley and Isa (Slo- 
cum) Avery, and grand-daughter of Milton Herman Avery (No. 1369, 
page 159), was bom, Dec. 14, 1898, at Hebron, Ohio. 

?klildred Beatrice Avery Smith, daughter of Dr. Walter Ernest and 
Bertha Jane (Avery) Smith (No. 863, page 678), was born, Sept. 26, 
1899, at Fairland, Indian Territory. 

Emily Avery Egelhofif, great-granddaughter of David and Emily 
(Avery) Knowles, (No. 784, page 105), was born, Oct. 18, 1899, at 
Weatherford. Texas. A picture of the mother was given in Notes 
AND Queries for last ]\Iay. page 91. 



ORANGE BLOSSOMS. 



Esther Maria Avery, daughter of Amos William .-Vvcry (No. 
574a, page 458). was married, July 30, 1899. at IMissoula, Montana, to 
Henry K. Rouzer. 

Elfie Dell Avery, daughter of Edwin Leslie Avery and grand- 
daughter of Oscar Avery (No. 1371, page 159), was married, October 
18, 1899, ^t Indianapolis. Ind.. to Reese Wysong. 



THE LAST ROLL CALL. 



]\Iary Cecilue Avery, the widow of Milton Herman Avery (No. 
1369, page 159), died, April 18, 1899, at Hebron. Ohio. 

Mrs. Indiana (Abbott) Rose, a granddaughter of ^lilton Herman 
Avery (No. 1369. page 159). died. Sept. 12. 1899. ^t Columbus. Ohio. 

^Irs. Fanny Maria (Avery) Corwin (No. 15 14, page 172), died, 
July 21. 1899. at Scranton. Pa. 

Andrew Gillespie, the husband of Mary Esther (Avery) Gillespie 
(No. 1510, page 262), died, June 29. 1899, at Binghamton, N. Y. I 
am informed that the record of her marriage to LcAvis Benedict, given 
by Mr. Sweet, is wholly wrong. 

Mrs. Helen Mar (Brower) Avery, the wife of William Osborne 
Avery (No. 956, page 208). died, Feb'y. 28, 1899, at Detroit, Mich. 

EHsha Avery (No. 351, page 348). died, Oct. 31. 1899, at Mont- 
gomery, Mass. 



I 



Mvcry J^oUs and Queries, 



"~ILP 



A Quarterly Magazine devoted to the History of the Groton Averys. 



No. 9. "Honor thy Father and thy Mother." Fetroary, 1900. 

The number and page references used in this magazine are to 
Sweet's History of "Tiie Avery's of Groton." 

Miss Elizabeth Wilson, instructor in English Literature at 
Lawrence University. Appleton, Wisconsin, is a great-grand-daughter 
of Annis (Avery) Hill, Xo. 207, page 33S. She has traveled exten- 
sively and studied successfully, and is an instructive and entertaining 
lecturer. 

Julia Marian Avery (No. 2156, page 258), daughter of Dean 
Richmond Avery of San Francisco, was married August 9, 1899, to 
Alfred Walter White, of Oakland, California. 

Sidney Morgan Avery (Xo. 2070, page 245), married October 16, 
1899, at Grace Church, Xevv York City, Miss Blanche Margaret 
Parker. 

Robert Lincoln Avery (Xo. 1032, page 515), married December 
6 1899, at Superior. Nebraska, Ora (j. Woolsey. 

Mrs. Amelia Avery Fisher (No. 243, page 456), whose portrait 
appeared in X'otes and Queries for last May (page 86), died 
Xovember 29, 1899, at Albany, Oregon, in the ninety-eighth year of 
her age. It was Ihe calm, triumphant ending of an eventful and 
useful life. 

Frank Morris ^Vvery (X"o. 898, page 532), died December 12, 1S99, 
probably at Chicago. 

On page 107 of Notes and Qjlieries it was erroneously stated 
tnat the Rev. Dr. Daniel Avery Whedon was for eighteen }ear5 editor 
of the Northern Christian Advocate. 

I can supply a few complete sets of Avery Notes and Q^ueries 
for 1898 and 1900. Price, one dollar per set, postage prepaid. 



114 AVHKV XoTHS AND Ol'HKlHS. 

MINOR'S OTARY. 

Lieutenant Thomas Minor of .Slonington, Connecticut, raitlifully 
kept a diarv from 1653 to 1684. It has long been a great source of in- 
formation to genealogists, and has recently been printed. It contains 
many items relating to the Averv family. Three of Thomas Minor's 
children married children of the first James Ayery. His son Ephraim 
married Hannah ^Vyery ; his son Joseph married Mary Ayery; and his 
daughter Hannah married Thomas Ayery. The follo', ing extract from 
the diary will show the esteem in which Thomas Minor was held by 
his townsmen and the colony : 

"Tliis .24th. of Apriil. 1669. I Thomas Minor am by my accounts 
sixtie one yeares ould I was by the Towne & this yeare Ciiosen to be a 
select man the Townes Tresurer The Townes Recorder The brander 
of horses b\- the generale Courte Recorded the head officer of the 
Traine band by the same Courte one of the iTouer that have the 
Charge of the milishcia of the whole Countie and Chossen and 
sworne Commissinor and one to assist in keeping the Countie Courte." 



THE FOl'XDERS OF THE FAMILY. 

I giye herewith a brief account of Christopher and James, tiie 
founders of the clan known as the Ayerys of (jroton, and of the 
daughters of the latter. My chief objects in so doing are to show 
what has been ascertained since the publication of Mr. vSweet's book, 
and to indicate the probable arrangement that will be adopted for 
the new edition. The first chapter of the book will contain informa- 
tion concerning the Ayery family before the coming of Christopher^ 
and James- to Salem, Massachusetts, in 1630, biographical sketches 
of Cliristopher^ and James-, and the genealogical records iierewith 
printed. The second, third, fourth, and fifth chapters will contain, 
respectiyely, the records of James^, Thomas^, John=\ and SanuieF, the 
sons of Captain James- Ayery. 

The plan of numbering names and generations will appear from 
what follows. Blank spaces are left for the entry of the now 
unknown dates, and names of places and persons. The following 
abbreyiations arc used : 

b. - born, s. p.— sine prole— without children, 

m. — married, unm. — unmarried, 

d. — died, d. y. — died j-oung, 

s.— son, dau.— daughter, 

bu.— buried, bap. — baptised. 



Avery Notes and Queries. 115 

The sequence and true relation of events of this early period are 
often confused for us by the difference between tlie "old style" and 
the "new style" calendars. For instance, the registry entitled 
"Births in New London" indicates that Capt. James and Joanna 
(Greenslade) Avery had born inito them a son on December 15, 1646, 
and a daughter on February 19, 1647. In fact, the interval between 
the two births was fourteen months instead of two, as at first glance 
appears. The calendar-amendment act, an English statute of 1751, 
established the first day of January as the beginning of each year 
(instead of Lady-day, March 35), adopted the Gregorian or "new- 
style" in place of the Julian or "old style" calendar, and cancelled the 
then existing excess of eleven days by making the third day of 
.September, 175-. the fourteenth Hence the double writing of the 
year in dates falling in January, February and March, so frequently 
met with in the following century. The last date in the registry 
record above quoted might be written February 19, 1647 (() S ) or 
I'ebruary 29, 1648 (N. vS.), or February 19, i647-'48. 

L Christopher' Avery^ the emigrant, was born in England.- l'^)r 
a sketch of his life, see Sweet's "Avery's of (iroton," pp. 9-14. I give 
the following additional items: ",^0:5:55 Christopher Avery is ad- 
mitted an inhabitant." (Boston Town Records, page 119, printed). 
An entry in the London Marriage Licenses for 1584 (published by the 
ILirleian Society) indicates (page 132) that Christopher Everye of vSt. 
James, London, and Mary Harryson, spinster, of St. Mary, Woolworth 
[Woolwich.^], dau. of William ILirryson. late of St. Magnus, London, 
were m. at or about that date. This may possibly help to determine 
the parentage of Christopher, the emigrant. He was born about 1590, 
and it has long been conjectured that his mother's name w^as Mary. It 
is hoped that, beft^re the publication of the new edition of the family 
history, the P^nglish home and the parentage of Christoj^her^ Avei-y 
will be ascertained. 

A statement in .Sweet's "Avery's of Groton," page 14, makes it 
appear that Minor, in his diary, records that Christopher Avery died 
March 12, 1679. The exact record in Minor's diary is as follows: 
"it was in the .5. day of march 7S-79 nirs. bruster was buried the 12. 
day ffather axery was buried." 

Child of Christopher and ( )Avery : 

2. i. James-, b. about 1620 in England. 



11^1 A\■KI!^■ XoTKS AND OuKRIlvS. 

2. Captain James'"' Avery ( diristof^hcr^ ) \n;is b. about 1620, in 
ICiio-laiul : m. 1 st , Xovrinbrr 10, if)):;, at IJosion. Joanna Greenslade, 

tlau. of ; 111. _'il., July |, i^ujS, Abigail^ ^vido^v of 

josluia ilohnes. Abit^ail I lobncs bad pre\ iousK been tbe widow of 
Samuel Cbeeseboro ; according to jiulii^e Ricbard A. Wbeeler, bar 
maiden name was Abigail Ingrabam. Ilcr daiigbter, Abigail Cbeese- 
l)oro, married Jobn'* Avery, son of Capt. James- Avery. 

For a biograpbical sketcb of James- Avery see Sweet's "Avery's 
of (iroton," pp. 14--7. Tbe sketcbes of Christopher^ and James- 
Avery have also been printed in pamphlet form, and will be given in 
the revised edition of tbe family history. 

Minor, in his diary, records, August, 1682 : •'J4dav Captayn Averie 
and his wife was beare.'" It is supposed that Joanna was alive as 
late as i(>93. Her ancestry is not known. It has been suggested by 
some that she might have been the daughter of an Edward (ireen- 
slade. while others incline to the opinion that her father was Thomas 
Greenslade, who came over in 1658 Again, this Thomas nn'gbt have 
been her brother, but no relationship has been proved. 

Children of James and Joanna ((ireenslade ) Avery : 
i. Hannah^, b. Oct. 11, 1644, at Gloucester, Mass. 

4. ii. JAMES-^ b. Dec. 16, 1646, at Gloucester, Mass. (See 

Chapter 2. ) 

5. iii. MarV'^, b. Feb. 29, 1647-8, at Gloucester, Mass. 

6. iv. Thomas'*, b. May 6, 1651, at New London, Conn. (See 

Chapter 3.) 
V. John3, b. Feb. 10, 1653-4, at New London, Conn. (See 
Chapter 4. ) 

8. vi. Rebecca^, b. Oct. 6, 1656, at New London, Conn. 

vii. JON.A.THAN3, b. Jan. 5, 1658, at New London: bu. Sept. 15, 

1681, at New London; unni. 
viii. Christopher^', b. April 30, 1661, at New London; d. Dec. 

S, 16S3, at New London; unm. 

9. ix. Samuel^', b. Aug. 14, 1664, at New London, Conn. (See 

Chapter 5. 1 

3. Hannah'' Avery ( James- , Christopher^ ) was b. Oct. 11, 1644, 
at (jloucester, Mass. ; m. June 30, 1666, at New London, Conn., Mr. 
Ephraim Minor. '^. of Thomas and Grace (Palmer) Minor of Stoning- 
ton, Conn. He w^as b. May i, 1642, at Ilingbam, Mass.; farmer; 
lived at Stonington, Conn. ; freeman, 1669; deputy to the general 
court several terms; justice of tbe peace many years; lieutenant of 



Avery Notes and Queries. 117 

the train band. She d. Aug. i3, 1721, at Stonington ; he d. May 19, 
1734, at Stonington. 

Thomas Minor, the father of Ephraim, in his famous diary, 
records : April, 1666 : " The nth day wensday The macth was made 
up between Ephraim and hanah Averie I gave the 3 horses to Ephraim 
and Josepth to buy Their weding suts sabath day the 15th Sabath 
day 33 Ephraim and hanah Averie was put over the meeting house 
dore" In June of the same year, he writes: '' wensday the 20. our 
Ephraim was maried" 

Children of P^phraim and Hannah (Avery) Minor (all born at 
Stonington) : 

i. HANNAII+, b. April 5, 1667 ; d. May 25, 1667, at Stonington. 

ii. Ephraim-i-, b. Jnne 22, 1668 ; m. May 24, 1694, at , 

Mary Stevens of Tannton, Mass. ; deputy to the general court 
many terms ; justice of the peace ; captain of the train 
band ; member of the Church of England ; d. Feb. 17, 1739, 
at Stonington. 

iii. THOMAS+,b. Dec. 17, 1669 ; d. Sept. 8, 1688, at Stonington, unm. 

iv. Hannah*, b. April 20, 1671 ; m. Jan'y 6, J691-2. at Stonington, 
Samuel Frink ; d , at 

V. Rebecca*, b. Sept. 17, 1672 ; m. July 8, 1696, at Stonington, 
Josiah Grant ; d. Jan'y 15, 1746-7, at Stonington. 

vi. Elizabeth*, b. April 30, 1674; m , at , John 

Brown ; d , at 

vii. SamuhIv*, b.Dec. 9, 1676 ; d. y., at Stonington. 
viii. Deborah*, b. April [5, 1678 ; d. Aug. ..., 1678, at Stonington. 

ix. Deborah*, b. April ..., 1679 ; m. July 8, 1696, at Stonington, 
Joseph Pendleton ; d. Sept. 8, 1698, at Stonington. Joseph 
Pendleton subsequently m. her cousin, Patience Potts (No. 
8, iii), as recorded below. 
X. Samuel*, b. Aug. 28, 1681 ; m. April 7, 1702, at Stonington, 
Ann Denison ; ensign in train band; d. before 1718, at 
Stonington, s. p. 

xi. James*, b. Nov. ..., 16S2 ; m. ist., Feb. 2, 1704-5, at Stoning- 
ton, Abigail Eldridge ; m. 2d., May a, 1721, at Stonington, 
Sarah Ayer ; deputy to the general court ; lieutenant of 
the train band ; d. June 3, 1726, at Stonington. 

xii. Grace*, b. Sept. ..., 1683 ; m , at , William 

Palmer; d , at 

xiii. John*, b. April 19, 1685, ; m. May 5, 1709, at Stonington, 
Mary F^ldridge ; justice of the peace ; d , at 

^^^- vSoNS*, twins, b. May 22, 1687, d. May 22, 1687, at Stonington. 

( Contimicd on page 1.20. ) 



IlS A\'KIM XOTKS AXn OlKHIKS. 

Hvery JVotes and Queries. 

J'liblislud by EIroy M. Avery, at 1157 Woodland Hills Ava/ne, 
Cleveland, Ohio. 

Subscript ion Price, Fifty cents per year. Fifteen cents per copy. 

Entered at the Cleveland, O., postoffice as second-class matter. 



THE GROTOX AVERY IILSTORY CLUB. 



Since the last report, club dues for 1900, have been received as follows : 

Blrs. Anna C. Greg^, Binghamton, N. Y | i.oo 

W. H. Castle, Philadelphia r.oo 

Dean Richmond Avery, San Francisco 2.00 

Irving J. Aver}-, New London i-oo 

Frank M. Avery, New York 6.50 

Gates Avery, Alva, Okla i.oo 

Mrs. vSarah E. S. Nighman, Canton, () 2.00 

Maj. Cyrus Avery, Camptown, Pa 2.00 

Mrs. Elisha S. Allyn, Ledyard, Conn i.oo 

C. B. Gilbert, New Haven, Conn 5-oo 

Mrs. Charles J. Barnard, Syracuse, N. Y i 00 

James Carrington Avery, Auburn, N. Y i 00 

Total I 24.50 

All dues i-eceived since the November issue of Notes and 
QjLTERiES are credited as for the year 1900, whether dues were paid 
for 1S99 t'l' '^ot. All persons paying club dues are entitled to the 
magazine without other payment. Dues are paid simply for the 
purpose of helping carry on the work of the family historian. Each 
member determines what his annual payment shall be — within the 
limits on one and ten dollars. You are eligible to membership, and 
your remittance will be gladly received and ack^iowledged in this 
magazine. 

This is a good time for you and your friends to subscribe for 
Notes and Qjlieries. 



Avery Notes and Queries. 119 

There are, in the homes of many who will receive this magazine, 
blanks headed " Biographical and Genealogical Memoranda," and 
sent out by me. The number of such unreturned blanks charged to 
the year 1899 exceeds three hundred. Occasionally one such dove 
returns to the ark. In the month of January, 1900, two that were 
sent out in 1897 came back in safety and with their long-waited-for 
messages. But if I have to wait that long for answers to my inquiries, 
I shall surely die before the new edition of the family history is ready 
for the printer. Please let me whisper in your ear (for I have loudly 
called in vain) my earnest request that you fill out those blanks and 
send them to me at once— before you forget it again. 



Attention is called to the genealogical records printed in this 
magazine. They show that many additions and corrections have been 
made since the publication of Mr. Sweet's book. They also show 
that many desired facts are still unknown. If you can supply informa- 
tion that will fill any of these gaps, please do so at your earliest con- 
venience. 



APPRECIATION. 

A recent correspondent says: " I have been looking all summer 
for a stray five dollars to add to your small fund. They are none too 
plenty and I have two uses for every dollar. But this is mine and I 
cheerfully give it to help on a work which ought to be done. I am 
glad that your heart is in it and hope that you may live to push it to 
completion.-' 

Another correspondent writes from Kansas City thus : ''There 
must be some expense in getting up this history, and I should like to 
pay my share. ]f you will let me know what others are paying, I 
will send you draft for the same. I should also like to buy one of the 
books." 



I have a few pamphlets containing the appendix to Sweet's "The 
Avery's of Groton," and relating to "Avery Coats of Arms" (with 
illustrations of four coats) and to "The Avery Family in England and 
France." These pamphlets will be furnished, as long as the supply 
lasts, at fifty cents per copy. 



I20 AVKKV XoTKS A.\l» (JUKRIES. 

( Co)itiinnd from poor 1 1 ]' . ) 

5. Mary" Avtry (jfa/z/cs- , Chrisiop/ict-'^ ) was b. Feb. 29, 164S, 
(n. s.) ;i1 (ilducL'stcr. Mass. ; in. Oct. 28, 1668, at New London, Conn. 
Mr. Joseph Minor, ^. of Tliomas and Grace (Palmer) Minor of Stoning- 
ton, Conn. He was b. Aug. 25, 1644, at Hingham, Mass. ; farmer; 
lived at Stonington ; freeman, 1669 ; deputy to the general court. She 
d. Feb. 2, 1708, at Stonington ; he d. Feb. i, 171 1. at Stonington. 

Thomas Minor, in his diary, records, March, 1667-8: " wensday 
tlie 18, we made an End between Jossepth & Marie Averie." 

On the Stonington town books is the following: " Joseph, son 
of Thomas Minor and Marie, daughter of James Averie of New Lon- 
don, married the 28th of October, 1668, by Lieut. James Averie." 

Children of Joseph and Mary (Avery) Minor (all born in Ston- 
ington) : 

i. Joseph^, b. Sept. 19, 1669 ; 111. June 18, 1700, at Stonington, 
Sarah Tracj- ; deputy to the general court ; d , at 



ii. MARiii+, b. Oct. 6, 1671 ; ni , at , EHsha 

Cheeseboro ; d. before 17 11. 

iii. MerciE-*, b. Aug. 21,1673 I "i > ^t , 

West; d at 

iv. Benjamin^, bap. June 26, 1676; m. Nov. 15, 1697, at Stoning- 
ton, Mary Saxton ; d. Feb. 28, 1710-11, at vStonington. 
V. Sarah-1-, bap. March 30, 1679; '" ^t , Na- 
thaniel Tracy, brother of the Sarah who ni. Joseph Minor 
as above recorded; d , at 

vi. Joanna*, bap. March 13,1680; ni , at , 

Richardson ; d at 

vii. Christopher-^, bap. June 13, 1684; m , a. , 

Mary Laje; d , at 

viii. Prudence-1, bap. May 6, 1688: ni. Feb. 17, 1707, at Stonington, 
Joseph Denison; d. Maj^ 26, 1726, at Stonington. 

Joseph Minor, sr. , m. 2d., Oct. 7, 1709, Eiridget, widow of 
William Thompson, by whom he had a daughter, Bridget, bap. March 
..., 171 1. This daughter, Bridget, m. May 26, 1726, at Stonington, 
Oliver Grant, son of Josiah and Rebecca (Minor) Grant, and grand- 
son of Hannah (Avery) Minor, No. 3. She died before March 18, 
1729-30, at which time Oliver Grant m. a second time. 



AvERV Notes and Queries. 13 i 

8. Rebecca'' Avery {y(r^^n\s- , Chr/stoplwr'^ ) wash. Oct. 6, 1656, 

at New London. Conn.; m. Aw^. 5, 1678, at , Mr. William 

Potts of New Castle, En^^land, a constable. Minor, in his diary, re- 
cords : " The .5th. .day of Agust. 167S. william pots and Rebeckah 

Avery was maried." vShe d , at He 

probably d. about 1730, as his estate was divided amono- his heirs at 
that time. 

Children of William and Rebecca (Avery) Potts: 

i. JOANNA+, 1). May 10, 1679, at ; d. y. at 

ii. William^, b. March 13, 1680, at ; no further information. 

jii. PaTiexCK^, bap. Aug. 12, 16S3, at New London, Conn.; ni. ist, 

Dec. n, 1700, at , Joseph Pgndleton, who had 

previously m. her cousin, Deborah Minor (No; 3, ix), as re- 
corded above. He d. Sept. 18, 1706, at Westerly, R. I. 
She m. id, April 28, 1707, at , Samuel Rogers. 



Hannah^ 
Abig 



^'^^4^' I twins, bap. May 5, 1695, at New London. 



William and Rebecca Potts probably had two other children, as 
follows : 

Jonathan^, b , at ; m. Nov. lu, 1713, at Groton, 

Conn., Mary Geer; d , at 

Mary*, b , at ; m. Jan. i, 171S, at New Lon- 
don, Conn., Jonathan Daniels; d , at 

[To he continued.) 



In his " Old Viro-inia and Her Neighbors," Mr. John Fiske, the 
eminent historian, says that the importance of ancestry is better appre- 
ciated in America now than it was a few generations ago. He adds : 
" The pedigrees of horses, dogs, and fancy pigeons have a value that 
is quotable in terms of hard cash. Far more important, for the student 
of human affairs, are the pedigrees of men. By no possible ingenuity 
of constitution-making or of legislation can a society made up of 
rufbans and boors be raised to the intellectual and moral level of a 
society made up of well-bred merchants and yeoman, parsons and 
lawyers. One might as well expect to see a dray horse win the 
Derby. Without genealogy the study of iiistory is comparatively 
lifeless." 



122 AvERv Notes and (Queries. 

COXXECTICl r MEX IX TIIR REVOLUTIOXARY \VAR. 

(From records printed by the state.) 



Aaron Avery, Stli militia, under Captain Pmrrows : Sept. S to 
Xovember 17, 1776, at Xew ^'ork. 

Abel Avery (Xo. 162. page 421.) pensioner. Chatham. Middlesex 
Co.. Conn.. 1S40. 

Abraham Avery (Xo. 55, page 416) vStonington, corporal, 7th 
Conn, regiment. Col. Charles Webb. Capt. Jonathan Lattimer and 
Capt. Xathan Hale, July i, 1775 to Dec. iS, 1775: re-enlisted Jan. i, 
1776; orderly sergeant, Capt. James Eldridge, Col. S. H. Parsons: 
transferred to the artificers under Capt. Bacon : at the evacuation of 
l)oston : at Xew York as armorer under Capt. John Ililliard : at Long 
Island and White Plains : discharged at end of service; Dec. 1778. 
enlisted as gunsmith on board the brig ''Eagle."' a privateer under 
Captain Elijah Luce: May i, 1779. ^^ley were captured by a British 
man-of-war under Admiral Young, taken to Antigua and placed on 
the '• Renown" and forced to work tlie ship. Thev convoyed a sugar 
fleet to the British Channel and then mailed for Xew York where 
Abraham Avery and ten of his companions petitioned to be placed on 
the prison ship, preferring confinement to enforced service against 
their country. After much suffering in the prison hulk, they were 
finally released. Abraham Avery reached home at Stonington in a 
starving state anil without enough clothes to cover his nakedness. 

Amos Avery (probably X^o. 73, page 421). sergeant, Coventry. 
Lexington Alarm under Major Thomas Brown. 

Amos Avery, private. Xew London. Lexington Alarm under 
Captain Williani Coit. 

Amos Avery (probably Xo. 73. page 421), lieutenant. Coventry, 
commissioned May i, 1775, discharged December. 1775. 3d regiment. 
Col. Israel Putnam, gth company. 

Amos Avery was in Capt. Jonathan Brewster's company, Col. 
Huntington's regiment, 1776. a pensioner. 

Amos Avery, sergeant. Col. vSherl)one"s regiment. Mav 20, 1777. 
Reduced to the ranks. Jan. i. 1779. 



Avery Notes and Queries. 123 

Amos Avery, second lieutenant, 1776 to 1777, Capt. Josiah Ham- 
mond, Col. Enos, 3d Bat, ; served in Rhode Island and Connecticut. 

Amos Avery, Capt. vStoddard's company, Col. Oliver Smith's 
regiment of militia, 1776. 

Amos Avery, private, pensioner; residing in New Haven, Conn., 

in 1833-4. 

If you can identify as (iroton Averys any of the above-mentioned 
Revolutionary soldiers who are not identiiied by number and page, 
please communicate with nie on the subject. 



I am indebted to Mr. Frank M. Avery, of New York City, for 
the following extract from the "New London (Jazette. Friday, August 
4, 1780. Printed by Timothy Green, near the C<Hn-t House." 

Groton. July 25, 1780. 
Mr. Green. 

Please to give the following a Place in your next Paper : 
On Tuesdav the nth Instant departed this Life, Col. Ebenezer 
Avery, in the 77th Year of his Age. A Gentleman possessed of a 
sensible and judicious Mind which furnished him for uncommon Use- 
fulness in his Day and e-rly introduced him to public Employments. 
For many Years he served the Town in various Capacities, frequently 
representing it to tlie general Assembly, from which he received a 
Commission for the Peace, which he executed to suppress Vice, and 
promote Peace and good Order. His (Genius so peculiarly fitted him 
for the service of his Country, that he was employed in Military 
Offices 'tillhe was honored with the rank of Colonel in the Regiment 
to which he belonged; al) which he filled up with Integrity and 
Honor; his Wisdom, Fidelity and Generosity procuring him universal 
Veneration and Esteem. Yet he excelled in the devout and religious 
Life, being a faithful Servant of God, a cordial Friend to Christ and 
Mankind, and honoring Religion. 

The record of this Colonel Avery appears as No^ 25. page 33, in 
Mr. Sweet's "The Averys of Groton." 

If you see in any newspaper an obituary notice of an Avery or a 
descendant of an Avery, please send a marked copy of the paper to 
the historian of the Groton Averys. This will be easy for you and 
of very great help lo him. 



124 



AVIOKV NOTKS AND OnKKl 



The. lion. lulward Avc-ry (No. ^^c. pnge65^), s. of Gen. Samuel 
and Mary A. \V. (Candler) Avery, was born March ,2, 1S28, at 
Marblehead, Mass. He was educated at Marl.lehead and Boston- 
studied ..t the Harvard law school, and hecan,e one of the leading men> 
bers of the Boston bar. He was a stalwart and consistent Democrat • 
many years a member of the Democratic state committee, and several 
tunes its chairman ; a member of the national Democratic conventions 
of 1868 and 1876, and, in each case, a member of the committee on 




THE HON. l;i)\VARD A\ERV. 

resolutions; a member of the lower house of the Massachusetts legis- 
lature m 186S, one of the eight who, that year, constituted the full 
strength of his party in that body. For more than twenty years he 
was senior warden in his parish church. He was a freemason and 
hlled many of the highest otl^ces in that order. He possessed rare 
oratorical powers. He was versatile, modest, courteous and genial, 
a loving friend, a generous and indulgent father, md a faithful and 
patriotic citizen. He died Dec. 29, 1896, at Boston, Mass. 



frjFLIC LIBRARY I 

Rvcry fioUe and Qticrte 

A Quarterly Magazine devoted to the History of the Groton Averys. 
No. 10. "Honor thy Father and thy Mother." May, 1900. 



The number and page references used in this magazine are to 
Sweet's History of " The Averys of Groton." 

I desire the address of the Robert Lincohi Avery who m. Ora G. 
Woolsey at Superior, Neb., Dec. 6, 1S99. 

Have you sent your family record to the family historian, Elroy 
M. Avery, 657 Woodland Hills Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio.? If so, have 
you reported to him all changes in your family since that time ? 

I am under obligation to Mr. Frank G. jSIiner of Parma, Mich., 
for information that enables the tilling of two blank dates in the family 
record printed on page i30 of Notes and Qjlieries. Marie"*^ Minor 
was married January 37, 1692, and died November 24, 1704. If you 
have information that will enable the filling of any such blank spaces, 
please send it to the family historian. 

According to Mr. Sweet, Joshua Avery (No. 58, page 332), son 
of Joshua and Jerusha (Rockwell) Avery, married Hannah Clark, and 
another Joshua Avery (No. 55, page 575), son of John and Bridget 
(Higgins) Avery, married the same Hannah Clark within four days. 
One of these records is wrong. Information wanted. 

Ralph W. Haggard, youngest son of Dr. James R. and Frances 
Helen (Avery) Haggard (No. 1375, page 253), was a sergeant in 
Company K, 3d Nebraska Regiment, during the late war with Spain. 

Born, Sunday, February 11, 1900, at Avondale, a suburb of Chi- 
cago, 111., Marjory .Grace Dada, a granddaughter of Mrs. Eva J. 
Hamilton, who is a great-great-great-granddaughter of Sylvester and 
Elizabeth (Avery) Baldwin (No. 19, page 337). Miss Marjory is of 
the eleventh generation in descent from Christopher Avery, and of 
the twelfth generation from Elder William Brewster of Plymouth. 
Her sister, Dorothy Prince Dada, was born March 3i, 1898. 

James Virgil Blair, son of Benjamin Vance and Mary (Avery) 
Blair and grandson of Cyrus Avery (No. 471, p. 627), was born Nov. 
15, 1899, '^^ Elmira, 111., the youngest of four children. 



126 AvERv Notes and Queries. 

Sarah Eastman Avery (Xo. 1053, page 519) married June 7. 
1899, at Moville, Iowa, Lester A. McCarter of Moville. 

Alfred Avery, son of Edwin Allen and Mary (Stark) Avery (No. 
1271, page 343), married Jennie Cornelia Drake at Old Forge, Pa., 
recently. I should like the date, and their place of residence. 



THE SEARCH FOR OUR ENGLISH ANCESTRY. 

From time to time I have had bright hopes that some one who 
had an interest in the matter and could afford to pay the bill would 
authorize me to employ a competent genealogist to make a thorough 
and, if necessary, a persistent searcii for the ancestors of Christopher 
Avery and his son, Captain James Avery, the founders of the clan 
known as the Averys of Groton. The last of these dreams came to 
naught because or the unwillingness of a certain Avery descendant 
to assume any obligation for payment without knowing in advance 
the extent of such obligation. Unfortunately, no genealogist can tell 
beforehand how much effort the search will involve, or assure 
success in any event. No reputable genealogist will undertake the 
search except upon the bnsis of fair pay for fair work. I understand 
that good business men sometimes send prospecting parties into min- 
ing regions at considerable expense, with nothing but a hope that 
something of value will be found. The genealogical quest seems to 
me to be strictlv analogous to such an enterprise, and if one is legiti- 
mate I cannot see why the other is not equally so; still I am a com- 
petent witness to the fact that Jasons of both kinds sometimes come 
back without the golden fleece. 

I now have, however, for consideration a proposition that is not 
so wholly of a speculative character, one in which something dejinite 
is assured. Many facts seem to point to Salisbury, England, as the 
English home of Christopher^ Avery. Most persons who have given 
the subject much study are of the opinion that in 1630 our founder 
came thence to Salem, Massachusetts. It is worth something definitely 
to establish or to disprove this hypothesis. I can have it done for a 
hundred dollars. If our genealogist finds there what we want, we 
shall have struck "pay dirt " at a very small expenditure. If he does 
not find it, we shall have eliminated tJiat unknown quantity of the 
problem, and shall have possession of all notes made in the search. 



Avery Notes and Queries. 127 

My correspondent says : '' I micrht even, in the event of such a show 
ing on your part, feel like going further than such a sum would pay 
for (if it were expended before the sought information was found), 
with the confident belief that if I did succeed eventually in finding 
tlie immigrant you would agree (tacitly) to take the discovery off my 
hands at a reasonable price." 

I feel full confidence in the professional ability and in the integ- 
rity of the genealogist who makes the offer. Will any one become 
responsible for the payment of tlie hundred dollars in question on the 
terms herein outlined ? 



MARKED PAPERvS. 



If you see in a newspaper a marriage, obituary, or other notice 
of an Avery, or of a descendant of an Avery, please send a marked 
copy of the paper to the historian of the Groton Averys. If the 
notice is not plainly marked it may be missed and, at the best, a care- 
ful search is made necessary. It is better to send a marked copy of the 
paper tlian it is to clip the article and then send it in a letter, unless 
tlie name and date of the paper, and the place of its publication are 
witli the clipping. For illustration, the clipped notice may state that 
Henry Avery and Jenny Raleigh were married at the M. E. Church 
by the Rev. Robert Reidy of Madison, N. J., at 6:30 o'clock last 
evening. Not knowing the date of the paper that contained the 
notice, I do not know the date of the marriage, an item verv much 
more important to the genealogist than the description of the gowns. 
Sometimes the clipping states that the marriage was performed at the 
residence of the bride's parents at No. 87 Main Street, but I can only 
guess whether it was in Dansville, Cincinnati, New London, or 
Oshkosh. 



Mrs. Frances Avery Haggard, of Lincoln, Neb., recently sent me 
a pamphlet entitled "Narrative of the Rise and Progress of the Diffi- 
culties which have issued in a Separation between the Minister and 
the People of Bennington [Vermont], 1783, vvith a Valedictory 
Address," by the Rev. David Avery (No. 78, page 422). It was 
printed by Haswell & Russel, Bennington, 1783, and an inscription 
shows that this copy was given by the Rev. David Avery to I. Badlam. 
For a portrait of this David Avery, see Notes and Queries, page 63. 



128 AVKRV XoTKS ANO OuERIES. 

DEDICATION OF THE AVERY MEMORIAL. 

Thr iiron/.e bust of Captain James- Avery, designed by Bela L. 
Pratt under order from tlie Avcrv Memorial Association, is so nearlv 
completed llial 1 am ahlf I o ^i \ <■ Ikm cw il !i :i | >ii I urc I li:i1 conveys a good 







idea of what it is to be. Tlie bust is to take the place of the conical 
apex of the shaft (see picture on page loi of Notes and Queries) 



Avery Notes and Queries. 129 

which will be cut off" for that purpose. The association has designated 
Friday, July 20, igoo, the anniversary of the burning of "The Hive of 
the Averys" built by Capt, James Avery in 1656, as the day for the 
formal dedication of the completed memorial. The exercises will, of 
course, be held on the site of the old home. There will be an address 
of welcome, a brief oration, a poem, music, prayer, etc. Ample pro- 
vision for tlie transportation and accommodation of the assembled 
members of tiie clan will be made by the association. But better 
than all else, there will be the glow and enthusiasm that come from 
the personal contact of men and women who have something in com- 
mon ; from standing face to face with hundreds in whose veins runs 
the ancestral blood that runs in yours ; of feeling the warm hand-clasp 
of cousins from all parts of the Domiiiion and of the States— all suf- 
fused with reverent affection for noble sires and blended into an har- 
nionious and delightful whole. I do not know, for certain, that Groton 
Averys will be there from Greenland's icy mountains and India's coral 
strand, but I do know that they will be there from the borders of the 
tepid Gulf and the shining sands of the Golden Gate. Of course, you 
will be there. 



Bela Lyon Pratt, the sculptor, was born at Norwich, Connecticut, 
in 1867. He entered the Yale School of Fine Arts in 1S85, and sub- 
sequently studied under vSt. Gaudens at Boston, and at the Ecole deg 
Beaux Arts at Paris. Among his first works of importance were two 
large groups in the peristyle at the Columbian Exposition at Chicago. 
Among his later works are the six 7-foot figures for the spandrels over 
the front entrance of the Library of Congress, one 12-foot figure of 
''Philosophy" inside the dome of the library, and a series of bas 
reliefs. He designed the life-size figure, "Winged Victory" in 
bronze, that adorns the forward turret of the United States battle- 
ship "Massachusetts." Tliis emblematic piece was the gift, 1897, of 
the commonwealth of that name. Speaking of Mr. Pratt's bronze 
bust of the late Phillips Brooks, the Boston Herald (April 23, 1899), 
pronounces it " by far the most satisfying and most thoroughly truth- 
ful of all the liknessesof the famous divine that has as yet appeared." 
Mr. Pratt is a descendant of vSamuel and Hannah (Avery) Morgan 
(No 18, page 32). His portrait will appear in the next number of 
Notes and Q_iteries. 



130 • AvERv Notes and Queuies. 

Hvcry JVotes and Queries. 



Published by Elroy M. Avery ^ at 657 Woodland Hills Avenue, 
Cleveland^ Ohio. 

Subsc7-iption Price, Fifty cents per year . Fifteen cents per copy. 

Entered at the Cleveland, O., postoffice as second-class matter 

THE GROTOX AVERY HISTORY CLl'R 



Since the lust rejiort. club dues for 1900 have been received as follows : 

Miss C. A. Samaine, Rochester, X. Y 5 i.oo 

Miss Ida F. Richardson, Southport, Ind i.oo 

Mrs. Frances Avery Haggard, Lincoln, Neb 2.00 

Mrs. Edna Avery Buckingham, Camp Denison, 2.00 

Franklin C. Avery, Fort Coliins, Colo 5.oo 

Dr. A. D. Thomas, Little Rock, Ark 5.(jo 

Lew J. Avery, Seneca Falls, NY i.oo 

Mrs. L. R. Sonthworth, New York City.. 2.50 

Phineas O Avery, Humboldt, Neb i.oo 

Mrs. \V. H. Carrier, Phoenix, N. Y i.oo 

Albert D. Allen, Pittsburg, Pa i.oo 

Miss Jessie Y. Avery, Erie, Pa i.oo 

Total I 23.50 

All persons paying club dues are entitled to the magazine without 
other payment. Dues are paid simply for the purpose of helping 
carry on the work of the family historian. Each member determines 
what his annual payment shall be — within the limits of one and ten 
dollars. You are eligible to membership, and your remittance will be 
gladly received and acknowledged in this magazine. 



This is a good time for you and your friends to subscribe for 
Notes and Queiues. 



Do not forget the time and place : July .:o, 1900; Groton, Conn. 



Avery Notes and Queries. 131 

THE AVERYS OF GROTON, 

In the last number of Notes and Q^ueries, I gave genealogical 
accounts of Christopher Avery, and his only son, James Avery (the 
founders of what is known as the family or clan of Groton Averys), 
and of Hannah, Mary, and Rebecca, the three daughters of the lat- 
ter. The record of the descendants of each of the four married sons 
of James- Avery will constitute a separate chapter in the revised 
family history now in preparation. The printing of these sample 
records is continued in this issue. Blank spaces are left for the entry 
of the now unknown dates, and names of places and persons. The 
following abbreviations are used : 

b. — born, s. p. — sine prole— without children, 

ni. — married, unm — unmarried, - 

d. — died, d. y. — died young, 

s. — son, dau. — daughter, 

bu. — buried, bap. — baptized. 

In the list of the children of Capt. James Avery, printed on page 
116 of Notes and Qjlieries, may be found this entry : 

4. ii. James3, b. Dec. 16, 1646, at Gloucester, Mass. 
The tigure 4 at the beginning of the line indicates that the record 
is to be continued in a subsequent paragraph bearing that number. 
The Roman numeral, ii. signifies that this James was the second child 
born unto his parents. The figure 3 following the name indicates 
that this James was of the third generation in descent from Christo- 
pher, the Emigrant. The line of descent (printed in parentheses) 
follows the name at the beginning of each paragraph. Of course, 
the number at the beginning of each paragraph will lead the searcher 
back to the record of the nearest ancestor. Thus James^ Avery will 
be- the only name in the whole book that has the number 4. Whether 
the first entry of the name, as on page 116 of Notes and Qjlieries, 
or the fuller record as it appears on page 132, is under observation, 
this figure 4 easily leads to the other entry. If such a name-number 
is wanting in any case, its absence indicates that the individual record 
is not continued in a later paragraph. Having only a single series of 
name-numbers for the clan (instead of such a series for each of the 
four sons of James^ Avery who became the heads of fainilies, as 
appear in the now existing family history), it will be possible to in- 
clude all the names in a single index. 



132 ^VVKKV XoiKS AND QlEIUKS. 

CHAPTER 11. 

(See pige 116 ) 

4. James^ Avery {jfamcs-, Christopher'^) was born Dec. 16. 1646, at 
(jloucester, Mass. ; m. Feb. iS, 1669, at New London, Conn., Deborah 

Stallyon, ilau. of Edward and Margaret ( ) Stallyon. 

She was born at 

The New London town records for 1669, contain the following 
entry: "James Avery jun. sonn of James Avery was marrved unto 
Deborah y*^ daughter of Edward .Stall von — jo of February."' The 
earlier date above given is that recorded by Mr. Sweet. 

Like his father, James Avery, jr took an important part in tiie 
affairs of the colony. He was deputy to the general court seven times 
from Xew London (1689— 1703), and nine times from Groton (1707- 
1712) : he was commissioned lieutenant in May. 1690, and captain in 
ISIay, 1692 ; he was made commissioner in May. 1693 and held the 
othce until May. 1695; he was counselor and advisor of the Pequot 
tribe and became their guardian in 1720: in 1 723 he instituted suits 
to recover lands of which tliev had been deprived; he several times 
acted as an interpreter to the council : in 1700. he was made one of a 
committee to find a tract of land for the Narragansett volunteers, 
which tract is now called \'ohinti)'>yn ; in this tract he received arable 
land and many acres of cedar swamp: he \yas often on committees to 
settle boundary disputes and the location of public lands ; he and his 
wife joined the First Church of New London in 1672 : he. with Mr, 
Crarv. appeared before the general court at its May session, 1696. in 
behalf of the inhabitants on tlie east side of the New London river 
for liberty to embody themselves into a church, which application 
was refused ; the}' again applied in 1697 and \vere again refused; 
because of this application, he came under the discipline of tlie 
church; about 1704, the application was granted and the Church of 
Christ of Groton was formed; the first names on the list of those in 
full communion in this church are those of Captain James^ Avery and 
his wife; they lived in the red house, the '"Hive of the Averys " at 
the head of Poquonnoc Plain in the town of Groton. He is generally 
spoken of as James Avery, jr. 

James Avery, jr. died Aug. 22. 1728 at Groton. His widow, 
Deborah (Stallyon) Avery, died March 27, 1729, at Groton. Tiieir 
gravestones stand near the center of the West burying-ground at 
Poquonnoc, and are still in good condition. 



i 



lO. 


1. 


II. 


ii. 


12. 


Hi. 


13- 


iv. 


14. 


V. 


15- 


vi. 


16. 


vii. 




viii. 


17. 


ix. 


iS. 


X. 


19. 


xi. 


20. 


xii. 


21. 


xiii. 



Avery Notes and Qiteries. i33 

Children of James and Deborah (Stallyon) Avery (all born in 
Groton) : 

DKBOR.4H+, b. August I, 1671. 
ii. JameS^, b. April 20, 1673. 
MarGARKTJ^, b. Feb. 5, 1674. 
Edward*, b. March 20, 1676. 
EBHNEZER-i, b. May i, 167S. 
Christopher*, b. Jau. 23, 1679. 
Jonathan*, b. Nov. 9, i(^^i. 
Mary*, b. Aug. 4, 16S3 ; d. y. 
Hannah*^, b. March 24, 16S5. 
Sarah*-, b. May 10, 16SS. 
Joseph*-, b. August 9, 1691. 

Benjamin*, b 

Mary*, b 

These birth-dates are given as they appear in Sweet's "Averys 
of (iroton '• The New London town records stale that James was 
born Feb. 29, 1673; Margaret^ Feb. 4, i^^74; Jonathan^ Noy. 9, 
1680 • Mary*, Feb. 4. 1683 ; ^uid Hannah*, March 4, 16^5. Mr. Sweet 
.1=0 says that Tslary*. born Aug. 4. 1683, died young, and that a 
second Mary was born. The authority for the statement ,s not 
known, but Tame,^ Avery, in a document executed June 10, 1717. 
mentions daughters, Deborah Allyn, Margaret Morgan, Hannah Mor- 
gan, Sarah Latluim,and Mary Morgan, thus indicating that Mary w- 
the youngest daughter. 

10. Deborah^ Avery {yamcs^ Janics^ Christopher^] was born 
Auaust I 1671, at Groton, Conn. ; m. June 39, irx;i, at Xexv London, 
Conn., Robert Allyn, son of John and Elizabeth (Gager) Allyn. 
According to the New London records, "Robert Allyn y- sonn of John 
and Elizabeth Allyn was borne about y<= middle of September [1671 ]. 
He lived at AUyn's Point, about six miles below Norwich, was a man 
of property, and was held in high esteem in the colony. He made his 
will December 37, 1739, and it was probated January 27, 1730, at 
New London. His widow, Deborah (Avery) Allyn, made her will 
May 33 I7H. and it was probated Dec. 17, i739^ ^^t New London. 
. She mentions all he-r sons and her daughters, Elizabeth Williams, and 
Deborah Lester. 

Children of Robert and Deborah (Avery) Allyn (all born m 

Groton) : 



as 



134 AVERN \()IK> WD (^IKKIKS. 

i. PU.IZAHETH-'"', h Nov 20,1694; 111 , at . 

Jonathan Williams ; d.. , at 

ii. JOHN^, b. January 11, 1696; in. July 28, 1726, at , 

Joanna Minor ; d , at 

iii. Robert^, b. January 25, 1697-S; m. May 25, 1725, atGroton, 

Abigail Avery, (see No ); d. April i, 1760, at Groton 

iv. James^, b. February 29, 1699-1700: m. Dec 17, 1729, at Groton, 

Alithea Avery, (see Xo ); d. Nov 1776, at Groton 

V. Ebeni-zer^, twin with Janies ; in. April 27, 1726, at Groton, 

Mary Thurber ; d at 

vi. Christopher^, b. April 12, 1702; d. March 26, 1703 atGroton. 
vii. Samuel^, b. May 26, 1704 ; m. May 27, 1731, at Groton, Hannah 

Aver\% (see No i; d Feb , 1762, at Groton. 

viii. Christopher^, b. July 21, 1706; ni at 

Ann ; d , at 

ix. Lucys, b. July 29, 170S ; d at unm. 

X. Nath.ax^, b. Oct 5, 1711; ni at , 

Jane Pearl ; d , at 

xi. Deborah^, b ; m Sept. 22, 1724, atGroton, Jona- 



than Lester ; d. 



Deborali (Avery) Allyn mentions her daughter. Deborah Lester, 
in her will. Tlie (iroton records *i,"ive the marriage of Deborah Allyn 
to Jonathan Lester. Prol)al)ly this Deborah .\llyn was born before 
her brother Nathan : otherwise she couUl not luive been more than 
twelve Years old at tlie time of her marriage to lonathan Lester. lie 
was born July 28, 1706, and was, tlierefore, but; eigliteen years old 
when he married. 

n. James^ Avery [yaiin-y^ ,ya/)ics- ,C//risfop//cr'*^) was born Aprd 

20. i(>73. at (7 rot on : m at 

Mary GrLwoId. She was Ixirn Feb I'^'Z.S. -'^ East Windsor, and 

was the daughter of John {iii>wold by his fir>t wife. Mary, whose 
surname is supposed to have been Bemis. 

John Griswold, in his will, made JanuarY 6. 1713 and on hie in 
the probate court at Xew London, mentions his daughter. Mary Avery. 
He was tlie son of Edward Griswold who married for his second wife 
tlie widow ^Llry IkMiii,-. She had a daughter. Mary Bemis. wiio is 
supposed to have married lier mother's stepson. Jolm Griswold. 

John and ALiry (jriswold had a daughter, ^L^ry. born Feb 1673. 

and John Griswold's daughter married an A\erY. Hence the sup- 
position above recorded. 



Avery Notes and Qjlteries. 135 

James* Avery was deputy to the Connecticut general court fifteen 
terms(i7i5-i735) ; justice for New London county from 1726 to 1735 ; 
guardian of the Pequot Indians after his father's death ; commissioned 
ensign of the first Groton train band in May, 1716; its lieutenant, 

October 1731 ; its captain. May , 1738. He is often spoken 

of as James Avery, 3d. 

He died Sept. 18, 1764, at Groton, His wife died Nov. 26, 1750, 
at Groton, aged 76. Her gravestone is still standing. 

Children of James and Mary (Griswold) Avery (all born in 
Groton) : 

22. i. Jamess, b. May 27, 1697. 

23. ii. Johns, b. Feb. 4, 1700. 

24. iii. EbenezerS, b. March 29, 1704. 

iv. Elihu^, b. July 29, 1707; d. about 1748, unm. 

25. V. MaryS, b. Feb. 23, 17 10. 

26. vi. Hannah-^, b. April 12, 1712. 

27. vii. Prudence^, b. March 21, 17 15. 

In this list of children, as printed in Sweet's "Averys of Groton,'' 
appears the name of a " Thomas, born as is supposed in 1717, but no 
i:urther record." Careful search has revealed no trace of this apocry- 
phal Thomas. The Rev. David Avery gives the names of the other 
children but makes no mention of one by the name of Thomas. 
From the evidence at hand, it seems that there was no such child. 

12. Margaret^ Avery [Jajnes^^ jfafnes-y Christopher'^) was born 
February 5, 1674, at Groton ; m. July 7, 1696, at New London, William 
Morgan, the son of James and Mary (Vine) Morgan. He was born 
March 4. 1669, at Groton. He was first deacon of the First Church 
of Groton, which was organized in 1704. He died Dec. 25, 1750, at 
Groton. She died about 1755 and her estate was settled that year. 

Children of William and Hannah (Avery) Morgan (all born in 
Groton) : 

i. Williams, b. April 7, 1697, at Groton; m. ( ist. ) Sept. 21, 1721, at 
Groton, Hannah Stanton; m. (2d.) Sept. 24, 1747, at Groton, 
Sarah Seabury; d. May 14, 177S, at Groton. 
ii. Margarets, b. Sapt. 10, 169S; m. January 29, 1719, at Groton, 

Samuel Davis; d. August 15, 1724, at Groton. 
iii. Deborahs, b. July 14, 1700. 

iv. Hannahs, b ^ 1702. 

v. Jerushas, b. July 14, 1704; m. Feb. 5, 1724, at Groton, Humphrey 

Avery, (No ); d. Sept. 20, 1763, at Groton. 

vi. Josephs, b. Aug. 10, 1706; m. Dec. 4, 1735, at Groton, Dorothy 
Avery, (No ); d. Dae. i, 17S5, at Groton. 



6 AvEKv Notes and C^ukkiks. 

vii. Solomon'", h. Oct. 5, 1708 ; ni. July i, 174J, at Groton, Mary Wads- 
worth; (1. Nov. 22, 1791, at Groton. 

viii. Elizabeth^, b. July 10, 1710; m , at , 

John Avery, (No 1; d. before 1751, at Groton. 

ix. M.\ry5, b. January 5, 1714; ni. .\ui;. 7, 1937, at Groton, Jonas Belton. 



THE LAST ROLL CALL. 

Mrs. Ida Celeste (Perry) Avery, wife of Herbert Dalton Avery, 
the son of Alonzo Bailey Avery (No. 648, page 466), died December 
4, 1S99, at Denver, Colo. 

Mrs. Sarah (Avery) Brown (No. 1243, page 142) , daughter of 
Calvin and Lilly (Gilbert) Avery, and widow of Michael Sweetman 
Brown, died Dec. 21, 1899, at Albion, Mich. 

Nelson Willard French, son of Jolm Calvin and Margaret (Avery) 
French (No. iiio<i', page 127) died January 31, 1900, at Norwich, 
Conn., aged 42. His home was at Willimantic. 

Marion Frances Avery (No. 1324, page 153) died February 20, 
1900, at Danville, Va. 

Mrs. Julia Ann (Taylor) Sheffield, daughter of John Braman and 
Prudence (Avery) Taylor (No. 452, page 447), died Feb'y 32, 1900, at 
Lebanon. Conn. 

Frank K. Avery (No. 1324, page 536) died :\Iarch 9, 1900, at 
Phoenix, N. Y.. of which village he was the president. 

Henry Clay Avery (No. 405, page 377) died March 30, 1900, at 
Wadham's Mills, Essex County, N. Y. 

Mrs. Mary Eliza (Avery) Ferguson, daughter of Charles Avery 
(No. 514, page 453), died April 4, 1900, at Seelyville, Wayne Co., Pa. 

Warren Leroy Ferguson, son of the above, died Feb'y 26, 1900, 
at Seelyville, Pa. 

Howard William Ferguson, brother of the above, died March 24, 
1900, at vSeelyville. Pa. 

Mrs. Adeline Elizabeth (Lester) Warner, daughter of Mrs. Eliza- 
beth (Avery) Lester (No. 283, page 51), died April 21, 1900, at Nor- 
wich, Conn. vShe was born May 14, 1S09, at Groton. 



3 \{iN^ U A8TO«, LENOX AND 

V^ XJJ ^ I TH. DEN FO0NDAT10H8. i 

Rvcry jVotcs and Queries. 

A Quarterly Magazine devoted to the History of the Groton Averys. 



No. J t, "Honor thy Father and thy Mother." AugfUSt, 1900. 



The number and page references used in this magazine are to 
Sweet's "The Averys of Groton." published at vSyracuse, N. Y., in 
1894. 

If this magazine readies you wlio have not paid for it, please 
consider it an invitation to become a subscriber. 

The First Church of Christ at New London, Conn., will cele- 
brate its 350th anniversary early next year. The tirst names upon the 
roll of members of this church are "James Avery and Wife." Why 
not place a memorial tablet for James and Joanna in that ciuirch prior 
to its quarter-millenial celebration ? Make up your mind how much 
you are willing to give for that purpose and let me know. If the re- 
sponses are satisfactory, the work will be undertaken. More anon. 

In the article entitled ''The Search for Our English Ancestry" 
(see May number of Notes and Qjljeries), 1 asked : "VV^ill anyone 
become responsible for the payment of the hundred dollars in ques- 
tion? " Very promptly came a hundred-dollar draft, sent by Miss 
Carrie M. Powers, of Decatur, 111. Remittance to England was 
made and, on July 20, our genealogist wrote to me from London : 
"Yours at hand and I will at once attend to the matter." This 
"matter" is the definite determination of the accuracy of the suppo- 
sition that Christopher Avery came in 1630 from Salisbury, England. 

The plaster cast of the bust of Capt. James Avery that surmounts 
the shaftof the recentlydedicatedmemorialatGrotonhasbeen presented 
by the sculptor to the x\very Memorial Association and is now in 
Groton. It will probably be placed in the monument house between 
Fort Griswold and the battle monument. This house has so many in- 
teresting objects that the Daughters of t!:ie American Revolution have 
undertaken the task of enlarging it. 

On page 135 of Notes and Qlteries appear the name and date 
of birthof Prudence 5 Avery, the seventh childof JamesandMary (Gris- 
wold) Avery. Further search for her descendants is made unnecessary 
by the fact that a few weeks ago Mrs. Elroy M. Avery and Miss 
Addie A. Thomas found her gravestone in the old Avery -Morgan 
burying-ground at Poquonoc and from it learned that she dieol at the 
age of seventeen. 



138 Avery Notes and Q^ueries. 

THE NEW FAMILY HISTORY. 

.Vs the revision of Mr. vSweet's "The Averys of Groton'" has ad- 
vanced, T have t^iven much thought to the serious problem of how it 
should be published, The problem is serious because very few such 
works bring in enough money to pay for printing and binding. I 
have gladly done a great deal of work and ha\e spent, in the gather- 
ing of material for revision, at least two thousand dollars more than 
I have received. Much more work must be done and more money 
spent before "copy" can be sent to the printer. In addition to this 
and that. I cannot afford the risk, of a deficit of several thousand dol- 
lars in publication. Two plans have been chiefly considered : 

1. To provide a guaranty fund by subscription ; the loss in pub- 
lication to be met by the subscribers in proportion to their several 
subscriptions. 

2. To ask for advance subscriptions for a suliicienT: number of 
volumes at a sufficient price to meet the cost of publication. 

Both of these plans disregard the labor and monev involved in 
the gathering of the material and its preparation for the printer. 
Most of these are the contributions made bv my wife and mvself. 
Both plans are open to serious objections. A third plan is to give 
the prepared manuscript to a publisher and let him print and bind 
the book and sell the copies for what he can get. With due regard to 
mechanical and artistic excellence and moderate cost, the objections 
to this plan seem insuperable. Mr Sweet printed only four hundred 
copies of his edition and was unable to dispose of them at five dollars 
each. We w^ant for the new edition, better paper, better illustration, 
better printing and better binding than we got in the first edition, 
and we do not want to pay any more than is necessary to secure them. 
A year ago I offered to give all of my genealogical material to anv 
one who would carry out my plans, to subscribe for twenty-five cop- 
ies of the book at the regular subscription price, and to pay twenty 
dollars a year for not more than five years to help defray the expenses 
of completing the family records. See Avery Notes and (Queries, 
page 102. No one has vet accepted the offer which is still open. 

I now submit to all persons interested the following proposition : 
The revised edition of the history of the Groton Avery clan will 
be published bv me in two volumes. The changes from the first edi- 
tion are radical and numerous. I shall make the work as nearly ac- 



Avert Notes and (^jtrries. 139 

curate and complete as 1 can. In mechanical execution it will be 
much superior to the existing edition. I am ready to receive subscrip- 
tions and will begin printing as soon as orders for five hundred copies 
are received. The terms are as follows : 

The price of the completed work will be ten dollars. 

Each order must be accompanied by an advance payment or five 
dollars for each copy ordered, the remaining five dollars to be paid 
upon receipt of notice that the two volumes are ready for delivery. 
If the prescribed five hundred subscriptions are not received within a 
reasonable period, the advance payments will be refunded by me. As 
to my pecuniary responsibility, etc., you may inquire (enclosing re- 
turn postage, of course^ of any Cleveland bank. 

If this proposition meets your approval, send in your order and 
money. If you do not like it, please suggest a better plan. At all 
events, let me hear from you. 



DEDICATION OF THE AVERY MEMORIAL. 

In 1630, Christopher Avery and his only son, James, came from 
England to America. In 1649, Jam.es Avery became a resident of 
New London, Connecticut. In 1650, he and his wife became mem- 
bers of the First Church of New London, their names being first on 
the roll of members. In 1656, he built a house on his farm at the 
head of Poquonoc Plain, in the present town of Groton, a mile and 
a half from the River Thames. In 1684, he bought the old Blinman 
meeting-house at New London, "the unadorned church and watch- 
tower of the wilderness," moved its material to Poquonoc, and re- 
built it as the completion of what was his home and that of his de- 
scendants for eight successive generations. This "Hive of the 
Averys" is pictured on pages 5 and 78 of this magazine. On the 
night of July 20, 1S94, the historic home was burned. It ruins are 
pictured on page 48 of this magazine. Then The Avery Memorial 
Association was incorporated by special act of the Connecticut legis- 
lature, received the old homestead site by deed of gift from its owner, 
James Denison Avery, and there erected a granite memorial in what 
is now known as Avery Memorial Park. The memorial and lot are 
pictured on page loi of this magazine. In the last year, the granite 
shaft was surmounted by a bronze bust of the builder of the "Old 
Hive," Capt. James Avery, founder of the Groton Avery clan. The 



[40 



A\EKv Notes and Oteries, 



bust IS pictured on page 128 of thi^ inaL(;r/,iiie. It was designed by 
the tli>tiiiguished seulptor. Ik'la Lyon l*r;ttt. an Avery descendant . 
and was cast by the Gorham company of I'rovidence, R. I. It is of he- 
roic size and represents the founder as a typical Puritan Indian- 
tighter and magistrate. Tlie Puritan hat, expressive face, broad col- 
hir. the twelve buttons of tlie coat typifying twelve terms in the 
Connecticut ireneral court, the crossed tomahawks and the state seal 




UELA LVON PRATT. 

make a picture good to look upon. It might be risky for one of 
Avery blood to speak of it as he would, but the descriptions given-by 
disinterested reporters speak of the face as "grand," showing "high 
resolution, sternness of endeavor, and mighty^ will," while ''in the 
mouth is a suspicion of tenderness and deep feeling." Again, "one 
can see in the fine brow, the noble cheek, and the grand chin, the 
idealization of a stern, resolute, straightforward character, slow to 
anger and able to feel mercv.'" To another, it tells '-the story of that 



Avery Notes and Queries. 141 

tenderness of heart, mingled with strict regard for the right which 
distinguished James Avery on the bench as a law giver and a law in- 
terpreter, as well as of the mercy that made him and Captain Denison 
entreat the general court to be more merciful to the conquered Pe- 
quots." That strangers read in the bronze these veritable character- 
istics of our great ancestor is complimentary to the sculptor, for he 
had no portrait to give shape to his concept. A brief sketch of Mr. 
Pratt and his work appears on page 129 of this magazine. His por- 
trait is herewith given. 

The exercises dedicatory of the completed memorial were held at 
the Avery Memorial Park on the afternoon of July 30, 1900, the 
sixth anniversary of the burning of "The Hive." The weather was 
delightful, the local arrangements were complete, and the exercises 
were equally simple and interesting. A large flag-decorated tent, 
with a platform for the speakers and chairs for the ladies, did its duty, 
while the trees furnished grateful shade for many. By special ar- 
rangement, railway trains going in each direction stopped at the 
park, where probably six hundred persons gathered, most of them 
members of the clan. The "Standard" band of New London filled 
the park and near-by woods with sweet sound. The floral decorations 
were providedand lemonade was served by the members of the Thomas 
Avery society of the Children of the American Revolution. This 
patriotic organization was named in honor of the seventeen-year old 
hero who fell nobly doing his duty in the memorable defense of Fort 
Griswold in 17S1. Under the guidance of Mrs. Cuthbert H. Slocum, 
state director of the Children of the American Revolution, and of 
Miss Addie Avei-y Thomas, president of the Poquonoc Bridge society, 
these coming citizens are being trained in reverent regard for the 
heroic dead and a corresponding recognition of their own obligation 
and duty to country. The work already done by them is notable 
and worthy of emulation by many of the hereditary, patriotic societies 
composed of "grown-ups." 

The reception committee consisted of the officers of the associa- 
tion, assisted by Mrs. Elisha S. Thomas of Poquonoc Bridge, Mrs. 
Abel H. Simmons of Mystic. Mrs. Joseph G. Cavarly of New Lon- 
don, Miss M. Jane Avery of Groton, Miss Cora AdrianaMarsh of New 
London, MissCassie Holman of Saybrook, and Airs. Daniel S. Marsh of 
New London. 

About half past three o'clock, Dr. Elroy McKendree Avery, of 

(Continued on page 143) 



142 AvERV Notes and C^uhries. 

Hvcry JVotcs and Queries. 



The official organ of ll^e Avery Memorial Association, of Groton, Conn 
and of the Historian of the Groton Averys 



Pj<hlhhed by EIroy M. Avery, at 657 Woodland Hills Avcuiic, 
Cleveland. Ohio. , 



Subsc7-iption Price, Fifty cents per year . Fifteen cents per copy. 

Entered at the Cleveland, O., postoffice as second-class matter 

THE GROTOX AVERY HISTORY CLUB. 



Since the last report, club dues for 1900 have been received as follows : 

Mrs. Frances L. W. Robinson, Norwich, Conn % i 00 

Reuben X. Avery, Aurora, O i.oo 

I\Irs. Adaline A. Shepard, Torrington, Conn i.oo 

Miss Mary L. Avery, New York City .- i.oo 

Mrs. Frances K. Hallock, Cromwell, Conn i.oo 

Mrs. Egbert Isaac Avery, Manlius, N. Y i.oo 

Mrs. Susan Look Avery, Louisville, Ky 5.00 

Charles R. Stark, Providence, R. 1 2.50 

Daniel H. Treadway, Groton, Conn 2.00 

Miss Addie Avery Thomas, Groton, Conn i.oo 

Lewis B. Avery, Redlands, California, i.oo 

Emily R. Samaine, Dorchester, Mass., i.oo 

All persons paying club dues are entitled to the magazine without 
other payment. Dues are paid simply for the purpose of helping 
carry on the work of the family historian. Each member determines 
what his annual payment shall be — within the limits of one and ten 
dollars. You are eligible to membership, and your remittance will be 
gladly received and acknowledged in this magazine. 

This issue of the Avery Xotes and (Queries is largely given 
up to an account of the doings at the dedication of the Averj^ me- 
morial at Poquonoc, in the town of Groton. Conn., on the twen- 
tieth of July. The usual edition of the magazine consists of a thous- 
and copies ; this edition, two thousand. I hope that each Avery de- 
scendant who receives a copy will find it interesting enough to induce 
him or her to become a regular subscriber or a member of the Groton 
Avery History Club. 



Avery Notes and Oi^eries. 143 

(Continued from page 141) 

Cleveland, rapped for order with a gavel made from wood which was 
saved from the old house at the time of its destruction, introduced 
himself, announced that for the rest of the day formal, personal in- 
troductions were out of order, and called upon the Rev. S.Leroy Blake, 
D. D., of New London to invoke the divine blessing. Dr. Blake 
told the people that he wos pastor of the church of which Capt. 
James Avery was a member as early as 1650, and that Captain 
Avery's name headed the original list of members. He reminded the 
audience that the old Avery house had been first of all the building 
in which the First Church of Christ worshipped in New London and 
that when it became too small for the church it was sold to Captain 
Avery who removed it to the lot on which they were standing. He 
aisoshowedan old Bible which had been the property of Parke Avery, 
a Separatist minister, who about loo years ago conducted religious 
services in the old house. He then asked the blessing of Almighty 
God upon the assembly. 

The address of welcome was then delivered by the Hon. Charles 
A. Russell of Killingly, the member of congress from the New Lon- 
don district. Mr. Russell said, in part : 
The Welcome. 

•'In the absence of the governor of the commonwealth of Con- 
necticut it has been given to me to welcome this assembly. I do so 
right gladly regretting of course that the executive of this state, so 
rich in the relics and memories of the history of localities and of the 
strong personalities who laid the foundation and built the structure of 
our grand commonwealth, is not able to be present and to express the 
satisfaction I am sure he feels, for himself and the state, that today a 
memorial is added to the long line of tributes which mark the birth 
and development of the commonwealth. Any association that pre- 
serves the record of great deeds and strong personalities is doing good 
work. Memorials are the milestones for the guidance of futurity 
along the road of duty and of progress. Memorials, tablets and 
statues of great deeds and strong men are to cheer and instruct in 
future generations. 

"I but express for the county and state pride and gratitude that 

this Avery association, heirs of a noble lineage, have added and are 

now dedicating a tribute to one of our founders. To me it seems 

J^roper that this memorial is placed on the home hearthstone, on the 



144 AvEHv Notes and Queries. 

spot where dwelt tlie character commemorated. The man and the 
deed are associated with the locality and the home. It is not my part 
in the program to speak of James Avery, of that life and character 
which did so much for the power and influence of those early days of 
Connecticut settlement. We all know that James Avery was a stal 
wart in his t^eneration, that from the home he built went forth power 
and intluence. Your ancestor was one of the strong pillars on^which 
New England was reared — a character which has been engrafted into 
the national tree. I am glad that in this spot you place a memorial 
which sheds honor on all the worthy dames and the worthy fathers 
who built up this grand old commonwealth. It is an incentive for 
patriotism and for sturdy lives. 

"Mr. Presidenfand friends, speaking in behalf of the governor, 
1 welcome this assembly and express for him thanks to the people and 
thanks to the association which has carried forward to completion 
this memorial." 

Mr. Russell's address was a happy combination of dignity and 
ease. It was thoughtful and thought-begetting and was heartily 
applauded. 

The Response. 
In his response to the address of welcome, the chairman said : 
"To Mr. Russell, to the governor and to all of the people of 
Connecticut who are not members of the Avery clan, in behalf of the 
Avery Memorial Association I receive the welcome that has been so 
kindly given in the spirit in which it was extended. We thank' you 
for your tribute to our grand ancestor and for your words of praises 
for his descendants. 

•'Twenty years ago as one of eighteen hundred soldiers of the 
civil war, I went from Cleveland to Mentor, (Jhio, to pay my respects 
to James A. Garfield. On that occasion Garfield said : "It is a great 
honor for any man eighteen years after the war to see eighteen hun- 
dred survivors of that war gathered in his dooryard. After that, it 
matters little what happens or what does not happen." In the same 
spirit, the idea comes to me that two hundred years after his warfare 
was ended, he, whose life we commemorate, if he were here (and who 
may say that he is not here) might feel and express a gratification to 
see here these hundreds gathered from the remotest bounds of our 
giant country— a giant that holds an ocean in either hand, bathes his 
brow in the cool waters of our northern lakes, and with his feet 
splashes the tepid waters of the gulf. 



Avery Notks and Queries. 



145 



"We speak often of James Avery. It is strange that we know 
so little of Joanna Greenslade Avery, his wife. We know little of 
her character, her ancestry or her death, but it is safe to say that in 
the seventeenth century no one called here to see the head of the house 
and was told that it was impossible because she was away attending 
a meeting of the Daughters of the American Revolution. But of one 
thing we may be sure, the woman who had the intellectual, moral 
and physical strength to be the mother of the family gathered here 
today was no ordinary woman.'' Dr. Avery tlien asked the descend- 
ants of Joanna Greenslade Avery to rise, and when his request was 
jcomplied with, said : "I dedicate this moment to the memory of the 
wife and mother." 

The report of the New London '"Morning Telegraph" states that 
"Dr. Avery spoke well and modestly and was well received." "If 
you see it in the Telegraphy it's true." The chairman announced 
that the audience would seek relief in music, and the band played 
"The Red, White and Blue." 




FRANK MON 



The chairman then announced the orator of the day, Mr. Frank 
Montgomery Avery, of New York City (No. 221 1, page 299), with the as- 
suring affirmation that "Frank's all right." The orator then verified 
the chairman's statement in the following words : 



146 AVEKV XoTf:s AND QuERlES. 

The Oration. 

We have assembled here today to join in the dedication of a me- 
morial ; not of a monument erected to the memory of any one man ;g 
not of a shaft or tablet to commemorate the happening of a greati 
historical event or the accomplishment of some illustrious personal'' 
achievement : but of a memorial designed to designate the spot where 
the roots of a family tree struck deep and strong enough to take per- ( 
manent hold in the soil of New England, and whence its branched 
have spread out far and wide and lusty with the strength of the 
parent stock. It is to honor the place of our forefathers' refuge and 
abode, of their struggles and triumphs, their birth place and theii 
death place through the early generations, that this shaft has been 
erected on the site of the first of their homesteads, and that \ve are 
here today. 

We have not come to indulge in the unprofitable rites of ancestoi 
worship, but we are here to show that we are not lacking in respect 
and reverence for our ancestors. We have no wish, in the poverty ot 
pride, to try to gild our lesser lives in t!ie reflected light of sorne tea! 
or fancied glorv of theirs ; but this we will do — here today on thi:- 
hallowed spot — we shall renew to them and to each other the pledge 
of our acceptance of the heritage they left to us in trust, the responsi- 
bility of worthily bearing an honest and an honored name, of doing; 
each of us his daily duty as they did theirs, and of passing on tc 
those who follow us an unblemished record which, though it may noi 
be embellished with the story of any great and glorious deed of oui 
doing, shall at least have no blank spaces to hint of actions bettei 
left untold. 

Before making what must necessarily be only a brief reference 
to the family or clan kno^vn as the "Groton Averys,"' it may not be 
unprofitable to speak for a moment of the class of men by whom the 
New England colonies were settled. In the first place these mer 
were not, as was the case in some of the other settlements in America 
the younger sons of the lesser or greater nobility; they were not 
greedy or unscrupulous adventurers come on tlving visits in search oi 
booty or gain ; they were not men shippeel over the sea for the gooci 
of the community which rid itself of them : they were, almost ex- 
clusively, men of the middle class or yeomanry of England; men oil 
some substance, of much intelligence, and of strong will and sturdyl 



Avery Notes and Queries. 147 

character. They came bringing with them in many cases their wives 
and families, and in some instances their domestic servants; tliey 
came voluntarily and with the intention of taking up their permanent 
abode in the New World, and of founding communities where they 
and their children might live in that condition of civil and religious 
liberty which they desired. It is iniportant to remember that it was 
not alone "freedom to worship God," but also freedom to manage 
their temporal aft'airs as to them seemed best that our forefathers 
braved the passage of the seas. If we would understand the charac- 
ter of the times and of the people, we must not lose sight of the fact 
that there were in England large numbers of political as well as re- 
ligious Puritans. Even the Pilgrim Fathers, in forsaking the home 
country, were actuated some by the one motive, some by the other, 
and some by both. Among these colonists were a few men of higher 
position, gentry, such as Winthropforexample,and witheachcommun- 
ity were a church organization and a minister. The clergymen .were 
generally men of good education and strong character, and were well 
fitted to be political and intellectual as well as spiritual leaders of men. 

The early settlers of Connecticut were republican in a ver\' full 
meaning of the term. While other English colonies in the New 
World were governed by lords and royal governors, and were under 
more or less direct control of the crown, the colony of Connecticut 
early adopted what is the first example of a written constitution, and 
organized a complete, practical, working government, with executive, 
legislative and military departments; with governors and officials 
elected by the people, and with powers defined by the constitution. 
The elections were by the vote of all who had been made "Freemen," 
These elected from their number deputies to the general assembly, and 
by this legislative body laws were made and repealed and levies were 
granted. This constitution was adopted in 1639; not until iSiS was 
a more modern constitution found necessary or desirable. 

The oath of office of the governor and other state officials con- 
tained no reference to the king of England^ or mention of allegiance to 
him — only to the commonwealth. It was no longer "God save the King," 
but "God protect the people." With the exception of Winthrop and 
Sir Edmund Andros — the former named in the charter for one year, 
and the latter a usurper whom the people never recognized — Connec- 
ticut has always chosen her own governors, legislators and judges ; 
has collected her own taxes and expended them for her own purposes ; 



H^ AvEKv Notes and (^rHRiEs. 

and has commissioned her own military officers. So you see that from 
the very earliest days Connecticut was a republic until she became 
part of a greater republic. The military company was an important 
factor in each colonial community of New Eno-land. Its leaders were 
the most prominent men in the colony, often combining with their 
military duties those of legislative and judicial office. The Connecti- 
cut colonist was not burdened with any chivahic or fantastic idea of 
personal honor; he was no ruffler ; but he had a severe, dominating 
and unyielding sense of duty. He made stringent laws, and when 
made he suffered no breach of them to go unpunished. He had few 
amusements and there was little light-hearted gayety. Life was a 
stern and solemn duty in all things, great and small. 

To the settlement at New London, first called the Pequot Plan- 
tation, came in 164S, the Reverend Richard Blinman, who was to be- 
come the clergyman of the community. With him from Gloucester, 
Mass., came James Avery, who in 1630 had come as a lad in com- 
pany with his father, Christopher Avery, from England. James 
Avery at once became prominent in the civil and military affairs of 
the colony. Most of you are familiar with his life. It wmII be enough 
therefore to say that he was successively ensign, lieutenant and cap- 
tain in the military organization, serving at one time as second in 
command under Governor Winthrop. He was twelve times elected 
deputy to the general assembly; for years he was upon the bench. 
During his life there were few important matters in the colony with 
which he was not connected. Serving throughout King Philip's war 
in command of a • ^pany of English and Indian allies, and after- 
wards commanding a company to protect the frontier, he was one of 
those "able Gentlemen and resolute Soldiers" spoken of by Hubbard, 
the contemporaneous historian. From him through his' four sons, 
James, Jr., Thomas, John, and Samuel, the Groton Averys 
descend. It is right that special mention be made of him to- 
day, and it is peculiarly fitting that this memorial should bear in last- 
ing bronze the likeness of him from whom all of the Groton Avery 
descendants trace their line. 

It would be impossible within the limits of any reasonable address 
even to refer to others of the family name who have taken an im- 
portant part in aft'airs, but of the one great tragic and perhaps un- 
paralleled event in which we all have a common interest, and from 
the participators in which most of you descend, I will speak briefiy. 



Avery Notes and Qj^teries. 149 

not to laud individuals, but for the honor of the name. On the sixth 
day of September, 1781, a British expeditionary force under command 
of Benedict Arnold, major-general by rank and traitor by profession, 
and by the way a native of these parts, sacked and burned the towns 
of New London and Groton. Fort Griswold was defended by a 
garrison of one hundred and fifty men. Some of them were officers 
belonging to the military detachment stationed there, others were 
officers of the Continental army at home on leave of absence or by 
reason of the expiration of term of service, and some were volunteers. 
The British numbered [about sixteen hundred men of all arms, and 
about half of them engaged in the storming of the fort on this side of 
the river. More than once the garrison was called upon to surrender, 
and more than once it refused. Again and again the fort's defenders 
repulsed the determined assault. Time does not serve to tell the whole 
story of that day. It is enough to say that finally yielding to over- 
powering numbers the fort surrendered, but not until eighty-eight of 
the garrison lay dead, with the remainder more or less severely 
wounded. Among the defenders of the fort were sixteen who bore 
the name of Avery. Of these nine w^ere killed, three were wounded, 
and four were taken prisoners. Such are the bald facts. 

There was once a man who simply did his duty ; who declined 
all rank ; who refused even the title of "First Grenadier of France." 
When he came to die they enshrined his heart in a silver urn (which, 
by the way, the French Government within the last few days has 
asked of nis heirs, so that it may be placed in the Pantheon, that build- 
ing in Paris dedicated " To the Memory of Men who have served 
France") and for years whenever upon dress parade or review^ the roll 
of his regiment w as called, the soldier who bore the casket answered 
to the name of Tour d'Auvergne : "Dead on the Field of Glory." 
In some such spirit as this we have enshrined in our hearts the mem- 
ory of these heroes and martyrs of our name whose names may be read 
inscribed on the monument yonder by the Fort. It is in their honor 
that we read the roll : Captain Elijah Avery, killed in action; Cap- 
tain Elisha Avery, killed in action ; Lieutenant Ebenezer Avery, Jr., 
killed in action ; Ensign Daniel Avery, killed in action ; Sergeant 
Christopher Avery, killed in action ; Sergeant Jasper Avery, killed 
in action ; Sergeant Solomon Avery, killed in action ; David Avery, 
killed in action; Thomas Avery (aged 17), killed in action ; Lieu- 
tenant Parke Avery, wounded ; Ensign Ebenezer Avery, wounded ; 



150 A\ KKV XOTKS AND CELERIES 

Amos A very . wounded : Caleb Avery, Peter Ayery, Nathan Ayery 
and Riifus Ayery, prisoners of \\-ar, and it \yas only by some strange 
good fortune of war that \ye are not called upon to answer to their 
names as well, "Killed in action I Dead on the Field of Glory!" 
For there are battle-fields of glory as there are battle-fields of shame ; 
just as there are battles of conquest, of oppression, of hatred and of 
greed, and battles for freedom, for mankind, for the right. It was in- 
deed glorious to fight as these men fought, to die as these men died. 

Such were our ancestors. This was the part they bore in colonial 
and reyolutionary days. They were not great men as the world knows 
greatness. Those whose names and deeds are recorded at all in his- 
tory have but a modest page in the annals of a town, of a county, of 
at most a single state. The great world knows nothing of them. 
But they were good men and true — they ^vere honest and faithful and 
trustable men throughout all the long line ; "able Gentlemen and reso- 
lute Soldiers :"' men wlio simply did their duty : faithtul ;. faithful in 
success; faithful in failure ; faithful unto death. It is an ancestry of 
which we are proud ; of which we haye a right to be proud : of which 
it is our duty to be proud. The name they left us carries no story of 
dishonor; the blood they gave us bears no raint. We are descended 
from no titled pander: from no wanton butcher of men; from no 
tanta^tic courtier; from no swaggering dicer or blustering bully; 
from no king's bastard; such as cumber the pages of history with 
their notorious names and still more notorious deeds; but from honest 
men of sturdy stock, such as peopled all Xew England and from 
whose loins sprang a race of freemen, sons of the soil and lords in 
the realm of labor; who struck the plains and reaped their bounty ; 
w^ho struck the hills and made them yield their treasure ; who struck 
the forests, and lo ! upon the waters sailed forth their ships to traverse 
the distant seas. 

Now what does all this amount to? Are w^e doing what we have 
just disclaimed.' Have we after all been* indulging in a sort of left- 
handed self-glorification— a kind of Chinese ancestor worship"' If 
so. there is no good in it. But I think there is nothing in this of so 
mean a quality. The Chinese worships his ancestors, oblivious of all 
the progress that is going on about him, with his face tow-ard the 
past and his back to the future, making his ancestors his gods. We 
contemplate the lives and actions and characteristics of our forefath- 
ers as a source of inspiration, and for the hope and promise and les- 
son that we may gain. 



Avery Notes and Qlteries. 151 

Why do we care to recall the story of our ancestors' lives? Why 
do we care to recount how some of them died? Merely to live, and 
to do one's duty, and to die is nothing. It is the cause, the motive, 
the example that we seek. From the lives and struggles and sacri- 
fices, even from the deaths of these who have gone before, we learn 
the lesson of Americanism ; we find running through the \vhole story 
the motive, the principle which, originating in New England, has 
become part of our national life, and which even in our wars has 
animated the heart of the nation and has kept awake its conscience. 
When we have had to fight, we have fought not for greed, not for 
revenge, not for conquest, not for power, not for dominion-, but for 
the right, for duty, for the betterment of conditions, for the uplifting 
of the down-trodden, for enlightenment, for liberty, for equality, for 
enfranchisement. 

It is this spirit and this motive that should be ours as it was our 
ancestors' ; and it is with this spirit and from this motive and for this 
principle that we are in Cuba and in Porto Rico; that our men are 
enduring hardships in the wildernesses of the Philippines; it is this 
sentiment that will make us shrink from no duty however hard ; and if, 
in the providence of God, such shall be the destiny of this nation and 
the heavenly mission of the -'starry flag," it is this spirit and this 
motive and this principle that we shall take with us into wider fields, 
even though the path of duty lies through the open door, beyond the 
confines of the China seas. (Mr. Avery here spoke of the Avery Me- 
morial Association, which was incorporated shortly after the destruc- 
tion of the old Avery homestead by fire on the night of July 20th, 
1894, which house was built by Captain James Avery in 1656, and 
was occupied by eight successive generations of Averys, passing by 
inheritance from father to son, of the objects of the association, and 
the erection of the memorial.) 

Such then is the memorial which we dedicate today. In an im- 
portant sense it is a monument — a monument to the memory of an 
old house. For those who have dwelt in it, for those who have passed 
from its doors to make homes for themselves and who have long since 
gone the way of all that is mortal, we make no lamentation ; but for 
the old house there is regret ; there is sorrow ; there is a sense of loss. 
For the old "Plive," not for those who lived and died therein, have 
we inscribed on the memorial Hinc illce lacryiine — "hence these 
tears." For years it was a place of pilgrimage; it seemed to have 



152 AVEKV XOTKS AND (^I'ERIES. 

taken on a peculiar charm durinfr its long life. The old homestead 
reached the age of nearly two hundred and fifty years, venerable in- 
deed for this continent. I'^ight generations lived beneath its roof. 
Around it where once had extended miles upon miles of untraversed 
forest had grown a busy state, with all the bustle and hurry of mod- 
ern life, and yet in the quiet place where it stood its rooms were full 
of memories. It bore its age with dignity and it was revered. Now% 
above its ashes this memorial shall stand to keep the old house in 
memory. It belongs to us, to each of us. No matter where we may 
make our homes, whether near or far, it shall be to us a place of pil- 
grimage. We shall stand alone on this spot dedicated to its memory, 
and if we will but attune our ears to listen, the whisper of the wind will 
bring to us the echoes of olden times; we may hear the patter of 
little feet over the old floors ; in the rooms the voice of love and the 
word of prayer shall sound again : or in the hush and silence of the 
place we shall seem to hear the laughter and tears of childhood and the 
tears and laughter of age; and the spirit of the old '^Hive," gained 
only by a house wherein men have been born and have lived and loved 
and wrought and died through generations, shall be about the place. 

They tell a story of the olden time, how building to God's glory 
across the sea a chapel in a little village, there came a time of drought 
and all the wells and streams ran nearly dry and there was scarcely 
water to keep the folk from perishing, and not a drop to mix the mortar 
for the church. And that this w^ork, destined to God's service, should 
not stop, the villagers came, each man bringing his store of wine — 
this one a whole cellar full, and this a few precious flasks hoarded 
against some festal day, the marriage of a daughter, or to make merry 
on the home-coming of a son from the wars — each came and brought 
all that he had and poured it freely out. And so the mortar was 
mixed with wine, and so the work went on. and so the church was 
built. And the legend says that even to this day, toward evening 
when the soft bells chime, there breathe sweet odors from the church 
which all the dav the loving sun has kissed, as though the wine 
poured forth in sacrifice could never lose its fragrance. 

And thus the lives and the sacrifices of those who have gone be- 
fore shall sanctify this place, and whenever we shall come in pil- 
grimage, in person or in thought, shall be a loving and a fragrant 
memorv to each of us who shares their blood : to every one of us who 
bears the name. 



Avery Notes and Quehiej 



53 



Unveiling the Bust. 

Dr. Avery then announced tliat tlie time had arrived for the un- 
veiling of the bust. When the question was asked as to \vJ:o should, 
unveil the memorial, all, with the exception of herself, had agreed that 
the honor belonged to her who had planned and built the memorial — 
Miss Helen Morgan Avery. While Miss Avery removed the flag 




THE MEMORIAL. 



Miss Bessie Hancox of vStonington sang "America," to the accompani- 
ment of the band. As hundreds stogd with bared heads and reverent 
gaze, and the starry banner fell revealing the idealized features of the 
Founder, the words of "My country 'tis of thee "took on new meaning. 
The song, lifted by a voice of wondrous purity and power, was like a 
prayer of trustful hope and triumph. In that solemn moment, few- 
eyes were undimmed. 



I;^^ , AVEKV XoTK^ AND C^IERIES. 

Election of Officers. 

Then came the annual ineetiiiLj of the association. The only bus- 
iness to be transacted was the election of otficers for the ensuing year, 
which resulted as follows : 

President — Dr. Elroy ]McKendrec Avery of Cleveland, O. 

Vice Presidents— Frank Montgomery Avery of Ne\v York. Allen 
Avery of Mvstic. Trueman G. Avery of Buffalo, ChristopherL. Avery 
of Groton, Gen. Robert Avery of Brooklyn. John O. Spicer of Gro- 
ton, Edgar M. Warner of Putnam. 

Secretary — Miss Helen ]SIorgan Avery of New London. 

Treasurer — Miss Addie Avery Thomas of Groton. 

Executive Committee— ElroyM. Avery, Helen M. Avery, Addie A. 
Thomas. William S. Thomas, Cyrus Avery, Allen Avery, Chris- 
topher L. Avery. Mrs. John O. Spicer, Mrs. Francis M. Manning. 

After the election the business meeting was speedily adjourned. 

At this point Gen. Robert Avery attempted a quiet withdrawal, 
but the chairman made an innocent-looking and elTective rearward 
movement that cut ofiF his retreat and forced him to face the 
audience. Gen. Avery w-as equal to the emergency and in a few 
earnest words won the admiration of the audience. After one leg and 
a crutch had carried the veteran from the platform, Dr. Avery in- 
formed the people that the general was a survivor of the civil war who 
had won his title by service. He is now on the retired list of the 
army. 

When the chairman attempted to introduce the next speaker, one 
of the clan who noticed the word "Poem" on the printed program, 
interrupted with an inquiry as to w^hether "the poet is to be turned 
down?" The chair promptly answered, "Xo, the poet has not turned 
up." After the consequent laughter, the Hon. Edgar M. Warner, of 
Putnam. Conn., an Avery descendant, was announced. Judge War- 
ner spoke as follows : 

The Closing Address. 

After all that has been said, you hardly need a single "closing 
word."" I should however be recreant to the memory of a beloved 
and sainted mother and grandmother if I refused to add my tribute of 
praise to the noble men of early generations whose virtues we cele- 
brate today. 



Avery Notes and Queries. 155 

In considering the life of Cupt. James Avery, founder of our 
family, extending as it did from 1620 to 1700, we are transported into 
one of the most illustrious and glorious periods of the world's history. 
He must have been familiar with the great life and thoughts of John 
Milton, and the struggle for free government in England successful 
under Cromwell and his contemporaries. The great discussion of 
human rights, the unparalelled agitation which led to the settlement 
of Plymouth and the founding of the Massachusetts Bay colony may 
well have been the inspirations of his early manhood. He was dis- 
tinctively a pioneer. He surely believed in the right of the individual 
man to work out his own destiny. Building his home here in the 
then wilderness in 1656, his only neighbors the Indians, and the 
nearest white settlement New London, he showed that courage and 
fearlessness that characterized the early settlers of New England. 
He seems to have been early prominent in public life, presumably 
knew the original settlers at Hartford, and doubtless listened to the 
logical and powerful preaching of Thomas Hooker, the founder of 
Connecticut and thereby one of the greatest leaders of free govern- 
ment in the whole world. 

I am glad that our young kinsman, Mr. Pratt, whom I am proud 
to remember as a bright-eyed lad who used to come into his father's 
ofHce in Norwich where I was reading law, has placed on this statue 
the state seal with its three vines. Those three vines, I know, are 
supposed by some to represent the three original towns of Hartford, 
Wethersfield and Windsor, but I better like the significance given 
them later, Knowledge, Liberty, and Religion : Knowledge, that 
ripened wisdom w-hich guides men in the right way in relation to the 
facts in the history of the past, and the rights and duties of mankind; 
Liberty, that freedom of action, public and private, which permits 
the highest development of the individual ; Religion, that Vision 
vSplendid which, revealing the brotherhood of man, links him with 
the Divine Father and raises him into relations with the Infinite. 
These three must not be separated, for knowledge without liberty and 
religion becomes a torment and leaves man a prisoner chafing against 
his bars : liberty without knowledge and religion degenerates into 
license and anarchy; religion without knowledge and liberty becomes 
bigotry and superstition. Verily, this state has always illustrated 
these qualities, for it is founded upon them. 



156 AvKl{^• NtrrKs and C^I'eiues. 

One ol" the most precious heirlooms of this family is the Bible of 
the Founder, handed down as it has been to successive generations. 
Herein we have a suggestion of tliat splendid religious faith and 
trust, that lirm and steadfast belief in (iod and reliance upon Him, 
one of the chief characteristics of our forefathers. Earthly help and 
assistance were denied them ; tlieir own strong right arm, sustained by 
faith in the unseen God, the Almighty Helper, was their only support, 
but even so. they walked unharmed amid dangers seen and unseen. 
Boldly and yet modestly they proclaimed their religious faith. They 
believed that they were fighting for the Almighty as well as for the 
rights of man. Like the Israelites of old whom they emulated, they 
did not fear although a host encamped against them. In our state 
motto we find that trust and confidence exhibited as in that of no other 
colony : ^ui transtiilit sustinef. 

We of the present reap what our fathers have sown. They 
builded better than they knew, and millions from all nations of the 
earth rise up and call them blessed. The little state founded in the 
wilderness has grown to be a world empire, glorious in the hearts 
and hopes of all mankind and destined to decide the fate of nations. 
The present owes a large debt of gratitude to the past. What we 
have received from our forefathers we must hand down unsullied to 
our children. The descendant of noble sires does not quite fulfil his 
mission in life unless he too does noble deeds. Will anybody know or 
care who we were or what we did after 250 years shall have grown 
moss over oi/r graves? There are yet noble lives to be lived, aye, noble 
lives to be given up in the cause of freedom and justice. There are 
yet noble sacrifices to be made, battles to be fought, victories to be 
won. What shall be the verdict of the grand assize as to each one of 
us.^ .Surely only that which shall come to every true-hearted, self- 
sacrificing man. If we are, in our day and generation, faithful to 
the call of duty and follow the Inner Light of the Soul, whether in 
humble or exalted station, each shall hear the welcome greeting: 
"Thou hast been faithful over a few things, I will make thee ruler 
over many things : enter thou into the joy of thy lord." 

The Finish. 
The Rev. John Avery of Norwich, Conn., spoke in his charac- 
teristic brief and interesting manner, after which the chairman an- 
nounced that formality would give way for handshaking. Until the 






Avery Notks and Q.uekirs. 15^ 



arrival of the railway trains, the time was spent in getting better ac- 
quainted. The only regret felt by any was the forced brevity of the 
afternoon, which made impossible the presentation of many venerable 
and distinguished visitors whom the clan desired to see and hear. 
There was an universal desire to hear from Judge Richard A. Wheel 
er of Stonington, Conn , and Maj. Cyrus Avery of Camptown, Pa., 
but altho everyone had seemed to keep in mind the injunction — 
"From June until September, 
Barbers, preachers, and that sort 
Of fellows should remetuber 
To cut it very short," 
railway schedules and inexorable Time said nay. 

Everything connected with the affair was a success. The local 
members of the association received well-merited commendation, and 
congratulations upon the results of their labor. All in all, it was a 
day long to be remembered. It is possible that the general desire for 
more frequent gatherings of the clan may be realized. 

The report of the New London -Day" closed with this paragraph : 
'•It's a long day since Poquonoc saw so many people gathered in a 
family reunion. The sterling quality of the Avery blood needs no 
better demonstration than the appearance of so many intelligent and 
prosperous looking descendants to do honor to the memory of the 
founder of the family," and everybody knows that "if you see it in 
the Day it's true." 

BIRTHS. 



Ouelee Stowell Avery, daughter of Dr. Robert Burns and Nina 
Belle (Stowell) Avery (No. 758, page 665), was born June 2, 1900, 
at Auburn, N. Y. 

William Avery Raymond Webb, son of William Griffith and 
Mabel Esther (Raymond) Webb, and grandson of Francis William 
and Alice Iowa (Avery) Webb (No. 3133, page 297), was born at 
South Norwalk, Conn , Feb. 3, 1900. 

Louisa Randall Avery, daughter of George Pettigrew and Nancy 
Eliza (Randall) Avery (page 132), was born at Groton. Conn., 
Feb'y 13, 1900. 

Priscilla Irene Avery, daughter of Lewis Burtis and Marie (Tol- 
man) Avery (No. 161 1, page 273) was born at Redlands, California, 
June i2> 1900. 



15^ AvEnv Notes and Q^ueries. 

ORANGE BLOSSOMS 



Maggie Belle Avery (No. 7S2, page 666) married January 22, 
1900, at Plains, Missoula County, Mont., Tom J. Sullivan of Plains, 
Mont. 

Alyce May Avery (No. 2452. page 297) married April 12, 1900, 
at Stamford, Conn., Thomas R Whitney of Xew Canaan, Conn. 

George Hoffman Avery (No. 1031, page 515) married March i, 
1900. at Edgar, Neb., Grace May Saxton of that place. 

Arthur Ernest Strong, son of Amasa Myron and Eva Rosalind 
(Avery) Strong (No. 667. page 676). married October 26, 1899, at 
Mt. \'ernon. N. Y., Jessie May Mains of that place. 

Albert R Avery (No. 2428. page 2S8) married June 5. 1900, at 
Westbarre, "N. Y., Bertha A. Allis of that place. 



THE LAST ROLL CALL. 



Mrs Phebe Tillinghast Lord, daughter of the Rev. John and 
Susan Caroline (Aver}') Tillinghast (No. 1191. page 139). died May 
21, 1900, at Providence, R. I. 

Mrs. Martha E. (Jones) Avery, wife of the late Judge Owen 
Miner Avery (No. 1402, page 255), died June 6, 1900, at Pensa- 
cola, Fla. 

Mrs. Kathleen Evangeline (Kinmouth) Avery, wife of Amos 
Geer Avery, Jr. (No. 2251. page 270). died April 27, 1900, at 
Ledyard, Conn. 

Mrs. Eva Rosalind (Avery) Strong (No. 667, page 676) died 
August 26, 1S99, at .Syracuse, N. Y. 



Photographs of the " Old Hive '" and of the Averv Memorial, 
plain or colored, and suitable for framing, are now on sale. For 
further particulars, address the secretary of the Aver}' Memorial 
Association, Miss Helen M. Avery, No. 6. North Main Street, New 
London, Conn. 



Charles Earle Avery, son of Amos William and Sarah (Baldwin) 
Avery (No. 474^', page 45S), was gradiuited Ph. B. by the Montana 
University in June. He intends to enter the law department of 
Michigan University in the fall. - 



Avery Notes and C^ueries. 159 

Dr. VVilliani Paul Moore, <rrandson of Elizabeth (Avery) Allyn 
(No. 178. p. 350). was recently elected mayor of Jackson, N. C. 

I liaye a few pamphlets containing the appendix to .Sweet's 
" The Avery's of Groton." and relating to "Avery Coats of Arms " 
(with illustrations of four coats) and to "The Avery Family in 
England and France." These pamphlets will be furnished, as long 
as the supply lasts, at fifty cents per copy. 

In 1665, certain residents of Portsmouth and Strawberry Bank, 
New Hampshire, sent their petition to the king's commissioners for 
New England (Nicolls, Carr, CartwTight and Maverick) stating 
that for several years past they had been kept under the Massachu- 
setts government by an usurped power, \vhose laws were derogatory 
to the laws of England, under which power five or six of the richest 
men of their parish ruled and ordered all ofiicers, both civil and 
military, at their pleasure, and none dared make opposition for fear 
of great fines or long imprisonment. They had been denied in their 
public meeting the common prayer, sacraments, and decent burial of 
the dead, and also the benefit of freemen. They asked the com- 
ini>sioners to rectify these miscarriages. Among the thirty-two 
names subscribed is that of Thomas Avery. (Calendar of English 
Slate Papers, Colonial. America and West Indies, No, 1015 ) In July 
i)f that year, the commissioners sent to Lord Arlington, a member of 
the famous 'cabal" cabinet, the petition of sixty-one inhabitants of 
Portsmouth and Strawberry Bank, Dover, Exeter, and Hampton to 
the king asking that they be taken into his royal protection and 
government and joined to the province of Maine The last of the 
names signed to the petition is that of Thomas Avery. (Calendar of 
English vState Papers, Colonial, America and West Indies, No. 1034,1.) 
He did not belong to the clan now known as Groton Averj^s. 

In 1661, certain merchant adventurers sent their petition to the 
English council for foreign plantations, stating that about ten years 
previously thev had erected sundrv iron works in New England at a 
cost of fifteen thousand pounds and left John Gifford and William 
Avery to manage the same. For supposed debts the petitioners' 
estates were seized and their agents imprisoned. About three years 
before, the petitioners had despatched an agent to implore the com- 
mon justice of the country, which they were so far from obtaining 
that their estates were still withheld even by some of the judges 
themselves so that the petitioners were without hope of remedy. 
They therefore prayed for relief. (Calendar of English Stale 
Papers, Colonial .Series, America and West Indies, No. 50.) 



[6o Avery Notes and Q^ueries. 



Do You Want 

A copy of the new 

HISTORY OF THE GROTON AVERYSi^ 

If you do, you would better read the article 
on pages 138 and 139 of this niaj^azine 



Do You Want 

To see the succeeding numbers of 

AVERY NOTES AND QUERIES 

Then you would better be sure that you 
are a paid-up subscriber. See terms 
on page 142 of this magazine 



Hvery J^oUq and Queries. 

A Quarterly Magazine devoted to the History of the Groton Averys. 
No. 12. "Honor thy Father and thy Mother." November, J 900. 



The number and page references used in this magazine are to 
Sweet's "The Averys of Groton," published at .Syracuse, X. Y., in 
1894. 

Wanted, the parentage of Hannah Avery of Groton, Conn., who 
married Joshua Johnson of Lancaster, Mass., Jan. 20, 1761. 

Wanted, the parentage of Temperance Avery, who married Jona- 
than Leilingwell, Dec. 25, 1792. They moved to western New York. 
The names of their children seem to indicate that she belonged to the 
Groton Averys. 

Wanted, the parentage of Horatio Avery, who married Irene 
Andrus, at Coventry, Conn., April 25, 1822. 

Wanted, the parentage of Sarah Avery, who married John Bur- 
nap in Scotland, Conn., March 30, 1789. 

Wanted, the parentage of Thomas Avery of Goshen, who mar- 
ried Lydia Brown of Colchester, Conn., Oct. 11, 1754. 

Who was Mehitable Avery of Boston, who administered on the 
estate of Gideon Avery, the son of Edward Avery, b. June i, 17 15? 
He left New London on a voyage in 1763 and never returned. His 
estate was administered in 1770. 

Who was Abigail Avery, who married Elisha Lothrop of Nor- 
wich, Conn., May 28, 1745? They had Elisha, Deborah. Anna, Solo- 
mon and Mary. 

Wanted, the parentage of Sylvanus Avery, who married Mary 
Luther, June 6, 1782, at Lyme, Conn. They had Benjamin, Betsey, 
Olive, Sylvanus, Nancy and Lucy. 

Any one desiring a copy of the Denison Genealogy would do well 
to correspond concerning the subject with Mrs. George D. Clift, 
White Plains. N. Y. She can also supply a few 8-page pamphlets 
relating to the Denison Genealogy, at 50 cents each. 



i62 AvEuv Notes a\i> (^^iteries. 

The old house in Groton, Conn., occupied in Revolutionary times 
by Ebenezer Avery (No. 144, page 60) is still in good condition, and 
occupied by the Misses Meech. It now bears, over its front door, the 
following inscription : 

"This tablet was placed by the 

Thomas Starr Society. C. A. R., vSept. 6, 1896, 

In Memory of 

the Shelter afforded our wounded and dying soldiers 

within this house after the massacre at 

Fort Griswold, Sept. 6, 1781." 

The letters C. A. R., signify Children of the American Revolu- 
tion. The house is at the foot of the hill that is crowned by the battle 
monument, pictured on page 22 of Avkry Notes and Qjlieries. 

The careless or thoughtless reader of the lists of births, marriages 
and deaths printed in this magazine might easily jump to the conclu- 
sion that the Groton Averys will soon be an extinct clan. The 
births and marriages, doubtless, are more numerous than the deaths, 
but the reports to the family historian are not so promptly made. 

THE MEMORIAL TABLET. 

The authorities of the First Church of Christ of New London, 
Conn., has voted consent for the Avery Memorial Association to place 
in their house of worship a tablet in memory of Capt. James Avery 
and his wife, Joanna. This church will celebrate its 250th anniver- 
sary next year. The first names upon its roll of members are "James 
Avery and Wife." The tablet will cost four or five hundred dollars. 
The subscription list for this purpose is now opened thus : 

Frank Montgomery Avery, New York $10.00 

Elroy M. Avery, Cleveland 10.00 

Mrs. Fred B. Egelhoff, Weatherford, Tex i.oo 

No money will be called for until the necessary amount is sub- 
scribed. If a good showing can not be made by the time of printing 
the next number of this magazine (February, 1901J, the plan will 
probably be given up. 

I can supply six complete sets of Avery Notes and Queries. 
Price, one dollar and a half a set, postage prepaid. 



AvERV Notes and Qjl'ektes. 163 

THE AVERY MEMORIAL ASSOCIATION. 

Report of the Treasurer for the year ending July 20, 1900. 
Moneys received prior to annual meeting of July 20, 

1899 .'. .,...$r,8o2.5o 

Received since July 20, 1S99 166.00 

Interest since organized 65.34 

Expenses paid prior to annual meeting of July 20, 

1899 |r,356.77 

Expenses since July 20, 1899 1S.62 

Balance on hand July 20, 1900 658.45 

$2,033.8412,033.84 
Since tlie annual meeting of last July, the bronze bust of Capt. 
James Avery has been paid for. This expenditure, with others, has 
left vei-y little money in the hands of the treasurer. Miss Addie Avery 
Thomas, of Groton, Conn. 



BIRTHS. 



Frank Rockafellow Little, son of Dr. Wilbur Taylor Little and 
great grandson of Lydia Ann f Avery) Taylor (No. 453, page 626), 
was born, September 10, 1900, at Canon City, Colorado. 

Frederick Guy Avery, son of Guy Leonard i\very and grandson 
of Lorenzo Erastus Avery (No. 2337, page 279), was born, May 19, 
1900, at Bradford. Fa. 

Marjory Lucia Van der Veer, granddaughter of Mrs. Lucia Eliza- 
beth (Avery) Mitchell (No. 533, page 453), vv^as born, May 27, igoo, 
at Springfield Center, Otsego county, N. Y. 

John Stuart Coonley, Jr., grandson of Mrs. Lydia Avery Coonley 
Ward (No. 1318, page 245), was born, February 3, 1900, at Chicago. 

John Avery Mulroy, son of Anthony B. and Henrietta (Avery) 
Mulroy (No, 209S, page 252), was born, January i, 1899, at St. Paul, 
Ind. The report to the family historian was not made very promptly, 
but that was not John's fault. 

Howard Coonley Hollis, son of Thomas and Mary (Coonley) 
HoUis (No. 1313 a, page 245), was born, October 7, 1899, at Con- 
cord, Mass. 



164 AvKKV Notes and (^uekiks. 

ORANGE BLOSSOMS. 



Arthur Ross Avery (No. 2229, page 268) married. May 2. 1900, 
at lluinboldt. Neb., Miss Grace Dennis. 

Lulu Belle Fulmer, only daughter of Mrs. Rosalind (Avery) Ful- 
mer (No. 1546, page 181), was married, October 16, 1900, to Joseph 
Vaughan. 

Catherine Armena Avery (No. 962, page 507) was married, June 
20, 1900, at Coldwater, N. Y., to VVilmer Everett Nelson, of Adams 
Basin, N. Y. 

THE LAST ROLL CALL. 



The Rev. Thomas Rogers, husband of Martha (Avery) Rogers 
(No. 1092, page 522), died, March 20, 1900, at 

Mrs. Eunice Latham (Avery) Morgan (No. 1624, page 275) died, 
September 15, 1900, at Willets, Calif. 

Henry Ward Avery, the youngest child of Charles Austin Avery 
(No. 396, page 355), died, June 21, 1900, at Painesville, Ohio. 

Mrs. Mary Abby Avery (No.' 848, page 187, and No. 874, page 
no) died, Oct. 8, 1900, at New London, Conn. 

Mrs. Minnie Florence (Avery) Corwin (No. 2089, page 247) 
died, Oct. 25, 1900, at Dunkirk, N. Y. 

Uriah Hunt Painter (No. 2129, page 296) died, Oct. 20, 1900, at 

West End, N. J. 

Mrs. Mary Melissa (Pence) Avery, wife of Daniel Wilson Avery 
(No. 1353, page 252), died, Oct. 26, 1900, at St. Paul, Ind. 

Wihiam Luther Mack, third child of Mrs. Alwilda (Avery) Mack 
(No. 768, page 679), died, Feb'y 28, 1899, at Wewahitchka, Florida. 

William Luther Mack, husband of Mrs. Alwilda (Avery) Mack 
(No. 768, page 679), died, July 12, 1899, ^^ Fort Mill, South Carolina. 

The Hon. Charles M. Denison, a grandson of Daniel and Katha- 
rine (Avery) Denison (No. no, page 53), died, Nov. 5, 1900, at 
Whitesboro, N. Y. 

Mrs. Lizzie Esther (Avery) Snow, wife of Herbert Timothy 
Snow, and daughter of Adnah Avery, Jr. (No. 358, page 374), died, 
Oct. 26, 1900, at Westfield, Mass. 

Mrs. Sarah Hills (Taylor) Avery, wife of Henry Avery (No. 
1752, page 284), died, Sept. 9, 1900, at Springfield, Mass. 



Ax'KRY Notes and Qlteries. 



165 



The Bill Memorial Library shown on page 175 was given to 
Groton, Conn,, by Mr. Frederick Bill, the husband of Mrs. Julia 
Owen (Avery) Bill (No. 2i3<S, page 255). 




CHARLES IIEDDING AVERV. 



Charles Redding Avery (No. 569, p. 503) is a lawyer living at 
Buffalo, N. Y. At the present time he is a member of the city 
board of aldermen, and hopes to live to see Buffalo as large a city as 
Cleveland. He's all right. 



i66 AvKRV Notes and C^iteiues. 

Jivcvy )Vfotc6 and Queries. 

The official organ of the Avery Memorial Association, of Groton, Conn., 
and of the Historian of the Groton Averys. 

Published by Elroy M. Avery, at 657 Woodland Hills Avcjiue, 
Cleveland, Ohio. 

Subscription Price, Fifty cents per year. Pifteen cents per copy. 

Entered at the Cleveland, O., postoffice as second-class matter. 



THE NEW FAMILY HISTORY AGAIN- 



In Avery Notes and Queries for August last, I explained that 
I had done a great deal of work and spent several thousand dollars in 
the gathering of material for a revision of Mr. Sweet's "The Aver3^s 
of Groton,'" and that more work must be done and more money spent 
before the manuscript could be sent to the printer. The additional 
serious problem of publication was discussed, and my long-standing 
offer to give all of my genealogical material to any one who would 
carry out my plans, and to add a liberal cash bonus to the gift, was 
renewed. In conclusion. I submitted to the members of the clan the 
following proposition : 

"The revised edition of the history of the Groton Avery clan will 
be published by me in tw^o volumes. The changes from tlie first 
edition are radical and numerous. I shall make the work as nearly 
accurate and complete as I can. In mechanical execution it will be 
much superior to the existing edition. I am ready to receive sub- 
scriptions, and will begin printing as soon as orders for five hundred 
copies are received. The terms are as follows : 

"The price of the completed work will be ten dollars. 

"Each order must be accompanied by an advance payment of five 
dollars for each copy ordered, the remaining five dollars to be paid 
upon receipt of notice that the two volumes are ready for delivery. 
If the prescribed five hundred subscriptions are not received within 
a reasonable period, the advance payments will be refunded by me." 

I had had so many disappointments in the w'ork that I hardly 



Avery Notes and Queries. 167 

expected any considerable response to the proposition. But tlie re- 
mittances soon began to arrive, and I now (November 20, 1900,) have 
received the prescribed advance payments for ninety-six copies, as 
follows : 

Frank M. Avery, New York City... 10 copies 

Trueman G. Avery, Buffalo, N. Y 5 '^ 

Walter H. Beebe, New York City i " 

Ozro T. Love, Plainfield, N. J i 

William H. Avery, L,os Angeles, Calif i " 

Ellery Denison, Ne.vv York City i " 

Charles M. Denison, Whitesboro, N. Y i " 

Dr. Otis Avery, Honesdale, Pa i " 

Mrs. Ann A. Randall, Cedar Rapids, la i " 

Mrs. E. J. Wolcott, Utica, N. Y 2 " 

Dr. H. H. Avery, Chelsea, Mich i " 

Mrs. Susan Look Avery, Anchorage, Ky 2 " 

Mrs. Lydia Avery Coonley Ward, Chicago, 111 2 " 

Avery Coonley, Chicago, 111 i " 

John S. Coonley, Chicago, 111 i " 

Miss Sarah Coonley, Chicago, 111 2 " 

Howard Coonley, Chicago, 111 J " 

Prentiss Coonley, Chicago, III i " 

Mrs. Helen A. Pope, Norwood, O J 

The Hon. Ben. H. Avery, Jefferson, N. Y i •' 

Mrs. Rufus Lord Avery, Mansfield, O i '' 

Charles I. Avery, Auburn, N. Y i '; 

Waite Gerry, Ventura, Calif i " 

Frank Rockefeller, Cleveland, O i 

Miss Amelia Morey, Potsdam, N. Y i '* 

Mrs. Louisa A. Avery, Groton, Conn i 

Dr. Aaron B. Avery, Pontiac, Mich i " 

Phineas O. Avery, Humboldt, Neb i 

Mrs. F. W. Goddard, Colorado Springs, Colo i 

Mrs. Mary A. Stockwell, Painesville, O i 

Mrs. Frances Haggard, Lincoln, Neb i 

Mrs. Kate A. Hallock, Cromwell, Conn i 

David C. Avery, Baltimore, Md i " 

Franklin C. Avery, F'ort Collins, Colo i " 

Amos L. Avery, Charlemont, Mass 2 " ^ 

George A. Clark, Utica, N. Y i 

Mrs. Helen Avery Robinson, Louisville, Ky 2 " 

John D. Rockefeller, New York City 25 

Mrs. Lucy A. Newman, Spokane, Wash i " 

George S. Avery, Galena, 111 2 " 

Charles W. Avery, Patchogue, N. Y i " 



i68 Avery Notes and Qjltehies. 

Dr. Alida C. Avery, San Jose, Calif i copies 

Mrs. Mary Hazard Avery Hine, Newark, N. J i " 

IMrs. George W. Powers, Decatur, 111 r " 

Mrs. Frances Lester W. Robinson, Norwich, Conn i " 

Mrs. Mary Coonley Hollis, Concord, Mass i " 

Charles H. Avery, Buffalo, N. Y ; 5 

Mrs. Cornelia C. Avery, New London, Conn i " 

Mrs. Olive L. Dietrich, Arlington Heights, 111 i " 

In addition to this, I have received many letters with promises 
something like these : "I want to be counted a subscriber to your His- 
tory of tlie Groton Averys, and you can count on me," or " I shall want 
one or two copies and will send the money soon." Of course, these 
letters are encouraging, but I can not "count" promises that do not 
comply with the conditions above printed. I have prepared blank 
orders, copies of which I shall be glad to send to any one asking for 
them. They are in the following form : 

ELROY M. AVERY, 

657 Woodland Hills Avenue, 

Ci.evei.and, Ohio : — Enclosed herewith tind Five 
Dollars, advance payment on my subscription for a copy of your 
History of the Averys of Groton. I hereby agree to pay an additional 
five dollars upon notice that the second volume of said history is ready 
for delivery. It is mutually agreed that the ten dollars above pro- 
vided for is to be in full payment for one complete copy of said His- 
tory of the Averys of Groton, and that if the requisite number of 
subscriptions is not secured within a reasonable period the full advance 
payment now made shall be returned to the subscriber. 



Name : 

.Street and Number : 

Town and State: 

Date : 

This revised edition will be strictly limited. The names and ad- 
dresses of subscribers will be printed in an appendix to the second 
volume. Each such subscriber will be sent a type-written copy of his 
or her family record so that it may be corrected (if necessary or desir- 
able) before printing. Of course, every reasonable precaution will be 



Avery Notes and Queries, 169 

taken to make all of the records correct, but it would be obviously 
impracticable to send out copies of all of them in advance of publi- 
cation. 

It is probable that many members of the clan who desire to sub- 
scribe for the book had no more confidence in the success of the plan 
proposed by me than I did, and that they therefore have held back 
their subscriptions. Now that the success of the plan seems assured, 
it is reasonable to suppose that the subscriptions of such persons will 
be promptly forwarded. It may be well to renew the statement that 
accompanied my proposition : "As to my pecuniary responsibility, 
etc., you may inquire (enclosing return postage, of course) of any 
Cleveland bank." To this, it may be proper to add the suggestion 
that the list of subscribers above printed is really a testimonial of con- 
fidence from persons some of whom are generally supposed to be 
wholly capable of taking good care of as large investments as are in- 
volved in their advance payments on the family history in question. 



NEW YORK AVERYS IN THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR. 

Abel Avery, the Levies, Marinus Willets, colonel. 

Abel Avery, 4th regiment of militia, Killian Van Rensselaer, 
colonel. 

Abel Avery, Associated Exempts, Zephaniah Piatt, colonel. 

Daniel Avery, Dutchess county militia. 

Ebenezer Avery, 3rd regiment of Westchester county militia, 
Pierre Van Courtland, colonel. 

Ebenezer Avery, 4th regiment of Westchester county militia, 
Thaddeus Crane, colonel. 

Ebenezer Avery, lieutenant, 4th regiment Westchester county 
militia, Thaddeus Crane, colonel. 

Elisha Avery, 4th regiment of Westchester county militia, 
Thaddeus Crane, colonel. 

Enoch Avery, 4th regiment of Westchester county militia, 
Thaddeus Crane, colonel. 

Enoch Avery, 4th regiment of Westchester county militia, 
Thaddeus Crane, colonel. 

Henry Avery, the Levies, Albert Pawling, colonel. 

Humphrey Avery, 3rd regiment of the line, James Clinton, 
colonel. 



170 AvEiiY Notes and Q^uekies. 

James Avery, 4th regiment of Westchester county militia,. 
Thaddeus Crane, colonel. 

John Avery, 4th regiment of Westchester county militia^ 
Thaddeus Crane, colonel. 

John Avery, 4th regiment of ^Vestchester county militia, Thaddeus- 
Crane, colonel. 

John Avery, 2d regiment Dutchess county militia, Abraham 
BrinkerhofF, colonel. 

( To be cant ill lied.) > 



THEY LOST THE NAME. 

The readers of this magazine may be interested in scanning the 
following hastily prepared, and therefore incomplete, list of promi- 
nent Avery descendants who do not bear the Avery name, and of 
persons to whom they were related :— 

Edwin D. Morgan, governor of New York and United States- 
senator, grandson of William and Temperance (Avery) Morgan (No. 
58, page 41) and great grandson of William and Mary (Avery) Mor- 
gan (No. 22, page 33). 

Schuyler Colfax, vice-president of the United States, grandson of 
George and Lucy (Avery) Colfax (No. 106, page 52). 

Horatio Seymour, United States senator and Democratic candi- 
date for presidency of the United States, great grandson of Youngs 
and Mary (Avery) Ledyard (No. 107, page 52). 

Julia S. Seymour, great granddaughter of Youngs and Mary 
(Avery) Ledyard (No. 107, page 52) and wife of the Hon. Roscoe 
Conkling, United States senator from New York. 

John D. Baldwin, editor of " Worcester (Mass.) Spy." author 
and member of congress from Massachusetts, grandson of Nathaniel 
and Amy (Avery) Stanton (No. 152. page 63). 

The Right Reverend Thomas Augustus Jaggar, D.D., grandson 
of Paul Frederick and Sabra (Avery) Niles (No. 322, page 106), and 
Protestant Episcopal bishop of southern Ohio. 

Jeremiah George Harris, paymaster in the United States navy, 
son of Richard and Mary (Avery) Harris (No. 861, page 190). 

The Rev. William Clift, son of William and Nancy (Avery) 
Clift (No. 190, page 439). 



Avery Notes and Queries. i?'' 

The Rev. David Avery Whedon, D.D., son of Hiram and Mar- 
garet (Avery) Whedon (No. 242, page 427). 

John D. Rockefeller, grandson of Godfrey and Lucy (Avery) 
Rockefeller (No. 164, page 604). 

John Henry Camp, congressman from New York, grandson of 
Nathan and Susan (Avery) Camp (No. 106, page 584). 

Hannah Avery Devereaux, granddaughter of Benjamin and Han- 
nah (Avery) Butler (No. 79, page 562), and wife of the Hon. Francis 
Kernan, United States senator from New York. 

Harriet Amelia Pumpelly, daughter of Charles and Frances 
(Avery) Pumpelly (No. 105, page 583), and wife of Theodore Fre- 
linghuysen, president of Princeton college. 

Elizabet-h Lenoir, granddaughter of William Ballard and EHza- 
beth (Avery) Lenoir (No. ii3, page 587), and wife of David McKen- 
dree Key, postmaster-general under President Hayes. 

Alphonso Calhoun Avery (No. 254, page 640), a justice of the 
supreme court of North Carolina, married Susan Washington Mor- 
rison, daughter of the Rev. Robert Hall Morrison, D.D., founder and 
president of Davidson college. Her mother was Mary Eugenia 
Graham, daughter of William Alexander Graham, governor of North 
Carolina, United States senator, secrerary of the navy under President 
Fillmore, and candidate for the vice-presidency oir the ticket with 
General Scott. Her sister married "Stonewall" Jackson. 

Sybil Noyes Avery (No. lor, page 58i), married Ezra Stiles, Jr., 
son of Ezra Stiles, president of Yale college. 



THE AVERYS OF GROTON. 

( Continued from page 136. See page 133). 
13. Edward' Avery {James^, James"-, Christopher^) was born 
March 20, 1676, at Groton ; m. June 3, 1679, at Preston, Conn., 
Joanna Rose, the daughter of Thomas and Hannah (Allyn) Rose of 
Rose Hill. Hannah Allyn was the sister of Robert Allyn, who mar- 
ried Deborah* Avery (No. 10), the sister of Edward* Avery. Thomas 
Rose mentions his daughter, Johanna Avery, in his will. Edward* 

Avery died April 14, 1759, at His wife died 

January 3, 1761, at 



I 



ij2 AvKuv Notes and Q_ueries. 

Children of Edward and Joanna (Rose) Avery (all born in Gro- 
ton) : 

28. i. Joanna^, b. Nov. 1700. 

ii. Thomas^, b. June 15, 1702; d. May 3, 1703, at Groton. 
iii. Edwards, b. May 22, 1704; d. J^nie 7, 1705, at Groton. 

29. iv. Deborah •', b. May 6, 1706. 

30. V. Theophilas-^, b. Sept. 6, 170S. 

31. vi. Benajah^, b. Oct. 12, 1710. 

vii. James5, b. Oct. 27, 1712; d. Nov. 25, 1715, at Groton. 

32. viii. Gideons, b. June I, 1715; d. before 1770. 

33. ix. Hannahs, b. June 30, 1717. 

34. X. Ichabods, b. May 7, 1719. 

35. xi. Asas, b. July 21, 1721. 

36. xii. MaryS, b. Nov. 3, 1723. 

Lydia, who is mentioned in Sw^eet's " Averys of Groton,^' page 
30, as born about 1725, was not the daughter of Edward* Avery, She 
was the daughter of Jonathan and Elizabeth (Lane) Avery, and be- 
longed to the Dedham family of Averys. (See Genealogical Record 
of the Dedham Branch of the Avery family, page 82, and Avery 
Notes and Queries, page 67). 

14. Ebenezer* Aver7 (Jawcs^, James-, Christopher^) was born 

May I, I67S, at Groton ; m. June 16, 1708, at , Dorothy 

Parke, the daughter of Capt. John and Mary ( ) Parke. She 

was bap. November 27. 1692, at and d. Nov. 6, 1732, 

at Groton. Ebenezer Avery was deputy to the general court from 
Groton, May and October, 1720; October, 1726; and October, 1732. 
He received a grant of a hundred acres of public land in 1720. On 
his wife's tombstone, he is called " Captain.'" 

Children of Ebenezer and Dorothy (Parke) Avery (all born in 
Groton) : 

37. i. Parkes, b. December 9, 17 10, 
3S. ii. MaryS, b. Feb. 17, 1713. 

39. iii. Dorothys, b. Jan. 10, 1716. 

iv. LucyS, b. Oct. 14, 1718; d. Jan. 9, 1719, at Groton. 

40. V. Ebenezers, b. April 3, 1724. 

41. vi. Atnys, b. Feb. 17, 1724. 

42. vii. Eunices, b. March 2, 1725. 

43. viii. Simeons, b. April 25, 1730. 

In his -'Averys of Groton," page 31, Mr. Sweet states that Eben- 
ezer* Avery had a second wife, Lucy Morgan. This is a mistake ; he 



Avery Notes and Queries. i75 

was not married a second time. William Morgan, in his will, states 
that his granddaughter, Lucy, married Ebenezer Avery but this 
granddaughter was Lucy Davis, the daughter of h,s daughter Mar- 
garet. This Lucy Davis married Ebenezer^ Avery, No. 40, above 
mentioned. 

OUR ENGLISH ANCESTRY. 

In Tune, Miss Carrie M. Powers, of Decatur, 111., sent one 
hundred dollars to be used in searching for the English ancestry of 
Christopher Avery, particularly in Salisbury. Mr. W. I. Bngham 
Tyler, of Chicago, a genealogist of repute who was in England, was 
employed to make the search. Mr. Tyler reports a careful search ot 
the records of the various parishes of Salisbury, notably. The Close, 
St Edmunds St. Martins, and Fisherton, the four oldest. Nothing 
has been found, and it seems useless to follow further the Salisbury 

hypothesis. . , t- 1 

Mr. Tyler also examined thoroughly the records of the Exchequer 
and Prerogative Court of York, which has a general jurisdiction over 
the north of England as Canterbury has over the south. Avery does 
not seem to have been a common north-county name, though a few 
records were found in Nottinghamshire. It may be worth while to 
search that county thoroughly. The York court records need never be 
searched again for our purpose, as everything relating to the family 
has been noted and no trace found of Christopher. 

The above is a report of progress to the present time. The next 
work will be to search the Canterbury wills, ard the parish records of 
Cornwall. Many think that Christopher Avery came from Cornwall ; 
there certainly was, in 1669, a Christopher Avery in Tmtagel, Corn- 
wall, as well as many others of the name. 

The money has not all been used and it may be that the missing 
link will be found before that happens. If not, perhaps some other 
member of the family may lend a hand. Many thanks are due to 
Miss Powers for enabling us to settle definitely the Salisbury 
hypothesis. 



Please look over the "Want ads" on the first page of this 
magazine, and see if you cannot lend a helping hand. 



I 7-1 A\'ERV XOTKS AXD QjUERIES. 

THE GROTON AVERY HISTORY CLUB. 

wSince the last report, club dues have been received as follows : 

Edward E. Avery, San Francisco, Calif $ i.oo 

Mrs. Allen H. Tyler, CoUinwood, O i.oo 

Howard Giles, Forest Hill, X. J 2.co 

Charles M. Denison, Whitesboro, X. Y i.oo 

Dr. Otis Avery, Honesdale, Pa i.oo 

Trueman G. Avery, Buffalo, X. Y 5-oo 

W. Paul Moore, Jackson, X. C i.oo 

Walter H. Beebe, Xew York City 5-oo 

Mrs. Adelaide L. Cavarly, Xew London, Conn i.oo 

• Mrs. Annie Avery Chadsey, Wickford, R. I i.oo 

C C. Baldwin, Worcester, Mass i.oo 

Dr. EUerj- Denison, New York City i.oo 

Mrs. Sarah L. Hall, Westerly, R. I ^i.oo 

Waite Gerr}' , Ventura, Calif i.oo 

Miss Emily Avery Egelhoff , Weatherf ord , Tex. " i . oo 

Mrs. Ann Avery Randall, Cedar Rapids, la i.oo 

Mrs. E. J. W^olcott, Utica, X. Y i.oo 

Dr. H. H. Avery, Chelsea, Mich i.oo 

Mrs. Helen A. Pope, Xorwood, O i.oo 

Mrs. Frances A. Averj', X'orwood, O i.oo 

The Hon. Ben. H. Avery, Jefferson, X. Y i.oo 

Mrs. Lucy A. Newman, Spokane, Wash 2.00 

Mrs. Rufus Lord Avery, Mansfield, O i.oo 

Mrs. Laura A. Holman, Saybrook, Conn i.oo 

John S. Coonley, Chicago, 111 2.50 

Mrs. Curtis Lord Aven,-, Wayne, Pa 2.00 

David C. Avery, Baltimore i.oo 

Mrs. W. A. Burt Jones, Minneapolis i.oo 

Mrs. ]Mary Coonley Hollis, Concord, Mass i.oo 

Total for the quarter |4i-50 

All persons paying club dues are entitled to the magazine without 
other payment. Dues are paid simply for the purpose of helping 
carry on the work of the famih* historian. Each member determines 
what his annual payment shall be — within the limits of one and ten 
dollars. You are eligible to membership, and your remittance will be 
gladly received and acknowledged in this magazine. 



' Tlie youngest tnember of the club. See Notes and Queries, /. rr2. 



176 AVHUV NOTHS AND (^UEKIES. 

Do You Want 

a copy of the new 

HISTORY OF THE GROTON AVERYS? 

If you do, j-ou would better read the article 
on pages 166-169 of this magazine. 



Do Y^ou Want 

to see the succeeding numbers of 

AVERY NOTES AND QUERIES 

Then you would better be sure that 

you are a paid-up subscriber. See 

» terms on page 166 of this magazine. 



Do You Want 

a fine colored photograph of the 

HIVE OF THE AVERYS 

or of the 

AVERY memorial:^ 

Then you would better write for prices, 
etc., to the secretarj^ of the Avery 
Memorial Association, Miss Helen I\I. 
Aver}-, No. 6, North Main vStreet, 
New London, Conn. 



P13BUU LiD.^rv.v , 

\ 



Hwry )Votc8 and Queries 

A Quarterly Magazine devoted to the History of the Groton Averys. 



No. J 3. "Honor thy Father and thy Mother." February, I90I. 

The number and page references used in this magazine are to 
Sweet's History of "The x\verys of Groton." 

You have been receiving' occasional copies of this magazine for a 
long time. Do you not desire to subscribe for it and thus help pay the 
cost of publication? See terms on page 182. 

Bulletin ^2, of the Home Education Department of the University 
of New York (Dec, 1900,) is a very valuable document relating to 
traveling libraries, traveling pictures, and schoolroom decoration. It 
was prepared by Miss Myrtilla Avery. She is one of the many de- 
scendants of an Enoch Avery whom I am very anxious to identify. I 
have little if any doubt that he was a Groton Avery. 

The Rev. Eugene Henry Avery (No. 1535, page 266), late of Vin- 
ton, Iowa, is now pastor of the Westminster church, Webster and 
Page streets, at San Francisco, Calif. His portrait may be found on 
page 35 of x\vERY Notes and Queries. 

If you cannot afford to buy a copy of the new History of the 
Groton Averys, remember that the next best thing is to have one in an 
easily accessible library. It would be well, in many cases, for several 
members of the tribe to club together for the purchase of a copy to be 
given to the public or other library where it may be consulted by all 
parties interested, including -the donors. 

Prior to the announcement of a forthcoming new edition of the 
History of the Averys of Groton, copies of Mr. Sweets' book sold read- 
ily for fifteen dollars each, three times the original price. A copy of 
the Denison Genealogy is valued at twenty-five dollars, five times the 
original price. Do you see the point? 

llie project of placing a memorial tablet in the First Church of 
Christ of New London, Conn., (see Notes and Queries, page 162) 
has l^een abandoned in favor of the later plan for placing a memorial 
window in the new church to be built at Groton, almost under tlie 



lyS A\KKV NOTKS A\n (^IKKIEs. 

shadow of the liattlc nionunu'iit (see X^otes axd Queries, page 22). 
The treasurer of this memorial window fund is Aliss EHzabeth ]\Iiner 
Avery, of Groton, Conn., to whom contributions should be sent. She 
will gladly answer any inquiry on tlic subject. 

Lee Meriwether, son of Minor and Elizabeth l-Ldnuuids (Averyj 
Meriwether (No. 506, page 364), has been nominated for mayor of 
St. Louis on a platform of municipal ownership of street railways 
and other public utilities. As a third party candidate at the last 
municipal election in St. Louis. I\Ir. IMeriwether polled nearly twenty 
thousand votes. 

If this paragraph is marked, your subscription to the Groton 
Avery History Club or to Notes and Q_ueries has expired, and you 
are requested to renew it. .See page 182. 



BIRTHS. 



Ralph Willis Crandall, son of Dr. A\'illis Augustine and Carrie 
(Avery) Crandall ( Xo. 1849. P^ge 229 j, was born April 20, 1900, at 
Buffalo, N. Y. 

Mildred Louise Rouzer, daughter of Henry K. and Esther Maria 
(Avery) Rouzer, and granddaughter of Amos Wilham and Sarah 
Elenor (Baldwin) Avery (Xo. 574a, page 458), was born April 25, 
1900, at ]\Iissoula, ^lont. 

H. X'^ason Avery, son of Morris H. and Idella May (X'^ason) 
Avery, and great-great-grandson of James and ]\Iargaret (Shook) 
Avery (Xo. 823, page 107), was born ]\Iay 4, 1900. at W'oonsocket, 
R. I.' 

William Ellery Denison, son of Dr. Charles Ellery Denison and 
great-great-grandson of Daniel and Katherine (Avery) Denison (No. 
no, page 53), was born X'ovember 29, 1900, at X'ew York City. 

Delia Stanton xVvery, daughter of Amos and Harriet Elizabeth 
(Byrne) Avery (No. 1792, page 224), was born April 16, 1900, at 
Hampton, Conn. 

Adams Bertrand Avery, son of Almeron ]^Iyron and Gertrude Clif- 
ton (x\dams) Avery (Xo. 787, page 680). was born Dec. 18, 1900. at 
Mason City, Iowa. , 



ASTOn, LENC-- 

x'X.VERv Notes and QuerTe^T^' —-^^-^^79 

MARRIAGES. 

Alercedes Louise Avery (No. 621, page 380) married September 
20, 1900, at Forest House, Pa., Fred Jasper Cooper. 

Roy Gerald Fitzgerald, son of Airs. Cornelia Maria (Avery ) Fitz- 
gerald (No. 2338, page 279), married September 5, 1900, at Dayton, 
Ohio. Caroline Louise Wetekamp. 

Phebe Alice Avery, daughter of Amos William Avery (No. 574a, 
page 458). married October 9, 1900, at San Francisco, California, Claus 
Buttman, of Coulterville, California. 

William A. Clift, grandson of the Rev. William and Harriet Ade- 
line (Peters) Clift (page 439), married November 29, 1900, at Spo- 
kane, Wash., Jessie M. Winslow. 

Abbie Fay Durfee, a granddaughter of Mrs. Almira Avery Giles 
(No. 205, page 338), married January 15, 1901, at Decatur, 111., George 
Chandler Kinsman. 

Alillard Fowler Avery, the fifth child of Hislop Latham Avery 
(No. 1682, page 279), married November 8, 1900, at Gowanda, Erie 
county, N. Y., Ella Fidelia Goodell. 

Frank Hiram Avery, son of \\'illiam Hiram Avery (page 132), 
married December 19, 1900, at Providence, R. I., Alary Shackford, of 
Providence. 

Lorrance Avery, youngest son of Humphrey and Emma Jane 
(Davison) Avery (No. 459, page 665), married July 4, 1900, at An-' 
gusta. Kansas, Edith May Baughman. 

Sarah Oliphant Coonley, the younger daughter of Mrs. Lydia 
(Avery) Coonley Ward (No. 1313, page 245), married November 29, 
1900, at Chicago, Air. William Walkins Davies. of Louisville, Ky. 

Walter Giles Avery (No. 848, page 675) married June 5, 1900. 
at Council Bluffs, Iowa, Emily Lucile Williams of that cit}'. 

From a newspaper clipping, I learn that a Herbert L. Avery 
married January 9, 1901, at New London. Conn., Lillian Everts. I 
cannot identify him as one of the Groton tribe, which he probably is. 



If vou see in any newspaper an obituar}^ or a marriage notice of 
an Avery or of a descendant of an Avery, please send a marked 
copy of the paper to the historian of the Groton Averys. This will 
be easy for you and of very great help to him. 



I So AVKKY Xoi KS AM> t^lKKIK; 

DEATHS. 



Benjamin Lathrop Avery (Xo. 779. page 527) died ]\Iarch 29, 
1900, at Genoa, N. Y. 

Mrs. Charlotte Ann (Avery) Jones (Xo. 1352. page 158) died 
April 19, 1900, near \\'aldron, Ind. 

Guy Carleton Avery, Jr.. (Xo. 1366, page 158) died September 4, 
1900, at Indianapolis, Ind. 

Mrs. ]\Iary (Sweet) Avery, wife of Benjamin Franklin Avery 
(No. 968, page 508), died January 14, 1900, at Greenbush, Wis. 

The Hon. Amos Avery (X^o. 225, page 358) died October 21, 1899, 
at Evans Center, Erie county, N. Y. 

Frank Aver}- Shepard, second son. of Charles \\". and Adeline 
(A\cr\-) Shepard (Xo. 368. page 349). died January 25, 1901, at 
Torrington. Conn. 



THE SEARCH IN ENGLAND. 



The following list of Avery wills proved in the prerogative court 
of Canterbury between the years 1383 and 1604 is kindly furnished by 
Frank ]\I. Averv, of X'ew York City. fi_)r whom a search was recently 
made. The jurisdiction of this court includes the south of England. 

(i) 1496. Thomas Averej-, St. Thos. the niart3T, Southwark 7 Home 

(2) 1572. Alice Averey, Yatton. Somerset 5 Peter 

• 3) 1571- John Averey, Westhuyake, Yatton, Somerset 31 Holney 

{4) 1563. Richard Aver}% Gent. Town of New Haven, France; 

d. at New Haven , 37 Chayre 

(5) 1571- Richard Averej^ Newton St. Cyres. Devon 31 Holney 

(6) 1576. Thomas Avery, Berden, Essex 39 Carew 

(7) 1576. William Averey, St. Sepulchres, London 23 Carew 

(8) 1580. William Averj', Congresbury, Barnwell and Tatton, 

Co. Somerset 29 Arundell 

(9) 1568. John Every, Donyett, Somerset 34 Holney 

(10) 1593. Richard Averye, the Pallant within the citye of Chi- 

chester, Sussex 42 Nevell 

(11) 1598. Thomas Averye, Yeoman, Shenyngton, Gloucester; 

to be buried at Ichington 38 Lewyn 

(12) 1589. Alexander Every, Citizen and Clothworker of Lon- 

don, Bradwaye, Somerset ; Axminster, Devon ; 

St. ]\Iichaell, Cornwall ; Bredsteete, London .34 Leicester 

(i,V) 1591- Alexander Every, of London 94 Sainberbe 



Avery Notks and Q^ukkies. i8i 

(14) 1585. John Every, Gent, and Serjeaunt at Amies. Chaff- 

rome, Somerset 20 Brudenell 

(15) 1585. Richard Every, the elder, Totnes, Devon 38 Brudenell 

(16) 1587. Richard Everye, Pitminster, Somerset 25 Spencer 

(17) 1592.' Thomas Everie, Hatche beacham, Somerset 74 Harrington 

(18) 1587. William Every, Chard, Somerset ; Devon 20 Rutland 

Editorial notes on some of the above mentioned wills : 

(8) William Avery, of Congresbury, county Somerset, had six 
sons, Thomas, Richard, William, John, Giles and Jacob. He married 
Ann Irish, of Congresbury. From his brother, Robert, are descended 
the Averys of Dedham, Massachusetts. Their coat-of-arms is the last 
of the four given in the appendix to Sweet's "The Averys of Groton." 

( 12) Alexander Avery, of London ; will made December 25, 1588 ; 
proved March 27, 1589, by his brother William; mentions brothers 
John, Thomas and William. 

(14) John Every, of ChaiTcombe, Somerset; will made January 
31, 1584; proved May i, 1585; mentions wife, Madelen, daughters 
Elizabeth, Ellenor, Madelene, Agnes, and Mary; sons Thomas and John; 
and cousins W'illiam Avery of Chard (18) and Alexander Avery (12). 

(16) Richard Avery, of Pitminster, Somerset; will made January 
14, 1586; proved May 3, 1586, by his brother William. 

(17) Thomas Everie, of Hatch IJeauchamp, Essex; will made 
August 31, 1592; proved October 27, 1592; mentions sons Richard and 
Thomas; daughters Katharine, Alice, Freeseed, Elizabeth, Mary; and 
wife Joanne. 

(18) William Avery, of Chard, merchant; will made January 10, 
1587; proved March 7, 1587, by Alexander Avery (12?); mentions 
John, Thomas of Hatch Beaumont (17?), Katharine, Elizabeth, Wil- 
liam. 

The following entry also appears in the abstracts of Somerset wills 
from which the foregoing notes were made : 

John Every, of Broadway, Somerset; will made March 21, 1576; 
mentions son Alexander. 



If you arc not a member of the Groton Avery History Club, it 
is probable that you ought to be. You can join now. Then you can 
see to it that some one else who ought to join docs his duty. There 
is opportunity for all. Turn this leaf and read. 



lS2 A\ Kin \<)I Ks AM) C^rHKIHS. 

Hvcry JVotes and Queries. 

The official orj^an of the Avery Memorial Association, of (iroton, Conn., 
and of the Historian of the Groton Averys 

PuhlisJicd by EIrov M. Avery, at 657 Wood /and Hi Us Avenue, 
Cleveland^ Ohio. 

Subscription Price. Fiftv cents per year. Fifteen cents per copy. 

Entered at the Cleveland, O., postoffice as second-class matter. 



THE GROTON AVERY HISTORY CLUB. 

Since the last report, club dues have been received as follows : 

Mrs. Lucia Eames Blount, Georgetown. D. C $i.oo 

C. W. Bevin, East Hampton, Conn i.oo 

Morris H. Avery, Woonsocket. R. 1 2.00 

Maj. Cyrus Avery. Camptown. Pa 2. go 

Miss C. A. Samaine, Rochester. N. Y i.oo 

Miss Susan Billings Meech. San Augustine. Fla i.oo 

S. F. Avery, West Taghkanic, N. Y ,3.00 

Mrs. Elisha S. Allyn, Westerly. R. I i.oo 

Mrs. Xora A. Tompkins. Berkeley. Calif i.oo 

Mrs. Mary A. Wood worth. Manlius. X. Y i.oo 

Frank ^I. Avery, New York City 5-50 

Mrs. Clara Avery Miller. Keokuk, la i.oo 

Miss Ida F. Richardson, Southport. Ind i.oo 

Mrs. Richard Morgan. Aurora. X. Y i.oo 

Cyrus Avery, Poquonnoc Bridge. Conn i.oo 

Mrs. Frances Avery Haggard, Lincoln. Xeb 2.00 

Elizabeth M. Avery, Groton. Conn i.oo 

Mrs. L. R. Southworth. Xew York City 2.50 

Myron Pease Avery, Somers. Conn i-oo 

Mrs. Edna Avery Buckingham. Camp Denison, O i.oo 

George H. Avery. Richmond Borough. Xew York City 3.50 

John G. Avery. Toledo. 100 

Total for the quarter l35-5o 

All persons pa>ing club dues are entitled to the ma.t>azine with- 
out other pa>ment. Dues are paid simply for the purpose of helping 
rarr\- on the work of the famih" historian. Each member deter- 



Avery Notes and Qjlieries. 



183 



mines what his annual payment shall be —within the limits of one 
and ten dollars. Vou are eligible to membership, and your remit- 
tance will be gladly received and acknowledged in this magazine. 



THE NEW FAMILY HISTORY. 



In the XoTK.s and Qukkies for last November, I explained my 
present plan for the publication of the new edition of the family history 
at the price of ten dollars for the two volumes, and gave the list of sub- 
scribers for the first ninety-six copies. Since then, subscriptions have 
been received from the persons named below. No subscription is 
counted that does not comply with all the conditions of my proposition, 
including advance payment of five dollars. 



Fla. 



Florillo P. Avery, Tunkhannock, Pa... 
William Randall Avery, Cincinnati, O. 
Miss Carrie M. Powers, Decatur, 111... 
Aliss Clara A. Avery, Detroit, Mich... 
Joseph A. Hyde, Deer Lodge, ^Nlont... 

A. J. Avery, Dunkirk, N. Y 

Morris H. Avery, Woonsocket, R. I... 

Maj. Cyrus Avery, Camptown, Pa 

Bertrand C. Avery, Lamar, Mo 

Miss Susan B. Meech, San Augustine, 

S. F. Avery, West Taghkanic, N. Y 

W. Avery Sweet, Syracuse, N. Y 

Edwin B. Avery, Los Angeles, Calif 

Mrs. Elsie C. Avery Allen, Cattaraugus, N. Y 

Mrs. George R. Stetson, Washington, D. C 

Miss Ida F, Richardson, Southport. Ind 

]\Irs. Richard Morgan, Aurora, N. Y 

Cyrus Avery, Poquonnoc Bridge, Conn 

Irving J. Avery, New London, Conn 

Mrs. L. R. Southworth, New York City 

^lyron Pease Avery, Somers, Conn 

James Carrington Avery, Auburn, N. Y 

James D. Avery, Shelburne Falls, Mass 

George H. Avery, Richmond Borough, New York City.. 

Elizabeth R. Avery. Ilion, N. Y 

Frederic Rill, Groton, Conn 

Mrs. F. B. Kgelhoff, Weatherford, Texas 

If you desire to subscribe for the book, I shall bt 
)u (upon request) a blank for that purpose. 



copy 



lad to send 



1S4 A\KKV \\)rKS ANO Q^IKKIES. 

THE TINTAGEL RECORDS. 



A recent letter from the vicar of Tintagel. in Xorth Cornwall, in- 
forms me that Averys have been numerous in that parish since 13 10. 1 
already knew that the name Christopher occurred among the Avery 
names there in 1679. ^t is believed by several who have given the sub- 
ject much study that Cornwall is the county in which to look for our 
Christopher Avery. As the money generously given by Miss Powers 
was not all expended in searching the Salisbury records and solving 
that problem, some of it will be expended in searching the records of 
Tintagel. The vicar has signified his willingness to do the w^ork, and 
arrangements have been made with him for it. Possibly the result may 
be ptiblished in the next Notes axd Queries, together with the list of 
Avery wills in the Canterbtu'v prerogative court from 1604 to 1640. 



CORRESPONDENCE. 



Among the hundreds who gathered at the old homestead at Groton 
last July was ]\Iajor Cyrus Avery, of Camptown, Pa., who had made 
the pilgrimage from the rugged hills of his native state that he might 
look upon the faces and press the hands of his assembled kinsmen. Few 
have given more assistance to the family historian than Major Averv 
^(No. 457, page 664). He was born March 8, 1821, at Falls township, 
in Wyoming (then Luzerne) county, Pennsylvania. His ancestral line 
runs thus: Cyi'us^, ■Miles", Cyrus*', Solomon^, Humphrey*, Samuel^, 
James-. Christopher\ It is with great pleasure that I am able to give 
the following commtuiication from him : 

I will ask vou to jotirney with me in imagination up the Pocono 
mountain, south of Wilkes-Barre ; not in the old stage coach that labor- 
iously jolted up the rocky steeps, but in comfort we will wind our way 
through the defiles in the palatial car of a modern railway train, catch- 
ing scenic glimpses here and there that rival those of the famous Swiss 
land. Then, standing at the summit, as we turn our faces to the north 
and west, we behold the magnificent panorama of the historic Wyoming 
A'alley. We see the river Susquehanna (Indian name for long and 
crooked) as it winds its snakelike form along the banks on which stand 
the city of A\'ilkes-Barre and a dozen towns of smaller proportions. 
^Ivriad columns of smoke and clouds of steam l)etoken the action of 



AvEKY i\otp:s axd Queries. 185 

mighty engines employed in heaving anthracite coal from the bowels 
of the earth, where an army of miners are employed in blasting it from 
its fastnesses and another army of men are handling it upon the sur- 
face. 

Two or three miles below Wilkes-Barre, on the opposite bank of 
the river, is the town of Plymouth, on whose site my mother was born. 
The fuel value of anthracite coal was unheard of, and the vapors that 
often shimmered at night were regarded as ghosts by superstitious 
l)eople. 

I point out the Wyoming Monument at Forty Fort, a few miles 
further north, where on the third day of July. 1778, the great Indian 
massacre occurred. On that monument is carved the name of our 
kinsman, Christopher Avery, whose bones rest beneath its shaft. Still 
a little further north we see Queen Esther's Rock — the bloody rock, as 
it is called — the execution block on which many prisoners gave up their 
lives at the hands of their murderous captors. I am in possession of 
fragments that I cut from it forty years ago. It is now guarded by an 
iron fence, erected by the Daughters of the American Revolution, who 
have taken much interest in preserving historic relics, marking the sites 
of ancient forts and other places of interest. In the valley near the 
monument is the birthplace of Martha Marsh, who married the Hon. 
Joseph Conant Avery (No. 219, page 632), and wdio now lives as the 
widow and mother of a distinguished family in Corvallis, Oregon. 

About twenty-five miles north of this point Tunkhannock Creek, a 
stream of considerable proportions, joins its waters to those of the Sus- 
quehanna, and at this point is situated the farm of my grandfather, 
Cyrus Avery, with his family 1)urying place, wdiere rest his remains and 
those of his father and my father and mother, lirothers, sisters and 
imcles. 

I had the family records from my grandfather's I'ible and my own, 
reaching l)ack to Humphrey Avery, of Groton, Conn., and took great 
pride in them. Knowing so well the six valiant sons of my grandfather, 
my father being the eldest — as grand men as ever trod Pennsylvania 
soil — I was anxious to know still more of the family genealogy. 

In 1862, Thomas W. Palmer, of Connecticut, who was getting up 
a map of Pennsylvania, put up at our house. He asked me if I were 
any connection of the Averys of Connecticut. I unrolled my long list 
of naiues on foolscap paper, the sheets fastened together with tlie ohi- 



l86 AVEHV NOTKS AM) (^IKKIKS. 

tasliioncd waliTs then in use. lie said: "Sure you are, as here are 
the family names and family burying- ])laces." He told me that Richard 
Wheeler, of Connecticut, who married an Avery, was making up a gene- 
alogy with the view of having it printed. I le made me promise to send 
a copy of what I had to Air. Wheeler, and ])romised on his part that 
Air. Wheeler should send the information he had to me. This arrange- 
ment was carried out, and I received from Air. Wheeler the grand old 
record from Christopher and his son, Capt. James, who came over from 
England in 1630, down to Humphrey, wdth the proud history of the 
Averys that has been grafted to mine. This inspired in me a desire to 
see it put into book form. 

I sent written copies to others, uncles and cousins, in Illinois. Ore- 
gon, California and Iowa, which were highly appreciated. In 1890 1 
took my record to Gen. Robert Avery, of 98 Second place, Brooklyn, 
N. Y., and he was more interested in it than I had supposed he would 
be. He said if I would get it arranged he would bear the expense of 
having it printed. 

I heard of a Cyrus /\very, at Syracuse, N. Y., and wrote to him, 
asking for such family records as he might have. He referred me to 
Homer D. L. Sweet. When I learned from Air. Sweet the great extent 
to which he had engaged in the same line of work, of his researches in 
Connecticut, I turned my work over to him and assisted him from that 
time until his death, which occurred while his book was in the bindery. 
Since then I have rendered such assistance as I could to Elro\- Al. 
Avery, of Cleveland, C)hio, who is working on a second edition of the 
book. 

Aly personal pride in the grand result and the contemplatioi'Kof the 
satisfaction it must give to posterity are a (loul)le reward for the part I 
have taken in preserving the record of our great family. 

1 am the only living member of my father's immediate familv, 
which was a large one. As I am now nearly 80 years of age, I may 
never have the pleasure of meeting with you again in your general 
gatherings, but I hope they will be continued, for the promotion of 
good fellowship and mutual interests. 

I trust that other hands will carry on the work, thus auspiciously 
begun, of preserving the records, that this great family, of which I am 
proud to be but an humble member, may not lose its individuality in the 
nation's growth. Alany of its meml)ers have already given good ac- 
count of themselves and I have no fear that any descendant will ever 
blush to acknowledge relationship. 



AvKRv Notes and C^ueries. 187 

THE AVERYS OF GROTON. 

{Continued from page 173). 

On page 17 r of Avery Notes and Queries it was stated that 

"Edward Avery (No. 13) died April 14, 1759, at 

His wife died January 3, 1761, at " 

Owing to information furnished by Mr. BilHngs T. Avery, of 
Ledyard, Connecticut, I have been able to amend this part of the record 
to read as follows : 

Edward* Avery lived in the northwest part of Groton (now Led- 
yard) on land that his father bought, January 6, 1694, of the heirs of 
John Coit. On March 18, 1728, the father, James ^ Avery, deeded this 
land to his sons, Edward* and Christopher*. On January 4, 1731, the 
sons divided the land, Edward taking the west side adjoining Thames 
river and Poquotannock cove. Here he lived and died. He was buried 
on his own land and not far from his house. His wife and several of 
their descendants are buried on the same lot. His plainly-lettered 
grave-stone bears this inscription : 

"Mr. Edward Avery of Groton, who died March 14. 1759, 
aged 84 years and 24 days, ' ' 

The age at time of death does not correspond to the date of death 
thus noted, but does agree with the date of death as recorded by Mr. 
Sweet, April 14, 1759. This reconciliation involves the use of the old- 
style date of l)irth. March 20, i675-"76. The wife, Joanna, died Janu- 
ary 3, 1761. 

15. Capt. Christopher* Avery (Janies'-^ ^ Janies^^ Christopher'^) 
was born January 23, 1679, (according to Mr. Sweet's record), at Gro- 
ton, then a part of New London. A trustworthy correspondent in- 
forms me that the date of birth was January 25, 1680. Probably the 
year was 1679, o^-^ style, or 1680, new style. He m. ist, Dec. 19, 1704, 

Abigail Parkct eldest dau. of Capt. John and Mary ( ) 

Parke, of Preston, Conn. She was bap. Nov. 7. 1686, and d. I^\^l). 12, 
1713. He m. 2d, April i, 1714, Mrs. Prudence (Payson) Wheeler^ 
dau. of John and Bathsheba (Tilestone) Payson, and widow of Richard 

Wheeler. She was b. Feb. 20, 1681. and d She 

was granddaughter of Edward and Mary (Eliot ) Payson. ]\Iary Eliot 
was the daughter of r)ennett Eliot and came from England, with her 
brother, the Rev. John Eliot, "the Indian Apostle," they landing at 



l8S AVKHV N'O'I KS AM) (,^UKKIES. 

MostDii, Mass., Xov. 4. iG^i. Christopher* Avery ni. 3tl, January i. 

1735 Mrs. Esther (Hammond) Prentice, dau. of Nathaniel and 

( ' 1 lamniiHKl, of Xcwton, Mass., and widow of Samuel 

Prentice, of Xoith Stonington, Conn. She was b. Feb. 20, 1681, and 

d His will, dated March 18, 1752. and of which I 

have a copy, mentions his wife Susanna. He probably m. 4th 

, Susanna Stoddard. It is not certain that her name was 

Stoddard, although numerous little things combine to give that impres- 
sion. Her identity must still be counted an unsolved puzzle; its deter- 
mination would illuminate several other obscure matters. 

Christopher* Avery was successively ensign, lieutenant (1714), and 
captain (Oct.. 1730). He was church clerk of the North Groton so- 
ciety. In 1724 and 1725, he was a deputy from Groton to the general 
court of Connecticut. Probably he was town clerk of Groton (1730), 
and served as one of the justices for New London county. In the divi- 
sion of the land in the northwest part of Groton (now Ledyard), given 
in 1728 by James^ Avery to his sons. Edward^ and Christopher*, as 
described in ni}- record of Edward* Avery (No. 13), Christopher took 
the eastern part, and there he lived, died and was buried. He died 
January 20. 1753. His property was thus appraised: 

Homestead farm iio.ooo (old tenor) 

Brewster's Xeck farm -.500 

Negroes — Juljc 500 

Jeune 260 

Nero 530 

Lydia 260 

Sarah 240 

Tom 210 

In 1888. some of his descendants set up a brown stone obelisk on 
the east side of Avery Hill in Ledyard. Connecticut (formerly the 
North Parish of Groton ). and not far from his former home. The 
front l)ears this inscription : 

CHRISTOPHER AVERY. 
1680-1753. 
His Four Wives. 
His daughter, Temperance-", and her husband. William Morgan, 
were buried in the same lot. 

The children of Christopher* and Abigail (Parke) Avery were: 



AvKRY Notes and C^ukries. i^9 

44. i. Johns, b. Oct. 26, 1705. at 

45. ii. Abigail^, b. July 16, 1707, at 

46. iii. Christophers, b. Nov. 16, 1709. at • ■ • • 

47. iv. Nathan^, b. March 10, 1712, at 

The children of Christopher^ and Prttdence ( Payson-Wheeler . 

Avery were : 

48. V. PriscillaS, b. April 29, 1715. at 

49. vi. Isaacs, b. :March 26, 1717 at 

50. vii. Hannah^ b. Feb. 10. 1719. at 



0^- 



VUl. 



Jacobs, b. Aug. 25. 172 1, at. 



Temperances, b. Sept. 14. 1725. at 

Probably all of the children were born at Groton, bttt I have not 
found such a record. 

(To be continued). 



JULIA CATHERINE (SEYMOUR) CONKLING. 

Julia Catherine Sevmour was the youngest child of Henry and 
Marv Ledvard ( Forman ) Sevmour. Her father, Henry Seymour, was 
the son of 'Major Aloes Sevmour. of Litchfield, Conn., who was present 
at the surrender of Burgovne. Her mother was the daughter of General 
Jonathan Forman. who served during the entire Revolutionary war 
and retired with the rank of major-general. General Forman s wife 
was Mary Ledyard: born Sept. 3. i/SS, at Groton, Connecticut; died 

:\Iav 30. 1806. . 

' Marv Ledvard was the daughter of Youngs and Mary (Aver> ) 
L dvard'(No '10- pa-e 52). Youngs Ledyard was the brother of 
Cof William Led4'rd, whJ fell at Fort Griswold. and of Dr. Nathaniel 
Ledyard, who lost his life in a premature explosion of gunpowder while 
iovfullv celel)rating the repeal of the stamp act. 

•^ ' Alarv \verv. the wife of Youngs Ledyard. was the daughter ot 
Col Ebenezer Avery, of the Eighth Connecticut -^^^^^^ though 
born in 1704, continued in the service of his country till October, 17/6^ 
He" brother Ebenezer fell at Fort Griswold. She was the cousin of 
Gen. William Colfax, the father of Schuyler Colfax^ 

Youngs and Mary (Avery) Ledyard had eight children. Deboiah 
.he oldest' married Col. Christopher Avery, of the ^evolulnonar,^ waj - 
Youngs fell at 1-^ort Griswold: Benjamin was captain of the First re..i 



[go 



AVKKV XOTHS AXI) (^tHKlKS. 




Mrs. Roscoe Coxkling, 



AVEKV NOTKS AND Q_UERIES. I9I 

ment of New York infantry, was at White Plains and Monmouth, and 
was one of the founders of the Order of the Cincinnati ; Isaac was also 
in the First New York infantry as surgeon and was one of the founders 
of the Cincinnati ; Mary, as stated above, married Gen. Forman ; Lucy 
married Capt. Seth Phelps, of the Revolutionary war; Caleb died on 
the ship "Trumbull" while serving as ensign during the Revolutionary 
war; William died young. AMiat family can show a more patriotic 
record ? 

Miss Seymour married Roscoe Conkling in June, 1855. She was 
considered one of the most graceful and refined women of the adminis- 
trations of Lincoln and Grant. Her home was the scene of many bril- 
liant gatherings of distinguished men. Governor Horatio Seymour, 
of New York, was her brother. See Avery Notes and Queries, page 
170. 

With such patriotic ancestral connections, it was not strange that 
she early became interested in the Daughters of the American Revolu- 
tion. She was the founder of the Utica Chapter. She died at Utica, 
N. Y., October 18, 1893. 



The old Avery Bible, brought to America in 1630 by the 
founders of the Groton Averys, and described in Sweet's History- of 
the Groton Averys, pages 256, and 689, is offered for sale by its 
owner. Price, $2,000. 



Photographs of the " Old Hi\e "' and of the Aver>' Memorial, 
plain or colored, and suitable for framing, are now on sale. For 
further particulars, address the secretary of the Avery Memorial 
Association, Miss Helen M. Aver}-, No. 6, North Main Street, New 
London, Conn. 



This is a good time for you and your friends to subscribe for 
Avery Notes and Qlteries. .See page 182. 



Now turn back to the last paragraph on the first page of this 
magazine. 



AVEHV XOIKS AND t^UERIKS. 

THE AVERY MEMORIAL. 

HV MAKV I,. 150LI.KS KRANCH. 

Here once an ancient homestead stood, 

Gray with long years, of fashion old, 
I'roni stately oak, from hallowed w^ood, 
Were hewn its beams, and strong and good 
Uprose its walls, a race to hold. 

Here round the hearth sat sires and sons, 

Mothers and babes, a charming throng; 
Eight times renewed the long line runs, 
The youths became the aged ones. 

The children grew to manhood strong. 

Honor and virtue here held sway. 

And courage high in word and deed. 
Forth went the statesman on his wa}-, 
Forth marched the soldier to his fray, 

A sturdy race from sturdy seed. 

Gone are the walls that stood so long. 

Mossed roof and chimney, all are gone. 
Where sheltered happy lives were passed 
Now blows at will the winter blast, 
There is no home, the spot is lone. 

Yet sta\^, what wonders love hath wrought I 

Here is the hearthstone of a race. 
The threshold that their feet have sought, 
Here to our view the bounds are brought, 
And ivies the old chimneys grace. 

Oh! rooms unseen by mortal eyes. 

Wherein m.a.y move the friendly guest. 
Oh! walls invisible that rise 
With household gods in unknown guise. 
What is there to meet our quest ? 

Behold, the vanished home uprears 
This granite shaft whereon today 
Wrought in enduring bronze appears 
One who shall greet the coming years, 
Chief of his race, who seems to say: 

Here once an ancient homestead stood. 

Gray with long years, of fashion old, 
From stately oak. from liallo wed wood 
Were hewn its beams, and strong and good 
Uprose its walls, a race to hold. 
New London. Conn. 



Rvcry f^otcs and Queries. 

A Quarterly Magazine devoted to the History of the Groton Averys. 



No. 14. "Honor thy Father and thy Mother." May, 1 90 1. 



The number and page references used in this magazine are to 
Sweet's History of "The Averys of Groton." 



THE NEW FAMILY HISTORY. 

The number of subscriptions reported in February was 128. Since 
then subscriptions have been received as follows : 

Mrs. R. Y. Alitchell, Findlay. O i copy 

Charles C. Baldwin, Worcester, Mass i 

Frank Slossim, Kenosha, Wis i 

Noyes Fred'k Avery, Grand Rapids, ^lich i 

Sidney S. Avery, Rochester, N. Y i 

Miss Janette C. Avery, Easton, Aid i 

Wm. N. Avery, Metuchen, N. J i 

Joseph Dixon Avery, Chicago, III i 

Mrs. Mary H. Johnston, Humholdt, la i 

A. A. Grinnell. Oakfield, N. Y i 

Lewis B. .Avery, Redlands, Calif i 

The subscription price for the two volumes of the history is ten 
dollars. Five dollars must accompany the order; this rule is invari- 
able . If you desire to subscribe for the book, I shall be glad to send 
you (upon request) a blank for that purpose. 

The small number of subscriptions received in the last quarter is 
not very encouraging. I am to begin printing when I get subscrip- 
tions for five hundred copies ; if that numljer is not reached within a 
reasonable period, I am to return the full amount received from sub- 
scril)ers. All such moneys are deposited by me as a separate fund. 
The next few months must determine whether I print or you get your 
money back. Perhaps some of your friends who ought to subscribe 
for one or more copies each have not done so. Remember that the 
whole scheme of the new family history is hanging in the air. Whether 
it goes up or down depends upon the action of those who are able to 
subscribe for copies and have not yet done so. 



[94 A\"Kl;^ N()ii> .wn (^ikkiks. 

BIRTHS. 



Helen Laureiie Merwiii. (laui;lner of the Rev. Milton K. and Lil- 
lian I'airohiKl I Avery) Merwin ( Xo. 2067. ])ai;e 244), was born April 
6. 1900, at Ponipey, X. Y. 

Avis Colbnrn. granddauiiiiter of Alonzo IJailey Avery ( X'^o. 648, 
page 466), was liorn .Ma\- 2^. 1900, at Sac City. Iowa. 

Baby Curtis, granddaughter of Alonzo Bailey Avery ( Xo. 648. 
page 466). was born February 4. 1901. at Sac City. Iowa. 

Olive \*irginia \ an Tuyl. daughter of IMiles Avery \'an Tuyl. and 
granddaughter of Esther (Avery) \'an Tuyl. ( Xo. 456, page 626). 
was born January 10, 1901, at South Eaton. Pa. 

Dudley A\cry McCauley, son of Ora Allen and Syhia Leone 
(Avery) McCaulev, and grandson of Oscar AA-ery (Xo. 1371, page 
159), was born January- 31. igoi. at W'aldron. Ind. 



MARRIAGES. 



Xora Edith Avery ( Xo. 2441. page 294) married April 11. 1900, 
at Shelbyville. Indiana. William Wilson Rickets. 

Horace \\^eston Avery, the oldest child of George Benjamin and 
Frances Gertrude (Stark) Avery ( Xo. 1279. page 243), married Feb- 
ruary 12. 1901. at Denver, Colorado. Edith I'lested. 

Charles Franklin Innis. son of Amanda Maria (Avery) Innis ( X'^o. 
1667, page igf). married Xov. 14. 1900, at Port Carbon. Pa.. Maude 
^Margaret Bailey. 

Emily Aver_\- Wdieeler. daughter of Judge Richard A. and Frances 
IMary (Avery) Wheeler ( Xo. 495. page 130), married December 5. 
1900. Seth Xoyes \\'illiams. 

Glenn Wood. ]M. D., of Chicago, great-great-grandson of Alithea 
(Avery) Allyn (page 328). Temperance (Avery) Morgan (page 41). 
and Katherine (Avery) Dennison (page 53): and great-great-great- 
grandson of Deborah (Avery) Allyn (page 29). and Marv (Avery) 
^lorgan (page 33). married January i. 1901. Doi'othy Gro\-es, at 
Evansville. Indiana. 

In the notice of the marriage of Al^bie Fay Durfee and George 
Chandler Kinsman (Xotes axd Queriks, page 179). it was errone- 



AvEKY Notes and Qjlteries. 195 

ously stated thai tlie l)ricle is a granddaughter instead of a great-grand- 
daughter of Mrs. Ahiiira Avery Giles. 

Edna Morine A\'ery, daughter of Edwin Leslie Avery, the 
oldest son of Oscar Avery (No. 1371, page 159), married Eeljruary 
6, 1901, at Waldron, Ind., Horace Robert Furnas. 



DEATHS, 



yirs. Phebe Augusta (Ely) Avery (Xo. 228, page 170) died b^b- 
ruarv 12, 1901. at Chicago, 111. 

Otis Alonzo Avery ( Xo. 519a page 453) was killed on the Erie 
Railway, Eebruary 13, 1901. 

Solomon Avery ( Xo. 202, page 626) died February 9, 1901, at 
West Taghkanic, Columl)ia count}', N. Y. 

James (jliver Avery ( Xo. 2152, page 255) died INIarch 17, 1901, 
at San b^rancisco, California. 

Dean Richmond Avery ( Xo. 1416, page 258) died April 2, 1901, 
at Alamefla, California. 

Francis M. Avery, son of Daniel Avery ( Xo. 116, page 415). died 
I3eceml:!er 30, 1900, at Providence, R. L 

]\Irs. Almira X'irginia (Ijestor) Avery ( Xo. 1346, page 247 ) died 
April 5, 1 90 1, at Chardon, Ohio. 

Mrs. Mary Perry (Ingham) Avery ( Xo. 457, page 664) died 
April II, 1 901, at Camptown, Pa. 

Mrs. Pertha (Francis) Avery ( Xo. 539, page 392) died May i, 
190 1, at Somers, Conn. 

The Rev. All)ert Franklin Park, son of Penjamin Franklin and 
Hannah (Avery) Park ( Xo. 449, page 478), died (Jctober 8, 1900. 



I recently received a complaint from a " regular reader " of 
Avery Notes and Qjlteries, a much-grieved member of the Groton 
Avery clan. He had not received his magazine for February. Upon 
investigation I found that /le had never paid a cent as a subscriber 
to the magazine or for dues to the Groton /\\'ery History Club. He 
had been getting the magazine so regularly that lie felt wronged 
when the free supply was interrupted! And he had "the gall" to 
grumble. Some folks are very queer, are the\' not? 



ic)6 AvEKY Notes and C^ukiuks, 

THE SEARCH IN ENGLAND. 



llcldw is ^ivcn the result nf llic search made in the parish of Tiii- 
tai^el. L'onnvall, luigland. As will he seen, the name Christo])lier oc- 
curs in the list of haptisms. It. however, comes too late to he the name 
of our emigrant. Whether the name ai)pears in any of the neighhor- 
ing ])arishes has not heen determined. The search was made possible 
by the generosity of Miss Carrie M. l^owers, of Decatur, Illinois. 

(/. 



)\'ai 


Name. 


rarciil's name. 


iriieii hapt 


icea 


i5'^3 


William 


Richard Avery 


Octr. 


7 


1583 


Thomsin 


John Avery 


Feb. 


7 


158^ 


Jane (liase) 


Annie Avery 


Octr. 


18 


1586 


Will mot 


Richard Avery 


Augiu 


:t 7 


1587 


John 


John Avery of ( ?] 


) Sept. 


10 


1588 


Francis 


Richard Avery 


Deer. 


9 


1589 


Parcew 


Parcew Avery 


Mai. 


29 


1589 


Eli/'.a])eth 


William Avery 


Nov. 


26 


1 590 


Lawrence 


John Avery 


May 


s 


1591 


Ami 


William Avery 


Octr. 


30 


1591 


Jane 


Richard Avery 


Nov. 


8 


159^ 


Theciplnlus 


Pascew Avery 


May 


25 


1 59-' 


Elizal)Cth 


John Avery 


Nov. 


'7 


I.S94 


John 


Pascew Avery 


Nov. 


S 


1595 


John 


Thomas Avery 


May 


6 


I.596 


Theophilus 


Theophilns Avery 


Sept. 


7 


1605 


Edward 


Thomas Avery 


Octr. 


12 


1606 


Argent (?) 


Edward Avery 


Nov. 


18 


1611 


John 


Francis Avery 


Aug. 


20 


1616 


Ellinor 


Clement Avery 


vSept. 


18 


161Q 


Robert 


Clement Avery 


Dtcr. 


8 


1622 


Christopher 


Clement Avery 







Miss Ida F. Richardson, a descendant of No. 821, page 107, has 
painted a picture of the Harrison homestead at North Bend, Ohio. 
The sketch from which the painting is taken was submitted to the 
Hon. J. .Scott Harrison, and received his approval. Here President 
Benjamin Harrison was born. The ])ainting has been highly com- 
mended. Miss Richardson is prepared to furnish photographs. Ad- 
dress her at Southport, Indiana, Rural Rotite, No. i. 



Avery Notes and Q^ueries. 
AT THE CATTLE SHOW. 



197 



Part of this aq-o-regation is of the Groton Avery clan, and the 
other jiart is owned l^y a member of it. On the rockinj:;- chair is 

Francis Deane, the son 
of James Deane Avery 
(No. 452, page 380), of 
Shelburne Falls, Mass. 
Under the chair is Mr. 
A V e r y ' s "J e r r y" — 
claimed to be the lar- 
gest and handsomest ox 
in the world. " Jerrv " 
is a n i n e-}' car old 
llolstein, weighs 4365 
pounds, is 15 feet, 
1 1 inches long, and is 
described as "a marx'el 
of gigantic grace and beauty." 




As everybody is going to take his family to the Pan-American 
exposition this summer, it has become necessary for nearly every 
householder m nufifalo to unbar his gates and make room for coming 
guests. If you want to provide a resting place in advance (and it 
would be unwise to go without doing so), you will be good to yourself 
if you write to Charles H. Avery, 475 Ashland Avenue, or to Mrs. 
Franklyn T. Aver}-, 52 Leroy street. Both of these places are on pleas- 
ant residence streets. From either of them the exposition grounds are 
easily accessible on foot. From Ashland avenue the Elmwood street 
cars give direct transportation to the grounds or to the business part of 
the city. From Leroy street, like service is aiforded by the belt line. 



If you see in any newspaper an obituary or a marriage notice 
of an Avery or of a descendant of an A\-ery, i')lease send a marked 
copy of the j^aper to the historian of the Groton Averys. This will 
be easy for you and of very great help to him. 

There is something interesting and important to you on the 
last page of this magazine. 



igf^ AVKUV XoTKS AXD (^UERIKS. 

Hvcry )Votc6 and Queries. 

The otTicial organ of the Avery Memorial Association, of Groton, Conn, 
and of the Historian of the Groton Avervs 



PifhlisJicd hy lilroy M. Avery, at 057 Woodland Hills Avcniic, 
Cleveland, Ohio. 



S/cbscription Price, Fifty cents per year. Fifteen cents per copy. 

Entered at the Cleveland, O., postoffice as second-class matter. 



THE GROTON AVERY HISTORY CLUB. 

Since the last report, clul) dues have l)een received as follows: 

-Mrs. R. Y. Mitchell. Findlay. O $2.00 

^Ir,s. E. J. Wolcott. Utica, N. Y i.oo 

Airs. Charles J. Barnard, Syracuse. N. Y i.oo 

Dr. Otis Avery. Honesdale. Pa i.oo 

Mrs. Hannah C. Partridge, Jewctt City. Conn i.oo 

Wm. H. .\very. Los Angeles. Calif i.oo 

Mrs. Eliza G. Weir. Xorwicli Town, Conn i.oo 

Mrs. Kate A. Hallock. Cromwell. Conn i.oo 

Mrs. Geo. Kingsley. Paola. Kas i.oo 

Miss Sibyl Howe Avery. Providence. R. I i.oo 

Mrs. Mary H. Johnston. Humboldt. Iowa i.co 

Miss Jessie V. Avery, Erie. Pa i.oo 

A. D. Allen, Pittsburg, Pa i.oo 

A. A. Grinnell, Oakfield. N. Y i.oo 

Lewis James Avery. Seneca Falls. N. Y i.oo 

Total for the cjuarter $16.00 

All persons payintj cluh dues are entitled to the magazine with- 
out ftu'ther payment. Dues arc paid sim])l}- for the purpose of helping 
carry on the work of the family historian. Each memher determines 
what his annual payment shall be — within the limits of one and ten 
dollars. You are eligible to mcmbershi]). and your remittance will be 
gladly received and acknowledged in this magazine. 

If _\-ou know of a birth, marriage, or death in the (iroton A\-ery 
clan, please report it promptl}- to the family historian. 



Avery Notes and QLrEuiEs. 199 

THE AVERYS OF GROTON. 

{Continued I'voni Page 189.) 

16. Jona.iha.n'^ Avery {Jcuitesr James,- Christopher'^ )\vas l)orn No- 

vcnil)cr 9, iTicSi, at Groton, CDnn., m. Ajiril 1 i, 1703, at 

Elizabeth Bill, daughter of Philip and I^Hzalieth (Lester) Dill. She 

was liaptized Dec. 27, 1691, at Jonathan Avery was a 

farmer and trader. Fie lived near the ferry in (iroton and traded in 
horses to the W'est Indies. He died in Cul)a with the vellow fever 
ahoiit 1 74 1 or 1742. 

Children of Jonathan and Elizaheth ( liill ) Avery (all l)orn in Gro- 
ton) : 

53. i. Jonathan'^,, ]). Dec. 30, 1703. 

54. ii. ElizarethS, 1j. Jan. 18. 1705. 

55. iii. Mary 5, 1). Dec. 3, 1707. 

56. iv. Lucyf^, b. March 20. 1709. 

57. V. AiiNER^, b. May 28, 1 712. 

58. vi. Samuel^, b. July 7, 1715. 

59. vii. Abel^, b. Sept. 17, 1717. 

60. viii. TrmpeRANCE'5, b. Pel). 3, 17 19. 

61. ix. Freelove^, 1). Marcli 16, 1722. 

62. X. E.xpekience'"', 1). Nov. 6, 1724. 

The ahove differs .qreatly from the record as o-iven in "The Av- 
erys of Groton" hy Homer D. L. Sweet, page 31. The following rea- 
sons have forced the change : 

( 1 ) The Rev. David Avery in his diary says that Jonathan, the 
son of James Avery, and his son J(Miathan "went in the expedition to 
take Carthagena and Cul)a and thev hoth died in the e.xjiedition at 
Cuha." Jc^nathan .Vver}', son of Ahner ( Xo. 57 ahove) says in his 
diary that his grandfather, Jonathan Avery, traded in horses to the 
West Indies and died there of the yellow fever. Evidently hoth of 
these records refer to the same Jonathan, and so the father of Ahner 
must have heen Jonathan, the son of James. 

(2) The date of the birth of Jonathan (No. 13, page 325 of Mr. 
Sweet's Record ) son of Thomas Avery, has been found. He was born 
at Montville, Conn., Dec. 9, 1691, altogether too late to have married 
Elizabeth P>ill in 1703. He was, however, old enough to have married 
Elizabeth Waterman in 1724. 



200 AVKK\ N'oi KS AM) (^UKKIHS. 

(3) Jonathan Avery, tlic son of James, was l)orn in 1681 and 
was tlicrcfore of the itroper a.i;e to niarrx' I'Jizaljelh Hill in 1703. If, 
as Mr. Sweet has it, he did !iot marry till 1724, he was then 41 years 
old. older than the men of those days nsually were when they married 
the first time. 

(4 Jonathan Avery, the son of James, lived at Groton and so did 
the I'.ills: Jonathan Avery, the son of Thomas, lived at Xorwich and 
so did the W'atermans. 

(5) In addition to the three ehildren assigned hy Mr. Sweet to 
Jonathan Avery and his wife Dorothy ( Denison ) Copp (page 32) was 
a fotirth child, ()li\-c. who was baptized at Xorwich, Ma\- 29, 1763. 
If the father of this Olive was Jonathan the son of James, he must 
ha\-e been 82 years old at the time of her baptism, and coidcl not 
have died in Cuba about 1741, as stated b>- I)a\id A\-er\-, an unim- 
peached and wholly trustworth>- witness. 

There seems to be no room for doubt that Jonathan Avery, the son 
of James, married Elizabeth Bill, and that Jonathan Avery, the son of 
Thomas, married Elizabeth Waterman an<l .Airs. Dorothv (Denison) 
Copp. The two wives and families, as recorded by Air. Sweet, must 
change their Jonathans. 

(To he Continued.) 



Miss Clara Avery of 47 f:iiot Street, Detroit, is preparing a 
history of the Ipswich (Mass.) line of Averys or Averills. She has 
had the Avery and Averill entries copied from the records of Barn- 
staple, Devonshire, h'.ngland. They will ai)pear in some future 

number of this magazine. 

Wanted The address of some descendant of Constant Avery, 
son of Jacob and Sylvia (Eddy) Avery. He was born about 1755. 
was in the Revolutionary- war. and subse(]uentl>- settled in Xew 
York state. He was li\dng in Eaton, X. \ ., in 1840. 

Wanted The ancestr\- of Peter Aver}-, who was born in the 
\-icinit\- of Xew \'ork cit\- about 1740. He has many descendants 
now li\ing in the southern and western states. 

Wanted The' names of the children of Charles Aver\- who 
married Merc_\- Thiu-ston at Westerl>-, R. I., in 1753. 



Avery Notes and Qjlteries. 201 

Nelicniiali Avery (No. "JJ, page 422) was tlic son of John and 
Lydia (Smith) Avery. He was born al;out 1744 and died Aug. 26, 
1789, at Norwich, Conn. He married April 2^, 1766, Anna Denison, 
tlie daughter of John and Aljigail (Avery) Denison (No. 2y , page 
411), and his own cousin. After the death of Nehemiah Avery, the 
widow, Anna Denison Avery, married, in No\cmber, 1799, Amos 
Clift. 





NEHEMI.^H AVERY. 



ANN.\ (denison) AVERY, 



In June, 1813, her daughter, Nancy Avery, b. wSept. 12, 1785, married 
Wihiam CHft, her stepson. WilHam CHft and Nancy Avery were the 
parents of the Rev. William Clift, one of the historians of the Avery 
family — a sketch of whose life appears on page 439 of Sweet's "The 
Averys of Groton." 



Photographs of "The Ok! Hix^e " that housed eight successive 
generations of Groton xA.x'erys, built in 1656 and burned in 1894, and 
of the memorial now standing on the site thereof, plain or colored 
and suitable for framing, are now on sale. For further particulars, 
write to the secretary of the Avery Memorial Association, Miss 
Helen M. Averv, No. 6 North Main Street, New London, Conn. 



302 AVKKV Nl)l KS AND (^IKRIES. 

BREAKING HOME TIES- 

In his "Connecticut;' one of the most brilliant state histories yet 
writlcn. Professor Alexander Johnston says (pa^e 127) that there have 
been four main channels of cmi-ratinii fn>m ilu- (.Id commonwealth: 
-In earlv vears to A'ermont and sn ..ver the 1). rder into New York; 
later K. i'ennsvlvania ( Wyomin-' ) and K. CL-niral Xew York; later still 
to the Western Reserve of Ohio and so throughout that state and the 
West : and of recent years to New York city and thence in every di- 
rection. In addition to these main channels, isolated routes of migra- 
tion have been innumerable, so that Comiecticut names are now to be 
found in everv part of the Union. Such a steady stream of migration 
could riot but have hastened the alienation of family property."' It 
mav properlv be noticed, in passing, that the homestead of the founder 
of 'the Groton Averys is a marked exception to such alienation of 
familv propertv. 

Although 'the ownership of the "Hive of the Averys" still inheres 
in the Avery name, the migrations mentioned have spread that name 
as described' Some of these routes have been so marked in the history 
of the Averv familv as to merit consideration in the pages of this 
magazine. The cha'rter granted by Charles II. to Connecticut in 1662 
conveyed title to a territory bounded on the north l^y the line of the 
^lassachusctts Plantation, and extending from the Xarraganset Kiver 
(,r bav westward to the South Sea. i. e., to the Pacific Ocean. This 
western domain was cut in twain liy the later gift of what we call the 
Empire State to the duke of York. In 1642, the Massachusetts authori- 
ties sent two surveyors to run the southern line of that colony. They 
began operations by finding what seemed to them a point "three Eng- 
lish Mvles on the South Parte of the Charles River, or of any. or 
everie Parte thereof." as was proper under the ^^lassachusetts charter 
of 1629. Instead of running the line thence westward to the Pacific, 
"the mathematicians" sailed around Cape Cod and up the Connecticut 
River and found a second point that they said was in the same latitude 
as the first. This second point was. in fact, eight miles too far south, 
but tlK- survLvors iK-rhaps thought that it was a part of their duty to 
show be\on(l douln that Agawam (Springfield) was in ^Massachusetts. 
Of course. Connecticut refused to recognize the survey, and both 
colonies appealed to the crown. In 17 14. a compromise line was 



AvERV Notes and Qjlteriks. 2133 

agreed upon. In return for concessions then made, Massachusetts 
gave Connecticut certain of her western lands, about sixty thousand 
acres of which were found to l)e in the territory later known as \^er- 
mont. These X'ermont lands were sold by Connecticut to private 
parties, and a considerable northward migration of Connecticut settlers 
Was thus developed. 

Under the grant of the English king to his l^rother, the duke of 
York, it was claimed that New York extended eastward to the Con- 
necticut River. So far as Massachusetts and Connecticut were con- 
cerned, this claim was given U]) by the duke, but north of the Massa- 
chusetts line the claim was insisted upon. At the same time Governor 
Wentworth of Xew Hampshire insisted that his colony extended west- 
ward as far as did Massachusetts and Connecticut, and the "Hampshire 
grants" became the bone of bitter contention. Thus there were two 
claimants to the jurisdiction of the Green Mountain region. Not only 
was Connecticut strongly represented there but some of the towns in 
the "Hampshire grants" actually held their first town meetings in 
Connecticut before the northward migration of their settlers. In 1777, 
a convention of these settlers adopted a declaration of the independence 
of the New Hampshire grants, and petitioned that New Connecticut 
might be ranked "among the free and independent American states, 
and delegates therefrom admitted to seats in the great Continental Con- 
gress." Within a year, the name Vermont was substituted for New 
Connecticut. Xew York took energetic measures to enforce her 
claims and sought congressional interference in her behalf. Thus 
sprang up two factions, the "Vermonters" and the "Yorkers." In the 
end, tlie state of X'ermont was estal)lished, and, in 1786, the legislature 
of Xew York granted "a quantity of vacant land equivalent to a town- 
ship of eight miles square" to the \'ermont settlers who "by their at- 
tachment, zeal, and activity in endeavoring to support the just and 
lawful authority of X'^ew York" had brought upon themselves con- 
fiscations and imprisonments, and "exquisite tortures." See Sweet's 
"History of the Groton Averys," page 417. The cause of the Con- 
necticut migrations to the \\'voming region of Tennsylvania and the 
Western Reserve of (Jhio may be discussed in future numl^ers of 

A\'ERY XOTES AND QuKRIE.S. 



The price of this magazine is oidy fifty cents a year. 



204 A\KU\- No IKS AND C^IKKIES. 

THE MEMORIAL WINDOW. 

The niovcnient for placiii!^- in the new huihhng of the First Chureh 
of Christ in Groton a window memorial to the founders of the Groton 
Averys has the warm approval of that organization. The church and 
society have constituted Mr. I'rederic IHll and ^liss Elizabeth ]\Iiner 
Avery of Cjroton, ]\lr. Frank Montgomery Avery of New York City, 
and Elroy Z\i. Avery of Cleveland a committee to determine plans for 
the window and to have general charge of the memorial. 

The new building is to be of stone, old English in style, and will 
stand almost under the shadow of the battle monument Ami marks the 
heroic deeds and deaths of so many of the Avery clan. The building 
was made possible by the generous gift of Mr. Bill, the chairman of 
the committee above mentioned and the founder of the Groton mem- 
orial library mentioned on page 165 of Notes and Queries. 

The estimated cost of the window is two thousand dollars. Of 
this amount, several hundred dollars ha\-e already- been sub- 
scribed. The project appeals strongly to every Groton Avery who has 
any adequate recognition of the noble heritage that he received from 
a noble ancestry. All such should contribute according to their ability 
to do so. Remittances should be sent to the treasurer of the 
memorial window fund. Aliss Elizabeth ^liner A\"ery. Box 177, 
Groton, Conn. She will gladly gi\'e, upon application, any informa- 
tion desired. 

At the time of going to press, the subscriptions reported are as 
follows : 

John D. Rockefeller ^'ooo.oo 

Frederic Bill 100.00 

Mrs. Frederic Bill .. 50.00 

Frank Montgomery Avery 50.00 

Latham Fish 50.00 

Trueman G. Avery 25.00 

Elroy M. Avery 25.00 

Mrs. Hannah Eldridge 10.00 

Henry \V. Avery 5.00 

Pick }-our own place and fall into line. He gives twice who 
gi\-es quicklw 



Hvcry jVotcs and Queries. 

A Quarterly Magazine devoted to the History of the Groton Avcrys. 
No. t5. "Honor thy Father and thy Mother." August, J 90 1. 

The number and page references used in this magazine are to 
Sweet's History of "The Averys of Groton." 

THE NEW FAMILY HISTORY. 

The number of subscriptions reported in May was 139. Since 
then, subscriptions have been received as follows : 

Clarence L. Avery, Herkimer, N. Y i copy 

Mrs. Harriet A. Jewell, Dunkirk, N. Y 2 " 

William H. Avery, Los Angeles, Cal 2 " 

Mrs. George D. Gift, White Plains, N. Y i " 

Alphonso C. Avery, Morganton, N. C i " 

Daniel H. Treadway, Groton, Conn i " • 

Mrs. Nancy E. Munson, Huntington, Mass i " 

Mrs. Emily A. Wheeler Williams, Stonington, Conn i " 

Miss Charity A. Samaine, Rochester, N. Y i " 

Mrs. Albert Babcock, Ravenna, O. ...... i " 

Alonzo B. Avery, Sac City, Iowa i " 

The subscription price for the two volumes of the history is ten 
dollars. Five dollars must accompany the order; this rule Is invari- 
able. If you desire to subscribe for the book, I shall be glad to send 
you (upon request) a blank for that purpose. 

I am to begin printing when I get subscriptions for five hundred 
copies ; if that number is not reached within a reasonable period, I am 
to return the full amount received from subscribers. The next few 
months must determine whether I print or you get your money back. 
Perhaps some of your friends who ought to subscribe for one or more 
copies each have not done so. Perhaps several of you can join in or- 
dering a copy for your public library, where it will be accessible to all 
of you. Remember that the whole scheme of the new family history 
is hanging in the air. Whether it goes up or down depends upon the 
action of those who are able to subscribe for copies and have not yet 
done so. 



206 AVEKV XOTES AND QrERIES. 

BIRTHS. 



Clarence Lucius Avery, son of Charles Porter Avery and grandson 
of Clarence Lucius Avery (No. 511, page 452). was born ]\Iarch 8, 
1901, at Herkimer, N. Y. 

Alice Angeline Avery, daughter of Arthur Ross and Grace (Denis) 
Averv (No. 2229, page 268), was born ]\Iarch 9, 1901. at Humboldt, 
Neb. 



MARRIAGES. 



Amelia Smith Avery, daughter of Lyman Ralph x\very and grand- 
daughter of Daniel Brewster and Harriet Eliza (Smith) Avery (No. 
836, page 108), married June 5, 1901, Guy E. Jackson. 

Florence ]\Iary Stockwell, daughter of Norris P. and ^lary Augus- 
ta (Avery) Stockwell (No. 396, page 355), married April 30, 1901, at 
Painesville, Ohio, Percy Kendall Smith. 

^NLirgaret Experience Avery (No. 1192. page 532) married June 
5, 190 1, at Kenosha, ^^'is., Andrew Bonner AlacCaughey, of Saint 
Paul, INIinn. 

Avery Coonley, son of Mrs. Lydia (Avery) Coonley Ward (No. 
I3i3> page 245), married June 8, 190 1, at Unadilla Center, New York, 
Oueene Ferr}', of Detroit. 

Theodore Seward Blakesley, son of Capt. Alpheus ]Miles and Alary 
Ann (Avery) Blakesley (No. 2196, page 298). married June 24, 1901, 
at Rock Island, 111., Calista ]\Iav Carl. 



DEATHS. 



Benedict Wells Alorgan (No. 1630, page 275) died Alay 15, 1901, 
at ]\Iystic, Conn. 

Thomas Alorris Avery (No. 544, page 492) died ]\Iay 26, 1901, at 
Chicago, 111. 

Airs. Jane (Avery) Fish (No. 1301, page 147) died June oy, 1901, 
at East Norwood, Hamilton countv, Ohio. 



Avery Notes and Querip:s. 307 

HUMANE SOCIETY OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

Testimontal. 

Granted June 6, 1856. 
It was voted, That this certificate be presented to James Augustus 
Avery, of the bark "Mustang," as a testimonial of the humanity and 
good management displayed by him, on the second day of December, 
1855, when, in l:)oisterous weather, in a rough, dangefous sea, he res- 
cued, with his boat, Capt. David B. Eldridge, his father, and the crew 
of the schooner "Henry" of Bucksport, the schooner being water- 
logged and in a sinking condition. 

Dav. Sears, Pres., 

G. Hooper, Rec. Sec'y. 

This James Augustus Avery (No. 1408, page 255) followed the 
sea the greater part of his life, sailing in command of various merchant 
vessels from Xew York to various parts- of the world. In i860, he 
sailed the schooner "Florence" around Cape Horn to San Francisco. 
About 1865, ill health forced him to give up the sea. He was born at 
Xew London, Conn., in 18 16, and died at San Francisco in 1870. 



The illustrated poem printed en the last page of this magazine was 
originall}- printed in "The Christian Herald," of which Dr. T. DeWitt 
Talmadge is editor. It is republished now by the kind courtesy of that 
l)aper. The author of the poem is the wife of a Groton Avery — that 
is to say, I think that he is a Groton Avery, although I can't prove it 
vet. 



If this paragraph is checked in l)lue pencil, you may know that 
your subscription ought to be renewed. 



The Hon. Richard A. Wheeler, of Stonington, Conn., is authority 
for the statement that Capt. John Parke m. Mary Witter. See Avery 
X'oTES AND Queries, p. 172. 



I recently received from Walter Sanford Avery, of Wellington, 
Ohio, the records of forty married descendants of Charles Avery (No. 
57, page 561), with about as many more unmarried children. This 
Charles Avery was born in Groton in 1731, and married at Westerly, 
R. I., in 1753. I h?d no record of anv of his descendants. 



3o8 Avery Notes and Qlteries. 

Every jVotce and Queries. 

The official organ of the Averx^ Memorial Association, of Groton, Conn, 
and of the Historian of the Grotou Averys. 

Published by Elroy M. Avery, at 657 Woodla?id Hills Avenue, 
Cleveland, Ohio. 



Subscriptio3i Pi-ice, Fifty cents per year. Fifteen cents per copy. 

Entered at the Cleveland, O., postoffice as secoud-class matter. 

THE GROTON AVERY HISTORY CLUB. 



Since the last report, club dues have been received as follows : 

Addison Avery, Norwich. Conn Si.oo 

Joseph -\. Hyde,_ Deer Lodge. Mont 2.00 

Mrs. Harriet A. JewelL Dunkirk, X. Y 1.00 

Mrs. N. D. Robinson, Norwich Town, Conn i.oo 

Clarence L. Avery, Herkimer, N. Y i.oo 

Mrs. Susan Look Avery, Anchorage, Ky i .00 

Josiah C. Pumpelly, New York City i.oo 

Miss Emily R. Samaine, Dorchester. Mass i.oo 

Judge A. C. Avery, Morganton, N. C 2.00 

Mrs, S. R. Osgood, Oakland. Cal i.oo 

Mrs. Sarah E. Nighman. Canton, O '. i.oo 

P. O. Avery, Humboldt, Neb i.oo 

Total for the quarter $14.00 

All persons pa5^ng club dues are entitled to the magazine with- 
out further payment. Dues are paid simply for the purpose of helping 
oarr\- on the work of the family historian. Each member determines 
what his annual pa>Tnent shall be — within the limits of one and ten 
lollars. You are eligible to membership, and your remittance wnll be 
gladly received and acknowledged in this magazine. 



If you know of a birth, marriage, or death in the Groton Avery 
clan, please report it promptly to the family historian. 



Avery Notes and Qjueries. 
THE AVERYS OF GROTON. 



209 



m. Sept. 30, 
November 13. 



741 at Groton. 



1735, at Groton. 



( Co)itinued From Page 200. See page 133.) 
17. Hannah* Avery (y^'^z^-^^, James'^, Christopher'^) was born 
March 24, 1685, ^^ Groton, Conn.; m. Dec. 30, 1708, at Groton, 
Conn., Samuel Morgan, son of John and Rachel (Dymond) Morgan 
of Groton, Conn. He was born Sept. 9, 1669 at Groton, Conn. 
Neither the date of his death nor that of his wife has been 
ascertained. 

Children of Samuel and Hannah (Avery) Morgan (all born in 
Groton ) : 

i. Samuel^', b. March 9, 171 1; 

Abigail Heath, 
ii. Elijah^, b. April 13. 1712, m 

Eunice Williams, 
iii. Hannah^, b. Feb. 14, 1714. 
iv. Abijah^, b. July 6, 1715. 
V. LuCY^, b. March 9, 1717. 

vi. TheophiluS^, b 

vii. Experience^, b 

viii. Timothy^, b 

J8. Sarah* Avery {Jamcs^^ James-, Christopher'^) was born 

May 10, 1688, at Groton, Conn.; m at 

Gary Latham, son of Cary and Susanna 

(Forster) Latham. He was born Sept. 13, 1690, at Groton; he died 
July II, 1735. at Groton and was buried in the "ancientest" burying 
ground in New London, where his tombstone is still standing. His 
wife, Sarah Avery Latham, died April 20, 1732, at Groton and is 
also buried in the "ancientest" burying ground and her tombstone 
is still standing. Cary Latham m. second, Sarah Waterhouse, who 
died Feb. 8, 1734. By her he had one son Cary. He m. for his 
third wife Dorothy (Otis) McLaren. 

Children of Cary and Sarah (Avery) Latham (all born in 
Groton ): 

i. Josephs, b. April S, 1714; m. Rebecca Green of Groton; 

d , at 

ii. vSusannahs, b. Sept. i, 1717, at Groton; m. John Williams, 
son of Peter Williams; d. July 23, 1799, ^t Groton. 

iii. Embi,em5, b. March 14, 1720; d , at 

iv. Sarahs, b. Sept. 25. 1723; d , at 



2IO AvERv Notes and Q^ueries, 

The abo\L- record of tin' family of Sarah Ax'ery does not appear 
in Sweet's "A\-er>^s of Ciroton". It is possible that it is not correct. 
The reasons for thinking- that it is correct are as follows: 

James A\'er\-, the father of this Sarah Avery, referred to her 
in 1717 as Sarah Latham; he wrote of her a^aiii in 1727 or 1728 as 
Sarah Latham. From this it is evident that his daughter was 
married to a INIr. Latham as earh^ as 171 7 and that she was alive in 
1727. 

A careful search among the Latham records reveals onh' one 
Latham married to a Sarah at that period. Earlier than 1714, Gary 

Latham married Sarah The last name has not been 

ascertained. Mrs. Sarah Latham's tombstone shows that she died 
in 1732, aged 44; Sarah Avery was born in 1688; the age agrees 
with the dates. 

The two families li\-ed not far apart, and an intermarriage was 
very probable. 

It is hoped that some one may be able to add to the above and 
to pro\'e or disprove the record as herein printed. 

19. Joseph* Avery (James^, James'-, Christophc7-"') was born at 

Groton, Conn., August g, 1691; m , 

at Tabitha Gardner. Mr. Sweet in 

" The Averys of Groton " says that they were married in South 
Kingston and that her father's name w^as William. A search in the 
South Kingston records shows no William who had a daughter 
Tabitha. It is probable that her father's name was George. A 
George and Tabitha (Tifft) Gardner of South Kingston, R. L, had a 
daughter Tabitha, b. abt. 1696. The date of the death of Joseph 
Avery has not been ascertained. He lived at Norwich, Conn. Jabez 
Fitch, a young man of Norwich, Conn., whose diary has been print- 
ed in the " Mayflower Descendants ", wrote that old Joseph Avery 
was drowned June 27, 1753. The entry probably refers to this 
Joseph Avery. 

Children of Joseph and Tabitha (Gardner) Avery (all born in 
Norwich): 

i. Joseph^, b. vSept. 26, 1715; d , at 

63 ii. Tabitha"', b Feb. 25, 1717. 

iii. RlizabrTh-^, b. Aug. 24, 1719; d. at Norwich, Conn., Ang 6, 
1743- 

64 iv. Benjamin-', b. Sept. 4, 1721. 

V. LuCY^, b. May 2, 1723; d...., it is supposed in 1743 
{To be Continued.) 



Avery Notes and Queries. 
THE AVERY MEMORIAL ASSOCIATION. 



The seventh annual meeting of the Avery Memorial Association 
was held at the Avery Memorial Park, Groton, Conn., on the afternoon 
of July 19, 1901. Vice-president Allen Avery, of Mystic, ])resided, 
and wielded the gavel made from a beam taken from the ruins of the 
old Avery homestead built in 1656 and Ijurned in 1894. A local re- 
port says that the afternoon was tine and balmy, cool breezes wafting 
the sweet perfume of new mown hay during the entire session. The 
place of meeting is ideal in every particular and it never looked more 
lovely than on this occasion. 

Interesting letters written to his young wife in 1778 and 1780 by 
Simeon Avery, an aide to General Jedediah Huntington, of New Lon- 
don, were read by his great-granddaughter. Miss Annie Miner Avery, 
of Memphis, Tennessee. 

Officers for the ensuing year were elected as follows : 

'President — Elroy M. Avery, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Vice-presidents — Frank Montgomery Avery, of New York; Allen 
Avery, of Mystic;Trueman G. Avery, of Buffalo, N.Y.; Christopher L. 
Avery, of Groton; Cyrus Avery, of Poquonoc Bridge; John O. Spicer, 
of Groton ; Edgar M. Warner, of Putnam. 

Secretary — Miss Helen Morgan Avery, of New London. 

Treasurer — Miss Addie Avery Thomas, of Groton. 

Executive Committee — Elroy M. Avery, Helen M. Avery, Cyrus 
Avery, Allen Avery, Christo])her L. Avery, Mrs. John O. Spicer, Mrs. 
Francis M. Alanwarring, Miss Addie A. Thomas, and William S. 
Thomas. 



It is proposed by the descendants of Solomon Avery to erect a 
monument on the family burial plot of Silas Avery, at Tunkhannock, 
Pennsylvania. Solomon Avery was l:)orn June 7, 1729, and is buried 
in this plot. Many of his descendants also rest near by. It is 

proposed to inscribe upon the monument the names of the ancestors 
of Solomon Avery and also of his descendants. The monument will 
be of polished granite, and the work will be commenced as soon as 
sufficient funds are subscribed to justify the movement. As there are 
several hundred living descendants of Solomon Avery, the effort to 
build the monument will undoubtedly be crowned with success. 



Avery Notes axd (Queries. 
THE MEMORIAL WINDOW. 



The movrment for placing in the new huildiiTg of the First 
Church of Christ in Groton a window memorial to the founders of 
the Groton Averys has the- warm approval of the church organiza- 
tion, and seems destined to meet with the complete success that it 
deserves. The estimated cost of the window is two thousand dollars. 
Every member of the Groton Avery clan ought to contribute ac- 
cording to his ability. Remittances should be sent to the treas- 
urer of the mrmorial window fund, Miss Elizabeth Miner Avery. 
Box 177, Groton. Conn. She will gladly give, upon application, 
any information desired. 

At the time of going to press, the subscriptions reported are as 
follows: 

JohnD. Rockefeller $1000.00 

Frederic Bill 100 00 

Mrs. Frederic Bill 5° 0° 

Frank Montgomery Avery SO-C-o 

Latham Fish 50-0" 

Tnieman G. Avery 25.00 

Elroy M. Averj' 25 00 

Mrs. Hannah Eldridge 10.00 

Henry W. Avery 500 

Mrs. Sarah L. Hall 5 00 

Orrin Avery 25 00 

Nathan D. Bill 5000 

J. Carleton Averv^ 3-oo 

Curtis Avery 10.00 

The Rev. John Avery 2 00 

Maj. Cyrus Avery i.oo 

Mrs. Julia A. Sherman 50-oo 

Mrs. Eleazer J. Avery i.oo 

Elizabeth R. Avery 2.00 

Mrs. Mary H. Hine 2000 

Miss Jane A. Avery 10.00 

$1494.00 
Thus, nearly three-fourths of the money needed has been 
pledged. The rest should be subscribed before the next number of 
"Avery Notes and Queries" is printed. It will help \i yo// do what 
vou can and do it at once. 



I- 



Avery Notes and Qjlteries. 213 

As cN'crybody is going to take his family to the Pan-American 
exposition this summer, it has become necessar)^ for nearly every 
householder in l^uffalo to unbar his gates and make room for coming 
guests. If you want to provide a resting place in advance (and it 
would be unwise to go without doing so), you will be good to }^our- 
self if you write to. Charles H. Avery, 475 Ashland Avenue, or to 
Mrs. Frankl>'n T. Avery, 52 Leroy street. Both of these places are 
on pleasant residence streets. From either of them the exposition 
grounds are easily accessible on foot. From Ashland Avenue the 
Flmwood street cars give direct transportation to the grounds or to 
the business part of the city. From Leroy street, like service is 
afforded bv the belt line. 



If you see in any newspaper an obituary or a marriage notice 
of an Avery or of a descendant of an Avery, please send a marked 
copy of the paper to the historian of the Groton Averys. This will 
be easy for you and of very great help to him. 



Photographs of "The Old Hive" that housed eight successive 
generations of Groton Averys, built in 1656 and burned in 1894, and 
of the memorial now standing on the site thereof, plain or colored 
and suitable for framing, are now on sale. For further j)articulars, 
write to the secretary of the Avery Memorial Association, Miss 
Helen M. Averv, No. 6 North Main Street, New London, Conn. 



The price of this magazine is only fifty cents a year. 



There is something interesting and important to you on page 
212 of this magazine. 



Do You Want 

a copy of the new 

HISTORY OF THE GROTON AVERYS? 

If you do, please read the article on 
page 205 of this magazine. 



214 



AvEltV XOTES AND Q^L'El 




OUR LITTLE "NORTH" AND "SOUTH" 



"\A/E'RE glad we are Americans- 
* ' Upon the glorious Fourth. 

I am a Mttle Southern girl, 
My cousin's from the North. 

"We play that we are children 

Of a-many years ago, 
To call on General Washington, 

Right merrily we go." 



"We'll call on General Washington, 
And then on Grant and Lee — 

And then, O dear ! we'd most forgot- 
Our Lincoln we must see. 

" 'Twould never do to leave him out- 
He was so great and good." 

And so, they trip to make play-calls 
In patriotic mood. 



Then, lo I thev mi.x their history up, Ah. could the spirits of the past 
,<.A^"^ ^^^^ °^ ^P"!^ ^"^ ^^^~ , Receive them as they come, 

'They were such nice, fine gentlemen. And see how faith and love survive. 

And good fnends, don't you see.' And all discords are dumb. 

Says South, "Lee gave his sword to j^„^^g^gj.^]g ^j,^ presidents 

Grant— , . , . „ Would greet this North and South 

c "'^ v"*!*" "o n f"i ^°-^ T Of jocuncfstep and clasping hand, 

much''- ' -"^"^ love-words in the mouth. 

He wouldn't take it, though.'' Myrta L. Avakv. 



Hvcry jVotes and Queries. 

A Quarterly Magazine devoted to the History of the Groton Averys. 
No. J 6. "Honor thy Father and thy Mother." November, 1 90 1. 

The number and page references used in this magazine are to 
Sweet's History of "The Averys of Groton." 



THE NEW FAMILY HISTORY. 



The number of subscriptions reported in August was 152. Since 
then, subscriptions have been received as follows : 

Cyrus M. Avery, Peoria, 111 i copy 

Henry Benton Avery, Springfield, Mass 

William Wallace Avery, Silver City, Idaho , 

Minor M. Avery, Dixon, 111 , 

Wm. C. Amsden, Garner, Iowa 

The Rev. F. B. Avery, Painesville, Ohio , 

Minnesota State Historical Society 

Van Brunt Avery, Savannah, Ga 

Christopher L. Avery, Groton, Conn 

Ward S. Brown, Albion, Mich 

Orrin W. Avery, Colchester, Conn 

Joseph Satterlee, Highlandville, Mass 

Miss Emma Van Pelt, Camp Dennison, Ohio 

Wm. Y. Avery, Philadelphia, Pa 

The subscription price for the two volumes of the history is ten 
dollars. Five dollars must accompany the order; this ride is invari- 
able. If you desire to subscribe for the book, I shall be glad to send 
you (upon request) a blank for that purpose. 

I am to begin printing when I get subscriptions for five hundred 
copies ; if that number is not reached within a reasonable period, I am 
to return the full amount received from subscribers. The next few 
months must determine whether I print or you get your money back. 
Perhaps some of your friends who ought to subscribe for one or more 
copies each have not done so. Perhaps several of you can join in or- 
dering a copy for your public library, where it will be accessible to all 
of you. Remember that the whole scheme of the new family historv 



2i6 AvEKY Notes and Qjlekies 

is lianging in the air. W'hetlier it goes up or down depends upon the 
action of those who are able to subscribe for copies and have not yet 
done so. See the article entitled "Heart to Heart," printed on page 

222. 



BIRTHS. 



^^'illianl Johnston Avery, son of Alphonso Calhoun and ^larv 
(Johnston) Avery (Xo. 533, page 641), was born ]^Iay 12, 1901, at 
Morganton, X. C. 

Ada Frances Robinson, daughter of Dr. Richard Francis and Jen- 
nie (Brennan) Robinson, and gran daughter of Roger and Ada Olivia 
(Avery) Brennan (Xo. 507, page 491), was born June 15, 1901, at 
Egan, S. D. 

Gail Amsden, daughter of William Cummings and Cora (Cruise) 
Amsden, and granddaughter of the Rev. Benjamin ^vlonrce and Reliance 
(Avery) Amsden (Xo. 478, page 628), was born July 14, 1901, at Gar- 
ner, Iowa. 

Kenneth Banning Avery, son of Gurdon Chappell and Elsie Ban- 
ning '(Beebe) Avery (X'o. 2234, page 268), was born June 19, 1899, at 
X'ew London, Conn. 

Cornelia Louise Axery, daughter of Gurdon Chappell and Elsie 
Banning (Beebe) Avery (X^'o. 2234, page 268), was born June 16, 1901, 
at Xew London, Conn. 

Griswold George Avery, son of George Griswold and Jennie Eliza- 
beth (Crosbie) Avery (Xo. 2232, page 268), was born June 13, 1901, 
at Xew London, Conn. 

Helen Aver}^ daughter of Homer ^^larshall and Rhoda Kirkwood 
(Cranor) Avery (X^o. 2109, page 294), was born January 23, 1900, at 
Sycamore, Ind. 

Harry \\'ilson Rickets, son of William Wilson and Xora Edith 
(Avery) Rickets (X^o. 2441, page 294), was born June 14, 1901, at Shel- 
byville, Ind. 

Irma Hoisington, daughter of Elmer Lincoln and Bessie ^lay 
(Xewman) and granddaughter of ]\Iorris Roberts and Lucy Ann 
(Avery) X'^ewman (Xo. 420, page 622), was born February 9, 1901, at 
Maple Creek Farm near Spokane, Wash. 



Avery Notes and Queries. 217 

MARRIAGES. 



David Avery Haggard, son of Dr. James R. and Frances Helen 
(Avery) Haggard (No. 1375, page 252), married August 21, 1901, at 
Lincoln, Neb., Anna Broady. 

Sidney Avery (No. 2219, page 266) married August 15, 1901, at 
Chicago, 111., Nellie Eloise Naylor. 

Albert Avery (No. 2100, page 252) married July 14, 1901, at 
Saint Paul, Ind., Mary Maude Leffler. 

Daniel Arthur Newman, son of Morris Roberts and Lucy Ann 
(Avery) Newman (No. 420, page 622), married July 4, 1901, at Syra- 
cuse, N. Y., Mary 



DEATHS. 



David Wesley Evans, husband of Cynthia Helen (Avery) Evans, 
daughter of Christopher Avery (No. 418, page 444), died April 8, 
1901, at Granville, Ohio. 

Jonas Edward Avery (No. 1506, page 262) died September 4, 
1901, at Grand Haven, Mich. 

Mary Ann (Benson) Avery, wife of Julian Morgan Avery (No. 
2289, page 274), died August 22, 1901, at Harman, a suburb of Denver, 
Colorado. 

Clarence Wright Bailey, elder son of Alvin Leslie and Mary Helen 
(Avery) Bailey (No. 21 10, page 294), died June 30, 1901, at Indian- 
apolis, Ind. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Fernald (Aver>') Sherburne (No. 579a, page 673) 
died September 15, 1901, at North Wolfboro, N. H. Her inclusion by 
Mr. Sweet among the Groton Averys was an error; she was of the 
Portsmouth clan. See Avery Notes and Queries, page 67. 

The Rev. Holly Hunt Avery (No. 585, page 376) died September 
2, 1901, at Unadilla, Neb. 

If this paragraph is checked in blue pencil, you may know that 
your subscription ought to be renewed. 



Avery Notes and Queries. 

Hvcry J^oUs and Queries. 



The official organ of the Avery Memorial Association, of Groton, Conn., 
and of the Historian of the Groton Averys. 



rifhlishcd by EIroy M. Avery, at 657 Woodland Hills Avenue, 
Cleveland, Ohio. 



Subscription Price, Fifty cents per year . Fifteen cents per copy. 

Entered at the Cleveland, O., postoffice as secotid-class matter. 

THE GROTON AVERY HISTORY CLUB. 



Since the last report, club dues have been received as follows : 

James A. Babcock, Cranford, N. J $i.oo 

Cyrus M. Avery, Peoria, 111 i.oo 

Mrs. Curtis Lord Avery, Wa5'ne, Pa i.oo 

Mrs. Chas. W. Avery, Yreka, Calif i.oo 

Henry Benton Avery, Springfield, Mass i.oo 

Dr. Ellery Denlson, New York City i.oo 

Dr. Alida C. Avery, San Jose, Calif i.oo 

Christopher L. Avery, Groton, Conn i.oo 

Miss Mary A. C. Avery, Norwich, Conn i.oo 

Joseph Satterlee, Highlandville, Mass 2.00 

Mrs. Mary A. Stockwell, Painesville, 2.00 

Miss Mabel L. Avery, Arverne, X. Y 2.00 

William Wallace Avery, Caldwell, Idaho i.oo 

Dr. Otis Avery, Honesdale Pa i.oo 

Total for the quarter $1 7.00 

All persons paying club dues are entitled to the magazine without 
further payment. Dues are paid simply for the purpose of helping 
carry on the work of the family historian. Each member determines 
what his annual payment shall be — within the limits of one and ten 
dollars. You are eligible to membership, and your remittance will be 
gladly received and acknowledged in this magazine. 



If you know of a birth, marriage, or death in the Groton Avery 
clan, please report it promptly to the family historian. 



Avery Notes and Queries. 
CONVENIENT COMFORT. 



319 



If you do not live in New York, the lately raided lair of the Tam- 
many Tiger, you expect to live long enough to go there again. One of 
the most delightful things about New York is the Upper Bay. Starting 
from the lower end of the city, a few minutes' ride by boat takes you to 
Staten Island. As you approach the wharf, your attention is attracted 
by the handsome Hotel Castleton. You needn't look for it — you can't 




25 MINUTES SAIL 






help seeing it. By stage or street car you ride from the ferry wharf to 
the hotel. The proprietor of the Castleton is George H. Avery, son of 
Hiram Avery (No. 825, page 107). If you turn to the record in Mr. 
Sweet's History of the Averys of Goton, you will see at a glance what 
a "find" on both sides was made when George H. Avery ran up against 
the family historian at the great gathering at Avery Memorial Park in 
Groton in July, 1900. 

The front of the Castleton shown in the picture overlooks the Bay. 
Picture of pictures ! Hemmed in by that wondrous arc made by Brook- 
lyn, New York and Jersey City is the matchless harbor furrowed by 
ocean steamers and vessels of every kind from every part of the world— 
an ever-changing panorama of interest and beauty. It is worth a trip 
to New York to look at this from the Castleton. 

I just spoke of "The front of the Castleton shown in the picture." 
The limitation is necessary, for both sides of the hotel are front — I d'on't 
know where the back door is. The second front overlooks a park as 
beautiful in its way as one could wish. In short, if you want a good 
hotel with easy access from the city and with freedom from the whirl 
and uproar of the city, take the Staten Island ferry and find it. 



Avery Notes and Queries. 
THE MEMORIAL WINDOW. 



As announced in the August number of Notes and Queries, the 
proposal to put an Avery memorial window in the new church now 
building at Groton, Conn., has met with warm approval from the church 
organization and the Avery clan. 

The First Church of Christ of Groton, as this Congregational or- 
ganization is officially called, was separated from the First Church of 




THE NEW CHURCH AT GROTON. 

New London by action of the Connecticut general court in 1702. The 
first names in the record of the First Church of Christ of New London 
that Mr. Bradstreet began on the day of his ordination, in 1670 are those 
of Captain James Avery and his wife Joanna who lived on the Groton 
side of the river. About a dozen vears later. Parson Bradstreet died 



AVERY^NOTES AND QuERIES. 221 

and Mr. Avery and his neighbors began to think about a church on 
Groton bank. The New London church made opposition, but Captain 
Avery and his sons and their neighbors kept pounding away until New 
London Christian patience broke down. And so it happened that about 
two hundred and thirteen years ago Capt. James Avery was put under 
censure of the church, and when some of his sons presented children 
for baptism the rite was administered only "on account of their wives." 
But their purpose was firm and, in the end, their hearts' desire was grat- 
ified. The names of the second James Avery and his wife stand first on 
the list of members of the First Church in Groton. For two hundred 
years, descendants of Captain James Avery have been among the active 
members of this church. In this period, three buildings have housed the 
organization, each for a period of between sixty and seventy years. The 
corner-stone of the fourth was laid on the twenty-seventh of September, 
1901. Addresses were delivered by the Rev. F. S. Hyde, the pastor of 
the church, the Rev. L. B. Sears, pastor of the Baptist church in Groton, 
and Dr. Elroy M. Avery of Cleveland. 

The walls are built of field stone gathered from the many Avery 
and other farms in Groton ; few of them have felt the hammer. The 
dressed stone around the windows and doorways and the coping on the 
walls and buttresses are of pink granite. The outlines of the building 
may be discerned in the accompanying cut. Many fine specimens of 
this old-time architecture are still standing in England. The building 
is at the corner of Monument and Meridian streets on the hill and not 
far from the old front, the battle monument, and the Bill Memorial 
Library. 

The Avery Memorial will occupy the large front window, just at 
the left of the tower. Its estimated cost is two thousand dollars or 
more — as much more as the members of the clan pay in for the purpose ; 
the more money the richer the window. The committee in charge of the 
memorial consists of Frederic Bill and Miss Elizabeth Miner Avery of 
Groton, Frank M. Avery of New York, and Elroy M. Avery of 
Cleveland. Remittances should be sent to the treasurer. Miss Eliza- 
beth Miner Avery, Box 177, Groton, Conn. She will gladly give, 
upon application, any information desired. 



Avery Notes and Queries. 



At the time of goiiu 
follows : 

John D. Rockefeller. $1,000.00 

Frederic Bill 100.00 

I\Irs. Frederic Bill 50.00 

Frank IMontgomery Avery 50.00 

Latham Fish 50.00 

Trueman G. Avery 25.00 

Elroy M. Avery 25.00 

Mrs. Hannah Eldridge 10.00 

Henry W. Avery 5.00 

Mrs. Sarah L. Hall 5.00 

Orrin Averv 25.00 

Nathan D. "Bill 50.00 

J. Carleton Avery 3.00 

Curtis Avery 10.00 

2.00 

1. 00 

50.00 

1. 00 

2.00 

20.00 

10.00 

5.00 

10.00 



The Rev. John Avery 
Maj. Cyrus Avery . . . 
Mrs. Julia A. Sherman 
Mrs. Eleazer J. Avery 
Elizabeth R. Avery . . 
Mrs. Mary H. Hine. . 
Miss Jane A. Avery. . . 
Frank Rockefeller . . . 

Cyrus M. Avery 

Frederic R. Avery lO.oo 

David A. Avery 2.00 

Mrs. Edna A. Buckingham... 10.00 
Mrs. H. M. Love i.oo 



to press, the subscriptions reported are as 



Mrs. Elizabeth A. Love i.oo 

Charles W. Avery 2.00 

Mrs. Hannah C. Partridge... i.oo 

Mrs. Charles E. White 5.00 

W. Arnold White (aged 11 yr.) i.oo 

Rachel White (aged 7 yr.) . . . i.oo 

Mrs. Samuel A. Wheeler 5.00 

Mrs. Louisa A. Avery 10.00 

Louisa Randall Avery 

(aged 19 months) 4.00 

Emily A. Copp (aged 13 yrs.) i.oo 

Joseph A. Copp (aged 11 yrs.) i.oo 
Belton Allyn Copp (aged 16 

j^ears) i.oo 

Mrs. Clara Morgan Chaney... 5.00 
Mary Elise Chaney (aged 12 

years) 3.00 

Morgan R. Chaney (aged 9 

years) I.oo 

Isaac G. Avery 5.00 

Capt. Van Brunt Avery 5.00 

Dr. Alida C. Avery i.oo 

Jessie V. Avery i.oo 

Miss Sarah A. Avery 5.00 

Albert D. Allen i.oo 

Mrs. Mary A. Stockwell 5.00 



HEART TO HEART. 



I know a lady living in Cleveland who is gathering material for a 
history of the family into which she was born. I may call her Mrs. X. 
Not long ago I met the wife of a distant relative of my friend. The 
latter lives in a good sized city at a considerable distance from Cleve- 
land. I may call her ]\Irs. Y. Knowing that I was from Cleveland, 
Mrs. Y. mentioned the facts that her husband had received from Mrs. 
X. a request for genealogical information concerning himself and his 
immediate family, and that the information had not been sent, and 
added : "I suppose it is the only way that the poor woman has of mak- 
ing a few dollars." I had to give her some information on the subject. 

I told her that no one would write a family history for the sake 
of making dollars, few or many ; that such an enterprise involves years 
of patient toil, long-continued drain upon, the bank account, irritation 
caused by unanswered inquiries, the drudgery of delving in dusty 



AvKRY Notes and Queries. 223 

libraries and more dusty town and state archives, the weariness of rail- 
way travel, the fatigue of grave-yard investigation, with the possible 
accompaniment of harmless snakes and more dangerous poison-ivy, the 
indifference of the many, and the rebuffs of an occasional uncultured 
Newrich who has taken too seriously Saxe's warning: 

"Depend upon it, my snobbish friend. 
Your family line you can't ascend , 
Without good reason to apprehend 
You may find it waxed at the other end 
By some plebeian vocation." 

I told her further that after all of this and more in the way of 
investment, the author finds that the sale of the books is so small that 
the product often fails to pay the cost of printing and binding. 

I have known many to make the trial but none who made any 
profit. One of my friends, a lawyer-judge, prepared and printed three 
family histories at an average net loss of $3,000 each. Another of my 
friends, a successful editor, politician and legislator, has just printed 
the history of his family, and his subscriptions do not equal ten per 
cent, of his printer's bills. Fortunately, both of these friends are finan- 
cially able to pocket the losses that they clearly foresaw. My friend, 
Mrs. X., "the poor woman" aforementioned, falls into the same class 
of those who, having "money to burn," can afford to work for nothing 
and pay their own bills. Mrs. X. can put a dollar on every one of 
Mrs. Y.'s dimes. 

But there are some family historians who cannot do all of this; 
they are willing to work without pay, but have to balk at the payment 
of publication bills. One of these whom. I know had the good fortune 
to be told by one of his clan, a wealthy member of the United States 
senate, substantially this : "Go ahead, write as good a history as you 
can, publish it in a style that will be creditable to the family, sell as 
many copies as possible, keep an accurate account of expenditures and 
receipts, and I will remit the ainount of the deficit." I have not found 
such a saccharine senator. 

With a full knowledge of the general facts above set forth, I have 
the particular knowledge that comes from my own attempts to get sub- 
scribers for the new edition of the history of the Groton Averys. My 
first subscription was received nearly fourteen months ago, and fewer 
than 200 of the 500 contemplated sets have been spoken for. I have 



224 Avery Notes and Queries. 

spent several thousand dollars in the preliminary work of authorship 
and neither expect nor desire to have it returned to me; but I cannot 
afford to add to this the loss of a like amount for printers' bills. Hence, 
I must wait until the subscriptions received justify contracts for pub- 
lication, or I must give up the project and return the money that I have 
received from subscribers. It begins to look as though the latter course 
would have to be followed. 



The accompanying autograph of John Avery (No. 5, page 404), 
is copied from the will of the second James Avery. The will was ac- 
knowledged June 10, 1717, before William Clarke, a justice of the peace 
in New London, witnessed by John Avery and Samuel Avery, and en- 



(j^dxrW^ 



tered on the Groton records, August 27, 1728, by Christopher Avery, 
recorder. The document is now in the possession of Miss Elizabeth 
Miner Avery of Groton. 



THE AVERYS OF GROTON. 



{Conti7iued froi7i Page 210. See Page 1 33.) 
19. Joseph* Avery {James^^ jfames"^ , Christopher'^) was born at 

Groton, Conn., August 9, 1691; m at The 

name of his wife is supposed to have been Tabitha Gardiner. Mr. 
Sweet in "The Averys of Groton" says that they were married in 
South Kingston and that her father's name was William. William 
Gardiner of Kingston, R. I., had a daughter Tabitha. He died in 171 1 
and in his will mentions his wife Elizabeth, and a daughter Tabitha 
then apparently unmarried. This Tabitha was probably born in Kings- 
ton, R. I., between 1685 ^"<^ 1690. George and Tabitha (Tefft) Gardi- 
ner of South Kingston, R. I., also had a daughter Tabitha born about 
1696. On the records of the Second Congregational Church of 
Griswold, Conn., is found the marriage of Henry Skilton of South 
Kingston to Tabitha Avery of North Kingston, As this Tabitha 



Avery Notes and Queries. 225 

was the daugliter of Joseph* Avery, the marriage record strengthens 
the theory that her mother, the wife of Joseph* Avery, came from 
Kingston. There were also Gardiners or Gardners residing in Nor- 
wich where Joseph Avery lived and died. A story has been handed 
down in the Skilton family to the effect that Joseph* Avery owned 
an outlying farm, where he had cattle and hay. This farm he of- 
fered to his eldest son if he would occupy the small house upon it 
during the coming winter, and feed and care for the stock. When 
the son declined the offer, the sister, Tabitha, accepted it. It was 
during this winter on the farm that she met Henry Skilton whom 
she soon married. Possibly this farm was in North Kingston and 
came to Joseph* Avery through his wife. If this is so, old deeds 
may reveal the parentage of the wife of Joseph* Avery. It has also 
been suggested that it was Benjamin, the son of Joseph* Avery who 
married a Gardiner. In his will, dated Feb. 13, 1776, Benjamin Gar- 
diner mentions a daughter Desire Avery. If the above suggestion 
is correct, Benjamin^ Avery had two wives, for, in his will, dated 
May 27, 1776, he calls his wife Elizabeth. More light is wanted on 
the subject of the wives of Joseph* Avery and of his son Benjamin. 
June 27, 1753, at Norwich, Conn., "Old Joseph Avery was 
drowned" is an entry in Jabez Fitch's diary, published in "Mayflower 
Descendants," vol. i, page 38. His estate was inventoried at Nor- 
wich, Nov. 6, 1753, but was not wholly divided until May 5, 1755. 
The heirs were the widow, sons Joseph and Benjamin, daughter 
Tabitha (Avery) Skilton, and the heirs of daughter Lucy, deceased, 
wife of Jonathan Tracy. (Norwich probate records, vol. i, page 

454-) 

Children of Joseph and ( ) Avery (all born in 

Norwich, Conn. ) : 

Joseph^, b. Sept. 26, 1715; d. later than 1755, at 

Tabitha^, b. Feb. 25, 1717. 

EUZABETH^. b. Aug. 24, 1719; d. Aug. 6, 1743, at Norwich, 

Conn. 
Benjamin^, b. Sept. 4, 1721. 
lyUcys, b. May 2, 1723. 
-The above record is corrected from the one printed on 
p. 210, and should be substituted for it. The differences between 
the two illustrate one of the purposes of printing these old records 
in Avery Notes and Queries. 



63. 




64. 


ii. 




ni. 


65. 


iv. 


66. 


V. 


Note. 


-T 



226 Avery Notes and Qiteries. 

20. Benjamin ^ Avery^ {yamcs-^ yamcs-, ChristopJtCj-'^) was b. 

, at Ciroton, Conn.; m ^it Thankful Avery^ 

dau. of John and Sarah (Denison) Avery. She was born April 25, 

1718, at Groton, Conn., and died January , 1813, at the same place. 

She is recorded as No. 28 on page 406 of Sweet's "The Averys of 
Groton." Mr. Sweet said that this Thankful Avery was born in 1712, 
the daughter of Benjamin Avery, whose record appears as No. 14 
on page 406 of his book. But careful search has failed to show that 
there was any such Benjamin, son of John^ Avery. The whole record 
that appears under No. 14 on the page in question should be can- 
celled. The family historian has taken care of the children ; the 
alleged father is a myth. According to the Rev. David Avery (see 
page 63 of Avery Notes and Queries), this Thankful Avery was 
a daugther of John, the son of John^. He calls her "Aunt Thankful," 
and visited her frequently to learn of family matters. Benjamin* 

Avery made his will in January, 1769; he died Dec. 3, 1772, at 

; the will was probated at Stonington, Conn., Feb. i, 1773. 

Children of Benjamin and Thankful (Avery) Avery (all born 
in Groton, Conn.): 

67. i. Benjamin^, b Sept. 9, 1735. 

68. ii. Abigails, b. Dec. 12, 1737. 

iii. Deborahs, b. Oct. 6, 173S; d. Oct. 29, 1738, at Groton. 

69. iv. Daniei,5, b. Nov. 14, 1740. 

70. V. Sarahs, b. July 29, 1742. 

71. vi. Annas, b. Jan. 15,1743-4. 

vii. Solomons, bap. June 4, 1749, First Cbarch of Christ of Gro- 
ton; d. Sept. 6, 1781, at Fort Griswold, Groton, unmarried. 
He was a sergeant of militia. 

72. viii. Marys, b. January ..., J 748. 

73. ix. Denisons, b. June 11, 1749. 

74. X. Lucys, b 

75. xi. Thankfuls, bap. Aug. i, 1755. 

xii. MercyS, bap. July 3, 1757; d , at unm. 

76. xiii. Deborahs, b. Oct. 2, J758. 

77. xiv. Hannahs, bap. May 30, 1762. 

Most of the children were baptised in the First Church of Christ 
of Groton (Congregational). At the time Benjamin* Avery made 
his will, Sarah, Mary, Lucy, and Thankful were unmarried. Mercy, 
also unmarried, was to be cared for during her natural life. Accord- 
ing to the Rev. David Avery she was tongue-tied. 
{To be continued.) 



Mvcry f^otes and Queries, 

A Quarterly Magazine devoted to the History of the Groton Averys. 
No. 17. "Honor thy Father and thy Mother." Febrttaryt 1902. 



The number and' page references used in this magazine are to 
Sweet's History of the "Averys of Groton." 

If this paragraph is checked in blue pencil, you may know that 
your subscription ought to be renewed. 

The editorial article entitled "Heart to Heart," that appeared in 
the last issue of this magazine (p. 222) was reprinted with commenda- 
tory comment in the Boston Transcript of December 11. 

The Nezv England Historical and Genealogical Register for Janu- 
ary speaks of Avery Notes and Queries as a periodical that "well 
merits the patronage of the family in whose behalf it is issued." 

A great many Groton Averys married into the Parke family. 
Their descendants will be glad to know that a genealogy of the Parke 
family (Park — Parke — Parkes — Parks) is in preparation by Frank S. 
Parks, 2104 H street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 

The Rev. Frederick Denison Avery (No. 1528, page 265) was 
born at Groton, Oct. 30, 1818. He was graduated at Yale in 1844. 
From 1850 to 1895, he was pastor of the Congregational church at 
Columbia, Tolland county, Connecticut. His parish then made him 
pastor emeritus, and placed in the church a memorial tablet in his 
honor. Behold how good and how pleasant it is for brethren to dwell 
together in unity. 

With this issue, Avery Notes and Queries begins its fifth year. 



THE NEW FAMILY HISTORY. 



The number of subscriptions reported last November was 166. In 
August, 1900, I submitted a proposition to print, in two volumes, the 
revised history of the Groton Averys when I had received five hundred 
actual subscribers. As will be seen from the above report, the result so 
far is very discouraging, and fully justifies my caution in asking for 



22S Avery Notes and Queries. 

adxancc su1)scri])ti(nis. I have written and printed so much on the sub- 
ject that I am Ijcgimiing to feel guilty of persistent mendicancy. I am 
assured that there are about one hundred libraries and societies that 
will take the history and pay for it when they get it, but that are pre- 
vented hv their rules from making any advance payment. I am willing 
to accc^:>t that assurance and to add one hundred to the number of 
subscriptions actually received. Since the last report, I have received 
twelve subscriptions. This is at the rate of one a week, a rate that 
would require more than four years more to secure the four hundred 
advance subscriptions necessary. Of course, it would not be fair to 
those who have made advance payments for me to hold their money so 
long, even if there was any certainty of getting the necessary number 
at all. Xor would such a course be fair to myself. If there is no de- 
mand for a revised histor}% I shall save much time and money by finding 
the fact promptly. I am beginning to fear that I was mistaken in 
accepting the expressed eager desire of a few as indicative of real 
desire on the part of many. 

If by the first of August next, the four hundred copies (additional 
to the one hundred that I am willing to reserve for libraries, societies, 
etc.) have not been subscribed for, I shall promptly return all moneys 
received by me on account of subscriptions to the proposed family his- 
tory. It probably will be many years before another is found willing 
to attempt success where I have failed. I do not want anyone to take 
a copy for the sake of pleasing me, but I would advise all persons who 
want a copy of such a family history as I have proposed to send in 
their names and money before the next Fourth of July. I will gladly 
send a subscription-blank to any would-be subscriber upon request. 

Since the last report, subscriptions have been received as follows : 

William Pierrepont White. Utica, N. Y i copy 

Miss Susie S. Hannahs. Watertown. N. Y i 

Mrs. Jane Treat Arnold. Albany. N. Y i 

Miss Lora S. Avery. Niagara Falls, N. Y i 

Amos W. Averv. Greenwich. Conn i 

W. J. Frisbie, Camden. N. J i [[ 

Urbane Avery, Noank, Conn i 

Miss Ellen F. Whedon, Lincoln, Neb i 

H. C. Avery, Pittsburg. Pa i " 

Osmar H. Morgan, Fort Flagler, Wash i 

John Avery Carter, Geneva, O i 

Charles C. Hopkins, Rome, N. Y i " 

If a change by birth, marriage or death occurs in your family, 
please report it promptly to the family historian. 



Avery Notes and Queries. 229 

The tug "Cynthia II," represented herewith, was the Associated 
Press dispatch boat in the Cuban campaign of the late American- 
Spanish war. Her master was Captain Van Brunt Avery (No. 11 54, 
page 528), of Savannah. During the siege of Santiago and battles 
San Juan Hill, El Caney, etc., she was kept busy carrying press dis- 




patches to the nearest cable. She was often under fire, and on one 
occasion was attacked by the U. S. steamer "Potomac," she being mis- 
taken for a Spanish boat. Captain Avery writes : "I missed the battle 
of Santiago and Schley's victory by about two hours. I was about as 
near as Sampson, only in another direction. I was on my way back 
from Jamaica to the fleet. The ships were all smoking hot." He still 
has the steam siren (whistle) of the "Almirante Oquendo." Another 
trophy from the same ship, captured at the same time, a small cannon, 
is now in the New York office of the Associated Press at 195 Broad- 
way. "Here's lookin' at ye. Captain." 



If you see in any newspaper an obituary or a marriage notice of 
an Avery or of a descendant of an Avery, please send a marked 
copy of the paper to the historian of the Groton Averys, This will 
be easy for you and of very great help to him. 



230 AVERV NOTKS AND Q^UERIES. 

Every f^otcs and Queries. 

The ofilcial organ of the Avery Memorial Association, of Groton, Conn., 
and of the Historian of the Groton Averys. 



Published by Elroy M. Avery, at 657 Woodland Hills Avenue 
Cleveland , Ohio. 



Tiventy-Jive cents per year. Ten cents per copy. 

Entered at the Cleveland, O., postoffice as second-class matter. 

THE GROTON AVERY HISTORY CLUB. 



Since the last report, club dues have been received as follows: 

Mrs. M. E. Mowbray, Brookliuc. Mass $1.00 

E. R. Haight, Washington, D. C 2.00 

Mrs. Mary H. Johnston, Humboldt, Iowa 2.00 

William Pierrepont White, Utica, N. Y i.oo 

Richard A. Wheeler, Stonington, Conn i.oo 

Miss Susie Hannahs, Watertown, N. Y . i.oo 

Mrs. Frederic Bill, Groton, Conn 2.00 

Mrs. Adelaide Avery Billings, Norwich, Conn i.oo 

Mrs. Elisha S. Allyn, Hartford, Conn i.oo 

H. C. Avery, Pittsburg, Pa 2.00 

Miss Charity A. Samaine, Rochester, N. Y i.oo 

Mrs. Frances Avery Haggard, Lincoln, Neb 2.00 

Miss Emily R. Samaine, Dorchester. Mass i.oo 

Mrs. Richard Morgan, Aurora, N. Y i.oo 

Mrs. Edna A. Buckingham, Camp Denison, O i.oo 

Mrs. L. R. Southworth, New York City 2.50 

Frank M. Avery, New York City 5-O0 

Maj. Cyrus Avery, Camptown, Pa 2.00 

Total for the quarter $29.50 

All persons paying club dues are entitled to the magazine without 
further payment. Dues are paid simply for the purpose of helping 
carry on the work of the family historian. Each member determines 
what his annual payment shall be — within the limits of one and ten 
dollars. You are eligible to membership, and your remittance will be 
gladly received and acknowledged in this magazine. 



Avery Notes and Queries. 231 

THE MEMORIAL WINDOW. 



In the November issue of this magazine (page 222) were reported 
subscriptions to the amount of sixteen hundred dollars for the Avery 
memorial window in the church now building at Groton, Conn. The 
church is now under roof. The window must be put in place by next 
June, at the latest. Of the estimated cost ($2,000), two hundred and 
fifty dollars remain to be raised. They who intend to have a share in 
this altogether commendable project must act promptly. Make checks 
payable to the treasurer of the committee. Miss Elizabeth Miner Avery, 
Groton, Conn. 

I was in Groton in January and saw the designs for the window re- 
ceived from competing firms in Boston, New Haven, New York, St. Louis 
and elsewhere. Members of the clan may be assured that the window 
will be artistically worthy of its purpose. The architecture of the 
church "grows on" the visitor. The coming Mekka of the Groton 
Averys will be a good thing to behold. 

The local members of the committee have made personal visits to 
various art concerns, given much study to the subject, and' paid their 
own expenses. Printing, postage, and stationery bills have also been 
paid in full by the same persons, so that every dollar subscribed for the 
windozu will go into the zvindozv. The thanks of the clan are due to 
Mr. Frederic Bill and Miss Elizabeth M. Avery, of Groton, for thus 
supplementing their work and their subscriptions. 

The subscriptions received since the last report are as follows : 



Mabel L. and Frederick W. 

Avery $5.00 

Alice Turner 5.00 

Mrs. James Allyn 10.00 

Mrs. J. R. Carter 2.00 

Jenny E. Williams 25.00 

Benjamin L. Armstrong 2.00 

Mrs. Mary E. A. Dobson 5.00 

Mrs. Mary T. Allyn Henry... 10.00 

Mrs. Belton A. Copp S-OO 

Owen Stewart Miner, aged 7 yrs. 5.00 

John Avery Carter 5.00 

Mrs. James B. Avery 2.50 

Mrs. Ella Avery Durbin 2.50 



Mary Jane Avery i.oo 

Mrs. M. Louise Avery Schel- 

lens 25.00 

William P. Cook lOjQO 

Mrs. Frances Avery Haggard. 2.00 

Mrs. Frances B. A. Ward i.oo 

James Avery i.oo 

Charles C. Hopkins i.oo 

Mrs. R. J. Depew 10.00 

Mrs. Nancy E. Munson i.oo 

Mrs. Thomas Hollis 5.00 

Mrs. Ameret McCall Robinson i.oo 

Mrs. Richard Morgan 5.00 



If you are going to help, now is the time. 



2^i AvEHv Notes and Q^rERiEg. 

FAITHFUL AND TRUE. 



StoningtOxX, Conn., Dec. 3, 1901. 
Dear Sir: 

I have received your November Avery Notes and Queries, and 
all of the same that you have issued, and I send you payment for the 
same. 

In looking back over my ancestral lines through thirty families I 
do not find a trace of Avery blood in my veins. But she who received 
and reciprocated the affections of my young manhood was an Avery, a 
direct descendant of Capt. James Avery, the emigrant ancestor of her 
family name. And though the grasses on her "green, low tent whose 
curtain never outward swings," have been growing for forty-six years, 

Fond memory to her duty true 
Brings back her faded form to view. 
How life-like through the mist of years 
Her bright and lovely face appears; 

and when she died 

Earth had a Christian less, 
Heaven an angel more. 

"\\'ith high regard. I remain, 

Yours very truly. 



To Dr. E. M. Averv. 



Richard A. Wheeler, 

(No. 495, page 130.) 



BIRTHS. 



Catherine Ann Aven,-, daughter of John Henry and Marv Eliza 
(Cartwright) Aver}- (No. 1551, p. 183), was born August 29, 1901, 
near Ozark. Ark. 

Leon Witter Billings, the second son of Charles William Freder- 
ick and Addie Luella (Avery) Billings (No. 2322, page 278), was 
born August 18, 1901, at Preston, Conn. 



Avery Notes and Queries. 233 

MARRIAGES. 



Richard Paulison Hawes, oldest son of William H. H. and Mary 
Louise (Avery) Hawes (No. 1568, page 269), married May 29, 190T, 
at Washington, D. C, Miss Edith Markle Smith. 

Mabel Eva Mitchell, daughter of Ransom Young and Lydia Ann 
(Avery) Mitchell (No. 494, page 450), married November 26, 1901, 
at Findlay, Ohio, Eugene Goldsborough Palmer. 

Harry Hamilton Avery (No. 2228, page 268) married November 
28, 1901, at Westerville, Neb., Nellie Leech. 

Ethel Avery, daughter of James Warren and Annie E. (Irvin) 
Avery (No. 1865, page 233), married January 20, 1902, at Webster 
Groves, Mo., Hans W. E. Glatte. 

Thomas P. Kernan, son ai Francis and Hannah Avery (Dever- 
eux) Kernan, and a descendant of Dr. Benjamin and Hannah (Avery) 
Butler (No. 79, page 562), married May 29, 1899, Mrs. Regina Paul 
Cornelius. As stated on page 171 of Avery Notes and Queries, his 
father, Francis Kernan, was United States senator from New York. 

Ralph Whitledge Haggard, son of Dr. James R. and Frances Helen 
(Avery) Haggard (No. 1375, page 252), married Februar}-' 12, 1902, 
at McCook, Neb., Selma Constance Noren. 



DEATHS. 



William Henry Harrison Hawes (No. 1568, page 269) died June 
23, 1 90 1, at Philadelphia. 

William Chester Avery, son of Samuel Baldwin and Sabrina 
(Root) Avery (No. 626, page 464), died November i, 1901, at Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

James Babcock Avery (No. nor, page 228) died November 14, 
1 90 1, at Denver, Colo. 

Mrs. Zipporah Fidelia (Spoor) Blake, daughter of Asahel and 
Anna (Avery) Spoor (No. 224, page 450), died November 15, 1901, at 
Yorkville, 111. 

Mrs. Cornelia Maria (Avery) Whitlock (No. 499, page 489) died 
August 27, 1901, at Chicago, 111. 

Mrs. Abigail (Avery) Leech (No. 606, page 153) died May 4, 
1901, at Aurora, N. Y. 

Samuel Look Avery, Jr., (No. 2071, page 245) died November 21, 
1901, at Chicago, 111. 



234 Avery Notes and Queries. 

Mrs. Lucy Ann iVvery (No. 1458, page 261, and No. 1621, page 
274) died September 10, 1901, at South Glastonbury, Conn. 

William Cuyler Avery (No. 937, page 532) died January 14, 1902, 
at New Orleans, La. 

Mrs. Hannah (Benedict) Avery (No. 1399. page 254) died Febru- 
ary 4, 1902, at New Canaan, Conn. 



HOW NOT TO DO IT. 



In December, I received from Peoria (which you may imagine to 
be in Spain), the following encouraging letter: 

Elroy AL Avery, Dear Sir — I don't see what good it will do to 
have half of the money paid in before you are sure you are going to 
need it. Yours truly, 

The letter was accompanied by one of my njbscription blanks for 
the family history — returned unsigned. The letter was signed. I have 
no doubt that the statement in the letter is strictly true — more's the pity. 



BY WAY OF CONTRAST. 



About the same time that I was struck by the letter printed above, 
came balm from a prominent lawyer of Columbia county. New York: 

Elroy M. Avery. 

My Dear Sir— I notice from the last number of Avery Notes and 
Queries that the subscriptions for the new Avery history come in 
slowly, so slowly as possibly to defeat the plan. I sincerely hope that 
the work will be published, and would suggest that if the number of 
subscriptions does not reach far enough to warrant publication at ten 
dollars each, you put the price higher and print fewer. I for one would 
be willing to double the price rather than to let the scheme fall through. 
You have done an enomious amount of work in. this matter and it 
would be a very great misfortune to the family not to have the work 
printed nov/. Trusting that you will get the necessary support and 
encouragement to finish your self-imposed task, and that the family 
will appreciate your great service to them, I remain, 

Yours very sincerely, 

S. F. Avery. 



If you know of a birth, marraige, or death in the Groton Avery 
clan, please report it promptly to the family historian. 



Mvcry )Votc8 and Queries. 

A Quarterly Magazine devoted to the History of the Groton Averys. 
No, 18. "Honor thy Father and thy Mother." May, 1902. 



The number and page references used in this magazine are to 
Sweet's History of "The Averys of Groton." 

If yon know of a birth, marriage, or death in the Groton Avery 
clan, please report it promptly to the family historian. He will record 
the facts thus reported as he has done heretofore. 

The annual meeting of the Avery A/femorial Association will be 
held on the afternoon of Friday, July i8, 1902, at Avery Memorial 
Park, Groton, Conn. 

I need a few copies of Numbers 5 and 17 of Avery Notes and 
Queries. If you have a copy of either number and are willing to send 
it to me, I shall be very glad to receive it. 

The Rev. F. B. Avery (No. 523, page 391), late the rector of St. 
James' parish, Painesville, Ohio, is now vice-president and managing 
director of Lincoln Memorial University at Cumberland Gap, Tenn. 
Gen. O. O. Howard is president of the board of directors. 

Pages 239 to 242 of this magazine are specimen pages taken from 
the first volume of "A History of the United States and its Peo- 
ple, by Elroy M. Avery, Ph. D., LL. D." The work, which will be 
completed in twelve volumes, is now in press. The Burrows Brothers 
Company, of Cleveland, Ohio, are the publishers. 

Once in a while, some one writes to me saying, in substance : "I 
do not care very much for a copy of your book, as I have a copy of Mr. 
Sweet's ;" no one has really expressed the fact with that bluntness. 
Mr. Sweet did a great work for the family; a work for which the Gro- 
\(jn Averys must always hold him in grateful remembrance. But his 
work was done imder great disadvantages, the effects of which are 
evident in the book. Because of these defects, the revision now in 
])rogress was begun. Of course, the revision never will be complete, 
never can be. lUit the additions and corrections are so numerous and 
important that the old edition will have little value after the new edition 
has been printed — if it ever is printed. See article on page 245. 



236 Avery Notes^and Queries. 

MARRIAGES. 



William Yale Avery, son of William Bailey and Annie Brown 
(Osborne) Avery (No. 2007, page 237), married, October 4, 1901, at 
New York City, Adele Margaret Garlicks. 

Anne Briscoe Clark, daughter of Cleaveland Briscoe and Julia 
Tracy (Avery) Clark (No. 1707, page 281), married, November 30, 
1901, at Memphis, Tenn., Robert Grattan Brown. 



DEATHS. 



Mrs. Hannah (Benedict) Avery (No. 1399, p. 254) died February 
8, 1902, at New Canaan, Conn. 

Audubon Arms, son of Charles Jessup and Alice (Avery) Arms 
(No. 1698, page 198), died February 21, 1902, at Providence, R. I. 

Frank Avery, the sixth child of Samuel Thomas Avery, the third 
child of Samuel and Cliloe (Elmer) Avery (No. 137, page 347), died 
February 11, 1902, at Manchester, Conn. 

Edna Avery (No. 634, page 84) died November 28, 1901, at In- 
dianapolis, Ind. 

Milton Brus, the husband of Eunice Almera (Avery) Brus (No. 
1589, page 187), died December 19, 1901, at Wyoming, 111. 

Mrs. Edith Elizabeth (Avery) Lane (No. 570, page 673) died 
March 3, 1902, at Rockford, 111. 

David Jackson Shaw, husband of Lottie Artalissa (Avery) Shaw, 
daughter of Jeremiah M. and Rowena (Morley) Avery (No. 298, page 
650), died February 19, 1902,' at Alexis, 111. 

Mrs. Phoebe (Reed) Avery (No. ^yy, page 458) died March 22, 
1902, at East Galena, 111. 

Harry Alphonso Rowland, son of Charles Henry and Anna Ma;/ 
(Avery) Rowdand (No. 1744, page 209), died February 15, 1902, at 
Broughton, Kans. 

The Rev. John Avery (No. 1040, page 222), died April 23. 1902, 
at Norwich, Conn. 

The Rev. Walter Edmund Avery, son of Josiah Smith Avery, the 
son of William Avery, the son of Humphrey Avery (No. 84, page 565), 
died April 22, 1902, at Wilmington, Del. 

Mrs. Hannah Minor Niles, daughter of Samuel Holman and Anna 
(Avery) Minor (No. 447, page 69), died March_ 13, 1902, at Bur- 
lingame, Kans. See portrait on another page of this magazine. 



Avery Notes and Queries. 



237 



Mrs. Hannah (Minor) Niles, whose portrait we give herewith, 
was born at Coleraine, Mass., February 7, 1802. She married Samviel 
Niles at HaHfax, Vt., May 8, 1827. As recorded elsewhere in this 
magazine she died March 13, 1902, at BurHngame, Kans., aged more 
than a hundred vears. She was the mother of ten children. 




After being a member of the Baptist church for nearly sixty years 
she went before a covenant meeting and announced a change of views. 
A statement of her belief "that the Good Shepherd will finally bring 
the last wandering sheep into the fol<l," signed by her in 1891, was, at 
her expressed desire, read at her funeral. In many ways she was a 
remarkable woman. The local papers gave many columns to notices 
of her hundredth anniversary and her soon succeeding death. 



538 AVKKY NoTKS ANO Q^UKKIp:s. 

Hvcry )Votc9 and Queries* 

The official organ of the Avery Memorial Association, of Groton, Conn, 
and of the Historian of the Groton Averys. 



Published by Elroy M. Avery, at 657 Woodland Hills Avenue 
Cleveland, Ohio. 



Twenty -jive cents per year. Ten cents per copy. 

Entered at the Cleveland, O., postoffice as second-class matter. 

THE GROTON AVERY HISTORY CLUB. 



Since the last report, cltib dues have been received as follows : 

Daniel H. Treadway, Groton, Conn $1.00 

Albert Brewster Avery, Fort Scott, Kas i.oo 

Morris H. Avery, Woonsocket, R. 1 2.00 

L. B. Avery, Clinton, Mich i.oo 

In the first number of Avery Notes and Queries (page 8) I pro- 
posed the organization of "The Groton Avery History Cltib, with 
annual dues ranging from one to ten dollars, each member to fix the 
exact amount for himself or herself. All dues shall be payable to the 
family historian, to be used by him for the sole purpose of defraying 
the cost of collecting and arranging for publication all available ma- 
terial for a complete and satisfactory family history." That was in 
February, 1898. The responses during the next quarter were encour- 
aging, but it now appears that I made the mistake of accepting the zeal 
of a few as evidence of a real interest on the part of many. As the 
Qroton Avery History Club has not accomplished the thing for which 
it was organized, and as there is no reason to think that it will or can 
do so, it is hereby disbanded. Any one who has paid dues in the club 
and regrets having done so, is requested to report that fact to me. 

The meaning of the next four pages is explained on the first 
page of this number of this magazine. They correctly represent 
the type and the paper of the book to which they relate. The 
margins are, however, somewhat reduced by trimming to the size of 
the page of this magazine. 



AvKRY Notes and Queries. 243 

THE NEW FAMILY HISTORY. 



The number of subscriptions reported in February was 178. 
Since then, subscriptions have been received as follows : 

Amy Avery Munger, Geneva, Ohio i copy 

Emma Buckbee Croft, Peekskill, N. Y i " 

Albert Brewster Avery, Fort Scott, Kas . . . i " 

Christina Avery Weaver, Gallatinville, N. Y i 

Reuben N. Avery, Aurora, Ohio i " 

Charles C. Avery, Oakfield, N. Y i " 

Albert R. Avery, Oakfield, N. Y i " 

Gilbert Lafayette Avery, Marengo, Til i " 

The subscription price for the two volumes of the history is ten 
dollars. Five dollars must accompau}^ the order; fhis rule is iirvari- 
ahlc. if you desire to subscribe for the book, I shall be glad to send 
you (upon request) a blank for that purpose. 

Three months ago 1 stated ( No^es and Queries, page 228) that 
unless a certain number of subscriptions was received by the first of 
August next, I should return all moneys received on account of sub- 
scriptions to the proposed family history. The present situation is that 
unless two hundred subscri])tions are received in June and July, I shall 
return such moneys and aban.don my long continued elTort to secure 
the publication of a family history worthy of the Groton Averys. 



HE DEMANDS PAY. 



Not long ago I sent some genealogical blanks to a lady whom I 
supposed to be living at Great Barrington, Mass. I received a reply 
from her son saying: "Now I can give you a good lot of information 
and a sort of history of the Averys, as my father's mother was an 
Avery and my mother a connection of the Rockefellers. * * * But I 
should expect to be compensated for the same. If you wish me to aid 
you please write me at once and I will at once go about it." There 
seems to be no doubt that this man has descended from a worthy an- 
cestor. His name is 



244 



Avery Notes and Queries. 
THE MEMORIAL WINDOW. 



As explained in previous issues of this magazine, the first names 
on the nienihership roll of the First Church of Christ in Groton, Conn., 
arc those of James .Vvery and wife. The church was organized in 
1702. A new buikhng will he dedicated in i(j02. The large window 
in the front of this new building is to he an Avery memorial, costing 
$2,000 or more. The design for the window has been accepted, and 
the contract has been let. The treasurer (jf the memorial window 
fund, Miss Elizabeth M. \very. of (jroton. Conn., reports the receipt 
of additional subscriptions as follows: 

Willie H. H. Treadway i.oo 

Frank Horatio Treadway i.co 

James Tyler Treadway i.co 

Norris MontRomery Treadway i.oo 

Mrs. Elizabeth Cass Ledyard.. 10.00 

Mrs. Helen A. Pope i.oo 

Mrs. Charles H. Pope i.oo 

Mrs. Jennie P. Meader i.oo 

Mrs. Franc A. Avery i.oo 

Mrs. Arthur L. Pope i.oo 

Mrs. Louisa A. Smith i.oo 

Mrs. Emily J. Robbins i.oo 

Mrs. Lucie ^Morgan Adams.... 5.C0 
Mrs. Elizabeth A. Von Nostrand i.oo 

George S. Avery 5.00 



David C Avery 


.$10.00 
. I.oo 


O/.ro T. Love 


Mrs. Joseph Caverly 


5.00 


John Coit Averv 


. 2.00 


Walter A. Peterson 


. I.oo 


^Irs. Uriah H. Painter 


25.00 


Sarah A. Stoddard 


. I.oo 




I.oo 


Mrs. Harriet A. Robinson. . . . 


I.oo 




. 2.00 


Pardon E. Tillinghast 


• 5-00 


iNIrs. Gertrude A. Shanklin. . . 


. 2.00 


Morris Tinglev 


2.C0 


Elisha Miner 


5.00 


^Irs. Adaline A. Shepard . . . 


I.oo 


Mrs. Frances L. W. Robinson 


I.oo 


C. F. Williams 


2.00 


Mrs. Deborah A. Kendall 


2.00 


Daniel H. Treadwav 


1.00 



Previously reported 



102.00 



Total $1,846.00 

Please notice that you still have an opportunity of securing a 
share in this altogether commendable enterprise. 



THE AVERYS OF GROTON. 



( Coiiti)iucd fro m Page 226.) 
2 1 . Mary^ Avery, ( Jamcs'^, Jamcs-i , CJu'}stop]ic)-\ , ) was bap. | uh^ 
3, 1693, First Church of Christ of New London; m. July 3, 1716, at 

Groton, William Morgan, b at son of Capt. 

John Morgan by his second wife, the Widow P^lizabeth Williams, 
dau, of Lieutenant-governor William Jones, and granddaughter of 



Avery Notes and Queries. 245 

Governor Theophilus Eaton of New Haven. He died October , 

1729; she died April , 1780, both at Groton, Conn. 

Children of William and Mary (Avery) Morgan (all born in 
Groton): 

i. Mary^, b. May 9, 1717; m. Joseph Allen; d at 

ii. EwzABETH^, b. Feb. i, 1719; d at 

iii. Wii,i,iam5, b. June 17, 1723; ni. Temperance Avery (Number 58, 

page 41 of Sweet's "Averys of Groton"); d. April 11, 1777, 

at 

iv. Margaret^, b. Feb. 26, 1721; d at 

V. Deborahs, b. June 26, 1726; m. Samuel Killam; d at 

vi. Prudence^, b. Feb. 29, 1728; m. John Morgan; d. April 16, 1815, 

at Groton. 



THE OLD AND THE NEW. 



One of the death notices printed on another page of this magazine 
gives a hint of the work that I have been doing in the way of correction 
and completion of the record of the Groton Averys as printed by Mr. 
Sweet. On page 347 of that book appears the record of Samuel 
Avery, No. 137. His mother's name is printed as Clarence instead of 
Candace. The book says that he married in 1806; he married Novem- 
ber 28, 1804. It says that he married "Betsy Avery, born 1788, dan. 
of Samuel of Groton;" he married Chloe Elmer, born November 28, 
1782, at East Windsor, Conn. She was eighteen years old on her wed- 
ding-day. As to children, the book gives "grace-numbers," but no 
names, and the remark, "Of whom I have learned nothing." Samuel 
and Chloe (Elmer) Avery had a large family; I have the names, etc., 
of nine of their children. At least eight of them were married, and I 
have the records of the eight families. 

The third son was Samuel Thomas Avery, born April 7, 1809, at 
South Windsor, Conn. He married Amelia Bunce, October 3, 1832, 
They had eight children ; I have their names, etc. Six of these mar- 
ried ; I have the records of their families. The records of the descend- 
ants of the brothers and sisters of Samuel Thomas Avery are also pretty 
well worked up. 



246 Avery Notes and Queries. 

TIic Moving Fingov writes; nnd having writ 
Moves on; nor all your Piety nor Wit 

Shall lure it back to cancel half a Line, 
Xor all your Tears wash out a, word of it. 

— Om a r Kh ay^ am. 

I ha\'c fi\'e complete sets of the Avkry Notes axd Qteries 
that I am willing- to sell at fiv^e dollars a set. 



DECIDEDLY THE BEST 

Physical Science Series of Text = Books 

(Physics and Chemistry) 

The Hon. EIroy M. Avery, Ph. D., LL D. 



BUTLER, SHELDON & CO. 

919 Walnut Street, PHILADELPHIA, 43-45 E. 12 Street, NEW YORK, 

315-321 Wabash Avenue, CHICAGO, 

To 'wKom all inquiries sHould be addressed. 



The publication of Avery Notes and Queries is to end with this 
issue. If any subscriber has paid for the mag^azinc to a date beyond 
this, he is requested to notify the publisher of tliat fact, and the un- 
earned part of his payment will be returned to him.