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Full text of "The chemist and druggist [electronic resource]"

CHEMISTandDRUGGIST 



For Retailer, Wholesaler and Manufacturer 



MARCH 7 1959 






QUALITY 



March 7. 1959 




DISPENSING BOTTLES 

1-oz. to 20-oz. 

RIBBED OVALS 

i-oz. to 16-oz. 

PLAIN OVALS 

4-oz- . 8-oz. and 16-oz. 

BOW-FRONT PANELS 

l-oz. to 8-oz. and 16-oz. 

OLIVE OIL BOTTLES 

2t-oz.. 5-oz. ami 10-oz. 

OVAL TABLET BOTTLES 

Nos. 1 to 7i sizes. 

RECTANGULAR TABLET BOTTLES 

No*. I. 2.3. 4. 5. 6 ami 9 sizes 

ROUND SCREW JARS 

Tail ami Semi-squat . 

PANEL FLATS 

1-oz. to 4-oz. 

VIALS 

i-oz. to 3-oz. 

Prompt delivery from stock 
Packed in easily handled cartons 
Wholesale only 



Ffrst Clots 



Trade %kW Mark 



AMBER BOTTLES. We can now 
ofTer certain types of ytass containers 
in Amber and your enquiries are 
invited. 



NATIONAL GLASS 
WORKS (york) LTD. 

FISHERGATE, YORK. Tel. YORK 23021 
ALSO AT: 105 HATTON GARDEN, LONDON, E.C.I. 
Tel. HOLBORN 2146 



Selling Agents in Northern Ireland: Magowan, Vicars (Chemicals) Ltd., 64/66 Townsend Street, BELFAST. 



Telephone: Belfast 298.10 



March 7, 



195 9 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



1 





Calcium B PAS wander 



BPasinah wander 

(calcium B-PAS Wander plus isoniazid) 

Chemotherapy of Tuberculosis 



B-PASJ (Wander), 4-benzoyIamino-2-hydroxybenzoic acid, first intro- 
duced by our Research Laboratories in 1948, is the drug of choice in 
regimens'comprising PAS in concurrent therapy. 

In [the form of its calcium salt, it induces only minimal side-effects as 
compared with sodium PAS, and because of its high acceptability guaran- 
tees as far as possible that domiciliary patients take their medication. 



CALCIUM B-PAS (Wander) 

Powders : Tins of 1 50 and 400 x 3.5g. envelopes 
Cachets : „ „ 80 and 400 x 1 .0g. 

Also available: Sodium B-PAS (Wander) 
in 1.5g. Cachets. 




' B-PASINAH ' (B-PAS plus Isoniazid) 

Powders: Calcium B-PAS (Wander) 3.5g. 

Isoniazid 87.5mg. 

Tins of 150 and 400 
Cachets: Calcium B-PAS (Wander) lg. 

Isoniazid 25mg. 

Tins of 100 and 500 



Price details of all forms of PAS from the Medical Dept. 



All Wander tuberculostatic products are available from usual wholesalers or direct from 
A. WANDER LIMITED, 42 UPPER GROSVENOR ST., GROSVENOR SQ., LONDON W.l 



T56 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 7, 1959 



m mm mmm ih all 

MAJOR PAPERS! 

Evan WHUowu 



Double Beauty Hand Cream 
advertisements will be seen — 





M&jHBflM 



SENSATIONAL NEW DISCOVERY! 

DOUBLE BEAUTY 
FOR HANDS AND NAILS 



TIMES 



PLUS massive T.V. coverage now 

EVERY WEEKMGHT ! 

a total viewing of — 





Wonderful News! Evan Williams and leading 
skin specialists have together developed a sen- 
sational new hand cream to protect and beautify 
your hands and nails.as never before. Housework, 
harsh detergents and winter winds remove natural 
oils from your hands causing rough red skin and brittle 
nails. Evan Williams sensational new discovery con- 
tains special oils to replace those lost and to make your 
hands softer, whiter, lovelier, than ever before. After use 

■ there's none of the stickiness you get with ordinary creams 

■ — just satin smoothness and the beautiful fragrance of its 
I exclusive French perfume. 

iress your hands and nails to beauty with 

Evoji William* 

BLE BEAUTY HAND CREAM 




PLUS exceptional introductory offer to retail chemists! 



# Ask our Representative for details of this big profit 

introductory offer to you ! 



EVAN WILLIAMS CO., LTD., 79BOND STREET W.I 



March 7, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



3 





2,249 babies are likely to be born in Great Britain to-day. 

And 2,249 tomorrow. And 2,249 more the next day. 
2,249 infants. All with skins so soft and tender 

that they need all the care that a mother can give. 

Every one of them a potential user of Johnson's Baby Powder. 
One, two, three — perhaps a dozen — new babies will 
arrive in your neighbourhood this week. In all likelihood 
their mothers — like four out of five other mothers 

—will choose smoother, softer Johnson's Baby Powder 
to guard against nappy rash, to soothe and 
cool baby's tender skin. And they'll want other 

Johnson's Baby Products too— Johnson's Baby Soap, 
Baby Lotion, Baby Cream and Johnson's 
Baby Shampoo that won't sting the eyes. 
Johnson & Johnson products are made for the care 
of the whole family. Many of the families in your 
neighbourhood are your friends already: make sure of their 
continued custom — and make friends with new customers— 
by stocking the full Johnson & Johnson range. 



ANOTHER 
CUSTOMER 

BABY PRODUCTS 




4 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 7, 



1959 



1 HOT NEWS! 

Just out 

= NEW SOLTANETTE 

— low priced infra-red lamp 



A lamp with extraordinary sales 
appeal in its contemporary de- 
sign and popular price. 
This new table model long wave 
infra-red generator lamp has all 
the well-known practical Soltan 
features, and some new ones: 

• contemporary lightweight 
stand; folds down for easier 
packing. 

• insulated knobs for easy 
angle adjustment. 

• strong, plated steel wire 
guard. 

• highly polished reflector. 

• convertibility to radiant 
heat. 

• 'cord-grip' cable entry. 

One of a range of new designs 

b y 

Write or 'phone for full details and 
illustrated list of infra-red lamps, 
ultra-violet lamps and high-frequency 
equ ipment. 

THE LONDON COMMERCIAL ELECTRICAL STORES LIMITED 

20-22 Cursitor Street, London, E.C.4 Tel: CHA 6488 

AAWKJLR&CQ 

120 PENTONVILLE RD, LONDON N.I 






CONGRATULATIONS 

to the winners of the fifteenth 

Sanatogen 

WINDOW - DISPLAY COMPETITION 



I John A. Lee, m.p.s., 
1 12 Central Road, 
Worcester Park, 
Surrey. 

2 J. E. Hodgson, Ltd., 
14 High Row, 
Darlington. 

3 Leslie Gabb, 

(Prop. F. Wale, M.P.S.), 

City Road Pharmacy, 
258 Dudley Road, 
Birmingham, 18. 



£40 

£20 — 'Sanatogen' 
Window Display 
£20—'Sebbix' 

Shampoo 
Window Display 



£10 

£10 — 'Sanatogen' 
Window 
Display 



£10 

£10 — 'Sanitogen' 
Window 
Display 



You have two 

more chances to win ! Enter now I 



TRADE 



< VERLOG 



MARK 



SURGICAL ELASTIC HOSIERY 

Belts, Trusses, Suspensory Bandages, etc. 

ATHLETIC SUPPORTS 

Knee Caps, Anklets, Jockstraps 

THOS. GLOVER & SON, LTD., CARLTON, NOTTINGHAM 

Tel.: 58227 (2 lines). 'Grams: Verlog, Nottingham 



CHEMIST S DICTIONARY OF 

MEDICAL TERMS 7th Edition 

Prepared primarily for pharmacists, the Dictionary is indis- 
pensable also for pharmaceutical manufacturers, advertising 
agents concerned with the marketing of medicinal products 
and indeed all who have to find their way around among 
the multifarious medicinal compounds of modern times. 
Order direct from: PRICE 17/6. Postage 9d. 



THE CHEMIST & 

.28 ESSEX STREET, STRAND, 



DRUGGIST 

LONDON, W.C.2. 



VoVih HUM d AUtXjfo Aah 

4 



More and more people 
turn to SELTO every day. Sales 
are reaching an all-time record. 
Have you adequate stocks ? 
Order NOW from your wholesaler 

SELTO (EASTBOURNE) LTD., 
HAMPDEN PARK, EASTBOURNE 



SELTO 

TOOTH POWDI 




PLASTIC CONTAINERS 

(screw cap) 3/2 retail 

inc. tax 

TINS 2/3 and 1/9 retail 

inc. tax. 

Special terms for orders 
of 3 dozen 



March 7. 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



5 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 



Abbey Parfumerie Co 52 

Agfa, Ltd 20 

Allen & Hanburys, Ltd Front Cover 

Apco Photographic Sales. Ltd 21 

Arrowtabs, Ltd 15 

Ashwood Timber Industries, Ltd 76 

Askit, Ltd 76 

Associated Television, Ltd. 34, 35 

Beatson, Clark & Co., Ltd 39 

Biometica. Ltd 72 

British Drug Houses, Ltd 49 

British Dyewood Co., Ltd. 76 

Brook, Parker & Co., Ltd 23 

Brown. Neville & Co., Ltd 12, 13 

Burroughs Wellcome & Co. . .Interleaved Edit., 41. 44, 45 
Bush, W. J., & Co., Ltd 36 

Calmic, Ltd 71 

Chemapol 62 

Chemist and Druggist Course of Modern Photo- 
graphic Studies 75 

Ciba Laboratories. Ltd 40 

Coronet. Ltd. 25 

Cox, Arthur H, & Co., Ltd Cover iv 

Cuticura Preparations 70 

Cuxson. Gerrard & Co., Ltd 66 



Dabitoff 30 

Daniel, Richard, & Son, Ltd 5 

Deb Chemical Proprietaries, Ltd 70 

Dendron Distributors, Ltd 51 

Dixor, Ltd 68 

Domestos, Ltd 67, 73 

Duncan, Flockhart & Co., Ltd 64 

Dyanese, Ltd 76 

Evan Williams Co., Ltd 2 

Fallowfield, Jonathan, Ltd 19 

Geigy Pharmaceuticals Co., Ltd 59 

Genatosan, Ltd 4 

George, Ernest J., & Co Classified Section 

Glaxo Laboratories, Ltd Interleaved Edit.. 271 

Glover. Thomas, & Son, Ltd 4 

Gnome Photographic Products. Ltd 22 

Greeff. R. W., & Co., Ltd. 3 

Haagman Colour Laboratories 18 

Haffenden. W. W.. Ltd. 50 

Hamburger, M., & Sons, Ltd 21 

Hawker & Co 4 

Hunter. R. F.. Ltd 17 



(continued overleaf) 



is tne racK tor 
YOUR dispensary 

j 




Supplies obtainable 
from your usual 
Wholesaler 



r 



Manufactured and packed 
in the Laboratories of 



Sample box gladly sent upon request from 

RICHARD DANIEL & SON, LTD. 

Mansfield Rd., Derby. Tel. 40671 (10 lines) and at 
Grosvenor St., Ashton-u-Lyne. Tel. 5161 (9 lines) 



6 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 7, 1959 



INDEX (cont.) 



Word. Ltd 14 

Johnson & Johnson (G.B.), Ltd 3 

Johnsons of Hendon, Ltd 24 

Kodak, Ltd 21. Interleaved Edit.. 42. 43 

' Kurbs ' 38 

Lake & Cruickshank, Ltd 53 

Lastonet Products. Ltd 64 

Lederle Laboratories Division Cover iii 

Leicester Camera & Optical Repair Co 21 

Liddle, Keen & Co.. Ltd 22 

London Commercial Electrical Stores 4 

London Rubber Co., Ltd 74 

Manchester Camera Co., Ltd 21 

Martin Display 16 

Meggeson & Co.. Ltd. 65 

Metrimpex Foreign Trading Co. for Instruments . . 47 

Mondart, Ltd 28, 29 

Mysore. Trade Agent for , . . . 68 

National Glass Works (York), Ltd Cover ii 

North Staffs Photographic Services 16 

Ormskirk Photo Services Classified Section 

Orridge & Co Classified Section 

P. C. Products, Ltd 54, 55, 46 

Pears Baby Powder 32. 33 

Perihel, Ltd 31 



Pharmax, Ltd 38 

Philips Electrical, Ltd., Photoflux 23 

Prince Regent Tar 70 

Racasan, Ltd 48 

Ransom. William. & Son, Ltd 58 

Rayner & Co., Ltd 76 

Reed. Albert E.. Ltd 56, 57 

Riley. John. & Sons, Ltd 22 

Robinson Barley Water 37 

Roche Products, Ltd Interleaved Edit. 272 

Rose Kia-Ora Sales Co 10, 11 

Sangers, Ltd 26 

Selto (Eastbourne), Ltd 4 

Silber, J. J„ Ltd 18 

Spa Brushes, Ltd 61 

Stafford-Miller, Ltd 6,70 

Taylor, Edward, Ltd 36 

Thermos, Ltd 8, 9 

Thornton & Ross. Ltd 66 

Torbet Lactic Oat Co., Ltd 68 

Universal Metal Products, Ltd 7 

Walker. W. & F., Ltd 60 

Wallace, Cameron & Co., Ltd 63 

Wander, A., Ltd 1 

Washington Chemical Co., Ltd 69 

White-Hudson & Co., Ltd 27 

Wright. Layman & Umney, Ltd 40 



ANNOUNCEMENT 




FROM MARCH 31st 1959 

Stafford-Miller Ltd., will be responsible for the distribution arrangements of POLI-GRIP 
and TARCORTIN which will be available through all wholesale chemists. 



IF ANY DIFFICULTY WRITE FOR FULL DETAILS TO: 

STAFFORD-MILLER LIMITED 

Manufacturing Chemists 
Hatfield, Herts 



March 7, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



7 




Universal Metal Products Ltd. 

SALFORD 6 LANCS. Telephone: PENDLETON 4444 

LONDON OFFICE: AROYLE HOUSE. 29/31. EUSTON ROAD. N.W. I . TEL. TERMINUS 2073 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 7, 1959 



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March 7, 1959 



THE 



CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



9 




B 



10 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST March 7, 1959 










BIGGEST ADVERTISING 
CAMPAIGN EVER 
PUT BEHIND 
ANY FRUIT DRINKS 




There'll be a new spring in springtime ... a terrific new power behind your sales of 
Suncrush, Kia-Ora and Rose's . . . the most massive advertising campaign ever put behind any 
fruit drinks ! T/V, magazines, press and bus sides will all play their part in making this 

the greatest selling year in history! To help you make the most of this wonderful 
sales opportunity ... to help you get in the stock you'll need for increased sales . . . and 
to help you raise your profits on fruit drinks this Spring . . . Rose Kia-Ora are 
presenting a brand-new, greatest-ever Spring Bonus Plan ! General details of this wonderful 
new Bonus Plan are on the opposite page . . . and further details come from 
your RoseKia-Ora representative. But as a sample of how this Plan can work for you, 
you can make a profit of jC4.14.6d. on an outlay of £8.i8.6d! 



March 7, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 






WATCH VOUR 

JUMP! AND 



YOUR PROFITS 

f 




ft A 





GREATEST-EVER SPRING 

BONUS PLAN 

MEANS GREATEST - EVER 

PROFIT FOR YOU! 



With every six-case order, made up of the suncrush and kia-ora drinks listed below 
SUNCRUSH Orange kia-ora Orange Squash 

suncrush Lemon kia-ora Lemon Squash 

suncrush Grapefruit kia-ora Grapefruit Squash 

suncrush Lemon Barley 

We will send free one case suncrush orange, provided 

ia) that your order reaches us before 30th April, and is for immediate delivery 
(b) that your order includes not less than 3 cases suncrush 
Rose's Lime Juice Cordial and Fruit Squashes are not included in the terms of this offer. 

ROSE • KIA-ORA SALES CO ■ GROSVENOR ROAD ■ ST. ALBANS ■ HERTS 



1 2 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 7, 1959 




errania camera 




IBIS 66 



Takes 12 pictures (2^' x 2$") on 120 size roll film 

The lens is a Ferrania Primar 8-5 cm. An optical 
eye-level viewfinder is built in, giving a bright 
and clear image. The smooth action shutter 
gives instantaneous and time exposures. Syn- 
chronised for flashlight photography, and fitted 
with an accessory shoe. Body in aluminium 
alloy, covered in grained morocco leather. 

£4.4.8 

.Ever-ready Case 21/6 



EURA 66 

Takes 12 pictures (2^' x 2^") on 120 size roll film 

Single speed shutter synchronised for flash and 
lens can be focussed from 6 feet to infinity. 
Built-in optical viewfinder gives a brilliant 
image; back of the camera is removable for 
easy loading. A standard English tripod socket 
is provided and there is a removable shoulder 
strap. Body is strongly made of plastic and 
metal, excellently finished, and the appearance 
is very attractive. 49 ^6 

Case 10/6 





IBIS 34 



16 pictures (3x4 cm.) on 127 roll film 

This precision-built " miniature " costs little more 
a box camera but its technical features and perform 
(under normal lighting conditions) are comparabl 
more expensive models. Beautifully finished, it h 
diecast light alloy body and is equipped with a spe( 
developed Ferrania f/7.7 Achromatic Lens with prec 
focussing. Excellent colour pictures can be obtaine 
using fast film in daylight or with synchronised 
Shutter speeds are 1/100, 1/50 and B. The diaph 
gives two stop settings and the double exposure pr 
tion device, normally confined to higher-priced can 
includes a handy red marker. Optical viewfinder, a 
sory shoe, removable shoulder strap. ^4 ^ 

Ever-ready Case 18 I 



March 7. 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



I 3 



photography 




IBIS 44 



12 pictures (4x4 cm.) on 127 roll film 

This most recent addition to the range of Ferrania 
cameras takes 12 square pictures (4x4 cm.), a size 
which is becoming increasingly popular on the Continent. 
The lens is a Ferrania f/7.7 65 mm. Achromatic and the 
shutter speeds are 1/100, 1/50 and B. The shutter is syn- 
chronised for flash. It has a double exposure prevention 
device, including a red marker, an accessory shoe to 
take flashgun, etc.. standard tripod socket, removable 
shoulder strap and large brilliant optical viewfinder. 
Diecast light alloy body covered with imitation Morocco 

, ... £4.17.6 

Ever-ready Case 18 I 




errania trims 



for alt cameras 

Ortho. Pan. and Colour Films 
in all popular sizes 



Sole Wholesale Distributors : 



MEVILLE BROWN & CO. LTD 

77 NEWMAN STREET, LONDON, W.I 

rade Counter: 3 BERNERS MEWS, W.I (rear of building) Telephone: LAN 7161 (10 lines) 




14 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST March 7, 1959 




ILFORD 



low-price camera will sell 
by the thousand 




The appealing design of the new ILFORD 
Sporti and its practical features will make 
it a seller at sight. 

Sporti takes 12 exposures (2j in. square) on 
120size roll film, and here is the specification: 

Lens in focusing mount (5 ft. to infinity) 
with marked scale 

2-position aperture control 

Modern press-button shutter release 

Eye-level viewfinder 

Flash-synchronised shutter 

Accessory mounting shoe 

Rememberthat for handiness, contemporary 
styling, and refinements that do not com- 
plicate the job of taking pictures — you won't 
find a camera to compare with the new 
ILFORD Sporti at the price. 





Retail £3. 19. 9 

Ever-ready case to retail at £1.2.5. 

^+ N.B. ILFORD Sporti is being advertised in the Radio Times 
and the popular press with a recommendation for ILFORD 
Selochrome Pan as the ideal film to use with it. 



Stock up with ILFORD films and sell the ILFORD Sporti camera 

ILFORD LIMITED ' ILFORD ' ESSEX 



March 7, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



Arrowtabs 

photo products 
a first-class range of accessories 

for your photographic counter 
The season opens soon. It's time to order now 



ARROWTABS 




Self - adhesive 
labels with 101 
uses. In 5 
colours includ- 
ing white, and 
a wide range of 
sizes. Ideal for 
transparency 
titling. Also pre- 
numbered self- 
adhesive spots 
lor indexing. 
Illustrated leaf- 
lets and price 
lists on request. 

From 

1/9 

per pkt. 




ARROWGARD 

Transparent plastic slide _ 
sleeves. Give low-cost 
protection for trans-j 
parencies against 
stains, scratches, 
etc. No trimming 
or mount strip- 
ping needed. 

(Free display 
d i spenser 
with 24 
boxes 
35 mm. 
size.) 



35 mm. 
size 3/6 
for 20 
2i" x2i" 
size 5/6 
for 12 



ARROWMOUNTS 



Self-adhesive 
photo mounts 
in automatic dis- 
penser. Adhesive 
both sides. Make 
the neatest ever 
job of mounting 
your photographs 
because they are 
invisible ! In 
counter display 
cartons of 24 
boxes. 



1/- a box 





ARROWFEX 



New idea for 
:ine enthusiasts. 
Do - it -yourself 
stick-on optical 
effects. Iris dis- 



solves. 
Fades, 
effects, 
sional 



Wipes. 
Other 
Profes- 
results — 
and no process- 
ing needed. 

For 8 mm. 
4/9 

7 effects. 
2/6 4 fades 
For 16 mm. 
10/9 

7 effects. 

Special 
adhesive 
2/6 




STROBE- 
0-DISC 

Simplest, most 
inexpen- 
sive method 
for synchron- 
ising projector 
and recorder. 
Strobe wheel 
operates by 
tape of tape 
recorder and 
reflected light 
back from the 
screen. Auto- 
matically 
keeps tape in 
step with film. 

35/6 

complete 




ARROWMATS 

For do-it-yourself slide titling. 
Programme notes, maps, names 
of countries, humorous re- 
marks — simply 
type or write 
with ball - point 
pen. A must for 
35 mm. projector 
owners. Supplied 
12 or 24 on elasti- 
cised showcard. 



2/6 

pkt of 
6 blanks 



INTERVAL 



THE LAST BUS 
LIFT MALT AM 
H9UHAQQ fi^r 



Write now for free leaflets, details and list of wholesalers to : 
ARROWTABS LTD., 93 CHURCH ROAD, HENDON, LONDON, N.W.4 



Telephone : SUNnyhill 3311 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 7, 1959 



GO 



ALL OUT 



FOR BIG SALES THIS YEAR 



These three quick sellers will help you — Guaranteed not to 
collect dust on your shelves— they won't be there long enough. 

The MASTRA V35 will be your best photographic line this year, 
its price is competitive, specifications excellent and reputation 
fabulous. The general design and craftsmanship are so reliable 
that each camera is accompanied by a written FIVE YEAR 
guarantee — a first rate selling point. The operation is simple to 
explain and simple in use, the 4 speed VERO shutter and the f/2'8 

CASSAR lens cover every 
in normal pic- 

£13 14s. lid. 




The PHOTOPIA Rangefinder 
is good value for money, 
robust and yet very accurate, 
scaled in either feet or metres. 



it measures from 3 ft. to infinity, 



eventuality 
ture taking. 
Retails at 



fits standard accessory shoes. Sells at 32s. 3d. 

The FELICA is more than a box camera. Amongst its specifica- 
tions it boasts: 12 exposures per 120 roll, body release, with two 
speed synchronised shutter, built in filter, two apertures, optical 
viewfinder and accessory shoe. All this plus a focusing lens for 
only 58s. 3d. 

NORTH STAFFS PHOTOGRAPHIC SERVICES 




NEWCASTLE, STAFFS 



London Office and Showroom : 36 WARDOUR ST., W.| 



Ni 



The more they SEE, the more they BUY 



£12 

COMPLETE 




.1- 



MARTINS GLASS DISPLAY CASES 



The beauty of a Martin glass 
display case is that it shows 
merchandise of every de- 
scription to your customers' 
best advantage. Each indi- 
vidual case, with its gleaming 
chrome fittings, is tested and 
guaranteed before delivery. 
Choose a vertical or sloping 
showcase and build better 
business from the moment 
it is installed. 



Unit of two vertical cases and one sloping case. Price per set £12. 0. 0. 
(Vertical showcase 24" high, 18" wide, 12" deep. Price £4. S. 0. Sloping 
showcase 14" high, 36" wide. 12" deep. Price £4. 5. 0. You save IS - on 
3 cases.) Vertical and sloping cases packed separately. All prices carriage 
paid in Gt. Bntom. All packages FREE of charge and NON-returnable. 

■ Special orders to customers' own requirements carried 
out quickly. Quantity orders an application. 



LOOK INTO IT TODAY- equip YOUR 

SHOP THE MODERN WAY! Send immediately 
for fully illustrated leaflet of Martin Display Cases 
and prices. 



Name 



Address 

Post to: MARTIN DISPLAY (Dept. CD), 52 Market St., Watford, Herts. Tel : Watford 9287 



March 7, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



1 7 



PATERSON 



Photographic Products 






FAST SELLING 
LINES 

which your customers 
ASK FOR BY NAME 



Extensive advertising is creating and 
sustaining an enormous demand — and 
as a result your customers ask for 
Paterson goods by name 



Don't miss this certain business by incom- 
plete stocks — cash in on the photographic 
boom. Check up with the list below and 
see now that your range is complete 



DARKROOM EQUIPMENT: 

PATERSON TANKS 
PATERSON DOUBLE & TRIPLE TANKS 
PATERSON SAFELIGHT LAMP 
PATERSON CONTACT PRINTER 
PATERSON FOCUS FINDER 

PATERSON MAGNIFIER 
PATERSON PRINT FORCEPS 
PATERSON THERMOMETERS 



COLOUR ACCESSORIES : 

PATERSON MAJORVIEW 35 & 2J x 2J 
PATERSON 2x2 ILLUMINATED VIEWER 
PATERSON VIEWER & CONTAINER 
PATERSON VIEWER & CONTAINER WITH 
ILLUMINATING ATTACHMENT 
PATERSON 6x6 POCKET VIEWER 
PATERSON FRAMES 2x2 and 2J x 21 
PATERSON SEALMASKS 

for both above 
PATERSON SLIDE BOX 



Attractive literature with full description of 
every article and prices is available to stockists 





Manufacturers and World Distributois 



c 




R. F. HUNTER LIMITED 

"Celfix House," 51/53 Gray's Inn Rd., London, W.C.I. Phone Hoibom 7311/2/3 

FACTORIES AT LONDON AND LEIGHTON BUZZARD, BEDS. 



C 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 7, 1959 



Behind 
the 


is an organisation that has equipped itself 
to produce only the finest quality results 
from reversal colour film. 


Name 


We process three types of film 

ANSCOCHROME 
EKTACHROME 

And the service we give on all these 
films is quite exceptional 


HA AG MAN 


COLOUR LABORATORIES 


lS DOUGHTY STREET ■ LONDON ■ WCl 




Telephone HOLborn 2 £03 



tfaJinli 1 

THE 35mm CAMERA 

with all metal body with 
satin Chrome finish 

* HALINA anastigmat f 3-5 45 mm. hard coated colour 

corrected THREE element lens. 

* FOUR speed shutter up to I 200th & "B ". 

* Synchronised for flash. 
•A: Double Exposure Prevention. 
+ Coupled Film Transport & Exposure Counter. 

Aperture Setting from f3.5 to fl6. 

* Front Cell Focusing from 3 ft. to infinity. 

* Automatic Exposure Counting Device from 1-36. 

* Takes all Standard 35 mm. Cassettes 

* Rewind Knob. + Tripod Bush. 
•*■ Socket for Wire Release. 

* Accessory Shoe. -k Easy Loading. 

* Depth of focus scale. 



•k All controls visible from above. 





ONLY 

£7-17-6 



40 46 LAMBS CONDUIT STREET, LONDON, W.C.I. HOL 42I4 5 



CHA 2237-3596 



arch 7, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



1 



PHOTOGRAPHIC CHEMISTS! 




Now! 

You can order 
from Fallow-field 



NIGHT 



Yes, it's true! Research has proved that 
many dealers and chemists take stock of their 
photographic requirements after business 
hours. What better time to do some quiet 
ordering ? Just compile your list and phone 
LANgham 9521 at any time — (dare we say 
it — even on Sunday!) And remember, you 
can have all the advantages of cheap evening 
trunk calls. All this plus our unique guarantee 
to phone you back the next morning should 
there be any query about last night's order. 



You and ( 



Fallowfield 

o| LTD 



Please note the NEW number 
LANgham 9521 - 5 , 

) do tonight what others do tomorrow ! 



Jonathan Fallowfield Ltd. 

74 Newman Street, London, W.1 



20 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 7, 1959 




SILETTE 

'The great little 35mm Cameras' 

SILETTE f2.8 9-speed 
Model as illustrated with f2.8/45mm Agfa Color- 
Apotar coated, anastigmat lens with ProntorSVS 
9-speed shutter, light value scale C20. O. 9 
Ever-ready leather case £2. 16. I. 

SILETTE f2.8 4-speed 
With f2.8/45mm Agfa Color-Apotar coated, anast- 
igmat lens and Pronto 4-speed shutter £16. 6. 6 
Special ever-ready leather case £2. 16. I. 




SILETTE VARIO 

One of the best of the easy-to-handle, 
quick action, inexpensive 35mm cameras. 
With f3.5/45mm Agfa Agnar lens and 
Vario 3-speed shutter £12. 3. 2 

Special ever-ready leather cases 
£2. 12. 3 and £1. 10. 6. 




SUPER SILETTE f2.8 

With coupled rangefinder. f2.8/45mm Agfa 
Color-Apotar lens. Prontor SVS 9-speed 
shutter, light value scale £32. 9. 2 

Ever-ready leather case £3. 3. 1 1. 
ALSO AVAILABLE SILETTE L f2.8 with 
Photo-electric exposure meter £31. 15. 5. 




ISOLETTE I 
'Square negative camera' 

With f4.5/85mm Agfa Agnar coated, colour 
corrected anastigmat lens and 3-speed 
Vario shutter CIO. 3. 2 

Ever-ready leather case £2. 3. 9. 
Other models from : £14. 18. 9 to £24. 2. 6. 






ISOLA 2i'x 2|" cameras 
ISOLA I 

With retractable lens mount; setting 
lever for two apertures, built-in yellow 
filter £4. 17. 8 

Also ISOLA II model £7. 10. 7 

Ever-ready cases for both models £1. 2. I. 



AGFALUX 

Capacitor flashgun for cap- 
less bulbs. Folds to 3?" x 
2$" x I Collapsible fan- 
out reflector; works off 
22±v battery £3. 19. 9 inc. 
zip case. 



KM FLASHGUN 

The smallest capacitor flash- 
gun ever! Designed for 
capless flash bulbs. Unique 
clip-on reflector ensures 
even illumination and maxi- 
mum light utilisation £2.1.8 
inc. zip case. 




KL FLASHGUN 

A very popular capacitor 
flashgun. Highly polished 
step reflector for maxi- 
mum light output and all- 
over illumination. For cap- 
less bulbs £2. 19. 5 inc. 
zip case. 



* Registered Trade Mark of the Manufacturers, Agfa A.G.,LeverkusenlWestern Germany 



the sure-fire combination for 



AGFA LIMITED • 27 REGENT ST . LONDON ■ SWI . REGent 8581/4 



March 7, 1959 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 21 



EFFICIENT CAMERA REPAIRS 

at COMPETITIVE PRICES 
backed by SOUND ADMINISTRATION 



by' 



MANCHESTER CAMERA CO. LTD. 

(MANAGING DIRECTOR : COLIN WAUDBy). 

12 BRA ZEN NOSE ST., MANCHESTER 2 Tel : BLAckfrhrs 3659 
STRICTLY TRADE ONLY 



Leicester Camera Repairs 

7. THE CRESCENT. KING STREET. LEICESTER 

Telephone: Leicester 2057/ 



FOR A SPEEDY SERVICE & GUARANTEE 
TO ALL PHOTOGRAPHIC APPARATUS 

Repairs — Modifications— Synchronisations — Lens Work, etc. 

SEND FOR LATEST LISTS 



LEADING MIDLAND REPAIR SPECIALISTS 



5jm TRAGACANTH 

" GUM KARAYA 



Phone: 
MANSION 
HOUSE 
4405 
( 3lmcs) 



M:HrvMBURG! o R&80HS 



Biochemicals 

The Research products of Nutritional 
Biochemicals Corporation of the 
U.S.A. are readily available in Great 
Britain from Kodak Limited. 



The range includes : 

STANDARDISED AMINO ACIDS 

PEPTIDES 

NUCLEO PROTEINS 

PURINES 

VITAMINS 

CARBOHYDRATES 

ENZYMES 

STEROID HORMONES 
GROWTH FACTOR ANALOGUES 
PLANT GROWTH HORMONES 
PEPTONES 

BIOLOGICAL TEST MATERIALS 
BIOCHEMICAL REAGENTS FOR ANALYSIS 



A list of nearly 2.000 items is available 
for distribution. 

KODAK LIMITED 

KTKKBY INDUSTRIAL ESTATE • LIVERPOOL 

Telephone : Simonswood 297718 



CENEI 




Extensive range of 



* TRANSPARENCY HOLDERS 



* LENSHOODS 



* VIEWERS 



* FILTERS 



* SLIDE BOXES 



The quality and prices of this well- 
established range of accessories will 
be appreciated 
by your 
customers — 




they always 
come back 
for more ! 




APPOINTED WHOLESALERS 

J. FALLOWFIELD LTD., 

for London and Home Counties 

J. LIZARS LTD., Edinburgh and Glasgow 

for Scotland 

Distributed by 

APCO PHOTOGRAPHIC SALES LTD 

12, COLEMAN STREET, LONDON, E.C.2 

Telephone: MET 6800 



7 2 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 7, 1959 



We are actual manufacturers 



and can 



C dtlUai III d II KM I d v L U I 

offer prompt delivery of, and keenest prices for:— 



1 



SODIUM METABISULPHITE 
SODIUM HYPOSULPHITE 




CRYSTALS and ANHYDROUS) 



SODIUM SULPHITE 




(CRYSTALS and ANHYDROUS) 



We invite 
your enquiries 
Samples and 
prices gladly 
sent on request. 
List of Technical 
Products on 
application. 




B.P. EPSOM SALTS 
B.P. PRECIPITATED SULPHUR 
ACCUMULATOR ACID • ZINC CHLORIDE 

(TECHNICAL) 

B.P. ZINC SULPHATE • B.P. GLAUBER SALTS. 



i 



JOHN RILEY & SONS LTD. 

CHEMICAL MANUFACTURERS 
Gramj : RILEYS, HAPTON HAPTON near BURNLEY Phone PADIHAM 290/291 




ALPHAX 



35 mm PROJECTOR 



A brilliantly designed 300 or 500 watt 
projector with a unique, twin parallel 
axis construction. For all 2x2 slides 
including Bantam and Superslide (4 x 4cm). 
With heat re- 
sistant aspheric 
and bi-convex 
condenser. 
Choice of 85 
or 100 mm f/2.8 
coated Wilon 
lenses. 



Price: 

£18/17/6 

Lamp extra. 

Write for details and counter leaflets 
GNOME PHOTOGRAPHIC PRODUCTS LTD. 
354 Caerphilly Road, Cardiff 




Buy direct from the manufacturer 

ORLA 

Chemist Display Units 




Rear view: 25 equal size drawers 
and three large stock drawers. 



Front view: Display section fitted 
with two rows of adjustable 
glass shelves, enclosed by a pair 
of rimless glass sliding doors, 
with oak polished interior. Flush 
ends and top. 

Size : 6ft. long x 3 ft. 3 ins. high 
x 18 ins. back to front (tapering 
at top to 15 ins.) 



Ex-works 



£19 



In spite of increased cost of material there has been no price 
increase in our NORLAND DISPLAY UNITS. The answer— 

EFFICIENT FACTORY PRODUCTION 

Write for complete catalogue. Extended credit terms. 

LIDDLE KEEN & CO. LTD. 

Norland Yard, London, W.I I. Tel: PARk 9881/2 



March 7, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



23 




and Company Limited 
PHOTOGRAPHIC WHOLESALERS 
CAMERAS: agfa, baldessa, coronet, ensign, halena, ibis, 

PAXETTE, PREFECT, TANIT, WELTAFLEX, VITO B, VITO BL, VITO Ma, 
ROCCA, ROLLOP I. 

CHEMICALS: agfa, ergol, ilford, johnsons, may & bakers, 

VANGUARD, ETC. 

CINE CAMERAS: AK8, B & H 624, CIMA D8, EUMIG, MOVEX 88' 
SPECTO 88, ETC. 

PROJECTORS: aldis, argus, braun, gnome, hilyte, b & h 625 

SPECTO, EUMIG P.8 AND IMPERIAL. 

TAPE RECORDERS : elpico, Elizabethan, truvox, veritone 

VENUS, SPECTONE, VERDIK, SCOTCH BOY, E.M.I. TAPES 
AND ACCESSORIES. 

WRITE FOR 'P* LIST 
' ASHFIELD,' HORTON ROAD, BRADFORD, 7, AND GLASGOW 
Telephones: 32281 (5 lines) Glasgow: Bridgeton 0127 Telegrams: Broparco. Bradford 




need to stock 
>JMWJ*L!Lf flashbulbs 



Yes ! the four popular ' Photoflux ' flashbulbs 
satisfy all the requirements for both 
black and white and colour flash photography. 




PF| for black & white PF5 for black & white PFI/97 for colour PF5/97 for colour 

Retail Price I/- (Blue) Retail Price 9d (Blue) Retail Price 1 / 1 



Retail Price 8d 



PHILIPS 



FLASHBULBS 



PHILIPS 




for 'Perfection in a Flash /' 

PHILIPS ELECTRICAL LTD 

Century House ■ Shaftesbury Avenue • London W.C.2 



(PP3060) 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 7, 1959 




ROTO ONE {DEVELOPING TANK 

An economical daylight developing polystyrene tank. 
Screw-on lid with removable polythene cap. Inversion to 
ensure thorough circulation of the developer is possible. 
The spiral, with transparent flanges for colour film 
processing, is adjustable to take size 120, 127 and 88 
roll films or 20 exposure lengths of 35 mm. Stirring rod 
unscrews for insertion of thermometer. Capacity 300 c.c. 
for 120 films; 185 c.c. for 35 mm. PRICE £1 10 0 



Both these Johnson developing tanks are as easy 
to sell as they are to use. So are the Vogue dishes. 
And the boom in home photography continues. 
By keeping well stocked up with these and other 
Johnson accessories — and by displaying them well 
— you can be sure of profiting from the boom to 
the utmost. 



ROTO TWO 



DEVELOPING TANK 




Larger-version tank with provision for inversion agitation and 
rotary "cam-action" movement of the spiral. Spiral adjustable 
to size 116, 120, 127, 88 (35 mm.) and 16 mm. Groove stops 
permit two size 120, two size 127, two No. 88 or two 20- 
exposure 35 mm. films to be loaded at once without overlap- 
ping. One 36-exposure length of 35 mm. film or one size 116 
may be inserted or approximately 6 ft. of 16 mm. Capacity: 
600 c.c. for 116; 570 c.c. for 120; 425 c.c. for 127; 340 c.c. for 
35 mm.; 200 c.c. for 16 mm. Hollow stirring rod. 

PRICE £1 . 12 . 6. Thermometer 5/- 



VOGUE 

TRIPLE PURPOSE SET 

The _ Johnson " Vogue " dishes 
come ' in sets of three and are 
separately coloured: Orange, Grey. 
White. By these colours the user 
can identify them for each process- 
ing job and retain them for specific 
chemicals. Strongly moulded in plas- 
tic, they are available in half-plate 
and whole-plate sizes. Prices: Set of 
3 I PL. 6/9d.— Set of 3 »/i PL.12/9d. 



FOR CONFIDENCE 

IN PHOTOGRAPHY 



JOHNSONS 

OF HENDON LTD 



March 7, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



2 5 




coronet 



coronet 



Top-sales 
Trio! 

Coronet's new, eye-level miniature in 
the format that is sweeping the world. 12 
pictures on 127 roll film. New retractable 
shutter lever for simplicity in use. 

Retail 21 




coronet 




These low-prlcet 
Coronet cameras 
make instant appeal to economy-mlndea 
customers. They boost your sales of roll film too ! 



Two speeds, two stops, flash synchronisec 
focussing 4 ft. to infinity. 12 "super-slide* 
negatives on 127 roll film. Retail 54/1 




Remember — on Coronet roll film you still 
30% discount. 



COronet J'la&hmadte^ 



CORONET LIMITED 



Eye-level viewfinder. Flash synchronisec 
Takes 12 2}' square pictures on 120 roll 
ilm. Retail 307 



MMER LANE • BIRMINGHA 



26 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 7, 1959 




GOOGH STREET BIRMINGHAM 



This change will facilitate larger stocks and faster and more efficient service 
in the supply of apparatus, chemicals and sensitised materials. 

We would like to remind you that comprehensive photographic stocks are 
also available from the following Companies with whom we are associated. 



SANGERS LIMITED 

London Bristol Newcastle 

May Roberts & Company Limited 

London Liverpool Plymouth 

Thos. McMullan & Company Limited 

Belfast 



John Thompson Limited 

Liverpool 

Brooks & Warburton Limited 

London 

Chemists' Supply Company Limited 

Eournemouth 



Hirst, Brooke & Goodalls Limited 

Leeds 




Francis Newbery & Sons Limited 

Cardiff 



SOUTHALL BROS. & BARCLAY LIMITED 



MIST 



Cn*' 



8$ 



k33 



y Mi. J 



'4JK*' < '[ 



I 



'.ft*' 



HACK 



The big bombardment's going great guns! 



THE DAILY HERALD 
THE DAILY EXPRESS 
THE DAILY MIRROR 



right on target in 

right on time — NOW! 



4V' 

3&s 



SHOW MORE PROFITS! 



CLEAR PROFIT! 

11d. A POUND 
3/8d. a 4 lb. JAR 
4/7d. a 5 lb. TIN 



8*S 



^Ltd . , Sf&Sutort, Lanes 



•»»» 



28 



I HE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 7, 1959 



ifr^l max 




These three Max products are the forerunners 
of the biggest range of Aerosols ever planned. 
The Max range is made to exacting and advanced formulae — brilliantly 
efficient, technically supreme, safe and simple for women to use. 



SOON EVERYONE WILL KEEP 



March 7, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 29 




r U every tf/gfoifa /4 weeks 



plus 
plus 

pm 
plus 



THE RADIO TIMES 

EVERY WEEK FOR 13 WEEKS 

THE T.V. TIMES 

EVERY WEEK FOR 11 WEEKS 

ALL HOME MAGAZINES 

CONTINUOUSLY FOR FOUR MONTHS 
TRADE PRICE 40/6d PER DOZ. 

INTRODUCTORY BONUS OFFER UP TO APRIL 30th 



Extra 

discount on 
orders of 
ii dozen (\ 
dozen of each) 



51 



Extra 

discount on 
orders of 
3 dozen (i 
dozen of each) 



78 



Extra 

discount on 
orders of 
6 dozen 
(your choice) 



You can order 



max 



from your usual wholesaler 



MONDART LIMITED, 49 PARK LANE. LONDON. W.I 

HYDE PARK 2I5S 



IIlclX ABOUT THE HOUSE 



30 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 7, 1959 



New plans for DABitoff dry cleaner I 



free bottles 

with every 3 doz ! 





BONOS 



Everything is ready to sell more 
DABitoff than ever. To help you cash in on the 
new high sales, there's a bonus offer of 3 free bottles with every 
3 dozen ordered between February 16th and March 31st. So get in 
touch with your distributors — 

Fassett & Johnson Ltd., 86 Clerkenwell Road, London, E.C.I 

— and order your stocks now! DABitoff costs 22/6 per dozen and sells at 

2/6 per bottle. 



Well-aimed advertising 

You'll find that DABitoff advertising for 
1959 is aimed squarely at putting a bottle of 
DABitoff in every household in the country ! 
Appearing thick and fast in woman, woman's 
own and radio times, powerful DABitoff 
advertisements now go straight to women — 
over 15 million of them! 3 in every 4 of your 
women customers read these magazines — 
many will see DABitoff advertisements in more 
than one! And all DABitoff advertisements 
carry this selling slogan — 

First aid on the spot 



DABitoff 




nstant 3 " solvent dry cleaner 



March 7, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



3 1 



THE S A 59 SUNLAMP PASSES 

WE OZONE SUNTAN TEST * 




1 



TECHNICAL LITERATURE 
DISPLA\ MATERIAL and 
LEAFLETS available on request. 

ORDER NOW FOR THE PEAK SELLING 
PERIOD. 





... ACTINEA 

THE PERIHEL *[JJ A , V * LET infra -red HEALTH LAMP 

PERIHEL LIMITED 146 NEW CAVENDISH STREET, LONDON, W.I. LANgham 2411 

(Member of the K. G. (Holdings) Ltd. Group of Companies) 



32 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 7, 1959 



NEW FROM PEAES 



First Baby 




You yourself well know the remarkable proper- 
ties of Roccal. Now it's in Pears Baby Powder. 
New Pears is just as safe, gentle, fragrant and 
soothing as other baby powders, but thanks to 
Roccal, it has far greater protective and prophy- 
lactic powers. It is effective against a wide range 
of skin organisms and, in particular it destroys the 
bacteria that cause Ammonia Dermatitis. It's an 
extremely effective body deodorant too. 



2/ 



— Retail 

* Active ingu client: 0.2% Benzalkonium Chloride. 

This is how we're backing 
New Pears Baby Powder 

* Impressive double page and whole page ads. in all 
the most widely read mother-and-baby magazines. 

* Special advertising to nurses and midwives. 

* Attractive display material for your shop. 

May we count on your support? 

Your advice as a chemist counts for a very great 
deal, and by recommending this remarkable new 
powder to your customers, you will be rendering 
them a service. 

*Pears are rogd. users of Trade Mark Roccal 



stock PEARS 



March 7, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



Powder with Roccal 




Baby POWDER 

PBP/3/7258/100 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 7, 1919 



Ask th< 
if it', 




You know — we know — that the most successful products 

are advertised on TV. That TV is the most successful 
advertising medium. The impact medium that stimulates 
the greatest demand and gets stocks moving fast. 



At home to 10 million viewers in London and the Midlan 



March 7, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



ravel I er 
!m television 




ASSOCIATED TELEVISION LIMITED 

Television House, Kingsway, 
London, W.C.2. 
Tel: CHAmery 4488 



3 6 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 7, 1959 



■BHMhHhIH 



ASPIRIN B.P. 

" Fre-Flo" Granular, Needle Crystals and Powder 

SALICYLAMIDE 

N-ACETYL p-AMINOPHENOL 





1 SODIUM SALICYLATE B.P. 






Flake and Powder 






1 ACETANILIDE B.P.C. 1949 




1 




Please write for samples and quotations 






Bush 


FINE CH E M 1 CAL 






MANUFACTURERS 


W. J. BUSH & 


CO. LTD. LONDON. E.8 . ENGLAND 




Now reduced 1b 1/6 per fin 

DISPLAY THEM ON 
YOUR COUNTER 
FOR QUICK SALES 



ADVERTISED IN THE 
SUNDAY PRESS DURING 
JUNE, JULY, & AUGUST 




CROWN CORN CAPS 

A product of 

EDWARD TAYLOR LTD • MONTON* ECCLES • MANCHESTER 



March 7, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 




FREE Robinson's 
Lemon Barley Water 




We are offering 6 FREE bottles of 
Robinson's Lemon Barley Water with 
every order of six dozen of any of 
Robinson's soft drinks. 

The fast-selling soft drinks made by 
Robinson's are: Lemon and Orange 
Barley Water, Orange Smash, Orange, 
Lemon & Grapefruit Squash, Sicilian 
Lemon Juice and, the newcomer, 



sweetened Sicilian Lemon Juice. For 
the purpose of the bonus, \2{ oz. bottles 
of Sicilian Lemon Juice count as half 
bottles. 

Take full advantage of this generous 
offer which represents an overall profit 
of at least 1/- per bottle. Place your order 
with our representative or send it direct 
to us. 



This special bonus will run for 8 weeks from March 2nd to April 25th. 



Robinsons 

J. & J. COLMAN LIMITED, CARROW WORKS, NORWICH 



38 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 7. 



1959 



WELLCOME INS' 
LIBRARY 



Diuromil tv. campaign 

IS SELLING HARD 

nation-wide point of sale success 
— order stocks NOW 

DIUROMIL TV advertising is a hard selling, intensive, 
convincing series on relief and treatment of Rheumatic 
Pain. It is designed specially for product recognition 
on your counter. Display DIUROMIL prominently. Cus- 
tomers now look for the blue DIUROMIL carton with 
the red seal. Stock up and sell. 

#117 Separate Commercials 
# reaching 7,000,000 homes 
• 18,000,000 adult viewers 

Diuromil 

ON TV. NOW! 




LONDON, MIDLANDS 
AND NORTHERN 
NETWORKS, 
SCOTS REG. & WALES 



Back up the TV 
message — there's 

worth-while profit 
on every sale I 



Display material available from: — 

PHARMAX LTD., WESTERN HOUSE, GRAVEL HILL, BEXLEYHEATH, KENT 



SINCLAIR'S 



A NEW and effective method of 
beating the Smoking Habit 



For long, people have genuinely hoped that, one day, it 
would be possible, through the agency of a medicinal pro- 
duct, to break the smoking habit, or at least drastically 
curtail it. For just as long they have been disappointed in 
the. various methods which have so far been available. 

Now comes a new — different approach to the problem — 
Sinclair's KURBS. 

This new safe product provides a one month's graduated 
course of treatment in capsule form. Formulated so as to 
take the place of the products of tobacco smoke in the 
system, KURBS remove the desire to smoke and once the 
habit is successfully broken the battle is more than half over. 

Manufactured in England by SINCLAIR'S PRODUCTS Sole 




4 



SINCLAIR'S 



KURBS 



RETAIL PRICE 1 9/3 PER TREATMENT 
TRADE PRICE 128/" PER DOZEN 
PURCHASE TAX 38/6 I'ER DOZEN 

Distributors : FASSETT & JOHNSON LTD. 

86 Clerkenwell Rood , London, E.C.I. 



March 7, 1959 



THE CHEMIST 



AND DRUGGIST 



39 





BEAT SON 



Ribbed Oval . . 



Attractive presentation and sound functional design 
are both provided by the Beatson Ribbed Oval. 

A wide range is available, both Cork Mouth and 
Screw Neck, with either White Enamelled, Black, 
Red or White Plastic Caps. 



Be sure to specify BEATSON 

The Sign of a 



TUM MAAZ 



Good Bottle" 



BEATSON, CLARK & CO., LTD. 

ESTABLISHED 1751 
Glass Bottle Manufacturers 
ROTHERHAM YORKS 

BC73a 



THE CHEMIST 
AND DRUGGIST 

ESTABLISHED 1859 

The weekly newspaper for pharmacy and 
all sections of the drug, pharmaceutical and 
fine chemical, cosmetic, and allied industries 

Official organ of the Pharmaceutical Society of Ireland 
and the Pharmaceutical Society of Northern Ireland 



Volur 



171 



March 7. 1959 



No. 4124 



CONTENTS 

Accuracy in Advertising 254 

Aspects of Crop Defence 252 

Chemists' Share of What is Spent ... 248 

Figures in Pharmaceutical World — 71 253 

Guide to New Medicaments ... 268 
Leading Articles: 

Soft Drinks and Their Content ... 265 

'• No One to Sell Pharmacy " ... 254 
Pharmaceutical Society of Northern 

Ireland: Council Meeting ... 267 
Photographic Department : 

Telerecording at the B.B.C. ... 255 

Developing and Printing Prices ... 257 

Camera and Exposure Faults ... 258 

Cameras for Colour Photography 260 

"It Wasn't What I Ordered" ... 262 

Photographic Notes 264 

Electronics in Enlarging 266 

South London and Surrey Golfers 250 

Topical Reflections 245 



Business Changes 249 
CAD. Retail Price List 275 
Coming Events ... 275 
Commercial Television 276 
Company News ... 249 
Correspondence . . . 248 

Deaths '...250 

In Parliament 251 

Legal Reports 249 

New Products ... 247 



Notes on Medicaments 274 
Overseas Visits ... 249 

Personalities 250 

Pharmacist's Anthology 267 

Price Changes 276 

Shopfitting Notes ... 246 

Trade Marks 276 

Trade Notes ... ... 246 

Trade Report 270 

World Trade 274 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS, Pp. 5 & 6. 
Classified Advertisements, p. 77. 

PUBLISHED BY 

MORGAN BROTHERS (PUBLISHERS), LTD., 

at 28 Essex Street, Strand, London, W.C.2 

Telephone : Central 6565 
Telegrams : Chemicus, Estrand, London 

WOLVERHAMPTON: 89 Woodland Avenue, Teltenhall Wood. 
GLASGOW: 160 Nether Auldhouse Road, S.3. Phone: Langside 2679. 
LEEDS, 16: 32 Wynford Rise, West Park. Phone: Leeds 67 8438. 

ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION 
which includes The Chemist and Druggist Diary and 
Year Book, £2 10s. Single copies one shilling each. 



40 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 7, 1959 



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243 



Chemist aXDruggi st 



Volume 171 



M ARCH 7, 1959 



No. 4124 



Cancer Research in Britain 

DAILY PRESS REPORT OF "CURE" DENIED 

REPORTS in the daily Press recently have linked two companies with 
cancer research and possible " cures." The latest, which appeared on 
February 27, and involved Imperial Chemical Industries, Ltd., followed 
speculative dealing in the company's shares. The company later issued 
the following statement : — 



The pharmaceuticals division of I.C.I, 
has been engaged in cancer research for 
over twenty years and its work is con- 
tinuing. Although from time to time 
possible leads have emerged, these have 
not, so far, provided any positive results. 
At the present time I.C.I, is unable to 
express any opinion as to whether or 
when its work might have a successful 
outcome, and reports that this is immi- 
nent are without foundation and, in view 
of the false hopes that they can raise, 
are to be regretted. Whilst I.C.I, attaches 
great importance to its pharmaceutical 
interests, these are a relatively small part 
of the interests of the company as a 
whole, so that in the event of a success- 
ful outcome to its research work on can- 
cer, the company's commercial and 
financial position would not be signifi- 
cantly affected. 

About a fortnight earlier the Daily 
Mail carried a report that Professor 
James Danielli and his fellow workers 
at King's College had, after five years 
of intensive research, evolved six new 
drug compounds which " may lead to a 
revolutionary new method of attacking 
cancer." Tests on human beings were 
to take place simultaneously in America 
and Britain. Experiments on thousands 
of animals in England had shown an 
80 per cent, rate of success on one type 
of tumour. Speaking of his research 
work, Professor Danielli is reported to 
have said " It was a question of find- 
ing out what a tumour can do and 
using that knowledge to make it blow 
itself up." But there were many com- 
plications; tumours could become re- 
sistant to drugs by producing an adap- 
tive enzyme. To overcome that obstacle 
the team decided to use one drug to 
produce an adaptive enzyme and then 
use that in turn to trigger off a second 
drug which would kill the growth; one 
of the six drug compounds to be tried 
in America uses that principle. Profes- 
sor Danielli stresses that, even if the 
drug is successful, it might apply to as 
few as 1 per cent, of human cancers, 
most likely the rapidly growing types. 
Some of the substance used in the drug 
stems from mustard gas. Professor 
Danielli is working in conjunction with 
research units of the Wellcome Found- 
ation, Ltd. 



Influenza Outbreaks 

PAST THE PEAK ? 

THE Ministry of Health, in a statement 
issued on February 28. points out that 
while the present widespread influenza 
outbreaks have affected most parts of 
the country there are indications that 
its peak may have been passed in some 
areas. " In the great majority of cases 
the illness this winter has been of a 
relatively mild nature, and the level of 
deaths now reached is not high in rela- 
tion to the considerable numbers of 
persons affected." The latest figure of 
influenza deaths, 1,121 in the week end- 
ing February 21. again shows a steep 
rise from the total of the preceding 
week (455). The Ministry states that 
the present level of influenza mortality 
is below the level of what are con- 
sidered to be the worst of recent years. 
" Broadly speaking it is less than half 
that of the peak of the 1951 outbreak 
and similar to the levels reached in the 
winter of 1953 and the autumn of 1957. 
In the week ending February 21 it was 
again the older age groups which suf- 
fered the heaviest fatalities : 768 out of 
the total of 1,121 were sixty-five or 
over and 452 were seventy-five or 
over." During the same period deaths 
from pneumonia and bronchitis in- 
creased by 42 and 25 per cent, respec- 
tively. 

A Patents Action 

SUITS FILED IN BENELUX COUNTRIES 

PATENT infringement suits have been 
filed in Belgium and the Netherlands 
by American Cyanamid Co. against the 
Italian pharmaceutical firm. Lepetit, 
S.p.A., Milan, Italy. An announcement 
by Mr. R. T. Bogan (director of market- 
ing, Cyanamid International) stated that 
the suits relate to Cyanamid's patents 
for the production of tetracycline, and 
that his company " were one of the 
pioneers in the research, development 
and production of broad-spectrum anti- 
biotics, and have filed patent applica- 
tions extensively throughout the world 
on these inventions. Lepetit has been 
producing tetracycline in Italy and has 
been exporting this product into certain 
countries in violation of our patent 



rights, which were granted by the 
governments of those countries." Mr. 
Bogan explained that Cyanamid had not 
brought suit against Lepetit in Italy be- 
cause, under existing Italian law, phar- 
maceutical products and processes for 
their production are not protected by 
patents. 

" Cold " Virus Strains 

FIRST ISOLATIONS IN EUROPE 

TWO strains HA1 and HA2 of a virus 
first isolated from common-cold vic- 
tims at Washington, D.C., U.S.A., in 
1958 have now been isolated also in 
Europe. At Sheffield, Yorks, Sutton 
and others (Lancet, February 21, p. 
395) obtained a strain serologically 
identical with HA1 from swabs taken 
from children showing the signs of 
mild fever, cough and nasal discharge. 
The technique they applied was the 
one used by Chanock at Washington. 
A strain Cop 222 was isolated by 
Petersen and von Magnus at Copen- 
hagen, Denmark, in 1958 and that has 
been shown to be serologically identical 
with Chanock's HA2. 

Monopolies 

NEW TOPICS FOR THE COMMISSION 

ELECTRIC shavers, the distribution of 
petrol and lubricating oil for motor 
vehicles and sodium bichromate are in- 
cluded in the subjects suggested to the 
Board of Trade for reference to the 
Monopolies Commission. The sugges- 
tions are contained in the Board of 
Trade's annual report for 1958 on the 
Monopolies and Restrictive Practices 
Acts (H.M. Stationery Office, nine- 
pence). It was also suggested that sole 
agency and exclusive arrangements gen- 
erally should be referred to the Com- 
mission. 




A DIRECTOR RETIRES: Mr. K. B. Bristow 
(chairman, Lewis & Burrows, Ltd., chemists, 
London) presents to Mr. John Griffiths, M.P.S., 
an inscribed silver cigarette box from the direc- 
tors and cheque from the staff on the latter's 
retirement as director after thirty-nine years' 
service with the company. The occasion was the 
company's annual staff dinner on February S. 



244 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 7, 1959 



Price Maintenance 

DEFENCE FUND TRUSTEES' REPORT 

SUBSCRIBERS who responded to an 
appeal issued in 1951 by the Coun- 
cil of the Proprietary Articles Trade 
Association " for contributions to a 
fund to be devoted to preserving and 
maintaining the principle of price main- 
tenance and all lawful methods of its 
enforcement " are reminded by the re- 
cent trustees' report that the sum sub- 
scribed (just over £10,000) was allocated 
to a fund called the " Resale Price 
Maintenance Defence Fund," the terms 
of which are recorded in a trust deed 
which empowers the trustees to apply 
the income or capital of the fund for 
the purposes set out in the deed. Speci- 
fic provisions enable the trustees to 
apply the fund to such purposes as the 
organising of meetings, the issuing of 
circulars and other publications, the 
employment of political and parlia- 
mentary agents, the presentation of 
evidence or arguments before any 
court, government or departmental 
committee or the Monopolies Commis- 
sion in cases where the merits of re- 
sale price maintenance are in issue. 
The application of the resources of the 
trust fund and the affairs of the trust 
are controlled by a council of manage- 
ment appointed by the trustees. Since 
the issue (in 1955) of their last re- 
port, the trustees and the council of 
management have authorised certain 
items of expenditure, including legal 
and other charges incurred in the 
furtherance of the objects of the fund. 
The sum now remaining, which in- 
cludes interest on investments, is ap- 
proximately £7,000. The present trus- 
tees are Messrs. R. G. Dyas (chair- 
man), J. E. Goodall and N. Dewey, 
Colonel S. Watson, Messrs L. D. Smith 
and F. G. Wells. 

Retail Sales 

BOARD OF TRADE STATISTICS 

RECENTLY issued Board of Trade 
figures show that sales of chemists' 
goods by independent retailers were 
40 6 per cent, higher in December 1958 
than in November and 1'5 per cent, 
higher than in December 1957. Multiple 
retailers' sales were 40'7 higher in De- 
cember than in November and 0 6 per 
cent, higher than in December 1957. 
Sales by Co-operative societies were 
32"5 per cent, higher in December than 
in November and 2 per cent, higher 
than in December 1957. The figures do 
not allow for receipts under the 
National Health Service. 

Hormones to Beef Cattle 

RISKS TO CONSUMERS " NEGLIGIBLE " 

SPEAKING at a cattle-breeders' con- 
ference at Chester on January 13, Dr. 
(i. E. Lamming (Nottingham Univer- 
sity) rated low the risks arising from 
the use of hormones to stimulate the 
growth rate of cattle and improve beef 
quality. He said that doubts had been 
expressed about hazards to the live- 
stock, to consumers of hormonised 
meat, and pastures. In cattle the nor- 
mal response obtained from hormone 
treatment was from 20 per cent, extra 
daily weight gain in summer to 60 per 



cent, extra gain in winter, in sheep 
from 15 per cent, in summer to 35 per 
cent, in winter. Carcasses of all well 
finished treated animals were found of 
superior quality to the control groups. 
Cost of hormone treatment, whether by 
implantation or orally, was negligible 
when compared with the additional 
profits. The only danger was to the 
operator, through inhalation, and Dr. 
Lamming thought that concentrated 
pre-mixes should not be made available 
for mixing under farm conditions. 
That job should be left to the feeding- 
stuffs manufacturer. 

Leeds University 

DONATIONS AND GIFTS 

AMONG donations and gifts acknow- 
ledged by the council of Leeds Uni- 
versity on February 18 were the fol- 
lowing: To the department of physics, 
£850 from Imperial Chemical Indus- 
tries, Ltd., for work in the field of 
solid state physics; to the department 
of inorganic and structural chemistry, 
£250 plus apparatus valued at £280 
from Imperial Chemical Industries, 
Ltd.; to the department of organic 
chemistry. £500 from the Department 
of Scientific and Industrial Research, 
and £350 from Imperial Chemical In- 
dustries, Ltd.; to the department of 
biomolecular structure. £200 from Im- 
perial Chemical Industries, Ltd., and 
$7,000 from the Muscular Dystrophy 
Association of America, Inc.; to the 
department of biochemistry, £500 from 
the Medical Research Council for a 
research project; to the department of 
colour chemistry and dyeing, £250 from 
Imperial Chemical Industries. Ltd.; 
£200 a year for seven years (under 
deed) from the Yorkshire Dyeware and 
Chemical Co., Ltd. 

Pre-Budget Submissions 

COMMERCIAL TRAVELLERS ON TAXES 

IN a pre-Budget memorandum ad- 
dressed to the Chancellor of the Ex- 
chequer the LJnited Commercial Travel- 
lers' Association have submitted that 
alleviations of the anomalies and bur- 
dens of purchase tax would " have a 
very marked effect on the efforts which 
are being made to combat the grave 
anxieties of unemployment." They also 
state that a major reduction in the rate 
of tax on petrol and diesel oil would 
benefit everyone. A plea is also sub- 
mitted for a reduction in the standard 
rate of income tax together with an 
improved earned income allowance. 

The Ciba Foundation 

REPORT FOR 1958 

MORE than eight hundred visitors 
from many countries stayed at the 
Ciba Foundation during the year. This 
was achieved in spite of major struc- 
tural repairs to the building, states the 
report for 1958 just published. The 
Foundation was responsible for six 
small international conferences during 
the year together with numerous 
smaller meetings, discussion meetings, 
film sessions and a series of research 
fora. The latter are held at the re- 
quest and on behalf of other scientific 
bodies or groups. 



IRISH NEWS 

THE REPUBLIC 

Associates' Section 

TENTH ANNUAL DANCE 

THE tenth annual dance of the Asso- 
ciates' Section, Ulster Chemists' Asso- 
ciation, held in Belfast, on February 26. 
proved as popular as ever. Upwards of 
350 guests enjoyed to the full a pro- 
gramme of party and spot dances and 
an exhibition of modern ballroom 
dancing. Mr. W. T. Hunter (chairman) 
received the guests, and in a brief 
speech expressed the Section's pleasure 
at having as their principal guests Mr. 
J. Caldwell (vice-president. Pharmaceu- 
tical Society of Northern Ireland), and 
Mrs. Caldwell; Mr. W. Gorman (secre- 
tary of the Society), and Mrs. Gorman; 
Mr. J. A. Brown (president, Ulster 
Chemists' Association). and Mrs. 
Brown; Mr. W. J. Moffett (vice-presi- 
dent of the Association), and Mrs. 
Moffett; Miss A. E. Strachan (secretary 
of the Association), and Mr. J. N. 
Patterson (pharmacy inspector) and 
Mrs. Patterson. The committee respon- 
sible for the arrangements, under their 
convener, Mr. G. P. Taylor, were: — 
Misses S. Comerton, I. Maguire, Messrs. 
W. R. Davidson, J. H. Galbraith. H. M. 
Hamilton, W. T. Hunter, W. Mitchell, 
J. E. Morley. T. McAlpine, A. J. T. 
Thompson. Mr. R. J. Dixon acted as 
master of ceremonies. 

No Pharmacist 

CAHIR COMPANY FINED 

AT Cahir. co. Tipperary, district court, 
on February 19. the Pharmaceutical So- 
ciety of Ireland prosecuted T. J. Lynch 
& Co. for compounding a medical pre- 
scription for an inspector of the Society 
when the company did not, it was 
stated, employ a pharmaceutical chemist 
in accordance with Section 30 of the 
Pharmacy Act, 1875. The solicitor for 
the company pleaded guilty but urged 
in mitigation of the offence that the 
defendants had been unable at the time 
to secure a chemist. Subsequently the 
company had succeeded in securing the 
services of a pharmaceutical chemist, 
who was still in their employment. A 
fine of 10s. was imposed and the justice 
allowed £8 costs and expenses. 

THE NORTH 

Health Board 

CHEMIST'S FIRST HOLIDAY SINCE 1948 

A CASTLEDERG pharmacist who has 
had no holiday for the past eleven years 
was given permission by Northern Ire- 
land General Health Services Board at 
its February meeting, held in Belfast, to 
close his pharmacy for a week in May. 
The pharmacist had been unable to 
obtain the services of a locum. A num- 
ber of chemists in the Falls Road area 
of Belfast were given permission to 
close on St. Patrick's Day. They asked 
the Board to regard St. Patrick's Day 
as a holiday also in subsequent years. 
The Board's secretary (Mr. G. D. 
Stewart) suggested, and it was agreed, 
the Board should grant permission this 
year and inform the chemists that they 
might make it a permanent arrangement. 



March 7, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



24 5 



NEWS IN BRIEF 

Manchester Regional Hospital 
Board have approved in principle plans 
to erect a new pharmacy at Ashton- 
under-Lyne General Hospital. 

A fire on February 25 in a ware- 
house containing empty stock bottles 
belonging to John Nelson, Ltd., chem- 
ists, Dale Street, Liverpool, was extin- 
guished by firemen. 

An application for a change in the 
method of charging import duty on 
solutions of alkyd resins (whether 
modified or not) in hydrocarbon oil. 
has been rejected by the Board of 
Trade. 

A revised classified list of dusts that 
have been tested for " explosibility in 
the form of a dust cloud " has been 
issued by H.M. Factory Inspectorate. 
Ministry of Labour and National Ser- 
vice. 

The Import Duties (Temporary Ex- 
emptions) (No. 2) Order, 1959 (S.I. 
1959, No. 314), revokes the temporary 
exemption from import duty of phenyl- 
acetaldehyde dimethyl acetal from 
February 28. 

Mr. G. R. Fraser, M.P.S., sustained 
injuries to his hands after an accident 
in the dispensary of his pharmacy, 19 
Silver Street, Wellingborough, North- 
ants, on February 15, when he was 
transferring phosphorus from one con- 
tainer to another. 

A further addition to the list of 
specially expensive drugs, reagents and 
appliances, for the supply of which 
doctors receive payment over and 
above their capitation fees, has been 
made by the Minister of Health. From 
March 1. Hydroxychloroquine sulphate 
tablets have been included in the list. 

Applications with entry fee of 
10s. 6d. for the eliminating round, to be 
held on July 5, of the Buxton trophy 
competition in first-aid and diagnosis 
organised by Casualties Union, should 
reach the Union's competition secre- 
tary, 9 Wimborne Way, Elmers End. 
Beckenham, Kent, by March 24. 

Officers of the Scottish section of 
the Society for Analytical Chemists, 
elected recently were: — Chairman, 
Mr. A. N. Harrow; Vice-chair- 
man, Mr. A. F. Williams; Secretary and 
Treasurer, Mr. J. Brooks, Nobel Divi- 
sion, Analytical Research Section, 
Ardeer Factory, Stevenston, Ayrshire. 

Officers of the North of England 
section of the Society for Analytical 
Chemistry elected recently are: — Chair- 
man, Dr. J. R. Edisbury; Vice-chair- 
man, Mr. J. Markland; Secretary and 
Treasurer, Mr. B. Hulme, Ch. Goldrei, 
Foucard & Son, Ltd., Brookfield Drive, 
Liverpool, 9. 

The similarities and differences be- 
tween the United Kingdom's existing 
tariff and the European Economic 
Community Tariff as it will be at the 
end of the transition period (1970-72) 
when the single external tariff of the 
Common Market has been established, 
are described in a report prepared for 
the Federal Trust for Education and 
Research by the Economist Intelligence 
Unit, Ltd. It is available at a price of 
10s. a copy from the Federal Trust, 10 
Wyndham Place, London, W.l. 



TOPICAL REFLECTIONS 

By Xrayser 
Control of Proprietaries 

Many of the readers of the address given by Dr. Harold Davis, 
(Chief Pharmacist, Ministry of Health) will have been surprised by his 
comparisons of standards of proprietary medicines (or " pharmaceutical 
specialities," as he preferred to call them) at home and abroad (p. 226). 
Many countries apply much more rigid standards than we do in Britain, 
where the legislation, like Topsy, " just growed." We have prided our- 
selves on reaching objectives by evolution rather than revolution but, 
in the pharmaceutical field. Dr. Davis reminds us of the swift and relent- 
less flood of new remedies which make their bow annually, completely 
free from the kind of control insisted upon in some other countries. Anti- 
pathy to controls has been regarded as a national characteristic in Britain, 
even if the much-vaunted freedom is, in some respects, largely illusory. 
But the necessity to anticipate some form of restriction is sound advice 
in any field, and the view of Dr. Davis is that it would be a better policy 
to consider the type of control that would prove least objectionable rather 
than to oppose what the speaker personally thought was inevitable. As 
in other forms of control, legal or ethical, those who act with scrupulous 
correctness have nothing to fear, and, indeed, their position is strengthened 
with little trouble to themselves. Many of the difficulties referred to by 
Dr. Davis as having been encountered by United Kingdom representatives 
on Western European Union would be smoothed by the acceptance of an 
internationally acceptable code. While it may be another of our boasts 
that we are more to be trusted with freedom from control than some 
other countries, the conditions laid down in some of the countries men- 
tioned by the speaker appear to be enlightened and desirable anywhere. 

Saccharin and Glucose 

Having partially recovered from the surprise occasioned by the address 
by Dr. Harold Davis, I turned to another page (p. 228) and found myself 
in a fresh world of surprises. I am not now a large consumer of drinks, 
either soft or hard, nor, since my early days in pharmacy, when I was 
graciously permitted to assist in the making of fruit syrups for aerated 
waters, have I given much thought to their present-day composition. In 
those far-off days, sacks of crystalline preserving sugar were used in the 
sweetening of beverages which occasioned distressing sounds amongst the 
junior apprentices, caused, I believe, by the involuntary contraction of the 
diaphragm while the glottis was spasmodically closed. It was understand- 
able that war-time shortages should have caused the necessity for the 
substitution of sugar by a chemical sweetener, but in my innocence I had 
imagined that normal supplies of sugar would have restored the status- 
quo. I agree with the Food Standards Committee report when it says: 
" In our view, the consumer has a right to expect soft drinks to be 
sweetened with sugar."* Concern on the part of the Food Manufacturers' 
Federation for the future of the saccharin industry does not alter my 
feeling in the matter. Pharmaceutically, the Committee's observations on 
the claims made on behalf of glucose in drinks sold by " advertisements 
of a medical or pseudo-medical character " are extremely interesting, and 
may have repercussions. *But see comment, p. 265. — Editor. 

Suppositories 

The teaching of practicai pharmaceutics today must inevitably take 
in many of the arts of a bygone age. Some of those may be covered in 
a lecture, but proficiency in the making of pills and suppositories cannot 
be acquired from a text-book. In general practice at the present time, 
suppositories requiring extemporaneous preparation are a comparative 
rarity, but the renewed interest in Germany in that form of medication, 
attributable in part to the new bases (p. 219), may result in a revival of 
the suppository in this country. In that event, the continued teaching of 
the art in schools of pharmacy may be more than justified. Belated recog- 
nition may also be accorded to both Galen and Dioscorides, who pre- 
scribed suppositories nearly 2000 years ago. 



246 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 7, 1959 



SHOPFITTING NOTES 

Shopfront Lighting. — A recently pub- 
lished 8-p. brochure, " Moderneon 
Neon Signs," illustrating twenty illu- 
minated shopfronts and a variety of 
illuminated signs installed by Modern 
Electric (Installations), Ltd., 66 Brew- 
ery Road, London, N.7, is available on 
request. Captions to the illustrations 
give details of the types of lighting and 
lettering used in each. 

Steel Shelving. — Steel shelving, 72 in. 
high x 34 in. x 12 in., in white or dark 
green, is available from the shelving 
division of N. C. Brown, Ltd., Hey- 
wood, Lanes. The shelves (six per bay) 
are adjustable at 1-in. intervals and can 
carry 400 lb. each. Messrs. Brown offer 
free delivery in England, Scotland and 
Wales for both the shelving and for 
their all-steel unit drawers which are 
available in any multiple of six. Each 
drawer is 3 in. high and 5 in. wide x 
Hi in. deep. 

Time-control Heating. — Hurseal, 
Ltd., 229 Regent Street, London, W.l, 
have introduced a new low-cost elec- 
trical time-switch control that is de- 
signed primarily to operate with oil- 
filled electric radiators. The unit brings, 
it is claimed, " a degree of automation " 
to the ever-increasing number of users 
of the radiators. The Hurseal time- 
switch controls up to 15 amperes on a 
twelve-hour cycle and may be connec- 
ted for either lighting or heating or both 
simultaneously. It may be fitted per- 
manently to a skirting board adjacent 
to the 13- or 15-amp. plug it is to control. 
Among the suggested uses are for after- 
hours shop lighting and the warming 
of offices before staff arrive. Such time- 
switch control is recommended for use 
only with electrical appliances with en- 
closed elements. 




DISPLAYING A RANGF. OF GOODS : 
Designed and manufactured by Displaywork, 
Ltd., 12 Henrietta Street, London, W.C.2. the 
revolving display illustrated, holds and shows a 
variety of Gala products. The stand is stove- 
enamelled cold, and silk-screened black and red. 



TRADE 

Skin Serum. — Phyllis Scott-Lesley, 
Ltd., 11 Old Bond Street, London, W.l, 
are marketing " special formula " 
BZ10 skin serum. 

A 50-mgm. Size. — Pharmaceutical 
Specialities (May & Baker), Ltd., 
Dagenham, are making available a 50- 
mgm. tablet of Largactil brand chlor- 
promazine hydrochloride in bottles of 
fifty and 500. 

Again Available. — Carlton Labora- 
tories (Southern), Ltd., 2 Norfolk 
Square, Brighton, Sussex, are able to 
supply, through wholesalers or direct, 
the Czech speciality Carlsbad Sprudel 
salt (for indigestion, hyperacidity, etc.). 

Change of Formula. — Lederie La- 
boratories Division of Cyanamid of 
Great Britain, Ltd., Bush House, Ald- 
wych. London, W.C.2, announce that 
their Gevral capsules now contain fer- 
rous fumarate in place of the previous 
ferrous sulphate. 

In Bovines Only. — Dictol, the new 
vaccine produced by Allen & Hanburys, 
Ltd., Bethnal Green, London, E.2, for 
protection against husk in cattle (see 
C. & D., February 28, p. 227) is put 
forward only for use against lungworm 
in cattle. [Corrected note.] 

Available Through Wholesalers. — 
Stafford-Miller, Ltd., manufacturing 
chemists, Hatfield, Herts, announce that 
Tarcortin (tar and hydrocortisone) 
cream and Poli-Grip cream dental-fixa- 
tive are available through trade whole- 
salers from March 31. 

Fashioned Support Stockings. — The 

Surgical Hosiery Co., Ltd., Russell 
Street, Nottingham, have added a new 
shade, black, to their range of Activ- 
ease fully-fashioned nylon-and-elastic 
support stockings. In three sizes (8}-9, 
9|-10 and lOy-ll in.) they are not avail- 
able through the National Health Ser- 
vice. 

Sole Distributors. — Fassett & John- 
son, Ltd., 86 Clerkenwell Road, Lon- 
don, E.C.I, have been appointed sole 
distributors of Pedair appliances 
(manufactured by Pedair Appliances, 
Ltd.). The products (insoles, chiropody 
padding, corn and callous pads, bunion 
protectors, etc.) are based on the use 
of plastic foam. 

Disinfectants in Bulk. — The Prince 
Regent Tar Co., Ltd., Brettenham 
House, Lancaster Place, London, 
W.C.2, are bulk suppliers of carbolic 
disinfectants (black and white types, all 
strengths); market and farm disinfec- 
tants; pine and aromatic disinfectants; 
lysol, B.P.; quaternary ammonium 
compounds, roxenol, B.P., etc., in 1-, 5-, 
10- and 40-gall. drums. 

An Additional Size. — Imperial 
Chemical Industries, Ltd., Pharmaceuti- 
cals Division, Fulshaw Hall. Wilmslow, 
Ches, are introducing on March 9 a 
1-oz. (when dispensed) bottle of Icipen 
suspension, in addition to the 2-oz. 
bottle already available. The new size 
has a tear-off label for dispensing pur- 
poses. It contains 150 mgm. of penicil- 
lin V (as calcium salt) per teaspoonful 
dose. 

Display Competition Prize-winners. 

Genatosan, Ltd., Loughborough, Leics, 
announce that in the fifteenth Sanato- 



NOTES 

gen window-display competition the 
winners were John A. Lee, M.P.S., 112 
Central Road, Worcester Park, Surrey 
(£40); J. E. Hodgson, Ltd., 14 High 
Row, Darlington (£10); and Leslie 
Gabb (F. Wale, M.P.S.), City Road 
Pharmacy, 258 Dudley Road, Birming- 
ham, 18 (£10). 

Coloured Toilet Tissues. — The Brit- 
ish Patent Perforated Paper Co., 
Ltd., Hackney Wick, London, E.9, an- 
nounce the launching of coloured 
Bronco (in a range of bright pastel 
shades) in the Midlands television terri- 
tory. — Jeyes-Ibco Sales, Ltd., River 
Road, Barking, Essex, have made avail- 
able for the first time in colour (pastel 
pink, pastel blue and standard) their 
Jeyes' interfolded toilet tissue. 

Change of Distributor. — Hormo- 
Pharma (Sales), Ltd., 20 Gamage Build- 
ing, Holborn, London, E.C.I, manufac- 
turers of Okasa tablets, announce that 
Lewis & Melchior, Ltd., their former 
distributors in the United Kingdom, 
have ceased to act in that capacity, and 
that Roberts & Co. (Bond Street), Ltd., 
76 New Bond Street, London, W.l, 
have been appointed distributors as 
from mid-March. The opportunity has 
been taken to improve the formula of 
the product, and to redesign the pack. 
There are two sizes containing fifty and 
100 tablets respectively. 

" Beneficiated Purified Hectorite."— 

Production Chemicals (Rochdale), Ltd., 
32 Deansgate, Manchester, 3, are the 
general agents in the United Kingdom 
and Western Europe for the Inerto Co., 
San Francisco, U.S.A., manufacturers 
of Macaloid " beneficiated hectorite." 
The product is a magnesium-lithium 
silicate ground to a coarse powder and 
slurried with heated-deionised water to 
form a thin gel, from which impuri- 
ties such as silica crystals are centrifu- 
gally separated. The resulting slurry is 
then dried and ground to form the thin, 
readily dispersible flakes of Macaloid. 
Macaloid has applications in absorbing 
proteins, alkaloids, cationically charged 
organic and inorganic materials; purify- 
ing liquids and gases by removing un- 
desirable components such as organic 
and inorganic waste; agglomerating 
and precipitating cationically charged 
particles at low concentrations; forming 
strong stable thixotropic gels. 

Bonus Offers 

Rose Kia-Ora Sales Co., Grosvenor 
Road, St. Albans, Herts. Suncrush 
orange, lemon, grapefruit and lemon 
barley, and Kia-Ora orange squash, 
lemon squash and grapefruit squash. 
One case Suncrush orange sent free 
with every six-case order that includes 
not less than three cases Suncrush placed 
before April 30. 

Pedair Appliances, Ltd. (distribu- 
tors: Fassett & Johnson, Ltd., 86 Cler- 
kenwell Road, London, E.C.I). Pedair 
appliances. Thirteen to doz. 

Wright, Layman & Umney, Ltd., 42 
Southwark Street, London, S.E.I. 
Wright's aerosols. Twelve charged as 
eleven on minimum assortment of 
twenty-four cans. A wire display unit 
is provided free of charge with that 
minimum order. 



M arch 7, 



1 959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



24 7 



Calls for Tenders 

THE Board of Trade has issued de- 
tails concerning tenders sought by 
various overseas bodies, and an out- 
line is given below of the requirements 
and closing dates. For fuller informa- 
tion readers should apply, quoting re- 
ference, to Export Services Branch. 
Lacon House, London, W.C.I. 



Vitamin tablets. The Chairman, Tender 
Board, Ministry of Health. P.O. Box 500, 
Colombo, Ceylon. (ESB/3009/59. April 
21.) 

Pharmaceutical preparations, fourteen 
lots, estimated value: B.Frs. 2\ millions. 
Ministry of Belgian Congo and Ruanda 
Urundi. Brussels. (E.S.B./3188/59. March 
26.) 



Pharmaceuticals and drugs. The Chair- 
an, Tender Board, Ministry of Health, 
O. Box No. 500, Colombo, Ceylon 
;.S.B./4274/59. April 28.) 

Surgical dressings. Federation of Rho- 
:sia and Nyasaland. forty-six items. The 
:cretary, Federal Tender Board, P.O. Box 
■ Salisbury, Southern Rho- 



des 

Secretary, . 

8075. Causeway, oaiiiuuiy, ouuuicu 
(E.S.B. 5516/59. March 20.) 



desia. 



NEW PRODUCTS AND PACKS 



Cortisone Cream with Neomycin. — 

The Crookes Laboratories, Ltd., Park 
Royal, London. N.W.I, announce that 
their speciality Cortoderm N (hydro- 
cortisone with neomycin in Lacto-cala- 
mine) is newly introduced. Cortoderm 
(hydrocortisone in Lacto-calamine) has 
been on the market for some time. 

Enteric-sealed Aspirin. — Eli Lilly & 
Co., Ltd., Basingstoke, Hants, have in- 
troduced a new speciality Nu-seals 
aspirin, replacing the former Enseals 
aspirin. Nu-seals brand enteric-sealed 
aspirin are coated to ensure that the 
contents of the tablet are not released 
until the tablet reaches the alkaline pH 
range of the digestive tract. The packs 
are bottles of 100 and 1,000 5-gr. or 
10-gr. tablets. 

Chlorothiazide Intravenously. — 
Merck Sharp & Dohme, Ltd., Hoddes- 
don, Herts, are marketing a new pro- 
duct: Lyovac Saluric, a special form 
of chlorothiazide for intravenous ad- 
ministration in urgent cases. The 
product has been processed in such a 
way as to make a sterile powder that 
is immediately soluble when the stated 
amount of water is added. It should 
not be injected subcutaneously or intra- 
muscularly or allowed to leak into the 
tissues. Lyovac Saluric is supplied in 
vial containing 0\5 gm. of chlorothia- 
zide as the sodium salt. 

Dequadin with Prednisolone. — Allen 
& Hanburys, Ltd., Bethnal Green, 
London, E.2, are marketing a new 
speciality, Dequalone-P, containing 
Dequadin (dequalinium) chloride, 04 
per cent., and prednisolone, 0 - 25 per 
cent., in a bland, non-irritating hydro- 
philic base which is non-greasy and 
does not stain the skin or clothing. The 
Dequadin is present to inhibit the 
majority of skin pathogens at low con- 
centration, and prevent secondary infec- 
tion in pruritic dermatitis. Topical ap- 
plication of prednisolone is present as 
an anti-inflammatory and anti-allergic 
agent. Dequalone-P is indicated in the 
treatment of acute or chronic dermatoses 



with an allergic or inflammatory basis, 
particularly where marked pruritus is 
present. It is supplied in 5-gm. tube. 

\ New Phenoharbitone Therapy. — 
West Pharmaceutical Co.. Ltd., 9 Pal- 
meira Mansions, Church Road, Hove, 3, 
Sussex, have put on the market a new 
speciality, Parabal, the claimed effect 
of which is to enable the intake of 
phenobarbitone to be reduced to one- 
sixth without loss of sedation, with ab- 
sence of " hangover " and " dopiness " 
(clinical effectiveness maintained with 
elimination of side effects); and a 
striking increase in the safety margin 
of phenobarbitone therapy. Each tablet 
contains 260 mgm. of phenobarbitone 
sodium dihydroxyaluminium aminoace- 
tate. For the average patient on con- 
tinuous treatment the dose is one tablet 
morning and night. Up to two tablets, 
three times daily, may be given without 
undue side effects. The pack contains 
fifty tablets. 

On Sale in Britain. — Ambre Solaire. 
the suntan preparation for which is 
claimed " the biggest sale in Europe," 
is available for the first time in Britain. 
The filtering ingredients it contains, dis- 
solved in vegetable oil, provide protec- 
tion against ultra-violet rays in the 
range 2,800-3.200 Angstrom units, giv- 
ing a " Riviera tan " without burning. 
The makers are Golden, Ltd., 7 Gros- 
venor Street, London, W.l. 



Tooth-brush " Aristocrat." — Spa 

Brushes, Ltd., Freeman Works, Ches- 
ham, Bucks, have launched a " bristle 
No. 1 " tooth-brush, " designed and 
made as a precision instrument." The 
new brush is longer than normal, and 
angled for greater reach. Shaped and 
trimmed for gum massage, it has a 
high acetyl handle in pink, blue, green 
or yellow and is packed in clear tube. 

Anti-fly Appliance. — Tack Air Con- 
ditioning, Ltd., Longmoore Street, Lon- 
don, S.W.I, are 
marketing a new 
electrical appliance 
to combat flies 
and moths. Swit- 
ched on for a few 
hours every two or 
three weeks, the 
appliance deposits 
on room surfaces 
an invisible film 
toxic to flies and 
moths but claimed 
harmless to humans 
and animals. The 
appliance, the Tack 
Saxane junior, op- 
erates from an 
electric point (a.c. or d.c. 200/250 volts) 
and consumes only 10 watts while 
vaporising one of the special tablets 
placed in the top of the apparatus. The 
appliance measures 6| x 3i in. 




MANUFACTURERS' ACTIVITIES 



Australian Exhibition. — The first 
Australian exhibition of automatic an- 
alytical instruments was held in the 
Sydney, Australia, showrooms of Wat- 
son Victor, Ltd., recently. The instru- 
ments, with a total value of about 
£35,000 were representative of those 
made by the London firm of Hilger & 
Watts, Ltd., 98 St. Pancras Way, Cam- 
den Road, London, N.W.I, and it is 
indicative of the faith the firm has in 
the Australian market (and in the will- 
ingness of the Australian manufacturer 



to accept new methods) that they were 
prepared to make so heavy an outlay 
for exhibition purposes. 

Cellophane Production at Barrow. — 
Production of Cellophane cellulose film 
is starting at British Cellophane Ltd.s 
new £3-million factory at Sandscale, 
Park Road, Barrow-in-Furness, Lanes. 
The factory should be in full produc- 
tion within the next few weeks. It is 
claimed the most up-to-date in the 
world for producing cellulose film. Half 
of the new output is to be exported. 





CONFERENCE AND PRESENTATION : Sales force of Ortho Pharmaceutical. Ltd., High Wycombe, Bucks, photographed at the company's winter 
sales conference held recently. Right: Mr. Charles J. Watson receives the managing director's " Salesman of the Year " award at r. dinner held in 
connection with the conference. 



2 4 8 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 7 



1959 



Correspondence 

Letters when received must bear the name and address of the sender, not necessarily 
for publication. The Editor does not hold himself responsible for the views expressed. 



Personal Tribute 

Sir, — I feel sure that many of your 
readers were sorry to learn of the re- 
tirement of Hugh G. Smith. Press 
officer to the Pharmaceutical Society of 
Ireland for many years. Those of us 
who were associated with the formation 
of a number of pharmaceutical stu- 
dents' associations and clubs in the 
early 1940's will particularly regret the 
fact that one who gave us such assist- 
ance and encouragement through excel- 
lent publicity in The Chemist and 
Druggist which he represented so ably, 
has now retired as a pharmaceutical 
journalist. Through his co-operation 
those various organisations were en- 
abled to gather strength and to achieve 
a good measure of success, and so pro- 
vide Irish pharmaceutical students with 
many amenities that had been previ- 
ously lacking. The writer is in posses- 
sion of a scrap-book composed of those 
cuttings and in it can also be found 
some journal photographs of several 
pharmacy " firsts," such as the founda- 
tion meeting of the Students' Council, 



the first chemists' Gaelic team to play in 
an inter-university and colleges com- 
petition, the camogie team which won 
the first cup for pharmacy, and the 
initial conferring ceremony in Mount 
Street. Those and many photographs 
of pharmaceutical functions which are 
of great interest all testify to the ability 
of Mr. Smith as a photographer and 
will serve as mementoes of him. To a 
sincere and courteous gentleman we all 
wish health and strength for many years 
to come. 

Seamus Fox, M.P.S.I., 
Athlone 

Resented Restrictions 

Sir, — So many pharmaceutical gim- 
micks are announced as a " new and 
significant advance " or a " new con- 
cept " that one fears that sensibilities 
may become bludgeoned into a state 
where the real advance is not distin- 
guished from the spurious. Is it not, 
therefore, unfortunate that, while con- 
gratulations are due to Allen & Han- 
burys, Ltd., for the development of a 



lungworm vaccine, the event is unlikely 
to excite much enthusiasm in retail 
pharmacy because supplies are refused 
it? This sort of policy is, of course, 
not new, though it is disappointing to 
find Messrs. A. & H. — who originated 
as retail chemists — now subscribing to 
it. But the excuse given for the restric- 
tion is new, and needs to be chal- 
lenged. It is said that " despite the fact 
that (the vaccine) is thus easier to ad- 
minister than injected vaccines, it is 
being issued to veterinary surgeons 
only. ... As the vaccine is the first 
ever to give protection against a para- 
sitic disease, it represents a new con- 
cept in prophylactic medicine and must 
on that account be given under profes- 
sional supervision." Unless that is ver- 
biage meaning " the vaccine has not yet 
received sufficient field trials " it must 
mean that Messrs. A. & H. think that 
" new concepts in prophylactic medi- 
cine " should be denied distribution 
through pharmaceutical channels. I 
think that this ambiguity merits eluci- 
dation by the manufacturers and also 
an assurance that, when this new con- 
cept loses some of its novelty — say in 
twelve months' time — the product will 
no longer be subject to restrictions re- 
sented in both farming and pharmaceu- 
tical circles. 

A. E. Moss, 
Shrewsbury 

DID YOU READ IT? 

The solution to the prescription prob- 
lem (C. & D., February 28, p. 225) is: 

R Diuromil salts, large 

R Solprin 100 ii t.i.d. 

R Enseals aspirin 100 iii nocte 

R Histantin Burroughs & Wellcome 
(sic) j oz. 

MUSEUM PIECE 




An extra large drufi jar for Glauber's salt (about 
14 in. high, with design in deep blue). From the 
collection of Philip Harris, Ltd., 144 Edmund 
Street, liirminsham, 1. 



THREEPENCE IN THE POUND 



Chemists' share of what 

OUT of every £1 spent in Britain 
" 5s. lOd. went on food and only three- 
pence to the pharmacist." This inform- 
ation was given during an address on 
" Factors in Successful Retail Business " 
by Mr. Ian MacDonald, M.P.S., of 
A. G. Nielson Co., Ltd., to the 
Glasgow and West of Scotland Branch 
of the Pharmaceutical Society on Feb- 
ruary 11. Mr. Macdonald said that since 
his last visit to Glasgow four years ago. 
the Press had accused the pharmaceu- 
tical profession, in banner headlines, 
of making hidden profits from drugs 
used in N.H.S. dispensing. The incidence 
of prescriptions was lower through the 
levy, and now it was put forward that 
a considerable saving could be effected 
if prescriptions were taken to hospitals 
for dispensing. Then there was the end 
of the Chemists Federation. Competi- 
tion was increasing and television was 
influencing sales. How had pharmacy 
stood up to the changes? The ratio of 
dispensing to other business had not 
been greatly affected, the average being 
30 per cent.' to 70 per cent, respectively. 
He urged strongly that pharmacists 
should look after the part that gave 
them 70 per cent, of their turnover. In 
Scotland the percentage turnover from 
the National Health Service was good, 
relative to population, but cash takings 
were below average for the whole coun- 
try. With regard to commodity sales, 
oral analgesics were now at the top of 
the list, followed by laxatives and 
tooth-pastes. Pharmacies now sold less 
than 50 per cent, of tooth-pastes 
Essential toilets and medicinals, each of 
which had increased by 6 per cent, in 
1957 over the previous year, showed 
no further increase in 1958. 

Mr. Macdonald urged all pharma- 
cists conducting their businesses to use 



the housewife spends 

drive and initiative; to accept changes; 
have premises bright and attractive; 
make use of display; train staff to give 
cheerful service; keep a keen eye on 
stock control and the rate of stock-turn; 
keep a very watchful eye on the need 
to widen interests; have an interest on 
staff productivity. 

He said pharmacists should accept 
that there was no likelihood that there 
would be new legislation to protect 
pharmacy from competition. They 
should pay attention to the physical 
character of their premises; a change 
often brought a considerable increase 
in turnover. Regarding advertising, he 
stated the public responded to it; 
although the effects of television adver- 
tising varied and there was no fixed pat- 
tern of increase arising from it. 

The problem of the competition of 
the supermarket had not yet arisen in 
Scotland. It was considerable in the 
South and would be doubled in the 
next two or three years. Those stores 
operated with overheads on a much 
lower scale than pharmacies; one which 
was presently run with wages at 6 per 
cent, of turnover was aiming at only 
4 per cent, for that expense. He did not 
think pharmacists were getting their 
share of photographic business, and 
wondered if they were getting their 
share of the teenage market, estimated 
at £1,000,000 per week. Quoting figures 
giving the turnover per person em- 
ployed in pharmacy, he said that the 
average for the whole country was 
£67 3s. per week. London having the 
highest figure at £79 and Scotland the 
lowest at £63 2s. 

Mr. R. Anderson, vice-chairman of 
the branch, presided over the meeting 
and a vote of thanks to the speaker 
was proposed by Mr. K. Scatchard. 



March 7, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



249 



LEGAL REPORTS 

Failed to Attend 

Because George Spedding. 12 Grove 
Lane. Camberwell, a drug-storekeeper, 
failed to attend to prosecute his appeal, 
the London Sessions Appeals Commit- 
tee ordered it to be dismissed and that 
he should pay £26 5s. costs. Spedding 
had entered an appeal against a fine 
of £5 and £6 6s. costs, or a month's 
imprisonment in default for selling a 
bronchial mixture not having in clear 
and legible writing on the label the 
designation or substance or the quanti- 
tive particulars of the ingredients. He 
also appealed against a further fine of 
£5 or a month's imprisonment, to run 
consecutively, for describing his busi- 
ness at 367 Lordship Lane, East Dul- 
wich, as a " Pharmacy " which was 
calculated to suggest that he was quali- 
fied to sell, dispense or compound drugs 
or poisons when in fact he was not so 
qualified. Counsel on behalf of the 
Pharmaceutical Society said Spedding 
was convicted of the two offences in 
October 1958 by the Lambeth magistrate 
and since then the appeals had been 
respited because of the non-attendance 
of Spedding. As he was again not pre- 
sent he applied that the appeals should 
be dismissed with costs. 

COMPANY NEWS 

Last year's figures in parentheses 

P. P. PAYNE & SONS, LTD.— 
Profit for year ended September 30, 
1958, was £86,688 (£134,226) less tax 
provision, £50,975 (£77,850). 

COW & GATE, LTD.— Group pro- 
fits for year ended September 30, 1958, 
including £35,735 (£38,548) net credits 
relating to previous years, amounted to 
£1,631,261, (£1,567,525). 

UNILEVER, LTD., and UNILEVER, 
N V. — Combined turnover expanded 
by £8 millions to £1,728 millions in 
1958. The net profit is up from £40-3 
millions to £47'3 millions. Unilever. 
Ltd.'s final dividend is 2s. L2d. per £1 
unit (against 2s. 3'6d.) making 4s. 2 4d. 
per unit (3s. 6d.). 

HICKSON & WELCH (HOLD- 
INGS), LTD. — Group profit for year 
ended September 30, 1958, was £547,223 
(£506,325). After deducting tax of 
£296,599 (£254,211), net profit was 
£248,553 (£251,397). A final dividend 
of 9i per cent, on the ordinary share 
capital as increased by capital bonus, 
is recommended. 

BRITISH OXYGEN, LTD.— Group 
capital expenditure programme of the 
company for the next three years at 
present totals £24 millions, which is 
expected to be financed from deprecia- 
tion, and reserves and other resources, 
without needing to issue further share 
or loan capital. Mr. J. S. Hutchison 
(chairman) expects expansion in sales 
and profits overseas coupled with a 
gradual improvement at home to yield 
results bearing a favourable compari- 
son with last year's profits. 

ILFORD, LTD.— The chairman (Mr. 
J. P. Philipps), in his annual statement 
circulated with the accounts for year 
ended October 31, 1958, says that 
despite hold-ups in the building of a 



new factory at Basildon it is hoped to 
transfer their colour processing station 
and several other departments to the 
new premises by the end of the year. 
Meanwhile their laboratories are work- 
ing at high pressure to take full advan- 
tage of the information and assistance 
now available from Imperial Chemical 
Industries, Ltd. It is hoped to introduce 
new colour products and extend the 
range of colour films to customers. Be- 
cause of the Common Market and the 
failure to agree on a Free Trade Area, 
Mr. Philipps fears that exports to those 
countries may ultimately become im- 
practicable and make it necessary to 
manufacture in one of the countries. 
Mr. Philipps points out that it is 
difficult at present to foresee the trend 
of world trade over the next few years, 
but at least it seems probable that ex- 
pansion in the company's sales of 
colour film will be rapid, though some 
part may be at the expense of the for- 
mer black and white trade. As stated 
(C. & D., February 21, p. 197), group 
net profits of £788,994 compare with 
£813.748 and the dividend is repeated 
at 16 per cent. 

New Companies 

P.C. = Private Company; R.O. = Registered Office 

LEIGHTON & SON (RETAIL), 
LTD. (P.C). — Capital £10,000. To 
carry on the business of manufacturers 
of and dealers in chemicals, drugs, 
medicines, etc. Directors: Harry 
Leighton and Audrey Leighton. R.O.: 
169 Lumb Lane, Bradford, 8. 

COLLINS CHEMISTS (STAN- 
MORE), LTD. (P.C.).— Capital £500. 
To carry on the business of chemists, 
druggists and librarians, etc. Subscrib- 
ers : S. J. Linton and Gerald Collins, 
M.P.S. The first directors are to be 
appointed by the subscribers. R.O.: 
19 Buckingham Street, London, W.C.2. 

VIRISIN LABORATORIES, LTD. 
(P.C.).— Capital £100. To carry on the 
business of manufacturing, research and 
dispensing chemists and druggists, etc. 
Directors: Doris M. Carr (a director, 
D. M. Carr & Co., Ltd.) and Arthur 
M. Nicholls. R.O.: 21 Jockeys Fields, 
London, W.C.I. 

T. H. WEATHERILL (CHEMISTS), 
LTD. (P.C.).— Capital £10.000. To ac- 
quire the business of a chemist and 
druggist carried on by T. H. Weatherill, 
M.P.S., at 67 Broadway, Chesham. and 
Nightingale Corner, Little Chalfont. 
Bucks, as T. H. Weatherill, etc. Direc- 
tors: Thomas H. Weatherill. Gipsey M. 
Weatherill, Hubert J. Weatherill, F.P.S., 
Anthony T. Weatherill, M.P.S., and 
Sheila M. Long. 

BUSINESS CHANGES 

LEWIS & BURROWS, LTD., have 
closed their branch at 209 Kensington 
High Street, London, W.8. 

HODDERS, LTD., have acquired the 
pharmacy of Bernard W. Rugg & Son, 
Thornbury, Glos. 

THE telephone number of Gale & 
Mount, Ltd., Commerce Road, Brent- 
ford, Middlesex, is being changed to 
Isleworth 4'334 on March 11. 

ADAMS POWEL EQUIPMENT, 
LTD., Gateshead, have opened a Lon- 



don office at 124 Victoria Street, S.W.I, 
to handle inquiries and assist customers 
in the London and South-eastern area. 

WEST END CHEMISTS (LANCA- 
SHIRE), LTD., have acquired the phar- 
macy of Mr. G. Hough, M.P.S., 48 
Manchester Road, Heywood, Lanes, 
and are to trade under their own title. 

LINDETEVES-JACOBERG, N.V., 
have removed their London offices to 
the offices of Jacobson van den Berg 
& Co. (U.K.), Ltd., 3 Crutched Friars, 
London, E.C.3 (telephone: Royal 
7664). 

Appointments 

GOLDEN, LTD., have appointed 
Mr. W. Forbes. 14 Crosslees Drive, 
Thornliebank, Glasgow, to represent 
them in Scotland. 

A. G. HERSOM, 119 Richmond 
Road, Kingston-upon-Thames, Surrey, 
has appointed Mr. George Emerson, 
M. A. (Cantab), as chief chemist. 

CARNEGIES OF WELWYN, LTD., 
have appointed Mr. C. S. Foot their 
export sales executive. The company 
state that he will be engaged on a con- 
centrated sales drive on the export 
market. 

CULLINGFORDS OF CHELSEA 
(Castle Soaps of Cambridge, Ltd.), 
Munroe House, Denbigh Street, Lon- 
don, S.W.I, have appointed Mr. Russell 
Harrison their sales representative for 
the Bristol and South Wales area 

SILMOR DISTRIBUTING CO., 
have made the following appoint- 
ments:— Mr. H. E. Pilon, 4 Seton Path, 
Auchmuty, Glenrothes, Fife (sole agent 
for Scotland); Henry Barlow & Sons, 
Lancashire Hill, Stockport (sole agent 
for S. Lanes, Cheshire and N. Derby- 
shire); and Mr. L. G. Winkley, 55 
Westmead Road, Sutton, Surrey (repre- 
sentative, London and Home Counties). 

OVERSEAS VISITS 

MR. D. A. HAMPSHIRE (assistant 
managing director, F. W. Hampshire & 
Co., Ltd.), flew from London on Feb- 
ruary 16 for an eight- weeks sales trip 
to Central and South African markets. 

MR. GORDON G. SPENCER (a 
director of George Spencer & Son, 
Ltd., and the 
son of the prin- 
c i p a 1 , Mr. i 
George Spen- * 
cer), is leaving J 
shortly for the f 
United States, 
where upon the an 
invitation of the 
John H. Breck 
Organisation he 
will study their 
production and 
d i s t r i b u - 
tion methods in 
their plants at 
S p r i n gf ield. 
Mass, Boston and Bermuda, for an 
approximate period of three months. 
During that period Mr. Spencer will 
also attend one of their training courses 
and be able to see and judge at close 
quarters how their salesmen are put 
through their comprehensive training 
programme. 




25 0 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 7, 1959 



DEATHS 

ASSINDER. — On February 21, Mr. 
Leslie Assinder, M.P.S., 97 King's Stone 
Avenue, Steyning, Sussex. Mr. Assin- 
der qualified in 1904. 

FINLAYSON. — Suddenly at Aber- 
deen on February 25, while on journey, 
Mr. James Finlayson, 1 Glebe Gardens, 
Corstorphine, Edinburgh. Mr. Finlay- 
son was representative and director of 
Harkness, Beaumont & Co., Ltd., 
wholesale chemists, Junction Bridge, 
Leith, Edinburgh, 6, and had represen- 
ted the company for fifty-seven years. 

GOODE. — On February 18, Mr. 
Arthur Frederick Goode, M.P.S., 4 
Winsley Avenue, West Southbourrie, 
Hants. Mr. Goode qualified in 1896. 

HALSTEAD.— Recently, Mr. Harold 
Emerson Halstead, M.P.S., Station 
Road, Cam, Glos. Mr. Halstead, who 
qualified in 1913, set up in business in 
Chapel Street, Cam, soon after the 
1914-18 war, continuing until his re- 
cent illness. He was a keen photo- 
grapher, naturalist and geologist and a 
local pioneer in wireless telegraphy. 

LATIMER. — Recently, Mr. Robert 
Cecil Latimer, M.P.S., who retired from 
his business, The Parade, High Street, 
Wellingborough, Northants, on Decem- 
ber 1, 1958. Mr. Latimer qualified in 
1920. 

PEARCE.— Recently, Mr. Arthur E. 
Pearce, M.P.S., Keystun, Oakwood, 
Tunstall, Nr. Sittingbourne, Kent. Mr. 
Pearce qualified in 1931. 

ROE. — On February 16, Mr. Alfred 
Roe, M.P.S., 59 Avenue G. Peri, Le 
Perreux-sur-Marne, Seine, France. Mr. 
Roe qualified in 1892. 

TAYLOR.— Suddenly, in London on 
February 22, Mr. Alexander Taylor, 58 
Queensborough Gardens, Glasgow, 
W.2. Mr. Taylor qualified as a chemist 
and druggist in 1916 and was in busi- 
ness in Dalmuir, by Glasgow. Bombed 
out during the war he left retail phar- 
macy. He recently sold his interest in 
a plaster business (Taylor Furst & Co., 
Ltd.). Mr. Taylor was taken ill on his 
way home from holiday at Tenerife. 

WHITLEY.— On February 27, Mrs. 
Alice Maude Whitley, wife of Mr. 
H. T. Whitley, M.P.S.I., 31 Main 
Street, Skibbereen, co. Cork. 

WILLIAMS— In hospital, recently, 
Mr. Benjamin Williams, M.P.S., 36 
Birch Road, Higher Crumpsall, Man- 
chester, 8, aged fifty-eight. Mr. Wil- 
liams was a manager for Boots. Ltd., at 
Manchester and Salford branches for 
thirty years. 

PERSONALITIES 

MR. W. L. KEMP. M.P.S., 51 Han- 
som Lane, Halifax, Yorks, has been in- 
vited to join the Halifax Executive 
Committee as pharmaceutical represent- 
ative. 

MR. GEORGE F. FOWLIE, M.P.S .. 
Nairobi, Kenya, has been appointed 
director with Ageca (Kenya), Ltd., Nov, 
Grogan Road, P.O. Box 1 1228, Nairobi. 
Kenya Colony. 

MR. T. W. WATTS, B.E.M., M P S., 
26 Market Street, Haverfordwest, Pem- 
.brokes, is retiring after thirty-seven 



years in business in the town. Mr. Watts 
was awarded the British Empire Medal 
for his work on behalf of the special 
constabulary, of which he has been 
superintendent for some years. 

MR. J. SWAN, M.P.S., F.S.M.C., 6 
Fernlea Gardens, Southampton, a 
member of the house subcommittee of 
the Southampton General Hospital for 
the past three years, has been invited 
to join the Southampton Hospital 
Group Management Committee. 

DR. J. F. DANIELLI (professor of 
zoology, King's College, University of 
London), is giving in the United States 
in March a series of lectures on the 
" Designing of Drugs for the Chemo- 
therapy of Cancer."' The audiences will 
be medical school groups. The lectures 
are being given (under the auspices of 
E. R. Squibb & Sons) at the new York 
Medical College and the Universities of 
Minnesota, North Dakota, and Illinois, 
as well as at the Upstate Medical Cen- 
ter in Syracuse. 



MR. F. V. BUTTERFIELD, M.P.S., 
of Harrogate, Yorks, celebrated his 
ninety-sixth birthday on February 28. 
Mr. Butterfield was registered on April 
16, 1885. His first appointment was 
with the firm of Savory & Moore in 
London. Later he founded the business 
which for nearly seventy years he has 
run either alone or with his son (Mr. 
E. Butterfield), at 5 Station Bridge, Har- 
rogate. Mr. Butterfield believes he is 
justified in claiming that he is now the 
oldest working pharmacist in the 
country. 

MR. DANIEL EDWARDS, F.P.S., 
who has been on the staff of the Royal 
College of Science and Technology, 
Glasgow, for the past five years has 
been appointed head of the School of 
Pharmacy at Robert Gordon's Techni- 
cal College, Aberdeen. He succeeds 
Dr. J. E. Bowen who is retiring. Dr. 
Edwards took his Pharmaceutical 
Chemist training at Robert Gordon's 
and graduated B.Sc. with second class 
honours at Aberdeen University. 



SOUTH LONDON AND SURREY GOLFERS 

Second " ladies' night " even better than first 



THE colourful menu cards in use at 
the second annual dinner and dance of 
the Couth London and Surrey Pharma- 




Mt. J. L. Wrathall (president) with Mrs. 
Wrathall. 

cists' Golfing Society on February 18, 
received a well deserved tribute from 



the chairman (Mr. J. L. Wrathall), who 
presided, to their printer and provider 
(Mr. Jock Whitelaw). Mr. Wrathall 
made specially good use of them by 
securing upon several of them the auto- 
graphs of all the diners at each table. 
In the only speech of the evening the 
chairman, after demolishing all the ex- 
planations any golfer ever made to his 
wife for being late home, went on 
with a certain inconsistency to persuade 
the wives that it was always to their 
advantage not to spoil their husbands' 
fun. His parting remarks, given in 
verse, were more apt than he knew, for 
a thick fog descended and the words 
were : 

To everyone who is here tonight, 
I'm very glad you came 
To help us all enjoy ourselves, 
And I hope you do the same. 

And when the band plays Auld Lang Syne 
And all the fun is over, 
I wish you all safe journey home — • 
Whether by Consul, Zephyr or Rover. 

The proceedings were expertly and 
most agreeably M.C.'d by Mr. Ivor 
Spencer. 




Accomplished performers (without handicaps) on the dance floor. 



March 7, 1959 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 251 

IN PARLIAMENT 

By a Member of the Press Gallery, House of Commons 



THE Chancellor of the Exchequer was 
asked by Mr. P. Maitland if he would 
publish the latest proposals made to 
the British Government by the Com- 
mission of the European Economic 
Community for reconciling the Com- 
mon Market with the rest of the Or- 
ganisation for European Economic 
Co-operation countries. In a written 
reply on February 27, Mr. R. Maud- 
ling (Paymaster General) stated that 
no proposals had been made but the 
European Commission was due to 
make proposals to the six governments 
in the near future. 

Pharmaceutical Exports 

Mr. J. S. Arbuthnot asked the Pre- 
sident of the Board of Trade what had 
been the value in each of the last ten 
years of the export sales of the phar- 
maceutical industry. In a written reply 
on February 19 Sir David Eccles 
(President, Board of Trade) provided 
the following information: — 

United Kingdom Exports of Drugs, 
Medicines and Medicinal Preparations 





£ million 




£ million 


1949 


18-37 


1954 


32-10 


1950 


23-06 


1955 


35-88 


1951 


34-02 


1956 


35-94 


1952 


31-66 


1957 


39-63 


1953 


28-66 


1958 


37-79 



Leukaemia 

Mr. Frank Allaun asked the Minis- 
ter of Health what were the causes of 
the rise in deaths from leukaemia in 
Lancashire by 22 per cent, between 
1950-53 and 1954-57 and by 40 per 
cent, in Cumberland compared with 13 
per cent, for the whole of England and 
Wales. Mr. Derek Walker-Smith in 
a written reply on February 19 stated 
the increases "illustrate a recent narrow- 
ing of the gap between the death rate 
from leukaemia in the North of England 
and the higher rate in the South. This 
trend may well be due in part to greater 
accuracy in diagnosis." 

Hospital Waiting Lists 

An adjournment debate was initiated 
by Mr. A. Blenkinsop on February 
23, regarding the problems of hospital 
waiting lists, especially in the North- 
east of England. He mentioned com- 
plaints of delays for consultant ap- 
pointments and the waiting list for 
hospital bed accommodation; also the 
difficulties of defining " an urgent 
case " and the undesirability of using 
" private consultations " to obtain 
earlier appointments and so " by-pass- 
ing others in the queue." Dame Irene 
Ward said that when increased pro- 
ductive capacity was required generally, 
it was unfortunate that " we ... do not 
ensure that no man . . . has to delay 
returning to ordinary life after illness 
because we have not the hospital beds 
available or the facilities for reducing 
waiting time when people have to visit 
out-patient departments." She contin- 
ued: " I sometimes feel that it is a great 
pity that the Ministers concerned in 
the Ministry of Health, when they find 
the Treasury or any other Minister 



arguing against them because they want 
a little more money, do not try to put 
in the balance the value in national 
efficiency of the improved health of 
the nation." On the same day in a 
written answer Mr. Derek Walker- 
Smith stated that the waiting list fig- 
ure for September 30, 1958, showed a 
slight reduction on the figure for Sep- 
tember 1957, and was nearly 100,000 
less than for the peak figure recorded 
at the end of 1950. He did not think 
a committee of inquiry or other special 
steps were called for. 

Leprosy 

Replying to a question by Mr. B. 
Janner, Mr. R. Thompson (Parliamen- 
tary Secretary, Ministry of Health), 
stated on February 23, that there were 
279 persons in this country suffering 
from leprosy. 

Purchase Tax 

Mr. G. D. N. Nabarro asked the 
Chancellor of the Exchequer whether, 
since November 18, 1958, he had given 
further consideration to the question of 
abolishing the 60 per cent, rate of pur- 
chase tax and what representations had 
been made ... by the . . . cosmetic 
industry. Mr. F. J. Erroll (Economic 
Secretary, Treasury) stated in a written 
reply on February 26, that representa- 
tions had been made but he could not 
anticipate Budget decisions. The same 
phrase was indicated in the reply given 
to Mr. G. D. N. Nabarro when he 
asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer 
on March 3, whether he was aware 
that French, German and American 
toilet preparations were now dominat- 
ing international sales, whilst Great 
Britain occupied a minor role; that a 
significant factor in the situation was 
the purchase tax charge on British 
toilet preparations and what steps was 
the Chancellor taking to remove con- 
tainers and packages from the tax. 

Chiropody Service 

Answering a number of questions on 
March 2, Mr. Derek Walker-Smith 
(Minister of Health) said he was ready 
to approve proposals by local health 
authorities who wish to provide a 
chiropody service in the National 
Health Service and he proposed to con- 
sult the local authority associations 
immediately. He intended to suggest 
that priority should, in the early years 
of the service, be given to the elderly, 
the physically handicapped, and expec- 
tant mothers. To another questioner, 
the Minister said that he had in draft 
a scheme for the registration of medi- 
cal auxiliaries, which included the regi- 
stration of chiropodists, on which he 
was consulting the medical profession. 

Pharmacists 

Mr. K. Robinson, on March 2, 
asked the Minister of Health if he was 
aware that pharmacists working in 
mental hospitals suffered financial dis- 
advantage compared with those work- 
ing in general hospitals and would he 
take steps through his representatives 
on the Whitley Council to remove that 



anomaly, especially in view of the 
rapid growth of chemotherapy in the 
treatment of mental disorder. 

Mr. Derek Walker-Smith : " The 
rates of pay of pharmacists in mental 
hospitals, other than chief pharmacists, 
are the same as those for pharmacists 
in general hospitals. The rates of pay 
of the chief pharmacists vary in accord- 
ance with a points scheme which takes 
into account, amongst other things, 
the size and type of hospital, and was 
agreed by the Pharmaceutical Whitley 
Council. The scheme is at present 
under review by the Whitley Council 
and the information being obtained 
will doubtless reflect any changes in the 
pharmaceutical work in mental hospi- 
tals." Mr. Robinson said whatever 
might have been the historical reason 
for that differentiation among chief 
pharmacists was the Minister aware 
that it had caused difficulties in recruit- 
ment for mental hospitals in the past? 
In view of the new development of 
drug treatment in mental hospitals the 
need for differentiation had completely 
disappeared. " Will the Minister do 
what he can, through the Whitley 
Council, to see that this anomaly is 
removed?" The Minister: "We had 
better await the results of this inquiry, 
which I understand should be available 
to the Whitley Council in the near 
future." 

Tranquillisers 

Mr. F. Noel-Baker asked the Mini- 
ster of Health on March 2 what repre- 
sentations he had had from the medical 
profession regarding the advertising 
and unrestricted sale of tranquillisers 
to the public; whether he had yet re- 
ceived a report from the inter-depart- 
mental committee on drug addiction 
which was considering that matter. 

Mr. Walker-Smith stated that some 
individual doctors had made represen- 
tations, and articles and letters had ap- 
peared in the medical Press. The inter- 
departmental committee was not yet 
ready to advise on this matter and in 
the circumstances he could say no more 
for the moment. 

Drugs for Private Patients 

Mr. Ronald Bell asked the Minister 
of Health what progress he had made 
in his negotiations with the medical 
profession about the provision of drugs 
and appliances to private patients upon 
National Health Service terms. The 
Minister said he had nothing to add to 
the statements he had already made. 

A PHOTOGRAPHIC 
MAGAZINE 

THE January/February English edition 
of the Japanese photographic maga- 
zine CamerArt contains technical 
articles, a section devoted to new pro- 
ducts, an article on four new 4x4 cm. 
cameras reputed to " bolster the grow- 
ing interest in super slide projections " 
and the Nikon " fish-eye " camera 
manufactured by the Nippon Kogaku 
Co. Its lens covers 180' and the camera 
gives twelve 50-mm. circular exposures 
on a 120 film. 



2 5 2 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST March 7, 1959 

ASPECTS OF CROP DEFENCE 

Agricultural chemicals and their formulation 



THE degree and diploma courses in 
pharmacy now require students to study 
the formulation of agricultural chemi- 
cals, said Dr. S. B. Challen at the 
commencement of his address to mem- 
bers of the Pharmaceutical Society in 
London on February 18. Pharmacists 
are interested in the hazards associated 
with the use of those chemicals, in the 
legislation regulating their sale, in their 
chemical and biological properties, and 
in the anatomy and physiology of plants 
and insects against which the chemicals 
are used. 

In his address Dr. Challen classified 
and gave information upon insecticides 
and fungicides as summarised in the 
accompanying tables: — 



FUNGICIDES 



1. 


Inorganic 


bordeaux mixture 


2. 


Organic 


copper 




copper 


8 quinolinate 






tetra-methy] thiuram 


3. 


Organic 


Nabam Fcrbam, 




sulphur 


TM.TD disulphide 


4. 


Organic 


phenylmercuric 




mercury 


nitrate ; 






phenylmercuric 






acetate 


5. 


Ouinones 


dichloronaphtho- 






quinone ; 






tetrachloro-p. 






benzoquinone 


6. 


Phenols 


pcnlachlorophenol : 






hexylrcsoreinol 


7. 


Heterocyclic 


captan 




nitrogen 




8. 


Antibiotics 


griseofulvin ; 






tcrramycin ; 






streptomycin 



DNC (3,5 dinitro-o-crcsol) and 
dinoseb arc translocated herbicides. 
Translocated auxins include 2.4D (2, 4 



dichlorophenoxyacetic acid); MCPA 
(4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid) ; 
245 T (2, 4, 5 trichlorophenoxyacetic 
acid); and MCPB (4-(4-chloro-2-methyl- 
phenoxy) butyric acid. Other substancer, 
classified as translocated auxins include 
IPC (isopropyl N-phenyl carbamate) 
(mitosis inhibitor); phenyl substituted 
ureas (inhibit photosynthesis); maleic 
hydrazide (mutagenic properties); as 
well as TCA (trichloracetic acid) and 
sodium chlorate. 

Points of Attack 

Formulations such as Bordeaux mix- 
ture, devised in 1885, were empirical, 
their exact properties and mode of ac- 
tion eluding research workers for fifty 



years. Current knowledge of insect 
cuticle and plant surfaces permit a 
greater appreciation of the formulation 
problems. Insects are vulnerable in 
four systems : Non-cuticularised mid 
gut; nerves; trachea and sporacular 
(respiratory); exo-skeleton with a cuti- 
cle the function of which is to pre- 
vent loss of water but which is unable 
to prevent the entry of chemicals. Dr. 
Challen discussed the various layers 
of the cuticle and explained the 
efTcct of an inert dust included in a for- 
mulation. The abrasive effect of such 
dusts, he said, damages the cuticle, per- 
mitting water loss and causing death. 
Particle size and hardness arc impor- 
tant. Dolomite is less effective than the 
silicas but it aids cuticle penetration, 
which is important with a lipoid-solublc 
insecticide such as DDT. The cuticle 
varies from species to species, the tsetse 
tl\ tarsus being particularly susceptible 
to penetration. A valuable research 
field is open at present to extend the 
knowledge of the penetration and inter- 
action of insecticides. Insufficient deter- 



gent in a formulation causes " fall- 
off "; excess can bring about a coalesc- 
ing of particles causing " run-off." De- 
tergents may have an effect upon the 
waxy layers in the insect but paraffin 
and mineral oils promote penetration. 

Plant surfaces are important factors 
in the penetration efficiency of herbi- 
cides. The leaf may exhibit two layers 
containing wax or wax platelets and 
cutins. The water-repelling properties 
of plant surfaces are governed by the 
presence or absence of wax and the 
thickness of the cuticle. Variations may 
occur for genetic reasons. Sometimes 
there is less wax on the under-surface 
of a leaf, permitting access, for ex- 
ample, of 24D or urea for the direct 
supply of nitrogen to leaf tissue. Age 
also causes variations, and it has been 
observed that in flax the cotyledon is 
more " wettable " than the leaves of 
the more mature plant. Leaf wax/cutin 
undergoes a daily variation that can be 
the result of environmental factors. 
TCA in the soil can reduce leaf wax, 
causing susceptibility to dinoseb. 

Dr. Challen went on to discuss some 
of the factors that influence the effec- 
tiveness of herbicides. Copper sulphate 
and sulphuric acid have a value depen- 
dent upon the retention of spray solu- 
tions. Systemic poisons must be water- 
soluble if they are to penetrate the root, 
stem or leaf surfaces as well as travel 
through the plant vascular system. They 
also require a degree of stability to 
ensure residual activity. 

Hazards in the use of those chemi- 
cals are residues in the soil; on plants; 
on food plants: and on stored products. 
They may also be toxic to useful fauna 
and resistance may develop if they are 
misused. Dr. Challen briefly discussed 
legislation and referred to the summary 
published in The Chemist and Drug- 
gist (February 7, pp. 156-58). 

Questions 

During the discussion following the 
lecture Dr. Fairbairn emphasised that 
crop protection was not to be confused 
with phytopharmacy. A questioner from 
Nottingham referred to the possible per- 
sistence of fat-soluble insecticides on 
sheep by solution in wool fat. Dr. 
CHALLEN considered that other factors 
were also involved. In answer to a 
further inquiry he thought there might 
be insignificant contamination of crude 
drugs by those chemicals, but a greater 
hazard might occur with food crops. 
Different formulations might be re- 
quired for aircraft spraying than with 
large land-spraying machinery. Assess- 
ments of spray residues from aircraft 
were being carried out. Ecological re- 
search was investigating the degree of 
resistance occurring from synthetic as 
against naturally occurring compounds. 
The demand for pyrethrum was in- 
creasing, and the speaker could remem- 
ber only one report upon resistance to 
pyrethrum. That related to Swedish ob- 
servations of laboratory flics, where the 
degree of resistance encountered was 
considerably less than had been re- 
ported for other insecticides. 



INSECTICIDES 



GROUP 



Natural products: 
Rotenone ; 
pyrethrum ; 
nicotine 



Arsenic and fluorine 
compounds 

Gases: 

Methyl bromide; 
hydrogen cyanide 



USE 



Stomach and contact-poison 



Chlorinated 
hydrocarbons: 
DDT; chlordone; 
gamma BHC; 
aldrin; dieldrin 



Organophosphorous 
compounds: 
TEPP (tetraethyl 
pyrophosphates); 
thiophosphates; 
parathion ; 
phosphoramides; 
schradan 



Dinitrocresols 



Stomach poison 



Fumigant 



Stomach and contact poisons; 
fumigant and residual effects 



Contact and stomach poisons 



Systemic poison 



Ovicides 



COMMENT 



Instability; not toxic hazard 



Instability; phytotoxic; leaves 
toxic residues 



Penetrating; toxic hazard 



Incompatible with alkali; toxic 
residue hazard 



Unstable in water; incompatible 
with alkali 



llinhly toxic 



March 7, 



1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



25 3 



FIGURES IN THE PHARMACEUTICAL WORLD 



LATER this month an evening meet- 
ing of the Pharmaceutical Society 
is being addressed by Professor G. E. 
Trease, B.Pharm., D. de l'U (Stras- 
bourg), F.P.S., F.R.I.C., F.L.S. A 
printed announcement describes the 
occasion as a " historical meeting " — 
not, one must suppose, because Profes- 
sor Trease is the masculine equivalent 
of a femme fatale, but because it has as 
its subject " A Thirteenth Century 
Family of Court Apothecaries." The 
prospectus of the meeting adds that 
" for some years Professor Trease, who 
is a member of the Society's History of 
Pharmacy Committee, has been inter- 
ested in the mediaeval period." That is 
borne out by his published essays 
" Nottingham Pharmacy in the Thir- 
teenth and Fourteenth Centuries " 
{Future Pharmacist, 1952. 12. 12); 
" Spicers in Mediaeval Nottingham " 
(Pharmakon, 1953. 1. 8); " Pharmaciens 
francais a la Cour d'Angleterre au 
Moyen-Age " (Revue d'Histoire de la 
Pharmacie, 1955, 145), etc. The address 
to be given on March 25 is understood 
to comprise a suitable selected fraction 
from a larger thesis : " The Spicers and 
Apothecaries of the Royal Household 
in the Reigns of Henry III, Edward I 
and Edward II," which will b e pub- 
lished in the third volume (September 
1 959) of Nottingham Mediaeval Studies. 
In the wider title lies the clue to Pro- 
fessor Trease's interest in and study of 
historical aspects of pharmacy, namely 
as an extension from his own subject of 
pharmacognosy. Pharmacognosy, it will 
be recalled, is a comparatively recent 
development from " materia medica," 
namely the study of the vegetable and 
animal substances used in medicine. 
Since some of those have been used 
from time immemorial it was natural 
enough that study of the scientific 
aspects — slender enough in some in- 
stances — should lead to a study of their 
entry into and use in medicine. 

Professor Trease's " Test-book of 
Pharmacognosy," first published in 
1935, has associated his name so 
strongly with the subject of its title that 
to many it may come as a surprise that 
his first published paper (Quarterly 
Journal of Pharmacy, 1926) was on a 
chemical theme : " the Use of Carbon 
Tetrachloride in Pharmacy." It could 
easily have happened, indeed, that Pro- 
fessor Trease would today be specialis- 
ing in chemistry for, after leaving 
school, he was a student in " pure " 
chemistry for one term at University 
College. Nottingham, before deserting 
it to take up a three-year apprentice- 
ship in pharmacy. His indentures were 
served in the period 1920-23 in the 
pharmacy of John Beachell. one of the 
best of its period in the city of Notting- 
ham. Since its completion his path has 
lain entirely within the academic field 
for, though he went south to London 
to qualify (from the now defunct Lon- 
don College of Pharmacy) he returned 
to Nottingham to take the higher quali- 
fication, stayed on as a member of the 
staff. There he has remained ever since, 
except for a period of war service in 
the Ministry of Economic Warfare, 
becoming successively demonstrator. 




71. PROFESSOR G. E. TREASE 



lecturer (1926), reader (1945) and pro- 
fessor (1957). On the death of Mr. Bent- 
ley in 1942 he was appointed ■ acting 
head and then, in 1944, head of the 
University Department of Pharmacy. 

Professor Trease's other published 
volumes are " The Chemistry of Crude 
Drugs" (with J. E. Driver, 1928); and 
" Aids to Pharmaceutical Latin " (1929). 
His contributions to the technical Press 
are too numerous to be catalogued 
here. For the most part they are on as- 
pects of pharmacognosy, but lectures or 
papers within a different category throw 
light on another of his interests : phar- 
macy as practised in France — of which 
it is essential, he considers, to have an 
adequate knowledge for any proper 
understanding of the early practice of 
pharmacy in this country. Professor 
Trease has had many contacts with 
France. Apart from numerous holidays 
he has contributed, with Professor 
Duguenois, to Annates Pharmaceutiques 



Francais a monograph on " La Nomen- 
clature des Resines de Jalap," has lec- 
tured on British pharmacy in the Uni 
versities of Montpellier, Strasbourg, 
Bordeaux and Clermont Ferrand. and 
has written for the University of Stras- 
bourg an essay on " The French 
Friends of Daniel Hanbury." It was 
from Strasbourg that he gained his hon- 
orary Doctorat de I'Universite. 

Another facet of Professor Trease's 
personality is his lively interest, of a 
kind much more personal than profes- 
sorial, in student activities. That may be 
one reason why Pharmakon, the Not- 
tingham pharmacy students' magazine, 
is outstanding among such publications 
for its serious purpose and informative 
content. On several occasions he has 
written for the Future Pharmacist, and 
he has lectured to British pharmaceu- 
tical students at their annual conference 
(his subject: "Pharmacy Today and 
Tomorrow "). Whether to a limited or 



254 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 7, 1959 



to a wide public, and whether of cameo 
dimensions or for a larger canvas, his 
writings convey always the compliment 
of respect for the reader's intelligent 
interest in the subject in hand. As a 
lecturer he has the facility of speaking 



authoritatively yet without assertive- 
ness, and of leavening information with 
a quiet humour. 

British pharmacists have not been 
notorious for the interest which, as a 
whole, they have taken in the history of 



their craft, and if, as is likely enough, 
he charms some of his hearers on 
March 25 into a more detailed study of 
the subject, the words " historical 
meeting " may prove to have a wider 
implication than was intended. 



ACCURACY IN ADVERTISING 

Supervision by an Advertising Council recommended 



THE appointment of an advertising 
council with objects similar to those 
of the existing Press Council is recom- 
mended in a report, " Advertising in a 
Free Society" (10 x 6i in. Pp. 216. 
18s.) prepared by Messrs. Ralph 
Harris and Arthur Seldon and pub- 
lished by the Institute of Economic 
Affairs. Among their twenty-one re- 
commendations the authors urge that 
codes of conduct and standards for ad- 
vertising should extend beyond medi- 
cines to all products and services and 
beyond television and posters to all 
media. They should be regularly re- 
vised in the light of new products and 
advertising appeals. 

The report recommends the Advertis- 
ing Association to demonstrate its con- 
cern to eliminate false and misleading 
advertisements by empowering its Ad- 
vertisement Investigation Department 
to take proceedings under the Merchan- 
dise Marks Acts against offending 
advertisers. It also urges the Retail 
Trading-Standards Association to take 
proceedings against advertising agents 
who continue to handle false or mis- 
leading advertisements. 

Other recommendations are that the 
penalties for false or misleading adver- 
tisements should be increased if 
offences are repeated. Offending firms 
and their advertising agents should be 
required to pay for an apology and cor- 
rections to be published in every 
medium that carried the advertisement. 
Repeated offenders should be put on 
probation and required by media 
owners to submit advertising copy to 
the Advertisement Investigation De- 
partment of the Advertising Associa- 
tion. The authors take the view that 
consumer organisations should not 
appear to be at war with private indus- 
try. "They will command greater 
influence by not pitching their claims 
too high, and remaining free from any 
suspicion of political bias or antagon- 
ism to industry." Manufacturers 
anxious to maintain a vigorous national 
network of individual retailers should 
explore constructive and perhaps co- 
operative methods of increasing the 
efficiency of smaller shopkeepers. An- 
other recommendation is that Press and 
Television proprietors should examine 
methods of ensuring greater accuracy 
in advertisements, possibly by requir- 
ing the advertising agent, if any, to be 
named in them. It urges that "no 
obstruction should be placed in the 
way of development of a new advertis- 
ing media," stating, "this should de- 
termine the form of organisation for a 
third or fourth television service." 

In addition to those recommenda- 
tions the authors present a series of 
selected case studies which refer to the 
activities of a number of well-known 
manufacturers. The tenth study con- 
cerns soft drinks, a brief history of 
Lucozade being given. The case history 



states that " in 1939, its first year as a 
Beecham Group product, the retail 
price of Lucozade was 2s. a bottle. The 
increase of 25 per cent, to the present 
price of 2s. 6d. compares with increases 
in costs from 1939 to 1956 of 78 per 
cent, for raw materials, 135 per cvnt. 
for bottles, and 260 per cent, for 
women's wages. If allowance be made 
for the fall in the value of money, the 
present price of 2s. 6d. is equivalent to 
Hid. in 1938, and in 1958 the propor- 
tion of the retail price represented by 
the cost of advertising was 8'4 per 
cent." 

Another Beecham Group product 
forms the basis of a selected case study 
of toilet products, the product being 
Macleans tooth-paste. Figures are given 
to show that, after the product came 
under the Beecham Group, the adver- 
tising outlay increased roughly in step 
with expanding sales, and that the in- 
creased volume brought a twofold 
economy, permitting new production 
methods, giving reduced costs, and en- 
abling trade margins to be reduced. 
" As a result of the successful market- 



ing of a nationally advertised brand, 
the customer finished up with a better 
product at a lower price." 

Other case reports concern Kleenex 
tissues and Toni " home permanent." 

The authors estimate that about two- 
thirds of the £334 millions spent by the 
advertisers in 1957 was returned to the 
public in the form of cheaper news- 
papers and transport, samples, gifts 
and so on. They believe that " resale 
price maintenance is a device born of 
a defensive mentality in a restrictionist 
atmosphere. It cannot but impede a 
dynamic and free economy. As an 
instrument of progress, the advertising 
profession should reconsider its custo- 
mary attitudes." 

The report is not against advertising 
as such, stating that " while it may be 
less powerful than both critics and sup- 
porters argue, it can play an important 
role by helping to market products, 
hasten the improvement and innovation 
of products, and keep competition 
keener than it would otherwise be." It 
contains a number of appendices on 
many aspects of advertising. 



"NO ONE TO SELL PHARMACY" 

Suggestions at Liverpool dinner 



THE importance of creating and main- 
taining good relations with the Press 
was the main theme of a speech by Mr. 
H. Standish at the annual dinner and 
dance of the Liverpool Chemists' Asso- 
ciation and Liverpool Branch of the 
Pharmaceutical Society, on February 
18. More than 300 people supported the 
event, at which Mr. H. W. Cottle presi- 
ded. The toast to the Pharmaceutical 
Society was proposed by Mr. Standish 
who, besides being the owner of a 
small group of chemist shops, is also 
the owner of a local newspaper and the 
president of the Liverpool Press Club. 
He said that all pharmacists must be 
aware of the problems presented by the 
bad handwriting on doctors' prescrip- 
tions. Although the subject was often 
treated with levity, it had a serious 
side, especially the waste of time in de- 
ciphering forms and the increased care 
necessary by pharmacists. He under- 
stood that in some countries it was a 
punishable offence for doctors to issue 
illegible prescriptions. " I do not sug- 
gest that we should have similar legis- 
lation, but I do think doctors should be 
asked in a friendly way to make their 
writing more understandable." 

In recent months the chemist hail 
come in for criticism in the national 
Press and that had created wrong im- 
pressions in the minds of the public. 
There had also been implications that 
pharmacy had inferior status to other 
professions. Such false impressions 
could have been put right in a few 
brisk sentences if the chemists had a 
competent authority or spokesman to 



state their case. " I advocate the setting 
up of a pharmaceutical publicity sec- 
tion or the appointment of a qualified 
press or public relations office," said 
Mr. Standish. " At present you have no 
one to sell pharmacy to the British 
public." No one would complain of 
just and fair criticism, but when wrong 
impressions were conveyed to the pub- 
lic, they ought to be corrected promptly 
and vigorously. Twenty-five years ago 
the National Pharmaceutical Union 
tried to form a pharmaceutical pub- 
licity association, a move which failed 
because of the apathy of the average 
chemist. " Pharmacy is an integral part 
of the nation's health service. Do not 
let it be undermined by bad publicity." 

Mr. T. Hesei.tine (a member of the 
Society's Council) said that pharmacy 
in general owed a big debt of gratitude 
to Liverpool and especially to Mr. H. 
Humphreys Jones. He and his col- 
leagues of the School of Pharmacy had 
been responsible for a steady flow of 
first-class students who had brought 
credit to the profession. Nor should 
one be unmindful of the fact that Liver- 
pool had provided the Society with two 
or three presidents, one of whom (Mr. 
W. J. Tristram) became lord mayor of 
the city. Tribute was paid to the work 
o f Mr. J. Farrer Barnes as a member 
of the Council of the Society. Finally. 
Mr. Heseltine thanked the Liverpool 
pharmacists for their generous contri- 
butions to the Benevolent Fund and 
congratulated Evans Medical Supplies, 
Ltd., on approaching the 150th anni- 
versary of their beginning in business. 



March 7, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



2 5 5 



For Future Use 



A DESCRIPTION OF THE USE OF FILM 
FOR RECORDING AND ARCHIVE PURPOSES 
IN THE B B C. TELEVISION SERVICE 



ALAN K. RICHARDSON, M.B.K.S. 

(Telerecording Manager, Film Department) 

LEO G. DIVE, A.M.I.E.E., A.M.Brit., I.R.E. 

(Engineering Information Department) 



THE post-war development of the B.B.C. Television 
Service demanded the creation of a Television Film 
Department which adds to its vital production func- 
tions of shooting, editing and sound recording a telerecord- 
ing production section and the B.B.C. Film Library. 

Though live broadcasts were, after the war, basic to the 
service, the demand for suitable programme material was 
greater than they could meet. The telerecording of important 
historical events transmitted by the B.B.C. plus the need 
to build up a programme reserve on film, led to the forma- 
tion of the film library and of a telerecording unit. In the 
thirteen years since the post-war reopening of the Corpora- 
tion's television service, a vast expansion has occurred in 
the telerecording field. In 1958 over 1,300 telerecordings were 
made, against only eighteen in the first year of operation. 
In 1958, over 580 were transmitted, representing 217 hours 
of programme time. Those figures illustrate the present im- 
portance of telerecordings in the programme structure of 
the Service. The majority of the large-scale drama, opera, 
and ballet productions are telerecorded for subsequent re- 
peat, as are most of the popular light-entertainment series. 
The use of telerecording methods enable the programmes to 
be pre-telerecorded at times when artists are more readily 
available. 

Recordings Viewers Never See 

A proportion of the telerecordings made are never seen 
by B.B.C. viewers, but are sent overseas as part of the 
B.B.C. Overseas and Transcription Services. In addition, 
agreement has now been reached whereby European coun- 
tries are able to retransmit on their own networks pro- 
grammes originating from the B.B.C. That means that the 
European television networks can screen the programmes at 
times most convenient to themselves, irrespective of the 
time of origin in Britain. Those facilities also work in 
reverse. Topical programmes of interest to the whole world, 
such as the recent Papal ceremonies from Rome, were 
transmitted through the Eurovision link to Britain, tele- 
recorded, processed, edited and transmitted to viewers a 
few hours later. Copies were also made, and by use of 
Transatlantic jet air-liners they were on the television 
screens in New York the same evening. Those telerecordings 
represent during the course of a year many millions of feet 
of film, all of which have to be stored and catalogued. They 
form a large portion of the Film Library's intake. 

Growth has been rapid. The Library was created in 1948, 
at the start of B.B.C. Television Newsreel. One vault and a 
staff of two at the commencement have increased to 100 
vaults and a staff of twenty-two. The increase in the footage 
held by the Film Library has been as dramatic and impres- 
sive as the expansion of television itself. Ewart Davis (the 
B.B.C. film librarian) estimates that his weekly intake is 
more than 130,000 ft. of 16-mm. and 35-mm. film. The 




Library receives 500 or more inquiries per week of one form 
or another, resulting in the making of 170 requisitions and 
involving the issue of something like 700 cans of films. As 
much as 3,800 ft. of library material is recut and used in 
new productions each week. In addition, an average amount 
of three hours 40 minutes per week of complete pro- 
grammes are retransmitted from the programme reserve. 
That represents approximately 20,000 ft. The tradition of 
high quality demanded by producers and engineers in both 
sound track and picture means that every care has to be 
taken of the original negative. 

Chemical testing of film may have to become a necessary 
routine if posterity is to benefit from the numerous histori- 
cal records which the last one and a half decades have pro- 
vided. At the moment, chemical testing is carried out not by 
the B.B.C. but by the National Film Archive, which receives 
and stores the negative of the B.B.C.'s television news 
output. 

Film made prior to 1950 was on comparatively less 
stable and more highly inflammable base than is used today. 
The nitrocellulose film base is unstable, releasing oxides of 
nitrogen which, contained by the can in which the film is 
stored, eventually combine with the gelatin part of the 
otherwise comparatively stable emulsion. The result of that 
combination bestows on the film an affinity for moisture 
which eventually reduces it to a " sticky " condition in which 
it exhibits increasing acidity, leading eventually to chemi- 
cal disintegration of the silver image. Variations, unfortu- 
nately, occur in the timing of that breakdown, which can 
take place with dramatic suddenness. The film at the early 
stage of the " sticky " process still projects satisfactorily. 
Later it becomes friable and brittle, but — even worse — it is 




Left: Exterior of the film vaults at Ealing. Right: 
16-mm. and 35-mm. film racks in the vaults. 



2 5 6 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 7, 



I 95 9 




I he Editola machine in use for viewing. The machine reproduces either 
photo or magnetic 35-mm. sound. 

capable of igniting at 106° F. Testing by the method of 
the National Film Archivet involves the removal of a j-in. 
diameter disc from the film and placing it in a test tube 
closed by a glass stopper, round which a filter paper satur- 
ated with a glycerin-water solution of alizarin red is 
wrapped. The tube is placed in an air bath at 134° C, with 
the upper section protruding and visible, bleaching of the 
lower edge of the filter paper indicating that acid vapour 
is being produced. Observation is made for one hour. 
Failure to react after sixty minutes indicates that the film 
may be safely stored for three years; reaction within 40-60 
minutes dictates retesting after one year; and within 20—40 
minutes retest after six months. If the reaction occurs 
within twenty minutes the film is considered unstable and 
unfit for further storage. When that happens fresh copies 
are normally made. 

Telerecordings are an important part of the library stocks. 
Sixty vaults at Lime Grove contain the permanent library, 
and forty vaults at Ealing the current library. Selection for 
permanent storage is discriminating and, for the " stock " 
shot, library " dupes " (duplicates) are sometimes made 
upon fine-grain film before editing, so that potentially valu- 
able sequences may be preserved in their longer, more 
useful state. 

Speedy tracing of specific scenes is made possible by a 
cross-reference index system. Complexity results from the 
variety of film gauges, optical and magnetic sound tracks, 
and copyright restrictions. Administrative difficulties within 
the Corporation are created by widely dispersed studio 
centres. 

Optical film, first on 35-mm. and later on both 35-mm. 
and 16-mm. gauges, has been used for telerecording from the 
inception of the process. Only within recent months has the 
alternative method of recording vision on magnetic tape 





Working surface of the 16/35-mm. Steenbeck editing machine. 

become available. Optical methods are still used whenever 
editing is required, as the problems of editing magnetic tapes 
have, to date, not been overcome. 

To appreciate the various methods of telerecording on 
cine film, it is first necessary to understand the way in 
which pictures are produced on a television screen. They are 
drawn line by line, much as the eye scans a page of print. 
Each complete picture is reproduced by two separate scans, 
the first producing the odd-numbered lines and the second 
the even-numbered, the scanning spot returning in a short 
interval of time from the bottom to the top of the screen 
after each scan. In the present British television system there 
are approximately 400 lines in a complete picture — that is, 
approximately 200 lines in each scan, the two sets of lines 
being interlaced. The time for each scan is 1 / 50th second, 
so a complete picture takes twice that time, or 1 /25th 
second. The scanning process is continuous, and thus the 
pictures are repeated, twenty-five appearing each second. 
When movement occurs in the televised scene each succes- 
sive picture is a little different from the preceding one. The 
picture-repetition frequency is sufficiently great for an im- 
pression of a continuous picture and of smooth movement 
to be created. 

Simple and Difficult Requirements 

Now the process of telerecording on cine film consists 
essentially of running a cine camera in front of a television 
screen on which are produced the pictures to be recorded. 
In that process the cine film should, ideally, remain stationary 
and be exposed while each complete television picture is 
reproduced. Then it should be moved on to the next film 
frame in the interval during which the scanning spot is 
moving back to the top of the screen to start the next 
picture scan. That involves both running the cine camera 
in synchronism with the television system, which may be 
done quite simply, and also shuttering the film, moving on 
the film and opening the shutter again in the very short time 
before the next television picture begins to appear on the 
screen. The latter requirement is extremely difficult to ful- 
lil a fact that will readily be appreciated once it is realised 
that the time available is only about one and a half thou- 
sandths of a second. 

A successful telerecording system that was developed by 
B.B.C. engineers and used for recording the Coronation in 
1953 records only alternate television scans, that is only 
approximately' 200 lines, so that only half the full picture 
information is recorded. The camera shutter is closed, and 
the film moved on during each of the " missing " scans. In 
that way reasonable-quality pictures are preserved. The 
system is known as " suppressed frame telerecording." 

A later system, also developed by B.B.C. engineers, has 
overcome the difficult) by arranging for each " miss- 
Making adjustments to the CiDCOta editing machine, which takes 35-mni. 
optical or magnetic " unmarried M Mm. 



March 7, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



2 5 7 



ing " picture to be retained on the 
television screen during the reproduc- 
tion of the following scan. In that 
way, although the film transport 
arrangements are as in the suppressed- 
frame system, all the picture informa- 
tion is retained in the recording. For 
good results the relative brightness of 
the two interlaced pictures must be 
accurately matched. Though that is 
difficult to achieve, satisfactory results 
are possible and indeeed regularly 
produced. The system is known as the 
" stored field system " of telerecord- 
ing. 

Finally, there is the most direct 
method — that of moving the film fast 
enough to enable each frame to be 
exposed to each pair of interlaced 
pictures as they are produced by the 
scanning spot on the television screen. 
The tremendous difficulties of cine 
camera design to achieve the rapid 
" pull down " required have been 
largely overcome for 16-mm. equip- 
ment although, even with material of 
that gauge, rather more time than the 
one and a half milliseconds available 
for the pull-down is still required. 
That requirement results in a small 
portion of the picture being elimin- 
ated. Consequently, when reproduced 
from such a film recording, the height 
of the picture is slightly reduced. 
Within the limits of what can be 
achieved with 16-mm. film, the results 
are very good, and 16-mm. " rapid 
pull-down " equipment is in frequent 
use. Unfortunately the problems of 
acceleration and deceleration of the 
film which are so much greater with 
35-mm. film because of the greater 
height of the film frames, have de- 
layed the introduction of 35-mm. 

rapid pull-down " equipment, 
though encouraging progress has been 
made. 

Video Recording 

The principle of magnetic tape 
" video " recording is the same as that 
used in magnetic tape recording of 
sound. However, because of the much 
greater rate at which information must 
be recorded, either extremely high tape 
speeds must be used or alternatively 
special recording techniques, using 
much wider tapes, must be intro- 
duced. It must be remembered that, 
for a complete recording, picture and 
scanning synchronisation and accom- 
panying sound programme must be 
simultaneously recorded. Great pro- 
gress has been made with the new 
techniques — both with the high-speed 
tape system and with the wide-tape 
and slower-tape-speed system. But it 
has to be borne in mind that the 
magnetic system, while possessing 
several advantages such as the ability 
to be "' played back " immediately 
without any processing, will never re- 
placs the optical, cine-film type. The 
latter offers advantages such as simp- 




Left: Film-tilting rostrum equipped with Newall camera, fully motorised table and auto-focus. 
Right: " Dubbing " operations in progress on a dubbing/mixing desk. 



ler editing and the ability to be repro- 
duced on television systems other than 
the present British one (magnetic tele- 
recordings cannot). Thus for inter- 
national exchanges only the cine-film 
type is suitable. 

The use of either magnetic or opti- 
cal telerecording methods permits the 
recording of events for almost-imme- 
diate or later transmission and for 
the archival storage of important 



items. Historical occasions do not 
necessarily take place at peak viewing 
times, and the international links that 
now widen the potentialities of tele- 
vision are made to leap the restrictive 
barriers of time and distance by the 
use of the new and still improving 
techniques of telerecording which 
have been mentioned. 

tBrown, H. G.. " Problems of Storing Film for 
Archive Purposes." Briiiih {Cinematography, 
1952. 20. 5. 



PHOTOGRAPHIC DEPARTMENT 

DEVELOPING AND PRINTING PRICES, 1959 

Photographic Dealers' Association recommended scale 

sizes of enlarging papers, and subject to trim- 
ming. The varying proportion of length to width 
in negative often necessitates trimming the fin- 
ished picture to correspond. 

Paper size B.&W. Sepia Mounting 

Up to 31 x 41 in. (J-plate) 9 11! 9 
3i x 51 in. (postcard) 10 16 9 
4± x 61 in. (l-plate) 2 0 3 0 1 6 
6{ x 8! in. (who'e-piate) 3 0 4 6 2 6 
8 x 10 in. ... 4 6 6 9 3 6 

10 x 12 in. 7 6 11 3 4 6 

Prices include folder, where requtsted, tor pot- 
card and larger. 

Postcard-size enlargements (3| \ 5-! in.) from 
whole or any selected part ol a negative. 
Black and white ... ... ... each 1 (I 

Sepia ... each 1 6 

COPY NEGATIVES 

From photographic originals only (books, maps, 
etc., charged extra). 

Up to j-plate ... ... ... ... 3 0 

4} x 61 in. S 0 

Orders for printing and reproducing are accepted 
on the impl ed condition that the customer is 
legally entitled to dispose of the copyright in 
the photograph or photographs and will indem- 
nify the dealer against any damages, costs or 
other expenses whatsoever incurred by him in 
consequence of any breach thereof. 
LANTERN SLIDES 

From customers' negatives 2x2 in., 2^ x 2| in., 
and 31 x 3} in. 

Bound complete ... ... ... each 3 6 

Unbound, and without cover glass ... each 2 6 
Masking and binding between cover 
glass customers' own transparencies each 1 6 
AFTER-TREATMENT' 

Cleaning, washing, intensifying, reducing, etc. 

Single negatives ... ... 9 

Kach additional negative ... ... ... 3 

Blocking out. according to work required 

minimum 2 6 



DEVELOPING Per spool 

Roll film 1 6 

Paper-backed miniatures ... ... ... 1 6 

Total failures, 50 per cent, charge. 
Miniature spools (35-mm.) 

One to twenty exposures ... ... ... 2 6 

Twenty-one to thirty-six exposures ... 3 0 

Total failures 50 per cent, charge. 
Plates and sheet film 

Lcs^ than 4 x 5 in. ... ... ... each 4 

4 x - 5 ... ... ... each 6 

4j x 6-J in. and over ... ... each 8 

CONTACT PRINTING (with standard borders) 
All sizes up to and including 2' s x 4{ in. 

each 4 

3{- x 4i in each 6 

3i x 5J in ... each 6 

Sepia toning, 50 per cent, extra. 
Strip-prints (on paper) trom 35-mm. films 

Per strip 

One to twenty exposures 2 6 

Twenty-one to thirty-six exposures ... 3 6 
Film-strip transparencies (for projection) from 
35-mm. films 

One to eighteen consecutive exposures . 7 6 
Nineteen to thirty-six consecutive expo- 
sures ... , ... ... 12 6 

If any deviation from sequence. 50 per cent, extra. 
EN-PRINTS 

From substantially the whole of the standard 
negative only, on single weight paper, to one of 
the following sizes according to proportions of 
negative: 31 x 3-1 in., 31 x 41 in.. 31 x 5 in. 
Black and white ... ... ... ... each 6 

M Foursquare " enlargements (from square nega- 
tives only) 

Whole of negative only on 41 x 4| in. paper. 

Black and white each 1 0 

Sepia each I 6 

ENLARGEMENTS 

First-quality from any selected portion of the 
negative, including shading, vignetting and spot- 
ting if required. Dimensions quoted are standard 



2 5 8 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 7, 195") 



Camera and 
Exposure Faults 




A GUIDE TO THEIR IDENTIFICATION FROM NEGATIVES 





PHARMACISTS with photographic 
counters and photographic dealers 
are often asked by their customers 
for help in finding the reasons that their 
pictures are sometimes spoilt. The classi- 
fication given below should aid in the 
speedy identification of camera exposure 
faults and help to put customers back on 
the right road to better picture making. 

The most profitable way of using the 
list is to do so in conjunction with the 
evidence the dealer already has, such as 
the type of camera (because, of course, 
different faults can occur with different 
cameras). For easy identification a descrip- 
tion of the appearance of the negative is 
given as a heading, the number against each 
fault being the reference to the illustration. 

Commonest Faults 

It is impossible, of course, to mention 
every exposure fault there is. but as many 
as possible are dealt with, representing 
the most common and those most likely 
to be encountered. 

1 a & b. 1 1 N DKR - DEV F.I.OPME1NT AND UNDE.R- 
FAPOSURK: A thin negative (la) in which shadow 
detail is present and high lights lack density. Under- 
exposure (lb) also produces a thin negative, but little 
shadow detail is present and only the high lights are 
recorded. 

2 a & b. OVER-EXPOSURE AND OVER-DEVEL- 
OPMENT: The negative (2a) is dense and, though 
there is an abundance ot shadow detail, flat. Over- 
development (2b) produces a dense, contrasting 
negative. 

3 a & b. SUBJEC T MOVEMENT: Produced by the 
use of too slow a shutter speed when taking a pic- 
ture of a fast -moving object. The negative shows a 
blurring of the image of the moving object. In gen- 
eral, the further away the camera is from the subject, 
the slower the shutter speed may be. 



As a general rule, the illustrations will be found to give 
a better understanding of the nature of a particular kind 
of fault than would the most careful description, and for 
that reason frequent reference should be made to the 
illustrations. 



FAULT 



CAUSE 



Unsharpness 

Fuzzy definition 
Blurred all over 

Blurred image of part of subject 

Too dense all over 

Flat with too much shadow detail 

Too thin all over 

Lacking shadow detail 

Dark markings 

Dark areas with images of lens 

diaphragm 
Black streaks 
Black edges (roll film) 

Black circle in centre of negative 

Fine black lines 

Dark ribbon-like tangle 

Light markings 

Sharply defined black area 
Irregular shaped small clear spots 
Undefined clear area at one edge of 
negative 

Clear curved margin at one of the 
longer edges of roll film (bellows 
camera) 



image out of focus 
camera shake 
subject movement 



over-exposure 



under-development 



light-fogged areas 
light leak 
edge fog 

accidental exposure 
abrasion marks 
sun tracks 



loose paper masking 
dust 

cut off 



bellows vacuum 



NO. 

15 
4 

3 



Miscellaneous faults 

Two images on same negative double exposure 

Picture slanting on negative or part 

of picture cut off untruthful finder 



6 
8 
13 

7 
14 

<) 



16 
10 

17 
II 

12 

5 



March 7, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGISI 





ADv *«ris, N 



"Slim as a reed", say the fashion creators — 
and millions of women become more 'weight- 
conscious' overnight. All these, and the 
overweight men too, will be attracted by 
the powerful, continuous 'SAXIN' advertising 
appearing right through the Spring and 
Summer. 

This month in leading National News- 
papers, and soon in Women's Magazines 
and on all commercial TV Stations, 
'SAXIN' will be strongly featured. All 
this adds up to splendid, profitable, 
regular trade for you — if you display 
and recommend 'SAXIN' — the non- 
fattening sweetener. 




I 



BURROUGHS WELLCOME & CO. (THE WELLCOME FOUNDATION LTD) LONDON 



42 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 7, 1959 



'Better pictures for then 





The better the pictures that people take, 
the more they'll want to take. And modern 
' Kodak ' cameras offer the way to better pictures for everyone, 
from the casual snapshotter to the knowledgeable expert. 

Every ' Kodak ' camera you sell means extra business 
for you. More film sales. More D & P. More enlarging. More 
customers in your shop — more often. 

This year, Kodak advertising will be packing a more 
powerful punch than ever, stimulating the demand for 'Kodak' 
cameras, directing potential customers to your shop. Tie in with 
the nation-wide drive with big window displays and counter 
shows... with your own advertising campaign (we can help here 
by providing free stereos). 

Yes, this year more than ever, ' Kodak ' cameras are 
good business. Stock them, show them — sell them ! 



Kodak 




CAMERAS 



KODAK LIMITED LONDON 



March 7, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



A 3 



bigger business for you 




'Brownie' 127 camera 25'1 I 

I 

'Brownie' 
Reflex 
camera 

42M 



'Brownie' jM/m 
Cresta II camera 4 1 I U 






Kodak 
'Duaflex n 
camera 

£3.11.8 



'Brownie' 

Flash cameras 4 models from 

| 'Brownie' I (no flash) 35/10 

I 

'Kodak' folding 
cameras 
I from 

£3.19.4 



+■ 





(2 models) £9.2.3and£11.10.0 | £10.15.1 



* See February Kodak Dealer News-letter 



I Bantam 'Colors nap' camera* Kodak 010 10 c 

' n . n 4r a . Retinette camera Sj 1 0. IO.0 



('Retinette' I camera £22.2.2) 



& FILMS 



'Kodak' is a registered trade-mark 




THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 7. [959 




Introducing 

TRILLETS' 

'TRILLETS' are the NEW throat lozenges containing 

HALOPENI U M CHLORlDE-an extremely potent 
antibacterial which is virtually non-toxic 
FR AM YCETIN- active against a wide range of organisms 
'XYLOCAINE'- which soothes inflamed surfaces 

Trillets' are effective against most bacteria found in mouth and 
throat infections. The comforting action is considerably assisted 
by the increased salivary secretion caused by 'Trillets' 

'TRILLETS' 

. . . are so safe they can be taken as often as four times an hour 

. . . are pleasantly flavoured and can be taken by children 
. . . are being introduced to doctors, so expect prescriptions soon 
. . . can be taken with advantage before and after dental treatment 

smooth, soothing 

TRILLETS' 

/'// tubes of 15, retailing at 2/6 a tube 

'XYLIX AINE' IS THE REGISTERED I KADI* MARK <)I A. B. ASTRA, SWEDEN 



BURROUGHS WELLCOME & CO., LONDON 

(THE WELLCOME FOUNDATION LTD.) 




mm 




m — 



March 7, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



4. CAMERA SHAKE: Move- 
ment of the camera during ex- 
posure causes complete blurring 
of the negative. The movement 
is caused by camera shake or b.v 
releasing the shutter with a jerk. 
Camera shake can be recognised 
by examining negative detail, 
which shows elongation of points 
and thickening of fine lints. The 
cure is to use a higher shutter 
speed, if the camera has a vari- 
able-speed shutter. A speed of 
1/25 second is considered the 
slowest for safety; box cameras 
usually have a fixed speed of 
1/30 second. 



6. LIGHT - FOGGED AREAS: 
Light-fogged areas are caused by 
reflection from the surface of the 
lens when the camera is pointing 
directly towards strong light. A 
lens bood is essential to guard 
against such light-scatter. 



8. LIGHT LEAK: 
Rays of light may 
enter a pinhole in the 
bellows of a folding 
camera and produce 
characteristic areas of 
fog. The defect may 
appear only occasion- 
ally and many nega- 
tives may be un- 
affected. The best way 
of examining the bel- 
lows for pinholes is 
to open the camera 
out, hold it up to 
strong light, and then 
examine the bellows 
from the inside, mov- 
ing the folds about at 
the same time. Light 
leak may also arise 
from a loose-fitting 
back, for instance if 
the back has become 
bent or the locking 
catch loosened. The 
leak is then at the 
edges of the negative, 
and shows as a dar- 
ker streak at the edge 
of the negative, trail- 
ing away nearer the 
film centre. 

9. SUN TRACKS: 
Tangles of ribbon-like 
markings are derived 
from a pinhole pro- 
ducing an image of 
the sun. 

1 0. DUST ON THE 
FILM: Indicated by 
clear spots on the 
negative. The camera 
interior should be 
dusted periodically, 
the rear surface of 
the lens being cleaned 
as well as the front 
surface. 

11. BELLOWS 
VACUUM: When a 
folding roll film camera 
is erected with a Jerk, 
a partial vacuum may 
be produced, causing 
the sides to cave in. 
The effect may be un- 
noticed at the time, 
but the result is that 
part of the picture is 
cut off. 







12. DOUBLE EX- 
POSURE: Caused by 
a failure to wind on 
the film before taking 
the next picture, two 
scenes being recorded 
on the one piece of 
film. Partial double 
exposure may be 
caused by over- 
winding or under- 
winding, and it is 
therefore important 
to ensure that the 
number on the paper 
backing is exactly in 
the centre of the red 
window at the back 
of the camera. The 
safest rule for guard- 
ing against double ex- 
posure is to wind on 
the film immediately 
a picture has been 
taken. 

13. EDGE FOG: 
Loose winding of roll 
film causes light to 
penetrate between the 
backing paper and the 
metal Ranges of the 
spool; sometimes due 
to the leading end of 
the backing paper 
being insufficiently 
wound on the take- 
up spool and eventu- 
ally becoming looser 
or working free; to 
loading and unload- 
ing in strong sun- 
light; or to allowing 
the backing paper to 
loosen before sealing. 

14. ABRASION 
MARKS: Abrasion 
marks may be caused 
by too great tension 
of the film across the 
guide rollers; a badly 
loaded spool may also 
cause torn or cockled 
film edges. Other 
causes are grit from 
the light-trap of a 
35-mm. cassette and 
pulling the roll film 
tight after it has been 
taken from the 
camera. 



5. UNTRUTHFUL VIEW- 
FINDER: A common fault 
caused by incorrect aiming of 
the camera, by a bent view- 
finder, or b.v incomplete erection 
of the viewfinder. Most view- 
finders are designed to give an 
accurate indication of the scene 
from 6 ft. to infinity, and if pic- 
tures are taken closer than 6 ft., 
then the aiming of the camera 
has to be adjusted accordingly, 
and tilted slightly upwards. Many 
view-finders incorporate a field 
of-view correction for distances 
closer than 6 ft. 



7. ACCIDENTAL EXPOSURE: 
The circular patch is character- 
istic of accidental exposure in a 
folding camera with bellows 
closed. Such an exposure may not 
be noticed, but the next picture 
taken shows the defect. A box 
camera usually gives, from acci- 
dental exposure, the effect of 
double exposure. 




1 V , 







15. OUT OF FOCUS: 
Caused by incorrect 
focusing. With a box 
camera the subject 
must not be nearer 
than 10 ft. or it will 
be unsharp. Out-of- 
focus pictures are 
distinguished from 
camera shake and 
camera movement by 
the " fuzzy " edges 
of the image. If a 
portrait attachment is 
fitted to a fixed lens, 
then it is passible to 
approach to 3 ft. 
from the subject to 
obtain a sharp image. 
Occasionally a folding 
camera produces 
" fuzzy " unsharpness 
more at one side of 
the picture than the 
other. That fault 
occurs when the front 
of the camera is bent 
slightly forward or 
backward, or is loose 
on its runners through 
wear, with resulting 
backward sag. With a 
range-finder camera, 
unsharpness may be 
due to the coupling 
being out of adjust- 
ment. That can hap- 
pen if the camera is 
dropped or knocked 
violently. Another 
kind of unsharpness, 
really a diffusion of a 
sharp image, may be 
caused by dirt on the 
lens or by the lens 
becoming clouded 
when brought from a 
cold atmosphere into 
a warm one. The re- 
sult is a softness over 
the whole picture. 

16. LOOSE PAPER 
MASKING THE 
FILM: Caused by 
paper inside the 
camera, usually a 
loose roll-film band- 
ing label. 

17. CUT OFF: The 
lens accidentally ob- 
scured during expo- 
sure by the hand or 
camera case flap. 



2 6 0 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 7, I S> 5 9 



Simple Cameras 
for Colour Photography 



COLOUR photography was made available in 1958. 
even to the user of the humble box camera, by the 
release of Kodacolor roll film. The response was 
phenomenal and it is reasonable to expect an even greater 
demand this year. There must be added to the thousands 
who tried it last year, and who may be expected to use it 
again, the further thousands who have been introduced 
to simple colour photography by seeing the results of their 
friends' efforts. The latter class should, however, be kept 
reminded of the possibilities. In addition, the many 127-size 
cameras in use or possibly lying idle may be used for 
colour, since Kodacolor is now issued in that size. In fact 
the languishing " V.P." film looks like receiving a new 
lease of life — but more of that later. 

Some degree of scepticism that colour prints can emerge 
from a humble box camera may be forgiven, but it is a 
fact that they can. Admittedly their quality is not up to the 
standard possible from a colour-corrected anastigmat lens, 
and it is agreed that only in good summer sunshine will the 
box turn out acceptable results, but it remains true that they 
are acceptable to the majority of the snapshotting public. 
Flash-contacted shutters fitted to most cameras in current 
production extend the scope of even simple cameras, and 
flash-bulbs will bring colour photography into the lounge 
after dark. What a talking point to the fond young mother 
that she can make colour pictures of her treasure, playing 
in the nursery or even in the bath, with a minimum of 
preparation or disturbance of routine! 

Once a customer has been " bitten by the colour bug " he 
may well be ready to listen to suggestions that a better 
camera will enable him to tackle a greater diversity of 
subjects, or that a second camera kept primarily for colour 
will enable him to carry on his monochrome work and yet 
be ready for the special shot that screams for colour. In 
the 35-mm. field it is quite usual for an enthusiast to have 
two cameras — the second, often a simpler one, reserved for 
colour. Why simpler? Because colour is in the main a fair 



3 



E 

V 



+6, 



— 4 "«i ■ 

5 cm ' 



KM \ HONSHU' Oh 127 I II ii TO "SUPER" SLIDE: Film width, 
4.. iiiiu.; picture width, 41 ft nun. Area of IhHh-.»ii size ncuatisc. 41 (i x 
41 (i (i.e., U K nun. ;ill round allowed for masking beyond the 4x4 cm. 
siuht size ol the " Super " Slide holder whose outside measurements arc 
standardised for 2 x 2-in. projector*.!. Ohsiousls the sixteen-on 127 pic- 
turi may, with suitable masking, he displaced as ••super" slides. 



weather occupation and does not usually call for ultra- 
wide apertures or high shutter speeds. 

So far reference has been made only to colour prints. The 
availability of colour prints at prices attractive to the man- 
in-the-street is comparatively new. The first were derived 
from transparencies, mainly a 35-mm. preserve so far as 
camera material was concerned. That in itself rather re- 
stricted the practice of colour photography to workers in 
the miniature sizes. 

Admittedly there have been available several negative- 
positive processes, some of which are suited to user process- 
ing, but they may be regarded as being in the province 
of the more advanced worker. 

It is opportune, therefore, to take stock of the current 
market and to classify the several types of material accord- 
ing to what they produce initially and what may subse- 
quently be obtained from them. 

Transparencies 

Reversal film was the first type to appear on the market. 
Since the early screen-plate processes were introduced im- 
mense strides have been made. The film exposed in the 
camera is processed to a strip of positive transparencies in 
colour. They may be viewed by transillumination in one or 
other of the many types of viewer-pocket, with or without 
internal llluminant, table viewer or by projection. It is 
unnecessary to dwell on the sales possibilities presented b\ 
those. In addition, colour duplicate transparencies, enlarged 
colour prints and monochrome negatives from which black- 
and-white prints can be made may be obtained. Thus the 
35-mm. colour transparency maker is provided with a com- 
prehensive service that can mean big business for his dealer. 

Reversal colour films are a little slower than the popular 
types of monochrome film and have less latitude. That 
means that a camera with a reasonably wide-aperture lens 
— f/4-5 will cover most contingencies — and multi-speeded 
shutter is called for. Instruments measuring up to those 
requirements are available in the £10-20 bracket. 

Negative film, after processing, bears a negative colour 
image which is not only inverted so far as brightnesses are 
concerned, as in the common monochrome negative, but 
is in colours complementary to those of the subject. Blue 
skies are represented as yellowish-to-orange areas, reds be- 
come greenish, and greens are rendered as magenta. AH 
come right in the end (given a little juggling, maybe, with 
correction filters and exposures to compensate for imper- 
fections of dyes and technique) when the negative is printed 
on to paper coated with an emulsion of a similar type. 
Black-and-white prints may be made on bromide paper in 
the ordinary way. 

Kodacolor is the outstanding example of the colour nega- 
tive film. It has been designed for high-speed automatic 
finishing comparable with that applied to black-and-white 
snapshot finishing. The high-speed work calls for expensive 
automatic equipment, strict chemical and physical control 
of the processing baths, automation of printing exposures, 
and checks at kev points b> highlj trained and experienced 
personnel. 

Negative colour films are much faster than the reversal 
tvpe and. since a certain degree of control of density is 



March 7, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



26 1 



possible in the printing stage, exposures are not quite so 
critical. It is for those two reasons that it is possible to 
obtain acceptable results in good light using a box-type 
camera. The instructions state that box-camera exposures 
should be confined to subjects lighted directly from the 
front by bright summer sun in the period from two hours 
after sunrise to two hours before sunset. Thus the old 
family camera can be put to good use during the holidays, 
provided always old Sol plays his part. But there is a good 
argument for suggesting the purchase of a better camera. 
The softer colours under a lightly clouded sky call for 
summer-time exposures of 1/25 or 1/30 second at f / 1 1 — 
just beyond the scope of the box, while the weaker light 
of autumn calls for larger stops to capture the glories of 
the season. 

Flash 

For several years manufacturers have been co-operating 
with the retail trade to popularise flash photography, pri- 
marily to keep the photo counter and the finisher operative 
during what was once regarded as the " off season." Flash 
is just as valuable in colour photography as in mono- 
chrome, so bulbs, guns and showcards should be kept well to 
the fore. But where negative colour processes are concerned 
it should be noted that clear bulbs should be used (except 
when used to " fill in " shadows in daylight exposures). 
Negative films are universal — that is they do not come in 
types specifically balanced for daylight or tungsten lighting. 
Reversal films, however, call for blue bulbs if they are to be 
daylight balanced, yellow if tungsten balanced. Ilford, Ltd., 
Ilford, Essex, make a reversal film (Ilford colour F) speci- 
fically for use with clear bulbs. 

There are two standard slide sizes (apart from the old 
lantern slide of 3j-in. sq. in which the slide itself is a 
gelatin-coated plate). They are 2 x 2 in. and 2J x 2\ in. 
in size. The smaller are standard for transparencies on 35- 
mm. and Bantam-size films. The larger, perhaps not so 
popular, is for the square pictures made in twelve-on-120 
size cameras. 

Earlier reference was made to a renewed interest in 127 
size film. The 4x4 cm. Rolleiflex has been reintroduced. 
That and several other Continental cameras make twelve 
frames on 127 film, the actual gate area being 41-6 mm. sq. 
It will be noted that those dimensions allow a reasonable 
margin within the 2 x 2-in. (5x5 cm.) transparency holder's 
external dimensions. By omitting the masking, or designing 
the frames suitably, the square picture of the 127 format 
can be displayed in a lantern designed originally for 35-mm. 
transparencies. Those slides with a sight-size of 4 cm. sq. 
are known as " super " slides, and their popularity in Ger- 
many and U.S.A. is extending to this country. 

Choice of Camera 

For negative film the choice of camera is extremely wide, 
ranging from the box camera to the Hasselblad, and the 
short selection here given is by way of suggestion. It is 
limited to cameras priced at up to £20. 

The Brownie series of Kodak, Ltd., Kingsway. London. 
W.C.2, includes flash and reflex models: 127 and Cresta. 
Also in the Kodak range are the folding " juniors." the 
Sterling, and the 66 models. No. II having an f/6-3 lens in 
Vario shutter (£9 2s. 6d.) and No. Ill an f/4-5 objective in 
a Velio shutter. Both make twelve negatives on 120 film 
and focus down to 3j ft. From Agilux, Ltd.. Purley Way. 
Croydon, Surrey, come the Agifiash (127) and the Agifolds 
(twelve on 120). Agfa, Ltd., 27 Regent Street, London. 
S.W.I, have a comprehensive range of roll-film cameras 
from the Clack through the Isolettes. The Adox 63 (f/6-3) 
represents good value for the man who wants something 
better than a box, but does not wish to spend money on a 
wide-aperture lens. Actina, Ltd., 10 Dane Street, London. 
W.C.I, offer the Bellas, including the 66 (twelve on 120). 
44 (twelve on 127) and 46/D (eight on 127). Neville Brown 
& Co.. Ltd.. 77 Newman Street, London, W.l, in addition 






Contina 



1. Colorsnap 


2. 


Ikonette 


3. Brownie 


4. 


Pentona 


Flash 


5. Mastra 






V35 


(>. 


Hunter 35 




7. 


Brownie 






Cresta 




2 6 2 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 7, 1959 





New Ilford Sportsman 



Kodak 66 



to the simpler Ibis and Tanit models, have the Elioflex, 
Paxina and Gloria. R. F. Hunter, Ltd.. 51 Gray's Inn Road. 
London. W.C.I, offer the Solidas, from the Record in the 
£5 bracket to the Model II at approximately £22. J. J. Silber. 
Ltd., 40 Lamb's Conduit Street, London, W.C.I, lists the 
Baldis. the Baldixette and the Halina within the £10-20 
price range and a Rangefinder Baldix at £20 12s. By Zeiss 
Ikon (distributors: Peeling & Komlosy. 181 Victoria Street, 
Dunstable, Beds), there are several models of the Nettar at 
prices from £12 upwards. 

An even more extensive choice exists in the 35-mm. field. 
Pride of place, perhaps, should go to the Kodak Bantam 
Colorsnap, which was designed specifically for colour snap- 
shotting. It uses 828 film (35-mm. wide but specially 
spooled), and has a focusing f/4-5 lens in a special shutter 
which is automatically adjusted to its slower speed when 
light conditions demand. Exposure calculation is simplified 
by a calculator fixed to the back. Kodacolor, Kodachrome 



and monochrome films are available for it The price is 
£10 15s. Id. 

For the usual 35-mm. perforated film, Kodak, Ltd., mar- 
ket the Retinette. Agfa cameras for 35-mm. film are the 
Silettes. and the AGI Agimatic, introduced at the last Photo 
Fair, has a novel release/ winding system that makes for 
rapid operation. Neville Brown & Co., Ltd., distribute the 
Paxette range with the lowest-priced model just within the 
limit set for this review. The Gazelle, by Apparatus & In- 
strument Co., Ltd., Aico House, Vineyard Path, Mortlake 
High Street, London, S.W.14, has a remarkably efficient 
f/2-8 lens for a camera at its price of £12 17s. 6d. Ilford, 
Ltd.. have introduced an improved version of the Sportsman 
at the unchanged price of £11 18s. 5d. North Staffs Photo- 
graphic Services offer the Mastra, with a five-year guaran- 
tee, at £13 14s. lid. J. J. Silber, Ltd., in addition to the 
well-known Baldessas, supply the Ideal Color 35, whose 
name should assist sales. It has an f/3-5 lens in a three- 
speed shutter and sells for £10 5s. In the Arette series (Pullin 
Optical Co., Ltd., 93 New Cavendish Street, London, W.l), 
model 1A falls within the price limit set. R. F. Hunter, Ltd., 
offer the Hunter 35 and Hunter 35 Rangefinder. Two new- 
comers from Eastern Germany, imported by Hanimex 
(U.K.), Ltd., 345 City Road, London, E.C.I, are the Pen- 
tona, at £9 17s. 6d., and the Altix, at £19 12s. 6d. In the 
Zeiss Ikon list there is a new addition : the Ikonette in a 
two-tone grey plastic body and f/3-5 Novar lens in four- 
speed Pronto shutter with single-sweep release and advance 
lever at £14 16s. 5d. There is also the Contina I at 
£20 6s. lid. 

The selection given, though not to be regarded as any- 
where near exhaustive, gives a good indication of the poten- 
tial business that colour photography presents even to the 
smaller retailer. 



"It wasn't what I ordered" 
(or else the film failed to arrive) 

SOME OF THE THINGS THAT GO WRONG BETWEEN DEALER AND PROCESSOR 

AND HOW THEY CAN BE AVOIDED 

WORKS ORDER 



THE chemist who sends films away to a developing and 
printing works is naturally annoyed when he doesn't 
get what he wanted. He knows from experience that 
his own customer is not likely to make any allowances. 

If the film is a colour film the annoyance is increased. 
A customer with a 35-mm. film may click his way through 
the spool with relative abandon, knowing that he will be 
making a choice later of the negatives from which to have 
Enprints made. But the same customer knows that every 
colour transparency or colour print is a costly item, and 
naturally expects great care and attention to be paid to 
his requirements at all stages. Of course everybody does 
pay attention to customers' wishes, but in the nature of 
things errors happen. The " human element," which is never 
mentioned unless in connection with something that is 
imperfect, inevitably enters at some stage into the most 
machine-like transaction. It is erroneous, too, to suppose 
that " machine-like precision " will ever exist as a 100 per 
cent, reality. 

All the same the aim in any developing and printing rela- 
tionship between cusU mcr, dealer and finishing house must 
be to reduce the chances of human error and increase 
the machine-like routine. The processor is the member of 
the trio most conscious of the need because he handles 
films and prints in such quantities that without standard- 
ised procedures made as simple as possible the result would 
soon be chaos. Indeed some dealers must have had experi- 
ence of processing houses that have promised more than 
the\ could perform. Result ? A switch of processing house 
until at last one is found that may not promise quite so 
much but can be relied on to keep its promises. The devices 



WORKS ORDER 



GT 8605 

i> 

120 



GT 8610 



tit 



Orders that leave the finisher in doubt. They are discussed in the text. 

adopted by modern processing houses to ensure efficiency 
and speed are ingenious and impressive and any chemist 
who has not visited a d. and p. works should take an early 
opportunity to do so. 

He may find, as others have often found, that some of 
the things that go wrong are due to faults in the instruc- 
tions given by the dealer. For example, the first illustration 
shows two orders put through on a typical processing order 
form such as is nowadays in almost universal use. The 
problem raised by the first is whether the dealer really 
wants what his order form demands, namely one contact 
and one Enprint of each negative. What would you do. 
chums ? The problem of the second is of the same kind. Is 
the demand for six prints or thirty-six ? In those forms the 
confusion arises from not following the models illustrated 



March 7, 1959 THE CHEMIST 

on the reverse of the front of the pad. The writer had 
quite a shock to discover how many chemists, who com- 
plain with good cause about doctors' bad handwriting on 
prescriptions, are themselves guilty of sending through in- 
decipherable d. and p. order forms. Apart from being inde- 
cipherable a few. though filled in, appear blank in dark 
room. Why ? Because they have been written with a red 
ball-point or red pencil ! Verb sap. 

Causes of Delay 

There are little things that may not cause error but 
certainly cause delay, and if they are multiplied in one 
delivery circuit on a busy day in the height of the season 
the result may come to much the same thing as an acUi?.] 
mistake. One is the way dockets are folded round the film. 
If the information is on the outside the person handling 
the packet can deal with it in his stride. But if it is on the 
inside there is delay while he takes off the rubber band, 
unfolds the form, turns it inside out and replaces it. Some 
finishers call for not more than five (or three) films on 
one form, or even a separate form for each. The reason is 
not cussedness but the nature and capacity of the processing 
tanks. If the tank takes five films on a rod and the order 
relates to six films, the fourth is an odd-man-out that 
runs the risk of not being correctly wedded up with the 
other three at the end of its journey through the works, 
and even when they are duly brought together there has 
been a hold-up that could have been avoided. There is the 
same plus another risk if loose negatives for printing are 
rubber-banded round a newly exposed film for developing 
and printing. Not only does that situation demand extra 
paper work from the processor but the loose negatives 
may scatter as he removes them, and, oh, horror!, if the 
number he picks up doesn't quite tally with the order! 
Who can say then whether there is still one more negative 
to find on the bench or the floor or whether, even if he 
searched all day, he would never find it, because it was 
never there ? That bone of contention will always be a 
risk, of course, where the number of negatives sent in is 
not filled in on the form, and that, too, does happen ! On 
the Works Order form, under " Dev." the figure inserted 
should be the number of spools (not " 1 " for the whole 
order). 

Sometimes when reprints are called for no size is marked, 
it being assumed, supposedly, that the finisher will remem- 
ber whether contact or enlarged prints were originally 
supplied. 

Colour films bring their own peculiar risks of things 
going wrong. The most obvious, and the most easily 
avoided, is that there is not enough indication to the fin- 
isher that a colour film is involved. If the colour film 
comes in company with black-and-whites, and by mis- 
chance goes forward with them, once the film has passed 
through the dark room there is no possibility of retribution. 
A rubber stamp to imprint the word " COLOUR " on every 
order form for colour processing would be a good (and 
inexpensive) insurance policy by the dealer, but certainly 
the word should appear in large letters on the form, even 
if in pencil. 

Kodachrome films do not. of course, go to d. and p. 
houses but direct to the makers at their Hemel Hempstead 
works (see C. & £>., December 13, 1958, p. 639). Labels are 
provided for return of the transparencies to the customer. A 
pretty foolproof system, one would think, since a person 
surely knows his own address! Yet the number of unde- 
liverable orders is a real headache at the company's pro- 
cessing works. Labels arrive bearing the company's address 
instead of the owner's or with no address at all. A dealer 
who had to identify a customer's black-and-white work by 
showing the prints or negatives to the customer would 
consider himself in a pretty bad spot, but in the colour 
works there is no possibility of doing even that. The 
lengths to which the processors go to get such incomplete 
orders to their owners are ingenious and deserving of high 



AND DRUGGIST 263 




RIGHT AND WRONG LABELLING?: The first is correct. The second 
bears the address of the manufacturers, not the customer's own. The third 
— a blank — is all too often received. 



commendation, but they must also be costly, and still, after 
all efforts have been made, there remains a residue of 
transparencies that never get back to their owners. It would 
seem that some customers forget not only to complete the 
label but even that they sent in a film at all ! 

The " detective system " starts with getting the film pro- 
cessed. It is then passed to a department that had to be 
created for the purpose, where each film is examined and 
its subject matter recorded on a card. If a car appears in 
any of the pictures and it is thought to belong to the photo- 
grapher, a letter is sent to the licensing authorities with a 
request to send another (enclosed) to the person who owns 
the vehicle. The enclosure merely tells the owner of the 
car that a film containing pictures of his vehicle has been 
received and, if the film is his, asks him to write in. The 
procedure is usually successful and most licensing authori- 
ties co-operate well. 

Films that are undeliverable for some labelling reason 
not apparent are returned to Hemel Hempstead by the Post 
Office. The addresses are either incorrect, incomplete or 
indecipherable. The returned films are filed in alphabetical 
order under the customer's name; 60-70 per cent, are 
eventually claimed and returned to their rightful owners, 
most of whom, of course, take some action when the films 
fail to arrive. 

So much for customers' labelling shortcomings. Dealers 
themselves are sometimes at fault when the material sent 
with the order form does not agree with the instructions, 
or the instructions are badly written and may be interpreted 
in different ways. A common example is when a dealer 
writes on the order form that a total of ten colour prints 
is required, whereas the instructions written on the envel- 
opes containing the negatives or transparencies indicate that 
twenty are to be made. Often " copies " are asked for from 
transparencies. That may mean colour prints, but it could 
mean duplicate transparencies. How can the worker tell? 

Many dealers do not take the trouble to examine negatives 
or transparencies before they send them in for colour 
printing or duplicating, etc. Their customers may subse- 
quently be most upset when the work they receive does 
not come up to their expectations. To make a point of 
discussing the quality of negatives and transparencies with 
customers could eliminate most such troubles. It is a short- 
sighted policy to accept work from customers without first 
ensuring that the material is suitable for reproduction, for 
the customer once disappointed will probably never go back 
to one's shop. 

It remains to wish all chemists perfect customers and 
snag-free relations with finishers and manufacturers during 
1959. 



264 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST March 7. 1959 

PHOTOGRAPHIC NOTES 



Colour Processing. — Haagman Colour 
Laboratories, 18 Doughty Street, Lon- 
don, W.C.I, undertake the colour pro- 
cessing of Anscochrome. Ektachroim 
and Ferraniacolor films. 

Low-priced Cameras. — Coronet, Ltd., 
Summer Lane. Birmingham, are fea- 
turing the Coronet 44, Victor and 
Flashmaster cameras from their low- 
priced range. 

Colour at Home. — Johnsons of Hen- 
don. Ltd.. 335 Hendon Way. London. 
N.W.4. offer polystyrene developing 
tanks with transparent flanged spirals 
for home processing of colour film. 

Northern Photographic Wholesalers. 

— A wide range of cameras, chemicals, 
projectors and tape recorders are 
stocked by Brook, Parker & Co., Ltd., 
Ashfield, Horton Road, Bradford, 7, 
and 65 Jamaica Street, Glasgow, C.l. 

Wholesale Service in Midlands. — 
Southall Bros. & Barclay, Ltd., an- 
nounce that their photographic section 
has been moved to Gooch Street, Bir- 
mingham, where facilities for increased 
service have been made available. 

35-mm. Projector. — Gnome Photo- 
graphic Products. Ltd., 354 Caerphilly 
Road, Cardiff, are makers of the 
Alphax projector, which gives a choice 
of 85-mm. or 100-mm. f/2-8 coated 
Wilon lenses. 

Flash-bulbs. — -Four flash-bulbs cover- 
ing all the requirements of black and 
white and colour flash photography, are 
marketed by Philips Electrical, Ltd.. 
Century House, Shaftesbury Avenue, 
London, W.C.2. They are the Photo- 
flux PF1, PF5, PF1/97 and PF5/97. 

Day-and-night Service. — A day-and- 
night service in receiving orders for 
photographic goods is maintained by 
Jonathan Fallowfield. Ltd., 74 New- 
man Street, London. W.l. Queries on 
night-recorded orders are taken up the 
following day. 

Sale or Return. — Pullin Optical Co., 
Ltd., 93 New Cavendish Street. Lon- 
don, W.l, have an approved agreement 
with the Customs and Excise authori- 
ties whereby specific goods ordered up 
to Budget day are delivered on a sale- 
or-return basis. 

Accessory Range. — Transparency 
holders; lens-hoods; viewers; filters and 
slide boxes are distributed by Apco 
Photographic Sales. Ltd.. 12 Coleman 
Street, London. H.C.2; they may be 
obtained through Jonathan Fallowfield. 
Ltd.. 74 Newman Street, London. W.l. 
and Jn. Lizars, Ltd.. 101 Buchanan 
Street. Glasgow. C.l. 

"Do-it-yourself" Aids. Displayed 
on the counter, the range of accessories 
(self-adhesive labels for transparencies; 
plastic slide sleeves; self-adhesive photo 
mounts, slide titling outfit, etc.) offered 
by Arrowtabs. Ltd.. 93 Church Road. 
Hendon, London. N.W.4, should bring 
quick and extra "pick-up" sales from 
camera enthusiasts. 

35-mm. Cameras. — 1 he Silette range 
oi cameras from Agfa. Ltd.. 27 Regent 
Street. London, S.W.I, includes the 
f/2-8 nine-speed; the f 2-8 four-speed; 
the inexpensive Silette Vario; and the 
Super Silette f/2-8 with coupled range- 
finder, nine-speed shutter, light-value 
scale and colour-Apotar lens. 



Twelve on 127. — Neville Brown & 
Co.. Ltd., 77 Newman Street, London, 
W.l. recently added to their range of 
Ferrania cameras the Ibis 44. Giving 
twelve exposures on a 127 film, the 
camera has an f/7-7 lens, shutter speeds 
oT 1/100, 1/50 and B, flash synchronisa- 
tion, accessory shoe and other attractive 
features. 

Colour Slide Projector. — The Koda- 
slide projector of Kodak. Ltd., Kings- 
way, London, W.C.2, is for viewing 2 x 
2 in. colour slides which are projected 
at a 4-times magnification on toa6j-in. 
sq. translucent screen, which forms the 
front of the unit. The projector may 
be used in ordinary room lighting or 
even in daylight. A plastic dust cover, 
which fits over the projector to keep 
it free from dirt when not in use, is 
included in the price. 

Projector Screen. — For 8-mm. cine 
and 35-mm. colour slide users R. F. 
Hunter, Ltd., 51 Gray's Inn Road. Lon- 
don. W.C.I, have produced the Safari 
screen. It is available in oblong and 
square shapes and in either crystal- 
glass beaded or Blankana white sur- 
face. Projection sizes range from 30 x 
22 in. to 48 x 48 in. In use, the screen 
may be hung or used standing (for use 
standing it is withdrawn from a ten- 
sioned-spring blind roller, then held 
by a steel rod housed in the top tube). 

The Perfect Cassette?— North Staffs 
Photographic Services, Ball's Yard, 
Newcastle. Staffs, are the distributors 
of a 35-mm. nylon cassette with claimed 
advantages over the velvet-lipped metal 
type. Designed by Mr. Ralph Norris, 
the patented and registered universal 
Consar cassette is made from a special 
non-wearing nylon plastic in which the 
film is only touched on its perfora- 
tions so that there is no scratching. The 
cassette has the usual centre core, an 
inner and an outer shells and two locat- 
ing rings which are adjustable and 
which are there to stop the cassette 
rotating when in the cassette chamber. 

Photographic Chemicals. — May & 
Baker, Ltd., Dagenham, Essex, manu- 
facture a range of photographic chemi- 
cals that includes Promicrol ultra-fine 
grain developer (in which a combina- 
tion of developing agents gives mini- 
mum graininess and maximum emul- 
sion speed, enabling exposure to be re- 
duced to one-half, or even one-third 
of normal); Cobrol enlarging-paper 
developer (useful for all bromide and 
chloro-bromide papers for either exhibi- 
tion and routine work); and colour de- 
velopers including Droxychrome (for 
negative /positive colour processes); 
Tolochrome (for processing Eastman- 
color positive film); Genochrome (used 
in reversal processes including Ferrania- 
color. Agfacolor. and Gevacolor); and 
Mvdochrome (used in processing Ekta- 
chrome E2). 

A New 35-mm. Stereoscopic Camera. 
— Wray (Optical Works), Ltd., Ash- 
grove Road. Bromley. Kent, announce 
the introduction of the Wray Stereo- 
graphic camera. The instrument 
measures 6} in. x 1} in. x 2} in. and 
weighs only a few ounces. No focus- 
ing mechanism is required and an Auto- 



focus device is based on the principle 
that one lens focuses sharply from 
about 4 ft. upwards and the other 
focuses sharply from about 15 ft. 
to infinity. The result is uniform 
sharpness. Exposure settings are 
marked: Cloudy; hazy; bright; bril- 
liant and f / 16. The " f " values are also 
shown. A single speed of 1/50 second, 
with a bulb setting, is provided. The 
film wind sets the shutter, advances the 
film and moves on the counter dial set- 
ting. A standard 35-mm. perforated film 
is used, and fifteen stereo pairs may be 
obtained from a standard twenty-expo- 
sure 35-mm. cassette, twenty-eight from 
a 36-exposure 35-mm. cassette. As a 
companion to the camera, the Graflex 
Stereo viewer is also available; it is 
battery-operated and provided with 
adjustments for focus and for eye sep- 
aration. Production is well advanced 
for early release, with good advertising 
support. 

Twin-lens Reflex. — Good twin-lens 
reflex cameras have been popular 
sellers for many years, but some in the 
lower price bracket have not in every 
respect qualified for the heading 
" good." One that certainly justifies that 
description is the Halina AI of J. J. 
Silber, Ltd., 40 Lamb's Conduit Street, 
London, W.C.I. With all the main attri- 
butes usually found in a twin-lens reflex 
of comparatively low price, the Halina 
has the added attraction that the latest 
models have a built-in conversion kit 
for taking 35-mm. pictures, while those 
already in the hands of customers may 
be converted (cost 32s. 6d. each). The 
conversion comprises two masks, one 
for the film and one for the viewing 
screen, and two windows at the back of 
the camera, the numbers being wound 
first into the lower window and then 
into the upper. In that way it is pos- 
sible to take twenty-four pictures size 
24 x 36 mm. on a spool of 120-size roll 
film. There is, of course, the added ad- 
vantage at full aperture that only the 
centre part of the image is being photo- 
graphed, so that any falling-off there 
may be at the edges of the screen is not 
recorded. The lens glass is made in 
this country by Chance Bros., Ltd.. 
Glass Works, Smcthwick, 40. Staffs, 
and the camera is Empire-made (in 
Hong Kong), which frees it from im- 
port duty. The lens is a Halina f/3'5 
three-glass anastigmat, and there are 
three shutter speeds (1/25, 1/50 and 
1 / 100). The release lever also loads the 
shutter, which is X-synchronised (elec- 
tronic flash at all speeds, and M-class 
bulbs at 1/25 second). There is a self- 
erecting hood with magnifier for close 
focusing. Tests with the camera proved 
it easy to use and comfortable to 
handle' and the results were first-rate 
at all speeds and with flash. The focus- 
ing screen was clear and brilliant, the 
wind knob large and easy to use. The 
finish is of black grained leatherette, 
with polished chrome-plated fittings. 
There is a double lens-cap and a hand- 
some ever-ready case with device for 
holding the camera securely in place. 
The Halina AI is supplied attractively 
boxed in a stout yellow carton with 
blue and black printing. 



March 7, 1959 



THE CHEMIST 



AND DRUGGIST 



26 5 



CHEMISTanTDRUGGIST 

For Retailer, Wholesaler and Manufacturer 

ESTABLISHED 1859 

Published weekly at 
28 Essex Street, Strand, London, W.C.2 

TELEPHONE CENTRAL 6565 
TELEGRAMS: "CHEMICUS ESTRAND, LONDON" 



Soft Drinks and What They Contain 

Some sections of the soft drinks industry have reacted 
sharply to the Food Standards Committee's report on 
soft drinks (C. & D., February 28, p. 228). They have 
been well supported by the saccharin and glucose 
industries. 

The Committee estimates that the expenditure upon 
soft drinks now amounts to something over £100 mil- 
lions annually. " The greater proportion of the total 
gallonage is in the form of carbonated and other ready- 
to-drink flavoured beverages." Control over the com- 
position of those classes of drinks has been limited to 
regulation of the amount and type of sweetening 
materials used. Control of the composition of soft 
drinks containing fruit juice has been more extensive, 
and the Committee considers the group to be of rela- 
tively greater importance from the point of view of 
protection of the public. The group includes the 
" squashes " made from imported fruit juice flavoured 
with citrus oils. There has also grown up a considerable 
popularity for drinks made by comminuting the whole 
fruit. A number of different processes are in use, vary- 
ing from complete comminution of the fruit to a 
method that involves little more than the squeezing of 
it. In all the processes some of the insoluble solids of 
the fruit are removed by sieving, but there are sub- 
stantial differences in the proportion of the original 
fruit rejected and the ratio of the juice to other con- 
stituents remaining in the drink. Some drinks appear 
to be mixtures of squash and comminuted drinks, and 
then there are the so called " bitter " orange and lemon 
drinks which have a fruit juice or comminuted fruit 
base and contain an additional bitter principle, usually 
quinine. 

The Committee considered that the public were being 
confused by the variety of drinks available and the 
lack of information as to their composition, and ex- 
pressed the view that the development of artificial 
flavours and colours had reached a stage at which the 
consumer, without protection, could easily be misled 
as to the nature of the ingredients in a soft drink. " We 
also believe the purchaser is ill-informed about the 
comparative fruit or juice content of different types of 
drink." A similar comment was made concerning the 
vitamin content of the different drinks. 

Since those were the decisions arrived at, it followed 
that some controls would be recommended by the 
Committee. The proposal to label all soft drinks with 
a declaration of their percentage fruit or juice content 



has been criticised by some sections of the industry, 
and in fact the Committee referred to the industry's 
problems in its report. No doubt the soft drinks industry 
will arouse some sympathy in the pharmaceutical indus- 
try on its labelling problems, but pharmaceutical ex- 
perience shows that the problems are not too difficult 
to solve. 

When it comes to the question of eliminating the 
term glucose, the Committee is undoubtedly attempting 
to correct what, on the advice given to it, is a mis- 
conception by the public that " glucose " has the very 
special power of providing energy in a form that is 
quickly and readily available to the body. The deci- 
sion to recommend the prohibition of any form of 
testimonial or nutritional claim based ort properties of 
the carbohydrate content of the soft drink is a reaction 
to the many medical and pseudo-medical advertise- 
ments by which the manufacturers have attempted to 
convince the public of the advantages of their products. 
The suggestion by the Food Manufacturers' Association 
that the nutritional claims made on behalf of glucose 
drinks are borne out by their continued recommenda- 
tion by doctors as energy restoratives during sickness 
or convalescence cannot be accepted at its face 
value. Pharmacists, among others, would demand 
proof by clinical trial, since doctors, like other mem- 
bers of the community, are prone to be influenced by 
continuous advertising pressure. The National Associa- 
tion of Soft Drinks Manufacturers would have been on 
stronger ground if it had quoted some conclusive clini- 
cal trial results instead of merely stating " Many doc- 
tors have recommended glucose and we consider the 
industry has been filling a demand by making glucose 
drinks available to the public." 

The technical question of the comparative values of 
sucrose, glucose and liquid glucose as sources of energy 
was referred by the Food Standards Committee to the 
Committee on Medical and Nutritional Aspects of Food 
Policy. The medical-aspects committee, after examining 
a number of references, which it quoted, stated " It 
is to be doubted whether there is any advantage in 
presenting to the human being a drink which contains 
a sugar which is a little more rapidly metabolised than 
others, but if such a sugar were deemed to be of value, 
the balance of evidence suggests that sucrose might 
be chosen rather than glucose or the products of the 
partial hydrolysis of starch which are found in com- 
mercial liquid glucose." 

It may be claimed that some of the quoted references 
should be interpreted in a different way, but until really 
conclusive evidence is produced to support that claim, 
the opinion of the independent committee must be 
given credence. It remains for the glucose-drink manu- 
facturers to make public some of the fundamental 
research work which they should have carried out if 
their claims are to be accepted. For it is unthinkable 
that the industry will have merely been producing 
saleable products and not ploughing some of its profits 
back into research. 

The suggested partial ban on saccharin appears to be 
based on what one might term the " commercial " 
aspects. " We see no good reason . . . why . . . the 
practice of substituting a non-nutritious substance for 
sugar should continue. In our view the consumer has 
a right to expect soft drinks to be sweetened with 
sugar." That claim of " right," so far as the man in 
the street is concerned, appears to us to be a little far- 



266 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 7, 1959 



fetched. We are not at all sure if the man in the street 
does in fact consider in that way what his soft drink 
contains. He no doubt expects a glucose drink to con- 
tain glucose, a fruit squash or drink to contain some 
fruit or fruit juice, but does he really go any further? 
We doubt it. Provided the drink is palatable and com- 
plies with the expectations cited, the drink will prob- 
ably be regarded by him as satisfactory. 

We are not in a position to dispute statements by the 
manufacturers that there are technical advantages in 
the use of saccharin in certain soft drinks, though it 
seems feasible that the drinks may, as they claim, be- 



come " too cloying " if an excess of sugar is used. How- 
ever, the Committee points out that representatives of 
one section of the industry did not agree that the use 
of sugar as the sole sweetening agent resulted in a 
product too viscous for palatability or that the use of 
saccharin conferred any technological advantages. 

Obviously the Food Standards Committee has dropped 
a stone into the pool and created ripples which will 
not soon subside. Before calm is restored all interested 
parties — the experts, the industry and the public — are 
likely to become a good deal better informed about 
the soft drinks they consume in such quantities. 



Electronics Applied to Enlarging 

A NEW WEAPON FOR THE PROFESSIONAL PHOTO PROCESSOR 



THE application of electronics to replace or enhance 
traditional crafts and skills is now so generally accep- 
ted it is hardly surprising that the control of tone, contrast 

and detail in pho- 
tographic enlarging 
has surrendered to 
its mathematical 
efficiency. An ap- 
paratus introduced 
by the graphic 
arts division of 
E.M.I. (Electron- 
ics), Ltd., Southall, 
Middlesex, is cap- 
able of producing 
a print enlarge- 
ment of excellent 
quality from many 
a poor negative. 

In a print ob- 
tained from a con- 
trasty negative on 
a soft paper by 
normal photogra- 
phic methods, bril- 
liance is usually 
lost. A negative 
marred by " thin " 
patches may yield 
a passable print 
only by skilful use 
of " dodges " in 
the enlarging and 
even the selective 
use of a developer. 
Human control of the degree of printing or development 
puts a premium, of course, upon the judgment of the opera- 
tor. By the ingenious use of the facilities made available by 
electronic techniques, the " feed-back " principle is used in 
the new E.M.I, apparatus to mimic human judgment and 
to introduce a standardisable control upon the amount of 
light required for each part of the negative. Such an 
operation is impossible with the orthodox photographic 
cnlarger, which provides a standard amount of light to 
the whole of a negative. The light source has to be 
replaced by a single scanning beam, which is provided by an 
oscilloscope tube. The beam travels in a magnetically 
controlled path producing a fascinating expanding and 
contracting pattern (which, incidentally, the human eye 
registers inaccurately as two rectangles at right angles). The 
light reaching the sensitised paper is measured by a light- 
sensitive cell beneath the paper. Excess illumination acti- 
vates the photocell and registers as an electric current, the 
" feed-back " reducing the light requirement to a pre- 




Circuit A is " feed-back " control; B is con- 
trolled exposure index; C is magnetic scanning- 
beam guide. 



determined level. A dense part of the negative reduces the 
amount of illumination penetrating the paper, and the 
necessary increase in intensity required for compensation 
is immediately adjusted. 

Range of Enlargement 

In practice the electronic enlarger accepts negatives from 
35-mm. up to i-plate size, and produces enlargements up 
to a maximum size of 30 x 40 in. Ten minutes are 
allowed for warming up, and the negative is adjusted in 
position and finely focused using an orthodox light source. 
The scanning pattern is tested and arranged so as to cover 
the full extent of the negative. The batch of sensitised 
paper in use has been previously tested to discover the 
necessary " dodging factor " in accordance with the emul- 
sion speed supplied. Presetting of factors for processing 
and print density reduces complications, though meticulous 
attention still needs to be paid to every detail of the pro- 
cess. That, however, is a routine procedure natural to 
every photographer using existing apparatus. Magnifica- 
tion using a 3-in. lens achieves an eleven-times magnifica- 
tion; with a 7-in. lens the magnification is x 10. 

Any commercial developing and printing unit with a 
demand for quality enlargements, and with sufficient turn- 
over, should welcome this new apparatus, the " techni- 
calities " of which are readily mastered. Output is in- 
creased, and the necessity for retouching is eliminated. 

In other spheres there appears to be scope for a unit 
that can provide enlargements of uniform tonal quality 
and with an exciting ability to discover and render detail 
despite poor negative quality. The method also ensures 
print quality in radiographs and the rendering of full 
detail in aerial photography mapping procedures. 

Ultrasonic Photography 

A NEW TECHNIQUE FOR MEDICAL USE 

APIECE of apparatus which was described as an 
" Ultra-sound image camera " was recently introduced 
to the electronics and communications section of the In- 
stitution of Electrical Engineers by Dr. C. N. Smyth and 
Mr. J. F. Sayers. Although considerable development of 
the apparatus, and of the technique of its use, are "neces- 
sary before perfection is arrived at, the demonstration unit 
gave an excellent image upon the two television sets to 
which it was connected. The uses to which the new 
apparatus may be put are complementary to those for 
jr-rays and pulse-echo ultrasonic inspection equipment. 

The principle is to render in visual light the pattern 
formed by sound waves after passage through material 
transparent to ultrasonic waves. In practice a specimen 
block of metal is immersed in water and a sound source 
emits an ultrasonic beam, which passes through the block 
and is then focused by a lens on to a quartz crystal. The 
quartz crystal forms the end wall of a scanning electron 



March 7, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



267 



tube similar to a television camera. It takes the place of 
the camera lens. The ultra-sound image on the quartz pro- 
duces a (piezo-electric) voltage distribution which is noted, 
point by point, by the scanning beam. The output current 
from the camera is proportional to the ultra-sound in- 
tensity. The brightness of a synchronised television receiver 



using the amplifier current is modified in sympathy with 
the scanning beam. In its present form the ultra-sound image 
camera has advantages over existing x-ray equipment. A 
composite picture of a transverse section of a patient's 
neck clearly showed an abnormality adjacent to the thyroid 
gland. 



PHARMACEUTICAL SOCIETY OF 
NORTHERN IRELAND 

Monthly meeting of Council 



A SPECTS of the new final Part II Qualifying course 
i\ were discussed at length at the recent February 
^- meeting of the Council of the Pharmaceutical 
Society of Northern Ireland held in Belfast. Mr. J. Caldwell 
(vice-president) was in the chair, the president (Mr. H. G. 
Campbell) being absent. Also present were Dr. R. G. R. 
Bacon and Messrs. R. M. Watson (honorary treasurer); 
W. H. Boyd; S. E. Campbell; W. P. Ewart, J.P.; H. W. 
Gamble, O.B.E.; J. Gordon; J. Kerr; D. Moore; F. R. 
Moore, J.P.; H. F. Moore; P. R. W. Shinner; W. C. Tate; 
A. Templeton, J.P.; W. J. Thornton; and W. Gorman (secre- 
tary). Apologies for absence were received from the presi- 
dent and Professor O. L. Wade and Messrs. R. Gibson, 
O.B.E., and C. A. Quinn. Mr. Caldwell reported that Mr. 
Quinn, who had been ill, was looking well and was 
allowed out for short periods. Mr. Caldwell gave a special 
welcome to Mr. Campbell, Derry, who had also been ill. 

Mr. Gorman read a letter from the Commissioners of In- 
land Revenue indicating that the Society had been approved 
under section 16 of the 1958 Finance Act as an organisa- 
tion whose members could claim relief from income tax on 
the amount of the retention fee paid to the Society. 

Miss E. Smyth (secretary, Society of Pharmaceutical Stu- 
dents) wrote about the students' annual works visit at 
Easter. She pointed out that eighteen students hoped to 
spend two days in Edinburgh and then travel to London 
where they would visit as many firms as possible in a week. 
The members of the party would be grateful for any finan- 
cial assistance. It was agreed to give £20 to aid the students. 

Applications for restoration of names to the register were 
approved for Aileen Dierdre Quinn, 16 Drumalane Road, 
Newry, co. Down, and Edward Alphonsus Bourke, 67 
Larne Street, Ballymena. 

The secretary reported that the earliest and most suitable 
dates for the June examinations would be June 12 and 13 
the theories, and the week beginning June 22 for practicals. 
Those dates were accepted. 

Qualifying Examination Course 

Presenting the Education Committee's report, Mr. 
Gordon said that Mr. C. W. Young (senior lecturer in phar- 
maceutics, College of Technology, Belfast) was in attendance 
to discuss certain aspects of the new final Part II qualify- 
ing examination course. 

The first point mentioned was that under the existing 
regulations a student could not commence the two-year 
full-time course for the final Part II examination until his 
apprenticeship was completed. Difficulty would arise in the 
case of a student who passed the Part I at a winter exam- 
ination because if he immediately entered into articles of 
pupilage his apprenticeship would terminate in December 
and he would not be able to commence the course for the 
Part II examination until the following September. The 
interval between the courses for Parts I and II examinations 
would be almost three years. 

The type of student who had trouble with the Part I 
examination was the one who could least afford to have 
such a break in his studies. Only five students passed the 
Part I examination under the new regulations in June, 1957. 
while a further six passed in December, 1957. If those two 
groups were allowed to combine to form the first two-year 



final Part II course commencing in September, a much more 
convenient size of class would result. 

Mr. Young suggested that where a student's apprentice- 
ship terminated in a December or January the student 
should be permitted to commence the final Part II course 
beginning in the September prior to the end of his appren- 
ticeship. Mr. Young was asked if he considered it desirable 
that students taking the two-year course for the Part II 
examination should be examined in certain subjects at the 
end of the first year of study. Mr. Young thought it would 
be advisable for students to dispose of the " more theoreti- 
cal " subjects at the end of the first year. 

After discussion it was suggested that certain subjects, 
to be referred to as group " A," should be taken at the end 
of the first year of study, the subjects comprising group 
" A " to be pharmacognosy, pharmaceutics I (forensic phar- 
macy), physiology and pharmaceutical chemistry I. It was 
suggested that at the end of the second year students should 
be examined in the subjects in group " B " (pharmaceutics 
II, pharmaceutical chemistry II and pharmacology). 

It was suggested that a student who passed in a least 
two of the four group "' A " subjects at the end of the first 
year should be referred in the remaining subject or sub- 
jects and should be allowed to proceed to the course for 
the group " B " subjects. 

It was agreed that further consideration should be given 
to the combination of group " A " subjects in which a stu- 
dent could be referred. 

A report of the finance committee was approved. 

A PHARMACIST'S ANTHOLOGY 

WAKING THE PLACE UP 

From Tono Bungay, by H. G. Wells 
" This place," said my uncle, surveying it from his open 
doorway in the dignified stillness of a summer afternoon, 
" wants Waking up ! " I was sorting up patent medicines in 
the corner. " I'd like to let a dozen young Americans loose 
into it," said my uncle. " Then we'd see." I made a tick 
against Mother Shipton's Sleeping Syrup. We had cleared 
our forward stock. " Things must be happening somewhere, 
George," he broke out in a querulously rising note as he 
came back into the little shop. He fiddled with the piled 
dummy boxes of fancy soap and scent and so forth that 
adorned the end of the counter, then turned about petu- 
lantly, stuck his hands deeply into his pockets and with- 
drew one to scratch his head. " I must do something," he 
said. " I can't stand it." ..." But suppose you tackled a 
little thing, George. Just some leetle thing that only needed 
a few thousands. Drugs, for example. Shoved all you had 
into it — staked your liver on it, so to speak. Take a drug — 
take ipecac, for example. Take a lot of ipecac. Take all 
there is ! see ? There you are ! There aren't unlimited sup- 
plies of ipecacuanha — can't be! — and it's a thing people 
must have. Then quinine again! You watch your chance, 
wait for a tropical war breaking out, let's say, and collar 
all the quinine. Where are they ? Must have quinine, you 
know. Eh ? Zzzz. Lord ! there's no end to things — no end 
of little things. Dill-water — all the suffering babies yowling 
for it. Eucalyptus again — cascara — witch hazel — menthol — 
all the toothache things. Then there's antiseptics, and 
curare, cocaine. ..." " Rather a nuisance to the doctors," I 
reflected " They got to look out for themselves. By Jove 
yes. They'll do you if they can, and you do them." 



26 8 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 7, 1959 



GUIDE TO NEW MEDICAMENTS 

Information about proprietary products supplied principally on prescription. Reprints on perforated gummed 
paper for affixing to index cards are obtainable from the Editor. Notes on the products are given on p. 274. 



The Chemist and Druggist Guide to New Medicaments, March 7. 1959 

ELE V AL-B 

Manufacturer: Gedeon Richter (Great Britain), Ltd.. 14 Weed- 
ington Road, London, N.W.5. 

Description : Tablets each containing amylobarbitone 0 03 
gm. ; methyl-amphetamine hydrochlor.. 5 mgm.; and vitamin 
Bj, 5 mgm. 

Indications : For the treatment of mental and emotional stress 
conditions. 

Dosage: Average dose is one tablet twice daily, but the response 
to this dosage will indicate whether or not a third daily dose 
is necessary. The first dose should be taken on rising and the 
second about four hours later. 

How Supplied: In bottles of twenty-five, fifty, 100, 250 and 
1,000 tablets. 

First Issued: January 1959. 

Supply Restrictions: P.I., S.l. S.4. 

The Chemist and Druggist Guide to New Medicaments, March 7, 1959 

HIBITANE Digluconate 

Manufacturer: Imperial Chemical Industries, Ltd., Pharmaceu- 
ticals division, Wilmslow, Ches. 

Description: An aqueous 20 per cent, w/v solution of chlor- 
hexidine digluconate. (Bis-(p-chlorophenyldiguanido)-hexane 
digluconate). As a convenient source of a chlorhexidine sol- 
uble salt for the preparation of simple aqueous or alcoholic 
solutions, for incorporation into creams, ointment, etc., and 
for combining with cetrimide. 

Indications and Use: For general antiseptic purposes, bladder 
irrigation and cystoscopy medium, pneumothorax bottles 
1 in 5,000 w/v. Pre-operative skin preparation, aqueous solu- 
tion 1 in 100 w/v, eye lotions, 1 in 1,000, or in 70 per cent, 
alcohol, 1 in 200 w/v, creams and ointments 0"2 - l«0 per cent. 

How Supplied: In bottles of 100 and 500 mils. 

First Issued: January 1959. 

Notes: Store in well stoppered bottles protected from light. 

The Chemist and Druggist Guide to New Medicaments. March 7, 1959 

VIOMYCIN Sulphate 

Manufacturer: Parke. Davis & Co.. Ltd., Staines Road, Houns- 
low, Middlesex. 

Description: An antibiotic from cultures of Streptomyces 
floridce. 

Indications : Treatment of selected cases of tuberculosis where 
the use of all. or all but one, of the usual anti-tuberculous 
drugs (for example, streptomycin, p-aminosalicylic acid and 
isoniazid) is impracticable, e.g., because the patient has 
shown drug-intolerance or has drug-resistant strains of 
tubercle bacilli. Where possible, viomycin sulphate should be 
combined with another anti-tuberculous drug. 

Dosage: Intramuscular viomycin 2 gm. in two doses of 1 gm., 
on the same day, twice weekly. This is best combined with 
intramuscular streptomycin 1 gm.. twice weekly, on the same 
days as the viomycin, or more often. Recommended dura- 
tion of treatment is three months. Doses are expressed in 
terms of pure viomycin bas'. 1 . 

How Supplied: In rubber-capped vial containing the equivalent 
of 1 gm. of viomycin base. 

Supply Restrictions : Therapeutic Substances Act. 

REFERENCES: Am. Rev. Tuberc, 1951. 63. 4; Am. Rev. Tuberc. 1951. 
63. 1 ; iMitcet, 1954. 1. 111. 

The Chemist and Druggist Guide to New Medicaments, March 7, 1959 

NOBECUTANE D 

Description: As for Nobecutanc entry but with tetramethyl- 

thiuramdisulphide included as an antiseptic. 
How Supplied: In bottle of 14 mils (\ fl. oz.) with brush inside 

cap. 

First Issued: November 1958. 



March 7, 1959 



The Chemist and Druggist Guide to New Medicaments. 

ZYNOCIN lozenges 

Manufacturer: Distillers Co. (Biochemicals), Ltd., Broadway 

House. The Broadway, London, S.W.I 9. 
Description: Lozenges, each containing xanthocillin. 1 mgm.: 

and benzocaine. 5 mgm. 

Indications: For the treatment of sore throat accompanying 
respiratory infections; tonsillitis and pharyngitis; Vincent's 
angina; stomatitis and gingivitis; prophylactically against 
respiratory infection and following dental extractions and 
minor oral surgery. 

Dosage: 1 or 2 lozenges slowly dissolved in the mouth 

every two hours, or as directed by the physician. 
How Supplied: In tube of twelve lozenges. 
First Issued: February 1959. 
Supply Restrictions: PI. 

References: Dtsche. Gesundh.-Wes., 1954. 9. 805. Ahlibiot. Annual, 
1956-57. 140. Pharmazie, 1956. 11. 409. 

The Chemist and Druggist Guide to New Medicaments, March 7, 1959 

DISTOLYT tablets 

Manufacturer: Distillers Co. (Biochemicals), Ltd., Broadway 
House, The Broadway, London, S.W.19. 

Description : Expectorant and antitussive tablets each contain- 
ing: chlorcyclizine hydrochloride, 10 mgm.; and guaiacol 
glyceryl ether, 100 mgm. 

Indications : The relief of cough in conditions such as bron- 
chitis; influenza; laryngitis; and allergic respiratory dis- 
orders. 

Dosage: Adults: 2 or 3 tablets, three or four times daily. 

Children (5-12 years): 2 tablets, three or four times daily. 

Children (1-5 years): 1 tablet, three times daily. 
How Supplied: In tube of twenty-four and bottle of 100 tablets. 
First Issued: February 1959. 
Supply Restrictions: PI. SI. S4. 

References: Canad. med. Ass. J., 1940. 42. 220. J. Pharm. expt. Therap., 
1945. 83. 120. Ibid., 1941. 73. 65. 

The Chemist and Druggist Guide to New Medicaments, March 7, 1959 

VILLESCON 

Manufacturer: Pfizer, Ltd., Folkestone, Kent, on behalf of 
C. H. Boehringer Sohn, Ingelheim-am-Rhine. 

Description : Orange-coloured, sugar-coated tablets, each con- 
taining l-phenyl-2-pyrrolidinopentane hydrochloride, 10 
mgm.; vitamin B„ 5 mgm.; vitamin B,. 3 mgm.; vitamin 
B 0 , 15 mgm.; nicotinic-acid amide. 15 mgm.; vitamin C, 
50 mgm. 

Indications: Convalescence after illness or surgical operation. 

Stress, strain or overwork conditions. In geriatrics to increase 

appetite and interest in surroundings and in obstetrics, post 

partum, especially during breast feeding. 
Dosage: 1 or 2 tablets twice daily, the first dose on rising and 

the second in the afternoon. 
How Supplied : In carton of twenty and bottle of 200. 
First Issued: January 1959. 

I he Chemist and Druggist Guide to New Medicaments, March 7, 1959 

FERROMYN and FERROMYN B 

Manufacturer: Calmic, Ltd., Crewe, Cheshire. 

Description: Ferromyn capsules, each containing in 4 minims 
150 mgm. ferrous succinate providing 37 mgm. of bivalent 
iron, and Ferromyn B capsules, containing in addition 
aneurine hyd.. 1 mgm.; riboflavine, I mgm.; nicotinamide, 
10 mgm. 

Indications: Microcytic anxmias; particularly the iron defici- 
ency state of pregnancy and also where a vitamin B 
deficiency exists. 

Dosage: 1 capsule, three times a day, between meals. 

How Supplied: In container of 100 and 1,000 capsules. 

First Issued: January 1959. 



March 7, 195 9 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



26 9 



The Chemist and Druggist Guide to New Medicaments, March 7, 1959 

TOFRANIL 

Manufacturer: Geigy Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., Roundthorne 
Estate, Wythenshawe. Manchester, 23. 

Description: A " thymoleptic " drug, regulating mood and 
assisting the patient to bring order to the emotions. No 
specific pharmacological basis for its action has yet been 
established, but it is assumed that the drug unblocks and 
lifts the fixed depressive mood rather than exerting an anti- 
depressive effect. It has little or no sedative action unless 
administered near toxic doses. The drug is available in two 
forms: sugar-coated tablets each containing. 25 mgm. : am- 
poules each containing 25 mgm. in 2 mil. Chemically: 
N - (y - dimethylaminopropyl) - iminodibenzyl hydrochloride, 
which is in the new pharmacologically active group of 
iminodibenzyl derivatives. 

CH, CH^/X 



N 



CH!_CH! CHi_ 



. HC1 



Indications: Endogenous depression; manic depressive psy- 
choses; depression due to involutional and organic changes; 
depression accompanying psycho-neurotic states. 

Dosage : Parental and Oral. Recommended for severe and inco- 
operate depressive states. Induction dosage consists of 3 
amps, on first day, increasing by 1 amp. per day on succeed- 
ing 4 days. Oral treatment is then started, 2 tablets per day, 
replacing 1 amp. daily until only tablets are being admin- 
istered. After clinical improvement, dosage is lowered by 
1 tablet per day until maintenance dose of 2-6 tablets is 
reached. 

How Supplied: In containers of fifty, 200 and 1,000 25-mgm. 
tablets and containers of ten and fifty 2-mil ampoules each 
containing 25 mgm. 

First Issued: To mental hospitals only, January 1959. 

Supply Restrictions: Available only to mental hospitals. 

References: Schweiz. med. Wschr., 1958. 88. 763. Schweiz. med Wschr.. 
1957. 87. 1135. 

The Chemist and Druggist Guide to New Medicaments, March 7, 1959 

DELTACORTRIL ENTERIC 

Manufacturer: Pfizer, Ltd., 137 Sandgate Road, Folkestone, 
Kent. 

Description: Enteric-coated tablets, each containing 2-5 mgm. 
of prednisolone. 

Indications: All conditions for which prednisolone or other 
corticosteroids are indicated. Principally: rheumatoid arth- 
ritis; bronchial asthma; and certain dermatological condi- 
tions. 

Dosage: For conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, asthma 
and allergic dermatoses, initial dose, two 2 5 mgm. tablets 
twice daily is suggested. II no response, increase to two 2 5 
mgm. tablets three times daily. 

How Supplied: In bottles of 100 and 500. 

First Issued: February 1959. 

Supply Restrictions : Therapeutic Substances Act. 

I he Chemist and Druggist Guide to New Medicaments, March 7, 1959 

SECROSTERON 

Manufacturer: The British Drug Houses, Ltd., Graham Street, 
London, N.l . 

Description: Tablets each containing 5 mgm. of 6rr:21-di- 
methylethisterone (dimethisterone), a potent orally active 
progestational agent with neither androgenic nor anabolic 
properties. 

Indications: Habitual abortion; premenstrual tension; menor- 
rhagia; secondary amenorrhoea; threatened abortion; steril- 
ity (due to endometrial dysfunction); metrorrhagia; toxcemia 
of pregnancy. 

Dosage: 5 mgm. three times daily except in habitual abortion, 

when the dose is 5 mgm. daily. 
How Supplied: In bottles of thirty and 100, 5-mgm. tablets. 
First Issued: January 1959. 



The Chemist and Druggist Guide to New Medicaments. March 7, 1959 

EPANUTIN parenteral 

Manufacturer: Parke, Davis & Co., Ltd.. Staines Road, 
Hounslow, Middlesex. 

Description: Freeze-dried phenytoin sodium (diphenylhydantoin 
sodium) for reconstitution with diluent (provided) contain- 
ing 40 per cent, of propylene glycol and 10 per cent, of 
alcohol in water for injection (resulting solution contains 
50 mgm. of the drug in each mil). 

Indications: For the control of status epilepticus and any 
persistent convulsive condition. 

Dosage: In status epilepticus, 5 mils (250 mgm.) is given intra- 
venously at a rate not greater than 2 mil per minute. If 
necessary up to 10 mils may be given. Maximum effect de- 
velops in approximately 20 minutes, permitting judgment of 
effectiveness. After attacks have been controlled oral 
therapy, capsules or suspension, will prevent recurrence. 
For prophylactic control of seizures in neurosurgery 100-200 
mgm. intramuscularly three or four times daily. 

How Supplied: In rubber-capped vial containing 250 mgm. of 
freeze-dried powder accompanied by 5-mil ampoule of 
diluent. 

First Issued: February 1959. 

References: J. Amer. med. Ass., 1956. 160. 385. Rhode Island med. J.. 
1953, 36. 576. Lancet, 1958. 2. 1147. 

The Chemist and Druggist Guide to New Medicaments, March 7, 1959 

HISTAM AL 

Manufacturer: Gedeon Richter (Great Britain), Ltd., 14 
Weedington Road, London. N.W.5. 

Description : Anti-allergic and decongestant nasal spray solu- 
tion containing mepyramine maleate. 05 per cent.; ephe- 
drine hydrochloride, 0-75 per cent.; Chlorbutol, 05 per 
cent., in isotonic solution. 

Indications : Hay fever, acute and chronic allergic rhinitis, sinu- 
sitis; common cold. 

Method of Use: Nebuliser container is squeezed twice into each 
nostril and the spray snilled into the nasal cavities. To be 
used 2-3 times daily. 

How Supplied: In plastic spray bottle of 20 mils 

First Issued: February 1959. 

The Chemist and Druggist Guide io New Medicaments, March 7, 1959 

PreCORTISYL intravenous 

Manufacturer : Roussel Laboratories, Ltd., 847 Harrow Road, 
London, N.W.10. 

Description: A preparation of the double succinate of predniso- 
lone and sodium, extemporaneously produced by adding a 
solution of sodium bicarbonate to a solution of prednisolone- 
21-hemisuccinate. Each ampoule contains: prednisolone-21- 
hemisuccinate, 25 mgm.; anhydrous solvent to 1 mil. Each 
diluent ampoule contains: sodium bicarbonate, 4-5 mgm.; 
distilled water to 4 mils. 

Indications: Severe manifestations of infectious diseases. Shock 
of varying aetiology and acute dehydration syndromes. 
Severe asthmatic attacks; status asthmaticus; and acute cor 
pulmonale. Virus hepatitis; various severe dermatoses; 
severe allergic disorders. 

Dosage: Maximum duration of treatment is 4-48 hours and 
oral prednisolone is substituted as soon as convenient. 
Adults: 25-50 mgm., either in a single intravenous injection 
or. following dilution with isotonic glucose saline or normal 
saline, by intravenous drip. Intervals between administration 
are extended progressively from two to eight hours, though 
dosage within twenty-four hours is at a maximum of 100 
mgm. Infants and children: Mean dose, 1 2-5 mgm. twice 
daily, rising to 50 mgm. daily. 

How Supplied: In box containing two 1-mil ampoules of medi- 
cament and two 4-mil ampoules of diluent. 

First Issued: February 1959. 

Supply Restrictions : Therapeutic Substances Act. 

Notes : During therapy, avoid excessive intake of fluids. Ad- 
minister suitable antibiotics in adequate dosage, to forestall 
any local or general infective process becoming established. 

References: J. Amer. med. Ass., 1957. 165. 410 (Abstract); J. Med 
Lyon, 1958. 39. 17. 



270 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

TRADE REPORT 



March 7, 1959 



The prices given are those obtained by importers or manufacturers for bulk quantities or original packages Various 
charges have to be added whereby values are in many instances augmented before wholesale dealers receive the ijoods into 
stock. Crude drugs and essential oils vary greatly in quality and higher prices are charged for selected qualities 

London, March 4: Spot business was done in Chinese Menthol at 57s. 
per lb., duty paid, during the week, but that price could not be repeated 
afterwards and 57s. 6d. to 58s. was being asked for the few available cases. 
Meanwhile there were still no offers of material from origin. Brazilian 
menthol, however, was unchanged in both positions. 
There was an active demand for 

Gallic acid.— B.P. is 10s. 7d. per lb. 
lor 1-cwt. lots. Technical grade is 9s. 9d. 
per lb. 



various Peepers and prices crept up 
steadily day-by-day. Some grades of 
Nutmegs were quoted threepence per 
lb. lower. Prices for Ginger were sub- 
stantially unchanged although African 
new-crop is now quoted for shipment 
at a level which represents a rise of 
7s. 6d. per cwt. over the old-crop 
values. 

Among Aromatic seeds spot Dutch 
Caraway was offering at 120s. per 
cwt. against 122s. 6d. in the previous 
week and Indian Celery at 162s. 6d. 
against 165s. in sympathy with lower 
offers at origin. Whilst only Chinese 
Fennel was being offered on the spot; 
both old and new-crop Indian seed was 
being quoted forward. Senega re- 
mained steady at 14s. 6d. per lb. on 
the spot although origin was still ask- 
ing 16s., c.i.f. Liquorice root con- 
tinued scarce on the spot with only 
Persian available. 

In Essential Oils Ceylon Citron- 
ella was one penny per lb. dearer for 
shipment with spot unchanged. Lemon- 
grass continued to decline, the spot 
quotation being 6s. 3d. per lb. (down 
three-halfpence). 

Pharmaceutical Chemicals 

Acetanilide. — 1-cwt. lots are 2s. lOd. 
per lb. for crystals and 5-cwt., 2s. 9d. 

Ammonium chloride. — Makers quote 
1-cwt. lots of B.P. powder at 90s. per 
cwt. and are quoting extra-pure crystals at 
126s. 

Aneurine hydrochloride. — 1-kilo quo- 
ted at £11 15s. and 10-kilo lots at 
£11 7s. 6d. per kilo. 

Ascorbic acid. — Rate per kilo : 1 
kilo, £4 2s.; 10 kilos, £3 18s. 6d. Sodium 
ascorbate is ottered at the same prices. 

Benzamine. — 16-oz. lots of lactate are 
15s. 3d. per oz. and hydrochloride 
16s. 3d. per oz. 

Benzoic acid. — 1-cwt. lots are 2s. Hid. 
per lb.; and Sodium salt is 2s. 9£d. per 
lb. in 1-cwt. lots. 

Calciferol. — B.P. is 3s. 3d. per gm. for 
1-kilo lots. 

Calcium pantothenate.— Price per kilo 
is £11 12s. 6d. 

ChloROCRESOL. — Pharmaceutical quality 
is quoted as 7s. 2d. per lb. for 1-cwt. lots. 

Cream of tartar. — Rates for the home 
trade: — 1-ton lots, 231s. per cwt.; 10-cwt., 
232s.; 5-9-cwt., 233s.; 2-4-cwt., 234s.; 
1-cwt., 235s. 

Cyanocobai amin. — 25-gm. lots are 
£47 10s. per gm., and 1 gm. £50. 

Dicopiiane (DDT). — Prices are as fol- 
lows: — 1-cwt. lots 3s. 2d. per lb.; 5-cwt. 
3s. Oid.; 1-ton, 2s. lid. 

I phi dkisi . \i kai oil), is nominally 
6s. 6d, per oz., sulphate, 4s. and hydro- 
( iiioride, 3s. 3d. per oz. 

I kuomi ikim . I in 2()-gm. lots the 
price of the MAi.EArE. b.p. is £17 10s. per 
gm. and the tartrate, £16 5s. per gm. 

Ergotoxine ethanesulphonate. — Price 
per gm. for b.p.c. (1949) is: 1 gm., 
68s. 9d.: 10 cm.. 155s. 3d. 



Glycerin. — Rates for pharmaceutical^ 
pure (s.g. 1-2627) are now: — 



Annual 




1 cwt. 


5 cwt. 


1 ton 


5 tons 


purchases 


Under 


and 


and 


and 


and 


or spot 


1 cwt. 


under 


under 


under 


under 


lots of 




5 cwt. 


1 ton 


5 tons 


25 tons 


Per cwt. 


s. d. 


i. d. 


s. d. 


s. d. 


s. d. 


Tins 










14 lb. 


259 0 


256 6 


252 6 


248 0 


245 6 


28-lb. 


255 0 


254 6 


250 6 


246 0 


243 6 


56-lb. 




250 6 


246 6 


242 0 


239 6 


Drums 












1-cwt. 


261 0 


234 6 


230 6 


226 0 


224 6 


2i-cwt. 




231 6 


228 0 


223 6 


222 0 


5-cwt. 






227 6 


223 0 


221 6 


10-cwt. 






226 6 


222 6 


J21 0 



For 25 tons and upwards the price is from 
220s. to 245s. 6d. as to containers. Bulk 
deliveries in tank wagons from 217s. 6d. 
to 218s. 6d. Technical grade glycerin, s.g. 
1-2627, is 5s. per cwt. less than the above. 

Ichthammol. — B.P. is from 2s. to 
2s. 6d. per lb. in 1-cwt. lots as to origin 
and container. 

Iron salts. — Gluconate, b.p.c, is 
6s. 3d. per lb. in 1-cwt. lots; sulphate, 
b.p. crystals are 9^d. per lb. in 28-lb. lots; 
1-cwt. is 57s. 6d. per cwt. and 5-cwt., 
52s. 6d. per cwt. ; sulphate exsiccated 
is Is. 5d. per lb. for 28-lb., 1-cwt., 123s.; 
5-cwt., 113s. per cwt., 1-cwt. fibre kegs 
free. Other packages extra, phosphate, 
b.p.c, 28-lb., 3s. 6d. per lb.; 1-cwt., 3s. 3d. 
phosphate, saccharated, b.p.c, 28-lb. lots 
are 3s. 9d. per lb.; 1-cwt., 3s. 6d. Oxide, 
red precipitated, b.p.c, 1949, 1-cwt., 
2s. Id. per lb.; carbonate, saccharated, 
b.p.c, 1949, 28-lb., 3s. 3d.; 1-cwt., 3s. 
ammonium citrate, scales, 6s. 6d. per lb.; 
granular, 5s. 9d. ammonium sulphate, 
1-cwt., Is. lOd. per lb. quinine citrate, 
2s. Id. per oz. in 100-oz. tin. 

Menaphthone. — B.P. is £8 per kilo; 

ACETOMENAPHTHONE, B.P., £8' WATER-SOL- 
UBLE (menadione sodium bisulphite, U.S.P.), 
£9 per kilo. 

Nicotinamide. — Prices per kilo are 
now: 1 kilo, 70s.; 10 kilos, 66s. 6d.; 50 
kilos, 64s. 6d. 

Nicotinic acid. — Prices per kilo are 
47s. 6d. for 1-kilo and 43s. 6d. for 50-kilo 
lots. 

Nikethamide. — Price per kilo is 100s. 

Paraffins. — ■ Prices to wholesale dis- 
tributors are : — Liquid : heavy, b.p., 
£107 17s. 6d. per ton; light, b.p., 
£87 15s.; Technical While oils, £79 5s. 
for the LIGHT and £92 15 s., for the 
medium. All in 40-50 gall, returnable 
loaned drums, delivered U.K. Soft: White, 
medium consistency is now £110 15s. per 
ton. Yellow, £88 10s., all b.p., in non- 
returnable drums delivered. 

Phenol. — Basic price for ice crystals in 
drums is Is. <\\d. per lb. (under 1-ton lots, 
Is. 7-id. ). Detached crystals. 2d. per lb. 
above and Liquid, b.p., id. per lb. below 
the foregoing prices. 

PiiFNYToiN sodium. — B.P. is 23s. per lb. 
in 1-cwt. lots or 25s. less than 56 lb. 

Phosphoric acids. — B.P. (s.g. 1-750) is 
quoted at Is. 4d. per lb. in 10-carboy lots. 
1-2 carboys. Is. 8d. per lb. B.P. 1914 is 
quoted from Is. 2d. to Is. 6d. per lb. 
HYPOPHOSPHORUS, b.p.c, in Winchesters 
is from 7s. 5d. to 8s. 6d. per lb., as to 
quantity. 



Pilocarpine.— In 2-kilo lots prices are: 
hydrochloride, 1,013s. per kilo; nitrate, 

825s. 

Piperazine.— Adipate is from 32s. 6d. 
to 36s. 6d. per kilo; citrate from 32s. 6d. 
to 36s. 6d. hexahydrate, 19s. 6d. and 
tartrate, 38s. 6d. 

Pyridoxine. — Manufacturers' rate for 
1 kilo is £75 per kilo; 10 kilos, £72 10s. 

Quinine. — Makers' rates for 1,000-oz. 
lots are now: — sulphate, b.p.c, 1932, 
Is. lOd. per oz. sulphate, b.p.c, 1953, 
2s. Oid.; bisulphate. Is. lOd. ; di-hydro- 

CHLOR1DE, 2s. 4^d. ; HYDROCHLORIDE, 
2s. 6^d.; ETHYL CARBONATE, 4s. 3d. 

Saccharin. — In lots of 1 lb. and over 
b.p.c powder is quoted at 99s. lOd. per 
lb., the Sodium salt is 80s. lOd. per lb. 
Prices include duty and carriage. 

Salicin. — Quoted at 17s. 6d. per oz. 

Salicylamide. — Price per lb. for 1-cwt. 
lots is 8s. 6d. 

Semicarbazide hydrochloride. — Techni- 
cal grade is 15s. 8d. per lb. for 1-cwt. lots. 

Sodium acetate— B.P.C. in 28-lb. lots 
is 2s. 4d. per lb.; 1-cwt. 2s., and 5-cwt., 
Is. lid. 

Sodium bromate. — 1-cwt. lots are 
quoted at 9s. 9d. per lb. 

Sodium carbonate. — B.P.C. exsiccated 
is 70s. per cwt.; 5-cwt., 65s. per cwt. 

Sodium chloride. — Re-crystallised is 
25s. per cwt. and b.p., 42s. 

Sodium metabisulphite. — Granular 
in 1-ton lots is from £48 12s. 6d. to 
£53 17s. 6d. per ton according to packing. 

Sodium perborate. — Prices (per ton) 
are £145 15s. in 1-cwt. kegs; £138 5s. in 
1-cwt. bags for b.p.c. (minimum 10 per 
cent, available oxygen). The perborate 
monohydrate testing 15 per cent, avail- 
able oxygen is £309 15s. and TETRA- 
hydrate, from £131 15s. to £139 5s. per 
ton, as to packing. 

Sodium percarbonate. — Price (per 
cwt.) is 170s. 9d. (bags, 7s. 6d. lower) for 
minimum 12^ per cent, available oxygen. 

Sodium phosphate. — B.P.C. powder 
is 2s. 3d. per lb. 

Sodium salicylate. — Rates are now: — 
1-ton lots in bulk, 3s. 7d. per lb.; 5-cwt. 
3s. 8d.; 1-cwt. 3s. lOd. 

Sodium sulphate. — Makers' prices for 
b.p. range from £12 10s, to £19 17s. 6d. 
per ton as to crystal and quantity, ex 
works. 

Sodium sulphite. — 1-ton lots on the 
spot of anhydrous (48-50 per cent.) are 
£71 10s. per ton in 1-cwt. drums or 
£67 5s., in 1-cwt. bags, crystals, b.p.c. 
are £32 15s. per ton in 1-cwt. paper-lined 
bags. Commercial crystals are from £27 
to £28 15s. as to packing. 

Sodium tuiosulphate. — Makers' price 
for 1-ton lots of photographic grade in 
paper-lined bags is £38 per ton. 

Terpineol. — Prices of b.p. grade are 
from 3s. to 3s. 6d. per lb. as to quantity. 

Theobromine. — Short. Ai.kaioid is 
nominally 27s. 6d. per lb. 

Vitamin A. — Synthetic. Supplied in 
concentrate 1 million international units 
per gm. as acetate or palmitatc the price 
is 9{d. per million i.u. 

Vitamin D,. — In oil, 2 million units 
per gm. the price is 2d. per million inter- 
national units. Crystalline : see under 
calciferol. 

Vitamin E (synthetic). — Tocopheryl 
ACETATE, B.P.C, 25 gm. to 100 gm., Is. Id. 
per gm.; 100 gm. to 1 kilo, lid. per gm.; 
I kilo and under 10 kilos. £42 per kilo; 
10 kilos. £41 per kilo. 



March 7, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



27 1 





He's on the ball 

He's telling many thousands of 
mothers every week (through the 
women's magazines) that fast 
growing bodies need the essential 
nourishment so well provided in 
FAREX. Pharmacists who benefit 
most from this campaign are those 
whose FAREX displays are bold, well 
placed and include the latest 
showcards and crowners. 
They're on the ball . . . 

are you? 



TRADE MARK 



Made with all the 
experience 
of Glaxo Laboratories 



GLAXO LABORATORIES LTD 
GREENFORD, MIDDLESEX BYRon 3434 
Farex is available in most countries 




PACKS AND 
TRADE PRICES: 

1 doz. x 10-oz cartons 12/10 

2 doz. x 10-oz cartons 24/- 
(a Glaxo ' top-profit ' parcel) 

Retail price 1/4 



272 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 7, 1959 



Elegance with Efficiency 




New effervescent 
'REDOXON' 



With 'Redoxon' effervescent tablets ig. a 
glass of water can be transformed into a pleasing 
effervescent drink containing a massive dose of 
Vitamin C. Such closes arc indicated in the 



treatment of the first manifestations of the common 
cold and other febrile conditions in which the 
reserves of Vitamin C are rapidly depleted. 



* Redoxon ' effervescent tablets ig. are supplied in tins of io. 



ROCHE PRODUCTS LIMITED, 15 MANCHESTER SQUARE, LONDON, W.I 



March 7, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



2 7 3 



Crude Drugs 

Aconite. — Spot supplies of Spanish 
napellus are 2s. 6d. per lb. 

Agar. — Kobe No. 1 is 10s. 6d. per lb., 
duty paid; new-crop for shipment, 8s. 10d., 

Aloes. — Cape prime on the spot is 
220s. per cwt. and for shipment 195s., 
c.i.f. 

Areca. — Sound nuts Is. 6d. per lb., spot. 

Balsams. — Quotations per lb. are: — 
Canada: Spot, 23s. Copaiba: Para from 
7s. 6d., duty paid. Peru: Scarce at origin. 
Spot, 10s. 3d. in bond. Tolu (genuine as 
imported): 17s. 6d., spot and 16s., c.i.f.; 

b. p., 15s. 3d. 

Belladonna. — Herb is 8s. 3d. per lb. 
on the spot. Root is Is. 6d. spot ; ship- 
ment, Is. 3d., c.i.f. 

Benzoin. — Sumatra block on the spot is 
£22 to £28 as to quality. Shipment not 
offering. 

Buchu. — Spot rounds are 6s. per lb. 
and new-crop for shipment, 5s. 4id., c.i.f. 

Calamus. — Root is quoted at Is. 4d. per 
lb., c.i.f. 

Camphor. — B.P. powder is from 4s. 3d. 
per lb. ; duty paid. Tablets, \-oz., are 
5s. 6d. m bond. 

Capsicums. — East African are from 
140s. to 175s. per cwt. on the spot. 

Cardamoms. — Aleppy greens, spot, 
14s. 6d. per lb.; forward shipment, 13s., 

c. i.f. Seeds, spot, 24s., shipment, 19s. 6d., 
c.i.f. 

Cascara. — Spot 1958 peel, 240s. per 
cwt., shipment, 200s. to 210s., c.i.f. 

Cassia lignea. — Spot, whole 270s. and 
shipment,, 225s., c.i.f. 

Cherry bark. — Thin natural is Is. 5d. 
per lb., and rossed is Is. lid. 

Chillies. — Spot Mombasa are 170s. 
per cwt. and Zanzibar, 225s. 

Cinnamon. — Ceylon for shipment (c.i.f.) 
per lb.; OOOO, 6s. 9d. ; OOO, 6s. 7|d.; 
OO, 6s. 4£d.; seconds, 4s. l\d.; feather- 
ings. Is. 4^d. ; quillings. 4s. Id.; chips, Is. 
. Cloves. — Zanzibar on the spot are 
3s. per lb.; shipment, 2s. 8d., c.i.f. 

Cochineal. — Silver-grey Peruvian on the 
spot from 5s. 6d. to 6s. 3d. as to quan- 
tity ; Canary Isles black-brilliant, about 
17s. 9d.; silver-grey, 15s., spot. 

Cocillana. — Bark is Is. 8d. per lb. on 
the spot. 

Colocynth pulp. — Spot, 3s. per lb. ; 
shipment, 215s. cwt., c.i.f. 

Digitalis leaf. — Purpurea from Is. 2^d. 
to 2s. 7d. per lb., c.i.f. 

Elemi. — Spot from Is. lO^d. per lb. 

FRangula. — Spot is 105s. per cwt. 

Gentian. — Spot : French, 170s. per 
cwt.: Jugo-Slavian, 152s. 6d. 

Ginger. — African, 130s. per cwt. spot 
and 125s. (new crop), c.i.f. Jamaican No. 
3, spot, 260s. and shipment 250s., c.i.f. 
Cochin spot 130s.; shipment nominal. 

Gum acacia. — Kordofan cleaned sorts 
are 130s. per cwt. on the spot; March- 
April shipment, 118s., c.i.f. 

Henna. — Indian 80s. per cwt., ex wharf; 
shipment, 62s., c.i.f. 

Ipecacuanha. — Shipment March-April 
(c.i.f.) Matto Grosso, 51s. 6d. per lb.; 
Colombian, 53s. 6d. ; Nicaraguan, 70s. 

Kola nuts. — Jamaican spot market 
cleared, shipment, 7d. per lb., c.i.f. Afri- 
can 5d. to 5jd. spot and 4d., c.i.f. 

Lanolin. — Anhydrous, b.p., is from 
170s. to 175s. per cwt. in 1-ton lots and 
hydrous, b.p., 150s., free drums, delivered. 

Liquorice — Natural root ; Persian on 
the spot is 50s.; for shipment, 42s. 6d., 
c.i.f., per cwt. Block juice : Anatolian 
and Chinese, 190s. per cwt., Italian stick 
from 310s. to 476s. per cwt. Spray dried 
extract, 3s. per lb. 



Lobelia herb. — Spot offers of Ameri- 
can are 3s. 9d. per lb. and for shipment, 
3s. 6d„ c.i.f. Dutch , 3s. Id., c.i.f. for 
shipment; spot, 3s. 5d. 

Lycopodium. — Russian triple-sifted for 
shipment, 25s. per lb., c.i.f., nominal. 

Mace. — Whole pale blade 23s. 6d. per 
lb. on spot. 

Menthol. — Chinese is short at 57s. 6d. 
per lb., duty paid; Brazilian, spot, 35s., 
duty paid, February-March shipment, 33s., 
c.i.f. Formosan for shipment, 38s., c.i.f. 

Mercury. — Price per flask (76-Ib.) is 
£74 on the spot. 

Nutmegs. — West Indian 80's 17s. per 
lb., spot ; sound unassorted, 12s. 6d. ; 
defectives, 8s. 9d. 

Orange peel. — Scarce. Spot : Sweet 
ribbon, 2s. per lb.; bitter quarters : West 
Indian, Is.; Spanish, Is. 8d. 

Pepper. — White Sarawak spot, 3s. 3d. 
per lb., February-March shipment, 3s. 2d., 
c.i.f.; Black Sarawak spot, Is. 10d.; Feb- 
ruary shipment. Is. 9|d., c.i.f. Black Mal- 
abar new-crop for March shipment up to 
235s., c.i.f., quoted, spot, 230s. 

Seeds. — (Per cwt.) Anise. — Spanish, 
162s. 6d. ; Turkish, 140s., both duty paid. 
Caraway. — Dutch now offering at 120s., 
duty paid. Celery. — Indian on spot now 
quoted at 162s. 6d. ; prompt shipment 
down to 142s. 6d., c.i.f. Coriander. — 
Moroccan now landing quoted at 52s. 6d., 
duty paid and Rumanian at 55s. ; 
Moroccan for shipment, 43s. 6d., c.i.f., 
quoted. Cumin. — Iranian on spot is 250s. 
in bond and 265s., duty paid. Shipment, 
Iranian 250s., c.i.f. and Indian for April- 
May, 255s., c.i.f. Dill. — Indian is firm 
at 77s. 6d. The shipment price is un- 
changed at 62s. 6d., c.i.f. Fennel. — 
Chinese only offering at 140s., duty paid. 
Indian for shipment, old crop, 102s. 6d. ; 
and new crop, 122s. 6d., c.i.f. Fenugreek. 
— Moroccan on spot is 45s., duty paid and 
for shipment 34s., c.i.f. Mustard. — Eng- 
lish still in short supply at 125s. 

Senega. — Spot offered at 14s. 6d. per 
lb.; shipment 16s., c.i.f., asked. 

Senna. — Tinnevelly leaves, prime 
No. 1, Is. 5d. per lb., f.a.q., No. 3 lOd. 
Pods: manufacturing (f.a.q.) Is. 3^d. and 
hand-picked. Is. 9d. to 2s. 2d. Alexandria 
pods: Manufacturing, offered from Is. 6d. 
with hand-picked from 4s. to 6s. 6d. 

Shellac. — F.O.T.N. 177s. 6d. per cwt., 
F.O. No. 1, 207s. 6d.; fine orange, 215s. 
to 265s. 

Slippery elm. — ■ Grinding quality bark 
is 2s. 7d. per lb. 

Squill. — White is quoted at 85s. per 
cwt. on the spot. 

Stramonium. — Indian leaves 70s. per 
cwt., and European, 80s., spot. Dutch 
0-5 per cent, alkaloid, 94s., c.i.f., ship- 
ment. 

Styrax. — Spot, 26s. per lb., afloat, 
23s. 9d., c.i.f. 

Tonquin beans. — Para on the spot are 
offered at 8s. 3d. per lb. Angostura, lis. 

Tragacanth. — No. 1 ribbon is £115 to 
£120 per cwt. No. 2, £105 to £110. 

Turmeric. — Madras finger is 85s. on the 
spot ; new crop for March-April ship- 
ment, 80s., c.i.f. 

Valerian root. — Spot : Indian (with 
rootlets) is 130s. and Belgian, 175s. to 
195s. per cwt. Dutch (max. 2-j per cent, 
sand) for prompt shipment. 159s., c.i.f. 

Vanillin. — Rates (per lb.) are now: — 
5-cwt. lots, 25s. 3d.; 1 cwt., 25s. 6d.; 
56-lb., 25s. 9d. ; smaller quantities. 26s. 

Waxes. — (Per cwt.). Bees'. — Dar-es- 
Salaam, spot, 480s.; shipment, 465s., c.i.f. 
Abyssinian, spot 450s. in bond ; shipment, 
420s., c.i.f. Benguela spot, nominal ; 
shipment, 405s., c.i.f. Candelilla. — Spot 
460s. Carnauba. — Fatty grey spot, 580s. ; 
for shipment, 575s., c.i.f. Prime yellow, 
spot, 900s.; shipment, 880s.. c.i.f. 



Essential and Expressed Oils 

Cardamom. — Price per lb. is from 
350s. for English-distilled and 267s. 6d. 
for imported. 

Cassia. — Spot is 13s. per lb.; shipment, 
13s. 3d., c.i.f. 

Castor. — Home-produced b.p. oil on the 
spot is £130 per ton naked ex mill (2-ton 
lots). 

Cedarwood. — American rectified, 5s. 
per lb. spot. 

Celery seed. — Oil is 90s. per lb. for 
bulk lots. 

Chenopodium. — Spot value is 38s. per 
lb. for original containers. 

Citronella. — Ceylon, spot is 3s. 9d. 
shipment, 3s. 5d., c.i.f. Formosan, spot 
4s., in bond, shipment, 3s. 8d., c.i.f. 

Coriander. — B.P. oil is quoted from 
67s. 6d. per lb. 

Eucalyptus. — Australian 70 to 75 per 
cent, eucalyptol on the spot is 4s. 9d. per 
lb. 80-85 per cent., 5s. 6d. Spanish 
(70-75), 4s. spot. Chinese 3s. to 3s. 3d. 

Ginger. — English-distilled oil is 160s. per 
lb. Imported : Jamaican, 130s.; Chinese, 
72s. 6d., duty paid. 

Grapefruit. — Jamaican, 20s. per lb. 
spot. Californian for shipment, 19s. 8d. 
per lb., c.i.f. South African, 10s. spot. 

Juniper. — B.P.C. 1949 oil is from 
12s. 6d. per lb. on the spot. English- 
distilled, 180s. Juniper wood, from 5s. 

Lavandin. — Spot is from 10s. to 12s. 6d. 
per lb. for original drums. 

Lavender. — French oil, 40-42 per cent 
is 42s. per lb. 

Lavender spike. — Spanish is at 13s. 6d. 
to 17s. 6d. per lb. for original drums. 

Lemon. — B.P. grades from 18s. to 30s. 
per lb. on the spot. Californian for ship- 
ment, 25s. to 28s. 6d., c.i.f. Terpeneless, 
500s. per lb. 

Lemongrass. — Spot 6s. 3d. per lb., 
and shipment, 5s. lid., c.i.f. 

Lime. — West Indian distilled is in the 
region of 54s. per lb. on the spot. 

Nutmeg. — Imported b.p. oil is from 70s. 
to 92s. 6d. per lb. English-distilled, 95s. 
to 97s. 6d. as to quantity. 

Orange. — Spot quotations of sweet oil 
include Floridan at 7s. 6d. per lb. ; Cali- 
fornian, 10s.; West Indian, 10s.; West 
African, 19s.; Israeli, 12s. 6d. For prompt 
shipment. Californian cold-pressed u.s.P., 
10s. 9d., c.i.f.; distilled 5s., c.i.f. Terpene- 
less is 200s. per lb., spot. 

Pimento. — English-distilled berry is 
180s. per lb.; imported, 77s. 6d. Rectified 
leaf, 27s. 6d. per lb. for small lots. 

Pine. — Pumilionis on the spot is 16s. 
per lb.; sylvestris, 25s.; Siberian (abietis), 
12s. 6d. 

Rosemary. — Spanish is 8s. 6d. per lb. 
on the spot for best quality. 

Rue. — Spanish is 25s. per lb. on the 
spot. 

Sassafras. — Brazilian is from 3s. 6d. 
per lb., duty paid. 

Spearmint. — Offers of u.s.p. grade are 
from 37s. 6d. to 42s. 6d. per lb., spot. 
Chinese, 27s. 6d., spot and 25s., c.i.f. per 
lb. nominal. 

Vetivert. — Spot is currently at about 
80s. per lb. 

Ylang ylang. — Spot is from 32s. 6d. 
to 46s. per lb. as to grade. 

UNITED STATES REPORT 

New York, March 3 : Psyllium 
seed moved up two cents to 17 cents 
a lb. during the week. Angelica root 
at 90 cents was down 10 cents and 
Irish moss at 32 cents, down four 
cents. Bois de rose dropped five cents 
to $175 per lb. 



2 74 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 7, 1959 



WORLD TRADE 

Swiss Cut Bank Rate. — The Swiss 
National Bank reduced its official bank 
rate from 2{ to 2 per cent, on Febru- 
ary 26. 

French Agreement With Poland. — 

A new trade agreement between France 
and Poland which is valid for one year 
with effect from January 1, allows for 
French exports to Poland of essential 
oils, dyestuffs, pharmaceuticals made up 
in packings, and chemical products. 

American Interest in South Africa. — 

The Pfizer Corporation of America is 
to erect a plant on a 5y-acre site re- 
cently bought at a cost of £35,000 by 
its South African subsidiary in the In- 
dustria area west of Johannesburg. The 
group plans to make it one of the main 
world depots for its products. 

Tax Changes in Hong Kong. — Duty 
on toilet preparations and proprietary 
medicines in Hong Kong was abolished 
on February 25. Mr. A. G. Clarke 
(Financial Secretary) announced that 
change among others in a budget 
speech when he forecast a budget 
surplus of 39 million Hong Kong dol- 
lars in the 'current financial year. 

Dominican Republic. — The report 
on the retail pharmaceutical outlets in 
the Dominican Republic (C. & D., 
February 14, p. 184), though correctly 
described in the text was unfortunately 
ascribed in the title to Dominica. 
Dominica is an island in the Windward 
group with an area of 300 sq. miles 
whereas the Dominican Republic is a 
Spanish-speaking country in the Antilles 
covering an area of 19,320 sq. miles. 

Expansion in Canada. — One of the 
Albright & Wilson group of companies 
in Canada (Electric Reduction Co. of 
Canada, Ltd.), announced a $10 million 
project to expand and diversify produc- 
tion facilities. ERCO are to build new 
plants to produce sulphuric and phos- 
phoric acids, as well as sodium phos- 
phates and other products, to fill the 
needs of industry and agriculture in 
Eastern Canada. 

Common Market Chemicals Trade. 

— The steering committee of the Italian 
Chemical Trade Association has de- 
cided to propose to the liaison bureau 
of the European Chemicals Whole- 
salers' Association to set up an inter- 
national secretariat for trade with 
chemicals for the Common Market 
countries. The secretariat, with provi- 
sional headquarters in Brussels, would 
aim at reconciling the interests of 
chemical wholesalers in individual 
countries with the aims of the Common 
Market as a whole. 

New Trade Arrangements with Bul- 
garia.— Negotiations in London with 
representatives of the Government of 
Bulgaria have resulted in the signing 
on February 27 of a new trade arrange- 
ment which provides a basis for trade 
until March 31, 1962. Import quotas 
are to be negotiated annually. The 
trade arrangement allows for Bulgarian 
purchases during the twelve months 
ending March 31, I960, of some £5} 
millions worth of United Kingdom 
goods, including chemicals. The United 
Kingdom market will remain open with- 
out restriction to a number of Bul- 
garian products such as essential oils. 



U.S. Exports to Soviet Countries. — 

The United States Commerce Depart- 
ment has announced the issuance of 
licences valued at $10,213,000 to ex- 
port U.S. goods to Soviet and other 
communist countries in the fourth 
quarter of 1958. The Department's dis- 
closure was made in the quarterly Ex- 
port Control Act report to President 



DELTACORTRIL enteric. — Contains predniso- 
lone, 2-5 mgm., in an enteric-coated tablet. 
A disadvantage of oral steriod therapy is a 
tendency to cause gastric disturbance, which 
in some patients may lead to peptic ulceration. 
That may be avoided by enteric coating, but 
the nature and thickness of such coating is 
important. If it is too thick, the tablets may 
disintegrate relatively late, with possible loss 
of activity owing to attack by certain intestinal 
bacteria. Deltacortril enteric is claimed to have 
a balanced coating, so that the tablet disin- 
tegrates and dissolves in the jejenum without 
delay. Gastric irritation may also be reduced 
by adding an antacid such as aluminium 
hydroxide or magnesium trisilicate. Co-hydeltra. 
Deltacortril A.F.. and Deltastab B are pro- 
ducts of this type. 

DISTOLYT. — Constituents: Chlorcyclizine and 
guaiacol glyceryl ether. Chlorcyclizine. though 
primarily an antihistamine, possesses cough- 
suppressant and spasmolytic properties. The 
guaiaco' derivative produces a marked increase 
in respiratory-tract secretion and. unlike am- 
monium chloride, does not cause gastro- 
intestinal irritation. The combination is useful 
in dry and useless cough associated with 
allergy and spasm. Other cough depressants 
include Robitussin, which contains glyceryl 
guaiacolatc and desoxyephedrine; pholcodine 
products such as Ethnine and Memine: and 
narcotine preparations such as Coscopin and 
Nicolanc. Among other synthetic products arc 
Tessalon, Sedulon, Toclase and Tucal. 

EPANUTTN parenteral. — Chemistry: Sodium 
5:5-diphenyl hydantoin. or phenytoin sodium. 
The subsiance is soluble in water, but the 
solution is frequently turbid through precipita- 
tion of the free base. Clear solutions are ob- 
tained if the pH is adjusted to about 11-7, 
but such simple solutions are not entirely 
suitable for injection. In Epanutin parenteral, 
a solvent containing propylene glycol, alcohol 
and water is used, and though the ph is still 
high (pn 12) the product may be given by 
intramuscular or intravenous injection. It 
should be noted that Epanutin only slowly 
dissolves in that solvent. Though the solution 
rate may be increased by warming, ten minutes 
may be needed to effect complete solution, 

FERROMYN capsules. — Constituents; Ferrous 
succinate; in Fcrromyn li. aneurine. nbo- 
flavinc and nicotinamide arc also present. Fer- 
rous succinate, one of the less irritant sails of 
iron, is free from many of the disadvantages 
associated with oral iron therapy. The capsules 
have good stability and are suitable for storage 
under varying climatic conditions. Other or- 
ganic iron preparations include Fcrsamal (fer- 
rous fumaraie): Plcsmet (ferrous aminoacctosul- 
phaic): ferrous gluconate producis are repre- 
sented by Ccrcvon. Fergon, Fcrlucon and 
F'olvron elixir, all based on ferrous gluconate; 
Ferroids and Sytron (chelated iron compound 
broken down in the alimentary tract to release 
the iron in an absorbable form). 

H1BITANE DIGLUCONATE. — Chlorhexidinc 
has hitherto been used principally as the di- 
acctatc, which is not very soluble in water. 
Maximum solubility is about 2 per cent., with 
the result that concentrates for subsequent dilu- 
tion are not satisfactory. The digluconatc is 
mote soluble, providing a 20 per cent, solu- 
tion without difficulty. Such a concentrate is 
useful for preparing dilution and in formulat- 
ing creams, alcoholic solutions, etc. When 
the compound is used in ointments and creams, 
only cationic or non-ionic bases should be cm- 
ployed. Cctavlon concentrate, Biocciab solu- 
tion, Roccal concentrate and Hradosol solution 
arc other examples of antiseptic concentrates. 



Eisenhower and the Congress. The re- 
port showed the total of export licences 
issued to the East European countries 
and the U.S.S.R. in the last three 
months of 1958, with the amounts of 
some of the larger commodities, as fol- 
lows, in dollars: Bulgaria — 60,074, with 
59,800 for phenol; Czechoslovakia — 
1,094,897, with 136,833 for antibiotics; 



HISTAMAL. — Constituents : Mepyramine maleate, 
ephedrine hydrochloride and chlorbutol. This 
is an association of an antihistamine and a 
vasoconstrictor for the relief of nasal congestion 
of allergic origin. Many similar preparations 
are available. Antistin-Privine and Neophryn 
with antihistamine also contain an anti- 
histamine and a vasoconstrictor; Neo-Endrine, 
Prinexin and Biomydrin contain antibiotics; 
and Vasocort and Hydrospray are nasal sprays 
containing hydrocortisone in addition. 
SECROSTERON. — Chemistry: 6a:21-Dimethyl- 
ethisterone or dimethisterone. The liver is 
known to inactivate steroid hormones, partly 
by hydroxylation in the 6-position. The addi- 
tion of a methyl group in that position blocks 
the inactivation resulting in increased and ex- 
tended activity. Similar enhanced activity by 
methylation in the 21 position is additive in 
effect, so that the 6-21 dimethyl derivative is 
about twelve times as active as ethisterone. 
Another compound exhibiting oral progesta- 
tional activity is Primulot N (nor-ethisterone) 
which has no methyl group in the 19-position 
as in other steroids. Preparations of ethisterone 
include Gcstone-oral, Oraluton, Progestoral and 
Lutocyclin linguets. 
TOFRANIL. — Chemistry: N-(y-dimethylamino- 
propyD-iminodibcnzyl hydrochloride. The 
compound possesses exceptional pharmacologi- 
cal properties, and has a remarkable anti- 
depressive action. Advances have been made in 
recent years in the treatment of certain mental 
disorders, notably schizophrenia, since the in- 
troduction of chlorpromazine, but antidepres- 
sive therapy improvements have been less 
spectacular. Central-ncrvous-systcm stimulants 
are widely used, but any elevation of mood 
thus achieved may be accompanied by an un- 
desirable degree of secondary tension or agita- 
tion. Attempts have been made to reduce such 
side-effects by combined treatment with stimu- 
lants and sedatives, and though such com- 
binations appear to be pharmacologically in- 
compatible, encouraging results have been 
achieved. Tofranol has a very different action; 
by inhibiting fixed depressive moods, it pro- 
duces effects comparable with a spontaneous 
remission of the depression. It therefore differs 
sharply from other drugs used in psychoihcra- 
pcutics. and its Introduction marks an advance 
in the treatment of endogenous or involutional 
depressive states. Other drugs used in de- 
pression include the amphetamines Benzedrine, 
Dexcdrinc, Methcdrinc; methyl phenidate 
(Ritalin): pipradol (Mcratran); and mephemer- 
mine (Mcphine). 
VII.LESCON. — Constituents: Phenylpyrrolidino- 
pentane. vitamins Bi, B*. Be, C, and nicotinic 
acid amide. The pyrrolidine derivative has a 
powerful central stimulant effect, increasing ap- 
petite, respiration and general interest in the 
environment. The preparation thus appears to 
have a balanced " tonic " effect and. apart 
from thyrotoxicosis, has no comra-indications. 
Other preparations with similar intentions may 
contain iron, strychnine, mineral and vitamin 
supplements, and arc basically different. 
ZYNOCIN. — Constituents: Xanthocillin and 
bcnzocaine. The antibiotic xanthocillin is active 
against a wide range of bacteria, and inhibits 
the growth of certain yeast and fungal organ- 
isms. It is not suitable for systemic use, but 
topical application is effective, and it has not 
so far been possible to induce resistance to 
the drug. Bcnzocaine is included as a slowly 
soluble and poorly absorbed local ana'sthetic. 
Other throat lozenges containing antibiotics 
and bcnzocaine include Tracincts, Tyrosolven, 
Tyrozcts and Enzolets. Hibitanc and Plam'dets 
are represcniativc of lozenges containing anti- 
septics and local anaesthetics. 



NOTES ON NEW MEDICAMENTS 



March 7, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



2 7 5 



COMING EVENTS 

Items for inclusion under this heading should be 
sent in time to reach the Editor not later than 
first post on Wednesday of the week of insertion. 

Monday, March 9 

London University. Physiology lecture theatre. 
University College, Gower Street, London, 
W.C.I, at 5.30 p.m. Professor J. Folchi-pi 
(Harvard medical school) on " Brain Lipo- 
proteins and Proteolipids " (first of two lec- 
tures: second on March 11). 

National Nylon Fair, Royal Albert hall, Lon- 
don (until March 13). 

Tuesday, March 10 

Birmingham Branch, Pharmaceutical Society, 
Chamber of Commerce, New Street, at 7.45 
p.m. Meeting. 

British Institute of Management, Maje tic 
hotel, Harrogate. Retail management confer- 
ence. (Ends March 12.) 

Nottingham Branches, National Association 
of Women Pharmacists and Pharmaceutical 
Society, MedicorChirurgical Society, 64 St. 
James's Street, at 7.30 p.m. Mr. C. C. Stevens 
(Imperial Chemical Industries, Ltd.) on " Some 
Legal Aspects of Homicide." 

Preston Pharmacists' Association, County club, 
Winckley Square, at 7.45 p.m. Talk by Mr. 
W. R. Roberts (chief inspector, Pharmaceutical 
Society). 

Self Service Development Association, Pack- 
aging centre, 50 Poland Street. London, W.l, 
at 6.30 p.m. Mr. W. A. Wilson (H. J. Heinz. 
Ltd.) on " The Findings of Investigations into 
Variations in Returns for Shelf Space," and 
Mr. A. Forsyth on " Applying the Results." 

South-east Metropolitan Association and 
Branch, Pharmaceutical Society; New Cross 
inn, 323 New Cross Road, London, S.E.14, at 
8 p.m. Mr. C. W. Robinson (Evans Medical 
Supplies, Ltd.) on " The Pharmacist in In- 
dustry." 

Wednesday, March 11 

East Kent Branch, Pharmaceutical Society, 
Falstaff hotel, Canterbury, at 8 p.m. Film 
show. 

Glasgow and West of Scotland Branch, Phar- 
maceutical Society, Craig's restaurant, 142a 
St. Vincent Street, Glasgow, C.2, at 7.45 p.m. 
Dr. A. G. Mearns (senior lecturer in social 
medicine, Glasgow University) on " Three In- 
comparable Benefactors." 

Isle of Wight Branch, Pharmaceutical Society, 
God's Providence house, Newport, at 7.30 p.m. 
Discussion on Branch Representatives' motions. 

Plymouth Branch, Pharmaceutical Society, Ad- 
ministrative block. Freedom Fields Hospital, 
Longfield Place, at 7.30 p.m. Talk by Mr. H. J. 
Graves (a member of the Society's Council). 

Reading Branch, Pharmaceutical Society, Great 
Western hotel, Reading, at 7.30 p.m. Annual 
dinner and dance. 

West Kent Branch, Pharmaceutical Society, 
Crooked Billet hotel. Southborough Lane, 
Bromley, at 7.45 p.m. Dance. 

Western (LondonI Pharmacists' Association, 
21 Portman Square, London, W.l, at 7.30 
p.m. Dr. A. A. Bradley (A. Wander. Ltd.) on 
*' The History and General Principles of the 
Chemotherapy of T.B." 

Thursday, March 12 

Chemical Society, Burlington house, Piccadilly, 

London, W.l, at 7.30 p.m. Irving Langmuir 

memorial lecture by Sir Eric Rideal. 
Leeds Branch, Pharmaceutical Society, School 

of Medicine, Leeds University, at 7.45 p.m. 

Talk by Dr. D. B. Bradshaw (medical officer 

of health for Leeds). 
Leicester Branch, Pharmaceutical Society, 

Robinsons of Chesterfield, at 2.15 p.m. Factory 

visit. 

Manchester and Salford Branch, Pharmaceu- 
tical Society, engineers' club, Albert Square. 
Manchester, at 7.45 p.m. Professor K. Bullock 
(Victoria University) on " Local Antesthetics." 

Norwich Branch, Pharmaceutical Society, Flix- 
ton rooms, Samson and Hercules house, at 
8 p.m. Annual dinner and dance. 

Portsmouth Branch, Pharmaceutical Society, 
Paley's restaurant. High Street, Gospon, at 



7.30 p.m. Discussion on Branch Representa- 
tives' motions. 
West Hertfordshire Branch, Pharmaceutical 
Society, Red Lion hotel. St. Albans, at 7.45 
p.m. Annual meeting. 

Friday, March 13 

Exeter Branch, Pharmaceutical Society, Turk's 
Head hotel. High Street, at 7.30 p.m. Business 
meeting. 

Hull Chemists' Association and Branches. 
Pharmaceutical Society and Photographic 
Dealers' Association, Imperial hotel, at 8 



p.m. Mr. C. L. Clark (Kodak, Ltd.) on 
" Colour Comparatives." 

WILLS 

Mr. R. J. Goodman, M.P.S., 106 Oxford Road, 
Banbury, Oxon. left £11.586 (£11,490). 

Mr. G. A. Johnson. M.P.S., 26 Tinwell Road. 
Stamford. Lines. left £19,713 (£19,526) net). 

Mr. G. W. Williams, M.P.S., Bodwyn, Dol- 
gellau, Merioneth, left £19,539 (£19,509 net). 

Mr. P. K. Bottomley, M.P.S., 47 Cable Road. 
Hoylake. Wirral, Cheshire, left £839 (£787 net). 



C. & D. RETAIL AND DISPENSING PRICE LIST 

The drug index for February was 208 0. 



Cost 


Item 


16 oz. 


4 oz. 


1 


oz. 


1 dr. 


d. 


per 


s. d. 


s. d. 


s. 


d. 


s. 


d. 




juu gm. 


Acid, acetylsalicyl. 




3 1 


0 


11 


U 




11 


juu gm. 


Acid, salicylic. ... 





2 4 


0 


84 


U 


I 


JO 


1^ (i m 
Z.J gill. 


Acid, undecenoic, B.P.C. 







5 


5 


n 


Q* 

"T 


49 


mile 
JUU III 1 IN 


Aether, meth. (tech.) ... 


4 9 


1 4 


0 


5 






Al 
4Z 


juu mils 


Aether, solvens 


4 9 


1 4 


0 


5 






11 


JUU gill. 


Ammon. bromid. 




2 4 


0 


8+ 


D 


i 
1 


OD 


Srtfl o-m 

JUU gin. 


Apii grav. sem. (celery) ... 





2 1 


0 


74 


u 


1 
1 




1 ID. 


Cataplasma kaolini 


4 0 













1 JO 


^Oft am 

juu gm. 


Cera alba in massa 




4 5 


1 


4 


(1 


2t 


1 AA 


JUU -III. 


Cera alba in placentis 





4 8 


1 
1 


5 


U 


2? 


1 11 
1 JZ 


SOU am 
JUU gm. 


Cera flav. (in massa) exot. 





4 3 


3 


U 


-> 


j\j 


JUU 1 1 II l> 


Emuls. chloroform 





0 114 


0 


34 






J J 


5 gm. 


Ephedrina P.I. (8) 


per 


grain 


0 


1 




A 

4 


in 

O J 


25 gm. 


Ephedrin. hydrochlor. P.I. (8) 


per 


grain 


0 


1 


1 


Q 

o 


93 


S00 cm 

JVJ\_T :_, 1 i 1 . 


Gelatinum zinci ... 




3 0 


o 


11 


U 


1 1 


129 


500 gm. 


Gelatinum zinc. oxid. et 














ichtham., B.P.C 





4 2 


i 


3 


u 


Z 


1 OS 

1 U J 


SOO am 
JUU gill. 


Glycer. acid, boric, B.P., '48... 





4 7 


i 


5 


U 


1JL 

2i 


1 14 


son (rm 

JUU gin. 


Glycer. acid, tannic 




4 9 


i 


5 


n 
u 


1 1 


1 lf\ 

1 L\t 


JUU gm. 


Glycer. aluminis, B.P.C. '49 ... 




5 3 


i 


7 


U 


2i 


1 UJ 


juu gm. 


Glycer. amyli wgt. 




3 4 


i 


0 


0 


14 


11 


SOO (rm 
JUU gm. 


Glycer. boracis, B.P.C 




3 0 


n 


1 1 


u 


1 1 

It 


60 


*\flO mile 
JUU Mills 


Linct. methadon.. N.F. S.l. D.D. 




2 3 


0 


8 


u 


i 
1 


nc 
ID 


CIV) mile 

juu mns 


Lin. ammoniac. B.P.C, '49 




2 5 


0 


84 


0 


1 


4j 


SOD mile 
JUU I 111 1 A 


Liq. azorubri ... 




1 5 


o 


5 






28 


1 fl. oz. 


Neb. isoprenalin. sulph. 






3 


6 


0 


6 


35 


1 fl. oz. 


Neb. isoprenalin. sulph. co. 


— 


— 


4 


5 


0 


74 


55 


25 gm. 


Ol. caryophylli 






8 


3 


1 


2 


42 


100 mils 


Ol. citronellas (Ceylon) 






1 


9 


0 


3 


78 


500 mils 


Ol. eucalypti 




2 6 


0 


9 


0 


14 


46 


1 pt. 


Ol. rapae 


4 8 


1 4 


0 


5 






156 


500 gm. 


Ol. theobromatis 




5 0 


1 


6 


0 


24 


68 


1 lb. 


Pasta mag. sulph. 


8 6 


2 5 


0 


84 






81 


500 mils 


Pig. iodi co., B.P.C 




2 7 


0 


94 


0 


14 


60 


500 gm. 


Potassii tartras acid. ... 




1 11 


0 


7 


0 


l 


54 


500 gm. 


Sapo durus pulv., B.P.C. 




1 9 


0 


64 






108 


500 gm. 


Sodii et lauryl. sulphas ... 




3 6 


1 


1 


0 


2 


39 


500 mils 


Sodii perboras, B.P.C 




1 3 


0 


44 


0 


1 


189 


25 gm. 


Strychnin, pulv S.l. (4) 


per 


grain 


0 


1 


3 


10 


189 


25 gm. 


Strychnin, hydrochlor. S.l. (4) 


per 


grain 


0 


1 


3 


10 


168 


25 gm. 


Strychnin, sulphas ...S.l. (4) 


per 


grain 


0 


1 


3 


5 


96 


500 mils 


Syr. creosoti co., B.P.C, '49 ... 




3 1 


0 


11 


o 


14 


58 


500 mils 


Syr. picis liq., B.P.C, '49 ... 




1 10 


0 


7 


0 


1 


84 


S00 mils 


Syr. rhamni, B.P.C, '34 




2 8 


0 


10 


0 


14 


60 


500 mils 


Syr. rhceados, B.P.C, '49 




1 11 


0 


7 


0 


l 


47 


25 gm. 


Theophyllin. et sod. acet. 










1 


0 


84 


100 gm. 


Thymol 






3 


8 


0 


6 


86 


500 mils 


Tinct. belladonna; .. .P.I. (9) 




2 9 


0 


10 


0 


14 


96 


500 mils 


Tinct. valerian, simp 




3 1 


0 


11 


0 


14 


45 


25 gm. 


Zinci undecenoat., B.P.C. 






6 


5 


0 


ll 



Cost 



d. I per 



168 


1,000 


84 


1,000 


198 


1,000 


240 


1,000 


162 


500 



TABLETS 



Ammon. chlorid. gr. 74 e/c 
Amphetamin. sulph. 4-mgm. 
Calcii sod. lact. gr. 74, B.P.C. ... 

Rhei co., B.P.C 

Sulphathiazol. 0'5-gm. S.l. R only 



.8.1. (4) 



Retail 



(in containers) 


25 


100 


s. d. 


s. d. 


1 3 


3 4 


0 11 


2 1 


1 2 


3 3 


1 6 


4 5 


1 9 


5 7 



The bold letters and figures at left of dispensing price relate to the classification of poisons in The 
Chemist and Druggist Poisons Guide. 



2 76 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 7, 1959 



TELEVISION 

Programme details are given to enable chemists 
to put in linking-up displays if they wish. 
Figures in the columns represent number of 
appearances of the product during the week. 



March 15-21 



•a .s a js 



2 I 



3 U) 

5 Z 



figs . . — 



Alka-Seltzer 
Amami wave set 
Anadin 

Andrews liver salt 
Anne French 
Askit 

Aspro 

Beecham's powders 
Bisodol 

Bristow's shampoo 
Bronco toilet rolls . . 
Brylcrccm 

California syrup of 
Camay soap 
Cephos 

Christy's lanolinc face pack 

Cojene 

Damask in 

Dclrosa 

Dclscy toilet rolls 
Diuromil 
Eno's fruit Salt 
Euthymol tooth-paste 
Fennings' Little Healers . . 
Ferguzade 
Formula 21 . . 
Germolene 

Gibbs' S.R. tooth-paste . . 
Gillette razors and blades 
Glymiel jelly 
Handy Andies 
Horlicks 

Ibcol 

Imperial Leather soap 
Iron Jelloids 
Knight's Castile soap 
I.anospray 
I-oxenc hair cream 
I.oxene medicated shampoo 
Maclean's tooth-paste 
Marigold baby pants 
Marigold house gloves . . 
Max Factor preparations. . 
Mayfair personal wc.ghcr. . 
Milk of Magnesia 
Milk of Magnesia tablets 
Milpar 

Moorland tablets 
I'enetrol 

Pepsodent tooth-paste 

Phensic 

Phosferine 

I'hyllosan 

Preparation H 

Punch and Judy tooth-paste 

R instead pastilles 

Scottics 

Sebbix 

Shavcx 
Slcrgcnc 

Suregnp house gloves 
Tangcc lipstick 
I wink home perm.ineni 
Valdcrma 
Valrosa 

Vaseline mcd.catcd shampoo 

Vaseline petroleum jelly . . 

Veno's cough mixture 

\ itapoinic 

Voscne shampoo 

Water lilies shampoo 

Vcast-Vitc 

/eph 

/ubes 



3 3 3 



4 4 
2 4 



12 

5 3 5 
1 2 — 



5 5 5 



1 



5 

3 2 



— 113 



2 3 

3 — 
1 1 



2 4 
1 I 



2—2 
2 2 2 



1 

— 2 — 
I 



1 1 

1 2 



1 1 

5 5 

— 4 

— 3 
1 1 



14 14 - 



3 3 
1 I 
1 2 3 



2 3 



— 77- 



2 3 
1 — 



3 3 
7 — 



3 


2 


2 


1 


1 






2 
1 


1 
1 


2 
I 


2 


3 
2 
1 


2 


2 
1 


2 


2 


1 


2 

2 


3 
1 


i 




4 

1, 


4 


3 


4 




3 


3 


1 


2 


2 


2 
1 


i 


1 


2 



1 2 

1 1 

2 2 



1 1 

— 1 

2 2 



1 



II 



4 3 4 

2 2 — 

— 33 

I 1 I 



4 4 4 

-33 



— 3 

I 1 

3 1 

4 4 



5 

4 



5 5 5 



5 5 
— 4 



2 

3 4 4 



2 

4 

3 

1111 

2 

2 2 2 2 



4 3 5 



PRESS ADVERTISING 

lii RRot t.iis WiiKOMt ,\; Co.. 18.1 Fusion Road. 
London, N.W.I: Saxin. In national newspapers 
and women's magazines. 

Edward Taylor. Ltd., Monton, Ecclcs, Man- 
chester: Crown corn caps. In Sunda> Press 
during June. July and August. 



TRADE MARKS 

APPLICATIONS ADVERTISED BEFORE REGISTRATION 



From the " Trade Murks Journal," February 25 

For non-medicated toilet preparations (3) 

POLYTUBE, 783,403, by Boots Pure Drug Co.. 

Ltd.. Nottingham. 
For chemical substances for preserving foodstuffs; 
and artificial sweetening substances (\) 

PAXO. 764,858. by John Crampton & Co.. 

Ltd.. Wythenshawc, Manchester. 
For chemical products for use in photographic 
developing processes (1) 

PHENIDEX, 783,511. by Ilford, Ltd.. Ilford. 

Essex. 

For perfumes, toilet preparations (not medicated), 
cosmetic prepirat'ons, dentifrices, depilatory pre- 
parations, toilet articles (not included in other 
classes), sachets for use in waving the hair, soaps 
and essential oils (3) 

TETE A TETE. 783.574. by Yardley & Co.. 

Ltd., London, E.15. 
For creams and lotions, none being medicated 
and all for use in cleansing the hands (3) 

OLAN, B782.010. by Autex, Ltd., London. 

W.l. 

For non-medicated toilet preparations and cos- 
metic preparations (3) 

Device with words TREE OF LIFE, 779.258, 
by Helena Rubinstein, Ltd., London, W.l: 
BONACROM, BONAFIT, BONAFORM. 
783.494-96. EXOTA, 783,499. LEGENDE. 
OBSIDAN. REFRAIN, 783,501-03, SANS 
SOUCI, 783,505, by Hans Schwarzkopf. 
Hamhurg-Altona, Germany. 



For colouring matters for food and beverages (1): 
preparations and substances for laundry use; and 
cleaning, polishing, scouring and abrasive pre- 
parations, soaps and dentifrices (3); infants' and 
invalids' foods, disinfectants, and preparations 
for killing weeds and destroying vermin (5) 
PAXO. 764,859-61, by John Crampton & Co.. 
Ltd., Wythenshawe, Manchester. 
For non-medicated preparations for use in clean- 
ing the hands (3) 

LANIMOL, 783.709. by Deb Chemical Pro- 
prietaries, Ltd., Belper, Derbyshire. 
For preparations for waving the hair (3) 

CLYNOL STYLE WAVE. 783,765, by A. ,t 
F. Pears, Ltd., Isleworth, Middlesex. 
For all goods for sale in the United Kingdom 
and lor export to the United States of America 
and to their respective Colonies and Dependen- 
cies as constituted on the 6th March, 1953, and 
to the Republic of Ireland (5) 

LEMCO, 715,534, by Oxo, Ltd., London, 
E.C.4. 

For pharmaceutical preparations (5) 
VITESULE, VITASULE, 774,654-55. by Mar- 
fleet Refining Co., Ltd., Hull. East Yorks. 
PETHIDEX, 781.322. by Clinical Products. 
Ltd., Richmond. Surrey. 
For pharmaceutical preparations for oral admin- 
istration (5) 

MECORAL' 775,233. by Dct Danske Medicinal 
,t Kemikalie Kompagni A/S, Copenhagen. 
Denmark. 



C. & D. WEEKLY LIST OF PRICES 

A = Advanced; R = Reduced; I.R.P. = Inclusive Retail Price; § = Tax 5 per cent.; * lax 30 per cenUt 

; Tax 60 per cent. 



CALMIC, LTD. 

Drapolene 



1 lb. 



12 6 R 



IIIMMI I . LTD. 

Beauty on a Budget scries} 



7 1 



1 3 



CROOKES LABORATORIES, LTD. 

Collozets lozenges 
Cortoderm* [corrected notel 



l.R.P. 
1 9 R 



NEW PRODUCTS AND PACKS 



ALLEN & HANBURYS, LTD. 









Doz. 






cent. 


10 


gm. 


30 0 


4 


6 


cent. 


10 


gm. 


48 0 


7 


25 


cent. 


10 


gm. 


90 0 


13 


6 



Dequalone — P 



5 gm. 



Each 
3 9 



1 

JEYES-IBCO SALES, LTD 
Nightlights 
Ibcolites 



MERCK SHARP 

March 9) 
Saluric tablets 





Gross 








19 6 




21 A 




Doz. 






12 


22 6 


2 


6 A 


& DOHME, 1.1 


I). 


(from 




Each 






100 


43 6 


65 


3 R 


500 


210 0 


315 


0 R 


packs 








4 oz. 


3 4 


5 


0 R 


16 oz. 


10 4 


15 


6 R 


4 oz. 


3 0 


5 


5 R 


CO., 1.1 D. (from 


March 3) 


i gr. 50 




8 


5 A 


500 




72 


0 A 



GOLDEN. LTD. 

Ambre Solaire suntan oilj 

ELI LILLY & CO., LTD. 

Nu-seals aspirin 5 gr. 100 
10 gr. 100 



5 7i 
7 6 



HOKMO-PHARMA (SALES), LTD. (distributors. 
ROBER'IS & CO. (BOND STREET), LTD.) 



Okasa tablets* 



50 
100 



14 

24 



Bo-Car-AI* 



RIDDKM. PRODUCTS. LTD. (from March 1) 
Sltpct Pag inhaler 

single bulb 52 6 A 

double bulb 57 6 A 

black bulb 5 3 A 

red bulb 5 9 A 

double bulb 10 7 A 

syphon I 6 A 

Pneumostll electric inhaler 460 0 I 

SMITH * NEPHEW PHARMACEUTICALS, 
LTD. (from April 1) Doz. 
Dilacol tablets* 24 30 0 4 6 R 

480 286 0 43 0 R 
hulk 500 270 0 40 6 R 

EDWARD TAYLOR, LID. 

Crown corn caps* 1 6 R 

P.A.T.A. LIST 
i llteratlon* notified this week l>> the Proprletarj 

\rticlis Dade Association.! 

WRIGHT, LAYMAN & UMNEY. I II). (from 
March 1) 

Wright's Coal Tar inhaler 

and vaporiser 72 0 8 0-4 

M >l NS I () I III I ISI 

< im \ GATE, l ll). 

Cow ,V Gate baby powder* 14 I III 

MOORE MEDICINAI PRODUCTS, ill). 

Deedon inhaler, model 2 168 0 20 0 
(Replaces previous model) 



1 3 



IMPERIAL 
14 0 



JEYES-IBCO SALES, LTD. 

Jcyes' coloured "flats'' II 7 

MERCK SHARP & DOHME, LTD. 

Lyoval Saluric vial 17 6 

PHARMACEUTICALS DIVISION, 
CHEMICAL INDUSTRIES, LTD. 

Doz. 

Icipen suspension I fl. oz. 112 0 

Each 

3 doz. 9 2 
6 doz. 9 0 



PIIAKMAt I I IK Al SPE< I AI IIILS (MAY 
& BAKER). LTD. 

l-antactil tablets 50 mgm. 

50 10 (» 15 9 
500 95 0 142 6 

PHI I I IS SCO! I -LESLEY, LTD. 

BZIO skin serum] 42 0 

spa BRUSHES, l ID. 

Spa bristle number one Doz 

tooth-brush 36 0 4 6 



LACK AIR CONDITIONING, LTD. 

Saxane junior appliance 63 

tablets 5 

\M.si I'll AKMA( hi IK AL CO., LTD. 

Bach 

Parabal tablets* 100 5 6 9 

MM) 22 6 40 



WRA\ (OP IK Al WORKS). LID. 

Wray Mcrcographic camera* 
Graft ex stereo viewer* 



II I OKI . I II). 

Sporti camera* 



case* 



455 0 
99 0 



79 9 
22 5 



7, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



EVERY SHEEP FARMER IN 
THE U.K. IS BEING TOLD ABOUT 



Trantin' 



Contains 

Bephenium Embonate 30% 
Bephenium 

Hydroxynaphthoate 60% 



DISPERSIBLE POWDER 



THE ONLY PROTECTION AGAINST NEM ATODIRUS ; ALSO HIGHLY 
EFFICIENT AGAINST THESE OTHER SERIOUS WORM PARASITES IN 
THE UNWEANED LAMB: 

Trichostrongylus axei, Haemonchus contortus, Ostertagia species, Cooperia species. 



There is no worm preparation as effective 
as 'Frantin'. Its discovery by the Wellcome 
Research Laboratories represents a trem- 
endous step forward in sheep husbandry. 
Today, deaths from deadly Nematodirus 
Infestation can be prevented and the 
retarding effects of ether worm parasites 
soon halted by dosing unweaned lambs 
with 'Frantin'. 

Lambs treated with 'Frantin' are healthier, 
heavier and more profitable to the farmer. 



PLACE 

YOUR 

ORDER 

NOW 

FOR 
DELIVERY 
IN APRIL 



Issued in bottles of 250 gm. 



Discovered by the Wellcome Research Laboratories 

BURROUGHS WELLCOME & CO. (The Wellcome Foundation Ltd.) 
The Wellcome Building, Euston Road, London, N.W.I. Tel. Euston 4477 
and 18 Merrion Square, Dublin. Tel. 65751/2 



46 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



March 7, 19 




AND 




EVENING NEWS 

March 23rd 

with a total Readership 
of 15 million 

SPECIAL NEWS SCOOP ! 

World-famous Woburn 
Abbey cleaned 
throughout with 
I00I . . . 




Don't miss the 
inevitable demand. 

DISPLAY I00I in 
your windows. 

STOCKS IMMEDIATELY 
AVAILABLE 

ORDER fresh supplies'from P.C. PRODUCTS LTD., Prospect 
Works, Allerton, Bradford, Yorks. Tel: 46404/5/6 

or 33 Union Street, Southwjrk, London. S.E.I. Tel: HOP ISM & -4 1 36 




March 7. 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



47 




The 

"PUNGOR'type 

HIGH-FREQUENCY 
TITRI METER . . . 




. . . operates in the» 
vicinity of the 150 Mc. frequency. 
It can be used for the determination of acids and 
bases in aqueous and non-aqueous dissolvents. It lends 
itself to precipitation tests as encountered in argentometric 
measurement or in sulphate and alkaloid determination, etc. 
It permits the temporal variations of fluids in enclosed ampoules to be 
observed by watching the changes of the conductibility. 
Finally, it can be used as an indicator for process 
inside ion exchanging columns. 





Exporter 



MITRIMPEX 



Hungarian Trading Company for Instruments 

Letters: Budapest 62, P.O.B. 202 Telegrams: INSTRUMENT BUDAPEST 



48 . THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST March 7. 1959 

Supplement 





The going is good 
for those who take 
advantage of the new 
Racasan Bonus offer 
(January 1 - April 11) 
Just look at these 
startling prices ! 



BLOCKS AND CONTAINERS Basic Discount — 33s% 
AEROSOLS Basic Discount — 30% 



3 dozen + 2{% 



PLUS BONUS 6 dozen + 5% 

1 2 dozen + 7{% 

The bonus applies to orders for a single product or for assorted parcels. 

For direct delivery products should be in standard trade packs 
BLOCKS — 3 DOZEN • CONTAINERS AND AEROSOLS — 1 DOZEN 
Any assortment can be sent via your wholesaler. 

RACASAN PRODUCTS INCLUDE 4l* 



RACASAN 
CHANNEL BLOCK 

'JET' INSECTICIDAL 
AEROSOL 

AIR FRESHENER 
AND MOTH BLOCK 



RACALAV 
TOILET TABLET 

PERMANENT CONTAINER FOR 
AIR FRESHENER BLOCKS 

RACALET 

LAVENDER TABLET 



RACALET 

PLASTIC CONTAINER 

'SPACE' GERMICIDAL 
AEROSOL 

RACAPAN 
SANITARY BLOCK 



Backed by consistent National Advertising: 

RACASAN LIMITED ELLESMERE PORT CHESHIRE 



March 7, 195^ 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 




introduces 




'SECROSTERON' 



TRADE MARE 



DIMETHISTERONE TABLETS 



the new orally active progestational agent 
the first all-British steroid discovery 



'Secrosteron' is 6cc:21-dimethylethisterone for which the British 
Pharmacopoeia Commission Approved Name is dimethisterone. 
It is a new progestational steroid having much more potency, 
when given by mouth, than ethisterone ; thus being more 
convenient in use than the progestational^ active 
substances hitherto available. It brings about true 
secretory changes in the endometrium and has no 
cestrogenic or androgenic action. 
Literature on 'Secrosteron' will be willingly sent 
on request — further details will appear in the 
February edition of B.D.H. Information. 




PRICES 



Tablets 5mg. trade retail 

Bottle of 30 tablets 25/- 37/6 

Bottle of 100 tablets 75/- 112/6 




THE BRITISH DRUG 
HOUSES LTD. 
GRAHAM STREET 
LONDON N.l 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



March 7, 1959 




TRIDENT 



The Trident is attractive 
yet businesslike — doing 
the job it was made to 
do without fuss. It is 
really comfortable, the 
ear pieces protecting the 
ears from pressure and the suction cups 
gently but firmly keeping the water out. 
Each cap is in an individual display pack 
with film window, packed 12 to a display. 



6/6d Retail 




SEAL 



The inner flange 
forms an air 
pocket, keeping 
thehaircompletely 
dry. Each cap in 
individual sleeve, 
packed 12 to a. 
display box. 

4/9d Retail 



PENGUIN 
FLORAL 

A thin, stretchy, 
watertight cap 
with fashionable 
floral decorations 
at a popular price. 
Each cap in 
polythene bag. 

7/9d Retail 



£OR flfSG CHOOSE 

FROM THE RANGE OF 'SUBMARINE' SWIMMING CAPS 



Again heavily advertised in the National Press. The 
Submarine range of swimming caps is comprehensive. 
The prices and styles meet ail needs, the quality is 
consistent and the rubber used is high grade and 
compounded to give maximum elasticity with long life. 
All caps are thin, making them easy to put on, light 
weight and comfortable. 

The brand name "SUBMARINE" is your guarantee 
of quality, backed by first-class service. 

2/1 1d — 7/9d 




PENGUIN 

A most popular 
and efficient 
swimming cap. 

Each cap in a 
polythene bag. 
Twelve to a display 
carton. The 
strapless model- 
will be much in 
demand. 

3/6d Retail 



STANDARD 

AND 
CLIPPER 

Now fitted with 
water-excluding 
ridges. Packed 
twelve caps to a 
box. 

2/1 1d Retail 



SUBMARINE HOT WATER 
BOTTLES 

A complete range at competitive prices — 
with metal or rubber stoppers. Every 
bottle fully guaranteed. 





W. HAFFENDEN LIMITED • RICHBOROUGH RUBBER WORKS ' SANDWICH • KENT 

Telephone: Sandwich 3361/2 



March 7, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 
Supplement 



Wew slimming 
development 

easier-fhan-ever way 
to make Big Profits! 



ablet' 




LARSON'S, which makes slimming so 
easy, now makes it even easier! For the 
first time, Swedish Milk Diet is presented 
in Tablet form — pleasant tasting, con- 
venient to carry and requiring no mixing. 
LARSON'S Tablets are simply chewed 
and swallowed with milk — so handy when 
away from home on business or pleasure. 
The Tablets are just as safe and sus- 
taining as the familiar LARSON'S 
Granules — and have the same 

Heavy National Advertising 



vitamin-enriched, natural formula. 
LARSON'S S.M.D. is the slimming 
product which doctors endorse. 

LARSON'S Tablets retail at 8/6d. for one 
week's supply and i4/6d. for the two-week 
pack. Prices of the Granules are unchanged. 
Slimming is big business with LARSON'S. 
You'll be selling Granules and Tablets, 
each with generous profit margins. Get 
your new season's stocks on Bonus 
Terms without delay! 

Millions will see LARSON'S advertisements in 
the leading Women's Magazines and National 
and Sunday Newspapers. 



Order LARSONS Now/w, 



Place your order now for both 
Granules and Tablets. Bonus 
offer gives 12 for the price 
of 11 (unbroken dozens only). 
You make 64% on outlay! 

DON'T MISS THE BOAT! 

ipeciat offer ends 




N DISTRIBUTORS LTD. 

RICKMANSWORTH ROAD 
WATFORD, HERTS. 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIS1 

Supplement 



March 7, 1959 



AT YOUR SERVICE 



tOjffSSSSSSB^-^,,^ and 

-^0. «•* ** ^^edged. We 

That* Y° u . sepaI atelV acW ° be 
, are all being sep pe ituines *» 

would -^ d ;°^ select ^ Budge , 

{oI e ask Y attenU0 n. ver . 

receive *** ^ ^ a n e^ve 

^ als o remind Y ° . npril ^ re- cte 
MaY an wiB start * *P* ^ 

using ca-P^ ^ me gloved an 
pub Uc demand » ^ peI ^eS. 
ie merobered 




pb: 



■THE CHEMIST 




Modern Plant and Production 

Rigid Quality Control 
Superior and Uniform Products 



LAKE & CRUICKSHANK LTD. 

MA NUFACTURING CHEMISTS 

NORTH BRIDGE ROAD • BERKHAMSTED • HERTS 

Phone: Berkhamsted 18801112 Cables: Lake Berkhamsted 



54 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGISI 
Supplement 



March 7, 1959 



PLANS FOR 

THE BIGGEST 

ADVERTISING 
CAMPAIGN... 

...IN 1001'S HISTORY 




STOCK/ SHOW/ SELL t007-UNK UP 

P.C. PRODUCTS LTD., PROSPECT WORKS, ALLERTON, BRADFORD, YKS. Tel: 46404-5-6 




arch 7, 1959 



THE 



CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



5 




Woman's Realm 

Woman's Weekly- 
Woman's Illustrated 
Ideal Home 

Three 'Homes' Group 
(Woman and Home, 
Wife and Home, 
My Home). 

Woman 

Woman's Own 

Woman's Day 

Good Housekeeping 

Homes and Gardens 

House Beautiful 

Housewife 



WOMEN'S MAGAZINES 



Full pages in colour 
and black and white 



Estimated 
Housewife 
readership 

3,500.000 



2,514,000 
1,624,000 
1,492,000 

1,884,000 
1,105,000 
937,000 

6,525,000 

5,731,000 

1,600,COO 

2,019,000 

1,084,000 

337,000 

1,048,000 

Total 31,400,000 



NATIONAL AND S E M I - N AT I O N A L NEWSPAPERS 



News Chronicle 
(Northern edition) 

Daily Express 

London Evening News 

Daily Mirror 

Scottish Sunday Post 



11" triple column 
space 

Full page 

Full page 

Triple column spaces 

11" triple column 
spaces 



PROVINCIAL 



ESS 



600,000 

4,353,000 
1,383,000 
5,458,000 
1,366,000 



Big 13" across 4 columns spaces in all the main provincial evening newspapers with a total 

combined Housewife Readership of 4,694,606. 



TELEVISION 



Concentrated campaigns in selected areas are being planned. 



DISPLAY 



Top-class display material and dispensers— including latest banners and electric 

TURN-TABLES— are available. 



Head Office: 33 UNION STREET, SOUTHWARK, LONDON, S.E.I. Tel. : HOP 2841-4136 



56 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



March 7, 1959 




OLD? 



(is your bottleneck showing?) 

\ 

A bottle, stark and simple, is not the most inspiring sales promoter. * 
And yet the fact is that a large quantity of pharmaceutical products' \\ 
contained in bottles and jars are offered at the point of sale without ip 
the benefit of a carton. This immediately puts them at a selling dis- ! k 
advantage compared with competitive products which are attractively 1 iff 
cartoned and often displayed on the same shelf. 

p! 



Reed 



REED CARTON DIVISION 



I -v. 



In the South CROPPER & COMPANY LIMITED 

Thatcham, Nr. Newbury, Berkshire. Telephone: Thatcham 2235 
In the North. CUT-OUTS (CARTONS) LIMITED 

Grantham Rd., Newcastle upon Tyne 2. Telephone: Newcastle upon Tyne 2-9806 



the 



March 7, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



57 




SOLD 



in a Reed Carton 



Reed carton is designed to sell. It fits in with 
r other promotional activities, gives immediate 
duct recognition and overcomes increasing 
petition. It is produced to fine limits for 
chine filling and is expertly printed. It pro- 
ts your product, proclaims its presence from 
|;lf and counter, helps the retailer in matters 
|J easy stacking and display and provides the 
ortunity for enclosures, both instructional and 
bmotional. 

The Reed Carton Division has for many years 
"ved the needs of the pharmaceutical industry 



and includes amongst its customers such well 
known companies as Beecham Pharmaceuticals 
Ltd., Reckitt & Sons Ltd., E. Griffiths Hughes 
Ltd., and Winthrop Laboratories Ltd. 



The Reed Carton Division would appreciate 
the opportunity of quoting for your cartons, 
or submitting suggestions for any of your 
packaging requirements. For further details 
of the facilities of the Reed Carton Division, 
please write for Publication No. D 1/200. 



RCVa 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

5up p 1 erne u i 



March 7, 1959 




Call on Ransom's 
experience 
for your own 
trade processing 




Did you know that your own raw 
materials can be processed to 
Ransom's high standards of ex- 
cellence ? When Ransoms process 
your materials — roots, barks, 
leaves, seeds, etc., you get all the 
benefits of Ransom's 100 years of 
specialised experience in the pro- 
duction of vegetable drugs and 
galenicals. Ransom's trade pro- 
cessing service is conducted under 
the supervision of qualified experts 
— and always in the strictest con- 
fidence. For proprietary products 
too, Ransom's offer a complete 
service from raw material to final 
packing. Whatever your process- 
ing problem — call in Ransoms 
and profit from their experience. 






WILLIAM RANSOM & SON LTD 

Manufacturing Chemists and Medicinal Plant Growers for over a Century 
HITCHIN HERTFORDSHIRE 



Established 1846 



March 7, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



5 9 



Tofranil 



® 



N-(y-Dimethylaminopropyl)-iminodibenzyl hydrochloride 



The purpose of this announcement is to inform all 
members of the Pharmaceutical Profession that at 
the present time Tofranil is available direct from 
Wythenshawe only to Mental Hospitals and other 
psychiatric units, to allow a full assessment of its 
therapeutic value in the treatment of mental illness. 



Thymoleptic is the word which best describes the 
unique mood-regulating properties possessed by 
Tofranil ; properties which inaugurate a new 
category of mental drugs. The remarkable 
clinical improvement produced by Tofranil is on 
a different plane from the effect on individual 
symptoms which characterizes other drugs. It has 
made possible the successful treatment of the 
large majority of depressive cases without the need 
for E.C.T. Tofranil is not suitable for the treatment 
of schizophrenia and it is not a tranquillizer. 



Indications Endogenous depression 

Depression due to involutional 
and organic changes 

Depression accompanying 
psycho-neurotic changes 

Availability Tofranil is available as tablets containing 25 mg. 
^— ^— and ampoules of 2 ml. containing 25 mg. 



Geigy Pharmaceutical Company Ltd. 



Wythenshawe, Manchester 23. 

® means Registered Trade Mark 



PH 142 PH 142a 



6 0 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



March 7, 1959 





YOU 



ic FOR LIMITED PERIOD 
ONLY! 

UNIQUE UP TO 




SONUS 



BONUS 




1\% 

BONUS 



m 

BONUS 



15 S3KB 

from an ' 

the * v -' 

0 ^ R DERS • 

8 D O Z EN 

the ^ 
range 

4 DOXEN, 

the ^ 
range 





ROTOsan the products with an all-year- 
through appeal to housewives . . . ROTOfresh 
the modern toilet fitting which made "sales 
history " last year . . . take advantage of this 
NEW splendid bonus offer, make up YOUR 
order from the full ROTOsan range . . . fine 
products with a big future for YOU ! 

BIGGER-THAN-EVER POTENT ADVERTISING . . . will 
appear in the leading National Newspapers and in the 
Women's Magazine Press, directed to the housewife. ROTOsan 
will be in bigger-than-ever demand this year. 



ORDER FROM THE 

FULL ROTOSAN RANGE 







TRADE PRICE 






RETAIL 


PER DOZ. 


P.T. 


ROTOfresh Toilet Hygiene 








Com plete 


1/8 


13/- 


5d. 


Refills 


1/3 


10/- 




ROTOsan Air Conditioner 








Discs 


1/3 


10/- 




Juniors 


2/6 


18/6 


1/3 


Automatics 


5/6 


41/6 


3/9 


Crystals (Superfume Bags) 


2/- 


16/- 




Channel Blocks (3 per pkt.) 


1/6 


12/- 




ROTOcubes (Large) 


1/3 


10/- 






Full particulars from CULLINGFORD OF CHELSEA, Cheyne Walk, London S.W.IO 



March 7, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



6 1 




Bristle 



NUMBER ONE 



ACTUAL 
SIZE 



—The Aristocrat of Toothbrushes 

MORE PROFIT FOR YOU! You clear i/6d. on every Spa Bristle 
Number One Toothbrush you sell! That's over twice your usual profit 
in fact it's as much as the whole retail price of many ordinary toothbrushes ! 

BETTER VALUE FOR YOUR CUSTOMERS! At last your 
customers can buy a toothbrush that's been designed and made as a 
precision instrument. 4/6d. spent on a Bristle Number One Toothbrush 
is a worthwhile investment in oral hygiene. 



* 



This 
is the 
Toothbrush 
that gives you 

16 

CLEAR PROFIT 



I 



ACTUAL SIZE This is the size and shape of the Spa Bristle 
Number One Toothbrush. It's longer — for greater comfort. It's angled — 
for greater reach. It's shaped and trimmed for gum massage. It's pure 
natural bristle for cleansing power. The Number One has a high-acetyl 
handle, and comes in four lovely colours: pink, blue, green, yellow. It's 
packed in a clear tube. 

Trade Price: 36/- per doz. Retail Price: 4/6d. each. 



TELEVISION CAMPAIGN STARTS APRIL 4th £3 

Nothing brings in the customers like TV ! But whose shop 
will they go into ? Make sure it's yours. Order the Bristle 
Number One Toothbrush nozv. And use this free individual 
display card — it's the ' star ' of the TV commercials. People 
will recognise it. They'll buy from you. And every time they 
do, it's another i /6d. in your pocket ! 

Order from your usual wholesaler or in case of difficulty write to : 
SPA BRUSHES LTD., Freeman Works. Chesham, Bucks, Telephone: Chesham 371 
THE SPA BRISTLE NUMBER ONE TOOTHBRUSH 




THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



March 7, 1959 




FOR INDIGESTION GASTRIC HYPERACIDITY • LIVER AND 

BILE DUCTS DISEASES CHRONIC CONSTIPATION • CHRONIC 

INTESTINAL CATARRH OR INFLAMMATION OF URINARY PASSAGES 

Ask for GENUINE NATURAL CARLSBAD SPRUDEL SALT 



Obtainable from: 

CARLTON LABORATORIES (Southern) LTD. 
2 Norfolk Square ■ Brighton • Sussex 

OR ALL WHOLESALERS 



LITERATURE AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST 



CHEMAPOL® 



PR AH A — CZECHOSLOVAKIA 



March 7. 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



6 3 



ALGINATE 



ULT RAPIST 




POCK* 
PACK 



ALGINATE! 



FIRST AID DRESSINGS 

w „ ll OO«.^HB-«»«'' t, " ,C iil 




One of Industry's most 
widely used wound dressings 



Now available to the public 



+ 



ULTRAPLAST ALGINATE STYPTIC DRESSINGS perfec- 
ted for the very exacting industrial market, have won the approval 
of doctors, nurses and first-aid men employed in some of Britain's 
largest industrial concerns. 
Now Ultraplast Alginate Wound Dressings in handy Pocket Packs 
are available to your customers. The Alginate Pocket Pack 
contains 4 Alginate Wound Dressings. For freshness and hygiene 
each dressing is individually wrapped in a heat-sealed, 
moisture proof Cellophane envelope. The eye-catching 
display outer contains 3 dozen Pocket Packs. 

ALGINATE is obtained from sea weed and is processed, spun and knitted 
into a silk-like gauze. In contact with tissue fluids the Alginate 
gauze softens into a jelly, stops bleeding, speeds healing 
and provides an admirable protection for the wound. 

ORDER NOW 

Price to retailer 48/- per outer (3 dozen Pocket Packs) 
Profit on cost 50% 

ULTRAPLAST 

ALGINATE 

STYPTIC FIRST AID DRESSINGS 
STOPS BLEEDING— SPEEDS HEALING— INDIVIDUALLY WRAPPED 



STQi 





NATIONAL 
ADVERTISING 
STARTS 
SUNDAY EXPRESS 
—MARCH 8th 



Wallace, Cameron & Co Ltd 
83 West Regent Street 
Glasgow C2 DOUGLAS 8078/9 



64 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



March 7, 1959 



An old and tried favourite with a 25% profit margin 

BAUMOL 

SOAP 

single wrapped tablets in a display outer of 1 dozen selling 
at l/3£d. per tablet (inc. P.T.) unwrapped tablets in a box 
of 3 selling at 3/lOfd. per box (inc. P.T.) 

trade price: lOd. per tablet (plus 3d. P.T.) 
PROFIT: per tablet 2|d. per box 7£d. 

from all wholesalers 

DUNCAN FLOCKHART OF EDINBURGH 




Duncan, Flockhart & Co., Ltd., Edinburgh 11 



ABA/I1/57P 




astone 




Lastonet products are well worth a good display. 
They're steady sellers with a very good profit margin. 
And you can step up your sales by 
using the eye-catching display material available. 
Showcards, display packs and display limbs J 
for Lastonet stockings in your window or at point j§ 
of sale will all help to boost business. 
Just write for whatever you can use. 
We'll send it right away. 



ml MM 



on show 




SURGICAL PRODUCTS 



LASTONET PRODUCTS LIMITED 
CARN BREA, REDRUTH, CORNWALL 




March 7, 1 959 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 65 

Supplement 



THE NAME BEHIND THE CHEMIST 



FOR OVER A CENTURY AND A HALF 




Meggeson & Co. Ltd., London, S.E.16 



66 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



March 7, 1959 



BABY PANTS 

There are good reasons why many Chemists are enjoying profitable 
sales of this product. 




1. Made from hard-wearing plastic. 

2. Generous in size, comfortable in use. 

3. Well presented at attractive retail prices. 

4. Choice of three qualities. 

5. Readily sold all the year round. 

6. The quality ensures repeat business. 
Why not place a trial order ? you can't go wrong. 



PLASTIC BABY PANTS 

in Cellophane Bags. 

Medium or large Retail Trade 
size. pair Dozen 
D.56 Elastic Legs 2/- 16/- 
D.57 Non-elastic legs 2/- 16/- 


NEW PLASTIC BABY PANTS 

In self-colour or pink. 
Each in attractive carton. 
Medium and large Retail Trade 
Pair Dozen 
D.60 Elastic legs 2/6 20/- 


NEW PLASTIC BABY PANTS 

(Rayon covered) 

Each in attractive carton, 
in Peach or White 
Medium and large Retail Trade 
Pair Dozen 
D.96 Elastic legs 3/9 30/- 


Also " SANIBRIEFS " and " SANIPANTS " for ladies 
PRODUCTS OF CitXSC&t , ^^MXiAci6Ccr./jttL OLDBURY, BIRMINGHAM 



Jfavai DISIN FECTANT 



backs up the retailer all the way ! 

A GOOD PRODUCT 



Zoflora floral disinfec- 
tant is a powerful 
germicide with a 
pleasant fragrance. 
Housewives all over 
the country use it 
regularly. It is a good 
steady seller. 



1/ 



'res 




A GOOD RANGE 

Besides the standard bottle of con- 
centrate retailing at 2 6 

there is the Spray Pack at 2/6 



The Junior Outfit 
at 4/6 



- The Standard Outfit 
at 3 9 and 12 6 





faym/j^ Zoflora 



WELL 
ADVERTISED 

Sales o* Zoflora are 
assured by the vig- 
orous national adver- 
tising appearing 
regularly in the mass 
circulation women's 
magazines, in 
Reader's Digest, 
Radio Times and the 
National Sunday 
Press. Every I.T.V. 
station in the 
country will trans- 
mit Zoflora spot 
advertisements 
during June. 



Si* *j 




FREE SHOW MATERIAL 




ATTRACTIVE SHOW CARDS 
ARE AVAILABLE ON REQUEST 



THORNTON & ROSS LTD. • HUDDERSFIELD 



March 7, 1959 



THE 



CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



67 




HERE'S HOW 
STERGENE 
SALES SUPPORT 
WORKS FOR 
YOU! 



No matter where you are in Great Britain 
and Northern Ireland throughout 1959 
you'll get the strongest advertising backing 
for Bubbly Stergene right to the point of 
purchase. 

Heavily concentrated regional advertising 
on Television or in your local papers will 
appear for one month . . . 



IN THE NORTH OF ENGLAND • SCOTLAND 
& NORTHERN IRELAND • MARCH 14- APRIL 7 



>|< backed by large space all year round advertising in colour 
and black and white in National Press and Women's Periodicals. 

j|< backed by specially designed point of purchase 
display material. 

; BE READY— stock now ! ^55*3 

That's sales support by J^ter6ene 

W Family size 21- 
plus 2d. retitrn- 

STERGENE IS A PRODUCT OF DOMESTOS LIMITED, NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE able onbottle. 




WHGJS33 



8 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



March 7, 1959 



POWDER CREAM 




m A 

AN 4 



Shades 

IVORY NATURAL PEACH SUNGOLD 
OCHRE APRICOT and RACHEL 
TUBES No. 2 No. 3 

TRADE 7/6 doz. 12/3 dor. RETAIL 1/4 ea. 2/2 ea. 
JARS : TRADE 17/2 doz. RETAIL 3/- ea. 



f 'cream 

' POWDER COMPACT 



Velpuff is a perfect creamy base, with 
the softest, finest powder. Ready to be 
smoothed on with its own puff, it stays 
matt for hours. 



LUXURY CASE 
WITH MIRROR 
Retail 5/11 each 
WHOLESALE 
33/6 per doz. 

4 SHADES 
FASCINATION 

( Natural ) 
ENCHANTMENT 

( Rachel ) 
MYSTIC TOUCH 
(Peach) 
IRRESISTIBLE 
( Brunette ) 
Also No. I Size 
(Metal Case) 
Retail 3/4 
Wholesale 18/8 doz. 



11 lYflD ST. LEONARD S RO 
UIAUK MO RTLAKE 
~Ci**uteOs LONDON. S.W. 14 



A 



A 



Ccdudettcs 





Calsalette advertisements 
are appearing in the Daily 
Sketch, Weekly Scots- 
man, Woman's Weekly, 
Woman's Illustrated , 
Woman's Day, Woman's 
Realm, Weekend Mirror, 
John Bull, Everywoman, 
Modern Woman, She, 
Housewife, Woman & 
Beauty, Punch, Wife & 
Home, Reader's Digest. 



A safe, pure laxative that 
is enjoying a steadily growing 
reputation. Intensive and 
increasing advertising 
will make your customers 
ask more and more for 
" Calsalettes." Keep 
them on display ! 

The 
Torbet 
Lactic 

Oat Co. Ltd. 



24 Great King Street, 

Edinburgh, 3. 
Phone: WAVerley 3881 






THE HALLMARK OF PURITY 

For further particulars apply to :— 

TRADE AGENT FOR MYSORE 

28 Cockspur Street, London, S.W.I 

Tel.: Whitehall 8334/5 

'Grams : MYSOF, Letcjuare, London 



March 7, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 
Supplement 



6 



i Pfi Trt« soNS 




PHARMACEUTICAL 

INDUSTRY 



Mil KCHN/CAL 
ON RSQU& T 



LIGHT AND HEAVY MAGNESIUM 
CARBONATES B.P. 

LIGHT AND HEAVY MAGNESIUM 
OXIDES B.P. 

MAGNESIUM OXIDE LEVISSIMA 
MAGNESIUM HYDROXIDE B.P.C. 
MAGNESIUM TRISILICATE B.P. 



WASHINGTON, CO. DURHAM, ENGLAND Telephone : Washington 3333 

A member of the TURNER & NEWALL ORGANISATION 



LONDON OFFICE: Empire House, St. Martin's le Grand, London, E.C.i. Telephone : MONarch 6898. 
MANCHESTER OFFICE : 220/222 Corn Exchange Buildings, Cathedral Street, Manchester, 4. Telephone : BLAckfriars 4401 

Agents throughout the world. 



70 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



March 1. , 1959 



Bulk Swff\UM 

DISINFECTANTS 
& ANTISEPTICS 



CARBOLIC DISINFECTANTS 

Black & White types — all strengths 

MARKET & FARM DISINFECTANTS 

Approved for use under Diseases of Animals Orders 

PINE & AROMATIC DISINFECTANTS 
LYSOL B.P. 

QUATERNARY AMMONIUM COMPOUNDS 
| ROXENOL B.P., etc. 

Packed in I, 5, 10 and 40 gallon drums 
THE PRINCE REGENT TAR CO. LTD. 

BRETTENHAM HOUSE, LANCASTER PLACE. 
STRAND, LONDON. W.C.2. 
Telephone: TEMPLE BAR 5801 (8 lines) 
Works.- PRINCE REGENT'S WHARF, SILVERTOWN, LONDON, E.I6 
Telephone: ALBERT DOCK 3311 




A Quality product . . . 
Consistent National & 
T. V. advertising . . . 
High profit margin . . . 

Dr. WERNET'S 

POWDER 

The best-seller in Denture Fixatives 



= STAFFORD-MILLER LTD 



HATFIELD 



HERTS = 



OBTAINABLE FROM YOUR 
USUAL SUNDRIESMAN 

YOUR^CUSTOMERS GET DIRTY HANDS 
THEY WANT YOU TO SELL 



Swarfega 



HAND CLEANSER 




Removes grease, oil, 
paint, tar, dyes and 
rubber compounds. 
Non-abrasive, antiseptic 

Price : 

Standard size I /6d. 
Large economy 
size 4 8d. 



Display this I dozen 
pack and benefit from powerful advertising. 




As advertised in : Practical Motorist, Good Motoring, Car 
Mechanics. The Motor, The Autocar, Motor Cycle. Motor 
Cycling, Top Gear, C.S.M.A. Gazette, Practical Householder, 
Do-it-Yourself. Homemaker. 



DEB CHEMICAL PROPRIETARIES LTD. BELPER Derbys. 

Your customers 
know . . . 

that Cuticura Ointment is the best 
possible all-round stand-by for cuts and 
grazes, minor burns, all kinds of spots 
and skin blemishes. Those who may not 
yet know it — rising teenagers, for in- 
stance — are being told about it by our 
nation-wide advertising. Simply remind 
them — by display and recommendation 
— that soothing, antiseptic Cuticura 
Ointment should always be kept handy 
in the home; and make sure that your 
stocks are ready for the demand. 

Cuticura Ointment 

also 

SOAP • TALCUM POWDER 
HANDCREAM • MEDICATED LIQUID 
SHAVING STICK 



March 7, 1959 



THE 



CHEMIST AND 

Supplemeni 



DRUGGIST 




among the finest 
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mild sedative 
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cream specific 
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SEDUMAX An innocuous sedative and analgesic 

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Packs : 50 and 300 tablets. 

DRAPOLENE For the speedy, soothing relief of napkin 
rash. This gentle cream was evolved specifically for the 
treatment and prevention of urinary dermatitis in infants 
and incontinent patients. 2-oz. tubes and 1-lb dispensing jars. £ 

FERROMYN For the treatment of iron deficiency 
anaemias, particularly during pregnancy. Ferromyn 
contains ferrous succinate, an organic iron salt which 
can be absorbed into the system with minimal toxic 
effects. Dosage: 1 teaspoonful/tablet t.d.s. or as 
prescribed. Packs: 4-oz., 20-oz., 40-oz., 80-oz. 
Bottles: 100 tablets, 1,000 tablets. 

CICATRIN An amino acid antibiotic cream or 
powder with the dual effect of controlling local 
infection and stimulating the growth of new tissue. 
Indicated for the treatment of superficial wounds, 
burns, varicose ulcers, rectal surgery and 
pyogenic skin conditions. Packs: 15 gramme 
collapsible tube, 15 gramme sprinkler. 

HYPON Ideally balanced analgesic tablets 
which contain Codeine, phenacetin and 
acetylsalicylic acid plus caffeine and 
phenolphthalein to offset the side effects of 
depression and constipation. 
Packs: 10, 50, 125. Tax-free dispensing 
packs 300, 600 tablets. 

POLYBACTRIN The first ever 
antibiotic powder spray. A combination of 
antibiotics which do not induce resistant 
strains are dispersed in ultra-fine powder 
form to secure bacterial inhibition 
over a wide area and ensure immediate 
contact with any wound pathogens. 
Indicated in all branches of surgery 
and for use on any broken tissue 
surface as a prophylactic or treatment. 

VASCUTONEX Efficacious in the 
treatment of muscular rheumatism 
and all soft tissue pains. Containing 
diethylamine salicylate and 
glycol salicylate, which ensure 
effective skin penetration and 
absorption into lipid tissue 
so that effective salicylate levels 
are obtained locally to the 
affected area. The cream 
is non-staining, odourless, 
and contains no counter- 
irritants. Pack : 30 
gramme tube. 



high-tolerance 
oral iron 



topical amino acid 
antibiotic 



balanced analgesic 
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unique antibiotic 
powder spray 



mm 



topical salicylate 
cream therapy 



CALMIC 



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Australia: 458/468 Wattle Street, Ultimo, Sydney. N.S.W. 



London : 2 Mansfield Street, W.l. LANgham 8038/9 
Canada : 220 Bay Street, Toronto. 



72 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



March 7, 1959 



BUY 




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FROM YOUR WHOLESALER! 



March 7, 1959 





THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

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! DOMESTOS LIMITED, COLLEGE WORKS, ALBION ROW, NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE 



74 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

supplement 



March 7, 1959 



The Anglican Bishops 
endorse Family Planning 



"Family planning, in such ways as are 
mutually acceptable to husband and wife 
in Christian conscience . . .is a right and 
important factor in Christian family life." 



REPORT OF THE NINTH LAMBETH CONFERENCE 

(1958) 



Commenting on the report, the Archbishop 
of Canterbury said : 

"...there is clearly a divine obligation to plan 
your family and not have them by accident." 
Asked if he personally advocated family 
planning, the Archbishop replied: 

"What the conference says is that it is a 
necessity, and I agree." 
With these words, the 310 Anglican 



Bishops have given their blessing to the 
principles of family planning. In setting 
forth this enlightened point of view, they 
have removed the confusion and controversy 
which have surrounded the subject for 
years. Their wise and human approach will 
be endorsed by thoughtful people every- 
where. 



(f 



FAMILY PLANNING 

REQUISITES 



The wording on this strip 
conforms with the code of ethics 
of the Pharmaceutical Society. 
( Size of strip: 7" x 2") 



The part you play... 

Millions of new users are being converted to modern 
DUREX methods of family planning by our "Planned 
Families" booklet, extensively advertised in news- 
papers and magazines. 

Write for the discreet "Family Planning Requisites" 
shelf strip (No. 30), which shows that you are a 
DUREX stockist. It will bring you extra business — 
so put it on display. 



LONDON RUBBER CO. LTD.. HALL LANE. LONDON. E.4 



March 7, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



7 



5 



An Authoritative Textbook for 
Students of Photography . . , 



'A MODERN COURSE OF 

PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIES' 



is available as a textbook adapted to the requirements of students 
for the examinations of the Photographic Dealers' Association 
51 pp. size 11" x 8|" with Linson Cover 



PRICE 7s 6d or 8s Id post free. 



Edited by H. BAINES, D.Sc, F.R.I.C., F.I.B.P., Hon. F.R.P.S. 
with chapters by T. J. L. BENTLEY, B.Sc, D.I.C.A.R.C.S. 
MORTIMER SHAPLEY, A. FINNIS ATTWELL 

Obtainable from the Publisher — 



First published as a series of articles in 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 





28 ESSEX STREET, STRAND, LONDON, W.C.2 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



March 7, 1959 



Do not 
disappoint 
your customers 

— stock and display 

aaut 

Powders and tablets for the safe and 
speedy relief of headaches, colds, chills, 
rheumatic and nerve pains. 
EX ALL LEADING WHOLESALE HOUSES 



PRICES REDUCED 



HARDWOOD APPLICATORS 

100 boxes and over 3/- per box, SO to 99 boxes 3/3 per box 
under 50 boxes 4/- per box. Standard pack, 6 gross to a box 

IMMEDIATE DELIVERY FRO s M T ^ s DON 
TONGUE DEPRESSORS 

LOWEST PRICES SINCE THE WAR 
Size 6in. x Jin. x 2mm. thick. Prime Hardwood perfectly finished 
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Wholesale Houses only supplied 

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Tel : ROYal 2494 Cables: ASHTIM, LONDON 



For acidosis . . . 
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hot or cold 



Lemons, Glucose, 
Scotch Barley & Sugar 
Controlled Resale Prices: 

13oz 2s. 4d. 

26oz 3s. 6d. 

MADE BY RAYNER AND COMPANY LIMITED, LONDON, N.I8 



ISy % DYES 



3d. STOCKING (except Black) . . 27/- gross 
4Jd. COLD WATER. CURTAIN 

and Black Stocking Dyes 41/- gross 

Order Dyes and Shade Cards from our Agents 
Gt. Britain: W. B. Cartwright Ltd., Rawdon. Leeds 
N. Ireland: T. McMullan & Co., Ltd.. 42 Victoria 
street, Belfast, Eire ■' May Roberts (Ireland) Ltd., 
Grand Canal Quay, Dublin, C.6 



GALLIC ACID 
PYROGALLIC ACID 

(RESUBLIMED, PURE CRYSTAL AND TECHNICAL) 

AND DERIVATIVES 



WHOLESALE AND EXPORT ONLY 



THE BRITISH DYEWOOD CO. LTD., 19 st. vincent place, Glasgow, c.i. 



March 7, 1959 



77 



Chemist^ Druggist 

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 

Telephone: CENlral 6565 

Specially spaced Advertisements, including : — Public and Legal Notices, Sale by Auction, Appointments, Contract Work, Patents, Partner- 
ships, 18/- per J inch minimum and pro rata. Box 2/-. Clearances and Wants, Businesses for Disposal and Wanted, Premises, Agents 
Wanted, Agencies Wanted, Miscellaneous, 17/6 for 36 words minimum; then 4d. per word. Box 2/-. Situations Vacant, 12/- for 36 
words minimum, then 4d. per word. Box 2/-. Situations Wanted, 3/- for 18 words minimum: then 2d. per word. Box 1/-. 
Mdrm Box Number Replleg to: THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST, 28 ESSEX ST., STRAND. LONDON, W.C.2 



| ORRIDGE & COMPANY JT,JE«V!SS 1 

| CHEMIST BUSINESS TRANSFER AGENTS AND VALUERS WHOLESALE AND RETAIL | 

BRANCHES: BIRMINGHAM - SOUTHAMPTON • LI VE R POO L • SH E FFI E LD • C A RDI FF | 

illllllllllllllllfllllllllllllll^ 



BUSINESSES FOR DISPOSAL 

BRANCH PHARMACY in Edinburgh for sale. 
Turnover appro*. £10.000 (without optics). As- 
sessed rental £90. Price for property, fittings 
(including fully-equipped optical room) and 
goodwill £5.000 or offers. Stock at valuation 
(approx. £1.500). Financial assistance may be 
arranged. Reply to Box C 2059. 

DRUG STORE, suit progressive chemist, ex- 
ceptional opportunity. Quick sale desired. Good 
position. living accommodation, long lease. 
Budden, 64 Park Street, Luton. C 2088 

EAST SUSSEX VILLAGE DRUG STORE for 

sale, suit qualified. Established 24 years, main 
road position. Population 1750 and growing. 
No near opposition within radius of 8 miles. 
Lock-up shop, freehold. Takings £65-£70 per 
week. Large stock Further particulars on ap- 
plication. Box C 2089. 

LONDON Pharmaceutical Company marketing 
own ethical preparations, widely known pro- 
fessionally by valuable trade-marks, for sale. 
Available tax losses. Box C 2087. 



PHARMACEUTICAL 

MANUFACTURING CO. 

FOR DISPOSAL 

Caused by the retirement of the Senior 
Executive. 

Exempt Private Company manufacturing 

Pharmaceutical Specialities. 

Home and Export Business with good 

profits over the years. 

Registered Trade Marks and Patents 

in many Countries. 

Full facilities for investigation to Prin- 
cipals only. 
Write Box C 8999. 



APPOINTMENTS 

LAMBETH HOSPITAL, 
BROOK DRIVE, S.E.ll 
(Acute General 510 beds) 

Pharmacist 

required. Salary in accordance with Whitley 
Council Scale, plus London Weighting. Appli- 
cations slating age. experience, qualifications 
and names of two referees to the Secretary. 

C 442 



ANCOATS HOSPITAL, 
MANCHESTER, 4 

Pharmacist 

Applications are invited for the above post. 
Whitley Council scale and conditions. 
Applications, stating age and experience, with 
names of two referees, to the General Super- 
in tendent (Dept. C.J.). C 9001 

BROOKWOOD HOSPITAL, 
KNAPHILL, WOKING 

Assistan t - in - Dispensing 

Applications are invited for the above post. 
The successful candidate will be required to 
work under the supervision of the Chief Phar- 
macist, who is responsible for the preparation 
and issue of drugs and dressings for about 
1,750 patients. 

Salary Scale £170 p. a. at age 16 years rising 
to £375 at age 22 years or over rising to a 
maximum of £490 p.a. (plus £20 p.a. for an 
approved qualification). 

Professional and Technical Council B of Whit- 
ley Council conditions apply to the appoint- 
ment which is subject to the provision of the 
National Health Service Superannuation Regu- 
lations. 

The successful candidate will be required to 

pass a medical examination. 

Accommodation available for female candidate 

for which a charge of £2 8s. per week will be 

made. 

Applications giving particulars of age, experi- 
ence and qualifications, together with names 
of two referees to the Physician Superintendent, 
as soon as possible. C 417 

KING EDWARD VII HOSPITAL, 
WINDSOR 
(Category III Hospital) 

Pharmacist 

required immediately. Whitley salary. Applica- 
tions giving details of service and names of 
three referees to Secretary. C 8992 



KNOWLE HOSPITAL, 
FAREHAM, HANTS 

Assistant-in-Dispensing 

Applications are invited for the above post 
(non-resident), the conditions of which are as 
agreed by the Whitley Council. 
Salary scale is £215 p.a. at age 18 rising to 
£395 at age 22 or over rising to a maximum of 
£510 p.a. (plus £20 p.a. for an approved quali- 
fication;. 

Applications giving age, experience and quali- 
fications, together with names of two referees, 
should be sent to the Physician Superintendent, 
as soon as possible. C 8977 



HAREFIELD HOSPITAL, 
HAREFIELD, MIDDLESEX 
(610 Beds) 

Senior Pharmacist 

required at the above general and chest hos- 
pital. London Weighting payable. Applications 
together with names of two referees to Medi- 
cal Director. C 8995 

HAREFIELD HOSPITAL, 
HAREFIELD, MIDDLESEX 
(610 Beds) 

Locum Senior Pharmacist 

required at the above general and chest hos- 
pital. London Weighting payable. Applications 
together with names of two referees to Medi- 
cal Director. C 8994 

MAYDAY HOSPITAL 
(Category IV) 

Senior Pharmacist 

Modern department. Good working conditions. 
Opportunity to secure wide experience in Hos- 
pital Pharmacy work. Mayday Hospital (Gen- 
eral Acute, 595 beds) is linked for Pharmacy 
control with a Geriatric Unit (410 beds) and a 
busy Eye Clinic. Whitley Council rates of pay. 
Application form obtainable from the under- 
signed. 

General Hospital. GEORGE A. PAINES, 

London Road, Croydon. Group Secretary. 
C 8937 

NOTTINGHAM No. 2 HOSPITAL 

MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE, 
NOTTINGHAM CITY HOSPITAL 
(811 Beds) 

Deputy Chief Pharmacist (Category V) 

required at the above hospital. Applications are 
invited for the above post, which is now 
vacant. 

The City Hospital is a Group hospital and 
caters for the pharmaceutical requirements of a 
number of subsidiary hospitals in the area. 
Applicants should have a wide experience in 
hospital pharmacy, and be capable of control- 
ling staff. A knowledge of surgical instruments 
is desirable. The successful applicant will work 
under the Group Chief Pharmacist and will be 
required to assume complete control in his 
absence. 

Further particulars regarding the post can be 
obtained on application to the Group Chief 
Pharmacist. Whitley conditions of salary. 
Applications, stating age, qualifications and full 
particulars of previous experience, together with 
the names of two referees, should be sent to 
the Group Secretary, Sherwood Hospital, Not- 
tingham, as soon as possible. C 9002 



ERNEST J. GEORGE & CO. 

329 HIGH HOLBORN, LONDON, W.C.I. Telephone : HOLBORN 7406/7 

Professional Valuers to the Pharmaceutical Trade. — Wholesale, Retail and 
Hospital Stocks. Branches throughout England and Scotland. 



78 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



March 7. 195* 



Appointments — Continued 

METROPOLITAN HOSPITAL, 
KINGSLAND ROAD, 
LONDON, E.8 

Pharmacist 

for modern department. Permanent post. Salary 
scale £605-£815 p.a. plus higher qualification 
allowance and London Weighting. Please apply 
with details of age, training and experience to 
the Hospital Secretary. C 437 



PINEWOOD HOSPITAL, 
NINE MILE RIDE, WOKINGHAM 

Locum Chief Pharmacist 

required from March 16 to 21 inclusive. Salary 
£16 16s. per week less accommodation charge. 
Applications to Secretary. C 8919 



PRESTON AND CHORLEY 
HOSPITAL MANAGEMENT 
COMMITTEE, 
PRESTON ROYAL INFIRMARY 

Senior Pharmacist 

Applications arc invited for the post of Senior 
Pharmacist at the above general hospital. 
Whitley Council scale and conditions. Salary 
£675 x £30 (1) x £35 (1) x £30 (3) x £35 Or— 
£865. plus £25 per annum higher qualification 
allowance. Additional payments for voluntary 
evening clinic duties. 

Applications with names of two referees, to 
the Group Secretary. Royal Infirmary, Preston. 
Uncs. C 8983 



READING AND DISTRICT 
HOSPITAL MANAGEMENT 
COMMITTEE 

Pharmacist 

required at the Royal Berkshire Hospital, Read- 
ing (Category V). Six pharmacists with full 
supporting staff. Frequent five-day weeks. Com- 
mencing salary, new entrants, up to £730 p.a. 
based on previous professional experience and 
National Service after qualification. Applica- 
tions to Group Pharmacist, Roval Berkshire 
Hospital. C 443 



SHREWSBURY HOSPITAL 
GROUP 

Pharmacist 

For Copthornc Hospital. 

Pharmacist 

For the Group Pharmacy at the Royal Salop 
Infirmary, with rota duties at other hospitals 
in the Group, as may be required. 
Salary in accordance with Pharmaceutical 
Whitley Council scale. 

Applications to the undersigned from whom 
any further particulars may be obtained. 

J. P Mallett, Group Secretary- 
C 8990 



STEPNEY GROUP HOSPITAL 
MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE 

Applications are invited for the post of 
Deputy Chief Pharmacist (Category IV) 

at Mile End Hospital, Bancroft Road. I ondon, 
1.1. Whitley Council salary scale and condi- 
tions of service. The department is responsible 
for pharmaceutical supplies to another hospital 
and clinic in the Group and the preparation 
of sterile products. Further particulars may be 
obtained on application to the Chief Pharma- 
cist. Applications stating age. qualifications, 
experience and the names of two referees to be 
addressed to the Group Secretary at Mile F.nd 
Hospital, not later than March 12. 1959. C 8975 



ST. BARTHOLOMEW'S HOSPITAL, 
LONDON, E.C.I 

Pharmacist 

A vacancy exists for a Pharmacist. Salary ac- 
cording to Whitley Council scales. Write, giv- 
ing names of two referees, to the Chief Phar- 
macist. C 8964 



ST. LAWRENCE HOSPITAL, 
CHEPSTOW 

Dispenser 

required. Apothecaries Hall or equivalent. Sal- 
ary at 18 £235. 19 £265, 20 £300, 21 £340. 22 
or over £415 x £15 (5) x £20 (2)— £530. Resi- 
dential accommodation available if desired, or 
accommodation found in locality if wishes to 
he non-resident. Write quoting two referees 
to T. A. Jones. Group Secretary, 64 Cardiff 
Ro.id. Newport. Mon. C 8981 



ST. BARTHOLOMEWS HOSPITAL, 
LONDON, E.C.I 

I oeuin Pharmacist 

Immediate vacancy exists for a Locum Pharma- 
cist. Salary by negotiation. Applications, in 
writing, to Chief Pharmacist. C 8965 

THE ANNIE McCALL 
MATERNITY HOSPITAL, 
JEFFREYS ROAD, 
LONDON, S.W.4 

Part-time Pharmacist 

in sole charge required. Preferably female. 
16 hours per week, Monday to Friday. Whitley 
Council terms and conditions of service. Salary 
43s. 8d. per session of 4 hours. Applications, 
giving full particulars of experience and names 
of two referees to Hospital Secretary. C 444 

ST. LEONARD'S HOSPITAL, 
NUTTALL STREET, 
LONDON, N.l 

Locum Pharmacist 

for one week. March 16 to 21. Please apply 
to Chief Pharmacist. C9015 

THE GENERAL HOSPITAL" 
DEWSBURY, YORKS 

Pharmacist 

required immediately for modern department 
in a Category III Hospital. Post offers good 
experience including small-scale manufacturing. 
Accommodation for single person can be ar- 
ranged, if required. 

Applications giving age. experience and qual - 
fications. together with the names and addresses 
of two referees to be sent, as soon as possible, 
to the Administrative Officer. C 8989 



EDUCATIONAL 



LONDON COLLEGE OF 
PHARMACY AND CHEMISTRY 
FOR WOMEN 

7 Weslbourne Park Road, W.2 

Established 1892 

The only College in S.E. England 
teaching exclusively for the Assistams- 
in-Dispensing Fjxamination of the So- 
ciety of Apothecaries. Enrolling now 
for six months' full-time or 2-year 
part-time course for Student Dis- 
pensers under 1956 Regulations. 100 
per cent. Examination successes in 
1958. C 404 



SITUATIONS VACANT 
RETAIL HOME 

BERKSHIRE, part-time dispensing assistant, 
lady, qualified or unqualified, modern phar- 
macy, few minutes' walk Ascot station. Light 
dispensing. Owner requiring more time for 
rapidly developing counter trade. Hours by 
arrangement. Apply in writing to Margaret 
Stiles, Brockenhurst Road. South Ascot. 

C 2084 

BLACKPOOL. Pharmacist, lady or gentleman 
required to manage medium -class shop. Scripts 
1.000 per month, counter £100 per week. Salary 
offered £1.000 per annum. Box C 2092. 

CHEMIST, Noting, energetic, plenty of initiative 
and pleasing personality, required to manage 
shop situated in Derby. Living accommoda- 
tion if required, plus salary and share of pro- 
fits, this post offers splendid prospects to 
suitable applicant. Box C 2086. 

JOHN DENT (Chemists). Ltd.. of 79 New 
Square. Chesterfield, will require a Pharmacist 
in July to manage their branch shop, situated 
in a pleasant suburb of Chesterfield within easy 
reach of the country and the Derbyshire moors. 
A bonus and pension scheme arc in operation 
and every assistance will be given to acquire 
accommodation. Please slate salary required; 
there is no Sunday, holiday or rota duty. 

C 2023 

OLDHAM CO -OPERATIVE CHEMISTS, 
LID., invite applications for position ol phar- 
macy branch manager, either sex. Modern ac- 
commodation available if necessary. Super- 
annuation. Salary and other emoluments at least 
£960. Applications, staling age. experience, etc.. 
to Oldham Co-operative Chemists, Ltd.. King 
Street. Oldham. C 2068 



LONG ESTABLISHED CHEMIST 

requires recently qualified assistant with 
view to eventual partnership if suitable. 
Wednesday half-holiday, normal clos- 
ing 6 p.m. Reply, stating expected sal- 
ary, religion. etc. J. Shillington, 
M.P.S., Cherryvallev Pharmacy, Gilna- 
hirk Road, Belfast. C 2063 



STAMEORD. Pharmacist required as branch 
manager. This is a modern shop with a busy 
counter trade but only light dispensing. Present 
inclusive salary £1.000 per annum. Very attrac- 
tive self-contained flat available at a reasonable 
rent. This is a permanent superannuated post. 
Apply Peterborough Co-operative Chemists. 
Ltd., Park Road, Peterborough. C 2052 

WIDNES. Metcalfe's of Liverpool require a 
Pharmacist /Manager for their branch phar- 
macy at Dillon, Widnes. Salary £1,040 per 
annum for a 44-hour week. Three-bedroom flat 
available. Apply to Managing Director, Met- 
calfe & Co. (Liverpool), Ltd., 596 Prescot 
Road. Liverpool, 13. C 2095 



WHOLESALE 

ANALYST wanted for analytical and research 
work; pharmaceutical qualification minimum 
and some experience preferred. Five-day week, 
pension scheme. Full details with application 
to: Technical Director. Ayrton, Saunders <t 
Co.. Ltd.. 34 Hanover Street, Liverpool. 1. 

C8976 



AYRTON. SAUNDERS & CO., LTD.. invite 
applications Irom young men pharmacists for 
interesting and varied work on sterile products 
and formulation. Five-day week, canteen, pen- 
sion scheme. Appl cations to Technical Direc- 
tor, Ayrton, Saunders iV Co., Ltd., 34 Hanover 
Street. Liverpool. I. C 9008 



CHEMIST'S REPRESENTATIVE 

(icnalosan, Ltd. (a member of the 
Fison Group) requires a representative 
to ECU to wholesale and retail chemists 
on a territory consisting substantially 
of Surrey and Fast Sussex. 
Applicants must have pharmaceutical 
qualification or background, or good 
selling experience in a similar field. 
Successful applicant will be expected to 
reside on the territory. 
This post is well remunerated and 
Superannuated, Applications in confi- 
dence, containing full details of age. 
education and experience, should be 
addressed to ihe Personnel Officer, 
Gcnaiosan, I id.. I oughborough, Lcics. 
Please quote Ref. : 63. C 9000 



BURROUGHS WELLCOME 
& CO. 

require a 

MARKETING EXECUTIVE 

Applications are invited from pharma- 
cists with wide technical knowledge 
and a sound commercial background. 
The position entails liaison with Sales, 
Production. Development and Research, 
and offers opportunities for advance- 
ment in a world-wide organisation. 

Commencing salary will depend upon 
age and experience. Contributory pen- 
sion scheme in operation. 

Applications (by letter only) will be 
treated in confidence: they should in- 
clude full details of education and ex- 
perience since qualification, and should 
be addressed lo the Manager. Marketing 
Department. Burroughs Wellcome <t 
Co Ihe Wellcome Building, Euston 
Road, London. N.W.I. C 9007 



March 7, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Su pplement 



79 



A 

A 


DAQT WITH PDOQPl?r^TQ 

r Uol Willi rKUor LL 1 o . • • 




Are vou a nharmacist (aeed about ^5) with sales experience a 




sound general knowledge of the pharmaceutical industry and able to 




run an office ? If so, do you want to be considered for an assistant 




managerial post on THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST with definite 




nrosnects of advancement in a few years' time'^ The nost carries a 

} A V./ >_J j V/ %■ kj V..' 1. t-4 V* T LI llv 111 \w 1 1 V 111 LA 1 w V V V ^- LA 1 u ill I 1 V * _1.11 \_ 1 ' V_/ . » V V- (A 1 1 1 W O CI 




four-figure salary, staff bonus and pension rights and offers an out- 




standing opportunity to the right man. 




Those wishing to apply should write, giving their age and full 




details of their career to date, to: 




THE STAFF DIRECTOR, 




MORGAN BROTHERS (PUBLISHERS) LIMITED 




28 ESSEX STREET, STRAND. LONDON, W.C.2 



SMITH KLINE & FRENCH LABORATORIES LTD. 

wish to appoint a number of 




MEDICAL REPRESENTATIVES 

to augment their field force in the United Kingdom. 

Successful candidates will undertake the personal promotion of a range 

of first-class ethical products to the medical profession. 

Applications are invited from men aged 25-35 who are capable of tackling 

enthusiastically a job which requires a high degree of initiative. Previous 

experience in the industry and professional qualifications are not essential. 

Selected candidates will be given intensive training and successful completion of 

this course will be a condition of employment. 

Preliminary selection will take place at Regional Centres during April and 
final selection in London during May. 

SKF offers a good starting salary, non-contributory pension and life 
assurance schemes. Company car and generous expense allowance — in fact a 
career in a dynamic, expanding organisation. 

Applications giving fullest details of age, career, education and present salary, 
should be addressed to: — 

The Personnel Officer, 

SMITH KLINE & FRENCH LABORATORIES LTD. 

120 Coldharbour Lane, London S.E.5 



80 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



March 7, 1959 




IMPERIAL CHEMICAL INDUSTRIES 
LIMITED 

There are the following vacancies in the Birmingham 
Sales Office of Imperial Chemical Industries Limited. 
For a PHARMACIST to work as a Representative 
calling on Doctors; also for a REPRESENTATIVE 
to call on Retail Chemists; and also for a young 
PHARMACIST to work in the Sales Office to gain 
the experience to fit him for the position of 
Representative. 

Applications should be made in writing to the Regional 
Staff Officer, Imperial Chemical Industries Limited, 
Britannia House, 50 Great Charles Street, Birmingham, 3. 

C 8960 




SPECIALISTS 

FINEST QUALITY WORK 
MODERN LABORATORY 

RETURN POSTAL SERVICE, 
DAILY VAN DELIVERIES, in 

Preston, Chorley, Bolton and 
South Lancashire. 
First Class Show Material FREE on request 

ORMSKIRK 
PHOTO SERVICES LTD. 

ORMSKIRK, LANCS. Telephone 2380 




Situations Vacant — Continued 

ASSISTANT ANALYST with qualification or 
experience for food factory near Watford. 
Five-day week, canteen, pension fund. Please 
write giving details and salary required to Box 
C 8998. 



CARLTON LABORATORIES LTD. 

wish to appoint Medical Representa- 
tives in the following areas: — 
Manchester, Midlands, Co. Durham and 
Kent. 

Applicants .should be based in the above 
areas, and should for preference, have 
had some experience in the field of 
medical detailing to Doctors and Hos- 
pitals. 

Exceptionally good prospects are attain- 
able to gentlemen who will work hard. 
Please state full details in confidence 
to the Sales Director. C 2097 



CALMIC LIMITED invite applications from 
pharmacists for the production and manufac- 
ture of general pharmaceuticals. These posi- 
tions offer excellent opportunities for advance- 
ment in a progressive and expanding company. 
Free life assurance and contributory pension 
scheme is operated by the company. Canteen 
facilities. Applications, which will be treated 
as strictly confidential, to Works Manager. 
Calmic Limited, Crewe Hall, Crewe. C 8973 



DEVELOPMENT PHARMACIST 

A vacancy arises in the Product De- 
velopment Section of Winthrop I ab- 
oratories. ltd., manufacturers of a 
wide range of internationally known 
pharmaceuticals. Work will involve 
formulation and production of a varied 
and enterprising range of new products 
in a modern well-equipped factory. 
Applicants should be qualified and have 
had adequate previous experience. Ap- 
plications in strict confidence to: Pro- 
duct Development Manager. Winthrop 
laboratories, ltd., Edgefield Avenue. 
Newcastle-upon-Tyne, 3. < 89" I 



HOSPITAL AND WHOLESALE REPRE- 
SENTATIVES. An old-established manufacturer 
of surgical dressings requires representatives to 
build new sales division. Experience and a 
good connection with hospitals and wholesalers 
is desirable but not essential. These are per- 
manent and progressive positions offering ex- 
ceptional opportunities to energetic and forcc- 
fui salesmen. Salary according to experience, a 
contributory pension scheme is in operation 
■ — and a car is provided. Please send brief 
details of age. education and experience in 
strictest confidence to Box C 9003. 
LEADING HOUSE manufacturing proprietary 
medicinal* requires a Representative lor West 
of England, resident in Bristol area. Successful 
applicant will be between 25 and 40 years of 
age. have a knowledge of, or an aptitude for, 
selling and preferably experience of the phar- 
maceutical and allied trades. Progressive salary, 
full expenses, superannuation and company car; 
thorough training given prior to representation, 
lull details please to Box C 9016. 



MANUFACTURERS of elastic stockings have 
a progressive position open for an energetic 
young man as representative to call on retail 
chemists. Interesting appointment with good 
opportunities for successful salesmanship, as 
distinct from mere order taking, with a well- 
known manufacturer. Apply giving outline of 
experience to date. Box C9013. 



PFIZER LTD. 

are requiring a 

PHARMACEUTICAL REPRESENTATIVE 

for North and East London and Essex. 
Applications are invited from men 
under the age of 40 for the above 
appointment. The applicant will be re- 
quired to call on dispensing chemists, 
and should have a sound pharmaceu- 
tical knowledge and background. 

He will receive: — 

(a> Comprehensive training 

th) Generous starting salary and bonus 

(c) Non-contributory Pension 

(d) Company car and expenses 
(c) Removal expenses. 

Applications, stating age. experience, 
should be made in writing to the 

Sales Recruitment Supervisor, 
PFIZER, LTD., 
Folkestone, Kent 



( N»M7 



SECRETARY shorthand-typist, age 26-40. In- 
telligent with initiative. Interested permanent 
position, required by Director N.W. London 
Manufacturing Chemists. Good salary. No Sat- 
urdays. Box C 9009. 



THE DISTILLERS COMPANY 
(BIOCHEMICALS) LIMITED 

Applications are invited from men up 
to 45 years of age with the appropriate 
experience for the position of medical 
and pharmaceutical representative. The 
vacant territory covers: — 

Dorset, Wilts and part of Somerset 

and the successful applicant should pre- 
ferably reside near Shaftesbury. A 
pharmaceutical qualification is desirahle. 
T he initial salary will be commensurate 
with experience and qualifications. A 
car is provided and all legitimate ex- 
penses met, A non-contributory pension 
scheme is in operation. 

Applications in writing should be ad- 
dressed to ihe Home Sales Manager 
at Broadway House. The Broadwa>. 
Wimbledon. London, S.W.19. Corres- 
pondence should he marked " Confi- 
dential." C 9014 



REPRESENTATIVE required to cover London 
(West) and /or the S.E. Counties. Applicants 
should have a knowledge of the pharmaceuti- 
cal trade in these areas. Car owner preferred. 
Salary, commission and liberal expenses. De- 
tails in confidence please to the Sales Manager. 
Meggeson & Co., Ltd., Chessington Hall. Ches- 
sington, Surrey. C9011 
STAFFORD ALLEN & SONS, LTD., have a 
vacancy for a young pharmacist for develop- 
ment work on new products. The position offers 
much scope for advancement Write stating 
age. experience, etc., to T.S.M.. Wharf Road. 
London. N.I. C 8946 

UNQUALIFIED, experienced (male) dispenser 
required by a South London manufacturing 
chemist. Five-day week. Apply giving full 
particulars to Box C 9010. 



WHOLESALE (OVERSEAS) 



THE DISTILLERS COMPANY 
(BIOCHEMICALS) LIMITED 

OVERSEAS REPRESENTATIVE 

This vacancy occurs in The Distillers 
Company (Biochemicals) Limited, a sub- 
sidiary of The Distillers Company 
limited. 

Candidates, aged 28-40, should have 
several years' successful experience of 
medical representation and proven 
ability in selling to the Pharmaceutical 
trade at home and abroad. A pharma- 
ceutical qualification is desirable. The 
appointment will be based on Nairobi, 
hut the successful candidate must be 
prepared to travel extensively through- 
out East and Central Africa. The work 
involves liaison with Agents and their 
medical representatives and the promo- 
tion of the Company's products with 
the Medical and Pharmaceutical pro- 
fessions. Tours are of 3 years inclusive 
of 4 months in the U.K. 

Write : 
SIAFF MANAGER. 
I HI DIS I II I I RS COMPANY 
I I Ml I ED, 

21 ST. JAMES'S SOUARE, 
I ONDON. S.W.I. 

Quote Ref. 23/59 CD 



AGENTS WANTED 

A WELL-KNOWN COMPANY requires ex- 
perienced sales agent with established connec- 
tion in retail chemists' trade who wishes to 
add a range of surgical hosiery and other pro- 
ducts to his existing lines. Territories avail- 
able. Midlands, North of England and Scot- 
land. Please write in first instance stating pro- 
ducts already handled and territory covered. 
Box C 9012. 

•• BIBI " DE PARIS, the new attractively pre- 
sented Trench nylon fringe. Tax free. Retail 
8s. lid. Agents required with good connections 
with chemists in all areas of the U.K. 15 per 
cent, commission. Please give full details of 
territory covered, Box C 2094. 



March 7, 1959 



THE 



CHEMIST AND 

Supplement 



DRUGGIST 



CLAFLIN CHEMICAL LTD 

DEPUTY TO 
EXPORT DIRECTOR 

Leading Manufacturers of Publicly Advertised 
and Ethical Pharmaceuticals with world-wide 
ramifications need an exceptionally capable man 
as Assistant and Deputy to Export Director. 
Although the position is primarily administra- 
tive, a sales outlook, commercial acumen and 
wide experience of marketing of branded 
articles is essential. 

Major qualifications: Preferably under 40, good 
organiser, " stickler for detail," experience in 
marketing, advertising and selling branded 
articles (preferably pharmaceuticals), some 
knowledge of budgetary control and accoun- 
tancy, familiarity with export procedure, hard 
worker. 

Languages an advantage but not essential. Some 
foreign travel. Good starting salary, dependent 
on experience, with good prospects. Pension 
Scheme. 

Write in strict confidence and in full detail, 
giving education, experience, salaries earned, to 
Box C 2093. 



ROCHE 



THE CHANCE OF 
A STEADY CAREER 

Opportunities are offered to outstanding young 
men with drive and initiative wishing to start 
as medical representatives. A pharmaceutical 
qualification/experience or equivalent academic 
attainment essential. Vacancies occur in — 

1. London /Essex 

2. West Riding of Yorkshire 

Good salary, exceptional pension scheme, full 
expenses; successful applicants are assisted to 
own their own cars. First-class candidates de- 
siring success and security should apply with 
full details to the Secretary, 

ROCHE PRODUCTS LIMITED 

15, MANCHESTER SQUARE, LONDON, W.I 

APPLICATIONS WILL BE TREATED AS CONFIDENTIAL 

C8987 



Agents Wanted — Continued 

M.A.A. — The Badge of a good manufacturers' 
agent. Manufacturers requiring reputable agents 
are invited to communicate with the Secretary. 
The Manufacturers' Agents' Association of 
Great Britain & Ireland (Inc.), Bream's 
Buildings, E.C.4. Membership available to 
established agents only. Particulars supplied. 

C 4 



SITUATIONS WANTED 
RETAIL HOME 

PART-TIME or relief occupation to supple- 
ment pension required by recently retired un- 
qualified. Energetic, pleasant, obliging. Long 
pharmaceutical and managerial experience. Box 
C 2096. 

RETAIL (OVERSEAS) 

DENVER WILLIAMSON, International 
locum. Kineton, Warwickshire. Replaces Pro- 
prietors/Managers worldwide. Experience home. 
France, Italy, South America, Africa. C 1987 



WHOLESALE 

MEDICAL REPRESENTATIVE, many years* 
experience pharmaceutical specialities, wants 
position with London or provincial firm near 
London. Car owner. Also compiling literature, 
organising medical propaganda considered. 
Medical background. C 2043 



WANTED 

BUYER specialises in disposing of job lots of 
any lines appertaining to pharmacy. Any quan. 
tity considered. Prompt cash settlement. Will- 
ing to discuss adaptation of any line which is 
not quite suitable in its present state. Please 
send samples and full details to N. Morris, 
218 Walworth Road. S.E.17. Tel. No.: ROD. 
7261. C395 



ALL KINDS OF BOTTLES, JARS, SCREW 
CAPS, cartons, packaging materials and 
manufacturers' stocks of all kinds bought at 
fair prices for spot cash. We are buyers of 
merchandise of EVERY DESCRIPTION. 
Clearance Stocks. Discontinued lines. Surplus 
and Redundant Stocks. Should you have any- 
thing for disposal, please send us samples and 
particulars. Reliance Trading Co.. 75 Fairfax 
Road, Swiss Cottage, London, N.W.6. Tel.: 
Kilburn 0581 and 0038. C 153 

TALCUM POWDER filling machine, bench or 
semi-automatic model. State particulars and 
price Box E.8, Lee & Nightingale, Liverpool. 

C 9004 



WANTED 

SURPLUS CAMERAS, ENLARGERS, 
CINE CAMERAS & PROJECTORS. 
PHOTOGRAPHIC EQUIPMENT OF 
EVERY DESCRIPTION. SURPLUS 
AND OUTDATED FILM & PAPER, 
LARGE OR SMALL QUANTITIES. 
Phone, write or call: — 

SPEARS 

(Dept. D.i, 14 Wailing Street, Shudehill, 
Manchester. 

Phone: Blackfriars 1916. 
Bankers: Midland Bank. Ltd. 

C438 



SALES BY AUCTION 



B. NORMAN & SON, 2-5 Little 
Britain (close to G.P.O.), London, 
E.C.I, will sell by Auction, Wednes- 
day, March 11, at 1.30 p.m., excellent 
light-oak and other Shop Fixtures and 
Equipment including Drug Runs, Nests 
oi Drawers, plate-glass counters, show- 
cases, National Cash Register, Mirrors, 
Display Stands, Office Furniture, Safes, 
Typewriters. 

View Day Prior. Catalogues (3d. by 
post) on application. Tel. Mon. 
8501/2. C 8993 



BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 

EXPANSION OF PLANT. Reputable firm 
making bath cubes for the trade is able to 
take further contracts. Box AC 46615, Samson 
Clarks, 57/61 Mortimer Street, W.l. C 8996 



A rapidly growing Market 

SOUTH AFRICA 

Get established now 

Your trade with South Africa may 
be feeling the restrictions of Import 
Control and Customs Tariffs. 

Get behind these barriers; Manufac- 
ture on the spot. Keep abreast with 
the market. 

We can help : a well-established 
Manufacturing Company organised to 
make and maintain quality of general 
proprietary lines. Modern factory, 
equipment and storage, under quali- 
fied supervision. 

Write now to Box C 2090. 



WE WILL PURCHASE for cash a complete 
stock, a redundant line, including finished or 
partly finished goods, packing raw materials, 
etc. No quantity too large. Our representative 
will call anywhere. Write or telephone: — 
Lawrence Edwards & Co., Ltd., 6/7 Welling- 
ton Close, Ledbury Road, London, W.l I. 
Tel. : Bayswater 4020 and 7692. C 140 



8 2 



THE 



CHEMIST AND 

Supplement 



DRUGGIST 



March 7, 1959 



Business Opportunities — Continued 

SILICONE Rubber Bungs, tubing, sheet, bottle 
cap liners, washers and mouldings made to 
specification. Esco (Rubber), Ltd., 34-36 
Somerford Grove, London, N.16. C 241 



PATENTS 



THE OWNERS of Patent No. 743043. 
which concerns " BASIC ETHERS OF 
SUBSTITUTED DIPHENYLMETHYL 
CARB1NOLS " are desirous of arrang- 
ing by way of Licence or otherwise, on 
reasonable terms, for the commercial 
development in Great Britain of this 
invention. For particulars address 
Elkington & Fife, 329 High Holborn, 
London, W.C.I. C 2085 



MISCELLANEOUS 




H 



ADVANCES WITH OR 
WITHOUT SECURITY 



FOR TERMS 
APPLY 



B 



R 



B 



U. 



26 SACKVILLE ST., t 
PICCADILLY, 
LONDON, W.I. 

(Tel: REGent 3123, 399S) 
Established 1922 



You 

may now 

TELEPHONE 

your classified 

advertisement 

GEN 6565 

by 12 Noon Wednesday 
for same week, subject 
to space available. 



CAMERA BFXLOWS 

Bellows supplied or fitted 

Write for trade list 

CLEMENT WAIN LIMITED, 

NEWCASTLE, STAFFS 

Telephone : 64506 

C 8974 



IMMEDIATE ADVANCES 

£50 to £20,000 
WITHOUT SECURITY 

REGIONAL TRUST LTD. 

8 CLIFFORD STREET 
NEW BOND STREET. LONDON, W.l 

Phone: Regent 5983 & 2914 

C 353 



DEVELOPING AND PRINTING 



IS PRICING YOUR PROBLEM ? 

KENNETT PRICE MARKERS 

are ultra smart, beautifully designed 
solid plastic markers that will really 
sell your goods. Send now for free 
samples. absolutely no obligation. 
55 Eastgate Street, Winchester, Hants. 



C439 



C 409 



QUALITY FIRST but QUALITY FAST 

and 

Guaranteed per return postal service 
G WENT PHOTOGRAPHIC SERVICE 

Snatchwood Works, Pontypool, MON 
Telephone: Talywain 355 

C274 



FOR YOUR «C & D" LIBRARY 



ESSENTIALS OF TREATMENT 

First Edition 

First appeared as articles in THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST, 1952 
to 1955. Reprinted as bound volume in response to many requests. 
Gives information on the most modern trends in the treatment of diseases of 
the digestive tract, respiratory system, lungs, liver, kidneys, thyroid, heart, 
ear, eye and skin. A guide to measures against burns and scalds, allergies, 
infectious diseases, etc. 1VS 6(1 



Postage 9d. 



Chemist 




ruggist 



28 ESSEX STREET, STRAND, LONDON, W.C.2 



Printed by The Haycc 
and published by the Proprietors, MoRGAr. 



Ltt> 



UBRA 1 



10 Ncate Street. Cambcrwcll. S.F..5, 

I), Limited, at 28 Essex Street, Strand, London, W.C.2. 



88/32 



March 7, 1959 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 




need Milt own 

MEPROBAMATE *REGD. TRADEMARK OF CARTER PRODUCTS INC 

relaxes emotional and muscular tension 

without clouding the consciousness 

In 2 presentations 

Capsules 200 mg. and 400 mg. Each capsule contains 
200 mg. or 400 mg. meprobamate. 
Packing and basic N.H.S. cost: 200 mg. 
bottles of 50 7/4., 250 £1.7.6. 
400 mg. bottles of 50 10/4., 250 £2.4.2. 

Tablets 400 mg. Each scored tablet contains 400 mg. 

meprobamate. Packing and basic N.H.S. 
cost: 400 mg. bottles of 50 10/4., 250 £2.4.2. 



LABORATORI 



LE □ E R LE 

a division of 

CYANAMID OF GREAT BRITAIN LTD. 



London W.C.2 




We have an 

in fart we have many eyes — electronic eyes — which 
see that constant accuracy ami precision are always 
maintained throughout the many processes of manufacture 
ami packaging. 

They also see that your requirements embody the 
latest scientific improvements at no extra cost. They watch 
your interests as well as our own. 

When you buy from COX, you 
buy the best consistently reliable 
products at the lowest reason- 
able prices. 



eye for accuracy 



ARTHUR H. COX & CO. LTD. 
BRIGHTON ENGLAND 



120 YEARS IN THE SERVICE OF PHARMACY