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Full text of "The chemist and druggist [electronic resource]"

CHEMISTaXDRUGGIST 



For Retailer, Wholesaler and Manufacturer 



MARCH 14 1959 





always at hand . . . 



THE NERO AN' 



CREAM 



PROMETHAZINE II YDROCHLORIDE 
FOR FIRST-AID TREATMENT 
OF BURNS 



M&B 

ANTISEPTIC 
EAM 



HI 




AlMTHISAIV 

trade mark brand 

CREA 



PROPAMIDINE CUE AM 



FOR ALL MINOR INJURIES 



MEPYRA MINE MA LEA TE 
FOR SKIN IRRITATIONS DUE TO 
ALLERGY OR SENSITIZATION AND 
INSECT BITES AND STINGS 
( Retail price 3 s Od.) 




MANUFACTURED BY 



MAY & II A K I K LTD • DAGI.NHAM 



( Retail price 3s 6d. ) ( Retail price 2s Od. ) 

DISTRIBUTORS: PHARMACEUTICAL SPECIALITIES (MAY & BAKER) LTD 



M&B i,r,n,,l Medical Products 



m 

DAGENHAM 



I 



SMITH 

of 

Edinburgh 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 
ii March 14. I9S9 



CASCARA 



reparations of Cascara Sagrada, including 
Dry Extract B.P.. Granular, for the manufacture 
of tablets. 




Chrysarobin B.P.C. 1949 — large or small quantities 
offered at keenest rates. 



CODEINE 



Codeine Phosphate Special (Smith) is recognised 
throughout the world as the Codeine of choice for the 
manufacture of tablets. 




Alkaloid, Salicylate and Sulphate available in all sizes 
of packs from I grain upwards. Quotations on request. 




ethidine Hydrochloride B P. for the preparation 
injections and tablets. Offered subject to D D. 

Regulations. 



T fit H SMITH LTD BLANDFIELD CHEMICAL WORKS EDINBURGH II 



March 14, 1959 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

I.C.I. Aerosol Insect Spray 



BIG CUTS IN 
PRICES - PLUS 



BONUS OFFER! 



PRICE CUTS 

5 oz. reduced from 5/6d. to 4/6d. retail 

IO/6d. to 9/ 




12 OZ. 
20 OZ. 



3S 



31 



l7/6d. to 15/- 



55 



BONUS OFFER 

5% extra discount on these trade prices 
for all orders received before April 30th: 

5 OZ. 37/ 1 Od. trade doz. (minimum 1 doz.) 
12 OZ. 75/7d. trade doz. (minimum i doz.) 

20 OZ. 126/- trade doz. (any quantity) 

Note minimum quantities on 5 oz. and 12 oz. packs to 
qualify for Bonus Terms. 

Please discuss credit for existing stocks with our repre- 
sentative when he calls. 

Three powerful insecticides combine to make I.C.I. 
Aerosol Insect Spray outstandingly effective. First, gamma m 
BHC; second, pyrethrin; third, piperonyl butoxide. To-P 
gethcr they form an insect spray that is both quick-acting 
and persistent — lethal to flying insect pests of all kinds, yet 
harmless to human beings and animals. 

Leading women's magazines will carry advertisements for I.C.I. Aerosol Insect Spray in 
summer issues. Counter leaflets, showcards and crowners are available for your own display. 

IMPERIAL CHEMICAL INDUSTRIES LIMITED Pharmaceuticals Division Wilmslow Cheshire 

Ph.905 





2 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 14, 19 




1 asil> assembled 
without spanners 



To meet domiciliary oxygen therapy 
prescriptions stock the Type H.S. Set now. 

THE WALTER KIDDE COMPANY LTD. 



8e/vue Rood, Northolt, Middlesex 
Telephone : Wox/ow 1061 




h 14, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 




Advertisements on TV reach 18,000,000 people, 
and press advertising 26,000,000 



Through the compelling medium of television, and 
powerful advertisements in the national daily and 
Sunday newspapers, the advantages of Disprin are 
being firmly impressed on the public mind. 

This wide-scale advertising is aimed to educate 
the public in the qualities of Disprin as a speedy, 
safe, pain-reliever; an analgesic which, because it 



dissolves, averts the danger common to non-soluble 
aspirins — that of acid particles of tablet lingering 
in the stomach to cause gastric disorder. 

So when your customers ask you for an analgesic 
to relieve headaches, 'flu, rheumatism, neuralgia 
and similar ailments, recommend soluble Disprin 
— the analgesic approved by the medical profession. 



Take advantage of large-scale DISPRIN advertising - 
see that you have full stocks of DISPRIN 



DISPRIN 



retail prices (incl. P.T.) ioo-tablet foil 
5/6; 50-tablet bottle 3/3; 28-tablet foil i/ni; 
26-tablet bottle i/ii^; 8-tablet foil gd. 

trade prices {excl. P.T.) ioo-tablet foil 
38/10 doz.; 50-tablet bottle 23/- doz. ; 28-tablet 
foil 13/10 doz.; 26-tablet bottle 13/10 doz.; 
8-tablet foil 5/2 doz. 



RECKITT & SONS LTD.. PHARMACEUTICAL DEPARTMENT. HULL 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 14, 1959 



Have you 
AN IODINE 
PROBLEM? 



If at any time you require advice 
or information on the pharma- 
ceutical uses of iodine the Chilean 
Iodine Educational Bureau will 
be pleased to help you. No charge 
is made for the Bureau's services. 

I CHILEAN IODINE 

EDUCATIONAL BUREAU 

Chile House, Ropemaker Street, London, E.C.2 



Whitaker's 
for Dyes 

"LUTON" STRAW HAT DYES and 
"AURORAL" COLD WATER DYES 

are nationally advertised and are regularly requested. 
Attractive Pattern Cards and Showcards supplied. 

Write for Order Form giving full lists of colours, prices and terms to: 

WHITAKER & CO. (KENDAL) LTD., KENDAL. 



Powerful advertisements on 
rrvand in ihe National Press 
are now appearing. tmi 

■ESULTS DEPEND ON YOU ! 

Display Victory-V Lozenges 
on your counter. Use the 

ruil POINT-OF-SALI »IDS. 




CASH IN ON 

VICTORY-V 

— ORDER TODAY 
from your usual supplier 



VICTORY FACTORIES 



NEISON. LANCS 



Now 

coughs abound 

SUGGEST BESORBON There's nothing 
like pure safe Besorbon to clear up 
obstinate colds and catarrh. 

NO TOBACCO Besorbon is a purely 
medicinal snuff. It is packed in handy 
hygienic tins. Each contains the full 
instructions. 

FREE COUNTER UNIT Stock Besor- 
bon by the dozen and obtain the attrac- 
tive impulse selling counter unit free. 
Display it prominently. You'll gain more 
sales — more business. 

It's big selling for 

BESORBON 



REGD TRADF MAP» 



MEDICINAL SNUFF 

Kemsales Ltd. - Eastcheap London, E.C.3 



OVER 19 d 
^PROFIT |= 
IN THE TILL 





KEARSLEYS 
PILLS 



Over 1/9 BOX PROFIT by ordering 
I dozen 6/5 size. Bonus given on every 
dozen (13). It pays to push this size. 

C. & G. KEARSLEY LTD. 

71 DARTMOUTH ROAD, LONDON, S.E.23 



C Always in Demand 

RODINE 

Rodine Phosphorus, Rodine Red Squill, 
Rodine Warfarin (Rcady-to-usc or Concentrate), 
and Special Rodine Mouse Warfarin. 

THOMAS HAH LET LTD., RODINE WORKS. PERTH, SCOTLAND J 



BURROUGHS 

ABSOLUTE ALCOHOL 

JAMES BURROUGH LTD. 1 CUE DISTILLERY LONDON S.L11 



March 14, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



5 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 



Academic Depot, Ltd Classified Section 

Acme Vacuum Flask Division 15 

Aspro-Nicholas, Ltd 42 

B. & P. Laboratories, Ltd 50 

Beatson, Clark & Co., Ltd 28 

British Dyewood Co., Ltd., The 56 

Britton, Malcolm & Co., Ltd 61 

Brown, N. C, Ltd 54 

Burrough, James, Ltd 4 

Burroughs Wellcome & Co 38 

Carnegies of Welwyn, Ltd 21 

Cartwright, W. B., Ltd 6 

Chilean Iodine Educational Bureau 4 

Continental Laboratories, Ltd 59 

Cosette, Ltd 54 

Cox, Arthur H., & Co., Ltd 8 

Cupal, Ltd 37 

Cuxson, Gerrard & Co., Ltd 8 

Dae Health Laboratories, Ltd Cover iv 

Dales Pharmaceuticals, Ltd 56 

Daniel, Richard, & Son, Ltd 23 

Distillers Co. (Biochemicals), Ltd., The 43 



Evan Williams Co., Ltd 22 

Evans Medical Supplies, Ltd Interleaved Edit., 36 

F.A.I.R. Laboratories. Ltd 53 

Fletcher & Farlow, Ltd 60 

Freeder Bros. Paper Mills, Ltd 52 

Fryer & Co. (Nelson), Ltd 4 

Furman, B. N. (Productions), Ltd 58 

Genatosan, Ltd 26, 27 

George, Ernest J., & Co Classified Section 

Gerhardt, C. F., Ltd., ' Siegfried ' 57 

Goya, Ltd. 24, 25 

Graesser Salicylates, Ltd 60 

Groves, O. R., Ltd Interleaved Edit., 298 

Halex .: 14 

Harley, Thos., Ltd , 4 

Harrison, Alf., & Sons. Ltd 52 

Holloway, E. R.. Ltd 48 

Horlicks 29 

Hon Laboratories 44 

Imperial Chemical Industries. Ltd. (Pharmaceuticals 
Division) 1 



Imperial Chemical Industries. Ltd. (Plastics Division) 7 

(continued overleaf) 



pillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll^ 



LEWIS & BURROWS LTD. 

WISH TO ACQUIRE SUBSTANTIAL BUSINESSES 
| SHOWING REASONABLE PROFITS | 

| • Commanding Main Road positions essential j 

• Minimum Turnover £15,000 per annum | 

• Better Class Trade with good Cosmetic j 
Agencies preferred j 

WRITE IN CONFIDENCE TO THE COMPANY SECRETARY 
| J. P. JEFFERY, F.C.I.S. Lewis & Burrows Ltd., Mappin House, Winsley St., London, W.I j 

iniiHiiiiiiiiiM 



6 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 14, 1959 



INDEX (cont.) 

Jeffreys. Miller & Co.. Ltd 62 

Kearsley, C. & G., Ltd 4 

Kellys. John (London). Ltd 58 

Kemsales. Ltd 4 

Kidde. The Walter. Co., Ltd 2 

Lastonet Products. Ltd 23 

Laughton & Sons. Ltd 20. 40, 45 

Lederle Laboratories Division ....Interleaved Edit., 33 

Lewis & Burrows, Ltd 5 

London Commercial Electrical Stores. Ltd. 54 

Macdonald & Son. Ltd 17 

Manesty Machines, Ltd. 46 

Maw. S.. Son & Sons, Ltd. 58 

Mawson & Proctor Pharmaceuticals, Ltd. 41 

May & Baker, Ltd 18, 19, Front Cover 

Medico-Biological Laboratories. Ltd 46 

Merck Sharp & Dohme. Ltd 12 

Morson. Thos.. & Son, Ltd 40 

Ormerod Engineers. Ltd 54 

Ormskirk Photo Services, Ltd Classified Section 

Orridge & Co Classified Section 

Ortho Pharmaceutical, Ltd 49 



Paines & Byrne, Ltd. 13 

Pharmethicals (London). Ltd Interleaved Edit.. 297 

Philips Electrical, Ltd.. ' Philishave ' 32 

Proprietary Pressure Packages, Ltd 30 

Rapidol, Ltd 31 

Reckitt & Sons, Ltd.. ' Disprin ' 3 

Remington Rand, Ltd Interleaved Edit.. 34, 35 

Riddell Products, Ltd 44 

Roussel Laboratories Cover iii 

Rozalex. Ltd 52 

Searle. G. D.. & Co., Ltd 51 

Smith Kline & French Laboratories, Ltd 47 

Smith. T. & H., Ltd Cover ii 

Smith. T. J., & Nephew, Ltd 16 

Societa Azioni per Industrie Agricole Meridionali . . 60 

Stafford-Miller. Ltd 42 

Stewart, Goodall & Dunlop, Ltd 56 

Suttley & Silverlock. Ltd 57 

Thermos. Ltd 10, 11 

Ulter (Bradford), Ltd 9 

Vitamins. Ltd 39 

Vogue Vanities. Ltd 52 

Whitaker & Co. (Kendal). Ltd 4 

Whitecross Optical Co 50 

Wilkinson. S. W., & Co., Ltd 60 

Wood. Bastow & Co 55 




\ 



TABLETS 



CARTWRIGHT S 

For the production of tablets to any formula consult 
W. B. CARTWRIGHT LTD., Manufacturing Chemists, RAWD0N, LEEDS 

We would welcome Export, Hospital or Wholesale enquiries 




March 14, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



We're putting the 
f; ' Alkathene' label before 
every woman's eyes 




Your customers are bound to see our advertising 
for 'Alkathene'. Colour pages in women's magazines; 
30-second T. V. commercials ; a 2-minute colour film. They 
all say 'Look for the 'Alkathene' label'. And your custo- 
mers will look for it, when they come into your shop. 

It will certainly pay you to sell goods labelled 'Alka- 
thene'. The label is a sign of good quality and reliability. 

To meet the growing demand, make sure you have 
plenty of goods labelled 'Alkathene'. Display them well 
and cash in on this forceful publicity drive. 



FREE DISPLAY MATERIAL 

to link your shop with 'Alkathene' 
national advertising, available on 
application through your usual 
trade channels or direct to Publicity 
Dept., Plastics Division, Imperial 
Chemical Industries Ltd., Welwyn 
Garden City, Herts. Shelf cards can 
be obtained from individual manu- 
facturers. 



'Alkathene' is the registered trade mark for the polythene manufactured by LCI. (\C 
IMPERIAL CHEMICAL INDUSTRIES LIMITED • LONDON • S.W.I ^ 



8 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 14, 1959 




EES 




Excellent formula. Modern pack and Display material 

CARTONED TUBES PACKED 
IN SHOWOUTERS OF I DOZEN 

Write to us for large sample tube and generous 
Trade Terms 





stock up early this year 



ARTHUR H. COX & CO. LTD 
BRIGHTON ' ENGLAND 



the service of pharmacy for 120 Year 




MOTORISTS 

FIRST AID OUTFIT 



There is a golden opportunity for you with this R.A.C. sponsored Outfit, 
and you will be well advised to make a feature display. In the familiar 
R.A.C. colours the tins are very attractive, and in addition to the sales 
of the Outfit itself, you would establish your pharmacy as suppliers of 
First Aid Outfits. There is a 
steadily increasing demand for 
First Aid Outfits, possibly greater 
than you realise, due to legislation 
and aroused public interest. As 
you are no doubt aware, we are 
the First Aid specialists and as 
pioneers we offer the widest 
choice of Outfits, with contents 
backed by 75 years' experience. 

A PRODUCT OF * 



SIZE: 5} in. x 3{ in. x \\ in. 
TRADE PRICE — 5/4 each 
RETAIL PRICE — 7/- each 

Carriage paid £6 and over (all goods). 



OLDBURY 



BIRMINGHAM 




March 14, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



9 



THE WORLD'S LOWEST PRICED, MOST 
EFFICIENT and FASTEST SELLING 




6 oz. Size 

0D 

Retail 
Cost 
34/- doz. 

(Tax Free) 



12 oz. Size 

W 

Retail 
Cost 
63/- doz. 

(Tax Free) 



AEROSOLS 

* GIVE THE PUBLIC 

WHAT THEY WANT -fc 

Advertising in LOCAL 
and NATIONAL PRESS 
MAY, JUNE & JULY 



The News of the World 
Yorkshire Evening Post 
Manchester Evening News 
Liverpool Echo 
Sheffield Star 

Newcastle Evening Chronicle 
Lancashire Evening Post 
Bristol Evening Post 
Glasgow Evening Citizen 
etc. etc. 



London Evening Star 
London Evening News 
Yorkshire Evening News 
Bradford Telegraph and Argus 
Birmingham Despatch 
Hull Daily Mail 

Middlesbrough Evening Gazette 
Northern Echo 
Blackburn Evening Telegraph 
etc. etc. 



See our Representatives for BONUS DISCOUNTS 
CERTAIN ORDERS PLACED BEFORE MARCH 31st 



6 oz. Size 

HD 

Retail 
Cost 
34/- doz. 

(Tax Free) 



2 oz. Size 

W 

Retail 
Cost 
63/- doz. 

(Tax Free) 



ORDER 



HAZE Air Purifier 

6oz. (3/11) 12 oz. (7/3) 

FLORET INSECTICIDE 

B.H.C. Gammexane-Pyrethrum 

6 oz. (3/11) | 12 oz. (7/3) 

Lilac \ 

Lavender 

Jasmin 

Gardenia 

Bouquet 

Carnation 



Name..., 
Address 



MINIMUM DIRECT ORDERS— 2 DOZ. (Assorted lines may be ordered). 



ULTER (BRADFORD) LTD., 12 BANK STREET, WIBSEY, BRADFORD, 6, YORKSHIRE 



10 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST March 14, 1959 




March 14, 1959 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 11 




THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 14, 1959 





The fastest-selling ethical throat lozenges. 

Not all throat lozenges receive the approval of 
young patients ! Taste is important. 

'Tyrozets' and 'Sucrets' are pleasant to 

taste and are willingly accepted, 
even when recommended for children. 
Against this background of 
ready acceptance by children and adults, 
'Tyrozets' and 'Sucrets' instantly 
and safely soothe sore throats. 

'Tyrozets' (exempt P.T.) retail at 2/6d.per tube; 
'Sucrets' at 2/6d. per tin ( including P. T.) . 

' Tyrozets' ami ' Sucrets' can be sold by 
pharmaceutical chemists without a prescription. 

'Tyrozets' and 'Sucrets' are Regd. Trade Marks 



MERCK SHARP & DOHME LIMITED 

HODDESDON, HERTS 



March 14, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



"He's such a problem, 
Doctor ....!" 

In every other respect a normal healthy 
child, he has never been dry at night, with the result 
that he has acquired undeservedly the label "difficult" 
As he grows older his shame and embarrassment will 
become more acute as those around him become less 
tolerant of his disability. 

In his case, as in the case of many others, Di-sipidin, 
by controlling enuresis symptomatically on strictly 
physiological lines, offers a real prospect of an 
early return to normal function with a consequent 
restoration of confidence and self-respect. 



References: BMJ {1954)11, 1433; 
BMJ (1954)1 1038; BMJ (1955)1 1194; 
LANCET (1955)i 1228; 
LANCET (1956)ii 1334 



DI-SIPIDIN 





INSUFFLATIONS 



Packings: Capsules: 25, 100, 500 

Outfit : Di-sipidin Insufflator and 25 capsules. 



PAINES & BYRNE LTD., PABYRN LABORATORIES, GREENFORD, MIDDX. 



I 4 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 14, 1959 



CkwtheA/ happy ev&rrt m 



HALEX 

nu/isehu wote 




Polythene Baby Bath 

with all the features Mothers look for :— 




Smooth, rigid, safe and unbreakable Decorated with colourful animal transfer 
Cannot chip or rust Easy to clean without abrasives 
Folding wooden stand to match Colours : White, pink or blue 

Retail Price 60I-, complete with stand. 

YET ANOTHER IN THE FAST-SELLING FAMILY OF HALEX NURSERYWARE 







£5$ 



TOILET SETS 



CHAMBER POTS FEEDING BOWLS MUGS TRAINING SEATS 



Order now through your usual wholesaler 

HALEX a Division of the British Xylonite Company Ltd. HIGHAM'S PARK, LONDON, E.4 



March 14, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 




ACME VACUUM FLASK 

DIVISION 

ANTIFERENCE LIMITED 

BICESTER ROAD, AYLESBURY, BUCKS Tel: Aylesbury 2511 (6 lines) 



ONE OF THE WORLD-WIDE ANTIFERENCE GROUP OF COMPANIES 
LONDON • BRUSSELS • TORONTO • SYDNEY 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 14, 1959 




The big Nivea sales drive is starting! So place your order now — and make 
sure of your extra profits from the Nivea Bonus offer. Remember, we 
are offering a Purchase Tax Guarantee as well ! 

Full details of Nivea Bonus have been mailed to all chemists. Have you 
received your copy? // not, please write at once to: 



SMITH & NEPHEW LIMITED, BESSEMER ROAD, WELWYN GARDEN CITY, HERTS. (S&Nj 



March 14, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



A BIG ADVANCE 

in dressings packs 




*»«»*- . . .... 




Nothing like this before .... 
a complete range of surgical 
dressings in film-wrapped cartons 
.... unrivalled for display . . 
better-than-ever protection. 



Certor 



w 

Regd. 



BLUE 

printed cartons for Cotton Wool 

GREEN 

printed cartons for White Lint 

RED 

printed cartons for Boric Lint 

MAROON 

printed cartons for Gauze 



FILM-WRAPPED 



CARTONNED DRESSINGS 



B-P-C 

Full standard N.H.S. range 



BETTER FOR YOUR CUSTOMERS. . . BETTER FOR YOU 



Also in film-wrapped cartons — 

CERTOR BAB r" COTTON WOOL • M AN SI L HOSPITAL COTTON WOOL 



MACDONALD & SON LTD. of MANCHESTER & LONDON 



PORTLAND MILL, ASHTON-UNDER-LYNE, LANCS. 25 HOLYWELL ROW, LONDON, E.C.2 
TELEPHONES : ASHTON-UNDER-LYNE 4422 (10 LINES). BISHOPSGATE 4809 (2 LINES) 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



SOUND FOUNDATIONS 

Make M&B chemicals the basis of your pharmaceutical manufac- 
tures. Our long experience, extending over a century, in the manu- 
facture, handling, and use of fine chemicals supports our claim that 
our products are entirely suitable in every respect for your purposes. 




For the manufacture of TABLETS 

ACETARSOL • CALOMEL • CODEINE PHOSPHATE AND OTHER OPIATES 
CAFFEINE ALKALOID AND SALTS • CARBARSONE • BARBITURATES 
DEXAMPHETAMINE SULPHATE • BISMUTH SALTS • AMINOPHYLLINE 
BROMIDES • SULPHONAMIDES • THEOBROMINE ALKALOID AND 
PREPARATIONS 



For the manufacture of PREPARATIONS FOR INJECTION 

AMINOPHYLLINE • CAFFEINE AND SODIUM BENZOATE • MERSALYL 
AMPHETAMINE SULPHATE • METHYLAMPHETAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE 
BARBITURATES • BISMUTH OXYCHLORIDB • BISMUTH SALICYLATE 
COCAINE SALTS • OPIATES 



We shall be pleased to 
receive enquiries for these and any other M&B brand 
pharmaceutical chemicals. 



March 14, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 




THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST March 14, 1959 




traitau 



jewelled sun glasses 
set the pace 
in style and sales 
for 1959 



ask for illustrated 
brochure and order 
your stocks and 
eounter dispenser 
NOW from 
your wholesaler 




"TW^ advertising introduces Stratton Jewelled 
Sun Glasses on the London, Midlands and Northern 
net-works in a ten weeks' campaign in 
May, June and July. 20 million viewers will sec 
the commercials for Stratton Jewelled Sun Glasses. 
Jewelled frames, designed by Stratton, give these sun glasses 
a glamour that makes them a fashion accessory. They 
are so pretty women will wear them whenever 
they get the chance, sight-seeing 
and shopping, holidaying on the 
Riviera, at the beach and in the country. 
Stratton Sun Glasses will sell on sight, 
and set the pace for sales in 1959. 

RHODOGLASS in 5 colours 

Smoke, Green, Blue, Rose, and Degrade. 

8 styles for women. 
2 conservative styles Tor men. 

Retailing at 8'6 w 15 '6 

Each in transparent carrying sleeve. 
Rotatable stand (26" high with a 
9" base, as shown) and display aids 
FREE with sun classes. 



Made 



LAUGHTON & SONS 



WARSTOCK ROAD, BIRMINGHAM, 14 
takers of the famous Stratton oompacl 





March 14, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



THE TREE OF LIFE, SYMBOL OF THE HIGHEST 
QUALITY IN FINE CHEMICALS TODAY. 

CARNEGIES 

of WELWYN 



ESTABLISHED 
1911 



MANUFACTURERS 
AND WORLD 
SUPPLIERS OF 
ADRENALINE 
AND ITS 
HOMOLOGUES 



For nearly half a century the name 
Carnegies has served as a standard 
in the fine chemical field for products 
of utmost purity and rigid adherence 
to pharmaceutical specification. 
Direct importation of raw materials, 
and the completion of every process 
under our own roof at Welwyn 
Garden City, enables us to compete 
successfully with world suppliers in 
any part of the globe. Yet we wel- 
come and treat with equal importance 
the smaller orders too. 



Enquiries are invited for • 



ADRENALINE 

ADRENACHROME 

MONOSEMICARBAZONE 

AMINOPHYLLINE 

ATROPINE & SALTS 

BISMUTH SALTS 

BRUCINE & SALTS 

CAFFEINE & SALTS 

CHRYSAROBIN 

EPHEDRINE & SALTS 

HO M ATROPINE & SALTS 

HYDANTOIN DERIVATIVES 

IODIDES 

ISONICOTINIC ACID 

HYDRAZ1DE 

ISOPRENALINE SALTS 

LITHIUM SALTS 

METHOIN 

NORADRENALINE & SALTS 
P.A.S. 

PIPERAZINE & SALTS 

RESERPINE 

SANTONIN 

STRYCHNINE & SALTS 
THEOBROMINE & SALTS 
THIOMERSALATE 
QUININE & SALTS 
CINCHONA FEBRIFUGE 
TOTAQUINA 



CARNEGIES OF WELWYN LIMITED 

Manufacturers of Fine Chemicals WELWYN GARDEN CITY • ENGLAND 
Telephone : welwyn garden city 5001 (10 lines) Cables : carnegies, welwyngardencity Telex : London 28676 



22 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 14, 1959 



m BEING mmim IN all 

mm papers! 

Evan WiUiami 



Double Beauty Hand Cream 
advertisements will be seen — 





DOUBLE BEAUTY 
FOR HANDS AND NAILS 



TIMES' 



PLUS massive T.V. coverage now 

EVERY WEEKMGHT ! 

a total viewing of — 



W,t00M0 





Wonderful News! Evan Williams and leading 
skin specialists have together developed a sen- 
sational new hand cream to protect and beautify 
your hands and nails as never before. Housework, 
harsh detergents and winter winds remove natural 
oils from your hands causing rough red skin and brittle 
nails. Evan Williams sensational new discovery con- 
tains special oils to replace those lost and to make your 
hands softer, whiter, lovelier, than ever before. After use 
■ there's none of the stickiness you get with ordinary creams 
I — just satin smoothness and the beautiful fragrance of its 
f exclusive French perfume. 

ress your hands and nails to beauty with 

Evan William 

BLE BEAUTY HAND CREAM 



PLUS 



exceptional introductory offer to retail chemists! 



Ask our Representative for details of this big profit 
introductory offer to you ! 



EVAN WILLIAMS CO., LTD., 79BOND STREET W.I 



March 14, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



23 



IF YOU ARE LOOKING FOR A TABLET MANUFACTURER TO HANOLE YOUR PRODUCT 
BE IT LARGE OR SMALL, IN THOUSANDS OR MILLIONS, WHY NOT 

> J J J J 

CONTACT ONE OF THE FOREMOST MAKERS WHO HAVE TAKEN PRIDE IH 




J 




MANUFACTURING TABLETS & PILLS FOR MANY YEARS 







RICHARD DANIEL & SON, LTD. DERBY 



Write us at Mansfield Road or ring Derby 4067 1 (Ten lines) 




7 iir nHftt r~ 

m -" v ^ pas es your P rof,ts! 

stocking increases s _ 




First In the field once again, with Improvement* 
In surgical stockings, Lastonet now introduo* 

light-resistant rubber into their elastic net. 

Because this largely prevents the deteriora- 
tion caused to rubber by exposure to light, it 
enhances the efficiency and lengthens the life of 
Lastonet Elastic New Stockings. 

With this added advantage. Lastonet Stocking! 
will be even more widely prescribed on the NHS. 
and your profits must be increased. 

No stock problems with Lastonet Stockings! No 
risk. Every stocking is individually made to the 
patient's measure. Quick delivery and an excel- 
lent profit margin are assured. 




/A* 



llNsff^ ELASTIC 
~ NET STOCKINGS 



Nylon Or Cotton Send today for 
stocking measurement forms 
and display material. 



LASTONET PRODUCTS LTD, CABN BRBA. BSDSDTH. CORNWALL 



1ST AND DRUGGIST 
March 14. 1959 




Remember . . . 



ft 



Soon, there will be an unforgettable new perfume called REMEMBER. 
Women will be enchanted with it! REMEMBER is for springtime; 
the newest and loveliest perfume to be created by 



26 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 14, 1959 




CHEMISTS' ASSISTANTS COMPETITION 



Here are the 53 prize-winners ! 




£100 goes to MRS. E. M. CHIMES 

OF J. F. BUTLIN & SON, 110 KIRBY ROAD, LEICESTER 



^^^^ 



£50 goes to MRS. E. EWEN 
OF S. D. EWEN, 97 VICTORIA ROAD, DUNDEE 



3rd 




£25 goes to MISS K. WILLIAMS 

OF L. E. OLSEN. 8 THE OVAL, BELMONT ROAD, HEREFORD 



consolation prizes 



MISS AICKEN, BELFAST 

MISS AIMES, LONDON 

MRS. BAMFORD, ROCHDALE 

MR. BATEY, NEWCASTLE ON TYNE 

MISS BIRSE, HAMPSTEAD 

MR. BRASSINGTON, NOTTINGHAM 

MISS BROOKES, LANCASTER 

MRS. BROWN, WINDLESHAM 

MISS CAUGE, WIDNES 

MR. CLOUTING, CIRENCESTER 

MRS. CRUMLISH, BAILLIESTON 

MISS DAVEY. MIDDLESBROUGH 

MRS. FRASER, PEMBROKE DOCK 

MR. FRASER-BETTS, SOUTHWICK 

MR. GEWATER, WILLESDEN 

MISS GRAHAM, GOOLE 

MRS. GRASSAM, PINNER 

MISS GREEN, WREXHAM 

MISS HENDERSON, PAISLEY 

MRS. HERD. BECKENHAM 

MISS HILL, WOMBWELL 

MRS. HOYLE, COVENTRY 

MISS JOHNSTON, HARROW 

MISS JONES, SOUTH NORMANTON 

MISS LEE, RAMSBOTTOM 



GO TO THESE 50 RUNNERS-UP ! 

miss lewis, leatherhead 

mr. madge, plymouth 

miss mcconnell, perth 

miss Mclaughlin, Glasgow 

mr. meakin, loughborough 

mrs. morley, southsea 

mr. musson, romford 

miss netherway, torquay 

miss parish, melton mowbray 

mrs. pettett, london 

miss ransom, paddock wood 

mrs. roberts, nelson 

miss robinson, beverley 

mrs. royle, manchester 

miss scott, glasgow 

miss smith, sutton-in-ashfield 

mr. thomson, london 

mr. trower, st. leonards-on-sea 

mr. vanarey, harlow 

miss walker, dunkeld 

miss watson, darlington 

miss wattie, albrighton 

miss wood, bridgnorth 

miss woodvine, newcastle 

mrs. woolrich, bromborough 



March 14, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



27 



Here are the CORRECT answers 
to the Sanatogen contest ! 



Here are the ten questions used in the ' Sanatogen' 
competition with their alternative answers. The 
answers, chosen by a team of experts, are set 
in bold type. 

1 I know 'Sanatogen' is a good tonic, but isn't it expensive? 

o A small jar of 'Sanatogen' costs no more than 40 cigar- 
ettes. 

u "Sanatogen' is not expensive at all when you consider the 
marked improvement in your health which follows. 

~ Not if you regard a course of 'Sanatogen' as a real 
investment in your health. 

2 Is 'Sanatogen' difficult to take? 



a : 



No, mixed with milk or water most people find 



Sanatogen' is readily acceptable. 



No, a cup of 'Sanatogen' can be made easily and quickly, 
fa and can be flavoured with coffee or cocoa, or nearly 
anything that you fancy. 

~ Made with hot milk and flavoured with sugar or a pinch of 
salt, 'Sanatogen' is a pleasant drink, especially at bedtime. 



3 What's so special about the protein in 'Sanatogen'? 

g Some forms of protein are more easily digested than 
others. ' Sanatogen' is particularly easy to digest. 

jU 'Sanatogen' is a first-class protein, specially combined 
with sodium glycerophosphate to have a tonic effect. 

It is highly utilised by the body, which means you obtain 
maximum benefit. 

4- What do doc'ors think about 'Sanatogen'? 

g 'Sanatogen' has been recommended by more than 25,009 
doctors. 

fa 'Sanatogen' is used in hospitals all over the world. 
C Many doctors use 'Sanatogen' themselves. 



5 Why is 'Sanatogen' so often recommended for expectant 
and nursing mothers? 

p. 'Sanatogen' supplies the extra protein these people must 
have. 

u 'Sanatogen' helps to combat stress conditions which are 
usually unavoidable during the nursing period. 

q 'Sanatogen' is well known for its general strengthening 
and body-building properties. 



6 Why is ' Sanatogen ' not generally available on the National 
Health Service? 

q 'Sanatogen' consists entirely of nutritional' substances 
and is, therefore, regarded as a food and not a medicine. 

jj Although having valuable restorative properties, especially 
when run down or nervy, ' Sanatogen' is not a drug. 

q 'Sanatogen' is classed as a food because it can often be 
taken with advantage to supplement the normal diet. 

7 How does 'Sanatogen' help to reduce weight? 

q 'Sanatogen' feeds extra protein which helps to burn up 
excess fat. 

Ij 'Sanatogen' provides nourishment without supplying 
extra fat. 

C ' Sanatogen' is free from both fat and carbohydrate. 

8 Why is ' Sanatogen ' so often recommended for ' nerves ' ? 

o Because 'nerves' result from physical or emotional strain 
and 'Sanatogen' helps to deal with both. 

Because generations of users and doctors have found 
'Sanatogen' successful in overcoming 'nerves'. 

q When people are nervy they tend to absorb less nourish- 
ment from their food. 'Sanatogen' provides concentrated 
nourishment which is easily absorbed. 

Q Why is 'Sanatogen' so good for convalescents? 

g 'Sanatogen' is easily digested and absorbed. 

U 'Sanatogen' promotes appetite and builds up the run-down 
person. 

q 'Sanatogen' helps to overcome the nervous tension which 
so often accompanies convalescence. 

"3 O What is 'Sanatogen'? 

g A combination of milk protein and sodium glycerophos- 
phate made by a unique and complicated process. 

u A tonic which supplies essential nutrients such as protein 
and phosphorus in an easily digested form. 

C A nerve tonic which is as natural in its action as sunshine. 



No completely correct answers were received, 
but each of the winners answered eight questions 
correctly. The summary of knowledge of 
'Sanatogen was taken into consideration in 
making the final assessment. 



28 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 14. 1959 



Pack to Attract 



The discerning Pharmacist demands a 
container which combines attractive 
appearance with sound functional design. 
Beatson Bottles are produced especially 
to satisfy both these requirements — they 
look well, store well, handle well, pour 
well — Beatson Medicals, Panels, Ribbed 
Ovals, Emulsions. Tablets, Olive Oils. 
Poisons, Winchesters and, in fact, every 
bottle used in Pharmacy is the better 
for being " BEATSON " 





...in Beatson bottles 




BEATSON CLARK & CO., LTD. 

GLASS BOTTLE MANUFACTURERS 
ROTHERHAM Established 1751 YORKS. 



'The Sign of a 



Good Bottle' 



ItC 82 



March 14, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



The M'x a Shake 

season opens with a bonus 




On all orders received before 30th April the following extra stocking-up bon- 
uses are offered to retailers: 1 x 12-dozen cases, or 2 x 6-dozen cases — normal 
retail terms 20% plus additional 5% 

2-5 x 12-dozen cases, or 4-10 x 6-dozen cases — normal retail terms 20% and 
5% plus additional 7%% 

6 and over x 12-dozen cases, or 12 and over x 6-dozen cases — normal retail 
terms 20% and 10% plus additional 10% 

lllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 



PINEAPPLE 



DISPLAY 

makes the most of your bonus 

A recent survey of Mix-a-Shake users showed that nearly HALF of them saw 
it for the first time IN THE SHOP! So display and increase your sales. 

A big television campaign for Mix-a-Shake begins in mid-April. Make 
certain you have the STOCKS and the DI SPLAY to tie-in with the advertising. 

Mix-a-Shake 

Available in cases of 6 or 12 dozen packets selling at 6d. per i-oz packet — 
one flavour only per case. 

Ask your wholesaler for Mix-a-Shake with the new stocking-up Bonus 
Offer, or write direct to : — 

HORLICKS LIMITED, SLOUGH, BUCKS. Tel. No.: siough 22322 



30 



THE 



CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 14, 1959 



WEI1C0MEINSTIT0, 
LIBRARY 


Coll. 


WelMOmec 


Col 

.... 






; 




! 




A NEW BIG NAME 
IN AEROSOLS 




. . . and the 
Medicated Cold 
Relief— retail- 
ing at 7j3d. 



See ihe Conquering Hero comes ! This 
great new line in aerosols is going to 
mean big business for you. To start the 
range rolling there's an Air Freshener and 
an Insecticide at 4/6d., an Oven Cleaner 
and a Spot Remover at 5/-. More to follow 
as Hero grows in popularity, backed by 

A 

heavy advertising. 

PROPRIETARY PRESSURE PACKAGES LIMITED 



BACKED BY A 
T.V. AND 
NATIONAL PRESS 
ADVERTISING 
CAMPAIGN TO 
MAKE SELLING EASY 



A.. A 




PRODUCTS 



Please send me details of the special 
introductory offer 



Name 

Address 



Ludgate House, 2 Ludgate Hill, BIRMINGHAM 3 
Telephone : CENtral 3053/4 



2J 



March 14, 1959 THE CHEMIST 




Hair Magic semi-permanent Browns cover 
up to 50% of greying hair in one simple 
operation, with flattering Brown, Ashen 
Brown and Chestnut Brown 



Halt- Magic is. best -for not* ¥uo . bringing 
i4t 8CZ profit oh every bottle you. sell. 

and herec how 

CHEMIST'S PRICE 1/8 per bottle plus go , p.t. 
RETAIL PRICE inc. p.t. 4/- per bottle 
CHEMIST'S PROFIT 1 4 per bottle . . or so-., profit 

and remember 

all the other Hair Magic shades give you 
the same profit. 

CFH/lN5s/l7 



AND DRUGGIST 31 




THE CHEMIST 
AND DRUGGIST 

ESTABLISHED 1859 

The weekly newspaper for pharmacy and 
all sections of the drug, pharmaceutical and 
fine chemical, cosmetic, and allied industries 

Official organ of the Pharmaceutical Society of Ireland 
and the Pharmaceutical Society of Northern Ireland 

Volume 171 March 14, 1959 No. 4125 



CONTENTS 

Guide to New Medicaments ... 295 
How a Consumer's Association 

Works 288 

Irish Medical Representatives ... 296 
Leading Articles: 

Averages and Extremes ... ... 289 

New Horizons for Penicillin ... 289 

A Rate by Any Other Name ... 289 

Reopening of a Closed Market ... 290 

Leicester Branch Dinner (cartoon)... 287 

More Profitable Retailing 283 

"Open Shop" 293 

Payment for Drugs in Scotland ... 282 

Penicillin " Breakthrough " 283 

Pharmaceutical Society of Great 

Britain: Council Meeting ... 294 

Possibilities of Air Transport ... 291 

Statutory Committee 282 

Topical Reflections 279 



Branch Events 


286 


Makers' Activities 


. 296 


Business Changes 


285 


Medical Abstracts 


. 295 


Coming Events 


301 


New Books 


. 292 


Commercial Television 


302 


New Products ... 


. 281 


Company News 


284 


Onward from Galen . 


. 290 


Correspondence 


283 


Personalities 


. 284 


Deaths 


284 


Price Changes ... 


. 302 


Echoes of the Past ... 


290 


Print and Publicity . 


. 302 


In Parliament 


285 


Trade Marks ... 


. 301 


Instruments and 




Trade Notes ... 


. 280 


Apparatus 


280 


Trade Report ... 


. 299 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS, Pp. 5 & 6. 
Classified Advertisements, p. 62. 



PUBLISHED BY 

MORGAN BROTHERS (PUBLISHERS), LTD., 

at 28 Essex Street, Strand, London, W.C.2 

Telephone : Central 6565 
Telegrams : Chemicus, Estrand, London 

WOLVERHAMPTON : 89 Woodland Avenue, Teuenhall Wood. 
GLASGOW ■ 160 Nether Auldhouse Road, S.3. Phone: Langside 2679. 
LEEDS, 16: 32 Wynford Rise, West Park. Phone: Leeds 67 8438. 

ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION 
which includes The Chemist and Druggist Diary and 
Year Book. £2 10s. Single copies one shilling each. 



32 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 14, 1959 




to a new high— with the 'Philishave' Jet 



It's the jet age right enough - the 'Philishave' Jet age ! 
For this new version of the world's top-selling dry 
shaver has the finest shaving technique Man 
has ever known. It shaves faster. It shaves closer. 
It shaves more easily and comfortably in every way. 
In fact, it's got everything - including mammoth 
advertising. Yes, you're certainly on to a good 
thing with the 'Philishave' Jet ! 

PHILIPS _ 

PH I LI SHAVE y&t" 



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: : 

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» New instant ' Press . . . Blow ' Cleaning. New two-tone * 

: styling. Dual-voltage: AC DC I 1 0- 1 30v . and 2OO-250v. • 

t £8*1 5*0 (lax paid) : 

: : 

J The other 'Philishave' mode's: Standrrd-vo:t £6.16.0 (tax paid). J 

I Battery model £7.11.3 (tax paid). t 

» « 
********************************************************** 



A PRODUCT OF 




PHILIPS ELECTRICAL LTD 



(PS974A) 




Ch em i st an d Druggist 



Volume 171 



MARCH 14, 1959 



No. 4125 



British Approved Names 

SUPPLEMENTARY LIST ISSUED 

THE British Pharmacopoeia Commission has issued the following sup- 
plementary list of approved names : — 



Approved 
Name 

Azapetine 



Calcium 
benzamido- 
salicylate 

Dexa- 

methasone 



Other Names 



Dimen- 



oxadole 



Ditophal 



Fluo- 



promazine 



Hydrochloro- 
thiazide 



Hydroflu- 
methiazide 



Mebhydrolin 



Methyl- 

chromone 
Norcodeine 
Normorphine 
Orphenadrine 



Phenmetra- 

zine 



Pipamazine 



Prothipendyl 



1 - Allyl - 2:7 - dihydro - 
3 : 4-5 : 6-dibenzazepine. 

Ilidar is the phosphate. 
Calcium 4-benzamido - 2 - 

hydroxybenzoate. 
Aminacyl B-PAS; Thera- 

pas. 

9a - Fiuoro - ll/3:17a:21 - 
trihydroxy - 16a- - methyl- 
pregna -1:4- diene - 3 : 
20-dione. 

9a - Fiuoro - 16« - methyl- 
prednisolone. 

Decadron ; Deronil ; Dexa- 
cortisyl is the 21-acetate. 

2- Dimethylaminoethyl a - 
ethoxy - aa - diphenyl- 
acetate. 

Diethyl dithiol/.vophthalate. 
Etisul. 

10 - (3 - Dimethylamino- 
propyl) - 2 - trifluoro- 
methyl-phenothiazine. 

Vespral is the hydrochlor- 
ide; Vesprin is the hy- 
drochloride. 

6 - Chloro - 3:4 - dihydro- 
7 - sulphamoylbenzo - 1: 
2:4 - thiadiazine 1:1 - 
dioxide. 

Esidrex; Hydro-Saluric. 

3:4 - Dihydro - 7 - sulpha- 
moyl - 6 - trifluoromethyl- 
benzo - 1:2:4 - thiadi- 
azine 1 : 1 -dioxide. 

Hydrenox; Naclex ; Rontyl. 

5 - Benzyl - 1:2:3:4 - 
tetrahydro - 2 - methyl- 
pyrid-[4,3-ft]indole. 

Incidal is the naphthalene- 

1 : 5-disulphonate. 

3- Methylehromone. 
Crodimyl. 

/V-demethyl codeine. 
iV-demethyl morphine. 

2 - Dimethylaminoethyl 2 - 
methyldiphenylmethyl 
ether. 

Disipal is the hydrochlor- 
ide. 

Tetrahydro - 3 - methyl - 

2 - phenyl -1:4- oxa- 
zine. 

Preludin. 

10 - [3 - (4 - Carbamoyl- 
piperidino)propyl] - 2 - 
chlorophenothiazine. 

10 - (3 - Dimethylamino- 
propyl) - 9 - thia - 1:10- 



diaza-anthracene. 
Phrenotropin is the hydro- 
chloride. 

Sulpha- 4 - Hydroxy - 4' - (pyrid - 

salazine 2 - ylsulphamoyDazoben- 
zene-3-carboxyIic acid. 
Salazopyrin. 
Thiambuto- \N-p- butoxyphenyl - A"- 
sinei p - dimethylaminophenyl- 
thiourea. 
Ciba 1906. 

Thiotepa Tri - 1 - aziridinylphos- 

phine sulphide. 
Triethylene thiophosphor- 
amide. 



N.P.U. Election 

BALLOT IN FOUR AREAS 

A BALLOT is needed in four areas for 
the election of the executive of the 
National Pharmaceutical Union. The 
four areas are North-western Division 
3, Western Division I, Eastern Division 
2. and Southern Division 3. Ballot 
papers, where necessary, are being 
issued on March 10, and are returnable 
by March 23. The following is a com- 
plete list of nominations. North-west- 
ern Division 1 (no ballot), C. Orrell, 
Preston. Lanes; North-western Divi- 
sion 2 (no ballot), H. Steinman. Man- 
chester, 4; North-western Division 3. 
E. J. Naylor. Warrington, Lanes, W. J. 



Tristram, Liverpool, 1 ; North-eastern 
Division 1 (no ballot), G. H. M. Gra- 
ham, Newcastle-upon-Tyne; North- 
eastern Division 2 (no ballot), T. 
Heseltine. Normanton, Yorks; North- 
eastern Division 3 (no ballot), E. A. 
Brocklehurst, Hull, Yorks; Western 
Division 1, G. H. Hughes. Colwyn 
Bay, Denbighs, H. O. Walters, Wel- 
lington, Shrops; Western Division 2 
(no ballot), G. T. M. David, Swansea, 
Glam; Western Division 3 (no ballot), 
C. H. Smith, West Bromwich, Staffs; 
Eastern Division 1 (no ballot), P. D. J. 
Spaanderman, Huthwaite. Notts; East- 
ern Division 2, H. B. Coulson, Cam- 
bridge, K. Jenkins, Bovingdon, Herts; 
Eastern Division 3 (no ballot), S. J. 
Stearn, Ipswich. Suffolk; Southern 
Division 1 (no ballot), A. Howells, 
Barnehurst, Bexleyheath, Kent; South- 
ern Division 2 (no ballot), W. T. Rees, 
Cheltenham, Glos; Southern Division 
3, J. O. Bond. Somerton, Somerset, 
T. C. N. Booth, Exeter, Devon; Metro- 
politan Division (no ballot). A. Ald- 
ington, London, N.15, H. G. Moss, 
Feltham. Middlesex. A. R. Valentine, 
Northwood, Middlesex. 

Shop Advertisements 

MINISTER SAYS " CLUTTER MUST GO " 

MR. Henry Brooke (Minister of Hous- 
ing and Local Government) told the 
Electrical Sign Manufacturers' Associa- 
tion at a luncheon in London on March 
9, that the country had to get rid of 
the " clutter " of advertisements on 
shops and elsewhere. The Outdoor Ad- 
vertising Industry Advisory Committee 
was engaged, he said, in drawing up a 
code which he hoped would be effective 




LABORATORY VISIT: The registrar of the Pharmaceutical Society (Mr. F. W. Adams) photographed 
during a recent visit to the laboratories of Parke, Davis & Co., Ltd., at Hounslow. He is seen 
examining a capsule-banding machine. 



2 7 8 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 14, 1959 



to deal with that problem (see C. & D., 
October 25, 1958, p. 439). "We have 
got to get rid of clutter," said Mr. 
Brooke. " It is bad in the eyes of every- 
one who cares about the appearance of 
our country. It is bad advertising, too. 
It is undistinguished — except by its 
badness — and surely the essence of 
good advertising is that it should be 
distinctive. I greatly hope that the com- 
mittee's efforts will succeed. I would 
far rather clutter was stopped and re- 
moved by voluntary action. I believe 
we could achieve success faster that 
way, if everyone seriously tried. I want 
no one to be in any doubt that by one 
method or another I intend to get rid of 
clutter, for I am sure it does no good 
to anyone. If a code which is going to 
be really effective cannot be arrived at 
by agreement, then some other method 
will be necessary. But I must say that I 
shall feel it will be a failure on the part 
of the advertising industry if it cannot 
clear up this mess itself." Mr. Brooke 
said that he was thinking of making two 
changes soon in the advertisement regu- 
lations. The present regulations relating 
to areas of special control were too in- 
flexible. " I think everyone agrees that 
there should be special control on ad- 
vertising in the open countryside, and 
also in what historically and architec- 
turally are the most distinguished parts 
of towns. But the special control must 
not be so restrictive that nothing at all 
can ever be allowed. That is what I 
want to achieve by my first change. The 
second change is that I intend to sim- 
plify and lubricate the machinery of 
advertisement control." 

Radio-iodine in Thyroid 

A METHOD OF DETERMINATION 

A METHOD of estimating radio-iodine 
in samples of thyroid gland is described 
in a booklet issued by the United 
Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority 
(" Determination of 131 Iodine in Thy- 
roid Glands," IGO-AM/W-1 14. H.M. 
Stationery Office, price Is. 6d.). Sodium 
iodide carrier solution is added to the 
sample (one sheep gland or twelve rab- 
bit glands) and fused with sodium 
hydroxide. A further fusion with potas- 
sium nitrate removes organic matter 
and the residue is dissolved in water. 
Sodium nitrite and nitric acid are added 
to release the iodine which is extracted 
with carbon tetrachloride. The iodine 
is converted to iodide and extracted 
into the aqueous phase after addition 
of sulphurous acid. Nitric acid is used 
to remove excess sulphur dioxide, 
followed by the addition of silver 
nitrate to convert all the iodide into 
precipitated silver iodide. Using a stain- 
less steel counting tray the slurried 
precipitate is dried and weighed. The 
(i activity is noted using a standard 
counter and corrected for chemical 
yield; the activity is calculated by com- 
parison with a standard 131 iodine. 

Mayer Fellowships 

FOR RESEARCH AND RESEARCH TRAINING 

THE Food and Agriculture Organisa- 
tion of the United Nations is offering 
ten or twelve Andre Mayer Fellowships 
in 1959. The awards are to be made 
under the following two groups: — 
Research (for unusually promising per- 



sons with research experience behind 
them who would offer a guarantee for 
the carrying out of independent re- 
search work); Research training (for 
younger and promising individuals who 
have demonstrated an inclination to- 
wards, and an aptitude for, research 
work). Due consideration is to be given 
to geographical distribution, to ensure 
that a proportion of the awards is given 
to candidates from countries where re- 
search facilities are not highly devel- 
oped and the need for trained research 
workers is great. The subjects presented 
must be in relation to F.A.O.'s activi- 
ties which comprise : Land and water 
development, plant production and pro- 
tection, animal production and health, 
rural institutions and services, fisheries, 
forestry and forest products, nutrition 
(non-medical), atomic energy in food 
and agriculture, agricultural economics 
(commodities, statistics, economic an- 
alysis). Further information is available 
from the secretariat of the F.A.O. 
National Committee for the United 
Kingdom. Ministry of Agriculture, 
Fisheries and Food, Whitehall Place 
(East Block), London, S.W.I. 

Radioactive Isotopes 

MARKETING REORGANISED 

TO meet the increasing demand for 
radioactive isotopes and to continue to 
improve their services to users through- 
out the world, the United Kingdom 
Atomic Energy Authority are reorgan- 
ising the isotopes production and mar- 
keting which has hitherto been shared 
between the Radiochemical Centre, 
Amersham. and the Isotope Division of 
the Atomic Energy Research Establish- 
ment, Harwell. The scope of the Radio- 
chemical Centre is being widened to 
form a single comprehensive organisa- 
tion for producing and marketing all 
such isotopes. The Radiochemical Cen- 
tre is to have irradiation facilities at 
Harwell and at other Authority sites. 
Dr. W. P. Grove is appointed director 
of the reorganised Radiochemical Cen- 
tre. The reorganisation is already effec- 
tive, but users of radioisotopes should 
continue, temporarily, to order their 
requirements from Amersham or Har- 
well as they have done in the past. 
Research into the properties of iso- 
topes and new applications of them and 
their radiations is to be continued by 
an isotope research division at Harwell 
and at the Wantage Radiation Labora- 
tories. 

Technology Courses 

POEYMERISA1ION, PLASTICS AND RUBBER 

THREE separate, ten-day. residential 
courses of lectures to be held in July, 
are being arranged by the National Col- 
lege of Rubber Technolog\. Holloway 
Road. London. N.7. The three courses, 
which include some practical work, are 
on: "Fundamentals of Polj merisation 
Processes": "Basic Rubber Technol- 
ogy for Sales, Buying. Costing and 
Planning Staff": and "Basic Plastics 
Processing." The first two courses are 
being held from July 6 to 15. and the 
third from July 15 to 24. Fee for each 
course, including residence (at the 
National College Hall of Residence) is 
£23 2s. for United Kingdom students 
and £31 10s. for overseas students. 



IRISH NEWS 

THE REPUBLIC 

Pharmacy Owner Fined 

POISONS ACT OFFENCES 

IN Dublin district court, on March 5, 
Mrs. Kathleen Gallagher, 2 North 
Strand, Dublin, was fined £5 for per- 
mitting the making-up of a prescrip- 
tion by an unqualified person at her 
premises on August 22, 1958. She was 
also fined £1 for selling Alophen pills 
(containing strychnine) contrary to Sec- 
tion 2 of the Sale of Poisons Act. The 
district justice allowed a total of £4 4s. 
costs and the defendant was ordered to 
pay 18s. expenses. Mrs. Gallagher was 
given two months in which to pay. An 
inspector of the Pharmaceutical Society 
of Ireland gave evidence of having pre- 
sented a prescription to the man in 
charge of the shop. The man, having 
taken it and read it, inquired where 
witness lived. On being told, he said 
he would make up the prescription. He 
asked if the inspector would wait or 
come back, and was told " I will wait." 
The man then made up the prescrip- 
tion and witness paid for it, afterwards 
asking for some Alophen pills, which 
he was given. The inspector identified 
the prescription and the tablets in 
court. Witness said he then asked the 
man his name and was told it was 
Peter McCullagh. When asked if he 
were qualified to make up the prescrip- 
tion the man replied " I am," but after 
further questioning revealed that he 
was not qualified. Mr. James G. Cole- 
man (registrar, Pharmaceutical Society 
of Ireland) gave evidence that Mr. 
McCullagh was not on any of the 
Society's registers, and in replying to 
Mrs. Gallagher's solicitor, that Miss 
Josephine Hickey was a registered 
pharmacist. The solicitor for the de- 
fendant, admitting that Mrs. Gallagher 
was not a qualified chemist, said that 
under the Act she was entitled, as an 
executor, administrator or trustee of 
the estate of a deceased pharmaceuti- 
cal chemist, to keep the shop open pro- 
vided she had a qualified chemist in 
charge. Mr. J. J. Gaynor (the Society's 
solicitor) stressed that the whole point 
of the Acts was to protect the public. 
Nobody but a bona fide chemist was 
entitled to make up prescriptions or 
sell poisons — otherwise the position 
would be open to great abuse. Mrs. 
Gallagher said in evidence that she 
was an executor of her late husband. 
She was not a chemist, but she em- 
ployed Miss Josephine Hickey, who 
was. She had a son who was a doc- 
tor and who intended to take out the 
pharmacy examination in July in order 
to carry on the business. She had never 
been in trouble before and had always 
conducted the business properly. The 
cause of the trouble on that occasion 
was that her qualified assistant was out 
at the time the inspector called. The 
Justice: "Isn't that the very point? A 
qualified assistant must not be out." 
Replying to Mr. Gaynor, witness admit- 
ted that she had been warned previ- 
ously about not having a qualified 
assistant. Mr. Gaynor said it was idle 
to pretend that the transaction was an 
isolated instance. The serious aspect 
was that the prescription had been 



March 14. 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



2 7 9 



compounded by a person with no 
qualifications whatever, and that he was 
also prepared to sell poison. 

Calendar of Society 

MORE MEMBERS ON REGISTER 

THE recently issued Calendar for 1959 
of the Pharmaceutical Society of Ire- 
land (corrected to December 1, 1958). 
shows that there have been thirty-six 
preliminary registrations and forty As- 
sistants' preliminary registrations since 
December 1, 1957. For the same period 
there were 114 additions to the Regis- 
ter of Pharmaceutical Chemists (ninety- 
nine by examination, and fifteen licen- 
tiate apothecaries); the names of fifteen 
deceased pharmacists were removed, 
making the total number of licentiates 
2,495 (compared with 2,380 for the pre- 
vious year). Of those, 1,167 are mem- 
bers of the Society, compared with 
1,129 in 1958. Dispensing chemists and 
druggists (at forty-seven) show a de- 
crease of one; there are two less regis- 
tered druggists, but seventeen more as- 
sistants to pharmaceutical chemists 
(1,656). Council members whose term 
of office expires in October are Miss 
Laura Cunniffe and Messrs. K. A. 
Banks, D. J. Kennelly, M. Power, G. C. 
O'Neill, M. L. Cashman and P. Fullam 
The Calendar contains copies of the 
syllabuses for the various courses. 
Copies may be obtained from the So- 
ciety's offices, Shrewsbury Road, Dub- 
lin (price 3s. 6d.). Copies of the Regis- 
ters are also on sale (price 5s.). 

NEWS IN BRIEF 

A parking ban in High Street, 
Stourbridge, Worcs. has led to local 
shopkeepers losing " up to 50 per cent." 
of their business, Stourbridge town 
council was told recently. 

The Ministry of Agriculture, Fisher- 
ies and Food, has published revised 
recommendations for the safe use of 
Phosdrin (2-methoxycarbonyl- 1 -methyl- 
vinyl dimethyl phosphate) for agricul- 
tural and horticultural purposes. 

Influenza deaths in the week ended 
February 28 totalled 1,571 compared 
with 1,121 the previous week, and 
deaths from pneumonia also increased 
to 2,121 compared with 1,951 the previ- 
ous week. Deaths from bronchitis were 
lower at 1,810 (1,909). 

A new pharmacy, costing £15,000. 
may be built at the Kent and Canter- 
bury Hospital some time during 1959- 
60. It is one of the major schemes 
allowed by the secretary of the Re- 
gional Hospital Board, to be included 
in next year's building programme. 

Among motions to be discussed at 
the annual delegate meeting of the 
Union of Shop, Distributive and Allied 
Workers, at Scarborough, March 29-31, 
are two, urging that mobile shops 
should be brought within the provisions 
of the Shops Act. 

The Association of Anaesthetists of 
Great Britain and Ireland, 47 Lincoln's 
Inn Fields, London, W.C.2, is appealing 
for funds to enable it to maintain the 
high British standard in the practical 
use of anaesthetics and to provide 
grants for research fellowships as well 
as student fellowships for overseas 
doctors. 



TOPICAL REFLECTIONS 

By Xrayser 

Gentle Spring 

Signs are not wanting that the winter of our discontent is passing. 
There is evidence in nature of a reawakening, and any morning now we 
may expect to read in the daily Press that the cuckoo has broken all 
previous records, having become audible to "Ornithologist" of Surbiton 
three days earlier than ever before. One likes to believe that stirrings of 
that order, and not merely a prosaic scheme dictated by the calendar, 
have inspired the editorial staff of The Chemist and Druggist in the 
production of their annual photographic issue, with its extremely helpful 
information. The pages of negatives illustrating the many traps for the 
unwary are most valuable, though perhaps necessarily incomplete. For 
not all cameras are modern, and each year the prospect of better weather 
results in the reappearance of humble box cameras of uncertain age and 
performance, the owners of which credit the lenses with such outstanding 
qualities that the manufacturers, could they hear their eulogies, might 
think that a grave error had taken place at the assembly bench. One 
such camera, held together by adhesive tape, came my way the other day. As 
a safety measure, designed to overcome the hazards of accidental moving 
of the shutter, it had a circular disc (attached by a chord) which fitted 
into the orifice in front of the lens — for the purpose, a thoughtful and 
simple device. But there is still the possibility of gigantic and catastrophic 
error, for it is beyond the powers of the manufacturers to devise a means 
of ensuring that the over-eager photographer will remember to remove 
the disc before taking the family group. Yet one has seen, from the 
cheapest and simplest of box cameras, a rare gem which any expert would 
give anything to have taken. Happy accidents of that description are 
seen only at long intervals, and on such occasions it is sometimes difficult 
to convince the snapshotter of the quality of his picture. In the splendour 
of new, precision-built scientific instruments such as are on the market 
today, one must still reckon with the unpretentious " box." 

Attractive New Models 

Despite the affection shown by the users for the older and cheaper 
cameras, the range of modern, medium-priced models illustrated last week 
will encourage the retailer to hope that, by an early and attractive display, 
he can shake the loyalty of that most conservative group before they have 
got the length of removing the dust from the 1925 model. In addition 
to the attractive appearance and the portability of the modern instrument, 
there is the magic word " colour," which is often the deciding factor in 
tipping the balance. Little could Fox-Talbot have foreseen, when he 
carried out his early photographic experiments in the lovely surroundings 
of Lacock Abbey, that the camera would become as ubiquitous as the 
antimacassar, the china dog or the sampler of his own day. The eager 
and resourceful men who built on the original work of Talbot, and 
brought the art within the reach of all, have brought a lot of happiness 
to the world, making it possible for those of us who have not the gift of 
brush or pencil to capture, fleetingly, the creative feeling of the artist. 

Spring Flowers 

Among the early spring blooms, there are few more attractive to eye 
or nose than Daphne mezereum, which appears to have had a particularly 
good season. The plant, like most others, at one time was reputed to 
have medicinal qualities. Dr. Withering, whose name is closely linked with 
digitalis — so closely, indeed, as to cause people to forget that he had other 
interests in life than foxglove — is recorded as having used the root in the 
treatment of a woman who suffered from a paralytic affection of the 
throat, Which for three years had prevented her from swallowing solids. 
Chewing of the root produced " considerable and long-continued heat and 
irritation," and after a month of chewing thin slices " as often as she 
could bear it " she recovered the power of swallowing. The old herbals 
say that it must be given with great caution, and only to those who have 
a strong constitution. Despite the recommendation, daphne remains an 
ornamental shrub. 



280 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 14, 1959 



INSTRUMENTS AND 
APPARATUS 

Microscopes. — W. R. Prior & Co., 
Ltd., London Road. Bishops Stortford, 
Herts, offer a range of bench micro- 
scopes and other accessories for micro- 
scopy. 

Laboratory Ovens and Heaters. ■ — 

Laboratory Thermal Equipment, Ltd.. 
Greenfield, nr. Oldham, are makers of 
thermostatic baths for laboratory use 
in serological practice; humidity and 
refrigerated humidity cabinets; water- 
jacketed and anhydric incubators; hot- 
air ovens, etc., in great variety. A water- 
bath unit, available in assemblies of 
three, four or six, permits individual 
control of temperature in each bath, a 
single constant head feeder maintain- 
ing the water level. 

Open-neck Reaction Vessels. — Quick- 
fit & Quartz, Ltd., Stone, Staffs, have 
published a catalogue supplement deal- 
ing with open-neck reaction vessels. It 
lists additions to the range of standard 
parts (including flasks and lids with 
flat-flange connections and an improved 
stirrer design) providing reaction ves- 
sels from experimental to small pro- 
duction size, and gives details of flasks 
from 700-mil to 20-litre capacity. An 
advantage of the new design is that the 
flask can be detached from its lid even 
when a reaction has been conducted at 
a high temperature with resinous 
material, or under other conditions in 
which larger conical glass joints tend 
to " seize." 

Personal Loan Service. — Research 
workers relying on academic or indus- 
trial grants often find it difficult to 
raise funds for adequate instruments 
for their work. The difficulty is in- 
creased because some of the equipment 
they may require is needed for limited 
periods only. Elga Products, Ltd., Rail- 
way Place, London, S.W.19, have in- 
augurated a personal loan service to 
lighten that burden. Under the service 
the Elgastat laboratory deioniser is 
available on loan for twelve months at 
a cost of £12 12s., including a liberal 
supply of ion-exchange resins. The ser- 
vice is being kept personal to individual 
research workers in Great Britain and 
does not apply to corporate bodies or 
institutions. 

Laboratory Shaker. - Apex Con- 
struction, Ltd., 15 Soho Square, Lon- 
don. W.l, have made available a lab- 
oratory shaker designed to give a rotary 
shaking action to (Tasks mounted upon 
it. The model 223A takes forty-nine 
250-c.c. flasks, which are mounted in 
a wooden board, the flasks being held 
by rubber and aluminium discs secured 
by wing nuts. The board rests on four 
steel balls which themselves rest in 
concave housings on the tubular floor 
stand. The board is held in position by 
springs at each corner, and each spring 
is held by two small pulleys, one of 
which is attached to the board and the 
other to the floor stand. The shaker is 
driven by a i -horse power motor and 
gear box, with final Vee-belt drive to a 
pulley mounted centrally on the stand. 
The final speed obtainable on the pul- 
ley is 100 or 160 revolutions per minute. 
( hange of speed is effected by change 
of motor pulley. 



TRADE NOTES 



Counter Unit Free. — Kemsales, Ltd., 
Eastcheap, London. E.C.3, offer a free 
counter unit supplied with an order for 
1 doz. Besorbon medicinal snuff. 

Fine Chemicals Now Available. — 
Evans Medical Supplies. Ltd., Speke. 
Liverpool, 24, have added to their 
range of fine chemicals aluminium hy- 
droxide powder, B.P., and ferrous 
f umarate. 

To Mental Hospitals Only. — Geigy 
Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., Roundthorn 
Estate, Wythenshawe, Manchester, 23. 
point out that their thymoleptic speci- 
ality Tofranil is available only to men- 
tal hospitals and psychiatric units. 

Shampoo in Tub. — Stewart. Goodall 
& Dunlop, Ltd., 121 A Princes Street, 
Edinburgh, are now marketing their 
Nucta egg and lemon shampoo (like 
their Nucta cream champoo with lano- 
lin) in a plastic tub. 

Distribution Restricted. — Ward, 
Blenkinsop and Co.. Ltd.. 37 Queen 
Square, London, W.C.2, point out that 
in addition to their " ethical " lines be- 
ing supplied only through professional 
channels, it is their intention to distri- 
bute their counter lines (the first of 
which is Gon tablets) in the same 
way. 

Pack Sizes. — West Pharmaceutical 
Co., Ltd., 9 Palmeira Mansions, Church 
Road. Hove, 3, Sussex, point out that 
their Parabal tablets are issued in con- 
tainers of 100 and 500 tablets and not 
as stated in a paragraph in this section 
last week. Sizes and prices were cor- 
rectly given in the C. & D. weekly list 
of prices. 

Range Reduced. — The Distillers Co. 
(Biochemicals), Ltd., Speke, Liverpool. 
19. announce that certain packs of 
their animal feed supplements (the 
Distafeed penicillin, riboflavin nos. 1 
and 2. and vitamin B, supplements, all 
in 1 -lb. containers) are being with- 
drawn. Orders are being executed until 
stocks are exhausted. The 10-Ib. and 
50-lb. packs continue to be available as 
previously. 

Competition Prize-winners. — In a 
1958 Ekco " picture baby" competition 
organised by Ekco Plastics. Ltd.. 
Southcnd-on-Sea, Essex, first prize went 
to Mrs. I. R. Mustoe, Hastings; second 



RKDRSIGNF.I) : I he 
Sccto continuous-action 
hand sprayer in its new 
colourful design (price 
unchanged). Makers are 
Cupal, l td.. Blackburn, 
Lane*. 

IMI'KOVKD PACK- 
AGE! Kimberly-Clark, 
Ltd., larklicld, Maid- 
stone, Kent, have mod- 
ernised the backs of 
their Kleenex parks l» 
including new illustra- 
tions as shown. I he 
drawings illustrate vari- 
ous uses of Kleenex 
tissues and are " con- 
temporary " in style, 
the blue front panels 
are taken over the ends 
of the pack to (arm a 
" quartered " effect at 
back and front ol box. 



prize to Mrs. R. N. Newman, Coven- 
try, Warwicks; and third prize to Mrs. 
J. Fewtrell, Great Malvern, Worcs 
(supplier : Boots, Ltd., Great Malvern). 
The prizes were awarded for photo- 
graphs of babies under two years old 
considered in the opinion of the judges 
to conform most closely to a " picture 
of health and happiness." The success- 
ful competitors received cash prizes of 
£100, £50 and £25 respectively. There 
are also prizes for the retailers who 
supplied the Ekco nurseryware. 

Oxvgen Equipment. — The Walter 
Kidde Co., Ltd., Belvue Road, North- 
olt, Middlesex, are makers of the 
Kidde type-HS oxygen set which is 
available for purchase (it was devel- 
oped specially for the National Health 
Service). The set, designed for use 
with standard medical oxygen cylinders 
fitted with bull-nosed valves, is easily 
assembled without spanners. Supplied 
in a strong box with two disposable 
masks, it is robust and simple to 
operate. 

Exhibitors. — At the Daily Mail 
Ideal Home Exhibition, Olympia, Lon- 
don, W.14, New Hygiene, Ltd., 266 
Holloway Road, London, N.7, are in- 
troducing an addition to their Scentinel 
range of air fresheners, the Quifette. 
In polythene squeeze bottle, the Quif- 
ette is available in " Old England " and 
" Perfection " fragrances. Emphasis on 
the stand of Max Factor Hollywood 
and London (Sales), Ltd., 16 Old 
Bond Street, London, W.l, is the gol- 
den jubilee this year of the foundation 
of the business. Perhaps the most 
impressive of the exhibits of Messrs. 
Max Factors is entitled the " Golden 
Court of Beauty." A competition is 
being held (with heats each evening) to 
find the " Max Factor 1959 Ideal Girl." 
There is a choice of two prizes for the 
winner: a model course or a charm 
course plus, in each case £50. A sec- 
tion of the exhibition is given over to 
" fashion and beauty " and a number 
of cosmetic and toiletries manufac- 
turers showed products. Also at the 
exhibition is the British Government 
Pavilion ("adjusted" to Olympia) 
from the Brussels International Exhi- 
bition containing inter alia the halls of 
technology and invention. 





March 14, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



28 1 



Laboratory Glassware Sets. — Quick- 
fit & Quartz, Ltd., Stone, Staffs, are 
marketing a new series of glassware 
" assemblage sets." The sets range 
from gm. to kilo, size and from the 
simplest set of five parts for use in 
schools to the comprehensive assem- 
blage suitable for complicated research 
work. Polystyrene trays, vacuum- 
formed to take all parts in each assem- 
blage, ensure the use of the minimum 
possible space. The trays are of sand- 
wich construction so that the labora- 
tory glassware is totally enclosed by 
two sheets of the protective plastic and 
have been designed so that they fit into 
any standard laboratory-bench drawer 
or cupboard. Alternatively, they may 
be kept in the original box in which 
they are dispatched by the manufac- 
turer and for storage purposes may 
conveniently be piled one above the 
other. The fitted trays make it possible 
quickly to note any broken or missing 
components and, since each component 
has its reference number moulded into 
the plastic tray, replacement is easy. 
Three sizes of assemblage are available: 
30 BU (up to 2-litres nominal capacity: 
the complete assemblage is made up 
of four sets which may be bought 
separately); 23 BU (50-mils capacity; 
three sets); 10 BU (up to 25-mils 
capacity; in addition to the full assem- 
blage, five smaller sets are available). 
The cost of each assemblage is about 
10 per cent, lower than the total cost 
of the individual items in the set. 
Messrs. Quickfit & Quartz have pub- 
lished a new 72-p. catalogue on the 
assemblages. 

Bonus Offers 

Crookes Laboratories. Ltd., Park 
Royal, London, N.W.10. Anabalm, 
Collozets. Karvol, Pectobalm and 
Crookes halibut oil capsules (standard 
parcel). Bonus terms end March 31. 

Dalmas, Ltd., Junior Street, Leices- 
ter. Dalmas first-aid dressings and 
plasters. Extra 5 per cent, on order 
value £3 or over in return for counter 
or window display using company's 
specially produced display aids. Ad- 
ditional quantity discounts of 3J per 
cent, for order value £3-6; 5 per cent, 
on order £6-15; 7i per cent, on order 
value £15 and over (all taken in one 
delivery). Until May 31. 

Calls for Tenders 

THE Board of Trade has issued de- 
tails concerning tenders sought by 
various overseas bodies, and an out- 
line is given below of the requirements 
and closing dates. For fuller informa- 
tion readers should apply, quoting re- 
ference, to Export Services Branch, 
Lacon House, London, W.C.I. 

Surgical goods and dressings (annual 
contract). The Chairman of the Tender 
Board, Cape Provincial Administration, 
Cape Town. (E.S.B. 4535/59 and 4538/59. 
March 17.) 

Sterile solutions. The Secretary, Federal 
Tender Board, P.O. Box 8075, Causeway, 
Salisbury, S. Rhodesia. (E.S.B. 5513/59 and 
5517/59. March 20.) 

Isoniazid tablets, dihydrostreptomycin 
sulphate, streptomycin sulphate, and PAS 
tablets. Central Purchasing Authority, P.O. 
Box H-5, Saigon, Vietnam. (E.S.B./561 1 / 
59/ I.C. A. April 1.) 



NEW PRODUCTS 

A 16-oz. Size. — Abbott Laboratories, 
Ltd., 8 Baker Street, London, W.l, 
state that their Compocillin-V oral 
suspension (hydrabamine penicillin V. 
Abbott) is now available in a 16-oz. 
bottle. 

Addition to Range. — Boots Pure 
Drug Co., Ltd., Station Street. Notting- 
ham, have added to their range of 
hydrocortisone preparations Hydro- 
cortistab skin lotion - 25 per cent in 
container of 20 mils. The product is 
subject to the Therapeutic Substances 
Act and regulations. 

Low-priced Infra-red Lamp. — Lon- 
don Commercial Electrical Stores, Ltd., 
20 Cursitor Street, London, E.C.4, have 
brought out, under the name New 
Soltanette, a low-priced infra-red lamp, 
table model, with " contemporary " 
light-weight stand that folds down for 
easier packing ; insulated knobs for 
easy angle adjustment; strong plated- 
steel wire guard; highly polished re- 
flector; and convertibility to radiant 
heat. 

Antibacterial Throat Lozenges. — 

Clarnell, Ltd., manufacturing chemists, 
Spark Lane, Mapplewell, near Barns- 
ley, Yorks, have launched a new 
throat lozenge, Dareets. Each lozenge 
contains 4 mgm. of cetyl pyridinium 
chloride in a glucose base to ensure 
maintenance of an adequate concentra- 
tion of the drug in the saliva for long 
periods. Dareets are available in vial 
of twelve. The cetyl pyridinium chlor- 
ide content gives the lozenges a 
marked antimicrobial activity in high 
dilution against most gram-positive 
and gram-negative organisms, patho- 
genic yeasts and fungi. 

Emollient Foam. — Derived from the 
formulation used in Codella emollient 
cream, the new 
Codella foam, in 
aerosol package, con- 
tains three to four 
months' supply of 
foaming hand cream. 
The product has the 
advantage of being 
unperfumed, so that 
it does not clash with 
any perfume the user 
may be wearing. The 
formula contains " a 
unique blend of 
emollient substances 
which replace in full 
the natural skin oils 
which are dried out 
of the hands as a 
result of housework and hard weather." 
The makers are Moore Medicinal Pro- 
ducts, Ltd., Waverley House, Waverley 
Place, Aberdeen. 

Sanitary Wear. — Two new products 
designed to ensure for women a high 
standard of personal freshness with the 
minimum trouble, are offered by the 
Kleinert Rubber Co., Walpole House. 
91 New Bond Street, London, W.l. 
The first is a sanitary brief, the Sava- 
belt with protective pocket into which 
a towel is easily slipped, making pins, 
belts and hooks unnecessary. Wash- 
able, the brief is available in fancy 
rayon or nylon, both with moisture- 
proof panels in Messrs. Kleinert's ex- 
clusive fleecenap cool and non-clinging 




fabric. The second new item, the 
" Quick and Easy " dress shield, has 
slides that slip on to bra or petticoat 
straps, and an elastic strap that an- 
chors the garment in place. There are 
four sizes. 

Insulated Carrier Bag. — Insulex. Ltd., 
67 Westbourne Grove, London. W.2, 
are marketing at a reduced price a new 
model of their Insulex plastic bag 
(thermobag). designed to increase its 




efficiency in hot weather. The insulat- 
ing fibre glass has been doubled in 
quantity, and a Freezella sachet is sup- 
plied. The Freezella is a new product 
designed to keep iced drinks iced, or 
to keep such goods as frozen foods 
cool in the carrier until they arrive 
home. Made from an opaque plastic 
and filled with a low-freezing-point 
solution, Freezella resembles a large 
hair shampoo sachet in appearance. Its 
temperature is brought down to 12° 
below freezing point after a few hours 
in the ice box. and remains colder than 
ice for a considerable length of time, 
leaving no mess as it melts. It is thus 
a boon both on shopping expeditions 
and when the household refrigerator 
is being defrosted. 



m SATARRB 





DISPLAY WITH PACK: Cut-out showstand for 
Colbax air spray takes an actual pack. Distribu- 
tors of the product are Fassett & Johnson, Ltd., 
86 Clerkenwell Road, London, E.C.I. 

INFORMATION WANTED 

The Editor would appreciate information aboutt 

Diasol salt substitute 
Creopinal codeine co. 
Bactalin pomade 



282 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 14, 1959 



PAYMENT FOR STANDARD DRUGS IN SCOTLAND 

Additions to list of specified packs for pricing 



FURTHER drugs are being brought 
within the provisions of an amendment 
to paragraph 6 of the Scottish Drug 
Tariff (see C. & D., November 29, 
1958, p. 571) providing for payments 
for certain drugs to be made at prices 
for quantities different from those 
ordinarily applied under the Drug 
Tariff. Payment on the new basis for 
those additional drugs (listed below) 
comes into operation for the pricing of 
prescriptions dispensed on or after 
April 1. Scottish Executive Councils 
are sending a copy of the appropriate 
memorandum to chemist contractors. 



Standard Drugs 



Tab. acid, acetylsalicyl. sol.. 
B.P. 

Tab. aethisteron. 10 mgm. 
Tab. aethisteron. 25 mgm. 
Tab. aminophyll. 0T gm. 
Tab. bellad. et phenobarb. 
Tab. butobarbiton. gr. H 
Tab. cyclobarbiton. gr. 3 
Tab. digit, praep. gr. 1 
Tab. digoxin 
Tab. ephed. hyd. gr. $ 
Tab. ferr. glucon. gr. 5 
Tab. ferr. sulph. gr. 3 
Tab. glyc. trinit. gr. 1/130 
Tab. glyc. trinit. gr. 1/100 
Tab. mag. carb. co. 
Tab. methyltestosteron. 25 
mgm. 

Tab. methyltestosteron. 50 
mgm. 

Tab. penicillin 400,000 i.u. 
Tab. phenobarbiton. gr. { 
Tab. phenobarbiton. sod. gr. i 
Tab. phenobarbiton. sod. gr. \ 
Tab. phenobarbiton. et theo- 
brom. 

Tab. pot. chlorat. gr. 5 
Tab. stilboestrol 1 mgm. 
Tab. sulphadimidin. 
Tab. thyroid gr. •£ 
Tab. thyroid gr. 1 
Acacia pulv. No. 1 
Acid, lactic. 
Acid, salicyl. 
Aethylmorph. hyd. 
Amethoeain hydrochlor. 
Argcntoprotein 
Argentoprotein mit. 
Atropin 

Atropin methonit. 
Atropin sulph. 
Benzyl, benzoas 
Bismuth, salicyl. 
Bismuth, subnit. 
Calc. carb. 
Cera. alb. 
Chloral hyd. 
Cocain 

Cocain hydrochlor. 
Codein 

Diamorph. hydrochlor. 
Elix. diamorph. et tcrpin. 
Elix. phenobarbiton. 
Emuls. paralf. liq. et phen- 
ol pth. 
Ext. hamamel. liq. 
Glyccr. bellad. 
Glycer. pepsin. 
Glycer. phenol. 
Linct. codein. 
Linct. scill. opiat. 



Quantity 



500 
25 
25 

500 

250 

250 
1,000 

500 
1,000 

500 
1,000 

500 

500 

500 

250 

25 

25 
100 

500 
250 
500 

1,000 
250 gm. 
500 
500 
500 
500 

250 gm. 
250 mils 
100 gm. 
2 gm. 
2 gm. 
10 gm. 
10 gm. 
2 gm. 

1 gm. 

2 gm. 
1 00 mils 
250 gm. 
250 gm. 

2 kilos 
4 oz. 
100 gm. 
1 gm. 

1 gm. 

2 gm. 
2 gm. 
I litre 

1 litre 

2 kilos 
100 mils 
lOOgm. 
250 mils 
250 gm. 

2 litres 
2 litres 



Lin. methyl, sal. co., B.P.C. 




Spt. aetheris co. 


100 mils 


1934 


250 mils 


Spt. aetheris nit. 


100 mils 


Lin. pot. iod. c. saponis 


250 gm. 


Spt. camph. 


100 mils 


Liq. bromid. co., B.P.C. 1949 


250 mils 


Spt. chirurgical. 


2 litres 


Liq. canthar. 


100 mils 


Spt. chlorof. 


250 mils 


Liq. iod. aquos. 


250 mils 


Styrax praep. 


103 gm. 


Liq. iod. simp. 


250 mils 


Succinylsulphathiazol. 


103 gm. 


Liq. morph. hydrochlor. 


100 mils 


Sulphacctamid. sod. 


10 gm. 


Liq. opii sed. 


100 mils 


Sulphadimidin. 


100 gm. 


Lotio calamin. 


2 litres 


Syr. cocillana co. 


2 litres 


Mas. carb. pond. 


2 kilos 


Syr. glycerophosph. co. 


1 litre 


Methadon. hydrochlor. 


1 gm. 


Tinct. aconit. 


100 mils 


Methyl, sal. 


250 mils 


Tinct. benz. 


100 mils 


Mist. mag. hydroxid. 


2 litres 


Tinct. capsici 


100 mils 


Morph. acetas 


2 gm. 


Tinct. catechu 


100 mils 


Morph. hydrochlor. 


2 gm. 


Tinct. chlorof. co. 


100 mils 


Morph. sulph. 


2 gm. 


Tinct. cinchon. 


100 mils 


Ol. amygdala 


250 mils 


Tinct. cinchon. co. 


100 mils 


Ol. camph. rect. 


100 mils 


Tinct. colch. 


100 mils 


Ol. eucalypt. 


250 mils 


Tinct. digital. 


100 mils 


Ol. olivae 


i gall. 


Tinct. ergot, ammon. 


100 mils 


Papiverin hydrochlor. 


2 gm. 


Tinct. guaiac. ammon. 


100 mils 


Paraff. liq. 


2 x i gall. 


Tinct. hamamel. 


100 mils 


Paraff. molle flav. 


1 kilo 


Tinct. limonis 


100 mils 


Paraldehyd. 


100 mils 


Tinct. nuc. vom. 


250 mils 


Pasta, alumin. co. 


100 gm. 


Ung. benzocain. co. 


250 gm. 


Pasta, resorcin. et sulph. 


250 gm. 


Ung. acid, salicyl. 


250 gm. 


Pasta, resorcin. co. 


100 gm. 


ung. capsici CO., D.r.^. i7<*y 


1 uu gm. 


Phenacetin. 


250 gm. 


Ung. hydrarg. co. 


250 gm. 


Phenol 


250 gm. 


Ung. hydrarg. nit. dil. 


250 gm. 


Pig. iod. co. 


250 gm. 


Ung. hydrarg. nit. fort. 


250 gm. 


Pig. iodoform, co. 


100 mils 


Ung. hydrarg. oleat. 


250 gm. 


Pilocarpin. nit. 


1 gm. 


Ung. methyl sal. co. dil. 


250 gm. 


Pot. permang. 


100 gm. 


Ung. picis liq. 


250 gm. 


Procain. hydrochlor. 


10 gm. 


Ung. resorcin. 


250 gm. 


Pulv. rhei. co. 


250 gm. 


Ung. resorcin. co. 


250 gm. 


Pulv. trag. co. 


100 gm. 


Ung. zinc. oxid. et ol. ricin. 


1 kilo 


Quinidin. sulph. 


10 gm. 


Ung. zinc, undecen. 


100 gm. 


Quinin. hydrochlor. 


10 gm. 


Zingib. Jamaica pulv. 


250 gm. 


Santonin 


2 gm. 










Sod. et lauryl sulph. 


100 gm. 


Chemical Reagents 


Quantity 


Spt. aetheris 


100 mils 


Fehling's solution 


100 mils 



STATUTORY 

Two cases adjourned; " 

THREE cases were considered at a 
meeting of the Statutory Committee of 
the Pharmaceutical Society in London 
on March 4. The first concerned an in- 
quiry held in November 1957, when it 
had been decided to postpone a deci- 
sion and to reconsider the case after 
twelve months, the Committee also de- 
manding a report from the registered 
superintendent of the company in- 
volved, and a report from the Society's 
inspector. The Chairman said that the 
Committee had received and considered 
those reports, and was satisfied with 
them. The decision had been reached to 
give no direction in the case. 

Evidence was next considered con- 
cerning the conviction of a body cor- 
porate of four offences under the Phar- 
macy and Poisons Act, 1933. The 
offences involved four illegal sales of 
Part I poisons, the sales being made 
when the company were not authorised 
sellers of poisons. The poisons had 
been sold in the form of dispensed 
medicines when there was no registered 
superintendent chemist in charge, and 
the case arose from the visit of an in- 
spector of the Pharmaceutical Society 
to the premises and his discovery from 
the owner of the company that, for 
some months previously, no pharmacist 



COMMITTEE 

no direction " in a third 

had been employed on a permanent 
basis. Counsel representing the com- 
pany stated that a pharmacist had been 
present in the shop not all the time 
" as he should have been, but for some 
hours each day. Every day of the week 
he attended to dispense the prescrip- 
tions that contained poisons." During 
evidence a director of the company 
stated that he employed a pharmacist 
who was also a representative for a 
manufacturer, and who attended the 
shop three or four hours a day, depend- 
ing how he finished his other work. 
Announcing the Committee's decision 
the chairman said that the Committee 
had assumed there was in the business 
a registered superintendent who was 
paying little attention to it, all he did 
being to attend three or four times a 
week. The Committee was not satisfied 
that he had dispensed or supervised the 
dispensing of the poisons in respect of 
which the convictions had taken place. 
A certificate of registration exhibited at 
the premises was in the name of a per- 
son who was not the superintendent, 
and who had no control of the retail 
sale of drugs. The Committee con- 
sidered it to be a bad case of a com- 
pany infringing the Pharmacy and Poi- 
sons Act quite deliberately, and in cir- 



March 14, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



283 



cumstances which afforded no excuse. 
" Any pharmaceutical business may be 
in difficulties for a period over not being 
able to get a qualified manager, but the 
Committee must make it plain once 
again that it is the duty of the company 
in those circumstances to stop selling 
poisons until a properly qualified man- 
ager is available." If a company delib- 
erately continued to sell poisons when 
there was no qualified manager in con- 
trol of the retail sale of drugs, then the 
company or the premises might " be 
removed from the register and disquali- 
fied from being registered for some 
named period." Having regard to the 



of new penicillins and related com- 
pounds which are not easily accessible 
in other ways. The investigation began 
about four years ago, when an attempt 
was made to produce, by conventional 
fermentation methods, a penicillin 
amenable, after fermentation, to 
chemical modification into new and un- 
known penicillins. The usual method 
of creating new penicillins is to grow 
a selected organism in a broth and feed 
in a precursor, which the organism in- 
corporates into the penicillin molecule 
at some stage of the microbiological 
synthesis. The most commonly used 
penicillin G is not susceptible to modi- 
fication, and the experimental work 
proved lengthy, since most of the chemi- 
cal precursors were not accepted by 
the moulds. It took almost a year to 
work out the conditions for the mould 
to produce one modifiable penicillin. 
In the course of the work the two con- 
ventional methods of assay — microbio- 
logical and chemical — were used. It 
was noted that, in certain conditions 
consistent discrepancies occurred be- 
tween the results from the two methods. 
It was thought that the "brew" con- 
tained intact penicillin-like material — 
probably 6-amino-penicillanic acid. 
That hypothesis was confirmed when 
it was found that the material could be 
converted to penicillin G. 

Later work resulted in the develop- 
ment of a process for the isolation of 
6-amino-penicillanic acid. Thus the bio- 



previous unblemished record of the 
company, and to the fact that a regis- 
tered superintendent had been ap- 
pointed to supervise the business, the 
Committee decided not to make any 
direction but to adjourn the inquiry for 
a year, at the end of which time the 
Committee would consider reports from 
the Society's inspector and from the 
registered superintendent. 

In the third case — a resumption of 
an inquiry adjourned from November 
1956 (C. & D., December 8, 1956, p. 
619)— the Committee decided, after 
hearing evidence, to reconsider it after 
a further year. 



TRADERS from all over the Midlands 
attending a one-day conference on 
" More Profitable Retailing Methods," 
at Hinckley, Leics, on March 5, were 
told that their assistants spend only 
one-fifth of their working time in 
selling goods. Mr. G. H. Simmons 
(head of the British Productivity Coun- 
cil's work study unit), who made that 
point, also dispelled the small retailer's 
inevitable first reaction of hearing such 
facts, viz. : " I can't see that this is 
going to help me. Productivity is for 
the big boys." 

" Of the 550,000 retail establishments 
in this country, 370,000 are one-man 
shops and it is in those cases that most 
benefit can be derived from work study 
techniques," Mr. Simmons told dele- 
gates. All the difficulties encountered 
by the retailer could be classified under 
three headings : Technical, economic 
and human. 

The whole object of retailing was to 
get the customer to the goods and the 
goods to the customer. There were, 
another speaker pointed out, only two 
useful handling operations in retailing: 
Taking the goods into stock, and selling 
them. " Each time you handle a com- 
modity, you add to its cost without 
adding to its value," he warned. 
The speakers said that all work in a 



Correspondence 

Support Solicited 

Sir, — I wish very strongly to support 
the candidature of Mr. Keith Jenkins 
in the forthcoming N.P.U. elections. 
He is, to say the least of it, a live wire; 
he can hold the rapt attention of any 
audience he addresses; he has the 
cause of professional pharmacy com- 
pletely at heart, and would bring to the 
task personal capability of a high 
order. A pharmacist who has a vote to 
spare cannot do better than to cast it 
for Keith Jenkins. 

J. T. Marriott, 
Hemel Hempstead 

" For Future Use " 

Sir, — With reference to the article 
headed as above (C. & D., March 7, 
p. 255) on the subject of television film 
recording — in my ignorance I thought 
that so called telerecordings were 
shows, etc., which had been recorded 
by means of cinematograph cameras or 
cine cameras direct, and retransmitted 
in the same way as an ordinary film 
might be. To the lay mind this seems 
simpler than the intricate and no doubt 
costly method used of making a sep- 
arate exposure of each scanned picture 
on a television screen, and in addition 
picking up the imperfections of a tele- 
vision screen caused by electrical inter- 
ference, etc. Perhaps the authors could 
reply. 

Sam B. Ryan, 
Worksop 

Appreciated 

I have derived much pleasure from the 
periodical whilst I have read it and 
consider The Chemist and Druggist 
to be really first-class in interest and 
utility.— M.J.T.E. 



shop could be divided into four cate- 
gories: Operational (for actual selling), 
inspectional (weighing, measuring and 
testing), transport (walking done by the 
assistant), and delay (waiting for the 
customer). By a new method of work 
study, called activity sampling, a rela- 
tively unskilled person could, by re- 
cording observations made at different 
times over a given period, assess to 
within a reasonable degree of accuracy 
the amount of time an assistant spent 
performing work in those four cate- 
gories. It would probably be discovered 
that some items were particularly popu- 
lar or that there was constant move- 
ment to or from certain objects. An 
obvious saving could be achieved by 
moving those objects closer together. 

Mr. Simmons said that when work 
study techniques had been applied suc- 
cessfully, the retailer might ask himself 
if he was any better off. He pointed 
out that if the retailer reduced the time 
spent in serving customers he could 
serve more customers. Although that 
might not matter so much during the 
week, it could mean the difference be- 
tween employing or not employing a 
part-time assistant on a Saturday. Dur- 
ing the week, those of the assistants 
who were not actually selling could be 
weighing and prepacking goods. 



PENICILLIN " BREAKTHROUGH 

The isolation of penicillanic 



99 



WHAT makes so important the isola- 
tion of penicillanic acid, to which the 
daily Press has given such widespread 
publicity in the past week, is that it 
makes possible the synthesis of new 
penicillins in, so to speak, limitless vari- 
ety. Among them may be antibiotics of 
high importance in medicine. 

The work was carried out by 
Rolinson, Doyle, Naylor and Batchelor 
in the Beecham Research Laboratories 
at Brockham Park, Surrey. It sprang 
from observations of discrepancies be- 
tween chemical and biological methods 
of penicillin assay when a precursor 
was omitted from penicillin fermenta- 
tions. First reference to the work was 
a contribution by the four-member 
team in Nature (January 24, p. 257). 
They described 6-amino-penicillanic as 
a most useful intermediate for the 
preparation 

S 

H,N.CH— CH^ ^c— (CH,) 2 
CO N CH.— COOH 



acid and what it may lead to 

chemist will have available an amine 
that he can modify by side chains to 
produce penicillins in variety without 
having to rely upon micro-organisms 
to effect the changes. 

It will, inevitably, be some time be- 
fore the " breakthrough in the anti- 
biotic field " (to which Professor Chain 
has said the discovery could lead) puts 
new weapons in the clinician's hands. 

Mr. H. Lazell (chairman of the 
Beecham Group) announced at a Press 
conference in London on March 6, that 
collaboration with an American com- 
pany was envisaged that should enable 
further development work to proceed 
apace. Dr. J. Farquharson (head of 
the Beecham Research Organisation) 
said on the same occasion that his re- 
search workers already had promising 
leads towards solving the problems of 
(a) penicillin-resistant strains of staphy- 
lococci; (b) penicillin-sensitive patients 
and (c) penicillins active against Gram- 
negative organisms such as B. coli, 
salmonella, proteus, etc. 

MORE PROFITABLE RETAILING 

A one-day conference on work study 



284 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 14, 1959 



MARRIAGES 

Silver Wedding 

BAXTER— CARSON. - At Edin- 
burgh, on March 3, 1934. John Henry 
Baxter, M.P.S., to Nancy Carson. Pre- 
sent address: 67 St. John Street. Whit- 
horn. Wigtownshire. 

DEATHS 

AKEROYD. - - On March 4, Mr. 
George Ira Akeroyd, M.P.S., 3 End- 
clifle. St. John's Road, Eastbourne, 
Sussex, former sales director of Boots 
Pure Drug Co., Ltd., Nottingham. Mr. 
Akeroyd, who qualified in 1905, joined 
the company as a branch manager in 
1916, and was appointed sales manager 
at Nottingham in 1921. He retired in 
1946. 

CHAMBERS. — On March 1. Mr. 
Lewis Chambers, M.P.S.. 48 Warley 
Road. Halifax. Mr. Chambers was ap- 
prenticed with the late Mr. Jabez 
Swire. After attending the Leeds Col- 
lege of Pharmacy he qualified in 1909. 
Two years later he began on his own 
account at 23 Union Street, Halifax, 
and was able to follow his business 
until fairly recently. Ho had been chair- 
man of Halifax Branch of the Pharma- 
ceutical Society, and president of the 
local Branch of the National Pharma- 
ceutical Union. His activities in civic 
and ambulance work were also exten- 
sive. He was a member of Halifax town 
council from 1927 to 1955. having been 
an alderman from 1938. In 1944 he was 
mayor of Halifax. As chairman of the 
health committee he took a leading part 
in the development of local hospital 
services until the introduction of the 
National Health Service, and became a 
Halifax representative on the Leeds 
Regional Hospital Board. In 1940 he 
was made a Serving Brother of the 
Venerable Order of the Hospital of St. 
John of Jerusalem. Among much fur- 
ther varied service were membership ot 
York Management Committee, chem- 
ists' representative on the local Execu- 
tive Council and its predecessor the 
Insurance Committee, and work as a 
Methodist lay preacher. He is succeeded 
in his business by his only son. 

CHECKETTS— Recently, Miss Mary 
Checketts, Birlmgham, Pershore. Wor- 
cestershire, aged ninety-three. Miss 
Checketts qualified as a chemist and 
druggist in 1898 and was believed to 
be one of the first, if not the first, of 
women pharmacists. She was trained 
by a Pershore chemist and later worked 
at the Northern Hospital, Winchmore 
Hill. London. 

GOOCH.— On March 8. Mr. Wilfrid 
Holmes Gooch. M.P.S.. 18 Richmond 
Road. Chingford, London. E.4. aged 
fifty-four. Mr. Gooch was first mana- 
ger then proprietor of the Loesby-Jones 
pharmacy, 16 Station Road. Chingford. 

Mr. H. L. Crossiev writes: Wilfrid 
Gooch was a friend of his fellow phar- 
macists, particularly in the Chingford 
and Walthamstow areas where he was 
chairman of the local association and 
National Pharmaceutical Union Branch 
for several years. We knew him as a 
man of high integrity whose friend!) 
and helpful advice was always at our 
disposal. Many others benefited from 



his wise counsel. He was auditor to 
Esseex Pharmaceutical Committee since 
1950 and was held in high esteem by 
its members. 

MERCER. — On February 20, Mr. 
Stanley Richard Mercer, M.P.S.. 48 
Chestnut Avenue, Forest Gate. London. 
E.7. Mr. Mercer qualified in 1929. 

POTTS. — On February 15, Mr. 
Robert Gowland Potts, M.P.S.. 14 
Stonegate Road, Meanwood, Leeds, 6. 
Mr. Potts qualified in 1910. 

PRATT. — On January 20. Walter 
Ryley Pratt, F.P.S.. 38 Queens Road. 
Barnet, Herts. After qualifying in 
1909. Mr. Ryley Pratt was a demonstra- 
tor and later an assistant lecturer at the 
Pharmaceutical Society's school. He 
was awarded the Pereira medal in 1910. 
In 1914 he entered industry along with 
colleagues to produce pharmaceuticals 
formerly imported from Germany. The 
business grew to become Pierson. 
Morrell & Co., Ltd., of which Mr. 
Ryley Pratt was the managing director. 

TAYLOR. — On February 27. Mr. 
Archibald Leonard Taylor, F.P.S., 68 
Ravelston Dykes, Edinburgh, aged 84. 
Mr. Taylor was chief pharmacist to 
the Bristol Royal Infirmary for 47 
years until his retirement in 1946. 

Mr. J. J. Boucher writes: By the death 
of Mr. Taylor, the pharmaceutical 
world has lost a man who devoted his 
life unstintingly to his profession. He 
qualified in 1896 and his first post 
after qualifying was as assistant dis- 
penser to St. Bartholomew's Hospital. 
London. He then became head dispen- 
ser to the East Dulwich Hospital going 
to the Bristol Royal Infirmary as chief 
pharmacist in 1899. He spent the re- 
mainder of his working life in Bristol 
with a break during the 1914-18 war 
when he was gazetted a captain in the 
R.A.M.C. Mr. Taylor was an examiner 
in pharmacy for the Pharmaceutical 
Society and was a most active member 
of various British Pharmacopoeia Com- 
missions. His knowledge of pharmacy 
seemed boundless and he imparted it 
to generations of apprentices to their 
great benefit. Outside pharmacy, he had 
many interests; he was fond of walking 
and collecting botanical specimens: he 
was a very keen chess player and, in 
later years, an ardent freemason. He 
also acquired a fine collection of old 
pharmacopa'ias. After retirement, he 
went to live in Edinburgh with his 
younger daughter w here he made many 
friends. 

THOMPSON.— On February 18. Mr. 
George William Allen I hompson, 
M T.S.. Ridge Green, Nutlev Drive, 
Goring-on-Sea, Sussex. Mr. Thompson 
qualified in 1903. 

TWYMAN. — On March 6. Mr. 
Frank Twyman. aged eighty-two. Mr. 
Twyman was a director of Hilger & 
Watts. Ltd.. until 1952 and then 
became their technical adviser. He was 
a master of the science of making fine 
optical components and will be chiefly 
remembered for his pioneer work in 
spectrochemical analysis. In 1924 he- 
was elected a Fellow of the Royal 
Society and was awarded in 1926 the 
Weatherill medal of the Franklin In- 
stitute of Washington, in 1927 the 
Duddell medal of the Physical Society, 
and in 1957 the gold medal of the 



Society of Applied Spectroscopists of 
the U.S.A. 

WHITE. — On February 28, Mr. 
Percy Frederick White, M.P.S.. Hydons. 
Hadlow Road. Tonbridge, Kent. Mr. 
White qualified in 1899. 

WILLOUGHBY. — Suddenly, at 1 
Goldsmith Terrace, Bray, on March 7, 
Mr. Robert Albert Willoughby. 
M.P.S.L. F.S.M.C. Mr. Willoughby 
qualified in 1931. 

WILSON. — On February 26. Mr. 
William Wilson. M.P.S.. 26 Baring 
Avenue. Bradford Moor. Bradford, 
Yorks. Mr. Wilson qualified in 1903. 

PERSONALITIES 

DR. H. L. FREEMAN, who is son 
of Mr. Bernard Freeman. M.P.S., of 
Freemans. Ltd.. chemists, George 
Street, Altrincham. has been appointed 
registrar of the Maudsley Hospital 
Group. 

MR. MERVYN MADGE (super- 
intendent pharmacist. Plymouth Co- 
operative Society. Ltd.). has been elec- 
ted by that Society its delegate to 
the Co-operative Congress to be held 
in Edinburgh, at Easter. 

DR. J. H. GADDUM. of Edinburgh 
University, is giving a series of lectures 
in United States medical schools during 
April and May. The lecture tour is 
under the auspices of E. R. Squibb & 
Sons, pharmaceutical manufacturers. 
Dr. Gaddum will speak on " The 
Pharmacological Analysis of Tissue Ex- 
tracts." at Georgetown University, 
Washington. D.C.; the University of 
Buffalo; Colombia University. New 
York; Emory University. Atlanta: and 
the University of Michigan. 

COMPANY NEWS 

Last year's figures in parentheses 

WILLOWS FRANCIS, LTD.— An 
interim dividend of 5 per cent, on the 
Ordinary shares is declared in respect 
of the year ending June 30, 1959. 

F. W. HAMPSHIRE & CO., LTD.— 
Final dividend, 13 2 L per cent., making 
20 per cent. (161 per cent.). Profit 
£177.083 (£189.580). including deprecia- 
tion written back nothing (£63.704), and 
before tax of £79,269 (£64.087). 

EASIPOWER. LTD.— Following a 
meeting of creditors, on February 25, 
at which it was agreed to liquidate the 
assets, the company has now been com- 
pletely reconstructed and refinanced. 
All the working assets have been pur- 
chased by a new company to be known 
as Frederick Williams (Appliances). 
Ltd. The directors are: — C. M. Bell. 
A. A. Christy, R. L. Eastwood. D. T. 
Papillon. S. E. Pryor and F. H. Wil- 
liams (managing). The various subsidi- 
aries of Easipower, Ltd., arc not 
affected by the change and have been 
purchased completely by Frederick 
\\ illiams (Appliances). Ltd. 

HILGER & WATTS. LTD. — Turn- 
over for the year ended September 30, 
1958, was again a record, reports Mr. 
(i. A. Whipple, the chairman. Though 
the incoming order rate in the current 
year is not increasing a steady expan- 
sion of production has been continued 
thereby reducing delivery times and in 
some instances building up limited 



March 14, 1959 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 285 



stocks of instruments ready for sale. 
Thus, adds Mr. Whipple, the company 
is prepared to meet promptly the re- 
newal of expenditure which may be ex- 
pected from improvements in the 
American economy and the relaxation 
of controls on the borrowing powers 
of industry in this country. 

New Companies 

P.C. = Private Company; R.O. = Registered Office 

GRENVITE, LTD. (P.C.).— Capital 
£100. To carry on the business of chem- 
ists, etc. Subscribers : Jean Herbert and 
Thomas A. Herbert, 156 Strand, Lon- 
don, W.C.2. The first directors are to be 
appointed by the subscribers. 

CASTLE LABORATORIES, LTD. 
(P.C.).— Capital £100. To carry on the 
business of dispensing chemists, etc. 
Directors : Sam Woodward, Stanley- 
West. M.P.S., and Sidney Swart. R.O.: 
77 Castle Street, Hinckley, Leics. 

CECIL NORMAN (CHELTEN- 
HAM). LTD. (P.C.).— Capital £1,500. 
To carry on the business of chemists, 
druggists and opticians, etc. Directors : 
Cecil Norman. M.P.S., and Thomas R. 
Ingram Norman. M.P.S. R.O. : 15 
Montpellier Walk, Cheltenham. 

A. J. COFFER (CHEMISTS), LTD. 
(P.C.).— Capital £100. To carry on the 
business of wholesale or retail consult- 
ing chemists, etc. Subscribers : Ann J. 
Coffer and Jean S. Coffer, 12 Colling- 
wood Avenue, London, N.10. Ann J. 
Coffer is permanent director. 

EVANSKY PRODUCTS. LTD. 
(P.C.).— Capital £100. To carry on the 
business of dealers in cosmetic and 
beauty preparations, etc. Directors : 
Albert Evansky, Rosel Evansky and 
Bernard Short. R.O.: 146 Bishopsgate, 
London, E.C.2. 

AMIROL LTD. (P.C). — Capital 
£5,000. To carry on the business of 
manufacturers, importers, dealers in 
hair preparations, perfumes, aromatics, 
essential oils, etc. Subscribers : J. W. 
Tapner and L. St. John T. Jackson. 
R.O.: 18 Austin Friars, London, E.C.2. 

Mclean & sons (chemists), 

LTD. (P.C.).— Capital £1,000. To carry 
on the business of manufacturing and 
general chemists, etc. Directors : Rob- 
ert F. McLean and Marjorie McLean. 
R.O. : 90 High Street, Gorleston-on- 
Sea, Norfolk. 

VANITY SHOP, LTD. (P.C.).— 
Capital £3,000. To carry on the busi- 
ness of chemists, dealers in chemists' 
sundries, cosmetics, etc. Directors : 
Samuel Benghiat, Samuel Memran. 
R.O.: 10 Regency Parade, Swiss Cot- 
tage, London, N.W.3. 

W. STEWART (CARLISLE), LTD. 
(P.C.).— Capital £100. To carry on the 
business of chemists, druggists and 
opticians, etc. Directors : Gladys M. 
Griffiths, M.P.S., Gordon H. Griffiths, 
M.P.S., Norah Wheeldon and Bernard 
Wheeldon. R.O.: 140 Botchergate, 
Carlisle. 

ROSS LABORATORIES. LTD. 
(P.C.).— Capital £100. To carry on the 
business of manufacturers' agents for 
chemists' sundries and perfumery pre- 
parations, etc. Directors : John Saville, 
Ann Ross Saville, Margaret R. Allen, 
Ormus N. T. Davenport (all directors, 



Saville Perfumery, Ltd.). R.O. : 16a 
Sackville Street, London, W.l. 

BUSINESS CHANGES 

WAM ORGANISATION have re- 
moved to Wamprint works, Bowlers 
Croft. Basildon, Essex (telephone: 
Basildon 20253). 

THE telephone number of L. Garvin 
& Co., Ltd., Garvin House, Isleworth, 
Middlesex, has been changed to Isle- 
worth 7171. 

KINGSLEY & KEITH, LTD., have 
opened a sales office at 10 Manchester 
Road, Bury, Lanes (telephone: Bury 
2747), under the management of Mr. 
J. A. Wright. 

TOZER KEMSLEY & MILL- 
BOURN, LTD., 84 Fenchurch Street, 
London, E.C.3, are removing to Mill- 
bourn House, 151 Minories, London, 
E.C.3 (telephone: Royal 3443). 

WARD CASSON. LTD., have 



REPLYING to a question by Mr. 
Ness Edwards, on March 3, Mr. K. 
Thompson (Assistant Postmaster-Gen- 
eral) said that the principles for tele- 
vision advertising contain the rule that 
the advertising of medicines and treat- 
ment must comply wth the basic stan- 
dard of the " British Code of Stan- 
dards in relation to the Advertising of 
Medicines and Treatments." Dr. Edith 
Summerskill asked how the Code of 
Standards " relate to the proprietary 
drugs which are now advertised and 
which have no therapeutic value at 
all." Mr. K. Thompson replied that 
all advertisements ar.d claims for those 
proprietary drugs were considered by 
the committee and would not be ap- 
proved if they were wildly extravagant. 

Cancer 

Mr. Hastings asked the Minister of 
Health whether he would give an esti- 
mate of the annual financial loss to the 
nation occasioned by cancer of the lung 
through the cost of hospital treatment, 
loss of working time, and premature 
death. Mr. Derek Walker-Smith in a 
written reply on March 4 stated an esti- 
mate was not available. 

Purchase Tax 

Mr. G. D. N. Nabarro asked many 
questions relating to purchase tax on 
March 5. including some on the cur- 
rent practice of exempting certain 
photographic equipment sold to indus- 
trial and professional users under 
signed covenant. Mr. F. J. Erroll 
(Economic Secretary to the Treasury) 
admitted there were difficulties caused 
by the discrimination against the mini- 
ature equipment, but those cameras 
were extensively used by amateurs on 
whom tax was " properly levied." 

Mr. Nabarro's purchase-tax question 
to the Chancellor of the Exchequer on 
March 9 was why nail cleaners, forceps 
and tweezers under 4| in. in length, and 
corn rasps, all for the use of human 
beings, were chargeable at 60 per cent, 
whereas animal toilet brushes were 
charged at only 30 per cent, and cer- 
tain other brushes for animals not 
taxed at all. Would the Chancellor re- 



acquired a factory and offices at 2 The 
Green, Richmond, Surrey, for the pro- 
duction, control and development of 
their pharmaceutical products. The 
factory, which is currently being re- 
equipped, will be under the technical 
direction of Dr. D. O. Holland and 
production is expected to commence 
there almost immediately. Orders and 
correspondence should be addressed 
there from March 25. 

BRITISH CELLOPHANE. LTD, 6 
Henrietta Place. London, W.l, has 
formed a plastic films division under 
which the company now groups the 
manufacture and marketing of films 
other than Cellophane cellulose film. 
Mr. J. Schwartz, who has been with 
the company since its formation in 
1935, and was recently sales service 
manager, has been appointed manager 
of the new division. Production mana- 
ger is Mr. D. Noble, and the sales 
manager is Mr. D. F. H. Drew. 



view those anomalies before introduc- 
ing future purchase-tax proposals. Mr. 
F. J. Erroll (Economic Secretary to 
the Treasury): Articles specially de- 
signed for cleaning farm livestock are 
not toilet requisites. 

Sunday Opening of Chemists 

Mr. J. Parker asked the Minister of 
Health on March 9 whether he would 
arrange for longer Sunday opening 
periods of all chemists's shops in the 
Dagenham area during the present 
epidemic period. The Minister re- 
plied that the arrangements in Dagen- 
ham were similar to those generally in 
operation, and he had no evidence that 
anything exceptional was required. 
Mr. Parker : When there is a great 
deal of influenza about it is surely un- 
suitable that people should have to 
wait at least three hours on two Sun- 
days in succession in trying to get 
medicines supplied to them. The Mini- 
ster said Mr. Parker would be aware 
of the facilities available in Dagenham 
and adjoining areas on Sundays, and, 
of course, at a time of heavy incidence 
of influenza chemists came under severe 
pressure. 

Treatment of Migraine 

Mr. Reader Harris asked the Mini- 
ster of Health on March 9 whether he 
was in a position to say what pro- 
posals he had for setting up, under the 
National Health Service, clinics to deal 
with migraine on the lines of the Eileen 
Lecky migraine clinic, and what in- 
vestigations had been made in the work 
of the clinic's out-patient department. 
The Minister replied that his advice 
was that the treatment available at the 
clinic had no advantages over what was 
already available under N.H.S. 

General Practitioner Service 

In a written reply to Sir M. Stod- 
dart-Scott on March 9, the Minister 
of Health estimated that about 3 per 
cent, of the population of England and 
Wales were not on doctors' lists and 
did not use the free practitioner ser- 
vice. That represented no change from 
recent years. 



IN PARLIAMENT 

By a Member oe the Press Gallery, House of Commons 



286 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 14. 1959 



BRANCH EVENTS 



FINCHLEY 
Figures and Finance 

Facing a slightly antagonistic audience 
who had recently paid an increased re- 
tention fee to their governing body, 
Mr. W. S. Howells (treasurer of the 
Pharmaceutical Society) addressed the 
members of the Finchley Branch on 
February 23 on the finances of the 
Society. After the interval, Mr. 
Howells aided by the finance officer of 
the Society, answered many controver- 
sial questions, which were asked in a 
light and friendly mood. Mr. H. J. 
Shore (branch treasurer) proposed the 
vote of thanks and referred to Mr. 
Howells' kindness in travelling from 
Wales to give his address. 

GRIMSBY 

Carboys as Decorations 

Two huge red and green carboys 
decorated the top table at the annual 
dinner and dance of the Grimsby Phar- 
macists' Association held in Cleethorpes 
recently. Mr. E. W. Broadburn 
presided, and his father (Mr. E. A. 
Broadburn), now seventy-nine years of 
age. watched his son performing the 
duties he himself had carried out 
almost thirty years ago. Dr. J. Lanny 
(president, Grimsby Branch. British 
Medical Association), proposed a toast 
to the Association, paying tribute to 
the magnificent co-operation that phar- 
macists had always given to doctors. 
Mr. Broadburn said most of the 
Grimsby Association's officers now 
lived in Cleethorpes and there was 
friendly rivalry between chemists of 
the two boroughs. Mr. J. S. Freer 
proposed a toast to the guests to which 
the mayor of Cleethorpes responded. 
About 200 people were present. 

EAST METROPOLITAN 
A Joint Meeting 

The East Metropolitan Branch of the 
Pharmaceutical Society and West Ham 
and District Association of Pharmacists 
and London Branch, Guild of Public 
Pharmacists, paid a joint meeting to 
Wellcome museum of Medical Science 
on February 19. They were shown the 
exhibits ilustrating the causes, symp- 
toms and treatment of many diseases, 
from those of viral origin to those of 
helminthic origin. They were then 
shown many rare books and manu- 
scripts in the Wellcome Historical and 
and Medical Library, the manuscripts 
seen including some written by Darwin 
and L.ord Nelson. The remainder of the 
evening was taken up by a colour film, 
"The Story of the Wellcome Founda- 
tion, Ltd.", in which the origin and 
development of the company was 
described. 

GLASGOW 

A Colourful Tour 

Denmark and Scotland were the places 
'• visited " when Mr. Alexander 
KITCHEN, MPS.. A.R.P.S., addressed 
members of the Glasgow and West of 
Scotland Branch recently. On " Wan- 
dering with a Colour Camera," 
Mr. Kitchen screened many slides, 
mostly Kodachrome, illustrating a 



journey across the North Sea by 
steamer taking a dozen passengers, and 
also, an itinerary visiting the princi- 
pal towns and places of interest in Den- 
mark. He followed these with many 
beautiful scenes taken in Scotland. Each 
series was accompanied by a racy com- 
mentary. A vote of thanks to the 
speaker was proposed by the treasurer 
of the branch (Mr. J. Chilton). Mr. J. 
Chilton proposed and Mr. A. Todd 
seconded a motion for submission to 
the Branch Representatives' meeting to 
be held in London in May. [The mo- 
tion has been published, C. & D., 
February 14, p. 171.] One member, Mr. 
W. T. Wilson, said that he was not in 
agreement with the motion. There was 
no amendment. 

MANCHESTER 
Golf Plans 

When the Manchester Pharmaceutical 
Golfing Society held its annual dinner 
on February 27, they entertained 
Messrs. G. S. Woolley (managing direc- 
tor, James Woolley, Sons & Co., Ltd.). 
R. Warren (representing Imperial 
Chemical Industries, Ltd., pharmaceuti- 
cals division), and H. Burlinson (Tho- 
mas Kerfoot & Co., Ltd.). The venues 
for the various competitions to be held 
in the coming season were suggested 
and noted. 

Fire Risks 

Following the business session 
at the annual meeting of the Manches- 
ter Branch of the Guild of Public 
Pharmacists on February 25, Mr. H. F. 
Waldron (chief surveyor of the London 
and Lancashire Insurance Co., Ltd.), 
gave a talk on " Fire Risks." On the 
same day members visited the 
John Rylands Library, Manchester, and 
were shown a unique collection of 
Bibles, including the first ever to be 
printed. In addition they saw early 
examples of the Koran, cookery books, 
and the famous cuniform tablets. 

BRADFORD 

Spending £ ' -million 

The principal of the Bradford Insti- 
tute of Technology (Dr. E. G. 
Edwards) speaking at the annual din- 
ner and dance of the Bradford Branch 
of the Pharmaceutical Society on March 
4, said that when the proposed plans 
of the institute were carried out Brad- 
ford would have a department of phar- 
macy " second to none in this country." 
It was proposed to spend nearly £{• 
million by the early part of I960 on 
new buildings, staff and technicians for 
the department. Thirty years ago, he 
said, " there was one laboratory, one 
head of department and one lecturer. 
We have progressed a little bit since 
then." The new plan is .to provide for 
a staff of thirty or forty, with an equal 
number of technologists. With a de- 
partment of that size he wondered what 
the future was going to be and whether, 
being granted University status in so 
many departments, they might look for- 
ward to the time when qualifications 
there would rank equally with those of 
a university. The lord mayor of Brad- 
ford proposed the " Pharmaceutical 



Society " and Mr. G. H. Hughes (vice- 
president of the Society) responded. 
Mr. J. W. Robinson (chairman), pro- 
posed "The Guests and the Ladies," 
Dr. Edwards responding. 

EDINBURGH 

The 1958 Pharmacopoeia 

Addressing members of the Edinburgh 
and South-east Scottish Branch of the 
Pharmaceutical Society recently Mr. 
Eric Knott traced the evolution of 
the Pharmacopoeia through those of the 
various Colleges of Physicians to the 
present day. He illustrated his address 
with an exhibition of some old phar- 
macopoeias and related books. He drew 
attention to the deletion of the many 
preparations which were household 
remedies, such as Gregory's Powdei, 
which will, no doubt, appear in the 
B.P.C. of the future. Many of the 
newer drugs have achieved official 
status but were still available only in 
the " ethical " pack. Commenting on a 
question concerning the absence of 
formulas for water miscible cortisone 
and hydrocortisone ointments Mr. 
Knott expressed the view that this was 
merely an oversight which would be 
remedied in the first addendum since 
it was quite possible to make such 
ointments. It was considered unfortun- 
ate that though the B.P. was striving 
for a full metric system such footnotes 
as appeared under tablets of ferrous 
gluconate had been made. Concerning 
the future of the B.P. Mr. Knott stated 
that inquiry amongst a number of 
chemists in business had elicited the 
information that none had a copy of 
the new edition, whilst some did not 
have the 1953 edition and so far, this 
had been no handicap in the day-to- 
day work in the pharmacy. Mr. A. W. 
Patterson, dealing with " Drugs 
and B.P.," illustrated his talk with 
specimens representing those which had 
been deleted and the newer additions 
used in surgery and surgical dressings. 
Mr. C. G. Drummond, chairman of the 
branch, presided. 

HARROW 

Preparing Eye Drops 

The necessity of always dispensing eye 
drops sterile was stressed by Mr. B. J. 
Thomas (manager of the pharmacy of 
Allen & Hanburys, Ltd., Vere Street, 
London. W. 1). at a recent meeting of 
the Harrow Branch of the Pharmaceu- 
tical Society. Where ingredients could 
stand heat, eye drops should always be 
heated. The ideal preparation should be 
isotonic, should contain a suitable pre- 
servative, and should be thickened. He 
found that methyl cellulose, which had 
the peculiar property of being more 
soluble in the cold than when heat was 
applied, provided a suitable thickening 
agent. When preparing such a solution 
he allowed the methyl cellulose to 
digest overnight; a preservative was re- 
quired, and he then found chlorbutol 
suitable. The current liquor pro gutt. 
was not entirely satisfactory, since a 
mould could grow in it. None of the 
various types of eye-drop bottles in use 
today, he said, was above criticism. On 
some occasions he had found that eye 



March 14. 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



28 7 




288 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 14, 1959 



drops had been coloured by the inner 
lining of the stoppers. There was always 
the risk that drops left in the pipette 
after use might contaminate the con- 
tents of the bottle upon its return. The 
ultimate objective, he thought, might be 
a container in which the liquid was 
packed under pressure, so that drops 
could not return to stock. Spraying had 
been tried in the United States, but such 
application was not without attendant 
risks. Contact lens solutions — usually 
1-5 per cent, sodium bicarbonate — 
would keep for only ten days, but he 
had experimented by bubbling carbon 
dioxide through the solution and wax- 
ing the stoppered bottles and had 
found that those procedures gave the 
solution a longer life. He used freshly 
boiled distilled water and filtered the 
solutions many times through good- 
quality cotton wool before packing in 
bottles that had been washed out with 
detergents and thoroughly rinsed. De- 
spite the preponderance of pill and tab- 
let counting in present-day dispensing 
he had collaborated with several speci- 
alists recently to meet their special re- 
quirements for such items as sterile 
bougies and special ointment bases. Mr. 
Thomas dealt also with tuberculin skin 
tests. A knowledge of the life of the 
various solutions was, he said, most 
important to pharmacists. 

LEICESTER 

Speaking of "Elephants" 

Speaking at the annual dinner on 
February 19 of the Leicester and 
Leicestershire Branch of the Pharma- 
ceutical Society. Mr. C. Gunn (head of 
the Leicester School of Pharmacy), 
said that when the school was first 
built it was called " a white elephant." 
Since then, he said, that white elephant 
had grown and had produced three 
vigorous " baby elephants " in Leicester 
and he congratulated the City Council 
on their foresight in providing the ori- 
ginal school. During the last session 
some seventy local chemists had taken 
refresher courses in pharmaceutics and 
therapeutics in their spare time. Aid. 
Sidney Brown (the lord mayor), said 
that the Council were proud of the 
way the school had prospered and said 
that possibly within the next few years 
there would' be a larger family for the 
" white elephant.'' The chief guest was 
Mr. G. H. Hughes (vice-president ot 
the Pharmaceutical Society). 

Students Again Spring A Surprise 

But for the fact that students of the 
school of pharmacy, Leicester College 
of Technology and Commerce, can 
always be relied on to provide a sur- 
prise at their annual reunion dinner 
and dance, those attending this year's 
function on March 6 (which coincided 
with the eve of " rag day " at Leicester 
University and College) might have 
been forgiven for believing that they 
had imbibed too freely when, alter 
the usual toasts, they saw a coffin being 
borne into the room by six students. 
In near darkness and to suitable musi- 
cal accompaniment, the coffin was 
solemnly opened to reveal " Lucifer " 
(impersonated by first-year student Bob 
Chatterton), who promised " dire peril 
and a swift departure to my abode " 
for all those who would not buy a copy 



of the students' rag-day booklet. 
Earlier, Miss S. Skerritt (lecturer in 
pharmacognosy at the College), when 
called upon by the chairman (Mr. 
Colin Gunn, head of the school) to 
propose " Our Guests," in accordance 
with tradition, " by standing on her 
seat." caused considerable amusement 
by drawing parallels between students 
and bacteria. (Both form colonies; there 
is an optimum temperature at which 
they work; sluggish at low tempera- 
tures they are dormant at high; they 
show a diversity of shapes and sizes; 
thrive best in the dark, etc.). Replying 
for the guests, Mr. John C. Hanbury 
recalled his own student days when, in 
1932, he found Mr. Gunn sitting next 



to him at the B. Pharm. examination. 
Wishing the students success in their 
forthcoming examinations he stressed 
how important it was for their answers 
to be clearly expressed. Good English 
could, he said, in border-line cases 
often tip the result in favour of the 
candidate. Mr. J. B. Dunsire (chair- 
man of the Pharmacy Students' Asso- 
ciation) proposed " The Old Lags," to 
which Mr. E. Creedy (secretary, Cov- 
entry Branch of the Pharmaceutical 
Society) replied. As dancing began 
someone discovered Mr. Aneurin Bevan 
sitting in an adjoining lounge. Needless 
to say the former Minister of Health 
was thereafter kept busy autographing 
the booklets. 



HOW CONSUMERS' ASSOCIATION WORKS 

The selection and testing of products explained 



ONE of the speakers at a recent one- 
day conference in London organised by 
the Industrial Welfare Society for ex- 
ecutives in the retail distributive trade 
was Miss Eirlys Roberts (research 
director. Consumers' Association, Ltd., 
and editor of Which? the Association's 
official journal). The conference was 
attended by more than 100 delegates. 
Miss Roberts' subject was "The Awak- 
ening Consumer Interest." " When my 
organisation started work fifteen months 
ago," she said, " we were a bunch of 
amateurs. We had the material for the 
first issue of the magazine, but it had 
not come out; we had budgeted for a 
few thousand copies. We had £275 in 
the bank. We had no expectancy of 
getting in more than a few hundred 
members, and we had the fear of libel 
actions hanging over us. Now we have 
115.000 members and. if we want, we 
can spend £14,000 on testing. That is 
the evidence of awakening consumer 
interest." 

A Shopping Problem 

The consumer today was faced with a 
difficult problem when shopping. One 
problem was the enormous number of 
things in the shops. " When we started 
testing convector heaters, we found 
there were 197 models on the market." 
The consumers' view was that a brand 
name meant quality. They paid for 
brand names, but were not always 
quite sure that it was worth it. Of mem- 
bership of the Association, Miss Rob- 
erts said that it was "almost entirely 
middle-class, upper-income group — 
£1.000 a year or more. Prevalent are 
intellectuals, university lecturers, doc- 
tors, technologists." 

Among products the Association were 
asked to test were detergents (at the 
top), tooth-pastes and shampoos. There 
had to be some selectivity in the items 
tested, hut they tried to test as many 
products as they could. " Stomach pow- 
ders are cheap and simple to test and 
so we can test the lot." Other goods 
were expensive, so they tested nearly 
every make in a certain size range. 

Then there was the question of samp- 
ling. No one could tell the Association 
what would be a fair sample. "What 
we do is, if anything turns out unex- 
pectedly good or bad, in gel another 
sample to test." 

The Association had no laboratory of 
its own. " If we arc testing cosmetics 



or " patent " medicines, we get them 
analysed by a public analyst or chemi- 
cal laboratory, and we get the report on 
that analysis written by one doctor and 
checked by one or two others. One or 
two independent laboratories would test 
electrical products for safety and 
mechanical features and the goods were 
then put to practical tests. " Everything 
we test is a new problem. First we have 
to work out the questions the consumer 
is going to ask. And then we have to 
find ways of getting the answers or get- 
ting the scientist to find them. After 
that we do the reporting that appears 
in Which? " 

The Association had no feeling for 
or against manufacturers or industry of 
any kind. " When we started, consumer 
interest was already rising, and I 
should think that a lot of people were 
motivated by resentment. They felt that 
they were being cheated, that they were 
being ' got at ' by advertising. Now 
so far as we are concerned, all that is 
washed out." The Association aimed to 
get the facts straight and had no feel- 
ings in any direction. " We insist that 
we are not giving people merely de- 
cisions, but facts as well, so that they 
can accept our decisions or not as they 
like." 

Replying to questions. Miss Roberts 
stated that manufacturers or suppliers 
were not advised what was being pub- 
lished in Which ? " As a matter of 
policy, the results of tests are not told 
to manufacturers before publication — 
unless something quite extraordinary 
comes out that we arc at a loss to 
understand." Test goods were always 
bought from a retailer, over the coun- 
ter, just as by the ordinary shopper — 
never from the manufacturer. Asked if 
any aspect of the Association's work 
was concerned with complaints about 
products and services, and with advis- 
ing members what to do. Miss Roberts 
said : " We want to spend as much time 
and money as possible on research. 
Therefore we cannot spare much time 
to help out over individual complaints; 
occasionally, however, we make excep- 
tions in deserv ing cases. The Consumer 
Advisory Council of the British Stan- 
dards Institution is better fitted to do 
that." The Association had no policy, 
said Miss Roberts, on resale price 
maintenance. " We stick firmly to find- 
ing out the facts about goods and ser- 
vices and reporting to our members." 



March 14, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



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THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 14, 1959 



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March 14, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



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36 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST March 14, 1959 



EVANS 

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March 14, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



289 



CHEMISTaS)RUGGIST 

For Retailer, Wholesaler and Manufacturer 

ESTABLISHED 1859 

Published weekly at 
28 Essex Street, Strand, London, W.C.2 

TELEPHONE CENTRAL 6565 
TELEGRAMS: "CHEM1CUS ESTRAND, LONDON" 



Averages and Extremes 

Under a headline " How the System Works," the 
Executive Council (March 1959) once again draws 
attention to the anomalies that occur under the averag- 
ing system of pricing prescriptions. To obtain the 
" average " which the pricing bureau applies to the 
under 5s. prescriptions, approximately 20 per cent, of 
those prescriptions are priced fully, and the average 
price per prescription calculated from that figure. The 
5s.-and-over prescriptions are individually priced, and 
the chemist receives the true value for them. If the 
bureau finds in the packets that it extracts for averag- 
ing any prescriptions over 5s. in value which have 
been placed there in error by the chemist, it never- 
theless includes them in the calculation of the average 
price. That has the effect of inflating the average 
price per prescription, but the mis-sorting has two 
effects on the chemist's payment. On the one hand 
he gets more than he should on account of the inflated 
average price. On the other, he loses money because 
he does not get the full true value for those over-5s. 
prescriptions that he has put in the wrong place. One 
of the over-payments that occurred in Cheshire was 
analysed by the pricing bureau and it showed that 
the chemist had included in the under-5s. bundle eighty- 
four prescriptions over 5s. in value (total value 
£33 2s. 7d.). The bureau in that instance extracted 
three packets which included fifty-six prescriptions over 
5s. (total value £23 5s.). As a result, the average price 
per prescription was inflated, to the chemist's net gain 
of £72 0s. 4d. Those three packets, said the writer, 
produced the maximum gain for the chemist. He went 
on to examine what would have happened if other 
combinations of packets had been extracted to work 
out the average price, and gave his results in the table 
here given : — 



PRESCRIP- 


OVER 5S. 


AVERAGE 






TIONS 


NUMBER 


VALUE 


INFLATION 


GAIN 


LOSS 






£ s. d. 


d. 


£ s. d. 


£ s. d. 


300 


56 


23 5 


17-20 


72 4 




300 


39 


16 13 51 


12-19 


34 4 10 




300 


32 


13 19 


9-76 


22 1 1 




300 


19 


7 7 8 


4-38 




3 7 


300 


9 


2 16 7i 


1-21 




25 18 10 


300 


1 


6 6 






26 13 1 



" It will be seen," the paper comments, " that, on 
the present averaging system in use, the mis-sorting of 
prescriptions by the chemist may produce either gain or 
loss in relationship to the true value." In Shropshire 



recently there was an over-payment of £107 3s. on 
£528 10s. 7d. for June 1958. When the Executive Coun- 
cil made inquiry of the pricing bureau whether the 
error was due to bad sorting, the reply was : " I have 
to advise you that sorting of the prescriptions by Mr. — 
is exceptionally good. Indeed it is the nearest approach 
to perfection which the writer has seen. Unfortunately, 
having done so well, he then appears to have included 
one packet of S prescriptions in the A batch, no doubt 
by pure mischance. By pure chance, too, we happened 
to select that particular packet for pricing, with the 
result you know. Had we not selected it, the con- 
tractor would have been seriously underpaid " (our 
italics). There seems no need for further comment. 

New Horizons for Penicillin 

It is clear that a new era of penicillin chemistry has 
been entered with the isolation (see p. 283) of the 
basic molecule common to the medicinal penicillins in 
use today. That confidence is supported by the opinion 
of so eminent an authority as Professor Chain, a Nobel 
prize-winner and one of the members of Professor 
Florey's research team responsible for the forging into 
a medicinal weapon of Sir Alexander Fleming's original 
" zone-of-inhibition " discovery. It is further confirmed 
by the alacrity with which almost all the American 
manufacturers of antibiotics approached the Beecham 
Group to offer collaboration in research and develop- 
ment. Messrs. Beecham have let it be known that they 
" hope to make an announcement in the near future " 
about an arrangement of some such kind with " one of 
the large American concerns in the field." That should 
give the Group a good lead in the commercial exploita- 
tion of the discovery, but it is also certain that, whether 
with inside information or not, other teams on both 
sides of the Atlantic are now or soon will be following 
up one of the most promising lines of medical research 
to be marked out since the new era of specific therapy 
began. Dr. Farquharson (the director of research at the 
Beecham Laboratories) has described the discovery as 
" simple when judged after the event." That might be 
said of many of the discoveries that have changed the 
world. The thought must not detract from the bril- 
liance of the work- — outcome of a " marriage " between 
chemistry and microbiology — of the four-man team (the 
oldest is thirty-seven) who engineered it. To expect 
from the new ability to isolate the core of the molecule 
the synthesis of new penicillins capable of overcoming 
the sensitivity some patients show to existing penicil- 
lins is a prophecy modest enough to be put forward 
with confidence. There is the far greater hope that it 
will lead to the taming of the staphylococcus. There is 
furthermore the chance that it may lead to the elabora- 
tion of compounds effective against diseases hitherto 
intractable. 

A Rate by Any Other Name . . . 

The next rates demand received by ratepayers will have 
a " new look." In one sense it will not be a " demand," 
for that nasty word has been dropped. The ratepayer 
will be asked to pay his dues. Of course, if the money 
is not paid, then court action will follow just as if it 
were a demand. The form on which payment of rates 
will be asked will reflect the different system introduced 
by the recently passed Local Government Act. Under 
that Act county and county-borough councils will no 
longer get specific grants from the Government for 



290 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 14, 1959 



such services as education, health, and care of children. 
Instead, they will get a general grant based on number 
of pupils, number of children, total population, etc. 
At this stage it is not easy to predict how the change 
will affect rates in the long run. The general grant may 
more than compensate for loss of discontinued grants. 
But it is clear that the full effects of any over or under 
spending will be shown in the rates levied. Industrial 
re-rating, provided for in the new Act, will be of bene- 
fit to district councils and should help to keep the 
rates down. Under it industrial properties are being 
rated on half instead of one-quarter of their assessable 
value. That may almost double the amount of rates 
factory owners have to pay. 

On general grounds it is to be expected that the 
new system will bring about a rates reduction in many 
areas. On the other hand increased expenditure is 
planned by many council committees (often to meet 
salary and wage increases and the growing cost of 
materials). Reports now coming in show that traders 
in many parts of the country are having to pay a little 
more in rates. The fact that the dues are being 
" requested " and not " demanded " is hardly likely to 
soften the blow. 



Reopening of a Closed Market 

The signing of a financial accord in Cairo on February 
28 brings the hope that trade between the United King- 
dom and Egypt will improve. In the past an important 
market for pharmaceuticals, Egypt has been closed to 
British exporters for nearly two-and-a-half years. While 
there was, after the Suez affair, a big shortage of drugs 
and medicines in that country, Germany was not long 
in stepping in with supplies and long-term credits so 
that the shortage in supplies may have been rather in 
familiar makes and packages than in the drugs them- 
selves. No doubt Britain will recover part of that lost 
trade, and indeed has already begun to do so, for in 
January exports of prepared medicines to Egypt were 
valued at £106,817 (against £37,617 in January 1957). 
But in Egypt, as elsewhere, there is a strong movement 
for producing everything locally, and according to the 
Egyptian Minister of Industry his country is soon to 
ban the import of all pharmaceutical preparations that 
can be made locally. Customs duties are being reduced 
on imported raw materials needed for the pharmaceu- 
tical industry, and it is also hoped to prohibit the import- 
ation of many cosmetics, including lipsticks. 



Onward from Galen 

A CURRENT CAUSERIE 



The fervour with which students enter into the spirit of 
" rag days " must always be a source of amazement to the 
older generation. Take, for instance, the recent " pram " 
race from Leicester Square, London, to Leicester (total 
distance ninety-nine miles), in which fifteen teams of stu- 
dents from the Leicester University and College pushed 
prams at breakneck speeds through the streets of London 
and its suburbs to the roads of Middlesex and on through 
the shires of Hertford, Bedford, Northampton and Leicester. 
The stunt was a curtain-raiser for their rag day. The 
school of pharmacy, winners in 1958, entered a team again 
this year and were adjudicated fourth, though rumour has 
it that, but for questionable tactics on the part of a rival 
team, they would have been in third place. The rival was 
alleged to have put its pram into a van and driven right 
to the front. Since the exploit was done during the hours 
of darkness, however, proof could not be established. The 
school of pharmacy took just over 7 hours' " running 
time *' against the winners' 6 hours 40 minutes. In a few 
years' time many of the participants will most likely be 
called upon to push a pram again. Then it is unlikely to be 
empty and the speed should be more leisurely, though one 
party to the transaction may expect them to shoulder the 
task with undiminished alacrity. 

★ 

One of the greatest chemists of his time. Andreas Sigis- 
mund Marggraf, was born at Berlin 250 years ago: on 
March 3, 1709. He studied in succession chemistry and 
pharmacy, medicine, and mineralogy and metallurgy at 
Berlin, Strassburg, Halle, and Freiberg, before returning to 
Berlin in 1735 to become assistant to his father, the royal 
court apothecary. Elected to the Berlin Academy of Science 
(later known as the Royal Prussian Academy of Science) in 
1738, Marggraf was appointed director of its chemical 
laboratory in 1754 and of its physics class in 1760. An able 
experimenter and a skilled and pains-taking analyst, he 
made many original contributions to chemistry and to in- 
dustry. Among other things he introduced the microscope 
into the chemical laboratory; differentiated between potas- 
sium and sodium compounds; produced numerous chemical 
reagents; prepared and described phosphorus pentoxide, and 
demonstrated that phosphorus is contained in urine as phos- 



phates. The economic importance of his discovery in 1747 
of sugar in the sugar beet was not recognised until the 
continental blockade of France in 1806. A voluminous 
writer, and one of the last great exponents in Germany of 
the phlogiston theory, Marggraf died at Berlin on August 
7, 1782. His collected papers were published in two volumes 
under the title Chymische Schriften (1761, 1767). 



Edmond Beraneck. of " Tuberculin Beraneck " fame, was 
a distinguished Swiss zoologist and bacteriologist, and was 
born at Vevey, in the canton of Vaud, Switzerland, on 
March 10, 1859. He studied medicine at Lausanne, and 
graduated M.D. at Geneva. In 1883 he became professor 
of zoology at the Neuchatel Academy, where he made a 
name for himself with his encyclopaedic erudition and his 
brilliant and painstaking teaching. His tuberculin was in- 
troduced while he was working in a bacteriological labora- 
tory at Geneva. He obtained it from tubercle bacilli grown 
on non-peptonised bouillon, for he was the first to realise 
that peptones interfered with the curative action of tuber- 
culin. He published his method in Revue Medicate de la 
Suisse Romande (1905. 25. 684-714). Beraneck's tuberculin, 
which was described by Hermann Sahli, Berne, as " theor- 
etically and practically the best based," was first used in 
Britain by (Sir) Robert Philip, Edinburgh, in a series of 
dilutions on a decimal scale differing from that of Sahli. 
Beraneck died at Neuchatel on October 26, 1920. 

ECHOES OF THE PAST 

VOMITING BLOOD 

From Primitive Physick: or, an Easy and Natural Method 
of Curing Most Diseases, by John Wesley, 1772. 

Take two Spoonfuls of Nettle-juice. (This also dissolves 
Blood coagulated in the Stomach.) Or, one Spoonful of the 
Juice of Quinces : Or, a Quarter of a Pint of Decoction of 
Nettles and Plant one, two or three Times a Day. 

TO DISSOLVE COAGULATED BLOOD 

Bind on the Part for some Hours a Paste made of Black 
Soap, and Crumbs of white Bread : or, grated Root of 
Burdock spread on a Rag: Renew this twice a Day. 



March 14, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



2 9 1 



A SHARP REDUCTION IN AIR FREIGHTS 

from Europe to the United States focuses attention on the possibilities of 

AIR TRANSPORT 

in the marketing of chemicals, drugs and pharmaceuticals 

By a Special Correspondent 



IT has just been announced by the International Air 
Transport Association that, subject to Government 
approval in the countries concerned, new commodity 
rates for chemicals, drugs and pharmaceuticals will become 
effective on May 1. At a time when transportation costs 
generally tend to increase rather than decrease, the news 
may come as something of a surprise. But a glimpse at the 
background against which this welcome reduction has taken 
place may serve to put it in its proper perspective and 
to give hope of even better things in the future. 

It was inevitable that the speed of air transport should, 
from the start, attract emergency and perishable traffic. 
The ability of the aircraft to overcome natural barriers, 
such as mountain ranges, jungle or swamp between a source 
of supply and the site of some project made it also a 
" natural " for the transportation of equipment and sup- 
plies. The aspect of such traffic that was always first to 
manifest itself was, however, cost. The extra cost of air 
transport was only justified by the seriousness of the emerg- 
ency, by the consequences of not taking immediate steps 
to meet such an emergency; the impossibility of transport- 
ing perishables by any other means, thereby making them 
luxuries at destination (and therefore costly); or by the 
value of the resources to be developed in otherwise in- 
accessible regions. 

An Impression and Why it Lingers 

Because aircraft engaged, from time to time, in such ex- 
ploits, that aspect of the usefulness of the aeroplane hit 
the headlines, and left an impression on the public mind 
that air transport was only for the special occasion. Per- 
haps the Berlin " air lift," which had the dramatic aspect 
of making history, served also to emphasise that impression, 
while proving beyond doubt the capabilities of the aircraft 
as a cargo vehicle. For, side by side with the glowing ac- 
counts of the precise planning and magnificent accomplish- 
ment of those engaged on the Berlin air lift were frequent 
reminders of its enormous cost. 

On the other hand, the air lines were primarily inter- 
ested in passenger traffic in the period of development 
immediately after the 1939-45 war. That there was space 
on the aircraft other than was required for passengers and 
their baggage was due to the vehicle's shape, which was 
dictated in order that it should fly, and not due to any speci- 
fication of the operators. Regular, scheduled air-freight 
space, therefore, was available only on the main routes 
of the world, and it suffered from limitations of size and 
weight. Only a limited number of routes offered a suffi- 
cient flow of traffic to warrant the introduction of all-cargo 
services. The alternative to a scheduled all-cargo service 
was a special charter, with its resultant question of cost. 

The freight space available on passenger aircraft was 
offered to shippers at a basic rate per kilo, with a reduction 
of 25 per cent, for consignments of 45 kilos (100 lb.) or 
more. The method had the advantage of enabling a shipper 
to buy as few kilos of space as he required, and brought 
in to the air lines a large volume of sample and small- 
parcel traffic. But as the frequency of passenger services 
was stepped up, so more capacity was created, and an ac- 
tive sales effort began, most carriers having realised that 
here was an added source of revenue with considerable 



potential to be exploited without a disproportionate in- 
crease in operating costs. 

The early sales approach of the air lines was directed 
towards the more expensive commodities, for which the 
cost of air transportation would be " lost " as a small per- 
centage of the final selling price; and towards commodities 
which required heavy and expensive packing to safeguard 
them through a surface journey but which could move 
safely by air with lighter and less costly packing, the dif- 
ference in packing cost being sufficient to cover the differ- 
ence between air and sea charges. As a further selling point 
there was the fact that insurance premiums charged on the 
same destination were much lower by air than by surface. 

Those " advantages " (a word used regularly by all car- 
riers in their air freight advertising) were pushed to the 
limit, and undoubtedly they brought in a large volume 
of traffic, mostly shorthaul. But as the length of haul 
increased, so did the rate per kilo, and the attractiveness 
of those " savings " decreased proportionately. 

For some loads, experience in the limited use of air 
transport revealed " side-effects " that encouraged shippers 
to make greater use of it purely for the sake of economy. 
Research undertaken by many air lines brought out into 
the open what are now described as the " hidden " ad- 
vantages of air transportation. A whole new concept of 
the subject emerged, which was as exciting as it was timely 
in the light of developments in the aviation industry. The 
new approach of the airlines virtually placed them in the 
category of business consultants rather than of mere sales- 
men of a service. 

The potential in traffic and revenue of the new considera- 
tions is now regarded with such certainty by the air lines 
that it has had its effect upon the design of aircraft types 
due to come into operation in the next few years. As 
already mentioned, the freight space is there anyway, 
whether the carrier chooses to offer it for that purpose or 
not. The specification for the new Vanguard called for 
particular freight attributes that make it not just another 
passenger aircraft with spare space that may as well be used 
for freight, but a pure passenger-cum-freight aircraft whose 
freight aspect plays its part in the economic operation of 
the aircraft while fulfilling the needs of the shipper — a 
sure sign of faith in the future. 

Jet Aircraft and the Freight Situation 

So far no mention has been made of jet aircraft. Those 
mammoth machines will certainly bring with them a new 
and more urgent emphasis on air freight — not entirely 
without problems to the operators. A passenger jet with all 
seats filled still has about 5 tons of freight space! The 
coming into operation of the jets will render obsolete 
many propeller aircraft with years of useful life ahead of 
them. A sudden and enormous increase in freight capacity 
will be created, and it will have to be filled if the carriers 
are to operate economically. 

The new awareness within the industry of the importance 
of and potential return from freight has been given added 
impetus by the advent of the jet aircraft. The problem 
has always been to attract new traffic, and effective ways 
and means have been found to do that in a gradual devel- 
opment. The problem now becomes acute, and some other 



2 9 2 



THE CHEMIST 



AND DRUGGIST 



March 14, 1959 



outstandingly effective attraction must be offered to bring 
in the traffic to fill the increased capacity. The major deter- 
rent has always been cost, and it is to that aspect that the 
air lines have looked to solve their problems. The aim is 
accordingly to cut the cost and thereby attract the extra 
traffic so urgently required. 

Prior to the announcement of the proposed introduction 
of the new rates per kilo, the best rate available under the 
heading of chemicals, drugs, pharmaceuticals and medicines 
from London to New York was 8s. 8d. per kilo. That com- 
pares with the basic rate of 19s. Id. per kilo under 45 kilos 
and 14s. 4d. per kilo over 45 kilos — basic rates which are 
due to go up by 5 per cent, on May 1 if the governments 
concerned approve the new proposals! The incentive of the 
new commodity rates should encourage shippers to move 
bigger single consignments by air, while the new higher basic 
rate will be applied to traffic for which speed alone is the 
most important factor or goods whose value is so great that 
the small increase will be insignificant. 

The immediate objective of the scheduled airline indus- 
try is, then, to encourage the use of air transport because 
it is a sound proposition on cost. But even those reductions 
do not bear direct comparison with surface shipping rates, 
nor are the old considerations of lighter packing and lower 
insurance sufficient to cover the difference. What they do 
achieve is a closing of the gap to a point at which the other 
aspects of air freight can be applied with greater effect. 

The significant thing about the aeroplane is not that it is 
fast but simply that it is faster! The use of the comparative 
brings out the real point and the whole basis of the new 
air-line approach to shippers. In saying that they can move 
goods from Europe to the United States faster than any 
other means of transportation, the air lines offer a speeding- 
up in the process of distribution. That speeding-up is in 
keeping with trends in other stages of production and distri- 
bution. In the factory there is automation and in the admin- 
istration there are the electric typewriter, calculator, ac- 
counting machine, etc. The introduction of such new 
methods into an industry is undertaken only in the light of 
the changes they will bring about in speed, efficiency and 
productive capacity. At every stage the question of cost 
arises and the decision to avail oneself of those new methods 
is taken only when it is evident that they will be worth the 
extra cost. To reach the stage at which such a decision can 
be taken a vast amount of research and analysis must be 
carried out. The fact that so many industries have plumped 
for automation is evidence that they were prepared to under- 
take the necessary research. As a further and most im- 
portant step in the whole marketing process such research 
should now be extended to include distribution. 

Essential Economic Research 

The prime function of those who aim to " sell " air 
freight as an idea is to encourage industry to undertake 
research of precisely that kind. If industry did respond, 
where would an organisation start to look for the effects of 
the greater speed of air transport? The first part of the 
answer is — right at the end of the production line! 

From there on through packaging and packing, accumula- 
tion of "shippable" quantities, providing space for storage, 
the keeping of inventories, the checking-out of bulk con- 
signments, transportation to docks and time taken to deposit 
loads there, time of transportation to the coast of the desti- 
nation country, unloading, clearance through customs, stor- 
ing of stocks at final distribution centre — every stage is an 
addition to the cost of retailing the product. 

Would the greater speed and frequency of air transport- 
ation affect any of those cost items? And if so would it 
affect them upwards or downwards? Frequency allied to 
speed immediately suggests smaller consignments sent more 
often. Smaller consignments need less storage space both 
as the goods come off the production line and at the whole- 
sale receiving end. That aspect alone brings up the whole 
cost of maintaining storage space in terms of staff, light, 
heat, equipment, rent, stocktaking, etc. 



The possibility of carrying smaller stocks without reducing 
service to the customer raises many marketing questions — - 
fresh condition; more accurate short-term forecasting of 
requirements; ability to catch "snap" markets (or are 'flu 
epidemics peculiar to this country?); the unlikelihood of 
deterioration; reduction of risk of losses through obsoles- 
cence? 

All those things having been considered, there is another 
big factor that might prove to be the final deciding point 
in favour of air transport — getting one's money back 
sooner! The greater speed of air transport ensures that the 
total time, from acceptance of raw materials to final return 
of payment for the product, is shortened. Turnover time 
reduced means an increase in the earning power of the 
capital that finances the whole operation. Investigation of 
those matters means a lot of hard work for a large number 
of people. For whom? 

In his report to the International Air Transport Associa- 
tion in October last year, Sir William Hildred (Director 
General of the Association) asked, " what kind of vitamins 
are needed to transform this promising stripling (airfreight) 
to a full-grown breadwinner? " He went on : 

" Another need is sales research and development. To fill 
our holds, we shall have to carry a variety of commodities 
which we seldom if ever handle today. This requires imagina- 
tion, research, education and promotion. The commodities we 
must lay our hands on have been moving through established 
channels of surface transport for centuries; to get hold of 
them means changes in packaging and packing, inventory and 
warehousing and other practices which have become crystal- 
lised by long use. Much of this we can do for ourselves but 
not all of it. Shippers and importers must be encouraged by 
the appeal to their own pockets to exercise their own imagina- 
tions. . . ." 

The appeal is to shippers' own pockets! The new rates 
across the North Atlantic are the first major step in that 
appeal. The new proposed rates for chemicals, drugs, 

PHARMACEUTICALS, MEDICINES are: — 

United Kingdom to New York: U.S. $0"91 per kilo (mini- 
mum 250 kilos). 

United Kingdom to Montreal: U.S. $1 per kilo (minimum 
250 kilo). 

It is to be hoped that the innovation will prove rewarding 
and extend itself to many more world routes. 

NEW BOOKS 

The New Chemotherapy in Mental Illness 

HiRSCH L. GORDON, M.D., PH.D., f.a.P.a. Peter Owen, Ltd., 
50 Old Brompton Road, London, S.W.7. 8j x 5i in. 
Pp. xvii + 762. 84s. 
This considerable volume contains the contributions, under 
different headings, of 167 U.S. medical men upon the use 
of tranquilliser drugs. The subject matter is organised 
under the headings: General surveys; side-effects; and 
clinical experience — psychiatry and related conditions. The 
wealth of data, experience and opinion deserves an index 
to aid easy reference. Unhappily print size and the repro- 
duction of the diagrams are not always ideal. 

Pressurized Packaging (Aerosols) 

A. herzka and J. pickthall, Biitterworths Scientific Pub- 
lications, 4 Bell Yard, London, W.C.2 (in the United 
States Academic Press, Inc., New York). 8} x 5J in. 
Pp. xi +411. 63s. 
Claimed by the publishers to be the first comprehensive 
book on pressurised packaging, the work summarises, among 
other things, the many and complex problems that must be 
solved before a pressure-packed product can be marketed, 
and indicates how they may be overcome. Recognised as 
authorities in the aerosol field of packaging, the authors 
devote chapters to propellants, dispenser components, filling 
techniques, and laboratory evaluations. More than 200 for- 
mulations are given for such items as foods, cosmetics, 
medicinal specialities, insecticides, etc. Perhaps an especial 
value lies in the appendices: a directory of materials sup- 
pliers and world lists of suppliers of the minimal require- 
ments for producing pressurised dispensers and of contract 
fillers. 



March 14, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



293 



"OPEN SHOP" 

AN UNSCRIPTED COMMENTARY ON THE 
SPECIAL PROBLEMS OF THE PHARMACIST 
IN RETAIL PRACTICE 



E. C. TENNER 

IT is now clear that the retail practice of pharmacy is 
entering a new phase. All customers — the public and the 
Government — are now acutely price-conscious. People 
will walk a mile to save a penny or two on the purchase of 
a small packet of any household drug or commodity. The 
principles of price maintenance do not inspire public sup- 
port. In fact, often public sympathy is aroused for the 
price cutter. The high cost of living is probably the root 
cause of that state of affairs. Anybody who doubts that 
should consider his own reactions when purchasing goods. 
He will generally find he just cannot afford to pay one sup- 
plier a fraction more than another for the same article. 

The price of glucose powder is a good example of how 
things are going. National Pharmaceutical Union " competi- 
tive " glucose at 2s. is undercut by multiple (and widely 
distributed) glucose at Is. 9d. I have seen a private chemist 
recently (and I think foolishly) advertising glucose at Is. 6d. 
per lb. To any hard-up member of the public (and that 
means almost everyone) Epsom salts is Epsom salts, and he 
will not any longer willingly pay a penny or twopence more 
for a fancy pack or name. Compare that toughness with the 
mood of a woman buying cosmetics. She will often choose 
the most expensive article, again regardless of quality. The 
woman is no longer aware of quality, only of price and 
mystery. There is no longer any mystery about Epsom salts. 
The standardised substance is good enough, and the law sees 
that she gets it, but she believes a cosmetic is a mysterious 
" open sesame " to beauty and love! 

With the public in that frame of mind we are told : " It is 
necessary for the Ministry (of Health) to be satisfied that the 
payments made from the Exchequer monies, according to 
the Drug Tariff for standard drugs and preparations, are in 
accordance with the prices paid by the chemist-contractors 
for such products. . . .The Ministry of Health . . . regret 
that they see no alternative to asking a representative sample 
of contractors to provide further factual data in a period of 
at least twelve months. The contractors selected for this 
inquiry will be changed each month, and no contractor will 
be asked to give the information for more than one month 
of the twelve. . . . The results will ... be kept under run- 
ning review, and if after, say, three months there is evidence 
to show that the Drug Tariff prices for individual drugs or 
the quantities on which the prices are based are either too 
high or too low, then adjustment will be made after con- 
sultation with the Central N.H.S. (Chemist Contractors) 
Committee." 

The current inquiry into the cost of dispensing will have 
exposed all the actuarial facts of what composed the turn- 
over and expenses of English retail pharmacy in 1958. The 
counter sales of drugs, preparations and appliances must 
support part of the expenses involved in the dispensing of 
National Health prescriptions and, because the Government 
is so keen that it shall be made impossible for any of us 
to make more than a minimum of profit out of dispensing, 
we are faced with the fact that, if our counter sales go 
down, it will be uneconomical for us to continue dispens- 
ing — in other words as pharmacists we shall be forced out 
of business. The multiples, supermarkets and our pushful 
competitor private chemists are all striving to attract our 
counter drug and proprietary trade away from us so as to 
increase their own profits while making it almost impossible 




for us to remain in business as pharmacists. Those are the 
hard facts of life in this new desperately competitive phase 
we are entering. Our last cushions of more generous pro- 
fits are being removed. The Government's present estimate 
of our worth is the miserable N.H.S. dispensing fee that is 
not even designed as a proper retaining fee! Unless we pay 
heed to all these things, many of us will find life hard 
indeed. 

What can we do to be saved? First, we must decide to 
find suppliers of reliable own-name packed drugs and 
counter lines that can be sold at prices comparable with 
those of our most competitive opponents. That will mean that 
some of our old-fashioned ideas have to be changed (and 
some of the old-fashioned ideas of some of our manufac- 
turers as well). To remain as chemists we have got to suc- 
ceed as shop-keepers, opposed as we are by efficient multi- 
ples and supermarkets with relatively infinite resources 
behind them. 

Secondly, and much more difficult, we have got to hold 
and build up the confidence of the public in our integrity 
and dignity. It is deeply significant that five out of seventeen 
motions submitted to the Pharmaceutical Society for dis- 
cussion at the Branch Representatives' meeting in London 
on May 21 deal with the question of our "public rela- 
tions." but the vital importance of our own personal busi- 
ness and professional ethics in forming those of our Society 
generally must not be overlooked. 

In face of all those circumstances I just cannot imagine 
what arguments the Hertford Branch of the Society will 
bring to support its motion " That the Society should take 
the lead in obtaining a separation of pharmaceutical ser- 
vices from general trading, with the ultimate aim of pro- 
hibiting the latter in registered premises." The Hertford 
motion would place ruinous restrictions on the majority of 
the members of the Society. Where the Society should rather 
lead is in obtaining statutory recognition that the pharma- 
cist is the only person properly qualified to distribute drugs 
and medicines for human consumption and in securing the 
statutory restriction of their distribution to the public to the 
channel of pharmacists' registered premises. 

Territorial Representation 

A postal plebiscite of the Society on the proposed insti- 
tution of area representation on the Council might settle 
once and for all that vexed question. Personally I welcome 
the motion on the matter that is being laid before the 
Branch Representatives by North Staffordshire. Like many 
other members I feel that the apathy in voting at the annual 
Council election is due to hesitancy to vote for persons 
almost unknown to the voter. 

There is one last motion that I must refer to. This time 
it is a resolution passed the other day by ten votes to two 
by the Scottish Department Executive to be submitted to 
the Council : " That in the opinion of the Executive the 
time is now opportune for the Council to reconsider the 
desirability of a scheme for the training, examination and 
supervision of unqualified assistants." What shall you and I 
tell candidates for the coming Council election to do about 
it? What do we want the Council to do about it? Unre- 
pentant, I still believe there should be no official recognition 
of unqualified assistants as such by the Society. 



294 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 14. 



1959 



PHARMACEUTICAL SOCIETY OF GREAT BRITAIN 

DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCES TO BE FORMED 

Co-ordinating the Society's scientific activities 



THE Council of the Pharmaceutical Society at its meet- 
ing on March 3-4 decided to establish a department 
of pharmaceutical sciences for the purpose of carrying 
on those activities in an enlarged and more effective man- 
ner, and giving them a more distinctive place in the Society's 
work. The bases of the reorganisation are the scientific publi- 
cations department and the museum, but in addition to 
absorbing those the new department is to be the instrument 
for giving effect in the broadest sense to the objects of the 
Society relating to the advancement of pharmacy and chem- 
istry and the application of pharmaceutical knowledge, for 
which in the past there has been no separate executive 
machinery. 

Among the purposes with which the department will be 
concerned are the following : 

To collect information on materials used in pharmacy and in 
particular on the sources, composition, chemical and physical 
properties, formulation, action and uses, and analysis of 
drugs and related substances. 

To make available the above information through the various 
publications of the Society and by any other suitable methods. 

To provide standards and standard methods of assay for drugs 
and pharmaceutical materials where these are not available 
in the British Pharmacopoeia or elsewhere and to publish 
these standards and standard methods in suitable form. 

To develop and publish standard formulas. 

To undertake in the laboratory research where this is re- 
quired for the various purposes set out above. 

To establish and maintain connection with those engaged in 
pharmaceutical research and to encourage research by phar- 
macists. 

To maintain and expand as necessary the collection of materia 
medica and the herbarium. 

To arrange or assist in arranging exhibitions. 

To arrange (a) meetings of the Society on scientific, technical 
and professional subjects; (b) refresher courses and other 
forms of post-graduate education, and to assist branches of 
the Society in making similar arrangements. 

To provide the Council with reports on scientific subjects as 
requested. 

A committee to advise the Council on the policy of the 
department is to be set up together with a number of 
specialised committees to deal mainly with practical investi- 
gations. One aspect of the department's work, i.e., that 
connected with exhibitions, will be part of a wider scheme 
embracing all forms of publicity. A publicity committee to 
advise the Council on such matters is in the course of being 
established. 

Dr. K. R. Capper and Mr. S. C. Jolly have been appointed 
respectively director and assistant director of the depart- 
ment and Dr. T. E. Wallis, emeritus curator of the museum, 
will act in an advisory capacity to the department in con- 
nection with the collection of materia medica and the 
herbarium. As part of the reorganisation all historical 
material in the Society's possession has been placed in the 
custody of Miss A. Lothian, who has been given the title 
of keeper of the historical collection in addition to that of 
librarian. 

T raining of Assistants 

The Council discussed the Scottish Department Execu- 
tive's resolution that reconsideration be given to " the 
desirability of a scheme for the training, examination and 
supervision of unqualified assistants " (see C. & £>., Febru- 
ary 21, p. 202). The President (Mr. D. W. Hudson) said 
the resolution was a request to look at the matter again 
and pointed out that there was no question of 
reviving rejected proposals. I he problem of unqualified 
assistants had been with them a long time and was now 



becoming a current topic again. It was agreed to resume 
the discussion at the next convenient meeting. 

The librarian's report recorded the presentation by 
Roberts & Co., New Bond Street, London, of a large old 
marble mortar on a wooden stand; and the gift to the 
library of an autograph letter dated December 20, 1849, 
written by Jacob Bell to Edward Smith, and presented by- 
Mr. H. E. Brocksom of Hampstead. It was stated that the 
John Bell centenary would be officially observed by the 
Society on June 12. The programme of events to mark 
that occasion would be announced later. 

The Education Committee took note of proposed altera- 
tions in the ordinances and regulations for the degree of 
B.Sc. with Honours in Pharmacy, and for the ordinary 
degree of B.Sc, of the University of Manchester. The re- 
ceipt was reported of an invitation to send a representa- 
tive to the International Conference and International 
Seminar on Vocational Guidance, to be held at Margate 
from May 1 to 5, and it was agreed to accept the invitation. 

On the Finance Committee's recommendation the Council 
confirmed proposals to alter the by-laws in the manner of 
which notice had been given previously (see C. & D., De- 
cember 20, 1958, p. 638), and on which no observations 
had been received within the prescribed period. Authority 
was given for a copy of the resolution to be sealed with the 
Common Seal of the Society, and it was agreed that the 
alterations should be submitted to the Privy Council for 
confirmation and approval. 

It was reported that the ad hoc committee with repre- 
sentatives of the Guild of Public Pharmacists, proposed at 
the last meeting to consider the final report of the Central 
Health Services Council Committee on Hospital Supplies, 
had been formed, and had agreed to the preparation of a 
statement for submission to the Ministry of Health. The 
Council appointed Dr. K. R. Capper to represent the Society 
at the 19th International Congress of Pharmaceutical 
Sciences, Zurich, September 6-9. Mr. W. K. Fitch was 
appointed to represent the Society at the meeting of the 
International Congress of Military Medicine and Pharmacy 
and the Military Pharmacists' Section of the International 
Pharmaceutical Federation to be held on April 2 and 3 to 
continue the work on the production of an International 
Military Pharmaceutical Formulary. 

Registration of Students 

To fill the place on the Public Services Committee vacant 
by the resignation of Mr. P. J. Fowler, one of the four co- 
opted members, it was agreed that Mr. S. Powlson (secre- 
tary, Guild of Public Pharmacists) should be co-opted as a 
member of the committee until May. 

In February eleven persons had been registered as " Stu- 
dent.'' making a total of thirteen in the current year, against 
428 in the corresponding period of 1958. Four former 
members of the Society, having paid the necessary fees 
and penalties, had been restored to the register. 

In January the Society's inspectors and agents visited 
1,242 authorised sellers, 240 listed sellers, and 344 drug- 
store proprietors and similar traders. Nine cases of alleged 
infringements under the Pharmacy and Poisons Act, 1933, 
and the Pharmacy Act, 1954, were considered, and appro- 
priate action was taken. 

The Benevolent Fund and War Aid Committee's report 
showed that grants amounting to £195 3s. 7d. had been made 
and recommendations for grants amounting to £457 6s. 2d. 
were approved. Four applications for assistance were de- 
ferred, together with one application to the War Aid Fund. 
Mr. A. Aldington reported on his visit to the Royal 



March 14, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



295 



Wolverhampton School, where four orphaned children of 
pharmacists are being educated, and on the Committee's 
recommendation the Council agreed that the annual sub- 
scription to that school should be increased to £100, to be 
paid from the Orphan Fund. A legacy of £100 was left to the 
Benevolent Fund by the late Mr. Sam Briggs, Lincolnshire. 

The Birdsgrove House warden's report stated that in the 
month to February 16 there were fourteen guests at the 
convalescent home for an aggregate of 18i weeks, against 
four guests and one week in the same period a year ago. 

Report on 1958 Resolutions 

The final report of the Council on resolutions passed at 
the Branch Representatives' meeting in May 1958 was pre- 
sented. On the resolution " That official drugs and prepara- 
tions whose name or title is unwieldy should have a shorter 
title to encourage medical practitioners to prescribe by 
official title," the Council state that the effect of the length 
of an official name on prescribing practice can easily be 
exaggerated. If medical practitioners do not use official 
titles that may well be because their minds naturally turn 
to the use of names with which they are more familiar as 
a result of the promotion activities of manufacturers. The 
Council do not consider there is sufficient evidence to sug- 
gest that the length of an official name is primarily respon- 
sible, if at all, for its not being used, particularly as the 
medical profession are well accustomed to ponderous 
terminology. Some official names may not be so easily 
memorised as brand names but it must be remembered that 
they have to conform to certain general principles, particu- 
larly the need for them to be understood internationally. 
Names which were too short would be in conflict with 
those principles and moreover might well make the phar- 
macist's task in interpreting prescriptions more difficult. It 
was that point which was in mind when the recent confer- 
ence on proprietary medicines deplored any recommenda- 
tion to prescribers to order drugs by abbreviations of 
official or proprietary names. In general the Council are 
satisfied that the appropriate authorities are conscious of 
the need to keep official names as short as possible and in 
particular welcome the steps which have been taken to 
omit acid radicles from the names of preparations where 
those are unnecessary. 

On the resolution " That the Council should be urged to 
appoint a curator and rehabilitate the Society's museum," 
the establishment of a Department of Pharmaceutical 
Sciences now announced makes appropriate provision for 
the future of the work of the museum. 

The Council are not yet able to present a final report on 
the following : — 

" That the Pharmaceutical Society should take steps, after 
consultation with all appropriate bodies, so to amend the 
Schedule 4 poisons regulations that a pharmacist may, after 
consultation with the prescriber, complete a Schedule 4 pre- 
scription in cases where either the amount or the strength of 
the preparation had not been stated, such prescription to be 
duly endorsed by the pharmacist. In addition, representation 
should be made to ensure that on prescriptions for Schedule 4 
poisons and for substances covered by the Therapeutic Sub- 
stances Act, initialled endorsement by a pharmacist should be 
accepted as evidence of completion or modification of the 
prescription." 

Other resolutions were the subject of an interim report 
(see C. & D., November 15 and 22, 1958, p. 533 and 560). 

MEDICAL ABSTRACTS 

MALFORMATIONS DUE TO DIET DEFICIENCIES 
In a paper read at a symposium on nutrition in pregnancy, 
Warkany (/. Amer. med. Assoc., 1958. 15. 2020), describes 
observations on animals, giving a warning against assum- 
ing that the findings can be applied to man. Warkany 
found in rats that a deficiency of riboflavine in the mother 
could cause malformation in the offspring. In a series of 
tests on animals, about one-third are understood to have 
had congenital malformations. Rats deprived of vitamin A 
in the period from weaning to pregnancy also produced 



young with congenital malformations. Reactions to de- 
ficiency differed according to foetal age. In the work on the 
vitamin-B complex, it was noted that regular soft-tissue 
malformation did not occur with riboflavine. Deficient folic 
acid and cyanocobalamin caused hydrocephalus in rats. 
Ocular defects were noted in the young of mothers de- 
prived of pantothenic acid. In pregnant rats, vitamin-E 
deficiency could result in foetal absorption. 

VANCOMYCIN, A NEW ANTIBIOTIC 
Davis and others (Brit. med. J., 1958. ii. 1394) report on 
the use of vancomycin (an antibiotic produced by Strepto- 
myces orientalis) in a case of puerperal septicaemia. 5. orien- 
talis occurs in certain Indonesian soils. Earlier in vitro in- 
vestigations indicated a lethal effect against Staph, aureus. 
In the case mentioned, vancomycin proved effective against 
an organism that had proved resistant to oxytetracycline, 
penicillin, Chloromycetin and erythromycin. Sterile blood 
cultures were obtained within three days of use of the new 
drug. Vancomycin may only be administered by the paren- 
teral route. It is not yet commercially available. 

GUIDE TO NEW MEDICAMENTS 

The following paragraph upon Tofranil — a new oral drug 
for use in the treatment of depressive states — should be 
inserted into the file systems to replace that published on 
March 7 (p. 269). Details of dosage have been amended 
on the basis that Tofranil is principally an oral drug for 
use in depressive states, parenteral use being secondary for 
severe cases. 

TOFRANIL 

Manufacturer: Geigy Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., Roundthorn 
Estate, Wythenshawe, Manchester, 23. 

Description : A " thymoleptic " drug, regulating mood and 
assisting the patient to bring order to the emotions. No 
specific pharmacological basis for its action has yet been 
established, but it is assumed that the drug unblocks and 
lifts the fixed depressive mood rather than exerting an anti- 
depressive effect. Tofranil is principally an oral drug for use 
in the treatment of depressive states. It has little or no seda- 
tive action. The drug is available in two forms : sugar- 
coated tablets each containing 25 mgm. ; and ampoules each 
containing 25 mgm. in 2 mils. Chemically : N-(y-dimethyl- 
aminopropyD-iminodibenzyl hydrochloride, which is in the 
new pharmacologically active group of iminodibenzyl 
derivatives. 



N 



O-h CHj CH; N; 



,CHi 



. HC1 

NTH, 

Indications: Endogenous depression; manic depressive psy- 
choses; depression due to involutional and organic changes; 
depression accompanying psycho-neurotic states. 

Dosage : Oral. The exact dosage will vary from case to case but 
in induction phase it is usual to give four tablets on first 
and second days (one in the morning, one at lunch-time 
and two at night) and that dosage is increased by two 
tablets a day, maintaining the three-times-a-day administra- 
tion to a maximum of ten tablets a day by the fifth day. 
That dosage is continued until clinical improvement is seen, 
when the dosage should be reduced gradually to a therapeu- 
tically effective maintenance level of two to six tablets a 
day. Parenteral: For severe and unco-operative depressive 
states. Start with three ampoules on the first day and in- 
crease by one ampoule per day to a maximum of eight 
ampoules daily by the sixth day. Oral treatment is then 
started, two tablets replacing one ampoule daily until tablets 
only are administered. Lower to the maintenance dosage of 
two to six tablets daily after clinical improvement is seen. 

How Supplied: In containers of fifty, 200 and 1,000 25-mgm. 

tablets and containers of ten and fifty 2-mil ampoules each 

containing 25 mgm. 
First Issued: To mental hospitals only, January 1959. 
Supply Restrictions: Available only to mental hospitals and 

psychiatric units. 
References: Schweiz. med. Wschr., 1958. 88. 763. Schweiz. med Wschr., 

1957. 87. 1135. 



296 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 14, 1959 



IRISH MEDICAL REPRESENTATIVES 

Inaugural dinner of new association 



THE inaugural dinner of a newly 
formed Irish Pharmaceutical and Medi- 
cal Representatives' Association, held 
in Dublin, on February 28, was at- 
tended by ninety-two members and 
guests including the president of the 
Pharmaceutical Society of Ireland. 
Dinner was followed by a smoking con- 
cert and with the speeches, mainly of 
an informal nature, the occasion was 
a great social success. The president of 
the Association (Mr. J. McKenna), wel- 
coming the guests, said that he was 
conscious of the privilege of presiding 
over the first of the Association's social 
functions. It was the Association's in- 
tention that, whatever other activities 
it undertook, it would always have at 
least one such function every year. 
Paying tribute to the Association's hon- 
orary secretary (Mr. F. Walsh), the 
president said that he had not only 
borne the brunt of the work on the 
organisational side of the Association, 
but was also responsible for most of 
the work of organising the dinner. 

Mr. McKenna said that, after the 
agreed final date for registrations, the 
Association's committee agreed that a 
social function would be the most suit- 
able occasion at which to meet all mem- 
bers and associates. They considered 
that it would also give the Association 
an opportunity of showing its appre- 
ciation of the kindness, courtesy, sup- 
port and encouragement they had re- 
ceived from existing pharmaceutical 
bodies. 

" Confidence in (he Association " 

" I know I am expressing the view 
of all present when I say that we are 
honoured to have with us Mr. H. 
Corrigan (president. Pharmaceutical 
Society of Ireland); Mr. G. O'Neill (a 
member of the committee, and a former 
president of the Irish Drug Associa- 
tion), who has come along at very 
short notice; Mr. Lohan (president. 
Hospital Pharmacists' Association); 
Mr. Hughes (president of the Com- 
pounders' Association); Mr. Coleman 
(registrar, Pharmaceutical Society of 
Ireland) and Mr. Brendan Smith (secre- 
tary, Irish Drug Association)." In a 
special tribute to their associates, the 
president said that had they shown 
their confidence in the Association not 
only by joining, but also by the num- 
bers in which they had come along 
that night to ensure the success of the 
dinner. Amidst applause Mr. McKenna 



Nome guests at I he 
in:iuuiir.il dinner: I ront 
TOW, Messrs. M. F. 

Walsh (secretary), H. 
p. Corrigan (president, 
Pharmaceutical Soderj 
of Ireland), and .1. 
McKenna (president <>i 

the Vssociation); second 
row, MtllMi E. 
Hughes (chairman, Com* 
pounders' Association), 
m i ohan (chairman, 
Hospital Pharmacists 1 

\ssociation), P. Cum- 
mins (treasurer oi the 
Asviciation), and J. 
Mt » It.in, Cork (fl mem- 
ber ol the committed. 



said : " I promise them that as long as 
this committee has anything to do with 
the Association their interests will re- 
ceive at least equal consideration with 
all others in all our future activities." 

Proposing the toast of the Pharma- 
ceutical Society of Ireland, Mr. J. 
Meehan (a member of the Associa- 
tion's committee) said that the Society 
had a great tradition, and a great re- 
sponsibility. It must guard the standards 
that had been handed down. " It is a 
progressive Society and I am proud to 
say it fosters and encourages a code 
of ethics and behaviour which is second 
to none." In no corresponding society 
in the civilised world was the standard 
of spiritual and ethical behaviour 
higher. " I am happy to see the Society 
keeping well abreast of the times. Its 
new school must be a source of pride 
to us all, and I am sure that, under 
the guidance of Mr. Corrigan and his 
able lieutenants, the Society will jeal- 
ously guard the fine traditions handed 
down by their predecessors — dignity not 
being the least." 

" Remarkable Organising Powers " 

Replying, Mr. H. P. Corrigan (pre- 
sident of the Society), thanked Mr. 
Meehan for " the handsome manner " 
in which he had proposed the toast 
and thanked the gathering for the man- 
ner in which they had received the 
toast. " I would like to emphasise how 
happy I am to represent the Society 
at this, the first social function of the 
Association. Although young, it has 
already shown remarkable growth and 
powers of organisation." The credit for 
that must go to the energetic committee 
who had a good deal to do with the 
establishment of the Association, the 
aims of which were commendable : to 
ensure that those who followed them 
would have the same qualities, the 
same pharmaceutical training and back- 
ground both individually and collec- 
tively. The relationships existing today 
between the medical and pharmaceuti- 
cal professions were on a better basis 
than at any time since the foundation 
of the Pharmaceutical Society. That 
that was due in no small measure to 
the excellent work and the good im- 
pression created by medical representa- 
tives was in no doubt. 

The toast " Our Guests " was pro- 
posed by Mr. E. Browne who, in a 
reference to Mr. Smith (secretary of 
the Irish Drug Association), said : 




" Mr. Smith especially deserves our 
support for the manner in which he 
has always upheld standards, prices and 
matters of that nature." 

Mr. M. Lohan (president of the Hos- 
pital Pharmacists' Association) replying, 
said that his Association had the inter- 
ests of the new body very much at 
heart. " We are wholeheartedly behind 
you because you are the people who 
come and indoctrinate us." 

The toast of the Irish Pharmaceuti- 
cal and Medical Representatives' Asso- 
ciation was proposed by Mr. O'Neill 
(Irish Drug Association). Mr. F. Walsh 
(secretary), replying, said that the Asso- 
ciation now had 192 members, which 
he considered wonderful progress. 

MANUFACTURERS' 
ACTIVITIES 

On Visit to Europe. — Mr. Milton M. 

Parfitt (supervisor of European sales 
for S. J. Stokes Corporation, Phila- 
delphia. Pa., U.S.A.) arrived in Lon- 
don recently on a seven-week trip to 
Europe. Until March 14 he is, with 
Mr. David Shaw (Alchem Processes, 
Ltd.: 36 Peckham Road, London. 
S.E.5), the company's representative in 
the United Kingdom, calling on 
customers and prospects in the British 
Isles with news of latest developments 
in Stokes automatic production equip- 
ment for the pharmaceutical, chemical 
and other industries. 

Photographic Equipment Exhibition. 
— In order to increase the usefulness 
of their service to the retail pharma- 
cist. Bradley & Bliss, Ltd., King's 
Road, Reading, have been extending 
the range of their photographic stock 
and a daily delivery service of all 
photographic items for which they are 
accredited distributors. To inaugurate 
that service, they held an exhibition of 
photographic equipment at the Great 
Western hotel. Reading, on March 
4-5, which was well attended by local 
retail chemists. Representatives of the 
company and of manufacturers were in 
attendance. 

European Research Institute Planned. 
— Plans for a new scientific centre in 
Geneva employing British, Swiss, 
French. German and other European 
scientists and devoted solely to long- 
range research in the chemical and bio- 
logical sciences, were announced re- 
cently by Dr. Robert C. Swain (vice- 
president for research and development, 
Cyanamid International). Dr. Swain 
said ..." We plan to employ six or 
seven senior scientists who will be 
selected from different scientific fields 
and from different national origins. 
Each of the scientists will become the 
head of a department fully stalled and 
equipped with modern facilities to per- 
mit him to continue and expand his 
personal scientific interests." An indi- 
cation of the company's research effec- 
tiveness, he said, was the fact that over 
50 per cent, of current sales came from 
products, developed in their own lab- 
oratories and which were completely 
unknown ten years ago. As a current 
example of progress. Dr. Swain was 
able to report that the first total syn- 
thesis of a tetracycline, biologically 
active and related to Aureomycin, had 
just been achieved. 



March 14, 1959 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 297 




Powerful oral progestogen many times more active 
and 4C . . . cheaper to use than ethisterone. . ."*) 

*) British Medical Journal May 31st, 1958, p. 1297 




Primolut 

Nor ethisterone 

Indications: Metropathia haemorrhagica, Polymenorrhoea, 
Postponement of Menstruation, Amenorrhoea, Sterility, 
Abortion, Premenstrual Tension, Dysmenorrhoea. 

PRESENTATION and TRADE PRICES 

Tablets containing 5mg. Norethisterone. 

Tube of 30 — 19/2 Bottle of 500 — 226/8 

Bottle of 100 — 53/4 Bottle of 1000 — 441/4 

Primolut N is exempt from purchase tix. 

SCHERING A.G. BERLIN / GERMANY 

U.K. Subsidiary: Pharmethicals (London) Ltd., 20, Gerrard Street, London, W.l 
Irish Office: H. E. Clissmann, 20, Merrion Square, Dublin 



:98 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 14, 19 



2EXTR 

OFFER EXTENDED TO MARCH 28th 1959 

FOR 

fi^Sd. Trade Mark 




LEMON BONUS OFFER 



Because of many requests from the trade, 
it has been decided that the Sunfresh 
Bonus Offer should be extended by 
2 weeks to finish at Easter. One bottle 
of Sunfresh Lemon Glucose Drink 
will be given FREE with every case of 
one dozen bottles of Sunfresh Orange 
delivered by March 28th. 



ORDER TODAY FROM YOUR USUAL SUPPLIER 



O. K. Groves Ltd.. 20 Jermyn Street. London. S.W.I, 
Tel GERrard 9484 (7 llnea) 



March 14. 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



299 



TRADE REPORT 

The prices given are those obtained by importers or manufacturers for bulk quantities or original packages. Various 
charges have to be added whereby values are in many instances augmented before wholesale dealers receive the goods into 
stock. Crude drugs and essential oils vary greatly in quality and higher prices are charged for selected qualities. 



London, March IT: The quiet trading conditions of the past week 
brought no major price changes. The scarcity of Chinese Menthol 
continued and Brazilian material tended to firm in consequence with ship- 
ment up by Is. 9d. per lb. 

Bombay Henna was the latest item 
from India to be marked up for ship- 
ment, the forward quotation being 70s. 
per cwt. against 62s. recently. New- 
crop African Ginger was quoted at the 
same level as spot old-crop. Peppers 
began to ease but later hardened on 
Continental demand and reluctance of 
Singapore merchants to offer. The for- 
ward rate of Senega at 15s. per lb. was 
less than previously asked but still 
represented a premium over spot quo- 
tations. Cinnamon was fractionally 
easier at origin. Curacao Aloes was 
currently offered at 495s. per cwt. on 
the spot. 

Lemongrass again eased in both 
positions while Brazilian Bois de rose 
was lower by sixpence per lb. On the 
other hand Chinese Peppermint was 
dearer by one shilling per lb. 

In Pharmaceutical Chemicals one 
manufacturer offered Citric acid in an 
alternative packing which represented 
a reduction of nearly one penny per lb. 
from established drum rate. 



Quinidine. — Prices are as follows: 



Pharmaceutical Chemicals 

Acetic acid. — B.P. glacial in 10-ton 
lots is £104 per ton naked and technical 
£91. Carboys are £8 and demijohns, £10 
per ton extra. Single carboys cost Is. 8d. 
per lb. (3s. 8d. per kilo). 

Aloin. — Spot offers (14-lb. lots} are 
28s. 9d. per lb. 

Benzyl benzoate — One-ton lots of b.p. 
grade are at 4s. 6d. per lb. 

Bismuth salts. — The following are the 
prices (per lb.) in largest bulk packages: — 



Citric acid. — Quotations (per cwt.) for 
domestic material in drums are 225s. for 
l^t-cwt. lots and 220s. for 5-cwt. lots. In 
paper bags 5-cwt. lots are 212s. 6d. 

Chlorbutol. — 28-lb. lots are quoted at 
10s. per lb. 

Chloroxylenol. — B.P. quality is 5s. 3d. 
per lb. for 1-cwt. lots and 5s. Id. for 
10-cwt. 

Creosote. — B.P. quality, ex beechwood, 
is from 6s. 9d. to 7s. 6d. per lb. 

Cresol. — Price of b.p. quality from dis- 
tillers is 7s. 9d. per gall, in 5-gall. lots. 

Diphenan. — Prices range from 55s. 3d. 
(56-lb.) to 63s. (1-lb.) per lb. 

Emetine. — Price for 32-oz. lots of the 
hydrochi or'De is 270s. per oz. The bis- 
muth iodide is 127s. per oz. 

Ether. — Per lb. in Winchesters: — tech- 
nical b.s.s., and solvent, 5-cwt. 2s. 7d. ; 
(4s. lid. litre). In drums the price is 2s.2d. 
per lb. Anesthetic, b.p., 5-cwt., 3s. lOd. ; 
10-cwt. 3s. 9d. 

Hydrocyanic acid. — Dilute b.p.c is 
from 3s. 2d. to 4s. per litre, as to quan- 
tity; Scheeles is from 3s. lOd. to 4s. 9d. 

Hydrogen peroxide. — • 27 5 per cent, 
(by weight), £119 per ton; 35 per cent., 
£143 in returnable carboys. 

Hydroquinone. — Quotations for 1-cwt. 
lots are lis. 6d. per lb. or 25s. 4d. per 
kilo. 

Hypophosphites. — Prices per lb. are: — 





7 lb. 


28 lb. 


1 cwt. 




s. d. 


s. d. 


s. d. 


Calcium. B.P.C. . 


6 9 


6 4 


5 11 


Iron, B.P.C. 


13 9 


13 3 


12 9 


Magnesium 


11 6 


11 1 


10 8 


Magnesium, B.P.C. 


13 11 


13 5 


12 11 


Potassium, B.P.C. 


9 3 


8 10 


8 5 


Sodium, B.P.C. 


7 7 


7 2 


6 9 





28 lb. to 
1 cwt. 


1 cwt. 


5 cwt. 




s. d. 


s. d. 


s. d. 


Carbonate 


22 3 


21 9 


21 4 


Salicylate 


21 9 


21 4 


20 10 


Subgallate 


21 1 


20 8 


20 2 


SUBN1TRATE 


20 5 


20 


19 6 



The 1-cwt. rates (per lb.) for other salts 
are: — citrate, b.p.c, 22s. 8d.; nitrate, 
crystals, 14s. 8d. ; oxide, b.p.c, 27s. 7d. ; 

OXYCHLORIDE, B.P., 27s. 9d. ; OXYIODOGAL- 
LATE, B.P.C, 28s. 9d. ; SODIUM TARTRATE, 

35s. 6d.; and tribromphenate, b.p.c, 
26s. 9d. 

Bromides. — Prices per lb. are as fol- 
lows: 





1 cwt. 


5 cwt. 




s. d. 


1. d. 


Potassium 


2 6 


2 5 


Sodium 


2 6 


2 5 


Ammonium 


2 10 


: s 



The prices quoted are for crystals (powder 
is 1-Jd. per lb. more) packages free, car- 
riage paid terms. The kilo rates for 50- 
kilo lots are 5s. 6d. for potassium and 
sodium and 6s. 3d. for ammonium. 

Cinchophen. — 1-cwt. lots are quoted at 
21s. per lb. 

Citrates. — Present rates (per lb.) for 
1-cwt. and 5-cwt. lots are as follows: — 





I cwt. 


5 cwt. 




s. d. 


s. d. 


Sodium t 


2 10 


2 9 


Potassium t 


3 1 


2 m 


Iron and ammonium*.. 


3 9 


3 7} 



tPowder 3d. per lb. more. *Scales lOd. per lb. 
more. 



Magnesium carbonate. — Minimum bulk 
rate for light is 121s. per cwt.; heavy 
is 160s. per cwt. for 1-cwt. lots and about 
130s. per cwt. for 1-ton lots. 

Magnesium chloride. — One^cwt. lots 
are quoted at Is. lOd. per lb.; 5-cwt., 
Is. 7d. 

Magnesium hydroxide. — Makers' prices 
for b.p.c. are 1-cwt. lots, 3s. 5d. per lb. 
and 1-ton, 3s. 2d. per lb. 

Magnesium oxide, b.p. — Bulk rates are 
as follows: — light, 3s. 2d. per lb., and 
heavy, 5s. lOd. per lb. 

Magnesium peroxide. — Price (per lb.) 
for 1-cwt. lots of b.p.c. (15 per cent.) is 
3s. lid. 

Magnesium sulphate. — Quotations for 
b.p. in minimum 1-ton lots vary between 
£18 and £21 per ton according to size of 
crystal and manufacturer. Exsiccated is 
£42 per ton. All ex works. 

Magnesium trisilicate. — In 28-lb. 
packages the prices (per lb.) are now as 
follows:— 28-lb., 4s. 9id. ; 1-cwt., 3s. 10d.; 
5-cwt., 3s. 7d. ; 1-ton, 3s. id. 

Oxalic acid. — Manufacturers' rates for 
1-ton lots are from £128 10s. per ton, de- 
livered in free kegs. 

Papaverine. — Synthetic hydrochloride 
is 295s. per kilo, minimum 1-kilo lots. 

Phenolphthalein. — Rate for 1-cwt. lots 
is 9s. per lb. 

Pyrogallic acid. — Pure crystals are 
22s. 6d. per lb. in 1-cwt. lots; resublimed, 
24s. 3d. 



Home Trade 


500 oz. or 
mo ri- 


100-400 oz. 




per OZ. 


per oz. 


Quinidine 


s. 


d. 


s. d. 


alkaloid 


1 


m 


8 li 


gluconate 


9 


4i 


9 6i 


HYDROBROMIDE 


6 


7 


6 9 


HYDROCHLORIDE 


6 


9 


6 11 


sulphate 


6 





6 2 


HVDROQUINIDINE 








HYDROCHLORIDE 


11 


2 


11 4 


GLUCONATE 


8 


6i 


8 81 



For export quinidine alkaloid ranges from 
£12 12s. 3d. to £12 17s. 4d. per kilo and 
sulphate from £9 10s. 5d. to £9 15s. 6d. 

Santonin. — 5-kilo lots, 400s. per kilo. 

Silver salts. — Protein, 36s. 3d. to 
42s. 9d. per lb.; vitellin from 68s. 6d. 
to 76s. 6d. per lb. as to quantity. 

Alcohol 

British spirit per proof gall.: — 
Ethyl Alcohol: (95 per cent. Gay 
Lussac. 66 o.p.); where the number of 
proof gall, taken over any one year ended 
March 31 is 300,000 or over 4s. 0|d. 
200.000 and less than 300,000, 4s. Oid. 
100,000 and less than 200,000, 4s. Ud. 
50,000 and less than 100,000, 4s. l|d. 
10,000 and less than 50,000, 4s. 2id. 
2,500 and less than 10,000, 4s. 2|d. Prices 
are exclusive of duty and are for tank 
wagon lots. In 40-gall. drums there is a 
surcharge of Id. per proof gall. The 
following grades are subject to a premium 
on the above prices as set out in the next 
paragraph : — 

Absolute Alcohol, 95-5 per cent., 74 5 
o.p., 3d. more per proof gall., the special 
high strength (99 9 per cent., 75-2 o.p.), 
5d. more. Doubly Rectified Alcohol 
(S.V.R.) 958 per cent., 68 o.p., is 3d. 
more and P.I. Rectified Alcohol, 96T per 
cent., 68-5 o.p., 8d. more. R. R. Absolute 
Alcohol (re-rectified, 99-7 per cent., 75 
o.p.), 14s. lOd. per bulk gall. net. 

Methylated Spirit 

Methylators' rates per bulk gall, in 
Great Britain are as follows: — 

Industrial Methylated spirit: Strength 
61 o.p., 500 gall, and over, 5s. lid.; 100 
gall, and under 500 gall., 6s. 2d.; 40 gall, 
and under 100 gall.. 6s. 5d.; 10 gall, and 
under 40 gall.. 6s. lOd. ; 5 gall, and under 
10 gall., 7s. 3d. Strength 64 o.p., id. per 
gall.; 66 o.p. (b.p.), Id.; 68 o.p., 3id. 
more than the above rates with 74 o.p. 
at 6s. 8id., 6s. Hid., 7s. 2id., 7s. 7id. 
and 8s. 0|d. per gall, for similar quanti- 
ties. Tank wagon delivery is lid. per gall, 
off list price — minimum, 500 gall. For 
industrial methylated spirit of standard 
toilet quality prices are from 7s. 2id. (tank 
wagon) for 500 gall, to 8s. 8d. for 5-10 
gall, (in drums) for 61 o.p. 

Pyridinised industrial methylated spirit: 
Strength. 66 o.p., 500 gall, and over, tank 
wagon delivery, 6s. 2d.; 100 gall, and 
under 500 gall, (in drums), 6s. 6id. ; 40 
gall, and under 100 gall.. 6s. 9id.; 10 
gall, and under 40 gall., 7s. 2id. ; 5 gall, 
and under 10 gall., 7s. 7id. 

Mineralised methylated spirit: Strength 
64 o.p. in one delivery, 100 gall, and un- 
der 500 gall.. 6s. 6id.; 40 gall, and under 
100 gall, 6s. 9id; 10 gall, and under 40 
gall., 7s. 2id. ; 5 gall, and under 10 gall., 
7s. 7id. 

Methylated resin finish is 3d. per gall, 
over and methylated shellac finish is_ Is. 
per gall, over the prices of pyridinised 
methylated spirit. 

Terms: — Deliveries free and carriage 
paid on returned empties; net cash. 



3 00 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 14, 1959 



Crude Drugs 

Aconite. - Spot supplies of Spanish 
napellus are 2s. 6d. per lb. 

Agar. — Kobe No. 1 is 10s. 6d. per lb., 
duty paid; new-crop for shipment, 8s. 10d., 
c.i.f. 

Aloes. — Cape prime on the spot is 
220s. per cwt. and for shipment, 195s.. 
c.i.f. Curacao, 495s., spot. 

Balsams. — Quotations per lb. are: — 
Canada: Spot, 23s. Copaiba: Para from 
7s. 6d., duty paid. Peru: Scarce at origin. 
Spot, 10s. 3d. in bond. Tolu (genuine as 
imported!: 17s. 6d., spot and 16s., c.i.f.; 
B.P., 15s. 3d. 

Belladonna. — Herb is 8s. 3d. per lb. 
on the spot. Root is Is. 6d. spot; ship- 
ment. Is. 3d., c.i.f. 

Buchu. — Spot rounds are 6s. per lb. 
and new-crop for shipment, 5s. 4^d.. c.i.f. 

Camphor. — B.P. powder is from 4s. 3d. 
per lb., duty paid. Tablets, i-oz., are 
5s. 6d. in bond. 

Cardamoms. — Aleppy greens, spot. 
14s. 6d. per lb.; forward shipment, 
13s. 6d., c.i.f. Seeds, spot. 24s., shipment. 
19s. 6d., c.i.f. 

Cascara. — Snot 1958 peel, 225s. per 
cwt., shipment, 200s., c.i.f. 

Cherry bark. — Thin natural is Is. 5d. 
per lb., and rossed is Is. lid. 

Cinnamon. — Ceylon for shipment (c.i.f.) 
per lb.; OOOO, 6s. 8d.; OOO. 6s. 6|d.: 
OO. 6s. 3|d.; seconds, 4s. 8jd.; feather- 
ings. Is. ll|d.; quillings, 3s. lid.; chips, 
IS. id. 

Cochineal. — Silver-grey Peruvian on the 
spot from 5s. 6d. to 6s. 3d. as to quan- 
tity; Canary Isles black-brilliant, about 
17s. 9d.; silver-grey, 15s., spot. 

Elemi. — Spot from Is. 1 O^d. per lb. 

Frangula. — Spot is 105s. per cwt. 

Ginger. — ■ African, 130s. per cwt. spot 
and 130s. (new crop), c.i.f. Jamaican No. 
3, spot, 260s. and shipment 250s., c.i.f. 
Cochin spot 130s.; shipment. 145s., c.i.f. 

Henna. — Indian 80s. per cwt.. ex wharf; 
shipment, 70s., c.i.f. 

Honey. — Australian light-amber is 
Mfss. to 110s. and medium amber 
100s. to 105s. Argentine. 115s. to 120s.; 
Jamaican, 120s. to 125s.; New Zealand 
clover, 170s., nominal; all per cwt. on the 
spot. 

Ipecacuanha. — Shipment March-April 
(c.i.f.) Matto Grosso. 51s. 6d. per lb.; 
Colombian, 53s. 6d.; Nicaraguan. 67s. 6d. 

Kola nuts. — Jamaican spot market 
cleared, shipment. 7d. per lb., c.i.f. Afri- 
can 5d. to 5id. spot and 4d.. c.i.f. 

Krameria. — Root is quoted at 90s. per 
cwt. 

Liquorice. — Natural root; Persian on 
the spot is 50s.; for shipment, 42s. 6d.. 
c.i.f., per cwt. Block juice: Anatolian 
and Chinese, 190s. per cwt., Italian slick 
from 310s. to 476s. per cwt. Spray dried 
extract, 3s. per lh. 

Lobe i i\ HERB. — ■ Spot oilers of Ameri- 
can are 3s. 9d. per lb. and for shipment. 
3s. 6d.. c.i.f. Dutch 3s. Id., c.i.f. for 
shipment; spot, 3s. 5d. 

Lycopodujm. — Russian triple-sifted for 
shipment, 25s. per lb., c.i.f.. nominal. 

Menthol. — Chinese is nominally at 
57s, fid. per lb., duty paid; Brazilian, spot. 
}5S. fill., duty paid, March shipment, 
34s. 9d.. c.i.f. Formosan for shipment, 
38s. to 39s.. c.i.f. 

Nutmegs. — West Indian 80's 17s. per 
lb., spot; sound unassorted, 12s. fid.: 
defectives. 8s. 9d. 

Orange peel. — Scarce. Spot: Sweet 
ribbon, 2s. per lb.; bitter quarters: West 
Indian. Is.; Spanish. Is. 8d. 

Papain. — East African. 20s. per lb., c.i.f., 
for grade one. spot, 22s. Belgian Congo. 
17s. 6d.. c.i.f. 



Pepper. — White Sarawak spot. 3s. 2^d. 
per lb., March-April shipment, 3s. 1 id., 
c.i.f.; Black Sarawak spot. Is. 10jd., 
nominal; March-April shipment. Is. 9d., 
c.i.f. Black Malabar new-crop for March- 
April shipment up to 230s.. c.i.f.. quoted, 
spot, 240s. 

Podophyllum. — Emodi: 230s. per cwt., 
c.i.f.. shipment. Peltatum, on the spot, 
4s. 3d. per lb.; shipment, 450s. per cwt., 
c.i.f. 

Pyrethrum. — Extract, minimum 25 per 
cent, w/w pyrethrins, is 75s. per lb. for 
small lots. 

Quassia. — Shipment offers are at 39s. 
per cwt., c.i.f. 

Quillaia. — Spot offers of whole bark at 
130s. per cwt.; cut, 170s.; crushed, 165s. 
Whole for shipment. 95s., c.i.f. 

Rauwolfia. — Caiiescens, 3s. 6d. per lb., 
c.i.f.: Vomitoria, 2s. 3d., c.i.f.; Serpen- 
tina, 6s., c.i.f. asked. 

Rhubarb. — Chinese small rounds 
6d. 4^d. to 6s. 9d. Best grades not avail- 
able on spot. 

Saffron. — Spanish is quoted at 200s. 
per lb. 

Sarsaparilla. — Jamaican native red on 
the spot is 2s. 9d. per lb. Shipment, 
2s. 4d., c.i.f. 

Seeds. — (Per cwt.). Anise. — Spanish. 
160s.; Turkish. 140s.. both duty paid. 
Caraway. — Dutch in poor demand, 120s. 
quoted, duty paid. Celery. — Indian, spot, 
165s.; prompt shipment easier at 137s. 6d. 
and new crop for June-July at 127s. 6d., 
c.i.f. Coriander. — Moroccan, 52 s. 6d., 
spot, duty paid; shipment, 43s. 6d., c.i.f. 
Cumin. — Iranian on spot firmly held at 
250s.. in bond and 265s., duty paid. Ship- 
ment: Iranian quoted only at 250s.; 
Cyprian. 260s. Dill. — Indian nominal on 
soot at 80s.; shipment. 62s. 6d.. c.i.f. 
Fennel. — Chinese. 140s.. duty paid and 
Indian. 130s. Fenugreek. — IVIoroccan in 
poor demand at 44s.. dutv paid; shipment 
unchanged at 34s. 6d., c.i.f. Mustard. — 
English quoted at 125s. 

Senega. — Spot offered at 14s. fid. per 
lb.; shipment 15s., c.i.f., asked. 

Senna. — Tinnevelly leaves. prime 
No. 1,1s. 5d. per lb., f.a.q.. No. 3. lOd. 
Pods: Manufacturing (f.a.q.) Is. 3jd. and 
hand-picked. Is. 9d. to 2s. 2d. Alexandria 
pods: Manufacturing, offered from Is. fid. 
with hand-picked from 4s. to 6s. 6d. 

Shellac— F.O.T.N. 177s. fid. per cwt., 
F.O. No. 1. 207s. 6d.; fine orange. 215s. 
to 265s. 

Slippery elm. — Grinding quality bark 
is 2s. 7d. per lb. 

Squill. — White is quoted at 85s. per 
cwt. on the spot. 

Stramonium. — Indian leaves 60s. per 
cwt., soot. Dutch 0-5 per cent, alkaloid. 
94s., c.i.f. 

Styrax. — Spot. 27s. per lb., afloat. 
26s., c.i.f. 

Tonquin beans. — Para on the spot are 
offered at 8s. 3d. per lb. Angostura, lis. 

Tragacanth. — No. 1 ribbon is £115 to 
£120 per cwt. No. 2. £105 to £110. 

Turmeric. — Madras (inner is 85s. on the 
spot; new crop for March-April ship- 
ment. 80s., c.i.f. 

Valerian root. — Spot: Indian (with 
rootlets) is 130s. and Belgian. 175s. to 
195s. per cwt. Dutch (max. 2-jt per cent, 
sand) for prompt shipment. 159s.. c.i.f. 

Vanillin. — Rates (per lb.) are now: — 
5-cwt. lots. 25s. 3d.: I cwt.. 25s. 6d.: 
56-lb., 25s. 9d.: smaller quantities, 26s. 

Waxes. — (Per cwt.). Bees'. — Dar-es- 
Salaarp. spot. 480s.: shipment. 465s.. c.i.f. 
Abyssinian, spot 450s. in bond; shipment. 
420s.. c.i.f. Benguela spot, nominal: 
shipment. 405s., c.i.f. Candelilla. — Spot 
460s. Carnaub\. — Fattv grev spot, 580s.; 
lor shinmcnt. 575s., c.i.f. Prime yellow, 
spot. 910s.; shipment. 885s.. c.i.f. 



Essential and Expressed Oils 

Almond. — British oil is 9s. per lb. 
Moroccan. 6s. 9d., in bond. 

Amber. — Rectified on the spot is Is. 6d. 
per lb. 

Anise.- — Chinese, 8s. 3d. per lb., spot; 
shipment, 8s., c.i.f. 

Bay. — West Indian is 12s. 6d. per lb. 
on the spot. 

Bergamot. — Spot supplies are from 
86s. 6d. per lb. 

Bois de rose. — Brazilian is 14s. per lb. 
on the spot and 13s., c.i.f. 

Cade. — Spanish is 2s. 6d. per lb. for 
drum lots. 

Cajuput. — Spot supplies are from 10s. 
per lb. 

Calamus. — Spot quotations are 62s. 6d. 
per lb. 

Camphor, white. — Chinese is Is. 9d. 
per lb. in bond. 

Chenopodium. — Spot value is 38s. per 
lb. for original containers. 

Citronella. — Ceylon, spot is 3s. 9d. 
shipment. 3s. 5d., c.i.f. Formosan, spot 
4s., in bond, shipment, 3s. 8d., c.i.f. 

Cod-liver. — B.P. is lis. 6d. per gall, 
in charged returnable drums. Veterinary 
is from 9s. 6d. per gall. 

Geranium. — ■ Bourbon is 112s. 6d. per 
lb. on the spot and 110s., c.i.f. Algerian, 
92s. 6d. 

Lemongrass. — Spot 6s. \{d. per lb., 
and shipment, 5s. lO^d., c.i.f. 

Patchouli. — Penang is 21s. 6d., duty 
paid and 18s. 6d., c.i.f., per lb. 

Pennyroyal. — Spot is quoted from 
17s. per lb., duty paid. 

Peppermint. — Arvensis : Chinese is 
27s. per lb. spot nominal; shipment not 
olfering. Brazilian, 8s. spot, and 7s. 10^d. 
c.i.f. Formosan, 16s. 6d., spot; March- 
April shipment, 16s.. c.i.f. Piperita: Italian 
" Mitcham-type " from 42s. 6d. to 50s.; 
American 27s. 6d. to 30s., as to origin. 

Petitgrain. — Paraguay is offered at 
17s. 6d. per lb. on the spot; 16s., c.i.f. 

Pimento. — English-distilled berry is 
180s. per lb.; imported. 77s. 6d. Rectified 
leal. 27s. fid. per lb. for small lots. 

Pine. — Pumilionis on the spot is 16s. 
per lb.; sylvestris, 25s.; Siberian (abietis), 
12s. 6d. 

Rosemary. — Spanish is 8s. 6d. per lb. 
on the spot for best quality. 

Rue. — Spanish is 25s. per lb. on the 
spot. 

Sage.— Spanish is 9s. 9d. per lb.; Dal- 
matian, 37s. 6d. 

Sandalwood. — Mysore offered from 
82s. 6d. to 85s. per lb. as to source. East 
Indian, 82s. 6d.. spot. 

Sassafras. — Brazilian is from 3s. 6d. 
per lb., duly paid. 

Spearmint. — Offers of u.s.p. grade are 
from 37s. 6d. to 42s. 6d. per lb., spot. 
Chinese. 27s. 6d.. spot and 25s., c.i.f. per 
lb. nominal. 

Tangerine. — Hand-pressed is 55s. per 
lb. and machine-pressed. 42s. 6d.; others. 
28s. to 29s. on the spot. 

Vetivert. — Spot is currently at about 
80s. per lb. 

Yi.ang ylang. — ■ Spot is from 32s. 6d. 
lo 46s. per lb. as to grade. 

UNITED STATES REPORT 

New York. March 10: Among 
Crude Drugs, Angelica root declined 
10 cents to 70 cents a lb. Rhodinol 
dropped $3 to $25 a lb. Lower per lb. 
among ESSENTIAL Oils, were Rose- 
mary at 95 cents, down 10 cents; East 
Indian Sandalwood at S13 35. down 15 
cents: and Abietis at $295 down five 
cents. 



March 14, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



30 1 



TRADE MARKS 

APPLICATIONS ADVERTISED 
BEFORE REGISTRATION 
From the " Trade Marks Journal," February 25 

For pharmaceutical preparations for the treatment 
of ingrowing toenails (5) 

ONIXOL, B750.073, by Scholl Mfg. Co., Ltd., 

London, E.C.I. 
For pharmaceutical preparations in liquid or 
tablet form for use in the alleviation of coughs 
(5) 

TUSSIONEX, 778,830, by R. J. Strasenburgh 
Co., Rochester, New York, U.S.A. 
For pharmaceutical preparations in tablet form (5) 
SINOTABS, 779,638, by Optabs, Ltd., Brad- 
ford, Yorks. 

For pharmaceutical preparations and substances 
in tablet form for oral administration (5) 

ALLITRIN, 779,728, by Allied Laboratories, 

Ltd., London, W.l. 
For all goods (5) 

NEMODON, 781,823, by Ward Blenkinsop & 

Co., Ltd., London, W.C.I. 
For pharmaceutical preparations and substances 
for human and veterinary use; and sanitary sub- 
stances and disinfectants (5) 

MEZAPRIN, 782,746, by Imperial Chemical 

Industries, Ltd., London, S.W.I. 
For pharmaceutical preparations for human use 
(5) 

TARUGAN, 782,979, by Ravensberg G.m.b.H., 

Zurich, Switzerland. 
For pharmaceutical preparations for the treatment 
of hypertonia, obesity and abnormal blood pres- 
sure (5) 

FILON, 782,981, by Ravensberg G.m.b.H., 

Zurich, Switzerland. 
For pharmaceutical preparations for use in the 
treatment of colds and coughs (5) 

TUSSNIP, 783,434, by Albert Harold Williams, 

Neath, Glamorganshire. 
For ftashlamps for photographic purposes (9) 

COMBINETTE, 781.980, by Julius Joseph 

Silber, London, W.C.I. 

From the " Trade Marks Journal," March 4 

For preparations for preventing the condensation 
of moisture on dental mirrors and spectacle lenses 
CI) 

OPTICLAR, 783,801, by James Rouse, Ltd., 
Sheffield, 1. 

For non-medicated toilet preparations, cosmetics 
and perfumes (3) 

Device, PRINCE ARTCHIL GOURIELLI, de- 
vice with word GOURIELLI, device with 
words PRINCE GOURIELLI, PRINCE 
GOURIELLI, GOURIELLI, device with words 
PRINCE ARTCHIL GOURIELLI, 747,862-68, 
by Prince Artchil Gourielli, Manhattan, New 
York, U.S.A. 
For soaps, perfumes, non-medicated toilet pre- 
parations; essential oils, cosmetics, hair lotions; 
and dentifrices, etc. (3); and for appliances 
(in the nature of syringes) for applying toilet 
preparations in liquid or paste form 

SPARBOY, 775,444 and 771,535 by Goldwell, 
G.m.b.H., Chemische Fabrik H.E. Dotter, 
Darmstadt-Eberstadt, Germany. 
For cleaning preparations, soaps and non-sapon- 
aceous detergents (not for use in industrial or 
manufacturing processes) (3) 

SALUTE, 780,865, by Deb Chemical Proprie- 
taries, Ltd., Belper, Derbys. 
For preparations for setting the hair (3) 

SECRET SET, B781.068, by A. B. Curtis & 
Co., Ltd., London, E.C.4. 
For cosmetic preparations (not being toilet pre- 
parations) made wholly or principally of silk; 
and briltiantine, hair lotions, non-saponaceous 
toilet shampoos, dentifrices and perfumes (3) 
SILKET, B781.209, by Thames Industries, Ltd., 
London, E.C.4. 
For perfumes, toilet preparations (not medicated), 
cosmetic preparations , dentifrices, depilatory pre- 
parations, toilet articles (not included in other 
classes); sachets for use in waving the hair, soaps 
and essential oils (3) 

IMPERIAL GUARD, 783,927, by Cussons, 
Sons & Co., Ltd., Kersal, Manchester, 7. 
For pharmaceutical preparations (5) 
Devices with word GEROLAN. 766,621 and 
766,623, by Tobal Products, Inc., Chicago. 
Illinois, U.S.A. RYNATAN, 783,173, by 
Irwin, Neisler & Co., Decatur, Illinois, U.S.A. 



For all goods (5) 

ALNATEX, 775,542, by Modern Health Pro- 
ducts, Ltd., Chessington, Surrey. LOMU. 
781,443, by Benger Laboratories, Ltd., Ho'mes 
Chapel. Ches. ROVIBE, 783,410, by Roche 
Products, Ltd., Welwyn Garden City, Herts. 
SYMPATOVIT, 783,774, by C. H. Boehringer 
Sohn, Ingelheim-on-Rhine, Germany. 
For sanitary towels (5) 

FEMANA, 778,418, by Cyril Lord, Ltd., 
London, W.l. 
For pharmaceutical preparations and substances, 
all for internal use (5) 

APTH1NE. 778,525, by A.B. Astra, Apote- 
karne, Kemiska Fabrika, Sodertalje. Sweden. 
For pharmaceutical substances for human and 
veterinary use; and sanitary substances and disin- 
fectants (5) 



Monday, March 16 

Birkenhead and Wirral Association and 

Branch. Pharmaceutical Society, Central 

hotel, at 8 p.m. Dr. J. W. Jones on " Life 

History of the Salmon." 
Enfield Association and Branch. Pharmaceu- 

tical Society, Enfield Arms, at 7.30 p.m. 

Mrs. F. Perry on " Myddleton House Gardens." 
Romford Branch, Pharmaceutical Society. 

Unicorn, Gidea Park, at 7.45 p.m. '* Brains 

trust." 

Society of Cosmetic Chemists, Beckton gas 
works (by-products). East Ham, London, E.6, 
at 2.15 p.m. Visit. 

West Middlesex Association and Branch. 
Pharmaceutical Society, Town hall, Eal- 
ing, London, W.5, at 8 p.m. Miss E. McDonald 
(J. & E Atkinson, Ltd.) on " The History and 
Development of Modern Perfumery." 

Tuesday, March 17 

Harrow Branch, Pharmaceutical Society (Ux- 
bridge meeting), Chequers hotel, High Street, 
Uxbrdge, at 8 p.m. Dr. F. A. Robinson (re- 
search director, Allen & Hanburys. Ltd.) on 
" Insulin and the Future of Diabetic Treat- 
ment." At 7 p.m.. informal supper party 
(telephone Miss W. M. Flowerdew. Uxbridge 
(UX5) 3053 by March 14 if able to attend). 

Hertford Branch, Pharmaceutical Society. 
Secondary school, Mangrove, Hertford, at 8 
p.m. Mr. J. M. Kirkness (deputy secretary. 
Association of British Pharmaceutical Industry) 
on '* European Free Trade and the Common 
Market." 

Manchester Branch, Guild of Public Pharma- 
cists, Engineers' club, at 6.30 p.m. Mr. 
W. W. Heseltine (E. R. Squibb & Sons, Ltd.) 
on " The Steroid Hormones." 

North London Association and North Metro- 
politan Branch. Pharmaceutical Society, 
Bealc's restaurant. Holloway Road. London. 
N.7. at 8 p.m. Mr. T. C. Thomas on " A 
Visit, to the Soviet Union." 

North Staffs Branch, Pharmaceutical Society, 
North Stafford hotel, Stoke-on-Trent, at 7.30 
p.m. Dr. J. G. Dare on " The Accuracy of 
Dispensing." 

Oil and Colour Chemists - Association, new 
hall, Royal Horticultural Society. Westminster, 
London. S.W.I. Technical exhibition (ends 
March 19). 

Portsmouth Branch, Pharmaceutical Society, 

Royal Beach hotel, South Parade, Southsea, 

at 8 p.m. Golden Jubilee banquet. 
Tees-side Branch, Pharmaceutical Society, 

Vane Arms hotel. High Street, Stockton-on- 

Tees, at 7.45 p.m. Film show. 

Wednesday, March 18 

Birmingham Association and Branch. Pharma- 
ceutical Society, Botanical Gardens, Edgbas- 
ton, at 7 p.m. Annual dinner and dance. 

East Metropolitan Branch, Pharmaceutical 
Society, and West Ham Association, Ross 
Wyld hall, Walthamstow, at 8 p.m. Mr. B. J. 
Thomas (Allen & Hanburys, Ltd.) on " Some 
Aspects of Pharmaceutics." 

Lcnddn Branch, British Computer Society, 
Ltd., Northampton College of Advanced 
Technology, St. John Street, London, E.C.I, 
at 6.15 p.m. Mr. C. E. G. Bailey on "An 



LUBRICIL, 780,317, by Imperial Chemical 

Industries, Ltd.. London, S.W.I. 
For disinfectants (5) 

GRENCOL. 778,884, by Same Products, 

Oadby, nr. Leicester. 
For medicated beverages and preparations for 
making such; and infants' and invalid's foods (5) 

BIOBALM, 780,535, by Modern Health Pro- 
ducts, Ltd., Chessington, Surrey. 
For vacuum flasks and insulated containers for 
foodstuffs (21) 

AVAX, 782,596, by British Vacuum Flask Co., 

Ltd., London, W.C.I. 
For devices for containing and dispensing cleans- 
ing preparations in liquid or semi-liquid form, 
hair creams, hand creams and the like (21) 

SPENSO. 783.201. by Deb Chemical Proprie- 
taries, Ltd.. Belper, Derbys. 



Approach to Learning and Teaching Machines," 
London Branch. Guild of Public Pharmacists. 

Wellcome building, 183 Euston Road. London. 

N.W.I, at 7 p.m. Dr. G. B. West (School of 

Pharmacy. University of London) on " The 

Naturally Occurring Amines." 
Leeds Branch. Pharmaceutical Society, Griffin 

hotel, Boar Lane, Leeds, 1, at 7 p.m. Annual 

dinner. 

London Section, Royal Institute of Chemis- 
try, William Beveridge hall. Senate house. 
University of London, at 5.30 p.m. Debate 
" That the Education of our Future Rulers 
Should be Primarily in the Sciences Rather 
than the Humanities." 

Scientific Film Association, Mezzanine Cinema. 
Shell-Mex House, Strand, London. W.C.2, at 
6.30 p.m. Symposium: "Recent Developments 
in Research Film." 

South London and Surrey Pharmacists' Golf- 
ino Society, Purley Downs Golf Club, Purley 
Downs Road, Purley. at 1.30 p.m. Stablcford 
competition followed by general meeting. 

Stockport Branch, Pharmaceutical Society. 
Deanwater hotel, Woodford, Ches, at 7.30 
p.m. Supper dance. 

Swansea and West Glamorgan Branch, Phar- 
maceutical Society, Talbot room, Mackworth 
hotel, at 7.45 p.m. Dr. K. R. Capper on " The 
Work of the Society's Scientific Publications 
Department and Laboratory." 

Thursday, March 19 

London Section. Society of Chemical Industry, 
William Beveridge hall. Senate house, Univer- 
sity of London, at 2.15 p.m. Symposium on 
" Costing in the Chemical Industry." and on 
Friday. March 20. 

North Gloucestershire Branch, National 
Pharmaceutical Union, Gloucestershire Dairy 
cafe. Promenade. Cheltenham, at 7.30 p.m. 
Address by Mr. G. H. M. Graham (a member 
of the N.P.U. Executive). 

Romford Branch, Pharmaceutical Society, 
King's Head, Romford Market Place, at 1 p.m. 
(to join coach). Factory visit to Goya, Ltd., 
Amersham, Bucks. 

Thames Valley Association and Branch, 
Pharmaceutical Society, Kingston hotel. 
Kingston-on-Thames, at 7.45 p.m. Mr. J. H. 
Oakley on " The Newer Look in Pharma- 
ceutics." 

Western Pharmacists' Association and West 
Metropolitan Branch, Pharmaceutical So- 
ciety, Connaught rooms. Great Oueen Street, 
London, W.C.2, at 6.30 p.m. Annual dinner 
and dance. 

Friday, March 20 

Norwich Branch, Pharmaceutical Society. 
City College, Ipswich Road, Norwich, at 7.45 
p.m. Dr. F. E. Camps (Home Office patholo- 
gist) on " Poisoning — Accident, Suicide, or 
Murder ? " 

Royal Commercial Travellers* Schools, 
Trocadero restaurant. Piccadilly, London, W.l. 
Festival dinner. 

Scottish Department, Pharmaceutical Society, 
36 York Place, Edinburgh, at 7.45 p.m. Dr. 
J. B. Stenlake (Royal College of Science and 
Technology. Glasgow) on " A Survey of Anti- 
biotics, Their Actions and Uses." 



COMING EVENTS 

Items for inclusion under this headine should be sent in time to reach the 
Editor not later than first post on Wednesday of the week of insertion. 



302 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 14, 1959 



TELEVISION 

Programme details are given to enable chemists 
to put in linking-up displays if they wish. 
Figures in the columns represent number of 
appearances of the product during the week. 



c c c 

March 22-28 ? J! f 2 8 £ . 

§15 § ,o « . 3 ■ « 
-J S 2« 

Alka-Scltzer . . ..211 — l i 

Anadin .. ..4444333 
Andrews liver salt ..1111123 

Anne French . . , . 1 1 

Askit j2 

* spr ° 1 113 

Beecham*s pills . . . . 3 

Bisodol .. .. 4 5 

Bristow's shampoo . . ^ 1 

Bronco toilet rolls.. .. — 3 1 

Camay soap . . -.2 2 2 3 2 2 4 

Cephos 1 3 

Christy's lanoline face pack 2 2 2 2 2 2 ~> 

Delsey toilet rolls . . — 1 — j j 

Diuromil 1 j j 12 

Euthymol tooth-paste . . — 1 

Fennings' Little Healers . . — 1 2 1 1 

Gibbs" S.R. tooth-paste .3 3 3 3 4 3 3 
Gillette razors and blades I 1 1 1 1 I J 

Glymiel jelly . . .. 14 14 14 

Horlicks 3 3 3 2 3 2 3 

,bc °' 2 2 2 — 2 2 — 

Imperial Leather soap . . 3 3 3 3 3 

Iron Jelloids . . . . 3 3 } 

Kolynos tooth-paste . . — 1 1 

Lanospray 2 11 

Loxene hair cream.. .. 2 — 5 

Loxene medicated shampoo 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 

Maclean's tooth-paste . . — 2 1 — 1 

Marigold baby pants . . I 

Marigold house gloves ..2111111 
Max Factor preparations.. 3 3 4 4 4 3 3 
Milk of Magnesia . . — 1 1 — 2 1 I 

Milk of Magnesia tablets 2 — 1 1 

Milpar .. .. .. — 2 

Pcpsodent tooth-paste . . 2 

Phensic .. .. .. 3 

Phosferinc .. .. — 1 

Preparation H .. .. 1 — — 

R instead pastilles .. .. 1 1 1 — 

Savlon barrier cream 1 — 

Scbbix 1 222 

Shavex — 2 2 

Stergene 3 3 3 

Suregrip house gloves ..2 2 2 1 2 1 2 




COLLECE-OF-SI RGEONS PREMIERE! Scene 
from a Mm •• Life in Emergency Ward 10 " 
(based mi the well-known television serial of 
ttmlkM name) which is having its premiere at the 
Royal College ol Surgeons, London, \\.< .2. mi 

March 24. Ike •• still " shows Nurse Robertl 

(Rosemary Miller) preparing aa oxygen cylinder 

for use. Ihc lilm is by Artistes Alliance (distri 
dolors. I rns Films), 




PRINT AND PUBLICITY 



for tlw t>< sl babies 

PRESS ADVERTISING 
tgf&%L Clay & Abraham (Mnfg.), Ltd., 2 Upper Duke 

Street. Liverpool, 1: Susie's Perfect Cleaner. 
In Home & Country, The Lady, Home, 
Woman's Journal, during coming months. 
Dendron Distributors, Ltd., 94 Rickmans- 
worth Road. Watford, Herts: Larson's Swedish 
milk dxt. In leading women's magazines and 
national and Sunday newspapers. 
Keldon I ii' , Wadsworth Road, Perivale, 
Middlesex: Optrex eye lotion. In Daily Tele- 
graph, Sunday Express, Sunday Dispatch, Sun- 
day Graphic, Glasgow Sunday Post, Mother & 
SHOWCARD WITH " MOBILE "s A new show- Child, and Wife & Home. Optone eye drops, 

card for Trufood cereal food introduced by the In Woman's Mirror. Optrose rose hip syrup 

manufacturers, Trufood, Ltd., 113 Newington ln Sunday Express, Woman's Mirror and Glas- 

Causeway, London, S.E.I, incorporates a goH ' s "" da y p »st. 

" mobile " (a miniature packet of the food). c Products, Ltd., 33 Union Street, South- 
ward London, S.E.I: 1001 cleaner. In 
Tangee lipstick 3 1 1 I } > I Woman's Realm, Woman's Weekly, Woman's 

Valderma 3 3 2 Illustrated, Ideal Home, Woman & Home, 

Valrosa 1 Wife & Home, My Home, Woman, Woman's 

Vaseline medicated shampoo 5 - ° w "- Woman's Day, Good Housekeeping, 

Vaseline petroleum jelly . . 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 Homes & Gardens, House Beautiful, House- 

Veno's cough mixture 1 wife, News Chronicle (Northern edition). Daily 

Vitapointc 2 2 ■ Express, Daily Mirror, London Evening News, 

Vosene shampoo 1 1 — Scottish Sunday Post, and in provincial evening 

Vykmin '.. 1 1 1, 1 1 newspapers. 

Water lilies shampoo 3 — 

Yeast-Vite 11112 

Zeph — 2 

Zubes 2222 




TELEVISION LINK-UP: Showcard produced by 
Parke, Davis & Co., Ltd., Staines Road. Houns- 
low, Middlesex, for Euthymol tooth-paste to 
link »ith current Press and television advertising. 



TRIPLE CROWNER SHOWCARD: Display- 
piece prepared by Mondart, Ltd., 49 Park Lane. 
London, W.l. for their Max packs (air freshener, 
moth proofer and fly killer). 



C. & D. WEEKLY LIST OF PRICES 

A = Advanced; R = Reduced; I.R.P. Inclusive Retail Price; • - lax 30 per cent. 



BURROUGHS WELLCOME & 


CO. 






BOOTS PURE DRUG CO., 


LTD. 






Stypven Russell viper Each 


l.R. 


P. 


Hydrocortistab skin lotion 








venom set of 1 mil 


4 


6 


A 


0-25 per cent. 20 mils 


4 3 


S 


8 


5 mil 


7 4 


II 


A 










Tabloid sodium citrate* 








CLARNELL. LID. 


Doz. 






gr. 2 100 


1 h 


2 


9 A 


Darcets throat lozenges 12 


20 


2 


6 


gr. 5 100 


1 10 


3 


4} A 








CANNON RUBBER MANUFACTURERS, 


LTD. 


INSULEX. LTD. 








Children's hot-water bottles: — 








I'wo-in-one Insulex bag 




115 


6 


Noah's Ark scries 




8 


6 R 










Cottage Doll scries 




8 


6 R 


KLE1NERT RUBBER CO. 








INSULEX, LTD. 








Savabelt sanitary brief 




8 




Insulex plastic bag (thermobag) 




25 


6 R 


rayon 




1 1 




42 


6 R 


nylon 




11 


6 


PARKE. DAVIS & CO., LID. 








" Quick and Easy " dress 






11 


C hloromycetin tincture 








shield 




5 



veterinary aerosol 
colourless tincture 
veterinary aerosol 



42 
32 



P.A.T.A. LIST 

I Alterations notified this week by the Proprietary 
Articles Ir.ide Association.) 

DELETIONS FROM THE LIST 
BENBOW'S DOG MIXTURE CO., LID. \ll 
products. 

GORDON -MOORE, LID. Moulin Rouge cos- 
mctic tooth-paste. 

E. R. sot iitit x sons. 1 ll). mi products. 

NEW PRODUCTS AND P AC KS 

iBBOTl LABORATORIES, LTD. 

CompocllHn V oral 

suspension 16 n. oz. 87 5 131 2 



LONDON COMMERCIAL 
SI ORES, LTD. 

New Solarcttc infra-red 
lamp 



ELECTRICAL 



50 



MOORE MEDICINAL PRODI KTS, LTD. 

Cod ells loam hand cream* 

aerosol 59 8 6 



NEW HYGIENE, LTD. 

Sccntincl Quifcuc 

refill 

SCRUBB & CO.. I II). 

Scrubb s padded top 
cleaner 3 oz. 



2 3 
1 



2 



STEWART, GOODAI.I. & DUNM)P. LTD. 

Nucta egg and lemon 

shampoo* plastic tub 6 8 10 



March 14, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



3 



In only 2 years Sales Treble 
wonderful fcDBl^EH products 



What greater wish do we have on 
holiday than to "go brown" and have 
a glorious Mediterranean sun-tan 
before coming home — without going 
red? 

People who use Sooth-tan products 
avoid "going red"; the powerful 
sunscreen agents in cream, oil and 
aerosol actually prevent the reddening 
rays ever reaching the skin; thus the 
skin is free to tan rapidly from the 
browning wavelengths. 

Sooth-tan preparations in their 
startling new packages, provide a 
choice of very high-class products. 
Your display of Sooth-tan can really 
help to make people s holidays 
happier. 

The cream is a highly effective pro- 
duct, and the aerosol is quicker to use, 
easier to spread and lasts longer. Both 
products have a light, pleasant per- 
fume and each is non-staining and 
non-greasy. The aerosol silicones 
protect even after swimming. 

Sales have trebled in two years. 
BUY YOUR BONUS NOW. 



a 




mediterranean sea tan 




aerosol sun spray 





Pharmaceutical Product 



CUPAL LTD. • BLACKBURN • LANCS 



Sooth-Ian is a Registered Trade Mark 



38 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



March 14, 1959 



EVERY SHEEP FARMER IN 
THE U.K. IS BEING TOLD ABOUT 



Frantin' 



Contains 

Bephenium Embonate 30% 
Bephenium . 

Hydroxynaphthoate 60% 



DISPERSIBLE POWDER 



THE ONLY PROTECTION AGAINST NEMATODI RUS ; ALSO HIGHLY 
EFFICIENT AGAINST THESE OTHER SERIOUS WORM PARASITES IN 
THE UNWEANED LAMB: 

Trichostrongylus axei, Haemonchus contortus, Ostertagia species, Cooperia species. 



There is no worm preparation as effective 
as 'Frantin'. Its discovery by the Wellcome 
Research Laboratories represents a trem- 
endous step forward in sheep husbandry. 
Today, deaths from deadly Nematodirus 
Infestation can be prevented and the 
retarding effects of other worm parasites 
soon halted by dosing unweaned lambs 
with 'Frantin'. 

Lambs treated with 'Frantin' are healthier, 
heavier and more profitable to the farmer. 



PLACE 
YOUR 
ORDER 
NOW 
FOR 
DELIVERY 
IN APRIL 



i : 



Issued in bottles of 250 gm. 



^w» Discovered by the Wellcome Research Laboratories 

E ft 2 

BURROUGHS WELLCOME & CO. (The Wellcome Foundation Ltd.) 
The Wellcome Building, Euston Road, London, N.W.I. Tel. Euston 4477 
and 18 Merrion Square, Dublin. Tel. 65751/2 




L 



March 14, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



39 



Becovite Elixir 
speeds Recovery 
after illness 




Becovite Elixir is valuable to your customer. . . 

because, containing a high concentration of 
the vitamin B complex, it promotes speedy 
recovery after illness. It is especially useful in 
stimulating appetite and promoting a sense of 
well-being after such illnesses as influenza 
and pneumonia. It also has a very pleasant 
flavour. 



Becovite Elixir is valuable to you . 

because it is such an excellent tonic, 
that every bottle you sell ensures 
you a grateful customer. 



Packs and prices 


RETAIL 


N.H.S. 


6 fl. oz. 




4/9 


40 fl. oz. 


39/- 


26/- 



FORMULA : 

Each fluid ounce contains : 

Aneurine Hydrochloride B.P. 

Riboflavine B.P 

Pyridoxine B.P.C 

Nicotinamide B.P. 
Strychnine 
hydrochloride B.P. 



. 20 m.g. 
10 m.g. 
5 m.g. 
... 50 m.g. 
i/2sth gr. 
(2.4 tag.) 



Becovite Elixir 

VITAMINS FROM VITAMINS LIMITED 
UPPER MALL, LONDON, W.6 



40 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



March 14, 1959- 



GLYCEROPHOSPHATES ? 



My 



When you have specialised for 
over a century, you may fairly 
claim to know your subject. 
And that is precisely our position 
today. For more than a hundred 
years, Morsons have been making 
chemicals for industry and the 
pharmacist; and this long ex- 
perience has resulted in the 
technical supremacy which is self- 
evident in every Morson product. 



GLYCEROPHOSPHORIG ACID 
20% B.P.C. 

CALCIUM GLYCEROPHOSPHATE 
B.P.C. 

MAGNESIUM 
GLYCEROPHOSPHATE B.P.C. 

SODIUM GLYCEROPHOSPHATE 
100% AND 50% B.P.C. 



If you have a chemical problem, 
Morsons are at all times glad to 
place their knowledge and tech- 
nical resources at your disposal. 



THOMAS MORSON & SON LTD. 

Ponders End, Middlesex 



Slumber 1 -Helmets 









0562 


fh 


Perm Protec- 




tor in Flame- 


Ji 


proof Nylon 




Net. Elasti- 




cated to fit 




anysizehead: 


J 


with Satin 



Ribbon Ties so 
that Protector 
may be placed 
over "set" with- 
out disarranging 
hair. Available 
Pink. Blue and 
Black. 39/- per 
dozen. Also 
available with 
Button Fasten- 
ing. 




IJ.560 

Slumber Helmet 
in Nylon Tricot. 
Rayon Ribbons. 
Pink and Blue. 
32/- per dozen. 

Gatalogue 
on 
request 



•your h//k?^q£e4' f 



MANUFACTURERS 

LAUGHTON ft SONS LTD. 
WARSTOCK ROAD, BIRMINGHAM 14. 



March 14, 1959 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 





-the 



recognised 
house for 



in the 
North-East 



MAWSON & PROCTOR 
PHARMACEUTICALS LTD 

Low Friar Lane, Newcaslle-on-Tyne 1 

Telephone 2975117 8 lines 




THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



March 14. 1959 



f 



4 powerful synergistic 
combination 



For sub-acute and refractory 
skin affections 



Treatment of sub-acute and refractory skin affections can now 
be considerably enhanced by combining tar, an established 
germicide, stimulus and anti-pruritic, with hydrocortisone as in 
TARCORTIN. Together, the medicaments have pronounced 
advantages over either one alone. 

TARCORTIN CREAM is non-greasy, stainless and hydrophilic 
and is supplied in 7 grm. and 15 grm. tubes containing o.c% 
Hydrocortisone in a special coal-tar extract. 

STAFFORD -MILLER LIMITED 




I 
pi] 
§ 
p] 



Manufacturing Chemists 
HATFIELD • HERTS • ENGLAND 



NEW 

PAEDIATRIC 

ANTIPYRETIC 

ANALGESIC 



brand of Paracetamol Elixir 



Presentation : Botilcs of 4 fl. oz. and 
40 fl. oz. (Dispensing Pack). 

Basic N.H.S. Price : 

4-oz. pack, 4/2 : 40-oz. pack, 30 7 

(exempt from Purchase Tax) 



Literature on request 



For the prompt 
reduction of 
I Fever 
and relief of 
pain in children 

' ENERIL,' a new paediatric elixir, is a 
stable preparation suitable for the reduction 
of fever and pain in children. ' ENERIL' provides accurate effective 
dosage, in pleasantly-flavoured form readily acceptable by children. 
It does not produce gastric irritation. Indicated in all conditions 
where antipyresis and analgesia are required. There are no contra- 
indications to 'ENERIL.' 

Each teaspoonful ( 4ml.) contains : 

120 nig. Paracetamol (N-acctyl-p-aminophenol). 

Dosage : Infants under 12 months, J teaspoonful (2 ml.) 

Children 1-4 yrs. J to 1 teaspoonful (2-4 ml.) 
„ 4-8 yrs. 1 to 2 teaspoonfuls (4-8 ml.) 
„ 8-12 yrs. 2 teaspoonfuls (8 ml.) 

To be given every 4-6 hours or as directed by the physician. 





ASPRO-NICHOLAS LTD 



4 Nicholat Product 



ETHICAL PHARMACEUTICAL DIVISION S/oUgfl, BuCl\S, England 

Manufactured by a subsidiary company — A. & G. NICHOLAS LTD., SLOUGH. 



March 14, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



4 3 




For 

AN INJECTION-FREE FUTURE 
IN PERNICIOUS ANAEMIA 











_J 

















woir 



vitamin B12 PEPTIDE complex 

AN ORIGINAL PRODUCT OF DC(B)L RESEARCH 



• efficiently absorbed after oral 

administration 

• clinically as effective as injection 

of crystalline vitamin B12 

• free from toxicity; no unpleasant taste 

'DISTIVIT' brand vitamin B12 peptide com- 
plex, backed by clinical investigation* is 
an oral preparation that is efficiently 
absorbed and which restores the normal 
blood picture in pernicious anaemia as 
effectively and consistently as does crystal- 
line vitamin B12 administered by the par- 
enteral route. 



'DISTIVIT' oral vitamin 6/2 PEPTIDE complex 
should not be confused with mixtures of 
crystalline vitamin 8/2 with intrinsic factor 
or other absorption additives. 

'Distivit' 20 

Each scored tablet contains 20 micro- 
grams combined vitamin B12 in the form 
of a peptide complex. 
Tubes of 25 and bottles of I00 tablets. 

'Distivit* 100 

Each tablet contains 100 micrograms of 
vitamin B12 in the form of a peptide 
complex. 

Bottles of 100 and 500 tablets. 



DISTIVIT' 



AN ORIGINAL PRODUCT OF 



RESEARCH 



The Oral Treatment of Pernicious Anaemia: A New Approach" — Lancet ( 1958). I, 982. 

THE DISTILLERS COMPANY (Biochemicals) LIMITED 

BROADWAY HOUSE, THE BROADWAY, WIMBLEDON, LONDON S.W.I9 
Telephone: Liberty 6600 



PPH 19/58 



Owners of the trademark 'Distivit' 



44 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST March 14, 1959 

Supplement 

v 

Thovaline 

rv • bedsores 

the answer to \ • burns 

^ • urine dermatitis 

BEDSORES can be prevented by applying THOVALINE before the trouble starts 
but if already in existence will help greatly in the healing. 

URINE DERMATITIS. Excellent healing properties where rash exists and will prevent 
such trouble occurring if applied beforehand. Offensive odour is eliminated. 

BURNS. Unique action. THOVALINE is self sterile, it eliminates pain and is a 
rapid healer. 

Particulars from your usual wholesale house : 

ILON LABORATORIES 

LORNE STREET ■ HAMILTON • LANARKSHIRE Tel: HAMILTON 410 



• RECOMMEND THE BELLAPURIN 



RECTAL THERAPY 

FOR RAPID RELIEF 

OF 

ABDOMINAL PAINS 
UTERINE INERTIA 
H/EMORRHOIDS 

Supplied in boxes of 12 and 50 Suppositories. 



TECHNICAL LITERATURE AND 
SAMPLES FREE ON REQUEST 

RIDDELL PRODUCTS LIMITED 

RIDDELL HOUSE, DUNBRIDGE STREET, LONDON, E.2 

Telephone : SHOredttck 7254/6 Telegrams : PNEUMOSTAT, BETH, LONDON 

and at II MANSFIELD CHAMBERS, ST. ANN'S SQUARE, MANCHESTER, 2 




March 14, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 




Princess Compact with satin 
gold two-tone decoration. 
F.M. 522/407. Retail from 29/' 




*>..* 



Elegant "Corona" Com- 
pact with silver mounted 
Marcasite and Onyx stone 
set on black ground. The 
ideal evening accessory. 
F.M. S45/OM.Retai! from 45/- 



Glamon'zer Compact for solid 
powder. Gay dancers on satin 
finished ground. F.M. 310/144. 
U.K.. Retail from 18/6 



Stratton Compacts and Acces- 
sories lead the field again in 1959. 
Ask to see the new Convertibles 
and Glamorizer for solid or 
loose powder — now more 
popular than ever. 
Retail prices have been computed 
to give the Chemist bigger profit 
margins. 

— You will be asked for — 
Nationally advertised Stratton, 
Stock Stratton — Sell Stratton. 



CONVERTIBLE COMPACTS 

FOR 

LOOSE OR SOLID "Queen" Convertible "Compact 
POWDER (f°r solid or loose powder) with 

jeweller's hand engine turned 
finish. 386 ETI. U.K. Retail from 45/ 



Convertible Compact for solid 
or loose powder with ballerinas 
on translucent blue enamel 
ground. F.M. 363/229. U.K. Retail from 




LAUCHTON & SONS LTD* 

FORMERLY - 

(JARRETT, RAINSFORD & LAUGHTON LTD) WAR STOCK R 




INGHAM 14 



46 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 
Supplement 



March 14, 1959 



NOW MADE 

HERE 



THE 




UNIVERSAL ALL-PURPOSE COMMINUTING MACHINE 

". . . for reducing to powder, 



Stainless steel 

construction 
★ 

Reversible 

comminuting chamber 
★ 

Easy to clean 
★ 

Completely mobile 
★ 

Full details from : 





granule or slurry 
pigs' ears[^|and mullet^ 

cullet— 



Gjjp candies and ^ 

and in a hurry!" 
MANESTY MACHINES LIMITED 




S P E K E 

TELEPHONE: HUNTS CROSS 1972 



LIVERPOOL 24 

TELEGRAMS : MANESTY, LIVERPOOL 24 



TABLET MACHINES 


MIXERS 


GRANULATORS 


COATING PANS 


PUNCHES AND DIES 





Detensyl 

Vegetp - Poly hormon ic Hypotensor 

" ,77,", conditio*" 

^!^JZ&Z£ """" 

requiring the ^ 



iETENSYL 



another of the 



KM 



L* M.B.L. preparations which has 
been accepted by doctors in many 
countries. In various indications 
associated with blood pressure, regu- 
lar administration restores normality. 
A small, periodic dosage is recom- 
mended for maintenance. 
DETENSYL contains mistletoe, 
liver, pancreas and lung substances. 
More than a palliative, it re-educates 
the endocrine glands, allowing them 
to resume their regulation of the 
arterial tension. 



INDICATIONS 

Conditions frequently associated with 
blood pressure, such as Menopausal 
Disturbances, Arteriosclerosis, 
Sclerosis of the Kidneys, Persistent 
Cephalalgia, Arthritis and Auditory 
and Ocular Troubles, respond to 
DETENSYL therapy and almosc inevitably 
disappear with the lowering of arterial 
tension. 



MEDICO-BIOLOGICAL 
LABORATORIES LTD. 

CARGftEKN ROAD, SOUTH NORWOOD LONDON S.Z.2S 



March 14, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 
Supplement 




Now is the busiest time of year for sales of ' Benzedrex' Inhaler and ' Neuro 
Phosphates'. This year we are redoubling our efforts to help you make the 
highest sales ever. This window display has been set up in many chemists' 
shops and is already stimulating sales. Counter display material is available to 
you at all times. If you want a display in your window, tell our representative 
or contact our office. 

BENZEDREX INHALER the supreme reliever of nasal congestion 
NEURO PHOSPHATES the tonic for appetite and vigour 



Smith Kline & French Laboratories Ltd, Coldharbour Lane, London SE5 

Telephone BRIxton 7722 




BXN : TA49 (col) 'Benzedrex' & 'Neuro Phosphates' are trade marks 



48 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



March 14, 1959 




For style -for value! 

the leaders in 
the I'- to 7'6 
price bracket 



A wonderful balanced 
range of inexpensive 
fashion models 
including both 
CROOKES lens and 
lightweights. 



FREE DISPLAYS 

with six dozen 
assortment or any 
two dozen 




Order quickly from your wholesaler! 



are the foremost lightweight sunglasses 
with Crookes glass lenses (copy of 
National Physical Laboratory report 
enclosed with every pair). Priced 
between 12 6 and 15/6. 



MADE BY E. R. HOLLOWAY LTD, BESSEMER ROAD, WELWYN GARDEN CITY, HERTS. WELWYN GARDEN 4444 



March 14, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 
Supplement 



49 




Masse 



cream 



TRADE MARK 



in antepartum nipple conditioning 
and postpartum nipple care 





Ortho Pharmaceutical Limited 

High Wycombe • England 



I 



50 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



March 14, 1959 




ASK YOUR USUAL WHOLESALER 
FOR OUR ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE 



Our latest French rhodoglass lightweight 
selection includes clip-overs retailing 
from 2/6 



Our attractive space-saving display 
stand supplied FREE with our 
sunglasses. 



Whitecross 



Optical Company 



REG. TRADE MARK 



(Proprietors, Fredk. Lehmann Co. Lid.) 
Frederick Works, Rochester Place, London, N.W.I 
Telephone: GULliver 6731 



SEAMLESS 




b 



f 



ELATINE 
APSULES 

... by tht 
most modern 
encapsulating 
technique 




Capsules to 
Customers' 
specifications 




B. & P. LABORATORIES LTD. 

Manufacturers of Seamless Gelatine Capsules 



9 PACKINGTON ROAD, ACTON, LONDON, W.3 

Tel ACOrn 6771 
Head Office :— ROYAL LONDON HOUSE, 
FINSBURY SQ., LONDON, E.C.I. Tel: MET. 04/4/9 



Samples and literature on request 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 




treatment for : 
Vaginitis * 

BRAND OF 

DI-IODOHYDROXYQUINOLINE 
COMPOUND 



Floraquin 



By combining ' Diodoquin ' with lactose, dextrose and boric 
acid, FLORAQUIN effectively eliminates trichomonal and mycotic 
infections, suppresses non-specific pathogens and restores normal 
vaginal acidity, epithelial structure and glycogen content favourable 
to the growth of protective Doderlein bacilli. r 



Retail Prices : 

25 tablets with applicator 8 9d. 

50 „ „ „ '66d. 

400 tablets with 8 applicators 122 6d. 

Powder in 1 oz. bottles 7/3d. 





HIGH WYCOMBE, BUCKS 



5 2 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



March 14, 1959 



Kwick-dr 



THE ^HOUSEHOLD PAPER TOWEL 
ouv€i unit noteUsuae9***Ze! 



SUPPLIED IN ROLLS SPECIALLY 
PERFORATED FOR ECONOMY 
Junior size retailing at 1/6 each. 
Senior size retailing at 2/- each. 

GOOD PROFIT MARGINS 



A BOON TO THE 
HOUSEWIFE 
They save work and drudgery 
DISPOSABLE AFTER USE 

FOR DRYING HANDS. 
CLEANING POTS & PANS. 
DRAINING FRIED FOOD, etc. 
KWICK-DRY TOWELS ARE VERY 
ABSORBENT AND CAN BE 
SQUEEZED LIKE A CLOTH 

WHEN WET. 
Attractive Plastic Holders in 
various colours to match 
Kitchen Units supplied to 

retail at 4/6 each. 
This NEW Hygienic habit is 
catching on — encouraged by 

press advertising. 
Attractive Showcards 

available on request. 
SAMPLES AND PRICES FROM 



Why wash greasy 
dishrloths and w 



kitchen 
ipers? 




"I've cut down on my Big 
Laundry Bills ! ! " 



FREEDER BROTHERS 1 PAPER MILLS 
BRIMSDOWN • ENFIELD • MIDDLESEX 

Telepho-e: HOWard |P47 (5 lines) "Crams: Svlkocrepe, Enfield 



You do not 

"THINK IT OVER" 

You send your Orders to the 

SPECIALIST 
PRINTER 

for all your 

CHEMIST'S PRINTING! 

Manufacturing • Wholesale © Retail 



WE 
OFFER 
YOU 



THE 

CORRECT 
SERVICE 



All HARRISON & SONS LTD. 

Carton, Medical and Advertising Printers 
BURLEY ROAD, LEEDS, 4 

Phone : Leeds 52668/9 



Grams : " Ideas," Leeds. 4 




Your customers are 

^-"""R.104 

catching: on to the 
ROZALEX habit — are you? 

Advertisements in the women's magazines for 
Rozalex barrier creams No. i and No. 8 will be 
intriguing your customers. So will you have 
displays ready — and good stocks? 

Supplied direct or through your usual wholesaler. 
ROZALEX LTD., IO NORFOLK ST. MANCHESTER 2 



TheV0CU8 tablet 
box is attractive 
in appearanceand 
white enamelled 
inside. 

There is a choice 
of six colourful 
ecorations from 
hjch to choose. 



Packed in 
cartons of 

six. 

Retailing 
at 1 0/-ea 




VOGUE VANITIES LTD 
BIRMINGHAM 19 

Manufacturers of 
quality compacts 




March 14, 1959' THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 53 

Supplement 




PACKINGS : Retail Prices including P.T., Trial size 40 tablets 7 5d., Standard size 120 
tablets 21 /3d. Full treatment size 640 tablets 106/6. ; Dispensing packs 720 tablets, P.T. exempt. 
Obtainable from your usual wholesaler. 



ROTER Tablets are not advertised to the public, and may be prescribed on 
E.C.IO forms. Literature and samples on request. 



F.A.I.R.. LABORATORIES LTD., TWICKENHAM, MIDDLESEX 



54 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



March 14, 1959 



Increased Profits? 



. . . BE YOUR OWN 
MANUFACTURER 

Here is your chance to make 
up your own products with 
the QP laboratory emulsifier. 
Strong and well designed this 
emulsifier will pay for itself 
many times over. Priced at 
£8-12-6 it is a must for your 
shop or laboratory. 

5% discount for cash with 
order. 






ORMEROD 

ENGINEERS LTD 



Send today for full details 
of how you can increase 
your profits. 

Homogenisers (Hand Oper- 
ated), 

HOLLOWS WORKS, 
SHAWCLOUGH, ROCHDALE. 

Telephone: Rochdale 49321 
Telegrams: Homogeniser, 
Rochdale. 



advert 



SANITARY PROTECTION IN 
LUXURY NYLON LINGERIE 

Women are quick to appreciate the many 
advantages of Cosette No-Belt Sanitary 
Protection. These dainty white nylon 
briefs with waterproof gusset and 
pockets for the towel are more 
hygienic, convenient and safe — a 
profitable line for you too ! 

No belts, hooks or pins 

RE TAIL 12/3 a pair. 3 sizes. 
Also in Rayon 9/1 1 a pair. 3 sizes. 



4! 



§ HOT NEWS! 

— Just out 

= NEW SOLTANETTE 

— low priced infra-red lamp 

A lamp with extraordinary sales 
appeal in its contemporary de- 
sign and popular price. 
This new table model long wave 
infra-red generator lamp has all 
the well-known practical Soltan 
features, and some new ones: 

• contemporary lightweight 
stand; folds down for easier 
packing. 

• insulated knobs for easy 
angle adjustment. 

• strong, plated steel wire 
guard. 

9 highly polished reflector. 

• convertibility to radiant 
heat. 

• 'cord-grip' cable entry. 

One off a range of new designs 

Write or 'phone for full details and 
illustrated list of infra-red lamps, 
ultra-violet lamps and high-frequency • 
equipment. 

THE LONDON COMMERCIAL ELECTRICAL STORES LIMITED 

20-22 Cursitor Street, London, E.C.4. Tel: CHA 6488 





DISPLAY OUTER & SHOWCAkD 



Be sure you can meet 
the immediate demand 6v 
sending for details and 
trade prices to : — 




STEEL 




SHELVING 

72 34 12 

HIGH WIDE DEEP 



DELIVERED FREE TO 
ENGLAND, SCOTLAND, 
AND WALES 

£3*15 



Brand new — manu- 
factured in our own 
works. 

Shelves adjustable 
every inch. 

Heavy gauge shelves 
will carry 400 lb. 
each. 

Stove enamelled 
dark green. 

6 shelves per bay — 
Extra shelves 8/- 
each. 

^ Quantity discounts. 



Also available in 
White at £5 per bay 



* 
* 

* 
* 



N • C • BROWN ltd 

SHELVING DIVISION, HEYWOOD, LANCS. PHONE:- 69018 (6 lines) 



COSETTE LTD., 45 BEAUCHAMP PLACE, LONDON, S.Vy.3 



March 14, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 
Supplement 




same day as receipt of order. 



WOOD, BASTOW (elastics) LTD 



Dove Green, Selston, Notts, 
and at Victoria Road, Pinxton, 



Telephone: Pinxton 474/5/6 
Derbyshire. Telephone: Pinxton 508 



56 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



March 14, 1959 




DIRECT FROM 

STEWART, GOODALL & DUNLOP LTD. 

I 2 I A PRINCES STREET • EDINBURGH 



NATURAL 

EPHEDRINE ALKALOID ANHYDROUS 

NF.X 



THE BRITISH DYEWOOD COMPANY LIMITED 

19 St. VINCENT PLACE GLASGOW C.I 



DALES PHARMACEUTICALS LTD. STEETON 3222 

Immediate quotations for Home Trade and Export 



l^Kl^^ IS JLm IE : :i 3^111 



4 ■ , 




DALES 
DALES 
DALES 
DALES 

BARROWS LANE, STEETON, Nr. KEIGHLEY, YORKS. 




March 14, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



5 7 



BAGS 

WRAPPINGS 

LABELS 

TABLET CARTONS 



SUTTLEY & SILVERLOCK 

(Branch of KeUy's Directories Ltd.) 

ANDOVER, HANTS 

Tel. 2234/5 



STOCK 
LABELS 

BY 
RETURN 



When Quality Counts . . . 

. . . Fine Chemicals from 

SIEGFRIED 

SIEGFRIED LTD. ZOFINGEN SWITZERLAND 

PHARMACEUTICAL PRODUCTS OF HIGHEST STANDARD 
Analgesics Anaesthetics Disinfectants 
Hypnotics Sympathomimetics 

Complete list available from sole U.K. agents 
HUFFER & SMITH LTD., NEW ERA WORKS, PURLEY WAY, 

Tel: Thornton Heath 4266-7 CROYDON, SURREY Cables: Santoninic, Croydon 

All Siegfried products meet Pharmacopoeia-specifications. A large variety of modern manufac- 
turing facilities is at the disposal of our customers for special (exclusive) production. 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 
Supplement 



March 14, 1959 




PRIDE 7 B 

NEW DOUBLE 




SHAMPOO SACHETS 



BEER SHAMPOO 

a special Blend for BRUNETTES which helps to 
attain that much sought after high gloss so neces- 
sary with either natural or tinted BLACK hairs. 

CHAMPAGNE SHAMPOO 

is specially packed for those who desire the in- 
vigorating effect of wine and spirit with a lovely 
FRENCH PERFUME. 

MEDICATED SHAMPOO 

a hair health shampoo free of all harsh antiseptics. 
Based entirely on the Pure Natural Oils of the 
Pine and Ti-Trees is delightful to use and assures 
a clean healthy scalp. 

These three shampoos are in double sachets giving sufficient 
for 2 complete shampoos. Smart and colourful pack. 

Price 3/9 doz. plus 1/2 P.T. 
From May, Roberts, Sangers or your usual wholesaler or direct- 

B. N. FURMAN (Productions) LTD., 

133 Fonthill Road, N.4 



and so do your profits 



Keep this strikingly attractive display box well 
in the public eye, but not in direct sunlight. 

Retailing at 8d. each from chemists only. 

S. MAW SON AND SONS LIMITED, BARNET, ENGLAND 



BOTANICALS 

CHEMICALS 

GUMS 




:jkc 



ESSENTIAL OILS 
SPICES 
WAXES 



a. 
O 
>- 



IPECAC 

SENEGA 

STY RAX 
STRYCHNINE 
DERRIS POWDER 
PYRETHRUM POWDER 



JOHN KELLYS (LONDON) LTD. 

24 OLD BROAD STREET, E.C.2. 



Telephone : LONdon WaU 6585 (4 line*) 
Ttlogramt: "Erfotin*. Stock. London" 



X 

> 
z 

DO 

c 

JO 

O 



March 14, 1959 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 




CONPRIN 

A new and unique form of 
Aspirin Therapy with Vitamin C 




CONPRIN is a fully soluble, 
effervescent, alkalised aspirin in 
powder form. CONPRIN is sachet 
packed for stability, and contains 
added Vitamin C. It has been 
developed as a result of the recent 
research, clinical and pharmaceu- 
tical, on the drawbacks to the 
use of previously available aspirin 
preparations. 

CONPRIN is unique because the 
CONPRIN sachet sealed with a 
double coat by a unique recently 
developed process, preserves the 
contents in a fresh, stable condi- 



tion and prevents decomposition. 
Total solubility — CONPRIN is 
unique because it dissolves in 
water in a few seconds, giving a 
crystal clear solution without 
either sediment or undissolved 
particles of aspirin. The result is 
an effervescent alkaline solution 
of sodium aspirin plus sodium 
ascorbate, possessing a bland 
slightly alkaline taste, and with 
none of the bitter after-taste 
normally associated with aspirin 
ingestion. Local irritation to the 
gastro-intestinal mucosa by free 



salicylic acid or from undissolved 
particles of aspirin is unlikely 
owing to the complete solubility 
and alkalinity of the CONPRIN 
solution. 

One CONPRIN sachet is equal to 
a 5 grain aspirin tablet. 
The Vitamin C incorporated in 
CONPRIN replaces the loss of 
adrenal content of Vitamin C 
which occurs on the administra- 
tion of salicylates, or as in the 
winter months when natural 
sources of this vitamin are most 
scarce. 




A CONTABS 
Ethical Product 



In alkaline solution 



Each sachet contains : 
In dry powder 

Acetylsalicylic Acid B.P. 5 grains Sodium acetylsalicylate 5-61 grains 

Citric acid B.P. 10-71 grains Sodium citrate 15-0 grains 

Sodium bicarbonate B.P. 21 -65 grains Sodium bicarbonate 5-0 grains 



Ascorbic acid B.P. 



200 mg. Sodium ascorbate 



225 mg. 



packing: Boxes of 12, 24, 240 sachets. 
Trade Prices: 2/-d., 3/8d., 32/6d. 

Sole distributors 



CONTINENTAL LABORATORIES LTD 

101, Great Russell Street, London, W.C.I. Telephone: MUSeum 2042-3. 



60 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 
Supplement 



March 14, 1959 




ROTARY and SINGLE 
PUNCH TABLETTING MACHINES 



New LB.I. Type Bench Tabletcing Machine 



OINTMENT MIXING and 
GRINDING MILLS 



PUNCHES AND DIES 
FOR ALL TYPES OF 

TABtETTlHG MACHINES 



Presses and Moulds for 
Gelatine Capsules 



S. W. WILKINSON & CO., LTD. 

WESTERN ROAD, LEICESTER 

Telephone: Leicester 21283. Telegram! : Wilkinson, Leicester 21283 

Engineer* and Specialists in Pharmaceutical Machinery for over 50 years. 




ASPIRIN 

THREE GOOD REASONS WHY 
YOU SHOULD CONSIDER USING 
" G. S." ASPIRIN 



The 
Symbol 
of 




Quality 

and 
Service 



it Highest Chemical Purity obtainable 
commercially 

Different Physical forms available to 
satisfy individual needs 

Prompt Personal Service always at 
your disposal 

For further information and/or samples you 
are invited to telephone HAWARDEN 2125 
or write to : — 

GRAESSER SALICYLATES LIMITED 
SANDYCROFT, Nr. CHESTER 

Telegrams: QUALITY CHESTER ' 



LIQUORICE 

Made from pure Calabrian 
liquorice root — the quality best 
appreciated in Gt. Britain and 
traditionally known as 

SOLAZZI 

Savepiam Via Oomenico Morelli 75 NAPLES (Italy) 




HONEYCOMB ALL-PURPQSI 



I 



FUUY 
SYNTHiT/t 



STANDARD SIZE (Approx. S'x3 t 'xlf) Reuil Price 2/11 
LARGE SIZE (Approx. 5|"x3j"xlJ') Raull Price 3/11 

USUAL DISCOUNTS 

Etch Sponge in ■ 3-coloured transparent ileeve — Sect* doe** 
In 4-coloured show carton — 12 dozens in Cardboard Box. 

Obtainable from YOUR USUAL WHOLESALER or contact 
FLETCHER A FARLOW LTD., Finsbury Court, 
Flnebury Pavement, London, E.C.2. Tel: MONardi 6601 




"SYMfomsuPtitsais onsig a 



March 14, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



6 



Surgical Instruments 

Specimens from a wide range — AT YOUR SERVICE 




We shall value your enquiries, and will, with 
pleasure, forward prices and details on request 

BumoNMMCoiMdlbtt 

38 SOUTH WARK BRIDGE / / / / ROAD LONDON S E I 

WAT4874/6 

Or* C 

p B ft D A ^ 



6 2 



March 14, 1959 




Chemist^ Druggist 

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 

Telephone: CENlral 6565 

Specially spaced Advertisements, including : — Public and Legal Notices, Sale by Auction, Appointments, Contract Work, Patents, Partner- 
ships, 18/- per \ inch minimum and pro rata. Box 2/-. Clearances and Wants, Businesses for Disposal and Wanted, Premises, Agents 
Wanted, Agencies Wanted, Miscellaneous, 17/4 for 36 words minimum; then 4d. per word. Box 2/-. Situations Vacant, 12/- for 36 
words minimum, then 4d. per word. Box 2/-. Situations Wanted. 3/- for 18 words minimum: then 2d. per word. Box I/-. 
Addr»i$ Box Number Replies to: THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST, 28 ESSEX ST., STKArtO, LONDON, W.C.2 



Oft RIDGE & COMPANY 



184 STRAND, W.C.2 1 

Tel: TEMple Bar 9212/3 & 6340 1 

| CHEMIST BUSINESS TRANSFER AGENTS AND VALUERS WHOLESALE AND RETAIL m 

| BRANCHES: BIRMINGHAM • SOUTHAMPTON • LIVERPOOL • SHEFFIELD • CARDIFF | 

Illllllllllllllll!!1lllll!!!lll!l!lllll! 



PREMISES TO LET 

PREMISES TO LET. Opportunity occurs to 
establish pharmacy in new shopping parade, 
residential district, Bexhill-on-Sea, on very 
favourable terms. Premises comprise lock-up 
shop, excellent maisonnette, garage. All services 
available. Box C 21 J2. 



BUSINESSES FOR DISPOSAL 

DONCASTER DISTRICT. Pharmacy for sale. 
Audited accounts. Apply, J. Thurgood & Co., 
55 High Street. Doncaster, for details C2113 
OLD-ESTABLISHED chemist business, centre 
of busy town. £10,000 p.a. turnover, account- 
ant's figures. Lease seven years, very low rent. 
£4,000 lease, goodwill, fittings and stock. 
Genuine concern, owner retiring. Dilnott 
Stokes, 17 Mount Pleasant, Tunbridge Wells. 
(Tel. No.: 3000-1.) C2106 

APPOINTMENTS 

ANCOATS HOSPITAL, 
MANCHESTER, 4 

Pharmacist 

Applicants are invited for the above post. 
Whitley Council scale and conditions. 
Applications, stating age and experience, with 
names of two referees, to the General Super- 
intendent (Dept. C.J.). C 9001 

BECKENHAM HOSPITAL, 
CROYDON ROAD, 
BECKENHAM, KENT 
Pharmacist 

required immediately at the above hospital. 
Permanent post — one other employed. Whitley 
Council salary and conditions of service. Ap- 
ply, stating qualifications and experience, and 
naming two referees, to Hospital Secretary. 
C 9029 

CENTRAL GROUP HOSPITAL 
MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE 

Senior Pharmacist and Pharmacist 

for Bethnal Green Hospital. Modern depart- 
ment approved for training students. Salary 
scale. Senior Pharmacist £675 — £865 p.a. Phar- 
macist £605 — £815 p.a., plus higher qualifica- 
tion allowance and London Weighting. Please 
apply with details of age. training and experi- 
ence to the Group Secretary, 213 Kingsland 
Road, London, E.2. C 344 

METROPOLITAN HOSPITAL, 
KINGSLAND ROAD, 
LONDON, E.8 

I oumi Pharmacist 
required from Monday, March 23, 1959, to 
work in a modern department. Apply to Hos- 
pital Secretary. C 445 



BROOK WOOD HOSPITAL, 
KNAPHILL, WOKING 

Assistant-in-Dispensing 

Applications are invited for the above post. 
The successful candidate will be required to 
work under the supervision of the Chief Phar- 
macist, who is responsible for the preparation 
and issue of drugs and dressings for about 
1.750 patients. 

Salary Scale £170 p.a. at age 16 years rising 
to £375 at age 22 years or over rising to a 
maximum of £490 p.a. (plus £20 p.a. for an 
approved qualification). 

Professional and Technical Council B of Whit- 
ley Council conditions apply to the appoint- 
ment which is subject to the provision of the 
National Health Service Superannuation Regu- 
lations. 

The successful candidate will be required to 
pass a medical examination. 

Accommodation available for female candidate 
for which a charge of £2 8s. per week will be 
made. 

Applications giving particulars of age, experi- 
ence and qualifications, together with names 
of two referees to the Physician Superintendent, 
as soon as possible. C 417 

ESSEX COUNTY HOSPITAL, 
COLCHESTER 

Assistant- in -Dispensing 

required at the above hospital. Salary as Whit- 
ley Council Scale rising to £510 per annum. 
Applications to Group Secretary, Colchester 
Hospital Management Committee, 14 Pope's 
Lane, Colchester. Essex. C 9027 

HAREFIELD HOSPITAL, 
HAREFIELD, MIDDLESEX 

Assistant - in - Dispensing 

required. London Weighting payable and addi- 
tional £20 p.a. if holding approved qualifica- 
tion. Applications, giving age, qualifications and 
experience, together with two testimonials to 
Medical Director. C 9023 

KING EDWARD VII HOSPITAL, 
WINDSOR 
(Category III Hospital) 

Pharmacist 

required immediately. Whitley salary. Applica- 
tions giving details of service and names of 
three referees to Secretary. C 8992 

LAMBETH HOSPITAL, 
BROOK DRIVE, S.E.I 1 
(Acute General 510 Beds) 

Pharmacist 

required. Salary in accordance with Whitley 
Council Scale, plus London Weighting. Appli- 
cations stating age, experience, qualifications 
and names of two referees to the Secretary. 

C 442 



NOTTINGHAM No. 2 HOSPITAL 
MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE, 
NOTTINGHAM CITY HOSPITAL 
(811 Beds) 

Deputy Chief Pharmacist (Category V) 

required at the above hospital. Applications are 
invited for the above post, which is now 
vacant. 

The City Hospital is a Group hospital and 
caters for the pharmaceutical requirements of a 
number of subsidiary hospitals in the area. 
Applicants should have a wide experience in 
hospital pharmacy, and be capable of control- 
ling staff. A knowledge of surgical instruments 
is desirable. The successful applicant will work 
under the Group Chief Pharmacist and will be 
required to assume complete control in his 
absence. 

Further particulars regarding the post can be 
obtained on application to the Group Chief 
Pharmacist. Whitley conditions of salary. 
Applications, stating age, qualifications and full 
particulars of previous experience, together with 
the names of two referees, should be sent to 
the Group Secretary, Sherwood Hospital, Not- 
tingham, as soon as possible. C 9002 

ROYAL EAST SUSSEX 
HOSPITAL, 
HASTINGS 

Locum - in - Dispensing 

required, from June 29 to July 4 and Septem- 
ber 7 to 12, 1959 Apply to the Administrator. 
C9021 

ST. BARTHOLOMEW'S HOSPITAL, 
LONDON, E.C.1 

Locum Pharmacist 

Immediate vacancy exists for a Locum Pharma- 
cist. Salary by negotiation. Applications, in 
writing, to Chief Pharmacist. C 8965 

SHREWSBURY HOSPITAL 
GROUP 

Pharmacist 

For Copthorne Hospital. 

Pharmacist 

For the Group Pharmacy at the Royal Salop 
Infirmary, with rota duties at other hospitals 
in the Group, as may be required. 
Salary in accordance with Pharmaceutical 
Whitley Council scale. 

Applications to the undersigned from whom 
any further particulars may be obtained. 

J. P. Mallett, Group Secretary. 
C 8990 

ST. BARTHOLOMEW'S HOSPITAL, 
LONDON, E.C.1 

Pharmacist 

A vacancy exists for a Pharmacist. Salary ac- 
cording to Whitley Council scales. Write, giv- 
ing names of two lcferces, to the Chief Phar- 
macist. C 8964 



ERNEST J. GEORGE & CO. 

329 HIGH HOLBORN, LONDON, W.C.I. Telephone : HOLBORN 7406/7 

Professional Valuers to the Pharmaceutical Trade. — Wholesale, Retail and 
Hospital Stocks. Branches throughout England and Scotland. 



March 14, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



6 3 



Appointments — Continued 

READING AND DISTRICT 
HOSPITAL MANAGEMENT 
COMMITTEE 

Pharmacist 

required at the Royal Berkshire Hospital, Read- 
ing (Category V) Six pharmacists with full 
supporting staff. Frequent five-day weeks. Com- 
mencing salary, new entrants, up to £730 p.a. 
based on previous professional experience and 
National Service after qualification. Applica- 
tions to Group Pharmacist, Royal Berkshire 

Hospital. c443 

ST. LEONARD'S HOSPITAL, 
NUTTALL STREET, 
LONDON, N.l 

Locum Pharmacist 

for one week, March 16 to 21. Please apply to 
Chief Pharmacist. C 9015 

THE ANNIE McCALL 
MATERNITY HOSPITAL, 
JEFFREYS ROAD, 
LONDON, S.W.4 

Part-time Pharmacist 

in sole charge required. Preferably female. 
16 hours per week. Monday to Friday. Whitley 
Council terms and conditions of service. Salary 
43s. 8d. per session of 4 hours. Applications, 
giving full particulars of experience and names 
of two referees to Hospital Secretary. C 444 

TOOTING BEC HOSPITAL 
MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE 

Pharmacist 

required at Tooting Bee Hospital, Tooting Bee 
Road, London, S.W.17. Permanent post, Whit- 
ley Council salary. Apply to Physician Super- 
intendent^ C 446 

THE GENERAL HOSPITAL, 
DEWSBURY, YORKS 

Pharmacist 

required immediately for modern department 
in a Category III Hospital. Post offers good 
experience including small-scale manufacturing. 
Accommodation for single person can be 
arranged, if required. 

Applications giving age, experience and quali- 
fications, together with the names and addresses 
of two referees to be sent, as soon as possible, 
to the Administrative Officer. C 9020 

EDUCATIONAL 



PASS YOUR EXAM ! 

that's what you can do — easily; with 
a wonderful course revealing the cor- 
rect psychological approach to studies 
and exam room; and with the remark- 
able book " The Exam Secret," full of 
invaluable information every student 
must have. For details: Dennis Jack- 
son, B.A., 6 Rosslyn Road, Manches- 
ter, 16. C2098 



SITUATIONS VACANT 
RETAIL HOME 

BERKSHIRE, part-time dispensing assistant, 
lady, qualified or unqualified, modern phar- 
macy, few minutes' walk Ascot station. Light 
dispensing. Owner requiring more time for 
rapidly developing counter trade. Hours by 
arrangement. Apply in writing to Margaret 
Stiles, Brockenhurst Road, South Ascot. 

C 2084 

CORBY, Northants. Pharmacist, lady or gentle- 
man, required to manage modern pharmacy 
with rapidly expanding turnover in this " New 
Town," with predominately Scottish population. 
A modern flat, with garage, is available. Early 
closing day Saturday. Superannuation scheme 
with transfer clause. A good salary will be 
paid to suitable applicant. Please apply giving 
details of career to Superintendent Chemist, 
Kettering Co-operative Chemists, Ltd., 23 King 
Street, Kettering. C 2105 

LONDON. E.C.4, AREA. Wanted Chemist/ 
Manager for new shop opening July. Male or 
female. Busy position. Good prospects for 
energetic person. No living accommodation. 
Every encouragement for advancement. Write 
Box C2116. 

OLDHAM CO-OPERATIVE CHEMISTS, 
LTD., invite applications for position of phar- 
macy branch manager, either sex Modern ac- 
commodation available if necessary Super- 
annuation. Salary and other emoluments at least 
£960. Applications, stating age, experience etc 
to Oldham Co-operative Chemists, Ltd 'King 
Street, Oldham. c -> 06 | 



Supplement 

QUALIFIED MANAGER required for small 
branch business. Two lady assistants on staff. 
Suit young pharmacist, lady or male. Also 
qualified assistant for dispensing business, two 
qualified on staff. Suit young man. Excellent 
prospects. Northern Ireland qualification would 
suit very' well and tie up with present staff. 
W. H Hampton, Ltd., 47 Northgate Street, 
Gloucester. C 2101 

WIDNES. Metcalfe's of Liverpool require a 
Pharmacist / Manager for their branch phar- 
macy at Ditton, Widnes. Salary £1,040 per 
annum for a 44-hour week. Three-bedroom flat 
available Apply to Managing Director, Met- 
calfe & Co. (Liverpool). Ltd., 596 Prescot 
Road, Liverpool, 13. C 2095 



RETAIL (OVERSEAS) 

APPLICATIONS are invited from qualified 
male staff for service in Northern Rhodesia. 
Three-year contract. Apply by air mail giving 
full details of experience with copies of refer- 
ences. State age, marital status, religion, 
nationality, etc., to Advertiser, P.O. Box 202, 
Broken Hill, Northern Rhodesia. C 9039 

A VACANCY will shortly occur for 
pharmacist (British qualification) as branch 
manager in West Africa with British company. 
Age under 35 years, preferably single. Progres- 
sive salary. Tours of eighteen months. Leave on 
full pay. Contributory pension scheme. Low 
income tax. Passage paid out and home. Free 
furnished accommodation in West Africa. 
Initial kit allowance. Reply giving full details. 
Age, experience, etc., to Box C 2100. 



ASSISTANT ANALYST with qualification or 
experience for food factory near Watford. 
Five-day week, canteen, pension fund. Please 
write giving details and salary required to Box 
C 8998. 



WHOLESALE 



ARMOUR PHARMACEUTICAL 
COMPANY 

w.sh to appoint a MEDICAL REPRE- 
SENTATIVE to the HARLEY STREET 
area of London, and the TEACHING 
HOSPITALS. 

Consideration will be given to appli- 
cants, aged 30-39, with a sound back- 
ground of medical representation, pre- 
ferably in the London area. 

This is a senior appointment to which 
great importance is attached, and it 
will be remunerated accordingly and on 
a progressive basis. Adequate expenses 
and a company car are provided and 
superannuation and group life insur- 
ance schemes are operative. 

Complete details of education and career 
to: 

Sales Manager, 
Hampden Park, 
Eastbourne 

C 9036 



AYRTON, SAUNDERS & CO., LTD., invite 
applications from young men pharmacists for 
interesting and varied work on sterile products 
and formulation. Five-day week, canteen, pen- 
sion scheme. Applications to Technical Direc- 
tor, Ayrton, Saunders & Co., Ltd., 34 Hanover 
Street, Liverpool, 1 C 9008 



ARMOUR PHARMACEUTICAL 
COMPANY 

We are expanding our sales force by 
appointing additional Medical Repre- 
sentatives throughout the U.K., and 
particularly for the London area. 

Applicants, aged 28-35, with experience 
in medical representation or a suitable 
pharmaceutical background, and with 
a determination to make a career in 
this extremely competitive but reward- 
ing field will be considered and local 
interviews arranged where necessary. 

Adequate training, generous salary, ex- 
penses, and a company car are provided 
and superannuation and group life in- 
surance schemes are operative. 

Complete details of education and 
career to: 

Sales Manager, 
Hampden Park, 
Eastbourne 

C 9037 



BURROUGHS WELLCOME 
& CO. 

require a 

MARKETING EXECUTIVE 

Applications are invited from pharma- 
cists with wide technical knowledge 
and a sound commercial background. 
The position entails liaison with Sales, 
Production, Development and Research, 
and offers opportunities for advance- 
ment in a world-wide organisation. 

Commencing salary will depend upon 
age and experience. Contributory pen- 
sion scheme in operation. 

Applications (by letter only) will be 
treated in confidence; they should in- 
clude full details of education and ex- 
perience since qualification, and should 
be addressed to the Manager, Marketing 
Department, Burroughs Wellcome & 
Co., The Wellcome Building, Euston 
Road, London, N.W.I. C 9007 



EXPERIENCED REPRESENTATIVE required 

for wholesale warehouse, to carry fashion 
jewellery as sideline. Good commission. Box 
C 9022. 



CARLTON LABORATORIES LTD. 

wish to appoint Medical Representa- 
tives in the following areas: — 
Manchester, Midlands, Co. Durham and 
Kent. 

Applicants should be based in the above 
areas, and should for preference, have 
had some experience in the field of 
medical detailing to Doctors and Hos- 
pitals. 

Exceptionally good prospects are attain- 
able to gentlemen who will work hard. 
Please state full details in confidence 
to the Sales Director. 2 Norfolk Square, 
Brighton, Sussex. C 9034 



ORDER CLERKS. The British Drug Houses, 
Ltd., require Clerks with a sound knowledge 
of ethical and proprietary medicines for tele- 
phone order and pricing work. Applicants 
should have experience in the wholesale distri- 
bution trade. Five-day week, canteen. Apply 
in writing stating age, experience and salary 
required to the staff manager, Graham Street, 
City Road, N.l. C 9018 



The British Drug Houses Ltd. 

require a 

MEDICAL REPRESENTATIVE 

for the following territory: — 

Hertfordshire and North London 

Candidates should be phar- 
macists and be under 35 
years of age. Remuneration 
by salary and expenses. A 
Company car is provided. 
There is a superannuation 
fund (contributory) and the 
Company operate life assur- 
ance and profit - sharing 
schemes. Apply giving details 
of age, qualifications and ex- 
perience to : — 

HAC/JLH, 
Personnel Manager, 
The British Drug Houses Ltd., 
Graham Street, London, N.l. 

C9026 



64 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



March 14, 1959 



Situations Vacant — Continued 

IMPERIAL CHEMICAL INDUSTRIES LTD. 
PHARMACEUTICALS DIVISION requires an 
experienced Tablet Maker at its Works in 
Linlithgow, West Lothian. Applicants, who 
should be not more than 35 years old, must 
have a working knowledge of large-scale tablet 
manufacturing techniques and be capable of 
controlling the work of others. Applications 
for this appointment, which is on the estab- 
lished staff and is pensionable, should be ad- 
dressed, in the first instance, to the Works 
Manager, Imperial Chemical Industries Ltd. 
Pharmaceuticals Division, Regent Works, 
Linlithgow, West Lothian. C 9030 

LEADING HOUSE manufacturing proprietary 
medicinals requires a Representative for West 
of England, resident in Bristol area. Successful 
applicant will be between 25 and 40 years of 
age, have a knowledge of, or an aptitude for, 
selling and preferably experience of the phar- 
maceutical and allied trades. Progressive salary, 
full expenses, superannuation and company car; 
thorough training given prior to representation. 
Full details please to Box C 9016. 

MIDLANDS manufacturing chemists require a 

Dispenser, preferably male, for dispensing and 

small-scale manufacturing. Please state salary 
and experience. Box C 9017. 



PFIZER LTD. 

are requiring a 

PHARMACEUTICAL REPRESENTATIVE 

for North and East London and Essex. 
Applications are invited from men 
under the age of 40 for the above 
appointment. The applicant will be re- 
quired to call on dispensing chemists, 
and should have a sound pharmaceu- 
tical knowledge and background. 

He will receive: — 

fa) Comprehensive training 

(b) Generous starting salary and bonus 

(c) Non-contributory Pension 

(d) Company car and expenses 

(e) Removal expenses 

Applications, stating age, experience, 
should be made in writing to the 

Sales Recruitment Supervisor. 
PFIZER, LTD., 
Folkestone, Kent 

C 8997 



REPRESENTATIVE required for Midland area, 
electro medical appliances. Write giving full 
particulars of previous experience to: Personnel 
Manager, Barber Electrical Services, The Air- 
port, Weston-super-Mare. C2107 

REPRESENTATIVE required to cover London 
(West) and outer suburbs. Applicants should 
have a knowledge of the pharmaceutical trade 
m this area. Car owner preferred. Salary, com- 
mission and liberal expenses. Details in confi- 
dence please to the Sales Manager. Meggcson it 
Co., Ltd., Chcssington Hall, Chessington, Surrey. 

C 9011 

SANDOZ PRODUCTS, LTD., require skilled 
men for compressing and granulating processes 
at their new Horsforth factory. Also an experi- 
enced female packaging supervisor. Detailed 
applications to the Manager, Pharmaceutical 
Dept., Sando/. Products, Ltd., Calverley Lane, 
Horsforth, Leeds. C 2099 

WILLIAM FREEMAN & CO., LIMITED, 

have a vacancy for an experienced sales repre- 
sentative, to cover the Counties of Leicester, 
Northants, and the part Counties of Lincoln- 
shire. Warwickshire. Bedfordshire. Buckingham- 
shire, and Oxon. An excellent existing connec- 
tion will be handed over to successful applicant, 
who should preferably be experienced in calling 
upon chemists and hardware outlets, both retail 
and wholesale. Car owner essential, domiciled 
on territory. Remuneration by salary, commis- 
sion and expenses. Staff superannuation scheme. 
Application in writing to: The General Sales 
'..anagcr, Suba Seal Works, Peel Street. Barns- 
ley. Yorkshire. C 9033 



SALES REPRESENTATIVES required for the 
south of England and London; well introduced 
with chemist retailers and wholesalers for rub- 
ber gloves, bathing caps, hot-water bottles, etc. 
Expenses and commission. Full-time applica- 
tions invited with full particulars and require- 
ments. Box C 9028. 

TABLET MAKER with experience of tablet 
coating required in pharmaceutical factory. 
Five-day week. Apply in writing to Personnel 
Officer. British Schering Manufacturing Labor- 
atories, Ltd., Macclesfield Road, Hazel Grove. 
Stockport. C 9038 



THE BRITISH DRUG HOUSES 
LIMITED 

require 

(1) a young MALE PHARMACIST 
as an assistant in Galenical Lab- 
oratory. The post offers a good 
opportunity for a person wishing 
to pursue a career in the pharma- 
ceutical industry. 

(2) a WOMAN PHARMACIST for a 
progressive post in the Dispen- 
sary. 

There is a superannuation fund (contri- 
butory) and the Company operates life 
assurance and profit-sharing schemes. 
Write stating age, qualifications, experi- 
ence and salary required to: 

Personnel Manager (Ref. 7028), 

The British Drug Houses, Ltd.. 

Graham Street, City Road, 

London, N.l 

C 9019 



WHOLESALE (OVERSEAS) 



PHARMACISTS 

as 

(a) SPECIAL REPRESENTATIVE, WEST 
AFRICA (British Commonwealth) 

A world-wide chemical organisation re- 
quires a young, unmarried man, to call 
on Doctors, Hospitals, Missions and 
Government Medical Departments. 
Some selling experience and knowledge 
of these territories would be desirable. 
This is a new, additional appointment, 
and the tour of duty would be based 
on 10 months in the territories, and 2 
months' paid leave in U.K. 

Commencing salary around £1,200 p.a., 
plus suitable Foreign Service allowance, 
and expenses; other benefits include use 
of company ear, and attractive Pen- 
sion/Insurance scheme. Interviews in 
London. 

(b) SPECIAL REPRESENTATIVE 

(Central African Federation) 

Duties and experience for this new 
appointment similar to those detailed 
for West Africa, plus calling on retail 
Chemists. A first-class, apposite sales 
experience might compensate for lack 
of qualification, and a married man 
could take his family with him, first- 
class travel expenses paid. 

Commencing salar> around £1,400 p.a., 
plus F.S.A. and expenses; car. Pen- 
sion scheme. Tour of duty 3 years 
based oil Salisbury, then 6 weeks' U.K. 
leave; annual local leave. Interviews 
in London. 

Fully-detailed applications, which will 
be acknowledged, should be addressed, 
in complete confidence, to Box PQ 165 
A.K Advg., 212k Shaftesbury Avenue, 
London. W.C.2. C 9024 



Situations Vacant Wholesale — Contd. 



AGENTS WANTED 

AGENT REQUIRED on commission basis for 
the Counties of Kent, Surrey and Sussex, to 
take over existing agencies and appoint new 
ones for the sale of seeds and fertilisers for 
leading Midland horticultural house. Write 
giving details of area covered, other lines carried 
and experience to Box C 2103. 



SITUATIONS WANTED 
RETAIL (OVERSEAS) 

DENVER WILLIAMSON, International 
locum. Kineton, Warwickshire. Replaces Pro- 
prietors/Managers worldwide. Experience home. 
France. Italy, South America, Africa. C 1987 



WHOLESALE 

DENTAL PROPAGANDA /SALES. Experienced 
medical representative with excellent contacts 
in the dental profession invites enquiries from 
ethical houses wishing to enter or extend in 
this field. Box C 2102. 

GENTLEMAN (31) desires position as Sales- 
man Representative. 16 years' experience in the 
pharmaceutical trade. Honest, hard-working, and 
good appearance. Phone Dublin 501243, or 
write Box C 2109. 

SENIOR REPRESENTATIVE with 24 years' 
experience and well-established connection with 
all retail and wholesale chemists, Co-oprative 
Societies, and other wholesale and retail 
traders in North-western area, including Pres- 
ton, Fylde. North Lancashire and Westmorland. 
Residence North-west I-ancashire. Modern car 
owner. Box C 2111. 



AGENCIES WANTED 



AGENCIES WANTED 

Chemist Manufacturer Wholesaler, situa- 
ted North Midlands, regularly repre- 
sented over approximately 6,000 square 
miles by eight reps. Nearly 3,000 good 
live accounts with grocers and small 
generals. This business is expanding 
steadily and more agencies in packed 
consumer goods and sundries arc- 
looked for. 

Good premises with ample extension 
space. B.O.T. assistance available. 
Would make ideal dep6t for national 
organisation, eventual amalgamation 
possible. Box C 2114 



SCOTLAND 

In completion of their pro- 
gramme for expanding and re- 
organising the Representative 
staff. Burroughs Wellcome & 
Co. are now selecting men for 
their final training course. 
Among the vacancies is one in 
Scotland. Applications are in- 
vited from Pharmacists in any 
branch of the profession of age 
25-30, who would like to know 
more about this interesting 
work which allows full scope 
for use of technical knowledge. 
Details and prospects can be 
discussed at a local interview. 
Please write in the first instance 
to The Manager, Home Sales 

Department (Medical), 
BURROUGHS WELLCOME 
& CO., 
The Wellcome Building, 
Euston Road, N.W.I. 

C 9032 



March 14, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 
Supplement 



HAVE YOUR PRODUCT MANUFACTURED IN THE 



CENTRAL AFRICAN FEDERATION 



CENTRAL AFRICAN PHARMACEUTICALS (PVT.) LTD. 

CHEMICAL & MANUFACTURING DIVISION 

can now accept contracts for the manufacture of: 
PHARMACEUTICALS • TOILET PREPARATIONS 
HOUSEHOLD COMMODITIES and ALLIED PRODUCTS 

in their Salisbury factory. 

Local Production will put your product in a strong position in 
this rapidly expanding market. 

Market Surveys and Efficient Distribution can also 
be effected by the Company's various marketing 
divisions, if required. 



DIRECTOR AVAILABLE, LONDON, FOR PERSONAL INTERVIEWS | 14th [MAY ONWARDS. 
Write Box 2279, Salisbury, Southern Rhodesia, or London address c/o Goode, Durrant & Murray Ltd., 
Durrant House, Chiswell Street, London, E.C.I. Phone: MONarch 4090 

C 9035 



LEADING 
PHARMACEUTICAL COMPANY 
OF WORLD WIDE REPUTE 

will shortly appoint a SUPERVISOR to control a 
Medical Detailing/Sales Force in the NORTH OF 
ENGLAND AND SCOTLAND. 

He should have (a) pharmaceutical qualifications or 
(b) adequate technical background, with experience in 
a supervisory capacity or several years' experience in 
medical and sales Representation. 

Applicants for this post should write in the first 
instance giving details of experience and stating salary 
required, in confidence, to Box C 9040. 




SPECIALISTS 

FINEST QUALITY WORK 
MODERN LABORATORY 

RETURN POSTAL SERVICE, 
DAILY VAN DELIVERIES, in 

Preston, Chorley, Bolton and 
South Lancashire. 
First Class Show Material FREE on request 

ORMSKIRK 
PHOTO SERVICES LTD. 

ORMSKIRK, LANCS. Telephone 2380 




ROCHE 



THE CHANCE OF 
A STEADY CAREER 

Opportunities are offered to outstanding young 
men with drive and initiative wishing to start 
as medical representatives. A pharmaceutical 
qualification/experience or equivalent academic 
attainment essential. Vacancies occur in — 

1. London/Essex 

2. West Riding of Yorkshire 

Good salary, exceptional pension scheme, full 
expenses; successful applicants are assisted to 
own their own cars. First-class candidates de- 
siring success and security should apply with 
full details to the Secretary, 

ROCHE PRODUCTS LIMITED 

15, MANCHESTER SQUARE, LONDON, W.I 

APPLICATIONS WILL BE TREATED AS CONFIDENTIAL 

C8987 



66 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



March 14, 1959 



Agencies Wanted — Continued 

FREE LANCE, calling on chemists and stores 
in Essex and Suffolk, seeks additional business 
(sole agency preferably). Box C2115. 



YOUNG, well connected, experienced repre- 
sentative, car owner, calling on a high-class 
chemist and store trade with internationally 
known perfumery house in South-western 
Counties, seeks well-known drug or cosmetic 
house. Only top grade advertised products con- 
sidered. Box C 2110. 



BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 



MANUFACTURING CHEMISTS (London area) 
required to undertake production and packing 
of medicinal syrups. Box C9025. 



A rapidly growing Market 
SOUTH AFRICA 

Get established now 



Your trade with South Africa may 
be feeling the restrictions of Import 
Control and Customs Tariffs. 

Get behind these barriers; Manufac- 
ture on the spot. Keep abreast with 
the market. 

We can help: a well-established 
Manufacturing Company organised to 
make and maintain quality of general 
proprietary lines. Modern factory, 
equipment and storage, under quali- 
fied supervision. 

Write now to Box C 2090. 



MEDICAL DETAILING. Are you represented 
in the North and North West? We specialise 
in personal representation to the medical pro- 
fession including hospitals and chemists. Staff 
available for this work. Box C2117. 

WE WILL PURCHASE for cash a complete 
stock, a redundant line, including finished or 
partly finished goods, packing raw materials, 
etc. No quantity too large. Our representative 
will call anywhere. Write or telephone: — 
Lawrence Edwards & Co., Ltd., 6/7 Welling- 
ton Close, Ledbury Road, London, W.ll. 
Id.: Bayswater 4020 and 7692. C 140 



WANTED 

BUYER specialises in disposing of job lots of 
any lines appertaining to pharmacy. Any quan- 
tity considered. Prompt cash settlement. Will- 
ing to discuss adaptation of any line which is 
not quite suitable in its present state. Please 
send samples and full deails to N. Morris. 
218 Walworth Road, S.E.17 Tel No.: ROD. 
7261. C 395 



WANTED 

SURPLUS CAMERAS, ENLARGERS, 
CINE CAMERAS & PROJECTORS, 
PHOTOGRAPHIC EQUIPMENT OF 
EVERY DESCRIPTION SURPLUS 
AND OUTDATED FILM & PAPER, 
LARGE OR SMALL QUANTITIES. 
Phone, write or call: — 
SPEARS 

(Dept. D.I. 14 Watling Street, Munich ill, 
Manchester. 

Phone: Blackfriars 1916. 
Bankers: Midland Bank, Ltd. 

C438 



MISCELLANEOUS 



ACADEMIC 
ELASTIC HOSIERY 

Academic Elastic Hosiery offers you a 
range of exclusive quality N.H.S. 
stockings that have a special appeal to 
women who are regular wearers. They 
build goodwill and create profitable 
and continuous repeat business in your 
pharmacy. Write for details of Academic 
Surgical Hosiery, which will be sent 
with our terms and particulars of dis- 
play material. 

ACADEMIC DEPOT, LTD.. 
175 GOSWELL ROAD, 
LONDON, E.C.I. 

C 9031 



H 



ADVANCES WITH OR 
WITHOUT SECURITY 



8. 



FOR TERMS 
APPLY 



B 



R 



D 



B 



U 



R. 



26 SACKVILLE ST., 
PICCADILLY, f 
LONDON, W.I. L 
(TW: REGmt 3123, 3995) T 
EttabliMhtd 1922 



IMMEDIATE ADVANCES 
£50 to £20,000 
WITHOUT SECURITY 

REGIONAL TRUST LTD. 

8 CLIFFORD STREET 
NEW BOND STREET. LONDON. W.l 
Phone: Regent 5983 & 2*14 

C 353 




TWO-WAY 
INTER-C0MS 

Install your own 
system with our 
complete ready to 
use 2-way intercom kit. 
For £12.12.0, carriage 
free, you will get 2 tele- 
phones, 1 00ft. cable and batteries. Brand new, 
the telephones are moulded in shatterproof 
plastic, each instrument being self contained 
with built-in buzzer and push-button system. 
They work over unlimited distances indoor or 
outdoor. The cable meets rigid G.P.O. stan- 
dards and the batteries are Ever Ready Long 
Life. Nothing for you to do but connect 4 
wires to screw terminals. This is a quality 
product and fully guaranteed for 12 months. 
(Extra cable 2d. per foot.) Send your instruc- 
tions or write for brochure. 

D. J. P. TELEPHONES LTD 

Dept. CD., 96 Great Titchfield St., London, W.l 
LANgham5l53 C2I04 



PARTNERSHIPS 



BRITISH FIRM willing to establish 
factory in West Pakistan in partner- 
ship with local house, to correspond 
with P.O. Box 4768, Karachi-2, in 
confidence. C 2108 



DEVELOPING AND PRINTING 



C439 



QUALITY FIRST but QUALITY FAST 

and 

Guaranteed per return postal service 
G WENT PHOTOGRAPHIC SERVICE 

Snatchwood Works, Pontypool, MON 
Telephone: Talywain 355 

C274 



/// W, 



WW 



*4M 



Malt and Cod Liver Oil 

Wkh the flavour that CANNOT be copied 



We are the premier firm supplying 
Chemists "own name" packs 



IMPORTANT 

Make sure of your stocks 
against the possibility of 
severe Winter epidemics. 



JEFFREYS. MILLER * COMPANY LIMITED. LEYLAND MILLS WIGAN 



Printed by The Haycock 
and published by the Proprietors, Morgan Br 




Ltd,, [Qfi-MdLNd 



ite Street. Camberwell, S.E.5, 

ited, at 28 Essex Street. Strand, London, W.C.2. 



72/24 



March 14, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



i i i 



'//,, '////,. ''///,. WSfc. '-W>. 



<m± 



TOWARDS FURTHER REDUCED DOSAGE 



A new perspective in 
anti-inflammatory corticotherapy 

DEXA-CORTISYL 



9a -fluoro - 1 6a-methyl prednisolone - 2 1 - acetate 



DEXAMETHASONE ACETATE 



ENHANCED POTENCY 

7-8 times greater than prednisone and 
prednisolone. 



REDUCED SIDE EFFECTS 

Does not affect the general condition. 

Does not affect sodium and water metabolism. 



3 




LONDON. N.W.IO. 
LADbroke 6611 



USUAL DOSAGE 

1 to 3 mg. in initial treatment. 
0.75 to 1.25 mg. for maintenance. 



PRESENTATION 

Scored tablets containing the 
equivalent of 0.5 mg. dexamethasone 
in the form of its acetate. 

Bottles of 20, 100 and 500 



^^^^^^^ 



LS75A 




CHEMISTa^DRUGGIST 



MARCH 14 1959 



THEY SEE Valderma advertised on Television 




V 'U 0::. 



in newspapers 
in magazines 



- - — t 



THEY HEAR Valderma praised by Doctors 

by Nurses 
by satisfied 




valderma 

Brand RCCD 

AArr/S£PT/C 

BALM 




users 



THEY BUY Valderma when they see it 

in window 
and counter 
displays 




■ 



QUICK-SELLING PROFITABLE ValdGPIIItl 



ANTISEPTIC BALM AND SOAP 
Dae Health Laboratories Ltd. 17 Berners Street, London, W.I. Museum 9515.