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Full text of "The chemist and druggist [electronic resource]"

For Retailer, Wholesaler and Manufacturer 



MARCH 2 1 1959 




taffordAUenS offer the longest experience in the pre- 
kration of fine medicinal extracts. Our high vacuum 
incentration process ensures full therapeutic activity, 
'e manufacture liquid, granulated, powdered and 
andardized extracts ; also concentrated extracts for 
le preparation of tinctures, infusions, liquid extracts, 
icoctions, confections, etc., etc. 

May we quote you for your requirements ? 

ITAFFORD ALLEN & SONS LIMITED 

HARF ROAD, LONDON. N.I Telephone: CLErkenwell 1000 




THE CHEMISr AND DRUCiGIST 



March 21, 19,'i'; 




TRADE MARK 



i iiw iiiiiPf 



iifiiiiiii 



lodevan (an iodophor consisting of a l"o aqueous solution 
of iodine solubilised with a non-ionic surface active agent) 
presents iodine in a form ideal for disinfection and anti- 
sepsis and from which the undesirable properties of 

iodine are eliminated. 



THE ADVANTAGES OF lODEVAN 



POWERFUL ANTISEPTIC ACTIVITY: NON-STAINING: It is not permanently 

undiluted lODEVAN contains approx. 8,000 staining to clothes or skin, 
parts per million active iodine. 

ABSENCE OF TOXICITY : It is non- BUILT-IN INDICATOR : the amber colour 

corrosive and causes no pain when applied of lODEVAN is a reliable indicator of the 

to open wounds. germicidal potency of the solution. 





EVANS MEDICAL SUPPLIES LTD 

LIVERPOOL AND LONDON 



(809. /?i9 



691 



March 21, 1959 l 




■ 'mi 

I 



Reduces phenobarbitone intake to one sixth 
without loss of sedation. 

Each tablet contains 260 mg. Phenobarbitone 
Sodium Dihydroxyaluminiitmaminoacetate. 

Bottles X 100 tablets — 5 '6 plus p.t. 
Bottles X 500 tablets — 22^6 plus p.t. 
All wholesale chemists hold stocks. 




WEST FHAEMAO:EOTIC/.I 

9 Palmeira Mansions Clmrch Road Hov*i S ->r;.. 
Tolephoue Hov«j 70608 



2 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 21, 1959 







Bettol 



Dettol is active against both Gram- 
positive and Gram-negative micro- 
organisms.* 

It is non-poisonous, non-corrosive and 
non-staining. 

It is well tolerated on the skin and 
tissues in high concentrations. 

It retains a high degree of efficiency 
in the presence of organic matter. 

It is compatible with soap. 



* Under standard conditions of test a 
I in loo dilution kills Staph, aureus 
— and a i in 500 dilution kills Strep. 
Pyogenes — in ten minutes. 



Bacteriological data and other Dettol literature available from 
Reckitt & Sons Limited, Pharmaceutical Department, Hull. 




March 21, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



3 




REGISTERED TRADE MARK 



a statement to the 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADES 






'Q-TiPS', for the first time in Britain, are now 

operating independently of any otiner company. 






WRITE TO 



' Q-T/ps ' ( Great Britain) Limited, 
41-43 North Road, Souttiend-on-Sea, Essex. 
Tel : Souttiend-on-Sea 46072 



4 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 21, 19 



You stock combs as part 
of your service . . . 



make it a PROFITABLE part 



We show the Barnet Magnum 
R.30 Bonus dispenser, giving 
a complete range of guaran- 
teed combs in one compact 
unit with free bonus dozen. It 
is one of eleven dispenser 
cabinets in the Barnet range. 





BARNET COMBS 

and refill your cabinets 

for up to 72% PROFIT 



Your wholesaler can give you 
the best service in the country 
for Barnet cabinets and highly 
profitable refills from the 
largest range in the world. 



ORDER FROM YOUR USUAL WHOLESALER 



Distributed by (Wholesale only) 

E. R. HOLLOWAY SALES LIMITED 

BESSEMER RD., WELWYN GARDEN CITY, HERTS. 

TELEPHONE: WELWYN GARDEN 4444 



March 21, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



5 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 



Allen & Hanburys, Ltd. Cover iv 

Allen, Stafford, & Sons, Ltd Front Cover 

Antigen, Ltd 58 

Associated Television, Ltd 52, 53 

Barker, Robert, & Son, Ltd 58 

Beatson, Clark & Co., Ltd 29 

Bencard, C. L., Ltd 47 

Berdoe & Fish Classified Section 

Borax Consolidated. Ltd. 38 

Bowring, C. T., & Co. (Fish Oils), Ltd 57 

Box, W. H 57 

British Drug Houses, Ltd 36 

British Nylon Spinners, Ltd 16 

Buckley Bowker Tablet Co., Ltd 57 

Burroughs Wellcome & Co 30, 32 

Burson Elastic Stockings 58 

Cadbury Brothers. Ltd 35 

Calmic, Ltd 20 

Chemist and Druggist Pharmaceutical Formulas, 

Volume II 59 

Cooper, McDougall & Robertson. Ltd. 14. \5 

Cox, Arthur H., & Co., Ltd 8 

Cuticura Preparations 56 

Cuxson, Gerrard & Co., Ltd. 8 



Daniel, Richard. & Son, Ltd 6 

' Dettol ' 2 

Distillers Co. (Biochemicals), Ltd 39 

Esso (Flit) 10, 11 

Evans Medical Supplies, Ltd Cover ii 

George, Ernest J.. & Co. Classified Section 

Glaxo Laboratories, Ltd 5 

Goya, Ltd 50, 51 

Groves, O. R., Ltd. — Sunfresh 12, 13 

Haffenden. W. W., Ltd 54 

Halex 26 

Heinz, H. J., Co., Ltd 31 

Holloway, E. R., Ltd 4, 48 

Hooper, B.. & Co.. Ltd 38 

Illingworth, E.. & Co. (Bradford), Ltd 46 

Kemball. Bishop & Co., Ltd 43 

{continued overleaf) 



GLAXO LABORATORIES 



Leading producers of 



OFFER 

PURE CRYSTALLINE SUBSTANCE 
B,2 TRITURATES 
B|2 SOLIDS 




FOR ALL PHARMACEUTICAL PURPOSES 

Pure -stable -high biological activity . Produced by streptomyces griseus fermentation 

I BULK SALES DEPARTMENT, GLAXO LABORATORIES LTD.. GREENFORD. MIDDLESEX. BYRon 3434 
Subsidiary Companies or Agents in most countries 



6 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 21, 1959 



INDEX (cont.) 



Laughton & Sons, Ltd 41 

Lederle Laboratories Division . . . .Interleaved Edit., 323 

Lewis & Burroughs, Ltd 7 

Lilly, Eli, & Co., Ltd 35 

London Commercial Electrical Stores 56 

Macarthys (Wholesale Chemists), Ltd 7 

Macdonald & Son, Ltd 21 

Maw, S., Son & Sons, Ltd 37 

May & Baker, Ltd 44, 45 

Metal Box Co., Ltd 24 

Mondart, Ltd 18, 19 

' News Chronicle ' 49 

Normalair, Ltd 36 



Q-Tips 5 

Racasan, Ltd 

Regna Cash Register Co Cover iii 

Rentokil, Ltd Interleaved Edit, 34 

Roberts Windsor Soap Co., Ltd I"? 

Salter, George, & Co., Ltd 40 

Scherer, R. P., Ltd 23 

Schutze, F., & Co., Ltd Classified Section 

Scott & Turner, Ltd Interleaved Edit., 33 

Smith Kline & French Laboratories, Ltd 22 

Thompson & Capper, Ltd.— Mothaks 9 

Twinco Combs 41 



Ormskirk Photo Services Classified Section 

Orridge & Co Classified Section 



Pascall-Knight, Ltd 29 

Pears Baby Powder Interleaved Edit., 324 

Polarizers (U.K.), Ltd 25 

Powley, R., & Sons, Ltd 42 

Progress Shaving Brush Co 



Warner, Wm. R., & Co., Ltd 28 

Webster, Isaac, & Sons, Ltd 57 

West Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd 1 

Whitaker & Co. (Kendal), Ltd 58 

Wilson & Mansfield, Ltd 57 

Woodward, G. O., & Co., Ltd 27 



38 



Zeal, G. H., Ltd. 



42 





This 
is the Pack for 
YOUR dispensar 





Supplies obtainable 
Vom your usual 
holesaler 



r 



I? Manufactured and packed 
in the Laboratories of 



Sample box gladly sent upon request from 

RICHARD DANIEL & SON, LTI 

Mansfield Rd., Derby. Tel. 40671 (10 lines) and at 
Grosvenor St., A$hton-u-Lyne. Tel. 5161 (9 lines) 



March 21, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



7 




CONSULTING ROOM 
EQUIPMENT AND THE 
PHARMACIST 

To many busy General Practitioners the 
pharmacy is the obvious place from 
which to obtain a new stethoscope or 
to hand in broken diagnostic equip- 
ment for repair, etc. 

Our Surgical Department is stocked, 
equipped and staffed to help you to 
encourage this demand and as with our 
other services, distribution is channelled 
only through the pharmacist. 

SEND FOR A COPY 
OF OUR NEW ILLUSTRATED LIST 

IT 




(WHOLESALE CHEMISTS) LTD 



ROMFORD, ESSEX Tel : Romford 46021 



LEWIS & BURROWS LTD. 

WISH TO ACQUIRE SUBSTANTIAL BUSINESSES | 

SHOWING REASONABLE PROFITS | 

• Commanding Main Road positions essential | 

• Minimum Turnover £15,000 per annum | 

• Better Class Trade with good Cosmetic | 
Agencies preferred | 

WRITE IN CONFIDENCE TO THE COMPANY SECRETARY | 
J. P. JEFFERY, F.C.I.S. Lewis & Burrows Ltd., Mappin House, Winsley St., London, W.I | 

iffllUUIHillllllllllllllllllllllltllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIilllllllllll^ 



8 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST March 21, 1959 




CARTONED TUBES PACKED 
IN SHOWOUTERS OF I DOZEN 

Write to us for large sample tube and generous 
Trade Terms 



ARTHUR H. COX & CO. LTD 
BRIGHTON ■ ENGLAND 



in the servic* of pharmacy for 190 Years 



Still the most popular 
Corn rem over ^^tflT 





THIS YEAR 
IDVERTISING! MORE SALES!! 

MORE PROFIT!!! 



Carnation Corn Caps will be advertised more exten- 
vely than ever before this season. Make sure your 
stocks are adequate, and display them prominently 
from now onwards. Bigger sales are anticipated and 
r revised terms offer better than ever profits. Don't 
forget too that Carnations are still strictly 
CHEMISTS ONLY. This is a first-class line in every 
It sells readily, both through enthusiastic 
mmendation and national advertising. All 
u have to do is to display them — they 
sell themselves. 



recor 



RETAIL I 3d. PACKET (INC. TAX) 
TRADE 8 3d. DOZEN (PLUS TAX) 



CARRIAGE PAID ORDERS 
£6 AND OVER 
(ALL PRODUCTS) 



ri-l PM ICTC 




'^hone. BROadwell.lSSS , 



PRODUCT OF 



March 21, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



9 



Last chance 
MOTHAKS 

BONUS OFFER 

closes 

April 1st. 



MOTHAK FLY SPRAY 

AND 

PARADOR AEROSOL 

BTGGIER ADVERTISING- 
BEST PROFITS 



5 



SPECIAL BONUS OF 

1^ on EVERY gross 
■ of MOTHAKS 

PLUS EXTRA O^/" 
off your TOTAL ORDER 

when you include 

PARADOR AIR FRESHENER 
PARADOR AEROSOL 
MOTHAK FLY SPRAY 
MOTHAK POWDER 




NOW 
ONLY 



4^3 



TERRIFIC VALUE! 




THOMPSON & CAPPER, LTD. LIVERPOOL. 24. 



1 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 21, 1959 




VL. si/ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ jAl ^ 
/Js /JN 7]^ TfT /JN >T\ /JN /I\ 

* * * 



CONTINUOUS- 
ACTION 
SPRAYER 





t 

m 



1 



m 




3'9 ■ 

RETAIL 

ll^ ^ 'Wi 
■M- 















^^^^ 










ffi 1959 FLIT products will be backed If 




DAILY MAIL w 
DAILY EXPRESS 7 
nthe DAILY MIRROR iif 
DAILY TELEGRAM 
NEWS CHRONIC^^ 



I 



March 21, 193y 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 




ally m^/mmm 



RADIO TIMES and 
WOMEN'S MAGAZINES 



OFFER CLOSES 
30th APRIL 
1959 



PETROLEUM COMPANY, LIMITED • SPECIALTY DEPT • 128-132 ALBERT STREET • LONDON NW1 



12 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST March 21, 1959 



Regd. Trade Mark 





Thousands entering for Sunfresh ^^3000 competition. And every 
entry a Sunfresh sale. Many more thousand entries expected 
before closing date — May 31st. And every entry a Sunfresh sale. 
You stock it — Sunfresh competition and advertising shifts it. 
Sunfresh on TV. Bus sides. In National newspapers. And 
local press. Glorious Sunfresh for glorious sales. 



arch 21, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



Regd. Trade Mark 




Order Sunfresh Orange now. You get a free bottle of either 
Sunfresh orange, lemon glucose, or lemon barley glucose 
with every one dozen case deUvered between March 30th and 
April 30th. Tell your usual supplier which of the free bottles 
you want. Make sure you have plenty of supplies for the holiday. 

O. R. Groves Ltd., 20 Jermyn St., London, W.i. Tel. GERrard 9484 (7 lines) 



14 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 21, 1959 



There is 

MASSIVE ADVERTISING 
for COOPER AEROSOLS 

this year 



TELEVISION s^tations continuously for 23 WEEKS from April to 



October. 



NATIONAL PRESS large spaces in National Dailies, 



and 'Radio Times' from April to October. 



I\/IAPA7IM[C Special support in 8 women's interest, home-making, and 
III AU I ll LU 'Do-it-yourself* magazines continuously for 9 MONTHS. 

niCDI AVQ PAI nDC Specially designed to help you SELL. From 
UlUI LHIU UHLUIIL your Cooper representative or direct. 



Setter aerosols — and lower prices — through COOPER research 



COOPER McDOUGALL & ROBERTSON LTD 



B E R K H A M ST E D • HERTS. 



March 21, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



1 5 




Killer 



KILLS FLIES. WASPS, 
MOSQUITOES AND 
*Ll FLYING INSECTS 




- Woodworm f I 




KILLS WOOD-eORINC 
BEETLES. PROTECTS 
FURNITURE 




'c RAWt INC ' 

Insect 1 




KILLS ANTS 
COCKROACHES 
■itTlES SILVERF'S** 



Cooper's wore first to bring aerosol prices down to 4/6d for 
the popular size and 9/- for the large. These now apply to the whole fast- 
selling range of Cooper's household aerosols — Fly Killer, Fresh-aire, Moth 
Proofer, Crawling Insect Killer, Woodworm Killer. With advertising support 
more than double that of last year, the range will now sell faster than ever. 



SpecGt 



Remember— Cooper's is the push-button range that sells 
—the range that the public knows and tru sts. Stock 
up with Cooper aerosols now! There's an EXTRA 
BONUS of up to for orders placed before April 
30th. It now pa ys more than ever to stock the full 
Cooper range. 



COOPER'S 



9/H,'10A 



J 



16 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST March 21. 1959 




AS Nylon GOES 



TO WORK 




NtjlOtl WORK WEAR saves money not only on a cost-lor-liic l)asis but also 
indirectly by reducing running costs and by increasing efficiency all round. Overalls, 
Lab. Coats, Clean Area Suits, Aprons and Gloves — all aie available now in nylon. 
All have these important advantages ; — 



Easy laundering 
Lint-free 



Longer, smarter wear 
Better hygiene 



Shrink-proof 

Light and comfortable 



Write to BRITISH NYLON SPINNERS LIMITED 

Marketing DcpartiiK'nt, (>8 Knightsbricigi-, London, S.W. i, for your 
free copy of ' NYLON'S 0\ ER.\LL .\DVANTAGES '. 




\ 



March 21, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



1 7 



ROBERTS WINDSOR 

fine soaps and 

toiletries 




New advertising 
sells loveliness 

tinrough full colour 



. products . • 
colourful proa 

colourful packs 
oolourlul advertising 



Roberts Windsor's growing popularity is apparent — and 
it has extra backing from beautiful full-colour advertise- 
ments in major women's magazines like WOMAN, 
WOMAN'S OWN, QUEEN, HOMES & GARDENS, 
EVERYWOMAN, HOUSEWIFE, GOOD HOUSE- 
KEEPING and WOMAN & BEAUTY plus regular 
smaller spaces in National class newspapers like the 
Daily Telegraph. 



ROBERTS WINDSOR LTD, WINDSOR A N D C O L W I C K , N O T T I N G H A M 

c 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 21, 1959 




I 



These three Max products are the forerunners 
of the biggest range of Aerosols ever planned. 
The Max range is made to exacting and advanced formulae — brilliantly 
efficient, technically supreme, safe and simple for women to use. 



SOON EVERYONE WILL KEEI 



March 21, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 




V. ever^ M^^ihi^ /4 week 



Pius TH 

PIUS 

plus 



E RADIO TIMES 

EVERY WEEK FOR 13 WEEKS 

THE T.V. TIMES 

EVERY WEEK FOR 11 WEEKS 



ALL HOME MAGAZINES 

CONTINUOUSLY FOR FOUR MONTHS 
TRADE PRICE 40/6d PER DOZ. 

INTRODUCTORY BONUS OFFER UP TO APRIL 30th 



Extra 

discount on 
orders of 
dozen 
dozen of each) 



Extra 

discount on 
orders of 
3 dozen (i 
dozen of each) 



Extra 

discount on 
orders of 
6 dozen 
(your choice) 



You can order 



max 



from your usual wholesaler 



MONDART LIMITED, 49 PARK LANE. LONDON. W.I 

HYDE PARK 2I5S 



ABOUT THE HOUSE 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 
20 March 21. 1959 



II 



Of 



AVAILABLE FOR PRESCRIPTION NOW 



ORAL IRON-A NEW PRESENTATION 




FERROMYN 



Many constructive reports originating from doctors who are prescribing 
FERROMYN in many countries throughout the world sponsored the de- 
velopments to improve its effectiveness still further. It became evident 
that it was necessary to present FERROMYN in a new form to achieve an 
even more rapid disintegration, coupled with increased stability. 
During the past two years, tests have been carried out presenting Ferrous 
Succinate in many forms- rwt most satisfactory of which has 

PROVED TO BE A CAPSULE. 



Providing these outstanding advantages : 



(0 ferric iron content is not more 

than O.Smg. and does not increase on 
prolonged storage. 



(ii) disintegration is rapid (5 minutes). 

(Hi) intolerance is less than 1%. 

(iv) haemoglobin response is 1 %— 2% per day . 



FERROMYN (Ferrous Succinate), originated and developed in our own 
laboratories, is prepared from the mild, atoxic ferrous salt of succinic acid 
and is one of the most effective organic iron salts, requiring no other 
additives to produce a rapid haemoglobin response or to reduce the 
intolerance and side effects usually associated with oral ferro- therapy. 



FERROMYN IN 



8 



FORMS: CAPSULES, TABLETS, ELIXIR 



FORMULAE 

FERROMYN 

Each capxuleltabletlteaspoonful contains' 
Ferrous Succinate ISO mg. 

FERROMYN 'B' 

Each capsuleltabletlteaspoonful contains: 

Ferrous Succinate 150 mg 

Aneurlne Hydrochloride 1 mil 

Riboflavin 1 mg. 

Nicotinamide 10 nig. 



DOSAGE 

one capsule, tablet or teaspoonful 
between meals or as prescribed. 



PRESENTATION 

FERROMYN 



Capsules \ 
Tablets / 



Packs of 
100 and 1.000 



Basic N.H.s. cost: from 1.000 dispensing pack. 

100 capsules/tablets 2/7d. + p.t. 

FERROMYN Elixir 

Bottles of 4 ozs. and 20 ozs. 

Basic N.H.s. cost: 

4 ozs. elixir 3/lld. + p.t. 



FERROMYN 'B' 



Capsules \ 
Tablets / 



Packs of 

100 and 1.000 



Basle N.H.s. cost: from 1.000 dispensing pack. 

100 capsules/ tablets 3/3d. exempt p.t. 

FERROMYN 'B' Elixir 

Bottles of 4 ozs. and 20 ozs. 

Basic N.H.s. cost. 

4 oz. elixir 4/-d. exempt p.t. 



C A L M I C 



■ ^ V ^1 k i I purely British Pharmaceuticals 

CALMIC LIMITED • CREWE HALL • CREWE • CHESHIRE • Crewe 3251/7 



h 21, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



21 



You're away in front with 




FILM-WRAPPED 
DRESSMGS 



Just look at the handsome Certor 
film-wrapped dressings! Truly the 
herald of a new era of dressings 
packaging. So well protected. 
So brilliant on display. Packs 
for the progressive chemist. 



Certor 



CHANGE NCm TO 

FILM-WRAPPED 



GARTONNED DRESSINGS 



B , P . C . 



SEUD TO-DAY FOR 

THIS SAMPLE RANGE 



► 




% MACDONALD & SON LTD. of MANCHESTER & LONDON 



PORTLAND MILL, ASHTON-UNDER-LYNE, LANCS. 25 HOLYWELL ROW, LONDON, E.C.2 
TELEPBONES: ASHTON-UNDER-LYNE 4422 (10 LINES). BISHOPSGATE 4809 (2 LINES) 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 21, 1959 



Two outstanding f^^K} skin preparations 



showing a big margin of prolit 



PRAGMATAR 

for dandruff 



' Pragmatar' is highly effective in the treatment 
of dandruff. Fresh, pleasant-smelling, 
'Pragmatar' has these advantages: 

• OU-in-water base, free from grease or wax. 

• Cetyl-alcohol coal-tar distillate : all the advan- 
tages of crude coal-tar but does not irritate. 

• Safe for children. 

PRAGMATAR for dandruflF 
safe • effective 

in 1 oz. tubes at a retaU price of 4/4|d. 



Acne sufferers like using 'Eskamel'. Here are 
three reasons why : 

• 'Eskamel' often brings improvement not in 
weeks or months — but in days. 

• The flesh-tinted base conceals the lesions 
while the active ingredients are at work. 

• 'Eskamel' is pleasant to use: virtually invisi- 
ble when applied, easy to put on, easy to remove. 

ESKAMEL for acne 
ininiediate concealment • rapid control 

in 1 oz. tubes at a retail price of 5/ld. 



Smith Kline & F>ench T,ab<>ratories Ltd, ( oldliarlionr Lane. I.ondon SES Telephone: BKIxton 7722 



ESKAMEL 

/or acne 



PR£MTA39(COl) 



' Vrn^niiitar' *t ' hiskiinud uri trade nuirks. 



21, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



23 





for the vast 
potential 

multi-vitamins 





IVlulti -vitamins represent an important, 
rapidly growing market; they are essential 
to health. Only the large, scientijtmUy 
controlled Soberer organisation is geared up 
to provide you with an xmequalled, 
comprehensive and fully confidential 
production service— NOW. 

LABORATORY CONTROL 

Scherer's Triple Guarantee 

1. All materials analysed on delivery. 

2. All mixes analysed before encapsulation. 

3. All capsules analysed before despatch and 
protocols available on request, 

PROTECTION 

Hermetic sealing ensures the perfect, 
permanent protection, essential with many 
vitamins. 

YOUR SAFEGUARD 

Thousands, or raiUions, of gelatin capsules can 
be produced completelj^ to your formula— in 
colours and shapes exclusive to you. 

ACCURACY 

Fill tolerance to within 1%. 

COMPLETE SERVICE 

The Scherer service means no capital outlay on 
your part; you supply your formula, and the 
encapsuled products, guaranteed, will be 
delivered to you complete — even strip packed 
if vou wish. 



erer Ltd. 



can encapsulate 
most pharmaceuticals- 
please ask for details 



r,. p. SCHERER, Ltd., 216-222 BATH ROAD, 
PLOUGH "RUCKS 'PlionP: SUOUGH 21241. 



24 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 21, 1959 



METAL BOX 
OFFERS 





Pack your products in containers 
that will not be left on the bathroom 
shelf! Metal Box polystyrene tubes 
are attractive and specially designed to 
be carried in the pocket or handbag. 




POLYSTYRENE TUBES 

The colour printed polystyrene tube is the latest aid 
to the sale of tablets. Direct printirig in two colours 
on the surface of the tube replaces labelling 
entirely, and the tube presents an extra smart 
and attractive appearance on the sales counter 
Polystyrene tubes are tough and hght. 
Each is effectively sealed by a one-piece 
polythene stopper, easy to remove 
and easy to replace. For additional 
sales-appeal a wide range of coloured 
stoppers is available. Please ask today 
for samples and further details. 



CUT 
THE COST OF 
COTTON WOOL ! 



The Pillar Pack Stopper with the flexible 
prongs holds tablets gently in place, keeping 
them undamaged. No cotton wool is needed, 
no labour to insert it. The tube looks tual, 





clean and efficient. Pillar Pack Stoppers can 
be supplied with the x 2i' tube, and are 
used by ICI for the Savlon pack featured in 
the main illustration. 



METAL BOX 





The Plastics Group o) 
The Aietal Box Company Limited 
37 Baker Street, London, W.i. 
Hunter S577 



arch 21, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 




SUNGLASSES 

with these two 

superb H9ii/mom 




401 



Rimless Gold-filled frame, in semi-upswept 
style with rocking Pads and neat trims. 







If 



402 



Rimless Gold-filled frame, a sunglass of 
distinction with new lens shape. 



Now is the time to 
order your 1959 
stocks of Polaroid 
Sun Glasses. Be 
ready to meet the 
demand for these 
Sun Glasses with 
the unique Polaroid 
polarizing lens which 
distinguishes between 
reflected glare and 
optically useful light. 



DON'T GET CAUGHT WITHOUT 
STOCK, ORDER NOW. 

// you have not already 
received the 1959 Cata- 
logue send for a copy 
today — it contains the 
complete range, prices, 
repair charges, etc. 




POLARIZERS (U.K) LIMITED 

186 ACTON LANE • HARLESDEN • N.W.I 0. 

TELEPHONE: ELCAR 6381/2. 
TELEGRAMS: POLUK • HARLES • LONDON. 

OP anil POLAROID are the regisleretl Trfule Murkf 
ol Polar oiil Corporation, Cambridge. Mass.. U.S.A. 



^ of folaroid C or/w 



26 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 21, 195'? 



HAIm'EK nylon combs 




C6yo Nylon comb unit: — 
2 dozen pocket combs Cioi i/6d. each retail. 
I dozen bag combs C202 i/9d. each retail. 
I dozen tail combs C303 i/9d. each retail. 
I dozen gents' dressing combs C405 2/-d. each retail. 
I dozen ladies' dressing combs C404 2/6d. each retail. 
Similar units available for 6 dozen Halex 
Acetate or Imprene combs. 



Refill packs available 
of I dozen combs 
Every comb bubble-packed 
Every comb individually priced 
Wonderful assortment of colours 

See your usual wholesaler soon — 
and step up your spur-of-the- 
moment sales. 



HALEX 

(0 Division of British Xylonite Company Limited) 

HIGHAMS PARK, LONDON E.4 



I Spur-of-the-moment 



sales go up 
with these 
free 

counter service 
units from 



HALEX 



* 

* 
* 



- the name for better 

COMBS 




For more spur-of-the-moment sales ask your 
wholesaler to deUver one of these 4-dozen wire 
dispensers for nylon, acetate or Imprene combs 
— specially designed to hang or stand. 



March 21, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



27 




• Medicinal Tablets prepared to customer's own formulae 

• Quality and accuracy guaranteed 

• Modern Plant • Prompt Delivery 

HOME AND EXPORT ENQUIRIES INVITED 



G. O. WOODWARD & CO., LTD. 

MANUFACTURING CHEMISTS 
LARKHALL WORKS, MORRISH ROAD, BRIXTON HILL, LONDON, S.W.2 

Telephone: TULSE HILL 9481-2-3 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 21, 1959 



New 




TRADE MARK 



Elixir 



specially for the elderly patient 




PACATAL the improved phenothiazine derivative is al- 
ready well established for the treatment of mental 
patients, and is being prescribed more and more for the 
elderly patient at home. 

PACATAL ELIXIR has now been introduced and in this form 
it is particularly suitable for the elderly patient. 
PACATAL ELIXIR is being promoted in the medical press 
and in mailings to doctors. 

Available now in 4 fl. oz. bottles at a retail price of 71- 
— not subject to purchase tax. 




Elixir 



WILLIAM R. WARNER & CO. LTD., EASTLEIGH, HAMPSHIRE. 



March 21, 1959 



THE CHEMIST 



AND DRUGGIST 



29 



The 

Beatson 
Medical 




Be sure to specify BE A TSON 

AVAILABILITY— THE BEATSON MEDICAL 

Cork Mouth— Ungraduated. 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 10. 12, 16, 20 oz. 
Graduated Teaspoons. 2, 3, 4 oz. 
Graduated Tablespoons. 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 16 oz. 
Parts. 6 oz. in 6 parts. 
8 oz. in 8 parts. 
12 oz. in 12 parts. 

Screw Neck— Ungraduated. 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 16, 20 oz. 
Graduated Teaspoons. 4 oz. 
Graduated Tablespoons. 6, 8, 10, 12, 16 oz. 

Screw Neck AMBER now available. 4, 8, 16 oz. 

Good Bottle" 



'The Sign of a 



TBAOt MARK 
■■OlSTIKID 



BEATSON, CLARK & CO., LTD. 

GLASS BOTTLE MANUFACTURERS 
ROTHERHAM Established 1751 YORKSHIRE 

BMI 



GUAVIN 

(say Gwar-vin ) 

AN ANNOUNCEMENT 

The partial failure of the French grape crop 
has caused a sharp increase in the demand for 
and the price of CYPRUS fruit from whence 
comes the sweet grape juice for Guavin. This, 
combined with the installation of a new and 
improved quality control system, necessitates 
an increase in the price of Guavin from 2/9 to 
3/- a bottle. This will take effect from April 1st. 

We regret this increase. But we are sure of 
these facts : 

First, that the new price more nearly 
reflects the quite outstanding quality of 
Guavin. 

Second, that at 3/- Guavin is still very 
competitively priced. 

Third, that the sales of Guavin will con- 
tinue to show a steady and gratifying 
increase. 

Orders placed before April Isl will be met at 
pre-increase prices. 



GUAVIN CONTAINS MORE NATURAL 
GOODNESS THAN ANY OTHER FRUIT 
DRINK NOW AVAILABLE. 

Guavin is pure fruit juice : a blend of the 
juices of sun-drenched guavas and luscious 
black grapes. 

li is extremely rich in Vitamin C (richer 
by far than blackcurrant juice) and contains 
a high proportion of pure grape sugars. 
There is no added sweetening, colouring or 
flavouring matter. The amber bottle protects 
the Vitamin C. The golden label sets the 
6cal on its quality. 




RETAIL 
Bottle contains 
I2i fl. ozs. m.n. 



3/- 



Guavin Is produced to the highest standards of purity by 

Pascall-Knight Ltd., Croydon (Est. 1931) 
Tel.: CROydon 3854 



30 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 21, 1959 




TRADE MARK 



ADVERTISING 



WELLCOME INSTITUTE 
LIBRARY 


CoB. 


WeiMOmec 


Coll. 
No. 














Next week the great 'SAXIN' Spring 
Advertising Campaign opens in the 
National Press. Continuing right through the 
Summer, advertisements v^ill appear in leading 
nev^spapers and magazines, including: — 



DAILY EXPRESS' 
'DAILY TELEGRAPH" 



'DAILY MAIL' 
WOMAN'S DAY' 



'DAILY MIRROR' 
WOMAN'S REALM' 



A concentrated TV campaign on all commercial 
TV Stations will attract many more Summer 
sllmmers. 



Be sure to take advantage of this 
support by displaying and recom- 
mending 'SAXIN' — the non-fattening 
sweetener. 

REGULAR ADVERTISING EVERY 
WEEK FROM NOW UNTIL AUGUST 




BURROUGHS WELLCOME & CO. (The Wellcome Foundation Ltd.) LONDON 



March 21, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 




Do mothers ask 
your advice about 
baby feeding ? 




Of course they do. And your advice is particularly 
valuable to those whose babies are at the mixed feeding 
stage. You know that a balanced and varied diet trains 
growing appetites along healthy lines. 

That's why you tell mothers about all 
the 25 kinds of Heinz Baby Foods. You 
help them, too, to pick out from your 
displays, varieties that they haven't 
tried before. 

Already well over 1 million cans of 
Heinz Baby Foods are eaten every week 
and there is still a huge potential in this 
growing market. More mothers will be 
encouraged to buy from you if you 
stock all the varieties and keep them 
on display. 




HEINZ^ 



YOU and 

together help 

build healtliy babies— 

make healthy profits too ? 




THE CHEMIST 
AND DRUGGIST 

ESTABLISHED 1859 

The weekly newspaper for pharmacy and 
all sections of the drug, pharmaceutical and 
fine chemical, cosmetic, and allied industries 

Official organ of the Pharmaceutical Society of Ireland 
and the Pharmaceutical Society of Northern Ireland 



Volume 171 



March 21, 1959 



No. 4126 



CONTENTS 

Any Business Questions? 317 

Automatic Vending 307 

British Polio Vaccine 308 

Display Aids in National Campaign 306 

Executive Changes at Nottingham ... 311 

Fifty Years Ago ... 316 

Hospital Contracts in S.W. London 313 
Leading Articles: 

The Chemist and his Counter Trade 3 1 5 

Outlook for Chemical Exports ... 315 

N.H.S. Estimates Approved ... 309 

Onward from Galen ... 316 

Pharmaceutical Society of Ireland: 

Council Meeting 318 

Quest for Nerve Transmitters ... 320 

Retail Changes in Next Ten Years . . . 321 

Statutory Committee 308 

Topical Reflections ... ... ... 305 

World Competition in Chemicals ... 319 



Business Changes 


J12 


Overseas Visits 


.. 312 


Coming Events 


327 


Personalities ... 


.. 314 


Commercial Television 


328 


Price Changes ... 


.. 328 


Company News 


312 


Print and Publicity 


.. 328 


Correspondence 


314 


Recent Re.search 


.. 315 


Deaths 


314 


Trade Marks ... 


.. 327 


In Parliament 


313 


Trade Notes ... 


.. 306 


Legal Reports 


312 


Trade Report ... 


.. 325 


Local Officers 


305 


Wills 


.. 327 


New Products 


307 


World Trade ... 


.. 327 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS, Pp. 5 & 6. 
Classified Advertisements, p. 60. 

PUBLISHED BY 

MORGAN BROTHERS (PUBLISHERS), LTD., 

at 28 Essex Street, Strand, London, W.C.2 

Telephone : Central 6565 
Telegrams : Chemicus, Estrand, London 

WOLVERHAMPTON: 89 Woodland Avenue, Tcuenhall Wood. 
GLASGOW: 160 Nether Auldhouse Road, S..V Phone: Langside 2679. 
LEEDS, 16; 32 Wynford Rise, West Park. Phone: Leeds 67 8438. 

ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION 
which includes The Chemist and Druggist Diary and 
Year Book, £2 10s. Single copies one shilling each. 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGISl 



March 21. 1959 



EVERY SHEEP FARMER IN 
THE U.K. IS BEING TOLD ABOUT 



Frantini 



Contains 

Bephenium Embonate 30% 
Bephenium 

Hydroxynaphthoate 60% 



DISPERSIBLE POWDER 



THE ONLY PROTECTION AGAINST NEMATODIRUS; ALSO HIGHLY 
EFFICIENT AGAINST THESE OTHER SERIOUS WORM PARASITES IN 
THE UNWEANED LAMB: 

Trichostrongylus axei, Haemonchus contortus, Ostertagia species, Cooperia species. 



There is no worm preparation as effective 
as 'Frantin'. Its discovery by the Wellconn 
Research Laboratories represents a trem- 
endous step forward in sheep husbandry. 
Today, deaths from deadly Nematodirus 
Infestation can be prevented and the 
retarding effects of other worm parasites 
soon halted by dosing unweaned lambs 
with 'Frantin'. 

Lambs treated with 'Frantin' are healthier, 
heavier and more profitable to the farmer. 




Issued in bottles of 250 gm. 



^i^KYP/,^ Discovered by the Wellcome Research Laboratories 

" BURROUGHS WELLCOME & CO. (The Wellcome Foundation Ltd.) 

'ijyWjni The Wellcome Building, Euston Road, London, N.W.l. Tel. Euston 4477 
and 18 Merrion Square, Dublin. Tel. 65751/2 




173 1 A 



303 



Chemist 




AND 



Druggist 



Volume 171 



MARCH 2 1, 1959 



No. 4126 



Pharmacy as a Career 

TWO NEW FILMS TO AID RECRUITMENT 

BELIEVED to be the first film on retail pharmacy as a career, " Phar- 
macy for You," which was shown at a premiere in London on March 
17, has the approval of the Pharmaceutical Society and the National 
Pharmaceutical Union as giving a fair picture of the career which 
pharmacy offers. 



Although sponsored by Boots Pure 
Drug Co., Ltd., the film as presented 
makes no mention of the company be- 
cause it is designed to be shown to 
children at public and grammar schools, 
at careers exhibitions and to interested 
organisations, etc., to demonstrate the 
interest, scope and responsibility of the 
position of the retail pharmacist. The 
film portrays the role of the retail phar- 
macist in society and tells the story of a 
boy who, finding he has a leaning to- 
wards science, decides on pharmacy as a 
career. The boy is seen in school and 
college, and is shown undertaking his 
year's practical training up to his re- 
ceipt of the Pharmaceutical Society's 
certificate. Although indicating that re- 
tail pharmacy is an attractive career, 
the film does not minimise the hard 
work involved in school and college 
and in practical training or in the re- 
sponsibilities inherent in the profession. 

At the film's premiere Mr. W. R. 
Norman (vice-chairman. Boots Pure 
Drug Co., Ltd.) said ; " There have 
been a number of requests for- such a 
pharmacy careers film, and only re- 
cently I read an article in The Chemist 
AND Druggist (March 7, p. 254) 
called " No One to Sell Pharmacy." 
We hope, therefore, that this film will 
be useful and will further enhance the 
prestige of pharmacy as a calling. . . . 
There appears nowhere in the film 
either the name or stamp of Boots, so 
it is available to aid recruiting for all, 
whether private or company chemist." 

Some of the scenes were shot at the 
College of Technology, Bristol, and at 
a pharmacy in London. The central 
character recently qualified and is now 
completing his National Service. 

The second film. " Pharmacy with 
Boots the Chemists '" is designed 
primarily for use by Messrs. Boots for 
training their staff and in their own 
recruiting efforts. It illustrates the 
many facets of their activities from 
pharmaceutical manufacture and re- 
search to animal husbandry and veter- 
inary science. It may be shown 
with or without " Pharmacy for You." 

Both films are 16 mm., in black and 
white with sound commentary. " Phar- 
macy for You runs for twenty 
minutes, " Pharmacy with Boots the 



Chemists " for ten minutes. They are 
available on loan, free of charge, from 
Sound-Services, Ltd., film library, Wil- 
ton Crescent, London, S.W.I 9. 

Festival of Films 

THREE ADDITIONAL AWARDS 

IN addition to the original six cate- 
gories for films shown competitively in 
the Festival of Films in the Service of 
Industry this year three more awards 
are being made. They are for the film 
which is most likely to promote British 
exports (the award to be presented by 
the council of the festival); for the film 
which provides the best exposition of 
the scientific principle underlying, an 
industrial process, and for the film 
which provides the best presentation of 
science to the public (the awards to be 
presented by the British Association for 
the Advancement of Science). Just over 
100 films have been selected for show- 



ing at the festival, which 0{>ens at Har- 
rogate on April 21. When the list closed 
at the end of January, 260 films in nine 
categories had been entered competi- 
tively for the festival. The six original 
categories are : Public relations (general 
and specialist audiences); sales promo- 
tion (general and specialist audiences); 
education and training, within and out- 
side industry; health and safety; pro- 
ductivity and efficiency; human rela- 
tions and welfare. In addition to the 100 
British films selected to compete for 
the awards, a number of foreign films 
are being screened on a non-competi- 
tive basis. Films have already been re- 
ceived from Denmark, Czecho-slovakia, 
Switzerland, Israel, U.S.A., Canada, 
Sweden and Belgium. During the three- 
day conference there are to be sessions 
on " Communications in Science," 
" Films to Promote Overseas Sales," 
" Safety in Industry " and " The Film 
in Industrial Research." 

New Research Laboratory 

WORK ON SYNTHESIS OF CHEMICALS 

THE Lord President of the Council 
(Lord Hailsham) is to open the new 
Warren Spring Laboratory of the De- 
partment of Scientific and Industrial 
Research at Stevenage on June 29. The 
new laboratory is intended to assist 
Government departments and industry 
by resources that are not available in 
any other establishment of the Depart- 




PHARMACY STUDENTS FROM WALES: Members of the Welsh Pharmaceutical Students' Associa- 
tion pictured recently at the Greenford, Middlesex, headquarters of Glaxo Laboratories, Ltd. The 
students toured the factory and saw something of the work in the analytical laboratory, ampoule 
department, pharmacy unit, biological department and streptom.vcin filling hall (the last seen from 
behind double plate glass in the visitors' gallery). 



304 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 21, 1959 



ment. Research and development in a 
wide field are to be carried out there 
and are not being limited to particular 
aspects of technology. The initial pro- 
gramme includes work on mineral pro- 
cessing, the synthesis of oils and chemi- 
cals from carbon-monoxide and hydro- 
gen, and research aimed at the suppres- 
sion of atmospheric pollution. Much of 
that work is of a chemical engineering 
character and requires basic chemical 
engineering research to be undertaken 
in parallel with it. 

IRISH NEWS 

THE REPUBLIC 

Post-graduate Study 

A POSTAL COURSE FOR PHARMACISTS 

A POSTAL course of post-graduate in- 
struction in physiology and therapeu- 
tics has been arranged by the Post- 
graduate Study Group of the Pharma- 
ceutical Society of Ireland. The course 
consists of ten lectures by Dr. 
O. Conor Ward, M.D., M.R.C.P.I., 
D.C.H., which are to be sent by post 
to students at approximately fort- 
nightly intervals. Emphasis is on the 
pharmacology of drugs used in the 
treatment of many pathogenic condi- 
tions. Fee for the ten lectures is £1 10s. 
Cheques should be made payable to 
the Post-graduate Study Group, Phar- 
maceutical Society of Ireland, and sent 
to the secretary of the Group, The Col- 
lege of Pharmacy, Shrewsbury Road. 
Dublin. Syllabus of the course is as 
follows : — 

Digestive system. salivary glands; gastric 
digestion; intestinal digestion; liver and biliary 
system; pancreas; movements of alimentary 
canal; absorption; antacids; purgatives; ion- 
exchange resins. Metabolism and nutrition, 
carbohydrates; fats, proteins; water; essential 
elements; dietary requirements for infants; thera- 
peutic diets; insulin. Blood and lymph, com- 
position; formation; function; coagulation; 
anaemia; agranulocytosis; iron; liver; B^,; folic 
acid; anticoagulants. Cardiovascular "system, 
heart and blood pressure; blood vessels and the.r 
enervation; digitalis; vasodilators; hypotensive 
drugs. Respiratory system, function and mechan- 
ism; cough reflex; adrenaline; expectorants. 
KndiKrine system, pituitary; thyroid; parathyroid; 
adrenal; hormones; sex glands; iodine; anti- 
thyroid medication. Nervous system, central and 
peripheral systems; autonomic system: cerebro- 
.spinal fluid; transmission of impulses; hypnotics; 
anaesthetics; relaxants; intrathecal therapy. 
Urinary system, funaion; urine; diuretics. 
Infection and allergy, bacteria; viruses; immun- 
ity; arsenicals; sulphonamides; antibiotics; anti- 
histamines; antitoxins; antituberculosis drugs. 
Intestinal parasites and poisoning, types; anthel- 
mintics; toxic agents; antidotes. 

Pharmacy Acts 

RKASONS FOR DKI.AYING AMENDMENTS 

THE Minister for Health (Mr. S. 
MacEnfee) told Dr. N. Browne in the 
Dail on March 1 1 that legislation to 
amend the Pharmacy Acts could not be 
introduced until discussions between 
the Pharmaceutical Society of Ireland 
and other interested bodies, relating to 
certain matters coming within the scope 
of the Bill, had been concluded. A 
further didiculty arose out of the 
Supreme Court decision that provisions 
of the Solicitors Act relating to the 
removal of solicitors from the roll by 
the Incorporated Law Society, were un- 
constitutional (see C. & D., July 19, 



1958. p. 75). The proposed pharmacy 
legislation contained a provision in re- 
lation to the removal of names from 
the Register of Pharmaceutical Chem- 
ists by the Pharmaceutical Society. The 
effect of the Supreme Court decision 
was at present under examination by 
the Attorney-General and the Depart- 
ment's legal adviser, and until the ques- 
tions arising had been determined, it 
would not be possible to proceed with 
the amending legislation. Mr. MacEntee 
also told Dr. Browne that he could not 
" at this stage " propose to make any 
regulations " further to those already 
announced last June " in relation to 
newspaper advertisements dealing with 
proprietary medicines and health 
drinks (see C. & D., June 28. 1958, 
p. 677). 

THE NORTH 

Health Costs 

AUDITOR-GENERAL'S REPORT 

THE 1957-58 report of the Comp- 
troller and Auditor-General for North- 
ern Ireland discloses that the cost of 
pharmaceutical services rose to 
£2,105,830 from £2,003.890 in 1956-57. 
In January 1957 the increase in pre- 
scription charges (from one shilling per 
form to one shilling per prescription) 
had the apparent effect of reducing the 
number of prescriptions dispensed as 
well as increasing the receipts. The in- 
cidence of epidemics, however, had an 
important bearing on the number of 
prescriptions in any one year, the re- 
port continues. In 1956-57 a total of 
7,118,817 prescriptions was dispensed 
compared with 6,906,668 in 1957-58 
and receipts from patients rose from 
£252,100 in 1956-57 to £322,646. From 



January 1, 1958, a revised Drug 
Tariff came into force and slight 
changes were made in the dispensing 
fees payable to chemists. The average 
cost of each prescription rose as fol- 
lows: April 1956, 5s. 8d.; April 1957, 
6s. 9d.; March 1958, 7s. 3d. The Gen- 
eral Health Services Board attributed 
the high costs to the large quantities 
ordered by doctors and the prescribing 
of expensive preparations placed on the 
market and brought to the notice of 
doctors by the pharmaceutical industry. 

Ulster Chemists 

BENEVOLENT FUND WHIST DRIVE 

THE annual whist drive in aid of the 
Northern Ireland Chemists' Benevolent 
Fund, organised by a small social com- 
mittee of Ulster Chemists' Association, 
was held in the rooms of the Pharma- 
ceutical Society of Northern Ireland, 
Belfast, on March 11. Mr. J. A. Brown 
(president of the Association) thanked 
the players for their support, the vari- 
ous manufacturer and wholesaler 
friends who had kindly co-operated by 
giving the prizes, and the Society for 
granting the use of their rooms. The 
prizes were presented by Miss C. B. 
Abernethy to the following: — Gentle- 
men, 1, G. H. Gregory; 2, J. A. Mc- 
Roberts; 3, G. Crawford; consolation, 
H. Williams. Ladies, 1. Mrs. G. Sym- 
mons; 2, Miss E. Ferguson; 3, Mrs. E. 
McFarland; consolation. Miss S. Irwin. 
The ballot prize was won by Mr. W. J. 
Moffett. Messrs. J. Caldwell and T. A. 
Gibson were masters of ceremony. The 
arrangements were made by Miss C. B. 
Abernethy, Miss C. E. Culbert, J.P., 
Messrs. W. H. Boyd, J. Caldwell, T. A. 
Gibson. W. J. Moffett, M. C. Mooney, 
and C. L. G. Rattie. 



A MACE FOR DARTFORD 

Wellcome Foundation's gift 



ON March 18 a mace was presented 
by the Wellcome Foundation, Ltd., to 
the Borough of Dartford in token of 
the company's long association with 



London firm of R. E. Stone. Roughly 
44 in. in length and weighing 120 oz., 
the mace is made throughout in silver, 
completely fire gilded and part burn- 




the borough. The presentation was 
made by Mr. A. A. Gray (a director 
of the Wellcome Foundation, Ltd.) to 
the mayor of Dartford. Mr. Gray is in 
charge of the Wellcome chemical 
works, the principal chemical and phar- 
maceutical manufacturing unit of the 
Foundation, which has been established 
in Dartford since 1889. when some 
paper mills at Dartford Creek were ac- 
quired by the company's two founders, 
Silas M. Burroughs and Henry S. Well- 
come. The mace, designed by Mr. Cyril 
Shinncr, M.S.I.A., R.B.S.A., is entirely 
hand-wrought and is the work of the 



ished, and is supported on a stand of 
English walnut with rests of rosewood. 
It bears the coat of arms of the 
borough and a group of decorative de- 
vices to symbolise education, hospitals, 
the chemical and paper industries, and 
the Church. Around the head is en- 
graved " Borough of Dartford " and 
the name of the present mayor of Dart- 
ford. The staff and knop are decorated 
with English oak leaves and Tudor 
roses for the borough's historical asso- 
ciations, and ears of wheat for agri- 
culture topped with a model of the 
white horse of Kent. 



March 21, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



305 



NEWS IN BRIEF 

At February 17, the index of retail 
prices was 110-3 compared with 110-4 
for January (calculated on the basis 
January 17, 1956 = 100). 

Over 200 students of marketing are 
expected to attend a one-day conference 
on sales management to be held by the 
Incorporated Sales Managers' Associa- 
tion at the College for the Distributive 
Trades, London, on March 23. The 
conference includes talks and discus- 
sions on psychology, human relations 
and economics. 

The scientific film committee of the 
British Association for the Advance- 
ment of Science is now considering 
films recommended for screening (16 
mm. only) at its annual meeting at York, 
September 2-9, and anyone still wish- 
ing to make recommendations is in- 
vited to write so soon as possible to the 
visual aids officer of the Association, 
18 Adam Street, London, W.C.2. 

IRISH BREVITIES 

THE REPUBLIC 

There was a large attendance at the 
first of six dances being organised by 
the " Dreamy Druggists," held in the 
Metropole ball-room, Dublin, on Feb- 
ruary 24. The next dance in the series 
is being held on April 8. 

A lecture on drugs used in the 
treatment of tuberculosis was given to 
a large audience at the rooms of the 
Pharmaceutical Society of Ireland, 
Dublin, on March 10. The speaker. 
Dr. D. Twomey (Medical Research 
Council of Ireland) dealt with the his- 
tory of the treatment of tuberculosis. 
In conclusion a film was shown by Mr. 
Ginnell (chief technical adviser, Coras 
Siuicre Eireann) on the work being 
carried out by the Institute of Chem- 
istry of Ireland on drug testing. The 
lecture was under the auspices of the 
Irish Pharmaceutical Students' Associa- 
tion. 

THE NORTH 

Estimated total cost of pharmaceuti- 
cal services in Northern Ireland in 
1958-59 is about £2,296,000 (£117,000 
more than the original estimate). An 
additional £40,000 is required for polio- 
myelitis vaccine. 

A REVIEW of tranquillisers was given 
by Mr. C. R. Day. F.P.S. (Pharmaceu- 
tical Specialities (May & Baker), Ltd.), 
when Mr. H. G. Campbell (president 
of the Pharmaceutical Society of Nor- 
thern Ireland) was " at home " to mem- 
bers and associates in the Society's 
house, Belfast, on February 23. 

SPORT 

Gaelic Football. — Collegf of Pharmacy 
G.A.A. jun:or icani v. Univkrshy Coi i i:ge 
Horticultural Sec-tion, at Belfiel^. on March 8. 
Going into an early lead the G.A.A. team led 
by 3-2 to I-O at half-time and maintained their 
lead, winning by i-1 to 1-5. 

LOCAL OFFICERS 

GUILD OF PUBLIC PHARMACISTS 
Manchester Branch. — Chairman, B. H. Smith; 
Vice-chairman. Mrs. E. Stubbs; Treasurer, W. 
Chattcrton; Social Secretary, B. H. Smith; 
Secretary, W. E. Phillipson, Crumpsall Hospital, 
Manchester, 8. 



TOPICAL REFLECTIONS 

By Xrayser 

Clutter 

Many will sympathise with Mr. Henry Brooke (Minister of Housing 
and Local Government) in his attitude to what he describes as " clutter " 
(p. 277). Mr. Brooke means, in this connection, the mass of advertise- 
ments of one kind and another that are scattered everywhere, regardless 
of their effect on the assthetic sense. The Minister, in a speech to the 
Fiectrical Sign Manufacturers' Association, made specific reference to 
the advertisements on shops, and did not apparently consider that the 
acceptance of luncheon at the hands of the association tied his hands in 
any way. As inhibitory agents, food and drink are not invariably success- 
ful. Not, I am sure, that the hosts intended that they should be, whatever 
they may have hoped. It is surprising how often one sees the hand of 
the feeder bitten. It has to be remarked, of course, that in referring to 
advertisements, Mr. Brooke did not single out electrical signs as the cause 
of his artistic disquiet, though, on the other hand, he did not specifically 
exclude them. But without any further speculation on the point, a walk 
along almost any shopping thoroughfare gives point to Mr. Brooke's 
remarks, and many pharmacies are not free of the stigma. I counted 
recently, on the glass door of a pharmacy, as many as eleven advertise- 
ments for proprietary medicines, some of which were in direct competition 
with others displayed, so that the really observant customer would enter 
with a mind already confused. Many of the advertisements on show 
were for products already heavily advertised in shops in the vicinity, whose 
connection with drugs is only conferred by contiguity. Many of those 
advertisements are, to use Mr. Brooke's mild expression, " undistinguished," 
and pharmacies would certainly, in my view, look more distinguished 
without them. 

Sunday Hours 

In times of epidemic, unforeseeable and indeterminate in duration, it is 
to be expected that there will be dispensing delay at peak periods. A 
question was recently asked of the Minister of Health in regard to Sunday 
hours in chemists' shops where, it was alleged, people had had to wait at 
least three hours on two Sundays in succession in trying to get medicines 
supplied to them. The complaint was merely of slowness, and not of 
failure to supply, and I have little doubt that, in the circumstances, a 
considerable amount of unconsidered overtime was worked by those on 
duty. Pharmacy has never counted the cost in that direction. The Minister 
was gracious enough to admit that, at a time of heavy incidence of 
influenza, chemists came under severe pressure. On the other side of the 
ledger, it is perhaps salutary to remind customers who felt inconvenienced 
that those chemists on Sunday rota (or, worse still, those of our colleagues 
who, by being the only pharmacist in a country area, never have a break) 
have to stand by on glorious days in summer while the erstwhile influenza 
victims flock to the coast. On the whole, the devotion to duty on the 
part of pharmacists is praiseworthy. 

Average 

One begins to feel, in matters connected with pharmaceutical finance 
under the National Health Service, a certain sympathy for the schoolboy 
who, faced with a question as to the meaning of the word " average," 
a.sserted that it was a thing that hens laid eggs on. The figures published 
in your leading article on p. 289, culled from the Executive Council (March) 
are disturbing — not that the facts have not been known for a long time, 
but that no steps have been taken to eradicate the causes of error and 
discontent. The element of chance is clearly shown in the Shropshire 
case quoted, and no amount of assurance that, on average, the average 
works out quite well over the country as a whole, will ever satisfy the 
contractor who has paid an actual price for all the goods he has dispensed, 
and paid actual wages for the services of his staff. Presumably the list 
of agreed maximum quantities of certain drugs and galenicals (p. 282) — 
.some of which might be of interest to the History of Pharmacy Committee 
— owes its inspiration also to the law of averages. 



306 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 21, 1959 



TRADE NOTES 



Packing Change. — Ingram & Royle, 
Ltd., 41b Blenheim Crescent, London, 
W.li, state that the Vichy Spa waters 
are now imported only in cartons (re- 
placing wooden-case packs). So are 
certain other French spa waters. 

New Hosiery Colours. — Yaks 
" superfine " nylon elastic stockings are 
now supplied in two new shades: 
" New light " and " new dark " (odd 
shades are being discontinued). The 
Yalcs " service " stockings remain dark 
for full-foot styles and light for open- 
toe styles, but the tones have been im- 
proved. The manufacturers are Glen- 
side (London), Ltd., 37 Percy Street, 
London, W.l. 

Discontinued. — Aspro-Nicholas. 
Ltd., ethical pharmaceutical division, 
225 Bath Road, Slough, Bucks, have dis- 
continued manufacturing Dormiprin, 
Menovo, Uniprin and Ciredrin tablets. 
Orders are being met until stocks are 
exhausted. — Merck Sharp & 
DoHME. Ltd., Hoddesdon, Herts, state 
that current stocks of the 16-oz. size 
of Cremomerazine are expected to be 
exhausted during the week March 
16-23, after which date the product is 
being discontinued. The 4-oz. size has 
already been deleted from the com- 
pany's range. — Parke, Davis & Co.. 



Ltd., Staines Road, Hounslow, Middle- 
sex, announce that they have discon- 
tinued issuing adrenaline suppositories, 
nitroglycerin (glyceryl trinitrate) tab- 
lets, gr. 1/100 (T.T. No. 122), in bottle 
of 100; and Streptococcus pyogenes 
vaccine, in 1-c.c. ampoule. — ■ Pfizer. 
Ltd., Sandgate Road, Folkestone, Kent, 
announce that Matromycin brand of 
oleandomycin capsules is being discon- 
tinued from March 23. 

Bonus Offers 

Thompson & Capper, Ltd., Liver- 
pool, 24. Mothaks. 5s. per gross special 
bonus. Ends April 1. 

Easter Holidays 

Normal Easter holiday for most com- 
panies in the trade is from Thursday 
afternoon March 26 until Tuesday 
morning March 31. The following ex- 
ceptional arrangements have been noti- 
fied :— 

Barclay & Sons, Ltd., 37 Devonshire 
Place, Brighton, 1. Staff in attendance 
8 a.m. to 12 noon Saturday for 
urgent prescription items for local 
delivery. 

The British Drug Houses, Ltd., Lon- 
don. Liverpool and Nottingham. 
Emergency staff at Graham Street. 



DISPLAY AIDS IN A NATIONAL CAMPAIGN 

Plans of Ilford, Ltd., to make the public " snap happy " 



PREPARING for what they expect to 
be their " biggest sales season ever," 
Ilford, Ltd.. Ilford, Essex, ha\e booked 
large-scale advertising in the national 
and provincial Press; in magazines — 
particularly in school-age and teenage 
publications; in the London Under- 
ground and on buses all over the coun- 
try, with emphasis on Ilford colour. 
From Radio Luxembourg will come 
" many star-studded broadcasts for a 
host of star-selling products." The 
company's team of representatives has 
been increased. 

Finally there has been made avail- 
able an attractive range of point-of-sale 
dealer aids that are being distributed in 
two parcels. The new material, is de- 
signed for both counter and window 
display. It includes showcards adver- 



tising the 35-mni. Sportsman and new 
Sporti 120-size roll-film camera, both 
of which are being advertised exten- 
sively in the trade and lay Press. 
Among many other dealer aids are illu- 
minated signs, including one of unique 
design (as illustrated) for outside use; 
counter mats, roll-film " dispensers." 
plastic runners and metal shelf strips. 
In some of the twenty-one centres at 
which lectures entitled " Selling Photo- 
graphs the Ilford Way " are being 
given, the first have already been 
staged. They are accompanied by 
demonstrations and practical instruc- 
tion specially arranged to help dealers" 
assistants to know more about the pro- 
ducts they are selling. The company is 
taking part in all important photogra- 
phic exhibitions in 1959. 



London, N.l, on Saturday morning 
to deal with urgent orders and to 
provide for normal inner London 
delivery schedules. 

Richard Daniel & Son. Ltd., Derby 
and Ashton-under-Lyne. Normal ser- 
vice on Saturday. 

Geigy Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., 
Roundthorn Estate. Wythenshawe, 
Manchester, 23. Staff in attendance 
Saturday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 

J. H. Haywood, Ltd., Warser Gate. 
Nottingham. Closed until Wednes- 
day morning (holiday and stock- 
taking). 

Pfizer, Ltd., i37 Sandgate Road. 
Folkestone. Orders dealt with as 
usual on Saturday. 
The following have notified that 

urgent supplies may be obtained from 

John Bell & Croyden, 50 Wigmore 

Street, London, W.l: — 

British Schering, Ltd., 229 Kensington 
High Street, London, W.8. 

May & Baker, Ltd., Dagenham, and 
Pharmaceutical Specialities (May 
& Baker). Ltd.. Dagenham. 

Merck Sharp & Dohme, Ltd., Hoddes- 
don, Herts. 

Paines & Byrne, Ltd., Greenford. 
Middlesex. 

Parke, Davis & Co., Ltd., Hounslow. 
Middlesex (Carfin, Lanarks, branch, 
closed on Easter Monday). 

Sandoz Products, Ltd., 23 Great 
Castle Street, London, W.l. 

Calls for Tenders 

THE Board of Trade has issued de- 
tails concerning tenders sought by 
various overseas bodies, and an out- 
line is given below of the requirements 
and closing dates. For fuller informa- 
tion readers should apply, quoting re- 
ference, to Export Services Branch. 
Lacon House, London, W.C.I. 

Drugs and chemical products, 202 lots. 
Ministerio de Salud Publica (tender num- 
ber 1215), Uruguay. (E.S.B. 5954/59. 
April 1). 

Phthalylsulphathiazole tablets. The Secre- 
tary, Federal Tender Board, P.O. Box 8075, 
Causeway, Salisbury, Southern Rhodesia 
(E.S.B. 6108/59, March 26). 

Anassthetic ampoules for dental u.se. 
Office of the Supply Department of the 
Greek Government, Social Insurance Head 
Office, 8 Agiou Konstantinou Street, 
.Athens (E.S.B. 6123/59. April 9). 




SIGN.S AND .SHOWPIECKS : Above, a brilliuni whilc-liuht-bchind-bluc- 
and-rcd-lcllcrini: plastic siun lor hancinc outside the shop or in a lobby 
(the messaEe \s on both sides). Kivht, the more permanent of the show- 
picce!i — framed panels lighted from behind; a roll-film " dispenser " and 
Ktsnt cartons — in a ranue that includes attractive (and deliberately small) 
cntout showcards, shelf edees and an udjuslable ** clock " to tell customer-t 
when to collect their orders. 




fie 
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March 21, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



307 



NEW PRODUCTS AND PACKS 



Promethazine in New Presentation. 

— Pharmaceutical Specialities (May & 
Baker), Ltd., Dagenham, Essex, an- 
nounce the introduction of a new pres- 
entation of Phenergan brand prome- 
thazine hydrochloride 2'5 per cent, 
solution in cartons of ten 1-c.c. 
ampoules. 

Available as Pulvules. — Eli Lilly 
& Co., Ltd., Basingstoke, Hants, an- 
nounce that, in response to requests, 
they are making available V-Cil-K 
brand penicillin-V potassium as pink 
Pulvules (in addition to the tablets) in 
125-mgm. and 250-mgm. sizes. The 
V-Cil-K range now includes Pulvules, 
tablets, and syrup, and V-Cil-K sulpha 
tablets (with sulphadimidine). 

Anti-pain Elixir. — William R. War- 
ner & Co., Ltd., Eastleigh, Hants, an- 
nounce the introduction on April 1 of 
Pacatal elixir, a presentation of Pacatal 
in palatable liquid form for use in the 
treatment of elderly disturbed patients 
living at home, or in hospitals in 
appropriate cases as an alternative to 
Pacatal tablets. Each teaspoonful of 
the elixir contains 20 mgm. of Pacatal 
as hydrochloride. The pack is a bottle 
of 4 oz. 

Oral Diuretic. — Boots Pure Drug 
Co., Ltd., Station Street, Nottingham, 
announce the issue of a new speciality, 
Hydrenox (hydroflumethiazide), a new 
oral diuretic claimed at least ten times 
as potent as chlorothiazide. The makers 
state that cost of treatment with Hydre- 
nox is lower than with any other potent 
oral diuretic, and that in many in- 
stances a single daily dose produces an 
adequate response. The product is 
packed in containers of 100 and 500 
50-mgm. tablets. 

A " New Concept " in Antisepsis. — 
Evans Medical Supplies, Ltd., Speke, 
Liverpool, 24, announce the availability 
of a new medical speciality, lodevan, 
described as " an entirely new concept 
in antisepsis and disinfection," which 
presents iodine combined with a non- 
ionic surface-active agent. It does not 
stain permanently, is non-corrosive, and 
causes no pain when applied to 
wounds. Undiluted, the product con- 
tains approximately 8,000 parts per mil- 
lion of active iodine; it yields an effec- 
tive bactericide even when diluted one 
part to 100 parts of water. The con- 
tainers are bottles of 500 mils and 
2 litres. 

Enuresis " Alarm " Device. — An 

electrical therapeutic treatment for noc- 
turnal enuresis in children or adults has 
been developed by N. H. Eastwood, 
electrical and electronic engineers, 5 
Farmleigh, Southgate, London, N.14. 
The device, the Eastleigh, provides an 
automatic alarm that wakens the child 
or adult immediately he starts to wet, 
use of the alarm creating the habit of 
waking with bladder fullness. The alarm 
consists of a self-contained control box 
(placed on table or floor) with buzzer, 
electric light and 6-volt battery. There 
is no connection with the electric mains 
supply, so it is safe and shockproof. 
The box connects by flexible wires to 
special contact mats placed in bed be- 
low the under-sheet. Immediately the 
mats are touched with urine the alarm 



and light operate, waking the user in 
an already lighted room. The condi- 
tioned response usually takes from two 
to three weeks to establish, and the ap- 
paratus requires to be used only during 
the training period. 

Diabetic Chocolate Drink. — A. Wan- 
der, Ltd., 42 Upper Grosvenor Street, 
London, W.l, announce an addition to 
their range of diabetic products: 




Wander diabetic chocolate drink. The 
product is " formulated in accordance 
with the latest scientific knowledge " 
and prepared in consultation with the 
British Diabetic Association. The only 
sweetening agents it contains are sorbi- 
tol and saccharin. Wander diabetic 
chocolate drink is low in carbohydrate 
content and is a rich source of extra 
dietary vitamin Bi. It is issued in 8-oz. 
and 16-oz. tins. 

Improved Dry-cleaner Pack. — Scrubb 
& Co., Ltd., Wimbledon Factory Estate, 
Morden Road, Wimbledon, London, 
S.W.I 9, have added to their range a 
new pack containing 3 oz. of Scrubb's 



dry cleaner (for removing pitch, paint, 
tar and stains from clothing). The new 
padded-top pack is sealed with a 
sunken polythene washer underneath 
the pad, and that has to be pierced with 
a pin before use. Evaporation and 
leakage are thus avoided. The pad is 
smaller than most and has been de- 
signed to give an easier application to 
stains (particularly smaller ones) with- 
out flooding the garment to which it is 
being applied. The bottle is shaped to 
give an easy grip, and the nylon pad is 
fitted with clip-on dust cover. 

White Cosmetic. — Described as a 
" new revolutionary " cosmetic, " White 
Wonder," just launched by Jane Sey- 
mour, Ltd., 162 New Bond Street, Lon- 
don, W.l, is claimed the first cosmetic 
that may be used on lips, eyes, hair, 
and for make-up generally. " White 
Wonder " is a white cosmetic stick, the 
basis of which is the same as in Jane 
Seymour's " Wonder " lipstick but with- 
out stain or coloured pigments. It is 
claimed both nourishing and protective. 
By its aid, any lipstick shade may be 
lightened and even made to change its 
tone. Used over lipstick, " White Won- 
der " gives the lips a " luminous, trans- 
lucent " look. Depending on the 
amount used, it enables a whole new 
range of colours to be obtained from 
one basic lipstick. Used as an eye 
shadow, " White Wonder " " gives to 
lids a soft, luminous touch that is par- 
ticularly flattering at night." It may 
also be applied under eye shadow to 
vary the depth of tone, and for special 
occasions to highlight the hair. It may 
also be used to disguise bad points and 
emphasise good ones. Under a scheme 
to launch the product, a specimen is 
being included with a "Wonder" lip- 
stick in a combined pack. 

A Tooth-paste for Children. — Cul- 
lingfords of Chelsea (Castle Soaps of 
Cambridge, Ltd.), Munroe House, Den- 
bigh Street, London, S.W.I, are intro- 
ducing a Noddy tooth-paste packed in 
attractive tube, and carrying an illus- 
tration of Noddy. 



AUTOMATIC VENDING 

An exhibition of coin-operated machines 



EXHIBITORS at the first International 
Automatic Vending Exhibition, held in 
London, March 2-5, were keen to illus- 
trate the uses to which their machines 
could be put, including the selling of a 
wide range of chemists' goods. Candy 
Vendors, Ltd., 23 Market Place, 
Wetherby, Yorks (distributors for 
Fisher & Ludlow, Ltd., Kingsbury 
Road, Erdington, Birmingham, 24), in- 
troduced, for example, a vending 
machine accommodating the company's 
own special packs of aspirin tablets 
and supplied free of charge against an 
order for the packs (at the time of the 
exhibition no decision had been taken 
as to the amount of the initial order 
required to qualify for a machine). 

The " Universal Autoshop " machine 
(Allied Produce Co., Ltd., Albert 
Road, Bristol, 2) is adaptable to any 
product measuring less than 6 x 6 x 
2 in. and costing 6s. or less. Products 
suggested by the manufacturers include 
toilet tissues, cosmetics, home " per- 
manents," soaps, and detergents. " Ever 



open shops " (two models) were shown 
by Automatic Canteen Co., Ltd., 5 
Bulstrode Street, London, W.l, who 
suggest tooth-pastes, hair creams, hand 
creams, etc., as suitable items for sell- 
ing from the machines. Similar machines 
were exhibited by Automat Machine 
Sales, Ltd., 173 Elmers End Road, 
Beckenham, Kent, and Berend Auto- 
mats, Ltd., 19 Goodge Street, London, 
W.l. Messrs. Automat were also exhib- 
iting a "Micro resonance vibrator" 
machine (similar in appearance to a 
large automatic weighing machine) for 
soothing tired feet. The user steps on 
to the machine and places a coin into 
a slot, starting up in that way the 
vibratory action. A similar machine, of 
Continental design, is being introduced 
in the near future by the British 
Automatic Co., Ltd., 14 Appold 
Street, London. E.C.2, who were ex- 
hibiting a range of automatic perfume 
" dispensers '" and " compartment ven- 
dors " for a variety of sundries and. 
toilet goods. 



308 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST March 21, 1959 

STATUTORY COMMITTEE 

Decision held over in an advertising inquiry 



FOR five hours on March 10 the Sta- 
tutory Committee of the Pharmaceuti- 
cal Society heard evidence concerning 
complaints from the Council of the 
Society about two advertisements 
issued by two associated companies dur- 
ing 1958. It was alleged that the ad- 
vertisements expressly or by implication 
advertised the dispensing of medicines. 
Mr. H. V. Lloyd-Jones, Q.C., and Mr. 
T. Dewar, counsel, instructed by Mr. 
A. C. Castle, solicitor, appeared for the 
Society. Sir Milner Holland, Q.C., and 
the Hon. L. H. L. Cohen, counsel, ap- 
peared on behalf of the respondents. 

At the end of the hearing the chair- 
man said they would reserve their 
decision and deliver it in due course. 

Mr. H. V. Lloyd-Jones said that the 
matters raised were of great importance 
both to the Society and the respon- 
dents, in that they dealt with the ques- 
tion of whether or not the advertising 
of dispensing services by a pharmacist 
amounted to misconduct. The question 
before the committee was: Did an adver- 
tisement which was issued in the Press 
on April 3, 1958, amount to an adver- 
tisement that could not properly be 
inserted by a pharmacist in respect of 
dispensing services? Was it inconsis- 
tent with proper conduct on the part 
of a pharmacist to insert such an ad- 
vertisement? The terms of the adver- 
tisement were "Good Friday, Eas er 
Monday and every day XYZ the chem- 
ists — address — (telephone number) 
— This shop will remain open day and 
night throughout the holidays for the 
supply of medicines and surgical neces- 
sities. Always open day and night." 

It was the submission of the Society 
it was plainly an advertisement dealing 
with Hie fact that the branch would be 
open at all times and it went far be- 
yond any limited purpose of giving in- 
formation in particular regarding the 
holiday period. It was clearly advertis- 
ing the dominant object of which was 
not to give information but to adver- 
tise for the benefit of the person who 
inserted the advertisement that his 
premises were available and open at all 
times. Mr. Lloyd-Jones said the 
Society considered that although the 
word " dispensing " did not appear on 
the face of the advertisement, the refer- 
ence to the supply of medicines neces- 
sarily implied dispensing services. The 
secretary of the company accepted full 
responsibility for having given the in- 
structions to insert the advertisement. 
Thus in the submission of the Council 
of the Society he had been guilty of 
such misconduct as would, if he were a 
registered pharmacist, render him unfit 
to be on the register. 

The second advertisement which ap- 
peared in the publication Festival Fan- 
fare 1958 stated "XYZ The Chemists 
welcome you to Edinburgh. . . . Local 
branches include ... 48 .S — P — open 
day and night." Then followed the 
telephone number in brackets — " Con- 
tinuous 24-hour service for dispensing 
and all medical and surgical require- 
ments." Mr. Lloyd-Jones said " There 
is plainly and expressly a reference to 
dispensing services." Later he read from 



correspondence with the company in 
which the secretary stated " We feel 
quite frankly that your council are be- 
ing wholly unreasonable and unrealistic 
in their attitude to the type of an- 
nouncement to which you refer. . . I 
should have thought it clearly in the 
national interest to give notice to the 
public of where a special service is 
provided for them to obtain medicines 
during a holiday period, and that it was 
equally clearly the right of the person 
providing that service to give the notice 
without reference to any organisation." 
In another letter, Mr. Lloyd-Jones said 
the secretary stated when referring to 
the proposed meeting of the Statutory 
Committee "... I have no desire to 
rely on any technicalities at the hear- 
ing, but wish simply to resolve the fact 
at issue, namely, whether the publica- 
tion was misconduct within the mean- 
ing of the Act. . . Mr. Lloyd-Jones 
recalled the same issue about advertis- 
ing was raised in 1950 (see C. & D.. 
July 15, 1950, p. 88) and he deaU at 
length with the Statutory Committees 
findings at that time adding " if it can 
be shown on the face of the advertise- 
ment that Its dominant object was to 
advertise the dispensing services rather 
than to give the public information, 
then I submit, it would plainly, on the 
reasoning of the Commiiiee in 1950. 
also be an advertisement which would 
not be consistent with proper profes- 
sional conduct." Mr. Lloyd-Jones then 
dealt with the revision of the Statement 
on Matters of Professional Conduct in 
May 1953 (C. & D.. May 23, 1953, 
p. 513). "I am sure the Committee 
will pay the greatest attention to the 
views of the Society and its members 
as expressed at the annual meeting — that 
the dispensing of medicines should not 
be advertised." Referring again to the 
correspondence Mr. Lloyd-Jones said 
tne secretary's defence was limited to 
the fact that the advertisement w.as in- 
serted in order to convey information 
about holiday arrangements. 

The chairman. Sir David Cairns, 
Q.C.: "You draw attention to the 
words ' every day " in the advertise- 
ment." Mr. Lloyd-Jones: "Yes that 
means that the dominant object was not 
to give information about Good Friday 
and Easter Monday, but to take advan- 
tage of that piece of information to 
say ' we are always available." Indeed 
it says so and it is not a matter of 
implication. ... It goes further and 



A THIRD manufacturer of poliomye- 
litis vaccine with facilities for large- 
scale production has now entered the 
field. The first batch of vaccine made 
by Pfizer. Ltd., Folkestone, involving 
163.000 doses was released by the Min- 
istry of Health recently, said Mr. R. C. 
Fenton (chairman. Pfizer, Ltd.) on 
March 12. There was also a further 
1 -million doses with the Medical Re- 
search Council undergoing tests and he 
expected release of further batches from 
those at frequent intervals. The de- 



shows a commercial motive. . . ." The 
chairman asked if " dispensing " in its 
ordinary significance involved the pre- 
paration of medicine, or was it only 
applied to medicines supplied in accor- 
dance with a prescription? Mr. Lloyd- 
JONES : "In my submission it must 
apply to the making up of a medicine 
according to a prescription in the 
ordinary sense. If you go into a chem- 
ist and buy a bottle of medicine which 
is already available in the bottle, you 
do not talk of that as having had a 
medicine dispensed. You may find it 
on the shelves. The dispensary is part 
of the undertaking where medicines are 
prepared in accordance with the man- 
date." He then referred to subsection 
(4) of Section 19 of the Pharmacy and 
Poisons Act 1933. The Chairman: 
" . . . that indicates that a medicine 
may be supplied or dispensed whether 
it is compounded in the shop or not." 

Referring to the Supplemental Char- 
ter of the Society granted during Nov- 
ember 1953, Mr. Lloyd-Jones said the 
whole emphasis of the objects of the 
Society defined therein was upon the 
professional side and the maintenance 
of the professional side of pharmacy. 
It went to show that pharmacy had ad- 
vanced in those matters. At the Branch 
Representatives" meeting on May 15, 
1958, a resolution was passed that Rule 
7 of the Code of Professional Conduct 
should be amended. It was a strong 
desire to leave no possible doubt or 
loophole as to the possible insertion of 
any Press announcement. During the 
same month the Society had sent a 
letter to all pharmacists conducting 
their own businesses and to all super- 
intendent pharmacists drawing attention 
to the Society's attitude on the adver- 
tising of dispensing services and indi- 
cating that failure to observe the State- 
ment would possibly result in informa- 
tion being submitted to the Statutory 
Committee. " The time had been 
reached when no form of advertising 
for any reason and in any circum- 
stances, if it were advertising [of dis- 
pensing services] could any longer be 
regarded as consistent with professional 
conduct."" 

Mr. Lloyd-Jones submitted that basing 
themselves upon the decision given by 
the Statutory Committee in 1950 the 
Council were right in saying that their 
allegations of misconduct in both the 
cases were made out. 

{To he concluded) 



cision to produce poliomyelitis vaccine 
was made in vSeptember 1957; the first 
building was delivered by contractors in 
December 1957 and by working night 
and day the plant was completed in the 
middle of February 1958. Then, said 
Mr. Fenton, the most difficult part of 
the operation began because poliomye- 
litis vaccine was one of the most diffi- 
cult and complicated products produced 
by the pharmaceutical industry. The 
company, however, had benefited from 
the free interchange of information 



BRITISH POLIOMYELITIS VACCINE 

A third source now available 



March 21, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



309 



with their American associates; although 
the latter had not yet gone into pro- 
duction they had been working on the 
vaccine for some time. He paid a 
special tribute to the Poliomyelitis Re- 
search Foundation of the South African 
Institute for medical research in Johan- 
nesburg, which had given the com- 
pany's staff facilities to work there to 
gain experience. Taking everything into 
account the venture had cost about £1 
million, and his company was the first 
to make the vaccine before receiving 
a contract from the Ministry of Health 
though he hoped that would now fol- 



low. The vaccine was of the same strain 
as other British-made vaccine, that is, 
Brunhilde strain, type one. 

The plant at Sandwich, Kent, was 
producing at the rate of 10 million 
doses a year, but was capable of 
double that output. It was his hope that 
the Ministry would now give greater 
consideration to extending the inocula- 
tion scheme by including everybody up 
to the age of forty. 

The company's aim was to produce a 
poliomyelitis vaccine substantially more 
potent than that made at present. Work 
on an improved vaccine was well for- 



ward and, " we may well have a state- 
ment to make on this in a few months 
time," he said. The Medical Research 
Council had recently published its find- 
ings concerning the use of previously 
available polio vaccine in adolescents 
and adults. One of the major conclu- 
sions reached was that a fourth dose 
of vaccine was highly desirable to en- 
sure adequate protection. Thus the 
country's need for vaccine would be 
increased by a third. It was intended to 
increase the range of vaccines produced 
by the company; production would be 
expanded as circumstances permitted. 




POLIO VACCINE PRODUCIION Al SANDWICH : Mixing the sUty 
or more ingredients of tlie nutrient solution. Kidney tissue cells, on which, 
later, the live virus multiplies, are themselves kept alive by the solution. 
Right: When the kidney tissue cells are ready each flask is seeded with 
about 2 mils of one type of live polio virus. 



N.H.S. SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATES APPROVED 

Minister of Healtli expects fewer prescriptions in current year 



THE Supplementary Estimates for the 
Health Service (see C. & D., February 
7, p. 131) were approved by the House 
of Commons on March 12. 

Opening the debate, Mr. Derek 
Walker-Smith (Minister of Health) 
said that whereas the original estimates 
were for 216 million prescriptions at 
an average of 6s. per prescription it 
was now expected that the number 
would fall to 205 million at an average 
cost of 6s. 5yd. The extra amount re- 
quired for the Service as a whole was 
£16,589,706. 

Four Main Items 

There were four main items; hospital 
revenue expenditure, £8'7 millions; 
general medical services, £2'2 millions; 
pharmaceutical services, £2'2 millions 
and poliomyelitis vaccine, £1 million. 
The Minister stated that much of the 
hospital revenue expenditure was devo- 
ted to salaries and wages. The general 
medical services item had arisen be- 
cause of the advance payment on 
account of the balance of the central 
pool for 1957-58 which otherwise 
would not have been paid until next 
year, and the further interim increase 
of 4 per cent, given to general practi- 
tioners on January 1. The £2 2 millions 
for the pharmaceutical services brought 
the total cost of those services to £69 
millions (about one-tenth of the total 
cost of the service). The shilling per 
item charge introduced during Decem- 
ber 1956 had resulted in some doctors 



prescribing larger quantities of drugs 
at less frequent intervals. The number 
of prescriptions fell accordingly. Later 
the Asian influenza epidemic in the 
autumn of 1957 increased the number 
of prescriptions and reduced their aver- 
age cost, because it was a fairly elemen- 
tary disease. Antibiotics, corticosteroids, 
and certain cardiac preparations now 
accounted for about 40 per cent, of the 
total ingredient cost of prescriptions. 
" One single new drug introduced early 
this year which is of particular value 
in the treatment of elderly patients may 
now be costing £1 million a year." 
Thus a new drug of great therapeutic 
value increased the outlay on the phar- 
maceutical services. But the cost of 
those new drugs must obviously be 
balanced against their value to the 
community, not only medically but 
also for the contribution made in- 
directly but none the less powerfully to 
the national economy by shortening 
illness and thereby promoting a speedier 
return to work. The pharmaceutical 
industry had considerable achievements 
to its credit for which the nation 
should be grateful. Describing methods 
of keeping the drug bill within reason- 
able bounds, the Minister said, " There 
is an agreement about the prices of 
most proprietary preparations which 
was negotiated with the industry to 
operate for a trial period. " Its progress 
is being watched over carefully." The 
Minister referred to the interim report 
by the Hinchliffe Committee, he 



looked forward to receiving the Com- 
mittee's final report, perhaps next 
month. There had been considerable 
progress with the poliomyelitis immu- 
nisation programme and there was 
plenty of vaccine available for late 
registrants. The Supplementary Esti- 
mate was not in any way due to ex- 
travagance but reflected valuable results 
in terms of the progress of the service. 

Disproportionate Cost of Hospitals 

Dr. Edith Summerskill believed the 
cost of the hospital service was dispro- 
portionate to some of the other ser- 
vices. It was being used in some 
measure as an alternative to a less ex- 
pensive welfare service. She referred 
to the recommendation of the Bradbeer 
Committee which considered that a 
medical administrator should supervise 
the medical equipment and medical 
supplies in co-operation with the chief 
pharmacist. " We must examine the 
cost of those drugs and discover how 
those responsible for ordering large 
amounts of drugs, are supervised. 
Again, it has been recommended that 
chief pharmacists in hospitals should 
be carefully supervised. It is not 
enough to say, as we are often told, 
that a medical advisory committee is 
functioning and that it examines de- 
mands for and costs of new medical 
equipment." She asked, was the hospi- 
tal prescription subject to the same 
scrutiny given to the prescription of 
the general practitioner? Was the con- 



310 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 21, 1959 



sullant who prescribed expensive pro- 
prietaries, when much cheaper standard 
preparations were equally efficacious, 
communicated with? She also asked 
what treatment was meted to those 
specialists known to favour always the 
latest proprietary drugs and was any 
examination made of the prescribing 
costs of consultants in the same speci- 
alty in different hospitals, particularly 
in relation to out-patients. 

Dr. Summerskill then referred to the 
drop in price of one of the corticoster- 
oids from £56 to £12 per 1,000 tablets. 
She said that members had shown con- 
cern about the matter. " It would ap- 
pear to be the activities of an Ameri- 
can drug ring." " The other day when 
this matter was raised . . . the only sup- 
port the Minister received was from 
the member for Lewes (Colonel Tufton 
Beamish)." " I understand that this 
gentleman, last November, was made a 
director of the drug firm, Smith, Kline 
& French, Ltd., a private American 
company. If I have been wrongly in- 
formed I shall be only too happy to 
withdraw this remark." 

Sir Hugh Linstead asked if Dr. 
Summerskill had informed Colonel 
Beamish that she intended to raise the 
matter. Dr. Summerskill replied that 
in view of the importance of the matter 
and the fact that drugs were being 
discussed she was certain that he would 
be there. Dr. Summerskill said the 
question of American firms operating 
in Britain, producing tranquillisers and 
advertising them extravagantly, must 
have been brought to the Minister's 
attention. She stated that on other 
occasions instances had been given of 
gross overcharging by American firms. 
It was clear that members were uneasy 
about the high price of proprietary 
drugs which were largely responsible 
for the rise in the cost of the pharma- 
ceutical services, and she asked the 
Minister for an inquiry into that aspect 
of the service. 

" Holding to Ransom " 

Mr. Maurice Edelman, speaking as 
a potential consumer of the products of 
the pharmaceutical industry, shared " a 
widespread anxiety about the startling 
rise in the cost of those products . . . 
which I would describe as holding up 
the consumer to ransom." The actual 
responsibility for the substantially in- 
creased cost, particularly in proprietary 
medicines, was that those drugs had 
" fallen into the hands of what I can 
only describe as a ring of producers 
which is, in effect, demanding of the 
consuming public prices which if they 
were translated into terms of other pro- 
ducts, would cause a tremendous wave 
of protest." He claimed that the coun- 
try had paid substantially more than it 
should for its medical services and that 
the Minister had shown himself to be 
" weak in tackling the pharmaceutical 
industry." 

Dr. Donald Johnson considered it 
was not only proper that there should 
be new drugs and perhaps more expen- 
sive drugs if they were worth while, but 
he asked whether we were not getting 
into the habit of thinking that because 
drugs were expensive they must be 
effective. The effectiveness of simple 
remedies such as sodium bicarbonate 
and Epsom salts seems to have been 



forgotten. " What disturbs me is that 
when I go to a chemist's shop and ask 
for a simple drug like that, or for 
Dover's powders, which are very good 
things to have for a cold, I always find 
difficulty in getting them because the 
shop is so filled up with more expensive 
drugs. We should do something to pre- 
vent simple drugs being driven out of 
the chemist's shop where we ought to 
be able to obtain them. I hope that my 
right hon. Friend will, as I have urged 
before, make every effort to remind 
prescribing doctors of the worth of 
these very simple remedies." 

Shortage of Hospital Pharmacists 

Sir Hugh Linstead, after disclosing 
his interest as a secretary of the Phar- 
maceutical Society, said very few in- 
dustries were more closely under finan- 
cial scrutiny than the pharmaceutical 
industry. " The Ministry's accountants 
are practically sitting in the accounts 
offices of the manufacturing firms and 
I doubt whether there is any informa- 
tion about their financial and internal 
working which is not fully known to 
the Minister." He then referred to the 
publication of the British National 
Formulary which he proclaimed had a 
remarkable effect in keeping down the 
cost of drugs. In Canada and the 
United States about 90 per cent, of the 
prescriptions were for proprietary 
medicines whereas in Britain the figure 
was about 50 per cent. Later Sir Hugh 
stated that at the moment the hospital 
service was short on its establishment 
of pharmacists by 20 to 25 per cent, 
resulting in an unbalanced pharmaceu- 
tical service with a majority of people 
at the higher levels and very few com- 
ing along behind to replace them. The 
career structure of the service was un- 
satisfactory, largely because of the 
salary structure. At present well over 
80 per cent, were on a scale, the maxi- 
mum of which was £1,070 a year. Com- 
pared with salaries outside there was 
no attraction for competent men to 
offer themselves for the hospital ser- 
vice. He suggested that the solution 
was a group pharmaceutical service. 
The need was possibly for fewer and 
better paid pharmacists, and a better 
and more organised use of technicians, 
rather than for a substantial increase in 
the number of pharmacists. The Mini- 
ster had not announced his intentions 
with regard to group pharmacists and 
their salary scale. Sir Hugh hoped 
that the pronouncement would not be 
delayed much longer, because if it 
dragged on the serious drain from the 
service would continue. 

Mr. .Iulian Snow said that whereas 
one saw from time to time " with 
great reputable companies like Glaxo," 
reference to the provision of reserves 
for pharmaceutical research, it was 
difficult to discover how much was 
spent on pure research. That was rele- 
vant because often they were paying for 
patent rights held outside Britain. Re- 
ferring to the recent research work on 
penicillins and the drug meprobamate, 
he said " In both cases the basic re- 
search was done in this country, but 
it appears that we shall lose the de- 
velopment work, as well as the market- 
ing and patent rights in the United 
.States." The Minister should consider 
how his department could stimulate 



research " so that in the long run, as 
the pattern of drug invention changes, 
we do not have to pay vast bills to 
overseas companies." 

Poliomyelitis Vaccine Costs 

Mr. Richard Thompson (Parliamen- 
tary .Secretary, Ministry of Health), 
replying to the debate, said that the 
price paid for British poliomyelitis vac- 
cine (about £900,000) was substantially 
higher per litre than those which had 
been paid for material from America 
or Canada, amounting to £1-8 million. 
'■ We should bear in mind, in this 
connection, the fact that the British 
vaccine is not identical with the Ameri- 
can or the Canadian, and, also, that 
the American firms have been in pro- 
duction for several years. During this 
time their prices have been reduced as 
production increased. British firms are 
only now coming into substantial pro- 
duction after considerable difficulties, 
and this may account for the dif- 
ference." 

The voluntary price regulation 
scheme was due to end during June 
1960, but the Ministry would not wait 
until then before considering the 
lessons to be drawn from it. It would 
study in good time to see whether the 
scheme should be renewed or im- 
proved. Referring to criticisms of ex- 
cessive charges for certain new pro- 
ducts, he thought it was a little unreal- 
istic to take the raw material cost and 
compare it with the price of the un- 
finished product and call the difference 
gross profit. It left out of account 
processing, packaging, cost of research 
and marketing, and also the possibly 
short life of a drug. 

" On the question of American sub- 
sidiaries as a whole, I would say that 
if new drugs are not manufactured in 
Britain the alternative is to import the 
finished product ; and that is always 
more expensive. It is not right to 
think of these firms as plunderers. 
Foreign firms have sunk considerable 
sums in setting up appliances here and 
we derive a valuable export trade and 
thriving industry from it apart from 
the benefit to the National Health Ser- 
vice of having these drugs which 
would otherwise be unobtainable from 
home production." He hoped that 
nothing that was said would have the 
effect of frightening away foreign firms 
who were prepared to export their 
brains and sink their capital in the 
drug industry, supplying employment 
to people in this country. " We must 
not allow the rise in the drug bill 
to obscure the fact that the increasing 
use of these drugs has led to much 
quicker recovery of patients and that 
more patients have been treated more 
cheaply at home rather than in hos- 
pital, and that the more rapid turn- 
over of hospital beds has been pos- 
sible." 

The drug industry was spending 
about £4 millions annually on pharma- 
ceutical research. It was of two types, 
long-term fundamental, which could 
only be undertaken by the largest firms, 
and short-term progress and develop- 
ment research. A measure of the work 
undertaken was shown by the fact that, 
on average, about 1,000 new substances 
were synthesised to produce one for the 
market. 



March 21, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



Sir Ewart Smith, who held a unique 
position in the field of work study, had 
agreed to become chairman of a coun- 
cil to assist the development of effi- 



cient techniques in the National Health 
Service. Other members of the council 
would be announced later. A small 
team was also to be established in the 



Ministry to visit hospital authorities 
and report on their staffing situation in 
order to facilitate the spread of good 
management practice. 



EXECUTIVE CHANGES AT NOTTINGHAM 

Announcements by Boots Pure Drug Co., Ltd. 



THE following have been appointed to 
the board of Boots Pure Drug Co., Ltd., 
with effect from April 1 : Messrs. R. M. 

Dickson, K. H. 
RETIREMENTS Harper and 
K. D. William- 
son. Messrs. 
H. S. Hibbins, 
S.Harker-Smith, 
J. W. Seekings 
and A.H. Cragg 
are retiring from 
the board on 
March 31. 
Messrs. S. M. 
Peretz and A.D. 
Spencer have 
been appointed 
to the com- 
pany's executive 
committee of 
manageme n t 
and Mr. A. P. 
Woodward be- 
comes manager 
of the printing 
department. 

MR. R. M. 
DICKSON, 
M.P.S., for the 
past seven years 
has been local 
director for the 
company in 
Scotland and 
since 1948 a 
member of the 
executive com- 
mittee of man- 
agement and a 
Mr. S. Harker-Smith director of 




Mr. H. S. Hibbins 




tied as a pharmacist in 1936. He then 
spent some time on the retail side be- 
fore transferring to pharmaceutical pro- 
duction. Mr. Harper joined the board 
of Boots Cash Chemists (Eastern), Ltd., 
in 1953 and was appointed a member of 
the executive committee in 1955. 

MR. K. D. WILLIAMSON, who 
joined the company in 1930 from 
Trinity College, Cambridge, and whose 
career has been largely concerned with 
the buying offices, has dealt particularly 
with toilet and fancy goods. He was 
appointed head buyer in 1955 and 
at the same, time became a member of 
the executive committee of management 
and a director of Boots Cash Chemists 
(Western), Ltd. 

MR. S. M. PERETZ, M.P.S., takes 
over management of the wholesale and 
international divisions. He joined the 
company as an apprentice in Guernsey 
in 1943 and qualified as a pharmacist 
in 1940. Subsequently he gained con- 
siderable experience in the branches 
before joining the Royal Marines. In 
1948 he was appointed publicity mana- 
ger and in 1952 he became a director 
of Boots Cash Chemists (Southern), 
Ltd. In 1955 he moved to the wholesale 
and international divisions where he has 
made a concentrated and detailed study 
of the company's overseas business. 

MR. A. D. SPENCER, who is ap- 
pointed a director of Boots Cash Chem- 
ists (Eastern), Ltd., has for the past 
year been in charge of shop planning. 
Before that he had been, since 1955, 
manager of the estates department. 
MR. H. S. HIBBINS, F.P.S., who 



1929 he was chosen as secretary of the 
works planning committee which 
planned the major development of the 
Beeston site which now contains the 
firm's largest factories. He was ap- 
pointed assistant production manager 
in 1936. Earlier tiiat year he had ac- 
companied Lord Trent (son of the 
founder of the company, and at that 
time chairman) on a trip to New Zea- 
land. After the second world war he 
became chairman of the works plan- 
ning committee at the time that the 
Airdrie factory and the new printing 
works were being planned. He has 
been closely associated with all recent 
major developments on the manufac- 
turing side. 

MR. S. HARKER-SMITH joined 
Messrs. Boots in 1921 from Cambridjge 
University and was the first university 
trainee to become a member of the 
board of the parent company. He has 
been director of merchandising since 
1955 and a member of the board since 
1954. He was appointed a director of 
Boots Cash Chemists (Northern), Ltd., 
in 1948 and a member of the executive 
committee in 1952. 

MR. J. W. SEEKINGS, M.P.S., has 
been head of Boots wholesale and in- 
ternational division since 1955. His 
association with the department began 
in 1924 when he was appointed man- 
ager of the office section. His work 
has taken him on extensive tours of 
the company's world markets including 
many visits to the continent of Europe 
and working trips to almost all parts 
of Africa and to the United States and 
Canada. India and Pakistan, Australia, 




Mr. J. W. Seekings 



-NEW APPOINTMENTS 







Mr. R. M. Dickson 



Mr. K. H. Harper 



Mr. K. D. Williamson 



Mr. S. M. Peretz 



Boots Cash Chemists (Northern), Ltd. 
Mr. Dickson joined the company in 
1923 and his experience has included the 
management of various retail branches 
and a period as territorial general man- 
ager in charge of a group of branches. 
He was also for a time general manager 
of the associate company in New Zea- 
land. 

MR. K. H. HARPER, M.P.S., was 
appointed production manager of 
pharmaceuticals in 1954. He joined the 
cpmpany from Cambridge and quali- 



retires on March 31, has been a vice- 
chairman of the company since April 
1955 and director of production since 
April 1954. He became a member of 
the executive committee in November 
1943 and was elected to the board in 
1946. Mr. Hibbins joined the com- 
pany in 1918 on his discharge from the 
army. He qualified as a chemist and 
druggist in 1919 and as a Pharma- 
ceutical Chemist in 1921. He played a 
large part in the formulation of many 
of Boots' manufactured lines and in 



New Zealand and Fiji. In recent years 
he has been engaged on a complete 
survey and replanning of the firm's 
overseas activities. He joined Messrs. 
Boots in 1919 and qualified as a phar- 
macist in 1921. He was one of the 
first pharmacists to leave the company's 
laboratories for a commercial career. 
In 1946 he became deputy manager of 
the wholesale and export department. 
Mr. Seekings was appointed a director 
of Boots Cash Chemists (Western), Ltd., 
in 1955. 



3 1 2 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 21, 1959 



LEGAL REPORTS 
Infringement Oaim Not Upheld 

Max Factor Hollywood and London 
(Sales), Ltd., Old Bond Street, London, 
W.l, unsuccessfully applied to Mr. 
Justice Vaisey, in the Chancery Divi- 
sion on March 10, for an interim in- 
junction restraining Callinan Giles & 
Co., Ltd., Newman Street, London, W, 
from the alleged infringement of their 
trade mark Top Secret which they use 
to describe a hair-setting lotion. They 
were also unsuccessful in seeking to re- 
strain the defendants from alleged 
" passing-off " of hair or cosmetic pre- 
parations as Max Factor preparations 
by the use of the words " Top Model " 
or words closely resembling Top Secret 
as to be calculated to deceive or cause 
confusion. For Messrs. Max Factor, it 
was said they believed themselves to be 
the first people to introduce to the pub- 
lic hair-setting lotion in an aerosol con- 
tainer. They introduced their aerosol in 
1954 and sales had since averaged about 
half a million a year. Large sums had 
been spent on advertising the prepara- 
tion under the trade mark Top Secret 
in the Press and on television. The de- 
fendants had been advertising their 
preparation, which not only set the hair 
but tinted it, as "Top Model." Their 
advertisement contained the phrase 
" First ever aerosol colour spray " and 
was remarkably similar to the plain- 
tiffs'. The use of such a name would 
cause confusion. For the defence it was 
said there was no danger of anybody 
mixing up the products because the pur- 
chaser when buying their preparation 
had to specify the colour she wanted. 
So far as the trade mark was concerned 
the plaintiffs could not claim a mono- 
poly in the word " top." The judge said 
there were similarities between the two 
preparations but he doubted whether 
they really covered the same ground 
of possible purchases or that there was 
any competition between them. He was 
not finally deciding the dispute but he 
did not think at this stage he would be 
justified in granting the plaintiffs any 
relief. 

Undertaking Under Seal 

Alex Drug Stores, Ltd., trading as 
Alex Stores, 79 High Road, Balham, 
London, S.W.I 2, and 375 North End 
Road, S.W.6, and as Alex Superstores, 
Surrey House, Surrey Street, Croydon, 
who had been selling at cut prices the 
goods of Bowater-Scott Corporation, 
Ltd., have now given to Bowater-Scott 
Corporation, Ltd., an undertaking 
under seal that they will not in future 
resell the Corporation's products at 
prices below those appearing in the 
current retail price lists of Bowater- 
Scott Corporation, Ltd., in contraven- 
tion of Section 25 of the Restrictive 
Trade Practices Act, 1956. Alex Drug 
Stores, Ltd., further undertake to bring 
the said undertaking to the notice of 
any proposed successor or assignee and 
make it binding upon him or them. 
A similar undertaking has been given 
by H. & M. Bloom (Deptford), Ltd.. 
trading as Globe Stores. 84 Deptford 
High Street, London, S.E.8, and 86 
Rushey Green, London, S.E.6, to John- 
son & Johnson (Gt. Britain), Ltd., Bath 
Road, Slough, Bucks. Both manufac- 



turers are members of the Proprietary 
Articles Trade Association and the As- 
sociation assisted them in this matter. 

Twelve Offences 

After he had admitted twelve offences 
under the Dangerous Drugs Act, fines 
totalling £60 were imposed at Hull on 
March 12 on Edward Allan Gray, a 
pharmaceutical chemist, 985 Hedon 
Road, Hull. There were five summonses 
for failure to register particulars of 
drugs obtained, five for failure to regi- 
ster particulars of drugs supplied, and 
two for failure to record the date of 
dispensing of National Health Service 
prescriptions. The penalty in each in- 
stance was a £5 fine. Prosecution said 
that Gray's books showed no record of 
purchases of drugs from wholesalers. 
Gray explained that he did not deal in 
Dangerous Drugs, as " the trouble in- 
volved was not worth the small re- 
ward." Further inquiries revealed that 
Gray had been purchasing such drugs 
and when seen again he admitted hav- 
ing done so. For Gray, it was said he 
had been a pharmaceutical chemist for 
about thirty years. He had run his 
business single-handed for a long time; 
it was a busy practice, and things be- 
came pretty hectic at times. He had 
been harassed and became ill. As a 
consequence he grew forgetful, and the 
offences were committed because of in- 
advertency. There was no suggestion 
that Gray had been taking drugs him- 
self. His family life was happy; he 
had eight children aged from three-and- 
a-half to sixteen-and-a-half years. He 
had found that looking after his family 
and his business presented a problem. 
He was well thought of by the public 
of his district, and in his church. He 
had never been in the slightest trouble 
before. Gray had put the drugs 
straight into a cupboard for safety: that 
was why he had failed to register them. 

COMPANY NEWS 

Previous year's figures in parentheses 

NEWTON, CHAMBERS & CO., 
LTD. — Group profit for 1958 amounts 
to £896,573 (£805,855) less tax £504,222 
(£469,000). The 1957 comparative 
figures do not include results of a sub- 
sidiary acquired since. Ordinary divi- 
dend, 16 per cent. (same). 

E. I. DU PONT DE NEMOURS & 
CO. (INC.).— Sales were $1,829 millions 
in 1958, or 7 per cent, less than in 
1957, but the final three months set a 
record figure for any quarter in the 
company's history. Dividends on the 
Common stock were $6 per share com- 
pared with $6 50 in 1957. Research was 
carried forward in the company by 
about 2,400 scientists during the year, 
the company spending $90 millions for 
research and development during 1958, 
exclusive of laboratory construction. 

FRANCO SIGNS, LTD.— Trading 
profits for the year ended September 
30, 1958, after charging directors' fees, 
etc., were £129,845 (£1 15.484); less taxa- 
tion, income and profits, £55,189 
(£48,058). Authorised share capital has 
been increased to £450.000 (£300,000) 
and since the date of the accounts 
224,000 shares of 10s. each have been 
issued for cash at par, making the 
issued share capital, £392,000 (£280,000). 



F. W. HAMPSHIRE & CO., LTD. 
— Profit for year ended December 5. 
1958, was £159,883, before tax of 
£79,269. The previous balance of 
£183,237 included £63,704 depreciation 
written back and was subject to tax 
of £64,087. As previously stated 
(C. & D., March 14, p. 284), final divi- 
dend of 131 per cent, makes total for 
the year 20 per cent. (16| per cent.). 

DIVERSEY (U.K.), LTD.— Follow- 
ing the acquisition of the Milton Group 
of companies by Vick Chemical Co. of 
America, through its English subsidiary 
(Vick International, Ltd.), Deosan, Ltd., 
one of the Milton group of companies 
has been acquired by Diversey (U.K.), 
Ltd., a subsidiary of the Diversey Cor- 
poration of Chicago. While Diversey 
(U.K.), Ltd., which has an issued share 
capital of £290,000, will receive some 
direction from the Diversey Corpora- 
tion, it is possible, that with successful 
developments during the course of the 
next financial period it may place its 
shares on the market, according to a 
statement from the company. At the 
factory at Riddings, Derbyshire, where 
Deosan products are manufactured, 
Diversey products are to be made, 
Diversey (U.K.), Ltd., being the manu- 
facturing unit, and Deosan, Ltd., the 
selling organisation. Mr. Albert Gale 
has resigned as director and secretary 
of Milton Antiseptic, Ltd., and has been 
appointed managing director of Diver- 
sey (U.K.), Ltd., and Deosan, Ltd. 

BUSINESS CHANGES 

MRS. KATHLEEN DURNIN, 
M.P.S.I., has opened a pharmacy at 
Main Street, Dunleer, co. Louth. 

THE telephone number of Pepsodent, 
Ltd.. 449 London Road, Isleworth, 
Middlesex, has been changed to Isle- 
worth 1266. 

THE London Office of Rocol, Ltd., 
is removing to General Buildings, Ald- 
wych, London, W.C.2 (telephone: Hol- 
born 1985), on March 23. 

KINGSLEY & KEITH, LTD., are 
removing to Rex House, 38 King Wil- 
liam Street, London, E.C.4 (telephone: 
Mincing 1101) on March 23. 

Appointments 

BAIRD & TATLOCK (LONDON), 
LTD. — Mr. Robert Douglas Baird, 
B.A., E.R.D., has been appointed a 
director of the company and of Hop- 
kin & Williams, Ltd. 

POTTER & CLARKE, LTD.— Mr. 
R. A. Bennett-Levy, M.A., has been 
appointed a director of the company. 
He is to act in the advisory capacity 
on technical research and development. 

UNITED GLASS, LTD., have ap- 
pointed Mr. Stanley Joseph Morris 
general manager at their Charlton 
works. 

OVERSEAS VISITS 

MR. D. F. HAYDON (chief techni- 
cal sales representative, Baird & Tat- 
lock (London), Ltd., and Hopkin & 
Williams, Ltd.), is making a six-week 
tour in the Middle East. He will be 
visiting agents, representatives and cus- 
tomers in the Persian Gulf, Iraq, Iran 
and the Lebanon. 



March 21, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



3 1 3 



IN PARLIAMENT 

By a Member of the Press Gallery, House of Commons 



NUMEROUS questions were addressed 
to the Postmaster-General on March 

1 1 about advertising on television, 
some members were critical of the 
delay in withdrawmg certain tooth- 
paste advertisements, which had been 
criticised by the Advertising Advisory 
Committee. Mr. Ernest Marples 
(Postmaster-General) agreed with the 
criticism but asked the members to 
note that the discrimination referred 
only to television advertising and that 
the same advertisement had appeared 
ici a variety of newspapers. 

Poliomyelitis Vaccination 

Mrs. J. S. Butler asked the Minister 
of Health what was the total expendi- 
ture incurred by the Government in 
connection with poliomyelitis vaccina- 
tion during 1957. Mr. Derek Walker- 
Smith in a written reply on March 11 
stated that figures for the calendar year 
were not available. The total expendi- 
ture falling upon the Exchequer in the 
financial year ended March 31, 1958, 
on purchasing and testing poliomyelitis 
vaccine for use in Great Britain was 
approximately £li million. The addi- 
tional expenditure by local health 
authorities on vaccination against polio- 
myelitis was not separately known. 

Consumers Council 

Sir David Eccles (President of the 
Board of Trade) on March 12 said 
that he was not yet in a position to 
make a statement regarding the pro- 
posal by the Consumer Advisory Coun- 
cil of the. British Standards Institution 
that an independent national body 
representing every aspect of consumer 
interest should be established. 

Purchase Tax 

Asked whether the Chancellor of the 
Exchequer when granting concessions 
of purchase tax, would seek assurances 
that the concessions were passed on to 
the consumer, Mr. F. J. Erroll (Eco- 
nomic Secretary, Treasury) on March 

12 replied in the negative. He added 
that the Chancellor considered it was 
a matter which should be left to the 
free play of competition. 

Receipts 

Sir J. Crowder asked the Chancellor 
if he was aware that many people still 
think that since the passing of the 
Cheques Act, 1957, it was no longer 
necessary to give duly stamped receipts 
even when requested to do so. 

Mr. J. E. S. Simon (Financial Secre- 
tary. Treasury) stated in a written reply 
on March 12, that the legal position 
was exactly the same as before the 
Cheques Act was passed. A receipt for 
a payment of £2 or more must be 
stamped (unless it comes under one 
of the special exemptions in the Stamp 
Act). A person who gives an unstamped 
receipt for such a payment or refuses 
to give a stamped receipt for it when 
required to do so by the payer is liable 
to a fine of £10. 

Pharmaceutical Education in Scotland 

On March 17, Miss M. Herbison 
asked the Secretary of State for Scot- 



land when a course leading to the 
"diploma of pharmaceutical chemistry" 
would be established in the West of 
Scotland. Mr. Niall Macpherson 
(Joint Under-Secretary of State for 
Scotland) said the long-term require- 
ments of the West of Scotland for facili- 
ties for pharmaceutical education were 
being considered by the Pharmaceutical 
Society, the pharmacy schools and offi- 
cials of the Scottish Department. In the 
meantime the Royal College of Science 
and Technology, Glasgow, had agreed 
to continue the present two-year dip- 
loma course for one more course start- 
ing in October 1959. 

Miss Herbison asked for an assur- 
ance that when that course was finished 
there would be some institution in the 
West of Scotland providing the course 
leading to the diploma. Students from 
Glasgow and the whole of the West of 
Scotland would otherwise have to go to 
Aberdeen or Edinburgh. 

Mr. Macpherson pointed out that all 
students who were registered with the 
Pharmaceutical Society after March 1, 
1958, would, in any case, have to take a 
three-year course in addition to their 
preliminary year. There was, therefore, 
very little dilTerence between that four- 
year course and a degree course. Mr. 



Macpherson added that the whole 
question of long-term provision was 
" discussed at a meeting convened by 
the Pharmaceutical Society last week.'" 
We shall certainly watch what happens 
in regard to the demand for courses, 
but we think that there will be a pre- 
ference for a degree course in the West 
of Scotland." 

Miss Herbison: "But, surely, the 
Under-Secretary is aware that, where 
we have a three-year course and a four- 
year course in teaching, by far the 
greater number still take the three-year 
course. Is he not also aware that 
what he says is no excuse at all for 
not having this three-year diploma 
course available in the West of Scot- 
land ? " 

Mr. Macpherson : " The three-year 
course is generally prefaced by a one- 
year preliminary course, making a four- 
year course in all." 

Instrument Inquiry Service 

Replying to a question by Mr. G. W. 
Lagden, on March 17, Mr. H. 
NiCHOLLS (Parliamentary Secretary, 
Ministry of Works), stated an instru- 
ment inquiry service was provided at the 
British Scientific Instrument Research 
Association. It was dealing with 2,200 
inquiries annually, providing help to 
bona fide research workers in the choice 
of suitable British scientific instruments 
for their investigations. • 



HOSPITAL CONTRACTS IN S.W. LONDON 

Committee claims saving of £24,500 in 1957-58 



AT the annual meeting of the South- 
west Metropolitan Hospital Pharma- 
cists' Committee, held recently, the sec- 
retary (Mr. W. S. Benjamin), in pre- 
senting the Committee's report on the 
regional contracts for pharmaceutical 
supplies, said that the total value of the 
contracts during 1957-58 was approxi- 
mately £250,000, compared with an esti- 
mated £200,000 during the previous 
year, when savings of about £20,000 
were estimated to have been achieved. 
After taking all price increases into ac- 
count the items contracted for during 
1956-57, for which contracts were again 
placed during 1957-58, produced a fur- 
ther net saving of roughly £4,500. The 
addition of new items to the contracts 
schedule resulted in further savings of 
about £500. The committee was satis- 
fied, after comparing the overall con- 
tract prices obtained with those which 
would have been paid in the absence 
of the joint contracting scheme, that the 
total value of savings during 1957-58 




M.'. W. S. Benjamin (secretary of the Commit- 
tee) witli Dr. D. Stark Murray (pathologist, 
Kingston Group Laboratory), and Mr. E. G. 
Rraithwaite (secretary. South-west Metropolitan 
Regional Hospital Board). 



was of the order of £25,000. The ad- 
ministrative costs of the scheme for 
1957-58 amounted to £510 (£367 for 
the previous year), and must be con- 
sidered exceedingly low in relation to 
the volume of the contracts and the 
results obtained. The increase in the 
sum expended, which also included 
overtime, stationery, printing, duplicat- 
ing, travelling expenses and part-time 
clerical help, was mainly accounted for 
by higher postal charges and by pay- 
ment to an agency for certain typing 
and duplicating. The administrative 
costs continued to be defrayed by the 
Regional Hospital Board. 

A questionnaire had been sent out to 
chief pharmacists participating in the 
scheme inviting their comments on the 
present contract arrangements. Forty 
replies had been received in all, of 
which twenty-four made general and 
eight made detailed comments regard- 
ing particular contractors. Virtually all 
those making general remarks com- 
mented favourably on the working of 
the scheme. The few complaints were 
mainly concerned with delivery times, a 
problem which the new provision in the 
1957-58 conditions of contract specify- 
ing a maximum of fourteen days for 
delivery had reduced to negligible pro- 
portions. 

Suggestions were received for nearly 
seventy additional drug items for the 
1959-60 contracts. Those suggestions 
had recently been considered and a pro- 
visional list of twenty-five new items 
had been adopted. The meeting decided 
unanimously to re-elect the previous 
year's committee and auditors and to 
retain the same co-opted members to 
serve during 1959. 



3 14 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 21, 1959 




PERSONALrriES 

MR. H. WILLIAMS, M.P.S., Read- 
ing, has been elected treasurer of the 
Reading Chamber of Commerce. 

DR. FRANCIS H. CARR, C.BTr, 
has been awarded the 1959 Society 
medal of the Society of Chemical In- 
dustry. The medal is awarded bienni- 
ally for conspicuous services to applied 
chemistry or to the Society. Previous 
recipients include Lord Leverhulme; 
Professor Sir Charles Dodds; Sir Eric 
Rideal; and Sir Walter Worboys. 

MR. E. Le Q. HERBERT has been 
nominated President-elect of the Royal 
Institute of 
Chemistry for 
the years 1959 
to 1961, taking 
office in April. 
He is managing 
director of Shell 
Refining Co., 
Ltd., a director 
of Shell Chemi- 
cal Co., Ltd., 
and other com- 
panics. He 
served for 
nearly twelve 
ii ^ years in Mexico 
before returning 
to the United Kingdom in 1938 and was 
appointed to his present position in July 
1955. Mr. Herbert is also a fellow and 
vice-president of the Institute of Petro- 
leum, a member of the Institution of 
Chemical Engineers, and the Institute of 
Fuel, an honorary fellow of the Heriot- 
Watt College and a governor of the 
Battersea College of Technology. 

MR. N. FRANCIS, F.P.S., has been 
appointed senior lecturer in pharma- 
ceutics at the department of pharmacy, 
Portsmouth College of Technology. In 
1958 Mr. Francis, who has been for 
many years on the staff of the College, 
was made an examiner in forensic 
pharmacy for the Pharmaceutical 
Society. 

MR. LLEWELYN W. JONES, 
M.P.S., Amlwch, Anglesey, has been 
elected alderman of the Anglesey 
county council. Mr. Jones was for- 
merly a member of the local urban 
council, and its chairman in 1939. 
Earlier he was for six years (from 
1922), a member of the Llangefni urban 
council. He is present secretary of the 
Anglesey Pharmaceutical Committee 
and is a pharmaceutical representative 
on the Executive Council. 

FOLLOWING a reference by the 
Hereford Times to a former Hereford 
chemist, Mr. Edwin Guy, the news- 
paper received a letter from Mr. H. 
Humphreys Jones, Liverpool. Mr Hum- 
phreys Jones, formerly head of the 
Liverpool vSchool of Pharmacy, was 
once assistant to Mr. Edwin Guy at 27 
Eign Street, Hereford, and describes 
him as " a fine fellow — a genuine John 
Bull in appearance and in other direc- 
tions. I really did quake in his presence. 
Most of his time was spent in his sur- 
gery behind, taking temperatures, rates 
of pulse, examining throats, laying 
down commonplace laws of health and 
hygiene." Mr. Guy was especially noted 
for pulling teeth. 



DEATHS 

ATKINSON. — At Whitleigh Green, 
Plymouth, on March 14, Mr. William 
Atkinson, M.P.S. Mr. Atkinson was 
for many years engaged in private 
pharmacy, but since 1953 had been a 
branch manager with the pharmacy 
department of the Plymouth Co-opera- 
tive Society, Ltd., at Whitleigh Green 
Pharmacy. He leaves a widow and two 
children. 

DYSON.— Suddenly on March 10, 
Mr. Ernest Thomas Benjamin Peacock 
Dyson, M.P.S., 17 Edgefold Road, 
Worsley. Mr. Dyson qualified in 1925. 

GUILER. — Suddenly, Mr. James 
Rowland Guiler, M.P.S.N.I., 20 Chip- 
pendale Avenue, Bangor, co. Down. 
Mr. Guiler, who was Irish representative 
of The British Drug Houses, Ltd., for 
almost thirty years qualified in 1911 in 
Dublin. Afterwards he worked in 
Derry, Dundalk, Bangor and Belfast 
before joining Messrs. B.D.H.; he re- 
mained with them until his retirement 
a few years ago. Mr. Guiler was also a 
familiar figure on the Ulster hockey 
field, being a well-known umpire and 
president of the Ulster branch of the 
Irish Hockey Union in its jubilee year, 
1946. He was the son of Mr. James 
Guiler, who carried on a pharmacy 
business on Ormeau Road, Belfast, and 
who for some time acted as an ex- 
aminer for the Pharmaceutical Society 
of Ireland and for the Northern Ire- 
land Society when it was formed. 

MAPPIN. — At her home, 165 Hun- 
loke Avenue, Boythorpe, Chesterfield, 
on March 8, Mrs. Eileen Elizabeth 
Mappin, aged thirty-seven. For some 
time Mrs. Mappin had been assisting 
her husband, Mr. S. A. Mappin, M.P.S., 
in his pharmacy in Chatsworth Road, 
Chesterfield. 

McKEEVER. — On March 9, Mr. 
Thomas McKeever, 14 Market Square, 
Navan, co. Meath. Mr. McKeever was 
father of Mr. Leo McKeever, M.P.S. I., 
Stillorgan, who is a member of the re- 
cently formed Irish Pharmaceutical and 
Medical Representatives' Association, 
and brother of Mr. James McKeever, 
M.P.S.I., Watergate Street, Navan. 

PETYT.— On March 7, Mr. Ernest 
Petyt, M.P.S., The Meadows, 130 
Haworth Road, Bradford, aged fifty- 
one. Mr. Petyt was proprietor of a 
pharmacy at 48 Whetley Hill, Brad- 
ford. He had been secretary and chair- 
man and at the time of his death was 
social secretary of the Bradford Branch 
of the Pharmaceutical Society. 

THOMSON. — - On March I, Mr. 
James Thomson, M.P.S., 6 The Cres- 
cent, Ilford, Essex. Mr. Thomson 
qualified in 1900. 

WALSH. — On March 11, Mrs. Ida 
Walsh, 10 Osborne Avenue, Sherwood, 
Nottingham. Mrs. Walsh was the wife 
of Mr. Harold Walsh, representative of 
Cupal, Ltd., Blackburn, for thirty-one . 
years. 

WILLOUGHBY.— At 1 Goldsmith 
Terrace, Bray, co. Down, on March 7, 
Mr. Robert Willoughby, M.P.S.I., aged 
fifty-five. Mr. Willoughby was a past 
examiner of the Association of Oph- 
thalmic Opticians of Ireland. He was 
father of Mr. Kenneth Willoughby who 
is a student of pharmacy. 



Correspondence 

The Late Mr. G. I. Akeroyd 

Sir, — May I be allowed a little space 
to pay a brief tribute to the late 
George Ira Akeroyd, M.P.S., whose 
death was reported in the C. & D. last 
week (p. 284). " G.I.A. " was known to 
thousands of pharmacists during his 
work as dynamic sales manager of 
Boots, Ltd., during the years 1921-46, 
and a large number who, like myself, 
left that organisation to become inde- 
pendent private chemists owe a great 
deal to the lessons in selling sent out 
from his office on large glossy broad- 
sheets. George Akeroyd had a great 
sense of humour, too. In 1928 I, to- 
gether with several other newly-quali- 
fieds, was detailed to assist with the pre- 
paration of the huge new branch in 
Western Road, Brighton. After many 
weeks' hard work the shop was ready, 
and the night before it was opened a 
dinner was given in the cafe over the 
shop. A large number of V.I.P.s, in- 
cluding the late Lord Trent and the 
mayors of Brighton and Hove, plus 
many local dignitaries, were to attend 
at 8 p.m. At about 4 p.m. " G.LA." 
grabbed my arm and asked if I had a 
dinner jacket. On being told I had, he 
said: " Good; be here at 7 p.m. sharp." 
I could hardly wait to tell my less- 
favoured colleagues. I arrived at 
6.45 p.m. and was met by " G.LA." 
who said " What the h . . 1 are you 
doing in that get-up? " On reminding 
him that he had told me to come along, 
he suddenly remembered what he had 
in mind for me. " Come this way, 
son " he said, and led me over to the 
large swing shop-doors. " Get hold of 
that handle, and whenever a car drives 
up, greet our guests with a smile and a 
polite ' Good evening. Sir '." I need 
hardly say I was a tnfle ruffled at that 
indignity at the time, but I afterwards 
saw the funny side — and so did my col- 
leagues, who for days afterwards asked 
how I had enjoyed the dinner! One 
final word: In last week's C. & D., 
(p. 293) E.C. Tenner states " The mul- 
tiples, supermarkets and our pushful 
competitor private chemists are all 
striving to attract our counter drug and 
proprietary trade away from us. . . . 
What can we do to be saved? " George 
Ira Akeroyd would undoubtedly have 
told him, in very few words! 

C. H. Patrick, 
Twyford 

Appreciated 

You are to be congratulated. It 
(the C. & D. Tablet and Capsule Iden- 
tification Guide) is an excellent publica- 
tion in this district, where few doctors 
keep adequate records. — • IV.G.G. 
[Name of place withheld. No prize for 
the best guess. — Editor.] 

CAN YOU READTT? 



R 



SE^4T in by a London pharmacist, the 
item is from an EClO, and was cor- 
rectly dispensed. 



March 21 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIS1 



33 



New manufacturing technique brings 
significant increase^ 
in initial acid adsorption 





mm 



INTRODUCING 

KQp\6 adsorption of gastric hydrochloric acid 
is accepted as the most effective method of 
obtaining rehef in peptic ulcer pain. 

In two minutes a single teaspoonful (3.5 mis.) 
of DROXALIN GEL will neutralise 50 mis. of 
N/IO HCI. This is severo/ t/mes the speed of 
acid adsorbents prepared by usual methods. 



DROXALIN GEL 

Using the well established Droxalin formu- 
lation a new and exclusive manufacturing 
technique has produced in DROXALIN GEL 
an antacid possessing this significant increase 
In initial acid adsorption. The advantages of 
quicker acting DROXALIN GEL in peptic ulcer 
therapy and hyperacidity will be readily 
.ecognised. The palatability of Droxalin 
Tablets is achieved. 





ACID ADSORBENT 

Droxalin palatability in liquid form 



ACTIVE INGREDIENTS 


DOSAGE 


PACKS AND PRICE 


Each teaspoonful (3.5 nils.) contains 60 grains 
Aluminium Hydroxide Gel B.P. (equivalent to 
5 grains Dried Aluminium Hydroxide Gel B.P.) 
and 5 grains Magnesium Trisilicate B.P. 


One or two teaspoonfuls one half-hour after 
meals. Repeat as necessary. 


DROXALIN GEL is available in 8 oz. and 80 oz. 
bottles. Prescribable on E.C.IO. Basic N.H.S. 
cost. l/IOd per 6oz. bottle. 



Clinical trial samples on request to:— sco^ & turner ltd. Newcastle upon tync 



34 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGCilST 



March 21. 1 



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March 21, 1959 



THE CHEMIST 



AND DRUGGIST 



3 1 5 



^hc ^^^^ 

CHEMISTanTDRUGGIST 

For Retailer, Wholesaler and Manufacturer 

ESTABLISHED 1859 

Published weekly at 
28 Essex Street, Strand, London, W.C.2 

TELEPHONE CENTRAL 6565 
TELEGRAMS: "CHEMICUS ESTRAND, LONDON'' 



The Chemist and His Counter Trade 

The next ten years in retailing concern retail phar- 
macists as much as other retailers, but among the 120 
delegates who attended a conference on the subject at 
Harrogate last week (p. 321), chemists were poorly 
represented. That was a pity for two reasons. First, 
it deprived many who could have benefited by it of 
much valuable and potentially profitable information 
(even though, as one would expect, some of it had to 
be separated out from less useful material). Secondly 
it would have given chemists a salutary insight into 
the ways in which retailers in many other categories 
are currently thinking and working. Some of those 
ways may, unless mitigated by chemists' own energetic 
action, leave them excessively vulnerable to a com- 
petition that widens and sharpens at an accelerating 
pace. Economists at the conference predicted that 
during the next ten years there will be a 30 per cent, 
increase — at 1957 prices — in total consumption: from 
£14,174 millions in 1957 to £18,700 millions in 1967. 
They did not, however, expect the same percentage 
increase to be reflected in all trades and services. As 
the standard of living increases, so consumers' spend- 
ing pattern changes. How the pattern changes, and 
how to keep one's place in it, call for research and 
planning by retailers to a far greater degree than at 
present. 

Why are changes likely to be much more rapid and 
drastic in the next ten years than hitherto? An im- 
portant factor is the much greater mobility of the 
customer, who can, by car or public transport, so 
easily today get to other shops if she has any reason 
to dishke the price or quality of the goods — or the 
service she receives — from the shopkeeper whose 
customer she has been. In the food trades the reaction 
to that situation is to try by every means to " maxim- 
ise the traffic " (increase to a maximum the number of 
customers who come into the shop and the amount 
that each one spends). " Every means " includes enticing 
them in with " bargains " (loss leaders). At the con- 
ference, accordingly, httle disposition was shown to 
acknowledge (a) the merits of uniform prices, even for 
branded and standardised goods, or (b) the virtues of 
expert advice (from, say, the chemist) in the selling of 
such an article as paper handkerchiefs. [Or perhaps, by 
implication, the prevalent idea seemed to be that the 
chemist was quite entitled to sell, with advice, at one 
price, but that if the customer wanted the item without 
the advice she should be able to get it at a lower figure 



from the non-chemist.] In other words, the mental 
climate of cut prices was very much in evidence, and it 
would seem that chemists can expect as little support 
from many other retailers as from the general public 
and the Government in pressing for the principles of 
resale price maintenance. That does not prove fair 
prices and orderly trading wrong. It seems to mean 
that things will, for the independent retail pharmacist, 
get worse before they get better — a challenge to his 
business acumen. 

Outlook for Chemical Exports 

Few chemical manufacturers who heard Mr. S. P. 
Chambers's recent address on international competition 
in chemicals (see p. 319), can have failed to be dis- 
turbed over the present position of their export trade 
and still more over the future outlook. 

So much has been said in the past about competi- 
tion from Western Germany and the United States that 
it comes as something of a shock to find that the dan- 
gers to the British exporter in the future are even 
more likely to be from quite a different quarter — namely 
from the Iron Curtain countries and in particular 
Russia and China. The home market, protected as it is 
by high tariffs, is not expected to be aflfected. It is 
in countries like India and South Africa, however, 
that the threat to British exports is likely to be strong, 
since Britain cannot expect corresponding protection 
for her goods from those markets. The present produc- 
tion drive in Russia and China will undoubtedly lead 
to surpluses which may come to be sold overseas at 
prices that bear little relationship to costs, the purpose 
being to get foreign exchange. 

The tendency in recent years has been for industrial- 
ised countries to import more, and non-industrialised 
fewer, goods. Thus Britain, which sends only 36 per 
cent, of her chemical exports to industriahsed countries 
(against Western Germany's 66 per cent. ; Switzerland's 
60 per cent. ; and France's 45 per cent.) has not been 
able to cash-in on the rising economy to the same 
extent as her neighbours. 

Yet there is a brighter side to the picture, for while 
British chemical exports as a whole may today not be 
going to the most satisfactory markets, there is a more 
favourable distribution of products within the indus- 
try in the sense that larger proportions of certain chem- 
icals, among them pharmaceuticals and plastics, are 
exported for which the demand is growing and is 
expected to continue growing. 

The subject is, of course, complex, and Mr. Cham- 
bers rightly points out that it is not possible to draw 
straightforward conclusions nor form an accurate assess- 
ment by counting all gains reflected in the export figures 
for individual products as gains for the whole econo- 
my. What must be looked for " is a steady expansion 
in British exports as a whole, with chemicals making 
their appropriate contribution either in other exports 
or as direct exports themselves." 

RECENT RESEARCH 

CHOLINESTERASE INHIBITORS IN PLANTS 

Cholinesterase inhibition is used to determine organo- 
phosphorous insecticide residues in plants. Unexpected diffi- 
culties encountered by three United States research workers 
(Science, 1958. 1136) led to the discovery in the tissues of 
solanaceous plants of a water-soluble inhibitor of human- 
plasma cholinesterase. 



3 1 6 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 21, 1959 



Onward from Galen 

A CURRENT CAUSERIE 



After a break of a year, Allenburys Amateur Dramatic 
Society resumed on March 6 its series of performances 
that otherwise has been annual since 1949. This year the 
play chosen was " And No Birds Sing," and the excellence 
of the production suggested that the extra year available 
for preparation had been put to good use, though it is 
understood that everything has in fact been concentrated 
in the period since December 31, 1958. Settings, presenta- 
tion and casting were alike good, and some newcomers to 
the company — in particular fifteen-year-old Joyce Clapham 
in a gamin role — must give the Society's committee con- 
fidence to go into production again next year. The " old 
hands " had, of course, the most exacting parts, and carried 
them off with sustained skill. Not the least advantage of a 
dramatic society in a manufacturing house is that it brings 
together members of the stafl: of many departments for a 
worth-while purpose quite outside their ordinary everyday 
work. 

THOUGHTS FOR THE CHANCELLOR 




BE FAIR - R.OTA IS OVERT|Me\ 
Pay for it - no EXEMPTIONS' 
FROM TEST-SCR(PT5-PAy £ARU£R 
IN NIONTH- STOP HA66LINQ OVERl 
CONTAINER ftLUOWANCE -|fVa?EAiE 

Oncost fees pgr, smaller 

CHEMl STS 



Advocates of collective advertising for pharmacists in this 
country may be interested in two whole-page advertisements 
before me as I write. They are in the West Australian of 
August 20 and November 21 and were sent by Mr. A. E. 
Footitt, M.P.S., who migrated to Perth in 1957 to become 
chief pharmacist at the Royal Perth Hospital. The later one 
is headed by a photograph of a young girl whose face ex- 
presses shocked surprise. "What! . . . buy medicine at the 
butchers ? " she is saying and the legend a little lower 
down, amidst panels devoted to proprietary remedies, ex- 
plains that " the butcher is a specialist. He sells meat and 
he knows meat," adding that " Your Chemist has had years 
of training and is highly skilled at his profession. He sells 
medicines and other products, because, apart from your Doc- 
tor, he alone understands them and can advise you on their 
proper use." The earlier advertisement, which like the 
other is issued by the Federated Pharmaceutical Service 



Guild of Australia, uses more cogent arguments. " Save 
£s . . . take full advantage of the income-tax deductions on 
medicines," it runs, " Within defined limits purchases of 
medicines are allowable taxation deductions, but only when 
purchased from a chemist." The policy seems obvious for 
the would-be advertisers in Britain. First bring about taxa- 
tion-law changes so that medicines command remissions 
" but only when purchased from a chemist." Secondly, 
think up a slogan that dramatically contrasts the chemist 
with other classes of trader (not necessarily those actually 
selling medicines themselves). Thirdly, no half measures in 
booking space — nothing less than full pages in the best 
media. 

A RECENT piece of market research has shown that, although 
3-5 million people already own an electric shaver, and that 
a further 4 millions " are likely to switch to electric shav- 
ing " or " are not opposed to it," the remainder of the adult 
male population is still " not yet sold " on the idea. That 
information was given in an article — "The Changing Face 
of Shaving" — (Financier Times, February 18), which stated 
that since 1953, in which year the electric-shaver production 
was J million, production has risen to nearly three times 
that figure in 1958. Two manufacturers (Remington Rand 
and Philips Electrical) share about 60 per cent, of the 
market, with Ronson " next in line." Other information in 
the article is that there are about fifty different varieties 
available in this country, " with British-made models com- 
prising three-quarters of the total sales." Although electric 
shaver manufacturers have been prospering, it is claimed 
that more blue Gillette blades were sold in 1958 than in any 
previous year. 

FIFTY YEARS AGO 

TRADE-MARK RIGHTS 

From the C. & D., March 20, 1909 
It has no doubt been observed that recently there has been 
a greatly increased number of applications for the regis- 
tration of trade-marks in the classes of goods which pertain 
to pharmacy. It is a sign of the times. The object of affix- 
ing a trade-mark to an article is to distinguish the product 
from others of similar composition or uses. In the case of 
chemical and pharmaceutical products some are protected 
by patents, while in most cases the makers desire by a 
trade-mark to signify that they have specialised in a par- 
ticular preparation. As the articles are advertised and sold 
under the registered titles, the reputation which they thus 
acquire is regarded as goodwill, the value of which the 
manufacturer is directly interested in maintaining. The in- 
centive is thus obtained for keeping up the quality of an 
article or raising it when increased knowledge is obtained 
in manufacturing the product, especially in the case of 
chemical products. It is. well known that no ordinary 
chemical is of 100 per cent, purity, and that a chemical 
name is frequently applied equally to the substances of 
from 70 to 90 per cent, purity. In the case of complex 
organic compounds there is the additional liability to con- 
stitutional variation, which in some instances is only de- 
tectable by physiological action; so that from the medicinal 
point of view it is erroneous to assume that what may be 
called the " imitation chemical " is the same as the " ori- 
ginal chemical." This is one reason why introducers of 
newly discovered organic compounds designate the products 
by protected names, the other being the well recognised 
legal and trading axiom that the first discoverer is entitled 
to the fruits of his labours. The experience obtained in 
making a new compound places the inventor in an almost 
impregnable position as regards the best process of manu- 
facture, and it is a striking fact that the maker of a special 
product can usually distinguish his article by tests, so that 
where another product is supplied in place of it there is 
seldom any difficulty in demonstrating the fact. 



March 21, 1959 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST , 317 

ANY BUSINESS QUESTIONS ? 



We have put up a partition in the back room of our 
shop premises in order to improve dispensing and stor- 
age facilities. The inspector of taxes is not allowing 
the cost to be charged against profits and refuses, more- 
over, to give any wear-and-tear allowances. Would you 
give your opinion of the matter ? 
Capital allowances (which refer to " wear and tear ") are 
given against the cost of fixtures and fittings but, from your 
description, the partition is being considered as tantamount 
to a wall and in that sense would not be equivalent to a 
fixture or fitting. The inspector is interpreting the expendi- 
ture as being of a capital nature, and will not allow it ac- 
cordingly as a chargeable expense. If the facts warrant, it 
may be possible to argue that the partition is not of its 
nature a material part of the premises itself and is remov- 
able without altering their nature. In those circumstances, 
it should be included with fixtures and fittings so that 
capital allowances should be computed thereon, but it may 
be found necessary to take the matter to appeal. 

/ feel I am paying too much in rates. I think the rate- 
able value of the premises is unduly high. What is the 
procedure to apply for a reduction? 
The way to appeal is to make a proposal for the alteration 
of the valuation list so far as your property is concerned. 
You will, in effect, be giving written notice that you are 
" aggrieved " by the contents of the list. There is a specially 
prepared form for the purpose. It is supplied by the local 
valuation officer and, when completed, must be returned to 
him. The form provides space for stating the suggested 
alteration and to say why the alteration should be made. 
Those are tricky questions. To the first you should answer 
as you think fair and right: " I propose that the gross value 
should be reduced to £....". In the second space you might 
state, simply, that you consider the present rateable value 
to be excessive and incorrect. Having completed the form 
(or got some expert to do it) and sent it off, you can but sit 
and await developments. According to law, the valuation 
officer can do one of three things. He can agree to the 
alteration as proposed by you, negotiate or object. If he 
adopts either of the first two courses, you should have little 
to worry about. If he objects then the matter will, unless you 
withdraw your proposal, come before a valuation court. 
The courts, which have the job of determining this type of 
appeal against the valuation of property for rating, have 
an informal atmosphere. If required there is a further 
appeal (both you and the valuation officer may take advan- 
tage of it) to the Lands Tribunal. However, before you begin 
your appeal, ascertain the details of the assessments of other 
and possibly similar properties from the valuation list at 
your town hall or council offices. Any ratepayer is entitled 
to make notes or copy details as required. It will be on the 
information thus obtained and any special circumstances 
concerning your property that you must prepare your case. 

There seems to be a strong possibility that my business 
premises (owned by my father and rented on a quar- 
terly basis but with no lease) will be compulsorily 
acquired for a road widening scheme. What steps, if 
any, can I lake to protect my interests? I have been 
in business here for over twenty years. Would any 
compensation be payable to me as tenant ? If not, 
would it be better for me to purchase the property now, 
before any decision is made by the Town Planning 
Authority about its future ? 

Presumably there is a town planning (general) scheme 
covering the area in which your premises are situate. Such 
a scheme is generally referred to as a development plan. If 
thai has not been yet brought forward you could object at 
the general inquiry that will be held. If the plan has gone 
forward, you may still object to the compulsory purchase 
order when it is made by the authority and before it has 
received the Minister's consent. Once the order has been 
approved by the Minister you can do nothing further ex- 
cept to make your claim for compensation in respect of 
the compulsory acquisition. You should consult a solicitor 
when the order is made and employ a competent planning 
surveyor to put forward your claim for compensation. As 
your property is required only because of road widening, 
it does not come within the Slum Clearance Act, 1956. 



It would appear that although you pay your rent quarterly, 
you are a yearly tenant, and as such you are entitled to 
compensation for the acquisition of your interest. Assum- 
ing, however, that you were a quarterly tenant, you might 
still be entitled to compensation, though under a different 
Act, namely the Landlord and Tenant Act, 1954. The 
Authority could, for instance, acquire the interest of your 
immediate landlords and then serve you with notice deter- 
mining your quarterly tenancy (assuming that the tenancy 
is a quarterly one). In that event you would not be entitled 
to any compensation for compulsory acquisition, since 
there would not be any such acquisition. You could in that 
case, however, make a claim under the 1954 Act to defend 
your right to compensation under that Act, unless the 
Authority itself took action under the 1954 Act. We do 
not see for the moment what you would stand to gain by 
purchasing your landlord's interest. Theoretically, as he 
also would be entitled to compensation for his interest if 
it were compulsorily acquired, you would be merely step- 
ping into his shoes. You would in those circumstances re- 
cover the interest at practically what you paid for it your- 
self. You should take expert advice at the appropriate time. 

/ recently formed a limited company to take over my 
private business. As a director of the company should I 
be regarded as employed or self-employed for National 
Insurance purposes ? 
This is a more important point than is often realised for, 
apart from the fact that personal contributions are less for 
an employee than for a self-employed person, the employee 
gets unemployment benefit, to which the self-employed per- 
son is not entitled, and participates in the industrial injuries 
scheme. A director of a limited liability company is not, 
as such, employed under a contract of service that implies 
a master-and-servant relationship, and it follows that any 
director whose duties for his company are carried out 
solely in the capacity of director is required to be insured 
as a self-employed person. However, where a director is 
also engaged in some other work which is under a contract 
of service, then his card is stamped at the Class 1 (employed 
person) rate. In those circumstances he does not have to pay 
a self-employed person's contribution. That might well be 
the case where a man was working for his company as a 
servant, as distinct from his work as a director, in return for 
a salary or other payment. In cases of .doubt reference 
should be made to the provisions concerning directors in the 
articles of association of the company. Some guidance may 
also be obtained from a service or other written agreement, 
the minute books, wages book or other company records. 
If the query cannot be settled in that way, then it is best 
to consult the local office of the Ministry of National 
Insurance. Where necessary, any party concerned may, under 
regulations made under the National Insurance Acts, apply 
to the Minister for the formal determination of the question. 

Is there any reason why I should not pay my son who is 
over twenty-one and at the university an annual sum 
under Deed of Covenant ? 

It is open for a parent to pay an allowance under covenant 
to his child who is no longer a minor. There should, of 
course, be no arrangement under which the net income re- 
ceived by the child is at all repayable as that would consti- 
ture a fraud on the revenue. On the other hand the parent 
can charge his son for any keep in which he is involved 
but it must be also remembered that, to obtain the child 
allowance, the annual income of the child taken into account 
must be within the exemption limit. 

My wife is the beneficiary of a family trust and receives 
the usual tax certificate for each year showing her share 
of the estate's net income. Is she entitled to make a 
reclaim of the expenses charged before arriving at that 
net income ? 

A CASE has, in fact, been brought before the courts on this 
point and it was there decided that no such claim is admis- 
sible. The net income of each beneficiary is " grossed up " 
at the standard rate of tax, and that gross figure represents 
the sum on which the beneficiary is taken as having suffered 
tax. Relief would, of course, be appropriately given by 
reference to such tax and the taxpayer's position. 



3 1 8 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 21, 1959 



PHARMACEUTICAL SOCIETY OF IRELAND 

Monthly meeting of Council 



MEMBERS at the March Council meeting of the 
Pharmaceutical Society of Ireland expressed con- 
cern about an advertisement for a new vaccine for 
the prevention of bovine husk, in which it was stated that the 
vaccine could be obtained only through veterinary surgeons. 

Mr. H. P. Corrigan (president) was in the chair and those 
present were Messrs. M. Costello, V. McElwee, T. R. Miller, 
J. P. Kissane, T. F. Robinson, K. Banks, J. P. O'Donnell, 
M. F. Broderick, J. J. O'Regan, D. J. Kennelly, J. Gleeson, 
M. L. Cashman, C. Cremen, G. O'Neill, P. A. Brady and 
M. Power. Apologies for absence were received from Miss 
Cunniffe and Mr. T. B. O'SuUivan. 

The matter of the advertisement was raised by Mr. M. F. 
Broderick who said that it referred to a new oral vaccine. 
The advertisement clearly stated that the preparation was 
being made available to veterinary surgeons only. Mr. J. P. 
O'Donnell said that the Irish Drug Association had already 
discussed the matter and had decided to take " a certain line 
of action." The Association claimed that the chemist must 
have access to all medicines of that nature for human and 
veterinary use. Certain arguments had been advanced ex- 
plaining why that particular vaccine had been confined to 
veterinary surgeons, but it was up to the Society to refute 
the underlying inference that chemists were not entitled 
to sell it. 

"A Slur on the Profession " 

Mr. M. Costello, supporting, said that Mr. O'Donnell 
had gone to the root of the matter. The implication was 
that pharmaceutical chemists, who by training, experience, 
right and statute, were the people most competent to handle 
and distribute such commodities either for human or veter- 
inary use, were not considered, in that instance, fit or proper 
people to handle the vaccine. It was a slur on the profes- 
sion. While there might be some reason for manufacturers 
to withhold injectable commodities from chemists on the 
grounds that such injections might get into the wrong hands, 
the particular preparation [mentioned in the advertisement] 
was an oral vaccine. It looked as if it might be " the thin 
edge of the wedge " to deny such supplies to chemists. 

Mr. J. J. O'Regan suggested that a dignified protest 
should be sent to the company concerned stating that the 
Council viewed the situation with alarm. Mr. O'Donnell 
said that unless some action were taken he could visualise 
a situation in which another firm of manufacturers might 
advertise that cures for stomach worms would be distributed 
only through veterinary surgeons. The fundamental princi- 
ple which the Council wanted to see unchallenged was that 
chemists should have access to all preparations for human 
or veterinary use. They could listen later to arguments 
advanced for exceptions in a particular case. 

Mr. D. J. Kennelly said that the State " made no bones " 
in giving chemists access " with a good deal of confidence " 
to the sale of serious narcotics for human use and yet 
there was that restriction on the sale of an animal vaccine. 
" I think this is a terrible thing because it is the thin edge 
of the wedge and it is only encouraging others if they get 
away with it," Mr. Kennelly declared. Urging the Council 
to take the matter up with the company concerned, he added 
that the relations between chemists and the manufacturers 
over the years had been cordial and it would be a pity if 
they should become somewhat strained now. 

Mr. J. P. Kissane said that the vaccine was of great interest 
to all country chemists and the Council could not take too 
strong an objection to the advertisement. " I don't think 
we could deal with the matter in any way that would be 
too strong," said Mr. Kissane, and he suggested that the 
Council should point out to the agents that it would be 
better for them, from a business point of view, to distribute 
the vaccine through chemists. Mr. O'Donnell said that 



there was a long list of horticultural articles which chemists 
were also not asked to supply. 

After further discussion the registrar was instructed to 
write to the agents for the particular vaccine expressing the 
Society's dissatisfaction at the implication, contained in the 
advertisement, that chemists would not be allowed to 
stock it. 

Post-graduate Postal Course 

Mr. Kennelly said that the Post-graduate Study Group 
had completed arrangements for a postal course of instruc- 
tion in physiology and therapeutics. Members had been 
circularised with the particulars of the course, which would 
comprise ten lectures devoted to a wide range of bodily 
conditions and ailments, with emphasis on the drugs used 
in their treatment. The lectures had been specially prepared 
by Dr. O. Conor Ward, who was thoroughly conversant 
with the problems confronting the pharmacist. Candidates, 
on enrolment, would receive the lectures at approximately 
fortnightly intervals, on payment of a fee of £1 10s. Mr. 
Kennelly thanked the members of the Post-graduate Study 
Group, and their chairman (Mr. D. W. P. Boyd), for the 
valuable work they had performed in making the lectures 
available. 

The President said the Group were to be congratulated 
on the excellent course they had prepared. He hoped that 
not only country members, but city members as well, would 
avail of it. 

A letter was read from the Editor of The Chemist and 
Druggist noting the retirement after twenty-seven years' 
service as Press recorder to the Society of Mr. Hugh G. 
Smith, and confirming the appointment of Mr. Desmond 
Leonard as his successor. 

The sales manager of the pharmaceuticals division of 
Imperial Chemical Industries, Ltd., wrote informing the 
Council that a tour of the division's new research labora- 
tory at Alderley Park, Ches, was being arranged for a num- 
ber of Irish pharmacists on April 2. The number would be 
limited to twelve members of the profession who would be 
accompanied by a representative of the company, and it 
was suggested that the party should consist of one member 
of the teaching staff of the College of Pharmacy, together 
with members of the Council, Hospital Pharmacists' and 
Compounders' Association. The Council was asked to 
nominate three of its members for the visit. The writer 
indicated that if the tour proved successful it was hoped 
to extend further invitations at later dates. It was unani- 
mously agreed that Mr. Costello and Mr. Broderick should 
represent the Council on the tour, and that Professor 
O'Connor and Mr. Harte should represent the teaching 
staff. On the motion of Mr. M. L. Cashman, seconded by 
Mr. Miller, a vote of thanks was passed to the company 
for the invitation. 

Mr. Fionan Harty (secretary, Kerry Chemists' Associa- 
tion) wrote stating that a motion had been discussed at a 
recent meeting of the Association requesting that the mat- 
ter of the establishment of a liaison between doctors and 
pharmacists should be examined \v'ith a view to obtaining 
greater harmony between the two professions. The regis- 
trar, in reply to Mr. Miller, said that a reply had already 
been sent to the Kerry Association stating that the Coun- 
cil were awaiting the report of the Planning Committee. 
Mr. Kissane said that while he appreciated what Kerry 
wanted he thought it was a matter for the Kerry Association 
itself to deal with. The Council had the whole of Ireland 
to consider. Mr. O'Neill said there were certain contacts 
being made between the medical, dental, nursing and 
pharmaceutical professions at present. Mr. Robinson and 
he were at the exploratory meetings. It was agreed to write 
to the Kerry Association pointing out that the contacts 



March 21, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



3 1 9 



referred to had been established, and asking them what 
unethical practices they had in mind which they wished 
to have eliminated. 

Notification was received from the office of the Senate, 
Leinster House, informing the Society that at the 1959 
annual revision of registers of nominating bodies under 
the Seanad Electoral (Panel Members) Acts, 1947 and 1954, 
the applications of Muintir Na Gaeltachta, Navan, co. 
Meath, and of the Royal Irish Academy of Music, Dub- 
lin, for registration in respect of the cultural and educa- 
tional panels, had been allowed. 

The Registers 

An application from a student for registration was 
granted. Another student was granted permission to enter 
for the First Professional (Supplemental) examination. 

The registrar reported on the deaths of Peter Paul Cofi'ey, 
M.P.S.I., Robert Farrell, L.P.S.I., Thomas King Beattie, 
L.P.S.I., and Robert Willoughby, M.P.S.I. 

The following changes of address were notified :^ — 

Mrs. Teresa C. White (nee McDonnell), M.P.S.I., to White's 
Pharmacy, Castlebellingham ; Mr. Louis Hyland, L.P.S.I., to 
T. J. White & Co., Market Street, Cootehill; Mr. Eric Massey, 
M.P.S.I., to Corbridge House, Qaremont Road, Howth; Mr. 
Patrick O'Rahilly, L.P.S.I., to 222 Harmonstown Drive, Artane; 
Mr. J. Gavin Pitt, M.P.S.I., to 9 Melton Road, West Bridgford, 
Nottingham; Mr. Michael Treanor, M.P.S.I., to The Pharmacy, 
Main Street, Stranorlar, co. Donegal. 

The following, who submitted marriage certificates, were 
granted change of name in the register: — ^Mrs. Teresa 
Carmel White (nee McDonnell), Castlebellingham; Mrs. 
Mary O'Shea (nee Byrne), Strand Street, Skerries. The 
Licence certificates of the following were signed and 
sealed: — Mrs. Ellen McDonnell (nee Farry); Catherine N. 
Connellan; Mary M. O'Connor; Mrs. Sheila McNelis (nee 
Healy); Etna B. Deery; Mrs. Mary Fee (nee McManus); 
Evelyn Bonar; Ann P. O'Connor and Messrs. Thomas 



O'Dwyer; Michael P. Sharkey, Dermot Dromey. 

The following were nominated for membership: — Miss 
Eileen T. Murphy, Minane Bridge, co. Cork; Mr. T. Kelly, 
150 Griffith Avenue, Drumcondra, Dublin; Mr. P. O'Rahilly, 
222 Harmonstown Drive, Artane, Dublin; Mr. M. Martin, 
18 Carlingford Road, Drumcondra, Dublin; Mr. E. 
O'SuUivan, Mortonville, Lombardstown, Mallow, co. Cork; 
Mr. P. Nolan, Tuam, co. Galway; Mr. P. C. Singleton, The 
Cremore Pharmacy, 64 Glasnevin, Dublin; Mrs. Kathleen 
Durnin (nee Masterson), Dunleer, co. Louth. 

The following were elected to membership: — Miss Mary 
Mackesy, Mr. J. Kelly, and Mr. M. J. Lynch (associate). 

At a meeting of the Benevolent Fund Committee at the 
close of the Council meeting, the registrar reported that 
£404 4s. had been forwarded by the Benevolent Fund Dance 
Committee as the proceeds of their annual dance, and that 
the Cork Chemists' Social Committee had forwarded £64 Is., 
representing the proceeds of the dinner-dance held in Cork. 
On the motion of Mr. Costello, seconded by The Presi- 
dent, a vote of thanks was passed to both committees. 
Mr. Costello said that the Benevolent Fund Committee's 
contribution was a " truly remarkable achievement " parti- 
cularly in view of the smaller attendances at dances gener- 
ally, and the fact that the night of the function was so 
inclement. As treastxrer he asked the Cork representatives 
to convey to the organisers of their function his thanks 
for their " magnificent gift." Mr. Corrigan associated him- 
self with Mr. Costello's remarks and said he wished to 
express his personal thanks to the Cork Committee " for 
the lovely evening " he had spent in Cork as the guest of 
the organisers of the function. 

The registrar reported that the Midland Drug Federation 
had disbanded and had forwarded a cheque for £3 odd, the 
balance of all monies outstanding. Regret was expressed 
at the passing of the Federation and tribute was paid to 
its work in the interests of the profession in the past. 



INTERNATIONAL COMPETITION IN CHEMICALS 

Russia and China seen as threat to British industry 



" IT is my belief that in the years to 
come we shall have to pay far more 
attention to competition from Russia 
and China than hitherto," said Mr. S. P. 
Chambers (deputy chairman. Imperial 
Chemical Industries, Ltd.) when ad- 
dressing the Plastics Institute on " Inter- 
national Competition in the Chemical 
Industry " on March 12. 

Up to the present time British indus- 
try had been worried by the growing 
competition from Western Germany 
with its rehabilitated industries and 
rather lower labour costs as well as by 
some marginal prices quoted from the 
United States. But it was competition 
from Russia and China that might be 
the most serious problem in the future. 
Such competition in the chemical field 
hitherto had been small and sporadic 
but recently the quantities had been 
growing and the areas to which they 
went were of special importance to the 
British chemical industry. Countries 
like India and South America were par- 
ticularly good targets for sales of 
chemicals and Britain could not expect 
those countries to erect obstacles to the 
import of low-priced chemicals for the 
benefit of British industry. While the 
export figures from Iron Curtain coun- 
tries were small in relation to world 
trade as a whole, the impact was ex- 
pected to be concentrated in certain 
areas of special importance to British 
industry. 

In 1950 exports of chemicals repre- 
sented 7 8 per cent, of total British ex- 



ports; in 1956 the percentage had risen 
to 9'3 per cent, while, in the world as 
a whole, chemicals represented 10 5 per 
cent, of total exports in 1950 and 11'2 
per cent, in 1956. Thus, the United 
Kingdom proportion was below aver- 
age. In 1956 only 36 per cent, of British 
chemical exports went to industrialised 
countries against West Germany's 66 
per cent., Switzerland's 60 per cent, and 
France's 45 per cent. 

Overseas sterling areas (which were 
not expanding their intake at the same 
rate as the more industrialised coun- 
tries) provided the main markets for 
British exports. Those countries were 
very dependent upon prices they ob- 
tained for their exports of primary pro- 
ducts. Thus the British industry was 
more vulnerable to fluctuations than 
either the United States which had a 
large internal consumption or Western 
Germany which supplied the industrial 
markets of Western Europe. Further- 
more, the sterling area countries were 
all beginning to establish industries of 
their own. In so far as Britain was 
depending too much on the overseas 
sterling area for its markets it would 
be a good sign if in future a large 
proportion went to miscellaneous mar- 
kets where the problems and hazards 
were different from those of the over- 
seas sterling area. 

He considered Western Europe less 
likely to be affected by balance of 
payments crises or sudden changes of 
policy and therefore the most suitable 



market for British goods although 
there hung over it the shadow of a 
steadily growing tariff wall. 

Pharmaceuticals were likely to con- 
tinue to figure largely in world trade 
because of almost world-wide demand 
for new drugs as they were discovered 
and the difficulty of setting up local 
manufacture of such new products at 
the high standards needed before fiu-- 
ther progress had rendered the product 
or process obsolescent. Exports of Brit- 
ish pharmaceuticals represented 15'8 
per cent, of the total (chemical) exports 
compared with West Germany's 8'8 per 
cent. It was possible therefore that 
while British markets for chemicals as 
a whole were not the most satisfactory 
markets today, the distribution of our 
exports between different products was 
more favourable in the sense that there 
were larger proportions of those chemi- 
cals in which world trade was likely to 
expand. 

Mr. Chambers concluded: "I think 
we should aim, if possible, at a sub- 
stantial expansion of exports to coun- 
tries behind the Iron Curtain because 
of the growing needs of their capital 
and consumption industries; and in- 
creased exports to all those miscellane- 
ous markets which lie outside the 
United States, Western Europe and the 
sterling area, which in total can pro- 
vide a good insurance against the haz- 
ards in the major markets to which at 
present we are inclined to devote most 
of our attention." 



320 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 21, 1959 



QUEST FOR NERVE TRANSMITTERS 

Edinburgh evening meeting hears of " cerebellar excitory factor " 



THE third meeting of the 107th session 
of the Pharmaceutical Society's Scot- 
tish Department was held in Edinburgh 
on February 18, Mr. J. B. Grosset 
(chairman) presiding. 

The Chairman said that Dr. J. 
Crossland, a Rockefeller and Beit 
Medical Research Fellow at the Uni- 
versity of Cardiff, had been a lecturer 
in physiology at the University of St. 
Andrews for the past six years. He had 
spent some time at the Montreal 
Neurological Institute of McGill Uni- 
versity, Montreal, in 1954 and expected 
to return there for a further six months 
during 1959. 

Dr. Crossland's address was on: — 
" The Quest for New Transmitter 
Agents in the Central Nervous System." 
Afterwards he answered questions. 

Pharmacist Collaborator 

Dr. Crossland said that, in work car- 
ried out in St. Andrews, he had had the 
invaluable assistance of a pharmacist 
(Dr. Jean Garven, F.P.S., now Mrs. 
Doyle) who was supported financially 
by the Scottish Hospitals Endowment 
Research Trust and by the Pharmaceu- 
tical Society of Great Britain. He was 
happy in acknowledging in public his 
debt to the Society. 

The biggest single problem confront- 
ing medical science today, said Dr. 
Crossland, was that of mental disease. 
While it was true that new methods of 
physical treatment (leucotomy, convul- 
sive therapy and chemotherapy) had 
had some striking successes, even their 
most enthusiastic advocates would 
admit that those therapeutic measures 
were largely empirical. It should be 
unnecessary for him to labour the 
point that the explanation of all activi- 
ties of the mmd must be sought in the 
brain. That organ, a soft and not very 
attractively shaped mass, contained no 
fewer than 100.000 million cells, or 
neurones, all basically of the same type 
and all operating " on the simple all- 
or-none system." That was, that at any 
given moment any neurone was either 
conducting a nerve impulse or it was 
not. A nerve impulse starting in one 
cell could traverse an infinite number 
of pathways, the one actually chosen 
being determined by the previous his- 
tory of the brain and the circumstances 
of the moment. It was easy to see how 
that complex fabric could determine 
such variability of behaviour among 
different individuals, and at different 
times in the same individual, as it did. 
Complex though brain activity was, it 
was likely that the mechanism whereby 
the impulse in one neurone was trans- 
mitted to the next was the same 
throughout the brain. It was with the 
basic process of transmission from 
neurone to neurone that he wished to 
deal. 

According to the hypothesis of 
chemical transmission, an impulse, 
when it reached the end of a nerve 
fibre, liberated a minute jet of " trans- 
mitter substance," which stimulated the 
next cell in the chain (neurone or 
muscle fibre) to discharge an impulse. 
The transmitter was then removed from 



the cell (either by enzyme action or by 
some other process), leaving it ready to 
accept another jet of transmitter sub- 
stance and thus to carry another im- 
pulse. In the central nervous system 
the mechanism of transmission was 
now accepted as being chemical in 
type, though the evidence for that view 
was not as yet so impressive as for 
chemical transmission at other sites. 
Chemical transmission in the brain 
raised the possibility that abnormali- 
ties of mental functioning might be due 
to abnormalities of metabolism of its 
transmitter substances. Mental disease 
might thus become a matter of its bio- 
chemistry, and its cure a pharmacologi- 
cal problem. 

The transmitters involved had not 
been completely identified. Acetylcho- 
line was certainly one of them, but it 
was equally clear that that substance 
could not be the transmitter at all cen- 
tral synapses. There seemed to be a 
tendency for fibres which liberated 
acetylcholine (cholinergic fibres) to 
alternate with those which did not 
(non-cholinergic fibres), but the excep- 
tions were many. It was necessary to 
postulate the existence of inhibitory 
transmitters which enabled a nerve cell 
to prevent another from firing. Recent 
experiments in Canada had led to the 
isolation of one such transmitter and 
to its identification as gamma-amino- 
butyric acid. 

Interest in two other possible trans- 
mitters had arisen from experiments on 
the brain itself rather than on extracts 
of sensory nerves. They were 5-hydroxy- 
tryptamine and Sympathin. Some tran- 
quillisers and hallucinatory agents 
seemed to be compounds that respec- 
tively released or blocked the action of 
5-hydroxytryptamine and, since their 
administration was followed by pro- 
found mental changes, it was not sur- 
prising to attribute those changes to 
interference with 5HT metabolism. 
Even if that were so, it did not neces- 
sarily follow that 5HT was involved as 
a transmitter substance. It was Dr. 
Crossland's belief that the substances he 
had named were not the transmitters, 
though all doubtless played important 
roles in the central nervous system. 

A New Approach 

He and his co-workers had decided 
to attack the problem in a different 
way. During some experiments on the 
acetylcholine content of different areas 
of the brain, they had been struck by 
the fact that the cerebellum, a large 
part of the brain which co-ordinated 
muscular movement and helped to 
maintain posture, contained little acetyl- 
choline in comparison with the 
amount found in the rest of the brain. 
If nervous transmission in the cerebel- 
lum were chemical in type, it was reas- 
onable to suppose that it might con- 
tain a more-than-averagc concentration 
of the non-cholinergic transmitter sub- 
stance, and that one of the properties 
of that substance might be to stimulate 
the cerebellum. They had therefore 
studied the effect of injecting into the 
cerebellum crude extracts of different 



parts of the brain and of other sub- 
stances of pharmacological interest. 
They had found that a crude extract of 
20 mgm. of cerebral hemispheres 
caused a well marked increase in cere- 
bellar activity. The excitatory action of 
the e.xtract could be abolished by brief 
boiling with alkali, a treatment that 
was known to destroy acetylcholine, so 
they had concluded that the excitatory 
action was due to its contained acetyl- 
choline. 

With extracts of cerebellum, how- 
ever, a different picture emerged. An 
extract of 20 mgm. increased the elec- 
trical activity of the cerebellum in the 
same way as it did extracts of other 
parts of the brain, but the excitation 
was not due to acetylcholine. They 
therefore concluded that the cerebel- 
lum contained a substance similar to 
acetylcholine in its stimulating action 
on the electrical activity of the cere- 
bellum, but dissimilar in being alkali- 
stable. They had provisionally called 
it CEF (cerebellar excitory factor) but 
had not yet been able to identify the 
active material. They had been able to 
determine some of the main chemical 
characteristics of CEF. It was a dialys- 
able, low-molecular-weight compound, 
and it seemed to be basic in nature. It 
could, perhaps, be a di- or tri-peptide. 

Mr. H. H. Campbell, Edinburgh, 
asked if there was evidence whether 
CEF (cerebellar excitory factor) was 
expendable. Dr. Crossland replied 
that CEF triggered off a reaction and 
was probably expended in the process. 
Asked what, in view of the experiments 
in which injection into the blood 
stream had been used, the probable 
route of administration would be if 
applied in the treatment of human 
beings, Dr. Crossland said that they 
had not yet got to the length of con- 
sidering how it would be administered. 

Professor J. P. Todd, Glasgow, 
asked for information regarding the 
purity of the cerebellum extracts used. 
He wondered whether, if the dose were 
doubled, the response would be doubled 
also. The reply was that, if the dose 
were doubled, the response would be 
blocked. The extracts used were puri- 
fied so far as possible by treatment by 
solvents, by dialysation, etc. They 
were pharmacologically pure, but no 
doubt were still impure chemically. 

Mr. a. W. Patterson. Edinburgh, 
asked why a tape recorder had been 
used in addition to the usual electro- 
encephalograph and received the reply 
that, in experiments of that type, the 
eyes were fully employed, and anything 
which transferred some of the work to 
the ears was an advantage. In addi- 
tion, a great deal of paper was used up 
by the electroencephalograph and the 
tape recorder was much more economi- 
cal in space. 

Mr. Lightowler. Edinburgh, asked 
why, if the cerebellum responded to the 
administration of histamine, it was not 
stimulated by the blood histamine. Dr. 
Crossland thought that the correct 
answer was that the histamine, being 
injected high up in the carotid artery, 
produced a higher concentration in the 



March 21, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



3 2 1 



region of the cerebellum than was pro- 
duced by the normal distribution of 
histamine in the blood. 

Dr. F. J. Elliott, Edinburgh, men- 
tioned the system by which acetylcho- 
line is synthesised in the body by 
choline acetylase and broken down by 
choline esterase. He also pointed out 
that the action of choline esterase could 



be prevented by eserine. He asked 
whether any substance similar in action 
to those compounds had been found 
during Dr. Crossland's investigations 
on CEF. Dr. Crossland knew nothing 
of any such synthesis or potentiation 
of CEF but said there was some evi- 
dence of an enzyme that destroyed it. 
Dr. F. J. Elliott, Edinburgh, pro- 



posing a vote of thanks, said the 
amount of research Dr. Crossland had 
done was remarkable considering that 
he was not a full-time research worker 
but had to spend much time lecturing. 

Mr. J. L. Paterson, Glasgow, sec- 
onding, hoped Dr. Crossland would be 
addressing them again in a few years' 
time to say what CEF really was. 



RETAIL CHANGES DURING THE NEXT TEN YEARS 

A forecast at retail management conference 



"BY 1969 [retail] trade will have risen 
by about 90 per cent." was one of the 
forecasts made by Dr. J. Baxter (Mar- 
ket Potentials, Ltd.). in an address 
" Changes Over The Next Ten Years," 
at a Retail Management Conference 
organised by the British Institute of 
Management at Harrogate on March 
11. Dr. Baxter began by reviewing the 
information yielded by the Censuses of 
Distribution carried out in 1950 and 
1957. 

Retail sales rose by 53 per cent, be- 
tween 1950 and 1957. Retail prices, on 
average, rose by rather more than 42 
per cent. Thus the physical volume of 
merchandise handled rose by only about 
8 per cent. The results varied with the 
different sections of trade. When those 
trends are compared with the rise in the 
numbers employed of nearly 7 per cent, 
and with a total rise in the wage and 
salary bill for the distributive trades 
as a whole — including wholesale trade 
— of more than 70 per cent., it is seen 
that the productivity of labour gener- 
ally in retailing has risen hardly at all 
over the past seven years. A major ob- 
jective in the next ten years in retail 
trade must be to find means of raising 
that productivity and of reducing lab- 
our costs. 

Continued Trend 

While total sales rose by more than 
50 per cent, between 1950 and 1957 
the number of shops fell slightly. Con- 
tinuing the trend now established for 
many years, the multiple organisations 
showed the greatest overall rise in sales: 
the Co-operative societies rather more 
than held their own; while the indepen- 
dent traders continued to lose ground. 
That loss of ground was most marked 
in the non-food trades. The volume of 
merchandise handled per employee 
hardly changed between 1950 and 1957. 
There were two outstanding develop- 
ments during the period — self-service 
and mail-order business. Summing-up 
the trends between 1950 and 1957, Dr. 
Baxter stated that retail sales in general 
expanded during that time but that, 
owing to price changes, the increase in 
volume was comparatively small. Em- 
ployment rose and became much more 
costly; sales per employee hardly 
changed in real terms; the multiples 
continued to expand more rapidly than 
other organisations; there were substan- 
tial advances in self-service and in 
mail-order business; and information 
about costs was scanty but they had risen 
substantially. Dr. Baxter emphasised 
the assumptions upon which his esti- 
mates for 1969 were based. They were 
that there will be no major war during 
the interval; that, whatever Govern- 
ment is in power, a primary objective 



ry gby 



of policy will be to maintain a high 
and stable level of employment (on 
average he assumed a much lower level 
than at present); that another major 
objective would be to hold back infla- 
tion. He thought prices would rise but 
expected the rate of increase to be 
slower than in recent years; that^. 
a balance-of -payments crisis would be 
avoided; and that there would be no 
reimposition of restrictions of consu- 
mer spending. 

Regarding the general economic 
position in 1969, Dr. Baxter expected 
that the national income would have 
about doubled by then in terms of cur- 
rent prices; that personal incomes from 
employment would rise faster than 
either incomes from investment or from 
rent and self-employment. That was of 
importance to the retailer, as it meant 
a change in the relative importance as 
buyers of the different types of custo- 
mer he could expect to find in his shop. 

The total spending on goods and ser- 
vices would also about double itself. 
The proportion going to retail trade 
would rise at a rather slower rate than 
that, and should be about 90 per cent, 
higher in 1969 than in 1958. 

Thus, so far as cash takings were con- 
cerned, the prospects for retail trade as 
a whole seemed good. Within the gen- 
eral total there would be changes in the 
pattern of spending, and in the relative 
importance of difTerent major groups 
of merchandise. 

The better relative progress of the 
multiples would continue, with the Co- 
operative societies coming a little be- 
hind and the department stores and 
the independent traders, while making 
good progress in total sales, showing 
rates of increase below the average. 
" That is not to say that there will not 
be problems facing the retailer in the 
future. I think, in fact, that his life will 
get tougher and tougher." 

More Price Cutting 

Discussing the problems that will face 
the retailer in ten years' time he said 
that some of them were already loom- 
ing on the horizon; they fell into cer- 
tain main groups : competition, loca- 
tion, method of sale, merchandise, 
costs, productivity of labour, and ad- 
ministration. During the past two years 
real competition had developed in the 
retail field. It would grow in intensity, 
and price-cutting was one aspect of it. 
That was likely to grow increasingly 
common, following a change in the 
attitude both of the general public and 
of retailers and manufacturers. 

Competition between the main types 
of retail organisation — multiples, inde- 
pendents. Co-operative societies and 
department stores, was also growing. So 



far conditions had favoured the bigger 
organisations, especially the big chains, 
which had been able to plan produc- 
tion, to place large orders so as to get 
price advantages, and to spend substan- 
tial amounts of money on modernisa- 
tion to attract customers to their pre- 
mises. 

There were now clear signs, however, 
that the independent shopkeepers were 
beginning to find part of the answer. 
The growth of voluntary buying organi- 
sations was the start, especially in the 
grocery field. That trend would con- 
tinue and gain in importance. There 
would probably be developments in the 
Co-operative movement. Growing con- 
gestion in the main shopping centres, 
the growing tendency for housewives to 
continue at work after marriage, and 
other forces, were all acting in favour 
of neighbourhood shopping. Already 
there were signs that new stores might 
develop on the fringe of large areas of 
population. 

A Long Way To Go 

Self-service was growing rapidly, but 
still had a long way to go. It could be 
expected that about half of the food 
trade would be organised on self-service 
lines by 1969. The methods were mov- 
ing into other fields, and would add 
considerably to the competition other 
traders would feel. There would be a 
big extension of self-selection, fostered 
by packaging techniques and high lab- 
our costs. Growth in mass purchasing 
power would increasingly need the de- 
velopment of methods of mass distri- 
bution to satisfy it and encourage the 
further growth of large chains. 

It could reasonably be assumed that, 
by 1969. some form of Free Trade Area 
in Western Europe, including Great 
Britain, would be in being. That would 
mean that retailers would find the range 
of choice of merchandise considerably 
widened. There would also be inter- 
national development by individual 
firms. Some Continental firms would be 
operating in this country. That trend 
would again tend to intensify competi- 
tion. " Costs are a constant headache 
and will continue to be." 

Dr. Baxter expected that by 1969 
retail trade would be approaching the 
standards of the engineering and other 
industries in the use of research and 
planning to keep down costs and to 
improve efficiency and raise sales. Lab- 
our costs must be reduced, partly by 
the increasing use of mechanical and 
electronic aids and by rationalising the 
layout of stores. 

" Retailing," the speaker concluded, 
" will always be an essential part in the 
modern economy — it is a major factor 
in the cost of living — retailers must find 



3 22 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGISl 



March 21, 1959 



the answer in reducing costs and rais- 
ing efficiency. Part of the answer will 
have been found by 1969." 

Efficiency by Simplification 

The story of a campaign against 
complicated systems and wasteful prac- 
tices was told by Mr. M. J. Glenn (head 
of the personnel group, Marks & Spen- 
cer, Ltd.). Although administrative pro- 
cedures used by his company were, he 
said, probably as good as any in the 
country, the board made a determined 
effort to simplify organisation. There 
had been a growing awareness of the 
evils of excessive paper work, wasteful 
practices and useless statistics. Paper 
increased because people tended to 
avoid personal contact; wasteful prac- 
tices arose from the failure to apply 
common sense to systems and methods. 
Mr. Glenn suggested that perhaps the 
greatest evil was the growth of statistics, 
because management too often encour- 
aged that growth in the belief that sta- 
tistics illuminate the business and that 
the more statistics the better the man- 
agement control. The board of his own 
company, having decided to adopt its 
new policy, issued a firm directive that 
everybody, from the top executive down 
to the most junior supervisor, should 
take vigorous action to stop wasteful 
practices, the directors emphasising that 
the policy was not an economy cam- 
paign. There were to be no foolish 
savings, and standards were not to be 
lowered. One of the first attacks was on 
the system used in providing merchan- 
dising information from the stores. It 
was found that, instead of a detailed 
system of recording stocks and sales 
and requirements, short summaries were 
adequate. " The price of perfection is 
prohibitive," declared the speaker. By 
action taken in that and similar fields 
" the paper " thrown out by the com- 
pany amounted to about 22 million 
pieces per year. 

Simultaneously recruitment of staff 
was susi)ended for, as simplification in- 
creased, fewer staff were needed to 
operate the system. People were rede- 
ployed from unproductive to produc- 
tive work. At the present time the 
company was achieving a larger turn- 
over with around 20 per cent, less staff 
than were employed three years ago. 

Another guiding principle was that 
people could be trusted. Once that was 
recognised a " whole host " of accoun- 
tancy checks and cross-checks could be 
thrown aside, the necessary degree of 
management control being achieved by 
occasional spot-checks. 

Mr. W. G. McClelland (managing 
director of a local grocery multiple) 
contributed a paper on " Pricing for 
Profit " in which he said that new de- 
velopments were working their way 
through the distributive structure. Lab- 
our had become more expensive. The 
gap between cost of minimum service 
and the cost of high service to the cus- 
tomer had widened. Consumers were 
more mobile — not only physically but 
from having the advantages of tele- 
phones and suburban transport. The 
principal characteristic of trading in the 
past, so far as a pricing policy was con- 
cerned, had been that the typical re- 
tailer had a mqnopoly of his position. 
As a result, if his price was a little 



above another's, he did not lose all his 
trade forthwith. That characteristic 
situation was being modified, and the 
result would be better value for the 
consumer and lower profits for the re- 
tailer. Innumerable functions that used 
to be exercised by the retailer were 
being transferred to the manufacturer. 
" The handling of goods in retail shops 
of different trades has become more and 
more similar, until the raison d'etre for 
many of the old distinctions between 
trades has disappeared." In future, 
goods would be segregated not by their 
origin but by their consumer charac- 
teristics and service content. Frequency 
of purchase was the most important 
consumer characteristic, serving to sep- 
arate foods, and along with them house- 
hold consumables, from " consumer 
durables " of high unit value, such as 
furniture. The former could be stocked 
by the supermarket. 

An Art 

The retailer had two separate prob- 
lems : how to maximise traffic through 
his shop and how to maximise profit 
on that traffic. The standard strategy to 
increase traffic was to draw the people 
in by setting really low prices on a 
limited number of lines. Leading the 
customer on to purchase more than she 
first intended, and to be glad she did so, 
was an art more than a science, and the 
right price depended not only on the 
article but on its position in the shop. 
A cardinal principle in business was to 
try to work to capacity. There were 
a lot of inescapable costs, but the higher 
the sales over which they could be 
spread the better the value that could 
be given and the greater the profit. 
Pricing policy depended on whether the 
retailer needed to build up to capacity. 
If he did, he had to decide if he was 
getting the traffic required or not selling 
enough to it. If the latter, he would 
probably need a wider range of bar- 
gains. Sales of many articles depended 
on the volume of traffic past the goods, 
and not on their price. If their price were 
high, then the goods might be bought 
on one occasion but the retailer would 
be pushing custom over to his com- 
petitors in the long run. If the price 
was low but not noticeably so, all that 
happened was that the retailer was 
losing profit he might otherwise have 
had. 

Mr. McClelland believed the inde- 
pendent retailer was often already em- 
bracing several trades and to that extent 
was " in line with the future." But his 
trade was likely to decline as customers 
became more mobile and main-street 
prices came down. The independent 
trader might be right to keep his prices 
high, because he could not increase his 
trade much by lowering them, and 
some people would still pay for the 
convenience of finding him just round 
the corner. He believed the Independent 
Commission's findings on the Co-oper- 
ative movement had strengthened the 
hand of the progressive societies and 
was likely to make the movement as a 
whole more competitive, taking advan- 
tage of its generally lower costs to offer 
some keen price competition. The mul- 
tiples showed the fastest adaptation to 
the new circumstances. There was no 
doubt about the future of the multiples 



as a whole. The only question was 
which would fall by the wayside. 

During question time Mr. W. K. 
Oliver (general sales manager. Boots 
Pure Drug Co., Ltd.) said there was a 
difference between cutting the prices of 
cauliflowers and cutting the prices of 
branded articles. He believed it was 
better to have standard prices for stan- 
dard articles and he recommended that 
consideration should be given to sup- 
porting such manufacturers as those of 
the Beecham Group who had been 
active in enforcing price maintenance. 
When other speakers suggested that price 
maintenance was not to the benefit of 
the country or the housewife, Mr. 
Oliver replied that prices were cut, 
not in the interests of the country or the 
housewife, but merely to " collar the 
other fellow's trade." Mr. C. J. Harvey 
(E. Moss, Ltd., Chemists, Feltham) said 
it was his experience that grocers 
looked to another trade, where profit 
was higher, to extend their business. 
He cited the selling of face tissues. 
Dr. J. B. Jeffreys retorted that nobody 
had laid down who should sell what. 
Each individual had to decide if he 
would or would not " maximise " his 
profits by " scramble " merchandising. 
Mr. McClelland asked " Why stop 
poaching? If the housewife prefers to 
do without the specialist's services why 
should she not buy the face tissues 
more cheaply? " Mr. Cyril Howe (re- 
presenting the Photographic Dealers' 
Association) pointed out that many cuts 
in prices were the result of inferior 
qualities, and the purchaser was not 
always in a position to assess the quality 
of the goods. Many speakers were 
vociferous against the fixing of mini- 
mum retail prices, Mr. McClelland 
stated that the customer and not the 
manufacturer should be allowed to be 
" sovereign." 




PARIING GIFTS: When Mr. John Adnum re- 
signed his position as publicity munacer of 
Biirrouuhs Wellcome & Co. (the Wellcome 
Foundation, Ltd.), London, N.W.I, his former 
colleamies presented him with a candelabrum 
and a scroll containins many signatures. IMr. 
Adnum, who in February took up a new ap- 
pointment as publicity and maiket-inforniation 
manager of the Distillers Co. (Biochemicals), 
Ltd., is a member of the executive committee 
of the Incorporated Society of British Adver- 
tisers, and in the past has taken an active part 
in the work of the Institute of Packaging. 



March 21, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



323 





BUFFERED TETRACICUNE 



REGD, TRADEMARK 



CAPSU1L.ES; 



2 50 mg. Bottles of IS, 1 OO ari<3 1 ,000 



SYRUP: 



PEDIATRIC DROP'S AQUEOUS: 



Each teaspoonful (S cc.) contains l 2S mg. 
tetracycline HCI. Bottles of 2 fl. oz. anci 
1 S fl. oz. 



Each cc. contains 100 mg. tetracycline — 
approximafeiy S mg. per drop. Plastic 
drop per- type tiottle of 1 O cc. 



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324 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 21, 19 



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March 21, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



3 2 5 



TRADE REPORT 



The prices given are those obtained by importers or manufacturers for bulk quantities or original packages. Various 
charges have to be added whereby values are in many instances augmented before wholesale dealers receive the goods into 
stock. Crude drugs and essential oils vary greatly In quality and higher prices are charged for selected qualities. 



London, March 18: Prices for Caffeine and its salts were reduced by 
one manufacturer during the week. The B.P. alkaloid is now quoted 
about 3s. per kilo lower at 35s. 3d. per kilo for 50-kilo lots. 

Demand for Sulphonamides has 
eased off and whilst prices in the home 
market are well maintained, competi- 
tion in the export field is strong. 

The Board of Trade is considering 
an application for the imposition, under 
the Customs Duties (Dumping and Sub- 
sidies) Act, 1957, of an anti-dumping 
duty on pentaerythritol containing not 
more than 20 per cent, by weight of 
di-pentaerythritol imported from 
Canada. 

With several manufacturing houses 
taking stock as their financial year end 
approaches, there was a further decline 
in inquiry for Crude Drugs. Holders 
of B.P. Tolu balsam were quoting 
lower prices for spot supplies, though 
little business ensued. Among Spices 
African Ginger was easier in both 
positions but Peppers, after first 
easing, became firmer and showed a 
gain over the previous week. Turmeric 
fell by 5s. per cwt. on the spot. Men- 
thol continued to advance with 59s.- 
60s. quoted for the small stocks of 
Chinese left on the spot; there were 
still no offers for shipment. Brazilian 
material also tended upwards and ship- 
pers were reluctant to offer for early 
delivery. Agar was considerably dearer 
for shipment, the price of 10s. per lb. 
comparing with 8s. lOd. recently. Ship- 
ments of Senna from Tuticorin during 
the month of February are given 
below : 



BUTOBARBITONE. — B.P.C. Is 82s. 6d. 
per kiio in minimum 25-kilo lots. 

Caffeine. — (Per kilo) Anhydrous, 5-kilo 
lots. 39s. ; 50-kilo, 37s. 6d. ; monohydrate, 
5-kilo, 37s.; citrate, 5-kilo, 27s. 6d. ; 
50-kilo, 26s. 

Carmine. — Price is 75s. per lb. for 
1-cwt. lots. 

Chiniophon. — B.P. 1948 is 67s. per kilo; 
50-kilo lots, 62s. 6d. per kilo. The sodium 
derivative (B.P. 1953) is 99s. 4d. and 
92s. 9d. for the same quantities. 

Chloroform. — ^1-cwt. lots in Winchesters 
are 3s. 4id. per lb.; 56-lb., 3s. 6d. In 
drums, prices are 3s. 2d. and 3s. 2id. per 
lb. respectively. 

Cocaine. — For 16-oz. lots the price of 
the hydrochloride is 91s. 6d. per oz. and 
alkaloid, 101s. Subject to D.D.A. Regu- 
lations. 

Cyclobarbitone. — Less than 25 kilos: 
B.P.C, 73s. per kilo. Calcium 85s. 

Dextrose. — In bulk, monohydrate, 
£76 per ton delivered; anhydrous, £115. 

Hexobarbitone. — In 25-kilo lots or 
over the price is 115s. per kilo. 

Hyoscine hydrobromide. — Price per oz. 
is 102s. 

Iodides. — Current quotations (per lb.) 
include the following: — 





28-lb. 


1-cwt. 


5-cwt. 




s. d. 


J. d. 


5. d. 


Potassium 


7 6 


7 3 


7 


Sodium . . 


13 


12 9 


12 3 


Ammonium 


21 9 


20 5 







U.K. 


U.S. 


Europe 


Senna 


Tons 


Tons 


Tons 


leaves 


10 


6 


112 


pods 


5 




7 



Among Essential Oils Formosan 
Citronella was one penny per lb. 
dearer for shipment at 3s. 9d. and 
Brazilian Peppermint sixpence dearer 
at 8s. 6d. Lemongrass continued its 
downward trend, the loss on the week 
being three-halfpence per lb. 

Pharmaceutical Chemicals 

Ammonium acetate. — 1-cwt. lots of 
B.P.C, 1949, are quoted at 4s. 5d. per lb. 

Ammonium bicarbonate. — The b.p. 
powder is £50 5s. per ton; carbonate is 
£81 10s. for lump and £85 10s. for pow- 
der, all delivered terms. 

Amidopyrin. — Minimum rate is 22s. 5d. 
per lb. with usual differentials for smalls. 

Amphetamine. — One to 10-kilo lots are: 
Base, from 140s. to 160s. as to quantity; 
sulphate is 110s. to 130s. and (/-ampheta- 
mine sulphate, 405s. to 420s. for similar 
quantities. 

Amylobarbitone. — B.P.C. is 77s. 6d. 
per kilo for minimum 25-kilo lots and 
sodium, B.P.C, 87s. 6d. per kilo. 

Barbitone. — Rate for less than 50-kilo 
lots is 53s. 6d. per kilo. The Sodium 
derivative is 56s. 9d. per kilo. 

Barium sulphate. — 250-kilo lots of 
B.P. (x-ray) are now 3s. 3id. per kilo. 

Bentonite. — Offers of b.p. material are 
about £70 per ton as to quantity. 

Brucine. — Alkaloid and sulphate in 
100-oz. lots is now 7s. 3d. per oz. 



Iodine. — Resublimed is 13s. 2d. per lb. 
in 1-cwt. lots, or 12s. 8d. in 5-cwt. lots. 
Minimum delivered rate for crude is now 
1 5s. per kilo. 

Iodoform. — Powder is 22s. 4d. per lb. 
in 28-lb. lots ; 21s. 8d. in 1-cwL and 
21 s. Id. in 5-cwt. lots. Crystals are 3s. 
per lb. more than the powder. 

Methadone hydrochloride. — Price is 
from 2s. to 2s. 6d. per gm. as to quantity. 
Subject to D.D.A. Regulations. 

Methyl phenobarbitone. — B.P. is 95s. 
per kilo for less than 25-kilo lots. 

Opiates. — Home trade prices (per oz.) 
subject to D.D.A. Regulations: — 





35 OZ. and 


Under 




over 


35 OZ. 




s. 


d. 


s. d. 


Codeine 








PHOSPHATE 


41 





42 


HYDROCHLORIDE 


47 


3 


48 3 


SULPHATE 


47 


3 


48 3 


ALKALOID 


54 





55 


Morphine 








ACETATE 


50 





51 


hydrochloride 


50 





51 


sulphate 


50 





51 


TARIRATE 


60 





61 


ALKALOID 


61 


3 


62 3 


Ethylmorphine 








HYDROCHLORIDE 


54 





55 


ALKALOID 


63 


3 


64 3 


Diamorphine 








HYDROCHLORIDE 


54 


9 


55 9 


ALKALOID 


59 


9 


60 9 



Phenobarbitone. — Under 50-kilo lots 
are 50s. per kilo and sodium, 55s. 6d. 

Pentobarbitone sodium. — Minimum 
25-kilo lots are 125s. per kilo. 

Pethidine hydrochloride. — B.P. 100- 
gm. lots. 100s. Subject to D.D.A. Regu- 
lations. 

Potash sulphurated. — Lump, b.p.c, 
is 2s. 4d. per lb. in 1-cwt. lots. 



Potassium acetate. — (Per lb.) 1-cwt. 
lots, 3s.; 5-cwt., 2s. 8d.; 10-cwt., 2s. 6d. 

Potassium bicarbonate. — B.P. powder 
is 110s. per cwt. l^cwt. lots and 
105s. per cwt. for 5-cwt. and over. 

Potassium bromate. — In 5-cwt. lots the 
price being asked is 5s. 3d. per lb. 

Potassium chloride. — In I-cwt. lots 
B.P., is Is. 6d. per lb. 

Potassium hydroxide. — B.P. sticks are 
from 6s. 8d. per lb. and pellets. 5s. Id.; 
technical flake. Is. 4d. 

Potassium 8-hydroxyquinoline sul- 
phate. — 1 kilo is 47s. Id. and 50 kilos, 
443. per kilo. 

Potassium nitrate. — Pharmacopoeial 
quality is 100s. per cwt. (crystal or pow- 
der) in 1-cwt. lots. 

Potassium permanganate. — Current 
rate for b.p. material for 1-cwt. lots is 
Is. lid. per lb. Technical is 204s. 6d. per 
cwt. and £193 10s. per ton. 

Potassium quadroxalate. — One-cwt. 
lots are 3s. 6d. per lb. 

Potassium sulphate. — One-cwt. lots 
are from Is. 2d. to Is. 3d. per lb. 

Potassium thiocyanate. — One-cwt. lots 
are 5s. 6d. per lb. 

Resorcinol. — 1-cwt. lots are now quo- 
ted at 13s. per lb. by manufacturer. 

Rochelle salt. — Rates (per cwt.) for 
powder or granulated material are as 
follows: — In 5-cwt. lots or over, 200s. per 
cwt.; 1-cwt., 202s. 6d. Seidlitz powder, 
ordinary strength is 170s. 6d. per cwt. in 
1-cwt. lots ; smalls, from 2s. to 2s. 3d. 
per lb. Extra strong is 172s. 6d. per cwt , 
and from 2s. Id. to 2s. 4d. per lb. for 
small quantities. Double-strength is 180s. 
per cwt.; smalls, 2s. 2d. to 2s. 5d. per lb. 

Salicylic acid. — Prices are now : 5-cwt. 
lots in bulk, 3s. O^d. per lb.; 1-cwt. 
3s. 2id. 

Salol. — Quotations for b.p.c. are about 
9s. per lb. for 1-cwt. lots. 

Strychnine. — Per oz. ; Alkaloid, crys- 
tals, 8s. 3d. hydrochloride, 8s. 4d. ; 
SULPHATE. 7s. 3d.; nitrate, 8s. 9d., all 
for 100-oz. lots in free containers. 

Sulphacetamide. — Quotations (per lb.) 
for 1-cwt. lots are 24s. 6d. The Sodium 
derivative is 30s. 

Sulphaguanidine. — Manufacturers' rates 
for 1-cwt. lots are about lis. per lb. 

Sulphanilamide. — Manufacturers' rates 
for 1-cwt. lots are 6s. per lb. 

Sulphathiazole. — Price (per lb.) for 
1-cwt. lots is 16s. 9d. 

Theophylline. — 50-kilo lots: Alkaloid 
anhydrous, 37s. 6d. per kilo and B.P. 
35s. 9d.; aminophylline, 35s. 3d. per 
kilo. 

Crude Drugs 

Aconite. — • Spot supplies of Spanish 
iiapellus are 2s. 6d. per lb. 

Agar. — Kobe No. 1 is 10s. 6d. per lb., 
duty paid; new-crop for shipment, 10s., 
c.i.f. 

Aloes. — Cape prime on the spot is 
220s. per cwt. and for shipment, 195s.. 
c.i.f. Curasao, 495s., spot. 

Areca. — Sound nuts Is. 6d. per lb., spot. 

Balsams. — Quotations per lb. are: — 
Canada: Spot, 23s. Copaiba: Para from 
7s. 6d., duty paid. Peru: Scarce at origin. 
Spot, 10s. 3d. in bond. ToLU (genuine as 
imported): 17s. 6d., spot and 16s.. c.i.f.; 
B.P., 15s. 

Belladonna. — Herb is 8s. 3d. per lb. 
on the spot. Root is Is. 6d. spot; ship- 
ment. Is. 3d., c.i.f. 



326 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 21 



1959 



Benzoin. — Sumatra block on the spot is 
£22 to £28 as to quality. Shipment not 
offering. 

BucHU. — Spot rounds are 6s. per lb. 
and new-crop for shipment, 5s. 4id., c.i.f. 

Calamus. — Root is quoted at Is. 4d. per 
lb., c.i.f. 

Camphor. — B.P. powder is from 4s. 3d. 
per lb., duty paid. Tablets, j-oz., are 
5s. 6d. in bond. 

Capsicums. — East African are from 
140s. to 175s. per cwt. on the spot. 

Cardamoms. — Aleppy greens, spot. 
14s. 6d. per lb.; forward shipment. 
12s. 6d., c.i.f. Seeds, spot, 24s., shipment, 
19s. 6d., c.i.f. 

Cascara. — Spot 1958 peel. 225s. per 
cwt., shipment. 200s., c.i.f. 

Cassia i.ionea. — Spot, whole 270s. and 
shipment, 255s., c.i.f. 

Cherry bark. — Thin natural is Is. 5d. 
per lb., and rossed is Is. lid. 

Chillies. — Spot Mombasa are 170s. 
per cwt. and Zanzibar, 225s. 

Cinnamon. — Ceylon for shipment (c.i.f.) 
per lb. ; OOOO, 6s. 7id. ; OOO, 6s. 5id. ; 
OO, 6s. 4d. : seconds, 4s. 9id. ; feather- 
ings 2s. Id.; quillings, 3s. lid.; chips. 
Is. Id. 

Cloves. — • Zanzibar on the spot are 
3s. per lb. ; shipment, 2s. 8d., c.i.f. 

Cochineal. — Silver-grey Peruvian on the 
spot from 5s. 6d. to 6s. 3d. as to quan- 
tity; Canary Isles black-brilliant, about 
17s. 9d.; silver-grey, 15s.. spot. 

Cocillana. — Bark is Is. 8d. per lb. on 
the spot. 

Colocynth pulp. — Spot, 3s. per lb. ; 
shipment, 215s. cwt., c.i.f. 

Digitalis leaf. — Purpurea from Is. 2id. 
to 2s. 7d. per lb., c.i.f. 
Elemi. — Spot from Is. lO^d. per lb. 
pRANGULA. — Spot is 105s. per cwt. 

Gentian. — Spot: French, 170s. per 
cwt.; Jugo-Slavian, 152s. 6d. 

Ginger. — • African. 125s. per cwt. spot 
and 127s. 6d. (new crop), c.i.f. Jamaican 
No. 3, spot, 260s. and shipment 250s.. 
c.i.f. Cochin spot quoted 1 35s. 

Gum acacia. — Kordofan rlem^d sn'*s 
are 135s. per cwt. on the spot; April- 
May shipment, 128s., c.i.f. 

Henna. — Indian 80s. per cwt.. ex wharf ; 
shipment, 70s., c.i.f. 

Honey. — Australian light-amber is 
105s. to 110s. and medium amber 
100s. to 105s. Argentine, 115s. to 120s.: 
Jamaican 120s. to 125s.; New Zealand 
clover. 170s.. nominal; all per cwt. on the 
spot. 

Hydrastis. — Spot 28s. per lb. 

Ipecacuanha. — Shipment March-April 
(c.i.f.) Matto Grosso. 51s. 6d. per lb.; 
Colombian. 53s. 6d.; Nicaraguan, 67s. 6d. 

Karaya. — No. 1 gum on the spot is 
quoted at 230s. per cwt.. No. 2 at 175s. 

Kola nuts. — Jamaican spot market 
cleared, shipment. 7d. per lb., c.i.f. Afri- 
can 5d. to 5W- spot and 4d., c.i.f. 

Kramfria. — Root is quoted at 90s. per 
cwt. 

Lanolin. — Anhydrous, b.p., is from 
170s. to 175s. per cwt. in 1-ton lots and 
hydrous, B.P., 150s.. free drums, delivered. 

Liquorice. — Natural root; Persian on 
the spot is 50s.; for shipment, 42s. 6d.. 
c.i.f., per cwt. Block juice: Anatolian 
and Chinese. 190s. per cwt., Italian stick 
from 310s. to 476s. per cwt. Spray dried 
extract, 3s. per lb. 

Lobelia herb. — Spot offers of Ameri- 
can are 3s. 9d. per lb. and for shipment, 
3s. 6d., c.i.f. Dutch 3s. Id., c.i.f. for 
shipment; spot. 3s. 5d. 

Lycopodium. — Russian triple-sifted for 
shipment, 25s. per lb., c.i.f., nominal. 



Mace. — Whole pale blade 23s. 6d. per 
lb. on spot. 

Menthol. — Chinese is 59s. to 60s. per 
lb., duty paid; Brazilian, spot. 35s. 6d., in 
bond; April-May shipment, 35s., c.i.f. 

Mercury. — • Price per flask (76-lb.) is 
£75 on the spot. 

Nutmegs. — West Indian 80's 17s. per 
lb., spot; sound unassorted, 12s. 6d.; 
defectives, 8s. 9d. 

Orange peel. — Scarce. Spot : Sweet 
ribbon, 2s. per lb. ; bitter quarters : West 
Indian, Is.; Spanish, Is. 8d. 

Orris root. — Florentine is 335s. per 
cwt. 

Papain. — ^East African, 20s. per lb., c.i.f., 
for grade one, spot, 22s. Belgian (Tongo, 
17s. 6d., c.i.f. 

Pepper. — White Sarawak spot, 3s. Ijd. 
per lb., March-April shipment, 3s. Ijd., 
c.i.f.; Black Sarawak spot. Is. lO^d., 
March-April shipment. Is. 9^d., c.i.f. 
Black Malabar new-crop for March-April 
shipment up to 230s., c.i.f. quoted, spot, 
2403. 

Peppermint leaves. — Dutch, Is. 2d. to 
2s. lOd. per lb., c.i.f. 

Pimento. — Spot value is 550s. to 560s. 
per cwt. 

Podophyllum. — Emodi: 230s. per cwt., 
c.i.f.. shipment. Peltatum. on the spot, 
4s. 3d. per lb. ; shipment 450s. per cwt. 
c.i.f. 

Pyrethrum. — Extract, minimum 25 per 
cent, w/w pyrethrins, is 75s. per lb. for 
small lots. 

Quassia. — Shipment offers are at 39s. 
per cwt., c.i.f. 

Quillaia. — Spot offers of whole bark at 
130s. per cwt.; cut, 170s.; crushed, 165s. 
Whole for shipment, 95s., c.i.f. 

Rauwolfia. — Canescens, 3s. 6d. per lb., 
c.i.f.; Vomiloria, 2s. 3d., c.i.f.; Serpen- 
tina, 6s., c.i.f. asked. 

Rhubarb. — Chinese small rounds 
6s. 4{d. to 6s. 9d. Best grades not avail- 
able on the spot. 

Safhion. — Spanish is quoted at 200s. 
per lb. 

Sarsaparilla. — Jamaican native red on 
the spot is 2s. 9d. per lb. Shipment, 
2s. 4d., c.i.f. 

Senega. — Spot offered at 14s. 6d. per 
lb.; shipment 15s., c.i.f., asked. 

Senna. — Tinnevelly leaves prime 
No. 1,1s. 5d. per lb., f.a.q.. No. 3. lOd. 
Pods: Manufacturing (f.a.q.). Is. 3id. and 
hand-picked. Is. 9d. to 2s. 2d. Alexandria 
pods: Manufacturing, offered from Is. 6d. 
with hand-picked from 4s. to 6s. 6d. 

Shellac— F.O.T.N. 177s. 6d. per cwt., 
P.O. No. 1, 207s. 6d.; fine orange, 215s. 
to 265s. 

Seeds. — (Per cwt.) Anise. — Spanish. 
157s. 6d.; Turkish, 140s.. both duty paid. 
Caraway. — Dutch easier at 117s. 6d., duty 
paid. Celery. — Indian spot unchanged at 
165s.; new crop for shipment, 130s., c.i.f. 
Coriander. — Moroccan, 47s. 6d. in bond; 
shipment, 43s. 6d.. c.i.f. Cumin. — Iran- 
ian, spot, 250s., in bond, and shipment, 
250s., c.i.f. Dill. — Indian to arrive quo- 
ted at 80s., landed; shipment, 62s. 6d., 
c.i.f. Fennel. — Chinese 140s., duty paid. 
Indian sold at 130s. Indian for shipment, 
122s. 6d.. c.i.f. Fenugreek. — Moroccan 
quoted at 44s., duty paid with no business 
passini;. Musiard. — English 125s. to 130s. 
according to quality. 

SiRAMoNiuM. — Indian leaves 60s. per 
cwt., snot. Dutch 0-5 per cent, alkaloid, 
94s., c.i.f. 

Styrax. — Spot, 27s. per lb., afloat, 
26s., c.i.f. 

Turmeric. — Madras finger is 80s. on the 
spot ; new crop for Apnl-May shipment, 
75s., c.i.f. 

Vali-rian root. — Spot: Indian (with 
rootlets) is 130s. and Belgian, 175s. to 
195s. per cwt. Dutch (max. 2^ per cent, 
sand) for prompt shipment, 159s., c.i.f. 



Essential and Expressed Oils 

Amber. — Rectified on the spot is Is. 6d. 
per lb. 

Bergamot. — Spot supplies are from 
86s. 6d. per lb. 

Calamus. — Spot quotations are 62s. 6d. 
per lb. 

Cananga. — Spot is from 42s. 6d. to 
45s. per lb. 

Caraway. — English-distilled is offered at 
55s. and imported 27s. 6d. per lb. 

Cinnamon. — From quillings, best Eng- 
lish-distilled is 50s. per oz. ; other b.p. oils 
from 165s. per lb. Ceylon, leaf, spot, 
lis. 6d. per lb.; shipment, 10s. lO^d., 
c.i.f.. rectified, 15s. per lb.; Seychelles, 
6s. 6d., spot. 

Citronella. — Ceylon, spot is 3s. 9d. 
shipment, 3s. 5d.. c.i.f. Formosan, spot 
4s., in bond, shipment, 3s. 9d., c.i.f. 

Clove. — Madagascar leaf, 6s. lO^d. per 
lb., duty paid; shipment. 6s., c.i.f. Recti- 
fied 87-88 per cent., 9s. 6d. Distilled bud 
oil, English, B.P., 30s. to 31s. 

Cor'Ander. — B.P. oil is quoted from 
67s. 6d. per lb. 

C^UMIN. — Quotations for English-distilled 
oil are about 90s. per lb. and imported, 
77s. 6d. 

Geranium. — Bourbon is 112s. 6d. per 
lb. on the spot and 110s., c.i.f. Algerian, 
92s. 6d. 

Grapefruit. — Jamaican, 20s. per lb. 
spot. Californian for shipment, 19s. 8d. 
per lb., c.i.f. South African, 10s. spot. 

Lavandin. — Spot is from 10s. to 12s. 6d. 
per lb. for original drums. 

Lavender. — -French oil, 40-42 per cent, 
i ; 42s. per lb. 

Lavender spike. — Spanish is at 13s. 6d. 
to 17s. 6d. per lb. for original drums. 

Lemon. — B.P. grades from 18s. to 30s. 
per lb. on the spot. Californian for ship- 
ment. 25f. to 28s. 6d., c.i.f. Terpeneless, 
500s. per lb. 

Lemongrass. — Spot 6s. per lb., and 
shipment. 5s. 9d., c.i.f. 

Olive. — French is 20s. to 21s. per gall, 
on the spot, for b.p. quality. For ship- 
ment. North African £205-£210 per 1.000 
kilo, c.i.f. Spanish. £213 per 1,000 kilo, 
f.o.b. 

Orange. — Spot quotations of sweet oil 
include Floridan at 7s. 6d. per lb.; Cili- 
fornian. 10s.; West Indian, lOs.; West 
African". 19s.: Israeli, 12s. 6d. For prompt 
shipment. Californian cold-pressed u.s.p., 
10s. 9d.. c.i.f.; distilled 5s.. c.i.f. Terpene- 
less is 200s. per lb., spot. 

Peppermint. — • Arvensis : Chinese is 
27s. per lb. spot nominal ; shipment not 
offering. Brazilian 8s. 6d. spot, and 8s. 4d. 
c.i.f. Formosan, 16s. 6d., spot ; March- 
April shipment, 16s., c.i.f. Piperita: Italian 
" Mitcham-type " from 42s. 6d. to 50s.; 
American 27s. 6d. to 30s., as to origin. 

Sandalwood. — Mysore offered from 
81s. 6d. to 85s. per lb. as to source. East 
Indian, 82s. 6d., spot. 

Spearmint. — Offers of u.s.p. grade are 
from 37s. 6d. to 42s. 6d. per lb., spot. 
Chinese. 27s. 6d., spot and 25s., c.i.f. per 
lb. nominal. 

Yi ANG Yi ang. — Spot is from 32s. 6d. 
to 46s. per lb. as to grade. 

UNITED STATES REPORT 

New York, March 17: Some weak- 
ness in Antibiotics and Hormones has 
now developed. Among Crude Drugs 
there were declines in Tolu balsam to 
$230 (down 15 cents a lb.), and in 
Papain to $700, down 75 cents. 

Spot prices for Eucalyptol were soft, 
easing to $1, or 10 cents below former 
levels. Essential Oils were generally 
unchanged. 



March 21, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



327 



WORLD TRADE 

Pakistan Licences Revalidated. — 

The Pakistan Government has revali- 
dated frozen and unused licences for 
drugs and medicines of all sorts (in- 
cluding raw materials for the pharma- 
ceutical industry); saccharin; medical 
appliances; glucose; and gelatin cap- 
sules. 

Australian Customs Tariff Simplifi- 
cation. — A simplification of the Austra- 
lian customs tariff by redrafting it on 
internationally accepted lines is to be 
undertaken, the Minister for Customs 
and Excise, Senator Norman Henty, 
announced on March II. The reorgani- 
sation will not be completed before the 
middle of 1962 and it is not expected 
that the review will cause any signifi- 
cant changes in the rates of duty. 

Polio Vaccine Price Cut. — Parke, 
Davis & Co., Detroit, U.S.A., have an- 
nounced a 15 per cent, reduction in the 
price of its polio vaccine; the seventh 
price cut since the company began pro- 
duction of its vaccine in March 1956. 
President Harry J. Loynd said the cut 
" reduces the cost to less than half the 
original price." The company declined 
to give the actual price of vaccine. 
However, it is understood that present 
wholesale prices run between $7 and 
$7 50 for a 9-mil vial which contains 
about nine shots. 

Tax on Soap in Haiti. — A tax of 

Gourde 015 per kilo is to be levied on 
soap manufactured in Haiti. A recent 
decree also provides for the Govern- 
ment control of the distribution of soap 
through the Government Agency, Regie 
du Tabac et des AUumettes. The same 
agency will sell laundry soap and fix 
quotas for the import of such soap, in 
agreement with the Ministry of Com- 
merce and Industry. Raw materials for 
the manufacture of soap and packing 
materials and cases not available locally 
may be imported free of duty. 

New Petrocliemical Plant in France. 

—A new complex of chemical plants 
has been brought into operation by 
Society Anonyme des Produits Chim- 
iques Saint-Gobain at their plant at 
Berre, near Marseille, France, adjacent 
to the oil refinery of Compagnie de 
Raflfinage Shell-Berre. The new facilities 
will enable Shell Saint-Gobain, in 
which the Royal Dutch /Shell group of 
companies has a 60 per cent, interest, 
to manufacture Epikote resins and base 
materials for carbon black and for de- 
termining, as well as to expand their 
range of organic solvents. 

Thailand's Narcotic Requirements. — 

The Thai Ministry of Public Health 
recently announced the quantities of 
narcotic drugs which will be officially 
required and which will be permitted 
to enter Thailand during 1959. The list 
includes: 120,000 gm. of medicinal 
opium in powder or 10 per cent, tinc- 
ture; 3,500 gm. of morphine hydro- 
chloride in powder, injection (strength 
0-01 gm. and 002 gm. per mil); 6,000 
gm. of codeine phosphate in powder 
and tablets; 3,000 gm. cocaine hydro- 
chloride, powder; 500 gm. dionine, 
powder; 500 gm. papaverine, powder; 
100 gm. methadone, injection; 1,500 gm. 
of pethedine, injection; 300 gm. Euco- 



dal, injection (002 gm. per mil); 200 
gm. Pantopon, injection (002 gm. per 
mil). 

U.S. Tartar Imports. — President 
Eisenhower has turned down two 
Tariff Commission recommendations to 
increase United States tariffs on impor- 
ted cream of tartar and tartaric acid. 
The President's rejection was disclosed 
by the White House in letters to Con- 
gress and to the Commission explaining 
his decision. Britain, Italy and Spain 
are the principal suppliers of cream of 
tartar to the U.S. market, while Italy, 
Spain, West Germany and France sup- 
ply tartaric acid. The acid is used in 
pharmaceuticals, foods and soft drinks 
and also in the manufacture of rayon, 
the dyeing and printing of textiles and 
in photography. An escape clause in- 
quiry into imports of the two products 
was begun by the Tariff Commission 
in April 1958 after the Stauffer Chemi- 
cal Co., New York City, the only 
domestic producer of the cream and the 
acid, complained that imports were in- 
juring its sales and that tariff relief was 
needed if the company were to remain 
in business. In the cream of tartar 
ruling, three Tariff Commissioners, 
constituting a majority, voted to in- 
crease tariffs from the present 3125 
cents to 7 5 cents per lb. In the tartaric 
acid ruling, five Commissioners recom- 
mended that U.S. duties be raised from 
the present 6 cents to 12 cents per lb. 

TRADE MARKS 

APPLICATIONS ADVERTISED 
BEFORE REGISTRATION 
From the " Trade Marks Journal," March 11 

For all goods (1) 

MECUFIX, 784,197, by May & Baker, Ltd., 

Dagenham, Essex. 
For all goods (3) 

DOMESTOS, 781,374, by Domestos, Ltd.. 

Newcastle-upon-Tyne, 6. 
for all goods in stick form (3) 

VENSnCK, 783.838, by William Pearson, Ltd., 

London, S.W.I. 
For pharmaceiilical preparations (5) 

DIMOTANE, 773,313, by A. H. Robins Co., 

Inc., Richmond, Virginia, U.S.A. 
For x-ray contrast media for use in the gastro- 
intestinal tract, being goods for sale in the 
United Kingdom (5> 

GASTRAPAOUE. 779.100, by Bayer Products, 

Ltd., Kingston-on-Thames, Surrey. 
For nutritional additives containing vitamins of 
grain germs for addition to foodstuffs and phar- 
maceutical products (5) 

BIOGERM, 3779,202, by Multiforsa, Ltd., 

Zug, Switzerland. 
For all goods (5) 

RUMAPEL, 781,864, by A. & G. Nicholas, 

Ltd.. Slough, Bucks. 
For dental preparations (5) 

VIRILON. 782,419, by Virilium Co., Ltd., 

London, S.W.I. 
For pharmaceutical preparations and substances 
(5) 

CARBOSTESIN, 782,848, by A.B. Bofors, 

Bofors. Sweden. 
For pharmaceutical preparations and sanitary 
substances (5) 

PRIMOGERON, 782,952. by Schering, A.G., 

Berlin. Germany. 
For sun glasses and lenses therefor (9) 

ULTRAGLAZE, B779.692, by E. R. Hollo- 
way, Ltd., Welwyn Garden City, Herts. 
For apparatus and instruments all for use in 
colour photography (9) 

COLORFLEX, 780,781, by Agfa, A.G., Lever- 

kusen-Bayerwerk, Germany. 
For stands for photographic, cinematographic and 
television cameras, etc, (9) 

MAXIPODE, 782,495, by Andr^ Victor Leon 

Clement Debrie, Paris. France. 



WILLS 

.Mr. K. a. Black, M.P.S., 15 Sunbury Avenue, 
Newcastle-upon-Tyne, left £850 (£785 net). 

Mr, M. Davison, M.P.S., 69 Linden Road. 
Gosforth, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, left £11.270 
(£11,166 net). 

Mr. E. S. Feltham, M.P.S., 3 Woodcliff 
Avenue. Weston-superJVlare. left £3,271 (£3,204 
net). 

Mr. M. I. Greene. M.P.S. , 49 Nonh Road. 
Droylesden, Manchester, left £5,068 (£2,139 net). 

Mr. W. T. Haynes, M.P.S., 16 Dyserth Road. 
Penarth, Glam, left £3,330 (£3.241 net). 

Mr. H. Holyoak, M.P.S., The Square, Elles- 
mere, Salop, left £7,725 (£4,687 net). 

Mr. C. A. Moore, M.P.S., 76 Station Lane, 
Homchurch, Essex, left £15.461 (£14.999 net). 

Mr. C. Parry, M.P.S., Lowood, Abbey Drive. 
Rhos-on-Sea, North Wales, left £13,393 (£13,208 
net). 

Mr. C. K. Reed, M.P.S., 38 Foster Road. 
Alver^toke, Hants. left £11,716 (£11,659 net). 

Mr. H. R. Stocks, Ph.C. M.P.S., Park Royde, 
Manor Close, Manor Heath Road. Halifax, Yorks, 
left £20,609 (£17,186 net). 

Mr. C. Vernon, M.P.S., 129 Bennetthorpe. 
Doncasier, Yorks, left £17.001 (£15.902 net). 

Mr. R. a. Williams, M.P.S., 14 Femdale 
Road. Hall Green. Birmingham, left £16.586 
(£16,533 net). 

Mr. C. a. McC. Wray, M.P.S., Camone. 
Cookstown, CO. Tyrone, left £3,668. 

COMING EVENTS 

Items for inclusion under this heading should be 
sent in time to reach the Editor not later than 
first post on Wednesday of the vfeeli of insertion. 

Monday, March 23 

FiNCHLEY Bran™. Pharmaceutical Society. 
Bull and Butcher, Whetstone, London, N.20, at 
8 p.m. Flight-Lieutenant J. Roberts on " Es- 
capes from Prison <;;amps." 

Glasgow Pharmaceutical Committee, Institute 
of Chartered Accountants, 220 St. Vincent 
Street, at 7.45 p.m. Annual meeting. 

South-west London (Demists' Association and 
South-west Metropolitan Branch, Pharma- 
ceutical Society, Lambeth town hall, Brixton 
Hill, London, S.W.2. at 8 p.m. " Your pre- 
sence is requested." 

Tuesday, March 24 

Fine Chemicals Group, Society of Chemical 
Industry. Teaching laboratory, Birkbeck Col- 
lege. London, W.C.I, at 4 p.m. Exhibition of 
laboratory techniques. 

Sheffield Bran.h, Pharmaceutical Society, 
Grand hotel, Sheffield, at 8 p.m. Dr. A. S. 
Curry on " The Chemistry of Poisoning." 

Wednesday, March 25 

Glasgow and West of Scotland Branch, Phar- 
maceutical Society, Masonic hall, Cadzow 
Street. Hamilton, at 8 p.m. Dr. G. H. 
Macmorran (resident secretary in Scotland) on 
'• Some Educational Problems," Mr. M. M. 
McNeill (secretary. Pharmaceutical General 
Council) on " N.H.S. Dispensing and Re- 
muneration." 

Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain. 17 
Bloomsbury Square, London, W.C.I, at 7.30 
p.m. Professor G. E. Trease on " A 
Thirteenth Century Family of Court Apothe- 
caries." 

Thursday, March 26 

Bristol Branch. Pharmaceutical Society, 
Board room. Old Council house. Corn Street, 
at 7.15 p.m. Dr. C. D. Evans on " Some Drug 
Eruptions." 

Advance information 

Bristol School of Pharmacy. Royal hotel, at 
7.30 p.m., Friday, May 8. Dinner-dance. Tickets 
(before April 28) 20s., 35s. (double) from Dinner- 
dance secretary. School of Pharmacy, College of 
Technology. Bristol, 7. 

International Convention on European Phar- 
maceutical Legislation, Rome. 

Monday, May 4: Switzerland; United Kingdom. 
Tuesday. May 5: France; Benelux countries. 
Wednesday, May 6: West Germany, Italy. 



328 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 21, 1959 



PRINT AND PUBLICITY 

PUBLICATIONS 
Booklets and Leaflets 

British Hydrocarbon Chemicals, Ltd., Devon- 
shire House, Piccadilly, London, W.l: Brithh 
Hydrocarbon Chemicals, Lid., 1958 — a new 
booklet on the Grangemouth petroleum chemi- 
cals plants. 

Murphy Chemical Co., Ltd., Wheathampstead, 
Herts: Murphy MCPA 25, Mecpa special 
MCPA, Dinamene DMBP, Crestol pre-emerg- 
ence weedkiller (2-p. leaflets). 

United Kingdom Glycerine Producers Asso- 
ciation, Ltd., 5 Bridewell Place, London, 
E.C.4: Glycerine data sheet (folder). 

Price Lists 

Brook, Parker & Co., Ltd., A.shfield, Brad- 
ford, 7: Ethical price list, March 1959. * 

Cannon Rubber Manufacturers, Ltd., Ashley 
Road, Tottenham, London, N.17: Hot-water 
bottle price list. 

Clarnell, Ltd., Spark Lane, Mapplewell, nr. 
Barnsley, Yorks: Price list January 1959. 

Glaxo Laboratories, Lid., Greenford, Middle- 




FREE WITH BONUS ORDER : Wire display 
stand for Wright's aerosol products (see C. & D., 
JVIarch 7, p. 246). The stand is sent free with 
twenty-four-can order (invoiced as twenty-two). 




POSTER: Duncan, Flockhart & Co., Ltd.. 16 
Wheatfield Road, Edinburgh, 11, have issued 
a poster to advertise their Baumol Soap. The 
poster is in three colours (predominantly blue) 
and measures 5 ft. x 1\ ft. Copies are available 
to wholesalers or to retail chemists on request. 
The poster is already in use on some wholesale 
druggists' vans. 

se.f: Antibiotics, corticoid preparalions and 
prednisolone preparations price lists. 
Lederle Laboratories Division, Cyanamid of 
Great Britain, Ltd., Bush House, Aldwych, 
London, W'.C.2 : Retail price list amendment 
sheets. 

PRESS ADVERTISING 

CuxsON Gerrard & Co., Ltd., Oldbury, Birming- 
ham: Carnation corn caps. In national Press. 

Imperial Chemical Industries, Ltd., Pharma- 
ceuticals Division, Fulshaw Hall, Wilmslow, 
Ches; Savlon antiseptic cream. In Daily Ex- 
press, Daily Mail, Daily Mirror, Daily Tele- 
graph, provincial newspapers, women's maga- 
zines. Family Doctor and Mother and Baby. 
Savlon barrier cream. In women's weekly and 
monthly magazines, Amateur Gardening, Gar- 
den News and Popular Gardening, 

Pepsodent, Ltd., 449 London Road, Isleworth, 
Middlesex: Model Set hair spray. In Woman, 
Woman's Own, Woman's Day and Woman's 
Realm. Harmony hair colorant. In Modern 
Woman, Woman and Beauty, Woman, 
Woman's Own, Woman's Day and IVoman's 
Realm. 

Racasan, Ltd., Ellesmere Fort, Ches: Racasan. 
In Woman, Woman's Realm and Woman's 

Weekly. 

Roberts Windsor, Ltd., Windsor, Berks: 
Roberts Windsor soaps and toiletries. In 
iVoman, Woman's Own, Queen, Homes and 
Gardens, Everywoman, Housewife, Good 
Housekeeping, Woman and Beauty and regular 
spaces in national newspapers. 

Stafford-Miller, Ltd., Hatfield, Herts: Dr. 
Wemet's powder: In national Press. 

Wallace, Cameron & Co., Ltd., 83 West Regent 
Street. Glasgow, C.2: Ultraplast alginate 
styptic first-aid dressings. In Sunday Express. 



COMMERCIAL 
TELEVISION 

Programme details are given to enable chemists 
to put in linking-up displays if they wish. 
Figures in the columns represent number of 
appearances of the product during the week. 



March 29— April 4 


ndon 


dland 




c 
— 


ales 


SI 






o 
i-J 




o 


o 


> 


(1 






1 




2 




2. 




2 


Anfl rpws 1 i vpr <;a 1 1 


2 


2 


2 


2 


Z 


2 


2 










12 








Brisiow s shampoo 












1 




Bronco loilct rolls... 




3 












V ad I lay ^KJa %j ■ . 




2 


2 


3 


'> 


3 


6 








3 














3 


3 


3 


1 


\ 


1 


Damaskin 


1 














F 1 II h vmni toot h-nasIP 


1 


1 
1 












I-ormiila 1 

I. KJl iliUia ^ L .. 
















Gibbs' S.R. looth-pasic 






_ 





A 
H 


_ 





Gillette razors and blades 


1 
1 


1 


1 


1 


1 

1 


1 


1 


GlyiTiiel jelly 


o 


D 


6 










rrui 11^1x3 • • ■ • ■ • 


1 
1 


2 


1 


1 


J 





1 


Ibcol 


■y 




2 




X 


2 




Imperial Leather soap . . 


■J 
J 




4 


3 






3 


Iron Jelloids 














2 






7 


7 


g 




. . 




Lanospray . . . . • . 


1 














Loxene hair cretin . . 









. , 


2 





3 


Loxene medicated shampoo 


1 
1 




1 


1 




1 


1 


Vi'opipan'c tr»rtih-nastp 


1 
1 


1 
1 


1 










Maripfilfi hoiisp 2lo\ PS 


1 
1 


1 
1 


1 


1 


J 


1 


1 


Ma V T*3Pf r>r nrpna rat ions 


2 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


N/tilL' ^'^f Mapnpsia tahlpts 






1 


3 


3 


2 


2 


Millf of Mnpnpsia 

iVl 1 1 ^ KJL IVldgllVO tu . > 




] 


1 










Milpar 




2 












Phillips tooth-paste . ■ 


1 
















1 














Pond's beauty products.. 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


Rinstead pastilles . . 


2 








1 


1 




Sebbix 


3 


1 


2 


2 








Shavex 




2 


2 










Silvikrin hair cream 


1 




1 


1 


2 


2 


1 








3 


3 






3 


Suregrip house gloves 


3 


5 


3 


2 


3 


-3 


2 


Tangee lipstick 














1 


Tru-gel 


1 


2 


1 


1 






1 


Valderma 


2 




2 


4 




















2 




Vaseline medicated shampoo 


5 


5 


5 


5 


5 


5 


5 


Vaseline petroleimi jelly . . 


1 


I 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 




2 


2 












Yeast-Vitc 




1 












Zubcs 


2 


2 


2 


"1 









C. & D. WEEKLY LIST OF PRICES 

A = Advanced; R = Reduced; I.R.P. = Inclusive Retail Price; *=Taz 30 per cent.; t = Tax 60 per cent. 



C. L. BENCARD, LTD. (from March 9) 
Nacton tablets Each I.R.P. 

2 mgm. 50 6 8 10 A 
250 30 10 46 3 4 

BRIITSH SCHERING, LTD. (from April 1) 
Androgeston tablets 20 10 71 14 2 R 
100 48 3 64 4 R 

PASCALL-KNIGHT, LTD. (from April 1) 
Guavin 3 0/1 

THORNTON & ROSS. LTD. 

FollowinR an error in a recent irade Press adver- 
tisement the company state thai the following 
are the correct rciail prices of their Zoflora 
preparations:— 

standard bottle of contcmralc 2 6 

spray pack 2 

junior outfit 3 9 

standard outfit 12 6 

aerosol 4 6 

P.A.T.A. LIST 

(Alterations notified this week by the Proprietary 
Articles Trade Associution.) 

ADDITKIN.S TO THE LIST 
<:HKSFJtROU<;H-POND'S. LTD. 

Vaseline medicated shampoo* Ciross 

sachet 49 2 7 
Doz. 

size 1 14 4 2 



white petroleum jelly* 

■■ economy " 32 8 4 6 
Pond's dry skin ereamt 

small 15 2 6 

GLAXO LABORATORIES, LTD. 

Farex 10 oz. 12 10 14 

Osiermilk (Nos. 1 and 2) 

1 lb. 40 3 9 

SCRUBB & CO.. L1X>. 

Scrubb's padded top dry cleaner (improved 
form). 



NEW PRODLCrS AND PACKS 

ABBOIT LABORATORIES, LTD. Icorrccied 
note! 

Compocillin V oral suspen- Each 

slon 16 11. oz. 83 124 6 

BOOTS PURE DRUG CO., LTD. 

Hydrcnox tablets* 100 24 

CULLINGFORDS OF CHELSEA 

Doz. 

Noddy tooth-paste* 18 2 1 11 



EVANS MEDICAL SUPPLIES. LTD. 

Each 



lodevan 500 mils 


6 


8 


10 





2 litres 


24 





36 





ELI LILLY & CO., LTD. 










V-Cil-K Pulvules 










125 mgm. 12 


S 


10 


8 


9 


100 


40 


6 


60 


9 


500 


197 


4 


296 





1,000 


383 


4 


575 





250 mgm. 12 


11 





16 


6 


100 


80 





120 





500 


382 


4 


573 


6 


1,000 


763 


4 


1,145 






N. H. EASTWOOD 

Eastleigh alarm set 

spare bed mats 



157 6 

30 



PHARMACT.UnCAL SPECIALITIES (MAY & 
BAKER), LTD. 

Phenergan 2-5 per cent, 
solution ampoules 

I mil 10 7 

.lANE SEYMOUR. LTD. 

While Wonder cosmetic 
slick with lipstick 

composite packj 3 

A. WANDER, LTD. 

Wander diabetic chocolate 

drink 8 oz. 3 

16 oz. 5 6 

WILLIAM R. WARNER & CO., LTD. 

Doz. 

Pacaial elixir 4 fl. oz. 56 



March 21, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



3 5 



BOURNVITA 




Madeby GADBURY 




ANNOUNCEMENT 



in response to many requests from doctors, we have pleasure 

in announcing the addition of 



'PULVULES' 



They are available in pink capsules 
containing 125 mg. and 250 mg. 
Packs and prices are identical 
with those of Tablets 'V-Cil-K' 
125 mg. and 250 mg. 



'V-CIL-K 

brand penicillin v potassium 



The 'V-Cil-K' range now includes 
'Pulvules' 125 mg. and 250 mg. 
Tablets 60 mg., 125 mg. and 250'mg. 
Syrup In bottles to make 30 cc. and 60 cc. 

* TRADE MARK 




ELI LILLY AND COMPANY LIMITED, BASINGSTOKE, ENGLAND. 



36 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplemen t 



March 21, 1959 



introducing 



SICCOLAM-B 



TRADE MARK 



a new cosmetically acceptable paste with 
modified dehydrating properties 



Pharmacists Medical Profession Retail 

1/6 2/6 2/9 

Retail prices and prices to the Medical Profession include Purchase Tax. 



Collapsible 

tube of 40 grammes 



BDH) 



I 



'SICCOLAM'-B 
* 

for use in skin conditions 
of a less acute nature 
where a mildly dehydrating 
action is required. 

* 

Cosmetically acceptable. 
* 

Indicated in a wide range 
of conditions from 
napkin rash to 
varicose eczema. 

* 

Supplements the original 
'Siccolam' Paste which 
is still available for the 
treatment of severe 
exudative dermatoses. 



THE BRITISH DRUG HOUSES LTD. GRAHAM ST. LONDON N.t 




OXYGEN THERAPY SETS 

Approved by the Ministry of Health for loan by 
chemists against E.C. 10 prescription orders and 
included on the drug tariff. 

Specially developed by Normalair for medical use, 
these light weight, compact sets, enable an accurate 
oxygen supply to be provided direct from any 
standard bull-nose-valve oxygen cylinder. 
ACCURATE, AUTOMATIC FLOW RATE. 
Positive flow selectors are made by simply turning 
a clearly marked control knob. The selected flow 
rate is maintained automatically within + or — 
10% with any cylinder pressure from 200 p.s.i. to 
1,980 p.s.i. thus eliminating the need for adjust- 
ment as cylinder pressure falls. 
Designed to ensure that the accuracy is not 
impaired by the handling to be expected in normal 
service. An integral guard protects the flow 
Miector and pressure gauge from tightening of the 
wing nut. No leak testing is necessary. 




Leading Particulars 

Weight 2^ Ik. 

Overall Height ^ ins. 

Max. Width 6 ins. 

Flow Rates 2 & 4 litres/ntin. 

Max. >nlet Pressure 

1,980 p.s.i. 

Ambient Temperature 
Range 10 °c to + 50° c. 

Outlet Connection 

suitable for sUndard 
bayonet connector. 



Designed and 
manufactured by 



NORMALAflRlLTD 



INDUSTRIAL DIVISION 

27/31 MINSHULL ST. MANCHESTER I. 
Telephone : CENTRAL 3111 



March 21, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



37 




TO 
SPEED 
YOUR 

« 

DISPENSING 



ALL MAW'S ETHICAL PRODUCTS 

are now directly available 

through your usual Prescription Wholesalers: 

TANCOLIN 

3 oz., 6 oz., and 2 litre 
Dispensing Pack 

HEMATRIX 

Ointment, Suppositories 
and Tablets 

ZONULYSIN 

THROMBIN 

THROMBORAL 

THROMBOPLASTIN 

NAPHTHIONIN 

REAZIDE 

NADECON 



MAW'S ETHICAL PRODUCTS 



38 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supple mem 



March 21, 1959 



MORE IDEAS BEGIN WITH BORON 




shining face for modern building 

A dean, permanent and colourful finish to the outside as well as the 
inside of buildings is an attractive prospect in architecture. It is provided 
by the use of 'curtain walls' of vitreous enamelled steel, which require 
less space than load-bearing walls, resist the elements better and cost far 
less to erect. In the production of tenacious and gleaming enamels for 
every purpose, borax is a vital ingredient. This contribution to building 
economy and progress is another new idea that is made possible by the 
use of this familiar product. In nuclear research, in new synthetic 
materials, and in rocket fuels, as well as in established fields of industry 
and pharmacy, the varied properties of boron compounds give rise to 
many new possibilities for progress. 



BORON IN PHARMACEUTICALS 

In the pharmaceutical industry, boric acid has long been acknowledged 
as one of the safest and gentlest antiseptics available, and is used in many 
modern talc preparations. In ointments, dressings, eye lotions and 
similar products, boric acid maintains and extends its traditional place 
on the pharmacist's shelf. 



For further information on Boron and its compounds, write to: 

BORAX CONSOLIDATED LIMITED 

BORAX HOUSE- CARLISLE PLACE- LONDON SW1 
TELEPHONE: VICTORIA 9070 



,'20 MULE team' Registered Trademark 



TSA BXI430 



NEW VULFIX 

PURE BRISTLE BRUSH 



VULFIX 





6/11 




^HE BRUSH WITH THE TWO YEARS' GUARANTEE | 
T6> WITH STYPTIC BLOCK IN BASE 



with 

STYPTIC 
BLOCK 
in BASE 

Packed In units 
of FOUR — 

ONE in vacuum 
Formed 

Showcard 

THREE in 
Window Packs 
Retail 6/11 

Cost 46/3 Doz. 
(P.T. 13/11) or 

15/5 per 4 

(P.T. 4/8) 



Please ask your Wholesaler for particulars 
of our Showstand and Bonus Parcel offers. 



PROGRESS SHAVING BRUSH (VULFIX) LTD 

92 Regent Street, London, W.I 




For more than 100 years 

CAMTHOL 

has been recommended 
for COUGHS & COLDS 

CAMTHOL LINCTUS 

The Cough mixture for Adults 

CAMTHOL PASTILLES 

In tins suitable for pocket and handbag 

CAMTHOL VAPOUR RUB 

Incorporating the finest Essential Oils 



i BONUS— Thirteen to the dozen on all orders | 

1 Retail per doz. j 

CAMTHOL LINCTUS 3/- per bott. Inc. P.T. Cost 27/6 I 

I CAMTHOL PASTILLES 1/9 per tin inc. P.T. Cost 14/11 J i 

B. HOOPER & CO. LTD. 

6 RAILWAY PLACE. FENCHURCH STREET, 
LONDON, E.C.3 



March 21, 1959 



THE CHEMIST ANt) DRtJGGlST 

Supplement 



39 



Announcing 





products 



For relief 
of cough 

Distolyt 



TRADEMARK 



antitussive tablets 



Each sugar-coated tablet contains: 

CHLORCYCLIZINE HYDROCHLORIDE 10 mg. 
GUAIACOL GLYCERYL ETHER 100 mg. 



* in tablet form for ready administration 
when coughs embarrass 

* chlorcyclizine minimises nasal congestion 
and suppresses persistent cough 

* guaiacol glyceryl ether promotes freer 
expectoration and reduces useless irritat- 
ing cough 



PACKS 



TRADE PRICE P. TAX 



RETAIL PRICE 
(INC. P. TAX) 



Tube of 24 
Bottle of 100 



3/- 
91- 



lld 

2/9d 



5/5d 
16/3d 



S4 POISON 



For throat 
infections 

Zynocin 



TRADEMARK 



antiseptic and 
sore tliroat lozenges 

Each pleasantly-flavoured lozenge contains: 

XANTHOCILLIN 1 mg. 
BENZOCAINE 5 mg. 

* contains xanthocillin, the new potent anti- 
biotic, effective against gram-positive and 
gram-negative organisms 

* inhibits secondary yeast and fungal 
activity; no evidence of cross-resistance 

* promptly relieves local soreness and pain; 
non-irritant and safe for all ages 

PACK 

TRADE PRICE P. TAX RETAIL PRICE 



Tube of 12 



2/6d 



3/9d 



f 

THE DISTILLERS COMPANY (Biochemkals) LIMITED 

BROADWAY HOUSE, THE BROADWAY, WIMBLEDON, LONDON S . W . 1 9. TELEPHONE LIBERTY 6600 



owners of the trademarks 'Distolyt' & 'Zynocin' 



PPH4y69 



40 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 
Supplement 



March 21, 1959 





/ 



PROFITS FOR 



I 




Salter's extensive press advertising will shortly 
be boosted with a National T.V. campaign for 
personal scales. This will create extra demand 
for this big selling line — make sure you get your 
full share by checking your stocks now. 

GEO. SALTER & CO. LTD., WEST BROMWICH 



National advertising in the 
leading journals listed below 
continues to push the sales of 
Salter products. 

Ideal Home ■ Good Housekeeping 
Woman & Beauty • Everywoman 
John Bull • Modem Woman 
Mother • Woman s Illustrated 
She • Reader's Digest 



March 21, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 
Supplement 



a case 




COMB SERVER AT 44/10 Plus Tax PER 4 DOZEN SET 



Containing 
1 DOZ.(03TTC) 
1 DOZ.(OITTC) 
1 D0Z.(020TTC) 
1 D0Z.(025TTC) 



LANCER 
CAVALRY 
OXFORD 
CADET 



1\ inch 
6 inch 
5 inch 
5 inch 



Retail 
2/- each 
1/9 each 
1/6 each 
1/6 each 



Total -resale 

24/- 
21/. 
18/- 
18/- 



HYGIENIC 




RETAILERS COST 44/10 + Tax RESALE VALUE 81/- 

I; 

MANUFACTURED BY 

LAUGHTON & SONS LTD • BIRMINGHAM 14 



42 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST March 21, 1959 

Supplement 



A 

P. 
E 
X 



great little machine at a remarkably low price. 



erfect bottles (2000 per hour) using less than 30 sq. ft. of floor space. 



very kind of bottle, with labels or without. r^^"^"" ^ 



eHBiceptionally low running costs. 



APEX' HYDRO BOTTLE WASHER 



FOR FULL DETAILS WRITE TO: 




R. POWLEY & SONS LIMITED, St. Marks Rd., Sunderland, England. 



Telegrams and Cables "Powley" Sunderland. 



Telephone 4846/7 



CLINICAL 

THERMOMETERS 



HOUSEHOLD 
THERMOMETERS 



INDUSTRIAL 

THERMOMETERS 



G.H.ZEAL 

LTD 



LOMBARD ROAD • MORDEN 
ROAD • LONDON • S-WI9 

Telephone: LIBERTY 2283-4-5.6 and 4201 
Cables: " Zealdom " London 




NICALS 



March 21, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



43 




The modern 



method 



of 



iron 



therapy 
without 
side 




FERROUS GLUCONATE 





Side by side with up-to-date equipment available 
today in hospitals, maternity wards and nursing 
homes are the very latest pharmaceuticals, pains- 
takingly developed. Of such is Ferrous Gluconate, 
now widely accepted as the most satisfactory means 
of treating iron deficiency. Besides being inexpen- 
sive it is non-toxic, easily absorbed, well tolerated 
and noted for its absence of unpleasant side effects. 



KEMBALL, BISHOP 



Chemicals for Industry 



KEMBALL, BISHOP & CO. LTD., THREE MILL LANE, BROMLEY-BY-BOW, LONDON, E.3 

Telephone : ADVance 1234 (7 lines) Telegrams ; KEMBALL, BOCHURCH, LONDON 



44 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 
Supplement 



March 21, 1959 



From the extensive range of 



PHARMAC 




M I CALS 



THEOPHYLLINE B.P. MONOHYDRATE 

5 kg. tins and 50 kg. kegs 



THEOPHYLLINE B.P. ANHYDROUS 

5 kg. tins and 50 kg. kegs 



AMINOPHYLLINE B.P. 

5 kg. tins, 121 kg. tins and 50 kg. kegs 



DIHYDROXYPROPYL THEOPHYLLINE 

5 kg. tin s 



MANOFAOTORED BY 



for fine 
pharmaceuticals 



MAY & BAKER LTD 

DAGENHAM • TEL: DOMINION .1060 
E X T : .117 • .118 



w 



e are pleased to announce that these four products 
are now made at our new plant at Norwich and are available 
quantities to suit all requirements. 

Rigorous analytical control ensures that these 
products are absolutely reliable and of high quality. 



EMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 

M^rch 21, 




3iily as much as you need is 
mlled out at a tu 




•k Package has tuck-m ends and 
Ian be re-sealed. 



'otton Wool kept clean 




roughout. 

k Elegant design of pack appro- 
|riate for lady's dressing 
table. 



March 21, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 
Supplement 



47 



BENCARD 



V 



fine 
chemicals 



ALUMINIUM 
GLYCINATE 



(« D.A.A.>0 



of pharmaceutical purity 



Aluminium glycinate finds increasing favour as a safe 
and reliable buffer antacid in gastroenterology. 

C. L. Bencard Ltd. are foremost producers of this 
compound and can olfer any quantity at competitive 
prices. 



Manufactured by the Fine Chemicals Division of 

C. L. BENCARD LTD. 

PARK ROYAL, LONDON, N.W.IO 

Telephone : ELGar 6681 
Telegrams : Bencarlond, London 



48 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



March 21, 1959 




The stylish lightweights 
with the Guaranteed Crookes 



Glass Lenses 



And for wonderful BARNET 
sunglasses selling from 2/- to 7/6 
ask to see the new 
LEADER RANGE 



Yes, the sunglasses with everything 
for top sales this summer . . . 
top styling . . . top value (only 1 2/6 
to 1 5/6) . . . top TV and Press support 
. . . top impact in unique FREE 
sales dispensers . . . 



Order quickly from your wholesaler! 



TOP PROFITS 



MADE BY E. R. HOLLOWAY LTD., BESSEMER ROAD, WELWYN GARDEN CITY, HERTS. WELWYN GARDEN 4444 



March 21, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

S u p p I c m c n I 



49 



COULD YOU 

TURN A 
£5000 PRIZE 

INTO A 
FORTUNE ? 



The News Chronicle 

offers you a chance to get ahead 

To build a successful business you need an 
idea — an idea backed up by shrewdness, 
commonsense and flair. But you need capital 
too; enough to make that scheme of yours 
earn money for you all the rest of your life. 
Once again the News Chronicle is offering 
a prize of £5,000 to a man or woman with a 
bright and promising business idea. 
It may be an entirely new idea, or it may be an 
existing one that just needs a financial boost 
to make it practicable — and profitable. Either 
way this could be the windfall you've been waiting 
for! This could be your chance to get ahead. 





(;* ii" 



SEE THE 



NEWS CHRONICLE 



EXPLAIN YOUR 'GET AHEAD' PLAN ON T.V! 

The contest heats and the Grand Final are 
all being televised by the B.B.C. on eight 
successive Tuesday evenings — the first was or- 
March 17th. Did you see it? There will be 
a special heat for women and there is still Lime for 
everyone to enter. If a panel of experts thinks 
that your idea deserves, on all-round merit, 
to succeed, you'll be invited to explain it to a 
nation-wide audience in one of these 
programmes. During the heats, prizes 
totalling £2,500 must be won (£1 ,000 by a woman) 
and if you are judged the overall winner you 
will receive more than £5.000 in all! 



FOR FULL DETAILS AND ENTRY FORMS OF THE FASCINATING 

Get Ahead' Competition 



March 21, 1959 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

bupplcmeni 




THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



March 21, 1959 



Ask the 
if it's 




You know — we know — that the most successful products 

are advertised on TV. That TV is the most successful 
advertising medium. The impact medium that stimulates 
the greatest demand and gets stocks moving fast. 



At home to lo million viewers in London and the Midlands 



March 21, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 





ASSOCIATED TELEVISION LIMITED 

Television House, Kingsway, 
London, W.C.2. 
Tel: CHAncery 4488 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



March 21, 1959 





TRIDENT 



The Trident is attractive 
yet businesslike — doing 
the job it was made to 
do without fuss. It is 
really comfortable, the 
ear [pieces protecting the 
ears from pressure and the suction cups 
gently but firmly keeping the water out. 
Each cap is in an individual display pack 
with film window, packed 12 to a display. 



6/6d Retail 




SEAL 



The inner flange 
forms an air 
pocket, keeping 
the hair completely 
dry. Each cap in 
individual sleeve, 
packed 12 toj a 
display box,^ 

4/9d Retail 



PENGUIN 
FLORAL 

A thin, stretchy, 
watertight cap 
with fashionable 
floral decorations 
at a popular price. 
Each cap in 
polythene bag. 

7/9d Retail 



FROM THE RANGE OF 'SUBMARINE' SWIMMING CAPS 



Again heavily advertised in the National Press. The 
Submarine range of swimming caps is comprehensive. 
The prices and styles meet all needs, the quality is 
consistent and the rubber used is high grade and 
compounded to give maximum elasticity with long life. 
All caps are thin, making them easy to put on, light 
weight and comfortable. 

The brand name "SUBMARINE" is your guarantee 
of quality, backed by first-class service. 

2/1ld — 7/9d 




PENGUIN 

A most popular 
and efficient 
swimming cap. 

Each cap in a 
polythene bag. 
Twelve to a display 
carton. The 
strapless model 
will be much in 
demand. 

3/6d Retail 



STANDARD 

AND 
CLIPPER 

Now fitted with 
water-excluding 
ridges. Packed 
twelve caps to a 
box. 

2/1 1d Retail 



SUBMARINE HOT W/\7£R 
607T/.ES 

A complete range at competitive prices- 
with metal or rubber stoppers. Every 
bottle fully guaranteed. 





W. HAFFENDEN LIMITED ' RICHBOROUGH RUBBER WORKS • SANDWICH ' KENT 

Telephone: Sandwich 3381/2 



March 21, 1959 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 55 

Supplement 





BONUS 



HEAVY 
BACKING 



This is the form the 
backing will take — consistent 
advertising throughout 
the year in three of the most 
influential women's magazines : 




llllllllgJp^M^ 

womm"s\u;i:ki.y 

Read by more 

than 18 million 
people a week 



RACASAN ^ONUS OFFER closes ir"" April m'l[T 



EACASAN LIMITED ■ ELLESMERE PORT • CHESHIRE 



56 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



March 21, 1959 



FOR YOUR «C & D'' LIBRARY 

I 



ESSENTIALS OF TREATMENT 

First Edition 

First appeared as articles in THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST. 1952 
to 1955. Reprinted as bound volume in response to many requests. 
Gives information on the most modem trends in the treatment of diseases of 
the digestive tract, respiratory system, lungs, liver, kidneys, thyroid, heart, 
ear, eye and skin. A guide to measures against burns and scalds, allergies, 
infectious diseases, etc. X7S 



Postage 9d. 




CHEMISTaZDRUGGIST 

28 ESSEX STREET, STRAND, LONDON, W.C.2 



A Soap 
for Two Markets 

The customer who wants a mildly medi- 
cated soap ; and the customer who hkes 
a top-quality toilet soap; you will sell 
Cuticura to both. Only Cuticura Soap 
has this happy combination. Super- 
fatted to give a rich, fragrant lather, it is 
also — hke Cuticura Talcum and Shaving 
Stick, those other best-sellers — mildly 
medicated to give skin health. It pays to 
display aud recommend 

Cuticura Soap 

also 

TALCUM POWDER • OINTMENT 
HANDCREAM • MEDICATED LIQUID 
SHAVING STICK 



.89 



%HQT NEWS! 

Just out 

= NEW SOLTANETTE 

— low priced infra-red lamp 

A lamp with extraordinary sales 
appeal in its contemporary de- 
sign and popular price. 
This new table model long wave 
infra-red generator lamp has all 
the well-known practical Saltan 
features, and some new ones : 

• contemporary lightweight 
stand; folds down for easier 
packing. 

• insulated knobs for easy 
angle adjustment. 

• strong, plated steel wire 
guard. 

highly polished reflector. 

• convertibility to radiant 
heat. 

• 'cord-grip' cable entry. 

One of a range off new designs 
by 

Write or 'phone for full details and 
illustrated list of infra-red lamps, 
ultra-violet lamps artd high-frequency 
equipment, 

THE LONDON COMMERCIAL ELECTRICAL STORES LIMITED 

20-22 Cursitor Street, London, E.C.4. Tel: CHA 6488 





March 21, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 
Supplement 



57 



MODERN EQUIPMENT 




ISAAC WEBSTER £ SONS LTD. 

ABBEY WORKS 
"--3°^- KIRKSTALL .telegrams 

LEEDS LEEDS. 5. KIRKSTALl 



TELEGRAMS,, 
ISAAC WEBSTER 
KIRKSTALL 



For the past sixty years 
BOX'S INDIGESTION PILLS 

have earned a good 
name as a Family 
Remedy and have 
built sound profit for 
the Chemist. 

P.A.T.A. Retail Prices 
1/7, 3/8, 6/., 13/9, and 25/. 
(incl. tax). 

W. H. BOX, 

47 COBOURG STREET, PLYMOUTH 




■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ 

■■■■■■■illHBHHBHBHaHHHBMBB>-»"ni 

IViTAMIN D3 

PURE(mnALLIliEI»j 



FINE CHEMICALS 



— — MBBMB 

Manufacturers : 

PEBOC 

LIMITED 

Sales Office : 629/630 TOWER BUILDING 
LIVERPOOL 3, ENGLAND 



mm 



Laboratories: NORTHOLT, MIDDLESEX 11 




Buckley Bowker Tablet Co. Ltd. 

29 Parkfield Street, London, N.l. 
Telephone: Canonbury 3401 
Manufacturers of the highest Standard 



Contraceptive 

^tT^Tablets 



and of every kind of Quality Tablets 
to Customer'' s own formulation . . . . 




W. K. BURNSIDE Pty., LTD., Melbourne, AUSTRALIA 

AUSTRALIAN EUCALYPTUS OILS 

RECTIFIED B.P. 70/75% and 80/85% 

EUCALYPTOL B.P. 

PRODUCED NATURALLY WITHOUT FRACTIONATION 

CONSEQUENTLY 

KEEP FRESH LONGER 

Agents for U.K.: WILSON & MANSFIELD, LTD., 15 Philpot Une, LONDON, E.C.3 

Phone: /V1ANS/0N HOUSE 9264-5-6 (WHOLESALE ONLY) Grams: WYFIELD, LONDON 



58 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 
Supplement 



March 21, 1959 






Burson Stockings, made exclusively 
on special knitting looms, are the product 
of many years' intensive research into the 
making of surgical stockings. 

Always dispense and recommend 
Burson 2-Way Stretch Hosiery and ensure 
your customers' complete satisfaction. 
The quality — finish — colour and durability 
of Burson Hose make them the first choice 
of those who appreciate the best. Burson 
Stockings are fully fashioned and virtually 
indiscernible in use. 

Burson Stockings are advertised in the 
Medical Journals and in a strong list of 
National Weekly Newspapers and Women's 
Magazines. 

DISPENSE BURSON whenever 
2-way stretch elastic or 
Last ex hosiery is prescribed 



AVAILABLE FREE ON REQUEST WITH BURSON STOCKINGS:— 

• Instruction Chart with details for measuring, 
fitting and exact adjustment to fit and tension. 

• Individual Measurement and Order Forms. 

• Instructions for mending and washing. 

• Illustrated leaflets for your customers. 

BURSON 

TWO-WAY STRETCH HOSIERY 
IS MADE FROM LASTEX YARN 

Sole Distributors.— FASSETT & JOHNSON LTD., 

86, CLERKENWELL ROAD, LONDON, E.C.I 
Also at 6 CROW STREET, DUBLIN 



MEGALON 

LIVER EXTRACTS 





Crude and Refined Injectable in bulk, 
ampoules and vials. Oral Tonics and 
concentrated pastes for oral preparations. 
a wide range of 

INJECTION PRODUCTS 

and 

COMPRESSED TABLETS 

to B.P., B.P.C. and B.Vet.C. specifications 
or to private formulations. 

Manufactured by 

ANTIGEN LTD., ROSCREA, 
REPUBLIC OF IRELAND 

Please send enquiries to : — 

ANTIGEN LTD., 67 HIGH STREET, 
BEXLEY i u.'T^ KENT 





ESTABLISHED 1793 



^TKINSON^B^RKERS 

INFANTS' PRESERVATIVE 



The Infants' Medicine 
of 150 years' standing 

For teething and digestive troubles 



ROBERT BARKER 

IS ALISTAIR STREET MANCHESTER, i 



& SON 

LTD 



Whitaker's 
for Dyes 

"LUTON" STRAW HAT DYES and 
"AURORAL" COLD WATER DYES 

are nationally advertised and are regularly requested. 
Attractive Pattern Cards and Showcards supplied. 

Write for Order Form giving full lists of colours, prices and terms to: 

WHTTAKER & CO. (KENDAL) LTD., KENDAL. 



March 21, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplemeni 





Recipes and methods 
of making 

ADHESIVES, BEVERAGES 
CLEANING MATERIALS 
CONFECTIONERY 
COSMETICS, CULINARY & 
HOUSEHOLD REQUISITES 
DENTAL PREPARATIONS 
HORTICULTURAL PRODUCTS 
LACQUERS & VARNISHES 
PASTILLES & LOZENGES 
PERFUMERY, PESTICIDES 
PHOTOGRAPHIC REQUISITES 
POLISHES, HAIR PRODUCTS 
TOILET PREPARATIONS 
VETERINARY PRODUCTS 
WRITING MATERIALS, Etc. 

Each section under 
an introductory 
chapter of text. 



FROM YOUR 
BOOKSELLER 
OR DIRECT 
FROM 



RMACEUTICAL 
FORMULAS. VOL 2 

PRICE 42/ 



postage 
l/9d. 



ChemistZDruggist 

28 ESSEX STREET, STRAND, 
LONDON. W.C.2 



SPECIAL 
COMBINED PRICE 

If you buy at the same time 
Pharmaceutical Formulas Vol. I 
(pharmaceutical products in- 
cluding those of foreign pharma- 
copoeias) you pay 75s. (postage 
2/3d.), a saving of 4s. 6d. 



60 



March 21, 1959 



Chemist 




AND 



Druggist 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 



Telephone: CENlral 6565 



Specially spaced Advertisements, including : — Public and Legal Notices, Sale by Auction, Appointments, Contract Work Patents Partner 

ships. 18/- per \ inch minimum and pro --— " — /-i— .-j va/ d.._- . ^ • • 

Wanted, Agencies Wanted. Miscellaneous, 
words minimum, then 4<1. per word. Box 



! :— ruDiic ano Legal r«ioxice$, sale Dy Auction, Appointments, Contract Work, Patents, Partner- 

t ^ Clearances and Warjts, Businesses for Disposal and Wanted, Premises. Agent. 

17/6 for 34 words minimum; then 4d. per word. Box 2/-. Situations Vacant. 12/- for 3t 

Box 2/-. Situations Wanted. 3/- for 18 words minimum: then 2d. per word Box 1/-. 



Addreu Box Number ReplleM to: THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST, 28 ESSEX ST., STRAND, LONDON. W.CJ 

I 



ORRIDGE & COMPANY 



184 STRAND, W.C.2 

Tel: TEMple Bar 9212/3 & 6340 



I CHEMIST BUSINESS TRANSFER AGENTS AND VALUERS WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 



BRANCHES: BIRMINGHAM 

lllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllli 



PREMISES TO LET 

PREMISES TO LET. Opportunity occurs to 
establish pharmacy in new shopping parade, 
residential district, Bexhill-on-Sea. on very 
favourable terms. Premises comprise lock-up 
shop, excellent maisonnette, garage. All services 
available. Box C 2112. 

TO LET for storage. Wholesale chemists. Man- 
chester, have self-contained two-storey wing 
comprising four rooms totalling 2,000 sq, ft, 
with separate entry to street Half-mile Picca- 
dilly. Box C 2130. 



PREMISES 



BROWETT, TAYLOR & CO., 
Chartered Suireyors and 
Anctioneers 

have an applicant wishing to purchase 
freehold chemist shops as investments 
and willing to grant leases back to 
present owners. Details to: 

Browett, Taylor & Co., 
3/4 Lincoln's Inn Fields, W.C.2. 
Chancery 827S. 

(Usual commission required) 

C 2141 



BUSINESSES FOR DISPOSAL 

KILWINNING, Ayrshire. Old-established pro- 
fitable pharmacy for sale owing to death. Offers 
invited for business and shop property. Stock 
at valuation. Inquiries to James Patrick & Muir. 
Solicitors. Dairy. Ayrshire, C2129 



APPOINTMENTS 

HORNSEY CENTRAL HOSPITAL, 
PARK ROAD, N.8 

Chief Pharniiicist (CateKory I) 
required at this general practitioner Hospital. 
Salary £7.?0 to £985 p.a. Candidates may visit 
the Department by arrangement with the Hos- 
pital Secretary (Mou. 6244), Applications stat- 
ing age, qualifications and previous experience 
to Group Secretary, Archway Group H.M.C. 
46 Cholmeley Park. N.6, within 10 days. 

C9045 



LIVERPOOL 

llllllllllllllllllll 



SOUTHAMPTON 

lllllllllllllllllllll 

ANCOATS HOSPITAL, 
MANCHESTER, 4 

Pharmacist 

Applications are invited for the above post, 
Whitley Council Scale and conditions. 
Applications, stating age and experience, with 
names of two referees, to the General Super- 
intendent. Dept. CD C 9052 



BROOKWOOD HOSPITAL, 
KNAPHILL, WOKING 

Assistant-in -Dispensing 

Applications are invited for the above post. 
The successful candidate will be required to 
work under the supervision of the Chief Phar- 
macist, who is responsible for the preparation 
and issue of drugs and dressings for about 
1.750 patients. 

Salary Scale £170 p,a, at age 16 years rising 
to £375 at age 22 years or over rising to a 
maximum of £490 p,a. (plus £20 p.a, for an 
approved qualification). 

Professional and Technical Council B of Whit- 
ley Council conditions apply to the appoint- 
ment which is subject to the provision of the 
National Health Service Superannuation Regu- 
lations. 

The successful candidate will be required to 

pass a medical examination. 

Accommodation available for female candidate 

for which a charge of £2 8s, per week will be 

made. 

Applications giving particulars of age. experi- 
ence and qualifications, together with names 
of two referees to the Physician Superintendent, 
as soon as possible. C 417 



H.M. PRISON SERVICE 

Chief and Basic Grade Pharmacist Vacancies 

Category I and II posts (open to men and 
women registered pharmacists aged 25 or over). 
Category I post at H,M, Prison Pentonville. 
London, N,7, Salary scale £700— £945. plus 
London allowance of £30 — £40, 
Category II post at H,M, Prison Birmingham. 
Salary scale £755— £1.030, 

Basic Grade post at H.M. Prison Wormwood 
Scrubs. London. W,12, Salary scale £605— 
£815. plus London allowance of £20 — £40. 
(Minimum of scale linked with age 23.) 
Additional allowance of £25 for higher quali- 
fications. 

Post siipciannuahic under the N.H,S, Super- 
annuation Scheme. 

Apply Establishment Officer. Prison Commission, 
Horseferry House. R 237. Dean Ryle Street, 
London, S.W.I, Closing date April 4. 1959. 

C 9061 



SHEFFIELD • CARDIFF 



In? 



ESSEX COUNTY HOSPITAL, 
COLCHESTER 



Assislan(-in-Dispen.sing 

required at the above hospital. Salary as Whit- 
ley Council Scale rising to £510 per annum. 
Applications to Group Secretary. Colchester 
Hospital Management Committtee. 14 Pope's 
t-ane. Colchester. Ess ex, C 9027 

HAREFIELD HOSPITAL, 
HAREFIELD, MIDDLESEX 
(610 Beds) 

Senior Pharmacist 

required at the above general and chest hos- 
pital, London Weighting payable. 
Applications together with names of 



referees to Medical Director, 



two 
C9058 



HAREFIELD HOSPITAL, 
HAREFIELD, MIDDLESEX 
(610 Beds) 

Locum Senior Pharmacist 

required at the above general and chest hos- 
pital, London Weighting payable. 
Applications together with names of two 



referees to Medical Director, 



C 9057 



HAREFIELD HOSPITAL, 
HAREFIELD, MIDDLESEX 

Assis(ant-in -Dispensing; 

required, London Weighting payable and addi- 
tional £20 p,a. if holding approved qualifica- 
tion. Applications, giving age. qualifications and 
experience, together with two testimonials to 
Medical Director. C 9023 

KING EDWARD VII HOSPITAL, 
WINDSOR 
(Category III Hospital) 

Pharmacist 

required immediately. Whitley salary. Appli- 
cations giv.ng details of service and names of 
three referees to Secretary, C 9042 



LEYTONSTONE (No. 10) 
HOSPITAL GROUP 

Locum Pharmacist 

Applications are invited for the above post (to 
work under Chief Pharmacist) at Langthome 
Hospital, l eytonstone. E.ll, (Category I Hos- 
pital,) Required for an indefinite period. 
.Salary £16 16s, per week. 

I he hospital is situated near the Central 
Underground line, within easy reach of Central 
London. 

Applications to the Senior Medical Officer as 
soon as possible, C9051 



ERXEST J. GEORGE & CO. 

329 HIGH HOLBORN, LONDON, W.C.I. T.i.phone : holborn 7406/7 

Professional Valuers to the Pharmaceutical Trade. — Wholesale, Retail and 
Hospital Stocks. Branches throughout England and Scotland. 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 21, 1959 

Appointments— Continued 

LAMBETH HOSPITAL, 
BROOK DRIVE, S.E.Il 
(Acute General 501 Beds) 

Pharmacist 

required. Salary in accordance with Whitley 
Council Scale, plus London Weighting. Appli- 
cations stating age, experience, qualifications 
and names of two referees to the Secretary. 

C 442 



METROPOLITAN HOSPITAL, 
KINGSLAND ROAD, 
LONDON, E.8 

Phannaci<>t 

for modem department. Permanent post. Salary 
scale £605-£8I5 p. a. plus higher qualification 
allowance and London Weighting. Please apply 
with details of age, training and experience to 
the Hospital Secretary. C 437 

METROPOLITAN HOSPITAL, 
KINGSLAND ROAD, 
LONDON, E.8 

Locum Pharmacist 

required from Monday. March 23, 1959, to 
work in a modern department. Apply to Hos- 
pital Secretary. C 445 

NOTTINGHAM No. 2 HOSPITAL 
MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE, 
NOTTINGHAM CITY HOSPITAL 
(811 Beds) 

Deputy Chief Pharmacist (Category V) 

required at the above hospital. Applications are 
invited for the above post, which is now 
vacant. 

The City Hospital is a Group hospital and 
caters for the pharmaceutical requirements of a 
number of subsidiary hospitals in the area. 
Applicants should have a wide experience in 
hospital pharmacy, and be capable of control- 
ling staff. A knowledge of surgical instruments 
is desirable. The successful applicant will work 
under the Group Chief Pharmacist and will be 
required to assume complete control in his 
absence. 

Funher particulars regarding the post can be 
obtained on application to the Group Chief 
Pharmacist. Whitley conditions of salary. 
Applications, staling age, qualifications and full 
particulars of previous experience, together with 
the names of two referees, should be sent to 
the Group Secretary, Sherwood Hospital, Not- 
tingham, as soon as possible. C 9002 

PRESTON AND CHORLEY 
HOSPITAL MANAGEMENT 
COMMITTEE, 
PRESTON ROYAL INFIRMARY 

Senior Phannacist 

Applications are invited for the post of Senior 
Phannacist at the above general hospital. 
Whitley Council scale and conditions Salary 
£675 X £J0 (1) X £35 (1) x £30 (3) x £35 (1)— 
£865, plus £25 per annum h gher qualification 
allowance. Additional payments for voluntary 
evening clinic duties. 

Applications with names of two referees, to 
the Group Secretary, Royal Infirmary, Preston, 
I^ncs. C 9047 

READING AND DISTRICT 
HOSPITAL MANAGEMENT 
COMMITTEE 

Pharmacist 

required at the Royal Berkshire Hospital, Read- 
ing (Category V). Six pharmacists with full 
supporting staff. Frequent five-day weeks. Com- 
mencing salary, new entrants, up to £730 p.a. 
based on previous professional experience and 
National Service after qualification. Applica- 
tions to Group Pharmacist, Royal Berkshire 
Hospital. C 443 

SHREWSBURY HOSPITAL 
GROUP 

Pharmacist 
For Copthorne Hospital. 

Pharmacist 

For the Group Pharmacy at the Royal Salop 
Infirmary, with rota duties at other hospitals 
in the Group, as may be required. 
Salary in accordance with Pharmaceutical Whit- 
ley Council Scale. 

Applications to the undersigned from whom 
any further particulars may be obtained. 

J. P. MALLETT. 
Group Secretary. 

C9044 



Supplement 

SEAMEN'S HOSPITALS 
MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE 

Locum Pharmacist 

required at Albert Dock Hospital, E l 6, from 
June 15 for one week. Apply, with particulars 
of previous experience to House Governor, 
Dreadnought Hospital. C 9065 



ST. ANN'S GENERAL HOSPITAL, 
ST. ANN'S ROAD, 
SOUTH TOTTENHAM, N.15 

Locum Phannacist 

required immediately. £16 16s. per week. Staff 
of three in dcparimeni. Apply to Hospital 
Secretary. C 9054 



ST. LUKE'S HOSPITALS, 
BRADFORD, 5 

Pharmacist 

required. General and .Maternity LInit, 862 beds. 
Commencing salary within the scale £605-£815 
per annum. Apply, giving the names of two 
referees to the Hospital Secretary. C 9056 



STEPNEY GROUP HOSPITAL 
MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE 

Deputy Chief Pharmacist (Category IV) 

Applications are invited for the above post 
at Mile End Hospital. Bancroft Road, London, 
E.l. Whitley Council salary scale and condi- 
tions of service. The department is responsible 
for pharmaceutical supplies to another hospital 
and clinic in the Group and the preparation of 
sterile produas. Funher particulars may be 
obtained from the Chief Pharmacist. Applica- 
tions stating age, qualifications, experience and 
the names of two referees, to be sent to the 
Group Secretary at Mile End Hospital, not 
later than April 1, 1959. C9053 



THE ANNIE McCALL 
MATERNITY HOSPITAL, 
JEFFREYS ROAD, 
LONDON, S.W.4 

Part-time Pharmacist 

in sole charge required. Preferably female. 
16 hours per week. Monday to Friday. Whitley 
Council terms and conditions of service. Salary 
43s. 8d. per session of 4 hours. Applications, 
giving full particulars of experience and names 
of two referees to Hospital Secretary. C 444 



TOOTING BEC HOSPITAL 
MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE 

Pharmacist 

required at Tooting Bee Hospital, Tooting Bee 
Road, London. S.W.17. Permanent post, Whit- 
ley Council salary. Apply to Physician Super- 
intendent. C 446 



WHITTINGTON . HOSPITAL, 
LONDON, N.19 

Pharmacists 

required for Archway and St. Mary's Wings. 
Salary £635-f855 p.a. Candidates may visit 
the departments by direa arrangement with 
the Medical Superintendent (Archway 3070, 
Ext.: 440). 

Applications, stating age, qualifications, experi- 
ence, and naming two referees to Medical 
Superintendent immediately. C 9046 



APPOINTMENTS OVERSEAS 

HONG KONG 
GOVERNMENT 

Pharmacist (Male) 

required (a) on probation for pensionable em- 
ployment, or (b) on temporary terms with 
gratuity at rate £150/ £200 a year. Commencing 
salary according to experience in scale (in- 
cluding expatriation pay and temporary cost- 
of-living allowance) equivalent to £1,069 a 
vear rising to £1,731 a year (single men), 
£1,1 80/ £1,906 (married men), £1,291/ £2,082 
(family men). Free passages. Liberal leave on 
full salary after initial 3! years tour. Candi- 
dates under 35 for terms (a) or under 50 for 
terms (b), must be M.P.S. (G.B.), or recog- 
nised equivalent, with minimum two years' 
post-registration experience, and should have 
had good experience, especially on inspectorial 
duties. 

Write to the Crown Agents. 4 Millbank, Lon- 
don, S.W.I. State age, name in block letters, 
full qualifications and experience and quote 
M3B/44847/CD. C 9041 



6 1 



EDUCATIONAL 



LONDON COLLEGE OF 
PHARMACY AND CHEMISTRY 
FOR WOMEN 
7 Westbourne Park Road, W.2 
Established 1892 
The only College in S.E. England 
teaching exclusively for the Assistants- 
in-Dispensing Examination of the So- 
ciety of Apothecaries. Enrolling now 
for six months' full-time or 2-year 
part-lime course for Student Dis- 
pensers under 1956 Regulations. 100 
per cent. Examination successes in 
1958. C 404 



SITUATIONS VACANT 
RETAIL HOME 

CORBY, Northanis. Pharmacist, lady or gentle- 
man, required to manage modern pharmacy 
with rapidly expanding turnover in this " New 
Town," with predominately Scottish population. 
A modern flat, with garage, is available. Early 
closing day Saturday, Superannuation scheme 
with transfer clause. A good salary will be 
paid to suitable applicant. Please apply giving 
details of career to Superintendent Chemist, 
Kettering Co-operative Chemists, Ltd., 23 King 
Street, Kettering. C2105 

COTSWOLD TOWN. Experienced dispensing 
assistant required for a good class country 
business, Salary well above average with living 
accommodation if required Interview expenses 
paid. Box C 2131. 

COVENTRY. Pharmacist a.ssistant, lady or 
gentleman, required for old-established, high- 
class dispensing and family business. Central 
position, excellent working conditions. Please 
apply, stating salary required, to Managing 
Director, Loveiti & Bones, Ltd., Hertford 
Street, Coventry. C2133 

COVENTRY. Private company has vacancy for 
assistant pharmacist to manage busy dispensary, 
and to take active and responsible part in gen- 
eral running of busy main shop, staff of twelve. 
No rota or Sunday duties. Opponunity for 
managership of branch in about twelve months 
if desired. This vacancy will provide first-class 
experience and carries excellent prospects. Salary 
to commence £1,000. Superannuation scheme in 
operation. Modem three-bedroom house avail- 
able. Apply to Greens' Pharmacies, 49 Hert- 
ford Street, Coventry. C 2126 

JOHN DENT (Chemists), Ltd., of 79 New 
Square. Chesterfield, will require a Pharmacist 
in July to manage their branch shop, situated 
in a pleasant suburb of Chesterfield within easy 
reach of the country and the Derbyshire moors. 
A bonus and pension scheme are in operation 
and every assistance will be given to acquire 
accommodation. Please state salary required; 
there is no Sunday, holiday or rota duty. 

C 2023 

LONDON, E.C.4, AREA. Wanted Chemist/ 
Manager for new shop opening July. Male or 
female. Busy position. Good prospeas for 
energetic person. No living accommodation. 
Every encouragement for advancement. Write 
Box C 2116. 

ORPINGTON, Kent. Lady dispensing assistant 
required in pleasant family business within easy 
reach of London. Permanency. Apply with 
usual particulars, including salary required, to 
H. J. Griffiths, manager, Farrants, 130 High 
Street, Orpington. Phone 20058. C 2138 

MIDDLESBROUGH. Pharmacist required to 
manage branch shop. Salary over £1,000. Com- 
petent staff. Superannuation scheme. Modem 
accommodation if required. Apply with usual 
particulars to Superintendent Chemist, Middles- 
brough Co-operative Chemists, Ltd., Middles- 
brough, Yorks. C2120 

QUALIFIED MANAGER required for small 
branch business. Two lady assistants on staff. 
Suit young pharmacist, lady or male. Also 
qualified assistant for dispensing business, two 
qualified on staff. Suit young man. Excellent 
prospects. Northern Ireland qualification would 
suit very well and tie up with present staff. 
W. H. Hampton, Ltd., 47 Northgate Street, 
Gloucester. C 2135 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



March 21, 1959 



Situations Vacant — Continued 

PHARMACIST assistant, lady, required imme- 
diately. No half-day, rota or Sunday duties. 
Close 1 p.m. Saturday. Congenial position in 
busy city business. Good supporting staff. Apply 
giving full paniculars to Robert Howden, Ltd., 
11 Fenchurch Street, London, E.C.3 (Phone: 
Man. 7065.) C2124 

READING. Opportunity for two young lady 
pharmacists to share small modem flat. £1,600 
a year and management of business — pre- 
dominantly dispensing. Mutual agreement for 
40-hour week and four weeks' annual holiday. 
Stanley Bubb. M.P.S.. Lansdowne House, 
Christchurch Road, Bournemouth. C 2125 

WIDNES. Metcalfe's of Liverpool require a 
Pharmacist /Manager for their branch phar- 
macy at Ditton, Widnes. Salary £1,040 per 
annum for a 44-hour week. Three-bedroom flat 
available. Apply to Managing Director, Met- 
calfe & Co. (Liverpool), Ltd., 596 Prescot 
Road, Liverpool, 13. C 2095 



RETAIL (OVERSEAS) 

APPLICATIONS are invited from qualified 
male staff for service in Northern Rhodesia. 
Three-year contract. Apply by air mail giving 
full details of experience with copies of refer- 
ences. State age, marital status, religion, 
nationality, etc., to Advertiser, P.O. Box 202, 
Broken Hill, Northern Rhodesia. C 9039 



WHOLESALE 

ALLEN & HANBURYS, LTD., Bethnal Green, 
London, E.2, require a pharmacist to act as 
representative in the Republic of Ireland and 
applications are invited from men of sound 
character with initiative and drive. A period 
of training will be given. The salary will be 
commensurate with qualifications and experience 
and a contributory pension scheme is in oper- 
ation. Expenses are paid and a car supplied. 
Full details of age, qualifications and experi- 
ence should be sent to the Personnel Manager, 

C 9048 

ALLEN & HANBURYS, LTD., Bethnal Green, 
London, E.2, require a pharmacist to act as 
representative for the Bournemouth and South- 
ampton area and applications are invited from 
men of sound character with initiative and 
drive. A period of training will be given. The 
salary will be commensurate with qualifications 
and experience and a contributory pension 
scheme is in operation. Expenses are paid and 
a car supplied. Full details of age, qualifica- 
tions and experience should be sent to the 
Personnel Manager. C 9049 

AYRTON, SAUNDERS & CO., LTD., require 
a pharmacist for analytical and research work, 
preferably with some experience. The applicant 
will be encouraged to work for A.R.I.C. if not 
already so qualified. Five-day week; pension 
scheme. Full details of age, qualifications and 
experience in writing to: Technical Director, 
34 Hanover Street, Liverpool, 1. C 9066 

CONSCIENTIOUS young man with technical 
background required to be trained as a com- 
pounder. Excellent prospects. Knowledge of 
French or Italian helpful but not necessary. 
Telephone for appointment lerminus 6127 or 
write to Box C 2142. 

EXPERIENCED REPRESENTATIVE required 
for wholesale warehouse, to carry fashion 
Jewellery as sideline. Good commission. Box 
C 9022. 

LEADING cosmetic company in West London 
require Chemist for laboratory work. Know- 
ledge oils and fats an advantage. Please write 
stating age. experience and salary required to 
Box C 2122. 

ORDER CLERKS. The British Drug Houses. 
Ltd., require Clerks with a sound knowledge 
of ethical and proprietary medicines for tele- 
phone order and pricing work. Applicants 
should have experience in the wholesale distri- 
bution trade. Fivc-day week, canteen. Apply 
in writing stating age, experience and salary 
required to the staff manager, Graham Street, 
City Road, N.l. C 9018 



OPENING FOR 
WORKS CHEMIST 

Lancashire firm of Manufacturing Chem- 
ists with old-established nation-wide 
business require Pharmacist for quality- 
control of wide range of medicinal 
liquid, tablet and powder preparations. 
The work will be interesting and 
varied, involving liaison with produc- 
tion and manufacturing departments. 
Applications, which will be treated 
in strictest confidence, should give full 
details of training, experience, age and 
salary required to Box C 9059. 



PHARMACIST required as manager of modem 
factory in Hertfordshire, within easy reach of 
London. All applications treated in strict con- 
fidence. Write giving full particulars to Box 
C 9064. 



PHARMACIST 

required as 

Assistant to Sales Manager 

A young man, preferably aged 23-27 
years, and of proven ability, is required 
to promote sales to retail pharmacies. 
Initial salary £800 p a., plus commis- 
sion and expenses. Saloon car and rent- 
free flat provided. Within two years the 
right man can expect to be appointed 
Asst. Sales Manager at a salary not 
less than £1.400 p.a. Please supply de- 
tails of past career and qualifications, 
in strict confidence, to: 

The Managing Director, 

THE CROWN CHEMICAL CO., LTD., 
Lamberhurst, Kent 

C9043 



PHARMACEUTICAL manufacturers require 
young qualified a.ssistant for quality control 
laboratory in Hampshire. He will be engaged 
on a wide and continuously expanding range of 
pharmaceutical products. A good salary will 
be negotiated in keeping with qualifications. 
Modern working conditions in newly-built lab- 
oratories. Non-contributory pension scheme. 
Write full details to Personnel Manager, Wm. 
R. Warner & Co., Ltd., Eastleigh, Hampshire. 

C 9050 

SANDOZ PRODUCTS, LTD., require skilled 
men for compressing and granulating processes 
at their new Horsforth factory. Also an experi- 
enced female packaging supervisor. Detailed 
applications to the Manager, Pharmaceutical 
Dept., Sandoz Products, Ltd., Calverley Lane, 
Horsforth, Leeds. C 2099 

SHIPPING CLERK REQUIRED. Knowledge 
Customs drawback an advantage. Canteen 
facilities. Contributory pension. Five-day week. 
Apply. Secretary, William Ransom & Son, Ltd., 
Hitchin, C 9062 

TRAINEE/FITTERS. The Scholl Foot Comfort 
Service requires young men and women between 
the «tes 24/30 as Trainee-Fitters. Applicants 
should have a good ba,sic education and must 
bo mobile for the first 12 months. The work is 
interesting and offers good scope. A pension 
scheme is in operation. Applications giving 
details of age, education and career to date 
should be sent to: Personnel Manager, Scholl 
Fool Comfort Service, 182 St. John Street, 
London, E.C.I. C 9063 

WILLIAM FREEMAN & CO., UMITED, 

have a vacancy for an experienced sales repre- 
sentative, to cover the Counties of Leicester, 
Northants, and the part Counties of Lincoln- 
shire, Warwickshire, Bedfordshire, Buckingham- 
shire, and Oxon. An excellent existing connec- 
tion will be handed over to successful applicant, 
who should preferably be experienced in calling 
upon chemists and hardware outlets, both retail 
and wholesale. Car owner essential, domiciled 
on territory. Remuneration by salary, commis- 
sion and expenses. Staff superannuation scheme. 
Application in writing to: The General Sales 
Manager, Suba Seal Works, Peel Street, Bams- 
ley, Yorkshire. C 9033 



AGENTS WANTED 

AGENT REQUIRED on commission basis for 
the Counties of Kent, Surrey and Sussex, to 
take over existing agencies and appoint new 
ones for the sale of seeds and fenilisers for 
leading Midland horticultural house. Write 
giving details of area covered, other lines carried 
and experience to Box C 2103. 

AGENTS WANTED (except London). Good 
connections chemists and stores. To sell new 
French toilet perfume. Popular price and imme- 
diate appeal. Big retail profit. Nationally adver- 
tised. Commission only. References essential. 
Box C 2127. 

AGENTS WANTED in Birmingham, London, 
Bristol, Glasgow and Dundee, calling on doc- 
tors, clinics, hospitals, wholesalers, etc., for 
progressive ethical and proprietary medicines 
company. Ten per cent, commission paid to 
gentlemen who can show good results. Our 
proprietaries are in big demand by the medical 
profession. Box C 2140. 

ESTABLISHED FIRM requires agents in Scot- 
land, Midlands, West of England and Northern 
Ireland to sell first-class medicinal products, 
including two sell-on-sight Summer lines and 
one entirely new product with big sales poten- 
tial. Box C 2136. 

IMPORTERS /WHOLESALERS of high-class 
fancy goods who are agents for two important 
French perfumes require agents capable of sell- 
ing to chemists and department stores. Terri- 
tories available: Midlands. North and South 
Wales and Western Counties. Please give full 
details to Box C 2123. 

MANUFACTURERS of cosmetics and toilei 
goods require energetic agents, well-introduced 
to chemists, in South-east England, South Coast. 
Bristol and South Wales. High rate of com- 
mission only. Box C 2128. 



SITUATIONS WANTED 
RETAIL HOME 

EXPERIENCED lady assistant requires pan- 
time post, mornings or three days weekly. 
Richmond district. Counter chiefly, willing to 
assist dispensing. Sansom, 145 Mortlake Road. 
Kew Gardens, Richmond, Surrey. C2139 

UNQUALIFIED lady with first-class counter 
experience seeks position with retail chemist 
in North, Central, N.W. London area. Boj 
C 2134. 



RETAIL (OVERSEAS) 

DENVER WILLIAMSON, International 
locum, Kineton, Warwickshire. Replaces Pro- 
prietors/Managers worldwide. Experience home, 
France, Italy, South America, Africa. C 1987 



V/HOLESALE 

AN EXECUTIVE (age 33) seeks progressive 
post. 12 years' experience in cosmetic and pro- 
prietary production control, purchasing, sales 
and market research. Holder of professional 
qualifications. Box C 2137, 



WHOLESALE (OVERSEAS) 

NEW ZEALAND. Medical representative re- 
turning shortly to N.Z., wants appointment as 
medical representative there. Wide experience 
in that country detailing doctors, vets, chem- 
ists. Also import procedure, costing and Gov- 
ernment liaison. Write Box C 2119. 



AGENCIES WANTED 

AGENT seeks new lines for promotion In 
New Zealand. Good conneaion with chemists, 
vets, doctors, hospitals and stores. Lines ia 
pharmaceutical, surgical Instrument, fancy goods 
and toilet fields wanted. Agent at present in 
London. Box C 2118. 



March 21, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplemeni 



A POST WITH PROSPECTS . . . 



Are you a pharmacist (aged about 35) with sales experience, a 
sound general knowledge of the pharmaceutical industry and able to 
run an office? If so, do you want to be considered for an assistant 
managerial post on THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST with definite 
prospects of advancement in a few years' time? The post carries a 
four-figure salary, staff bonus and pension rights and offers an out- 
standing opportunity to the right man. 

Those wishing to apply should write, giving their age and full 
details of their career to date, to: 

THE STAFF DIRECTOR, 
MORGAN BROTHERS (PUBLISHERS) LIMITED 
28 ESSEX STREET, STRAND, LONDON, W.C.2 




SPECIALISTS 

FINEST QUALITY WORK 
MODERN LABORATORY 

RETURN POSTAL SERVICE, 
DAILY VAN DELIVERIES, in 

Preston, Chorley, Bolton and 
South Lancashire. 
First Class Show Material FREE on request 

ORMSKIRK 
PHOTO SERVICES LTD. 

ORMSKIRK, UNCS. Telephone 2380 




F. SCHUTZE & CO., LTD. 

ESTABLISHED 1882 

For "MASTER" BRAND SURGICAL TRUSSES 
SUSPENSORY BANDAGES 
JOCK STRAPS, etc., etc. 



PERFUMERY BOHLE WICKERERS in RAFFIA 
or SILK, plain or fancy, wide range of designs. 
Own bottles wickered at moderate cost. 



Black Bull Works, Market Road 
London, N.7 



MEDICAL PROPAGANDA 

Reckitt & Sons Ltd. wish to appoint an assistant in 
their Pharmaceutical Department to accept administra- 
tive responsibility for the direction of medical propa- 
ganda. The appointment would be at the Head Office 
of the Company. Applicants must have practical 
experience of similar work and should be in the age 
group 30-35. The appointment offers a wide range of 
interest in a developing field. There is a good Com- 
pany pension scheme. Enquiries should be made in 
writing giving full information and should be addressed 
to the Personnel Director, Reckitt & Sons, Ltd., 
Dansom Lane, Hull. 

C9055 



BERDOE & FISH 

Chemists' Transfer Agents and Valuers 
41 ARGYLE SQUARE, KING'S CROSS, W.C.I 

(opposite St. Pancras and King's Cross Stations) 

Wanted immediately good class 
businesses in London, Home Counties 
and South Coast. Private clients 
waiting with cash up to £10,000. 

• All Valuations and Stocktakings, carried out under 
personal supervision of principals. 

Established 1870 Phone: TERmlnus 3574 



64 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



March 21, 1959 



BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 

EXPANSION OF PLANT. Reputable firm 
making hath cubes for the trade is able to 
take further contracts Box AC 46615, Samson 
Clarks, 57/61 Monimer Street, W.l. C 8996 
OPPORTUNITY occurs for Representative with 
connection Surrey, Sussex. Hants, to join 
wholesale house, sundries, view to taking con- 
trol. Capital required, £3.000. Box C2121. 



WANTED 

BUYER specialises in disposing of job lots of 
any lines appertaining to pharmacy. Any quan- 
tity considered. Prompt cash settlement. Willing 
lo discuss adaptation of any line which is 
not quite suitable in its present state. Please 
send samples and full details to N. Morris, 
218 Walworth Road, S.E.17. Tel. No.: ROD. 
7261. C 395 



WANTED 

SURPLUS CAMERAS, ENLARGERS, 
CINE CAMERAS & PROJECTORS. 
PHOTOGRAPHIC EQUIPMENT OF 
EVERY DESCRIPTION SURPLUS 
AND OUTDATED FILM & PAPER, 
LARGE OR SMALL QUANTITIES. 
Phone, write or call: — 
SPEARS 

(Dept. D.), 14 Watling Street, Shudehill, 
IVlanchester. 

Phone: Blackfriars 1916. 
Bankers: Midland Bank, Ltd. 

C438 



WE WILL PURCHASE for cash a complete 
stock, a redundant line, including finished or 
partly finished goods, packing raw materials, 
etc. No quantity too large. Our representative 
will call anywhere. Write or telephone: — 
Lawrence Edwards & Co., Ltd., 6/7 Welling- 
ton Close. Ledbury Road, London, W.ll. 
Tel. : Bayswater 4020 and 7692. C 140 



TINCTURE PRESS, second-hand, required, 
small, approximately 1 pint. Kirkcaldy, 2 Font- 
hill Terrace, Aberdeen. C 2132 



MISCELLANEOUS 



H 



ADVANCES WITH OR 
WITHOUT SECURITY 



FOR TERMS 
APPLY 



B. 



B 



U 



26 SACKVILLE ST., 
PICCADILLY, 
LONDON, W.l. 
(T«J: i;£C«rX 3123. 3995) 
Eitabliilud 1922 



R. 



C439 



IMMEDIATE ADVANCES 
£50 to £20,000 

WITHOUT SECURITY 

REGIONAL TRUST LTD. 

8 CLIFFORD STREET 
NEW BOND STREET. LONDON. W.l 
Phone: Regent 5983 8i 2914 

C 353 



ACADEMIC 
ELASTIC HOSIERY 

Academic Elastic Hosiery offers you a 
range of exclusive quality N.H.S. 
stockings that have a special appeal to 
women who are regular wearers. They 
build goodwill and create profitable 
and continuous repeat business in your 
pharmacy. Write for details of Academic 
Surgical Hosiery, which will be sent 
with our terms and particulars of dis- 
play material. 

ACADEMIC DEPOT, LTD., 
175 GOSWELL ROAD, 
LONDON. E.C.I. 

C9031 



IS PRICING YOUR PROBLEM 7 

KENNETT PRICE MARKERS 

are ultra smart, tieautifully designed 
solid plastic markers that will really 
sell your goods. Send now for free 
samples, absolutely no obligation. 
55 Eastgate Street, Winchester, Hants. 



C 409 



DEVELOPING AND PRINTING 



QUALITY FIRST but QUALITY FAST 

and 

Guaranteed per return postal service 
GWENT PHOTOGRAPHIC SERVICE 

Snatchwood Works, Pontypool, MON 
Telephone: Talywain 355 

C274 



Of a size to fit the pocket 




REVISED, FULLY UP-TO-DATE, COMPLETE 




^X)^^^^^ OF 




The Publisher :— 
THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST, 28 essex 



FOR the chemist-contractor 
who supplies trusses and 
elastic hosiery under the 
National Health Service, 
this complete and handy 
illustrated handbook, written 
by a practising truss maker 
and fitter of many years' 
practical experience, tells: — 

What appliance or giimient to 
■apply : How to mcasore and 
how to fit : Pitfalls to arold. 

With iu forty-eight Ai" x 6' pagea, 
it slips easily into the pocket Its 
flexible linson cover stands up to 
wear without making the book 
heavy or bulky. 

Fully reviled, the book has been tnlartod 
lo Include eaually useful Information on 
olhtr appUtmcei that may be prescribed om 
E.C.JO forms. 




Send for /our 
copy today 



4'6 

Postage 2d. 



STREET, STRAND, LONDON, W.CJ 



I*rinted by The Haycock 
and published by the Proprietors, Morgan Bra 



^140 Neate Street, Camberwell, S.E.5, 

Limited, at 28 Essex Street, Strand, London, W.C.2. 



70/24 



UBRARY 



March 21, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



1 1 1 




^^^^^^^^ 




CASH REGISTERS 

For their new scheme 
analysing shop tailings 

throughout their 
1,300 shops I 

1,000 REGNA CASH 
REGISTERS TO BE 

INSTALLED IN 1959 



5,000 ADDITIONAL CASH REGISTERS NEEDED 
TO COYER ALL BRANCHES 

This major order for REGNA CASH REGISTERS 
is a remarkable triumph for this outstanding machine, and 
proves beyond doubt its pre-eminent position as the 
Master Cash Register for all cash control and analysing 
systems. There are models for every business — from 
single units upwards and at prices to meet all turnovers. 

AGENTS THROUGHOUT THE UNITED KINGDOM 
FULLY GUARANTEED SERVICE 














U S' H 



THE REGNA CASH REGISTER COMPANY 

London : 27 JOHN ADAM ST., ADELPHI, W.C.2. Tel : TRAfalgar 335 1 /4 

Scotland : 1 09- 1 1 1 STOCKWELL ST., GLASGOW, C. I . Tel : Bell 1614 

Please send full details of the money-saving Regna Cash 
Rejister and details of the Regna system of Cash Control. 



NAME 

ADDRESS 

THIS COUPON 




ALLEN & HANBURYS LTD LONDON E2