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Full text of "The chemist and druggist [electronic resource]"

CHEMISTandDRUGGIST 



For Retailer, Wholesaler and Manufacturer 



MARCH 28 1 959 



Now it's 

Spring Cleaning time 
make sure 
you've plenty of 
Savlon Barrier Cream 

{it protects hands for wet and dry work) 

This is the season for still bigger sales of Savlon 
2-purpose Barrier Cream - the cream that pro- 
tects hands for both wet and dry jobs. It seals out 
hard water and grease for hours. It protects the 
hands from the degreasing effect of detergents 
and prevents grime from becoming ingrained in 
the skin. Sold through chemists only. 

Advertised in the 
big-circulation women's magazines 



RETAIL PRICE 
3/- A TUBE 




Savlon 



2-purpose Barrier Cream 



MPERIAL CHEMICAL INDUSTRIES LIMITED 
PHARMACEUTICALS DIVISION WILMSLOW CHESHIRE 
H.912 






• 



u. 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 28, 1959 



now -relief from h OTU M II 
attacks-anywherel 



ho* 1 




"•"e when or where an 
g^on. But now you 
-spot treatment 

'CW ANTASMA 

t the thing 
to bring 
asthma 
asy to 
: been 
.'arch 
ong- 
Ask 
list's 



Amend 



KEEP THESE 
TABLETS HANDY 



The makers of ANTASMA 
strongly advise all asthmatics 
to seek medical advice. 



Sales promotion and advertising for Antasma, 
Potter's asthma preparation in 
tablet form which was introduced a year ago, 
has now been extended to cover a number 
of specially chosen women's magazines. 
It is becoming increasingly evident that 
this new advertising is creating demand, 
and many letters expressing appreciation 
have been received from grateful asthma 
and hay fever sufferers. 




Some of the magazines used for Antasma 
advertising : 
TRUE STORY ■ TRUE ROMANCES 
WOMAN'S ILLUSTRATED 
WOMAN'S REALM ■ WOMAN'S DAY 
WOMAN'S MIRROR 



Retail : 

2- small size 

5- large size (3 phials ) 



THE PRODUCT IS RIGHT! THE PRICE IS RIGHT! ARE YOUR STOCKS RIGHT? Orders through Wholesalers only 
Sole Proprietors & Manufacturers: 

POTTER & CLARKE LIMITED, River Road, Barking, Essex. Telephone : RIPpleway I 105 



1 



March 28, 1 959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



1 




SOLPRIN CODIS CAFDIS 

Their place to-day 



General acceptance won by Solprin, 
Codis and Cafdis is due to their 
aspirin content being soluble and 
substantially neutral. Consequently 
all three are quick acting and are 
far less likely to upset the stomach. 



Medical opinion to-day is over- 
whelmingly in support of soluble 
aspirin. This is why doctors pre- 
scribe Solprin, Codis or Cafdis, 
and this is why the chemist dis- 
penses them so often. 



SOLPRIN 



Neutral soluble 
aspirin. 




Soluble aspirin 
with codeine and 
phenacetin. 



CAFDIS 



Soluble aspirin, 
phenacetin and 
caffeine. 



RECK1TT & SONS LTD.. PHARMACEUTICAL DEPARTMENT, IU'tJ. 



A 



2 



THE CHEMIST ANb DRUGGIST 



March 28, 19 



There's 

BIG MONEY 

for YOU in 

BRITAIN'S 

fast-growing 

SUMMING 

market 




tfElPMEk LOSE WE POUNDS. . . YOCfU GAINTtfEMf 



SUMMERS' 
BISCUITS : 




Trade: 28/- and 
47/- per dozen 



BISKS «*» 



.fig 



The new methyl 
cellulose method : 

Retail: 6/6 and 16/9 
Trade: 58/6 and 
1 50/9 per dozen 



r 



BISKOfDS 

Non-fattening Sweeten- 
ing Tablets with 0.25 mg. 
Vitamin B! per t;iblit: 
Retail: 6d., 1/6 and 6/6 
Trade: 4/6, 1 3/6 ana 
58/6 per dozen 



ONE NAME STANDS 
SUPREME AS THE 
HOUSE FOR SLIMMING 




PRODUCTS 



REGD. 



8ISK °LAIT ! 8ISKCAFE 



Improved Swedish Milk 
Diet Supplement: 

Retail: 1/6, 4/6 and 15/8 
Trade: 13/6, 40/6, 141/- 
per dozen 



BfSKREEM 



Swedish Massage 
Criam, for "spot' re- 
duction ot flabby areas: 

Retail: 7/6 a jar. 
Trade: 46/1 1 per dozen 



BISK LAIT Swedish 
Milk Diet Supplement 
with PURE coffee): 

Retail: 5 '9 and 19/10 
Trade: 51/9 and 178/6 
per dozen 



erSKAUTE 




Slimming Bath Salts: 



Retail: 9d. and 4/3 

Trade: 5/6 and 31/3 
per dozen 




BRITISH CHEMOTHEUTIC PRODUCTS LTD., KEMTHEUTIC HOUSE, GRANT ST., BRADFORD 3. P.O. BOX 242 



WOMEN WANT THEM 



March 28, 1 959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



THIS FULL-PAGE ADVERTISEMENT 
WILL APPEAR REGULARLY IN: 

WOMAN, WOMAN'S OWN, WOMAN'S REALM 
WOMAN'S ILLUSTRATED, WOMAN'S DAY.. 
WOMAN'S WEEKLY, WOMAN'S COMPANION, 
WOMAN & BEAUTY, HOUSEWIFE, SHE, 
GOOD HOUSEKEEPING, MODERN 
WOMAN, EVERYWOMAN, WOMAN & 
HOME, WIFE & HOME, MY HOME, 
T.V. TIMES, THE VIEWER * . . . 
PLUS LARGE-SPACE ADVERTISE- 
MENTS IN SELECTED NEWSPAPERS 

★ ★ ★ 

* Combined net sales per insertion — 17,019,099 

Combined estimated readership per 
insertion— 62,762,000 

★ ★ ★ 

BACKED BY THIS GIGANTIC, 
FORCEFUL CAMPAIGN, THE DEMAND 
WILL BE ENORMOUS— AND 
CONTINUOUS! BE PREPARED- 
ORDER NOW! 




BIGGEST SUMMING AWBmsmO £V£k I 



LINK YOUR COUNTER AND WINDOWS WITH 
Use these new Display Units ! 



DICT, 




BISKoLAIT 

Showcard holding 
small tin 



BISKOIDS 

Showcard showing 
tube 




BISK! 
J 2 1 -day diet 

Showcard 



BISKS 

Crowner 



PRODUCTS NATIONAL ADVERTISING 



BISKOIDS 

in your tea or coffee 
™ 5 



VITAMIN B, 









VOUttMMf 







f . ****** 



SISKCAFE 

Showcard showing 
small tin 



BISKALITE 

Display outer 



SHOW BISKS PRODUCTS -THEY'LL SELL 



4 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 28, 1959 



Specialists in Vegetable 
Raw Materials 

We stock 600 lines as diverse as : AGAR AGAR • CAMPHOR ■ EUCALYPTOL 
PEPPERMINT • QUILLAYA • SPERMACETI ■ TRAGACANTH • WITCH HAZEL 

BROME & SCHIMMER LTD [' le n a ™n "T" 



©UEEN 

Non Allergic 

BEAUTY PRODUCTS 

THE SAFETY FACTOR IN 
EVERY DAY MAKE-UP 

Queen beauty products form a complete range 
of toilet and beauty preparations, including 
lipsticks, specially for those women who 
have sensitive skins. Queen products con- 
tain no orris in any form, nor any other 
skin irritants AND ARE RECOMMENDED 
BY THE MEDICAL PROFESSION. 



Obtainable from Messrs. Sangers Ltd and 
Allied Companies, or direct from your 
Wholesaler. 

BOUTALLS CHEMISTS LTD. 

60 Lamb's Conduit St., London, W.C.I 




NEW™ 



GREAT BRITAIN 



Nicobrevin 



ANTI SMOKING CAPSULES 

HARMLESS-TASTELESS-EFFECTIVE 

RETAIL PRICE 21/- per tin of 50 capsules 
TRADE PRICE ll/8d plus PT. 3/6d 

Literature & display material on request 
ASK YOUR WHOLESALER 

or write MILLER OF GOLDEN SQ., LTD. 

13 GOLDEN SQ LONDON Wl Telephone CERrord 6533 



Whitaker's 
for Dyes 

"LUTON" STRAW HAT DYES and 
"AURORAL" COLD WATER DYES 

are nationally advertised and are regularly requested. 
Attractive Pattern Cards and Showcards supplied. 

Write for Order Form giving full lists of colours, prices and terms to: 

WHITAKER & CO. (KENDAL) LTD., KENDAL. 



AMBYTHENE 

(BRAND OF POLYTHENE) 

MEDICINE MEASURES 

UNBREAKABLE— ACCURATE 

with or without close fitting lids 
obtainable from usual distribu- 
tors at 12/1 dozen with lids or 
8/9 dozen without lids. 

Wholesalers' supplies 
obtainable direct from 



AMPLEX APPLIANCES (KENT) LTD. 

19 DARTMOUTH ROAD. HAYES, BROMLEY, KENT 

(RAVensbourne 5531) 




OYER 19 d 
^PROFIT^ 
IN TIE TILL 





KEARSLEYS 
PILLS 



Over 1/9 BOX PROFIT by ordering 
I dozen 6/5 size. Bonus given on every 
dozer. (13). It pays to push this size. 

C. & G. KEARSLEY LTD. 

71 DARTMOUTH ROAD, LONDON, S.E.23 



BURROUGHS 

^< DOUBLY x 4 
JUL • ^BtCL» RECTIFIED / 

JAMES BURROUGH LTD.. "** — — — .-»^~ 

I CALE DISTILLERY LONDON I.I.I I 



CHEMIST'S DICTIONARY OF 

MEDICAL TERMS 7th Edition 

Prepared primarily for pharmacisis, the Dictionary is indis- 
pensable also for pharmaceutical manufacturers, advertising 
agents concerned with the marketing of medicinal products 
and indeed all who have to find their way around among 
the multifarious medicinal compounds of modern times. 
Order direct from: PRICE 17/6. Postage 9d. 

THE CHEMIST & DRUGGIST 

.28 ESSEX STREET, STRAND, LONDON, W.C.2. 



March 28. 



1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



5 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 



Acme Vacuum Flask Division 45 

Addis, Ltd. 46 

Amplex Appliances (Kent), Ltd 4 

Ayrton. Saunders Co.. Ltd 40 

Barber Electrical Services. Ltd 7 

Barnet & Foster, Ltd 44 

Bayer Products, . Ltd 31 

Beatson, Clark & Co., Ltd. 12 

Boots Pure Drug Co., Ltd 14 

Boutalls Chemists. Ltd 4 

British Chemotheutic Products, Ltd. — Bisks 2, 3 

British Dyewood Co., Ltd 43 

British Felsol Co., Ltd Cover iv 

British Oxygen Gases. Ltd 15 

Brome & Schimmer, Ltd 4 

Brown, N. C, Ltd 42 

Burrough, James, Ltd 4 

Burroughs Wellcome & Co Interleaved Edit.. 349 

Byard Manufacturing Co.. Ltd 32 

Cannon Rubber Manufacturers. Ltd 5 

Carnegies of Welwyn, Ltd Interleaved Edit.. 350 

Christy, Thos., & Co., Ltd. . 6 

Coates & Cooper. Ltd 38 



Cocker Chemical Co., Ltd 43 

Cooper, McDougall & Robertson, Ltd 20 

Cox, Arthur H., & Co., Ltd 13 

Cresswell Bros. Sponges 36 

Cuticura Preparations 46 

Cuxson, Gerrard & Co.. Ltd 32 

Daniel. Richard. & Son. Ltd 7 

Ellis, J. E., Ltd 42 

Ever Ready Co. (Great Britain). Ltd.. The ...... 10, 11 

Fibrenyle, Ltd 21 

Furman. B. N. (Productions). Ltd 44 

George. Ernest J., & Co Classified Section 

Glaxo Laboratories, Ltd 18, 19 26 

Graesser-Thomas, H. W., Ltd 46 

Great National Dividend Stores. Ltd.. The ........ 35 

Groves, O. R., Ltd. 16. 17 



(continued overleaf) 



T he MODERN 
f NURSER 

* "n htm rfrnW** 
"> htdmg battle 




P°ul»!« action t** 
"WJm is H ft*** 



^*** *nd h«t »'<>* 



Every mother will appreciate the value of the ' Modern ' Nurser, enabling 
her to look after baby when out on picnics and visits just as well as she 
can at home. With the ' Modern ' Nurser there is no chance of leakage and 
it is easily packed. After filling, the teat is simply inverted and the cap and 
disc screwed down. For feeding the sterilised teat just ' snaps' into position 
without being handled. The ' Modern ' Nurser, with its double action teat 
for ' Nearest to Natural ' feeding, is available in heat resistant and flint 
glass, and also in polythene. 



Completely hygienic 
Controlled feeding 




CANNON 



Wide neck for easy cleaning 
Keeps feed sterile 

' Modern ' Nurser teats fit all 
screw topped feeding bottles and 
retail at only 7id. each. 

Order today from your wholesaler 



FINE QUALITY 
RUBBER PRODUCTS 



All obtainable from your usual wholesaler 

If in difficulty write direct to: 
CANNON RUBBER MANUFACTURERS LTD., ASHLEY RD.. TOTTENHAM, LONDON, N.I7 



6 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 28 



1959 



INDEX (cont.) 

Holloway, E. R.. Sales. Ltd 9 



Organon Laboratories, Ltd 28 

Ormskirk Photo Services Classified Section 

Orridge & Co Classified Section 



Imperial Chemical Industries. Ltd. (Pharmaceuticals 



Division) Front Cover 

International Bottle Co., Ltd 39 

Jeffreys, Miller & Co., Ltd 43 

Johnson & Johnson (G.B.), Ltd. 22. 23 

Kearsley, C. G., Ltd. 4 

Kelly, John (London), Ltd 42 

King Development Co.. Ltd Cover iii 

Lastonet Products, Ltd ... 27 

Lederle Laboratories Division .... Interleaved Edit., 30 
London Rubber Co.. Ltd « 41 



Parke. Davis & Co.. Ltd Interleaved Edit.. 29 



Potter & Clarke. Ltd Cover ii 



Reckitt & Sons, Ltd 1 

Riddell Products. Ltd ' 40 

Robinson & Sons. Ltd • 47 

Robinson Bros.-. Ltd. (Cork Growers) 44 

Rozalex, Ltd 44 

Smith & Hill (Chemists), Ltd. 42 

Smith Kline & French Laboratories. Ltd 24 



United Glass Bottle Manufacturers. Ltd 



Manesty Machines, Ltd 38 

Medico-Biological Laboratories, Ltd 36 

Miller of Golden Square. Ltd 4 

New Hygiene. Ltd 8 



Vick International. Ltd 25 

Vitamins. Ltd 34 

Wallace, Cameron & Co., Ltd. 37 

Whitaker & Co. (Kendal). Ltd. 4 




AND 

Dandruff 
Shampoo 

SOAPLESS 



fo' the u rnoTQt of Sturf flnrf Dandruff 

TMI IDlAl SHAMPOO »Ofl U1I 
PBlOO TO PIAMANINT WAVINQ 




7u/o a&ofofa u/Ufxetef 




i 



Scurf 

AND 

dandruff 
Lotion 



p for treatment 
p of the scalp 




Dr. Page Barker. Everyone 
knows that name. It stands for 
quality. And it is quality and 
reputation that ensure 
repeated sales. 

Dr. Page Barker's Scurf and 
Dandruff Lotion and D.43 
Shampoo are known for their 
unfailing reliability in keeping 
the scalp clean and healthy. 

T.V. SUCCESS 

In the Lancashire region last 
autumn's successful T.V. 
advertising campaign is being 
repeated and intensified 
throughout April and May 
telling viewers of something 
you know only too well — that 
the reputation of Dr. Page 
Barker's Scurf and Dandruff 
Lotion stands supreme. 

Wherever your sales area 
may be. Dr. Page Barker's 
Scurf and Dandruff Lotion 
is a winner. 



THOS. CHRISTY & CO. LTD 



North Lane. Aldershot. Hants. 



March 28, 1 959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



7 



■ 



IF YOU ARE LOOKING FOR A TABLET MANUFACTURER TO HANDLE YOUR PRODUCT 
BE IT LARGE OR SMALL, IN THOUSANDS OR MILLIONS, WHY NOT 

> J J J J 

CONTACT ONE OF THE FOREMOST MAKERS WHO HAVE TAKEN PRIDE IN 




MANUFACTURING TABLETS & PILLS FOR MANY YEARS 







RICHARD DANIEL & SON, LTD. DERBY 



Write us at Mansfield Road or ring Derby 40671 (Ten lines) 



We teU 

You 5£U 



The story of Health Master lamps is being told 
to a very large public through many leading 
national magazines — another reason for re- 
minding you that — 



Check up your stocks now and take a share in this 
healthy business. Remember, all Barber Health 
Master lamps are made to the highest standards 
of quality and finish, are tax free and free of 
Budget worries, too. 

Send for Sales literature NOW. 



SELL 
FASTER 




596 

Infra-Red. 
Luminous 
Heat 
59/6 



POPULAR 

Infra-Red. 
Luminous 
Heat 
90 ,'- 



325 

Infra-Red, 

Luminous 

Heat 

£8 . 10. 



425 

Floor Stand 
Infra-Red, 
Lumi nous Heat 
£9. 15. 



Produced under rigid laboratory control by 

BARBER ELECTRICAL SERVICES 

THE AIRPORT, WESTON-SUPER-MARE, 



365 

Infra-Red 
Ultra-Violet 
13 gns. 



465 

Ultra-Violet 
Infra-Red, 
Luminous Heat 
£25 



LIMITED 
SOMERSET 




8 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 28, 1 959 



Scentinel 

/t MAKES Sa/es 





THIS 
DISPLAY 
STAND 

FREE! 




«< 



SWISH " 



This striking Display Stand showing the 
whole range of Scentinel Home Fresheners 
will make regular sales, profitable sales. 
Show Scentinel products and they sell 
themselves. You see them advertised in 
National Magazines and on TV — so do 
your customers. 



We're telling the Homes of the Nation — 

GIVE YOUR HONE A MODERN AIR- 
HAVE "SCENTINEL" FRESHNESS EVERYWHERE! 

and you can cash in on our campaign 




MS 




QUIFF" 

The fragrant air - freshener 
spray, Aerosol 4/6. Squeeze 
bottle 3/6. Refills 1/6. 

"WHAM" 

The fragrant fly-spray in 
squeeze bottle 3/6. Refills 
1/6. Aerosol 4/6. 





"MINOR 



»» 



MIKE" 



BOBBY " 



Fragrant chemical block 
in unbreakable holder, 



Toilet bowl cleanser and Popular air-freshener in Attractive new package with suction grip, 1/6 



disinfectant. Held in pan plastic holder, with sue- 
by suction hook. 1 /6 tion grip. Complete 2/9. 
complete. Refills 9d. Refills 1/3 and 9d. 

DISPLAY STAND 

FREE! 

SEND IN THE COUPON AND GET FULL 
DETAILS OF OUR FREE OFFER. OUR 
REPRESENTATIVE WILL CALL AND SET UP 
THE DISPLAY IN YOUR STORE. 



for hanging in wardrobes complete, 
or cupboards 2|" square. Refills (also fit "Mike" or 



1/- complete. 



any small container) 9d. 



PLEASE SEND DETAILS OF YOUR DISPLAY j 
STAND OFFER. 



NAME- 



ADDRESS 



NEW HYGIENE LTD., 

Telephone: NORth 5041-2-3 



266- 268 HOLLOWAY ROAD, LONDON, N.7 

Telegrams: AIROGENA-HOLWAY, CODE A 8 C 



March 28, 1 959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



9 




For style -for value! 

the leaders in 
the If- to 7'6 
price bracket 



A wonderful balanced 
range of inexpensive 
fashion models 
including both 
CROOKES lens and 
lightweights. 

FREE DISPLAYS 

with six dozen 
assortment or any 
two dozen 



Order quickly from your wholesaler! 




are the foremost lightweight sunglasses 
with Crookes glass lenses (copy of 
National Physical Laboratory report 
enclosed with every pair). Priced 
between 12/6 and 15/6. 



E. R. HOLLOWAY SALES [LTD., [BESSEMER ROAD, WELWYN GARDEN CITY, HERTS. WELWYN GARDEN 4444 



1 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 28, 195 




Fver Ready 




MAKERS OF DRY BATTERIES HANDLAMPS TORCHES PORTABLE RADIOS 



rer Ready, the battery people, marketing a non-battery operated 
product? Yes, indeed! This important development in the Company's 
history is linked with the introduction of an entirely new mains- 
electric dry shaver. Only because it is outstanding in every way, has 
this new shaver been launched on such a competitive market. But it 
ie an expanding market— and surveys have shown that there is room 
at the top for a top-performance shaver. Figaro is just that. Ever 
Ready are confident that in this new shaver they have yet another 
success to share with you. 



TRIC SHAVER THAT'S EVER READY 



\\C*CtfQ wasn't born yesterday . . . Figaro is no hasty creation. It took 
O years of careful research and great technical skill to 
evolve this precision instrument, truly deserving the name Figaro . . . 
because it does indeed give a 'barber-close' shave to everyone. And 
Figaro is British made throughout. 



THE EVER READY COMPANY (GREAT BRITAIN) LIMITED 

Hercules Place, Holloway, London, N.7 



March 28. 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 





EVER READY 



WITH A 'BARBER-CLOSE' SHAVE 



s here . . . 

fabulous Figaro — the mains-operated 
electric shaver by EVER READY— that 
has everything: two exclusive inter- 
changeable foils (thin for sensitive skins 
and extra thin for barbed wire beards), 
an exclusive 'snap-up' trimmer at the 
side, self-sharpening shears, dual-voltage, 
built-in ON/OFF switch, self-starting 

FIGARO FAST. ..FIGARO CLOSE ... FIGARO SMOOTH 



motor, exclusive presentation case with 
travel wrap inside. Everything ! 
And Figaro is British made throughout. 
FIGARO I, 10 guineas (tax paid) 
FIGARO II, £8.15.0 (tax paid) 
FIGARO III, 7 guineas (tax paid) 
Figaro is already heavily booked for its 
T.V. and Press Premiere on April 27th. 





THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



The Beatson Tablet 



•k Distinctive SQUARE Shape. 

★ Black Plastic or White Enamelled 
Caps. 

★ Production Clean in Sealed Cartons. 
•k Prompt Despatch from Stock. 

★ Available in the following sizes— 
3dr \ i 1 H H 2 3 3» oz. 



'The Sign of a 



Good Bottle 



Suggested Packs — 
|-oz. — 25 Aspirin, 
l-oz. — 50 Aspirin or 

25 Codeine. 
Ij-oz. — 100 Aspirin or 

50 Codeine. 
3i-oz.— 100 Codeine. 





Beatson,Clark &Co.Xtd 

GLASS BOTTLE MANUFACTURERS 
ROTHERHAM established 1751 YORKS 



Be sure to specify BEATSON 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



packagin 







r — V 


j 


Nasal 
;. Spray 









manufacturing 



he COX organisation offers a complete manufacturing 
id packaging service for the retailer, wholesaler and those 
arketing proprietary brands. 

It is a home and overseas service that provides the finest 
oducts well packed and ethically presented. 

Here are a few features designed by our Art and 
tckaging Departments : 

even attractive styles for retail pharmacists' " own name " 
eparations. 

►ecial designs for proprietaries and private formularies, 
daily, post paid, breakage free, bulk tablet delivery, 
ood visual designs for T.V. 

gh grade carton board and label paper and printing. 

rip packaging — extensive range. 

chets for powdered and granular products. 




ARTHUR H. COX & CO. LTD. 
BRIGHTON ENGLAND 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 28, 1959 



announcing 

HYDRENOX 

HYDROFLUMETHIAZIDE 

A really important advance in 

ORAL DIURETIC therapy 

vfc Hydrenox is a new oral diuretic which is at least 
ten times as potent as chlorothiazide. 

The cost of treatment with Hydrenox is lower 
than with any other potent oral diuretic. 

% In many cases a single daily dose produces an 
adequate response. 




INDICATIONS 

Hydrenox is indicated in all cases of cardiac and renal 
oedema (irrespective of their severity) and in all other 
cases of fluid retention, including oedema of pregnancy, 
hepatic oedema, oedema of premenstrual tension and 
oedema resulting from steroid therapy. 

PACK 

Hydrenox is available in containers of 100 and 500 tablets. 
Each tablet contains 50 mg. of Hydroflumethiazide. 

PRICE 

The Basic N.H.S. cost is 24/- per 100 tablets, 116 - per 500 
tablets. Plus P. Tax (Normal dose, 1-4 tablets daily). 



*}>!«** 





HYDRENOX 




Available from your usual wholesaler or from Wholesale Division of 

BOOTS PURE DRUG CO. LTD., STATION STREET, NOTTINGHAM Telephone: Nottingham 56:11 
or 71 FLEET STREET, E.C.4 Telephone : Fleet Street 01 1 1 



March 28, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 




"Please provide oxygen therapy set 
with Polymasks - MS 500 48 cu. ft. oxygen" 

You might receive this prescription now that the new lightweight 
Single Unit Set for domiciliary oxygen therapy has been approved for 
use against E.C.10 orders. Developed by British Oxygen this equipment Is 
robust, easy to operate, and is supplied with two disposable Polymask 
inhalers. This domiciliary oxygen therapy equipment is now 
an essential item in a chemist's stock. 

For demonstration and full details of how to purchase or 
hire this equipment, please write to 




British Oxygen Gases Limited 

Medical Dlv., Great West Road, Brentford, Mlddx. 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 28, 1 959 



Regd. Trade Mark 

COMPETITION 
TO EMPTY 

YOUR SHELVES 

BHUHBHnBBHM 

Thousands entering for Sunfresh £3000 competition. And every 
entry a Sunfresh sale. Many more thousand entries expected 
before closing date — May 31st. And every entry a Sunfresh sale. 
You stock it — Sunfresh competition and advertising shifts it. 
Sunfresh on TV. Bus sides. In National newspapers. And 
local press. Glorious Sunfresh for glorious sales. 



March 28. 1959 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 17 



new Sm 

BONUS OFFER 
TO FILL 



YOUR TILL 



Regd. Trade Mark 




Order Sunfresh Orange now. You get a free bottle of either 
Sunfresh orange, lemon glucose, or lemon barley glucose 
with every one dozen case delivered between March 30th and 
April 30th. Tell your usual supplier which of the free bottles 
you want. Make sure you have plenty of supplies for the holiday. 

O. R. Groves Ltd., 20 Jermyn St., London, W.I. Tel. GERrard 9484 (7 lines) 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST March 28, 1959 



March 28, 1 959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



Once again Ostermilk and Farex are appearing in the 
Daily Express with another insertion in Glaxo Laboratories 
continuing campaign in leading newspapers and women's 
magazines. 

In the next dominant half-page advertisement in the 
series (which appears on April 2nd), Glaxo Laboratories 
will re-emphasise the story of the scientific experience 
behind Ostermilk and Farex . . . the unique scientific 
experience which creates trust and confidence among 
parents the world over. And they will use as an example 
of this unique experience the development of GlucoDin 
— another of your best selling products. 

Profit from the confidence created by this persuasive 
advertising. Check your stocks of Ostermilk, Farex and 
GlucoDin now. Make sure you have enough to maintain 
all your customers' custom. 





OSTERMILK and FAREX 




ADVERTISEMENTS WILL BE SEEN BY 



OVER 12 MILLION READERS IN THE 



DAILY EXPRESS 



20 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 28. l 1 )? 1 ) 




last day for Cooper's 



Offer covers assortments of 
whole dozens of: Cooper's push- 
button Fly Killer, Fresh-aire, 
Moth Proofer, Crawling Insect 
Killer, Woodworm Killer. 

12doz. andover-7i% Bonus Discount 
4 doz. to 11 doz. — 5% Bonus Discount 

This high bonus discount applies 
only to orders placed before April 
30th and is extra to the normal Trade 
and Cash Discount. 1958 was a record 
year for Cooper aerosols and this 
year the whole range will receive even 
more powerful advertising support. 
There will be more and better display 
material too — including a new five- 
unit stand for counter display. 

So cash in on the Bonus now— it will 
pay you to STOCK AND DISPLAY 
THE WHOLE RANGE. 



1 




Thursday| 


1 






1 



The push-button way to BIGGER SALES 



COOPER, McDOUGALL & ROBERTSON LIMITED, BERKHAMSTED, HERTS 



March 28, 1 959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 




"SKYLON" POLYTHENE 
HOT WATER BOTTLES 

A P.A.T.A. LINE 

Illustration above shows the range of colours in which the new 
" SKYLON " polythene hot water bottles are being made. Light in weight 
and complete with high density Polythene cap and rubber seal. 

Packed in polythene bags with attractive 
"Sales-Appeal" design showing, in silhouette, a 
Teenager in shortie and alternatively, Father in 
his nightshirt and cap, they are, with their 
bright colours a sure selling line for young and 
old. Ask your Wholesaler to show you the 
bottles in their printed wrapper and stock up 
now — you know our climate! 



1 



III IIIIIIB R IE 



157 DUKES ROAD 
WESTERN AVENUE, LONDON, W. 3 



ACORN 5073-4 




22 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST March 28, 1959 



5 REASONS 



WHY YOU SHOULD BUY 
JOHNSON'S CARTON 
PACKS OF DRESSINGS 





(I) Different coloured 
cartons for B.P.C. and 
'Fairlie' Cotton Wool. 




(4) Attractive cartons 
and distinctive labels 
for window or 
counter display. 



(2) Distinctive end- 
labelling for easy 
shelf recognition. 





(5) Made by the World's 
largest manufacturers 
of Surgical Dressings. 



(3) Special end closure 
to maintain Dressings in 



j to maintain pressings in 

j hygienic condition after 
carton is opened. 



THE WORLD'S MOST TRUSTED NAME IN SURGICAL DRESSINGS 



March 28, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



SPECIALITIES 





'STEM-PADS' 

— to cover and 
protect grazes, 
cuts and all skin 
injuries. Packets 
of four dressings, 
each 3" x 3" sterile 
and individually 
wrapped. 





NEW 






for Home 
First -Aid 




STERI-PADS 

Sterile Germ-free 




4 

STERILISED 
SAME DRESSING 

"wiwwiu* ■nmi 





JOHNSON'S ABSORBENT 
UNDERPADS- prevent 
soiled sheets, save 
drudgery and cost in home 
nursing confinements, 
etc. Disposable, 
super absorbent. 



JOHNSON'S PLEATED WOOL 

— hygienic, large size, 
polythene pack. 




corra/v" w c 

1 COTTON W0( 



'FAIRLIE' HOUSEHOLD PACK 

— cotton wool in large 
size family pack, specially 
prepared for surgical use. 




*«•'•»«. »» 



'N-A' DRESSINGS 

—for varicose ulcers and 
othergranulating wounds. 




THE WORLD'S MOST TRUSTED NAME IN SURGICAL DRESSINGS 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 28, 1959 



New 

easy-to-recognise Spansule capsules 

These are the new designs of 
SK& F's SPANSULE products. 
Half the capsule is 
coloured with a distinctive 
product colour — 
the other half is clear, 
showing the pellets 
inside just as the whole 
capsule did formerly. 




Dexedrine Spansule 



Drinamyl Spansule 



Histryl Spansule 



Phenobarbitone Spansule 



Smith Kline & French Laboratories Ltd 



SU:TA29(col> 



'Spansule' is a trade mark. Brit. Pat. Nos. 71 5305 & 742007 



March 28, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



25 




. ^ T BE^ EBE3) ^vDTSCO^ 5 T ^ T SEBVIC 

■ - * cou * ^ nr."- 

.Ml* « e S .11 ° rf ' r5 ' VI 1- Te 

1 1 t<>r ^ -tBEBT , V*** 

tflie *» aA TlW^ 




26 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST March 28, 1959 



when there's a 





feverish 



need for energy 



During fever Glucodin provides 

extra energy whilst sparing fat 

and protein and easing digestive strain. 

* 99% powdered medicinal glucose 

* added vitamin D, calcium and phosphorus 

* sweet but not sickly 

* a good "mixer" that helps your soft drink sales 



the original Glucose D 

Retail price — i-lb carton 2/9 

Trade prices — 12 x i-lb cartons 24 9 

Glaxo " top profit " parcel 2 doz x I -lb cartons 44/- 

GLAXO LABORATORIES LTD, 
GREENFORD, MIDDLESEX B Y Ron 3434 



TRADE MAPV 




Glucodin is available in mot countries. 

In some it is known as Glueolin or Glucose-D Glaxo 



March 28, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



27 




These 
stockings 
ensure 

REPEAT 
BUSINESS 




Because surgical stockings have a limited life, somebody 
must derive benefit from 'repeat sales' to customers 
with leg afflictions. That 'somebody' can be you — if 
you dispense 'Lastonet' Stockings on N.H.S. prescrip- 
tions brought to your shop. Here's why: 



LASTONET Elastic Net 
Stockings, being made indi- 
vidually to each customer's 
own measure, provide better 
support, fit more accurately, 
and look better under the 
wearer's own nylons. 

LASTONET airy-cool, open- 
weave elastic net fabric is 
wonderfully comfortable, 
and supports without chafing 
or restriction. 



LASTONET are made with 
light-resistant rubber, which 
lessens perishing, and en- 
sures retention of fit. 

LASTONET will please your 
customers so much, that 
they'll return to you for 
subsequent stockings . . . 
and of course, additional 
purchases of other require- 
ments. 



FOR QUICK DELIVERY 
EXCELLENT 
PROFIT MARGIN 
AND REPEAT SALES 





J* 












ELASTIC 


NET STOCKINGS 



T8 

Display Material and Measurements Forms from: 

LASTONET PRODUCTS LIMITED, CARN BREA, REDRUTH, CORNWALL 



THE CHEMIST 
AND DRUGGIST 

ESTABLISHED 1859 

The weekly newspaper for pharmacy and 
all sections of the drug, pharmaceutical and 
fine chemical, cosmetic, and allied industries 

Official organ of the Pharmaceutical Society of Ireland 
and the Pharmaceutical Society of Northern Ireland 



Volume 171 



March 28, 1959 



No. 4127 



CONTENTS 

Branch Events 338 

British Pharmaceutical Conference 336 

Bronchial Asthma 347 

Classifying Proprietary Names ... 340 

Correspondence ... 335 

Drug Testing Under N.H.S 345 

Golden Jubilee at Portsmouth ... 340 

Hospital Pharmacy Forum 343 

"In No Way Relevant to Pricing" 342 

International Non-proprietary Names 336 
Leading Articles : — 

Classification by Letters 341 

Overseas Trade in February ... 341 

Mansfield Branch Dinner (cartoon) 339 

N.H.S. Accounts 337 

Pharmacies of Britain — 79 344 

Royal Society Fellowships 336 

Statutory Committee's Inquiry ... 348 

Topical Reflections ... ... ... 331 



Business Changes 


334 


New Products ... 


... 332 


Coming Events 


353 


News in Brief ... 


... 331 


Commercial Television 


354 


Personalities ... 


... 334 


Company News 


333 


Pharmacist's Anthology 341 


Deaths 


334 


Price Changes ... 


... 354 


Information Wanted... 


332 


Sport 


... 331 


In Parliament ... 


333 


Trade Marks ... 


... 353 


Irish News 


330 


Trade Notes . . . 


... 332 


Legal Reports 


334 


Trade Report ... 


... 351 


Miscellaneous Inquiries 353 


World Trade ... 


... 353 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS, Pp. 5 & 6. 

Classified Advertisements, p. 48. 

PUBLISHED BY 

MORGAN BROTHERS (PUBLISHERS), LTD., 

at 28 Essex Street, Strand, London, W.C.2 

Telephone : Central 6565 
Telegrams : Chemicus, Estrand, London 

WOLVERHAMPTON: 89 Woodland Avenue, Tcttenhall Wood. 
GLASGOW: 160 Nether Auldhouse Road. S.3. Phone: Langside 2679. 
LEEDS, 16: 32 Wynford Rise, West Park. Phone: Leeds 67 8438. 

ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION 
which includes The Chemist and Druggist Diary and 
Year Book, £2 10s. Single copies one shilling each. 



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THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 28, 1959 



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Phone : TEMple Bar 6785 6 7, 0251 2, 1942 3. Grams : Menformon, Rand, London 




Chemist aXDruggist 



Volume 171 



MARCH 28, 1 9 5 9 



No. 4127 



Obsequies of C.F. 

WINDING-UP CEREMONIES IN LONDON 

THE Chemists Federation gave visible and tangible effect on March 24 
to the decision of Mr. Justice Devlin and the Restrictive Practices Court 
in November 1958 that its activities could not be allowed to continue. 

At a dinner in London the Federa- 



tion's last president (Mr. Frank Mellor) 
surrendered his jewel of office to the 
National Pharmaceutical Union to pre- 
serve as a memento, and presented the 
Union with a presidential chair as a 
deathbed gift to the parent body. 

Earlier in the proceedings Captain 
R. C. Kelly (chairman of the Crookes 
Laboratories, Ltd.), who, in 1946, pre- 
sented the Federation with a presiden- 
tial badge and chain of office, gave out 
replicas to eleven of the fifteen presi- 
dents (the others sent apologies for ab- 
sence) who had held office during its 
lifetime, as well as to the final-year 
vice-president (Mr. L. D. Smith) and 
treasurer (Mr. K. G. Patteson). 

First speaker of the evening was Mr. 
Joseph Dean (junior counsel at the 
hearing of the C.F. case) who said he 
appreciated that the occasion was a sad 
one to many present and many outside. 
Although the decision had gone against 
the Federation, he was sure that chem- 
ists had lost nothing by the fight. 

Mr. D. W. Hudson (president of the 1 
Pharmaceutical Society) said that, for 
all the apparently hydra-headed struc- 
ture of pharmaceutical institutions, 
they had done a complicated job effi- 
ciently and well, safeguarding both the 
public and the profession. C.F. had 
died as the result of an ill-considered 
technique. The blame was on those who 
could not see that fatal diseases had 
insidious beginnings. The simple medi- 
cines of earlier times had developed 
today into potent substances, and the 
public would one day realise that those 
substances must be treated differently 
from other saleable commodities. The 
death of C.F. was a greater tragedy to 
the public than to the profession of 
pharmacy. The medical profession itself 
should not remain aloof to the fact that 
any unqualified person could give ad- 
vice on medical matters. 

Mr. S. J. Stearn, as the senior past- 
past-president of the Association (in 
office in 1940) said that pharmacy had 
gained tremendously by the association, 
within C.F., of retailers, wholesalers 
and manufacturers. He was confident 
that the Federation had " lit such a 
candle as would never be extinguished." 

A cheque to cover the purchase of the 
presidential chair was handed over to 
the chairman of the National Pharma- 
ceutical Union (Mr. H. G. Moss) by 



Mr. Mellor. Mr. Moss said the Union 
felt keenly the passing of C.F. The 
lesson for the future was that there was 
still a long wav to go in putting over 
to the public " what pharmacy is and 
what it stands for." He had faith that 
out of evil good would come. 

Tranquillisers Classified 

REPORT BY SIX-NATION STUDY GROUP 

SIX countries were represented in a 
ten-member World Health Organisa- 
tion study group whose report " Atar- 
actic and Hallucinogenic Drugs in 
Psychiatry " is now available (Tech- 
nical Report Series No. 152). The re- 
port, a 72-p. booklet, clarifies and clas- 
sifies the considerable data and varied 
views upon those drugs. The devising 
of a tentative system of grouping de- 
manded a precise terminology and dos- 
age the available material was in- 
sufficient to satisfy. Instead, a median 
effective dose has had to be accepted, 
and full references are given to sources 
of any definitions given of terms used. 
Investigations in recent years have 
shown the presence of a number of 



compounds in the central nervous system 
which may have significance in explain- 
ing the action of the ataractic drugs. 
Those considerations are touched on in 
the report though full explanations are 
not possible without greater knowledge 
of biochemistry than exists at present. 
The classification suggested by the 
study group is based upon exhaustive 
investigation of the literature. 

A Contractor's Error 

REMOVAL FROM LIST RECOMMENDED 

SOUTHEND - ON - SEA Executive 
Council, at a meeting on March 16. 
agreed to recommend to the Ministry 
of Health that a company of chemists 
should be removed from the Council's 
list. Dr. H. F. Hiscocks (chairman) 
commented that it was a sad and diffi- 
cult case to which a great deal of 
thought and consideration had been 
given. It would have been a disservice 
to the man concerned if the Council 
had arrived at any other decision, 
though one member of the Council 
considered the decision a little harsh. 
The superintendent pharmacist, who 
was also a director of the company, 
admitted that he had made an error in 
dispensing. It was pointed out that he 
carried out all dispensing, serving and 
cleaning without assistance, and had not 
had a holiday for ten years. Reference 
was made at the meeting to four previ- 
ous allegations proved against the phar- 
macist, and the chairman said there was 
no dispute as to the error having been 
made in the present instance. The phar- 




LADIES' NIGHT: Edinburgh Chemists' Golf Club's annual whist drive and dance, held recently, 
was evidenti] well supported by the fair sex. In the front of the group are Mr. A. Nelson Fleming 
(Club captain) and Mrs. Fleming. 



330 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 28, 1 959 




Mrs. Una Sniilh 



macist concerned was stated to be now 
in a convalescent home. In reaching 
their decision the Committee stated: 
" We are unanimously of the opinion 
that the continued inclusion on the 
Council's pharmaceutical list of the 
firm's name, of which the respondent is 
the superintendent pharmacist and a 
director, would be prejudicial to the 
efficiency of the service." 

Bournemouth Conference 

LADIES' EXCURSIONS PROGRAMME 

TO assist ladies intending to visit the 
Bournemouth meeting of the British 
Pharmaceutical 
C o n f erence, 
September 21- 
25, to complete 
their applica- 
tion forms, Mrs. 
Una Smith 
(chairman of 
the local Ladies' 
Committee) has 
issued a list of 
excursions that 
are being pro- 
vided for them. 
Seven excur- 
sions are avail- 
able, six of 
which are being 
repeated. It is possible for each lady 
to go on five, as well as the main Con- 
ference excursion. The first excursion is 
designed to show all the ladies some 
of the coastal scenery in the area. The 
drive is through the Chines, with views 
of the Isle of Wight, the Needles, Stud- 
land and the Purbeck Hills. Four of 
the next five excursions may be cho- 
sen : A coach trip to Wimborne (an 
old market town with a Minster of 
special interest containing a chained 
library of 243 volumes and a four- 
teenth-century astronomical clock); a 
drive through the New Forest; a visit to 
Compton Acres, a series of seven pri- 
vate gardens including Roman, Italian 
and Japanese; a trip to Christchurch 
(an ancient municipal borough whose 
magnificent priory church is among the 
finest in the country, with examples of 
successive schools of architecture from 
the Norman to the Renaissance). There 
are also the ruins of a Norman house 
and a castle; a coach ride to Corfe 
castle and Wareham. The former is a 
quaint village built of Purbeck stone 
and has the ruins of an ancient castle 
said to have been the scene of the 
murder of the young King Edward in 
978 and one of the last strongholds 
to surrender during the Civil War. The 
latter is an old Roman town. Its tiny 
St. Martin's Church contains an effigy 
of Lawrence of Arabia. The seventh 
excursion is a sheltered sea trip by 
motor cruiser to the Dorset lakes, with 
views of Poole harbour, the Purbeck 
hills and Brownsea island (a bird sanc- 
tuary with a castle built in the time of 
Henry VIII). Ladies who avail them- 
selves of all the excursions will have 
little free time during the day but the 
timing is such that the programme will 
not be strenuous. Still other events, in- 
cluding a mannequin parade, are under 
consideration for the benefit of those 
who like a full programme of events. 
Evenings will be taken up with the civic 



reception, the banquet, theatre visit and 
ball. 

Lectures on Therapeutics 

A REFRESHER COURSE IN WEST HAM 

THE East Metropolitan Branch of the 
Pharmaceutical Society and West Ham 
and District Association of Pharma- 
cists have organised a course of six 
lectures on modern therapeutics. Places, 
dates, times, subjects and lecturers are : 
At Ross Wyld Hall, Church Hill, Wal- 
thamstow, London, E.17, at 8 p.m. on 
Wednesday, April 1 : Dr. E. K. Gard- 
ner (consultant anaesthetist, Barnet 
Group of Hospitals) on " Drugs Used 
in Modern Anaesthetics "; at lecture hall, 
nurses' home, Piaistow Maternity Hos- 
pital. Howards Road, London, E.13, 
at 8 p.m. on Wednesday, April 
8, Dr. F. M. Hogg (consultant in 
gynaecology) on " The Use of Modern 
Therapeutic Agents in Gynaecology"; 
at Piaistow Hospital, Samson Street, 
Piaistow, E.13, at 3 p.m. on Thursday, 
April 16, Dr. P. Ellman (consultant 
chest physician) on " Modern Drug 
Therapy in Diseases of the Chest"; at 
Langthorne Hospital. Langthorne Road, 
E ll, at 8 p.m. on April 24, Dr. J. De 
Largy (consultant physician in geri- 
atrics) on "Development in Geriatrics"; 
at Claybury Hospital, Woodford 
Bridge, Essex, at 8 p.m. on Wednes- 
day, May 8, Dr. J. S. Pippard (con- 
sultant psychiatrist) on " The Use of 
Drugs in the Treatment of Mental Ill- 
ness"; at Whipps Cross Hospital, Ley- 
tonstone, E.I I, at 8 p.m. on May 8, Dr. 
E. Hinden (paediatrician), on " Present- 
day paediatrics." Registration fee: 5s. 
(free to student members). 

Research Fellowships 

DANISH-BRITISH CO-OPERATION 

APPLICATIONS are being invited for 
the Carlsberg-Wellcome Travelling Re- 
search Fellowships, 1959-60. Object of 
the Fellowships is to encourage co- 
operation, on an exchange basis, between 
Danish and British research workers in 
any branch of the natural sciences 
which has a bearing upon human and 
animal medicine. One Fellowship annu- 
ally is awarded to a candidate from the 
United Kingdom for a year's work in 
Denmark, and one annually to a Dan- 
ish candidate for a year's work in the 
United Kingdom. The stipend ranges 
from £800 to £1,200 per annum (or the 
equivalent sums in Danish Kroner), 
travelling and some incidental expenses 
being provided in addition. Tenure of 
the awards starts in September 1959. 
United Kingdom inquiries from candi- 
dates should be addressed to the Assis- 
tant Scientific Secretary, Wellcome 
Trust, 52 Queen Anne Street. London, 
W.l, and completed applications must 
be in before April 30. 

Students' Congress 

INTERNATIONAL MEETING IN HOLLAND 

THE sixth congress of the International 
Pharmaceutical Students' Federation is 
being held at Nordwijk-on-Sea, Hol- 
land, September 5-15. The congress 
commemorates the tenth anniversary of 
the founding of I.P.S.F., and a total of 
about 175 students arc expected to 



attend. The programme of events in- 
cludes social functions, excursions, and 
visits to pharmaceutical factories and 
institutions. For participants from 
Britain, accommodation costs £13 15s., 
and a deposit of £2 7s. 6d. is required. 
Return fare via Harwich and the Hook 
of Holland is about £11, but if there 
is a sufficiently large party there is a 
possibility of a reduction in fares. Full 
details and application forms are avail- 
able from Miss H. Cranston, c/o 3 
Maryland Way, Sunbury-on-Thames. 
Middlesex. 

Aerosols on Display 

PACKAGING CENTRE EXHIBITION 

AN educative display of " Aerosols 
and Pressure Packaging " is on view at 
the Packaging Centre, 50 Poland Street, 
London, W.l, until April 8. Sixteen 
companies are participating and their 
displays cover all aspects, including 
propellents, valves, containers, coatings, 
formulations, machinery and equipment 
and contract filling. The display is 
planned to give a complete picture of 
what makes an aerosol or pressurised 
pack. Individual exhibits are supported 
by an illustrated guide to the processes 
used, the manufacturing sequence, re- 
cent developments and possible future 
applications. A separate section shows 
some successful products now put up in 
pressurised form. The display is open 
on weekdays from 10 a.m. to 5.30 p.m. 
Admission is free. 



IRISH NEWS 

THE NORTH 

A New Milk Plant 

COLERAINE-PRODUCED SANATOGEN 

A NEW milk-processing plant, using 
5 million gall, of milk a year, is being 
set up at Coleraine, Northern Ireland, by 
Fisons, Ltd., parent company of Gen- 
atosan, Ltd. Messrs. Fisons have de- 
cided to transfer the manufacture of 
Sanatogen nerve tonic from Lough- 
borough, England, to the site of their 
milk-processing company Fisons Milk 
Products, Ltd., Coleraine. The new 
plant will cover an area of 20,000 sq. 
ft., and the transfer is being under- 
taken in two stages. Full production 
at Loughborough will continue until 
the end of July, then half the plant 
will be shut down and transferred to 
Coleraine. Bv the end of the year the 
transfer is expected to be complete, 
and by March I960 in full production. 
About fifty additional people are re- 
quired, of whom at least half will be 
men. Mr. P. S. Needham (managing 
director of Genatosan, Ltd.) states that 
Sanatogen manufacture was being trans- 
ferred to Northern Ireland because 
supplies of milk in the Loughborough 
area are not sufficient to meet the 
present demand for the product. " We 
need 5 million gall, of liquid milk every 
year to manufacture Sanatogen," he 
said. " We can expect to receive locally 
little more than half this vast quantity 
in any year, and the balance has to be 
made up by buying milk powder, sup- 
plies of which are unreliable and un- 
economic. At Coleraine we expect to 
obtain the liquid milk we require." 



March 28, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



3 3 1 



NEWS IN BRIEF 

Mr. C. H. Glassey has been elected 
President of the British Plastics Fed- 
eration. 

The Board of Trade announce that 
they are considering an application for 
an increased protective duty on sodium 
hydrogen glutamate (monosodium glu- 
tamate). 

The lending library unit of the 
Department of Scientific and Industrial 
Research is collecting Chinese scientific 
literature and now has about 150 
Chinese periodicals on regular order. 

Regulations published as S.I. 1959 
No. 401 (S.15) and effective April 1 
provide for the alteration from three 
years to four years of the term of 
office of members of Regional Hospital 
Boards. 

An order published as S.I. 1959 No. 
412 provides for an increase of one in 
the membership of the General Optical 
Council by the nomination by the 
Privy Council of an additional lay 
member. 

Hydroxychloroquine sulphate 
tablets (Plaquenil tablets) have been 
added to the list of specially expensive 
drugs, appliances and reagents for the 
supply of which doctors receive pay- 
ment over and above their capitation 
fees. 

The Treasury has made an Order 
(published as S.I., 1959, No. 423) which 
makes certain reductions in the import 
duties in accordance with or consequen- 
tial upon the undertakings given by the 
United Kingdom in the tariff negotia- 
tions with Switzerland on the occasion 
of the provisional accession of the latter 
country to the General Agreement on 
Tariffs and Trade. 

A letter from Leeds Regional Hos- 
pital Board on their recent decision to 
replace two members of Hull " A " 
Group Hospital management commit- 
tee is to be considered by the " A " 
Group's general purposes committee. 
The letter says the Board have acted 
within their rights in replacing Mr. B. 
Foster, M.P.S., who had served on the 
committee for nine years, and another 
member. At their last meeting some 
members of the Hull " A " Group ex- 
pressed strong disapproval at the 
Board's action. 



SPORT 

Gaelic Football. — College of Pharmacy junior 
leam v. Benburbs, at Phoenix Park, on March 15. 
Second round of the championship. The pharmacy 
team scored first and maintained their lead 
throughout. They finally won by 2-6 to 2-3. The 
scorers for the victors were T. Toner (1-1), M. 
Treacy (1-2), T. Moran (0-2), and M. Shannon 
(0-1). 

Golf. — South London and Surrey Pharma- 
cists' Golfing Society. Officers for 1959-60: — 
President, M. Lewis; Vice-president, F. Jamieson; 
Treasurer, G. G. Watt; Secretary, G. G. Jamie- 
son, 3 High Street, South Norwood, London, 
S.E.25. Sixty members and visitors attended 
the opening meeting of the season at Purley 
Downs golf club, on March 18. Results: 
Scotia bowl (presented by G. G. Watt), 1, D. J. 
Hobern. Walton Heath, 34; 2, G. Philp, Langley 
Park, 32 (better score on last nine holes); 
3, W. J. Baldock, Croham Hurst, 32. Scotia 
tankard, G. Philp. Visitors, 1, F. Dawes, Shirley 
Park. 3*; 2. T. Killick, Coulsdon, 35; 3, J. Hale. 
Waltoo Heath. 32. 



TOPICAL REFLECTIONS 

By Xrayscr 

Retail Selling 

Your report (pp. 321-22) of the Retail Management Conference held at 
Harrogate recently gives some indication of the thought which goes into 
the selling of goods by retail today. " Maximising " traffic and " maximis- 
ing " the profit on that traffic are fundamental in successful retail business 
on the large scale, and the most likely ways of securing those twin desirable 
objectives are the subjects of much thought and planning. To the experts 
whose task it is to devise ways and means of increasing sales and profits, 
and whose waking moments must be dedicated to hatching plans of an 
original and ingenious kind, the lack of method of some pharmacists must 
seem appalling. It is not true of all pharmacists, any more than of all 
grocers or haberdashers, but there are a few unprogressive and thoroughly 
charming pharmacists to whom the public cling, regardless of " loss- 
leaders " and the maximising of profits. Such apparently unambitious char- 
acters have, probably quite unknown to themselves, a personality which 
encourages people to seek their advice — and take it — and there is a very 
close link, forged over the years, between the individual and the family, 
resulting in a respect and a confidence which transcend window display, 
right price and position in the shop. It is true that such methods of con- 
ducting business seldom produce a Croesus but, to some, personal satisfac- 
tion produces a fuller life than the accretion of riches. The position of the 
private pharmacist today depends largely on the selling of himself to the 
people he serves, and, in competition with self-service and cut prices, there 
is still a comfortable, if limited, livelihood to be made. 

Standard Strategy 

In his paper on " Pricing for Profit " (p. 322) Mr. W. G. McLelland told 
the Conference that the standard strategy to increase " traffic " in retail 
business was to draw the people in by setting really low prices on a limited 
number of lines. " Leading the customer on to purchase more than she first 
intended, and to be glad she did so, is an art more than a science," said 
the speaker. To criticise the expert in such matters must appear to be rank 
heresy, but I am not without experience of the methods outlined by him. 
It is not necessary to have practised the methods to be aware of them. I 
have frequently been subjected to them in the role of consumer, and, 
frankly, they do not create a favourable impression on me. I never like to 
feel that I am being " got at." I was interested in the contribution to the 
discussion by Mr. W. K. Oliver (general sales manager, Boots Pure Drug 
Co., Ltd.), who found himself very much in the minority in his plea for 
standard prices for standard articles, and in his call for support for manu- 
facturers who were active in enforcing price maintenance. Mr. Oliver said 
there was a difference between cutting the prices of cauliflowers and cutting 
the prices of standard articles. Would Mr. Oliver, I wonder, regard aspirin 
tablets as cauliflowers or standard articles? And when he argues that prices 
are cut, not in the interests of the country or the housewife, but " merely 
to collar the other fellow's trade," is Mr. Oliver not leaving himself open to 
question ? 

Receipts 

Since the uncertainty created by the introduction of the Cheques Act of 
1957, several questions have been asked in the House with regard to the 
stamping of receipts. The replies have not always been noted for their 
clarity, but perseverance brings its reward in Parliament as elsewhere. A 
written reply on March 12 (p. 313) states that the legal position is exactly 
the same as before. A receipt for £2 or more must be stamped, and a 
person who gives an unstamped receipt for such a payment, or refuses to 
give a stamped receipt when required to do so by the payer, is liable to a 
fine of £10. I shall expect to see, following the pronouncement, a change 
in the practice of many to whom I have occasion to send cheques. An 
early statement in such unequivocal terms would have cleared up the posi- 
tion long ago. " Returned for your records " has never seemed to me to be 
sufficient, leaving aside any question of common courtesy. 



3 3 2 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 28, 1959 



TRADE NOTES 

A New Strength. — Eli Lilly & Co., Ltd.. 
Basingstoke, Hants, have a new 25 
mgm. strength of their anthelmintic 
Telmid (already available in 100-mgm. 
tablets). 

Typographical Correction. — Aspro- 
Nicholas, Ltd., 225 Bath Road, Slough, 
Bucks, point out that, of the four pro- 
ducts mentioned last week as having 
been discontinued, the fourth is Vire- 
drin, and not as previously stated. 

Additional Strength. — Lederle Labora- 
tories division of Cyanamid of Great 
Britain, Ltd., Bush House, Aldwych, 
London, W.C.2, announce that their 
Achromycin V capsules are available 
from April 1 in a 50-mgm. strength. 

Sale Date Postponed. — Revlon Inter- 
national Corporation, 86 Brook Street, 
London, W.l, stated that, owing to 
manufacturing difficulties, the " on- 
sale " date for their new propelling 
eyebrow pencil is now April 27. 

An Emergency Service. — J. H. 
Haywood, Ltd., Warser Gate, Notting- 
ham, point out that, though their 
Easter holiday and stocktaking arrange- 
ments are as given in this column last 
week, they are maintaining an emer- 
gency service, except on Easter Sunday 
and Monday. 

Especially for the Elderly. — William 
R. Warner & Co., Ltd., Eastleigh, 
Hants, point out that their Pacatal 
elixir has been launched especially for 
the treatment of elderly patients, to 
whom it is acceptable as a palatable 
presentation of the active ingredient. 

Withdrawn. — Duncan, Flockhart & 
Co., Ltd., 16 Wheatfield Road, Edin- 
burgh, 11, have withdrawn the 30-mil 
size of Domogen therapeutic; the 10- 
mil size continues to be available. — 
A. Wander, Ltd., 42 Upper Grosvenor 
Street, London, W.l, have discontinued 
the 250-tablet and 1,000-tablet packs 
of Asmac. 

Bed-wetting Controlled. — Paines & 
Byrne, Ltd., Greenford. Middlesex, 
offer, in their Di-Sipidin insufflations, 
a method of controlling enuresis in 
children symptomatically " on strictly 
physiological lines." The outfit con- 
tains an insufflator and twenty-five cap- 
sules (also available separately in con- 
tainers of twenty-five, 100 and 500). 

Bonus Offers 

Smith & Nephew, Ltd., Welwyn 
Garden City, Herts. Elastoplast pocket 
strips. Offered for a limited period 
only at 7s. 6d. per doz. (instead of 
8s. 6d.) on unit of 3 doz. (2 doz. fabric, 
1 doz. waterproof). Two or more sales 
units may be bought at 7s. per doz. 

O. R. Groves, Ltd., 20 Jermyn 
Street, London, W.l. Sunfresh orange. 
One bottle of Sunfresh orange, lemon 
glucose, or lemon barley glucose free 
with every case delivered between 
March 30 and April 30. 

Edward Taylor, Ltd.. Monton. 
Eccles, Manchester. Taylors' first-aid 
dressings, waterproof Filmic dressings 
and adhesive zinc-oxide plaster. Extra 
5 per cent, discount for two week's dis- 
play. Ouantity discounts: 3j per cent, 
on £3-£6 order; 5 per cent, on £6— £ 1 5 
order; 7| per cent, on order over £15 
in value. 



NEW PRODUCTS 

New Diuretic. — Boots Pure Drug Co., 
Ltd.. announce the introduction of 
Hydrenox, a new oral diuretic stated to 
be at least ten times as potent as chloro- 
thiazide. It is supplied as 50-mgm. 
tablets of hydroflumethiazide. The drug 
is effective orally and active in low 
dosage and is said to be capable of re- 
placing the parenteral administration of 
diuretics. 

" Easy-to-recognise " Capsules. — Sm ith 

Kline & French Laboratories, Ltd., 
Coldharbour Lane, London. S.E.5, are 
now issuing their Spansules in capsules 
with coloured /clear halves for quick 
identification. A distinctive colour is 
adopted for each product, and the clear 
half shows the pellets within. The vari- 
eties are Spansules of Dexedrine, 
Drinamyl, Histryl and phenobarbitone. 

Ampoules of Vancomycin. — Eli Lilly 
& Co., Ltd.. Basingstoke, Hants, an- 
nounce the introduction of Vancocin 
brand vancomycin, a potent new anti- 
biotic for the treatment of staphylo- 
coccal, streptococcal and pneumococcal 
infections in cases that do not respond 
to other antibiotics. Supplies of Vanco- 
cin are restricted to hospitals (careful 
supervision of the patient being neces- 
sary). The product is available in 10- 
c.c. ampoules for intravenous use, each 
containing - 5 gm. 

Antifungal Agent. — Imperial Chemi- 
cal Industries, Ltd. (pharmaceutical 
division). Fulshaw Hall. Wilmslow, 
Ches, have added to their range of 
medical products Fulcin (the antibiotic 
griseofulvin), distinguished by its 
powerful antifungal properties. The 
product has proved highly effective 
when given by the mouth as a systemic 
treatment for dermatophytic infections, 
particularly those of the skin, hair and 
nails that do not respond to topical 
medication. Clinical experience so far 
available indicates that a daily dose of 
1 gm. (one Fulcin tablet four times a 
day) is adequate for most cases. In 
severe infections, 2 gm. may be given 
initially to adults, reducing to 1 gm. 
when clinical response has occurred. 
Fulcin is presented in containers of 100 
and 1,000 scored tablets of 250 mgm. 

Tonic for the Middle-aged. — United 
Chemists Association, Ltd., Ucal Works, 
Cheltenham. Glos. are marketing a new 
counter speciality, Forty Plus tonic, for 
men and women of middle-age and 
over. The product contains vitamin Bi 
with glycerophosphates of potassium 
sodium, iron and magnesium; strych- 
nine hydrochloride; and caffeine. It is 
issued in cartoned bottles of two sizes. 

Pocket Strip Dressings. — Smith & 
Nephew, Ltd., Welwyn Garden City, 
Herts, announce the introduction of 
Elastoplast pocket strips, a new pre- 
sentation of the Elastoplast first-aid 
dressings. The strips. individually 
wrapped and sterilised, are sold in car- 
tons of nine, and are available in both 
fabric and waterproof-type dressings, 
size 2\ x I in. The product is being 
heavily advertised in the national and 
women's Press. 

Talc in " Puffer " Bottle. — Josephine 
Kell, Ltd., 22 Old Bond Street, Lon- 
don, W.l, are marketing Californian 
Poppy talcum in a Flexi-puff (white 



plastic puffer) bottle with the character- 
istic scarlet poppy motif. The talc is 
claimed to have a " muted, lingering 
quality which is truly contemporary." 

For the Beauty Counter. — What is 
described as an " exciting new line for 
gift and beauty counters." perfumed 
Spun-gee, is a heart-shaped piece of 
sponge-like material impregnated with 
exotic flower fragrances and in a choice 
of pastel colours. The manufacturers 
are King Development Co., Ltd., Mor- 
ley House. 320 Regent Street, London, 
W.L 

Wall Charts for Housecraft Teachers. 

—J. & E. Atkinson. Ltd., 24 Old Bond 
Street, London, W.l, are giving away 
in each copy of the March issue of 
Home Economics (a subscription maga- 
zine going to housecraft teachers) two 
" good grooming " wall charts with a 
letter emphasising the importance of 
appearance to young people. The charts 
are understood to have the approval 
of senior education officials. They show, 
by means of sketches and diagrams, 
how a girl can make the best of herself. 

A New Perfume. — An " unforget- 
table new perfume " " Remember " 
launched by Goya, Ltd., 161 New Bond 
Street, London, W.l, has a smoky back- 
ground. It is described as a " sophistica- 
ted complex of floral notes, including 
an ' impossibly sharp tuberose note ' " 
and as a "sparkling flower cocktail 
with a lot of French and a dash of 
Italian." " Remember " has a high 
proportion of flower absolutes and 
costs more per oz. than any other per- 
fume made by the company, but sells 
at the same prices. It is available in 
royal flacon, gift and classic flacons and 
handbag phial. Other products in the 
range are a 1-oz. perfumed Cologne 
and a perfumed Cologne stick; a 3-oz. 
tablet soap (also available in boxes of 
three); bath-size soap; bath blossoms; 
bath salts; perfumed talc and bath 
dusting powder. 

Mains Shaver by Battery Makers — 
A newcomer to the field of electric 
dry shavers, the Figaro, is a mains 
shaver introduced bv the Ever Ready 
Co. (Gt. Britain), Ltd.. Britain's largest 
manufacturers of electric batteries. 
British made, and conforming to Brit- 
ish Standards Specification BS 2991 :58, 
the Figaro has an exclusive detachable 
foil, exclusive " snap-up " trimmer, 
robust power unit, quiet running, self- 
starting, dual voltage, on /off switch 
operated by a flick of the thumb, 
bayonet-cap adaptor for use from a 
light-socket, and handsome presenta- 
tion case. Three models are available: 
the Figaro I. a de luxe version; the 
Figaro II. embodying many features of 
the de luxe; and the Figaro III, econ- 
omy shaver. Extensive advertising is 
being undertaken, and supporting show 
material and leaflets are available. Re- 
lease date is April 27, when the cam- 
paign is being launched in South-east 
England. 

INFORMATION WANTED 

The Editor would appreciate information abouti 

Benrodin 

Hcatex hot-water bottle 
I oimlilc power pills 
MPM nasal spray 
Hydrovitan vitamin ampoules 



March 28, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



333 



IN PARLIAMENT 



ADVERTISEMENTS by tooth-paste 
manufacturers were discussed at ques- 
tion time on March 19 when Miss F. E. 
Burton unsuccessfully asked the Presi- 
dent of the Board of Trade to recon- 
sider his decision not to amend the 
Merchandise Marks Act so that tooth- 
paste manufacturers and others have to 
substantiate statements in advertise- 
ments. 

Mr. Vaughan- Morgan (Minister of 
State, Board of Trade), replying to a 
question by Mr. W. N. Warbey, stated 
that no official estimates were made of 
the total expenditure on advertising in 
the United Kingdom but the estimate 
for 1957 by the Advertising Associa- 
tion was £334 millions. Mr. Warbey 
asked if in view of those estimates that 
the United Kingdom advertisements in 
overseas markets were costing £13 mil- 
lions would the Minister consult with 
the Chancellor of the Exchequer to 
consider ways of discouraging frivo- 
lous advertising. Mr. Vaughan-Morgan 
said : " No Sir ... I would point out 
that advertising expenditure now repre- 
sents about the same proportion of the 
national income as before the war." 

Aspirin in Hospitals 

Mr. J. Rankin asked the Minister 
of Health on March 23 what directions 
he had given to hospital authorities on 
purchases of " patented varieties of as- 
pirin " and " is he aware that . . . one 
variety is widely advertised at six tab- 
lets for sixpence against twenty-four 
tablets of aspirin for fourpence " ? 
Mr. Derek Walker-Smith said that 
guidance had been issued to hospital 
medical staff to avoid " expensive pro- 
prietary preparations where alternatives 
exist and not to prescribe preparations 
advertised direct to the public. Dr. E. 
Summerskill asked if the prescriptions 
were examined in the same way as in 
general practice and the doctor com- 
municated with where necessary. The 
Minister replied that there were two 
different sets of circumstances but 
economy was enforced in hospitals 
through regional machinery. 

Mecamylamine Costs 

Mr. M. Edelman asked the Minister 
if he would make a statement on the 
price of mecamylamine hydrochloride 
in view of the fact that following com- 
ments in the House the manufacturers 
had reduced their prices by about 15 
per cent, to hospitals but had not 
given the reduction to the medical pro- 
fession as a whole. Mr. R. Thomson 
(Parliamentary Secretary, Ministry of 
Health) said the Minister was in touch 
with the manufacturers. Mr. Thomson 
understood that the prices of the larger 
packs were reduced on March 16, the 
reductions resulting from a review of 
demand made in January when a new 
plant was opened. " I am informed 
that the pattern usually followed by 
the company is to reduce prices to 
hospitals first and to follow this with 
a reduction to the trade generally and 
that it is proposed to follow this course 
for this drug." 

Sterilisation Services in Hospitals 

Dr. D. Johnson asked the Minister 
of Health what steps he proposed to 
take to determine who had the final 



responsibility for efficient sterilisation 
of instruments and dressings in a 
National Health Service hospital. 

Mr. Walker-Smith : Yes, I shall 
shortly be sending a memorandum to 
hospital authorities on this matter, in- 
cluding the advice that one member 
of the medical staff should be charged 
with the supervision of sterilisation ser- 
vices in each hospital. 

Protecting the Customer 

Mr. F. Willey moved on March 20 
that the Government should review the 
present safeguards to protect the con- 
sumer, encourage organisations seeking 
to assist the consumer and improve 
standards, and where necessary pro- 
vide further safeguards. He suggested 
that a consumers' council should be 
established for that purpose; there was 
a precedent, he said, in the Arts Coun- 
cil. Despite recent legislation, many 
things required to be done, even in 
respect of food and drugs. There were 
also the questions of hire purchase and 
false descriptions and the sale of habit- 
forming drugs. Mr. Philip Goodhart 
said that a consumers' council could 
do useful work by providing consumer 
education, a complaint service, advice 
to manufacturers, and could even es- 
tablish standards. The Government 
should be careful about embarking upon 
comparisons of quality and using pub- 
lic money to subsidise public organisa- 
tions which tested the goods. 

Before the debate was adjourned, Mr. 
John Rodgers (Parliamentary Secre- 
tary, Board of Trade) said that the 
Government intended to set up a com- 



mittee to consider the problem. " I 
hope within days or weeks to be able 
to announce both the terms of refer- 
ence and the name of the chairman 
and the persons who will constitute 
that committee." He also promised 
that a new Weights and Measures Bill 
would be introduced. 

Purchase Tax 

Mr. G. Nabarro asked the Chancel- 
lor of the Exchequer on March 24, 
approximately what percentage of the 
total revenue was represented by the 
current yield of purchase tax; and 
what such percentage would be if all 
goods liable to tax at 60 per cent, be- 
came liable to tax at 30 per cent., and 
if the 30 per cent, tax were abolished 
on goods liable to such rates on 
Groups 12, 19 (a), 26 (b), 27 and 28. 

Mr. D. Heathcoat Amory (Chan- 
cellor of the Exchequer): " The Budget 
estimate of £490 millions for the yield 
of purchase tax in the current financial 
year represented 9 per cent, of the esti- 
mated total ordinary revenue. The esti- 
mate included about £209 millions in 
respect of goods chargeable at 60 per 
cent, and about £88 millions in respect 
of the 30 per cent, goods mentioned. 

Mr. Nabarro then asked the Chan- 
cellor if he was aware that this was 
the 194th purchase tax question from 
himself in the 1958-59 series. The 
Chancellor : " I realise that this is the 
last shoot of the season, and, because 
I am very anxious that he should not 
go home without something in the bag, 
I should like to assure him that, in the 
review of taxation which I am now in 
the course of making. I shall give full 
consideration to his views." 



MORGAN BROTHERS (PUBLISH- 
ERS), LTD.— Sir E. R. Chadwyck- 
Healey, Bt., M.C., has been appointed 
a director of the company. 

ALBRIGHT & WILSON, LTD. — 
Ordinary dividend is raised from the 
equivalent of 16 per cent, to 17 per 
cent, with a second interim of 13 per 
cent, for 1958. Consolidated trading 
profits expanded from £4,754,000 to 
£5,388,000. After depreciation and tax, 
the net balance is £111,000 higher at 
£1,723,000. The proportion of profits 
taken by the tax charge is higher than 
in 1957 when it was abnormally low 
owing to tax allowances which were 
mainly confined to that year. 

SMITH & NEPHEW ASSOCIATED 
COMPANIES, LTD.— Group profit 
advanced from £1,496,408 to £1,949,162 
in 1958, and the dividend is raised from 
6yd. to 7id. per 4s. share. The 1957 
profit does not include Southalls (Bir- 
mingham), Ltd., and Arthur Berton, 
Ltd. If the 1957 figures were adjusted 
to include those companies the 1958 
group profit would show an increase of 
77 per cent. Taxation, £927,003 
(£859,984), and net profit, £985,404 
(£627,788). 

JEYES' SANITARY COMPOUNDS, 
LTD.: — Provided the situation at home 
and abroad remains stable Mr. T. B. 
Brown (chairman) views the future with 
confidence. Net sales for 1958 were a 



COMPANY NEWS 

Last year's figures in parentheses 

record and as a result of the organisa- 
tion being greatly strengthened good 
results are anticipated. Following the 
revaluation in December 1958, freehold 
land and buildings as shown in the par- 
ent's balance-sheet have been increased 
by £92,244, and in view of this the 
directors did not consider it necessary 
to provide for depreciation of freehold 
land and buildings in respect of that 
year's accounts. Future depreciation 
will be calculated on the revised values. 

MONSANTO CHEMICALS, LTD.— 
Expenditure on capital projects during 
1958 was £3,461,106 and at the year- 
end outstanding commitments totalled 
approximately £1,965,000 (£1-65 mil- 
lions). Of the company's sales of 
£15-46 millions (£15-68 millions), direct 
exports were responsible for 35 per 
cent. (41 per cent.). Group net profits 
declined from £1,078,557 to £992,415 
in 1958 because of reduced profit mar- 
gins, initially high operating costs of 
new and expanded plants brought into 
production and to the marked reduc- 
tion in export sales turnover. As pre- 
viously stated (C. & D., February 28, 
p. 222), the year's dividend is repeated 
at I3i per cent. Sir Miles Thomas 
(chairman) expects an increase in turn- 
over this year, but adds that the rela- 
tive profit position will continue to be 
subject to those factors encountered 
last year. The intention to expand pro- 
duction of aspirin, phenacetin and their 
intermediates, is again expressed. 



3 34 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 28, 1 959 



LEGAL REPORTS 

Misuse of Prescriptions 

For obtaining drugs for his own use 
on National Health Service prescrip- 
tions, Dr. Bernard John Barnett, Adams 
Road. Woodford Halse, Rugby, was at 
Rugby recently put on probation for 
three years. Dr. Barnett pleaded guilty 
to twenty-six charges of obtaining by 
false pretences a mixture containing 
morphine hydrochloride and sodium 
bicarbonate. Prosecution said Barnett 
had been a drug addict for many years, 
and had been a patient in hospital for 
two spells. For the doctor it was said : 
" This is a case of fraud, but it is fraud 
by drug addiction and not by a man in 
full possession of his moral powers. 
There has been a long history of pain- 
ful illness." 

BUSINESS CHANGES 

FORSTERS (PHARMACEUTI- 
CALS), LTD., 124 Westgate Road, 
Newcastle-on-Tyne, are shortly closing 
their business. 

MR. J. M. BLAU, M.P.S., has 
acquired the pharmacy of the late Mr. 
C. A. Moore, 350 Eastern Avenue, 
ILford, Essex, and is to trade as J. Blau 
(Chemists), Ltd. 

MR. JAMES AULD, M.P.S., has 
taken over the business of Mr. Hugh 
Dewar, Main Street, Newmilns, Ayr- 
shire. Mr. Auld received his training 
in the pharmacy he is acquiring. He 
afterwards moved to Muirkirk. 

R. P. BRISTOW, LTD., chemists. 
High Wycombe, Bucks, have disposed 
of their businesses in the town. The 
shop at 17 Oxford Street, has been 
taken over by Mr. G. F. S. Hussey, 
M.P.S. (trading as R. P. Bristow) and 
the premises at 3 Crendon Street by 
Mr. M. E. Seymour, M.P.S. (trading as 
the Crendon Pharmacy, Ltd.). 

EVANS MEDICAL SUPPLIES, 
LTD., Speke, announce that the fol- 
lowing companies in the group are now 
operating under new names: — Evans 
Medical (Northern), Ltd., Newcastle- 
on-Tyne (formerly Evans Medical Sup- 
plies (Northern), Ltd.); Evans Medical 
(India) Private, Ltd., Bombay, Calcutta 
and Madras (formerly Evans Medical 
Supplies (India) Private, Ltd.); Evans, 
S.A., Paris, France (formerly Labora- 
toires Evans S.A.); Evans Medi- 
cal (Ireland), Ltd., Dublin (formerly 
Evans Medical Supplies (Ireland), Ltd.). 

Appointments 

WHIFFEN & SONS. LTD., 95 Wig- 
more Street, London. W.l, have ap- 
pointed Mr. Frank H. Taylor sales 
manager for both industrial and phar- 
maceutical chemicals with effect from 
April 1. Mr. Taylor has been sales 
manager (pharmaceuticals) and South- 
ern representative of the company for 
many years. 

THE DISTILLERS CO. (BIO- 
CHEMICALS), LTD.. Broadway House, 
London, S.W.19, announce the follow- 
ing appointments: — Mr. J. M. Butters 
(manager, export sales department (gen- 
eral)); Mr. W. G. Poole, M.P.S. (man- 
ager, export sales department (speciali- 
ties)); Mr. G. N. Henderson. B.Sc. 
M.R.C.V.S. (manager, veterinary de- 
partment). 



DEATHS 

ATTEWELL. — Recently, Mr. Oscar 
Hebbley Attewell, M.P.b>., Ringmer 
Cottage, Wembley Avenue, Lancing, 
Sussex. Mr. Attewell qualified in 1909. 

CHAPMAN.— In Lochmaben Hospi- 
tal, recently, Mr. William Chapman, 
M.P.S., Hillside, Lockerbie, Dumfries- 
shire, aged sixty-five. A native of 
Wishaw, Mr. Chapman was in business 
on his own account in Shotts for nearly 
twenty years. He gave up pharmacy 
and went to Dumfriesshire to take over 
a farm. About four years ago, how- 
ever, when the chemist's business be- 
longing to the late Mr. Duncan Camp- 
bell, 62 High Street. Lockerbie, came 
into the market, he acquired it. 

HAYES. — At St. Brendan Street, 
Portumna, co. Galway. Eire, on March 
18, Mrs. Kathleen Hayes, wife of Mr. 
Robert W. Hayes. L.P.S.I. 

HERISSEY. — In Paris recently, Pro- 
fessor Henri Herissey, the most senior 
honorary member of the Pharmaceuti- 
cal Society. Dr. Herissey was for many 
years professor in the Faculty of Phar- 
macy of the University of Paris and in 
1955 was elected president of the 
National Academy of Medicine. He 
was a member of the Council 
of the Ordre National des Pharmaciens 
dc France for a considerable period. 
He was a commander of the Legion 
of Honour and of the Ordre de la 
Sante Publique. In the 1914-18 war 
he won the Croix de Guerre and in 
1923 was appointed an honorary mem- 
ber of the Pharmaceutical Society of 
Great Britain. 

HUNNINGS. — At North Middlesex 
Hospital, on March 20, Mr. Thomas 
March Hunnings, M.P.S.. 91 High 
Street, Waltham Cross, Herts, aged 
sixty. Mr. Hunnings was formerly in 
business at 25 High Street. Enfield. 
Middlesex. 

MILLER.— On March 17. Mr. 
Robert Miller. Armitage Road. 
Golders Green, aged nineteen. Mr. 
Miller was a student at the School of 
Pharmacy, University of London, and 
had recently been elected chairman of 
the pharmaceutical students' union at 
the university. 

SCOTT.— At Canniesburn Hospital, 
on March 15, Mr. William Scott. 
M.P.S.. 9 West Chapelton Avenue. 
Bearsden, Glasgow. Mr. Scott, who 
qualified in 1917. was formerly in busi- 
ness at Rutherglen. . 

SHAW — Recently, Mr. Geoffrey 
Shaw. F.P.S., 21 Wharncliffe Road. 
Sheffield. 10, Yorks. Mr. Shaw, who 
qualified in 1944 was laboratory 
chemist with G. T. W. Newsholmc. 
Ltd.. Sheffield, until 1945, when he 
took up an appointment as first assist- 
ant pharmacist at the Royal Hospital, 
.Sheffield. He later joined the teaching 
staff of the Pharmacy Department, 
University of Manchester, where he 
was also an Allen & Hanburys Research 
Fellow. In 1952 he took up a lectur- 
ing post in the pharmacy department 
of Bradford Technical College. 

WALKER. — On February 2. Mr. 
Alexander Fred Walker, F.P.S., 92 The 
Glade. Shirley. Croydon. Surrey. Mr. 
Walker qualified in 1912. 



PERSONALITIES 

MR. R. A. JACKSON, F.P.S., Whit- 
ley Road, Whitley Bay, has been 
elected chairman of the local chamber 
of trade and commerce. 

DR. DAVID TRAILL (research 
director of the Nobel division, Imperial 
Chemical Industries, Ltd.), has been 
elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of 
Edinburgh. 

MR. F. G. BELL, M.P.S., Holy- 
moorside, Chesterfield, who recently re- 
tired from management of the Chester- 
field branch of Boots, Ltd., was given 
a farewell dinner. Mr. Bell qualified in 
1924. 

MR. J. A. EGGLESTON, B.Sc, 
F.R.I.C. (head of the standards labora- 
tory at the Airdrie factory of Boots 
Pure Drug Co., Ltd., since that works 
was opened ten years ago) is retiring 
on April 1. 

MRS. VIVIAN JUNE BURNS, who 
has been appointed a director of N. C. 
Brown, Ltd., Eagle Steel Works, Hey- 
wood, was the company's secretary and 
is Mr. N. C. Brown's daughter. At 
twenty-two years of age she is the 
company's youngest-ever director, and 
almost certainly the country's youngest 
director in the steel equipment busi- 
ness. 

MISS KATHLEEN TOES, M.P.S., 
who has been chief pharmacist at the 
Leeds Hospital for Women for the past 
twenty-six years is retiring at the end 
of March. Miss Toes qualified in 1930 
after training at the former Leeds Col- 
lege of Pharmacy, and took over her 
present appointment in 1933. lit 1948 
she temporarily worked part-time in the 
pharmacy department, General Infirm- 
ary of Leeds. 

MR. V. WALTERS, B.Pharm., 
F.P.S., has been awarded the degree of 
Doctor of Philosophy, University of 
London, for a thesis entitled " Studies 
on Bacterial Populations in Solutions 
of Phenols." Dr. Walters studied under 
Dr. H. S. Bean at Chelsea School of 
Pharmacy, where he was a member of 
the staff. He was recently appointed 
senior lecturer in pharmaceuticals at 
the Nigerian College of Technology, 
Ibadan. 

MR. NORMAN BERRY, M.P.S., 
M.S.M.A.. is leaving early in April to 
take over the 
post of general 
sales manager 
of Burroughs 
Wellcome & Co. 
(Pakistan), Ltd. 
Mr. Berry join- 
ed Burroughs 
Wellcome & Co. 
as a medical 
representative in 
1 946 following 
demobilisation. 
Previously he 
had served in 
private and mul- 
tiple retail phar- 
macies and during the war with the 
R.A.M.C. during the siege of Malta. 
He was later commissioned into the 
R.A.S.C. and served in the United 
Kingdom and in Germany. From 1946 
to 1954 he represented the Wellcome 




March 28, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



335 



Foundation, Ltd., in East Lancashire, 
being appointed president of the Bol- 
ton branch of the Pharmaceutical 
Association in 1951. Since 1954 Mr. 
Berry has been sales executive, and 
later assistant manager, home sales de- 
partment (medical) until February 
1958 when he was promoted manager 
of the home sales department (veterin- 
ary), the appointment he is now leav- 
ing to go to Pakistan. 

DR. DANIEL EDWARDS, who has 
been on the staff of the Royal College 
of Science and Technology, Glasgow, 
since 1953, has been appointed head 
of the school of pharmacy at Robert 
Gordon's Technical College, Aberdeen, 
in succession to Dr. J. E. Bowen, who 
is retiring. Dr. Edwards, who was 
educated at Keith Grammar School, 
qualified as a pharmaceutical chemist 
at Gordon's and graduated B.Sc. with 
second class honours at Aberdeen Uni- 
versity. He was awarded the Ph.D. of 
Glasgow University for a thesis on 
tuberculostatic agents. Dr. Edwards 



has been assistant secretary to the 
Glasgow and West of Scotland section 
of the Royal Institute of Chemistry. 
The appointment is subject to the ap- 
proval of the Scottish Education 
Department. 

DR. PETER HANSELL (director of 
the medical photography departments, 
Westminster Hospital, London, and at 
the Institute of Ophthalmology) has 
relinquished editorship of Medical and 
Biological Illustration. His successor is 
Mr. C. E. Engels (chief photographer, 
Guy's hospital medical school). Dr. 
Hansell has been editor of the journal 
since its inception in 1950, and his con- 
tributions to medical photography have 
been widely acknowledged. His pub- 
lished work includes: " 35 mm. Film- 
strip Technique" (Ilford, Ltd.); (with 
E. S. Perkins) " An Atlas of Diseases 
of the Eye " (J. & A. Churchill, Ltd.); 
and " A System of Ophthalmic Illustra- 
tion " (Blackwell Scientific Publica- 
tions, Ltd.). Dr. Hansell is maintain- 
ing his connection with the paper as a 



member of its editorial advisory board. 

MR. C. S. BANGAY, M.S.M., 
F.C.I.S., A.C.I.S. (Clerk to the Lon- 
don Executive Council), retires on 
March 31. For almost six years Mr. 
Bangay has been editor of the Officer 
(the journal of the Association of Offi- 
cers of Executive Councils and Pricing 
Committees). He was president of the 
Association, 1957-58. Dr. J. Green 
(chairman, London Executive Council) 
writes : " Mr. C. S. Bangay has been a 
member of the staff of the London In- 
surance Committee since 1913 and was 
appointed Clerk to the Executive 
Council in 1953. Many members of 
the pharmaceutical profession have 
good cause to remember him for his 
willing and helpful advice. His atten- 
dance at the London Pharmaceutical 
Committee has helped to maintain the 
cordial relations that exist between the 
two bodies." On March 26 the Exe- 
cutive Council placed on record its 
high appreciation of Mr. Bangay's 
services. 



Correspondence 

Letters when received must bear the name and address of the sender, not necessarily 
for publication. The Editor does not hold himself responsible for the views expressed. 



Personal Planning for the Future 

Sir, — As a pharmacy student, hoping 
to qualify during the course of the next 
few months, may I mention certain 
aspects of the future that unduly en- 
gage the attention of many young men. 
Students realise that current trends 
divert technical staff in industry into 
non-administrative posts and that the 
majority of graduates inevitably drift 
aimlessly into the backwater of routine 
work. On the other hand arts gradu- 
ates are frequently sought by industry 
for management training. The theoreti- 
cal combination of commercial and 
technical men cannot be a happy part- 
nership. We would welcome advice 
from those in a position to appreciate 
our frustrated hopes of the future as to 
the course our activities should take if 
we are to hope to succeed to the higher 
administrative positions which industry 
has to offer. 

Twenty 

Glucose Beverages 

Sir, — I read with interest your lead- 
ing article on " Soft Drinks and What 
They Contain " (C. & D., March 7, p. 
265), in which you refer to glucose 
beverages. As this company has sup- 
plied a leading glucose beverage to 
pharmacists for many years, perhaps 
you will allow me to comment. I agree 
entirely that it may be claimed that 
some of the references cited in the note 
by the Committee on Medical and Nu- 
tritional Aspects of Food Policy (ap- 
pendix B) " should be interpreted in a 
different way." In actual fact the con- 
clusions drawn by that Committee from 
the references quoted are quite invalid 
and frequently irrelevant. In addition, 
there are errors of commission and 
omission and the note is obscure and 
contradictory. I would like to illustrate 
these points. 

(1) An example of one of the errors 
of commission is seen in paragraph 2, 



which states : 

There is no significant difference in the 
total amount of energy contributed by 
similar quantities of sucrose, glucose or 
the products of the acid hydrolysis of 
starch known as " liquid glucose " when 
given by mouth. Sucrose may even con- 
tribute a larger amount (perhaps 5 per 
cent, more) than glucose given in this 
way, certainly not less. . 
If the argument is considered relevant, 
why is it not also mentioned that the 
energy value of the solids of liquid 
glucose is about 3 per cent, greater than 
that of sucrose? 

(2) It is an extraordinary omission 
that no reference is made to the origi- 
nal work of C. F. Cori (/. biol. Chem., 
1925. 66. 691), who showed that dex- 
trose was absorbed more than twice as 
fast as fructose. That work has been 
adequately confirmed over the years 
by many workers using different tech- 
niques. 

(3) Paragraphs 3 and 8 of the note 
are contradictory. Paragraph 3 states 
quite unequivocally that : 

The issue therefore is whether the 
energy of glucose or the components of 
"liquid glucose" is made available to the 
body more rapidly than that of sucrose 
when these sugars are given in solution 
by mouth. 

but the Committee, realising the weak- 
ness of their position, state in paragraph 
8 that : 

It is to be doubted whether there is 
any advantage in presenting to the 
human being a drink which contains a 
sugar which is a little more rapidly 
metabolised than others. . . . 

Paragraph 6 illustrates one of the many 

obscurities, for it states that : 
. . . fructose has an advantage over glu- 
cose in ease of utilisation by the body 
when there is a deficiency of insulin or 
a tendency towards such a deficiency. 

I assume that the reference here is to 

diabetes or incipient diabetes. Insulin 



deficiencies do not occur in the normal 
(non-diabetic) person. The muddled 
thinking evident in the Report on Soft 
Drinks would appear to be infectious, 
for in your leading article you state, 
in relation to the nutritional value of 
glucose drinks, that : 

Pharmacists, among others, would de- 
mand proof by clinical trial, since doc- 
tors, like other members of the com- 
munity, are prone to be influenced by 
continuous advertising pressure. 
I infer that pharmacists and " others " 
are not influenced by advertising 
whereas the general public and members 
of the medical profession are! Phar- 
macists should realise that the medical 
profession recommends glucose drinks 
from experience gained from trials in 
many thousands of patients — the 
patients being their own controls. When 
a nauseated subject is given glucose, he 
usually retains it, whereas, if he is 
offered even a " light diet " he vomits. 
We must, sir, keep our sense of propor- 
tion in this matter — glucose drinks are 
of unquestionable value in the sick- 
room. Your leading article also makes 
a reference to the disposal of profits in 
relation to research. Beecham Group, 
the proprietors of Lucozade, have cer- 
tainly ploughed profits back into re- 
search for many years. Fundamental 
carbohydrate research is carried out, 
though the main effort has, up to now, 
been devoted to other ends. May I sug- 
gest that you refer to your newspapers 
for March 6 and 7 and consider the 
source of the finance that made the 
recent penicillin break-through possible. 
E. T. Knudsen, M.B., B.S., 
M.R.C.S., L.R.C.P. 
Beecham Group, Ltd., 
Brentford, Middlesex 

DID YOU READ IT? 

The solution to last week's " Can You 
Read it ? " poser was: 

Pil. Ferri et Aloes 
[T.] t.d.s.p.c. 48 



3 36 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 28, 1959 



INTERNATIONAL NON-PROPRIETARY NAMES 

Proposals by World Health Organisation 



THE World Health Organisation has 
issued the following list of names which 
are under consideration as international 
non-proprietary names. Comments on, 
or formal objections to, the proposed 
names may be forwarded by any per- 
son to the Pharmaceutical Section of 
the World Health Organisation until 
June 30. Inclusion of a name in the list 
of proposed international non-proprie- 
tary names does not imply any recom- 
mendation for the use of the substance 
in medicine or pharmacy. 



Proposed 


Chemical Name or 


Name 


Description 


dextropropoxy- 


( + ) - 4 - dimethylam no - 3 


phenum 


methyl - 1,2 - diphenyl - 2 


dextropropoxy- 


propionoxybutane 


phene 




dimenoxadolum 


dimethylaminoethyl 1 - ethoxy 


dimcnoxadol 


1.1-d.phcnylacetate 


levoproxy- 


(-) - 4 - dimethylamino - 3 


phenum 


methyl - 1,2 - diphenyl - 2 


levopropoxy- 


propionoxybutane 


phene 




nicomorphinum 


di-nicotinic acid ester of mot 


nicomorphine 


phine 


norcodeinum 


/V-demethylated codeine 


norcodeine 




normorph num 


/V-dcmethylated morphine 


normorphine 




noscapinum 


(-) - 2 - methyl - 8 - methoxy 


noscapine 


6.7 - methylenedioxy - 1 
(6,7 - dimethoxy - 3 - phthali 
dyl) - 1,2,3,4 - tetrahydro/io 
quinoline [name used previ 
ously: narcotinel 



In accordance with the procedure for 
the selection of recommended inter- 
national non-proprietary names the 
following are recommended. 



Recommended 

Name 
acetylmetha- 

dolum 
acetylmethadol 
alphacetylmetha- 

dolum 
alphacetyl- 

mcthadol 
alphametha- 

dolum 
alphamethadol 
anileridinum 
anilcridino 

betacetylmetha- 

dolura 
betacetyl- 

methadol 
betamethadolum 
betamethadol 
betaprodinum 
helaprodine 
dcsomorphinum 
desomorphine 
dicthylthiam- 

bulenum 
diethylthiam- 

butene 
dimethylthiam- 

butcnum 
dimcthylthiam- 

butenc 
dipipanonum 
dipipanone 
ethohcptazinum 
ethohcptazine 
ethylmethyl- 

thiambutenum 
ethylmethyl- 

thiambutcnc 
hydroxy- 

pethidinum 



Chemical Name or 
Description 



6 - dimethylamino - 4,4 - di- 
phenyl - 3 - acetoxyheptane 

- 6 - dimethylamino - 4,4 - 
diphenyl-3-acetoxyheptane 



d - 6 - dimethylamino 
diphenyl-3-heptanol 



4,4 - 



1 - [2 - (p - aminophenyl) - 
ethyll - 4 - phenylpiperidinc - 
4-carboxylic acid ethyl ester 

R - 6 - dimethylamino - 4,4 - 
diphcnyl-3-acetoxyheptane 



R - 6 - dimethylamino - 4,4 - 

diphenyl-3-heptanol 
R - 1,3 - dimethyl - 4 - phenyl - 

4-propionoxypiperidine 
dihydrodcsoxymorphine 

3 - diethylamino - 1,1 - di - (2 - 
thicnyl)-l-butcne 



3 - dimethylamino - 1,1 - di 
(2-thienyl>-l-butene 



4,4 - diphenyl - 6 - piperidino - 

3- hcptanone 

1 - methyl - 4 - carbethoxy - 

4- phcnylhcxameihylcnciminc 

3 - cthylmcthylamino - 1.1 - di - 
(2-thicnyl)-l-butenc 



1 - methyl - 4 - (3 - hydroxy- 
phenyl} ■ piperidina - 4 - 



hydroxy- 
pethidine 
levallorphanum 
levallorphan 
levorphanolum 
levorphanol 
metethohep- 

tazinum 
metetholiep- 

tazine 
metheptazinum 
metheptazine 

methyldesor- 

phinum 
methyldesor- 

phine 
methyldihydro- 

morphinum 
methyldihydro- 

morph ne 



carboxylic acid ethyl ester 

(-) - 3 - hydroxy - N - allyl- 

morphinan 
(-) - 3 - hydroxy - N - methyl- 

morphinan 
1,3 - dimethyl - 4 - carbethoxy - 

4-phenylhexamethyleneimine 



1,2 - dimethyl - 4 - carbometh- 
oxy - 4 - phenylhexamethyl- 
eneimine 

6-methyl- 6 -desoxymorph;ne 



6-methyIdihydromorphine 



myrophinum 

myrophine 

normethadonum 

normethadone 

oxpheneridinum 

oxphenertdine 

oxymorphonum 
oxymorphone 
phenomor- 
phanum 
phenomorphan 
proheptazinum 
proheptazine 
properid num 
properidine 

propoxyphenum 
propoxyphene 



myristyl ester of benzylmorphine 

4,4 - diphenyl - 6 - dimethyl- 

amino-3-hexanone 
1 - (2 - phenyl - 2 - hydroxy- 

ethyl) - 4 - carbethoxy - 4 - 

phenyl-piperidine 
dihydrohydroxymorphinone 

3-hydroxy-N-phenethylmorphinan 



.3 - dimethyl - 4 - phenyl - 4 - 
propionoxyhexamethyleneimine 

- methyl - 4 - phenylpiperi- 
dme - 4 - carboxylic acid iso- 
propyl ester 

- dimethylamino - 1,2 - di- 
phenyl - 3 - methyl - 2 - 
propionoxybutane 



BRITISH PHARMACEUTICAL CONFERENCE 



Preliminary programme 

THE preliminary programme of the 
1959 meeting of the British Pharmaceu- 
tical Conference, to be held in Bourne- 
mouth, September 21-25, is: — 

Monday (September 21).— At 10.30 
a.m., coffee in the pavilion ball-room; 
at 11.15, opening session and address 
by chairman of the Conference in the 
pavilion ball-room; at 2.30 p.m., 
science session in the grand hall, town 
hall; at 2.30, ladies' excursion; at 8 for 
8.30, civic reception and dance in the 
pavilion ball-room. 

Tuesday (September 22). — At 9.30 
a.m., professional session in the grand 
hall, town hall; at 9.30, science 
session in the pavilion popular restaur- 
ant; at 9.30, ladies' excursion; at 
2.30 p.m., science session in the grand 
hall, town hall; at 2.30, ladies' excur- 
sion; at 7.15 for 7.45, conference ban- 
quet in the pavilion. 

Wednesday (September 23).— At 9.30 
a.m., science session in the grand hall, 
town hall; at 12 noon. Conference 
luncheon in the pavilion ball-room; at 
1 p.m., Conference excursion (afternoon 
tea en route). Evening free. 

Thursday (September 24).— At 9.30 
a.m., symposium session in the grand 
hall, town hall; at 9.30, ladies' excur- 
sion; afternoon, sports; evening, theatre. 

Friday (September 25). — At 9.30 a.m., 
professional session in the grand hall, 
town hall; at 9,. 30, science session in 
the pavilion popular restaurant; at 9.30, 
ladies' excursion; at 2.30 p.m., science 
session in the pavilion popular restaur- 
ant; at 3.45, afternoon tea in the 
pavilion ball-room; at 4.15, closing ses- 
sion in the pavilion theatre; at 8 for 
8.30, Conference ball in the pavilion 
ball-room (buffet refreshments). 

Tickets. — Books of tickets (Monday- 
Friday inclusive) are £4 each. Day 
tickets are being issued for the events 
of any one day, if accommodation is 
available, at 30s. for Monday, Wednes- 
day, Thursday, or Friday, and 15s. for 
Tuesday. There is room at the banquet 
for all attending the Conference and 
tickets for that are available separately 
at an additional cost of £1 lis. 6d. 
each, and may be purchased by holders 
of books of tickets or holders of day 



for Bournemouth meeting 

tickets for Tuesday. A limited number 
of places are available for gentlemen 
on the ladies' excursions on payment 
of an additional charge. 

Accommodation. — ■ Accommodation 
has been reserved at a number of 
hotels. Applicants are asked to give de- 
tails of their requirements on the ap- 
propriate form on receipt of which 
arrangements are made for suitable 
hotels to confirm the bookings with the 
applicants. As the Conference Local 
Committee must confirm reservations 
by June 1, they are unable to guaran- 
tee accommodation applied for after 
that date. Most of the hotels require 
a booking or payment for a full week. 
Members return to their hotels for lunch 
each day with the exception of Wednes- 
day, the day of the Conference excur- 
sion, when lunch is being provided, a 
ticket for which is included in the 
ticket for that day and in the books of 
tickets. 

Applications. — Applications for 
tickets and accommodation should be 
made on the appropriate form obtain- 
able from the Conference honorary 
general secretaries, 17 Bloomsbury 
Square, London, W.C.I, and from the 
honorary local secretary, Mr. D. F. 
Smith. 12 Redhill Crescent, Bourne- 
mouth. Completed forms together with 
remittance (made payable to B.P.C. 
Bournemouth Committee), should be 
sent to the honorary local secretary so 
soon as possible. 

ROYAL SOCIETY 

New Fellows elected 

THE following are among newly elec- 
ted Fellows of the Royal Society: — 
Dr. G. H. Beale, M.B.E. (senior lec- 
turer in genetics, University of Edin- 
burgh institute of animal genetics) for 
researches on the genetics of flower 
pigments and on nucleus-cytoplasm re- 
lations in Paramecium. Professor 
Franz Bergel (professor of chemistry, 
University of London, at the Chester 
Beatty Research Institute of the Insti- 
tute of Cancer Research, Royal Cancer 
Hospital) for work in synthetic organic 
chemistry in the field of vitamins and 
drugs. Dr. Ann Bishop (director of 



March 28, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



337 



Medical Research Council group for 
research in chemotherapy at the Mol- 
teno Institute of Biology and Parasitol- 
ogy, Cambridge) for work on the 
malaria parasite and its resistance to 
drugs. Professor G. E. Blackman 
(Sibthorpian professor of rural economy 
in the University of Oxford department 
of agriculture) for research work on 
the ecology of wild and cultivated 
plants and on weed-killers. Professor 
A. R. Clapham (professor of botany, 
University of Sheffield) for research 
upon important aspects of ecology and 
taxonomy. Dr. F. H. C. Crick (mem- 
ber of staff, Medical Research Council 
unit for research on the molecular 
structure of biological systems, Caven- 
dish Laboratory, Cambridge) for con- 
tributions to molecular biology. Dr. 



D. W. W. Henderson, C.B. (director, 
Ministry of Supply microbiological re- 
search establishment, Porton, Wilts), 
for work on aerosols and the patho- 
genesis of air-borne infections. Dr. 
R. D. Keynes (lecturer in physiology, 
University of Cambridge physiological 
laboratory) for work on ionic move- 
ments in nerve and muscle, etc. Pro- 
fessor R. J. W. Le Fevre (professor 
of chemistry, University of Sydney and 
head of its school of chemistry) for 
studies of the physical properties of 
organic compounds. Professor W. C. 
Price (professor of physics, University 
of London, King's College) for contri- 
butions to chemical physics, especially 
spectroscopy. Dr. R. E. Richards (lec- 
turer in chemistry, University of Ox- 
ford physical chemistry laboratory) for 



work on nuclear magnetic resonance 
and its application to chemical pro- 
blems. Dr. R. Spence, C.B. (chief chem- 
ist and head of chemistry division, 
Atomic Energy Research Establishment, 
Harwell) for work on chemistry of 
radioactive elements. Dr. J. F. Tait 
(Worcester Foundation, Shrewsbury, 
Massachusetts, U.S.A.) for work on the 
hormones of the suprarenal cortex. 
Mrs. S. A. S. Tait (Worcester Founda- 
tion) for work on the hormones con- 
trolling the distribution of salts in the 
body. Dr. M. H. F. Wilkins (deputy 
director, Medical Research Council 
biophysical research unit, King's Col- 
lege, London) for contributions to the 
development of reflexion and interfer- 
ence microscopy, and for work on the 
structure of nucleic acids. 



N.H.S. ACCOUNTS, 1957-58 

Pharmaceutical services costs 



THE amount paid to pharmacists in 
England and Wales for dispensing fees 
under the National Health Service in 
the year 1957-58 was £12,790,000; in 
Scotland it was £1,688,000 during the 
same period. The cost of drugs and 
appliances was £38,145,000 in England 
and Wales and £4,336,000 in Scotland. 
Those figures are given in the sum- 
marised accounts for 1957-58 published 
by H.M. Stationery Office (Nos. 105 
and 106, price 3s. and Is. 6d. respec- 
tively). 

Hospitals 

The national average net in-patient 
cost per week and per case respectively 
for all Acute hospitals in England and 
Wales were £22 12s. 5d. and £46 6s. in 
hospitals administered by Hospital Man- 

Scotland 



agement Committees; and £30 10s. 2d. 
and £64 7s. lOd. in hospitals adminis- 
tered by Boards of Governors. Where 
the cost per week was £22 odd, the 
amount attributed to drugs is 14s. 9d. 
and to dressings, 5s. 6d. 

Scotland 

The cost to the Exchequer for the 
Pharmaceutical Services in Scotland in 
1957-58 was £661,090 (or 11*7 per cent.) 
more than in 1956-57. The gross sums 
due to chemists for dispensing pre- 
scriptions increased by £907,230, the 
number of prescriptions dispensed 
being 20,908,000 at an average cost of 
82-2d. as against 21,343,000 in 1956-57 
at an average cost of 70-8d. The aver- 
age cost of ingredients per prescription 
rose by eightpence; in addition dis- 



pensing fees cost more as 1957-58 was 
the first year in which the full effect 
was felt of the revision of chemists' 
remuneration as from September 1, 
1956. 

The charges paid by patients in 
respect of prescriptions realised £257,100 
more than in 1956-57, when the new 
charge of one shilling per prescription 
instead of one shilling per form was 
in operation for only part of the year. 
The following table is an analysis of 
the payments for the Pharmaceutical 
Services in Scotland and in England 
and Wales :- — 

Drugs, dressings, instruments cost the 
Regional Hospital Boards in Scotland 
£2,056 437 during the year or 5-5 per 
cent, of the gross hospital running cost 
total. 



Contractors 



1. Payments to pharmacists: — 

(a) gross sums due 

(b) less charges to patients ... 

2. Payments for rota scheme 

3. Payments to medical practitioners 

for supply and dispensing of 
drugs, etc. : — ■ 

(a) gross sums due 

(b) less charges 

4. Superannuation 

5. Provision of services at Health 

Centre : — 

(a) Pharmacists' salaries, etc. 

(b) Superannuation contribu- 

tions (Council's share) 

(c) Cost of drugs and appli- 



7,289,634 
1,106,810 



126,547 
162 



1,616 
120 

6,125 



1,945 



6, 



182,824 
4,934 



stamps; and (iii) £1,131 paid by patients at health centre 
pharmacy. 

England and Wales 
l.To pharmacists (excluding iota 

fees:— £ £ 

(a) For supply and dispensing of 

drugs and appliances ... 61,820,617 

(b) Less net repayments 5,709 



173 



(c) Less charges to patients 



61,814,908 
10.767,777 



126,385 
5,062 



2. To pharmacists for rota scheme 

3. To medical practitioners for supply and dispensing 

of drugs and appliances, less charges, etc. 

4. Superannuation contributions for medical practi- 

tioners ... 

5. Other payments 



51,047,131 
290,829 

1,908,043 

74,236 
5 



Total ...£53,319,704 



7,861 



Total 



Breakdown of item 1 (a) above: — 

(i) Dispensing fees 

(fi) Cost of drugs and appliances ... 

(iii) Allowance for overheads and profit 

(iv) Container allowance 



£6,327,066 
£ 

1,688,000 
4,336,000 
1,093,000 
173,000 

£7,290,000 



In addition to the charges reported at items 1 (b) and 3 (b) 
above, the following were also paid by patients : — (i) £13,113 
collected by doctors; (li) £3,222 paid by means of postage 



(1) Payments to pharmacists (items 1 (a) and (b) £ 

above) : — 

(i) Dispensing fees ... 12,790,000 

(ii) Cost of drugs and appliances 38,145,000 

(iii) Allowance for overheads and profits... 9,535,000 

(iv) Allowance for containers 1,345,000 

(2) Special interim payments (item 1 (b) above): — 

Repayments during year 58,335 

Less Issues during year to new contractors ... 52,626 

Net repayments ... £5,709 
Total amount of special interim payments out- 
standing at March 31, 1958 £1,521,539 

(3) Prescription charges collected by doctors amount- 

ing to £211,469 



3 3 8 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 28, 1959 



WEST HAM 

Conference Chairman as Guest 

The toast " The West Ham and District 
Association of Pharmacists " at the As- 
sociation's annual dinner and dance on 
March 5 was proposed by Mr. H. 
Treves Brown (chairman of the British 
Pharmaceutical Conference, 1959). Mr. 
and Mrs. Treves Brown had, with the 
Association's president (Mr. C. Col- 
linge) and Mrs. Collinge, welcomed the 




FOUNDER MEMBER: Mr. Clifford Jones (one 
of West Hani's two surviving founder members) 
with Mr. Douglas Herd, East Ham. 

diners as they arrived. In proposing the 
toast Mr. Treves Brown said he re- 
garded his being asked to do so as an 
honour to the Conference. The two 
organisations had, he suggested, some- 
thing in common. Both served to bring 
the latest developments in pharmacy to 
the notice of pharmacists, and both 
tried to spice that function with more 
pleasurable activities. As one who had 
served his apprenticeship in Cumber- 
land, said the speaker, it pleased him to 
know that the West Ham Association 
had furnished the Cumberland room at 
Birdsgrove House. In his reply, Mr. 
Collinge said the Association, founded 
in 1903, was proud to have present one 
of the two surviving founder members : 
Mr. Clifford Jones. The other (Mr. 
Joseph Reed) was unfortunately not 
well enough to attend. Dr. A. F. Mc- 
Donald (chairman of the Stratford 
division, British Medical Association) 
in proposing " The Ladies," said he 
brought the good wishes of the divi- 



BRANCH EVENTS 

sion. Mrs. Collinge gracefully replied. 
A raffle for the Pharmaceutical So- 
ciety's Benevolent Fund realised £50. 

WESTERN LONDON 
Season's Finale 

What with top brass, West Britons, the 
best part of the staff and students from 
Chelsea School of Pharmacy, officers 
from neighbouring pharmaceutical as- 
sociations and branches, representatives 
of manufacturing houses, and ordinary 
folk like you and me, there was a full, 
varied and light-hearted attendance at 
pharmaceutical London's last big social 
event of the season: the dinner and 
dance of the Western Pharmacists' As- 
sociation on March 19. A toast to the 
Pharmaceutical Society was proposed 
by Mr. H. G. Moss, who commented 
favourably on the speed with which the 
Council had started to make alterations 
to the premises after its recent acquisi- 
tions of neighbouring properties so as 
to provide the Society with a worthy 
headquarters. The reply was by Mr. 
F. W. Adams (registrar) who, after say- 
ing that he had a particular affection 
for the Western as being the Associa- 
tion he had had most to do with when, 
in his early days, he worked in the 
West End of London, added that that 
area exemplified most strongly the 
changes that had taken part in pharma- 
ceutical practice — changes of which the 
Society had to take account. " The 
Western Pharmacists' Association " was 
proposed by Mr. H. Treves Brown 
(chairman, British Pharmaceutical 
Conference, 1959), and answered by the 
chairman for the evening, Mr. Clif- 
ford Evans (president of the Associa- 
tion). Mr. Evans said the Western had 
always been closely associated with the 
Conference and proud to welcome its 
chairmen. 

READING 

Guests From Many Counties 

A company of over 300 diners, mem- 
bers of the Reading Branch of the 
Pharmaceutical Society and their 
guests from Berks, Bucks, Oxon, 




EAST GREETS WEST: " Never the twain shall meet " is not true of east and west in London 
pharmacy, where even year the Western Pharmacists' Association is well represented at the annual 
dinner and dance of the West Ham and District Association of Pharmacists. Here Mrs. and Mr. 
Clifford Evans (social secretary of the Western) are being received by Mrs. and Mr. H. Treves Brown 
(proposer of the principal toast) and Mrs. end Mr. C. Collinge (West Ham's president). 



Herts, Hants and even so far as Bristol, 
filled a Reading hotel and overflowed 
into a nearby restaurant when the 
Branch held its annual dinner and 
dance on March 11. After dinner, the 
" exiles " from the restaurant joined the 
main party to hear the guests welcomed 
by guest-of-honour Alderman E. A. 
Busby (mayor of Reading). The toast 
of the Reading Branch was proposed 
by the other guest of honour, Mr. O. H. 
Waller, M.P.S. (editor, The Chemist 
and Druggist). Mr. Waller said he be- 
lieved the Branch, which was founded 
in 1924, was the only Branch of the 
Society to possess an honorary life 
president, Mr. F. W. Vasey, now in his 
ninety-first year. Mr. J. P. Bate (chair- 
man of the Branch), in his reply to the 
toast, said that, of the members of the 
Branch, only two or three were natives. 
Most had come to the town to make 
their fortunes [he did not say whether 
they had done so]. After dinner and 
during the dancing a centre of attrac- 
tion was the tombola, an annual feature 
for which the Branch is famous. 

MANSFIELD 

Pharmacists as " Dedicated Men " 

Proposing the toast of the Pharmaceu- 
tical Society at the annual dinner and 
dance of the Mansfield Branch on 
March 4, Mr. A. C. Shepherd, M.C. 
(town clerk of the borough) spoke of 
the high standard of education and 
integrity required of a pharmacist, sug- 
gesting that the remuneration obtained 
was often not commensurate with the 
skill required in the performance of 
his duties. Some measure of dedication 
was necessary, he thought, in a man 
electing to make pharmacy his career. 
Mr. J. C. Bloomfield (a member of 
the Society's Council), stressed in his 
reply the necessity for a high standard 
of education. Appealing for continued 
financial help for the Benevolent Fund 
he spoke of " ever-increasing calls " 
upon it. The toast to the ladies and 
visitors was proposed by Mr. G. R. 
Milton (chairman), Mrs. T. S. Mc- 
Kean (wife of the medical officer of 
health for Sutton-in-Ashfield) replying 
on behalf of the ladies and Mr. Ray 
Price on behalf of the visitors. A draw 
in aid of the Benevolent Fund raised 
£13. 

SHEFFIELD 

Judicial Occasion 

To celebrate his first visit to Sheffield 
as an Assize Judge, members of the 
Sheffield and District Branch of the 
Pharmaceutical Society gave a dinner 
to Mr. Justice Glyn-Jones on March 
4. A very pleasant evening included 
speeches of welcome from representa- 
tives of the various sections of phar- 
macy, and the presentation of some 
Sheffield cutlery on behalf of members 
unable to be present. 

NORTH STAFFORDSHIRE 
Dignity, Integrity and Competence 

Pharmacists' " courtesy, sympathy and 
human understanding " were praised by 
Professor H. D. Springall (vice-princi- 
pal and professor of chemistry at North 
Staffordshire University College), when 



March 28, 1959 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 339 




3 40 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 28, 1959 



he proposed a toast to the Pharmaceu- 
tical Society at the annual dinner of 
the North Staffordshire Branch, re- 
cently. The Society was maintaining the 
dignity, integrity and competence of the 
profession, he said, in the face of a 
challenge of a revolution in public 
medicine. Responding, Mr. G. H. 
Hughes (vice-president of the Pharma- 
ceutical Society) spoke of the Society's 
close liaison with the various branches 
of the medical profession. Mr. G. L. 
Walton (branch chairman), who pro- 
posed a toast to the guests, did so in 
rhyme, welcoming representatives of 



the British Medical Association, the 
Medical Society of North Staffordshire, 
the Stoke-on-Trent Executive Council, 
and local dental and optical societies. 
Dr. C. W. Healey (president, Medical 
Society of North Staffordshire), re- 
sponded. A replica of the chairman's 
badge was presented to the immediate 
past-chairman (Mr. G. R. Mee) by Mr. 
Walton, and Mrs. Mee received a pot- 
tery figure in recognition of her work 
as chairman of the ladies' group. Mrs. 
Walton presented a cheque for £20, 
raised by the ladies' group for the 
Benevolent Fund, to Mr. Hughes. 



GOLDEN JUBILEE BANQUET 

Portsmouth's happy occasion 



GOOD organisation and good food 
contributed to make the golden jubilee 
banquet of the Portsmouth and District 
Chemists' Association, held in South- 
sea on March 17, an occasion to live 
in the memory of members and guests. 

The organisers, befittingly for a naval 
dockyard, had deployed their tables like 
ships pointed to the centre of the long 
table of the principal guests, and the 
arrangement combined the advantages 
of " family " parties with proper regard 
for the oratorical purpose of the occa- 
sion. 

There were three toasts, but — for a 
reason that will appear — seven speeches. 
The President of the Pharmaceuti- 
cal Society (Mr. D. W. Hudson) pro- 
posed " The City of Portsmouth," ex- 
pressing thanks to the city for what it 
had done for his own professional col- 
leagues, and congratulating it upon 
establishing a great industrial centre 
within its boundaries without destroy- 
ing the town's amenities. The compre- 
hensive technological facilities that were 
being provided by the city authorities, 
he said, were proof that the future was 
not being left to take care of itself, and 
he was grateful that his own profession 
was not being overlooked. Of new ac- 
commodation approved in 1958 no less 
than 2,000 sq. ft. had been allocated to 
pharmacy, and the Council of the So- 
ciety was watching the development 
with great interest. 

The Lord Mayor of Portsmouth 
(councillor A. L. Blake, M.C., LL.B., 
J. P.) responded on the City's behalf. 
He was aware, he said, of the high stan- 
dards set by the pharmacists of Ports- 
mouth, and that, in the interest they had 
taken in the development of the Col- 
lege, they were not falling short. He 
made mention of the fact that the 
British Pharmaceutical Conference 
would be meeting in Portsmouth in 
1960— after fifty years — and hoped the 
City would prove a good host. 

The second toast, " The Association," 
was proposed by Mr. H. G. Moss 
(chairman of the National Pharmaceu- 
tical Union). The Association had 
fathered, he said, the Portsmouth 
Branches of the Pharmaceutical Society 
and the National Pharmaceutical 
Union and was still to the fore in 
such ways as submitting " frankly rebel- 
lious " resolutions at Branch Repre- 
sentatives' meetings. More branches 
were needed to take similar steps to 
stimulate action. Pharmacy was in great 
need of a better presentation of its 
case, and the N.P.U. was giving a good 



deal of thought to those considerations. 
In his reply, as president of the Asso- 
ciation, Mr. J. C. Bloomfield read 
congratulatory telegrams from local 
pharmaceutical organisations or indi- 
vidual pharmacists in Brighton, Bourne- 
mouth, Worthing, Slough, Isle of Wight, 
Durham, Guildford, Birmingham, Bir- 
kenhead and Southampton, and a cable 
from " Old Greg " (Mr. Gregory, who 
emigrated to Australia in 1958). He 



also read a number of apologies for ab- 
sence — in particular from eighty-five- 
year-old founder secretary Mr. T. O. 
Barlow, who had been billed to speak 
but was under doctor's orders to stay 
away. Mr. Bloomfield recounted epi- 
sodes in his own career to illustrate the 
importance of the Association within 
the field of pharmacy in Portsmouth, 
and wound up by announcing a special 
jubilee campaign by the Association to 
provide technical reference and text 
books for the school of pharmacy. 
Nearly £200 worth of books had 
already been given in response to the 
appeal. His " personal " target for his 
year of office of £500. Mr. Bloom- 
field made a token presentation of 
books to Mr. N. Francis (that day 
promoted senior lecturer in pharmaceu- 
tics at the College, see C. & D., March 
21, p. 314), whose speech in acknow- 
ledgement was the one (already re- 
ferred to) additional to those on the 
printed programme. 

"The Guests " was proposed by Mr. 
L. J. Chamberlain and replied to by 
Mr. Norman C. Jeffery (president. 
Proprietary Articles Trade Association). 
Mr. N. L. Banks acted as M.C. 



CLASSIFYING PROPRIETARY MEDICINES 

Revision of categories recommended 



A CHANGE from numbers to letters 
for identifying the categories into which 
proprietary medicines are classified for 
National Health Service purposes is 
recommended by a Joint Committee of 
the Central and Scottish Health Ser- 
vices Councils (chairman, Lord Cohen 
of Birkenhead), in a report, Classifica- 
tion of Proprietary Preparations, pub- 
lished on March 24 (H.M. Stationery 
Office, price sixpence). The present 
Committee recommends the change from 
the former category numbers 1 to 6 to 
letters to avoid the mistaken belief 
which has arisen, both here and abroad, 
" that the numbers represent a de- 
scending order of therapeutic merit." 
They also recommend a new category 
of "suspended judgment." The categories 
now recommended for adoption are: — 
N. New drugs of proved value which 
are not yet " standard " (that is 
described in the British Pharmaco- 
poeia, British Pharmaceutical Codex 
or British National Formulary). 
S. (a) All preparations whose active 
therapeutic constituents are identi- 
cal with or modifications of those 
of " standard " preparations; 

(b) elegant preparations of drugs in 
Category N; 

(c) mixture of drugs in Category N 
with drugs in Category S. 

P. Preparations which are not " stan- 
dard " for which prima facie evi- 
dence of therapeutic value is pre- 
sented, but which the Committee 
cannot accept as of proved thera- 
peutic value without further evi- 
dence, which must be provided 
within a period stipulated by the 
Committee. 

Preparations not " standard " which 
in the Committee's view have not 
been proved of therapeutic value. 
Preparations which are a combina- 
tion of drugs in Category O with 
those in Categories N., S. or P. 



O. 



H. 



The Committee advise that prepara- 
tions in categories N and P should be 
freely prescribable, those in S pre- 
scribable under certain conditions, and 
that practitioners should be discouraged 
from prescribing those in categories O 
and H. At the same time " there should 
be no absolute restriction on the pre- 
scribing by a general practitioner of 
any drug which in his opinion was 
necessary for the treatment of his 
patients." 

P is a new category of " suspended 
judgment " in which a new drug not yet 
standard, but for which there is prima 
facie evidence of value, could be placed 
for a specified period during which the 
manufacturer would be asked to pro- 
vide conclusive evidence of its value. 
At the end of that specified period (un- 
less the Committee otherwise determine) 
if the evidence is not presented the drug 
will be categorised as " not proved of 
therapeutic value." 

But during the period of " suspended 
judgment " the drug should be prescrib- 
able without the prescriber being called 
upon to justify his prescription. For 
example, if it is claimed that drug " X " 
will arrest or cure cancer of the stom- 
ach even in a relatively few patients, 
and the prima facie evidence presented 
with the claim is suggestive, the Com- 
mittee consider that it would clearly be 
wrong to withhold the drug until its 
value had been conclusively confirmed 
or refuted. 

The report has been circulated to all 
practitioners accompanied by a letter 
from Sir John Charles (Chief Medical 
Officer, Ministry of Health) in which 
he stresses that " you will doubtless 
wish to refrain from prescribing any 
preparation in these categories (O and 
H) unless you are satisfied that it is 
essential for the treatment of individual 
patients." 



March 28, 1 959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



29 



Many years of clinical experience 
have proved the value of Metatone* 
in restoring normal metabolic 
function after debilitating illness. 

Metatone is a combination of 
appetite-promoting vitamin Bi 
with strychnine and mineral 
glycerophosphates designed to 
assist and speed the convalescent's i 
return to full vigour. 





Restoration 

of the 
I Patient 




1 



Metatone 



♦TRADE MARK 



Supplied in bottles of 8, 16 and 80 fl. ounces 



for rapid restoration of 
lb ; normal metabolic function 

after illness 



PARKE, DAVIS & CO. LTD. (Inc. USA) Hounslow, Middlesex. Telephone; Hoimslow 2361 
and at Carfin Industrial Estate. Carfin Lanarkshire. Telephone: Holytown 326/7 101 1 



G 



3 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 28, 1 959 




in low dosage, long-acting sulpha drugs 



in safety and simplicity 



LEDERKYN 



* Round-the-clock therapy on once-a- 
day dosage 



* High, sustained blood levels ensure 
continuous antibacterial action 



* Full chemotherapeutic potential — 
anti-bacterial spectrum equivalent to 
that of sulphadiazine 



* Well tolerated-negligible side-reactions 

LEDERKYN TABLETS : 0.5 Gm. 

Packing- and basic N.H.S cost. Bottles of 24, 
15,8, 100, £2.18.8 and 500, £13.16.4. 

LEDERKYN ACETYL : Pediatric Suspen- 
sion 250 mg/5 cc. Packing- and basic N.H.S. 
cost. Bottles of 2 fl. oz. 8/- and 16 fl. oz. £2.16.8. 




SULPH AM E THOXYPYRI DAZI NE 



REGD. TRADEMARK 




LAB O FRATO R I EE S 




CYANAMID OF GREAT BRITAIN LTD. London W.C.2 



March 28. 



1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



34 1 



CHEMISPaSDRUGGIST 

For Retailer, Wholesaler and Manufacturer 

ESTABLISHED 1859 

Published weekly at 
28 Essex Street, Strand, London, W.C.2 

TELEPHONE CENTRAL 6565 
TELEGRAMS: "CHEM1CUS ESTRAND, LONDON 



Classification by Letters 

The reasons given for the latest report by the Standing 
Joint Committee on the Classification of Proprietary 
Preparations (see p. 340), are that since the last report 
the Committee has had a further three years' experience 
in classifying several thousand preparations and that 
certain pricing arrangements have been agreed between 
the Health Departments and the industry making the 
time opportune for a revision of the categories. 

The committee acknowledges that, by employing 
numbers for their present classification, it has created 
the impression, both at home and overseas, that drugs 
in category 1 are the best and those in category 6 are 
the poorest, with a decreasing therapeutic merit in the 
intermediate categories. There can be no doubt that 
such official separation of " sheep and goats " has had 
a harmful effect on some of the country's exports. The 
committee believes that, by now altering the numbers 
to letters, it will dispel that illusion. The harm, however, 
has been done and we think it may be many years be- 
fore it will be forgotten. A new category (P) has been 
created. Described as a " suspended judgment " cate- 
gory, it is for new drugs which are not " standard," for 
which evidence of therapeutic value has been presented, 
but which the committee cannot accept without further 
evidence (to be provided within a time limit, the time 
allowed varying according to the drug). If the evidence 
has not been supplied within the given period the drug 
will be placed in category O (formerly 5). 

Overseas Trade in February 

The value of drugs, medicines and medicinal prepara- 
tions shipped from the United Kingdom during Febru- 
ary was £3-07 millions, against £3-87 millions in January 
and £3-07 millions in February 1958. Despite the fall 
in the group total, aspirin exports were at their highest 
level since August 1958, and sulphonamides since Nov- 
ember 1958. For January and February combined, in- 
sulin shipments at £87,407 were down by nearly 50 per 
cent, on the corresponding months of 1958. 

The destinations for the medicinal exports in Febru- 
ary followed the familiar pattern, with Australia as the 
largest single market (£205,523), followed by Nigeria 
(£173,286). Sales to Egypt were maintained and, at 
£116,339, brought the two months' total to £224,084. 
Sales to the- United States, however, fell to £81,000 in 
February from £124,000 in January, and those to 
Canada to £75,000 (from £110,000). Turkey is beginning 
to come back into the picture again after her trade- 



balance difficulties, while exports to Indonesia showed 
a sizeable upturn. India's purchases on the other hand 
continued to decline. 

Imports of prepared medicines dipped sharply during 
February to £259,173 — the lowest value recorded for 
any month during the past few years. The February 
export and import values of those drugs for which statis- 
tics are available, together with several allied products, 
are given in the accompanying tables. 

Taking the U.K. trade as a whole the visible deficit 
in February was £30-4 millions or £19 millions less than 
in January. That, says the Board of Trade, is normal 
for February because the seasonal effect is usually 
greater on imports than on exports. 



FXPORTS 


VALUE 


Drugs, medicines, medicinal preparations 


£ 


(total) 


3,073.737 


Vitamins 


171.056 


Ppniptllirt salts ... 


100.031 


Penicillin injections 


56^675 


Penicillin tablets, ointments, etc 


65,652 


Antibiotics other than penicillin 


JZo, /14 


Quinine ... 


10,758 


Alkaloids, excluding quinine 


1 06.045 


Aspirin 


QA 0^1 

V4,o J I 


Antihistamines ... 


"50 A OT 


Antipaludics 


72.219 


Barbiturates 




Liver extracts ... 


I 3, /VJ 


Ointments and liniments 


yv.ozy 


Insulin 


zo,iw-y 


Sulphonamides ... 


i ia Tin 


Proprietary medicines 


Voo.VZ / 


Other medicines, unclassified 


T)Q ion 


Glycerin 


oil, /oo 


Acetone 


IZ.Zo/ 


Citric acid 


4U, 111 


Salicylates ... 


y, /i 4- 


Perfumery and toilet preparations 




Lipstick, face powder, etc. ... 


247,501 


Dentifrices ... 


147,194 


Toilet soaps ... ... ... 


267,760 


Synthetic detergents 


504,712 


IMPORTS 


£ 


Vitamins 


32,424 


Antibiotics 


28,478 


Alkaloids ' 


47,755 


Proprietary medicines ... 


38,335 


Unclassified medicines 


112,181 


Borax 


68,766 


Iodine ' 


11,669 


Menthol 


32,876 


Essential oils 




Bergamot 


13,068 


Citronella 


16,262 


Clove ' 


608 


Geranium 


33,349 


Lavender 


46,873 


Lemon 


106,227 


Orange 


7,730 


Peppermint .-.!'» 


71,778 


Unclassified 


153,087 



A PHARMACIST'S ANTHOLOGY 

LIGHTING A CENTURY AGO 

From Story of Buchanan Street (Glasgow, 1885), 
by Daniel Frazer 
The Bude light, adopted by ourselves and neighbours — 
Mr. George Baird and Mr. Andrew Rutherglen — being 
about the earliest fitted up in Glasgow, created considerable 
excitement at the opening of the new [pharmacy] premises. 
As a much greater proportion of our business was then 
[1847] done in the evenings than there is now done in these 
days of late dinner hours, this excitement may have been 
another " spoke in the wheel " in the upward progress of 
our business, for certain it is that it greatly increased after 
this date. 



342 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 28, 1959 



In no way relevant to the pricing 

The fictional correspondence published below directs attention to a 
prescription-pricing situation that could result in a substantial loss to a 
chemist-contractor — and did to one. The moral is to know one's Drug 
Tariff inside-out, and be forearmed against any similar misfortune. 



From Mr. John Carboy, M.P.S., to 
Galenicals, Ltd. 

Sirs, — May I draw your attention to 
an increase of 6s. in the amount charged 
to me (your invoice 13579 of August 15, 
1 958) for supplying 4 kilos of ointment 
to my special formula H9753. On all 
previous occasions the cost has been 
42s. You give no explanation of the 
increase. May I take it that it is an 
error? 

From Galenicals, Ltd., to Mr. John 
Carboy, M.P.S. 

Sir, — While it is regretted that, by 
an oversight, you were not given an 
explanation of the advance when the 
goods were invoiced, the new amount 
of 48s. charged to you on August 1 5 for 
making four kilos of ointment to your 
special formula H9753 is correct. The 
increase is due to high labour costs. 

From Mr. John Carboy, M.P.S. , to the 
Superintendent, Blankshire Prescription 
Pricing Bureau. 

Sir, — On a number of occasions I 
have supplied to a local doctor an oint- 
ment to a special formula, and it is 
ordered in such quantities that to make 
it as a dispensary operation is not prac- 
ticable. I therefore had it manufactured 
by one of the trade wholesalers, and 
have endorsed the prescription accord- 
ingly. On the last occasion the whole- 
saler's invoice arrived after the prescrip- 
tion form, endorsed as usual " cost 
42s." had been sent to the pricing 
bureau. The invoice was for 6s. more 
than the usual amount. I checked it with 
the supplier, who confirmed the new 
amount as correct, the increase being 
due to higher labour costs. I shall be 
glad, therefore, if you will take steps to 
see that the difference of 6s. is credited 
to me when the prescription is priced. 

From the Superintendent, Blankshire 
Prescription Pricing Bureau, to Mr. 
John Carboy. M.P^S. 

Sir, — I have to inform you that the 
ointment supplied by you to Dr. Jones 
on a prescription form dated August 
5, 1958, was not a proprietary, and that 
it has been priced, both on this occa- 
sion and previously, under paragraph 2 
(2) (B) of Part 1 of the Drug Tariff. 
The amount charged to you by your 
trade supplier, therefore, is in no way 
relevant to the pricing of the form. 

From Mr. John Carboy, M.P.S., to the 
Sit perintendent, Blankshire Prescription 
Pricing Bureau. 



Sir, — In view of the information 
given in your letter of September 14, I 
must request you to let me know pre- 
cisely what amount was credited to me 
for the supply of 7 lb. of the special- 
formula ointment supplied to Dr. Jones 
on my prescription form dated Febru- 
ary 17. 

From the Superintendent, Blankshire 
Prescription Pricing Bureau, to Mr. 
John Carboy, M.P.S. 

Sir, — The amount certified in respect 
of the 7 lb. of special ointment sup- 
plied by you to Dr. Jones on form 
dated February 17 was £1 3s. 6d. 

From Mr. John Carboy, M.P.S., to the 
Superintendent, Blankshire Prescription 
Pricing Bureau. 

Sir, — From your letter it seems that 
I have suffered a loss of 18s. 6d. on 
each supply of ointment, yet no indi- 
cation was given to me that my en- 
dorsements were being ignored. I con- 
sider such treatment unjustifiable and 
am taking up the matter with my trade 
association. 

From Mr. John Carboy, M.P.S., to the 
Secretary, Pricing Audit for Chemist 
Contractors. 

Sir, — On investigating the amount 
credited to me by the Blankshire Pre- 
scription Pricing Bureau for supplying 
7 lb. of ointment to a local doctor on 
an EC10 form dated February 17, I 
discovered that it was £1 3s. 6d. Even 
if I had myself made up the ointment, 

1 should have been heavily out of 
pocket, but as it is not practicable to 
make such quantities on the dispensing 
bench I contracted with Galenicals. 
Ltd., to make the ointment in 4-kilo 
lots and supply it to me. The prescrip- 
tion form was endorsed with the 
amount charged to me by the whole- 
saler, and I expected payment on that 
basis. The wholesaler meantime in- 
creased his charge to 48s. and it was 
only as a result of that change that I 
made the discovery that I had been 
losing heavily on each transaction. I am 
informed now by the Pricing Bureau 
that payment is made under paragraph 

2 (2) (b) of Part I of the Drug Tariff, 
which allows a dispensing fee of only 
Is. 6d. for making 7 lb. of an extem- 
poraneously prepared ointment. As I 
have been supplying the ointment to 
the doctor at a frequency of about 
7 lb. per two months for quite a long 
time, I must by now be heavily out of 
pocket. Will you therefore ascertain for 



me (a) on how many prescription forms 
I have been paid only according to the 
paragraph of the Drug Tariff, and (b) 
whether there are any steps that I can 
take, or which you can take, to obtain 
redress. 

From the Pricing Audit for Chemist 
Contractors to Mr. John Carboy, 
M.P.S. 

Sir, — We have now received from 
the Superintendent of the Blankshire 
Prescription Pricing Bureau details of 
the number of prescriptions for the 
ointment in question, and his com- 
ments on their pricing. The item occurs 
four times among the bundles in his 
possession, which cover a period of six 
months. We can only confirm the 
Superintendent's statement that he has 
no authority to price the prescription 
otherwise than as an ointment prepared 
extemporaneously. The only solution 
we can suggest to your problem would 
be to get the doctor to order the oint- 
ment as a proprietary preparation (e.g., 
"Ung. H9753, Galenicals, Ltd. 7 lb." 
The Bureau would then be able with- 
out question to certify payment at the 
price charged by the manufacturer. 

From Mr. John Carboy, M.P.S., to the 
Pricing Audit for Chemist Contractors. 

Sir, — I am in receipt of your letter 
of April 29, and am dismayed to note 
that, while you make a suggestion as 
to how to obtain full payment for the 
ointment in the future, you give no 
suggestion of any attempt to obtain a 
just settlement for what is obviously the 
injustice that over a long period I have 
received a grossly inadequate payment 
as a contractor under the National 
Health Service. At the very least, I 
thought I could count on you to per- 
suade the Pestlers' National Trade As- 
sociation to approach the Ministry to 
seek a ruling upon such an anomaly. 
On the Tariff pricing it would appear 
that pharmacists receive a dispensing fee 
of Is. 6d. for compounding 7 lb. of 
ointment to formula. That is a ridicu- 
lous situation, and it is also evident 
from the invoices of the manufacturing 
chemists that they do not consider it 
an economic proposition to make such 
a quantity of ointment for a profit of 
Is. 6d. 

From the Secretary, Pestlers" National 
Trade Association, to Mr. John Carboy, 
M.P.S. 

Dear Mr. Carboy, — It is unfortunate 
that neither you nor ourselves were 



March 28, 1 959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



34 3 



aware of the position regarding the 
pricing of bulk ointments before we 
reached agreement recently with the 
Ministry of Health on a revised scale 
of dispensing fees. Your own case is 
the first in which we have encountered 
a prescription ordering 7 lb. of an ex- 
temporaneously prepared ointment, or 
indeed of any ointment. In the lengthy 
negotiations which we had with the 
Ministry on the fees scale, the possi- 
bility of any chemist receiving such an 
order never crossed our minds. Let me 
say at once that I can see no way in 
which anything can be done about the 
prescriptions which you have dispensed 
in the past, since any approach to the 
Ministry would inevitably meet with 
the reply that the prescriptions which 
you dispensed were priced in accord- 
ance with the Drug Tariff, which was 
negotiated in accordance with the estab- 
lished machinery. In view of the 
unusual circumstances of your case, 
however, we are placing the facts 
before the Central Negotiating Com- 



mittee at its next meeting, and shall 
seek the Committee's view on the ques- 
tions (a) whether they feel any useful 
purpose would be served by an ap- 
proach to the Ministry about the pre- 
scriptions you have dispensed in the 
past, and (b) what should be done to 
prevent similar cases arising in the 
future. 

From Mr. John Carboy, M.P.S., to the 
secretary, the Pestlers' National Trade 
Association. 

Dear Mr. Quill,— I still maintain 
that the Blankshire Prescription Pricing 
Bureau failed in its duty by not inform- 
ing me that the price endorsed on the 
EC 10 form was not allowed, and that 
I am therefore entitled to reimburse- 
ment. I trust you will make that quite 
clear when you place the facts before 
the Central Negotiating Committee, and 
I shall await their reaction before press- 
ing the matter further. In any case, a 
revision of fees for ointments dispensed 
extemporaneously is indicated, because 



even for 8 oz. of ointment, which is an 
amount we quite often dispense, the 
operation usually involves much more 
time at the bench than is covered by 
their present fee, which can only be 
regarded as grossly inadequate. 

From the Pestlers" National Trade As- 
sociation to Mr. John Carboy, M.P.S. 

Dear Mr. Carboy, — The correspon- 
dence which passed between you and 
the Pricing Audit for Chemist Contrac- 
tors and ourselves was fully discussed 
by the Central Negotiating Committee, 
but the decision reached was that action 
could not usefully be taken about the 
past prescriptions. For the future, the 
Committee has to face the situation 
that it is impossible to produce a scale 
of fees that takes proper account of all 
likely circumstances, and that an up- 
ward adjustment in one part of the 
Tariff would have to be counterbal- 
anced by deductions elsewhere. The 
Committee has therefore decided not to 
approach the Ministry. 



HOSPITAL PHARMACY FORUM 

THE HIGHER THE FEWER 



THE debate in Parliament on the Supplementary Esti- 
mates for the Health Service (C. & D., March 21, p. 
309) provided one note of encouragement for hospital 
pharmacists. It was when Sir Hugh Linstead pressed for an 
early implementation by the Minister of recommendations 
made by the Standing Pharmaceutical Advisory Committee 
of which Sir Hugh is chairman. In particular he urged that 
action should be taken in regard to the establishment of a 
group service, and added that what the hospitals needed 
was not necessarily more pharmacists, but better paid ones 
and a better organisation of them. Sir Hugh's efforts have 
evidently not been fruitless, for an inquiry into the staffing 
position at each hospital has already been called for by the 
Ministry, and it does appear that, at long last, the problem 
is being recognised as one worthy of attention. The Guild 
of Public Pharmacists is already busy trying to orientate its 
salary claims to the new situation, and that will demand 
some vigorous new thinking by the membership. 

In the past, there has been a reluctance on the part of 
Guild members to recognise the need for a group pharma- 
cist. That is probably due to a fear that it would result in 
the depression of the salaries and status of those who are 
not group officers, but also to a fear that they would be 
restricted in their activities by coming under the authority 
of a group officer. Now the group has undoubtedly de- 
veloped as the unit of hospital organisation, and in every 
activity except pharmacy the executive officers are at group 
level. It is partly that factor which has put the pharmacist 
at a disadvantage in relation to the supplies officer and has 
led to his being relegated to a junior position in the admin- 
istrative set-up. With a pharmacist at group level, many 
of the matters that must now go via the hospital secretary 
to the group secretary would be dealt with directly between 
the pharmacists concerned. Far from being a brake on the 
local pharmacist, the group organisation would give phar- 
macists collectively a better chance of stating their case to 
the governing body and of achieving an efficient service. 

The shortage of staff in hospital pharmacies has continued 
for so long that it must be fairly obvious that it will prob- 
ably never be possible to staff the departments fully accord- 
ing to the older ideas. Some-delegation of work to assistants 
is inevitable. Unfortunately in present circumstances that 
often happens without plan under the weight of sheer neces- 



sity. Hospitals are left for considerable periods without a 
pharmacist and in others assistants-in-dispensing are given 
charge of departments for which their training is inade- 
quate. It is probable that the number of pharmacists now 
in the service would be adequate if the service were more 
efficiently planned and if rational use were made of the 
assistants. Rational use would surely mean using assistants 
to assist — and not to act in lieu of a pharmacist. Centralisa- 
tion of some of the work at the group headquarters hospital 
would in many cases enable the assistants to be used at the 
centre, working under adequate supervision, whilst pharma- 
cists took the responsibility for the smaller outside units, 
working them as branches of the main hospital. Some would 
need only a part-time pharmacist in charge. Others might be 
operated by sending supplies as for an internal ward, the 
pharmacist visiting the unit only at intervals to check on 
the general care and custody of the drugs. 

Such a concept of the service is not new : there are many 
groups where something of the kind has been in operation 
for several years. What is new is the acceptance of that 
concept officially by both the Ministry and the Guild. Hos- 
pital pharmacy needs the service of men with real ability 
and initiative and must attract a fair proportion of the 
ablest youngsters to make a career in it. It is unlikely to do 
so until the newly qualified can see a reasonable chance of a 
responsible and adequately paid job comparable with that 
offered in industry or in retail. Very few unit hospitals can 
offer such scope, and the pharmacist, if he is to expect an 
adequate salary, must expect to take on the wider admin- 
istrative responsibility of the group. 

The establishment of such an organisation provides an 
opportunity for completely re-casting the salary structure, 
and the Guild's council has already made some attempt in 
that direction. The present structure, based on somewhat 
minute scalp-counting, and complicated by arbitrary methods 
of equating general and specialist hospitals, has produced 
only frustrations and anomalies. A more liberal approach is 
necessary, and that should be based on the group as an 
organism rather than on tacking on a small allowance for 
group responsibility to the existing scales. Some provision- 
should be made for evaluating posts locally within a general 
plan, so that a premium is put on the quality of the work 
as well as on the mere quantity of beds or out-patients. 



344 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST March 28, 1959 



PHARMACIES OF BRITAIN— 79 




THE PHARMACY AT 59 HIGH STREET, EVESHAM 

Proof of the venerable age of the pharmaceutical business of H. A. Elliott & Co., Ltd., Evesham, is that the oldest 
prescription book in its possession is dated 1874 but is No. 41 in the series. The business is certainly more than a 
century old. ' 



March 28, 1 959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



345 



DRUG TESTING UNDER THE HEALTH SERVICE 

A survey of samples taken during 1953-54 



A SURVEY of the 
National Health 
Service drug testing 
scheme in England 
and Wales for the 
year ended 
March 31, 1954, has 
been prepared by 
Mr. W. J. W. Price, 
F.P.S. (pharma- 
ceutical section, 
Ministry of Health). 
The tables and other 
details correspond 
to those in previous 
surveys (C. & D., 
January 21, 1956, 
p. 56) so that direct 
comparisons may be 
made. The report 
shows that 7,392 
certificates of ana- 
lysis were issued in 
1953-54, compared 
with 7,273 issued in 

1952- 53. The num- 
ber of certificates 
referred to Pharma- 
ceutical Service 
Committees in 

1953- 54 was 489, 
compared with 639 
in 1952-53. As in the 
other surveys all the 
results have been 
taken from certifi- 
cates of analysis of 
preparations and 
dressings sampled in 
England and Wales. 
The main results 
concern extempor- 
aneously prepared 
mixtures, but details 
are also given of the 
dispensingof tablets, 
powders, ointments 
and dressings. Ex- 
amples are provided 
of errors other than 
those of measure- 
ment. In table I ap- 
pear those drugs 
prescribed on thirty 
or more test pres- 
criptions during the 
year, except in three 
instances where it 
has been necessary 
to include items for 
comparison with 
previous surveys. 
Ephedrine hydro- 
chloride, kaolin and 
sodium sulphate are 
included for the first 
time. Footnotes to 
the table indicate 
why certain drugs 
are included in the 
column headed 
" 100 per cent, and 
over." 



TABLE I 

Percentage deviations from the weights or volumes of drugs ordered on test prescriptions 



Prescribed 
Quantity 
gr. or 



Number 

of 
Prescrip- 



Number of percentage deviations within the stated ranges 



Not referred 



min. 


tions 


Up 


101 


201 


501 


Over 








to 


to 


to 


to 


10% 


Total 






1% 


2% 


5% 


10% 




Ammonium bicarbona 


te 












24 


102 


22 


14 


20 


19 


19 


94 


40 


24 


7 


1 


6 


5 


3 


22 


48 


60 


24 


16 


15 


1 


2 


58 


60 


224 


83 


27 


59 


23 


11 


203 


72 


248 


80 


21 


81 


36 


10 


228 


Ammonium chloride 














120 


113 


55 


15 


31 


7 





108 


360 


91 


46 


13 


20 


4 


— 


83 


Boric acid 
















16 


32 


9 


4 


7 


7 


2 


29 


60 


37 


12 


7 


11 


5 


— 


35 


90 


40 


16 


2 


18 


2 





38 


Chloral hydrate 














120 


106 


68 


13 


18 


2 


— 


101 


Citric acid 
















64 


34 


18 


7 


4 


4 





33 


144 


74 


25 


9 


25 


6 





65 


216 


293 


135 


43 


59 


22 





259 


Ephedrine hydrochloride 










38 


8 


39 


23 


4 


8 


3 





Glycerin of phenol 














192 


62 


27 


6 


17 


3 





53 


360 


36 


15 


9 


6 


N 





30 


Dilute hydrochloride acid 












160 


70 


38 


8 


15 


5 





66 


240 


206 


127 


30 


29 


7 


— 


193 


Ferric ammonium citrate 












480 


51 


29 


6 


13 





— . 


48 


720 


172 


97 


28 


34 


4 


— 


163 


Kaolin 
















720 


50 


22 


7 


19 


I 





49 


Liquefied phenol 












121 


60 


127 


58 


17 


36 


9 


1 


120 


52 


22 


12 


13 


3 





50 


Light magnesium carbonate 












120 


42 


24 


5 


9 


2 




40 


240 


123 


71 


17 


23 


4 





115 


Magnesium sulphate 














1440 


45 


30 


5 


7 








42 


Potassium bicarbonate 












240 


33 


11 


7 


12 


1 





31 


360 


91 


34 


20 


33 


3 





90 


Potassium bromide 














160 


86 


45 


15 


20 


1 


1 


82 


240 


619 


349 


100 


118 


20 


1 


588 


320 


35 


23 


2 


7 


2 





34 


Potassium chlorate 














80 


54 


29 


5 


13 


3 


— 


50 


120 


203 


84 


40 


57 


1 1 


1 


193 


Potassium citrate 














720 


119 


41 


16 


57 


3 





117 


1080 


257 


96 


48 


75 


20 


2 


241 


Potassium iodide 














60 


64 


38 


7 


11 


4 


— 


60 


72 


173 


82 


31 


44 


5 


1 


163 


Sodium bicarbonate 














30 


25 


11 


5 


8 





1 


25 


40 


39 


23 


5 


8 


2 




38 


42 


27 


4 


4 




1 
1 


1 
1 


•>c 
AJ 


160 


124 


62 


28 


27 


3 




120 


240 


720 


320 


133 


197 


32 


4 


686 


320 


41 


22 


7 


7 


3 




39 


360 


63 


32 


10 


16 


2 




60 


Sodium chloride 














60 


26 


10 


5 


10 


1 




26 


72 


47 


15 


9 


18 


2 




44 


Sodium citrate 














1080 


34 


16 


~ 7 


8 


1 




32 


Sodium salicylate 














240 


187 


73 


32 


63 


5 


1 


174 


360 


91 


46 


15 


27 


2 




90 


Sodium sulphate 




'2 










875 


42 


18 


12 


5 




37 


Solution of ferric chloride 












120 


74 


36 


8 


16 


4 


1 


65 


Solution of potassium hydroxide 










120 


45 


31 


4 


5 


1 




42 


Strong solution of lead subacetate 










96 


66 


33 


8 


16 


3 




60 


Zinc sulphate 














9 


37 


16 


3 


7 


5 


3 


34 


1 35 


42 


21 


4 


14 


1 




40 


Totals 60 1 7 


2804 


926 


1524 


330 


66 


5650 



Referred 



5 
to 
10% 



11 21 

to to 

20% 30% 



31 
to 

50% 



51 
to 

75% 



Over 
75% 



100% 

and Total 
over 



1 
1 

11 

7 

2 
2 

1 

1 



1 
4 
14 



1 — 



1 

10 
1 



1 

3 

1 

2 

2 
2 



3 — 



4 — 



1 1 8 

I a 2 

— 2 
1» 21 

— 20 

— 5 

— 8 

— 3 
2 

— 2 

— 5 

— 1 

— 9 
3« 34 



I — 



1 — 



1 — — 



1 — — 



1 — 
— 1 

2 — 
14 7 



I" 



I — 



4 

13 



— 1 

— 6 

— 2 



2 
I 

4 
31 
I 

4 
10 

2 
16 

4 

10 



1 
2 
4 
34 

2 
3 



3 

2 

13 
1 

5 

9 

3 

6 

3 
2 



43 



148 



60 



65 



26 



20 



367 



Footnotes to Table I 

1 * * Rather more than double the prescribed amount 

of ammonium bicarbonate was dispensed. 
* (a) Tartaric acid was dispensed. 
(6) Sodium bicarbonate was dispensed. 
(c) Citric acid was absent. 



7 10 14 is Double the prescribed quantity 

dispensed. 
6 (a) Hydrobromic acid was dispensed. 
(6) A different mixtare was dispensed 
Table V). 

8 Potassium nitrate was dispensed. 



was 9 Sodium citrate was dispensed. 

" Potassium bromide was dispensed. 

12 Potassium bicarbonate was dispensed, 
(see 13 Potassium bromide was dispensed. 

10 Glycerin and rosewater was dispensed. 



346 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 28, 1 959 



Table II lists the total number of 
prescriptions for those drugs given in 
table I and the number of each referred to 
Pharmaceutical Service Committees. 



TABLE II 





Number 


Number 


Drug 


prescribed 


referred 


Ammonium bicarbonate 


7 1 1 


56 


Ammonium chloride 




14 


Boric acid 


1 36 


9 


Cnioral nydrate 


1 64 


6 


Citric acid 


440 


47 


Ephedrine hydrochloride 


jZ 


1 


Glycerin of phenol 


i m 


15 


Dilute hydrochloric acid 




1 8 


Ferric ammonium citrate 




1 2 


Kaolin 


DO 


6 


Liquefied phenol 




10 


Light magnesium 






carbonate 


101 


1 1 


Magnesium sulphate 


/u 


A 


Potassium bicarbonate... 


147 


3 


Potassium bromide 


784 


39 


Potassium chlorate 


111 


14 


Potassium citrate 


432 


22 


Potassium iodide 


310 


19 


Sodium bicarbonate 


1,108 


48 


Sodium chloride 


125 


5 


Sodium citrate ... 


56 


2 


Sodium salicylate 


314 


15 


Sodium sulphate 


42 


5 


Solution of ferric chloride 


102 


13 


Solution of potassium 






hydroxide 


61 


3 


Strong solution of lead 






subacetate 


75 


6 


Zinc sulphate 


134 


11 


Totals 


6,955 


414 



Table III is adapted from two tables in 
the report which give respectively infor- 
mation about mixtures and linctuses, etc.; 
and gargles, lotions, ear drops, etc. The 
total numbers of mixtures, etc., dispensed, 
was 4,125, and referred 299; number 
of gargles, etc., dispensed 1,072 and 
referred 134. According to the report 
the majority of deviations arose from the 
containers, actual volumes deviating from 
the prescribed volumes but, as in previous 
reports, there were instances of the wrong 
quantities being dispensed. 

Table IV was not included in previous 
surveys. It lists the reasons why certain 
other certificates were referred to Pharma- 
ceutical Service Committees, where errors 
other than errors of measurement were 
made in dispensing mixtures, lotions, 
gargles, etc. 

Table V lists the percentage deviations 
from the prescribed quantity and table VI 
gives the reasons why certain certificates 
of analysis for ointments and pastes were 
referred. A far greater number of those 
preparations were tested during the year, 
and there was a slight proportionate in- 
crease in the number referred. The most 
frequent reason for referring certificates 
was that the dispensed weight was less 
than that prescribed. The explanation 
usually given for the deficiency was that of 
failure to counterbalance the ointment 
container. Total ointments dispensed were 
242, the number referred 18. The reasons 
why the prescriptions for the following 
ointments were referred are shown in 
parenthesis: Ammoniated mercury (de- 
ficient in ammoniated mercury); mag- 
nesium sulphate (deficient in magnesium 
sulphate; no phenol present; deficient in 
weight of ointment dispensed); salicylic 
acid (deficient in salicylic acid and weight 
of ointment dispensed); salicylic acid and 
sulphur (excess salicyclic acid; deficient in 
weight of ointment dispensed); sulphur 
(deficient in sulphur; deficient in weight of 
ointment dispensed); zinc oxide (deficient 
in weight of ointment dispensed); zinc 
oxide and camphor (deficient in weight of 



ointment dispensed); zinc oxide com- 
pound (deficient in weight of ointment 
dispensed); zinc oxide and salicylic acid 
(deficient in zinc oxide and weight of 
ointment dispensed) ; extemporaneous 
ointment (deficient in salicylic acid). 

Table VI lists the percentage deviations 
from the prescribed quantity of powders 
for internal administration and dusting 
powders. The number of powders of both 
kinds prescribed during the year was sig- 
nificantly less than in the previous year, 
but the decline in the proportion referred 



was even greater. One powder certificate 
was referred because magnesium com- 
pound powder was dispensed instead of 
magnesium carbonate compound powder. 

The total number of certificates for 
tablets dispensed during the year was 660, 
approximately the same as for the previous 
year; of those 22 were referred, a small 
decline. Table VII lists the reasons why 
they were referred. Of the 22, 16 were 
apparently due to errors on the part of 
the dispenser, 4 to the failure of the tablets 
to conform to the disintegration test, (2 



TABLE III 



Percentage deviations from the prescribed volumes of liquid preparations 



Prescribed 


Up to 


M 


2-6 


51 


7-6 


101 


Over 


Tot yl 


Volume 


1% 


to 2-5% 


to 5 0% 


to 7-5% 


to 10% 


to 20% 


20% 




i fl. oz. 

1 „ 

2 „ 


1 

2 














1 


63 




48 




1 

12 


7 


1 


3 
131 


3 ft 


21 




16 


4 


1 


2 




44 


4 „ 


118 


120 


75 


8 


2 


4 


7 


334 


6 „ 


58 


59 


81 


11 


3 


1 




213 


8 „ 


388 


775 
1 


156 


27 


1 


3 


2 


1,352 


9 „ 
10 „ 


28 


9 


5 


1 


2 






2 
42 


12 „ 


1,492 


998 


373 


37 




5 


1 


2,908 


16 „ 


59 


69 


23 










151 


20 „ 


6 


9 


1 










16 


Totals ... 


2,236 


2,040 


778 


88 


22 


22 


11 


5,197 



TABLE IV 



Preparation prescribed 



Nux vomica and acid mixture, B.P.C. ... 

Saline mixture, B.P.C. 

Ipecacuanha and alkali mixture, B.P.C. ... 

Potassium bromide and chloral mixture, B.P.C. 

Ammonia and ipecacuanha mixture, B.P.C. 
Ipecacuanha and morphine mixture, B.P.C. 



Rhubarb compound mixture, B.P.C. 
Zinc sulphate lotion, B.P.C. 
Potassium chlorate gargle, B.P.C. 
Ferric chloride gargle, B.P.C. 
Borax compound eye lotion, B.P.C. 
Alkaline nasal douche, B.P.C. 
Menthol inhalation (2) 
Menthol inhalation 



Preparation dispensed 



Potassium bromide and nux vomica mixture, 
B.P.C. 

Sodium chloride compound mixture 

Ammonia and ipecacuanha mixture, B.P.C. 

Chloral and potassium bromide mixture for 
infants, B.P.C. . 

Ipecacuanha and morphine mixture, B.P.C. 

A mixture containing just over 25 % of the pres- 
cribed volume of tincture of chloroform and 
morphine. 

Rhubarb, ammonia and soda mixture, B.P.C. 

Zinc sulphate compound eye lotion, B.P.C. 

Potassium chlorate and phenol gargle, B.P.C. 

Potassium chlorate gargle, B.P.C. 

Boric acid eye lotion, B.P.C. 

Phenol and alkali mouthwash, B.P.C. 

Benzoin inhalation (2) 

Menthol and eucalyptus inhalation, B.P.C. 



TABLE V (OINTMENTS) 



Percentage deviation from the prescribed weights 



Weight 





2-6 


51 


7-6 


10 1 


Over 




Prescribed 


to 


to 


to 


to 


to 


20% 


Total 


in Grains 


2-5% 


50% 


7-5% 


10% 


20% 




437-5 






1 








1 


480 


1 








1 






875 


11 


3 


3 


3 


7 


— 


27 


960 


87 


21 


16 


8 


27 


15 


174 


1,440 


2 


1 










3 


1,750 


3 


2 


2 


2 






9 


1,920 


14 


3 


3 


2 


3 


1 


26 


Totals 


118 


30 


25 


15 


38 


16 


242 



TABLE VI 

(POWDERS FOR INTERNAL ADMINISTRATION) 
Percentage deviation from the prescribed weights 



Weight 





2-6 


51 


7-6 


101 


Over 




Prescribed 


to 


. to 


to 


to 


to 


20% 


Total 


in Grains 


2-5% 


50% 


7-5% 


10% 


20% 






960 


33 


12 


3 




1 


2 


51 


1,750 


1 








2 




3 


1,920 


8 




1 


2 


2 




13 


3,500 


1 










1 


2 


Totals 


43 


12 


4 


2 


5 


3 


69 



DUSTING POWDERS 



960 


12 


2 






1 


1 


16 


1,440 




1 


1 








2 


1,920 


3 








1 




4 


4,800 












1 


1 


Totals 


15 


3 


1 




2 


2 


23 



March 28, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



347 



TABLE VII 



Name of tablet 


No. of pre- 
scriptions 


No. 
referred 


Reason for referring 


Abidon with vitamin C ... 


1 


1 


Abidec capsules dispensed 


Aspirin 


79 


1 


Too few tablets dispensed 


Aspirin compound 


20 


3 


Aspirin tablets dispensed (2) 






Tablets deficient in aspirin and caffein (1) 


Aspirin and phenacetin ... 


8 


2 


Tablets of phenacetin and caffeine dis- 






pensed (1) 

Tablets deficient in aspirin 


Aspirin soluble ... 


9 


1 


Aspirin tablets B.P.C. and calcium aspirin 






tablets dispensed 


Ascorbic acid 50 mgm 


49 


1 


Calcium lactate tablets dispensed 


Ascorbic acid 25 mgm. ... 


9 


2 


50 mgm. tablets dispensed 


Butobarbitone' ... 


5 


1 


Disintegration test 


i r\f\(>\rte* nhncnhaip 

V. | ' 1 11 ' > }->!( vl H. ••• ■•- 


4 




Codeine compound tablets dispensed 


Mercurous chloride 


1 


1 


Disintegration test 


Nicotinic acid 


14 


1 


Too few tablets dispensed 


Phenacetin 


27 


2 


Disintegration test 


Phenobarbitone gr. J 


65 


3 


Too few tablets dispensed (1) 






1£ gr. tablets dispensed (1) 
i gr. tablets dispensed (1) 


Sulphathiazole 


18 


1 


Too few tablets dispensed 


Nasal alkaline 


4 


1 


Solution tablets of borax and benzamine 
dispensed 


TABLE VIII (SURGICAL DRESSINGS) 


Dressing 


Number 


Number 


Reason for referring 


prescribed 


referred 


Bandages : 








calico 


1 






cotton crepe 


5 


i 


Crepe dispensed 


cotton elastic 


6 






cotton and elastic net 


2 






crepe 


169 


i 


Cotton crepe dispensed 


domette... 


2 


i 


Flannel bandage dispensed 


elastic adhesive 


103 


i 


Porous adhesive dispensed 


elastic web 


6 


i 


"Count" and length 


flannel ... 


2 






plaster of paris 


2 


i 


B.P.C. 1934 bandage dispensed, plain weave 






instead of leno weave, deficient in plaster 


rayon elastic ... 


6 






triangular 


11 






white open wove 


75 


i 


Elastic web bandage dispensed 


zinc paste ... 


20 






Cellulose tissue ... 


10 


i 


Cellulose wadding dispensed 
Deficient in "area" 


Cellulose wadding 


22 . 


i 


Cotton wool B.P.C 


222 


14 


Not of B.P.C. quality 


Cotton wool, hospital ... 


39 


1 


Not in a sealed packet, wrapped in brown 
paper 


Dressings : 








boil 


1 






multiple pack ... 


29 


1 


Cotton wool not B.P.C. "absorbency" 


standard dressings 


38 


7 


Not B.P.C. 


Gauzes : 








absorbent 


92 


2 


"Area" and "absorbency" 


boric acid 


3 


1 


Boric acid content excessive 


paraffin ... 


15 






Gauze and cotton tissue 


17 


7 


"Absorbency" and colour 


Lint: 








absorbent 


166 


5 


Rayon lint dispensed (1); "absorbency", 
"tearing", colour (4) 


boric 


91 


. 4 


Wrong size dispensed (1); "area" (1); 
"absorbency" (1) 








rayon 


7 




Not in a sealed packet, wrapped in brown 
paper (1) 


Zinc oxide plaster 


29 






Jaconet 


1 


1 


Deficient in "proofing" 


Oiled silk 


7 


1 


The oiled nylon dispensed was deficient in 
the "warp" and "weft" 








Elastic anklets 


2 





TABLE IX (CERTIFICATES OF ANALYSIS AND NUMBER REFERRED) 





Total number of certificates 


Total number referred 




1951-52 


1952-53 


1953-54 


1951-52 


1952-53 


1953-54 


Mixtures, etc 


4,105 


4,027 


4,125 


332 


366 


299 


Gargles, etc. 


996 


1,074 


1,072 


124 


134 


96 


Ointments and pastes . . . 


160 


165 


242 


19 


10 


18 


Powders ... 


133 


148 


92 


6 


10 


1 


Tablets ... 


673 


657 


660 


42 


26 


22 


Dressings 


1,194 


1,202 


1,201 


60 


93 


53 


Totals ... 


7,261 


7,273 


7,392 


583 


639 


489 



of which were phenacetin tablets), and 2 
to deficiencies of active ingredient. 

During the year under review there 
were 1,201 certificates of analysis for 
dressings, of which 53 were referred. Of 
14 certificates for absorbent cotton wool 
B.P.C, 10 were referred because of 
failure to conform to B.P.C. standards 
due to presence of " neps," " leaf and 
shell," and/or " threads," or on account of 
" absorbency " and " colour." Three were 
referred because hospital quality cotton 
■wool was dispensed, one of them because 



in addition the packet was brown paper, 
not a sealed packet. It appeared that 
larger packets had been cut in half with a 
knife. Another was referred because 
4 lb. was dispensed instead of 4 oz. 

Of six certificates for No. 2 dressings, 
three samples were deficient in weight of 
cotton wool. In three samples the oiled 
cambric was unsatisfactory. In one of the 
three the cotton wool lacked absorbency 
and boric acid in the lint was excessive. 

Table IX compares the results of the 
present survey with earlier results. 



BRONCHIAL ASTHMA 

A review of treatments 

THE Council of the American Medical 
Association has authorised the publi- 
cation of a report upon current therapy 
in bronchial asthma. The condition is 
defined as " a distressing and common 
form of acute, recurrent, or chronic 
bronchial inflammation and obstruc- 
tive emphysema, usually of allergic 
origin." 

The aim is to remove or reduce 
predisposing influences (allergy, the 
common cold and paranasal sinus 
diseases as well as bronchitis; and 
physical, psychosomatic, and miscellane- 
ous factors) as early as possible. 
Whether there was an allergic stimula- 
tion requires to be investigated, but 
treatment should not be excluded while 
the investigation is in progress. 

Subcutaneous administration of 2- 
3 mil of 1 : 1000 adrenaline hydro- 
chloride is considered to be of value, 
though larger doses may precipitate an 
" adrenaline-fast " state, often en- 
countered in patients. Repeated use of 
adrenaline preparations should be 
avoided until sensitivity to them is re- 
stored, and a useful rule is to avoid 
introducing the drug into intravenous 
infusions of aminophylline, iodides, 
dextrose, etc., administered in status 
asthmaticus. Bronchodilator aerosols 
have proved of value in relaxing bron- 
chospasm, and an attack may be re- 
lieved or aborted by the use of 005- 
1 mil of nebulised spray. More severe 
spasm may require 0*5-1 mil of a nebu- 
lised bronchodilator solution to be 
continuously administered with the aid 
of oxygen or a simple air-pump (usu- 
ally for 10-15 minutes at a rate of 4 
litres per minute). Bronchodilators 
mentioned are 2*25 per cent, racemic 
adrenaline hydrochloride; isoproterenol 
hydrochloride 1 :200; 2*5 per cent, race- 
mic adrenaline hydrochloride with 0*5 
per cent, atropine sulphate; 04 per 
cent, isoproterenol sulphate with 2 per 
cent. phenylephrine hydrochloride. 
Aminophylline may be administered 
orally in cases of bronchoconstriction, 
with higher doses if antinausea factors 
are added. One such preparation con- 
tains 300 mgm. of aminophylline, 150 
mgm. of aluminium hydroxide, and 30 
mgm. of ethyl aminobenzoate — a basic 
formula that may be varied to meet 
individual requirements. 

Persistent attacks may be treated by 
rectal administration, for which avail- 
able suppositories are less valuable than 
300-600 mgm. of aminophylline dis- 
solved in 15 mils of tap water and 
administered rectally every 8-12 hours 
(for children, 60-200 mgm.). If relief 
is not obtained from any of the above 
procedures, severe paroxysm of cough- 
ing and wheezing may be treated with 
intravenous aminophylline (for attacks 
of less than 12 hours' duration, 250 
mgm. in 10 mils of water for injection; 
for more protracted attacks 500 mgm. 
aminophylline in 200 mils. To avoid 
untoward effects, injection speeds should 
normally be approximately 1 mil per 
minute. If more than one parenteral 
administration is needed daily, the patient 
is taken to hospital and given continuous 
infusion (aminophylline, 500 mgm., in 
a litre of 5 per cent, dextrose) at a 



3 48 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 28, 1 959 



rate of thirty drops per minute to a 
maximum of 3 litres in twenty-four 
hours. If after one or two days there 
is improvement, intermittent adminis- 
tration of 1,500 mils between 9 a.m. 
and 9 p.m. may be substituted. Treat- 
ment may extend to ten days, though 
rectal administration is suggested dur- 
ing convalescence. After recovery oral 
aminophylline with aluminium hydrox- 
ide and ethyl aminobenzoate should re- 
place rectal therapy in view of the 
presence of latent bronchoconstriction. 

The " trigger " effect of bronchitic 
cough may extend distress and call 
for bronchial evacuation, using therapy 
based upon expectorants : iodides, 
ipecacuanha; positional drainage; and/ 
or bronchoscopy. A patient with a pro- 
ductive cough should not be sedated 
or the bronchiolar mucus, by retention 
and dehydration, may become thick- 
ened and tenacious. Diphenhydramine 
hydrochloride and aminophylline have 



special value in cases associated with 
vasomotor rhinitis. Very ill patients 
benefit from the addition of 1-2 gm. 
of sodium iodide to each litre of in- 
fusion solution. When coughing be- 
comes productive, oral administration 
of a saturated potassium-iodide solu- 
tion may be started (initially 2 mil 
after each meal and at bedtime, with 
a gradual daily increase of 01 mil per 
dose to a maximum of 1'3 mil; at that 
point dosage is abruptly returned to 
0'2 mil and gradually increased once 
more — a procedure intended to pre- 
vent the development of intolerance). 
If the saturated potassium iodide solu- 
tion causes gastric irritation, enteric- 
coated tablets of 0'5 to 1 gm. of salt 
may be substituted. Ipecacuanha is 
worthy of trial in the form of a syrup 
(composition not given) administered 
with lukewarm boiled water. Positional 
drainage is of greatest effect when the 
patient has easily raised accumulated 



secretions. Antitussive measures include 
the avoidance of irritants and the ad- 
ministration of benzonatate, or 30-60 
mgm. of noscapine at graded intervals. 
Asthmatic patients frequently suffer 
anxiety, fear, insecurity, etc., and those 
may be accentuated by aminophylline, 
adrenergic compounds, and cortico- 
steroids. Heavy sedation is inadvisable, 
but an attack of several hours' dura- 
tion requires sedation in addition to in- 
travenous asthma therapy. Sodium 
bromide or chloral hydrate are of value 
in mild or recurring chronic attacks. 
Meperidine hydrochloride (50 - 100 
mgm.) at 6-8-hour intervals for 2-5 
days has not caused addiction, though 
the method is not suggested for routine 
use. Paraldehyde (20-30 mils) or ether 
(60-70 mils) may be administered as 
a retention enema. Chlorpromazine. 
prochlorperazine or meprobamate may 
be of value in the patient who is seri- 
ously ill. 



STATUTORY COMMITTEE'S ADVERTISING INQUIRY 

Concluded from The Chemist and Druggist, March 21, p. 



Sir Milner Holland for the com- 
panies said that if the Statutory Com- 
mittee's decision was adverse his clients, 
subject to their right of appeal to the 
High Court, would comply with it. 
" This is a matter which we are seek- 
ing to test and we shall accept the de- 
cisions of the Statutory Committee, 
subject to that right of appeal and con- 
duct ourselves accordingly." He sub- 
mitted that those who exercised that 
profession of pharmacy exercised one 
which was inextricably entangled with 
trading. The pharmacist acted as a 
trader when he sold aspirins without a 
doctor's prescription and a professional 
man when he sold them with a pre- 
scription. It was impossible to say 
" Here is a man carrying on a profes- 
sion and nothing else." He sold goods 
sometimes in his professional capacity 
and sometimes not. There were people 
such as estate agents who might rightly 
be regarded as professional men who 
could and did advertise and there was 
nothing improper about it. The com- 
panies concerned in the case entirely 
subscribed to the view held by the 
Pharmaceutical Society about advertis- 
ing, that it was undesirable to advertise 
in a form which suggested that " you 
and you alone are capable of accurately 
compounding prescriptions and that 
your dispensing is more reliable than 
others, because that implies a criticism 
of the other members of your own pro- 
fessional body." Referring to previous 
decisions of the Statutory Committee 
Sir Milner Holland believed that if the 
advertisements which were the subject 
of the present case had been submitted 
in 1950 the decision would have been 
" no misconduct." A previous deci- 
sion had included the following 
" ... in existing circumstances we do 
not regard as misconduct the use in a 
dignified public advertisement of the 
description ' dispensing chemist ' with 
his address and the days on which and 
hours between which his dispensing 
services are there available." He did 
not think that either of the advertise- 
ments was undignified. There was noth- 
ing vulgar about them. Dealing with 
the history of the 1953 regulation, Sir 



Milner Holland said it was far from 
clear that the whole body of pharma- 
cists thought there was anything 
wrong in advertising as dispensing, 
chemists. It was quite plain that the 
feeling at the annual general meeting 
in 1953 took a different line from that 
of the Branch Representatives' meeting. 
The annual general meeting was in fav- 
our of permitting public announcements 
of the fact that one was a dispensing 
chemist, though Sir Milner Holland ad- 
mitted, not by a large majority. " It 
is no good pretending that this ruling 
in 1953 proceeded from a general con- 
science among pharmacists . . . because 
it isn't true." Dealing with the Easter 
advertisement Sir Milner Holland said 
" My friend says it implies we dispense 
medicines. I do not know where he got 
that from. It says as we are entitled to 
say, when we are open, the hours we 
are open and what the shop is open for." 
The Chairman : " What Mr. Lloyd- 
Jones is saying is that you refer to the 
supply of medicines and any reader of 
that would interpret the work ' supply ' 
as including the dispensing of medi- 
cines. He would not distinguish in his 
mind between the supply of medicine 
on prescription and the supply with- 
out." Sir Milner Holland: "If he is 
right what it amounts to is that my 
clients cannot advertise their hours of 
opening at all." Everybody knew that 
the company " fill prescriptions." " Let 
us be realistic about it. ... ' XYZ 
the chemists will remain open day and 
night,' that would be wrong too. Im- 
pliedly, because we say we are open 
day and night we are advertising dis- 
pensing and that is . . . disgraceful con- 
duct for which we should be removed 
from the register." That was where the 
whole question of the inevitable mix- 
ture of professional standards and trad- 
ing standards made it unworkable to 
say that when a pharmacist stepped out 
of his dispensary into his shop to sell 
some toilet soap, his right foot was the 
professional foot and his left was the 
trader's foot. "To bring the company 
before the Committee for that adver- 
tisement — and I do not mince my words 
— is really childish and absurd." 



308 

Sir Milner dealt with the National 
Health Service (General Medical and 
Pharmaceutical Services) Regulations 
1954 and stated that Parliament ex- 
pressly allowed chemists to advertise. 

Power of the Committee 

He reminded the Committee that 
when it was first set up in 1933 the 
power which it was exercising was 
that which Parliament had in mind for 
something which, in the abstract, was 
considered as misconduct, which in 
that context was linked with a criminal 
offence. The purpose of the Pharmacy 
and Poisons Act 1933 was to protect 
the public by creating a reliable body 
of pharmacists on whom the public 
could rely. In 1933 nobody had thought 
that there was anything wrong in adver- 
tising, save of course misleading ad- 
vertisements. Parliament could not 
have intended anybody to interpret mis- 
conduct as they thought fit. If the 
climate of opinion had changed and it 
was considered that advertising was 
misconduct it was for Parliament to 
say so! 

The Chairman : " Do you put your 
proposition as widely as this? That 
the categories of misconduct must be 
deemed to be closed in 1933 and that 
thereafter nothing that is not miscon- 
duct in 1933 can be deemed to be mis- 
conduct? " Sir Milner: "Yes I do. 
Parliament must have known what it 
was doing." 

Sir Milner thought it was in the 
national interest that the type of ad- 
vertisement with which the present 
cases were concerned should not be pre- 
vented. They gave the public useful 
information. 

Mr. Lloyd-Jones later addressed the 
Committee and suggested that it was 
unrealistic to talk about misconduct in 
terms of a period before the 1933 Act 
or even at the passing of the 1933 Act 
when the code of ethics was not in ex- 
istence. Furthermore the Committee 
did not come in at the passing of the 
Act but was postponed until 1936. It 
was for the Committee, against the 
whole background of the 1933 Act, to 
decide what was misconduct. 



March 28, 1 959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



349 




Introducing 

— 

TRILLETS' 

'TRILLETS' are the NEW throat lozenge's containing 

HALOPENIUM CHLORIDE-an extremely potent 
antibacterial which is virtually non-toxic 
FR AM YCETIN— active against a wide range of organisms 
'XYLOCAINE'- which soothes inflamed surfaces 

'Trillets' are effective against most bacteria found in mouth and 
throat infections. The comforting action is considerably assisted 
by the increased salivary secretion caused by 'Trillets' 

'TRILLETS' 

. . . are so safe they can be taken as often as four times an hour 

. . . are pleasantly flavoured and can be taken by children 
. . . are being introduced to doctors, so expect prescriptions soon 
. . . can be taken with advantage before and after dental treatment 

smooth, soothing 

TRILLETS' 

TBADI HARK 

in tubes of 15, retailing at 2/6 a tube 

'XYLOCAINE' IS THE REGISTERED TRADE MARK OF A. B. ASTRA, SWEDEN 



BURROUGHS WELLCOME & CO., LONDON 

(THE WELLCOME FOUNDATION LTD.) 




350 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 28, 1959 



THE TREE OFLIFE, SYMBOL OF THE HIGHEST 
QUALITY IN FINE CHEMICALS TODAY. 

CARNEGIES 

of WELWYN 



ESTABLISHED 
1911 



REGD TRADE 
MARK 



MANUFACTURERS 
AND WORLD 
SUPPLIERS OF 
STRYCHNINE 
AND SALTS 



For nearly half a century the name 
Carnegies has served as a standard 
in the fine chemical field for products 
of utmost purity and rigid adherence 
to pharmaceutical specification. 
Direct importation of raw materials, 
and the completion of every process 
under our own roof at Welwyn 
Garden City, enables us to compete 
successfully with world suppliers in 
any part of the globe. Yet we wel- 
come and treat with equal importance 
the smaller orders too. 



Enquiries are invited for: 

ADRENALINE 

ADRENACHROME 

MONOSEMICARBAZONE 

AMINOPHYLLINE 

ATROPINE & SALTS 

BISMUTH SALTS 

BRUCINE & SALTS 

CAFFEINE & SALTS 

CHRYSAROBIN 

EPHEDRINE & SALTS 

HO M ATROPINE & SALTS 

HYDANTOIN DERIVATIVES 

IODIDES 

ISONICOTINIC ACID 

HYDRAZIDE 

ISOPRENALINE SALTS 

LITHIUM SALTS 

METHOIN 

NORADRENALINE & SALTS 
P.A.S. 

PIPERAZINE & SALTS 

RESERPINE 

SANTONIN 

STRYCHNINE & SALTS 
THEOBROMINE & SALTS 
THIOMERSALATE 
QUININE & SALTS 
CINCHONA FEBRIFUGE 
TOTAQUINA 



CARNEGIES OF WELWYN LIMITED 

Manufacturers of Fine Chemicals WELWYN GARDEN CITY • ENGLAND 
Telephone : welwyn garden city 5001 (10 lines) Cables : carnegies, welwyngardenctty Telex : London 28676 



March 28, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



3 5 1 



TRADE REPORT 



The prices given are those obtained by importers or manufacturers for bulk quantities or original packages. Various 
charges have to be added whereby values are in many instances augmented before wholesale dealers receive the goods into 
stock. Crude drugs and essential oils vary greatly in quality and higher prices are charged for selected qualities. 



London, March 25: Trading in Crude Drugs was again on a limited 
scale during the week. Sarawak Pepper prices were markedly easier. Other 
Spices showing the same trend were Turmeric (down 2s. 6d. per cwt.) and 
both African and Cochin varieties of Ginger. 
Quassia was offered on the spot at 



120s. per cwt. against 130s. recently. 
Firm features of the market included 
Agar which was Is. 3d. per lb. dearer; 
Gum acacia up 5s. per cwt. and Brazil- 
ian Menthol up sixpence per lb. 
Aleppy green Cardamoms for shipment 
were Is. 3d. per lb. higher. 

Among Essential Oils a sharp rise 
in Bourbon Geranium put the forward 
price 7s. 6d. higher than last week — a 
lead which spot holders did not en- 
tirely follow and thus spot quotations 
were cheaper than those for shipment. 
Brazilian Peppermint was threepence 
per lb. dearer in both positions and 
Patchouli one shilling up for spot sup- 
plies. Mysore Sandalwood dropped 
2s. 6d. per lb. with quotations ranging 
from 80s. to 82s. 6d. per lb. 

A substantial fall in the price of Cal- 
cium lactate was the only price 
change in Pharmaceutical Chemicals 
during the week. 

Another British chemical manufac- 
turer is to produce Phthalic anhy- 
dride. 

Pharmaceutical Chemicals 

Adrenaline. — Rates for synthetic b.p. 
are from Is. Id. (500-gm. lots) to Is. 6d. 
(10-gm.) per gm.- and acid tartrate, b.p., 
from 9d. to Is. 

Aluminium hydroxide. ■ — One-cwt. lots 
of b.p.c 1943 are 3s. 3d. per lb. 

Antimony salts. — Quotations for pot- 
assium tartrate b.p., are 7s. 6d. per lb. 
for 1-10 cwt. and sodium tartrate, b.p., 
12s. 6d. 

Aspirin. — 5-cwt. lots are 4s. 9d. per 
lb.; 1-cwt., 4s. lid. The Calcium salt is 
12s. 6d. per lb. 

Atropine. — Rates for 16-oz. (500-gm.); 





per 


oz. 


per kilo 




s. 


d. 


s. 


d. 


alkaloid 


39 





137S 





Hydrochloride 


36 





1269 





Methonitrate 


39 





1 375 





Methylbromide 


38 


6 


1357 





Sulphate 


34 





1198 


6 



Borax. — B.P. grade for quantities of 
1 ton and upwards; Granular, £55; crys- 
tals, £57 10s.; powder, £58 10s. ; extra 
fine powder, £59 10s. per ton. Supplied in 
hessian sacks. Prices of commercial range 
from £45 to £50 10s. per ton, as to type 
and packing. Dehydrated borax is £68 per 
ton in paper-lined hessian bags or £67 in 
paper bags ; carriage paid in Great 
Britain. Surcharges for smaller quantities: 
Less than 1 ton but not less than 5 cwt., 
Is. per cwt., 3 cwt., 2s.; 1 cwt., 3s. 

Boric acid. — Prices (per ton) for b.p. 
grade in quantities of 1 ton and upwards 
are as follows : — Granular, £89 10s.; 
crystals, £96 10s.; powder, £94; extra-fine 
powder, £96 per ton in lined hessian bags, 
carriage paid in Great Britain. Less £i 
per ton if supplied in paper bags. Techni- 
cal grades range from £75 10s. to £85 per 
ton according to type and packing. 

Calcium carbonate —B.P. light precipi- 
tated powder, 1-ton lots, £33 per ton in 
free bags, ex works. 

Calcium chloride. — B.P. crystals are 
Is. 3id., and granulated, 10£d. per lb. in 
1-cwt. lots. 



Calcium gluconate. — Quantities of 
3 cwt. and upwards are quoted at 3s. 6d. 
per lb. ; 1 cwt. to 2 cwt., 3s. 7d. 

Calcium succinate. — Quotations are 
from 10s. 6d. to 12s. 6d. per lb., as to 
quantity. Succinic acid is from 10s. 6d. 
to 12s. 3d. per lb. 

Chalk. — Prepared powder b.p., is £22 
per ton for minimum 1-ton ex works. 

Chloral hydrate. — In 1-cwt. lots the 
price is about 4s. 3d. per lb. 

Ether. — Prices (per lb.) in Winchesters 
are as follows : — technical b.s.s., and 
solvent, 5-cwt. 2s. 7d. ; (4s. Hd. litre). 
In drums the price is 2s. 2d. per lb. 
Anesthetic, b.p., 5-cwt., 3s. lOd. ; 10-cwt. 
3s. 9d. 

Formaldehyde. — B.P. solution in 1-4- 
drum lots is £39 15s. per ton ; 5-drum 
lots are £38 15s. per ton. 

Glycerophosphates. — Rates per lb. for 
1-cwt. lots are as follows: — acid, b.p.c, 
20 per cent., 4s. 7d.; calcium, soluble, 
b.p.c, lis. 9d. ; iron, b.p.c, scale, 15s. 9d. 
and powders, 14s. 9d.; magnesium, sol- 
uble, b.p.c, 14s. 3d., and insoluble, 7s. 6d.; 
manganese, b.p.c, 26s. 3d.; potassium, 
50 per cent., b.p.c. 3s. 9d. and 50 per 
cent., b.p.c, 3s. Id. and 75 per cent., 
b.p.c, 5s. 6d. 

Guaiacols. — Liquid b.p. is 16s. 3d. per 
lb. for 28-lb. lots ; crystals, 16s. 9d.; 
carbonate, 18s. 3d. 

Hexamine. — B.P. is Is. Hid. per lb. for 
1-ton lots, delivered in 1-cwt. kegs. Tech- 
nical is threepence per lb. under those 
rates. 

Homatropine. — Current rates (per oz.) 
for 16-oz. lots are now : alkaloid, 
30s. 6d. ; hydrobromide, 24s. 6d.; hydro- 
chloride, 28s. 6d.; methylbromide, 
25s. 6d. 1-oz. rates are Is. 6d. per oz. 
above those rates. 

Isoprenaline sulphate. — B.P. is Is. 3d. 
per gm. for 1,000-gm. lots and Is. 9d. per 
gm. for 100-gm. lots. 

Kaolin. — In 1-cwt. bags light is quoted 
at 60s. per cwt. and 1-ton lots at 57s. 

Lactates. — Calcium, b.p., is 2s. 3d. 
per lb. in 5-cwt. lots and 2s. 4d. in 1-cwt. 
lots ; Calcium sodium for similar quan- 
tities is 4s. 9d. and 4s. lOd. per lb. 

Lactic acid. — B.P. is 4s. 5d. per lb. 
for 12-winchester lots and 4s. 4d. for 
5-cwt. lots. 

Lactose. — English, in 1-ton lots packed 
in 1-cwt. paper-lined sacks, is £129 10s. 
per ton, delivered in the United Kingdom. 

Lead acetate. — B.P. crystals are 200s. 
per cwt. and technical, 180s. 

Mandelic acid. — In 1-cwt. lots the price 
is 12s. 6d. per lb., with the calcium salt 
also 12s. 6d. Sodium mandelate is 13s. 
and ammonium mandelate 50 per cent, 
solution, 7s. 6d. 

Mercury derivatives. — Quotations (per 
kilo) for less than 50-kilo lots are now as 
follows: — ammoniated, b.p., lump or pow- 
der, 58s. 9d. ; perchloride, b.p., powder, 
50s. 9d. and lump, 51s. 9d.; subchloride 
(calomel), b.p., 58s., oxides, yellow, b.p., 
61s. 6d.; red b.p.c, 1949, 62s. 6d. 

Methoin. — 8-P- is about 120s. per lb. 

Metol. — In 1-cwt. lots the price is 
24s. 6d. per lb. 

Oleic acid. — B.P. grade £170 10s. per 
ton (£174 10s. single drum lots); 1 gall, 
tins 21s. per gall. 



Phenacetin. — In 5-cwt. lots makers' 
price is 6s. 8d. per lb.; 1-cwt., 6s. 9d. 

Sulphocarbolates. — Sodium phenosul- 
phonate, b.p.c, 1949 (powder) is 5s. 6d. 
per lb. in 1-cwt. lots and Zinc, b.p.c, 
1949, is 5s. 6d. 

Terebene. — For 1-carboy lots, 4s. 2d. 
per lb. is asked. In Winchesters, prices are 
15s. 9d. per lb.; 28-lb., 14s. 6d. 

Zinc carbonate. — In 1-cwt. lots the price 
is Is. 9id. per lb. 

Zinc chloride. — B.P.C. cake from 
4s. 6d. to 4s. lOd. per lb.; sticks from 
5s. lOd. to 6s. 2d. per lb. Technical, 115s. 
per cwt. 

Zinc oxide. — B.P. quality in 2-ton lots 
is now £110 10s.; 1-ton, £111; 10-cwt., 
£112 10s. 

Zinc peroxide. — Price (per lb.) for 
1-cwt. lots of b.p. is 5s. 3d. 

Zinc sulphate. — B.P. in 1-cwt. lots is 
quoted at Is. 9d. per lb.; technical, 60s. 
per cwt. 

Industrial Chemicals 

Acet aldehyde. — The 100 per cent, is 
£155 per ton. 

Acetates. — Prices (per cwt.) for drum 
lots are as follows: — Amyl (technical), 
255s., and B.S.S., 257s. Butyl, 179s.; 
Ethyl, 151s.; Isopropyl, 147s. 

Acetic anhydride. — 10-ton lots are 
quoted at £126 per ton, delivered U.K. 
in returnable drums; 1-ton lots, £128. 

Acetone. — One-ton lots are quoted at 
£90 per ton. 

Benzole. — Thiophene-free is from 
9s. 3id. per gall, for one 50-gall. barrel 
and pure, 6s. 3£d. per gall, for similar 
lots. 

TV-Butyl alcohol. — 1-ton to 5-ton lots 
are quoted at £159 per ton and one-drum 
lots are £163 per ton. Secondary is £130: 

Carbon tetrachloride, b.p. — 1-2-carboy 
lots are £135 per ton. Technical, in 40- 
gall. drums, in less than 1-ton lots is 
£84; 1 ton and under 2 tons, £81; 2 tons 
and under 4 tons, £80 10s.; 4 tons and 
upwards, £79 10s. 

Isopropyl alcohol. — Technical grade 
(99 per cent.) 5s. Old. per gall, for 10,000- 
gall. lots; anhydrous in drum lots is £108 
per ton. 

Methyl ethyl ketone. — One-ton lots in 
drums are quoted at £145 per ton. 

Methyl isobutyl ketone. — One-ton 
lots (in one delivery) are now £165 per 
ton. 

Naphthalene. — Home market prices 
(per ton for 4-ton lots at one time) are 
as follows : — crude, crystallising point 
64-71-9° C, £22 5s. to £23; whizzed, c.p. 
72-77-5° C, £27 5s. to £35 15s. accord- 
ing to the crystallising point, ex works; 
phthalic grade, minimum c.q. 77-5° C, 
£42 10s. ex maker's works; crystals from 
£62 10s. to £65, delivered; ball and flake, 
£71 to £73 10s. delivered. 

Phthalates. — Prices (per ton) for drum 
lots are as follows: — Dibutyl, £216; Di- 
isobutyl, £202; Diethyl, £193 10s.; Di- 
methyl, £185. 

Stearates. — Spot prices for minimum 
1-ton lots are now as follows : — Alu- 
minium (all grades), 258s. 6d. per cwt., 
Calcium (precipitated), 248s. 6d.; Lead 
(30 per cent.), 228s. 6d.; Magnesium 
(standard), 261s. and (superfine), 307s.; 
Zinc, 261s. to 291s. as to grade. 

Titanium dioxide. — In 5-ton spot lots 
anatase is from £162 5s. per ton; rutile is 
£178 5s. for surface-coated and £170 for 
non-surface-coated. 



3 5 2 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 28, 1959 



Crude Drugs 

Aconite. — Spot supplies of Spanish 
napellus are 2s. 6d. per lb. 

Agar. — Kobe No. 1 is lis. 9d. per lb., 
duty paid; new-crop for shipment, 10s. 6d., 
c.i.f. 

Aloes. — Cape prime on the spot is 
215s. per cwt. and for shipment, 192s. 6d., 
c.i.f. Cura?ao, 495s., spot. 

Balsams. — ■ Quotations per lb. are: — 
Canada: Spot, 23s. Copaiba: Para from 
7s. 6d., duty paid. Peru : Scarce at origin. 
Spot, 10s. 3d. in bond. Tolu (genuine as 
imported): 17s. 6d., spot and 16s., c.i.f.; 

B. P., 15s. 

Belladonna. — Herb is 8s. 3d. per lb. 
on the spot. Root is Is. 6d. spot; ship- 
ment. Is. 3d., c.i.f. 

Calamus. — Root is quoted at Is. 4d. per 
lb., c.i.f. 

Camphor. — B.P. powder is from 4s. 3d. 
per lb., duty paid. Tablets, i-oz., are 
5s 6d. in bond. 

Capsicums. — East African are from 
140s. to 175s. per cwt. on the spot. 

Cardamoms. — Aleppy greens, spot, 
14s. 6d. per lb.; forward shipment, 
13s. 9d., c.i.f. Seeds, spot, 24s., shipment, 
19s. 6d., c.i.f. 

Cherry bark. — Thin natural is Is. 5d. 
per lb., and rossed is Is. lid. 

Cinnamon. — Ceylon for shipment (c.i.f.) 
per lb.; OOOO, 6s. 7id.; OOO, 6s. 5id.; 
OO, 6s. 4d.; seconds, 4s. 9id.; feather- 
ings, 2s. Id.; quillings, 3s. lid.; chips, 
is. Id. 

Cloves. — Zanzibar on the spot are 
3s. per lb.; shipment, 2s. 8d., c.i.f. 

Colocynth pulp. — Spot, 2s. 9d. per lb.; 
shipment, 215s. cwt., c.i.f. 

Digitalis leaf. — Purpurea from Is. 2^d. 
to 2s. 7d. per lb., c.i.f. 

Elemi. — Spot from Is. lO^d. per lb. 

Frangula. — Spot is 105s. per cwt. 

Gentian. — Spot : French, 170s. per 
cwt.; Jugo-Slavian, 152s. 6d. 

Henna. — Indian for shipment 72s. 6d., 
c.i.f. 

Ginger. — African, 125s. per cwt. spot 
and 125s. (new crop), c.i.f. Jamaican 
No. 3, spot, 260s. and shipment 250s., 

C. i.f. Cochin spot quoted 130s. 

Gum acacia. — Kordofan cleaned sorts 
are 140s. per cwt. on the spot; April- 
May shipment, 132s. 6d., c.i.f. 

Hydrastis. — Spot 28s. per lb. 

Ipecacuanha. — ■ Shipment March-April 
(c.i.f.) Matto Grosso, 51s. 6d. per lb.; 
Colombian, 53s. 6d. ; Nicaraguan, 67s. 6d. 

Kola nuts. — Jamaican spot market 
cleared, shipment, 7d. per lb., c.i.f. Afri- 
can 5d. to 5jd. spot and 4d., c.i.f. 

Lanolin. — Anhydrous, b.p., is from 
170s. to 175s. per cwt. in 1-ton lots and 
hydrous, b.p., 150s., free drums, delivered. 

Liquorice. — Natural root : Persian on 
the spot is 50s.; for shipment, 42s. 6d., 
c.i.f., per cwt. Block juice : Anatolian 
and Chinese, 190s. per cwt.; Italian stick 
from 310s. .to 476s. per cwt. Spray dried 
extract, 3s. per lb. 

Lycopodium. — Russian triple-sifted for 
shipment, 25s. per lb., c.i.f., nominal; spot, 
30s. 

Mace. — Whole pale blade 23s. 6d. per 
lb. on spot. 

Menthol. — Chinese is 59s. to 60s. per 
lb., duty paid; Brazilian, spot, 36s., in 
bond; April-May shipment, 36s., c.i.f. 

Nutmegs. — West Indian 80's 17s. per 
lb., spot ; sound unassorted, 12s. 6d.; 
defectives, 8s. 9d. 

Orange peel. — Scarce. Spot : Sweet 
ribbon, 2s. per lb. ; bitter quarters : West 
Indian, Is.; Spanish, Is. 8d. 

Orris root. — Florentine is 335s. per 
cwt. 



Papain. — East African. 20s. per lb., c.i.f., 
for grade one, spot, 22s. Belgian Congo, 
17s. 6d., c.i.f. 

Pepper. — White Sarawak spot, 3s. l|d. 
per lb., March-April shipment, 3s. 0|d., 
c.i.f.; Black Sarawak spot, Is. 10^d., 
March-April shipment, Is. 9d., c.i.f. 
Black Malabar new-crop for March-April 
shipment up to 220s., c.i.f., quoted, spot, 
230s. 

Podophyllum. — Emodi: 230s. per cwt., 
c.i.f., shipment. Peltatum, on the spot. 
4s. 3d. per lb.; shipment, 450s. per cwt., 
c.i.f. 

Pyrethrum. — Extract, minimum 25 per 
cent, w/w pyrethrins, is 75s. per lb. for 
small lots. 

Quassia. — Spot offers are 50s. per cwt., 
ex wharf. 

Quillaia. — Spot offers of whole bark at 
129s. per cwt.; cut. 160s. Whole for ship- 
ment, 95s., c.i.f. 

Rauwolfia. — Canescens, 3s. 6d. per lb., 
c.i.f.; Vomitoria, 2s. 3d., c.i.f.; Serpen- 
tina, 6s., c.i.f. asked. 

Rhubarb. — Chinese small rounds 
6s. 4id. to 6s. 9d. Best grades not avail- 
able on the spot. 

Saffron. — Spanish is quoted at 200s. 
per lb. 

Sarsaparilla. — Jamaican native red on 
the spot is 2s. 9d. per lb. Shipment, 
2s. 4d., c.i.f. 

Seeds. — (Per cwt.). Anise. — Spanish, 
157s. 6d.; Turkish 137s. 6d., both duty 
paid. Caraway. — Dutch, 115s., duty paid. 
Celery. — Indian on spot 165s., value new 
crop for June-July shipment, 130s., c.i.f. 
Coriander. — Moroccan unchanged at 
52s. 6d., duty paid; 43s. 6d., c.i.f., quoted 
for prompt shipment. Cumin. — Iranian 
advanced to 275s., duty paid. Dill. — 
Indian is 80s., spot, and 62s. 6d., c.i.f., for 
April shipment. Fennel. — Chinese, 140s., 
duty paid; Indian quoted at 135s. Fenu- 
greek. — Moroccan quiet at 44s.. duty 
paid. Mustard. — English, 110s. to 125s. 
according to quality. 

Senega. — Spot offered at 14s. 9d. per 
lb. ; shipment nominal. 

Senna. — Tinnevelly leaves, prime 
No. 1, Is. 5d. per lb., f.a.q.; No. 3. lOd. 
Pods: Manufacturing (f.a.q.), Is. 3^d. and 
hand-picked. Is. 9d. to 2s. 2d. Alexandria 
pods: Manufacturing, offered from Is. 6d. 
with hand-picked from 4s. to 6s. 6d. 

Shellac— F.O.T.N. 177s. 6d. per cwt., 
F.O. No. 1, 207s. 6d.; fine orange. 215s. 
to 265s. 

Slippery elm. — Grinding quality bark 
is 2s. 7d. per lb. 

Squill. — White is quoted at 85s. per 
cwt. on the spot. 

SrRAMONiuM. — Indian leaves 60s. per 
cwt., spot. Dutch 0-5 per cent, alkaloid. 
94s., c.i.f. 

Styrax. — Spot, 27s. per lb. 

Tonquin beans. — Para on the spol are 
offered at 8s. 8d. per lb. Angostura, lis. 

Tragacanth. — No. 1 ribbon is £115 to 
£120 per cwt. No. 2, £105 to £1 10. 

Turmeric. — Madras finger is 77s. 6d. on 
the spot; new crop for April-May ship- 
ment, 72s. 6d., c.i.f. 

Valerian root. — Spot : Indian (with 
rootlets) is 130s. and Belgian. 175s. to 
195s. per cwt. Dutch (max. 2| per cent, 
sand) lor prompt shipment, 159s., c.i.f. 

Vanillin. — Rates (per lb.) are now: — 
5-cwt. lots, 25s. 3d.; 1 cwt., 25s. 6d.; 
56-lb., 25s. 9d.; smaller quantities, 26s. 

Waxes. — (Per cwt.). Bees'. — Dar-es- 
Salaam. spot, 480s.; shipment. 465s., c.i.f. 
Abyssinian, spot 450s. in bond; shipment. 
420s., c.i.f. Benguela spot, nominal : 
shipment. 405s., c.i.f. Candelili.a.— Spot 
460s. Carnauba. — Fatty grey spot. 580s. ; 
for shipment, 577s. 6d., c.i.f. Prime yellow, 
spot. 910s.; shipment. 885s., c.i.f. 



Essential and Expressed Oils 

Almond. — British oil is 9s. per lb. 
Moroccan, 6s. 9d., in bond. 

Bergamot. — Spot supplies are from 
86s. 6d. per lb. 

Cade. — Spanish is 2s. 6d. per lb. for 
drum lots. 

Cajuput. — Spot supplies are from 10s. 
per lb. 

Calamus. — Spot quotations are 62s. 6d. 
per lb. 

Camphor, white. — Chinese is Is. 9d. 
per lb. in bond. 

Cananga. — Spot is from 42s. 6d. to 
45s. per lb. 

Caraway. — English-distilled is offered at 
55s. and imported 27s. 6d. per lb. 

Cardamom. — ■ Price per lb. is from 
350s. for English-distilled and 267s. 6d. 
for imported. 

Cassia. — Spot is 13s. per lb.; shipment, 
13s. 3d., c.i.f. 

Cubeb. — Small spot supplies of impor- 
ted are 65s. per lb.; English, 90s. 

Eucalyptus. — Australian 70 to 75 per 
cent, eucalyptol on the spot is 4s. 9d. per 
lb. 80-85 per cent., 5s. 6d. Spanish 
(70-75), 4s. spot. Chinese 3s. 6d. to 
3s. 9d. 

Fennel. — Spanish sweet on the spot is 
quoted at 9s. 6d. per lb. 

Geranium. — Bourbon is 115s. per 
lb. on the spot and 117s. 6d., c.i.f. Al- 
gerian, 92s. 6d. 

Ginger. — English-distilled oil is 160s. per 
lb. Imported : Jamaican, 1 30s. ; Chinese. 
72s. 6d., duty paid. 

Juniper. — B.P.C. 1949 oil is from 
12s. 6d. per lb. on the spot. English- 
distilled, 180s. Juniper wood, from 5s. 

Lemon. — B.P. grades from 16s. to 26s. 
per lb. on the spot. Californian for ship- 
ment, 25s. to 28s. 6d., c.i.f. Terpeneless. 
500s. per lb. 

Lemongrass. — Spot 6s. per lb., and 
shipment, 5s. lO^d., c.i.f. 

Patchouli. — Penang is 22s. 6d., duty 
paid and 19s., c.i.f., per lb. 

Peppermint. — Arvensis : Chinese is 
27s. per lb. spot nominal; shipment not 
offering. Brazilian, 8s. 9d. spot, and 8s. 7^d. 
c.i.f. Formosan, 16s. 6d., spot ; March- 
April shipment, 16s., c.i.f. Piperita: Italian 
" Mitcham-type " from 42s. 6d. to 50s.; 
American 27s. 6d. to 30s., as to origin. 

Pine. — Pumilioms on the spot is 16s. 
per lb.; sylvestris, 25s.; Siberian (abietis), 
12s. 6d. 

Sandalwood. - - Mysore offered from 
80s. to 82s. 6d. per lb. as to source. East 
Indian, 82s. 6d., spot. 

Sassafras. — Brazilian is from 3s. 6d. 
per lb., duty paid. 

UNITED STATES REPORT 

New York, March 24: Lack of both 
domestic and imported supplies brought 
an increase in Glycerin prices making 
the soap lye 1 81 cents a lb., up a half- 
cent, and the saponification type nomi- 
nally 20| cents, up one cent. Cyanoco- 
balamin (Vitamin Bu) has been reduced 
to $139 per gm. for the u.s.P. crystal- 
line, a cut of $24 from its former price. 

Botanical drugs were about un- 
changed and in only average demand. 
Senega root was increased ten cents 
to $2 20 per lb. Higher per lb. among 
ESSENTIAL Oils were Bourbon Gera- 
nium at $19 25 (up 25 cents), and Lime 
at $7 75 (up 75 cents). Lower per lb. 
were East Indian Sandalwood oil at 
$13 25 (down ten cents); Abietis, $2 70 
(25 cents); Coriander, $11 (50 cents); 
Italian Lemon, $650 (25 cents); and 
Dalmatian Sage, $360 (15 cents). 



March 28, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



353 



WORLD TRADE 

Competition for Latin American 
Market.— European chemical producers 
are cutting deeper into the United 
States share of the 736 million-dollar 
Latin American market, according to 
the periodical Chemical Week. In 1956, 
U.S. firms gathered 631 per cent, of a 
$50 million market; in 1957 the share 
was 60'7 per cent, of a 745-million- 
dollar market which last year slipped 
to 58'7 per cent. 

Pakistan and Foreign Investors. — 

The Pakistan Minister of Industries on 
February 20 said that the Government 
had no intention of nationalising indus- 
tries involving foreign investment. 
Should circumstances or an emergency 
necessitate nationalisation, he said " just 
and fair compensation will be paid in 
the currency of the country from where 
the foreign investment originated." In- 
dustries where the Government sought 
to attract foreign investment included 
heavy chemicals and pharmaceuticals. 

Pharmaceutical Manufacture in 
Colombia. — Several subsidiaries and 
affiliates of leading United States 
chemical and pharmaceutical organisa- 
tions have received credits from the 
Washington Export-Import Bank for 
expansion projects. Abbott Laborator- 
ies de Colombia, S.R.L., Bogota, were 
given a credit of 7 - 7 million pesos (17 2 
pesos equal £1) to finance the construc- 
tion of a pharmaceutical plant near 
Bogota; Carboquimica S.A., Bogota, an 
affiliate of W. R. Grace & Co., New 
York, obtained 600,000 pesos for new 
facilities for the manufacture of chemi- 
cal products, while 2 - 4 million pesos 
were lent to Parke Davis Inter-Ameri- 
can Corp., Ltd., for the construction of 
a pharmaceutical plant. Pfizer Cor- 
poration, Bogota, is to construct a 
pharmaceutical packaging plant in 
Bogota with the aid of a credit totalling 
1*7 million pesos. 

MISCELLANEOUS 
INQUIRIES 

Silcock's Base 

Can you give me the formula for 
Silcock's base? 
The formula for Silcock's base is: — 

Paraffin liq 15 per cent. 

Promulsin wax 10 per cent. 

Aqua dest. ad 100 per cent. 

Cannibalism in Poultry 

Can you tell me anything about the use 
of methionine in the treatment of canni- 
balism in poultry ? 
The use of amino-acid methionine for 
cannibalism in poultry is given in the 
following extract on the use of methionine 
in poultry feeds (W. M. Neal, Poultry 
Science, 1956. 35. 10-13) :—" Cannibalism 
and feather-picking are vices causing great 
anxiety to the commercial poultry keeper 
— particularly under deep-litter manage- 
ment. Numerous reasons have been put 
forward to explain these conditions — e.g., 
boredom, too much heat, crowding and 
various food deficiencies. W. M. Neal 
considers the cause to be a deficiency of 
methionine. He submits data showing that 
a level of 0-3 per cent, methionine sup- 
pressed the condition in his flock after 
an interval sufficient to permit the ab- 



sorption of methionine from the digestive 
tract. Feather-picking and cannibalism 
virtually disappeared from the flock for 
the approximate time that the supplemen- 
tation maintained an increased physiologi- 
cal level of this nutrient. In support of 
this theory, Neal draws attention to the 
suppression of cannibalism that has often 
been noted following oat feeding. This 
action, he pointed out, effectively reduces 
the energy content of most diets and so 
narrows the methionine : energy ration, 
i.e., effectively increases the methionine 
level. Attention is drawn to the fact that 
0-3 per cent, methionine in the diet is 
little in excess of the 0-28 per cent. 
N.R.C. recommendation." From this, you 
will see that the drug should be used in 
the feed at a strength of 0-3 per cent., 
preferably at the time when the trouble is 
rife, and for a short period afterwards. 
Medicinal quality methionine can be ob- 
tained from most drug houses. It is pos- 
sible that a commercial grade may be 
available at a lower price. 

• Sterilising Dairy Equipment 

Can you name any chemicals that may 
be used to keep well water in proper 
condition for cleaning milk utensils ? 
The well is fed partially from a spring. 
Sterilisation of dairy farm utensils may 
be carried out either with steam or with 
approved solutions of sodium hypochlorite. 
Treatment with sodium hypochlorite is 
commonly practised in this country: it is 
permitted by the Milk and Dairies Regu- 
lations. Only officially approved brands of 
hypochlorite may be used, and details of 
them are given in Advisory Leaflet No. 422, 
" Sterilising Farm Dairy Utensils by Ap- 
proved Hypochlorite," issued by the Min- 
istry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food. 
It would be desirable to send a sample of 
the well water to the local public-health 
laboratory for bacteriological examination, 
so as to be certain that the water is safe 
to use. 

TRADE MARKS 

APPLICATIONS ADVERTISED 
BEFORE REGISTRATION 
From the " Trade Marks Journal," March 18* 

For acetytated cetyl alcohol (1) 

CETILON, 774,578, by Field & Co. (Aro- 

matics), Ltd., Ruislip, Middlesex. 
For chemical products for use in photographic 
development processes (1) 

PHENISOL, 783,512, by llford, Ltd., Ilford, 

Essex. 
For all goods (1 & 3) 

IRGASAN, 783,560-61, TINUVIN, 783,562-63, 

by J. R. Geigy, S.A., Basle, Switzerland. 
For soaps, non-medicated toilet preparations and 
perfumes <3) 

Device of word GERARD, 779.371-72, by 

Gerard Brothers, Ltd., Nottingham. 
For non-medicated toilet preparations, cosmetic 
preparations, soaps, shampoos, hair lotions, per- 
fumes, dentifrices, lipsticks, brilliantine , eau-de- 
Cologne, essential oils and toilet articles (.not 
included in other classes) (3) 

BEAUTHYS, 780,039, by Beauthys, Neuilly-on- 

Seine, France. 
For all goods (3) 

PANTENIL, 783,412, by Roche Products, Ltd.. 

Welwyn Garden City, Hens. 
For pharmaceutical preparations and substances 
for human use (5) 

LUDOMIL. 777,522, by CIBA, Ltd., Basle, 

Switzerland. 
For all goods (5) 

BENTEN, B779.679, by C. L. Bencard, Ltd., 

London, N.W.10. IMPATAX, 779,438, IM- 

POTRLX, 779,440, by Benger Laboratories, 

Ltd., Holmes Chapel. Ches. AUTRIN, 782,825, 

by American Cyanamid Co., New York, U.S.A. 



NESM1L, 782,984, DIETON, 783,370, by 
the Nestle' Co.. Ltd., Hayes, Middlesex. DE- 
QUALONE, 784,314. by Allen & Hanburys. 
Ltd., London, E.2. 

Fo.' pharmaceutical preparations and substances 

(5) 

LOMUDASE, 777,693, LOMUPRENDASE, 

777,699, IMPODASE, 779,439, by Benger 

Laboratories, Ltd., Holmes Chapel, Ches. 
For pharmaceutical preparations and substances 
for human and veterinary use, being goods in 
tablet form (5) 

HELMATAB, 778,629. by Gale, Baiss & Co.. 

Ltd.. London, S.E.15. 
For pharmaceutical preparations and substances 
for human and veterinary use, none being for ex- 
port to Turkey (5) 

ORABOLIN, 779,929, by Organon Laboratories. 

Ltd., London, W.C.2. 
For dental preparations (5) 

ROCKSTONE, B780.604, by Virilium Co., Ltd., 

London, S.W.I. 
F of pharmaceutical preparations and substances 
consisting of or containing penicillin (5) 

CLEMAC1LLIN, 781,574, by Distillers Co. 

(Biochemicals), Ltd., Sreke, Liverpool. 
For pharmaceutical preparations (5) 

BONASPIN, 781,783, by Farbenfabriken Bayer, 

A.G., Lev^kusen, Germany. 
For pharmaceutical preparations and substances 
cons'sting of or containing amides (5) 

DISAMIDE, 783,573, by The British Drug 

Houses, Ltd., London, N.l. 
For medicinal preparations (5) 

MED1HALER-CORT, 783,930, by Riker 

Laboratories, Inc., Los Angeles, U.S.A. 
For electric apparatus and instruments ; photo- 
graphic and cinematographic apparatus, photo- 
graphic instruments , etc. (9) 

Device, 779,767, by Rank Organisation, Ltd., 

London, W.l. 
For sponges (21) 

KINGFISHER. 783,890, by Declon Sponges. 

Ltd., London, N. 6. 

COMING EVENTS 

Items for inclusion under this heading should be 
sent in time to reach the Editor not later than 
first post on Wednesday of the week of insertion. 

Wednesday, April 1 

Food Group, Society of Chemical Industry. 
14 Belgrave Square, London, S.W.I, at 6.15 
p.m. Professor H. Nicol (West of Scotland 
Agricultural College) on " Facts About Food 
Supplies." 

London Section, Society for Analytical 
Chemistry, Chemical Society, Burlington 
House, London, W.l, at 7 p.m. Original 
papers. 

Thursday, April 2 

Burnley Branch, Pharmaceutical Society-, Cross 
Keys hotel, St. James Street, at 7.45 p.m. 
Meeting. 

Durham County Branch, Pharmaceutical So- 
ciety, Waterloo hotel. Old Elver, Durham 
City, at 7.45 p.m. Meeting. 

Guildford Branch, Pharmaceutical Society, 
Prince of Wales hotel, Guildford, at 7.30 p.m. 
Meeting. 

Harrogate Branch, Pharmaceutical Society, 
Blue Bird cafe, Parliament Street, at 7.30 p.m. 
Mr. A. Aldington (a past-chairman. National 
Pharmaceutical Union) on " Pharmacy — Our 
Business." 

Friday, April 3 

Birkenhead and Wirral Pharmacists' Asso- 
ciation and Brxnch, Central hotel, at 8 p.m. 
Talk by Dr. F. E, Camps. 

Merseyside Branch. National Association of 
Women Pharmacists, 17 Bluecoat Chambers, 
Liverpool, 1. at 7.45 p.m. Dr. J. Thomas 
(lecturer in pharmaceutical chemistry, Man- 
chester University) on " The Development of 
Chemothcrapeutic Research." 

Advance Information 

International Symposium on Fluorine Chem- 
istry, Birmingham University, July 14-17. Ap- 
plications by June 13 to: General Secretary, 
Chemical Society. Burlington House, London, 
W.l. 



354 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



March 28. 



1959 



TELEVISION 

Programme details are given to enable chemists 
to put in linking -up displays if tbey wish. 
Figures in the columns represent number of 
appearances of the product during the week. 



April 5-11 



-1 is 



~ O (9 

Z v> f 



as 
Z 



Alka-Seltzer 
Amami wave set . . 
Andrews liver salt 
Askit 

Bcecham's pills 
Bronco toilet rolls. . 
California syrup of figs.. 
Camay soap 
Cephos 

Christy's lanoline face pack 
Oiticura preparations 
Damaskin 

Delsey toilet roll.. 
Euthymol tooth-paste 
Formula 21 

Gillette razors and blades 
Ibcol .. .. '.. 

Imperial Leather soap 
Lanospray 

Loxcnc hair cream.. 
Lucozade 

Maclean's tooth-paste 
Marigold house gloves 
Max Factor preparations.. 
Milk of Magnesia tablets 
Milk of Magnesia 
Milpar 

Phillips tooth-paste 
Phyllosan 

PU 

Pond's beauty products.. 
Ribena 

Rinstead pastilles .. 
Robinade 

Sebbix 

Sellers . . 
Shavex 

Silvikrin hair cream 
Stergene 

Sun-Orange Quosh 
Suregrip house gloves 
Tru-gel 
Valderma 
Valrosa 
Vaseline med 
Vitapointe 
Vosene 
Yeast-Vite 
Zoflora 
Zubcs 



2 1 
— .3 
1 1 



1 



1 



I 



4 2 

— 4 

— 2 
2 2 

2 1 

3 — 
1 1 

1 1 

— 2 
1 1 



2 — 

4 3 

2 1 

4 3 

5 — 

— 2 

— 2 
I — 

1 2 

3 3 

2 2 



11113 

— 12 

2 3 3 3 3 

2 2 2 2 5 
112 2 2 



— 1 — 1 — 

11111 

2^- 2 2 - 
2 3 3 

2 11 

2—2 

— 1 1 

3 4 4 3 3 
11111 

4 3 4 5 5 

— 5 5 7 2 



— 3 3 

3 3 3 3 3 
2 2 2 2 1 

4 2 

3 3 




EDINBURGH IN LONDON: A recently in- 
stalled display in the window of John Bell & 
Croyden, Wlgmore Street. I .melon. W.l, for 
DF 118, the dihydrocodeinc hitartrutc speciality 
of Duncan, Flockhart & Co., I tel.. Edinburgh, 
compels attention by its enlarged photograph 
of the Waverley Memorial in Princes Street, 
with Edinburgh castle in the background. 



PRINT AND PUBLICITY 

MEDICAL PROPAGANDA 

Manufacturers' leaflets, folders, booklets, etc., 

directed to doctors, but available to pharmacists. 

British Schering, Ltd., 229 Kensington High 
Street, London, W.8: " Androgeston," " Neo- 
Mercazole," " Tyromist," (4-p. folders); 
" Neutradonna," " Oblivon C " (information 
cards); " Orasecron " (blotter). 

CIBA Laboratories, Ltd., Horsham, Sussex: 
Pharmaceutical products therapeutic index 
(110-p. booklet), " Esidrex " (24-p. booklet 
and information card). " Tessalon " (12-p. 
booklet). " Vioform - hydrocortisone " (8-p. 
booklet). 

Geigy Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., Wythenshawe. 
Manchester, 23: Documenta Rheumatologica 
No. 7 (Radiology of the Wrist), Pp. 83; No. 12 
(Heredity in Joint Diseases). Pp. 74. " Irga- 
pyrin " (4-p. folder), " Delta-Butazolidin " 
(12-p. booklet), " Siogen " (4-p. folder), 
" Tofranil " (10-p. and 14-p. booklets and 
dosage card), " Tebafen " (4-p. folder). 

Merck Sharp & Dohme, Ltd., Hoddesdon, 
Herts: " HydroSaluric " (4-p. folder). 

Pharmaceutical Specialities (May & Baker). 
Ltd., Dagenham, Essex: " Avomine " (blotter), 
" Largactil " (4-p. folder), " Otamidyl," 
" Rovamycin," " Penitriad and Sulphatriad " 
(leaflets), " Stemeti! " (information card). 

Roche Products, Ltd., 15 Manchester Square. 
London, W.l: " Gantrisin eye drops" (blot- 
ter). 

Roussel Laboratories, Ltd., 847 Harrow Road, 

London, N.W.10: " PreCortisyl skin lotion and 

skin cream " (information card). 
The British Drug Houses, 

Street, London, N.l: 

booklet and folder). 
Ward, Blenkinsop & Co., 

Square, London, W.C.I: 

ies " (information card). 

DISPLAY MATERIAL. 

Glaxo Laboratories. Ltd., Greenford, Middle- 
sex: Ostermilk and Farex showcards depicting 
average growth and development of babies and 
children from one to three years. 

Ieyes-Ibco Sales, Ltd., River Road, Barking. 
Essex: Counter display carton for Sanilav per- 




toy S H U I. T O FX 



Ltd., 16 Graham 
Secrosteron " (9-p. 

Ltd., 37 Queen 
Penotrane pessar- 



DISPLAY CARDS : Shulton (Great Britain), 
Ltd., 160 Piccadilly, London, W.l, have pro- 
duced several new and arresting display cards 
for Old Spice. The card illustrated is " pernio - 
finished," and shows against a blue background 
a selection of Old Spice preparations for men. 
Another, not shown, is a red and white cat-out 
card for Old Spice after- shave lotion. 

fumed lavatory cleaner to hold six tins. Jeyes' 
garden scene card for Jeyes' fluid and Jeypeat 
compound. Size, 12J x 8 in. 
Vitamins, Ltd., Upper Mall, London, W.6: 
Poster for display in clinics, health centres and 
schools gives details of basic food requirements 
of children 1-6 years old. 

PRESS ADVERTISING 

Glaxo Laboratories, Ltd., Greenford, Middle- 
sex: Ostermilk and Farex. In Daily Express. 

Keldon, Ltd., Wadsworth Road, Perivale. 
Middlesex: Optrex eye lotion. In Envoy and 
Sphere. 

Pepsodent, Ltd., 449 London Road, Isleworth, 
Middlesex: Twink home permanent. In Daily 
Mirror, Woman, Woman's Own, Woman's 
Realm, Woman's Day, Woman's Mirror, True 
Story, True Romances, Photoplay, Woman's 
Story and Sincerely. 

Potter & Clarke, Ltd., River Road, Barking. 
Essex: Antasma tablets. In True Story, True 
Romances, Woman's Illustrated, Woman's 
Realm, Woman's Day, Woman's Mirror. 



C. & D. WEEKLY LIST OF PRICES 

A = Advanced; R= Reduced; I.R.P. = Inclusive Retail Price; » = Tax 30 per cent.; t = Tai «• p«r cent. 
DRUG CO., LTD. 



BOOIS PURE 

March 19) 



(from 



Viules medical cartridges: — 


Each 


I.R.P 




adrenaline, 1 in 2,000 












1 mil 6 


2 


10 


4 


3 


A 


atropine sulphate, gr. 












1/100 1 mil 6 


2 


8 


4 





A 


100 


26 





39 





A 


Cobastab 50, 1 mil 6 


2 


3 


3 


II 


A 


Cobastab 100, 1 mil 6 


3 





4 





A 


Cobastab 200, 1 mil 6 


4 


6 


6 





A 


diamorphine hydrochloride 












gr. i 1 mil 6 


3 


6 


5 


3 


A 


Mersalyl 2 mils 6 


3 


71 


5 


5 


A 


methadone hydrochloride 












10 nigm. 1 mil 6 


2 


7 + 


3 


6 


A 


mcthylamphctaminc hydrochloride 








30 mgm. 1-5 mils 6 


2 


10 


4 


3 


A 


nikethamide 2 mils 6 


2 


10 


4 


3 


A 


papavcretum, gr. \ with 












scopolamine gr. 1/150 












1 mil 6 


3 


6 


5 


3 


A 


pethidine hydrochloride 












50 mgm. 1 mil 6 


2 


2 


3 


3 


A 


100 


31 


8 


47 


6 


A 


100 mgm. 2 mils 6 


2 


1 1 


4 


4i A 


100 


43 





64 


6 


A 



No. n 

No. I 

GOYA, LTD. 

" Remember " perfumet 



175 
230 



3 9 

10 

20 

100 



IMPERIAL CHEMICAL INDUSTRIES, LTD., 
PHARMACEUTICALS DIVISION 

Fulcin • tablets* 100 51 90 

1,000 560 840 

JOSEPHINE KELL, LTD. 

Californian Poppy talcum! 2 9 

KING DEVELOPMENT CO., LTD. 
Perfumed Spun-gee* 6 11 

LEDERLE LABORATORIES DIVISION, CY- 
ANAMID OF GT. BRITAIN, LTD. 

Achromycin V capsules 

50 mgm. 25 12 1» 
100 45 • 67 6 



GEDEON RICHTER (GREAT BRITAIN), 
LTD. (from March 30) 
Broval*; Neuratonc*; Richter 
mist, bronchialis* ; Syro- 

fans* ; Tussibrom* 6 oz. ISA 

16 oz. 5 5 .4 

dispensing packs 40 oz. 8 10 A 

80 oz. 17 2 A 
Paratex* ; Paravitan* 6 oz. 2 T A 

16 oz. 6 1 A 

dispensing packs 40 oz. 9 10 A 

80 oz. 19 2 A 



SMITH & NEPHEW, LTD. 

Elastoplast pocket strip Doz. 
dressing 8 6 10 

UNITED CHEMISTS ASSOCIATION, LTD. 

Forty Plus tonic 3 

5 



WILLS 



NEW PRODUCTS AND PACKS 

EVER READY CO. (GT. BRITAIN), LTD. 

Figaro shaver* No. Ill 147 



Mr. J. R. Elliott, Ph.C. M.P.S., 4 Manor 
Way. Petts Wood. Orpington, Kent, left £9,903 
(£8,906 net). 

Mr. J. Hopkins, M.P.S., 13 St. David's 
Avenue. Carmarthen, left £4,000 (£3,629 net). 

Mr R. C. Russell, M.P.S., 6 Prospect, Cor- 
sham, Wilts, left £3.572 (£2,007 net). 

Mr. H. I. C. Thomas, M.P.S., 71 High Street. 
Shcerncss. Kent. left £9,380 (£8.527 net). 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 




It is not always possible to know which 
customers are susceptible to gastric irritation, 
constipation or allergy troubles. But as panadol 
is safe for everyone, it is definitely indicated when 
you are asked for something to relieve headache, 
dysmenorrhoea, rheumatic pains, the common 
cold or influenza symptoms. 
PANADOL is a good analgesic and antipyretic of 
outstanding safety and freedom from 
side effects. It contains no aspirin, codeine 
or phenacetin. You can offer panadol 
with confidence. 

Panadol is safe for Everyone 

Tablets: 0.5G., N-acetyl-p-aminophenol. 
In containers of 12, 100, 500 and 2,500. 



BAYER PRODUCTS LIMITED 

Neville House, Kingston-upon-Thames, Surrey 



3 2 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 
Supplement 



March 28 1959 



To increase your 

These eye-catching advertisements for "Halo" 32 nylon 
hair nets and "Tango" S.118 pure silk hair nets mean 
business — for you. 

in every town and village 

Popular Women's Magazines, having an overall readership 
of over 9 million women, carry these advertisements 
every month. 



D isplay if Se// 

HALOL 

AND 

tango: 

HAIR NETS 




Make certain of your share of this profitable business — 
order "Halo" 32 and "Tango" S.118. Your wholesaler 
can supply you. 

Mode by BYARD MANUFACTURING CO. LTD., WOOLPACK LANE, NOTTINGHAM. 




Towels 



DISPLAY MATERIAL AVAILABLE 




QUANTITY ALLOWANCE 

A monetary allowance is made on quantities of 7 gross 
and over, according to brand. 



The demand for our products increases, as the 
range we offer meets most requirements. If 
you are not already handling these, ask us, or 
our Representative about our introductory 
offer for Sylvia. 

SYLVIA 



Size : 
Trade price : 19/3 
Retail Price : 2/1 
Minimum Order 12 



12 per packet 

1 2 

21/6 2S/6 
2/4 2/10 

12. 12 



30/6 Dozen 
3/6 Packet 
6 Packets 



SYLVIA MATERNITY PADS 



Size 12 inch. 12 per packet 

Trade price : 31/6 Dozen. Retail price 

Minimum Order 6 packets 



Size : 1 
Trade price : 
Retail price : 
Minimum Order 



SOFTEXE 

Sizes 1 and 2 only 

(Twelves) 1 (Sixes) 



17/7 
2/- 
12 



»/- 
1/- 
24 



3/11 Packet 



2 (Twelves) 
22/2 Dozen 
2/6 Packet 
12 Packets 



ALTEX 



Size 1 only. A splendid seller reserved to the trade 

Size : I (Twelves) I (Sixes) 

Trade price : I /- Dozen 9/9 Dozen 

Retail price : 2/1 Packet 1/1 Packet 

Minimum Order 12 Packets 24 Packets 



A PRODUCT OF OLDBURY, BIRMINGHAM 



March 28, 1 959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



3 3 




WINNING EIGHT IN THE BOTTLE RACE 

Qee that rowing eight? Reminds me of our bottle makers 

— United Glass. They've got eight bottle factories on the job, 
all pulling the same way. Every one of them producing bottles 
by the million. Now I'm not setting up as a rowing expert. But I do 
know this. Set a crew of eight against a boat with fewer men in it 
and I can tell you which one I'd back. Yes, I get bottles from 
United Glass and nobody else. I still run out of cigarettes and petrol. 
But I'm never caught short of bottles for my filling lines. 

The eight United Glass factories keep thousands of customers 
supplied with bottles for a wide range of products-— and no delays. 
They are first-class designers and market research experts. And 
they are the only bottle makers in this country with a closure sub- 
sidiary. They can help you in so many ways. Please get in touch. 



UNITED GLASS 

United Glass Ltd., 8 Leicester Street, London, W.C.2. Tel: GERrard 86n 
Telegrams : Glaspak, Lesquare, London. 




3 4 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



March 28, 1959 



" Don't forget the Bemax, mummy!" 




BEMAX is an asset for 6 good reasons 



BEMAX is the richest natural vitamin-protein-mineral supplement 
containing 27% protein, the whole of the vitamin B complex, 
and iron — all in their natural state. 

bemax improves and maintains health — specially in the trying 
months of winter and spring. 

Doctors have recommended bemax for over 30 years. 

Regular advertising keeps bemax before the public. 

The price of bemax has never been raised since the war. 

bemax helps to keep the whole family well, is easy to take, 
good for both appetite and digestion. 



You — and your customers — are bound to benefit from 

BEMAX 



STABIL 
WHEAT 



ZED 
GERM 



VITAMINS LTD., UPPER MALI., LONDON, W. 6. 




March 28, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 




„ NYLOK 

^Jmic€<0 DRESS overalls 

J m THESl BEAUT i F u L SHADES jfe^ IffrUAs St&j^~ 



RUB* WINE 



OVTSTANDIMG 
OFFER 



3 OR MORE 
GARMENTS 
5% CASH 
DISCOUNT 
6 OR MORE 
10% CASH 
DISCOU 
POST 
FREE I 




APPLE GREEN 



lUR QU0ISE 



SAXE BLUE 



PMK 



SNOW 



WHITE 



1 



GUARANTEED 

SUPER 





Button through 
3 large pockets 
Flared Skirt 
Tie Belt and 
Spare Buttons 



LONG SLEEVES 

SIZES : 
SW., W., WX. 
OS. 5/- EXTRA 
also 

SHORT SLEEVES 
4$/- 
PLEASE STATE 
BUST MEASUREMENTS 



Sizes: 
Small Men's 
Average Men's 
& Large Men's 
Kindly State Chest Measurement 



Ule Guarantee 

YOUR COMPLETE 
SATISFACTION 



★ 



Average Men's 
& Large Men's 

Kindly State 
Chest Measurement 



Sewn throughout 
with Nylon thread 

All seams reinforced and 
heat sealed to prevent 
fraying 

Will withstand the hardest 
of wear and dirtiest of jobs 

When soiled simply wash and dry 
on specially designed hanger supplied 
FREE with each garment 




Should your Staff purchase their own 
overalls kindly let them see this offer. 
Single Garments Post and Packing 2j- 
Two or more Post Free 



Direct farm the ItUwufactu/ieA tc yvu 



THE GREAT NATIONAL DIVIDEND STORES LIMITED 

NATIONAL BUILDINGS • P.O. BOX 32 • STOCKPORT • CHESHIRE (MAIL ORDER ONLY) 



36 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



March 28, 1 959 



Of proved efficiency against infection 

The Antipeol products incorporate the broth 
filtrates of the microbes common to most 
cutaneous, naso-pharyngeal and ocular complaints. 



ANTIPEOL 



RHINO-ANTIPEOL 



CUTANEOUS OINTMENT 

For the immediate treatment of Burns and Scalds. 

For Boils to avert surgical intervention. Also for abscesses, 

ECZEMA, CARBUNCLES, VARICOSE ULCERS, HAEMORRHOIDS, 

and certain types of dermatitis. 

PROPHYLACTIC NASAL CREAM 

For asthma, bronchitis, catarrh, coryza, rhinitis and 
many other infections of the naso-pharynx. 



OPHTHALMO-ANTIPEOL 



THERAPEUTIC OPHTHALMIC OINTMENT 

For blepharitis, conjunctivitis, dacriocystitis, keratitis 
and other inflarrmatory conditions of the eye. 



Among the Medical and Nursing Profession and The First 
Aid Associations, the ANTIPEOL preparations enjoy a con- 
tinued and growing popularity. They are highly regarded as 
simple but effective remedies against even the more virulent 
forms of skin, nose and eye infections. 

MEDICO-BIOLOGICAL LABORATORIES LTD. 

CARGREEN ROAD, SOUTH NORWOOD, LONDON, S.E.25- 




PB26 




CRES3WELLS 
HAVE GIVEN SATISFACTION 
TO THEIR CUSTOMERS FOR 
ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS 




To display a natural deep sea sponge is to sell it- 
because discriminating customers know that it is 
softer and kinder to the skin, and more lasting 
and more hygienic than any substitute — as well as 
holding three times as much water. 

Cresswell's offer the best of the sponge 
crop. Please write for our price lists, and 
when in the West End of London a visit to 
make your own selection is welcomed. 



CRESSWELL BROS. SPONGES 

3-9, EARLHAM STREET, CAMBRIDGE CIRCUS. LONDON. W.C.2 



March 28. 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supple m e n I 



37 



ALGINATE 




ultraplast 



ALGINATE 



POCKt 
PACK 



FIRST AID DRESSINGS 

L, „OM.P«N BROH.M I 






One of Industry's most 
widely used wound dressings 




+ 




ULTRAPLAST ALGINATE STYPTIC DRESSINGS perfec- 
ted for the very exacting industrial market, have won the approval 
of doctors, nurses and first-aid men employed in some of Britain's 
largest industrial concerns. 

Now Ultraplast Alginate Wound Dressings in handy Pocket Packs 
are available to your customers. The Alginate Pocket Pack 
contains 4 Alginate Wound Dressings. For freshness and hygiene 
each dressing is individually wrapped in a heat-sealed, 
moisture proof Cellophane envelope. The eye-catching 
display outer contains 3 dozen Pocket Packs. 

ALGINATE is obtained from sea weed and is processed, spun and knitted 
into a silk-like gauze. In contact with tissue fluids the Alginate 
gauze softens into a jelly, stops bleeding, speeds healing 
and provides an admirable protection for the wound. 

ORDER NOW 

Price to retailer 48/- per outer (j dozen Pocket Packs) 
Profit on cost 50% 

ULTRAPLAST 

ALGINATE 

STYPTIC FIRST AID DRESSINGS 
STOPS BLEEDING— SPEEDS HEALING— INDIVIDUALLY WRAPPED 




NATIONALLY 
ADVERTISED 
IN 

SUNDAY EXPRESS 



Wallace, Cameron & Co Ltd 
83 West Regent Street 
Glasgow C2 DOUGLAS 8078/9 



3 8 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



March 28, 1959 



Planned parenthood needs wise advice 



Fulfilment of the lasting happiness of 
responsible family planning is assisted 
by the guidance young married couples 
receive regarding the use of an efficient 
and harmless contraceptive. 
Gynomin has aesthetic appeal, is sper- 
micidally efficient and may confidently 
be recommended. 

THE IDEAL ANTISEPTIC AND DEODORANT CONTRACEPTIVE TABLET 

Approved by the Family Planning Association lor use 
in conjunction with a mechanical barrier. 

Tubes of 12 tablets (Retail 3/6) 31/6 doz. 

Quantity discounts 
3 doz. 5% - 6 doz. 7i% - 12 doz. 121% 
From your wholesaler 




GYNOMIN 



Regular propaganda is directed to the medical 
profession and detailed literature is available to 
pharmacists on request. 



COATES & COOPER LTD. 

West Drayton, Middlesex. 




AUTOMATIC WATER STILLS 



WITH THE NEW 



VITREOUS FINISH'*' 



The MAIN EST Y 00B and OB Automatic Water Stills, gas, paraffin or 
electrically operated models, are now available in the new vitreous 
finish. Simply installed, Manesty Still3 ensure a constant supply of 
fresh pure distilled water at extremely low running costs. No storage, 
handling or transport problems arise, and to save further floor space, a 
wall bracket is provided for each model. 

MANESTY STILLS are available for outputs ranging from 2 pints 
to 50 gallons per hour. 

For further details send for our fully illustrated leaflets. 

Vitreous enamelled boiling chamber (inside and outside) 
Condenser Pipe. Wall bracket and Weir Chamber. Other 
fittings chromium plated. 





OB 
Cu. 

Output 6 to 
8 pints 
per hour. 



MANESTY Machines and 
Stills are now used in over 
sixty countries. 



MANESTY MACHINES LIMITED 



SPEKE • LIVERPOOL 24 



Telephone: Hunts Cross 1972 



Telegrams: M anc sty \ Liverpool 21 



TABLET MACHINES 



COATING PANS 



GRANULATORS 



MIXERS 



PUNCHES and DIES 



March 28, 1959 



THE 



CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



3 9 




vies for 
ottles for 
Jottles for 
Bottles for 
Bottles for 




of 




or 



Bottles for 
Bottles for 
bottles for 
ottles for 
+ les for 



rc i. i umery 
Perfumery- 
Perfumery 
Perfumery 
Perfumery 
Perfumery 
Perfumery 
Perfumery 
perfumery 
erfumery 
erfumery 
'erfumery 
erfumery 
erfumery 
erfumery 
erfumery 
erfumery 
erfumery 
erfumery 
erfumery 
3 erfumery 
erfumery 
erfumery 
Perfumery 
Perfumery 
Perfumery 
Perfumery 
Perfumery 
Perfumery 
Perfumery 
■Dor fumerv 



L-Oauxc 
Cosme 
Cosme 
Cosme 
Cosme 
Cosme 
Cosme 
Cosme 
Cosme 
Cosme 
Cosme 
Cosme 
Cosme 
Cosme 
Cosme 
Cosme 
Cosme 
Cosme 
Cosme 
Cosme 
Cosme 
Cosme 
Cosme 
Cosme 
Cosme 
Cosme 
Cosme 
Cosme 
Cosme 
Cosme 
fins™* 



tics 
tics 
tics 
tics 
tics 
tics 
tics 
tics 
tics 
tics 
tics 
tics 
tics 
tics 
tics 
tics 
tics 
tics 
tics 
tics 
tics 
tics 
tics 
tics 
tics 
tics 
tics 
tics 
tics 



and 
and 
and 
and 
and 
and 
and 
and 
and 
and 
and 
and 
and 
and 
and 
and 
and 
and 
and 
and 
and 
and 
and 
and 
and 
and 
and 
and 
and 



Drt 

Dru. 

Dru£ 

Drug 

Drug 

Drug 

Drug. 

Drugf 

Drugs 

Druga 

Drugs 

Drugs* \ 

Drugs| \ 




Designers and Manufacturers of High Quality Glassware 
THE INTERNATIONAL BOTTLE CO., LTD. 

140 PARK LANE W.I Telephone MAYfair 6992 (5 lines) Telegrams AUTREFOIS. AUDLEY. LONDON 



40 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST March 28, 1959 

Supplement 



THE 




IVY TABLETS 

A scientific combination of Iron, Vitamin 
and Yeast in the form of an casy-to-takc 
coated tablet. 

Helps to restore energy and vitality. 




CHLOROPHYLL AND 
YEAST TABLETS 

Combine Yeast and Iron Phos- 
phate with Chlorophyll to pro- 
vide a general tonic of especial 
value to the over forties. 




1w SpWng Health 



SULPHUR LOZENGES 
(Lime Flavour) 

The Lozenges, an attractive lime 
colour as well as Lime Flavoured, 
are heat-sealed in clear film bags. 
A popular Spring seller. 




SULPHUR AND YEAST 
TABLETS 

A first class pick-me-up that is 
strongly in demand during the 
Spring and Summer months. 
The unusual display outer is 
an eye-catching feature. 




AYRTON SAUNDERS & CO. LTD. HANOVER ST. LIVERPOOL 



for A S T H M A and Allied Chest 
Complaints, you can safely recommend — 

RIDDOYYDRIN 'IBEfo 

—A BIOLOGICAL PREPARATION CONTAINING VITAMIN C 

RIDDOVYDRIN gives Rapid and Prolonged 
Relief to the most Chronic Cases. 

SAMPLES AND LITERATURE FREE ON REQUEST 

TOGETHER WITH 



RIDDOPAG INHALER 

WITH OR WITHOUT MASK 
— UNBREAKABLE — 
Gives a Fine Dry Vapour Free of Drops 

MAY BE SUPPLIED ON E.C.IO FORMS 

dfl° / DISCOUNT ALLOWED ON ALL INHALERS 
/ ° RETAILING FROM 9/6d. TO 58/6 TAX FREE 





RIDDELL PRODUCTS 

HEAD OFFICE LTD. 

RIDDELL HOUSE, 
10-14 DUNBRIDGE STREET, LONDON, E.2 

Phone : SHOredicch 7254/6 
BRANCH OFFICE: 

II MANSFIELD CHAMBERS, 
ST. ANN'S SQUARE, MANCHESTER, 2 

Phone: BLA. 2894 



March 28, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



The Anglican Bishops 
endorse Family Planning 



Family planning, in such ways as are , 
mutually acceptable to husband and wife 
in Christian conscience . . .is a right and 
important factor in Christian family life. 



REPORT OF THE NINTH LAMBETH CONFERENCE 

(1958) 



Commenting on the report, the Archbishop 
of Canterbury said: 

"...there is clearly a divine obligation to plan 
your family and not have them by accident." 
Asked if he personally advocated family 
planning, the Archbishop replied: 

"What the conference says is that it is a 
necessity, and I agree." 
With these words, the 310 Anglican 



Bishops have given their blessing to the 
principles of family planning. In setting 
forth this enlightened point of view, they 
have removed the confusion and controversy 
which have surrounded the subject for 
years. Their wise and human approach will 
be endorsed by thoughtful people every- 
where. 



FAMILY 

REQUISITES 




The wording on this strip 
conforms with the code of ethics 
of the Pharmaceutical Society. 

( Size of strip: 7" x 2") 



The part you play... 

Millions of new users are being converted to modern 
DUREX methods of family planning by our "Planned 
Families" booklet, extensively advertised in news- 
papers and magazines. 

Write for the discreet "Family Planning Requisites" 
shelf strip (No. 30), which shows that you are a 
DUREX stockist. It will bring you extra business — 
so put it on display. 



LONDON RUBBER CO. LTD., HALL LANE, LONDON, E.4 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 
Supplement 



March 28, 1959 



THE NEW RED LABEL 



DAISY 



POWDERS 



* NEW 'PLUS' FORMULA 
+ NEW MODERN PACKING 
+ NEW BIGGER PROFITS 

In Two Sizes 

l/l I (8 Powders) 13/10 doz. (Plus Tax 30%) 
5/4 (24 Powders) 38/4 doz. (Plus Tax 30%) 
Single Powders 3d. each 

DAISY TABLETS at corresponding whole- 
sale prices retailing at l/l I, 2/11, and 3/11. 

Split bulk sales of DAISY POWDERS from 
the 5/4 size show chemists 36% profit on 
net turnover. The smaller size shows 26% 
profit sold intact and 31% when split. 

From any wholesaler : 

J. E. ELLIS LTD. regent house, harrogate 

Manufacturing Chemists 





tf Ws0 CARD 
CARC 

» NO 



SttftitH & Htll (Chemiits) LTD. 

MATILDA STREET, SHEFFIELD t 
Tel. 28383 (5 lines) 



Also CARDINAL WORKS 
CARDINAL STREET 
NOTTINGHAM 
TbI.S«»3!><jS4»34 



79A URBAN ROAD 
HEXTHORPE 
DONCASTER 
T«L6S24l-2 



12 DRAWER UNIT 

12 Type 'A' Drawers. Available in 

any multiple of 6 drawers. 
8" high by 36" wide by ll£" deep. 




£4.15.0 DELIVERED 



In England, Scotland and Wales 



TYPE 'A' DRAWER 



S" wide by 3" high 
long. With one 
divider per 
drawer. 

Extra dividers : 
plain 6d. each, 
with card holder 
9d. each. 




NC- BROWN 

SHELVING DIVISION, HEYWOOD, LANCS. PHONE :- 690I8 (6 lines) 



LTD 



BOTANICALS 

CHEMICALS 

GUMS 




ESSENTIAL OILS 
SPICES 
WAXES 



o 
>- 

UJ 

z 



IPECAC 
SENEGA 
STY RAX 
STRYCHNINE 
DERRIS POWDER 
PYRETHRUM POWDER 



> 

2 
ao 
C 
30 

o 



JOHN KELLYS (London) LTD. 

24 OLD BROAD STREET, E.C.2. 



Telephone. LONdon Wall 6S8S (4 tines) 
Telegrams : " Ergotine, Stock, London " 



March 28, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



You cannot do better than specify COCKER 



P.CM.X. and D.C.M.X 



For many years we have been large-scale manufacturers of these widely-used intermediates for 
which we should be pleased to receive your enquiries and to submit samples at your request. 

In addition we should like to draw your attention to the undermentioned selection from 
our production of fine chemicals. 



D.D.T. (and certain formulations) 
Terpineol B.P. and Perfumery 
Chlorxylenol fractions 
Chlorinated Cyanuric Acids 

The finest of the fine from : 



Dichlorphenol 
P.C.O.C. 

Chloral Hydrate B.P. 
Terpinolene 



M.B.T. 
M.B.T.S. 

Benzylated-CresylioAcid 

Chloral Anhydrous 

Ortho Benzyl parachlorphenol 



COCKER CHEMICAL CO. LTD. 

OSWALDTWISTLE • LANCASHIRE 

Telephone: Accrington 3621-3 



(Dept. CD.) 



am __________ <0&%&&ft. HHH| 

i "W" Hkl M 

SUGAR CANE MOLASSES 

packed in glass jars 

i- i for convenience and 

better protection. 

Available in various sizes. 

SELLING AGENTS 

JEFFREYS, MILLER & CO. LTD. 

LEYLAND MILLS, WIGAN 



NATURAL 

EPHEDRINE ALKALOID ANHYDROUS 

NF.X 



THE BRITISH DYEWOOD COMPANY LIMITED 

19 St. VINCENT PLACE GLASGOW C.I 



44 THE CHEMIST 

S u p p I 



AND DRUGGIST 

e ra e n t 



March 28, 1959 



BEST- SELLERS 

ALL 




Sun-tang; 



Sun-tang — made from whole oranges 
sugar and glucose— contains Vitamin 
C, essential to good health 



'NIAGARA' 



Blackcurrant Syrup 



Niagara — made from Blackcurrant 
juice and sugar — rich in Vitamin C 
— the perfect drink for young and 
old alike. 



More customers are asking for both these delicious, 
health-giving drinks. Meet the extra demand by ordering 
ample stocks NOW and make sure of year-round profits. 

BARNETT & FOSTER LTD. 

QUEENSBRIDGE ROAD, LONDON, E.8. Tel.: CLIssold 7132 



D 



PRIDE 7 

NEW DOUBIE 




SHAMPOO SACHETS 



BEER SHAMPOO 

a special Blend for BRUNETTES which helps to 
attain that much sought after high gloss so neces- 
sary with either natural or tinted BLACK hairs- 

CHAMPAGNE SHAMPOO 

it specially packed for those who desire the in- 
vigorating effect of wine and spirit with a lovely 
FRENCH PERFUME. 

MEDICATED SHAMPOO 

a hair health shampoo free of all harsh antiseptics. 
Based entirely on the Pure Natural Oils of the 
Pine and Ti-Trees is delightful to use and assures 
a clean healthy scalp. 

These three shampoos are in double sachets giving sufficient 
for 2 complete shampoos. Smart and colourful pack. 

Price 3 9 doz. plus 1/2 P.T. 
From May, Roberts, Songers or your usual wholesaler or direct. 

B. N. FURMAN (Productions) LTD., 

133 Fonthill Road, N.4 




R.I 09 



Your customers are 
catching on to the 
ROZALEX habit — are you? 

An intriguing campaign for Rozalex barrier creams 
is appearing in the women's magazines. It's to 
remind women to make a habit of using these barrier 
creams regularly. Link up with these advertisements 
by displays — and how are your stocks of No. I 
cream for dry work, No. 8 cream for wet work ? 
Supplied direct or through your usual wholesaler. 

ROZAI.KX LTD.. 10 NORFOLK ST., MANCHESTER 2 





PRESCRIPTION 
BOTTLES 

require top grade cork 
stoppers which permit no 
leakage. 

Chemists who know 
from experience, continu- 
ally specify Robinson 
Corks — the first class 
quality never varies. 

Write for full details 
and prices to: — 



ROBINSON BROS 

CORK GROWERS LTD. 
21 HORTON STREET HALIFAX 

London Address: 54-62. Regent Street. London. HM. Tel. GER 3965/8 



March 28, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



ACME Offer mom to the. 

RETAILER 



TOP 

QUALITY 
PPOtHJCT 





THAbE 
blSCQUNT 




EACH FLASK CLEARLY 
MARKED WITH PRICE 

Supplied only tfitough 
Appointed bicfributorc 

LARGE 
STOCKS AVAILABLE 
FOR. IMMEDIATE 
bEUVEtoy 




„ ACME 



ACME VACUU 



FLASK 



DIVISION 



A N T I F 



N C E LI 



I T E 



BICESTER ROAD, AYLESBURY, BUCKS Tel: Aylesbury 2511 (6 lines) 



ONE OF THE WORLD-WIDE ANTIFERENCE GROUP OF COMPANIES 
LONDON • BRUSSELS • TORONTO • SYDNEY 



4 6 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



March 18. 1959 



ALEX DRUG STORES 
LIMITED 

give 

price - maintenance 
undertaking 
to 

ADDIS LIMITED 

Alex Drug Stores Ltd., trading as Alex Stores at 
79 High Road, Balham, S.W.I 2, and 375 North 
End Road, Fulham, S.W.6 and as Alex Super- 
stores, Surrey House, Surrey Street, Croydon, 
who had been selling at cut prices the goods 
of Addis Limited, have now given to Addis 
Limited an Undertaking under Seal that they 
will not in future resell any goods sold by 
Addis Limited subject to a condition that such 
goods may not be resold at prices below those 
appearing in the current retail price lists of 
Addis Limited, at prices below those appear- 
ing in the said retail price lists in contraven- 
tion of Section 25 of the Restrictive Trade 
Practices Act 1956. Alex Drug Stores Ltd. 
further undertook to bring the said Under- 
taking to the notice of any proposed successor 
or assignee and make it binding upon him 
or them. 



Shaving Soap 
is a must 

Men are conservative creatures who cling 
through the years to the toiletries that 
please them. Especially when Cuticura 
— that mark of distinction — is the brand 
they favour. You simply cannot afford 
not to stock, show — and recommend to 
new shavers — 

Cuticura 

MILDLY MEDICATED 

Shaving Stick 

And don't forget the rest of the popular Cuticura range 
SOAP • OINTMENT 
TALCUM POWDER • HAND CREAM 
MEDICATED LIQUID 

!3 




for fine chemicals 
especially : 

ASPIRIN B.P. "FRE-FLO" 

SALICYLIC ACID B.P. 
SODIUM SALICYLATE B.P. 
SALOL B.P.C. 
VANILLIN 100% 

H. W. GRAESSER-THOMAS LIMITED 

49 LEADENHALL STREET, 
LONDON, E.C.3 

TELEPHONES: ROYAL 301 1-61 1 I 



March 28, 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supple mcni 



4 7 




4 See our exhibits at 
the Packaging Centre 
50 Poland Street, Wl 



WHAT DO YOU KNOW? 



"Tell nie, Mr. Chemist, who would you say produce a 
range of dispensing hoxes really adequate to your needs?" 
1 Robinsons of Chesterfield sir. And there'' s not the 
slightest doubt about if." 

"But can they cater for all your requirements?" 
' Without a single exception sir. Their range of 
Chemists , boxes include Pill Boxes, Chepette and Sealite 
Ointment Boxes, Purple Flanged Pill Boxes, Standard 
i Little John'' Drums, Pill and Tablet Cartons— in fact the /of." 
"Well, Mr. Chemist, this must add up to a tremendous 
amount of Rohinson 'know-how'." 
"It does indeed sir and any Chemist who disregards it 
is years behind in his methods ." 






Ask your icholesaler for particulars 



Robinsons 



PURPLE FLANGED PILL BOX 



ROBINSON AND SONS LIMITED WHEAT BRIDGE MILLS CHESTERFIELD 

Telegrams: "Boxes" Chesterfield. Telephone : 2105, 8 lines 
London Olflce: King's Bourne House, 229/231, High Holborn, London W.C.1. Telegrams: 'Omnlbox' Holb. London. Telephone: Holborn6383 

CI 



48 



March 28, 1959 



CHEMISTand 




Druggist 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 



Telephone: CENtral 6565 



Specially spaced Advertisements, including : — ruonc and Legal inoiicol-, sale Dy Auction, Appointments, Contract Work, Patents, Partner- 
ships, 18/- per | inch minimum and pro rata. Box 2/-. Clearances and Wants, Businesses for Disposal and Wanted, Premises, Agents 
Wanted, Agencies Wanted, Miscellaneous, 17/6 for 36 words minimum; then 4d. per word. Box 2/-. Situations Vacant, 12/-' for 36 
words minimum, then 4d. per word. Box 2/-. Situations Wanted. 3/- for 18 words minimum: then 2d. per word. Box 1/-. 
Addreat Box Number Repflea to: THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST, 28 ESSEX ST.. STRAND, LONDON, W.C.2 

=: : :.. :m:. -.ii'. .im, i: 'ii :: -;m : . 'i;. !>...;:,.. 'i ■ ,:. :: .1 :^ ■ ,;■ j- ;i ■ ; : ;i : ■: ; ,; ■ .: i" ■!!■ :■ ■ ;r - .nii'fiiHKLj 



ORRIDGE & COMPANY 



184 STRAND, W.C.2 

Tel: TEMple Bar 9212/3 & 6340 

| CHEMIST BUSINESS TRANSFER AGENTS AND VALUERS WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

BRANCHES: BIRMINGHAM • SOUTHAMPTON • LIVERPOOL ■ SHEFFIELD • CARDIFF 



BUSINESSES FOR DISPOSAL 

DRUG STORE. Large corner site N.W. Lon- 
don shopping parade, multiple area. Excellent 
for chemist, next -door doctor. Lease for dis- 
posal and stock at valuation. Box C 9076. 
KILWINNING, Ayrshire. Old-established pro- 
fitable pharmacy for sale owing to death. Offers 
invited for business and shop property. Stock 
at valuation. Inquiries to James Patrick ,Sc Muir. 
Solicitors, Dairy, Ayrshire. C2129 



APPOINTMENTS 

ANCOATS HOSPITAL, 
MANCHESTER, 4 

Pharmacist 

Applications are invited for the above post. 
Whitley Council Scale and conditions. 
Applications, stating age and experience, with 
names of two referees, to the General Super- 
intendent, Dept. CD. C9052 

BROOKWOOD HOSPITAL, 
KNAPHILL, WOKING 

Assistant-in -Dispensing 

Applications are invited for the above post. 
The successful candidate will be required to 
work under the supervision of the Chief Phar- 
macist, who is responsible for the preparation 
and issue of drugs and dressings for about 
1,750 patients. 

Salary Scale £170 p. a. at age 16 years rising 
to £375 at age 22 years or over rising to a 
maximum of £490 p a. (plus £20 p. a. for an 
approved qualification). 

Professional and Technical Council B of Whit- 
ley Council conditions apply to the appoint- 
ment which is subject to the provision of the 
National Health Service Superannuation Regu- 
lations. 

The successful candidate will be required in 
pass a medical examination.' 

Accommodation availab'e for female candidate 
for which a charRC of £2 8s. per week will be 
made. 

Applications giving particulars of age. experi- 
ence and qualifications, together with names 
of two referees to the Physician Superintendent, 
as soon as possible. C 417 

EASTERN HOSPITAL, 
LONDON, E.9 

Locum Pharmacist 

14-16 guineas per week, according to experi- 
ence. Write Secretary, Hackney Hospital, E.9. 
with full details. C 448 



I 

CENTRAL GROUP HOSPITAL 
MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE, 
BETHNAL GREEN HOSPITAL, 
CAMBRIDGE HEATH ROAD, 
LONDON, E.2 

Locum Pharmacists 

required for varying periods between May 18 
and October 3 for duties in the modern phar- 
macies at three hospitals in the Group. Salary 
up to 16 guineas per week. Applications to the 
Chief Pharmacist. C 447 

CENTRAL GROUP HOSPITAL 
MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE 

Senior Pharmacist and Pharmacist 

for Bethnal Green Hospital. Modern depart- 
ment approved for training students. Salary 
scale. Senior Pharmacist £675 — £865 p.a. Phar- 
macist £605 — £815 p.a., plus higher qualifica- 
tion allowance and London Weighting. Please 
apply with details of age, training and experi- 
ence to the Group Secretary, 213 Kingsland 
Road. London, E.2. C 344 

CRUMPSALL HOSPITAL, 
MANCHESTER, 8 

Locum Pharmacist 

required, salary £18 18s. per week. 
Apply, giving age, qualifications, and experi- 
ence together with the names and addresses of 
two referees, to the Hospital Administrator, as 
soon as possible. C9081 



HAREFIELD HOSPITAL, 
HAREFIELD, MIDDLESEX 

Assistant- in-Dispensing 

required. London Weighting payable and addi- 
tional £20 p.a. if holding approved qualifica- 
tion. Applications, giving age, qualifications and 
experience, together with two testimonials to 
Medical Director. C 9023 

KING EDWARD VII HOSPITAL, 
WINDSOR 
(Category III Hospital) 

Pharmacist 

required immediately. Whitley salary. Appli- 
cations giving details of service and names of 
three referees to Secretary. C 9042 

METROPOLITAN HOSPITAL, 
KINGSLAND ROAD, 
LONDON, E.8 

Locum Pharmacist 

required from Monday. March 23, 1959, to 
work in a modern department. Apply to Hos- 
pital Secretary. C 445 



III 

HIGHCROFT HOSPITAL, 
BIRMINGHAM, 23 

Chief Pharmacist (Category ID 

Salary £755 to £1.030 per annum plus additional 
allowance if in possession of higher qualifi- 
cations. 

Apply Secretary, stating age, qualifications and 
experience and names and addresses of two 
referees. C 9080 



HORNSEY CENTRAL HOSPITAL, 
PARK ROAD, N.8 

Chief Pharmacist (Category I) 

required at this general practit oner Hospital. 
Salary £730 to £985 p.a. Candidates may visit 
the Department by arrangement with the Hos- 
pital Secretary (Mou. 6244). Applications stat- 
ing age, qualifications and previous experience 
to Group Secretary, Archway Group H.M.C., 
46 Cholmeley Park, N.6, within 10 days. 

C 9045 



LAMBETH HOSPITAL, 
BROOK DRIVE, S.E.11 
(Acute General 501 Beds) 

Pharmacist 

required. Salary in accordance with Whitley 
Council Scale, plus London Weighting. Appli- 
cations stating age, experience, qualifications 
and names of two referees to the Secretary. 

C442 



MAIDENHEAD GENERAL 
HOSPITAL, 
BERKSHIRE 

Pharmacist 

required immediately. Applications stating age, 
qualifications and expenence with copies of 
testimonials to the Secretary. C 9070 



NORTH WIRRAL HOSPITAL 
MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE, 
VICTORIA CENTRAL HOSPITAL, 
WALLASEY 

Pharmacist 

Applications are inv.ted for the appointment of 
Pharmacist to assist the Chief Pharmacist. 
Salary and conditions in accordance with Phar- 
maceutical Whitley Council Committee " C." 
Applications, x. ith full details of experience, 
etc., together wiih names and addresses of 
ihrec referees to the Administrative Officer. 

C 9085 



ERNEST J. GEORGE & CO. 

329 HIGH HOLBORN, LONDON, W.C.I. Telephone •: HOLBORN 7406/7 

Professional Valuers to the Pharmaceutical Trade.— Wholesale, Retail and 
Hospital Stocks. Branches throughout England and Scotland. 



March 28. 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



49 



A ppv. intments — Continued 

NOTTINGHAM No. 2 HOSPITAL 

MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE, 
NOTTINGHAM CITY HOSPITAL 
(811 beds) 

Deputy Chief Pharmacist (Category V) 

Required at the above Hospital. Applications 
are invitee! for the above post, which is now 
vacant. 

The City Hospital is a Group hospital and 
caters for the pharmaceutical requirements of a 
number of subsidiary hospitals in the area. 
Applicants should have a wide experience in 
hospital pharmacy, and be capable of control- 
ling staff. A knowledge of surgical instruments 
is desirable. The successful applicant will work 
under the Group Chief Pharmacist and will be 
required to assume complete control in his 
absence. 

Further particulars regarding the post can be 
obtained on application to the Chief Pharma- 
cist. Whitley conditions of salary. 
Applications, stating age, qualifications and 
full particulars of previous experience, together 
with the names of two referees, should be sent 
to the Group Secretary, Sherwood Hosp.tal. 
Nottingham, as soon as possible. C 9060 



READING AND DISTRICT 
HOSPITAL MANAGEMENT 
COMMITTEE 

Pharmacist 

required at the Royal Berkshire Hospual, Read- 
ing (Category V). Six pharmacists with ful 
supporting staff. Frequent live day weeks. Com 
mencing salary, new entrants, up to £730 p. a. 
based on previous professional experience and 
National Service after qualification. Applica- 
tions to Group Pharmacist, Royal Berkshire 
Hospital. C 443 



ST. PETER'S HOSPITAL, 
CHERTSEY, SURREY 

Pharmacist and Assistant-in-Dispensing 

required. Whitley Council conditions. Hospital 
in pleasant rural surroundings within easy 
reach London. Temporary accommodation avail- 
able for single woman. 

Salaries: Pharmacist £605 to £815 according to 
experience. 

Assistant-in-Dispensing (age 22 or over) £395 
to £510. 

Applications stating age and experience giving 
two referees to Administrative Officer. C 9086 



APPOINTMENTS OVERSEAS 



PRESTON AND CHORLEY 
HOSPITAL MANAGEMENT 
COMMITTEE, 
PRESTON ROYAL INFIRMARY 

Senior Pharmacist 

Applications are invited for the post of Senior 
Pharmacist at the above general hospital. 
Whitley Council scale and conditions. Salary 
£675 x £30 (1) x £35 (1) x £30 (3) x £35 (1)— 
£865, plus £25 per annum higher qualification 
allowance. Additional payments for voluntary 
evening clinic duties. 

Applications with names of two referees, to 
the Group Secretary, Royal Infirmary, Preston. 
Lanes. C 9047 

PRUDHOE AND MONKTON 
HOSPITAL MANAGEMENT 

COMMITTEE, 
PRUDHOE AND MONKTON 
HOSPITAL, 
PRUDHOE-ON-TYNE 

Chief Pharmacist 
required. Salary scale as applicable to a Cate- 
gory H hospital, £755 rising to £1,030 per 
annum. Whitley Council conditions of service. 
The successful candidate will be expected to 
work single-handed and to take charge of a 
new pharmacy to be built in the near future. 
Applications, stating age and full particulars of 
experience, etc., together with names and 
addresses of two referees to be addressed to 
the Medical Superintendent. C 9068 

PRESTON AND CHORLEY 
HOSPITAL MANAGEMENT 

COMMITTEE, 
CHORLEY AND DISTRICT 
HOSPITAL, CHORLEY 

Pharmacist 

Applications are invited for the post of phar- 
macist at the above general hospital. 
Excellent opportunities to obtain wide experi- 
ence in hospital pharmacy. 

Whitley Council scale and conditions. Salary 
£580 — £785 per annum, plus £25 per annum 
higher qualification allowance. 
Applications with names of two referees, to the 
Group Secretary, Roval Infirmary, Preston. 
Lanes. C 9082 



SHREWSBURY HOSPITAL 
GROUP 

Pharmacist 

For Copthorne Hospital. 

Pharmacist 

For the Group Pharmacy at the Royal Salop 
Infirmary, with rota duties at other hospitals 
in the Group, as may be required. 
Salary in accordance with Pharmaceutical Whit- 
ley Council Scale. 

Applications to the undersigned from whom 
any further particulars may be obtained. 

J. P. MALLETT. 
Group Secretary. 

C 9044 



STEPNEY GROUP HOSPITAL 
MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE 

Deputy Chief Pharmacist (Category IV) 

Applications are invited for the above post 
at Mile End Hospital, Bancroft Road, London, 
E.l. Whitley Council salary scale and condi- 
tions of service. The department is responsible 
for pharmaceutical supplies to another hospital 
and clinic in the Group and the preparation of 
sterile products. Further particulars may be 
obtained from the Chief Pharmacist. Applica- 
tions stating age, qualifications, experience and 
the names of two referees, to be sent to the 
Group Secretary at Mile End Hospital, not 
later than April 1, 1959. C 9053 



SHREWSBURY HOSPITAL 
GROUP 
ROYAL SALOP INFIRMARY 

Locum Pharmacist 

required imediately for an indefinite period. 
Salary £16 16s. per week. 

Applications to undersigned from whom any 
further particulars may be obtained. 

J. P. MALLET1, 
Group Secretary. 

C 9074 



CANADA 

Required male or female Pharmacist ior 
dispensary of General Hospital — 285 
beds, 61 basinettes, 80 chronic unit 
beds. Commencing salary $305-00 per 
month, equivalent in English pounds 
(approx. £109 per month). Work as 
Assistant Pharmacist. Application with 
full details and names of two referees 
to be sent as soon as possible to: 
Personnel Manager, 
St. Thomas-Elgin General Hospital. 
St. Thomas, Ontario, Canada. C 9084 



ST. STEPHEN'S HOSPITAL, 
CHELSEA, S.W.10 

Assistant-in-Dispensing 

required immediately. Terms by arrangement. 
Apply Chief Pharmacist. C 9072 



THE ANNIE McCALL 
MATERNITY HOSPITAL, 
JEFFREYS ROAD, 
LONDON, S.W.4 

Part-time Pharmacist 

in sole charge required. Preferably female. 
16 hours per week. Monday to Friday. Whitley 
Council terms and conditions of service. Salary 
43s. 8d. per session of 4 hours. Applications, 
giving full particulars of experience and names 
of two referees to Hospital Secretary. C 444 



TOOTING BEC HOSPITAL 
MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE 

Pharmacist 

required at Tooting Bee Hospital. Tooting Bee 
Road, London, S.W.17. Permanent post, Whit- 
ley Council salary. Apply to Physician Super- 
intendent. C 446 



WHITTINGTON HOSPITAL, 
LONDON, N.19 

Pharmacists 

required for Archway and St. Mary's Wings. 
Salary £635-£855 p.a. Candidates may visit 
the departments by direct arrangement with 
the Medical Superintendent (Archway 3070, 
Ext. 440). 

Applications, stating age, qualifications, experi- 
ence, and naming two referees to Medical 
Superintendent immediately. C 9046 



SITUATIONS VACANT 
RETAIL HOME 

COTSWOLD TOWN. Experienced dispensing 
assistant required for a good class country 
business. Salary well above average with living 
accommodation if required. Interview expenses 
paid. Box C 2131. 

KENT. Manager wanted for small pharmacy re- 
quiring interest and attention. Attractive mod- 
cm flat, garden and garage. 3J miles from the 
sea. Sharp & Waterhouse. Ltd., 4 Victoria 
Road, Deal. C2151 

MIDDLESBROUGH. Pharmacist required to 
manage branch shop. Salary over £1.000. Com- 
petent staff. Superannuation scheme. Modern 
accommodation if required. Apply with usual 
particulars to Superintendent Chemist, Middles- 
brough Co-operative Chemists, Ltd., Middles- 
brough, Yorks. C 2120 

OLDHAM CO-OPERATIVE CHEMISTS. 
LTD., invite applications for position of phar- 
macy branch manager, either sex. Modern ac- 
commodation available if necessary. Super- 
annuation. Salary and other emoluments at least 
£960. Applications, stating age, experience, etc., 
to Oldham Co-operative Chemists, Ltd., King 
Street, Oldham. C 2145 

ORPINGTON, KENT. Lady dispensing assistant 
required in pleasant family business with.n easy 
reach of London. Permanency. Apply with 
usual particulars, including salary required, to 
H. J. Griffiths, manager, Farrants, 130 High 
Street, Orpington. Phone 20058. C 2138 

PHARMACIST assistant, lady, required imme- 
diately. No half-day, rota or Sunday duties. 
Close 1 p.m. Saturday. Congenial position in 
busy city business. Good supporting staff. Apply 
giving full particulars to Robert Howden, Ltd., 
11 Fenchurch Street, London, E.C.3 (Phone: 
Man. 7065.) C 2124 

PHILADELPHIA JEYES & CO., LTD., of 

Northampton require managers for Bedford and 
Stamford branches. Permanent position, with 
good salary and self-contained flat, rent and 
rates free. Non-contributory superannuation 
scheme with life cover. Full particulars in first 
letter to Philadelphus Jeyes &. Co., Ltd., The 
Drapery, Northampton. C2149 

SEASIDE resort. Pharmacist required as Assis- 
tant in high-class , business, duties mainly dis- 
pensing. Good supporting staff. Suitable flat to 
applicant's requirements will be made available. 
Please apply A. Procter & Son, Ltd., 6 Station 
Parade, Eastbourne. C2150 

SEDGEFIELD, Co. Durham. Pharmacist, either 
sex, required to manage busy rural business. 
No Sunday duty, no rota duly. Salary by 
arrangement plus bonus. Details of salary re- 
quired, experience, etc., to Wm. Smith, Chem- 
ist, 1 Chaytor Terrace, Fishburn, Stockton-on- 
Tees. C2143 

WIDNES. Metcalfe's of Liverpool require a 
Pharmacist /Manager for their branch phar- 
macy at Ditton, Widnes. Salary £1,040 per 
annum for a 44-hour week. Three-bedroom flat 
available. Apply to Managing Director, Met- 
calfe & Co. (Liverpool), Ltd., 596 Prescot 
Road, Liverpool, 13. C 2095 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

Supplement 



March 28, 1959 




SPECIALISTS 

FINEST QUALITY WORK 
MODERN LABORATORY 

RETURN POSTAL SERVICE, 
DAILY VAN DELIVERIES, in 

Preston, Chorley, Bolton and 
South Lancashire. 
First Class Show Material FREE on request 

ORMSKIRK 
PHOTO SERVICES LTD. 

ORMSKIRK, LANCS. Telephone 2380 




THE CROOKES LABORATORIES LTD. 

require a representative to cover Surrey and West 
Sussex. 

A pharmaceutical qualification or adequate technical 
background is essential. The appointment is super- 
annuated and well remunerated with progressive salary, 
adequate expense allowance and commission directly 
associated with territorial results. 

Promotion is possible either in the U.K. or to overseas 
positions. Only candidates with keen desire to progress 
should apply in writing with full details regarding age 
and past experience to the Sales Director, The Crookes 
Laboratories Limited, Gorst Road. Park Royal, N.W.10. 

C 9078 



Situations Vacant — Continued 



RETAIL (OVERSEAS) 

APPLICATIONS are invited from qualified 
male staff for service in Northern Rhodesia. 
Three-year contract. Apply by air mail giving 
full details of experience with copies of refer- 
ences. State age, marital status, religion, 
nationality, etc.. to Advertiser. P.O. Box 202, 
Broken Hill, Northern Rhodesia. C 9039 



WHOLESALE 

ALLEN & HANBURYS, LTD., Bethnal Green, 
London, E.2, require a pharmacist to act as 
representative in the Republic of Ireland and 
applications are invited from men of sound 
character with initiative and drive. A period 
of training will be given. The salary will be 
commensurate with qualifications and experience 
and a contributory pension scheme is in oper- 
ation. Expenses are paid and a car supplied. 
Full details of age, qualifications and experi- 
ence should be sent to the Personnel Manager. 

C 9048 

ALLEN & HANBURYS, LTD., Bethnal Green, 
London, E.2, require a pharmacist to act as 
representative for the Bournemouth and South- 
ampton area and applications are invited from 
men of sound character with initiative and 
drive. A period of training will be g.ven. The 
salary will be commensurate with qualifications 
and experience and a contributory pension 
scheme is in operation. Expenses are paid and 
a car supplied. Full details of age, qualifica- 
tions and experience should be sent to the 
Personnel Manager. C 9049 

AYRTON, SAUNDERS & CO., LTD., require 
a pharmacist for analytical and research work, 
preferably with some experience. The applicant 
will be encouraged to work for A.R.I.C. if not 
already so qualified. Five-day week; pension 
scheme. Full details of age, qualifications and 
experience in writing to: Technical Director, 
34 Hanover Street, Liverpool, 1. C 9066 

BURROUGHS WELLCOME & CO. invite ap- 
pl. cations from pharmacists for a post in pro- 
duction at the Wellcome Chemical Works. It 
w.ll be an advantage if applicants have had 
some industrial experience, but newly qualified 
pharmac.sts will also be considered. Contribu- 
tory pension scheme. Good conditions of em- 
ployment. Salary will be in accordance with 
qualifications and experience. Applications 
should be made in writing to the Personnel 
Manager, Wellcome Chemical Works, Dart- 
ford. Kent. C 9079 
EXPERIENCED REPRESENTATIVE required 
far wholesale warehouse, to carry fashion 
jewellery as sideline. Good commission. Box 
C 9022. 

FULL-TIME REPRESENTATIVES required 
by distributor of advertised French lipstick and 
toilet requisites, covering London and Home 
Counties. Good salary and commission. Only 
well-introduced men need apply. Write giving 
particulars, age, experience, references, to: 
Distributor, Box C 2148. 

INVENTIVE young man. aged 23-28, for well 
known chemists' sundries manufacturers, view 
training as export manager. Good prospects for 
keen, alert type with ideas and personality. 
Write giv.ng fullest details of career and salary 
required. Box C 9083. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS supplying com- 
mercial users now wish to introduce and de- 
velop several interesting and new insecticides 
and weedkillers for the amateur gardener. A 
new post is open to the man with initiative pre- 
pared to advise and to undertake routine visits. 
All applications treated in strict confidence. 
Apply to the General Manager, Box C 2144. 



PHARMACEUTICAL 
LIAISON OFFICER 

A new appointment is to be made to 
the administrational research staff of 
an internationally-known company 
manufacturing proprietary and lay- 
pharmaceutical products. 

The successful applicant will be a well- 
qualified (male) pharmacist or pharma- 
ceutical chemist, with specialised know- 
ledge of the pharmacolog.cal basis 
of therapeutics and forensic pharmacy. 
He will be directly responsible to the 
Research Director, and will co-operate 
closely in an advisory capacity, with 
research teams, and with Senior Sales 
and Marketing personnel, on the form- 
ulation of new therapeutic products. 
He will also advise on, and ass.st in, 
the compilation of promotional litera- 
ture. 

The post calls for extreme keenness 
and initiative, and a personality which 
will permit of successful and harmoni- 
ous negotiation both inside and outside 
the Company. The associated rewards, 
both immediate and in prospect, will 
be attractive. Apply, with full details, 
in strict confidence, to Box CD 944, 
LPE, Romano House, 399/401 Strand. 
London, W.C.2. . C 9091 



PHARMACIST required as manager of modern 
factory in Hertfordshire, within easy reach of 
London. All applications treated in strict con- 
fidence. Write g.ving full particulars to Box 
C 9064. 

PHARMACIST 

required as 
Assistant to Sales Manager 

A young man, preferably aged 23-27 
years, and of proven ability, is required 
to promote sales to retail pharmacies. 
Initial salary £800 p.a., plus commis- 
sion and expenses. Saioon car and rent- 
free flat prov.ded. Within two years the 
right man can expect to he appointed 
Asst. Sales Manager at a salary not 
less than £1,400 p.a. Please supply de- 
tails of past career and qualifications, 
in strict confidence, to: 

The Managing Director, 

THE CROWN CHEMICAL CO., LTD., 
I.amberhurst, Kent. 

C 9043 



REPRESENTATIVE required by well known 
company. Must be fully experienced in sell.ng 
top grade French perfumery to stores and re- 
tail chemists. Excellent opportunity for right 
man. Write Box C2146. 



SALES REPRESENTATIVES required for the 
south of England and London; well introduced 
with chemist retailers and wholesalers for rub- 
ber gloves, bathing caps, hot-water bottles, etc. 
Expenses and commission. Full-time applica- 
tions invited with full particulars and require- 
ments. Box C 9028. 



SALES SELECTION LTD. 

will safeguard the interests of candi- 
dates for the position of Assistant 
Sales Manager with an International 
Pharmaceutical House about to expand 
its operations in the U.K. Essential 
qualifications are a good knowledge 
of selling ethical products, experience 
in training and the ability to control 
and lead by example a team of initially 
10 Medical Representatives. A high 
basic salary will be paid and early 
promotion to senior management is a 
genuine prospect. No information will 
be passed to our clients without ap- 
proval after interview. Please send tabu- 
lated particulars marked " A21 " to 
us at Victoria House. Southampton 
Row. London. W.C.I. C 9073 



THE BRITISH DRUG HOUSES 
LIMITED 

require an 

EXPORT EXECUTIVE 

Applications are invited from PHAR- 
MACISTS with Overseas experience 
preferably in a Commonwealth market 
and with a sound commercial back- 
ground. The position entails responsi- 
bility for Commonwealth markets and 
offers opportunities for advancement. 
There is a superannuation fund (con- 
tributory) and the Company operates 
life assurance and profit-sharing 
schemes. 

Apply in writing giving details of age, 
qualifications and experience to: 

The Personnel Manager (Ref. FWG), 

The British Drug Houses. Ltd., 



Graham Street, London, N.l 



C9075 



SHIPPING CLERK REQUIRED. Knowledge 
Customs drawback an advantage. Canteen 
facilities. Contributory pension. Five-day week. 
Apply. Secretary, William Ransom <t Son, Ltd.. 
Huchin. C 9062 

TABLET COATER required by small pharma- 
ceutical firm in Yorkshire. Details to Box 

C 9069. 



March 28, 1959 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 5 1 

Supplement 



AGENTS WANTED 



AGENT REQUIRED on commission basis for 
the Counties of Kent, Surrey and Sussex, to 
take over existing agencies and appoint new 
ones for the sale of seeds and fertilisers for 
leading Midland horticultural house. Write 
giving details of area covered, other lines 
carried and experience to Box C2103. 
AGENTS WANTED (except London). Good 
connections chemists and stores. To sell new 
French toilet perfume. Popular price and imme- 
diate appeal. Big retail profit. Nationally adver- 
tised. Commission only. References essential. 
Box C 2127. 



SITUATIONS WANTED 
RETAIL HOME 

DISPENSING lady, experienced, seeks position 
in London with accommodation Please write: 
Mrs. Marsinck, 8 Harman Street, London, N.l. 

C 2147 



RETAIL (OVERSEAS) 

DENVER WILLIAMSON, International 
locum, Kineton, Warwickshire. Replaces Pro- 
prietors/Managers worldwide. Exper.ence home, 
France, Italy, South America, Africa. C 1987 



BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 



CALL US and reduce those stocks of 

superfluous ethicals. 
CALL US and save yourself from 

buying in bulk. 
CALL US and we will help you re- 
lease that tied-up capital 
" CALL-CHEM " at GIPsy Hill 3924 
and learn about this important new 
service for chemists. C2152 



HAVE YOUR PRODUCT MANUFACTURED IN THE 



CENTRAL AFRICAN FEDERATION 



CENTRAL AFRICAN PHARMACEUTICALS (PVT.) LTD. 

CHEMICAL & MANUFACTURING DIVISION 

can now accept contracts for the manufacture of: 
PHARMACEUTICALS • TOILET PREPARATIONS 
HOUSEHOLD COMMODITIES and ALLIED PRODUCTS 

in their Salisbury factory. 

Local Production will put your product in a strong position in 
this rapidly expanding market. 

Market Surveys and Efficient Distribution can also 
be effected by the Company's various marketing 
divisions, if required. 



DIRECTOR AVAILABLE, LONDON, FOR PERSONAL INTERVIEWS 14th MAY ONWARDS. 
Write Box 2279; Salisbury, Southern Rhodesia, or London address c/o Goode, Durrant & Murray Ltd., 
Durrant House, Chiswell Street, London, E.C.I. Phone: MONarch 4090 

C9035 



A Director of Potter & Birks Pty. Limited, Australia and New Zealand, 
will arrive in England on March 25, for the purpose of contacting firms 
who are interested in having the following type products manufactured 
and distributed in these countries : 

Pharmaceutical and Ethical lines, 
Tablets (excluding ampoules), 
Ointments, Liquids and Toiletries. 

Our factories are modern and their selling facilities cover all areas of 
both Australia and New Zealand, continuously calling on hospitals, 
chemists, department stores, etc. 

Kindly address enquiries : — • 

W. A. SPARROW & CO., LTD., 
4/7 CHISWELL STREET, 
LONDON, E.C.I, ENGLAND, 

who will be pleased to supply particulars of the various agencies now 
held, as we cannot accept representation for competitive agencies. 

We also specialise in chemists' sundries and novelties (for Australia 
only, at present) and are prepared to buy lines of interest on an exclu- 
sive selling basis. Please leave samples and prices with W. A. Sparrow 

& Co., Ltd. „ . „ 

C 9067 



♦ 



rHE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 
Supplement 



March 28, 1959 



Business Opportunities — Continued 

OPPORTUNITY occurs for Representative with 
connection Surrey, Sussex, Hants, to join 
wholesale house, sundries, view to taking con- 
trol. Capital required, £3,000. Box C2121. 



BUYER specialises in disposing of job lots of 
any lines appertaining to pharmacy. Any quan- 
tity considered. Prompt cash settlement. Willing 
to discuss adaptation of any line which is 
not quite suitable in its present state. Please 
send samples and full details to N. Morris, 
218 Walworth Road, S.E.17. Tel No.- ROD. 
7261. C 395 

WE WILL PURCHASE for cash a complete 
stock, a redundant line, including finished or 
partly finished goods, packing raw materials, 
etc. No quantity too large. Our representative 
will call anywhere. Write or telephone: — 
Lawrence Edwards & Co., Ltd., 6/7 Welling- 
ton Close, Ledbury Road, London, W.ll. 
Tel.: Bayswatcr 4020 and 7692 C 140 



MISCELLANEOUS 



ACADEMIC 
ELASTIC HOSIERY 

Academic Elastic Hosiery offers you a 
range of exclus.ve quality N.H.S. stock- 
ings that have a special appeal to dis- 
cerning customers for their fit and 
comfort. They build goodwill and create 
profitable and continuous repeat busi- 
ness in your pharmacy. Write for de- 
tails of Academic Surgical Hosiery, 
which will be sent with our terms and 
particulars of display material. 

ACADEMIC DEPOT, LTD., 
175 GOSWELL ROAD, 
LONDON, E.C.I 

C 9031 



IMMEDIATE ADVANCES 

£50 to £20,000 
WITHOUT SECURITY 

REGIONAL TRUST LTD. 

8 CLIFFORD STREET 
NEW BOND STREET. LONDON, W.l 

Phone: Regent 5983 & 2914 

C 3S3 



MISCELLANEOUS SALES 



DIOPHANE, 3,400 lb., in 645 reels substance 
300, Type MSAT. 2ft wide in reels diam. 8 in. 
(diam. core 1\ in.). Box C 9077. 



FOR YOUR FARMER CUSTOMERS 

" MEDIVET " 5-gram triple sulphon- 
amide tablets, retail a? 18s. 9d. box of 
20. Usual discount, carriage paid 
orders of i-dozen. 

Hodges & Moss, Ltd., 
Castle Gates, Shrewsbury 

C9090 



FOR SALE. Approx. 5,000 lbs. Aspirin B.P. 
Offers invited. Box C 9087. 



Growing Canadian Drug Company 
with over two thousand Contacts 
wishes to hear from Manufacturers 
of the following, 

Veterinary Products 

Pharmaceutical 

Specialties 

Cosmetics 

and Associated Items 

Drug Sundries 
Private Formulae 

If you have something New, Orig- 
inal or Exciting in the Drug Line, 
please get in touch with us. Box 
C 2153. 



WANTED 



WANTED 

SURPLUS CAMERAS, ENLARGERS. 
CINE CAMERAS & PROJECTORS. 
PHOTOGRAPHIC EQUIPMENT OF 
EVERY DESCRIPTION. SURPLUS 
AND OUTDATED FILM & PAPER, 
LARGE OR SMALL QUANTITIES. 
Phone, write or call: — 

SPEARS 

(Dept. D.), 14 Watling Street, Shudehill, 
Manchester. . 

Phone: Blackfriars 1916. 
Bankers: Midland Bank, Ltd. 

C438 



WANTED. Small steam distillation plant. De- 
tails and price required to Robert Blackie, 
Ltd., Pomeroy Street, London, S.E.14. New 
Cross 1122. C 9088. 



H 



ADVANCES WITH OR 
WITHOUT SECURITY 



s. 



FOR TERMS 
APPLY 



B 



R 



B 



U 



26 SACKVILLE ST.. 
PICCADILLY. 
LONDON, W.l . 

(Tel: REGmt 3123. 3995) 
Etlablithed 1922 



R. 



D. 



GLANDULAR POWDERS, Orchitic, Thymus. 
Suprarenal, Prostate, Ovarian, Pituitary Whole 
Gland, large or small quantities available at 
keenest prices. Box C 9089. 



DEVELOPING AND PRINTING 



C439 



QUALITY FIRST but QUALITY FAST 

and 

Guaranteed per return postal service 
GWENT PHOTOGRAPHIC SERVICE 

Snatchwood Works, Pontypoot, MON 
Telephone : Talywain 355 

C274 



FOR YOUR 'C&D' LIBRARY 

ESSENTIALS OF TREATMENT 

First Edition 

First appeared as articles in THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST, 1952 to 1955. Reprinted 
as bound volume in response to many requests. Gives information on the most modern trends 
in the treatment of diseases of the digestive tract, respiratory system, lungs, liver, kidneys, 
thyroid, heart, ear, eye and skin. A guide to measures against burns and scalds, allergies, 
infectious diseases, etc. 17s. 6d. 

Poaagt 9d. 

28 ESSEX STREET, STRAND, 

ChemisTand Druggist london .... w. c . 2 



Printed by Tim Haycock Press, Ltd., 
and published b> the Proprietors, Morgan Brothers (Pu« 



ate Street, Cambcrwcll. S.E.5. 
'Qdf^ D ' at ^ ^ ssex Street, Strand, london, W.C.2. 



58/24 



LIBRARY 



rch 28. 1959 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGCi IS I 



Exciting new line ibr gift 

and oeauty counters! ! 





# Heart shaped . . . for women to lose 
their hearts to! Perfumed Spun- gee is 
the most exciting, completely new line 
to be introduced in years. Impregnated with 
exotic flower fragrances which really last, and in 
a choice of pastel colours, Perfumed Spun. gee 
will be an immediate best seller. Promote it in 
your windows and in counter displays and tie-in 
with TV advertising! 



ANOTHER KING PRODUCT 



Heart shaped 

Perfumed — with 
exquisite flower 
fragrances 

Beautifully packaged 



To be advertised on TV 



Glamour is the key note of Perfumed 
Spun. gee's TV advertising cam- 
paign. So make glamorous displays 
yourself and profit by the exciting 
publicity for this wonderful new line. 



All enquiries to 

KING DEVELOPMENT CO. LTD., MORLEY HOUSE, 320 REGENT STREET, LONDON, W.I 

Telephone: LANgham 1158/9 



CHEMISTa^DRUGGIST 

MARCH 28 1959 



THE ETHICAL MEDICAL PREPARATION FOR 
THE TREATMENT OF ASTHMA 




Prescribed and recommended by the Medical Profession 
in Hospitals, Private Practice and Government 
Departments in all parts of the world to which it 

has been introduced. 



Tax free Dispensing Pack available. 



BRITISH FELSOL COMPANY 1 TD 



WIGTON HOUSE, 206-212 ST JOHN STREET, CLERKENWELL, LONDON, E.C.I. II 
^ Telephone. CLErkenwell. 5H62 Cablps. 'Felsol'. Smith. London jft]