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Full text of "History and directory of Kent County, Michigan, containing a history of each township, and the city of Grand Rapids; the name, location and postoffice address of all residents outside of the city; a list of postoffices in the county; a schedule of population; and other valuable statistics"

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HISTORY AND MKICTORY OF KENT COTOSTY. 



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HISTORY AJT» MRECTORY df K1NT OOtrtTTT. 




COLE & BRO., 

The oldest and most reliable 

BOOT &, SHOE HOUSE 

Xxx. tbe City. 

The Best of Cnstom-Made Work constantly on hand. 

No. 20 Canal St., 
GRAND RAPIDS, - - MICHIGAN. 

LA. MERRILL'S 

Gem Picture Gallery, 

Ma. m Canal St., 

tJust South of Z4/011 Street. Call and let the Pictures do the puffing. 

m GET THE BEST 

If €111 $1411 Till 

H. LEONARD & SON, Agents, 

OKtITA HAW 

No. 13 Monroe Street, 
GRAND RAPIDS, - - MICHIGAN. 

See AdverUsement on Page 151* 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY 



OF 



If COUNTY 



^^« * — — — ML * * 1 

MICHIGAN, 





CONTAINING A 



$org of £adt|o«jns%, and ft* |;^ of |rand fapids; 

The Name, Location and Postoffice Address of all 

Residents outside of the City ; a List of 

Postoffices in the County ; a 

Schedule of Population; 

AND OTHER VALUABLE STATISTICS. 



COMPILED AND PUBLISHED BY 

DILLENBACK & LEAVITT, 

County, History, Directory and J&ap Publishers. 



GRAND EAPIDS, MICH.: 

Daily Eagle Steam Piunting Hours. 

1S70. 



INTRODUCTION. 



The publishers of this work take pleasure in presenting to the citizens of 
Kent County a book that supplies a long-felt need experienced by business men, 
and which unites with its utility an amount of truly interesting historical mat- 
ter. At the same time, they pride themselves upon its originality of design and 
tasty execution — not being altogether blind, however, to its defects. Doubtless 
errors will be found, which, to some may seem almost inexcusable ; but where 
they occur the public may rest assured that they are not the result of careless- 
ness on the part of the publishers. It can be safely said that no book of the 
kind was ever published which was free of errors. In collating the historical 
matter great care was taken to draw the information from the most reliable sour- 
ces. As you glance througk the history of your township or city, or any town- 
ship with whose history you claim to be acquainted, do not hastily pro- 
nounce statements errors until you are confident that you are correct and the 
historian wrong ; but remember that some one equally as well informed as you, 
in regard to the general tacts, has stated otherwise. In a number of instances, 
tlie histories of particular townships have been wrjtten by residents, who have 
taken great pains to collect facts into the form in which they appear. To this 
diversity of authorship may be attributed the repetitions which occur in some of 
the sketches ; similar thoughts in regard to the sufferings and privations of the 
pioneers being in the minds of all. 

The publishers are well aware that a work of this kind, relating, as it does, 
facts with which purchasers are themselves acquainted, will meet with more or 
less criticism. Knowing this, they have left no stone unturned which would 
assist in making the book wl^at the prospectus represented it would be. Besides 
using every precaution to avoid errors in the matter promised, they have even 
added to its appearance and utility a very pretty map of the State, which was 
engraved expressly for this work. 

The book purports to contain the name of every man in the county (of twenty- 
one years of age and upwards) outside of Grand Kapids city, and of every widow 



8 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY Of KENT COTJKTY. 

owning real estate. The canvassers were instructed to call at every house, and 
to be as thorough as a census taker. 

The names were copied, compared, and arranged in every instance before they 
were placed in the hands of the printer ; and where a question arose in the mind 
as to the correct name, or mode of spelling, it was referred to the canvasser. 

Numerous advertisements have been inserted, but in no instance in a man- 
ner that can be made just cause of complaint. The history is complete in itself, 
and only here and there have advertisements been placed in the directory mat- 
ter, and even then uniformly on the right hand page. Further, the advertise- 
ments are from the best business firms in the county, and if carefully noted ? will 
prove of great value to purchasers. 

It has been customary to prepare Directories of cities exclusively, while there 
has been even greater need of Directories of counties and farming territory. The 
publishers intend to make this the first of a series ot like publications, in this and 
other States, and, while they hope to increase their facilities for preparing even 
better books than the present, they trust this will not only meet the present de- 
mand in this locality, but be preserved as a book containing an account of the 
sufferings, trials, and achievements of the pioneers of Kent county. 

The generous patronage and cordial co-operation of all classes of the com- 
munity have fully justified the publishers? reliance on their intelligence and public 
spirit ; and they are under obligations, in every town, to the township officers 
and old residents for historical and statistical information, always cheerfully 
furnished. 

Grand Rapids, Mich., Nor. 31, 1870. 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS. 



PAGE. 

Aikin N. J., physician — 139 

Albert & Krupp, groceries, etc 237 

Allyn C. B., dry goods, etc 245 

Antisdel A. R., proprietor Eagle Hotel 189 

Antisdel & Hawk, proprietors Rathbun House 211 

Antrim Mrs. E., milliner 169 

Ayers A. C, general store, (Casnovia) 177 

BallS. S., livery between 136 and 137 

Bank, City National 153 

Bank, First National 253 

Barker Mrs. S. A., proprietress National Hotel 173 

Barker Wm. P., dentist 145 

Barr & Liesveld, marble works 267 

Berkey Brothers & Gay, manufacturers of furniture Inside of first cover. 

Birge & Somers, groceries 229 

Bissonette Chas. A., manufacturer wagons 235 

Bole John, job printer 181 

Borden A. D. & Co., contractors, etc 213 

Budington C. O., Justice of the Peace 309 

Burchard C, clothing 163 

Butterworth & Lowe, iron works 149 

Button R., dentist 175 

ChildsF. L., books and engravings 313 

Cody D. D., grooeries between 136 and 137 

Cole & Bro., boots and shoes 4 

Comstock C. C, manufacturer lumber, etc 149 

Congdon W. H., quick lime 277 

CoxWm. <fcCo., Valley City File Works 311 

Crosby & Son, insurance and real estate agents. ... * 139 

Cross Mrs. Alma, oculist between 136 and 137 

Cummings E. H., physioian 309 

Currier & Putnam, booksellers and stationers 145 

Denison W. C, agricultural implements 157-187 

Deane G. S. <fc Son, agricultural implements 313 

Dewey H. E., insurance agent 179 

2 



10 HISTORY AltD DIRECTORY Of MITT COUNTY. 

DeVinney A. F., engraver 261 

Dikcman E. B., jeweler 165 

Earle J. E. & W. S., furnishing goods 235 

Eaton & Lyon, booksellers and stationers 159 

Eaton E. G., jeweler 227 

Emmer Joseph, manufacturer of buggies, &c 239 

Emmer Joseph, Jr., painting 309 

Escott E. B., druggist 195 

Farwell J. H., undertaker 189 

Fiebig & Rathman, manufacturers of carriages. 253 

Finckler Joseph, groceries 21 9 

Fitch Geo. 0., manufacturer of carriages 169 

Fox John 197 

Fox P. V., & P. N., general insurance agents 307 

Fretts G. L., sewing machines 251 

Giles John, groceries (Lowell) 16 

Grady & Smith, carpenters 277 

Hall L. A., confectionary . 245 

Hall Francillo, housebuilder 213 

Harrison Wm., manufacturer of lumber wagons. 143 

Hatch & Seymour, fine art emporium between 136 and 137 

Heath Fred, photographer. . . v . 259 

Herkner J. C, jeweler 227 

Herrman Louis, manufacturer of baskets and chairs 203 

Holden, Bales & Co., insurance agents 221 

Holmes E. S., dentist 269 

Hopkins D. S., architect 23fi 

Horton O. W., photographer, betwren 136 and 131 

Houseman & May, clothing x . ? 

Hovey Wm., superintendent and agent of Gr. R. Plaster Co 155 

Humphrey R. J., dentist 26 1 

Hunt & Hoyt, physicians and surgeons between 136 and 13' 

Husted N. P., proprietor Gr. River Nurseries (Lowell) 17' 

Innes Wm. P., insurance and real estate agent 20! 

Ives C. L., livery 1 26 

Johnson W. B., furniture, Lowell 18 

Kendall E. M., clothing 18 

Kennedy J. M., livery 21 

Ketcham S. G., confectionery 22 

Ketchum M. D., hotel between 136 and 11 

Kingsbury S. O., insurance and real estate agent 15 

Kopf John & Co., manufacturer of chairs, Lowell 19 

Kreekel <fe Schroder, clothing 3: 

Kruger C. J., & Co., mannfacturers of harness, etc 11 

Kustcrer P., groceries, &c. % 

Lankester and Sister, milliners 3 

Lapham Smith, proprietor of the American Houte. . , H 



HISTOBY AJTB D11IOTORT Qfr OHT OOITHTY. 11 

Latourette D. L., banker . . 175 

Leonard H. <fc Son, crockery dealers 4&151 

Loettgert F., rariety store 16 

Long A. B. & Sons, lumber 311 

Loomis & Brown, boots and shoes 169 

Manufacturing Company, G. R 219 

McConnell, Laoey & Co., manufacturers of Snow's Catarrh Remedy 317 

McKay & Son, old books .between 136 and 137 

McRaeMissC, cloak and dress-making 309 

Merrill L. A., photographer 4 

Merrill R. S., portrait painter 259 

Miller E. T., attorney between 136 and 137 

Mitchell A. J., music store 315 

Morgan H. & Son, insurance and real estate between 136 and 137 

Naegele J., proprietor Michigan House 311 

Nelson, Matter & Co., manufacturers of furniture . .<• 147 

Newborg D. L., dry goods 313 

Nichols & Naysmith, manufacturers of doors, sash, &c 237 

Osterle F. & Co., manufacturers of carriages, &c 269 

Organ Company, Empire 171 

Owen Geo. F., sewing machines 245 

Parks S. D., jeweler 147 

Patterson James, Valley City Paint Shop 311 

Peck H. B., manufacturer of Catarrh Specific 46 

Perry Bros., hats, caps, &c 153 

Plank James, bee-keeper, Section 8 Cannon 181 

Potter Charles J., attorney 311 

Powers W. H. & E. K., manufactuaers of doors, sash, etc 251 

Putnam Alfred, Justice of the Peace betwsen 136 and 137 

Pntnam Bros., & Co., confectioners 229 

Quintus J., insurance agent..... 181 

Ramsey J. M. and H. C between 136 and 137 

Reid & Smith, wall paper, <fco ..*.. 173 

Ridell & Co., painters 253 

RingelbergH., groceries, &c 197 

Rindge L. J. &Co., boots & shoes 161 

Ritter E. P., boot and shoemaker. between 136 and 137 

Robinson, Chapin & Co., grocers (Lowell) 177 

Robinson, Solomon & Co., manufacturers of lumber, &o 275 

Rose A. J., groceries 235 

Rose C. H., dentist on map. 

Rusche John A., shoemaker , 313 

Schenckelberg C, groceries 219 

Soheufler F. & Son., hardware 277 

Seeley J. M. & Co., perfumers (Detroit; 167 

Seymour & Waite, general store, mill creek, Kent county and Paris, Mecosta Co.... 183 

Shickell Peter C, groceries, Ac 189 

Shinkman & Jenka, insurance agents. 307 



12 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF K1NT COTJlfTY. 



Simonds J. C. , manufacturer of steain engines 269 

SinolairBros., & Co., insurance and real estate agents 243 

Skinner & Ward, insurance and war-claim agents 139 

Soule Geo. H., groceries 267 

Southwick & Wright, crockery, &c 205 

Smith, Mosely & Co., boots and shoes 161 

Smith S. C, groceries • 221 

Spring & Avery, dry goods 319 

Squier Milon L., groceries, &c, (Casnovia) 167 

Stang George, foundry 213 

Steketee & Kimm, druggists 318 

Stephenson H. C, physician (Lowell) 307 

Stuart Geo. M., druggist 239 

Swensberg & Rob bins, proprietors of Commercial College 141 

Thomas Edgar M., manufacturer of bed bottoms 147 

ThumWm., druggist 261 

Tooher John E., groceries 227 

Tompkins J. H., photographer 309 

Topping R. H., general store, (Casnovia) 183 

Tucker & Rogers, hardware, &c 173 

Tyler, Graham & Co., Yankee notions 197 

VanHouten & Co., painters, &o • between 136 and 137 

Voorheis & Co., groceries between 136 and 137 

Voigt & Herpolsheimer, dry goods, etc between 136 and 137 

Widoe John, merchant tailor 317 

Wilkins W. L. & Co., dry goods 157 

Williams U. B., groceries, &o 187 

Withey L. H. & Co., manufacturers of lumber, &c 211 

Wood Arthur, manufacturer of buggies, etc 159 

Woodruff E., physician 161 

Wykes, photographer , 187 



GENERAL INDEX. 

Ada History of, 20 

Algonia History of, ---- --22 

Alpine History of, ---------- 29 

Bowne History of, 38 

Business Directory ------ 305 

Byron, History of, 36 

Caledonia, History of---.- 40 

Cannon, History of - - 43 

Cascade, History of 46 

County officers, list of, 15 

Courtland, History of - • - 53 

Directory of Kent County, - 137 

Gaines, History of - 55 

Grand Rapids Township, History of, ----- - 58 

Grand Rapids city, History of - - - - - - - - - 114 

Grattan, History of---- 60 

Kent County, Sketch of 19 

Lowell, History of, -- 64 

Map of Michigan, -------- between 16 and 17 

Nelson, History of, ----------- 71 

Oakfield, History of 73 

Paris, History of 78 

Plainfield, History of - 82 

Population, Table of- - 17 

Postoffices, List of _._*_- 18 

Solon, History of-. 86 

Sparta, History of- 90 

Spencer, History of _.- 94 

State officers, List of 14 

Tyrone, History of 96 

Vergennes, History of 99 

Walker, History of 102 

Wyoming, History of 107 

/ 



STATE OFFICERS. 



Governor HENRY P. BALDWIN. 

Lieutenant Governor MORGAN BATES. 

Secretary of State DANIEL STRIKER. 

State Treasurer '. i VICTORY P. COLLIER. 

Auditor General WILLIAM HUMPHREY. 

Commissioner of Land Office CHAS. A. EDMONDS. 

Superintendent of Public Instruction ORAMEL HOSFORD. 

Attorney General DWIGHT MAY. 

Member of Board of Education WITTER J. BAXTER. 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 

State Senator BYRON D. BALL. 

Representative 1st District JULIUS HOUSEMAN. 

Representative 2d Distriot SAMUEL M. GARFIELD. 

Representative 3d District ASA P. FERRY. 

Representative 4th District NICHOLAS R. HILL. 

Sheriff JESSE F. WYCKOFF. 

Clerk DANIEL McNAUGHTON. 

Treasurer , GEORGE YOUNG, Jb. 

Register WILLIAM G. BECKWITH. 

Prosecuting Attorney ANDREW J. REEVES. 

Dircuit Court Commissioners OMAR H. SIMONDS, JAMES B. WILSON. 

Coroners JOHN BRADY, CHARLES G. HYDE. 

Surveyor ROBERT S. JACKSON. 



16 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 



I . L0ER8EVT 

Variety Store, 

16 CANAL STREET, GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

FANCY GOODS, WORSTED TOYS 

Baskets, Childrens' Wagons, Carts and Sleighs. 

Hoop Skirts & Corsets made to Order. 

JOHN GILES, 
Grocer, 

Lowell, - - Michigan. 

7-44. RE WARD GIV EN. 7-44 

All who have got that terrible Disease, CATARRH, will get a REWARD by 

procuring a bottle of 



CATARRH SPECIFIC, 

As it was never known to fail in any genuine case 6f Catarrh, and gives relief the 

first dose, causing no prostrating effect on the system. Sold by Druggists. 
7-44 LOA^ELL, MIOS. "7-4=4. 



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DMertback & Leavitt Coiwtv History, .Directory. <f Map Publishers Gfxund Rctpicts Mich Merchants Liih.Co. 

Special attention given to the preservation of the Natural Teeth. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed. 

Mo. 23 Canal Street, 

Near Cor. Canal and Lyon, 



GRANS RAPIBS. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



17 



^Population of Kent County. 

FIRST REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICT. 

Pop. 1870. 

City of Grand Rapids, 1st Ward 3,483 

" " " " 2d " 4,780 

" " " " 3d " 3,906 

" " " " 4th " 2,781 

" " " " 5th « 1,557 

16,507 

SECOND REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICT. 

Pop. 1860. 

Wyoming Township 1,237 1,787 

Paris " 1,314 1,543 

Cascade " 892 1,157 

Lowell <• ) 1,583 

" Village \ 1 » 201 1,503 

Bowne " 743 1,275 

Caledonia " 763 1,599 

Gaines « 870 1,205 

Byron " 1,039 1,328 

12,980 

THIRD REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICT. 

Alpine " 1,249 1,446 

Walker " 1,430 1,675 

Plainfield " 1,240 1,499 

Grand Rapids " 8,085* 1,650 

Cannon " 1,061 1,126 

Ada " 1,116 1,427 

Vergennes " 1,344 1,342 

10,165 

FOURTH REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICT. 

Grattan " 1,127 1,298 

Oakfield " 1,078 1,092 

Courtland •« 947 1,338 

Algoma « ) 1,377 

Rockford Village \ "" yyrf 582 

Sparta Township 939 1,668 

Tyrone « 172 730 

Solon « 393 911 

Nelson « 462 1,102 

Spencer " 580 

10,678 

Total 30,716 50,330 

♦City and Township. 
3 



18 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



tPost-offlces in Kent County. 

NAME. TOWNSHIP. 

Ada, - - - - - Ada. 

Alaska, - Caledonia. 
Alpine, -.__-_ Alpine. 

Alto, ------ Bowne. 

Alton, ----- Vergennes. 

Austerlitz, - - - - Plainfield. 

Belmont, ------ Plainfield. 

Bostwick Lake, . _ . Cannon. 

Bowne, - - - - - Bowne. 

Burch's Mills, ----- Algoma. 

Byron Center, - Byron. 

Caledonia, - Caledonia. 

Caledonia Station, - - ' - - Caledonia. 

Cannonsburg, ----- Cannon. 

Casnovia, - Tyrone. 

Cedar Springs, - Nelson. 

Cody's Mills, - Byron. 

Courtland Center, - Court land. 

Edgerton, ----- Algoma. 

Spencer Mills, - Spencer. 

Vergennes, - - - - - Vergennes. 

English ville, ----- Alpine. 

Fallassburg, ... Vergennes. 

Gainesville, - - - - Gaines. 

Grattan Center, ----- Grattan. 

Grand Rapids, ----- Grand Rapids City. 

Grandville, ------- Wyoming. 

Hammond, ------- Gaines. 

Harris Creek, - - - - - Bowne. 

Indian Creek, - - - - Walker. 

Kelloggville, - - . - Paris. 

Lisbon, - - - - - Sparta. 

Lowell, - - - - - Lowell. 

Mill Creek, - - Plainfield. 

Nelson, - - - Nelson. 

North Byron, ----- - Byron. 

Oakfield, ------ Oakfield. 

Pleasant, - - - Alpine. 

Rockford, - - - - Algoma. 

Sand Lake, ----- Nelson. 

Sparta Center, - - - - Sparta. 

Spencer Mills, ----- Spencer. 

Vergennes, - Vergennes. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 19 



COUNTY OF KENT. 

The county of Kent was organized in the year A. D. 1836. It was at that time 
very thinly populated, fifteen years only having elapsed since the first wh^te set- 
tler placed his foot upon its soil. Rix Robinson came in the year 1821, and re- 
mained several years almost entirely alone, trading with the Indians. In 1826, 
Uncle Louis Campau settled here, and from that time forward the county has 
been steadily settling up. 

The soil of Kent, considered as a whole, is not as good as that of some of its 
neighbors; however, it possesses some of the finest and most productive farms in 
the State. Some individual townships in the county possess as much good 
land as can be found anywhere within a limit of thirty-six square miles. But in 
the northern part of the county especially, there is much poor land, the timber 
being chiefly pine. 

Its railroad facilities within a few years have become quite good, and, we are 
happy to say, are still improving. The Detroit & Milwaukee Railroad passes 
through the entire county, from east to west, having stations at Grand Rapids, 
Lowell and Ada. The Kalamazoo Division of the Lake Shore & Michigan South- 
ern Railroad comes in from the south, passing through the townships of Byron 
and Wyoming, and has the following stations: Eagle Mills, Grandville, Scudder 
and Byron Center, with a northern terminus at Grand Rapids. 

The Grand Rapids & Indiana Railroad passes through the entire length of the 
county, from north to south, and has the following stations : Cedar Springs, 
Burchville, Edgerton, Rockford, Child's Mills, Whitney, North's Mills and Grand 
Rapids, thereby opening up the northern part of the county, whence come most 
of the lumber and logs in this section. This road has recently been completed 
between Fort Wayne and Grand Rapids. 

The Grand River Valley Division of the Michigan Central Railroad comes in 
from the south, and passes through the townships of Caledonia, Gaines and 
Paris, with a northern terminus at Grand Rapids. This road has the following 
stations: Hammond, Paris and Caledonia. 

The villages in the county are all small with the exception of Lowell and Rock- 
ford; the former having a population of 1503, and the latter 582. Both of these 
are thrifty, go ahead places, and are rapidly building up. 

Grand River enters the county on its east line, and meandering north-westerly 
and south-westerly, touches in its course eight townships and passes out a little 
south of a point directly opposite of the place of entrance. At the rapids, in 
the City of Grand Rapids, it furnishes an immense water power, which has been 
considerably improved. 

Thornapple River forms a junction with the Grand at the village of Ada, the 
Flat River at the village of Lowell, and the Rouge River at Austerlitz (formerly 
Plainfield.) 

This sketch being intended simply as an introduction, we will leave the more 
particular history of the county to be treated under the head of the several 
townships. 



20 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

ADA. 

Ada township is centrally located in the county ; being bounded on the north 
by Cannon, on the east by Vergennes, on the south by Cascade, and on the west 
by Grand Rapids. It was named, — it is said, — after a highly respected lady by 
the name of Ada Smith, who then resided in the township. 

Unfortunately the records of the township are not now in existence previously 
to the year 1835, which,4iowever, must have been soon after the date of its orga- 
nization. 

The township of Ada originally embraced a large tract of country, including 
several of what are now the adjacent towns. It was of Ada as it then existed, 
that Rix Robinson, Esq., was elected the first supervisor. The first entry upon 
the records, under date of 1835, is to the effect that Norman Smith was elected 
supervisor by one majority, he receiving in all thirty -two votes. 

Supposing that he had but one competitor, — as he probably had, — we estimate 
the whole number of votes sixty-three. Just think of it ! In an extent of terri- 
tory where there were at the last election at least one thousand votes polled, 
thirty-five years ago they could muster but sixty-three. Picture in your mind the 
sights of a " town meeting " during those times. Here they come, one by one, 
from the different points of the compass, hard-working, honest men. It is a 
gala day with them. They meet perhaps for the first time in months. They go 
early and stay late. They urge their brief political campaign in their homely 
way. They enjoy as well as perform their duty, and then part for the scenes of 
stern labor. Thus the times count themselves, each year bringing an increase in 
numbers, until fourth and fifth sub-divisions count more votes than the original 
united one. 

One of the most prominent of the early settlers was Rix Robinson, Esq., the 
first white man in the township, and one of the first in the country. For a long 
time he was engaged in the fur trade with the Indians on Grand River. Alone 
he traversed the forests, and " paddled his own canoe," surrounded with savages 
by nature, — and sometimes by deed, — but he remained unmolested by them. 
The spirit of the natives had already been somewhat subdued by the influence of 
Christianity, and itinerant missionaries were then laboring among them. A tribe 
of these Indians remained on sections six and seven of the present township of 
Ada, until about the year 1860 or '61, when they sold their lands, and removed 
to Pentwater. During the latter years of their residence on these lands, they 
cultivated the soil, built respectable dwellings, had well organized schools and 
comfortable churches. They were of the Roman Catholic faith. 

Mr. Robinson, or " Uncle Rix," as he is familiarly called, during his sojourn 
and life among the Indians, became quite attached to them ; so much so that he 
chose one of their daughters as his partner for life, with whom he now lives. 
They have but one son, and he is well known throughout Grand River Valley as an 
energetic business man. 

The life of the pioneer is fraught with toil, and peril, and actual suffering. It 
is pleasant for us to sit by the warm fire on a chilly night, and listen while the 
grandfather tells of the " dark days," as he once called them, in the history of 
his experience. We have often heard him repeat the story of the nights he 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 21 

spent in the woSds alone, far from any house; of fording streams in winter; of 

encounters with wolves and other animals ; of the poor log house with its stick 

chimney ; of sickness and death in the family, with no attending physician, and 

so on through the long lists. But we are not the only delighted one. What a 

change came over the countenance of the aged man as he recounted those scenes ! 

Ah! yes, he was "dreaming a dream of the olden time." All was not sorrow, 

hardship and suffering. It may have seemed to him at the time that it was 

nearly all " rainy weather ; " but as he now calls up their " shadowy forms," he 

discovers that 

" Taking the year all around * * * * 
There wasn't more night than day." 

Then we have passed through the valley of youth and middle age, and have 
ascended the hill of years, as we look back into the valley through which we 
have come, we shall discover many more scenes of real enjoyment than of dis- 
content. So it is : whatever may be his experience, wherever he may be, in 
country, town, or wilderness, with pure mind, and a laudable ambition, every 
individual has his share of the music of life. 

The experience of the pioneers of Ada, was similar to that of other townships ; 
they worked hard, they endured much, and they enjoyed much. They lived a 
noble life, although it was a life perhaps few of us would choose. They lived a 
noble life. I say, and did a good work. Every stroke of their pioneer axe sounded 
a note in the song of a " thousand years." 

Among the early settlers of Ada in addition to the one we have already 
mentioned may be named Edward Robinson, who settled in 1830, Torrey Smith, 
A. H. Riggs and Edward Pettis in 1836-7, Peter McLean, R. G. Chaffee, Heze- 
kiah Howell, E. McCormick, P. Fingleton, Gurden Chapel, John Findlay and J. 
8. Schenck, 1840 to 1845. 

The principal 

RIVERS 
in the township are the Grand and Thornapple. Grand River crosses the town- 
ship from the northwest to the southeast, and is navigable for small crafts. Be- 
fore the completion of the Detroit and Milwaukee Railroad, steamboats passed 
up the river as far as Ionia. 

Among the 

LAKES 
" Chase's" is the only one worthy of mention. It is located on sections 
two and eleven, and contains about one hundred and sixty acres. 

THE TIMBER 
is mostly oak. 

THE LAND 
being what is usually termed " oak openings." It is rolling, particularly on 
either side of Grand River, but becomes nearer level as it recedes from the 
river. 

THE SOIL 
is rather sandy, being well adapted to fruit culture. It is well suited also to the 
production of the different kinds of grain. 

The citizens of Kent County appreciate the value of good educational faculties. 



22 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

No township can be said to be an exception to this statement. The 

SCHOOL HOUSES 

of Ada are located and numbered as follows : School house No. 1 was erected in 
1858, at a cost of $600, on section thirty-four. Material, wood. School house 
No. 2 is located on section twenty, value, $800. Material, wood. School house 
No. 3 was erected in 1859. Material, wood. School house No. 4 (fractional 
Ada, Vergenues and Lowell,) was erected in 1852, at an expense of $200. Ma- 
terial, wood. School house No. 4 was erected in 1867, at an expense of $800 ; 
located on section twenty-three. Material, wood. School house No. 6 w T as 
erected in 1854, at a cost of $450 ; on section twelve. Material, wood. School 
house No. 8 was erected in 1856, at an expense of $800, on section five. School 
house No. 13 was erected in 1867 at an expense of $1,000, located on section ten. 
Material, wood. 

ADA VILLAGE 
was laid out into lots by Dalrymple & Dunn when the Detroit and Milwaukee 
Railroad was built, — about the year 1858 ; and although one or more additional 
plats have been made its growth seems to be quite slow. It is located on sections 
thirty-three and thirty-four, near the confluence of the Thornapple and Grand 
Rivers, ten miles, via the railroad, from the city of Grand Rapids. It pos- 
sesses a tolerably good water power, which, as yet, has been but slightly 
improved. Two good grist mills are situated on Thornapple River, and appear 
to be doing a good business. One of them is called the " Ada Mills." It was 
built in 1856, and cost about $15,000. The present proprietors are E. Bradfield 
& Sons. The other, called the " Kent County Mill of Ada," was built in 1865, 
at an expense of about $15,000. It is situated at the mouth of the Thornapple, 
River, and is owned and operated by E. Averill & Co. 

The Baptist Church, which, by the way, is the only church in the village, is a 
substantially built and well furnished brick structure. The village also contains 
a good school-house, two hotels, three dry goods stores, one drug store, two 
grocery stores, besides various blacksmith, butcher, cooper and shoemaker shops. 



ALSOMA. 

Algoma lies north of Plainfield, and is bounded on the north by Solon, east by 
Courtland, and west by Sparta. 

It was first settled by Smith Lapham, from Washtenaw T county, in 1843. He 
settled on the east side of Rouge River, in the southeast part of the township, 
where he now lives in the midst of the village of Rockford, (formerly called 
Laphamville.) 

He was soon followed by the Hunter Brothers and others, in this corner ; but 
none went farther north or west until 1845, when Joshua Briggs and family, 
from Yates county, New York, went on the east line of section twenty-five. 
John Davis and family, from Ingham county, went a mile farther north on the 
east line of section twenty-four, and Henry Helsel and Henry Shank and fam- 
ilies, from Ohio, went up the right bank of the river and settled on sectio a 
twenty-one. Mr. Helsel now has a fine farm of 280 acres, mostly improved ; Mr. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 23 

Briggs and bis sons have nice farms where they first settled ; and Mr. Davis now 
lives, on an enchanting spot, on the bank of a roaring brook, which leaps and 
tumbles over a dam close to his cabin door, two miles west of his old home. Mr. 
Shank is not now a resident of the township. 

Benj. Pettingill, and his son B. N. Pettingill, who came from Ingham county, 
and settled in the southeast corner of the township in 1845, are now living on a 
good farm on section twenty-six. The Longs and Turners who came in at an 
early day and settled in this vicinity, have good farms, with nice farm buildings, 
orchards, &c. 

Among other pioneers in this township we would mention the names of Henry 
Morningstar and sons, John Boyer, John Jacobs, Jacob Ipe and sons, John M. 
Smith, James Smith, James Barnes, Andrew House, Daniel Youngblood, James 
Mosher, and Messrs. Emmons, Hull, Bowers and Christy, all within the first ten 
years. Mr. Emmons was the first settler on the west line, north of the river. 
Mr. Morningstar and sons were the first to penetrate the forest and settle on the 
now thickly settled line, one and one.half miles east of, and parallel w r ith the west 
township line. They were soon followed by John Dome and Daniel Youngblood. 

They were then three and one-half miles from Mr. Helsel, who was their 
nearest neighbor. 

This is now one of the finest farming regions of the township. The farm of 
Mr. John Hull being the largest and one of the best. On the south line are some 
old, nice farms, f among the largest of which are those of Messrs. Jewell and Bennett. 

But we must return to the 

ORGANIZATION 
of the township under the present name — Algoma — which was given in honor of 
a steamer of that name then plying on Grand River, between Grand Rapids ^nd 
Grand Haven. 

Algoma was previously attached to Plainfield. The first annual township 
meeting of Algoma was held in 1849, at which time the following were elected 
as the 

FIRST TOWNSHIP OFFICERS : 

Supervisor — Smith Lapham ; Clerk — William Thornton ; Treasurer — Albert L. 
Pickett ; Justices — Morgan Allen, John H. Jacobs and John Hamilton. 

The township meetings have generally been held at the school house, one mile 
south of the center, known as the Helsel school house, or more commonly as the 
"Gougeburg" school house. By a majority vote of the electors the place of 
meeting was changed in 1869, to Rockford village. 

PRESENT TOWNSHIP OFFICERS. 
Supervisor — H. N. Stinson ; Clerk— C. E. Blakeley ; Treasurer— Richard Briggs ; 
Justices — Charles G. Hyde, Benj. W. Soule, William Powell, Oscar House. 
GENERAL DESCRIPTION. 
Pine was the prevailing timber of this township, although very much mixed 
with beech, maple, oak, etc. 

There are some small parcels of land timbered exclusively with beech and 
maple ; but they are small parcels, and few in number ; and are situated prin- 
cipally in the west and southwest part. 



24 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 

In the southeast part, near Rouge River, oak prevails ; but there are only 
a few farms in the township which are entirely free from pine stumps. The 
northeastern part is still almost an unbroken pine forest, with but little other 
timber. 

As may be inferred from the timber, there is a great variety of soil. We were 
told by one man that he could show as great a diversity of soil on twenty acres 
of his farm, as could be found in the State. There is scarcely any swampy land 
in the township. 

The south part along the river is very much broken, some of the hills being 
very steep, and nearly a hundred feet above the level of the land along the 
streams. This is chiefly a sandy or clay soil, intermixed with stone and gravel. 
In the remaining portions, those parts which are timbered with beech and 
maple are usually a fine, rich loam, and the parts which are exclusively timbered 
with pine are generally sandy. 

We commenced our general description by describing the timber, as that has 
oeen more valued in the past than has the soil ; but as the timber is being rapidly 
taken off, more interest is now taken in the latter. 

At first it was bought in large tracts by speculators, who generally hold it 
until the pine can be culled, and all of the best taken off; then it is sold out in 
smaller parcels to actual settlers. At one time, J. B. Chipman, of the State of 
New York, owned nearly a thousand acres of land, chiefly timbered with pine, 
in the northeast corner of the township. In 1854, his son, Walter Chipman, a 
lawyer by profession, came to look at the land, and, becoming enamored of 
"backwoods life in Michigan," settled here, where he still remains, a much 
esteemed citizen. 

Some years previous to coming hither, Mr. Chipman, being obliged, by a de- 
cline in his health, to give up his profession, joined a regiment of soldiers just 
starting out for our Western coast, and when he was discharged, remained as a 
pioneer in California. He was a member of the Convention which framed the 
Constitution of that State when it was admitted into the Union. Returning to 
New York, he spent some time with his friends, then went to Vermont, where 
he engaged in teaching for a year, and at last came here as before stated and 
became a pioneer in this township. I say pioneer, for although the south part 
had been settled eleven years, the north part was very new when he came. His 
brother J. B. Chipman, Jr., came on some years later. 

Andrew House, who was one of the first settlers of Plainfield, as well as 
Algoma, owned, at one time, 700 acres of pine land, in the east part of the town- 
ship. 

John Almy, of Grand Rapids, also owned several hundred acres in the north 
and northwest. These were among the largest tracts, although there were others 
who owned parcels of considerable size. 

STREAMS, LAKES, &C. 

Rouge River is the principal stream of Algoma. It flows in on section thirty, 
from Sparta ; thence southeast for a short distance ; then northeast, and lastly, 
south across nearly the whole width of the township, and out, on section thirty- 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 25 

six, into Plainfield. It is a good sized, rather swift-flowing stream, and furnishes 
plenty of power for the manufacturing now done, with much to spare. This 
stream is quite extensively used for running pine logs to the various mills be- 
low, on this and Grand River. 

Cedar Creek comes from Solon, enters the northeast corner of Algoma, flows 
southwest, to the northeast corner of section sixteen, where it unites with a 
branch called the Little Cedar, which also comes from the northeast, but further 
to the south. From here it flows south, and enters Rouge River on section 
twenty-two. This stream furnishes good water power in two places, which are 
used. It might be used in various other places. 

A spring creek, sometimes known as Wicked Creek, about five miles long, rises 
in the west part of Courtland, flows southeast, crossing sections thirteen and 
fourteen, and enters Rouge River on section twenty-three. This stream, though 
but a mere spring brook runs sufficiently swift to furnish power for twelve mills, 
all of which are within four miles of its mouth ; eight of them in this township, 
and four in Courtland. 

A fine spring brook, two and one half miles in length, rises in the western part 
of Courtland, flows across the farm of E. H. Penfield on section twenty -five, and 
empties into Rouge River. This stream is remarkable for its nearly uniform size 
throughout the whole length, and during the whole year. This uniformity is 
caused by its being so short that it is hardly affected by heavy rains. 

In the northwest part of this township, and on the adjoining sections in the 
southwest corner of Solon, and the northeast corner of Sparta, are a number of 
small lakes, among which are the following : 

Camp Lake is a long, narrow lake, nearly one mile in length, situated in the 
west part of Algoma, on sections seven and eighteen. Its outlet is a small 
stream which flows northwest through sections twelve and one of Sparta, and 
enters Rouge River. 

Long Lake is nearly as large, and lies in the southwesterly part of section 
thirty-one, in Solon. 

Round Lake is smaller, and lies on the line between Algoma and Solon. So 
also do the two Sand Lakes and Big Lake. 

On and near the line of Algoma and Sparta are the two Indian Lakes and 
Squaw Lake. The outlet of these latter lakes is a small stream, sometimes called 
Indian Creek, which flows across section one of Sparta, and enters Rouge River 
from the northeast. 

These lakes abound in small fish, such as bass, perch, etc., and an effort is being 
made to propagate pickerel in some of them. 

Marl or Bog-lime has been found on the south side of Big Lake, on the south 
line of section thirty-two, of Solon, much of which has been burned and used 
for building purposes in the surrounding country. 

The land in this vicinity is rolling, and is said to be good for the production 

of fruit. 

VILLAGES. 

Rockford is a flourishing little town of over 500 inhabitants. It is situated on 

the Rouge River five miles from its mouth, and thirteen miles from Grand Rapid*, 

4 



26 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

on the Grand Rapids and Indiana Railroad. It is in the extreme southeast 
corner of Algoma, on section thirty-six, and includes a small piece of section one 
of the township of Plainfield. The first settler here was Smith Lapham, pre- 
viously mentioned as the first settler of the township. He came in the year 1843, 
constructed a dam across the river, and erected the building now used by Mess- 
more & Watkins as a shingle mill. The mill on the west side of the stream, 
now used by the same firm, was erected the following year by Hunter Brothers. 

In the year 1845 a Postoffice was established here, with S. Lapham as the first 
Postmaster. The mail being carried by him from Plainfield, once a week, in his 
pockets, for want of a mail-bag. 

In the year 1848, White and Rathbun, of Grand Rapids, opened the first stock 
of store goods sold here. A grist mill was erected by Chase and Judson, in 
1852, which contains three run of stone, and is now owned and operated by 
Messmore and Watkins. 

The village was first platted in 1856, under the name of Laphamville, replatted 
in 1865, and the name changed to Rockford. It was regularly incorporated by 
an act of the Board of Supervisors, in June, of the year 1866. It now contains 
fifteen stores, one livery stable, two meat markets, three shoe shops, two brick 
yards, one foundry and two or three blacksmith and wagon shops, etc. Also a 
photograph gallery, a good supply of lawyers and doctors, and last, but not 
least, we noticed two or three good looking millinery establishments. There are 
two good frame hotels, one kept by H. N. Stinson, and the other by Smith Lap- 
ham ; a steam stave factory, owned by Barker and Hyde, which cuts about three 
million staves and one million heading per year ; a sash, blind and door factory, 
run by water power, and owned by McConnell and Addison, who do a good cus- 
tom business and ship some work north ; beside the grist mill and two saw mills 
of Messmore and Watkins, before mentioned, and which seem to be doing a good 
business. 

The Baptist Church is a good frame building, 36x60 feet in size. It was erected 
in 1858. 

The Methodist Episcopal Church is also a frame building, 24x60 feet in size, and 
was erected in 1865. 

The schools are on the graded system, consisting of three departments. This 
is the original district No. 1, of Algoma, and the frame building used for the 
school, years ago, still stands in the southern part of the village, on an eleva- 
tion, near the river. This building was about 25x35 feet in size, and when the 
village began to grow up, an addition, nearly the same size, was built on the 
rear. Subsequently the wood house was taken for a primary department, and 
now, these three failing to be sufficient to accommodate the u rising generation," 
a fine, large brick school house 60x63 feet in size, is being erected at a cost of 
$20,000. This building is on the original site, which has received some addi- 
tions and now includes nearly a whole block. 

Burchville, situated near the centre of section one, in the northeast corner of 
Algoma, is a thriving " lumber station," on the Grand Rapids and Indiana Rail- 
road, five and one-half miles from Rockford, and about eighteen from Grand 
Rapids. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF K!ENT COUNTY. 27 

It was platted in 1868, by John S. Weller, of Ann Arbor, and named in honor 
of his partner, Jefferson Burch, who came here and built the first steam saw mill 
in 1866. That mill was totally destroyed by fire in 1867, and a new one erected 
by Mr. Burch on the same site. This mill is now operated by M. L. Whitney 
and has a capacity for cutting 15,000 feet of lumber and 15,000 shingles per day. 
It now cuts only about half that amount for want of logs. 

In 1867, George R. Congdon & Co., erected a mill of about the same capacity, 

which was destroyed by fire in June, 1870, with about $100,000 worth of lumber. 

It was at that time owned by Isaac Newton & Co., of Grand Rapids, who are 

now erecting a new mill on the same ground. Newton & Co. have also a small, 

portable steam mill near by, which cuts 10,000 feet of lumber per day. 

Campbell & Stanton have a portable steam shingle mill about one hundred rods 
west of the station, which cutb 15,000 shingles per day. This mill has been run- 
ning since October, 1868. 

In 1868 a school district was organized here, and a school is kept in a board 
shanty, although money has once been raised and paid for building a school 
house. Finding that they were the victims of misplaced money as well as mis- 
placed confidence, the people have voted $910, and let the job to another man, 
who is to put up a good frame house this summer. It -will be 30x36 feet in size, 
with sixteen feet posts. 

The present population is probably about two hundred, including those on 
Congdon 's addition, recently platted, and which includes all of that part of the 
village lying south of the Little Cedar Creek. 

Edgerton is the name of a railroad station about halfway between Rockford 
and Burchville, and a little more than half a mile from the east line of Algoma. 
This place boasts a postoffice and two groceries. Andrew House is the present 
Postmaster. This is near the well known " Porter Hollow," which contains the 
stream that is noted for so many 

MILLS, 
which we now will proceed to describe : Going west from the station about a 
quarter of a mile, we come to the first saw mill built on this stream. It stands 
on the southwest corner of section thirteen, and was erected in 1846 by Newton 
Andrews. It is now run by Charles Fox, and cuts 4,000 feet of lumber or 12,000 
shingles per day. 

Half a mile southwest of this at the mouth of the creek, is the shingle mill of 
John S. Doty. This was built by Hiram Davis in 1866, and cuts 10,000 shingles 
per day. 

We will now retrace our steps and go up the creek nearly to the railroad, and 
about one quarter of a mile from the station, where we come to a grist mill and 
shingle mill, both of which are operated by David Munro. These mills were 
erected by Harvey Porter, in 1854, and are now owned by Jones and Johnson. 
These parties also own and operate a saw mill just above the railroad track, 
which was erected in 1854, by Seth Porter. The grist mill is principally used 
for custom business, although they ship some flour and feed north. The shingle 
mill cuts 10,000 shingles per day, and the lumber mill about 10,000 feet of lum- 
ber. Up the creek three-fourths of a mile farther, is a shingle mill, capable of 



28 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

cuttiDg 10,000 per day, owned and operated by Seth Porter. A few rods farther 
east, near the Courtland line are the grist mill and saw mill of Coon & Scar veil. 
These mills were erected by Dennis Porter in 1862. They are small custom mills ; 
the former making some flour and feed for sale. All of these mills except the 
second are on section thirteen, and that is on twenty-three. 

Two miles west of Edgerton, on the Cedar Creek, near the west line of section 
twenty-two, Jackson and George Coon are erecting a grist mill, on the site of a 
saw mill which was destroyed by fire some time ago. 

One and a half miles up this creek, on the north side of section sixteen, is the 
saw mill commonly known as the Morningstar Mill. This mill was erected in 
1852, by Norman Ackley, and refitted, and mostly rebuilt, in 1866, by Solomon 
and Caine, who now own and operate it. Its capacity is about 7,000 feet of lum- 
ber, or 14,000 shingles per day. 

About one and one-fourth miles farther up the Big Cedar, is a large, steam 
saw mill, which was erected in December, 1868, by Amnion Fox, who still 
owns and operates it, cutting 14,000 feet of lumber, or 15,000 shingles per day. 

There is a portable detached steam saw mill on the west side of section eleven, 
on the Little Cedar, erected in June, 1869, by McClure & Kidder. This mill 
cuts 10,000 feet of lumber, or 15,000 shingles per day. It will be better known 
as the " Hodag " mill. 

This name was given it, from the fact that an unknown and mysterious animal 
was heard, seen, and even fired at, in the woods near here, some years ago, and 
as no other name could be tound for it, it was called " Hodag," and when the 
mill was built, this was the name given to it by the people of Burchville. 

Jacob Long has a small water power saw mill on the northwest-quarter of sec- 
tion five, near the northwest corner of the township. This mill was built by 
Zimrod Burnham, in 1860, and cuts about 3,000 feet of lumber per day. 

SCHOOL HOUSES. 

District No. 2 (fractional with Courtland), organized in 1850, and a small 
frame house erected, which was used until 1866, when the present frame building 
was erected at a cost of $500, one half mile east of Edgerton station, on the 
township line. District No. 3 has a small, wooden frame house, erected in 1852. 
This school house is one mile south of the centre of the township, and half a 
mile north of the little collection of houses known as Gougeburg, where a dam 
was once built across Rouge River and a saw mill erected by C. C. Comstock, of 
Grand Rapids. The mill burned down, the proprietor failed, and so also did the 
village, which was springing up around the mill. District No. 4 has a small 
frame house, which was erected in 1854, on the center of section twenty-nine 
District No. 6 organized in 1852, and erected a small log house on the south side 
of section eight. In 1862 the site was changed to the north side of eight on 
account of a division of the district, and a block house erected the following 
year, which is still used. District No. 7 has a building called the " House" school 
house. It is a frame building, and was erected in 1863, on the south part of sec- 
tion twenty-three. District No. 8 organized in 1860, and a log house was erected 
near the north side of section sixteen, on the farm of Calvin Babcock. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 29 

The Good Templars are erecting a frame hall 24x36 feet in size, at the center of 
section twenty-nine. Estimated cost $300. 



ALPINE. 

Alpine is one of the west tier of townships, and is bounded on the north by 
Sparta, on the east by Plainfield, on the south by Walker, and on the west by the 
township of Wright, Ottawa county. It retains its original form and size, con- 
taining thirty-six square miles. 

The first settlers were Solomon Wright and family, who came from Wayne 
county, New York, in the year 1837, and located on the south line, near Indian 
Creek. The family consisted of the old gentleman and lady and five sons, Benja- 
min, Solomon, Noadiah, Andrew and Jeremiah, only one of whom remains in the 
township, and that is Solomon. The old people are both dead, one son lost his 
life in the recent war, one is living at Lowell, and two are in Walker. In the 
year 1840 John Coffee and Richmond Gooding came from Ohio, penetrated the 
forest nearly five miles beyond the Wright neighborhood and sett! ed on section 
nineteen, near the west line of the township. For years this was considered the 
"jumping off place," as they called it, there being no settlements north of them, 
and in fact no house in any direction nearer than three or four miles. About the 
same time Jacob Snyder — a German — settled on section thirty-five, and another 
"German by the name of John Platteeon section thirty-six, in the southeast corner 
of the township. A short time before this, Turner Hills and family came from 
Vermont, and located in the east part of the township, on section thirteen, where, 
for several years, they were the northernmost settlers. Mr. Hills died many years 
ago, but the widow and two sons remain in the township. 

Among other pioneers w r ho settled in various parts of the township, were Noel 
Hopkins, Baltas Schaffer, Peter Schlick, James Snowden, Sherman Pearsall, John 
B. Colton, A. B. Toms, Thompson Kasson, Joseph Hipler, John Ellis, Edward 
Wheeler, Hervey Wilder, Joseph Bullen, Moses Ramsdell, John J. Downer, 
Hiram Stevenson, Artemus Hilton, Henry S. Church, Charles Anderson, Francis 
Greenley, and the Boyds, Denisons, Meads, Brewers, Davenports, and Cordes, all of 
whom came before 1850; and most of them yet remain to enjoy the fruits of their 
early labors and sufferings. 

Many and varied were the privations endured by these early settlers. We who 
have never been pioneers cannot fully appreciate the sufferings, the trials, and 
hardships which were their lot. Think of a journey to Grand Rapids w T ith an ox 
team, over rough roads, with a grist for the mill; of a return in the night with its 
many perplexities, now and then losing the indistinct road, with a consequent 
delay of an half hour; of finding trees blown across the way, preventing further 
progress until they have been removed by the use of the ax, and so on through 
the list. 

Again imagine the loneliness of a family coming from a thickly settled part of 
the country, and making a home in the wilderness, with no actual neighbors; 
with no schools; with no churches; and in fact with no associations except those 
of their own fireside. Little time can be spared for social intercourse even at 



30 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

home. The round of duties consumes each day but the Sabbath, which is to 
them indeed a day of holy rest. 

We would not wish to be understood to intimate that there are no enjoyments 
connected with such a life, for downright satisfaction is always the result of 
manly toil. -Situated, as the pioneer is, in an unbroken forest, with every stroke 
of the ax, and with every effort made toward improvement, he seems to be hew- 
ing out a little world of his own. Every acre added to the cleared space adds 
more than its proportionate amount of pleasure to the soul of the laborer. He 
looks forward to the time when his broad acres shall be seen clothed with the 
rich yellow grain of a plenteous harvest. He walks by faith and not by sight. 
The " sweet bye and bye " is anticipated, and that is w 7 hat incites him to labor 
and to endure. 

Then again much pleasure is found in the little visits which they are occasion- 
ally favored with. That peculiar community of feeling which is the characteristic 
of persons in depressed circumstances, is enjoyed by pioneers, and early settlers, 
in an unusual degree. There is a mutual dependence of one upon another, felt 
by everybody ; and this never fails to beget a spirit of friendship between them. 

ORGANIZATION. 

Alpine was united with the township of Walker, until the year 1847. Its first 
independent township meeting was held at the School House in the southeast 
corner of the township, on the 5th day of April, 1847; which resulted in the 
election of the following named persons as officers: Supervisor, Edward Wheeler ; 
Clerk, C. D. Shenich; Treasurer, Casper Cordes ; Justices, Wm. II. Withey, John 
Coffee, John Colton, and John Tuxbury. The next annual meeting was held at 
the house of Edward Wheeler, near the center of the township. Soon after this a 
small log School House was erected on the corner of Mr. Wheeler's farm, one-half 
mile east of the center, and was used as a place of holding township meetings 
until about the year 1860, when a nice, frame, Town Hall building was erected on 
the northeast corner of section twenty-one. 

THE PRESENT OFFICERS 
of Alpine are Supervisor, Isaac Haynes; Clerk, Hanson Rogers; Treasurer, 
Charles Dole; Justices, John Coffee, Warren Bailey, Charles Waterman, and 

Hollis R. Hills. 

GENERAL DESCRIPTION. 

Alpine — which is said to have derived its name from the supposition of many 
of the early settlers, who were near the streams, and in the eastern part of the 
township, that it was chiefly timbered w r ith pine — is very different from what its 
name would indicate to a stranger. There was, originally, considerable pine 
along the larger streams, and in the northeasterly corner of the township. At one 
time, seven saw mills were situated on Mill Creek, and were doing a brisk busi- 
ness; but now there is hardly enough pine left to sustain three. 

The source of Mill Creek is Cranberry Lake, which is situated on the line be- 
tween Kent and Ottawa counties, extending into section six of Alpine. From 
there to Pickerel Lake on section ten Mill Creek is but a small rivulet. We 
mention this as the main stream ; however there is another branch about the 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 31 

same size, which comes in from Sparta, and unites with the former near the north 
line of section nine. From Pickerel Lake to its mouth it is fed by several small 
streams, one of which comes from Downer Lake on the southeast quarter of sec- 
tion ten. The main stream passes about one and one-half miles north of the 
center of the township, thence southeasterly until it unites with Grand River in 
the southwest corner of Plaintield. For a distance of five or six miles from its 
mouth, the water power is sufficiently good for manufacturing purposes. Along 
this stream is a series of small swamps, extending nearly the whole width of the 
township from east to west, and bordered on either side by clay bluffs, rising in 
some places to a height of sixty or seventy feet. 

North of this, and extending into Sparta, is a ridge of high, rolling, timbered 
land, which is as good as can be found in the county, for farming purposes, fruit 
growing, etc. On the south is a similar ridge, which divides Mill Creek on one 
side from Indian and Sand Creeks on the other. 

One branch of Indian Creek rises near the center of the township, and the other 
in the western part. These branches unite in the north part of section twenty- 
eight; thence the stream flows south into Walker, crossing the south line of 
Alpine near the center. 

One branch of Sand Creek rises in the Western part of Alpine; and flows south 
into Walker, and thence west into Ottawa county. Another branch of the same 
stream has source in a small lake covering about ten acres, situated on the line 
between sections twenty-eight and twenty-nine. 

Minnie or New Boston Lake is situated on the east line of section twelve, and 
extends east into Plainfield. The lake and surrounding swamp cover about forty 
acres. A number of years ago a saw mill was erected on the north side of this 
lake, and an effort was made to build up a burgh, which was christened New 
Boston ; but like many other enterprises of a like nature it never went much 
beyond the paper plat. 

THE SOIL 

of the beach and maple timbered portions of Alpine — which comprise about two- 
thirds of the township — is generally clay or loam. Indeed Alpine is a township 
of good land, well adapted to the production of both grain and fruit. The good 
looking orchards, and the loads of nice apples, peaches, plums, pears, etc., as well 
as the excellent yields of wheat and other grain, speak for themselves. The soil 
of the pine timbered portions is sandy, but it grows fair crops when well culti- 
vated and improved. Among the largest and best farms in the township, are 
those of Solomon Wright, A. Downer, Mrs. James Snowden, Judson Buck, L. N. 
Dennison, David Herrick, Richmond Gooding, and Eberhard Cordes, each of 
which comprises two hundred acres or more. 

MILLS AND MANUFACTURING ESTABLISHMENTS. 

Colton's Saw Mill, built in the year 1845 by Colton and Phillips, situated on 

the south side of section thirteen, is now owned and operated by Gideon Colton. 

This mill is capable of cutting nearly a million feet of lumber per year ; but on 

account of the scarcity of pine does a comparatively small business. 

The Saw Mill situated on the northeast corner of section twenty-five, commonly 



32 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

called Withey's Mill, is manufacturing large quantities of shingles and some lum- 
ber. It is owned and operated by Aaron Leland. 

Stonehouse's Steam Saw Mill, situated on the northeast corner of section twen- 
ty-five, was erected by John Stonehouse in the year 1868, on the site of an old 
w r ater power mill owned by him, and which was destroyed by fire in the year 
1867. The new mill is turning out large quantities of shingles, also some lumber 
and lath. 

Ellis & Brown's Grist Mill, situated on section thirteen, on Mill Creek, is doing 
a good custom business. 

The Wolverine Pump Works, S. 1ST. Edie, Proprietor, are situated on section 
thirty-six, one-half mile northwesterly of Mill Creek Post-office. This establish- 
ment w r as erected in the year 1868. It is located on a small branch of Mill Creek, 
whose waters give it motive power. The shop is furnished with facilities for manu- 
facturing five thousand pumps per annum. 

Orrin Gee owns and operates a small Brick Yard on the south side of section 
thirty-one. 

There is a water power Cider Mill situated on Mill Creek, owned and operated by 
Gideon Colton, which is wo rthy of notice. The mill is so built on the bluff at the 
side of the stream, that the apples can be unloaded from the wagon into the hop- 
per at the top, where they are ground, below which they are pressed, then bar- 
reled and loaded into wagons at the foot of the bluff without necessitating the 
lifting of a pound. 

SCHOOL HOUSES. 

District No. 1 is in the center of the township. Its first School House was built 
on the farm of Edward Wheeler, on the north side of section twenty-two. The 
present School Building was erected in the year 1861, and is a substantial frame 
structure. It stands on the south side of section fifteen, one-half mile east of the 
Town Hall. 

District No. 2 has an old wooden building, commonly known as the Coon 
School House. 

District No. 3 (fractional with Wright,) has a nice, brick building situate on 
the north side of section thirty. It was erected in 1868 at an expense of $1,000. 

District No. 4 (fractional with Sparta,) has a small frame house, known as 
Rouse School House, situated on the north line of section three. 

District No. 6 (fractional with Sparta), has a school house in the northeast 
corner of section five. It was erected in the year 1864, at a cost of about $1200. 

The school house in District No. 7 (fractional with Plainfield), known as the 
Colton school house, situated on the south side of section thirteen, is a neat 
frame structure. It was erected in the year 1869, at an expense of $950. 

District No. 8 has a small, frame house, known as the Pearsall school house, 
which was erected in 1851, on the northwest corner of section twenty-eight. 

District No. 9 (fractional with Plainfield), has a very old building, known as 
the Withey school house, situated on the northeast corner of section thirty-six. 

District No. 10 (fractional with Wright), has a small frame house, known as 
the Boyd school house, standing on the southwest corner of section eight. It 
was erected in the year 1856. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 33 

District No. fl has a small, wooden building, which was erected in the year 
1855, and used until the year 1869, when the Roman Catholics of the district, 
with the aid of those of surrounding districts, erected a building of their own at 
at a cost of $1500, in which they now have a German-English school. The de- 
serted building is situated on the south side of section twenty six, and the new 
one at the center. 

District No. 13 (fractional with Walker), has a nice frame building, known as 
the Johnson school house. It was erected in the year 1859, and stands on the 
south side of section thirty-four. 

District No. 14 (fractional with Sparta), has a small, frame building, which was 
erected in the year 1852, and is known as the English ville school house. It is 
located on the north side of section one. 

District No. 15 (fractional with Walker), has a small, frame building, known as 
the Monroe school house. 

CHURCHES. 

The Alpine and Walker Baptist Church is a good frame building, 36x56 feet in 
size. It was erected in the year 1859 on the south side of section thirty-three, at 
a cost of probably $2000. 

The Roman Catholic Church, situated on the north side of section thirty-four, 
was erected in the year 1849, at a cost of about $1500. It is a frame structure 
26x46 feet in size. 

HOTELS. 

The Alpine House, which was erected in the year 1867 by M. Crill, is a large, 
commodious, frame building, situated on the south side of section thirteen on 
the Sparta Center road. This is located in the midst of a little cluster of houses, 
sometimes called Coltonville. They have a postoffice known as' Alpine, also two 
or three shops, and not far distant on the same section, are the grist and saw 
mills heretofore described. The "Brick Inn," erected by Joseph Bettes, in the 
year 1862, on the site of the old " Log Inn," is now owned and kept by Wash- 
ington Heath. It is located in the south part of section thirty, on the Newaygo 
State road. 



BOWNE. 

Bowne is the southeastern township of Kent County. It is bounded on the 
north by Lowell, on the east by Campbell, Ionia county, on the south by Irving, 
Barry county, and west by Caledonia. The surface of the township is rolling in 
the south part, the western part is mostly timbered openings, while the eastern 
part is beech and maple land, and is rather level. It is all rich and excellent soil, 
and well adapted to all kinds of agricultural pursuits. And, although compara- 
tively new, is fast being developed into fine farms. It is watered by the Cold- 
water, or Little Thornapple, which enters the township on its eastern boundary 
on section thirty-six, and flows in a westerly direction through the township, 
leaving its western boundary on section thirty-one. This is a very rapid stream 
and would afford five or six mill sites within the limits of this township, only 
two of which are improved. One on lection twenty-nine, occupied by Patter- 
5 



34 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

son's saw mill, and one on section thirty-six, occupied by Richardson's saw mill. 
In the western part of the township is a small stream flowing from the north, 
called Harris Creek, on which Hon. A. D. Thomas has a grist mill with two run 
of stone, driven by an overshot wheel with a fall of thirty feet. In the eastern 
part of the township is another small stream called Duck Creek, which affords 
in the northeast corner of the township water power for a saw mill, owned by 
Jaspar Kuykendall. 

In 1836, Mr. Jonathan Thomas, of Ovid, New York, entered a large tract of 
land in the southwestern portion of this township, and, in 1837 came on to im- 
prove it, bringing with him Mr. Frederick Thomson and family, who still reside 
in Bown'e, Mr. Israel Graves and family, and Mr. William Wooley and family. 
They came by water to Toledo, and thence to their destination with ox teams, 
making the trip from Toledo in about two weeks. They proceeded to build houses 
and clear up the farm now owned by A. D. Thomas. The first house they built, 
and the first within the town, is still standing, and is preserved by Mr. A. D. 
Thomas as a relic of the past and as a contrast with the present. It is of logs, 
about twelve by fourteen feet square, without any chamber, and with only one 
door and one window and a " shake " roof. Near this Mr. Thomas built two 
other houses and a small log building for an office for himself. Mr. Thomas was 
taken sick soon after he arrived, and was sick most of the time until the next 
winter, when his son-in-law Mr. John Harris came, and they fixed a bed 5n a 
sleigh and he started for his home in New York. They made the whole distance 
with a sleigh, dragging through northern Ohio in the slush and mud. During 
the first summer, when they got out of provisions, Mr. Thomas, although quite 
ill at the time, had his bed fixed in a wagon, and taking his whip started his ox 
team for Kalamazoo. He was obliged to go a few miles beyond there and buy 
wheat, bring it back to Kalamazoo and have it ground. Mrs. Thomson says there 
were a great many Indians on the Coldwater when they moved there. They 
found them good neighbors when they were sober, but when they could get 
" fire water" they were quarrelsome, and occasioned trouble at times. One came 
to their house one day when Mr. Thomson was away from home, and sat down in 
the rocking chair before the fire and rocked himself over into the fire-place, she 
pulled him out of the fire and he became enraged and attempted to stab her. 
But when she picked up an axe, and told him she would kill him if he did not 
leave, he beat a retreat. Another time, a lot of Indians came up on their ponies, 
when the men were gone, and ordered Mrs. Wooley to get them something to 
eat. She ran to her door and called to Mrs. Thomson, who went over, she says, 
as brave as could be, and talked to them. The old chief ordered her to go back 
to her wigwam and get him something to eat. She obeyed, trembling with fear 
all the time, and got the best dinner she could under the circumstances, setting 
her table with the nicest spread and dishes she had. The chief ate his meal 
alone at her house and seemed much pleased, told her she was a " brave squaw," 
and that they would not harm them then, but after a certain number of moons 
they were going to kill all of the whites in the country. The other families 
that came with them soon became discouraged and went back, and they were left 
alone, seven miles at first, from any white neighbors. One time Mrs. Thomson 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 35 

remained alone eight days. Mr. Thomson went to Kalamazoo to mill, and while 
there his oxen strayed away, and before he could find them and get home, eight 
days passed by. She remained at home until nearly noon the last day, when the 
suspense became so great she could not bear it any longer, and she started, on 
foot, for the nearest neighbor's, "Leonard's," seven miles distant. After proceed- 
ing about half way she met a white man. He was very much surprised at meet- 
ing a woman under such circumstances, and inquired of her where she was going. 
She told him, and inquired if he had seen or heard of her husband. He told her 
of his losing his cattle, and that he was on the road and would be along before 
night, and as it was very warm advised her to either go back or wait until her 
husband came along, and when she told him " No," she would never stop until 
she had seen her husband, he said that he was a bachelor, but if he could find a 
woman who would endure as much and as bravely for him he should certainly 
marry. They used to see many wolves and bears, but never felt much fear of 
them. For some years they went to " Scale's Prairie" to meeting, and afterward, 
when there got to be population enough so that preachers used to come among 
them, Mrs. Thomson says she used frequently to entertain three or four at a time in 
their little log shanty, twelve by fourteen feet square. 

In the spring of 1838 Messrs. Malcolm and John McNaughton commenced 
" breaking " on section twenty. They broke up forty acres that year and put it 
into wheat. In the fall of 1838 Messrs. Roswell Tyler, Norman Foster and J. G. 
Beach settled at the centre of Bowne. They came from Detroit with teams, via 
Gull Prairie, and were about ten days on the road. Mr. Tyler and another man 
came through from Jackson on foot, following what wag called the Clinton Trail. 
At this time there were no settlements nearer on the north than Ada and Lowell. 
Among the other early settlers whose names we have been able to get, we find 
James H. Truax, Jared Miller, William Stewart, Daniel 0. McVean, Abraham 
Lowe, and Messrs White and Cobb, who settled at diiferent times ranging from 
1840 to 1845. 

SCHOOL HOUSES. 

There are eight school houses in Bowne, all frame buildings, situated on sections 
29, 28, 24, 12, 7, 4, 22 and 20. Bowne is well supplied with 

POSTOFFICES. 

Containing three, viz : Bowne, Alto, and Harris Creek. The Bowne postoffice, 
James C. Johnson, P. M., is located at Bowne Center. Alto postoffice is situated 
near the centre of section four, and kept by David M. Skidmore. Harris Creek 
postoffice, Wilbur S. March, P. M., is on the southwest part of section twenty- 
nine, near Thomas' Mills. 

LAKES. 

Foster Lake, on section 24, is a fine sheet of water about a quarter of a mile in 
length. On the northwest corner of section 23, near the residence of Stephen 
Johnson, is a small lake called Putnam Lake. A small lake near the centre of 
section 10, is known as Number Ten Lake. Campbell Lake is a handsome lake, 
about half a mile in length, on section 19. In the north part of the township 
are several large swamps, interspersed with small lakes or ponds; one range lying 
on sections 1, 2, 3, and 4, and one lying on sections 5 and 8. 



36 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

ORGANIZATION. 

The township of Bowne was organized in the year 1848, by the election of the 
following named gentlemen as the 

FIRST TOWNSHIP OFFICERS: 

Supervisor — Roswell C.Tyler; Clerk — Daniel C. McVean ; Treasurer — Justus 
G. Beach ; Justices of the Peace — Jared Miller, Norman Foster ; Assessors — 
Abijah Poole. John A. Campbell; Commissioners of Highways — Loren B. Tyler, 
James H. Truax, Asa. R. Tyler. School Inspectors — Jared Miller, William Gib- 
son. Overseers of the Poor — Roswell F. Tyler, John Underwood. Constables — 
Salmon E. Piatt, Henry C. Foster. 

TOWNSHIP OFFICERS IN 1870. 

Supervisor — Abner D. Thomas. Clerk — Abel Ford. Treasurer — James M. 
Nash. Justices of the Peace — Stephen Johnson, Benjamin J. Lee, Levi Stone, 
Henry D. Francisco. Commissioners of Highways — Loren B. Tyler, Henry B. 
Francisco, William H. Stone. Constable — Oliver A. Stone. 



BYRON. 

The township of Byron is situated in the extreme southwestern part of Kent 
county, with Wyoming on the north, Gaines on the east, Dorr, Allegan county, 
on the south, and Jamestown, Ottawa county, on the west. 

The surface of it is rolling, being covered with gently rolling swells and small 
knolls, with the exception of a swamp which commences on section thirteen and 
extends in a southwesterly direction into Allegan county. This swamp varies 
from eighty rods to one mile in breadth, and is mostly timbered with tamarack 
and cedar. The extreme southwestern part of the township is somewhat broken, 
but not enough so to injure its value for farming purposes. The soil varies from 
argillaceous to sandy ; but is what is generally known to farmers as either clayey 
or sandy loam. The surface of some of the creek bottoms is underlaid with marl 
or " bog lime," while the " big swamp " is a bed of muck, in many places of 
several feet in thickness. On section twenty-one, on the farm of S. S. Towner, is 
a small swamp timbered with tamarack, through which the track of the northern 
branch of the Lake Shore and Michigan Southern Railroad passes, which has 
several times sunk so as to engulf the road bed. This swamp is probably the site 
of a lake which has become covered with a coating of vegetable matter of suffi- 
cient thickness to support trees of from fifty to sixty feet in height. 

This township is composed of what is known as " timbered lands," comprising 
within its limits nearly every variety of trees known in this climate, viz . the Oak, 
Elm, Basswood, Whitewood, Sugar and Soft or White Maple, Blackwalnut, Butter- 
nut, Sycamore, Pepperage, Beech, White and Black Ash, Hickory and Bitter Wal- 
nut, Pine, Cedar and Tamarack. And in some very favored localities a few Hack- 
berry trees are to be found. Of shrubs nearly all that flourish in this State are 
found, and in the rich hollows of the heavy timbered lands the Paw Paw flourishes 
to a considerable extent. 

Byron is quite well watered by Buck and Rush Creeks, and the springs and 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 37 

♦ 
numerous small streams that form these creeks. One branch of Buck Creek rises 
in the extreme southeastern corner of the township, flows a northwesterly direc- 
tion for some distance, and then north by east until it leaves the town on its 
northern limits at the center line of section one. Another branch rises in Dorr, 
Allegan county, and flows northeasterly through the " big swamp " until it forms 
a junction with the main stream. 

About the center of section twenty-six is a small lake called " Mud Lake." 
Rush Creek rises near the center of the township and flows in a northwesterly 
direction, leaving Byron very near its nort hwestern limits. 

Go back with me reader for a space of thirty -four years, to the summer of 1836. 
Byron was then an unbroken wilderness. The ruthless hand of the w T hite man, 
armed with that terribly destructive weapon, the axe, had never been laid on 
natures beautiful forest that crowned the hills and shaded the vales. As the God 
of nature created it so the grand old forest stood. But the axe, the Pioneer's 
great weapon, as honored as his rifle, was soon destined to be heard in its depths. 
During the summer of this year Mr. Nathan Boynton located a farm on section 
five, and selected a place to build a house on a little knoll near the banks of Rush 
Creek. Mr. Boynton returned to Grandville and was taken sick, but in August 
or September sent his brothers, Messrs, William and Jerry Boynton to build a 
bouse for him. All the guide they had was the section line. This they followed 
until they came to the line between the present townships of Byron and Wyom- 
ing, where they, not knowing that there was a variation in the section lines of 
the different ranges of townships, lost the line and were sometime finding the 
place Nathan had selected for his dwelling. Having found the spot they went at 
work to erect a house. Listen reader while we give you the description Mr. 
William Boynton gave us. It was built of small logs, such as they could carry 
and put up, the roof was of small basswood, split in two parts and gutters cut, 
with an ax, in the flat side. One tier of these was laid with the flat side up and 
the other with the flat side down, so that the outside edge of the upper tier fitted 
into the gutter of the lower. The floor and door of the house were made of plank, 
or as woodsmen usually call them " puncheons," split from basswood trees. The 
fire place was built of clay, which Mr. Boynton says he mixed by treading with 
his bare feet, and was built up with small twigs ; while the chimney was built of 
split sticks laid up in the same kind of mortar. This fireplace and chimney were 
used, and did good service for a goodly number of years. Such was the first 
house erected in the township of Byron. 

Messrs. Jerry and William Boynton soon located farms on sections nine and 
eight, respectively, and commenced improving their present homesteads, which 
by their skill and energy they have rendered both attractive and productive. In 
1837 Mr. John Harmon settled on section nine. During the same year Mr. Har- 
mon Kellogg settled on section three, and Mr. James B. Jewell on section nine. 
We cannot find that any one settled in the township in 1838 except Mr. Ella 
Judson, who during this year settled on section eight. Mr. Judson says that 
when he built his log house he had to go a distance of four miles for men to help 
" raise" and only had eight men at that. In 1839 Mr. Larkin Ball settled on 
section twenty, at which time he was the only man south of the center of the 



88 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

township. Soon after, Peter Goldin settled on the same section. Mr. William 
Boynton says that four of them cut the logs, carried them, and raised Mr. Goldin's 
house. This house was standing as late as 1859. During this year Mr. Eli Cros- 
sett settled on section seventeen ; also Mr. Amelek Taylor on the same section. 
Mr. Alden Coburn on section seven, and Mr. Benjamin Robinson on section six. 
During 1840 there was but one new settler in the town, Mr. William Olmstead, 
who settled on section eight. 1841 went by without any augmentation of the 
numbers of this sturdy band of pioneers. In 1842 Samuel Hubbel settled on sec- 
tion twenty-eight, Joseph Gallup on section thirty-two, and Henry A. Vannest on 
section five. Mr. William Boynton says that when they " raised " either Mr. 
Gallup's or Mr. HubbePs house, he has forgotten which, they did not get it up 
the first day, and it was so far to go home that they stayed and camped out over 
night, and finished " raising " the next day. And all they had for supper and 
breakfast was roast potatoes. 

During the year 1843 Mr. Fox was the only man who settled in the "South 
Woods." Oliver Harris settled on section fourteen about this time, but we have 
not been able to fix the exact date. 

During 1844 Mr. Ezekiel Cook settled on section thirty-five, Mr. Tuft on sec- 
tion twenty-three, and Messrs. E. R. Ide and James K. McKenney on section 
twenty. 

Mrs. Cook tells us that when they moved into the woods they had no neighbors 
nearer than four miles, they being the first to settle in the southeast part of the 
township. And their nearest Post-office was at Grand Rapids, a distance of four- 
teen miles through an unbroken wilderness. At the time Mr. Kenney moved on 
his place there was no road from there to Grand ville except as he followed the 
trails that wound around through the woods. Mrs. McKenney says that they 
moved into their house the 19th day of November, 1844, and that there were 
neither doors nor windows in the house, and no floor below. They moved into 
the loft or chamber, and the next day Mr. McKenney was taken sick and was 
confined to his bed for two weeks. And before he was well enough to build a fire- 
place and chimney there was two feet of snow. And that during all this time she 
had to do all of her cooking out of doors by a log fire. Mrs. Tuft says that they 
moved on their place the last day of December, 1843, and all the signs of a house 
they had was a small sled load of lumber. Mr. McKenney says that for some 
time he used to carry his " grist " to Jerry Boynton's, a distance of three miles, 
on his shoulders, get him to take it to Grand Rapids to mill, and when he re- 
turned, carry it home again. 

During the year 1845 Messrs. Corking Barney, Clark S. Wilson and William 
Davidson settled within the limits of the township. Among the early settlers 
whose names we have been able to procure are Josiah R. Holden, Bradley 
Weaver, Daniel Prindle, Carlos Weaver and Prentice Weaver, who settled in Byron 
from 1846 to 1849. During 1850 and '51 Messrs. Eli Young and James M. Barney 
settled on section thirty-two. About this time is famous among the old set- 
tlers as the " wolf year." Mr. Young says that he killed one within four rods of 
his door, .with his dog and corn cutter. Mr. William Boynton says that frequently, 
before this time, however, when he was obliged to work at Grandville to get pro- 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY Off KENT COUNTY. 39 

vision for the support of his family, he would work all day, get the proceeds of 
labor in provisions, and at dark start for home, a distance of about five miles, 
through the woods, while the wolves were howling all around him and sometimes 
coming almost within reach of the good, stout cudgel which he carried. Mr. 
James M. Barney says that during the first summer that he lived on his place he 
had to keep his cow and calf in a high log pen near his house, nights, to keep 
them from the wolves. He says that one night, after being kept awake until 
almost morning, lie took his gun just at daylight and sallied forth, determined on 
vengeance. When he went out the wolves retreated for a short distance. But 
when he came into a thicket of bushes they surrounded him, and he backed up 
against a tree, and they kep him there for about two hours, until broad daylight. 
He shot at them several times, but the bushes were so thick that he did not kill 
any, although they would come so near that he could hear them snap at each 
other. The wolves were never very thick after this season, and as they decreased, 
until about 1856, deer increased and became very thick. Mr. Barney says that 
he has had during the winter from forty to fifty deer hung up in the woods at 
one time. 

ORGANIZATION. 

The first township meeting (the township of Byron then embraced Wyoming 
also), was held at the house of Charles H. Oaks, in Grandville, on Monday, the 
second day of May, A. D. 1836. The following officers were chosen, viz : 

Supervisor — Gideon H. Gordon. Township Clerk — Isaac A. Allen. Assessors- 
Eli Yeomans, Ephraim P. Walker and Justin Brooks. Justices of the Peace — 
Gideon II. Gordon, Robert Howlett and Ephraim P. Walker. Collector — Lorenzo 
French. Commissioners of Highways — Gideon H. Gordon, Eli Yeomans, and H. 
Pitts. Commissioners of Schools — Joseph B. Copeland, Sanford Buskirk and 
James Lockwood. School Inspectors— Gideon H. Gordon, Isaac A. Allen and Eli 
Yeomans. Overseers of the Poor— Ephriam P. Walker and Justin Brooks. Con- 
stables — Lorenzo French and Sanford Buskirk. 

At the first general election held at Grandville, November, 1836, the highest 
number of votes cast for electors lor President and Vice President was twenty. 

The following are the present township officers, viz. : Supervisor, William P. 
Whitney ; Township Clerk, Silas L. Hamilton ; Treasurer, Samuel A. McKenney ; 
Justices of the Peace, William P. Whitney, James M. Brown, George W. Ewing 
and Isaac M. Winegar, Jr. ; School Inspectors, George W. Swings and William 
P. Whitney ; Commissioners of Highways, Jerry Boynton, George W. Ewings 
and John Homrich ; Constables, A. A. Palmer and William D. Tibbits. 

The whole number of votes cast at the last general election held at Byron 
Center, November, 1868, was 337. 

For the first few years the settlement of Byron progressed very slowly. It re- 
quired a brave heart and a strong arm to encounter the dangers and hardships 
consequent to the opening up of a new and heavy timbered country. But 
gradually the forest yielded to the axe of the pioneer ; beautiful fields, thrifty 
orchards, comfortable dwellings, «nd well-filled barns have taken the place of the 
little log cabin and unbroken forest. Byron is now fast becoming one of the 
foremost agricultural townships in Kent County. With a varied soil, adapted to 



40 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

■early all of the different branches of husbandry, and especially to fruit growing, 
and the very best facilities for marketing its produce, its farmers must soon 
stand among the best. Byron is traversed by two railroads, viz. : the northern 
branch of the Lake Shore and Michigan Southern R. R., and the Grand Rapids 
and Indiana R. R. The Lake Shore and Michigan Southern runs north and south 
through the town, and has two stations on its line, in Byron, viz. : Byron Center 
and North Byron. The Grand Rapids and Indiana runs north and south through 
the eastern part of the township, and has one station near the south part of the 
town. The present population is 1,328. 

. Mr. George L. Tobey carries on the manufacture of lumber, at his mill, on sec- 
tion twelve, and Rosenberger Bros. & Co. carry on the manufacture of flour, feed, 
lumber and heading, at the village of Cody's Mills, on section twenty-five. 

POST-OFFICES. 

Cody's Mills, Byron Center and North Byron. 

SCHOOL HOUSES. 

Byron has eight school houses, ranging from first-class to indifferent. District 
No. 1 has a fair wooden house ; District No. 2 has one of the finest country school 
buildings in the county ; it was erected in 1858. There is a very good school 
house at Cody's Mills. The people of this township support their schools liberally. 



CALEDONIA. 

Caledonia is one of the southern tier of townships of Kent County, and is 
bounded on the north by Cascade, on the east by Bowne, on the south by Thorn- 
apple, Barry County, and west by Gaines. It is traversed from south to north by 
the Thornapple river which divides it into two equal parts. The banks of the 
river are high and the country on both sides of the river is high and rolling. On 
the east side of the river the land is what is known as " openings," the soil being 
sandy and gravelly with a slight mixture of clay, and is timbered principally 
with oak and hickory. The soil on this side of the river is especially adapted to 
wheat and fruit, but produces good crops of all kinds of grain and most grasses. 
There are several lakes on this side of the river. There is a lake on sections one, 
two, eleven and twelve, about one mile long, and from eighty to one hundred and 
sixty rods in width. The shore on the southeast side is sandy and on the north- 
west side mucky and marshy. Barber's Kake is on sections twenty-five and 
twenty-six. Tobey's Lake is on section twenty-three. Lovejoy's Lake is on sec- 
tion twelve. The Coldwater or Little Thornapple enters Caledonia on section 
thirty-six and empties into the Thornapple on section thirty-five. The west side 
of the river is all " timbered lands," producing all of the kinds of timber that 
usually grow in this climate on such lands. The surface of most of this part of 
the town is high and somewhat rolling, with a clayey loam soil, that is well adapted 
to all kinds of farming purposes, especially to grazing. All kinds of fruits grow 
almost to perfection on this soil. There are a great many fine mrms in this town- 
ship, and its agricultural resources are being developed very fast. 

The Thornapple ia a very rapid stream here, and with its high banks is cap*- 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY Otf KENT COUNTY. 41 

ble of affording a great amount of water power. Mr. Warren S. Hale informs us 
that there are at least nine chances for water powers, only three of which are de- 
veloped, within the limits of this township, with a fall at each of from five to 
eight feet without overflowing the banks at any place. This river is full of pic- 
turesque islands, varying in size from one-half acre to three acres. With the rich 
agricultural country tributary to it, with its unfailing water power, the time must 
come when this town will be the " Lowell " of Western Michigan, when the busy 
hum of machinery will be heard from its northern to its southern boundary. 

Nestled among the hills on the banks of the Thornapple, in the northern part 
of the township, is the thriving little village of Alaska, formerly known as North 
Brownville. It has a very pleasant location and is an active, enterprising place. 
It contains one dry goods and grocery store, one dry goods, grocery and drug 
store, one grocery store, one hardware store and tin shop, one flouring mill, two 
saw mills, one furniture manufactory, which ships a great deal of cabinet work 
in the white besides finishing for the home market ; one carriage and wagon fac- 
tory and one hotel, besides the usual number of blacksmith shops, boot and shoe 
shops, &c. There is not a saloon in the place. Surrounded by a rich agricul- 
tural country, its growth must be rapid and its future prosperous. 
EARLY SETTLEMENT. 

Mr. Asahel Kent was the first settler in the township, settling on section thirty- 
five in 1838. Mr. Kent, and after his death Mrs. Kent, kept a public house, 
which became famous for its good cheer, all over the surrounding country. A 
gentleman who lived at that time in New York State, tells us that he used to 
hear people who had been to Grand River tell about " Kent's Tavern," and when 
one would return, others who had traveled on this route — the " Gull Trail" — 
would always inquire after the Kents. Mrs. Kent afterwards married Mr. Peter 
McNaughton, and the place became equally well known to travelers on the Battle 
Creek and Grand Rapids stage route, as McNaughton's. And while talking of 
this subject there are some reminiscences of this stage route that Mr. Edward 
Campau relates, that we may as well give now, and which will help contrast the 
mode of traveling in those days with that of the present. Mr. C. says that in 
1839, he, then a boy of 14, made the journey with three or four others from 
Grand Rapids to Detroit, and that they stopped at " Kent's " over night, and he 
with others of the men had to sleep out in a sort of shed, as the house was so 
small it would not accommodate them. At this time this was the only house 
from Ada to " Leonard's," a distance of seventeen miles. About two years after 
this he commenced to drive stage on this route, and drove for several years. The 
road at this time wound round through the woods, and it was no uncommon 
thing to get u stuck " in the mud or to overset. At one time, a very dark, 
stormy night, they broke an axletree about six miles south of Ada, and the pas- 
sengers, five or six in number, had to walk through mud and snow to that place, 
as it was the nearest settlement. At another time Hon. John Ball, Mrs. Thomas 
B. Church and others were in the stage ; they overset in a mud-hole and the pas- 
sengers were all landed (?) in the water. It was quite dark, and Mr. Fred. Church, 
then an infant, was nearly suffocated before they found him. At another time 
6 



42 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Hon. Win. A. Richmond and Hon. Harvey P. Yale were his only passengers, the 
roads were muddy and badly rutted out and the night dark. Mr. Yale fell 
asleep and the wheel striking into a deep rut pitched him out into the mud. 
After a hearty laugh he resumed his place and they labored along. There is a 
great contrast between travel over that route, and over the different railroad 
routes, with their elegant passenger coaches, now leading from the Valley City. 
To go back to the settlement of Caledonia : Mr. James Minsey settled on sec- 
tion thirty-six in 1838 or 1830. Among the earlier settlers were Orsemus Rath- 
bun, Eber Moffitt, Hiram McNiel, Peter McNaughton, Levi Tobey, John Sinclair, 
O. B. Barber, John Pattison, Henry Jackson, Wm. H. Brown, and Warren S. 
Hale. Mr. Lyman Gerrald was the first settler on the west side of the river. 
Mr. Wm. II. Brown erected the saw mill at Alaska, now owned by L. W. Fisher, 
in 1848, and the flouring mill now owned by J. W. Boynton, in 185.% and is now 
one of the proprietors of the Caledonia mills, two miles above Alaska, on section 
twenty-two. Mr. Orsemus Rathbun is the oldest settler now residing in the 
township. 

Among the incidents connected with the early settlement oi the township, 
showing some of the hardships the pioneers had to endure, we have the follow- 
ing : Mr. Win. IT. Brown, previous to his settlement at Brownsville, but after he 
located his land, lived at " Scale's Prairie " or Middleville. Having occasion to 
go there one winter, he started Irom home in the morning on horseback, intend- 
ing to return the same day. After making his observations and examining his 
land about where the village of Alaska now stands, he started for home ; night 
soon came on, and after endeavoring to follow his track for a while he found out 
that he was lost. He dismounted, and as he had nothing to kindle a fire with, 
cleared the snow out of a path, with his feet, and some bark from a dry tree, and 
walked backwards and forwards in it all night. When morning came he mounted 
his horse and after riding for some time came out at the Green Lake House. His 
friends had started after him in the morning, expecting to find him frozen to 
death, and followed his tracks until they found him at Green Lake. 

At the mouth of the Coldwater was a great Indian camping ground and burial 
place. They did not leave here entirely until within a very few years. One of 
them, old Soh-na-go, or " Squirrel," has been since seen visiting the burial place 
and the hunting grounds of his fathers, but the " White man's axe " had been 
there, and it was no longer a home for him. 

Caledonia has nine school houses, all wooden buildings, and two churches, viz: 
The Baptist Church at Alaska, and a Catholic Church on section twenty-five, both 
wooden structures. There are two hotels in this township, the Alaska Hotel, at 
Alaska, Wm. H. Lock, proprietor, and the Oak Grove House, O. B. Barber, pro- 
prietor, on section twenty-six. There is a saw mill on section twenty-seven, 
Jacob Brown, proprietor. 

The postofflces are as follows . — Alaska, Warren S. Hale, P. M.; Caledonia, O. 
B. Barber, P. M.; Caledonia Station, Adam B. Sherk, P. M. 

The Grand River Valley Railroad crosses the southwest corner of the township 
and has a station on section twenty-nine. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 48 



ORGANIZATION. 

The township of Caledonia was organized in 1840 by the choice ol the following 
named officers : 

Supervisor — John P. McNaughton. Clerk — Justus G. Beach. Justices of the 
Peace — Justus G. Beach, Loren B. Tyler, Malcolm P. McNaughton, Asahel Kent. 
Treasurer — Norman Foster. Assessors — Roswell F. Tyler, Malcolm P. McNaugh- 
ton, John A. Campbell. Highway Commissioners — Asahel Tyler, Asahel Kent, 
Norman Foster. School Inspectors — Norman Foster, William G. Wooley. Direc- 
tors of the Poor — Roswell Tyler, John Campbell. Collector — Roswell F. Tyler. 
Constables — Roswell F. Tyler, Frederick B. Thompson. 

OFFICERS IN 1870. 
Supervisor — Adam B. Sherk. CJcrk — Daniel S. Haviland. Treasurer — Sher- 
man T. Colson. Justices —Adam B. Sherk, Levi White, Hugh B. McAlister, 
Elijah V. E. Pratt. Highway Commissioners — John Patterson, David Kinsey, 
Isaac Stauffer. School Inspectors — Alfred W. Stow T e, Levi White. Constables — 
Fayette Mclntyre, Charles E. Emmons, Eliphalet Scott. 



CANNON. 

Cannon, originally a part of Plainfield, lies northwest of Grand Rapids, having 
Courtland on the north, Grattan on the east, Ada on the south, and Plainfield on 
the west. 

In the year 1837 the first farm was entered within its territory by Andrew 
Watson, who came with his family, accompanied by A. D. W. Stout and family, 
and settled on section thirty, where Mr. Watson and his aged wife yet reside. In 
the next year came Isaac Tomlinson, Sen., locating upon section twenty-seven, in 
a beautiful situation commanding an extensive and enchanting view 7 of Grand 
River and its beautiful valley. In 1839 Win. M. Miller settled upon section nine- 
teen. Steadily now a tide of emigration set in, rolling the wilderness back by the 
sturdy energy of the hardy and determined pioneer, swiftly multiplying farms 
and broadening cleared acres. 

Prominent among the new comers in 1840 were James Thomas, on section 
twenty-seven, Oliver Lovejoy, on section seven, Mr. Rood, and Rev. Mr. Frieze, on 
section nineteen, the first Minister of the Gospel who took up his residence 
within the town. 

Among the early settlers who bore a conspicuous part in the development and 
organization of the new town, we would make honorable mention of M. A. Pat- 
rick, locating on section twenty-six, and Ebenezer C. Smith, on section twelve, 
in 1844. About the same time Mr. Samuel Steel located five lots for as many sons, in 
the near vicinity of Mr. Smith, thus fixing the name of Steel's Corners to a most 
beautiful and productive part of the town. Mrs. John Ilartwell, on section thirty- 
four, and Demas Dine, on section thirty, settlers of 1845, and James Dockery, on 
section four, who settled in 184(>. 

In 1845 a separation from Plainfield was effected, and the township was erected 



44 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

into a separate town, under the name, by a mistake in the Legislature, of Church- 
town, assuming its present name, however, in honor of its principal village, at 
its first town meeting, held to complete its organization, on the first Monday of 
April, 1846, at the house of C. Slaght, in Cannonsburgh. At that time it had a 
population of about 290, and the whole number of votes cast were 64. Its present 
population is 1,126 

FIRST TOWNSHIP OFFICERS. 

Supervisor, Andrew Watson; Clerk, Henry H. Worden; Treasurer, Lewis D. 
Dean ; School Inspectors, Loyal Palmer, M. A. Patrick ; Directors of the Poor, 
Ebenezer C. Smith, Martin Johnson; Commissioners of Highway, John Hartwell, 
Cornelius Wample; Justices of the Peace, Harlow T. Judson, John Bishop, Demas 
Hine, Jared Spring; Constables, Robert Howard, Major Worden, Isaac Toinlin- 
son, Mindrus Whitney. 

OFFICERS IN 1870. 

Supervisor, Asa P. Ferry; Clerk, Thomas Noy; Treasurer, Charles A. Provin ; 
Justices of the Peace, Nathaniel Steel, James Nesbit, Demas Hine, M. A. Patrick ; 
Highway Commissioner, Wm. C. Young; School Inspector, John C. Chapman; 
Constables, John S. Baker, John M. Thomas, Charles A. Provin, Henry C. 
Watkins. 

Cannon presents a great variety of surface, soil and productions, being quite 
hilly and broken along Bear Creek and in the vicinity of Grand River, but in 
other parts, more gently rolling, or beautifully undulating scenery meets the view. 
In the southern part there are patches of beech aud maple timber land, with a 
sprinkling of pine along the streams, but, mainly, the town is oak openings, plen- 
tifully interspersed with hickory. Its main staples raised for the market are 
wheat, wool, corn and apples. Of the former, large quantities are exported, and 
its rolling lands and dry, healthful climate make its wool growing a success. 
Lying within the great Western fruit belt, and being blessed with a deep, pliable 
soil, it is eminently adopted to horticultural pursuits ; of this its people are fully 
aware, and we find in many flourishing orchards. Apples, pears, peaches, cherries 
and currants abound, while grapes and the small fruits are fast becoming speci- 
alities. 

Whatever may be said of its business centers, .thrift and enterprise mark its 
rural districts. Comfort smiles from its tasteful dwellings, nestled amid shade 
and bloom, and an abounding plenty peeps from its well filled and commodious 
barns. Indigence is scarcely known among its population. All are, to a remark- 
able degree, independent in worldly goods. 

Bear Creek, the exclusive property of Cannon, rises in the northwest corner of 
the town, on section one, in a large spring having the peculiar power of petrify- 
ing all substances that may chance to lie in its waters. The creek, fed by springs 
all its length, takes its devious way south and southwest, cutting the town nearly 
in two, debouching in Grand River on section thirty, the southwest corner of the 
town. This stream, being fed by springs, presents a never failing supply of water, 
and, running rapidly, gives an opportunity for a number of mill sites, and excel- 
lent facilities for manufacturing purposes. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 45 

Cannonsburgh, the only business center of any note within the town was foun- 
ded in 1842, an Indian war trail its main thoroughfare, and the settler's ax the 
only key that would open the forest gates that guarded its entrance. In 1844 
and 1845 its mills were erected by E. B. Bostwick, H. T. Judson architect, and a 
store opened. As an inducement to permanent settlement, the village was platted 
in 1845, and Mr. Bostwick, the enterprising business agent of LeGrand Cannon, 
its proprietor, (an eastern capitalist and large land holder in the town,) was in- 
structed to give a village lot to each resident not otherwise provided for ; thus 
twenty-five lots were given away. The town received the name it now bears in 
honor of its founder, who testified his appreciation of the distinction conferred 
by presenting the village with a small ordnance bearing his name and the date. 
This is treasured as a memento of early times, and used on the 4th of July and 
other holiday occasions, wakening the echos of memory in many a heart as its 
thunders reverberate among the hills that completely surround the little village. 
Cannonsburg is situated upon both sides of Bear Creek. Laterly it has suffered 
much by fire. It has one store, one grist mill, one woolen mill, with a cider mill 
attached, one saw mill, one cooper shop, two wagon shops, three blacksmith 
shops, and one hotel. It has no dedicated place of worship, but. the Methodists 
are about erecting a fine church, to be constructed of wood, 38x60 feet in size, 
and costing $3,300. It has a Union School House, situated on a picturesque bluff 
overlooking the town; it is built of wood, two stories high, 34x56 feet in dimen- 
sion. Two teachers are employed in its schools. 

Buenavista is situated on section thirty, near the mouth of Bear Creek. It con- 
sists of eight or ten dwelling houses, and the Bear Creek flouring mill, erected in 
1848, and now owned by Carey & Horton, of Grand Rapids. There is nothing 
more to be said of it, save that it is located amidst beautiful scenery, and is some- 
thing of a wheat mart in the fall of the year. 

There are several lakes within the town, but only two are worthy of particular 
note. Silver Lake, on sections nine and ten, lying just north of and touching the 
line of the Grand Rapids and Ionia State Road, as its name indicates, is a most 
beautiful sheet of water, containing about 300 acres. 

One mile directly east of Silver Lake we come upon Bostwick Lake, a huge 
crystal, in emerald setting. No more beautiful scene can well be imagined. Its 
waters are very cold, evidently emanating from springs, as it has no visible inlet 
or natural outlet. This was a favorite resort in early days for fishing parties, and 
parties of pleasure coming from the village often camped on its banks and tarried 
over night. A huge canoe, fashioned by an Indian, from a white wood tree grown 
a mile south of Cannonsburgh, was transported with a vast amount of labor to its 
shores and launched upon its waters. The distance traversed was five miles, occu- 
pying two days in the transit, and employing four yoke of oxen. There, in the 
later years, the settlers on lands adjacent to the lake found the deserted canoe, a 
monster of its kind, over thirty feet in length. Wind and wave have long since 
done their works upon it; only a fragrant of it remaining as a relic in the family 
of S. B. Kutz, formerly of Cannon, now a resident of Rockford. This lake also 
lies north of the State Road, which bends slightly in passing round its southern 
shore. It contains about 400 acres. 



46 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT GOUNTY. 

Ball Hill is a noteworthy eminence on section one. It rises abruptly trom the 
surrounding country, and lifting its lofty tower above the forest trees, is visible 
for many miles away. It received its name from its long time-owner, John Ball, 
of Grand Rapids. It is now the property of Mr. Cowen, and planted with apple 
trees to its very summit, 

CHURCHES AND SCHOOLS. 

There are eight district schools in the town, and two churches. The First Con- 
gregational Church, (Rev. Mr. Eaton, of Lowell, present officiating pastor,) is a 
wooden structure 36x50 feet in dimensions. It stands upon a little eminence east 
of and commanding a beautiful view of Bostwick Lake. It has a small Cemetery 
attached. The First M. E. Church, at Steel's Corners, one mile east, was erected 
in the same year. It is also built of wood and is a trihV smaller than the Congre- 
gational Church. 

The number and prosperity of the schools and churches in the town are a reflex 
of the intellectual and spiritual enterprise of the people, speaking more than 
volumes of history for their useful and moral lives. 

It is worthy of record here, that, of the first six families settling in the town, 
namely A. Watson, A. D. W. Stout, I. Tomlinson, E. Whitney, Mr. Hood and J. 
Thomas, both heads of each family are yet living, and four familes still reside in 
the town. 

It is an equally remarkable fact that the first two white children were born in 
the families of Mr. Stout and Mr. Watson, on the same day, September 27, 1837. 
Both were daughters, and there was but two hours difference in their birth. The 
children were named respectively Mary Stout and Jeanette Watson. 

May G, 1842, the o-reat destroyer entered the family of Mr. Isaac Tomlinson and 
laid low his little daughter, Martha Jane. This was the first death in the town, 
occurring among the whites. 

Most of the early settlers are living yet, but some are dead. Of those who are 
gone, justice demands that, as in a u roll of honor, 1 ' should be placed the names of 
E. B. Bostwick, business agent for Mr. Cannon, who died on an overland journey 
from the States to California ; S. S. Haskins, closely identified with the early his- 
tory and prosperty of the town, and several years a dealer in dry goods and groceries 
at Cannonsburgh ; Timothy Wetmore, horticulturist, and at one time an efficient 
Supervisor of the town, and Benj. Davis, also Supervisor for some years, and 
dying while yet holding that office. These have passed on, but in the prosperity 
of the people, and smiling fields from the wilderness reclaimed, their works do 
yet remain. 



CASCADE. 

Cascade lies in the second tier of townships from the south and east line of the 
county, and is bounded on the north by Ada, on the east by Lowell, on the south 
by Caledonia, and on the west by Paris. The Detroit and Milwaukee Railroad 
passes through this town, entering on the north part of section 12, and following 
the course of the Grand River Valley through the southwest corner of section 1, 



ItlSTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 47 



crossing section 2 in almost a direct line from southeast to northwest, into Ada, 
where is located its nearest depot, four miles from Cascade village. 
GENERAL DESCRIPTION. 
Cascade presents a variety of soil, from light sand and gravel to heavy clay, 
and is greatly diversified by hills, valleys, streams, lakes, springs and marshes. 
Grand River flows northwest through sections 12, 1 and 2, into Ada, and the 
Thornapple — one of the most important tributaries of Grand River— takes its 
course north through the centre of the township. Entering Cascade from the 
south on section 24, it flows through 27, 22, 10, 0, 10, 3 and 4 to Grand River, at 
Ada village. On the east of the Thornapple, a creek rises in section 11, and 
enters that stream at section 10. Another, one branch of which rises in section 
30, Lowell, and the other in section 1, of Caledonia, forms a junction at section 
20, in Cascade, and carries its united currents to ttie Thornapple at 27 ; furnish- 
ing, in its route, water power to a saw mill on section 20. On tlie west side of 
the river, a creek rising on section 20, forms a junction with it on section 34. 
Another having its head on section 10, enters the river at 10. Another, whose 
source is a large boiling spring on section 0, in its course of two and a half miles 
attains considerable size, aud empties its waters into the Thornapple at section 
0. Remains of an old beaver dam were to be found on this creek, quite recently. 
On the southeast corner of section 14, is found a lake with a greater depth of 
water than Lake Erie. The aborigines of the country have a singular supersti- 
tion with regard to this lake ; never floating their canoes on its bosom, or eating, 
the fish of .its waters, asserting that it is inhabited by an »* Evil Spirit," or, as 
they term it, a " Great Snake." Another lake is also found on the line of sec- 
tions 4 and 5. Also one in the northwest corner of section 8, matched by one 
some forty rods directly south. 

TIMBER. 

This township contains but little pine, which is sparsely scattered along the 
borders of its streams. The sandy soil is chiefly oak openings ; while the gravel 
and clay bear some fine sugar orchards and are also productive of beech, elm, ash, 
hickory, and a meager supply of white wood. 

MINERAL WEALTH. 

Lime is manufactured on section 35. Brick have also been manufactured on 
section 3, and a bed of red ochre lying on section was used in pain tin o- some of 
the first buildings and the old red school house on that section. This mineral is 
not considered pure enough to be profitably worked. The soil also shows traces 
of bituminous coal, copper and iron. The latter ore, manifesting itself in mag- 
netic 6t mineral springs. One of these, of great power, has been discovered this 
year, on the form of James Sutphen, section 20. The water bubbles up from the 
soil with icy coldness, and flows over a pebbly bed, staining — with brilliant 
coloring — its stony path. Iron brought in contact with it becomes heavily 
charged w T ith magnetism. The water has not yet been analyzed. 
EARLY SETTLEMENT. 

This township was at first a part of the township of Ada. Lewis Cook, a 



48 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

native of New Jersey, is said to have been the first settler within the limits of 
Cascade. He removed from that State to Seneca county, New York ; from 
thence to Washtenaw county, in this State ; from which he came, a pioneer set- 
tler to Cascade in 183G. At or near this time also came Mr. Hiram Laraway to 
this place from New York. His wife being a sister of Mrs. Cook. But, dis- 
couraged by the hardships of the wilderness, he soon returned to his native 
place. In the following year, Edward Linen, a native of Ireland — whose shores 
he left for America in 1836 — settled in Cascade, where he yet resides, a useful, 
industrious citizen. During the year 1838, and the subsequent year, he was fol- 
lowed by James May, David Petted, John Farrell, James and William Annis, 
Michael Matthews, Patrick, Christopher and Michael Eardley, all natives of the 
same country, most of whom yet survive, orderly citizens of their adopted home. In 
1838, Frederick A. Marsh, of New York, united in marriage with Olive Guild, a 
daughter of Joel Guild, one of the pioneer settlers of Grand Rapids — and began 
domestic life in. the unbroken wilderness, one mile north, and west of where Cas- 
cade village now stands. Mr. Marsh lived to see the forest yield its place to cul- 
tivated fields and comfortable dwellings, and to have a school house erected on his 
own land. He was killed by a fall from his wagon in 185G. Mrs. Marsh, afterwards 
Mrs. Walden s survived her husband eleven years, and often spoke of those days, 
when her nearest neighbors were miles away, and for three months at a time she 
did not see the face of a white man, except her husband, while a human being pass- 
ing over the newly cut road was a relief to her intense loneliness. She died at the 
old homestead in 1867. 

Sometime during 1839 or 1840, Mr. Laraway returned to his Cascade posses- 
sions, and was frozen to death between that place and Ada, in the winter of 1841. 
Widow Laraway bravely met the heavy burdens of pioneer life, and trained up 
three sons and a daughter to lives of usefulness. While the name of aunt Mary 
Laraway became a household word in the community and a synonym of virtue 
and piety. She lived to see her children settled in life, and died suddenly in the 
summer of 1869. Her oldest son is well known as the proprietor of a stone- 
cutting establishment in Grand Rapids. 

Peter and George Teeple came to Cascade during these years, joining the set- 
tlers on the west side of the Thornapple, while the eastern side was yet unmarked 
by civilization, but inhabited on and near sections 23 and 26, by a colony of 
about 350 natives, known, through the adoption of the name of their missionary, 
as the Slater Indians. 

la the year 1841, Peter Whitney, of Ohio, moved his family into that part of 
Cascade known as Whitneyville, and E. D. Gove, of Mass., selected a site for his 
future home near the center of the township on sections 22, 15 and 14, to which 
he brought his family in the summer of 1842. Horace Sears, from New York, 
and Zerah and Ezra Whitney,' (father and brother to Peter) accompanied them in 
their journey and settled in Whitneyville. Mr. Gove yet resides on the land he 
first settled, on section 15. But the old homestead on section 21 — being the second 
house built on the east side of the river, in this township — having sheltered chil- 
dren and grand children, was burned in the autumn of 1869. Mr. Sears yet-lives 
in Whitneyville ; and Zerah Whitney, elected Justice of the Peace at the first 



HISTOBY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 49 

township meeting — now an aged man — resides with his son Ezra on a farm south v 
of Grand Rapids. Another son of Zerah Whitney, Oscar, died at Whitneyville 
in 1849. And the remaining sons, Peter, Johnson and Martin, now reside in other 
parts of the county. 

In the Spring of 1845, Asa W. Denison, and family, of Mass., (accompanied by 
a brother, Gideon H. Denison, look ing for a homestead, to which he brought his 
family the following year,) came to join the settlers on the west side of the 
Thornapple. Coming in on the State road, from Battle Creek to Grand Rapids, 
the teams, women and children of the company, were obliged to wait at Ezra 
Whitney's public-house, for the road to be " chopped out" between that point 
and the river, theirs being the first teams that passed over the road. At Cascade 
they forded the Thornapple with their household goods, and found timbers on 
the ground for the erection of the old Ferry House, (now Cascade Hotel,) which 
was, at that time, owned by D. S. T. Wellcr. During that year the house was so 
far completed as to admit of occupancy, and the first ferry-boat commenced its 
trips just above where the bridge now spans that stream. D. S. T. Weller then 
owned the plat of land now occupied by Cascade village, although first pur- 
chased by Joel Guild ; and it was at that time staked out into. lots of one acre 
each, as the fine fall on the river gave hopes for the speedy erection of mills at 
that place, some of the most sanguine settlers phophesying that Cascade would 
outstrip Grand Rapids in the strife for precedence. Mr. W. sold out his prop- 
erty here to W. S. Gunn, in 1846, who held it until after the organization of the 
township. Mr. Weller ultimately settled in Grand Rapids city, where he re- 
mained until he transferred his home to Detroit, in 1869. 

During the year 1845, a disease, which our old settlers denominate the black 
tongue, broke out among the Indians near Whitneyville, reducing their number 
in a few weeks to about 200 persons. The band now became slowly wasted by 
disease and removal, until less than fifty remained at the time of their removal 
to the Indian Reservation in 1856. In the year 1846, another family was added to 
the few settlers, of the east side of the river ; — Jared Strong, the first settler in 
the forest between E. D. Gove and Ada. The following year a school was opened 
in a little log house on the river bank, section 27, for the few pupils of that vicinity. 
Who the young woman was, to whom belongs the rank of pioneer teacher, we 
have been unable to ascertain, or whether this was the first school taught in the 
township. It was certainly the first on the east side of the river ; and the lum- 
ber sawn for the Whitneyville school house, erected in 1848, was among the first 
work done by the old saw mill, on Sucker Creek, then owned by Peter Whitney. 
Abont this time, also, the Kalamazoo stage made its trips through Whitneyville — 
via Ada — for Grand Rapids. 

ORGANIZATION. 

The first township meeting was held at Whitneyville, April 3, 1848, and the 
following board of township officers was elected : 

Supervisor— Peter Teeple. Clerk — John R. Stewart. Treasurer — Asa W. 
Denison. School Inspectors — James H. Woodworth, Thomas I. Seeley. Com- 

7 



60 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

inissioners of Highways—Ezra Whitney, Fred. A. Marsh, Wm. Degolia. Justices 
of the Peace— Leonard Stewart, Zerah Whitney. Assessors— Thomas I. Seeley, 
Harry Clark. Constables— Morris Denison, O. P. Corson, Win. Cook, Peter J. 
Whitney. 

Of the above board, Peter Teeple is yet a respected member of the township. 
J. R. Stewart, after filling other offices of trust, and teaching for several terms 
the Cascade school, removed to the city, where he now resides. A. W. Denison, 
was also a recipient of the various gifts of the voting public, for many years, and 
died from injury by the kick of a colt, in 1857, aged 52 years, universally 
mourned by his townspeople. His widow — now Mrs. Johnson — yet lives, and to 
her are we indebted for much of our information in regard to the early days of 
Cascade. J. H. Woodworth is now engaged in fruit culture in the north part of 
the township, near Ada village. Of T. I. Seeley we have known nothing since 
1853. Messrs. Whitneys and Marsh, we have spoken of in our preceding pages. 
Wm. Degolia amassed a fine property, and left the county in 1860. A few months 
after his removal, his body was brought back for burial. L. Stewart is also with 
those, who, sleeping, dream not! Harry Clark yet lives, where he first broke 
ground, a hale old man. Mr. Denison is a thriving farmer on the north line of 
the township. 

About the year 1848, W. H. Chillson came to Cascade and erected a small 
dwelling house near the hotel; also a log house just across the river, to which, 
in 1849, Rev. Erie Prince, of Ohio, brought a small stock of Yankee notions and 
opened a store, or grocery, for those whose nearest trading point was Grand 
Rapids. Elder Prince deserves more than a passing notice. He soon identified 
himself with the religious, and educational needs of the young community. He 
held at one time the office of School Inspector, and, up to the time of his death, 
worked actively in the Sunday school cause, as Superintendent in the different 
neighborhoods, now grown around the first nucleus of settlers. Was a picnic or 
temperance meeting to be looked after, or were chastened hearts called to lay 
their treasures in the dust, Elder P. was ever found ready to speak the kindly 
word, pour forth the earnest appeal, or— with tender thought of sympathy — lead 
the sorrowing mourner to Him, who is the " resurrection and the life." The 
fathers and mothers of the little ones of to-day remember with affectionate 
respect the tall, slightly bowed form, the kind face, the searching, yet mild grey 
eye, and the hand lightly laid on the head, as he passed them with some friendly 
question, or brief admonition — seed sown in life's morning time ! In the autumn 
of 1853 he was called upon to speak before the Kent County Agricultural and 
Horticultural Society, at Grand Rapids, October 6th ; and his address will be 
found in the records of the society, for that year. About the year 1856, he 
donated to the township of Cascade the land occupied by the Cascade cemetery ; 
and there his body lies buried. His grave is shadowed by a young oak, and 
Unmarked — by an explicit clause in his will — by a headstone. He died August 
7, 1862, aged 65. In church connection he was a Presbyterian. 

We have been unable to learn the precise time that a postoffice was given this 
township. We think, however, it was established at Whitneyville, soon after its 
organization. The first Postmaster was Clement White, who held that position 



HI8T0RT AND DIRECTORY OF KBKT COUNTY. 51 

with only an intermission of one or two years, until the office was discontinued 
in 1868. 

A postoffice was also established at Cascade in 1854, postmaster Dr. M. W. 
Alfred, first resident physician. A store was opened the same year at Cascade by 
Seymour Sage, and William Gardner. When the drumbeat of the Union echoed 
through our land in 1801, Cascade was not forgetful of her trusts and privileges 
as a small member of a great country. It is to be regretted that no complete list 
of those who donned the soldier's uniform has been preserved. We have called 
to mind eighty volunteers, and the number is probably about a hundred. Of 
those who never returned we are also unable to give a perfect record. But, from 
every battle field of the Republic from 1861 to the close of the eontest, came 
back a voice bidding some heart grow chill with pain, yet glow with hallowed 
pride, for the houIs that were " marching on ! " 

CASCADE TO-DAY. 

Cascade has been an organized township for twenty-two years, and, according 
to the census for 1870, has 1175 inhabitants. Children, between the ages of five 
and twenty, by report of public schools, 1869 — 416. Votes cast at the last April 
election — 227. Property assessed, real estate, $204,107 ; personal, $32,317. 

The following is the present Board of township officers: Supervisor, Edgar K. 
Johnson; Clerk, Henry C. Denison ; Treasurer, Geo. W. Gorhain; Justices of the 
Peace, Geo. S. llichardson, John F. Proctor, Lawrence Meach, Hugh B. Brown ; 
School Inspectors, E. R. Johnson, Chas. F. Holt; Highway Commissioners, Jona- 
than W. Sexton, Clinton A. Wood, Chas. M. Dennison; Constables, S. G. Fish, T. 
J. Hulbert, Miner Spaulding, Warren Streeter. 

SCHOOL HOUSES. 

Cascade can claim one or two school houses of decidedly fine appearance and 
convenience. Bat many of her school buildings are those erected in her infancy, 
and are wholly inadequate to the demands of the present school population. A 
movement is being made, however, to remedy this defect in many districts. 

Her present number of districts is ten. District No. 10 was organized in 1847. 
There is a frame house on section 35, built in 1848. District No. 4 was organized 
in 1847, and built a small frame house on section 9 : are now (1870) erecting a 
fine structure on the same site, on the Cascade and Grand Rapids road, one mile 
from Cascade village. District No. 1 was organized in 1848, and built a school 
house in 1849, on section 29, which stood until 1869, when a frame house was 
erected on the same site. District No. 2 was organized in 1849, and built a small 
log house on section 10, which yet stands. District No. 12 (fractional district, 
Cascade and Paris) was organized in 1849, and built a small frame house on sec- 
tion 31, in 1850. In 1867 a good frame house, painted white, and protected by 
window blinds, was erected. District No. 3 was organized in 1853, and built a 
frame house on section 14, in 1854. District No. 8 has a frame school house, 
painted white, built in 1856, on section 8. Fractional District No. 10 (Cascade 
and Lowell) was organized in 1859, and has a small log house on east side of sec- 
tion 13. District No. 5 was organized in 1857, and school taught in a small log 
house on south side of section 33 ; was reorganized in 1860 and log house built in 



52 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

center of section 33. This was burned in 1867, and a temporary building lias 
supplied its place until the present year. A fine house is now in process of erec- 
tion on section 28. District No. 6 was organized about 1860, and has a nice frame 
school building, painted white, and fitted with black walnut furniture, on sec- 
tion 26. 

CHURCHES. 
Only one church edifice has as yet been erected in Cascade. This has been 
built by the Roman Catholic Brotherhood, and stands on the northeast corner of 
section 31. It was built in 1856, and cost about $1,000. The building is of wood, 
with a stone foundation. The society worshiping here was founded by Fathers 
Deeunic and Fizaski. The latter was parish priest in 1849, when the church mem- 
bers were few and worshiped in private houses. Now the church numbers about 
47 families, to whom Father Rivers preaches monthly. A Sabbath School is con- 
nected with the church. The M. E. Church also has two classes in this township, 
numbering about 60 members and worshiping in school houses. The United 
Brethren persuasion have a small charge of about a dozen members. And the 
"Christians" also hold public worship, but the strength of the order we have not 
ascertained. 

We regret our inability to give the number and membership of our Sunday 
Schools; though nearly every district has one connected with its regular church 
worship. 

CEMETERIES. 

Cemeteries are located on section 31— Catholic. Section 10 — Cascade Burial 
Ground. Section 35 — Whitney ville. Section 7 — West part of township. . 

CASCADE VILLAGE. 

Cascade village is located on the line of sections 9 and 16, on the west side of 
the Thornapple river. It contains a Hotel, now owned by DeWitt Marsh, where 
all township business is transacted ; a general store, and Post-office, in charge of 
E. D. Johnson ; flouring and saw mills, owned by H. L. Wise and Jacob Kusterer ; 
a physician's office, occupied by Dr. Danforth ; and less than a dozen private resi- 
dences. The flouring mill is a large, well constructed building, with a capacity 
for three run of stone. Dr. Danforth is the resident physician, and is making 
preparations for opening a drug store in connection with his office. His practice 
is Eclectic. 

Gaylord Holt, professor and teacher of music, resides one mile north of Cas- 
cade, on the river road. This was also the former home of Hon. H. H. Holt, now 
of Muskegon, who has represented his district in the State Legislature. 

WHITNEYVILLE. 

Whitney ville is a point on the old State Road, between Battle Creek and Grand 
Rapids; and is situated on section 35. A Hotel, erected there in 1853, and famil- 
iarly known as the Whitney Tavern Stand, yet opens its doors to the public, under 
charge of S. F. Sliter. James Sutphen now owns the old Whitney saw mill on 
section 26. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KBNT COUNTY. 53 

COURTLAND. 

Courtland is bounded on the north by Nelson, on the east by Oakfield, on the 
south by Cannon, and on the west by Algonia. 

Barton Johnson, the first settler of the township, located in May, 1838. He is 
still a resident, and may be -found on the west half of the southwest quarter of 
section twenty- two. Alexander Dean settled in the township in 1839. He was 
the first to locate lands, selecting the northeast quarter of section twenty-one. 
The manner in which this tract came to be located by him is quite amusing. Mr. 
Dean and fifteen others came into the country to select homes and lands, with the 
understanding that the right of first choice should be decided among them by 
lot. So they drew, and lo and behold the lot fell upon — not Jonah, but Alexan- 
der, and he therefore exercised the right of first choice by selecting the piece 
just mentioned. 

These sixteen persons located land contiguous to each other, and moving to the 
township a short time afterward, organized it, and resided there alone for a num- 
ber of years — or until about the year 1844, or 1845, when they were joined by 
Horace Colby, Philip Becker, the two Thompsons, and others. The first town- 
ship meeting was held at the residence of Barton Johnson, in the spring of 1839. 

Among the other early settlers of the township were the following named per- 
sons : Thomas Addison, John Austin, Sabin Johnson, Benjamin Botsford, David 
Haynes, Lauren Austin, Irani Barnes, Anson Ensign, Philo Beers, James Kinyon, 
the Rounds and Hunting families, Zenas B. White, and others. 

The present township of Courtland, together with some rive other townships, 
were united under the name of Courtland, about the year 1839. Subsequently 
Algoma was detached from this organization, and still later by a legislative mis- 
take, Oakfield and Courtland were reorganized under the the euphonious name 
of Wabasis. 

The first officers of the township were : Supervisor, Philo Beers; Clerk, Thomas 
Addison. The records do not give the names of the persons filling the less im- 
portant offices. 

The 

PRESENT OFFICERS, 

are, Supervisor, Win. 11. Myers; Clerk, Isaac M. Hunting; Treasurer, Frederick 
C. Stegaman; Justices of the Peace, Joseph Salkeld, Henry D. Burlingame, Win. 
II. Myers, Thomas Addison ; Commissioners of Highways, Simon P. Peterson, 
Ezra Stoner, Jos. Salkeld ; Constables, Robert Carlyle, John Peterson, Peter Cud- 
ington, Cornelius Richardson ; School inspectors, Nelson Graham, Charles H. 
Carlyle. 

THE SOIL 
of Courtland is mostly good. The southern part is what is called timbered open- 
ings ; the northern part is timbered with pine, mixed with hard wood, and the 
soil is less productive than the southern part. There are many better townships ; 
but yet there is some land within its bounds that cannot be outdone in the 
production of the staple crops. 

There are many fine tarms in Courtland, among which are those of Alexander 
Dean, Joseph F. Hayes, Calvin and Almon Thompson, Philip Becker, Jacob Sny- 



54 HI8T0RT AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

der, Daniel S. Moore, Edward S. Fuller, Nathan D. Saunders, Zenas B. White, 
Win. H. Myers, Horace Colby, Robert Cornell and Noah R. Ashley. 

THE LAKES. 

Iu this township are few in number. Silver Lake, the largest, is situated on 
sections twenty-seven and twenty-eight. It is triangular in shape, being about 
one and one-halt miles in length by one half mile in breadth in the widest place. 
It has fine gravelly banks, and is one of the most beautiful lakes in the county. 
Johnson Lake, a small, but fine body of water, is situated on the southeasterly 
portion of section twenty-two. Big and Little Brower Lakes are situated on the 
southern part ot section thirty-four. Both of them are small. 

THE SCHOOL HOUSES 

are numbered and located as follows : The Round's school house, in district No. 
8, is located on the south line of section thirty, is a small, red, frame structure, 
and was built in the year 1860. 

The Stinson school house, in district No. 1, is situated on the south line of sec- 
tion twenty-eight. It is a wooden building, painted white, and was built some 
twelve years ago. 

The Shank school house, district No. 2, is located on the north line of section 
twenty-nine, near the residence of G. Shank. It is a respectable looking, red, 
framed structure. 

The Graham school house, in district No. 7, a small, frame building, painted 
white, is located on the east line of seetiou twenty-seven. 

The Becker school house, in district No. 4, is located on the south line of section 
twenty-five. It is a small, white, framed structure, and has been built some 
fifteen years. 

The Smith school house, in district No. 6, is built of logs, aud is situated on 
the north line of section two. 

The Courtland Center school house, in district No. 3, is located on the north 
line of section twenty-two, one-half mile east of the centre of the township. It 
is a fine, framed structure, painted white, and h is been standing but two years. 

The Benham school house, in district No. 5, is located on the west line of sec- 
tion nine. It is a framed building, painted red, and was erected in the year 
1860. 

MILLS. 

The Becker Shingle Mill, Jacob Becker, proprietor, i» located on the north line 
of section twenty-three. It was built in the year 1868. 

The Davis steam saw and shingle mill combined, is located near the centre of 
section 10. It was erected in the year 1869. Hiram 11. Davis, proprietor. 

The Becker saw mill, Garrett Becker, proprietor, is located near the northwest 
corner of section eight. It was erected in the year 1867. 

The Anderson saw r mill, John II. Anderson, proprietor, is located near the 
south line of section 7, on Potter Creek. It was built in the year 1866. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY.. 55 



The Porter shingle mill, Dennis Porter, proprietor, is located on Porter Creek, 
near the centre of section 7. It was built in the year 1868. 
The 

COURTLAND CENTER HOUSE 

is the only hotel in the township. It is situated at Courtland Center, on the 
southwest corner of section 15. It is a fine, framed structure. 



GAINES. 

The township of Gaines — town 5 north, of range 11 west —is situated in the 
southern tier of townships of Kent county. It is hounded on the north by Paris, 
on the east by Caledonia, on the south by Leighton, Allegan county, and on the 
west by Ityron. 

The first settler in this township w T as Alexander Clark, who located on section 
8, in the spring of 1837. He was joined the following autumn by Alexander L. 
Bouck, who located on section 5, his present homestead, and Andrew and his son, 
Renssalaer Mesnard, who located on section 17, the place now occupied by Henry 
Kelley; and soon after by Foster Kelley, Charles Kelley and Joseph Blain, who 
located on their present homesteads, on sections 4 and 5. Gaines at that time had 
little to recommend her to the eyes of civilization ; being nothing more or less 
than 36 square miles of wilderness. Yet to the hardy, enterprising pioneers her 
heavy forests ot beech and maple, and in some localities pine and oak, abundant 
supply of fresh water, with an average supply ot bear, wolves, deer, wild turkeys, 
etc., possessed a charm that was irresistable. And the ice once broken the develop- 
ment of her resources was only a question of time. 

At this time the only thoroughfare within the limits of the territory of Gaines 
was a road known as the " Old Gull Road," running a zig-zag course from north 
to south. And the first settlers seemed for evident reasons to strike for the vicinity 
of this road. And we now find some of the richest farms in the county near its 
line. It was afterward straightened as the township became settled, to corres- 
pond with the section lines, and became a stage route from Grand Rapids to Kala- 
mazoo, until the completion of the plank road in 1854. 

Among the first settlers who still reside in the township, and identified with 
its organization, growth and prosperity, are Daniel Woodward, Stephen A. Ham- 
mond, John E. Woods, Charles B. Keefer, Benjamin Colburn, R. C. Sessions, Jas. 
Reynolds, William Kelley, John Wolcott, R. R. Jones, William Hendrick, Aaron 
Brewer, Thomas and Wilmot II. Blain, William Budlong, James M. Pelton, Orson 
Cook, Peter Van Lew, Eseck Burlingame, James T. Crumback and Bryan Green- 
man. 

Gaines, aside from her agricultural prospects, offered but little inducement to 
business men. Plaster and Buck Creeks both rise near the center of the town- 
ship, but were too small during most of the year for mill sites. There was, how- 
ever, a small water mill erected on the latter stream about the year 1852, by Eseck 
Burlingame, on section 18, which is still running, and which cut the lumber for 
some of the first frame buildings in the township. 



56 HISTOKY AND DIKECTOBY OF KENT COUNTY. 

• - . , 

Most of the settlers of Gaines, as is usual, were poor, having barely means 
enough to enable them to purchase their land of the government at $1.25 an 
acre, get their families and household goods transported through the wilderness, 
and gain a foothold on their farms. But with persistent energy they set to work, 
and the heavy forests began to disappear. It was soon found to be one of the 
richest tracts in the vicinity for agricultural purposes, and at the present date is 
ov.o of the best in the county. The north half of the township is gently rolling, is 
well watered with springs and small streams. The soil is good and of almost 
every variety. Apple and peach orchards abound. Pears, grapes, quinces and 
cherries are cultivated to some extent and with good success. 

The southern portion comprises a range ol beautiful hills and table lands, ad- 
mirably adapted to fruit and. vine culture, and although not developed to any 
great extent, has some of the best orchards in the county. The soil is gravelly, 
with a mixture of clay and loam, and is well adapted to all kinds of grain. 

ORGANIZATION. 

The first attempt at organization was as a part of Paris, in 1839. Foster Kelley, 
Joseph Blain, Alexander Clark and Andrew and Renssalaer Mesnard were among 
the township officers of said organization. In the year 1848, it was organized 
under the name of Gaines, and the first townshijj meeting was held at the old red 
school house, on the northeast corner of section 8. Among the laws passed at the 
first meeting was the following : 

"On motion of Orson Cook, it was voted that a tax of two dollars and fifty cents 
be raised for every wolf killed in the township." 

Wolves were rather troublesome neighbors in those days, and the author of the 
motion probably owed them a grudge for their former depredations. Wolves 
made frequent visits to the early settlers, and would make the very earth tremble 
with their howlings and complaints to the intruders of their time-honored homes, 
and usually levied a tax before morning. And, like the wolves of the present day, 
were only satisfied with the best quality of mutton. One occupation of the boys 
and larger girls of that day used to be to fire the old stumps about the place in 
the evening to scare away the wolves. About the year 1846, there was a wolf who 
had her beat from this vicinity to Gull Prairie, in Barry county, and was known 
as the " Gull Prairie wolf," who usually made the round trip once a week. (Better 
time than the early stages.) The dogs would not molest her, and she seemed to 
fear neither man nor beast. She had been caught once in a steel trap, and all 
efforts to entrap her again were for a long time unsuccessful. Even the children, 
in time, learned to distinguish her voice from other wolves, and were in the habit 
of listening for her on certain nights. She seldom disappointed them, and made 
night hideous with her dismal howls. She finally killed four sheep in one night 
on the premises of Mr. Mesnard, belonging to Mr. Rice. Mr. R. R. Jones, who 
lived near, requested the owner to leave one of the carcasses which madame wolf 
had partially devoured, and he did so. Mr. Jones and Orson Cook then held a 
council of war. It was determined to make one more effort to entrap her. 
Accordingly two traps were set about the carcass. But on her next visit she 
contrived to remove the carcass several rods, taking care to avoid the traps. 
Another council resulted in tome more traps. Four were set — placing in the in- 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT^COUNTY. 67 

termediate spaces small pieces of iron, which were left in sight, while the traps 
were carefully concealed. This time they outwitted her. For after visiting two 
barns in the neighborhood, and trying to obtain a fresh quarter of mutton, she 
went and put her identical game foot into one of the traps. Early on the follow 
ing morning, Messrs. Jones and Cook took the trail in pursuit. They obtained 
a glimpse of their victim near the present residence of Mr. Blake, on section 15, 
and, after following her to the vicinity of Duncan Lake, in Barry County, suc- 
ceeded in getting her headed toward home. They followed and overtook her on 
section 25, in Gaines. She " caved in," completely vanquished, and submitted to 
being bound with bark and slung to a pole ; our two hunters resolving to carry 
her back alive the the scene of her recent murders. A thing, by the way, much 
easier resolved than executed. For they were soon satisfied to leave all but the 
pelt, for which they received one dollar, and ten and a half dollars in the shape 
of County and State bounties. They soon after caught a neighbor's boy by the 
heel, in one of the same traps. A large, good natured specimen of the " Genus 
Yankee," about twenty years of age, who, anxious to become versed in all the 
mysteries of woodcraft, was peering about to see how a wolf trap was set. He 
found out — as well as how one was sprung. His cries soon brought his father to 
his assistance, and gave the wolf hunters no further trouble. 

But the wolves, and their allies the bears and wild-cats, have disappeared. The 
growth of the township has not been rapid. It could not be expected when we 
consider the difficulties to be overcome. At the first township meeting only 35 
votes were polled. Yet in 1868, at the Presidential election, she polled 252 votes, 
and her present population (1870) is 1,205. Thrifty farms greet you at every 
turn ; comfortable frame cottages take the place of the log hut of the pioneer ; 
roads on section lines traverse all parts of the township ; and, from 36 square 
miles of wilderness, she has grown in thirty-three years to be an enterprising, 
thrifty, agricultural town. 

The first school was taught in a log house erected by Mr. Clark, on the north- 
east corner of section 8, about the year 1842. This, in time, gave way to a small 
frame building, painted red, and known throughout the country as the " red 
school house," which was succeeded, in 1863, by the present elegant structure on 
the same site, which takes the name and color of its predecessor. There are, in 
all, eight school houses in the township— all comfortable frame buildings. 

The society of United Brethren built a church on section 28 in 1867, which, 
although plain and modest, is neat and tasty, an honor to the association and an 
ornament to the community. It is situated on one of the most elevated points 
in the township, and can be seen for miles around. 

Gaines has been without railroad communication until the present year, (1870) 
when the Grand River Valley Railroad was constructed through her territory. 
Hammond Station was established on the farm of S. A. Hammond, on section 11, 
and a large freight and passenger depot, with telegraph oflice, erected. Wood- 
ward & Buckingham have erected a large grain elevator. W. W. Pierce and 
Philetus Marsh, Esq., have each a small grocery running, and the place already 
assumes a business aspect. 

8 



58 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY, 

FIRST TOWNSHIP OFFICERS. 

ELECTED APRIL 3d, 1848. 

Supervisor —Peter Van Lew. Clerk — James M. Pelton. Treasurer — Charlea 
Kelley. Justices of the Peace — Joseph Blain, Josiah Drake and Robert R. Jones. 
Assessors — Foster Kelley and Abraham T. Andrews. Commissioners of Highways — 
Daniel Rice, Levi M. Dewey and William Kelley. School Inspectors — Renssalaer 
Mesnard, A. T. Andrews. Poor Directors — Orson Cook, Levi Cheney. Consta- 
bles — Lorenzo W. Sandford, John E. Guild, Foster Kelley, Daniel Williams. 
PRESENT TOWNSHIP OFFICERS. 

Supervisor — James M. Pelton. Clerk — George Cook. Treasurer — Morris Free- 
man. Commissioners of Highways — Chester C. Mitchell, John M. Hanna, William 
B. Pickett. School Inspectors — Abraham C. Clemens, Aaron C. Bowman. Over- 
seers of the Poor — James M. Pelton, Morris Freeman. Constables — Samuel Zel- 
ner, John M. Hanna and Thomas M. Read. 



GRAND RAPIDS. 

The township of Kent was organized April 4th, 1834. There does not appear 
to have been any certain limits to the organization, but it is supposed to have 
embraced all the settlements within the present County of Kent. The records 
from that time to the present are now in the possession of the township clerk. 
The division, now called the township of Grand Rapids, received its name in 
April, 1842. 

The first township meeting was held at the house of Joel Guild, April 4, 1834. 
This house stood on the present site of the City National Bank, and was the only 
frame building in the county except that occupied as a Catholic church. The 
officers elected were : Supervisor — Rix Robinson ; Clerk — Eliphalet Turner ; 
Assessors — Joel Guild and Barney Burton ; Collector — Ira Jones. This is the 
same election that was referred to in the history of Ada, to be found in another 
place. 

At the time of the organization, and for several years thereafter, the taxes were 
collected by the collector, and paid over to the supervisor, and disbursed by him. 
In 1839 a treasurer was elected. The first entry on his book reads as follows : 
" May, 14, 1839, received of E. W. Davis, supervisor, eight dollars, on the Grand 
River Bank. Three dollars on the Ypsilanti Bank, one dollar and twenty-five 
cents on the Bank of Pontiac, and sixty-two cents in specie." Amouut of taxes 
collected the year previous, $174.00. This includes all the taxes collected in 
what is now Grand Rapids town and city, Ada and Paris. The rapid growth 
and prosperity of the township will be seen when it is stated that the taxes col- 
lected for the year 1869 in Grand Rapids township amounted to $7,763.00. 

The first settler within the present limits of the township was Ezekiel Davis, 
who located on section thirty-four in 1834. He also erected the first house. 
During the same summer Lewis Reed, Ezra Reed, Porter Reed, David S. Leavitt, 
Robert M. Barr, settled in the township. James McCrath, George Young, and 
Simeon Stewart settled in the year 1836. Robert Thompson, John W. Fisk, and 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 59 

Mathew Taylor settled in the year 1837. Mr. Fisk erected the first hotel, now 
known as the Lake House. 

THE PRESENT OFFICERS 

of the township are : Supervisor— -Foster Tucker ; Clerk — Charles J. Manktelow; 

Treasurer — Henry B. Davis. 

THE SOIL 
is of good quality, excepting that in the northeastern part of the township. The 
land is usually rolling, yet in places is quite hilly. The town is generally adapted 
to the production of wheat and other grain, and is equally well adapted to fruit 
culture. There are several small marshes in the town, but the largest and most 
productive is on section eight, and contains about one hundred and fifty acres. 
The principal part of it belongs to the estate of Obed H. Foote. Saddle Bag 
Swamp contains about three hundred acres, and is situated on sections twenty- 
three, twenty-four, twenty-five and twenty-six. There are a few more swamps, 
but all of them are small. 
There are twelve 

LAKES 
in the township. The largest is Reed's. This lake is well knawn to the citizens 
of Grand Rapids, being a recognized summer resort for pleasure seekers. Grounds 
have recently been fitted up and tastily laid out with walks by the Grand Rapids 
Boat Club, which will add greater attraction to the place. On the north side of 
the lake is the " Lake House," whose present proprietor is Delos Drew, Esq. 
Boats and fishing tackle are kept by H. B. Miller and John Paul on the south 
side, for the use of visitors. 

The 

MINERAL SPRING 

excitement which has run so high throughout the State during the past summer, 
has not passed us by. One of these u Fountains of Youth " hag been discovered 
on the banks of the lake just mentioned, which is supposed to be of considerable 
medicinal value. The water has been analyzed by Prof. Kedzie, of Lansing, who 
makes the following report : 

SOLID RESIDUE IN A GALLON, 28.326. 

CONSISTING OF 

Carbonate of lime ^„ 11.59 

Carbonate of magnesia .,„ 10.80 

Carbonate of iron % „ 50 

Sulphate of lime *%.,,,. 1.49 

Common salt N 1.50 

Chloride of Potassium „ 95 

Silica 1.10 

Organic matter and loss %.%•..,,,,,, 1.96 

Free carbonic acid 17.1-6 inches. 
The public 

SCHOOLS 
in this township are in a flourishing coA$tian^ every infcab itant being attached 
to a regularly organized school district. 



60 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

Lake sehool house, in district No. 3, situated on the southeast corner of section 
twenty-nine, was erected in the year 1859. It is a brick structure, with a bell. 
The school room is supplied with many of the modern conveniences. 

The school house in district No. 8, situated on the southwest corner of section 
five, was erected in the year 1863. It is a neat, substantial wooden building. 

Knapp school house, in district No. 7, situated on section seventeen, is a 
wooden structure. It was erected in the year 1850. 

The school house in district No. 5, situated on section thirty-six, near the resi- 
dence of James H. Martin, was erected in the year 1852. It is a wooden building. 

The school house in district No. 2, situated on section twenty-five, near Perry 
Hills, is a substantial wooden structure with a bell. It was erected in the year 
1869. 

The school house in district No. 9, situated on the southwest corner of section 
eleven, was constructed of wood, in the year 1850. 

The school house in district No. 10, located on section ten, was erected in the 
year 1860. It was constructed of wood. 

The Beckwith school house in district No. 11, situated on section sixteen, was 
erected in the year 1860. It is a very neat, wooden structure. 

The schogl house in district No. 4, situated on Bridge street, on section number 
twenty-one, was erected in the year 1860. Material, wood. 

There are two 

HOTELS 
in the township. The Powers Hotel, aud the Lake House. The former is situated 
near the city limits, and is kept by A. Powers. The latter is situated near Reed's 
and is kept by Delos Drew. Owing to its proximity to the city this township 
has no postofiice, mill, factory, machine shop, store or church. 



GRATTAN. 

Grattan, one of the eastern tier of towns, is bounded on the north by Oakfield, 
on the east by Otisco, Ionia county, on the south by Vergennes and on the west by 
Cannon. It was originally a part of Vergennes, and was erected into a separate 
town in 1846. It was largely settled in its southern portion, by emigrants direct 
from Erin, and in deference to them, the new town was named Grattan, in honor 
of the great Irish orator, at the instance, and by the influence of Hon. Volney W. 
Caukin, now a resident of Sparta. 

Its first town meeting to perfect its organization, was held on the first Monday 
of April, 1846, at the house of Converse Close ; and the number of votes polled 
was twenty-three, resulting in the election of the following named gentlemen as 
its 

FIRST OFFICERS. 

Supervisor— Milton C. Watkins. Clerk— Volney W. Caukin. Treasurer-— Eras- 
tus W. Beasom. Highway Commissioners— Thomas J. Morgan, Joshua Fish, Wm. 
C. Stanton. Justices of the Peace— Samuel H. Steele, John P. Weeks, William 
Byrne, Luther B. Cook. School Inspectors— Samuel H. Steele, Wm. Beaurmann. 
Constables— Jedediah H. Wood, Thomas J. Morgan. Overseers of Poor— Luther 
B Cook, Samuel H. Steele. Assessors — Anthony King, Barlow Barto. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 61 

OFFICERS IN 1870. 

Supervisor — Oliver J. Watkins. Treasurer — Joseph Tower. Clerk — George D. 
Wood. Justices of the Peace — Joseph Tower, Oliver I. Watkins, Wm. Daniels. 
School Inspectors — Asa W. Slayton, George C. Adams. Constable — Thomas M. 
Henry. Commissioners of Highways — Wm. C. Slayton, Thomas M. Henry. • 

The number of votes polled at the last town meeting was 240. 

By the census returns, the town has now a population of 1,298. 

Although the surface is quite broken in consequence of its extraordinary net- 
work of lakes, there are no ranges of hills, nor prominent highlands in the town, 
and its soil is remarkably uniform, adapting it to the mixed husbandry of the coun- 
try, and especially rendering it the best wdieat growing portion of the county. Its 
wool interests are more than an average, and its productions of hay, corn, oats, 
potatoes, and neat stock are very fair. Apples, pears, peaches, cherries, currants 
and grapes, are a universal success, and much attention is being paid by some to 
the cultivation and improvement of choice varieties of fruit3. Prominent among 
these stands Asa W. Slayton, and it well repays a lover of rural beauty, and horti 
cultural enterprise, and success, to visit his pleasant and tasteful home, situated 
on section 22, south of the Grand Rapids and Ionia State road. 

Formerly, considerable attention was paid to the raising of hops, and some 
years the returns for this crop reached as high as $10,000, but the reduction of 
prices has ruined the hop interest here, as in many other places. 

Mainly, the town is heavily wooded with oak and hickory, but sections 25 and 
36, and a portion of sections 5 and 35, are rich timber lands. 

There are no less than twenty-four lakes in this town, covering an area of 
from 36 to 300 acres each, besides a host of smaller lakes or ponds; but six de- 
mand especial notice. Nagles, or Murray's Lake, lies on sections 33 and 34 in 
Grattan, and extending more than half across section 4 in Vergennes, is the 
largest of these, and is remarkable for its peculiar shape, being nearly divided in 
two by a long, narrow, promontory of land owned by Mr. W. Fullington. 

Crooked Lake, lying on sections 20, 21 and 29, is one mile long, quite irregular 
in shape, and is noted for its Islands. Round Lake, a pretty sheet of water, on 
section 21, is one half mile long, and about the same in width, and contains about 
80 acres. This lake and Crooked Lake discharge their waters through Seely 
Creek into Flat River. 

Slay(on Lake is another 'small, but beautiful sheet of water, lying on section 23. 
It takes its name from one of the early settlers whose residence is near its shore. 
Musk-Rat Lake, on sections, 4, 5, 8 and 9, is one mile and a half long, and about 
one-fourth of a mile wide, on the average. It contains about 230 acres, and is 
bountifully stocked with fish. The kinds caught in it are black, rock and silver- 
bass, pickerel and muskelonge. 

Pine Island Lake, lying on sections 3 and 10, one mile and a quarter long, and 
three eights of a mile wide, is the mo3t beautiful of them all. Pine Island, from 
which the lake takes its name, lies on its bosom like a gem on the wave. The 
tar sweeping lake with its picturesque shores and forest crowned isle, as seen from 
the home of Mr. Converse Close, near it, fixes the gaze of the beholder like some 
enchanted scene, of which we sometimes dream. 



62 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

Grattan has no water course of any note, except Seely's Creek, the outlet of 
nine of its principle lakes. It is an insignificant stream, averaging no more than 
two rods wide, yet, with its numerous, and inexhaustible fountains, supplying 
water power sufficient for three grist mills and one saw mill, in its short course of 
half a dozen miles. It takes its rise in a small lake on section 15, just north of 
the State Road, three fourths of a mile east of Grattan Center, running north one 
and one quarter miles, through Pine Island Lake, west one and one quarter miles 
through Musk-Rat Lake, south-east one and one quarter miles through Wolf 
Lake, where it appears as a small stream running thence due east, passing within 
60 rods of its source, and debouching in Flat River, at the village of Smyrna, in 
Ionia county. It was named after Munson Seely, a young hunter, who, in early K 
days camped upon its banks and pursued the chase through its adjacent forests. 
In 1850, Edward Bellamy and Nathan Holmes, brothers in-law, formed a part- 
nership, and erected a grist mill upon the stream, near its embouchure from 
Wolf Lake, on section 16. This was the nucleous of Grattan Center. The mill is 
now owned by J. A. Adams & Bros. This place is the only business center in the 
town. It has twelve or fourteen dwellings, one hotel, one cabinet shop, one 
wagon shop, one cooper shop, two blacksmith shops, one paint shop, one drug 
store, two dry goods stores, and a fine new church. (Baptist, C. C. M-ller, Pastor.) 
It was erected in 1868. It is built of wood, painted white, costing $5,400. 

The Grattan Union School House, a white, two story, frame building, with two 
departments, is located here, on a beautiful eminence just east of the village. The 
Metropolitan Cheese Factory, is located just west of here, and its enterprising pro- 
prietor, Capt. B. .Madison, is opening up an apparently prosperous business for 
himself and the farmers for miles around, by this new branch of industry. Grat- 
tan Center is situated in a fine rural district, and its proprietors are wide-awake 
and enterprising, but altogether too far away from railroads for their own con- 
venience, or comfort. Within the past year, the place has suffered a severe loss 
in the sudden death of its esteemed citizen W. L. Atkins, a long time merohant, 
and efficient business man of the town. 

As early as 1848. the Catholics erected a small church in their cemetery, on sec- 
tion 32, dedicated to St. Patrick. In ten years their congregation had become 
much too large for the seating capacity of the ho use, and it was moved upon sec- 
tion 31, and converted into a School House, and a new and commodious edifice 
erected on an eminence one fourth of a mile west of the old site. 

This building, while undergoing repairs, was accidentally burned in 1868. Im- 
mediately, scores of teams were put upon the roads hauling lumber preparatory 
to the building of a new church, which is now in process of erection, and when 
completed will be an honor to its builders, and an ornament to the town. It is 
136 by 50 feet in size ; has a tower 168 feet high, and is lighted with massive 
windows of stained glass, which show with pleasing effect. 

The congregation is very large, and their annual picnic for the benefit of the 
church has become an " institution" of Grattan. It is noted for its tastefully ar- 
ranged, and bountifully supplied tables, and the hosts that congregate. Father 
Rivers is closely identified with the early history and prosperity of this people, 
but J. P. McMannus is now the resident priest. 

Besides the Union School, Grattan has but four district school houses, but, as 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 63 

would at first seem, its educational interests are not neglected, as it is completely 
gurrounded by fractional districts. 

In 1843, the first settlement was made within the limits of the town, by Dennis 
and John McCarthy, on section 30, and Richard Giles, on section 32. In 1844, 
Luther B. Cook built the first house north of Seely's Creek, on section 12. The 
same year, William Smith, also settled on section 12. Converse Close, on section 
11; Jared Watkins, on section 13; Henry Green, on section 13 ; Anthony King, Alan- 
son King on section 1 ; Volney W. Caukin, on section 9 ; Michael Kennedy, on section 
19 ; and William McCarthy, on section 30. Prominent among the settlers of 1845, 
we may mention John P. Weeks, located on section 25 ; Orson Nichoson, on ac- 
tion 2 ; William Byrnes, on section 27, and Anson Green, on section 14. In 1^46 
Russel Slayton, located on section 14, and Dudley Newton, on section 17. Among 
the settlers of 1847, we find Martin Mason, located on section 23. Of these old 
settlers, most reside where they first located, but Anthony King, Russel Slayton 
and Orson Nichoson, are dead. Marshal King, son of Alan son King, born Decem- 
ber, 1844, is supposed to be first white child born in the town. The first death 
occurred in the fall of 1846, in the family of a Mr. Springer, then living on section 
15. Isaac Springer, an interesting little boy of five years, was the first victim, but 
in less than 18 months, five of the family were laid side by side, and now sleep 
on the very spot where the Union School House stands. 

There are many interesting personal experiences incident to the early settle- 
ment of a new country, which the limits of this work will not permit us to record, 
but the circumstances attending the first wedding in this town are so peculiar, we 
may not omit to mention it here. A widely known, and highly esteemed couple, 
still residents of the town, wished to get married, but there was no functionary 
in that part of Kent, vested with authority to perform the ceremony. A well 
known Justice of Ionia county, chanced to be visiting at the house where the par- 
ties were, and their dilemma was made known to him. Of course he had no 
jurisdiction in Kent, but the county line was only half a mile away, and a walk 
through the forest, was proposed and agreed to. The Justice took his stand in 
Ionia county, and the bride and bridegroom, protesting they would not leave 
the town to be married, joined hands just over the line, and in the presence of a 
few friends, gathered beneath the grand old oaks, on the pleasant afternoon of 
July 28, 1844, the twain were made one to their own gratification and the gratifi- 
cation and amusement of their friends here, as elsewhere. 

In those early days, the settler, with his axe, cut the way for his future home, 
and in the absence of stores, grist mills and saw mills, supplied, by his own in- 
genuity, the actual necessities of himself and family. To-day, all the conveniences 
of civilized life are at his hand, and the well cultivated farms, and the more than 
ordinary wealth displayed in dwellings and out buildings, are highly significant 
of the sobriety, enterprise, and consequent prosperity of the people. 

Grattan has not only maintained an honorable position in the county, but has 
also made its record among the dignitaries of the State. Of its first set of officers, 
Hon. Volney W. Caukin has once represented the Twenty-ninth District, <at Lan- 
sing, and Hon. Milton C. Watkins, its first Supervisor, has been Representative, 
also Senator in the State Legislature, and now holds an appointment under the 
United States Government. 



64 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

LOWELL. 

This township lies north of Bowne, and south of Vergennes. It is one of the 
eastern tier of townships in Kent county, being bounded on the east by Boston, 
Ionia county, and on the west by the township of Cascade. 

Its soil, timber and productions are greatly diversified. The soil of the south 
half is mostly clay or loam, lies very high, and is generally level and well adapted 
to farming purposes, and on account of its elevation, an excellent fruit section. 

The north half is considerably broken ; by Grand River, which crosses the 
township from east to west, at an average distance of one mile from the north 
line, and Flat River, which comes in from Vergennes, on the north, and enters 
Grand River about one and one half miles west from the county line, of Kent and 
Ionia counties. The river bottoms, from half a mile to a mile in width, are 
heavily timbered with elm, ash, soft maple, etc., and when cleared make good 
meadow lands. Next back of these bottoms, on either side, rise the sand and clay 
bluffs, which line these streams throughout the greater part of their course in the 
county. In some places they rise to the highth of nearly 200 feet, and are usual- 
ly covered with oak, some time quite heavy, but in other places only what is com- 
monly known as " openings," the timber being light, and the ground covered 
with a small growth of oak, interspersed with hazel, and other shrubs. These 
bluffs, somewhat broken by many small brooks which come in from both sides, 
extend back an average of about a mile on each side, which, on the north side 
brings us about to the township line, and on the south to the high level tract be- 
fore mentioned. This latter is partially watered by some small lakes, the largest 
of which is Pratt Lake, covering about 300 acres on the north part of section 25, 
near the east line of the township, and about three miles south of Grand River. 
It is named in honor of William Pratt, who settled on the north side of it about 
the year 1850. Barcis, or McEwing Lake, on the east part of section 32, is nearly 
one mile in length, but quite narrow, its greatest width being less than 80 rods. 
It extends from the northeast to southwest.' On the northwest corner of the 
same section is a pond of about ten acres, called Morse Lake. Between them, and 
on the south part of the same section, is a small lily pond, hardly to be called a 
lake. Stoughton Lake is a small lake of 4 or 5 acres, near the center of section 
35, and has a tamarack swamp of about 20 acres on the east of it. There is also 
a small lake of 3 or 4 acres, and a swamp of about 15 acres on the south side of 
section 22. A swamp of some 300 or 400 acres lies west of Pratt Lake, on section 
26. On the south side of section 33, and extending over the line into Bowne, is 
a fine marsh of about 40 acres. From Pratt Lake and the swamp already mentioned, 
to this marsh is a ravine through which is a stream of water in wet seasons, but 
which dries away in ordinary weather, leaving the lake without any visible out- 
let. The people along the line have recently petitioned the County Drain Com- 
missioner to open this natural water course deep enough to form a living stream, 
to the south line of Lowell township, from which it would flow into a small 
stream which runs to Thornapple River. Aside from the sources already men- 
tioned, and some few smaller ponds and swamps, water can only be obtained in 
this part of the township by digging a depth of 50 to 100 feet. The timber 
of this southern part was originally sugar maple and beech, interspersed with 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT, COUNTY. 65 

very large red and white oaks. This township is well supplied with stone for 
building purposes, and in some parts they are used to some extent for fencing, 
especially in the northwest corner of the township, and various other places north 
of Grand River. Fine gravel beds also abound throughout the north part> and 
the soil is quite gravelly along the road leading down the river from Lowell vil- 
lage. 

PIONEERS. 

In the year 1829, Daniel Marsac came from Detroit, and went among the In- 
dians in the vicinity of the present village of Lowell, as a trader, although a re- 
gular, trading post was not established until 1831, when Mr. Marsac built a log 
hut on the south side ol Grand River, near the present site of J. Kopf & Co.'s ex- 
tensive chair works. 

What changes a few years have made ! When Mr. Marsac first pitched his tent 
within the borders of Kent county, then an almost unbroken wilderness, the only 
roads were the Indian trails, and the only means of navigation was the canoe, or 
" dug out," as it is sometimes called ; or, for more extensive transportion, a raft 
made of poles, or small logs, fastened together. We do not need to speak of the 
railroads and other facilities for travel now, as the reader can easily compare the 
present with the past. 

In the spring of 1835, a family by the name of Robinson, numbering in all 44 
persons, set out from the State of New York, and arriving at Detroit, embarked 
on a small vessel for Grand Haven via Mackinaw. On the 7th day of June of that 
year they reached the mouth of Grand River, and, putting their household goods, 
etc., on rafts, and " paddling their own canoes," made their way up the river and 
settled in Kent and Ottawa counties, principally the latter, in the vicinity of 
Blendon. These were only a part of the Robinsons. Rix Robinson had been 
trading with the Indians at Thornapple— now called Ada — for several years prev- 
ious to this, and had one son by the squaw whom he had taken for a wife soon 
after he came there. A year later, in 1836, another brother, named Lewis, cam« 
with his family and settled on the west bank of Flat River, in the south part of 
what is now the village of Lowell. He was soon followed by Rodney, a brother 
from the Blendon settlement, who remained one year with Lewis, and then re- 
moved up the river into the present township of Vergennes, where he and another 
brother, Lucas, have made good farms. Philander Tracy — a relative of the 
Robinson family, who now resides at Grand Rapids, and is generally known as 
Judge Tracy, also came from the State of New York, and was for some time with 
Lewis Robinson. The timber for their first log hut was cut two or three miles up 
Flat River, and floated down by the help of Indians, who were always friendly to 
those who used them well. 

There were good and bad Indians, as well as good and bad whites. One Indian, 
named Negake, who was not, however, a member of either of the tribes then oc- 
cupying this portion of the State, but a renegade from some Eastern tribe, who 
had taken up his abode with the Pottawotamies, caused the whites some trouble, 
and was reported to have killed one of the Government Surveyors some years 
previous, when an attempt was made to survey and throw into market all lands 
up to the 43 degree of latitude, which parallel cut across a bend in the river in this 
9 



66 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

township, and took a strip about a mile in width on the north side, to which sur- 
vey the Indians objected. Subsequently the river was made the frontier line, and 
no lands north of the river were put into market until August, 1839. 

A tract of land lying on the east side of Flat River, was set apart as University 
lands. In 1836, Luther Lincoln, from Grand Rapids, formerly from the south part 
of the State, where he had been quite a wealthy man, came and settled on a small 
lot of this University land, and built a log house, which was afterwards used by 
Don A. Marvin, as a tavern. Mr. Lincoln and Rodney, and Lucas Robinson, 
helped the Indians to fence in a tract of about 100 acres, on the east side of Flat 
River, and about one mile from Grand River, for a planting ground, to prevent 
any trouble on account of their letting their cattle run at large on " Uncle Sam's 
Domain," as the cattle would have been likely to destroy their crops, and this 
would natdrally have led to hostilities. 

Mr. Rodney Robinson states that the Indians were usually good neighbors, and 
even Mr. Lincoln — whose mind was somewhat wandering, and consequently led 
him into some trouble with the early white settlers, always got aloDg finely with 
the Indians, and when, on account of some " unpleasantness 1 ' with the whites he 
was obliged to leave this point, he went up the river a long distance and erected 
a saw mill, right in the midst of the Indian country. They were often employed 
to work for the early white settlers, and generally well paid, although it was 
usually best to pay them in provisions and other necessaries, rather than in 
money, for, if they got money, many of them would go off to places where they 
could get liquor, and come home drunk, when they would be quarrelsome and 
dangerous neighbors, until the fire-water and its effects were gone. No liquor 
was allowed to be sold to them in this vicinity if the settlers could prevent it, 
although itinerant traders would sometimes undertake to sell it to them in order 
make it easier to cheat them in their trades. 

In 1837, Charles Newton, Matthew Patrick, Samuel P. Roll, Ira A. Danes, Wil- 
liam Vandeusen and Mr. Francisco — nearly all of whom were from New York, 
settled along the north side of Grand River, on the old Grand River Road, from 
two to five miles west of Flat River. This road came from Ionia, by the way of 
Fallassburg — at which point the first bridge was built across Flat River, in 1840, 
previous to which the river was forded — and passed about two miles west of the 
mouth of the river, thence along down Grand River, near the side of the bluffs. 

The following bit of school romance is introduced without any apology: In 
1837 the people of this vicinity organized a School District, including all the set- 
tlers on Flat River, and being the only School District between Grand Rapids 
and Ionia. They erected a log school house in 1838, in the north part of the pre- 
sent village, on the west side of Flat River, and employed Miss Caroline Beard, 
from New York State, to teach the first school that summer. The following win- 
ter the district furnished a cook-stove and provisions, and Miss Beard lived in 
the school house and kept the school. Caleb D. Page, who had taken up a piece 
of land near the Fallassburg of later days, took matrimony into his head and 
Miss B. to his heart, and the bonds of wedlock were entered into by this couple 
in the school house. 

In 1839, William B. Lyon and Ransom Rolf, also from New York, settled on the 



HI8T0RY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 67 

same road, near those previously mentioned. At the time of the sale of lands in 
this tract, (previously mentioned as occurring in August, 1839) the Indians at- 
tempted to enter and hold the land they had been tilling, under the pre-emption 
laws, but, as the agent knew nothing about whether the red man could hold land 
by those laws, the matter was referred to the General Land office, and, while 
waiting the decision, Philander Tracy attempted to gain possession by erecting 
a amall hut on it, and sowing the field to oats, which were destroyed by the In- 
dians. His papers which had been granted were afterward revoked, and, al- 
though the decision was that Indians could not enter lands in their own name, 
they lent money to a Frenchman by the name of Nontah, and he bought the land, 
and afterward, failing to pay back the money, he gave them a deed of it. 

The lands were afterward found to be a part of the " University Grant," andso 
also was the land taken by Lincoln. When Mr. L. left here, he sold his claim to 
Daniel Marsac, who, in 1847, platted it under the name ot " the village of Dans- 
ville," which name it retained until about the year 1855. Iu 1850 Mr. M. sold his 
claims to Edwin Avery, of Ionia, who then paid the State and obtained a com- 
plete title to the same. John B. Shear and some others, came in about the year 
1844, and settled in or near the present village of Lowell. In December, 1846, 
Cyprian S. Hooker, formerly from Connecticut, came from Saranac, Ionia county, 
where he had been a pioneer and almost the only settler. Mr. Hooker erect eji the 
first trained house in the township, which was also the first in the village. His 
lumber was brought from Saranac. He commenced his house on the 18th day of 
December, 1846, and on the ensuing Christmas moved into it with his family. 
This would be called quick work even in these days of steam and electricity. 
Said house is the one now owned and occupied by Robert Marshall. In 1847 Mr. 
Hooker erected the grist mill on the east side of Flat River, now owned and since 
enlarged by William W. Hatch, who erected another large mill on the west side 
of the river in 18G7. When Mr. H. first erected his mill it was run by an overshot 
water-wheel — water being brought by means of a race, a distance of about 40 rods 
from the Island in Flat River. In 1849, Mr. Hooker constructed the dam across 
the river just below Bridge street. In 1849, the first sermon ever preached in 
Dansville, was delivered at the house of C. S. Hooker, Esq., by Rev. S. S. Brown, 
a Congregational Minister. Mr. Hooker also had the job of building the first 
frame school house in the village, which was the first in the east part of the coun- 
ty. It was built in 1850 and stood on the present M. E. Church site. Soon after 
this a Sunday School was established by the agent of the Congregational Union 
Society. 

The Lowell post office was established about the year 1848, and took its name 
from the township, which was organized about this time, and which seems to 
have been named on account of its prospects as a manufacturing point, although 
the village was still called Dansville. After Mr. Avery bought Mr. Marsac's 
claim, he added some territory to the original plat, making in all about 100 acres. 
In 1854 Messrs. Richards & Wickham platted nearly 100 acres on the west side of 
Flat River, which they named 

LOWELL. 
About the same time Chapin & Booth's addition to the village of jDansyille was 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



platted, containing about 30 acres, and lying on the east of the original plat, but 
within a year, by common consent, the whole village was called Lowell, since 
which the following additions have been platted, and called Additions to the 
Village of Lowell ; Fox's Addition, lying north of R. & W.'s plat on the west side 
Flat River, containing 52 acres, platted by James S. Fox. Lee's Addition, on the 
north of Avery's plat, east of Flat River, containing 48 acres, platted by Peter Lee 
in 1868. SnelVs Addition, on the west and south of R. & W.'s addition, contain- 
ing about 50 acres, platted by Mrs. Caroline Snell in 1869. EllsworWs Addition, 
lying north and east of Lee's addition, contains 60 acres, 20 of which are within 
the present corporate limits of the village of Lowell, and the remainder in the 
township of Vergennes, platted by A. M. Ellsworth in 1870. 

An act to incorporate the Village of Lowell passed the State Legislature in 1859, 
but for some reason the village was not then organized. It was re-enacted March 
15, 1861, and the organization completed in the summer following. 

FIRST VILLAGE OFFICERS. 
President — Cyprian S. Hooker. Recorder — Charles A. Blake. Treasurer — 
Simeon Hunt. Marshal — J. Chapman. Assessor — Cyrus Hunt. Trustees — Wil- 
liam W. Hatch, J. B. Shear and Arvine Peck. 

PRESENT VILLAGE OFFICERS. 

President — Morris R. Blodget. Recorder — John Huggins. Treasurer — Clark 
M. Devendorf. Marshal — Robert Marshall. Trustees ~L. B. Lull, John C. Scott 
and Simeon Hunt. 

The village proper now contains 1,503 inhabitants, according to the census of 
1870. During the past four years some fine brick buildings rA,ve been erected, 
among which are the large two story block on Bridge street, west of the river, 
containing five stores below, and a large hall and offices above ; Lee's Block, two 
story, which contains two stores and a hall above ; King's Block, now used by 
Joseph Amphlett as a carriage factory, and Graham's Block, three story, contain- 
ing two stores, printing office and other offices, and which was erected almost en- 
tirely by Mr. Graham with his own hands. Besides the brick stores there are 
some very good wooden buildings. The village contains in all between 30 and 40 
stores, besides the usual number of meat markets, restaurants, etc. There are two 
hotels: The Clifton House, part brick, kept by Charles Morse, and the Franklin 
House, a large frame building, kept by C. C. Parks. 

MANUFACTURING ESTABLISHMENTS. 

Hatch & Craw's grist mills are two large framed mills containing three run of 
stone each, and capable ot grinding 50,000 barrels of flour per year, besides doing 
a large custom business. Water power. 

The Lowell Woolen Mill, erected by Blodgett Brothers, in 1867, is a good, 
framed building, now owned by M. R. Blodgett, and does about $20,000 worth 
of business per year. Water power. 

Wilson, Gardner & Co. have a steam planer, sash, door and blind factory, 
erected in 1868, and are doing a good custom and shipping business. 

Avery & Johnson have a planer and sash, door and blind factory, which is 
doing an extensive custom business, and shipping largely both east and west. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 69 

This factory runs by water power, and was erected ia 1868, on the site of their 
mill which was destroyed by fire the previous year. In connection with this 
mill is a machine for the manufacture of wooden eave troughs— a new invention 
of Mr. E. W. Avery. 

FORT'S WESTERN MEDICINE MANUFACTURING COMPANY. 

E. M. Fort, the patentee of these medicines, commenced business a few years 
since on borrowed capital, paying therefor at the rate of 15 per cent, interest. 
Many of our readers will remember having seen his pleasant face on the streets 
of the various towns and villages of Kent county, when he was selling his reme- 
dies at retail. The business had increased so rapidly and become so popular in 
Lowell, that in March, 1870, some of the leading capitalists of the town joined 
him, and established the above-named stock company with a chartered capital of 
$100,000, making Mr. Fort the secretary and business manager, with the assist- 
ance and advice of a board of directors. Since that time they have branched out 
and are rapidly introducing it in the adjoining states, and money invested in the 
company's stock must prove exceedingly profitable. Parties who know best, 
think it will soon pay a dividend of 30 per cent, as the sales are already immense 
and largely on the increase ; these preparations being acknowledged to be among 
the best medicines in the market, their popularity having gained for them the 
endorsement of the widely known and popular drug house of Farrand, Sheley & 
Co., of Detroit, generally admitted to be the largest wholesale drug house in 
Michigan, who have purchased a large amount of the capital stock of the com- 
pany, and are acting as their agents for Detroit. 

Boyce & Nash have a shop for the manufacture of agricultural implements, 
axes, etc., making about 150 dozen axes per year, and manufacturing in all about 
$6,000 worth per year. 

Joseph Amphlett's carriage factory is quite an extensive establishment, turn- 
ing out about 100 carriages and wagons per year. 

CHURCHES. 
The Methodist Episcopal church building is a fine brick structure 40x60 feet in 
size, completed and dedicated in 1859. It stands on a little rise of ground on 
Bridge street, east of the business part of the village. Cost over $8,000, includ- 
ing furniture. Near this is the unpretending Baptist church, which is a good, 
little framed building, erected in 1859. During the present season this church 
has been tastefully fitted up and newly painted. The Congregational church on 
the west side of Flat River is a good looking, framed building, 40x56 feet in size, 
erected in 1858 at a cost of $2,500. There are also two or three church societies 
and a Masonic Lodge and a Good Templar's Lodge, which meet in halls. 

SCHOOLS. 
There is a good, framed school-house 36x54 feet in size, and two stories high, 
which was erected in 1862 at a cost of about $2,000. It is being repaired the 
present season, but is small for the size of the district, which takes in quite a 
large extent of territory, and a larger building will soon be required. There is 
one ward or branch school in connection with this district, which is the old dis- 



70 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 

trict No. 1, of the township of Lowell. This branch school is located on the 
•outh side of Grand River, in the vicinity of the Detroit and Milwaukee Railroad 
depot, where a village called Segwun was platted by William Chesebro, about 
the time the railroad was built, but which is seldom known by that name. 

MILLS AND FACTORIES. 

On the above-mentioned plat is the steam saw mill ot 0. T. Wooding, erected 
in 1866 by Knapp & Tucker, and capable of cutting 20,000 feet of lumber per 
day; also, the cider and vinegar manufactory of E. R. Peck, erected in 1869, and 
capable of grinding 18,000 bushels of apples per year. In this vicinity is also 
quite a collection of small houses, mostly occupied by laborers in the above- 
named establishments and on the railroad. Near at hand and a little east of the 
depot is the extensive chair factory of John Koph & Co., which has a small cluster 
of pleasant looking buildings around it, and has withal an appearance of thrift 
and neatness. This building was erected in 1858, by Seth Cogswell, and the 
machinery is run by an overshot waterwheel, water being obtained from a small 
spring brook which rises about two miles south and comes in through a gorge in 
the hills. 

About a mile distant is the large grain cradle and bed bottom factory of E. W. 
Tucker. His first mill was a three-story frame building 80x40 feet in size, erected 
in 1862, in connection with which is a new mill or shop 35x50 feet, erected in 
1868. In the one item of grain cradles they have facilities for manufacturing 
1,200 dozen per year, besides bed-bottoms and harvesting implements, such as 
hay-rakes, etc. This is also run by an overshot water-wheel. From 20 to 60 
hands are employed. 

At the head of this stream, and about two miles south of the depot, is a fine bed 
of marl, on the farm of Alexander McBride, from which Mr. McB. has manufac- 
tured $4,000 worth ot lime within the past four years. 

THE GRAND RIVER NURSERIES. 

N. P. Husted, proprietor, are situated about five miles southwest of the 
Lowell depot. He commenced planting in 1862, putting out about 40,000 
apple trees, 40,000 peach trees, and other stock, since which time he has 
been gradually increasing until now he sets 300,000 apple and 300,000 
peach and other stock every year. Besides this he is giving considerable atten- 
tion to ornamental stock. The nurseries now cover 130 acres, all closely planted, 
and the amount of sales is nearly $50,000 per year. From 30 to 60 hands are 
employed. He is also turning his attention to orchard culture, having at present 
1,000 four-year old peach trees, over 500 apple trees, 400 pear trees, 200 plum 
trees, and 4,000 grape vines ; also, a good assortment of small fruits. The soil is 
a clay loam, which is well adapted to the growth of hardy, sound, nursury stock 
and profitable orchard culture. There are now over 15,000 orchard trees in the 
immediate vicinity, all of which have been set within a few years. Peaches have 
borne well every year. 

EARLY SETTLERS SOUTH OF GRAND RIVER. 

Among the pioneers in this part part of the county was George Post, who came 
from Connecticut in 1842 and settled on the northwest corner of section 23, at the 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 71 

crossing of the territorial road from Portland to Grand Rapids, and the one from 
Battle Creek via Hastings, to the trading post then established by Daniel Marsac 
at Lowell. He was thefirBt, and for three years the only settler south of the pres- 
ent line of the D. & M. Railroad, within the township. In 1843, Mainard Chater- 
don, with his wife and family of three sons and three daughters, came from Cal- 
houn county, Michigan, (formerly from the state of New York), and went nearly 
to the southwest corner of the township, on section 31, where his widow and the 
three sons and one of the daughters still live, and have nice farms. In 1848-9, 
Harrison Wickham, Peter Hornbrook, Charles Gordon, Mr. Monk, and Mr. Mon- 
tague settled in the south and southwest part of the township, followed in 1850 
to 1854 by John Brannan, William Pratt, John Yeiter, Jacob and Christian 
Loyer, George Acker, Jacob Yeiter, James Easterby, James Wallace and William 
Proctor, most of whom were from Ohio, and of Dutch descent, and nearly all of 
whom are now wealthy farmers, having good farms and buildings. 

ORGANIZATION. 

The township of Lowell was organized in 1848, being previously a part of the 
township of Vergennes, which originally included all of the east part of the 
county. The first township meeting was held at the house of Mr. Timothy White. 
FIRST TOWNSHIP OFFICERS. 

Supervisor — Cyprian S. Hooker. Clerk — Timothy White. Treasurer — Henry 
Church. Justices — C. S. Hooker, Daniel McEwen, Samuel P. Rolf and Ira A. 
Danes. 

PRESENT TOWNSHIP OFFICERS. 

Supervisor — Robert Hunter, Jr. Clerk — John Huggins. Treasurer — Webster 
Morris. Justices — Robert Hunter, Jr., Simeon Hunt, Joseph W. Sprague and 
Matthew Hunter. 



NELSON. 

The township of Nelion is one of the northern tier of townships, and is bounded 
on the north by Pierson, in Montcalm county, on the east by the township of 
Spencer, on the south by Courtland, and on the west by Solon. 

Twenty years ago this township was an unbroken wilderness where wild ani* 
mals made their homes but little molested by man, and twenty years is a short 
time in which to make a history. But the stalwart men who are now cutting 
down its forests and converting the timber into lumber, while at the same time 
fitting the soil for the growth of grains and fruits are doing a good work, which, 
if it offers few salient points for the historian, is still of immense value to man- 
kind. If he who causes a blade of grass to grow where there was none before is 
a public benefactor, the world must owe much to those who open the wilderness 
to the uses of man. 

We are informed that William H. Bailey was the first white settler in Nelson, 
having settled there in 1851, some time in July of that year. He still resides in 
the township on section 8. We are glad to have sold him a copy of this history, 
and have no doubt he will feel a justifiable pride when he reads the long list of 



72 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

residents who now point him out as that honored individual " the oldest inhabi- 
tant." Mr. John S. Jones moved into the township during the same year, and is 
said to be the second settler. He now resides on section 33. 

Among the early settlers, although we did not learn the date of their coming, 
were John M. Towns, Josiah Towns, N. R. Hill, D. B. Stout, H. M. Stanton, 
George Stout, Andrew Stout, Riley Smith, Samuel Punches, Joseph M. Clark, 
Andrew S. Tindall, John N. Tindall, John Dean, Elisha Dean, H. D. Streeter, 
Thomas Almy, Mr. Ream and his two sons, Bradford Bailey, James Bailey and 
Joseph Wood. 

Wni. C. Benjamin, a bachelor, came to this town several years ago with a 
" pocket full of rocks," from California, purchased a fine farm, and improved and 
beautified it. He also repented of this lonely state, married an intelligent lady 
and became the father of two children. Last summer, at the close of harvesting, 
in which he had worked hard, he committed suicide by cutting his own throat, — 
it is supposed in a fit of temporary insanity. This sad tragedy cast a gloom over 
the entire community where he lived. 

ORGANIZATION. 

Nelson was organized as a township by the Board of Supervisors on the 13th 
day of October, 1854, and the first township election was held at the house of 
Charles H. Leake on the first Monday of April, 1855, George Hoyle, John S. 
Jones and George N. Stoddard, being Inspectors of Election. The following were 
the 

FIRST TOWNSHIP OFFICERS. 

Supervisor — George Hoyle. Clerk — George N. Stoddard. Treasurer — Charles 
H. Leake. Justices of the Peace — Samuel Punches, Simpson Anderson, Cyrus 
Stillwell, Harlow H. Stanton. Commissioners of Highways — Smith Barrett, Har- 
low H. Stanton, Moses E.Ross. School Inspectors — Harlow H. Stanton, Ithiel 
R. Smith. Constables — Bradford Bailey, Josiah D. Townes, Amos Bessey, Peter 
D. Buck. Overseers of Poor — Church Bailey, Joseph Wood. 

From this election we take a step of fifteen years and present the names of the 

PRESENT TOWNSHIP OFFICERS. 

Supervisor — Mindrus H. Whitney. Clerk — Brownell S. Simmons. Treasurer- 
David B. Stout. Justices of the Peace — Brownell S. Simmons, Mindrus H. Whit- 
ney, Jason R. Squires. Commissioners of Highways — Jason R. Squires, Stephen 
Ferner, Nathaniel Hughey. School Inspectors — Orion Smith, Nicholas R. Hill. 
Constable — William A. Dean. 

GENERAL DESCRIPTION. 

Pine timber predominates in this township, and in the northeast corner there 
are many large cedar and tamarack swamps. But the soil, although in many 
places light, as the presence of pine denotes, is still very productive, where, as is 
generally the case, beech, maple and other hard wood trees are mixed with the 
pine. For fruit raising this town promises to be one of the best in the county. 
Its streams are Black Creek, m the northern part of the township, and Little 
Cedar and Big Cedar, in the western part. "Pine Lake is a fine sheet of water, 
covering some 100 acres on sections 26 and 35. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. T3 

SCHOOL HOUSES. 

The school house in District No. 1, known as the Clark School House, is located 
in the center of section 8, and is a fine framed building, painted white. 

The school house in District No. 2, is a plain framed structure, standing near 
the northwest corner of section 20. It was built in 1869. 

The school house in District No. 3, a large white, framed building, was erected 
in 1869. It stands on the southeast corner of section 23. 

District No. 4, has a good, white, framed school house on the west line of section 
34. It was erected in 1867 and is known as the " White Dove :1 school house. 

The Cedar Springs school houses, used for a graded school, are described in the 
history of 

CEDAR SPRINGS, 

which village is located partly in this township and partly in Solon, its descrip- 
tion being given under the latter head. 



OAKFIELD. 

Oakfield, formerly a part of Courtland, lies twenty-one miles northeast of Grand 
Rapids, having Spencer on the north, Eureka, in Montcalm county, on the east, 
Grattan on the south, and Courtland on the west. 

The first settlement was made within its territory, June 5th, 1838, by Hon. 
Wm. R. Davis, w T ho located on section 19. There seems to have been no one save 
himself and family to break the solitude of the wilderness, till June, 1839, when 
Mr. Isaac Tower, Stephen S. Tower and William Thornton, (ex-Sheriff of Kent 
county,) with their families, moved in, and become comparatively near neighbors 
to the hitherto lonely pioneers. Stephen S. Tower and Mr. Thornton locating 
on section 29, and Mr. Isaac Tower on section 30. There were no more settle- 
ments till April, 1842, when Thomas Crinnion located on section 18, and David 
J. Gilbert on section 19, in September of the same year. In 1844, Sheldon Ashley 
selected a beautiful home on section 36, and in 1845, three brothers, Harry, Giles 
and Erie McArthur, located respectively on sections 33, 32 and 34. Morris Hart, 
section 8; Nathaniel W. Mack, section 12 ; John Davis, section 32 ; Levi White, 
section 21 ; James Elstley, section 31 ; William Peterson, section 20, and Benjamin 
Potter, section 21, may be mentioned as among the settlers of 1846 and 1847. 

At one time the town was organized under the name of Wabasis, but by sub- 
division of the territory, was again incorporated with Courtland, and finally per- 
manently organized under the name of Oakfield, through the influence of Sheldon 
Ashley, in March, 1849. Its first town meeting was held the first Monday of 
April, 1849, at a little log school house in district No. 1, on section 29. This was the 
first school house in the town, but the log cabin was replaced in 1852, by a frame 
structure thirty-six by twenty-six feet in size. This is the famous No. 1, that has 
educated, and sent forth more, and better teachers, than any other district school 
in the county. It is known as the White Swan School. Oakfield has six other 
district school houses : noteworthy among these is the Horton School House, a 
large frame edifice, painted white. It was erected in 1868, and is used as a church, 
10 



74 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

as well as for school purposes. It is located on sections 17 and 18, just across the 
road from the Horton Cemetery, beautifully situated on the southwest corner of 
section 8. There is no Union School in the town ; but its educational interests 
are, and have always been of paramount importance in the minds of its people. 
Its first school was organized with but six scholars — all the children then in town 
and kept in a private house, with Miss Sarah Davis, now Mrs. Almon Thompson 
of Courtland, as teacher. When a school house was finally erected, Mr. Harry 
McArthur was installed as teacher, and to his earnest labors many, not only in 
this town, but in adjacent towns, owe much of their advancement in knowledge. 

CHURCHES. 

Religious societies among the people of Oakfield have reached a highly ad 
vanced, and truly enviable position, if we may be allowed to judge of moral status 
by success, and pecuniary prosperity. It has three very fine church edifices, 
and all its places of worship are well attended. 

The First Baptist Church of Oakfield, is a fine frame structure, located on sec- 
tion 36. It was built in 1863, and has a fine bell. It cost about $2,200, and the 
honor of its erection is largely due to Shelden Ashley, one of the oldest inhabi- 
bitants of the town. C. C. Miller is the present pastor. 

The Second Baptist Society of Oakfield was organized in April, 1865, with some 
40 members, under the ministration of Rev. C. C. Miller, pastor, and Stephen S. 
Tower, Henry Rich, Thomas Jones, Nathan R. Squiers and William R. Jones, 
Trustees. The house belonging to this Society — the Second Baptist Church, of 
Oakfield — a fine frame building, dedicated January 14, 1808, stands upon on acre 
of ground purchased from the farm of Robert Olmsted, in the southeast corner of 
section 19. It is 36 by 56 feet in size, and has a tower 95 feet in height, which is 
furnished with a very fine toned bell that cost $400. The whole cost of the 
church was $4,150, of which the citizens of the City of Grand Rapids generously 
donated over $500. It has an organ, and an excellent choir under the efficient 
leadership of Mrs. Samuel Tower. Rev. C. C. Miller, is the pastor. 

The First Methodist Episcopal Church, of Oakfield, is also a very fine frame 
building, located on the south line of section, 9, one fourth of a mile away 
from the Second Baptist Church. 

The total cost of its erection closely approximated $4,500. It was dedicated 
April 14, 1809, and is yearly supplied by the circuit with a pastor. 

The physical geography of this town presents us with a rolling surface, quite 
frequently broken with lakes and ponds, with a soil much too sandy in the north- 
ern part, but a rich clay loam in the more southern portions, peculiarly adapt- 
ing it to w T heat culture, wool-growing, and dairying, besides the ordinary pro- 
duction of corn, oats, potatoes and buckwheat. 

Of wheat, large quantities of excellent quality, annually find their way from 
this town to the markets east and west; and as to wool, Oakfield has some of the 
best flocks, and carries some of the finest clips to the factories, of any town in 
the county. 

The dairy is receiving more and more attention, and pays exceedingly well, 
where care and capital are expended. 

Horticulture is in its infancy here as in many other towns ; but on some farms 



HI8T0RY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 75 

it has received a share of attention, and the returns in apples, pears, peaches, 
grapes, cherries, currants and strawberries, show that Oakfleld, in fruit raising, 
may become a peer of her successful sister towns. The timber is mainly oak; but, 
scattered over the town, there were some fine groves of pine, which are fast 
being decimated by the lumbermen's axe and saw. 

On sections 1 and 2 there is a very fine bed of marl lime, so pure as to be cut from 
the bed in squares, dried and placed immediately in the kiln for burning. To fa- 
cilitate the mining of this bed, a chain of lakes on sections 1, 2 and 11 were drained. 
Their natural outlet was through Stack's Lake, which emptied into Black Creek; 
but, by dint of engineering, an outlet was effected into Wab-ah-see Creek, from 
the head of the Horse Shoe — a large lake on section 2 — which is thus rendered 
nearly dry. Of this marl deposit George and John Banks are proprietors. 

Besides the above, there are several small 

LAKES 

that demand but a passing notice. Of such is Scram's lake, and Addis' lake 
closely connected with it, lying on sections 17, 18 and 19 ; the Zeigenfuss lake on 
sections 11 and 14 — the outlet from which forms the north branch of Wab-ah-see 
Creek; and also a number of little lakes on sections 33 and 34, the principal of 
which is Flat-Iron Lake near the residence of Harry McArthur, Esq. But Long 
Lake, about one-half mile long, and one-eighth wide, situa'ed on section 34, 
cannot be thus lightly passed by, for on its frozen surface in March, 1843, oc- 
curred the first death among the whites of this township. Orin Gilbert, brother 
of Rev. D. Gilbert, in endeavoring to reach his brother's house from Cook's 
Corners, w 7 as overcome by fatigue and cold, and perished on this lake. Soon after 
Tahanah, an Indian, in passing on the trail, discovered him lying on the snow. 
The wily Indian did not approach him, but, after circling several times around 
the prostrate form to make sure that he was dead, sped away to convey the sad 
intelligence to his friends. Ever after, the Indians called this u Dead Man's Lake." 

Wab-ah-see, or Wabasis, as the white people call it, is much the largest lake of 
the town, or even of the county, being two miles long. It is very irregular in 
shape, but it is said to average nearly one mile in width. It has excellent fishing 
grounds, and at certain seasons of the year- -though they are caught at no other 
time, and even then, are only found in particular places — whitefish are caught in 
considerable quantities. How they come there no one can tell, and where they 
disappear to is equally a mystery. 

The Wab-ah-see abounds with pickerel, and a gigantic specimen of this variety 
of fish has frequently been seen by seekers of the finny spoil, so immense in its 
dimensions as to excite almost as much wonder as the periodical appearing of 
the fabulous sea-serpent. AVab-ah-see projects into sections 29, 33 and 34, but 
lies mainly on sections 27 and 28. It was named after the Indian chief Wab-ah- 
see (White Swan), who fell under the displeasure of his people for selling their 
lands, and also (as they supposed) for secreting and retaining the gold for the 
purchase. To obtain this, they deferred his death, and banished him to the 
shores of this beautiful and romantic lake. By some the gold is supposed to be 
hidden on its shores, and many have sought for it by torchlight and by sun- 
light, with equal lack of success. Failing to extort money, and maddened by the 



76 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

loss of their hunting grounds, the big chief, Ne-ogg-ah-nah, with almost fiendish 
subtlety, induced Wab-ah-see to go beyond his limits, and, in a drunken frolic, 
killed him with a firebrand. His broken skull is now in a museum in Connec- 
ticut, having been sent there by Mr. Hall, of Plainfield. 

The Oakfield grist mills, containing two run of stones, erected in 1864, is lo- 
cated upon section 15, on Wabasis Creek, the outlet of the lake, which becomes 
quite a stream, emptying into Flat River in Montcalm county. 

The first saw mill in town was built by John Davis, about the year 1846 or 
1847. It was located on Beaver Dam Creek, a small stream running into Wab- 
ah-see Lake. Three times it was swept into ruins by the freshets, and as often 
repaired, or rebuilt, by the indomitable perseverance of its owner. But at last, 
patience and capital alike gave out, and a steam mill was erected in its stead. 
That has since been dismantled, and desolation now reigns where sterling enter- 
prise once presided. No inhabitant of Oakfield and adjacent to towns, who 
may read these pages, shall be allowed to forget, for lack of a record here, the 
history ot the old mill on Beaver Dam Creek, or the vicissitudes of its cheery and 
brave-hearted owner, who snapped his fingers in the face of the jade, Fortune, 
when she made faces at him, and went whistling away to the tune of " Old 
Ragged," despite all adversity. (The foregoing quaint cognomen will be under- 
stood by every old-time business man of Kent county.) 

The Lillie Steam Shingle Mill was built in 1861, on section 3. It was burned 
on the 17th of April, 1868, and rebuilt in the same year. The Addis Shingle and 
Cider mills are located on the northwest quarter of section 20, and were built in 
1869; John Addis, proprietor. The Oakfield shingle mill is located on Wab-ah- 
see Creek, adjacent to the grist mill spoken of above. Near these mills a little 
village, consisting of a store or two, a blacksmith shop, and half a dozen dwell- 
ings, has sprung up within a few years. This is the only business center in the 
town. 

FIRST TOWNSHIP OFFICERS. 

Supervisor — Thomas Spencer. Town Clerk — Harry McArthur. Treasurer — 
Harry Osgood. Justices of the Peace — Thomas Spencer, Harvey D. Pond, David 
J. Gilbert, Wm. M. Gould. Constables— Nathan H. Gould, Giles McArthur, Wil- 
liam Chapman, Jesse Stewart. Commissioners of Highways — Benjamin Morey, 
William Peterson, Cyrus B. Thomas. School Inspectors — John Davis, Lafayette 
Knight. Overseers of the Poor — Sheldon Ashley, Harry Osgood. 

PRESENT TOWNSHIP OFFICERS. 

Supervisor — Wm. R. Davis. Clerk — Azariah V. Rowley. Treasurer — John 
Ashley. Justices of the Peace — Henry Watson, Oliver R. Lewis, John Ashley, 
George Cathey. Commissioners of Highways — Henry E. Rowley, Chester A. Lillie, 
Rutin Caukin. School Inspectors — Wm. H. H. Davis, Henry E. Rowley. Con- 
stables — John W. Gilbert, Henry E. Rowley, Edward Jones. 

The town has now a population of 1,092. Of the old settlers, and men who 
took an active part in the organization of the town, Isaac Tower and Morris 
Hart, are dead ; also Thomas Spencer, the first Supervisor of the town, who 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 77 



was toru in pieces by the machinery in a mill, in Montcalm county, in the spring 
of 1867. 

The first marriage in the town was solemnized by Rev. James Ballard, August 
2nd, 1840. Bride — Miss Hannah Tower, daughter of Isaac Tower; bridegroom — 
Zen as G. Winsor, now of Grand Rapids. 

The first birth among the whites, was Wm. H. H. son of Wm. R. and Electa 
M. Davis. Born April 24, 1840. 

Among other first things occurring in the town, was the first bear killed, by 
John, and his brother, Win. R. Davis, present member of the State Legislature, from 
the Fourth Representative District, and present nominee for the same position. 
Returning late one afternoon, in the summer of 1842, from mowing on a marsh 
on Crinnion Creek, in the north part of the town, William riding a horse, and 
carrying some game he had caught through the clay, John on foot, equipped with . 
a fine rifle, and closely followed by a faithful dog, were surprised and delighted 
when within two miles of home, by the discovery of a huge black bear. The dog 
gave instant pursuit, closely followed by the brothers. Frightened by the baying 
of the dog, the bear was soon treed. The brothers were quickly upon the spot, 
William, anticipating bruin a speedy victim to his brothers unerring aim ; but 
what was their chagrin, on examining the rifle, to find that in the hurry of the 
pursuit, their last cap had been lost from the gun. Here was a dilemma ; but 
necessity is said to be the mother of invention, and she did not belie her charac- 
ter in this case. The only expedient was to send William one and one half miles 
away, to Mr. Crinnion's, the nearest house, for caps, if they could be found, 
otherwise for tire, while John and the dog kept watch by the bear. Mounting 
old Dutch, his horse, and furiously flourishing his whip, William was soon lost to 
sight, returning in a very short time, not with gun and caps, however, but a burn- 
ing brand from Mrs. Crinnioirs fire-place. He found bruin a few rods from where 
he left him, in another tree, and John and the dog still watching. It was already 
dusk ; what was to be done, must be done speedily. Powder was poured into the 
tube, and John, a splendid marksman, took aim, while William stood by with a 
live coal, ready to apply at the word fire, which soon came, William asserts, in a 
trembling voice, but whether John's voice trembled, or William's ears, has not 
been decided to this day ; however, that the sharp crack of the rifle rang through 
the forest depths, and that the bear lay dead at the foot of the tree, are verities 
not to be disputed. 

David J. Gilbert built the second frame barn and dwelling in the town ; Isaac 
Power having built a frame barn in 1840, and William Thornton a frame house 
in 1841. In luture time, posterity may open its eyes with wonder, asking " of 
what, then, were other dwellings made ?" and it is therefore well to record that, 
in the early days, the woodman's ax was his only saw mill, and the forest, with 
its treetops waving many feet aloft in the breezes, his only lumber-yard ; conse- 
quently his house was made of rough logs rolled one above another, his floor of 
logs, his roof of pieces of the same, called " shakes;" his fire place was composed 
of sticks and clay ; his fire of huge logs stood on end and walked across the floor, 
a side at a time, and rolled to their place with a hand-spike. The doors were 
rude oaken planks split from the heart of some huge forest giant, and as for win- 



78 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

dows — some houses had very small holes in their sides which passed by that 
name, and some had none. 

The only means of transportation, either for business or pleasure, was the lum- 
ber wagon, or sled, drawn by the patient ox, whose rate of speed might be three 
miles an hour in good going; and many a party of pleasure, clad in homespun 
and homemade garments, and seated on the straw in the bottom of the wagon 
or sled, as the case might be, has been borne thus slowly over the 
devious roads leading from one cabin to another, and have found 
ample time to enjoy themselves by the way, sure of a hearty welcome at the end of 
their ride, who now live in stately dwellings, dress in costly raiment and ride in 
tine carriages, /after dashing steeds timed to many a mile the hour. But not a whit 
the lighter are their hearts now, than then ; fortunate indeed are they, if, in the 
trials and perplexities of life they have not grown sad. Then, men broke ground, 
and civilization came after. Now, the log cabin is an institution of the past, and 
the hardships of frontier life, a tale that is told. Now the iron rail pushes its way 
into distant gorges, and unbroken forests, and on the coming railway train man 
follows, bringing with him all the comforts and appliances of civilized life. 

In these days of easy and speedy transportation and mechanical improvements, 
teeming fields are won from the wilderness in a few months; palatial residences 
rise, and cities spring up as if by magic, almost surpassing the fabled oriental 
stories of the olden time. 

The people of this town arc noted for industry, sobriety and hospitality. There 
is but one place in the town where strong drinks are sold. 

Oakfield responded nobly to the call for volunteers, in the late rebellion, send- 
ing her bravest and her best to the front, and many of her noble boys lie buried 
in known and unknown graves, in southern soil. Many suffered the untold hor- 
rors of southern prisons. Prominent among these was Chyler B. Davis, made 
prisoner at Gettysburg, July 3, 1863, who endured all forms of hardships, 
in all the Southern prisons from Belle Isle to Andersonville, for 17 months, when 
he was paroled, a mere walking skeleton, and finally discharged at Fort Leaven- 
worth, Kansas, in June, 18G5. He recovered, as by a miracle from his long suffer- 
ing, and starvation, and is now farming in this town. 



PARIS. 

The township of Paris is situated in the second tier of townshipsfrom the south 
line of the county, and is bounded on the north by Grand Rapids, on the east by 
Cascade, on the south by Gaines, and on the west by Wyoming. Being situated 
so near the City of Grand Rapids, which is a market for all its produce— and being 
traversed by the Grand River Valley Railroad, it is, so far as convenience is con- 
cerned, an exception to the general location of townships. 

Paris is next to the oldest township in the county. As long ago as the year 
1833, Barney Burton, Edward Guild, Joel Guild, Daniel Guild, and James Van- 
derpool located within its present limits. Benjamin Clark and Abram Laraway, 
settled in the year 1835; Jacob Patterson, Miner Patterson, James Patterson, Orleans 
.Spaulding and Philanzo Bowen, in the year 1836 ; Nicholas Carlton in the year 



HI8T0RY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 79 

1837 ; Hiram H. Allen in the year 1838. Among the other early settlers were 
De Witt Shoemaker, Clinton Shoemaker, Robert Shoemaker, Alvin H. Wansey, 
.Tared Wansey, James Ballard, Stephen Hinsdill, Abram Laraway and Robert 
Barr. We would here also make special mention of " Captain Davis," as he was 
familiarly called, who was the father of Ezekiel W. Davis, commonly known as • 
" Judge." He settled in the township in the year 1834, and remained a resident 
up to the time of his death, which occurred some twenty -five years ago. 

The trials and hardships undured by the pioneers of those days seem to have 
been unusual. Nearly all of the settlers were poor, and consequently were un- 
able to relieve the unequal distress of the less fortunate among them. The lots 
of some were peculiarly distressing. Orleans Spaulding, who was before men- 
tioned as having settled in the year 1836, informs us that, in th°. month of June, 
1837, he was afflicted with sore eyes, and that for six years he was thereby unfitted 
for labor. During tliree years of the time he was totally blind, and that, too, while 
his family was dependent upon the productions of their little farm for a living. 

But there were trials of a general nature which had to be endured at this period, 
occasioned by the " hard times," or " wild cat times," as they were commonly 
called. Many of the new settlers had but a small part of their farms cleared, and 
and a still smaller part cultivated, and consequently were obliged to buy their 
provisions. Those who bad been in the country longer, and had larger improve- 
ments, raised a few bushels of wheat more than was required for their own use, 
but they could sell it neither for money, nor for groceries. Usually it could be 
given in exchange for " shelf goods" as they were called, provided no more than 
filty cents per bushel was charged. 

While wheat was selling at only fifty cents per bushel, flour was selling at $15 
per barrel, pork $36 per barrel, potatoes $2 per bushel, and butter fifty cents per 
pound. 

We are informed by Mrs. Burton," that when she commenced keeping house in 
the township, on what is now the Garfield farm, she had no neighbors on the 
south nearer than Gull Prairie, none on the east nearer than Ionia, and none 
whatever on the west. Uncle Louis Campau, Joel Guild and Jonathan F. Chubb, 
were the only residents of Grand Rapids. Rix Robinson was in the township of 
Ada, trading*among the Indians. 

Mr. Burton built the first log house in the township of Paris, and erected the 
first barn the county. He also erected the first frame house in the township, 
upon the site of the present fine residence of S. M. Garfield. 

The following incident illustrates the condition of the country at an early day: 
when Mr. Burton was on his way from Gull Prairie to Grand Rapids, one night 
he and his few companions halted as usual, spanceled their horses, and took their 
rest. In the morning, the horses belonging to Mr. Burton were nowhere to be 
seen, so he started out in search of them. He wandered about in the thick woods 
for several hours, without success, and finally turned about with the intention of 
returning to the camp. He traveled until the sun was low in the west, and no 
oamp could be found. Night came on, and he rested himself, a lost man in a 
dense forest. The experience of the succeeding day was similar to that of the 
first ; and it was not until the third day that he reached a settlement. By follow- 



80 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

ing a creek which he found in his wanderings, he reached the Thomapple river, 
tracing which to its mouth brought him to what is now the Village of Ada. 
Thence he proceeded to Grand Rapids where he found the settlers quite excited 
over the fact of his disappearance, which had been reported by his companions ; 
Mr. Campau having already dispatched a number of Indians in the direction 
he supposed Mr. Burton would be, to search for him. 

At one time in the winter of the years 1835 and 1836, the cries of what was sup- 
posed to be a man were heard in the vicinity of Mr. Burton's residence. He was 
answered, horns were bio wed, and other noises made to attract his attention, with 
no result. About the same time a grey horse came to the residence of Abram 
Laraway, not many miles away, which none of the settlers claimed. Early in the 
spring a saddle was found by Robert Barr in the woods not far away. Still later 
the body of a man was found on what is now called the Penny property, in the 
Third Ward of the City. Its appearance indicated that death had taken place 
some months previously. A few dollars in money, a watch, and some papers were 
found on his person, the latter indicating the name of the man to have been 
Moore. Nothing further was ever ascertained in regard to the matter. He pro- 
bably lost his way in the pathless woods, wandered about for several days, perhaps 
lost his horse, and finally starved to death ; or, overcome with weariness sank 
down to rest, and perished by the excessive cold. 

In the year 1835 or 1836, a man by the name of Sizer was shot by an Indian, 
near Plaster Creek, on what are now the premises of Henry Allen. At that place 
on the creek was a deer lick, which, of course, was watched by the early settlers as 
well as by the natives. The parties concerned in the affair to which we refer 
were both looking for deer, the one not knowing of the presence of the other. 
As the white man was moving about in the bushes, the eye of the Indian caught 
a glimpse of his white shirt bosom, which he mistook to be a spot upon a deer 
about to run. A second more, and the white man fell dead, with a bullet through 
his heart. You can imagine the terror of the Indian when he discovered what he 
had done, as he supposed his own life must pay the forfeit. 

It seems to have been the custom of the Indians to demand a life for a life. We 
were informed by an old settler that, at one time, while a little Indian girl was 
taking care of an infant white child, near what is now the city, she accidentally 
let it fall from her arms upon the ground, and it was taken up dead. The Indians 
took the girl with the intention of executing her ; but upon the earnest solicita- 
tion of Uacle Louis Campau, and Joel Guild, and the offer of an amount of money 
for her life, she was spared. 

In this instance the Indian went immediately to the missionary named Slater, 
who lived on the west side of the river, told him all, and gave himself up. Mr. 
Slater advised him to go back, arouse the whites and tell them what had he 
done ; and assured him that he would not be punished. He did as he was ad- 
vised, and the affair there ended. 

When Benjamin Clark came into the township, in 1835, he selected a piece of 
land on section twelve, located upon it, and has ever since made it his home. 
When he settled, no one was living in that part of the township, except Alexander 
Clark. He says he came all the way from Morau's residence near Reed's Lake, to 
Abram Laraway's, without seeing a house. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 81 

James Patterson came into the township in 1836, via a road on the east side 
of Thornapple River, which he followed to Ada. There he found John W. Pisk 
keeping tavern in the wilderness. His cattle swam the river, while himself and 
family and team were ferried across on a scow owned by Mr. Fisk. From there 
he took a southwesterly course through swamps, streams, and woods, without 
the least sign of a road, a distance of six miles to his new home. On his route 
thither he saw only one settler, and he had but just located. 

When Hiram H. Allen settled in the township in the year 1838, there was but 
one regular thoroughfare through it, and that was the old Gull Prairie, or Kala- 
mazoo road. N. O. Sargeant had just previously established a line of stages 
between Kalamazoo and Grand Rapids. Mr. Allen says he took a trip through 
Cascade in 1838, and found but very few settlers. From the Patterson settle- 
ment on sections 12 and 13 to Cascade village, there were no passable roads for 
teams. 

During the first few years of early settlement there was no regular ' camp of 
Indians in the township. Occasionally they would pitch their tents for a few 
days on their hunting and fishing excursions, but the first regular colony was 
formed about the year 1840, on or near section 33. They lived there for several 
years, but when the county became more thoroughly settled, they sold their lands 
and left. 

ORGANIZATION. 

The township of Paris — which then included Gaines — was organized in the 
year 1839, and the first town meeting was held at the house of Hiram H. Allen, 
which resulted in the election of the following officers: 

Supervisor — Joel Guild. Clerk — Hiram H. Allen. Treasurer — Robert Barr. 
Assessors — Stephen Hinsdill, Foster Kelley, Joseph H. Blain. Justices of the 
Peace — H. II. Allen, Hezekiah B. Smith, Barney Burton, Alexander Clark. Com- 
missioners of Highways — Joseph Blain, Jacob Patterson, John Kirkland. School 
Inspectors — James Ballard, Renssalaer Mesnard, Joseph K. Palmer. Directors of 
the Poor — Andrew Mesnard* Daniel Guild. Collector — Jacob Patterson. Con- 
stables — Jacob Patterson, Joseph J. Baxter, Palmer Allen. 

SOIL, TIMBER, Etc. 

The soil of Paris as a township, is quite good. To be sure it has its poor land 
as well as other townships ; but considered as a whole, it is considerably above 
the average. The soil in the southeasterly and central parts is heavy clay, while 
in the northerly and westerly parts it is sandy. 

The timber in the southeasterly and central part3 is quite heavy ; thajb in the 
northerly and westerly parts light, and what might be called oak openings. In 
the southwesterly part of the town is some pine, in places mixed with elm, black 
ash, etc. 

There are many good farms in Paris, among which may be mentioned those 
belonging to T. S. Smith, on section 27 ; Stark Le Fever, on section 35 ; Seeley S. 
Buck, on section 34 ; Isaac D. Davis, on section 29 ; Philanzo Bowen, on section 28 ; 
Abram G. Shear, on section 21 ; Oscar S. Shafer, on section 23 ; James Patterson, 
on section 12 ; Miner Patterson, on section 13 ; S. S. Bailey, on section 13 ; Myron 
11 



82 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

Richards, on section 10; John H. Ford, on section 2 ; S. M. Garfield, on section 7 ; 
John D. Alger, on section 7 ; Joel Siinonds, on section 7. 

Some of the best residences in the township are those owned by T. S. Smith, 
Myron Richards, S. M. Garfield, John D. Alger, and Riley Cole. The orchard on 
the premises of John H. Ford, is the most thrifty and extensive of the many we 
saw in the township. 

SCHOOL HOUSES. 

The first school-house erected in the township stood on the corner of the north- 
east quarter of section 7. It was used for many years, but was finally removed, 
and the present building erected in 1857. There are several fine school-houses 
in the township. The Godwin school-house standing on the old plank road, a 
short distance beyond the Godwin tavern, is a good brick building, and an orna- 
ment to the locality. The school-house on the southwest corner of section 10, 
built of brick, presents a fine appearance, and exhibits the enterprising character 
of the inhabitants in its vicinity; also, the frame school-house situated near the 
northeast corner of section 34. "We mention these as being particularly good, 
while, in fact, all of the school buildings in the township are above the average 
character. 

COUNTY POOR HOUSE. 

The county farm and poor-house are located in Paris, on section 1G. The farm 
contains 104 acres or thereabouts, and has the appearance of being well worked. 

At the time the farm was purchased by the county, a log house was standing 
on it, which was used for a number of years as a poor house. It was removed in 
1860, and the present frame building erected in its stead. Several additions have 
been made to it, until now it is a large structure. The present keeper is John 
Otis. 

MILLS. 

The Bostwick Grist and Saw Mills were erected many years ago, on Plaster 
Creek, on the east line of section 17. Four dams were constructed at different 
times, but in each instance they were carried away. The mills were run at in- 
tervals, but never for any great length of time, and were finally abandoned. 

The Tanner Mills, situated on the southeast corner of section 20, were operated 
for a number of years ; but are now among the things of the past. 

THE PRESENT OFFICERS 
of Paris, are: Supervisor — Samuel M. Garfield. Clerk —John Steketee. Treasurer 
— Everett Hurd. School Inspectors — John H. Ford, Gilbert G. Bailey. Justices 
of the Peace — Hiram H. Allen, Abram C. Barclay, Seeley S. Back, John II. Ford. 
Commissioners of Highways — G. G. Bailey, Mason L. Shafer, Bester Brown. Con- 
stables — Abram T. Cook, Thomas H. Foster. 



PLAINFIELD. 

Plainfield lies north of Grand Rapids, east of Alpine, south of Algoma, and 
west of Cannon, and has a population of 1,499. 

It was settled in 1837 ; and in 1838, when it was organized, comprised within 
its limits, several townships of land, that eventually organized into separate towns, 
under their respective names of Algoma, Courtland, Cannon, etc. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 83 

It was named for the many plains within its borders, that, swept clean by the 
annual Indian fires, presented their wild, but beautiful acres to the admiring gaze 
of the settlers. Its first township meeting to complete its organization, was held 
on the first Monday of April, 1888, at a rude log school house on section 23. There is 
no record of the number of votes cast ; but at its last town meeting, the number 
of votes polled was 220. 

FIRST TOWNSHIP OFFICERS. 

Supervisor — Zen as G. Winsor. Clerk — Ethiel Whitney. Assessors — Daniel 
North, Andrew Watson, George Miller. Highway Commissioners — A. D. W. 
Stout, Warner Dexter. School Inspectors — Zenas G. Winsor, Ethiel Whitney, 
Cornelius Friant. Collectors — Damas Francisco, Henry Godwin. Poor Masters 
— Jacob Francisco, Jacob Friant. Justices of the Peace — Daniel North, Samuel 
Baker, Zenas G. Winsor, George Miller. Constables — James Francisco, Henry 
Godwin, Ezra. Whitney. 

OFFICERS IN 1870. 

Supervisor — Hollis Konkle. Treasurer — James Crawford. Clerk — Edwin A. 
Morris. Justice of the Peace — George S. Curtis. School Inspectors — George H. 
Outhouse. Highway Commissioners — Joseph C. Upson. Constables — Caleb E. 
Carr, Gilbert Dickerson. 

Plamfield presents many variations in soil and surface. High bluffs along 
Grand River, and the Rouge, present the beholder with many magnificent out- 
looks, over lowland, water course, hillside and plain, rarely excelled; and no more 
beautiful spot can well be found, than the little prairie set in hills, lying on the 
Grand Rapids and Ionia State Road, just north and east of the little village of 
Plainfield, where, for many years was the home of the Hon. Harry C. Smith, now 
a resident of Grand Rapids. 

There is a troublesome amount of stone in some portions, and some sand along 
the western line ; but, as a general thing, the soil is a rich clay loam, rendering 
this a first class agricultural town. 

Its timber is mainly oak, with some beech and maple, and considerable pine 
along its western borders. 

Its principal productions are, wheat, wool, corn, oats and potatoes, all of which 
it exports in fair quantities ; but most of wheat, wool, and corn. Its rich intervals 
of grass lands, its numerous spring brooks, and clear and rapid watercourses, 
peculiarly adapt it to dairy purposes ; but no esp ecial attention is paid, as yet, 
to this healthful and lucrative branch of husbandry. 

It also lies within the great western fruit belt, and where the altitude is favor- 
able, gives splendid returns of apples, peaches, cherries, currants, and the small 
fruits generally ; but in the bottom lands, and low situations, the returns are by 
no means sure, the frosts destroying the peaches, and the winters killing the trees. 
It presents many fine locations for vinyards, and the hardier varieties of grapes 
ripen nicely here ; but nothing worthy of note is being done in this branch of 
horticulture. 

There are several inconsiderable lakes in the town, but only two are worthy of 
note, namely: Scott's Lake, lying on section 17, about three-fourths of a mile 



84 . HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

long, and half a mile wide, quite deep, and well stocked with fish; and Crooked, 
or Dean V Lake, on sections 33 and 34, one mile long and half a mile wide. It 
has an Island of one acre, is generally shallow, and quite destitute of fish. These 
lakes are adjacent to no highway, hence are only visited by fishing parties, or 
hogs seeking aquatic sports. But for what it lacks in lake views, it makes ample 
amends in river scenery. 

THE RIVERS. 

Grand River, the Owash-te-nongof theredman, enters its borders by its eastern 
boundary, at the northeast corner of section 36, reaches the highest northern 
point at the exact center of section 23, where the bridge on the Grand Rapids 
and Ionia State Road, crosses its stream; then it sweeps away to the southwest — - 
its banks adorned on either hand with billowy maples, and grand old elms, that 
have shed their leaves for centuries on its waves, leaving the town by its southern 
line, on the southeast quarter of section 31. 

The Rouge River, so called from the peculiar tint of its waters, enters the town 
from the north, on the west half of section 1, and runs southwesterly, debouching 
in Grand River, on the line of sections 22 and 23. 

The G. R. and I. R. R. entering the town on section 1, and leaving it near 
Plumb's mill, on section 31, crosses this stream six times within two miles, hence, 
as may readily be seen, it is very crooked in its course, and being very rapid, pre- 
sents vast facilities for manufacturing purposes. 

In 1840, Gideon H. Gorden erected on section 15, the first mill placed upon the 
stream. It is only a saw mill now, and owned by Mr. Watters, of Grand 
Rapids, but then it had a small grist mill attached, and there the settlers and 
Indians carried their corn to be ground. 

In 1848, a saw mill was erected by Roberts and Winsor, on section 2, at a point 
then called Gibraltar. It is now owned by H. B. Childs & Co., who erected in its 
near vicinity, a paper mill in 1866, which was destroyed by fire in 1869, but re- 
built the second year by the enterprising proprietors. It is on the line of the G. 
R. and I. R. R. and the place is now known as Child's Mills Station. 

In 1850, a saw mill was erected by Robert Konkle some forty rods from the 
mouth of the Rouge. It is now owned by Tradewell & Towle. Save the above, 
no use is made in this town of the immense water power of the stream, amply 
sufficient to drive a continuous chain of machinery, several miles in extent. 

Mill Creek runs through the southwest corner of the town, and as early as 1838, 
a saw mill was erected on this stream on section 31, by Daniel North. It is 
now owned by Eli Plumb, who erected a flouring mill at the same place, in 1866. 
It lies on the line of the G. R. & I. Railroad, and is known as North's Mills 
Station. There is also a railway station at Belmont, about six miles northeast of 
Grand Rapids. It lies in the midst of a fine farming district, and has a large 
hotel, kept by Mr. Post, for the accommodation of parties of pleasure ; otherwise, 
it possesses no particular advantages or attractions. 

Plainfield village is a very small place, at the foot of the bluffs on section 23. It 
was the old ferrying post, when a ferryboat was the only means of communication 
— if we except the Indian canoe— between the two banks of the Grand River. It 
lias a sunny site, and a pleasant outlook up and down the river. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 85 

Plainfield has ten district school-houses, but its Union sehool interests are 
merged at the present with Rock ford, in Algoma, and the same may be said, in 
a measure, of its church interests. It has but one church edifice, which belongs 
to the Episcopalians. It is picturesquely situated on the bluff above the village 
of Plainfield, is a wooden structure 30x60 feet in size, is painted brown, and has a 
tower sixty feet high. It was erected in 1852. Its officiating clergyman was Rev. 
Mr. Van Antwerp, of Grand Rapids. It has no pastor at the present time. 

Among the early settlers, we find, in 1837, George Miller, Esq., located on sec- 
tion 23 ; James Clark, on section 24 ; Thomas Friant, on section 24 ; and Warner 
Dexter, on section 14. In 1838, Cornelius Friant, on section 24; Zera Whitney, 
on section 15 ; Gideon II. Gordon, on section 15; and Daniel North, on section 
31 ; and in 1844 Samuel Post settled on section 8, while his father, Jacob Post, 
and seven other sons, settled about the same time. 

In 1835, Samuel Gross made his way with his iamily, by the aid of his axe, to a 
home on section 2; and in 1840 Chester Wilson settled on section 12. 

The first family on the ground was Mr. George Miller, and the deprivations 
w T hich fell to their share was the common lot of all who made their homes in this 
new land, at that early day. Grand River was the only thoroughfare and means 
of communication with the outside world, hence the settlers depended mainly on 
what they raised, and their own ingenuity, to prepare it for food. Pork, if im- 
ported, was $00 per barrel. The nearest flouring mill was sixty miles away, and 
the bread eaten in the family of Mr. Miller, for eighteen months, was ground in 
a coffee mill. 

In the fall of 1838, the first birth occurred among the whites, in the family ot 
Mr. Miller, a twin girl and boy, living but a short time, making the first deaths, 
also, among the settlers ; and the greatest delicacy loving friends were able to 
offer Mrs. Miller during her confinement, was boiled wheat. 

In the winter of 1838, the accidental shooting and subsequent death of Mr. 
Peleg Barlow, who had come to seek a home, but had not located, cast a sadden- 
ing gloom over the little band of pioneers. 

Although the lands were being surveyed and rapidly located, they were not in 
market, and it was no uncommon thing to see white men and Indians tilling their 
corn in the same fields, in amicable proximity to each other. But in the fall of 
1839 the great land sale came off, when the settlers secured their claims, and the 
red man vanished from the scene, leaving naught in memoriam but the benes of 
his dead, on section 23, where the burial mounds, w T orn by the attritions of the 
plow, are fast being leveled with the surrounding country. 

Of those who bore a conspicuous part in the settlement and organization of the 
town, Warner Dexter, James Clark, Thomas Friant, Daniel North and Gideon H. 
Gordon are dead ; but by their tireless energy, they helped to open up a town- 
ship possessed with natural resources of wealth, surpassed by none in the country. 
Smiling vineyards should terrace its sunny slopes, and teeming factories line the 
rapid flowing Rouge, for fabulous wealth lies hidden there, awaiting the fiat of 
combination and enterprise, surer to the seeker than in the golden gorges of the 
mountains that lean against our western skies. 



86 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



SOLON. 

Tliis township lies in the north part of the county, betweeu Algoma on the 
south and the township of Ensley, of Newaygo county, on the north; with Tyrone 
on the west, and Nelson on the east. 

It was first settled in 1854. Some of the residents claim that a Mr. Beals, who 
is not now a resident of the township, was the first settler, and others that J. M. 
Rounds, who now resides in Algoma, was in advance. They were soon followed 
by John and Martin Hicks, from Indiana ; also Ilobbins Hicks, from Ohio. In 
185G and 1857 the Jewells, Smiths, Roys and Whispels came, followed in 1858 by 
Ansel Rogers. J. D. Watkins, now a resident of Alpine, settled on section twenty- 
six in 1855. 

ORGANIZATION. 

This township was attached to Algoma (and called north Algoma) until 1857, 
when it was organized as a separate township, under the name of Solon. The first 
annual meeting was held at the house of Walter Rowe, one mile south of the 
center. 

FIRST TOWNSHIP OFFICERS. 

Supervisor — Edward Jewell. Clerk — John E. Roys. Treasurer — John D. 
Watkius. Justices — Andrew Fluent, Munson Robinson and Obadiah Smith. 

For several years the annual township meetings were held at the school house 
-o -'district No. 2. In 1885 the place of meeting was changed to Cedar Springs — 
where they are now held. 

PRESENT TOWNSHIP OFFICERS. 

Supervisor — Benj. Fairchild. Clerk — John Thetge. Treasurer — Wm. Johnson. 
Justices — John Thetge, C. B. Ford and J. D. Clark. 

GENERAL DESCRIPTION. 

The elevation of Solon is probably as great as any township in the county, it 
being nearly on the divide between Grand and Muskegon rivers. It is compara- 
tively level, and, in the eastern part, somewhat swampy. 

The timber is chiefly pine throughout the whole township, being interspersed 
with some grand old oaks in some parts, and in others with beech and occasion- 
ally a little maple. 

The farms are generally new, with but small improvements. The farms of M. 
H. Clark, Jewell, and one or two others might be mentioned as exceptions to this. 
Fruit does well on this pine land wherever orchards have been set. The south- 
eastern part of the township is the most thickly settled, while nearly the whole 
of the northwest quarter is an unbroken forest. 

LAKES, STREAMS, ETC. 

In describing the lakes and streams of this township we will commence at the 
north. 

First, then, there is a small lake on the north line of section four, lying partly 
in the township of Ensley, Newaygo county. This is sometimes called Lampman 
Lake. On the Kent county map, published in 1863, there was a large sized stream 
marked as the outlet of this lake, but we failed to find any such stream. It has 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 87 



no outlet. One and a half miles east of this, on the northwest corner of section 
two, is a large, flowing spring, known as Crandall's Spring, which is the source 
of the west branch of Duke Creek. The stream flows southeasterly through three 
lakes, known as the Chain of Lakes; the first being on the line of sections two and 
three, (chiefly on three); the next near the center of section two; and the third 
on the south line of two and partially on seven. This stream then flows a little east 
of south, to the north part of section twenty-four, w T here it unites with the east 
branch, which rises in Jordan Lake, on section one, flows out into Nelson, where 
it receives some additional water, and again enters Solon at the southeast corner 
of section twelve. At the junction of these two streams Well man & Co. con- 
structed a dam in 1856, at a cost of $1,000, with the intention of erecting a large 
saw mill, which, however, was never built. From this point Duke Creek flows in 
a southwesterly direction across the township, and passes out on section thirty, 
into Tyrone. It is fled by several small streams, the largest of which comes from 
a small lake near the center of section fourteen, (for which we heard no name), 
and flows into the main creek on the north side of section twenty-eight. This 
stream has been much used for running logs to the Rouge, and thence to Grand 
River. 

There is a small lake on the north line of section fifteen, known as Mud Lake, 
which has no outlet. 

The size of these seven lakes varies from ten to one hundred acres each. 

Cedar Creek rises in Nelson, flows across the southeast corner of Solon, and 
southwest into Algoma, in the history of which it will be mentioned at greater 
length. 

In the southwest corner are Long Lake, and some smaller ones, which will be 
farther spoken of in connection with the lakes in the northwestern part of 
Algoma. 

THE VILLAGE OF CEDAR SPRINGS 

was platted in 1859, and probably will be incorporated at the next session of the 
State Legislature. 

It is situated twenty miles northeast from Grand Rapids, by the G. R. & I. Rail- 
road, and lies about half in Solon and half in Nelsou, one mile from their south 
line. 

The first settler here was Robbins Hicks, who came in 1855, and was previously 
mentioned as one of the early residents of Solon. He now resides with his family 
in the northeast corner of the township. 

There were but few inhabitants and but a very limited amount of business in 
Cedar Springs until 1867, when the railroad was completed to that point. This 
immediately infused life into the place, and it continued to grow rapidly as long 
as it was the terminus of the railroad north, which it was for nearly two years. 
Since that time, although it has not grown as rapidly, and business has not been 
quite as good in some respects, still it is steadily progressing, and new enter- 
prises are being engaged in. 

A line has been surveyed the present season, for a railroad from this place to 
Muskegon, in connection with a road projected from Greenville hither, which, in 
connection with the road now running from Lansing to Ionia, and the one being 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



constructed from Ionia to Greenville, would make a continuous line from the 
lake shore to our state capital, directly through Cedar Springs. 

We are informed by Mr. Fairchild, who, by the way, is wide awake on railroad 
matters in that vicinity, and in fact on matters of every kind connected with the 
growth and prosperity of the village, that the Continental Improvement Com- 
pany contemplate building a branch railroad from this place to Newaygo. A 
state road passes through here from Grand Rapids to Big Rapids; also, one from 
here to Muskegon. 

A Flour-Barrel, Stave and Heading Factory has been erected the present sea- 
son, by Richards & Sharer, which seems to be doing a good business, cutting 
20,000 staves and 10,000 headings per day, besides circling fiity to seventy-live 
barrels per day for their own use, in packing the heading which they ship. 

The village contains six Steam Saw Mills, which cut in the aggregate 50,000 
shingles and 50,000 feet of lumber per day. These mills have all been erected 
since 1866, and are severally owned and operated by the following gentlemen 
and firms : W. L. Barber & Co., Byron Prentiss & Co., Mr. Slawson and J. H. 
Shaw, all of this place ; and Isaac Newton and Chauncey Pelton, of Grand 
Rapids. 

It also contains about twenty stores, three or four restaurants, three hotels, 
kept respectively by Benj. Fairchild, J. S. Tisdell, and C. W. Denison, one livery 
stable, four blacksmith and several other shops, such as wheelright, cooper shops, 
etc. 

The Baptist Society have a very good frame church, 36x60 feet in size, which 
was erected in 1868, at a cost of about $4,000. 

The Methodist Episcopal Society are erecting a nice, frame structure, in size 
40x70 feet, which is to be finished in good style, with stained glass windows, and 
a spire one hundred feet high. This will be the best church building north of 
Grand Rapids, and will cost from $5,000 to $6,000. 

The Masonic Order have a nice little Hall, tastefully fitted up for their accom- 
modation. There are also two or three halls for public meetings, the largest of 
which is a new one christened Union Hall, just completed by Paine & Manly. 
The Post-office is kept at present by Mr. II. C. Russell, in his drug store. A 
weekly newspaper, called the Wolverine Clipper, is published by Maze & Sellers. 

The schools are on the graded system, and consist of three departments, which 
are kept in three buildings, for want of a good Union School House. 

MILLS. 

Outside of the village there are a number of mills, which cut a large amount of 
lumber and shingles. 

We will first mention that of George French, of Rockford. This is a steam saw 
mill, capable of cutting 10,000,000 shingles and 2,000,000 feet of lumber per year, 
and stands on the southwest corner of section twelve. It was erected by Mr. 
French in 1868. 

We next come to a first-class steam saw mill, on the north line of section one, 
which was erected in 1869, on the site of one built the year previous and destroyed 
by fire. Capacity of this mill, 20,000 feet of lumber and 16,000 shingles per day. 
Proprietor, John B. Wagner. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 89 

A small, Water-power Saw Mill is to be erected the present year, on the north- 
east corner of section twenty-eight, on Duke Creek, by Lewis S. Hancock. This is 
intended to be used as a lumber and shingle mill. 

Andrew J. Fluent has a Portable Steam Shingle Mill, on the. west side of sec- 
tion twenty-two, which cuts 15,000 shingles per day. 

The Portable Steam Saw Mill, situated on the south side of section ten, is capa- 
ble of cutting 10,000 feet of lumber and 15,000 shingles per day. The lumber mill 
is owned and operated by H. Morse & Co., and the shingle attachment by C. A. 
Tower & Co. 

The Portable Steam Saw Mill of Willard Barnhart, set up in May, 1870, on the 
west side of section thirteen, is capable of cutting 10,000 feet of lumber per day. 

Solomon Ipe's Portable Steam Shingle Mill, on the south side of section twenty- 
three, was erected by him in 1866, and cuts 14,000 shingles per day. It will be 
noticed that every mill now running in this township is run by steam, although 
good water power could be obtained on almost any section which now has a 
mill. 

SCHOOL HOUSES. 

District No. 1 was organized in 1858, and a small frame house erected, which was 
used until 1860, when a good frame building was erected at a cost of $600. It is 
located one and one-hali miles west of Cedar Springs, on the north side of section 
thirty-five. 

District No. 2 —Solon Center — was organized in 1858, and a small log house 
erected. In 1869 a nice frame building was erected on the southeast corner of 
section sixteen, at a cost of $700. 

This School House is really an ornament to the district, and, in fact, to the 
township, showing, as it does, that the people of Solon are wide awake, and un- 
derstand the effect of good educational advantages on the growth and prosperity 
of a new country, and are willing to provide for the comfort of their children. 

We mention this house more particularly because it stands in a much newer 
portion of the township than the one previously mentioned. 

District No. 3 (fractional with Nelson) was organized in 1860, and a small log 
house was erected, which still stands on the west side of section thirteen, near 
the residence of A. B. Fairchild. This district is about to raise money for a new 
house, to be built on the same site, at a cost of $600 or $700. 

District No. 4 (fractional with Algoma) was organized in 1869. In the spring 
of 1870, a nice little frame house was erected at a cost of $250, located on the south- 
west corner of section twenty-nine, four and one-half miles west of Cedar Springs, 
on the C. S. & M. State Road. 

District No. 5 was orgrnized in 1866, and a small frame house erected the same 
year on the west side of section eleven, at a cost of $180. 

There are many older townships which can erect large churches and other 
public buildings, but fail to do as well for their school interests as this " back- 
woods " township of Solon. 



12 



90 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

SPARTA. 

This is one of the western tier of townships, adjoining Chester, Ottawa county, 
on the west, and Algoma on the east, and lying between Alpine on the south, 
and Tyrone on the north. 

This township was first settled in 1844, when Lyman Smith — now residing at 
Grand Traverse — settled on section 25, near the southeast part. Very soon 
after, Norman and Edwin Cummings went on section 34, on the south line, and 
commenced chopping on the farm now owned by Norman. So far there was no 
house (worthy of the name) in the township — they only having small shanties. 

In a short time, Lewis W. Purdy came from Genessee county, settled on the 
southwest corner of section 28, and erected the first log house in the now thickly 
settled township of Sparta. Mrs. Purdy was the first white woman in the town- 
ship. In January, 1845, Joseph English and family came direct from England, 
and went just over the line on section 36, in the southeast part of the township. 

Mr. English, although unable to read or write when he came to Sparta, being 
a man of great perseverance, succeeded, in the course of a few year3, in erecting 
a large steam saw mill, which drew quite a number of men, who bought lots and 
erected small houses, thereby making a little village, which was called English- 
ville. This mill being destroyed by fire, Mr. English moved to Laphamville, now 
known as Rockford, which was then considered about dead. 

By buying some of the mills and renting others, he succeeded in getting con- 
trol of nearly all of the mills on Rouge River, from which he shipped a large 
quantity of lumber to Chicago ; but owing to a decline in prices, he failed to 
make it pay, and was obliged to give up in that quarter, but not until he had — 
by his great energy and venturesome spirit — infused new life into the whole lum- 
bering district of Rouge River. 

He afterwards, with his sons, erected a water mill on the north part of his farm, 
which is now run by his sons, William, Joseph and Richard. The post office 
still known as Englishville, is about all that remains to remind us of the once 
flourishing little Ville, which will probably again revive, if the Grand Rapids 
and Newaygo Railroad, which has been surveyed, is constructed, and a station 
established there. 

In the spring of 1845, Mr. Cummings — the father of Norman, Edwin and Nel- 
son Cummings — came with his family to the place where the sons had previously 
began. 

The parents are long since dead, but the three sons still remain on the south 
line, one in Sparta and the others in Alpine, where they have large farms with 
good buildings, as the fruits of their early labors in pioneer days. 

Mr. Lyman Smith and Mr. Purdy did not long remain residents of Sparta, but 
the marks made by them still remain. 

In June, 1845, John Symes, Elihu Rice, and Anthony Chapman, met in Alpine, 
while on their way to settle in Sparta. They were strangers, but soon found, by 
comparing descriptions, that the lands which they had respectively bought or 
pre-empted, all lay adjoining, and, going on the principle that "in union is 
strength," they, after some consultation, decided on the course they would take ; 
and the next morning Rice and Symes started from the house of Joseph English 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 91 

to underbrush a road from there west, along the present town-line of Alpine and 
Sparta. Meanwhile Chapman had returned to Mill Creek for provisions. After 
cutting west to the section corner, now known as Rouse's Corners, they turned 
north, and followed the line between sections 34 and 35. Toward night they 
were beginning to think of returning to the house of Mr. English, but at that 
moment they heard a wagon approaching, and on waiting for it to come up, 
found it was Chapman, who had come with supplies. They now built a fire by 
the side of a log, and camped for the night, with the wolves howling around 
them while they slept ; and in the morning completed their road to what was to 
be their homes. 

Mr. Rice's land was on section 27, and Mr. Symes' and Mr. Chapman's on 26. 
Three trees were found on the line of Symes' and Chapman's land which would 
do for three corner posts of a shanty ; and by putting in one post, and the use of 
a few boards which had been brought along from Mill Creek, a shelter was soon 
formed, to which the families were taken the next day, where they lived together 
until houses were erected. About this time David B. Martindale, who now lives 
just east of Sparta village, settled on section 36. 

During the following fall and winter, Hiram II. Meyers settled east of Rouge 
River, on section 24, and was soon followed by his father and family from Canada. 
This family took a large tract of land in the east part of Sparta, where they have 
engaged quite extensively in lumbering, especially Hiram, John and Myron Bal- 
com near the centre of the township, and William Blackall and family southwest 
of the center. Myron Balcom is now in Missouri, and John, commonly known as 
Deacon Balcom, is now living in the village of Sparta. William Blackall has 
long been laid beneath the sod; but his sons, Benjamin and Charles, still remain. 

We neglected to mention Mr. Clark Brown, who came from the state of New 
York, early in 1845, and is still living on the farm where he first commenced, on 
the south line of section 33. 

In 1846, J. E. Nash, from Massachusetts, settled where he now lives, one mile 
east of the center of the township. 

Among other early settlers who were pioneers in various parts of the township, 
were the Spangenburgs, Amidons, Bradfords, Hinmans, McNitts, Taylors, Steb- 
bins', R. D. Hastings, and Ira Blanchard, most of whom still reside in Sparta. 
Hon. Lyman Murray settled in Sparta at an early day, but soon removed to 
Alpine. 

ORGANIZATION. 

Sparta was organized very soon after it was settled. The first annual meeting 
was held in April, 1846, at the house of Clark Brown, on the south line of the 
township, at which time there were only eleven votes cast. As the full ticket 
requires sixteen officers, there could not have been much opportunity for a 
choice. 

The present township of Tyrone was attached to Sparta from the time it began 
to be settled, until 1855. 

FIRST TOWNSHIP OFFICERS. 

Supervisor — Lewis W. Purdy. Clerk— John M. Balcom. Treasurer — Myron 
H. Balcom. 



92 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

At a subsequent annual election, John M. Balcom was elected to the office of 
Constable by one vote. 

The township meetings are now held at the school-house in the village of 
Sparta. 

OFFICERS IN 1870. 

Supervisor — Volney W. Caukin. Clerk — Ervin J. Emmons. Treasurer — 
Charles C. Eddy. Justices — A. B. Cheney, Volney W. Caukin, Albert Finch. 
GENERAL DESCRIPTION. 

The general surface of Sparta is high and rolling, and it contains but little 
waste land. 

There are several small swamps in various parts of the township, but none ot 
much account, except in the north and northwest parts. 

On sections 2 and 3 is a swamp of some extent, requiring the services of the 
Drain Commissioners. Also a series nearly or quite connected, extending west 
across sections 4 or 5, and passing off into the south part of Tyrone. There are 
two quite extensive swamps which commence on the west part of section 6, and 
run west into Chester. Between them is the ridge, well known to those accus- 
tomed to travel the G. R. & Newaygo State Road, as the Hog-back Hill. The 
highest hills and deepest valleys are in the northwest ; still it contains some as 
nice farming lands as are to be found in the township. 

The timber is mostly beech and sugar-maple, with some pine in the northeast 
and southeast parts. There is some hemlock interspersed with the pine in the 
northeast. The soil is generally a rich loam, suited to the production of wheat, 
corn, oats, grass, potatoes, etc. Nearly all kinds of fruit which can be raised in 
the county, do well here. 

Among the large farms of Sparta, we would mention that of Mrs. John Manly, 
in the southwest part of the township, which contains 280 acres, and that of 
Elias Darling, farther north on the same road, containing 320 acres. The large 
farm of Moses Bradford is now divided between his sons, Jason and Perry. 
The farm formerly owned by Nathan Earl, is now owned by his son-in-law, 
Charles M. Chapman. Norman Cummings has 240 acres on the south township 
line, which is, however, in two separate parcels. 

STREAMS. 

Rouge River is the principal stream of Sparta, entering it on section 1, from 
Tyrone, and passing south and southeast through the east tier of sections ; 
thence out into Algoma, from the east part ot section 25. It is used for running 
logs, having been cleared lor that purpose nearly twenty years ago, through this 
township. 

Ball Creek, which has also been considerably used for logging, enters Sparta 
from Tyrone, near the central part of the line, and flows in a southeasterly direc- 
tion across sections 3, 2 and 11, into Rouge River, of which it is the principal 
branch from this township. 

Nash Creek, formed by several small branches from the west, flows through the 
central part, and empties into Rouge River on the southeast corner of section 
fourteen. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Symes Creek rises in the southern part of the township, and flows northeast- 
erly into Rouge River, on the southwest corner of section twenty-four. 

A small stream, sometimes known as the River Jordan, comes in from Alpine, 
and flows in a northerly direction across sections twenty-five and twenty-six, and 
empties into Rouge River near the center of the latter section. 

Two small streams empty into Rouge River from the northeast, on section one, 
being the outlets of a chain of lakes in the west part of Algoma. These streams 
have also been used for running logs. 

VILLAGES. 

The village of Sparta, not yet incorporated, is a flourishing little town of about 
200 inhabitants, located on Nash Creek, one mile east of the geographical center 
of the township, and 15 miles from Grand Rapids. This place was first settled 
by J. E. Nash, in 184G, and for some time known as Nashville. It now contains a 
Post-office, known as Sparta Center, two churches — Baptist and Methodist Epis- 
copal — both of which were erected in 1866, at a cost of about $3,000 each, a good 
steam saw^ mill, five stores, two blacksmith shops, and one wagon shop ; also a 
very good hotel, known as the Sparta House, and kept by John M. Balcom. But 
as yet no graded school building has been erected, although it is greatly needed. 
A small, frame, district school house, erected in 1849, is the only public school 
building in the place. A good select school is kept during the winter months by 
Mr. Amherst Cheney. The steam saw mill already mentioned, is now owned and 
operated by Wm. Olmsted and Sons. It has a planing machine attached ; also 
one run of stone for grinding flour and feed. 

LISBON VILLAGE, 
on the west line of Sparta, is sixteen miles from Grand Rapids, on the Grand 
Rapids and Newaygo State Road. It was first settled by John Pintler, who came 
here from the State of New York, in 1846. In 1848 a Mail Route was established 
from Grand Rapids to Newaygo, with a Post-office at this point, under the name 
of Pintler's Corners, Mr. Pintler being the first Postmaster. In 1859 the name of 
the office was changed to Lisbon. The first goods sold from a store in this place 
were by Miner Atherton, in 1855. In March, 1869, it was regularly incorporated 
as a village, including half a mile each way from the northwest corner post of 
section 30. It will be noticed that this includes half a section — or, more properly, 
two quarter sections — from the township of Chester, Ottawa county ; but, as the vil- 
lage is under the jurisdiction of Kent county, we will include the whole in our 
History and Directory. 

This village now contains nine stores, three blacksmith shops, two wagon shops, 
one hotel, a good, two-story frame school house, and three good sized frame 
churches; also a good steam grist mill, and a saw mill. 

The Hotel is a good, frame building, owned and kept by Lorenzo Chubb. 

The Graded School building, erected in the summer of 1869, is a good, substan- 
tial frame structure, two stories high, 36x46 feet in size, and cost $2,700. 



94 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



SPENCER. 

The township of Spencer is situated in the norteast corner of the county, and is 
bounded on the north by the township of Maple Valley, Montcalm county, on the 
east by Montcalm, Montcalm county, on the south by Oakfield, and on the west 
by Nelson. 

The first white inhabitant of Spencer was an old trapper, by the name of Lin- 
coln. He had a shanty on the bank of the lake of that name, and there he lived, 
Boon like, for a number of years. 

The first regular settler of the township was Cyrus B. Thomas, who located in 
the summer of 1846. Henry Stroup, the second settler, located in January, 184ft. 
Both of these settled on a plain in the southeastern part of the township, near the 
Oakfield line; and, for a number of years, were the only actual settlers. Matthew 
B. Hatch, the present Supervisor of Spencer, and one of the earliest settlers, came 
to the township in 1853. In the list of early settlers may also be mentioned the 
names of S. B. Cowles, B. G. Parks, Jacob Van Zamlt, Wm. H. Hewitt, Wm. T. 
Parshall, Daniel Haskins, the Cooper family, and others. 

The township of Celsus was organized in the year 18(51, and the first township 
meeting was held on the first Monday of April, in the same year, at the residence 
of Thomas Spencer. Matthew B. Hatch, Thomas Spencer, and Shepard B. Cowles, 
acted as inspectors of election. The election resulted in the choice of the follow- 
ing named persons as 

FIRST TOWNSHIP OFFICERS. 

Supervisor — Freeman Van Wickle. Clerk — Henry A. Freeman. Treasurer — 
Daniel Haskins. Commissioners of Highways- -Wm. W. Hewitt and Freeman 
Van Wickle. Justices — Wm. W. Hewitt, Edwin D. Clark. School Inspectors — 
Hiram Conse and Alfred Hulburt. Constables — Wm. H. Smith, Geo. McClelland, 
Henry Strope, and Darius Gray. 

The name of the township was subsequently changed to Spencer, in honor of 
Thomas Spencer, one of the early settlers. 

PRESENT OFFICERS. 

Supervisor — Matthew B. Hatch. Clerk — Aaron Norton. Treasurer — Beriah 
G. Parks. Justices — Warren F. Getman, Samuel Van Wickle, Avery J. Sutton, 
Edward H. Smith. Commissioners of Highways — Edwin Wilson, John Moran. 
School Inspectors — Wm. B. Powell, Shepard B. Cowles. Constable — Joseph De- 
Graw. 

THE SOIL 

of Spencer is, as might be supposed, rather poor, the timber being principally 
pine. There are, however, some pieces of good land, which it pays to cultivate. 
There are some fine farms within its limits, among which are those owned by M. 
B. Hatch, Owen D. Cooper, Beriah G. Parks, Edward H. Smith, Fayette Hough, 
and Wm. Rittinger. 

Spencer is inconveniently located, having no railroad within its limits, and no 
railroad station within a number of miles ; nevertheless, it is fast settling up, and 
everything indicates that a few years will greatly increase its population and 
wealth. The first 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 95 

LUMBERING 

establishment, on Black Creek, was commenced in 1853. During the year 1870, 
one million feet were run out of that stream. The Van Wickle saw mill is located 
on the same creek, near the south line of section twenty-five. It was built in the 
year 1856 : H. Van Wickle, proprietor. The Powell steam saw and shingle mill, 
combined, is situated on the bank of Lincoln Lake, on section twenty-seven. It 
was built in 1867 : Wm. B. Powell, proprietor. The Parks steam saw mill, near 
the center of section seven, was built in 1868 : E. H. Gibbs, proprietor. The Gris- 
wold steam saw and shingle mill, combined, is located near the south west corner of 
section twenty-nine. It was built in the year 1868: Jabes W. Griswold, proprietor. 
The Spencer Mills, from which the Post-office and settlement derived its name, 
was built in 1855, by Thomas Spencer, near the southeast corner of section twen- 
ty-seven. It was burned in the year 1861. 

BLACK CREEK 

is the principal stream that flows through Spencer. It enters from the northwest 
and passes southeasterly through the township. It is of sufficient width and 
depth to float logs, and a number of millions of feet are run out every year. It has 
several small tributaries, among which are Clear and Butternut Creeks. 
Among the 

LAKES 

in this township, Lincoln is the largest. It is a fine sheet of water, situated a short 
distance east of the center of the township, and is nearly one and one-half miles 
in length, by one-half mile in width. Cooper Lake, in the easterly part of section 
thirty-five, is a narrow strip of water, surrounded by a marsh. There is a lake 
in the southwesterly part of section thirty-four, composed of two distinct sections, 
connected by a narrow neck. Conjointly they are about one-half mile in length. 
North of Lincoln Lake is an assemblage of small lakes, extending through the 
township into Maple Valley, in Montcalm county. 
Our list shows but three 

SCHOOLS 

in Spencer. The first is held at the Griswold School House, in fractional district 
No 1. The building is a fine, wooden structure, painted white, and stands near 
the southwest corner of section twenty-nine. It was built in 1869. The second 
is held at the Hatch School House, in district No. 3. This is a substantial wooden 
building, is located at the center of section seventeen, and was built in 1867. The 
third is held at the Mill School House, in regular district No. 1. The building is 
a fine, slate-colored wooden structure. It was erected in 1861. 
The only 

POST-OFFICE 

in Spencer is in the southeast corner of section twenty-seven. Oliver P. McClure, 
Postmaster. 



96 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

TYRONE. 

This is the northwest corner township of Kent county, lying north of Sparta, 
and west of Solon; and being bounded on the north by Grant township, Newaygo 
county, and on the west by Casnovia, Muskegon county. 

Tyrone was first settled in 1849, by Mrs. Louisa Scott and family, who went in 
to board workmen on the State Road then being made on the west line of this 
township, by John Brooks, of Newaygo, who had the contract from the State. 
The family were deprived of the father, by insanity, a short time after going into 
the woods; but, owing to the great perseverence of Mrs. Scott, they remained, and 
have succeeded in building up a good home, and making a fine farm on section 
thirty-one, in the southwest part of the township. In 1850 Lot Ferguson, from 
Hillsdale county, went about one mile farther and settled on the southwest part 
of section nineteen, where the Casnovia House now stands. Alfred Bonner set- 
tled on section thirty, but remained only a short time. 

In 1852 Jacob Smith, from Cleveland, Ohio, and Harlow Jackson, from Branch 
county, Mich., settled one mile east from the state road, and a mile north from 
the township line, on the present state road from -Cedar Springs to Muskegon. 
There was not a white settler east of them nearer than Greenville. 

In 1853 John Thompson came into the same neighborhood, from Tioga county, 
New York, and about the same time, Joseph Kies came from Hillsdale county, 
Mich., and settled near Mr. Fulkerson. 

In 1855 Uriah Chubb, who had been living for a few years in Chester township, 
Ottawa county, settled on the west part of section thirty, and Leander Smith, 
from Otsego county, New York, went into the Jackson neighborhood. 

About this time Asa Clark and family, from Steuben county, New York, pene- 
trated the forest northeast from Sparta Center, or Nashville, as it was then called, 
and built their cabin on section thirty-six, in the southeast part of the township. 
Here they had no neighbors, except those who came for a few months at a time 
to cut pine logs along the river; and during the war they were the only regular 
settlers in the east part of the township. 

James Blackall, from Sparta, also went on section thirty-two in 1855. From 
that time to the commencement of the war there were many additions, and since 
the war its population has increased very fast. 

ORGANIZATION. 
This township was for some time attached to Sparta. 

In 1855 it was organized as a seperate township, under the name of Tyrone, the 
first annual meeting being being held at the only school house, which stood on 
the west line, near the residence of Mrs. Scott. The township meetings are still 
held in the same school district, the house now used being about a mile north of 
where the old one stood. 

FIRST TOWNSHIP OFFICERS. 
Supervisor—Uriah Chubb. Clerk — Albert Clute. Treasurer — Harlow Jackson. 
Justices — Patrick Thompson, Albert Clute, and Uriah Chubb. 
PRESENT TOWNSHIP OFFICERS. 
Supervisor — James M. Armstrong. Clerk — Harlow Jackson. Treasurer — B. S. 
Treadway. Justices— J. M. Armstrong, U. Chubb, L. V. Hoag, and David Clark. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 97 

GENERAL DESCRIPTION. 

About three-fourths of this township is timbered with pine, which extends 
along the Rouge River in the east, and across the north part in connection with 
the great Muskegon belt. The southwest portion is timbered with beech and 
maple, interspersed with some pine throughout nearly the whole extent — there 
being but two sections (thirty and thirty-one) which had none. The pine timber- 
ed portions here, as elsewhere, are principally sandy, while the beeech and maple 
timbered part is mostly clay soil, or rather a clay loam, which makes excellent 
farming land. This township is high and rolling, and is a good fruit region. 

There are no very large improvements yet; those of Messrs. Smith, Jackson and 
Hemsley, one mile from the south line, and about the same distance from the west 
line, are probably the largest. Mr. Daniel Hanson, and others, a mile north, are 
making a good start, and, juding from present appearances, will soon have splen- 
did farms. The same may also be said of II. C. Wylie, and others, east of those 
first mentioned. On the west line the land is divided into smaller parcels, with 
one or two exceptions. Mr. Edward Hay ward has a nice, large farm lying partly 
in this township and partly in Casnovia. 

STREAMS AND LAKES. 

Rouge River is the principal stream of Tyrone. It rises in Rice Lake, in the 
township of Grant, Newaygo county, about three miles north of the township 
line, enters Tyrone about one ond one-half miles west from the northeast corner, 
flows a little east of south, and then flows out near the southeast corner into 
Sparta. It is fed by several small streams, among which Duke Creek, which 
flows through Solon and comes in from the northeast on section thirty-six, is 
the largest. Ball Creek rises in several small streams in the west part of the 
township, flows southeast, and passes out into Sparta near the middle of the 
township line. 

A curiosity may be found on this stream, on the farm of H. C. Wylie on section 
thirty-three, which is worthy a description. 

It is no more nor less than an old Beaver Dam. This dam was about sixty rods 
long and rose to a hight of three, four, and even five feet in some places. It was 
built in a zig-zag form, the sections being uniformily about two rods in length. It 
must have been built a long time ago, for large trees are found growing on the 
emban kment. Where the pond was, the timber has been killed by the flowing, leav- 
ing nothing but a marsh. This pond had apparently covered from ten to fifteen acres, 
and perhaps more. The remains of trees, cut down by those curious and wonder- 
, ful animals, have been found there, showing plainly the prints of their teeth in 
the wood. The stream has broken through in three places. The river, and these 
creeks, have been much used for floating pine logs. 

South Crockery Creek, in the southwest part of the township, rises in Sparta, 
flows northwest through two small lakes, on section thirty-two, thence across 
thirty-one and out into Muskegon county, on the west. 

There is a lake of about twenty acres on the line of sections seventeen and 
eighteen, the outlet of which flows southeast across the township into Rouge 
River. Another, nearly as large, near the center of se'ction twenty-two, also has 
a small stream flowing from it to Rouge River. 
13 



98 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

There is considerable wet, swampy land, in the northeast part of the township, 
and a few small swamps in various other parts ; but none ot any great extent. 

CASNOVIA CORNERS 

(not incorporated) is nearly as much ot a village as some which have 
been platted and incorporated many years. It was first settled by Lot Fulker- 
son (before mentioned) in 1850. Mr. Fulkerson was the first to open his 
doors for the accommodation of travelers, and soon put out his sign, and kept 
a regular country tavern. In a short time his little one-story log cabin became 
too small for the accommodation of his guests, and he therefore erected a good 
frame building for that purpose, which was afterwards kept by Mr. Mizner, and 
later by Mr. Heath, who erected a large hall adjoining. These buildings are 
now owned and kept by Mr. John Tuxbury, formerly of Alpine. 

In 1853, a post office was established, with Daniel Bennett, who lived just over 
the line, as postmaster. The first store goods were sold by H. Hamilton, in 
May, 1862. 

There are now four stores, a blacksmith shop, etc.; also, a steam saw mill, 
which was erected in 1864, now owned by Patterson Brothers. They are doing 
a good, fair business, and have pine enough within reach to run the mill twenty 
years. 

Asher and Robert Post have a portable steam saw mill three miles north of 
here ; also one on the west line of the township. 

SCHOOL HOUSES. 

District No. 1, (fractional with Casnovia) was organized in 1853 with nine 
scholars in attendance at school. A small log house was erected and used until 
1861, when the present frame building was erected at a cost ot about $500. The 
former stood on section 31, and the latter stands on the west side of section 30, 
near the residence of Mr. Chubb. 

District No. 2, (fractional with Sparta), erected a frame house worth about 
$400, in 1863. This house stands on the northwest corner of section 36, and is 
commonly known as the Clark school house. 

District No. 3, (fractional with Casnovia), erected a small frame house in 1864, 
on the southwest corner of section 6, known as the Murray school house. 

District No. 4, was organized in 1861, and a nice frame house was built, worth 
$500, the following year. It stands on the southeast corner of section twenty- 
nine, and is known as the Leander Smith school house. 

District No. 5, was organized in 1868, and a good frame house erected at a cest 
of $500, known as the Ross' school house. It stands on the northeast corner of 
section nineteen. 

District No. 6 was organized in January, 1870. It has four scholars in summer, 
and about twenty in winter — being in the midst of a pine country, which brings 
in the people in winter, and drives them out in summer. This district has no 
school house yet, school being held in the house of Mr. L. R. Burch. It has been 
chiefly sustained by Mr. B. thus far, at a cost of $50 per term. 

District No. 7, was organized in 1870. A house is to be erected on section 
twenty»two or twenty-seven at a coat of about $500. 



HI8T0RT AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 



Tyrone has no churches, and only one hotel, besides the one mentioned, situated 
at the Corners, in the village of Casnovia. 

This other hotel is generally known as the Block Tavern, being made of hewn 
logs, and stands on the Cedar Springs and Muskegon state road. It is now kept 
by Allen Cumings. Mr. L. V. Hoag, and others, are quite sanguine of getting a 
Post-office established here soon, and building up a village. This is nearly twenty 
mile3 from Grand Rapids, and Casnovia is about twenty-two miles from the same. 
The Cedar Springs and Muskegon state road crosses this township on the section 
line, one mile from the Sparta line. The surveyed route of the C. S. & M. R. R. 
runs nearly parallel to the state road, and very near it. The surveyed line of the 
G. R. and Newaygo R. R. also crosses this township, and strikes Casnovia 
Corners. 



VERGENNES. 

Vergennes is bounded on the north by Grattan, on the east by Keene, Ionia 
county, on the south by Lowell, and on the west by Ada. 

Sylvester Hodges, the first white settler in the township, Came from the State 
of New York, in the year 1836. He transplanted the first apple trees put out in 
the township of Lowell, also assisted in building the first house where the village 
of Lowell now stands. The trees referred to, may now be seen standing on a lot 
owned by Mrs. Caroline Snell, near the bank of Flat River, a short distance from 
the road leading from the village to the D. & M. Railroad depot. 

The township of Vergennes was organized in the year 1838. The first town- 
ship meeting was held on the second day of April, of the same year, when the fol- 
lowing persons were chosen as 

FIRST TOWNSHIP OFFICERS. 

Supervisor — Rodney Robinson. Clerk — M. Patrick. Assessors —Lewis Robin- 
son, T. I. Daniels, John M. Fox. Collector — Porter Ralph. School Inspectors — 
Everett Wilson, Lewis Robinson, George Brown. Directors of the Poor — Everett 
Wilson, Chas. Newton. Commissioners of Highways — Lucas Robinson, Henry 
Daines, P. W. Fox. Constables — Porter Ralph, A. D. Smith, O. H. Jones, Jas. S. 
Fox. 

We are informed by Benj. Fairchild, Esq., that at this time there were only 
about nineteen families in the township. This gentleman, who went there during 
the year 1838, says that, as he passed through the township of Lowell, on his way 
from Canada, he counted but three houses. For several years the farmers in that 
vicinity were obliged to take their grist to Ionia, to Grandville, or to Kalamazoo 
to be ground. Considering the poor roads which the scattered community were 
then tormented with, and the bridgeless streams which must be crossed, such 
journeys doubtless seemed quite uninviting. 

Reader, have you ever traveled through a new country ? If you have, you can 
understand the meaning of the expression, "poor roads," "horrid roads." You 
who have not, I would advise to take a trip into the northern part of the State 
of Michigan immediately after a heavy rain. A trip of that kind will benefit your 
health as much as a voyage on the lakes, during rough weathfer., , , , '» < 



100 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

The entire county was then a howling wilderness. Grand Rapids could boast 
of but half a score of houses, with most of them owned by one man ; and two 
Stores, one kept by " Uucle Louis," and the other by a man named Watson. 

Among the early settlers may be mentioned the following : Silas S. Fallass, who 
settled in the year 1838, J. Wesley Fallass, in 1839, Lucas Robinson, in 1837, 
Thompson I. Daniels, in 1837, James Wells, in 1842, A. R. Hoag, in 1842, Sylves- 
ter Hodges, in 1836, James S. Fox, 1836, William P. Perrin, in 1837, Alexander 
Rogers, in 1837, Alanson K. Shaw, in 1839, Emery Foster, in 1837, Newcomb 
Godfrey, in 1838, Amos Hodges, in 1838, Eliab Walker, in 1838, Christopher 
Misner, in 1838, Morgan Lyon, in 1838, Benjamin Fairchild, in 1838, John Bran- 
agan, in 1837, Alfred Van Deusen, in 1838, Adam Van Deusen. in 1840. 

THE SOIL 

of Vergennes is mostly heavy ; yet along the banks of Flat River we found some 
quite light and sandy. The greater portion of the township consists of what might 
be called oak openings. We noticed a belt of timbered land extending south from 
Eagle or Horse Shoe Lake, one and one-half miles wide, and four miles in length, 
reaching into sections twenty and twenty-one ; also a short strip of timbered 
land on the west side of the same lake. 

The township is well watered by Flat River, and numerous little tributaries, 
through the easterly and central part, and Honey Creek, which passes through 
three sections on the westerly tier. 

THE PRESENT OFFICERS 
of the township are: Supervisor — J. W. Walker. Clerk — John L. Covert. Treas- 
urer — James Casey. Justices — Joseph S. Jasper, J. L. B. Kerr, Dennis Driscoll, 
John L. Covert. Constable — John Hull. 

The site now occupied by 

THE VILLAGE OF FALLASSBURG 
was settled upon about the year 1840, by the family or families from which it de- 
rived its name. 

The two mills and the hotel therein situate were erected before the present 
thriving village of Lowell had commenced to be built up. Fallassburg Grist Mill, 
situated on Flat River — a three-story wooden building — was erected in 1840 : 
Proprietor, J. Wesley Tallass. Hecox's Saw Mill, situated here, is an old, wood 
colored, three-story building. The upper part is occupied as a chair manufactory. 
It was erected in 1839 : Proprietor, Charles Hecox. 

Fallassburg supports one store, which has been in operation for many years ; 
and the building was erected before any similar structure in the village of Lowell. 
The village school house, located in the easterly part of the burgh, is a fine 
wooden structure, painted white. It was built in the summer of 1867. 

FLAT RIVER 
passes into Vergennes from the east, three-quarters of a mile south of the north- 
easterly corner of the township, when it curves and passes back into Ionia county, 
at a point about three-quarters of a mile south of the place of entrance. It re- 
enters jMKsecfcicai ^hrjteen, and, meandering southwesterly, passes out near the 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 101 

quarter post, on the south line of section thirty-five. It forms a junction with the 
Grand at the village ot Lowell. 

THE LAKES 

in Vergennes are nearly all small. Eagle, or Nagle, or Horse Shoe Lake, projects 
a short distance into the town. Eagle was once the most familiar name. It was 
thus christened, after a bird of that species, which built its nest in a large oak, on 
an island or peninsula in the lake. From its resemblance to a horse shoe it some- 
times passes by that name. It has an outlet called Lake Creek, which is a tribu- 
tary of Flat River. 

Odell Lake is situated near the center of section twenty-nine. It is fifty rods 
in width, and has an average depth of thirteen feet. The lake and surrounding 
swamp cover about eighty acres. 

Cole's Lake, situate on the east half of section thirty, is a shallow sheet of 
water, covering about ten acres. Miller's Lake, situate on the west half of sec-, 
tion twenty-nine, is quite deep, and covers four or five acres. 

Long Lake, situate on section nineteen, is a fine body of water, about three 
quarters of a mile in length, with an average width of thirty rods. It is fre- 
quented by pleasure seekers in both summer and winter. 

Vergennes has good educational facilities. Its 

SCHOOLS 

are well organized, and are supplied with competent teachers. The school build- 
ings are generally good, though not costly, and present a tidy appearance. 

The Valley School house, situate on the south part of section twelve, is a plain, 
wooden structure. It was once white, but the elements have produced their 
usual effects upon it, until now it presents a wood-colored appearance. 

Bailey School house, situate on the northeast corner of the northwest quarter 
of section twenty-nine, is a plain, white, wooden structure. It was built in 1855. 

The school house at Fox's Corners is a beautiful, new, wooden building, is 
situate on an eminence at the southeast part of section twenty-seven, and was 
built in 1870. The McPherson school house is situated on the northeast corner 
of the southeast quarter of section eighteen. It is a white wooden building, built 
in 1861. 

The Aldrich school house, situate at the center of section nine, is constructed 
of logs, is quite old, and, to all appearance, is becoming unsafe. The people of 
tfye district intend to build a new one ere long. 

The Kelsey school house, situate on the northeast corner of section thirty-two, 
was erected in 1852. It is a red wooden building. 

Barto school house, situate on the northeast corner of section two, is a plain, 
white, wooden structure. It was built in the year 1856. The Godfrey school 
house, situate on the south half of the southeast quarter of section two, is an old 
red wooden building. It was built about twenty-five years ago. 

The Water's school house, situated on the northwest corner of section twenty- 
three, is a neat wooden structure, painted white. It was built in 1868. 

There are two 



102 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 

CHURCHES 

in Vergennes, outside the village of Fallassburg. The First Methodist Episcopal 
church is situated on the southwest corner of section twenty, within a short dis- 
tance of Long Lake. It is a substantial wooden building, painted white, and has 
a capacity to seat three or four hundred persons. The present pastor of the con- 
gregation who worships there, is the Rev. Charles Chick. The First Christian 
Church of Vergennes, situated at the southwest corner of section two, was built 
in 1868, and is a substantial wooden structure, painted white. The Wesleyan 
Methodists in this vicinity also hold their meetings in the same building. 
There are two grist 

MILLS 

and one saw mill in Vergennes, outside the village of Fallassburg. The Foster 
grist mill is situated on Flat River, on section twenty-six. It is a three-story 
wooden structure, painted white. Proprietors, T. W. Fox & Co. 

Alton grist mill is situate on the northeast corner of section ten, on Wood's 
Creek. It is a two-story wooden building, used exclusively for mill purposes : 
Proprietor, Thomas B. Woodbury. 

Ring's Saw Mill and Wagon Shop, are situated on the northwest corner of sec- 
tion ten, on Wood's Creek. The mill contains one upright saw. Proprietor, 
Edmund Ring. 

There are 

BLACKSMITH SHOPS 

at the following places : Northwest corner of section twenty nine ; northwest 
corner of the southwest quarter of section fifteen, (Lewis Smith, proprietor); and 
northwest corner of section thirty-four. 

WALKER. 

Walker is in the western tier of townships, being bounded on the north by 
AJpine, on the east by Grand Rapids townshp and city, on the south by Wyom- 
ing, and on the west by Talmadge, Ottawa couuty. It was originally six miles 
square ; but, owing to the course of Grand River, which has become the estab- 
lished eastern and southern boundary, it is now quite irregular. The corpora- 
tion of the city also takes five and one-fourth sections out of the southeasterly 
part. 

The division line between the township of Grand Rapids and Walker, was for- 
merly what is now Division street, in the city ; therefore, a list of the early settlers 
of Walker woald include those who located west oC that line. However, as the 
history of the city will be made a special theme, in this we will refer to that part 
only which lies within what are now the bounds of Walker. 

In the year 1836 Samuel White, then a man fifty years of age, came with his 
family from Canada, and settled on section twenty-three. He had five sons and 
several daughters, one or two of whom were married. The family purchased of 
the Government about six hundred acres of land on sections ten, fourteen, fifteen 
and twenty-three. Mr. White built the first frame barn west of Grand River ; and 
soon after this, with the assistance of his sons, Milo and James, erected a saw mill 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 103 

oq Indian Creek, on the north side of section fifteen. Mr. and Mrs. White are 
still living on the old homestead, and can now count a family of over sixty chil- 
dren, grand children, and great grand children, notwithstanding the loss of one 
son in the Mexican War, and one in the recent War for the Union. 

Later in the year 1836, Jesse Smith, who was also from Canada, settled on 
Bridge street, about two miles west of the river. He had a large family of sons 
and daughters, some of whom were married, and who settled in different parts of 
the township. One of the elder sons, Benjamin, commenced at an early day on 
the south side of section ten, where he built a small grist mill and machine shop 
on Indian Creek. The parents are now deceased, and the family scattered. 

During the same year, a Frenchman, by the name of John J. Nardin, who had 
served in the French army under Napoleon the First, came from Detroit, with a 
large family, and settled in the southern part of the township, west of where the 
Eagle Plaster Mills now stand. The parents are still living on the old iarm, while 
near them reside two sons, John and George, and two daughters, Mrs. Roger 
Atkinson and Mrs. James Sawyer. Late in the same year Zelotis Bemis and Robert 
Hilton went still further south, and located on the north bank of the river, two or 
three miles below the plaster mills. A portion of the Bemis- farm, now owned by 
John N. Butterfield, was formerly an " Indian Planting Ground." Soon after he 
settled, Mr. Bemis commenced raising wheat quite extensively, the harvesting of 
which furnished employment for some of those that came a year or two later. 

The following named persons settled in the township soon after those just men- 
tioned : Henry Helmka, Wm. W. Anderson, Joseph Denton, John Hogadone, and 
Harvey Monroe, from Canada; John Harrington, of Vermont, and Patrick O'Brien, 
Stephen O'Brien and James Murray, trom Ireland. The family of Edisons also 
came at an early day, and settled on what is now Bridge street, of which family 
John Edison is now themily representative on that street. 

There are many others who could hardly be classed as first settlers, but who are 
known as old residents; among whom are Thomas McMan, David Waters, Wm. 
C. Davidson, Jonathan Blair, Martin Wheeler, Bernard Courtney, and Quigley, in 
the south part ; Samuel Westlake, the Schermerhorns, Phillips, Escotts, Burds, 
Samuel Corporon, Thomas Cofcney, Asa Pratt, Thales Dean, Daniel Stocking, 
and the Armstrongs, near the central part; the Matthews, A. C. Bailey, Samuel 
Root, Miner Johnson, John Miller, Peter Huwer, Andrew Loomis, Tenny, the 
Chappells, Fullers, Tabors, Covell, and Dean in the north ; and Palmerlee, Tryon, 
Berry Wait, Devendorf, and Lamoreaux, in the west. 

ORGANIZATION. 

The first township meeting was held in the month of April, 1838, at the Mission 
School House, which stood on the west bank of Grand River, near the present 
jail site. The records indicate that this was the only school house then in the 
township, for it was spoken of as " the School House of Walker." 

THE FIRST OFFICERS 
of the township were : Supervisor — Lovell Moore. Clerk — Isaac Turner. Treas- 
urer — Harry Eaton. Justices — Robert Hilton, Isaac Turner, Ira Jones and Isaiah 
Burton. 



104 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

About three years after the' organization of the township, a log school house 
was erected on the north side of section twenty-two, and the township meetings 
were, for a time, held there. Alpine was detached from Walker in the year 1847 ; 
for a year or two previous to which time the meetings were held at the Simon d's 
School House, and afterwards at the center. In the year 1867 a nice brick building, 
in size 26x36 feet, was erected on the north side of section twenty-two, for a Town 
Hall. 

THE PRESENT OFFICERS 

of the township are : Supervisor — Ezra A. Hebard. Clerk — Henry O. Seherraerliorn. 
Treasurer — George Weaver. Justices — Thomas Healey, Nathan Earle, Bernard 
Courtney, and Daniel Schermerhorn. 

GENERAL DESCRIPTION. 

The soil ot Walker is strangely diversified. On the east and south, along Grand 
River, is a tract of low land, from eighty rods to a mile in width, extending from 
the northeast to the southwest corner of the township, which is underlaid with a 
strata of lime stone, lying from two to ten feet below the surface. Above this is 
a gravelly loam, which, in some parts, is filled and covered with large boulders. 
Back of this is a series of hills and sandy bluffs, rising to a height of fifty or sixty 
feet. The sandy belt also extends diagonally across the township from northeast 
to northwest, and varies in width from one-half to two miles. The original timber 
of the former was elm, black oak, soft maple, hemlock, cedar, etc., and of the 
latter, pine and oak. 

We next come to what is commonly called timbered land ; the timber being 
chiefly beach and sugar maple, with considerable valuable oak interspersed 
through some portions. This timbered land extends throughout the remainder 
of Walker, and northwest into the adjoining townships of Ottawa county. The 
soil of the northwestern portion is chiefly clay, with some small parcels of rich, 
black, sandy loam. The face of the country is gently undulating, with but few 
hills and swamps. 

Walker is as thickly settled as any township which contains no village. The 
southeasterly part is mostly divided into small lots, containing from five to forty 
acres, and which are usually devoted to market gardening and fruit-growing. 
The westerly and northwesterly part is devoted principally to farming purposes. 
In that locality are to be seen some quite large, as well as fine, farms. Stephen 
O'Brien owns two hundred and eighty acres, situated south of Bridge street, two 
miles west of the plaster quarries, two hundred acres of which is in a good state 
of cultivation. Mr. O'Brien informed us that he raises from nine hundred to one 
thousand bushels of wheat per year, besides other general crops ; and that he has 
sold as high as one hundred tons of hay as the result of one year's yield. P. F. 
Covell, N. C. Wright, and Daniel Schermerhorn, near the center ; Haines Edison 
and B. F. Woodman, in the northern part of the township ; and McCarthy and 
Davidson in the southern part, have farms containing from one hundred and 
sixty to two hundred and sixty acres each. Peaches, apples and other kinds of 
fruit are raised in abundance on the sandy belt, and on most parts of the clay 
land. The low lands along the river produce good crops of grass and grain. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 105 

The greatest elevation in the township is the high rolling swell of land extend- 
ing from section thirty-two in the southwest, passing through the central part, 
broken by Brandy Creek, near the residence of William Dunnett, continuing 
northward on the west of Indian Creek, and afterwards crossing the line into 
Alpine. On the highest part of this ridge, near the center of section nine, is a 
lake covering about four acres, situated in the middle of a swamp of about twenty 
acres. This lake is about one hundred feet above the level of Grand River, and 
has no visible outlet. Poles have been run down sixty feet without striking any 
solid bottom. 

There is a swamp of about one hundred acres on Bridge street, three and one 
half miles west of the river, lying mostly on section twenty-nine. There is also 
one about the same size in the sourthern part of section six. We found one of 
rather small dimensions on section eight ; also, one on section thirty -four. There 
are other small swamps in different parts of the township, some of which are 
being drained and cultivated, and are fast becoming rich meadow land. In all, 
there are, probably, about four hundred acres of swamp land in the township. 

Of the streams in Walker, Indian Creek, formerly known as Indian Mill Creek, 
is the most important. It derived its name from a mill which was erected near 
its mouth by the Indians, or for them — we have not learned which — many years 
ago. (The site of this mill was near the present junction of the Detroit & Mil- 
waukee with the Grand Rapids & Indiana Railroad, on section thirteen.) The 
source of the stream is in Alpine. It enters Walker from the north, near the pres- 
ent location of the Indian Creek post office, and passes through sections ten, 
fifteen, fourteen, and thirteen, and unites with Grand River near the D. & M. 
Railroad bridge. There was once considerable pine along its banks, and during 
the first ten years of the early settlement of the township, five saw mills were 
erected. In the year 1850, three of them remained. Now, the pine is very nearly 
gone ; and at the time we went through the township (May, 1870), but one of the 
mills was running. 

Brandy Creek, which is a branch of Indian Creek, rises on section sixteen, and 
flowing north easterly, enters the latter on the south side of section ten. 

Black Skin Creek — so-called after an Indian chielf of that name — rises in the 
southern part of the original township, and flowing south alongside the plant- 
ing ground before mentioned, enters Grand River on the south side of section five. 

Sand Creek flows through the northwesterly part of the township, and passes 
out into Ottawa county on the west. 

There are several other small creeks in the township, but none demanding 
special notice. 

RAILROADS. 

Walker is crossed by three railroads. The Detroit & Milwaukee passes through 
the northern part of the township ; the Kalamazoo, Allegan & Grand Rapids 
division of the Michigan Southern runs through the southeasterly part ; and the 
Grand Rapids and Indiana runs parallel with the river through the northeasterly 
part. 

14 



106 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

MILLS AND MANUFACTURING ESTABLISHMENTS. 

In the year 1845, Joseph Builen erected a saw mill on the eastern part of "sec- 
tion 4. It is run by an overshot waterwheel ; the water being conveyed from the 
pond on Indian Creek, near the residence of Solomon Wright, in Alpine, a dis- 
tance of nearly ninety rods. The mill possesses the facilities for sawing one mil- 
lion feet of lumber per year; but on account of the scarcity of pine, it does a 
much smaller business. The mill also contains one run of mill-stones for grind- 
ing " feed," etc. The present proprietors are McNitt & Wilder. 

The plaster mills and quarries on section thirty -four, two and one half miles 
below Bridge street, in the side of the bluff near the river, are on the east part of 
section thirty-four. Plaster was first discovered here by R. E. Butter worth, of 
Grand Rapids, who then owned the land. He opened the first quarry in the year 
1852, which was operated under the superintendence of Bernard Courtney. This 
is the mine now known as " Plaster Cave," or " Hovey's Cave," and is operated by 
the Eagle Mills Plaster Company. They have large mills and extensive works for 
grinding the rock for land plaster, and also for the manufacture of stucco. 

SCHOOL HOUSES. 

The school houses of Walker are generally good, although, perhaps, not quite 
equal to those of some other townships, nor quite as good as should be expected 
of a wealthy class of inhabitants near a city of the size of Grand Rapids. 

District No. 4, commonly known as the " Walker Center" district, was organ- 
ized in 1841, and then included a territory of about fifteen square miles. Their 
first house was a log building, and stood on the north side of section 22 ; the next 
was a small wooden building standing at the original geographical center of the 
township, on the northeast corner of section twenty-one. This building was used 
until 1867, when a nice frame building was erected at a cost of $1,000. This is 
the best school house in the township. 

District No. 7 — Bridge street — has a good wooden building, which was erected 
in the year 1860. Cost, $400. It is located on the south side of section twenty- 
two. 

District No. 8 was organized in the year 1845. A log house was built, which 
was used until the year 1858, when the present frame structure, which is gen- 
erally known as the O'Brien school house, was erected at a cost of $400. Loca- 
tion, south side of section twenty-nine. 

District No. 2 is the oldest district now in existence in Walker. A log build- 
ing was first used. The present frame building was built in the year 1860, at an 
expense of about $300. Location, near south side of section thirty-three. This 
district is about to be divided to form a new one in the vicinity of the plaster 
mills. 

District No. 3 has a small frame building on the northeast corner of section 
nineteen, near the residence of Henry C. Hogadone. 

District No. 12 has a small frame house on the north side of section seventeen, 
near the residence of A. T. Liscomb. 

District No. 6 was organized about the year 1840, and a small frame building 
erected, which was used until 1858, when a large frame house was erected at a 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 107 

cost of $700. This house is located on the south side of section three, and is com- 
monly known as the Simonds' school house. 

District No. 11 was organized in the year 1850, and a small frame house built 
on the west side of section twelve, known as the Wait school house. 

In District No. 5, the first school house was built on the farm of Andrew 
Loomis, on the southwest corner of section six. The present building — a small 
frame structure — stands on the northeast corner of section seven. 

There are several fractional districts, partly in Walker, of which the school 
houses are in the adjoining townships. 

CHURCHES. 

Walker contains none yet, but one is being built by the Wesleyan Methodist 
society, on the southeast corner of section two, which is to be a wooden building 
28x44 feet in size. The estimated cost is $1,500 to $1,600. 

HOTELS. 
The Walker House, owned and kept by Solomon Pierce, was erected in the 
year 1856, by N. C. Wright. It is a three-story frame building, and stands on 
the north side of section ten, four miles from the city. 



WYOMING. 

Wyoming is one of the western tier of townships of Kent county. It is bound- 
ed on the north and northwest by the city of Grand Rapids and the township of 
Walker, on the east by Paris, on the south by Byron, and on the west by George- 
town, Ottawa county. 

The soil of this township is diversified, a portion of it, extending from the 
northern, northeastern part of the township in a southwesterly direction, with a 
breadth of about two miles, and a length of about five miles, has a gravelly soil, 
timbered with burr and white oak. It is now principally under cultivation, and 
is especially adapted to wheat growing. Adjoining this, on the westerly side, 
are the Grand River bottoms, varying in width from one-fourth to one -half of a 
mile ; and on the east is a large swamp and open marsh. Parts of this swamp are 
densely timbered with cedar and pine, with an occasional island hemlock and 
maple. East of this is a large tract of sandy openings, timbered with white and 
yellow oak. The soil is light, but affords a fair quality of farming lands. South 
of this is Buck Creek, with its bottom lands ; adjoining which on the south is a 
strip of pine, of about one mile in width, extending from the south line of the 
township in a north, northwestery direction, to within about two miles of its west- 
ern border. South of this is a strip of beech and maple land, varying in width 
from one mile at its eastern extremity to three at its western. 

Buck Creek enters Wyoming from the south, about the center of section thirty- 
six, and flows northwesterly, entering Grand River on section seventeen. This 
stream affords three good mill sites within the township, which are occupied as 
follows: One by Fisher's Saw Mill, David Fisher, proprietor, on section twenty- 
seven ; another by Dewey's Saw Mill, on section twenty-one, Egbert Dewey, pro- 



108 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

prietor; and the third by the Wyoming Flouring Mill, at Grandville, H. 0. 
Weston, proprietor. 

Plaster Creek enters Wyoming from the east, on section twelve, and flows 
northwest, leaving the township just before it reaches Grand River. 

There are numerous small spring brooks throughout this township, one of 
which, entering it from Paris, on section one, and flowing west into Plaster Creek, 
affords water power for running the plaster mills. 

THE VILLAGE OF GRANDVILLE 
is located in the western part of this township, on the left bank of Grand River, 
and contains a population of about 300. It contains five dry goods and grocery 
stores, two drug stores, two blacksmith shops, one wagon shop, one boot and 
shoe store, and one harness shop. It has two churches ; one Cangregational, 
which was erected about the year 1855, and a Methodist Episcopal, now nearly 
finished. The first Congregational Society was organized at Grand villee in 1838, 
and Rev. James Ballard was the first pastor. The Grandville Union School.House, 
erected in 1867, is a very fine building. It is thirty feet in width, by sixty in 
length, with a transept sixteen by thirty feet in size, has two stories above the 
basement, and is surmounted by a tower. The cost was $10,000. 

David Tucker built the first frame house in Grandville. It stood a little north 
of the present residence of H. O. Weston. 

PLASTER. 

The existence of gypsum beds, on Plaster Creek, was known to the Indians at 
the time when the first white settlers came to this township, and gave the stream 
its name. A portion of the rock was exposed in the bed of the creek at the site 
of the first plaster mill, where George H. White & Co.'s works are now located. 
Douglass Houghton, State Geologist, visited the place in 1838, and gave the first 
published account of the deposits. Prior to that time the 80 acres of land on 
section two, on which the plaster was found, had been purchased by Mr. De- 
garmo Jones, of Detroit, with a view to its mineral worth. 

The first mill for grinding plaster was built in the winter of 1840-1, by Mr. 
Daniel Ball, of Grand Rapids. It was driven by a large water wheel, and con- 
tained but one run of stone. The last remains of this building, in use until a few 
years ago, were torn down in 1869. Mr. Ball leased the bed of Mr. Jones, and paid 
him in plaster, delived in Detroit via Grand River and the lakes. Mr. Henry R. 
Williams bought the lease of Mr. Bali in 1843, and during the same year built an 
addition to the works, putting in another run of stone for custom flouring. Mr. 
James A. Rumsey entered these works in 1842, and has been 'connected with the 
business since that time, being now employed as foreman by George II. White & 
Co. The plaster produced for the first four years found a market principally at 
Detroit, but by dint of wise exertions on the part of the proprietors, who sold it, 
and often gave it away to farmers for trial, its use as a fertilizer became quite 
general in the southern part of the State. It was often conveyed on sleighs for 
use on farms, from 30 to 100 miles distant. George H. White & Co. now own the 
80 acres on which the first mill was built, and land adjoining, to the amount of 
425 acres in all, of which about 300 acres is underlaid with plaster. The stratum 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 109 

now quarried is 12 feet in thickness, and is overlaid with from 12 to 16 feet of 
earth, and in places by a stratum of partially decomposed plaster, known as the 
" seven foot course." The following is the estimated product of these works from 
1852 to the present time : 

From 1842 to 1850 500 tons yearly 

" 1850 " 1860 -------- 2,000 " " 

" 1860 " 1864 -------- 3,000 " " 

" 1864 " 1868 8,000 " " 

During the year 1869 - 12,000 tons. 

" " " 1870 ------- probably 12,000 tons. 

They have a water mill with one run of stone capable of grinding two tons per 
hour, and a steam mill with two run of stone that grind four tons per hour, and 
storage for 4,000 tons of ground plaster. Their capital is sufficient to supply all 
the present or future demands of the trade. The works are located half a mile 
south of the city limits, on the Grand Rapids & Indiana Railroad, having easy 
access to all other railroads leading to the city, and also to Grand River. 

SAW MILLS. 

The Saw Mill of David Fisher is located on section twenty-seven. It contains 
two saws, one upright and one circular, and cuts about two and one-half million 
feet per annum. Egbert Dewey carries on the manufacture of lumber and lath at 
his saw mill on section twenty-one. The mill contains six saws, and cuts about 
one million two hundred thousand feet per annum. 

H. O. Weston carries on the manufacture of flour at the Wyoming Mills, at 
Grandville. This mill has three runs of stone, and has a capacity ot about fifty 
barrels of flour per day. . It was erected by Egbert Dewey, about the year 1856. 

These mills are all driven by water power, and are located on Buck Creek. 

David Fisher carries on the manufacture of lime, from marl, or bog lime, near 
his saw mill, affording an excellent lime for mason work, and a good fertilizer. 
Mr Carpenter also carries on the manufacture of the same kind of lime on section 
three. 

RAIL ROADS. 

Wyoming is traversed by three railroads. The Grand River Valley Railroad 
crosses the northeast corner of the township. The Grand Rapids & Indiana runs 
across the township, from north to south, near the center line of the eastern tier 
of sections, and has a station near the center of section thirty-six. The northern 
branch of the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Railroad runs north and south 
through this township, very near its center line, and has a station near the center, 
called Grandville Station. 

EARLY SETTLERS. 

As near as we can learn from the memory of the early settlers, Mr. David 
Tucker was the first settler in Wyoming, he having settled at Grandville in 1832. 
During the same year Gideon II. Gordon settled at Grandville. In 1833 Luther 
Lincoln, Joseph B. Copeland, Hiram Jenison, and William R. Godwin settled at 
Grandville, Jonathan F. Chubb on section four, Myron Roys on section nine, and 
Henry West on section twenty. During 1834 Roswell Britton, Julius C. Abel, 



110 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Ephraini P. Walker, Abraham Bryant, and Josiah McCarthy settled at Grand- 
ville, Robert Howlett, and George Thomson on section nine, and Alvah Wanzy 
on section one. Charles H. Oaks, Joseph A Brooks, Thomas H. Buxton, and 
Manly Patch en settled at Grandville in 1835, and during the same year, Ransom 
Sawyer, and Richard Moore on section nineteen, and Justus C. Rogers on section 
fourteen, and Eli, and Erastus Yeomans also came to Grandville. In 1836 Hiram 
Osgood, Orrey Hill, Nathan White, Charles Wheeler, D wight Rankin, James 
Lock wood, Jacob Rogers, Charles J. Rogers, Leonard Stoneburner, and Mr. Fet- 
terman located at Grandville, and in different parts of the township. Among the 
settlers of 1837 and 1838, we find the names of Lewis Moody, Chase Edgerly, Col. 
Hathaway, William Butts, James P. Scott, Jotham Hall, Savoy R. Beals, Cyrus 
Jones, Cyrus Marsh, Horace Wilder, and James McCray. Edward Fekin was also 
one of the earliest settlers. Of these, the first settlers of this township, forty-seven 
in number, only thirteen are now living in Wyoming, viz : Myron Roys, Joseph 
B. Copeland, Thomas H. Buxton, Richard Moore, Justus C. Rogers, Dwight Ran- 
kin, Erastus Yeomans, Eli Yeomans, Charles J. Rogers, Leonard Stoneburner, 
Lewis Moody, Horace Wilder, and Edward Fekin. Of the others, some few have 
removed, but the greater part are deceased. Savoy R. Beals and Cyrus Jones had 
resided in this county some time before settling in Wyoming. 

Grandville was one of the first settlements in Kent county; and, for a number 
of years, one of the largest places. One of the first saw mills, if not the first, (ex- 
cept one built on Indian Mill Creek for the Indians,) was built near the site of the 
Wyoming Mills, by Messrs. Ball and Wright, in 1834. This mill, after passing 
through various hands, was destroyed by fire many years ago. 

In 1834 Gideon H. Gordon built a saw mill on section seventeen. This mill 
afterwards fell into other hands, and finally rotted down. During this year 
Messrs. Britton and Brown also built a saw mill on the site of Dewey's mill, on 
section twenty-one. It was afterwards torn down to make room for the mill 
which now occupies the site. 

In 1835 Mr. Fetterman commenced to build a saw mill at the mouth of Rush 
Creek, just within the limits of Wyoming, and afterwards sold it to Geo. Ketchum, 
who completed it, and also put in a run of mill stones for grinding grain. They 
were the first ever run in Kent county, and were twenty or twenty-two inches in 
diameter. 

Mr. Gideon H. Gordon, during the same year, built a saw mill on section twen- 
ty-seven, on the site of Fisher's Mill. It was afterwards burned. Josiah Burton 
also built a saw mill on the site of Rumsey's Plaster Mill, in 1836. 

Ketchum and McCray built the first furnace and machine shop on Grand River, 
at Grandville, in 1837. Horace Wilder says that in 1837, under the direction «of 
Mr. McCray, he melted and cast the first iron ever cast in Kent county. 

During 1837-8 George Ketchum built, and put in operation, the first flouring 
mill at Grandville. This mill was burned in 1843, and was never rebuilt. In 1838 
the State authorities commenced to bore a salt well at the marsh, on section three, 
about where the railroad bridge of the L. S. & M. S. R. R. now crosses Grand 
River. The work was under the charge of Dr. Douglas Houghton, State Geolo- 
gist. During this year a dwelling house, boarding house, blacksmith shop, and 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. Ill 

stables were erected, a dock built, tower erected, and curb sunk to the rock, and 
a steam engine set and made ready for the next year's operations. The next year 
the job of boring the well was let to Hon. Lucius Lyon, of Detroit, who bored to 
the depth of 700 feet, when the shaft broke, and the drill, with a portion of the 
shaft, was left at the bottom of the well. The work was then abandoned and the 
buildings left to decay. 

George Ketch um also built a Gang Saw Mill, at an early day, in what is now 
Georgetown, Ottawa county, on the site of Jenison's flouring mills. 

INCIDENTS OF EARLY SETTLEMENT. 

Justus C. Rogers came to Kent county in 1835. He walked from Detroit to 
Chicago, and from there back to Grand Rapids. At that time the only public 
conveyance across Michigan was a lumber wagon stage, and walking was prefera- 
ble to riding in it over the roads as they were then. In the spring of 1836, Mr. 
Rogers built a small frame house on the site of his present residence, on section 
fourteen, and in September of the same year there came a tornado which took it 
up from the foundation and carried it about one rod. When it struck it ended 
over, so that the south end of the frame lay to the north, and the whole building 
a wreck. Some of the roof boards and shingles were carried more than a mile, 
and the woods were strewed with them for quite a distance. Mr. Roger's family 
had not yet arrived, and he was absent from home at the time. The course of 
the tornado was from southwest to northeast, and the next building in its course 
was a log house, on section six, of Paris, which was occupied by Cyrus Jones and 
family. This it blew down, to within three or four logs of the ground, but luckily 
none of the inmates were seriously injured, although none of them escaped with- 
out some bruises. 

Erastus and Eli Yeomans came to Grandville in 1835. They came from Pon- 
tiac on foot, via the Shiawassee trail, and had to ford all the streams. D wight 
Rankin came with a wagon in 1836, by way of Gull Prairie, and was nine days 
coming from Detroit to Grand Rapids. When they forded the Cold water they 
got " set," and were an hour or two getting through. 

A pole boat called the Cinderella, was launched at Grandville in June, 1837, 
and Mrs. Rankin says the occasion was made one of general rejoicing. All the 
people around were invited, and the boat was poled up and down the river, while 
they had music and dancing on board. Mr. Lewis Moody came to Grandville in 
the spring of 1837, but did not bring his family until November. They, with 
others, came by Green Lake, and were six days getting through. They had four 
ox teams, and four wagons, and were frequently obliged to put the four teams on 
one wagon. Just at dark of the fourth day, they came to the outlet of Green 
Lake, and found the poles that composed the bridge afloat, and were about two 
hours getting across ; and it was raining all of the time. When they reached the 
Green Lake house, tbey found some three or four others there before them, but 
they had none ot them had any supper, and all they could muster towards it 
were some potatoes and onions that the people who kept the house had, and 
some venison that one of the travelers had. Mrs. Moody told them she could 
furnish bread, and they made out a supper that relished well, tired and hungry 



1J2 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 

as they were. The next night for supper they had nothing but bread ; and the 
same, in a very limited quantity, for breakfast. Mr. Moody says the Fourth of 
July, 1837, was the " liveliest'' Fourth he ever saw. The steamboat, " Gov. 
Mason," made her trial trip from Grand Rapids to Grandville. Dr. Scran ton was 
to deliver an address on board of the boat at Grandville, but, as it was very 
lengthy, when he was but partly through, some one blowed the whistle, and the 
crowd cheered and broke up. There were four liberty poles raised at Grandville 
that day, but at night none of them were standing. Mr. M. says that when they 
first began to carry the United States mail from Grandville to Grand Haven, they 
used to tie it up in a pocket handkerchief. Mr. Leonard Stoneburner relates the 
following story, which Mr. E. B. Bostwick told of one of the mail-carriers, an 
Irishman. He started from Grandville late, and did not get to the lumber camp, 
where he was to stay all night, until after dark. Just before he got through, Mr. 
Bostwick, who was but a short distance behind him, heard an owl cry out, u Tu 
who-o, who-o," and the Irishman answered, u Me name is Jemmy O'Nale, sure, 
and I carry the mail." 

Ebenezer Davis, now of Wyoming, was one of the early settlers of Kent county, 
having settled at Grand Rapids in 1836. Mr. Davis says that in the spring of 
1837, there -was a scarcity of flour; and for three weeks there was none to be 
had at Grand Rapids, and almost everybody lived on sturgeon. The first supply 
of flour came from Jackson, down Grand River, on a flat boat. Mr. Wilder, and 
others at Grandville, say that in 1838, they had no flour at Grandville, except 
some which was said to have been sunk in Lake Michigan. After knocking 
the hoops and staves off, the flour retained the shape of the barrel, and 
had to be cut to pieces with an axe, and pounded up. That sum- 
mer was very sickly, and most of the time this was all that could be had 
for sick or well. Mrs. McCray says she made bread for her husband, ot the same 
flour, when he was very sick, and for a long time they could get no butter ; but 
finally Mr. Myron Roys, who kept bachelor's hail on his place, and had two cows, 
made some for them. Mrs. McCray says that, when she hears people complain of 
hard times and hard fare, now, she always feels like seeing them have a slight 
trial of those times . 

Hiram Jenison says, that, when he came to Grandville in 1834, there was no 
settlement between Grandville and Grand Haven, and but two families at Grand 
Haven : Messrs. Ferry and Throop. Ottawa was at that time a part of Kent county. 
He went to Grand Rapids once to attend an election. 

At the time Mr. Roys settled in Wyoming all of the opening lands were entirely 
free from bushes, and, except the trees, were almost like the prairies. Mr. Roys 
says that, the first summer he was in Michigan, he worked for Mr. Wright, at the 
mill, and the woman who was there to cook for them became homesick, and went 
back to the settlements, and they put him in cook. He would cook meat, beans, 
etc., as well as any of them, but making biscuit and bread puzzled him. He used 
to put saleratus into sweet milk, until one night his cow laid out, and the milk 
soured. He was in trouble ; but, finally, concluded to put his saleratus into the 
sour milk, mixed it up and baked it, and found that he had learned to make 
biscuit. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 113 



FIRST TOWNSHIP OFFICERS. 

The township of Wyoming was organized in 1848. Wm. R. Godwin was the 
first Supervisor ; Joseph Blake, Clerk ; Chase Edgerly, Treasurer ; Erastus Yeo- 
mans and Roswell Britton, Justices of the Peace ; Nicholas Shoemaker, Dwight 
Rankin, and James B. Jewell, Commissioners of Highways ; Luther D. Abbott 
and Justus C. Rogers, School Inspectors; L. D. Abbott and J. C. Rogers, Over- 
seers of the Poor ; Wm. Richardson, J. A. Britton, C. J. Rogers, and H. N. 
Roberts, Constables. 

At the general election, Nov. 1st, 1848, the whole number of votes cast was 101. 
At the general election in 1868, there were 344 votes cast. 

PRESENT TOWNSHIP OFFICERS. 

Supervisor — William K. Emmons. Clerk — Adelbert H. Weston. Treasurer- 
John V. D. Haven. Justices of the Peace — William H. Galloway, Alexander Mc- 
Inroy, Cyrus Freeman, Augustine Godwin. Highway Commissioners — Daniel 
Stewart, Augustine Godwin, Cyrus Freeman. School Inspectors — W. K. Em- 
mons, W. H. Galloway. Overseers of the Poor — Cyrus Freeman, James Jewell. 
Constables — Charles L. Moody, W. L. Galloway. 




15 



114 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

CITY OF GRAND RAPIDS. 

Grand Rapids is located on Grand River —the largest inland stream in the state 
— about forty miles from its mouth, and at the head of navigation. Its site is 
one of great natural beauty, lying on both sides of the river, between the high 
bluffs that stand nearly two miles apart, and from whose summits the eye takes 
in a beautiful panorama of hill, vale and river, with all the streets of the busy 
city laid out like a map at the feet of the beholder. 

Grand River at this point runs nearly south, but soon after leaving the city 
resumes its general westerly direction. On the west side of the river, the ground 
is nearly level back to the bluffs ; on the east side, there were smaller hills between 
the bank and the bluffs, the leveling of w r hich has cost, and is yet to cost, large 
sums of money. The east side bluffs, once an ornament to the town, are now 
marred with deep cuts and unsightly excavations, which may be likened to con- 
stantly open sores on the face of nature. But the sores are likely, we must add, 
to be soon healed, and covered by a crown of comfortable homes, with church 
spires shooting up from their midst to point the way to the home above. 

In writing this sketch, w T e are not compelled to go to ancient books and dusty 
files for the record of how the town has grown ; for its founder is still alive, and 
a large proportion of its early settlers. What we write is derived from their lips, 
and if we fail to mould it into the symmetrical form o.' legitimate history, we beg 
some allowance to be made to the live elements that compose it, which will per- 
sist in sticking out like the hands and feet of a class of vigorous boys, and will 
not easily be folded smoothly down like a "preserved specimen." 

We have no knowledge of the first white man who visited the rapids on Grand 
River, called by the Indians the Owashtenong. An Indian village had long ex- 
isted here — of the Ottawa tribe — before any wdiite men came here to reside. The 
history of this village, of its chiefs and warriors, of its forays and defences, its 
councils and treaties, is lost in oblivion from human knowledge, and only writ- 
ten in the books of the Recording Angel. 

In 1821, Isaac McCoy — who was appointed by the Board of Managers of the 
Baptist Missionary convention for the United States, to labor in Illinois and In- 
diana — visited Gen. Lewis Cass at Detroit, to lay before him the claims of that 
society, and the needs of Indian tribes of Michigan Territory. The general re- 
ceived him cordially and gave him $450, in goods, for the benefit of his mission 
at Fort Wayne. 

At the Chicago treaty of the same year, through the influence of Col. Trimble, 
of Ohio, the Pottaw T attomies agreed to give one mile square of land, to be located 
by the President, in consideration of the promise of the government to locate 
thereon a teacher, and a blacksmith, for the instruction and aid of the Indians ; 
the government agreeing to appropriate $1,000 each year for that object. A 
similar arrangement was afterwards made with the Ottawas, the government 
agreeing to maintain a teacher, a blacksmith and a farmer, at an expense of 
$1,500 per year. 

Detroit at that time contained only a few hundred inhabitants, and the whole 
territory of Michigan was, a vast wilderness, with only here and there an oasis of 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 115 

a fort or trading post. On the west side of Grand River, and on what is now the 
Fifth Ward of the city of Grand Rapids, stood, at that time, a collection of 50 or 
60 huts, Kewkishkam being the village chief, acknowledging the control of Noon- 
day, chief of the Ottawas. 

On the 28th of June, 1822, Mr. McCoy went from Fort Wayne to Detroit, for 
the purpose of securing the privileges of the Chicago treaty, the war department 
having placed the matter under the control of Gen. Cass. Gen. Cass commis- 
sioned Charles C. Trowbridge to make definite arrangements with the Indians for 
the sites of the missionary stations. The site for the Pottawattomie station was 
established on the St. Joseph Rirer, and that of the Ottawas on the Rapids of 
Grand River. Mr. McCoy visited Grand Rapids in 1823, accompanied by a 
Frenchman named Paget, and one ot his Indian pupils, for the purpose of put- 
ting matters into operation at the contemplated station among the Ottawas ; but 
was unable to make any satisfactory arrangement, and soon returned to Carey, as 
the Pottawattomie station was called. In the fall of the same year he had a 
blacksmith shop set up at Kalamazoo, but only a little was done with it, so far 
as we can learn, and it was afterwards removed to Grand Rapids. 

Some time in 1824, as near as we can learn, Rev. L. Slater, Baptist missionary, 
and a blacksmith, and one or two other white workmen, came to Grand Rapids 
and commenced work. The winter proved a very hard one, and supplies had to 
be sent them on horseback before spring. Mr. Slater erected a log house for him- 
self, and a log school house — the first buildings ever put up in the county. 

Religion having let a ray of light into the wilderness, Commerce, her necessary 
handmaid, was not long in following. The first white settler of Grand Rapids, 
who came here to found a business and make himself a home, was Louis Campau, 
an Indian trader. Mr. Campau is still alive, and well known to all the older 
residents of the city, who honor and respect him as a venerable pioneer and true 
gentleman. His portrait may be found in the City Directory for 1870, thus mak- 
ing his face familiar to those who, from their short term of residence, had not 
made his acquaintance. Mr. Campau was born in Detroit, in the year 1791. His 
ancestors were French, and came to Detroit before the war of the Revolution. 
He had but few advantages of early education, but made his own career with a 
clear head, a strong right arm, and an honest purpose. In the fall of 1814, he 
went to Saginaw to trad.3 with the Indians, at which place he remained for ten 
years, before removing to Grand Rapid3. 

Mr. Campau came to Grand Rapids at the solicitation and under the auspices 
of William Brewster, of Detroit, who was very extensively engaged in the tur 
business in rivalry with the American Fur Company, and who furnished him with 
all that he needed to carry on his business. Mr. Campau afterwards opened 
trading posts and established his agents at Muskegon, Manistee, Kalamazoo, 
Lowell. Hastings, and Eaton Rapids. He had no trouble with the Indians, but 
found them friendly and peaceable. They were uniformly honest, and could be 
trusted with goods, never failing to pay as soon as they had the ability. The 
currency of that time was — fur. And this was all the Indian had to exchange 
for the products of civilization. 

From 1820 to 1833, Mr. Campau's only white visitors were traders like himself, 



116 HISTORY ANI> DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

with a few occasional travelers. He cut down the timber from a few acres of 
ground to let in the sunlight, but did not attempt any extensive improvements. 
His brother, Toussaint, then only a youth, was with him most of the time, and 
helped carry on the business. Toussaint Campau is still a resident of Grand 
Rapids, and not much burdened with the weight of years. 

In 1833, the pioneers of civilization, of whom we may call Mr. Campau the fore- 
runner and scout, began to find their way to Grand Rapids. A land office was 
opened at White Pigeon in that year, and Louis Campau and Luther Lincoln 
were the first purchasers. Mr. Campau bought a tract of land in what is now the 
city of Grand Rapids, and Mi*. Lincoln took up a portion of the site of the present 
village of Grandville. 

In the spring of 1833, Mr. Samuel Dexter came to Ionia with a colony of 63 per- 
sons from New York, cutting a road through the woods from Pontiac, which was 
afterwards known as the Dexter trail — and he laid out what is known as the 
'Dexter Fraction in this city. Several of this company afterwards became resi- 
dents of Grand Rapids and vicinity. Louis Campau, who carried a quantity of 
goods up the river in batteaux for Mr. Dexter, brought back with him Mr. Joel 
Guild, carrying his household goods free. He sold Mr. Guild a lot, adjoining the 
one on which the City National Bank building now stands, for twenty-five dol- 
lars. On this lot Mr. Guild erected, during the next summer, a small frame 
house, which was the first frame building erected in the city, unless, possibly, we 
may except a building which Mr. Campau erected, just across the street, for a 
store, and which was completed about the same time. Mr. Guild came from 
Paris. Oneida county, New York, and brought with him his family, consisting of 
a wife and seven children. Three of those children are still living : Mrs. Baxter, 
Mrs. Burton, and Consider Guild; the two former in this city, both widows, but 
both loved and honored by a large circle of friends, for their useful and consistent 
lives. The latter now carries on a farm in Ottawa county. 

Joel Guild, soon after his arrival, was appointed Postmaster, and held that 
position for some time, being succeeded by Darius Winsor. Mail was brought 
once a month from Gull Prairie, on the backs of Indian ponies. Postage was two 
shillings on a letter, and the ties of friendship had to be pretty strong to support 
a regular correspondence. A gentleman who came several years later, says that 
the fifty cents a month required to pay postage on his letters, and the replies of 
his sweetheart in New York, proved a fearful drain on his pocketbook. 

Grand Rapids in 1833, contained but a few acres of cleared land on either side 
of the river. The Indians had three or four acres cleared on the west side, just 
below where the bridge of the Grand Rapids and Indiana Railroad now stands, 
and about as much more on the east side, along what is now Waterloo Street. 
The timber in that part of the city lying between Fulton and Lyon Streets was 
mainly oak, and the soil light and sandy. Prospect Hill, (where are the present 
residences of Dr. Shepard and Deacon Haldane,) which is now nearly removed, 
was an elevation of remarkable beauty, but in many places so steep that a wagon 
could not be drawn up without much difficulty. 

But the tide of emigration was now fairly set in this direction, and in the next 
four years Grand Rapids became quite a village. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 117 

Eliphalet Turner, wliose death occurred this fall, (1870), came in 1833; also Ira 
Jones, who survived Mr. Turner but a few days. During the same year came 
Jonathan F. Chubb, with his wife and two children. Mr. Chubb located and im- 
proved a beautiful farm between here and Grandville — the same now occupied by 
Mr. A. N. Norton — but, in a few years, sold out, moved into the'city and opened 
an agricultural store on Canal street. He died several years ago, but his son, A. 
L. Chubb, is now one of our most active business men. 

Rev. Mr. Barrigau, afterward Bishop of the Lake Superior region, also came as 
a missionary among the Indians, and a church building was commenced on the 
west side of the river — a small, framed structure. Mr. Campau wanted the build- 
ing on the east side, and eventually carried his point, hiring Barney Burton to 
move it across the river on the ice. Mr. Barrigau did not succeed to suit him, 
and did not remain long. 

A saw mill was erected on Indian Creek, about just above Wonderly & Co.'s 
mammoth mill, some time during the same year. 

In the fall of 1833, Mr. Slater kept a school on the west side of the river, and 
every morning sent an Indian across with a canoe for the white children on the 
other side. 

Among the settlers of 1834, were Richard Godfroy, who set up a store to trade 
with the Indians, Robert Barr, Louis Morau, and Lovell Moore, Esq. The first 
marriage in Grand Rapids occurred in 1834. Mr. Barney Burton and Harriet 
Guild w r ere the happy pair. 

The first town meeting was held in 1834 (see history of Grand Rapids town- 
ship). It was held in the house of Joel Guild, and the whole number of voters was 
nine. 

In the fall of 1834, Mr. Campau commenced a large frame building, which now 
exists as the upper two stories of the Rathbun House. During the year 1835, 
Edward Guild and Darius Winsor moved down the river from Ionia, and quite a 
large number of settlers arrived, among whom were Hon. Lucius Lyon, Jefferson 
Morrison, Antoine Campau, James Lyman, A. Hosford Smith, Demetrius Turner, 
William C. Godfroy, Dr. Wilson, Dr. Charles Shepard, and Julius C. Abel. Dr. 
Wilson was the first Doctor. He was furnished with a medicine case and a set 
of instruments by Louis Campau, and commenced practice among a population 
of about 50 souls. Julius C. Abel was the pioneer lawyer, and grew rich out of 
the misunderstandings of the growing town. James Lyman and Jefferson Morri- 
son set up stores and commenced trading. In the same year, N. O. Sargeant 
purchased an interest with Lucius Lyon in the Kent Plat, and came on with a 
posse of men to dig a mill race. Judge Almy and wife came at the same time, 
with Mr. Sargeant. Among the men in his employ w T as Leonard G. Baxter. The 
entrance of that number of men w T as an interesting and exciting event in the little 
town. The workmen came into the place wdth their shovels and picks on their 
shoulders, to the inspiriting notes of a bugle in the hands of one of their number 
— Crampton by name, now living in i^da — who afterward blew the same bugle on 
the first steamboat that ascended above the Rapids. Old Noonday thought they 
were enemies, and sent Mr. Campau an offer of assistance to expel the invaders. 

About this time, Martin Ryerson, then a promising boy sixteen or seventeen 



118 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



years old, came here as a clerk in the employ of Richard Godfroy. He has since 
become one of the leading lumbermen in Chicago, and is now traveling in Europe 
with his family. Among other young men who came here, and remained for some 
time, were Lyman and Horace Gray — the latter a Major in the Fourth Mich. Cav. 
during the Rebellion — and Andrew Robbins. Rev. Andrew Vizoisky also came in 
1835, and, for seventeen years, was pastor of the Catholic flock in this city. Mr. 
Vizoisky was a native of Hungary. He received his education at the Catholic in- 
stitutions of learning, in Austria, under the patronage of the Hungarian Chan- 
cery. From these sources he obtained that profound knowledge of ancient liter- 
ature, and of the history and doctrines of the Holy Catholic Church, which dis- 
tinguished him even in a Brotherhood of world wide reputation for erudition. 
He came to the United States in 1831. By the appointment of the Bishop of 
Detroit he officiated three years in St. Clair County. Thence, in 183."), he removed 
to the Grand River Mission. His ministry in Grand Rapids was marked by un- 
surpassed devotion, and the most gratifying success. No road was rough enough, 
and no weather inclement enough, to keep him from the post of duty. To the 
poor he brought relief; to the sick, consolation ; and to the dying, the absolvatory 
promises of his office. He died January 2nd, 1852, at the age of sixty years : hav- 
ing lived to see a handsome stone church edifice erected on Monroe street, two 
years previous to his death, and filled with a numerons and prosperous congre- 
gation. 

1836 witnessed the advent of a large number of new settlers, and the mania of 
speculation possessed the town. Lots were held at almost as high prices as they 
will bring to-day. If a man bought a piece of land fur $100, he immediately set 
his price at $1,000, and confidently awaited a purchaser. The currency was in- 
flated, and " wild cat money " in abundance supported these fictitious values. 
Every man got largely in debt, and every man lived to rue the indiscretion, long 
and bitterly. 

Among those who came in 1836, were Hon. John Ball, William A. Richmond, 
John W. Pierce, Philander Tracy, Ebenezer W. Barnes, Isaac Turner, A. B. Turner, 
George C. Nelson, Jam,es M. Nelson, Warren P. Mills, G orge Young, Robert 
Hilton, Billius Stocking, Abram Randall, William A. Richmond, Truman H. 
Lyon, William Haldane, Loren M. Page, Charles H. Taylor, Jacob Barnes, Wil- 
liam Morman, David Burnett, K. S. Pettibone, Asa Pratt, Samuel Howl and, J. 
Mortimer Smith, Hczekiah Green, George Coggeshall, John J. Watson, George 
Martin, Myron Hinsdill, Stephen Hinsdill, Hiram Hinsdill, and Harry Eaton. Mr. 
Eaton, in 1840, was elected Sheriff of the county. His death occurred in 1850. 

Roswell Britton, of Grandville, w r as the first Representative in the S;ate Legis- 
lature from this section. His district comprised Kent, Ottawa, Clinton, and Ionia 
counties. The State Constitution had been adopted only the year before — -1835. 
Major Britton was succeeded in 1837 by John Almy ; in 1838, by John Ball; in 
1839, by Noble H. Finney ; and in 1840, by C. I. Walker. 

Hon. John Ball, who has contributed not a little to the growth and prosperity 
of the town, is a native of Hebron, N. II., and afterward resided in Lansingburg 
and Troy, N. Y. He graduated at Dartmouth College in 1820, and afterward 
practiced law in Troy. He came here as a land operator, and has since devoted 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 119 

more of his time to real estate business than to law. He took A. D. Rathboneinto 
partnership with him in 1840, who continued in that relation for about a year. In 
1844 Solomon L. Withey became his partner, and the firm was known as Bali & 
Withey. Afterward George Martin became a partner, and the firm was Ball, 
Martin & Withey. Afterward it was Ball, Withey & Sargeant. It is now Ball <fc 
McKee. 

Myron Hinsdill erected the National Hotel in 1836, and it soon after went into 
.the hands of Canton Smith. 

John W. Peirce, the pioneer dry goods man of Kent, came here with the late 
Judge Almy, and assisted that gentleman in surveying and platting that portion 
of the city now comprising so much thereof as lies under the bluffs. He erected 
the dwelling on Ottawa street in 1842, and resided therein until, within the last 
few weeks, (Oct. 15, 1870) he removed into his new and elegant residence, corner 
of Bronson and Kent streets — having occupied the old mansion for nearly twenty 
seven consecutive years. He is one of the gentlemen who had an abiding faith in 
Kent, and the Rapids in general, and by great and and unwearied perseverance 
has become comfortably off in this world's goods, and, by his enterprise, added 
many new buildings to this growing city. Mr. Peirce says that he counted all the 
frame buildings in Grand Rapids when he came, and there were just thirteen. 
His book store was the first one in the State, west of Detroit. 

John J. Watson came from Detroit, and erected, in 1836, a very large store- 
house, about where the skating rink now stands. It was, in the course of time, 
moved up the river, and became a part of W. D. Foster's old wooden store. 

George Martin, previously mentioned among the settlers of 1836, was a grad- 
uate of Middlebury College, Vt. He was for a number of years County and Cir- 
cuit Judge of this county, and, at the time of his death, was Chief Justice of the 
Supreme Court of Michigan. 

In 1836, Richard Godfrey built the first steamboat on Grand Rivtr, and called 
it the u Gov. Mason." The first boat, however, other than the batteaux of the 
traders, was a pole boat called the "Young Napoleon," constructed for Mr. Cam- 
pau by Lyman Gray. 

The " Gov. Mason " was commanded by Captain Stoddard. It only had a short 
existence, being wrecked off the mouth of the Muskegon River in 1838. Captain 
Stoddard died a number of years ago, in Barry county. 

We have mentioned Judge Almy as one of the pioneers of the place. His genial 
disposition, most corteous manners, and unbounded hospitality, added to a phy- 
sique at once commanding and noble, made him a representative gentleman in the 
early days. He was a civil engineer and practical surveyor, of eminence, and was 
in charge, in 1837-8, of the improvement of the Grand and Kalamazoo Rivers; was 
a member of the State Legislature, and one of the County Judges. He was also 
a lawyer by profession, but did not practice any after coming to Michigan. Few 
men, dying, have left behind them the reflection of a better spent life than John 
Almy's. 

The late George Coggeshall emigrated, in 1836, to this place, from Wilming- 
ton, N. C, with his family, and invested his means in Kent. He erected the frame 
house, on tjie corner of Bridge and Kent streets, now occupied by the distinguished 



120 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Homeopathic physician, Dr. Charles Hempe!, and which has been somewhat modi- 
fied from its primitive appearance. Mr. Coggeshall was a man of many sterling 
qualities, and was a firm believer in the future of that once impassable quagmire, 
u Kent," whicli is now a part of the most populous ward in the city. 

Among those who came here in 1837, were Israel V. Harris, Rev. James Ballard, 
Leonard Covell, G. M. McCray, William A. Tryon, L. R. Atwater, William I. 
Blakely, A. Dikeman, H. K. Rose, John F. Godfroy, Gaius S. Deane, Henry 
Dean, C. P. Calkins, James Scribner, and Col. Samuel F. Butler. 

The first banking establishment was the Grand River Bank, established in 
1847, Judge Almy being President, and Lucius Lyon, Cashier. It lasted a couple 
of years, and issued bills which were considered good, but finally succumbed to 
the hard times, and left its promises to pay, a dead loss in the hands of the 
holders. 

Another bank, called " The People's Bank," was started during the same year, 
under the auspices of George Coggeshall, with Louis Campau for President, and 
Simeon Johnson for Cashier. The institution failed to secure cash and nails 
enough to comply with the State Banking Law, and was soon wound up ; John 
Ball being appointed Receiver. 

For several years succeeding 1837, this was a very " blue" place. Folks were 
terribly poor, and real estate was hardly worth the taxes. A good many French 
mechanics, who had been attracted here by the rapid growth of the town, were 
thrown out of employment, and left in disgust. 

A little steamboat, called the " John Almy," was built in 1837, to run above 
the Rapids. It went up the river as far as the mouth of Flat River,— Crampton 
waking the echoes with his bugle,— but, alas ! sunk before it completed its trip, 
and rotted away in the bed of the river. 

A. Dikeman opened the first watchmaker and jeweler's establishment, in 1837, 
on Monroe street. It was kept up by him until 1867, and since that time by his 
son, E. B. Dikeman, whose store is now on Canal street. 

Among the settlers of 1838, we may mention W. D. Roberts, John T. Holmes, 
Esq., Amos Roberts, C. W. Taylor, Erastus Clark, J. T. Finney, and Solomon 
Withey and his sons, S. L., William, and Orison. 

The Bridge Street House was built in 1837, and first kept by John Thompson ; 
subsequently, it was kept by Solomon Withey, who was succeeded by William A. 
Tryon and Truman H. Lyon— the last two still living in this city. 

Amos Rathbun, Ira S. Hatch, Damon Hatch, W. M. Anderson, G. B. Rathbun, 
and F. D. Richmond, came in 1839. R. E. Butterworth, Heman Leonard, John 
W. Squier, and Silas Hall, came in 1842. 

THE ROCHESTER OF MICHIGAN. 

The following description of the place and its prospects appeared in the first 
newspaper ever printed in Grand Rapids, and was headed " The Rochester of 
Michigan." We quote it entire, as it appeared in the editorial columns of the 
Grand River Times, Tuesday, April 18, 1837 : 

" Though young in its improvements, the site of this village has long been 
known, and esteemed for its natural advantages. It was here that the Indian 
traders long since made their grand depot. It was at this point that the mission- 



HISTOBY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 121 

ary herald established his institution of learning — taught the forest child the 
beauties of civilization, and inestimable benefits of the Christian religion. This 
has been the choicest, dearest spot to the unfortunate Indian, and now is the 
pride of the white man. Like other villages of the west, its transition from the 
savage to a civilized state, has been as sudden as its prospects are now flattering. 

Who would have believed, to have visited this place two years since, when it 
was only inhabited by a few families, most of whom were of French origin, a peo- 
ple so eminent for exploring the wilds and meandering rivers, that this place 
would now contain its twelve hundred inhabitants ? Who would have imagined 
that thus rapid would have been the improvement of this romantic place. The 
rapidity of its settlement is beyond the most visionary anticipation ; but its loca- 
tion, its advantages, and its clime, were sufficient to satify the observing mind, 
that nothing but the frown of Providence could blast its prospects ! 

The river upon which this town is situated is one of the most important 
and delightful to be found in the country — not important and beautiful alone 
for its clear, silver like water winding its way through a romantic valley of some 
hundred miles, but for its width and depth, its susceptibility for steam naviga- 
tion, and the immense hydraulic power afforded, at this point. 

We feel deeply indebted to our Milwaukee friends for their lucid description of 
the advantages to be derived from a connection of the waters ot this river with 
those of Detroit, by canal or railroad. A canal is nearly completed around the 
rapids at this place, sufficiently large to admit boats to pass up and down, with 
but little detention. Several steamboats are now preparing to commence regular 
trips from Lyons, at the mouth of the Maple River, to this place, a distance of 
sixty miles ; and from this to Grand Haven, a distance of thirty-five or forty 
miles ; thence to Milwaukee and Chicago. 

Thus the village of Grand Rapids, with a navigable stream — a water power of 
twenty-five feet fall — an abundance of crude building materials — stone of excel- 
lent quality — pine, oak, and other timber in immense quantities within its 
vicinity, can but flourish — can but be the Rochester of Michigan ! The basement 
story of an extensive mill, one hundred and sixty by forty feet, is now completed ; 
a part of the extensive machinery is soon to be put in operation. There are now 
several dry goods and grocery stores — some three or four public houses — one 
large church, erected, and soon to be finished in good style, upon the expense of 
a single individual, who commenced business a few year ago, by a small traffic 
with the Indians. Such is the encouragement to Western pioneers ! The village 
plat is upon the bold bank of a river, extending back upon an irregular plain, 
some eighty to a hundred rods, to rising bluffs, from the base and sides of which 
some of the most pnre, crystal like fountains of water burst out in boiling»springs, 
pouring forth streams that murmur over their pebbly bottoms, at once a delight 
to the eye and an invaluable luxury to the thirsty palate. 

New England may surpass this place with her lofty mountains, but not with 

her greatest boast, purity aud clearness of water. Our soil is sandy and mostly 

dry. The town is delightful, whether you view it from the plain upon the banks 

of the river, or from the bluffs that overlook the whole surrounding country. To 

16 



122 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

ascend these bluffs you take a gradual rise to the height of a hundred feet, when 
the horizon only limits the extent of vision. The scenery to an admirer of beau- 
tiful landscape is truly picturesque and romantic. Back east of the town is seen 
a widespread plain of burr oak, at once easy to cultivate and inviting to the agri- 
culturist. Turning westward, especially at the setting of the sun, you behold the 
most enchanting prospect — the din of the ville below — the broad sheet of water 
murmuring over the rapids — the sunbeams dancing upon its swift gliding ripples 
— the glassy river at last losing itselt in its distant meanderings, presents a 
scenery that awakes the most lively emotions. But the opposite shore, upon 
which you behold a rich, fertile plain, still claims no small amount of admiration. 
Near the bank of the river is seen the little, rude village of the more civilized 
Indians— their uncouth framed dwellings — their little churches, and moundlike 
burying places. The number and size of the mounds which mark the spot where 
lies the remains of the proud warrior, and the more humble of his untamed tribe, 
too plainly tell the endearment of that lovely plain to the native aborigines, and 
how quick the mind will follow the train of association to by-gone days, and con- 
trast these reflections with present appearances. Thus we see the scenes of savage 
life, quickly spread upon the broad canvass of the imagination — the proud chief- 
tain seated, and his tribe surrounding the council fires — the merry war dance — 
the wild amusements of the 'red man of the forest,' and as soon think of their 
present unhappy condition ; the bright flame of their lighted piles has been ex- 
tinguished, and with it has faded the keen, expressive brilliancy of the wild man's 
eye! Their lovely Washtenang, upon which their light canoes have so long 
glided, is now almost deserted ! 

It is from this point, too, that you can see in the distance the evergreen tops of 
the lofty pine, waving in majesty above the sturdy oak, the beech, and maple, 
presenting to the eye a wild, undulating plain, with its thousand charms. Such 
is the location, the beauties, and the advantages of this youthful town. The citi- 
zens are of the most intelligent, enterprising and industrious character. Their 
buildings are large, tasty, and handsomely furnished — the clatter of mallet and 
chisel — the clink of the hammer — the many newly raised and recently covered 
frames — and the few skeleton boats upon the wiiarves of the river, speak loudly 
for the enterprise of the place ! Mechanics of all kind find abundance of employ, 
and reap a rich reward for their labor. Village property advances in value, and 
the prospect of wealth is alike flattering to all ! What the result of such advan- 
tages and prospect will be, time alone must determine. 

But a view of this place and its vicinity, where we find a rich and fertile soil, 
watered with the best of springs, and enjoying as we do a salubrious climate, a 
healthful atmosphere, and the choicest gifts of a benign Benefactor, would satisfy 
almost any one that this will soon be a bright star in the constellation of w T estern 
villages. Such, gentle reader, is a faint description of the place from which our 
paper hails — from which we hope will emenate matter as pleasing and interest- 
ing as the town is beautiful and inviting." 

A NOTED INDIAN CHIEF. 

The following graphic sketch, from the pen of C. W. Eaton, we quote entire : 
" We have been told many good anecdotes of Meccissininni, the young chief of 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 123 

the Grand River Indians, in an early day, by an old resident of this place. Mec 
cissininni was called the Young Chief, and old Black Skin the Old Chief; 
although Meccissininni was not a very young man, being 45 ; but, according to 
the custom of the Indians, a young brave that marries the Chief's daughter is 
made Chief, and called the Young Chief. He was an eloquent orator, a very 
proud, haughty Indian, and "wanted to be like his white brethren," as he often 
said. He always dressed like his white brethren, and you might often see him on 
a hot day in the summer carrying an umbrella, when there was no sign of rain — 
to keep from being tanned, probably. 

He was one of the band of Chiefs that went with Louis Campau, Rix Robinson, 
and Rev. Mr. Slater to Washington to make a treaty relative to selling their lands 
on the west side of the river, which was consummated in 1835. While in Wash- 
ington, Gen. Jackson wished to make him a present of a good suit of clothes, and 
asked him what kind he would prefer. He said as General Jackson was Chief of 
his people, and he was Chief of the red men, he thought it would be appropriate 
if he had a suit like his. The General ordered the suit. It was a black frock 
coat, black satin vest, black pantaloons, silk stockings, and pumps ; but the best 
of the thing was, Gen. Jackson wore at that time a white bell-crowned hat, with 
a weed on it, being at the time in mourning for his wife. The unsuspecting 
Indian, not knowing that the weed was a badge of mourning, had one on his' 
hat also, which pleased Gen. Jackson and his Cabinet not a little. He was much 
delighted with the warm receptions he received in the different cities on his return 
home. 

After he returned, a council met to hear the nature of the treaty, where Meccis- 
sininni distinguished himself as an orator, in his portrayal of the treaty. They 
sold their lands, and the treaty provided for their removal west of the Mississippi, 
in a certain number of years; where lands were given them. Several of the 
Chiefs were opposed to the treaty; but Meccissininni was in favor of their re- 
moval, and made an eloquent speech in support of it. In his remarks he said that 
for his part he had rather remain here, and be buried where his forefathers were ; 
but, on his people's account, he had rather go west of the Mississippi, as his peo- 
ple would become debased by association with the pale faces. 

In 1841 he was invited to a Fourth of July celebration. The dinner was served 
up near the present site of Ball's Foundry, where, after the oration, and refresh- 
ments, the cloth was removed and regular toasts drank. Meccissininni was called 
upon for a toast, and responded as follows : 

" The pale faces and the red men — the former a great nation, and the latter a 
remnant of a great people ; may they ever meet in unity together, and celebrate 
this great day as a band of brothers." 

Our narrator relates an incident which occurred while he was keeeping a grocery 
and provision store on the west side, opposite the Barnard House, where the old 
ferry was located. Meccissininni said he wanted to get trusted for some provis- 
ions, and would pay at the next Indian payment. When he returned from the 
annual payment, he was asked to settle his bill. He told the provision vender 
that he must put it on paper, send it to his home, and he would pay it. He said 
he wished to do business like white people. So our friend made out his bill and 



124 HISTORY AND DIBEOTOKT OF KENT COUNTY. 

repaired to the Chief's house, and was ushered in with all the politeness imagin- 
able. He promptly paid the bill, and signified his wish to have it receipted. 
After showing him all his presents, and donning his suit which Gen. Jackson had 
presented him, he brushed his hair back and imitated the walk of the General, 
taking long strides back and forth across the room ; and also mimicked that of 
the Vice President, Martin Van Buren, by stepping short and quick. Having 
passed an hour very pleasantly, he took his leave, with a polite invitation from 
Meccissininni to call again. 

About the year 1843, he was attacked with a disease of the lungs, which, after a 
short illness, terminated his existence, at the age of fifty. He lived and died a 
professor of the Catholic faith, under the spiritual guidance of the late Rev. Mr. 
Vizoisky. He was followed to his last resting place by a large concourse of the 
citizens of Grand Rapids, together with his own tribe." 

INDIAN MOUNDS. 

The Indian burying ground on the west side, in the Filth Ward, which the 
denizens of the village of Kent found in 1833, remained, with its rude enclosure, 
the wonder of all strangers, until about the year 1850, when it had gradually 
disappeared under the power of decay, and the avarice of man. In this mound — 
small portions of which yet remain— the sainted priest, Vizoisky, had consigned 
to their final rest the bones of many a converted Ottawa, who had been taught to 
say his Pater Noster and Ave Maria, and perform his daily Matins in the tiny 
church, that for years was the spiritual home of that good and devoted Catholic 
priest. 

BRIDGES. 

The first bridge that spanned Grand River was a narrow foot bridge, built by 
James Scribner and Lovell Moore, in 1843. E. H. Turner and James Scribner 
built the first wagon bridge in 1845. The first toll bridge, on Bridge street, was 
finished in 1852, and for the first year did not pay the expenses of running it. 
Now there are three in the city, all of which are fine, covered bridges, and pay 
large dividends. Pearl street bridge was completed in 1858, and Leonard street 
bridge in 1859. On the sixth day of April, 1858, Bridge street bridge took fire 
and was utterly destroyed. A foot bridge was at once commenced, and com- 
pleted by April 10th. During the interval between the destruction of the bridge 
and the completion of a new one, the steamer Nebraska ran back and forward as 
a ferryboat. 

GAS. 

« The Grand Rapids Gas-Light Company was incorporated in 1857, and in No- 
vember of that year the stores^on Monroe street were lit with gas for the first 
time. Gas-pipes were not extended across the river until 1869. 

PLANK ROAD. 

The plank road from this city to Kalamazoo was completed in 1854, previous 
to which, stages were two days in going from one town to the other. The plank 
road enabled them to make the trip in one day. W. H. Withey was the pro- 
prietor of the first line of stages on the new road. This road was of immense im- 
portance to the rising city, and, until the completion of the Detroit and Milwau- 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 125 

. . -______-. * 

kee Railroad in 1858, it was the avenue by which nearly all visitors from the east 
approached the city. The author has counted as many as 170 teams in one day, 
coming to the plaster mills in this city and Wyoming township. . Many of these 
teams brought loads of corn and pork for the supply of the Grand Rapids market, 
which then, as at the present time, furnished immense quantities of those staples 
to the lumbermen in this vicinity and farther north. In 1869, the toll-gates were 
abolished, and now the planks are fast breaking up and becoming a nuisance, and 
in many places are entirely taken up. 

NEWSPAPERS. 

The first newspaper, called the Grand River Times, was started by George W. 
Pattison in 1837,. and the first number published April 18th, of that year. Several 
copies of the first number are still extant, having been printed on cloth with a 
view to their preservation. Uncle Louis Campau has one of these sheets, which 
was presented to him by the editor, with his name printed on the margin. Mr. 
Pattison was assisted, as editor, by Noble H. Finney. The press on which this 
paper was printed was drawn up the river from Grand Haven, on the ice, by a 
team of dogs. It was purchased the winter previous at Buffalo, by Judge Almy. 
At Detroit it was shipped for Grand Haven on the steamer Don Quixote, which 
was wrecked off Thunder Bay, and the press taken around the lakes on another 
boat. Some years after, the paper passed into the hands of James H. Morse, who 
published a neutral paper for several years. The political department was di- 
vided equally between the Whigs and Democrats. Articles were written on the 
Democratic side by Simeon M. Johnson, C. H. Taylor, Sylvester Granger, and C. 
I. Walker, and on the Whig side by George Martin, Wm. G. Henry, E. B. Bost- 
wick, and T. W. Higginson. Finally Mr. Johnson was employed as editor, and 
in 1841 changed the name of the paper to Enquirer, after the Richmond Enquirer, 
which was his favorite paper. In 1843, E. D. Burr became a partner, and hoisted 
the Democratic flag, with the name of John C. Calhoun for President. In 1844, 
it supported James K. Polk, and published a campaign sheet called Young Hickory. 
After this the paper was published by Jacob Barnes, as agent, with T. B. Church, 
as editor. Then C. H. Taylor became partner, and was the editor. 

In March, 1855, A. E. Gordon started the Daily Herald, which was the first 
daily paper published in Grand Rapids. This was followed in 1856 by a daily 
from the Enquirer office, Taylor & Barnes, proprietors, J. P. Thompson, editor. 
In a short time the two papers were merged in the Enquirer and Herald, Gordon 
& Thompson, publishers. Mr. Thompson, now assistant editor of the Eagle, left 
the Enquirer and Herald, and, associated with Charles B. Benedict, establised a 
semi-weekly paper called the Grand Mapids Press. Gordon continued the En- 
quirer and Herald until it was closed under a mortgage held by H. P. Yale. It 
was resurrected by N. D. Titus, who afterwards took in Fordham as a partner, 
and called the Democrat. M. H. Clark soon after obtained an interest in the paper. 
Titus went out, and Mr. Clark continued it, witli a Mr. Burt as partner. After 
Mr. Burt left, C. C. Sexton and Robert Wilson had an interest in it, and finally 
Dr. C. B. Smith. The Democrat, under the able management of Mr. Clark, now 
boasts one of the finest printing establishments in this part of the state, and is a 
large, well filled, handsome and prosperous paper. ' . 



126 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

The Eagle was commenced as a weekly, December 25, 1844, (the press and type 
arriving in time to print tickets for Henry Clay), by A, B. Turner, with George 
Martin and Charles F. Barstow as nominal editors. Early in 1848, Ralph W. 
Cole was associate editor. In 1851, James Scribner became a partner, but, being 
a Democrat, had nothing to do with the editorial department. Mr. Scribner's in- 
terest was purchased by A.. B. Turner in the fall of 1852. Immediately after the 
defeat of Scott in 1852, the Eagle abandoned the Whig organization and advo- 
cated a new one, which assumed the name of Republican at the Jackson conven- 
tion, in July, 1854. Mr. Turner started a daily May 26, 185G, with telegraphic 
dispatches by stage from Kalamazoo. He was assisted during the Fremont cam- 
paign by Albert Baxter, who continued on the paper until 1860. After that 
time L. J. Bates, now of the Detroit Post, assisted him until 1865, when Mr. Bax- 
ter returned. Mr. E. F. Harrington has had an interest in the Eagle since 1865. 
Mr. J. P. Thompson came in September, 1869, as another assistant. No man in 
Grand Rapids has shown more persistent energy, often under the most discourag- 
ing circumstances, than has Aaron B. Turner, and he is now at the head of a 
profitable business, and in prosperous circumstances : his printing office being 
one of the best in the state. 

In 1857-8, C. W. Eaton and W. S. Leffingwell published, for a year, a small 
monthly, called the Young Wolverine, to a file of which we are indebted for some 
interesting facts. They were then typos in the. Enquirer and Herald office. P. R. 
L. Peirce's exceedingly comical " Rhythmical History of Grand Rapids, More or 
Less," in choice doggeral, appeared in this little sheet. 

In 1857, Thomas D. Worrall started the Great Western Journal, a weekly paper 
whose high sounding name did not save it from a final collapse in a short time. 
Several other newspapers have risen and died out since that date. 

The Vrijheids Banter '—Banner of Liberty — a paper printed in the Holland lan- 
guage, is published weekly from the Eagle building, by W. Verburg. 

The Times, daily and weekly, C. C. Sexton, proprietor, was started a few months 
ago, and has achieved a large circulation. 

A weekly paper, called the Pioneer, is printed in the German language. 

COURT HOUSE. 

For several years, the question of the location of the Court House and County 
offices agitated the Board of Supervisors at almost every session from 1851 to 
1861 ; and it is not clear that it is yet definitely settled. The first building 
erected for court purposes, was on the square, directly in front of Mr. A. B. Judd's 
present residence. It was a wooden structure, two stories high, with an impos- 
ing cupola in the center of the roof. The second story was used for a court room, 
and also for religious meetings. The lower floor for a jail, and jailor's residence. 
In this primitive edifice, Judges Pratt and Whipple of the Circuit, assisted by 
Side Judge Almy, deceased, E. W. Davis, and P. Tracy, both yet living, ex- 
pounded and interpreted the law, which was being " practiced" by George 
Martin, A. I). Rathbone, Sylvester Granger, E. E. Sargeant and others not now 
living, and by T. B. Church, John Ball, J. T. Holmes, J. C. Abel, C. P. Calkins, 
J. S. Chamberlain and S. L. Withey, who are still on terra ftrmu. Those were 
high old days for the law, and, had not the records of the county been burned in 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COtJNTY. 127 

January, 1861, some rare information could have been obtained from them ; but 
much of this is still in the head of a gentleman still living amongst us, who was 
for fourteen years clerk of the county, and who personally knows more of the 
days we write of than any other man in the city, and can recall with photographic 
exactness a hundred incidents of peculiar interest, touching those palmy days of 
Grand Rapids, which we hope he may some day find it convenient to give the 
public. 

HON. LUCIUS LYON. 

Among the number of those who contributed not a little to the " opening up" 
of the future of this city, was the Hon. Lucius Lyon, one of the proprietors, with 
the late Hon. Charles H. Carroll, of that part of the city called the Kent Plat. 
Believing that salt could be made here, and knowing that this section indicated, 
geologically, saline springs, he, in 1841, commenced sinking a well on the west 
bank of the canal, above the big mill, which, after many difficulties and embar- 
rassments, became a supposed success, and the manufacture of salt was, in 1843- 
4 and 5, prosecuted with considerable spirit, by means of boiling and evapora- 
tion. But it failed of being profitable, owing to the difficulties in keeping out 
fresh water which diluted the brine. We believe Mr. Lyon expended upwards 
of $20,000 in this experiment, and his profits were nothing. Subsequently, in 
1858 to 1864, Messrs. Ball & McKee, J. W. Winsor, W. T. Powers, C. W. Taylor, 
and the late James Scribner, with others, renewed the effort to make salt, and 
several wells were sunk, and several thousand barrels made, but East Saginaw 
had, in the meantime, found the "Seat of Empire,*' and, from superior and purer 
brine, soon demonstrated that she was u master of the situation, and our people 
could not compete with her, and the works in this city gradually went the way 
of all unprofitable enterprises. 

JUDGE WITHEY. 

Hon. Solomon L. Withey was born in St. Albans, Vermont. He came to this 
city in 1838. After studying law for some time he was admitted to the bar, and 
became the law partner ot Hon. John Ball in 1844. He was also, for several years, 
law partner of Hon. George Martin, afterwards Chief Justice of the Supreme 
Court of Michigan — now deceased. In 1848 he was chosen Judge of Probate for 
Kent county, and held that office for four years. In 1860 he was elected State 
Senator, and served during the regular session, and two extra sessions called to 
meet the exigencies of the rebellion. Upon the organization of the Western Dis- 
trict of Michigan, in 1863, he was appointed by President Lincoln to the honora- 
ble position of United States District Judge thereof, in which capacity he has 
since served. In 1869 he was tendered an appointment as Judge of the United 
States Circuit, comprising the States of Michigan, Ohio, Kentucky, and Tennes- 
see, which, after due consideration, he declined. He is President of the First 
National Bank of Grand Rapids, and enjoys, to a remarkable degree, the respect 
and confidence of the public. 

W. D. FOSTER. 

W. D. Foster came to Grand Rapids, from Rochester, N. Y., in the year 1838. 
He started a small " 7x9 " store, at the foot of Monroe street-in 1845, keeping a 



128 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

general assortment of tin whistles, patty pans, skimmers, pie plates, and such like, 
cutting and hammering them all out, and soldering the same with his own hands, 
there not being business enough to warrant having a journeyman. He did quite 
a thriving trade for several years, gradually, by great industry, economy and 
perseverance, accumulating and adding to his slow gains, until, having been 
prospered, as such men will be, he has become the foremost man in the hardware 
line in Western Michigan, owner of a large brick block, five stories high, filled 
from top to bottom with his own merchandise ; and not to know Wilder D. Foster 
is to acknowledge one's self unknown. He employs men by the dozens, and his 
trade is measured annually by tens of thousands. Mr. Foster has had several 
partners. The firm for a time was Foster & Parry, then Henry Martin and Mar- 
tin Metcalf became his associates, and it was W. D. Foster & Co. Afterward it 
was Foster, Martin & Metcalf, then Foster & Metcalf, and, since 1862, W. D. Fos- 
ter alone. He built his present block in 1868. " Live and let live," has ever been 
Mr. Foster's motto, and, if the gratitude of hundreds to whom he has lent sub- 
stantial assistance in time of need, is worth anything, he is rich in something 
better than earthly stores. 

HON. P. R. L. PEIRCE. 

Probably no man has been more intimately connected with public affairs in 
Kent county, during the past twenty years, than Hon. P. R. L. Peirce, a native of 
Geneseo, N. Y., or Peter Peirce, as he is familiarly called by half the men in the 
county. It is possible that some men in the county work harder than Mr. Peirce, 
and that some man may get off more jokes, but entirely improbable that any 
other man works as hard and says as many funny things as he does. He came to 
Grand Rapids to reside in the year 1840, from Detroit, and studied law in the 
office of Judge Martin, along with Hon. S. L. Withey, acting as Deputy County 
Clerk in 1842-3. In 1853 and 1854, he was City Clerk, and, in 1854, he was elected 
Clerk of Kent County, which office he held during a period of fourteen years. 
He was generally conceded to be as good a County Clerk as any in the State, and 
was always in high favor with the Judge and members of the bar. The young 
lawyers regarded him almost as a father, and men from all parts of the county 
came to him with their grievances, sure of sympathy, and assistance if it lay in 
his power. During the past eighteen years he has contributed largely to the city 
press, on various topics of personal and local interest to the community, and is a 
walking encyclopedia of useful information with regard to all that has transpired 
in the county since he came here. He enjoyed great popularity with the soldiers 
during the rebellion, and has worked steadily for their interests at all times. In 
1868 he was elected State Senator, in which capacity he has proved one of the 
most influential men from this part of the State. He is now assistant to Hon. 
William A. Howard, in the Land Office of the Grand Rapids & Indiana Railroad, 
for which position his rare clerical skill renders him peculiarly fitted. 

HENRY R. WILLIAMS. 

Among those who are worthy to be mentioned as having contributed not a 
little to the growth of this city, was the late Henry R. Williams. Mr. W. came 
to Grand Rapids in|L841, from Rochester, N. Y., and entered into business with 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 129 

Warren Granger, of Buffalo, N. Y., and occupied one of the Nelson stores, on the 
corner of Canal and Bronson streets — being now a portion of the Bronson House. 
The firm of Warren, Granger & Co. were engaged in merchandising, flouring and 
boating, and Mr. Williams built up a splendid reputation as a prompt, efficient, 
and reliable business man. He was once a candidate for Congress against Hon. 
Samuel Clark (lately deceased). His genial companionship, and earnest endeavors 
to open up this once wild section, endeared him to all of the then denizens ; and 
the "old settlers" recall his memory with feelings of uniform kindness and pleas- 
ure. He died some twelve or fifteen years ago. In his lifetime, he built the elegant 
stone residence on the hill overlooking Bronson street, now owned by Mr. O. S. 
Camp. 

REV. DR. CUMING. 

Any history of this city would be imperfect without a brief reference to Rev. 
F. H. Cuming, D. D., who died in 1863. Doct. Cuming came here from Ann 
Arbor (and Rochester, N. Y.) in 1843, and took charge of the Episcopal Church. 
He was a man of large business capacity, of indomitable energy, and a wonderful 
perseverance, and, outside of his immediate pastoral labors, he gave much of his 
time to the various enterprises of a local and public nature, calculated to advance 
the growth and redound to the interest of the city. He had -many tempting offers 
to go to various cities, where his vast capacity could have a larger field of useful- 
ness, but he declined them all, for he had great faith in the future of this city and 
county, and ventured the prognostication that persons were then born who 
would live to see a population of 30,000 inhabitants here. Doct. Cuming erected 
the substantial residence (on the hill between Bridge and Bronson), now occu- 
pied by his esteemed widow and family, and was eighteen years rector of the 
Episcopal Church, erecting, with the aid of his flock, the large stone edifice on 
Division, at the head of Pearl street, now occupied by St. Mark's congregation. 

REV. JAMES BALLARD. 

One of the pioneers who has made his mark in the valley City, is the Rev. James 
Ballard, a native of Charlemont, Massachusetts, who graduated at Williams Col- 
lege, and, after residing for some time in Vermont, found his way to this city in 
1837. He was pastor of the Congregational Church for ten years, and, during 
that time, exhibited such zeal and enterprise as will forever associate his name 
with the history of that society. The old Congregational Church building, in 
use until about a year ago, was, through his efforts, purchased of Mr. Louis . 
Campau, and Mr. Ballard walked seventeen hundred miles, through the Eastern 
States, and appealed to the churches there to assist him in buying a Catholic 
Church building, for the use of a Protestant society. When he had raised the 
greater part of the sum required, he came home and mortgaged his own property 
to pay the remainder. (The old church was built by Mr. Campau, in 1837, and, 
until the last stick of it is in ashes, it will be a monument to the noble, religious 
zeal of Louis Campau, the Catholic, and James Ballard, the Protestant. Mr. 
Campau sold it because his business affairs required the use of a part of the 
money which it cost, and the Church was not able to refund it.) When the 
church changed hands, the Catholics reserved the iron cross which surmounted 
the cupola, and, in removing it, a man lost his life. 
17 



180 HISTOKT AND DIRECTOKY OF KENT COUNTY. 

Mr. Ballard, as mentioned hereafter, lias been, at different times, principal of 
both the Union Schools in this city. He still resides here, as active as ever, and 
is now State Agent for the Freedmen's Aid Society, in which capacity he is, as 
usual, doing a good work. He is also very extensively known for his labors in 
the Sunday School cause. 

GRAND RAPIDS IN 1846. 

Prof. Franklin Everett, in the City Directory for 1865, thus describej> the infant 
city of twenty-four years ago: 

"We will step back about twenty years to the time when I first saw the village 
in the wilderness. Then, forty acres was about the extent of the place. Division 
street might be said to bound civilization on the east, Monroe street on the south, 
Bridge street on the north, and the river on the west. There were scattered 
buildings, only, outside of those limits. A wing dam ran half way across the 
river, and furnished water power for three saw mills, two grist mills, and some 
minor works. Irving Hall, Fanuel Hall, Commercial Block, Backus' Block, corner 
of Canal and Bronson streets, and Peirce's Franklin Block, were the stores par 
eminence. — the last two " clear out of town." Sinclair's store, where Luce's Block 
now is, was the business stand fartherest up Monroe street — " too far out of town to 
do business." Canal street was the muddiest hole in all creation. A two foot side 
walk, supported on posts, kept the pedestrians out of the mud. It must be borne 
in mind that this street has been filled from five to ten feet. Where Fitch & 
Raymond's carriage shop now is, and around there, was a fine, musical frog pond ; 
and there was another, (which by the way is not now altogether filled), north- 
west of there. The stumps were in the street, and the houses were all one story. 
Our communication with the outside world was by the Battle Creek stage. Peo- 
ple came to church with ox teams. They came to worship God — not, as we go now, 
to show dry goods. There were no fashionables; men and women dressed plain, 
and almost all had the ague. Every cow had a bell on, of course; hence we 
lacked not for music. Wood was one dollar a cord, and a drug at that. Wheat, 
fifty cents a bushel; corn, twenty-five cents; venison, half a cent a pound; pork 
and beef three cents ; young ladies were scarce and in active demand. Mr. Bal- 
lard was preaching in the Congregational Church, and got his living by farming. 
The Episcopal Church was the building, since much improved, opposite Fitch & 
Raymond's shop. The Catholics used a dwelling house for a chapel. The Metho- 
dists had their present house. We had no fashionable churches or christians. 
Poor people could go to meeting and be considered decent ; and I observed that 
people spoke of the sermons more than the dresses. It was an out-of-the-way, 
stirring, primitive place, with warm hearts and energetic heads." 

THE PRESENT CITY. 

On the first day of June, 1870, Grand Rapids contained, according to the 
United States census, 16,507 inhabitants, and is therefore the second city in the 
State, in population. It contains fifteen hotels, twenty dry goods stores, upwards 
of fifty groceries, eight hardware stores, nine drug stores, twelve c!othing stores, 
sixteen boot and shoe stores, six photograph galleries, seven watchmaker and 
jewelers* establishments, seven printing offices, three book-binderies, upwards of 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 131 

fifty lawyers, upwards of forty physicians, fourteen dentists, six banking houses, 
eight machine shops, five flouring mills, four breweries, six furniture manufac- 
tories, three large brick manufactories, one fanning mill manufactory, one file 
manufactory, one mammoth box factory, one file manufactory, one axe factory, 
two hub factories, two marble cutting establishments, one organ factory, two 
woolen mills, seven planing mills, eight saw mills, one immense factory for the 
manufacture of Water's patent barrels, fourteen wagon and carriage manufac- 
tories, etc., etc. The traveler can approach or leave the city by railroad, in six 
different directions, and several new roads are contemplated, and will soon be 
constructed. 

A street railway extends from the depot of the Detroit <fc Milwaukee Railroad, 
the full length of Canal and Lyon streets, a distance of over two miles. 

WAR RECORD. 

Grand Rapids was behind none of her sister cities in her support of the govern- 
ment during the late civil war. The Third and Eighth infantry regiment* had 
their rendezvous here, and the Second, Third, Sixth, Seventh and Tenth cavalry 
regiments ; all of which were largely filled by volunteers from this vicinity. Each 
and all did credit to the city and State on many well fought fields. 

SCHOOLS. 

That portion of Grand Rapids which lies upon the east side of Grand River, 
and south of the Coldbrook district, was, in the year 1849, organized under the 
school law then existing, as School District No. 1, of the City of Grand Rapids. 
The stone building which stood on the hill, known as the " Central School," was 
erected in the autumn of 1849. The first school in it was opened in 1850, under 
the supervision of Mr. Johnson, with four assistants. Mr. Johnson was soon after 
succeeded by Rev. James Ballard, who had charge of the school about three 
years, when he was followed by the late Prof. Edward Chesebro. After Prof. 
Chesebro resigned, on account of illness, his brother, George Chesebro, was Su- 
perintendent for a short time, when Prof. Danforth took the place, with Prof- 
Edwin Strong, as Principal of the High School department. Prof. Danforth re- 
mained about three years, and was succeeded, in 1863, by Prof. Strong, who has 
since filled the place to the complete satisfaction of all. 

In 18G7, the stone building having become too small to accommodate the 
greatly increased attendance, and as it was thought unsafe by reason of defective 
walls, the present edifice was commenced. It was completed and the old build- 
ing removed in 1868. Having a commanding site, its tower 137 feet high, it is 
the first object that attracts the eye of a stranger on entering the city, and the 
last he sees when leaving it. The cost of the building was about $50,000. 

Primary No. 1, is a commodious and nicely arranged brick building, on the 
corner of Division and Bridge streets, and cost about $15,000. 

Primary No. 2, is on South Division street. It is a frame building with a brick 
basement, and has cost about $5,000. 

Primary No. 3, is located on Fountain street, east of Prospect, and is a large 
wooden structure. 

Primary No. 4, is situated on the corner of Wealthy Avenue and Lafayette 
street. This building was completed in 1869, is of brick, and cost $12,000. 



182 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

The West Side Central School building was erected in 1855, and during the 
summer of 1869, thoroughly overhauled and re-arranged. 

In 1869, a brick school house was begun in the Fifth Ward, which, when com- 
pleted, will cost about $15,000. A part of it is now in use. Prof. S. Montgomery 
is Superintendent of the West side schools. 
GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS COLLEGE AND TELEGRAPHIC INSTITUTE. 

The Grand Rapids Business College and Telegraphic Institute, Swensberg & 
Robbins, proprietors, has been in successful operation for the last five years, and, 
during that time, has educated several hundred young ladie3 and gentlemen. 
We can safely say that no similar institution in the northwest is more favorably 
regarded, or offers better advantages to students, who desire a thorough business 
education. Prof. C. G. Swensberg, who gives his whole time to the school, with 
able assistants, is one of the finest penmen and most accomplished teachers in- the 
west. The large and commodious rooms of this institution are located in Luce's 
Block, Monroe street. 

CHURCHES. 

There are, in this city, twenty church buildings, and two more in process of 
erection. The finest among these are the Congregational, Methodist Episcopal, 
Episcopal, Presbyterian, Catholic (new), True Reformed, Second Reformed, and 
Universalist churches. Anything like a satisfactory history of the different socie- 
ties would far transcend the limits of this sketch. 

RAILROADS. 

The first train of cars entered Grand Rapids on the tenth day of July, 1858, at 
4:30 p.m.; the Detroit & Milwaukee Railroad Company having that day com- 
pleted their road to the long expectant and previously isolated city. This was 
one of the most important events, as touching the development of the town, that 
we have to record, and let in at once a new tide of enterprise and capital. 

The next road that led out from the place was a section ot the Grand Rapids & 
Indiana Railroad, from here to Cedar Springs, on which regular trains commenced 
running on the twenty-third day of December, 1867. Through trains commenced 
running on this road, to Port Wayne, Indiana, on the tenth day of October, 1870 ; 
opening a new market for our manufactures, which promises to prove of great 
importance to the leading branches of industry. 

The first train of cars on the Kalamazoo, Allegan & Grand Rapids Railroad, 
now a division of the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Railroad, arrived on the 
first day of March, 1869. 

Regular trains commenced running on the Grand River Valley Railroad, now 
a branch of the Michigan Central, on the seventeenth day of January, 1870. 

MANUFACTURING ESTABLISHMENTS — PLASTE R. 

F. GODFREY & BROS.' 

plaster works are situated in the city, on the Grand River, and convenient to all 
the railroads for shipping. They have 100 acres ot plaster land. The stratum of 
plaster is about twelve feet thick, exposed by removing the earth above it, and 
furnishes 35.000 tons per acre. P. Godfrey discovered plaster at this point in 
1859, and works were erected in 1860, the product for that year being about 1,000 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 133 



tons. From this amount the yearly product has steadily increased until 1869, in 
which year they quarried 12,000 tons. They have one water mill and a steam 
mill, each with two run of stone, and can grind in the two mills 80 tons of plaster 
in ten hours, or 160 tons in 20 hours. Their calcining works are very extensive, 
being sufficient to manufacture 260 barrels of calcined plaster per day, and their 
capital is amply sufficient for all their purposes. 

THE WEST SIDE OF GRAND RIVER. 

The first plaster discoveries on the west side of Grand River were made by Mr. 
R. E. Butterworth, an English gentleman of culture and enterprise, now proprie- 
tor of one of the principal machine shops and founderies in Grand Rapids. He 
purchased 162 acres of land, now owned by the Grand Rapids Plaster Company, 
in 18 12. His knowledge of geology led him to think that his land contained 
plaster rock, and he made repeated borings to ascertain the fact. In 1819 he dis- 
covered plaster near the present site of the Eagle Mills, and erected a plaster mill 
in 1852. In 1856 he sold to Hovey & Co. for $35,000. 

EAGLE MILLS. 

Hovey & Co. bought their property in 1856, and built their mill during the 
summer of 1857. The first year they mined about 2,000 tons. The business 
steadily increased until 1860, when the Grand Rapids Plaster Company was or- 
ganized and the firm oi Hovey & Co. merged in that. The amount of plaster quar- 
ried and sold by them prior to 1869 was about 98,000 tons, and for 1869 the total 
was about 18,000 tons. They have now increased their facilities, so that they can 
grind 200 tons of land plaster in 20 hours, and have the power to double their 
capacity ii they choose. They have just completed and put in running order a 
new engine of 200 horse power, and have facilities for loading from 40 to 50 cars 
per day. They have also recently put in one of the Illinois Pneumatic Gas Com- 
pany's machines for lighting their quarry and mill. The quarry is under a low 
bluff, aud is widely known as the great plaster cave, being about five acres in ex- 
tent and covered with from 20 to 75 feet of earth and rock. The stratum is about 
12 feet in thickness. The Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Railroad (Kalamazoo 
Division) runs through their mill yard, connecting with other railroads leading 
into the city. 

EMMET MILLS. 

These mills are owned by C. H. Taylor, B. F. McReynolds, P. R. L. Peirce, and 
L. G. Mason, under the firm name, however, o:' Taylor & McReynolds, who own 
about 40 acres of plaster land, which will work out about 35,000 tons per acre. 
They bought the property three years ago, and have mined for the past three 
years an average of 10,000 tons per year. Their works were trebled in extent 
during the year 1870, and can manufacture 200 tons ot ground plaster in 22 hours, 
and 20,000 barrels of stucco per year. Their location is on Grand River, near the 
city limits, and on the line of the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Railroad 
(Kalamazoo Division), and they quarry under the hill the same as the Eagle Mills. 
The product of this mill for 1870 will be about 10,000 tons. 

The companies above named, together with Geo. H. White & Co., mentioned in 
the history of Wyoming, are all that are engaged in plaster mining in Grand 



134 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

Rapids and vicinity, and the aggregate capital now engaged in this business is 
about $400,000. The total of the production of plaster in and near Grand Rapids, 
up to the close of 1869, was about 277,000 tons, and the aggregate value thereof 
has been $1,248,000. The total of the production of 1869 was about 50,000 tons. 
Plaster has been found at Grandville, seven miles below Grand Rapids, on Grand 
River, and also at points two and three miles above Grand Rapids, and it is prob- 
able that many good quarries may be opened in the future, should the demands 
of the trade require it. The beds now worked are practically inexhaustible. 

c. c. comstock's manufactories. 

Mr. C. C. Oomstock ig one of the leading manufacturers in Grand Rapids. He 
has two saw mills, a pail and tub factory, planing mill, and sash, blind and door 
factory. His principal manufactories are situated on the east side of Canal street, 
between Mason and Newberry streets, occupying, with the yard for piling staves 
and lumber, drying houses, etc., sixteen lots, 50x100 feet each. The principal 
building is of brick, and 220 feet in length, averaging 45 feet in width, three 
stories high, is covered with a durable tin roof, and is divided by fire walls and 
iron doors into six apartments. In the other buildings and the old pail factory, 
45x100 feet, and two stories high, a full set of pail machinery is running. In 
another building, 22x70 feet, ten saws are run, cutting pail and tub staves and 
bottoms. On the grounds are nine dry kilns, either built or lined with brick, 
the largest quite expensive, and fire proof, beside a number of large buildings for 
drying, storage, etc. The number of men in his employ is about 50, and it re- 
quires an outlay of nearly or quite $150,000 per year to carry on his business. 

NELSON, MATTER & CO. 

It would be hard to find in this part of the West a more complete establishment 
for the manufacture and sale of furniture, than that of the above named firm, in 
this city. Their manufactory at the foot of Lyon street is 68x90 feet in size, four 
stories high, and full of the most improved machinery for turning, sawing and 
carving the numerous styles of furniture which they manufacture. Their store- 
houses on Huron street are 54x68 feet in size, and four stories high, and their ele- 
gant sales rooms, 29 and 31 Canal street, are 54x80 feet, and occupy three floors. 
They, employ, constantly, about 90 workmen, and ship their manufactures to all 
parts of Michigan, to Illinois, to Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, Nebraska, 
Kansas, Ohio, and Pennsylvania. 

GRAND RAPIDS MANUFACTURING COMPANY. 

The above named company have their works on Water street, west side, and 
their office in Ball's new block, Canal street, and are extensively engaged in the 
manufacture of agricultural implements and machinery. They make, among other 
things, large numbers of Sulky Rakes, and of the Buckey Saw Machine ; employ- 
ing from 30 to 40 men. The sales rooms of the company, in Ball's block, are 22x 
100 feet in size, and occupy four floors ot that elegant building. The business was 
first established by the late J. F. Chubb, in 1850, and went into the hands of the 
present company about a year ago. Mr. A. L. Chubb has been connected with 
the works ever since they were started, and is now President of the company. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTOR* Of KENT COUNTY. 135 

EMPIRE ORGAN COMPANY. 

The Empire Organ Company is one of the manufacturing institutions which 
reflects credit on the city. It was first established in Kalamazoo, in 1867, and re- 
moved here last April. The excellence of the musical instruments which they 
send out, achieves for the makers success, esteem and patronage, which other 
manufacturers have not been able to acquire in years. Mr. Piggott has had along 
experience in this branch of manufactures, and there is not a more thorough mas- 
ter of the art of making reed instruments than he. Their instruments have taken 
the first premium in competition with the Smith's American, Mason & Hamlin, 
and Estey organs. Their factory and music store is located at 05 Monroe street, 
and occupies three floors, employing several first-class workmen. The firm con-, 
sists of George Piggott and A. F. Burch. Mr. E. A. Baird is traveling agent. 

WM. HARRISON. 

One of the largest manufacturing establishments in the city is the lumber 
wagon manufactory of Wm. Harrison, occupying two buildings, one on Front 
street, west side of the river, and the other on Mill street, east side. Mr. H. com- 
menced the manufacture of wagons in the building situated on the west side of 
the river, fourteen years ago. His business becoming very extensive he finally 
found it necessary to occupy a second building, devoting the one on this side of 
the river to machinery work, and the other to hand work. The latter building is 
a large, stone structure, 40x80 feet in size, three stories high. The former is 50x70 
feet in size, and is two stories high. 

Mr. Harrison has about 35 men constantly in his employ, and has turned out 
during the past year 700 wagons. He is doing a large wholesale business through- 
out this State, and sends some of his wagons as far as Texas. They are sold, in 
large numbers, in the States of Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska, Minnesota, and Iowa. 
He does not confine himself to the wholesale trade, however, but does a large re- 
tail business. Everybody has heard of "Harrison's wagons," and very many in 
this vicinity, and elsewhere, can testify to their strength and durability. 

BUTTERWORTII & LOWE 7 S FOUNDRY AND MACHINE SHOP. 

Located near the foot of the east side canal, in the very heart of the city, are 
the Foundry and Machine Shops of Butterworth & Lowe. Long years ago a por- 
tion of the sita on which they stand was occupied by Uncle Louis Campau's In- 
dian trading post. These works were first started by James McCray, since de- 
ceased, in 1843. In 1844, Mr. Daniel Ball became a partner. In 1851, Mr. 
McCray died, and the business was carried on by Mr. Bali, in company with G. 
M. and S. B. McCray — sons of the first proprietor. Mr. Ball finally bought out 
their interests, and, in 1856, admitted Mr. R. E. Butterworth as a partner. Mr. 
Butterworth, two years later, bought out Mr. Ball, and was sole proprietor until 
1869, when he admitted his present partner, Mr. James Lowe, recently from near 
Manchester, England. Mr. G. M. McCray is now principal foreman. These works 
are among the oldest and largest in western Michigan, and occupy, with foundry, 
machine shops, blacksmith shops, agricultural shop, pattern shop, storehouses, 
etc., over half an acre of ground ; giving employment to from fifty to sixty hands. 

BERKEY BROS. Ss GAY. 

Berkey Bros. & Gay have one of the most extensive furniture manufactories in 



136 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

the Western States. Their factory is situated on the east side canal, near Bridge 
street, and is 50x140 feet in size, with four floors. On the corner of Kent and 
Hastings streets they have two warehouses for shipping and storage purposes, 
each 35x100 feet in size, and three stories high. Their retail rooms are situated 
at No. 43 Monroe street, occupying three floors, each 25x90 feet in size, in one 
block, and two of about the same dimensions in an adjoining building. They are 
now making, and keep on hand, some of the finest upholstery work, lamberkins 
and cornices, manufactured in the country. During the past year they have 
shipped about $150,0Q0 worth of furniture of their own manufacture, and their 
trade extends not only over our own state, but into New York, Pennsylvania, 
Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin, Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri, 
and Colorado. They employ as many as 120 men in and about their establish- 
ment, and keep on hand some 1,500,000 feet of walnut and other valuable 
lumber. 

EMPIRE GANG SAW MILLS. 
Among the most important manufacturing establishments in Grand Rapids are 
the extensive steam sawmills of Wonderly & Co., situated on the west side of 
Grand River, between Leonard street Bridge and the track of the Detroit & Mil- 
waukee Railroad. This enterprising firm, thoroughly acquainted with the lum- 
ber business in Pennsylvania, commenced operations here in the latter part of 
October, 1869. Since that time they have erected one of the most extensive saw 
mills in the State, capable of cutting 15,000,000 leet per season, and manufactured, 
up to November 1st, 1870, over 8,000,000 feet of lumber. Their main building is 
50x116 feet in size, two stories high, and has engine and boiler rooms attached. 
The machinery is run by two engines of 150 horse power. A gang of saws, in 
which twenty-eight saws can be run when necessary, converts the largest log into 
boards in a few minutes, it being first trimmed on two sides by a five foot circular 
saw. The lumber is distributed in the yard by means of some 4,500 feet of horse- 
railway, elevated about ten feet from the ground. A railroad track extends to 
the yard, which, with about 1,000 feet of track between the different lumber 
piles, gives easy access to all railroads extending from the city. Their logs are 
procured on Rouge River, Flat River, Fish Creek, and their tributaries, where 
they have a supply of pine timber that will last for many years. Their booms 
hold about 2,000,000 feet of logs at one time. They ship immense quantities of 
lumber to southern Michigan, Indiana, Ohio, Kentucky, and some to Pennsyl- 
vania, competing successfully with Chicago dealers. In connection with the saw 
mill is a large planing mill, containing two heavy flooring and matching machines, 
a surfacing machine, patent siding mill, circular re-sawing machine, etc. J. II. 
Wonderly and D. E. Little, both young men, compose the firm. 

THE MICHIGAN BARREL COMPANY 
have recently erected an immense factory near the depot of the Detroit & Mil- 
waukee Railroad, in which they have one of the largest steam engines in Western 
Michigan. They manufacture the " Water's improved barrel," bail, salt and 
grease boxes, and all kinds of rim work, employing a large number of men and 
boys, and shipping their manufactures to nearly all parts of the union. The 
building which they occupy is vast in its proportions, and admirably arranged 
throughout. 




THE 




M0S TMWE&TESW 



MUTUAL LIFE INSUKANOE COMPANY, 

MILWAUKEE, WIS. 



|if if«$B0 jpwwt tofiwi of fif £t rttwl* 




This Coiapany, to ensure perpetual security to ite p«Hcy holders, has adopted a 
POUR PER CENT. RESERVE, 

Th© H% heat Rtesew® op Seomtrity Kriown in Am©pio«K l*«tfip«fi««. 

This basis of Reserve is recommended by the most EMINENT ACTUARIES, and fur- 
I nishes an impregnable security for the payment of all policies of the Company as they 
become claims. 



HQLBESG A Bl&H BJESX&TC 



D 



And bein^Jocated where ite funds are iuvested with ENTIRE SAFETY, at a HIGH RATE 

" ~ ... - jortion of the country, thus securing a IX) W 

! company THE GREATEST opportunity for the largest 



of INTEREST, and its risks being in a healthy portion of the country, thus securing a LOW 

RATE of MORTALITY, gives the company THE GREATEST opportunity f A x 

returns to its members, and the greatest inducements to the insuring public. 




HKBER SMITH, 

Vice J'resident. 



J. H. VAN DIKE, 

Prtsident 



AUG. CMYL0R1), 

Secretary. 

H. MORGAN, Agent, GRAND KAPIDS, MICH. 




LOANED FOB FIFTY YEARS, 

At 6 per Cent, Compound Interest, amounts to $ 18,420.15 j 

3»,457.08 

46,901.61 

111,390.85 



7 


k< 


u 


tt 


*» 


8 


*( 


»4 


4* 


** 


10 


»% 


<*- 


4t 


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TH K 





Northwestern Mu tual Life 

INSUKANCE COMPANY, 

Loans its funds in tl\e West, where money is in demand at 
Higlx J\ates of Interest. 



ITS EATO @F MO&TAUTY 

since its organization has been BELOW t*\e average of all 

Companies. These TWO advantages render it able 

to furnish insurance AS CHEAPLY as any 

COMPANY in U\e COUNTRY. 



X « El" 

ItBflWIIflll 

'Will Loan, in Kent County, an amount equal to the Reserve 
on its Policies in the County. 





HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



VOORHIS & CO'S "T" STORE, 

DEALERS, IKT 

Fine Teas, Green, Roasted and Ground Coffees, 

PURE GROUND SPICES, 

And FINE FAMILY GROCERIES, 

CTo. 38 Monroe Street, 
GRAND RAPIDS, - - - MICHIGAN. 

VAN HOUTEN & CO., 

DEALERS IN 

Paints, Oils, Brushes, Varnishes 

wall m&m, wflM®@w $im®i§, 

Pictures, Picture Frames and Glass. 

Painting, Graining &. Paper Hanging done in the Best Style, 

A.rrr> at reasonable rates. 

12 Canal Street, 

Q-rand iFLctplcLis, - - - Miolaigan. 

H. MORGAN & SON, 

GENERAL INSURANCE AGENTS 

AND ADJUSTERS. 

» — ♦ — • 

Money Loaned on unencumbered Real Estate. Farms and City Property 

Bought and Sold. 

Agents Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company, 

(SEE OPPOSITE PAGE.) 

Office, QX Monroe Street, 

GRAND RAPIDS,- - - MICHIGAN. 





HISTORY AKD DIRECTORY O* KENT COUNTY. 



Mrs. Alma Gross, 
OCULIST, 

61 Greenwich Street, 
GRAND RAPIDS, - - MICHIGAN. 

Kent Street House, 

KTo- 16 ELoiJLt Street, 

GRAND RAPIDS, - - MICHIGAN. 

Board per week *& •• 

Day Board * •• 

Single Meals ° 3 * 

M. D> KETOHUM, Proprietor. 

D. D. CODY, 

Wholesale and Retail Grocer, 

25 Monroe Street, 

Opposite tlxe Xt-a-tHto-ian. House. 

Having purchased the interest of 0. D. Lyon, in the late firm of Lyon & Cody, 
I am prepared to offer 

GREAT INDUCEMENTS TO COUNTRY DEALERS 

J&.XXK5L OONSUME1B.S AT XjAXI.G-£1. 

A LABGE ASSOBTMENT OF 

FANCY GtfOCEtft£$» 

OYSTERS AND LIQUORS. 

ORDERS PROMPTLY FILLED. 

3D. ID. OODIT. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



0**** J. BARTH, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

Notions, Toys, Ladies Furnishing Goods, 

Zephyrs, Kid Gloves, Ribbons, 

FRENCH AND AMERICAN CORSETS, 

Willow Baskets, Ladies Ready-made Garments, 

&c. |3^~Agents for the Abdominal Corsets. 

24 Monroe St. 

LOVELAND <£ POWERS, 

MANUFACTURING 




€Q&?l€Yt*lf: 



Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

FRUITS, NUTS, OYSTERS, CIGARS, AC, 

No. 106 Monroe Street, 

WM kVgow^ D - GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 

W. O. RINDQE, 

Saddle *n& JJarnes* £kop> 

Manufacturer and Dealer in 

Harnesses, Saddles, Whips, 

Horse Blankets, Buffalo Robes, &c, 

87 Canal Street, 

(CHUBB'S OLD STAND,) 

GRAND RAPIDS, - - MICHIGAN. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



MEW MMT&&&MM STORE 



Voigt <£ Herpolsheimer, 



DEALERS IN 



DRY GOODS and NOTIONS, 

Wholesale and ZELotail. 

41 Monroe Street, 

O-IR/^TnTID IR^DPIIDS, MICH. 

Drs. Hunt& Hoytf 

I0HE0PATIIC PHYSICIANS 



JL1ST> 



SURGEONS. 



PURE HOMEOPATHIC MEMCMES etimiEO* 

Medicine Cases, Books, etc., kept constantly on hand. 

15 Monroe Street, 
Grand Rapids, - - - Michigan. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 



HATCH'S 

Fine Art Stationery Emporium 



AND 



PICTURE FRAME MANUFACTORY 

49 Monroe & 3 Justice Streets. 



SCHOOL BOOKS, WEITI1TG DESKS 

BLANK BOOKS, 

ALL KINDS OF ARTISTS' MATERIALS, 

A. FULL. ASSORTMENT OF 1 

WALL PAPER, 

ELEGANT BRACKETS 

A1NTO 

PARLOR ORNAMENTS. 

CIMOS & OIL FUNK 

Stereoscopes & Stereoscopic Views, 

PHOTOGRAPHIC ALBUMS, &c, 
Grand Rapids, - - - Michigan. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



.PTOKI^MMtTO 




The undersigned would express his thanks to the multitude of friends who have 
given him a share of their patronage during the last eighteen years, and extends a 
cordial invitation to all to call on him at his 

New Art Gallery, 

In Leonard's Block, 



HAVING ADOPTED 

ALL THE LATE IMPROVEMENTS 

In arrangement of Light and other fixtures in the Operating De- 
partment, together with his 

LONG EXPERIENCE IN THE BUSINESS, 

HE FEELS CONFIDENT OF PRODUCING 

In clearness of detail and beauty of tone, either East or West. 

PICTURES MADE FROM THE SMALLEST TO LIFE SIZE, 

OLD PICTURES COPIED AND ENLARGED TO ANY SIZE DESIRED. 
A GOOD ASSORTMENT OF FRAMES ALWAYS ON HAND 



:ELe»na©xxxlo©r* the Plaoe, 

Sortoaa J s 3NTew Art Galle: 

Leonard's Block f 

17 Foot of Monroe Street, 17 

Sign of the Big Camera. GRAND RAPIDS. 

O. W. HORTON, Artist 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



MANUFACTURER ICF 



iW REPAIRING NEATLY DONE. 

4B GctTxal Street, Qran d, IFLaiDica.* 

ALFRED FTJTIsrAI^, 



Residence, Corner Barclay and Fountain Street. Office, 28 Lyon St., (up stairs,) 

GRAND HAPIDS, MIOECIGAM". 

HABILE WORKS. 

•-*-* 

J. M. & H. C. Ramsey, 



DEALERS IN 



Foreign and American Marble, 

MOJSOHIJENTS, HEADSTONES, 

A.rsrx> m^rbl 13$ ttoric ip* general. 



EASTERN PRICES OBSERVED, WITH ADDITION OF FREIGHT. 
Near Pearl Street Bridge, 

GRAND RAPIDS, - MICHIGAN. 

OLD BOOK STORE, 

Gl Monroe Street, 61 

OPPOSITE THE CATHOLIC CHURCH, 

GRAND RAPIDS, - - MICHIGAN. 

Wo buy and sell all kinds of Books and Magazines, and keep School Books and 
Stationery for sale, or exchange, CHEAPER THAN ELSEWHERE, at the Old 
Book Store, 61 Monroe Street, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

McKAY & SON. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Livery, Omnibus &. Hack Stables 

Opposite the Rathbtm and Eagle Hotels, 

Waterloo Street, 

GRAND RAPIDS, - - MICHIGAN. 

ITLEAVE YOUR ORDERS.^ 

L. R. ATWATEE, 
NOTARY PUBLIC, 

Represents the following Reliable Companies: 

Great Western— Grand Rapids Branch Capital $1,000,000 

Lamar— Grand Rapids Branch " 1,000,000 

Sim, Cleveland, O " 200,000 

Buffalo German, Buffalo - * " 200,000 

Lumberman's, Chicago " 200,000 

27 OANAXi STREET, 

GRAND RAPIDS, - - MICHIGAN. 
£. T. MILLER, 

Solicitor iu Chaacory s 

Office, 65 Canal Street, 

Grand Rapids, - - Michigan. 
~~~ MARCUS W. BATES, 

Office with Grand Rapids Savings Bank, 

GRAND RAPIDS, • - • MICHIGAN. 



Directory of Kent County, 

INCLUDING ALL THE TERRITORY OUTSIDE OF 
GRAND RAPIDS CITY. 



In the following list the figures and names following the names of individuals, 
indicate the number of the section upon which the person resides, the name of 
township, and post-office address, in the order mentioned. 



A 



Abbott Mrs. Juliana, 13 Algoma, Edger- 
ton. 

Abbott John Henry, 13 Algoma, Edger- 
ton. 

Abbott Ezra R., 1 Bowne, Lowell. 

ABBY SYLVESTER, Cedar Springs. 

Abby Sylvester, 35 Solon, Cedar Springs 

Abel Myron, 14 Vergennes, Lowell. 

Abel Carlos A., 30 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

Abraham Edson, Low r ell. 

Abraham James, 30 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Abrams Delos, Lowell. 

Abram Patrick, 1 Ada, Cannonsburg. 

Ackley Edward, 33 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Ackley Samuel L. Village Cedar Springs 

Ackerson William, 8 Grand Rapids. 

Ackerson C, 8 Grand Rapids. 

Ackert Peter A., 32 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

Ackert Oliver C, 15 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

Ackert George T., 15 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

Acker Theodore, Rockford. 

Acker Geo., 35 Lowell, Lowell. 

Adams John, 3 Courtland, Courtland 
Center. 

ADAMS ALANSON R., 1 Oakfield; 
Greenville. 

ADAMS FRANK D., 10 Grattan, Grat- 
tan Center. 



Adams George C, 10 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

Adams John A., 16 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

ADAMS JOHN II., 34 Tyrone, Sparta 
Cen. 

Adams J. B., Lowell. 

ADAMS DANIEL. Sparta Center. 

Adams James, — Cannon, Cannonsburg 

Adams Seymour H., Lowell. 

Adams Wm. W., 23 Gaines, Hammond. 

ADAMS JAMES W., 25 Byron, Cody's 
Mills. 

Adams II . S., Lowell. 

Adams John P., 6 Cannon, Rockford. 

Adams Marcellus, 28 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Adams Marcellus W., 29 Byron, Byron 
Center. 

Adams James, 34 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Addison Albert,, 23 . Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

ADDISON THOMAS, 23 Courtland, 
Courtland Center. 

Addison Robert, 23 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Addison Robert, Rockford. 

ADDIS GEO. W., 20 Oakfield, Oak- 
field. 

ADDIS JOHN, 20 Oakfield, Oakfield. 

Afton Charles, 27 Tyrone, Sparta Cen. 

AKERLY BENJ. N., 4 Cannon, Rock- 
ford. 

Abbey Henry, 30 Alpine, Indian Creek. 

Albert Martin, 11 Alpine, Alpine. 



FORT'S WESTERN LINIMENT CURES ALL LAMENESS. 

18 



138 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Albee K P., 19 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Albright Gideon D., 30 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Albright Isaac, 5 Byron, Grandville. 

Albright John, 31 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

Alcorn Joseph, Lowell. 

Alcorn John, Lowell. 

Alcumbrack Daniel, 20 Grand Rapids. 

Alcumbrack Alonzo, 27 Vergennes, 
Lowell. 

Alderman Erastus D., 24 Lowell, Low- 
ell. 

Aldrich Harmon, 32 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Aldrich Marvin, Lowell. 

Aldrich Lyman, Lowell. 

ALDRICH JAMES, 16 Bowne, Alto. 

Aldrich Cyrus, 24 Grattan, Grant. 

Aldrich Henry, 35 Grattan, Alton. 

Aldrich Hiram, 23 Vergennes, Ver- 
gennes. 

ALDRICH AURILLA, 24 Vergennes, 
Fallassburg. 

Aldrich Marshal, 2 Vergennes, Alton. 

Aldrich Julius, 9 Vergennes, Alton. 

Aldrich Edward, 26 Byron, Cody's 
Mills. 

ALDRICH WILLIAM, 9 Vergennes, 
Alton. 



Allen Robert T., 35 Gaines, Caledonia 

Station. 
Allen Samuel, 16 Lowell, Lowell. 
ALLEN SYLVESTER, 30 Plainfield, 

Mill Creek. 
Allen Laban, 20 Courtland, Courtland 

Center. 
Allen Hiram H., 19 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
Allen Isaac, 27 Courtland, Courtland 

Center. 
Allen Wright C, 19 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
Allen William, 23 Plainfield, Austerlitz. 
ALLEN ASA M., Rockford. 
Allen L. W., 3 Walker, Indian Creek. 
ALLEN THOMAS W., 1 Solon, Sand 

Lake. 
Allen Ebenezer, 27 Algoma, Rockford. 
ALLEN CHAS. B., 6 Cannon, Rock- 
ford. 
Allen Laban, 29 Cannon, Austerlitz. 
ALLEN VOLNEY, 3 Oakfield, Spencer 

Mills. 
Almy Alonzo, 28 Nelson, Cedar Springs 
Almy Thomas, 28 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Almy William, 28 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 



BUY TRUNKS AND VALISES OF ROUSE & DOOLITTLE. 



Alden Scott, 2 Courtland, Courtland 

Center. 
Alden Avery E., Alaska Village. 
ALDEN ELIJAH D., Alaska Village. 
Alden John S., Alaska Village. 
Alden Avery E., Alaska. 
Alexander Willard, 31 Vergennes, 

Lowell. 
Alexander Nelson W., 14 Wyoming, 

Grand Rapids. 
Alexander Charles, 14 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
ALGER LOUIS J., 12 Vergennes, 

Lowell. 
Alger John L., 7 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Alger John D., 7 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Allen Joseph W., 3 Walker, Indian 

Creek. 
Allen James, 28, Lowell, Lowell. 
ALLEN WM. T., 29 Gaines, Cody's 

Mills. 
Allen William G., 7 Cascade, Grand 

Rapids. 
Allen Mrs. Mary A., 20 Courtland, 

Courtland Cen. 
Allen Henry, 16 Paris, Grand Rapids. 



Almy Alphonso W., 5 Walker, Indian 
Creek. 

Althen Charles, Lowell. 

Ames John, 4 Ada, Ada. 

Ames B., 18 Grand Rapids, Grand 
Rapids. 

AMES WALTER C, 24 Wyoming, 
Kelloggsville. 

Amidon Caleb, 9 Sparta, Sparta Center. 

Amidon Wiliard, 16 Sparta,, Sparta 
Center. 

Ammerman Nelson, 30 Cannon, Aus- 
terlitz. 

Ammerman David, 22 Plainfield, Aus- 

tPT*ll t7 

AMMERMAN NELSON, 1 Plainfield, 
Austerlitz. 

Ammerman Elisha, 23 Cannon, Can- 
nonsburg. 

Ammerman David, 1 Plainfield, Rock- 
ford. 

AMOND GODFREY, Cedar Springs. 

Amond Joseph, Cedar Springs. 

Anion John, 20 Caledonia, Caledonia 
Station. 

Amphlett Joseph W., Lowell. 

Amsden L. Miles, Lowell. 



FORT'S WESTERN LINIMENT CURES SPAVINS & WIND GALLS 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 189 

A. I* SKINNER. GEO. S. WARD. 

SKINNER & WARD, 




-A-IsHD 



WAB CLAIM ACBNTS, 

Office up stairs, City National Bank Building, 

Post Office Drawer, S28I. VXXvAjN O RAPIDD, JVHUH. 

Dr. AIKIN, 

Office, No. 11 Canal Street, - - Grand Rapids, 

(First stairs north of Sweet's Hotel.) — Attends to Cases in All Branches of His 

Profession, curing hundreds where "old school," one-pathy, inexperienced, ignorant " root and herb, 
or Indian" doctors fail. C^~Terms favorable to all. Consultation, Free. 

No idle pretensions or imposture, no flattering or experiments, no injurious drugs, but careful exam- 
ination and the most reliable treatment — the best remedies approved by science and experience — which 
may cure YOU, though discouraged and hopeless. 

Special tic* : — Diseases of the Eye and Ear, Throat, Lungs and Heart, Liver and Kidneys, and all 
Chronic, Constitutional and Blood Diseases. 

Skillful attention given to all cases in Surgery. 

Asthma, Catarrh, Rheumatism, Neuralgia, Epilepsy, Scrofula, Piles, Dropsy, Dyspepsia, &c, cured. 

LADIES out of health, assured of easy, safe cure. 

Cancers and Tumors removed without the knife. 

ISP-lNFALiiiBiiE Remedies — Surest and quickest known for all Private Diseases of both sexes, young 
and old. The worst cases of Stricture and Chronic Venereal diseases quickly relieved. No Mercury used. 

Travelers supplied with medicines at short notice. 

To Youths and Men : The only perfect mire, permanent and reliable, for Seminal Weakness, Nervous 
Debility, Impotence, etc. Worth $1,000 to the unfortunate. No quackery or deception. The fullest 
guarantee given. All Business Strictly Confidential. 

twin all special, important cases, stop unreliable or useless treatment, and consult Dr. Aikin at once. 
Call, or send postage for circulars and questions. (Hours 8 to 8.) 

Address, N. J. AIKIN, M. D., 

P. O. Drawer, 2Q91. Grand Rapids, Mich. 

J. a CROSBY. M. S. CROSBY. 

CROSBY & SON'S 

GENERAL 

Insurance and Heal Estate Agency, 

13 Canal Street, 

GRAND RAPIDS, MIGH. 



Capital Represented, $73,178,105.38. 

. — .» . 

Agents "Mutual Benefit Life Insurance Co." 



140 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Amstice James, Cedar Springs. 

Amy Samuel, 14 Courtland, Courtland 

Center. 
Anderson M. B., 1 Byron, Grand 

Rapids. 
ANDERSON JOSEPH, 29 Bowne, 

Harris Creek. 
Anderson John, 32 Lowell, Alto. 
Anderson John A., 8 Gaines, Gaines- 
ville. 
ANDERSON PETER, 20 Courtland, 

Rockford. 
Anderson Duncan, 16 Vergennes, Ver- 

gennes. 
ANDERSON DONALD, 16 Vergennes, 

Vergennes. 
Anderson Christian, 17 Grattan, Grat- 

tan Center. 
Anderson Andrew, 10 Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 
Anderson William, 10 Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 
Anderson John, 10 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 
ANDERSON CHARLES, 39 Alpine, 

Englishville. 
Anderson Joel, Lisbon. 
ANDERSON JOHN H., 7 Courtland, 

Edgerton. 
Anderson Isaac, 20 Oakfield, Oakfield. 



Ankney Michael, 26 Gaines, Hammond. 

Ankney Jonathan, 35 Gaines, Cody's 
Mills. 

Annis Solomon, Lowell. 

Annis Alexander C, 18 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

Annis Richard, 30 Cascade, Cascade. 

Annis Solomon, Lowell. 

ANNIS WILLIAM, 28 Cascade, Cas- 
cade. 

Annis Wallace, Lowell. 

Annis Alson, Lowell. 

ANNIS JAMES, 1 Alpine, Englishville. 

ANNIS MRS. GRACE, 28 Cascade, 
Cascade. 

Anna Nicholas, 32 Byron, Byron Center 

Ansalmann John, 27 Alpine, G. Rapids. 

Antor Adam, 10 Alpine, Alpine. 

An way Ira, 11 Tyrone, Sparta Center. 

Apet George, 9 Courtland, Courtland 
Center. 

Apple Andrew, Lisbon. 

Apsey John, 35 Cascade, Alaska. 

APTED A. M., 34 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Arbour James F., 28 Alpine, G. Rapids 

Arbour M. T., Rockford. 

Arbour B. P., 28 Alpine, Grand Rapids. 

Armstrong Riel, Cedar Springs. 



W. D. FOSTER, HARDWARE, STOVES, AND TIN WARE, u & 16 Monroe at. 



Anderson Joseph, 20 Oakfield, Oakfield. 

Anderson Thomas, 32 Lowell, Alto. 

Anderson Goram, 7 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Andrews James H., 34 Grattan, Alton. 

Andrews Alva H., 34 Grattan, Alton. 

Andrews Norman, 10 Gaines, Hammond 

Andrews Samuel, 1 Plainfield, Rock- 
ford. 

Andrews Oliver, 25 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

ANDREWS WILLIAM, 6 Bowne, Alto. 

Andrews John A., 34 Grattan, Alton. 

Andrews Lewis P., 28 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 

Andrus Lemon, 29 Oakfield, Oakfield. 

ANDRUS CHARLES W., 1 Alpine, 
Englishville. 

Andrus Mrs. Sarah, 1 Alpine, English- 
ville. 

Anderson Jacob, 7 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Anderson Alexander, 16 Vergennes, 
Vergennes. 

ANN ABLE GEORGE, 6 Cannon, Rock- 
ford. 

Angel Heber, 32 Lowell, Alto. 

ANGELL ABIAH, 7 Caledonia, Alaska. 

Angell Amasa, 18 Oakfield, Oakfield. 

FORT'S SALVE CURES CUTS, BRUISES, AND OTHER WOUNDS. 



Armstrong George W., 20 Cannon, Can- 
nonsburg. 

Armstrong Charles, 21 Cannon, Can- 
nons burg. 

ARMSTRONG JAMES, Cedar Springs. 

Armstrong Jesse B., 20 Cannon, Can- 
nonsburg. 

Armstrong James M., 30 Tyrone, Cas- 
novia. 

Arnold Alonzo J., 29 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

Arnold Abram II., 25 Nelson, Nelson. 

Arnold William, 21 Grand Rapids. 

ARNOLD DARIUS C, 8 Gaines, Gaines- 
ville. 

Arnold Janus, 19 Spencer, Nelson. 

Arnet William, 4 Gaines, Grand Rapids 

Arndt Jacob W., 26 Walker, G. Rapids. 

ARSNOE NELSON, 18 Plainfield, Al- 
pine. 

Arsnoe James, 24 Alpine, Mill Creek. 

ARSNOE PETER, 24 Alpine, Alpine. 

Arsnoe Charles, 24 Alpine, Alpine. 

Arthur John, Village Cedar Springs. 

Artin Thomas, 26 Grand Rapids. 

Aschenbrenner Fred., 23 Alpine, Alpine 



HISTOET AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 



141 




142 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



ASHLEY SHELDON, 1 Grattan, Ash- 
ley. 

Ashley Calvin, 35 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

ASHLEY NOAH R., 28 Courtland, 
Courtland Center. 

ASHLEY CHARLES, 2 Grattan, Ash- 
ley. 

ASHLEY ABNER, 1 Grattan, Ashley. 

ASHLEY JOHN, 36 Oakfield, Ashley. 

Ashmore Samuel, 5 Walker, Indian 
Creek. 

ATHERTON SYLVANUS, Lisbon. 

Atherton George, 19 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Atkinson Roger, 23 Walker, G. Rapids. 

ATKINS JOHN P., Lisbon. 

ATKINS WM. J., 16 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

Atkins Horace G., 16 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

Atkins Guy H., 16 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

Atkins Mrs. W. L., 16 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

At wood William, 14 Vergennes, Lowell. 

Auble Milo C, 26 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

AUBLE ISAAC E., 30 Cascade, Grand 
Rapids. 

Auble William, 30 Cascade, G. Rapids. 

ROUSE 8l DOOLITTLE, 

Auble George, 35 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Auble Andrew J., 9 Cascade, Cascade. 
Auger Lewis, 27 Vergennes, Lowell. 
Augustine Rinaldo, 5 Alpine, Lisbon. 
Austin John, Lowell. 
Austin Henry, 10 Lowell, Lowell. 
Austin Leonard C, Rockford. 
Austin Orville. 17 Lowell, Lowell. 
Austin Charles E., 17 Lowell, Lowell. 



AUSTIN LAUREN, 15 Courtland, 
Courtland Center. 

Austin Phineas, Rockford. 

Austin Nelson F., 16 Plainfield, Bel- 
mont. 

Austin J. J., Rockford. 

Austin John, 21 Courtland, Courtland 
Center. 

AUSTIN L. H., 14 Solon, Cedar Springs 

Austin Isaiah W., 33 Paris, G. Rapids. 

AUSTIN DAVID C, Rockford. 

Austin Henry J., 7 Sparta, Lisbon. 

AUSTIN AMOS, Rockford. 

Austin Lewis, 6 Lowell, Lowell. 

Austin Russell, 33 Oakfield, ,Grattan 
Center. 

AUSTIN GEORGE, 4 Grand Rapids. 

Austin Reuben S., 1 Plainfield, Rock- 
ford. 

Austin Lumas, 6 Lowell, Lowell. 

Austin Philip, 12 Plainfield, Rockford. 

Averill E., 34 Ada, Ada. 

Averill Levi F., 7 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Avery H. W., Lowell. 

Avery Wm. II., Rockford. 

Avery Robert, 30 Cannon, Austerlitz. 

Avery Edward, Lowell. 

Avery Earl W., Lowell. 

S3 MONROE STREET. 

Avery Robert, 19 Spencer, Nelson. 

Avery George, Lowell. 

Avery Mrs. F. R., Lowell. 

Avink Amber, 14 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Avink Aaron J., 24 Paris, Grand Rapids 

AYERS AUGUSTUS, 19 Tyrone, Cas- 

novia. 
AYLESWORTH WILLIS, 22 Cannon, 

Cannonsburg. 



B 



Babcock Calvin, 16 Algoma, Rockford. 

Babcock Charles A., 16 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 

Babcock Benj. F., Sparta Center. 

Babe James, 33 Cascade, Alaska. 

Babe James, 4 Caledonia, Alaska. 

BACON JOHN, 10 Grand Rapids. 

Bacon Elisha D., Village Cannonsburg. 

Bacon B. F., 1 Alpine, Englishville. 

BACON RICHARD, 22 Tyrone, Cas- 
novia. 

Bacon Horace L., 22 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Bacon Rufus, 3 Grand Rapids. 

BACON S. S., 17 Grand Rapids. 



BADGLEY JOHN, 21 Plainfield, Bel- 
mont. 

Bahre William, Lisbon. 

BAIL J. W., 30 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Bail F. A., 30 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Bailey Bradford, Cedar Springs. 

Bailey W. J., 35 Solon, Cedar Springs. 

RAILEY WARREN, 1 Alpine, English- 
ville. 

Bailey Mrs. R., 35 Algoma, Rockford. 

BAILEY MRS. NANCY, 2 Alpine, 
Englishville. 

BAILEY H. L., 1 Alpine, Englishville. 

BAILEY CHARLES, 1 Alpine, Eng- 
lishville. 



FORT'S MEDICINES ARE WARRANTED. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY Of KENT COUNTY. 143 

WIVI-HARRISON, 



Manufacturer of 



LUMBER 




ftU 





! a 



An Old Established House. 
SELLS EXTENSIVELY AT WHOLESALE. 



Wagons at Wholesale and Retail 



46 Front St., West Side, 
Mill Street, East Side, 



Grand Rapids, Mich. 



144 



HISTORY AND DIRECTOR* Of KENT . COUNTY, 



BAILEY ARTHUR, 1 Ada, Ada. 

Bailey' Murray, 1 Ada, Ada. 

Bailey Harvey K., 34 Algoma, Rock- 
ford, 

Bailey Otis, 20 Vergennes, Vergennes. 

Bailey Wm, K., 24 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg: 

Bailey Benjamin, 35 Bowne, Bowne. 

Bailey John, 35 Bowne, Bowne. 

Bailey Bradford, 30 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

Bailey Emerson, 23 Bowne, Bowne. 

Bailey Sanford H., 19 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

Bailey Gideon, 15 Nelson, Sand Lake. 

BAILEY WM. H., 8 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

Bailey Gilbert G., 14 Paris, G. Rapids. 

Bailey Freeborn F., 13 Paris, G. Rapids 

Bailey Joseph C, 19 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

Bailey Mary, 17 Nelson, Cedar Springs. 

BAILEY SMITH, 20 Vergennes, Ver- 
gennes. 

Bailey Joseph S., 14 Paris, G. Rapids. 

Bailey Ansil E., 14 Paris, G. Rapids. 

Bailey Wm. L., 2 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Bainbridge Thomas, 21 Byron, Byron 
Center. 



Baldwin Henry, 29 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

Baldwin William, Bockford. 

Baldwin Edward, 18 Vergennes,^Ver- 
gennes. 

Baldwin James L., Jr., 18 Vergennes, 
Vergennes. 

BALDWIN JAMES L., 18 Vergennes, 
Vergennes. 

Baldwin William, 2 Cannon, Rockford. 

Baldwin James H., 23 Cannon, Can- 
nonsburg. i 

Baldwin James A., Village Cannons- 
burg. 

Ball J. S., Lowell. 

Ball Wm. N., Lowell. 

Ball, Allen P., 13 Alpine, xYlpine. 

BALL SILAS, 13 Alpine, Alpine. 

BALL NATHAN A., 32 Byron, Byron 
Center. 

Ball Benton W., 29 Byron, Byron Cen. 

Ball Nathan P., 29 Byron, Byron Cen. 

Ball Mrs. Huldah C, Grandville. 

Ballard Charles L., 35 Sparta, English- 
ville. 

Ballard Lyman S., 35 Sparta, English- 
ville. 

Ballard Benjamin, 3 Walker, Indian 
Creek. 



AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS AT W. D. FOSTER'S, W and 16 Monroe-st. 



Bainbridge John, 9 Gaines, Hammond. 

BAINBRIDGE WM. R., 9 Gaines, Ham- 
mond. 

Baker William, 15 Byron, Byron Center 

Baker Isaac, 13 Plainfield, Rockford. 

Baker Alonzo, 36 Caledonia, Middle- 
ville, Barry County. 

Baker John, 12 Vergennes, Lowell. 

Baker Nathan N„ 20 Paris, G. Rapids. 

Baker Lorenzo, 36 Caledonia, Middle- 
ville, Barry County. 

Baker Zelken, 1 Wyoming, G. Rapids. 

Baker George R., 12 Vergennes, Lowell. 

Baker John C, 34 Bowne, Fillmore, 
Barry County. 

BAKER JOHN, 3 Plainfield, Rockford. 

Baker William, 3 Plainfield, Rockford. 

Baker John, Village Cannonsburg. 

Baker George R., 12 Vergennes, Alton. 

Baker John C, 12 Vergennes, Alton. 

Baker Eunice, 29 Cannon, Austerlitz. 

Balcom George B., Lowell. 

BALCOM JOHN, Sparta Center. 

Bale Henry, 16 Grattan, Grattan Center 

Baldwin Edward, 29 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 



Ballard 0. T., 22 Plainfield, Belmont. 

Ballard Sherre H., 35 Sparta, English- 
ville. 

BALFOUR JAltfES, 9 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Bammaerlin Lewis F., 30 Plainfield, 
Mill Creek. 

BAMMAERLIN REINHARDT F., 30 
Plainfield, Mill Creek. 

Banks John, 1 Oakfield, Greenville. 

Banks George, 1 Oakfield, Greenville. 

Bannister Willis, 31 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

Barber George W., 27 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia. 

Barber James M., 27 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia. 

BARBER GEORGE, 19 Gaines, Gaines- 
ville. 

Barber M. C, Lowell. 

Barber Leonard, 9 Grand Rapids. 

Barber J. H., 11 Lowell, Lowell. 

Barber Alfred, 24 Lowell, Lowell. 

Barber Alfred, 24 Lowell, Lowell. 

Barber William R., Lowell. 

Barber Martin, 13 Lowell, Lowell. 

Barber Wallace, 9 Grand Rapids. 

Barber Robert, Lowell. 



NO RISK IX USING FORT'S REMEDIES. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 145 

W. P. BARKER, 

DENTIST, 

Office, 65 Monroe Street, 

Grand Rapids, - - Michigan, 

(OPPOSITE THE CATHOLIC CHI/HCH,) 

All work done promptly and in the best manner. Chloro Nitrous Oxide Gas, 
the safest and most reliable anaesthetic in use in Dental Surgery, administered 
with care and skill. 

Currier & Putnam, 



newsdealers, Bookbinders, 

And Manufacturers of all kinds of 

Shelf, Confectionery and Medicine Boxes. 

CONSTANTLY ON HAND, A GOOD ASSORTMENT OF 

WALL AND CURTAIN PAPER, PICTURES, ALBUMS, 
BIBLES, POCKET BOOKS, POCKET CUTLERY, 

Also, a good stock of FAIRCHILD'S GOLD PENS & PENCILS. 

^^"Subscriptions received for all Daily, Weekly and Monthly Papers and 
Magazines. 

Leonard's New Block, 15 Monroe Street. 

A. W. CUBBIEB. T. C. PTJTNAM. 

19 



146 



HISTORY AND DIRECTOftY^O* KENT COUNT?. 



BARBER OSCAR B., Postmaster at 

Caledonia. 
BARBER A. A., Lowell. 
Barber Asahel, 3 Cannon, Rockford. 
Barber Robert, Lowell. 
Barber William, 12 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
Barbin Raine, Lowell. 
Bardeen Lewis, 30 Oakfield, Oakfield. 
Baragar James, 22 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
Baragar Theodore, 22 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
Barr Axtyl Y., 8 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
BARR GUILD, 7 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Barr R. M., 28 Grand Rapids. 
Barr George R., 25 Grand Rapids. 
BARR REUBEN, Cedar Springs. 
.Barr Thomas B., 6 Lowell, Lowell. 
Barringer Marcus, 28 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 
Barringer David, 28 Algoma, Rockford 
Barigan Dennis, 10 Courtland, Coilrt- 

land Center. 
Barringer John, 28 Algoma, Rockford. 
Barrett George, Alaska. 
Barrett Smith, 7 Nelson, Cedar Springs. 
BARRETT HIRAM A., 9 Grattan, Grat- 

tan Center. 



Barnes Mott, 4 Courtland, Courtland 

Center. 
Barnes Thomas, 32 Bowne, Harris 

Creek. 
Barnes Augustus, 25 Grattan, Smyrna, 

Ionia County. 
Barnes E. P., 17 Grand Rapids. 
Barnes Irani, 25 Nelson, Cedar Springs. 
Barnes James, 23 Plainfield, Austerlitz. 
Barnes John, 29 Grand Rapids. 
Barnes John M., 24 Algoma, Edgerton, 
BARNES T. D., Lisbon. 
Barnes Reuben, 21 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 
Barnes Iram C, 16 Oakfield, Oakfield. 
Barnes Ely, 25 Byron, Cody's Mills. 
Barnes Jacob, 23 Walker, G. Rapids. 
BARNEY CORKINS, 18 Byron, Byron 

Center. 
Barney James M., 32 Byron, Byron 

Center. 
Barney Simon Z., 32 Byron, Byron Cen. 
BARNUM WM. W., 30 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
Barnum Franklin H., 31 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
Barnum Franklin, 25 Wyoming, Kel- 

loggville. 
Barkman James, 19 Algoma, Sparta 

Center. 



BUY SHIRTS OF ROUSE & DOOLITTLE. 



Barrett Henry J., 34 Tyrone, Sparta 

Center. 
Barrett Charles L., 27 Tyrone, Sparta 

Center*. 
BARRETT JOHN, Alaska. 
Barry James, 36 Grand Rapids. 
Barrows George H., 36 Sparta, English- 

ville. 
Barrows Asahel, 32 Plainfield, Grand 

Rapids. 
Barrows Corydon, 24 Cascade, Cascade. 
Barrows Abner, 2 Cannon, Bostwick 

Lake. 
Barris Ransom, Alaska. 
BARRIS WILLIAM, 2 Caledonia, Al- 
aska. 
Barris Ransom J., Alaska Village. 
Barras Charles, 22 Cascade, Cascade. 
Bareis Jacob, 32 Lowell, Alto. 
Barris B*ron B., 2 Caledonia, Alaska. 
Barnard'Ezra P., 30 Oakfield, Oakfield. 
Barnard James, Lowell. 
Barnard William, 30 Oakfield, Oakfield. 
BARNARD JAMES F., Lowell. 
BARNARD STEPHEN P., 33 Grand 

Rapids. 



Barkley Wm. H., 32 Cannon, Austerlitz. 

BARKLEY CHARLES, 29 Grand 
Rapids, Grand Rapids. 

Barkley Wellington, Village Cedar 
Springs. 

Barkley Byard, 15 Ada, Ada. 

Barkley Harvey, 28 Lowell, Lowell. 

BARCK JOHN H., Alaska. 

BARCLAY ABRAHAM C, 24 Paris, 
Grand Rapids. 

Barker John W., Rockford. 

Barker J. W., Rockford. 

Barker R. W., Rockford. 

Barker Thomas N., Rockford. 

Barker I. Irving, Rockford. 

Barker Nelson, 30 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

Barker T. Newton, Rockford. 

Barker Isaac, Rockford. 

Barker Mason A., 30 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

Barker Charles L., 29 Cannon, Auster- 
litz. 

Bartlett Jonah, 5 Nelson, Sand Lake. 

BARTLETT HORATIO N., 17 Cas- 
cade, Cascade. 



FORT'S LINIMENT CURES RHEUMATISM AND NEURALGIA. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 147 

Nelson, Matter & Co., 

(STJCCESSOBS TO NELSON, COMBTOCK k CO.,) 

Manufacturers of 











8 

The Largest Assortment of Parlor, Chamber 

and Common Furniture, in 

Western Michigan, 

SOLD AT PRICES TO SUIT THE TIMES. 

Ware Rooms at 29 & 31 Canal Street, 

Grand S?apids> + Michigan* 

Call and Examine our Stock. 

EDGAR M. THOMAS, 

Manufacturer and Dealer in 

"WTIiIKIITS & IPXjTTIMIIB'S 

Improved Spring Bed Bottoms, 

8@~Family, Town, County and State Rights for Sale. 
KELLOGGSVILLE, MICH. 

S ■ MM m P JnL R JuL S f 
DEALER IN 

Watches, Clocks, Jewelry, 

No. 15 Monroe Street, GRAND RAPIDS, MICHIGAN. 

j«H*HlMl<«liMMll|«MM l «l|H|»Ui«lMU|HMk|«Ml|^H < » 

jg^Personal ^ttentipn tp Repairing, and Work Warranted. 



148 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



BARTLETT GEO. E., 36 Lowell, 

Lowell. 
Barto Barlow, 35 Grattan, Alton. 
Barton John, 23 Spencer, Spencer Mills 
Barton Elliott, 23 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Barton Silas, Jr., 22 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
BARTON GEO. W., 26 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Barton Silas, 23 Spencer, Spencer Mills. 
Bash George, 1 Bowne, Alto. 
Bassinger Winfield, 32 Yergennes, 

Lowell. 
Bassett Almon, 26 Grattan, Grant. 
Bassett Ezra, Village Cedar Springs. 
Bassett Frederick, Sr., 20 Gaines, 

Gainesville. 
Bass Wm. 8., 1 Sparta, Sparta Center. 
Bassett George, 6 Byron, Grandville. 
Bassett Mrs. Phebe, 20 Gaines, Gaines- 
ville. 
BATCHELTER JOHN T., 12 Solon, 

Cedar Springs. 
Bates Alfred G., 29 Bowne, Harris 

Creek. 
Bates B. F., 17 Grand Rapids. 
BATES EDWARD, 15 Grand Rapids. 
Bates George, 21 Oakfiekl, Oakiield. 

BUILDERS' HARDWARE 8l TOOLS AT W. D. FOSTER'S, U and 10 Monroe-st. 



Beach Richard W., 19 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

Beach Mrs. Rosanna, 1 Ada, Ada. 

Beach Samuel, 16 Ada, Ada. 

BEACH VALENTINE, 32 Cannon, 
Cannonsburg. 

BEACH WM. A., 12 Bowne, Bowne. . 

Beach Wm. H., 1 Ada, Ada. 

Beach Warren, 22 Ada, Ada. 

BEAK GEORGE, 29 Grand Rapids. 

Beals Abram E., 13 Courtland, Oak- 
field. 

Beals Edward, 13 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapid 8. 

Beals Mrs. S. R.. 15 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

Beals William S., 16 Spencer, Spencer 
Mills. 

BEAMER JOHN II., Alaska. 

BEAR TIMOTHY C, 2 Caledonia, 
Alaska. 

Beard Linsan, 5 Cascade, Cascade. 

Beard Linsan, Jr., 5 Cascade, Cascade. 

Beard Nelson, 5 Cascade, Cascade. 

BEARDSLEY WILLIAM L., Village 
Cannonsburg. 

Beardslee Abram, 25 Oakiield, Green- 
ville. 



Bates Nathan, 15 Grand Rapids. 

Bates P. E. F., 17 Grand Rapids. 

Bates Beth C, 24 Grattan, Grant. 

Bates George R., 8 Gaines, Gainesville. 

Bateman Caleb L., 24 Caledonia, Alaska 

Bauchamp Anthony, 13 Algoma, Edger- 
ton. 

BAUCHAMP JOSEPH, 13 Algoma, 
Edgerton. 

Bauchamp William, 13 Algoma, Edger- 
ton. 

Bawn Truman, 10 Grand Rapids. 

Baxter Bernard, 22 Cascade, Cascade. 

•Baxter Eber H., 22 Cascade, Cascade. 

Baxter Milo, 22 Cascade, Cascade. 

Baxter Ormon, 22 Cascade, Cascade. 

Baylis Thomas M., 14 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

Bayle Henry, 31 Lowell, Alaska. 

Beaber Joseph, 31 Byron, New Salem. 

Beach Admiral, 1 Ada, Ada. 

Beach Benjamin, 22 Ada, Ada. 

Beach Mrs. Laura, 31 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Beach Mary H., 32 Cannon, Cannons 
burg. 

Beach Orrin, 22 Ada, Ada. 

FORT'S ENEMY OF PAIN CURES COLDS AND SORE THROAT. 



Beardslee John C, 34 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

Beatty Hamilton, 26 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Beatty William, 26 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

BECHTEL BENJAMIN H., 28 Paris, 
Grand Rapids. 

Bechtel Ephraim, 32 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia Station. 

Beckwith Charles W., 23 Vergennes, 
Fallassburg. 

Beckwith Elijah, Rockford. 

Beckwith Edgar L., 15 Vergennes, 
Lowell. 

Beckwith Geo. II. , 15 Vergennes, Low- 
ell. 

Beckwith Lysander, 22 Grand Rapids. 

Beckwith Peter, 21 Grand Rapids. 

BECKWITH WM. G., 16 Grand Rapids, 
Grand Rapids. 

Becker Daniel, 13 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Becker Garrett, 8 Courtland, Courtland 
Center. 

Becker Jacob N., 16 Oakiield, Oakfield. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 149 

GRAND RAPIDS IRON WORKS^ 

Butterworth & Lowe, Prop'rs, 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



LAND AND MARINE STEAM ENGINES, 

Ptauur-IKiNill a@d) §aw-l!ffi?!lll (5tay@@py, 
Also, Circular Log Mills and Siding Mills, 

WITH ALL THE LATEST IMPROVEMENTS. 

Building Castings, and Furnace Work of every kind, Bridge Bolts and 

Blacksmith Work of all descriptions, Agricultural Implements 

and Machine Work in general. 

Office and Works on Huron Street, off Canal Street, 
G-x?£txx<3. H.«t;iD±c3Us, - - - IVElolxlSAXX. 



Manufacturer and Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 



• 



SHINGLES, SASH, 

DOORS, BLINDS, PAILS AND TUBS. 

DEALER IN REAL ESTATE, 

Both in and out of the City, 
G-xtaxxcSL rtevpicijs, IMClolxJLs^xx. 



150 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY 0* KENT COUNTY. 



Becker Philip, 36 Courtland, Courtland 
Center. 

BECKJER THEODORE W., 27 Court- 
land, Courtland Cen. 

Beckley Everett A., 8 Cascade, Cascade. 

BEEBE GUIRDEN F., South 6 Walker, 
Grand Rapids. 

Beebe Rans, 34 Ada, Ada. 

Beech Frank, 14 Grand Rapids. 

Beede Franklin, 31 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Beehler George, Lowell. 

Beer John, 13 Walker Grand Rapids. 

BEERS JOHN IL, 35 Vergennes, Low- 
ell. 

Beeton John, 22 Vergennes, Lowell. 

Begrow Charles, 31 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia Station. 

Begrow Henry, 29 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia Station. 

Behler John, 34 Lowell. Alto. 

BEHLER LEONARD, 34 Lowell, Alto. 

BELKNAP ANSEL, 32 Vergennes, 
Lowell. 

BELKNAP CHARLES, 6 Byron, Grand- 
ville. 

BELKNAP CHARLES E., 24 Sparta, 
Sparta Center. 



Bence Geo., Cedar gprings. 

Benewa Luey, 11 Gaines, Hammond. 

BENE W A JACOB, 11 Gaines, Ham- 
mond. 

Benedict Edgar R., Cedar Springs. 

Benedict E. R., Cedar Springs. 

Benedick Eli S., Lowell. 

Benedict J. 0.. Cedar Springs. 

Benedict Julius 0., Village Cedar 
Springs. 

Benedict Luther, Rockford. 

Benham Frederick, 9 Courtland, Court- 
land, Center. 

BENHAM FERNANDO, 8 Courtland, 
Courtland Center. 

BENHAM FRANCIS, 8 Courtland, 
Courtland Center. 

Benham John, 7 Bowne, Alto. 

Benham Mrs. Lorain, 9 Courtland, 
Courtland Center. 

Bennett George B., Low r ell. 

Bennett Geo., 24 Courtland, Courtland 
Center. 

Bennett Harmon, 14 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Bennett Harmon, 13 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Bennett Horace T., 19 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 



BUY FURNISHING GOODS OF ROUSE & DOOLITTLE. 



Belknap James A., 24 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

Belknap Joshua, 6 Byron, Grandville. 

Bellows Ezra, 7 Cannon, Rockford. 

Bellows Edmund C, 15 Cannon, Can- 
nonsburg. 

Bellows John D., 34 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

BELLOWS LYMAN 0., Alaska. 

Bellows Simeon, 34, Courtland, Rock- 
lord. 

Bell C. C, 5 Grand Rapids, Grand 
Rapids. 

Bell E. B. 5 Grand Rapids. 

BELL C. E., 5 Grand Rapids, Grand 
Rapids. 

Bell John, Sparta Center. 

Bell Robert H., 11 Lowell, Lowell. 

Bellamy William, 17 Cascade, Cascade. 

Bement H. H., Rockford. 

Bemis Charles E., Rockford. 

Bemis Charles, 2 Plainfield, Rockford. 

Bemis Henry, 2 Plainfield, Rockford. 

Benaway Chas. H., 14 Caledonia, 
Alaska. 

Benaway Minard P., 14 Caledonia, 
Alaska. 



Bennett John, 14 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

BENNETT JOHNS., 21 Alpine, Grand 
Rapids. 

Bennett Jonathan, Cedar Springs. 

Benjamin Lewis, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 

Benjamin William C, 24 Nelson, Nel- 
son. 

Benjamin Stephen H., 24 Ada, Ada. 

Bennett Albert C, 21 Alpine, Grand 
Rapids. 

Bennett Amelius A., 4 Lowell, Lowell. 

Bennett Adelbert, Rockford. 

Bennett Benjamin, Burch's Mills. 

Bennet Charles, 22 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

BENNETT CLARK L., 4 Lowell, Low- 
ell. 

Bennett E. B., Lowell. 

Bennett Edward L., 22 Vergennes, 
Lowell. 

Bennett Frances E. W., 4 Lowell, 
Lowell. 

Bennett Morris 36 Alpine, Grand Rap- 
ids. 

BENNETT PERRY 14 Courtland, 
Courtland Centre. 



FORT'S ENEMY OF PAIN CURES TOOTHACHE & NEURALGIA. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY Of KENT COtJNTY. 151 



EeitaTollJSlxoca. in 1844. 



H. Leonard & Son, 



-AT- 











No. 13 Monroe Street, 

WHOLE8ALE A.NO RETAIL DEALERS IPT 

Crockery, 

China, 

Glassware, 
Lamps, 

Table Cutlery, 
Silver Plated Ware, &c, 

And all Articles usually kept in a First-Class Crockery Store. 

From a long experience in the business, we are enabled to offer customers 
the y 

VERY BEST GOODS 

AT THE 

LOWEST POSSIBLE PRICES! 



Remember tlxe Place, 

CHINA HALL 

13 Monroe Street. 



152 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Bennett Mrs Sarah, 14 Courtland Court- 
land Center. 

Bennett Lyman 14 Courtland Courtland 
Center. 

Bennett Wm. II. Village, Cedar Springs 

BENNETT WILLIAM 34 Ada Ada. 

Bennett William H. Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 

BENTON JAMES, 21 Alpine, Indian 
Creek. 

BENSON PETER, 34 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

Bentley^Alvin, 20 Grand Rapids. 

Bentley Abisha, 24 Yergennes, Fallass- 
burgl 

Bepka Joseph, 20 Plainfield, Auster- 
litz. 

BERGY EMANUEL, 35 Bowne, Fill- 
more, Barry County. 

Bergy Isaac, 30 Caledonia, Caledonia. 

Bergy Peter, 30 Caledonia, Caledonia. 

Bergin J. S., Lowell. 

BERGER HENRY R., South 5 Walker, 
Grand Rapids. 

Berger W., 34 Walker, Grand Rapids. 

BERKEY PETER, 25 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Berry Arthur, 33 Lowell, Alto. 

Berry Caroline, 10 Oakfield, Oakfield. 

ANVILS, VICES, BELLOWS & BLACKSMITH TOOLS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S 



Bickford Alonzo T., 33 Oakfield, Grat- 

tan Center. 
BickhtJrt Jacob, Cedar Springs. 
BICKNELL CHESTER C, 36 Solon, 

Cedar Springs. 
Biddinger George, 34 Cascade, Alaska. 
BIDDLEMAN HIRAM, 27 Sparta, 

Sparta Center. 
Biddleman Simeon P. F., 27 Sparta, 

Sparta Center. 
Bietwork William, 1 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
Bigford Thomas, 18 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
Bigler William, 12 Oakfield, Greenville. 
Biggers John, 12 Lowell, Lowell. 
Billings Calvin, 8 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Billings Ezra, 13 Plainfield, Austerlitz. 
Billings George, Cedar Springs. 
Billings Mrs. Mary Ann, 18 Sparta, 

Lisbon. 
Bills C. S., Lowell. 
Bingaman Benj. F., Alaska. 
Birch Alfred, 11 Vergennes, Lowell. 
Birch Edwin, 11 Vergennes, Lowell. 
Bird Edward, 9 Courtland, Courtland 

Center. 
Bird John, 3 Grand Rapid?. 



Berry Edward, 33 Tyone, Sparta Cen. 
Berry Henry, 13 Wyoming, G. Rapids. 
Berry John, 9 Cannon, Cannonsburg. 
Berry John, 1 Walker, Grand Rapids. 
Berry Justus, 1 Cannon, Bostwick Lake. 
Berry Lester, 18 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 
Berry Matthew, 13 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
Berry Peleg, 40 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
BERRY SIDNEY, 29 Grand Rapids, 

Grand Rapids. 
Besard David, 33 Wyoming, North 

Byron. 
BESSEY L. F., 9 Nelson, Sand Lake. 
BEST JONATHAN, 16 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Betterly Albert, 5 Alpine, Lisbon. 
Betterly Adelbert, 5 Alpine, Lisbon. 
BETTERLY LEWIS, 5 Alpine, Lisbon. 
Bettes Henry, 31 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Bettes James, 31 Alpine, Indian Creek. 
Bettes Joseph, 5 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Bettes William E., 5 Sparta, Lisbon. 
* Bettes Gilbert, 31 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Betzler Joseph, 32 Caledonia, Caledonia 

Station. 
Bevins David W., 7 Cascade, Cascade. 



Bird Joseph F., 18 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Bird Patrick, 3 Grand Rapids. 

Bird Peter, 17 Grand Rapids. 

BIRDSALL WM., 34 Alpine, Indian 
Creek. 

Bisby George, 26 Vergennes, Lowell. 

Bisbee John, Cedar Springs. 

Bishop Christian, 2 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

Bishop Edmund B., 13 Oakfield, Green- 
ville. 

Bishop Frederick, 2 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

Bishop Loouiis K., 24 Cannon, Can- 
nonsburg. 

BISHOP WM. F., 27 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

Bissell Arnold, 32 Spencer, Cedar 
Springs. 

Blackall Abraham H., 20 Sparta, Lis- 
bon. 

Blackall Benjamin, 29 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Blackall Charles, 20 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Black Andrew, 34 Courtland, Rockford. 

Black John, 29 Algoma, Rockford. 

BLACK JAMES, Cedar Springs. 



TRY FORT'S REMEDIES. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 158 



11 Monroe Street, 11. 

PERRY BROS, 

Exclusive Dealers in 

Hats, Caps, Furs, Hotes and Gloves, 



ALWAYS KEEP A FULL STOCK OF 



Seasonable Goods 

-A.T THE 

LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



msiMrisittnER, the place, 

No. 11 Monroe Street, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

CITY NATIONAL BANK 

No. 1 Monroe Street. 



DESIGNATED U. S. DEPOSITORY. 



Capital paid in, - - - ' - $260,000.00. 

Surplus and Profits, - - $95,000.00. 



DIRECTORS : 



THOS. D. GILBERT, MOSES V. ALDRICH, JAMES M. NELSON, 

WM. B. LEDYARD, HENRY FRAUCK, GEORGE KENDALL, 

RANSOM E. WOOD, RANSOM C. LUCE, NOYES L. AVERY. 

OPTIOERS: 

TnOS. D. GILBERT, Pres. WM. B. LEDYARD, Vice Pres. J. FREDERIC BAARS, Cashier. 



Collections made and Promptly Remitted for at Current Hates of Exchange. Draft* 

on all the principal Cities of Europe sold at Lowest Bates. 

Gold, ©liver and Canada Currenoy Bonijlxt and ©old.. 

20 



154 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Black John, 7 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Black William J., Rockford. 

Black William, Cedar Springs. 

Blackley Aaron, 18 Courtland, Edger- 
ton. , 

Blackstone Cassius, 29 Vergennes, 
Lowell.* 

Blackmer Richmond, Cedar Springs. 

Blackman Lorenzo D., 17 Sparta, Lis- 
bon. 

Black shiel Richard, 23 Byron, Byron 
Center. 

BLAIN CHARLES H., 5 Gaines, Grand 
Rapids. 

BLABST GEO. W., 17 Gaines, Grand 
Rapids. 

Blaine George, 20 Byron, Byron Center. 

Blain Joseph, 5 Gaines, Grand Rapids. 

Blain John, Lowell. 

Blair John D., 36 Ada, Lowell. 

Blain Joseph R., 5 Gaines, G. Rapids. 

Blair Nathan, 17 Lowell, Lowell. 

BLAIN NORMAN B., Lowell. 

BLAIN OSCAR W., 18 Gaines, Gaines- 
ville. 

Blain Thomas, 18 Gaines, Gainesville. 

BLAIN WILMOT H., 29 Gaines,Gaines- 
ville. 



BLANCHARD WALTER D., 4 Court- 
land, Courtland Center. 
Blanchard Edwin W., 12 Oakfield, 

Greenville. 
Blanchard Charles N., 21 Oakfield, Oak- 

^field. 
Blanding Charles, Lowell. 
Blanding Alex. H., 32 Vergennes, 

Lowell. 
Blanding Daniel S., 29 Vergennes, 

Lowell. 
BLANDING NOAH P., 32 Vergennes, 

Lowell. 
Blass Charles, Lowell. 
Blauvelt John W., 19 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Bliss Adelbert F., Rockford. 
Bliss Albert, 5 Lowell, Lowell. 
Bliss Curtis, 21 Bowne, Bowne. 
Bliss Edward, 6 Cannon, Rockford. 
Bliss Wm. J., Rockford. 
Blobet John, 29 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Blodget Alvin, 33 Algoma, Rockford. 
BLODGETT CHAUNCEY, 33 Paris, 

Grand Rapids. 
Blodgett Heman, Alaska. 
Blodgett M. R., Lowell. 
BLOMSTROM CHARLES E., Lisbon. 
Blomstrom C, Lisboa. 
Blood Abel, 33 Alpine, Indian Creek. 



BAR, ROD AND SHEET IRON, AT W. D. FOSTER'S, U and 16 Monroe Street 



Blair Edwin M., 23 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

BLAIR JONATHAN, South 6 Walker, 
Grand Rapids. 

Blaisdell Wm. R., Lowell. 

Blake Joseph, 35 Algoma, Rockford. 

BLAKE JOSEPH, Grandville. 

BLAKE SAMUEL P., 15 Gaines, Ham- 
mond. 

Blakeny Dwight, 26 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Blakeny Edward, 26 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Blakeslee Alex., 29 Lowell, Lowell. 

Blakeslee Enos L., 14 Lowell, Lowell. 

Blakeslee Daniel C., 28 Lowell, Lowell. 

Blakeley Buel, 19 Algoma, Sparta Cen. 

Blakeley Charles E., Rockford. 

Blakely Egbert, 12 Alpine, English- 
ville. 

Blakeley Moses, 30 Algoma, Sparta 
Center. 

BLAKELEY R. L., Rockford. 

BLANCHARD IRA, 19 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Blanchard Orrin D., Lisbon. 

Blanchard Riley, 17 Alpine, Pleasant. 



Blood Hiram W., 36 Sparta, English - 
ville. 

BLOOD ISAAC D., 22 Ada, Ada. 

BLOOD J. M., 4 Walker, Indian Creek. 

Blood Mrs. Mary, 4 Walker, Indian 
Creek. 

Blood Putnam, 33 Alpine, Indian Creek. 

Blood Zachariah, 36 Sparta, English- 
ville, 

BLOSS CHARLES A., Sparta Center. 

Bloss David, 32 Pans, Grand Rapids. 

Bloss Henry, 20 Gaines, Gainesville. 

Bloss Volney, 15 Sparta, Sparta Center. 

Blouerh Jacob, 24 Bowne, Lowell. 

Blount Walter, Rockford. 

Blush Christian, 20 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

BLUSH RODOLPHUS, 20 Tyrone, 
Casnovia. 

Boardman Arthur F., 2 Grattan, Ash- 
ley. 

Boardman William, 2 Plainfield, Rock- 
tord. 

Bodell Benjamin, 20 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Bodell Henry, 20 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Bodell Jacob, Lowell. 

Bodell Michael, 20 Tyrone, Casnovia. 



THIS LINE IS TO ADVERTISE FORT'S LINIMENT AND PILLS. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 155 

S. 0. KINGSBURY'S 
FIRE and INLAND 

Insurance Agency, 

B0R %S1^ s Smts, Grand Rapids, Michigan, 

(OPPOSITE SWEET'S HOTEL,) 
Represents the following OldL and. HeliaTble Companies: 

CAPITAL. ASSETS. 

^Etna Insurance Co., Hartford, Conn $3,000,000 00 $5,744,372 66 

Lorillard Insurance Co. of New York, 1,000,000 00 1,680,590 46 

International Insurance Co. of New York, 500,000. 00 1,353,398 17 

(GOLD.) 

Pacific Insurance Co. of San Francisco, Cal., 1,000,000 00 1,696,854 80 

Occidental Insurance Co. of San Francisco, Cal.,. . 300,000 00 444,311 47 

Detroit and Fire Marine Insurance Co., Det., Mich. 150,000 00 236,873 06 

Policies Issued without delay in either of the above sterling old Companies, 
at Bates as Moderate as other responsible Companies offer. 

Special attention will be given to Insuring Dwellings, Barns and 
Contents, for a period of One, Three or Five Years, and 

NO ASSESSMENTS MADE. 

m m — 

S. O. KINGSBURY, 

General Land and Tax Agent, 

GRAND RAPIDS, KENT COUNTY, MICH., 

Established in 1850, 

Will attend to the Purchase, Sale and Exchange of Real Estate. 
Particular attention will be given to the Payment of Taxes, 
Purchasing Lands sold at Tax Sales, Examining Titles, Reclaiming 
Lands Sold at Tax Sales, and will take a general supervision of all 
Lands entrusted to his charge. 



156 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Boden Anthony, 23 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
Boden Joseph L., 23 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
Bogardus Henry IL, 36 Wyoming, 

Grand Rapids. 
Bogardus Jacob, 19 Wyoming, Grand- 

ville. 
Bohlen John, 23 Alpine, Alpine. 
Bohn John A., 27 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Bohlen Michael, 23 Alpine, Alpine. 
Boice Albert, 14 Solon, Cedar Springs. 
BOICE LUTHENIUS S., 27 Caledonia, 

Caledonia. 
Bolan James. 27 Grand Rapids. 
Bole George W., Village Cedar Springs. 
Bolgar John, 3 Grand Rapids. 
Bolhuis Lanowert, 25 Byron, Cody's 

Mills. 
Bolt Adolphus E., 20 Cascade, Alaska. 
BOLT LOUIS J., Sparta Center. 
BOLTER LEWIS, 24 Lowell, Lowell. 
Bolzar Dennis, 17 Plainfield, Austerlitz. 
Bomas Peter, 29 Grand Rapids, Grand 

Rapids. 
Bond B. F., 34 Sparta, Engiishville. 
Bonser John, 20 Lowell, Lowell. 
Bonma Oats, 17 Wyoming, Grandvillu. 



BOUCK ALEXANDER L., 5 Gaines, 

Hammond. 
Bouck Oscar, 5 Gaines, Hammond. 
Bouck Theodore, 5 Gaines, Hammond. 
Bouck William, 25 Bowne, Fillmore, 

Barry county. 
Bouchard Edward, 14 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
Boughton Israel, 17 Wyoming, Grand- 

ville. 
Boughton Ira, 1 Alpine, Engiishville. 
Bovie Peter D., Burch's Mills. 
Bowen Amos, 25 Lowell, Lowell. 
Bowen Elijah, 25 Lowell, Lowell. 
Bowen Orange, 20 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Bowen Jehiel, 26 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
BOWEN MERRICK, 29 Gaines, Cody's 

Mills. 
BOWEN PHILANZO, 28 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
Bowers Benjamin, 8 Algoma, Rockford. 
Bowers Henry, 8 Algoma, Rockford. 
Bowler James, 4 Algoma, Rockford. 
Bowler Richard, 19 Grattan, Cannons- 
burg. 
Bowman Aaron C, 28 Gaines, Grand 

Rapids. 



BUY TRUNKS AND VALISES OF ROUSE & DOOLITTLE. 



Bonter James, 31 Alpine. Indian Creek. 

Boo key James, Village Cannonsburg. 

Boomer Moses, 23 Vergennes, Fal lass- 
burg. 

Boorom A. J., 6 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Boorom A. W., 6 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Boorom Darius, 18 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Boorom Lewis, 17 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Booth Andrew, 22 Yergennes, Lowell. 

Booth Andrew, 34 Vergennes, Lowell. 

Booth Edwin, 34 Ada, Ada. 

Booth E. J., Lowell. 

Booth Henry W , 1 Lowell, Lowell. 

Boquette Wm. IL, Village Cedar 
Springs. 

Boss Charley, 25 Gaines, Caledonia 
Station. 

Boshoven Peter, 29 Grand Rapids. 

BOSWORTH H. J., Lowell. 

Botsford David, 13 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Botruff Adam, 16 Algoma, Rockford. 

Botruff Isaac J., 16 Algoma, Rockford. 

Botruff Samuel S., — Tyrone, Sparta 
Center. 

Botruff William, 16 Algoma, Rockford. 



Bowman Absalom, 15 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

BOWMAN BENJ. B., 32 Gaines, Cody's 
Mills. 

Bowman Charles, 32 Grand Rapids. 

Bowman Elias, 28 Gaines, Grand 
Rapids. 

BOWMAN ELIAS C, 27 Gaines, Cale- 
donia Station. 

Bowman Gabriel W., 25 Courtland, 
Oakfield. 

Bowman Jacob W., 30 Oakfield, Oak- 
field. 

Bowman Jacob, 27 Caledonia, Caledo- 
nia Station. 

BOWMAN JOSEPH C, 35 Gaines, 
Grand Rapids. 

Bowman Levi, 34 Caledonia, Caledonia 
Station. 

Bowman Nelson B., 30 Oakfield, Oak- 
field. 

Bowman Owen C, 27 Gaines, Grand 
Rapids. 

BOWMAN SOLOMON, 4 Caledonia, 
Alaska 

BOWMAN WENDELL C, 35 Gaines, 
Grand Rapids. 



WE RECOMMEND FORT'S MEDICINES TO ALL. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 157 

DRY GOODS! DRY GOODS! 
W. L. WILKINS & CO., 

(SUCCESSORS TO R. C. LUCE,) 

34 Monroe St., G-x*£tiaci XlApids. 

DEALERS IN 

STAPLE AND FANCY DRY GOODS. 

We shall always keep a Full and Complete Stock of Goods, and at Prices 

that will not fail to suit. 

W. L. WILKINS & CO. 

Agents for Stone Sewer Pipe and Fire Brick 

Parties contemplating Building Sewers or Drains, are invited to 
examine 

One of the Best Sewer Pipes that is made. 
54 Monroe Street. W. L. WILKINS & CO. 

GRAND RAPIDS 

Agricultural Implement Agency. 

W. C. DEN1SOn7 Agent, 

FOR THE SALE OF 

Reapers, Mowers, Threshing 1 Machines, 

WOOD SAW MACHINES, CLOVER HULLERS, 

GRAIN BRILLS, SULKY HAY RAKES, 

CULTIVATORS, PLOWS, (either Cast, Combination 
or Steel,) 

Cider Mills, Mower Knife Grinders, and all kinds of 
Agricultural Machinery of the most Approved Patterns. 

JMACIIIIVJE EXTHAS CONSTANTLY OIV 1IA.NI>. 

Office and Sample Room in Gilbert's Block, 

No. 104 Monroe Street, GRAND RAPIDS, MICHIGAN. 

Consignment of Saleable Articles solicited. 



158 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Boyce Wm., Lowell. 

BOYD GEORGE, 17 Alpine, Pleasant. 

Boyd James, 17 Alpine, Pleasant. 

Boyd Samuel G., 19 Courtland, Rock- 
iord. 

BOYER DAVID, 21 Plainfield, Bel- 
mont. 

Boy'er George, 14 Bowne, Lowell. 

Boyer John, 28 Algoma, Rockford 

BOYER JOHN W., 4 Plainfield, Bel- 
mont. 

Boy Ion Cornelius, 6 Yergennes, Can- 
nonsburg. 

BOYLON CORNELIUS, 21 Grattan, 
G rattan Center. 

Boylan Larry, 31 Wyoming, Grandville. 

BOYLON THOMAS, 7 Ada, Grand 
Rapids. 

BOYNTON JEREMIAH W., Alaska, 
Village. 

BOYNTON JERRY, 9 Byron, North 
Byron. 

BOYTON LEVI 8., 29 Grand Rapids. 

BOYNTON PHILIP W„ 10 Caledonia, 

BOYNTON WILLIAM, 5 Byron, North 

Byron. 
BOYNTON WILLIAM, 34 Cascade, 

Alaska. 



BRADFORD MOSES, 29 Grand Rap- 
ids, Grand Rapids. 
BRADFORD MOSES, 11 Sparta, 

Sparta Center. 
Bradford Perry, 11 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 
Bradford Robert N., Lowell. 
Bradfield Edward, 34 Ada, Ada. 
Bradfield Henry H., 34 Ada, Ada. 
BRADFIELD JOHN R., 34 Ada, Ada. 
Rradfield Sidney C, Lowell. 
Bradfield Washington, 13 Algoma, Ed- 

gerton. 
Bradish Joshua, 10 Grand Rapids. 
Bradish Benjamin, Lisbon. 
Bradley Hyacinth M., 11 Courtland, 

Courtland Center. 
Bradley Lansel, 7 Algoma, Sparta Cen. 
BRADIN JOHN, 15 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
Brady Charles, 21 Lowell, Lowell. 
Brady Hugh, 21 Lowell, Lowell. 
Bradshaw Edward, 23 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Bradshaw Jared, 28 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Braford Mrs., 33 Ada, Ada. 
Braford Joseph J., 19 Cannon, Auster- 

litz. 
Braford Jesse, 30 Cannon, Austerlitz. 



LEATHER AND RUBBER BELTING, AT W. D. FOSTER'S, 14 & 16 Monroe Street 



Braam Adrian, 29 Grand Rapids. 

Brabb George, Rockford. 

Brabb George, Rockford. 

BRACE AVERY, 3 Walker, Indian 
Creek. 

Brace Hiram L., Cedar Springs. 

Brace Emmett, 3 Walker, Indian Creek. 

Brace George W., 3 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

BRACKETT ALBERT, Sparta Center. 

Brackone John, 11 Pans Grand Rapids 

Bradbury William, Lisbon. 

Bradford Abner S., 30 Cannon, Auster- 
litz. 

BRADFORD CHARLES H., 21 Walker, 
Grand Rapids. 

Bradford Durfee T., 21 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Bradford Mrs. Eunice, 16 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

Bradford Ephraim A., 10 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

Bradford Edmund, 31 Cannon, Auster- 
litz. 

BRADFORD EDWARD, Sparta Cen. 

BRADFORD JASON S., Sparta Cen. 



Bragg Alexander, 13 Gaines, Ham- 
mond. 

BRAGG ELMER M., 13 Gaines, Ham- 
mond. 

BRAGG GEO. N., 13 Gaines, Ham- 
mond. 

Brainard Alfred, 18 Gaines, Gainesville. 

Brainard Dudley, 33 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

Brainard Hugh, 33 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

Brakey Thomas, 17 Lowell, Lowell. 

Braman II. O., 20 Lowell, Lowell. 

Branagan John, 18 Vergennes, Ver- 
gennes.' 

Brandon Adam, Alaska Village. 

Brandt Adelbert. 28 Alpine, G. Rapids. 

Brannan Isaac, 32 Lowell, Alto. 

Brannan John, 32 Lowell, Alto. 

BRANNAN JAMES, 32 Lowell. Alto. 

BRANT JOHN, 31 Plainfield, Mill 
Creek. 

Brantner George, 2 Plainfield, Rock- 
ford. 

Brantner John, Rockford. 

Brasted Silas, 6 Lowell, Lowell. 

Brasted Silas, Jr., 6 Lowell, Lowell. 



FORT'S WESTERN LINIMENT CURES HEADACHE. 



ElSTORY AND DIRECTORY 0* KENT COUNTY. 159 



ARTHUR WOOD 




MANUFACTURER OF 

BUGGIES, SLEIGHS, 

And LIGHT WAGONS. 

My work was awarded the FIRST AND SECOND 
PREMIUMS at the Kent County Fair, in 1808, the 
FIRST in 1869 and 1870. Also the FIRST at the 
y STATE FAIR, in 1870. fcS^All work warranted, 

BRICK SHOP, 



33 Waterloo Street, Grand Rapids, Mich, 

EATON & LYON, 



(Successors to H. M. Hinsdill,) 



BOOKSELLERS & ST1TMEBS 



And Dealers in 



Grand Rapids Plaster Co., 

MANUFACTURERS AJ*T> DEALERS IN 

LA1TD and CALCINED PLASTEE, 

WM. HOVEY, Supt & General Agent, 
Office 11 Canal Street,' 

Cr»»d Kap ids, + Wioiigan, 



160 



HISTOEY AND DIRECTOKY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Brownell George, 11 Plainfield, Auster- 

litz. 
Bray Benj. C, 12 Gaines, Hammond. 
BRAYMAN JAMES H., 7 Nelson, 

Cedar Springs. 
Brearley Amos, 35 Gaines, Cody's Mills. 
BREARLEY EMORY, 35 Gaines, Cale- 
donia Station. 
BREAK ABRAHAM B., 20 Caledonia, 

Caledonia Station. 
Brechting William, 23 Alpine, Grand 

Rapids. 
Br^ese John, Village Cedar Springs. 
Bremer Francis, 15 Walker, G. Rapids. 
Bremer Henry, Rockford. 
BRENNER ANDREW, Burch's Mills. 
Brenner Isaac, Burch's Mills, 
►renenstuhl < 

tan Center. 
Bresee Jared N., 34 Ada, Ada. / 
Bresnahan Ellen, 18 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
Bresnahan John, 18 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
Bresnahan Patrick, 20 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
BREWER AARON, 9 Gaines, Grand 

Rapids. 
Brewer Alonzo, 9 Alpine, Grand Rapids 



BRIGGS ROBERT, 6 Grand Rapids, 

Grand Rapids. 
Briggs Richard, 18 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Briggs Spencer B., 23 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Briggs S. M., 25 Algoma, Rockford. 
Briggs Simeon L., 23 Byron, Byron 

Center. 
Briggs Volney, 13 Algoma, Edgerton. 
Brigham Fitch M., 10 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Brigham George, 32 Oak field, Grattnn 

Center. 
Brigham John, 32 Oakfield, Oakfield. 
Brigham Timothy, 10 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Brink John, 25 Grand Rapids. 
BRINK LOREN, Village Cannonsbnrg. 
Brinkman Herbert, 35 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Bristol Bethel, 34 Ada, Ada. 
Britton Dewitt C, Grandville. 
Broad Charles, Lowell. 
Broad William, Lowell. 
Broadbent Thomas, 7 Bowne, Alaska. 
BROCK JAMES, 31 Caledonia, Alaska. 
Bromman Charles, 5 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Bromman Franklin, 5 Sparta, Lisbon. 



ROUSE 8l DOOLITTLE, 22 MONROE STREET. 



Brewer Francis, 9 Alpine, G. Rapids. 

BREWER FREEMAN, 9 Gaines, G. 
Rapids. 

Brewer Nelson, 16 Gaines, G. Rapids. 

Bresee Charles W., 22 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Bride Francis W., 17 Plainfield, Auster- 
litz. 

Brigham Albert, 35 Algoma, Rockford. 

Briggs B. B., 13 Algoma, Edgerton. 

Briggs Barnett W., 36 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 

Briggs Barber, 7 Grand Rapids. 

Briggs Charles, 13 Algoma, Edgerton. 

Briggs Charles, 13 Solon, Cedar Springs 

Briggs E. L., 7 Grand Rapids. 

Briggs Mrs. E. A., Cedar Springs. 

BRIGGS GEO. A., 14 Algoma, Edger- 
ton. 

BRIGGS HORACE J., 3 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

Briggs Hiram, 25 Algoma, Rockford. 

Briggs Isaac, 18 Nelson, Cedar Springs. 

Britton Josiah, 21 Algoma, Rockford. 

Briggs Joshua, 25 Algoma, Rockford. 

Briggs Jason, 18 Nelson, Cedar Springs 

Briggs Richard, Rockford. 



Bromman John, 5 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Bromman Jones, 5 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Bromman Peter, 5 Sparta, Lisbon. 

BRONSON FRANK, 35 Bowne, Fill- 
more, Barry County. 

Bronson H. S., 16 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Broomhall John, 3 Cascade, Ada. 

Brooks Elias, 30 Courtland, Rockford. 

Brooks Elisha, 33 Oakfield, Grattan 
Center. 

Brooks Hollis L., 4 Grattan, Grattan 

BROOKS JOSEPH A., Grandville. 

Brooks Joseph, Lisbon. 

BROOKS JOHN, Lisbon. 

Brooks James, 23 Plainfield, Austerlitz. 

Brooks Lucius, 4 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 

Brooks Willis, 11 Nelson, Nelson. 

Brooks Lemuel, 33 Oakfield, Grattan 
Center. 

Brot Washington, 33 Tyrone, Sparta 
Center. 

Broth well George E., 6 Cannon, Rock- 
ford. 

Brott Washington, 33 Tyrone, Sparta 
Center. 



FORT'S REMEDIES ARE SAFE AND RELIABLE. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 161 

Dr. E. WOODRUFF, 

Botanic Fhy sieian* 

OFFICE AT HIS 

Root, Bark and Herb Store, 

W ®m&L STRUT, @GtAN® RAP()@>$, MO,®.* 

Where, for 10 years, every Description of 

Acute, Chronic and Private Diseases has been 
Successfully Treated, 

STRICTLY ON BOTANIC PRINCIPLES. NO POISON USED. 
P. O. Drawer, 2391. Counsel at Office Free. 

I*. J. RINDGE <£ CO., 

MANUFACTURERS AND DEALERS IN 

Boots an4 Shoos, 

14 Canal Street, 

Grand Rapids, - - Michigan, 

SMITH, MOSELY & CO., 

IVtaxi.T^LJpEiot'ui.rer'js of tHo 

CELEBRATED 

And Jobbers In 

BOOTS, SHOES ANB RUBBERS, 

17 Canal Street, up stairs, 

tom. c. mosely, m. h. walker. unAINU nArlUo, IVllLni 

21 



162 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Broughan Dennis, 31 Cascade, Grand 
Rapids. N 

BROUGHAN JOHN, 31 Cascade, Grand 
Rapids. 

Broughan William, 31 Cascade, Grand 
Rapids. 

Brownell Philo, 3 Plainfield, Rockford. 

Brownell Wm. 21 Vergennes, Lowell. 

Brownell Charles, 10 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Brower Abraham C, 24 Gaines, Cale- 
donia Station. 

Brower Daniel C, 22 Gaines, Grand 
Rapids. 

BROWER HENRY C, 22 Gaines, Cale- 
donia Station. 

BROWER ISAAC C, 22 Gaines, Grand 
Rapids. 

BROWER JOHN C, 24 Gaines, Cale- 
donia Station. 

BROWER JOSEPH, 19 Caledonia, 
Caledonia Station. 

Brower Moses C, 25 Gaines, Caledonia 
Station. 

Brower Sylvester, Lowell. 

Brower Wm., 22 Gaines, Grand Rapids. 

Brown Azetus, 31 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

BROWN ALLEN, 23 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 



Brown Ezra, 9 Alpine, Grand Rapids. 

Brown Edward, 1 Byron, Gainesville. 

Brown F. Z., 29 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Brown George E., 15 Caledonia, Alaska. 

Brown Henry, 34 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Brown Hosea, 11 Alpine, Englishville. 

Brown Hiram, 33 Sparta, Englishville. 

Brown H. P., 22 Algoma, Edgerton. 

Br'own Hugh B., 30 Cascade, Cascade. 

Brown I. E., Rockford. 

BROWN JOHN R., 16 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Brown James, 36 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Brown John, 13 Algoma, Edgerton. 

Brown Jarvis. 18 Alpine, Pleasant. 

BROWN JAMES M., 4 Byron, North 
Byron. 

Brown John A., Sparta Center. 

BROWN JOHN, 34 Sparta, English- 
ville. 

Brown John, Sparta Center. 

BROWN JOSEPH, 19 Ada, Ada. 

Brown Joseph, 6 Gaines, Gainesville. 

Brown Kearney, 2 Alpine, Englishville. 

Brown Mrs. Lavinia, Lowell. 

Brown Lorenzo, 17 Alpine, G. Rapids. 

Brown Lorenzo D., Rockford. 

Brown Martin, 30 Gaines, Cody's Mills. 

BROWN 0. L., Rockford. 



BUY FURNISHING GOODS OF ROUSE & DOOLITTLE. 



Brown Albert E., Rockford. 

Brown Bester, 27 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Brown Byron, 1 Plainfield, Rockford. 

Brown Charles, 32 Gaines, Cody's Mills. 

Brown Charles, South 5 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Brown Charles II., 15 Cascade, Cascade. 

Brown Charles, 36 Sparta. 

Brown Christy, 31 Alpine, Indian Creek. 

BROWN CHARLES E., 9 Oakfield, 
Oakfield. 

Brown Charles, 32 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

Brown Charles H., 19 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia Station. 

Brown Charles, 31 Algoma, English- 
ville. 

Brown Clark, 33 Sparta, Englishville. 

Brown David T., 15 Oakfield, Oakfield. 

BROWN EPHRAIM E., 6 Plainfield, 
Englishville. 

BROWN EUGENE, 25 Byron, Cody's 
Mills. 

BROWN EDGAR, 1 Algoma, Burch's 
Mills. 

BROWN ELISHA T., 29 Alpine, In- 
dian Creek. 



BROWN OLIVER, 5 Oakfield, Oakfield. 

Brown 0. E., 13 Alpine, Alpine. 

Brown Peter C, Cedar Springs. 

Brown Perry, 33 Sparta, Englishville. 

Brown Fletcher, 29 Gaines, Cody's 
Mills. 

Brown Robert J., 5 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Brown Robert J., 26 Grand Rapids. 

Brown Roswell, Grandville. 

BROWN ROBERT, 20 Grand Rapids. 

Brown Stillman, 4 Alpine, Englishville. 

Brown Samuel, 1 Courtland, Oakfield. 

Brown T. P., Lowell. 

Brown Thomas, 18 Gaines, Gainesville. 

Brown William, 15 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Brown William, 31 Plainfield, Mill 
Creek. 

Brown William A. C, Lowell. 

Brown William, 29 Grand Rapids, 
Gr^nd Rapids. 

Brown William E., 1 Vergennes, Alton. 

BROWN WM. H., 1 Vergennes, Alton. 

Brown William, 13 Algoma, Edgerton. 

BROWN WILLIAM, 16 Cannon, Can- 
nonsburg. 



FORT'S STICKING SALVE IS ONLY 15 CENTS PER ROLL. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



163 



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164 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Brown William, 19 Oakfield, Oakfield. 

Brown William, 32 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

BROWN WM. H., Alaska. 

Brudi Charles, 4 Byron, North Byron. 

BRUDI JOHN C, 4 Byron, North 
Byron. 

Brudi Jacob, 35 Wyoming, North 
Byron. 

Brunell David, 13 Spencer, Spencer 
Mills. 

Bruner Anthony, Lowell. 

Bruton Mrs. Ann, 30 Bowne, Harris 
Creek. 

Bruton Michael, 24 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia. 

Bruton Patrick, 24 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia. 

Bruton Robert, 24 Caledonia, Caledonia. 

Bruner Richard, 12 Cannon, Bostwick 
Lake. 

Brunner Joseph M., 19 Lowell, Lowell. 

Brunner W., 29 Grand Rapids. 

Bryant Amos, 25 Vergennes, Lowell. 

Bryant Caspar W., 8 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Bryant Daniel, 33 Lowell, Lowell. 

Buchanan Augustus, 35 Vergennes, 
Lowell. 



Budway Daniel, 34 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Buel Alfred, 36 Grand Rapids. 
BUEL MARCUS, 11 Caledonia, Alaska. 
Buel Mrs. Susan, 36 Grand Rapids. 
Buell William, 31 Ada, Ada. 
Bull J. N.. 16 Grand Rapids. 
Bullard Edwin M., 8 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
BULLARD JOSEPH, 1 Alpine, Eng- 

lishville. 
Bullard Martin, 9 Bowne, Alto. 
Bullen Chauncey, 22 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Bullen Mrs. Hannah, 3 Walker, Indian 

BULLEN JOSEPH, 33 Alpine, Indian 

Creek. 
Bulliment Thomas, — Wyoming, Gran d- 

ville. 
Bullis Isaac, 33 Grand Rapids. 
Bullis James, 1 Walker, Mill Creek. 
BULLOCK JOHN, 24 Algoma, Edger- 

ton. 
BULLOCK JOSEPH, Cedar Springs. 
Bunce Aaron, 3 Lowell. Lowell. 
BUNKER EDWIN A., 16 Bowne, Alto. 
Burch Alfred, 11 Vergennes, Lowell. 
Burch Noah, 16 Lowell. Lowell, 



BEAUTIFUL JAPANNED WARE, AT W. D. FOSTER'S, 14 and 16 Monroe Street. 



BUCHANAN JAMES R., 25 Lowell, 

Lowell. 
BUCHANAN JAMES W., 29 Bowne, 

Harris Creek. 
Buchanan Samuel, 36 Sparta, English- 

ville. 
Buck Alonzo, Rockford. 
Buck Cary, 4 Alpine, Lisbon. 
BUCK CURTIS, Village Cedar Springs. 
BUCK ELIJAH, 12 Caledonia, Alaska. 
Buck Eli S., 34 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Buck Judson J., 4 Alpine, Lisbon. 
Buck Ira J., 12 Lowell, Lowell. 
Buck Myron, Village Cedar Springs. 
Buck Seeley S., 34 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Buck Seralpha A., 21 Gaines, Grand 

Rapids. 
Buck Seralpha C, 21 Gaines, Grand 

Rapids. 
BUCK THOMAS D., 23 Caledonia, 

Caledonia. 
Buckle William, 7 Oakfield, Oakfield. 
Buckley P. B., Rockford. 
Buddinger Mrs. Margaret, 19 Byron, 

Byron Center. 
BUDLONG WM. H., 18 Gaines, Gaines- 
ville. 



Burch Alpheus, 8 Lowell, Lowell. 

Burch David, 16 Solon, Cedar Springs. 

Burch D. W. C, Rockford. 

BURCH HOMER A., 19 Courtland, 
Courtland Center. 

Burch Jefferson, 5 Nelson, Sand Lake. 

Burch Mrs. Lucy, 20 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Burch L. R., 14 Tyrone, Sparta Cen. 

BURCH TRUMAN H., 16 Plainfield, 
Belmont. 

Burch Truman H., 16 Plainfield, Bel- 
mont. 

Burchard A. H., 33 Grand Rapids. 

Burdick Eli, Lowell. 

Burdick Marcus T., 19 Ada, Ada. 

Burdick Truman C, 18 Ada, Ada. 

Burd Joseph, 20 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Burdison Andrew, 12 Oakfield, Green- 
ville. 

Burgess Cyrus N., 35 Cannon, Can- 
nonsburg. 

Burgess E. J., Rockford. 

Burgess John M., Village Cannonsburg. 

Burger Stephen S., 34 Ada, Ada. 

Burget Isaac, 8 Algoma, Sparta Center. 

Burgi Joseph, 35 Byron, Cody's Mills. 



IF I HAD THE RHEUMATISM I WOULD USE FORT'S LINIMENT, 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 165 

Dikeman's Watch Depot, 

Established in 1837, 

Wlio, by honest and liberal dealing for thirty-three years, has built up a 
large business, and, having succeeded him in business, it will be my chief aim 
to retain his good name and business. I have constantly on hand all the 



OF 

LADIES' AND GENT'S 

GOLD WATCHES, 



All Grades of the 



A Large Stock of the 



FINEST JEWELRY, RINGS AND CHAINS, 

All Patterns and Styles of the Seth Thomas Clocks, 
FINE BRONZE CLOCKS, STERLING FINE SILVER WARE 

And a Large Stock of Silver Plated Ware. 

§©{© &gmt fop tfe© W & Q> P>1$$ITT WATtHHIS, 

A.lso for tlxe 

CELEBRATED DIAMOND SPECTACLES. 

All of my stock I shall endeavor to Sell as Cheap as any First-Class Goods can 
be sold. 



ED. B. DIKEMAN. 

NOTICE— Remember, after the 1st of May, 1871, I shall remove to No. 38 
Canal Street, when, with great expense, I shall have the handsomest store and 
largest stock in the city, and I can say outside of Detroit. 

ED. B. DIKEMAN. 



166 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY, 



Burke John, 29 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Burke James, 29 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Burkholder David, 28 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Burkholder John, 28 Paris, G. Rapids. 

BURLINGAME HENRY D.. 17 Court- 
land, Courtland Center. 

BURLINGAME EDWIN A., 2 Wyom- 
ing, Grand Rapids. 

Burlingame Eseck, 18 Gaines, Gaines- 
ville. 

Burlingame James, 5 Oakfield, Oak- 
field. 

BURLESON STEPHEN, 14 Plainfield, 
Austerlitz. 

Burns Dennis, 12 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

Burns Felix. 23 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Burns Francis, 32 Cascade, Alaska. 

BURNS LAWRENCE, 34 Ada, Ada. 

Burns Michael, 32 Cascade, Alaska. 

Burns Patrick, 12 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

Burns Philip, Burchville (Burch's 
Mills.) 

Burns Thomas, 16 Paris, G. Rapids. 

Burns Thomas, 23 Caledonia, Caledo- 
nia. 



BurtB. E., Lowell. 

Burt Beldin H., 27 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 
Burt Justus W., 29 Ada, Ada. 
Burton E. O., 13 Algoma, Edgerton. 
Burton Henry, 16 Plainfield, Belmont. 
Burton Henry, Cedar Springs. 
Burton George, 32 Gaines, Cody's Mills. 
Burt Lucien, 2 Wyoming, G. Rapids. 
BURTCH HARMON A., 20 Courtland, 

Courtland Center. 
BURTCH HIRAM, 9 Alpine, Grand 

Rapids. 
BUSH DANIEL. 15 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Bush Daniel, 10 Walker, Indian Creek. 
Bush Mrs. Fanny, 18 Plainfield, Alpine. 
Bush Horatio N., Village Caunonsburg. 
Bush H. T., 10 Walker, Indian Creek. 
BUSH ISAAC, 11 Cannon, Bostwick 

Lake. 
BUSH JAMES, 18 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
Bush Jacob, Village Cannonsburg. 
Bush William, 10 Cannon, Bostwick 

Lake. 
Bush William II., 10 Cannon, Bostwick 

Lake. 
BUTLER CHARLES II., 31 Nelson, 

Cedar Springs. 



BUY SHIRTS OF ROUSE & DOOLITTLE. 



BURNS WILLIAM, 36 Oakfield, Ash- 
ley. 

Burns John, 6 Ada, Plainfield. 

Burns Sr. John, 25 Caledonia, Caledo- 
nia. 

Burns James, 24 Plainfield, Grand 
Rapids. 

Burns Jr. John, 25 Caledonia, Caledo- 
nia. 

Burns James, 32 Cascade, Alaska. 

Burnham Charles, 23 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

Burnap Tracy, 7 Grand Rapids. 

Burnett Win., 13 Lowell, Lowell. 

Burpee George, 16 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Burroughs Mrs. R. E., Lowell. 

Burroughs Mrs. E. J., Lowell. 

Burroughs Sanford, 9 Caledonia, 
Alaska. 

Burrill Z., 29 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Burr Aaron, 4 Cascade, Cascade. 

BURR EDMUND, 18 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

Burr Levi, 18 Lowell, Lowell. 

Burse Esburn, 17 Courtland, Courtland 
Center. 



Butler Cornelius, 36 Caledonia, Caledo- 
nia. 

Butler Edwin IT., 12 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Butler Helen L., 34 Ada, Ada. 

Butler Henry, 12 Plainfield, Austerlitz. 

BUTLER WM. H., 7 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

Butler I. G., 2 Alpine, Englishville. 

BUTLER JAMES, 25 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia. 

But! er Jonah, 36 Sparta, Englishville. 

BUTLER MRS. MARGARET, 26 Cale- 
donia, Caledonia. 

Butler Henry N., 28 Plainfield, Grand 
Rapids. 

Butler William, 36 Caledonia, Caledo- 
nia. 

Butrick Charles, South 1, Ada,, Lowell. 

Butterfield Albert, South 5 Walker, 
Grand Rapids. 

BUTTERFIELD CHESTER, 6 Caledo- 
nia, Grand Rapids. 

BUTTERFIELD JOHN N., South 5 
Walker, Grand Rapids. 

Butterfield William, South 5 Walker, 
Grand Rapids. 



WHERE KNOWN, FORT'S MEDICINES SELL THEMSELVES. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 167 



J. M. Seely & Co., 











9. 

263, 265 and 267 Woodward Avenue, 
DETROIT, - - - - MICHIGAN, 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

FLAVORING EXTRACTS, 

Perfumeries, Odors, Colognes, Hair Oils, 
Pomades, Cosmetics, &c, &c, 



MILON L. SQUIER, 



DEALER IN 



Choice family Crocerios> 

Agricultural Implements, Hardware, etc., 

Also Manufacturer of and Dealer in 

BOOTS «fe SUBCODES. 

CASNOVIA, Kent Co., Mich. 

All Orders promptly Filled, at Lowest; Cash Prices. 

AMERICAN HOUSE. 

AND 

GREENVILLE STAGE OFFICE, 

Courtland Street, 
ROCKFOBD, ZMUCZHHa-A-TST, 

(NEAR THE DEPOT,) 

SMITH LAPHAM, - - - Proprietor. 



168 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



BUTTON DARIUS T., 23 Walker, G. 
Rapids. 

Button Ira, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 

BUXTON THOMAS H., Grandville. 

Byers John, Jr., 20 Algoma, Sparta 
Center. 

Bvers Jacob, 32 Courtland, Rockford. 

BYRNE JOHN, 28 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

Byrne Lawrence, 13 Ada, Ada. 

BYRNE THOMAS, 2 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

BYRNE MICHAEL, 28 Grattan, Grat- 
tan Center. 

Byrne^ William, Jr., 22 Grattan, Grat- 
tan Center. 

BYRNES THOMAS, 18 Vergennes, 
Vergennes. 

Byrnea Toboise, 32 Grattan, Cannons- 
burg. 

BYRNES JAMES, 18 Vergennes, Ver- 
gennes. 

CABOT FRANCIS M., 34 Tyrone, 
Sparta Center. 

Cady Elisha, 22 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

Cahill Edward, 25 Tyrone, Sparta Cen. 

Cahill Patrick, 9 Walker, Indian Creek. 

Cahoon Geo. H., 15 Lowell, Lowell. 



Camp Mrs. Sarah A., 10 Walker, Indian 
Creek. 

Campbell Chas., 12 Lowell, Lowell. 

Campbell Edward, 12 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

Campbell Finley, Lisbon. 

CAMPBELL G. W., 2 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

Campbell Hugh, 34 Tyrone, Sparta 
Center. 

Campbell Ira, 13 Oakfield, Greenville. 

Campbell Isaac M., 1 Algoma, Burch's 
Mills. 

Campbell John J., 6 Bowne, Alto. 

Campbell Lemuel II., 10 Oakfield, Oak- 
field. 

Campbell Lewis, 13 Oakfield, Green- 
ville. 

Campbell Mrs. Mary, 25 Plainfield, Aus- 
terlitz. 

Campbell Peter, 19 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Campbell Peter, 10 Nelson, Nelson. 

Campbell Mrs. Phila A., 5 Bowne, Alto. 

Campbell Sophronia, 18 Grattan, Grat- 
tan Center. 

Campbell Samuel, 22 Plainfield, Aus- 
terlitz 

CAMP BELL STEVEN, 2 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 



AXES, CHAINS. COOPERS' TOOLS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S, 14 and 16 Monroe Street. 



CAINE JAMES E., 16 Algoma, Edger- 
ton. 

Cairns Thomas, 26 Tyrone, Sparta Cen. 

CALDWELL HENRY O., 33 Ada, Ada 

Caldwell Walter, Alaska Village. 

CALKINS ALANSON, 30 Lowell, 
Lowell. 

Calkins Addison, 31 Paris, G. Rapids. 

Calkins Andrew M., 30 Lowell, Lowell. 

CALKINS DANIEL, 26 Spencer, Spen- 
cer Mills. 

Calkins John, 25 Vergennes, Lowell. 

Calkins Milo, 25 Vergennes, Lowell. 

CALLEN JOHN, 3 Grand Rapids. 

Callen Peter, 3 Grand Rapids. 

Callard Robert, 9 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Callard Samuel. Sr., 9 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Callard Samuel. Jr., 9 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Callard Thomas. 7 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Camp Charles, 27 Algoma, Rockford. 

Camp Edward P., 4 Walker, Indian 

CAMP JOJIN, 33 Ada, Ada. 
CAMP P. SPENCER, 4 Walker, Indian 
Creek. 



Campbell Wilton, Cedar Springs. 

Campbell Wm. T., 9 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

CAMPAU EDWARD, 11 Caledonia, 
Alaska. 

Campfield Frank, 27 Ada, Ada. 

Camfield Bradford, 33 Lowell, Alto. 

Candle James, South 5 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Canfield Alfred N., 16 Ada, Ada. 

Canfield J. H., 5 Ada, Ada. 

CANFIELD MOULTON II., 12 Grat- 
tan, Grattan Center. 

Canfield William, 12 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

CANEN CARLTON, 29 Tyrone, <?as- 
novia. 

Canen Michael, 29 Tyrone, Casnovia.- 

Cane William, Burchville (Burch's 
Mills.) 

Canton Michael, 10 Grand Rapids. 

Caples Michael, 22 Sparta, Grand 
Rapids. 

Caples Michael, 29 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Card J. H., 7 Alpine, Pleasant. 

Carey William, 30 Ada, Grand Rapids. 



FORT'S WESTERN LINIMENT CURES CORNS AND WARTS. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 169 

/ 

j — : , • : . i .,..,... " , — . 

The Best Place to Buy Millinery Goods. 
Mrs. E. ANTRIM, 

Fashionable Millinery Rooms, 

CLOAK AN? QR;ESS UMMfflG, 

ALSO AGENT FOR 

Mrs. D. A. JACKSON'S FRENCH PATTERNS, 

TRIMMED AND PLAIN, 

57 Monroe Street, GRAND RAPIDS, MICH, 

Grand Rapids Carriage Manufactory, 

134 & 136 Division St., 

GEO. C. FITCH, - - - Proprietor, 

Es t£t tolls JtLoc3L Irx 184,8, 

The best of materials used, and first-class workmen employed. Sole manufacturer 
of the 

Pat. Improved Swell Body Sleigh, 

Acknowledged to be the best looking, most durable and strongest Sleigh that 
can be built. 

Lumber Wagons, of superior selected Lumber, 
Made to Order. 

LOOMIS <fc BROWN, 

Manufacturers and Dealers in 




BOOTS, SHOES, 

Rubbers, &c, 

30 Canal St., 



Proprietors LOOMIS' QUAKER WATER PROOF. 



170 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Carey John, 3 Ada, Ada. 

Carlton Lewis M., 14 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Carlton Norman L., 16 Cascade, Cas- 
cade. 

Carlton Nicholas, 11 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

CARLTON PHIL. P., 15 Cannon, Can- 
non sburg. 

CARLTON ROBERT, Ada Village. 

Carlton William, 8 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

CARLISLE JAMES, 35 Gaines, Middle- 
ville, Barry County. 

Carlisle William, 4 Cannon, Rockford. 

Carlyle Charles H., 21 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Carlyle John, Jr., 28 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Carlyle John, 28 Courtland, Courtland 
Center. 

CARLYLE ROBERT, 32 Courtland, 
Rockford. 

Carll Gideon, 27 Cascade, Alaska. 

Carll John, 27 Cascade, Alaska. 

Carl Ralph L., Lowell. 

Carl William P., 29 Ada, Ada. 

Carlan Edward, 34 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 



CARR ALFRED B., 26 Plainfield, Au* 

terlitz. 
Carr Aaron, 17 Sparta, Sparta Center. 
Carr Caleb E., 26 Plainfield, Aasterlitz. 
Carr Edward, Lowell. 
Carr Geo. E., 1 Lowell, Lowell. 
Carr John, 22 Grand Rapids. 
CARR ROBERT, 26 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Carr William, 17 Sparta, Sparta Center. 
Carson Charles, 30 Cascade, Grand 

Rapids. 
CARSON ROBERT, 23 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
CARTER CHAS. B., 3 Lowell, Lowell. 
Carter Theodore, 36 Vergennes, Lowell. 
CARTER ZEN A W., 29 Lowell, Lowell. 
Cartwright M. H., Burchville (Burch's 

Mills.) 
Carty Maggie, 27 Oakfield, Ashley. 
Carver Sarah W., 10 Vergrennes, Alton. 
Cary Charles, 18 Lowell, Lowell. 
Gary Horace, 18 Lowell, Lowell. 
Carey Patrick, 1 Courtland, Courtland 

Center. 
Cary Patrick, 33 Cascade, Alaska. 
Cary Patrick, 7 Vergennes, Vergennes. 
Case David, Lisbon. 
Case Horace, 7 Nelson, Cedar Springs, 



IRON, NAILS AND STEEL, AT W. D. FOSTER'S, 14 and 16 Monroe Street. 



Carlton Nelson, 11 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Carmer William, 86 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

Carner Hiram, 2 Wyoming, Grandville. 

Carold Daniel, 31 Grattan, Cannons- 
burg. 

Carpenter Benj. T., 18 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

Carpenter Chasper H., 36 Bowne, Fill- 
more, Barry County. 

Carpenter Darius W., 21 Byron, Byron 
Center. 
s CARPENTER H. D., 29 Grand Rapids, 
Grand Rapids. 

Ca penter James, 21 Byron, Byron Cen. 

Carpenter Jasper B., 17 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Carpenter Levi, 23 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia. 

Carpenter Lorenzo, 13 Plainfield, Aus- 
terlitz. 

Carpenter Oscar P., 32 Gaines, Cody's 
Mills. 

Carpenter Mrs. Melinda, 12 Plainfield, 
Austerlitz. 

Carpenter Peter, 10 Byron, Byron Cen. 



Case Justus, 17 Bowne, Alto. 

Case William C, Sparta Center 

CASEY JAMES, 15 Vergennes, Lowell. 

Casner George, 3 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 

Casner Jerry, 8 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 

Casner Peter, 5 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 

Casner William, 3 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

Cassada Albert B., Rockford. 

Cassady John, 27 Walker, Grand Rapidi. 

Cassedy James, 25 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 

CASSEL ABRAHAM B., 16 Gaines, 
Grand Rapids. 

Caswell Benj. C, 26 Oakfield, Ashley. 

Caswell Elisha B., 27 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

CATHEY GEORGE, 9 Oakfield, Oak- 
field. 

Cathey Geo. L., 9 Oakfield, Oakfield. 

Caton Thomas, 25 Grattan, Grant. 

Caukin Rufin, 31 Oakfield, Oakfield. 

CAUKIN VOLNEY W., 10 Sparta, 
Sparta Center. 

Cavener Alexander, Rockford. 

CAVNER JAMES, 8 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

Cazier Edward, 18 Alpine, Pleasant. 



FORT'S WESTERN LINIMENT CURES ALL LAMENESS: 



HISTORY. AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



171 



Empire Organ Company, 

Manufacturers of the 





-A.3VO- 



Also Dealers lxx 



^JL 




Sheet Music, Musical Merchandise, 

&c., &c. 

FACTORY Axxca. SAXjSS ROOMS 

No. 65 Monroe Street, 
GRAND RAPIDS, - MICHIGAN. 



GEO. PIGGOTT. 



A. F. BTJBCH. 



|y Those desiring Good Organs, will find it to their advantage to purchase of us, or our regularly 
employed Agents, as in so doing they can save at least one commission on the instruments, thereby 
getting them cheaper than if purchased of foreign companies. 

We invite all interested in the purchase of Good Instruments y to 
call at our Factory and examine our stock. 

ALL GOODS ARE FULLY WARRANTED. 



172 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Cazier Samuel, 19 Alpine, Pleasant. 

Ceah Christian, 1 Byron, North Byron. 

Cisco Warren, 3 Gaines, Hammond. 

CHAFFEE E. M., 23 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 

Chaffee Edwin N., 33 Ada, Ada. 

Chaffee Rodolphus G., 38 Ada, Ada. 

Chaffee W. T., 24 Algoma, Rocktord. 

Chalmers Andrew, 28 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 

Chalmers John, 32 Algoma, Rockford. 

Chambers Geo. W., 16 Alpine, Grand 
Rapids. 

Chambers George, 16 Alpine, Alpine. 

Chambers Joseph, 10 Ada, Ada. 

CHAMBERS HIRAM J., 16 Alpine, 
Grand Rapids. 

Chambers Mrs. Lydia, 16 Alpine, Grand 
Rapids. 

Chamberlin Charles L., Village Can- 
non sburg. 

Chamberlain Frank, 16 Alpine, Grand 
Rapids. 

Chamberlain John H., Rockford. 

Champion David, Jr., 5 Walker, Indian 
Creek. 

Champion J. D., 19 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Champlin Jeffery C, 20 Walker, Grand 



Rapids. 



CHAPEL JESSE B., 1? Bowne, Harris 
Creek. 

Chapel Jerod, Sparta Center. 

CHAPEL LEMON B., 27 Ada, Ada. 

CHAPEL M. D. L., 5 Ada, Ada. 

CHAPMAN BENJ., 26 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

Chapman Milton, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 

Chase Amos G., 34 Ada, Ada. 

Chase Abel, 16 Alpine, Grand Rapids. 

Chase Homer, 20 Alpine, Indian Creek. 

Chase James S., Village Cannonsburg. 

Chase Lafayette, 34 Ada, Ada. 

Chase S., Village Cannonsburg. 

CHASE SEYMOUR, Village Cannons- 
burg. 

Chase William, 16 Alpine, Grand 
Rapids. 

Charles Joel, 12 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

Charles James, 8 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

CHATERDON GEO. W., 31 Lowell, 

CHATERDON JOHN, 32 Lowell, Alto. 
Chaterdon Mrs. Minerva, 31 Lowell, 

Alto. 
Chaterdon William, 31 Lowell, Alto. 
Chester Brayton, 19 Sparta, Lisbon. 
CHESTER ELISHA H., Cedar Springs. 



ROUSE 8l DOOLITTLE, 22 MONROE STREET. 



Chester Elisha, 19 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Chester Elijah, 19 Sparta, Lisbon. 

CHESEBRO ALLEN D., 8 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Chesebro Mrs. Isabella, 5 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

CHEESEBROUGH JOB, 31 Caledonia, 
Caledonia Station. 

Cheeseman James, Lowell. 

Cheney Amherst B., Sparta Center. 

Cheney Elliott, 27 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Cheney Nehemiah N., 22 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

Chick Charles, 24 Vergennes, Fallass- 
burg. 

CHILD E. K, Burchville (Bufch's 
Mills.) 

Child George, 1 Vergennes, Alton. 

Childs James W., 35 Sparta, English- 
ville. 

Childs Nicholas, 22 Oourtland, Court- 
land Center. 

CHILDS WM. II., 2 Plainfield, Rock- 
tord. 

Child Stephen, 1 Vergennes, Alton. 

Chilson Alonzo, 19 Cannon, Austerlitz. 

Chilson William, 30 Cannon, Austerlitz. 

FORT'S WESTERN MEDICINE MANUFACTURING CO.. LOWELL, 



Champlin J. C, 20 Grand Rapids. 
Chapman Anthony, 26 Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 
Chapman Charles M., 16 Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 
Chapman D., 6 Grand Rapids, Grand 

Rapids. , 
Chapman E. A., Lowell. 
Chapman Jared, 7 Grand Rapids. 
Chapman John C, 3o Cannon, Can- 
nonsburg. 
CHAPMAN JOSEPH B., South 5 

Walker, Grand Rapids. 
Chapman Lorenzo, 36 Tyrone, Sparta 

Center. 
CHAPMAN LE GRAND C, 35 Cannon, 

Cannonsburg. 
Chapman William, 30 Sparta, Lisbon. 
CHAPIN E. E., Rocktord. 
Chapin Plavel, 13 Grattau, Grant. 
Chapin Gilbert A., 9 Grand Rapids. 
Chapin Joseph, 9 Grand Rapids. 
CHAPIN J. ELY, Lowell. 
CHAPPELL DAN N., 7 Walker, Berlin. 
Chappeli George S., 7 Walker, Berlin. 
Chapel Gurden, 27 Ada, Ada. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 17t 



A. J. TUCKER. DENNIS L. ROGERS- 

TUCKER & ROGERS, 

(Successors to R. B. Butterworth,) 

Hardware, Stoves and Rags, 

Agricultural Tools, Wrought, Scrap & Cast Iron, 

Manufacturers of TIN, COPPER AND SHEET IEON WARE, ' 

33 & 35 Canal Street, GRAND RAPIDS, MICHIGAN. 

Particular attention is called to their INVINCIBLE (HOT AIR) COOK 
STOVES— the latest and most approved style— Patented 1870. Examine and 
be satisfied. 



REID & SMITH, 



DEALERS IN 



WALL PAPER, WINDOW SHADES 

Pletwire and Pktap© Wmm®§ t 

Mirrors, WImMbw @lmm,j &®. JfJ 

ALSO MANUFACTURERS OF 

AW J3L±ulc3L& of Picture IPraxxiojs, 

Monroe Street, under Rathbun House, 

GRAND RAPIDS, - MICHIGAN. 

NATIONAL HOTEL, 



Free Omnibusses to and from all Passenger 

Trains. 



PBIOB, S2.00 PEB ZD.A/2". 
MRS. S. A. BARKER, - - Proprietress. 

L. J. J A CKSON, Clerk. E. S. JENNE, Manager. 



174 



HISTORY AKD DIRECTORY 0* KENT COUHTY. 



Chipman John B., 2 Algoma, Burch- 
ville (Burch's Mills.) 

CHIPMAN WALTER, 2 Algoma, 
Burchville (Burch's Mills.) 

Chirgwin Martin, 28 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Chirgwin Thomas H., 26 Cannon, Can- 
nonsburg. 

Chirgwin Richard, 28 Cannon, Can- 
nonsburg. 

CHITTENDEN F., 17 Grand Rapids. 

Chittenden James, 3 Grand Rapids. 

Christy John-, 26 Lowell, Lowell. 

Christy Lafayette, 8 Algoma, Rockford. 

Christenson John, 12 Oakfield, Green- 
ville. 

Christenson Nelson, 12 Oakfield, Green- 
ville. 

Christenson Samuel, 13 Algoma, Edger- 
ton. 

Chubbuck Horace G., 8 Tyrone, Cas- 
novia. 

CHUBB GEO. S., Lisbon. 

Chubb Lorenzo, Lisbon. 

CHUBB LEWIS L., Burchville (Burch's 
Mills.) 

CHUBB MILES, Lisbon. 

CHUBB URIAH, 30 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

CHURCH ALBERT, 10 Bowne, Alto. 

LANTERNS, ALL KINDSj ALSO SKATES, AT W. D. FOSTER'S, 14 & 16 Monroe-st 



Clark Alex., 30 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Clark Alvin, 6 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Clark Almond, 5 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Clark Arba, 1 Plainfield, Rockford. 

CLARK ARUNA S., 15 Grand Rapids. 

CLARK ASA, 36 Tyrone, Sparta Cen- 
ter. 

Clark Mrs. Bridget, 16 Wyoming, 
Grandville. 

Clark Benjamin, 12 Paris, Grand Rap- 
ids. 

Clark Charles H., 8 Alpine, Grand 
Rapids. 

Clark Charles, 11 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Clark Chas. 28 Lowell, Lowell. 

Clark David, 19 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Clark David H., 23 Cascade, Cascade. 

Clark Eli, 2 Cascade, Ada. 

Clark Edward, 20 Lowell, Lowell. 

Clark Frederick, 29 Paris, Grand Rap- 
ids. 

Clark Goodhand, 2 Plainfield, Rock- 
ford. 

Clark George H., 3 Cascade, Ada. 

Clark II. F., Lowell. 

Clark Henry A ? , 11 Lowell, Lowell. 

Clark Henry, 34 Walker, Grand Rap- 
ids. 



Church Cephas, 19 Spencer, Nelson. 
Church Chauncey, 26 Tyrone, Sparta 

CHURCH COLBIN E., 2 Alpine, Eng- 

lishville. 
Church Calvin, 7 Gaines, Gainesville. 
CHURCH CHESTER, 3 Vergennes, 

Alton. 
Church David C, 19 Spencer, Nelson. 
Church Eustes E., 36 Lowell, Lowell. 
Church George W., 19 Spencer, Nelson. 
Church John, 13 Solon, Cedar Springs. 
Church Henry, Lowell. 
Church Henry S., 2 Alpine, English- 

ville. 
Church Lewis H., 2 Alpine, English- 

ville. 
CHURCH LEONARD W., 34 Ada, 

Ada. 
Church Silas, 5 Bowne, Alto. 
Church Wilson, 12 Vergennes, Alton. 
Church William, 13 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Clackner J. F., 24 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 
Clackner J. H., 24 Sparta, Sparta Cen- 
ter. 
Clapp William, 9 Byron, North Byron. 



Clark Henry, 34 Walker, Grand Rap- 

ids. 
Clark, N. M., Lowell. 
Clark Henry, 11 Tyrone, Sparta Center. 
CLARK HARMON, 36 Cascade, Al- 
aska. 
Clark Henry, 3 Cascade, Ada. 
CLARK ISAAC M., village of Cedar 

Springs. 
Clark Jay, 3 Cascade, Ada. 
Clark James D., 17 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Clark John, 20 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Clark, John II., 31 Plainfield, Mill 

Creek. 
Clark John R., 13 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
Clark John II., 36 Alpine, Mill Creek. 
CLARK JOSEPH M., 5 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Clark Lyman, 19 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Clark Oresta E., Rockford. 
Clark Lewis P., 23 Grand Rapids. 
CLARK LEWIS S., 25 Cascade, Lowell. 
Clark M. J., Cedar Springs. 
Clark Peter S., 12 Plainfield, Rockford. 
Clark Perry, 15 Bowne, Alto. 



FORT'S WESTERN LINIMENT CURES SPAVINS * WINGALLS, 



BISfOfcY AND DIRECTOR* 0* KENT COtJNTt. 



175 



D. L. LATOURETTE, - BANKER. 

Business paper discounted. 

Business accounts solicited. 

Deposits Received. Daily accounts and special deposits, 

Collections made on all points. 

Interest paid on Deposits. 

Foreign Exchange on all points for sale. 

Specie, U. 8. Bonds, &c, bought and sold. 

Savings deposits received. Interest allowed. 

Exchange on New York, and all points bought and sold. 

Revenue Stamps for sale. 

Office hours, 8 to 5 daily. Saturday, 8 a. m. to 8 p. m. 

1>. JU. JLATOURETTE, linker. 

Grand Rapids, opposite Postofflce. 
References :— National Park Bank, New York; Central National Bank, New York; Second National 
Bank, Detroit ; Manufacturers' National Bank, Chicago ; Banks and Bankers throughout the State. 



DENTIST, 



Located in 



•f w V 



RAPIDS, 



R. BUTTON, 

Has permanently 

GRAND 

And has neatly fitted up the ^Bjf W &^F^^W*tt Roohis formerly occu- 
pied by the City Council. ^^^ A ^ He feels confident, 

after an experience of 18 years, of giving satisfaction to all wishing the services 
of his profession. 

PRIONS T7-E3H.TT MOIDEFLATE. 

KEMEMBER THE NUMBER, 

34 CANAL STREET, 

Two Doors South of the Star Clothing House, up stairs. Call and see Specimens. 

Manufacturers and Dealers in 

Saddles, Harness, Trunks, and all kinds of Horse "Clothing, 

BufTalo Robes, ^%7%J m lx±jp& 9 cfeo*, 

ALSO SOLE MANUFACTURERS OF THE 

Common Sense Neck Pad! 
F©ip H)®ii*§© ©©Maps, 

The Only Tad Known to Prevent Gall- 
ing the Neck or Cutting 
the Mane* 

Ladies' Saratoga & Sole Leather 
Trunks, 

Of our own manufacture, always on hand. 
* 72 Monroe Street, 

THE OLDEST AND LARGEST ESTABLISHMENT IN THE STATE. 




176 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



CLARK PHEBE J., 13 Vergennes, 

Fallassburg. 
Clark Robert, 3 Alpine, Englishville. 
Clark Timothy C, Grandville. 
Clark Thomas, 22 Plainfield, Auster- 

litz. 
Clark Warren, 1 Sparta, Sparta Center. 
Clark William M., 15 Grand Rapids. 
Clark William S., 16 Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 
Clark William, 3 Courtland, Courtland 

Clark William H., 5 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Clark Walter, 13 Yergennes, Fallass- 

burg. 
Clark William, 36 Cascade, Alaska. 
Clausen Martin, 29 Grand Rapids. 
Claun Charles, Bowne, Alto. 
CLEMENS AMOS M., 17 Gaines, 

Grand Rapids. 
Clemens Abraham C, 17 Gaines, Grand 

Rapids. 
Clemens Christian, 34 Gaines, Grand 

Rapids. 
Clemens Henry W, 36 Bowne, Fillmore, 

Barry County. 
CLEMONS ALONZO, 34 Oakfield, 

Grattan Center. 



Close Edward R., 32 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

Close Samuel A., 33 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

Close William W., 4 Cannon, Rockford. 

Clousterhouse Claus, 21 Grand Rapids. 

Clousterhouse Ralph, 21 Grand Rapids. ' 

CLUTE DARWIN B., 28 Tyrone, Cas- 
novia. 

CLUTE ORLANDO H., 30 Tyrone, 
Casnovia. 

Clyne Elias, Alaska Village. 

CLYNE PETER, 9 Caledonia, Alaska. 

Coats Mrs. A., Lowell. 

Coats Freeman, 16 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

Coats Leman J., 16 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

Coats Marvin, 16 Wyoming, Grandville. 

Coats Oliver, Lowell. 

Cochlan Patrick, 20 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Cochlan Michael, 34 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

C6bb Ezekiel H., 8 Cascade, Cascade. 

COBB JAMES, JR., 8 Bowne, Alto. 

Cobb James, 8 Bowne, Alto. 

Cobb Thomas M., 34 AValker, Grand 
Rapids. 



BUY TRUNKS AND VALISES OF ROUSE & DOOLITTLE. 



demons Henry, 3 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

Clements John L., 34 Ada, Ada. 

Clements Jacojb, 21 Plainfield, Belmont. 

Clepper Henry, 20 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

Clerk Henry P., Lowell. 

CLEVELAND ELEAZER B, 36 Spen- 
cer, Spencer Mill. 

CLEVELAND W. H., 23 Sparta, Spar- 
ta Center. 

Clifford Frederick, 17 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Clifford James, 23 Oakfield, Ashley. 

CLINGER HENRY J., Village Can- 
nonsburg. 

CLINTON CHAS. E., 7 Courtland, 
Cedar Springs. 

Clinton Frederick, 1 Grand Rapids. 

Clock Henry W., Village of Cedar 
Springs. 

Cloffenstein John, 26 Gaines, Cody's 
Mill. 

CLOSE CONVERSE, 11 Grattan, Grat- 
tan Center. 

Close Elnathan D., 4 Cannon, Rockford. 

CLOSE EVAN, 4 Cannon, Rockford. | 



Coburn Andrew J., 9 Byron, North 
Byron. 

Coe George F., 12 Byron, Gainesville. 

Coe William, 29 Grand Rapids. 

COFFEE JOHN, 19 Alpine, Pleasant. 

COFFIN MARION E., 18 Plainfield, 
Mill Creek. 

Coffin Monroe, 20 Plainfield, Austerlitz. 

Coger Charles, 8 Cascade, Cascade. 

COGER JABEZ D., 8 Cascade, Cascade. 

Cogshall Henry, 24 Bowne, Bowne. 

Cogswell Harvey D., 11 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

COGSWELL LUMAN W., 13 Lowell, 
Lowell. 

Cogswell Martin, Lowell. 

Coil John, 16 Ada, x\da. 

Coker Albert, 2 Plainfield, Rockford. 

COLBY HORACE, 33 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

Colby Isaac C, 18 Bowne, Alto. 

Colby James, 33 Courtland, Rockford. 

Colby Truman' Rockford. 

,Colby Truman W., Rockford. 

Colby Spencer, 27 Tyrone, Sparta Cen. 

COLBURN ANDREW K., 19 Tyrone, 

r Casnovia. 



FOR SICK HEADACHE USE FORT'S LIVER PILLS. 



HISTORY ANB DIRECTORY Of KENT COUNTY. 17T 

ROBINSON, CHAPIN & CO., 

WHOLESALE AXsHD RETAIL 




LOWELL, MICHIGAN. 

J. B. ROBINSON. J. E. CHAPIN. B. D. FOX. 

A. C. AYRES, 

DEALER IN 

DRY GOODS, GROCERIES, 

BOOTS AND SHOES, &c, 

ALSO, 



CASNGVIA, KENT €0., MICH. 

EVERYTHING IN MY LINE AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 

JOHN KOPF & CO., 

PROPRIETORS OF THE 

towoll Chair Factory^ 

Also Manufacturers and Dealers in all kinds of 

FURNITURE & UPHOLSTERY, LOOKING GLASSES, 

BEADY-MADE COFFINS, &c, 

LOWELL, - - - MICHIGAN. 

Grand Eiver Nurseries, 

3L0WEIX, - KENT COUNTY, - MICHIGAN, 
NOAH P. HUSTED, Proprietor. 

One Hundred and Twenty-Five Acres under thorough Cultivation. 

The growing of well-tested, hardy and reliable varieties, adapted to the West 
and Northwest, made a SPECIALTY. 

|gr*All authorized Agents from this Nursery will be furnished with a Certifi- 
cate of recent date. 

NOAH P. HUSTED, 

Lowell, Kent Co., Mick 
23 



178 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY O* KENT COUNTY. 



Colburn Benj. Q., 33 Gaines, Cody's 
Mills. 

Colburn David, 6 Grand Rapids, Grand 
Rapids. 

Colburn R. H., 19 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Colburn Sylvester, 13 Caledonia, Alaska. 

COLBORN AMOS, Caledonia Station. 

Colborn John, Caledonia Station. 

Cole Albert, 8 Sparta, Sparta Center. 

COLE ABRAM, 33 Ada, Ada. 

COLE ANDREW, 30 Vergennes, Ver- 
gennes. 

Cole Bradley, 9 Sparta, Sparta Center. 

Cole Charles, 33 Ada, Ada. 

Cole Franklin. 33 Ada, Ada. 

COLE GARRETT, 15 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

COLE G. FILLMORE, 15 Walker, 
Grand Rapids. 

Cole Henry, 15 Wyoming, Grandville. 

Cole Harlan, 28 Bowne, Harris Creek. 

Cole Hiram, 19 Alpine, Pleasant. 

Cole John D., 33 Ada, Ada. 

Cole James, 26 Gaines, Hammond. 

Cole James, 19 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 

Cole Lemuel, 24 Spencer, Spencer Mills. 

Cole Luther, 33 Ada, Ada. 

Cole Peter, 18 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Cole Peter B., 12 Gaines, Hammond. 



Colley Watson, 15 Byron, Byron Cen* 

ter. 
Collagan John, 19 Ada, Ada. 
COLSON SHERMAN T., Alaska. 
Colton Benton, 19 Plainfield, Auster- 

htz. 
Colton Gideon, 13 Alpine, Alpine. 
Colvin Eli, 3 Caledonia, Alaska. 
Colvin James, 13 Vergennes, Fallass- 

burg. 
Colvin George, 29 Lowell, Alaska. 
Colvin Samuel, 3 Caledonia, Alaska. 
Colwell Hulbert, 28 Byron, Byron 

Center. 
Colwell Josiah, 19 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 
Colwell Weaver B., 19 Wyoming, 

Grandville. 
Colyer Henry J., 30 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Colyer N. J., 33 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Combs Charles, 13 Bowne, Bowne. 
Combes Thomas, 18 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Compton A. T., 28 Algoma, Rockford. 
Compton Franklin W., 31 Plainfield, 

Mill Creek. 
Compton James R., 31 Plainfield, Mill 

Creek. 



BUY SHIRTS OF ROUSE €l DOOLITTLE. 



Cole Reiley, 18 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Cole William, 29 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Coleman Albert, 7 Alpine, Pleasant. 

Collar Abraham, Lowell. 

Collar Charles D., 25 Ada, Lowell. 

Collar E. R., Lowell. 

COLLAR NELSON, 29 Vergennes, Ver- 
gennes. 

COLLAR SILAS, 31 Vergennes, Lowell. 

Collar Sylvester W., 15 Ada, Ada. 

Collins Charles, 25 Byron, Cody's Mills. 

Collins Cornelius, 31 Spencer, Oakfield. 

Collins Dennis, 1 Nelson, Nelson. 

COLLINS JAMES, 5 Nelson, Sand 
Lake. 

Collins Julian, 29 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Collins James, Rockford. 

Collins Jabez, 29 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Collins James, 1 Grand Rapids. 

Collins Michael, 24 Grand Rapids. 

Collins Simon, 24 Grand Rapids. 

Collins Thomas W., 1 Alpine, English- 
ville. 

Collins Timothy B., 5 Nelson, Sand 
Lake. 

Collum Samuel, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 



Compton Oscar, Lisbon. 

Comstock Charles, 28 Tyrone, Casno- 
via. 

Comstock Joseph, 28 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Comstock Nathan, 21 Tyrone, Casno- 
via. 

Conant Chester, 9 Courtland, Courtland 
Center. 

Conant Horace, 28 Cascade, Alaska. 

Conant Plimpton, 22 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

Concidine John, 16 Byron, Byron Cen- 
ter. 

Condon H. W., 31 Algoma, English- 
ville. 

Condon John, 17 Walker, Grand Rap- 
ids. 

CONDON SAMUEL, 12 Vergennes, 
Lowell. 

Condon Thomas, 12 Vergennes, Lowell. 

Cone Ira, Village of Cedar Springs. 

Congdon William C, Burchville, 
(Burch's Mills.) 

Congdon George R., Burchville, 
(Burch's Mills.) 

Conklin Alfred, 19 Oakfield, Oakfield. 



FORT'S LINIMENT CURES RHEUMATISM AND NEURALGIA. 



HI8T0RY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 179 

MB W BE T @®@B$ .890MB 



Voigt <£ Ferpolsheimer, 

DEALERS IN 

t y @©©is and Stltti 

W liolesale £tzxc3L Xt.etci.ll. 

41 Monroe Street, 

GRAND RAPIDS, - - MICHIGAN. 

GRAND RAPIDS BRANCH 

Republic Insurance Company. 

++-^^-.^+ 

CASH CAPITAL, $1,000,000. 



DIRECTORS : 
R. C. LUCE, JAMES MILLER, GEO. W. THAYER, WM. SEARS. 

JAMES MILLER, President. H. E. DEWEY, Manager. 



Issues Policies Covering Damage by Fire, and Lightning where no Fire 
ensues, and, in case of Loss, 

Pays immediately, without Discount for Interest 



180 



HISTORY AND DIMCTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Conklin Charles C, 14 Wyoming, 

Grand Rapids. 
Conklin Du Bois, 21 Alpine. Grand 

Rapids. 
CONKLIN GEORGE M., 17 Courtland, 

Rockford. 
Connelly Edward, 2 Grand Rapids. 
Connelly James, 2 Grand Rapids. 
Connelly Patrick, 2 Grand Rapids. 
Conolly John, 15 Grand Rapids. 
Conner T. W., 18 Wyoming, Grandville. 
Conrad Edmund L., Lisbon. 
Conula Peter, 29 Grand Rapid 3 . 
Converse James, 27 Vergennes, Lowell. 
Conway Nicholas, 34 Wyoming, North 

Byron. 
Cook Ariston J., 23 Byron, Cody's Mills. 
Cook Abraham, 24 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
COOK CLEVELAND C, 35 Byron, 

Ccdy's Mills. 
Cook Emery, 16 Algoma, Rockford. 
COOK EZRA, 26 Nelson, Cedar Springs. 
Cook G. W., 15 Byron, Byron Center. 
COOK GEORGE, 17 Gaines, Gaines- 
ville. 
COOK HENRY, 23 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Cook Henry V., 8 Gaines, Grand 

Rapids. 



Cool Benj. J., Cedar Springs. 

Cool Eli J., 32 Nelson, Cedar Springs. 

COOL URI, 32 Nelson, Cedar Springs. 

Cooley Geo. N., 14 Caledonia, Alaska. 

Cooley Geo. B., Lowell. 

Cooley George W., 21 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Cooley John, Lowell. 
COOLEY SEYMOUR E., 21 Solon, 

Cedar Springs. 
COONS A. LEWIS, 23 Bowne, Bowne. 
Coons Jacob J., 23 Bowne, Bowne. 
Coon Dennis, 9 Walker, Grand Rapids. 
COON CHARLES L., 23 Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 
Coon Geo. T., 5 Walker, Berlin. 
COON GEORGE, 22 Algoma, Edger- 

ton. 
Coon George, 30 Gaines, Cody's Mills. 
Coon Hally B., 5 Walker, Berlin. 
COON JACKSON, 13 Algoma, Edger- 

ton. 
Coon Phillip, 9 Walker, Grand Rapids. 
COON REUBEN, 4 Byron, North 

Byron. 
Cooper Adelbert, 23 Lowell, Lowell. 
Cooper Calvin C, 17 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Cooney F., 32 Grand Rapids. 



SAWS, (MILL AND CROSS-CUT,) AT W. D. FOSTER'S, 14 and 16 Monroe Street. 



Cook Ira, 17 Gaines, Gainesville. 
Cook Jackson, 7 Cascade, Cascade. 
COOK JOEL P., 1 Grattan, Ashley. 
Cook John F., 28 Cascade, Alaska. 
Cook Jehial, 6 Cannon, Rockford. 
Cook Jesse, 24 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Cook Joseph, 25 Alpine, Alpine. 
COOK SYLVESTER R., 28 Cascade, 

COOK LEWIS, 7 Cascade, Cascade. 
COOK LUTHER B., 12 Grattan, Otisco, 

Ionia County. 
Cook Martin, 19 Gaines, Cody's Mills. 
Cook Madison W., 24 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
Cook Oliver, 27 Wyoming, Grandville. 
Cook Orson, 17 Gaines, Gainesville. 
Cook Reuben W., 28 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
COOK TRUMAN F., 12 Grattan, Otisco, 

Ionia County. 
COOK THOMAS, 7 Cascade, Cascade. 
Cook William, 9 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Cook William, 36 Byron, Cody's Mills. 
Cook Wm. G., 17 Nelson, Cedar Springs. 
Cook Wm. F., 28 Cascade, Alaska. 
Cool Benj. H., Cedar Springs. 



Cooper Franklin H., 36 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Cooper Edwin, 7 Oakfield, Oakfield. 
Cooper George W., 36 Grattan, Alton. 
Cooper Horatio N., 22 Byron, Byron 

Center. 
Cooper John D., 20 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Cooper Justus, 11 Algoma, Burchville 

(Burch's Mills.) 
Cooper James, 2 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Cooper J. C, Burchville (Burch's 

Mills.) 
Cooper John, 13 Alpine, Alpine. 
Cooper Lewis C, 28 Byron, Byron Cen. 
Cooper Nelson F., 27 Byron, Byron 

Center. 
Cooper Owen, 17 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Cooper Rogers C, 36 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Cooper Samuel, 22 Plainfield, Auster- 

litz. 
Cooper Samuel, 22 Plainfield, Auster* 

litz. 
Cooper William, 7 Bowne, Alaska. 



FORT'S MEDICINES ARE WARRANTED. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



181 




BEN. FRANKLIN 

Book § Jot Printing 

OFFICE, 

Lovett's Block, Opposite Sweet's Hotel, 

CANAL STREET, 

GRAND RAPIDS, MICHIGAN. 

The Cheapest and Best 

Place in Grand Rapids to get Job Printing done, such as 
Cards, Bill-heads, Labels, Letter-heads, Hand-bills, Pro- 
grammes, Pamphlets, Briefs, Show Cards, etc. 

|3F~Orders from the country promptly attended to. 
A 11 work executed with neatness and dispatch, and in all 
cases we gurantee entire satis/action. 

JOHN BOLE, Propietor. 



Insure Your Life in 



The Mutual tifo 

INSURANCE CO., OF NEW YORK. 



ASSEITS, - 



- $41,000,000. 



Tlie Hiararest Company in the World., 

J. QUINTUS, Agent, 

Office, Justice St., near Monroe, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Ocean Passage Tickets and Drafts on Europe for Sale. 

JAMES PLANK^ 



SECTION 8, CANNON, 

> Has constantly on hand 

GOOD THRIVING HIVES FOR SALE. 



Is prepared to fill orders for ITALIAN QUEEN BEES— 1 Bee, 
$5 ; 2 for $8 ; or a Hive for $15. He is also prepared to give 

Instructions for Keeping Bees. 

Address, ROCKFORD, MICH. 



182 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTJ. 



Cooper Warren, 16 Spencer, Spencer 
Mills. 

Cooper William, 1 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Cope Albert A., Rockford. 

Cope George, 6 Ada, Austerlitz. 

Cope Robert, 31 Cannon, Austerlitz. 

Cope Robert, 31 Cannon, Cannonsburg. 

Copeland Joseph B., Grandville. 

COPPENS CHARLES, 26 Bowne, 
Bowne. 

Coppens Francis, 9 Bowne, Alto. 

Coppens Peter T., Lowell. 

Coppernoll Peter, 2 Gaines, Hammond. 

Corbett Reuel, 24 Alpine, Alpine. 

Corbin Charles G., 7 Byron, Grand- 
ville. 

CORCORAN JAMES, 28 Ada, Ada. 

Corcoran Thomas, 29 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

CORDES CASPAR, 27 Alpine, Grand 
Rapids. 

Cordes Eberhard, 26 Alpine, Grand 
Rapids. 

Cordes William, 26 Alpine, Grand Rap- 
ids. 

Corey Daniel, 18 Gaines, Gainesville. 

Corey F. G., 29 Byron, Byron Center. 



Cornell Perry, 32 Bowne, Harris Creek. 
CORNELL ROBERT B., 36 Courtland, 

Bostwick Lake. 
Cornell William M,, 22 Oakfield, Oak- 

field. 
Cornwell Charles M., 28 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Cornwell John A., 2 Vergennes, Alton. 
Cornwell John K., 12 Vergennes, Alton. 
Cornue P. D., 20 Lowell, Lowell. 
Cornula Martin, 29 Grand Rapids. 
Corporon Samuel, 16 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
CORRIGAN PETER, 10 Vergennes, 

Alton. 
Corrigan Patrick, 27 Ada, Ada. 
Corser George W. N., 28 Walker, G. 

Rapids. 
Cortright Cornelius, 16'Ada, Ada. 
Cortright Samuel, 29 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 
Cory Mary, 20 Byron, Byron Centre. 
Cory Philip, Lowell. 
CORYELL CHARLES E., 7 Courtland, 

Edgerton. 
Cotney Mrs. Ann, 16 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Cotney Henry, 18 Walker, G. Rapids. 
Cotney James, 16 Walker, G. Rapids. 



BUY FURNISHING GOODS OF ROUSE & DOOLITTLE. 



Corey Harvey T., 27 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

Corey Joseph J., 29 Byron, Byron Cen- 
ter. 

Corey Lyman H., 35 Wyoming, North 
Byron. 

Corey Rufus B., 18 Gaines, Gainesville. 

Corey Silas W., 27 Sparta, Sparta Cen- 
ter. 

Corkins Geo. W., 10 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

CORKINS ORSAMUS, 10 Wyoming, 
Grand Rapids. 

CORKINS RUFUS, 3 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

Corkins Wariner, 10 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

Corlis Cornelius, Lowell. 

Corlis John S., 34 Walker, Grand Rap- 
ids. 

Corman Isaac, 34 Lowell, Lowell. 

Cornall James, 13 Algoma, Edgerton. 

Corn N. B., 3 Alpine, Englishville. 

Cornell David, 10 Walker, Grand Rap- 
ids. 

Cornell John, 17 Courtland, Courtland 
Center. 



Cotney Thomas W., 8 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Court Marcus D., 16 Lowell, Lowell. 

Court John H., 16 Lowell, Lowell. 

Courson Hampton, 8 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

Courtwright Aaron, 31 Sparta, Lisbon. 

COURTNEY BERNARD, 34 Walker, 
Grand Rapids. 

Covell Charles, 13 Algoma, Edgerton. 

Covell Daniel, 34 Algoma, Rockford. 

Covell Gideon R., 14 Cascade, Cascade. 

Covell George, 29 Ada, Ada. 

Covell Joseph W., 13 Algoma, Edger- 
ton. 

Covell James, 13 Algoma, Edgerton. 

COVELL P. F., 22 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Covell Martin, 1 Plainfield, Rockford. 

COVEY E. H., 4 Walker, Indian Creek. 

Covey John W., 2 Algoma, BurclVs 
Mills. 

COVEY L. R., 35 Tyrone, Sparta Cen. 

Covert Dyer, 2 Vergennes, Lowell. 

COVERT JOHN L., 2 Vergennes, 
Lowell. 

Corey Silas W., 27 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 

Cowan Austin, 32 Courtland, Rockford. 



NO RISK IN USING FORT'S MEDICINES. 




HISTOKY AKD DIRECTORY OT'KBSt COUNTY. 188 

19 Monroe Street, 
Grand Rapids, - - Michigan, 

(SUCCESSOR TO BALL, THE CLOTHIER.) 

HIT. B. JOHNSON, 

Dealer in all kinds of 

CABINET FURNITURE, SOFAS, MATTRESSES, CHAIRS, 

Patent Spring Beds, Looking Glasses & Picture Frames. 

kUo>i (ieneirall Omsuiranee &%m% t 

ROCKFORD, - - - MICHIGAN. 

" O .A. S IST OTIA S T O IR; IE ." 

R. H. TOPPING, 

General Dealer in 

Dry ©®@fls ? (Emeries, -Ctreekery. 

Hardware, Boots and Shoes, Clothing, Stationery, 
Fancy Goods, etc., etc., 

OASNOVIA, 

TERMS, CASH. Kent County, Mich.. 

SEYMOUR, & WAITE, 




And Dealers in 

Hardware, Tinware, Agricultural Implements, Flour, Feed. 

Grain, Produce, etc, 

Mill Greek, Kent Co., and Paris, Mecosta Co., Mich. 

AH Order* promptly Oiled at Lowest Cash Price*. 

FBAUK SBYMOUK. LUKE W. WAITH. 



184 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Cowan Alon£o P., 18 Grattan, Bostwick 
Lake. 

Cowan Alexander, 32 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

COWAN ALEXANDER, 2nd, 6 Grat- 
tan, Bostwick Lake. 

Cowan Alexander T., 32 Courtland, 
Rockford. 

Cowan David, 14 Plainfield, Austerlitz. 

Cowan Mrs. Eunice, 19 Courtland, 
Rockford. 

COWAN JOHN C, 6 Grattan, Bost- 
wick Lake. 

Cowan Peter, 18 Grattan, Bostwick 
Lake. 

COWAN THOMAS M., 32 Courtland, 
Rockford. 

Cowan Thomas, 1 Cannon, Bostwick 
Lake. 

Cowan Wm. S., 18 Grattan, Bostwick 
Lake. 

COWELL ISAAC, 34 Bowne, Fillmore, 
Barry County. 

COWLEY JOHN, 22 Vergennes, Lowell. 

Cowley Robert, Lowell. 

COWLES SHEPARD B., 29 Spencer, 
Nelson. 

Cox John, 9 Courtland, Courtland Cen. 



Crane Samuel M., 24 Vergennes, Pallasa- 
burg. 

Crane William, Lowell. 

Cranston Gardner, 15 Plainfield, Bel- 
mont. 

CRANSTON THOMAS, 15 Plainfield, 
Belmont. 

Crannell Wm. W., 16 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

CRANMER CHARLES, 11 Plainfield, 
Rockford. 

Cranmer Eugene, Lisbon. 

Cranmer Israel, 9 Alpine, Grand^ Rap- 
ids. 

Cranmer James M., 12 Plainfield, Rock- 
ford. 

CRANMER JOHN, 9 Alpine, Grand 
Rapids. 

Crandall Alonzo H., 16 Plainfield, Bel- 
mont. 

Crandle Joseph, 14 Paris, Grand Rap- 
ids. 

Crandall Myron, 30 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

Crandall Nathan, 17 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Crandall Ormond F., 36 Wyoming, Kel- 
loggsville. 



HARDWARE AND CUTLERY, AT W. D. FOSTER'S, 14 and 16 tfonroe Street. 



Cox James, 8 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Cox Nicholas, 29 Plainfield, Grand 

Rapids. 
, Coy Daniel, 1 Caledonia, Alaska. 

Crabtree Wm. B., 20 Byron, Byron Cen. 

Crager Cornelius, 18 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

CRAHAN JAMES, 24 Grand Rapids. 

Crahan Martin, 24 Grand Rapids. 

Crahen John, 25 Grand Rapids. 

Craig Wm. T., 27 Grand Rapids. 

CRAKES FRANCIS, 25 Ada, Ada. 

Crakes George, 28 Vergennes, Lowell. 

"Crakes John J., 31 Vergennes, Lowell. 

Crakes Theodore W., 35 Vergennes, 
Lowell. 

Cramer Adelbert, 29 Vergennes, Ver- 
gennes. 

Cramer George, 20 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

CRAMER JEROME, 20 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Cramer John G., 20 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

CRAMTON ALANSON, 21 Ada, Ada. 

Cramton Charles, 27 Ada, Ada. 

Crans W. J., 10 Walker, Indian Creek. 



Crandall Stuart, 17 Gaines, Gainesville. 

CRAW EDWIN R., Lowell. 

Crawford David, 25 Oakfield, Ashley. 

Crawford Green B., 11 Grattan, Grat- 
tan Center. 

Crawford George, 8 Oakfield, Oakfield. 

Crawford James, 26 Plainfield, Auster- 
litz. 

Crawford John, Lowell. 

Crawford James, Lowell. 

CRAWFORD JOHN W., 11 Grand 
Rapids. 

Crawford Samuel, 36 Oakfield, Ashley. 

Creamer Thomas, Sparta Center. 

Creager John, 30 Caledonia, Caledonia 
Station. 

Creager William, 30 Caledonia, Caledo- 
nia Station. 

Creit Averd, 29 Grand Rapids. 

CREVLING BENJAMIN, 7 Plainfield, 
Alpine. 

Criil Mark, 13 Alpine, Alpine. 

Crinion Michael, 10 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Crinion Thomas, 15 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 



FORT'S SALVE CURES CUTS, BRUISES AND OTHER WOUNDS. 



HI8T0RY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



185 



Crinnian Thomas, 34 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Crippen Alfred A., 36 Wyoming, Kel- 
loggsville. 

CRIPPEN W. S., 36 Wyoming, Kel- 
loggsville. 

CRISHER JOHN L., 24 Alpine. 

Cris8ey, J. W., 13 Algoma, Edgerton. 

CRISSEY WILLIAM S., 13 Algoma, 
Edgerton. 

CRISSMAN JOHN, 29 Grand Rapids, 
Grand Rapids. 

Crissman William, 7 Cannon, Rock- 
ford. 

Crissman Henry, 21 Plainfield, Auster- 
litz. 

Crissman Henry K., 13 Plainfield, Rock- 
ford. 

Crits George, 32 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Critchett Geo. W., 19 Ada, Ada. 

Crocker Alanson, 14 Byron, Byron Cen- 
ter. 

Crocker Alvan, 30 Gaines, Cody's Mills. 

Crocker Lewis N., 11 Byron, Byron 
Center. 

Crocker Samuel J., 30 Gaines, Cody's 
Mills. 

Cromwell Alexander, 24 Vergennes, 
Fallassburg. 



Crowley Patrick, 28 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 

Crowley William, 28 Sparta, Sparta 
Center 

CROW GEORGE, 21 Ada, Ada. 

Crumback Mrs. Charity M., 35 Gaines, 
Cody's Mills. 

Crumback George, 26 Bowne, Bowne* 

CRUMBACK GERHARD W., 34 
Gaines, Cody's Mills. 

Crumback^James T., 26 Gaines, Ham- 
mond. 

CRUMBACK SAMUEL W., 25 Gaines, 
Caledonia Station. 

CRUMBACK SAMUEL, 26 Bowne, 
Bowne. 

Crusen John, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 

Crysler Henry, 30 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Cubitt William, 33 Ada, Ada. 

Cudahie M., 23 Grand Rapids. 

Cuddeback Solomon, 26 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Cuddihie James, 14 Grand Rapids. 

Cuddihie Michael, 14 Grand Rapids. 

Cudeihy Thomas, 11 Bowne, Alto. 

Cudington Peter, 17 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Culp Hiram, 9 Algoma, Sparta Center. 

Culver Mrs. Azuba, 35 Sparta, English- 
ville. 



TABLE AND POCKET CUTLERY, AT W. D. FOSTER'S, 14 and 16 Monroe Street, 



Culver Lewis M., 24 Caledonia, Alaska. 

Culver Orris, 35 Sparta, Englishville. 

Culver Robert G., 35 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia. 

CUMIN GS ALLEN, 26 Tyrone, 
Sparta Center. 

Cummings Mrs. Bridget, 30 Walker, 
Grand Rapids. 

Cumings Edwin, 3 Alpine, English- 
ville. m 

Cumings Fred. M., 13 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

CUMINGS JOSEPH M., 13 Sparta, 
Sparta Center. 

Cummings John, 24 Plainfield, Aus- 
terlitz. 

Cummings John, 30 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Cumings Marcus, 18 Algoma, Sparta 

CUMINGS MARCENE, 13 Sparta, 
Sparta Center. 

CUMINGS NORMAN, 34 Sparta, 
Englishville. 

Camings Nelson, 3 Alpine, English- 
ville. 

CUMMER JACOB, Cedar Springs. 

FORT'S ENEMY OF PAIN CURES COLDS AND SORE THROAT. 



Cromwell B. C, 16 Grand Rapids. 

Cromwell Geo. W., 2 Plainfield, Rock- 
ford. 

Cronan Timothy, 20 Grand Rapids. 

CRONINGER DANIEL, 35 Cascade, 
Alaska. 

Croninger Jacob, 35 Cascade, Alaska. 

Croninger Joseph, 23 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia. 

CRONINGER MICHAEL, 23 Caledonia, 
4 Caledonia. 

Croninger Talcott R., 35 Cascade, Al- 

CRONiNGER WM, B., 2 Caledonia, 
Alaska. 

Crook Wm. A., 11 Lowell, Lowell. 

CROOK JOHN R.. 11 Lowell, Lowell. 

Crosby Geo. W., 29 Vergennes, Lowell. 

CROSBY WM., 13 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. * 

Cross Charles H., Rockford. 

Cross Elry E., 35 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

CROSS SHUBEL, 29 Grand Rapids. 

Crossman Jacob, 29 Algoma, Sparta 
Center. 

Crowley Jerry, 28 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 



2± 



186 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 



Cummer Wellington W., Cedar Springs. 

Cunningham Allen, 29 Wyoming, Grad- 
ville. 

CUNNANB PETER, 3 Ada, Ada. 

CUPPLES ROBERT, 17 Sparta, Lis- 
bon. 

Curlcy James, 20 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 

Curley John, 20 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 

Curley James, 32 Grattan, Vergennes. 

Curley Patrick, 19 Bowne. Bowne. 

CURRAN JOHN, 33 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

CURREN EZRA, 1 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

CURREN LEVI, 1 Courtland, Cedar 
Springs. 

CURREN WELLEN, 1 Courtland, 
Courtland Center. 

Currin Charles W., 25 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

Curren Jerome M., 25 Oakfield, Green- 
ville. 

Curtiss Charles, 16 Plainfield, Belmont. 

Curtis Ch'as. F., 27 Vergennes, Lowell. 

Curtis Charles, 16 Plain tidd, Belmont. 

Curtiss Charles H., 16 Plainfield, Bel- 
mont. 

Curtiss Chauncey, 22 Plainfield, Aus- 
terlitz. 



Curtis Elliott, 13 Alpine, Alpine. 
Curtiss George, 11 Plainfield, Rockford. 
Curtiss John L., 26 Ada, Ada. 
Cure Andrew J., 12 Byron, Gainesville. 
Curtiss S. P., 29 Lowell, Lowell. 
CUSACK MARTIN, 28 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
Cushman Alphonzo, 26 Tyrone, Sparta 

Center. 
Cushman J. B., Lowell. 
Cushelman Michael, 10 Alpine,, Eng- 

lishville. 
Cushway Paul, 16 Grand Rapids. 
Cusser Isaac, 11 Vergennes, Alton. 
Cutler Charles J., 6 Gaines, Gaines- 
ville. 
Cutler John L, 6 Gaines, Cody's Mills. 
CUTLER JOHN, 6 Gaines, Kelloggs- 

ville. 
Cuttenbacker John, 1 Walker, Mill 

Creek. 
Cutts George, 21 Courtland, Courtland 

Center. 
CUYKENDALL JASPER, 23 Bowne, 

Bowne. 
Cuykendall Solomon, 23 Bowne, 

Bowne. 



JAMES GALLUP, WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DRUGGIST, No. « Canal Street 



D 



Dager John, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 

Daggett Marshall, 36 Sparta, English- 
ville. 

Daggett William, 38 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Daily Henry, Grandvilie. 

Daily John, 20 Grand Rapids. 

Dalberg Charles, 28 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Daily Dennis, 11 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

Daley James, 2 Plainfield, Rockford. 

Danforth Albert, 2 Plainfield, Rock- 
ford. 

DANFORTH MORTIMER W., 9 Cas- 
cade, Cascade. 

DANFORTH WILLIAM A., Rockford. 

DANIELS AARON F., 31 Vergennes, 
Lowell. 

DANIELS CHAS. H., 7 Lowell, Lowell. 

Daniels John S., 33 Vergennes, Lowell. 

Daniels Howard, Rockford. 

Daniels Napoleon, 32 Cascade, Alaska. 
DANIELS THOMPSON L, 33 Ve.- 
g nnes, Lowell. 



Daniels William, 36 Grattan, Smyrna, 

Ionia County. 
Damelson Andrew, 19 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Darling Edward, 8 Alpine, Pleasant. 
Darling Elias, 18 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Darling George, 22 Alpine, Alpine. 
Darling Hiram H., 10 Paris, Grand. 

Rapids. 
DARLING MARTIN, 21 Lowell, Low- 

elll. 
Darling Silas, 16 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
DARLING SAMUEL, 25 Grand Rap- 
ids. 
Darrow Alexander L., 31 Courtland, 

Rockford. 
Darrow John, 31 Courtland, Rockford. 
Darrin ByrOn, 5 Nelson, Sand Lake. 
DART FREEMAN, 3 Vergennes, Alton. 
Darwin Erastus, 27 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Daugherty John, 1 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 



PORT'S ENEMY OF PAIN CURES TOOTHACHE AND NEURALGIA 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 187 



U. B. WILLIAMS, 



DEALER IX 



Orooli.ery, G-lass cto Olxina "W «,!•©. 

CASH PAID FOR SHEEP PELTS AND PRODUCE. 



Goods Delivered in Town Free of Charge. 

j*miz*mn^a*>~ W. C. Denison, 

-^^^^^ STV ' (iHAXl) RAPIDS, MICH. 

WYKE'S 

PHOTOGRAPH GALLERY, 

48 IMIOItTIR/OE ST., 

The Best Place in town to get Photographs, 
and all kinds of Sun Pictures. 



Jwtow* cotorttl it* f nit, <$il aud Water Mm. 



No. 4k8 Monroe St., 

GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 



188 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Davenport Aaron, 30 Plainfield, Mill 

Creek. 
Davenport George, 9 Oakfield, Oak- 
fieUl. 

Davenport George, 16 Cannon Cannons- 
burg. 

Davenport Ithamer, 30 Plainfield, Mill 
Creek. 

Davenport Jonathan, 19 Plainfield, 
Mill Creek. 

Davenport Mrs. Miriam, 30 Plainfield, 
Mill Creek. 

DAVIS ALBERT W. 12 Cannon, Bost- 
wick Lake. 

Davis Alonzo, 13 Paris, Cascade. 

Davis Alanson, 23 Algoma, Edgerton. 

Davis Abraham, 26 Paris, Grand Rap- 
ids. 

Davis Alexander D., 27 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

Davis Asa B., 27 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Davis Chyler, B., 29 Oakfield, Oak- 
field. 

Davis Daniel, 14 Courtland, Courtland 
Center. 

Davis Dennis G., 15 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Davis Daniel S., 15 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 



Davis John, jun., 23 Algoma, Edger- 
ton. 

Davis John H., Rockford. 

Davis James M., 25 Sparta, English- 
ville. 

Davis Jerome, 9 Wyoming, Grandville. 

DAVIS JAMES P., 19 Oakfield, Oak- 
field. 

Davis Jordan, 16 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

Davis Josepti, 29 Courtland, Rockford 

Davis John, 23 Algoma, Edgerton. 

Davis John, 20 Grand Rapids. 

DAVIS ISAAC D., 29 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

DAVIS KING S., 16 Plainfield, Bel- 
mont. 

Davis L. H., 14 Wyoming, G. Rapids. 

DAVIS LUTHER B., 25 Grand 
Rapids. 

Davis Martin, 17 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

DAVIS MARTIN, Rockford. 

Davis Nancy N., 12 Cannon, Bostwick 
Lake. 

Davis Perry M , 23 Algoma, Edgerton. 

DAVIS PETER, 3 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 



SASH. GLASS AND PUTTY, AT W. D. FOSTER'S, 14 and 16 Monroe Street. 



Davis Elisha, Rockford. 

Davis Ezekiel W., 20 Grand Rapids. 

DAVIE EDWARD, 7 Cannon, Rock- 
ford. 

DAVIS EBENEZER, 9 Wyoming, 
Grandville. 

Davis Emmet B., 20 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Davis Franklin M., 18 Cascade, Cas- 
cade. 

Davis Frank, 14 Wyoming, Grand Rap- 
ids. 

Davis George, Lowell. 

DAVIS GEORGE C, 27 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

DAVIS GEORGE W., 36 Bowne, Fill- 
more, Barry County. 

DAVIS HIRAM R., 10 Courtland, 
Courtland Center. 

Davis Henry, 24 Grattan, Smyrna, 
Ionia County. 

DAVIS H. B., 20 Grand Rapids, Grand 
Rapids. 

DAVIS HORACE W., Grandville. 

DAVIS HENRY S., 7 Cannon, Rock- 
ford. 

DAVIS JOHN S., 34 Grand Rapids. 



Davis Reuben, 1 Cannon, Bostwick 
Lake. 

Davis Reuben E., 9 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

Davis Stephen B., 26 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Davis Solomon, 20 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Davis Wm. H. H., 29 Oakfield, Oak- 
field. 

DAVIS WM. R., 19 Oakfield, Oakfield. 

Davis, Wm. W., 34 Ada, Ada. 

Davison William, 17 Byron, Byron 
Center. 

Davidson Walter, 8 Ada, G. Rapids. 

DAVIDSON WILLIAM C, South 7 
Walker, Grand Rapids. 

Dawley Charles K., Rockford. 

Dawson David, Lowell. 

Dawson Elias, Lowell. 

Dawson Heman F., Lowell. 

Dawson James H., Lowell. 

Dawson Richard L., 35 Vergennes, 
Lowell. 

Day Elexis, 20 Lowell, Lowell. 

DAY LEVI, Grandville. 

DEACON ELIJAH E., Cedar Springs. 

Deacon Jonathan, 17 Paris, G. Rapids. 

WE RECOMMEND FORT'S MEDICINES THROUGH THE LAND. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 189 

PETER C. SHICKELL, 

DEALER IN 

CHOICE FAMILY GROCERIES! 

Flour, Feed, Canned Fruits, Vegetables, Yankee Notions, 
Crockery, Glassware, &c. 

HIGHEST I'RICE PAID for FARMERS PRODUCE, 
Corner of Front and Leonard Sts. 9 West Side, 

GRAND RAPIDS, - MICHIGAN. 

EAGLE W^99Mmp 

COR. WATERLOO AND LOUIS STREETS. 



STRICTLY TEMPERANCE. 



A. R. ANTISDEL, - Proprietor. 

J. H. FAEWELL, 

UNDERTAKER. 



-♦ — ■» • 



Coffins and Caskets at Wholesale and Retail. 



26 L"Y"03ST STREET, 

Opposite the Post Office, 
Residence, Bostwick St., between Lyon and Bronson, 

Grand Rapids, - - Michigan. 



190 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Deal, Joshua, 25 Oakfield, Ashley. 

Deal Jasper, 35 Oakfield, Ashley. 

DEAL SOLOMON, 35 Oakfield, Ashley. 

DEAN ALEXANDER, 21 Courtland, 
Courtland Center. 

Dean, A. J., Lowell. 

Dean Bethuel P., 31 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

DEAN D. J., 20 Grand Rapids. 

Dean Elisha, 32 Nelson, Cedar Springs. 

Dean John F., Lowell. 

Dean Mor'imer B., 16 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Dean Russell J., 3 Caledonia, Alaska. 

DEAN WM. A., 33 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

De Boer Brown, 10 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

De Bout Leonard, 18 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

DEARLING JAMES, Lowell. 

De Camp E. W., 25 Bvron, Cody's Mills. 

DECK WILLIAM, 3 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Decker George, 31 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia. 

Decker Mrs. Maria, 20 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

DECKER MICHAEL S., Lisbon 



Delavan John, 3 Nelson, Sand Lake. 

Demings Phillier, 30 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville 

Deming Aaron S., 23 Bcwne, Bowne. 

Deming Charles, 23 Bowne, Bowne. 

Demor Lander, 8 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Dempsey Simpson, 2 Plainfield, Rock- 
ford. 

Demund Edward, 3 Gaines, Hammond. 

Demund George R., 3 Gaines, Ham- 
mond. 

Denise William, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 

Denise David H., 11 Lowell, Lowell. 

DEN1SON CALVIN W., Cedar Springs. 

Denison Henry A., 28 Alpine, Indian 
Creek. 

Denison William, 17 Alpine, Grand 
Rapids. 

DENNIS AARON. 19 Vergennes, Ver- 
gennes. 

Dennis Byron, 19 Vergennes, Ver- 
gennes. 

Dennis James, 24 W r yoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

Dennis John, 19 Vergennes, Vergennes. 

Dennis Leonard L., 11 Oaktield, Green- 
ville. 

Dennis Mahlon, 32 Ada, Ada. 



BUY PATENT MEDICINES AT 6 Canal Street 



Decker William, 17 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 
DE COU GEO. W., 23 Nelson, Nelson. 
DE COU BENJ. F., 24 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Deen John J., Cedar Springs. 
Deer George, 2 Plainfield, Rockford. 
De Forrest Sylvester, 14 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Delreze John, 32 Grand Rapids. 
Defries W., 29 Grand Rapids. 
Deger James, 22 Walker, Grand Rapids. 
De Glopper Cornelius, 3 Wyoming, 

Grand Rapids. 
De Groot Dirk, 19 Wyoming, Grand- 

ville. 
De Graw Augustus M., 2 Oakfield, 

Greenville. 
De Graw John, 3 Oakfield, Greenville. 
De Graw Joseph, 32 Spencer, Oakfield. 
De Graw Nelson, 31 Spencer, Oakfield. 
DEISHER CHARLES, 34 Ada, Ada. 
De Jonge Ingle, 4 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
DELANEY JOHN, 4 Vergennes, Alton. 
DELANEY KER, 35 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
Delaney William, 4 Vergennes, Alton. 



DENNIS WM. H., 16 Oakfield, Oak- 
field. 

Dennis Mrs. Eleanor, 1.1 Ada, Ada. 

Dennis James A., 15 Ada, Ada. 

Dennison Lorenzo N., 17 Alpine, Grand 
Rapids. 

Dennison Morris W., 3 Cascade, Ada. 

DENNISON DANIEL P., 34 Ada, Ada. 

Denison Henry C, 11 Cascade, Cas- 
cade. 

DENNEY MAXIM, 24 Vergennes, Fal- 
lassburg. 

Dennison Asahel J., 14 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Dennison Barnard M., 14 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Denison Charles M., 8 Cascade, Cas- 
cade. 

Denmau John, 1 Oakfield, Greenville. 

Denmau Joseph, 1 Oakfield, Greenville. 

Denny Jesse F., 33 Ada, Ada. 

Denny Joseph, Lowell. 

Denny Joseph, 1 Lowell, Lowell. 

Densmore Luther, 34 Ada, Ada. 

Dent Samuel, BurchvLle (Burch's Mills.) 

Denton Alexander, 36 Vergennes, 
Lowell. 



THIS LINE IS TO ADVERTISE FORT'S LINIMENT AND PILLS. 



SISTOKY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



191 



Denton George, 36 Vergennes, Lowell. 

Denton George, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 

Denton Joseph, 2 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

De Pew John, 33 Algoma, Rockford. 

De Pew Ralph, 36 Algoma, Rockford. 

DERMITT THOMAS, 31 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

De Ruiter Henry R., Grandville. 

Detray Albert C, 26 Gaines, Cody's 
Mills. 

Detray Henry M., 32 Gaines, Cody's 
Mills. 

DETRAY JACKSON B., 26 Gaines, 
Cody's Mills. 

Detwilder Abraham W., 7 Caledonia, 
Hammond. 

Detwilder Isaac, 29 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia Station. 

Detwilder Joseph, 28 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia Station. 

Deuel Joseph, 35 Courtland, Rockford. 

De Vail Elizabeth, 12 Cascade, Cascade. 

DEVENDORF CLARK M., Lowell. 

DEVENDORF C. V., 29 Grand Rapids, 
Grand Rapids. 

Devendorf David, 17 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

DEVENDORF J. J., Lowell. 



De Young Gurt, 29 Grand Rapids. 

Dias David, 19 Gaines, Gainesville. 

Dias John, Sr., 19 Gaines, Gainesville. 

DIAS JOHN, Jr., 19 Gaines, Gaines- 
ville. 

Dias James, 19 Gaines, Gainesville. 

Dias William, 19 Gaines, Gainesville. 

Dibri Peter, 19 Byron, Byron Center. 

Dice Stephen, 35 Alpine, Alpine. 

Dickson Daniel, 18 Vergennes, Ver- 
gennes. 

Dickson Edward, 18 Vergennes, Ver- 
gennes. 

Dickerson Gilbert, 15 Plainfield, Bel- 
mont. 

Dickerson Isaiah, 16 Plainfield, Belmont 

Dickerson James H., 16 Plainfield, Bel- 
mont. 

DICKERSON SILAS M., 9 Oakfield, 
Oaktield. 

DICKINSON G. W., 22 Grand Rapids. 

Dicks John, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 

DIETRICH C. J., 29 Grand Rapids. 

DIEFENBACKER JACOB, Alaska. 

Dietfen backer Jacob, 9 Caledonia, Al- 
aska. 

Diefenbaeker Philip, Alaska. 

Dikemaster John, 20 Gaines, Grand 
Rapids. 



TINNER'S STOCK, AND TINWARE, AT W. D. FOSTER'S, 14 and 16 Monroe-st 



DEVINE EDWARD, 8 Vergennes, Ver- 
gennes. 

Devine John, 4 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 

Devine Mary A., 3 Vergennes, Alton. 

Devine William, 8 Vergennes, Ver- 
gennes. 

Devore Ransom, 1 Alpine, Englishville. 

Devore William, 7 Plainfield, English- 
ville. 

De Vriend Charles, 7 Ada, Grand 
Rapids. 

Dewey Egbert, 21 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

Dewitt Issacher, 2 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

Dewey Lafayette, 25 Oakfield, Green- 
ville. 

De Wolf John, 29 Plainfield, Grand 
Rapids. 

DEYARMOND ALEX. P., 10 Ver- 
gennes, Alton. 

DE YOUNG ADRIAN D., 26 Grand 
Rapids. 

De Young Cornelius, 29 Grand Rapids. 

De Young James, 26 Grand Rapids. 

DE YOUNG JOHANNES, 29 Grand 
Rapids. 



Dikestraw Garam, 32 Grand Rapids. 

Dikestraw John, 29 Grand Rapids. 

Dikestraw William, 29 Grand Rapids. 

Dikestraw John, 32 Grand Rapids. 

Dikeman Reynard, 5 Cascade, Cascade. 

DILLENBACK BYftON A., 14 Wyo- 
ming, Grand Rapids. 

DILLENBACK CHRISTIAN, 14 Wyo- 
ming, Grand Rapids. 

DILLENBACK GEO. W., 35 Wyo- 
ming, Grand Rapids. 

Dildine Harmon, 4 Algoma, Rockford. 

Dilley Calvin F., 30 Algoma, Sparta 

DILL1NGER JOHN M., 29 Bowne, 
Harris Creek. 

Dillingham James C, 18 Cannon, 
Rockford. 

Dimick Leander B., 11 Grattan, Grat- 
tan Center. 

Dines Joseph, 28 Solon, Cedar Springs. 

Dines Philip, 21 Solon, Cedar Springs. 

Dines Wm., 21 Solon, Cedar Springs. 

Dinger Joseph, 13 Walker, Grand Rap- 
ids. 

Ditmus J., 7 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Divine Wm. H., 17 Oakfield, Oakfield. 



FORT'S REMEDIES ARE SAFE AND RELIABLE. 



192 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



DIVINE LEANDER G., 19 Oakfield. 
Oakfield. 

DIVINE WILLIAM, 24 Caledonia, Cal- 
edonia. 

Dixon Mrs. Isabel, 13 Ada, Vergennes. 

Dixon Roger, 34 Walker, Grand Rap- 
ids. 

Dobson John, 4 Walker, Grand Rap- 
ids. 

Dobson John, jr., 4 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Dockeray Clarence H., 6 Cannon, 
Rock ford. 

Dockeray Clarence, 25 Algoma, Edger- 
ton. 

DOCKERAY JOSEPH, 6 Cannon, 
Rock ford. 

Dockeray Joseph A., 5 Cannon, Rock- 
ford. 

DOCKERAY JAMES, 5 Cannon, Rock- 
ford. 

DOCKERAY R. L., Rockford. 

Dockeray Robert, (> Cannon, Rockford. 

Dockeray R. Lewis, 5 Cannon, Rock- 
ford. 

Dodge Henry A., 1 7 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Dodge Isaac, Lowell. 

Dodge Isaac F., Lowell. 

Dodge Joshua, 10 Lowell, Lowell. 



Dooley Patrick, 33 Bowne, Harris 

Creek. 
Doolittle Franklin, 27 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Dorand John, Grandville. 
Dory William, 8 Byron, North Byron. 
Doster Peter, Rockford. 
DOTY ELWOOD F., Lowell. 
DOTY JOHN S., 23 Algoma, Edgerton. 
Dougherty John, 27 Tyrone, Sparta 

Center. 
DOUGHERTY JERRY, 3 Plainfield, 

Rockford. 
Douglas Edward, 5 Walker, Indian 

Creek. 
Douglas James, 11 Caledonia, Alaska. 
DOUGLASS ORLIN, 24 Vergennes, 

Fallassburg. 
DOUGLASS ROBERT, 16 Grattan, 

Grattan Center. 
Dougla3 T., 18 Grand Rapids, Grand 

Rapids. 
DOUGHAN JOHN, 28 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Dowling John, 3 Walker, Grand Rap- 
ids. 
DOWLING MELVIN, 3 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
DOWLING WM. C, 14 Alpine, Alpine. 



BUY DRUGS AND MEDICINES AT J. GALLUP'S DRUG STORE, 6 Canal Street. 



DODGE OWEN, 20 Gaines, Gaines- 
ville. 

Dodson David, 35 Paris, Grand Rap- 
ids. 

Dole Charles, 16 Alpine, Grand Rapids. 

DOLE JAMES E., Burch's Mills. 

Dole Martin P., 33 Alpine, Indian 
Creek. 

Doller Jacob, 32 Byron, Byron Center. 

DONALDSON D WIGHT, 20 Grattan, 
Grattan Center. 

Donaldson James, 24 Plainfield, Aus- 
terlitz. 

Donaldson James, 26 Plainfield, Aus- 
terlitz. 

Donahoe Gerald, 21 Cascade, Cascade. 

Donahue Charles, 6 Oakfield, Oakfield. 

DONNELL J. O., 34 Grattan, Alton. 

Donovon Daniel, 2 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

Donovan Fulmoth, 24 Grattan, Grant. 

Donovon John, 2 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

Donovan William, 24 Grattan, Grant. 

Doody Patrick, 33 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 



DOWNER AVERY, 15 Alpine, Alpine. 

Downer Chas., Cedar Springs. 

DOWNER SILAS B., Burch's Mills. 

Downs Michael, 12 Ada. Ada. 

Downing Abraham, 28 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Downing Erastus, 14 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

Downing William, 3 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Doyle Barney, 4 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Doyle John, 8 Grand Rapids. 

Doyle John, 5 Vergennes, Alton. 

Doyle Michael, 20 Grand Rapids. 

Doyle Martin, 20 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 

Doyle Michael, 1 Ada, Cannonsburg. 

Doyle Owen, 30 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 

Doyle Thomas, 5 Vergennes, Cannons- 
burg. 

Doyle Thomas, 1 Ada, Cannonsburg. 

Doyle William, 29 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Draper Jacob S., 3 Bowne, Alto. 

Drake Dwight S., 34 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Drake Gilbert, 34 Sparta, Englishville. 

Drakey Frank, 16 Gaines, Hammond. 

Dresser A. L., Lowell. 

Dresser William, 15 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 

DREW DELOS, 28 Grand Rapids. 



TRY FORT'S REMEDIES. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



193 



DREW GEO. H., 20 Grand Rapids. 

Drew Patrick, 28 Grattan, Grattan. 

Drinkall John, 20 Byron, Byron Center. 

Drinkall William, 17 Byron, Byron Cen. 

DRINDLE A., Lowell. 

Dri8coli Daniel, 8 Vergennes, Alton. 

Driscoli Dennis, 8 Vergennes, Ver- 
gennes. 

Driscoli Daniel, Lowell. 

Driscoli Dennis, 32 Grattan, Alton. 

Driscoli D., 34 Walker, Grand Rapids. 

Driscoli John, 32 Bowne, Harris Creek. 

Driscoli James, 30 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Driscoli Michael, 30 Walker. G. Rapids 

Driscoli Mrs. Margaret, 30 Walker, 
Grand Rapids. 

Driscoli Patrick, 5 Vergennes, Ver- 
gennes. 

Druce Charles, 23 Cascade, Cascade. 

DRUCE MARK, 27 Bowne, Fillmore, 
Barry County. 

Dry Peter, 32 Grand Rapids. 

Dudbridge John, 24 Vergennes, Fal- 
lassburg. 

DUFF PATRICK, 34 Ada, Ada. 

Duffey Charles, 18 Paris, Grand Rap- 
ids. 

DUFFEY JEROME, 1 Plainfield, 
Rockford. 



Dunham James H., 17 Lowell, Lowell. 

Dunham Johnson A., Cedar Springs. 

Dunham Linnaeus, 31 Bowne, Harris 
Creek. 

Dunlap James H., 15 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

DUNDAP RILEY R., 15 Walker, 
Grand Rapids. 

DUNLAP SAMUEL M., 14 Walker, 
Grand Rapids. 

Dunn Dennis, 20 Lowell, Lowell. 

Dunn Joseph, 20 Lowell, Lowell. 

Dunn Lewis, 8 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Dunn Robert, 30 Algoma, Sparta Cen- 
ter. 

Dunn Win., 8 Lowell, Lowell. 

Dunnett Wm., 16 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Dunton R. M., 14 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

Dun woody William, Burch's Mills. 

Dupee David C, 24 Lowell, Lowell. 

DUPEE FRANK, 24 Lowell, Lowell. 

Durend Milo, 12 Byron, Gainesville. 

Durfee Milton J., 14 Nelson, Nelson. 

Durfey Nathan, 26 Ada, Ada. 

Duster Peter, Rockford. 

Dutcher Charles, 32 Ada, Ada. 



JAMES GALLUP, WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DRUGGIST, No. 6 Canal Strett 



Duffey James, 15 Vergennes, Lowell. 
Duffey Robert, 1 Plainfield. Rockford. 
Duffle William, 6 Oakfield, Oakfield. 
Duffy Cairn, 34 Walker, Grand Rapids. 
Duffy John ; 9 Vergennes, Alton. 
Duffy Patrick, 34 Walker, G. Rapids. 
DUGA JEROME A., 27 Grattan, Lowell. 
Duga Alexander, 27 Grattan, Lowell. 
DULEY JAMES, 17 Algoma, Rockford. 
Dumas Peter, 23 Nelson, Nelson. 
Dumphy Adam, Rockford. 
Dunphey Addison, Rockford. 
Duncan Ebenezer, 22 Cascade, Cascade. 
Dundas A. A., 20 Grand Rapids. 
DUNHAM ABNER, 32 Grand Rapids. 
DUNHAM ANDREW J. Grandville. 
Dunham Charles B., 16 Caledonia, Al- 
aska. 
Dunham Eden S., Grandville. 
Dunham John F., Grandville. 



Dutcher Charles W., 32 Ada, Ada. 

Dutcher David, 14 Caledonia, Alaska. 

Dutmers John, 19 Plainfield, Alpine. 

Dutmers Martin, 1 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

Dutt Philip, Grandville. 

DUTTON ALFRED, 24 Alpine, Alpine. 

Dutton Ira, 24 Alpine, Alpine. 

Dutton Edwin, 24 Alpine, Alpine. 

Dutton Ralph, 24 Alpine, Alpine. 

DWYER JAMES, 26 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia. 

Dwyer William, 26 Caledonia, Caledo- 
nia. 

Dwyer Walter, 26 Caledonia, Caledonia. 

Dwyer Edward, 31 Plainfield, Mill 
Creek. 

Dyer John, Sparta Center. 
, Dygert Thomas, 13 Caledonia, Alaska. 

Dyke Jacob L., 8 Wyoming, Grandville. 



LUMBERMEN USE FORT'S WESTERN LINIMENT. 

25 



194 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 



E 



Eagan Mrs. Catherine, 5 Caledonia, 
Alaska. 

Eogan Keeran, 4 Caledonia, Alaska. 

Earhardt John, 28 Ada, A<?a. 

Earhardt William, 28 Ada, Ada. 

Eardley James W., 21 Cascade, Cascade. 

Eardly John, 19 Cascade, Cascade. 

Eardly James, 20 Cascade, Cascade. 

Eardiey Patrick. 32 Cascade, Cascade. 

EARDLY WILLIAM, 20 Cascade, Cas- 
cade. 

EARDLY THOMAS, 19 Cascade, Cas- 
cade. 

Earle Adeibert, 13 Plainfield, Rockford. 

Earl Catharine, 4 Courtland, Courtland 
Centre. 

EARLL NATHAN, 13 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Easterby James, 27 Lowell, Lowell. 

Easrerbrook Henry, 16 Lowell, Lowell. 

Eastman Alexander, 20 Tyrone, Oas- 
novia. 

Easton E. A., 17 Grand Rapids. 

Eastwood Charles, 11 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

Eaton E. L., 12 Lowell, Lowell. 



Edgerton Zeno, 18 Algoma, Sparta Cen. 

Edie D. W., Lowell. 

E<lie James, Lowell. 

Edie S. N., 36 Alpine, Grand Rapids. 

Edie William, Lowell. 

Edison Albert R., 27 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Edison Enos, 2 Walker, Grand Rapids. 
Edison George M., 21 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Edison George, 2 Walker, G. Rapids. 
Edison Haines, 2 Walker, Grand Rapids. 
Edison Isaac, 9 Walker, Grand Rapids. 
EDISON JOHN, 27 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
EDISON JAMES R., 21 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
EDISON JOHN II., 2 Alpine, English- 

ville. 
Edison Milo II., 2 Walker, G. Rapids. 
Edison Mrs. 0. M., 28 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Edmunds Samuel F., 5 Lowell, Lowell. 
Edwards Charles B., 10 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 



SASH, DOOaS AND BLINDS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S, 14 and 16 Monroe Street. 



Eber Aaron, 20 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Ebras> Henry, 11 Alpine, Alpine. 
Ecker Win. S., 5 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Ecker Win. J., Lowell. 
Ecklestaffer Ernest, 21 Plainfield, Bel- 
mont. 
ECKLESTAFFER LEONARD, 21 

Plainfield, Belmont. 
Eddy Charles, 16 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 
Eddy Charles C, Lisbon. 
Eddy Mrs. E. M., 16 Alpine, Alpine. 
Eddy James, 33 Plainfield, Grand 

Rapids. 
EDDY MRS. MALINDA, Lisbon. 
EDDY MRS. MARION A., Cedar 

Springs. 
Eddy Maieom, 16 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
Eddy Wallace, 15 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
EDDY WM. H., Lowell. 
Ede Edwin E. H., 11 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Edgerton Albert, 2 Plainfield, Rock> 

ford. 
Edgerton Curtis, 32 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 



Edwards Ephraim, 7 Yergennes, Ver- 
gennes. 

Edwards H. B., 10 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

Edwards Henry E., 10 , Wyoming, 
Grandville. 

EDWARDS JAMES, 15 Oakfield, Oak- 
field. 

Edwards P. S., Rockford. 

Eggleston Harvey, 35 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 

EGGLESTON HARRISON, 8 Cannon, 
Rockford. 

Eggle9ton James, 35 Algoma, Rockford. 

Eldridge Daniel, 8 Caledonia, Alaska. 

Eldridge Edward, 8 Caledonia, Alaska. 

ELDRIDGE EDGAR M., 24 Grattan, 
Grattan Center. 

Eldridge Harry W., 24 Grattan, Grant. 

Eldridge Ira, io Courtland, Courtland 
Center. 

Eldridge Ira, Jr., 10 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Eldridge Charles J., 7 Caledonia, 
Alaska. 

Eldridge Charles, 10 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 



FORT'S WESTERN LINIMENT CURES ALL LAMENESS* 



HI8T0RY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 195 

E. B. ESCOTT, 

Wholesale and Retail 

DRUGGIST, 

57 Canal Street, 

GRAND RAPIDS, - - MICHIGAN, 



DEALER IN ALL TUG 



Popular Proprietary Medicines, 

Pure Drugs, Wines and Liquors, California 

Wines, Isabella and Catawba Wines, from 

the Urbana Wine Co., New York, 

^VtT A. IEL H A N T E 33 P U H. E ! 

AGENT FOB 

Wye tli's Medicinal Preparations, 

WARNER'S SUGAR-COATED PILLS, AND PARKE, 
JENNINGS & CO'S FLUID EXTRACTS. 

Also on hand, a large stock of 

Paint Brushes, Paints, dry and ground in Oil, 
Linseed Oil, Turpentine, Lubricating Oils, of 
different grades, at 

MANUFACTURERS' PH.IOEIS ! 

Pure White Lead, from the Best Manufacturers, Artists' Brushes, 

Gold Leaf, Bronze, Tube Colors, and other articles 

too numerous to mention, 

All of the Best Quality and at Reasonable Prices. 



196 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 



Eldridge Chas. J., 7 Caledonia, Alaska. 

Eldridge Reuben N. ? 24 Grattan, Grat- 
tan Center. 

Eldridge William, 10 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Eldridge Win. J., 16 Byron, Byron Cen. 

ELDRED A. J., 15 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Eldred Amos, 12 Plainfield, Rockford. 

ELDRED BENEDICT, 8 Plainfield, 
Belmont. 

Eldred Clarisa, 8 Cannon, Rockford. 

ELDRED JOHN, 17 Cannon, Auster- 
litz. 

ELDRED SAMUEL T., 5 Plainfield, 
Belmont. 

ELK1NS AUGUSTUS W., 35 Court- 
land, Rockford. 

Elkins Squire F., 30 Court-land, Rock- 
ford. 

ELKINS WM. J., 6 Grattan, Bostwick 
Lake. 

ELMONDORPH JAMES L., 18 Walker, 
Grand Rapids. 

Elmer Charles, Burchville (Burch's 
Mills.) 

Ellerton Thomas, 20 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 



ELLSWORTH ZARA W., 5 Nelsen, 
Sand Lake. 

Elsby Daniel B., 33 Plainfield, Grand 
Rapids. 

Elsbey James, 31 Oakfield, Oakfield. 

Elsbey John E., 31 Oakfield, Oakfield. 

Ellwell Chauncey, 12 Byron, Gainesville. 

Ely John J., Rockford. 

Emerson George, 33 Walker, G. Rapid9. 

Emery Hiram, 33 Nelson, Cedar Springs. 

Emery Horace F., 9 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Emmert Isaac, 21 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

Emmons Andrew K., 14 Byron, Byron 
Centre. 

Emmons Christopher, 18 Algoma, 
Sparta Centre. 

Emmons Charles E., 29 Caledonia, Cal- 
edonia Station. 

EMMONS CHARLES, 11 Grattan, 
Grattan Centre. 

EMMONS DAVID V., 15 Oakfield, Oak- 
field. 

Emmons Ervin J., Sparta Centre. 

Emmons Hiram, 13 Grattan, Otisco, 
Ionia Co. 

EMMONS JOHN T., 34 Wyoming, 
North Byron. 

BUY DRUGS AND MEDICINES AT J. GALLUP'S DRUG STORE, 6 Canal Street. 



ELLIS ALFRED, 10 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

ELLIS ARTHUR, 7 Bowne, Alaska. 

Ellis Albert G., Village Cannonsburg. 

Ellis Benjamin, 12 Caledonia, Alaska. 

Ellis Hiram, — Sparta, Sparta Center. 

Ellis Hiram, 27 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 

Elis Ira, Village Cannonsburg. 

Ellis John, Lowell. 

Ellis John J., 13 Alpine, Alpine. 

ELLIS JOHN, Grandville. 

Ellis Mrs. Maria, 7 Bowne, Alaska. 

Ellis Williard, 13 Alpine, Alpine. 

Elliott Dolly, £2 Oakfield, Oakfield. 

Elliott George M., 22 Oakfield, Oak- 
field. 

Elliott Henry, 31 Algoma, English vi lie. 

Elliott Hiram, 23 Plainfield, Austerlitz 

Elliott John H., 22 Oakfield, Oakfield. 

Elliott Nelson T., 22 Oakfield, Oakfield. 

Elliott William J., 4 Sparta, Sparta 
Centre. 

ELLMAKER CHARLES V., 34 Ada, 
Ada. 

Ellson F. W. C, Lowell. 
ELSWORTH A. M., Lowell. 
ELSWORTH HENRY, Rockford. 



Emmons John, 6 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 

Emmons Nicholas, 18 Algoma, Sparta 
Centre. 

Emmons Nicoll D., 34 Wyoming, North 
Byron. 

Emmons Simon, 9 Algoma, Sparta Cen. 

EMMONS WALK, 34 Wyoming, North 
Byron. 

Emmons Uriah, 6 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 

Emmons Uriah, 11 Grattan, Grattan 
Centre. 

Endres Fritz, 29 Byron, Byron Center. 

Eness Geo. L., 28 Ada, Ada. 

Engel Louis, 25 Wyoming, Grand Rap- 
ids. 

Engles John, 4 Lowell, Lowell. 

Engel Louis, 35 Wyoming, Grand Rap- 
ids. 

English Edward S., 36 Sparta, English- 
viile. 

English Joseph S., 36 Sparta, English- 
viile. 

English Joseph S. jun., 35 Sparta, Eng- 
hshville. 

English Richard S., 36 Sparta, English- 
ville. 



FORT'S WESTERN LINIMENT CURES RHEUMATISM. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



197 



JOHW FOK 




REPAIRER 

Of all kinds of 

Sewing Machines, 

Watches, Clocks, Jewelry, Etc., 

125 MONROE STREET, 

Grand Rapids, Mich. 



H. RINGELBERG, 



DEALER TS 



Flour, Feed, Liquors, Vegetables, Yankee Notions, Crockery, 

EARTHENWARE, &c. 

HIGHEST PRICE PAID for FARMERS PRODUCE. 

No. 159 Ottawa St., 
GRAND RAPIDS, - MICHIGAN. 




Wholesale Dealers in 



yahs 



mmmm 



} $ 



1& €amal Mi, 



*9J 



S. M. TYLER. 
W. L. GRAHAM. 
A, B. MINER. 
A. E. WOttPEN, 



GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 



198 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



English William S., 35 Sparta, English- 
ville. 

Ennig Goddfried, 31 Byron, New Sa- 
lem. 

ENOS RUSSELL J., Lowell. 

Enrich John, 80 Spencer, Spencer 
Mills. 

Enrich Leonard, 19 Spencer, Nelson. 

Entricon George, 28 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Entwistle Alfred, Lowell. 

Erb Moses, 24 Lowell, Lowell. 

ERB D. C, 13 Lowell, Lowell. 

Erwin .Tared, 28 Byron, Byron Center. 

Erler Titus, 24 Gaines, Caledonia Sta- 
tion. 

Ernst Frank, 10 Lowell, Lowell. 

Ernst Joseph, 10 Lowell, Lowell. 

ESCOTT GEORGE S., 15 Walker 
Grand Rapids. 

ESCOTT JOSEPH, 15 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Esterlee Peter, 15 Vergennes, Lowell. 

Esterlee Peter, jr., 15 Vergennes, Low- 
ell. 

Eulrich Philip, 33 Spencer, Spencer 
Mills. 

Evans Amos, 22 Plainfield, Austerlitz. 

Evans Alfred, 35 Bowne, Bovvne. 



Evans Edward, 30 Vergennes, Lowell. 
Evans Tra, 10 Wyoming. G. Rapids. 
EVANS JAMES A., 29 Gaines, Cody's 

Mills. 
EVANS NATHANIEL, Lowell. 
EVANS THOMAS, 11 Bovvne, Bowne. 
Evans Thomas J., 23 Plainfield, Aus- 
terlitz. 
Evans William, Sen., 12 Ada, Ada. 
Evans William. Jr., 12 Ada, Ada. 
Evans William L, 23 Byron, Byron 

Center. 
Evans Win., 26 Lowell, Lowell. 
Evarts S. H., 29 Grand Rapids. 
EVERETT BENJAMIN P., 22 Sparta, 

Sparta Center. 
Everet Tonas B., 2G Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 
Everts H. P., 25 Byron, Cody's Mills. 
Everts N. K., 25 Byron, Cody's Mills. 
Ewing Alexander, 10 Byron, Byron 

Center. 
Ewing George W., 26 Byron, Cody's 

Mills. 
EWING WEBSTER B., 6 Gaines, G. 

Rapids. 
EWING JAMES, 22 Grand Rapids, 

Grand Rapids. 



FAIRBANKS STANDARD SCALES, AT W. D. FOSTER'S, 14 and 16 Monroe Street. 



Evans Judson, 26 Sparta, Sparta Cen- 
ter. 
Evans Charles, 36 Sparta, Englisliville. 
Evans Charles, 23 Sparta, Sparta Center. 



EYER MICHAEL, 14 Gaines, Ham- 
mond. 
Eyester Matthias, 6 Oakfield, Oakfield. 



F 



Fahay Patrick, 20 Grand Rapids. 
Fain Michael, 7 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
FAIRCHILD A. B., 14 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Fairchild Benjamin, 17 Vergennes, 

Vergennes. 
Fairchild Benj., 29 Lowell, Lowell. 
Fairchild Mrs. Betsey, 15 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
FAIRCHILD BENJ., Cedar Springs. 
FAIRCHILD WM. F., 17 Vergennes, 

Vertrennes. 
Fairchild Eliezer, 35 Grand Rapids. 
Fairchild Horace R., 1 Caledonia, Al- 
. ask a. 

Fairchild Joseph E., Lowell. 
Fairchild John, 1 Caledonia, Alaska. 
Fairchild L. L., 29 Lowell, Lowell. 
Fairchild Mrs. N. A., Lowell. 



FALEN MICHAEL, South 5 Walker, 

Grand Rapids. 
FALLASS HENRY B., 24 Vergennes, 

Fallassburg. 
Fallasston James, 18 Cannon, Auster- 

li'z. 
Fallass J. Wesley, 24 Vergennes, Fal-' 

lassburg. 
FALLASS SILAS S., 23 Vergennes, 

Fallassburg. 
Fallass Silas S., jun., 23 Vergennes, 

Fallassburg. 
FALLASS WILLIAM A., Lowell. 
Fancher Andrew, 33 Grand Rapids. 
Fancett Charles, 19 Ada, Ada. 
Fannagan Lewis, 21 Cascade, Cascade. 
Fanning Peter, Lowell. 
Fanniburg Edward, 18 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 



FORT'S ENEMY OF PAIN CURES COLIC. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY Of KENT COUNTY. 



199 



Farmer Giles A., 23 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

Farmer David 0., 30 Lowell, Lowell. 

Farnam Reuben, 4 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

Farnham Benjamin, 7 Caledonia, Ham- 
mond. 

Farham Caroline E., 10 Cascade, Ada. 

Farnham Darwin, 18 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

FARNHAM WM. D., 7 Caledonia, 
Alaska. 

Farnsworth B. C, 27 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

FARR CHARLES, 5 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

FAKR ELI A., 13 Solon, Cedar Springs. 

PARK HENRY F., 14 Cannon, Can- 
nonsbnrtr. 

FARR JEHU, 32 Nelson, Cedar Springs. 

Farr Thomas, 5 Courtland, Cedar 
Springs. 

Farril John, 28 Cascade, Cascade. 

Farrall Garrett, 14 Ada, Ada. 

Farrall Michael, 11 Ada, Ada. 

Farrall William, 11 Ada, Ada. 

Fasel Matthias. 31 Bvron, Bvron Center 

FAUNCE CHESTER R., 34 Ada, Ada. 

Faulkner Arnold T., 11 Lowell, Lowell. 



Ferrand L., 34 Walker, Grand Rapids. 
Ferrand Louis G., 15 Wyoming, Grand- 

ville. „ 

Fero Charles G., Lowell. 

Fen James D., 13 Ada, Ada. 

FERO MUNSON B., 18 Vergennes, 
Vergennes. 

Ferris Josiah B., 31 Ada, Ada. 

FERRY A. P., 18 Cannon, Rockford. 

Ferry George, 24 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. . 

Ferry John, 18 Cannon, Rockford. 

FEHNER STEPHEN, 25 Nelson, Nel- 
son. 

FESSEL G. M., Cedar Springs. 

Fessendon Henry, 13 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

Fewlass John R., 11 Gaines, Hammond. 

Fiance Andrew, 24 Plainrield, Auster- 
litz. 

Fiance Cornelius, 24 Plainfield, Auster- 
litz. 

Field B. F., 15 Walker, Grand Rapids. 

Field Charles S., 20 Spirta, Sparta Cen. 

Field Chauncey B., 2 Alpine, English- 
ville. 

Field Gaylor, 35 Sparta, Englishville. 

Field Jesse B., 5 Alpine, Pleasant. 

Field John W., 28 Sparta, Lisbon. 



BUY PATENT MEDICINES AT 6 Canal Street 



Faulkner Frances E., 11 Lowell, Lowell 
Faurot David, 7 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Faurot James. 8 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
FAUST JOHN, 29* Grand Rapids. 
Faxon Samuel, Ada Village, Post- 
master. 
Fekin Edward, 1 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
Felo C. B., Lowell. 
Fenton Ambrose W., 14 Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 
Fenning Peter, 20 Lowell, Lowell. 
Fenn Edwin T., 34 Algoma, Rockford. 
Fenton Joseph, 18 Algoma. Sparta Cen. 
Fenton Lewis, 35 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 
Fenton Thomas, 2 Plainiieid, Rockford. 
Ferguson Andrew, 7 Byron, Grandville 
Ferguson B. C, 35 Solon, Cedar Springs 
Feiguson George, 2 By ion, North 

Byron. 
Ferguson James, 7 Ga'nee, Gainesville. 
Ferguson Matthew, 19 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
Ferguson Stephen, 29 Gaines, Grand 

Rapids. 
Ferrand Charles, 34 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 



Field Lyman, 6 Alpine, Pleasant. 

FIELD SYLVESTER IL, 35 Sparta, 
Englishville. 

Firield Jehial, 24 Vergennes, Fallass- 
burg. 

Firield Jehiel, 4 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 

Fitield Philbert E., 12 Courtland, 
Courtland Center. 

Filkins Alphonso, Lowell. 

Filkins Elijah, 15 Plainfield, Belmont. 

Filkins Hiram, Lowell. 

Filkins Isaac, 6 Lowell, Lowell. 

Filkins John, Lowell. 

Filkins William, 2 Caurtland, Court- 
land Center. 

FINCH ASA, 32 Grand Rapids. 

Finch Alfred, 33 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Finch Albert, 33 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Finch Franklin, 33 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Finch Henry, 27 Walker, G. Rapids. 

FINCH JAMES N., 8 Plainfield, Bel- 
mont. 

FINCH JAMES, 13 Grand Rapids. 

Finch Nathan, 8 Plainfield, Belmont. 

Finch Noah, 13 Grand Rapids. 

Finch William E., 8 Plainfield, Bel- 
mont. 



FORT'S ENEMY OF PAIN CURES CHOLERA MORBUS. 



200 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Findlay Alexander, 9 Ada, Ada. 

Findlay John, 9 Ada, Ada. 

Findlay William, 9 Ada, Ada. 

Fingleton Dan'l, 35 CannonJ Cannons- 
burg. 

FINGLETON PATRICK, 2 Ada, Can- 
nonsburg. 

Fingleton William, 34 Cannon, Can- 
nonsburg. 

Finn James, 8 Vergennes, Vergennes. 

Finn James, 1 Ada, Ada. 

Finn John, 1 Wyoming, Grand Rapids. 

Finney J. G., Lowell. 

Finney James A., 10 Paris, G. Rapids. 

FINTON CHAS. H., 20 Gaines, Cody's 
Mills. 

Finton James W., 20 Gaines, Cody's 
Mills. 

Fisher Albert, 17 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Fisher Albert, 29 Grand Rapids. 

Fisher Daniel, 33 Wyoming, North 
Byron. 

FISHER ELIAS T., 1 Plainfield, Rock- 
ford. 

FISHER JAMES, 29 Grand Rapids, 

Fisher Leonard, 30 Lowell, Lowell. 

FISHER LEVI W., Alaska. 

Fisher Michael, 24 Alpine, Alpine. 

Fisher William H., 34 Paris, G. Rapids. 



Fitzgerald Isaac, 33 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Fitzgeralds Joel, 18 Alpine, Pleasant. 

Fitzgerald Michael, 28 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Fitzgerald Michael, 6 Oakfield, Oak- 
field. 

Fitzgerald Patrick, 12 Lowell, Lowell. 

Fitzgerald Thomas, 34 Ada, Ada. 

Fitzgerald William, 10 Vergennes, 
Alton. 

FITRGERALDS WM, 7 Alpine, Pleas- 
ant. 

Fitzpatrick James, 1 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

Fitzpatrick Michael, 26 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

FITZPATRICK PATRICK, Rockford. 

Flanagin Isaac D., 3 Walker, Indian 
Creek. 

Flanagan John, 26 Grattan, Grant. 

Flanigan Terry, 24 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Flanigan Michael, 24 Oakfield, Ashley. 

Flannery Adeline, 24 Byron, Gaines- 
ville. 

Flanner Rodolphus J., 31 Plainfield, 
Grand Rapids. 

FLEMING MARTIN J., 30 Paris, 
Grand Rapids. 



MASONS' AND MECHANICS' TOOLS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S, 14 and 16 Monroe-st 



Fish Charles D., 10 Walker, G. Rapids. 
Fish Emory W., 1 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Fish John, 7 Cascade, Cascade. 
Fish Sanford G., 6 Cascade, Cascade. 
F.sk John W., 28 Grand Rapids. 
Fisk Nathaniel, 27 Walker, G. Rapids. 
Fisk William H., Sparta Center. 
Fitch Amasa, 31 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Fitch Benjamin, 30 Algoma, Sparta 

Center. 
Fitch Charles A., 14 Cannon, Bostwick 

Lake. 
Fitch Calvin, 14 Cannon, Bostwick 

Lake. 
Fitch George, 13 Algoma, Edgerton. 
Fitch Joseph, 30 Algoma, Sparta Cen- 
ter. 
Fitch Norton, 5 Alpine, Lisbon. 
FITCH NELSON H., 31 Walker, G. 

Rapids. 
FITCH WELLINGTON, 32 Sparta, 

Lisbon. 
FITCHET MERRITT, 3 Vergennes, 

Alton. 
Fitzmorris James. 8 Walker, G. Rapids. 
FITZGERALD DENNIS, 34 Ada, Ada. 
Fitzgeralds George, 7 Alpine, Pleasant. 



Fleming Watson B., 30 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
Flemming John, Cedar Springs. 
Fletcher David, 32 Cannon, Austerlitz. 
FLETCHER DANIEL C, 30 Cannon, 

Austerlitz. 
Fletcher George, 1 Vergennes, Alton. 
Fletcher Jerome, 24 Lowell, Lowell. 
FLETCHER JESSE, 13 Lowell, Lowell. 
Fletcher James, 27 Plainfield, Grand 

Rapids. 
Fletcher John, 13 Lowell, Lowell. 
Fletcher James, 1 Vergennes, Alton. 
Fletcher John R., 30 Cannon, Aus- 
terlitz. 
Fletcher Levi, 13 Lowell, Lowell. 
Flood Dennis, 27 Grand Rapids. 
Flood Thomas, 27 Grand Rapids. 
FLUENT ANDREW J., 22 Solon 

Cedar Springs. 
FLYNN BERNARD, 33 Bowne, Harris 

Creek. 
Flynn Edward M., Jr., 28 Grattaa, 

Grattan Center. 
Flynn Edward, 28 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 



FORTS WESTERN LINIMENT IS THE BEST FOR HORSES. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



201 



FLYNN FRANK, 28 Bowne, Harris 
Creek. 

Flynn John, 34 Walker, Grand Rapids. 

Flynn James. 34 Walker, Grand Rapids. 

FLYNN PETER, 25 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia. 

Flynn William, 23 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

FOGARTY MRS. MARGARET, 31 
Walker, Grand Rapids. 

Fogle Jacob, 11 Alpine, Alpine. 

Foley James, 27 Plain field, G. Rapids. 

Foley John, 27 Plainfield, G. Rapids. 

Foley Martin, 11 Grand Rapids. 

Foley Thomas, 27 Plainfield, Austerlitz. 

Foley Thomas, 3 Ada, Ada. 

Follett Harmon L., 1 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

Folsom George, Sparta Center. 

Folsom Benj. G., 34 Ada, Ada. 

Fonger James, 24 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

Fonger Levi, 24 Wyoming, G. Rapids. 

Foote James, 32 Wyoming, Grand ville. 

Foote Merritt, 6 Oakfield, Cedar Springs 

Foote Lavias H., 11 Byron, Byron Cen. 

FOOTE OBED H., 8 Grand Rapids. 

FOOTE PETER S., 29 Grand Rapids, 
Grand Rapids. 



Ford Orren, 35 Grattan, Alton. 
FORD WARREN, 34 Grattan, Alton. 
Forman Edwin, Lowell. 
Forney Eli, 25 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Forrest James E., 20 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
FORT EDWIN M., Lowell. 
Fort John, 20 Lowell, Lowell. 
Fort John P., 20 Lowell, Lowell. 
Foster Abraham, 20 Lowell, Lowell. 
Foster Charles M., 13 Bowne, Bowne. 
Foster Emery, 14 Vergennes, Lowell. 
Foster Gilbert, 31 Bowne, Harris Creek. 
Foster John, 32 Ada, Ada. 
FOSTER NORMAN, 13 Bowne, Bowne. 
Foster Oscar, 21 Wyoming, Grandville. 
FOSTER RUFUS, JR., 35 Grattan, 

Alton. 
Foster Thomas H., 5 Paris, G. Rapids. 
Foster Wm. H., 14 Vergennes, Lowell. 
Fountain Benjamin, 35 Cascade, Alaska 
Fountain Cornelius, 29 Grand Rapids. 
FOWLER E. D., 20 Algoma, Sparta 

Center. 
Fox Ammond, 4 Algoma, Cedar Springs 
Fox Amos, 34 Bowne, Fillmore, Barry 

County. 
Fox Ambrose L., 6 Byron, Grandville. 
FOX BENTON D., Lowell. 



DETROIT SAFES, FIRE AND BURGLAR PROOF, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



Foote Wm. R., 2 Cannon, Bostwick 
Lake. 

Forbes John W., 2 Paris, Grand Rapids 

Forbes William, 3 Lowell, Lowell. 

Forbes William, 21 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

FORCE BRITTON, 5 CaDnon, Rock- 
ford. 

Fordham Theodore, 4 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

Ford Abel, 2 Vergennes, Alton. 

FORD ANNA M., 2 Vergennes, Alton. 

FORD ALFRED T., 2 Vergennes, 
Alton. 

Ford Abel, 21 Bowne, Bowne. 

Ford Amos, 11 Grattan, Grattan Center 

Ford Alfred T., 11 Lowell, Lowell. 

Ford Andrew C., Cedar Springs. 

FORD CHESTER S., Cedar Springs. 

Ford Hiram, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 

Ford Horace B., 25 Grattan, Smyrna, 
Ionia County. 

Ford Ira, 10 Vergennes, Alton. 

Ford Joseph T., 2 Vergennes, Alton. 

Ford John H., 2 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

FORD JACOB A., 16 Spencer, Spencer 
Mills. 

FORD LEVI, 24 Bowne, Bowne. 



Fox Charles, 13 Algoma, Edgerton. 

Fox Charles M., Lowell. 

FOX DANIEL R., 8 Caledonia, Alaska. 

Fox Erastus J., 22 Alpine, Indian Creek 

FOX GEORGE, Alaska Village* 

Fox Gilbert, 13 Algoma, Edgerton. 

Fox Henry, 6 Byron, Grandville. 

Fox John M., Lowell. 

Fox Jacob, 27 Vergennes, Lowell. 

FOX JAMES S., 33 Vergennes, Lowell. 

Fox Jacob, 29 Vergennes, Lowell. 

Fox Josiah, 29 Wyoming, Grandville. 

FOX JORDAN, 34 Bowne, Fillmore. 

Fox Wesley, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 

Fox William, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 

Fox Philip W., 27 Vergennes, Lowell. 

FOX RICHARD, 32 Vergennes, Lowell. 

Fox Theron J., 22 Alpine, Indian Creek. 

Fox William H., 27 Vergennes, Lowell. 

FRANCISCO CHAS., 26 Grattan, 
Alton. 

Francisco Chas. E., 34 Grattan, Alton. 

Francisco Henry D., 31 Bowne, Harris 
Creek. 

Francisco Jeremiah, 21 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 



26 



FORT'S MEDICINES ARE WARRANTED. 



202 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



FRANCISCO LEVI J., 27 Grattan, 

Alton. 
FRANCE W. W., 29 Grand Rapids. 
Frank George, 32 Spencer, Cedar 

Springs. 
Frantz John, 11 Byron, Byron Center. 
Fraser John H., 35 Cascade, Alaska. 
Fraser John C, 35 Cascade, Alaska. 
Fravel George, 5 Nelson, Sand Lake. 
Frawley James 24, Grand Rapids. 
Frawley Patrick, 19 Ada, G. Rapids. 
Frawley Simon, 24 Grand Rapids. 
Frawley Thomas, 24 Grand Rapids. 
Frayer Abram, 24 Cascade, Lowell. 
Frayer Martin J., 24 Cascade, Lowell. 
Frayer Robert, 24 Cascade, Lowell. 
Frazier Alex., Cedar Springs. 
Frazier Charles, 35 Ada, Ada. 
Frazier Darius N., 15 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
FRAZIER GEORGE, 31 Vergennes, 

Lowell. j ' 

Frazier Ira, 35 Ada, Ada. 
Frazier Nelson, 31 Vergennes, Lowell. 
Fredenberg Elijah, 32 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Freddelfeilt Henry, 13 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Free Daniel, 24 Byron, Cody's Mills. 



FREYERMUTH JOHN, 30 Lowell, 
Lowell. 

FREY ADAM, 30 Cannon. Austerlitz. 

Frick William, 30 Sparta, Lisbon. 

FRIEND CHRISTIAN P., 24 Paris, 
Grand Rapids. 

FBOST ALEXANDER B., Lisbon. 

Frost Charles J., 23 Plainfield, Auster- 
litz. 

FROST CHARLES H.. 20 Cascade, 
Cascade. 

Frost Sylvanus II., 31 Plainfield, Grand 
Rapids. 

FROST SAMUEL, 32 Plainfield, Grand 
Rapids. 

Frost Sylvanus, 34 Plainfield, Grand 
Rapids. 

Frost William, 9 Gaines, Hammond. 

Frost William, 25 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

Fry Allen S., 19 Oakfield, Oakficld. 

Fry Samuel M., 21 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Fry Wm. J., 9 Lowell, Lowell. 

Fulbert Peter, 13 Walker, G. Rapids. 

FULKERSON BURNETT, 19 Tyrone, 
Casnovia. 

FULKERSON LOT, 30 Tyrone, Cas- 
novia. 



JAMES GALLUP, WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DRUGGIST, No. 6 Canal Street 



Free Mrs. Huldah, 25 Byron, Cody's 
Mills. 

Free Patrick O., 19 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

Free William, 25 Byron, Cody's Mills. 

FREEMAN CYRUS, 31 Wyoming, 
Grandville. 

FREEMAN ERASTUS, Cedar Springs. 

Freeman George, 24 Vergennes, Fallass- 
burg. 

Freeman Seymour, 28 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

FREEMAN MORRIS, 16 Gaines, Grand 
Rapids. 

Freeman Otis, 32 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

Friedenthaler Christian, 20 Tyrone, 
Casnovia. 

French Arod, 18 Lowell, Lowell. 

French, Mrs. Deborah, 12 Lowell, Lo- 
well. 

French George, Rockford. 

French Hiram W., 9 Cascade, Cascade. 

French Steven, 30 Algoma, Sparta Cen- 
ter. 

French Wyman, 12 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 



Fuller Charles, 6 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
Fuller Elisha W., 10 Alpine, Alpine. 
Fuller Elijah, Lowell. 
FULLER EDWARD S., 13 Courtland, 

Courtland Center. 
Fuller Hiram, Rockford. 
Fuller Horatio, 6 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
Fuller Henry A., G Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
Fuller James, 6 Walker, Berlin. 
FULLER MORRIS, 27 Courtland, 

Courtland Center. 
Fuller O. B., Lowell. 
Fuller Olney B., Lowell. 
Fuller Suel, 6 Walker, Berlin. 
Fuller Sanford, 25 Ada, Ada. 
Fuller William, 24 Cascade, Cascade. 
FULLER WINDFIELD S., 11 Grattan 

Grattan Center. 
Fullerton S. S., Lowell. 
FULLINGTON GEORGE W., 10 Ver- 
gennes, Alton. 
Fullington Norman, 21 Vergennes, 

Lowell. 



FORT'S AROMATIC OINTMENT CURES PILES* 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 203 

Just What you have so long 1 Wanted, 



County Map. 

m • m 

Now is the Time to Get It. 
Louis Herrmann, 

MANUFACTURER OF 

Sast&ets $i Chairs* 

m~%-m 

I Re-Seat all Willow and Cane Chairs, 

AND 

MAKE TO onOEB Alt KtMOS OF RUSTIC WORK 

Division Street, Three Doors South of the Union Brewery, 

GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 

WM. P. INNES, 
And Business Agent, 

Attends to the Purchase and Sale of Farms, Wild Lands, Mills, Mill Sites, 
Town Lots, City Property, Bonds and Mortgages. 

AGENT FOB SALE OF KANSAS PACIFIC B. B. LANDS. 

Special Attention given to the Investigation of Tax Titles, Collection of Bents, 
Payment of Taxes and Conveyancing, 

No. 81 Monroe St,, 

QPPQSITE THE NATIONAL HOTEL, \JTTQiOl(X R&piClS, jVLlCll* 



204 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



FULLINGTON ORMUS, 21 Vergennes, 
Lowell. 

FurloDg Geo. W., 27 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Furman James W., Grandville. 



FURTNEY AMOS, 8 Gaines, Gaines- 
ville. 

FURTNEY SAMUEL C, 36 Gaines, 
Cody's Mills. 

Furtney Samuel F., 36 Gaines, Cody's 
Mills. 



Gains Frank, 24 Grattan, Grant. 
Gaines Frank, 10 Lowell, Lowell. 
Gaines J., 10 Lowell, Lowell. 
GAIN WILLIAM, 7 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Gaiter Nicholas, 26 Alpine, Indian 

Creek. 
Gale Benj. F., 15 Cascade, Cascade. 
Gallaway Andrew, Jr., Grandville. 
Gallaway Andrew S., Grandville. 
Gallaway Washington L., Grandville. 
Gallaway Wm. H., Grandville. 
Gallup Ira, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 
Gannon Chauncey S., 33 Gaines, Cody's 

Mills. 
Gano Julius C, 20 Alpine, G. Rapids. 
Ganson John, 29 Grand Rapids, Grand 

Rapids. 
Garber Henry, 16 Gaines, Gainesville. 



Gasper Joseph S., 25 Vergennes, Lowell 
Gaulthier Lewis, 1 Walker, G. Rapids. 
GAVIN JOHN, South 5 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Gavin Thomas, 34 Walker, G. Rapids. 
Gaylord Orson, 23 Vergennes, Fallass- 

burg. 
Gean James, 25 Cannon, Cannonsburg. 
Gee Charles, 31 Alpine, Indian Creek. 
Gee Orrin, 31 Alpine, Indian Creek. 
Gee Walter S., Rockford. 
Geges Henry, 1 Solon, Sand Lake. 
Geib George, 6 Caledonia, Alaska. 
GEIB NICHOLAS, 22 Gaines, Grand 

Rapids. 
Geiger George, 35 Bowne, Fillmore, 

Barry County. 
Geill Frank A., 27 Vergennes, Lowell. 



BAG TIES-SIMPLE, CHEAP AND EVERLASTING, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



GARDNER DANIEL C, 9 Sparta, 

Sparta Center. 
Gardiner Earls, 34 Ada, Ada. 
Gardner Frank N., 10 Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 
Gardner Ira, 34 Walker, Grand Rapids. 
GARDNER IRA, 9 Bowne, Alto. 
Gardner Ira, 25 Grattan, Smyrna, Ionia 

County. 
GARDENER JULIUS, Sparta Center. 
Gardner Jonathan, 28 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Gardner Robert II., 15 Cascade, Cas- 

GARDNER W. B., Lowell. 

GARFIELD SAMUEL M , 7 Paris, G. 
Rapids. 

Garity John, 16 Courtland, Courtland 
Center. 

Garity James, 16 Courtland, Courtland 
Center. 

Garlick Robert, 15 Plainfield, Belmont. 

Garlick William, 15 Plainfield, Bel- 
mont., 

Garrity Patrick, 10 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Gasper Freeman S., Lowell. 



Geill F. E., Lowell. 

Gelfoyle John, 33 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Gerald Fitz, 34 Grattan, Grattan. 
Gettings Louis, 8 Oakfield, Oakfield. 
Getman Warner F., 19 Spencer, Nelson. 
Gibby Abraham, 19 Paris, G. Rapids. 
Gibbs Alfred O., 23 Ada, Ada. 
Gibbs Mrs. Anna, 4 Ada, Ada. 
Gibbs Charles N., 23 Ada, Ada. 
Gibbs Calvin, 17 Byron, Byron Center. 
Gibbs Edmund L., 23 Ada, Ada. 
Gibbs James W., 23 Ada, Ada. 
Gibbs Job, 23 Ada, Ada. 
Gibbs Josiah H., 4 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
Gibbs Thomas W., 19 Alpine, Pleasant. 
Gibbs Wm. H., 4 Ada, Ada. 
Gibbon John, Grandville. 
Gibson Archibald K., 25 Ada, Ada. 
GIBSON CHARLES K., Ada Village. 
Gibson Henry, 21 Algoma, Rockford. 
GIBSON JOHN A., 2 Bowne, Alto. 
GIBSON WILLIAM, 14 Bowne, Bowne. 
Gibson William, 20 Lowell, Lowell. 
Giffin Johnson M., 13 Grattan, Otisco, 

Ionia County. 



FORT'S AROMATIC OINTMENT CURES SORE ETES. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 205 

SOUTHWICK & WRIGHT, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

CROCKERY, 

China, 










AND 



HOUSE FURNISHING GOODS 

Also a Fine Assortment of 

Silver Plated Ware, Table Cutlery, Lamps, 
Burners and Chimneys, 

Of tla© Best Stylo and. <^\x«,lity, 

And all Goods pertaining to the Crockery Business, offered at 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL. 

44 Monroe St., 

Grand Rapids, - - Michigan. 



206 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Gilbert Charles, 23 Byron, Cody's Mills. 

Gilbert David J., 19 Oakfield, Oakfield. 

Gilbert Egbert, 20 Lowell, Lowell. 

GILBERT JOHN W., 19 Oakfield, Oak- 
field. 

Gilbert John W., 30 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Gilbert Truman, 3 Byron, North Byron. 

Gilbert Thomas M., 12 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

Gilbert Norton, 23 Byron, Cody's Mills. 

Gilden Robert, 24 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Giles Alpha, 9 Byron, North Byron. 

GILES CHARLES L., 13 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

Giles Elijah, 25 Sparta, Sparta Center. 

Giles Edward W., 13 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

Giles Edwin, 13 Solon, Cedar Springs. 

GILES JOHN, Lowell. 

Giles Richard, 32 Grattan, Cannons- 
burg. 

Giles Richard, jr ,.32 Grattan, Cannons- 
burg. 

Gilfelling Joseph, 1 Algoma, Cedar 
Springs. 

Gilfoyle Michael, 28 Spencer, Spencer 
Spencer Mills. 

Gilfoyle William, 32 Spencer, Spencer 
Mills. 



Gillmore Henry, 19 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Gillmore James C, 19 Tyrone Cas- 
novia. 

Gilner Frederick, 2 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

Gilson Asa J., 32 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Gimble William, 17 Caledonia, Caledo- 
nia Station. 

Girdler Benjamin C, 7 Walker, Berlin. 

Girdler William P., 7 Walker, Berlin. 

Gitchell Lafayette, 22 Plainfield, Aus- 
terlitz. 

Glacier Seneca, 17 Caledonia, Alaska. 

Glass Cyrus, 16 Plainfield, Belmont. 

Glass Peter, 16 Plainfield, Belmont. 

GOBLE JACOB, 11 Vergennes, Alton. 

Godfrey George F., 5 Byron, North 
Byron. 

GODFREY GEO. II., 11 Vergennes, 
Alton. 

Godfrey Joseph G., 22 Bowne, Bowne. 

Godfrey Newcomb, 2 Vergennes, Alton. 

Godfrey Smith, 2 Vergennes, Alton. 

Godfrey Zerah, 22 Bowne, Bowne. 

Godwin Augustine, 13 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

Goff Charles, 17 Grand Rapids. 

Goff W. H., 31 Algoma, Englishville. 



BUY DRUGS AND MEDICINES AT J. GALLUP'S DRUG STORE, 6 Canal Street. 



Gillett Alex., 31 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Gitlet Dan'l A., 2 Alpine, Englishville. 

GILLETT GEO. H., 30 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Gillett Lewis E., 30 Paris, G. Rapids. 

Gillett Wilkes, 30 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Gill Buell, 4 Caledonia, Alaska. 

GILL CHARLES N., 16 Gaines, Ham- 
mond. 

Gill Isaac, 16 Gaines, Hammond. 

Gill Jay J., 6 Walker, Berlin. 

Gill Mrs. Joanna, 4 Caledonia, Alaska. 

GILL PATRICK, 15 Grand Rapids. 

Gill Simon, 15 Gaines, Hammond. 

GILL GODFREY, 28 Alpine, Indian 

GILLAM BENJAMIN, 22 Sparta, 
Sparta Center. 

Gillam John, 27 Sparta, Sparta Center. 

Gilieland James O., Rockford. 

GILMAN GEORGE, 26 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

Gilman Jacob M., 17 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Oilman Steven, 27 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

Gillmore Darwin, 31 Tyrone, Casnovia. 



Goggins Barney, 34 Bowne, Harris 

Creek. 
Goggins Patrick, 29 Bowne, Harris 

Creek. 
Goggin Thomas, 12 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
Goler John, 25 Alpine, Mill Creek. 
GOLDS GEORGE, 14 Ada, Ada. 
Golden Charles, 10 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Goldner John, 13 Alpine, Alpine. 
Goldsmith Vincent J., 30 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Gooch Benjamin, 1 Alpine, Englishville. 
Gooch Nathan W., 18 Plainfield, Alpine 
Goodell Duwane,9 Paris, Grand Rapids 
Goodell John, 9 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Goodell Warren, 9 Paris, Grand Rapids 
Goodenough Fred., 25 Ada, Lowell. 
Goodfruit Chas. G., 29 Ada, Ada. 
Goodfellow James, 22 Sparta, Sparta 

Center 
Gooding C. C, 7 Alpine, Pleasant. 
Gooding Richmond, 19 Alpine, Pleas- 
ant. 
Gooding Seymour, 20 Alpine, Grand 

Rapids. * 
Goodin Philip, 26 Vergennes, Lowell. 



FORT'S STICKING SALVE MAKES A GOOD PLASTER, 



HISTORY" AND DIRECTORY 0* KENT COUNTY. 



207 



Goodsell D. M., Lowell. 

GOODSELL JOHN 0., 24 Vergennes, 
Fallassburg. 

Goozen Peter, 15 Solon, Cedar Springs. 

GORDON GEO. W., 33 Cascade, Alaska 

Gordon Charles, 31 Lowell, Lowell. 

Gordon Harvey, Alaska. 

GORDON ISAAC H., 7 Cannon, Rock- 
ford. 

Gore John, 20 Grand Rapids. 

Gore John, Jr., 20 Grand Rapids. 

Gorham George W., 16 Cascade, Cas- 

GORHAM MARVIN, 4 Caledonia, 

GORMAN PATRICK, 10 G. Rapids. 
Gormin Patrick, 27 Ada, Ada. 
GOSCH ALBERT, 29 Bowne, Harris 

Creek. 
Gosch Henry, 29 Bowne, Harris Creek. 
Gosch Zerubabel, 29 Bowne, Harris 

Creek. 
Goss Benson O., 12 Cannon, Bostwick 

Lake. 
Goss Darius, 12 Cannon, Bostwick 

Lake. 
Goss Keyes IL, 19 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 



Graham James, 32 Cascade, Cascade. 

Graham John F., 26 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Graham Joseph, 27 Lowell, Lowell. 

Graham John G., Cedar Springs. 

Graham Jason, 27 Spencer, Spencer 

■ Mills. 

GRAHAM NELSON, 26 Courtland, 
Courtland Center. 

Graham Philip, 35 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

Graham Wm. K., 22 Lowell, Lowell. 

GRAHAM WM. B., 27 Lowell, Lowell. 

Gramberg Chas. A., Lisbon. 

Grant Alfred, 32 Algoma, Rockford. 

Grant George, 32 Algoma, Rockford. 

GRAJST GEORGE, Cedar Springs. 

Grant James, 13 Lowell, Lowell. 

Grant James, 8 Ada, Ada. 

Grant John, 32 Algoma, Rockford. 

GRANT JOHN, 15 Ada, Ada. 

Grant William, 5 Ada, Ada. 

Graves George G., 6 Gaines, Gaines- 
ville. 

Graves Jeremiah A., 24 Cascade, Lowell. 

Graves John W., 9 Ada, Ada. 

Graves N. B., 6 Ada, Ada. 

Graves William, 6 Ada, Ada. 



DISSTON'S NONPARIEL CROSS-CUT SAWS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



Goss Orin L., 11 Cannon, Bostwick 
Lake. 

Gougerty William, 20 Bowne, Harris 
Creek. 

Gould Charles, 8 Nelson, Cedar Springs. 

GOULD H. L., 10 Lowell, Lowell. 

Gould Joseph W., 27 Plainfield, Grand 
Rapids. 

Gould J. B., Sparta Center. 

GOULD NATHAN H., 35 Oakfield, 
Oakfield. 

Gould Piatt, 2 Oakfield, Greenville. 

Gould Simeon, 8 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

Gould Wm. W., 5 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Gouldsborough Robert J., 30 Nelson, 
Cedar Springs. 

GOVE EDMUND D., 15 Cascade, Cas- 
cade. 

Grachtrup Joseph, 35 A 1 pine, Grand 
Rapids. 

GRAHAM ARCHIBALD, 15 Grand 
Rapids. 

Graham Charles, 22 Lowell, Lowell. 

Graham Elwood, 27 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Graham James, 25 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 



GRAVES LIVEUS, 6 Gaines, Grand 
Rapids. 

GRAVES Mrs. M.B., 30 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Grawn Augustus, 16 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

Grawn Andrew, 8 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Gray Darius, 3 Oakfield, Spencer Mills. 

Gray James, 8 Wyoming, Grand ville. 

GRAY JAMES, 8 Caledonia, Alaska. 

Gray John, 33 Sparta, Englishville. 

Gray Lyman C, 29 Alpine, Indian 
Creek. 

Gray Ogden, 19 Cannon, Austerlitz. 

Gray Thomas, 13 Spencer, Spencer 
Mills. 

GRAY WM. H., 36 Grattan, Grant. 

GREEN ANSEL D., 14 Grattan, Grat- 
tan Centre. 

Green Birdsley, 19 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Greene Benjamin, Lowell. 

GREEN EDMUND, 8 Courtland, Court- 
land Centre. 

Green Henry, 12 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 

GREEN H. W., 26 Grand Rapids. 

Green Henry, 13 Grattan, Otisco, Ionia 
Co. 



TRY IT* 



208 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY* 



Green Isaac D., 15 Bowne, Bowne. 
Green Obidiah S M 32 Lowell Lowell. 
GREEN SAMUEL J., 35 Spencer, Spen- 
cer Mills. 
Green Thomas, 16 Grand Rapids. 
Green Wm., 11 Lowell, Lowell. 
GREEN WILLIAM W. G., 16 Bowne, 

Alto. 
GREEN WARREN, 8 Grand Rapids. 
Green William, 26 Grand Rapids. 
GREENLY HARLAN A., 20 Alpine, 

Grand Rapids. 
GREENMAN BRYAN, 18 Gaines, 

Gainesville. 
Greenwood Joseph, 6 Algoma, Sparta 

Centre. 
Gregory Abraham, 13 Algoma, Edger- 

ton. 
Gregory Giles, 27 Wyoming, G. Rapids. 
Gregory Lorenzo, 24 Cascade, Cascade. 
Greiner Julius, Lisbon. 
Gridley Charles, Grandville. 
Gridley George W., South 7 Walker, 

Grand Rapids. 
GRIDLEY WILLIAM C, South 6 

Walker, Grand Rapids. 
GRIFFIN CHARLES, 15 Plainfield, 

Belmont. 



Groner Jacob, 28 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Groner Theodore, 33 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Groner Valentine, 33 Cannon, Can- 
nonsburg. 

Groom Matthew, 16 Byron, Byron 
Center. 

Gross Alexander, 34 Algoma, Rockford. 

Grose Charles, 32 Solon, Cedar Springs. 

Grose Frank, 34 Algoma, Rockford. 

Grose Reuben, 34 Algoma, Rockford. 

GROSE WILLIAM, 20 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 

Gross Henry, 34 Algoma, Rockford. 

Gross J. P., Lowell. 

GROSS MICHAEL, 14 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Gross Samuel, 2 Plainfield, Rockford. 

Grossman Christian, 30 Cannon, Aus- 
terlitz. 

Grouw Jacob, 14 Grand Rapids. 

GROSVENOR EDWARD, 14 Solon, 
Cedar Springs. 

GRUNWELL WILLIAM, 3 Sparta, 
Sparta Center. 

Grutsch Peter, 17 Caledonia, Caledonia 
Station. 



BUY PATENT MEDICINES AT 6 Canal Street. 



Griffin James, 5 Vergennes, Cannons- 
burg. 

Griffin John, 21 Wyoming, Grandville. 

Griffith Rha P., 5 Ada, Ada. 

Griffith Grffiith E., 32 Oakfield, Oak- 
field. 

Griggs George W., 6 Paris, G. Rapids. 

Griggs Joseph E., Lowell. 

GRIUGS LEVERETT S., Lowell. 

Grindle Mrs., Lowell. 

Griswold Jabez W,, 82 Spencer, Cedar 
Springs. 

Griswold Scott, 32 Spencer, Cedar 
Springs. 

GROAT NICHOLAS, Rockford. 

Groff Henry, 32 Caledonia, Caledonia 
Station. 

Grommet James, 2 Plainfield, Rock- 
ford. 



Grutter Garrat, Grandville. 

Grutter Jacob, Grandville. 

Guild Albert H., 8 Paris, G. Rapids. 

Guild Edward, 4 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Guild Horace H., 4 Paris, G. Rapids. 

Guilmer Thomas, 2 Plainfield, Rock- 
ford. 

Gulliford James, Lowell. 

Gunn Hector W., 21 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Gunning Stephen, 9 Vergennes, Alton. 

Gurnee Caleb, 15 Solon, Cedar Springs. 

GURNEE SAMUEL B., 14 Solon, 
Cedar Springs. 

Gwinnell Daniel, 11 Algoma, Burch's 
Mills. 

Gwinn Mrs. M. A., 1 Byron, G. Rapids. 



FORT'S MANDRAKE PILLS, 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KBNT COUNTY. 



209 



H 



Haas Christopher, 25 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

Hachmuth Christy C, 36 Alpine, G. 
Rapids. 

Hachmuth Henry, 1 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Hackett James, 26 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia. 

HACKING HENRY, 27 Walker, G. 
Rapids. 

Hadden Horace, 13 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Hadden Thomas, 28 Bowne, Harris 
Creek. 

Hadley Martin, 11 Alpine, Alpine. 

Haede Koop, 28 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Haffer George, 24 Byron, Gainesville. 

HAFFY THOMAS, 33 Courtland, 
Courtland Center. 

Hagerty Timothy, 32 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Hagadone Peter, 7 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Hagadone William H., 7 Sparta, Lis- 
bon. 

Hagget John, 26 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Haines Harvey, 18 Cannon, Austerlitz. 

Haines Henry, 34 Walker, G. Rapids. 



Hall Elihu, 27 Plainfield, Austerlitz. 
HALL E. D., 12 Algoma, Edgerton. 
Hall Edward, 12 Solon, Cedar Springs 
Hall E. M., Rockford. 
HALL ELIAS, 28 Plainfield, Grand 

Rapids. 
HALL GEO. W., 26 Byron, Cody's 

Mills. 
Hall Frederick, 16 Byron, Byron Cen. 
Hall Henry, 26 Solon, Cedar Springs. 
Hall Harrison, 18 Nelson, Cedar Springs 
Hall Henry S., 9 Gaines, Grand Rapids 
Hall Jonathan B., 1 Grattan, Ashley. 
Hall J. F., 20 Algoma, Sparta Center. 
Hall James I., 28 Walker, G. Rapids. 
HALL JOSEPH, Lowell. 
Hall John B., 23 Lowell, Lowell. 
Hall Levi, 2 Cascade, Ada. 
Hall M. E., Rockford. 
HALL SETH T., 11 Grand Rapids. 
Hall Samuel C, 11 Gaines, Hammond. 
Hall Thomas,' 11 Solon, Cedar Springs. 
Hall Wm. II., Lowell. 
Halpen James, 24 Ada, Ada. 
Halpen John, 14 Ada, Ada. 
Halpen Mrs. Mary, 14 Ada, Ada. 



JAMES GALLUP, WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DRUGGIST, No. 6 Canal Street 



Haines Moses D., 5 Cannon, Rockford. 

Haines William, 34 Paris, G. Rapids. 

Haines Virgil, 21 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Haight George, 19 Caledonia, Caledo- 
nia Station. 

Haight Mrs. Lowell. 

Hait John, 32 Vergennes, Lowell. 

Haket Cyprus, 19 Ada, Ada. 

Halcro James, 17 Alpine, Pleasant. 

Haiders Tees, 32 Grand Rapids. 

HALDANE MRS. EMELINE T., South 
4 Walker, Grand Rapids. 

Haldane Arthur W., 4 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

HALE DAVID P., 22 Caledonia, Al- 
aska. 

Hale Elisha G., 31 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

Hale Henry W., 32 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. \ 

HALE WARREN S., Alaska. 

Hall A. G., 1 Alpine, Englishville. 

Hall Alfred A., 14 Lowell, Lowell. 

Hall Charles, 21 Wyoming, Grandville. 

Hall Dwight E., 1 Grattan, Ashley. 

Hall Daniel, 19 Wyoming, Grandville. 



Halsted David, 29 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Hamburg Peter, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 

Hamer John D., 12 Paris, G. Rapids. 

Hamer John D., Jr., 12 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

HAMILTON AMOS H., 29 Byron, 
Byron Center. 

Hamilton David, 2 Bowne, Alto. 

HAMILTON HARMON, 19 Tyrone, 
Casnovia. 

Hamlinton Henry F., 16 Courtland, 
Courtland Center. 

Hamilton Isaiah B., 8 Wjoming, Grand- 
ville. 

Hamilton 'James W., Cedar Springs. 

Hamilton Robert, 20 Lowell, Lowell. 

HAMILTON SILAS L., 21 Byron, 
Byron Center. 

Hamlin John R., Grandville. 

Hamlin Loomis, 18 Algoma, Sparta 
Center. 

Hammersmith Frank, 22 Alpine, Grand 
Rapids. 

Hammond Mrs. Anna, 11 Gaines, Ham- 
mond. 

Hammond Charles, 17 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 



27 



A HARMLESS SUBSTITUTE FOR CALOMEL. 



210 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 



HAMMOND ESASMUS L., 14 Gaines, 
Hammond. 

Hammond Eli E., 11 Gaines, Hammond. 

Hammond Horace C, 8 Gaines, Ham- 
mond. 

Hammond Horton G., 14 Gaines, Ham- 
mond. 

Hammond Ira II., 6 Caledonia, Alaska. 

Hammond James, 11 Gaines, Ham- 
mond. 

Hammond John 0., 13 Gaines, Ham- 
mond. 

Hammond Randall S., 11 Gaines, Ham- 
mond. 

Hammond Stephen A., 1 1 Gaines, Ham- 
mond. 

Hammond William, 2 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Hanchett Edward E., Lowell. 

Hancock George, 28 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

Hancock Lewis S., 28 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

Hand Caleb M., 29 Grand Rapids. 

Hand Thomas, 31 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

Handlin Thomas, 30 Bowne, Harris 
Creek. 

Haner Alfred, Lowell. 



HANSON DANIEL N., 29 Tyrone, 
Casnovia. 

Hanson John, 33 Oakfield, Ashley. 

Hanson S. H., Lowell. 

Hanson William, 14 Solon, Cedar 
Springs.! 

Hapeman John G., 35 Grattan, Alton. 

HARD W. P., South 6 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Hardy George W., 9 Paris, G. Rapids. 

Hardy John, 19 Nelson, Cedar Springs. 

Hardy Eugene, 9 Gaines, Grand Rapids 

HARDY WM. J., 9 Gaines, G. Rapids. 

Hardy John, 26 Solon, Cedar Springs. 

Hardy William, 20 Byron, Byron Cen. 

Hardwick James, 34 Bowne, Fillmore, 
Barry County. 

Harger Harvey, 13 Caledonia, Alaska. 

Harger Leonidas, 13 Caledonia, Alaska. 

HARLAN JOSEPH, 5 Cascade, Cas- 
cade. 

Harmon Anthony, 25 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Harmon Delos, 4 Bowne, Alto. 

Harmon James, 25 Paris, Grand Rapids 

Harmon John, 31 Caledonia, Caledonia 
Station. 

Harmon Michael, 6 Caledonia, Alaska. 

Harmcn William, 24 Byron, Gainesville 



DISSTON'S CIRCULAR, MILL AND DRAG SAWS. AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



Hanes John, 2 £yron, North Byron. 
Haner Conrad, 35 Vergennes, Lowell. 
Haner Charles, Rock ford. 
Hanei John, 27 Plaintield, G. Rapids. 
Hanes Reuben F., 2 Byron, North 

Byron. 
HANNA JOHN M., 26 Gaines, Ham- 
mond. 
HANNA JOHN, 2 Gaines, Hammond. 
HANNA KENNEDY, 30 Gaines, Cody's 

Mills. 
Hanna Kennedy, 28 Grand Rapids. 
HANNA SAMUEL, 26 Gaines, Cody's 

Mills. 
Hanna Wesley, Lisbon. 
Hanna William, 26 Gaines, Hammond. 
Han rail an John, 33 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Hanrahan Thomas, 33 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Hanrahan William, 33 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Hanscom Abner L., 13 Nelson, Nelson. 
Hanscom Zebulon J., 13 Nelson, Nelson 
HANSES ANTHONY, 13 Walker, 

Grand Rapids. 
Hansen Casper, 35 Alpine, G. Rapids. 



HARNISH FINDLEY, South 7 Walker, 

Grand Rapids. 
Harnish Jacob, South 7 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Harper John, 15 Caledonia, Caledonia. 
Harrigan Michael, 1 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
Harrington John, 2 Walker, G. Rapids. 
Harrington Jasper, 1 Plainfield, Rock- 
ford. 
Harrington LeviM., Burchville (Burch's 

Mills.) 
Harrington Vernon, 2 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Harrison Luther C, 15 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
Harris George W., 30 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Harris George W., 36 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. . ' 

Harris Richard, 11 Cascade, Cascade. 
Harris Robert, 34 Ada, Ada. 
Harris William, 15 Cascade, Cascade. 
Harroun Henry E., Lowell. 
Harsey Law ton, 19 Spencer, Nelson. 
HART LUTHFR, 6 Oakfield, Oakfield. 
Hart Sarah, 8 Oakfield, Oakfield. 



FORT'S ENEMY OF PAIN CUBES NEURALGIA. 



HISTORY AND D1KECT0RY OP KENT COUNTY. 211 

L. H. Withey & Co., 

Manufacturers and Dealers in 

PINE LUMBER. 

Shingles, Lath, &c., 
GRAND RAPIDS, - MICHIGAN. 

Office and Yard, Corner of Fountain and Greenwich Streets. 
Mill, near D. &M. R. R. Bridge. 

Bathbun. House* 

(Centrally Located,) 

Corner of Monroe and Waterloo Streets. 

FIRST-CUSS HOUSE— MODERATE TERMS. 



J. F. ANTISDEL, > PrODrietorB 
W. W. HAWK, \ "opnetors. 



GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 



LIVERY. SALE Ai BOARDING 



Cor. Fountain & Greenwich Streets, 

GRAND RAPIDS, - MICHIGAN. 

J. M. KENNEDY, Proprietor. 

Horses Boarded by tlie Day or Week, and kept for Sale. 



212 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY, 



Hart Thomas, 1 Solon, Sand Lake. 

HART WILLARD M., 8 Oakfield, Oak- 
field. 

Hartt John, 12 Lowell, Lowell. 

Hartt George W., 12 Lowell, Lowell. 

Hartley John, 32 Lowell, Alto. 

Hartman David, 17 Byron, Byron Gen. 

Hartwell John W., 34 Cannon, Can- 
nonsburg. 

Hartwell John, 34 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Hartwell Mrs. M. J., 35 Cannon, Can- 
nonsburg. 

Hartwell Wm. Chas., Village Cannons- 
burg. 

HARTWELL WILLIAM, 27 Cannon, 
Cannonsburg. 

Hartz John, 13 Walker, Grand Rapids. 

Hartzy Antoine, 15 Byron, Grandvifle. 

Hartzy Henry, 5 Byron, Gran dvi lie. 

Hartzy Peter, 5 Byron, Grandville. 

Hasha Barhbart, i8 Lowell, Cascade. 

Hashbarger Abraham, 36 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Hashbarger Tobias, 36 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Haskin Clark, 8 Ada, Ada. 

Haskin Mrs. M., 8 Ada, Ada. 

Haskins Asa, Lowell. 

BUY DRUGS AND MEDICINES AT J. GALLUP'S DRUG STORE, 6 Canal Street. 



HAVENS CHAS. R., 81 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

HAVEN JOHN V. B., Grandville. 

Havens John W-, 15 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Havens Nathaniel, 15 Oakfield, Oak- 
field. 

Haviland Daniel L., Alaska Village. 

HAVILAND DANIEL S., Alaska. 

Hawkins Abraham, 14 Caledonia. 
Alaska. 

Hawkins Charles, 16 Sparta, Sparta 
Cen. 

Hawkins Hiram, 14 Caledonia, Alaska. 

Hawkins G. C, Rock ford. 

Hawkins Richard, Lisbon. 

Hawkinson John, 7 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Hawk Edward, 22 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Hawley Jame?, 32 Alpine, Indian 
Creek. 

Hawley Salma B., 3 Alpine, English- 
ville. 

Hawthorn Thomas, 25 Plainfield, Aus- 
t e r 1 i 1 7 

HAYDOCK WILLIAM, 35 Nelson, 
Courtland Center. 

Hayes Daniel, 20 Plainfield, Mill Creek. 



Haskins Jesse, 34 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
HASLEM JOHN, 28 Walker, Grand 

Rapid*. 
Hastie Archie, 28 Lowell, Lowell. 
Hastie James, 22 Lowell, Lowell. 
Hastings George IL, 23 Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 
HASTINGS W. IL, 3 Lowell, Lowell. 
Hastings Thomas B., 4 Lowell, Lowell. 
Hastings W. G., 3 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 
Hatchevv Mrs. Lena, Lowell. 
Hatch Alphens, Lowell. 
Hatch B. G., 29 Grand Rapids, Grand 

Rapids. 
Hatch Charles W., Lowell. 
Hatch Ephriam, Lowell. 
HATCH JOHN F., 24 Lowell, Lowell. 
HATCH JOHN, 29 Grand Rapids, 

Grand Rapids. 
HATCH MATTHEW B., 17 Spencer, 

Spencer Mills. 
HATCH WM. W., Lowell. 
Hathaway H. M., 22 Byron, Byron Cen. 
Hattan Charles, 20 Lowell, Lowell. 
HATTON GILES, 21 Bowne, Bowne. 
Hatton Leslie, 21 Bowne, Bowne. 



HAYES EDWIN P., 30 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
HAYES HORACE N., Burch's Mills. 
Hayes Ira A., 22 Courtland, Courtland 

Center. 
HAYES JOSEPH F., 22 Courtland, 

Courtland Center. 
HAYES PATRICK, 20 Plainfield, Mill 

Creek. 
Hayes Roday, 19 Plainfield, Alpine. 
Haymaker Mrs. Mary A., 25 Byron, 

Cody's Mills. 
Hay nes David, 27 Courtland, Courtland 

Genter. 
Haynes George, 21 Alpine, G. Rapids. 
HAYNES ISAAC, 21 Alpine, Indian 

HAYNES HIRAM B., 34 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
Haynes Oscar, 2 Courtland, Courtland 

Center. 
HAYNES ROBERT, 34 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
HAYNES FRANCIS, 21 Alpine, Grand 

Rapids. 
Hays Virgil, 30 Nelson, Cedar Springs. 
Hay ward Edward, 30 Tyrone, Casnovia. 



FORT'S WESTERN LINIMENT CURES LAMENESS. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 213 

Francillo Hall, 

HOUSE BUILDER 

* AND 

G- IE IfcT IE :e, A. L JOBBER, 

Shop on Water Street, 2d door South of Bridge Street, 
West Side, 

GRAND RAPIDS, - MICHIGAN. 



NT. 15. —Con tracts Holicited. 



GEORGE STANG, 

DION AND BRASS F0U1BY. 

■ — ♦■ — • 

All Patent Right and other Castings 

Made to Order. 

■ — » — « 

FOUNDRY OPPOSITE JACOUOICE'8 MACHINE 
©HOP, BIVEB ©TREET, WEST SIDE, 

Grand Eapids, Mich. 
A. D. BORDEN & CO., 

Contractors and Master Builders, 

AND MANUFACTURERS OF AND DEALERS IN 

DOORS, SASH, BLINDS, 

And Door and Window Frames. 

Molding 8 Manufactured and Bracket Sawing and Custom JPlaning 

Done to Order, 

fb %\r% r r e e Vbv^?a 8 n ,d c e horch, GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 

Dressed Lumber, Dressed Flooring, Ceiling and Bevel Siding constantly on hand 
and tor Sale at LOWEST MARKET RATES. 



214 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 



HAYWARD J. W., Sparta Center. 

Hazelton John, 12 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

Hazen Isaac D., 7 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Head Albert A., 22 Plainfield, Auster- 
litz. 

Headley Artemus S., Rockford. 

Headley George, Ada Village. 

Headley Hiram, Ada Village. 

Headley John, Ada Village. 

Headley Orville, 2 Plainfield, Rockford. 

HEAD WORTH CHARLES, 21 Bowne, 
Bowne. 

HEADWORTH WILLIAM, 27 Plain- 
field, Austerlitz. 

Healy Henry J., 29 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Healy John, 34 Walker, G. Rapids. 

HEALY THOMAS, 29 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Heaton Abraham, 31 Ada, Ada. 

Heaton Mrs. Eunice, 29 Ada, Ada. 

Heath Caleb, 19 Plainfield, Mill Creek. 

Heath Daniel, 19 Plainfield, Mill Creek. 

Heath George L., 20 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Heath Guy, 32 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Heath George, 20 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Heath Jesse B., 26 Sparta, Lisbon. 



Heintzleman Andrew J., 36 Paris, 

Grand Rapids. 
Heintzleman Joseph, 30 Cascade, G. 

Rapids. 
Heintzleman Nathan, 25 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
Heintzleman Peter, 36 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
Heintzelman Reuben, 30 Cascade, 

Grand Rapids. 
Heintz Henry, 27 Gaines, Cody's Mills. 
HEINTZ JOHN, 34 Gaines, Cody's 

Mills. 
Heinrich William, 26 Bowne, Bowne. 
Hellehen James, 30 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Helmer Henry, Lowell. 
Helmlka Henry, 15 Walker, G. Rapids. 
Helmka Henry S., 16 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Helpin Peter, 32 Vergennes, Lowell. 
Helsel Henry, 21 Algoma, Rockford. 
Helsel Joseph, 8 Caledonia, Alaska. 
HELSAL JOHN, 7 Caledonia, Alaska. 
Helsal Joseph, 7 Caledonia, Alaska. 
Helsel Lester, 16 Algoma, Rockford. 
Helsel Noah, 22 Algoma, Rockford. 
Helsel Noah F., 21 Algoma, Rockford. 
Helsel Philip, Burchville^Burch's Mills) 

TUTTLE'S PATENT CHAMPION CROSS-CUT SAWS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



Heath Jonathan, 19 Plainfield, Mill 
Creek. 

HEATH OSCAR L., 30 Alpine, Indian 
Creek. 

Heath Mrs. Susan D., 19 Plainfield, 
Mill Creek. 

HEATH WASHINGTON, Lisbon. 

Hebard Ezra A., 16 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Hecox Don, 24 Vergennes, Fallassburg. 

Hecox Francis M., 23 Vergennes, Lo- 
well. 

Heffron Daniel, 36 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Heffron Edward, 35 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

HEFFRON GEORGE, 25 Cannon, Can- 
nonsburg. 

HEFFLON HIRAM, 6 Lowell, Lowell. 

HEFFRON JAMES, 25 Cannon, Can- 
nonsburg. 

Heffron Michael, 20 Grand Rapids. 

Heffron William, 31 Grattan, Cannons- 
burg. 

Heidchuh Philip, jun., 11 Bowne, Alto. 

Heidchuh Philip, 11 Bowne, Alto. 

HEIMLER JOHN B., 20 Caledonia, 
Caledonia Station. 



Helsel P. F., 33 Algoma, Rockford. 

HEMBLING ABRAHAM D., Alaska 
Village. 

Hemmingway Gabriel, 27 Oakfield, 
Oakfield. 

Hemmingway Moses, 22 Oakfield, Oak- 
field. 

HEMMINGWAY LAWSON, 27 Oak- 
field, Oakfield. 

Hemphrey George, 23 Cascade, Cas- 
cade. 

Hemsley William, 31 Tyrone, Casnoyia. 

Hemsworth James, 26 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

HEMSLEY GEORGE, 31 Tyrone, 
Casnovia. 

Hendrick D. Millard, 2 Vergennes, 
Lowell. 

HENDRICH ERWIN, 5 Gaines, G. 
Rapids. 

Hendrick Gideon A., 2 Vergennes, 
Lowell. 

Hendrick Harlan, 6 Gaines, Grand 
Rapids. 

Hendrick Henry M., 5 Gaines, Grand 
Rapids. 

Hendrick Wm., 5 Gaines, G. Rapids. 



FOR SPASMODIC COLIC IN HORSES, 



HtsTOfc* AND DIRECTOR* OF KENT COUNTY. 



215 



Henderson Isaac, 31 Vergennes, Lowell. 

Henderson Philo P., 12 Oakfield, 
Greenville. 

Henderson Samuel, 7 Walker, Berlin. 

Hene Philip, 17 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Hennessey John, 31 Cascade, Grand 
Rapids. 

Hennessey William, 21 Cascade, Cas- 
cade. 

Hennagin George, 31 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

Henry Charles. 5 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

Henry David, 11 Plainfield, Austerlitz, 

Henry Dewitt C, 34 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

Henry Deloss G., 25 Ada, Ada. 

Henry Mrs. Haley, 5 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

Henry James, 17 Cascade, Cascade. 

Henry Thomas M., 5 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

Hensel, Michael, 31 Byron, New Salem. 

Henshaw Albert T., 4 Byron, North 
Byron. 

Henshaw Charles J., 16 Cascade, Cas- 
cade. 

Henshaw Horace, 16 Cascade, Cascade. 

Henteg George, 33 Grand Rapids. 



Hey ford Charles, 24 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Hibbard Charles H., Grandville. 
Hibel Adam, 18 Byron, Byron Center. 
Hibel John, 18 Byron, Byron Center. 
Hice, Ad'am, 32 Walker, Grand Rapids. 
HICE JOSEPH, 32 Walker, G. Rapids. 
Hice Jerome, 32 Walker, G. Rapids, 
HICKEY SYLVESTER K., Alaska. 
HiCKS ALBERT R., 27 Spencer, 

Spencer Mills. 
HICKS, BENJAMIN H., 28 Lowell, 

Lowell. 
Hicks Daniel, 22 Solon, Cedar Springs. 
Hicks, Daniel C, 28 Lowell, Lowell. 
Hicks Frederick, 1 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Hicks Martin, 25 Solon, Cedar Springs. 
HICKS ROBBINS, 1 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Hicks, Stephen, 6 Cannon, Rockford. 
Hicks Seely, 32 Spencer, Cedar Springs. 
HICKS WILLIAM, Rockford. 
HICKOCK BENJAMIN F., 5 Nelson, 

Sand Lake. 
HICKOX LUCIUS L., 22 Byron, By- 
ron Center. 
Hickox William C, 15 Byron, Byron, 

Center. 



BUY PATENT MEDICINES AT 6 Canal Street 



Henteg Frank M., 33 Grand Rapids. 

Hergrove James, 26 Grattan, Grant. 

Hergrove William, 24 Grattan, Grant. 

Heriman Ira S., 35 Vergennes, Lowell. 

HERRICK DAVID, 21 Alpine, Grand 
Rapids. 

Herrick Martin C, 13 Gaines, Ham- 
mond. 

Herrick Wm., 31 Gaines, Cody's Mills. 

HERRIMAN IRA S., Lowell. 

Herron James O., 19 Bowne, Caledonia. 

Hershey Isaac, 22 Courtland, Courtland 
Center. 

Hertley Martin, 11 Alpine, Englishville. 

Hesler Gottlieb, 32 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

HESS E. W., 1 Wyoming, G. Rapids. 

Hessler Charles, 3 Byron, North Byron. 

Hettis William, 15 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Hevers Michael, 32 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Hewes Joseph, 20 Lowell, Lowell. 

HEWITT, J. B., Rockford. 

Hewitt, Rosannah, 21 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Hewitt William W., 22 Spencer, Spen- 
cer Mills. 



HIDE URIAH R., Village of Cannons- 
burg. 

Hidtsgetter John, 15 Alpine, Alpine. > 

Hier John, 24 Gaines, Caledonia Station. 

Higby Stephen, 14 Byron, Byron Cen. 

Higgins Henry, 29 Grand Rapids. 

Hike Case, 2 Wyoming, Grand Rapids. 

Hildebrandt Wm., 14 Alpine, Alpine. 

HILDRETHA.S., Lisbon. 

Hildreth Cyrus, 30 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

Hildreth John A., Lisbon. 

Hildreth Lester C, Lowell. 

Hiler Miio, Lowell. 

Hiler Mrs. M., Lowell. 

HILER WALTER, 28 Vergennes, Ver- 
gennes. 

HILLS AARON H., 23 Alpine, Alpine. 

Hill Andrew, 33 Algoma, Rockford. 

Hill Albert, 1 Walker, Grand Rapids. 

Hills Mrs. Adelia, 13 Alpine, Alpine. 

Hill Albert C, 16 Bowne, Alto. 

HILL ALPHEUS G., 15 Caledonia, 
Alaska. 

Hill Bryant, 25 Solon, Cedar Springs. 

Hill Chas. O., 11 Lowell, Lowell. 

Hills David E., Rockford. 



DRENCH WITH FORT'S ENEMY OF PAIN. 



216 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



HILL ELDIN G., 32 Cannon, Ada. 
Hills H. R., 13 Alpine, Alpine. - 
Hill Horatio, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 
Hill Hughes S., 15 Caledonia, Alaska. 
HILL JAMES, 17 Alpine, G. Rapids. 
Hill John, 32 Algoma, Rockford. 
Hill Jamee, 32 Cannon, Ada. 
Hill Lone, 22 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
HILL NICHOLAS R., 31 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. f 

HILL PRENTICE, 11 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
HILL OTIS, 19 Ada, Ada. 
Hill Orton, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 
Hill 01e,5 Plainfield, Belmont. 
HILL ORPHEUS B., Village Cedar 

Springs. 
Hills Jefferson, 35 Grand Rapids. 
HILLS PERRY, 25 Grand Rapids. 
Hill Thompson, 31 Gaines, Cody's 

Mills. 
Hilliker Wm. H., 23 Paris, G. Rapids. 
Hillman Samuel B., 24 Nelson, Nelson. 
Hillock Joseph, Caledonia Station. 
Hilty David, 24 Gaines, Caledonia 

Station. 
HILTON ALANSON V., 21 Sparta, 

Sparta Centre. 



Hitchcock Hugh, Sparta Center. 

Hittle John, 8ft Algoma, Rockford. 

Hitzert William, 2 Byron, North Byron. 

HINE (M. D.,) DEMAS, 30 Cannon, 
Austerlitz. 

HINE JAS. W., Lowell. 

HINE M., B., 30 Cannon, Austerlitz. 

Hine Martin N., Lowell. 

Hines John, 21 Wyoming, Grandville. 

Hines Stephen, 16 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

Hinkson James, 16 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

HINMAN ALFRED S., 4 Sparta, 
Sparta Center. 

Hi n man C. C, 32 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Hinman Charles, Sparta Center. 

Hin man Enoch, Cedar Springs. 

Hinman John, Sparta Center. 

Hinman J. T., Sparta Center. 

Hinman Norman, Sparta Center. 

Hinman Newell, Sparta Center. 

Hinman N. D , 33 Sparta, Lisbon. 

HINMAN, Z. M., 9 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

Hinyan Oliver P., 33 Lowell, Alto. 

HIXSON JOHN, Lowell. 

HOAG ALBERT, 26 Tyrone, Sparta 
Center. 



WELCH & GRIFFITH'S CIRCULAR SAWS. AT W, 

28 Alpine, Indian 

35 Alpine, Indian 

W., 6 Walker, In- 

W., 7 Cannon, 



D. FOSTER'S. 



Hilton Artemas, 
Creek. 

HILTON DAVID 
Creek. 

HILTON DAVID 
dian Creek. 

HILTON GEORGE 
Rockford. 

HILTON MRS. JANE, 8 Grand Rapids. 

Hilton J. K., 26 Byron, Codv's Mills. 

HILTON LEONARD R., *3 Waiker, 
Indian Creek. 

Hilton Newell,* Burch's Mills. 

Hilton W. W., 34 Alpine, Indian 
Creek. 

Hilze Matthias, 32 Byron, Byron 
Center. 

Hime8 Amasa, 5 Alpine, Lisbon. 

HIMBECK JOSEPH, 12 Alpine, Al- 
pine. 

Hirst George, 21 Byron, Byron Center. 

Hirst Thomas, 21 Byron, Byron Center. 

HINE CHAS. R., Lowell. 

Hinckley George, 14 Gaines, Ham- 
mond. 

Hipler Joseph, 34 Alpine, G. Rapids. 

Himbeck Frederick, 12 Alpine, Alpine. 



HOAG ARTEMUS R., 30 Vergennes, 

Vergennes. 
Hoag Catherine, 31 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 
Hoag Earl, 2 Grand Rapids. 
Hoag John E., 23 Cannon, Cannons* 

burg. 
HOAG LYMAN V., 26 Tyrone, Sparta 

Cpn tpr 
HOAG LORENZO D., 23 Cannon, Can* 

nonsburg. 
Hoag Myron B., 23 Cannon, Cannons* 

burg. 
HOAG SIDNEY E., 34 Vergennes, 

Lowell. 
Hoag Warren, 26 Tyrone, Sparta Cen. 
t oagesteeger, Adrian, 33 Grand Rapids 
Hobourt H. A., Burchville (Burch's 

Mills.) 
HOBBS WILLIAM, 17 Bowne, Alto. 
Hodley Norton, 16 Algoma, Rockford. 
Hodley John, 23 Algoma, Rockford. 
HODGES AMOS, &2 Vergennes, Lowell 
Hodges Chester D., 22 Lowell, Lowell. 
Hodges James, 21 Lowell, Lowell. 
Hodges Levi, 16 Sparta, Sparta Center. 



FORT'S WESTERN LINIMENT CURES THE WORST GASES 



HISTORY AND DIRECTOR* OF KENT COUNTY. 



air 



HODGES OREN S., 33 Vergennes, 

Lowell. 
Hodges Russell, 4 Alpine, Englishville. 
Hodges Sylvester, 33 Vergennes, Lowell 
Hodgers John, 6 Plainfieid, Belmont. 
Hoffman Adam, Lisbon. 
Hoffman Hugh, 1 Bowne, Lowell. 
Hogan Heman E., 1 Lowell, Lowell. 
Hogan Michael, 1 Wyoming, G. Rapids. 
Hogan Patrick, 27 Grattan, Grant. 
Hogan 8. G., 4 Lowell, Lowell. 
Hogadone Edwin D., 28 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
HOGADONE HENRY C, 19 Walker, 

Grand Rapids. 
HOGADONE JOHN B., 28 Walker, 

Grand Rapids. 
HOGLE GEO. W., 30 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Holben Beniamin, 20 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Holbs James, 36 Spencer, Spencer Mills. 
Holben Jacob, 20 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Hoi comb Edwin R., 5 Nelson, Sand 

Lake. 
Holcomb Horace, 31 Vergennes, Lowell 
HOLCOMB MARTIN A., 26 Bowne, 

Harris Creek. 
Holcomb Phineas W., 3 Algoma, Cedar 

Springs. 



Holmdon William, 24 Oakfield, Green- 
ville. 

HOLMES ALBERT N M 31 Tyrone, 
Casnovia. 

Holmes Edgar C, 17 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

Holmes George, 10 Byron, North 
Byron* 

Holmes John, 10 Alpine, Englishville* 

Holmes Mrs. Martha, 1 Wyoming, G* 
Rapids. 

HOLMES NELSON, 17 Grattan, Grat- 
tan Center. 

Holmes Robert, 34 Ada, Ada. 

Holoway Samuel, 11 Alpine, Eoglisb- 
ville. 

Hoist John, 20 Lowell, Low r ell. 

Holt. H. Gaylord, 3 Cascade, Cascade. 

HOLT HENRY, 3 Cascade, Cascade. 

Holt Simeon D., 35 Ada, Ada. 

Holy Christian, 16 Gaines, Hammond. 

Homrich John, 30 Byron, Byron Cen. 

Homrich Peter, 31 Byron, Byron Cen. 

Homrich Sebastian, 29 Byron, Byron 
Center. 

Honeyman George, 26 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

HOOD ANDREW, 26 Grand Rapids. 

Hookstraw B., 32 Grand Rapids. 



HUBBARD BROS. CIRCULAR, MILL 8l DRAG SAWS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



HOLCOMB W. F., 27 Cannon, Can- 
nons burg. 

Holden Chapin B., 18 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

Holden Charles M., 18 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

Holden Horatio S., 18 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

HOLDEN WM. W., 27 Wyoming, 
Grand Rapids. 

Holiday George W , 29 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 

Holiday Henry, 17 Algoma, Rockford. 

Holldridder Franklin, Lowell. 

Holiday John A., 36 Sparta, English- 
ville. 

Holland John, 10 Courtland, Courtraud 
Ceuter. 

Holland Theodore, 32 Sparta, Lisbon. 

HOLLISTER WILLIAM, Sparta Cen. 

Hollis A., 31 Wyoming, Grandville. 

Holly James, 1 Gaines, Hammond. 

Holly Milo B., 18 Caledonia, Hammond. 

HOLLY ORLANDO H., 1 Gaines, 
Hammond. 

Holm John P., 33 Caledonia, Caledonia 
Station. 



Hookstraw Martin, 32 Grand Rapids. 

Hookstraw Nater, 32 Grand Rapids. 

HOOKER CYPRIAN S., 11 Lowell, 
Lowell. 

HOOKER EDWARD C, 18 Gaines, 
Gainesville. 

Hooker George W., 25 Plainfieid, Aus- 
terlitz. 

Hooker J. S., Lowell. 

HOOK MARK, 14 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

Hooper Clement, Grandville. 

Hooper David, 30 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

Hooper Elam, Village Cedar Springs. 

Hooper Edward, 80 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

Hooper Joseph, 30 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

Hooper Henry, 30 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

HOOSE MADISON, 1 Alpine, Eng- 
lishville. 

HOOVER ABRAHAM, 36 Gainei, 
Caledonia Station. 

HOOVER BARNEY, 33 Garnet, Co- 
dy's Mills. 



128 



OF CATARRH IK THREE MINTTTES. 



218 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Hoover John, 24 Gaines, Hammond. 
Hoover John, 33 Gaines, Cody's Mills. 
HOPS HENHY, 3 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 
HOPE JOSEPH, 23 Sparta, Sparta 

Center 
HOPE JAMES M„ 23 Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 
HOPKINS ANSEL, 4 Grand Rapids. 
Hopkins Truman H., 10 Lowell, 

LowelL 
HOPKINS GIRDIN, 29 Alpine, In- 

<li&A Greek 
HOPKINS HIRAM, 5 Grand Rapids, 

Grand Rapids. 
HOPKINS JOHN L., Alaska Village. 
Hopkins John T., Lowell. 
Hopkins Lewis, 32 Alpine, Indian 

Creek. 
Hopkins Nelson R., 30 Alpine, Indian 

Creek. 
Hopkins Mrs. Noel, 32 Alpine, Indian 

Creek 
HOPKINS SIMON P., 29 Courtland, 

Rockford. 
Hoppe William, 35 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
Horagan Martin, 34 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Hornbrook Peter, 24 Lowell, Lowell. 



HOUGH FAYETTE, 29 Spencer, 
Spencer Mills. 

Houghtaling E. F., 16 Grand Rapids. 

Houghtaling Henry, 1 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Houghtaling Ransom, 23 Plainfield, 
Aiififcpi*lit7 

HOUGHTALING W. 0., 16 G. Rapids. 

Hough Theodore G., 23 Gaines, Ham- 
mond. 

Houlihan Patrick, 3 Vergennes, Alton. 

Hounsom John H., Sparta Center. 

HOUSE ABRAHAM P., 30 Nelson, 
Cedar Springs. 

HOUSE ANDREW, 13 Algoma, Edger- 
ton. 

House Abraham. Rockford. 

House Alonzo, 1 Alpine, Englishville. 

House Conrad, 5 Plainfield, Belmont. 

House James W., 23 Algoma, Edgerton 

House Oscar, 24 Algoma, Edgerton. 

House Robert, Rockford. 

Housman Charles F., Cedar Springs. 

Houseman Jacob, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 

Housell James, 11 Plainfield, Rockford. 

Houser Frederick, 9 Vergennes, Alton. 

Houser Gustavus, 9 Vergennes, Alton. 

HOVER MRS. CATHARINE, 23 
Bowne, Bowne. 



BUY DRUGS AND MEDICINES AT J. GALLUP'S DRUG STORE, 6 Oand Street. 



Horton L W., 17 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

Horton Isaac, 17 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

Horton Jesse M., Grandville. 

Horton John. 17 Wyoming, Grandville. 

Horton, James B., 9 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

Horton John, 8 Byron, North Byron. 

Horton Peter, 8 Byron, Grandville. 

HORTON SILAS P., 7 Oakfield, Oak- 
field. 

HORTON Mrs. S. M., Cannonsburg. 

HORTON WILLIAM, 17 Wyoming, 
Grandville. 

Hosford Fred. H., Lowell. 

Hosford Frank H., Lowell. 

Hoskine Henry, 33 Ada, Ada. 

HOSKINS JAMES R., 26 Solon, 
Cedar Springs. 

Hosley Jabez J., 84 Byron, Cody's 
Mills. 

Host Anthony, 30 Alpine, Indian Creek. 

Host John, 80 Alpine, Indian Creek. 

H0UCK FAYETTE, 23 Bowne, 
Bowne. 



Hovey G. E., Rockford. 

Howarth Edmond, 17 Cannon, Can- 
nonsburg. 

Howard Andrew, 16 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

Howard Christopher, 6 Plainfield, Eng- 
lishville. 

Howard Crispan, 6 Plainfield, English- 
ville. 

Howard Daniel, 5 Vergennes, Ver- 
gennes. 

HOWARD JOHN, Lowell. 

Howard J^mes, 22 Cannon, Cannons* 
burg. 

Howard John, 8 Vergennes, Vergennes. 

Howard Mary, 8 Vergennes, Vergennes. 

Howard Orville, 1 Algoma, Burchville 
(Burch's Mills.) 

Howard Owen, 8 Vergennes, Vergennes. 

Howard Robert, 4 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

Howard William, Jr., 4 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

Howe C. E., Lowell. 

Howe Elisha B., 22 Walker, G. Rapids. 

HOWE GARDNER, 5 Nelson, Sand 
Lake. 



FORT'S WESTERN IklXIMEXT 18 THE BEST FOR HORSES. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 219 



GEAND RAPIDS 

1AMFACTMM COME 

(SUCCESSORS TO CHUBB, STEWABT & LUTHER,) 

Manufacturers and Dealers in 

Horse Powers & Saw Machines, 

Sulky Rakes, Plows, Cultivators, 



ALSO, 



Agents for the Sale of Reapers, Mowers, Threshing Machines, 

Cider Mills, and nearly every kind of Agricultural Machinery. 

SALESROOM AND OPFCCK, 4=1 CA1VAJL. ©TJ&JE3ET. 

Manufactory, South Water Street, 

GRAND RAPIDS, - - MICHIGAN. 
JOSEPH FINCKLER, 

DEALER IN 

Groceries and Provisions. 

CASH PAID FOR PRODUCE. 

No. 104 Canal St., 
Grand Rapids, Michigan. 

P. SCHENKELBEEG, 

DEALER IN 

Groceries and Provisions, 

Crocker} and Glassware, Ciprs and Tobacco. 

CASH PAID FOR PRODUCE. 
-No. 13 Front Street, ( West Side,) 



220 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Howe H. A., Lowell. 

Howe JesBe B., 36 Plainfield, Grand 

Rapids 
Howe Zadok, Lowell. 
HOWgLL HEZAKIAH, 31 Ada, Grand 

Hrtfeir taftua, iO Grattan, Graf tan 

Center. 
Howell John, 10 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 
Howell Rebecca, 10 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. * 
HdNi^i^ifldore L, 31 Ada, G. Rapids. 
H^w^l Wiilbm, 81 Ada, Ada. 
Howk Andrew J;, Lowell. 
Howk Jacob, Lowell 
Howl0tt Thomas, 29 Wyoming, Grand- 

i$uL ' 
Howjefct William, 29 Wyoming, Grand- 

ville. 
Howman John, 30 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Hozis Collins, 5 Grand Rapids, Grand 

Rapids. 
HOX1E WM. II., 5 Grand Rapids, 

Grand Rapids. 
HOYLE GEORGE, 35 Solon, Cedar 

8prings. 
Hoyle Henry, 20 Nelson, Cedar Springs. 
Hoyt Albert, Rook ford. 
Hoyt Edwin, 7 Paris, Grand Rapids. 



Sugbes Mrs. Lydia, Rockford. 
ujbrhetf Monroe, 2 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 

IJuffbes W. Scott, 24 Wyoming, Grand 
RapkU. 

Hughes William, 11 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 

^Ngaey Nathaniel, 84 Nekon, Cedar 
Springs. ♦ 

Hughson T. E., Lowell. 

Huggins George, Lowell. 

Huggins John, Lowell. 

Huggins Win. R., Lowell. 

Huggard Francis, 12 Nelson; Nelfotf. 

Huggard John, 1 Nelson, Nelson. 

Hulbert Charles E., Lowell. 

HULBERT JOHN W., 22 Cascade, 

» Cascade. 

Hulburt Thomas J., 10 Cascade, Cas- 
cade. 

Hulburt William, 22 Cascade, Cascade. 

Hull Amasa, 2 Oaktteld, Greenville. 

HULL CYRUS, Alaska. 

Hull E. F., Alaska. 

HULL GEO. F., Alaska. 

HULL JOHN, 8 Algoma, Rockford. 

Hull John, 24 Vergennes, Fallassburg. 

HULL SYLVANUS E, 7 Bowne, Alto. 

Hull William H., 8 Algoma, Rockford. 

Hull Zacnary, 1 Oak field, Greenville. 



RUBBER AND HEMP PACKING, AND LACE LEATHER, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



Hoyt NathlSn, Lowell. 
Hoyt Wilbur, Rockford. 
HUBBARD AUGUSTUS, Lisbon. 
Hubbard Charles, Lisbon. 
Hubbard Joel M.,-0 Parte, Grand Rapids 
Hubbard John, 25 Solon. Cedar Springs 
Hubbeli Ehnon S., 31 Oakiield, Grattan 

Center. 
Hubble Eurotus G., 25 Grattan, Grant. 
Hubbei Ehnon S., 1 Cannon; Grattan 

Center. 
Ht§*ifee4l John, 31 Oakfield, Grattan 

Hubbei Jolrn, 1 Cannon, Grattan Cen. 
Hudson Alexander, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 
Hudson Joseph, 22 Algoma, Edgerton. 
Hudson Samuel S., 1 1 Lowell, Lowell; 
Huff Andrew, 22 Gaines, Hammond. 
Huff Atfajn, 22 Gaines, Hammond. 
Hilt r#>4e§ick, 22 Gaioe*, Hammond. 
Htttffternion, 13 Byron, Gainesville. 
Huff Isaac, 21 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Huff James F., 82 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Hughes James, 10 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
Hughes John, 24 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 



Hulliberger Lee, 2 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Hull Jabez H., 36 Ada, Ada. 

Humes Corp elius, 9 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Hummer George, Grandville. 

Hummer Jacob, Grandville. 

Hunt Leonard H., Lowell. 

Hunt Simeon, Lowell. 

HUNT WILLARD, Cedar Springs. 

Hunt Zenas, 1 Plainfield, Rockford. 

Hunter Arvine P., Lowell. 

Hunter Adefmer, 1 Sdlon, Sand Lake. 

HUNTER C. P., Lowell. 

HUNTER E.B., Lowell. 

Hunter Edwin, Lowell. 

HUNTER JAMES I., Lowell. 

Hunter John, 30 Spencer, Nelson. 

Hunter Matbew,'20 Lowell, LoweU* 

Banter, Robert, jun., Lowell. 

Hunter Robert C, 20 Lowell, Lowell. 

HUNTER ROBERT, sen., Lowell. 

Hunter William, sen., 16 Spencer, 
Spencer Mills. 

Hunting Edward B., 28 Courtland, 
Courtland Center. 



FORT'S ENEMY OF PAIN CURES TOOTHACHE. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COtJNTY. 221 



General Insurance Office, 

]2stfrblt«lie<l In 1850. 



BQ&B11V, B4VB8 fe ©@*, 
General Insurance Agenis and Adjusters, 

Cash Capital Represen ted, - Over $2O,00J,000. 

Office in the Basement Rooms of the City National Bank Building, 
Corner of Monroe and Pearl Streets, 

Grand. JEla&ixaLm^-^-^j* Miolalsan.. 

We are SPECIAL and ADJUSTING Agents in the State of Michigan, for the following Companies: 

Tonkers and New York Insurance Co., of 2f ew York, Cash Assets, $1,000,000 
Andes Insurance €o., of Cincinnati, O., " « 1,000,000 

INSURANCE EFFECTED WITHOUT DELAT ON ALL CLASSES OF INSURABLE PROPERTY AT 

SEASONABLE RATES. '* X 

Losses ADJUSTED and PAID, at this Agency, when "fair and square," 

without delay. 

E. O. ». HOLDER, Attorney at Law and General Adjuster of Fire Losses. 
M. W. BATES, Treasurer of the Grand Bapids Savings Bank. 

JOHN K. STEWAKT, Notary and Conveyancer. 
Ii. TANDE RHOEF, Book Keeper and Solicitor. 



< 
D 
o 



S. G. KETCHAM 

Retail Dealer In 

TOYS, CONFECTIONERY, 

Fresh and Canned Fruits, Cigars, Fresh &. Cove Oysters. 

FA.Ei.nxzixt.fip LTJJxroiia: rooms 

Bridge Street, West Side, 

GRAND RAPIDS, - - - MICHIGAN. 



tn 
o 

a 

I 

o 
*1 



$« a SMITH, 

G3r JrO ^^ (*-^ -tU JrC- 

71 Monroe Street, 

Grand Rapids, - - Michigan. 



222 



HISTOBY AND DIRECTORY Of KENT COUNTY. 



HUNTING GEORGE S., 28 Courtland, 
Courtland Center. 

HUNTING ISAAC M., 24 Courtland, 
Courtland Center. 

Huntington Thomas, 28 Bowne, Bowne. 

Huntington William, $8 Bowne, 
Bowtte ! 

HUNTLEY ADELBERT C, 11 Grat- 
tan, Grattan Center. 

Huntley Erwin, 11 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

Huntley lira. Francis, 86 G. Rapids. 

Huntley James, 20 Lowell, Lowell. 

HUNTLEY ORIN P.,27 Ada, Ada. 

HUNTLEY THOMAS, 35 Paris, Ham- 
mond. 

HURD A. D., 13 Alpine, Alpine. 

Hurd Charles W., 3 Paris, G. Rapids. 

Hurd Everett, 10 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Hurd John, 26 Wyoming, G. Rapids. 

Hurley Christopher, 5 Vergennes, Ver- 
genncs. 

Hurley William, 6 Vergennes, Ver- 
gennes. 

Hurlburt Charles, 32 Grand Rapids. 

Hurlburt P. S., 32 Grand Rapids. 

Huse Carr, 36 Sparta, Englishville. 

Husted Elijah, 16 Lowell, Lowell. 



Husted James D., 20 Lowell, Lowell. 

HUSTBD NOAH P., 20 Lowell, 
Lowell. 

HUSTED SYLVESTER, 8 Lowell, 
Lowell. 

Hutchinson Bradley, 17 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Hutchins Charles, Cedar Springs. 

Huttle Henry, 5 Vergennes, Vergennes. 

HUWIR ANDREW, 26 Alpine, Al- 
pine. 

Huwer Mrs. Barbara, 26 Alpine* Al- 
pine. 

Huxley Edward, Lowell. 

HYDE C. G., Rockford. 

Hyde Charles N., Rockford. 

Hyde Charles N., 1 Plainfiekl, Rock- 
ford. 

HYDE OSCAR F., Rockford. 

Hyde Oscar, 1 Plain field, Rockford. 

HYDORN HENRY C, 23 Ada, Ada. 

Hyland Peter, 30 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Hylef Wm„ 6 Alpine, Lisbon. 

HYSER WILLIAM, 23 Plainfield, Aus- 
terlitz. 

HYSTE THOMAS, Grandville. 

Hyste James, Grandville. 



BUY PATENT MEDICINES AT 6 Canal Street 



I 



Ide Edwin, 20 Byron, Byron Center. 

Ide Eleazear R., 20 Byron, Byron Cen. 

Ide Frank, 10 Lowell, Lowell. 

Ide Orvrlie, 28 Byron, Byron Center. 

Ingersoll Berlin, 31 Algoma, Rockford. 

Ingersoll Theodore P., 17 Lowell, 
Lowell. 

In graham Aaron, 16 Spencer, Spencer 
Mills. 

Ingrahatn Frank E., 85 Spencer, Spen- 
cer Mills. 

INGRAHAM ISAAC M., 18 Paris, G. 
Rapids. 

In wood Jame*, 19 Gannon, Austerlitz. 

Ipe Jacob, 5 Algoma, Sparta Centre. 

IPE MRS. ELIZA, 5 Algoma, Sparta 
Centre* 

IPE FftB&SRICK:, 8 Atgoma, Sparta 
Cej>t#e. v.- * "■ 



Ipe Jackson, 28 Solon, Cedar Springs. 

Ipe Solomon, 23 Solon, Cedar Springs. 

Ireland Wm. H., 9 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Irish E. L., Lowell. 

Irish Heman, Lisbon. 

IRISH H. B., Lisbon. 

Irons Andrew, 6 Caledonia, Alaska. 

IRONS JOSIAH, Alaska. 

Irwin David, 17 Byron, Byron Cen. 

Irwin Nelson, 17 Byron, Byron Cen. 

ISHA&I MRS. LO VINA, 14 Alpine, 

Englishville. 
Ishain Robert A., 14 Alpine, Alpine. 
Isham Charles, 14 Alpine, Alpine. 
Isham James, 14 Alpine, Alpine. 
Ives Benager, 19 Plainfield, Mill Creek. 
Ives Gbas. W„ 5 Cannon, Rockford* 
IVES FLOYD H., 19 Plainfield, Mill 

Creek. 
Ivinson Thomas, 2 Cannon, Rockford. 



OLD MEN AND WOMEN, YOUNG MEN AND 



tftSTOR* AKD DIRECTORt GT KENT COtTITTY. 



223 



JACKSON DUDLEY, 33 Oakfield, 

Grattan Centre. 
JACKSON HARLOW, 30 Tyrone, Cas- 

novia. 
Jackson Henry, 2 Caledonia. Alaska. 
JACKSON JOEL G., 2 Caledonia, 

A ! aflkft * 
JACKSON ROBERT S., Alaska. 
Jackson Robert, 16 Byron, Byron Cen. 
Jackson William, 14 Caledonia, Alaska. 
JACOBS FRANK E., 20 Sparta, Lis- 

bon. 
Jacobs John H., 20 Algoma, Rockford. 
JACOBS REUBEN, Village Cedar 

Springs. 
JACOBS WM. S., 30 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Jacox Allen B., 10 Gaines, Hammond. 
Jacox David, 24 Byron, Gainesville. 
Jakeway Asa, 23 Grattan, Grant. 
Jakeway Ami, 26 Grattan, Grant. 
Jakeway John H., 23 Grattan, Grant. 
JAKEWAY JAMES, 23 Grattan, 

Grant. 
JAMISQN EUGENE, 13 Caledonia, 

Alaska. 



Jennings Daniel, 29 Algoma, Roefkford. 

Jennings David, 24 Cascade, Cascade^ 

Jennings Howard, 8 Paris, G. Rapids. 

Jennings Miss, Lowell. 

JENNINGS THOMAS, 20 Plainfield, 
Mill Creek. 

JEWELL CHAS. A, 5 Nelson, Sand 
Lake. 

Jewell Edward, Village Cedar Springs. 

Jewell George, 2 Plainfield, Rockford. 

Jewell Harmon, 33 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

Jewe 1 James, 8 Wyoming, Grandvilie. 

Jewell Loomis, 33 Algoma, Rockford. 

Jewell Rodolphus D., 26 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 

JEWELL SILAS E., 5 Nelson, Sand 
Lake. 

Jipson Almond, 15 Grand Rapids. 

Johnston Robert, 25 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

JOINER PAULINA, 16 Grattan, Grat- 
tan Center. 

Johnson Abram H , 26 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 



RUBBER HOSE, AT W. D. FOSTER'S, 14 and 16 Monroe Street. 



JAMISON HUGH, 13 Caledonia, 
Alaska. 

Jameson James, Cedar Springs. 

Jaqua Charles D., 31 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

JAQUA CHARLES J., 31 Courtland, 
Rockford. 

Jaques Lewis, 11 Lowell, Lowell* 

JAQUA NELSON, 5 Nelson, Sand 
Lake. 

JARMAN JOHN C, Alaska. 

Jarman Henry J., Alaska. 

Jarvis Morris, 11 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Jastopher Michael, — Cannon, Can- 
nonsburg. 

Jean Jerry, 35 Conrtland, Rockford. 

JENKS C. W., 85 Alpine, Indian Creek. 

Jenkins Jabez, 25 Byron, Cody's Mills. 

Jentetna John, 21 Wyoming, Grand- 
vilie. 

JBNNE LANSING K., 7 Grand Rapids, 
Grand Rapids. 

Jenne Newton E., 16 Courtland, Court- 
land Centre. 

Jenness Mrs. John, Grandvilie. 

Jennings Daniel, 6 Grand Rapids, G. 
Rapids. 



Johnson Alfred C, 28 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

JOHNSTON BARTON, 22 Courtland, 
Courtland Center. 

Johnson Benjamin, 22 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Johnson Calvin D., 24 Caledonia, 
Alaska. 

Johnson Charles, Lowell. 

Johnson Charles, Sparta Center. 

Johnson Cord, 2 Plainfield, Rockford. 

Johnson Chandler, Lowell. 

Johnson Carl, Grandvilie. 

Johnson Chas. W., Cedar Springs. 

Johnson Charles P., 36 Spencer, Spencer 
Mills. * 

Johnson Charles, 36 Gaines, Caledonia 
Station. 

JOHNSTON CHAS. L., 25 Byron, 
Cody's Mills. 

Johnson Charted W., 24 Byron, Gaines- 
ville. 

Johnson Charles, 30 Alpine, Indian 
Cre**k 

JOHNSON CHAS. B., Sparta Center. 

JOHNSON CHARLES, 17 Sparta, Lis- 
bon. 



MAIDENS, TO* FORT'S MEDICIHES. 



224 



HISTOKY AUD DIRECTORY Of KENT COUNTY. 



JOHNSON DAVID R., 35 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

Johnson Daniel, Sparta Center. 

Johnson Enos, 21 Gaines, Gainesville. 

Johnson Erastus W., 10 Walker, Indian 
Creek. 

JOHNSON EDGAR R., 17 Cascade, 
Cascade. 

JOHNSON EZRA D., 16 Cascade, Cas- 
cade. 

Johnson Mrs. E. M., Lowell. 

Johnson Edwin O., Lowell. 

Johnson Eli D., 23 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia. 

Johnson Frederick, 29 Lowell, Lowell. 

JOHNSON GEORGE, 7 Grattan, Grat- 
tan Center. 

Johnson Gilbert E., 13 Conrtland, 
Courtland Center. 

Johnson George W., 10 Courtland, 
Courtland Center. 

Johnson George, Lowell. 

Johnson Gust, 8 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Johnson Harley M., 16 Cascade, Cas- 
cade. 

Johnson Hebir W., 15 Oakfield, Oak- 
field. 

Johnson Henry, 20 Grand Rapids. 

Johnson Henry E., Lowell. 



JOHNSON LUKE, 3 Gaines, Ham- 
mond. 
Johnson Lewis, 28 Alpine, Indian 

JOHNSON LUTHER H, 33 Alpine, 

Indian Creek. 
Johnson Michael B., 29 Caledonia, 

Caledonia Station. 
Johnson Morris, Lowell. 
JOHNSON MINER T., 30 Tyrone, Cas- 

novia. 
Johnson Martin W., Rockford. 
Johnson Marquis L., 2 Cannon, Bost- 

wick Lake. 
Johnson Nathaniel, Lowell. 
Johnson Nathaniel C, 22 Bowne, 

Bowne. 
JOHNSON NELSON M., 1 Cannon, 

Bostwick Lake. 
JOHNSON ORRIN L., 15 Bowne, 

Bowne. 
Johnson Pyrrhus E., 18 Grattan, Grat- 
tan Center. 
Johnson Mrs. Phebe, Rockford. 
JOHNSON PERLEY W., 4 Walker, 

Indian Creek. 
Johnson Peter, 18 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Johnson fclabin, 1 Piainfield, Rockford. 



JAMES GALLUP, WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DRUGGIST, No. 6 Canal BtrttL 



JOHNSON ISAAC W., 34 Ada, Ada. 
Johnson John, 6 Nelson, Sand Lake. 
JOHNSON JAMES C, 16 Bowne, 

Bowne. 
JOHNSON JEFFERSON, 15 Cascade, 

O ft ftP A(j ^* 

JOHNSON JONATHAN R., 17 Cas- 

Oftdfi v ft 80ft (1C 

JOHNSON JAMES, 8 Grand Rapids. 

Johnson Joseph, 28 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

Johnson John, 34 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Johnson John, 4 Walker, Indian Creek. 

Johnson Joseph, 22 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Johnson John, 23 Algoma, Edgerton. 

JohnBon Joseph, 29 Tyrone, Casuovia. 

Johnson Jasper, 22 Bowne, Bowne. 

Johnson John, 17 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Johnson John C, 22 Bowne, Bowne. 

JOHNSON JAMES E., 10 Alpine, 
Englishville. 

Johnson James, 13 Algoma, Edgerton. 

JOHNSON JOSEPH B., Rockford. 

JOHNSON JAMES, 21 Cannon, Can-' 
nonsburg. 



Johnson Salem, 36 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

JOHNSON STEPHEN, 22 Bowne, 
Bowne. 

Johnson Samuel W., Lowell. 

Johnson Thomas C, 23 Courtland, 
Courtland Centre. 

Johnson Thomas, 26 Grattan, Grant. 

Johnson William A., 22 Courtland, 
Courtland Centre. 

JOHNSON W. W., 32 Grand Rapids, 
G. Rapids. 

JOHNSON WILLIAM B., Rockford. 

JOHNSON WILLIAM C, 21 Court- 
land, Courtland Centre. 

Johnson Wesley, 30 Lowell, Lowell. 

JOHNSON W. W. JK } 80 Lowell, 
Lowell. 

Johnson William, 4 Sparta,' Sparta 
Center. 

Johnson Wm. S., 28 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

Johns Richard, 20 Grand Rapids. 

Joles Albert A., 9 Caledonia, Alaska. 

Joles Alfred A , 9 Caledonia, Alaska. 

Joles James, 9 Caledonia, Alaska. 

Jones Alvah, 12 Lowell, Lowell. 



FORT'S LINIMENT CURES CAKED UDDER, 



HISTOKY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



295 



Jones Abram, 2 Byron, North Byron. 

Jones Mrs. Amelia, 22 Plainfield, Aus- 
terlitz. 

Jones Almon, 11 Walker, G. Rapids. 

JONES A. B., 6 Grand Rapids, Grand 
Rapids. 

JONES CHARLES, 27 Wyoming, 
Grand Rapids. 

Jones Cyrus, 13 Wyoming, G. Rapids. 

JONES MRS. ELIZABETH, 13 Cale- 
donia, Alaska. 

Jones Edward, 21 Oakfield, Oakfield. 

JONES E. E., 13 Algoma, Edgerton. 

Jones Frederick, Lowell. 

Jones George, 16 Courtland, Courtland 

JONES GAYLORD, 11 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Jones George G., 11 Vergennes, Alton. 
JONES ISAAC, 19 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Jones Ira B., 16 Lowell, Lowell. 
JONES JOHN S., 33 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
JONES JOHN, 8 Plainfield, Belmont. 
Jones James M. W., 3 Byron, North 

Byron. 
Jones John, 2 Byron, North Byron. 
Jones James, 3 Ada, Cannonsburg. 
Jones Loven, 21 Oakfield, Oakfield. 



Jones Orrin E., 16 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
Jones Philip, 11 Vergennes, Alton* 
Jones Philip A., 13 Caledonia, Alaska* 
JONES PHILETUS P., Village of 

Cannonsburg. 
Jones Ross, 14 Caledonia, Caledonia* 
Jones Riley A., 24 Grattan, Grant* 
JONES ROBERT R., 17 Gaines, 

Gainesville. 
Jones Samuel, 29 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
JONES THOMAS J., 38 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Jones Thomas, 21 Oakfield, Oakfield. 
Jones Wm., 13 Lowell, Lowell. 
Jones William, 21 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
Jones Wesley, 10 Vergennes, Alton. 
Jones Wm. II., 11 Walker, G. Rapids. 
JONES WILLIAM R., 12 Oakfield, 

Greenville. 
JORDAN HENRY C, jr., 20 Paris, 

Grand Rapids. 
Jordan Henry C, 20 Paris, G. Rapids. 
Joslin Blynn D., Alaska. 
JOSLIN BENJAMIN, 34 Nelson, 

Cedar Springs. 
Joslin William W., 33 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 



JAMES GALLUP, WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DRUGGIST, No. 6 Canal Street 



Jones Leonard S., 23 Cannon, Cannons- 

bnrg. 
Jones Michael, 21 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
Jones Owen, 22 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 



Judd.A. H., 20 Lowell, Lowell. 
Judd Martin, 35 Wyoming, G. Rapids. 
JUDSON ELLA, 8 Byron, Byron Cen. 
Judson H. T., 9 Wyoming, Grandville. 
JUNE GEORGE, 23 Paris, G. Rapids. 
June Hanford, 1 Plainfield, Rockford. 
June Henry, 23 Paris, Grand Rapids. 



K 



Kane Thomas, Rockford. 

Kannedy Alonzo, 11 Vergennes, Alton. 

Karcher Adam, 26 Bowne, Bowne. 

KARCHER GEORGE, 26 Bowne, 
Bowne. 

Karmsen Charles, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 

KARMSEN WILLIAM, Lowell. 

KARSCHNER JOHN, 34 Vergennes, 
Lowell. 

Rating Patrick, 4 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

Kauffman Jonas, 13 Bowne, Lowell. 

Kavenaugh Thomas, 6 Vergennes, Can- 
nonsburg. 

K ealiher Sewell, 22 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 

Keamerling Servaas, 26 G. Rapids. 



Kearney N., 34 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Kearney Patrick, 27 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

Kearns James, 16 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

Keary John, 23 Paris, G. Rapids. 

Keary James, 25 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Keech Andrew, 6 Walker, Berlin. 

Keech Alexander, 36 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 

Keech David H., 13 Cannon, Bostwick 
Lake. 

KEECH HENRY, 14 Grattan, Grant. 

Keech Joseph, 13 Cannon, Bostwick 
Lake. 

Keech Peter, 23 Grattan, Grant. 



29 



IT HAS SAVED VALUABLE COWS. 



226 



HISTOEY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Hellogg H. H., Cedar Springs. 
Kellogg Isaac, Lowell. 
Kellogg Jason, 31 Plainfield, Mill Creek 
Kellogg Lafayette, 3 Byron, North 

Byron. 
KELLOGG LEWIS B., 3 Byron, North 

Byron. 
KELLOGG ORSON, 29 Grand Rapids, 

Grand Rapids. 
Kellogg Orrin, South 1 Ada, Lowell. 
Kellogg Titus, 17 Vergennes, Ver- 

gennes. 
Kellogg Wm. H., 3 Byron, North Byron 
Kelsey Samuel, 17 Cascade, Cascade. 
Kelsey Theron A., 17 Cascade, Cascade. 
KEMP JOHN, 34 Ada, Ada. 
Kemp Nicholas, 2 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
KENNEDY ALEXANDER, Sparta 

Center. 
Kennedy James, 14 Gaines, Hammond. 
Kennedy James, 30 Grattan, Cannons- 
burg. 
Kennedy James, 34 Walker, G. Rapids. 
KENNEDY MRS. JANE, 17 G. Rapids. 
Kennedy Joseph, 17 Grand Rapids. 
Kennedy John N., 8 Walker, G. Rapids. 
Kennedy Michael, 19 Grattan, Can- 

nonsburg. 

JEFFORD'S 8l HATHAWAY'S AXES, AT W. D. FOSTER'S, 14 and 16 Monroe Street. 



Keccli William, 6 Walker, Berlin. 

Keefer Charles S., 15 Gaines, Ham- 
mond. 

Keefer Joel C, 15 Gaines, Hammond. 

KEEFER CHARLES B., 15 Gaines, 
Hamnond. 

Keeler George W., 25 Oakfield, Ashley. 

Keeler Timothy D., 25 Oakfield, Ashley. 

Keena John, 10 Ada, Ada. 

KEENEY FRANKLIN, 25 Grattan. 
Grant. 

Keeney Francis, 10 Bowne, Alto. 

KEENEY JOHN M., 10 Bowne, Alto. 

Kegal Fred., Alaska. 

Kehoe Patrick, 1 Ada, Cannonsburg. 

Keifer Andrew J., Grandville. 

Keifer Furman, Grandville. 

Keifer Samuel, 16 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

Kelder Peter, 16 Wyoming, Grandville. 

KELLER CHRISTIAN, jun., 24 
Bowne, Bowne. 

Keller Christian, 24 Bowne, Bowne. 

Kellier John, 28 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

KELLEY AUGUSTUS, 31 Paris, 
Gainesville. 

Kelly Dennis, 29 Cascade, G. Rapids. 

KELLEY DANL B.,33 Lowell, Lowell. 



Kelley Charles W., 21 Gaines. Grand 
Rapids. 

KELLEY CHARLES, 4 Gaines, Grand 
Rapids. 

Kelley Foster, 4 Gaines, G. Rapids. 

KELLEY HENRY, 17 Gaines, Grand 
Rapids. 

Kelley Lee, 4 Gaines, Grand Rapids. 

Kelley Nelson, 4 Gaines, Grand Rapids. 

Kelley James, 27 Ada, Ada. 

Kelley James, 2 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Kelley Norman, 12 Grattan, Otisco, 
Ionia County. 

Kelly Patrick, 24 Grand Rapids. 

Kelly Patrick, 8 Walker, Grand Rapids 

Kelley Patrick, 25 Nelson, Nelson. 

Kelley Patrick, Cedar Springs. 

Kelley Patrick, 34 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Kelley Randolph, 33 Courtland, Rock- 
ford, 

Kelley Timothy, 34 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Kelley William, 20 Gaines, G. Rapids. 

Kellogg Charles, 2 Paris, Grand Rapids 

KELLOGG FRANKLIN B., 30 Nelson, 
Cedar Springs. 

Kellogg Francis N., Cedar Springs. 

Kellogg Harmon, 3 Byron, North Byron 



Kennedy Michael, 30 Grattan, Can- 
nonsburg. 

Kennedy Michael, 19 Grattan, Can- 
nonsburg. 

Kennedy Patrick, 19 Paris, G. Rapids. 

KENNEDY SIMON, 30 Grattan, Can- 
nonsburg. 

Kennedy Sherman, 11 Vergennes, Alton 

Kennedy Wm. W., 17 Grand Rapids. 

Kenney Edward, 34 Ada, Ada. 

Kenney Elijah, 13 Vergennes, Fallass- 
burg. 

Kenney James, 2 Plainfield, Rockford. 

KENNY JOHN, 8 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Kenny Mrs. Mary, 8 Walker, G. Rapids 

Kenny Patrick, 8 Walker, G. Rapids. 

KENNEL ENOCH J., 5 Nelson, Sand 
Lake. 

Kennon Marshall, 34 Walker, G. Rapids 

Kenny Thomas, 33 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Kent Cyrus, Rockford. 

KENT MARCUS A., 11 Caledonia, 
Alaska. 

Kent Marvin, 9 Grand Rapids. 

Kent Simeon, 11 Caledonia, Alaska. 

KENT WILLIAM, 1 Solon, Sand Lake. 



FORT'S ENEMY OF PAIN CURES CHOLERA MORBUS. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 227 



Coldbrook St, Grocer, 

Retail Dealer In 



GROCERIES, STONEWARE, 

Scraps, flies astd) Uqjwws. 

Cash. Paid JFor Produoe cto Fxxma. 
Kea, P .* M . Depot, GRAND RAPIDS. 

E. G. Eaton, 



(SUCCESSOR TO EATON & CANFIELD,) 



WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

JEWELER, 

No. 7 Canal St., 

Grand Rapids, - ? Michigan. 

~ J. C. HERKNER, 



DEALER IN 



Clocks & Watches, 

7 MONROE STREET, 7 

»"R,epairin» Done witlx Neatness and. X>lspatcli..d 



228 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 



KENYON CRANDALL A., 4 Plain- 
fleld, Rockford. 

Kenyon George W., 1 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

Kenyon E. G., 19 Byron, Byron Center. 

Kepkey Frederick, 22 Caledonia, Alaska 

Kerickes M. Bela, 1 Lowell, Lowell. 

Kerr Ed., 31 Algoma, Englishville. 

Kerr James L. B., 22 Vergennes, Ver- 
gennes. 

KERR JAMES N., 22 Vergennes, Ver- 
gennes. 

Kerrer John, 20 Caledonia, Caledonia 
Station. 

Kerrer Michael, 19 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia Station. 

Kerrer Michael, 20 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia Station. 

Ketchum Edward, 9 Lowell, Lowell. 

KETCHUM LORINE., 21 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

Keyes Henry D:, 18 Paris, Grand Rapids 

Keyes James, 33 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

KEYES JAMES A., 33 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Kilts Nicholas, 17 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

Kimball Charles W., 12 Nelson, Nelson. 

Kinche Danforth, Lowell. 



King George, 13 Lowell, Lowell. 

KING JOHN L., 26 Cascade, Alaska. 

King John J., 26 Cascade, Alaska. 

King Thomas, 33 Ada, Ada. 

King Michael G., 24 Vergennes, Fal- 
lassburg. 

KING MYRON J., 34 Vergennes, 
Lowell. 

King Melvin A., 34 Grattan, Alton. 

King Myron A., 26 Cascade, Cascade. 

KING1N HARRY II., 19 Courtland, 
Edgerton. 

KINGIN JAMES, 20 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

Kingin Oliver T., 20 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

Kinne Edwin, 5 Grand Rapids, Grand 
Rapids. 

Kinne Lyman, 5 Grand Rapids, Grand 
Rapids. 

KINNEY DANIEL G., 34 Ada, Ada. 

Kinney Daniel, 8 Ada, Ada. 

Kinney Daniel, Lowell. 

Kinney George, 14 Paris, Grand Rapids 

Kinsley Abisha, Lowell. 

Kinsey David, Caledonja Station. 

Kinsey Isaac, 30 Caledonia, Caledonia 
Station. 



BUY DRUGS AND MEDICINES AT J. GALLUP'S DRUG STORE, 6 Canal Street. 



Kindry Wm. S., 27 Tyrone, Sparta Cen. 

King Alvin B., 27 Cascade, Alaska. 

King Augustus, 13 Cascade, Cascade. 

Kies Othniel, 2 Wyoming. G. Rapids. 

Kibble Richard, 33 Bowne, Harris 
Creek. 

Kibboom Jacob, 8 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

KIDDER M. C, 11 Algoma, Edgerton. 

Kiefer Samuel E., 19 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Kiel Simon, 19 Lowell, Lowell. 

Kies William, 13 Lowell, Lowell. 

Kies Joseph, 19 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

KILBURN JOSIAH R., 34 Wyoming, 
Grand Rapids. 

Kilgus Frederick, 1 Bowne, Alto. 

Killmartin Jerrv, 5 Caledonia, Alaska. 

KILMER VAN 'RENSSELAER, 20 Cas- 
cade, Cascade. 

Kilmer Simon, 9 Caledonia, Ala ka. 

King Arza H., 34 Grattan, Alton , 

King Charles B., 13 Alpine, Alpine. 

King David H., 34 Vergennes, Lowell. 

King Darius, 18 Walker, Grand Rapids 

King Edmund, 10 Vergennes, Alton. 

King Erastus, 20 Ada, Ada. 

KING FRANK W., 1 Grattan, Ashley. 



Kinsey Jacob, 30 Caledonia, Caledonia 
Station. 

KINSEY JOHN, 4 Gaines, Hammond. 

Kinsman A. C, Lowell. 

KINSMAN JOHN II., 11 Lowell, 
Lowell. 

Kinyon Joseph, 23 Lowell, Lowell. 

Kinyon Jas. W., 16 Lowell, Lowell. 

KINYON WM, W., 16 Lowell, Lowell. 

KIPP JESSE, 21 Walker, G. Rapids. 

KIPP MOSES J., 4 Cannon, Rockford. 

Kirby Peter, 3 Wyoming, G. Rapids. 

Kirchner Fred, Lisbon. 

KIRKLAND JACOB C, Burchville, 
(Burch's Mills.) 

Kistler Washington, 8 Gaines, Gaines- 
ville. 

Kistler Manelious S., 8 Gaines, Gaines- 
ville. 

Kitchen Henry, 3 Paris, G. Rapids. 

KITCHEN Z. E., 12 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Klaus Peter, 36 Alpine, G. Rapids. 

Kleinlogel Charles, 1 Solon, Sand Lake, 

Klenk G., 30 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Klenk John F., 19 Alpine, Pleasant, 



FORT'S ENEMY OF PAIN CURES COLIC. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 229 

BIRGE ISOMERS. 

Staple and Fancy 

GROCERS! 



EXTENSIVE DEALERS 1ST 



Teas, Coffee, Sugars, Syrups, Molasses, 

SPICES, CANNED GOODS, &c, &c. 
SELLING EVERYTHING LOW FOR CASH. 

Highest Market Price Paid for Country Produce, 

35 Monroe St., 
GRAND RAPIDS, - MICHIGAN. 

Putnam Bros. & Co., 

Wholesale Dealers In 

OYSTERS, 

And Manufacturers of 

CONFECTIONERY 

20 Monroe Street, 
GRAND RAPIDS, - MICHIGAN. 



230 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Kline Julia A., 24 Ve'rgennes, Fallass- 
burg. 

KLINE JOHN W., 1 Bowne, Alto. 

Kline Philip, Rockford. 

Kline William, Burchville, (Burch's 
Mills.) 

KLINGMAN DAVID, 23 Gaines, Ham- 
mond. 

Klingman Jacob, 23 Gaines, Ham- 
mond. 

Klingman John K., 25 Gaines, Grand 
Rapids. 

Kloot Joost, 29 Grand Rapids. 

Klumpp August E., Lowell. 

Klumpp William E., Lowell. 

Knapp Amasa, 27 Vergennes, Lowell. 

Knapp Albert B., 21 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

Knapp Abner, Lowell. 

KNAPP E. U., 17 Grand Rapids. 

Knapp Franklin C, 27 Vergennes, 
Lowell. 

KNAPP HARRY, Lowell. 

KNAPP STEVEN B., Lowell. 

Knee Wesley H., 35 Grattan, Alton. 

KNIFFIN HIRAM, Alaska. 

Knickerbocker Charles, 16 Caledonia, 
Alaska. 



Kodderetsch August W., 26 Paris, 

Grand Rapids. 
Konkle Abraham, 28 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Konkle Elijah, 21 Plainfield, Belmont. 
KONKLE HOLLIS, 28 Plainfield, 

Belmont. 
Konkle Phineas, 31 Plainfield, Mill 

KONKLE TIMOTHY, 28 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Kooistra John, 17 Wyoming, Grand- 

ville. 
KOON CHARLES E., Lisbon. 
KOON WM. L., 19 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
KOON SHERMAN J., Lisbon. 
Koopman Cornelius, 29 Grand Rapids. 
Kopf Goodrich, Lowell. 
KOPF JOHN, Lowell. 
Koster Henry, Grandville. 
Koyack Anthony, 6 Plainfield, English- 

ville. 
KRAFT GEORGE B., Caledonia, 

Alaska. 
KRAFT VALENTINE, Lowell. 
Kramer Nicholas, 13 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Kramer Peter, 33 Alpine, Indian 

Creek. 



PUMPS, PIPE 8c POINTS FOR PAT. DRIVE WELLS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



Knickerbocker Cyrenius, 16 Caledonia, 

Alaska. 
Knickerbocker Porter, 16 Caledonia, 

Alaska. 
Knickerbocker Walter, 12 Oakfield, 

Greenville. 
Knickerbocker Sylvanus, 16 Caledonia, 

Alaska. 
Knight George W., 3 Byron, North 

Byron. 
Knight Homer, 13 Algoma, Edgerton. 
KNIFFIN ADGATE C, 20 Lowell, 

Lowell. 
Kniffin Colossian, Lowell. 
Kniffin Charles, 20 Lowell, Lowell. 
KNIFFIN HIRAM, Alaska. 
Knowles James A., Grandville. 
Kocher Albert, Sparta Center. 
KOCHER CHRISTOPHER, 3 Sparta, 

Sparta Center. 
Kocher Elmon A., 8 Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 



Krance Christian, 12 Walker, G. Rapids. 
Kreke Conrad, 35 Wyoming, North 

Byron. 
Kritcher Conrad, Lisbon. 
Kromer Augustus, Cannonsburg. 
KROMER ABRAHAM, Village Can- 
nonsburg. 
KROMER RUSSELL, 30 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
KRUM ADELBERT, 31 Vergennes, 

Lowell. 
Krutn Abram, 32 Vergennes, Lowell. 
KRUM CORNELIUS, 31 Vergennes, 

Lowell. 
Krum Edwin B., 32 Vergennes, Lowell. 
KRUM WILLIAM, 31 Vergennes, 

Lowell. 
Krupp Daniel, 12 Alpine, Alpine. 
KULP JARED, Alaska. 
Kusterer Christian, 20 Walker, Grand 

Rapidi. 
Kusterer Jacob, 9 Cascade, Cascade. 
KUTZ S. B., Rcckford. 



THE KNOWING ONES, AND GOOD JUDGES, USE 



fllSTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



231 



Laawenman Gaart, 32 Grand Rapids. 

LaBarge Benjamin ? 16 Caledonia, 
Alaska. 

LaBarge Francis, 16 Caledonia, Alaska. 

LABARGE GEORGE, 35 G. Rapids. 

LaBarge Stephen H., 32 Ada, Ada. 

LaBarge William, 29 Ada, Ada. 

LaBarr Joseph H., 30 Sparta, Lisbon. 

LaBarres James, Rockford. 

Laberdy James, 1 Lowell, Lowell. 

LACEY HEZEKIAH, Cedar Springs. 

Lacey John R., Village Cannonsburg. 

Laddbury Lewellyn, 12 Gaines, Ham- 
mond. 

Ladner Herbert, 36 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Ladner Francis, 36 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Ladner Henry, 26 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Ladner James, 36 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

LADNER JAMES, 26 Cannon, Can- 
nonsburg. 

Lafayette Isaac, 18 Spencer, Nelson. 



Lamphier Lorenzo, 29 Grand Rapids. 
Lamoreaux Andrew W., 13 Plainfield, 

Mill Creek. 
Lamoreaux Andrew W., 31 Plainfield, 

Mill Creek. 
Lamoreaux Andrew J., 1 Walker, Mill 

Creek. 
Lamoreaux Andrew, 1 Walker, Mill 

Creek. 
LAMOREAUX AMBROSE, 8 Ada, 

Ada. 
Lamoreaux David, 31 Plainfield, Mill 

Creek. 
Lamoreaux Florence, 1 Walker, Mill 

LAMOREAUX, GEORGE W., 13 

Plainfield, Austerlitz. 

Lamoreaux Lester H., 1 Walker, Mill 
Creek. 

Lamoreaux Peter, 26 Plainfield, Aus- 
terlitz. 

Lamoreaux Wm. M., 29 Cannon, Aus- 
terlitz. 

Lamont Alexander, 34 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 



BUY PATENT MEDICINES AT « Canal Street. 



Laison Jacob, 1 Wyoming, G. Rapid. 
Laison John, 1 Wyoming, G. Rapids. 
Lake John T., 21 Bowne, Bowne. 
Lallor Joseph, 17 Walker, G. Rapids. 
Lally Martin, 11 Bowne, Bowne. 
LALLY PATRICK IT., 27 Grattan, 

Grant. 
Lally Thomas S., 11 Bowne, Bowne. 
Lally Thomas, 27 Grattan, Grant. 
Lamb Thomas B., Lowell. 
LAMBERTON DANIEL C, 5 Grand 

Rapids, Grand Rapids. 
Lamberton, Daniel C, Jr., 5 Grand 

Rapids, Grand Rapids. 
Lamberton Charles, 17 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
LAMBERTON JACOB, 17 Spencer, 

Spencer Mills. 
Lamberton Theron, 17 Spencer, Spen- 
cer Mills. 
Lampman Henry, 25 Lowell, Lowell. 
Lampman James, 25 Lowell, Lowell. 
Lampee Henry, 19 Alpine, Pleasant. 
Lamphier Albert, 17 Grand Rapids. 
Lamphere Calvin, 17 Wyoming, Grand- 

ville. 
Lamphere Lester S., 31 Ada, G. Rapids. 



Lamont John, 34 Walker, G. Rapids. 
Lamont Silas H., 16 Vergennes, Lowell. 
Landon Adonijah, 1 Ada, Cannons- 
burg. 
Landon David F , Lisbon. 
LANDON D. F., Lisbon. 
LANDON IRA, Cannonsburg. 
Landis Eli, 7 Byron, Grandville. 
Landis John, 18 Byron, Grandville. 
Landis Samuel, 18 Byron, Grandville. 
Lane C. C, 14 Lowell, Lowell. 
Lane Mrs. F. A., Lowell. 
Lane Geo., 13 Lowell, Lowell. 
Lane George F., 22 Vergennes, Lowell. 
Lane James M., 25 Byron, Cody's Mills. 
Lane John, 24 Grattan, Grant. 
Lane Jonas H., Lowell. 
Lane Palmer, 25 Vergennes, Lowell. 
Lane Wm. E., 13 Lowell, Lowell. 
Langley George, Lowell. 
Langley Warren, Lowell. 
Langs Alonzo, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 
Langs Jacob, 11 Vergennes, Alton. 
Langs James M., 11 Vergennes, Alton. 
Langs, Mrs. Mary, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 
Langs Wallace W., 11 Lowell, Lowell. 



FORT'S EXTRACT OF LEMON. 



232 



HISTOKY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



LANNING EDWARD, 12 Courtland, 
Oakfield. ' 

Lapham Darius A., Rockford. 

Lapham Embre B., Rockford. 

LAPHAM SMITH, Rockford. 

Lappin Michael, 31 Grattan, Cannons- 
burg. 

Lara way Alvin, 17 Paris, G. Rapids. 

Laraway Barney J., 8 Paris, G., Rapids. 

LARAWAY JAMES R., 4 Cascade, 

LARAWAY WILLIAM, 28 G. Rapids. 

Larimer James, 32 Alpine, Indian 
Creek. 

Larkin Peter, Cedar Springs. 

Larson Lars, 9 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 

Last William, 26 Grand Rapids. 

Latham Leonard, 21 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

Laughlin John, 7 Vergennes, Ver- 
gennes. 

Laughlin James, 28 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

Laughlin Patrick, 8 Vergennes, Ver- 
gennes. 

Laughlin William, 36 Cannon, Can- 
nonsburg. 

Lavendar John, 10 Vergennes, Lowell. 



LAWYER JOHN, 3 Bowne, Alto. 

LAWYER MRS. LYDIA, 35 Grand 
Rapids. 

Lawyer Wm. R., 35 Grand Rapids. 

Lazier James, 33 Alpine, Indian Creek. 

Leach Cerril, 12 Plainfield, Rockford. 

Leach Collins, Rockford. 

LEATHERS DEW1TT, 22 Cascade, 
Cfmpfirl p 

LEATHERS D. J., Rockford. 

Leathers Samuel, 36 Algoma, Rockford. 

Leatherman John, 16 Gaines, G. Rapids 

Leavitt Henry A., 16 Oakfield, Oak- 
field. 

LEAVENWORTH ALONZO D., 24 
Algoma, Edgerton. 

Leavenworth Fred. M., 24 Algoma, 
Edgerton. 

Le Baron William, 4 Alpine, G. Rapids 

Leclear Baptist, 36 Cascade, Alaska. 

Leclear Daniel, 35 Cascade, Alaska. 

LECLEAR FRANCIS, 36 Cascade, 
Alaska. 

Leclear James, 35 Cascade, Alaska. 

LECLEAR LEVI, 27 Cascade, Cascade. 

LE CLEAR GEORGE R., 15 Caledonia, 

A 1 ft qI^q 

LE CLEAR THOMAS, 15 Caledonia, 

Alaska. 



PUMPS FOR CISTERNS, AND FORCE PUMPS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



Lavender Mrs. Lucretia, 7 Walker, 
Grand Rapids. 

Lavender Marvin B., 7 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Laverty Henry, 14 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

LAVERTY HARVEY E., 14 Grattan, 
Grattan Center. 

Lawless James, 5 Vergennes, Ver- 
gennes. 

LAWRASON ROBERT, 25 Cascade, 
Alaska. 

Lawrence C. D., 15 Grand Rapids. 

Lawrence George, 21 Plainfield, Bel- 
mont. 

LAWRENCE LYMAN, 11 Walker, 
Grand Rapids. 

Lawrence Thomas, 13 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Lawrence Wm. Cedar Springs. 

Lowry Ephraim, 2 Bowne, Alto. 

Lowry Leonard B., 17 Cascade, Cas- 

LOWRY MOSES, 2 Bowne, Alto. 
Lawson Lewis G., 13 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Lawyer Fred., 21 Lowell, Lowell. 



Ledger James, 15 Byron, Byron Center 

Ledward John, 29 Grand Rapids. 

Ledyard Wm. B., South 6 Walker, 
Grand Rapids. 

Lee Benj. J., 28 Bowne, Bowne. 

Lee Charles H., 36 Paris, Grand Rapids 

LEE EDMUND Jr., Lowell. 

Lee J. Edwin, Lowell. 

Lee Leverett J., 34 Vergennes, Lowell. 

LEE PETER, Lowell. 

LEE SOLOMON, 34 Vergennes, Lo- 
well. 

Lee William, 20 Oakfield, Oakfield. 

LEE WILLIAM, 27 Bowne, Bowne. 

Leece Ferdinand, 11 Bowne, Alto. 

Leece John, 1 Bowne, South Boston. 

LEEMAN WALTER, 16 Oakfield, Oak- 
field. 

Leeuw Abram, 32 Paris, Grand Rapids* 

LEFFINGWELL C. W., 22 G. Rapids. 

Leffler David, 28 Alpine, Indian Creek. 

Leffingwell Henry H., 12 G. Rapids. 

LEFEVER, FRANCIS M., 35 Paris, 
Hammond. 

LeFever Stark, 35 Paris, Hammond. 

Legg Elijah, Rockford. 



A BLESSING TO ANY COUNTRY-FORT'S 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



231 



Leibler Jacob, 20 Gaines, G. Rapids. 

Leland Aaron, 25 Alpine, Mill Creek. 

LEMON JOHN A. Lowell. 

LENNON EDWARD, 29 Cascade, Cas- 
cade. 

Lennon John, 29 Cascade, Cascade. 

Lennon Thomas, 29 Cascade, Cascade. 

Lent Adam, 17 Algoma, Rockford. 

LENT GEORGE W., Sparta Center. 

Lent James M., 13 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Leonard Charles, 12 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

Leonard Henry, 4 Bowne, Alto. 

Leonard Henry S., 15 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 

LEONARD PATRICK, 17 Bowne, Har- 
ris Creek. 
Leonard Patrick, 27 Ada, Ada. 
Lcpard David, 10 Paris, G. Rapids. 
LeRue, Lewis B., 36 Grand Rapids. 
LESLIE CHAS. H., 26 Lowell, Lowell. 
LESLIE JAMES B., 26 Spencer, Spen- 
cer Mills. 
Lester Henry S., 19 Sparta, Lisbon, 
Lester, Miss Elnor, 30 Ada, Ada. 
LESTER JOHN L., 30 Ada, Ada. 
Lester James, 23 Sparta, Sparta Center. 
Lessen Barnard, 26 Grand Rapids. 



LILLIE CHESTER A., 3 Oakfield, 

Greenville. 
Lillie Chester, 3 Oakfield, Greenville. 
Lillie William H., 3 Oakfield, Oakfield. 
Lillibridge Richard, 30 Alpine, Indian 

Creek. 
Lillibridge C, 31 Alpine, Indian Creek. 
Lillibridge Thomas, 31 Alpine, Indian 

Creek. 
LILLY GEORGE, 21 Byron, Byron 

Byron Center. 
LILLY JULIA A., 10 Byron, Gaines- 
ville. 
Linberg John, 32 Sparta, Lisbon. 
LINDERMAN G. 8., 29 G. Rapids. 
LINDERMAN JASON, 16 Courtland, 

Courtland Center. 
Linderman Richard, 15 Wyoming, 

Grandville. 
Lind George, 6 Bowne, Alto. 
Lind Wm. H., 1 Caledonia, Alaska. 
Lind William, 6 Bowne, Alto. 
Lindsay Joseph W., Lowell. 
LINDSAY JOHN L., 17 Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 
Lindsay Solomon, 5 Caledonia, Alaska. 
Lindsley Lester S., 9 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 



ROPES, ALL SIZES, AND TACKLE BLOCKS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



LESSITER HENRY, 4 Grattan, Grat 
tan Center. 

LESSITER WILLTAM, 33 Oakfield, 
Ashley. 

Lewis Allen, 15 Plainfield, Belmont. 

Lewis Abner, 14 Vergennes, Lowell. 

Lewis Benton, 17 Nelson, Cedar Springs 

Lewis Dennis, 17Nelson, Cedar Springs 

LEWIS EDWARD, 14 Algoma, Edger- 
ton. 

Lewis George, 15 Plainfield, Belmont. 
Lewis George R., 25 Paris, G. Rapids. 
Lewis Harry, 10 Oakfield, Oakfield. 
Lewis J. S., Burchville (Burch's Mills.) 
Lewis Julius, 8 Courtland, Courtland 

Center. 
Lewis John, 32 Algoma, Rockford. 
Lewis Joseph, 30 Bowne, Harris Creek. 
Lewis Loren, 13 Cascade, Cascade. 
Lewis Oliver R., 15 Oakfield, Oakfield. 
Lewis Peter, 13 Walker, Grand Rapids. 
Lewis Wm. H., 10 Oakfield, Oakfield. 
Liddle George, Rockford. 
Liddy James, Cedar Springs. 
Lifer John, 4 Sparta, Casnovia. 
Light George W., 28 Sparta, Lisbon. 



Linesetter John, 36 Plainfield, Grand 

Rapids. 
Link Alonzo, Cedar Springs. 
LINNELL GEORGE, 33 Courtland, 

Courtland Center. 
LINSEA WJLLIAM, 12 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Linsey Myron, Alaska Village. 
Linsley Henry, 15 Caledonia, Alaska. 
Lippela Christian, 4 Oakfield, Oakfield. 
Lippela John C, 4 Oakfield, Oakfield. 
Liscomb A. Q., 17 Walker, G. Rapidg. 
LISTON DANIEL, 9 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Litle Charles E., 15 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 
Litle Lois, 15 Cannon, Cannonsburg. 
LITLE WM. G., 15 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 
Littell A. J., Rockford. 
Littlefield Samuel, Lowell. 
Livergood Andrew G., 34 Ada, Ada. 
Livingston Charles, 20 Bowne, Harris 

Creek. ' 

Livingston Hiram, 3 Bowne, Alto. 
LIVINGSTON HARVEY, 34 Ada, Ada 
Livingston John, 21 Ada, Ada. 



30 



WESTERN LINIMENT AND LIVER PILLS- 



234 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Livingston Moses, 3 Bowne, Alto. 

LLOYD MARION, 2 Plainfield, Rock- 
ford. 

LIVINGSTON MRS. P. A., Cedar 
Springs. 

Livingston ¥m. H., Cedar Springs. 

Livingston William, 23 Plainfield, Aus- 
terlitz. 

LOASE JOHN F., Rockford. 

LOCK WM. H., Alaska Village. 

Lock Wm. N., 27 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Lockwood Dix, 23 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Lockwood George, 19 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

Lockwood Harvey, Burchville (Burch's 
Mills.) 

Lockwood Hezekiah, 34 Ada, Ada. 

Lockwood James M., 18 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

Lockwood John W., 21 Courtland, 
Courtland. Center. 

Lockwood John A., 23 Oakfield, Ashley 

LOCKWOOD NANCY J., 23 Oakfield, 
Ashley. 

LOCKWOOD S. R., Lisbon. 

Lockwood Seth, 23 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 



Lord Edwin, 11 Tyrone, Sparta Center. 
Lord William C, 15 Nelson, Nelson. 
Lord Wm. L., 25 Sparta, Sparta Center 
Loschet Michael, 31 Alpine, Indian 

Creek. 
Lot William, 1 Bowne, Lowell. 
Lott Charles, 30 Nelson, Cedar Springs. 
Louckes Alvah, 2 Walker, Grand Rapids 
Louckes John, 2 Walker, Grand Rapids 
LOUDON JOHN, Cedar Springs. 
Loudon John, 36 Tyrone, Sparta Cen. 
Loughlin Frank, 34 Walker, G. Rapids 
Longhlin Thomas, 34 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Lounsbury Gerret R., 5 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
Love Henry, 27 Cascade, Alaska. 
Lovejoy Asa T., 4 Byron, North Byron. 
Lovejoy Alanson, 7 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Lovejoy Cyrus, Lowell. 
Lovejoy Daniel, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 
Lovejoy David, 22 Lowell, Lowell. 
Lovejoy Hiram, 28 Byron, Byron Ctn. 
Lovejoy James, 7 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Lovejoy John, 30 Nelson, Cedar Springs 
Lovejoy Lewis T., Lowell. 
Lovejoy Oliver, 7 Cannon, Rockford. 
LOVELAND CYRENO, 27 Lowell, 

Lowell. 



COOPERS' AND BLACKSMITHS' TOOLS, AT W. D FOSTER'S. 



Lohr Henry, 17 Pans, Grand Rapids. 

Lohrke Julius J., 34 Ada, Ada. 

Long Jacob, 5 Algoma, Cedar Springs. 

LONG JOHN R., 2 Byron, North 
Byron. 

Long John, 27 Algoma, Rockford. 

Long Samuel, 18 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Long William, 35 Algoma, Rockford. 

Longcore John, Sr., 3 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Longcore John, Jr., 3 Tyrone, Casnovia 

LOOK JOHN Q., Lowell. 

Loomis Alvin C., 8 Spencer, Spencer 
Mills. 

Loomis Alfred, 6 Walker, Grand Rapids 

Loomis Alexander, 26 Paris, G. Rapids. 

Loomis Daniel, Cedar Springs. 

Loomis Hugh, 6 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 

LOOMIS JEFFERSON W., 4 Ver- 
gennes, Alton. 

Loomis Levi, 13 Caledonia, Alaska. 

Loomis Lovica B., 14 Byron, Gaines- 
ville. 

Loomis Wm. H., 29 Gaines, Cody's 
Mills. 

Loop John, 9 Oakfield, Oakfield. 

Lord Charles, 1 Courtland, Courtland 
Center. 



Loveless Erastus, 1 Gaines, Hammond. 

LOVELESS GEO. W., 1 Gaines, Ham- 
mond. 

Loveless Sylvester, 1 Gaines, Ham- 
mond. 

LOVELL EDWARD, 15 Walker, G. 
Rapids. 

Lovell James, 29 Algoma, Rockford. 

Lovell James, Burchville, (Burch's 
Mills.) 

Lovell James, 12 Vergennes, Fallass- 
burg. 

Lovell Joseph, 14 Vergennes, Alton. 

Lovell James, 6 Plainfield, Belmont. 

Lovell Sally, 6 Plainfield, Belmont. 

Lovell Sylvester, 6 Plainfield, Belmont. 

Lovelock Levi, 21 Oakfield, Oakfield. 

Low Alvah, 11 Grattan, Otisco, Ionia 
County. 

Lowden Mrs., Lowell. 

Lowden James, 35 Tyrone, Sparta Cen. 

Lowden Stephen E., 35 Tyrone, Sparta 

LOWE CHARLES C, 22 Sparta, Spar- 
ta Center. 

Lowe Charles, 36 Gaines, Caledonia 
Station. 



LUMBERMEN USE FORT'S WESTERN LINIMEVT. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 285 

CHAS. A. BISSONETTE, 

MANUFACTURER OF 

Light and Lumber Wagons. 

_ ©©is m® §mmm. 

H.o^£tli*lxiS of j3k.1T. XS.lxxc3.i9. 

ALL WORK WA.RRA.NTEI>. 

No. 42 Bridge St West Side. 

GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 

LADIES AND CHILDREN'S 

Furnishing Goods Store! 

No. 39 Monroe Street. 

Ladies' Uunder Garments, Hosiery, Children's 

Hose, Wrappers and Drawers, Corsets, 

Handkerchiefs, Collars and Cuffs, 

Lace Goods, Forms, Bustles, 

Gloves, Hoop Skirts, &c. 

THE (MY STOKE OF T8E JUNO M THE CITY* 
Our Prices are Low. 

J. E. & W. S. Earle, 

No. 39 Monroe Street. 
An JT. ROSE, 

DEALER IDT 

Groceries and Provisions, 

STGUR, FEED, tJRAIN, &€. 

ALL ORDERS PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 

Corner Court and Bridge Sts., 

(wests^) GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 



236 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Lowe Hiram, 28 Bowne, Harris Creek. 

Lown Joseph, 12 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 

Lowry Ephraim, 2 Bowne, Alto. 

Lowry Leonard B., 17 Cascade, Cas- 
cade. 

LOWRY HENRY NEWELL, 17 Cas- 
cade, Cascade. 

LOWRY MOSES, 2 Bowne, Alto. 

Loyd Patrick, 18 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Loyer Christian, 33 Lowell, Lowell. 

Loyer Jacob, 34 Lowell, Lowell. 

Lucas Henry, 32 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

LUCAS HOWARD J., 32 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

LUCE E. M., Lisbon. 

Luce Hiram C, 24 Cascade, Cascade. 

Ludington Wm. D., 1 Byron, Kelloggs- 
ville. 

Ludwig Endres, 30 Byron, Byron Cen. 

LULL LUCIAN B., Lowell. 

Lull Lyman, 21 Vergennes, Lowell. 

Lundun Charles, 9 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Lundeen Gustavus, 5 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Luneke Luis, 25 Byron, Cody's Mills. 

Lusher John, 28 Algoma, Rockford. 

Lusk Eliza P., 14 Lowell, Lowell. 



Lusk Jeremiah, 36 Lowell, Lowell. 
Lybarker George, 24 Caledonia, Alaska. 
LYBARKER LAFAYETTE, 23 Cale- 
donia, Caledonia Station. 
LYNCH JEREMIAH, 31 Walker, G. 

Rapids. 
Lynch Jeremiah, 1 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
Lynch Mrs. J., 1 Wyoming, G. Rapids. 
Lynch Timothy, 1 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
Lyndyck Peter, 13 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
Lynch Patrick, 31 Walker, G. Rapids. 
Lynn Nathan, 15 Gaines, Hammond. 
Lyon Henry M., 8 Bowne, Alto. 
Lyon Morgan L., Lowell. 
Lyon Morgan, 20 Vergennes, Ver- 

gennes. 
Lyon Nelson T., 8 Lowell, Lowell. 
Lyon R. B., 7 Lowell, Lowell. 
Lyon Sanford W., 28 Grand Rapids. 
Lyon Wm. B., 8 Lowell, Lowell. 
Lyons John, 31 Yergennes, Lowell. 
Lyons Orsamus, 16 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 



AMERICAN CIDER MILLS. AT W. D. FOSTER'S, 14 and 16 Monro© Street. 



M 



Maas Joseph, 13 Alpine, Alpine. 

Maben Charles, 13 Paris, Cascade. 

Mabie Amos C, 28 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

MABIE EL1AS, 11. Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

Mabie Nelson, 21 Solon, Cadar Springs. 

MABIE JOHN F., 13 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

Macomber Horatio B., 11 Cannon, Bost- 
wick Lake. 

Mack Nathaniel, 12 Oakfield, Green- 
ville. 

Maddern Edwin, 26 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Maddern Frank, Village of Cannons- 
burg. 

Maddocks Alphonso, 14 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

Madan Owen, 19 Paris, Grand Rapfds. 

Madigan James, 20 Cascade, Cascade. 

Madison Cass B., 16 Grattan, Grattan' 
Center. 



Madison Charles, 36 Tyrone, Sparta 
Center. 

MADISON GRANVILLE, 13 Cannon 
Bostwick Lake. 

MADISON LUTHER K., 16 Grattan 
Grattan Center. 

Madron David, 7 Vergennes, Ver- 
gennes. 

Maera William, 20 Ada, Ada. 

Magaron John, 26 Plainfield, Austelitz. 

Magaron John, 24: Plainfield, Auster- 
htz. 

MAGEE FRANS, 4 Grand Rapids. 

Magoon Henry, 17 Algoma, Sparta 
Center. 

Magoon Thomas, 17 Algoma, Sparta 
Centre. 

Mahane John, 19 Grattan, Cannons- 
burg. 

Mahoney J., 34 Walker, G. Rapids, 

MAIER JACOB, 24 Gaines, Caledonia 
Station. * 



FORT'S WESTERN LINIMENT CURES ALL LAMENESS. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 237 



Altovt & Rrupp* 



DEALERS IN 



GROCERIES, PROVISIONS, 

Crockery, Glassware, 

Fruits > Vegota'blos* &$♦> 

86 Canal Street, 
GRAND RAPIDS, - MICHIGAN. 

IT, B.— HIGHEST PRICE PAID FOB PRODUCE. 

NICHOLS & NAYSMITH, 

Manufacturers of and Dealers in 

Doors, Sash, Blinds, 

Frames, Bevel; Siding and Matched] Ftcorkf . 

Stair Building, Scroll Sawing, and Custom 

Planing, Done to Order. 

28 Mill Street, South of Bridge St, Bridge, 
GRAND RAPIDS, - - MICHIGAN. 

Agents for the New Patent Machine Made Roped Moldings, 1 

P. KUSTERER, 

T\rHolesale and 3EL©tail. 



Wines and Liquors, Cigars and Tobacco, 

OF ALL KINDS. 
T»-A.XI> FOR PRODUOB. 

No. 100 Canal Street, 

Grand Rapids, - - Michigan. 



238 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



MAIN GEORGE, 1 Oakfieid, Green- 

ville. 
Main John, 34 Algoma, Rockford. 
Main Samuel, 26 Tyrone, Sparta Cen. 
Main William, 1 Oakfieid, Greenville. 
Makkas Garrat, 18 Wyoming, Grand- 

ville. 
Makkas Klaas, 18 Wyoming, Grand- 

ville. 
MALCOLM ISAAC B., Alaska. 
Malcolm Joshua T., 15 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Malcolm John, 20 Walker, G. Rapids. 
Malcolm James W., 20 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
MALCOLM JAMES, Alaska. 
Malin William, 8 Byron, Grandville. 
MALIN PATRICK, 8 Byron, Grand- 
ville. 
Mallory M., Burchville, (Burch's 

Mills.) 
MALLORY RUSSEL, 20 Courtland, 

Courtland C«nter. 
Malone John, 28 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 
Malone Jphn, 29 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
Malone Michael, 22 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
Malone Patrick, 3 Ada, Cannonsburg. 



Manning Martin, 36 Grand Rapids. 

Man waring Wm. II., 8 Wyoming, Grand 
ville. 

MAN WARING WILLIAM, 8 Wyom- 
ing, Grandville. 

Mapes Andrew, 27 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 

Mapes Barnabas, 27 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 

Mapes Fernando C, 21 Lowell, Lowell. 

Mapes Joseph, 6 Plainfield, Englishville 

Mapes Jesse, 8 Plainfield, Belmont. 

Mapes Nehemiah, 28 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

Mapons Wm. H., 10 Byron, North 
Byron. 

March Wilbur S., 29 Bowne, Harris 
Creek. 

Morgan Charles, 7 Lowell, Lowell. 

MARIS PAUL, 29 Grand Rapids. 

MARKEN THOMAS, 2 Grand Rapids. 

Markham Bradley, 21 Alpine, Berlin. 

Markham Chauncey, 18 Alpine, Pleas- 
ant. 

Marks John, Alaska. 

Marritt James, 15 Byron. Byron Center 

MARSH CHAS C, 5 Cascade, Cascade 

Marsh Henry B'., Alaska. 

MARSH PHILETUS L., 11 Gaines, 
Hammond. 

MARSH THOMAS, 8 Cascade, Cascade 



SPINNING WHEELS AND REELS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S, 14 & 16 Monroe Street 



Malone Patrick, 36 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Malone Sidney, 33 Gaines, Cody's 
Mills. 

Malony Michael, 30 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia Station. 

Maloy P., 29 Grand Rapids, Grand 
Rapids. 

Mai pass Daniel, Lowell. 

MANCHESTER JOHN, 7 Sparta, Lis- 
bon. 

MANCHESTER MARTIN, 18 Bowne, 
Alaska. 

Mangletz E., Grandville. 

Manktalow Charles J., 16 G. Rapids. 

MANLY EDMUND, 4 Walker, Indian 
Creek. 

Manly Edwin, 6 Alpine, Pleasant. 

Manly John, 4 Walker, Indian Creek. 

MANLY MRS. J., 32 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Manly Sherebiah H., Lisbon. 

MANN CHARLES, 33 Courtland, 
Rockford. 

Mann Christian, 18 Sparta, Lisbon. 

MANN JACOB F., Lisbon. 

Mann Peter, 16 Vergennes, Lowell. 

Manning John, 36 Grand Rapids. 



MarshaU George, 2 Byron, North Byron 

Marshall Isaiah, 10 Byron, North Byron 

Marshall Joseph, 3 Byron, North Byron 

Marshall Robert, Lowell. 

MARSHALL SAMUEL, 2 Byron, North 
Byron. 

Marshall Scott, 16 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Marshall Wm. D., 33 Lowell, Alto. 

Martin Conrad, 27 Alpine, G. Rapids. 

MARTIN DANIEL W., 18 Caledonia, 
Caledonia Station. 

Martin David, 13 Algoma, Edgerton. 

Martin Ensley, Rockford. 

Martin Frederick, 13 Algoma, Edger- 
ton. ^ 

Martin Gandliff, 13 Algoma, Edgerton. 

Martin George, 1 Solon, Sand Lake. 

MARTIN JOSIAH, 18 Oakfieid, Oak- 
field. 

MARTIN JOSEPH, 6 Gaines, Grand 
Rapids. 

MARTIN JAMES IL, 36 G. Rapids. 

Martin Joseph A., 32 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Martin John, Alaska Village. 



FORT'S WESTERN LINIMENT CURES RHEUMATISM. 



msTOHY Attfc DIRECTORY Of fcEND COtJOTY. 239 

+* ARCHITECT. "V 

Designs for City and Country furnished upon Short Notice, 

Office, 26 Canal St., (up stairs,) 

Grand Rapids, Mich. 

West Side Drug Store, 

Martin's Block, Bridge St., (West.) 

GEO. M. STUART, 



DEALER IN 



DRUGS, MEDICINES AND CHEMICALS, 

Oils, Paints, Varnishes and Brushes. 

The Choicest Brands of Cigars, Smoking & Chewing Tobaccos, 

A Carefully Selected Assortment of 

STATIONERY & SCHOOL BOOKS 

Has been added to the above stock. 

GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 

JOS, EMMEB, 

Manufacturer of 

BUGGIES, SLEIGHS, 

LIGHT AND HEAVY LUMBER WAGONS, 

BLACKSMITHING AND ALL KINDS OF 

REPAIRING. 

Nos. 12 and 14, Cor. Bronaon and Kent Sts., 

O-i-axtca. Xt£tF>ica.s, - - - MioHlgan. 




240 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Martin N. M., 5 Grand Rapids, Grand 

Rapids. 
MARTIN RUFUS W., 6 Cascade, Cas- 
cade. 
MARTIN SIMON P., 9 Caledonia, 

Alaska. 
Martin Thomas, 30 Vergennes, Ver- 

gennes. 
MARTIN THOMAS W., 16 Paris, 

Grand Rapids. 
MARTIN THOMAS, 6 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
MARTIN THOMAS S., 26 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
Martindale Benjamin F., 27 Walker, 

Grand Rapids. 
MARTINDALE CHARLES J., 11 

Sparta, Sparta Center. 
Martindale David B., Sparta Center. 
MARTINDALE THEODORE F., 34 

Alpine, Indian Creek. 
MARVIN ORVILLE G., 5 Nelson, 

Sand Lake. 
Mason Mrs. A. H., Lowell. 
Mason Benjamin, 16 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
MASON ELLIOTT, 25 Grattan, Grant. 
Mason Frank, Lowell. 
Mason James, 3 Ada, Cannonsburg. 

NOVELTY CLOTHES WRINGER, AT W. D. FOSTER'S, 14 & 16 Monroe Street. 



Maxfield Allen D., 34 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Maxfield Matthew M., 27 Spencer, 

Spencer Mills. 
Maxfield W. W., 24 Grand Rapids. 
Maxim Mrs. Mary, 13 Algoma, Edger- 

ton. 
MAXWELL HUGH T., 4 Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 
May Gustavus, 34 Alpine, Indian Creek 
May James, 20 Cascade, Cascade. 
Maybee William, 1 Alpine, Englishville 
Mayer Jacob, 30 Plainfield, Mill Creek. 
MAYNARD JOHN, 12 Lowell, Lowell. 
MAYNARD THOMAS R., 28 Walker, 

Grand Rapids. 
Mayne Andrew, 33 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
MAZE JAMES H., Cedar Springs. 
McALISTER HUGH B., Alaska. 
McAlon Swindle, 33 Plainfield, Grand 

Rapids. 
McArthur Frank, 32 Oakfield, Grattan 

Center. 
McARTHUR GILES, 32 Oakfield, Grat- 
tan Center. 
McARTHUR HARRY, 33 Oakfield, 

Grattan Center. 



Mason Martin, 24 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

MASON SAILSBURY, 2 Wyoming, 
Grand Rapids. 

Mason Theodore W., Lowell. 

Mason William, 34 Plainfield, Grand 
Rapids. 

MASON WM. R., 26 Grattan, Grant. 

MASTENBROECK HENRY, 23 Ver- 
gennes, Fallassburg. 

Masterbrooks John, 30 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Matthewson Jno. E. W., 24 Gaines, 
Hammond. 

MATHEWSON J. M., Lowell. 

Mathewson Neil, 32 Oakfield, Oakfield. 

Matthews John, 18 Alpine, Pleasant. 

Matthews James E., 18 Alpine, Pleas- 
ant. 

Matthews John, 1 Lowell, Lowell. 

Matthews Michael, 16 Cascade, Cas- 
cade. 

Matthews Philip F., 18 Alpine, Pleas- 
ant. 

Maurer Mrs. Anna M., 6 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 



McArthur Orange, 33 Oakfield, Grattan 
Center. 

McArthur Robert, 20 Bowne, Harris 
Creek. 

McArthur Solomon, 30 Oakfield, Oak- 
field. 

McArthur Truman, 26 Byron, Cody's 
Mills. 

McBRIDE ALEX., 13 Lowell, Lowell. 

McBRIDE WM. T., 13 Lowell, Lowell. 

McCabe Andrew, 36 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

McCabe Chester, Lowell. 

McCabe Henry, Lowell. 

McCaine Simon, 13 Lowell, Lowell. 

McCall Mrs. Catharine, 4 Bowne, Alto. 

McCALLUM DUNCAN, 29 Bowne, 
Harris Creek. 

McCarthy Charles, 29 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

MCCARTHY CHARLES, 30 Grattan, 
Cannonsburg. 

McCarthy Dennis, 30 Grattan, Can- 
nonsburg. 

McCarthy Dennis, 34 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 



LET EVERY.ONEITROUBLED WITH LIVER 



HI8T0RY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



241 



McCarthy Jeremiah, 29 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
McCarthy John, 30 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
McCarthy John, 7 Vergennes, Ver- 

gennes. 
McCarthy William, 30 Grattan, Can- 

nonsburg. 
McCarty Charles, Lowell. 
McCarty Charles, 33 Bowne, Harris 

Creek. 
McCarty Daniel, 34 Walker, G. Rapids. 
McCarty John, 1 Wyoming, G. Rapids. 
McCarty Moses A., 31 Gaines, Cody's 

Mills. 
McCARTY MICHAEL, 31 Gaines, 

Cody's Mills. 
McCarty N. L., Lowell. 
McCARTY PERRY, 35 Bowne, Fill- 
more, Barry County. 
McCaul Benj. R., 20 Ada, Ada. 
McCaul Charles S., 26 Ada, Ada. 
McCaul, Win. II., 2(5 Ada, Ada. 
McCauley Barney, 32 Grattan, Can- 

nonsburg. 
McCauley James, 28 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
McCauley Patrick, 33 Oakfield, Grattan 

Center. 



McConnell William, 28 Byron, Byron 

Center. 
McConnell Wm. A., Lowell. 
McConnell William, 3 Caledonia, Alaska 
McConnon Patrick, 23 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
McCord Patrick, 20 Grand Rapids. 
McCORMICK EDWARD, 2 Ada, Can- 

nonsburg. 
McCormick II. F., 23 Grand Rapids. 
McCormick James, 2 Ada, Cannons- 

burg. 
McCormick Michael, 35 Cannon, Can- 

nonsburg. 
McCOY MARK II., Grandville. 
McCoy Sheldon, Lowell. 
McCrath Charles, 21 Grand Rapids. 
McCRATH JAMES, 21 Grand Rapids. 
McCrath Lewis, 9 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
McCrory E. S., Rockford. 
McCULLY THOMAS, 20 Bowne, Harris 

Creek. 
McDaniel Daniel, Lowell. 
McDaunell O. C, Lowell. 
McDIARMID ANGUS, 15 Bowne, 

Bowne. 
McDIARMID CHAUNCEY, 27 Bowne, 

Bowne. 
McDiarmid Duncan, 15 Bowne, Bowne. 



THE AMERICAN BASE BURNER COAL STOVE, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 

James D., 22 Bowne, 

22 Bowne, 



McCauley Peter, 33 Oakfield, Grattan 

Ppntpr 
McCauley Wm. II., 20 Plainfield, Aus- 

terlitz. 
McCHESNEY JOHN M., Village Cedar 

Springs. 
McCieian James L., 33 Ada, Ada. 
McClelan Wm. H., 33 Ada, Ada. 
McClure Jay, 11 Algoma, Eclgerton. 
McClure Oliver P., 27 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
McCombs Hiram, 20 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
McConnell Gilbert C, Rockford. 
McConnell Geo. W., 5 Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 
McConnell Guian, 3 Caledonia, Alaska. 
McConnell Jemima, Village Cedar 

Springs. 
McConnell John, 23 Bowne, Bowne. 
McCONNELL JOHN S., 22 Caledonia, 

Alaska. 
McConnell Lafayette, Rockford. 
McConnell Luther, 29 Lowell, Lowell. 
McCONNELL MARCUS, 4 Caledonia, 

Alaska. 
McConnell Milo, 3 Caledonia, Alaska. 



McDiarmid 

Bowne. 
McDIARMID JAMES, 

Bowne. 
McDIARMID JOHN D., 29 Bowne, 

Harris Creek. 

Mcdonald Alexander, is Bowne, 

Alaska. 

Mcdonald Alexander, 5 Nelson, 

Cedar Springs. 

McDonald Angus, 2 Alpine, English- 
ville. 

McDONALD ANDREW Jr., 5 Ver- 
gennes, Alton. 

McDonald Andrew, 5 Vergennes, Alton. 

McDonald Barney, 17 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

McDonald Charles 17, Wyoming, Grand* 
ville. 

McDonald Duncan, 13 Sparta, Spart* 
Center. 

McDonald Edward, 23 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

McDonald Finley, 84 Ada, Ada. 

McDONALD JOHN, 32 Bowne, Harrk 
Creek. 



81 



COMPLAINT, TRY FORT'S PXLXS. 



242 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 



McDONALD JAMES,32 Bowne, Harris 

Creek. 
McDonald John, 4 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 
McDonald John, 12 Alpine, Grand 

Rapids. 
McDonald James, 34 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
McDonald Patrick, 8 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
McDonald Peter, 5 Vergennes, Alton. 
McDonald Thomas, 30 Wyoming, 

Grandville. 

Mcdonald Washington, 35 ai- 

goma, Rockford. 
McDonald William, 2 Alpine, English- 

ville. 
McDorman Geo. W., 14 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
McDougal James, 36 Tyrone, Sparta 

Center. 
McDowell Jas. A., 36 Byron, Cody's 

Mills. 
McEwen Charles, 3 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
McEwing Daniel, 8 Bowne, Alto. 
McEwen Patrick, 20 Grand Rapids. 
McEwen Mrs. Sarah, 3 Wyoming, 

Grand Rapids. 



McGlin Timothy, 7 Vergennes, Ver- 
gennes. 

McGlynn Patrick, 34 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

McGovern Michael, 10 Grattan, Grat- 
tan Center. 

McGovern Patrick, 11 Nelson, Nelson. 

McGovern Thomas, 11 Nelson, Nelson. 

McGoveran Hugh, 84 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

McGuire James, 34 Walker, G. Rapids. 

McGuire James, 16 Lowell, Lowell. 

McGurk James, 36 Oakfield, Ashley. 

McGrain Daniel, 35 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

McGRATH THOMAS, 30 Alpine, Ber- 
lin. 

McGregor A. II., Lowell. 

McGregor amos h., 13 Lowell, 

Lowell. 

McGregor Asa, 10 Walker, Indian 
Creek. 

McIIugh John, 11 Ada, Cannonsburg. 

Mclntire James, 8 Lowell, Lowell. 

Mcintosh James, 20 Lowell, Lowell. 

Mclntyre Fayette E., 4 Caledonia, Al- 
aska. 

Mclnroy Alexander, Grandville. 

Mclnroy William, Grandville. 



COOK AND PARLOR STOVES, ALL KINDS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



McEwen William, 3 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

McFadden James, Burchville, (Burch's 
Mills.) 

McFall Jonathan, 20 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 

McFarland John, 26 Lowell, Lowell. 

McGann Michael, 3 Ada, Ada. 

McGARRY JAMES, 25 Caledonia, Cal- 
edonia. 

McGaven John, 34 Plainfield, Auster- 
litz. 

McGEE BERNARD, 10 Vergennes, 
Alton. 

McGee Cormick, 33 Graf tan, Grattan 
Center. 

McGee James, 21 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 

McGEE JOHN, 28 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

McGee James, 10 Vergennes, Alton. 

McGee Owen, 34 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 

McGILLIVRAY DUNCAN D., Station 
Agent at Ada Village. 

McGinnis John, 18 Bowne, Harris 
Creek. 

McGinnis Kerns, 3 Ada, Cannonsburg. 



McKee William, 10 Cascade, Ada. 

MeKenzie Alexander, 27 Walker, G. 
Rapids. 

MeKenzie Mrs. Marion E., 13 Walker, 
Grand Rapids. 

McKenna James, 34 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

McKenney James K., 20 Byron, Byron 
Center. 

McKENNEY SAMUEL, 17 Byron, 
Byron Center. 

McKnight James, 29 Cascade, Cascade. 

McKnight Thomas, 29 Cascade, Cas- 
cade. 

McKinzie Kinneth, 8 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

McKinster Charles, Cedar Springs. 

McKinney John, 3 Cannon, Rockford. 

McKinney William, 3 Cannon, Rock- 
ford. 

McKoy Win. M., 7 Grand Rapids. 

McLain Abner, 30 Cannon, Austerlitz. 

McLain George, 34 Ada, Ada. 

McLain Mrs. James, 6 Alpine, Lisbon. 

McLAIN JOHN, 34 A<la, Ada. 

McLane Curtis, 8 Alpine, Pleasant. 

McLane David, 8 Alpine, Pleasant. 



FORT'S AROMATIC OINTMENT CURES SORE EYES. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



243 



REAL ESTATE AGENCY 

SINCLAIR BROS. <£ CO., 

O Canal (Street, 

G-:r«£tnc3L Rapids, IMElolxl&eixi. 

Established 8 Years. (Sweet's Hotel Block.) Established 8 Years. 



We have, since 18H2, been uninterruptedly engaged in a General Real Estate Agency, in the growing 
City of Grand Rapids, Mich. We buy and sell Real Estate for Residents and Non-Residents, Manage 
Estates, Pay Taxes, &c. 

Our Sales for 1869 amounted to over $500,000.00. In Jnne, 1870, we sold 
#78,000.00 worth of Real Estate. Ours is, without doubt, the most extensive 
Land Agency in Michigan. 

t^~If you have Farms or City Property for sale, leave it with us. Correspondence solicited. We 
refer to 

Messrs. E. P. & S. L. FULLER, Bankers, City. 

Hon. LEWIS PORTER, Washington, D. C. 

Hon. L. G. MASON, Muskegon, Michigan. 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK, City. 

Hon. C. C, COMSTOCK, City. 

WILLIAMS, HARRIS & CO., 362 Broadway, New York. 

Our Senior Partner is Vice President of the National Board of Real Estate 
Agents of the United States, and its rates govern our office. 

List of Lots, Blocks, Lands, River Fronts, Manufacturing and Business 
Property, always for Sale. 

INSURANCE. 

We call attention of the Citizens of Kent County, to our list of old and sub- 
stantial Insurance Companies, comprising the 

Strongest and Best Companies in the United States, viz.: 



Railway Passengers Life Ins. 
Phcenix, of Marl ford. 
Springfield, of Massachusetts. 
Home, of New Haven* 
Vity Fire, of Hartford. 
Norwich, of Connecticut* 
Merchants, of Rhode Island* 



Home, of New York. Railway Passengers Life Ins. Co* 

Roger William*, of Rhode Island* 

Putnam, of Hartford. 

metropolitan, of New York. 

Lamar, of New York* 

American, of Chicago* 

Connecticut Mutual Life Ins* Co* 

Union Mutual Life Inssurance Co* 

REPRESENTING A. CASH CAPITAL OF OVER 

$60,000,000.00. 

Dwellings and Barns insured for a Term of Years, at 

Xj O T7S7- RATES. 

iSPFARMERS are invited to call on us for Insurance. 

SINCLAIR BROS. & CO., 

TVo. o Canal Street, Grand Rapids. 

General Agents for the " Roger Williams Fire Insurance Co., of Providence," to 
whom all applications for Agencies throughout Michigan, must be made. 



244 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



McLaughlin Michael, 9 Vergennes, 
Alton. 

MCLAUGHLIN THOMAS, 5 Ver- 
gennes, Alton. 

McLEAN ALEXANDER, 19 Ver- 
gennes, Vergennes. 

McLean Neil, 19 Vergennes, Vergennes. 

McLean Peter, 13 Ada, Ada. 

McLenethan Charles, 36 Gaines, Cale- 
donia Station. 

McLOUTH PETER IL, Village of 
Cedar Springs. 

McMahon Owen, 2 Ada, Cannonsburg. 

McMann John, 11 Grand Rapids. 

McMANN THOMAS, 11 Grand Rapids. 

McMann William, 22 Plainfield, Aus- 
terlitz. 

McMannus J. P., 31 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

McMillan Archibald, Jr., 5 Ada, Ada. 

McMillan Archibald, 32 Can- 
non, Ada. 

McMillan Cornelius, 32 Cannon. Ada. 

McMILLAN JOHN, 4 Ada, Ada. 

McMillen John, 34 Walker. G. Rapids. 

McMinnis B. F., 12 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

McMullen Isaac, 12 Lowell, Lowell. 

McMurray Mrs. Hannah, 34 Ada, Ada. 



McNitt William, 4 Walker, Indian 
Creek. 

McNorton William, 13 Lowell, Lowell. 

McPherson John, 32 Cannon, Ada. 

McPherson Peter W., 18 Vergennes, 
Vergennes. 

McPHERSON WILLIAM, 18 Ver- 
gennes, Vergennes. 

McPoland Terry, 34 Walker, G. Rapids. 

McQUARRIE JOHN, 23 Caledonia, 
Caledonia. 

McQUEEN JOHN, 35 Cascade, Alaska. 

McQueen J. G., 29 Sparta, Lisbon. 

McTaminany John, 23 Tyrone, Sparta 

McVEAN DAVID E., 10 Bowne, Alto. 
McVean Hobert, 3 Bowne, Alto. 
McVEAN MRS. LUCY, 10 Bowne, 

Alto. 
McVicker Mrs. M., Lowell. 
McWHINNEY WILLIAM, 2G Bowne, 

Bowne. 
Meach Asa W., 15 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Meach Charles, 15 Paris, G. Rapids. 
Meach David, 11 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Meach George, 15 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Meach Volney. 11 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Mead Clark, 12 Alpine, Alpine. 
Mead Ebenezer, 5 Bowne, Alto. 



PATENT SAP SPILES-BEST THING OUT, AT W. D. FOSTEFV3. 



McNamara John, 20 Grand Rapids. 

McNamara Michael, 16 Wyoming, 
Grandville. 

McNamara Michael, 34 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

McNamara Martin, 23 Grand Rapids. 

McNamara Michael, 1 Paris, G. Rapids 

McNamara Simon, 34 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

McNana, Patrick, 12 Grand Rapids. 

J^cNaughton Archibald, 30 Bowne, 
Harris Creek. 

McNaughton Alexander, 18 Ada, Ada. 

McNAUGHTON DOUGALD, 33 Can- 
non Cannonsburg. 

McNaughton Dougald, 18 Ada, Ada. 

McNaughton John, 33 Cannon, Can- 
nonsburg. 

McNAUGHTON JOHN D., 9 Ada, Ada 

McNaughton Mrs. M., 4 Ada, Cannons- 
burg. 

McNAUGHTON RICHARD D., 31 
Bowne, Harris Creek. 

McNeal Abram H.,11 Caledonia, Alaska 

McNee James, 29 Bowne, Harris Creek. 

McNitt Frank, Lisbon. 

McNITT SAMUEL, Lisbon. 



Mead Enos, 12 Alpine, Englishville. 

MEAD LAFAYETTE, 34 G. Rapids. 

Mead Wm., 12 Alpine, Alpine. 

Meaks Charles, 16 Plainfield, Belmont. 

Mears A. T., Lowell. 

Medler Charles, 4 Courtland, Courtland 

Center. 
Medler Samuel F., 34 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Medler W. J., Lowell. 
MEDLER WM. IL, 34 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Meech Lawrence, 7 Cascade, Cascade. 
MEEHAN MICHAEL T., 24 Gaines, 

Hammond. 
Meeker Allen, 29 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Meggison William, 13 Algoma, Ed- 

gerton. 
MEKEEL WILLIAM H., 30 Ada, Ada. 
Melervy John, 34 Walker, G. Rapids. 
MELONING EMMETT, Village of 

Cedar Springs. 
Melville John, 29 Grand Rapids. 
Meredith Joseph, 8 Paris, G. Rapids. 
Merley August, Alaska Village. 
Merren John, 9 Nelson, Cedar Springs. 



FORT'S AROMATIC OINTMENT CURES PILES. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 245 



THE OLDEST MACHINE IN THE WORLD. 
f mSS» the ORIGINAL 



Sewing Machine! 

WITH ALL THE 

Late Improvements, 



/ X Wm/iW EVERY MACHINE 

i NPi WmkA for 3 fears I 

^^^^^^^^GEO. F. OWEN, 

P^BHaB fi^HBy 27 Monroe Street, 
HSS***'- ~~ " Grand Rapids, Mich. 



c. &. allyn, 

GENERAL 

DRY GOODS, CARPETS, &c, 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL. 

@® and) ?Q> Mow©© Street. 
GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 

Li. A, HALL, 

DEALER IN 

Confectionery, Canned Fruits, 

^* A.H.3VE3EJH.S'' RESTAURANT. 

Warm Meals at all Hours. 

No. 14 Front Street, GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 



246 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Merren Patrick, 19 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

MERRILL CHARLES, 30 Tyrone, 
Oasnovia. 

Merrill Orsemus, 26 Paris, G. Rapids. 

Merrill Roswell, 26 Paris, G. Rapids. 

Merritt Emmett, Lowell. 

MERRIMAN WILLIS L., 30 Ver- 
gennes, Lowell. 

MERVAU ANDREW, 15 Gaines, 
Hammond. 

MESLER WILLIAM C., 14 Paris, 
Grand Rapids. 

MESNARD CYRUS, 29 Gaines, Gaines- 
ville. 

Mesnard Enoch, 25 Gaines, Gainesville. 

MESNARD GEORGE E., 25 Gaines, 
Gainesville. 

MESNARD NOAH W., 16 Gaines, 
Gainesville. 

Messmore E. M., Rockford. 

Met calf Joseph, Rockford. 

Meyers Andrew, 24 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 

Meyers Andrew P., 24 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

31eyers Andrew, 18 Algoma, Sparta 
Cen ter. 

Meyers George, 4 Algoma, Rockford. 



MILLER DAVID II., 35 Bowne, Fill- 
more, Barry County. 

Miller David, 4 Alpine, Pleasant. 

Miller, David M., 29 Vargennes, Lo- 
well. 

Miller Ezra, 17 Oakfield, Oakfleld. 

Miller Edward, south 6 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

MILLER ELI J. 32 Gaines, Cody's 
Mills. 

MILLER EZRA C, 12 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Miller Gariat, Grandville. 

Miller G. W., 17 Alpine, Indian Creek. 

Miller George, 23 Plainfield, Austerlitz. 

Miller George, 17 Plainfield, Austerlitz. 

Miller Henry B., 18 Oakfield, Oakfield. 

Miller Henrv S., Rockford. 

MILLER HENRY M., 19 Cannon, Aus- 
terlitz. 

Miller Homer, 19 Cannon, Austerlitz. 

Miller Hugh, 14 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Miller Heury D., 11 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

MILLER H. B., 34 Grand Rapids. 

MILLER JARED, 5 Bowne, Alto. 

Miller John, 11 Sparta, Sparta Center. 

Miller John S., 9 Walker, Indian Creek. 



NORTH AMERICAN COOK STOVE, AT W. D. FOSTER'S, 14 and 16 Monroe Street. 



MEYERS HIRAM II., 24 Sparta, 
Sparta Center. 

Meyers James M., 32 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia Station. 

MEYERS PETER, 24 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

MICHAEL ANTHONY, 19 Walker, 
Grand Rapids. 

Midendorf Martin, 3 Wyoming. Grand 
Rapids. 

Milan Mrs. Margaret, 34 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Miles Reuben, 23 Solon, Cedar Springs 

Milford Thomas, 24 Nelson, Nelson. 

Miller Abram, 23 Vergennes, Fallass- 
burg. 

Miller Alfred, 23 Plainfield, Austerlitz. 

Miller Anthony, 33 Cascade, Alaska. 

Miller Alfred P., 35 Oakfield, Ashley. 

Miller Benjamin, 27 Cascade, Alaska. 

Miller Charles W., 17 Oakfield, Oak- 
field. 

Miller Charles, 27 Plainfield, Austerlitz. 

Miller Charles D., 24 Cannon, Can- 
nonsburg. 

Miller Charles, 1 Courtland, Courtland 
Center. 



Miller James S., 3(5 Tyrone, Sparta 
Center. 

Miller John, 6 Lowell, Lowell. 

Miller John, 15 Grand Rapids. 

Miller James, 10 Byron, Byron Center. 

Miller John D., Rockford. 

Miller James B., 23 Vergennes, Lowell. 

Miller John II., 1 Alpine, Englishville. 

Miller Joseph, Lisbon. 

Miller John, 36 Algoma, Rockford. 

MILLER JOHN, 35 Bowne, Fillmore, 
Barry County. 

Miller John T., 34 Grand Rapids. 

Miller J. H., 9 Walker, Grand Rapids. 

Miller John, 20 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Miller Levi, 24 Cannon, Cannonsburg. 

Miller Levi, 25 Gaines, Caledonia Sta- 
tion. 

Miller Lyman, 12 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Miller Mrs. Mary, Grandville. 

Miller Major, 34 Ada, Ada. 

Miller Manson, 34 Ada, Ada. 

Miller Moses, 28 Cascade, Alaska. 

Miller Michael, 15 Grand Rapid3. 

Miller Martin, 15 Grand Rapids. 

Miller Oliver, 2 Alpine, Englishville. 

Miller Peter, 24 Bowne, Bowne. 



FORT'S OINTMENT-A SOVEREIGN REMEDY 



fllsTOHlr AND DIRECTORY OT KENT COUNTY. 



247 



MILLER REV. C. C., 1 Grattan, Ashley 

Miller Win. H., 24 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Miller Wm. R., 15 Lowell, Lowell. 

MILLER WM. E., 1 Alpine, English- 
ville. 

MILLER WM. H., 23 Plainfield, Aus- 
terlitz. 

Mills Aaron, Rockford. 

Mills Benj. P., 15 Grand Rapids. 

Mills Daniel, Grandville. 

Mills Daniel W., Rockford. 

MILLS ELNATHAN. 12 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Mills Ephraim F., 24 Cannon, Cannons- 
bur^. 

Mills Hezakiah, 16 Grand Rapids. 

Mills John, 32 Wyoming, Grandville. 

Mims Henry, Lowell. 

Minderhout Cornelius, Grandville. 

Minderhout Martin, 27 Wyoming, 
North Byron. 

MINER EDW^ARD, 4 Walker, Indian 
Creek. 

Miner Hubbard, 7 Byron, Grandville. 

Mines Matthew, 12 Alpine, Alpine. 

Minisee John, 18 Byron, Grandville. 

Minisee William, 2 Gaines, Hammond. 

Minzey Franklin, 15 Walker, G. Rapids 



MITCHELL HENRY, Lowell. 

Mitchell Isaac, Lowell. 

Mix Mrs. Sarah, Sparta Center, 

Mizner Abner, Rockford. 

Mizner Henry, 24 Nelson, Nelson. 

MIZNER HIRAM W., 1 Alpine, Eng- 

lishville. 
Moe Irving W., 16 Grattan Center Cen. 
Moe Robert, Lowell. 
MOFFIT EDMUND G., 4 Caledonia, 

Alaska. 
Moffit Jasper, 4 Caledonia, Alaska. 
Moffit Lester C, Alaska. 
Moffit Mrs. Nancy J., 4 Caledonia, Al- 

MOFFIT NEWTON, 4 Caledonia, Al- 
aska. 

Moffitt William S., 32 Cannon, Auster- 
litz. 

Moffitt William B., 32 Cannon, Auster- 
litz. 

Molesta Henry, 16 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Moll Abram, 13 Wyoming, G. Rapids. 

Monger Edwin, 17 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Mongersall Samuel, 21 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

Monks Philip A., Lowell. 

Mountstephens John, 13 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 



THE AMERICAN BROILER, AT W. D. FOSTER'S, U & 16 Monroe Street. 



Minzey James, 15 Walker, Grand Rapids 

MISNER ANDREW, 33 Vergennes, 
Lowell. 

MISNER CHRISTOPHER, 33 Ver- 
gennes, Lowell. 

Misner Charles C. 33 Vergennes, Lowell 

MISNER DANIEL, Lowell. 

Misner George, 7 Algoma, Sparta Cen. 

MISNER HIRAM, 30 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

MISNER JAMES, 26 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Misner John, 7 Algoma, Sparta Center. 

Misner John, 4 Algoma, Cedar Springs. 

Misner John, 14 Cannon, Cannonsburg. 

Misner John, 12 Cannon, Bostwick 
Lake. 

Misner Peter, 26 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Misner Peter, 24 Plainfield, Austerlitz. 

Misner Wm. H., 14 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

MISNER WILLIAM H., Lowell. 

Mitchell Charles, 14 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

MITCHELL CHESTER C, 7 Gaines, 
Gainesville. 

Mitchell Charles. 31 Ada, Ada. 



MONROE C. W., 32 Alpine, Indian 

MONROE DAVID, 6 Walker, Indian 

Creek. 
Montross David, 24 Vergennes, Fallass- 

burg. 
MONROE EDWIN, Alaska. 
Monroe Henry D., Village of Cedar 

Springs- 
Monroe Harvey B., 5 Walker, Indian 

Creek. 
Monroe James, 5 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
MONROE ORVILLE B., 5 Walker, 

Indian Creek. 
Monroe Stephen, 5 Walker, Indian 

Creek. 
MONSEAU EDWARD, 10 Gaines, 

Hammond. 
MONSEAU EDWARD, 10 Gaines, 

Hammond. 
Montgomery Henry, 7 Algoma, Sparta 

Center. 
Montgomery James, 20 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 
Montgomery Thomas, 7 Algoma, Sparta 

Center. 



FOR GALLS AND SORES ON HORSES. 



248 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Montgomery William, 7 Algoma, Sparta 

Center. 
Moody C. W., 32 Grand Rapids. 
Moody Charles L., Grandville. 
MOODY LEWIS, Grandville. 
MOODY WATSON, 6 Alpine, Pleasant. 
MOON CHARLES B., 34 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Moon Cassius, 14 Solon, Cedar Springs. 
Moon Henry B., 4 Vergennes, Alton. 
Mooney Ann, 4 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 
Mooney Henry, 5 Vergennes, Grand 

Rapids. 
Mooney Jacob, 35 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Mooney John, 5 Vergennes, Alton. 
Mooney Peter, 5 Vergennes, G. Rapids 
Moore Albert, 8 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 
Moore Albert, 22 Plainfield, Austerlitz. 
Moore Benjamin, 8 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
Moore Charles, Burchville (Burch's 

Mills.) 
MOORE CURTISS T., Lowell. 
MOORE CHARLES H., 6 Gaines, 

Gainesville. 
Moore Daniel, 25 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 



Moore John, Lowell. 

MOORE JOHN D., 15 Oakfield, Oak- 

field. 
Moore James M., 6 Oakfield, Oakfield. 
MOORE NELSON H., 18 Oakfield, 

Oakfield. 
MOORE RICHARD, 19 Wyoming, 

Grandville. 
Moore Win. L., 8 Oakfield, Oakfield. 
MOORE WM. R., 31 Paris, G. Rapids. 
Moore William, 23 Algoma, Edgerton. 
Moorman William, 7 Byron, Grandville. 
Moorman Win. T., 7 Byron, Grandville. 
Moran John, 28 Spencer, Spencer Mills. 
Moran James, 28 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Moran John, 5 Oakfield, Oakfield. 
Moran Thomas, 28 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
MordufT James, 10 Gaines, Hammond. 
Mordnff Proctor, 10 Gaines, Hammond. 
MOKE MRS. ANN M., 23 Caledonia, 

Caledonia. 
Morehouse Emery, 1 Algoma, Burch- 
ville (Burch's Mills.) 
Morehouse Mrs. Euceline, 22 Solon, 

Cedar Springs. 
MOREHOUSE EDMUND, 23 Bowne, 

Bowne. 



THE FLUTING FLAT IRON, AT W. D. FOSTER'S, U & 16 Monroe Street. 

Morehouse George, 22 Solon, Cedar 
32 Nelson, Cedar 



MOORE DANIEL S., 22 Courtland, 

Court land Center. 
Moore David S., 6 Oakfield, Oakfield. 
M »ore Edward, 25 Byron, Cody's Mills. 
MOORE FREDERICK, 23 Algoma, 

Edgerton. 
Moore Geo. I., Jr., 21 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
MOORE GEO. I., 21 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Moore Henry, 22 Plainfield, Austerlitz. 
Moore Hiram, 7 Oakfield, Oakfield. 
Moore John, 30 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Moore John D., 35 Alpine, Indian 

Creek. 
Moore John, 22 Algoma, Rockford. 
MOORE JAMES W., 25 Spencer, 

Spencer Mills. 
Moore James, 8 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 
Moore John, Lowell. 
MOORE JOSEPH, 22 Cannon, Can- 

nonsburg. 
Moore James, 22 Cannon, Cannonsburg. 
Moore James, 36 Wyoming, Kelloggs- 

ville. 
Moore John R., 34 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 



Springs. 

Morey John C, 
Springs. 

Morgan Isaac W., 16 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

Morgan J. G., 5 Grand Rapids, Grand 
Rapids. 

Norman George, 18 Byron, Byron Cen. 

Morman Ransaier, 19 Byron, Byron 
Center. 

Morningstar Henry, 17 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 

Morningstar Henry, Jr., 17 Algoma, 
Rockford. 

Morningstar John, 16 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 

Morningstar Wm. II., 16 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 

Morrell Alfred, 22 Plainfield, Belmont. 

Morrell George, 16 Plainfield, Belmont. 

Morris Edwin A., 15 Plainfield, Bel- 
mont. 

Morris George, 11 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Morris Isaac D., Lowell. 



FORT'S WESTERN LIMIMENT IS WARRANTED 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 



249 



Morris James K., 15 Plain field, Bel- 
mont. 

Morris John, 28 Bowne, Harris Creek. 

MORRIS LEANDER E., Cedar 
Springs. 

MORRIS NELSON, 1 Caledonia, Al- 
aska. 

Morris Robert, 17 Byron, Byron Cen. 

MORRIS WAYNE E., Lowell. 

MORRIS WEBSTER, Lowell. 

Morrison David, 23 Algoma, Edgerton. 

Morrison Daniel, Alaska Village. 

Morrison Lewis, 15 Grand Rapids. 

Morrissy Martin, 1 Grand Rapids. 

Morrissey Thomas, 34 Ada, Ada. 

Morrill Andrew J., 35 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

Morrill James M., 35 Wyoming, North 
Byron. 

Morse Benj., 32 Lowell, Lowell. 

Morse Carrolton, 6 Bowne, Alto. 

MORSE CHARLES, Lowell. 

Morse Edgar S., Lowell. 

Morse Freeman, 24 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

MORSE FRANK, 20 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

MORSE HENRY, 10 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

BEST CATTLE TIE YOU EVER SAW, AT W. D. FOSTER'S, U k 16 Monroe St. 



Mount Nisbet, Sparta Center. 
Mount Nathan, Sparta Center. 
Mowat John, 12 Ada, Ada. 
Mower Jacob, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 
MOXON J. S., 5 Grand Rapids, Grand 

Rapids. 
Moye Samuel, 25 Vergennes, Lowell. 
MOYER GIDEON M., 15 Gaines, 

Hammond. 
MOYER JONATHAN E., 28 Gaines, 

Grand Rapids. 
Moyer Nathan, 15 Gaines, Hammond. 
Muchler Lorenzo E , 2 Cascade, Ada. 
MUELLER THEODORE, Lowell. 
Muir Alexander, 27 Grand Rapids. 
Muir Hugh, 3 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Muir John, 10 Plaintield, Belmont. 
Muir Thomas, 3 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
MULFORD MILES, 26 Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 
Mulford Thomas, 24 Nelson, Nelson. 
MULHOLLAND JACKSON, 7 Byron, 

North Byron. 
Mullin Michael, 17 Walker, G. Rapids. 
MULL DANIEL J., Grandville. 
Mulligan Michael, 16 Ada, Ada. 
Mulligan Patrick, 3 Ada, Ada. 
Multer R. P., 14 Solon, Cedar Springs. 



Morse Joel, 6 Lowell, Lowell. 

Morse James, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 

MORSE LAURA A., 16 Grattan, Grat- 
tan Center. 

Morse Nathan, 22 Lowell. Lowell. 

Morse Peter, 31 Lowell, Alto. 

Morse Peter, 20 Lowell, Lowell. 

Morse Win., Lowell. 

Morey Win. C, 9 Alpine, G. Rapids. 

Mosher Mrs. Almini, 33 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 

Mosher Electa, 11 Vergennes, Lowell. 

Mosher Edwin, 24 Vergennes, Fallass- 
burg. 

Mosher Eseck J., 11 Vergennes, Lowell. 

Mosher H. P., 7 Algoma, Sparta Cen. 

Mosher James, 33 Alejoma, Rockford. 

MOSHER AVILLIAM, 11 Vergennes, 
Lowell. 

Mosier Alrenzo, 4 Walker, Indian 
Creek. 

Mosier Wm., 11 Lowell, Lowell. 

Moss Martin, Lowell. 

Motley William, 9 Cascade, Cascade. 

Moulsta Frank, 7 Paris, G. Rapids. 

Moulsta John, 18 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Moulton Marcus C, 8 Ada, Ada. 



Mulohill Larence, 1 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

Mulyneeney John, 19 Vergennes, Ver- 
gennes. 

Munger D. C, 16 Grand Rapids. 

Munn Jonathan S., 11 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

MUNRO* DAVID, 13 Algoma, Edger- 
ton. 

Munson C W., Lowell. 

Munson Truman, 15^ Plainfleld, Bel- 
mont. 

Munson Wm., 20 Lowell, Lowell. 

Munshaw Lambert, 21 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

MURPHY ARCHIBALD, 34 Ada, 
Ada. 

Murphy Andrew, 31 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

Murphy Daniel, jr., 18 Grattan, Grat- 
tan Center. 

Murphy Daniel, 18 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

Murphy Daniel, 14 Cannon, Bostwick 
Lake. 

Murphy Edward, 3 Gaines, Hammond. 



32 



TO CURE YOUR LAME BACK- 



250 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY^* KENT COUNTY. 



MURPHY FRANK, 22 Grattan, Grat- 
tan Center. 

Murphy George, 2 Plainfield, Rockford, 

MURPHY GEORGE, 35 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

MURPHY HENRY E., 14 Cannon, 
Bostwick Lake. 

Murphy James, 10 Ada, Ada. 

Murphy John, 10 Ada, Ada. 

Murphy James, 14 Cannon, Bostwick 
Lake. 

Murphy John, 10 Vergennes, Alton. 

Murphy John, 21 Grattan, Grattan Cen 

Murphy Michael, 26 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Murphy Margaret, 22 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

MURPHY PETER, 10 Ada, Ada. 

Murphy Patrick, 5 Vergennes, Ver- 
gennes. 

Murphy Patrick, 29 Grand Rapids. 

Murphy Patrick, 2 Paris, Grand Rapids 

Murphy Patrick, 21 Cascade, Cascade. 

MURPHY THOMAS, 21 Grattan, Grat- 
tan Center. 

MURPHY THOMAS G., 1 Solon, Sand 
Lake. 

Murphy Richard, 23 Lowell, Lowell. 

Murphy William, 26 Lowell, Lowell. 

THE TUBULAR LANTERN-THE BEST IN U3E-AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



MURRAY MICHAEL, 29 Walker, 

Grand Rapids. 
MURRAY NATHAN C, 4 Courtland, 

Courtland Center. 
Murray Patrick, 12 Ada, Ada. 
Murray Patrick, 29 Walker, 5 Grand 

Rapids. 
Murray William, 28 Bowne, Harris 

Creek. 
Murray Wm. H., 32 Bowne, Harris 

Creek. 
Murthy John, 33 Bowne, Harris Creek. 
Muste John, 29 Grand Rapids; 
Muste Leonard, 29 Grand Rapids. 
Musscn Richard, 26 Plainfield, Auster- 

litz. 
Mutching Martin, 13 Alpine, Alpine. 
Myers Charles K., 11 Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 
MYERS DURANCE, 19 Plainfield, 

Mill Creek. 
MYERS HENRY, 9 Bowne, Alto. 
Myers Henry, 24 Sparta, Sparta Center. 
MYERS JOHN I)., 11 Grattan, Grat- 
tan Center. 
Myers John, 9 Bowne, Alto. 
Myer Jacob, 15 Alpine, Alpine. 
MYERS JOHN P., 3 Bowne, Alto. 



Murray Daniel, 33 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
Murray George, 13 Grand Rapids. 
Murray John, 24 Caledonia, Caledonia. 
MURRAY JAMES N., 3 Vergennes, 

Alton. 
MURRAY LYMAN, 5 Alpine, Lisbon. 
Murray Lucius B., 6 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Murray Michael, 12 Alpine, Alpine. 
Murray Mrs. Margaret, 29 Walker, 

Grand Rapids. 



Myers Martin, 12 Ada, Ada. 

Myers Merritt, 23 Plainfield, Austerlitz 

Myers Mrs. R., 24 Sparta, Sparta Center 

Myers Spencer J., 10 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

Myers Mrs. Sarah, 23 Plainfield, Aus- 
terlitz. 

MYERS THOMAS II., 24 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

Myers Wm. H., 28 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 



N 



Naftzger Josiah, 24 Vergennes, Fallass- ; 

burg. 
Nairracon Henry C, 34 Ada, Ada. 
Naramor John, 35 Oakfield, Ashley. 
NARD1N GEORGE, 33 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
NARDIN JOHN P., 33 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Nardin John James, 33 Walker, Grand 

R ipids. 
Narregang Owen, 8 Wyoming, Grand- 

Yille. 



Nash Mrs., Lowell. 

Nash David, 36 Caledonia, Middleville, 

Barry County. 
Nash Harmon, Lowell. 
Nash Ira, Lowell. 

NASH JONATHAN E., Sparta Center. 
NASH JAMES M., 23 Bowne, Bowne. 
Nash Levi, 6 Lowell, Lowell. 
Nash M. B., Sparta Center. 
Nason Charles F., 32 Plainfield, Grand 

Rapids. 



FORT'S MEDICINES ARE WARRANTED. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 251 

OF 

KEN T COU NTY. 

m m — 

USEFUL TO EVERYBODY, 

And to Farmers and Business Men in particular. 



Give your Children a knowledge of their own County. You will 
never regret the investment of $5 in that direction. 

WM. H. & E. K. POWERS, 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Doors, Sash, Blinds, 

Window and Door Frames, Moldings, Flooring and Beveled 
Siding. Also, Bristol's Patent Water Elevator, 

Which we are prepared to deliver and set up on short notice* 

tafScroll and Brackett Sawing, Turning, Planing, and General Jobbing in Wood. Manufacturers and 
Dealers in Lumber, Lath and Shingles, at Wholesale or Retail. 

Office and Yard, opposite Factory, on Water Street, 

North of Pearl Street Bridge, (West Side of River,) 

Grand Rapids, Michigan. 

Finkle & Lyon Improved Sewing Machine. 

They are Simple, Silent and Durable. Have a 

Self-Adjusting Needle, 

Which no other Shuttle Machine has, and 
they are 

Equal to any Machine made, 

And in some points better. We do not hesi- 
tate to say that, with the recent improvements, 
it is the one to choose. 

t3F D Try them, and convince yourselves, be- 
fore buying any other. Every machine war- 
ranted. Send for Circular. 

Office, 7 A 9 Monroe St* 

G. L. FRETTS, Agent. 




253 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Nason Wm. A., 34 Plainfield, Grand 

Rapids. 
NAYSMITH JOHN, 9 Ada, Ada. 
NAYSMITH JAMES, 10 Grand Rapids. 
NEAL D. B., 16 Grand Rapids. 
Neal James R., 25 Plainfield, Austerlitz 
Neal Jesse, 20 Grand Rapids. 
Neal Lewis, 29 Grand Rapids, Grand 

Rapids. 
Near Abram, 2 Byron, North Byron. 
Needham Bela C, 33 Lowell, Lowell. 
Needham Geo. G., 23 Lowell, Lowell. 
Neinhens Venedert, 2 Wyoming, G. 

Rapids. 
Nelist William P., 14 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
Nellins Henry, 6 Bowne, Alto. 
Nellist John D., 13 Paris, G. Rapids. 
Nelles John J., 2 Walker, Indian 

NELSON CHARLES, 3 Vergennes, 

Alton. 
Nelson F. W., Lowell. 
Nelson Geo., Lowell. 
Nelson John, Cedar Springs. 
Nelson Michael, 25 Algoma, Rockford. 
Nelson N., 13 Algoma, Edgerton. 
Nelson Peter, 12 Oaklield, Greenville. 



Newland James, 22 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
NEWLAND STEPHEN S., 13 Sparta, 

Sparta Center. 
NEWMAN JOHN W., 26 Caledonia, 

Caledonia. 
Newman Lewis, 24 Nelson, Nelson. 
Newson Mrs. Emily M., Alaska. 
NEWSON HORACE S., Alaska. 
Newton Clark, Lowell. 
Newton Dewitt, Burchville, (Burch's 

Mills. 
NEWTON DUDLEY, 17 Grattan, Grat- 

tan Center. 
Newton Daniel, Grandville. 
Newton Gifford, Burchville (Burch's 

Mills.) 
Newton Henry, 17 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
Newton John, Burchville (Burch's 

Mills.) 
NEYGUS ISAAC, Cedar Springs. ' 
Nicely Elias, 19 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Nicholson A. II., Burchville (Burch's 

Mills.) 
Nichols F. R., Rockford. 
Nichols A. L.,-31 Cannon, Austerlitz^ 
Nicholson Geo. W., 26 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 



THE ONLY GENUINE MORGAN CRADLE, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



NELSON SHEAR, 15 Oakfield, Oak- 
field. 

NELSON THEODORE, Lowell. 

Nelson Theodore, jun., Lowell. 

Nesbitt James, Cannonsbu rg. 

Nesler Christian, 33 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

NESTLE HARVEY, 35 Tyrone, Sparta 
Center. 

Nestle Peter, 25 Tyrone, Sparta Center. 

Nestle William H., 25 Tyrone, Sparta 
Center. 

Nevius John S., 1 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

Nevius William S., 32 Grand Rapids. 

NEWBERRY HENRY B., 33 Cannon, 
Cannonsburg. 

Newcomb Alfred J., South 5 Walker, 
Grand Rapids. 

NEWHALL EUGENE J., Alaska. 

Newhall John W., 15 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

Newins Thomas, 31 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia Station. 

Newkirk Aaron B., 6 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 



Nichols I. C, Rockford. 

NICHOLS HENRY C, 14 Oakfield, 
Oakfield Center. 

Nichols Henry, 4 Walker, Indian Creek 

Nichols Jonathan, 15 Vergennes, Alton. 

NICHOLS JAMES, 17 Grand Rapids. 

Nichols Josiah, 31 Paris, G. Rapids. 

NICHOLSON JOHN W., 23 Grattan 
Grattan Center. 

Nichols Levi, 23 Cascade, Cascade. 

Nichols Mary A., 31 Cannon, Auster- 
litz. 

Nichoson Matilda, 23 Grattan, Grattan 

NICHOLS MRS. MARIA L., 27 Cale- 
donia, Alaska. 

Nichols Uriah, M., Rockford. 

NICHOLSON WM. D , 8 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

NICKOLS ABRAM, 12 Lowell, Lowell. 

Nickols Benj. F., 11 Lowell, Lowell. 

Niehaus Henry, 23 Alpine, G. Rapids.| 

Nightlinger John, 3(> Vergennes, Lowell 

Niles Edgar, 28 Ada, Ada. 

Nippress Gilbert, 20 Lowell, Lowell. 

Nippress Thomas, 14 Ada, Ada. 

Nippress William, 20 Lowell, Lowell. 



FORT'S WESTERN LINIMENT CURES LAMENESS. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 253 

First National Bank, 

GEAND EAPIDS, MICH. 

Capital, - - - - $400,000. 

SOLOMON L. WITHEY^ ~JAMES M. BARNETT, 

President. Vice President* 

HARVEY J. HOLUSTER, €»*„,«,. 

Collections made on all points in the United 
States. 

Drafts issued on all the principal Cities of 
Europe. 
New York Correspondent National Park Bank. 

DIRECTORS : 

MARTIN L. SWEET, JOHN CLANCY, W. D. ROBERTS, 

W. D. FOSTER, AMOS RATHBONE, L. H. RANDALL, 

T. H. LYON, Jr. 

RIDEIiX* <£ CO., 

HURON STREET, near Buttcrworth's Foundry, 

Grand Rapids, Mich., 



DEALERS 1ST 



Paints, Oils, Varnishes, Brushes, &c, 

PAINTING, GRAINING, KALSOMINING AND PAPER HANGING, 
In all its Branches. 

Your patronage soliolteca.. 

FIEBIG & RATHMAN, 

Carriage and Wagon 

MAKERS, 

No. 221 Canal St., 

Gaand Rapids. 

Carriages, Wagons, Sleighs and Cutters on hand, and made to 

order. 




254 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 



Nixon Martin, 7 Plainfield, Englishville 

Nobbs Matthew, 11 Paris, Grand JRapids 

Noble B. R., Lowell. 

Noble Beni. C., 16 Oakfield, Oakfield. 

NOBLES ERASTUS, 17 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Noble Joseph, 20 Cannon, Austerlitz. 

NOBLE JOHN, 5 Nelson, Sand Lake. 

Noel John, 17 Wyoming, Grandville. 

NOEL PETER R., 20 Wyoming, 
Grandville. 

Nolen Henry, 6 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Nolon John, 7 Walker, Grand Rapids. 

Noonan John, 31 Plainfield, Grand 
Rapids. 

Noonan John, 3 Grand Rapids. 

Noonan Peter, 3 Grand Rapids. 

Noonan Thomas, 25 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Noonan William, 3 Grand Rapids. 

Noonan William, 25 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Norcutt Daniel, 4 Lowell, Lowell. 

Norman Edward, 24 Byron, Cody's 
Mills. 

Norman Samuel, Lowell. 

Normen John, 3 Cannon, Bostwick 
Lake. 

North Abram, 22 Plainfield, Austerlitz. 

North Giles, 22 Plainfield, Austerlitz. 



NORTON ANSON N., 4 Wyoming, 
Grand Rapids. 

NORTON AARON, 7 Spencer, Spencer 
Mill. 

Norton C. C, 13 Walker, G. Rapids. 

NORTON ERASTUS W., 3 Sparta 
Sparta Center. 

Norton Fred A., Lowell. 

NORTON JAMES W., Lowell. 

NORTON JOHN. 24 Alpine, Alpine. 

Norton James, 27 Oakfield, Ashley. 

Norton John, 27 Oakfield, Ashley. 

Norton John, 22 Oakfield, Ashley. 

Norton John, 34 Courtland, Rook ford. 

Norton M., 8 Grand Rapids, G. Rapids. 

Norton Mary, 35 Oakfield, Ashley. 

NORTON KELSON A, 23 Alpine, 
Alpine. 

Norton Patrick, 22 Oakfield, Ashley. 

Notting Albert, Grandville. 

Noy Thomas, 21 Cannon, Cannonsburg. 

Nugent Daniel, 24 Cannon, Cannons* 
burg. 

Nugent Emanuel, 6 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

Nugent Hugh, 24 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Nugent James, 24 Cannon. Cannons- 
burg. * 



HAY SCALES PUT UP BY W. D. FOSTER, U & 16 Monroe Street. 



North Mrs. Helen, 6 Bowne, Alaska. 

North James, 20 Lowell, Lowell. 

North Robert, Rockford. 

North Robert, 22 Plainfield, Austerlitz. 

Northrup Needham, 13 Algoma, Edger- 
ton. 

Northrup Olivier L., 21 Cannon, Rock- 
ford. 



Nugent John, 24 Cannon, Cannonsburg 

Nugent Russell, 16 Byron, Byron Cen. 

Nulty James, 31 Cascade, Alaska. 

Numa Henry, Cedar Springs. 

NUTLER JOHN M., 3 Cannon, Rock- 
ford. 

NYE LEONARD J., 25 Gaines, Ham- 
mond. 



o 



Obely Caleb, 25 Vergennes, Lowell. 
O'Brien Daniel, 11 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
O'Brien Dennis, 25 Alpine, Mill Creek. 
O'Brien James, 25 Alpine, Mill Creek. 
O'Brien Michael, 30 Walker, G. Rapids. 
O'Brien Michael, 26 Oakfield, Ashley. 
O'Brien Mary, 26 Oakfield, Ashley. 
O'Brien Patrick, 29 Walker, G. Rapids. 
O'BRIEN STEPHEN, 32 Walker, 

Grand Rapids. 
O'Brien Scalley, 26 Grattan, Grant. 
O'Brien Timothy, 3 Lowell, Lowell. 



O'Brien William, 30 Bowne, Harris 

O'Brien William, 34 Walker, G. Rapids 
O'Brien William, 30 Walker, G. Rapids 
O'Brien William, 26 Oakfield, Ashley. 
O'Conner John, 20 Paris, Grand Rapids 
O'Conner John, 34 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia Station. 
ODELL ADELBERT, 20 Vergennes, 

Vergennes. 
Odell Charles, Lowell. 
Odell Orson, 9 Courtland, Courtland 
Center. 



FORT'S ENEMY OF PAIN CURES 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY 0* KENT COUNTY. 



255 



Odell Mrs. Silence W., 20 Vergennes, 

Vergennes. 
Odell Simeon J., Lowell. 
O'Donald James, 26 Plainfield, Auster- 

litz. 
O'Donald John, 24 Plainfield, Auster- 

litz. 
O'DONNELL MICHAEL, 16 Ada, 

Ada. 
O'Farrell Garret, 16 Wyoming, Grand- 

ville. 
Offen George, 4 Nelson, Sand Lake. 
Offen Justus, 10 Nelson, Nelson. 
Ogden William L., 23 Cascade, Ada. 
Ogg Andrew, 10 Nelson, Sand Lake. 
Ogg John, 3 Nelson, Sand Lake. 
GIL VIE ALEXANDER, 6 Grattan, 

Grattan Center. 
Ogilvie John, 6 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 
O'Haire Michael, 1 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
OTIara H., 23 Lowell, Lowell. 
O'Heran Timothy, 34 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. . 
Ohler Adam, Grandville. 
Ohler Jacob, 24 Sparta, Sparta Center. 
Ohler Peter, 32 Walker, Grand Rapids. 
O'Keefe James, 34 Walker, Gr. Rapids. 



OMANS LEVI, 33 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Onan Alex. J., 17 Lowell, Lowell. 

Onan Gabriel, 13 Vergennes, Lowell. 

ONAN SAMUEL, 17 Lowell, Lowell. 

O'Neil Cornelius, 19 Paris, Gr. Rapids. 

O'Neil Dennis, 19 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

O'Neill Daniel, 8 Walker, Gr. Rapids. 

ORCOTT SAMUEL G., 33 Tyrone, 
Sparta Center. 

ORCUTT Mrs. J. S., 32 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

Orcutt Matthew, 20 Plainfield, Aus- 
terlitz. 

Orcutt Samuel, 32 Solon, Cedar Springs. 

Orlop John. 28 Ada, Ada. 

Orlop Jacob, 28 Ada, Ada. 

Orman Patrick, 31 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Ormiston James B., Lowell. 

Orr Peter A., Rock ford. 

Orrin Albert N., 1 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

Orser Henry, 25 Sparta, Sparta Center. 

ORTH BERNARD, 20 Grand Rapids. 

Orth Peter, 20 Grand Rapids. 

Osborn Dan'l, 19 Lowell, Cascade. 

Osborn David, 33 Ada, Ada. 

OSBORN GEORGE W., 21 Wyoming, 
Grand Rapids. 



COOPERS' TOOLS-A FULL ASSORTMEIMT-AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



Olbske. Joseph, 8 Walker, Indian 
Creek. 

Olcott Mrs. Elizabeth H., 11 Lowell, 
Lowell. 

Olcott Philander W., 11 Lowell, Lowell. 

OLDF1ELD CHAS., Cedar Springs. 

OLDS ALBERT, 22 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

Olds Mathew, 16 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 

O'Leary Mrs. Margaret, Cedar Springs. 

Oleson John, 8 Grand Rapids. 

Olin John C, 32 Solon, Cedar Springs. 

Olin Osmond, 2 Alpine, Englishville. 

Olin Henry, 15 Lowell, Lowell. 

Olish Hubert, 35 Alpine, G. Rapids. 

Olish Joseph, 35 Alpine, G. Rapids. 

Olish Matthias, 24 Alpine, Alpine. 

Oliver John, Grandville. 

Oliver William, 36 Grand Rapids. 

Olmsted Gideon, 25 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

Olmsted Isaac, 25 Solon, Cedar Springs. 

Olmsted Joseph, Sparta Center. 

OLMSTED ROBERT, 19 Oakfield, 
Oakfield.' 

OLMSTED W. C, Sparta Center. 

Olmstead W. I., Sparta Center. 



OSBORN HIRAM, Alaska Village. 

Osburn Albert, 11 Tyrone, Sparta Cen 

Osburn Eli, 10 Tyrone, Sparta Center. 

Osgood Harry, 10 Oakfield, Oakfield. 

O'SHIRTZ HENRY, 21 Wyoming, 
Grandville. 

Osmar Henry, 35 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

OSTERHAND £., Cedar Springs. 

Osterwick Matthew, 18 Wyoming, 
Grandville. 

Osterhouse Jacob, 14 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Osterhouse Nicholas, 22 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Osterhuis George, 18 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

Osterhuis Henry, Grandville. 

Osterhuis Nicholas, Grandville. 

OSTROM JACOB L., 32 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

O'Sullivan Timothy, 30 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Otis John, 16 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Otterbach Christian, 28 Spencer, 
Spencer Mills. 



GOLDS AND SORE THROAT* 



55B 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Otterbach Gottlib, 28 Spencer, Spencer 
Mills. 

Otterbach John, 20 Spencer, Nelson. 

Otterbach Jacob, 19 Spencer, Nelson. 

Otterbien Ambrose, 18 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Outhouse Geo. II , 11 Plainfield, Bock- 
ford. 

Overholt Abraham, 10 Gaines, Ham- 
mond. 

Overholt Amos, 10 Gaines, Hammond. 

Overholt John, 10 Gaines, Hammond. 



Overholt William, 10 Gaines, Ham- 
mond. 

Overbeck Francis, 29 Grand Rapids. 

Overlay Martin, 11 Nelson, Nelson. 

Overlay Thomas, 5 Nelson, Sand Lake. 

Ovenshire John F., 18 Lowell, Lowell. 

Ovenshire Richard G., 18 Lowell, 
Lowell. 

OWEN HIRAM G., 3 Oak field, Green- 
ville. 

Owen James H., Lowell. 

OWEN TALBOT L., 6 Ada, Ada. 



Packard John, 25 Byron. Cody's Mills. 
Page George, 29 Lowell, Lowell. 
Page Wright, 35 Byron, Cody's Mills. 
Paine Eplnaim, 4 Walker, Indian Creek 
Paine Hiram H M 34 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
Paine Lawson A., 3 Alpine, English- 

ville. 
Paine Marvin H, Cedar Springs. 
Paine R. N., 34 Sparta, Englishville. 
PAKE KRYNNES, 29 Grand Rapids, 

Grand Rapids. 



Pangborn Luther W., Burchville 

(Burch's Mills.) 
Pangborn Samuel, Cedar Springs. 
PANGBORN SALMON H., Burchville 

(Burch's Mills.) 
Pannell John, 11 Walker, Grand Rapids 
Pardee Eli, 14 Bowne, Bowne. 
Pardee James W., 24 Bowhe, Bowne. 
Pardee Ozi, 14 Bowne, Bowne. 
PARDEE WAYNE, 13 Bowne, Bowne. 
Parish' Leonard, 5 Algoma, Cedar 

Springs. 



TUCKER CRADLES AND RAKES, AT W. D. FOSTER'S, 14 and 16 Moroe Street. 



Palmatier Daniel. 27 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Palmer Amos, 8 Caledonia, Alaska. 
Palmer Alonzo J., 4 Byron, North 

Byron. 
Palmer Amos W., 15 Caledonia, Alaska 
Palmer Alexander, 32 Byron, Byron 

Center. 
Palmer Benjamin, 32 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
PALMER CHARLES, 32 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Palmer Carlos H., 25 Paris, Alaska. 
Palmer Davis, 33 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Palmer Geo. F., 14 Paris, Grand Rapids 
Palmer Hiram, 17 Caledonia, Alaska. 
PALMER LOYAL, 29 Byron, Byron 

Center. 
PALMER L. E., 9 Grand Rapids. 
Palmer Oliver, 22 Solon. Cedar Springs 
PALMERLEE HEMAN, 2 Walker, 

Grand Rapids. 
Palmiter Edson, 13 Lowell, Lowell. 
PANGBORN ALBERT, Cedar Springs 
Pangborn Joel S., Cedar Springs. 



Parker Charles. 10 Oakfield, Oakfield. 
PARKER ELIAS D., 4 Lowell, Lowell. 
Parker Elisha D., 3 Caledonia, Alaska. 
Parker George, 4 Lowell, Lowell. 
Parker G. W., Lowell. 
PARKER GEORGE J., 7 Walker, 

Grand Rapids. 
Parker Henry W., 27 Oakfield, Ashley. 
Parker James, Cedar Springs. 
Parker Jane, 7 Vergennes, Vergennes. 
Parker John, 5 Nelson, Sand Lake. 
Parker Leonard F., 7 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Parker Thomas, 18 Bowne, Alto. 
Parker Robert, 7 Vergennes, Vergennes. 
PARKER SHELDON, 21 Vergennes, 

Lowell. 
PARKER THOS., Jr., 4 Nelson, Sand 

Lake. 
Parker Thos., Senr., 4 Nelson, Sand 

Lake. 
Parker Wm. H., 31 Vergennes, Lowell. 
Parker Wm. H., Jr., 31 Vergennes, 

Lowell. 
Parker Wilson J., 4 Bowne, Alto. 
PARKHURST ISABELLA, 19 Plain- 
field, Alpine. 



IF YOU WISH TO HAVE TOUR WIFE CHEERFUL, 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



267 



PARKINSON HENRY, 8 Courtland, 
Courtland Center. 

Parkinson Robert, 8 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Parks Beriah G., 19 Spencer, Nelson. 

PARKS C. C, Lowell. 

Parks Leonard C, Alaska. 

Parks Mortimer, Lowell. 

Parks Oliver, 7 Bowne, Alaska. 

Parks Win. R., 6 Lowell, Lowell. 

Parmer Abram H., 12 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

PARMER LEWIS, 3 Oakfield, Green- 
ville. 

Parmlee John, 22 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Parr John H, li Byron, Grandville. 

Parr Stephen S., 6 Byron, Grandville. 

Parrish C. B., Lowe) I. 

Parrish Eugene, Lowell. 

Parrott Clement, 33 Lowell, Lowell. 

Parrott Chas. M. F., 28 Lowell. Lowell. 

Parrott George, 32 Lowell, Lowell. 

Parrott Jacob, 28 Lowell, Lowell. 

Parshall Terry, 32 Spencer, Spencer 
Mills. 

PARSHALL WILLIAM T., 32 Spen- 
cer, Spencer Mills. 

Parsons William S., 5 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 



PATTERSON MINER, 13 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
Patterson Perry W., 21 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 

Paterson Perry W., 21 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Paterson Peter, 19 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Patterson Robert, 12 Paris, Cascade. 

Patterson Mrs. Rose A., 13 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Patterson Wm. P., 28 Plainfield, Grand 
Rapids. 

Patterson Warren A , 13 Paris, Grand 
Rapfds. 

Patterson William, 12 Paris, Cascade. 

PATTEN C. II., 20 Grand Rapids, 
Grand Rapids. 

PATTEN MRS. S. L., 35 Alpine, Indian 
Creek. 

PATT1SON JOHN, 11 Caledonia, 
Alaska. 

Pattison John, Jr., 11 Caledonia, Al- 
aska. 

Paul Anthony, 3 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Paul John, 34 Grand Rapids. 

Payne Alonzo, 10 Algoma, Rockford. 

Payne Daniel B., 11 Oakfield, Green- 
ville. 

Payne Lorenzo, 10 Algoma, Rockford. 



ALL KINDS OF FARM AND GARDEN TOOLS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



Parter John, 31 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

PASKIL GEO., It Lowell, Lowell. 

Patch in William E., 11 Alpine, Alpine. 

PATRICK M. A., 20 Cannon, Can- 
nons burg. 

Pattee Asa D., 4 Alpine. Indian Creek. 

PATTEE AMOS, 3 Walker, Indian 
Creek. 

PATTEE E. D., Burchville, (Burch's 
Mills.) 

Pattee Gustavus, 21 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

PATTERSON ALEXANDER, 29 G. 
Rapids, Grand Rapids. 

Paterson Adam, 19 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Patterson Chauncey, 19 Cascade, Cas- 
cade. 

Patterson Franklin, 16 Cascade, Cas-« 
cade. 

PATTERSON GEO. W., 29 Bowne, 
Harris Creek. 

Paterson James, 19 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Patterson John M., 19 Cascade, Cas- 
cade. 

Patterson John, 24 Paris, G. Rapids. 

PATTERSON JAMES, 12 Paris, Cas- 
cade. 



Payne William, 16 Algoma, Rockford. 
Peakft Lemuel, Rockiord. 
Pearsall William, Lowell. 
PEARSOLL SHERMAN M., 28 Alpine, 

Grand Rapids. 
Peasley Albert, 23 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Pease Charles D., Lowell. 
Pease David P., 33 Sparta, Englishville 
PEASE HERMON B., 1 Ada, Ada. 
Pease Jerome C, Lowell. 
Pease Lester, 24 Courtland, Courtland 

Center. 
PEASLEY CHARLES, 26 Spencer, 

Spencer Mills. 
Peasly Mrs. Marion, 23 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Peasley Timothy, 35 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Peat Charles, 6 Bowne, Alto. 
PECK All VINE, Lowell. 
Peck C. W., 11 Lowell, Lowell. 
Peck Charles, 13 Oakfield, Greenville. 
Peck Horatio N.„ 16 Grand liapids. 
Peck H. B., Lowell. 
Peck Horton B., 36 Vergennes, Lowell. 
Peck E. R., 11 Lowell, Lowell. 



83 



USE FORT'S WESTERN LINIMENT, 



258 



HISTOKY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Peck Horace, 13 Oakfield, Greenville. 

Peck Manser W., 35 Paris, Hammond. 

Pcckham Hiram, 6 Plainfield, Belmont. 

PECK FREELING W., 35 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Peel George, 34 Plainfield, Grand 
Rapids. 

Peel Thomas, 34 Plainfield, G. Rapids. 

Peet Enan, 2 Caledonia, Alaska. 

Peet Edgar M., 27 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia. 

Peet Kosciusko, 31 Lowell, Alaska. 

Peet Oscar D., 22 Caledonia, Alaska. 

PEET ROLLA A., 1 Caledonia, Alaska. 

Peice Edward, 22 Solon, Cedar Springs. 

Peirce L. W., 11 Lowell, Lowell. 

Peirce Walter J., 19 Vergennes, Ver- 
gennes. 

Peirce Warren L., 35 Paris, G. Rapids. 

Peiscth John, 31 Byron, Bvron Center. 

Pellet William H., 4 Courtland, Cedar 
Springs. 

Pellet William, 27 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

Pelton Andrew J., 18 Gaines, Gaines- 
ville. 

Pelton Alfred, 26 Byron, Cody's Mills. 

Pelton Ephraim, 22 Walker, G. Rapids. 



PERRIN WILLIAM P., 28 Vergennes, 

Lowell. 
Perry Abijah S., 23 Byron, Cody's 

Mills. 
Perry Albert A., 23 Byron, Cody's 

Mills. 
PERRY ARTHUR E., 17 Plainfield, 

Belmont. 
Perry Mrs. C. R., Lowell. 
Perry Edmund, 17 Plainfield, Belmont. 
Perry James S., 20 Algoma, Sparta 

Center. 
Perry John D. D., 32 Vergennes, 

Lowell. 
Perry M. M., Lowell. 
Perry P. R., 23 Algoma, Rockford. 
Perry Wm. II., 24 Ada, Vergennes. 
PERRY WILLIAM, 3 Oakfield, Spencer 

Mills. 
Perry Wm. R., Lowell. 
Peters Chnrles, 13 Paris, Grand Rapids 
Peters Isaac, 8 Cascade, Cascade. 
Peters William, 9 Byron, Byron Center 
Peters William, 13 Paris, Grand Rapids 
Peterson Alonzo, 22 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 
Peterson Charles F., 32 Tyrone, Cas- 

novia. 



SAP PANS, GALVANIZED AND RUSSIA IRON, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



PELTON CHAUNCEY, Village of 

Cedar Springs. 
PELTON J. M., 18 Gaines, Gainesville. 
Pelton Samuel, 13 Byron, Gainesville. 
Pember John W., 20 Plainfield, Aus- 

terlitz. 
Penfield Edwin H., 25 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 
Pennel John W., 18 Paris, Gr. Rapids. 
Pennington James, 84 Courtland, 

Rockford. 
Penny Ross, Lowell. 
Perean Richard, Burchville, (Burch's 

Mill.) 
PERKINS CHARLES, Burchville, 

(Burch's Mill.) 
Perkins C. J., 16 Grand Rapids. 
Perkins C. S., 16 Grand Rapids. 
Perkins Daniel, 9 Cascade, Cascade. 
Perkins Erastus, 16 Bowne, Bowne. 
Perkins James B., 8 Alpine, Pleasant. 
Perkins Mrs. Lucy, 33 Ada, Ada. 
Perkins William, 16 Bowne, Bowne. 
PerLee Abraham F., 36 Alpine, Mill 

Creek. 
Perrin Theodore, 28 Vergennes, Lowell. 



Peterson Frank, 22 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Peterson G., 32 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Peterson John, 24 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Peterson John, 1 Plainfield, Austerlitz. 

Peterson Moses, 35 Oakfield, Ashley. 

Peterson William, 20 Oakfield, Oakfield 

Peterson Samuel, 20 Oakfield, Oakfield. 

Peterson Simon P., 24 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

PETE RMAN- JOHN, 29 Bowne, Harris 
Creek. 

Petit Simon, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 

PETTINGILL B. N., 26 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 

Pettingill Benjamin, 26 Algoma, Rock- 

♦ ford. 

Petrie Isaac, 13 Grattan, Otisco, Ionia 
County. 

PETTED BERNARD, 5 Caledonia, 

PETTED DAVID, 20 Cascade, Cascade. 
PETTIS EDWARD, 28 Ada, Ada. 
Pfyffer Henry J., 84 Wyoming, North 
Byron. 



FORT'S ENEMY OF PAIN CURES TOOTHACHE. 



HI8T0RY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 259 

R.S. MERRILL, 

PORTRAIT & LANDSCAPE 



No. 19 Monroe Street, in Heath's Photograph Gallery. 

Portrait, Miniature & Photograph 

PAINTING, 

In all its Branolies. 

Copies from Old and Faded Pictures Enlarged to any size, and 
satisfactorily painted in any style desired* 

ggT'Call and see specimens. Studio open to visitors from 10 
A. M. to 4 P. M. 

FRED. HEATH'S 

EXCELSIOR 

PHOTOGRAPH ROOMS, 

23 Monroe Street, 

Opposite Rathbun House, 

GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 



The best-arranged Gallery in the City. Well 
lighted and elegantly furnished. Pictures col- 
ored in Ink, Oil and Water Colors. 



260 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Phelps Arthur, 17 Alpine, Grand Rapids 
Phelps Asa G., 6 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
PHELPS COUNT P., 32 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Phelps Edgar, 31 Nelson, Cedar Springs 
Phelps Eli M., 1 Courtland, Courtiand 

Center. 
Phelps G. W., Cedar Springs. 
Phelps George, 4 Walker, Indian Creek 
Phelps Henry, 9 Courtland, Courtland 

Center. 
Phelps Horace, 10 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 
Phelps Isaac, 6 Grand Rapids, Grand 

Ripids. 
Phelps Jeremiah, 10 Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 
Phelps Lester, 8 Plainfield, Belmont. 
Phelps Lester, 10 Courtland, Courtland 

Center. 
Phelps Lester, 11 Courtland, Courtland 

Center. 
Phelps Mrs. M. J., Lowell. 
Phelps Sylvaaus, 2 Courtland, Court- 

Kid Center. 
PIJELPS THEODORE, Cedar Springs. 
Phelps Wellington, 10 Courtland, 

Courtland Center. 



Phillips Luther E., 14 Plainfield, Aus- 

terlitz. 
Phillips Levi, 24 Vergennes, Fallass- 

burg. 
Phillips Newton, 27 Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 
Phillips Peter, 14 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
PHILIPS JOHN, Grandville. 
Phillips Spary E., 28 Bowne, Harris 

Creek. 
PHILLIPS WILLIAM H., Burchville, 

(Burch's Mills.) 
Phillips William, 27 Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 
Phoenix Samuel W., 20 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
Pi card Joseph, Lowell. 
Pickerd Adam, 14 Algoma, Edgerton. 
PiCKERD JOHN, 14 Algoma, Edger- 
ton. 
PICKET A. L., Rockford. 
Picket Richard, 29 Grand Rapids. 
PICKETT WM. B., 33 Gaines, Grand 

Rapids. 
Pikaard John, 29 Grand Rapids. 
PIERCE BARTON T., N. E. corner 

Walker, Mill Creek. 
PIERCE CHARLES B., 10 Walker, 

Grand Rapids. 



THE GEM RAD1ATOR-THE BEST DRUM IN USE, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



Phelps Zimri, 32 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Philpott Abram, 12 Lowell, Lowell. 
Phillips Calvin, 7 Cannon, Rockford. 
Phillips Conrad, 17 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Phillips David, 3 Nelson, Sand Lake. 
Phillips Daniel C, 27 Plainfield, Grand 

Rapids. 
PHILLIPS EDWARD, Burchville, 

(Burch's Mills.) 
Phillips Ensign, 1 "Lowell, Lowell. 
Phillips Eli C, 1 Lowell, Lowell. 
PHILLIPS GEO. W., 7 Cannon, Rock- 
ford. 
Philips Jerome E., 19 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
PHILLIPS JOHN W r ., 21 Walker, G. 

Rapids. 
Phillips James W., 24 Vergennes, Fal- 

lassburg. 
Phillips Lewis, 3 Nelson, Sand Lake. 
Phillips Levi L., 33 Plainfield, Grand 

Rapids. 
Phillips Lewis, 27 Bowne, Fillmore, 

Barry County. 



Pierce Lewis, 22 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Pierce iSolomon, 10 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Pierce Stephen, 27 Grand Rapids. 

Pierce Walter, 27 Grand Rapids. 

Pierce Warren E., 21 Grand Rapids. 

Pierson William, 29 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

PIERCE WARREN H., 14 Gaines, 
Hammond. 

PIERCE WM. W., 2 Gaines, Hammond 

Pierson Mrs. C. M., 3(i AJgoma, Rock- 
ford. 

Pierson George, 34 Algoma, Rockford. 

Piter Charles W., 7 Gaines, Gainesville. 

Pi lien Aclolphus, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 

P1NKNEY WM. B., lli Plainfield, Bel- 
mont. 

Pinkerton Andrew, 26 Tyrone, Sparta 
Center. 

PINTLER CURTIS, Lisbon. 

Pintler Harmon, 14 Bowne, Bowne. 

Pin tier Mrs. Mary, Lisbon. 

Pintler William, 7 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Pisot Henry, 7 Walker, Grand Rapids. 

Pitcher Benjamin, 22 Oakfield, Oak field 

Pitcher Harrison, Village Cannonsburg 



FORT'S ENEMY OF FAIN CURES NEURALGIA. 



HISTOBY AND DIRECTOKY OF KENT COUNTY. 261 

WM. thumT 



DEALER IN 



PURE DRUGS Ai MEDICIKES 

Pure Wines and Liquors, 

(FOR MEDICINAL USE.) 

I^.A.XEa'T®, OXX*S, DYE-STUFFS, 

Perfumery, Fancy Goods and Toilet Articles, Trusses, 
Brushes, etc., 

92 Canal Street, opposite Opera Hall, 

Grand Rapids, - - Michigan. 
A. I\ DeVINNY, 

General Engraver &. Die Sinker, 

ALSO MANUFACTURER OF 

S« p>©p»tap Steed Stamps f©p Gtefefrag To©C§, 

Stencil Marking Brands for Marking Barrels, Bales, Boxes, &c. 

SEAL PRESSES, SEALS, 

Canceling Stamps, Door Plates, Badges, Railroad, Hotel and Key Checks, 

Stencil Materials 9 Ink, Paste, Brushes, 

NAME PLATE AND KEY CHECK DIES ON HAND, OR 
MADE TO ORDER. 

Steel Alphabets and Figures, Brass Alphabets and Figures, Pattern 

Letters for Castings. 

All Steel Die Work made of the best of English Steel, and war- 
ranted to give the best of satisfaction. 

All Kinds of OTJUIVIIVO BRANDS A. 8PECIATY. 

57 Canal Street, 



262 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Pitch Martin, 22 Alpine, Alpine. 

Pitts Ransom, 30 Wyoming, Grandville 

Pitts William, 7 Courtland, Edgerton. 

Pixley Lewis R., 15 Grattan, Gfattan 
Center. 

Place Arthur, 5 Alpine, Lisbon. 

Plaice Charles, 13 Lowell, Lowell. 

PLANK JAMES, 26 Plainfield, Aus- 
terlitz. 

PLANK JAMES, 8 Cannon, Rockford. 

Plass John, 27 Algoma, Rockford. 

Platchley John, Cedar Springs. 

Platte John, 35 Alpine, Grand Rapids. 

Pletcher Daniel E., 10 Lowell, Lowell. 

PLEUNE ADRIAN, 15 Grand Rapids. 

Pleune Peter, 15 Grand Rapids. 

Plowman James, 3L Alpine, Berlin. 

PLUMB ELI, 31 Plainfield, Mill Creek. 

Plumpton George, 25 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 

Plumb Hiram, 18 Spencer, Nelson. 

Plumb Henry D., 31 Plainfield, Mill 
Creek. 

Plumb John, 24 Nelson, Nelson. 

Poats Ira J., 12 Sparta, Sparta Center. 

Poats Schuyler, 19 Algoma, Sparta 
Center. 

Pollock John, 23 Plainfield, Austerlitz. 

Poole A. J., 35 Solon, Cedar Springs. 



PORTER PETER B. ? 24 Alpine, Alpine 

Porter Ralph, 13 Nelson, Nelson. 

Porter Sybean, Alaska. 

PORTER SETH, 13 Algoma, Edgerton 

Porter Sabine, 16 Caledonia, Alaska. 

Porritt John, 28 Bowne, Harris Creek. 

Porritt William, 27 Bowne, Bowne. 

Post Asher, 7 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Post Alanson, 8 Plainfield, Belmont. 

Post Aaron, 10 Courtland, Courtland 
Center. 

Post Christopher, 8 Plainfield, Bel- 
mont. 

POST GEO. C, 14 Lowell, Lowell. 

Post Henry, 28 Algoma, Rockford. 

POST J. CARTER, 14 Lowell, Lowell. 

Post John, 8 Plainfield, Belmont. 

POST JACOB, 8 Plainfield, Belmont. 

Post Jacob, jr., 8 Plainfield, Belmont. 

Poss John, 30 Plainfield, Mill Creek. 

Post Jacob, 10 Walker, Grand Rapids. 

Post John, 32 Grand Rapids. 

Post Leander J., 14 Lowell, Lowell. 

Post McKenzie, 18 Vergennes, Ver- 
gennes. 

POST PHILIP, 16 Plainfield, Belmont. 

Post Robert, 7 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

POST SAMUEL, 8 Plainfield, Belmont. 

Post William, 23 Plainfield, Austerlitz. 



TUBS, PAILS, AND ALL KINDS OF WOODEN WARE, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



POOLE CLEWREY, 14 Bowne, Bowne 

Poole Henry r 14 Bowne, Bowne. 

Poole N. C, 35 Solon, Cedar Springs. 

Pool Samuel J., 19 Ada, Ada. 

Poole S. J., 35 Solon, Cedar Springs. 

Pool Wm. A., 21 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Pope George, 4 Plainfield, Belmont. 

Pope Mrs. 8., 9 Algoma, Rockford. 

Pond Cyrus, 35 Oakfield, Ashley. 

Pond Edron II., 35 Oakrield, Ashley. 

POND HARVEY D., 34 Oakfield, 
Ashley. 

Pond Trafton, 19 Courtland, Rockford. 

•Ponting Benjamin, 18 Vergennes, Ver- 
gennes. 

Porter Curtis, 21 Alpine, Grand Rapids 

Porter Henry, 20 Alpine, Indian Creek. 

Porter Dennis, 17 Courtland, Edgerton 

Porter David C, 21 Alpine, G. Rapids. 

PORTER GEORGE, 29 Alpine, Indian 
Creek. 

Porter John, 10 Wyoming, G. Rapids. 

PORTER LORENZO, 1 Gaines, Ham- 
mond. 

Porter Martilus, 13 Nelson. Nelson. 

Porter Sorens L., 2 Plainfield, Rock- 
ford. 



Potratz Albert, 20 Lowell, Lowell. 
Potter Benjamin, 21 Oakfield, Oakfield. 
Potter John, 19 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Potter Joshua, 21 Oakfield, Oakfield. 
Potter John, 21 Oakfield, Oakfield. 
Potter Joel, 4 Nelson, Sand Lake. 
Potter Myron, 12 Oakfield, Greenville. 
Potter Mrs. Lois, Sparta Center. 
Potter Wm. A., 4 Nelson, Sand Lake. 
Pottraz John, 2(3 Ada, Ada. 
Powers A. L., 29 Grand Rapids, Grand 

Rapids. 
POWERS A., 29 Grand Rapids, Grand 

Rapids. 
Powers George W., 19 Algoma, Sparta 

Center. 
Powers Henry, 11 Sparta, Sparta^Cen. 
POWERS JOHN, 31 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Powers Jonathan, 4 Paris, Gr. Rapids. 
Powers John, 28 Ada, Ada. 
POWERS J. C, Burchville, (Burch's 

Mills.) 
Powers Mrs. Mary, 20 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Powers Wm., south 5 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 



FORT'S STICKING SALVE MAKES A GOOD PLASTER, 



HISTO&T AND DIRECTOR* OJ KENT COUNTY. 



263 



Proctdr Benjamin, Alaska Village. 
Proctor Henry H., Alaska. 
Proctor Henry, 27 Lowell, Lowell. 

Proctor John T., 34 Cascade, Alaska. 

Proctor John, 8 Courtland, Courtland 
Center. 

PROCTOR J. B., 35 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia. 

Proctor John, 27 Lowell, Lowell. 

PROCTOR OLIVER, 26 Cascade, Al- 
aska. 

Proctor Wm., Jr., 27 Lowell, Lowell. 

Proctor William, 27 Lowell, Lowell. 

Proper John, 18 Nelson, Cedar Springs. 

PROPER WILLIAM, 14 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

PROVIN ANDREW J., 9 Cannon, Can- 
nonsburg. 

PROVIN CHAS. A., 16 Cannon, Can- 
non sburg. 

Provin James, 16 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Provin Tyler W., 17 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Puddefoot Alfred, Sparta Center. 

Pugh A. J., 8 Alpine, Pleasant. 

Pugh James, 8 Alpine, Pleasant. 

Pullen William, Lowell. 

WOODEN AND TIN SAP BUCKETS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S, 14 and 16 Monroe Street. 



Powell Chauncey, Grandville. 

Powell Edward, 30 Ada, Ada. 

Powell George S., Rockforo^ 

Powell George, Burchville, (Burch's 
Mills.) 

Powell Oscar F., Grandville. 

Powell Silas, Grandville. 

Powell William, Rockford. 

Powell William B., 27 Spencer, Spen- 
cer Mills. 

Powlison Cornelius, Lowell. 

Pratt Asa, 20 Grand Rapids. 

Pratt Charles, 27 Vergennes, Lowell. 

Pratt Charles, Rockford. 

Pratt Charles K., Rockford. 

Pratt David C, 9 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Pratt Elijah V. E., 22 Caledonia, Al- 
aska. 

Pratt J. Edwin, 26 Vergennes, Lowell. 

PRATT LUTHER C, 10 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

Pratt Marshall T., 5 Byron, North 
Byron. 

Pratt Polycarpus S., 26 Vergennes, 
Lowell. 

PRATT URIAH, south 7 Walker, 
Grand Rapids. 

Prentiss Mrs., Lowell. 



Prentice Byron, Cedar Springs. 

PRENTICE ISAAC, 36 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

Prentice Richard, 1 Caledonia, Alaska. 

PRESCOTT BENJAMIN, 36 Grand 
Rapids. 

Prescott Geo. W., 1 Paris, Gr. Rapids. 

Prescoit Price IL, Rockford. 

Prescott William H., Rockford. 

Pressey Ransom R., 36 Sparta, English- 
ville. 

Pressey Thomas, 28 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Prestage Henry, 18 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

Preston Sheldon, 27 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Preston John, 17 Alpine, Pleasant. 

Price Arthur. 33 Ada, Ada. 

PRICE GEORGE, Village of Cannons- 
burg. 

Price Luther G., 29 Vergennes, Ver- 
gennes. 

PRICE LEWIS N., 30 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

PRINDLE MRS. MARY L., 35 Byron, 
Cody's Mills. 

Prindle Seth, 26 Byron, Cody's Mills. 



Pulver Henry N., 26 Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 
Pnlte August, 23 Alpine, Grand Rapids 
PUNCHES SAMUEL, 20 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
PURDY GEO. W., 25 Grattan, Smyrna, 

Ionia County. 
PURDY HERMAN D., 33 Gaines, 

Cody's Mills. 
Purdy Henry, 14 Grattan, Grant. 
Purdy James L., 14 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
Purdy John, 25 Grattan, Smyrna, Ionia 

County. 
Purdy Orrin, 16 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 
PURDY PERRY, 23 Grattan, Grant. 
Purple Daniel, 34 Ada, Ada. 
Purple James, 34 Ada, Ada. 
Purple Thomas, 34 Ada, Ada. 
Purple William, 5 Lowell, Lowell. 
PURSEL WM. R., 18 Gaines, Gaines- 
ville. 
Putnam Alpheus, 6 Cannon, Rockford. 
Putnam Chester B., 3 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
Putnam John, 20 Lowell, Lowell. 
Putnam Mrs. Maria, 23 Bowne, Bowne. 



TRY IT. 



264 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Pysher Frederick H., 2 Byron, North 1 1 Pysher Wm. W., 12 Byron, Gainesville. 
Bryon. 



a 



Quackenbos Abram, 35 Byron, Cody's 

Mills. 
Quackenbos Win. P., 35 Byron, Cody's 

Mills. 
QUICK J. IT., Lowell. 
Quick John, Grandville. 
Quick M. S., Lowell. 
Quick Reuben S., Lowell. 
Quiggle Silas P., 14 Cascade, Cascade. 
Quigley Edward 11., 30 Tyrone, Cas- 

novia. 
Quigley George, 1 Paris, Grand Rapids 
Quigley Joseph, 34 Walker, G. Rapids. 
Quiliin Andrew, 8 Vergennes, Ver 

gennes. 



Quiliin John, 8 Vergennes, Vergennes. 

Quiliin Terry, 8 Vergennes, Vergennes. 

Quimby Isaac, 10 Kelson, Sand Lake. 

Quinsey George, 32 Gaines, Cody's 
JVlibs. 

Quinsey John, 32 Gaines, Cody's Mills. 

Quin ey Mrs. Julia, 32 Gaines, Cody's 
Mills. 

Quinn Daniel, 30 Wyoming, Grandville 

Quinn Patrick, 30 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

Quirk Patrick, 12 Wyoming, G. Rapids 

Quirk William, 20 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 



R 



THE BEST STOCK OF SCYTHES-ALL WARRANTED-AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



Raap Antoine, 1 Wyoming, G. Rapids. 
Race Alvin S., 30 Lowell, Lowell. 
Race Abraham, 12 Algoma, Burchville 

(Burch's Mills.) 
Race Peter, (5 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Raddigan John, 31 Grattan, Cannons- 
burg. 
Rafferty Mrs. Aun, 8 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Raffeity George, 8 Walker, G. Rapids. 
Ragan James, Lowell. 
Ramer Samuel, 18 Courtland, Edgerton. 
Raniftdiil Moses, 15 Alpine, Alpine. 
Ramsdill Orrin, 15 Alpine, Alpine. 
RAMSDELL JACOB, Lowell. 
RAMSDELL SOLOMON, 17 Grattan, 

Grattan Center. 
RANDALL HORATIO, 33 Grand 

Rapids, Grand Rapids. 
RANDALL JOHN L., 16 Grattan, 

Grattan Center. 
RANDALL KINNICUM, 34 Oakfield, 

Ashley. 
Randall Romanzo, 20 Oakfield, Ashley. 
Randall Richard F., 20 Sparta, Li&bon. 
RANDEL EDMOND S., 10 Cannon, 

Bostwick Lake. 



RANDEL SILAS, 10 Cannon, Bost- 
wick Lake. 

Rankin Albert D., 19 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

RANKIN DWIGHT, 19 Wyoming, 
Grandville. 

Ranney George, 30 Grattan, Cannons- 
burg. 

Ransley John «R., 3 Oakfield, Spencer 
Mills. 

Rapelyea John, 17 Plainfield, Auster- 
litz. 

Rarich William, 8 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Rarick Jacob, 12 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 

R^RIOK JOHN D., 13 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

Rathbone D. S., 29 Plainfield, Grand 
Rapids. 

Rathbun Seba, 29 Plainfield, Grand 
Rapids. 

RATHBUN G. B.. 28 Grand Rapids. 

Rathbun Hugo B., 1G Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Rathbun James, 26 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia. 



FORT'S MANDRAKE PILLS, 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



265 



RATHBUN LANSING K., 17 Paris, 
Grand Rapids. 

RATHBUN LEVI 0., 26 Caledonia, 
Caledonia. 

Rathbun Orsemus, 4 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

RATHBUN ORSEMUS, 26 Caledonia, 
Caledonia. 

Rathbun Thomas, 35 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia. 

Raub Andrew, 27 Spencer, Spencer 
Mills. 

RAUCH JACOB, 6 Byron, Grandville. 

Raymer John, 1 Solon, Sand Lake. 

Raymond Leander, 15 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

Raymond Leander A., 15 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

Read Mrs. Loritta, 16 Caledonia, AI- 
RE AD THOMAS M., 7 Gaines, Gaines- 
ville. 

Reagan Dennis, 10 Vergennes, Alton. 

Reams Abram, 12 Byron, Gainesville. 

Reams John, 10 Courtlaud, Courtland 
Center. 

Reardon John, 29 Cascade, Cascade. 

Rebels Arselas, 26 Lowell, Lowell. 



REED NATHANIEL, 27 Bowne, 
Bowne. 

Reed Seymour A., 22 PlainflelcU Aus- 
terlitz. 

Reed Thomas E., 33 Grand Rapids, 
Grand Rapids. 

Reed Thcophilus, 11 Paris, Gr. Rapids. 

Reed Theophilus, jr., 11 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Reen Timothy, 34 Walker, Gr. Rapids. 

REES GUSTAVUS, Lowell. 

Rees Theodore, Lowell. 

Reese Harmon, 2 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

REESE OSCAR, Lowell. 

REEVES L. F., 28 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Reid John, 2 Grattan, Grattan Center. 

Reid Thomas, 1 Grattan, Ashley. 

Reish Peter, 16 Courtland, Courtland 
Center. 

Reiley Edward, 24 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia. 

Remington M., jr., 11 Lowell, Lowell. 

REMINGTON WAGAR T., 4 Bowne, 
Alto. 

RENHLAN SOLOMON, 23 Walker, 
Grand Rapids. 



ROPE AND BED CORDS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. Hand 16 Monrot Street. 



Rebroon Edward, 7 Algoma, Sparta 
Center. 

Rocktbrd Rollin, 11 Grand Rapids. 

Rector Benjamin, 24 Algoma, Edger- 
ton. 

RECTOR EDWARD, 30 Courtland, 
Rockford. 

Rector George, 14 Algoma, Edgerton. 

RECTOR HENRY E., 23 Algoma, 
Rockford. 

Rector Jacob, 1 Algoma, Burchville, 
(Burch's Mill.) 

Rector William F., 14 Cascade, Cascade. 

Redinger Michael, 35 Lowell, Lowell. 

Redinger Gaudloupe, 35 Lowell, Lo- 
well. 

Redinger John, 35 Lowell, Lowell. 

Redmire John, 17 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Redmbn John, 11 Courtland, Courtland 

REED GIBSON D., 13 Grattan, Otisco, 

Ionia County. 
Reed Horace, 27 Bowne, Bowne. 
Reed Henry G., 25 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
Reed Horace W., 7 Paris, G. Rapids. 
REED HARRISON, 32 Grand Rapids. 



Renishagen Jacob, 12 Plainfield, Rock- 
ford. 
Ream Andrew, 1 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
Rennehen John, 34 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
RESH CHARLES, 13 Alpine, Alpine. 
Ressequye Harvey, 35 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Retan Andrew E., 33 Wyoming, North 

Byron. 
RETAN JOHN R., 33 Wyoming, North 

Byron. 
REfTINGER WILLIAM, 26 Spencer, 

Spencer Mills. 
Reuletsterz Philip, Lowell. 
Rewshaw Francis, South 7 Walker, 

Grand Rapids. 
Rextord William, 24 Vergennes, Fal- 

lassburg. 
Rexford Alanson, 32 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Rexford Amos, 31 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Rexford David, 31 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Rexford Daniel, 31 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Reynolds Alexander, 11 Nelson, Nek on 
Reynolds Benj. F., 10 Cannon, Can- 

nonsburg. 



34 



A HARMLESS SUBSTITUTE FOR CALOMEL. 



266 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Reynolds Bradley, 1 Plain field, Rock- 
ford. 

REYNOLDS D. L., Rockford. 

Reynolds Elisha, 19 Lowell, Lowell. 

Reynolds George N., 14 Plainfield, Aus- 
terlitz. 

Reynolds Ira, 14 Plainfield, Austerlitz. 

REYNOLD JAMES S., 29 Gaines, 
Grand Rapids. 

Reynolds John M., 14 Plainfield, Aus- 
terlitz. 

Reynolds Levi, 14 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 

Reynolds J. Mason, 20 Plainfield, Aus- 
terlitz. 

Reynolds Moses, 32 Oakfield, Oakfield. 

Reynolds Myron, 25 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

Reynolds Orville, 19 Lowell. Cascade. 

REYNOLDS PATRICK, 80 Gaines, 
Cody's Mills. 

Reynolds Stephen, 35 Grattan, Alton. 

Reynolds Steven, 27 Sparta, Sparta Cen 

RHINES DANIEL, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 

RHOADES JOHN H., 20 Spencer, Nel- 
son. 

RHODES HIRAM A., 17 Ada, Ada. 

Rhodes J. H., 36 Grattan, Grant. 

Rhodes John, 36 Grattan, Alton. 

Rice Elihu, 27 Sparta, Sparta Center. 



Richards Horace, 2 Paris, Gr. Rapids. 
RICHARDS HENRY S., 22 Caledonia, 

Alaska. 
Richards J. B., 36 Algoma, Rockford. 
RICHARDS J. C, Cedar Springs. 
Richards Myron, 10 Paris, Gr. Rapids. 
Richards Simeon, Alaska Village. 
Richards Truman, 12 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
Richards Theodore F., 26 Walker, 

Grand Rapids. 
Richards Warren, 16 Caledonia, Alaska. 
Richards Wilson H., 10 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
Richardson Andrew, 23 Plainfield, 

Austerlitz. 
Richardson Cornelius, 25 Courtland, 

Courtland Center. 
RICHARDSON CHARLES H., 1 

Bowne, South Boston. 
Richardson George S., 9 Cascade, Cas- 
cade. 
Richardson Geo. S., jr., 11 Paris, Gr. 

Rapids. 
RICHARDSON JOSEPH H., 36 

Bowne, Fillmore, Barry County 
Richardson Norman, 26 Plainfield, 

Austerlitz. 



DRAG TEETH AND CULTIVATOR TEETH, AT W. D FOSTER'S. 



Rice Geo. H., 24 Alpine, Alpine. 

RICE HUGH, 24 Alpine, Alpine. 

Rice H. A., Lowell. 

Rice John, 32 Solon, Cedar Springs. 

Rice James, 21 Plainfield, Belmont. 

Rice Lewis, 30 Nelson, Cedar Springs. 

Rice Newell J., 11 Byron, Gainesville. 

RICE OREN S., 27 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 

Rice Russell, 19 Plainfield, Austerlitz. 

Rice Timothy F., 11 Byron, Gainesville 

Rice W. F., 24 Alpine, Alpine. 

Rice William, 13 Alpine, Alpine. 

Richards Alvin, 10 Paris, Grand Rapids 

RICHARDS BEZAL E., Alaska Vil- 
lage. 

Richards Daniel C, 9 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 

Richards Daniel C, 4 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 

Richards Edward, 16 Caledonia, Alaska 

Richards Erbin, 10 Paris, Grand Rapids 

Richards Francis, 8 Paris, Grand Rapids 

Richarts Frederick, 35 Wyoming, 
Grand Rapids. 

Richards Fletcher, 9 Algoma, Rockford. 

Richards Frank, 17 Paris, Gr. Rapids. 

Richards Gilbert, 8 Cascade, Cascade. 



Richens Paul H., 15 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
Rickets Henry, 17 Wyoming, Grand- 

ville. 
Ricketts William, Lowell. 
Richley Jerry, 34 Ada, Ada. 
Richmire Augustus, 30 Plainfield, Mill 

RICHMOND BENJAMIN F., 10 
Walker, Grand Rapids. 

Richmond David, Cedar Springs. 

Richmond Mrs. Emma, 11 Gr. Rapids. 

Richmond Fred J., 14 Vergennes, Lo- 
well. 

Richmond James C, 14 Vergennes, 
Lowell. 

Richmond Olney A., 31 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

Rich Albert P., Lowell. 

Rich Frank H., 12 Oakfield, Greenville. 

Rich Nelson, 29 Oakfield, Oakfield. 

Rider James, 19 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Rider Mortise, 26 Alpine, Gr. Rapids. 

Ridgeway Levi, 24 Nelson, Nelson. 

RIGGS AUGUSTUS H., 24 Ada, Ada. 

Riggs E. W., Lowell. 



FORT'S WESTERN LINIMENT CURES LAMENESS- 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 267 

Dr. R. J. Humphrey, 

DENTIST, 

@fi(k©, flf RDqw©© Street* 

(Over Perry Bros.' Hat Store,) 

GRAND RAPIDS, - MICHIGAN. 

N.B.—All work done promptly and in the best manner* 

GEO. H. SOULE, 



Retail Dealer in 



Groceries and Provisions, 

Cigars and Tobacco, Wines and liquors, 

4^A Fine Assortment ofTEAS constantly on hand. 
No. 234 South Division Street, 

GRAND RAPIDS, - - MICHIGAN. 

g@»CASH PAID FOR PRODUCE. 

Steam Marble Works. 

BARB & LIESVELD, 

(Successors to Win. Laraway & Co.,) * 

Dealers in Scotch Granite and Marble 

Monuments, Grave Stones 

AND FURNITURE MARBLE, 

63 Monroe and 9 Fountain Street, GRAND RAPIDS, MICH; 

A. E. BARB. H. W. LIESVELD. 




268 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Riorers Orville A., 32 Gaines, Cody's 

Mills. 
Rihbien Earnest, 23 Walker, G. Rapids 
RILEY E. E., Cedar Springs. 
RILEY EDWARD E., Cedar Springs. 
Riley Hugh, 24 Plain Held, Austerlitz. 
Riley Isaac, 1 Solon, Sand Lake. 
Riley Patrick, 24 Plainfield, Austerlitz. 
Riley Thomas, 32 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Ringuet Henry M., Lowell. 
Riordan Michael, 5 -Caledonia, Alaska. 
Riplow John, 2 Wyoming, Grand Rapids 
Rippey Matthew F., 14 Plainfield, Aus- 
terlitz. 
Risedorph Henry, Lisbon. 
Rish Henry, 17 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Rietchow Louis, 35 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
RITENGER FREDERICK, 2 Bowne, 

Alto. * 

ROACH ANTHONY, 8 Lowell, Lowell. 
Roach Thomas, 8 Lowell, Lowell. 
Roach Thomas, 18 Grand Rapids, Grand 

Rapids. 
Roback Richard, 12 Solon, Rockford. 
Bobbins Mrs. Elizabeth, 7 Caledonia, 

Alaska. 
Bobbins Eber, Cedar Springs. 

A FULL LINE OF REFRIGERATORS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S, H & 16 Monroe Street. 



ROBINSON E. W., 7 Grand Rapids, 
Grand Rapids. 

Robinson G. F., 7 Grand Rapids, Gr. 
Rapids. 

ROBINSON JOHN, 20 Algoma, Sparta 
Center. 

Robinson Jefferson, 35 Vergcnnes, Lo- 
well. 

ROBINSON JESSE II., 35 Tyrone, 
Sparta Center. 

ROBINSON JOHN R., 34 Ada, Ada. 

Robinson John T., 21 Lowell, Lowell. 

ROBINSON JOHN, jr., 22 Paris, Gr. 
Rapids. 

Robinson Oscar, Lowell. 

Robinson James, 27 Paris, Gr. Rapids. 

Robinson Jeremiah, 30 Courtland, 
Rockford. 

Robinson Lucas J., 35 Vergennes, Lo- 
well. 

Robinson Lucas, 35 Vergennes, Lowell. 

ROBINSON MLNSON, 20 Solon, 
Cedar Springs. 

Robinson Mrs. M. H., 13 Algoma, 
Edgerton. 

Robinson Mrs. Mary, Lowell. 

Robinson Marion, 13 Algoma, Edger- 
ton. 



ROBBINS JOHN C, 7 Caledonia, 

Alaska. 
Bobbins John M., 26 Lowell, Lowell. 
Rubbing Warren, 20 Lowell, Lowell. 
Robens Sanford, 16 Paris, Grand Rapids 
Roberts Arthur. 5 Paris, Grand Rapids 
Roberts Albert, Lowell. 
ROBERTS MRS. CATHARINE, 17 

Sparta, Lisbon. 
Roberts Edson, 8 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Roberts Ira, 31 Spencer, Cedar Springs. 
Roberts Joseph, 6 Algoma, Sparta Cen. 
Roberts Wm. II., Burchville (Bureb/s 

Mills.) 
Roberts Wm. C, 12 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Roberts Wm. M., 6 Algoma, Sparta 

Center. 
Roberson Wm. W., 24 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
ROBERTSON DAVID, 33 Grand 

Rapids, Grand Rapids. 
ROBERTSON GEORGE, Cedar Springs 
Robinson Alien, 35 Vergennes, Lowell. 
ROBINSON ALONZO, 13 Algoma, 

Edgerton. 



ROBINSON MELVIN, 13 Oakfield, 
Greenville. 

Robinson Nelson, 7 Ada, Ada. 

Robinson Nathan, 36 Ada, Ada. 

Robinson Nathan C, 15 Cannon, Can- 
nonsburg. 

Robinson Oscar, Lowell. 

Robinson Orville G., Lowell. 

Robinson Pe'er, 16 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia Station. 

ROBINSON RODNEY, Lowell. 

Robinson Rix, 27 Ada, Ada. 

Robinson Rufus, 23 Cascade, Cascade. 

Robinson Seth T., 35 Vergennes, Lo- 
well. 

Robinson William, 25 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

Robinson William J., 22 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Robinson William E., 25 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

ROBINSON WILLIAM, 30 Vergennes, 
Ada. 

Robinson William J., Rockford. 

Robson Chas. J., 32 Cannon, Auster- 
litz. 



FORX 9 5 ENEMY OF PAIN CURES CHOLERA MORBUS. 




HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 269 

F. OSTERLE & CO., 

CAEEIAGE & WAGON 



Shop on East side tonal Street, three doors 
JSorth of Bridge Street, 

GRAND RAPIDS, MICHIGAN. 

Carriages, Wagons, Sleighs and Cutters on hand, and made to order, 

LIVERY, 

ill®, 

C. L. IVES, Proprietor, 

(SUCCESSOR TO A. J. GILL,) 

81 sasara.. <.«**. grand rapids, mioh. 

E. S. HOLMES, D. D. S., 

Particular attention given to the Cure of Diseases and 
Derangements of the Teeth and Mouth. 

Gold, Teeth, and other Dental Goods, for Sale at 
Manufacturers 9 Prices. 

Office, Ko. 18 Monroe Str^ 9) GRAND RAPIDS. 

J. C. SIMONDS, 

MANUFACTURER OF 

: A M ENGINES 




SHINGLE MACHINES, MILL GEARING, 

And all binds of Machinery, 

26 Waterloo Street, GRAND RAPIDS, MICH., 



270 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 



ROBSON JOHN, 31 Cannon, Auster- 
litz. 

ROBY EDWIN A., Sparta Center. 

Roe Adam, 5 Nelson, Sand Lake. 

Roe James, 29 Grattan, Grattan Center 

Roe John, 29 Grand Rapids. 

Roe John, 30 Alpine, Pleasant. 

ROE MICHAEL, 29 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

Roe Patrick, 29 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 

ROE PATRICK H., Jr., 14 Grattan, 
Grattan Center. 

ROGERS A. JACKSON, 5 Alpine, 
I^leasant 

ROGERS ALEXANDER, 27Vergeunes, 
Lowell. 

Rogers Mrs. Betsey A., 28 Alpine, In- 
dian Creek. 

ROGERS CHARLES J., Grandville. 

Rogers Chauncey L., 28 Alpine, Indian 
Creek. 

Rogers Cyrus, 23 Solon, Cedar Springs. 

Rogers Erwin M., 14 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

Rogers Edwin, 21 Solon, Cedar Springs 

Rogers Fred., 13 Vergennes, Lowell. 

Rogers Geo. W., 5 Alpine, Pleasant. 

ROGERS HANSON H., 29 Alpine, In- 
dian Creek. 



Rosenkrans Argelos M., 31 Cascade, 

Grand Rapids. 
ROSENKRANS FRANCIS M., 31 Cas- 
cade, Grand Rapids. 
ROSE ALBERT G., 21 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Rose A. W., Lowell. 
Rose Chauncey, 32 Vergennes, Lowell. 
ROSE CHARLES H., 15 Walker, Gr. 

Rapids. 
Rose David, 28 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
ROSE DAVID, 6 Cannon, Rockford. 
ROSE ERASTUS W., 13 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Rose Elmer, 22 Solon, Cedar Springs. 
ROSE LYMAN, 15 Bowne, Alto. 
ROSENBERGER ABRAHAM, 30 

Gaines, Cody's Mi ! ls. 
ROSENBERGER AMOS, 25 Byron, 

Cody's Mills. 
ROSENBERGER CORNELIUS, 28 

Gaines, Cody's Mills. 
Rosen berger Daniel, 11 Tyrone, Sparta 

Center. 
Rosenberger Jacob, 30 Gaines, Cody's 

Mills. 
Rosenburg Charles, 13 Lowell, Lowell. 
Rosenberger Jacob, sen., 30 Gaines, 

Cody's Mills. 



KEDZIE'S CELEBRATED FILTERS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S, 14 and 16 Monroe Street 



Rogers Henry L., 20 Alpine, G. Rapids. 
Rogers James, 3 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Rogers John, 7 Grattan, Bostwick Lake 
ROGERS JUSTUS C, 14 Wyoming, 

Grand Rapids. 
Rogers Joseph, 25 Vergennes, Fallass- 

burg. 
Rogers Nelson, 21 Lowell, Lowell. 
Rolf Alvah R., 9 Lowell, Lowell. 
Rolf Alburn, 7 Lowell, Lowell. 
Rolf Ransom, 7 Lowell, Lowell. 
Romig John, Lowell. 
Ronon Mike, 24 Plain field, Austerlitz. 
Ronan Patrick, 12 Grand Rapids. 
Rood Zebulon, 20 Cannon, Austerlitz. 
Rooney John, 34 Walker, Grand Rapids 
Root Andrew, 29 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Root Elijah, 33 Nelson, Cedar Springs. 
Root Gustavus, 12 Alpine, Euglishville. 
Root J. I., Lowell. 

Root Joseph, 12 Alpine, Englishville. 
Root Lorin, % 29 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Root Samuel V., 9 Walker, Indian 

ROOT WILLIAM, 12 Alpine, English- 
yille. 



ROSENBERG DAVID, 25 Byron, 
Cody's Mill. 

Rosenberg Peter, 13 Lowell, Lowell. 

ROSZELLE OBADIAH, 20 Byron, By- 
ron Center. 

Rosser Simon P., 32 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Ross Duncan, 19 Bowne, Harris Creek. 

Ross Daniel, 26 Byron, Cody's Mills. 

ROSS FRANK, 30 Paris, Gr. Rapids. 

Ross George, 21 Algoma, Rockford. 

Ross Hiram, Lowell. 

ROSS HUGH, 18 Plainfield, Alpine. 

Ross John S., 17 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Ross James, 34 Algoma, Rockford. 

ROSS JOHN, 20 Gaines, Gaines- 
ville. 

Ross Peter, 20 Gaines, Gainesville. 

Ross William, Sparta Center. 

Ross William, 22 Sparta, Gr. Rapids. 

Ross William, 20 Gaines, Gainesville. 

Rounds Ambrose, 1 Algoma, Burchville 
(Burch's Mills.) 

Rounds Eli C, 22 Solon, Cedar Springs 

Rounds Geo. W., 30 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

Rounds Henry C, 30 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 



FOR SPASMODIC COLIC IN HORSES, 



StSTOltf AND DIRECTOR* 0* KEN* COUNTY. 



271 



Hounds Horton, 30 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

Rounds J. M., 1 Algoma, Cedar Springs 

ROUNDS J. M., Jr., Burcliville 
(Burch's Mills.) 

ROUNDS LORENZO D., 31 Courtland, 
Rockford. 

Rounds Maudly, 27 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

Rounds Nathan, 31 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

Rounds Richard A., 8 Paris, G. Rapids 

ROUNDS WM. H., 30 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

Roundtree James, 8 Spencer, Spencer 
Mills. 

ROUNDTREE WM. W., 20 Spencer, 
Spencer Mills. 

Rouse Henry M., 32 Paris, G. Rapids. 

ROUSE J., 9 Alpine, Grand Rapids. 

ROUSE MRS. NANCY, Sparta Center. 

Rouse Simeon, 2 Alpine, Englishville. 

Roush John, 36 Bowne, Fillmore, 
Barry County. 

ROUSH JOHN L., 36 Bowne, Fillmore, 
Barry County. 

Roush Michael, 35 Bowne, Fillmore, 
Barry County. 

Roup Jacob, 28 Alpine, Indian Creek. 



Roys E. J., Cedar Springs. 

Roys Geo., 35 Solon, Cedar Springs. 

Roys Holmes, 9 Wyoming, Grandville. 

Roys Holmes, 16 Walker, Gr. Rapids. 

Roys John E., 35 Solon, Cedar Springs. 

ROY JAMES, 4 Walker, Indian Creek. 

Roys James, 4 Wyoming, Grandville. 

Roys Myron, 9 Wyoming, Grandville. 

Rozema Hilbrant, 2 Paris, Gr. Rapids. 

RUCKLE DAVID, 36 Bowne, Fill- 
more, Barry County. 

Rudes Aaron, Cedar Springs. 

RUDES HENRY M., 31 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

Rugg Samuel, 36 Bowne, Fillmore, 
Barry County. 

Rubs John, 17 Caledonia, Alaska. 

Runion Perry, 23 Plainfleld, Austerlitz. 

RUTHARDT GEORGE M., 15 Alpine, 
Alpine. 

Ruthardt Phillip, 23 Alpine, Alpine. 

Ruthardt William, 15 Alpine, Alpine. 

Rusche Anthony. 14 Alpine, Alpine. 

Rusche Peter, 14 Alpine, Alpine. 

Rusco Isaac C, 33 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Rusco James II., 32 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

RUSH A. W., Lowell. 

RUSH JOHN, 13 Alpine, Englishville. 

Russague Harvey, 8 Grand Rapids. 



MEAT CUTTERS AND SAUSAGE STUFFERS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



ROWE DAVID, 35 Tyrone, Sparta Cen 
Rowe George, 22 Solon, Cedar Springs 
Rowe William, 10 Walker, G. Rapids. 
ROWE WALTER, 27 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Rowland Mrs., 31 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Rowland Almond, 20 Lowell, Lowell. 
Rowland Franklin, 31 Bowne, Harris 

ROWLAND FRANCIS M., 27 Cale- 
donia, Caledonia. 

Rowland Ira B., 8 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

Rowland Joseph, 31 Bowne, Harris 
Creek. 

Rowland Luke, 27 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia. 

ROWLAND WM. A., 27 Caledonia, 
Caledonia. 

ROWLEY AZARIAH V., 8 Oakfield, 
Oakfield. 

Rowley Henry E., 17 Oakfield, Oakfield 

ROWLEY HARVEY A., 15 Oakfield, 
Oakfield. 

ROWLEY JAMES M., 7 Oakfield, Oak- 
field. 

Rows well T. J., 7 Algoma, Sparta Cen. 



Russell Almon, 22 Walker, Gr. Rapids. 
RUSSELL EDWIN F., 35 Vergennes, 

Lowell. 
Russell Eliphalet, 3 Caledonia, Alaska. 
RUSSELL FIL1ER, 23 Plainfield, Aus- 

terlitz 
RUSSELL HENRY C, Village of 

Cedar Springs. 
Russell Isaac, 14 Caledonia, Caledonia. 
Russell Julia A., 11 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
Russell Luther, 4 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Russell Peter L., 36 Courtland, Bost- 

wick Lake. 
Russ€ll Warren, 10 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Russell , 8 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Russ Christian, 22 Paris, Grand Rapids 
Russ Henry H., 21 Cascade, Cascade. 
Russ Nathan H M 21 Cascade, Cascade. 
Ryan Mrs. Ann M., 17 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Ryan Joseph L., 17 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Ryan N., 1 Courtland, Courtland Cen* 
Ryan Patrick, 3 Ada, Cannonsburg. 



DRENCH WITH FORT'S ENEMY OF PAIN. 



272 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 



Ryan Patrick, 17 Walker, G. Rapids. 
Ryan Taylor, 1 Courtland, Courtland 

Center. 
Ryder Benjamin, 35 Vergennes, Lowell. 
Ryder Charles C, 1 Algoina, Burchville 

(Burets Mills.) 
Ryder John, Lowell. 
Ryder Ray land, 35 Vergennes, Lowell. 
Rykert George W., 25 Ada, Ada. 



Rykert George L., 4 Plainfield, Rock- 
ford. 

Rykert Huldah W., 4 Plainfield, Rock- 
ford. 

Rykert Sanford, Rockford. 

Ryno Ephraim W., 33 Gaines, Cody's 
Mills. 

Ryno Eber, 33 Gaines, Cody's Mills. 



Sabine H. E., Sparta Center. 
Sabin Daniel, 23 Nelson, Nelson. 
Sabin James, 23 Nelson, Nelson. 
Sach Mrs. Sarah A., 10 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
Sackett Wra. II., 33 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Sadler Eliphalet, 6 Byron, Grandville. 
.Sadler Henry, 32 Wyoming, Grandville 
Sadler Henry F., 15 Byron, Byron Cen. 
Sage Adrian, 30 Wyoming, Grandville. 
Sage Amos, 18 Cannon, Rockford. 
Sage George A., 1 Plainfield, Rockford 
Sage John, 22 Vergennes, Lowell. 
Sage Lafayette, 22 Vergennes, Lowell. 
SAGE VOLNEY, Rockford. 

DETROIT STOVE-MADE OF LAKE SUPERIOR IRON-AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



SANFORD JOHN S., 8 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Sapp Daniel, Lowell. 

Sapwell Mrs. Susan, 14 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

Sapwell Wm., 14 Solon, Cedar Springs. 

Sarel Edwin, Rockford. 

Sarel Joseph, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 

Saull John, 20 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 

Saul] Michael, 20 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 

Saulsbury William, 6 Oakfield, Oak- 
field. 

SAUNDERS GEORGE T., 10 Court- 
land, Courtland Center. 



Sailor Martin, 22 Alpine, Indian Creek. 

Salisbury Nagus. 1 Lowell, Lowell. 

SALISBURY RUSSELL W., 5 Nelson, 
Sand Lake. 

Salisbury Wm. M., 18 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

Salkeld Joseph, 25 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

SALMON ARCHIBALD, 32 Wyoming, 
Grandville. 

Salmon Vincent J., 29 Wyoming, 
Grandville. 

SALYER DAVID, 18 Oakfield, Oak- 
field. 

Salyer Jacob II., 18 Oakfield, Onkfield. 

Samuel Andrew, 21 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 

Samuel Alvah, 21 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 

Samuel James C, 3 Cascade, Ada. 

Samuels Mordecai, 3 Casade, Ada. 

Samondinger Leonard, 34 Lowell, Lo- 
well. 

SANBORN MRS. CORNELIA, 15 
Caledonia, Alaska. 

Sanders Joel, Lowell. 

Sanders Oliver, Rockford. 



SAUNDERS NATHAN D., 15 Court- 
land, Courtland Center. 

Sanders Martin, 15 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Saunders Martin, 22 Plainfield, Auster- 
litz. 

Saur Andrew, 8 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Saur Charley, 18 Alpine, Pleasant. 

Saur John, 29 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Saur Johnson, 8 Alpine, Pleasant. 

SAUR PETER, 8 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Sawyer Charles, 6 Alpine, Lisbon. 

Sawyer Eugene F., 32 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Sawyer James, 32 Walker, Gr. Rapids. 

Sawyer Joseph, 5 Byron, Grandville 

SAYLES ALFRED B., 23 Cascade, 
Cascade. 

Sayles Alonzo, 23 Cascade, Cascade. 

Sayles Daniel C, 15 Vergennes, Lowell. 

SAYLES ELIAS, 36 Vergennes, Lo- 
well. 

Sayles Francis, Lowell. 

Sayles J. Harris, Lowell. 

Sayles Serene, Lowell. 

Sayles Thomas, Lowell. 



FORT'S WESTERN LINIMENT CURES THE WORST 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



273 



Sayles William G., Lowell. 

SAYLES WILLIAM H., 15 Vergennes, 

Lowell. 
Scaddin Charles, 25 Alpine, Mill Creek. 
Scally Barnard, 22 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
SCALLY JOHN, 27 Grattan, Grant. 
Scalley O'Brien, 26 Grattan, Grant. 
Scaulz Peter, 23 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Scalley Thomas, 27 Grattan, Grant. 
Scally Timothy, 16 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
Scarvell Thomas, 13 Algoma, Edgerton. 
Scelly Patrick, 34 Walker, Gr. Rapids. 
Scelly Thomas, 34 Walker, Gr. Rapids. 
SCHAONDORF MICHAEL, 19 Bvron, 

Byron Center. 
Schantz Andrew, 6 Caledonia, Alaska. 
SCHANTZ HENRY, 6 Caledonia, Al- 
aska. 
Schafer John, 28 Cannon, Cannonsburg. 
Schaffer Baltas, 27 Alpine, Gr. Rapids. 
SCHAFFER JOSEPH, 27 Alpine, Gr. 

Rapids. 
Schaffer Stephen, 27 Alpine, Grand 

Rapids. 
SCHEIDEL HENRY, 32 Caledonia, 

Caledonia Station. 



Schlich Bartholomew, 34 Alpine, Grand 

Rapids. 
Schlief John, 36 Wyoming, G. Rapids. 
8chlief Michael, 36 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
Schmidt John, 13 Walker, G. Rapids. 
Schmidt William, 29 Grand Rapids. 
Schmidt Waltmer J., 34 Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 
Schmit John, Grandville. 
Schnable Henry, Alaska. 
Schneider Martin, 19 Lowell, Lowell. 
Schneeberger Jacob, 17 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
Schnell Augustus, 5 Walker, Indian 

Creek. 
Schnoble H., Alaska. 
Schofield John, 1 Solon, Sand Lake. 
Schomaker Christian, 25 Byron, Cody's 

Mills. 
Schooley Asa B., 23 Gaines, Hammond. 
Schooley John L., 23 Gaines, Ham- 
mond. 
Schooley Jonas, 16 Caledonia, Alaska. 
Schoolmaster Joseph, 17 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
Schoonmaker Harrison, 22 Cannon, 

Cannonsburg. 



CALL AND SEE OUR PATENT PANCAKE GRIDDLE, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



Scheiffley Frederick, 31 Caledonia, 

Caledonia Station. 
Scheiffley Gideon, Alaska. 
SCHENCK JACOB S., 22 Ada, Ada. 
Schenck William Y., 36 Ada, Ada. 
Schentema K., 32 Grand Rapids. 
Scherer Nicholas, 26 Alpine, Alpine. 
Schermerhorn Cornelius P., 22 Walker, 

Grand Rapids. 
Schermerhorn Daniel, 22 Walker, 

Grand Rapids. 
Schermerhorn George, 22 Walker, 

Grand Rapids. 
SCHERMERHORN HENRY O., 22 

Walker, Grand Rapids. 
Schermerhorn Isaac V., 21 Walker, 

Grand Rapids. 
SCHERMERHORN M. R., 28 Cannon, 

Cannonsburg. 
Schindler Edward, 11 Alpine, English- 

ville. 
Schindler Ferdinand, 22 Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 
Schidell Ferdinand, 22 Alpine, Alpine. 
Schiedel John, 25 Courtlaud, Court- 
land Center. 



Schoonmaker James, 21 Cannon, Can- 
nonsburg. 

Schoonmaker Walter, Village Can- 
nonsburg. 

Schram Abraham, 32 Paris, G. Rapids. 

Schrapper Theodore, 2 Courtland, 
Courtland Center. 

Schroeder Mat., 34 Alpine, G. Rapids. 

SCHWADERER MRS. FRED., 34 
Lowell, Alto. 

Schwitzer Nicholas, 35 Alpine, Grand 
Rapids. 

Scott Asa, 31 Algoma, Englishville. 

Scott E. L., Lowell. 

SCOTT ELIPHALET, 13 Caledonia, 
Alaska. 

Scott Henry, 16 Vergennes, Lowell. 

Scott Harley, 16 Alpine, Grand Rapids 

Scott Henry, 21 Alpine, Grand Rapids. 

Scott James, 14 Cannon, Bostwick Lake 

Scott John, 5 Grattan, Grattan Center. 

SCOTT JOHN C, Lowell. 

Scott Jesse W., 24 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Scott James, 16 Vergennes, Lowell. 

SCOTT JAMES H., 26 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 



85 



CASES OF CATARRH IN THREE MINUTES* 



274 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Scott John M., 13 Caledonia, Alaska. 

Scott Mrs. Louisa, 31 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Scott Levi, 36 Gaines, Caledonia Station 

SCOTT LUTHER W., 18 Grattan, Can 
nonsburg. 

Scott Morgan, 11 Cascade, Ada. 

Scott Melvin J., 19 Grattan, Cannons- 
burg. 

Scott Septer, 28 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Scott Simon G., 19 Grattan, Cannons- 
burg. 

Scott Thomas, 31 Caledonia, Caledonia 
Station. 

Scott Theodore P., 31 Tyrone, Cas- 
novia. 

SCOTT WILLIAM, 14 Plainfield, Aus- 
terlitz. 

Scott Walter D., 26 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Scoville Cass, 26 Plainfield, Austerlitz. 

Scoville Lorenzo, Rockford. 

Scoville Marinus, Rockford. 

Scranton Leonidas S., 6 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

SCRANTON SAMUEL B., 17 Grattan, 
Grattan Center. 

Scudder Cyrus A., 4 Byron, North 
Byron. 



Service Chauncey, Rockford. 

Severy Luther, Lowell. 

Severy Myron, Lowell. 

Sexton Bartley, 27 Walker, Gr. Rapids. 

SEXTON BLISS, 26 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

Sexton Jonathan W., 4 Cascade, Ada. 

Sexton Patrick, 34 Walker, Gr. Rapids. 

Sexton William, 4 Cascade, Ada. 

SEYMOUR FRANK, 31 Plainfield, 
Mill Creek. 

Seymour Henry, 5 Paris, Gr. Rapids. 

Seymour Luther, 18 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

SHACKELTON H. II., Rockford. 

Shackelton William, 16 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Shadduck Asa, 19 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

Shadduck George W., 19 Courtland, 
Rockford. 

Shaddock Horton, 30 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

Shaclle Daniel, 4 Nelson, Sand Lake. 

Shafer John, 23 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Shafer John M., 21 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Shafer Lorenzo, G. 10 Walker, Indian 
Creek. 



GALVANIZED WIRE FOR CLOTHES-LINES, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



Scudder Henry W., 4 Byron, North 

Byron. 
SCUDDER SAMUEL, Village Cedar 

Springs. 
Scully James, 1 Grand Rapids. 
Seabolt Henry, 15 Cascade, Cascade. 
Sears Austin, 2 Caledonia, Alaska. 
Seart Charles F., Rockford. 
SEARS FRANK 0., 2 Caledonia, Al- 
aska. 
Sears Horace, 36 Cascade, Alaska. 
Sears Luke, 30 Courtland, Rockford. 
Sebring John, 14 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Sebring Thomas B., 14 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
Sedgwick James, 12 Algoma, Edgerton. 
Seely Edward, 20 Byron, Byron Cen. 
Seeley William, 1 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 
Seitzemer Claus, 1 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
SELLERS T. M., Cedar Springs. 
Senges Charles, Alaska Village. 
Sent Frederick, 23 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Sessions John, 3 Grand Rapids. 
SESSIONS RODNEY G., 29 Gaines, 

Grand Rapids. 



SHAFER MASON L., 26 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Shafer Marion A., 26 Paris, Gr. Rapids. 

SHAFER OSCAR S., 23 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Shafer Sherman B., 26 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Shaffer Levi, 14 Oakfield, Greenville. 

Shaner Sebastian, 20 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Shangles David, 6 Sparta. Casnovia. 

Shangles Joseph L., 6 Sparta, Cas- 
novia. 

Shangler James, 13 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 

SHANK DALLAS M., 29 Courtland, 
Rockford. 

SHANK E. W., 1 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 

Shank George, 29 Courtland, Rockford. 

Shank Henry, 1 Sparta, Sparta Center. 

Shank Jacob, 7 Courtland, Edgerton. 

Shantz Jacob, 8 Caledonia, Alaska. 

Shapels Peter, 18 Ada, Ada. 

Sharp Amos, 9 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Sharp Arthur, 9 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Sharp Augustus C, 18 Gaines, Gaines- 
ville. 

Sharp James G., 9 Paris, Gr. Rapids. 



ifGftT'S WESTERN LINIMENT IS THE BEST FOR HORSES* 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY, 275 

Drs. Hunt& Hoyt, 

I0HIE0F1TIIC PHYSICIANS 



JL TXT> 



Pure Homoeopathic Medicines Supplied. 

*■+•+» 

Medicine Cases, Books, Etc, kept constantly on hand. 

37 Monroe Street, 
Grand Rapids, - - Michigan. 

ROBINSON, SOLOMON & CO. 

Manufacturers of 

Lumber, Timber, Lath 

Shingles, Sash, Doors, Blinds, 

Fit AMES, MOLDINGS, BH ACKETS 

And all kinds of Material for Joiners' Use. 

Particular attention paid to SAWING BILL STUFF, and 
Manufacturing Goods to Order. 

Office and Yard, Corner of Canal and Trowbridge Streets, 

a-x*anc3L HapidLs, 3MClol3.lsa.xx- 

3. D. ROBINSON. F. LETELLIEB, T. STEWART WHITE, 

W. H. SOLOMON, JOHN M. AVEBY. 



276 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Sharp John C, 18 Gaines, Gainesville. 

SHARP JAMES F., 18 Gaines, Gaines- 
ville. 

Sharp Lewis, 9 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Shattuck Mrs. Mahala, 17 Sparta, Lis- 
bon. 

Shaughlonessy Patrick, 34 Ada, Ada. 

Shaver Henry, 17 Byron, Byron Center. 

Shaver William, 31 Sparta, Lisbon. 

SHAW ALANSON K., 23 Vergennes, 
Lowell. 

Shaw Charles B., 33 Grand Rapids. 

Shaw Charles. 36 Sparta, Englishville. 

Shaw Edwin P., Lowell. 

Shaw Eli, 34 Algoma, Rockford. 

SHAW GEORGE N., 30 Courtland, 
Rockford. 

Shaw Henry, 34 Algoma, Rockford. 

SHAW JEROME II., Cedar Springs. 

Shaw McDole, Lowell. 

Shaw Nicholas, 30 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

Shaw Winslow, 25 Algoma, Edgerton. 

Shaw Willis C, 33 Lowell, Alto. 

Shaw Winslow, Cedar Springs. 

Shear Abram G., 21 Paris, Gr. Rapids. 

SHEAR ABRAM, 33 Plainrield, Grand 
Rapids. 

Shear Charles, 21 Paris, Grand Rapids. 



Shepard Albert E., 13 Ada, Ada. 

SHEPARD CHARLES, 34 Bowne, 
Fillmore, Barry County. 

Shepard Casey P., 13 Ada, Ada. 

Shepard James, 13 Ada, Ada. 

SHEPARD LAWRENCE B., 17 Oak- 
field, Oakfield. 

Shepard Z. W., Lisbon. 

Shephard Henry, Lowell. 

Shephard Horace, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 

Sherck Samuel, Lisbon. 

Sheridan Michael, 31 Grattan, Can- 
non sburg. 

SHERINGTON ROBERT, 22 Gaines, 
Hammond. 

SHERK AMOS, 21 Caledonia, Caledo- 
nia Station. 

SHERK ADAM B., 20 Caledonia, Cal- 
edonia Station. 

Sherk Aaron G., 17 Caledonia, Caledo- 
nia Station. 

Sherk Christian, 21 Caledonia, Caledo- 
nia Station. 

Sherk David, 23 Gaines, Hammond. 

SHERK HENRY, 16 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia Station. 

Sherk Joseph, 16 Caledonia, Caledonia 
Station. 

SHERK JOHN, 23 Gaines, Hammond. 



WOODEN CHURNS AND POPCORN POPPERS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S, 



Shear Charles, 19 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Shear C. L., 12 Grand Rapids. 

Shear David E., 4 Lowell, Lowell. 

Shear John W ., 21 Paris, Gr. Rapids. 

SHEAR JOHN B., Lowell. 

Shearer Alvin, 23 Alpine, Alpine. 

Sheehan Joseph, 10 Vergennes, Alton. 

Sheehan John, 32 Cascade, Cascade. 

Sheehan Michael, 32 Grattan, Cannons- 
burg. 

Sheehan Patrick, 29 Cascade, Cascade. 

Sheehan Patrick, 31 Grattan, Cannons- 
burg. 

Sheffield Harvey H., 8 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

SHE1CKLER ADOLPH B., 13 Gaines, 
Alaska. 

Sheidel J., Alaska. 

Sheldon Geo. W., Village Cedar Springs. 

Sheldon Norns B., Village Cedar 
Springs. 

Sheler Calvin. 13 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Shelhammer Moses, 27 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 

Shelhammer Sylvester, 27 Algoma, 
Rockford. 

Shenaman Lovina, 29 Cascade, Cascade. 



SHERK MENNO, 20 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia Station. 

Sherk Samuel, 20 Caledonia, Caledonia 
Station. 

SHERMAN & MILLS, Lowell. 

Sherman Arthur, Lowell. 

Sherman Alfred, 34 Ada, Ada. 

Sherman Edward, 2 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Sherman James, 29 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Sherman Oliver, 27 Plainrield, Grand 
Rapids. 

Sherwood Byron D., 30 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Sherwood Charlotte M.,30 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Sherwood Delos, 15 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 

SHERWOOD JEROME, Sparta Center. 

Shi mm el Adam, 2 Plainrield, Rockford. 

Shimmel A. N., 21 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Shimmel Henry, 18 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Shimmel J. W., 21 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Shine John, 29 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Shimmel John, 33 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 

Shipman W., 18 Algoma, Sparta Center 

SHOEMAKER CLINTON L., 8 Gaines, 
Grand Rapids. 



FORT'S ENEMY OF PAIN CURES COLIC. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 277 

VALLEY CITY LIME WORKS. 



W. H. CONGDOBT, 




0ft £&v <3fiJ- \ti 





MANUFACTURER OF 

mm* mm* 







And Dealer in Akron Cement, Milwaukee 
Lime and Plastering Hair. 



Kn„,-We St ^e, oppose jk * M, R. Oepot, g^j p^ jy,.^ 



Office 49 Canal Street, 



GRADY «£ SMITH, 

Carpenters, Contractors, 



A.1VL> 



PRACTICAL STAIR, BUILDERS. 

Shop on Canal Street, opposite Kent Woolen Mills, 

GRAND RAPIDS, - MICHIGAN. 

N.B.— We mahe a Specialty of Stair Building 

JOHN GRADY. EDWARD SMITH. 

FERDINAND SCHEUFLER & SON 

DEALERS IN 

Stoves, Tinware, &c. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Tin, Copper, and Heavy Sheet Iron Work. 



SAVE TROUGHS, CONDUCTORS AND ROOFING MADE TO ORDER. 

Repairing promptly attended to* 

Shop Corner Canal and Bridge Sts., 

GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 



278 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



SHOEMAKER NICHOLAS, Grandville 

Shores William, 7 Bowne, Alaska. 

SHOTWELL DAVID S., 35 Court- 
land, Courtland Center. 

Shotwell David S., Jr., 35 Courtland, 
Courtland Center. 

Shotwell Isaac M., 10 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Shoup Austin, 11 Vergennes, Alton. 

SHOUP HENRY, 10 Vergennes, Alton. 

SHRINER G. HENRY, 21 Sparfa, Lis- 
bon. 

Shriner Sanford, 21 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Snug Henry, 34 Cannon, Cannonsburg. 

Shutnan Erastus P., 2 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Shumway Leonidas, 4 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

Shupert Eli, 16 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Sibert John, 28 Caledonia, Caledonia 
Station. 

Sibley Abner, Grandville. 

Sidon William, 13 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Sidon , 13 Walker, Grand Rapids. 

Silcox Mrs. Adarany, 31 Bowne, Harris 
Creek. 

Sillaway Joseph, 20 Tyrone, Ca«novia. 

SILVER HORACE, 1 Alpine, English- 
ville. 



SIMPSON JOHN S., 27 Bowne, Bowne 
Sinclair Albert G., 24 Cascade, Cascade 
Sinclair Barney, 13 Cascade, Cascade. 
SINCLAIR DANIEL A., 29 Bowne, 

Harris Creek. 
Sinclair George W., 24 Cascade, Cas- 
cade. 
Sinclair Hiram, 24 Cascade, Cascade. 
Sinclair Hosea B., 13 Cascade, Cascade. 
Sinclair John D., 29 Bowne, Harris 

Creek. 
Sinclair Peter J., 29 Bowne, Harris 

Creek. 
Singer Alexander, 10 Caledonia, Alaska 
Sipple Christopher, 15 Courtland, 

Courtland Center. 
SIPPLE WILLIAM, 16 Courtland, 

Courtland Center. 
Sissem Albert T., 18 Courtland, Edger- 

ton. 
Sissem Benjamin, 12 Algoma, Burch- 

ville (Burch's Mills.) 
Sissem Charles, 12 Tyrone, Sparta Ccn. 
Sissem John, 36 Solon, Cedar Springs. 
Sisson Reuben B., 26 Plainfield, Aus- 

terlitz. 
Sisson Samuel B., 7 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Skellenger Charles B., 34 Ada, Ada. 



POST HOLE AUGERS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S, 14 and 16 Monro. Street. 



SIMMONS BORWNELL S., 18 Nelson, 

Cedar Springs. 
Simmons Charles, 11 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
Simmons Henry, 22 Nelson, Nelson. 
SIMMONS HENRY A., 12 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Simmons John, 34 Algoma, Rockford. 
Simmons John, 35 Algoma, Rockford. 
Simmons Jonas, 13 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
SrMMONS JONATHAN B., Village 

Cedar Springs. 
Simmons Oscar A., 35 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 
Simmons Sylvester, 13 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
SIMMONS WM. W., 18 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Simonds Joel A., 7 Paris, Grand Rapids 
Simonds James, 29 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Simonds John A., 20 Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 
Simon Joseph, 19 Byron, Byron Center 
SIMPSON FRANK, 1 Bowne, Lowell. 
SIMPSON HORACE, 21 Pans, Grand 

Rapids. 



Skellinger Henry, 13 Grattan, Smyrna, 

Ionia County. • 
Skellenger James S., Rockford. 
Skidmore Mrs. Catharine, 4 Bowne, 

Alto. 
SKIDMORE DAVID M., 4 Bowne, 

Alto. 
Skinner Christopher, Rockford. 
Skinner Charles W., 8 Byron, Byron 

Center. 
Skinner David, 8 Byron, Byron Center. 
Skinner James, 16 Byron, Byron 

Center. 
SKINNER JOSEPH, 8 Byron, Byron 

Center. 
Skinner John, 1 Plainfield, Rockford. 
Skinner Reuben, 1 Plainfield, Rockford. 
SKINNER THOMAS W., 23 Paris, 

Grand Rapids. 
Skutt George, 19 Spencer, Nelson. 
Skutt Myron, 24 Courtland, Courtland 

Center. 
Slade Merritt, 34 Plainfield, Grand 

Rapids. 
SLAGHT SPENCER, 14 Vergennes, 

Lowell. 
Slate George, 16 Plainfield, Belmont. 



OLD MEN AND WOMEN, YOUNG MEN 



HISTORY AKD DIRECTOR* Otf OtfT COUNTY. 



279 



Slater George, 15 Paris, G. Rapids. 

Slater Isaac. 14 Grand Rapids. 

Slater Peter, 22 Vergennes, Vergermes. 

Slater Robert, 15 Paris, G. Rapids. 

SLAUGHTER ABRAHAM, 10 Oak- 
field, Oakfield. 

Slaughter Daniel, 10 Oakfield, Oakfield 

Slaughter Garrett, 22 Plainfield, Aus- 
terlitz. 

Slawson Leander B., 15 Oakfield, Oak- 
field. 

Slawson Morris, Cedar Springs. 

Slawson N. F., Cedar Springs. 

SLAYTON ASA W., 22 Grattan, 
Grant. 

SLAYTON CHESTER M., 14 Grattan, 
Grant. 

SLAYTON FRANCIS M., 14 Grattan, 
Grattan Center. 

Slayton Thomas J., Lowell. 

SLAYTON WM. C, 24 Grattan, 
Grant. 

Sleeper Americus, 21 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

SLEEPER PETER A., Sparta Center. 

Sliter Alfred V., Village Cedar Springs. 

Sioatmaker Mark, 29 Grand Rapids. 

Slover Benjamin, 7 Gaines, Gainesville. 

SLUSSAR HARRISON, 9 G. Rapids. 



Smith Barlow, 2 Wyoming, Gr. Rapids. 
Smith Benjamin, 14 Grand Rapids. 
Smith B., 34 Walker, Grand Rapids. 
Smith Charles H., 22 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Smith Conrad, 19 Lowell, Lowell. 
Smith Charles W., 35 Paris, Grand 

Rapids.. 
Smith Cyrenus, 36 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Smith Charles, 28 Bowne, Harris Creek. 
Smith Charles, 24 Ada, Lowell. 
Smith Charles R. Burchville. 
Smith Mrs. Catharine, 2 Alpine, Eng- 

lishville. 
Smith Charles A. C, 12 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
SMITH CHARLES, 10 Alpine, English- 

ville. 
Smith Daniel, 2 Alpine, Englishville. 
Smith David G., 35 Algoma, Rockford. 
Smith David R., 14 Lowell, Lowell. 
Smith Daniel B., 2 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 
Smith Mrs. D. W., 9 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Smith Edward, 14 Byron, Byron Cen. 
Smith Elijah C, South 6 Walker, Gr. 

Rapids. 



HAY FORK PULLEYS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. Hand 16 Monroe Street. 



Smack William, 13 Algoma, Edgerton. 

Smalley John, 5 Grand Rapids, Grand 
Rapids. 

SMILEY MERRILS F., 5 Algoma, 
Cedar Springs. 

Smith A. Oscar, 16 Byron, Byron Cen. 

Smith Alfred D., 24 Alpine, Alpine. 

Smith Amos J., 14 Byron, Byron Cen. 

Smith Anthony D., 12 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

Smith Albert, 2 Wyoming, Gr. Rapids. 

Smith Abraham, 21 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Smith Asa, south 6 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Smith Albert, 2 Wyoming, Gr. Rapids. 

Smith Almon C, 21 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia Station. 

Smith Almon K., 16 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia Station. 

Smith Abram, 3 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 

Smith Aaron, 28 Bowne, Harris Creek. 

Smith 'Alexander, 15 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Smith Alvah, 30 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Smith Alonzo, 32 Courtland, Rockford. 



Smith Eli, 23 Solon, Cedar Springs. 

Smith Edward, 31 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Smith Elihu B., 32 Gaines, Cody's 
Mills. 

Smith Evander, 34 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

SMITH ELI, 3 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

Smith Edward H., 28 Spencer, Spencer 
Mills. 

Smith Elihu, 7 Grand Rapids. 

Smith Eugene, 29 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Smith Eli, 22 Solon, Cedar Springs. 

SMITH EBENEZER C, 12 Cannon, 
Bostwick Lake. 

Smith Freeman, . 3 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

Smith Frank, 3 Sparta, Sparta Center. 

Smith Franklin DeF., 24 Alpine, Al- 
pine. 

Smith George, 36 Lowell, Lowell. 

Smith Geo. T., Lowell. 

Smith Gilbert, 16 Solon, Cedar Springs. 

Smith George, 13 Plainfield, Rockford. 

SMITH GEORGE, 22 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Smith George J., 35 Algoma, Rockford. 



AND MAIDENS, USE FORT'S MEDICINES. 



280 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Smith George, 23 Alpine, Alpine. 
Smith Henry K., 31 Ada, Ada. 
Smith Henry, 35 Ada, Ada. 
Smith Hiram M., 20 Plainfield, Mill 

Creek. 
Smith Heman H., Alaska. 
SMITH HARVEY, 7 Courtland, Ed- 

gerton. 
SMITH HEMAN S., 25 Courtland, 

Courtland Center. 
SMITH HIRAM W., Lisbon. 
Smith Israel D., 21 Wyoming, Grand- 

ville. 
SMITH ISRAEL C, 15 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
SMITH ISRAEL, 3 Alpine, English- 

ville. 
Smith John H., Rockford. 
Smith John, 10 Solon, Cedar Springs. 
Smith Joseph, 15 Bowne, Bowne. 
Smith John M., 16 Algoma, Rockford. 
Smith James, 34 Walker, G. Rapids. 
Smith Jacob A., 35 Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 
Smith John, 2 Oakfield, Greenville. 
Smith John, Jr., 12 Oakfield, Greenville 
Smith John W., 16 Wyoming, Grand- 

ville. 



Smith James L, 35 Algoma, Rockford. 

Smith Joseph E., Sparta Center. 

Smith John H., Rockford. 

Smith J. J., Lisbon. 

Smith Jacob, 29 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Smith Joseph, 11 Byron, Byron Center 

Smith James W., 12 Cannon, Bostvvick 

Lake. 
Smith Jack, 7 Cannon, Rockford. 
Smith James, 1 Courtland, Courtland 

Center. 
Smith Levi S., 15 Bowne, Bowne. 
Smith Leander, 29 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Smith Lyman, 32 Courtland, Rockford. 
SMITH LEWIS, 15 Vergennes, Lowell. 
Smith Mervin A., 30 Lowell, Lowell. 
Smith Michael, 16 Algoma, Rockford. 
Smith M. De LaFayette, 2 Courtland, 

Courtland Center. 
Smith Martin C, 2 Grattan, Ashley. 
Smith M., 34 Walker, Grand Rapids. 
Smith Moses R., 8 Ada, Ada. 
SMITH MORTISE, 25 Alpine, Mill 

SMITH NEHEMIAH, 3 Grattan, Grat- 
tan Center. 

Smith N. J., 11 Walker, Gr. Rapids. 

SMITH NEWTON N., 12 Grattan, 
Otisco, Ionia County. 



FOUR BUCKWHEAT CAKES TURNED AT ONCE, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



Smith James W., 23 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
Smith John W., 29 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Smith John S., 20 Lowell, Lowell. 
Smith John, 18 Nelson, Cedar Springs. 
SMITH JOHN W. B., 15 Grattan, Grat- 
tan Center. 
Smith John C, 2 Grattan, Ashley. 
SMITH JOHN, 15 Bowne, Bowne. 
Smith Joseph M., 14 Cascade, Cascade. 
Smith John S., 23 Cascade, Cascade. 
Smith John, 15 Courtland, Courtland 

Center. 
Smith John M., 35 Algoma, Rockford. 
Smith John L., 35 Algoma, Rockford. 
SMITH JAMES, 24 Algoma, Rockford. 
Smith James, 13 Algoma, Edgerton. 
Smith James, 26 Algoma, Rockford. 
Smith John O , 36 Grand Rapids. 
SMITH J. HOWARD, Lowell. 
Smith Joseph W., 24 Algoma, Edger 

ton. 
Smith John B., Burchville (Burch's 

Mills.) 
Smith John V., 15 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 
SMITH JOSEPH H., 23 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 



Smith Orlow L., 17 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

Smith Oscar R., 13 Caledonia, Alaska. 

SMITH OBADIAH, 11 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

Smith Orlow, 17 Nelson, Cedar Springs. 

Smith Perry W., Cedar Springs. 

Smith Peter K., 30 Ada, Ada. 

SMITH PETER, 18 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia Station. 

Smith Philo, 33 Spencer, Spencer Mills. 

SMITH PHILIP, 1 Courtland, Oak- 
field. 

Smith Peter S., 29 Alpine, Indian 
Creek. 

Smith Phineas P., 6 Cannon, Rockford. 

Smith Robert, 4 Lowell, Lowell. 

Smith Robert, 33 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Smith Russell, 14 Bowne, Bowne. 

SMITH RILEY, 20 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

Smith Robert J., 7 Byron, Grandville. 

Smith Seth, 18 Bowne, Alaska. 

Smith Samuel B., 28 Spencer, Spencer 
Mills. 

SMITH G. II., 7 Grand Rapids. 

Smith Sala, 14 Grand Rapids. 

Smith Sydney B., Lowell. 



FORT'S LINIMENT CURES CAKED UDDER, 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 



281 



Smith Thomas, 28 Ada, Ada. 

Smith Torry, 35 Ada, Ada. 

Smith Timothy S., 27 Paris, G. Rapids. 

Smith Thomas, 36 Lowell, Lowell. 

Smith Thomas, 21 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Smith Thomas, 15 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Smith Valentine, 4 Oakfield, Spencer 

Mills. 
Smith V. R., 33 Cannon, Ada. 
Smith William H., 14 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
Smith William, 12 Grattan, Otisco, 

Ionia County. 
SMITH WILLIAM II., 21 Spencer, 

Spencer Mills. 
Smith William, 20 Lowell, Lowell. 
Smith William H., 1 Cannon, Bostwick 

Lake. 
Smith William O., 18 Tyrone. Casnovia. 
SMITH WM. B., 7 Gaines, Gainesville. 
Smoake Jacob, 26 Lowell, Lowell. 
Snapen Henry, 1 Solon, S^nd Lake. 
Snell Anson, 2 Wyoming, Gr. Rapids. 
Snethen Charles, 10 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Snell Jefferson, 16 Paris, Gr. Rapids. 
Snell Joseph C, 12 Lowell, Lowell. 



Snyder James, 17 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

Snyder James, 25 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Snyder John D., Grandville. 

Snyder Jacob, 25 Courtland, Courtland 

SNYDER JACOB, 22 Ada, Ada. 

Snyder Lester E., 18 Oakfield, Court- 
land Center. 

Snyder Lewis C, 30 Courtland, Edger- 
ton. 

SNYDER L. C, 13 Algoma, Edgerton. 

Snyder Lewis, 29 Oakfield, Oakfield. 

Snyder Robert, Grandville. 

Snyder Spencer, Grandville. 

Snyder William, 27 Walker, G. Rapids 

Snyder Win. T., 27 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Soddard J., 34 W^alker, Grand Rapids. 

Solomon Mrs. Amanda, 11 Gaines, 
Hammond. 

Solomon Joseph, 21 Plainfield, Aus- 
terlitz 

SOLOMON LEWIS A., 4 Gaines, Ham- 
mond. 

SYMES JOHN, 26 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 

Symes James A., 26 Sparta, SpartaiCen. 

SYMONDS JOHN P., 35 Grand Rapids 

Sones Charles, 20 Grand Rapids. 



LETTERS FOR MARKING BAGS AND SHEEP, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



Snethen John, 11 Solon, Cedar Springs. 
Snider Frederick, 19 Vergennes, Ver- 

gennes. 
Snider Joseph, jr., 15 Alpine, Alpine. 
Snider John, 15 Alpine, Alpine. 
Snider Jacob, 35 Alpine, Gr. Rapids. 
Snider Josiah, 6 Cannon, Rockibrd. 
Snitzler John, Grandville. 
Snook Edward, Cedar Springs. 
Snow Albert, 36 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Snow Ansel, 27 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Snow Dewitt, 21 Sparta, Sparta Center. 
Snow Horace S., Sparta Center. 
Snow Henry, 28 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Snow Uriel, 13 Cascade. Lowell. 
Snow William R., 12 Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 
Snow Warren, 13 Cascade, Lowell. 
Snowden James A., 17 Alpine, Grand 

Rapids. 
Snyder Albert, 18 Oakfield, Courtland 

Center. 
Snyder Alfred, Grandville. 
Snyder George R., south 7 Walker, 

Grand Rapids. 



SOPER DAVID, 3 Paris, Grand Rapids 
Soper David, 22 Plainfield, Austerlitz. 
Soper Francis B., 3 Paris, Grand Rapids 
Soper John W., 5 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Soper James, 3 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Souders John, 6 Courtland, Cedar 

Springs. 
Soule Susan A., 29 Vergennes, Lowell. 
Soules B. W., 19 Algoma, Sparta Center 
Sours Lawrence, 29 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Sours William, 29 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Southard Mrs. Margaret, Lowell. 
Southwer Fred., Burchville (Burch's 

Mills.) 
South wick Prank, 32 Alpine, Indian 

Creek. 
Southwick Nelson, 29 Grand Rapids, 

Grand Rapids. 
Soutter Frederick, 30 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia Station. 
SOWER ANTHONY, 36 Alpine, Grand 

Rapids. 
Sower Peter, 35 Alpine, Grand Rapids. 
SOWERBY EDWARD, 3 Cannon, 

Rockford. 
Sowerby John, 3 Cannon, Rockford. 



su 



IT HAS SAVED VALUABLE COWS. 



282 



HISTOBY AKD DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



SOWERBY THOMAS, 4 Cannon, Rock- 
ford. 

Soy Arthur, 34 Walker, Grand Rapids. 

Soy Richard, 34 Walker, Grand Rapids 

Spangenberg George, 21 Sparta, Lisbon 

Spangenberg Jacob, 21 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Spark Ephraini, 8 Plainfield, Belmont. 

Sparks Edgar C, 23 Gaines, Hammond 

Sparks Geo. W., 23 Gaines, Hammond. 

Sparks James, 8 Plainfield, Belmont. 

Sparks James, 32 Courtland, Rockford. 

Spaulding Charles S., 8 Caledonia, 
Alaska. 

Spaulding Francis, 12 Algoma, Edger- 
ton. 

Spaulding Hermon, 21 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

Spaulding Hiram, 33 Cascade, Alaska. 

Spaulding Isaiah, 28 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Spaulding J. E., 2 Grand Rapids. 

Spaulding John, 36 Plainfield, Grand 
Rapids. 

Spaulding James M., 10 Courtland, 
Courtland Center. 

Spaulding Jefferson, 29 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

Spaulding Jerry, 22 Plainfield, Auster- 
litz. 



SPENCER CHESTER, 17 Bowne, 

Bowne. 
Spencer Enos, Lowell. 
Spencer Jacob, 6 Ada, Austerlitz. 
Spencer James, 3 Cannon, Rockford. 
Spencer John, 17 Ada, Ada. 
Spencer Luther D., 17 Bowne, Bowne. 
Spencer Reuben, 6 Ada, Austerlitz. 
S pence Perry, 17 Ada, Ada. 
Spence William, 17 Ada, Ada. 
Spence Edward, 17 Ada, Ada. 
Spence James, 3 Cascade, Ada. 
Spicer Henry L., 5 Algoma, Cedar 

Springs. 
Spicer John, 16 Algoma, Rockford. 
Spiker John, 25 Bowne, Lowell. 
Spiker Samuel, 24 Bowne, Lowell. 
Spiller Daniel, 27 Tyrone, Oasnovia. 
Spitzer Aaron, 2 Caledonia, Alaska. 
Sprague A. S., Cedar Springs. 
Sprague Arthur, 13 Oakfield, Greenville 
SPRAGUE EDGAR, 5 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Sprague John P., 10 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Sprague Joseph W., Lowell. 
Sprague J. A., Lowell. 
Sprague J. B., Lowell. 
SPRAGUE RICHARD, 11 Lowell, 

Lowell. 



THE BEST CATTLE TETHER IN MARKET, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



SPAULDING LYMAN, 15 Oakfield, 
Oakfield. 

Spaulding Miner, 27 Cascade, Alaska. 

SPAULDING MURRAY, 29 Nelson, 
Springs. 

Spaulding Orleans, 12 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Spaulding Ransom L., 12 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Spaulding Samuel, 36 Plainfield, Grand 
Rapids. 

Spaulding Timothy, 25 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

Speaker G. D., 10 Lowell, Lowell. 

Spears Alexander, 29 Byron, Byron 
Center. 

Speicher Abijah W., 13 Gaines, Ham- 
mond. 

Speicher Abraham, 13 Gaines, Ham- 
mond. 

Spencer Almon, 16 Spencer, Spencer 
Mills. 

Spencer Alfred, 6 Ada, Austerlitz. 

Spencer Geo. M., 16 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

Spencer Charles, 22 Plainfield, Auster- 
litz. 



Sprague Wm. H., 16 Paris, G. Rapids. 

Sprague William, 24 Algoma, Edger- 
ton. 

Sprague Wesley, 13 Oakfield, Green- 
ville. 

Spring Daniel W., 17 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Spring Jared S., 8 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Spring Volney, 18 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Springsted Jacob, 21 Wyoming. 

Sponable John, 8 Wyoming, Grandville 

Spooner Charles, 19 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

Spooner Rev. J. G., Alaska. 

SPOOR ABRAM, 27 Vergennes, Lowell 

Spoor Amaziah, 27 Vergennes, Lowell. 

SPORE J. M., Rockford. 

Spore Jacob C, Rockford. 

Squiers Lewis M., Rockford. 

Squiers Robert, 26 Algoma, Rockford. 

Squier Mrs. Effie M., 22 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Squires Gideon, 23 Nelson, Nelson. 

Squires Gideon, 4 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 



FORT'S WESTERN LINIMENT CURES ALL LAMENESS. 



HI8T0EY AND D1BECT0RY OF KENT COUNTY; 



283 



SQUIRES JASON R., 23 Nelson, Nel- 
son. 

SQUIER MTLON L., 30 Tyrone, Cas- 
novia. 

Squier Manly M., 22 Paris, Grand Rapids 

SQUIRES MRS. NATHAN, 24 Court- 
land, Courtland Center. 

Squires Nathan, 24 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Squires Robert, Sr., 35 Courtland, 
Courtland Center. 

Stage George W., 27 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

Stage John, 9 Alpine, Englishville. 

Stahl Alexander, 12 Bowne, Lowell. 

Stan dish Ira, Lowell. 

STANIFORD GEORGE, 28 Sparta, 
Sparta Center. 

Stange John, 32 Caledonia, Caledonia 
Station. 

Stanton C. C, 1 Algoma, Burehville 
(Burch's Mills.) 

STANLEY ISAAC W., 18 Alpine, 
Pleasant. 

Stanton E. W., 7 Grand Rapids. 

Stanton Elisha, 15 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

Stanton Fletcher L., 1 Algoma, Bureh- 
ville (Burch's Mills.) 



Stauffer Isaac T., 32 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia Station. 

Stauffer Isaac, 27 Caledonia, Caledonia 
Station. 

Stauffer William, 33 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia Station. 

Stearns James, Lowell. 

STEBBINS CHAUNCEY P., 34 Paris, 
Hammond. 

Stebbins Charles D., 26 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

Stebbins Gaius P., 26 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

Stebbins Joseph P., 33 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Stebbins Orrin, 5 Walker, Gr. Rapids. 

STEBBINS WILLIAM G., 1 Sparta, 
Sparta Center. 

Stedman Devillo, 25 Sparta, English- 
ville. , . 

Stedman Joseph, 25 Spartaf English- 
ville. 

Steed Charles, 36 Sparta, Englishville. 

STEEL DANIEL D., 8 Caledonia, 
A 1 fislc a 

STEELE GEORGE, 18 Grattan, Bost- 
wick Lake. 

STEELE LUCETTA M., 16 Grattan, 
Grattan Center. 



BUILDERS' HARDWARE-LATEST STYLES-AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



Stanton F. A., Burehville (Burch's 
Mills.) 

Stanton Harmon, 14 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

STANTON LEWIS W., Burehville 
(Burch's Mills.) 

Stanton Lafayette J., 16 Grattan, Grat- 
tan Center. 

Stanton Zael, 14 Courtland, Courtland 
Center. 

Stang Charles, 35 Spencer, Spencer 
Mills. 

Stapleton Wm. H., 14 Cascade, Cascade 

STARK JAMES M., Caledonia Station. 

Stark Lewis V.. 9 Cascade, Cascade. 

Starks Charles H., 11 Alpine, Grand 
Rapids. 

STARKS D. S., 11 Alpine, Englishville 

Starks Myron, 16 Bowne, Bowne. 

Starr Irving P., 15 Grand Rapids. 

STARR JOHN, 15 Grand Rapids. 

Staats Jacob, 12 Lowell, Lowell. 

Stauffer David, 33 Caledonia, Caledonia 
Station. 

Stauffer Hiram, 20 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia Station. 



STEELE NATHANIEL, 13 Cannon, 
Bostwick Lake. 

STEELE SAMUEL H., 13 Cannon, 
Bostwick Lake. 

Steele Samuel, 13 Cannon, Bostwick 
Lake. 

STEKETEE JOHN, 22 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Steketee Peter, 21 Paris, Gr. Rapids. 

Stennett Joshua, 4 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 

STEPHENSON H. C, Lowell. 

Stephenson James R., Lowell. 

Sternbergh Sylvester, 15 Wyoming, 
Grand Rapids. 

Sterling Daniel, 21 Lowell, Lowell. 

Sterling Marcus, 21 Lowell, Lowell. 

Sterling , 13 Grand Rapids. 

Stetzwick John, 29 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia Station. 

Stetzwick Paul, 30 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia Station. 

Stetter George, 30 Spencer, Nelson. 

Stetter John, 30 Spencer, Nelson. 

STEVENS AMOS W., 28 Oakfield, 
Oakfield. 

Stevens B. F., 22 Byron, Byron Cen, 



LUMBERMEN USE FOJVTS WESTERN MMIMENT. 



284 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



STEVENS CHARLES E., 14 Wyo- 
ming, Grand Rapicls. 

Stevens Gabriel, 17 Oakfield, Oakfield. 

Stevens Henry, 23 Alpine, Alpine. 

Stevens John S., 21 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Stevens James D., 2 Plainfield, Rock- 
ford. 

Stevens John P., 6 Paris, Gr. Rapids. 

Stevens John, 22 Oakfield, Oakfield. 

Stevens James W., 11 Lowell, Lowell. 

Stevens Ransom, 9 Byron, Byron Cen. 

Stevens Robert, 13 Caledonia, Alaska. 

Stevens Russel, 2 Courtland, Courtland 
Center. 

Stevens Robert, 7 Bowne, Alaska. 

Stevens Samuel, 12 Courtland, Oakfield. 

Stevens Samuel H., 17 Oakfield, Oak- 
field. 

Steven sUtt Hiram, 10 Alpine, English- 
ville. 

STEVENSON WM. H., 3 Alpine, 
Englishville. 

Stewart Asa P., Village of Cedar 
Springs. 

Stewart Charles R., 22 Wyoming, 
Grandville. 

STEWART DANIEL, 21 Wyoming, 
Grandville. 



Stilwill Nirtim, 33 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

Stilwill Phebe,28 Courtland, Rockford. 

Stingle William II., 35 Ada, Ada. 

STINSON H. N., Rockford. 

STINTON JOSEPH, 7 Lowell, Lowell. 

Stinton Wm., 7 Lowell. Lowell. 

STOCKS HENRY, 27 Spencer, Spencer 
Mills. 

Stocks Thomas, 27 Spencer, Spencer 
Mills. 

Stocking Dan'l M., 16 Grattan, Grat- 
tan Center. 

Stocking Fidius D., Lowell. 

Stocking Miller J., 16 Grattan, Grat- 
tan Center. 

STOCUM D. R., Rockford. 

Stoddard Chester S., 27 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

Stoddard Eli B., 30 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

Stoddard Geo. M., 30 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

Stoddard Henry W., 30 Cannon, Aus- 
terlitz. 

Stoddard Mrs. Hannah, 26 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

Stoddard Orange W., 30 Cannon, Aus- 
terlitz. 



STEELYARDS WEIGHING FROM 50 TO 1,000 POUNDS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



Stewart Ezra, 36 Algoma, Rockford. 
STEWART HILAN H., 5 Cascade, 

Ada. 
Stewart Henry W., 21 Wyoming, 

Grandville. 
STEWART JOHN, 11 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Stewart Marvin, 36 Algoma, Rockford. 
Stewart Mrs. Mary, 20 Grand Rapids. 
STEWART OSCAR L., Village of 

Cedar Springs. 
STEWART SIMEON S., 35 Grand 

Rapids. 
STEWART SYLVESTER J., 11 

Walker, Grand Rapids. 
STEWART WILLIAM H., 5 Bowne, 

Alto. 
Stiles Benjamin, 31 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
STILES CHAS O., Village of Cedar 

Springs. 
Stiles L. W., Cedar Springs. 
Stiles Jedediah B., 21 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
Stiles Raymond, 9 Plainfield, Belmont. 
Stilwell Cyrus, 31 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. | 



Stoddard Richard, Sparta Center. 

STOKES WILLIAM H., 20 Plainfield, 
Austerlitz. 

Stolp Leonard, 1 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

Stoner Alfred, 25 Byron, Cody's Mills. 

Stoner Charles, 23 Courtland, Court 
land Center. 

Stoner Ezra C, 14 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Stoner Jacob J., 23 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

STONER JOHN, Rockford. 

Stoner Riley, 23 Courtland, Courtland 
Center. 

Stonebraker Albert C, 36 Gr. Rapids. 

Stonebreaker Henry, 34 Alpine, Grand 
Rapids. 

Stonehouse. John, 25 Alpine, Mill 
Creek. 

Stoneburner John, 16 Wyoming, 
Grandville. 

STONEBURNER LEONARD, 16 Wyo- 
ming, Grandville, 

Stone A. R., Rockford. 

Stone Chester G., Lowell. 



FORT'S WESTERN LINIMENT CURES RHEUMATISM. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 285 

nm% mxrtm. 

Manufacturer of and Dealer in 

SADDLES, .Mk- HARNESS, 




Blankets, ^m^ Fly Ms, 



And Everything pertaining to the Saddlers' Business, 

No. 67 Canal Street, 

(Empire Block,) 

Grand Rapids, - - Michigan. 

LEMON'S 

FRAME FACTORY, 

71 Canal Street, 

Opposite tlxo Bronson House. 

OVAL AND SQUARE PICTURE FRAMES MADE TO ORDER, 



« «• • » » 



Old Mirrors & Picture Frames 

Regilded and Repaired, and made as Good as New, 

The subscriber, being a practical Gilder, warrants his work to give satis- 
faction. Call and Examine my stock of Oval and Square Frames, before pur- 
phasing elsewhere. EiPDon't forget the number, 

"7X Canal Street, 

Q. W. LEMON, Proprietor. 



286 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Stone David T., Burchville, (Burch's 

Mills.) 
STONE DAVID, Burchville, (Burch's 

Mills.) 
Stone Elias B., 4 Bowne, Alto. 
STONE FRANKLIN C, Rockford. 
Stone George, 6 Bowne, Alto. 
STONE HENRY G., 23 Walker, Gr. 

Rapids. 
STONE ISAAC L., 21 Algoma, Rock- 

ford. 
Stone John B., Lisbon. 
Stone Levi, 6 Bowne, Alto. 
Stone Normandus A., Lowell. 
Stone O. A., Lisbon. 
Stone Oscar, Lowell. 
Stone Oliver, 6 Bowne, Alto. 
Stone William J., 21 Algoma, Rockford. 
STONE WM. H., 6 Bowne, Alto. 
Stoops James A., Rockford. 
Storm Adam, 27 Alpine, Grand Rapids 
Storm Philip, 27 Alpine, Grand Rapids 
Stover Fred., 23 Ada, Ada. 
Story Benjamin, 4 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
Story Benj. A., Jr., 9 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
Story Eugene, 13 Lowell, Lowell. 



STOWE LOTHROP COOLEY, 18 Cas* 

cade, Cascade. 

Stow Russell, 24 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

STOW THOMAS S., 10 Caledonia, 
Alaska. 

Stow Thomas, 11 Caledonia, Alaska. 

Stowe William, 16 Cascade, Cascade. 

Stowe Zebulon, 18 Cascade, Cascade. 

Stowers Adelbert, 29 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 

Stowers Nathan, 29 Algoma, Rockford. 

STOWELL NATHANIEL W., 31 Plain- 
field, Mill Creek. 

Straight Royal A., 21 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 

Straight Lemuel, 34 Paris, G. Rapids. 

Strait Nehemiah, 22 Caledonia, Alaska. 

STRAUB E. AUGUST, 30 Nelson, 
Cedar Springs. 

Stroble Benjamin, 30 Grattan, Can- 
nonsburg. 

STREETER HARMON D., 28 Nelson, 
Cedar Springs. 

Streeter Mr*. H. M., 2 Cannon, Bost- 
wick Lake. 

Streeter Morris N., 2 Cannon, Bost- 
wick Lake. 



I X L POCKET KNIVES AND RAZORS AT W. D. FOSTER'S. Uand 16 Monro* St. 



Story Thomas B., 22 Spencer, Spencer 
Mills. 

STOUT ANDREW, 3 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

STOUT ANDREW DE WITT, 19 Plain- 
field, Austerlitz. 

STOUT DAVID B., 34 Nelson, Court- 
land Center. 

Stout Ira, 19 Courtland, Rockford. 

STOUT JOSEPH S., 23 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

Stout John, 3 Courtland, Courtland 
Center. 

Stout Lafayette, 33 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

Stout Oscar, 5 Nelson, Sand Lake. 

Stout Samuel, 19 Courtland, Rockford. 

Stout Samuel S., 19 Plainfield, Alpine. 

Stout Unas, 36 Spencer, Spencer Mills. 

STOUGHTON CHARLES, 35 Lowell, 
Lowell. 

Stow Alfred W., 17 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia Station. 

Stow Christopher, 11 Caledonia, Alaska 

Stowe Elbridge, 18 Plainfield, Auster- 
litz. 

Stow Joseph, 11 Caledonia, Alaska. 



STREETER WARREN, 35 Cascade, 

Alaska. 
Strock Aaron, 32 Cascade, Alaska. 
Strock John, 8 Gaines, Gainesville. 
Strock Marion, 32 Cascade, Alaska. 
Strong Truman, 11 Cascade, Ada. 
STRONG GEORGE, 23 Ada, Ada. 
STRONG HENRY W., 29 Byron, By- 
ron Center. 
STRONG JARED, 11 Cascade, Ada. 
Strong Nathan, 11 Cascade, Ada. 
STROPE GEORGE W., 25 Spencer, 

Spencer Mills. 
Stroup Edgar, 34 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
STROUP HENRY, Jr., 35 Spencer, 

Spencer Mills. 
STROUP HENRY, 34 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Stroup Oscar, 34 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Stuart Charles, 9 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
STULTS FRANCIS M., 9 Oakfield, 

Oakfield. 
Stuttard Henry, Sparta Center. 
Stuart William, 1 Alpine, Englishviile. 



THE KNOWING ONES, AND GOOD JUDGES, 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



287 



SUDDICK JOHN, 14 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

Sullivan Dennis, 1 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

SULLIVAN DANIEL, 31 Grattan, 
Cannonsburg. 

Sullivan Florea, 12 Paris, Cascade. 

Sullivan John, 31 Walker, Gr. Rapids. 

Sullivan John W., 2 Byron, North 
Byron. 

Sullivan James, 34 Walker, Gr. Rapids. 

Sullivan John, 31 Grattan, Cannons- 
burg. 

SULLIVAN JOHN, 34 Ada, Ada. 

Sullivan Michael, 13 Gaines, Ham- 
mond. 

Sullivan Michael, 30 Grattan, Cannons- 
burg. 

Sullivan Patrick, 20 Grand Rapids. 

Sullivan Patrick, 30 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Sullivan Simon, Grand ville. 

Sullivan Solomon, 20 Plainfleld, Aus- 
terlitz. 

Sullivan Timothy, Village Cannons- 
burg. 

Sullivan T., 34 Walker, Grand Rapids. 

Sunderland Myron W., 10 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 



SUTTON AVERY J., 26 Spencer, 
Spencer Mills. 

Sutton H. H., Burchville (Burch's 
Mills.) 

Swan Andrew J., 10 Ada, Ada. 

Swan Charles, 8 Ada, Ada. 

Swan Ebenezer, 9 Ada, Ada. 

SWAN EBEN, 8 Ada, Ada. 

SWAN JOHN A., Lisbon. 

Swan Josiah, 8 Ada, Ada. 

Swan Lyman D., 1 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Swan Solomon, 8 Ada, Ada. 

Swank John, Cedar Springs. 

Swank Peter, 21 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Swartout Andrus, 11 Oakfield, Green- 
ville. 

Swartout Conrad, 3 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

SWARTZ AUGUSTUS, Rockford. 

SWARTZ EDWIN, 32 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Swenson Charles, 5 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Swenson Isaac, 5 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Sweet Edward O., 5 Algoma, Sparta 
Center. 

Sweet Ebenezer P., 26 Lowell, Lowell. 

Sweet John G., 5 Algoma, Sparta Cen. 

Sweet Wm. J., 7 Algoma, Sparta Cen. 

Sweetland Charles, Lowell. 

Sweetland Samuel, Lowell. 



KNIVES AND FORKS FROM $1 TO $12 PER SET, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



Sunderlin Eugene A., Lowell. 
Sunderlin E. A., Lowell. 
Sutherland Alexander, Lowell. 
Sutphen James, 26 Cascade, Alaska. 



Swift Morgan L., Lowell. 

Swift Silas, 23 Spencer, Spencer Mills. 

Sylverthorn Thomas, 24 Vergennes, 

Fallassburg. 
SYMONS JOHN, 2 Sparta, Sparta Cen 



T 



TABER JAMES, 12 Solon, Rockford. 

Taber Justin O., 21 Walker, G. Rapids. 

TABER MARCIUS, 5 Walker, Indian 
Creek. 

Taber Nathan, Rockford. 

Taft Charles L., 12 Oakfield, Greenville 

Taggart Harvey, 27 Sparta, Sparta Cen 

Taggart William, 6 Byron, Grandville. 

Takens Gaart, 32 Grand Rapids. 

Talbot T. F., 5 Grand Rapids, Grand 
Rapids. 

Talbot Dennis, 83 Grattan, Grattan Cen 

Talbot Dennis, Jr., 33 Grattan, Ver- 
gennes. 

TALBOTT JOHN, 33 Grattan, Alton. 

TALBOT RICHARD, 33 Grattan, Grat- 
tan Center. 



Tallman T. W., 18 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Tallman John C, Village Cannonsburg. 

TALLMAN LEWIS D., Village Can- 
nonsburg. 

Talman Edson, Lisbon. 

Tanner James H., Alaska Village. 

Tanner Levi H., Sparta Center. 

TANNER WARREN D., 6 Gaines, 
Gainesville. 

Tate George, 20 Grattan, Grattan Cen, 

Tate James, 17 Courtland, Courtland 
Center. 

Taplin Wm. T., 16 Courtland, Court* 
land Center. 

Tapley S., Cedar Springs. 

Tate Thomas, Lowell. 

TAYLOR A. J., 24 Alpine, Alpine. 



USE FOltT'0 EXTRACT OF LEMON. 



288 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Taylor Allen, 18 Algoma, Sparta Center 

Taylor Mrs. Catharine, Rockford. 

Taylor Corwin, 3 Lowell, Lowell. 

Taylor Charles, 31 Vergennes, Lowell. 

Taylor Daniel, 18 Algoma, Sparta Cen. 

TAYLOR GEO. E., 36 Grand Rapids. 

Taylor Geo. P., 16 Lowell, Lowell. 

Tavlor Henry, Lowell. 

TAYLOR HOLLIS R., 36 Grand Rapids 

TAYLOR HARMON S., 9 Sparta, 
Sparta Center. 

Taylor John, 20 Lowell, Lowell. 

Taylor John, Lowell. 

TAYLOR J. BRAINARD, Sparta Cen. 

Taylor Kendrick, 12 Bowne, Alto. 

Taylor L. L., Lowell. 

Taylor Loyal L., 9 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 

TAYLOR MRS. MARY, 17 Sparta, 
Sparta Center. 

Taylor Michael, 8 Walker, Indian 
Creek. 

Taylor Martin, Cedar Springs. 

Taylor Matthew, 21 Grand Rapids. 

Taylor Orlando, 3 Lowell, Lowell. 

TAYLOR OLIVER, 26 Cascade, Cas- 
cade. 

Taylor S. J., Lowell. 

Taylor Simeon H., 3 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 



Templar Gilbert, 32 Spencer, Cedar 

Springs. 
Ten Eyck Joseph, 14 Plainficld, Aus- 

terlitz. 
Terrill Adelbert S., 10 Byron, Byron 

Center. 
Terrill A. Jackson, 15 Byron, Ryron 

Center. 
Terrill A. Philoman, 10 Byron, Byron 

Center. 
TERRILL EDWARD L., 10 Solon, 

Cedar Springs. 
Terrill Tillitson, 22 Paris, G. Rapids. 
Terwilliger Silas W., 25 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Terry Frank, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 
Terry Minerva M., Village Cannonsburg 
TETLEY WILLIAM, 12 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
Thatcher David, 7 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Thayer George N., 13 Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 
THAYER LEWIS, 28 Alpine, Indian 

Creek. 
Thede John, 30 Caledonia, Caledonia 

Station. 
Therry Nicholas, Lowell. 
Thetge John, Cedar Springs. 
Thibos John, 18 Lowell, Lowell. 



SLEIGH BELLS AND WHIPS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S, 14 and 16 Monroe Street. 



Taylor Samuel, 18 Algoma, Sparta 
Center. 

Taylor Samuel A., Sparta Center. 

Taylor William H., Sparta Center. 

Taylor William, 26 Cascade, Alaska. 

Teed Lamoreaux, 1 Alpine, English- 
ville. 

Teeple Chas., 8 Lowell, Lowell. 

Teeple Elbert B., 33 Cascade, Alaska. 

TEEPLE GEORGE W., 18 Cascade, 
Cascade. 

Teeple James, 15 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 

Teeple Oscar F., 18 Cascade, Cascade. 

TEEPLE PETER, 18 Cascade, Cas- 
cade. 

TEEPLE PETER, Jr., 20 Cascade, 
Cascade. 

Teeple Seneca, 18 Cascade, Cascade. 

Teeple William M., 15 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

Teesdale Charles, 27 • Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 

Tefft Amos B., 20 Courtland, Rockford. 

Tefft Orrin J., 17 Courtland, Courtland 

TELLER P. S., Rockford. 



THOMAS ALBERT, 5 Cascade, Ada. 

Thomas Abner D., 31 Bowne, Cale- 
donia. 

Thomas Ashley, 23 Cascade, Cascade. 

Thomas Alexander, 11 Cannon, Bost- 
wick Lake. 

Thomas Alfred, 11 Cannon, Bostwick 
Lake. 

Thomas Benjamin, 12 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

Thomas Calvin, 27 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

Thomas Chauncey, 34 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

Thomas Charles, 2 Byron, North Byron 

THOMAS DEWITT C, 14 Cascade, 
Ada. 

Thomas Edward, 27 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

THOMAS EDGAR M., 25 Wyoming, 
Kelloggsville. 

THOMAS FRANCIS, 18 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Thomas Hudson B., 16 Plainfield, Bel- 
mont. 

Thomas Jonathan T., 25 Cascade, 
Lowell. 



A BLESSING TO ANY COUNTRY, 



HISTORY^ AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



289 



THOMAS DR. J. R., 28 Grand Rapids. 

Thomas Joseph, Lowell. 

Thomas Joshua, 12 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. . 

Thomas John. H., 30 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

THOMAS JAMES, Village Cannons- 
burg. 

Thomas John M., 28 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Thomas James L., 28 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Thomas Levi, 34 Spencer, Spencer Mills 

Thomas Lewis D., 28 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

THOMAS LORENZO D., 3 Oakfield, 
Greenville. 

THOMAS MARTIN F., 16 Spencer, 
Spencer Mills. 

Thomas Nathan, 29 Grand Rapids, 
Grand Rapids. 

Thomas Peter K., 13 Bowne, Lowell. 

Thomas Richard, 16 Plainfield, Bel- 
mont. 

Thomas Sidney S., 8 Spencer, Spencer 
Mills. 

Thomson Samuel, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 

THOMAS WILLIAM, 32 Bowne, Harris 
Creek. 



Thompson Horton, 21 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

Thompson John T., 18 Lowell, Lowell. 

Thompson John, 25 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

THOMPSON JAMES R., 28 Bowne, 
Bowne. 

Thompson John, 32 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Thompson John W., 32 Tyrone, Cas- 
novia. 

THOMPSON JAMES, 22 Grand Rapids 

Thompson Lorenzo, 23 Cascade, Cas- 
cade. 

Thompson Leroy, 24 Paris, G. Rapids. 

Thompson Michael, 34 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

THOMPSON ROBERT, 17 G. Rapids. 

Thompson Sylvester A., 21 Spencer, 
Nelson. 

Thompson Sylvanus D., 10 Bowne, Alto 

Thompson Thomas, 9 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

THOMPSON THOMAS, 36 Wyoming, 
Kellog^sville. 

Thompson William, 28 Grand Rapids. 

Thomson Andrew, 31 Ada, G. Rapids. 

Thompson Hiram E., 16 Byron, Byron 
Center. 



LADDERS FOR PICKING FRUIT, AT W. D. FOSTER'S, 14 and 16 Monroe Street 



Thomas William, 18 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Thomas William, Village Cannonsbnrg. 
Thomas Win. W., 10 Byron, North 

Byron. 
Thomas Mrs. Tabitha, 3 Oakfield, 

Greenville. 
THOMAS WILLIAM, 18 Wajker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Thome Michael, 15 Alpine, Alpine. 
Thome Peter, 34 Alpine, Indian Creek. 
THOMPSON ALMON, 36 Courtland, 

Courtland Center. 
Thompson Adam, 13 Grand Rapids. 
THOMPSON ANDREW, 34 Spencer, 

Spencer Mills. 
THOMPSON CALVIN, 25 Courtland, 

Courtland Center. 
Thompson Charles S., 22 Grand Rapids 
THOMPSON ELIAS, 18 Sparta, Lisbon 
THOMPSON FREDERICK B., 12 

Bowne, Bowne. 
Thompson Frederick W., 22 G. Rapids. 
Thompson George, 25 Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 
THOMPSON HENRY H., 27 Bowne, 

Harris Creek. 



Thomson Isaac R., 16 Byron, Byron 

Center. 
Thomson Robert, 5 Ada, Grand Rapids 
Thorington Smith, 16 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Thurbur Darius, 15 Grand Rapids. 
Thurstin S. L., 2 Alpine, Englishville. 
Thurston Daniel, Lisbon. 
Thurston Daniel B., Lisbon. 
Thurston Franklin, Lisbon. 
THURSTON JOHN, Lisbon. 
Tibbets Henry, 7 Byron, Grandville. 
Tibbets Wm. D., 8 Byron, Grandville. 
Tierney Michael, 24 Grand Rapids. 
Tiffany Alva, 25 Cannon, Cannonsburg. 
TIFFANY REUBEN C, 25 Cannon, 

Cannonsburg. 
Tim Charles, 28 Caledonia, Caledonia 

Station. 
Tiinmersma Derrick, 32 Grand Rapids. 
Timpson Joseph, 9 Bowne, Alto. 
Tindall Smith, 27 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Tindall John N., 34 Nelson^ Cedar 

Springs. 
TISDELL JOHN S., Cedar Springs. 
TITUS NATHAN J., 15 Ada, Ada. 



FORT'S WESTERN LINIMENT AND LIVER PILLS. 

S7 



290 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Tobey Albert, 26 Caledonia, Caledonia. 

TOBEY GEO. L., 11 Byron, Byron Cen 

TOBEY PRINCE W., 26 Caledonia, 
Caledonia. 

TOBEY SAMUEL, 9 Byron, Byron Cen 

Tobin William, 34 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Tobias Charles, 8 Cascade, Cascade. 

Tobias Stephen, 16 Paris, Grand Rapids 

Tooiey Edward, 11 Grand Rapids. 

Tooley Isaac, 15 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Tooiey Noah, 15 Paris, Gr. Rapids. 

Tole Miss Phebe A., 24 Lowell, Lowell. 

Tomlinson Isaac, Sen., 31 Cannon, Aus- 
terlitz. 

Tomlinson Isaac, Jr., 31 Cannon, Aus- 
terlitz. 

Tomlinson Stephen, 11 Vergennes, 
Alton. 

TOMPSETT CHARLES, 21 Cannon, 
Cannon sburg. 

Tompsett Henry, 24 Nelson, Nelson. 

Tompsett James, 24 Nelson, Nelson. 

TOMPSETT JESSE, 24 Nelson, Nel- 
son. 

Tompsett Jesse, Lowell. 

Tompsett James, 21 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Tompkins Henry, 15 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 



TOWER ISAAC, 29 Oak field, Oakfield. 
Tower Joseph, 15 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
Tower Rufus C, 15 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
Tower Solomon, 15 Grattan, Grattan 

Center 
TOWER* SCHUYLER, 2 Vergennes, 

Alton. 
TOWER STEPHEN S., 29 Oakfield, 

Oakfield. 
TOWLE JAMES, 22 Plainfield, Aus- 

terlitz. 
Town Alfred B., 33 Cascade, Alaska. 
Towner Samuel W., 21 Byron, Byron 

Center. 
TOWNER SAMUEL S., 21 Byron, By- 
ron Center. 
Townes John A., 33 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
TOWNES JOSIAH D., 33 Nelson, 

Cedar Springs. 
Townes Simon, 33 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Towns John, 30 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Townsend George, 25 Wyoming, Kel- 

loggville. 
Tracy Michael, 2 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 



EVERYTHING IN THE HARDWARE LINE, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



Tompkins William H., 15 Nelson, 
Cedar Springs. 

Toms A. L., 1 Alpine, Englishville. 

Toms A W., Rockford, 

TOMS A. B., 1 Alpine, Englishville. 

TOMS JOSEPH E., 1 Alpine, English- 
ville. 

Toms Oscar, Rockford. 

TOPPING R. H., 19 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Torrey Ezra O., Lowell. 

TORREY LUCIUS W., Village of 
Cedar Springs. 

Torrey Seymour, 13 Lowell, Lowell. 

Totten J. J., 33 Tyrone, Sparta Center. 

TOTTEN THOMAS, 26 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

Totten Thomas, 30 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

Tower Adelbert A., Rockford. 

Tower Charles E., 15 Grattan, Grattan 
Cpnt py 

TOWER* CHARLES A., 10 Solon, 
Cedar Springs. 

Tower David, Rockford. 

Tower George, 29 Algoma, Rockford. 

TOWHR ISAAC L., 30 Oakfield, Oak- 
field. 



Train Jarvis C, Lowell. 

TRAIN MRS. CAROLINE, 24 Lowell, 

Lowell. 
Tramper J. W., 26 Grand Rapids. 
Trauger John, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 
Trask Chas. H., 10 Lowell, Lowell. 
Trask H. M., 11 Lowell, Lowell. 
Traxler Alex,, 6 Algoma, Sparta Cen. 
TREADWAY BENJ. S., 19 Tyrone, 

Casnovia. 
Treat B. P., 28 Tyrone, Sparta Center. 
Treat Mrs. Elizabeth, 16 Grand Rapids. 
Treat Oscar F., Rockford. 
Tredenick James, Lowell. 
Treust Lurn, 30 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Treiton William, 13 Walker, G. Rapids. 
TRILL DAVID P., 22 Nelson, Nelson. 
Trill Edward, Rockford. 
Trill Samuel, 22 Nelson, Nelson. 
Trill Thomas, 9 Courtland, Courtland 

Center. 
Trill William, 22 Nelson, Nelson. 
TRIM SAMUEL, Cedar Springs. 
Trimmer David, 33 Lowell, Lowell. 
Troost Paul, 29 Grand Rapids. 
Trowbridge P. C, 21 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Troy Edmund M., 19 Caledonia, Alaska. 



FORT'S MEDICINES ARE WARRANTED, 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 291 



JOHN P. CREQUB, 

(atrccEssoE to boynton, creque & co.,) 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN 











Manufacturer of UPHOLSTERED GOODS, 

69 Canal Street, GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 

A. LEITELT & BRO., 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

mil EMIffi & BOILERS 

Foundry and Machine Shop opposite the Bronson House, 

GRAND RAPIDS, - MICHIGAN. 



GRAND RAPIDS LIME WORKS. 



JOHN HILL, 

MANUFACTURER OF 

QUICK LIME! 

And Dealer in Milwaukee, Sheboygan & Toledo Lime, 
Calcine Plaster, Water Lime, Hair etc, 

OO Oanal St., OHFLAHXTIP 3Et,AI»IPB. 

Kinney & Mitchell, 






A Specialty made of Shoeing Horses that are Tender- Footed, 
and those that Interfere. JJ®» We guarantee satisfaction. 

Shop, four doors North of Bridge Street, opposite Canal Street House, 

^Sl} Grand Rapids. 



292 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Troy James, 19 Caledonia, Caledonia 
Station. 

Troy John C, 19 Caledonia, Alaska. 

TROY JOHN M., 8 Caledonia, Alaska. 

Truax James, 2 Plainfield, Rockford. 

TRUAX JAMES H., 8 Bowne, Alto. 

Truax Mrs. Eleanor, 9 Bowne, Alto. 

Truax Mrs. Elizabeth, 8 Bowne, Alto. 

Trumbull Cassius, 36 Grattan, Alton. 

Trumbull Oren S., 36 Grattan, Alton. 

Tryon F. E., 13 Algoma, Edgerton. 

Tubbs Cornelius, Rockford. 

Tubbs Cornelius, 6 Cannon, Rockford. 

Tubbs Hosea, 23 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 

Tubbs Israel, 10 Walker, G. Rapids". 

Tubbs Martin S., 22 Grand Rapids. 

Tubbs Nathan, South 7 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Tubbs Mrs. Rebecca, 36 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 

Tu') 1 s Tunis, 19 Gaines, Gainesville. 

Tucker E. W., 13 Lowell, Lowell. 

TUCKER FOSTER, 17 Grand Rapids. 

Tucker Henry, 21 Byron, Byron Cen. 

Tucker J. B., 9 Byron, North Byron. 

Tucker Joseph D., 10 Sparta, Sparta 
Centre. 

TUCKER SOLOMON J., 10 Sparta, 
Sparta Centre. 



Tuttle Abraham S., 26 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

Tuttle Eugene, 35 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Tuttle George L., 6 Cannon, Rockford. 

Tuttle Hiram, 35 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

TUTTLE J. E., 24 Algoma, Edgerton. 

Tuttle John, Rockford. 

Tuttle Lyman V., 20 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Tuttle Oscar, 24 Algoma, Edgerton. 

TUTTLE STEPHEN L., 6 Cannon, 
Rockford. 

Tuthill Jason, 31 Oakfield, Oakfield. 

Tu thill Stephen II., 31 Oakfield, Grat- 
tan Center. 

TUXBURY BENJ. F., 28 Alpine, Gr. 
Rapids. 

Tuxbury Byron S., 19 Tyrone, Cas- 
novia. 

TUXBURY JOHN S.,.19 Tyrone, Cas- 
novia. 

Tuxbury Norton, 28 Alpine, Grand 
Rapids. 

Tyler Asa R., 27 Bowne, Harris Creek. 

Tyler Augustus, 33 Bowne, Harris 
Creek. 

Tyler Adon, 13 Bowne, Bowne. 

Tyler Alban A., 26 Paris, Gr. Rapids. 



SLEIGH BELLS AND WHIPS, AT W D. FOSTER'S. 14 and 16 Monroe Street. 



Tucker Samuel, 10 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 

TUFFELMIRE ABRAHAM, 13 Sparta, 
Sparta Centre. 

Tally Patrick M., 2 Grattan, Ashley. 

Turk John W., 26 Grattan, Grant. 

Turner Alfred, 11 Grand Rapids. 

Turner L. R., 26 Algoma, Rockford. 

Turbush Barnard, 12 Cascade, Cascade. 

Turner Lewis, 7 Alpine, Pleasant. 

Turner Marvin C, 15 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 

TURNER MARVIN, 27 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 

TURNER SALEM T., 6 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Turner William, 26 Algoma, Rockford. 

Turnbull Robert, 6 Ada, Ada. 



Tyler Alexander G., 27 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Tyler Edward, 16 Cascade, Cascade. 

TYLER HEWITT, 12 Bowne, Bowne. 

TYLER JUSTUS J., 25 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Tyler John, 28 Cascade, Alaska. 

Tyler Loren B., 13 Bowne, Bowne. 

Tyler Oren, 26 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Tyler Roswell F., 15 Bowne, Bowne. 

Tyler William, 26 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

TYSON ISAAC W., 8 Gaines; Gaines- 
ville. 

TWADEL JOHN, 22 Plainfield, Aus- 
terlitz. 

Twiss Loren, 32 Alpine, Indian Creek. 

Twohay Jolin, 29 Grattan, Cannons- 
burg. 



u 



Umlor Tebolt, 7 Alpine, Pleasant. 
U.mlor Joseph, 7 Alpine, Pleasant. 
UNDERHILL ALFRED, 21 Sparta, 
Sparta Center. 



Underhill George, 19 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

UNGER CHRISTIAN, 3 Vergennes, 
Alton. 

Unger Solomon, 3 Vergennes, Alton. 



FORT'S AROMATIC OINTMENT CURES SORE EYES. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



293 



UNGER WILLIAM, 15 Oakfield, Oak- 
Held. 

Upson Jesse, 4 Plain field, Rockford. 

Upson Joseph C, 4 Plainfield, Rock- 
ford. 

Utter Amos, 33 Wyoming, Grandville. 



Utter Franklin, 33 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

UTTER JOHN B., 6 Byron, Grand- 
ville. 



v 



VALANCE AMOS, 10 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Vallance John, 9 Solon, Cedar Springs. 
Vanamburgh John Nelson, 33 Cascade, 

Alaska. 
Vanamburgh Lewis, 28 Cascade, Alaska 
Vanamburgh William, 33 Cascade, 

Alaska. 
Van Antwerp John, 17 Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 
Van Antwerp John, 16 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
Van Antwerp Samuel E., 17 Sparta, 

Sparta Center. 
Van Antwerp, Wm. L., 17 Sparta, 

Sparta Center. 



Van Deusen Chauncey B., 1 Plainfield, 

Rockford. 
Van Deusen Elam, 28 Vergennes, Ver- 

gennes. 
Van Deusen Hiram, Lowell. 
Vandeusen Jesse, 4 Lowell, Lowell. 
Van Deusen John 8., 28 Vergennes, 

Vergennes. 
Van Deusen Ray, 5 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Van Deusen William, 8 Lowell, Lowell. 
Vandine Jacob, 29 Grand Rapids. 
Van Doren John T., 34 Ada, Ada. 
Van Donge Dennis, 19 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Van Donge John, 19 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Vandyke Albert, 8 Bowne, Alto. 



HAY FORK PULLEYS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S 14 and 16 Monroe Street. 



VAN AUKEN JAMES, 17 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Van Blaricum Luther, 21 Lowell, Lowell 

Van Buren Geo. W., 28 Lowell, Lowell. 

Vanderslotpe Engel, 33 Grand Rapids. 

Vanderpool James, 18 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Vanderhoof Simon, 1 Paris, G. Rapids. 

Vanderhoof William, Lowell. 

Vanderbilt John, 18 Cascade, G. Rapids 

Vandermass Martin, 29 Grand Rapids. 

Vanderlip John, Lowell. 

Vanderstol C, 18 Grand Rapids. 

Vanderfliet Martin, 29 Grand Rapids. 

Vanderburg Cornelius, 29 Grand Rapids 

Vandewerker Henry, 24 Bowne, Bowne 

Vandewerker Nelson, 24 Bowne, Bown 

Vanderbroeck John, 1 Vergennes, Alton 

Vanderbroeck R., 1 Vergennes, Alton. 

Van Deusen Austin, 21 Lowell, Lowell. 

VAN DEUSEN ALFRED, 28 Ver- 
gennes, Vergennes. 

Van Deusen A. Delos, 28 Vergennes, 
Vergennes. 

Van Deusen Adam, 24 Vergennes, Ver- 



Vandyke Alvin, 32 Spencer, Cedar 
Springs. 

VAN EVERY GEO. W., Alaska. 

Van Hooven Aaron, 7 Paris, G. Rapids 

Van Hoven Edwin, 30 Paris, G. Rapids 

Van Hooven Mrs. Nellie, 30 Paris, 
Grand Rapids. 

Vanilen Daniel, Village Cannonsburg. 

VAN LEW JOHN, 31 Gaines, Cody's 
Mills. 

Van Lew Oscar G., 31 Gaines, Cody's 
Mills. 

Van Lew Peter, 31 Gaines, Cody's Mills 

Van Liew Daniel, 21 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 

Van Liew James C, 21 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 

Van Liew William, 16 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 

VAN LIEW WINFIELD S., 8 Nelson, 
Cedar Springs. 

VAN LOON VOLNEY, 13 Algoma, 
Edgerton. 

VANNEST GEORGE, 5 Byron, North 
Byron. 

Van Nornum Harrison, Lowell. 



FORT'S AROMATIC OINTMENT CURES PILES. 



294 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



VANNALSTINE LAMBERT, Ada Vil- 
lage. 

Vannalstine Peter L., Ada Village, 

Van Order Isaac, 31 Bowne, Harris 
Creek. 

Van Order William, 29 Bowne, Harris 
Creek. 

Van Reen Herman, Grandville. 

Van Raalte Ralfee, 3 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

VAN SCHOTEN GEORGE, 31 Can- 
non, Austerlitz. 

Van Schuyler James, 19 Sparta, Lisbon 

Van Schuyler Richard, 19 Sparta, Lis- 
bon. 

Van Sickles Alfred, 1 Paris, G. Rapids. 

Van Size Simon B., Village Cannons- 
burg. 

Van Sledright Art, 15 Paris, G. Rapids 

Van Stolsman Peter, 2 Wyoming, 
Grand Rapids. 

Van Wagner John, 6 Oakfield, Oakfield 

Van Winkle Samuel, 25 Spencer, 
Spencer Mills 

Van Wormer James, Rcckford. 

Van Volkinburg Jonathan, Burchville 
(Burch's Mills.) 

VAN ZANDT JACOB, 23 Spencer, 
Spencer Mills. 



Verlin Michael, 16 Ada, Ada. 

Verlin Richard, 17 Vergennes, Ver- 

gennes. 
Verbanks John, 20 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 
Vincent Benjamin, Sparta Center. 
Vincent Michael, 24 Caledonia, Alaska. 
Vinkemulder John, Grandville. 
VINTON H. II., (Dep'y Sheriff,) Lowell. 
Vinton Jerome, 13 Alpine, Grandville. 
Vinton Porter, 13 Alpine, Gr. Rapids. 
Virgil James E., 1 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
Vitty John, 7 Grand Rapids. 
Vogt Henry, 29 Lowell, Lowell. 
Volpert John, 14 Alpine, Alpine. 
VOND JOHN, 33 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
VOND WILLIAM C, 9 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Von Ehrenkrook Charles, Lowell. 
VONNEY BICK, 19 Algoma, Sparta 

Center. 
Von Manen Stephen, 16 Wyoming, 

Grandville. 
Vorholick Andrew, 22 Alpine, Indian 

Creek. 
Vorholick Sebastian, 23 Alpine, Alpine. 
Vrealand John T., 8 Paris, Gr. Rapids. 
VROOMAN JOHN C, 23 Paris, Gr. 

Rapids. 



LETTERS FOR MARKING BAGS AND SHEEP, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



VAUGHN MALCOMB W., 11 Walker, 
Grand Rapids. 



Vroman William H., Alaska Village. 



w 



Wa'ldell John, 19 Cannon, Austerlitz. 

Waddell William, 30 Cannon, Aus- 
terlitz. 

Wade John, 13 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 

Wade Lawson N., 31 Plainfield, Grand 
Rapids. 

Wadentellow John, 19 Byron, Byron 
Center. 

Wadsworth A. 0., Lowell. 

Wagener Christian, 31 Byron, Byron 

WAGNER JOHN B., 1 Solon, Sand 
Lake. 

WAIT DeLOSS V., 5 Cannon, Rock- 
ford. 

Wait Hastings, Sparta Center. 

Wait Milo, 27 Cannon, Cannonsburg. 

Wait Paine, 13 Grattan, Otisco, Ionia 
County. 

Wait Sanford, Lowell. 



Wait Mrs. Susan, Sparta Center. 

Waite F. F., 10 Walker, Gr. Rapids. 

Waite Joseph, 12 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

WAITE L. W., 12 Walker, Gr. Rapids. 

WAKEMAN ALFRED, 1 Grattan 
Grattan Center. 

Wakeman John, 28 Spencer, Spencer's 
Mill. 

Wakeman Stephen, 28 Cannon, Can- 
nonsburg. 

Walden Lodowic, 16 Gaines, Ham- 
mond. 

Walden Guy S., 9 Cascade, Cascade. 

Walker Albert B., 33 Grand Rapids. 

Walker David, 33 Plainfield, Grand 
Rapids. 

Walker Eliab, 28 Vergennes, Lowell. 

Walker George, 3 Grand Rapids. 



LET EVERT ONE TROUBLED WITH LIVER 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



295 



WALKER HUGH, 9 Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 
WALKER ISAAC, 29 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Walker John J., 19 Lowell, Lowell. 
Walker John J., Jr., 19 Lowell, Lowell. 
WALKER JACOB W., 28 Vergennes, 

Lowell. 
Walker Levi, 21 Vergennes, Lowell. 
Walker Melvin, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 
Walker Thomas, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 
Wall Samuel, 35 Courtland, Bostwick 

WALL* WILLIAM, 1 Plainfield, Rock- 
ford. 

WALLACE MRS. CAROLINE, 26 
Sparta, Sparta Center. 

Wallace Charles II., 24 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

Wallace Corydon, 19 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

Wallace James, 20 Lowell, Lowell. 

Wallace John W., 11 Lowell, Lowell. 

Wallace Nathaniel, 12 Grattan, Otisco, 
Ionia County. 

Wallace Nathan, 1 Lowell, Lowell. 

Wallace Nathaniel T., 11 Lowell, Lo- 
well. 



Walton John S., 25 Bowne, Fillmore, 

Barry County. 
Walton Ransom, 25 Bowne, Fillmore, 

Barry County. 
Walz George, 26 Ada, Ada. 
Wamsley Edwin C, Village Cedar 

Springs. 
Ward Charles, 20 Grand Rapids. 
Ward Hugh H., 15 Ala, Ada. 
Ward Horatio G., 36 Ada, Ada. 
Ward Henry, 8 Walker, Grand Rapids. 
Ward Jonathan, Village Cedar Springs. 
Ward John, 5 Vergennes, Cannonsburg. 
Ward James, 31 Spencer, Cedar Springs 
Ward Jared, 19 Spencer, Nelson. 
Ward Michael, 31 Spencer, Cedar 

Springs. 
Ward Silas, 16 Grattan, Grattan Center 
Ward Wm. W., 24 Ada, Ada. 
WARD WM. D., 14 Grattan, Grattan 

Wardwell William, 27 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
WARE SAMUEL L., 4 Nelson, Sand 

Lake. 
WARING H. E., 21 Grand Rapids. 
Warner Amos W., 32 Bowne, Harris 

Creek. 
WARNER ANDREW, 14 Grand Rapids 



BUILDERS' HARDWARE-LATEST STYLES-AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



WALLACE SAMUEL M., 11 Lowell, 
Lowell. 

WALLACE WILLIAM, 15 Ada, Ada 

Waller William A., Rockford. 

Walhn Charles, 20 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

WALPOLE JOHN, 11 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Walpole Thomas, 11 Paris, Gr. Rapids. 

WALSH HUGH, 32 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Walsh John, 8 Vergennes, Vergennes. 

Walsh John, 34 Walker, Gr. Rapids. 

Walsh Patrick, 25 Alpine, Mill Creek. 

Walsh Thomas, 19 Walker, G. Rapids. 

WALTER JOHN, 36 Grand Rapids. 

Walter James, 15 Grand Rapids. 

Walters George, 17 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Walters Homer P., 34 Ada, Ada. 

Walters John, 30 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Walters NieJ, 19 Algoma, Sparta Center 

Walters Stephen, 36 Wyoming, Kel- 
loggsville. 

Walters Townsend, 19 Algoma, Sparta 
Center. 

Walterson John, 26 Cascade, Cascade. 

Walton Andrew J., Lowell. 



Warner Abijah J., 35 Tyrone, Sparta 

Center. 
Warner Benjamin F., 32 Bowne, Harris 

Creek. 
Warner Calvin F„ 35 Cascade, Alaska. 
Warner Ezra G., 16 Byron, Byron Cen. 
Warner Gilman, 35 Paris, Hammond. 
Warner George, 22 Plainfield, Auster- 

litz. 
Warner George W., 26 Plainfield, Aus- 

terlitz. 
Warner Henry, Rockford. 
Warner H. S., 19 Algoma, Sparta Cen. 
Warner John W., 12 Caledonia, Alaska 
Warner James, 35 Tyrone, Sparta Cen. 
Warner Lawson S., Lowell. 
WARNER LEWIS, 11 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Warner Lewis W., 14 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
Warner Lyman, 20 Bowne, Bowne. 
Warner Truman G., 20 Bowne, Bowne. 
Warnock William, 17 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Warner William, 35 Lowell, Lowell. 
Warren Chas. H., Lowell. 
Warren Francis, 21 Byron, Byron Cen. 



COMPLAINT TRY FORT'S PILLS. 



S96 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Warren Geo. R., Cedar Springs. 
Warren G. W., 24 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Warren Ira, 14 Solon, Cedar Springs. 
WARWICK MRS. A. A., Lowell. 
Washburn Benjamin, F„ 33 Ada, Ada. 
Washburn Benjamin F., 29 Grand 

Rapids, Grand Rapids. 
Washburn Charles J., 36 Cascade, Al 

ask a. 
Washburn Clark D., Ada Village. 
Washburn Daniel, 20 Lowell, Lowell. 
WASHBURN JAMES A., 1 Cannon, 

Bostwick Lake. 
Washburn Nathan, 20 Lowell, Lowell. 
WASHBURN ROLLIN F., 36 Cascade, 

Sl 1 q air q 

WASHBURN MRS. ROSETTA, 14 

Cascade, Cascade. 
Waterbury Dewitt, 2 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
Waterman Charles, 16 Alpine, Grand 

Rapids. 
Waterman John, 11 Algoma, Edgerton. 
Waters B. G., 18 Grand Rapids. 
Waters Charles, Lowell. 
Waters David L., south 5 Walker, Gr. 

Rapids. 
Waters II., 18 Grand Rapids. 



Watson H. C, 30 Cannon, Austerlitz. 

WATSON HENRY, 2 Oakrield, Green- 
ville. 

WATSON JOSEPH J., 17 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

WATSON JOHN S., 2 0akfield, Green- 
ville. 

Watson Montgomery D., 9 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Watson Thomas, 24 Oakfield, Ashley. 

Watts James N., 18 Byron, Grandville. 

Watts William, 21 Bowne, Bowne. 

WATTS WM. H., 18 Byron, Grandville 

Weaver Asa, 26 Byron, Cody's Mills. 

WEAVER BRADLEY, 35 Byron, 
Cody's Mills. 

Weaver Carlos, 34 Byron, Cody's Mills. 

Weaver George, 21 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Weaver Josiah, 11 Bowne, Lowell. 

Weaver John, 34 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Weaver Joseph, 34 Alpine, Indian 
Creek. 

Weaver Martin, 19 Alpine, Alpine. 

Weaver Prentiss, 34 Byron, Cody's 
Mills. 

Weaver Randall, 26 Byron, Cody's 
Mills. 

Weatherwax Henry, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 

Weber John, 34 Walker, Grand Rapids 



THE BEST CATTLE TETHER IN MARKET, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



Waters Levi, 12 Lowell, Lowell. 

Waterson Wm., 20 Lowell, Lowell. 

Watkins Adrian, 4 Walker, Indian 
Creek. 

Watkins Charles J., 2 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

Watkins E. C, Rockford. 

Watkins Joseph, 22 Algoma, Edgerton. 

Watkins J. D., 11 Alpine, Englishville. 

Watkins Joseph W., 15 Algoma, Edger- 
ton. 

WATKINS JOHN, 1 Plainfield, Rock- 
ford. 

Watkins Jared, 13 Grattan, Grant. 

WATKINS JASON C, 23 Grattan, 
Grant. 

WATKINS L. W., 16 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

WATKINS MILTON C, 2 Grattan, 
Grattan Center. 

WATKINS OLIVER I., 13 Grattan, 
Grant. 

Watson Andrew, 30 Cannon, Austerlitz 

Watson Cyrus P., 29 Cannon, Auster- 
litz. 

Watson Daniel W., 30 Cannon, Auster- 
litz. 



Weber Peter, 13 Walker, Grand Rapids 
Webster Charles B., 16 Cascade, Cas- 

WEBSTER ERASTUS W., 9 Cascade, 
Cascade. 

Webster George, 12 Cascade, Cascade. 

Webster Hiram, Jr., 12 Cascade, Cas- 
cade. 

Webster Hiram, 12 Cascade, Cascade. 

Webster Henry, Lisbon. 

Webster Henry T., 18 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Webster Stephen B., 17 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

WEDGE HENRY D., 32 Alpine, In- 
dian Creek. 

Wedge Joseph, Sparta Center. 

Wedgewood Amaziah, 10 Wyoming, 
Grandville. 

Wedgewood Amaziah, 17 Byron, Byron 
Center. 

Wedgewood Chas. H., 10 Wyoming, 
Grandville. 

WEDGEWOOD GUSTAVUS R., 16 
Byron, Byron Center. 

Weeks Abel, Lowell. 

Weeks John P., 25 Grattan, Grant. 



FORT'S WESTERN LINIMENT IS WARRANTED 



HlSTO&T AND DlRECTORT Ot KBNT^COtJNTT. 



297 



Weeks John J., 30 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

Weeks James II., Lowell. 

Weeks Orrin D., 4 Vergennes, Alton. 

Weed Sylvanus, 1 Oakfield, Greenville. 

Weg<ll Swen, 5 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Weitz George, 34 Gaines, Cody's Mills. 

Wei ting John, 34 Wyoming, North 
Byron. 

Weiringa Henry, 33 Alpine, Indian 
Creek. 

Wekenmann Henry, 24 Gaines, Cale- 
donia Station. 

Wekenmann Stonnas, 24 Gaines, Cale- 
donia Station. 

Welch Andrew. 8 Caledonia, Alaska. 

WELCH CYRUS S., 12 Gaines, Ham- 
mond. 

Welch Edward, 25 Plainfield, Auster- 
litz. 

Welch James, 25 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Welch Mr&. Lavina, Grandville. 

Welch Patrick, 24 Plainfield, Auster- 
litz. 

Welch Robert, Village Cedar Springs. 

WELCH RENSSELEAR J., 5 Nelson, 
Sand Lake. 

WELCH WILLIAM, 8 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 



Wells James L., 80 Paris, Gr. Rapids. 

Wells Nathan, 31 Courtland, Rockford. 

Welton George, 27 Spencer, Spencer 
Mills. 

WELTON MORTIMER G., 30 Cale- 
donia, Caledonia. 

Welty Frederick, 2 Gaines, Hammord. 

Wells Orville G., 26 Plainfield, Auster- 
litz. 

Wells Robert, 26 Plainfield, Austerlitz. 

Wells Robert D., 26 Plainfield, Auster- 
litz. 

Wells T. W., 30 Algoma, Rockford. 

Wells Winsor, Rockford. 

Welsh James. 11 Lowell, Lowell. 

Welsh Win., Lowell. 

Welsh Win, 31 Solon, Sparta Center. 

Wendorf John, 24 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

Wen dover Henry, Lowell. 

WENGER ISAAC G., 18 Caledonia, 

WENGER JONAS G., 7 Caledonia, 

Alaska. 
Werdon Oscar N., 17 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Werdon Mrs., 33 Alpine, Indian Creek. 
Wertman Daniel, Alaska Village. 
West Charles, 13 Alpine, Englishviile. 



WELCH 8l GRIFFITH'S CIRCULAR SAWS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



Welch Willinm, 12 Gaines, Hammond. 
Weller Edgar, 16 Cannon, Cannons- 

WELLER HENRY N., 22 Cannon, 
Cannonsburg. 

Weller Harvey, 2 Cannon, Rockford. 

Weller John P., 13 Piainiield, Auster- 
litz. 

Weller Mirza, 3 Cannon, Rockford. 

Weller Morton II., 9 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Weller Sidney, 8 Cannon, Cannonsburg 

Weller Theodore, 4 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

WELLER VIRGIL, 18 Cannon, Rock- 
ford. 

WELLMAN EUSTICE J., 21 Oakfleld, 
Oakfield. 

Welling Henry, 9 Wyoming, Grandville 

WELLS ALMERN, 30 Vergennes, 
Vergennes. 

WELLS C. E., Lisbon. 

Wells George II., 26 Plainfield, Aus- 
terlitz. 

Wells Henry, 1 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

WELLS JAMES, 30 Vergennes, Ver- 
gennes. 



WEST H. S., Lowell. 

WEST J. C, Lowell. 

West Lorenzo, 25 Alpine, Alpine. 

West Warren, 13 Alpine, Englishviile 1 . 

WEST WILLIAM II., 30 Plainfield, 
Mill Creek. 

Westbrook Thomas, 23 Vergennes, Lo- 
well. 

Westbrook Haggai, 16 Vergennes, Lo- 
well. 

Westbrook John R., 34 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

Westcott Charles, 9 Byron, Byron Cen. 

Westcott Dexter, 22 Byron. Byron Cen. 

Westcott William B., 22 Byron, Byron 
Center. 

Westerhouse F. J., 34 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Westervelt John, 21 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

West-fall Abram, 15 Grand Rapids. 

WESTFALL BENJAMIN, 8 Grand 
Rapids. 

Westfall Frederic, 8 Grand Rapids. 

Westfall George, 8 Grand Rapids. 

Westfall William, 32 Sparta, Lisbon. 



88 



TO CURE YOUR LAME BACK* 



298 



HISTORY AKD DIRECTORY OF KENT COtJtttfY. 



Westlake Samuel, 29 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
WES TON ADELBERT H., Grandville. 
Weston Nathan, 35 Cascade, Alaska. 
Weston Horace O., Grandville. 
Weston Henry, 21 Algoma, Rockford. 
Weston William, 32 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
WHALEN KER, 14 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
Whalen Michael, 11 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
Whalen Thomas, 31 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Whaley Isaac, 21 Ada, Ada. 
Whedon Hamilton, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 
Whedon Israel, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 
Whelan Andrew, 11 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
Whelan Mrs. Alice, 20 Wyoming, 

Grandville. 
Whelan Edmund, 11 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
Whelan Michael, 11 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
Whelan Thomas, 1 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
Wheeler Barnes, 14 Grand Rapids. 
Wheeler Edward A., 22 Alpine,, Alpine. 



White Charles, 15 Courtlaad, Conrt- 
land Center. 

White Elijah, 31 Cannon, Austerlitz. 

White Frank, Lowell. 

WHITE GEORGE, 8 Vergennes, Alton 

White Isaac N., Lowell. 

White Isaac W., 10 Vergennes, Alton. 

White James, 32 Ada, Ada. 

WHITE JOSEPH, 17 Bowne, Alto. 

White John, 16 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 

White James M., 10 Walker, G. Rapids 

White Mrs. Julia, Lowell. 

WHITR JOHN R., 35 Grattan, Alton. 
'WHITE LEONARD, Lowell. 

White Levi, 1 Caledonia, Alaska. 

White Otis, 24 Grattan, Grant. 

WHITE OTIS, 24 Grattan, Grant. 

White Orange, 3 Wyoming, G. Rapids. 

White Robert, 8 Bowne, Alto. 

WHITE SAMUEL, Jjr., 23 Walker, 
Grand Rapids. 

WHITE SYLVESTER C.,#15 Court- 
land, Courtland Center. 

White Safford, Alaska. 

White Samuel, Sr., 23 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

WHITE WM. C, 35 Cascade, Alaska. 

WHITE WILLIAM, 16 Caledonia, 
Alaska. 



DISSTON'S NONPAFUEL CROSS-CUT SAWS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



Wheeler Edward, 22 Alpine, Alpine. 

Wheeler John, 14 Grand Rapids. 

Wheeler John, 20 Algoma, Rockford. 

Wheeler Joseph, 15 Alpine, Alpine. 

Wheeler Montsier, 31 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

Wheeler Martin G., South 6 Walker, 
Grand Rapids. 

Wheeler Nelson J., 8 Cannon, Rock- 
font. 

WHEELER WM. W., 22 Alpine, Al- 
pine. 

Whipple John, 13 Algoma, Edgerton. 

Whipple Wallace, 32 Byron, Byron 
Center. 

Whitbeck Benj., 2 Oakfield, Greenville. 

Whitbeck Elizabeth, 2 Oakfield, Green- 
ville. 

Whitcomb Riggs, 33 Byron, Byron 
Center. 

WHITE ALBERT C, 34 Wyoming, 
Grand Rapids. 

White Amos S., Lowell. 

White Anna, 21 Oakfield, Oakfield. 

White Anson, 31 Cannon, Austerlitz. 

White Burtis, Lowell. 

White Benjamin, 1 Vergennes, Alton. * 



White William, 32 Grand Rapids. 

WHITE WALTER, 10 Vergennes, Al- 
ton. 

White Zenas B., 15 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Whitebread Lewis, 16 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 

Whitehead Thomas, 22 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 1 

Whitfield Henry, Rockford. 

tVhitford Mrs. Abbey A., 7 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Whitford Henry M., 28 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

WHITFORD LINAS, 3 Gaines, Ham- 
mond. 

Whitford Rufus, 34 Paris, Hammond. 

Whitford Silas. 21 Gaines, Gr. Rapids. 

WHITING MRS. CATHARINE, Cedar 
Springs. 

Whiting Mrs. Elizabeth, 19 Gaines, 
Grand Rapids. 

Whiting James S., 26 Ada, Ada. 

Whitlow J. T., 22 Algoma, Rockford. 

Whitmore James, 1 Sparta* Sparta 
Center. 

Whitney |Ethel, 16 Plainfield, Belmont. 



FORT'S WESTERN LINIMENT CURES LAMENESS. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 299 

BROWN & FOSTER, 



DEALERS IN 



I 



Saddlery - Hardware ! 

Carriage and 

* 

Wagon Goods, 



ALSO, 



Manufacturers of Bent Cutter-Stuff, Bent Felloes 

Poles and Shafts, Bent Logging and 

Road Bob-Runners. 

The Place to Buy all manner of Goods needed in Building or 

Repairing Carriages, Buggies, Wagons, Sleighs f 

Cutters and Harness, 

ALSO, 

HOUSE CLOTHING of ALL KINDS 

BLANKETS, NETS, SLEIGH BELLS, WHIPS, LAP ROBES, 
MATS, HORSE COLLARS, &c, &c, 

25 Canal Street, 

Grand Rapids, Mich. 



300 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



WHITNEY EUGENE C, 16 Cannon, 
Cannonsburg. 

Whitney Herman E., 16 Grattan, Grat- 
tan Center. 

Whitney Henry, 8 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

Whitney Job, 2 Byron, North Byron. 

Whitney Leonard, 18 Cascade, Cascade. 

WHITNEY MINDRUS H., 8 Nelson, 
Cedar Springs. 

WHITNEY M. L., Burchville. 

WHITNEY MARTIN, 13 Caledonia, 
Alaska. 

Whitney Solomon, 23 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

Wiiitney Wm. P., 3 Byron, North 
Byron. 

Whitney William E., 16 Cannon, Can- 
nonsburg. 

Whitney Zcrah, 16 Plainfield, Belmont. 

Whit8elt Andrew. Lisbon. 

Whit-sell Samuel, Lisbon. 

WHITWOKTH GRORGE, 17 Algoma, 
Roekford. 

Whittall Thomas, 23 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Whittemore Jemima, 22 Plainfield, 
Austerlitz. 



Wigbtman William, 26 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

Wilbur Hiram H., 22 Gaines, Ham- 
mond. 

Wilcox Ira, 1 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Wild Moses, Lowell. 

WILDER HORACE, Grandville. 

Wilder Joseph, 4 Walker, Indian Creek 

Wilder Marion, Grandville. 

WILEY NATHAN W., 22 Cannon, 
Cannonsburg. 

Wilhelm George, Lowell. 

Wilkerson Sherwood I)., 33 Caledonia, 
Caledonia Station. 

Wilkes George, 22 Oakfield, Oakfield. 

Wilkinson Andrew J., 18 Alpine, Pleas- 
ant. 

Wilkinson Andrew S., 9 Cannon, Rock- 
ford. 

Wilkinson G. A., Rockford. 

Wilkinson Jamas C, 3 Grattan, Grat- 
tan Center. 

Wilkinson James A., 9 Cannon, Rock- 
ford. 

Wilkinson L. II., Rockford. 

WILKINSON OLIVER, 9 Cannon, 
Rockford. 

Wilkins Almeron, 19 Ada, Ada. 

Willard Aaron, 22 Byron, Byron Center 



DISSTON'S CIRCULAR, MILL AND DRAG SAWS, AT W D. FOSTER'S. 



Whitten John, Jr., 7 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

Whitten John, 7 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 

Whitten William, 33 Oakfield, Grattan 
Center. 

Whitters William, 26 Grand Rapids. 

Whitters Robert, 31 Sparta, Lisbon. 

WHITTICUS WILSON, 28 Tyrone, 
Casnovia. 

Whittington George, 22 Plainfield, 
Austerlitz. 

Whittington Levi, 22 Plainfield, Aus- 
terlitz. 

Wickham H. C, Lowell. 

Wickham H. S., Lowell. 

Wickhani William, 25 Vergennes, Lo- 
well. 

Wicks Henry, 24 Algoma, Edgerton. 

Wicks Wm. E., 3 Lowell, Lowell. 

WIHRIG ALLEN, 28 Gaines, Cody's 
Mills. 

Wieland Caleb, 1 Bowne, Alto. 

Wieland Christian, 1 Bowne, Alto. 

Wiggins Culin, 24 Grattan, Grant. 

Wiggins William, 1 Vergennes, Alton. 

Wightman David H., 26 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 



Willard John II., 6 Walker, Berlin. 

Willard Warren, 6 Walker, Berlin. 

Willcox Gardner, 35 Vergennes, Lowell 

Willcoxson James, 34 Ada, Ada. 

Willett Lyman C, 18 Cannon, Rock- 
ford. 

Willett Wm. M., 8 Cannon, Rockford. 

Williams Alonzo, Grandville. 

Williams Chas. A., 1 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

WILLIAMS CHARLES, 1 Wyoming, 
Grand Rapids. 

Williams Edmond II., 7 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Williams Eli, 16 Alpine, Alpine. 

Williams Egbert, Cedar Springs. 

Williams George, 24 Byron, Gainesville 

Williams George, 25 Grattan, Smyrna, 
Ionia County. 

Williams Geo. W. t Alaska Village. 

Williams Gersham II., Alaska. 

Williams George B., Alaska. 

Williams George, 4 Alpine, Lisbon. 

Williams Hiram, 31 Paris, Gr. Rapids. 

Williams Jesse B., 23 Byron, Byron 
Center. 



FORT'S ENEMY OF PAIN CURES NEURALGIA. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



801 



WILLIAMS JACOB C., 23 Byron, 
Byron Center. 

Wiiiiams Joel, 6 Byron, Grandville. 

Williams James W., 22 Vergennes, 
Lowell. 

Williams Jacob, Alaska. 

Williams John C, Lowell. 

Williams John J., 5 Gaines, Grand 
Rapids. 

Williams John A., 5 Gaines, Grand 
Rapids. 

Williams Lewis, 16 Alpine, Alpine. 

Williams Leonard, 1(> Alpine, Alpine. 

Williams Orrin II., 16 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 

Williams Reuben, 28 Alpine, Alpine. 

Williams Smith C, 8 Caledonia, Al- 
aska. 

Williams Silas, 26 Oak field, Ashley. 

Williams Sidney L., 23 Byron, Byron 
Center. 

Williams Thomas R., 5 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Williams Worthy A., 22 Vergennes, 
Lowell. 

Wiiiiams William, 16 Algonia, Rock- 
iord. 

Williams William, 29 Grand Rapids. 

Williams Win. L., 7 Alpine, Pleasant. 



Wilson David A., 33 Vergennes, Lo- 
well. 

Wilson Daniel, 20 Cannon, Canhons- 
burg. 

Wilson Edwin, 8 Spencer, Spencer 
Mills. 

WILSON GEORGE M., 23 Plainfield, 
Austerlitz. 

Wilson George, 3 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

Wilson Henry D., 30 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

Wilson Henry, 26 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

Wilson John, 23 Lowell, Lowell. 

Wilson John C, 19 Alpine, Pleasant. 

Wilson John S., Lowell. 

Wilson Mulunox, 28 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia Station. 

WILSON R. A., Lowell. 

WILSON REUBEN A., 4 Byron, North 
Byron. 

Wilson Thomas, 26 Byron, Cody's 
Mills. 

Wilson William, 26 Plainfield, Auster- 
litz. 

WILSON WM. R., 11 Tyrone, Sparta 
Center. 

Wilson Wm. P., 4 Byron, North Byron. 



TUTTLE'S PATENT CHAMPION CROSS-CUT SAWS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



Williams W. W., 5 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

WILLIAMS U. B., Lowell. 

Williams Zabin, 8 Caledonia, Alaska. 

Williams — , — Alpine, Indiftn Creek. 

Williamson Sylvia, 24 Vergennes, Fal- 
lassburg. 

Williamson Mrs. S., Lowell. 

Wil lough by Herbert, 36 Bowne, Fill- 
more, Barry County. 

Willey Franklin, 33 Wyoming, North 
Byron. 

Wiley George E., 22 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

WILMARTH DARIUS A., 25 Nelson, 
Nelson. 

Wi'son Andrew, 1 Alpine, Englishville. 

Wilson A. A., 18 Walker, Gr. Rapids. 

WILSON ALBERT E., 19 Alpine, 
Pleasant. 

WILSON ANDERSON, 33 Vergennes, 
Lowell. 

WILSON B. G., Lowell. 

Wilson Colvin B., 36 Lowell, Lowell. 

Wilson Chester, 12 Plainfield, Rock- 
ford. 

WILSON CLARK S., 4 Byron, North 
Byron. 



Wilton Thomas, 29 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Wiiton William, 29 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Wiltse Benj., 13 Solon, Cedar Springs. 
Winans Frank M., Lowell. 
Winans John. Lowell. 
WINCHESTER CALVIN, 10 Byron, 

Byron Center. 
Winchester Jerome L., 15 Byron, Byron 

Center. 
Winchester Justus J., 4 Byron, Byron 

Center. 
Winchester John L., 14 Byron, Byron 

Center. 
Winchester Laadau, 10 Byron, Byron 

Center. 
Winchester Lorenzo G., Alaska Village. 
Winchsel Isaac, 30 Oakfield, Oaktield. 
Winchell Justus, 7 Paris, Gr. Rapids. 
WINCHELL MONROE, 12 BoWne, 

Bowne. 
WINEGAR ASIIBEL, 15 Vergennes, 

Lowell. 
Winegar Isaac, Jr., 28 Byron, Byron 

Center. 
Winegar Milton. 28 Byron, Byron Cen. 
WINEGAR R. D., Lowell. 
Wingler John, Lowell. 



FORT'S ENEMY OF PAIN CURES TOOTHACHE, 



302 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Wingler Joseph, 19 Lowell, Lowell: 

Winkler William, 27 Gaines, Cody's 
Mills. 

WINKS CHARLES, 23 Caledonia, 
Caledonia. 

Winks Henry S., 23 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia. 

Winslow Peter, 16 Spencer, Spencer 
Mills. 

Winslow Robert, 10 Spencer, Spencer 
Mills. 

WINSOR JACOB W., 32 Grand Rapids 

Winter Albert, 5 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 

Winters Albert, 20 Spencer, Spencer 
Mills. 

Winters Albert, 11 Cascade, Ada. 

Winters Charles, 2 Plainfleld, Rock- 
lord. 

Winters Freeman, 12 Byron, Gaines- 
ville. 

Winters James, Burehville (Burch's 
Mills.) 

Wirtel Lewis, 22 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

WISE ABRAM. 4 Plainfleld, Belmont. 

Wise Benjamin F., Village Cannons- 
burg. 

W T ise Henrv L., 9 Cascade, Cascade. 

WISE SAMUEL, 27 Algoma, Rockford. 

Wise Samuel, Rockford. 



Wolcott Philo G., 20 Gaines, Gaines- 
ville. 

Wolf Alonzo, 30 Wyoming, Grandville. 

Wolf Baldasar, 30 Byron, Byron Center 

Wolf Jacob, 30 Ryron, Byron Center. 

Wolf Jacob, Jr., 30 Byron, Byron Cen. 

Wolfe Frederick, 4 Oaktield, Oakfield. 

Wolfe Mary E., 16 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

Wolner Julius, 22 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Wolven George E., 29 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 

WOLVEN HARYEY H., 24 Algoma, 
Rockford. 

Wolverlon John C, 20 Spencer, Spencer 
Mills. 

WOOD AMASA, 24 Pans, G. Rapids. 

Wood Abraham, 10 Cascade, Ada. 

WOOD BEVERLY B., 1 Alpine, Eng 
lishville. 

Wood Clinton A., 25 Cascade, Alaska. 

Wood Clayton, 5 Nelson. Sand Lake. 

WOOD De ROY A., 25 Cascade, Alaska 

Wood Francis, 28 Wyoming, Grandville 

Wood Frank A., 25 Cascade, Alaska. 

WOOD G^O. D., 22 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

Wood Harvey J., Alaska. 

Wood Henry. 21 Grand Rapids. 



DETROIT SAFES, FIRE AND BURGLAR PROOF, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



Wiser Joseph, 29 Algoma, Rockford. 

Wisinger Alexander, 12 Bowne, Bowne 

Wismer Henry C, 11 Gaines, Ham- 
mond. 

Wisner Byron B., 26 Cascade, Alaska. 

Wisner M. L., Lowell. 

Wisner Peter S., 26 Cascade, Alaska. 

Wite Gilbert N., 18 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Witbara Jos. G., 1 Oakfield, Green- 
ville. 

Withey Albert, 34 Sparta, Englishville. 

Withey Calvin, 25 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

Withey John H., 3 Cascade, Ada. 

Withey James L., 6 Byron, Grandville. 

Withey Livius, 24 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 

Withey Reuben L., 3 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

WITMER HENRY D., 24 Gaines, Ham- 
mond. 

Witty Jacob, 18 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

WOLCOTT ASA, 10 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

Wolcott George B., 20 Gaines, Grand 
Rapids. 

WOLCOTT JOHN, 20 Gaines, Gaines- 
ville. 



WOOD JOSEPH, 7 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Wood James, Burehville (Burch's 

Mills.) • 
Wood Jedediah II., Lowell. 
WOOD JOHN, 2 Courtland, Cedar 

Springs. 
Wood Granthan, 2 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 
Wood Philo, 24 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Wood Philetus W., 33 Gaines, Cody's 

Mills. 
Wood Sylvester, Alaska. 
Wood Solomon, A' ask a. 
WOOD WM. I., 24 Caledonia, Alaska. 
Wood Win. A., Alaska Village. 
Woodall Alonzo, 7 Spencer, Nelson. 
WOODARD EPHRA1M IL, 7 Walker, 

Grand Rapids. 
Woodbeck John, 2 Oakfield, Greenville 
Woodbury Samuel, 4 Algoma, Cedar 

Springs. 
WOODBURY THOMAS B., 10 Ver- 

gennes, Alton. 
Woodcock John, 26 Vergennes, Lowell. 
Woodell John, 33 Wyoming, Grandville 



FORT'S OINTMENT-A SOVEREIGN REMEDY FOR 



ffltSTOft* Afff> SlfcECfOfcY Oi? KiSlSfT cotrlrt*. 



SOS 



Wood in Eleazer, Burchville (Burcli's 
Mills.) 

WOODIN RUSSELL II., Sparta Center 

Wooding Charles T., Lowell. 

Wooding Jobn, 11 Cascade, Cascade. 

WOODMAN LEWIS C, 4 Walker, In- 
dian Creek. 

Woodman Nathaniel H., Sparta Center 

Woodruff Charles, 16 Grand Rapids. 

Woodruff F. M ., Rockford. 

Woodruff Vol ney, Cedar Springs. 

Woods Andrew, 7 Caledonia, Alaska. 

Woods John, 7 Ada, Grand Rapids. 

Woods John, 1 Wyoming, G. Rapids. 

Woods John H., 11 Gaines, Hammond. 

Woods John E., 11 Gaines, Hammond. 

Woods Thomas, Lowell. 

Woodward Daniel, 2 Gaines, Ham- 
mond. 

WOODWARD GEO. W., 2 Gaines, 
Hammond. 

Woodward R. S., Alaska. 

WOODWARD WM. B., 1 Gaines, 
Hammond. 

Woodworth J. H., 32 Grand Rapids. 

Woodworth Samuel, 32 Plainfield, 
Grand Rapids. 

Woodworth Thomas, 32 Plainfield, 
Grand Rapids. 



WRIGHT EBER K., 35 Lowell, Lowell 
Wright Francis C, 10 Lowell, Lowell. 
Wright Geo. E., 12 Lowell, Lowell. 
Wright Geo. E., 15 Vergennes, Alton. 
Wright Geo. N., 16 Walker, G. Rapids. 
Wright Joseph. 4 Lowell, Lowell. 
Wright John W., Lowell. 
WRIGHT JEREMIAH S., 27 Walker, 

Grand Rapids. 
Wright Leander, 2 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
WRIGHT N. C, 15 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Wright Patrick N., 13 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Wrigut Philander B., 25 Byron, Cody's 

Mills. 
Wright Rigdon, 7 Plainfield, English- 

ville. 
WRIGHT SOLOMON, 33 Alpine, In- 
dian Creek. 
Wright William, Lowell. 
Wright William, 4 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
WRIGHTMAN HENRY C, Village 

Cannonsburg. 
Wunsch Anton, South 1 Ada, Lowell. 
Wunsch Sebastian, South 1 Ada. 
Wurzler Frederick, 11 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 



BAG TIES-SIMPLE,:CHEAP AND EVERLASTING, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



Woolever Henry, 20 Cannon, Austerlitz 

Wooster August W., 21 Grand Rapids. 

Wooster Coon rod, 26 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Worcester Mrs., Lowell. 

Worden Annanias,4 Cannon, Rockford. 

Worden David, 17 Grand Rapids. 

Worden Henry M., 15 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Worden Silas, Lowell. 

Worden Wilson M., 27 Vergennes, 
Lowell. 

Wornica Mrs. Malvina, 31 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Wride Anderson, 32 Ada, Ada. 

Wnde James C, 6 Cascade, Cascade. 

Wride Joseph, 6 Cascade, Cascade. 

Wride Mrs. Malinda. 31 Ada, Ada. 

Wright Adelbert, 4 Lowell, Lowell. 

Wright Anson, 2 Wyoming, G. Rapids. 

WRIGHT BENJ. B., 14 Bowne, Lowell 

Wright Benjamin, 3 Lowell, Lowell. 



Wykes James, 10 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Wykes John P., 10 Paris, Grand Rapids 

Wylie George P., 17 Grand Rapids. 

WYLIE H. C, 33 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

WYLIE HENRY H., 28 Tyrone, Cas- 
novia. 

Wvlie Wm. D., Sparta Center. 

WYLIE WM. M., 17 Grand Rapids. 

Wvman Daniel, 24 Solon, Cedar Springs 

WYMAN DANIEL G., Cedar Springs. 

WYMAN JOHN R., 23 Algoma, Edger- 
ton. 

Wyman Lafayette M., 16 Lowell, Lo- 
well. 

Wyman 0. C, Cedar Springs. 

Wyman Samuel J., 27 Vergennes, Lo- 
well. 

WYNNE DANIEL, 19 Vergennes, 
Vergennes. 

Wynne Thomas, 19 Vergennes, Ver- 
gennes. 



GALLS AND SORES OH HORSES. 



804 



HisTOltf Affb totBEdtofelr of fcEtt* <56tJttf¥. 



Y 



Yagle Frank, 27 Alpine, Gr. Rapids. 

Yale George W., 8 Paris, Gr. Rapids. 

Yale Welcome, 8 Paris, Gr. Rapids. 

Yanson Charles, 21 Paris, Gr. Rapids. 

Yateman William, 29 Bowne, Harris 
Creek. 

Yates Mrs. Ilettte, Cedar Springs. 

Yeiter David, 20 Lowell, Lowell. 

Yeiter Ered'k 27 u " 

Yeiter Fred., jr., 20 Lowell, Lowell. 

Yeiter Jacob, 22 " " 

Yeiter John, 29 " «• 

YENORE MOSES, south 4 Walker, 
Grand Rapids. 

Yeomans Elliott, 31 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

Yeomans Eli, 31 Wyoming, Grandville. 

YEOMANS ERASTUS, 32 Wyoming, 
Grandville. 

Yeomans Levi, 32 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

Yerkes Anthony. 22 Vergennes, Lowell. 

Yerkes Edward W., 11 Lowell, Lowell. 



YOUELL JOHN, 29 Grand Rapids. 
Young Darwin, 3t> Gaines, Caledonia 

Station. 
Young Daniel^ 27 Solon, Cedar Springs. 
Young Eiihu It., 30 Courtiand, Rock- 
ford. 
YOUNG GEORGE, 33 Grand Rapids. 
Young John, 10 Cannon, Bostvvick 

Lake. 
Young John, 32 Byron, Byron Center. 
Young Jacob, Lowell. 
Young T. E., 32 Grand Rapids. 
Young Vachel I)., Lowell. 

Young , 5 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Young William C, 10 Cannon, Can- 

nonsburg. 
YOUNG ZEBULON, 30 Courtiand, 

Rockford. 
Youngblood Daniel, 8 Algoma, Sparta 

Center. 
YOUNGBLOOD JAMES, 8 Algoma, 

Sparta Center. 



LETTERS FOR MARKING BAGS AND SHEEP, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



Yerkes William, Lowell. 

YODER JOSEPH, 13 Bowne, Lowell. 

YODER STEPHEN, 11 Bowne, Lo- 
well. 

Yokum P. F., 29 Grand Rapids, Grand 
Rapids. 

Yonge Henry, 10 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

Yongson Rasmus, 2 Oakfield, Green- 
ville. 

Yonkers Andrew, 7 Sparta, Lisbon. 

York Joseph, 2 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Yost Jacob, 27 Alpine, Indian Creek. 



Youngblood Thomas N., Algoma, 

Sparta Center. 
Youngs Eli, 32 Byron. Byron Center. 
Youngs Edward, 22 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Youngs Fayette E., 20 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
Yonngs James E., 32 Byron, Byron 

Center. 
Youngs James T., 14 Lowell, Lowell. 
Youngs Philip, 31 Byron, New Salem. 
Youngs T. Newton, 32 Byron, Byron 

Center. 



Zelner Aaron, 25 Bowne, Bowne. 

Zelner Aaron, 12 Gaines, Hammond. 

ZELNElt JOHN, 12 Gaines, Ham- 
mond. 

Zelner Samuel, 12 Gaines, Hammond. 

Ziegenfuss Charles, 21 Oaktield, Oak- 
field. 

IZiegenfuss David, 13 Oakfieid, Green- 
ville. 



ZIEGENFUSS HANNAH, 13 Oakfield, 
Greenville. 

ZIMMEIt GEORGE, 6 Byron, Grand- 
ville. 

Zimmerman George A., 32 Courtiand, 
Rockford. 

Zimmerman Paul, 32 Courtiand, Rock- 
ford. 



FORT'S ENEMY OF FAIN CURES COLIC. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



305 



CLASSIFIED BUSINESS DIRECTORY OP ADVERTISERS 



ADA VILLAGE. 

BRIDGEBUILDER. 

Jared N. Bresee. 

DRUGGIST. 

Charles K. Gibson. 

COOPER. 
Bethel Bristol. 

GROCERIES. 

John R. Robinson. 

MASON. 

Manson Miller. 

MECHANIC. 

Andrew G. Livergood. 

MERCHANT MILLER. 

John R. Bradtield. 

MILLERS. 

William Bennett. 
John Kemp. 

WAGON MAKER. 

Edward Davie. 

ALASKA VILLAGE. 

BLACKSMITH. 

A. D. Hembling. 

BOOTS ANB SHOES. 
Josiah Irons. 

CARPENTERS AND JOINERS. 
John L. Hopkins. 
Cyrus Hull. 

CARRIAGES AND WAGONS-<Manu- 
facturer of.) 

B. E. Richards. 

DRY GOODS AND GROCERIES. 
Beamer & Haviland. 

FLOURING MILL. 
J. W. Boynton. 

FURNITURE MANUFACTURERS. 
Van Every <fe Bellows. 

FURNITURE— (Wholesale.) 
L. W. Fisher. ^ 

GENERAL STORE. 

8. T. Colson & Co, 
19 



HARDWARE AND TIN. 

Kniffin & Proctor. 

HOTEL. 
William II. Lock. 

JUSTICE OF THE PEACE* 

Hugh B. McAlister. 

MASON AND PLASTERER. 

Sylvester K. Hickey. 

MERCHANT TAILOR. 
John Martin. 

MEAT MARKET. 

Horace S. NcSvson. 

MILLINER AND DRESSMAKER. 

Miss E. It. Newson. 

MILLWRIGHT AND DEALER IN 
TUKBINtt WATER WHEELS. 

E. D. Alden. 

PAINTING—PLAIN AND ORNA- 
MENTAL. 

Daniel R. Fox. 

PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS. 

George Fox. 
Isaac B. Malcolm. 

POSTMASTER. 
Warren S. Hale. 

PH OTOG R APHER. 
G. F. Hull. 

SURVEYOR AND ENGINEER. 
Robert S. Jackson. 

SAW MILL. 

L. W. Fisher, proprietor. 

BOWSE TOWNSHIP. 

WAGON-MAKER. 

Jno. M. Dillinger, at Thomas 1 Mills. 

CANNON TOWNSHIP. 

APIARIST. 

JAMES PLANK. Section 8. (See 
Advertisement page 181.) 
DAIRY-KEEPER. 

Lorenzo D. Hoag. Section 23. 



306 



HISTOEY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 



MASON. 

Richard Bruner. Secticn 12. 

MERCHANTS. 

Ira Ellis, Cannonsburg. 

MERCHANT MILLERS. 

8. Chase & Son, Cannonsburg. 
WAGON MAKERS. 

Edward Davie. Section 7. 
Loren Brink, Cannonsburg. 

CASNOVIA. 

GENERAL STORES. 

A. C. AYRES. (See Advertisement.) 
R. H. TOPPING. (See Advertise- 
ment.) 

MILON L. SQUIER. (See Adver- 
tisement. 

HOTEL. 
J. Tuxbury. 

PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON. 
R. H. Colburn. 

CEDAR SPRINGS. 

DRUGGISTS. 

V. Hayes. 
H. C. Russell. 
Fessell & Hayes. 

GENERAL STORES. 

Goldsborough & McLouth. 
G. M. Stoddard. 
Stiles Brothers. 

GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS. 

Isaac M. Clark. 
C. Pelton. 

HOTELS. 

B. Fairchild. 

National, C. W. Denison, proprietor. 

LIVERY. 

Theodore Phelps. 

* LUMBER, Etc. 

Jacob Cummer. 
Morris & Johnson. 

C. Pelton. 
Salisbury & Co. 

NOTARY PUBLIC. 

B. Fairchild. 

PHYSICIANS. 

E. T. Chester. 
V. Hayes. 
Fessell & Hayes. 

SALOON— (Ice Cream and' Eating.) 

E. A. Straub. 



SALOON— (Billiard and Bowling.) 

Lewis N. Price. 

SHINGLES, Etc. 

Goldsborough & McLouth. 
Salisburv & Co. 

C. Pelton. 

STAVES, Etc. 

Richards & Sharer. 

GAINES TOWNSHIP. 

GRAIN MERCHANTS. 

Woodward & Buckingham — Ham- 
mond Station. 

GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS. 

W. W. Pierce — Hammond Station. 

SAW MILL. 

Wm. R. Pursel, proprietor, section 18. 
GRANDVILLE. 

BLACKSMITH. 

D. C. Britton. 

BOOTS AND SHOES, HIDES, AC. 

C. J. Rogers 
J. W. Furman. 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 

A. J. Dunham. 

DRUGS. 

A. J. Dunham. 

FLOUR, FEED, «fco. -- MANUFAC- 
TURER AND DEALER. 

H. 0. Weston. 

GENERAL STORES. 

Shoemaker & McCoy. 
Silas Powell. 
Daniel J. Mull. 
Haven & Mclnroy. 

GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS. 

J. A. Knowles. 

HOTEL. 
John Ellis. 

HARNESS. 

J. W. Furman. 

PHYSICIAN A SURGEON. 

A. H. Weston. 

GRAND RAPIDS TOWN- 
SHIP. 

HOTEL. 



Delos Drew, (Lake House.) 



HISTORY AKD DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



807 



H. C. STEPHENSON, 

Homoeopathic Physician & Surgeon, 

Manufacturer and Wholesale Dealer in 

Stephenson's Patent Trusses and Supporters. 

Residence—First House Nortn of Union School. Office— 2d Floor, 2d Door 

East of Bank, 

- - - MICHIGAN. 



LOWELL, - - - 

R V. & P. N. POX, 

State Agents of the 

Mutual Benefit Life Ins. Co., 

OF NEWARK, N. J., 
For Mlonlgarx and Wisconsin. 
City National Bank Building, 

GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 



Merchants Insurance Company 



OF CHICAGO. 



_CO 

CD 
CO H 
CO a 

< 

sz g 

CO 

cd 




CO 

w 

W 



'13 

Dwelling Houses and Farm Property Insured against Fire 

and Lightning for a Term of Years, at Low Rates. 
SOLICITORS /vsT-AltfTSID. 



308 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



O RATTAN CENTER. 

Cheese Manufacturer. 
Cass B. Madison. 

Cabinet Maker. 
J. A. Adams & Bros. 

Miller. 
J. A. Adams & Bros. 

Wagon Makers. 
J. A. Adams & Bros. 
Robert Douglass. 

KELLOGG VILLE. 

Manufacturer and Dealer in 
Wilkins' & Plumb's Patent 
Spring Bed Bottoms. 

EDGAR M. THOMAS. (See adver- 
tisemrnt, page 147.) 

LOWELL VILLAGE. 

Barber. 
John Romig. 

Chairs— (Manufacturer of.) 
JOHN KOPF. (See advertisement, 

page 177. 

Groceries. 

John Giles. 

U. B. WILLIAMS. (See advertise- 
ment.) 

ROBINSON, CHAPIN & CO. (See 
advertisement.) 

Lawyer. 

J..M. Mathewson. 

Fort's Western Medicine Man- 
ufacturing Company. 
^ M. FORT, Secretary. 



J 



>- Nursery. 



NOAH,P. TIUSTED. (See advertise- 
ment,*gage 177.) 

Physician and Surgeon. 
J. Howard Smith. 

OAKFIELD TOWNSHIP. 

General Stores. 

D. V. Emmons, Oakfield Center. 
H. A. Rowley, Oakfield Center. 
Chester A. Lillie, section 3. 

Physician. 
Abraham Slaughter. 

Shingles. 
Cheater A. Lillie, section 3. 



ROCKFORD VILLAGE. 

Clothing. 
Peter S. Teller. 

Drugs. 
H. H. Shackelton. 
C. E. Biakeley. 

Furniture. 
W. B. JOHNSON. See Advertise- 
ment. 

General Store. 
John J. Ely. 

Hotels. 
AMERICAN HOUSE, SMITH LAP- 
HAM Proprietor. See Advertise- 
ment. 

Lawyer. 

John F. Loase. 

Saw Mill. 
George French. 

Watchmaker and Jeweler. 

R L. Dockera}'. 

SPARTA TOWNSHIP. 

Boots and Shoes. 
Thomas Creamer, Sparta Center. 

Carriages and Wagons. 
Blomstrom & Gramberg, Lisbon. 

Drugs. 
Drs. C. E. & S. J. Koon, Lisbon. 
General Stores. 

R. II. Woodin, Sparta Center. 
T. D. Barnes, Lisbon. 
Chubb & Thurston, Lisbon. 

Grist Mill. 
Washington Heath, Lisbon. 

Harness. 
J. J. Smith & Co., Lisbon. 

Hotels. 
Jno. M. Balcom, Sparta Center. 

Notary Public. 
Jno. M. Balcom, Sparta Center. 

VERGENNES TOWNSHIP. 

Blacksmith. 
George W. Fullington, Alton. 

Farmer. 
Orlin Douglass, Fallassburg. 

Miller. 
Thomas B. Woodbury, Alton. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 309 

JOS. EMMER, Jr., 

Carriage, Wagon & Sign Painting, 

No. 14, Cor. Kent and Bronson Sts., GRAND RAPIDS. 

MISS O. MC'RAE, 

CLOAK & DRESS MAKSKGo 

All Kinds of Work ill tbis line solicited. 

No. 33 Canal Streot, Central Block, Grand Rapids. 

DR. E. H. CUMMINGS, 

Homoepathic Physician and Surgeon. 

No. 10 Canal Street, GRAND RAPIDS, MICH, 

Especial attention given to I hronic Diseases. Address Box 291. 

CLAUSON O. BUDINGT ON, 

JUSTICE OF THE PEACE. 

Office, Corner of Canal & Erie Sts., G^\TO ~&V?Y»S. 

MEZZOTINT PHQTQGftAFHS, 

(Patented July 16th, 1867.) 
THE EXCLUSIVE RIGHT to make these charming Pictures, in Grand 
Rapids, has just been granted to the undersigned, during the existence of the 
patent. Specimens may be seen at the 

tWW TOEK GALLERY, 

iKTo. 34 Oanal Street, 

Hiss Nellie Lankester & Sister, 



Ladies' Bonnets, Ribbons. Flowers, &c, always on hand. 

No. 59 Monroe Street, up stairs, 

GRAND RAPIDS, - - MICHIGAN. 



310 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



WALKER TOWNSHIP. 

Blacksmith. 

James Roy. 

Groceries. 

SEYMOUR & WAITE, Mill Creek. 
See Advertisement. 

Wagon Maker. 

A. D. Pattee, Indian Creek. 

WYOMING TOWNSHIP. 
Nursery. 

Taylor & White, Grandville road. 

CITY OF GRAND RAPIDS. 
Agricultural Implements. 

W. C. DENISON, 104 Monroe street. 

(See advertisement.) 
G. R. Manufacturing company, 41 

Canal street. (See advertisement.) 

Architect 

DAVID S. HOPKINS, 26 Canal street. 
(See advertisement.) 

Attorney. 

C. J. POTTER, 24 Canal street. (See 
advertisement.) 

Banks. 

CITY NATIONAL BANK, 1 Monroe 
street. (See advertisement.) 

D. L. LATOURETTE, opposite Post 
Office. (See advertisement.) 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK, corner 
Canal and Pearl streets. (See ad- 
vertisement.) 

Baskets and Chairs— (Manufacturer 
of.) ' 

LOUIS HERRMANN, Division street, 
three doors south Union Brewery. 
(See advertisement.) 

Blacksmiths. 

KINNEY & MITCHELL, near corner 
Bridge and Canal streets. (See ad- 
vertisement.) 

Booksellers and Stationers. 

CURRIER & PUTNAM, 15. Monroe 
street. (See advertisement.) 

EATON & LYON, 22 Canal street. 
(See advertisement.) 

Boots and Shoes— (Wholesale and 
Retail.) 

L. J. RINDGE & CO., 14 Canal street. 

(See advertisement.) 
LOOMIS & BROWN, 30 Canal street. 

(See advertisement.) 



COLE & BROTHER, 20 Canal street. 

(See advertisement.) 

Boots and Shoes— (Wholesale.) 

SMITH, MOSELY & CO., 17 Canal 
street, up stairs. (See advertise- 
ment.) 

Business College and Telegraphic 
Institute. 

SWENSBERG & ROB BINS, proprie- 
tors, Luce's block. (See advertise- 
ment.) 

Carriages, Buggies, Sleighs, Etc. 

A. WOOD, 33 Waterloo street. (See 
advertisement. 

GEO. C. FITCH, 134 and 136 Divi- 
sion street. (See advertisement.) 

Carriage and Wagon Goods, Etc. 

BROWN & FOSTER, 25 Canal street. 

(See advertisement.) 

Clothing. 

C. BURCHARD, foot of Monroe street. 

(See advertisement.) 
E. M. KENDALL, 19 Monroe street. 

(See advertisement.) 
KRECKEL & SCHRODER, 101 Canal 

street (See advertisement.) 

Confectionery, Etc. 

S. G. KETCHAM, Bridge street, 
(West Side.) (See advertisement.) 

PUTNAM BROTHERS & CO., 20 
Monroe street. (See advertisement.) 

L. A. HALL, 14 Front street. (See 
advertisement.) 

Crockery. 

H. LEONARD & SON, 13 Monroe 
street. (See advertisement.) 

SOUTHWICK & WRIGHT, 44 Monroe 
street. ^See advertisement.) 

Bentists. 

W. P. BARKER, 65 Monroe street. 

(See advertisement.) 
R. BUTTON, 34 Canal street. (See 

advertisement.) 
R. J. HUMPHREY, 11 Monroe street. 

(See advertisement.) 
E. S. HOLMES, 18 Monroe street. 

(See advertisement.) 

Boors, Sash, Blinds, Etc. 

NICHOLS & NAYSMITH, 28 Mill 
street. (See advertisement.) 

WM. II. & E. K. POWERS, Water 
street. (West Side.) (See adver- 
tisement. 



fllSTOUT AND DIRECTOR.* OF KENT COtJlTCY. Sll 

» ■ ., „ , — r . . ■ ■. ' — . .. . . -*■ .1 ' .i. i .- 

CHARLES J. POTTER, 

Attorney, Counselor and Solicitor, 

Office, Vo. 24 Canal Street, 

GRAND RAPIDS, - MICHIGAN. 

VALLEY CITY FILE WORKS, 

(OPPOSITE LEITELT'S MACHINE SHOP,) 

Erie Street, Grand TH.eLj£>±c3Lmm 

FILE RE-CUTTING IN ALL ITS BRANCHES. B^""NEW FILES FOR SALE. 

WM. COX & CO. 

VALLEY CITY PAINT SHOP. 

Painting, Glazing, Graining, Paper Hanging, Kalsomining, 

&c. Also, can be found at all times, a good assortment of 



^ W*+J*> 



&A.f»H. FURNI8HED REAJOY OLAZEO. 

JAMES PATTERSON, 
No- 10 Bronson Street, (up stairs,) GRAND RAPIDS. 

A. B. MoQUEWAN. W. J. LONG. G. H. LONG. 

A. B. LONG d SONS, 

Keystone JSet,\7cr Mills, 

MANUFACTURERS OF AND DEALERS IN 

LUMBER, LATH, SHINGLES AND PICKETS. 

Office at the Mill, West Side, near Detroit aud Milwaukee E. R. Depot, 

P. O. DRAWER 2549. (jT JtlA JN 1J JtvAJrl-Do. 

Michigan House, 

Corner Louis and Justice Streets, 

GRAND RAPIDS, - - - - MICHIGAN. 



Charges Moderate, 



#« NASC^t-15, ^Proprietor* 



312 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 



Drain Tile. 

H. LEONARD & SON, 13 Monroe 
street. (See advertisement.) 

Drugs, Medicines, Etc. 

E. B. ESCOTT, 57 Canal street. (See 

advertisement.) 
GEO. M. STUART, Bridge street, 

(West Side.) (See advertisement.) 
WILLIAM THUM, 92 Canal street. 

(See advertisement.) 
STEKETEE & KIMM, 67 Monroe 

street. (See advertisement.) 
JAMES GALLUP, 6 Canal street. 

(See lines.) 

Dry Goods. 

W. L. WILK1NS & CO., 54 Monroe 
street. [See advertisement.] 

VOIGT & HERPOLSHEIMER, 41 
Monroe street. [See advertisement.] 

C. B. ALLYN, 68 and 70 Monroe 
street. [See advertisement.] 

SPRING & AVERY, 48 Monroe street. 
[See advertisement.] 

D. L. NEWBORG, 46 Canal street. 
[See advertisement.] 

Foundries. 

GEORGE STANG, River street, [West 
Side.] [See advertisement.] 

BUTTERWORTH & LOWE, Huron 
street. [See advertisement.] 

Frame Factory. 

G. W. LEMuN, 71 Canal street. [See 
advertisement.] 

Furnishing Goods. 

J. E. & W. S. EARLE, 89 Monroe 
street. [See advertisement.] 

Furniture. 

NELSON, MATTER & CO., 29 and 
31 Canal street. [See advertise- 
ment.] 

J. P. CREQUE, 69 Canal street. [See 
advertisement.] 

Groceries. 

JOHN E.TOOHER, Coldbrook street. 
[See advertisement.] 

B1RGE & SOMERS, 35 Monroe street. 
[See advertisement.] 

A. J. ROSE, corner Court and Bridge 
streets, [West Side.] [See adver- 
tisement.] 

ALBERT & KRUPP, 86 Canal street. 
[See advertisement.] 

P. KUSTERER, 100 Canal street. [See 
advertisement.] 



GEO. H. SOULE, 234 South Division 
street. [See advertisement.] 

PETER C. SHrCKELL, corner Front 

and Leonard streets, West Side. 

(See Advertisement.) 
N. RINGELBERG, 159 Ottawa st. 

(See advertisement.) 
JOSEPH FiNOKLER, 104 Canal st. 

(See advertisement.) 
P. SCHENKELBERG, 13 Front st., 

West Side. (See advertisement.) 
S. C. SMITH, 71 Monroe street. (See 

advertisement.) 

Hardware. 

W. D. FOSTER, 14 and 16 Monroe 

TUCKER & ROGERS, 33 and 35 
Canal street. (See advertisement.) 

FERDINAND SCHEUFLER & SON, 
Corner Canal and Bridge streets. 
(See advertisement.) 

narness, Trunks, etc. 

C. J. KRUGER & Co., 72 Monroe 
street. (See advertisement.) 

FRANK MATT1SON, 67 Canal street. 
(See advertisement.) 

Hats, Caps, <fcc. 

PERRY Bros., 11 Monroe street. (See 
advertisement.) 

Hotels. 

National Hotel. (See advertisement.) 
Eagle Hotel. " " 

Rathbun House. " " 

Michigan House. " " 

House-builders. 

FRANC ILLO HALL, Water street, 

West Side. (See advertisement.) 
A. D. BORDEN & Co., Front street, 

West Side. (See advertisement.) 
GRADY & SMITH, Canal street, 

opposite Kent Woolen Mills. (See 

advertisement.) 

Fire Insurance. 

SINCLAIR Bros. & Co., 9 Canal st. 
See advertisement. 

SKINNER & WARD, City National 
Bank building. (See advertise- 
ment.) 

CROSBY & SON, 13 Canal street. (See 
Advertisement.) 

S. O. KINGSBURY, corner Canal 
and Pearl streets. (See advertise- 
ment.) 

H. E. DEWEY, 1 } Leppig's block. (Se© 
advertisement.) 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 813 

JOHN A. RUSCHE, 

Shoemaker, Hide and Felt Dealer. 

(S3B He Sells Cheap and Buys Dear. Cor* Monroe and Division Stm. 9 

G. S. DEANE & SON, 

Manufacturers and Dealers in all kinds of 

^Agricultural Implements and Machinery. 

Ware Rooms, Corner Canal and Bridge Sts. Foundry on Canal, (East side,) 

D. L. NEWBORG, 

Dealer in 

FOREIGN & DOMESTIC 

Dry Goods! 

Notions and Hosiery. 

Country Merchants Supplied at Chicago Prices. 

M*o. 4s Canal cfe St Pearl Street, 

LoveWa Block, 

GRAND RAPIDS,- - - MICHIGAN. 

F. I*. GUILDS, 

P^blis^ers* ISeaoral JLgoat 



FOR 



First-Class Books and Engravings. 

CSrXTAxaca. ^L*\j£>l<3.&, Mioh. 

|3F~A few active Agents wanted to take orders for <4 H*.l s' Guide Bof rd to 
Health, Peace and Competence" — the best selling book of the day. We of.er 
superior inducements, and experienced Agents find our work the most acceptallf 
of any in the field. 
40 



S14 



HISTORY AND DIREOTOltY OF KENT COUNTY. 



W. P. INNES, 81 Moaroe street (See 
advertisement.) 

HOLfcEN, BATES & Co., City Na- 
tional Bank building. (See adver- 
tisement.) 

SHINKMAN & JENKS, 24 Canal 
street. (See advertisement.) 

Life Insurance. 

CROSBY & SON, 13 Canal street. 
(See Advertisement.) 

8. O. KINGSBURY, corner Canal 
and Pearl streets. (See advertise- 
ment.) 

J. QUINTUS, Justice street, near 
Monroe. (See advertisement.) 

HOLDEN BATES & Co., City Na- 
tional Bank building. (See adv.) 

SINCLAIR BROS.& Co., 9 Canal 
street. [See adv.] 

H. MORGAN & SON, Leonard's 
Block. (See advertisement.) 

Iron Works. 

BUTTERWORTH & LOWE, Huron 
street. (See advertisement.) 

Jewelers, etc. 

S. D. PARKS, 15 Monroe street. (See 

advertisement.) 
E. B. DIKEMAN, 26 Canal street. 

(See advertisement.) 
E. G. EATON, 7 Canal street. (See 

advertisement.) 
J. C. HERKNER, 7 Monroe street. 

(See advertisement.) 

Justice of the Peace. 

C. 0. BUDINGTON, corner Canal 
and Erie streets. (See advertise- 
ment. 

Lime. 

W. H. CONGDON, 49 Canal street. 

(See advertisement.) 
JNO. HILL, 53 Canal street. (See 

advertisement.) 

livery. 

J. M. KENNEDY, corner Fountain 
and Greenwich streets. (See ad- 
vertisement.) 

C. L. IVES, Kent street. (See adver- 
tisement.) 

Lumber. 

C. C. COMSTOCK. (See advertise- 
ment.) 

L. H. WITHEY, corner Fountain 
and Greenwich streets. (See adver- 
tisement.) 



EOBINSON, SOLOMON & Co., cor- 
ner Canal and Trowbridge streets. 
(See advertisement.) 

A. B. LONG & SONS. (See adver- 
tisement.) 

Machinists. 

J. C. SIMONDS, 26 Waterloo street. 
(See advertisement.) 

A. LEITELT & BRO. [See advertise- 
ment] 

Marble Works. 

BARR & LIESVELD, 63 Monroe 
street. [See advertisement.] 

J. M. & H. C. RAMSEY, near cor. 
Pearl and Canal sts. (See adv.) 

Millinery. 

Mrs. E. ANTRIM, 57 Monroe street. 
[See advertisement.] 

MISS NELLIE LANKESTER & SIS- 
TER, 59 Monroe Street. [See ad- 
vpi*fcispropnt "1 

MISS C. McRAE, 33 Canal street. 
[See advertisement.] 

Oculist. 

MRS. ALMA CROSS, Greenwich st. 
(See advertisement.) 

Organs, Melodeons, Pianos, etc. 

EMPIRE ORGAN CO., 65 Monroe 

street. [See advertisement] 

A. J. MITCHELL, 26 Canal street. 
(See advertisement.) 

Painter— (Portrait and Landscape.) 

R. S. MERRILL, 19 Monroe street. 
[8ee advertisement.] 

Paints and Painting. 

RIDELL & CO., Huron street. [See 
advertisement.] 

J. PATTERSON, 10 Bronson Btreet. 
[See advertisement.] 

JOSEPH EMMER, Jr., corner Kent 
and Bronson streets. [See adver- 
tisement.] 

Photographers. 

WYKES, 48 Monroe street. [See 

advertisement.] 
FRED. HEATH, 23 Monroe street. 

[See advertisement.] 
L. A. MERRILL, 18 Canal street. 

[See advertisement.] 
J. H. TOMPKINS, 34 Canal street. 

[See advertisement.] 
O. W. HORTON, Leonard's block, 

Monroe street. [See advertisement.] 



HI8T0BY AND MRBOTOBY 0* MOT COUKTY. 



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HISTORY AKD BIBECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Physicians. 

Dr. K. J. AI KIN, first stairs, north 

Sweet's Hotel. [See advertisement.] 
Dr. E. WOODRUFF, 87 Canal street. 

[See advertisement.] 
Db*. HUNT & HOYT, Monroe street. 

[See advertisement.] 
Dr. E. H. CUMMING, 10 Canal street. 

[See advertisement.] 

Plaster. 

G. R. PLASTER CO., 11 Canal 
gtreet. [See advertisement.] 

Printing— Job. 

JOHN BOLE, corner Canal and Pearl 
streets, third floor. [See advertise- 
ment.] 

Real Estate Agents. 

CROSBY & SONS, 13 Canal street. 
[See advertisement.] 

S. 0. KINGSBLTRY, corner Canal and 
Pearl streets. [See advertisement.] 

W. P. TNNES, 81 Monroe street. [See 
advertisement.] 

Sewing Machines. 

JOHN FOX (repairer) 125 Monroe 
street. [See advertisement.] 

GEO. F. OWEN, 27 Monroe street. 
[See advertisement.] 

G. L. FRETTS, 7 and 9 Monroe street. 
[See advertisement.] 

Stencil Establishment. 

A. F. De VINNEY, 57 Canal street. 
[See advertisement.] 



Undertaker. 

J. H. FARWELL, 26 Lyon street. 
[See advertisement.] 

Variety Store. 

F. LEOTTGERT, 16 Canal street. 
[See advertisement.] 

Wagon Manufactories. 

WM. HARRISON, 46 Front street, 
(West Side), and Mill street, (East 
Side.) [See- advertisement.] 

A. WOOD, 33 Waterloo street. [See 
advertisement.] 

CHAS. A. BISSONETTE, 42 Bridge 
street, (West Side.) [See advertise- 
ment.] 

JOSEPH EMMER, corner Bronson 
and Kent streets. [See advertise- 
ment.] 

FIEBIG & RATHMANN, 221 Canal 
street. [See advertisement.] 

F. OSTERLE & CO., Canal street, 
three doors north of Bridge street. 
[See advertisement.] 

Wall Paper, Picture Frames, Ac. 

REID & SMITH, Monroe street, 
under the Rathbun House. [See 
advertisement.] 

War Claim Agents. 

SKINNER & WARD. City National 
Bank building. 

Yankee Xotions--(Wholesale.) 

TYLER, GRAHAM & CO., 19 Canal 
street. [See advertisement.] 



NOV 9- ms 



■<* :<■* ^■■:-;$^**& 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KESNT OOTJN1Y. 



m 



JOHN WIDOE, 

MERCHANT TAILOR, 



JlIVO HEADER II* 



(Hotting, 

HATS, CAPS & GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS 

61 Canal Street, 

Opposite Bronson House, - GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 



Snow's Great Catarrh Remedy, 

THE GREATEST DISCOVERY OF THE AGE. " 

• ^» — m , 

A certain and speedy cure for that fearful disease— CATARRH— is guaranteed in every case where the 
Catarrh Powder is fairly tested. It is yet in its infancy, but hundreds have been permanently ' cured 
and are ever ready to speak loudly in praise of this great remedy. ' 

It Cures Bronchitis, Colds in the Head, or Nervous Headache. 

We, the undersigned, do unhesitatingly recommend the CATARRH POWDER a« the best known 
remedy for Catarrh, Bronchitis, Cold in the Head, Nervous Headache and the Respiratory Organs : 



C. L. Henderson, M. D., Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Henry Jewett, Stationer, etc., " 

I. L. Crittenden, Clothier, " 

E. B. Judd, Hardware Dealer, " 

E. D. Burr, Editor Daily Sun, " 

M. Taggart, Counselor at Law, " 

Col. A. T. McReynolds, Att'y at Law, " 

M. P. Young, Oswego, 111. 

Mrs. H. T. Thompson, Aurora, 111. 

C. D. Lyon, Bookseller, etc., Grand Rapids, Mich. 

J. F. Godfroy, Retired Merchant, " 

Benj. Luce. Real Estate Broker, «' 

Canton Smith, Esq., " 

J. H. Morgan, Dentist, " 

H. M. Hinsdill, Wholesale Stationer, " 



J. F. Grove, M. D., Grand Rapids, Mich. 

N. D. Carpenter, Hardware Dealer, " 
A. B. Turner, Ed. Eagle and P. M. •« 
Eben Smith, Circuit Court Commiss'r, " 
Julius Houseman. (Houseman, May & Co., " 
J. F. Nelson, Bookseller and Stationer, '« 

Miss E. Murdock, Oswego, I1L 
Mrs. H. 0. Hopkins, " 

J. B. Hopkins, Bridesbury, Pa. 
A. Preusser, Jeweler, etc., Grand Rapids, Mioh. 
W. S. Earle, Merchant, " " 

Thompson Sinclair, Justice of the Peace, " 
H. B. Strong, Tobacconist, Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Hon. W. H. Ramsey, ex-State Comptroller, 
Wisconsin. 



Price, jEMJCty Oonts per Bottle, 

Sent by mail to all parts of the United States, on receipt of price and 3-cent stamp. 

McCONNELL, LACEY «fc CO., Proprietors, 

* ^ ^ ^ , „ (SUCCESSORS TO JOHN SNOW,) 

Office, Ko. 12 Canal Street, 

General Depot, 60 Canal St., 



Grand Rapfcf?, ffiteh. 



HUftLBHX & £DSALL, Wholesale Agents, 32 Lake ^t.. Cnicairo, Illinois. 
SOLD BY ALL FIRST-CLASS DRUGGISTS. ■ • » • •»• 






f^ HISTORY AKP .DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



nr. f f ' «r, , 



STEKETEE & KIMM, 

MANUFACTURERS AND PROPRIETORS OF 

STEKETEE & KIMM'S FAM ILY MEDICINES. 

limm'sj Anti-Bilious Root and Plant Pills 

WILL CURE ALL 

LIVER COMPLAINTS, 



AND ACT ON THE 

GENERAL DISABILITY OF THE SYSTEM. 

THEY ALSO PURIFY THE BLOOD. 

As a Medicine for Curing all Biliousness, these Pills cannot be surpassed. As a Cathartic Pill, no pill 
of any description can equal Kimm's within the United States. One of these Pills will operate quicker 
than three or four of any other kind, and we warrant said Pills FREE FROM CALOMEL OR JALAP. 

Reasons why they are so much Better than all others. 

And why they operate so much quicker than other pills, is because we purchase the roots and plants in 
bulk, and pulverize the medicine ourselves, instead of compounding them of medicines mixed up of 
articles substituted in place of the genuine articles. Thousands of names we could attach to the above 
if necessary. Be sure and ask for 

KIMM'S ANTI-BILIOUS ROOT AND PLANT PILLS. 

13*- None are genuine unless signed by STEKETEE k KIMM. Beware of counterfeits. 

M. B. KIMM, Chemist, 

STEKETEE & KTMM, Sole Proprietors, 67 Monroe-St., 

GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 



STEKETEE & KIMM'S 

Holland Stomach Bitters, 

These Bitters are good for all diseases arising from a derangement of the stomach. As/i corrective it can- 
not be excelled. Pleasant to the taste, assists digestion, and keeps the system generally in good condition. 
Reasons why wo have so Great a Demand for oar Bitters. 
First — Because they are more f oodsome than other bitters. Second — Because the bottles are as large 
as a great many bitters which sell for $1.00, while ours are sold for the small sum of FIFTY GFNTS. 

DIRECTIONS.— One-half wine glass before each meal. Take one-third bitters and two-thirds water 
or liquor, and you will have a pleasant drink. 
Bold by dealers generally. 

STEKETEE & KIMM, Sole Proprietors, 

67 Monroe Street, - . - - Grand Rapid*, Mich. 

Kimm's Holland Worm Cakes. 

These Worm Cakes are a safe and certain cure for Worms, and are a safe and pleasant remedy. 
Children love them as well as they do candy. Sixty thousand boxes of worm cakes were manufactured 
by Mr. M. B. Kimm, the junior partner and chemist of the firm of Steketee k Kimm, while engaged in 
the manufacturing of Worm Cakes for Mr. W. Tresling, of Holland, Europe, who shipped them to the 
East Indies, Where they were sold, and ever since has continued to manufacture, on account of the in- 
creased demand. Hundreds and thousands of names could we attach to the above, did space allow us. 
BUY NO OTHER WORM CAKES THAN THOSE PUT UP BY 

STEB^ZEsTIEEI cfe kxscac, 

67 MONROE STREET, - - GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 

IsF Each Box has the directions on the box. Price, Twenty-Five Cents per box. 
N. B. All the above medicines are prepared by M. B. Kimm, (Chemist,) junior partner of the above 
firm, wfco ha* bad an experieno* of £0 yeast as chemist in Europe. 



i^i Ir 



Conservator's Report 
Bentley Historical Library 

Title: Dillenback and Leavitt. History and Directory of 
Kent County, 1870 

Received: Book bound with tunnel back style binding. Cover 
was one-quarter leather with cloth sides. Leather was 
abraded. Joints were broken. Boards were loose. Headbands 
were loose. Book was sewn two on over recessed cords. 
Sewing was shaken. 

Treatment : Picked book to pieces. Deacidified. Reinforced 
or reconstructed signature folds as needed. Sewed all along 
over cloth tapes. Rounded and backed. Lined the spine. 
Added new machine-woven headbands. Rebound in new cover of 
full cloth. 

Materials: Jade #834-403N PVA adhesive. Wei T'o 
deacidification solution. Barbours linen thread. Cotton 
tapes. PROMATCO heavy-duty endsheet paper. Ademco cerex 
tissue. Machine-woven headbands. Backing flannel. Davey 
"Red Label" binder's board. Pyroxylin- impregnated cotton 
text cloth. 23K gold. 

Date work completed^ July 1994 



Signed: James W. Craven